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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  September 20, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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crisis talks this lunchtime over the soaring price of gas. the business secretary is meeting energy firms amid fears more of them will go bust. now the market has shot up, they really are between a rock and a hard place, but there are fundamental problems in the energy market. we'll bring you the latest on how the crisis is affecting you. also this lunchtime... a dad says he is broken, after his 11—year—old daughter and 13—year—old son were found dead alongside another child and a mum. a murder investigation has begun. the first 12 to 15—year—olds in england and scotland have been given their covid jabs. a volcano erupts on a spanish holiday island in the canaries. cheering. and british talent wins multiple honours at the emmy tv awards last night.
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and coming up in sport later in the hour on the bbc news channel: there is a losing start for england's netballers in new zealand. the world champions, too strong for the commonwealth champions in christchurch. good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. the business secretary's been holding crisis talks with energy firms this morning, amid worries of big rises to energy bills in the coming weeks. five smaller energy suppliers have already gone bust, unable to cope with a 70% hike in the cost of wholesale gas since august. it's understood the government is considering offering emergency state—backed loans to companies.
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0fgem has confirmed british gas has agreed to take on an extra 350,000 customers from the collapsed firm people's energy. and the uk's sixth largest energy company, bulb, is seeking new funds to try to stay afloat. downing street says it wants to fix the issues as fast as it can. our business correspondent emma simpson reports. gas, the cornerstone of our energy supply and the cost of eight is rocketing. there has been a surge in global demand and not enough supply. energy firms here are battling global demand and not enough supply_ energy firms here are battling to stay afloat. in energy firms here are battling to stay afloat-— energy firms here are battling to sta afloat. . . ~ stay afloat. in the current market as it is we — stay afloat. in the current market as it is we are _ stay afloat. in the current market as it is we are not _ stay afloat. in the current market as it is we are not going - stay afloat. in the current market as it is we are not going to - stay afloat. in the current market as it is we are not going to see i stay afloat. in the current market as it is we are not going to see it| as it is we are not going to see it through the winter. if it gets worse, that time will get shortened. i think ourselves along with another —— other energy suppliers, need direct government intervention. fizre direct government intervention. five su - liers direct government intervention. five suppliers have collapsed since the start of last month. but dozens
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could be out of business by the end of the year. the reason? wholesale gas prices have risen by more than 300% compared to last winter. when a supplier collapse is what normally happens is the regulator steps in to get somebody else to take on the customers. but prices have gone up so much the big suppliers are saying they can't afford to do this within they can't afford to do this within the government's price cap without racking up huge losses. the regulator — racking up huge losses. the regulator has _ racking up huge losses. the regulator has allowed something like 70 new_ regulator has allowed something like 70 new entrant into the game in the last few_ 70 new entrant into the game in the last few years. they have entered with very — last few years. they have entered with very little behind them. very reckless _ with very little behind them. very reckless business models, selling energy— reckless business models, selling energy cheaper than they can buy it for, energy cheaper than they can buy it for. to— energy cheaper than they can buy it for. to grow— energy cheaper than they can buy it for, to grow a customer base fast and then— for, to grow a customer base fast and then sell themselves or increase prices _ and then sell themselves or increase prices at _ and then sell themselves or increase prices. at the same time ofgem imposed — prices. at the same time ofgem imposed a — prices. at the same time ofgem imposed a price cap which prevented them _ imposed a price cap which prevented them putting prices up. now the market— them putting prices up. now the market has shot up. the them putting prices up. now the market has shot up.— market has shot up. the prime minister has _ market has shot up. the prime minister has arrived _ market has shot up. the prime minister has arrived in - market has shot up. the prime minister has arrived in new. market has shot up. the prime. minister has arrived in new york
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saying his government is working on some answers. irate saying his government is working on some answers— saying his government is working on some answers. we have to try and fix it as fast as — some answers. we have to try and fix it as fast as we _ some answers. we have to try and fix it as fast as we can, _ some answers. we have to try and fix it as fast as we can, make _ some answers. we have to try and fix it as fast as we can, make sure - some answers. we have to try and fix it as fast as we can, make sure we i it as fast as we can, make sure we have the supplies we want, make sure we don't allow the companies we rely on to go under. we have to do everything we can. but this will get better as the market starts to sort itself out as the world economy gets back on its feet. but itself out as the world economy gets back on its feet.— back on its feet. but high gas rices back on its feet. but high gas prices are _ back on its feet. but high gas prices are already _ back on its feet. but high gas prices are already having - back on its feet. but high gas prices are already having a i back on its feet. but high gas i prices are already having a huge knock—on effects. it has forced a shut down of two factories producing most of the uk plus my carbon dioxide are used in the food and industry. we dioxide are used in the food and indust . ~ ., dioxide are used in the food and indust . ~ . ., ., dioxide are used in the food and indust .~ . ., ,, dioxide are used in the food and indust .~ . ., industry. we are at a crisis point. he doesn't _ industry. we are at a crisis point. he doesn'tjust — industry. we are at a crisis point. he doesn'tjust own _ industry. we are at a crisis point. he doesn'tjust own burnet - industry. we are at a crisis point. - he doesn'tjust own burnet matthews turkey is. this is the biggest producer of chicken in the uk. we have four to five days left and we have _ have four to five days left and we have to _ have four to five days left and we have to reduce our production by 10%~ _ have to reduce our production by 1096. ., ., ,~ ,, ., have to reduce our production by 1096. ., ., , . , , ., that 1096. how many chickens is that? that is over half a — 1096. how many chickens is that? that is over half a million _ 1096. how many chickens is that? that is over half a million chickens - 1096. how many chickens is that? that is over half a million chickens a - is over half a million chickens a week — is over half a million chickens a week. . . ., . is over half a million chickens a week. . _, . ,., is over half a million chickens a week. . _, . . ,, ., week. that could mean some gaps on the shelves — week. that could mean some gaps on the shelves by — week. that could mean some gaps on the shelves by the _ week. that could mean some gaps on the shelves by the end _ week. that could mean some gaps on the shelves by the end of— week. that could mean some gaps on the shelves by the end of the -
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week. that could mean some gaps on the shelves by the end of the week. l the shelves by the end of the week. the clock is ticking for the government to find a solution to an energy crisis with potentially far—reaching ripple effects. emma simpson, bbc news. our business editor simonjack is here. what happens if someone's energy company goes bust? don't panic is the first thing. take a metre reading and sit tight, as emma was explaining. what normally happens is 0fgem will get one of the bigger companies to take over your customer. the problem is it is going to be economically damaging because the current prices are much higher than the cap that they can sell. so every customer they take on they will be losing money, so the talks today are about what to do about that. i understand that some sort of state backed loans to the big companies will be taking on the smaller companies, not prop up the smaller companies, not prop up the smaller companies, not prop up the smaller companies themselves, this will take a couple of days to get through. we could see four or five companies go bust this week. thank ou. companies go bust this week. thank yom simon — companies go bust this week. thank yom simonjack. — companies go bust this week. thank you. simon jack, our _ companies go bust this week. thank you. simon jack, our business - you. simonjack, our business editor. a murder investigation has been
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launched after three children and a mum were found dead at a house in derbyshire. officers were called to a property in the town of killamarsh on sunday morning. a man has been arrested. 0ur correspondent danny savage is there. yeah, victoria. this is the scene where _ yeah, victoria. this is the scene where the — yeah, victoria. this is the scene where the bodies were found early yesterday — where the bodies were found early yesterday morning in killamarsh, in this terraced property, the semi detached — this terraced property, the semi detached one of the end of this terrace. — detached one of the end of this terrace, where you can see the police — terrace, where you can see the police forensic tents, a number of white _ police forensic tents, a number of white vans— police forensic tents, a number of white vans parked outside. those are the forensic _ white vans parked outside. those are the forensic scientist working inside — the forensic scientist working inside. what we do know is that it was the _ inside. what we do know is that it was the bodies of a woman and three children— was the bodies of a woman and three children found in the house. jason bennett— children found in the house. jason behhett is— children found in the house. jason bennett is the father of two of those — bennett is the father of two of those children. he came to the scene today _ those children. he came to the scene today he _ those children. he came to the scene today. he said his heart was broken into a _ today. he said his heart was broken into a million pieces. he also posted — into a million pieces. he also posted on— into a million pieces. he also posted on facebook last night, paying — posted on facebook last night, paying tribute to his children. he left some — paying tribute to his children. he left some flowers to lacey, 11 years old, describing heras a left some flowers to lacey, 11 years old, describing her as a tiktok queen, — old, describing her as a tiktok queen, and to his sonjohn,13,
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old, describing her as a tiktok queen, and to his sonjohn, 13, a boy with — queen, and to his sonjohn, 13, a boy with a — queen, and to his sonjohn, 13, a boy with a kind heart. also here were _ boy with a kind heart. also here were his — boy with a kind heart. also here were his parents, the children because — were his parents, the children because my grandparents. they came to visit _ because my grandparents. they came to visit they— because my grandparents. they came to visit. they were very upset but as they _ to visit. they were very upset but as they left — to visit. they were very upset but as they left they did stop and talk to us _ she was a proper girl — pink and sparkly, and john was just all into computers and all that. but they were the most well mannered children you would ever meet. yeah. is kids nowadays, they were, they were well mannered. they always remembered of their manners, always please and thank you. if you have about them are presently first thing they did was go on facebook and thank you. i don't know how we're going to without them. it's just awful, isn't it, the stress they are going through? they came down here to see for themselves what had happened at where it happened and to talk to police officers as well. there is another child involved, the body of another child involved, the body of a third child was found. we don't know who he or she is. what we
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understand it is a friend who was here on a sleepover on saturday night, was also caught up these awful events. a man was arrested soon after the bodies were found. he is being held in police custody and we are expecting derbyshire police to give more detail about what happened. just awful. lots of people standing around here this lunchtime from this community, deeply shocked ljy from this community, deeply shocked by these awful events in this house behind me. by these awful events in this house behind me— behind me. victoria. thank you. danny savage — behind me. victoria. thank you. danny savage reporting. - some 12 to 15—year—olds in parts of england and scotland have begun receiving covid vaccines. jabs for this age group are also due to begin soon in northern ireland and in wales next month. meanwhile, millions of older and vulnerable people across the uk are being contacted to arrange their booster shots. our health correspondent anna collinson reports this is jack, one of the first healthy young teenagers in england to receive a coronavirus vaccine. there you are. all done. around
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3,000,012 — there you are. all done. around 3,000,012 to — there you are. all done. around 3,000,012 to 15-year-olds - there you are. all done. around 3,000,012 to 15-year-olds are l there you are. all done. around i 3,000,012 to 15-year-olds are due there you are. all done. around - 3,000,012 to 15-year-olds are due to 3,000,012 to 15—year—olds are due to follow him. it 3,000,012 to 15-year-olds are due to follow him. ., , �* 3,000,012 to 15-year-olds are due to follow him. �* . , _ follow him. it was ok. i'm happy i have not follow him. it was ok. i'm happy i have got it — follow him. it was ok. i'm happy i have got it because _ follow him. it was ok. i'm happy i have got it because it _ follow him. it was ok. i'm happy i have got it because it makes - follow him. it was ok. i'm happy i have got it because it makes it. have got it because it makes it easier to go out and enjoy myself now. easier to go out and en'oy myself now. �* , , . now. there's been quite a few students that _ now. there's been quite a few students that have _ now. there's been quite a few students that have taken - now. there's been quite a few students that have taken up i now. there's been quite a few i students that have taken up the opportunity to be vaccinated. we were _ opportunity to be vaccinated. we were informed on friday about the vaccinations and we have loads of students — vaccinations and we have loads of students and parents getting on board, — students and parents getting on board, so— students and parents getting on board, so that's great. with students and parents getting on board, so that's great.— board, so that's great. with the risks and benefits _ board, so that's great. with the risks and benefits finely - board, so that's great. with the i risks and benefits finely balanced, reaching this point has involved much debate. the uk's vaccine advisory panel initially said it could not recommend vaccinating all 12 to 15—year—olds based on health grounds alone. but once factors like the impact on education were taken into account, the uk's chief medical 0fficers advised they should receive one dose of the pfizerjab. it’s one dose of the pfizer 'ab. it's reall one dose of the pfizerjab. it�*s really important to remember the uk chief medical 0fficers supported the vaccine to this age group and it has been signed off by government. we are rolling it out in schools because it is our best chance not
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just to protect children, but to protect families as well, as we head into winter. protect families as well, as we head into winter-— into winter. from today in scotland have the jabs _ into winter. from today in scotland have the jabs will _ into winter. from today in scotland have the jabs will first _ into winter. from today in scotland have the jabs will first be _ have the jabs will first be available at drop—in centres. wales and northern ireland expected to administer theirfirst vaccines and northern ireland expected to administer their first vaccines to this age group in october. millions of young teens have now been vaccinated globally, including here in france, as well as the us. there —— for cases of hard information are rare, some parents are concerned. i rare, some parents are concerned. i know the risks are minimal of getting — know the risks are minimal of getting myocarditis, but there is still a _ getting myocarditis, but there is still a risk — getting myocarditis, but there is still a risk. and getting myocarditis, but there is stilla risk. and i'm not getting myocarditis, but there is still a risk. and i'm not sure getting myocarditis, but there is stilla risk. and i'm not sure i want — stilla risk. and i'm not sure i want to— stilla risk. and i'm not sure i want to put— stilla risk. and i'm not sure i want to put my son, expose my son to that risk, — want to put my son, expose my son to that risk, given that the benefits of getting the vaccination are so minimal~ — of getting the vaccination are so minimal. ., ., of getting the vaccination are so minimal. . . _, , , minimal. parental consent will be sou~ht minimal. parental consent will be sought but _ minimal. parental consent will be sought but children _ minimal. parental consent will be sought but children are _ minimal. parental consent will be sought but children are able - minimal. parental consent will be sought but children are able to i sought but children are able to overrule parents if they are considered competent. latest research suggests even the younger children could eventually be vaccinated. a study by pfizer found
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its jab seems to be safe and well tolerated in children aged five to 11. the coronavirus booster campaign is also under way, with millions of the most vulnerable due to be contacted this week. as the challenges of winter approach, it is hoped everyjab will strengthen the wall of defence. anna collinson, bbc news. folic acid is to be added to flour in the uk, to prevent life—threatening spinal conditions in babies. women are advised to take the b vitamin before and during pregnancy, which can guard against spina bifida in unborn babies. the government says the move could prevent 200 birth defects a year. gluten—free foods and wholemeal flour are exempt from the new rules. a volcano has erupted on the spanish holiday island of la palma in the canaries. thousands of residents, have been evacuated, as rivers of lava streamed down the mountain. it's the first time the cumbre vieja volcano has erupted in 50 years.
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it was expected by experts as thousands of tremors had hit the area in recent days. james reynolds reports. after a week of tremors, the cumbre vieja volcanic ridge erupted. no one has seen anything like this in the island of la palma for half a century. it has created its own apocalyptic landscape. rivers of lava channel their way down towards nearby villages. "look, look! it's falling," the man says. the flow of lava takes down a building. at least 20 isolated homes have now been swallowed up. "eight metres of lava," he says.
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"this is the civil guard," says an officer through a loudspeaker. "please leave your homes." the residents of four villages have been ordered to get to safety. translation: the situation - is drastic because of where the lava is advancing, sweeping away everything in its path, especially houses. the authorities have a good view of the eruption and the rivers of lava. they expect the flows to continue to the coast. the rescue effort even takes in farm animals. police officers and local residents round up every goat and sheep they can find. it's not yet clear how long this eruption will last. the most recent major activity in 1971 went on for three weeks. james reynolds, bbc news.
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a labour mp who has pulled out of her party's annual conference after receiving online abuse for her views on transgender issues, has requested a meeting with sir keir starmer. rosie duffield says she has received some "pretty awful" threats, and wanted clarity on the party's position on transgender issues. let's speak to our political correspondent ione wells. would clarifying the party's stance on this help ms duffield? well, victoria, ithink well, victoria, i think there are two issues at play here. labour is under some pressure to clarify what their stances on transgender issues. rosie duffield has come out with quite a controversial stance on transgender issues. this is something which involves people's identities, it involves people's right to self identify and to access certain spaces. that view, like any view on politics, something which has opened her to a lot of scrutiny as well, particularly with an issue
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like this where there is very live debates going on at the moment about whether gender recognition laws need to be reformed. 0thers whether gender recognition laws need to be reformed. others in the labour party have different views. 0ne senior labour mp said they were frustrated with the oxygen this row was getting, saying they would rather labour focused on was getting, saying they would rather labourfocused on nhs waiting times for transgender people. so there is this pressure. this is what rosie duffield asked of keir starmer earlier in terms of clarifying the party position. lots of women have been asking to meet with starmer in groups or one—to—one about this issue, and obviously he is incredibly busy, but it would be good to just clarify what our position is as a party and just to discuss how we go forward with this issue. but just to make it clear, _ you have asked to see him command at the moment what is his response? he's always positive about trying to organise a meeting, itjust hasn't happened yet. but you would like i that to happen soon? yeah, i think it's really necessary that we actually talk about this subject.
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interesting, she is calling for clarity on the party position, with differing views in labour about what that stance should be, but something i think politicians of all different stripes agree on is that nobody in public life should fear for their safety if critics turn what is perhaps legitimate criticism of somebody�*s position into abuse. we know online abuse and the threat of that escalating into real—life abuse is nothing new, particularly the way in which it disproportionately impacts women in public life, so why labour clarifying its position to mps about what their view is on transgender issues, separately to that, that is not necessarily something that may resolve internal party conflicts, but not necessarily something that will stop people like rosie duffield receiving the kind of abuse that she has been.— rosie duffield receiving the kind of abuse that she has been. thank you very much- —
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the time is 1:15. our top story this lunchtime: and coming up — it's finally back, but how will the chelsea flower show look in the autumn? coming up in the sport in the next 15 minutes on the bbc news channel: decision time for the ecb ahead of their proposed tour of pakistan. after new zealand pulled out of theirs, will england send their teams next month? a leading football agent, who used to represent raheem sterling, has broken football association rules by signing under—age players, according to evidence seen by bbc panorama. aidy ward, who owns colossal sports management, also asked sterling to speak to a 15—year—old via video call, as part of an attempt by ward to sign him. the fa prohibits agents approaching players before they are in their 16th year. rory carson has this report. aidy ward is one of the most high—profile agents in football. we've spoken to a player who says
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he was approached by ward when he was just 12 years old, in breach of fa rules. foday nabay was born in sierra leone and moved to england with his mum when he was six. hejoined birmingham city academy and was picked for the england youth team. soon after, aidy ward got in touch. what did he say? just like how many teams wanted me to go to them, and why i should like, why i should go. that's when my head, it started getting into my head a bit. aidy ward says he has never been foday �*s agent, but panorama has obtained evidence that appears to contradict his claim. e—mail correspondence shows ward was involved in negotiations to move foday, then 1a, to fulham, with agency fees if the transfer went through. the agency fees ended up
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being way more than... like, my contract, i was happy with what i got, because i didn't move there for money, but when i got to look at it, i was like, that's not right. foday says when he found out about agency fees, he told fulham he would only sign if they weren't paid. fa rules ban agents profiting from the transfer of underage players. fulham fc say they hadn't paid or agreed to pay mr ward in relation to foday�*s registration with the club. foday completed the transfer in 2013 but was released five years later. he blames ward for a move he was never happy with. i was young, i didn't know much about football. my mum didn't know anything about football, so i thought that was just normal. we've also obtained evidence that ward approached other underage players. 0ne document describes a meeting at this london restaurant between ward,
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a 15—year—old boy and his mother. aidy ward asked his famous client raheem sterling, a minority shareholder in colossal, to speak via video call to the boy, in a bid by ward to attract the young player to his agency. sterling's lawyers told panorama that, as an england international, he feels responsibility to speak to aspiring players, but not about agents or financial issues, and he supports fa rules to protect young players. raheem sterling dropped aidy ward as his agent late last year. ward is under investigation by the fa. he says he can't comment, out of respect for that process. rory carson, bbc news. and you can watch the panorama: football's broken dreams on bbc one at 8.30 tonight. thousands of students across the uk will be heading off to university over the next few weeks. the pandemic has caused 18
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months of disruption, with students not experiencing face—to—face teaching, campus living and social events. here our education correspondent elaine dunkley. over the next few weeks, universities across greater manchester will welcome more than 100,000 students. i'm looking forward to meeting new people, to actually studying. but just trying to get that university experience we kind of missed out on. it'sjust fun, getting the vibe back from the two year break we've had in lockdown, and you know, just coming back, everybody together and stuff, getting that unique feeling. it's the start of a new chapter for these freshers at manchester metropolitan. because of the pandemic, some students have started uni without visiting the place that will become their home for the next few years. i didn't know what it was going to be like at all. i was saying to my mum, what if i get up there and i hate it? i could be completely completely like out of my depth. but no, i'm loving it so far. i went to uni last year and i studied a different course. it was quite similar.
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but obviously, being a creative course, online, it wasjust so difficult. but already i was saying, i had about a week, not even a week. two days. the government is urging universities to provide face—to—face teaching this term, but some universities are keeping those in large groups online. at the university of bolton, all lectures are on campus. there is a vaccination boss, and students are advised to do covid tests twice a week. people want face—to—face more than anything else, so we are encouraging everybody to come on campus in a safe way, following the measures we've still got in place. of course, they can still stream. so, if somebody did have to isolate or have to be away from university, because there are clinically vulnerable people who don't want to attend, then they can stream it themselves if they want to. covid has had a huge impact on many aspects of student life. here in bolton, the university is offering financial support for international students. a lot of students who are on the red list countries, for all of them, the university's paying the quarantine charges, so i think that's a big relief for them when they come. freshers' week marks the start
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of university life, a chance to enjoy new friendships and freedom. with the disruption of the past 18 months, it will also feel like a fresh start for many returning back to university. elaine dunkley, bbc news. france's defence minister has pulled out of talks with her british counterpart amid a row over a new security deal between the uk, us and australia. paris is angry after australia signed the pact to build nuclear—powered submarines with american technology, pulling out of a major contract with france in the process. borisjohnson says france had nothing to worry downing street says the deal was in no way intended to be exclusionary and has postponed the talks to a later date. at least six people have been killed in a shooting at a university in central russia. a man opened fire on campus at perm state university this morning. steve rosenberg is in moscow. it must have been absolutely terrifying — tell us
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what you know so far, steve. just imagine, victoria, you are at couege just imagine, victoria, you are at college on a monday morning, and at 11am you notice a young man coming onto campus who has a gun. he stops shooting and then goes into the building and carries on shooting, and there is panic. so, some teachers and students barricaded themselves into classrooms in the building. 0thersjumped out of building. 0thers jumped out of a first—floor windows to try to get away. then a local traffic policeman, a junior lieutenant in the traffic police, became the hero of the day. he was a letter to what was going on at the university, came over with his partner and went into the building and confronted the gunman. he shot him. the gunman was wounded and taken to hospital. six people had been killed. what do we know about the gunman? we know he is a student, and he allegedly posted a chilling message on social media before the shooting spree, explaining his actions. according to
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this message, he was consumed by hatred. he wanted to cause pain to people since he was at primary school, according to this message, and he wanted to destroy everyone in his path. steve rosenberg, thank you, reporting from moscow. it was a big night for british talent at the emmys last night. the crown dominated the awards, picking up seven prizes including outstanding drama series. 0livia colman and josh 0'connor won for their portrayals of the queen and prince charles. there were also wins for kate winslet, for mare of easttown, and michaela coel, for i may destroy you. sophie long reports from los angeles. # you got what i need. a celebration of television at a time it provided a lifeline. # you say he's just a friend. ahhhhh! british actress hannah waddingham took the first award of the evening for her role in ted lasso — beating her best friend and co—star, juno temple. i swear to god, if i could break off one of her arms and give it to you —
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because that's what you are to me. there's no rebecca without keeley. and if you ever leave my life, i'm going to stalk you! brett goldstein, ted lasso. that wasn't the last time the theme tune of the upbeat comedy blasted out in downtown la. brett goldstein collected an emmy for his role as the foul—mouthed roy kent. it won best comedy series, and best lead actor in a comedy went to jason sudeikis — the man who created it. kate winslet. kate winslet won for her lead role in the miniseries mare 0f easttown. i just want to acknowledge my fellow nominees in this decade that has to be about women having each other�*s backs. i support you, i salute you. i'm proud of all of you. 0h! the crown. but it was the crown that triumphed once again — winning best drama and multiple emmys for its cast and creators. 0livia colman won for her portrayal of the queen — accepting an award in london
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in the early hours of the morning. i wish my dad was here to see this. audience: ohh! i lost my daddy during covid, and he would have loved all of this! josh 0'connor won for his role as prince charles, tobias menzies for his prince philip, and gillian anderson won for her portrayal of margaret thatcher. there was a standing ovation forjean smart for her role in hacks — the comedy series which beat ted lasso to writing and directing awards. many tears of joy were shed in appreciation for those that created the places we escaped to during a pandemic year when we perhaps needed them more than ever. sophie long, bbc news, los angeles. for the first time in its history, the chelsea flower show is being held in september. covid restrictions prevented the event from taking place earlier this year, and the new date has brought an autumnal look to the plants and flowers on display. members of the british royalfamily and celebrities are getting the first glimpse of the show, before it opens to the public tomorrow. daniela relph has more.
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chelsea is looking different. the usual spring colours of a may flower show have been replaced by the reds and yellows of autumn. late flowering plants, grasses and trees give chelsea a wilder look this year. trees dominate the biggest plot on the site. 21 have been planted in the queen's green canopy garden, and there were some vip guest getting the first viewing, as we are all being encouraged to plant a tree for the queen's platinum jubilee. ~ ~' ., a tree for the queen's platinum jubilee. ~ ~ ., . . . jubilee. we know about climate chan . e jubilee. we know about climate change and _ jubilee. we know about climate change and we _ jubilee. we know about climate change and we talk _ jubilee. we know about climate change and we talk about - jubilee. we know about climate change and we talk about it. i jubilee. we know about climate | change and we talk about it. this jubilee. we know about climate i change and we talk about it. this is actually doing something about climate change. planting trees, we know will help. we must do it, and so it is practical, but also, this is the first time we've ever got to celebrate a platinum jubilee in our
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history. celebrate a platinum jubilee in our histo . , . ~ history. pretty important, i think. giant window _ history. pretty important, i think. giant window boxes _ history. pretty important, i think. giant window boxes in _ history. pretty important, i think. giant window boxes in the - history. pretty important, i think. giant window boxes in the cop26| giant window boxes in the cop26 garden to mark the un climate change conference in glasgow. the message, however small your space is, you can make a difference in your garden. in the window boxes, we have got dahlias and different salvias in the garden, and it's fantastic because it provides nectar and food for the pollinators going forward to the end of september now, and these plants are still flowering, so these insects and birds and everything else like that are still being fed beautifully. the else like that are still being fed beautifully-— else like that are still being fed beautifull. , ., . , ., beautifully. the show also hopes to ca ture beautifully. the show also hopes to capture the — beautifully. the show also hopes to capture the gardening _ beautifully. the show also hopes to capture the gardening boom - beautifully. the show also hopes to capture the gardening boom seen l capture the gardening boom seen during lockdowns. the royal horticultural society estimates 3 million of us turned to gardening when stuck at home. like million of us turned to gardening when stuck at home.— million of us turned to gardening when stuck at home. like a lot of --eole, i when stuck at home. like a lot of people, i started _ when stuck at home. like a lot of people, i started getting - when stuck at home. like a lot of people, i started getting into i when stuck at home. like a lot of people, i started getting into it i when stuck at home. like a lot of people, i started getting into it a| people, i started getting into it a bit of a lockdown. i love a puny. we have a lot of rose bushes back in california. we cut the roses every thursday with my son, which is sweet. fit.
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thursday with my son, which is sweet. �* , ., thursday with my son, which is sweet. �* , . ., ,, ., sweet. a chelsea flower show in september _ sweet. a chelsea flower show in september has _ sweet. a chelsea flower show in september has brought - sweet. a chelsea flower show in september has brought its i sweet. a chelsea flower show in i september has brought its challenges for everyone involved. it is likely to be a one—off chance to enjoy the unfamiliar sites an autumn show brings. daniela ralph, bbc news, chelsea. princess beatrice and her husband edoardo mapelli mozzi have welcomed a baby girl, who was born on saturday. the queen's granddaughter gave birth to her first child at the chelsea and westminster hospital. buckingham palace said the princess and her daughter are "doing well" and the baby's grandparents and great—grandparents are "delighted". time for a look at the weather. favourable weather for the chelsea sour show —— the chelsea flower show. early morning mist across parts of wales. we have more cloud across parts of east anglia and pushing into the north—west of scotland. when you take a look at the satellite picture, the expense where we will see sunshine this
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afternoon is pretty fast. there is the tail end of a better

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