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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 20, 2021 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines: the business secretary meets energy firms amid fears more of them will go bust over the soaring price of wholesale gas. now the market has shot up they really are between a rock and a hard place but there are fundamental problems in the energy market. a dad says he is "broken" after his 11—year—old daughter and 13—year—old son were found dead along with their mother and another child. a murder investigation has begun. the first 12— to 15—year—olds in england and scotland have been given their covid jabs. a volcano erupts on a spanish holiday island in the canaries. cheering. and british talent wins multiple honours at the emmy tv awards last night.
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good afternoon, and welcome to bbc news. the business secretary's been holding crisis talks with energy firms this morning, amid worries of big rises to energy bills in the coming weeks. five smaller energy suppliers have already gone bust, unable to cope with a 70% hike in the cost of wholesale gas since august. it's understood the government is considering offering emergency state—backed loans to companies. 0fgem has confirmed british gas has agreed to take on an extra 350,000 customers from the collapsed firm people's energy. and the uk's sixth largest energy company, bulb, is seeking new funds to try to stay afloat. downing street says it wants to fix the issues as fast as it can. our business correspondent emma simpson reports.
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gas, the cornerstone of our energy supply and the cost of it is rocketing. there has been a surge in global demand and not enough supply. energy firms here are now battling to stay afloat. in the current market as it is we are not going to see it through the winter. if it gets worse, that time will get shortened. i think ourselves along with other energy suppliers, need direct government intervention. five suppliers have collapsed since the start of last month. but dozens could be out of business by the end of the year. the reason? wholesale gas prices have risen by more than 300% compared to last winter. when a supplier collapses what normally happens is the regulator steps in to get somebody else to take on the customers. but prices have gone up so much the big suppliers are saying they can't afford to do this
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within the government's price cap without racking up huge losses. the regulator has allowed something like 70 new entrants into the game in the last few years. they have entered with very little behind them. fairly reckless business models, selling energy cheaper than they can buy it for, to grow a customer base fast and then sell themselves or increase prices. at the same time ofgem imposed a price cap which prevented them putting prices up. they haven't been hedging. now the market has shot up. the prime minister has arrived in new york saying his government is working on some answers. we have to try and fix it as fast as we can, make sure we have the supplies we want, make sure we don't allow the companies we rely on to go under. we have to do everything we can. but this will get better as the market starts to sort itself out as the world economy gets back on its feet.
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but high gas prices are already having huge knock—on effects. it has forced a shut down of two factories producing most of the uk's carbon dioxide used in the food and industry. we are at a crisis point. he doesn'tjust own bernard matthews turkeys. this is the biggest producer of chicken in the uk. we have four to five days left and we have to reduce our production by 10%. how many chickens is that? that is over half a million chickens a week. that could mean some gaps on the shelves by the end of the week. the clock is ticking for the government to find a solution to an energy crisis with potentially far—reaching ripple effects. emma simpson, bbc news. our business editor simonjack explained what to do if you think your gas supplier is one of the firms at risk of going bust. don't panic is the first thing. take a meter reading and sit tight, as emma was explaining. what normally happens
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is 0fgem will get one of the existing bigger companies to take over your custom. the problem is it is going to be economically damaging because the current prices are much higher than the cap that they can sell. so every customer they take on they will be losing money, so the talks today are about what to do about that. i understand that some sort of state—backed loans to the big companies who will be taking on the smaller companies, not to prop up the smaller companies themselves, this will take a couple of days to get through. we could see four or five companies go bust this week. simonjack, our business editor. here with me is peter mcgirr who is the ceo green.energy. worrying times for your company, what problems are you facing? i think we are facing the same problems as all suppliers are in the market, notjust small problems as all suppliers are in the market, not just small suppliers facing problems, the largest lies
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have deeper pockets to weather the storm. should prices continue as they are it is likely even the larger suppliers will have to go to the government and ask for some support mechanism to be put in place. what is your response to commentators�*s view is that in some cases a small energy firms are somewhat reckless in the way they have been set up in the first place, they haven't got enough contingencies, not enough behind them? i think the narrative being put forward is disingenuous, that they have a vested interest in the marketplace shrinking to scoop up those firms. we have a sustainable profit margin of 3.5% without one of these events happening. how can one prudently hedge for a lockdown? how can i foresee that and by the
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energy? using 20% more energy, those households, being stuck at home? this has been going on throughout the pandemic. we were mandating holiday payments to our customers last year but without support from government. that is fine if you have deep pockets like centrica but if you are a small independent where will you find the money in a marketplace where people are barely operating due to the pandemic? that would be the starting point and moving forward from that. we have had tankers stuck in the panama canal. and other things which we have not been able to plan for as a smaller supplier. to say it is bad business is terrible and an all boys
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club where the big boys club together with 0fgem to come up with a solution to take out all the other players from the marketplace. the idea is there is meant to be parity in the marketplace for the customers. biggerfirms are parity in the marketplace for the customers. bigger firms are saying it will cost them money in the short term to take on customers. how worried should your customers be that you will not be there? they will be extremely worried unless government provides a lifeline or support as they have done to other industries across the pandemic. the business secretary was written to by 0fgem in march 2020 on the energy crisis we faced as a whole, and no stimulus package was put in place. this is not news. the suggestion is there might be government loans available, how appealing would that be as a solution? government loans have only been made
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available to larger suppliers, i have had no contact with the business secretary, neither have 15 other smaller suppliers which have put an open letter to 0fgem and the government, representing millions of customers and thousands of employees whose voices have yet to be heard. peter, thank you very much for talking to us. a murder investigation is under way after three children and a mother were found dead at a house in derbyshire. officers were called to a property in the town of killamarsh on sunday morning. a man has been arrested. 0ur correspondent danny savage is there. this is the scene where the bodies were found early yesterday morning in killamarsh. it's in this terraced property, the semi—detached one at the end of this terrace where you can see the police forensic tent and you can see a number of white vans parked outside. those are the forensic scientists who are working inside this property. what we do know is that the bodies of a woman and three
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children were found in the house. jason bennett is the father of two of those children. he came to the scene today. he said his heart was broken into a million pieces. he also posted on facebook last night, paying tribute to his children. he left some flowers as well with messages on, to lacey, who was 11 years old, describing her as a "tiktok queen" and to his sonjohn, who was 13, "a boy with a kind heart", he said. also at the scene today were his parents, the child ren�*s grandpa rents. they came to visit. they were very upset but as they left, they did stop and talk to us. lacey was a proper girl, pink and sparkly. john was just all into computers and that. they were the most well— mannered children you would ever meet. yeah. for kids nowadays, they were well mannered. they were always remembering their manners, always please and thank you. if you ever brought them a present, the first thing they did was to go on facebook and thank you. i don't know how we're going to manage without them.
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it's just awful, the distress they're going through. they came down here to see for themselves what had happened and to talk to police officers as well. there is another child involved. the body of a third child was found here as well. we don't know who he or she is, but we understand it was a friend who was here on a sleepover on saturday night, who was also caught up in these awful events. a man was arrested soon after the bodies were found. he has been held in police custody and we are expecting derbyshire police to give a bit more detail about what happened, but just awful. lots of people are standing around this lunchtime from this community, deeply shocked by these awful events in this house behind me. some 12— to 15—year—olds in parts of england and scotland have begun receiving covid vaccines. jabs for this age group are also due to begin soon in northern ireland and in wales next month. millions of older and vulnerable people across the uk are being contacted
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to arrange their booster shots. 0ur health correspondent anna collinson reports. this is jack, one of the first healthy young teenagers in england to receive a coronavirus vaccine. there you are. all done. around 3,000,00012— to 15—year—olds are due to follow him. it was ok. i'm happy i have got it because it makes it easier to go out and enjoy myself now. there's been quite a few students that have taken up the opportunity to be vaccinated. we were informed on friday about the vaccinations and we have loads of students and parents getting on board, so that's great. with the risks and benefits finely balanced, reaching this point has involved much debate. the uk's vaccine advisory panel initially said it could not recommend vaccinating all 12— to 15—year—olds based on health grounds alone. but once factors like the impact on education were taken
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into account, the uk's chief medical 0fficers advised they should receive one dose of the pfizerjab. it's really important to remember the uk chief medical 0fficers supported the vaccine to this age group and it has been signed off by government. we are rolling it out in schools because it is our best chance not just to protect children, but to protect families as well, as we head into winter. from today in scotland the jabs will first be available at drop—in centres. wales and northern ireland expect to administer theirfirst vaccines to this age group in october. millions of young teens have now been vaccinated globally, including here in france, as well as the us. while cases of heart inflammation are rare, some parents are concerned. i know the risks are minimal of getting myocarditis, but there is still a risk. and i'm not sure i want to put my son, expose my son to that risk, given that the benefits of getting the vaccination are so
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minimal. parental consent will be sought but children are able to overrule parents if they are considered competent. latest research suggests even the younger children could eventually be vaccinated. a study by pfizer found its jab seems to be safe and well tolerated in children aged five to ii. the coronavirus booster campaign is also under way, with millions of the most vulnerable due to be contacted this week. as the challenges of winter approach, it is hoped everyjab will strengthen the wall of defence. anna collinson, bbc news. a gunman has killed at least six people at a university in russia. students at perm university were seen jumping from first floor windows to escape. the attacker — thought to be a student himself — has been detained. 0ur correspondent steve rosenberg is following developments from moscow.
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stu d e nts students and teachers barricaded themselves into classrooms, others jumping from a first—floor windows to get to safety. then a local traffic policeman turned into a hero of the day, a junior lieutenant of the russian traffic police was nearby, he was alerted to what was happening. your ride on the scene, went into the building, confronted the attacker, shot him, winded him, and the attacker was then taken to hospital. what do we know about the gunman? we know he was a student and it is alleged that before the attack he posted on social media a chilling explanation of why he would go on a shooting spree today. according to the message he left, he was consumed by hatred. he wanted to destroy
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everything on his path. he also said in that message that since primary school, he had wanted to cause pain to those around him. the headlines on bbc news: the business secretary is meeting energy firms amid fears more of them will go bust over the soaring price of gas. a dad says he is "broken" after his 11—year—old daughter and 13—year—old son were found dead alongside another child and a mum. a murder investigation has begun. the first 12— to 15—year—olds in england and scotland have been given their covid jabs a volcano has erupted on the spanish holiday island of la palma in the canaries. thousands of residents have been evacuated. it's the first time the cumbre vieja volcano has erupted in 50 years. thousands of tremors had hit the area in recent days, as james reynolds reports.
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after a week of tremors, the cumbre vieja volcanic ridge erupted. no one has seen anything like this in the island of la palma for half a century. it has created its own apocalyptic landscape. rivers of lava channel their way down towards nearby villages. "look, look! it's falling," the man says. the flow of lava takes down a building. at least 20 isolated homes have now been swallowed up. "eight metres of lava," he says. "this is the civil guard," says an officer through a loudspeaker. "please leave your homes."
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the residents of four villages have been ordered to get to safety. translation: the situation l is drastic because of where the lava is advancing, sweeping away everything in its path, especially houses. the authorities have a good view of the eruption and the rivers of lava. they expect the flows to continue to the coast. the rescue effort even takes in farm animals. police officers and local residents round up every goat and sheep they canfind. it's not yet clear how long this eruption will last. the most recent major activity in 1971 went on for three weeks. james reynolds, bbc news. france's defence minister has pulled out of talks with her british counterpart, amid a row over a new security deal between the uk, us and australia. paris is angry after australia
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signed the pact to build nuclear—powered submarines with american technology, pulling out of a major contract with france. downing street says the deal was "in no way intended to be exclusionary . the talks with france were postponed until a later date. thousands of students across the uk will be heading off to university over the next few weeks. the pandemic has caused 18 months of disruption, with students not experiencing face—to—face teaching, campus living and social events. here our education correspondent elaine dunkley. over the next few weeks, universities across greater manchester will welcome more than 100,000 students. i'm looking forward to meeting new people, to actually studying. but just trying to get that university experience we kind of missed out on. it'sjust fun, getting the vibe back from the two year break we've had in lockdown, and you know, just coming back, everybody together and stuff, getting that unique feeling. it's the start of a new chapter for these freshers at manchester metropolitan. because of the pandemic, some
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students have started uni without visiting the place that will become their home for the next few years. i didn't know what it was going to be like at all. i was saying to my mum, what if i get up there and i hate it? i could be completely like out of my depth. but no, i'm loving it so far. i went to uni last year and i studied a different course. it was quite similar. but obviously, being a creative course, online, it wasjust so difficult. but already i was saying, i had about a week, not even a week. two days. the government is urging universities to provide face—to—face teaching this term, but some universities are keeping those in large groups online. at the university of bolton, all lectures are on campus. there is a vaccination bus, and students are advised to do covid tests twice a week. people want face—to—face more than anything else, so we are encouraging everybody to come on campus in a safe way, following the measures we've still got in place. of course, they can still stream. so, if somebody did have to isolate
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or have to be away from university, because there are clinically vulnerable people who don't want to attend, then they can stream it themselves if they want to. covid has had a huge impact on many aspects of student life. here in bolton, the university is offering financial support for international students. a lot of students who are on the red list countries, for all of them, the university's paying the quarantine charges, so i think that's a big relief for them when they come. freshers' week marks the start of university life, a chance to enjoy new friendships and freedom. with the disruption of the past 18 months, it will also feel like a fresh start for many returning back to university. elaine dunkley, bbc news. iam here i am here but we had problems with pictures. i will carry on talking a little. there we go. sorry, i don't know what happened there.
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folic acid is to be added to flour in the uk, to prevent life—threatening spinal conditions in babies. women are advised to take the b vitamin before and during pregnancy, which can guard against spina bifida in unborn babies. the government says the move could prevent 200 birth defects a year. gluten—free foods and wholemeal flour are exempt from the new rules. we have all sorts of problems. fortunately, we have our guest here. ursula arens is a spokesperson for the british dietetic association — and has been writing about the importance of folic acid for 30 years. it is 30 years since the uk publication of the definitive study showing that folic acid in very early pregnancy or preferably before pregnancy dramatically reduces the risk of neural tube defects. many countries have already got
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legislation requiring fortification of flour, at least 80 countries, the most recent is new zealand. significantly the united states has had legislation in law for more than 20 years and have been able to demonstrate without any dispute at all that the measure does reduce the risk of neural tube defect and is not associated with any other measurable, observable health risk. there risks being examined could it masks some forms of anaemia. yes. we know that, in theory, that older people have a higher risk of vitamin b12 deficiency which is linked to some kinds of anaemia. not because they consume a lot less speed 12 but because they become less efficient at absorbing it as we get older. but this has been looked at by the us.
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would you like to pick the phone up and put it back down again to stop it ringing? somebody has probably seen you on the tv and reading you to tell you, that is what often happens! 0h, to tell you, that is what often happens! oh, dear. why isn't going to be put into gluten—free and wholemeal flour? at the wholemealflour? at the moment wholemeal flour? at the moment there is already legislation in place and it has been in place for 80 years, since 1941, requiring the addition of certain b vitamins and calcium and iron to white flour exempting wholemeal flour. in fact if you look at your loaf of bread you will see that on the label. there was discussion about whether all flour should be fortified but there are two considerations. the first is wholemeal flour naturally is more nutritious than white flour simply because it contains all of the wheat germ etc in it. if you look at verlic acid content of wholemeal, it
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is twice that of an fortified white flour so you are simply bringing it up flour so you are simply bringing it up to the level. secondly, some people do not want, for various reasons, to have things added to foods, and this allows people the choice if they choose not to have fortified food, namely, wholemeal flour. gluten—free flour, this is a niche product covered by all sorts of other regulations and is possibly milled in a different place, a smaller operation and probably it would get complex. why do you believe britain is taking this step now when 80 other countries have been doing it for a long time and benefits far outweigh concerns? i think the reason is, until recently, britain was part of the eu, and there is no other eu country that has this requirement. all the
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80 countries are outside the eu. i think the idea was within the eu you standardised legislation in terms of fortification and labelling, so one option would have been to have persuaded all 27 countries to adopt this. the other option is if they hadn't adopted —— hadn't adopted it, it would have been a barrier to trade which would have been complex. now it is easier to implement. cutting birth defects is a fantastic result. but to what extent will the women who are trying to get pregnant or are pregnant and still be encouraged to take supplements on top? putting it in bread flour reduces it across the population, everyone who eats bread, to some degree. ideal is to take a folic acid supplement, 400
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micrograms, once a day, and before pregnancy. that is quite difficult because obviously not every pregnancy is planned, and you don't know when you are going to fall pregnant. the ideal is before pregnancy, when you are not using contraception, and from that point for the first 12 weeks of pregnancy. thank you very much for talking to us. it was a big night for british talent at the emmys last night. the crown dominated the awards, picking up seven prizes including outstanding drama series. 0livia colman and josh 0'connor won for their portrayals of the queen and prince charles. there were also wins for kate winslet — for mare of easttown — and michaela coel, for i may destroy you. sophie long reports from los angeles. # you got what i need. a celebration of television at a time it provided a lifeline. # you say he's just a friend.
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ahhhhh! british actress hannah waddingham took the first award of the evening for her role in ted lasso — beating her best friend and co—star, juno temple. i swear to god, if i could break off one of her arms and give it to you — because that's what you are to me. there's no rebecca without keeley. and if you ever leave my life, i'm going to stalk you! brett goldstein, ted lasso. that wasn't the last time the theme tune of the upbeat comedy blasted out in downtown la. brett goldstein collected an emmy for his role as the foul—mouthed roy kent. it won best comedy series, and best lead actor in a comedy went to jason sudeikis — the man who created it. kate winslet. kate winslet won for her lead role in the miniseries mare 0f easttown. i just want to acknowledge my fellow nominees in this decade that has to be about women having each other�*s backs. i support you, i salute you. i'm proud of all of you. 0h! the crown.
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but it was the crown that triumphed once again — winning best drama and multiple emmys for its cast and creators. 0livia colman won for her portrayal of the queen — accepting an award in london in the early hours of the morning. i wish my dad was here to see this. audience: ohh! i lost my daddy during covid, and he would have loved all of this! josh 0'connor won for his role as prince charles, tobias menzies for his prince philip, and gillian anderson won for her portrayal of margaret thatcher. there was a standing ovation forjean smart for her role in hacks — the comedy series which beat ted lasso to writing and directing awards. many tears of joy were shared in appreciation for those that created the places we escaped to during a pandemic year when we perhaps needed them more than ever. sophie long, bbc news, los angeles. princess beatrice and her husband edoardo mapelli mozzi have had a baby girl who was born on saturday. the queen's granddaughter gave birth
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to her first child at the chelsea and westminster hospital. buckingham palace said the princess and her daughter are "doing well" and the baby's grandparents and great—grandparents are "delighted". now it's time for a look at the weather with susan powell. 0rton is slowly creeping in with early morning mist and fog. today the leaves are picking up a tent but there is still generous amounts of warm sunshine across the uk. into the evening we will see showers across eastern england. more cloud into scotland and northern ireland and patchy rain for a time. by tuesday morning, a lot of dry weather across the uk, light winds, and temperatures in double figures overnight. the fog risk will be across eastern england. sunshine first thing should make short work
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of that and across the uk tuesday will be a day offering up fine weather and sunshine. breezy towards the north—west with a few showers into western scotland on tuesday afternoon. this is bbc news comedy —— the headlines: the business secretary meets energy firms amid fears more of them will go bust over the soaring price of wholesale gas. a murder investigation is under way after three children and a mother were found dead at a house in derbyshire — the father of two of the children says he's "broken". the first 12 to 15—year—olds in england and scotland have been given their covid jabs. a volcano erupts on a spanish holiday island in the canaries. and british talent wins multiple honours
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at the emmy tv awards last night. we are a bit static this afternoon, sorry. darren is bashing things in the gallery, somebody clever will come and sort it all out. time for the sport now, speaking of clever people. here is 0lly at the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. england lionesses manager sarina wiegman is strongly opposed to having a world cup every two years — saying "players are not robots". fifa will hold a summit with its member associations and various fans groups at the end of the month. they say that there is a broad consensus that the international men's and women's calendar needs to be "reformed and improved". the current programme of fixtures runs until the end of 2023. fifa's head of global development, arsene wenger, is in favour
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of a world cup every two years. wiegman most certainly isn't. i wouldn't do it. what's my kawai? because i think it's not good for the players, for their welfare. in england, we are very organised. we have good competitions. we have the euros, then the olympics. then you have the world cup, which are major tournaments for us from europe, and i think when you have all these tournaments every year, when other players going to get some rest? and when are they going to recover from a very intense football year every yearin a very intense football year every year in a row? players are not robots, so i don't think it's a good idea. everton midfielder james rodriguez has travelled to qatar for talks over a potential move to the middle east. the colombian has yet to play
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for manager rafael benitez this season after missing a number of games because of a covid—related issue. he joined from real madrid a year ago and is reported to be on wages worth £200,000 a week. the chief executive of the pakistan cricket board wasim khan has urged england to go ahead with their tour to the country next month. new zealand pulled out of their series because of a specific security threat last week despite assurances over their safety. the england men's and women's teams are due to travel to rawalpindi next month and the ecb are expected to make a decision on that tour very soon. it would be england's first visit there since 2005. the west indies and australia are also due there in the following months. no major nation has toured pakistan since a terrorist attack on the sri lankan team in 2009. this is going to cost us millions of dollars. this has severely affected us from a cricket credibility perspective and has set us back. we
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hope england will be touring and that that will be announced later today, and we believe and we hope they will be coming. england's netballers have lost the opeing match of their series in new zealand. it was really tight, right up to the final quarter, the roses fighting back to level the game in christchurch at 38—38. the world champions were too good in the end, winning 48—42. the next match is on wednesday. it is something of a makeshift england team, but the squad will be be reinforced by a few of their australian based players when they head there for another series after this one. that's all the sport for now. some breaking news from the united states. our north america editorjon sopel hasjust states. our north america editorjon sopel has just tweeted this.
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it looks like this could apply to travellers from the uk and the eu, but we are waiting for details. many people will be pleased to hear that, notjust people will be pleased to hear that, not just for holiday people will be pleased to hear that, notjust for holiday purposes, but also as a way of seeing family and continuing business, which of course has been disrupted for 18 months. a leading football agent who used to represent raheem sterling has broken football association rules by signing under—age players, according to evidence seen by bbc panorama. aidy ward, who owns colossal sports management, also asked sterling to speak to a 15—year—old via video call, as part of an attempt by ward to sign him. the fa prohibits agents approaching players before they are in their 16th year. rory carson has this report. aidy ward is one of the most high—profile agents in football. we've spoken to a player who says he was approached by ward when he was just 12 years old, in breach of fa rules. foday nabay was born in sierra leone
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and moved to england with his mum when he was six. hejoined birmingham city academy and was picked for the england youth team. soon after, aidy ward got in touch. what did they say? just, like, how many teams wanted me to go to them. and why i should, like, why i should go. that is when my head... it started getting into my head a bit. aidy ward says he has never been foday�*s agent but panorama has obtained evidence that appears to contradict the claim. email correspondence shows ward was involved in negotiations to move foday, then 14, to fulham, with agency fees if the transfer went through. the agency fees ended up being way more than my contract. i was happy with what i got.
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i did not move there for the money and that, but when i got to look at it i thought, wait, that is not right. foday says when he found out about the agency fees, he told fulham he would only sign if they were not paid. fa rules ban agents profiting from the transfer of underage players. fulham fc say it had not paid or agreed to pay mr ward in relation to foday�*s registration with the club. foday completed the transfer in 2013, but was released five years later. he blames mr ward for a move he was never happy with. i was young and did not know much about football, my mum doesn't know anything about football. i thought it was just normal. we have also obtained evidence that ward approached other underage players. 0ne document describes a meeting at this london restaurant between ward, a 15—year—old boy and his mother.
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aidy ward asked his famous client raheem sterling, a minority shareholder in colossal to speak via video call to the boy in a bid by mr ward to attract the young player to his agency. sterling's lawyers told panorama says that as an international he feels a responsibility to speak to aspiring players, but not about agents or financial issues and he supports fa rules to protect young players. raheem sterling dropped aidy ward as his agent late last year. ward is under investigation by the fa and says he cannot comment under respect for that process. and you can watch the panorama: football's broken dreams on bbc one at 8.30 tonight. sorry, we are having a few problems this afternoon. a 54—year—old man has died and a woman has been seriously
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injured in a paragliding collision. the conservationist, sacha dench, and a member of her support staff, dan burton, were in the final stages of a challenge to circumnavigate britain. the pair were flying battery—powered paramotors to mark the forthcoming un climate change conference in glasgow. a labour mp who has pulled out of her party's annual conference after receiving online abuse for her views on transgender issues has requested a meeting with sir keir starmer. rosie duffield says she has received some "pretty awful" threats and wanted clarity on the party's position on transgender issues. let's speak to our political correspondent ione wells. would clarifying the party s stance on this help ms duffield? well, there are two issues at play here. as you say, labour is under pressure from mps like rosie duffield to clarify their position on transgender issues. rosie duffield herself has taken a stance on this. she has raised some of her own concerns on this very emotive topic, which of course involves
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people's identities and their right to self—identify, to access certain spaces. and her taking opinion has opened her up to some scrutiny, is taking any kind of political opinion does, particularly on an issue like this, where there are currently very live debate going on about whether gender recognition laws need to be reformed. herview gender recognition laws need to be reformed. her view is not one that is shared by everybody in the labour party. today i have heard some senior labour mps are saying they are quite frustrated with the oxygen that rosie duffield's stance on this has taken, saying they would prefer that labour focused on things like nhs waiting times for transgender people. but rosie duffield thinks the labour leader sir keir starmer needs to meet with women in the party to clarify their stance. lots of people have been asking to meet _ lots of people have been asking to meet with— lots of people have been asking to meet with starmer in groups or one—to—one about this issue. and obviously— one—to—one about this issue. and obviously he _ one—to—one about this issue. and obviously he is busy, but it would be good — obviously he is busy, but it would be good to — obviously he is busy, but it would be good to clarify what our position is as a _
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be good to clarify what our position is as a party— be good to clarify what our position is as a party and discuss how we go forward _ is as a party and discuss how we go forward 30— is as a party and discuss how we go forward. , ., is as a party and discuss how we go forward, , ., ., is as a party and discuss how we go forward. i. ., ., ,~' is as a party and discuss how we go forward. ,, . ., ,~' ., is as a party and discuss how we go forward. ,, . ., ., , forward. so you have asked to see him and what _ forward. so you have asked to see him and what is _ forward. so you have asked to see him and what is his _ forward. so you have asked to see him and what is his response? - forward. so you have asked to see him and what is his response? he| forward. so you have asked to see i him and what is his response? he is alwa s him and what is his response? he is always positive _ him and what is his response? he is always positive about _ him and what is his response? he is always positive about trying to organise — always positive about trying to organise a meeting, itjust hasn't happened — organise a meeting, itjust hasn't happened yet. but organise a meeting, it 'ust hasn't happened “at organise a meeting, it 'ust hasn't happened yet. but you would like that to happen — happened yet. but you would like that to happen soon? _ happened yet. but you would like that to happen soon? yeah, - happened yet. but you would like that to happen soon? yeah, i- happened yet. but you would like i that to happen soon? yeah, i think it is necessary _ that to happen soon? yeah, i think it is necessary to _ that to happen soon? yeah, i think it is necessary to talk _ that to happen soon? yeah, i think it is necessary to talk about - that to happen soon? yeah, i think it is necessary to talk about this. . so rosie duffield is calling for labour to clarify their stance on this. a separate data that is something no politician disagrees with, which is the fact that no one in public life should feel that their safety is threatened, which is something rosie duffield has raised. politicians of all stripes are saying that online abuse, particularly when it threatens to turn into real life abuse as well, is something nobody in public life should be going through. that is not a new issue. we know this is something that has affected people in politics for a long time, particularly women in politics. so on the one hand, labour is under pressure to clarify what their
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stance is and that may help resolve some of the internal party political disputes over this. but given that there is online and real—life abuse in the public sphere which is not a new issue, it is unlikely that labour resolving their stance on this will be enough to stop rosie duffield receiving some of the more severe abuse, which is where scrutiny and legitimate criticism has escalated into abuse and threats to her safety. four men from blackburn have been charged after allegedly shouting antisemitic abuse from a car in north london earlier this year. the men are due before westminster magistrates' court next month. mohammed iftikhar hanif, jawaad hussain, asif ali and adil mota are accused of using theatening, abusive or insulting words or behaviour whilst part of a convoy of vehicles taking part in a pro—palestinian protest in stjohn's wood in may. a monument dedicated to all the dutch victims of the holocaust has opened in amsterdam. it lists 102,000 jewish people killed by the nazis —
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as well as more than 200 sinti and roma. tim allman reports. the holocaust was a crime committed in so many places, with so many victims. more than 100,000 of them, are named here. the first such memorial in the netherlands dedicated to a dark chapter in the country's history. translation: this monument confronts us with the criminal murder of thousands, murdered for no other reason than their identity. in doing so, the monument also demands accountability. accountability as to whether more should be done during the war years to save those who were murdered. the netherlands was occupied for much of the second world war and three quarters of the country's jewish
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population were killed, most by the nazis but some by local collaborators, a difficult legacy to deal with. the king met with some of the survivors, seated next to the wall where the victims' names were inscribed. translation: i thought it was emotional. i just saw the name of a friend of mine, not anne frank or anyone famous, but a friend of mine, and ifound it hard to read. i knew she was dead, of course. i still keep a picture of her at home. as one survivor put it, this monument is a tribute that can never be erased, and a warning that can never be forgotten. tim allman, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... the business secretary is meeting energy firms amid fears more of them will go bust over the soaring price of gas. a murder investigation is under way after three children and a mother were found dead
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at a house in derbyshire — the father of two of the children says he's "broken". the first 12 to 15 year olds in england and scotland have been given their covid jabs. canadians go to the polls today in an election taking place two years early. prime ministerjustin trudeau called the snap poll last month, seeking to capitalise on public approval for his handling of the covid—19 pandemic. but the latest opinion poll points to an extremely tight race, with mr trudeau virtually neck—and—neck with his conservative rival, erin 0'toole. from montreal, samira hussain reports: in the remaining hours of the campaign, prime minister justin trudeau is in his element, greeting voters, his charm on full display — but it wasn't always this much fun. many canadians are just
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plain frustrated, worried about the economy, the vaccine mandates, that this election was even called in the first place. some of that anger has come out in very un—canadian ways. for many struggling to keep their livelihoods intact and open, mr trudeau's decision to hold canada's second election in less than two years feels like an unwanted distraction. i have so many worries right now. every day is a worry. we're not through the pandemic, so do i have enough mental space and heart space to even worry about the elections? we're still in small business worrying about keeping the doors open, staying in business. the son of a former prime minister, mr trudeau carries the most famous name in canadian politics, but he also carries the burden of canada's liberal history and is coming up against some very modern
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conservative energy. the leader of the conservative party — and mr trudeau's main challenger — is painting him as a politician born with a silver spoon in his mouth. every canadian has met a justin trudeau in their lives — privileged, entitled, and always looking out for number one. he was looking out for number one when he called this expensive and unnecessary election in the middle of the pandemic. here in western canada, support for the conservatives is strongest, but the election is not top of mind for farmers who are dealing with some of the driest conditions on record. this is a long way from the country's political heartland. how can they help? they can't make it rain, they can't make the feed grow, so if somebody gives us some money all it does is, now your bale of hay that was $100 is $120. justin trudeau decided to have
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this election betting that he could turn his apparent success leading canada through the pandemic into a bigger majority and a firmer hold on power, but it is not entirely clear that that bet will actually pay off, such is canada's disillusionment with this election. it is even possible he may lose power altogether. samira hussein, bbc news, montreal. the new foreign secretary, liz truss, is to urge her iranian counterpart to release british nationals being held in the country, at a meeting in new york. about a dozen western dual nationals are detained in iran, including nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe. caroline hawley�*s report contains some distressing images. elika ashoori makes macaroons and cakes for a living, treats for other people's celebrations, but her own wedding is on hold, her whole life consumed by her father's arrest. i have to always throw myself into my work to not think about it too much because it drives me crazy.
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he was never political. he was a mechanical engineer with a love of astronomy. throughout his entire life he has put me and my brother first. but in august in 2017, while visiting his elderly mother in tehran, anoosheh ashoori was thrown into iran's notorious evin jail, one of around a dozen westerners being held in iran, including nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe. their families describe them as hostages being used by iranian authorities for political and financial leverage with the west. evin is notorious for being horrific. each room is shared by 15—20 people. they have rats and cockroaches all the time. he was interrogated very, very heavily. they threatened to hurt us throughout the interrogations. they told my dad that they knew where we lived, where we worked, what pets we had. my dad was saying, "i have nothing to confess to you."
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twice he tried to take his own life because he thought that if he was out of the equation, then they would not be able to hurt us. last month, cctv footage from inside evin was hacked into and leaked. former inmates say it shows the outside world just a small glimpse of what the jail is like. elika fears her father will not get out until iran and the uk strike a bargain for his release. i mean, he is 67 now and he has been there forfour years, for having done nothing. who will be answerable to that? elika's father always supported everything she did. the nature of my business is constantly to talk to people about weddings, birthdays and to be excited for them. and that is why it was very difficult at first for me to do myjob. i didn't want to make things for happy people, as horrible as it sounds.
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now i use my business and i use my cakes to focus on people's happiness because it is kind of like a beam of hope. so in her head she keeps planning the ultimate cake, the one she will make to eventually welcome him home. caroline hawley, bbc news. in the us, teams searching for missing 22—year old gabby petito have found a body they say matches her description in a national park in the state of wyoming. ms petito's not been seen since her boyfriend brian laundri, returned home from a cross—country trip without her. police have named him a person of interest. 0fficers said they're waiting for the results of forensic tests. earlier today, human remains were discovered consistent with the description of gabrielle petito. full forensic identification has not been confirmed 100% that we found
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gabby, but herfamily has been notified of this discovery. the cause of death has not been determined at this time. london has two new tube stations on the northern line — the first major expansion of the underground network this century. trains began running between battersea power station and nine elms this morning. london's mayor's said the project will play "a major role" in the capital's recovery. here's bbc london's transport correspondent tom edwards. # going underground...# welcome to the new northern line extension, where a choir welcomed the transport glitterati this morning. there are now two new stations in south london which have been a long time coming. it's just great finally being on the tube at battersea. 0bviously with the power station here as well in development, it's going to get more people down and also for the people in battersea, they can use it for work, use it to get across london. it's an historic day. it's always had a soul, but the soul is definitely coming back and it's just so wonderful.
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this is nine elms. the other is battersea power station. the line now links into the existing northern line at kennington. for now, there will be trains every ten minutes. oh, i think it's absolutely fabulous. it's just four and a half minutes walk from my flat. and i get into the west end any time, ten minutes. ten minutes to leicester square. that means we have to go to the theatre now. we haven't been for years! the station is beautiful, signage is wonderful. i think it's incredibly exciting. it's the first major extension of the underground this century. it's the first new station on the northern line for more than 80 years. and it'sjust the shot in the arm london needs. the whole area is undergoing a massive redevelopment. the extension will also serve the us embassy nearby. this is a big dealfor this area. 20,000 homes are being built, jobs are being created and you can now get into the west end in just 12 minutes. it cost £1.1 billion,
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which will eventually be paid for by developers. so what now for future infrastructure in london? could we see more projects? what about the bakerloo line extension, or crossrail 2? we are a government committed to levelling up the country. we've never, ever said that means levelling down london. we want london, the south—east, the productive parts of our economy, to carry on being as productive and more, whilst we level up the rest of the country. today is a very good example of how that works, which is when we get together, build things like this, we can bring jobs to the capital, bring new homes to the capital. there is the option to extend this land further to clapham junction. but today was the day the underground arrived in battersea. tom edwards, bbc london. some more information about what might be happening to travel in the united states. according to an airline industry source, the
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possibility of travelling to and from the united states and the uk is likely to open up in november if you are fully vaccinated and a traveller from the uk. the us government is due to make an announcement on this at three o'clock, our time, and we will get more on it from our transport correspondent caroline davies in the next few minutes. now it's time for a look at the weather with susan powell. hello. autumn is now slowly creeping in across the uk. the leaves are picking up a bit of a tint. there's some early morning mist and fog to be found in places, but still in the days ahead, a lot of sun to come and still some notable warmth to that sun. it does look like the story, though, could change to a more lively autumnal picture towards the end of the week. certainly through monday and tuesday, though, it is this area of high pressure from the south—west that's trying
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to dominate, so that will mean light winds for many and a lot of fine weather. but the tail end of the front will bring showers into eastern england in the short term. a weakening weatherfront will push its way in from the north—west through the evening and overnight. hardly any rain in association with it by the time that front gets into wales and northern england at the end of the night. there will be some mist and fog across eastern england. elsewhere, some patchy cloud, but it is a mild and fine night on the whole. for tuesday, the high pressure is more dominant on our weather chart. notice the isobars towards the north—west are quite squeezed together. it will be a breezier day across northern ireland and western scotland. a bit more cloud around here. a lot of sunshine to come for the majority of the uk. early morning mist and fog clearing. but we could see some showers grazing into western scotland as that wind kicks up through tuesday afternoon. windier still for western scotland come wednesday as this weatherfront starts to loom large. initially, it will bring heavy rain into the north of scotland,
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but the front weakens as it slides south through the course of the day. a spell of pretty strong winds across western scotland. rain for northern england and northern ireland later in the afternoon. wednesday is the equinox, "equi" meaning equal, equal day, equal night, and it is the astronomical start to autumn. you can see the weather getting that memo a little for the end of the week as the stronger winds come to affect all parts of the uk. we'll see some weatherfronts tucking in as well in terms of our forecast, so perhaps a greater risk of some showery rain in places. certainly the end of the week, the strengthening wind most notable across the southern half of the uk, we'll already have experienced that for scotland and northern ireland earlier in the week. the figures in the black circles give you an indicator of the gust strengths. still some warm sunshine to come, though, to the south.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: the united states is expected to relax travel restrictions on vaccinated passengers from the uk. the bbc understands the new rules will come into effect from november. the business secretary meets energy firms amid fears more of them will go bust over the soaring price of wholesale gas. now the market has shot up they really are between a rock and a hard place but there are fundamental problems in the energy market. the business secretary kwasi kwarteng will give a statement on the uk gas market to the house of commons in about half—an—hour�*s time. a murder investigation is under way after three children and a mother were found dead at a house in derbyshire — the father of two of
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the children says he's "broken". the first 12— to 15—year—olds in england and scotland have been given their covid jabs. a volcano erupts on a spanish holiday island in the canaries. cheering and british talent wins multiple honours at the emmy tv awards last night. the united states is expected to relax travel restrictions on vaccinated passengers from the european union and britain. the new rules are expected to come into effect from november. 0ur transport correspondent is caroline davies. what more are you hearing?
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it is early days, we are waiting to have that official announcement from the us government but my understanding from you industry sources are airlines are being briefed this change will crack on, a much awaited change for the industry desperate to get the us — uk lines connected again. if you happen to be from the us coming into the uk, you have been able to do so if you have been double—jabbed and not need to quarantine, from august. but you cannot travel from the uk to the us unless you have a green card or you have a special supervision or us passport. that has limited things for businesses that rely on going back and forth between the countries and crucially families who have been disconnected and not able to visit. some have travelled indirectly to get to the united states. they are not currently able to go from the uk
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to the us directly. big news today. big business for the airlines as well. a lot of these long—hauler airlines rely on the us— uk route. that has been closed from the beginning of the pandemic. donald trump closed it in march 2020. that is a long time without that source of income, some routes have been running but also for cargo ships, bringing cargo back and forth. but in terms of passenger numbers which is a major source of income for airlines it has not been possible. that will be welcome for the ni airlines it has not been possible. that will be welcome for the n! is relying on that. caroline, thank you. the business secretary has been holding crisis talks with energy
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firms amid worries of big rises to energy bills in the coming weeks. five smaller energy suppliers have already gone bust, unable to cope with a 70% hike in the cost of wholesale gas since august. it's understood the government is considering offering emergency state—backed loans to companies. 0fgem has confirmed british gas has agreed to take on an extra 350,000 customers from the collapsed firm people's energy. and the uk's sixth largest energy company, bulb, is seeking new funds to try to stay afloat. downing street says it wants to fix the issues as fast as it can. our business correspondent emma simpson reports. gas, the cornerstone of our energy supply and the cost of it is rocketing. there has been a surge in global demand and not enough supply. energy firms here are now battling to stay afloat. in the current market as it is we are not going to see it through the winter. if it gets worse, that time will get shortened.
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i think ourselves along with other small energy suppliers, need direct government intervention to see it through the coming months. five suppliers have collapsed since the start of last month. but dozens could be out of business by the end of the year. the reason? wholesale gas prices have risen by more than 300% compared to last winter. when a supplier collapses what normally happens is the regulator steps in to get somebody else to take on the customers. but prices have gone up so much the big suppliers are saying they can't afford to do this within the government's price cap without racking up huge losses. the regulator has allowed something like 70 new entrants into the game in the last few years. they have entered with very little behind them. fairly reckless business models, selling energy cheaper than they can buy it for, to grow a customer base fast and then sell themselves or increase prices. at the same time ofgem imposed a price cap which prevented them putting prices up.
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they haven't been hedging. now the market has shot up. the prime minister has arrived in new york saying his government is working on some answers. we have to try and fix it as fast as we can, make sure we have the supplies we want, make sure we don't allow the companies we rely on to go under. we have to do everything we can. but this will get better as the market starts to sort itself out as the world economy gets back on its feet. but high gas prices are already having huge knock—on effects. it has forced a shut down of two factories producing most of the uk's carbon dioxide used in the food and industry. we are at a crisis point. he doesn'tjust own bernard matthews turkeys. this is the biggest producer of chicken in the uk. we have four to five days left and we have to reduce our production by 10%. how many chickens is that? that is over half
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a million chickens a week. that could mean some gaps on the shelves by the end of the week. the clock is ticking for the government to find a solution to an energy crisis with potentially far—reaching ripple effects. emma simpson, bbc news. let's speak to our business correspondent theo leggett. this will be a worry for customers whose energy supplies could be teetering. absolutely. in theory the system is designed to cope with this sort of thing. if an energy supply goes bust there is what is called supplier of last resort appointed by 0fgem which is what we have seen with british gas taking over customers from people's energy. if your supplier goes bust, you will get your account transferred to another supplier at their best rate. the problem is if
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too many go bust at once, those suppliers which have been more resilient and planned ahead by buying more of their energy in advance, they don't want to take on hundreds of thousands or potentially millions of new customers if it will cost them money. 0ne millions of new customers if it will cost them money. one thing we understand that supplies and the government have been talking about todayis government have been talking about today is the possibility of some kind of emergency loan. the government backing lending to suppliers so they have an incentive to cushion the blow of taking on extra customers which might cost them money. what the government does not want to do is to prop up failing suppliers who might have done bad business, and sending out the wrong message. talks today have been about finding a way to protect consumers to ensure everyone still has a supplier and make sure the larger more resilient supplies can take on extra customers if they need, without bailing out failing entities. we have spoken to 1's smaller energy
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company that feels it doesn't have anywhere near enough support from the government, claiming this is a manoeuvre by the big firms to hoover up manoeuvre by the big firms to hoover up customers that are shared by these smaller customers! companies that can't stay in business. the big companies would be wanting to take over as many customers as possible because when you are making a profit the more customers you have the better. the argument at the moment is though that because most customers are on fixed price deals, gas and electricity companies won't make a huge amount of money because they can't lift their prices when faced with higher wholesale prices. people on variable tariffs, you can't raise their prices beyond a certain level because they are capped by 0fgem. so when wholesale prices go up there is little profit to be made from getting extra customers. nevertheless smaller
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companies do feel vulnerable, they are most exposed to high wholesale energy prices and feel they need more support from the government so they can stay in business because of them business creates more competition for the bigger supplies and ultimately keeps prices down for consumers. but if you have to change supplier, how likely is it you will see your energy prices go up? when it is a supplier of last resort they are meant to give you the best available rate, that is part of the system. the problem is people who are coming to the end of an energy deal who would have come to the end of a fixed rate in a couple of months, they will not be in a position to shop around easily because the rates themselves will be going up. what we are seeing is even if you have a fixed rate, at some point that will come to an end. if wholesale prices stay very high, the deals on offer when you come to the
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end of the rate will not be as attractive so if these prices stay high for months, as expected, then pretty much everybody ultimately will end up paying more because if the price of the raw material goes up, ultimately it is the consumer whether it is domestic or business, who has to pay. for the moment, thank you. earlier i spoke to peter mcgirr who is the ceo of green energy — an energy supplier based in the north east of england. he told me about some of the problems his company is facing we are facing the same problems as all supplies in the marketplace, not just a small supply is facing this problem, largersupplies just a small supply is facing this problem, larger supplies have deeper pockets to weather the storm. should prices continue as they are coming it is likely even the larger supplies will have to go to the government and ask for some support mechanism. what is your response to
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commentators's views in some cases a small business energy firms are somewhat reckless in the way they have been set up, they haven't got enough contingencies, not enough behind them? i think the narrative being put forward is disingenuous by the marketplace that has a vested interest in the marketplace shrinking to scoop up customers. they are saying we are unsustainable, we have had 3.5% for our customer place without these events happening. how can one prudently headed for a lockdown put in place at a moment's notice, how can i foresee that and by that energy, for people using 15% more energy, for people using 15% more energy with having their children at home, working from home. it is not something we can predict is a business. it has been put this crisis has come about in the last couple of days, this has gone on
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through the pandemic. we were mandated to offer payment holidays which we did in december last year but without support from government. that is fine if you have deep pockets like 0ctopus energy or centrica but if you are a small independent where you find this money in a marketplace where people are barely operating due to the pandemic. that would be the starting point and we need to move on from that. we had the tanker stuck in the canal which did not help. these are not things we can plan for as a smaller supplier or as a larger suopiy, smaller supplier or as a larger supply, no one can predict this. it is an all boys club where the big boys club together with 0fgem to come up with a solution to take out the other players from the marketplace. the idea is there is meant to be a plurality to make it better for customers and bigger firms will say if we take on customers from failing
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firms it will cost us money certainly in the short term. what are you telling customers, how worried should they be you won't be there for them?— there for them? they should be extremely _ there for them? they should be extremely worried _ there for them? they should be extremely worried unless - there for them? they should be extremely worried unless the i extremely worried unless the government provides a lifeline or support as they have done to other industries. the business secretary was written to by 0fgem in march 2020 on the energy crisis we face, all suppliers, and no stimulus package was put in place. the suggestion is there might be government loans available, how useful would that be to you? government loans have only been made available to larger suppliers, i have had no contact with the business secretary, neither have 15 other smaller suppliers which have put an open letter to government and 0fgem representing 15 suppliers representing millions of suppliers and thousands of employees whose voices have yet to be heard.
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a murder investigation is under way after three children and a mother were found dead at a house in derbyshire. officers were called to a property in the town of killamarsh on sunday morning. a man has been arrested. 0ur correspondent danny savage is there. this is the scene where the bodies were found early yesterday morning in killamarsh. it's in this terraced property, the semi—detached one at the end of this terrace where you can see the police forensic tent and you can see a number of white vans parked outside. those are the forensic scientists who are working inside this property. what we do know is that the bodies of a woman and three children were found in the house. jason bennett is the father of two of those children. he came to the scene today. he said his heart was broken into a million pieces. he also posted on facebook last night, paying tribute to his children. he left some flowers as well with messages on, to lacey, who was 11 years old, describing her as a "tiktok queen" and to his sonjohn,
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who was 13, "a boy with a kind heart", he said. also at the scene today were his parents, the child ren's grandpa rents. they came to visit. they were very upset but as they left, they did stop and talk to us. lacey was a proper girl, pink and sparkly. john was just all into computers and that. they were the most well— mannered children you would ever meet. yeah. for kids nowadays, they were well mannered. they were always remembering their manners, always please and thank you. if you ever brought them a present, the first thing they did was to go on facebook and thank you. i don't know how we're going to manage without them. it's just awful, the distress they're going through. they came down here to see for themselves what had happened and to talk to police officers as well. there is another child involved. the body of a third child was found here as well. we don't know who he or she is, but we understand it was a friend who was here on a sleepover
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on saturday night, who was also caught up in these awful events. a man was arrested soon after the bodies were found. he has been held in police custody and we are expecting derbyshire police to give a bit more detail about what happened, but just awful. lots of people are standing around this lunchtime from this community, deeply shocked by these awful events in this house behind me. the headlines on bbc news: the united states is expected to relax travel restrictions on vaccinated passengers from the uk. the bbc understands the new rules will come into effect from november. the business secretary meets energy firms amid fears more of them will go bust over the soaring price of wholesale gas. a murder investigation is under way after three children and a mother were found dead at a house in derbyshire — the father of two of the children says he's "broken".
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some 12— to 15—year—olds in parts of england and scotland have begun receiving covid vaccines. jabs for this age group are also due to begin soon in northern ireland and in wales next month. millions of older and vulnerable people across the uk are being contacted to arrange their booster shots. 0ur health correspondent anna collinson reports. this is jack, one of the first healthy young teenagers in england to receive a coronavirus vaccine. there you are. all done. around 3,000,000 12— to 15—year—olds are due to follow him. it was ok. i'm happy i have got it because it makes it easier to go out and enjoy myself now. there's been quite a few students that have taken up the opportunity to be vaccinated. we were informed on friday about the vaccinations and we have loads of students and parents getting on board, so that's great. with the risks and benefits finely balanced, reaching this point has
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involved much debate. the uk's vaccine advisory panel initially said it could not recommend vaccinating all 12— to 15—year—olds based on health grounds alone. but once factors like the impact on education were taken into account, the uk's chief medical 0fficers advised they should receive one dose of the pfizerjab. it's really important to remember the uk chief medical 0fficers supported the vaccine to this age group and it has been signed off by government. we are rolling it out in schools because it is our best chance not just to protect children, but to protect families as well, as we head into winter. from today in scotland the jabs will first be available at drop—in centres. wales and northern ireland expect to administer their first vaccines to this age group in october. millions of young teens have now been vaccinated globally, including here in france, as well as the us. while cases of heart inflammation are rare, some parents are concerned.
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i know the risks are minimal of getting myocarditis, but there is still a risk. and i'm not sure i want to put my son, expose my son to that risk, given that the benefits of getting the vaccination are so minimal. parental consent will be sought but children are able to overrule parents if they are considered competent. latest research suggests even the younger children could eventually be vaccinated. a study by pfizer found its jab seems to be safe and well tolerated in children aged five to 11. the coronavirus booster campaign is also under way, with millions of the most vulnerable due to be contacted this week. as the challenges of winter approach, it is hoped everyjab will strengthen the wall of defence. anna collinson, bbc news.
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i'm joined now by danny altmann, professor of immunology at imperial college london. it isa it is a nuanced discussion, our arguments shift from simple arguments shift from simple arguments to greyer arguments. we are terribly aware of the infections occurring with the delta especially in vulnerable people and elderly people and people will have heard from the data in israel where they gave booster shots and those breakthrough cases fell to almost nothing. you say it requires more nuanced thinking. ratherthan you say it requires more nuanced thinking. rather than blanket coverage, ideally, what should the approach be? i am approach be? iam an approach be? i am an immunologist so i would like to see more data, more detailed, more monitoring of responses because
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one might end up arguing there are vulnerable people who because of their age or medication or comorbidities need that boost, and many others who are normal, healthy people who don't and their dose might better go to someone else. there is the ethical issue, how to justify it, to keep giving vaccines in this country when so many countries abroad struggling to vaccinate for the first time. these are difficult issues. at the heart of it i think we need some hard—nosed modelling and data to try to convince if that is the case that we get more benefit by sharing those doses with other countries from where the next variants of concern might come, rather than vaccinating our own population more and more. we really do need that data. having got data like that, we need the logistics to do that sharing. there
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is no point me giving up my dose if i have no means of transferring it to another country. some scientists did not believe it was a wise idea to be vaccinating 12 to 15—year—olds, and yet we are seeing that programme rolled out. how likely is it there could be an argument put forward soon for them to get boosters as well? it is possible. i really hope that would be a debate informed by real—life data because my suspicion is that there will be an enormous benefit from giving one dose to 12 to 15—year—olds because they do get sick, they do miss school, one in 200 of every 12 to 15—year—olds getting infected gets hospitalised and that means rather ill. so i think there will be real benefit to children from one dose. i would be surprised if they need boosters but
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c. always good to talk to you, thank you for your insights today. more details about travel to the united states and we are learning the vaccinated passengers from the uk, from early november, are likely to be able to travel to the united states for the first time in a long time. the white house says it plans to lift restrictions barring most foreign nationals from travelling to the us. in the uk, china, brazil and other countries, people have not been allowed to travel. americans who are not vaccinated must undergo stricter covid—19 testing requirements. more information coming through. we are likely to get more details in the next few hours. a volcano has erupted on the spanish island of la palma in the canaries. thousands of residents have been evacuated. it's the first time the cumbre vieja volcano has erupted in 50 years.
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thousands of tremors had hit the area in recent days, as james reynolds reports. after a week of tremors, the cumbre vieja volcanic ridge erupted. no one has seen anything like this in the island of la palma for half a century. it has created its own apocalyptic landscape. rivers of lava channel their way down towards nearby villages. "look, look! it's falling," the man says. the flow of lava takes down a building. at least 20 isolated homes have now been swallowed up. "eight metres of lava," he says. "this is the civil guard," says an officer through a loudspeaker. "please leave your homes."
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the residents of four villages have been ordered to get to safety. translation: the situation - is drastic because of where the lava is advancing, sweeping away everything in its path, especially houses. the authorities have a good view of the eruption and the rivers of lava. they expect the flows to continue to the coast. the rescue effort even takes in farm animals. police officers and local residents round up every goat and sheep they can find. it's not yet clear how long this eruption will last. the most recent major activity in 1971 went on for three weeks. james reynolds, bbc news. borisjohnson is co—hosting a meeting in new york with the un
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secretary general to try to persuade the rich world to spend more money to help poorer countries cope with climate change. the prime minister has already said it is going to be tough to make enough progress before the un climate summit takes place in glasgow in november. promises to deliver $100 billion a year in climate finance by 2020 have not been met. 0ur reality check correspondent chris morris is here to explain. if you think it's going to be hard for rich countries to adjust to the need to remove fossil fuels and carbon from their economies, just think about how hard it's going to be in the developing world where there's far less money to pay for new infrastructure in the first place — but there's it's a challenge which has been recognised for some time. as long ago as 2009, the developed world agreed it would provide $100 billion a year by 2020 to help poorer countries deal with the effects of climate change and build greener economies in the future. well, 2020 has come and gone, and the target has not been reached, even though a new and more ambitious
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target is supposed to be set for 2025. for many countries around the world, this is the issue in the run—up to november's cop26 climate summit in glasgow. so, how far short of money are they? it's quite hard to calculate what should be included because it's a complicated mix of public and some private finance. but the 0ecd estimates that by 2019 the figure had reached just over $79 billion — and it won't have got to $100 billion by 2020. between 2016 and 2018, 43% of the funding went to asia, 25% africa and 17% to the americas — a lot of it spent on green energy or transport infrastructure. and a big push to increase the overall amount of money provided is certainly on. but where should it come from? un climate experts say the most generous donors among the g7 group of rich countries have been germany, jap0an france in that order.
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slightly behind them are the uk and canada. but the main laggards are the united states which is important because it's so big, and particularly italy. here's the crucial point: by 2018, about three—quarters of the public money made available for climate action in developing countries was in the form of loans that need to be paid back rather than grants that don't. the share of grants was higher to the very poorest countries, but still less than half the total. and that's a big problem in countries where the covid pandemic has made access to international funds even more pressing. many countries are already heavily in debt and huge loans will make that problem worse. so it's a critical issue. the message from the world's poor to rich countries in the run—up to the glasgow summit — if you want ambitious climate targets, you're going to have to pay for them. now it's time for a look at the weather with susan powell.
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autumn is slowly creeping in with early morning mist and fog. today the leaves are picking up a tint but there is still generous amounts of warm sunshine across the uk. into the evening we will see showers across eastern england. more cloud into scotland and northern ireland and patchy rain for a time. by tuesday morning, a lot of dry weather across the uk, light winds, and temperatures in double figures overnight. the fog risk will be across eastern england. sunshine first thing should make short work of that and across the uk tuesday will be a day offering up fine weather and sunshine. breezy towards the north west with a few showers into western scotland on tuesday afternoon.
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to begin, i want to make two points extremely clear.— extremely clear. firstly, mr speaker. — extremely clear. firstly, mr speaker. l _ extremely clear. firstly, mr speaker, i must _ extremely clear. firstly, mr speaker, i must stress - extremely clear. firstly, mr speaker, i must stress that| speaker, i must stress that protecting consumers is our number one primary focus and will shape our entire approach to this important issue. secondly, ialso entire approach to this important issue. secondly, i also want to reassure the house that while the uk, like other countries in europe, has been affected by global prices, britain benefits from having a diverse range of gas supply sources.
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we have sufficient capacity and more than sufficient capacity to meet demand and we do not expect supply emergencies to occur this winter. there is no question, mr speaker, of the lights going out or people being unable to heat their homes. there will be no three—day working weeks or a throwback to the 1970s. such thinking is alarmist, unhelpful and completely misguided. to begin, i would like to set out some of the context to the global situation we are now witnessing. 0f situation we are now witnessing. of the world comes out of covid—19 and economies reopen, we are seeing a dramatic uptick in global gas demand, much faster than many people had anticipated. high demand, mr
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speaker, for liquefied natural gas in asia, transported by freight, means that far less lng has reached europe. weather events in the us have also affected lng exports to europe. so therefore, increased demand, coupled with a reduced variety of supply globally, has put upward pressure on the price of gas which is traded globally. high wholesale gas prices have subsequently driven an increase in wholesale power prices, with a number of short—term markets trading at or near record levels. while we are not complacent, we do not expect supply emergencies this winter. this is an important point. this is not a question of security of supply. the great british uk gas system has
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delivered securely to date and is expected to continue to function effectively, with a diverse range of supply sources and sufficient delivery capacity to more than meet the demand. the national grid electricity system operator has the tools within itself to operate the electricity system reliably, to balance that system, and we remain confident that electricity security can be maintained under a wide range of scenarios. we are not reliant on any one particular source for our gas, like many of our friends any one particular source for our gas, like many of ourfriends in europe. domestic production, as a right honourable members should note, is our gas supply source, accounting for 50% of total supply last year. however, the uk also
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benefits from an excellent relationship with norway, one of our most important and reliable energy partners. that delivers nearly 30% of our total gas supply. in the last half hour, i was privileged enough to speak to the norwegian energy minister and to welcome the announcement today that gas production will significantly increase from the 1st of october this year to support demand. 0ur remaining supply is sourced from global markets by two interconnected to the continent and also through the lng infrastructure which is, as many members know, the largest in europe. 0bviously, many members know, the largest in europe. obviously, the global gas situation has had an impact on some of our energy supplies. we have
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already seen four suppliers exit the market in recent weeks and we may see whether companies exiting the market over the coming weeks. i have to say that having been energy minister for two years before to say that having been energy ministerfor two years before i became secretary of state, we saw, in those two years, companies exiting the market. there may be more this year, but this is something which, at this time of year ahead of the renewal obligation certificate payment, this is something which is often seen in the market. but i want to make it clear today that this is not unusual, for smaller energy suppliers to exit the market, particularly when wholesale global prices are rising. the sector has seen regular entry and exit over the last five to ten years, and that is a feature of a highly competitive market. the current global
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situation, as i have said, may see more suppliers than usual exiting the market, but this is not something which should be cause for alarm or panic. we have clear processes in place to make sure that all customers are supplied with energy. when an energy supplier typically fails, off gem appoints another supplier to take on serving customers and there is no interruption to supply. i reiterate, our first and primary consideration is that the customer. i would like to stress three further principles which are guiding the government's approach in this matter. firstly, the government will not be bailing out failed companies. there will be no rewards for failure or mismanagement. the taxpayer should not be expected to prop up companies which have poor business models and
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are not resilient to fluctuations in price. secondly, customers, especially vulnerable customers, must be protected from price spikes. thirdly, we must ensure that the energy market does not pay the price for the poor practices of a minority of companies and that the market still maintains the competition which is a feature of today's current system. we must not simply return to "the cosy oligopoly" of years past, where a few large suppliers simply dictated to customers conditions and pricing. i would like to reassure all members and honourable members' constituents that the energy price cap, which saves 15 million households up to £100 a year, is staying. it is not
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going anywhere. as i said, our priority has to be the consumer, the great british public. and the cap has done that effectively. it has protected millions of customers from sudden increases in verbal prices this winter. we are committed to that price cap and it will remain in place. meanwhile, sir, ourwarm home discount winter fuel payments and cold weather payments will continue to support millions of vulnerable and low—income households with their energy bills. it is vital that the energy bills. it is vital that the energy supplies sector remains a liberalised, competitive market in order to deliver value and good service to consumers. as a result of high global gas prices, members and right honourable members will have
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read that two fertiliser plants shut down in teesside and cheshire last week. they suspended the production of c02 and ammonia, a decision which has surely affected, in the short term, our domestic supply of carbon dioxide, which, as everybody knows, is used in the food and drink as well as the nuclear and health sectors. yesterday i met the global chief executive of cf industries. we discussed the pressure is the business is facing and we have explored possible ways to secure vital supplies. work is ongoing across departments in whitehall to ensure that those sectors which are affected by this announcement have appropriate contingency plans in
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place to ensure that there is minimal disruption, to maintain our domestic supplies of c02, we are in constant contact with relevant companies who produce and supply c02 and we are monitoring the situation minute by minute. 0ver and we are monitoring the situation minute by minute. over the past few days, as has been widely reported, i have held several discussions with chief executives of the uk's largest energy suppliers and operators, and also with 0fgem to discuss this vital issue. just this morning, i chaired a roundtable with uk energy companies and the representatives of consumer groups in which i reiterated, as i have done on the floor of this house, the need for all of us in government and across the industry to prioritise customers and protect the consumer. meetings
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are continuing across government today and throughout this week. in terms of further actions and statements, this afternoon, shortly after the statement presented here, i will be making a joint statement with 0fgem setting out the government's next steps, following healthy discussions with them and suppliers. mr speaker, oursecurity suppliers. mr speaker, our security of suppliers. mr speaker, oursecurity of gas supply is robust, but the uk is still too reliant on fossil fuels. 0ur exposure to volatile global gas prices underscores the importance of our plan to build a strong, home—grown renewable energy sector to strengthen our energy security into the future. thanks to the steps we have made as a government, renewable energy sources have quadrupled in terms of
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gigawatts capacity since 2010, far more than quadrupled, in fact. but there is still more we can do in this area. that is why we have committed to approve at least one large—scale new nuclear project in the next few years and are backing the next few years and are backing the next few years and are backing the next generation of advanced nuclear technology with £385 million, helping to attract billions of pounds in private capital and create thousands ofjobs. consumers come first, and we must protect our constituents. come first, and we must protect our constituents-— constituents. before anybody bothers, constituents. before anybody bothers. it — constituents. before anybody bothers, it is _ constituents. before anybody bothers, it is totally - constituents. before anybody - bothers, it is totally unacceptable to spend — bothers, it is totally unacceptable to spend so long. you have not warned — to spend so long. you have not warned the _ to spend so long. you have not warned the opposition. the fact that you have _ warned the opposition. the fact that you have taken almost 13 minutes, i would _ you have taken almost 13 minutes, i would have — you have taken almost 13 minutes, i would have thought the people who put this— would have thought the people who put this together with time this out. put this together with time this out it— put this together with time this out it is— put this together with time this out. it is ten minutes for a statement. we need to get back into the rules— statement. we need to get back into the rules of— statement. we need to get back into the rules of the house, not the rule is that— the rules of the house, not the rule is that i_ the rules of the house, not the rule is that i make, the rule is that
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this— is that i make, the rule is that this house _ is that i make, the rule is that this house makes. so what i'm going to say— this house makes. so what i'm going to say to _ this house makes. so what i'm going to say to the — this house makes. so what i'm going to say to the opposition is, i am sorry— to say to the opposition is, i am sorry you — to say to the opposition is, i am sorry you didn't know it was going to take _ sorry you didn't know it was going to take so — sorry you didn't know it was going to take so long, but by all means, you can _ to take so long, but by all means, you can have — to take so long, but by all means, you can have an extra minute or whatever— you can have an extra minute or whatever to _ you can have an extra minute or whatever to compensate for this. but please, _ whatever to compensate for this. but please, in _ whatever to compensate for this. but please, in future, it is right. we shouldn't— please, in future, it is right. we shouldn't take advantage of the members here who were here to question— members here who were here to question the secretary of state. can i thank the question the secretary of state. ce”! i thank the secretary of state for his statement and can i first of all say that he is right, and i agree with him that we should not be alarmist on the issue of security of supply. but i do fear his statement was much too complacent on the price and economic impact of the current situation. let me ask him first about the continuity of supply issue. we support him taking necessary measures to ensure that families and businesses continue to have access to energy and secure the issue of c02 supplies. he says there are mechanisms in place to ensure that customers at failing companies get taken on, but the scale of problems in the market will provide an unprecedented test of those mechanisms. so can he tell us
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whether he believes taxpayer support will be necessary to deal with the problem, and if it is, we must ensure value for money. i welcome his caution about outcomes which lead to taxpayer subsidy for big companies to further concentrate their market share. but can he explain what the alternatives are and what he proposes happens to the customers of suppliers that do not get through this crisis? he is making a statement later this afternoon. it would be good to know what he is going to say. secondly, on the impact of price rises on business and industry, can he set out his plans to support businesses, particularly energy intensive industries? has he considered the provision of government support, including the loans to help businesses facing difficulties? 0n consumer support, businesses facing difficulties? 0n consumersupport, he businesses facing difficulties? 0n consumer support, he is right to keep the price cap in place. it is a measure i have long supported. but the rise in the price cap of £139 means half a million more families
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will be plunged into fuel poverty. at a minimum, will be plunged into fuel poverty. ata minimum, he will be plunged into fuel poverty. at a minimum, he should will be plunged into fuel poverty. ata minimum, he should be will be plunged into fuel poverty. at a minimum, he should be looking at making the operation of the £140 warm home discount automatic and possibly extending it, but even that will not be enough. families are facing a triple whammy — rising energy prices, national insurance rises and at the end of this month, the £1000 cutting universal credit. these energy price rises turn the indefensible decision on universal credit into an unconscionable one. if he really wants to put consumers first, if he wants to help working people and if he wants to tackle fuel poverty, isn't it time, even at this late stage, to cancel this terrible decision on universal credit? third, we need to learn longer term lessons from this crisis about the resilience of our energy system and the lack of resilience which has contributed to large price spikes. there are global issues, he is right, but the uk is facing
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particular difficulties for in 2017, the gas storage facility was partly planned for closure. the government did nothing. 0ur lack of gas storage was raised by industry, the gmb union and by the chair of the select committee in 2019. my sport, the memberfor leeds west. committee in 2019. my sport, the member for leeds west. the minister said in reply to her, the uk gas system is secure and well placed to respond to unexpected changes in supply and demand. mr speaker, wasn't the government then, as now, far too complacent on the issue of gas storage? next, energy efficiency. this could significantly cut the demand for gas, but we have had the fiasco of the green deal followed by the fiasco of the green homes grant and then the delayed heat and building strategy. and emissions from buildings out of a higher than they were in 2015. when is he going to have a proper retrofit plan? 0n new nuclear, you might say that has stalled. and
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while we have made progress on renewables, we need to go further and faster with a more diverse supply. above all, there isjust not yet enough of a clear plan from government for how we meet net—zero with affordability and security. he will have read the climate change committee's progress report this summer where they said it is hard to discern any comprehensive strategy. the truth that there is a direct line from delay, debtor and failure to the issues we face today? in the midst of this crisis, i urge him to use this awesome's net—zero strategy, delayed, and the comprehensive spending review, to finally put in place a proper plan. households, businesses and energy suppliers are looking to the government for support and direction as we face this crisis. it requires not words, but action and delivery. it is long past time for government to get a grip.
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it is long past time for government to get a grip-— l i to get a grip. secretary of state. i would like to _ to get a grip. secretary of state. i would like to apologise _ to get a grip. secretary of state. i would like to apologise for - to get a grip. secretary of state. i would like to apologise for the - would like to apologise for the lengthy statement that i issued a few moments ago. i would like to address a couple of the points that the right honourable gentleman made. he talks about a plan. we have got plans galore. we have the energy white paper which was widely received and i was happy to present thatis received and i was happy to present that is energy minister. we have the prime minister's ten point plan, and i was struck by the fact that when john kerry, former secretary of state, came to the uk, he said the uk's plans for decarbonisation were more advanced than any other country. in terms of his legitimate concern about vulnerable customers, i have made it clear to industry and 0fgem that vulnerable customers are the priority. we are looking at the warm home discount. we have always
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focused on protecting the vulnerable in fuel poverty and we will continue to do so. ,, , . ., in fuel poverty and we will continue to do so._ thank- in fuel poverty and we will continue to do so._ thank you, | to do so. stephen crat. thank you, mr speaker- _ to do so. stephen crat. thank you, mr speaker. the _ to do so. stephen crat. thank you, mr speaker. the secretary - to do so. stephen crat. thank you, mr speaker. the secretary of - to do so. stephen crat. thank you, j mr speaker. the secretary of state is right. the uk is better placed than most european countries when it comes to the sources and diversity of its gas supplies, not least thanks to the two major liquefied natural gas terminals in my constituency of milford haven. would he join constituency of milford haven. would hejoin me in paying tribute to the team is working at the lng terminals, but also make a commitment to work with myself, the port authority and industry to make that transition to the next stage of our energy developed and see a new generation of floating offshore wind and other renewable energy sources there? i and other renewable energy sources there? ., ., , and other renewable energy sources there? ., . , . . there? i write for and will be aware there? i write for and will be aware there is a commitment _ there? i write for and will be aware there is a commitment to - there? i write for and will be aware there is a commitment to a - there? i write for and will be aware | there is a commitment to a floating offshore wind in the ten point plan. we have set a target of 2030 and i hope and expect that is exceeded. i
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am also pleased to be able to tell him that i will be keenly focused on dagger lng. i haven't visited it yet in my two years as energy minister, but i will be happy to accept his invitation. . , , but i will be happy to accept his| invitation._ thank invitation. stephen flynn. thank ou, mr invitation. stephen flynn. thank you, mr speaker. _ invitation. stephen flynn. thank you, mr speaker. the _ invitation. stephen flynn. thank you, mr speaker. the secretary| invitation. stephen flynn. thank. you, mr speaker. the secretary of state almost didn't say it, but decades of underinvestment in renewable technologies, the barriers put in check by brexit, 11 years of tory austerity, a national insurance tax hike, the plan to rob £20 per week from those claiming universal credit, food prices rising, shelves emptying and now this, consumers facing eye—watering energy bills. let's call this what it is, mr speaker. this is a cost of living
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crisis, and it is one created on the watch of this uk government. so what now? with all due respect, i don't think the warm words of the secretary of state quite cut it. he mentioned the energy price cap, but he failed to acknowledge the fact that in a matter of weeks, the energy price cap will be at its highest level ever. will he therefore backed new financial support for those in the lowest income households, and will he of course: the chancellor to scrap the cut to universal credit —— will he call on the chancellor to scrap the cut? he acknowledged that it is not just households being hit by this, it is also businesses, particularly those who produce and transport goods. he didn't say what specific support he intends to provide to
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those businesses. 0n renewables, one of the key solutions to our supply issues, of course not nuclear, hydro pumped storage. can i ask the secretary of state, when will he finally introduced a mechanism to make that technology really come to the fore? finally, it would be remiss of me not to ask the secretary of state, what message would he have for the likes of the prime minister, who of course told us in 2016 that if we vote to leave the european union, their energy bills will be reduced? i the european union, their energy bills will be reduced?— bills will be reduced? i find it extraordinary _ bills will be reduced? i find it extraordinary that _ bills will be reduced? i find it extraordinary that the - bills will be reduced? i find it - extraordinary that the honourable gentleman is still really to getting —— again macalou to getting the so—called brexit war. this is a serious issue and it is not a time
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to re—fight the battles of five years ago. in respect of the committee made, i am fully conscious of the outstanding contribution of hydroelectric power. i was just speaking to the norwegian minister, and that country has 96% of its electricity deriving from hydropower. the geography of our own country means we cannot reach that level, but that is something i have asked officials to look into. he will know, given my record but as energy minister and as secretary of state that i am a keen supporter of renewable energy. as i have always said, and i said to the right honourable gentleman opposite, the safety and the focus on protecting vulnerable customers in a case of this government is absolute. andrea leadsom. this government is absolute. andrea leadsom- my _ this government is absolute. andrea leadsom. my right _ this government is absolute. andrea leadsom. my right honourable - this government is absolute. andrea | leadsom. my right honourable friend is riaht leadsom. my right honourable friend is ri . ht to leadsom. my right honourable friend is right to reassure _ leadsom. my right honourable friend is right to reassure consumers - leadsom. my right honourable friend is right to reassure consumers that l is right to reassure consumers that energy security in the uk is safe,
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but does he agree that we need to urgently move towards far greater, as we transition away from fossil fuels towards renewables, electricity market reform? we need an independent system operator and we need much more local generation and local energy pricing to encourage consumers to use plentiful wind and solar energy when they are generating for their optional energy use. i generating for their optional energy use. ., ~ ., generating for their optional energy use, ., " ., ., " generating for their optional energy use. ., 4' ., . ~' , use. i would like to thank my right honourable _ use. i would like to thank my right honourable friend _ use. i would like to thank my right honourable friend and _ use. i would like to thank my right honourable friend and i _ use. i would like to thank my right honourable friend and i remind - use. i would like to thank my right| honourable friend and i remind the house that when i was appointed as energy minister, she was the secretary of state for the department and pushed a great deal of reform and innovation in this area. i would like to reassure her that conversations about an independent system operator and how we can modernise the way we balance the electricity system are happening all the time. i would be open to hearing her suggestions about how to bring us about. i think energy
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security in this country, thanks in part to her efforts when she held the post that i currently do, are good. we have diversity of supply, we have a wide range of renewables and we are leading the world in the development of renewable technology. i'm grateful to the secretary of state for advanced copy of his statement. there are of course a range of important questions here to ensure we don't face a similar energy crises in the future, and my committee will be asking ministers to answer those questions over the coming weeks. can i ask one specific question today? can the secretary of state guarantee that the warm homes discount rebate will continue to be paid to consumers who are forced to change energy supplier? he is tem -atin change energy supplier? he is tempting me _ change energy supplier? he is tempting me on _ change energy supplier? he is tempting me on dangerous . change energy supplier? he: 3 tempting me on dangerous ground, but of course, any guarantee of that kind has a fiscal implication, of which he will no doubt be aware is also a matter for the treasury as well. we are in discussion about that. i look forward to seeing him
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in his usual place at the committee on wednesday. i know he takes these matters seriously and i'm sure we will have more discussion of these subjects then. 5ir will have more discussion of these subjects then-— subjects then. sirjohn redmond. will the secretary _ subjects then. sirjohn redmond. will the secretary of _ subjects then. sirjohn redmond. will the secretary of state - subjects then. sirjohn redmond. will the secretary of state took . subjects then. sirjohn redmond. | will the secretary of state took to the industry urgently about having more gas storage capacity? we have tiny capacity compared with most advanced countries, and it would provide a buffer smooth supplies and keep prices down if this turns out, as we hope it will, be a short—term interruption to supply from russia and america. the interruption to supply from russia and america-— interruption to supply from russia and america. the right honourable gentleman. _ and america. the right honourable gentleman. his — and america. the right honourable gentleman, his characteristic- gentleman, his characteristic acuity, hits the nail on the head. gas storage is definitely an issue. but he points out that we don't know how long this spike in the gas price lasts. we mustn't precipitate any panic. there is no cause for that, but this is a situation that needs
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to be reviewed. i am happy to speak to be reviewed. i am happy to speak to him about solutions. i know he has various views on interconnect as i look forward to discussing with him about the way ahead. further to that question. _ him about the way ahead. further to that question, the _ him about the way ahead. further to that question, the honourable - that question, the honourable gentleman referred to our tiny capacity. the uk cut its strategic gas storage to 1.7% of annual demand when a former government adviser suggested it should be closer to 25%. in light of this, why did the government allow for the ref storage facility of the trick is to close without taking action? has facility of the trick is to close without taking action? ides! facility of the trick is to close without taking action? as i have said repeatedly _ without taking action? as i have said repeatedly from _ without taking action? as i have said repeatedly from this - without taking action? as i have i said repeatedly from this dispatch box, we do have a wide source of energy supply. we have by far the largest offshore wind capacity in the world. there is no reason why we should be inducing panic because of the closure of gas storage facilities. it is something i said we should look at, but i don't think
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it's right for honourable and right honourable members to smoke alarm by focusing on questions that are not really relevant to today's debate. i really relevant to today's debate. i declare an interest as the chair of the all—party committee on energy security. i pay tribute to the secretary of state for the action he is taking to protect consumers and to calm the concerns that some commentators and members here have expressed. but does my right honourable friend agree that diversity is the key phrase to reduce the long—term risk of such volatility in the markets? that is diversity of supply, diversity in energy generation, be it wind, nuclear, biomass, hydro or other sources, but also diversity in location in where the energy is generated. some nations, regions and even countries have an excess supply on some occasions and they should fall on others. the greater the diversity, the less the risk. is he
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sufficiently reassured that 0fgem are sufficiently proactive in this field? ., ~ are sufficiently proactive in this field? . ~ i. are sufficiently proactive in this field? . ~ ~ are sufficiently proactive in this field? . ~ field? thank you, mr speaker. he soke field? thank you, mr speaker. he spoke about— field? thank you, mr speaker. he spoke about three _ field? thank you, mr speaker. he spoke about three categories - field? thank you, mr speaker. he spoke about three categories and | field? thank you, mr speaker. he | spoke about three categories and i can assure him that in all three, we have a degree of robustness. in terms of the spread of the gas supply, i said we have a wide range of sources for gas. in terms of electricity generation, i can reassure him that our work with renewables, we brought onshore and offshore wind, solar. there is a wide range of supply of electricity generation in the uk than practically any other country. and in terms of geographical spread, he will notice that a lot of this capacity is spread evenly across the uk. and i know that because i spent a large part of the last two years visiting those sites. 0ne one of the fertilising plants in my constituency has had to close down.
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whilst there are impacts on consumers, it is the employment prospects of my constituents at the forefront of my mind. i am pleased to hear he met with the company and wrote to the department might go pointing out for the need of action on the cost pressures these companies. i hope those discussions prove fruitful not just for my constituents but we don't want to be in a situation where we rely on importing carbon dioxide from other sources which puts us at risk of fluctuations in world prices. i would like to thank the honourable gentleman for his ongoing interest and support for employment in his constituency. i spoke to him considerably in the last few months. focused on the fertilising ——
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fertiliser plants in his constituency, and the other on teesside in billingham. we are trying to do what we can to support ongoing production in both those places. the secretary of state has referenced the difficult situation facing my stockton constituency plant. . there has been a knock—on impact to the industry. losing one could lead to a domino effect. he and i have visited these sites together. he is right to say there is a cost relying on the ammonia coming from the billingham plant
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studio: let us go to a police press conference being held in derbyshire about the murder investigation after three children and a woman were found dead in a house in killamarsh. the two children, 11—year—old daughter— the two children, 11—year—old daughter lesley bennett and 13—year—old sonjohn paul bennett, and her— 13—year—old sonjohn paul bennett, and her friend connie also 11, from sheffield — and her friend connie also 11, from sheffield. the families of —— have all been _ sheffield. the families of —— have all been informed and my thoughts along _ all been informed and my thoughts along with all of derbyshire constabulary are with them at this most _ constabulary are with them at this most tragic of times. this has been an understandably shocking event that has _ an understandably shocking event that has deeply affected the local community in killamarsh as well as a family— community in killamarsh as well as a family and _ community in killamarsh as well as a family and friends in sheffield and our thoughts are also with them. i would _ our thoughts are also with them. i would also — our thoughts are also with them. i would also like to state my thanks to those _ would also like to state my thanks to those officers who arrived at the
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scene _ to those officers who arrived at the scene with — to those officers who arrived at the scene with such speed as well as colleagues from the east midlands ambulance service. all acting with professionalism in a difficult situation. whilst understandably upsetting, this is believed to be an isolated _ upsetting, this is believed to be an isolated incident in which those involved — isolated incident in which those involved were known to one another and nobody— involved were known to one another and nobody else is being sought in relation _ and nobody else is being sought in relation to— and nobody else is being sought in relation to this incident or in connection with the deaths. the force _ connection with the deaths. the force did — connection with the deaths. the force did not have prior contact with— force did not have prior contact with those _ force did not have prior contact with those involved. the man officers — with those involved. the man officers arrested at the scene, the 31-year-old — officers arrested at the scene, the 31—year—old male from killamarsh remains _ 31—year—old male from killamarsh remains in — 31—year—old male from killamarsh remains in custody on suspicion of the murders. a team of detectives have been— the murders. a team of detectives have been working through the night to understand what led to their deaths — to understand what led to their deaths and i would urge anyone with any information to come forward. of particular— any information to come forward. of particular interest is anyone who
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was in _ particular interest is anyone who was in chandos crescent area between 9:30pm _ was in chandos crescent area between 9:30pm on _ was in chandos crescent area between 9:30pm on saturday and at 7:30am the following _ 9:30pm on saturday and at 7:30am the following day. who may have information that will be helpful to the investigation. thank you. studio: it looks as if that was a short police press conference there, regarding those deaths in killamarsh that police were called to early on sunday morning in chandos crescent in killamarsh, north derbyshire. we heard there from the chief constable
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about the people who have now been named as those who were killed, and the fact a 31—year—old man is in custody in connection with those murders. a few moments ago we were listening to the business secretary in the house of commons saying the government did not expect an emergency in gas supply this winter. he said there is no question of the lights going out. despite the fact a number of energy firms are going out of business. let's speak to our political correspondent peter saull. very keen to reassure consumers, the business secretary. that was what he wanted to stress, the supply of gas and electricity were secure, and he took us back in time talking about the 1970s, the
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winter of discontent, the three—day working week, the period of lengthy blackouts, heating going off, and he said any talk of that is alarmist, we are entirely confident in our supplies. the immediate concern for the government is the potential some smaller energy suppliers could go bust. four have gone out of business in the past couple of weeks and he admitted many more could follow suit. he ruled out bailing out using taxpayers's money failing companies. he said that would not happen but he would protect consumers against future price rises, there was no chance they would scrap the energy price cap but bearing in mind that would go up at the start of next month and the labour shadow business secretary said that would push half—a—million people into fuel poverty and called on the business secretary to do more to protect
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consumers. the second element to this story is the impact on the wider economy, the closure of two big fertiliser plants, one in cheshire, the other in teesside. a by—product of that is carbon dioxide used in the food and in this —— food and drinks industry and the nhs. the business secretary has said they are working to come up with contingency measures to help the wider economy. a strident defence of what the government has been doing and what people are calling a crisis but the message from labour is the government is complacent and should be doing more. thank you very much. what happens if the company that supplies your power goes bust? first — you will not stop receiving gas and electricity.
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your account will be moved to a new supplier by energy regulator ofgem — although this may take a few weeks. unfortunately, you may end up on a more expensive tariff if you are switched to a new supplier. the us is expected to relax travel restrictions, rules expected to come into effect from november. let us hear from gary o'donoghue. into effect from november. let us hearfrom gary o'donoghue. not into effect from november. let us hear from gary o'donoghue. not a moment too soon many will say. there will be relief in europe and the uk and ireland for this change because until now there has been an asymmetry to the travel restrictions, americans have been able to travel to europe and the uk easily providing they took tests and were vaccinated. that wasn't true the other way around for 18 months. most british people have not been able to come to the us. that has
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been a bone of contention. we were expecting changes back at the g7 meeting but it didn't happen. they have been talking ever since. now they have come to an agreement. from november if you are double vaccinated in the uk you will need to take a test within three days of travel. you will be able to travel to the us and will not need to quarantine. fora us to the us and will not need to quarantine. for a us citizen who has not been vaccinated, the restrictions are being tightened for you if you are outside this country. you will need to test within one day of travelling back home to the us and a test when you get here. the other thing uk travellers will need to do is give up their mobile phone numbers and e—mails for contact tracing as the cdc will institute some contact tracing method. i presume that is about dangers of new variants. the good news for families
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who have been separated and the tourism industry, airlines have been crying out for this, and business which has wanted things to open up and has been lobbying hard. finally the americans have agreed. the new british foreign secretary liz truss has taken to social media. excellent news, she says. how much of this is down to ongoing diplomatic chat behind the scenes as opposed to the science of covid? the interesting thing is there has been this working group talking about opening things up since the g7, between europe, the uk and the us but nothing has emerged, we did not expect something, expectations were dashed at the g7 and nothing has emerged since other than they were sticking to the rule. this is
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somewhat out of the blue. it does help in the sense that not only it does the obvious things but america is facing criticism from european allies over all sorts of things at the moment, not least from the french on the way they handled the new alliance with the uk and australia over the afghanistan withdrawal. so this will help smooth over some of those problems they have had diplomatically. i don't think that will necessarily have been the motivating factor but it will certainly help. it will normalise things. the other thing is the dominant variant in the us is the dominant variant in the us is the delta variant which is the same as it is in the uk. as levels of vaccination are higher in the uk, i think if a new variant emerged in the uk or europe, that might change the uk or europe, that might change the calculation from the point of
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view of the us. they haven't said that but that would be an obvious thing to think about. as things stand, they think they can do this while keeping the population here safe. gary, thank you very much. boris johnson has been tweeting about this development and he says this. the easing of us travel rules for fully vaccinated travellers is a fantastic boost for business and trade. very similar to what liz truss was saying. some 12— to 15—year—olds in parts of england and scotland have begun receiving covid vaccines. jabs for this age group are also due to begin soon in northern ireland and in wales next month. millions of older and vulnerable people across the uk are being contacted to arrange their booster shots. our health correspondent anna collinson reports.
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this is jack, one of the first healthy young teenagers in england to receive a coronavirus vaccine. there you are. all done. around 3,000,000 12— to 15—year—olds are due to follow him. it was ok. i'm happy i have got it because it makes it easier to go out and enjoy myself now. there's been quite a few students that have taken up the opportunity to be vaccinated. we were informed on friday about the vaccinations and we have loads of students and parents getting on board, so that's great. with the risks and benefits finely balanced, reaching this point has involved much debate. the uk's vaccine advisory panel initially said it could not recommend vaccinating all 12— to 15—year—olds based on health grounds alone. but once factors like the impact on education were taken into account, the uk's chief medical officers advised they should receive one dose of the pfizerjab. it's really important to remember the uk chief medical officers
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supported the vaccine to this age group and it has been signed off by government. we are rolling it out in schools because it is our best chance not just to protect children, but to protect families as well, as we head into winter. from today in scotland the jabs will first be available at drop—in centres. wales and northern ireland expect to administer their first vaccines to this age group in october. millions of young teens have now been vaccinated globally, including here in france, as well as the us. while cases of heart inflammation are rare, some parents are concerned. i know the risks are minimal of getting myocarditis, but there is still a risk. and i'm not sure i want to put my son, expose my son to that risk, given that the benefits of getting the vaccination are so minimal. parental consent will be sought but children are able to overrule parents if they are considered competent. latest research suggests even
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the younger children could eventually be vaccinated. a study by pfizer found its jab seems to be safe and well tolerated in children aged five to 11. the coronavirus booster campaign is also under way, with millions of the most vulnerable due to be contacted this week. as the challenges of winter approach, it is hoped everyjab will strengthen the wall of defence. anna collinson, bbc news. professor adam finn is professor of paediatrics at the university of bristol, and a member of thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation. there was discussion about whether 12 to 15—year—olds should be vaccinated and yet here we are seeing it happen. what is the purpose of it after all that touring and throwing? the purpose is clear, the vaccine is
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definitely work in this age group to prevent severe covid is quite unusual in this age group and many children have already had the infection and so are already to a degree perfected. it is the case archer protected. it is the case it is a much bigger problem in adults and olderfolks but in is a much bigger problem in adults and older folks but in young is a much bigger problem in adults and olderfolks but in young problem it is not a serious problem. so it will be beneficial, the vaccine definitely works by actually covid is not something to worry about too much if you are 12 to 15 and otherwise healthy. there was the discussion why are we vaccinating children to protect older people because even once vaccinated you can still spread it. the vaccine will reduce transmission. they are not terribly efficient at doing that but it will have that effect. if large numbers of children are immunised then there will be fewer infections in other
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children and adults. i had to emphasise there is more infecting of children by adults going on than the other way. children are not efficient vectors of this virus. that brings us to the use of boosters. how sure are we that boosters. how sure are we that boosters are necessary and who should have them? there is beginning to be evidence particularly the oldest members of society who were immunised first and most vulnerable to covid, their protection may be beginning to wane, having been immunised at the beginning of the year. we also have evidence around the levels of antibody circulating in the blood, and that is to some extent predictive of protection as well. so we are seeing there are some people who may benefit from being boosted
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in terms of bringing back up their levels of protection against getting this infection or getting it again. as you work your way through the population into younger people, the evidence is less secure and it becomes more a kind of being boosted on a case—by—case basis. there is some evidence for mild infection a booster may be useful. how necessary is it to give everyone over a certain age, over 50, a booster, if some already have good immunity, they might not need it. that is right. there will be some people who don't need it. you have to draw the line somewhere. a lot of the discussion was at what age one should draw that line. people under 50 will be offered boosters if they are particularly vulnerable because of underlying comorbidities. but it
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is a case of trying to draw the line and the fact is it is quite difficult to be certain about these things. there is a certain amount of being extra careful in this approach. i still speak to people who do not want to be vaccinated and they say if it is up to me, if i choose to take the risk, i am not a risk to anybody else by not having the jab, thatis anybody else by not having the jab, that is not entirely true, is it? it is not entirely true, we all depend on hospitals for our health. the real reason we have had such disruption over the last year—and—a—half is because we simply can't afford to have people dying in the streets, we need to be able to care for people who get seriously ill. particularly for people in my age range, it is critical they get immunised notjust to avoid dying themselves but also to avoid an
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overwhelming surge of infection in the coming winter which may be combined with flu and other illnesses and that would have knock—on effects for everyone else. good to talk to you again, thank you. a volcano has erupted on the spanish island of la palma in the canaries. thousands of residents have been evacuated. it's the first time the cumbre vieja volcano has erupted in 50 years. thousands of tremors had hit the area in recent days, as james reynolds reports. after a week of tremors, it erupted. no one has seen anything like this in the island la palma for half a century. it has created its own apocalyptic landscape. rivers of lava channel their way down towards nearby villages.
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"look, look! it's falling," the man says. the flow of lava takes down a building. at least 20 isolated homes have now been swallowed up. "eight metres of lava," he says. "this is the civil guard," says an officer through a loudspeaker. "please leave your homes." the residents of four villages have been ordered to get to safety. translation: the situation - is drastic because of where the lava is advancing, sweeping away everything in its path, especially houses. the authorities have a good view of the eruption and the rivers of lava. they expect the flows to continue to the coast. the rescue effort even
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takes in farm animals. police officers and local residents round up every goat and sheep they can find. it's not yet clear how long this eruption will last. the most recent major activity in 1971 went on for three weeks. james reynolds, bbc news. thousands of students across the uk will be heading off to university over the next few weeks. the pandemic has caused 18 months of disruption, with students not experiencing face—to—face teaching, campus living and social events. here is our education correspondent elaine dunkley. over the next few weeks, universities across greater manchester will welcome more than 100,000 students. i'm looking forward to meeting new people, to actually studying. but just trying to get that university experience we kind of missed out on. it'sjust fun, getting the vibe back from the two—year break we've had in lockdown,
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and you know, just coming back, everybody together and stuff, getting that uni feeling. it's the start of a new chapter for these freshers at manchester metropolitan. because of the pandemic, some students have started uni without visiting the place that will become their home for the next few years. i didn't know what it was going to be like at all. i was saying to my mum, what if i get up there and i hate it? i could be completely like out of my depth. but no, i'm loving it so far. i went to uni last year and i studied a different course. it was quite similar. but obviously, being a creative course, online, it was just so difficult. but already i was saying, i had about a week, not even a week. two days. the government is urging universities to provide face—to—face teaching this term, but some universities are keeping those in large groups online. at the university of bolton, all lectures are on campus. there is a vaccination bus, and students are advised to do covid tests twice a week. people want face—to—face more than anything else, so we are encouraging everybody to come on campus in a safe way,
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following the measures we've still got in place. of course, they can still stream. so, if somebody did have to isolate or have to be away from university, because there are clinically vulnerable people who don't want to attend, then they can stream it themselves if they want to. covid has had a huge impact on many aspects of student life. here in bolton, the university is offering financial support for international students. a lot of students who are on the red list countries, for all of them, the university's paying the quarantine charges, so i think that's a big relief for them when they come. freshers' week marks the start of university life, a chance to enjoy new friendships and freedom. with the disruption of the past 18 months, it will also feel like a fresh start for many returning back to university. elaine dunkley, bbc news. folic acid is to be added to flour in the uk, to prevent life—threatening spinal conditions in babies. women are advised to take the b vitamin before and during pregnancy,which can guard against spina bifida in unborn babies. the government says the move could prevent 200 birth defects a year. gluten—free foods and wholemeal
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flour are exempt from the new rules. borisjohnson has been co—hosting a meeting in new york with the un secretary general to try to persuade the rich world to spend more money to help poorer countries cope with climate change. the prime minister has already said it is going to be tough to make enough progress before the un climate summit takes place in glasgow in november. promises to deliver $100 billion a year in climate finance by 2020 have not been met. our reality check correspondent chris morris explains. a powerful roundtable heard from some _ a powerful roundtable heard from some of— a powerful roundtable heard from some of the countries staring down the barrel, — some of the countries staring down the barrel, the maldives, bangladesh, the marshall islands, countries — bangladesh, the marshall islands, countries pleading with the developed world to step up to the plate _ developed world to step up to the plate and — developed world to step up to the plate and supply the finance needed to make _ plate and supply the finance needed to make the changes necessary to fi-ht to make the changes necessary to fight climate change in the developing world. we heard from some of the _
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developing world. we heard from some of the industrialised countries, the developed world countries, the faint si-ns developed world countries, the faint signs of— developed world countries, the faint signs of progress, and i would single — signs of progress, and i would single out— signs of progress, and i would single out what we heard from denmark, _ single out what we heard from denmark, from sweden, maybe from italy~ _ denmark, from sweden, maybe from italy~ and _ denmark, from sweden, maybe from italy. and let us see what the president of the united states has to say— president of the united states has to say tomorrow. but this is absolutely crucial because it is the developing world, this was the point made _ developing world, this was the point made so _ developing world, this was the point made so powerfully by leader after leader. _ made so powerfully by leader after leader. it _ made so powerfully by leader after leader, it is the developing world that is— leader, it is the developing world that is bearing the brunt of catastrophic climate change, in the form of— catastrophic climate change, in the form of hurricanes, fires, floods, and the _ form of hurricanes, fires, floods, and the real— form of hurricanes, fires, floods, and the real long—term economic damage — and the real long—term economic damage that they face. and yet it is the developed world that over 200 years— the developed world that over 200 years has— the developed world that over 200 years has put the carbon in the atmosphere that is causing this acceleration of climate change. so it is really— acceleration of climate change. so it is really up to us to help them.
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the arguments were made very powerfully. we have to see where we uet powerfully. we have to see where we get to _ powerfully. we have to see where we get to in _ powerfully. we have to see where we get to in securing that 100 billion. we also _ get to in securing that 100 billion. we also got some good news about uk travellers _ we also got some good news about uk travellers to the united states, double — travellers to the united states, double vaccinated uk travellers will be able _ double vaccinated uk travellers will be able to _ double vaccinated uk travellers will be able to go by the end of october. we are _ be able to go by the end of october. we are very— be able to go by the end of october. we are very used to global leaders gathering — we are very used to global leaders gathering annually— we are very used to global leaders gathering annually to _ we are very used to global leaders gathering annually to talk- we are very used to global leaders gathering annually to talk about i gathering annually to talk about climate — gathering annually to talk about climate change _ gathering annually to talk about climate change but _ gathering annually to talk about climate change but we - gathering annually to talk about climate change but we have - gathering annually to talk about | climate change but we have also gathering annually to talk about - climate change but we have also this year seen _ climate change but we have also this year seen the — climate change but we have also this year seen the dangers _ climate change but we have also this year seen the dangers of— climate change but we have also this year seen the dangers of global - year seen the dangers of global warming — year seen the dangers of global warming with _ year seen the dangers of global warming with terrible _ year seen the dangers of global warming with terrible floods - year seen the dangers of globali warming with terrible floods and fires across _ warming with terrible floods and fires across the _ warming with terrible floods and fires across the continents. - warming with terrible floods and fires across the continents. arel warming with terrible floods and . fires across the continents. are we now at— fires across the continents. are we now at an — fires across the continents. are we now at an inflection _ fires across the continents. are we now at an inflection point? - now at an inflection point? ithink— now at an inflection point? i think the _ now at an inflection point? i think the glasgow - now at an inflection point? i think the glasgow cop - now at an inflection point? i think the glasgow cop 26| now at an inflection point? l i think the glasgow cop 26 is now at an inflection point? - i think the glasgow cop 26 is a turning — i think the glasgow cop 26 is a turning point for the world and it is the _ turning point for the world and it is the moment when we have to grow up is the moment when we have to grow up and _ is the moment when we have to grow up and take _ is the moment when we have to grow up and take our responsibilities. we io up and take our responsibilities. we go through— up and take our responsibilities. we go through a period of glorious indifference about the world, we have _ indifference about the world, we have been through that, we have been through— have been through that, we have been through our—
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have been through that, we have been through our childhood if you like and we — through our childhood if you like and we have to realise this is a problem that requires grip and there are changes we need to make. but people _ are changes we need to make. but people should be optimistic because we can— people should be optimistic because we can make these changes whilst encouraging the creation of literally— encouraging the creation of literally millions of high skill jobs — literally millions of high skill jobs. we need to move from old hydrocarbon technology into new clean _ hydrocarbon technology into new clean green technology. that is a fantastically promising option. you can see _ fantastically promising option. you can see the problems with the hydrocarbon shortages around the world _ hydrocarbon shortages around the world caused by the resurgence of the global economy. we need more than ever— the global economy. we need more than ever to move to security of supply, — than ever to move to security of supply, clean green sources of energy — energy. on the 100 billion energy. — on the 100 billion climate fund you said last _ on the 100 billion climate fund you said last night _ on the 100 billion climate fund you said last night you _ on the 100 billion climate fund you said last night you had _ on the 100 billion climate fund you said last night you had a _ on the 100 billion climate fund you said last night you had a six- on the 100 billion climate fund you said last night you had a six out. on the 100 billion climate fund you said last night you had a six out ofl said last night you had a six out of ten chance — said last night you had a six out of ten chance of— said last night you had a six out of ten chance of delivering _ said last night you had a six out of ten chance of delivering this - said last night you had a six out ofl ten chance of delivering this before november — ten chance of delivering this before november the _ ten chance of delivering this before november. the warning _ ten chance of delivering this before november. the warning that - ten chance of delivering this before november. the warning that john i november. the warning thatjohn kerry— november. the warning thatjohn kerry said. — november. the warning thatjohn kerrysaid, i— november. the warning thatjohn kerry said, i quote, _ november. the warning thatjohn kerry said, i quote, i— november. the warning thatjohn kerry said, i quote, i think- november. the warning thatjohn kerry said, i quote, i think we - november. the warning thatjohnj
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kerry said, i quote, i think we are going _ kerry said, i quote, i think we are going to _ kerry said, i quote, i think we are going to get — kerry said, i quote, i think we are going to get this _ kerry said, i quote, i think we are going to get this done. _ kerry said, i quote, i think we are going to get this done. he - kerry said, i quote, i think we are going to get this done. he told i kerry said, i quote, i think we are going to get this done. he told us to stay— going to get this done. he told us to stay tuned _ going to get this done. he told us to stay tuned for— going to get this done. he told us to stay tuned for the _ going to get this done. he told us to stay tuned for the president's i to stay tuned for the president's speech — to stay tuned for the president's speech what _ to stay tuned for the president's speech. what are _ to stay tuned for the president's speech. what are your - to stay tuned for the president's speech. what are your odds - to stay tuned for the president'sl speech. what are your odds now, to stay tuned for the president's - speech. what are your odds now, ten out of— speech. what are your odds now, ten out of ten? _ out of ten? i— out of ten? . i congratulate out of ten? - i congratulate you on out of ten? — i congratulate you on following the story as _ i congratulate you on following the story as closely as you are. you are right _ story as closely as you are. you are right we _ story as closely as you are. you are right. we have been here before, we have all— right. we have been here before, we have all heard lots of pledges and positive _ have all heard lots of pledges and positive noises. let us see where we uet positive noises. let us see where we get to _ positive noises. let us see where we get to we _ positive noises. let us see where we get to. we are not counting our chickens— get to. we are not counting our chickens here. we want to see where we get _ chickens here. we want to see where we get to _ chickens here. we want to see where we get to. we made a lot of progress in carbis— we get to. we made a lot of progress in carbis bay, the numbers are increasing _ in carbis bay, the numbers are increasing. we had some promising commitments from our friends in sweden, — commitments from our friends in sweden, denmark, italy and others, the eu _ sweden, denmark, italy and others, the eu the — sweden, denmark, italy and others, the eu. the united states is crucially— the eu. the united states is crucially important. this— crucially important. this will send a powerful signal to
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the world, — this will send a powerful signal to the world, the developing countries i the world, the developing countries i have _ the world, the developing countries i have been talking about, that we in the _ i have been talking about, that we in the industrialised west really do take it _ in the industrialised west really do take it seriously and we really are willing _ take it seriously and we really are willing to — take it seriously and we really are willing to step up and help them. what _ willing to step up and help them. what you — willing to step up and help them. what you also heard from those countries — what you also heard from those countries is a desire for concrete programmes to help them with the green _ programmes to help them with the green technology and that we also have to _ green technology and that we also have to do. on - have to do. on the travel ban, great news have to do. — on the travel ban, great news uk citizens— on the travel ban, great news uk citizens can — on the travel ban, great news uk citizens can come _ on the travel ban, great news uk citizens can come to _ on the travel ban, great news uk citizens can come to the - on the travel ban, great news uk citizens can come to the us - on the travel ban, great news uk citizens can come to the us if - on the travel ban, great news uk| citizens can come to the us if they are double—jabbed. _ citizens can come to the us if they are double—jabbed. but— citizens can come to the us if they are double—jabbed. but you - citizens can come to the us if they are double—jabbed. but you said, i citizens can come to the us if theyj are double—jabbed. but you said, i have _ are double—jabbed. but you said, i have to _ are double—jabbed. but you said, i have to warn — are double—jabbed. but you said, i have to warn you, _ are double—jabbed. but you said, i have to warn you, i— are double—jabbed. but you said, i have to warn you, i don't - are double—jabbed. but you said, i have to warn you, i don't think - are double—jabbed. but you said, i have to warn you, i don't think we | have to warn you, i don't think we will crack— have to warn you, i don't think we will crack it — have to warn you, i don't think we will crack it this _ have to warn you, i don't think we will crack it this week. _ have to warn you, i don't think we will crack it this week. again - have to warn you, i don't think we will crack it this week. again as i have to warn you, i don't think we | will crack it this week. again as on the timing — will crack it this week. again as on the timing of— will crack it this week. again as on the timing of the _ will crack it this week. again as on the timing of the withdrawal- will crack it this week. again as on the timing of the withdrawal froml the timing of the withdrawal from afghanistan, _ the timing of the withdrawal from afghanistan, it— the timing of the withdrawal from afghanistan, it seems— the timing of the withdrawal from afghanistan, it seems like - the timing of the withdrawal from afghanistan, it seems like you i the timing of the withdrawal from . afghanistan, it seems like you have been caught— afghanistan, it seems like you have been caught out _ afghanistan, it seems like you have been caught out by— afghanistan, it seems like you have been caught out by a _ afghanistan, it seems like you have been caught out by a president- been caught out by a president acting — been caught out by a president acting unilaterally. _ acting unilaterally. actually, - acting unilaterally. actually, what - acting unilaterally. i actually, what most acting unilaterally. _ actually, what most fair—minded people _ actually, what most fair—minded people would say is we have made a lot of— people would say is we have made a lot of progress on getting people to
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be allowed to travel to the united states. _ be allowed to travel to the united states, they will be able to get there _ states, they will be able to get there by— states, they will be able to get there by thanksgiving. i thank everyone _ there by thanksgiving. i thank everyone in ourjoint working group who have _ everyone in ourjoint working group who have been hard at it, and i thank— who have been hard at it, and i thank the — who have been hard at it, and i thank the president for the progress we have _ thank the president for the progress we have been able to make. we have done it— we have been able to make. we have done it faster than we expected but that is— done it faster than we expected but that is thanks to the hard work of our team — that is thanks to the hard work of our team. and that is thanks to the hard work of ourteam. and to that is thanks to the hard work of our team. and to the high levels of vaccination — our team. and to the high levels of vaccination there are in the uk. and there _ vaccination there are in the uk. and there are _ vaccination there are in the uk. and there are very reassuring levels of immunity— there are very reassuring levels of immunity there are now in the uk. it is not _ immunity there are now in the uk. it is not perfect and i seize this opportunity to remind everybody, the 5 million— opportunity to remind everybody, the 5 million who have still not been vaccinated, go get yourjab, you won't _ vaccinated, go get yourjab, you won't regret it. people are terrified about their energy prices going up. how are you going to prevent energy businesses from going under and what steps with the government take to prevent them is collapsing or are you going to leave it to the market? i
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is collapsing or are you going to leave it to the market?- is collapsing or are you going to leave it to the market? i think you need to listen _ leave it to the market? i think you need to listen to _ leave it to the market? i think you need to listen to what _ leave it to the market? i think you need to listen to what kwasi - need to listen to what kwasi kwarteng, the business secretary, has to— kwarteng, the business secretary, has to say — kwarteng, the business secretary, has to say. he is working flat out with the — has to say. he is working flat out with the energy companies, doing everything we can to help them. clearly. — everything we can to help them. clearly, their business model has been _ clearly, their business model has been affected when the wholesale price massively increases and they have loads — price massively increases and they have loads of customers on fixed retail— have loads of customers on fixed retail prices. but we are working hard _ retail prices. but we are working hard to— retail prices. but we are working hard to find a way through to keep a steady— hard to find a way through to keep a steady supply of gas. but i repeat what i _ steady supply of gas. but i repeat what i said yesterday. what you are basically _ what i said yesterday. what you are basically saying, it is like when there _ basically saying, it is like when there has— basically saying, it is like when there has been a serious frost in your— there has been a serious frost in your house — there has been a serious frost in your house and all the pipes are frozen — your house and all the pipes are frozen. then the big thaw comes and that is— frozen. then the big thaw comes and that is when— frozen. then the big thaw comes and that is when you have problems and the leaks _ that is when you have problems and the leaks and all the difficulties. that is— the leaks and all the difficulties. that is what is happening to the global— that is what is happening to the global economy. it is un—thawing
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rapidly, — global economy. it is un—thawing rapidly, or— global economy. it is un—thawing rapidly, orthawing global economy. it is un—thawing rapidly, or thawing rapidly, global economy. it is un—thawing rapidly, orthawing rapidly, i should— rapidly, orthawing rapidly, i should say. and you are seeing problems— should say. and you are seeing problems in the supply chains, very strong _ problems in the supply chains, very strong demand for gas around the world _ strong demand for gas around the world which is producing this phenomenon. but we are going to fix it. �* , ., �* , it. and you said the uk's relationship _ it. and you said the uk's relationship with - it. and you said the uk's relationship with france | it. and you said the uk's. relationship with france is indestructible but defence secretary ben wallace has been snubbed by his french counterpart. the aukus pact has caused damage to the relationship with france, how are you going to patch things up with paris? l you going to patch things up with paris? , ., you going to patch things up with paris? , . ., ., paris? i repeat what i said to everybody — paris? i repeat what i said to everybody yesterday. - paris? i repeat what i said to everybody yesterday. our . everybody yesterday. our relationship with france is incredibly important and historic. it incredibly important and historic. it goes _ incredibly important and historic. it goes back a long time. and it is founded _ it goes back a long time. and it is founded on— it goes back a long time. and it is founded on shared values, shared belief— founded on shared values, shared belief in— founded on shared values, shared belief in democracy. . the uk and france _ belief in democracy. . the uk and france are — belief in democracy. . the uk and france are shoulder to shoulder in the sahel — france are shoulder to shoulder in the sahel. we are shoulder to shoulder— the sahel. we are shoulder to shoulder in the baltic states, in
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nato's — shoulder in the baltic states, in nato's largest current mission. and there _ nato's largest current mission. and there is— nato's largest current mission. and there is one — nato's largest current mission. and there is one other country in the world _ there is one other country in the world with — there is one other country in the world with whom we share a programme to do simulated nuclear testing. which _ to do simulated nuclear testing. which country is that? it is france. the uk _ which country is that? it is france. the uk and — which country is that? it is france. the uk and france have an important and indestructible relationship, and of course _ and indestructible relationship, and of course we will be talking to all our friends — of course we will be talking to all our friends about how to make the aukus _ our friends about how to make the aukus pact— our friends about how to make the aukus pact work so that it is not exclusionary, it is not divisive and it doesn't— exclusionary, it is not divisive and it doesn't have to be that way. this isjust— it doesn't have to be that way. this isjust a _ it doesn't have to be that way. this isjust a way— it doesn't have to be that way. this is just a way of the uk, the it doesn't have to be that way. this isjust a way of the uk, the us it doesn't have to be that way. this is just a way of the uk, the us and australia _ is just a way of the uk, the us and australia sharing certain technologies because that is the sensible — technologies because that is the sensible thing to do in the world in which _ sensible thing to do in the world in which we _ sensible thing to do in the world in which we find ourselves. that does not in _ which we find ourselves. that does not in any— which we find ourselves. that does not in any way mean we wish to be adversarial— not in any way mean we wish to be adversarial towards anybody else or exclusive _ adversarial towards anybody else or exclusive or crowd anybody else out. thank _ exclusive or crowd anybody else out. thank you _ exclusive or crowd anybody else out. thank you very much. what exclusive or crowd anybody else out. thank you very much.— exclusive or crowd anybody else out. thank you very much. what do you say to the developing _
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thank you very much. what do you say to the developing world _ thank you very much. what do you say to the developing world when - thank you very much. what do you say to the developing world when you - thank you very much. what do you say to the developing world when you askl to the developing world when you ask them about coal? funding is one thing, but to ask them to cut coal when countries like the uk and the us built their economies and fossil fuels, how do you convince them to do that? china, technically, is still considered developing world here at the un. what is your message to them and what is their response? you can do it, is what i say. firstly, _ you can do it, is what i say. firstly, i— you can do it, is what i say. firstly, i accept your premise that if the _ firstly, i accept your premise that if the guys — firstly, i accept your premise that if the guys who created the problem -- we _ if the guys who created the problem -- we are _ if the guys who created the problem —— we are the guys who created the problem _ —— we are the guys who created the problem. the industrial revolution started _ problem. the industrial revolution started more or less in our country, in the _ started more or less in our country, in the iron— started more or less in our country, in the iron and coal fields of the midlands — in the iron and coal fields of the midlands and elsewhere. that is where _ midlands and elsewhere. that is where it— midlands and elsewhere. that is where it began. and ever since then for 250 _ where it began. and ever since then for 250 years, we have been pumping this stuff— for 250 years, we have been pumping this stuff out. so of course, i understand the feelings of injustice in the _ understand the feelings of injustice in the developing world and passionate appeals which is heard from _ passionate appeals which is heard from costa rica, the maldives and other— from costa rica, the maldives and other countries just now.
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from costa rica, the maldives and other countriesjust now. that is why we — other countriesjust now. that is why we have got to get the funding to help _ why we have got to get the funding to help you to make the progress need _ to help you to make the progress need and — to help you to make the progress need. and if beth is right, let's hope _ need. and if beth is right, let's hope there is progress. we will watch _ hope there is progress. we will watch it— hope there is progress. we will watch it carefully. the second thing is that _ watch it carefully. the second thing is that you — watch it carefully. the second thing is that you can do it. you can transit— is that you can do it. you can transit away from coal. the uk itself, — transit away from coal. the uk itself, in — transit away from coal. the uk itself, in 2012, 40% of our power came _ itself, in 2012, 40% of our power came from — itself, in 2012, 40% of our power came from coal. it is now less than 1%. came from coal. it is now less than i%~ when— came from coal. it is now less than i%~ when i— came from coal. it is now less than 1%. when i was a kid, it was 70%. that— 1%. when i was a kid, it was 70%. that is— 1%. when i was a kid, it was 70%. that is partly— 1%. when i was a kid, it was 70%. that is partly because of gas but mainly— that is partly because of gas but mainly because of the arrival of clean, — mainly because of the arrival of clean, green renewables on a scale that we _ clean, green renewables on a scale that we never dreamt possible. and it is bringing that imagination to bear— it is bringing that imagination to bear on — it is bringing that imagination to bear on the problem that will make all the _ bear on the problem that will make all the difference.— bear on the problem that will make all the difference. what do you make ofthe
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all the difference. what do you make of the lan all the difference. what do you make of the plan for— all the difference. what do you make of the plan for vulnerable _ all the difference. what do you make of the plan for vulnerable countries i of the plan for vulnerable countries to swap their debt to climate resilient projects?— to swap their debt to climate resilient projects? resilient pro'ects? that was a ro osal resilient projects? that was a proposal from _ resilient projects? that was a proposal from colombia - resilient projects? that was a proposal from colombia and i resilient projects? that was a - proposal from colombia and others. i thought— proposal from colombia and others. i thought that was an extremely interesting proposal. ithink thought that was an extremely interesting proposal. i think the mdbs _ interesting proposal. i think the mdbs need to look at that. we need the mdbs back and the developed nations— the mdbs back and the developed nations to focus on the requirements of the _ nations to focus on the requirements of the countries that are making the transition _ of the countries that are making the transition and to work out how, by concrete _ transition and to work out how, by concrete financing means, we can leverage — concrete financing means, we can leverage in— concrete financing means, we can leverage in the private sector, leverage — leverage in the private sector, leverage in the private sector, leverage in investment in clean, green _ leverage in investment in clean, green technology can because that is lloii'i green technology can because that is going to _ green technology can because that is going to make the difference. develop — going to make the difference. develop an aid on its own will not fix this _ develop an aid on its own will not fix this it — develop an aid on its own will not fix this. it has got to be the private _ fix this. it has got to be the private sector that comes in as well _ private sector that comes in as well. thank you, everybody. i would love to _ well. thank you, everybody. i would love to stay— well. thank you, everybody. i would love to stay all afternoon, but i have _ love to stay all afternoon, but i have to — love to stay all afternoon, but i have to go _ love to stay all afternoon, but i have to go-_ love to stay all afternoon, but i have to go. love to stay all afternoon, but i have to no. ,, , , ., �* ., have to go. studio: they don't want to let him go. _
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have to go. studio: they don't want to let him go. do _ have to go. studio: they don't want to let him go, do they? _ have to go. studio: they don't want to let him go, do they? the - have to go. studio: they don't want to let him go, do they? the prime i to let him go, do they? the prime minister, at the united nations in new york. making the case for the richer parts of the world to support poorer countries in pursuit of climate change goals, urging china to give up coal, pointing to how the uk has done it. it has of course taken us decades to get there. you are watching bbc news. your questions answered is next. so, householders face a large rise in energy bills next month — as well as the possibility their supplier could go bust. this is because there's been a massive rise in the price energy suppliers pay for gas — up 250% this year. let's take a look at that and try and answer some of your questions. and try and answer some with me is our business correspondent theo leggett.
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i'm alsojoined by lisa barber, home products and services editor at consumer review service which? colin asks, why are gas prices higher? colin asks, why are gas prices hither? ,, . , colin asks, why are gas prices hither? , . _, colin asks, why are gas prices hither? , . higher? gas prices are higher, as with anything. — higher? gas prices are higher, as with anything, when _ higher? gas prices are higher, as with anything, when there - higher? gas prices are higher, as with anything, when there is - higher? gas prices are higher, as with anything, when there is a i higher? gas prices are higher, as| with anything, when there is a lot of demand. and at the moment, there is a great deal of demand. economies are picking up in the wake of covid and also, if you look at what happened a few months ago, in europe there was a harsh winter, said supplies of gas were used up. normally of the summer, we saw those supplies replenish. lots of european companies have good gas torch. but for those reasons, that hasn't happened. for example, there has been less gas coming in from russia, which is a key supplier. there may be political reasons for that. in the uk, we have had issues of our own. there has been less gas coming in from the north sea because of maintenance going on, some of which was deferred because of the covid
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pandemic. we have had nuclear reactors which have been out of commission, has meant that more gas has been used to generate electricity. and when you get this higher demand, prices go up and that is what we are saying.— is what we are saying. theo, david asks, wh is what we are saying. theo, david asks. why do _ is what we are saying. theo, david asks. why do we — is what we are saying. theo, david asks, why do we buy _ is what we are saying. theo, david asks, why do we buy gas _ is what we are saying. theo, david asks, why do we buy gas and - asks, why do we buy gas and electricity from abroad? well, we do aet a lot of electricity from abroad? well, we do get a lot of gas _ electricity from abroad? well, we do get a lot of gas domestically - electricity from abroad? well, we do get a lot of gas domestically from i get a lot of gas domestically from the north sea and we do make our own electricity which we generate from nuclear power and renewables as well as gas. the reason we import some is that we don't get enough from domestic sources. if domestic sources are out of commission, for example if nuclear reactors off—line or if we have had too much calm weather as in recent weeks, so we aren't getting enough wind energy, we have little option but to bring in what we need from abroad because we have to the lights on. so that is the reason. if the amount of electricity and gas we need is
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higher than what we have domestically, we need to obtain it from somewhere. and we have quite an efficient grid of interconnect to bring in energy from abroad when we needed. a ., bring in energy from abroad when we needed. a, ., ., , ., needed. lisa, margaret asks, what will happen — needed. lisa, margaret asks, what will happen to _ needed. lisa, margaret asks, what will happen to the _ needed. lisa, margaret asks, what will happen to the warm _ needed. lisa, margaret asks, what will happen to the warm homes - will happen to the warm homes discount for customers if the company they are with ceases trading? will their entitlement be switched along their account? that is a hood switched along their account? that is a good question. _ switched along their account? that is a good question. firstly, when 0fgem _ is a good question. firstly, when 0fgem is — is a good question. firstly, when ofgem is appointing the new supplier, they are called the supplier— supplier, they are called the supplier of last resort. ofgem does take into _ supplier of last resort. ofgem does take into account warm homes discount — take into account warm homes discount customers. there are two groups— discount customers. there are two groups within this. you are in the core _ groups within this. you are in the core group — groups within this. you are in the core group if you get the guaranteed credit— core group if you get the guaranteed credit element of pension credit. you are — credit element of pension credit. you are likely to be fine. there is a broader— you are likely to be fine. there is a broader group as well, those who are on— a broader group as well, those who are on a _ a broader group as well, those who are on a low— a broader group as well, those who are on a low income and also meet the suppliers' criteria for the warm homes _ the suppliers' criteria for the warm homes discount. this is a slightly more _ homes discount. this is a slightly more grey— homes discount. this is a slightly more grey area depending on who the new supplier is and what their criteria — new supplier is and what their criteria are. but it this applies to you, _ criteria are. but it this applies to you. you — criteria are. but it this applies to you, you will get a letter when you are switched over that will have
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full details of what is going to happen— full details of what is going to happen to you and your account. if you are _ happen to you and your account. if you are in — happen to you and your account. if you are in any doubt, ring the new supplier— you are in any doubt, ring the new supplier for— you are in any doubt, ring the new supplier for peace of mind.- supplier for peace of mind. theo, june and had _ supplier for peace of mind. theo, june and had a — supplier for peace of mind. theo, june and had a say, _ supplier for peace of mind. theo, june and had a say, wouldn't - supplier for peace of mind. theo, june and had a say, wouldn't it i supplier for peace of mind. theo, | june and had a say, wouldn't it be sensible for the government to help households fund heat source pumps or pass legislation insisting that all new houses have solar panels fitted to reduce the use of other types of energy? that would also help with climate change goals. that sounds like a great _ climate change goals. that sounds like a great longer _ climate change goals. that sounds like a great longer term _ climate change goals. that sounds like a great longer term goal, - climate change goals. that sounds like a great longer term goal, but| like a great longer term goal, but of course, all these things cost money and we are in the aftermath of the covid pandemic. that has cost the covid pandemic. that has cost the government a great deal, so the argument had to be made that money should be spent on this rather than on something else. the problem is that this crisis is about what is happening here and now. it's about the wholesale price of gas and electricity being at a very high level at a time when many suppliers who by that gas and electricity can't raise the prices they charge
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to consumers because the cost of variable prices is capped, so that is threatening the business of many suppliers. so we are looking at a short—term crunch at the moment. the technological solutions you are suggesting are great, but they are medium to longer term options. lisa. medium to longer term options. lisa, brian asks. — medium to longer term options. lisa, brian asks. l— medium to longer term options. lisa, brian asks. i am _ medium to longer term options. lisa, brian asks, i am two _ medium to longer term options. lisa, brian asks, i am two days _ medium to longer term options. lisa, brian asks, i am two days away from switching to a new small energy company and have prepaid my first month's bill was that i have an existing credit balance with my old small energy supplier. what is likely to happen?— small energy supplier. what is likely to happen? small energy supplier. what is likel to ha en? , ., small energy supplier. what is likel to hauen? , ., ., likely to happen? remember that if a su lier likely to happen? remember that if a supplier goes — likely to happen? remember that if a supplier goes bust, _ likely to happen? remember that if a supplier goes bust, your _ likely to happen? remember that if a supplier goes bust, your money - likely to happen? remember that if a supplier goes bust, your money is - supplier goes bust, your money is protected — supplier goes bust, your money is protected. all consumers are protected. all consumers are protected. there are heavy regulations in place which mean you are not— regulations in place which mean you are not going to lose out. if your old supplier goes bust and you are in credit— old supplier goes bust and you are in credit to — old supplier goes bust and you are in credit to them, that will be switched _ in credit to them, that will be switched to your new supplier who will make — switched to your new supplier who will make sure you are in credit. if you are _ will make sure you are in credit. if you are switching to a new supplier and they— you are switching to a new supplier and they go bust and you have already— and they go bust and you have already paid money up front, that money— already paid money up front, that money will— already paid money up front, that money will also be protected. and if
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you owe _ money will also be protected. and if you owe your supplier money and they io you owe your supplier money and they go bust. _ you owe your supplier money and they go bust. you _ you owe your supplier money and they go bust, you will still owe money which _ go bust, you will still owe money which he — go bust, you will still owe money which he will have to pay to your new supplier. above all, you are going _ new supplier. above all, you are going to — new supplier. above all, you are going to be _ new supplier. above all, you are going to be protected.— new supplier. above all, you are going to be protected. thank you. also to lisa, _ going to be protected. thank you. also to lisa, from _ going to be protected. thank you. also to lisa, from twitter, - going to be protected. thank you. also to lisa, from twitter, i - going to be protected. thank you. also to lisa, from twitter, i am i also to lisa, from twitter, i am with people energy, who have ceased trading. they have told us not to move supplier and to wait for guidance but i'm concerned about an increase in costs and whether i will lose a window of opportunity to secure a good deal before prices rise. should i be worried? ofgem's uuidance rise. should i be worried? ofgem's guidance is — rise. should i be worried? ofgem's guidance is don't _ rise. should i be worried? ofgem's guidance is don't switch, _ rise. should i be worried? ofgem's guidance is don't switch, wait. - rise. should i be worried? ofgem's guidance is don't switch, wait. it i guidance is don't switch, wait. it makes _ guidance is don't switch, wait. it makes everything easier. so take a metre _ makes everything easier. so take a metre reading, take a photograph of the metre _ metre reading, take a photograph of the metre on your phone if that makes — the metre on your phone if that makes it— the metre on your phone if that makes it easier to keep your records, _ makes it easier to keep your records, and wait for the new supplier— records, and wait for the new supplier to get in touch with you. when _ supplier to get in touch with you. when they— supplier to get in touch with you. when they do, you will be put on what _ when they do, you will be put on what is _ when they do, you will be put on what is called a deemed account. you have not— what is called a deemed account. you have not chosen it, so you can switch — have not chosen it, so you can switch at — have not chosen it, so you can switch at any time. it is not likely to be _ switch at any time. it is not likely to be the — switch at any time. it is not likely to be the cheapest deal for you. the
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new supplier will not have been able to hedge _ new supplier will not have been able to hedge in — new supplier will not have been able to hedge in buying forward, so they will have _ to hedge in buying forward, so they will have paid more and taking on new customers. just ask them for their— new customers. just ask them for their cheapest deal. have an old bill to— their cheapest deal. have an old bill to hand, make sure you know how many _ bill to hand, make sure you know how many kilowatts per hour you have been _ many kilowatts per hour you have been using — many kilowatts per hour you have been using every year. you can get a good, _ been using every year. you can get a good, accurate estimate of what your usages— good, accurate estimate of what your usages and _ good, accurate estimate of what your usages and how much your new tariff will be _ usages and how much your new tariff will be. gone switching websites as well _ will be. gone switching websites as well some — will be. gone switching websites as well. some of them haven't been showing — well. some of them haven't been showing cheaper deals. there are still deals— showing cheaper deals. there are still deals out there. you can go to the which — still deals out there. you can go to the which website and see all the deals— the which website and see all the deals that are out there, not just the ones — deals that are out there, not just the ones people earn commission on. you may— the ones people earn commission on. you may have to ring the supplier directly _ you may have to ring the supplier directly to — you may have to ring the supplier directly to get on that deal, but there _ directly to get on that deal, but there are — directly to get on that deal, but there are still deals available. do a bit of— there are still deals available. do a bit of research and find out what is best _ a bit of research and find out what is best for— a bit of research and find out what is best for you.— is best for you. theo, abbas says, my energy — is best for you. theo, abbas says, my energy supplier _ is best for you. theo, abbas says, my energy supplier is _ is best for you. theo, abbas says, my energy supplier is avro - is best for you. theo, abbas says, | my energy supplier is avro energy. what will happen to my energy supplies if avro energy goes bust? as lisa has been explaining, if an
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energy supplier goes bust, the system is designed to handle that. so you have this passage to a supplier of last resort. if that or any other energy company goes bust, ofgem will support somebody else to take over those customers. so you continue getting your supply. you will be put on that theme to tariff that lisa was talking about, so it's a good idea to search around and find a better tariff for you. but the idea is that you switch from one supplier to another. you don't choose that supplier, it is nominated for you by ofgem. but in theory, there is a smooth transition. that happened to me earlier this year, when my energy supplier went out of business, and the transition was smooth.- supplier went out of business, and the transition was smooth. theo, ken asks, what could _ the transition was smooth. theo, ken asks, what could the _ the transition was smooth. theo, ken asks, what could the implications - the transition was smooth. theo, ken asks, what could the implications of i asks, what could the implications of the electricity crisis be for people who have bought electric vehicles, thinking they were doing the right thing for the environment? this thinking they were doing the right thing for the environment? this is a huestion thing for the environment? this is a question about _ thing for the environment? this is a question about suppliers _ thing for the environment? this is a question about suppliers rather- thing for the environment? this is a|
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question about suppliers rather than supply. if you have an electric car, you will still be able to use it. if you will still be able to use it. if you are going out and charging it up ata you are going out and charging it up at a public charging point, those charging points should still be in operation. if you are charging it at home, is a question of what tariff you are on because some people who have electric cars are signed up the tariffs that are designed for electric car users, who obviously consume more electricity than other people. if your supplier goes bust, you will be moved to a different tariff with a different supplier. so that might not be tailored to your needs. so that would be the kind of situation lisa was describing where you should look around, do your research and try and find a tariff thatis research and try and find a tariff that is more appropriate. but it won't stop you driving your electric car. and let's not forget, petrol prices go up and down as well. thank ou to prices go up and down as well. thank you to theo — prices go up and down as well. thank you to theo leggett _ prices go up and down as well. thank you to theo leggett and _ prices go up and down as well. thank you to theo leggett and lisa - prices go up and down as well. thank you to theo leggett and lisa barber for answering those questions. it is obviously something that is exercising many viewers at the
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moment. the new foreign secretary, liz truss, is to urge her iranian counterpart to release british nationals being held in the country, at a meeting in new york. about a dozen western dual nationals are detained in iran, including nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe. caroline hawley�*s report contains some distressing images. elika ashoori makes macaroons and cakes for a living, treats for other people's celebrations, but her own wedding is on hold, her whole life consumed by her father's arrest. i have to always throw myself into my work to not think about it too much because it drives me crazy. he was never political. he was a mechanical engineer with a love of astronomy. throughout his entire life, he has put me and my brother first. but in august in 2017, while visiting his elderly mother in tehran, anoosheh ashoori was thrown into iran's notorious evin jail, one of a dozen westerners being held in iran, including
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nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe. their families describe them as hostages being used by iranian authorities for political and financial leverage with the west. evin is notorious for being horrific. each room is shared by 15—20 people. they have rats and cockroaches all the time. he was interrogated very, very heavily. they threatened to hurt us throughout the interrogations. they told my dad that they knew where we lived, where we worked, what pets we had. my dad was saying, "i have nothing to confess to you." twice he tried to take his own life because he thought that if he was out of the equation, then they would not be able to hurt us. last month, cctv footage from inside evin hacked into and leaked. former inmates say it shows
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the outside world just a small glimpse of what the jail is like. elika fears her father will not get out until the iran and uk strike a bargain for his release. i mean, he is 67 now and he has been there forfour years, for having done nothing. who will be answerable to that? elika's father always supported everything she did. the nature of my business is constantly to talk to people about weddings, birthdays and to be excited for them. and that is why it was very difficult at first for me to do myjob. i didn't want to make things for happy people, as horrible as it sounds. now i use my business and i use my cakes to focus on people's happiness because it is kind of like a beam of hope. in her head she keeps planning the ultimate cake, the one she will make to eventually welcome him home. caroline hawley, bbc news.
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a monument dedicated to all the dutch victims of the holocaust has opened in amsterdam. it lists 102,000 jewish people killed by the nazis — as well as more than 200 sinti and roma. tim allman reports. the holocaust was a crime committed in so many places, with so many victims. more than 100,000 of them, are named here. the first such memorial in the netherlands dedicated to a dark chapter in the country's history. translation: this monument confronts us with the criminal murder of thousands, murdered for no other reason than their identity. in doing so, the monument also demands accountability. accountability as to whether more should be done during the war years to save those who were murdered. the netherlands was occupied
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for much of the second world war and three quarters of the country's jewish population were killed, most by the nazis but some by local collaborators, a difficult legacy to deal with. the king met with some of the survivors, seated next to the wall where the victims' names were inscribed. translation: i thought it was emotional. i just saw the name of a friend of mine, not anne frank or anyone famous, but a friend of mine, and ifound it hard to read. i knew she was dead, of course. i still keep a picture of her at home. as one survivor put it, this monument is a tribute that can never be erased, and a warning that can never be forgotten. tim allman, bbc news. raheem sterling, has broken football association rules a leading football agent, who used to represent raheem sterling, has broken
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football association rules by signing under—age players, according to evidence seen by bbc panorama. aidy ward, who owns colossal sports management, also asked sterling to speak to a 15—year—old via video call, as part of an attempt by ward to sign him. the fa prohibits agents offering deals before the 1st of january in the year of a player's16th birthday. rory carson reports. aidy ward is one of the most high—profile agents in football. we've spoken to a player who says he was approached by ward when he was just 12 years old, in breach of fa rules. foday nabay was born in sierra leone and moved to england with his mum when he was six. hejoined birmingham city academy and was picked for the england youth team. soon after, aidy ward got in touch. what did they say? just, like, how many teams wanted me to go to them.
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and why i should, like, why i should go. that is when my head... it started getting into my head a bit. aidy ward says he has never been foday�*s agent but panorama has obtained evidence that appears to contradict the claim. email correspondence shows ward was involved in negotiations to move foday, then 14, to fulham, with agency fees if the transfer went through. the agency fees ended up being way more than my contract. i was happy with what i got. i did not move there for the money and that, but when i got to look at it i thought, wait, that is not right. foday says when he found out about the agency fees, he told fulham he would only sign if they were not paid. fa rules ban agents profiting from the transfer of underage players. fulham fc say it had not paid or agreed to pay mr ward in relation to foday�*s registration
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with the club. foday completed the transfer in 2013, but was released five years later. he blames mr ward for a move he was never happy with. i was young and did not know much about football, my mum doesn't know anything about football. i thought it was just normal. we have also obtained evidence that ward approached other underage players. one document describes a meeting at this london restaurant between ward, a 15—year—old boy and his mother. aidy ward asked his famous client raheem sterling, a minority shareholder in colossal, to speak via video call to the boy in a bid by mr ward to attract the young player to his agency. sterling's lawyers told panorama says that as an international he feels a responsibility to speak to aspiring players, but not about agents or financial issues and he supports fa rules to protect young players. raheem sterling dropped aidy ward as his agent late last year. ward is under investigation
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by the fa and says he cannot comment under respect for that process. and you can watch panorama: football's broken dreams on bbc one at 8.30 tonight. now it's time for a look at the weather. season is here, how is it looking? if i offered to show you my crepuscular rays, would you be frightened? don't be. it is these rays of sunshine coming down across heathrow recently. thanks to the cloud we have got, we have got this phenomenon to look at, courtesy of our weather watcher, phenomenon to look at, courtesy of ourweatherwatcher, but phenomenon to look at, courtesy of our weather watcher, but that doesn't mean it has been a bit cooler across the south—east of england and east anglia this afternoon. and these cumulus —type clouds could give us a few showers, just grazing across eastern england in the next hour. a weak weather
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front has tapped a bit more cloud into the north—west of the uk this afternoon. forthe into the north—west of the uk this afternoon. for the majority, there has been a lot of sunshine and that will continue into the evening. after dark, any clouds clearing the south—east. more cloud drifting south—east. more cloud drifting south into northern england and the midlands. a fine night ahead, some clear spells, some mist and fog developing across eastern england. lows in double figures. the tuesday, high pressure pushing up from the south keeps this area of low pressure at bay. any early morning mist and fog will clear and there is more in the way of sunshine on the cards for tomorrow than we have seen today. it should certainly look brighter across eastern england. for the north west of scotland, the cloud is thinner for the first part of the day, with light rain in the west later. pleasantly warm. the
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high holds most of our weather systems to the north of the uk as we look at it week, but this front will be our biggest player through the week ahead. it will bring heavy rain into northern scotland. northern scotland is back out into the sunshine, windy in the west initially. to the south, some warmth as well, but a wetter and to the day for southern scotland and northern ireland. it looked like these weather systems would come barrelling in across the uk at one point. now it looks like we will have a decent end of the week. there will be transient rain across scotland and it will become more breezy for all of us. but overall, aside from that wet weather in the far north—west on wednesday, there is a lot of dry weather to come, and there are still spells of sunshine on the cards and the temperatures don't do badly either. but don't get too used to it, it looks like things
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could be very different come next week. hello, this is bbc news. i'm victoria derbyshire. here are your headlines at 5pm: the united states will relax travel restrictions on vaccinated passengers from the uk — the new rules will come into effect from early november. the business secretary says the government doesn't expect an emergency in gas supply this winter, amid soaring gas prices. he says the uk has the capacity to meet demand. there is absolutely no question, mr speaker, of the lights going out or people being unable to heat their homes. there will be no three—day working weeks or a throwback to the 1970s. a murder investigation is under way after four people were found dead at a house in derbyshire. police have confirmed they were a mother, her son and daughter and a friend of the daughter.
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borisjohnson co—hosts a meeting in new york with the un

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