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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 21, 2021 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. our headlines today. a difficult winter ahead with soaring energy prices — but the government insists a price cap must remain in place to protect consumers. we are going to have to heat the house because we cannot be cold. so we are going to have to basically cut back on food. the prime minister meets the president — climate change, afghanistan and a us trade deal are all up for discussion. the most wanted ticket in town — tom parker reunites with his band mates for a charity concert to help fellow brain cancer patients. england's cricketers won't play
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in pakistan next month. the ecb have cancelled the men's and women's tours over concerns of player welfare and about travel to the region. good morning, some mist and fog around and some of it dense in the south—east. that will lift and for much of the country, dry with sunny spells, but it will cloud overlaid to in the north—west with light rain or drizzle. it's tuesday, september 21st. our top story. energy price caps, which help prevent consumers paying too much for gas and electricity, will remain in place despite some firms claiming the system is not sustainable. surging wholesale gas prices have caused four suppliers to go bust, with four more on the brink. in a joint statement last night, the business secretary kwasi kwarteng and industry regulator ofgem said the caps will remain — as jon donnison reports. the government insists there is no question of the lights going out this winter,
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but as energy prices soar, some are worried. my bills are already at breaking point and then going into the winter, i've got a daughter and, obviously, myself, and it's a worry, it's a real big worry. the only way to sort of you know, we are going to have to heat the house, because we can't be cold, so we are going to have because we can't be cold, so we are going to have to basically cut back on food. and food supply issues will be beyond the agenda when the government meets with the food and drink federation later today. the huge spike in energy prices means c02 gas suppliers have shutdown production. the soft drinks association now says they only have a few days supply of carbon dioxide left. and meat producers have warned of price rises within the week, if slaughterhouses can't get enough access to c02. high demand for gas as the global economy picks up, coupled with a reduced supply,
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are behind a surge in wholesale gas prices. but after an emergency meeting with energy firms, the government, alongside the industry regulator ofgem, reiterated last night there would be no question of removing the cap that stops suppliers passing on those wholesale price rises to consumers. it protects and has protected millions of customers from sudden increases in global prices. this winter. we are committed to that price cap and it will remain in place. that means more small energy supplier is unable to turn a profit will likely go bust. the government says it's considering offering state—backed loans to those that survive, but insists it will not be bailing out failed companies. john donnison, bbc news. let's get more on this now with nina. this sounds like bad news for the smaller energy firms but how will it affect consumers?
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the energy storm has seen the wholesale price go through the roof. yesterday we talked about providers going bananas did the government would bail them out and the answer was a firm no with kwasi kwarteng saying there would be no reward for failure or mismanagement and the taxpayer should not prop up companies with flawed business models. they said they would guarantee loans to larger companies that absorbed the customers. they said integral was the energy can't stays in place, so a limit as to how much you pay on a variable rate which is controversial in the industry. they say it is limited, they cannot make more money in a crisis. and households will now end “p crisis. and households will now end up paying more for energy because cheap deals are missing from the market and the hike for variables is about to kick in and there might be another in the spring. what should
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you do if your provider has gone bump or you you do if your provider has gone bump oryou are you do if your provider has gone bump or you are concerned they might? do not panic. what you should do while you are waiting to see who your provider is is get a metre reading, take a photograph, look online and your accounts, paper bills, make sure you have them to hand, anything that make sure you get a fair deal when you end up with a new provider. it is likely your prices will go up. you will not get as good a deal as the one you are on, probably. as competition falls, we are set to pay more for energy and there is a warning that those on prepayment metres will end up seeing the biggest hikes in prices. i got a text last night to say i was moving company and they contacted with details about how much more i will have to pay. and people are waiting to see how much that will be. thanks. plenty more on that later. a vigil has taken place for a woman
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and three children who were found dead at a house in derbyshire. hundreds of people gathered in the village of killamarsh, near sheffield, to lay flowers and messages of condolence in memory of terri harris, her 13—year—old sonjohn—paul, her 11—year—old daughter lacey, and lacey's friend connie gent, who was also 11. a 31—year—old man is being held on suspicion of murder. borisjohnson will meet president biden at the white house today to discuss topics including climate change, trade and the situation in afghanistan. it's the first time a british prime minister has met a president at the white house since theresa may visited donald trump there in 2017. our political correspondent helen catt reports on the build—up to another historic meeting. it was all smiles in the sunshine when borisjohnson metjoe biden in person for the first time just three months ago at the g7 summit in cornwall. mrjohnson says he hasn't had much of a chance to get to know the us president,
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but he says they have a genuinely terrific relationship and see eye to eye on all sorts of things. he'll be hoping the reception is as warm when they meet in the oval office in the white house later. what would have been one of borisjohnson�*s key requests has already been fulfilled. in a surprise move yesterday, the us lifted its travel ban on uk citizens. but other issues could be more difficult. borisjohnson is expected to push the us to increase its climate commitments ahead of november's crucial climate change summit cop26, which will take place in glasgow. it's the moment when we have to grow up and take our responsibilities. i think we go through, you know, a period of glorious indifference about the world. we've been through that, we've been through our childhood, if you like. we've now got to realise that this is a problem that requires grip. the two men are also expected to discuss the situation in afghanistan after the two countries withdrew troops. and what about a trade deal?
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borisjohnson has been pretty downbeat about the chances of that happening quickly. he told reporters that american negotiators were pretty ruthless and that he would rather get a deal that works for the uk than get a quick deal. borisjohnson is meeting several world leaders this week, but this meeting will certainly be the most closely watched. helen catt, bbc news. we'rejoined now by our chief political correspondent, adam fleming. adam, lots to discuss for the two leaders there — how much of an impact will borisjohnson be hoping to make? some of the winds are stacking up for the uk already, being part of the us — australia security pact, the us — australia security pact, the fact transatlantic travel will start again in november and also, whenjoe biden speaks to the united nations meeting today, lots of
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speculation he will increase the us contributions to less rich countries to fight climate change is part of the process leading up to the climate change conference the uk will host in glasgow in november. i think that will be chalked up as another diplomatic win for the uk, although it might be as much about us interests as british. speculation in the other direction the us is not that impressed by the uk's chairmanship of the conference so far. i always think back to big meetings between british prime ministers and american presidents. rather than the big diplomatic staff it is the personal stuff we remember. remembertony it is the personal stuff we remember. remember tony blair and george w bushjoking remember. remember tony blair and george w bush joking about using the same toothpaste, gordon brown getting into the golf cart and george w bush drove off fast. david cameron going to a basketball game
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with barack obama. and last time in the white house, theresa may's face when donald trump grabbed her hand to walk down that rant. i when donald trump grabbed her hand to walk down that rant.— to walk down that rant. i wonder what pictures — to walk down that rant. i wonder what pictures we _ to walk down that rant. i wonder what pictures we will— to walk down that rant. i wonder what pictures we will see - to walk down that rant. i wonder what pictures we will see later. l what pictures we will see later. high—power memories there. the ministry of defence has apologised for a data breach which may have compromised the safety of dozens of afghan interpreters who worked for british forces. more than 250 people seeking relocation to the uk — many of whom are in hiding — were mistakenly copied into an emailfrom the mod, in which their names and some profile pictures were visible. defence secretary ben wallace has launched an investigation into how the breach occurred. the duke of york has been served with a sexual assault lawsuit after the relevant paperwork was delivered to his us lawyer, according to his accuser�*s legal team. virginia giuffre is seeking damages after claiming prince andrew sexually assaulted her, which he vehemently denies. earlier this month, miss giuffre's lawyers tried to serve the paperwork
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by leaving it with police officers guarding the royal lodge in windsor — but the prince's legal team argued it was not a valid method of serving legal documents. police have launched a fresh appeal for information 20 years after the torso of a young nigerian boy was found in the river thames. it is believed his death may have been a ritualistic killing. detectives called the boy adam, but his identity is still unknown. 0ur correspondent angus crawford has the story. a warning that some viewers may find his report distressing. just ten days after 9/11, a grim discovery in the river. nicknamed adam, he was believed to have been sacrificed in a ritualistic killing. and last saturday they placed a wreath in the river at the spot where his body was found. the torso of an african boy, his head and limbs removed, murdered in some kind of ritual. there were raids, arrests and scientific breakthroughs,
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but the boy has never been identified, no one ever charged with his murder. a source of real regret for one former officer in the case. the fact that we weren't able to prosecute is very frustrating. which is why the met is launching a new appeal for witnesses, asking people who stayed silent then to be bold and come forward now. a cemetery in east london, a cross with no name. adam's final resting place. 20 years on, i wish that we knew the identity of adam, his parents. you know, he is, in reality, a missing child from a family who probably don't know that he is here. hope, then, even after two decades, of finding both his killers and his real name. angus crawford, bbc news. the canadian prime ministerjustin
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trudeau is on course to win the snap general election he called, but without gaining the parliamentary majority he was hoping for. mr trudeau called the election in august, less than two years after his liberal party lost its majority in 2019. some votes are still being counted but the leader of the main opposition party has conceded defeat, paving the way for the liberals to form another minority government. a documentary has shed new light on what the duke of edinburgh was like as a father and grandfather. all of the duke's four children and grandchildren — but not the queen — took part in the programme, which will be broadcast on bbc one tomorrow. they portray prince philip as firm but fair, with a fondness for practicaljokes. 0ur royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. as well as assisting - the queen, he has a separate and independentjob of his own. he ran his public life from this office in buckingham palace. he loved the latest technology. and, of course, he was famously forthright.
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he will always make everyone very clear where you stand. i think people find that refreshing, that they know that there's nothing else going on or there's no there's no games played. he's very upfront. he's very honest and he's very matter of fact. and he brought that same no—nonsense approach to most things, even to the royal family's barbecues, at which, inevitably, he took charge. he adored barbecuing. he turned that into an interesting art form. and if i ever tried to do it, i could never get the fire to light, or something. he'd say, "go away!" and the barbecues were the perfect place for practicaljokes. one of the games he used to enjoy playing when we used to go for family barbecues. instead of like a mustard pot, we had a squeezy mustard tube. and he used to take the lid off and put it in your hands. he gets you to hold it _ gets you to hold it in your hands and the lid's off. i and i can't remember exactly what he says, but he ends.
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up slamming your hands together. and then he'd squish your hands together to fire the mustard onto the ceiling. it went all over the ceiling. he used to get in a lot of trouble from my grandmother for covering most of the places we had lunch and things with mustard on the ceiling. i actually think the marks are still there. yeah, i think so. you know, he enjoyed those jokes. he enjoyed messing around with the children and kind of being a grandfather. the duke of edinburgh fondly remembered by his family, remembered by his family. nicholas witchell, bbc news. he would not get away with the mustard trick in my house. very naughty. we will chat with the person who put that together later in the programme to get an insight. we need to check on carol. we had an eventful morning yesterday. 0ur your right after flashed the dog was
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cheeky with you? can i apologise for laughing and not checking on your welfare immediately. no apology needed. flash and myself were fine. the weather today is not too shabby. for many, dry, sunshine, and that is the story the rest of the week especially in the south. tomorrow it will turn windy and cooler in the north. mr and fog, dense fog apart —— mist and fog. in parts of the south and east of ireland, and south scotland, they will tend to stay drive. temperatures 14—21, maybe 22 in the sunshine. 0vernight, clearskies in the south, a week where front
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sinking south with cloud and drizzle. a new one in the northwest overnight. that will be heavier rain with gusty winds. temperatures not too bad. 9—12. tomorrow, the autumn equinox, we have the rain in the north—west. still windy here. in the south, sam cloud, but dry weather and sunshine. if you go to the chelsea flower show, it is set fair —— some cloud. if you watched breakfast on friday you might have seen the pop star tom parker talking really frankly about living with brain cancer. tom was also looking forward to his old band — the wanted — getting together for their first public performance in seven years. that gig took place last night — and tim muffett was there to see it. cheering. for many, the most
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"wanted" tickets in town. really excited to be here, yeah! we've been there since day dot. we've been here from the start, yeah. we've been there from the start. we've been all over the country watching the wanted — - we were actually lucky enough to meet them, win one - of their competitions and go up to manchester and play- laser quest with them. you played laser quest with the wanted? yeah, with the wanted. # and if you know, how do you get up... one of the uk's biggest boy bands, back together after seven years for a very special cause. band member tom parker was diagnosed with a brain tumour last year. he recently announced that he's decided to stop his gruelling chemotherapy. i think it's going to be more emotional than we all think, and i think that's going to really hit home. this event isn'tjust about the wanted reforming, it's a way of raising money for causes close to tom parker's heart — stand up to cancer and the national brain appeal. it's quite close to my heart, tonight, because my sister—in—law
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passed away from cancer. that's another reason why we love that the wanted done this, as well. obviously, what tom parker's gone through, it's the exact same as what emily went through — like, they had the same brain tumour. and amongst the artists appearing as well as the wanted, a member of a former rival boy band. how important was it for you to come along today? huge — i mean, when i heard this story it really hit home because of how young we all are, and obviously we've known each other for a very long time, so i wanted to do everything i could to be here tonight. it's, yeah, its proper... this one proper cut you deep, to be honest with you. backstage at the royal albert hall, about to go on stage, and you're back together. how are you feeling? very excited. it feels pretty surreal. what have the rehearsals been like? the words, the dance moves — how has that been, getting back together again after seven years? well, when you've got a brain tumour, it's very difficult to try and rememberanything... oh, my god! so, yeah, that's been... for me, that's been real, real, really quite tough. it's hard enough, anyway. it's hard enough not doing
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it for seven years — - never mind, like, you know, you with all that going on. . to be honest, you always forgot... idid. and, to be fair, the dance moves have never really been there, - so we just kind of make it up as we go along _ please, go wild, for the wanted! cheering. music: all time low. # only thing i'll never know. # how do you get up from an all—time low? # i can't even find a place to start. # how do i choose between my head and heart? music: gold forever. # say my name like it's the last... # time. # live today like it's the last night. cheering.
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congratulations, congratulations. what an amazing performance. how was it to be back on stage together? absolutely incredible — the atmosphere was electric. it was mental. honestly, i don't think we've experienced anything like it, to be honest. i it was amazing — it's made my little| 14—year—old heart happy again, so... emotional! unreal, emotional! incredible. literally incredible. incredible. it feels more special, the fact that we were all together doing it, you know? and they're there — the boys are there to support me, and that's beautiful for me. it must have been really emotional. it was. there was a moment where i almost lost it, to be honest with you! and then i managed to pull it back. so amazing. it was the best thing ever. it was lovely to see tom, of all people, back on stage, doing what he does best. it was amazing. being in a band, a kind of a brotherhood, it's probably never felt more important to you.
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honestly. yeah, the boys have been like brothers, they really have. they've been there at low moments, they've been there at high moments, but that's what they're brothers for. boy band veterans. but a performance unlike any they've given before. tim muffett, bbc news, at the royal albert hall. that looked brilliant. absolutely brilliant. talking to tim afterwards and showing how important it was. the moment they came off stage and the response from the crowd. and the joy of the fans must be brilliant to see. there is some of that in the papers. let's take a look at today's papers. the energy crisis continues to dominate a number of the front pages. the i warns that taxpayers face footing the bill for energy firms which go bust. the telegraph reports that the business secretary — kwasi kwarteng — is under growing pressure from energy companies to scrap the price cap on bills.
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but he's insisted that the cap will remain in place. we will be asking him about that later on the programme. you could soon be able to request the right to work at home from yourfirst day in a newjob — that's according to the front page of the times. the paper says changes to the law are set to be announced this week. at the moment you can't request flexible working until you've been in a job for six months. and the guardian focuses on calls for the government to invest billions in children's mental health in england, after a landmark report found a fifth of youngsters are unhappy. we'll be speaking to the children's commissioner, dame rachel de souza, in about half an hour. i think we have time for a few. pylons, or world cup? both. a new shape pylon, normally those that you see in fiels. this is the new shape. look at that. that was my pylon impression. shaped like
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a t with diamond earrings either side. what is the thinking? the structure consists of a crosspiece. they were placed in a familiar lattice. they take up a smaller footprint than the lattice design. and they are shorter so less of an environmental impact. 116 of them will be installed on a route from hinkley point power station. the world cup. things they are doing for the next world cup in qatar. using two cruise ships to house 6000 fans, like party boats. they are trying to triple the number of bars for foreigners. they are
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trying to get acts like abba and lady gaga to perform. that is aiming high. even abba do not perform for abba. also an offence to drink in public places. you have to be over 21 to drink. at the moment they are unsure whether laws will change for the world cup. party boats, i am not sure about that. lava is continuing to flow on the spanish island of la palma after a volcano erupted on sunday. the molten rock has already destroyed at least a hundred homes — and local officials say it could trigger explosions and toxic gasses when it reaches the sea. our correspondent danjohnson sent this report from la palma. homes that once enjoyed views of this island's impressive volcanic landscape are now
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being smothered under it. the relentless downhill creep of molten lava burns its way through anything it touches. the eruption follows a week of tremors, but nobody has seen anything like this on la palma for half a century. "look, look, it's falling," the man says. another house destroyed. that's more than 100 now, either burned or buried. "eight metres of lava," he says. nobody can stop the larva and nobody can control where it goes. these are the strongest forces of nature at work in a spectacular but destructive display, and the only option is to get out of its way. translation: right now, the most important thing l is to guarantee security. we are still in the eruption phase. please, let's be extremely careful.
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so residents of four villages have been ordered to safety and some tourists have decided to go home. i am worried, or i am sorry for all the people who are losing or have already lost their houses. there is no good feeling now on this island and therefore we want - to leave as fast as possible. this is a disaster movie in slow motion. the lava keeps crawling towards the sea. spain's tourism minister sees an opportunity — a chance to entice tourists back to view the eruption from a safe distance, because nobody knows how long this will last. danjohnson, bbc news, la palma. incredible pictures. scary stuff. you're watching breafast. still to come on today's programme. we'll hear about a crisis in mental healthcare for young people in england and speak to the children's commissioner about why girls are twice as likely as boys to be unhappy with their mental health.
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time now to get the news where you are good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. detectives have named a woman who was found dead in cator park in kidbrooke on saturday, as they appeal for anyone who saw anything suspicious to come forward. police believe 28—year—old sabina nessa was attacked at 8.30 on the previous evening, when the park was likely to have been used by dog walkers and joggers — but her body remained undiscovered. a man arrested on suspicion of murder has been released pending further enquiries. young people who survive cancer are at risk of missing out on the chance to have children in the future because fertility preservation services aren't adequately funded. that's according to a new study which includes research by the ucl hospital foundation trust. it's found certain treatments aren't always nhs—funded. lauren shute from high wycombe
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was 17 when she was diagnosed with cancer. she had ovarian tissue preserved — a procedure which was paid for by a charity. i know people who haven't had it, who hadn't heard of it, and i almost feel guilty bringing it up when someone who i know who's also gone through a similar experience hasn't had that, because it's allowed me to kind of move on from cancer and to not have it impact every single point in my life. it will impact my health forever, but to know that it hasn't affected my fertility as it could have — i'm so grateful every day for that. nhs england says all children with cancer should be advised about their options in line with clinical guidelines. the london—based firm pimlico plumbers has been sold to us home services group neighborly. the deal will see founder charlie mullins off—load his 90% stake. the company, which was established just over a0 years ago, employs more than 400 workers. let's take a quick look at the travel situation.
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for all other travel news, tune in to your local bbc radio station. onto the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's set to be a fairly pleasant day of weather today across the capital — not as cloudy as it was yesterday, there'll be more in the way of sunshine, it will stay dry and it will feel warmer, too. but it's been quite a chilly early start to the morning, temperatures having dropped back into high single figures. still a bit of mist to lift and clear, but there will be some spells of sunshine emerging — we'll keep those sunny spells as we head into the afternoon. the winds stay light, and temperatures will peak in the low 20s in celsius — 21 or maybe even 22 degrees celsius. now, as we head through the evening and overnight, then the winds will pick up a touch so there won't be quite so much of an issue with mist and fog into wednesday morning. but still, temperatures dropping back as low as perhaps eight or nine degrees celsius in some of the rural spots. so locally, again, quite a chilly start to the day with lots of clear skies around.
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and then tomorrow, again, it's dry and its warm, there'll be a lot of sunshine around. it will turn windier again into the afternoon as that wind picks up. top temperatures again peaking at around 21 degrees. on thursday and friday, we start to draw in more of a northwesterly wind, but it should stay dry or mostly dry as we head through the rest of this week, with some more sunshine at times. i'm back with the latest from bbc london in half an hour. now, though, it's back to dan and sally. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. coming up on breakfast this morning... motor neurone disease campaigners — including rob burrow, doddie weir and stephen darby — are delivering a petition to downing street today, demanding more funding for research. we'll speak to a woman who has lost six family members to mnd — including her two sons. every barbecue that i've ever been on, the duke of edinburgh has been there cooking.
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senior royals have been sharing their memories of the duke of edinburgh for a new bbc documentary, which was co—produced and written by the journalist robert hardman. he'll be giving us the inside story before nine. and stand by for a new set of prize—winning pastries and marzipan meltdowns. we'll be looking ahead to the new series of the great british bake off, with the help of extra slice presenter tom allen, and former finalist ruby bhogal. we've been hearing this morning about borisjohnson�*s trip to the us but, from early november, anyone who is double jabbed will be able to fly from the uk to the states. the lifting of travel restrictions — imposed more than 18 months ago — is welcome news to many families, including carol and brian woodward from nottingham, whose daughter claire now lives in boston with husband steve. we can say hello to them now.
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good morning, everybody, great to see it this morning. carol and brian, let's come to you first. tell me your reaction when you heard the news about the travel restrictions. i was working all day yesterday so i didn't have the news on the radio and then i got a text saying rink meet with aeroplanes on. i knew something was, you know, had happened. when i eventually called her she told me. i didn't think it would happen until next year, to be honest, so happy it is earlier. claire, what has it been like for all of you to be applied for so long now? it all of you to be applied for so long now? . , , , , ., now? it has 'ust been... it is hard to explain — now? it hasjust been... it is hard to explain to _ now? it hasjust been... it is hard to explain to people _ now? it hasjust been... it is hard to explain to people that - now? it hasjust been... it is hard to explain to people that aren't i to explain to people that aren't going through it. you know, we moved to the states knowing that we were leaving friends and family behind, but we had already planned to make a return trip every year or get family over here to visit us. and then
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suddenly we werejust over here to visit us. and then suddenly we were just here on our own with no family and with no sort of light at the end of the tunnel, really. there was no... it is of light at the end of the tunnel, really. there was no. . ._ really. there was no... it is hard because. — really. there was no... it is hard because. you — really. there was no... it is hard because, you know, _ really. there was no... it is hard because, you know, we - really. there was no... it is hard because, you know, we made i really. there was no... it is hardl because, you know, we made the decision_ because, you know, we made the decision based on the fact it is a small_ decision based on the fact it is a small world these days, that the flights _ small world these days, that the flights are relatively easy, people can come — flights are relatively easy, people can come and see us, it is not even that longer— can come and see us, it is not even that longer flight. but who knew? who knew — that longer flight. but who knew? who knew there was going to be this global— who knew there was going to be this global pandemic, it is something you can't plan _ global pandemic, it is something you can't plan for. the first two years of being — can't plan for. the first two years of being here we had always got someone — of being here we had always got someone planning to visit when visiting — someone planning to visit when visiting and then all of a sudden we had got _ visiting and then all of a sudden we had got nobody and, as claire said, we are _ had got nobody and, as claire said, we are here — had got nobody and, as claire said, we are here on our own and it has been_ we are here on our own and it has heenvery— we are here on our own and it has been very hard, very difficult and we didh't— been very hard, very difficult and we didn't think it would end anytime so yesterday was unbelievable. it is nice to see — so yesterday was unbelievable. it is nice to see his _ so yesterday was unbelievable. it 3 nice to see big smiles on your faces. claire, when was the last time you saw each other? at the end was it like, 0k, see you in a couple
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of? , . y was it like, 0k, see you in a couple of? , ~ 3 , was it like, 0k, see you in a couple of? , . g , ., was it like, 0k, see you in a couple of? , ~ n , ~ , of? pretty much. my mum, my dad, my nehew of? pretty much. my mum, my dad, my nephew and _ of? pretty much. my mum, my dad, my nephew and my — of? pretty much. my mum, my dad, my nephew and my sister _ of? pretty much. my mum, my dad, my nephew and my sister came _ of? pretty much. my mum, my dad, my nephew and my sister came over - of? pretty much. my mum, my dad, my nephew and my sister came over to - nephew and my sister came over to visit in september. august of 2019. and i had planned to book, and we had booked flights to travel back for the whole of this summer in 2020. and of course, well... those flights got cancelled! so we haven't seen them since last august, 2019. i know there are so many families in a similar position to you. brian, what is the plan now? tell me. have you made a plan, and how soon do you hope you can all see each other? we are hoping to go across this christmas, to spend christmas and new yeah — christmas, to spend christmas and new year. we have already looked at flights, _ new year. we have already looked at flights, clive has looked at flights for us, _ flights, clive has looked at flights for us, and we are getting those hooked — for us, and we are getting those booked more or less as we speak. we
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are just _ booked more or less as we speak. we are just hoping that there are plenty— are just hoping that there are plenty of— are just hoping that there are plenty of seats left on the plains! i plenty of seats left on the plains! i sure _ plenty of seats left on the plains! i sure there are quite a few people in the same situation. carol, i wonder how difficult it was. what year we are now? when people were able to hook their relatives and see their relatives, coming out of lockdown, that must have been particularly difficult for you guys, thinking about where claire was and you still haven't seen her for so long. you still haven't seen her for so lonu. ., you still haven't seen her for so lonu. . �* , long. yeah. because... it was quite wor in: long. yeah. because... it was quite worrying when _ long. yeah. because... it was quite worrying when the _ long. yeah. because... it was quite worrying when the pandemic- long. yeah. because... it was quite worrying when the pandemic was i long. yeah. because... it was quite| worrying when the pandemic was on because i thought, if one of us got really poorly, she would be on her own with nobody to look after her, but luckily i have all stayed well, so when we eventually meet, there will be a massive hug!— will be a massive hug! claire, tell me this. will be a massive hug! claire, tell me this- it— will be a massive hug! claire, tell me this. it sounds _ will be a massive hug! claire, tell me this. it sounds like _ will be a massive hug! claire, tell me this. it sounds like you - will be a massive hug! claire, tell me this. it sounds like you are i me this. it sounds like you are going to have one incredible christmas coming up. i hope you start organising it now because i
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imagine carol and brian will be coming with quite a lot of presence. i will be looking extra suitcases on their flights for all the candy and cookies and crisps that they can stuff in a suitcase and bring over to me. it is going to be a love, actually moment and we are not telling the children, either. haste telling the children, either. have alwa s telling the children, either. have always wondered _ telling the children, either. have always wondered about - telling the children, either. have always wondered about this. what are you missing? is there some rigid product you are desperate for? fish and chi s. product you are desperate for? fish and chips- -- _ product you are desperate for? fish and chips. -- out— product you are desperate for? fish and chips. -- out some _ product you are desperate for? fish and chips. -- out some british - and chips. -- out some british product- _ and chips. -- out some british product- you _ and chips. -- out some british product. you can't _ and chips. -- out some british product. you can't bring - and chips. -- out some british product. you can't bring that l and chips. -- out some britishl product. you can't bring that on and chips. -- out some british i product. you can't bring that on a plane. product. you can't bring that on a lane. ., , ., ., plane. the only thing other than family that _ plane. the only thing other than family that l _ plane. the only thing other than family that i miss. _ plane. the only thing other than family that i miss. fish - plane. the only thing other than family that i miss. fish and - plane. the only thing other than i family that i miss. fish and chips. carol and brian, _ family that i miss. fish and chips. carol and brian, i _ family that i miss. fish and chips. carol and brian, i imagine - family that i miss. fish and chips. carol and brian, i imagine you - family that i miss. fish and chips. carol and brian, i imagine you are caroland brian, i imagine you are planning on smaller presence so you can take a few. planning on smaller presence so you can take a few-— can take a few. just... a stocking filler will do. _ can take a few. just... a stocking filler will do. just _ can take a few. just... a stocking filler will do. just take _
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filler will do. just take yourselves. _ filler will do. just take yourselves. note - filler will do. just take yourselves. note that| filler will do. just take i yourselves. note that is filler will do. just take - yourselves. note that is it. so filler will do. just take _ yourselves. note that is it. so we do send parcels over, we call them red cross parcels from the colonies! make sure you send us a photograph of you getting on the plane with a bag of fish and chips under each arm. ~ , ., , . ., , arm. might be a bit cold when they aet there. arm. might be a bit cold when they get there- i — arm. might be a bit cold when they get there- i am _ arm. might be a bit cold when they get there. i am sure _ arm. might be a bit cold when they get there. i am sure your - arm. might be a bit cold when they get there. i am sure your daughter| get there. i am sure your daughter will appreciate _ get there. i am sure your daughter will appreciate it _ get there. i am sure your daughter will appreciate it nonetheless. - get there. i am sure your daughter will appreciate it nonetheless. i i will appreciate it nonetheless. i hope when you get together it is brilliant to.— hope when you get together it is brilliant to._ thank i hope when you get together it is l brilliant to._ thank you. brilliant to. thank you. thank you. thank you. — brilliant to. thank you. thank you. thank you, goodbye. _ brilliant to. thank you. thank you. thank you, goodbye. i— brilliant to. thank you. thank you. thank you, goodbye. i love - brilliant to. thank you. thank you. thank you, goodbye. i love that. l thank you, goodbye. i love that. havinl a thank you, goodbye. i love that. having a love — thank you, goodbye. i love that. having a love actually _ thank you, goodbye. i love that. having a love actually momentl thank you, goodbye. i love that. | having a love actually moment to stop and i don't like to mention christmas this earlier. we are definitely allowed. john peers here with all the sports and not great news coming out of the ecb. it and not great news coming out of the ecb. , ., ., ., ecb. it is not. england due to travel there, _ ecb. it is not. england due to travel there, the _ ecb. it is not. england due to travel there, the men - ecb. it is not. england due to travel there, the men and i ecb. it is not. england due to i travel there, the men and women side, next month, but the tour has been cancelled and i think there will be a lot of frustration because they were travelling to pakistan and there has been frustration with a lack of cricket. pakistan will be
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frustrated because let's not forget they came here last summer when england were facing a black hole because of coronavirus and the lack of prayers and they made the trip but this time england will not be reciprocating that so there is some frustration. it would have been the first time the men had played in pakistan since 2005, for the women the first time ever following the terror attack on the sri lankan team bus in 2009 the announcement came just a few days after new zealand abandonned their matches in the country, because of what they called a "specific and credible threat". the ecb said their withdrawl was down to concerns over travel to the region but also to protect the mental and physical well being of the players. pakistan cricket, though, are not impressed. i'm extremely disappointed — so are the fans, actually. because, right now, we needed england, because it's a small cricket fraternity that we have. and so, in such times, we were expecting england tojust be a little bit more responsive and responsible, i guess.
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so we are hurt, but forward we shall move. staying with cricket, the former new zealand international, chris cairns says he's "facing possibly the greatest challenge" of his life after being left paralysed from a spinal stroke during a heart operation. the 51—year—old — regarded as one of the best all—rounders of his generation — needed emergency surgery at a hospital in sydney last month and was briefly on life support. he posted this message on social media. hi, everybody. just over six weeks ago, i suffered a type a aortic dissection, which essentially means there is a tear in one of the major arteries of the heart. i had several surgeries and grafts and, very thankfully, the specialists were able to save the heart itself. one of the complications that arose was a spinal stroke, which in itself will provide me with possibly the greatest challenge that i have ever faced in rehab, going forward. good luck to him and his recovery.
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all four home nations are in world cup qualifying action for the 2023 women's world cup tonight. all four won their first matches last week, scotland's women will make history as they play a world cup qualifier at hampden park for the the first time with the faroe islands the visitors to glasgow following a 2—0 win over hungary last week. for every home game, to be there, it is a huge boost, not just for us as players, to be able to play there, but for fans it is more attractive. it is a great day out for friends and family that want to come, and, yeah, just really happy that the scottish fa have made that decision. england thrashed north macedonia 8—0. it's luxembourg laterfor them — who are well down the women's rankings. there are still things that you can, you know, squeeze out of these games and still learn. because if you're coming off and you have not won your duel, still, and you're not doing the right things, it catches up. it's important that we do it now, so that we play better opposition. by all means, these games are still hard, because you've got to stay focused and switched on.
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after scoring six against kazakhstan, another win is expected in estonia tonight for wales. the team's never reached a major tournament before, they're currently second in their group, behind france. northern ireland's women will play at windsor park when they take on latvia later, looking to build on their 4—0 win over luxembourg on friday, with manager kenny shiels looking to the fans to play their part. and the countdown is well and truely on to the ryder cup. and the countdown is well and truly on to the ryder cup. the european team, led by captain padraig harrington, have arrived in wisconsin ahead of the start on friday. that is tommy fleetwood and the team flying out in style on monday. and there could be plenty to look out for on the course at whistling straits. very excited. very proud and humbled to be here representing team usa. welcome, padraig, to wisconsin. we've got to get you a cheesehead, i think. have you ever seen those? i've seen a cheesehead, yeah.
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did you get that? nothing wrong with cheeseheads- — did you get that? nothing wrong with cheeseheads. they _ did you get that? nothing wrong with cheeseheads. they love _ did you get that? nothing wrong with cheeseheads. they love a _ did you get that? nothing wrong with cheeseheads. they love a big - did you get that? nothing wrong with | cheeseheads. they love a big cheese. it is a well—known thing, the funds where lots of cheese on their head. obviously fake. they are the biggest dairy producer of all the us states that there is one. apart from the sparkling golf, don't be surprised to see a big block of yellow or several blocks of yellow. it is high for me to explain _ several blocks of yellow. it is high for me to explain how— several blocks of yellow. it is high for me to explain how excited i i several blocks of yellow. it is high | for me to explain how excited i am about ryder cup. i for me to explain how excited i am about ryder cup.— about ryder cup. i think you might be about to- _ about ryder cup. i think you might be about to. nadiya _ about ryder cup. i think you might be about to. nadiya olla _ about ryder cup. i think you might be about to. nadiya olla sat i about ryder cup. i think you might be about to. nadiya olla sat where ou were be about to. nadiya olla sat where you were yesterday _ be about to. nadiya olla sat where you were yesterday i _ be about to. nadiya olla sat where you were yesterday i don't - be about to. nadiya olla sat where you were yesterday i don't view i be about to. nadiya olla sat where i you were yesterday i don't view your golf face! i you were yesterday i don't view your lolf face! ., �* ., golf face! i don't have the coalface. _ golf face! i don't have the coalface. i— golf face! i don't have the coalface. i have _ golf face! i don't have the coalface. i have had i golf face! i don't have the coalface. i have had a i golf face! i don't have the i coalface. i have had a good chat with nadiya _ coalface. i have had a good chat with nadiya about _ coalface. i have had a good chat with nadiya about how- coalface. i have had a good chat with nadiya about how i - coalface. i have had a good chat with nadiya about how i need i coalface. i have had a good chat with nadiya about how i need to coalface. i have had a good chat i with nadiya about how i need to fit the golf around training. i with nadiya about how i need to fit the golf around training.— the golf around training. i have s-oken the golf around training. i have spoken to _ the golf around training. i have spoken to nadiya, _ the golf around training. i have spoken to nadiya, as _ the golf around training. i have spoken to nadiya, as well- the golf around training. i have spoken to nadiya, as well live | the golf around training. i have i spoken to nadiya, as well live show on saturday, get that sorted a spoken to nadiya, as well live show on saturday, get that sorte- on saturday, get that sorted a busy schedule, come _ on saturday, get that sorted a busy schedule, come on! _
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on saturday, get that sorted a busy schedule, come on! of— on saturday, get that sorted a busy schedule, come on! of the - on saturday, get that sorted a busy schedule, come on! of the wants i on saturday, get that sorted a busy| schedule, come on! of the wants us to move on- — schedule, come on! of the wants us to move on. she _ schedule, come on! of the wants us to move on. she might— schedule, come on! of the wants us to move on. she might become i schedule, come on! of the wants us to move on. she might become a i to move on. she might become a lolfer to move on. she might become a golfer and _ to move on. she might become a golfer and if _ to move on. she might become a golfer and if you _ to move on. she might become a golfer and if you are _ to move on. she might become a golfer and if you are going - to move on. she might become a golfer and if you are going to i to move on. she might become a golfer and if you are going to get| golfer and if you are going to get her involved, if there will be anything... her involved, if there will be anything- - -_ her involved, if there will be i anything. . ._ she is anything... boys... boys... she is usinl anything... boys... boys... she is using my — anything... boys... boys... she is using my love _ anything... boys... boys... she is using my love of— anything... boys... boys... she is using my love of golf... _ anything... boys... boys... she is using my love of golf... sign i anything... boys... boys... she is using my love of golf... sign up. anything... boys... boys... she isj using my love of golf... sign up at right, it is nearly a quarter to rescue us. right, it is nearly a quarter to rescue us— right, it is nearly a quarter to rescue us.- 0h, - right, it is nearly a quarter to rescue us.- oh, gosh, i right, it is nearly a quarter to i rescue us.- oh, gosh, look right, it is nearly a quarter to rescue us. help! oh, gosh, look at the time! the _ rescue us. help! oh, gosh, look at the time! the weather— rescue us. help! oh, gosh, look at the time! the weather wait, i rescue us. help! oh, gosh, look at the time! the weather wait, for most of us _ the time! the weather wait, for most of us will— the time! the weather wait, for most of us will he — the time! the weather wait, for most of us will be fairly— the time! the weather wait, for most of us will be fairly subtle. _ the time! the weather wait, for most of us will be fairly subtle. it - the time! the weather wait, for most of us will be fairly subtle. it will i of us will be fairly subtle. it will be dry. — of us will be fairly subtle. it will be dry. sunny— of us will be fairly subtle. it will be dry, sunny and _ of us will be fairly subtle. it will be dry, sunny and there - of us will be fairly subtle. it will be dry, sunny and there will- of us will be fairly subtle. it will be dry, sunny and there will be | be dry, sunny and there will be someone — be dry, sunny and there will be someone sunshine. _ be dry, sunny and there will be someone sunshine. on- be dry, sunny and there will be someone sunshine. on friday. someone sunshine. on friday temperatures _ someone sunshine. on friday temperatures in— someone sunshine. on friday temperatures in the - someone sunshine. on friday. temperatures in the south—east someone sunshine. on friday- temperatures in the south—east could reach _ temperatures in the south—east could reach 23 _ temperatures in the south—east could reach 23 or— temperatures in the south—east could reach 23 or 24 — temperatures in the south—east could reach 23 or 24. if— temperatures in the south—east could reach 23 or 24. if you _ temperatures in the south—east could reach 23 or 24. if you are _ temperatures in the south—east could reach 23 or 24. if you are in _ temperatures in the south—east could reach 23 or 24. if you are in the - reach 23 or 24. if you are in the north— reach 23 or 24. if you are in the north of— reach 23 or 24. if you are in the north of the _ reach 23 or 24. if you are in the north of the country, _ reach 23 or 24. if you are in the north of the country, tomorrow| north of the country, tomorrow especially, _ north of the country, tomorrow especially, it— north of the country, tomorrow especially, it will— north of the country, tomorrow especially, it will turn - north of the country, tomorrow especially, it will turn windieri north of the country, tomorrow. especially, it will turn windier and as a result — especially, it will turn windier and as a result the _ especially, it will turn windier and as a result the change _ especially, it will turn windier and as a result the change in - especially, it will turn windier and as a result the change in ms, i especially, it will turn windier and as a result the change in ms, iti as a result the change in ms, it will he — as a result the change in ms, it will he that— as a result the change in ms, it will be that bit _ as a result the change in ms, it will be that bit cooler. - as a result the change in ms, it will be that bit cooler. this i will be that bit cooler. this morning _ will be that bit cooler. this morning we _ will be that bit cooler. this morning we have - will be that bit cooler. this morning we have got - will be that bit cooler. this morning we have got this i will be that bit cooler. this i morning we have got this week whether— morning we have got this week whether from _ morning we have got this week whether from sinking _ morning we have got this week whether from sinking south, ii whether from sinking south, i pressure _ whether from sinking south, i pressure firmly— whether from sinking south, i pressure firmly in _ whether from sinking south, i pressure firmly in charge. i whether from sinking south, i| pressure firmly in charge. you whether from sinking south, i- pressure firmly in charge. you can see from — pressure firmly in charge. you can see from the — pressure firmly in charge. you can see from the isobars _ pressure firmly in charge. you can see from the isobars it— pressure firmly in charge. you can see from the isobars it will- pressure firmly in charge. you can see from the isobars it will be - see from the isobars it will be windier— see from the isobars it will be windier in _ see from the isobars it will be windier in the _ see from the isobars it will be windier in the far— see from the isobars it will be windier in the far north—west.i see from the isobars it will be - windier in the far north—west. cloud
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arriving, _ windier in the far north—west. cloud arriving, bringing _ windier in the far north—west. cloud arriving, bringing in— windier in the far north—west. cloud arriving, bringing in some _ windier in the far north—west. cloud arriving, bringing in some drizzle i arriving, bringing in some drizzle eventually— arriving, bringing in some drizzle eventually to _ arriving, bringing in some drizzle eventually to western _ arriving, bringing in some drizzle eventually to western scotland, i arriving, bringing in some drizzle i eventually to western scotland, and also the _ eventually to western scotland, and also the north—west _ eventually to western scotland, and also the north—west of— eventually to western scotland, and also the north—west of northern - also the north—west of northern ireland — also the north—west of northern ireland for— also the north—west of northern ireland. for most, _ also the north—west of northern ireland. for most, when- also the north—west of northern ireland. for most, when we - also the north—west of northern| ireland. for most, when we lose also the north—west of northern - ireland. for most, when we lose the mist and _ ireland. for most, when we lose the mist and fog — ireland. for most, when we lose the mist and fog this _ ireland. for most, when we lose the mist and fog this morning, - ireland. for most, when we lose the mist and fog this morning, which- ireland. for most, when we lose the mist and fog this morning, which is. mist and fog this morning, which is quite _ mist and fog this morning, which is quite dense — mist and fog this morning, which is quite dense in— mist and fog this morning, which is quite dense in places _ mist and fog this morning, which is quite dense in places like - mist and fog this morning, which is quite dense in places like east - quite dense in places like east anglia — quite dense in places like east anglia and _ quite dense in places like east anglia and the _ quite dense in places like east anglia and the south—east, . quite dense in places like easti anglia and the south—east, we quite dense in places like east - anglia and the south—east, we will find a _ anglia and the south—east, we will find a lot— anglia and the south—east, we will find a lot of— anglia and the south—east, we will find a lot of sunshine. _ anglia and the south—east, we will find a lot of sunshine. if— anglia and the south—east, we will find a lot of sunshine. if you - anglia and the south—east, we will find a lot of sunshine. if you are i find a lot of sunshine. if you are heading — find a lot of sunshine. if you are heading to— find a lot of sunshine. if you are heading to the _ find a lot of sunshine. if you are heading to the chelsea - find a lot of sunshine. if you are heading to the chelsea flower l find a lot of sunshine. if you are - heading to the chelsea flower show today— heading to the chelsea flower show today it _ heading to the chelsea flower show today it is _ heading to the chelsea flower show today it is set — heading to the chelsea flower show today it is set fair, _ heading to the chelsea flower show today it is set fair, 21 _ heading to the chelsea flower show today it is set fair, 21 degrees- heading to the chelsea flower show today it is set fair, 21 degrees top. today it is set fair, 21 degrees top temperature, _ today it is set fair, 21 degrees top temperature, 16— today it is set fair, 21 degrees top temperature, 16 as _ today it is set fair, 21 degrees top temperature, 16 as we _ today it is set fair, 21 degrees top temperature, 16 as we push - today it is set fair, 21 degrees top temperature, 16 as we push up. temperature, 16 as we push up towards _ temperature, 16 as we push up towards stornoway. _ temperature, 16 as we push up towards stornoway. through . temperature, 16 as we push up. towards stornoway. through this evening — towards stornoway. through this evening and _ towards stornoway. through this evening and overnight, - towards stornoway. through this evening and overnight, still- towards stornoway. through thisi evening and overnight, still clear skies _ evening and overnight, still clear skies in — evening and overnight, still clear skies in the — evening and overnight, still clear skies in the south, _ evening and overnight, still clear skies in the south, so _ evening and overnight, still clear skies in the south, so the - skies in the south, so the temperature _ skies in the south, so the temperature will- skies in the south, so the temperature will fall- skies in the south, so the i temperature will fall away, skies in the south, so the - temperature will fall away, mist skies in the south, so the _ temperature will fall away, mist and fo- temperature will fall away, mist and fog reforminq — temperature will fall away, mist and fog reforming. areas— temperature will fall away, mist and fog reforming. areas of— temperature will fall away, mist and fog reforming. areas of pushing - fog reforming. areas of pushing south _ fog reforming. areas of pushing south with— fog reforming. areas of pushing south with drizzle _ fog reforming. areas of pushing south with drizzle and _ fog reforming. areas of pushing south with drizzle and a - fog reforming. areas of pushing south with drizzle and a new- fog reforming. areas of pushing - south with drizzle and a new weather front. _ south with drizzle and a new weather front, qet _ south with drizzle and a new weather front, get across _ south with drizzle and a new weather front, get across the _ south with drizzle and a new weather front, get across the north _ south with drizzle and a new weather front, get across the north west - front, get across the north west introducinq _ front, get across the north west introducing rain _ front, get across the north west introducing rain and _ front, get across the north west introducing rain and it— front, get across the north west introducing rain and it will- front, get across the north west introducing rain and it will be . introducing rain and it will be heavier— introducing rain and it will be heavier than— introducing rain and it will be heavier than it _ introducing rain and it will be heavier than it is _ introducing rain and it will be heavier than it is likely- introducing rain and it will be heavier than it is likely to - introducing rain and it will be heavier than it is likely to be| heavier than it is likely to be through— heavier than it is likely to be through the _ heavier than it is likely to be through the course - heavier than it is likely to be through the course of- heavier than it is likely to be through the course of today. heavier than it is likely to be - through the course of today. gusty winds _ through the course of today. gusty winds locally, _ through the course of today. gusty winds locally, we _ through the course of today. gusty winds locally, we are _ through the course of today. gusty winds locally, we are looking - through the course of today. gusty winds locally, we are looking at. winds locally, we are looking at dale's — winds locally, we are looking at dale's into— winds locally, we are looking at dale's. into tomorrow, - winds locally, we are looking at dale's. into tomorrow, here - winds locally, we are looking at dale's. into tomorrow, here isi winds locally, we are looking at. dale's. into tomorrow, here is that where _ dale's. into tomorrow, here is that where the — dale's. into tomorrow, here is that where the front. _ dale's. into tomorrow, here is that where the front. look— dale's. into tomorrow, here is that where the front. look at _ dale's. into tomorrow, here is that where the front. look at the - where the front. look at the isobars. _ where the front. look at the isobars, windy, _ where the front. look at the isobars, windy, even - where the front. look at thei isobars, windy, even further where the front. look at the - isobars, windy, even further south, it will— isobars, windy, even further south, it will be _ isobars, windy, even further south, it will be blustery _ isobars, windy, even further south, it will be blustery wherever - isobars, windy, even further south, it will be blustery wherever you - it will be blustery wherever you are _ it will be blustery wherever you are blustery— it will be blustery wherever you are. blustery or... _ it will be blustery wherever you are. blustery or... i— it will be blustery wherever you are. blustery or... i can't- it will be blustery wherever you are. blustery or... i can't even| it will be blustery wherever you i are. blustery or... i can't even say it. are. blustery or... ican't even say it. t hat— are. blustery or... i can't even say it. that it _ are. blustery or... i can't even say it. that it has — are. blustery or... i can't even say it. that it has been _ are. blustery or... ican't even say it. that it has been for— are. blustery or... i can't even say it. that it has been for quite - are. blustery or... i can't even say it. that it has been for quite somei it. that it has been for quite some time _ it. that it has been for quite some time a _ it. that it has been for quite some time a lot— it. that it has been for quite some time a lot of— it. that it has been for quite some time. a lot of dry— it. that it has been for quite some time. a lot of dry weather. - it. that it has been for quite some i time. a lot of dry weather. whether from _ time. a lot of dry weather. whether from sinkinq — time. a lot of dry weather. whether from sinking south, _ time. a lot of dry weather. whether from sinking south, producing - time. a lot of dry weather. whether from sinking south, producing the l
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from sinking south, producing the cloud, _ from sinking south, producing the cloud, so— from sinking south, producing the cloud, so there _ from sinking south, producing the cloud, so there will _ from sinking south, producing the cloud, so there will be _ from sinking south, producing the cloud, so there will be a - from sinking south, producing the cloud, so there will be a build—up| cloud, so there will be a build—up throuqh— cloud, so there will be a build—up through the — cloud, so there will be a build—up through the course _ cloud, so there will be a build—up through the course of— cloud, so there will be a build—up through the course of the - cloud, so there will be a build—up through the course of the day, i cloud, so there will be a build—up. through the course of the day, rain sinkinq _ through the course of the day, rain sinking southwards— through the course of the day, rain sinking southwards across - through the course of the day, rain| sinking southwards across northern ireland _ sinking southwards across northern ireland and — sinking southwards across northern ireland and scotland _ sinking southwards across northern ireland and scotland and _ sinking southwards across northern ireland and scotland and behind - sinking southwards across northern ireland and scotland and behind it i ireland and scotland and behind it we see _ ireland and scotland and behind it we see a — ireland and scotland and behind it we see a return _ ireland and scotland and behind it we see a return to _ ireland and scotland and behind it we see a return to some - ireland and scotland and behind it we see a return to some blusteryi we see a return to some blustery showers — we see a return to some blustery showers still— we see a return to some blustery showers. still a _ we see a return to some blustery showers. still a chance _ we see a return to some blustery showers. still a chance of- we see a return to some blustery showers. still a chance of some i showers. still a chance of some local— showers. still a chance of some local qales _ showers. still a chance of some local gales out _ showers. still a chance of some local gales out towards - showers. still a chance of some local gales out towards the - showers. still a chance of some. local gales out towards the north and west. — local gales out towards the north and west. and— local gales out towards the north and west, and wednesday- local gales out towards the north and west, and wednesday is- local gales out towards the north and west, and wednesday is the| and west, and wednesday is the autumn— and west, and wednesday is the autumn equinox. _ and west, and wednesday is the autumn equinox. temperature l and west, and wednesday is the| autumn equinox. temperature is and west, and wednesday is the i autumn equinox. temperature is 13 and west, and wednesday is the - autumn equinox. temperature is 13 to about— autumn equinox. temperature is 13 to about 23— autumn equinox. temperature is 13 to about 23 degrees, _ autumn equinox. temperature is 13 to about 23 degrees, so _ autumn equinox. temperature is 13 to about 23 degrees, so still— autumn equinox. temperature is 13 to about 23 degrees, so still a _ autumn equinox. temperature is 13 to about 23 degrees, so still a bit- about 23 degrees, so still a bit above — about 23 degrees, so still a bit above average _ about 23 degrees, so still a bit above average for— about 23 degrees, so still a bit above average for the - about 23 degrees, so still a bit above average for the time - about 23 degrees, so still a bit above average for the time ofi about 23 degrees, so still a bit- above average for the time of year. wednesday— above average for the time of year. wednesdav into _ above average for the time of year. wednesday into thursday, - above average for the time of year. wednesday into thursday, our - above average for the time of year. - wednesday into thursday, our weather front since _ wednesday into thursday, our weather front since south _ wednesday into thursday, our weather front since south as _ wednesday into thursday, our weather front since south as a _ wednesday into thursday, our weather front since south as a weak _ wednesday into thursday, our weather front since south as a weak feature. i front since south as a weak feature. still quite _ front since south as a weak feature. still quite a — front since south as a weak feature. still quite a blustery— front since south as a weak feature. still quite a blustery day— front since south as a weak feature. still quite a blustery day ahead - front since south as a weak feature. still quite a blustery day ahead on l still quite a blustery day ahead on thursdav — still quite a blustery day ahead on thursdav we _ still quite a blustery day ahead on thursday. we also _ still quite a blustery day ahead on thursday. we also have _ still quite a blustery day ahead on thursday. we also have a - still quite a blustery day ahead on thursday. we also have a weather front _ thursday. we also have a weather front in _ thursday. we also have a weather front in the — thursday. we also have a weather front in the north _ thursday. we also have a weather front in the north producing - thursday. we also have a weather front in the north producing some| front in the north producing some rain at _ front in the north producing some rain at least — front in the north producing some rain at least for _ front in the north producing some rain at least for a _ front in the north producing some rain at least for a time, _ front in the north producing some rain at least for a time, and - front in the north producing some rain at least for a time, and still. rain at least for a time, and still strong _ rain at least for a time, and still strong winds _ rain at least for a time, and still strong winds across _ rain at least for a time, and still strong winds across the - rain at least for a time, and still. strong winds across the north—east of scotland — strong winds across the north—east of scotland and _ strong winds across the north—east of scotland and also _ strong winds across the north—east of scotland and also to _ strong winds across the north—east of scotland and also to the - strong winds across the north—east of scotland and also to the east - strong winds across the north—east of scotland and also to the east of| of scotland and also to the east of the pennines _ of scotland and also to the east of the pennines. come _ of scotland and also to the east of the pennines. come south - of scotland and also to the east of the pennines. come south and - of scotland and also to the east of the pennines. come south and wei of scotland and also to the east of- the pennines. come south and we will see briqhter— the pennines. come south and we will see brighter skies _ the pennines. come south and we will see brighter skies and _ the pennines. come south and we will see brighter skies and sunshine. - see brighter skies and sunshine. rain— see brighter skies and sunshine. rain cominq _ see brighter skies and sunshine. rain coming in— see brighter skies and sunshine. rain coming in from _ see brighter skies and sunshine. rain coming in from the - see brighter skies and sunshine. rain coming in from the west. see brighter skies and sunshine. - rain coming in from the west through the course _ rain coming in from the west through the course of— rain coming in from the west through the course of the _ rain coming in from the west through the course of the day. _ rain coming in from the west through the course of the day. temperaturesl the course of the day. temperatures ten to _ the course of the day. temperatures ten to about — the course of the day. temperatures ten to about 21— the course of the day. temperatures ten to about 21 degrees, _ the course of the day. temperatures ten to about 21 degrees, so - the course of the day. temperatures ten to about 21 degrees, so cooler . ten to about 21 degrees, so cooler in the _ ten to about 21 degrees, so cooler in the north — ten to about 21 degrees, so cooler in the north. then— ten to about 21 degrees, so cooler in the north. then as _ ten to about 21 degrees, so cooler in the north. then as we - ten to about 21 degrees, so cooler in the north. then as we moved . ten to about 21 degrees, so cooler i in the north. then as we moved from friday— in the north. then as we moved from friday and _ in the north. then as we moved from friday and into — in the north. then as we moved from friday and into the _ in the north. then as we moved from friday and into the weekend, - in the north. then as we moved from friday and into the weekend, you - in the north. then as we moved from i friday and into the weekend, you can see we _ friday and into the weekend, you can see we have — friday and into the weekend, you can see we have high _ friday and into the weekend, you can see we have high pressure _ friday and into the weekend, you can see we have high pressure in - friday and into the weekend, you can see we have high pressure in charge. i see we have high pressure in charge. front _ see we have high pressure in charge.
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front cominq — see we have high pressure in charge. front coming up _ see we have high pressure in charge. front coming up from _ see we have high pressure in charge. front coming up from the _ see we have high pressure in charge. front coming up from the south - see we have high pressure in charge. front coming up from the south and i front coming up from the south and then we _ front coming up from the south and then we have — front coming up from the south and then we have a _ front coming up from the south and then we have a lot _ front coming up from the south and then we have a lot of— front coming up from the south and then we have a lot of isobars - front coming up from the south and then we have a lot of isobars on - front coming up from the south and then we have a lot of isobars on the i then we have a lot of isobars on the charts _ then we have a lot of isobars on the charts cominq — then we have a lot of isobars on the charts coming in— then we have a lot of isobars on the charts coming in from _ then we have a lot of isobars on the charts coming in from the _ then we have a lot of isobars on the charts coming in from the west - then we have a lot of isobars on the charts coming in from the west with that whether — charts coming in from the west with that whether front, _ charts coming in from the west with that whether front, so _ charts coming in from the west with that whether front, so translated, l that whether front, so translated, this weekend _ that whether front, so translated, this weekend for— that whether front, so translated, this weekend for many— that whether front, so translated, this weekend for many will- that whether front, so translated, this weekend for many will be - that whether front, so translated, this weekend for many will be dry| this weekend for many will be dry with some — this weekend for many will be dry with some sunshine _ this weekend for many will be dry with some sunshine and - this weekend for many will be dry with some sunshine and a - this weekend for many will be dry with some sunshine and a few- with some sunshine and a few showers. _ with some sunshine and a few showers. but _ with some sunshine and a few showers, but it— with some sunshine and a few showers, but it looks - with some sunshine and a few showers, but it looks like - with some sunshine and a few showers, but it looks like on i with some sunshine and a few- showers, but it looks like on sunday we could _ showers, but it looks like on sunday we could have — showers, but it looks like on sunday we could have some _ showers, but it looks like on sunday we could have some rain— showers, but it looks like on sunday we could have some rain coming - showers, but it looks like on sunday we could have some rain coming in. we could have some rain coming in from _ we could have some rain coming in from the _ we could have some rain coming in from the west _ we could have some rain coming in from the west. quite _ we could have some rain coming in from the west. quite a _ we could have some rain coming in from the west. quite a bit - we could have some rain coming in from the west. quite a bit going i we could have some rain coming in| from the west. quite a bit going on with the weather from the west. quite a bit going on with the weather in from the west. quite a bit going on with the weather in the from the west. quite a bit going on with the weather in the next from the west. quite a bit going on with the weather in the next few days _ with the weather in the next few days i— with the weather in the next few da 5. , ., . .. with the weather in the next few da 5. . . days. i will give you a call later about the _ days. i will give you a call later about the ryder _ days. i will give you a call later about the ryder cup, - days. i will give you a call later about the ryder cup, i - days. i will give you a call later about the ryder cup, i can - days. i will give you a call later about the ryder cup, i can tell| days. i will give you a call later - about the ryder cup, i can tell you are interested stop free i can hardly contain my excitement, dan. don't switch your phone up again, all right chris thank goodness we have carol to keep us all in check. children with mental health disorders are facing long waits for treatment in england — with one area having an average lag of eight months between referral and the first session of counselling. that's the finding of a bbc investigation, which has revealed that one in five patients waited longer than 12 weeks. our health correspondent sophie hutchinson has been meeting some of the parents who are desperate to get help for their children.
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her report contains some details which you may find upsetting. that feeling of helplessness. i can't even describe how awful, as a parent, is to see that. you're waiting for a service that you know could help your child. the desperate situation facing some parents with a mentally ill child. when things get tough, this is where sue comes — her teenage daughter, who has self—harmed, has been waiting for mental—health treatment for almost two and a half years. we don't know how long it's going to be before she receives help, but when she does receive that help, you know, we don't know now how she's going to engage with that because of the wait. and, as i say, you know, i do wonder if, as a result of those delays, you know, she might end up needing medication because the anxiety is now so high. it's estimated, in england, 1.5 million under—18—year—olds have
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a probable mental—health disorder. but in the year to 2021, the child and adolescent mental health service — camhs — sawjust under a third of them. and data obtained by the bbc from half of camhs' services in england suggests, since the pandemic, one in five have waited longer than 12 weeks — and in one area, the average wait was nearly nine months. your teachers here really, really care about you, and... some teachers are so concerned they're telling parents not to bother with camhs. the additional support for mental health is completely overwhelmed as things stand currently. when i have parents that are in a really desperate situation, i'm often reluctant to refer them on to these services because i know the length of time that they will wait. and sometimes there just isn't that opportunity to wait — you need that support right there, right then to try and help the child and the family. sandra — not her real name. her 16—year—old daughter has waited
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three years for treatment, despite attempting suicide 17 times. you get told to call the crisis team, who are never there in times of crisis because you can only have a crisis between 8am and 6pm. and then you get referred to adult services who just say "ring an ambulance". the government says, due to the pandemic, nhs staff are now treating more children and young people than ever before. and that, thanks to the nhs long—term plan, an additional 345,000 children and young people each year will get help. she can't imagine living her life in the way that she does. she can't imagine living her life feeling the way that she does. and so the consequence of having to wait this long is that it's done an awful lot of psychiatric damage to her, really. how painful is that to you? it's devastating. she is so talented. she's amazing at art and music.
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she's really creative. but when you are constantly trying to just keep your daughter alive another day, to hope that someone will give us some therapy... sorry. after five suicide attempts this summer, sandra's daughter was eventually referred for the therapy she needs. and sue's daughter — who's waited since october 2018 — has now been given an appointment. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. dame rachel de souza is the children's commissioner for england. she joins us from westminster. thank you for talking to us this morning. hugely distressing pieces that we just played their and we know that the story we've just been able to tell is probably reflected across the country. there are many, many families in situations like this at the moment. a huge concern is getting your child help when they need it. we knew things were bad, in fact they are worse than anybody
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thought. what is your reaction to that and what can be done? 50. thought. what is your reaction to that and what can be done? so, first off, my heart _ that and what can be done? so, first off. my heart goes _ that and what can be done? so, first off, my heart goes out _ that and what can be done? so, first off, my heart goes out to _ that and what can be done? so, first off, my heart goes out to those - off, my heart goes out to those parents and children and those stories they have just told us. i have just done a survey of over half a million of england's children and the single biggest concern that children have raised is their own mental health and well—being, especially coming out of the pandemic, so this is an issue that has got larger during the pandemic and not gone away. there are some really practical things that need to be done. nhs england need to prioritise catch—up funding they have got for children's mental health and i spoke to their new ceo of the nhs last week and i was speaking to providers and deliveries of services and we need to provide the children's mental health no question. the fact that children are telling us this up in our survey that we launch today makes it even
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more real. there are also some things that we can do to avoid problems getting to where these have got to. we need to be much better at the delivery and support of mental health in schools, and again, children and young people have told me, that is over half a million of them, that when they are feeling bad for when they are feeling anxious, where they want to get support first is in schools. that is with people that they trust. i am very keen on rolling out digital counselling as a first step, and that could be done very, very quickly. and the 2017 mental health green paper which has a roll—out of mental health teams into schools and into the community right across country, it is a ten year plan, i would like that speeded up year plan, i would like that speeded up because the pilots of those are going down very, very well. sol think we know what to do, i think things are moving but they need to move more quickly than ever because particularly of lockdown and
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children are telling us that they need this. i mean, one bit of reassurance is that 80% of children of that half a million children who responded said they personally feel happy and 0k, mental health is definitely the biggest issue for children, and they have raised it in this survey. it children, and they have raised it in this survey-— this survey. it is heartening that children do _ this survey. it is heartening that children do feel _ this survey. it is heartening that children do feel more _ this survey. it is heartening that children do feel more able - this survey. it is heartening that children do feel more able to i this survey. it is heartening that. children do feel more able to talk about their mental health and maybe talk about how they feel, but sometimes this younger generation is criticised for perhaps not being tough enough. what do you say to that? it tough enough. what do you say to that? , , , that? it is very interesting. there was half a — that? it is very interesting. there was half a million _ that? it is very interesting. there was half a million respondents i that? it is very interesting. there i was half a million respondents have told me absolutely clearly, we are not a snowflake generation. we have just been through a global endemic and i will say they are a heroic generation. they have been through something really tough, they want to get back to school. they have told me that they want great careers, they want to work hard, they don't expect things to be easy, but they are far more literate. it is the first generation that is really
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literate about their mental health and well—being. we need to support them and the best way to do that is to deal with things early in schools, youth clubs, community hubs, mental health services in there, training our professionals who engage with students in recognising issues and dealing with them early. this is a great hard—working generation who care about each other. they have told me they care about the environment, they care about the environment, they care about the environment, they care about the community, they want to work hard and i think it is time for us to give them something back. he time for us to give them something back. ,. ., time for us to give them something back. ,. . , ., back. he said at the beginning of this interview _ back. he said at the beginning of this interview that _ back. he said at the beginning of this interview that nhs _ back. he said at the beginning of this interview that nhs england | this interview that nhs england needs to prioritise the funding for children's mental health services. do you think that is maybe not happening at the moment? taste do you think that is maybe not happening at the moment? we are 'ust cominu out happening at the moment? we are 'ust coming out of — happening at the moment? we are 'ust coming out of the fi happening at the moment? we are 'ust coming out of the pandemic, �* happening at the moment? we are 'ust coming out of the pandemic, they h coming out of the pandemic, they have just received their covid funding. we are committed to working better for children. funding. we are committed to working betterfor children. none has risen and my call is, i know they have lots of priorities. there are health issues coming out of covid but i think prioritise children. every pound spent weeks massive benefits
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later. early intervention is really, really important.— later. early intervention is really, really important. dame rachel de souza, really important. dame rachel de souza. thank— really important. dame rachel de souza, thank you _ really important. dame rachel de souza, thank you very _ really important. dame rachel de souza, thank you very much - really important. dame rachel de i souza, thank you very much indeed for your time this morning. dame rachel de souza there, reflecting on the findings of that report into the state of children's mental health at the moment. the state of children's mental health at the moment-— the moment. the tiny 656. at the time is- -- — the moment. the tiny 656. at the time is- -- i _ the moment. the tiny 656. at the time is... i have _ the moment. the tiny 656. at the time is... i have just _ the moment. the tiny 656. at the time is... i have just said - the moment. the tiny 656. at the time is... i have just said that. i time is... i havejust said that. what is going on? time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. i will try to wake up. good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. detectives have named a woman who was found dead in cator park in kidbrooke on saturday, as they appeal for anyone who saw anything suspicious to come forward. police believe 28—year—old sabina nessa was attacked at 8.30 on the previous evening when the park was likely
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to have been used by dog walkers and joggers. her body remained undiscovered for nearly 2a hours. a man arrested on suspicion of murder has been released pending further enquiries. young people who survive cancer are at risk of missing out on the chance to have children in the future because certain fertility preservation services aren't always funded by the nhs. that's according to a new study which includes research by the ucl hospital foundation trust. lauren shute from high wycombe was 17 when she was diagnosed with cancer. she had ovarian tissue preserved — a procedure which was paid for by a charity. i know people who haven't had it, who hadn't heard of it, and i almost feel guilty bringing it up when someone who i know who's also gone through a similar experience hasn't had that, because it's allowed me to kind of move on from cancer and to not have it impact every single point in my life. it will impact my health for ever, but to know that it hasn't affected my fertility as it could have — i'm so grateful
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every day for that. nhs england says all children with cancer should be advised about their options in line with clinical guidelines. the london—based firm pimlico plumbers has been sold to us home services group neighborly. the deal will see founder charlie mullins offload his 90% stake. the company which was established just over a0 years ago employs more than 400 workers. let's take a look at the travel situation. there are severe delays on the district line. all other lines are running well. for all other travel news, tune in to your local bbc radio station. onto the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's set to be a fairly pleasant day of weather today across the capital — not as cloudy as it was yesterday, there'll be more in the way of sunshine, it will stay dry and it will feel warmer, too. but it's been quite a chilly early start to the morning, temperatures having dropped back into high single figures. still a bit of mist to lift and clear, but there will be some
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spells of sunshine emerging — we'll keep those sunny spells as we head into the afternoon. the winds stay light, and temperatures will peak in the low 20s in celsius — 21 or maybe even 22 degrees celsius. now, as we head through the evening and overnight, then the winds will pick up a touch so there won't be quite so much of an issue with mist and fog into wednesday morning. but still, temperatures dropping back as low as perhaps eight or nine degrees celsius in some of the rural spots. so locally, again, quite a chilly start to the day with lots of clear skies around. and then tomorrow, again, it's dry and it's warm, there'll be a lot of sunshine around. it will turn windier again into the afternoon as that wind picks up. top temperatures again peaking at around 21 degrees. on thursday and friday, we start to draw in more of a northwesterly wind, but it should stay dry or mostly dry as we head through the rest of this week, with some more sunshine at times. i'm back with the latest from bbc london in half an hour. bye for now.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. our headlines today. a difficult winter ahead with soaring energy prices — but the government insists a price cap must remain in place to protect consumers. we are going to have to heat the house, because we can't be cold. so we are going to have to basically cut back on food. i'll look at what this means if you are already struggling to pay. and whether prices will go up for everyone. can, should, the government do more? a question we'll put to the business secretary kwasi kwarteng. the prime minister meets the president — climate change, afghanistan and a us trade deal are all up for discussion. mnd campaigners are asking for millions of pounds for research into the condition. england's cricketers won't play in pakistan next
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month. the ecb have cancelled the mens and womens tours over concerns of player welfare and about travel to the region. there is mist and fog patches around this morning. dense in the south—east and east anglia. they will lift and most will have a dry and sunny day. later, rain and drizzle coming to the north—west. it's tuesday, september 21st. our top story. energy price caps, which help prevent consumers paying too much for gas and electricity will remain in place despite some firms claiming the system is not sustainable. surging wholesale gas prices have caused four suppliers to go bust — with four more on the brink. in a joint statement last night, the business secretary kwasi kwarteng and industry regulator ofgem said the caps will remain — as jon donnison reports. the government insists there is no question of the lights going out this winter, but as energy prices soar, some are worried.
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my bills are already at breaking point, and then going into the winter, i've got a daughter and, obviously, myself, and it's a worry, it's a real big worry. the only way to sort of... you know, we are going to have to heat the house, because we can't be cold, so we are going to have to basically cut back on food. and food supply issues will be beyond the agenda will be be on the agenda when the government meets with the food and drink federation later today. the huge spike in energy prices means c02 gas suppliers have shutdown production. shut down production. the soft drinks association now says they only have a few days supply of carbon dioxide left. and meat producers have warned of price rises within the week, if slaughterhouses can't get enough access to c02. high demand for gas as the global economy picks up, coupled with a reduced supply, are behind a surge in wholesale gas prices.
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but after an emergency meeting with energy firms, the government, alongside the industry regulator ofgem, reiterated last night there would be no question of removing the cap that stops suppliers passing on those wholesale price rises to consumers. it protects and has protected millions of customers from sudden increases in global prices. we are committed to that price cap and it will remain in place. that means more small energy supplier is unable to turn a profit will likely go bust. the government says it's considering offering state backed loans to those that survive, but insists it will not be bailing out failed companies. john donnison, bbc news. let's get more on this now with nina. where will this hit consumers? that is the bi where will this hit consumers? t�*ué�*if
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is the big question. we asked yesterday, this perfect storm that has seen prices rocket, and what will happen to smaller businesses who cannot afford to buy in at that price, will the government pick up the tab? the answer yesterday was no. kwasi kwarteng said there would no. kwasi kwarteng said there would no —— be no reward for mismanagement and the government could not prop up companies with the flawed business model. he suggested underwriting loans for larger companies who take customers from companies that have failed. the energy price cap is integral, a limit to how much they can charge people on a variable rate. that is controversial in the industry because they say when prices go up they are limited how much they can charge customers. most households will pay more. the 12% hike for variable rates translates to £140 annually for the average
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household. and those on a different rate will not be able to shop around —— on a fixed rate will not be able to shop around. if you think your company has gone bump, do not panic, no one will cut off your supply. wait to see who your provider is and in the meantime get metre readings, a screen grab online of accounts, keep paper copies, so that when you move to a new provider you get the fairest deal possible. but brace yourself, it is unlikely anyone will get as good a deal when it comes to renewing contracts. there is concern for people on prepayment metres, often people who struggle financially and they might see the biggest increases. aha, financially and they might see the biggest increases.— financially and they might see the biggest increases. a suggestion the covernment biggest increases. a suggestion the government needs _ biggest increases. a suggestion the government needs to _ biggest increases. a suggestion the government needs to step - biggest increases. a suggestion the government needs to step in - biggest increases. a suggestion the government needs to step in and i biggest increases. a suggestion the government needs to step in and it| government needs to step in and it should be more regulated. the? should be more regulated. they criticise providers _ should be more regulated. they criticise providers for _ criticise providers for mismanagement and people saying you mismanaged regulation and you have it in your power to ensure
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businesses are ready when crises like this occur. we businesses are ready when crises like this occur.— like this occur. we will speak to kwasi kwarteng _ like this occur. we will speak to kwasi kwarteng about - like this occur. we will speak to kwasi kwarteng about this - like this occur. we will speak to kwasi kwarteng about this in i like this occur. we will speak to i kwasi kwarteng about this in about 25 minutes. vigil has taken place for a woman and family who died in derbyshire. hundreds of people gathered in the village of killamarsh, near sheffield, to lay flowers and messages of condolence in memory of terri harris, her 13—year—old sonjohn—paul, her 11—year—old daughter lacey, and lacey's friend connie gent, who was also 11. a 31—year—old man is being held on suspicion of murder. borisjohnson will meet president biden at the white house today to discuss topics including climate change, trade and the situation in afghanistan. it's the first time a british prime minister has met a president at the white house since theresa may visited donald trump there in 2017. our political correspondent helen catt reports on the build—up to another historic meeting. it was all smiles in the sunshine
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when borisjohnson metjoe biden in person for the first time just three months ago at the g7 summit in cornwall. mrjohnson says he hasn't had much of a chance to get to know the us president, but he says they have a genuinely terrific relationship and see eye to eye on all sorts of things. he'll be hoping the reception is as warm when they meet in the oval office in the white house later. what would have been one of borisjohnson's key requests has already been fulfilled. in a surprise move yesterday, the us lifted its travel ban on uk citizens. but other issues could be more difficult. borisjohnson is expected to push the us to increase its climate commitments ahead of november's crucial climate change summit cop26, which will take place in glasgow. it's the moment when we have to grow up and take our responsibilities. i think we go through, you know, a period of glorious indifference about the world. we've been through that, we've been through our childhood, if you like. we've now got to realise
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that this is a problem that requires grip. the two men are also expected to discuss the situation in afghanistan after the two countries withdrew troops. and what about a trade deal? borisjohnson has been pretty downbeat about the chances of that happening quickly. he told reporters that american negotiators were pretty ruthless and that he would rather get a deal that works for the uk than get a quick deal. borisjohnson is meeting several world leaders this week, but this meeting will certainly be the most closely watched. helen catt, bbc news. we'rejoined now by our chief political correspondent, adam fleming. a lot to talk about. how much of an impact will borisjohnson be able to make in these discussions? that impact will boris johnson be able to make in these discussions?- make in these discussions? that is an interesting _ make in these discussions? that is an interesting question _ make in these discussions? that is an interesting question because i make in these discussions? that is an interesting question because ifl an interesting question because if you look at the two things boris johnson would describe as diplomatic
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wins, you have one yesterday which is the us decision to restart transatlantic travel for people from the uk and europe from november if double vaccinated. and it looks like when joe double vaccinated. and it looks like whenjoe biden speaks to the un today, he will commit more american money to the fight against climate change in the rest of the world, something the uk has pushed for ahead of the climate conference the uk is hosting in november. the uk would say those things have happened because of diplomatic pressure from borisjohnson. others would say those are things that would happen anyway because they are in the us national interest. you have the question about whether america does the stuff it will do anyway or does the stuff it will do anyway or does the british prime minister have influence the white house? i think the things that stick in your mind are the more human moments on these trips. back to that time gordon
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brown went to see george w bush. two characters like chalk and cheese. you have the moment when gordon brown got in the golf cart and george bush went fast and gordon brown looked horrified. it captured the relationship between them. theresa may went to the white house to see donald trump for the first time. everyone thought it was an unpredictable person beating an uptight person. the conversation went well but then you have the image of theresa may holding his hand as they gingerly walked down a ramp. it summed up the weird relationship between the us and uk in the donald trump era. i wonder what images we will get that will sum up thejoe biden, borisjohnson relationship. we sum up the joe biden, boris johnson relationship-— relationship. we were watching that foota . e. relationship. we were watching that footage. gordon _ relationship. we were watching that footage. gordon brown, _ relationship. we were watching that footage. gordon brown, it - relationship. we were watching that footage. gordon brown, it was - footage. gordon brown, it was brilliant. president bush does an unnecessary doughnut. and then he
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goes off and gordon brown trying to look comfortable while clinging on for dear life.— for dear life. who would think a uolf cart for dear life. who would think a golf cart would _ for dear life. who would think a golf cart would be _ for dear life. who would think a golf cart would be scary. - the ministry of defence has apologised for a data breach which may have compromised the safety of dozens of afghan interpreters who worked for british forces. more than 250 people seeking relocation to the uk — many of whom are in hiding — were mistakenly copied into an emailfrom the mod, in which their names and some profile pictures were visible. defence secretary ben wallace has launched an investigation into how the breach occurred. an earthquake measuring 3.8 in magnitude has struck the spanish island of la palma, where a volcano erupted on sunday. the authorities have sped up the evacuation of thousands of people and more than 100 homes have been destroyed by lava, which is continuing to flow. local officials say it could trigger explosions and toxic gasses explosions and toxic gases when it reaches the sea. the canadian prime ministerjustin trudeau is on course to win the snap general election he called
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— but without gaining the parliamentary majority he was hoping for. mr trudeau called the election in august, less than two years after his liberal party lost its majority in 2019. some votes are still being counted, but the leader of the main opposition party has conceded defeat, paving the way for the liberals to form another minority government. a new documentary about the duke of edinburgh's family life will air on bbc one tomorrow. most senior members of the royal family — including princes charles, william and harry, but not the queen — were interviewed for the programme. they shared memories of the duke as a "firm but fair" family man with a love of barbecues and practicaljokes. one of the games he used to enjoy playing was when we used to go forfamily barbecues. instead of like a mustard pot, we had a squeezy mustard tube. and he used to take the lid off and put it in your hands. he gets you to hold it.
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gets you to hold it in your hands and the lid's off. i and i can't remember exactly what he says, but he ends up slamming your hands together. and then he'd squish your hands together to fire the mustard onto the ceiling. it went all over the ceiling. he used to get in a lot of trouble from my grandmother for covering most of the places we had lunch and things with mustard on the ceiling. it sounds like you had a good mustard gag. and a big supply of mustard. we will talk to people who put that together. i think it is a record—breaking documentary. the most royals who have appeared in one programme. an incredible piece of television. morning, carol. good morning. the weather today is fairly settled for most and the next few days, for some, that will be the
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case, dry with sunshine. temperatures in the south—east by friday could be up to 24. it will turn windy and cooler in the north. today, you notice the wind picking up today, you notice the wind picking up in the far north—west. slowly easing tomorrow night and into the following day. this morning some mist and fog especially in east anglia and the south—east and also the south—western midlands. they will lift and there will be sunshine and dry weather. thicker cloud in north—west. introducing drizzle and light rain. and the wind gust to gale force. this evening and overnight, is still local gales across the north—west of scotland. a blustery night. weather front sinking south, taking cloud with it. ahead of it, under clear skies, it
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will be cool with a return of mist and fog. at the same time a new weather front will introduce heavy rain. that is how we start the day tomorrow. the rain slowly slipping southwards. still windy for time especially in parts of scotland to the east of the pennines. blustery further south but here you are likely to see most of the sunshine and behind the weather front a mixture of sunshine and showers. thanks. let's return now to our top story — and ministers and businesses will continue talks today to deal with effects of the ongoing gas crisis. from soaring energy bills to price hikes in food, our consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith explains what's gone wrong. how much you will have to pay for energy this autumn is still up in the air. the industry has been forking out
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three times the usual cost for gas. that means many firms are left in the red after tempting customers with low fixed prices, and the price cap stopping them boosting bills to make up the shortfall. with so many companies looking precarious, the pressure is mounting on the government. the taxpayer should not be expected to prop up companies that have poor business models and are not resilient to fluctuations in price. if your provider collapses, you will be automatically transferred to another. you will not lose any credit you have, but you might be charged a higher tariff. and manyjust can't afford it. i did just get a bill through and it's going up twice the amount we normally pay, so that's not great. wintertime will be the telling time, i think. it is notjust energy bills that will be going up thanks to the rising gas prices. manufacturers will be passing
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on those higher costs by charging us more for everything we buy, particularly for meat, where there has been such a crisis caused by the hike in gas prices, that we are likely to see prices go up within the week. so as the weather turns and the heating is flicked on more often, everyone's budgets will need to tighten. colletta smith, bbc news. let's explore this further with energy analyst ellen fraser and the food scientist kumud ghandi. good morning. there will be people watching today and the big question is i understand there is no —— there is i understand there is no —— there is a global gas issue but how will it hit me in a pocket? understandable concerns? entirely understandable. people are concerned
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about energy bills going into winter anyway. it is a topic front of mind. people coming from covid have tight finances anyway. in the short—term people will be protected who are on fixed tariffs. the price cap will go up fixed tariffs. the price cap will go up in october but that has been relatively well signposted by government. short—term, prices will government. short—term, prices will 9° up government. short—term, prices will go up but it's manageable. the debate is what happens in the medium term and the extent to which government might step in to help suppliers manage prices to get through the price hikes. we suppliers manage prices to get through the price hikes. we have a selection of _ through the price hikes. we have a selection of props. _ through the price hikes. we have a selection of props. until— through the price hikes. we have a selection of props. until this - selection of props. until this current crisis, people would not have known how important co2 is in food production. have known how important c02 is in food production.— have known how important c02 is in food production. c02, and a number of cases food production. c02, and a number of gases are — food production. c02, and a number of gases are used _ food production. c02, and a number of gases are used in _ food production. c02, and a number
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of gases are used in food _ food production. c02, and a number of gases are used in food packaging | of gases are used in food packaging and production. we have here salads, baked _ and production. we have here salads, baked goods, meats, raw and cooked, ready— baked goods, meats, raw and cooked, ready meals. — baked goods, meats, raw and cooked, ready meals, fish. all of those ingredients are usually packaged in a modified atmosphere, which contains— a modified atmosphere, which contains a number of gases, c02 being _ contains a number of gases, c02 being one — contains a number of gases, c02 being one. that will affect how packaged food comes to the market. the supermarkets. these are everyday items. we spoke to farmers yesterday talking about pigs and how co2 is used in that. these, eventually, maybe in days, could affect whether we see products on shelves? items in the packaging — we see products on shelves? items in the packaging will— we see products on shelves? items in the packaging will be _ we see products on shelves? items in the packaging will be affected. - the packaging will be affected. whereas the loose items, things not in the _ whereas the loose items, things not in the packaging, will still be
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available. perhaps there might be a move _ available. perhaps there might be a move to _ available. perhaps there might be a move to bringing more things that are loose — move to bringing more things that are loose and buying more food that is loosely— are loose and buying more food that is loosely packaged rather than in packaging. we is loosely packaged rather than in -a~ackain. ~ . is loosely packaged rather than in -~~ackain.~ ., is loosely packaged rather than in wackain_ . ., , ., , ., packaging. we have some questions to ut to ou packaging. we have some questions to put to you from — packaging. we have some questions to put to you from viewers. _ packaging. we have some questions to put to you from viewers. this - packaging. we have some questions to put to you from viewers. this is - packaging. we have some questions to put to you from viewers. this is the - put to you from viewers. this is the big one, should ifix an energy price? big one, should i fix an energy rice? , . , ., , , ., price? fixing prices generally is a aood thin price? fixing prices generally is a good thing because _ price? fixing prices generally is a good thing because it _ price? fixing prices generally is a good thing because it gives - price? fixing prices generally is a l good thing because it gives people certainty — good thing because it gives people certainty. you understand how you can budget — certainty. you understand how you can budget for finances and move forward — can budget for finances and move forward. fixing energy prices now is hard with_ forward. fixing energy prices now is hard with a — forward. fixing energy prices now is hard with a lot of suppliers withdrawing tariffs. the range of tariffs _ withdrawing tariffs. the range of tariffs available is restricted. if you can — tariffs available is restricted. if you can find a good tariff, lock it in and _ you can find a good tariff, lock it in and give — you can find a good tariff, lock it in and give certainty going forward. this is— in and give certainty going forward. this is a _ in and give certainty going forward. this is a viewer question that a number are asking. and yesterday after speaking to the farmers...
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mindful it is early in the morning and i do not want to go into detail, there are a couple of other methods that can be used. captive bolting is used commonly for cattle and sheep. that does not use co2. besides those and of course, non—stunting is used which is also used in kosher meat and halal. ~ ., ., . and halal. what about packaged noods, and halal. what about packaged goods, without _ and halal. what about packaged goods, without c02? _ and halal. what about packaged goods, without c02? using - and halal. what about packaged goods, without c02? using c02j and halal. what about packaged - goods, without c02? using c02 and nitrouen is goods, without c02? using c02 and nitrogen is about _ goods, without c02? using c02 and nitrogen is about shelf— goods, without c02? using c02 and
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nitrogen is about shelf life, - goods, without c02? using c02 and nitrogen is about shelf life, about i nitrogen is about shelf life, about giving us longevity of food. typically, food packaged in a modified atmosphere would give us 21 days of shelf life as opposed to perhaps five days if it was non—modified. what we could do is look at buying locally, from butchers, where meat is not in a packaged form, buying from greengrocers, localfarm shops, directly from farms, where it does not have to go into packaging. buying loose lettuce like this is greener and will last longer. typically, that would last in your fridge for a number of days than the packaged, because once you open the package, once the nitrogen and co2 escapes, you lose the shelf life. interesting. it escapes, you lose the shelf life. interesting-— interesting. it is oxidation. penetrating _ interesting. it is oxidation. penetrating the _ interesting. it is oxidation. penetrating the surface - interesting. it is oxidation. i
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penetrating the surface area. interesting. it is oxidation. - penetrating the surface area. could ou penetrating the surface area. could you exotain — penetrating the surface area. could you explain about _ penetrating the surface area. could you explain about the _ penetrating the surface area. could you explain about the energy price cap? what it means. we have one in place now and a change coming next year. it place now and a change coming next ear. , , , , year. it is refreshed every six months by — year. it is refreshed every six months by ofgem _ year. it is refreshed every six months by ofgem and - year. it is refreshed every six months by ofgem and a - year. it is refreshed every six| months by ofgem and a large year. it is refreshed every six - months by ofgem and a large part of that is— months by ofgem and a large part of that is based on wholesale price and the past _ that is based on wholesale price and the past few cycles, the cap has dropped — the past few cycles, the cap has dropped down. that fixes the top price _ dropped down. that fixes the top price customers can pay for a six month— price customers can pay for a six month period. recently it has gone up month period. recently it has gone up and _ month period. recently it has gone up and will— month period. recently it has gone up and will go up on october the 1st. up and will go up on october the 1st and — up and will go up on october the 1st. and with the wholesale price ist. and with the wholesale price spikes— 1st. and with the wholesale price spikes there is a thought about whether— spikes there is a thought about whether the government will increase it further~ _ whether the government will increase it further. effectively it locks in the maximum price you can charge in the maximum price you can charge in the market— the maximum price you can charge in the market for a six month period to -ive the market for a six month period to give customers certainty over that period~ _ give customers certainty over that eriod. . , , give customers certainty over that eriod. .,, , ,, . ., , period. papers speculate this mornin: period. papers speculate this morning the _ period. papers speculate this morning the rise _ period. papers speculate this morning the rise next - period. papers speculate this morning the rise next year i period. papers speculate this i morning the rise next year could period. papers speculate this - morning the rise next year could be as much as 200%. it is
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morning the rise next year could be as much as 200%.— as much as 200%. it is too early to sa . we as much as 200%. it is too early to say- we need _ as much as 200%. it is too early to say- we need to — as much as 200%. it is too early to say. we need to be _ as much as 200%. it is too early to say. we need to be careful- as much as 200%. it is too early to| say. we need to be careful because energy— say. we need to be careful because energy prices are spiking. 300, £400 is not _ energy prices are spiking. 300, £400 is not impossible. there is a reality— is not impossible. there is a reality check in that it will flow through — reality check in that it will flow through to energy prices at some point _ through to energy prices at some point we — through to energy prices at some point. we have to be careful because it is too— point. we have to be careful because it is too early to say exactly what it is too early to say exactly what it is too early to say exactly what it is but — it is too early to say exactly what it is but people planning ahead with finances _ it is but people planning ahead with finances to ensure they have flexibility in home budgets to allow for a level— flexibility in home budgets to allow for a level of increase is a wise thing _ for a level of increase is a wise thing to— for a level of increase is a wise thing to do _ for a level of increase is a wise thing to do— for a level of increase is a wise thing to do. for a level of increase is a wise thin to do. ., , ., thing to do. you can understand the concern when _ thing to do. you can understand the concern when you _ thing to do. you can understand the concern when you think _ thing to do. you can understand the concern when you think of _ thing to do. you can understand the concern when you think of that, - concern when you think of that, national insurance increases and universal credit. quite a lot to talk to kwasi kwarteng about. thank you very much. and thank you for bringing in the food. he is hungry. you can take the cabbage. too early
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for cabbage. it felt like we were talking about it for a long time but the vaccine roll—out for healthy 12 to 15—year—olds is now under way in most of the uk. let's get an idea of what the different nations of the uk are doing. vaccinations have already started in hundreds of schools in england and scotland. invites are also being sent out in wales this week, while in northern ireland they are likely to be offered from next month. around three million children in that age group are eligible for one dose of the pfizer vaccine. we can hear now from a couple of teenagers in that 12—to—15 group who got their covid jabs yesterday. it wasn't too bad? no. where i have got older... i've got grandparents. i'd love to be safe around them and spend time with them and be safe. they are all happy, because it allows you to go out without the worry of becoming more ill from covid—19.
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we're nowjoined by the headteacher of chase terrace academy in burntwood, nicola mason. good morning. lovely to speak to you. we'd talk to ministers about how they feel the vaccine roll—out will work and it's great to speak to you on the front line, seeing this with these 12—15 year olds. what is the picture in your school this morning?— the picture in your school this morninr? ., ., ., ., ., , morning? we do not have a date yet for vaccinations _ morning? we do not have a date yet for vaccinations but _ morning? we do not have a date yet for vaccinations but we _ morning? we do not have a date yet for vaccinations but we have - morning? we do not have a date yet for vaccinations but we have booked| for vaccinations but we have booked in a flu vaccination and we expect the covid vaccination before half term. once we get the date we will prepare for that. most schools in this area in particular are in the same position.— this area in particular are in the same position. how is that being communicated? _ same position. how is that being communicated? do _ same position. how is that being communicated? do you - same position. how is that being communicated? do you speak i same position. how is that being communicated? do you speak to| same position. how is that being i communicated? do you speak to public health officials, weight for documentation? taste health officials, weight for
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documentation?— health officials, weight for documentation? ~ ., ., ., documentation? we are waiting for the guidance _ documentation? we are waiting for the guidance to _ documentation? we are waiting for the guidance to come _ documentation? we are waiting for the guidance to come through i documentation? we are waiting for the guidance to come through as i documentation? we are waiting for| the guidance to come through as to how it will work but usually we get information from the local authority who are good at communicating plans. we have a meeting before the announcement that 12—15 year olds would be able to get the vaccine so that we have a provisional plan in place for when the vaccine was approved, which we expected. ourjob is now to make sure families have the right information, talk to staff to make sure we are not pressuring children and families and it is the family's decision. taste children and families and it is the family's decision.— children and families and it is the family's decision. we spoke to you about schools _ family's decision. we spoke to you about schools and _ family's decision. we spoke to you about schools and teachers - family's decision. we spoke to you about schools and teachers being l about schools and teachers being caught in the middle. what conversations have you had the past few days? you are talking to teachers and directly to students and i imagine parents have many questions. and i imagine parents have many ruestions. . , . and i imagine parents have many ruestions. ., , ., questions. parents are looking towards the —
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questions. parents are looking towards the teachers - questions. parents are looking towards the teachers and i questions. parents are looking towards the teachers and the i questions. parents are looking i towards the teachers and the staff for reassurance and advice. the staff need to make sure they take a neutral position in terms of persuading parents or children, putting pressure on, that is not our job. ourjob is to educate and make sure children make an informed decision with the family. some parents are worried because i think parents are worried because i think parents have been put in a difficult position because of the way the vaccine wasn't approved initially, solely on health benefits which they said was marginal. it is a difficult choice but we respect it is their choice but we respect it is their choice to make. some parents have said they will not send their children in, for example. i do not know if you _ children in, for example. i do not know if you have _ children in, for example. i do not know if you have a _ children in, for example. i do not know if you have a safeguarding l know if you have a safeguarding protocol or have to write one for that situation where either a child would like it but parents are not sure all parents say the child
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should have it and the child has a different decision. how have you been coping with that situation? what we would normally do in programmes of vaccination is children go to where we set up the vaccination centre and talk to the nhs professional who will check at that point whether they have consent. we will make sure staff are checking that first level of consent so that if children of families have not consented, they do not go to the vaccination centre. it provides extra assurance to families they are in control of the decision. if they have not given consent it will be down to the nhs professionals to talk to families about vaccinating their child. , , , ., , ., their child. this must be a strange start to the _ their child. this must be a strange start to the term? _ their child. this must be a strange start to the term? i _ their child. this must be a strange start to the term? i think - their child. this must be a strange start to the term? i think the i their child. this must be a strange start to the term? i think the past | start to the term? i think the past two years. — start to the term? i think the past two years. for— start to the term? i think the past two years, for all— start to the term? i think the past two years, for all schools, -
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start to the term? i think the past two years, for all schools, it i start to the term? i think the past two years, for all schools, it has l two years, for all schools, it has been strange and different. we are getting normality back in some areas but as quickly as you do, other things change. but schools react and support the children. the children have been incredible and staff have supported them in an amazing way and i am sure that is the case in most schools in the country. we get on with it and it is important we do that for the safety and education of the children. that for the safety and education of the children-— the children. thanks. a busy _ the children. thanks. a busy day _ the children. thanks. a busy day for - the children. thanks. a busy day for them. | the children. thanks. i a busy day for them. a the children. thanks. - a busy day for them. a huge the children. thanks. _ a busy day for them. a huge day. kwasi kwarteng is coming up in five minutes. time for the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. detectives have named a woman who was found dead in cator park in kidbrooke on saturday — as they appeal for anyone who saw anything suspicious to come forward. police believe 28—year—old sabina nessa was attacked at 8.30
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on the previous evening when the park was likely to have been used by dog walkers and joggers. the primary school teacher's body remained undiscovered for nearly 24 hours. a man arrested on suspicion of murder has been released pending further enquiries. young people who survive cancer are at risk of missing out on the chance to have children in the future because certain fertility preservation services aren't always funded by the nhs. that's according to a new study which includes research by the ucl hospital foundation trust. lauren shute from high wycombe was seventeen when she was diagnosed with cancer. she had ovarian tissue preserved — a procedure which was paid for by a charity. i know people who haven't had it, who hadn't heard of it, and i almost feel guilty bringing it up when someone who i know who's also gone through a similar experience hasn't had that, because it's allowed me to kind of move on from cancer and to not have it impact every single point in my life. it will impact my health forever, but to know that it hasn't
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affected my fertility as it could have — i'm so grateful every day for that. well, nhs england says all children with cancer should be advised about their options in line with clinical guidelines. the london—based firm pimlico plumbers has been sold to us home services group neighborly. the deal will see founder charlie mullins offload his 90% stake. the company, which was established just over 40 years ago, employs more than 400 workers. let's take a quick look at the travel situation... for all other travel news, tune in to your local bbc radio station. onto the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's set to be a fairly pleasant day of weather today across the capital — not as cloudy as it was yesterday, there'll be more in the way of sunshine, it will stay dry and it will feel warmer, too. but it's been quite a chilly early start to the morning,
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temperatures having dropped back into high single figures. still a bit of mist to lift and clear, but there will be some spells of sunshine emerging — we'll keep those sunny spells as we head into the afternoon. the winds stay light, and temperatures will peak in the low 20s in celsius — 21 or maybe even 22 degrees celsius. now, as we head through the evening and overnight, then the winds will pick up a touch so there won't be quite so much of an issue with mist and fog into wednesday morning. but still, temperatures dropping back as low as perhaps eight or nine degrees celsius in some of the rural spots. so locally, again, quite a chilly start to the day with lots of clear skies around. and then tomorrow, again, it's dry and its warm, there'll be a lot of sunshine around. it will turn windier again into the afternoon as that wind picks up. top temperatures again peaking at around 21 degrees. on thursday and friday, we start to draw in more of a northwesterly wind, but it should stay dry or mostly dry as we head through the rest of this week, with some more sunshine at times. i'm back with the latest from bbc london in an hour. now, though, it's back to dan and sally. bye for now.
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hello, this is breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. the energy price cap is here to stay. that's the promise from the government and industry regulator ofgem. but with four small energy firms going bust — and others on the brink — what happens to people who find themselves forced to use a new supplier? joining us now is the business secretary kwasi kwarteng. good morning, mr kwarteng, great to have the programme. i want to start by reflecting a little on what he said yesterday in westminster, that the lights will not go out this winter, but you have said we are in the midst of a global crisis. how are you going to keep the lights on? one of the things i said yesterday was that we actually have a very robust and diverse source of supply, gas supply, in the uk, and a lot of the conversation has been focused on
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the conversation has been focused on the energy suppliers. so the fact that we have something like 50, 55 different energy suppliers, and the difficulty is that some of those suppliers will face. i have always said that our first principle is the security of supply and also protecting customers, particularly in vulnerable customers, from massively increased global prices because it is a global issue we are facing. because it is a global issue we are facina. ., , ., because it is a global issue we are facina. ., i. ~ , , facing. how will you keep the lights on? you say _ facing. how will you keep the lights on? you say there _ facing. how will you keep the lights on? you say there is _ facing. how will you keep the lights on? you say there is a _ facing. how will you keep the lights on? you say there is a diversity i facing. how will you keep the lights on? you say there is a diversity of i on? you say there is a diversity of supply but some of those firms will fail, won't they?— fail, won't they? yes, so what i said sorry _ fail, won't they? yes, so what i said sorry i _ fail, won't they? yes, so what i said sorry i wasn't _ fail, won't they? yes, so what i said sorry i wasn't clear. - fail, won't they? yes, so what i i said sorry i wasn't clear. customers of ailing companies will find other energy suppliers, that is a process that already exists —— failing companies. what we have to remember is that every winter about five to
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eight suppliers over the last three orfour eight suppliers over the last three or four years eight suppliers over the last three orfour years since i have been in thejob have orfour years since i have been in the job have exited the market and there is a process in place already focused most of their failing companies to move suppliers, that is something try and test it. what is different this year is that the numbers of those countries that people are saying, they think, it will be higher than the usual five to eight and that is why we have contingency plans to make the supplier of last resort process more robust. ., ., ., , _ ., robust. you are happy to let those firms fail? — robust. you are happy to let those firms fail? i— robust. you are happy to let those firms fail? i don't _ robust. you are happy to let those firms fail? i don't think _ robust. you are happy to let those firms fail? i don't think it - robust. you are happy to let those firms fail? i don't think it is - robust. you are happy to let those firms fail? i don't think it is the i firms fail? i don't think it is the riaht firms fail? i don't think it is the right thing _ firms fail? i don't think it is the right thing for _ firms fail? i don't think it is the right thing for government i firms fail? i don't think it is the right thing for government and | right thing for government and taxpayer money to be injected into companies badly run. as i have said over the last three or four years every winter we have suppliers which exit the market, which failed for various reasons and we don't fail those out, we simply transfer their customers and other companies. let’s customers and other companies. let's
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look at the bigger— customers and other companies. let's look at the bigger picture for the winter coming up at the moment. we have an energy crisis, labour and members of your own party are warning of a triple whammy of rising taxes, rising fuel costs, and of course the end of universal credit. all of those things will happen in very short space of time, leaving people even more vulnerable so you are right to mention the national insurance , . ., , , insurance price, tax rise. of course that kicks in _ insurance price, tax rise. of course that kicks in in — insurance price, tax rise. of course that kicks in in april _ insurance price, tax rise. of course that kicks in in april so _ insurance price, tax rise. of course that kicks in in april so it _ insurance price, tax rise. of course that kicks in in april so it is - insurance price, tax rise. of course that kicks in in april so it is not i that kicks in in april so it is not strictly a winter issue. you are also right to say that we face a global energy spike in terms of prices, but i have said that there are mechanisms in place now to protect consumers, i have been very clear that the energy price cap is staying, even though some energy companies, i read today, iasking for it to be removed. i have been very clear that this staying. protecting customers. we have the warm homes discount, winter fuel
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payments, which again focused on our most vulnerable customers so we are completely focused on helping vulnerable customers through this winter, particularly with regard to energy prices quite tell me what you think about the situation with universal credit and the approaching... i universal credit and the approaching. . .- universal credit and the approaching... universal credit and the auroachinu... ~ ., , approaching... i know the plans chance approaching... i know the plans change in _ approaching... i know the plans change in that _ approaching... i know the plans change in that situation, - approaching... i know the plans change in that situation, when i change in that situation, when looking at families who will be thinking at the moment, am i going to heat my house or feed my children?— children? you will note that universal— children? you will note that universal credit _ children? you will note that universal credit is - children? you will note that universal credit is a - children? you will note that| universal credit is a difficult situation, it could be a very difficult winter, which is why as energy minister i am very focused on helping the fuel poor. universal credit is an issue for the chancellor and the work and pensions secretary. i am speaking to them a great deal about it but i'm focused on the fuel poor and protecting people from rising energy prices, thatis people from rising energy prices, that is what i am 100% engaged with.
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i appreciate that, but looking at the bigger picture, universal credit is part of this picture. there are some members of your own party who think that this will only add to the problem that we have over the coming months. what do you think about potentially keeping the current status of universal credit going? 50 status of universal credit going? sr we are coming from a global pandemic, this is context, where we have spent something like £350 billion, a huge amount of money, one year. there has been massive support for the economy, massive support for workers, people on the furlough scheme. there was a debate as to how long we can continue to afford this. i am very, very focused on protecting the most vulnerable, elderly people, who are exposed to fuel poverty, and the government is resolutely focused on that. the debate about universal credit, you will know, is a wider debate within
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government and is the responsibility for the treasury, and i will not second—guess or undermine their position. second-guess or undermine their osition. .,, ., , second-guess or undermine their osition. ., , , .,, position. those vulnerable people we are talkin: position. those vulnerable people we are talking about _ position. those vulnerable people we are talking about will— position. those vulnerable people we are talking about will lose _ position. those vulnerable people we are talking about will lose around i are talking about will lose around £1000 from october. taste are talking about will lose around £1000 from october.— are talking about will lose around £1000 from october. we have talked about this. £1000 from october. we have talked about this- we _ £1000 from october. we have talked about this. we have _ £1000 from october. we have talked about this. we have talked _ £1000 from october. we have talked about this. we have talked about i about this. we have talked about this a great deal, particularly in government, and we are looking at ways to support the most vulnerable this winter. iii ways to support the most vulnerable this winter. ., ways to support the most vulnerable this winter-_ i - ways to support the most vulnerable this winter._ i have i this winter. in what ways? i have mentioned _ this winter. in what ways? i have mentioned them _ this winter. in what ways? i have mentioned them but _ this winter. in what ways? i have mentioned them but you - this winter. in what ways? i have mentioned them but you seem i this winter. in what ways? i have | mentioned them but you seem to ignore them. there is a warm homes discount, the winter fuel payment. there are lots of ways. we have the energy price cap which i have maintained will stay, despite the fact that energy companies want us to remove that. these are all ways in which we are helping vulnerable customers with their bills this winter. �* ., , , ., , winter. but there are suggestions. we know the _ winter. but there are suggestions. we know the price _ winter. but there are suggestions. we know the price cap, _ winter. but there are suggestions. we know the price cap, you - winter. but there are suggestions. we know the price cap, you are i we know the price cap, you are saying it will stay for now, you mentioned the change in national insurance coming up next year.
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around the same time, the price cap will be reviewed. there are fears from industry insiders that the price cap will go much, much higher people could expect to pay an extra 280 pounds to almost £300. there are alwa s fears 280 pounds to almost £300. there are always fears that _ 280 pounds to almost £300. there are always fears that the _ 280 pounds to almost £300. there are always fears that the price _ 280 pounds to almost £300. there are always fears that the price cap - 280 pounds to almost £300. there are always fears that the price cap may i always fears that the price cap may go always fears that the price cap may 9° up always fears that the price cap may go up but because it can also go down. we don't five frankly, what's this gas price will be —— we do not know. do this gas price will be -- we do not know. , ., this gas price will be -- we do not know. i. , . ., ., ., i] know. do you expect it to go down? i am not a gas — know. do you expect it to go down? i am not a gas trader, _ know. do you expect it to go down? i am not a gas trader, i _ know. do you expect it to go down? i am not a gas trader, i don't - know. do you expect it to go down? i am not a gas trader, i don't know- am not a gas trader, i don't know whether prices will be a six months. i don't suspect many viewers know that. what i have said at what i'm committed to the fact that we are going to support the most vulnerable customers and i mentioned a number of the schemes that we have. we are always looking to enhance that and i have said, the fact of the price cap is here to stay.— have said, the fact of the price cap is here to stay. which you wouldn't rule out that _ is here to stay. which you wouldn't rule out that price _ is here to stay. which you wouldn't rule out that price cap _ is here to stay. which you wouldn't rule out that price cap being - is here to stay. which you wouldn't rule out that price cap being much | rule out that price cap being much higher, come next spring. , i can't
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tell you what the gas price is going to be. i would love to be able to to be. i would love to be able tr: inform you six months ahead of time what the energy prices will be. all i am saying is that we are going to have a cap, we will not go back to the world where a small number of companies essentially set, can set whatever fees and prices they want. that is not something i want to see again. that is not something i want to see aaain. �* , that is not something i want to see aaain. v . ~ that is not something i want to see aaain. �*, ., ~ ., that is not something i want to see aaain. �*, ., ~'., , that is not something i want to see aaain. �*, ., «a, , again. let's talk a little bit about the energy _ again. let's talk a little bit about the energy suppliers. _ again. let's talk a little bit about the energy suppliers. will- again. let's talk a little bit about the energy suppliers. will you i again. let's talk a little bit about| the energy suppliers. will you be underwriting loans for larger firms now who are going to be taking on these new consumers who have been linked, tied to companies that are failing? linked, tied to companies that are failin: ? . , linked, tied to companies that are failin: ? ., , ., linked, tied to companies that are failina? ., , ., ., linked, tied to companies that are failin.? ., , ., ., .,, failing? that is one of the ideas we are looking at. _ failing? that is one of the ideas we are looking at. as _ failing? that is one of the ideas we are looking at. as i _ failing? that is one of the ideas we are looking at. as i have _ failing? that is one of the ideas we are looking at. as i have said, i failing? that is one of the ideas we are looking at. as i have said, we i are looking at. as i have said, we have a process called the solar process —— eight solr process. the supplier of last resort. five to eight suppliers typically exit the market in the winter. we use the supplier of last resort to get the
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customers from one failing company to a larger company. the support we give will be related to the number of companies that exit the market. i cannot give you that number, i cannot give you that number, i cannot tell you on the 21st of september, today, how many of these companies will exit the market and, clearly, that number is going to effect how the supplier of last resort works so taxpayer money will not be used to failing companies, but it sounds from what you are saying like it might be used to bolster companies that do manage to keep afloat. so the one difference is that any support for those larger companies will be in terms of working capital, it will be at the loan. it will not be a blank cheque, i grant, it will be something where, if we do have this facility, if we do have this policy, they will be expected to pay back the loan, whereas in the case of a bailout,
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thatis whereas in the case of a bailout, that is what it is, a bailout where you've grant money, taxpayers money, the taxpayer doesn't see any return from that. ., ., , ., , , , from that. you have probably seen the front page _ from that. you have probably seen the front page of _ from that. you have probably seen the front page of the _ from that. you have probably seen the front page of the times - from that. you have probably seen the front page of the times today, | from that. you have probably seen | the front page of the times today, i am sure you will be aware. the possibility that people starting new jobs will now be allowed to request home—working from day one in their job, employees will be able to request the right to work from home from the very first day. are you set to confirm that in the coming days? i don't think that is something we are going to confirm, i don't know where the story came from but that is certainly not something that i wanted to pursue.— is certainly not something that i wanted to pursue. kwasi kwarteng, thank ou wanted to pursue. kwasi kwarteng, thank you very _ wanted to pursue. kwasi kwarteng, thank you very much _ wanted to pursue. kwasi kwarteng, thank you very much indeed. - wanted to pursue. kwasi kwarteng, thank you very much indeed. thanki thank you very much indeed. thank ou. it is 7:45am, tuesday morning. jon is on the sofa. its, it is 7:45am, tuesday morning. jon is on the sofa-— is on the sofa. a bit of cricket news. england _ is on the sofa. a bit of cricket news. england were - is on the sofa. a bit of cricket news. england were going i is on the sofa. a bit of cricket news. england were going to| is on the sofa. a bit of cricket i news. england were going to play a much anticipated tour to pakistan, they haven't played there was such a
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long time, since 2005. since that attack on the sri lankan team bus. it was the wording of the statement that came up from the ecb, because new zealand pulled out and then it was perhaps inevitable that england will do the same but it seems it is more about the physical and mental well—being of the players because they will go into that bubble environment in pakistan in the world cup going forward. it is tricky. i think pakistan will be utterly disappointed because they were here last summer, when england needed them, but england seemingly not going to reciprocate. international relation issues. _ going to reciprocate. international relation issues. a _ going to reciprocate. international relation issues. a diplomatic- going to reciprocate. international relation issues. a diplomatic row, | relation issues. a diplomatic row, es. england abandoning their plans to travel to pakistan days after new zealand pulled out of their tour because of a specific and credible threat. no suggestion of a security issue for the ecb, who said whilst travel to the region was a concern it was to protect the mental and physical wellbeing of the players who faced living in a strict bubble environment. england women have never played there, the men returning for the first time since 2005, were using the matches as as preparation for the 2020 world
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cup. i'm extremely disappointed — so are the fans, actually. because, right now, we needed england, because it's a small cricket fraternity that we have. and so, in such times, we were expecting england tojust be a little bit more responsive and responsible, i guess. so we are hurt, but forward we shall move. you get the sense of frustration that the pakistan football properties bought are feeling. —— cricket board. staying with cricket, the former new zeland international, chris cairns, says he's "facing possibly the greatest challenge" of his life after being left paralysed from a spinal stroke, during a heart operation. the 51—year—old — regarded as one of the best all—rounders of his generation — needed emergency surgery at a hospital in sydney last month and was briefly on life support.
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he posted this message on social media. hi, everybody. just over six weeks ago, i suffered a type a aortic dissection, which essentially means there is a tear in one of the major arteries of the heart. i had several surgeries and grafts and, very thankfully, the specialists were able to save the heart itself. one of the complications that arose was a spinal stroke, which in itself will provide me with possibly the greatest challenge that i have ever faced in rehab, going forward. good luck to him. and the european ryder cup team must be feeling ready for action come friday. come on! this was them jetting out in style, tommy fleetwood at the front there heading out to wisconsin. and padraig harrington is clearly revelling in his role as captain. hello, folks. this is your captain speaking, — hello, folks. this is your captain speaking, i_ hello, folks. this is your captain speaking, i always wanted to say that _ speaking, i always wanted to say that not — speaking, i always wanted to say that. not your real captain on this
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flight, _ that. not your real captain on this flight, but — that. not your real captain on this flight, but many of you are here today— flight, but many of you are here today and — flight, but many of you are here today and have put in a lot of work over the _ today and have put in a lot of work over the last three years to get to this point— over the last three years to get to this point sol over the last three years to get to this point so i would like to thank you for— this point so i would like to thank you for that. he is enjoying that, isn't _ you for that. he is enjoying that, isn't he — you for that. he is enjoying that, isn't he yellow he has been given a warning _ isn't he yellow he has been given a warning that he might have to don a of headwear very excited. very proud and humbled to be here representing team usa. | welcome, padraig, to wisconsin. we've got to get you i a cheesehead, i think. have you ever seen those? i've seen a cheesehead, yeah. this is new to me. i didn't realise this is new to me. i didn't realise this was a _ this is new to me. i didn't realise this was a thing. _ this is new to me. i didn't realise this was a thing. as _ this is new to me. i didn't realise this was a thing. as much - this is new to me. i didn't realise this was a thing. as much of i this is new to me. i didn't realise this was a thing. as much of the | this was a thing. as much of the nfl, the green _ this was a thing. as much of the nfl, the green bay _ this was a thing. as much of the nfl, the green bay packers i this was a thing. as much of the nfl, the green bay packers are| this was a thing. as much of the i nfl, the green bay packers are known as cheeseheads so that is a regular sight in wisconsin. [30 as cheeseheads so that is a regular sight in wisconsin.— as cheeseheads so that is a regular sight in wisconsin. do you know why the are sight in wisconsin. do you know why they are called _ sight in wisconsin. do you know why they are called the _ sight in wisconsin. do you know why they are called the cheeseheads? i they are called the cheeseheads? because wisconsin is a very big
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cheese... biggest dairy producer in the whole of the usa. can be seen that picture again? what is on the top of his cheesehead? is that the lobster? ., . ., top of his cheesehead? is that the lobster? ., _, ,., . ~ top of his cheesehead? is that the lobster? ., . ~ ., , lobster? you could pack anything he wanted. lobster? you could pack anything he wanted- maybe _ lobster? you could pack anything he wanted. maybe a _ lobster? you could pack anything he wanted. maybe a bit _ lobster? you could pack anything he wanted. maybe a bit of— lobster? you could pack anything he wanted. maybe a bit of brie. - lobster? you could pack anything he wanted. maybe a bit of brie. please | wanted. maybe a bit of brie. please can we move _ wanted. maybe a bit of brie. please can we move away _ wanted. maybe a bit of brie. please can we move away from _ wanted. maybe a bit of brie. please can we move away from the - wanted. maybe a bit of brie. please can we move away from the cheese| wanted. maybe a bit of brie. please i can we move away from the cheese is white _ can we move away from the cheese is white we _ can we move away from the cheese is white we can— can we move away from the cheese is white we can talk about golf if you like. , . ., , ., like. expect to see a few cheeseheads _ like. expect to see a few cheeseheads at - like. expect to see a few cheeseheads at the i like. expect to see a fewi cheeseheads at the golf. carol, rescue me from all this cheese! — carol, rescue me from all this cheese! ., ., ., , ., carol, rescue me from all this cheese! ., ., ., 4' cheese! carol, do you like cheeseheads? _ cheese! carol, do you like cheeseheads? you - cheese! carol, do you like cheeseheads? you never| cheese! carol, do you like i cheeseheads? you never know. cheese! carol, do you like _ cheeseheads? you never know. this mornin: it cheeseheads? you never know. this morning it is — cheeseheads? you never know. this morning it is a _ cheeseheads? you never know. this morning it is a chilly _ cheeseheads? you never know. this morning it is a chilly start _ cheeseheads? you never know. this morning it is a chilly start but - morning it is a chilly start but some of us, but for many it is male. through the rest of the week it will be dry for most points some warm sunshine. however, in the north it will turn winding it later today, tonight and into tomorrow evening, tomorrow night for a time and it will be cooler. some missed to lift,
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and some folk from the south—eastern corner. week medical thinking, breaking all the time, a lot of dry weather and a lot of sunshine. in the north—west, a new week when a front coming our way will introduce some thick cloud, patchy light rain or some drizzle, the winds are strengthening, especially with exposure across the north and west of scotland, where we could have gusts of up to gale force. it will still be windy with gusts up to gale force to go through the night, i work front seeking south as a band of cloud, not much work on it. in the south under clear skies we will see a return to mist and fog patches forming, hearing rural areas it will be cool but by the end of the night we had our next weather front coming our way, we had our next weather front coming ourway, introducing we had our next weather front coming our way, introducing some rain and that rain will sink steadily southward through the course of. a blustery day, particularly across scotland, not hers windy as today, and also to the east of the pennines, but further south than it is not as strong and we will see some sunshine. if you are the chelsea flower show it is looking pleasant for much of this week.
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thank you. three former sportsmen we've come to know very well here on breakfast — rob burrow, doddie weir and stephen darby — will be visiting downing street today. it isa it is a big day for them. they'll be delivering a petition calling for £50 million of funding for targeted research into motor neurone disease, which all three of them are living with. nicola waters will be with them — she was diagnosed with mnd two years ago. shejoins us now from essex, while here in the studio we have campaigner cris hoskin, who lost six family members to the disease, and professor chris mcdermott, one of the neurologists leading the call for funding. good morning to you. nicola, let's come to you first. good morning. great to have you on the programme. you are first diagnosed two years ago, so give us an idea of the changes that you and your family have all been through in those last two years. i
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have all been through in those last two ears. ., , ., two years. i went to the gp two ears two years. i went to the gp two years ago _ two years. i went to the gp two years ago with _ two years. i went to the gp two years ago with a _ two years. i went to the gp two years ago with a limp _ two years. i went to the gp two years ago with a limp and i two years. i went to the gp two years ago with a limp and after| years ago with a limp and after seeing a neurologist i was diagnosed with motor neurone disease, which is obviously completely devastated. since then i find it now very difficult to walk, to stand up, to use my arms. to help my kids do things that mum usually does with them, so it's been very difficult. nicola, as you say, the diagnosis is simply devastating and i know for many people who are diagnosed, straightaway, there isn't a huge amount of information out there, and not a huge amount of support. what was that like for you when you are diagnosed, how much were you told, how much did you know? i diagnosed, how much were you told, how much did you know?— diagnosed, how much were you told, how much did you know? i already had known it to people _ how much did you know? i already had known it to people with _ how much did you know? i already had known it to people with the _ how much did you know? i already had known it to people with the disease, i known it to people with the disease, who had both died very quickly, so for me, when i found out, it was really a case of this will be my
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last christmas with the kids, the last christmas with the kids, the last birthday. so it was very frightening. i have a fantastic team that look after me, a fantastic neurologist, but they are very limited because there are no treatments, there is nothing they can do for you, so i think that is the frustration i feel, and which the frustration i feel, and which the people who have signed this letter, the hundreds of people, the frustration we feel, and to be scared, as well, really scared about the future. , ., the future. cris, we mentioned in the future. cris, we mentioned in the introduction _ the future. cris, we mentioned in the introduction that _ the future. cris, we mentioned in the introduction that you - the future. cris, we mentioned in the introduction that you have i the future. cris, we mentioned in| the introduction that you have lost six members of yourfamily the introduction that you have lost six members of your family to this disease. i struggled to get my head around a huge impact it has had on your entire life and those you love. absolutely massive. like nicola said, i think the devastating diagnosis in the beginning is bad enough, and that started for me 1998 with my father. and then to carry on and repeat that time and time again with different family members,
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including both of my suns, one of whom died injanuary, it is like a perpetual nightmare. i could have been through it several times, it's never gets any easier. it is very difficult. the impact on your life is just devastated. your future difficult. the impact on your life isjust devastated. yourfuture is gone, yourfuture having families, grandchildren. and this research, and this petition today is so important because for me the reason why i am here today is to stress how much we need it because i would not wish any of it family to go through what we have. haste wish any of it family to go through what we have.— what we have. we saw pictures of our two what we have. we saw pictures of your two sons. — what we have. we saw pictures of your two sons, jon _ what we have. we saw pictures of your two sons, jon and _ what we have. we saw pictures of your two sons, jon and james? i what we have. we saw pictures of i your two sons, jon and james? yes. give us an _ your two sons, jon and james? yes. give us an idea. _ your two sons, jon and james? yes. give us an idea. how— your two sons, jon and james? yes. give us an idea. how this _ your two sons, jon and james? jazz give us an idea. how this campaign can makea give us an idea. how this campaign can make a difference. are you hopeful that things will change and other people might not have to go through the heartache you have been free? i through the heartache you have been free? . , through the heartache you have been free? ., , ., , through the heartache you have been free? ., , .,, ., ., free? i am very hopeful. compared to when we first —
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free? i am very hopeful. compared to when we first started _ free? i am very hopeful. compared to when we first started working - free? i am very hopeful. compared to when we first started working with i when we first started working with mnd on knowing mnd. the difference in research and the genetic research in research and the genetic research in particular, i am really hopeful that they will be a cure so hopefully that generations of my family will not suffer what we have and other people like nicola were not, even. and other people like nicola were not. even-— and other people like nicola were not, even. ., , , not, even. 0k. professor chris, time to review it- — not, even. 0k. professor chris, time to review it. they _ not, even. 0k. professor chris, time to review it. they are _ not, even. 0k. professor chris, time to review it. they are desperate - not, even. 0k. professor chris, time to review it. they are desperate for i to review it. they are desperate for more funding and more research. what is out there, what progress do you think could be made? 50. is out there, what progress do you think could be made?— think could be made? so, this tarueted think could be made? so, this targeted funding _ think could be made? so, this targeted funding we _ think could be made? so, this targeted funding we are - think could be made? so, this- targeted funding we are requesting and asking the government to bring to mnd research well, i think, bring forward by decades the day when we can sit here and say we live in a world free of motor neurone disease, so nobody else in cris' only has to die because of it. that is what is on the table here. we have put
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together a detailed scientific plan which we have submitted to the government for consideration in the spending review. and this petition and letter being delivered today is to help focus the government around that plan, that detailed scientific plan we have put in place. in a nutshell, what we're asking to do in that 50 page document we have already submitted, is to bring together the worlds leading scientists in the uk, clinicians, patients, the charity and industry, to pull forward the drugs that we know are out there, attacking the targets in the motor nerves to discover what works quickly and make a difference for people. is it discover what works quickly and make a difference for people.— a difference for people. is it a case of improving _ a difference for people. is it a case of improving quality - a difference for people. is it a case of improving quality of. a difference for people. is it a i case of improving quality of life, or, as cris was saying, is a potentially a cure down the line if there is enough sustained money to try to make a difference in that
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area? ., , ., , ., . ., ., area? the ambition is to cure motor neurone disease, _ area? the ambition is to cure motor neurone disease, so _ area? the ambition is to cure motor neurone disease, so people - area? the ambition is to cure motor neurone disease, so people like - neurone disease, so people like nicola and cris turn to us as the clinicians and scientists and said, you need to do more, you need to think bigger, you need to be more ambitious. and so that is what we are doing. we are aiming for a cure and we have the confidence with the huge advances in knowledge in the last ten years about what is going wrong in motor neurone disease. we now have better models to work out which drugs might work, and then we can pull those through it too much lighter, faster trials and get the answer quicker.— lighter, faster trials and get the answer quicker. that is what i was aoinu answer quicker. that is what i was auoin to answer quicker. that is what i was going to ask _ answer quicker. that is what i was going to ask nicola _ answer quicker. that is what i was going to ask nicola about. - answer quicker. that is what i was| going to ask nicola about. smarter and faster trials. i know from talking to the people i have met with motor neurone disease, actually, they are not that interested in being on trial because trials have to be double—blind, there has to be a placebo. you just want to take something at some point and how it might work. how would you feel about that? i don't know if you have been involved in any trials but
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how do you feel about maybe trying some of the new drugs out there? film. some of the new drugs out there? oh, absolutel . some of the new drugs out there? oh, absolutely- i— some of the new drugs out there? on absolutely. i think for some of the new drugs out there? oi absolutely. i think for me and for the hundreds of people who have signed this letter, we want to have a chance and that is what we don't have at the chance to try these drugs. i know that the way cris and the —— chris and the other scientists have developed these trials, they will be done in a way to minimise the placebo group, so thatis to minimise the placebo group, so that is fantastic, but since your piece last week with doddie and chris, i have been inundated with e—mails from people across the country, from patients who feel like they have hope for the first time since their diagnosis. we are really pleading with the government to really increase the funding and support our scientists find this cure. , y ., ., support our scientists find this cure. , ., ., ., ., cure. cris, you are nodding along, listenin: cure. cris, you are nodding along, listening to _ cure. cris, you are nodding along, listening to nicola _ cure. cris, you are nodding along, listening to nicola there. - cure. cris, you are nodding along, listening to nicola there. do - cure. cris, you are nodding along, listening to nicola there. do you | listening to nicola there. do you think that some of the times you have heard rob burrow and doddie weir and stephen darby talk, and some of the powerful documentary is
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you have seen on this programme as many much of that coverage, has that make a difference to people who are suffering and families? yes. make a difference to people who are suffering and families?— suffering and families? yes, it has, because you _ suffering and families? yes, it has, because you have _ suffering and families? yes, it has, because you have seen, _ suffering and families? yes, it has, because you have seen, we - suffering and families? yes, it has, because you have seen, we have i because you have seen, we have voices that we don't get opportunities to tell our stories, although i am here today. to have such high profile sportsmen such as doddie and rob going down today, it brings more people into an understanding. people are often horrified by my story because they didn't realise that it could have that impact on the single family. we tend to think of individuals. the more we can get the message out there by whatever means, the better, and i think it would just push our because further and perhaps us as individuals can't.— individuals can't. thank you for cominu individuals can't. thank you for coming on _ individuals can't. thank you for coming on as _ individuals can't. thank you for coming on as telling _ individuals can't. thank you for coming on as telling your - individuals can't. thank you for coming on as telling your storyj individuals can't. thank you for i coming on as telling your story so powerfully. it is great to see you. nicola, appreciate your time, hope it goes well. good luck. professor, lovely to have you on the sofa. thank you. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. our headlines today. a difficult winter ahead with soaring energy prices — and the business secretary tells breakfast more firms will go bust within months. but how many more will go out of business? what does that mean for your bills and what can you do to best protect your pocket? the prime minister meets the president — climate change, afghanistan and a us trade deal are all up for discussion. the most wanted ticket in town — tom parker reunites with his band mates for a charity concert to help fellow brain cancer patients. england's cricketers won't play in pakistan next month. the ecb have cancelled the men's and women's tours over concerns of player welfare and about travel to the region. perfect pastries and cake catastrophes are back on our screens as the great british bake off returns.
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we're talking to extra slice presenter tom allen and former contestant ruby bhogal. good morning. early morning mist and fog to clear and when it does most will have a dry and sunny day but later it will cloud over in northern parts with light rain and drizzle and the wind will pick up here, also. it's tuesday september zist. our top story. the business secretary kwasi kwarteng has warned that more energy firms will go bust as the price of wholesale gas soars. last night, he insisted that the price cap on consumer bills will remain in place, meaning suppliers can't pass on the price hike to their customers. let's get more on this from nina. there is a lot going on.
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what we see as collateral damage of the energy prices increasing is companies going bust. four have gone more to follow. the business secretary said it happens every year but more are expected to follow suit. , , .., , ., but more are expected to follow suit. , , , ., ., ., suit. typically, in a normalwinter, the ast suit. typically, in a normalwinter, the past few _ suit. typically, in a normalwinter, the past few years, _ suit. typically, in a normalwinter, the past few years, 5-8 _ suit. typically, in a normalwinter, the past few years, 5-8 suppliersl the past few years, 5—8 suppliers have _ the past few years, 5—8 suppliers have exited the market and we use the supplier of last resort to get the supplier of last resort to get the customers from a failing company to a larger— the customers from a failing company to a larger company. the support we -ive to a larger company. the support we give is _ to a larger company. the support we give is going — to a larger company. the support we give is going to be related to the number— give is going to be related to the number of— give is going to be related to the number of companies that exit the market _ number of companies that exit the market i— number of companies that exit the market. i cannot give you that number, — market. i cannot give you that number, i_ market. i cannot give you that number, i cannot tell you today how many _ number, i cannot tell you today how many of _ number, i cannot tell you today how many of these companies will exit the market. many of these companies will exit the market-— many of these companies will exit the market. ., ., , ., ., . the market. what does that mean? we know the sale — the market. what does that mean? we know the sale prices _ the market. what does that mean? we know the sale prices pushing _ know the sale prices pushing businesses to the brink, going up threefold in the space of the year. he told us those companies going under, they are not prepared to
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save, but what they will do potentially is give loans to businesses who will absorb customers of those companies that have gone under. that is the suggestion and looking likely through loans. what they have said and he reiterated was they have said and he reiterated was the energy price cap, if you are on a variable rate, it is only a certain amount it can increase mine. that is controversial because as an energy firm with a cap, and you buy it in for more, little wonder many are going bump. ultimately, he is saying he is protecting customers, but aren't we all are about to start paying more? around £140 per year for average households. and those whose businesses have gone out of business, looking for a sweet deal, there are not many at the moment. many getting in touch asking what we should do if the business has gone bump. the business secretary told us
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not to panic, your supply will not be cut off. you need to think about what is next and when the next supplier takes over make sure you have a record of where you are up to, metre readings, statements, paper bills, to ensure you get the fairy steel. a warning that prices are likely to go up forjust about everybody until this settles down. less competition means more difficult prices. there is concern about those on prepayment metres. often the most vulnerable in society. mary, a london pensioner said already on the price she pays on the set rate she has to make the decision between food and fuel and she cannot do that overwinter. tom said i am in credit my business, what happens if they go bust? the answer is it should be carried over to the next provider. we are getting criticism of the government. people
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saying you allowed this to happen in the first place. it is saying you allowed this to happen in the first place-— the first place. it is complicated and a tricky _ the first place. it is complicated and a tricky few _ the first place. it is complicated and a tricky few months - the first place. it is complicated and a tricky few months ahead. | the first place. it is complicated - and a tricky few months ahead. and you will have a busy few days! hopefully that information useful, asking those questions. borisjohnson will meet president biden at the white house today to discuss topics including climate change, trade and the situation in afghanistan. it's the first time a british prime minister has met a president at the white house since theresa may visited donald trump there in 2017. our political correspondent helen catt reports on the build—up to another historic meeting. it was all smiles in the sunshine when borisjohnson metjoe biden in person for the first time just three months ago at the g7 summit in cornwall. mrjohnson says he hasn't had much of a chance to get to know the us president, but he says they have a genuinely terrific relationship and see eye to eye on all sorts of things. he'll be hoping the reception is as warm when they meet in the oval office in the white house later.
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what would have been one of borisjohnson's key requests has already been fulfilled. in a surprise move yesterday, the us lifted its travel ban on uk citizens. but other issues could be more difficult. borisjohnson is expected to push the us to increase its climate commitments ahead of november's crucial climate change summit cop26, which will take place in glasgow. it's the moment when we have to grow up and take our responsibilities. i think we go through, you know, a period of glorious indifference about the world. we've been through that, we've been through our childhood, if you like. we've now got to realise that this is a problem that requires grip. the two men are also expected to discuss the situation in afghanistan after the two countries withdrew troops. and what about a trade deal? borisjohnson has been pretty downbeat about the chances of that happening quickly. he told reporters that american negotiators were pretty ruthless and that he would rather get a deal
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that works for the uk than get a quick deal. borisjohnson is meeting several world leaders this week, but this meeting will certainly be the most closely watched. helen catt, bbc news. we'rejoined now by our chief political correspondent, adam fleming. let's start with the meeting between the prime minister and president biden. a lot to discuss for them. i think borisjohnson will biden. a lot to discuss for them. i think boris johnson will feel he has think borisjohnson will feel he has victories already because yesterday the american administration said they would restart transatlantic travel for those from the uk and europe who have had both vaccinations and also president biden will speak at the united nations this morning. it looks like he will commit more money from the us to the rest of the world to help fight climate change, something borisjohnson has been pushing for. it is debatable whether the us were
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going to do those things anyway and may be the uk did not have much difference diplomatically, but i think downing street will talk them up think downing street will talk them up as victories. sometimes with these meetings what sticks in your mind are the more personal moments between the people. think about when gordon brown went to see george w bush and the american president took him for a hair raising ride in a golf cart with gordon brown looking terrified. it summed up the fact they were different characters. and when theresa may went to see donald trump and everybody was wondering what it would be like, the relationship between an uptight person and chaotic person. the image was then walking down the ramp hand in hand. that summed up that strange relationship, as well. i wonder what pictures will lodge in our memories from this trip. it is
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pictures will lodge in our memories from this trip-— from this trip. it is fascinating. the are from this trip. it is fascinating. they are presidents _ from this trip. it is fascinating. they are presidents and - from this trip. it is fascinating. they are presidents and prime| they are presidents and prime ministers but humans. they will know that walk, the ride on whatever it might be, they know everyone in the world is watching for the awkward moment. the tongue at the mouth, the way they eat a sandwich, that is what people remember. we way they eat a sandwich, that is what people remember. we have been derived of what people remember. we have been deprived of those _ what people remember. we have been deprived of those moments _ what people remember. we have been deprived of those moments because i deprived of those moments because there has been little face—to—face diplomacy because of covid, but the awkward moments are back! the ministry of defence has apologised for a data breach which may have compromised the safety of dozens of afghan interpreters who worked for british forces. more than 250 people seeking relocation to the uk — many of whom are in hiding — were mistakenly copied into an emailfrom the mod, in which their names and some profile pictures were visible. defence secretary ben wallace has launched an investigation into how the breach occurred. the duke of york has been served with a sexual assault lawsuit after the relevant paperwork was delivered to his us lawyer, according to his
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accuser�*s legal team. virginia giuffre is seeking damages after claiming prince andrew sexually assaulted her — which he vehemently denies. earlier this month, miss giuffre's lawyers tried to serve the paperwork by leaving it with police officers guarding the royal lodge in windsor — but the prince's legal team argued it was not a valid method of serving legal documents. a vigil has taken place for a woman and three children who were found dead at a house in derbyshire. hundreds gathered in the village of killamarsh, near sheffield, to lay flowers in memory of terri harris, her 13—year—old sonjohn paul, her 11—year—old daughter lacey, and lacey's friend connie gent — who was also 11. our reporter tom ingall is in killamarsh. tom, we know a 31—year—old man remains under arrest on suspicion of murder. what's the latest? it isa it is a very quiet, subdued start to
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the day here in killamarsh. the awful disbelief is sinking in about the terrible things that have happened. the police activity is getting under way again. the temporary tent in place and vehicles have just arrived and things will continue here. we saw police activity in the field behind the house. there is a chord and around the house as investigators try to find out what happened. last night, there was a vigil with hundreds turning up not at the scene but at a nearby local park with children gathering and families, lots of flowers. that is the most striking thing here, the tributes, hundreds of flowers here. teddy bears, balloons, tea lights. they have continued to grow through the day. i have been struck by how people arrived in cars, standing for in a few moments to look at the flowers. among those jason bennett who yesterday paid an emotional tribute
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to his two children who have died, on facebook, saying his heart was broken in a million pieces. he was here this morning, spending 15 minutes sitting quietly, looking and reading at the tributes. aha, reading at the tributes. a desperately sad situation. two of the uk's biggest transport companies are in talks about a possible merger. stagecoach, which employs around 24,000 people, says it's discussing the idea with rival operator national express, which employs nearly 50,000 — saying it would lead to cost savings and "new growth opportunities". the canadian prime ministerjustin trudeau is on course to win the snap general election he called — but without gaining the parliamentary majority he was hoping for. mr trudeau called the election in august, less than two years after his liberal party lost its majority in 2019. some votes are still being counted but the leader of the main opposition party has conceded defeat, paving the way
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for the liberals to form another minority government. let's get the weather from carol. good morning. what is going on? quite a bit. if we look at the rest of the week first, it will be dry for most with sunshine and temperatures a bit above average for the time of year. it will turn windy and cooler in the north, especially from later today in the north—west. we have mist and fog to lift. we have a weak front moving south, breaking up, and the bulk of uk will be dry and sunny. we do have a weather front across the north and west later. introducing cloud, light rain and drizzle and the wind will pick up here. with exposure it could reach gusts and gale force. it will
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continue overnight across the north and west. the weather front moving south. rain dying away. ahead of the band of cloud, clear skies. rural areas will be cool and there will be mist and fog patches forming. overnight, at the end, and weather front introduces heavy rain, and it will continue to move south. a blustery day in scotland and east of the pennines. as we come south, the weak weather front produces cloud. again, it will start to break up. for most, dry, sunny, temperatures up for most, dry, sunny, temperatures up to 23. as we've been hearing, the prime minister borisjohnson is in the us, urging world leaders to do more to tackle climate change. that's because in just six weeks' time, the uk will host a major climate
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conference known as cop26. so who's going and what will it achieve? nearly 200 world leaders will meet in glasgow in november. they'll discuss how to limit climate change and its effects — like rising sea levels and extreme weather. they're being asked to set ambitious targets to reduce the amount of greenhouse gases, which add to global warming, going into the atmosphere by 2030. they'll also look at how to achieve net zero by 2050 — that means the amount of greenhouse gasses entering the atmosphere does not exceed the amount taken out. burning fossilfuels is a major cause of emissions, so steps could include ending the use of coal and investing in renewable energy, as well as stopping deforestation. here to discuss all that is the bbc�*s new climate editor, justin rowlatt.
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congratulations. good morning. as mentioned, big, important conference coming up soon. world leaders will be in the uk talking about what to do next. how important is it we at home pay attention? they have just made me climate editor and of course i would say it is the most important conference in the world. if everybody turns up it will be the biggest gathering of world leaders in british history. a huge conference and the issue at the heart, tackling global warming, i described it today as the central project of the 21st century. climate is changing and we know the effects of climate change could be catastrophic. we know how to stop it, reducing greenhouse gas emissions. all we need now is getting the world together to sort it out but that is a huge challenge.
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you have done a report. i have. it is slightly bizarre. we have someone i met 15 years ago who is keen on composting and we look at the efforts he is making to compost off in his garden and what it tells us about the challenge of reducing carbon emissions. excuse me, would you like some free potatoes? meet britain's king of compost. john cossham has been crazy keen on rotting down organic waste for decades. he collects waste fruit and veg from local shops and restaurants and — yup, bins, too — and brings it back to his suburban garden. i first metjohn 15 years ago. and, if anything, he's now even more into composting. so, listen — how many compost heaps have you got now? oh, i don't know. maybe about 40. do you want to come and have a look? let's go and have a look. and it's easy to get started. it's quite a good idea to chop stuff up.
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all this will be eaten by bacteria and fungi — and it's notjust carbon, it has got nitrogen and phosphorus and some micronutrients in it. this is what nature does. and what is it about compost that you enjoy so much? i think one of the best things is it's a way to connect you with nature. it's something that anybody can do who's got a garden. and it makes you connected with the cycle of food going to waste and putting it in the soil and then growing more food. environmentalists and some economists say composting shows us how the whole economy needs to change. hi, come in. kate raworth is an oxford economist famous for her theory of doughnut economics. it's all happening now. it's ok. i bet people always bring you these.
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i've got some doughnuts. i can only find these mini ones. but what does a doughnut tell us about the limits of modern capitalism? so we've inherited the idea that the shape of economic progress is endless growth, a nation getting richer and richer, no matter how rich it already is. and that is pushing us to the limits of the planetary home that we have. we need to reimagine the shape of progress. and so — let me have a little one. i hope it's going to be bigger than this in reality. it's more like a doughnut, silly, though, it sounds. so imagine humanity's use of earth's resources radiating out from the centre of that doughnut. the goal is to leave no one in the hole. that's where people are falling short on the essentials of life. but as we use earth's resources, we mustn't overshoot this outer limit, because that is where we put so much pressure on our planetary home. we cause climate breakdown. we acidify the oceans. we break down the web of life. so we must meet the needs of all people within the means of the living planet.
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that's the 21st—century project. so within the boundaries of the doughnut, so to speak. so what does that mean about use of materials? so it means...a—ha! let me see. here's some hosepipe. so we've inherited a linear industrial system where we take those materials, put them in the pipe of production, make them into stuff. we will use it often only once and throw it away. and that take—make—use—lose has been pushing us over the limits of our planet and running down the life support systems we depend upon. we've got to bend that linear process into a circular or cyclical one, so that resources are used again and again, far more carefully, more collectively, creatively and slowly. no surprise, then, that kate is a keen composter. like most of us, she uses the local—authority composting scheme. about half of all local authorities now offer food waste collection. your waste is brought to centres like this. plastic is taken out and it goes
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through a giant magimixer. then it's rotted down in these huge vats. the methane is pumped off and used to generate electricity. and what's left — look at that — is a lovely, rich liquid fertilizer that can be put back on the fields. back in york, john has been saying for years we need to do more than just compost our food and garden waste. you bury something. it sits in a hole where there's no oxygen. it's an anaerobic process. it gives off pollutants like methane. have you guessed what he's talking about yet? i think we can compost human beings. i mean, what happens in nature when something dies, it gets incorporated into the soil very, very quickly. because i don't see humans as separate from nature. we are part of the cycle. 15 years ago, he pretended to compost me.
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the real process would be a bit more complicated than this. but for you, this is the ultimate recycling. i want to be composted when i die. now, a compost funeral might not be for everyone, but the message is clear. if we're going to achieve the circular economy kate talked about, it means reusing and recycling virtually everything. did you know you would be doing that when you signed up for your newjob? that is perhaps not the piece i would have chosen to mark the beginning of my role. you would have chosen to mark the beginning of my role.— would have chosen to mark the beginning of my role. you will be coverin: beginning of my role. you will be covering a _ beginning of my role. you will be covering a certain _ beginning of my role. you will be covering a certain number- beginning of my role. you will be covering a certain number of- beginning of my role. you will be i covering a certain number of issues in the build—up to this conference. the plan is to run a number of pieces in the run—up to underlying issues. composting, it shows us the circular economy we need to make and virtually everything. we circular economy we need to make and virtually everything.— virtually everything. we talk about this a lot. virtually everything. we talk about this a lot- it— virtually everything. we talk about this a lot. it is _ virtually everything. we talk about this a lot. it is the _ virtually everything. we talk about this a lot. it is the global - virtually everything. we talk about this a lot. it is the global issue - this a lot. it is the global issue at the minute. at the minute? for
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ever. from now, i mean, it is more discussed than before. how much of a change has the presidency in america made to this? donald trump had a clear view, and president biden seems to have changed the dialogue. he has changed the calculus of international diplomacy. he said america is behind it and would put investment in it and if he got his way there would be an infrastructure bill involving lots of spending on low carbon technology, charging points across america, solar, etc. it creates confidence in china that america is serious about it and allows them perhaps to be more ambitious. we have the problem that there is tension, unusual tension in there is tension, unusual tension in the world. i cannot remember anything like this since the cold war, and that tension makes it difficult for china and america to
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talk but they say they are trying to put aside short—term issues and recognise this is an existential global issue, an issue that could affect the future, not just ours, but hundreds of years into the future, thousands of years. they say let's try to put that aside and do something about it. the momentum towards this conference has not so far been brilliant. the towards this conference has not so far been brilliant.— far been brilliant. the lead story toda is far been brilliant. the lead story today is energy _ far been brilliant. the lead story today is energy and _ far been brilliant. the lead story today is energy and energy - far been brilliant. the lead story l today is energy and energy prices. it affects us all every day. we might look at this conference and think lots of important people chatting, but it is relevant for everybody. chatting, but it is relevant for everybody-— chatting, but it is relevant for eve bod . , ,, , everybody. the energy issue is massive but — everybody. the energy issue is massive but it _ everybody. the energy issue is massive but it is _ everybody. the energy issue is massive but it is also - everybody. the energy issue is massive but it is also about i massive but it is also about changing the way... energy is the basis of the economy. changing the way we use energy will change lots of things. it is easy to be pessimistic about this and talk about the shortcomings of ambitions of a country but the other way is to
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say this is an amazing opportunity. we have new industry growing up. look at what you see here, the wind industry off the coast of yorkshire, the way the car industry is developing electric cars. if i were leaving school i would think green tech. maybe 20 years ago i would be thinking social media and digital technology. green tech, huge businesses to be built and this is where billionaires of the future will be. we should tell that story and say there is a positive side to this. borisjohnson referred to it today. the insulation. how manyjobs you could create insulating britain's 29 million homes. great opportunities _ britain's 29 million homes. great opportunities and _ britain's 29 million homes. great opportunities and huge _ britain's 29 million homes. great opportunities and huge challenges. and brexit, a test of britain's ability to host a huge conference like this. aha, ability to host a huge conference like this. �* . ability to host a huge conference like this. �* , ., like this. a huge test for the government _ like this. a huge test for the government and _ like this. a huge test for the government and to - like this. a huge test for the government and to play - like this. a huge test for the government and to play an l
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like this. a huge test for the - government and to play an important role on the world stage.— time for the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. detectives have named a woman who was found dead in cator park in kidbrooke on saturday — as they appeal for anyone who saw anything suspicious to come forward. police believe 28—year—old sabina nessa was attacked at 8.30 on the previous evening when the park was likely to have been used by dog walkers and joggers. a man arrested on suspicion of murder has been released pending further enquiries. young people who survive cancer are at risk of missing out on the chance to have children in the future because certain fertility preservation services aren't always funded by the nhs. that's according to a new study which includes research by the ucl hospital foundation trust. lauren shute from high wycombe was seventeen when she was diagnosed with cancer. she had ovarian tissue preserved — a procedure which was
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paid for by a charity. i know people who haven't had it, who hadn't heard of it, and i almost feel guilty bringing it up when someone who i know who's also gone through a similar experience hasn't had that, because it's allowed me to kind of move on from cancer and to not have it impact every single point in my life. it will impact my health forever, but to know that it hasn't affected my fertility as it could have — i'm so grateful every day for that. well, nhs england says all children with cancer should be advised about their options in line with clinical guidelines. the london—based firm pimlico plumbers has been sold to us home services group neighborly. the deal will see founder charlie mullins offload his 90% stake. the company, which was established just over 40 years ago, employs more than 400 workers. let's take a quick look at the travel situation. for all other travel news — tune in to your local bbc radio station. we know the the campaign group insulate britain are back on the m25 once again today.
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this time blocking junction ten at wisley in both directions. onto the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's set to be a fairly pleasant day of weather today across the capital — not as cloudy as it was yesterday, there'll be more in the way of sunshine, it will stay dry and it will feel warmer, too. but it's been quite a chilly early start to the morning, temperatures having dropped back into high single figures. still a bit of mist to lift and clear, but there will be some spells of sunshine emerging — we'll keep those sunny spells as we head into the afternoon. the winds stay light, and temperatures will peak in the low 20s in celsius — 21 or maybe even 22 degrees celsius. now, as we head through the evening and overnight, then the winds will pick up a touch so there won't be quite so much of an issue with mist and fog into wednesday morning. but still, temperatures dropping back as low as perhaps eight or nine degrees celsius in some of the rural spots. so locally, again, quite a chilly start to the day with lots of clear skies around. and then tomorrow, again, it's dry and it's warm, there'll be a lot of sunshine around. it will turn windier again into the afternoon
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as that wind picks up. top temperatures again peaking at around 21 degrees. on thursday and friday, we start to draw in more of a northwesterly wind, but it should stay dry or mostly dry as we head through the rest of this week, with some more sunshine at times. i'm back with the latest from bbc london in half an hour. now, though, it's back to dan and sally. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. morning live follows us on bbc one this morning. let's find out what's in store from gethin and janette. good morning. good morning. coming up on morning live — it's thought 35 million people will be taking up the flu jab this year. but today dr punam explains why a pneumonia vaccine could keep you even safer this winter. that's right. i will be telling you who is entitled to it, how often you
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need and how it can protect you. plus, heart disease and circulation conditions are responsible - for a quarter of all deaths in the uk every year — - but a ground—breaking cardiac test promises to change all that. - this analysis straightaway tells me this patient has a very critical narrowing. this patient has a very critical narrowing-— this patient has a very critical narrowina. ., ., . narrowing. doctor referred to that arte as narrowing. doctor referred to that artery as the _ narrowing. doctor referred to that artery as the widow _ narrowing. doctor referred to that artery as the widow maker, - narrowing. doctor referred to that artery as the widow maker, as i narrowing. doctor referred to that artery as the widow maker, as it | artery as the widow maker, as it kills _ artery as the widow maker, as it kills so — artery as the widow maker, as it kills so men of my age, just... gone — kills so men of my age, 'ust. .. gone. . , . , gone. really some incredible technologv- _ gone. really some incredible technology. we _ gone. really some incredible technology. we will - gone. really some incredible technology. we will meet i gone. really some incredible j technology. we will meet the gone. really some incredible - technology. we will meet the man who owes his— technology. we will meet the man who owes his life _ technology. we will meet the man who owes his life to— technology. we will meet the man who owes his life to it. _ and he's the new boy on the antiques roadtrip team. professional bargain hunter ochuko ojiri explains why marble and tropical prints are the two top trends to watch out for this year. also today, we've bagged a vip pass to this year's chelsea flower show. i mark lane's giving us a tour around | the beautiful gardens that celebrate autumnal plants and produce. and swapping his trunks for a sparkly tuxedo — we're catching up with olympic swimmer—turned—strictly star adam peaty and his partner katya jones as they prepare
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for their first live performance. i don't know, to me he looks like one idon't know, to me he looks like one of— i don't know, to me he looks like one of the — i don't know, to me he looks like one of the strongest boys in the competition. would you agree? | competition. would you agree? i think competition. would you agree? think so. i competition. would you agree? i think so. i like that move. you i think so. i like that move. you could even _ think so. i like that move. you could even win, _ think so. i like that move. you could even win, i _ think so. i like that move. you could even win, i reckon. - think so. i like that move. you could even win, i reckon. we i think so. i like that move. you - could even win, i reckon. we don't talk about — could even win, i reckon. we don't talk about here, _ could even win, i reckon. we don't talk about here, we _ could even win, i reckon. we don't talk about here, we don't - could even win, i reckon. we don't talk about here, we don't mention| talk about here, we don't mention him. , , him. every time i see him in the strictly corridors _ him. every time i see him in the strictly corridors he _ him. every time i see him in the strictly corridors he has - him. every time i see him in the strictly corridors he has his - him. every time i see him in the strictly corridors he has his top. strictly corridors he has his top off and is very intimidating. i can imarine. off and is very intimidating. i can imagine- just _ off and is very intimidating. i can imagine. just like _ off and is very intimidating. i can imagine. just like you,, - off and is very intimidating. i can imagine. just like you,, before i imagine. just like you,, before mornin: imagine. just like you,, before morning live — imagine. just like you,, before morning live starts. _ imagine. just like you,, before morning live starts. you - imagine. just like you,, before morning live starts. you know| imagine. just like you,, before i morning live starts. you know you have my vote- _ morning live starts. you know you have my vote. it _ morning live starts. you know you have my vote. it is _ morning live starts. you know you have my vote. it is getting - have my vote. it is getting competitive. _ have my vote. it is getting competitive. it _ have my vote. it is getting competitive. it is - have my vote. it is getting competitive. it is all- have my vote. it is getting competitive. it is all good | have my vote. it is getting - competitive. it is all good fun. if you watched breakfast on friday you might have seen the pop star tom parker talking really frankly about living with brain cancer. tom was also looking forward to his old hand — the wanted — getting together for their first public performance in seven years.
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that gig took place last night — and tim muffett was there to see it. cheering. for many, the most "wanted" tickets in town. really excited to be here, yeah! we've been there since day dot. we've been here from the start, yeah. we've been there from the start. we've been all over the country watching the wanted — - we were actually lucky enough to meet them, win one - of their competitions and go up to manchester and play- laser quest with them. you played laser quest with the wanted? yeah, with the wanted. # and if you know, how do you get up... one of the uk's biggest boy bands, back together after seven years for a very special cause. band member tom parker was diagnosed with a brain tumour last year. he recently announced that he's decided to stop his gruelling chemotherapy. i think it's going to be more emotional than we all think, and i think that's going to really hit home. this event isn'tjust about the wanted reforming, it's a way of raising money for causes close to tom parker's
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heart — stand up to cancer and the national brain appeal. it's quite close to my heart, tonight, because my sister—in—law passed away from cancer. that's another reason why we love that the wanted done this, as well. obviously, what tom parker's gone through, it's the exact same as what emily went through — like, they had the same brain tumour. and amongst the artists appearing as well as the wanted, a member of a former rival boy band. how important was it for you to come along today? huge — i mean, when i heard this story it really hit home because of how young we all are, and obviously we've known each other for a very long time so i wanted to do everything i could to be here tonight. it's, yeah, it's proper... this one proper cut you deep, to be honest with you. backstage at the royal albert hall, about to go on stage, and you're back together. how are you feeling? very excited. it feels pretty surreal. what have the rehearsals been like? the words, the dance moves — how has that been, getting back together again after seven years? well, when you've got a brain tumour it's very difficult to try and rememberanything... oh, my god!
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laughter. so, yeah, that's been... for me...that's been real, real, really quite tough. it's hard enough, anyway. it's hard enough not doing it for seven years — - never mind, like, you know, you with all that going on. i to be honest, you always forgot... idid. and, to be fair, the dance moves have never really been there, - so we just kind of make it up as we go along _ please, go wild, for the wanted! cheering. music: all time low. # ..only thing i'll never know. # how do you get up from an all—time low? # i can't even find a place to start. # how do i choose between my head and heart? music: gold forever. # say my name like it's the last...
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# time. # live today like it's the last night. cheering. they've come off stage... congratulations, congratulations. what an amazing performance. how was it to be back on stage together? absolutely incredible — the atmosphere was electric. it was mental. honestly, i don't think we've experienced anything like it, to be honest. i it was amazing — it's made my littlel 14—year—old heart happy again, so... emotional! unreal, emotional! incredible. literally incredible. incredible. it feels more special, the fact that we were all together doing it, you know? and they're there — the boys are there to support me, and that's beautiful for me. it must have been really emotional. it was. there was a moment where i almost lost it, to be honest with you!
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and then i managed to pull it back. so amazing. it was the best thing ever. it was lovely to see tom, of all people, back on stage, doing what he does best. it was amazing. being in a band, a kind of a brotherhood, it's probably never felt more important to you. honestly. yeah, the boys have been like brothers, they really have. they've been there at low moments, they've been there at high moments, but that's what they're brothers for. boy band veterans. but a performance unlike any they've given before. tim muffett, bbc news, at the royal albert hall. tough to watch, isn't it? amazing gate and you saw how happy they were to be that which you can also see the faces of the other members of the faces of the other members of the band and how hard it is for them. it the band and how hard it is for them. . . the band and how hard it is for them. ., ., the band and how hard it is for them. . . , ., . . the band and how hard it is for them. . ., ., . . a them. it was a a performance. a time. them. it was a a performance. a time- thank— them. it was a a performance. a time. thank you _ them. it was a a performance. a time. thank you to _ them. it was a a performance. a time. thank you to all— them. it was a a performance. a time. thank you to all of - them. it was a a performance. a time. thank you to all of them i them. it was a a performance. a - time. thank you to all of them being able to talk about it on tv because it is a very powerful message stuck will keep in touch with all of them.
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it's that time of year again — from the anguish of a tiramisu in tatters to the triumph of a well—executed tarte tatin — and all in a very large tent. can you guess what it is? the new series of the great british bake off starts tonight, with 12 new hopefuls ready to do battle. let's have a quick preview. bakers, you have had half an hour. no, no, no, they've got half an hour. oh, you've got half an hour left. that makes more sense. lovely. thank you very much. same difference, isn't it? no. 0h. that's panicked me, so i'm, like, miles behind. - that's a strong smell. what is that? come on, just do it. cos they're mini, you've got to get it really tight. paul and prue have demanded a perfectly defined swirl. but if the sponge is even a fraction overbaked... come on! ..it will split. not perfect, but whatever. trying to keep it all in one piece. quite a lot of cracking. which is why i'm covering them in something to make them a bit more attractive. i'm horrendous at doing neat finishes. paul's going to love you.
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don't look into his eyes, all right? i'm going to stare him down. don't stare paul down — you will not win that battle! that was quite scary! it is a big favourite in our house, bake off, love it. let's speak to a couple of bake off experts. ruby bhogal was a runner—up three years ago, and tom allen presents the extra slice spin—off show. good morning to you both. lovely to have you with us. really, what is it like at this stage the contest is? you build it and then you're waiting for it to start on tv and get people invested. it is you're waiting for it to start on tv and get people invested.- and get people invested. it is so weird. at this _ and get people invested. it is so weird. at this point _ and get people invested. it is so weird. at this point i _ and get people invested. it is so weird. at this point i had - and get people invested. it is so| weird. at this point i had already gone back to my normal dayjob and i remember being on the tube and someone is holding a metro paper in front of me. i opened it up and they looked at the paper, looked at me and was like, wait! are you on bake off? it absolutely blew my mind because you lived in this bubble where you have been filming bake off
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for ten weeks and then you go back to normal life and it almost felt like did that even happen? see your face in the paper in the morning is a shock to the system, let me tell you. but i can imagine they have woken up with butterflies in their stomach and a bit like christmas morning, but it is so exciting, i cannot wait to watch it tonight. tom, it is like this in my house but few new baking a cake could be so dramatic? i few new baking a cake could be so dramatic? ~ ., , , ,.,, few new baking a cake could be so dramatic? ~ ., , , . , dramatic? i know! i suppose that is what we all— dramatic? i know! i suppose that is what we all love _ dramatic? i know! i suppose that is what we all love about _ dramatic? i know! i suppose that is what we all love about it. _ dramatic? i know! i suppose that is what we all love about it. even - what we all love about it. even though — what we all love about it. even though it — what we all love about it. even though it seems quite incidental everyone — though it seems quite incidental everyone is obsessed with making their mini — everyone is obsessed with making their mini rolls or whatever they are doing — their mini rolls or whatever they are doing. that is quite nice in a world _ are doing. that is quite nice in a world where there are so many things to worry— world where there are so many things to worry about and get down about. actually. _ to worry about and get down about. actually, just panicking about what you are _ actually, just panicking about what you are going to do with a victoria sponge _ you are going to do with a victoria sponge is — you are going to do with a victoria sponge is quite nice and refreshing, reallv _ sponge is quite nice and refreshing, reall . ~ . , ., sponge is quite nice and refreshing, reall . ~ . i. , sponge is quite nice and refreshing, reall . ~ . , ., . really. where are you up to with all of this? do — really. where are you up to with all of this? do you _ really. where are you up to with all of this? do you know— really. where are you up to with all of this? do you know what - really. where are you up to with all of this? do you know what is - really. where are you up to with all. of this? do you know what is coming already or do you wait, like the rest of us? i
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already or do you wait, like the rest of us?— already or do you wait, like the rest of us? ., . , . ., rest of us? i unfortunately i am not m stic rest of us? i unfortunately i am not mystic meg — rest of us? i unfortunately i am not mystic meg so _ rest of us? i unfortunately i am not mystic meg so i— rest of us? i unfortunately i am not mystic meg so i can't _ rest of us? i unfortunately i am not mystic meg so i can't predict - rest of us? i unfortunately i am not mystic meg so i can't predict the i mystic meg so i can't predict the future _ mystic meg so i can't predict the future. something about the hair. i watch _ future. something about the hair. i watch it— future. something about the hair. i watch it about a week in advance so i am not _ watch it about a week in advance so i am not that— watch it about a week in advance so i am not that far in it. are two reasons — i am not that far in it. are two reasons. one, i like to watch it with _ reasons. one, i like to watch it with everyone else and i am absolutely terrified that if i knew the ending i would let it slip because _ the ending i would let it slip because i'm notjust where the. ruby. _ because i'm notjust where the. ruby. we — because i'm notjust where the. ruby, we mentioned you did bake off three years ago, you talked about the incident on the tube. what has life been like post bake off? what life been like post bake off? what can i sa ? life been like post bake off? what can i say? it _ life been like post bake off? what can i say? it has— life been like post bake off? what can i say? it has completely - life been like post bake off? transit can i say? it has completely changed my life. i have gone from working in an office to eating cake every single day, literally living the carbohydrate dream. it is like i have won the lottery. it feels fantastic. last year has been fantastic, not to say that sounds very chizzy but it has been a roller—coaster since then. i say my job for about nine months after the show and then it was one of those
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moments where i had to give my all to baking or to myjob and of course cake will always win! went down that avenue and i have not looked back. i feel very, very fortunate. that was what i imagine with baker, it propels you to a different platform and allows you to take forward a passion that maybe some people didn't know existed or has been a lifelong hobby. didn't know existed or has been a lifelong hobby-— lifelong hobby. ruby, tell us the truth, lifelong hobby. ruby, tell us the truth. what _ lifelong hobby. ruby, tell us the truth, what is _ lifelong hobby. ruby, tell us the truth, what is it _ lifelong hobby. ruby, tell us the truth, what is it really _ lifelong hobby. ruby, tell us the truth, what is it really like - lifelong hobby. ruby, tell us the truth, what is it really like an i truth, what is it really like an attempt? watching bake off, it looks like everyone is really helping each other and there is a lovely atmosphere. dan is lacking. it seems very kind, had tense does it get? i mean... i don't know. because i haven't been baking for very long, i went into the show with zero expectation. i thought i was going out in the first week, never thought i would make it to the final. because of my lack of experience i went in thinking i was going to go
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into have fun. whilst some other people may have been sweating under pressure, i was there to have a bit of a giggle. i am in a tent with noel fielding! how my not going to have a bit of a laugh? there are certain moments, when they say you have five minutes left, it is literally the blood drained from your face and like, literally the blood drained from yourface and like, oh, this isn't a joke. i have to actually present something. but, yeah, it can be really hard when you're having a meltdown and you about 15 cameras all glaring in yourface meltdown and you about 15 cameras all glaring in your face so it meltdown and you about 15 cameras all glaring in yourface so it is not the most fun bit but it is an absolute hoot.— not the most fun bit but it is an absolute hoot. ., ., , ., absolute hoot. tom, to be involved in a programme — absolute hoot. tom, to be involved in a programme that _ absolute hoot. tom, to be involved in a programme that vastly - absolute hoot. tom, to be involved| in a programme that vastly expands outside the tv you watch, you have to spin off show, and then you get this weird situation where someone like temporary make—up —— markets and like ruby is begging to be set out in the supermarkets. people are obsessed with the programme. it is one of the interactive elements that
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people _ one of the interactive elements that people watch the show. they often like to _ people watch the show. they often like to bake before the show, i have realised. _ like to bake before the show, i have realised. so— like to bake before the show, i have realised, so they can watch the show whilst _ realised, so they can watch the show whilst eating cake so they don't get jealous— whilst eating cake so they don't get jealous of— whilst eating cake so they don't get jealous of people on screen, which is a nice _ jealous of people on screen, which is a nice way— jealous of people on screen, which is a nice way of doing it. a big part— is a nice way of doing it. a big part of— is a nice way of doing it. a big part of an— is a nice way of doing it. a big part of an extra slice, withjoe brand, — part of an extra slice, withjoe brand, we _ part of an extra slice, withjoe brand, we have so much fun celebrating everything to do with it what we _ celebrating everything to do with it what we really like is also when it goes _ what we really like is also when it goes badly. that is more amusing and also more _ goes badly. that is more amusing and also more relatable because everybody has days when it goes wrong _ everybody has days when it goes wrong. think about it, it doesn't matter— wrong. think about it, it doesn't matter how— wrong. think about it, it doesn't matter how well people do in the tent because we just like watching people _ tent because we just like watching people trying their best, that is what _ people trying their best, that is what it— people trying their best, that is what it is— people trying their best, that is what it is about.— people trying their best, that is what it is about. that is the great thing about _ what it is about. that is the great thing about an — what it is about. that is the great thing about an extra _ what it is about. that is the great thing about an extra slice, - what it is about. that is the great thing about an extra slice, when| thing about an extra slice, when things go wrong, it makes everybody feel a bit better about themselves. which we need every day.- feel a bit better about themselves. which we need every day. ruby, what is our
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which we need every day. ruby, what is your signature _ which we need every day. ruby, what is your signature cake? _ which we need every day. ruby, what is your signature cake? if _ which we need every day. ruby, what is your signature cake? if someone i is your signature cake? if someone were to come round and say they were going to your house, what will you put on the table and say, have a bit of that? i put on the table and say, have a bit of that? ~ , ., , . put on the table and say, have a bit of that? ~ , .,, . ,., of that? i think people are so disappointed _ of that? i think people are so disappointed when _ of that? i think people are so disappointed when they - of that? i think people are so | disappointed when they come of that? i think people are so i disappointed when they come to of that? i think people are so - disappointed when they come to mind because they think i will put on something glorious and it is random bits that things that haven't done right things i am testing but i absolutely love cakes, that for me is my specialty and something i love to do. i have an absolute killer. chocolate orange cake. from matilda, the bruce bogtrotter cake, something really bad for you. that is what i would make for you guys if you pop round. ~ . . i. ., would make for you guys if you pop round. ~ . . ., . round. what are you doing later? laughter _ laughter tom, has working with this programme alongside its made you a better baker to cook?— alongside its made you a better baker to cook? ~ , , ., ., baker to cook? absolutely not. you won't aet baker to cook? absolutely not. you won't get anything _ baker to cook? absolutely not. you won't get anything if _ baker to cook? absolutely not. you won't get anything if you _ baker to cook? absolutely not. you won't get anything if you come - baker to cook? absolutely not. you won't get anything if you come to i baker to cook? absolutely not. you. won't get anything if you come to my house _ house.
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laughter i liked the stand up to cancer version, — i liked the stand up to cancer version, which was fun but really difficult — version, which was fun but really difficult in— version, which was fun but really difficult. in general i find ijust cannot— difficult. in general i find ijust cannot be _ difficult. in general i find ijust cannot be bothered. that is my input on it _ cannot be bothered. that is my input on it i_ cannot be bothered. that is my input on it. i thought i would be great because — on it. i thought i would be great because i— on it. i thought i would be great because i have been watching so intensely— because i have been watching so intensely for the last few years but i was _ intensely for the last few years but i was terrible, absolutely rubbish. i was terrible, absolutely rubbish. i have _ i was terrible, absolutely rubbish. i have to — i was terrible, absolutely rubbish. i have to ask you. what is your favourite cake that you have sampled on an extra slice? what is the best one? . . on an extra slice? what is the best one? ., , ., on an extra slice? what is the best one? . , . , ., one? that is a good question. some are tuite one? that is a good question. some are quite horrible _ one? that is a good question. some are quite horrible but _ one? that is a good question. some are quite horrible but when - one? that is a good question. some are quite horrible but when we - one? that is a good question. some are quite horrible but when we werej are quite horrible but when we were allowedm _ are quite horrible but when we were allowed... there was one that was chocolate — allowed... there was one that was chocolate and bacon a few years ago. oh, chocolate and bacon a few years ago. oh. hello! _ chocolate and bacon a few years ago. oh, hello! . ., , , oh, hello! ridiculous but quite unusual. that _ oh, hello! ridiculous but quite unusual. that sticks _ oh, hello! ridiculous but quite unusual. that sticks in - oh, hello! ridiculous but quite unusual. that sticks in the - oh, hello! ridiculous but quite i unusual. that sticks in the mind. but something like that, probably. sometimes you go for the old fancy, who cares? _ sometimes you go for the old fancy, who cares? who cares, i want a nice
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tight— who cares? who cares, i want a nice tight for— who cares? who cares, i want a nice tight for something.— tight for something. excellent. thank you _ tight for something. excellent. thank you for— tight for something. excellent. thank you for being _ tight for something. excellent. thank you for being with - tight for something. excellent. thank you for being with us i tight for something. excellent. | thank you for being with us this morning. we are sharing your delights that bake off starts tonight. ruby, thank you for the imitation around your house and, tom, thank you for letting us know. laughter speak to you later. chocolate orange cake. what is your favourite? anything chocolate related. sometimes you can't beat a victoria sponge done well. i bet sometimes you can't beat a victoria sponge done well.— sometimes you can't beat a victoria sponge done well. i bet carol does a brilliant victoria _ sponge done well. i bet carol does a brilliant victoria sponge. _ sponge done well. i bet carol does a brilliant victoria sponge. i _ sponge done well. i bet carol does a brilliant victoria sponge. i am - brilliant victoria sponge. i am treat at brilliant victoria sponge. i am great at opening _ brilliant victoria sponge. i am great at opening the - brilliant victoria sponge. i am great at opening the packet and taking _ great at opening the packet and taking it — great at opening the packet and taking it out and putting it on a plate — taking it out and putting it on a plate. good morning, everyone. i taking it out and putting it on a plate. good morning, everyone. lam delighted— plate. good morning, everyone. lam delighted to — plate. good morning, everyone. lam delighted to announce the winner of the weather watches pic of the season— the weather watches pic of the
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season and that is jay—z bean, who took this— season and that is jay—z bean, who took this wonderful picture. isn't it gorgeous? he is retired, he has been _ it gorgeous? he is retired, he has been working on his photography since _ been working on his photography since he — been working on his photography since he has been retired, and i think— since he has been retired, and i think you — since he has been retired, and i think you will agree it is certainly working. — think you will agree it is certainly working. a — think you will agree it is certainly working, a beautiful picture. you might see some sunsets like that again— might see some sunsets like that again this — might see some sunsets like that again this week because this week the weather is dry for most comes in once a _ the weather is dry for most comes in once a change in the day and on friday— once a change in the day and on friday temperatures can reach 23 or 24 some _ friday temperatures can reach 23 or 24 some parts of the south—east, way above _ 24 some parts of the south—east, way above average for the time of year. but it— above average for the time of year. but it is— above average for the time of year. but it is going to turn windier and cooler— but it is going to turn windier and cooler in— but it is going to turn windier and cooler in the north and that will start— cooler in the north and that will start later— cooler in the north and that will start later on today. what we have is high—pressure in charge of weather— is high—pressure in charge of weather across southern areas a week with a _ weather across southern areas a week with a front _ weather across southern areas a week with a front coming in later to the north-west— with a front coming in later to the north—west will introduce thicker cloud _ north—west will introduce thicker cloud into — north—west will introduce thicker cloud into north and west of scotland _ cloud into north and west of scotland and also northern and western — scotland and also northern and western pipes of northern ireland and the _ western pipes of northern ireland and the wind was tax difficult. you can see _ and the wind was tax difficult. you can see the — and the wind was tax difficult. you can see the amount of sunshine we have _ can see the amount of sunshine we have got _ can see the amount of sunshine we have got. this cloud could be picking — have got. this cloud could be picking up was apache light rain or some _ picking up was apache light rain or some drizzle, and temperatures 14 to about _ some drizzle, and temperatures 14 to about 21 _ some drizzle, and temperatures 14 to about 21 degrees. as we head on into
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the evening _ about 21 degrees. as we head on into the evening and overnight it will still be — the evening and overnight it will still be fairly gusty across the north— still be fairly gusty across the north and west. at times that gust could _ north and west. at times that gust could reach— north and west. at times that gust could reach 50, 50 five miles per hour~ _ could reach 50, 50 five miles per hour~ at— could reach 50, 50 five miles per hour~ at the _ could reach 50, 50 five miles per hour. at the same time we have a weather— hour. at the same time we have a weather front coming in, introducing some _ weather front coming in, introducing some persistent rain. a week when different— some persistent rain. a week when different from today pushing further south, _ different from today pushing further south, not _ different from today pushing further south, not much more than a band of cloud _ south, not much more than a band of cloud south — south, not much more than a band of cloud. south under clear skies it will be _ cloud. south under clear skies it will be chillier and we will see a return— will be chillier and we will see a return to — will be chillier and we will see a return to some mist and fog patches for me _ return to some mist and fog patches for me. excuse me. tomorrow, when difference _ for me. excuse me. tomorrow, when difference continue to push south, taking _ difference continue to push south, taking its— difference continue to push south, taking its made with it. still quite blustery— taking its made with it. still quite blustery across scotland and the east of _ blustery across scotland and the east of the pennines, not as windy as today — east of the pennines, not as windy as today. i'm a week when difference continues— as today. i'm a week when difference continues to — as today. i'm a week when difference continues to push further south across— continues to push further south across england and wales. you might see the _ across england and wales. you might see the shower but she probably won't _ see the shower but she probably won't and — see the shower but she probably won't and they will be a lot of dry weather— won't and they will be a lot of dry weather as— won't and they will be a lot of dry weather as the weather front tends to fizzle _ weather as the weather front tends to fizzle. behind this one you will find the _ to fizzle. behind this one you will find the return to sunny spells and also some — find the return to sunny spells and also some blustery showers. cooler in the, _ also some blustery showers. cooler in the, 13— also some blustery showers. cooler in the, 13 or— also some blustery showers. cooler in the, 13 or 14 degrees, still on the one — in the, 13 or 14 degrees, still on the one side further south, 21, 22,
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possibly— the one side further south, 21, 22, possibly 23~ — the one side further south, 21, 22, possibly 23. into thursday, the front _ possibly 23. into thursday, the front seats the south, weakening all the time _ front seats the south, weakening all the time. another little front pushing _ the time. another little front pushing across the north of scotland where _ pushing across the north of scotland where it _ pushing across the north of scotland where it will still be pretty windy to start — where it will still be pretty windy to start with, but the winds will ease _ to start with, but the winds will ease through the course of the day. you can— ease through the course of the day. you can see — ease through the course of the day. you can see how our first front seats — you can see how our first front seats south as a band of cloud, some bright _ seats south as a band of cloud, some bright skies _ seats south as a band of cloud, some bright skies and sunshine but later more _ bright skies and sunshine but later more rain — bright skies and sunshine but later more rain returns to the west of scotland — more rain returns to the west of scotland. temperatures range from ten in _ scotland. temperatures range from ten in the _ scotland. temperatures range from ten in the north to about 21 as we weep _ ten in the north to about 21 as we weep down — ten in the north to about 21 as we weep down towards the south. lots going _ weep down towards the south. lots going on— weep down towards the south. lots going on with the weather this week. thank— going on with the weather this week. thank you _ going on with the weather this week. thank you very much. tuesday morning, 8:50am. when the duke of edinburgh prince philip died in april, we heard many tributes to his work as a royal navy officer, a champion of british trade and, of course, the longest serving royal consort in british history. in a new documentary on bbc one tomorrow night, we'll get to hear a lot more about the duke as a family man. all of the queen and duke's children and grandchildren took part in the programme.
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and they all shared very personal memories. let's take a look. one of the games he used to enjoy playing was when we used to go forfamily barbecues. instead of, like, a mustard pot, we had a squeezy mustard tube. and he used to take the lid off and put it in your hands. he gets you to hold it. gets you to hold it in your hands and the lid's off. i and i can't remember exactly what he says, but he ends up slamming your hands together. and then he'd squish your hands together to fire the mustard onto the ceiling. it went all over the ceiling. he used to get in a lot of trouble from my grandmother for covering most of the places we had lunch and things with mustard on the ceiling. i actually think the marks are still there. yeah, i think so. you know, he enjoyed those jokes, he enjoyed messing around with the children and kind of being a grandfather. what i remember now is the expressions on his face to the things that happened, things that went wrong, and the craziness that was happening around him.
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he would just sit there so completely calmly with his legs crossed and his arms folded, or his hands classed, and just literally watches run by going zoom, zoom. he made time for all of us, - supported all of us and he kept control of most of us. the royaljournalist robert hardman, who wrote and co—produced this documentary, joins us now. you really do get an insight into the personality and we have talked so much about him but i do think we learn more, don't we? knife so much about him but i do think we learn more, don't we?— learn more, don't we? we really do because we — learn more, don't we? we really do because we have _ learn more, don't we? we really do because we have the _ learn more, don't we? we really do because we have the people - learn more, don't we? we really do because we have the people who i learn more, don't we? we really do i because we have the people who knew him best and they all loved him dearly. there were so many fascinating stories. i think we all heard a great deal about every aspect of his life and so many people were amazed by all the things he had done, which we heard at the time of his funeral. to hear it from the family, a whole new side of him, it is wonderful stuff. hour the family, a whole new side of him, it is wonderful stuff.—
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it is wonderful stuff. how much of the documentary _ it is wonderful stuff. how much of the documentary is _ it is wonderful stuff. how much of the documentary is a _ it is wonderful stuff. how much of the documentary is a barbecue i the documentary is a barbecue anecdotes? laughter there is a bit of cooking in there. you have bake off earlier! he did like his cooking. in out you have bake off earlier! he did like his cooking. in— like his cooking. in out the series we to like his cooking. in out the series we go inside _ like his cooking. in out the series we go inside his _ like his cooking. in out the series we go inside his amazing - like his cooking. in out the series we go inside his amazing library, | we go inside his amazing library, 15,000 books, but there are several shelves which have cookery books. there is a small bit of cooking in here but a lot of other stuff to do. it is so clear from the film that he was very much a hands—on grandfather and quite naughty, quite rebellious. quite rebellious, he loved having the grandchildren around. i think he liked sort of kiddie chaos. prince harry talks about how he used to sit back and watch the bedlam around. very sweet hearing from his children about, yes, he was a hands—on dad. prince charles talked about in reading bedtime stories and princess and, remembering how he taught her how to drive. try to teach you how to fish but unsuccessfully i don't
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know if you had a list of who you want it on this beforehand but the queen has not spoken to you but you have more members— queen has not spoken to you but you have more members of— queen has not spoken to you but you have more members of the _ queen has not spoken to you but you have more members of the royal i have more members of the royal family talk on this and any other programme may be for. i family talk on this and any other programme may be for.- family talk on this and any other programme may be for. i think it is the first documentary _ programme may be for. i think it is the first documentary effort - programme may be for. i think it is the first documentary effort that i the first documentary effort that has had all the members of the royal family. the queen obviously doesn't do interviews. this started out as a film to celebrate his 100th birthday this time last year, and obviously then covid intervene and we started interviewing people that eased off a bit in the spring, and then of course the sad news came and we stopped and then after which we thought, well, you know, we have heard already is so important and poignant. shall we carry on? at the family were all very keen to do that. in the end, 14 members of the family plus a member of the family from germany, as well, so it is a big cast. it from germany, as well, so it is a bi cast. . from germany, as well, so it is a bi cast. , ., . . big cast. it is not all about food, is it? that _ big cast. it is not all about food, is it? that not _ big cast. it is not all about food, is it? that not all _ big cast. it is not all about food, is it? that not all about - big cast. it is not all about food, is it? that not all about chaos. l big cast. it is not all about food, i is it? that not all about chaos. his relatives are really honest about
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him. there is a clip we have here which is prince william and princess, the duchess of cornwall, remembering him and how tough he was. he would always make everyone very clear where you stand. i think people find that refreshing. they know there is nothing else going on or there is no game is played. he is very up front, he is very honest and he is very matter of fact. he is fundamentally a problem solver and i think a lot of that stems from his early experience and the problems in his early life. i am so curious about people. ijust asked him - about his childhood. it was absolutely riveting. my father was the youngest. he must have been 16, 17 years younger than his older sister. so his father was quite a lot older. i never knew my grandfather, his father — prince andrew of greece — because he died before i was born. he was obviously understand it because he had been around for such a long time, such a huge figure in that family. what you have seen from not only speaking to people and observing them for a long time, who will the spacing he has not, do you
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think? this will the spacing he has not, do you think? ~ , , ., will the spacing he has not, do you think? ~ , i. . , think? as you said earlier he is the lonuest think? as you said earlier he is the longest serving _ think? as you said earlier he is the longest serving royal _ think? as you said earlier he is the longest serving royal consort - think? as you said earlier he is the longest serving royal consort in i longest serving royal consort in history. i think he is irreplaceable but his legacy is carried on in so many ways by other members of the family and things like his duke of edinburgh award scheme. that is now being carried out by the millions of people and in the series we took to his granddaughter, lady louise, the earl and countess of wessex' daughter, who is actually doing the duke of edinburgh award herself at the moment. it is herfirst interview. and so we see how all the things he did have been passed down through the royal generation. you go throuuh his through the royal generation. you go through his office, _ through the royal generation. you go through his office, as _ through the royal generation. you go through his office, as well. _ through the royal generation. you go through his office, as well. that - through his office, as well. that was amazing- — through his office, as well. that was amazing. we _ through his office, as well. that was amazing. we had _ through his office, as well. that was amazing. we had to - through his office, as well. tryst was amazing. we had to get in there because buckingham palace is being refurbished, the builders are about to move in so we needed to see that. just to see 15,000 books and the desk where it all happened and all the interesting thing he collected. he was untouched. that the interesting thing he collected. he was untouched.—
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the interesting thing he collected. he was untouched. that is the thing that strikes me, _ he was untouched. that is the thing that strikes me, when _ he was untouched. that is the thing that strikes me, when you - he was untouched. that is the thing that strikes me, when you see - he was untouched. that is the thing that strikes me, when you see his i that strikes me, when you see his office, you see doesn't decades old may be images of his office, it didn't change, over the years. was untouched and had models of some of his former ships and a collection of statuettes of early his former ships and a collection of statuettes of earl— statuettes of early prime ministers and the ships _ statuettes of early prime ministers and the ships in _ statuettes of early prime ministers and the ships in bottles _ statuettes of early prime ministers and the ships in bottles and - statuettes of early prime ministers and the ships in bottles and coins i and the ships in bottles and coins the 15,000 books, and amazing collection on everything from philosophy, we talked about cookery earlier, but wildlife, stacks of shells on wildlife and nature and he was a big conservationist. {either was a big conservationist. other members of _ was a big conservationist. other members of the _ was a big conservationist. other members of the royal— was a big conservationist. other members of the royal family i was a big conservationist. other| members of the royal family are talking about him in the programme but i know you interviewed him on numerous occasions. what was your takeaway on those chats with him? you had to do your homework. did he test ou? you had to do your homework. did he test you? you — you had to do your homework. did he test you? you really _ you had to do your homework. did he test you? you really didn't _ you had to do your homework. did he test you? you really didn't want - you had to do your homework. did he test you? you really didn't want to i test you? you really didn't want to net the test you? you really didn't want to get the sort _ test you? you really didn't want to get the sort of _ test you? you really didn't want to get the sort of "damn _ test you? you really didn't want to get the sort of "damn fool!" - get the sort of "damn fool!" question. he was a polymath, he had views on everything and they were considered views. he released a
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debate. i can't think of anyone else in public life who has written books on birds and wildlife but also a series of theological essays but he's quite happy about things like manure extraction or the problems of running a farm shop. he was great company. running a farm shop. he was great com an . �* ., . company. and hugh, of all the children and _ company. and hugh, of all the children and grandchildren, i company. and hugh, of all the children and grandchildren, is| company. and hugh, of all the i children and grandchildren, is the most like him? filth. children and grandchildren, is the most like him?— most like him? oh, that is tricky. they have — most like him? oh, that is tricky. they have all _ most like him? oh, that is tricky. they have all got _ most like him? oh, that is tricky. they have all got aspect - most like him? oh, that is tricky. they have all got aspect of- most like him? oh, that is tricky. they have all got aspect of him i most like him? oh, that is tricky. i they have all got aspect of him but i thought lady louise mountbatten windsor, not only does she do the award but she has taken on the carriage driving and was very good at it. that was his great passion in later life, his carriage driving, as we saw at the funeral, the very moving moment with the carriage and the ponies and it is lady louise has now taken up the reins, literally white you have obviously got a good relationship with the family, they trust you to make this programme, do you have anything else lined that, the programme, follow—up? who; you have anything else lined that, the programme, follow-up? why are ou the programme, follow-up? why are you giggling? — the programme, follow-up? why are you giggling? having _ the programme, follow-up? why are you giggling? having managed - the programme, follow-up? why are you giggling? having managed to i you giggling? having managed to interview the _ you giggling? having managed to interview the whole _ you giggling? having managed to interview the whole lot, - you giggling? having managed to interview the whole lot, i -
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you giggling? having managed to interview the whole lot, i think i interview the whole lot, i think they have probably seen enough of me for a bit! they have probably seen enough of me fora bit! it they have probably seen enough of me for a bit! it has been a real privilege to do it because of the time of his funeral, we heard all these amazing aspects of his life and there was that extraordinary funeral but there was no memorial service and there were so many aspects of it and this bill, i hope people feel there is a lot of lightness in there as well as reflect this but particularly to hear about his early life is fascinating. duchess of cornwall said, is riveting. you even get to see his early teenage attempts at being an entrepreneur, but i will not spoil that.— being an entrepreneur, but i will not soilthat. . ~ , . not spoil that. thank you very much for coming — not spoil that. thank you very much for coming in- _ prince philip: the royal family remembers is on tomorrow at 9pm on bbc one. you're watching bbc breakfast, it's 8.59.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. the government insists a price cap must remain in place to protect consumers amidst the disruption caused by soaring gas prices. i'm very, very focused on protecting the most vulnerable, elderly people who are exposed to fuel poverty, and the government is resolutely focused on that. senior representatives of the food and drinks industry will meet ministers later, amidst warnings of empty shelves in supermarkets, to discuss the knock—on effects of high gas prices. meanwhile, i'd love to hear from you this morning — your thoughts on the issue and if you are seeing problems in your local area. you can tweet me @annita—mcveigh, using #bbcyourquestions. borisjohnson and president biden are set to meet

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