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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 9, 2021 3:00pm-3:31pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. pressure grows on the government to help businesses facing soaring energy bills. women travelling home alone could soon be offered protection to a free mobile phone app. theirfirst meeting since protection to a free mobile phone app. their first meeting since the group seized control of afghanistan in august. british teenager emma vedder canning loses herfirst match since winning the us open beaten in straight sets by the world number 100. -- straight sets by the world number 100. —— emma raducanu. environmentalist chris packham joined activists at buckingham
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palace owning the royal family to return the land to its natural state. —— urging the royalfamily. and studying the effects of long covid in children and young people, especially centres are due to open across england this week. —— specialist centres. good afternoon. welcome to bbc news. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. a number of conservative mps have joined those calling for the government to provide urgent support to businesses struggling with soaring gas prices. the leaders of industries with heavy energy consumption say spiralling costs are threatening their future.
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ministers insist they're in regular contact with business groups to explore possible solutions. our business correspondent katie prescott reports. cement, glass, steel, chemicals. the industries with the heaviest energy consumption in the uk. to keep the furnaces burning, they're crying out for government support. absolutely right now. gas prices are at an unprecedented level. and the businesses that manufacture the goods that we need are trying to operate under these unprecedented conditions. they are backed by some conservative mps representing industrial areas. they need government support, either in direct support or a cap on their energy prices to allow them to continue in business, and it would be ludicrous that we would lose these high energy intensive businesses that we need for our economy. but so far that support isn't forthcoming. the government says....
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businesses don't have the cushion of the energy price cap so they tend to buy their energy a year or so in advance. for those whose contracts are now up for renewal, it's a really painful time as they face skyrocketing costs. we've got kids in a nursery. i mean, we can't not turn the heating on for children in the nursery. looking at the prices now, you are looking, at the moment, energy is selling eight times higher than it was when that contract started. eight times higher. that is just crazy. i don't know how people and businesses are actually going to cope. while households might be directly protected by the price cap,
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rising costs for businesses eventually feed through to all of us. if energy prices won't come down, then this will happen to this nursery. katie prescott, bbc news. dave dalton, who's the ceo of british glass, the british glass manufacturers' confederation said that more government support would be needed to help many small and medium size firms survive the winter months. i think to be fair to the secretary of state that was acknowledged during the meeting. models had already been constructed to decide whether we could weather the, sort of, transient sea of issue. i think everyone has in mind that it is likely to be dealt with in terms of its ability before the winter is out an even sooner than that if contacts have already been seen being negotiated with russia and elsewhere. the is going to be incredibly difficult to make the impacts that that is manageable
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between the immediate term. it is impossible. yet. we're going to need intervention at a company level where those of us who are particularly exposed enable likely fine measures to deal with it. that was default _ fine measures to deal with it. that was default on _ fine measures to deal with it. that was default on their— fine measures to deal with it. that was default on their speaking tours earlier. ——that was dave dalton there speaking to us earlier. plans for a phone service aimed at protecting lone women walking home have been announced by bt. the company's chief executive said the firm started to develop the system in the wake of the murders of sarah everard and sabina nessa. bt has set out its plans in a letter to the home secretary. some campaigners argue such a service does not tackle the real i'm joined now by nick gazzard, founder and ceo of the hollie gazzard trust who have an app on safeguarding women. this is a similar app and has been
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downloaded around 300,000 times. the father of the woman who was murdered is the ceo and joined us in gloucester. thanks forjoining us here in bbc news. ijust first off want to get your reaction to this announcement today about the bt social media phone app. in announcement today about the bt social media phone app.— announcement today about the bt social media phone app. in one way, i am really. — social media phone app. in one way, i am really, really _ social media phone app. in one way, i am really, really pleased _ social media phone app. in one way, i am really, really pleased because l i am really, really pleased because it means that the government are taking this issue really seriously. but on the other hand, i am a little bit disappointed because we have been trying to work with the government ministers for a very long time now with respect to our own act and it actually has the same functionality that the bt app proposes to have but has a lot more functionality so we are a bit perplexed as to why the government and speaking to us but as soon as a big giant comes in they start to speak to them so we would like to speak to them so we would like to
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speak to the government. 0ur app is tried, tested, working out for six years and we could put that out tomorrow so the whole country. i mean, realistically, you could be working with the government, with bt to really push this out there. absolutely and i'm quite prepared to do that. we have a problem already in the research and development has come in for a number of years because the issues have been lined out for a few years we have an app now that really does make a special fuses and helps to keep them safe and feel safe and that is the reaction we are getting from those people that use our app. priti patel did say that this is exactly the kind of innovative scheme that it would be good to get going as soon after hearing you speak she will be reminded that it is it is already going. now, you said that there has been a lot of research done. 0bviously, now, you said that there has been a lot of research done. obviously, it has been used for six years. {guild has been used for six years. could ou 'ust has been used for six years. could you just take _ has been used for six years. could you just take us — has been used for six years. could you just take us through, - has been used for six years. colic you just take us through, please, what you have learned, he was using
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this app, when are they using it? because the bt at they are saying is to help women walk home but yours isn'tjust to help women walk home but yours isn't just for to help women walk home but yours isn'tjust for women, is a? isn't just for women, is a? absolutely. isn'tjust for women, is a? absolutely. 0ur app doesn't differentiate, you know. our app is for everybody, anyone who wants to feel extra safe or feel safe when they are out of this house they download holly guard and activate it will help them to feel safe and stay safe. we have people from the age of 12 right up to the age of 90 he is ourapp, male and 12 right up to the age of 90 he is our app, male and female and it is used across the whole country so we have sophisticated mapping process and sophisticated data that we can get out of the end of our apps to show who is using it across the country, when they are using it and how they are using it and we know that lots of people are finding it of real benefit.— that lots of people are finding it of real benefit. ~ ., , , of real benefit. when are they using it? because — of real benefit. when are they using it? because this _ of real benefit. when are they using it? because this is _ of real benefit. when are they using it? because this is really _ it? because this is really fascinating because a lot of people are saying one of the criticisms is
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that it could waste police time if it is not used correctly, for example. if users don't respond to the app when they are meant to respond to it. how is it being used? but have you learnt? fine respond to it. how is it being used? but have you learnt?— but have you learnt? one of the thins but have you learnt? one of the things that _ but have you learnt? one of the things that we _ but have you learnt? one of the things that we have _ but have you learnt? one of the things that we have learnt - but have you learnt? one of the things that we have learnt is - but have you learnt? one of the| things that we have learnt is that we have set up an additional security function in a app called holly guard extranet allows a 24/7 monitoring by a professional monitoring by a professional monitoring agent so when someone raises an alert to the phone starts to record voice and video, that goes to record voice and video, that goes to that monitoring centre, they filter it out, and if they believe that that individual needs to have emergency services called then they will liaise with the emergency services so we are not getting wasted police resource going to incidents that they no longer need to be with. what we are getting is police to that goal those areas where people need it need it most service is one of the things that we have learnt over the last five years and that has been in since the middle of last year, now. very cuickl , middle of last year, now. very quickly. nick. _ middle of last year, now. very quickly, nick, have _ middle of last year, now. very quickly, nick, have you - middle of last year, now. very quickly, nick, have you spoken to the home office over the last five
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to six yea rswe the home office over the last five to six yearswe have. we the home office over the last five to six yearswe have.— the home office over the last five to six yearswe have. we spoke to the home office — to six yearswe have. we spoke to the home office and _ to six yearswe have. we spoke to the home office and i _ to six yearswe have. we spoke to the home office and i had _ to six yearswe have. we spoke to the home office and i had some - to six yearswe have. we spoke to the home office and i had some fundingl home office and i had some funding from the home office to issue holly guard extra two victims of domestic abuse during covid—i9 so they are aware of ourapp abuse during covid—i9 so they are aware of our app and therefore we cannot understand why they are not talking to us to have this app to the whole nation.— talking to us to have this app to the whole nation. nick, obviously there's a lot _ the whole nation. nick, obviously there's a lot more _ the whole nation. nick, obviously there's a lot more work _ the whole nation. nick, obviously there's a lot more work that - the whole nation. nick, obviously there's a lot more work that you | the whole nation. nick, obviously. there's a lot more work that you do in part of education and raising awareness. you travel to schools and you are trying to, i suppose, the important thing is a culture shift and have there been any surprises that you have come across in terms of the way people think and their attitudes towards violence, whether it is domestic or out on the streets towards women?— it is domestic or out on the streets towards women? yes, absolutely. one ofthe towards women? yes, absolutely. one of the reasons — towards women? yes, absolutely. one of the reasons why _ towards women? yes, absolutely. one of the reasons why a _ towards women? yes, absolutely. one of the reasons why a set _ towards women? yes, absolutely. one of the reasons why a set up _ towards women? yes, absolutely. one of the reasons why a set up the - of the reasons why a set up the holly trust was to try and contribute the issues that she
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faced, domestic abuse, stalking, knife crime in the first pattern about raising awareness, providing education and the third passive prevention with the app. we going to schools and deliver workshops in schools, colleges and universities in one of the me is how much people don't know what a healthy relationship is and that is why comic where it really starts and we have to try and teach our young people about healthy relationships and ensure that if they can identify when they are getting into an unhealthy relationship, to identify the red flags, that they can talk to soon about it and hopefully get himself out of that relationship safely. so that is one of the big things that we've learnt since we've been going into schools and live in our programmes.— been going into schools and live in our programmes. have you seen any improvement — our programmes. have you seen any improvement in — our programmes. have you seen any improvement in the _ our programmes. have you seen any improvement in the agencies - our programmes. have you seen any| improvement in the agencies working together? improvement in the agencies working touether? , ., ., , together? yes, i have. over the last seven years — together? yes, i have. over the last seven years since _ together? yes, i have. over the last seven years since holly _ together? yes, i have. over the last seven years since holly has - together? yes, i have. over the last seven years since holly has been - seven years since holly has been murdered i think agencies are starting to work together. it was one of the problem is when holly was murdered that, you know, information was out there, the red flags with
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air and individual agencies had those but they didn't pick up on them and they didn't liaise together and for example the perpetrator of holly�*s murder it was arrested 23 times in the preceding six years before murdering holly. he had two previous partners that he put into hospital. so, you know, these flags were out there but there is no actual cohesion between the agencies. that is a lot better now but i still believe that we have a long way to go. flan but i still believe that we have a long way to go— but i still believe that we have a long way to go-_ long way to go. can you remind us very quickly _ long way to go. can you remind us very quickly where _ long way to go. can you remind us very quickly where people - long way to go. can you remind us very quickly where people can - long way to go. can you remind us i very quickly where people can demo the app? www.hollieguard.com. thanks your image. —— thank you very much. american officials and representatives of the taliban have been meeting face—to—face for the first time since the group took control of afghanistan in august. the united states said the talks
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in the qatari capital, doha did not signal a recognition of taliban rule. yesterday at least 50 people died and more than 100 were injured in a suicide bomb attack on a mosque in the afghan city of kunduz. the islamic state group said it was behind the attack. we have heard from the taliban delegation, the foreign minister they've appointed has said senior taliban leaders met us officials and both sides agreed to uphold what was negotiated in the february 2020 us—taliban deal. he said that the us has agreed to help the taliban out and humanitarian aid and delivery of covid—i9 vaccines and he also warned that no country should interfere in the internal policies. policies of another country. it has been three weeks now since the taliban banned girls from going to secondary schools in the country. women have not yet been allowed
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to go back to theirjobs so one imagines there when he was talking about internal policies but these meetings, really, i'm a part of taliban efforts to gain international recognition recently they also had a meeting with a uk delegation in kabul. he also says they will be meeting european officials soon, and international recognition is important because it is directly linked to funding going back to afghanistan. funding from foreign countries as well as international agencies has been frozen at the moment for fears that it will fall into taliban hands and could be misused, and the taliban very keen for a resumption of that funding. yogita, you said that there was this agreement on both sides coming from the taliban foreign minister and they would uphold what was negotiated in february 2020.
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what was that? what was agreed or negotiated? so, a key part of that was that afghanistan and its territory should not be used against the us or any of its allies, that the security of the us or its allies should not be threatened from afghan territory and that is one of the things we're expecting to be discussed, but the top of the us agenda right now is the evacuation of us nationals and others who are still stuck in afghanistan have permits to leave the country. in the past few weeks there have been delays and difficulties in the evacuation process, particularly by air and via doha, where i am, and the us will be hoping to smooth out that process and hold the taliban to its commitment to upholding people with the right documents to leave the country.
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they report also, a day after dozens of people were killed in a bombing in kunduz city in afghanistan which was claimed by islamic state khorasan province, and the growing state of islamic state militancy is also something that's expected to be discussed during this two—day meeting. yogita limaye with that update. german police say they're investigating several cases of so called "havana syndrome" at the american embassy in berlin. the illness first came to light in cuba in 2016. dozens of american officials have reported symptoms including nausea, memory lapses and dizziness. police in berlin said they were looking into an "alleged sonic weapon attack". an appeals court in the united states has temporarily reinstated a near—total ban on abortions in texas. the ruling overturns the decision of a lower court earlier this week, which had blocked the bill. under the law, abortion in texas is prohibited after about six weeks of pregnancy and makes no exceptions in cases of rape or incest. the dispute could ultimately end up
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before the us supreme court. the headlines on bbc news... pressure is growing on the government to help businesses who were facing soaring energy bills and some of its own mps were facing soaring energy bills and some of its own mstoin were facing soaring energy bills and some of its own mps join industry bossesin some of its own mps join industry bosses in asking for support. women travelling home alone could soon be offered protection from a free mobile phone app. the united states and the taliban are holding face—to—face talks on their first meeting since the troops seized control of afghanistan. in august. now we're going to catch up with all the sports news on the bbc sports news on the bbc sport centre. high. we are going to start with football because it is the manager said about the in the team —— city
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went down to ten players in the first half but they still managed to take the lead through a jamaican international and they could only hold on for so long as united levelled after the break and then went ahead. there was just over ten minutes to go after that went insane united thought they might have won it but despite having a play disadvantage city are back on level terms. that initial shock left ellen white there were just a simple tap in so it is still too— is to with just under five minutes left to play. just under five minutes left to play- -- just under five minutes left to play. —— it is still 2—2. in and another player dominic northern ireland peace goal to smack in andorra northern ireland face switzerland. the scotland boss is
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hoping in full house can inspire his team to victory. hoping in full house can inspire his team to victory-— team to victory. exciting for me. first time _ team to victory. exciting for me. first time as _ team to victory. exciting for me. first time as head _ team to victory. exciting for me. first time as head coach - team to victory. exciting for me. first time as head coach will - team to victory. exciting for me. | first time as head coach will have experience of the full house and in an area that players looking forward to it and i'm looking forward to it and alsojust to it and i'm looking forward to it and also just because of that little bit extra to go get the point is that we want.— bit extra to go get the point is that we want. �* ._ ., ., ., that we want. away from football in the sentiment _ that we want. away from football in the sentiment was _ that we want. away from football in the sentiment was quickest - that we want. away from football in the sentiment was quickest in - the sentiment was quickest in qualifying for the turkish grand prix. you'll take a ten place grid penalty for changing his engine this weekend. hamilton did set a new track record as he beat mercedes team—mate by 10th of a second and will start from pole ahead of redbone's match this to happen and will want to read jane might regain the championship. —— will want to regain the championship, head of max
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verstappen. the steam from outside the north of england to lift the title. though catalan has finished up title. though catalan has finished up the table in the regular season experts have sent down as favourites as they go for a third straight title. ., . ., as they go for a third straight title. ., _, ., ., , ., , title. to come to old trafford is secial title. to come to old trafford is special and _ title. to come to old trafford is special and just _ title. to come to old trafford is special and just looking - title. to come to old trafford is special and just looking around | title. to come to old trafford is i special and just looking around the place and over and obviously the memories that it billings. luckily enough, i have been here before. i have been on both sides of the scoreline, if you like. i've been here and lost and been him in one so i knew which one i would rather be on. i i knew which one i would rather be on. ., ., ., , , i knew which one i would rather be on. ., ., , . ., on. i love what has been created back in france _ on. i love what has been created back in france by _ on. i love what has been created back in france by what _ on. i love what has been created back in france by what they - on. i love what has been createdj back in france by what they have achieved — back in france by what they have achieved so far. the national interest, _ achieved so far. the national interest, the media there has been tremendous for the group but it is all about— tremendous for the group but it is all about performance at the weekend and performing well to win the game. the big _ and performing well to win the game. the big heavyweight fight between tyson fury and deontay whilst at tomorrow morning. there has been plenty of angry talking but now that all stops as the pair into the win
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for the third time. the first fight was a draw, fewer than convincingly won the second so what will happen to this time around? reporting from las vegas. such was the intense rivalry between tyson fury and a deontay wilder that they were kept apart before the fight. they were kept apart before the fiht. ., , , , they were kept apart before the fiht. ., ,, , ~ , they were kept apart before the fiuht. ., ,, , ~ , ., fight. calmness is the key to the storm. fight. calmness is the key to the storm- you _ fight. calmness is the key to the storm. you know, _ fight. calmness is the key to the storm. you know, i _ fight. calmness is the key to the storm. you know, i know- fight. calmness is the key to the storm. you know, i know that i fight. calmness is the key to the i storm. you know, i know that when fight. calmness is the key to the - storm. you know, i know that when i am not calm my mind is cloudy so when your mind is clouded it allows you to make bad decisions. deontay wilder has barely _ you to make bad decisions. deontay wilder has barely engaged - you to make bad decisions. deontay wilder has barely engaged with - you to make bad decisions. deontay wilder has barely engaged with the | wilder has barely engaged with the media we can contest a tyson fury who has taken centre stage. the odds masters have him as the favourite to win the final bout of what has been a fascinating rivalry. if other was floored twice in the first fight in 2018. down but not how it ended in a draw. then it was fairly�*s to underplay the us in the rematch.
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perfect performance and in while to his first love but america which claimed that the retreat, cheated his way to victory. between the two revivals. i his way to victory. between the two revivals-— two revivals. i think it is going to be really exciting _ two revivals. i think it is going to be really exciting and _ two revivals. i think it is going to be really exciting and i _ two revivals. i think it is going to be really exciting and i can't - two revivals. i think it is going to be really exciting and i can't waitj be really exciting and i can't wait to see _ be really exciting and i can't wait to see what _ be really exciting and i can't wait to see what kind _ be really exciting and i can't wait to see what kind of— be really exciting and i can't wait to see what kind of drama - be really exciting and i can't wait to see what kind of drama takes| to see what kind of drama takes place _ to see what kind of drama takes place in — to see what kind of drama takes place in the _ to see what kind of drama takes place in the ring _ to see what kind of drama takes place in the ring and _ to see what kind of drama takes place in the ring and how- to see what kind of drama takes place in the ring and how both. place in the ring and how both dramas — place in the ring and how both dramas dominic— place in the ring and how both dramas dominic boxes- place in the ring and how both dramas dominic boxes deal. place in the ring and how both. dramas dominic boxes deal with place in the ring and how both- dramas dominic boxes deal with each other~ _ dramas dominic boxes deal with each other. . , . , dramas dominic boxes deal with each other. ., , ., , ., dramas dominic boxes deal with each other. ., , ., . dramas dominic boxes deal with each other. ., . other. healy was in a much calmer mood as he _ other. healy was in a much calmer mood as he made _ other. healy was in a much calmer mood as he made his _ other. healy was in a much calmer mood as he made his way - other. healy was in a much calmer mood as he made his way out - other. healy was in a much calmer mood as he made his way out of. other. healy was in a much calmer. mood as he made his way out of the arena but he remains confident that they will only be one outcome. this fiuht is they will only be one outcome. this fight is only — they will only be one outcome. this fight is only going to go one way. i hit him. _ fight is only going to go one way. i hit him. he — fight is only going to go one way. i hit him, he hits the floor, it's las vegas _ hit him, he hits the floor, it's las vegas. peace out. bbc hit him, he hits the floor, it's las vegas. peace out.— hit him, he hits the floor, it's las vegas. peace out. bbc news, las veras. it will be some fight, that. you can
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find all the sport on the bbc sport website. it is a fantastic website to! the education secretary has vowed to tackle people absences and nadhim zahawi have said disadvantaged pupils miss out most for not being at school and ahead of the spending review he also said he wanted to invest record sums in children's education. this man is the general secretary of the national association of head teachers. thank you forjoining us this afternoon on bbc news. were you happy with what you heard? yes bbc news. were you happy with what ou heard? , ., ~ , ., .,, you heard? yes we are. mrs howie has onl been you heard? yes we are. mrs howie has only been in — you heard? yes we are. mrs howie has only been in post _ you heard? yes we are. mrs howie has only been in post for _ you heard? yes we are. mrs howie has only been in post for two _ you heard? yes we are. mrs howie has only been in post for two weeks - you heard? yes we are. mrs howie has only been in post for two weeks and i only been in post for two weeks and he set out his stall very early on that he wants to work with profession —— mr zahawi has only
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beenin profession —— mr zahawi has only been in post for a few weeks. we thought we would assess that and invite him into the lions den so to speak and he was good enough to come here today to set out his stall and here today to set out his stall and he said a couple of things that were meaningful bearing in mind he has only been in the seat for a couple of weeks and we would expect a loss of weeks and we would expect a loss of detail but he said he would base its decisions on evidence evidence led basis which is very important, he would talk to us and be straight with us which we absolutely need and when he was asked about the levels of investment, whether with them were any threats of the structures that exist at the moment and the questions on a quality he didn't sugar—coat any of his answers in terms of the amount of detail he was able to give us and invited us to bring evidence in support of what we were talking about one of the things that we have challenged him do and he has acknowledged as the mole as he has acknowledged as the mole as he needs to be the champion for education around the cabinet table and make sure that this government understands that the success really does stand on the shoulders of educators. does stand on the shoulders of educators-— does stand on the shoulders of educators. ~ ., , ., , ., educators. what needs to be done,
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then? and offer _ educators. what needs to be done, then? and offer what _ educators. what needs to be done, then? and offer what needs - educators. what needs to be done, then? and offer what needs to i educators. what needs to be done, then? and offer what needs to be l then? and offer what needs to be done. then? and offer what needs to be done- three _ then? and offer what needs to be done. three things _ then? and offer what needs to be done. three things really - then? and offer what needs to be done. three things really need i then? and offer what needs to be done. three things really need to | done. three things really need to happen straightaway. we need investment straightaway and he is indicated today both in the press and at the conference that he is in negotiation with the treasury found the spending review on any details about i understand but we need a properfunding about i understand but we need a proper funding settlement so we can take schools forward, that is absolutely crucial.— take schools forward, that is absolutely crucial. paul, sorry, i 'ust want absolutely crucial. paul, sorry, i just want to _ absolutely crucial. paul, sorry, i just want to get _ absolutely crucial. paul, sorry, i just want to get some _ absolutely crucial. paul, sorry, i just want to get some thing i absolutely crucial. paul, sorry, i| just want to get some thing edgy very quickly. he says he cannot reveal those sums. could you throw him an idea of what that sum should look like, because you know, don't you? look like, because you know, don't ou? ~ look like, because you know, don't ou? . ., , you? well, the education recovery were talking _ you? well, the education recovery were talking about _ you? well, the education recovery were talking about £15 _ you? well, the education recovery were talking about £15 billion i you? well, the education recovery were talking about £15 billion and | were talking about £15 billion and epi, the respected institute that talks about this seems to be talking about 13— £15 billion so those are the sort of sums of money that come from independent observers that is something we would like to see him get close to. what we get in reality we will see over the coming weeks by what we are going to have to do is work out what really can be delivered based on whatever the
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funding settlement is. {lilia delivered based on whatever the funding settlement is.— delivered based on whatever the funding settlement is. ok, so he entered the _ funding settlement is. ok, so he entered the lions _ funding settlement is. ok, so he entered the lions den _ funding settlement is. ok, so he entered the lions den and - funding settlement is. ok, so he entered the lions den and he i funding settlement is. ok, so he i entered the lions den and he came out alive, as she said, but disadvantaged children. now, we've really seen those weaknesses and those disadvantages are exposed during this pandemic year. what is he going to do about that? itrefoil. during this pandemic year. what is he going to do about that? well, it can't or less _ he going to do about that? well, it can't or less with _ he going to do about that? well, it can't or less with educators, i can't or less with educators, although the trigger for this is talking about specific absences from schools. actually, one of the things we are really suffering from is the retreat of the support services around schools, child mental health and social care systems, health health care system is not being around for schools refers to so it is notjust about around for schools refers to so it is not just about what we can do around for schools refers to so it is notjust about what we can do in school than what the secretary of state and education can do but what his colleagues can deliver on the government table to make sure that we can support the whole child, not just education. in we can support the whole child, not just education-— just education. in the stand, but he also said that _ just education. in the stand, but he also said that the _ just education. in the stand, but he also said that the number - just education. in the stand, but he also said that the number of - just education. in the stand, but he also said that the number of black. also said that the number of black head teachers in the country is not good enough. why does that matter? well, that was in response to a
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question where we were talking about does the teaching profession properly represent the communities that we serve. and we don't, quite frankly, at the moment. we haven't recruited enough educators from across all parts of our community. the secretary of state agreed with that and we are trying to find ways along with him to make sure we can solve those problems because we have to represent the community is that we serve. ., . ., ., ~ we serve. ok. paulwhiteman, thank ou ve we serve. ok. paulwhiteman, thank you very much _ we serve. ok. paulwhiteman, thank you very much indeed. _ we serve. ok. paulwhiteman, thank you very much indeed. thank- we serve. ok. paulwhiteman, thank you very much indeed. thank you. i 16 specialist centres looking at the effects of long covid in children and young people will be opening across england from monday. the paediatric hubs will bring together experts on common symptoms like chronic fatigue and respiratory problems. fiona lamdin has been to meet 10 year old taylor,
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who'll be benefitting from the treatment. ten—year—old taylor in the pool for her weekly hydrotherapy session. since having covid nearly 20 months ago, this is now the only place that she can be without behing in pain. when you wake up, your symptoms will already start to kick in. i wake up with a bad headache, and normally everything aches and i don't want to get out of bed. but when i do, i still feel that pain. it doesn't really go, and then i go to school tired, and ifeel like my hands are, like, going to collapse and not work, and the same with my legs. my back can hurt a few times, but it's not the same as my arms and legs. but my head can hurt a lot, and i'll always feel tired, and that goes on for the whole day. and it's notjust the physical pain — her mum also worries about her daughter's mental health. she used to do things like cheerleading and horse riding and enjoy those things, but she wouldn't be able to do it now, and obviously while she's not been at school even with the lockdowns and then not going back last year because of the pain, she's become quite isolated and then that's obviously affected her as well.
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well, the world's first study into children with long covid suggests that one in seven still suffer symptoms 15 weeks after contracting coronavirus. and so, now, 16 hubs are opening across the country, looking at long covid in children, and one of the pilot's is here in bristol. long covid is essentially a new condition, and there are symptom clusters or groups of symptoms that we don't understand completely and we need to develop treatments for. the outcome for children in general is much, much better than the outcome for adults. so what the hub is going to do is to bring the top specialists at bristol children's hospital together and discuss cases. i feel really strongly that what we need to do is to offer treatment quickly, because the kids are sick and they're missing school right now. how does it feel to know you're going to have access to a specialist team of doctors that are hopefully going to get you better? i feel better because they can
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properly help and not... well, other doctors can help, but these ones are made for long covid. taylor's being seen on monday. after months of pain, she and herfamily hope she can get the help she finally needs to get better. fiona lamdin, bbc news. the wildlife campaginer chris packham and around one hundred children have delivered a petition to buckingham palace calling on the royal family to �*rewild' their estates restoring the land they own to its natural state. ecologists believe some of the estates would naturally be home to beavers and wild boar as simon jones explains. taking their message direct to buckingham palace. campaigners say the royals must re—wild. they are the biggest landowning family in the country,
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with practices like deer stalking and grouse shooting.

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