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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 9, 2021 4:45pm-5:31pm BST

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secondary breast cancer. now, finally, the nhs will fund a scheme to get those stats in england and wales. we are planning your treatment. and it's important stuff. i think it's a game changer, because by knowing how many women are living with secondary breast cancer, we can design our services better. we know how to plan forward, how many specialist nurses we need, how to plan our chemo units. what doesn't change is that behind the numbers are people. ann needs all the help she can get. can i get you to pop . your fluids up for you? yeah. after her telephone consultation, she has been rushed in. this is effectively a&e for cancer. ann was first diagnosed with breast cancer in 2008. it spread, became secondary. she's had years of support. today, from phil, a clinical nurse specialist at cns.
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nurse specialist, a cns. it's a highly professional medical role, but there's more to it than that. phil knows that at this point, ann's needs are not simply medical. if there is anything i can get foryou, and i mean anything, a bacon buttie, a cream cake, a newspaper, just let me know. you're a star. clearly phil is special. rare, too, thought to be the only male cns in the country dedicated to secondary cancer. dedicated to patients like ann. i get up and come to work to fight for people's mums, people's sisters, people's wives, people's daughters and i have a mum, a wife, a sister, a daughter and if they are not worth getting up and fighting for, then i don't know what is. you are a passionate man. oh, i love what we do here. yeah, very much so. decided to give me chemotherapy... ann is poorly. she has been admitted to the ward. after so many years living with cancer, today is tough. it's getting worse. you know, symptoms are getting worse, no doubt about it.
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my breathing and things like that. stay positive until the time comes when all these lovely people can't do anything more for me. i do feel at peace, i do feel i have accepted things. the clatterbridge service aims to make things as normal as possible, for as long as possible, and so there is this. cancer treatment out on the road and into people's homes. hiya, karen, you 0k? good morning. today, nurse sarah is out visiting karen. any chest pains? no chest pains at all. shortness of breath? n0~ _ it's very painful. aw. karen's case is complicated. as well as secondary breast cancer, she's also got skin cancer. is it very painful now, karen, is it? yes. difficult to live with, because i can't move very quick. yeah. there's no option for me to give up. i've got to keep fighting.
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of course. are you ready, karen? ready. sharp scratch coming. well done. there are now 135 patients registered for this service. much better than having to be hooked up to a machine. definitely. used to be about two hours, didn't it? a number that has grown over the pandemic with fewer hospital appointments. i much prefer to be at home having things done. you actually feel more in control. we get to know our patients really well. what i like, there's a lot of positivity in this room. definitely. i've got to be positive, because the day you stop being positive, you are on a slippery slope. so i have to remain positive. that's the treatment done. innovative treatment, and again, this determination that even with a terminal diagnosis, there can be life. until next time, three weeks. good—quality life. yeah, we do need to be heard. i don't want to be put into the shadows, i want to get out there and talk about it and say,
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"look, yeah, 0k, i've got cancer, "it's a difficult situation that i'm in, but we need to talk about it, "because my life is not over." i keep my fingers crossed really, really tightly, because i'd like to see my daughter get married and i'd like to see herfirst baby. she is coming in face—to—face. is she? yeah. back in the hospital, it's clinic day, and it's busy. the new drive to collect better information on patients with secondary breast cancer is designed to target support where it's needed. have a seat. to people like maureen. your lungs are clear. your adrenal glands- and kidneys are all fine. 0h, brilliant. that's all i wanted to know. i'm used to needles, 86 treatments i've had, she is a marvel. if i had not have gone for my scan, my mammogram, i would not be here. you are our miracle. did you hear that? jo just said you are the miracle. maureen laughs. at home, maureen is living proof that even with her kind of secondary breast cancer...
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we are a bit early, is that 0k, maureen? yeah. ..there can be good days, months, even years. "the boy sighed. "'so, young man,�* began the doctor in a singsong tone..." _ maureen is both nanny and effectively mum to her granddaughter, p°ppy--- "there are 192 questions..." ..whose own mother died tragically young. she made me better with my cuddles, do you know that? did she? a bit of cuddle training? when i used to come back from getting the treatment... they are making me better, didn't they? getting maureen's cancer under control has changed her life, of course. but also poppy's. very moving to see you and poppy, very moving, because you have given her everything, and if there is no you, she is missing so much. i know. i know, that's it, isn't it? so... so i've got to live another ten years or more, haven't i? what has it meant to you to be here for her formative years? oh, so much. so much.
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the stakes here could not be higher. most patients with secondary breast cancer are women. many are mothers. all right? yeah, i'm fine. you sure? yeah. alina's daughter is three and every second they get to spend together is precious. she has got another two years until she goes to school, but i am looking forward to seeing her go into that. and i hope i can see her go to that. sorry, can ijust have a moment? it's one of the hardest things, is talking about... and the worry that i might not see her. i'm confident i will. and i will get there. but there is always that sliver of worry... ..that you might not see that big milestone for her. you might not be able to take her through all of her milestones as a young lady and my husband might have to do that. with professor palmieri in my team, i'm sure i'll see it.
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the national audit is aimed at getting better, more targeted treatment to patients like ann. we want to get some more bloods off you. the long—term hope, of course, is a cure, but for now, for the next generation, it's about making secondary breast cancer something that someone can live with, some women can live with, rather than die of. from somewhere, i've got this strength and i don't know where. i always say i have two guardian angels, my mum on one side, and my dad on another. and i do believe that they walk with me.
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hello. you're watching the bbc news channel. the british chambers of commerce described it as dire for small and medium—sized firms. simmering 2a hours a day, seven days a week. there is little this business can do to cut its energy usage. bills recently have been painful. usage. bills recently have been ainful. , , . , ., , , painful. energy prices going up is not what we _ painful. energy prices going up is not what we need. _ painful. energy prices going up is not what we need. my _ painful. energy prices going up is not what we need. my overheads i painful. energy prices going up is - not what we need. my overheads are already extremely high as it is and it's a concern, it's a deep concern about the viability of the business and i don't want to pass that cost
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onto our customers. i'll do everything i can to avoid that. businesses don't have the cushion of an energy price cap. they tend to fix their bills a year or two in advance so that those whose contracts are coming to an end at the moment, it's a really painful time and it's even worse for companies like this one who don't have those contracts and pay their energy bills on a three monthly metered basis. steel, chemicals, industries with the heaviest energy consumption in the uk are rocketing. to keep the furnaces burning, they're crying out for government support. absolutely right now, gas prices are at an unprecedented level. and the businesses that manufacture the goods that we need are trying to operate under these unprecedented conditions. and they're backed by some conservative mps representing industrial areas. they need government support,
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either in direct support or a cap on their energy prices to allow them to continue in business, and it would be ludicrous that we would lose these high energy intensive businesses that we need for our economy. but so far, that support isn't forthcoming. the government says.... for now though, businesses like this facing a transport crunch and rising taxes would like to see limits on how much they have to pay. i’m taxes would like to see limits on how much they have to pay. i'm doing eve hinu how much they have to pay. i'm doing everything i — how much they have to pay. i'm doing everything i can _ how much they have to pay. i'm doing everything i can to — how much they have to pay. i'm doing everything i can to keep _ how much they have to pay. i'm doing everything i can to keep this - everything i can to keep this business running. the last thing we need now is sky high energy bills to top that. katie prescott, bbc news. american officials and representatives of the taliban have met face—to—face for the first time since the group took control of afghanistan in august.
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the us cautioned talks in the qatari capital of doha do not signal a official recognition of taliban rule. in afghanistan, funeral ceremonies have been taking place for many of the victims of the huge bomb blast in kunduz yesterday. around 50 people died with the islamic state group saying it carried out the attack on a mosque. and we can speak to our correspondent yogita limaye in doha now. do we have any indication of how the talks are progressing? irate do we have any indication of how the talks are progressing?— do we have any indication of how the talks are progressing? we have heard some time ago _ talks are progressing? we have heard some time ago from _ talks are progressing? we have heard some time ago from the _ talks are progressing? we have heard some time ago from the acting - some time ago from the acting foreign minister of the taliban appointed government and he is here leading the delegation in doha. he says that they want to improve relations with the international communities and so this really is part of a series of efforts from the taliban to try and gain international recognition. some days ago they met with the uk delegation
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in kabul and some time from now they say they will also meet european officials. he said that the us has offered to help provide covid—i9 vaccines and humanitarian aid but also warned that no one should interfere with the internal affairs of any country. it has been three weeks now since the taliban banned girls from going to secondary schools in most parts of afghanistan and that is the backdrop against which these talks are happening. the taliban are hoping to get international recognition because it's very key step to the unblocking of foreign funding, which has been frozen to afghanistan since they seized control of the country on the 15th of august. as far as the us is concerned, the key thing on their agenda is safe evacuation of us nationals and others in afghanistan. they will be hoping to hold the taliban to its commitment of allowing anyone who wants to leave
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the country and who has the right documents to do so, that they will indeed give the safe passage to those people. in the past three weeks, there has been difficulties and delays in this process and the us will be hoping to iron out those issues. . ~ us will be hoping to iron out those issues. ., ~ , ., ., us will be hoping to iron out those issues. ., ~' , ., ., ., let's take a look at the uk's latest coronavirus figures. the government data shows there were 34,950 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period. there were 133 deaths, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—19 test. 85.4% of the population — aged 12 or over — have had their first dose of a vaccine and 78.5% have had both doses. plans for a phone service aimed at protecting lone women walking home have been announced by bt. the company's chief executive said the firm started to develop the system in the wake of the murders of sarah
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everard and sabina nessa. bt has contacted the home secretary about their plans but some campaigners are arguing such a service doesn't tackle the deeper problem of male violence. lebanon's electricity grid has shut down, leaving the country without power for the second weekend in a row. fuel shortages forced its two largest power stations to stop operations, as the country grapples with an economic and financial crisis. officials say it's unlikely supplies will resume before monday. the wildlife campaginer chris packham and around 100 children have delivered a petition to buckingham palace — calling on the royal family to rewild its estates — restoring the land to its natural state. ecologists believe some of the estates would naturally be home to beavers and wild boar, as simonjones explains. taking their message direct to buckingham palace, campaigners say the royals must re—wild.
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they're the biggest landowning family in the country but it's claimed their estates are an ecological disaster zone, with practices like deer stalking and grouse shooting. instead, there are calls for the land to be allowed to return to a more natural state. because of their global celebrity and the way they lead and other people follow, if they were to do this it would be a fantastic gesture and significant at a time when we are rather tiring of people talking the talk and we need them to be walking the walk. we need meaningful, positive action. a petition signed by 100,000 people is delivered to the palace by 14—year—old simeon, while his brother explains his concerns. we're still quite young and so we have a lot of time ahead of us and by the way, like, the world is going, like, that may not be very pleasant because there's going to be so much chaos in the future. planting trees at balmoral for the queen's platinum jubilee. the royal estate say the royal family has a long—standing commitment to conservation and they�* re constantly looking for new ways to improve biodiversity.
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next month, senior members of the royal family are due to attend the glasgow climate conference. campaigners here say that would be the perfect opportunity for them to take a stand. they're calling it a polite protest but one they hope will bring about change. simonjones, bbc news, buckingham palace. the us open champion emma raducanu says she'll learn from her defeat at the indian wells tournament in california and take it as a lesson. it was the first competitive match for the 18—year—old since her momentous grand slam victory last month. mike bushell reports. and from great britain, _ please welcome emma raducanu! a new feeling for britain's teenage star, walking out onto court as the big name, the world superstar and in terms of the world rankings, the favourite. emma raducanu, the world number 22 now, up against an opponent
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just inside the top 100. and early on, raducanu lived up to this billing. an excellent start against aliaksandra sasnovich of belarus, holding to love in the opening game and roared on by a supportive crowd of 4000 for the night session. but, remember, the british number one is still only 18. she's also now without a permanent coach after parting ways with long—standing mentor andrew richardson. and there's no substitute for experience and 27—year—old sasnovich took control, as raducanu was forced into errors and seemed anxious to close out rallies quickly on a slower court than she's used to. and after the 6—2, 6—4 straight sets defeat, raducanu said she was glad, in a way, she'd lost as she can learn from it as she develops in the weeks, months and years ahead. andy murray, though, is still involved in indian wells and was relieved to have his wedding ring tied to his trainers once more, after both were lost and then found, handed in by lost property.
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and he had a spring in his step as he eased past frenchman adrian mannarino to reach the second round here. mike bushell, bbc news. that's it. i'll be back with the late news at a 10.15. bye for now.
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hello. you're watching the bbc news channel. more now in our top story. energy firms have said the price cap
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currently regulating household bells is not fit for purpose. they are warning that customers could face increased costs as more suppliers are forced out of business by spiralling wholesale prices. separately a number of conservative mps havejoined separately a number of conservative mps have joined those calling for the government to provide urgent support to industries struggling as a result of the crisis. the chief executive of together energy explains why his company is currently making losses. they have to keep their— currently making losses. they have to keep their costs _ currently making losses. they have to keep their costs as _ currently making losses. they have to keep their costs as low - currently making losses. they have to keep their costs as low as - to keep their costs as low as possible, forecast the number of customers they are going to have and you have to service your customers to the best of your ability. those three things are what makes a supplier successful. three things are what makes a suppliersuccessful. in three things are what makes a supplier successful. in the markets we are in just supplier successful. in the markets we are injust now, we have customers who are staying with us that we just would not have expected to stay, we would've expected them to stay, we would've expected them to move on to a more competitive deal, and we haven't been in a position to hedge for those
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customers, and that is leading the business under huge pressure and putting us under strong constraints. that was paul richards of together energy there. dave dalton, who's the ceo of british glass, the british glass manufacturers' confederation said that more government support would be needed to help many small and medium size firms survive the winter months. i think, to be fair to the secretary of state, that that was acknowledged during the meeting. the reality is that models had already been constructed to look at whether we could weather the, sort of, transiency of the issue. i think everyone has in mind that this is likely to be dealt with, in terms of its severity, before the winter's out — and maybe even sooner than that, with contracts that we've already seen be negotiated with the russians and elsewhere. the reality is, it's going to be incredibly difficult to make the impacts of that something that is manageable in the immediate term. we're seeing contracts now meaning that it's impossible for us to react,
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so we're going to actually need intervention at a company level, where those that are particularly exposed are able to actuall find measures to deal with it. that was dave dalton speaking to us earlier. plans for a phone service aimed at protecting lone women walking home have been announced by bt. the company's chief executive said the firm started to develop the system in the wake of the murders of sarah everard and sabina nessa. bt has set out its plans in a letter to the home secretary. some campaigners argue such a service does not tackle the real problem of male violence. asimilarapp was a similar app was set up following the murder of holly in 2014. and has been downloaded at around 300,000 times. herfather is been downloaded at around 300,000 times. her father is the ceo of the trust from gloucester, and he gave
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me his reaction to the bt social media apps stop and one man pleased because it means that the government are taking this issue very seriously, but on the other hand, i'm a little disappointed, because we have been trying to work with the governments and ministers for a very long time now with respect to our own app called holly guard. it actually has the same functionality that the bt app proposes to have, but has a lot more functionality. so we are a bit perplexed as to why the government aren't speaking to us, but as soon a big giant comes in, you know, they start to speak to them. so we would like to speak to them. so we would like to speak to the government. 0ur app is up and running from its tribe, it's tested, it's been working out for six years, and we can put that out tomorrow for the whole country. i mean, realistically, you could be working with the government, with bt to really push this out there, couldn't
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you? really push this out there, couldn't ou? �* , ,., , really push this out there, couldn't ou? �* , , �* really push this out there, couldn't ou? �* , , ~ ., you? absolutely. and i am quite reared you? absolutely. and i am quite prepared to _ you? absolutely. and i am quite prepared to do _ you? absolutely. and i am quite prepared to do that _ you? absolutely. and i am quite prepared to do that because - you? absolutely. and i am quite prepared to do that because we | you? absolutely. and i am quite - prepared to do that because we have a product already. the research and development that's been going in for a number of years, all the issues have been ironed back over a few years, so we have an app now that really does make it special for users and helps to keep them safe and feel safe. and that is the reaction we are getting from those people that use the act.— people that use the act. pretty patel did say — people that use the act. pretty patel did say that _ people that use the act. pretty patel did say that this - people that use the act. pretty patel did say that this is - people that use the act. pretty| patel did say that this is exactly the kind of innovative scheme which would be good to get going as soon as we can. hopefully, after hearing you speak, she will be reminded that it is already going. now, you said that there has been a lot of research done. 0bviously, that there has been a lot of research done. obviously, it's been used for six years. could you just take us through, please, what you have learned. who is using this app? when are they using it? because the bt app they are saying is to help women walk home, but yours isn't just for women, is that? h0. just for women, is that? no, absolutely- _ just for women, is that? no, absolutely. our— just for women, is that? no, absolutely. our app - just for women, is that? i157, absolutely. 0ur app does not differentiate. 0urapp absolutely. 0ur app does not differentiate. 0ur app is for everybody, everybody who wants to
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feel extra safe or feel safe when they are out of the house, if they download holly guard and activated, that will help them feel safe and stay safe. we had people from the age of 12 right up to the age of 19 who use the app. male and female, and it is used across the whole country. so we have a sophisticated app country. so we have a sophisticated app and process, sophisticated data that we can get out of the end of our apps to show who is using it across the country, when they are using it and how they use it. and we know that lots of people are finding it every benefit.— it every benefit. when are they usin: it it every benefit. when are they using it to? _ it every benefit. when are they using it to? what _ it every benefit. when are they using it to? what have - it every benefit. when are they using it to? what have you - it every benefit. when are they - using it to? what have you learned? this is really fascinating. a lot of people are saying that one of the criticisms is that it could waste police time. if users don't respond to the app when they are meant to respond to it, how is it being used? what have you learned? {line respond to it, how is it being used? what have you learned?— what have you learned? one of the thins what have you learned? one of the thin . s that what have you learned? one of the things that we _ what have you learned? one of the things that we have _ what have you learned? one of the things that we have learned - what have you learned? one of the things that we have learned is - what have you learned? one of the things that we have learned is that | things that we have learned is that we have set up an additional security function within our app called holly guard extra command
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that allows a 20 47 monitoring by a professional monitor agents, so when someone raises and alerts, the phone starts to record voice and video. that goes to that monitoring centre. they filter it out, and if they believe that that individual needs to have emergency search called, then they will liaise with emergency services. so we are not getting wasted police resource going to incidents that they no longer need to be with. what we are getting is policed to those areas where people need it and need it most. so that's one of the things that we have learned over the last five years, and that has been in since the middle of last year now.- middle of last year now. very ruickl , middle of last year now. very quickly. nick. _ middle of last year now. very quickly, nick, have _ middle of last year now. very quickly, nick, have you - middle of last year now. very quickly, nick, have you spoken to the home office over the last 5— six years? the home office over the last 5- six ears? ~ . ~ the home office over the last 5- six ears? ., . , ., the home office over the last 5- six ears? . ., . , ., ., years? we have. we spoke to the home office, we years? we have. we spoke to the home office. we have — years? we have. we spoke to the home office, we have some _ years? we have. we spoke to the home office, we have some funding _ years? we have. we spoke to the home office, we have some funding from - office, we have some funding from the home office to issue holly guard extra to victims of domestic abuse during covid—19, so they are well aware of ourapp, during covid—19, so they are well aware of our app, and therefore, we cannot understand why they are not
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talking to us to have this app across the whole nation. that was nick nair of _ across the whole nation. that was nick nair of the _ across the whole nation. that was nick nair of the holly _ across the whole nation. that was nick nair of the holly gasser - across the whole nation. that was| nick nair of the holly gasser trust. now, american officials and representatives of the taliban have been meeting face to face for the first time since the group took control of afghanistan in august. the united states said the talks in the qatari capital, doha did not signal a recognition of taliban rule. yesterday at least 50 people died and more than 100 were injured in a suicide bomb attack on a mosque in the afghan city of kunduz. the islamic state group said it was behind the attack. our correspondent in doha, yogita limaye gave us this update. we have heard from the taliban delegation, the foreign minister amir khan muttaqi they've appointed has said senior taliban leaders met us officials and both sides agreed to uphold what was negotiated in the february 2020 us—taliban deal.
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he said that the us has agreed to help the taliban out on humanitarian aid and delivery of covid—19 vaccines, and he also warned that no country should interfere in the internal policies of another country. it has been three weeks now since the taliban banned girls from going to secondary schools in the country. women have not yet been allowed to go back to theirjobs so one imagines there when he was talking about internal policies, that's what he means, but these meetings, really, are a part of taliban efforts to gain international recognition. recently, they also had a meeting with a uk delegation in kabul. mr muttaqi also says that they will be meeting european officials soon, and international recognition is important because it is directly linked to funding going back to afghanistan.
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funding from foreign countries, as well as international agencies, has been frozen at the moment for fears that it will fall into taliban hands and could be misused, and the taliban very keen for a resumption of that funding. yogita, you said that there was this agreement on both sides, coming from the taliban foreign minister, that they would uphold what was negotiated in february 2020. what was that? what was agreed or negotiated? so, a key part of that was that afghanistan and its territory should not be used against the us or any of its allies, that the security of the us and its allies should not be threatened from afghan territory. that is one of the things we're expecting to be discussed, but the top of the us agenda right now is the evacuation of us nationals and others who are still stuck in afghanistan, have permits to leave the country. in the past few weeks, there have been delays
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and difficulties in the evacuation process, particularly by air and via doha, where i am. the americans will be hoping to smooth out that process and to hold the taliban to its commitment to allowing people with the right documents to leave the country. the talks also come a day after dozens of people were killed in a bombing in kunduz city in afghanistan. that was claimed by islamic state khorasan province, and the growing state of islamic state militancy is also something that's expected to be discussed during this two—day meeting. yogita limaye with that update. pope francis is launching what some catholics are describing as the most ambitious project of church reform in 60 years. a two year consultation involving every parish begins this weekend. it's the first time catholic voices across the world have been asked for their opinion on all types of issues from women's ordination to blessings for gay couples. our religious affairs reporter, harry farley, has more details on the project.
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it's effectively a giant consultation exercise. pope francis is asking every diocese around the world to meet and to discuss solutions to the issues they are facing. and so, in terms of the processes, as you say, what's going to happen is those local discussions will then be fed through to national bishops who will then filter through those ideas next year before taking their suggestions, those solutions to the problems they face, to rome in 2023. i think there are a couple of reasons why this is significant. first of all, the catholic church is a very hierarchical institution, so cardinals sit above bishops who sit above priests, and so this is a real shift towards consulting lay and ordinary catholics as to the church's future direction. the second reason why this is significant is it opens up for discussion all sorts of thorny issues that the catholic church faces. so, for example, as you mentioned, the possibility of women being ordained as deacons, the possibility of blessings for gay couples, it throws all those
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issues up into the air. we will speak now to austin hill lead at the bbc sport centre. it is fight night tonight, isn't it, austin? hi, lukwesa. good evening. we're going to start with football because we've got three of the home nations in world cup qualifying action this weekend. england and northern ireland play later, but right now scotland are taking on israel in a crucial game at hampden park. the match kicked off at 5... so we're just over 20 minutes in and the visitors are already ahead. isreal taking the lead in the first 5 minutes after a brilliant free—kick from eran zahavi. now scotland are second in their group, just a point ahead of israe, so this really is a crucial game — there's live commentary on bbc radio scotland. staying with football... the honours were even
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in a dramatic manchester derby in the women's super league. united and city drawing 2—2 at leigh sports village. city went down to ten players in the first half but still managed to take the lead throuthamaican international khadija shaw. but they could only hold on for so long as united levelled after the break and then went ahead through alessia russo. but despite having a player disadvantage, city got back on level terms. the initial shot from jess park, leaving ellen white with just a tap in to draw the game. lewis hamilton was quickest in qualifying for sunday's turkish grand prix, but the championship leader will have to start from eleventh. he's taken a ten—place grid penalty for changing his engine this weekend. hamilton set a new track record at istanbul park, as he beat mercedes team mate valtteri bottas by a tenth of a second.
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the finn will start from pole, ahead of red bull's max verstappen, who'll be desperate to regain the championship lead. history could be made at old trafford this evening, that big fight starts in the early hours of tomorrow morning. plenty of angry talking, but tonight that all stops as the pair enter the ring for the third time. the first bite was a dry, fury convincingly won the second, so it will happen this time because mac our correspondent is in las vegas for us. because mac our correspondent is in las vegas for us— las vegas for us. such as the intense rivalry _ las vegas for us. such as the intense rivalry between - las vegas for us. such as the intense rivalry between themj las vegas for us. such as the - intense rivalry between them that they were kept apart yesterday's away in for fear of a fight before the fight. that didn't stop both men trading verbal blows. while they are much milder than he's been all week. when i come this is the key to the storm. i know that when i'm not calm, , , . ., , storm. i know that when i'm not calm, , , calm, my mind is cloudy, so when
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our calm, my mind is cloudy, so when your mind — calm, my mind is cloudy, so when your mind is _ calm, my mind is cloudy, so when your mind is cloudy, _ calm, my mind is cloudy, so when your mind is cloudy, it _ calm, my mind is cloudy, so when your mind is cloudy, it allows - calm, my mind is cloudy, so when your mind is cloudy, it allows you | your mind is cloudy, it allows you to make — your mind is cloudy, it allows you to make bad decisions.— your mind is cloudy, it allows you to make bad decisions. while there has barely engaged _ to make bad decisions. while there has barely engaged with _ to make bad decisions. while there has barely engaged with the - to make bad decisions. while there has barely engaged with the media| has barely engaged with the media all become an contrast to tyson fury who has taken centre stage. they have ten as the favourite to win the third and final bout of what has been a fascinating rivalry. fury threw place in their first bite in 2018, down but not outcome it ended in a draw, then it was fury�*s trying to play the aggressor in the rematch. a punch perfect performance and wilder's first loss. he accused him of cheating and that has created a tension between the two men who were once respected rivals. i a tension between the two men who were once respected rivals.- were once respected rivals. i think it's auoin were once respected rivals. i think it's going to _ were once respected rivals. i think it's going to be — were once respected rivals. i think it's going to be very _ were once respected rivals. i think it's going to be very exciting. - were once respected rivals. i think it's going to be very exciting. i - it's going to be very exciting. i can't _ it's going to be very exciting. i can't wait _ it's going to be very exciting. i can't wait to see what type of drama takes _ can't wait to see what type of drama takes place — can't wait to see what type of drama takes place in the ring and how both boxers _ takes place in the ring and how both boxers deal— takes place in the ring and how both boxers deal with each other. after that the objects _ boxers deal with each other. after that the objects and _ boxers deal with each other. ifiev that the objects and high—octane performance on stage at the way yesterday, fury is in a much calmer mood as he made his way out of the
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arena, but there remains confidence that there will only be one outcome. this fight will go one way, i hit him, he hits the floor, i hit las vegas. him, he hits the floor, i hit las veras. �* , , ., vegas. but will it be his hand raised orwell— vegas. but will it be his hand raised orwell at _ vegas. but will it be his hand raised orwell at wilder's - vegas. but will it be his hand - raised orwell at wilder's punching power to decide the outcome? we will find out later this evening. it is going to be some fight that one. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. including the build—up to the final for the catalan dragons. that kicks off injust over for the catalan dragons. that kicks off in just over half our time. the class i, that is your spirit. so much going on, austin, thank you very much indeed. 16 specialist centres looking at the effects of long covid in children and young people will be opening across england from monday. the paediatric hubs will bring together experts on common symptoms like chronic fatigue and respiratory problems. fiona lamdin has been to meet 10 year old taylor, who'll be benefitting from the treatment.
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ten—year—old taylor in the pool for her weekly hydrotherapy session. since having covid nearly 20 months ago, this is now the only place that she can be without behing in pain. when you wake up, your symptoms will already start to kick in. i wake up with a bad headache, and normally everything aches and i don't want to get out of bed. but when i do, i still feel that pain. it doesn't really go, and then i go to school tired, and ifeel like my hands are, like, going to collapse and not work, and the same with my legs. my back can hurt a few times, but it's not the same as my arms and legs. but my head can hurt a lot, and i'll always feel tired, and that goes on for the whole day. and it's notjust the physical pain — her mum also worries about her daughter's mental health. she used to do things like cheerleading and horse riding and enjoy those things, but she wouldn't be able to do it now, and obviously while she's not been at school even
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with the lockdowns and then not going back last year because of the pain, she's become quite isolated and then that's obviously affected her as well. well, the world's first study into children with long covid suggests that one in seven still suffer symptoms 15 weeks after contracting coronavirus. and so, now, 16 hubs are opening across the country, looking at long covid in children, and one of the pilot's is here in bristol. long covid is essentially a new condition, and there are symptom clusters or groups of symptoms that we don't understand completely and we need to develop treatments for. the outcome for children in general is much, much better than the outcome for adults. so what the hub is going to do is to bring the top specialists at bristol children's hospital together and discuss cases. i feel really strongly that what we need to do is to offer treatment quickly, because the kids are sick and
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they're missing school right now. how does it feel to know you're going to have access to a specialist team of doctors that are hopefully going to get you better? i feel better because, like, they can properly help and not... well, other doctors can help, but these ones are made for long covid. taylor's being seen on monday. after months of pain, she and her family hope she can get the help she finally needs to get better. fiona lamdin, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather. hello, good afternoon. despite barely fog some sunshine has come up for many. it's a tale of two halves, the weather, because for the north and west, we have had a band of cloud, quite an active by the north and west, we have had a band of cloud, quite an active weather friend bringing rain, but it will appear out as it eases its way across and for northern ireland, western scotland a few showers and for most, still pretty mild, temperatures above where they should be for the time of year, especially so in that sunshine. after the
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evening and overnight, that cloud on that weather front and its catchy rain well at southwards blanketing the fall in temperature here. there shouldn't be as much fog, although, there could be the odd dance patch towards morning in the far south and east. further north, we have cleared the skies. behind that with a friend, a chillier start for both scotland, northern ireland in northern england. that's because high pressure is building in and squeezing out all the rain on that weather front and limiting the cloud. across the north, as you can see, some tightly packed isobars, so a pretty windy day in the far north of scotland, but with the bright skies further south we have cloudy skies further south we have cloudy skies prevailing. so quite a great start to be at because of the weather front with some patchy drizzle or some fog as well. it gradually to enable easy way, just dragging its heels across east anglia, for many, dry, bright connected spells of sunshine to my scattering of showers across western and northern scotland where we have that brisk wind as well, and we will notice the drop in temperature here, much fresher feeling day across scotland and northern ireland. we
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have changed our wind direction. however, despite changing our wind direction, we still have high pressure firmly in charge as they go into the new week. yes, we got these new by the friends coming into the north, so there will be patchy rain around, however, it will be fine and dry for many even if it is a little cooler with an increasing risk of overnight frost. so, on monday, possibly a little bit of patchy mist and fog in the south, but a good deal of dry and bright weather and a witness weather fronts, weak as weak as it is, starts to drift southwards and east rates introducing a bit more cloud. temperatures will be down on those that we have seen through the week just down on those that we have seen through the weekjust kind, 15— 16 and under the cloud for the north distinctly cool as you can see for the week ahead, there is still a lot of dry and settled weather to come. as i become a combined out more weather information including any warnings and for us from our website.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines. pressure grows on the government to help businesses facing soaring energy bills. mps help businesses facing soaring energy bills. mstoin industry bossesin energy bills. mstoin industry bosses in asking for support. the united states and the taliban are holding face—to—face talks in their first meeting since the group seized control of afghanistan in august. plans for a phone service aimed at protecting lone women walking home have been announced by bt. now on bbc news, it's time for the media show. hello. how do you interest the public in public interestjournalism? how do you get a bigger splash?
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that is the theme of today's programme.

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