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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 10, 2021 11:00am-11:31am BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines from viewers in the uk and around the world. the uk business secretary kwasi kwarteng defends the government's handling of the energy crisis after suppliers said the system of having a cap on prices was not fit for purpose. i a cap on prices was not fit for purpose-— purpose. i think it's a critical situation- — purpose. i think it's a critical situation. clearly _ purpose. i think it's a critical situation. clearly i'm - purpose. i think it's a critical. situation. clearly i'm speaking purpose. i think it's a critical- situation. clearly i'm speaking to industries who have said that all the time. high gas prices, they quadrupled this year, are making an impact, and that is why, as you say, speaking to people, listening and trying to work out a way forward. britain's tyson fury defends his heavyweight title against american deontay wilder with an 11th round knockoutin deontay wilder with an 11th round knockout in las vegas. white the
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french government tells the uk to keep to its side of the deal to police the channel. taiwan's president uses the island's national day to issue a strong response to a speech by china's leader who warned the two would have to unify. and scientists warn the loss of biodiversity risks tipping the world into ecological meltdown. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. the uk business secretary kwasi kwarteng says keeping the energy price cap is non—negotiable despite calls for suppliers for it to be scrapped.
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soaring gas prices have caused a number of uk suppliers to collapse, because the cap means they are unable to pass the extra costs onto domestic customers. megan paterson reports. the cost of switching on is mounting up. the business secretary, kwasi kwarteng, says the government's priority is protecting customers, and describes the price cap as a non—negotiable safety net, shielding people from worrying price increases over christmas. it comes after suppliers criticised the price cap system as being not fit for purpose. energy experts say while it does provide reassurance for customers worried about paying their household bills, the protection won't last forever. the price cap actually won't move until the beginning of april. so that period, i think, is helpful, it gives people peace of mind, and we need to, you know, we need to lock that in. i think then it does create uncertainty going into april. all of the forecasts suggest there will be quite a significant increase to the price cap at that time. so we need to be very mindful of that, and people need to budget accordingly. for businesses, though,
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there is no price cap, and mr kwarteng gives no indication of how government might seek to ease pressure for those unable to scale back their usage. some already warning higher energy bills will mean increases in the price customers pay for goods. talks with energy—intensive industries are expected to continue this week after calls for urgent government intervention. this comes as strain on supply chains continues to grow. the government has confirmed intensive training courses for hgv drivers will be opened to a further 2,000 people, although those taking part will not qualify until after christmas. labour said it was a drop in the ocean compared to what was required. megan paterson, bbc news. 12 energy suppliers have gone bust in the uk so far this year. the big six companies have called for the energy price cap to be lifted. 0vo energy is the third largest company with 4.5 million customers. it's founder, stephen fitzpatrick, says the government need to find a fair way to help both
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suppliers and consumers. when you look at whether it is taxpayers' or consumers�* money, there is going to need to be a higher price to be paid for energy over time. i think probably what is best for consumers is to see that smoothed out, it is not that we can somehow magically subsidise or make energy cheaper, but it is a good idea for that to be smoothed out, so that households can prepare for it. if you talk about what the consumer is paying, what that really means is that everybody is paying the same and what that means is that lower—income households end up paying a disproportionately higher amount. if we pay through the tax system, which is a progressive system, wealthy people in society end up paying more. stephen fitzpatrick of bovo energy. i the government is facing increasing
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pressure to step in and support some of these energy intensive companies who are struggling with the rising cost of bills, things like steel, cement, ceramics, all of which have huge energy production costs and therefore as energy prices rise, their bills rise. kwasi kwarteng met with some of these industries on friday and says he is listening to their concerns, but he has been accused of not stepping in to provide immediate solutions. emily thornberry, shadow trade secretary, said that while she didn't say what labour would do, whether they would provide subsidies to firms or introduce some kind of industry price cap like we have households, she did say that when she was in that department, they had plans in place to try to avoid a situation like this. in place to try to avoid a situation like this. , ., , ., ., , like this. in the seat before me was a nu like this. in the seat before me was a guy from — like this. in the seat before me was a guy from an _ like this. in the seat before me was a guy from an energy _ like this. in the seat before me was a guy from an energy company - like this. in the seat before me was a guy from an energy company who i a guy from an energy company who said, _ a guy from an energy company who said. what— a guy from an energy company who said, what we should have is a department for energy and climate change _ department for energy and climate change i_ department for energy and climate change. i was in that department, and what — change. i was in that department, and what we were doing was we were making _ and what we were doing was we were making sure —
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and what we were doing was we were making sure they were new nuclear power _ making sure they were new nuclear power stations, making sure we had -as power stations, making sure we had gas storage, making sure that we were _ gas storage, making sure that we were insulating homes. all of these things— were insulating homes. all of these things were happening and we were making _ things were happening and we were making sure there was offshore and onshore _ making sure there was offshore and onshore wind. i making sure there was offshore and onshore wind-— onshore wind. i know that this is important. _ onshore wind. i know that this is important. but _ onshore wind. i know that this is important, but we _ onshore wind. i know that this is important, but we are _ onshore wind. i know that this is important, but we are where - onshore wind. i know that this is important, but we are where we| onshore wind. i know that this is . important, but we are where we are now. �* . . important, but we are where we are now. �* ., important, but we are where we are now. ., ,., now. but as opposition, it is fair for us to say _ now. but as opposition, it is fair for us to say that _ now. but as opposition, it is fair for us to say that when - now. but as opposition, it is fair for us to say that when we - now. but as opposition, it is fair for us to say that when we were | now. but as opposition, it is fair. for us to say that when we were in power. _ for us to say that when we were in power, these were the plans we had, the government at those. we now have another— the government at those. we now have another wave _ the government at those. we now have another wave of crisis, this government has wave after wave of crisis _ government has wave after wave of crisis and _ government has wave after wave of crisis and that i am asked to come in and _ crisis and that i am asked to come in and say. — crisis and that i am asked to come in and say. if— crisis and that i am asked to come in and say, if you are in this situation. _ in and say, if you are in this situation, what would you do tomorrow? and i think it's only fair tomorrow? and i think it's only fair to make _ tomorrow? and i think it's only fair to make that point. in tomorrow? and i think it's only fair to make that point.— to make that point. in response to this, we to make that point. in response to this. we had _ to make that point. in response to this, we had kwasi _ to make that point. in response to this, we had kwasi kwarteng - to make that point. in response to - this, we had kwasi kwarteng speaking to the bbc earlier, and he said that he is working very closely with industry to try to find some solutions. some of the ones industry have been calling for other things like a price cap on the amount they pay for energy or some kind of subsidy. but he highlighted again a point they have stressed a lot this week which is that some of these energy intensive firms have already received £2 million in government supports its 2013 to help with
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electricity costs. —— £2 billion. he also said it was not true as some newspaper report suggested this morning that he had asked the treasury for billions to try to subsidise some of the firms. it is treasury for billions to try to subsidise some of the firms. it is a critical situation. _ subsidise some of the firms. it is a critical situation. clearly _ subsidise some of the firms. it is a critical situation. clearly i - subsidise some of the firms. it is a critical situation. clearly i am - critical situation. clearly i am speaking to industry as you said all the time, and high gas prices, they have quadrupled this year, are making an impact, and that is why i'm, as you say, speaking to people, listening, trying to work out a way forward. we listening, trying to work out a way forward. ~ ., ., , ., ., listening, trying to work out a way forward. ~ ., ., i. ., ., forward. we read that you have asked forward. we read that you have asked for billions from _ forward. we read that you have asked for billions from the _ forward. we read that you have asked for billions from the treasury - for billions from the treasury either for a for billions from the treasury eitherfor a price cap or some kind of went to help the industry. is that true? i of went to help the industry. is that true?— that true? i have not asked for billions. we _ that true? i have not asked for billions. we have _ that true? i have not asked for billions. we have got - that true? i have not asked for billions. we have got existing | billions. we have got existing schemes and working very closely with rishi sunak, the chancellor, to get us through this situation. i think he showed a great deal of flexibility when he and allowed £500 million to help vulnerable consumers, and we are working to see what we can do to help protect industry. 50 what we can do to help protect indust . ., ., , what we can do to help protect indust ., ., , ~'
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industry. so what does it look like the government _ industry. so what does it look like the government will _ industry. so what does it look like the government will do? - industry. so what does it look like the government will do? at - industry. so what does it look like the government will do? at the i the government will do? at the moment there _ the government will do? at the moment there is _ the government will do? at the moment there is a _ the government will do? at the moment there is a lot - the government will do? at the moment there is a lot of - the government will do? at the - moment there is a lot of uncertainty about this. we heard the business secretary stressing that he is working closely with these industries to try and identify a solution, listening to them about the proposals they are putting forward. interesting we heard that he is working very closely with the chancellor on all of this. off the back of that interview, one treasury source told me that the business secretary had been mistaken and the treasury and the chancellor had not been involved in any talks, so i think what this tells us is there is debate and discussion going on within government itself at the moment about how it handles this. currently it doesn't look like there is any new pot of money that we are expecting off the back of some of the concerns that have been erased by these industries, but of course the government's spending review is coming up later this month, and we may expect to hear more detail then. but in the meantime, pressure certainly growing with these calls from industry not going away, saying some firms have already had to halt production at times of day when costs are higher and fears that they may have to halt production going forward even more as these spikes in
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energy prices throughout the day get more frequent. energy prices throughout the day get more frequent-— tyson fury has knocked out deontay wilder to retain his title as wbc heavy weight champion of the world. fury knocked out wilder in the 11th round of the trilogy fight in las vegas. fury has now extended his undefeated professional record to 32 fights. well, our sport correspondent ade adedoyin was watching the fight in las vegas and gave us this assessment. it was a brilliant fight, this will go down as one of the great nights in heavyweight boxing history. and the rivalry between deontay wilder and tyson fury will go down as one of the greatest in history as well. there have been some great fights, the likes of muhammad ali and joe fraser, they had three bouts, three good bouts. the second, though, was not anything really to write about, but as far as deontay wilder and tyson fury are concerned, every bout they have had has been better than the previous. there was so much hype in the build up to this fight because of the rivalry between the pair. there is no love lost between them. not particularly respectful of each other, there was a lot of abuse sent
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either way from both fighters, but the fight more than lived up to expectation and they had five knock—downs in this fight, it was incredible. at one moment, it looked like one fighter was about to win, only for the other to rally back. fury finally won it in the 11th round, as you say, with a knockdown and it ends what is a brilliant trilogy emphatically. i caught up with fury as he was making his way out of the arena and he acknowledged it was one of the greatest nights of his career so far. there were some shaky moments in there, but i never lost faith and i continued on and i carried on and persevered and got that single punch knockout. as soon as i landed and jumped on the ropes, i knew it was over, he was not getting back up from that. it was a great trilogy. you need a good dance partner for trilogies and wilder has been a good dance partner. but there is no rematch clause. it is actually done. wilder is done, there is no more deontay wilder. a deserved rest for tyson fury now, but i think the long—term goal will be to win all the belts in the heavyweight division. 0leksandr usyk has the other belt after dethroning anthonyjoshua. they will have a rematch next year.
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tyson fury�*s promoter, frank warren, says the end goal will be to perhaps challenge the winner of that bout sometime in the autumn next year. they both have to get, as you say, the rematch with usyk and joshua, so that will take place and whoever wins wins and they will have the bout and then maybe we can make the winner of that fight. and as you say, regarding dillian whyte, i don't know what the wbc, which is the belt titleholders, are going to do, but i think dillian whyte is fighting wallin first and that is no easyjob, so that will be interesting. so there will be some options and we will look at them, but there is no rush. he needs some time out now and whatever he wants to do is what we will do. in terms of a unification bout, realistically, when do you think that will happen? it could not happen, i don't think, until autumn, maybe this time next year, because obviously i think they are talking about putting that fight on sometime in march, so they will need six months after that, so that is when it would happen. it would be an ideal world for anthonyjoshua not to go for the rematch and we could go straight to it.
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i think the unification bout is one for the future, but for now, i think tyson fury will have a well—deserved rest. he put in a really good performance and he said something on stage in the press conference afterwards and he said, i always find a way to win. his issues with alcohol and drugs in the past have been well—documented, his battle with mental health and he said i have been down and out but i always find a way to come back and in a lot of ways he showed that tonight in this bout against deontay wilder because when he went down in the fourth round, there was a look in his eyes that i thought, he will not make it, but he did, he found a way to win. brilliant, brilliant performance by him and as i say, his long—term goal now would be to unify the division and finish his career as the undisputed heavyweight champion of the world. the french authorities are calling on the british government to honour its promise to pay them more than £50 million to help them try to stop migrants crossing the englsih channel in small boats. hundreds of people have made
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the journey in the past two days, leading to tension between france and the uk. simonjones reports. on a visit to calais, the french interior minister meets the officers on the frontline in the battle to stop migrants crossing the channel. some of their work is funded by the british taxpayer. injuly, home secretary priti patel promised an extra £54 million to double the number of patrols on the beaches in northern france and to pay for increased surveillance. but m darmanin says that cash has yet to come. translation: the british - government has not yet paid us what they promised us. at the moment not a single euro has been handed over by the british, following the deal that i negotiated several months ago with priti patel. the english are an honourable nation, and i'm sure it's just a small delay and they will keep their promise. priti patel recently threatened to withhold the money if the french authorities didn't prevent more crossings. france says it's now stopping 65% of those who attempt to set off. but hundreds of migrants have
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reached the uk on small boats in the past two days, including children and a baby. that brings the total for this year to around 18,000 people. the number arriving by lorry, though, is comparatively small — around 850 people detected between january and august. and overall, asylum claims fell by 4% in the past year. both britain and france agree that the dangerous journeys must be stopped, but there's no consensus on the best way to achieve this. the home office has said it's doing everything it can to support the french response and to target the criminals organising the crossings. simon jones, bbc news. well, simon is with me in the studio. what is the latest on that row between britain and france? quite a diplomatic row over that £54 million that britain promised, but the cash is yet to be handed over. we have heard from the home office here in the uk today that negotiations are ongoing about this money, diplomats are working to sort
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out the final funding arrangement. what is not clear is what sort of timetable we're talking here, because of the day the french interior minister from what he said when he visited calais was expected to have at least some of this money by now, and it is not at all clear whether it is dependent upon results, because france certainly seem to think they were getting this money come what may, but we had suggestions from the home secretary, priti patel, but the money was dependent on results, and stopping these crossings, but front saying actually we're stopping more crossings from getting onto the water than ever before, so real tensions, and i think relations between britain and france are at a low ebb anyway, there was all the controversy over submarine deals with australia and a row over fishing permits, so not in a good place at the moment between the two countries. 50 place at the moment between the two countries. ., , ., , ., countries. so what is the latest on the number _ countries. so what is the latest on the number of _ countries. so what is the latest on the number of migrants _ countries. so what is the latest on the number of migrants crossing l countries. so what is the latest on i the number of migrants crossing the channel? it the number of migrants crossing the channel? . . . the number of migrants crossing the channel? ., , , ., , _ the number of migrants crossing the channel? , ., , _ , channel? it has been a busy couple of da s. channel? it has been a busy couple of days- we — channel? it has been a busy couple of days- we had — channel? it has been a busy couple of days. we had figures _ channel? it has been a busy couple of days. we had figures released i of days. we had figures released friday and saturday and they tell us that 1115 migrants managed to reach
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the uk by boat on 40 boats, so 40 separate incidents. the busiest day was friday when more than 600 people made the crossing. yesterday almost 500 people managed to reach the uk. we're told over those two days france managed to prevent around 400 people from making the crossing. but the numbers are continuing to grow. i think why we've seen it busy over the past couple of days is that for around ten days it was pretty rough in the channel, not conditions for attempting the journey, and in the channel, not conditions for attempting thejourney, and it in the channel, not conditions for attempting the journey, and it is the busiest shipping lane in the world, so it is dangerous whenever you try. but it has been pretty calm in the last couple of days in the number of boats have been spotted in the channel, so it is likely to be another busy day for the emergency services in border force and also for the lifeboat.— services in border force and also for the lifeboat. taiwan's president has issued a strong response to a speech by china's leader xi jinping, who has warned that taiwan would
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have to unify with mainland china. tensions across the region have been rising in recent weeks, as mark lobel reports. taiwan's national day celebrations, a visual show of defiance after rising tensions with china, which views the island as a breakaway province. taiwan disagrees, with a pledge to defend its sovereignty and democracy. taiwan's president, tsai ing—wen, said she was hoping for an easing of relations and would not act rashly, but insisted taiwanese people would not bow to pressure. tensions have been rising after around a record 150 chinese warplanes made incursions into taiwan's air defence zone, includingjets, bombers and spy planes, injust four days.
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on saturday, china marked the 110th anniversary of a 1911 revolution which saw the last chinese imperial dynasty toppled. china's president said reunification with taiwan should be achieved, adding chinese people had a glorious tradition of opposing separatism. translation: national reunification by peaceful means best serves - the interests of the chinese nation as a whole, which includes our compatriots in taiwan. the taiwan question is an internal matter for china. there should be no outside interference. far from an internal matter, this dispute has once again spilled out onto the global stage. beijing seems to think that right now is the moment where it needs to rattle it sabre and threaten taiwan even more. the united states, japan and the united kingdom of course recently completed some naval exercises with four aircraft carriers in waters approximate to taiwan and i think some
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of what china is doing is trying to show that it too has a capacity to threaten taiwan. two competing visions between the inevitability of unification and taiwan's vision that it will not be forced down a path it does not want to take. mark lobel, bbc news. at least 15 people have been killed in a plane crash in russia. preliminary reports suggested four people survived when the light aircraft came down in tatarstan, nearly a thousand kilometres east of moscow. the plane is said to have been owned by a local flying club. the man regarded as the father of pakistan's nuclear programme, abdul qadeer khan, has died at the age of 85. the atomic scientist, was hailed by many pakistanis as a national hero in 1998, for making his country the first islamic nuclear power. he was notorious for having smuggled nuclear technology to states such as iran and north korea.
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he died in islamabad with lung complications, after being admitted to hospital in august with covid—19. iraqis are voting in a parliamentary election called in response to months of anti—government protests. iraq faces an economic crisis, corruption and sectarian division. president barham saleh says the poll is an opportunity to rebuild the state. 0ur correspondent murad shashani says iraqi people remain divded over the election. this election is coming at a very interesting time. back in 2019, protests sparked in major cities in iraq. youngsters calling, demanding for reforms. one of their main demands was an early election. early elections now here in iraq, you can see, was one of these demands amongst many others, including fighting corruption, political reform, etc. in this case, that led some people to call for increasing calls to boycott the elections here. that is what you see
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actually here in mosul. many people i spoke to here, this city has been liberated, as iraq is now, from the so—called islamic state about four years ago. since then they are rebuilding, it is ongoing, but still many things have to be done yet. therefore the locals told me, many people i spoke to, they do not represent all people here in mosul, however, many people i spoke to stressed they will not be taking part in this election. there are two major levels we need to talk about here regarding this sunday's elections. first one that on a technical level iraq has allowed international observers to take part, very highly technology supported system created for this election. new election laws have been implemented allowing for instance for women to be represented in reserved seats and quotas,
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about 20%, but the political question remains that there is a fear of polarisation, especially among the shia parties, and while we also have seen sunnis are taking part in the elections in a very strong manner, their campaigns are very strong, and even their clerics and leaders are calling urgent people to take part in these elections to change the political deadlock as many people told me. the taliban says it will observe a peace agreement negotiated with the united states last year. the announcement — which includes a pledge to prevent al-qaeda from operating in afghanistan — follows face—to—face talks with the us in the qatari capital, doha. 0ur correspondent, yogita limaye is there. from the taliban's point of view, this is part of a series of efforts from the group to try to gain international recognition. they met with uk diplomats a few days ago.
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now they are meeting us officials and amir khan muttaqi, who is the acting foreign minister of the taliban—appointed government and who is leading the delegation here in doha. they will also be meeting european officials soon and the reason they want to get international recognition is because it is directly linked to the unblocking of foreign funds into afghanistan, which have been frozen since the group seized control of the country. but muttaqi, speaking in doha, also said that they did not want anyone to interfere in the internal affairs of any country. they are speaking against the backdrop of girls not being allowed to go to secondary schools in most parts of afghanistan and women not being allowed to go to work. it is unclear whether the us would bring up those issues in these talks. the variety of plant and animal life in the uk is so depleted it could cause an ecological meltdown. that's according to scientists at the natural history museum, who say the uk has only 53% of its biodiversity remaining, well
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below the global average of 75%. helen briggs reports. the air we breathe, the water we drink, the food we eat. all rely on biodiversity, the variety of all plant and animal life on earth. but biodiversity is dwindling fast, because of us, with an estimated 1 million species at risk of extinction. the uk is no exception. it has just 53% of its biodiversity left, well below the global average of 75%, according to a new study from the natural history museum. researchers say there is little room for nature in a country where so much of the land has long been built upon or used for intensive agriculture. and they warned the world has lost so much natural biodiversity we risk an ecological meltdown, a future in which we can't rely on nature to provide the energy, food and timber we need.
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biodiversity is more than something that is beautiful to look at and that we love. it is also what provides us with so many of our basic needs. it is the foundation of our society. we have seen recently how disruptive it can be when supply chains breakdown. nature is at the base of our supply chains. the team from the natural history museum hope their data will help global leaders meeting for the un biodiversity conference next week. during a week of virtual talks hosted by china, negotiators will thrash out plans for protecting nature over the next ten years. none of the targets for the previous decade were met, and scientists say this is our last best chance for a sustainable future. helen briggs, bbc news.
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and airport in the canary islands has reopened after a volcano erupting caused it to close. you are watching bbc news. now for a weather update with susan. hello. we started the day with some thick cloud to the south, as a weather front pulled across southern england and east anglia, but through this afternoon the sunshine will become increasingly widespread here. for scotland, quite strong westerly winds ushering in showers from the west coast and pulling quite a few across the northern isles. very gusty along the western coast of scotland, strengthening wind for northern ireland and parts of northern england as well. light winds in the south, and in the sunshine again, temperatures up to 19 or 20, so above average for the time of year. but for the start of
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the new week, we are switching to a more north—westerly air stream, so that will usher cooler air to more areas, and the first thing on monday, a chillier start than we have been used to, nothing especially cold but temperatures down in single figures. early rain pushing into western scotland, but for much of the uk through the week ahead the story is going to be a dry one. a little cooler than last week, as temperatures move back to more average values for the time of year. for the week ahead, high pressure will always be keen to sit to the south of the uk, and then we will see various fronts trying to come into play to the far north. through monday, they will be some rain across western scotland, some showers for the northern isles, and the rain gradually works its way eastwards through the duration of the day. perhaps a little just getting into the far north—west of england as well. but for northern ireland and much of england and wales, more spells of sunshine, but temperatures in the high teens.
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through tuesday, the front pivots and pushes its cloud down the north sea coast, so here with the breeze off the north sea, it will feel on the chillier side, temperature scratching around in double figures for the likes of newcastle and hull. but towards the west, there should be some decent spells of sunshine, for wales in the south west england, and highs of 17 in cardiff. cooler, though, along the north sea coast, also for aberdeen, a high ofjust 11. they looking further ahead into the week, we pick up a breeze off the week, we pick up a breeze off the land for newcastle and hull, and that will warm things up for wednesday and thursday, still a lot of fine weather to come through the rest of the week.
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hello this is bbc news. the headlines... uk business secretary kwasi kwarteng defends the government's handling of the energy crisis after suppliers
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said the system of having a cap on prices was not fit for purpose. britain's tyson fury defends his heavyweight title against american deontay wilder, with an 11th round knockout in las vegas. pay up to stop illegal migrants the french government tells the uk to keep to its side of a deal to police the channel. taiwan's president uses the island's national day to issue a strong response to a speech by china's leader, who warned the two would have to unify. and scientists warn that the loss of biodiversity risks tipping the world into �*ecological meltdown'. we arejust we are just getting breaking news about the czech president reportedly being taken to hospital. we are
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hearing that the president has been

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