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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 20, 2021 9:00am-10:01am BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. some coronavirus restrictions like more mask—wearing and working from home must be immediately reintroduced in england to avoid a winter crisis. that's according to a group of health leaders as cases continue to rise across the uk. if we don't take these measures and things carry on as they are, we will reach a situation where patient safety is threatened. ministers, scientists, experts, are looking— ministers, scientists, experts, are looking at— ministers, scientists, experts, are looking at data on an hourly basis, and we _ looking at data on an hourly basis, and we don't feel that it's the time for plan— and we don't feel that it's the time for plan b — and we don't feel that it's the time for plan b right now. do you think it's time for plan b to deal with rising cases or are you concerned about the impact of renewed restrictions? also let me know if you've been able
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to get either your third main vaccination if you're immunocompromised or a booster jab if you're eligible. price rises slow slightly in september, but the cost of living still rises by 3.1% as the economy continues to reopen. the government admits it's concerned. police investigate a number of reports from women who say they have been injected with needles on nights out, leaving them incapacitated and with memory loss. it's now a month since a volcano on the spanish island of la palma first erupted, and officials say there are no signs of the lava and ash stopping. # there is no life i know to compare with pure imagination... lesley bricusse, the british songwriter behind songs
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like goldfinger and the music from willy wonka has died at the age of 90. health leaders are demanding the immediate reintroduction of some covid restrictions in england to avoid the nhs "stumbling into a winter crisis". the nhs confederation says a sharp rise in cases means measures, including mandatory face coverings in crowded spaces should be implemented. daily covid cases across the uk have been rising sharply, with 43,738 cases reported in the latest 2a hour period, which means there were almost 16,000 cases on average per day, in the past week. another 223
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people died within 28 days of a positive covid test, which is the highest daily figure since march. in england, the government's plan a for dealing with covid throughout winter is already in place with booster jabs set to be offered to 30 million of the most vulnerable people along with a single dose of the vaccine for healthy 12—15 year olds and people advised to wear face coverings in crowded and enclosed spaces. but if the measures do not prevent unsustainable pressure on the nhs, other measures could be introduced as part of plan b, such as making face coverings mandatory in some settings, asking people to work from home and the introduction of vaccine passports. here's our health editor, hugh pym.
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the nhs confederation says that increases in hospital covid numbers are worrying, and that with other demands on the service and pressure on staff, health leaders are worried about what might be around the corner. the latest government figures show that week on week uk covid cases, deaths and hospital admissions are all rising at a rate of 10% or more, though they remain well below levels seen injanuary. relying on the vaccine programme is not going _ relying on the vaccine programme is not going to be a solution, i'm afraid — not going to be a solution, i'm afraid the _ not going to be a solution, i'm afraid. the vaccines are extremely good _ afraid. the vaccines are extremely good to— afraid. the vaccines are extremely good to stop you getting into hospital or getting seriously ill but their— hospital or getting seriously ill but their ability to stop you getting _ but their ability to stop you getting the infection at all or pass it on our— getting the infection at all or pass it on our modest, it contributes to transmission of the virus restriction, but it by no means solves— restriction, but it by no means solves the _ restriction, but it by no means solves the problem. the nhs confederation has called on the government to take pre—emptive action and enact plan b in england, drawn up by ministers to be implemented if pressure on the nhs
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becomes unsustainable, with measures including compulsory face coverings in some settings, vaccine passports and more working from home. scotland, wales and northern ireland all currently have tighter restrictions, including mandatory face coverings in some public places. yesterday, downing street said the government was not complacent and there'd been no discussion about moving plan b in england, while the key message was the vital importance of the vaccine booster programme. hugh pym, bbc news. matthew taylor is the chief executive of the nhs confederation, he says there's a risk the health service will be overwhelmed again in the next few months. i speak to health leaders every day and they report a service that is under immense pressure and all the evidence suggests that pressure is going to grow, and it is important to say it is the government themselves who said that the criteria for determining whether or
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not to enact plan b was safeguarding the health and care system. so, i understand that these are measures that make it difficult and they may be inconvenient, they are a lot less problematic than if we were to have to go to full lockdown, nobody wants that, so we can take a variety of measures, measures which other parts of europe are taking, even though they have lower infection rates than us, we can take those measures and carry on with normal life and hopefully we can head off the worst of this coming winter crisis. our political correspondent damian grammaticas is at westminster. hello to you, i suppose the key question is, has the government been clear as to when plan b might be enacted? a, ~ ., ., enacted? morning, annita. not in secific enacted? morning, annita. not in specific terms. _ enacted? morning, annita. not in specific terms. as _ enacted? morning, annita. not in specific terms. as they _ enacted? morning, annita. not in specific terms. as they have - enacted? morning, annita. not in specific terms. as they have said | specific terms. as they have said before in the pandemic, they say they are monitoring the situation. the business secretary kwasi kwarteng was saying this morning that the key thing they are looking
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at is not the infection rate, it is the hospitalisations and deaths, and he says that because that is lower at the minute, they do not feel the need to move to any more restrictions. he said they didn't want to be complacent, but now, he thought, was not the time to act. this is what he's been saying. we review the data, we are not waiting — we review the data, we are not waiting and watching, we analyse the data and _ waiting and watching, we analyse the data and we try to come up with the film data and we try to come up with the right policies. that is something which _ right policies. that is something which could change, but at the moment— which could change, but at the moment we think that the course that we are _ moment we think that the course that we are plotting is the right one, and as_ we are plotting is the right one, and as you _ we are plotting is the right one, and as you remember, all through this period — and as you remember, all through this period you've had people, experts, — this period you've had people, experts, say that lockdown should be longer, _ experts, say that lockdown should be longer, we _ experts, say that lockdown should be longer, we should go back into lockdown, _ longer, we should go back into lockdown, other people have been saying _ lockdown, other people have been saying that we shouldn't have a lockdown, _ saying that we shouldn't have a lockdown, and we've had a balanced approach _ lockdown, and we've had a balanced approach as— lockdown, and we've had a balanced approach as a government, and i think. _ approach as a government, and i think. so— approach as a government, and i think, so far, even though i don't want _ think, so far, even though i don't want to— think, so far, even though i don't want to inject any hint of
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complacency, i think so far, our approach — complacency, i think so far, our approach is _ complacency, i think so far, our approach is working. he complacency, i think so far, our approach is working.— complacency, i think so far, our approach is working. he said that he believed that _ approach is working. he said that he believed that they _ approach is working. he said that he believed that they have _ approach is working. he said that he believed that they have managed i approach is working. he said that he| believed that they have managed to, he said, get back a degree of normality into life and he didn't want to reverse that. but that of course is talking about lockdown so the government is making a bit of a political back, it wants to keep this policy going, what those health professionals we were hearing from were talking about was a lower—level intervention, not a full lockdown, things like mask wearing, things that they believe are important because the earlier you bring them in, the bigger impact they have. so this is a sort of balance that the government is taking. the thing to watch i think will be how long, and whether or not, they can hold out against that sort of pressure from the health service itself, saying that they believe measures are needed when the government position is that it will act to protect the health service if necessary. so, a difficult balancing act and one which will perhaps get more difficult if case rates and
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hospitalisations increase. damian grammaticus. — hospitalisations increase. damian grammaticus, a _ hospitalisations increase. damian grammaticus, a political- grammaticus, a political correspondent, thank you very much. joining me now is professor of medicine at the university of east anglia, paul hunter. thank you for your time today. is the nhs confederation right to say that plan b should be implemented in england immediately? i that plan b should be implemented in england immediately?— england immediately? i think it's a very difficult _ england immediately? i think it's a very difficult issue, _ england immediately? i think it's a very difficult issue, this. _ england immediately? i think it's a very difficult issue, this. cases, . very difficult issue, this. cases, hospitalisation rates, are going up, but nowhere near as quickly as they were this time last year. about a year ago, were this time last year. about a yearago, people in were this time last year. about a year ago, people in hospital, the numbers were doubling about every 9-10 numbers were doubling about every 9—10 days. at the moment they are doubling about every five or six weeks. so, ithink doubling about every five or six weeks. so, i think we have got a little bit more time to judge what is going to be happening. this has been very difficult to predict, this autumn, from the data. what we've seen since august is hospitalisations have been pretty flat, but numbers of cases have been
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going up and down a bit like a yo—yo really sincejuly, and at the moment, it's not clear really since july, and at the moment, it's not clear whether what we're seeing at the moment will continue to increase as we move towards christmas, or, as some modellers have suggested, actually will peak sometime this month and then start declining. and i think it is going to become more obvious, hopefully, in the coming days, how this is going to continue. i think there are early signs that the booster campaign may be reducing the risk to the over—80s, which are the group most likely to die, most likely to go into hospital. so, i think there are some hopeful signs that actually, we are not going to see such a dreadful winter as some are suggesting. but it is early days. i think we won't see anything nearas days. i think we won't see anything near as bad as it was last year, i think every model that i've seen and
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every epidemiologist i think to much believes that.— believes that. effectively, the government _ believes that. effectively, the government is _ believes that. effectively, the government is placing - believes that. effectively, the government is placing all- believes that. effectively, the government is placing all its i believes that. effectively, the - government is placing all its eggs in the vaccine basket, if i can use that analogy, but let's pick up on the point you were making about the booster programme, and also we're talking aboutjobs for people who are immunocompromised, would be the third main dose, not a booster, in those instances, plus vaccinations for 12— to 15—year—old is, how well are all of these programs going? anecdotally, we are hearing about lots of delays and it not happening as quickly as the initial covid vaccine programme? indeed, and certainl , vaccine programme? indeed, and certainly. i _ vaccine programme? indeed, and certainly, i have _ vaccine programme? indeed, and certainly, i have got _ vaccine programme? indeed, and certainly, i have got no _ vaccine programme? indeed, and certainly, i have got no further. certainly, i have got no further insight on that but we are hearing that... you just look at the numbers, we're not anywhere near as high proportion of people that are eligible for their vaccinations being vaccinated, compared to what we were seeing for the second dose, even. so, yes, that is a concern.
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but, to a certain extent, in terms of the risks to the health service, you don't need to vaccinate, every person that you vaccinate reduces the pressure on the health service in terms of the booster dose, so, as long as we get a reasonable number, we are actually managing to control that pressure. it isn't at all sure at the moment that we will see, even without the booster vaccination campaign, cases continuing to increase throughout the next few months. they may do, it's just really difficult to predict at the moment. , ., really difficult to predict at the moment. , . ., . ., moment. given that there are record waitin: moment. given that there are record waiting lists — moment. given that there are record waiting lists for _ moment. given that there are record waiting lists for non-covid _ waiting lists for non—covid treatment and the nhs confederation is obviously concerned about the told that the last 18 months or so has taken on staff, on frontline staff, can you understand why they are saying introduce plan b in england immediately, in that
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context, and does therefore the government need to reasonably say, this is the point at which we would introduce plan b so that the nhs can actually plan? is a introduce plan b so that the nhs can actually plan?— actually plan? is a very good point and i actually plan? is a very good point and i would _ actually plan? is a very good point and i would totally _ actually plan? is a very good point and i would totally agree - actually plan? is a very good point and i would totally agree with - actually plan? is a very good point| and i would totally agree with what you've just said, actually. and i would totally agree with what you'vejust said, actually. is and i would totally agree with what you've just said, actually. is a medical doctor myself, i can understand the concerns within the health service most health—care workers who have lived through a pretty dreadful winter, and naturally they are very nervous about those sorts of pressures... it is a political decision, and not just a public—health decision, and i think really, at the moment, it isn't absolutely clear how this is going to progress over the coming weeks and months come with the roll—out of vaccine with possibly the new variant which may be more
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infectious, but may not, and it is incredibly difficult to predict, but i think we do have to have, because case numbers and hospitalisations aren't increasing anywhere near as rapidly last year, it does mean that the pressure to make a very urgent, soon decision, is not as great as it would have been this time last year. professor pool hunter, thank you very much. and let me bring in some of your thoughts on this question about sticking with plan bay this one says... save the nhs staff from more exhaustion and stress, get plan b in now. this one says... of course it is time for plan b, already late, as usual, the government is always to slow. this one says... yes, two masks back on. this one says... to quit planai. this one but has
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definitely plan b, i have never stopped mask wearing a distancing, we must protect ourselves and others from this deadly virus despite vaccinations. this one... i want plan b to go ahead because we know it will slow the spread of coronavirus, but this could lead to another knockdown if not introduced sooner rather than later. lots more coming in here. this one says... the rules should not have been removed in the first place, so, yes, i am absolutely in favour of implemented plan b, especially as someone with asthma who has waning immunity but who has been removed from the covid booster programme. keep those thoughts all coming in, we want to read out more of your thoughts on whether you think the government should stick with plan eight in england, remember, in northern ireland, scotland and wales there are stricter measures. —— plan a. or should the government in england moved to plan b immediately, as the nhs confederation is calling for?
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you can contact me on twitter just after on twitterjust after half past nine we will be speaking to the deputy chief executive of nhs providers, the body which represents health trusts in england. charities have called for people with weakened immune systems to be given access to walk— in vaccination centres — so more of them can get the third doses they need to fight covid—19. the centres are reserved at the moment for boosterjabs for the over—50s and first doses for 12 to 15—year—olds, as well as flu jabs. official figures show price rises dipped slightly in september as the economy continued to reopen. the increase in the cost of living, as measured by the consumer prices index, fell to 3.1% in september, down from 3.2% in august, according to the office for national statistics. higher prices for transport were the biggest contributor to price rises.
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let's get more on this with our economics correspondent, andy verity. so, andy, morning to you. pick out for us the key points from this latest data?— for us the key points from this latest data? well, annita, this isn't really _ latest data? well, annita, this isn't really the _ latest data? well, annita, this isn't really the end _ latest data? well, annita, this isn't really the end of- latest data? well, annita, this isn't really the end of this - latest data? well, annita, this. isn't really the end of this surge in the cost of living that we have seen recently, more a temporary respite. a 3.1% rise in the consumer prices index, is slightly less than previous figure of 3.2%. the main reason is what you're comparing it with. in august, we were comparing it with the august before, in 2020, when we had eat out to help out, the prices in restaurants and hotels were artificially depressed by the government subsidy. and now we're comparing it with september, when that scheme had finished, and there for, there is less of a contrast with last year. and therefore the big rise in prices is slightly less
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in restaurants and hotels. but there are still huge upward pressures on inflation, mainly from the cost of fuel, petrol prices, we didn't actually have the queues at the pumps which featured at the end of september, they are priced into these figures, because these figures were conducted on 15th september, rather than after, when the queues started to form, but nevertheless, big upward pressures. so although we have had a slight easing in retail prices, the prices that producers are paying for their raw materials were up by 11.4%, which is partly fuel, also things like metals, iron and steel, those prices are very expensive, which will make it more expensive, which will make it more expensive to buy new cars. that has had a knock—on effect on second—hand car prices, which are up by more than a fifth over the past year. things like airfares are up by 9.7%, carpets are up 9.6%, and a few items falling, like meat and coffee and tea, but it is certainly the case that with those raw materials prices going up, the prices at the factory
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gate were up by 6.7%, that is the highest rise in a year. so although we have had a temporary respite, it does look very much as if we've got further inflationary pressure coming down the line, and all that adds up to the likelihood of an interest rate rise by the end of this year. andy verity, thank you very much, our economic correspondent. managers running care services in england say staff shortages are so acute, they have to make difficult decisions about which patients they can support. the national care forum says it shows the stark reality of the pressure the care system is under. here's our social affairs editor, alison holt. this is vital work, caring for people who are older or disabled, either in a care home like this or in their own home. but it's become so difficult to fill jobs, care managers say people are working even longer hours and office staff are filling in gaps in the rota. exhaustion from the pandemic, compulsoryjabs in care homes
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and better pay being offered in other sectors, are all adding to the problems. 340 care managers with more than 21,000 staff responded to questions from organisations representing them. they had an average of 17% ofjobs vacant. more than two thirds had stopped or limited some services, including saying no to taking patients from hospital. it is estimated together they have turned down nearly 5000 requests for help since september the 1st. i think all of us across the sector, including myself and many others of my peers, are really seriously concerned, because we can't see any end in sight, i guess, to the current situation. the situation is getting progressively worse month on month with no end in sight, and i think with winter coming and all the additional pressures that are placed on staffing, under normal circumstances throughout the winter,
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it really is a grave cause for concern. and we are seeing every single day people saying, "you know, ijust can't do this any more and i'm leaving social care." the government says it is putting more money into the care system, including investing in training and regular recruitment campaigns for staff. alison holt, bbc news. around 9.40, we will be talking to the manager of a care home who has had to turn people away. we will be bringing you that a little later this hour. a study into a condition that causes extreme sickness during pregnancy has found that more than half of the women affected considered having an abortion because of their symptoms. the survey of 5,500 women with hyperemesis gravidarum is the biggest of its kind ever carried out in the uk. the condition isn't widely known, but the duchess of cambridge suffered with severe vomiting during all three of her pregnancies. daniela relph has been to meet one woman who recorded a video diary about her experience of pregnancy. i don't get the normal experience that other people get. ijust have to sit here
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for nine months and just... ..wait. i still can't eat, and i can't drink. and i'm hungry. and i'm stressed, and i can't sleep. i just want to get to the end of this pregnancy... ..with a baby. alive. extreme sickness in pregnancy can be brutal. the condition — known as hg — can overwhelm you. i'm so cold. two years ago, laura anderson kept a video diary of her pregnancy. it's a horrible illness. just makes you a complete shadow of who you were. two years on, and laura is now mum to ava. we had to try very hard to get pregnant and we'd had four miscarriages and she was very wanted, and she was
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what kept me going. because i knew the only way to get a baby was to get to that end point, and that's what got me through. but the pregnancy left her feeling isolated and struggling to get help. she wants other women to get better care and treatment. the mentaljourney is actually harder, because that's still left over at the end of it, and that doesn't go away as quickly as the physical symptoms. it's nine months of isolation and feeling completely useless because you can't do anything. and some people have to quit theirjobs, some people have other children that they feel like they're letting down. obviously treat the physical first, because that can be very dangerous if not, but so can the mental part of it. laura had wanted more children, but she's forever changed by her hg experience. do you think you'll have any more children? no, no.
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i very much, at the end of ava's pregnancy, told myself, i am finally done with hg. and i was happy about that. if i could be promised that i wouldn't have hg, i would definitely have another baby. that is the only reason we're not having another baby. it's just too risky for you. yeah, yeah. i can't be a mum if i've got hg. i'm joined now by chessie king, a new mum who suffered from hyperemesis gravidarum throughout her pregnancy. thank you so much forjoining us and congratulations on your baby girl, who is just 15 weeks old. when you first had sickness, you thought it was just regular morning sickness, when did you realise, at what point did you think, this is actually much more than that? it did you think, this is actually much more than that?— did you think, this is actually much more than that? it was around eight weeks and l — more than that? it was around eight weeks and i have _
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more than that? it was around eight weeks and i have passed _ more than that? it was around eight weeks and i have passed the - more than that? it was around eight weeks and i have passed the ten - weeks and i have passed the ten sickness mark, i would always tally it up so i knew how many times, and i thought, is this normal? i had never experienced it, i had nothing to compare it to, and i had never called 111, and i did, after my partner saying, called 111, and i did, after my partnersaying, i called 111, and i did, after my partner saying, i don't think this is right. and he said, he uttered the words hg and he said, people call it hg, and if you're lucky, then you get it because, you might know that the duchess of cambridge had it. and i was like, good, iam lucky to experience this, apparently! and i went to hospital for the first time at eight weeks. and what happened? thea;r for the first time at eight weeks. and what happened?— for the first time at eight weeks. and what happened? they cast it as food poisoning _ and what happened? they cast it as food poisoning for— and what happened? they cast it as food poisoning for a _ and what happened? they cast it as food poisoning for a while, - and what happened? they cast it as food poisoning for a while, because | food poisoning for a while, because i haven't hit the 12 week mark, so they couldn't guarantee that i was pregnant, even though i had an early scan to prove to them, and i had
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tests, and they put an iv drip in me to get my fluids up. you tests, and they put an iv drip in me to get my fluids up.— to get my fluids up. you are incredibly — to get my fluids up. you are incredibly dehydrated - to get my fluids up. you are incredibly dehydrated at - to get my fluids up. you are| incredibly dehydrated at that to get my fluids up. you are - incredibly dehydrated at that point? yes, and i don't want to, it is obviously morning, people are having their breakfast, but my wee sample was like thick beer and they said i had left it dangerously late and i would have been in trouble if i had left it any longer. would have been in trouble if! had left it any longer.— left it any longer. interestingly, in this survey. _ left it any longer. interestingly, in this survey, 3996 _ left it any longer. interestingly, in this survey, 3996 of— left it any longer. interestingly, in this survey, 3996 of women . in this survey, 39% of women described their primary care experience when they went to their gps either poor or extremely poor, and 30% said their secondary care experience, so, in hospital, was either extremely poor or pork, did you feel that the staff, the medical professionals you met, knew much about this condition? i professionals you met, knew much about this condition?— about this condition? i would say that maybe _ about this condition? i would say that maybe one _ about this condition? i would say that maybe one in _ about this condition? i would say that maybe one in ten _ about this condition? i would say that maybe one in ten of- about this condition? i would say that maybe one in ten of the - about this condition? i would say| that maybe one in ten of the staff that maybe one in ten of the staff that were looking after me, and they were all very, very overstretched, obviously it was locked down three.
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they were sympathetic but kept on saying, it must be food poisoning, you can't be this sick whilst i was being sick. full stops or lockdown three and they did admit me, at 16 weeks i was admitted with severe, intense pain in my rib and they said i could have cracked a rib or torn and intercostal muscle from being sick so much. that is when they started to take note, and they started to take note, and they started to take note, and they started to think, maybe this is serious, maybe she does have hyperemesis gravidarum. picture you ainted hyperemesis gravidarum. picture you painted matches _ hyperemesis gravidarum. picture you painted matches with _ hyperemesis gravidarum. picture you painted matches with the _ hyperemesis gravidarum. picture you painted matches with the idea - hyperemesis gravidarum. picture you painted matches with the idea of - painted matches with the idea of extreme sickness. this must have had an incredibly bad toll on your mental health, of yourself and your partner? i mental health, of yourself and your artner? ~ ., ' . , partner? i think it affected my artner partner? i think it affected my partner more _ partner? i think it affected my partner more than _ partner? i think it affected my partner more than me, - partner? i think it affected my i partner more than me, because i partner? i think it affected my - partner more than me, because i felt the purpose, i knew that i would have a baby girl at the end of it and i was extremely lucky to be experiencing that, but he felt helpless, and hopeless, and ifelt
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just an overwhelming sense of guilt for the baby inside me because i was, like, i'm not giving you any nutrition, i couldn't even take sips of water, i couldn't keep any food down, i was being sick 25—30 times a day, some days. and i spent a lot of it in hospital and ijust felt lonely, i didn't know how to explain it. ., ., , ., , ., it. you have been told if you were to net it. you have been told if you were to get pregnant — it. you have been told if you were to get pregnant again, _ it. you have been told if you were to get pregnant again, you - it. you have been told if you were to get pregnant again, you are . to get pregnant again, you are likely to sufferfrom to get pregnant again, you are likely to suffer from hg again, is this making you think twice about having another baby potentially? absolutely. i mean if i am lucky enough to get pregnant a second time, i don't know how i would deal with the hg if rey lee—lo was young enough for me to have to look after her, i keep on saying, if she is ten she can look after herself and, look after me when i'm being sick, but it definitely makes me feel completely differently about having a second child and none of the treatment you got made a difference to you, or,
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what treatment did you get? i could have opened a pharmacy, i was given so many pills to swallow, and they would alljust come back because obviously they would not stay down. but i was given this one magic medication that would melt on my tongue so i didn't have to swallow anything, and that really, really help, and i took that throughout pregnancy until the day i had her. chessie king, thank you so much for sharing your experiences with us, new mum to a 15—week—old baby girl. for details of organisations which offer advice and support with pregnancy related issues, you can go online to bbc action line. state media in syria has reported that a bomb attack
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on a military bus in the capital, damascus, has killed several people and injured many others. some reports suggest as many as thirteen people may have died. pictures on state media showed the charred cabin of the bus. the sana news agency reported that two bombs exploded as the vehicle passed under the president bridge. let's go live to our correspondent anna foster who is in beirut. correspondent anna foster details correspondent anna foster of this gauge are very sketchy, details of this gauge are very sketchy, but we have seen is blackened smoke billowing from the windows. most information have come from the syrian state agency, it seems to have been a planned attack with to explosive devices that went off and one more that was found. it went off right in the centre of damascus, and it's important to point out that damascus is one of the most secure parts of syria. in the most secure parts of syria. in the last couple of years they reduced the number of checkpoints
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because things were considered to be more secure. it is notable to see an attack of this size in the syrian capital. in terms of who has claimed responsibility, so far nobody, but we can read perhaps a little between the lines if we look at what happened one or two hours later in the north—west, in the rebel held enclave of it leb idlib, and perhaps 11 people were killed including schoolchildren. it's too early to link those two events, but maybe in the future of the day progresses and things become clearer we may see that one was carried out in retaliation for the other. thank you for that update. _ retaliation for the other. thank you for that update. not _ retaliation for the other. thank you for that update. not several - retaliation for the other. thank you
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for that update. not several look . retaliation for the other. thank you | for that update. not several look at the weather. some of us started off with skies like this in lincolnshire, but some had torrential rain moving eastwards, heavy thundery downpours moving north—eastwards, that will continue as we go through the course of the day, they will be a thundery element of the shower is easing through the afternoon. then we will see more coming in across the south—west, and gusty winds across southern counties and also the channel islands. there will be some sunshine across parts of england and wales, more so across scotland and northern ireland, when the weather front comes our way introducing rain. temperatures on the mild side of the time of year, but not as mild as they were yesterday. tonight we have got all this rain crossing southern counties, our weather fronts and the sync celsis feature, northerly winds behind it, showers and those will be wintry and higher ground. it will be colder than it has been the last few nights. tomorrow we say goodbye to the
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weather front, tomorrow we say goodbye to the weatherfront, dry tomorrow we say goodbye to the weather front, dry weather and sunshine, brisk north—westerly wind, and we could have some gales and the north sea coastline. it will feel much colder. hello this is bbc news. the headlines: some coronavirus restrictions, like more mask wearing and working from home, must be immediately reintroduced in england to avoid a winter crisis, according to a group of health leaders — but the government says changes aren't needed yet. if we don't take these measures and things carry on as they are, we will reach a situation where patient safety is threatened. ministers, scientists, experts are looking at data on an hourly basis, and we don't feel that it's the time for plan b right now. price rises slow slightly in september — but the cost of living still rises by 3.1% as the economy continues to reopen.
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the government admits it's concerned. police investigate a number of reports from women who say they have been injected with needles on nights out leaving them incapacitated and with memory loss. lesley bricusse, the british songwriter behind songs like goldfinger and the music from willy wonka has died at the age of 90. sport, and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here'sjohn watson. good morning. morning. liverpool's mo salah illustrating why he's been called the best in the world by his manager scoring two goals in the champions league last night. he becomes the first liverpool player to score in nine
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consecutive matches. it was a great night for the english clubs with wins for both manchester city and liverpool. eleven goals in those two games, and for liverpool, no shortage of drama, as andy swiss reports. so who's for a champions league thriller? well, liverpool and atletico madrid were, as liverpool raced into a 2—0 lead. a shot from mo salah that took a hefty deflection, and one from naby keita that certainly didn't. here's the shot! what about that? but atletico aren't the spanish champions for nothing — and back they roared. two goals from antoine griezmann — 2—2 at the break. and after it, the drama continued. a high boot, and griezmann was sent off. and when liverpool were later awarded a penalty, salah coolly made it 3—2. then atletico were given a penalty — only for the referee to consult the video and change his mind. victory for liverpool in about the most eventful way possible. with ten men they were quite intense to play. er... but the dirty three points are very often the most important and they were dirty tonight, of course.
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it's not our best football, but we got them and that's a big step. earlier there'd been a mancunian master—class, as city blazed past bruges. phil foden's pinpoint pass picking outjoao cancelo with impressive results. and it's tapped out brilliantly. that, though, was just the start — as, after extending their lead from the penalty spot, city cruised clear at the break, courtesy of kyle walker at then 19—year—old cole palmer — just moments after coming on as a sub. how's that for an entrance? and although bruges pulled one back, riyad mahrez rounded things off in suitably thumping style. 5—1 to city — and some statement. andy swiss, bbc news. talking of special players, what about this from lionel messi? scores level at two all in their champions league tie. he scored a classy penalty that won it for paris saint germain against leipzig. a little reminder he's still up
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there with the very best. celtic just about kept their europa league knockout hopes alive beating hungarian champions ferencvarosit was a great opener, kyogo furuhashi with a sublime bit of control afterjota's pass. but they only made sure of the win late on, they had a golden chance, which went down as own goal that put them 2 up, leaving them third in group g. the cricket t20 world cup continues later with ireland looking to make it two wins out of two and boost their chances of qualifying for the next stage of the tournament. they take on sri lanka in abu dhabi, 3 o'clock our time. the netherlands play namibia at 11. scotland are one win away from qualifying for the next stage after beating papua new guinea by 17 runs, their second win in two games. richie berrington top scored with 70 off 49 balls before taking an excellent catch as papua new guinea fell short of their target.
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scotland will progress to the main group stage if they beat oman tomorrow. novak djokovic's defence of his australian open title is in doubt after the country's immigration minister confirmed overnight that all players will need to be double vaccinated against covid—19 to obtain a visa to compete in next year's tournament. the 20—time grand slam champion has declined to reveal his vaccination status, and previously said he's unsure whether he'll defend his crown. i don't have a message, i have a message to everyone who wishes to visit australia, they say they have to be double vaccinated, that is a universal application, notjust universal application, not just tennis players, universal application, notjust tennis players, every visitor to australia will have to be double vaccinated. meanwhile andy murray is continuing to offer up a little reminder of what took him to the top. another battling performance and another victory over a top 50 player, beating the american frances tiafoe. amazingly every set went to a tie break.
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he said after he'd never played a match like that, to come through his opening match of the european open. he plays his second round match tomorrow. and one other cricket line which has reached up in the last hour or so — australia fast bowler james pattinson has retired from all international cricket. that means of course he won't be lining up against england in the ashes which start in november. that's all from me for now, back to you. more now on our main story — a warning that the government must urgently bring back some covid measures in england to avoid another winter crisis in the health service. it's come from the nhs confederation which represents health service organisations across the uk. the government has a series of measures known as plan b on standby. let's get the view of another health body. saffron cordery is deputy chief executive of nhs providers, which represents health
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trusts in england. thank you forjoining us today, so, your view on plan b is now the time to implement it so the reintroduction of monetary mask wearing and crowded indoor spaces, perhaps more working from home and so on? i perhaps more working from home and so on? ~ ., , ., . so on? i think the social distancing measures that _ so on? i think the social distancing measures that everyone _ so on? i think the social distancing measures that everyone has - so on? i think the social distancing measures that everyone has been | measures that everyone has been asked to abide by our really, really important. i think what we have got to look at here is what is good for patients, because that's the fundamental element. this is not just about protecting the nhs, it's about protecting patients who use the nhs, and what we have got to haveis the nhs, and what we have got to have is the capacity in place to be able to really cut that back log of
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care that exists in terms of really long waiting list, we have got to get that down, because it's not good for patients to be waiting. we got to be able to manage the urgent and emergency care that is really the demand for that is really growing, and if people can't be seen in an emergency, that is not good for patients, and finally we have to be able to support patients with covid, and if we don't have the capacity to do that then that's also not good for patients, so it's about working out what matters for patients, and we know we are in a really concerning situation here. 50. we know we are in a really concerning situation here. so, is that, given _ concerning situation here. so, is that, given everything _ concerning situation here. so, is that, given everything you - concerning situation here. so, is that, given everything you have | concerning situation here. so, is. that, given everything you have set out, yes or no to plan b at this point? out, yes or no to plan b at this oint? ., ~' out, yes or no to plan b at this oint? ., ~ ., point? right now, i think we need to talk to health _ point? right now, i think we need to talk to health service _ point? right now, i think we need to talk to health service leaders - point? right now, i think we need to talk to health service leaders first i talk to health service leaders first before we go for that, i completely understand the nhs confederation's position, and it is right to signal the warning that we need to think really carefully about where the nhs is headed now in the run—up to winter, so, ithink is headed now in the run—up to winter, so, i think it's likely that that time will come soon, because we know numbers are rising, we know
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cases are rising, we know infections are rising, and we know those being admitted to hospital is growing, so one of those numbers are on the upward trajectory. if one of those numbers are on the upward trajectory.— one of those numbers are on the upward trajectory. upward tra'ectory. if you think the time is upward trajectory. if you think the time is rrot _ upward trajectory. if you think the time is not immediately, - upward trajectory. if you think the time is not immediately, but - time is not immediately, but soon, why not go with those measures now? why not recommend those measures now and try to get ahead of this? we know cases are rising, hospital admissions are rising, the highest number of deaths within 28 days of a positive case yesterday since march, so those figures are not good, they are not the way we want to see them going, so why not try and get ahead of this? i going, so why not try and get ahead of this? ~ ., �* , going, so why not try and get ahead of this? ,, . �*, ., , ,., , of this? i think that's absolutely ri . ht, of this? i think that's absolutely riaht, we of this? i think that's absolutely right. we do _ of this? i think that's absolutely right, we do need _ of this? i think that's absolutely right, we do need to _ of this? i think that's absolutely right, we do need to get - of this? i think that's absolutely right, we do need to get ahead| of this? i think that's absolutely i right, we do need to get ahead of this growing number of cases, so we need to look at that. what i'm saying is that we would like the opportunity to talk to health service leaders and identify what they think is most important, what
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they think is most important, what they think is right, there, but we know that things like vaccinations are absolutely critical, and we have just seen the announcement of the roll—out, renewed roll—out, vaccinations for 12—15 —year—olds, and i think that's absolutely critical, because we've seen that big spike in cases from the school sector, so from young people, we do need to see young people being vaccinated, i think that will help, but, yes, ithink vaccinated, i think that will help, but, yes, i think the time is coming soon. ~ ., ., but, yes, i think the time is coming soon. ~ . ., i. but, yes, i think the time is coming soon. ~ . ., ., but, yes, i think the time is coming soon. ~ . ., i. ., ., soon. what are you hearing about the boosterjabs. — soon. what are you hearing about the boosterjabs, the _ soon. what are you hearing about the boosterjabs, the third _ soon. what are you hearing about the boosterjabs, the third jabs _ soon. what are you hearing about the boosterjabs, the third jabs for - boosterjabs, the third jabs for immunocompromised people, the single judge the 12—15 —year—olds? anecdotally we're hearing the roll—out for all those is moving at a slower pace than the initial covid rock vaccine roll—out, do you have any concerns about the ability of the programme to do what it is
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intended to do? i the programme to do what it is intended to do?— the programme to do what it is intended to do? i think a vaccine roll-out we _ intended to do? i think a vaccine roll-out we know _ intended to do? i think a vaccine roll-out we know the _ intended to do? i think a vaccine roll-out we know the invitations | intended to do? i think a vaccine i roll-out we know the invitations are roll—out we know the invitations are going out for boosterjabs now, i think it goes out on a rolling basis because it is a period of time after you have had your second jab, so i think that's really important to remember. the critical thing is uptake, so when people get the invitation they must go along and get theirjab, and i think that's one of the important elements. in schools, we know there's been a really big refocus on schools, and we have seen a new plan announced yesterday for that, so i think there will be really important to hopefully get that fully under way and fully into action so it can have and fully into action so it can have a real impact, and whether we have half term coming out to be backed up, which i think will be an important break point for the spread
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of covid in schools. {lilia important break point for the spread of covid in schools.— of covid in schools. 0k, thank you very much — of covid in schools. 0k, thank you very much for— of covid in schools. 0k, thank you very much for your _ of covid in schools. 0k, thank you very much for your thoughts i of covid in schools. 0k, thank you very much for your thoughts on i of covid in schools. 0k, thank you i very much for your thoughts on that story today. we have been asking you whether you think the government should stickers plan a or whether plan b should be introduced, we can have a couple of your comments quickly, this is from twitter, we need restrictions, social distancing and mask wearing, i'm not asking for and mask wearing, i'm not asking for a lockdown, just to curb the spread of covid. this one says, what is the government waiting for to reintroduce at least mask wearing, waiting too long as usual, we've already seen a bad one. here, in favour of plan b, also on twitter, plan b and sort out mitigations in
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schools. this is from david tyler, plan b is a must, like yesterday. i'm looking through to see if we have got some more people in support of plan a. here is dido dando, who says definitely don't like oh, no, deftly should be moving to at least plan a, i think dido dando means that plan b, why wait again? the vast majority are in favour of plan b, it seems. iam vast majority are in favour of plan b, it seems. i am scanning the tweets, and we did have an earlier thing stick with thy a, but think thatis thing stick with thy a, but think that is the only one so far. whatever you think, keep getting in touch with me. you can do that on twitter and i will do my very best to read out some of your comments. police in nottinghamshire are investigating a number of reports from women who say they have been injected with needles on nights out leaving them incapacitated and with memory loss. emily anderson reports. zara owen is a first—year student at the university of nottingham, and hasn't been living in the city for long.
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she was on a night out with friends last week at pryzm nightclub, and it was here she think she was injected with a needle in her leg. i have no recollection of the nightclub, what had happened to me there, but the next morning i had an agonising pain in my life, and i couldn't walk on it. oops an agonising pain in my leg, and i couldn't walk on it. i had a huge limp which was causing me great pain. it's still terrifying, the fact that it happened to me, and i don't know when it could have happened or where in the club or anything that it happened. a spokesperson for pryzm nightclub has said, while these incidents are rare, they take all reports of this nature very seriously, and will do all they can to make sure they don't happen on their premises. in a separate incident at stealth nightclub on the 12th of october, a woman says she felt a pinch on the back of her arm before blacking out and being taken to hospital. she believes she was injected
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with a mystery liquid. stealth nightclub has said it's absolutely unacceptable for women to live in fear of being spiked by needles on a night out, and it takes reports of this nature very seriously. students at nottingham trent university held a meeting to discuss improving women's safety in the city. we have a whole initiative coming out regarding bottle stops, which at the moment are being given away for free behind most bars, and then we've got nightcaps that we are trying to invest in, so, like, scrunchies that double up as cop covers. zara says she feels apprehensive about going out in nottingham in the future, but says she won't let fear stop her from enjoying student life. east midlands today's emily anderson reporting, there. it's three months since thousands of afghans were forced to flee their country and make a new home in the uk but many are still living in hotels that were meant to be temporary. it means they don't have access to jobs, proper health care or education as our home editor,
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mark easton has been finding out. a budget hotel in buckinghamshire is currently home to 160 afghan migrants, mostly children. and after more than two months stuck there, it's the children who often find it hardest. a local primary has offered educational support, but the authorities discourage such arrangements, and that is a source of frustration. my wife and seven children, it's very difficult for us. nazeer�*s children missed a lot of school in afghanistan. and after more than two months stuck in uk hotels, he's desperate to get them back into a classroom. i think the permanent education system is not available at the moment. and we are very keen and really trust the government to sort out as soon as possible. finding a suitable accommodation for large families is a huge challenge. there are fears some may be in what are called bridging hotels for many months yet.
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local charities help, but stuck in institutional limbo it seems even basic safeguarding is not always there. we visited some families here that have been in the country for three weeks. and children had unseen bullet holes in their legs, so we were able to muster support, get people to a local walk—in surgery. that's great, but it shouldn't be down to you! that surely is something that should have been spotted? i agree with you. but rather than complain about it, i think i can do something. heads, shoulders, knees and toes, knees and toes. heads, shoulders... in south london one school has found a way to get afghan children out of a local hotel and into class. after meeting a desperate migrant dad, the head at walworth academy realised that if afghan parents applied for an available place, her school was legally bound to take them. so off we went down to that hotel and quite literally sat in the lobby with a gentleman talking to him,
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which meant that more people and more people kept coming up, and by the next day we got a telephone call here saying, "oh, i understand you've been to this hotel. could you come down and see us? we are really interested in school places". we are so worried we can't go outside. we just work on internet. these three girls, all evacuated from kabul with their families as the taliban seized control, are thrilled to be in school at last. i'm so happy because i love education. our mind is fresh. we get more friends in here. it's too comfortable, it's too good for us. when you approached the home office and the department of education, what was the reaction to your offer of places? i think it was just a bit too early in their process. so they turned you down, essentially? they didn't turn us down directly. the education department says it is finding extra school places for afghans and trying to get children into classrooms as soon as possible. but the question is whether
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the government should be doing more to support the children now. mark easton, bbc news. with me now is leyla williams who's the deputy director of west london welcome — a community centre which has been offering help to new arrivals from afghanistan. thank you forjoining us today. just give us an overview, if you would, of what you have been doing with the afghan refugees and what sort of help you have been providing them. thanks for having us on today. we have been supporting newly arrived afghan families since they arrived backin afghan families since they arrived back in august, and we have been supporting with clothing, advice, helping kids registerfor school, and generally emotional support. many of those individuals or families, have many like they've been moved into permanent accommodation in any cases, or almost still living in hotels? the vast majority —
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almost still living in hotels? the vast majority of _ almost still living in hotels? tie: vast majority of afghans that almost still living in hotels? ti9 vast majority of afghans that we have met in west london are still living in hotels. the major issue is that we see with that is three key problems, people have no money, they have had no money since they first arrived in august, they have no idea what will happen in housing and will still be in hotels as far as we are understanding for months to come, and they have no proper documentation, so they have no way proving their identities, documents with which to work or receive benefits, and no way to even open a bank account. 50. benefits, and no way to even open a bank account-— bank account. so, are you saying the are bank account. so, are you saying they are rrot _ bank account. so, are you saying they are not getting _ bank account. so, are you saying they are not getting the - bank account. so, are you saying they are not getting the level i bank account. so, are you saying they are not getting the level of| they are not getting the level of support from the government that they should expect to get? yes. support from the government that they should expect to get?- they should expect to get? yes, i think people _ they should expect to get? yes, i think people have _ they should expect to get? yes, i think people have been _ they should expect to get? yes, i think people have been very i they should expect to get? yes, i | think people have been very much they should expect to get? yes, i i think people have been very much not supported by the government since they first arrived, so, apart from having food to eat in hotels and a room, and these people are very grateful to receive that support, they don't have any idea what will
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happen in the coming months, so people have a real lack and uncertainty about the situation, and it's really hard to support the family. it's really hard to support the famil . , it's really hard to support the famil _ , ., it's really hard to support the famil . , :, :, :, , family. so, it is a follow-up process. — family. so, it is a follow-up process. to _ family. so, it is a follow-up| process, to communication. family. so, it is a follow-up i process, to communication. other people you are working with, are they getting any letters or communication on a reasonably regular basis to keep them informed of what's next, of what's supposed to happen?— of what's next, of what's supposed to hauen? :, :, , to happen? no, no. so, the people that we know. _ to happen? no, no. so, the people that we know, in _ to happen? no, no. so, the people that we know, in particular- to happen? no, no. so, the people that we know, in particular the i to happen? no, no. so, the people that we know, in particular the few| that we know, in particular the few families that we have been working with, i've been wondering when they will hear from the home office on even their immigration status. so, they don't even know if they are considered, for example, arap families if they have another
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status, so sometimes they will go inside the hotels and speak to people, but it won't be everybody, and it is very chaotically delivered. so, would they really haven't had what they need from the home office, which is clarity. thank ou ve home office, which is clarity. thank you very much _ home office, which is clarity. thank you very much for — home office, which is clarity. thank you very much for the _ home office, which is clarity. thank you very much for the insight. i home office, which is clarity. thank you very much for the insight. the i you very much for the insight. the home office has said it is funding at least £12 million for a package to prioritise additional school places for children and young people arriving from afghanistan and they say they are in conversation with local authorities to understand individual concerns. as we've been hearing, managers running care services in england say staff shortages are so acute, they have to make difficult decisions about which patients they can support. the national care forum says it shows the stark reality of the pressure the care system is under. rebecca marks is owner and director of ark care homes in devon. she employs 225 members of staff to run 6 care homes and joins us from one of them in plymouth.
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good morning to you. so, explain to our viewers what your staffing situation is at the moment. do you have the full complement of staff or not? :, :, , ,:, , :, �* have the full complement of staff or not? :, , :, �* �*, not? no, we absolutely don't. it's absolutely — not? no, we absolutely don't. it's absolutely heartbreaking, - not? no, we absolutely don't. it's absolutely heartbreaking, really, | absolutely heartbreaking, really, the crisis that we have faced, not just in the last couple of months, but definitely since covid really kicked off, our staff are working tirelessly hard, they are exhausted, they are working overtime, it's extremely hard to be making these heartbreaking decisions where we are getting to the point where our care potentially may not be safe and we have to turn away residents when ultimately we would love to look after them. ultimately we would love to look after them-— ultimately we would love to look after them. :, :, , , after them. so, how many enquiries have ou after them. so, how many enquiries have you had _ after them. so, how many enquiries have you had about _ after them. so, how many enquiries have you had about beds _ after them. so, how many enquiries have you had about beds and - after them. so, how many enquiries have you had about beds and one i after them. so, how many enquiries have you had about beds and one ofj have you had about beds and one of your care homes that you have had to turn away? your care homes that you have had to turn awa ? ~ :, :, :, turn away? well, in total at the moment we _ turn away? well, in total at the moment we run _ turn away? well, in total at the moment we run six _ turn away? well, in total at the moment we run six care - turn away? well, in total at the moment we run six care homes turn away? well, in total at the i moment we run six care homes in north and south devon, we have 21% of our beds are empty, that is purely because we cannot stop them.
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so, 21% of your bed is empty, and that represents how many patients, potentially? it’s that represents how many patients, otentiall ? �*, :, ' ' :, that represents how many patients, otentiall ? �*, ' ' :, '~ potentially? it's about 15, 15 or 16 beds. potentially? it's about 15, 15 or 16 beds- and _ potentially? it's about 15, 15 or 16 beds- and you — potentially? it's about 15, 15 or 16 beds. and you don't _ potentially? it's about 15, 15 or 16 beds. and you don't have - potentially? it's about 15, 15 or 16 beds. and you don't have the i potentially? it's about 15, 15 or 16 | beds. and you don't have the staff to look after— beds. and you don't have the staff to look after the _ beds. and you don't have the staff to look after the number - beds. and you don't have the staff to look after the number of - beds. and you don't have the staff. to look after the number of patients to look after the number of patients to deal with that capacity patients? the other kind of position that we are in is that we are paying overtime and bonuses, we are throwing money for people to come and join us, throwing money for people to come andjoin us, we throwing money for people to come and join us, we have training regimes, we support nvqs, and our staff are saying, you know, i'm going to work in a supermarket, for example, because they can get paid more, they don't have to wear ppe 24 hours a day, and don't have the responsibility of looking after our loved ones. 50 responsibility of looking after our loved ones-— responsibility of looking after our loved ones. , :, , , loved ones. so you can get the stuff ou want, loved ones. so you can get the stuff you want. the _ loved ones. so you can get the stuff you want, the deadline _ loved ones. so you can get the stuff you want, the deadline for- loved ones. so you can get the stuff you want, the deadline for care i loved ones. so you can get the stuff. you want, the deadline for care home staff, care workers to be vaccinated, as well, is approaching, november 11 to the deadline. we know some care workers have said they don't want to be vaccinated. is not
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factor, as well?— don't want to be vaccinated. is not factor, as well? absolutely, we have around 225 staff, _ factor, as well? absolutely, we have around 225 staff, we've _ factor, as well? absolutely, we have around 225 staff, we've probably i around 225 staff, we've probably lost about ten staff to not being vaccinated, they've gone to work at the hospital is that they have had a life changing on the hospital is that they have had a life change are gonna work somewhere else, so we have had a diminishing pool in the workforce anyway, and it is then emphasised with the looming deadline of the 11th of november. you emphasised with the looming deadline of the 11th of november.— of the 11th of november. you say you thrown everything — of the 11th of november. you say you thrown everything at _ of the 11th of november. you say you thrown everything at this _ of the 11th of november. you say you thrown everything at this problem i thrown everything at this problem that you can think of, higher wages and so on, yet you are still left with about 21% of the beds that you have across the six care homes empty, because you don't have the staff. what else can you think of at this stage to try to sort this out? if i'm honest, the community of care providers, there are in exactly the same place, we are getting towards this dead end. we need help we need it fast, and whether that is trust funding to be able to pay our staff higher wages to kind represent responsibility in the amazing job
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they do, it's very difficult place to care providers and staff, and ultimately a residence, really. thank you very much for talking to us and the situation. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. thank you, good morning, it's been a wet start today, torrential rain moving across southern england clearing away to these, more heavy showers, some of them thundery, still in the wash in lincolnshire at the moment, pushing north—eastwards, gusty round there, but they will be replaced later by more coming into the south—west, gusty winds in areas adjacent to the english channel. in these areas were looking at sunshine and in scotland and northern ireland we are also looking at some sunshine, but we have a new weather front coming in across the north. that is a cold front, will bring in some rain, and behind it the wind viewers to milder northerly, the temperatures today ranging from 11
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in the north to 18 in the south. tonight this is front sinks south, opens a door to much colder conditions. notjust tonight but also the course of tomorrow. who is in beirut. conditions. notjust tonight but also the course of tomorrow. jab this is bbc news, these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. some coronavirus restrictions, like more mask—wearing and working from home must be immediately reintroduced in england to avoid a winter crisis. that's according to a group of health leaders, as cases continue to rise across the uk. if we don't take these measures, we will reach a situation where patient safety is threatened.— will reach a situation where patient safety is threatened. scientists and exerts are safety is threatened. scientists and experts are looking _ safety is threatened. scientists and experts are looking at _ safety is threatened. scientists and experts are looking at data - safety is threatened. scientists and experts are looking at data on i safety is threatened. scientists and experts are looking at data on an . experts are looking at data on an hourly _ experts are looking at data on an hourly basis and we don't feel that it is time _ hourly basis and we don't feel that it is time for plan b right now. at least 14 people have died in a bomb attack on a military bus

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