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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  November 15, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm GMT

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police declare yesterday's explosion in a taxi at liverpool women's hospital a terrorist incident. they also say a fourth man has been arrested and will be questioned by counterterrorism officers today. we are able to confirm that this is being treated as the ignition of an explosive device. our enquiries also indicate that the device was brought into the cab by the passenger. we believe we know the identity of the passenger but we cannot confirm this at this time. meanwhile the taxi driver who escaped has been named locally as david perry. he's been described as a hero and praised by the prime minister. we'll bring you the latest from liverpool. also in the programme... the bbc is told the government will scrap plans for a high
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speed train line between the east midlands and leeds. a big expansion to the covid booster programme — all over 40s in the uk will be offered one and 16— and 17—year—olds will be eligible for a second dose. avoidable deaths, sub—standard care and examples of racism — a report criticises how some sickle cell patients in england are treated. and adele tells oprah she had "terrifying anxiety attacks" after her divorce and she was "embarrassed" her eight—year marriage broke down. and coming up in sport on the bbc news channel... more on the yorkshire cricket racism scandal, as england bowler adil rashid becomes the third player to support allegations against michael vaughan.
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good afternoon, welcome to the bbc news at one. that explosion in a taxi outside liverpool women's hospital yesterday has been declared a terrorist incident, though police say they don't yet have a clear idea of a motive for the attack. four people have now been arrested under the terrorism act in connection with the explosion. a male passenger in the cab — who has not yet been named by police — was killed in the blast. officers believe he had built an improvised device. the prime minister will chair a meeting of cobra this afternoon. this report from our correspondent danny savage contains images that you may find distressing. a taxi arrives at liverpool women's hospital late yesterday morning. this explosion must have been terrifying for anyone there at the time. the driver does manage to get
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out after the blast and is ushered away by a man who runs over to help him. fire then sets into the wrecked car with the man who caused the explosion still in it. police have now confirmed this was a terrorist incident. this morning, investigators gave their latest update at merseyside police headquarters.— update at merseyside police headuuarters. , , headquarters. yesterday, shortly before 11am. _ headquarters. yesterday, shortly before 11am, a _ headquarters. yesterday, shortly before 11am, a local— headquarters. yesterday, shortly before 11am, a localtaxi - headquarters. yesterday, shortly before 11am, a local taxi driver. before "am, a local taxi driver picked up a fare in the rutland avenue area of liverpool. the fair, a man, had asked to be taken to liverpool women's hospital, about ten minutes away. as the taxi approach the drop—off point at the hospital, an explosion occurred from within the car. this quickly engulfed in flames. remarkably, the taxi driver escaped from the cab. he is being treated for his injuries that he sustained and has now been released from hospital. it is not clear what the motivation for this
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incident is. our enquiries indicate that an improvised explosive device has been manufactured and our assumptions so far is that it was built by the passenger in the taxi. the reason why he then took it to the women's hospital is unknown, as is the reason for its sudden explosion. is the reason for its sudden expl°5i°"-_ is the reason for its sudden exlosion. �* , ~ ., . explosion. any link to remembrance da , explosion. any link to remembrance day. though. — explosion. any link to remembrance day. though. is— explosion. any link to remembrance day, though, is not _ explosion. any link to remembrance day, though, is not clear. _ explosion. any link to remembrance day, though, is not clear. we - explosion. any link to remembrance day, though, is not clear. we are - explosion. any link to remembrance day, though, is not clear. we are of| day, though, is not clear. we are of course aware _ day, though, is not clear. we are of course aware that _ day, though, is not clear. we are of course aware that there _ day, though, is not clear. we are of course aware that there were - course aware that there were remembrance events just a short distance from the hospital and the ignition occurred shortly before 11am. we cannot at this time draw any connection with this, but it is any connection with this, but it is a line of enquiry we are pursuing. the taxi driver is understood to be this man, david perry. the prime minister has praised him for his quick reactions. the minister has praised him for his quick reactions.— minister has praised him for his quick reactions. the taxi driver in . uestion, quick reactions. the taxi driver in question. with — quick reactions. the taxi driver in question, with incredible - question, with incredible presence of mind _ question, with incredible presence of mind and bravery. but this is something _ of mind and bravery. but this is something that is an ongoing investigation and it would be premature to say much more than
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that _ premature to say much more than that h— premature to say much more than that. �* ., ., ., ., ., , that. a total of four men have been arrested. that. a total of four men have been arrested- the)! _ that. a total of four men have been arrested. they are _ that. a total of four men have been arrested. they are all— that. a total of four men have been arrested. they are all aged - that. a total of four men have been arrested. they are all aged in - that. a total of four men have been arrested. they are all aged in their| arrested. they are all aged in their 20s. they were detained at addresses linked to the passenger in the taxi. this is a very bizarre and alarming incident. treated as terrorism, but with so many questions unanswered about motivation and reason. danny's outside merseyside police headquarters now. what's being done by police to reassure people on merseyside? the news reassure people on merseyside? tue: news conference reassure people on merseyside? tte: news conference this reassure people on merseyside? tt2 news conference this morning, we heard from the chief constable of merseyside police who tried to send a reassuring message to say people are safe but there are of course extra patrols out in the liverpool area at the moment, a very high police presence, highly visible police presence, highly visible police presence, highly visible police presence, in parts of the city, as well as the investigation continuing. it's fair to say the immediate danger is over from this incident but the investigation is just now getting going. there is an area cordoned off in rutland avenue
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not far from where the explosion happened in liverpool, where significant items were found at an address linked to the passenger in the taxi. eight families have been moved out of their homes there while investigations continue there. you heard the senior officer say there was an improvised explosive device involved in this incident so they will perhaps be looking at where that was built and any other materials that might be involved with that. no further addresses are being searched at the moment apart from the three we already know about. experience tells us these are often very fast moving investigations, new information suddenly comes to light and suddenly officers focus on something else so i think people in this part of the country, in liverpool and merseyside at the moment, expect to see potentially more police activity in the coming days as that investigation unfolds. the coming days as that investiuation unfolds. , .. . investigation unfolds. danny savage, thank ou. our security correspondent
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gordon corera is here. no surprise this was declared a terrorist incident given the improvised explosive device. police i have spoken to have been cautious about offering an explosion for the motive of the attack. the attacker is now deceased so the ability to ask them orfind out is is now deceased so the ability to ask them or find out is trickier. there is the issue of the proximity and timing to potential remembrance day events, that is a possibility, but people are being very cautious at this stage. the investigation is really looking at the individual�*s background, at electronic media. they have talked about finding significant items at one address, likely to be bomb—making equipment used to create the device. they will look to see if there is any other credible threat but so far the mood music, the noises from police, suggest they do not see a significant ongoing threat, which suggests they haven't identified a wider network that would be active at the moment. but we could see the threat level go up. we have seen two
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terrorist attacks in the last months now, with the mp sir david amess being killed as well. a cobra meeting being chaired by the prime minister is happening right now in whitehall. ., ~ , ., minister is happening right now in whitehall. ., ~ ., minister is happening right now in whitehall. ., ., ., ., the government is set to scrap the high speed rail link between the east midlands and leeds. the department for transport is expected to announce plans later this week — which will see the existing line between east midlands parkway and leeds upgraded rather than replaced. in a moment we'll speak to our business correspondent colletta smith, but first to our political correspondent nick eardley in westminster. how significant is this? the integrated _ how significant is this? the integrated rail— how significant is this? the integrated rail plan - how significant is this? tt2 integrated rail plan is a big deal for many people around england who want to know what it will mean for their journey want to know what it will mean for theirjourney times, but want to know what it will mean for their journey times, but also for their journey times, but also for the government, as it seeks to try and persuade voters it means business when it talks about levelling up opportunity outside london. this is going to be a big package, around £96 billion will be
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spent over the coming decades. £40 billion of the plan we expect to see on thursday will be new money we haven't heard about before. but there are going to be some significant changes to the plans we were expecting. hs2 will still go to nottingham, but it will not now go to leeds. the northern powerhouse rail line that was expected to run as a high—speed line between leeds and manchester will now largely be based on existing railtrack, which will be upgraded and many will see that as falling far short of what the government has promised. there are going to be some significant upgrades, some electrification processes and probably some new lines in this plan on thursday as well. but scrapping the line to leeds and downgrading that plan between leeds and manchester will lead some conservative mps to be nervous about what the government is
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delivering and will lead to charges from the opposition that the government is not following through on its promises. colletta smith, how will passengers and businesses across the north react to this? tt and businesses across the north react to this?— and businesses across the north react to this? it is a double dose of frustration _ react to this? it is a double dose of frustration for _ react to this? it is a double dose of frustration for businesses - react to this? it is a double dose of frustration for businesses and j of frustration for businesses and passengers depending on planning on a future based around these lines. for passengers in yorkshire and the north—east there is a real disappointment to see the scrapping of the plans of that final chunk of h52 of the plans of that final chunk of hs2 coming up the east coast of the country. they are missing out on the trumpeted benefits of that hs2 and it's not necessarily about faster connections to london, but the faster intercity connections it would bring between leeds, sheffield and birmingham along the way. and also easing of congestion on existing lines by building a separate parallel line, you would have moved a lot of the passenger transport onto that different line, freeing up the existing network for smallerjourneys freeing up the existing network for smaller journeys and freeing up the existing network for smallerjourneys and indeed for
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transporting goods. as nick eardley mentioned, there is also a second potentially more worrying news about the line between manchester and leeds not being built as a separate line butjust having upgrades along the way, which lots of business groups are saying it will simply not cut the mustard and will not deliver what has been promised. it is a crucial route across the pennines between the two biggest cities in the north that are both growing very fast at the moment. nobody here is necessarily surprised to hear the announcement even though they are disappointed. the funding has been difficult, just for the london to birmingham section. the price tag has increased, there have been long delays in that chunk so passengers across the north will not necessarily be surprised to hear that what is promised will not be arriving and definitely will not be arriving and definitely will not be arriving on time.— arriving and definitely will not be arriving on time. colletta smith and nick eardley. _ arriving on time. colletta smith and nick eardley, thank _ arriving on time. colletta smith and nick eardley, thank you. _ the uk government's vaccine advisors say all over 40s should be offered a booster dose of a coronavirus vaccine. thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation says a third jab
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would top up protection and help limit the spread of the virus overwinter. they've also advised that 16— and17—year—olds, who were initially offered only a single dose, should now get a second. our health correspondent jim reed has more. you are happy to take the booster? very happy. you are happy to take the booster? very happy-— very happy. government scientists say booster— very happy. government scientists say boosterjabs — very happy. government scientists say boosterjabs like _ very happy. government scientists say boosterjabs like this _ very happy. government scientists say boosterjabs like this are - very happy. government scientists say boosterjabs like this are our . say boosterjabs like this are our best defence against covid this winter. this morning, the prime minister was visiting a surgery in east london, giving out those vaccines. more than 12 million have had to the third dose so far. tt’s had to the third dose so far. it's that extra _ had to the third dose so far. tt�*s that extra level of protection that we really need. the message is, anyone over 70, come forward, anybody over 50 come forward and get your booster and in the next week or so, anybody over 40 as well, come forward and get your booster. under this chan . e forward and get your booster. under this change to _ forward and get your booster. under this change to the _ forward and get your booster. under this change to the booster— this change to the booster programme, another 8 million people in their 40s will be able to book a top upjab as long as
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in their 40s will be able to book a top up jab as long as they are six months after their second dose. new data shows why. 140 days after a second dose, protection from the vaccine does start to fade. at that point the astrazeneca jab prevents 44% of infections and to make doses of the pfizerjab stops 63%. look how that changes after an extra booster dose. around 93% of those infections were prevented. tt the infections were prevented. if the booster programme _ infections were prevented. if the booster programme is _ infections were prevented. tf tt2 booster programme is successful, and with very high uptake, we can massively reduce the worry about hospitalisation and death due to covid at christmas and for the rest of this winter for literally millions of people. of this winter for literally millions of --eole. ~ .., , ., millions of people. when it comes to teena . ers, millions of people. when it comes to teenagers. all _ millions of people. when it comes to teenagers, all 16 _ millions of people. when it comes to teenagers, all 16 and _ millions of people. when it comes to teenagers, all 16 and 17-year-olds i teenagers, all 16 and 17—year—olds have been offered one dose of the vaccine so far. now the medicines watchdog says it has studied more safety data and it is recommending the second dose. tote safety data and it is recommending the second dose.— the second dose. we have become more and more reassured _ the second dose. we have become more
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and more reassured that _ the second dose. we have become more and more reassured that the _ the second dose. we have become more and more reassured that the safety - and more reassured that the safety picture _ and more reassured that the safety picture in _ and more reassured that the safety picture in young people and children. _ picture in young people and children, teenagers, isjust what we have seen— children, teenagers, isjust what we have seen in— children, teenagers, isjust what we have seen in the older population, so our message today is definitely come _ so our message today is definitely come forward for your second dose. ministers— come forward for your second dose. ministers in— come forward for your second dose. ministers in every nation of the uk have said they will accept the new scientific advice. the idea is to build the highest level of protection as the winter nights draw in and more people mix over the christmas season. jim reed, bbc news. mps will look again today at the case of the former conservative minister, owen paterson, who broke lobbying rules, and which has sparked multiple stories about mps' sleaze. a motion will be brought before the house of commons to unpick the changes voted in the week before last week. the government faced a huge backlash after trying to block mr paterson's suspension. the prime minister acknowledged last night that his handling of the whole case cld have been "better". case could have been "better". a new report has found serious care failings for sickle cell patients in england, including avoidable deaths and "near misses. "
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a cross party group of mps which carried out the review, says its findings highlighted serious and damaging levels of trust in the health system. the disease, which mainly affects people from african and caribbean backgrounds, causes blockages in the red blood cells, responsible for carrying oxygen around the body. here's our community affairs correspondent adina campbell: a life cut short, caused by failures in his care. he was a loving and charming guy. he always wanted to help people. he was a very clever and brilliant boy. 21—year—old evan smith developed sepsis after having a gall bladder stent removed. he also lived with sickle cell disease and experienced a painful episode while in hospital in london known as a sickle cell crisis. a coroner ruled he may have survived if he was offered a blood transfusion sooner. things were happening so fast. he was scared.
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he was... i mean, i could imagine the state he was in, and each time i think of it, it's something else. i can't believe we just lost him like that. evan smith's death was the cause of this new report. it found a number of serious concerns, including sub—standard care for sickle cell patients admitted on general wards or in a&e, inadequate training among health care staff, and racism experienced by some patients. people living with sickle cell feel there is inequality in the way that they are being treated here. no—one wants to put one community above anyone else, but they do want equality in treatment. and right now, with sickle cell, we don't have that. nhs england says it's overhauled the way treatment is delivered to patients,
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with ten new centres for sickle cell disease being set up across the country. people living with sickle cell feel there is inequality in the way sickle cell patients live with long—term, often excruciating, pain. it's an inherited condition from both parents, predominantly affecting people with african or caribbean heritage. and that's why some senior health campaigners feel it's not given the attention it deserves. if these failures affected the general anglo—saxon population, there would be an outcry. there would be an outcry, then immediate "we must do something about this". and what we're saying is that this has gone on far too long for people who live with sickle cell, and action — and urgent action — must be taken now. the report has made a number of recommendations, including more funding for sickle cell research, and better training for health care staff — to help save lives and avoid painful tragic deaths. adina campbell, bbc news.
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the time is 13:17. our top story this lunchtime... police declare yesterday's explosion in a taxi at liverpool women's hospital a terrorist incident. also on the programme, the british poultry council say there will definitely be enough turkeys this christmas. coming up in sport on the bbc news channel... little over a week after being sacked by aston villa, dean smith is named as norwich city's new manager, as he signs a two—and—a—half—year deal. austria has introduced a partial lockdown from today for the two million people there who haven't had two doses of a coronavirus vaccine. they've been told to stay at home, except for work and essential shopping, initially for the next ten days. the country has one of the highest infection rates in europe, but one of the continent's lowest vaccination rates. sean dilley reports. many austrians have had a last—minute change of heart, as they
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line up to be vaccinated. demand for the jab has rocketed, as the country has in effect grounded around 2 million people who have, for whatever reason, previously avoided it. from today, unvaccinated people will only be able to leave home for limited reasons, such as to buy food and to go to work. translation: the covid situation in austria is serious. _ while the incidence for the vaccinated is fortunately declining, it continues increasing exponentially among the unvaccinated. ourfocus is now on boosting the vaccination rate. therefore, we must create pressure backdrops and incentives. it's a decision authorities said they didn't want to make, but cases in austria are among the highest in the region, at a time when take—up is among the lowest in western europe — at around 65%. officials introduced the unprecedented lockdown after pressure on the country's health services and intensive care units. hundreds protested in the capital over the weekend.
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for some, concern and upset. translation: i'm here today because i want i to fight for my rights. these measures are absolutely discriminatory. my body, our bodies, we have the right to decide about them. translation: on the one hand, i think that life can only go on if. everyone is vaccinated and we are free again. but on the other hand, i think it's bad to limit people like that. they don't have a life any more. the lockdown for unvaccinated austrians will initially last for ten days. children under the age of 12 and those who have recently recovered from the virus are exempt. but officials over the border in germany, where vaccination rates are only slightly higher, will be watching closely, as europe faces the reality that — once again — it is most seriously affected by covid—19. sean dilley, bbc news. the polish defence ministry says the belarussian military are bringing more groups of migrants to one of the principal border
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crossings between the two countries. the eu has accused belarus of pushing migrants towards its eastern borders to undermine security, a charge it denies. guards at the frontier said they believed the crowd would try to force their way into poland. eu foreign ministers are set to increase sanctions against belarus later today. eu commission president ursula von der leyen, has warned that sanctions will be applied to airlines and officials transporting migrants to the area. steve rosenberg is at the border. there's a polish helicopter monitoring the situation here, which is very tense, because hundreds of migrants have just pushed their way through the gate on the belarusian side of the border, right up to the checkpoint with poland. from what we saw, belarusian forces made no attempt to stop them. they were allowed right through. as you can see, many of them have sat down here.
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they're determined to stay, until they're allowed into poland, into the european union. so what you have, in effect, is a stand—off between the migrants on one side and the polish police, polish troops, on the other. england bowler adil rashid says he heard michael vaughan make a racist comment to a group of asian cricketers, becoming the third player to accuse the former england captain. azeem rafiq, seen here, has alleged vaughan told him and a group of asian players in 2009, "there are too many of you lot, we need to do something about it. " michael vaughan says he "completely and categorically denies the allegation." campaigners are seeking a change in the law which would lead to harsher sentences for hit—and—run drivers. a petition started by the family of ryan saltern, who was killed whilst walking to a party in 2019, has received more than 167,000 signatures and will be debated
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in parliament today. john maguire has this. # happy birthday to you #. ryan saltern was married, with a young son. his 31st birthday was his last. never be the same, dad. when his father and sister visit the narrow cornish road where ryan was killed while walking to a party late one night, they think of his final moments. my wife helen really struggles to come here, to be honest. shejust sees images in her head. erm... but the bench is really important, that we put it in place, as a reminder of obviously what happened, but also a reminder that ryan's not forgotten. even after a trial and an inquest, it's not clear exactly what happened that night, but the driver who ran him over admitted failing to stop and report an accident and was given a four—month suspended sentence
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for the hit—and—run. we've been in the darkest places, to be honest, and we pulled ourselves out of that. it's been tough. ryan's pulled us out of that, with ryan's law... yeah _ ..because that's what's got us through. that drive to make a change and to make sure nobody else suffers like this. ryan's law would mean a hit—and—run being classified as dangerous driving. a proposed law change currently going through parliament would increase the maximum sentence for causing death by dangerous driving from 14 years to life in prison. the family's petition has more than 167,000 signatures. we wanted something that was going to last longer than all of us. yeah. helen and louise have been friends for many years but, in recent times, their bond has been strengthened by tragedy as — in separate collisions — both lost sons to hit—and—run drivers.
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the most horrific thing for me at that point was the fact my child was alone — he'd been left there like a piece of meat — and that i couldn't get my head round that. matt and paul were friends from school, fellow chefs and motorcyclists. paul was hit by a disqualified driverjust nine months after his friends death. the guy who ran him over got out of his car, had a cigarette and disappeared. the hit—and—run, the guidelines at the moment are six months, but they were brought out years and years ago for if you clip a wing mirror. matthew and paul were not a wing mirror. this needs to stop. hopefully, it will also stop people from leaving the scene if there's something more heavier — as in, sentence—wise — that makes them, stops them from perhaps leaving, and maybe then encouraging them
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to help, rather thanjust walking away — or driving away, in some cases. in a statement, the government says its thoughts remain with the families and that it understands the concerns. it's exploring options, as part of long—term and wider work on road safety. the families will attend today's debate. compelled by the grief they live with, they're desperate to see the law changed and to change drivers' behaviour, in the hope that no other family will suffer the pain that they continue to endure. john maguire, bbc news. there will be enough turkey for us all this christmas — so says the british poultry council, which says more than 2,500 workers from the eu have been recruited through a government scheme to help labour shortages. that's only around half of the 5,500 temporary visas that were made available, but as our business correspondent emma simpson reports, the industry reckons it should be able to cope. christmas is coming, and the turkeys are nice and fat.
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after months of worry, paul kelly's now got his seasonal workers, including 22 of them through the temporary visa scheme. it's about 20% of our workforce, so it was, you know, very touch—and—go for us. we had many sleepless nights, up until the last week of september, when we got the green light to get some, we could get some visas. christmas has been saved. christmas has been saved, at this point in time. more than 2,500 temporary workers will be arriving in the uk in the coming days. that's about half as many as the industry originally was asking for. but it should be enough — partly because fewer birds have been reared this year, because some farmers were worried about getting enough staff. so, will there be enough turkeys to go round? there will definitely be enough turkeys for christmas. and i think there will be a focus on whole birds
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and very— simple crowns and roasts. this streamlining of our product choice has helped us in terms of overall volume. amid all the supply—chain problems, turkeys, at least, are now back on track, but the industry's calling for a permanent solution to ensure it gets the seasonal workers it needs. emma simpson, bbc news, chelmsford. adele has revealed she was "embarrassed" by her divorce. speaking to oprah winfrey, ahead of the release of her latest album, the star said she felt like she had "disrespected" the idea of marriage when she separated from her husband, simon konecki, in 2018. she added that "terrifying anxiety attacks" after the divorce prompted her to adopt an exercise and weight loss regime over the next two years. there are some flashing images in this report. this was adele's first tv interview about the release of her new album. she said because her own dad left when she was just two, she had
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promised herself that whatever happened, when she had children, she would always stay with her partner. what do you think the deep wound from the past from you as a little girl growing up, you are trying to heal as you reach for your relationships as an adult woman? mr; relationships as an adult woman? my dad's absolute lack of presence and effort _ dad's absolute lack of presence and effort with — dad's absolute lack of presence and effort with me. but as i got older, i effort with me. but as i got older, idefiniteiy— effort with me. but as i got older, i definitely understood that it was the alcohol, it wasn't a choice that he was necessarily making himself that he _ he was necessarily making himself that he didn't want... but when you are little. _ that he didn't want... but when you are little, you don't know. she that he didn't want. .. but when you are little, you don't know.— are little, you don't know. she told orah she are little, you don't know. she told oprah she was _ are little, you don't know. she told oprah she was embarrassed - are little, you don't know. she told oprah she was embarrassed her i oprah she was embarrassed her marriage of eight years crumbled and said it felt like that meant she was disrespecting the institution of marriage. tt disrespecting the institution of marria . e. . , disrespecting the institution of marriaue. . , , disrespecting the institution of marriaue. , ., , marriage. it was 'ust exhausting t in: to marriage. it was 'ust exhausting trying to like — marriage. it wasjust exhausting trying to like keep _ marriage. it wasjust exhausting trying to like keep going - marriage. it wasjust exhausting trying to like keep going with i marriage. it wasjust exhausting trying to like keep going with it. j trying to like keep going with it. it's trying to like keep going with it. it's a _ trying to like keep going with it. it's a process, the process of a divorce. — it's a process, the process of a divorce. the _ it's a process, the process of a divorce, the process of being a single — divorce, the process of being a single parent. the process of not seeing _ single parent. the process of not seeing your child every single day wasn't _ seeing your child every single day wasn't really a plan that i had when
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i wasn't really a plan that i had when i became _ wasn't really a plan that i had when i became a — wasn't really a plan that i had when i became a mum.— wasn't really a plan that i had when i became a mum. adele also revealed she had suffered _ i became a mum. adele also revealed she had suffered a _ she had suffered a paralysing anxiety attacks after her divorce and only started going to the gym mainly to control the stress. it led to her losing over seven stone in two years, but crucially, she said, it helped her mental health. tt it helped her mental health. it became my time, me having a plan every— became my time, me having a plan every day— became my time, me having a plan every day when i had no plans, i had no idea _ every day when i had no plans, i had no idea what— every day when i had no plans, i had no idea what each day was going to bring _ no idea what each day was going to bring for— no idea what each day was going to bring for me, but me knowing at 9am i bring for me, but me knowing at 9am iwouid _ bring for me, but me knowing at 9am iwouid go _ bring for me, but me knowing at 9am iwouid go to— bring for me, but me knowing at 9am i would go to the gym, 0k, great, that gives — i would go to the gym, 0k, great, that gives me some discipline. at 1pm. _ that gives me some discipline. at 1pm, i— that gives me some discipline. at ipnr. i go — that gives me some discipline. at 1pm, i go for a that gives me some discipline. at 1pm, i go fora hike. having that gives me some discipline. at 1pm, i go for a hike. having these pins in— 1pm, i go for a hike. having these pins in my— 1pm, i go for a hike. having these pins in my day helped me keep myself together~ _ pins in my day helped me keep myself together. you pins in my day helped me keep myself touether. ., �* , ., ., together. you weren't starting out t in: to together. you weren't starting out trying to lose _ together. you weren't starting out trying to lose weight? _ together. you weren't starting out trying to lose weight? no, - together. you weren't starting out trying to lose weight? no, not i together. you weren't starting out trying to lose weight? no, not at. trying to lose weight? no, not at all, i trying to lose weight? no, not at all. i wasn't _ trying to lose weight? no, not at all, i wasn't bothered _ trying to lose weight? no, not at all, i wasn't bothered about i trying to lose weight? no, not at all, i wasn't bothered about that| trying to lose weight? no, not at l all, i wasn't bothered about that at all, i wasn't bothered about that at all. but _ all, i wasn't bothered about that at all. but in — all, i wasn't bothered about that at all, but in that process of having lost all _ all, but in that process of having lost all that weight, i definitely really— lost all that weight, i definitely really contributed towards me getting — really contributed towards me getting my mind right and giving mew _ getting my mind right and giving mew it— getting my mind right and giving me... it shop and everything. without— me... it shop and everything. without a _ me... it shop and everything. without a shadow of the doubt. it .ave without a shadow of the doubt. it gave me — without a shadow of the doubt. it gave me a — without a shadow of the doubt. it gave me a real purpose.- without a shadow of the doubt. it gave me a real purpose. adele and orah. time for a look at the weather.
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here's sarah keith lucas.

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