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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 5, 2021 5:00am-5:31am GMT

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this is bbc world news, i'm lucy grey. our top stories... president biden and president putin agree to hold talks as russia's military build—up on the ukrainian border sends tensions soaring. the parents of a teenager suspected of a deadly school shooting have pleaded �*not guilty�* to involuntary manslaughter — after they were found hiding in a basement. the uk tightens its travel rules — as the omicron variant continues to spread. from tuesday, all arrivals will need a pre—departure covid test. the us network cnn fires its leading anchor, chris cuomo — the brother of the former governor of new york. and — the closures among britain's smaller abattoirs — causing a crisis for farmers, and the rural economy. we have a special report. there has to be a purpose where
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you are making money, looking after the livestock, producing things that customers want to buy and be happy with but it reaches a point where it's too difficult to do that, you must stop. hello and welcome to bbc news. president biden is due to hold a video call next week with vladimir putin amid growing fears that russia may be preparing to launch a full scale invasion of ukraine. tensions between russia and ukraine have been building for some time in the wake of russia's annexation of crimea. these are ukrainian troops stationed in the donietsk region on the russian border. on friday, ukraine warned that russia is massing more than 90,000 troops on the other side — it's saying its intelligence analysis points to a possible invasion at the end
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of january next year. bbc russian senior correspondent 0lga ivshina has been telling us what to expect from these talks. ukraine is the heart of this matter, and what's interesting is that recently, mr putin, during one of his public speeches, actually gave a hint that in a way he's enjoying this tension, enjoying this build—up of pressure and he said, you know, "yes, we've seen that. there are a lot of intelligent reports from the western side, yes, we've seen that. there is lots of harsh rhetoric on the other side, but they should be worried. that's actually what we need." so, in a way, you know, he's enjoying this nervous situation in the west, but also, he needs it from an internal point of view, from the internal political point of view, because russia's economy is struggling, coronavirus cases are on the rise, so in order to distract attention from things which are going wrong inside the country, he definitely needs this
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international arena, these challenges on the just to show that, "listen, we have enemies outside. let's concentrate on that." it actually mirrors, in a way, russia's strategy back in 2007—08 before the russian—georgian war. back then, russia gave a lot of passports to people who need them in georgian regions, and then when the tension started, they said, "we'rejust defending russian citizens. you know, we must do that." so russia is, in a way, repeating that trick currently in eastern ukraine, in the regions which are not controlled by kyiv at the moment. this gives them some changes economically because they need to pay them a pension, some social guarantees, but it gives them a lot of trumps on their sleeves in terms of foreign policy. the parents of a 15—year—old boy accused of killing four fellow students in the us state of michigan, have pleaded not guilty to charges of involuntary manslaughter.
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prosecutors say ethan crumbley carried out the shooting at his school on tuesday with a semi—automatic pistol, which had been bought by his father. peter bowes reports. in prison and up to a $7,500 fine, and mandatory dna. in court, via video, james and jennifer crumbley wept as the charges were read. four counts of involuntary manslaughter. earlier, the authorities offered a $20,000 reward for information leading to the couple's arrest. they'd missed a scheduled court appearance, prompting a massive search by the authorities. they were found hiding in the basement of a warehouse after a tip—off from someone who saw their car. they were in a commercial building, in a room. we were able to take them into custody without incident, however they were very distressed as they were walking out. prosecutors say the couple are culpable in the alleged crime of their teenage son because they ignored a sequence of events, including the concerns of teachers, that
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ethan crumbley might be about to use a gun. hours before the shooting, teachers raised the alarm after they spotted a drawing by the boy depicting a gun and a bloody scene with the words, "the thoughts won't stop, help me". in another section of the note was a drawing of a bullet with the following words above, "blood everywhere". this is an unusual case in a country that has wrestled with the scourge of school shootings for decades. ethan crumbley is accused of murdering four classmates — hannah saintjuliana wasjust 14; tate myre, i6; madison baldwin and justin schilling, both 17. if found guilty, he faces a maximum sentence of life without parole. his parents could be sent to prison for up to 15 years. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles. the uk's health secretary, sajid javid, has announced a further tightening of travel restrictions in response to the 0micron variant of covid.
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anyone arriving in the uk, will require proof of a negative test, taken before departure. it means britain isjoining a long list of countries who are tightening restrictions — including the us — which announced similiar rules last week. 0ur political correspondent, ben wright, reports. travellers arriving into london on eurostar trains this evening did not need to take a covid test before boarding, but from 4am on tuesday morning the rules change. everyone entering the uk will have to show proof of a negative test, whether they've been vaccinated or not. we are seeing an increasing number of cases linked to travel and we've always said we will act swiftly if we need to, if the changing data requires that, and that's why i've decided to bring in this change on pre—departure tests. i stress these are temporary measures. we want to remove them as soon as we possibly can, but before we learn more about 0micron, it's right that we have these
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measures in place. passengers will have to take a pcr or lateral flow test within 48 hours of getting on a train, boat or plane. it's an abrupt change of tack by the government. earlier this week, downing street said any further restrictions would have a detrimental effect on the travel industry and passengers. labour had called for pre—departure tests since tuesday. we know from the first wave and from the delta wave that the pandemic accelerates when you have lots and lots of different, new cases seeding here from abroad and that's why we just need this basic simple thing of a test before people get onto the aeroplane, and that's why it's really just so disappointing that the government has left it until nearly two weeks after 0micron was first identified. i'm glad they have now u—turned, but they should move much faster on these covid border measures. the arrival of the 0micron variant had already prompted a change to travel rules with passengers required
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to take a pcr test within two days of landing in the uk. the latest move has caused dismay within the industry. i think it's a step too far. i think it will damage consumer confidence because yet again you've got another layer of complexity being added to travel. government approved quarantine hotels are set to get busier too. nigeria becomes the 11th country to be added to the growing travel red list, from early monday uk and irish citizens arriving from nigeria must self—isolate for ten days at their own expense. while bolstering the borders might help slow the spread of the new variant, vaccines are the first line of defence. let's get some of the day's other news thousands of people have been evacuated from india's eastern 0disha and andruh pradesh states as a storm approaches. cyclone jawad is expected to make landfall on sunday. people have been told to stay away from coastal areas.
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st mark's square in venice was flooded on saturday morning after high tides swept through the city. the one—metre high tide left the square submerged but did not stop tourists going for a stroll. the high tide though was still not enough to activate the mose flood barriers, which were launched last year. cnn says it has fired its news anchor chris cuomo because of the help he gave his brother, the former new york governor andrew cuomo, in fighting allegations of sexual misconduct. in a statement cnn said they had commissioned an independent review of chris cuomo's involvement with his brother's defence, and additional information had come to light, and they had terminated his contract, effective immediately. on twitter, chris cuomo has posted: "this is not how i wanted my time at cnn to end but i have already told you why and how i helped my brother." he goes on to thank his team at cnn. jeremy barr, media reporter at the washington post, has been telling me
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what led to the dismissal. the whole thing has been very sudden and urgent and we knew on tuesday that cnn had suspended cuomo, which was itself, very surprising. for a few months, this has been an uncomfortable situation for cnn, chris cuomo had admitted he had helped his brother and his defence from sexual misconduct allegations. the network had let it lie. on monday, they got several hundred pages of new documents from the attorney general investigation which showed in detail that his brother, chris, was very involved, he was suggesting statements that could be issued, he was weighing in on media coverage and contacting journalists, basically trying to get leads about possible negative stories. that was monday. the network said they needed time to review the matter on monday. on tuesday, they suspended him indefinitely which was very surprising. he is their biggest host at 9pm which is the biggest hour on american cable tv.
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he is the big guy at 9pm. four days later after the suspension, out of nowhere, the network announces that they have conducted an investigation using an outside law firm which we also did not know, and that the additional information had come to light that required them to terminate him. very surprising development. it wasn'tjust in the way they phrased it, the executives saying they realised, they understood the need to put his brotherfirst before hisjob, didn't they, that was a really strong backing? i think they liked having an anchor who was that connected to a big democratic politician, famous in the us, it made the show feel more relevant, i think, but it also was a huge ethical issue and cnn had been dealing with this controversy for a while, journalists in the network were not happy about it but essentially, the networks felt they had been misled about the extent of his participation.
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these documents on monday basically made cnn, from my conversations with them, feel cuomo had not said exactly what he had done and that it looked worse now, and that they were kind of made to look a bit like a fool for having trusted it was just a casual conversation between brothers. there was pressure from victims groups as well? absolutely. it looked bad for the network, it was a distraction because cnn is a very legendary journalism brand, known for impartiality, moreso than say, nbc and fox. and having a 9pm host that had been intimately involved with pushing back on accusations of sexual misconduct, it was a bad look for the network but they were loyal to cuomo and they wanted to give him a second chance. and then this investigation happened and the new additional information came out which the network has not said what that is yet. that really is what it hinges on, what else did they find out during that very quick investigation.
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a six—year—old boy, who was the only survivor of a cable car crash in italy, has returned there after being smuggled to israel by his grandfather. israel's supreme court rejected a final appeal to let him stay. eitan biran was living in italy at the time of the accident that killed his parents, his younger brother and his great—grandparents. jatinder dhillon reports. it was a heart—rending story. back in may, a cable car crashed in northern italy and everyone inside was killed. except for one boy. six—year—old eitan biran was saved by his father's protective hug, his parents, younger brother and great—grandparents were among the 14 who died in the accident. what then followed was months of a bitter custody battle for eitan between his italian and israeli families. an italian court gave
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guardianship to his paternal aunt, an israeli—born doctor who lives in italy. but in september, eitan�*s maternal grandfather smuggled the boy to israel where he lives. the grandfather had visitation rights. he took his grandson out for the day, travelled with him by car to switzerland, and then flew to tel aviv in a privatejet, using the boy's israeli passport. eitan�*s aunt petitioned the israeli family court for his return to italy. then in october, the israeli court found that the grandfather's actions had amounted to kidnapping under the hague convention on the return of abducted children. a final appeal was rejected by the israeli supreme court last month. and at the weekend, eitan returned to italy to live with his aunt. the lawyers for the aunt welcomed the ruling.
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translation: we hope l the spotlight on the child's private life can now be turned off to protect his privacy and a new chapter will begin to allow him to grow up more easily. it's even more necessary now after the terrible tragedy he experienced. the grandfather insists his actions were legal and in the boy's best interests. but the italian authorities are now pursuing kidnapping charges against him. meanwhile, he says the family will continue to fight to return eitan to israel but it's not clear what legal options are available to them in the italian courts. this is bbc news, the latest headlines... president biden and president putin have agreed to hold talks —
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as russia's military build—up on the ukrainian border sends tensions soaring. the parents of a teenager suspected of a deadly school shooting have pleaded �*not guilty�* to involuntary manslaughter — after they were found hiding in a basement. as europe is experiencing a fourth wave of covid restrictions following the 0micron variant — many countries in asia pacific like singapore and australia are slowly opening up. but after getting used to being apart for so long how will we cope with being together again? and what if we've forgotten how to socialise — especially during the holiday season? kate reynolds, professor of psychology at the australian national university in canberra has some answers for us. this idea of a shrinking world effect. when things like lockdown has happened, people feel a bit more unsafe, interacting with different people and interacting in different places and i guess here in australia, we are just coming out of lockdown and still waiting to hear what might happen with omicron but at the moment, people are trying to reconnect. i guess for some people, they might assess their risks very
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differently, some people are still wearing masks in spaces where they do not necessarily have to and i guess all of that is about people taking measures to keep themselves safe. that tension within friendship groups is interesting because you can go and meet a group of people, there may be some who would not like to be inside, they would like to be out having a walk, others who try and hug you, socially it's quite tricky to navigate without offending people. it's much easier when we all knew the rules and were doing more or less the same things but i think people are slowly getting used to it again. some people might be taking small measures, going to places they may not have been for a while, spending short periods of time there, getting reacquainted, feeling safe in those places again and trying to reconnect with others, maybe having coffee instead of a long lunch but it is an awkward period and people are making decisions based on their own risk assessment and i think we all need to see that
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as being 0k. people are making light of it. it doesn't feel like a hugely serious thing to discuss when you turn up and say, are we hugging? but for some people, you are thinking about life or death in that situation, almost, aren't you? maybe we need some new codes to signal some of that but it is going to be a little bit awkward for a while. here in australia lots of people are focused on summer holidays, travelling, reconnecting over this holiday season. i think that gives them something to focus on and talk about which is not about the past, lockdown, but about the future but omicron is really throwing a spanner in the works. i'm sure people are feeling uncertain and fearful again. getting some more guidance about that i think will help. it's that uncertainty all the while that is unsettling for people. perhaps if you are predisposed to anxiety anyway. but not knowing whether you can
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make plans, not knowing whether if next week things will totally change again, you get used to one thing and then everything changes, it's all so up in the air all time, isn't it? i think it is, people need to recognise it is an uncertain period. there are variants and responses to covid—i9 that are not behind us yet. and i think it's going to be a real challenge for people day to day but also to sort of shape health behaviour again. we do know people are willing to do the right things if they think the request is legitimate. if they see other people doing them. if they think it's going to make a difference, that's efficacy, and also if they are showing empathy, if again, they sense what they do could affect another person. all of that is probably coming to the fore again and it's really going to put some pressure on health officials to be driving the messages through this time.
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indonesia's disaster management agency says 13 people are now known to have died after a volcano erupted on the island of java on saturday. dozens of people have been injured — videos posted on social media show people running from approaching clouds of ash from mount semeru. the volcano has been in a state of near constant eruption for decades. in recent years, numerous small and medium—sized abattoirs in the uk have closed and there are concerns more may follow. as gareth barlow, himself a former slaughterman reports, there are warnings that if more are lost, there may be significant consequences for rural economies. the north york moors. it's a landscape with agriculture at its heart. but for farmers like peter mawson, that's under threat. the majority of it is grazing land. he had to stop raising livestock after his local abattoir closed. the pigs went for good reason. there has to be a purpose, where you're making money,
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looking after the livestock, producing things that customers will buy and be happy with. but it reaches a point where, when it's too difficult to do that, you must stop. many smaller slaughterhouses struggle to stay open and for some farmers the lack of abattoirs able to slaughter and butcher their animals is undermining their business. and supplying direct to consumers is often far more profitable. to give you an overview idea, it might be three times as much income. it depends who i sell to, how i sell the carcass, so parts of it going to a restaurant would earn you less than all of it going to consumers. i've become the price—maker as opposed to the price—taker. in the 1970s there were just over 1100 red meat abattoirs in the uk. last year that figure was down to just over 200. this is one of the uk's small abattoirs. it's the abattoir that i used to work in.
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it's obviously closed now. this is where the livestock would have arrived. they would have come through then into here. this unit's closed and so are three more within 20 miles of here. all of their services lost from the rural economy. across the sector, abattoir owners point to finding staff, conforming to what they say are outdated regulations, and just remaining profitable, as constant challenges. but despite that, opportunities remain. abattoirs might have closed but not all of those businesses have closed. they're still there. they're now cutting plants, using the other abattoirs to do their processing for them, so it's quite a complex picture. so we've got a range of different... - smaller abattoirs often provide services larger sites can't offer, enabling producers to have carcasses butchered and delivered to other businesses. and with the government's financial support for farmers reducing, for many farms being able to supply direct to buyers and maximise profit will be increasingly vital for their survival.
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farmers have diversified - and they've got burger bars, farm shops, farmers' . markets, box schemes. a whole range of rural- businesses are dependent on having this service from us. abattoirs are often overlooked. they're the unglamorous part of the food supply chain. but without them and without smaller units that support local economies, there's a real risk that farms and the countryside may be forced into significant change. gareth barlow, bbc news. now for a story about what a bit of fancy footwork can get you. for one group of friends from leicester, it led to roles in a hollywood blockbuster. they responded to an advert for bollywood dancers and found themselves in the latest marvel movie — "eternals". heidi booth went to meet them. a show stopping slice of bollywood thanks to some fancy footwork in leicester.—
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footwork in leicester. being on set and around _ footwork in leicester. being on set and around these _ footwork in leicester. being on set and around these people, | set and around these people, that's something i hadn't really experienced on that scale ever before. for me, as a dancer, to get that chance to be a part of something that i love watching so much. if someone told me you're going to be in a marvel movie doing bollywood dancing, i would never have believed it. it's unreal. , , unreal. the friends responded to an advert — unreal. the friends responded to an advert looking _ unreal. the friends responded to an advert looking for - to an advert looking for professional south asian dancers. they had no idea it was for a marvel film until they got to the additions. once we found out _ they got to the additions. once we found out it _ they got to the additions. once we found out it was _ they got to the additions. once we found out it was marble, i they got to the additions. once we found out it was marble, it| we found out it was marble, it was _ we found out it was marble, it wasjust— we found out it was marble, it wasjust the thrill of we found out it was marble, it was just the thrill of knowing we are — was just the thrill of knowing we are going to be in a marvel movie~ — we are going to be in a marvel movie all_ we are going to be in a marvel movie. all four of us that auditioned to get the role, it was — auditioned to get the role, it wasjust_ auditioned to get the role, it wasjust insane. an insane feeling, _ wasjust insane. an insane feeling, the excitement in the way back, we were all in the carjourney on the way back knowing _ carjourney on the way back knowing that this is actually reality— knowing that this is actually reality now. knowing that this is actually reality now— knowing that this is actually reality now. knowing that this is actually reali now. ., ., ' reality now. they are among 51 south asian — reality now. they are among 51 south asian bollywood - reality now. they are among 51 south asian bollywood dancers who feature in the new eternal
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is movie alongside this lead actor. ., ., , actor. katz, ok. that is good. it was amazing, _ actor. katz, ok. that is good. it was amazing, such - actor. katz, ok. that is good. it was amazing, such a - actor. katz, ok. that is good. it was amazing, such a good l it was amazing, such a good experience. it was nice to be able — experience. it was nice to be able to— experience. it was nice to be able to share that set and the stage — able to share that set and the stage and the experience with so many— stage and the experience with so many other dancers. this is the first time _ so many other dancers. this is the first time this _ so many other dancers. this is the first time this many - the first time this many british— the first time this many british south— the first time this many british south asian - the first time this many - british south asian dancers have — british south asian dancers have been— british south asian dancers have been in— british south asian dancers have been in a _ british south asian dancers have been in a hollywood l british south asian dancers - have been in a hollywood movie this bit} — have been in a hollywood movie this bit} it— have been in a hollywood movie this hit} it is— have been in a hollywood movie this big. it is marble, _ have been in a hollywood movie this big. it is marble, we - have been in a hollywood movie this big. it is marble, we madel this big. it is marble, we made it in— this big. it is marble, we made it in the — this big. it is marble, we made it in the mcu, _ this big. it is marble, we made it in the mcu, we _ this big. it is marble, we made it in the mcu, we really- it in the mcu, we really did make — it in the mcu, we really did make history— it in the mcu, we really did make history and _ it in the mcu, we really did make history and this - it in the mcu, we really did make history and this is- it in the mcu, we really didl make history and this isjust the beginning. _ make history and this isjust the beginning. i'm- make history and this isjust the beginning. i'm really- the beginning. i'm really excited _ the beginning. i'm really excited to— the beginning. i'm really excited to see _ the beginning. i'm really excited to see what - the beginning. i'm really. excited to see what comes the beginning. i'm really- excited to see what comes out of it _ excited to see what comes out of it. ~ ., of it. with the film now in cinemas _ of it. with the film now in cinemas they _ of it. with the film now in cinemas they can - of it. with the film now in cinemas they can finally l of it. with the film now in - cinemas they can finally shout about being part of such a huge moment. , ., ., , ,., about being part of such a huge moment. , ., ., , . moment. everyone was so excited when it could _ moment. everyone was so excited when it could happen. _ moment. everyone was so excited when it could happen. well- when it could happen. well worth the _ when it could happen. well worth the wait. _ when it could happen. well worth the wait. so - when it could happen. well worth the wait. so monumental. the actor— worth the wait. so monumental. the actor we were working with, such _ the actor we were working with, such a _ the actor we were working with, such a big — the actor we were working with, such a big step forward for south _ such a big step forward for south asians around the world. we get — south asians around the world. we get to— south asians around the world. we get to be the ones who represent that culture and bring _ represent that culture and bring it— represent that culture and bring it to the big screen.
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that is all for me. thank you so much for watching. goodbye. hello there. it's been very cold everywhere across the uk on saturday. we've seen increasing amounts of snow across southern southeast scotland and across northern england, mainly over the pennines. sunday is also going to be another cold day, maybe not quite as cold cos the winds won't be as strong as saturday, and there will be further rain. most of the rain towards the eastern side of the country. we've still got that cold air mass across the uk, but like i mentioned, the winds won't be quite as strong across northern and western areas, thanks to this ridge of high pressure. these weather fronts across the east and certainly the northeast will bring further rain. so it could be quite wet again across southeast scotland into the northeast of england. that rain continues through the day to bring localised flooding in places and further winteriness over the high ground.
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further south, i think most of the showers will slowly ease down through the day, but will leave a legacy of cloud. the winds quite strong across the eastern side of the country. but apart from the odd shower further north and west, there should be quite a bit of sunshine around here with light winds, shouldn't feel too bad — top temperatures 9—10 celsius across the far southwest and into the channel islands. looks like that rain will eventually ease away for a time through sunday night, but then we look to the west, a new frontal system will work its way in to bring another band of rain, and again, we will see some sleet and snow over the pennines across the scottish hills as it bumps into the cold air. but the east of england will stay dry until later in the morning. so, this frontal system will work its way eastwards across the country through monday, then it turns colder again with a run of west—north westerly winds, which will be quite strong feeding in plenty of showers. so, quite wet across much of the country through monday morning, that rain eventually clears off into the north sea, taking the mountain snow with it. and then it's a brighter afternoon for many with some blustery showers, some of these will be heavy and frequent across the northwest and turning increasingly
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wintry once again. it's a blustery day, those are mean wind speeds — gusts will be high, particularly around some irish sea coasts. and it will feel chilly again, temperatures of 3—8 celsius. then we look to the atlantic, the potential of this deep area of low pressure to develop and hurtle in towards ireland, and then, the uk as we push through tuesday and wednesday. still some uncertainty with its track, but i'm pretty sure it could bring some wet and very windy weather on tuesday and wednesday, so do stay tuned to the forecast.
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this is bbc news,
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the headlines: president biden and russian leader vladimir putin have agreed to hold talks after weeks of rising tension over ukraine. the discussions will take place via video call on tuesday. russia has recently boosted its military presence near ukraine's border, but denied that it's preparing an attack. the parents of a teenager accused of killing four fellow students in the us state of michigan have pleaded not guilty to charges of involuntary manslaughter. theirson, ethan, is accused of carrying out the high—school shooting, with a semi—automatic pistol bought by his father. cnn says it's fired news anchor chris cuomo because of the help he gave his brother, former new york governor andrew cuomo, in fighting allegations of sexual misconduct. the claims forced andrew to step down as governor in august. next on bbc news, dontae sharpe spent 26 years in a us prison
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in north carolina for a murder he did not commit.

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