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tv   Sportsday  BBC News  March 3, 2022 6:30pm-7:01pm GMT

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thank you, sophie. a million people have now fled this country since the russian invasion began. almost all of them are women and children. more than half have gone to poland and many are travelling by train through the western ukrainian city of lviv just over a0 miles from the border. lviv isn't occupied for now but there are people living there who know all too well what it means to be invaded. it is relentless. in a station where they load aid for the embattled armies in the east, and coming the other way, families propelled into exile by president putin's war. these are roma gypsies who fled the russian advance from kharkiv 1000 kilometres to the russian advance from kharkiv1000 kilometres to the east. what is it
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like in kharkiv? translation: ., , translation: the war, it is difficult. everything - translation: the war, it is difficult. everything is - translation: the war, it is | difficult. everything is burning, everything is destroyed. no one is listening to us, no one wants to help us. listening to us, no one wants to hel us. , . . listening to us, no one wants to hel us. , ., ., , help us. his daughter sonia says it is terrible- — help us. his daughter sonia says it is terrible. the _ help us. his daughter sonia says it is terrible. the roma _ help us. his daughter sonia says it is terrible. the roma have - help us. his daughter sonia says it is terrible. the roma have an - is terrible. the roma have an inherited memory of war trauma. tens of thousands were murdered by the nazis in world war ii. and this city of lviv, a crossroads of east and west, xi one of the worst programmes directed atjews. it's not about trying to draw exact parallels, but if you are somebody who has a personal lived experience of that terrible time, then this is a period
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of increased anxiety. history casting a long, deep shadow. i met someone in lviv who grew up in the shadow of trauma. tatiana is 8a years old, a survivor of the holocaust. now tatiana has family who are trapped in kyiv.
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lviv is the city where lawyers first discussed the very concept of genocide and crimes against humanity. it is a city of thinkers. like historian sofia, who now helps refugees and worries for ukraine and the world. you refugees and worries for ukraine and the world. ., u, ., , the world. you cannot rebuild life which was killed, _ the world. you cannot rebuild life which was killed, and _ the world. you cannot rebuild life which was killed, and the - the world. you cannot rebuild lifel which was killed, and the question for us is what kind of world we want to live in in the future. the world where, because of, you know,
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geopolitical situation and world order, we can pay the price for human lives. i think this is about here and it's about syria, it's about so many places in the world. at the station, a volunteer place ukraine's national anthem. the history of lviv is a story of survival but also war�*s immense continuing cost. fergal keane, bbc news, lviv. the humanitarian crisis there as a result of this. let's get a final word from lyse doucet. russia is a proud nation, but it is a pariah state now as a result of all of this. , ., ., , . ., ., this. there is not a sector of society which _ this. there is not a sector of society which seems - this. there is not a sector of society which seems to - this. there is not a sector of society which seems to have this. there is not a sector of - society which seems to have been untouched by this war where we are in ukraine. i have never seen a war where everyone wants to stand up and
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be counted. presidents and prime ministers, bankers and business executives, athletes from vegas —— figure skaters to tennis stars, symphonies are playing ukrainian music, even the cat federation decided to ban russian breeds of cats. this war has gone viral, and everyone is thinking, how does the war in ukraine affect me and what i do? what are the principles at stake here? we have talked a lot and defence ministers talk about the territorial sovereignty, the integrity of borders, freedom of the press, respecting geneva conventions against not targeting civilians in war, but this has touched a chord in a way i haven't seen, any of us have seenin a way i haven't seen, any of us have seen in a long time, and it is going to keep striking that card because the war has only entered its second week. �* , ., , ,
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the war has only entered its second week. �*, .,y ,, that's all from the bbc news at six — so it's goodbye from me and on bbc one we nowjoin the bbc�*s news teams where you are. have a very good evening.
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welcome back to bbc news. i'm lu kwesa i'm lukwesa burak. let's recap now on the day's main developments so far. this afternoon, ukraine's president zelensky has asked vladimir putin for one—to—one talks. russia's president insists military operations in ukraine are going according to plan and praised its soldiers as heroes.a and praised its soldiers as heroes. a second session of talks has begun
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this afternoon between ukraine and russian officials. 0n the ground, kyiv remains under ukrainian control, but the port of kherson has now been taken by the russians. 0n the ground, kyiv remains under ukrainian control, but the port of kherson has now been taken by the russians. ukrainian officials say at least 33 civilians have been killed in a russian airstrike on the northern ukrainian city of chernihiv. the southeastern city of mariupol is under intense pressure — with the mayor reporting that the russians are using siege tactics. people trapped there have no running water and no power, and after a night of shelling, dozens are feared dead. those are the updates there today. we're going to talk now about an
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aspect of the conflict in ukraine. it's not immediately obvious to the eye, but our next guest will say it is a crucial element. doctor tom willington �*s own expert in electronic warfare. what is electronic warfare. what is electronic warfare. what is electronic warfare mean exactly? that's a very good question. i like to use the analogy of the human body. if you think about a military, the brains of the soldiers, that is the brains of the soldiers, that is the brain of the army. the limbs are the brain of the army. the limbs are the weapons, the ships, the aircraft, the bullets and bombs. the electronic spectrum and radio is the nervous system, and it's also the way that body senses. and it's the
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only area of warfare that human beings cannot perceive — we cannot taste it, hear it or see it. the spectrum, which is why radio waves reside, and they carry orders to soldiers, sending them back to their commanders to make decisions. that's why electronic warfare's so important, because it targets that use of the electromagnetic spectrum. how would you say it has been used in this conflict so far? have you seen evidence of it? can you pinpoint it by looking at development on the ground? well, like our development on the ground? well, like your colleagues, _ development on the ground? well, like your colleagues, it's _ development on the ground? well, like your colleagues, it's very - like your colleagues, it's very difficult to get very definitive information now, but what we are seeing is a surprising lack in some ways of russia's attempts to control that radio spectrum, to attack it and ensure that ukrainians cannot use it to their own advantage. at a very superficial level, we see
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mobile footage coming out and people using the internet, we see on your reports communications. all these technologies rely on the use of radio. in previous wars, in syria and ukraine from 201a, the russians worked very hard to attack that radio. this time around so far, we haven't seen that to such an extent. it has been happening, but not at the same extent, and that raises some very interesting questions and potentially has a good advantage to the ukrainians.— the ukrainians. there is a map that ou ut the ukrainians. there is a map that you put together. _ the ukrainians. there is a map that you put together, so _ the ukrainians. there is a map that you put together, so hopefully, - the ukrainians. there is a map that| you put together, so hopefully, this will illustrate what we're talking about. this looks like areas where you believe... describe it, what are we looking at? it’s you believe. .. describe it, what are we looking at?— we looking at? it's very kind of you to showcase _ we looking at? it's very kind of you to showcase my — we looking at? it's very kind of you to showcase my haphazard - we looking at? it's very kind of you | to showcase my haphazard artwork. the blue shaded areas, myself and my
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colleagues have made on the size of the electronic warfare coverage. the russian units in those areas could be able to execute. what that would mean effectively is that any radio or radar within those blue circles could be attacked. what we call that is jamming, so we use interference to stop those radios working, a bit like when you're in the car and the radio stopped working in the tunnel. those blue spheres are aiming to give an idea of where that electronic warfare coverage could be. they could correlate roughly where units are based on the moment. it is hypothetical. but hopefully gives people an idea of how that kind of electronic warfare can operate. kind of electronic warfare can 0 erate. �* , kind of electronic warfare can oerate. �* , ., , , ., operate. i'm sure many people who have been following _ operate. i'm sure many people who have been following this crisis - have been following this crisis have picked up on the story of elon musk
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being brought into it. what is it and how is that helping? starling is and how is that helping? starling is an interesting _ and how is that helping? starling is an interesting technology. - and how is that helping? starling is an interesting technology. at - and how is that helping? starling is an interesting technology. at the l an interesting technology. at the constellation of micro satellites. mr hislop —— his idea is to cover the world with it —— starlink. anyone can have internet broadband coverage, not using cell phone towers. just simply beaming there traffic and messages to these little satellites above them, and the terminals he's supplying as a way of ensuring ukrainians can have access to the internet. should the russians be able to cut off ukraine's links to the outside world, that kind of thing. one of the things from what i've heard about the way that starlink works as it can be quite difficult to jam, so that's obviously another advantage for ukrainians who can use those
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terminals and use them to put this into any compact. you want the good guys to use it, but you don't want the bad guys too, so that will be a challenge, but it's interesting to see how it plays out.— see how it plays out. couldn't electronic— see how it plays out. couldn't electronic warfare _ see how it plays out. couldn't electronic warfare essentially | see how it plays out. couldn't - electronic warfare essentially end a war was yellow it sounds very powerful. it war was yellow it sounds very powerful-— war was yellow it sounds very owerful. , , �* ., , powerful. it probably can't on its own, but powerful. it probably can't on its own. but it _ powerful. it probably can't on its own, but it can _ powerful. it probably can't on its own, but it can certainly - powerful. it probably can't on its i own, but it can certainly contribute to the end. going back to the second world war, montgomery said if we lose the war in the air, we lose the whole war and quickly. i think to an extent, that's the case with the electronic spectrum. it's hard to see how a modern military can fight efficiently if it is denied access to radio. coupled with other aspects
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on the battlefield such as the ukrainian army's ability to manoeuvre quickly, to manoeuvre advantageously, that means attacking the russians in the way they don't expect and anticipate. it could certainly make an important contribution.— certainly make an important contribution. ., ., ~ ., contribution. doctor tom willington, it's been fascinating. _ contribution. doctor tom willington, it's been fascinating. thank- contribution. doctor tom willington, it's been fascinating. thank you - it's been fascinating. thank you very much indeed. we are going to speak to our correspondent nick urged lee, who is in westminster. —— nick eardley. we have breaking news concerning... when it comes to sanctioning oligarchs, i understand in the next few minutes, the uk government is going to confirm that two further oligarchs are being added to the
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sanctions. we've not been able to speak to either of them, but that will be confirmed in the next few minutes by the uk government, and some people might be familiar with mr usmanov. announce one of his yachts was actually seized today by officials in europe, and the other was someone who is close to president putin. you might remember that the labour leader in the commons raised that he had two properties very close to the uk parliament and there are questions over why he hadn't been added to this sanctions list as of yet. both will be added in the next few
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minutes, and assets in the uk are frozen. as i say, we will reach out to both of them for further comment from the legal teams soon. we haven't had a chance to do thatjust yet, but that news will be confirmed in the next few minutes. {lilia yet, but that news will be confirmed in the next few minutes.— in the next few minutes. 0k, nick, thank ou in the next few minutes. 0k, nick, thank you very _ in the next few minutes. 0k, nick, thank you very much. _ the un has opened a probe into alleged word crimes. —— war crimes. but speak to david, who was the first united states ambassador at large for war crimes under former president bill clinton. he's currently seniorfellow president bill clinton. he's currently senior fellow at the council foreign relations. currently senior fellow at the councilforeign relations. thank you for speaking to us. can you tell us a little bit more about this? inaudible
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then the general assembly in the un human rights council, all pointing towards not only condemnation, but also setting out the investigative capabilities that it has and other atrocities around the world to gather evidence and substantiate it. of course, the real action is with the international criminal court, which has the power of responsibility against the leadership in russia, and they have have been truly activated in the last a8 hours with referrals by 39 governments. that is utterly unprecedented. it provides an enormous power left to the icc prosecutor to go into ukrainian territory. 0bviously at some risk to his teams, to gather the evidence that they can uniquely gather with the permission of the legitimate government of ukraine, and that's
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powerful, too. they're going in in real times so that before the country is perhaps occupied by the russian army, as difficult as that may be, investigative teams can be hard at work. but ijust want may be, investigative teams can be hard at work. but i just want to note, there's a lot of investigation going on by civil society, by other governments, overhead imagery being recorded hour by hour by troop movements. this is going to be an extremely well—documented condition of war crimes and progression. so, no one in moscow should pretend to think that anything is on—the—fly here. it's completely transparent. president putin seems to follow his own rule book. let'sjust say president putin seems to follow his own rule book. let's just say that all the evidence is gathered and a day in court is set. how do you get
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in there? , ., ., ,, . in there? first of all, you indict him, and that _ in there? first of all, you indict him, and that won't _ in there? first of all, you indict him, and that won't be - in there? first of all, you indict him, and that won't be that - him, and that won't be that difficult. ukraine's territory is under the international criminal court. even though ukraine is not a state party, it has provision of the court to declare and invite the international critical court to have doris —— to havejurisdiction. that is set. if even a nonparty national like putin and his leadership commit atrocity crimes on ukraine territory, the criminal law is all about territorial law, so they are committing these crimes on ukraine territory. they are subject to investigation and indictment by the international criminal court. 0nce international criminal court. once they are indicted, they're a pariah and no one will deal with them. the un can even talk with them. so, they're a pariah and the people of
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russia i think will become rather tired of that, and that then leads to the possibility of ultimately if putin of his friends —— and his friends are deposed, the possibility of surrender becomes very possible, just because we saw in serbia with melodic let mejust point let me just point out the russian people will bring this pressure, because i don't think a lot of the sanctions currently imposed on russia — and they're enormous — will be lifted until indicted fugitives from criminaljustice are surrendered to the hague. that's the motto we used in the balkans. russia will now be subjected to that methodology, mainly until they're surrendered, the sanctions remain in place. its surrendered, the sanctions remain in lace. , ., ,
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surrendered, the sanctions remain in lace. , . ~' surrendered, the sanctions remain in lace. , ., . ~' i” surrendered, the sanctions remain in lace. , ., . 4' y., , place. its fastening. thank you very much indeed- _ place. its fastening. thank you very much indeed. -- _ place. its fastening. thank you very much indeed. -- it's _ place. its fastening. thank you very much indeed. -- it's fascinating. i let's get the latest from the sporting world now. 0lly foster is at the bbc sports centre in salford. many thanks indeed. the big sanctions day really comes out of beijing on the eve of the winter paralympic games. the ipc said belarusian and russian athletes could take part. they justify that decision in a lake the statement by saying that they simply did not have the power to throw those athletes out. they talked about the power of sport ringing everybody together and saying they hope that the other nations could view them as just neutral athletes, which would they be made to compete as. should they win any medals, not be counted on the table. 2a hours on, a huge u—turn because there's
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been an outcry from the other competing nations in beijing ahead of the opening ceremony, and the ipc president says they've been put in a unique and possible situation. nations were likely to withdraw and a viable games would not have been possible. the atmosphere in the games is not pleasant. the situation is escalating and has now become untenable, so a complete u—turn of those athletes now not allowed to take part in the games. a kremlin spokesman says that it's disgusting, the decision from the ipc, and the state news agency is quoting, saying they are draughting a lawsuit to take to the court of arbitration for sport to have this overturned. but the time is running out for them to do that because the opening ceremony is less than 2a hours away.
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indeed, thank you. we're going to take a brief look at some of the news now and the uk. kevin williamson, who was twice sacked as a cabinet minister, is to receive a knighthood. mr williamson was also fired as defence secretary following an inquiry into a leak from the national security council. the a5—year—old, whose first career was manufacturing, set as the government's cheap whip. a year on since the murder of sarah everard by a serving metropolitan police officer, her family say they are "immensely grateful to everyone for their support". tonight, a march will be held in clapham in south london to remember sarah. laura moss reports. it was a crime that shocked the capital and shone a spotlight on women's safety. the kidnap, rape and murder
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of sarah everard by a serving police officer, an appalling act of violence that stunned a nation. but one year on, what's the relationship like with the police and how do women feel today in london? there is definitely still fear amongst women in the streets. madison and laura set up lambeth urban angels, offering safety advice, and organising a walk in clapham tonight to remember all victims of gendered violence. the impact that sarah everard's murder had on myself, my friends and the community in lambeth was massive. so personally, it really shocked me to my core. a lot of my friends became more wary about what they were doing, where they were going. i think everyone was much more on edge.
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jamie says there is still too much emphasis on what women need to do. why did you end up dead, not why did he kill— why did you end up dead, not why did he kill you? _ half of the society needs measured to protect _ half of the society needs measured to protect safety, we have a huge issue _ to protect safety, we have a huge issue. ., ,,., ., ., issue. the murder of sarah everard rom ted issue. the murder of sarah everard prompted a — issue. the murder of sarah everard prompted a crawl _ issue. the murder of sarah everard prompted a crawl for _ issue. the murder of sarah everard prompted a crawl for real— issue. the murder of sarah everard prompted a crawl for real change . issue. the murder of sarah everard j prompted a crawl for real change in attitude towards women safety —— a call. before her death, 260 women in london were killed where a man was the substitute. that's according from... more than half of those were partners and former partners. over the last 12 months, projects promoting women's safety have expanded across london. in islington, hundreds of businesses are putting up a safe haven signs, where people can go and ask for help when they feel vulnerable. the blackstock pub in finsbury park is one of them. unfortunately, it's not a new phenomenon that
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women haven't felt safe, but i think there is a new commitment to doing something about it. and it's not so much that you might actually use them. you don't worry because you see those signs. you don't worry because you see those signs-— you don't worry because you see thosesians. , ., , those signs. gyms are also signing u . those signs. gyms are also signing u- to a those signs. gyms are also signing no to a similar _ those signs. gyms are also signing up to a similar scheme. _ those signs. gyms are also signing up to a similar scheme. we - those signs. gyms are also signing up to a similar scheme. we have l those signs. gyms are also signing| up to a similar scheme. we have to make sure — up to a similar scheme. we have to make sure we _ up to a similar scheme. we have to make sure we address _ up to a similar scheme. we have to make sure we address men's - make sure we address men's behaviour. if my gender that's responsible, responsible for women having _ responsible, responsible for women having a _ responsible, responsible for women having a bad experience in gyms. this campaign, its support is targeting _ this campaign, its support is targeting the behaviour of men so women _ targeting the behaviour of men so women can go about our city anytime of the _ women can go about our city anytime of the day— women can go about our city anytime of the day with whatever they want to wear~ _ of the day with whatever they want to wear. ., , ., to wear. there have been other stranrer to wear. there have been other stranger attacks. _ to wear. there have been other stranger attacks. these - to wear. there have been other stranger attacks. these sisters| to wear. there have been other- stranger attacks. these sisters were killed in a park in 2020. wayne couzens abused his position
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to kidnap sarah everard. he will spend the rest of his life in prison. inquiries are being carried out, and the met has lots it's violence —— we watched it back violent action plan. irate it's violence -- we watched it back violent action plan.— it's violence -- we watched it back violent action plan. we try to make sure everyone _ violent action plan. we try to make sure everyone understands - violent action plan. we try to make sure everyone understands the - sure everyone understands the issues — sure everyone understands the issues. everybody— sure everyone understands the issues. everybody understandsj sure everyone understands the - issues. everybody understands the issue _ issues. everybody understands the issue that — issues. everybody understands the issue that affects _ issues. everybody understands the issue that affects women - issues. everybody understands the issue that affects women in - issues. everybody understands the issue that affects women in termsl issues. everybody understands the l issue that affects women in terms of what difference _ issue that affects women in terms of what difference we _ issue that affects women in terms of what difference we can _ issue that affects women in terms of what difference we can make. - issue that affects women in terms of what difference we can make. but. issue that affects women in terms of what difference we can make. but as an of this what difference we can make. but as any of this working? _ what difference we can make. but as any of this working? to _ what difference we can make. but as any of this working? to women - what difference we can make. but as any of this working? to women feell any of this working? to women feel safer? ., ., ., ., , ,., safer? not alone. if i was with some more people. _ safer? not alone. if i was with some more people. so _ safer? not alone. if i was with some more people. so i— safer? not alone. if i was with some more people, so i bit— safer? not alone. if i was with some more people, so i bit -- _ safer? not alone. if i was with some more people, so i bit -- feel- safer? not alone. if i was with some more people, so i bit -- feel a bit i more people, so i bit —— feel a bit more people, so i bit —— feel a bit more at —ese. i more people, so i bit -- feel a bit more at -ese-— more people, so i bit -- feel a bit more at -ese. i wouldn't be walking. i would more at -ese. i wouldn't be walking. i would have — more at -ese. i wouldn't be walking. i would have my _ more at -ese. i wouldn't be walking. i would have my keys _ more at -ese. i wouldn't be walking. i would have my keys in _ more at -ese. i wouldn't be walking. i would have my keys in my - more at -ese. i wouldn't be walking. i would have my keys in my hand - more at -ese. i wouldn't be walking. | i would have my keys in my handjust i would have my keys in my hand just in case _ i would have my keys in my hand 'ust in case. . v i would have my keys in my hand 'ust in case, ., �*, ., , i would have my keys in my hand 'ust in case. ., �*, ., , i would have my keys in my hand 'ust incase. ., �*, ., , , in case. sarah's family say they remember _ in case. sarah's family say they remember today _ in case. sarah's family say they remember today as _ in case. sarah's family say they remember today as every - in case. sarah's family say they remember today as every day, | in case. sarah's family say they| remember today as every day, i in case. sarah's family say they - remember today as every day, i miss her all the time. they say their thoughts are also with other families who lost women —— and miss her.
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here's the weather. hello again. for many of you, it's been another grey and cloudy day. this is how the weather looks in cumbria — misty, a bit murky, low cloud and also a bit of rain in the area as well. in bingley, meanwhile, temperatures only got to 5 celsius — that's in the hills of west yorkshire. but we did have some sunshine, particularly for northern ireland, but also across parts of southeast england and in east anglia, too, where temperatures reached 13 celsius. so, contrast to the amount of cloud, contrast in the temperatures as well. still, for most of us, we had the cloudy weather thanks to this very slow—moving weather front, and the reason it's slow—moving, the front will push rain across scotland. mist and fog, maybe a bit of ice across western scotland with temperatures dipping below freezing. i think there will be more of you that have brighter, sunnier conditions with the best of the sunshine across the western side of the country through friday. that still leaves eastern scotland and england with cloud and rain never far away. cold for aberdeen and
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newcastle, further west, temperatures return double figures. know all too well what it means to be invaded. hello, i'm ros atkins, this is 0utside source. russia takes control of it's first major city in ukraine, and its bombardment continues. strikes in the north, east and south — and residents in the city of mariupol say they're under siege. they cannot rescue the injured. putin says the invasion goes on. translation: i putin says the invasion goes on. translation:— putin says the invasion goes on. translation: ., , ., ., . translation: i would never pronounce my conviction — translation: i would never pronounce my conviction that _ translation: i would never pronounce my conviction that russians _ translation: i would never pronounce my conviction that russians and - my conviction that russians and ukrainians are one people, despite part of the ukrainians having been brainwashed by the nazi nationalist propaganda. the
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brainwashed by the nazi nationalist ro “aanda. brainwashed by the nazi nationalist --roa~anda. . ., , brainwashed by the nazi nationalist --roa~anda. ., ., , propaganda. the united nations says more than 1 million _ propaganda. the united nations says more than 1 million people _ propaganda. the united nations says more than 1 million people have -

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