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tv   Newsday  BBC News  June 7, 2022 1:00am-1:31am BST

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welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore. i'm arunoday mukharji. the headlines: borisjohnson survives as britain's prime minister — but he suffers a substantial rebellion among his conservative mps the vote in favour of having confidence in borisjohnson is 211 votes in the vote against was 148 votes. and therefore, i can announce that the parliamentary party does have confidence. the result means thatover 40% of the parliamentary party declared a lack of confidence in borisjohnson. but he remains defiant.
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i think it's a convincing result, a decisive result and what it means is that, as a, as a government we can move on and focus on stuff that i think really matters. also in the programme: ukraine's president zelenskyy visits frontline troops in the donbas. and high—income countries are still too slow in redistributing covid—i9 vaccines. a stark warning from new zealand's former prime minister. live from our studio in singapore, this is bbc news. it's newsday. hello and welcome to the programme. the british prime minister, borisjohnson, has survived a confidence vote brought by members of parliament from his own party.
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148 conservativecmps voted against him. 211 said they wanted mrjohnson to stay in office. he's faced months of criticism after it emerged that events had been held at government offices in downing street during coronavirus lockdowns. under the current rules, mrjohnson cannot be challenged in a leadership vote again for a year. our political editor chris mason brings the story of the vote and the result. after months of awkward question for boris johnson, weeks _ question for boris johnson, weeks of question for boris johnson, weeks of mountin- question for boris johnson, weeks of mountin- speculation weeks of mounting speculation and a _ weeks of mounting speculation and a day— weeks of mounting speculation and a day of intense public, sometimes angry arguments, the moment — sometimes angry arguments, the moment. 35s sometimes angry arguments, the moment. �* . , moment. a verdict, the result with yes. _ moment. a verdict, the result with yes. the _ moment. a verdict, the result with yes, the potential- moment. a verdict, the result with yes, the potential to - with yes, the potential to remove mrjohnson as prime minister but also shape his future in thejob. the minister but also shape his future in the job.— minister but also shape his future in the job. future in the “ob. the vote in favour future in the “ob. the vote in f of— future in the job. the vote in favour of having _ future in the job. the vote in favour of having confidence i future in the job. the vote in | favour of having confidence in borisjohnson as leader is 211 votes in the vote against was
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148 votes and therefore, i can announce that the parliamentary party does have confidence. aha, party does have confidence. a mathematical victory for boris johnson but those numbers are awkward to him. more than 40% of his mps labelling him a liability the country would be better off without. but liability the country would be better off without.— better off without. but he insisted... _ better off without. but he insisted... i— better off without. but he insisted. .. i think- better off without. but he insisted... i think it's - better off without. but he insisted... i think it's an l insisted... i think it's an extremely good, positive, conclusive, decisive result which enables us to move on, to unite and focus on delivery and thatis unite and focus on delivery and that is exactly what we are going to do. that is exactly what we are going to tie-— that is exactly what we are going to do. that is exactly what we are ffointodo.~ , , , ., going to do. westminster is now divestive going to do. westminster is now digestive in _ going to do. westminster is now digestive in the _ going to do. westminster is now digestive in the result. - going to do. westminster is now digestive in the result. those i digestive in the result. those wanting mrjohnson out beaten tonight but insisting they are not defeated. i tonight but insisting they are not defeated.— not defeated. i think frankly it is very — not defeated. i think frankly it is very bad _ not defeated. i think frankly it is very bad indeed. - not defeated. i think frankly it is very bad indeed. i - it is very bad indeed. i was expecting we might make three figures. i hadn't expected more than a third of the parliamentary party expressing
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no confidence in the prime minister. that is extremely damaging to him and his reputation.— damaging to him and his refutation. ., ., , ., reputation. for the opposition farties reputation. for the opposition parties today. _ reputation. for the opposition parties today. a _ reputation. for the opposition parties today, a chance - reputation. for the opposition parties today, a chance to - parties today, a chance to stand back and watch their opponents in a mess. this evening — opponents in a mess. this evening the _ opponents in a mess. this evening the conservative l opponents in a mess. ti 3 evening the conservative party had a decision to make, does show some back bone or back borisjohnson. the british public after that up, fed up with the prime minister who promises big, but never delivers. promises big, but never delivers— promises big, but never delivers. , ., ., delivers. the day began with an announcement _ delivers. the day began with an announcement that _ delivers. the day began with an announcement that the - delivers. the day began with an| announcement that the moment some conservative mps longed for and others desperately hoped to avoid had come. the threshold _ hoped to avoid had come. the threshold of _ hoped to avoid had come. the threshold of 1596 _ hoped to avoid had come. tue: threshold of 15% of hoped to avoid had come. tte: threshold of 15% of the parliamentary party seeking a vote of confidence in the prime minister has been passed. therefore a vote of confidence will take place within the rules of the body.- rules of the body. within moments. _ rules of the body. within moments, the _ rules of the body. within moments, the public - rules of the body. within - moments, the public argument began. cabinet ministers offering the best spin on things. do you expect that this vote of confidence is a bad
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news for any leader?- news for any leader? i've already — news for any leader? i've already said _ news for any leader? i've already said to _ news for any leader? i've already said to some - news for any leader? i've already said to some of l news for any leader? t�*2 already said to some of the broadcasters, it's the village of any member of parliament to choose to request a new leader. i don't think that's the right choice but i'm not going to condemn people.— choice but i'm not going to condemn people. how can boris johnson possibly _ condemn people. how can boris johnson possibly recover- condemn people. how can boris johnson possibly recover from i johnson possibly recover from this? �* , �* johnson possibly recover from this? j ~ ' ., this? by winning. a 1-vote win is enough- _ this? by winning. a 1-vote win is enough. two _ this? by winning. a 1-vote win is enough. two cabinet - is enough. two cabinet ministers _ is enough. two cabinet ministers turning - is enough. two cabinet ministers turning out i is enough. two cabinet - ministers turning out together, what does that say? tt ministers turning out together, what does that say? it suggests ou are what does that say? it suggests you are worried. _ what does that say? it suggests you are worried. it _ what does that say? it suggests you are worried. it suggests - you are worried. it suggests unity and strength, we're both in the position of supporting the prime minister, it's the right thing for our party and country to draw a line under this and i get back to focusing on the core reduce the effect all of our constituents. t all of our constituents. i really urge might conservative colleagues in parliament to unite — colleagues in parliament to unite today.— colleagues in parliament to unite toda . ,, , unite today. supporters in the foreground. — unite today. supporters in the foreground, critics _ unite today. supporters in the foreground, critics wanting i unite today. supporters in the foreground, critics wanting to | foreground, critics wanting to be heard as well is the prime minister's anti—corruption champion decided to resign or stop leadership and integrity are absolutely central to the ministerial code, they are baked into it, they run through it like a stick of rock and i'm
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afraid that menzies broken the ministerial code and that means as a result, it's a resignation matterfor as a result, it's a resignation matter for any as a result, it's a resignation matterfor any minister as a result, it's a resignation matter for any minister and as a result, it's a resignation matterfor any minister and it matter for any minister and it also matterfor any minister and it also has to be a resignation matter for also has to be a resignation matterfor me as also has to be a resignation matter for me as well. and there was anotherjunior there was another junior resignation there was anotherjunior resignation later. john lambert stood down as a ministerial aid to the foreign secretary. and to the foreign secretary. and to next a potential successor as prime minister. jeremy hunt took on borisjohnson last time is lost. today he tweeted: if you think that sounds blunt, listen to this response to it from the culture secretary. t’m from the culture secretary. i'm incredibly _ from the culture secretary. th incredibly disappointed that jeremy hunt, was said throughout, i'm not going to challenge the prime minister while there is a war in ukraine, has come out and challenge the prime minister on the day russia sends rockets into kyivv. some the questions about borisjohnson �*s into kyivv. some the questions about boris johnson �*s future won't go away. —— kyiv.
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there are a number of reasons why many conservative mps decided to vote against the prime minister. to recover even when they win a confidence vote. our deputy political editor vicki young looks at borisjohnson's leadership and what could lie ahead. he won the conservatives their biggest victory in decades. good morning, everybody. my friends, well, we did it! so why, just 2.5 years later, have so many of borisjohnson's own mps turned on him? in the early days, breaking the brexit deadlock was the priority and a huge plus point with colleagues. then, an unprecedented pandemic derailed any plans mrjohnson may have had. you must stay at home. some trace his problems back to other choices. sticking by a divisive adviser, dominic cummings, who had alienated conservative mps, clashed with the prime minister's wife and was then accused of breaking covid rules.
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it's mrjohnson's leadership style that concerns others. i think he did a brilliant job over brexit, for which the country and the conservative party should always be grateful. but he does not in my view govern the way that a modern prime minister governs, through the normal processes of the state. it feels a bit more like a mediaeval monarch governing through a court and you absolutely cannot govern modern britain in that way.— britain in that way. some tory mps complain _ britain in that way. some tory mps complain about _ britain in that way. some tory mps complain about a - britain in that way. some tory mps complain about a lack- britain in that way. some tory mps complain about a lack of| mps complain about a lack of direction from u—turns free school meals to an embarrassing climbdown after mrjohnson tried to change parliamentary rules on standards to protect one of his friends. three, two, one! that led to the loss of an ultra safe conservative seat. but it's the lawbreaking parties in downing street which have done the most damage. a police investigation, a fine for the prime minister and another enquiry looming into whether he lied to parliament. polls suggest the scandal has
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dented his popularity. some even booed his arrival at st paul's cathedral forjubilee celebrations. he paul's cathedral forjubilee celebrations.— paul's cathedral forjubilee celebrations. ., , ., ., celebrations. he does have real volitical celebrations. he does have real political abilities _ celebrations. he does have real political abilities and _ celebrations. he does have real political abilities and he - celebrations. he does have real political abilities and he does i political abilities and he does have, i think, political abilities and he does have, ithink, and instinct to be able to position himself where new voters have not voted for the conservative party before can do that but he's got these huge floors which have always been a problem for him in every office that is held and i think those things will continue to cause a problem for him. ~ . ., . continue to cause a problem for him. ~ _, . ., , him. when confidence votes doesnt him. when confidence votes doesn't always _ him. when confidence votes doesn't always end - him. when confidence votes doesn't always end well. - him. when confidence votesl doesn't always end well. john major was victorious in 1995. dot. it is time to put up or shut up. dot. it is time to put up or shut lip-— dot. it is time to put up or shut u -. .,, , ., shut up. lost the general election _ shut up. lost the general election two years _ shut up. lost the general election two years later. - election two years later. theresa may one hers but resigned within six months. aha, resigned within six months. core part of the conservative party don't want oursjohnson as their prime minister and that makes it difficult if you're trying to get ylesy through, when votes in parliament and campaign around the country and these by—elections and in the run—up to any general election. by-elections and in the run-up to any general election.- to any general election. there are many _ to any general election. there are many reasons _ to any general election. there are many reasons behind - to any general election. there are many reasons behind this| are many reasons behind this unhappiness with dorisjohnson.
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unhappiness with doris johnson. for some, unhappiness with dorisjohnson. forsome, it's unhappiness with dorisjohnson. for some, it's the economy. they want tax cuts. some of been sacked or overlooked for promotion. some talk about his character, saying he lacks integrity and leadership skills but most will be making very simplejudgement. is he still a vote winnerfor the vote winner for the conservatives? borisjohnson conservatives? boris johnson was conservatives? borisjohnson was never going to an overall the critics and his party but he hopes the victory tonight silenced them for now. i spoke tojon tonge, a professor of politics at the university of liverpool for his take on borisjohnson's win. it wasn't a convincing win for borisjohnson. a win is a win in one sense and under the rules under which they cannot be a leadership challenge for a year, borisjohnson is safe but in the world of real politics this
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was not a convincing win, it was actually the worst performance in any conservative leader who has been subject to a vote of confidence from within his or her own party, it's the worst performance than boris johnson's predecessor theresa may achieved and theresa may did not last long in that office thereafter so borisjohnson is still under an immense amount of pressure. in many ways, the vote has solved nothing this evening and borisjohnson really, can he now lead the conservatives into an election when four in every ten of his own mps say they do not want him? his position is very precarious but if ever there was a political escapologist, it is indeed borisjohnson. professor tonge, we have seen in the past where prime ministers have survived a vote of confidence but then having to step down in the long run. is that a scenario you predict could also be a reality for boris johnson? yes, i think the conservative mps who voted against borisjohnson will still be putting pressure upon him to stand down and say look, this situation is untenable. the parliamentary party is really divided in half as to whether to back you and therefore you cannot carry on as conservative
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party leader. you need to step aside. but the message of it coming back loud and clear from borisjohnson and his friends this evening, is, look, i have one, under the rules of the game, i am entitled to carry on as leader, you cannot challenge me again for another year and it's now time to forget what has gone on in the past, move forward and borisjohnson will try and reshape the political agenda in his direction. if he can hold on until the parliamentary recess over the summer, he has a chance. the difficulty he has is that issues such as his conduct in 10 downing street, the so—called partygate affair, that is not going to go away because there is still one commons committee, one house of commons committee that is inquiring into whether borisjohnson misled parliament in that respect. right. professor tonge, a very quick question. the labour leader keir starmer said the conservative party was popping up mrjohnson in spite of popular opinion. how will he be viewing these developments? i think keir starmer will in many ways want borisjohnson to carry
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on as leader because it —— he looks politically wounded. the fact that he was booed at the jubilee celebrations over the weekend spoke volumes about where public opinion has shifted in terms of borisjohnson. you're watching newsday on the bbc. still to come on the programme: what the public make of borisjohnson's leadership —— climate change and conflict — how global efforts to tackle carbon emmissions are being affected by the war in ukraine. the day the british liberated the falklands. and by tonight, british troops have begun the task of disarming the enemy.
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in the heart of the west german capital, this was gorbymania at its height. the crowd packed to see the man who, for them, has raised great hopes for an end to the division of europe. it happened as the queen moved towards horse guards parade - for the start of- trooping the colour. gunshots the queen looks worried, but recovers quickly. - as long as they'll pay to go see me, i'll get out there and kick �*em down the hills. what does it feel like to be the first man to go across the channel by your own power? it feels pretty neat. it feels marvellous, really. this is newsday on the bbc. i'm arunoday mukharji in singapore. the main headline: borisjohnson survives as britain's prime minister but he suffers a substantial rebellion among conservative mps,
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in a confidence vote. the russian foreign minister, sergei lavrov, has repeated a threat to hit new targets in ukraine, if the west supplied longer—range missiles to kyiv. mr lavrov said the longer the range of the weapons the west supplied, the further russia would push back the line from which ukrainian forces could threaten the russian federation, as he put it. our defence correspondent jonathan beale has more details. fighting in the city of severodonetsk has been described as the hottest of the conflict, with relentless russian artillery strikes reducing the area to rubble and ashes. ukraine's president zelensky has called the situation hell. this weekend, sheltered in a building, he made his first visit to troops there, fighting against huge odds — an effort to boost morale.
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translation: you are true heroes of our country, - ukraine. you are heroes of war. because of you we have and will have our land and our country. ukraine's forces are outnumbered and outgunned. russia's vast arsenal of artillery trying to pummel and break ukrainian resistance. both sides are taking heavy casualties. but for ukraine, more help will soon be on its way. today, britain announced it will be sending this, its most advanced rocket launcher. following the lead of the us, which is supplying ukraine with a similar system. this british army version can fire a dozen rockets in a minute, and has a range of up to 50 miles — further than most of russia's artillery. the flow of western weapons has already angered moscow, though president putin is also trying to play down its significance.
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translation: we believe that the delivery of - rocket systems by the united states and some other countries is related to making up for the losses of combat hardware. there is nothing new about that, and this actually changes nothing. the question now — will these weapons arrive in time to make a difference? and in such small numbers — the us is sending just four of its rocket launchers to ukraine, the uk, another three — but for ukraine, every little helps. jonathan beale, bbc news. lessons learned from the covid—19 pandemic show that the world is largely in the same place as before the outbreak, and the tools we have will not be good enough to handle another pandemic. that's according to the former new zealand prime minister, helen clark, who co—chaired the independent panel for pandemic preparedness and response. the committee was tasked with assessing the global pandemic response, and making recommendations for the next virus outbreak. a short time ago i asked
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helen clark how she rates the global response. well, the global response obviously hasn't been a brilliant. here we are, more than two and a quarter years into the pandemic phase of the disease, it is still raging, it is still killing people every day, around the world. we haven't got a grip on it. our report talked about how to try and arrest the pandemic now and also how to get better plans in place for the future. neither are moving very fast. ms clark, in your report you talk about the need for radical change in a global response to the pandemic, so in your opinion, what is that radical change that needs to happen? well, firstly, you need dedicated finance to fight pandemics. we still haven't got that. you need a much better platform than the one that was created to try to get vaccines and other essential supplies
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out to developing countries. it has been underfunded and unable to get enough doses of vaccine, for example, out to low income countries. and in africa still you don't have even 15% of the population having received two doses. i think, what we are seeing now is a drop—off in political resolve around the world, to fight the pandemic. people are very distracted by other issues. the public is fed up with covid. but the problem is covid is not over us and we are essentially facing the next health threats with the same tools facing the next health threats with the same tools as we had. so we need to get on and give the who the powers it needs to act effectively in the face of a pandemic and also support support its better funding. as the lead global health organisation is actually a very poorly funded organisation at the present time. ms clark, you're talking about those major wake—up calls that are around us. what would be your advice to global leaders which would
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nudge them in the right direction according to you? well, i think i would show them the washington post editorial of a couple of days ago which talked about monkeypox. now, look, let's hope and pray that monkeypox doesn't take off to pandemic levels, but we don't know. what we do know is we've still got inadequate tools to deal with it. so i would say to leaders of every country, review your covid experience, look at where the gaps were, look at where you need to tidy your legislation, your law, your tools, have your supplies on hand and give a push to your negotiators who are looking at the state of the international health regulations which are not good enough, the possible new pandemic convention, the much—needed new dedicated finance and the need for a better platform than the covax one which was designed on the fly to meet this pandemic. unless we can do these kinds of things, and get a proper
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global oversight council to make sure things happen, we are going to be in the same state again. ms clark, just as we wind down, wondering if i can get a quick comment from you on the big story that we are tracking, you know, about borisjohnson and, as a former prime minister, i am sure you have been following those updates coming in from downing street and the vote of confidence. what would your advice be, as a former prime minister, for someone who is facing this kind of rebellion and dissent within his own party? well, i neverface that as prime minister. i did as leader of the opposition and it was pretty tough. i did face down challenges and bounced back from them, but it needs a clear strategy and i guess the ability to convince colleagues that you can do a betterjob than anyone else and, often, you will keep standing because there isn't anyone better equipped to do the job so let's see how it plays out. obviously, very uncomfortable for all sides at the moment.
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helen clark, former prime minister of new zealand. let's take a look at some other stories in the headlines: sri lanka's embattled president, gotabaya rajapaksa, has insisted that he will serve his remaining two years in office. the president has been facing weeks of protests, calling for him to resign, a retired british geologist, seen here on the left, has been jailed for 15 years for attempting to remove artefacts from iraq. 66—year—old jim fitton collected 12 stones and shards of broken pottery, during a recent geology and archaeology tour of the country. mr fitton has insisted he had no idea he was breaking iraqi laws. a former leader of the far—right proud boys group has been charged in the us with seditious conspiracy for his alleged role in the storming last year of congress. enrique tarrio and four other men are accused of plotting the attack.
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the un's climate change chief says efforts to tackle global warming can help create unity between nations at a time of conflict. patricia espinosa was speaking as negotiators from almost 200 countries, having been meeting in bonn, six months after the cop26 climate summit in glasgow. our climate editor justin rowlatt has been looking at whether promises made then are being kept. we've seen more blistering temperatures this year. it hit 51 celsius in pakistan last month, 49.2 degrees in delhi — the highest temperature ever recorded in the indian capital. drought is fuelling food shortages in somalia too. and just look at lake mead, which provides water to 25
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million people in the us and mexico. water levels are at their lowest since the 1930s. countries promised to take action to curb emissions at last year's big un climate conference in glasgow... hearing no objections, it is so decided. ..but the world has changed since then. energy and food prices have soared since russia invaded ukraine. and as delegates gather in germany, there is recognition that progress on climate has been slow. i appeal to all of you, especially in these difficult and challenging times, not to lose hope, not to lose focus, but to use our united efforts against climate change as the ultimate act of unity between nations. china is one of 34 countries planning new coal power stations. india is planning to reopen 100 coal mines.
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they say these are stopgaps in a time of crisis, but it's easy to see why the us climate envoy is worried. the war in ukraine has given a pass momentarily to some coal usage, but i think it would be an enormous mistake for anybody to believe that ukraine is a legitimate excuse for building out massive new infrastructure that is going to be there 20, 30, 40 years from now. if that's the choice, then we're cooked. so we need some good news, and here it is. despite all the conflict and disagreement in the world, nations are still meeting here to discuss how to tackle climate change. as long as we're still engaging with the issue, we can still make progress. justin rowlatt, bbc news, bonn. 0ur our top story remains, boris
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johnson the prime minister winning the confidence vote. thank you very much for watching bbc newsday. hello. a warmer feel to the weather on tuesday for wales and england, where the past few days have been so cool, cloudy and, for some, very wet. most places will have a dry tuesday. there's a chance of catching a shower, mind you. low pressure's clearing away, further weather systems heading in this week. it'll be wet at times, though not all the time. and this out in the atlantic is tropical storm alex, remnants of which, although passing us to the north, will increase the winds across the uk, especially the further north you are, to end the week. but light winds as tuesday begins, some patchy mist and fog, some showery rain close to the south coast of england, gradually clearing as the morning goes on. some patchy rain in north east england, fizzling out into the afternoon, though we'll keep lots of cloud here. for the rest of england and for wales, warmer sunny spells, a few showers pop up,
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mostly in the afternoon — very hit—and—miss. northern ireland staying mainly dry until the evening. cloudier skies towards southern scotland, rather than northern scotland, where, here, we'll see the most of the sunshine, the odd shower in the highlands. 16 degrees in newcastle. it's high teens and low 20s elsewhere. now, as we go on into the evening, you can see the rain moving into south west england, wales, northern ireland, and then spreading north and east, as we go into wednesday morning. some heavy bursts on that, not reaching northern scotland, but overnight temperatures, you see how mild it is for many as wednesday begins. this area of rain becoming slow—moving as it inches further north through scotland on wednesday. elsewhere, there will be some sunny spells around. there'll also be some showers, some heavy and thundery ones, in places, and it will be a windier day across southern areas. it'll be a cooler day at this stage in scotland, after several days of warmth. now, as we go into thursday, a few showers pop up here and there, an approaching weather system from the west will cloud things over across western areas and produce some patchy rain
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or showers into the afternoon, and the wind will start to pick up here. that is connected to what's left of tropical storm alex. here it is incorporated within this area of low pressure. you can see the track of it, missing us to the north and northwest. closer to that, though, it will turn very windy for a time. may see some gusts of 40—50 mph across north—western parts of scotland, for example. and it stays windy into the start of the weekend across many northern areas. this is where we'll see most of the showers, whereas the further south you are, fewer showers and, here, it'll stay mainly dry. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news. we will have the headlines and all the main news stories at the top of the hour, straight after this programme. how many years for the new yorker? seven. from her new york apartment, tina brown keeps a close eye on events in buckingham palace. those 3,000 miles give this british—american author a different, more global perspective on the royal ?family. for her new bestselling book the palace papers, she interviewed over 120 people to tell the story of the women of the house of windsor.

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