Skip to main content

tv   The Papers  BBC News  June 26, 2022 10:30pm-10:46pm BST

10:30 pm
at the mirror, and olivia utley, the assistant comment editor for the telegraph. the assistant comment editor we the assistant comment editor will say hello to both moment. tomorrow's front pages, starting with... the i leads with the news from the g7 summit in bavaria, and western leaders�* commitment to doing more to stand up to russia and china, amid fear of countries�* abandoning support for ukraine. the financial times also leads with g7 news, and the angle on the proposal to hurt the russian war chest with a price cap on crude exports. the front page of the metro reports on g7 leaders allegedly mocking russian president vladimir putin's macho image. the mail investigations unit has a story that britain has become the global capital of fraud, with losses rocketing to almost £3 billion a year. the guardian leads on prime minister borisjohnson telling other g7 leaders not to give ground on ukraine. and "charles cash in bag probe" — the sun's front page says the charity watchdog will invesitgate the handing
10:31 pm
of 3 million euros in cash to prince charles by a qatari sheikh. clarence house says all the correct processes were followed. good evening to you at home and good evening to you so lots to get this we will get cracking straightaway and start with a front page of the financial times covering this g7 summit going on in bavaria today and we are covering it here on bbc news. look at the headline they have picked out there, g7 aims to hurt russian war chest with price cap on crude exports will stuck any talk us through what is going on here? yes. through what is going on here? yes, so what all of _ through what is going on here? yes, so what all of the _ through what is going on here? yes, so what all of the bits _ through what is going on here? ye: so what all of the bits of world leaders gathered in the bavarian alps for the summit and the ft look at the story about kind of
10:32 pm
conversations about limiting the amount of money going to russia and honestly we have seen huge sanctions across the world, the uk and other nations but a real issue around kind of trying to reduce dependency on russian oil and gas. and there have been conversations going on for a while about trying to reduce dependence on that, and the ft looking today at the conversations being had at the g7 trying to impose a price cap on russian oil. this has been a subject for a lot of negotiations behind the scenes and obviously lots of countries are dependent on russian oil and the uk may be less of than some european countries and this is something i think that's being pushed by the us and also by italy and now it sounds like germany are getting quite interested in this idea as well. so obviously a really important conversation going on as the war in ukraine continues and we saw today
10:33 pm
heavy missile fire going towards kyiv, so obviously top of the agenda at the g7. �* . at the g7. and further than the sanctions _ at the g7. and further than the sanctions road _ at the g7. and further than the sanctions road we _ at the g7. and further than the sanctions road we get, - at the g7. and further than the sanctions road we get, the - at the g7. and further than the i sanctions road we get, the more difficult things get because the more other countries imposing the sections have to make sacrifices. what do you make of this measure the ft would have pulled out? it what do you make of this measure the ft would have pulled out?— ft would have pulled out? it does aet ve ft would have pulled out? it does get very difficult _ ft would have pulled out? it does get very difficult indeed, - ft would have pulled out? it does get very difficult indeed, so - ft would have pulled out? it does get very difficult indeed, so the i get very difficult indeed, so the way this— get very difficult indeed, so the way this price cap would work is basically— way this price cap would work is basically these countries would club together— basically these countries would club together and tell the body which sells russian oil that it cannot sells russian oil that it cannot sell oil— sells russian oil that it cannot sell oil for above a certain price and the — sell oil for above a certain price and the hope being that russia is then unable to export its oil anywhere and is forced to sell it at a lower_ anywhere and is forced to sell it at a lower price to europe. the issue obviously— a lower price to europe. the issue obviously is — a lower price to europe. the issue obviously is that vladimir putin could _ obviously is that vladimir putin could just — obviously is that vladimir putin could just turn off the tabs and russia — could just turn off the tabs and russia is— could just turn off the tabs and russia is already in a pretty dire stale _ russia is already in a pretty dire stale and — russia is already in a pretty dire state and the hope is that m food
10:34 pm
and act _ state and the hope is that m food and act rationally and for the good of his— and act rationally and for the good of his people in the sensible thing obviously— of his people in the sensible thing obviously would be to sell oil at a lower— obviously would be to sell oil at a lower price — obviously would be to sell oil at a lower price to europe rather than 'ust lower price to europe rather than just turning off the tap altogether. but so _ just turning off the tap altogether. but so far— just turning off the tap altogether. but so far he has not behaved particularly sensibly so it would be a huge _ a huge risk and it's true that the us is very— a huge risk and it's true that the us is very keen and the us is not dependent — us is very keen and the us is not dependent on russian oil, so it's quite _ dependent on russian oil, so it's quite easy— dependent on russian oil, so it's quite easy for them to be pretty keen~ _ quite easy for them to be pretty keen. borisjohnson sound scheme and macron— keen. borisjohnson sound scheme and macron is— keen. borisjohnson sound scheme and macron is behind it but as far as i read _ macron is behind it but as far as i read germany feels a bit queasy about— read germany feels a bit queasy about it because they are very dependent on russian oil and it sounds — dependent on russian oil and it sounds like scholz is pretty worried that vladimir putin could turn off the taps — that vladimir putin could turn off the taps so it's a bold move and he could _ the taps so it's a bold move and he could pay— the taps so it's a bold move and he could pay but certainly risky. interestingly we'll stick with the g7 and slightly less seriously but who knows? the metro and talk us through this, the full monty is the headline and the picture that i'm sure lots of us will have seen
10:35 pm
before whether you want to were not of what on earth is going on here? yes, a picture from back in 2009 i believe that obviously was seen around the world of vladimir putin horseback riding without his shirt off in a sort of attempt to look tough and macho. and at the g7 summit today, the leaders were sat around the table and the cameras picked up somejokes around the table and the cameras picked up some jokes that were being made. borisjohnson basically said to i think it wasjustin trudeau should we take ourjackets up because it's really warm and the weather is very nice in germany at that moment, and they were sort of joking with me themselves about how they should take their shirts off and they should show their pack light letter prudent. which obviously is a sort of meant as light—hearted remarks at the top of what was going to be quite a serious
10:36 pm
meeting, but it's quite light—hearted considering the context and i don't think it's gone down very well in some quarters. very quickly on that light—hearted comments for a meeting i don't want to dwell too long on this but no harm done or possibly harm done. i rather like the idea and i think he needs— rather like the idea and i think he needs to — rather like the idea and i think he needs to be teased a little bit and not taken — needs to be teased a little bit and not taken too seriously but you also take what _ not taken too seriously but you also take what he does seriously but the man himself, a bit of mockery is quite a _ man himself, a bit of mockery is quite a good thing although the idea borisjohnson showing his pacs is not particularly pleasant. we boris johnson showing his pacs is not particularly pleasant.- not particularly pleasant. we will move on him _ not particularly pleasant. we will move on him let's _ not particularly pleasant. we will move on him let's go _ not particularly pleasant. we will move on him let's go to - not particularly pleasant. we will move on him let's go to the - not particularly pleasant. we will| move on him let's go to the front page of the ft again and actually let's go first to the i newspaper and let's go about the g7 and into the front page there but actually what i want to focus on is the uk politics angle of this. so this idea that leaders seek united front away from turmoil and home and clearly borisjohnson has had tricky times
10:37 pm
recently at home with those violation losses. what do you make a borisjohnson in his position at the moment? i boris johnson in his position at the moment? ~ , boris johnson in his position at the moment? ~' , ., , , moment? i think he is in a pretty precarious _ moment? i think he is in a pretty precarious position _ moment? i think he is in a pretty precarious position at _ moment? i think he is in a pretty precarious position at home - moment? i think he is in a pretty precarious position at home but. moment? i think he is in a pretty precarious position at home but i think most— precarious position at home but i think most people do agree fairly and rightly really that he has done and rightly really that he has done a very— and rightly really that he has done a very good job in ukraine and he really— a very good job in ukraine and he really has been a true friend to zelensky— really has been a true friend to zelensky in the ukrainian people. so what he _ zelensky in the ukrainian people. so what he likes to do is when the going _ what he likes to do is when the going gets tough over here and he has a lot— going gets tough over here and he has a lot of— going gets tough over here and he has a lot of trouble with the by elections — has a lot of trouble with the by elections in his backbench mp start asking difficult questions, he seems to like _ asking difficult questions, he seems to like to _ asking difficult questions, he seems to like to fly abroad and reflect a bit to like to fly abroad and reflect a hit of— to like to fly abroad and reflect a bit of what he has done well other than what — bit of what he has done well other than what he could do better. i don't blame him. i have been the same _ don't blame him. i have been the same but — don't blame him. i have been the same but i'm not sure if it's particularly sensible a strategy for the future is i don't think he can sort _ the future is i don't think he can sort of— the future is i don't think he can sort of run — the future is i don't think he can sort of run away from his own problems— sort of run away from his own problems forever. that said, of course — problems forever. that said, of course russia has to be at the top of our— course russia has to be at the top of our agenda, the way the cost of living _ of our agenda, the way the cost of living crisis—
10:38 pm
of our agenda, the way the cost of living crisis is what borisjohnson is really— living crisis is what borisjohnson is really in — living crisis is what borisjohnson is really in trouble for back here and without a sensible global united strategy— and without a sensible global united strategy on how to deal with russia and had _ strategy on how to deal with russia and had would oppose those nations, the cost _ and had would oppose those nations, the cost of— and had would oppose those nations, the cost of living crisis is only going — the cost of living crisis is only going to _ the cost of living crisis is only going to get worse. so it bit of this in a — going to get worse. so it bit of this in a hit— going to get worse. so it bit of this in a bit of that but i do think he likes— this in a bit of that but i do think he likes to escape a little bit. let's — he likes to escape a little bit. let's stick— he likes to escape a little bit. let's stick with the same story and the i pulls out this detail and i wonder what you make of it is on the home front will announce new policies aimed at shoring up his position including a promise to crack down on benefits claimants and new tariffs on foreign steel and what do you make of that? yes campus ofthe what do you make of that? yes campus of the i has picked _ what do you make of that? yes campus of the i has picked up _ what do you make of that? yes campus of the i has picked up on _ what do you make of that? yes campus of the i has picked up on a _ of the i has picked up on a couple of the i has picked up on a couple of stories going around today. we have got first of all on benefits, the work and secretary gave an interview today were she hinted at this change around the amount of hours people are required to work before they no longer have to go and see a job coach to talk about
10:39 pm
seeking work which is currently set at nine hours that they are talking about increasing it to 12. so it would basically mean that you would need to work more hours before you can stop going for those appointments and i think it's an attempt to try and get more people into work to try and reduce the number of people receiving benefits. so that's one area they look at and the other thing is around steel. so sort of steel safeguards as they are sort of steel safeguards as they are sort of steel safeguards as they are sort of note are due to expire this week, which are basically there to try and limit the amount of cheap steel that can be imported from abroad. and this is a bit of a thorny issue because it's something... borst also has positioned as a something that he wants to protect a critical national industry and steel is an important industry and steel is an important industry in the uk, worth more than £2 million of the economy each year,
10:40 pm
but this move could also be in breach of wt0 rules and so it was something that the prime minister possibly ethics adviser who reside quite recently and this was part of the conversations that triggered his resignation, that he thought it was wrong for the prime minister to knowingly breach international rules. so there is quite a couple get a political row going on there, but these are attempts by downing street and the prime minister to get on the front foot a bit in policy after weeks and weeks of political difficulty. the after weeks and weeks of political difficul . ., , ., �* ., difficulty. the ft as he won't want to look at this _ difficulty. the ft as he won't want to look at this story _ difficulty. the ft as he won't want to look at this story that - to look at this story that i mentioned earlier and i want to ask you, the little story on the left—hand side, wallace rises up ranks inventory popularity stakes. what is going on? interesting as for months _
10:41 pm
what is going on? interesting as for months and — what is going on? interesting as for months and months, liz truss was at the top _ months and months, liz truss was at the top of— months and months, liz truss was at the top of this list of which can administer they like to well and the chancellor— administer they like to well and the chancellor always doing well and now sunak— chancellor always doing well and now sunak and _ chancellor always doing well and now sunak and played it with his whole wife and _ sunak and played it with his whole wife and her status in the scenes are disappeared out of the public eye really altogether. so you have truss— eye really altogether. so you have truss people are not quite sure about _ truss people are not quite sure about on— truss people are not quite sure about on ukraine is there is been a lot of— about on ukraine is there is been a lot of posturing over recent months. we saw _ lot of posturing over recent months. we saw pictures of her wandering around _ we saw pictures of her wandering around in — we saw pictures of her wandering around in a — we saw pictures of her wandering around in a fur hat and coat without really _ around in a fur hat and coat without really saying a huge amount and i think— really saying a huge amount and i think conservative members are beginning — think conservative members are beginning to worry slightly if she is up _ beginning to worry slightly if she is up for— beginning to worry slightly if she is up for the job and in the meantime, ben wallace has absolutely flown up _ meantime, ben wallace has absolutely flown up in _ meantime, ben wallace has absolutely flown up in their estimations and he is a defence — flown up in their estimations and he is a defence secretary and i think he was _ is a defence secretary and i think he was an— is a defence secretary and i think he was an officer and perhaps higher ”p he was an officer and perhaps higher up than _ he was an officer and perhaps higher up than that in the army but he is a law career— up than that in the army but he is a law career in— up than that in the army but he is a law career in the army and has been very bold _ law career in the army and has been very bold on — law career in the army and has been very bold on sending weapons to ukraine — very bold on sending weapons to ukraine. making sure that he does
10:42 pm
everything — ukraine. making sure that he does everything in his power to make sure the uk _ everything in his power to make sure the uk is _ everything in his power to make sure the uk is up — everything in his power to make sure the uk is up in ukraine in every way possible— the uk is up in ukraine in every way possible and — the uk is up in ukraine in every way possible and quite a reassuring manner— possible and quite a reassuring manner about them as well. a man you want in _ manner about them as well. a man you want in a _ manner about them as well. a man you want in a crisis — manner about them as well. a man you want in a crisis type person and it looks— want in a crisis type person and it looks a _ want in a crisis type person and it looks a little bit because a problem for a long _ looks a little bit because a problem for a long time has been lots of conservatives are pretty sick a borisjohnson both in the punditry party— borisjohnson both in the punditry party and — borisjohnson both in the punditry party and in the wider party and they— party and in the wider party and they don't— party and in the wider party and they don't quite know who is going to replace him. and slowly but surely — to replace him. and slowly but surely it — to replace him. and slowly but surely it does the listener they might— surely it does the listener they might be — surely it does the listener they might be beginning to coalesce around — might be beginning to coalesce around ben wallace and that is one of the _ around ben wallace and that is one of the names that is coming forward seriously— of the names that is coming forward seriously as — of the names that is coming forward seriously as his lever —— he is a leap _ seriously as his lever —— he is a leap supporter as well like jeremy hot. leap supporter as well like jeremy hot~ and — leap supporter as well like jeremy hot. and yes there is a possibility for someone who could take over from borisjohnson and he is high up there _ borisjohnson and he is high up there in— borisjohnson and he is high up there in the cabinet. he can be ready— there in the cabinet. he can be ready to — there in the cabinet. he can be ready to go. there in the cabinet. he can be ready to go— there in the cabinet. he can be ready to go. those polls always roduce ready to go. those polls always produce interesting _ ready to go. those polls always produce interesting thought - produce interesting thought experiments. let's go to the front page of the sun and a story about prince charles. charles cash in bag probe. what is this will exclusive
10:43 pm
there? ., ., ., , probe. what is this will exclusive there? .,., ., , there? extraordinary as it originally _ there? extraordinary as it originally was _ there? extraordinary as it originally was in - there? extraordinary as it originally was in the - there? extraordinary as it l originally was in the sunday there? extraordinary as it - originally was in the sunday times this revelation that the prince of wales had received 3 million euros in cash from the former prime minister of qatar. between 2011 and 2015. there is no suggestion that this was illegal. it's this money was given to him and was put towards his charitable foundation but extraordinary detail but the fact that one of the bags was a suitcase and that one was a carrier bag with sort of huge sums of cash in it. so the charity commission have said that they are reviewing what is happening which obviously is a very embarrassing thing for the prince of wales and potentially could have consequences if it's found that there was anything done or any
10:44 pm
declarations or processing of funds it was not done correctly as the suggestion there is that in the case but a very eye—catching story and raises quite a lot of questions about i suppose prince charles and hisjudgment in this about i suppose prince charles and his judgment in this case. about i suppose prince charles and hisjudgment in this case. i about i suppose prince charles and hisjudgment in this case.- hisjudgment in this case. i should 'ust sa hisjudgment in this case. i should just say as — hisjudgment in this case. i should just say as you _ hisjudgment in this case. i should just say as you alluded _ hisjudgment in this case. i should just say as you alluded to - hisjudgment in this case. i should just say as you alluded to their. just say as you alluded to their there was a statement from clarence how safe the donations received from the sheik were part and passed immediately to one of the prince's charities who carry out the appropriate governance and have assured us that all the correct processes were followed. that is a statement there and last week i would issue the front page of the guardian as we are out of time but i want to show you the picture because why would you not want to see a picture of the fabulous diana ross being very fabulous as she makes a worthy form explode with the schedule interesting of course glastonbury which is back and been fairly well received. and know what they have at work received well but
10:45 pm
you've been well received and thank you very much for talking to us and he were back for the next review later thank you. that's it. dojoint us later. bye—bye. hello, and welcome to this big, green open space. never before have we appreciated outdoor spaces and parks like we have since lockdown. yeah, unfortunately, though, lockdown also saw an increase in something that's threatening to turn some of our green and pleasant lands into brown and unpleasant landfill, and that is the illegal dumping of rubbish.
10:46 pm
there've been well over a million fly—tipping incidents

13 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on