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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 2, 2022 1:00am-1:30am BST

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this is bbc news i'm lucy grey. our top stories. cheering. the ukrainian flag flies once again in a key town in the donetsk region, just a day after moscow claimed the territory would be russian forever. asa as a cleaner begins, the true extent of destruction in florida becomes apparent. people in tunisia take to the streets to protest against the high cost of living and food shortages. the final push for votes as brazil prepares for what could be its most election the
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we start this hour with some breaking news — and a police spokesperson in indonesia says that at least 127 people have been killed after a riot at a football match in east java. this story is developing as we speak, but an official said most of the deaths happened when the crowd stampeded. our reporter, shelley phelps, hasjoined me with the latest details. what more can you tell us? this incident occurred _ what more can you tell us? this incident occurred after - what more can you tell us? ti 3 incident occurred after a football match. it was between two teams. the fighting is reported to have started when thousands of people rushed onto the pitch. the home team lost 2-3. the pitch. the home team lost
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2—3. there is dramatic footage on social media where you can see people rushing onto the pitch. police have said 127 people have been killed and one health official have said people died of chaos, overcrowding, trampling and suffocated. large numbers of people reported to be injured. they have been taken to local hospitals. we have had a statement from indonesia's football association. they say they are investigating a riot that took place after the match and there was a statement from the football association's chair. in that, they said they regret the actions of the arena supporters. they say they are sorry and apologise to the families of the victims and for all parties involved in the incident. they added they were supporting the police investigation but the incident had tarnished the face of indonesian football.- had tarnished the face of indonesian football. 0k, thank ou ve indonesian football. 0k, thank you very much- _ indonesian football. 0k, thank you very much. we _ indonesian football. ok, thank you very much. we will- indonesian football. 0k, thank you very much. we will bring l you very much. we will bring you very much. we will bring you more details on that as and when we get them. thank you.
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president zelensky says the ukrainian flag is flying, once again, in the strategically important town of lyman in donetsk, a day after vladimir putin declared the eastern ukrainian region would be russian "for ever". mr zelensky said fighting was still going on, although the kremlin insists all of its troops have pulled out. kyiv says many russian soldiers were killed or taken prisoner. this report is from our ukraine correspondent james waterhouse. ukraine's counteroffensives have slowed, but for ukrainians, progress is still progress. traces of occupation are being removed, and quickly. lyman was a logistics hub for russia's invasion. despite continued fighting, it is set to become a platform for ukraine to keep pushing east. cheering
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it's territory that russia officially celebrated as its own only yesterday. despite this recent show of patriotism, it is another embarrassing retreat for vladimir putin. as ever, his generals are trying to put a positive spin on russia's latest setback. translation: in connection with the threat of encirclement, - the allied troops were withdrawn from the settlement of lyman to more advantageous lines. to add to the kremlin�*s headache, ramzan kadyrov, one of putin's closest allies, called russia's military "shameful," and suggested it use what he called low yield nuclear weapons. that is essentially a repetition of russia's threat of an escalation in this war. momentum is very much with ukraine, which continues to undermine russian rhetoric by taking back lost territory. it has given kyiv the confidence to repeat its terms for any peace talks. translation: ukraine will get back what belongs to her, bothj
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in the east and in the south. what they try to annex now and crimea which they annexed in 2014. our flag will be everywhere. complete liberation is a long way off. a lot more people on both sides will lose their lives. however, ukraine will feel that victories like these will pave the way. james waterhouse, bbc news. we can now speak to mark montgomery who's a former us navy rear admiral. thank you forjoining us, what is the situation on losing lyman, is it a setback for russia?— lyman, is it a setback for russia? ., ~ , ., ., ., russia? thank you for having me and es, russia? thank you for having me and yes. losing _ russia? thank you for having me and yes, losing lyman _ russia? thank you for having me and yes, losing lyman is - russia? thank you for having me and yes, losing lyman is a - and yes, losing lyman is a major setback, for the exact reason your reporter noted, it is a strategic railhead for russia. one of the problems
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russia. one of the problems russia has had its logistics throughout the eight months of fighting. losing lyman will have a negative effect on the ability to protect the rest of the donbas regions. tell me more about _ the donbas regions. tell me more about its _ the donbas regions. tell me more about its logistical - more about its logistical problems?— more about its logistical problems? rush it really struggled _ problems? rush it really struggled in _ problems? rush it really struggled in the - problems? rush it really struggled in the first - problems? rush it really - struggled in the first months of this campaign with 200 to 300 kilometre logistics trains. 3oo kilometre logistics trains. they showed they were no longer a large—scale manoeuvre army. they have got to this tie combat alongside the eastern border of ukraine and russia's border of ukraine and russia's border with 40, 50 kilometres logistics lines, the russians would be able to fight more effectively, but clearly they have been able to. they are losing here and losing in other areas. ., ., i, , losing here and losing in other areas. ., ., i, areas. some analysts are saying k iv has areas. some analysts are saying kyiv has the _ areas. some analysts are saying kyiv has the momentum - areas. some analysts are saying kyiv has the momentum of- areas. some analysts are saying kyiv has the momentum of the i kyiv has the momentum of the war at the moment. do you think there is a chance they could be successful in their aims of
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reclaiming the areas they have lost? , ., lost? they will need to maintain _ lost? they will need to maintain three - lost? they will need to maintain three things i lost? they will need to l maintain three things for lost? they will need to - maintain three things for that. one, keep this strong morale. ukrainian troops are clearly fighting for their country. russian troops are fighting for four autonomous regions i doubt they knew existed a few hours ago. ukrainians have better tactical mobilisation. finally, these weapons we are delivering are significant. both the us and europeans, infact are significant. both the us and europeans, in fact we announced a delivery last wednesday, another 1.1 billion. this constant drumbeat of announcements of armaments coming. all these things added together give the momentum to the ukrainians to continue to push into russian held territory. push into russian held territory-— push into russian held territory. push into russian held territo . . ., i, territory. one analyst i spoke to yesterday _ territory. one analyst i spoke to yesterday said _ territory. one analyst i spoke to yesterday said president i to yesterday said president putin has made negotiations
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impossible with these annexations, do you see a role for dialogue on any of this? l for dialogue on any of this? i think that is exactly right. it is the two elements, one is the annexation and the second is the discussion of nuclear weapons. i really think it makes it really hard for both ukraine and the west to do dialogue with president putin and his team now. x�*t�*oll dialogue with president putin and his team now.— dialogue with president putin and his team now. you wear in the us navy. _ and his team now. you wear in the us navy, how— and his team now. you wear in the us navy, how concerned . and his team now. you wear in i the us navy, how concerned are you when you hear president putin making references to the us is setting a precedent with hiroshima and nagasaki and said he is not bluffing when it comes to nuclear weapons? l comes to nuclear weapons? i worry about both ends of the nuclear weapons. one is a low yield tactical nuclear weapon or a grey zone operation where they fire significant weapons into zaporizhzhia or other areas and create large—scale
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contamination. those are both serious issues that the united states needs to plan for, so we can support ukraine after it happens, but also we have to signal, as i think, the president has two president putin, that is an unacceptable line to cross.— line to cross. thank you very much for _ line to cross. thank you very much for talking _ line to cross. thank you very much for talking to - line to cross. thank you very much for talking to us. - line to cross. thank you very much for talking to us. markj much for talking to us. mark montgomery, former us rear admiral. gas has begun flowing through a new pipeline from norway to poland that will give central and eastern europe another option to russian energy. poland had been dependent on russian gas for decades — until supplies were cut off in april when it refused to pay its bills in roubles. the polish prime minister said the opening of the new link marked the end of russia's domination. meanwhile, another gas pipeline has been inaugurated between greece and bulgaria, with the potential to supply countries throughout the balkans. the european commission president ursula von der leyen attended the ceremony, and stressed the importance of the pipeline for europe's overall energy security. this pipeline
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is a game changer. it is a game changer for both bulgaria and europe's energy security. and it means freedom. it means freedom from dependency on russian gas. adam easton, the bbc�*s warsaw correspondent, explains how the new pipelines came about. poland is one of the oldest buyers of russian gas dating back to the late 1940s. but over the years, russia's near—monopoly supply status allowed it to overcharge poland for its gas. in fact, it used to charge poland more than it charged germany because of the fact that poland couldn't get it from anywhere else. and then again, in 2014, russia's annexation of crimea, those two factors basically changed minds in warsaw and they decided that we've got to approve projects which will allow us to buy gas elsewhere. and that has now happened today with the opening, the first gas flow of this
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pipeline from norway, which is significant because that can almost, just by itself, replace all the supplies from russia that were cut off in april. it will also be able to supply lithuania and slovakia because poland has gas pipeline interconnections with those countries. so it's a new route into europe, central and eastern europe for norwegian gas. and as you also mentioned, there's another new route of non—russian gas. this is this time gas from azerbaijan, which will come through this pipeline between greece and bulgaria, which has started operating today. that's significant as well because russia cut off its supplies to bulgaria also in april for the same reason that both poland and bulgaria refused to pay for that gas in roubles. a huge clean—up operation is under way in florida in the wake of hurricane ian. dozens of people are feared to have lost their lives,
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while many thousands of homes and businesses have been destroyed. before—and—after aerial pictures have revealed the scale of the devastation in coastal areas of south west florida. causeways linking many islands to the main land have been washed away, cutting off entire communities. azadeh moshiri reports. storm ian's strong winds and heavy rain have left parts of the carolinas under water. this is charleston, its historic buildings flooded and myrtle beach, overwhelmed by what officials dread it most, storm surges. but in florida, the areas that were hit the hardest are still trying to recover from the storm. i went back to see cindy, who lives in a manufactured housing community full of rvs and wooden homes. mother nature and god was helping me out that night. look at it. i get the chill is now just thinking about it. i keep getting my body going through these tremors, because i still feel like i'm rocking and rolling in that.
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like a roller—coaster, in my bathtub. i then met herbert, whose roof was blown off when he rode out the storm as he was sitting on his couch. this is what he filmed after the hurricane made landfall. that was the window over there? yes, there was a window here, and a stick came through and broke about this much. i came here about a day after the storm hit, there was a lot more water on the streets around here, but the clean—up crews have drained that water, but people here still clearly need help. they have been told that a government agency will come and potentially offered them some help, but they have also been told that it could tell them that this entire area is uninhabitable. search and rescue missions
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continue, with flooding protest in iran following the death of a woman in police custody show no signs of abating. the two frontrunners in brazil's highly polarised presidential election have been holding their final rallies ahead of sunday's vote. all major polls have put former leftist president, luiz inacio lula de silva, ahead of the right—wing incumbant, jair bolsonaro, but anxiety over a contested outcome remains. laura trevelyan reports from rio dejaneiro. there's great uncertainty here in brazil heading into the first round of the presidential election. and here's why — the incumbent president, jair bolsonaro,
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who is behind in the polls to his opponent, former president lula de silva, is actually casting doubt on the integrity of brazil's voting system. now, brazil has electronic voting machines, the result comes through nationally within two hours of polls closing. but president bolsonaro and his party have suggested, without any evidence, that somehow government officials could alter the results. and so this is all leading to speculation that perhaps if he doesn't accept the result, what will that mean here in brazil? memories are still fresh of the fact that brazil was a military dictatorship until the late 1980s. is it possible that president bolsonaro could somehow call on the military to make sure that he stays in power? now, military officials are so worried about the public perception that they would do this, that they have briefed brazilian newspapers
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that they have no intention the steal" that led to the january 6th assault on the us capitol. so a lot of uncertainty here. but if one candidate were to get more than 50% of the vote in the first round of the election on sunday, that would mean that there wouldn't be a runoff on october the 30th. so many, many questions here in brazil and some anxiety and uncertainty heading into sunday's election. here in the uk, more than 50,000 rail workers have been taking part in strike action, causing the biggest disruption in decades. only around 11% of the usual services ran. it's the first time four rail unions have taken action on the same day in their long—running disputes over pay, jobs and conditions. our transport correspondent katy austin reports. shutters down, empty platforms.
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it is the most disruptive train strike yet. l it is the most disruptive train strike yet-— strike yet. i have got no train, now _ strike yet. i have got no train, now i _ strike yet. i have got no train, now i am - strike yet. i have got no train, nowl am having i strike yet. i have got no - train, nowl am having to... i train, now i am having to... i havejust rung my train, now i am having to... i have just rung my husband, he has got to drive two hours, well, longerthan has got to drive two hours, well, longer than that, has got to drive two hours, well, longerthan that, down has got to drive two hours, well, longer than that, down to here to pick me up.— here to pick me up. they need to be paid _ here to pick me up. they need to be paid for— here to pick me up. they need to be paid for the _ here to pick me up. they need to be paid for the work - here to pick me up. they need to be paid for the work they i to be paid for the work they are doing, but i don't like the strike, — are doing, but i don't like the strike, nu _ are doing, but i don't like the strike. "0-— are doing, but i don't like the strike, no. ., , ., , '::::f strike, no. for my money, 10096 behind strike, no. for my money, 100% behind them. _ strike, no. for my money, 100% behind them. all _ strike, no. for my money, 100% behind them. all power - strike, no. for my money, 100% behind them. all power to - strike, no. for my money, 100% behind them. all power to them | behind them. all power to them and i_ behind them. all power to them and i hope — behind them. all power to them and i houe they— behind them. all power to them and i hope they win. _ behind them. all power to them and i hope they win.— and i hope they win. karen from staffordshire _ and i hope they win. karen from staffordshire is _ and i hope they win. karen from staffordshire is running - and i hope they win. karen from staffordshire is running the - staffordshire is running the london marathon tomorrow to raise money for the hospital where she had breast cancer treatment. news of the strike meant changing her plans to get there. ., , , , there. for me, this 'ust blew everything h there. for me, this 'ust blew everything apart. _ there. for me, this 'ust blew everything apart. i h there. for me, thisjust blew everything apart. i couldn't i everything apart. i couldn't even begin to think of how we would get there. ijust even begin to think of how we would get there. i just worried and until we knew what our plan was, ijust panicked. the and until we knew what our plan was, ijust panicked.— was, i 'ust panicked. the red lines was, ijust panicked. the red lines on this _ was, ijust panicked. the red lines on this map _ was, ijust panicked. the red lines on this map shows - was, ijust panicked. the red lines on this map shows the | lines on this map shows the only part of the rail network where some trains are running today. large parts of england, scotland and wales have none at
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all. where there has been trained today, they started a lot later than usual and they finished earlier as well. nothing at all has been running between london and some other major cities, including edinburgh, newcastle and brighton. the train drivers union aslef is demanding a pay rise amid high inflation. the rmt once that for its rail worker members, two and argue job security and working conditions are under threat. it says its current mandate for strike action last until late november.— strike action last until late november. ~ ., . november. we are commencing every ballot _ november. we are commencing every ballot next _ november. we are commencing every ballot next week. - november. we are commencing every ballot next week. that - every ballot next week. that process will be under way and we expect a very healthy return and a fresh mandate that will go through until the middle of next year if that is what's needed. we don't want that, we would rather get a settlement and get this dispute out the way and get back to normal. rail industry bosses say they want to give a pay rise but the impact of the pandemic of finances and travel patterns means reforms must be agreed to afford it. me means reforms must be agreed to afford it. ~ ., afford it. we need to standardise - afford it. we need to
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standardise areas . afford it. we need to standardise areas of| afford it. we need to - standardise areas of working practices that will then allow us to— practices that will then allow us to give staff an increase. but — us to give staff an increase. but we _ us to give staff an increase. but we can't forget there is a £2 billion— but we can't forget there is a £2 billion funding gap and there _ £2 billion funding gap and there is— £2 billion funding gap and there is no new money, we have -ot there is no new money, we have got to— there is no new money, we have got to generate that money from within_ got to generate that money from within the industry. negotiations continue and the new transport secretary recently met with the rmt and aslef leaders. but there has been no breakthrough and unions have made it clear more strikes could be coming down the track. katie austin, bbc news. people in tunisia have taken to the streets this week, to protest about the high cost of living and food shortages. more than half of the population is now living in poverty, and almost 700,000 people have left the country, headed for europe, since the start of the year. anna foster reports from the capital, tunis. "i'm telling you to take care of your country. "don't leave." this is the angry new conversation on the streets of tunisia. food is more expensive than ever before. each month, inflation
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hits a new record high. translation: there's no oil or sugar, sometimes l there's no bread. how can people live? what can people do? more than a decade ago, a tunisian fruit and vegetable seller set himself on fire. mohamed bouazizi's death caused widespread protests againstthe high cost of living. the arab spring uprisings were supposed to spark change. for walid, they did — but not in the way he'd hoped. me, myself, i remember them every day... one of his best friends was killed, and while demonstrating walid was shot — he lost his right leg. translation: i sacrificed my leg for the sake of improving l the situation in my country. unfortunately, jobs and national dignity haven't been achieved
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over the past 12 years. for a time, there was change. but injuly, tunisians voted for a new constitution, which concentrated power in the hands of the president, kais saied. it undid many of the democratic gains made since the arab spring. the rising cost of living is directly affecting the political system here. 11 years after protests that removed a dictator, tunisia is back in the grip of one—man rule. but so many people i speak to here tell me that even though their hard—fought freedoms are being lost, they see a forceful leader as the only way to get the economy back on its feet. living standards in tunisia are now worse than when the arab spring began — the number of families in need has tripled since 2010. hannan�*s husband isn't at home — he's meeting the people smugglers who've offered him a seat on a dangerous boatjourney to italy. the family's life is desperate.
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they can't afford fruit for the children any more, or meat orfish. translation: if you go outj to the street and ask people to choose between dignity and bread, they will choose bread, because they don't care about dignity any more because people have got hungry. imagine he goes on the trip and dies on the sea, we will be lost. if he dies, we will be automatically homeless. this country has known some of history's most famous battles. now its people are facing a new fight — simply to survive. anna foster, bbc news, tunis. until the early 90s, india's only muslim—majority region, kashmir, had a dozen thriving cinemas. but an armed rebellion against indian rule that started in the late 8'os forced theatres to close
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across the region. well, this weekend, cinemas have re—opened to the public in kashmir�*s main city srinagar for the first time in over two decades. let's speak to vijay dhar, chairman of srinagar cinema project and owner of srinagar inox cinema. welcome to bbc news, how did the opening go? good. we are waiting for more people to get in. l good. we are waiting for more peeple to get im— people to get in. i hear you didn't have _ people to get in. i hear you didn't have that _ people to get in. i hear you didn't have that many - people to get in. i hear you i didn't have that many people turning up? it didn't have that many people turning up?— didn't have that many people turning up? it takes time. for 30 years. _ turning up? it takes time. for 30 years. peeple _ turning up? it takes time. for 30 years, people have - turning up? it takes time. for 30 years, people have not. turning up? it takes time. for. 30 years, people have not known the cinema here. they don't know. i think it will take another ten to 15 days before people turn to the cinema. itruilmt people turn to the cinema. what was it like _ people turn to the cinema. what was it like before _ people turn to the cinema. what was it like before the _ people turn to the cinema. what was it like before the 1990s - was it like before the 1990s going to the cinema? kashmir's history with _ going to the cinema? kashmir's history with the _ going to the cinema? kashmir's history with the cinema - going to the cinema? kashmir's history with the cinema is -
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going to the cinema? kashmir's history with the cinema is very i history with the cinema is very old. the first cinema was built in 1932. after that, 1934 is when another cinema was built. we have got a long association with the cinema and we have been cinema buffs ever since. i remember my childhood going to watch a movie. there were just three cinemas before we brought in our cinema in 1965, which we had to close down in 1990. we try to restart it in 1999, but had to close it down again because there was no audience. the cinema has been in our dna for a long time.— for a long time. there was an attack on _ for a long time. there was an attack on a — for a long time. there was an attack on a cinema _ for a long time. there was an attack on a cinema back - for a long time. there was an attack on a cinema back in i for a long time. there was an | attack on a cinema back in the 90s, do you think people have concerns about security still now about going to the cinema?
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i have said this many times, when you start a ritual like this, you don't think from the head, you think from the heart. so we have done it from the heart in the interests of the state and the national interest.— state and the national interest. ., ,, , ., , interest. ok, thank you very much for — interest. ok, thank you very much forjoining _ interest. ok, thank you very much forjoining us. - interest. ok, thank you very much forjoining us. the - interest. ok, thank you veryj much forjoining us. the line is cutting out, thank you very much. a reminder of our breaking news this hour. 127 people have died after a football match in indonesia. at least 180 others were hospitalised after a riot following a national—level football match in east java, indonesia. police said around 3000 people went down to the centre of the football stadium looking for players and officials.
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the police then released tear gas after they thought that the situation put everyone in danger. the number of fatalities is expected to rise. we will bring you more details as they come into us and bbc news. thank you for watching. hello. a slightly different focus to the weather on sunday, where a saturday was a day of sunshine and showers for sunday. many will be dry, but not all. i'm sure your eyes are drawn to this frontal system sliding its way eastwards across the south of england and south wales. and through sunday morning that will be bringing some heavy rain to south west england, some rumbles of thunder to that rain also extending across into south east england, potentially a little
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bit into south wales and the south midlands. and we could see some patchy rain for a time for the london marathon, particularly through as the day wears on, that rain will tend to pull away southwards and maybe some late spells of sunshine for the late finishers. but as that rain pulls away actually for much of the uk sunday as a fine and dry day with spells of sunshine, still some showers to watch out for, particularly for western scotland and the northern isles maybe later in the day for the north west of northern ireland where we've got the sunshine, temperatures in the mid to high teens up to 17 or 18 celsius at their highest. the winds not as strong as they have been, but still quite noticeable for the western and the northern isles. could also see some stronger gusts for a time for southern coastal counties associated with that band of rain, which continues to pull away southwards through sunday evening. most of the showers will fade and actually for much of the uk dry and clear, but with some cloud pushing back into northern ireland ahead of some rain on monday. but under clear skies could be quite a chilly night for england and wales with temperatures down to four or five celsius. we start the new week with an area of high pressure in charge for much of england and wales. but this frontal system bringing outbreaks of rain
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and some stronger winds into northern ireland and scotland. so northern ireland seeing the rain first through monday, then pushing its way eastwards, getting into scotland around midday and then into the afternoon. but for much of england and wales it stays dry with some good spells of sunshine, although northern england likely to see more cloud. in the sunshine across england and wales, temperatures getting up to 18 or 19 celsius. so we've got the rain across scotland more like 13 or 14 celsius. and we still got that area of rain across scotland and northern ireland on tuesday. high pressure drifting away south where some of that rain likely to move into wales and northern england on tuesday. by and large, most of the rain in the week ahead will be for scotland, northern ireland, northern england and wales. drier conditions with some sunshine further south and east. that's all for me.
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this is bbc news, the headlines... 127 people have been killed after a stampede at a football match in east java. police had tear gas to try and control the crowd. ukrainian forces have retaken a key town just one day after president putin declared it was now part of russia. lyman was a strategic target, used by russia as a logistics hub. russia's ministry of defence confirms its forces have withdrawn. a huge clean—up operation is under way in florida after hurricane ian. dozens of people are feared
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to have died, while many thousands of properties have been destroyed.

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