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tv   The Papers  BBC News  October 2, 2022 9:30am-10:01am BST

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this is bbc news. i'm luxmy gopal and these are the headlines. one of the world's worst stadium disasters. at least174 people have died in a stampede at an indonesian football match after police tear—gassed pitch invaders. britain's prime minister admits to the bbc that she should have laid the ground better ahead of the government's mini budget announcement which sparked a week of chaos on the financial markets. king charles will now not be at next month's climate change conference
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in egypt following reports that prime minister liz truss "ordered" him not to attend. a man has been charged with the murder of nine—year—old olivia pratt—korbel, who was shot in her home in liverpool in august. and the ukrainian flag flies once again in a key town in the donetsk region — just a day after moscow claimed the territory would be russian forever. now the sport with jane dougall. there was late drama in the premier league yesterday as chelsea rescued a win against crystal palace with a 90th—minute winner. graham potter got his first victory as chelsea boss after his side came from a goal down to beat palace at selhurst park. conor gallagher got the winner against his former club in stoppage time. it was a breathtaking game at anfield where liverpool came from 2—0 down to lead brighton 3—2 after an adam webster own goal.
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but leandro trossard's hat—trick meant brighton walked away with a point. that's more ground lost in the premier league table forjurgen klopp�*s side, who are down to ninth. it was drawn 3—3 and that feels again it like a defeat even though it is not a defeat, and we have to fight through this. the confidence level is now not extraordinarily high, and in our situation, the things you want to happen, getting confidence back, you want to keep it and increase it. you want to build on that. arsenal's superb start to the season continues, they remain top of the premier league after a dominant performance in the north london derby to beat rivals tottenham 3—1. thomas partey opened the scoring for the gunners with a wonderful strike in the first half. that was cancelled out by harry kane's penalty. but gabrieljesus capitalised on hugo lloris�*s blunder to give arsenal the lead again just four
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minutes into the second half. granit xhaka then went on to secure the three points for mikel arteta's side, taking advantage of emerson royal's sending off for tottenham. right from the beginning, we were ready for it. i think we showed a lot of bravery and a commitment to play the way we wanted to play. we generated the energy that we wanted to generate at the stadium, which is incredibly helpful when you play a game like this. and i think the players took the game, grabbed the game from the hand, and i think we deserved to win the game. at craven cottage, newcastle cruised to victory against ten—man fulham. nathaniel chalobah was sent off afterjust eight minutes. miguel almiron scored two for newcastle, including this first—half stunner as they ran out comfortable 4—1winners. in yesterday's late game, west ham picked up a crucial three points to move out
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of the relegation zone. gianluca scamacca's first goal since joining the club set david moyes�* side on the way to victory in the first half as wolves dropped into the bottom three to put pressure on boss bruno lage. don't forget, it's derby day in manchester. city host united later this afternoon. in scotland, celtic bounced back from their first premiership defeat in a year with a 2—1 win over motherwell. rangers remain two points behind after they won at hearts, ryan kent ending his 22—game drought by sealing a 4—0 win in stoppage time. elsewhere there were wins for st mirren, hibs, aberdeen and stjohnstone. in rugby union's premiership, saracens blew away the champions leicester tigers 51—18. in a repeat of last year's final sarries made amends for losing. most of the damage was done
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in the first half with four tries. sean maitland capped off a dominant display, making it three wins in three for saracens and a second loss for leicester. in the united rugby championship, edinburgh went down to the defending champions stormers. the scottish side had led, but the south africans came storming back in the second half to complete a hard fought win in cape town. in formula one, qualifying returned to singapore's marina bay circuit for the first time since 2019. charles leclerc, who needs a win in the lion city to keep his slim title hopes alive, gave himself the best possible chance with an impressive pole position during a session made treacherous by earlier rain. max verstappen, who can win a second world title this weekend, has his work cut out for him as he could finish no higher than eighth. mercedes�* lewis hamilton starts from third. we're so, so close. i was trying so hard. these guys are always so quick.
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but i really thought maybe, maybe just with a perfect lap, it was really hard to get, that we could be fighting for first place and just didn't have the grip at the last lap. but nonetheless, i'm grateful to be on the second row, and i'm grateful to the team for continuing to push. and, you know, wejust keep my head down. hopefully tomorrow will be a better day. in golf, england's charley hull has a share of the lead going into the final round of the ascendant lpga. the 26—year—old is on ii—under, along with china's lin xiyu. hull is looking for a second lpga win of her career. her first was in 2016 at the tour championship. england's richard mansell leads at the alfred dunhill links championship, on is—under heading into the final round at the old course, four shots ahead of second. rory mcilroy had a good recovery from a miserable second round, he shot a 66 to move to seven—under for the tournament. mark allen will face welshman ryan day in the final
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of snooker�*s british open later in milton keynes. the northern irishman made short work of thailand's noppon saengkham in the opening semifinal, winning six frames to one, while day held his nerve in the final frame to win 6—5 against england's williams. that's all the sport for now. hello and welcome to our look at what the the papers are saying today. with me are broadcaster penny smith, and business journalistjohn crowley. today's front pages. the observer leads with a new poll that says voters have abandoned the tories. 71% of conservative voters believe the pm and the chancellor have lost control of the economy. the people echoes this, stating �*you've lost their
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truss, liz'. the independent says conservative mps have told prime minister liz truss to u—turn now orface rebellion. the sunday telegraph leads on a liz truss interview in which she says only her plan will reverse the economy's decline. the sunday times leads with the story of prime minister liz truss telling king charles to stay away from this year's cop27 climate summit. the sunday express leads on the charge over the killing of nine—year old olivia pratt—korbel. so let's begin. sunday, telegraph stop. if we start with you, penny, liz truss and seeing all in my plan for growth will reverse the cloud. and we have seen her really doubling down rather
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than any sign of a u—turn. i seen her really doubling down rather than any sign of a u-turn._ than any sign of a u-turn. i don't think we were _ than any sign of a u-turn. i don't think we were going _ than any sign of a u-turn. i don't think we were going to _ than any sign of a u-turn. i don't think we were going to see - than any sign of a u-turn. i don't think we were going to see any i than any sign of a u-turn. i don't i think we were going to see any sign of a u—turn quickly. even if it is a u—turn it will be really small u—turn it will be really small u—turn probably by degrees. in the coming telegraph the court changes are always something people might find worrying. i think the words might find worrying is particularly worrying that she thought people would look at what was going on and goal, yes, this is great. —— and say, yeah this is great. people who earn lots of money get a tax break, i think that is a great idea. i think people who have a lot of money weren't expecting a great tax break and a bit later on in this particular article, and a bit later on in this particulararticle, i and a bit later on in this particular article, i will quote it. we can crawl the size of the pie —— we can crawl. —— grow. i immediately
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go back to marie antoinette and let them eat cake. then you have her seeing we need to grow the size of the pie. whatever you think in some peoples ice she may be bold and brave i thinkjobs have to be careful when you use food. john, could you — careful when you use food. john, could you see — careful when you use food. john, could you see it _ careful when you use food. john, could you see it is _ careful when you use food. john, could you see it is the _ careful when you use food. john, could you see it is the way - careful when you use food. john, could you see it is the way she i careful when you use food. john, could you see it is the way she sees the keep needing to be distributed. she said she was moving away from a focus on redistributing and away is
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redistributed. so much i would agree with penny on redistributed. so much i would agree with pennj ., redistributed. so much i would agree with penn ., ., ., ., , ., with penny on the analogy on food, this is a bit — with penny on the analogy on food, this is a bit of— with penny on the analogy on food, this is a bit of a _ with penny on the analogy on food, this is a bit of a dogs _ with penny on the analogy on food, this is a bit of a dogs dinner. - with penny on the analogy on food, this is a bit of a dogs dinner. she . this is a bit of a dogs dinner. she says— this is a bit of a dogs dinner. she says she — this is a bit of a dogs dinner. she says she wants to turn britain into a low _ says she wants to turn britain into a low tax — says she wants to turn britain into a low tax economy and reverse the current _ a low tax economy and reverse the current trajectory to decline but this is— current trajectory to decline but this is happened on the watch of 12 years— this is happened on the watch of 12 years of— this is happened on the watch of 12 years of multiple conservative led governments. before liz truss became prime _ governments. before liz truss became prime minister she was the longest serving _ prime minister she was the longest serving cabinet minister in the government so it is not something she can _ government so it is not something she can skip. in the interviews she is talking _ she can skip. in the interviews she is talking about supply—side reforms to support _ is talking about supply—side reforms to support the economy to do with tax cuts _ to support the economy to do with tax cuts that includes some interesting detail, lowering the threshold of what constitutes a small— threshold of what constitutes a small business to be so that rises from _ small business to be so that rises from 250 —
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small business to be so that rises from 250 employees to 500 employees. and this _ from 250 employees to 500 employees. and this will remove red tape and admin— and this will remove red tape and admin for— and this will remove red tape and admin for an estimated 40,000 businesses across the uk. there are also some _ businesses across the uk. there are also some plants in the forms to cut the cost _ also some plants in the forms to cut the cost of— also some plants in the forms to cut the cost of childcare which is a huge _ the cost of childcare which is a huge burden for many young families around _ huge burden for many young families around the _ huge burden for many young families around the country but as penny saidi _ around the country but as penny said. what— around the country but as penny said, what was interesting on sunday with laura _ said, what was interesting on sunday with laura kuenssberg as she was not giving _ with laura kuenssberg as she was not giving ground and said that she should — giving ground and said that she should have read better. notjust in terms _ should have read better. notjust in terms of— should have read better. notjust in terms of waters but also the markets in the _ terms of waters but also the markets in the city _ terms of waters but also the markets in the city with all the tax cuts that _ in the city with all the tax cuts that would be announced to be before last. ., that would be announced to be before last. . . , , that would be announced to be before last. . ,., that would be announced to be before last. . , . ., last. that leads us nicely onto the front -aie last. that leads us nicely onto the front page of _ last. that leads us nicely onto the front page of the _ last. that leads us nicely onto the front page of the observer - last. that leads us nicely onto the front page of the observer which l front page of the observer which talks about a new shock poll which
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shows three quarters of uk waters including 71% of those who backed the conservatives in the last general election believe that liz truss and kwasi kwarteng have lost control of the economy. we saw in the interview with laura kuenssberg what the prime minister did see was she felt she could have laid the ground betterfor this. the ground better for this. the communication ground betterfor this. the communication side of things. i think you could also be better briefed yourself because when you looked at what went on when liz truss finally emerged from purdah to suddenly be in 24 radio stations everyone commented on how she got slower and slower and sounded like a doll winding down and didn't seem to
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have the comeback in question is that she was being asked and i think that she was being asked and i think that was we are in the first place you felt that the ground hasn't sufficiently been prepared but neither had she. there was a great court in one of the papers today, i think it is the times with dan snow, the historian saying it was the worst start to apremiership since the 17th century. when you lay the groundwork you have to take people with you and sound like you're in control and i think that is where it went wrong from the beginning. notice about shoring up and saying i didn't do terribly well there but i know what i'm doing and the problem is people worry.
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know what i'm doing and the problem is people worry-— is people worry. john, one thing that emerged — is people worry. john, one thing that emerged from _ is people worry. john, one thing that emerged from the - is people worry. john, one thing| that emerged from the interview is people worry. john, one thing i that emerged from the interview in the past hour as when liz truss was asked about the top rate of tax and not committing to dropping out, and when she was asked if there had been discussion with the cabinet, she said there was not. again, what does this say about any level of confidence voters might have on her plans? confidence voters might have on her lans? ,, ., , confidence voters might have on her lans? ,, ., confidence voters might have on her lans? ,, .. , , plans? she has a credibility problem- — plans? she has a credibility problem. as _ plans? she has a credibility problem. as well _ plans? she has a credibility problem. as well as - plans? she has a credibility| problem. as well as policies plans? she has a credibility - problem. as well as policies you have _ problem. as well as policies you have to — problem. as well as policies you have to command and convince people you know _ have to command and convince people you know what you're talking about, that you _ you know what you're talking about, that you are — you know what you're talking about, that you are prepared. that is preparing _ that you are prepared. that is preparing the ground for other people — preparing the ground for other people to interpret but you have to be people to interpret but you have to he across _ people to interpret but you have to he across it — people to interpret but you have to be across it as well. it's quite unbelievable that the 45p rate of tax cut _ unbelievable that the 45p rate of tax cut was not discussed with the cabinet _ tax cut was not discussed with the cabinet. was a lot of detail in the
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interview — cabinet. was a lot of detail in the interview. she seemed to be seeing that the _ interview. she seemed to be seeing that the 45p tax rate was kwasi kwarteng, the idea of the chancellor rather— kwarteng, the idea of the chancellor rather than — kwarteng, the idea of the chancellor rather than her. and of course the chancellor — rather than her. and of course the chancellor loves to keep a rabbit in the heart. — chancellor loves to keep a rabbit in the heart, so to speak, when you make _ the heart, so to speak, when you make that — the heart, so to speak, when you make that kind of announcement. he must _ make that kind of announcement. he must have _ make that kind of announcement. he must have discussed it with her but it seems— must have discussed it with her but it seems he — must have discussed it with her but it seems he was pushing it. going back— it seems he was pushing it. going back to _ it seems he was pushing it. going back to the — it seems he was pushing it. going back to the article in the observer, labour— back to the article in the observer, labour have — back to the article in the observer, labour have extended their lead over the conservatives and it has gone up by 40 _ the conservatives and it has gone up by 40 percentage points in the last week _ by 40 percentage points in the last week. we — by 40 percentage points in the last week. ~ ., ., ., by 40 percentage points in the last week. . ., ., ., by 40 percentage points in the last week. ~ ., ., ., ., week. we will go on to look at really hope — week. we will go on to look at really hope this _ week. we will go on to look at really hope this affects - week. we will go on to look at really hope this affects real i week. we will go on to look at - really hope this affects real people because leaving for that mince for the political party, the conservatives themselves, that's where we get on to page six of the observer which talks about higher rates and smaller loans and an icy
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fear gripping home buyers. i have suckled a quotation from a mortgage broker northern ireland who says peoples fear is not how we will heat our homes, it is beyond that and it is all we have roofs over our heads? exactly, not about heating your home, will we have a home? the problem with all of this is if somebody were to say to us, and they could absolutely guarantee this is going to be a short—term thing, in a year this will all have calmed down and we will be back to where we were before all this happened, then people could budget for it. like they always say, the markets want certainty, so do we stop we have to plan things. and we havejobs certainty, so do we stop we have to plan things. and we have jobs and lots of people have precarious jobs and don't know whether they will have a job today or tomorrow. i read an interview during the week about a
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builder who barely makes ends meet at the moment. no he doesn't even know whether the hoses he is involved in building will even be sold and for that he will get any money and meanwhile he still has to pay and was talking about rental. you're also talking about people who when they took at the mortgages and they were low. —— he doesn't even know whether the homes he is building. this is such a big jump and people are saying 40% of mortgage products have been withdrawn. that is huge, and you're talking about hundreds of pounds extra per week and about people who might have been thinking about downsizing and no wondering for sell the house and if it is the wrong time. it casts everything into confusion. the worry, sleepless nights, it is terrifying. so
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confusion. the worry, sleepless nights, it is terrifying.— confusion. the worry, sleepless nights, it is terrifying. so we can cover a few _ nights, it is terrifying. so we can cover a few more _ nights, it is terrifying. so we can cover a few more of _ nights, it is terrifying. so we can cover a few more of the - nights, it is terrifying. so we can cover a few more of the papers, | nights, it is terrifying. so we can| cover a few more of the papers, i will move on to the front page of the times. there is a story about kwasi kwarteng budget party with financiers who may have cashed in. on the day he delivered his fiscal budget— on the day he delivered his fiscal budget the chancellor kwasi kwarteng attended _ budget the chancellor kwasi kwarteng attended a champagne reception with hedge _ attended a champagne reception with hedge fund bosses and the apparently told him _ hedge fund bosses and the apparently told him to double down on the tax cuts literally as they were shorting the pound — cuts literally as they were shorting the pound and making millions of pounds _ the pound and making millions of pounds from this. last week, on sunday— pounds from this. last week, on sunday with laura kuenssberg, he
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indicated — sunday with laura kuenssberg, he indicated more tax cuts were on the way and _ indicated more tax cuts were on the way and this— indicated more tax cuts were on the way and this is what is said to have spooked _ way and this is what is said to have spooked the markets even more. perhaps — spooked the markets even more. perhaps the most damning thing in the article — perhaps the most damning thing in the article as several hedge fund managers — the article as several hedge fund managers called the chancellor a useful— managers called the chancellor a useful idiot. take a moment to consider— useful idiot. take a moment to consider that. useful idiot. take a moment to considerthat. it useful idiot. take a moment to consider that. it is a terrible look for the _ consider that. it is a terrible look for the government and it really calls— for the government and it really calls into — for the government and it really calls into question the judgment of keir starmer as calls into question the judgment of keir starmeras he calls into question the judgment of keir starmer as he was —— kwasi kwarteng — keir starmer as he was —— kwasi kwarteng as— keir starmer as he was —— kwasi kwarteng as he was quaffing champagne hedge fund managers. the prime champagne hedge fund managers. iie: prime minister champagne hedge fund managers. tie: prime minister in champagne hedge fund managers. ti9 prime minister in the interview said it was thejob prime minister in the interview said it was the job of kwasi kwarteng to meet with businessmen. i want to move on to page four of the times
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what it has an article saying the letter from what it has an article saying the letterfrom kwasi kwarteng warns what it has an article saying the letter from kwasi kwarteng warns of austerity and austerity 2.0 is on the way. austerity and austerity 2.0 is on the wa . . . austerity and austerity 2.0 is on the wa . , , ., the way. this is where we will learn where the scrapping _ the way. this is where we will learn where the scrapping of _ the way. this is where we will learn where the scrapping of tax - the way. this is where we will learn where the scrapping of tax for - the way. this is where we will learn where the scrapping of tax for the l where the scrapping of tax for the super—rich, how we will fund it. and asjohn said it is about how it looks at the moment. this trickle—down theory, has it ever been proven? john could probably tell you. it looks like feathering the nest of the people with the biggest most feathered nests and to pay for that everyone will have to tighten their belts. in every way it does not look good and austerity, we have been here before and it into pretty, and it is not nice. at the same time as you see all these
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exciting projects coming along and i don't know about you, john, but when you talk about deregulation, regulations are often there to protect us. people make a great thing about health and safety, health and safety, but it is there to protect us so we don't lose limbs if the machine is not properly protected and we can actually go about our normal day—to—day business without having issues and looking forward to a hideous future life. i think the thing about austerity, it is never good and particularly when it doesn't feel like we are all in it doesn't feel like we are all in it together. most people are in it apart from the super—rich were not. i will askjohn if you can ask —— talk about page six of the mirror. it is the plan, 70 tory mps could
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force liz truss out and they say that our plans where up to 70 mps are being tapped up in bid to oust the prime minister. with the current rules of the 1922 committee liz truss can't face a confidence vote until a year after taking office. in the article it says until october the article it says until october the 18th — the article it says until october the 18th so she hasn't even been there _ the 18th so she hasn't even been there long — the 18th so she hasn't even been there long enough for votes to be deep _ there long enough for votes to be deep put — there long enough for votes to be deep put in by angry conservative mps _ deep put in by angry conservative mps. michael gove said a number of mistakes _ mps. michael gove said a number of mistakes had been made in the budget. — mistakes had been made in the budget, really big thing to say, but there _ budget, really big thing to say, but there was— budget, really big thing to say, but there was time to rectify them. he said he _ there was time to rectify them. he
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said he didn't believe the 45% tax cut was— said he didn't believe the 45% tax cut was correct and pretty much indicated — cut was correct and pretty much indicated he would not forfeit. some conservative mps will not fought for the finance bill, generally that is seen _ the finance bill, generally that is seen as— the finance bill, generally that is seen as a — the finance bill, generally that is seen as a vote of no—confidence in the government and they have an effective — the government and they have an effective majority of 71 mps so if there _ effective majority of 71 mps so if there are — effective majority of 71 mps so if there are 70 letters going on, and i wonder— there are 70 letters going on, and i wonder if_ there are 70 letters going on, and i wonder if michael gove is one of them. _ wonder if michael gove is one of them. this— wonder if michael gove is one of them, this is another situation that clearly— them, this is another situation that clearly li2— them, this is another situation that clearly liz truss does not want to deal with — clearly liz truss does not want to deal with. , . ., , :, dealwith. penny, ifi can get your thou:hts. dealwith. penny, ifi can get your thoughts- she _ dealwith. penny, ifi can get your thoughts. she is _ dealwith. penny, ifi can get your thoughts. she is not _ dealwith. penny, ifi can get your thoughts. she is not going - deal with. penny, if i can get yourl thoughts. she is not going anytime soon and we _ thoughts. she is not going anytime soon and we all _ thoughts. she is not going anytime soon and we all know— thoughts. she is not going anytime soon and we all know there - thoughts. she is not going anytime soon and we all know there will. thoughts. she is not going anytime soon and we all know there will no | soon and we all know there will no u—turn. i am sure in number ten there were a lot of people meeting in corridors and i bet there is someone somewhere is seeing what can we do and how can we make this
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better? what can we do to actually 90. better? what can we do to actually go, ok, we're not doing a u—turn but what we will do is do this to actually take the curse of it, as it were. ——off it. if they don't vote for it, what happens? i assume they have to change it and does that look much worse than changing it beforehand? i much worse than changing it beforehand?— much worse than changing it beforehand? . :, , ., , beforehand? i have to put in a bit of a response _ beforehand? i have to put in a bit of a response from _ beforehand? i have to put in a bit of a response from what - beforehand? i have to put in a bit of a response from what the - beforehand? i have to put in a bit| of a response from what the prime minister and chancellor have said and as we have seen in the interview liz truss said it is about boosting growth and has admitted in her words she could have laid the ground better. obviously there will be a lot more to discuss about this and a lot more to discuss about this and a
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lot more to discuss about this and a lot more followed from it and we shall have to see how things develop but for now, thank you both for your time at the sunday morning and discussing a whole load of things there. there is so much more, we could have talked on for ages but thank you both for your time. that's it for the papers this morning. this evening, we will be back to take a look at tomorrow's front pages — with parliamentaryjournalist tony grew and journalist and broadcaster caroline frost. goodbye for now. hello. it was certainly a soggy start to sunday across some southern parts of england and wales, but that rain continues to clear its way southwards and eastwards, and we'lljoin the rest of the country with a fine afternoon with sunny spells. it was this weather system which was a little bit further south than we were expecting 24 hours ago. because of that, it clears away a little bit quicker, too, which means a brighter, drier afternoon for most. clearing away from the southeast corner
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by the time we get to lunchtime, maybe a few showers continuing across the channel islands through the afternoon, but away from that isolated showers mainly to the north and west of scotland. but overall, fewer showers than yesterday and temperatures up a little bit. and that's because we'll have lighter winds than yesterday, especially for england and wales. still a keen breeze across parts of the north and west of scotland, that will keep temperatures up here through the night, as it will do in northern ireland as the breeze picks up. but away from that, across england and wales, particularly southeast scotland, a few mist and fog patches forming with clear skies. a bit more cloud pushing in from the west later, but that won't stop the temperatures from dropping too much. this is how we look in the towns and cities to start your monday morning commute. the mildest weather, cloudiest, breeziest weather, is towards the west of scotland and northern ireland, but in some rural parts of england and wales we could see temperatures around two or three degrees. that's low enough for a touch of frost on the grass and the cars. so it's that ridge of high pressure which keeps things dry to begin
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with with light winds. but as these weather fronts push in through the north and west through the day with strengthening wind, we will see some cloud run ahead of it. so not quite as sunny as it will be for some of you this afternoon, but there'll still be some spells of hazy sunshine around. an isolated chance of a shower in cumbria, maybe across devon, cornwall and dorset. but rain will come and go north and west of scotland, turning heavier through the afternoon. same, too, across parts of northern ireland where it become more extensive later in the day. it's a southerly wind, so temperatures will be on the milder side for the stage in october and a mild night to come, then, through the night and into tuesday. weatherfronts pushing their way southwards. a wet start across parts of scotland, northern ireland, but basically two batches of rain working their way into england and wales through the day and gradually fizzling. brightening up through scotland,
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northern ireland on tuesday after that wet start. east anglia, the south east could stay dry throughout with temperatures around 20 or 21 degrees, but that area extends back into another system, which will bring more widespread wind and rain on wednesday. and the end of the week looks fairly blustery and it's back to a mix of sunshine and showers. see you soon.
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this is bbc news broadcasting in the uk and around the globe. i'm luxmy gopal and these are the latest headlines. one of the world's worst stadium disasters. at least 174 people have died in a stampede at an indonesian football match after police tear—gassed pitch invaders. i regret this tragedy and i hope this is the last tragedy to occur in indonesian football. we cannot have any more in the future. sportsmanship, humanity and brotherhood in the nation should be upheld together. britain's prime minister admits to the bbc that she should have laid the ground better for announcements that sparked chaos on the financial markets. i do stand by the package we announced, and i stand by the fact that we announced it
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quickly because we had to act. but i do accept we should have laid the ground better —

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