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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 2, 2022 2:00pm-3:00pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm ben boulos and these are the latest headlines... britain's prime minister admits to the bbc that she should have laid the ground better for announcements that sparked chaos on the financial markets and divisions in her own party. ido i do stand by the package we announced and i stand by the fact that we announced it quickly, because we had to act, but i do accept we should have laid the ground a better, i do accept that. the sheer risk of using borrowed money— the sheer risk of using borrowed money to— the sheer risk of using borrowed money to fund tax cuts, that is not conservative. one of the world's worst stadium disasters. at least 125 people have died in a stampede at an indonesian football match after police tear—gassed pitch invaders. football is by far the number one
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sport in this country and everybody loves it in this country so it's very difficult to see a future without football, theyjust have to get to the bottom of what happened and make sure it is said, be glad to come back. king charles will now not be at next month's climate change conference in egypt following reports that prime minister liz truss "advised" him not to attend. a man has been charged with the murder of nine—year—old olivia pratt—korbel, who was shot in her home in liverpool in august. brazilians are voting in the first round of an election which has seen a bitter campaign between past and present presidents. and kenya's amos kipruto and ethiopia's yalemzerf yehualaw win their maiden london marathon titles with breakaway victories in the elite men's and women's races.
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liz truss says she stands by her policy of cutting taxes, arguing that her government had to act. but the prime minister said she would learn from the week of turmoil which followed the mini budget, during which the pound fell to a record low against the dollar. today is the first day of the conservatives�* party conference in birmingham. our political correspondent, helen catt is in birmingham for us now. it's filling up here, delegates are at started arriving a few hours ago, this is the first party conference where liz truss is the prime minister and she has only been in office slightly less than a month. but she is arriving knowing she has a bit of a reassurance job to do here and that is because of those divisions on her economic approach which we saw to some extent in the
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leadership campaign over the summer, they have been heightened since with they have been heightened since with the mini budget on friday and the fallout from that reaction in the markets, mortgage rates, that has deepened concerns amongst conservative mps that do not like the plan and there are of course many who do, so everything that liz truss says this week, every word thatis truss says this week, every word that is whiting says, is going to be heavily scrutinised, she knows she has this reassurance job to do, that started this morning when she admitted to laura kunz berg that perhaps they could have handled that the mini budget better. there perhaps they could have handled that the mini budget better.— the mini budget better. there is an issue that interest _ the mini budget better. there is an issue that interest rates _ the mini budget better. there is an issue that interest rates are - the mini budget better. there is an issue that interest rates are going i issue that interest rates are going up issue that interest rates are going up around — issue that interest rates are going up around the world and we do have to face _ up around the world and we do have to face that — up around the world and we do have to face that and we do have two... but, _ to face that and we do have two... but, i_ to face that and we do have two... but, i do _ to face that and we do have two... but, i do want to say to people, i understand — but, i do want to say to people, i understand their worries about what has happened this week and i do stand _ has happened this week and i do stand by— has happened this week and i do stand by the package to be announced and i stand _ stand by the package to be announced and i stand by the fact that we announced it quickly, because we had to act _ but i do accept we should have
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laid the ground better. i do accept that, and i have learned from that, i have learned from that, and i will make sure that in future we do a betterjob of laying the ground. one of the issues in the mini budget, things amid many mps liked but one of the things that caused probably the biggest political row was the policy to scrap the 45p top rate of tax for the highest earners. liz truss did say this morning that was the chancellor's policy but you did defend it, she did say it didn't really raise very much money, she stood by doing it as part of a larger package of tax measures. but there are many conservative mps that think it is the wrong thing to do. have a listen to michael gove. there are two main — have a listen to michael gove. there are two main things _ have a listen to michael gove. there are two main things that _ have a listen to michael gove. there are two main things that are - are two main things that are problematic, two major things that are problematic with the fiscal event, the first is the sheer risk of using borrowed money to fund tax
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cuts. that is not conservative. then, the second thing is, the decision to cut the 45p rate to change the law how bankers are paid in the city of london. ultimately, at a time when people are suffering, you are right to point out the concerns people have to do with mortgages and benefits. when you have additional millions of pounds in play, to have as your principal decision, the headline tax move, cutting tax for the wealthiest, that is a display of the wrong values. it sounds right now, if things carry on as they have, you won't be able to build as these measures? the good thin , build as these measures? the good thing. there — build as these measures? the good thing, there are _ build as these measures? the good thing, there are many _ build as these measures? the good thing, there are many good - build as these measures? the good thing, there are many good things i thing, there are many good things and i do welcome the broader point she made about growth. but the critical thing is that liz truss has acknowledged that with hindsight, the mistakes were made were in the preparation... you the mistakes were made were in the preparation - -_
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preparation... you are carefully avoidin: preparation... you are carefully avoiding this — preparation... you are carefully avoiding this question - preparation. .. you are carefully avoiding this question of- preparation... you are carefully i avoiding this question of whether you will vote on its? i... the labour you will vote on its? i. .. the labour leader— you will vote on its? i. .. the labour leader keir— you will vote on its? i... the labour leader keir starmer said he would work with conservative mps who wanted to vote that down, although this morning the conservative party chairman said this morning that anyone who did that would lose at the web, there are certainly a lot of division that liz truss will be trying to get past this week. i have with me a conservative mp who was he at conference, the mp for devizes in wiltshire, what did you make of liz truss saying she could have lay the ground better? i truss saying she could have lay the ground better?— truss saying she could have lay the ground better? i am gratefulto her for doinu ground better? i am gratefulto her for doing so — ground better? i am gratefulto her for doing so because _ ground better? i am gratefulto her for doing so because the _ ground better? i am gratefulto her for doing so because the fact - ground better? i am gratefulto her for doing so because the fact is - ground better? i am gratefulto her for doing so because the fact is the | for doing so because the fact is the politics of this has been pretty unfortunate and it is easy to say that with hindsight, and i think she is right to recognise that what should have happened is the sequencing of these announcements should have been different. there is a large scale reform package the government is going to be introducing, details of that will be announced over the coming months. i
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recognise now, what we should have seen was the wider supply—side reforms. i'm particularly interested interested in how we support families and communities themselves to sustain the economic shocks. the tax package are part of that, but it would have made sense to do differently, but who am i to judge? this is all part of a larger package, we have to give the government time to set things up. is thisjust a communications problem, or is there a problem with the 45p policy? there is a necessarily with 45p policy, if it is in the context of a wider package of reform, that will deliver the growth of an agreement on productivity and regional growth that we need. we have a very unequal economy in this society and if we can stimulate enterprises, stimulus investment, crucially get more money into the business and places that need them, then i have no problem. the 45p tax ban is only introduced in 2010, labour went through their whole 12 years of government with a 40p tax
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rate. all we're doing is going to that now. but if that is all that is happening, obviously that is not right. happening, obviously that is not riuht. ~ . . happening, obviously that is not riiht, m ., happening, obviously that is not riuht. a ., ., ., ., right. michael gove said, that to do that at a time _ right. michael gove said, that to do that at a time when _ right. michael gove said, that to do that at a time when ministers - right. michael gove said, that to do that at a time when ministers are i that at a time when ministers are signalling they are going to commit to raising benefits in line with inflation but that displays the wrong values? i inflation but that displays the wrong values?— inflation but that displays the wron: values? ., ., wrong values? i would agree with that, i think _ wrong values? i would agree with that, i think we _ wrong values? i would agree with that, i think we are _ wrong values? i would agree with that, i think we are not _ wrong values? i would agree with that, i think we are not going - wrong values? i would agree with that, i think we are not going to i that, i think we are not going to support families —— like if we are not going to support families, if we are going to impose further squeeze is on a spending, it might be necessary in order to balance the books. that shouldn't be done, in my view, just by across the piece cut to spending. what we need is reform to spending. what we need is reform to reduce the demand that we are placing on our acute public services, welfare, health care and otherwise so that it is possible to come over time, reduce the burden of taxation. but i don't think we should be going immediately to spending cuts, unless we are also reforming the system. itruihat spending cuts, unless we are also reforming the system. what could liz truss say over _
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reforming the system. what could liz truss say over the _ reforming the system. what could liz truss say over the next _ reforming the system. what could liz truss say over the next couple - reforming the system. what could liz truss say over the next couple of - truss say over the next couple of days to convince your colleagues? because we're not going to get detail about that, the regulations, we will not get those details it before the end of november, they have been clear about that. so what can she do, what can she say, over the next few days that will change people's mines? i the next few days that will change people's mines?— the next few days that will change people's mines? i think she needs to do what she — people's mines? i think she needs to do what she has _ people's mines? i think she needs to do what she has begun _ people's mines? i think she needs to do what she has begun to _ people's mines? i think she needs to do what she has begun to do - people's mines? i think she needs to do what she has begun to do today i do what she has begun to do today which is explain that the announcements made a week ago a part of a long—term package of reform. it was necessary to understand the argument they are making which is that we needed to come out quickly and signal a very clear change of direction and assimilate the economy with these tax reforms. what needs to happen over the next couple of daysis to happen over the next couple of days is the confident communication, of a long—term plan, which is about reforming the supply side of the economy but also, as i say, of society itself, strengthening communities and families to sustain shocks. . ~ communities and families to sustain shocks. ., ., , ., communities and families to sustain shocks. . ~' , ., , . communities and families to sustain shocks. ., ., , ., , . ., , shocks. thank you very much. that is the view of — shocks. thank you very much. that is the view of one _ shocks. thank you very much. that is the view of one conservative - shocks. thank you very much. that is the view of one conservative mp, - the view of one conservative mp, things liz truss need to do in the next few days. let see how that pans
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out. indonesian officials have revised down, to 125, the number of people killed in the crush at a football match on the island ofjava. it's thought to be the deadliest stadium disaster in more than half a century. fifa president gianni infantino said his thoughts were with the families of the victims. it happened in malang when fans of a local team ran onto pitch after they lost against bitter rivals. police fired tear gas. as panic spread, thousands surged towards the exits, where many suffocated. a warning that you may find some of shelley phelps's report distressing. chaos erupted as fans stormed the pitch moments after the final whistle on the match which saw arema lose at home to persebaya surabaya. players had to be ushered away by security. police say they started firing tear
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gas in response to the situation. | translation: it was the feeling of disappointment that prompted the supporters to go down to the field to ask the players why they lost the game. that's when the security team moved in for prevention efforts, so they won't get onto the field or interact with the players. during that process, in the prevention effort, tear gas was fired because it had gotten anarchic. they started attacking officers. they damaged cars. the tear gas caused the crowd to surge towards the exit, where many people were crushed. the tragedy is already one of the world's deadliest sporting disasters, and the number of fatalities is rising. scores of injured people are being treated in nearby hospitals. in a statement, indonesia's football association expressed its deepest condolences for what happened to football lovers in the country.
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indonesia's president has ordered the authorities to thoroughly reevaluate security at football matches. translation: i regret this tragedy, and i hope this is the last tragedy to occur in indonesian football. we cannot have any more in the future. sportsmanship, humanity and brotherhood in the nation should be upheld together. the premier football league has been ordered to suspend all matches until what happened has been investigated. shelly phelps, bbc news. joining me from bali in indonesia is resty woro yuniar, asia reporter for the south china morning post. thanks forjoining us here on bbc news, what more details are emerging now about the tragic events of that match? . . �* now about the tragic events of that match? ., , �* , now about the tragic events of that match? . , �* , ., match? there hasn't been more details except — match? there hasn't been more details except for _ match? there hasn't been more details except for the _ match? there hasn't been more details except for the police - match? there hasn't been more| details except for the police who said that dozens of bodies are still out and identified, because they didn't carry their citizenship and
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identity cards with them indicating that they are still teenagers or children because the pitch limited to get a card limit is 17. iii children because the pitch limited to get a card limit is 17.— to get a card limit is 17. in terms ofthe to get a card limit is 17. in terms of the scenes, _ to get a card limit is 17. in terms of the scenes, it _ to get a card limit is 17. in terms of the scenes, it does _ to get a card limit is 17. in terms of the scenes, it does seem - of the scenes, it does seem incredibly chaotic, have you witnessed anything like this before, on the island that there or indeed any of the other islands? i have never seen _ any of the other islands? i have never seen anything _ any of the other islands? i have never seen anything on - any of the other islands? i have never seen anything on this - any of the other islands? i have i never seen anything on this scale before, except during riots and during massive protests, because the police here, they have been criticised for being heavy—handed during their approach to riots or large protests because they are so easy—to—use tear gas to disperse the crowds, so to use one inside the stadium during the match, has taken everyone back, it's very unusual for
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them to use tear gas inside a stadium. d0 them to use tear gas inside a stadium. ., ., , stadium. do we know why the police chose to use — stadium. do we know why the police chose to use that _ stadium. do we know why the police chose to use that method _ stadium. do we know why the police chose to use that method to - stadium. do we know why the police chose to use that method to try - stadium. do we know why the police chose to use that method to try to l chose to use that method to try to restore order when there would have been other options open, presumably? i talked to someone earlier and he said that it may be because the police doesn't have the standard operating procedure to disperse crowds during football matches. so they use the same procedure they have been using to basically come down or to disperse crowds during protests. as i said, for indonesians, it's common to see police using tear gas during large—scale protests. so they use this to calm down the supporters who invaded the pitch and try to express their disappointment because the team has lost, so everybody,
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especially human rights organisations have been criticising the police, they didn't have the standard operating procedure and they actually violate fifa's own rules about not using tear gas inside the stadium. taste rules about not using tear gas inside the stadium.— rules about not using tear gas inside the stadium. we know the resident inside the stadium. we know the president has — inside the stadium. we know the president has ordered _ inside the stadium. we know the president has ordered that - inside the stadium. we know the president has ordered that all. president has ordered that all matches in indonesia's top league stop until an investigation has taken place, do we know how long that might be? that taken place, do we know how long that might be?— taken place, do we know how long that might be? at this point in time we'd have no _ that might be? at this point in time we'd have no idea _ that might be? at this point in time we'd have no idea how— that might be? at this point in time we'd have no idea how long - that might be? at this point in time we'd have no idea how long the - we'd have no idea how long the investigation will be, but i think fifa will have to help the local soccer tournament dummy organisation here —— rack the local organisation. they have to help them develop normal standard operating procedure and improve the security during football matches because this is not the first time that hooliganism has
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struck. . ~' , ., , the first time that hooliganism has struck. ., ,, , ., , . simon mcmenemy has managed football teams in the region for the past ten years and is currently technical director of bhayangkara fc. he spoke to me about indonesian football culture. the crowd play a very active part of football in this country. we get big crowds, 40,000, 50,000, 60,000 to an average league game, and they are loud, boisterous, but it can spill over. they are very passionate about their football, and sadly the team lost last night and they simply wanted to ask the players why and made sure they knew who they were playing for. what normally happens in situations like this in indonesia where fans spill onto the pitch? normally, there is a police response, a heavy police response at every game. games in this country cannot go ahead without a police safety certificate, which means they must be enough police in attendance. normally the police push the crowd
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back, it doesn't normally spill over into violence, they are pushed back into the stadium seating or standing areas, and in the crowd to disperse afterwards. last night, i think we saw, from all the videos, that it ended up slightly different. the headlines on bbc news... britain's prime minister admits to the bbc that she should have laid the ground better for announcements that sparked chaos on the financial markets. one of the world's worst stadium disasters. at least 125 people have died in a stampede at an indonesian football match after police tear—gassed pitch invaders. and kenya's amos kipruto and ethiopia's yalemzerf yehualaw win their maiden london marathon titles with breakaway victories in the elite men's and women's races. brazilians are voting in perhaps
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the most divisive presidential election in decades. the leftist former president luiz inacio lula da silva is hoping to make a political comeback. here he is casting his vote, shortly after the polls opened. most opinion polls favour him, but it's unclear whether he can get 50% in the first round or whether a second round will be required. a few minutes later, incumbent jair bolsonaro cast his vote. he has not committed to accepting the result if he loses. an indication of the outcome is expecting late on sunday local time. our correspondent in brazil, katy watson, has this update. there are nearly a dozen candidates in the race but only two matter, the frontrunner is a former leftist president lula, he was what i want and the most popular politician here, but he fell from grace over
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corruption scandals and spent time in prison, sincejudges being annulled. at the other end, bolsonaro, a man who is known for his patriotism, family values, and conservatism, but he is also known for his disdain of democracy. that is the big concern in this vote. basically, over the weekend, the latest polls show that lula could win this vote in one round, avoiding a run—off later in the month. actually he could get more than 50% of the vote. bolsonaro is trailing him by about 14%, there is also a real possibility that second bag will not accept the result, he has called the poll is a lie, his supporters agree with that, they say the only way this can be a real race is if bolsonaro wins. certainly a lot of attention about the boat today, see if we he will accept the boats if the polls are counted. a man is due to appear in court tomorrow, charged
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with the murder of nine—year—old olivia pratt—korbel, who was shot at her home in liverpool in august. 34—year—old thomas cashman from west derby, has also been charged with the attempted murder of olivia's mother, cheryl, and joseph nee, who he's alleged to have chased into olivia's home. judith moritz reports. it's six weeks since olivia pratt—korbel was killed — six weeks of her family grieving... i feel i'm on it as well. ..and the police hunting for the gunman responsible. at last, a breakthrough, announced at a hastily arranged media conference. the crown prosecution service has authorised merseyside police to charge thomas cashman, 3a, from grenadier drive, west derby, with the murder of nine—year—old olivia pratt—korbel, also the attempted murder ofjoseph nee and cheryl korbel on the 22nd of august 2022.
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olivia was shot when a gunman burst into her home in the liverpool suburb of dovecot in august. he'd been chasing another man when they both ran through the front door, which olivia's mum cheryl had opened, wanting to see why there was so much noise outside. olivia's death has shattered the community where she lived. another man, ao—year—old paul russell, has also been charged in connection with the shooting, accused of assisting an offender. both men will appear at liverpool magistrates court on monday. judith moritz, bbc news. king charles will not attend the cop27 climate change conference in egypt next month, buckingham palace has confirmed. it follows reports that the uk prime minister liz truss had advised him to stay away. in response, the palace confirmed advice had been sought by the monarch and given by liz truss. before ascending the throne, the king, who's campaigned
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for environmental causes for decades, indicated that he would attend. two men have been arrested and charged for the alleged assault of another man who heckled prince andrew as he walked behind his mother's coffin in edinburgh. the 22—year—old shouted at the duke of york from the crowd as he took part in her majesty's funeral procession along the royal mile the two men, both 3a, are accused of attacking the man who was later seen lying on the ground after being removed from the crowd. a leading expert in infectious diseases has said the uk's fight against the monkeypox virus is looking "very positive". professor neil ferguson said vaccines and vigilance have helped to drive down the number of cases from its peak injuly — to below a hundred new infections a week. our global health correspondent, naomi grimley, has more. painful lesions, long self—isolation periods and queues for vaccines.
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for many men who have sex with men, the monkey pox outbreak has caused huge worry, and even triggered a worldwide public health emergency as cases multiplied on a scale not seen it before. sam, who has asked us to keep his identity private, fell ill with the virus in the first few weeks of the outbreak. since then, he's noticed a change in the social scene he's part of. lots of gay men are having a lot less sex, and are having sex with less people. some people i know have been avoiding going out to places like sex clubs. the idea of going out, meeting lots of people in the dark, and then you not swapping contact details with them, i think people are just thinking a bit about how much risk they are willing to take on. after an initial cluster of infections in the spring, the uk saw a steady crescendo in new cases throughout the early summer, but a peak was reached injuly and since then cases have been falling again.
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other european countries like france and germany have followed this pattern. at the moment, everything is looking very positive. one of britain's top infectious disease experts who has also been advising the government thinks the latest data is good news. we are not completely sure of exactly why vaccination started to be rolling out probably had some effect but it does not explain it all. the likely hypothesis, and there is some circumstantial data but not good data, is that there was quite a big change in behaviour in the most affected community, namely men who have sex with men, gay and bisexual men. are we now at a point where we can wipe our brow and think, this is not going to become endemic? if it is going to persist it will probably persist at sporadic levels. we should not be complacent. if it has been driven mostly by behaviour change that we have to be alert to the possibility that
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once case numbers are much lower may be people are less vigilant and we start to see a resurgence. the uk says it is ready to start giving second doses of the monkey pox vaccine to those at high risk. sexual health services are still under huge pressure, but the wider picture is looking hopeful. naomi grimley, bbc news. the cost—of—living crisis is hitting people living in rural areas harder than those living in towns and cities, according to a new report. the rural services network says people in the countryside are spending more on essentials, like heating, transport and housing. joanne writtle has more. like many rural villages, welshampton, near ellesmere, doesn't have mains gas. great—grandad ian fletcher relies on heating oil, and the price has shot up. we've no other alternative. we've got to buy the oil or we freeze, basically, and can't cook. so, we've got to make sure we have the oil in at all times. he gets a small discount
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through a community bulk—buying scheme and has solar panels. the government has said householders off the gas grid will receive £100. the north shropshire mp says that's not enough, as oil prices have doubled in a year. for an average household, that's about £1,200 more and the government have only offered them £100, which isn't going to be enough to meet that challenge. and if we look at the impact of last friday's budget, where sterling has collapsed and oil is traded in dollars, there's a risk that those prices are going to go even higher over the next few weeks. so, you're saying a £100 payment isn't enough but where would the money come from to pay for more? well, we'd like to see the energy price cap extended to people who are off—grid, and we've been very clear that we'd like to see that paid for with a windfall tax. the department for business and energy told us further details will be announced shortly. meanwhile in prees, log seller richard evans says this year
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is his busiest in a decade of trading as people with open fires stock up. normally, we would start deliveries approximately now — end of september, running into october. this year, it started on the first week ofjuly and it went absolutely crazy and it has not stopped since. he's increased prices slightly but not enough, he says, to cover his soaring electricity costs. joanne writtle, bbc news. kenya's amos kipruto has won the men's london marathon while ethiopia's yalemzerf yehualaw triumphed in the women's. many more of the estimated 42,000 people are now starting to cross the finish line. let's speak to my colleague, sarah mulkerrins. she is there at the finish line. over to you. there are so many people that are just finishing and i feel a little bit sorry for this
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man, straight over the finish line, how was that?— man, straight over the finish line, how was that? brutal. i am humbled b the how was that? brutal. i am humbled by the 26-2 — how was that? brutal. i am humbled by the 26.2 miles _ how was that? brutal. i am humbled by the 26.2 miles that _ how was that? brutal. i am humbled by the 26.2 miles that l _ how was that? brutal. i am humbled by the 26.2 miles that i have - how was that? brutal. i am humbled by the 26.2 miles that i have just - by the 26.2 miles that i have just run. what an amazing day, though. the support along the way is just ridiculous, it's so... where else do you get that many people in london wishing each other well? tens of thousands of people cheering each other on, it was glorious. i think i need a nurse, it was a joy. i glad i finished it though. it's a long way. was there any point when you thought, oh god, i mightjust slope off? i thought, oh god, i might 'ust slope off? ., ., ., , off? i thought that after the first mile and then _ off? i thought that after the first mile and then every _ off? i thought that after the first mile and then every half- off? i thought that after the first mile and then every half mile . off? i thought that after the first l mile and then every half mile until the finish. i kept looking around for a bus or open i could steal, but nothing, no. that is the thing about this, everyone is supporting you, but you have to do it. it's a treat
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and i am very pleased i did it. but i am shattered.— and i am very pleased i did it. but i am shattered. regulations, lovely medal, celebrate _ i am shattered. regulations, lovely medal, celebrate well, _ i am shattered. regulations, lovely medal, celebrate well, put - i am shattered. regulations, lovely medal, celebrate well, put your- i am shattered. regulations, lovely| medal, celebrate well, put your feet up, enjoy your rest, well done today. up, en'oy your rest, well done toda . . ~ up, en'oy your rest, well done toda . ., ., i. up, en'oy your rest, well done today._ stephen, i up, en'oy your rest, well done i today._ stephen, not up, en'oy your rest, well done - today._ stephen, not long today. thank you. stephen, not long across the finish _ today. thank you. stephen, not long across the finish line _ today. thank you. stephen, not long across the finish line into _ today. thank you. stephen, not long across the finish line into an - across the finish line into an interview talking to us here in the bbc news channel but it's just wonderful scenes all morning long. we have had run as you mentioned in the bulletin, but for a lot of people this marathon is about their own stories, their own journeys, people this marathon is about their own stories, their ownjourneys, why they are running it, those connections and those reasons that are close to them and they all crossing the finish line here in their own at their own achievements and they are being shed on as stephen was saying by the people of london all through that tough, tough journey. 26.2 miles. but it makes it all worthwhile when they get to the finish line and use the see the smiles on theirfaces finish line and use the see the smiles on their faces and they get to celebrate and enjoy a very long
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rest after it. full of admiration, 26.2 miles, first thing across the finish line, live on bbc news being interviewed by yourself. thank you very much, enjoy the rest of the day. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren. hello. it was certainly a soggy start to sunday across some southern parts we will see some rain from these two areas, they willjoin we will see some rain from these two areas, they will join forces we will see some rain from these two areas, they willjoin forces and pressure from the north—west in from the atlantic, that is a caveat early on across southern parts of england, brought that rain first thing, that is gone, seeing some sunshine here, sunny spells with the rest of the day. tempted by late afternoon, still if you like showers in the north—west of scotland. those should get pushed away, clearer skies for a while, tumbling temperatures, in the west in the cloud tends to increase later so it will be colder tonight across eastern scotland and across eastern england and across the
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midlands. in ruralareas eastern england and across the midlands. in rural areas those damages could be as low as 2 or three degrees. that will be the coldest night of the week ahead, quite mild over the weekend, but it will be windy. we will see some rain from time to time as well. we saw on the satellite picture the cloud coming in from the atlantic, that will be pushing its way into northern ireland and scotland, bringing some rain into the north—west together with strengthening winds, gales by the end of the day. quite a well of england and wales, dry air after that chilly start, some sunshine, a bit hazy at times but again at those damages could reach highs of 18 or 19 degrees. high pressure is giving aid a dry on monday across england and wales, but that is getting shunted away by these weather fronts here moving in from the atlantic, winds pick up overnight and into tuesday across more of the country and we have that broad band rain they across the north—west is that rain pushes into england and wales in the afternoon and becomes a lighter and more patchy, following that we get some sunshine and a few showers in scotland and northern ireland, should stay dry towards the
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south—east, quite warm here, tempted reaching 20 degrees. some places, will see more than their fair share of rain, on tuesday and wednesday. maybe across north wales but more especially in cumbria and also south—west scotland 50— hundred millimetres of rain is on the forecast. wet weather to start the day, it will be followed by some showers coming into the north—west, but across that band, winds particularly gusty, windy day, quite widely, particular across england and wales widespread gales hear the winds could touch 60 miles an hour. that'll make it feel colder as showers coming to scotland and northern ireland, still some decent temperatures though in the south—east.
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good afternoon. the prime minister has said her government should have "laid the ground better" before announcing major tax cuts in the recent mini budget, which led to days of turmoil in the financial markets. however, liz truss stood by the plans, saying they would promote economic growth. she confirmed that a tax cut for the highest earners will go ahead, but would not rule out cuts in public spending and welfare benefits. our deputy political editor vicki young is in birmingham — where the conservative's party conference has begun.
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vicki. . yes, and liz truss comes in here as the — vicki. . yes, and liz truss comes in here as the newly _ vicki. . yes, and liz truss comes in here as the newly elected - vicki. . yes, and liz truss comes in here as the newly elected leader. vicki. . yes, and liz truss comes in. here as the newly elected leader and of course prime minister, but this has been really one of the most difficult runs to a party conference i can ever remember, the government hope that mini budget would put them in the driving seat, setting the agenda, show them being very bold and deceive, instead, though, that hostile reaction to it, has real will i left the party reeling. this is a prime minister who needs to calm the markets and many in her own party. the decision to borrow billions to pay for tax cuts was met with panic and disbelief. today she made no apology for acting quickly to help with energy bills, but did finally accept a small part of the torrent of criticism that has come her way. i do stand by the package we announced, and i stand by the fact that we announced it quickly, because we had to act. i do accept we should have laid the ground better. i do accept that.
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you accept you should have laid the ground better? and i have learned from that. i have learned from that, and i will make sure that in future, we do a betterjob of laying the ground. but she repeated her view that global problems are to blame for a rise in interest rates. liz truss and her team believe higher growth is the answer to the country's problems, and lower taxes will help. so will she still abolish the top 45p rate for the most wealthy? yes. and it is part, laura, it is part of an overall package of making our tax system simpler and lower. can i ask you, prime minister, did you discuss scrapping the top rate with your whole cabinet? no, we didn't. it was a decision that the chancellor made. the prime minister has admitted some of her plans will make her unpopular. today she sidestepped questions about cuts to public services. what i'm going to do is make sure we get value
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for money for the taxpayer, but i'm very, very committed to making sure we've got excellent front line public services. this was the immediate verdict from a former cabinet minister who never thought miss truss should be in the top job. is she at risk of using borrowed money to fund tax cuts? - that is not conservative. and then the second thing - is the decision to cut the 45p rate and indeed at the same time - to change the law which governs how bankers are paidj in the city of london. when you have additionalj billions of pounds in play, to have as your principal decision, the headline tax moved, - cutting tax for the wealthiest, that is a display of _ the wrong values. michael gove wouldn't say whether he'd vote for his own government's plans. he and some colleagues are concerned that ministers are considering breaking a promise to raise benefits in line with inflation. what we have to do is to make
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people spend more to have growth in the country. and if 45p of a tax cut, which is kind of nothing, really, is going to make a big difference to people's spending, then let's go for it. it's horrific. absolutely hugely damaging to us. they need to u—turn it, reverse the decision, get it changed. it's going to kill us. we should thrive on our loyalty to the leader, irrespective - of who you voted for, _ and i'm very happy that we're taking a positive approach to the economy. the conservative party chairman has warned rebellious mps they will be kicked out of the parliamentary party if they don't vote for the plans. many are waiting for a sign that liz truss will be the one to back down. ly ly left the party reeling. among left the party reeling. among left the party reeling. among those members & how concerned are they about the position the party finds itself in?—
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are they about the position the party finds itself in? well, michael gove's intervention _ party finds itself in? well, michael gove's intervention is _ party finds itself in? well, michael gove's intervention is significant. i gove's intervention is significant. not only has he been a senior figure in government for many years but he is articulating in public what many tory mps are telling people like me, in private. of course he has never been a fan of liz truss, but that doesn't mean there isn't a lot of unhappiness, there are eyebrows being raised about kwasi kwarteng's position. liz truss making it clear it was his decision to cut that rate of 45 pence, but mps are saying his politicaljudgment isn't up to it. he should have seen how the markets would respond to this unfunded tax cut, all that extra borrowing, so what do mps want to see in they are coalescing round that unhappiness about the 45 pence rate. there won't be a vote on it in parliament until some time next year but what they are worried about is the damage it is doing to the party �*s reputaion between now and then, this idea of “p between now and then, this idea of up fairness, they say if you are not going to keep benefits up hiring but you are helping the wealthy that is damaging to their cause, of course
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what the government is doing now is banking everything on growth. liz truss saying if they can get the economy to grow, that means there will be more money and more money to spend on public services. thank you vice vicky young our deputy political editor at the conservative conference in birmingham at least 125 people have been killed in a crush at a football match in indonesia. the stampede began after police fired tear gas at fans who had invaded the pitch at a stadium in the city of malang on the island ofjava. a warning you may find some of the details injonathan head's report distressing. videos posted by fans at the stadium showed the disaster unfolding almost as it happened. it had been a hard fought match between two teams with a history of rivalry. the home side had lost two goals to three. the home side had lost 2—3, and some of its fans streamed onto the pitch in protest. there were running skirmishes
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with the police, who then decided to fire tear gas, which drifted into the stands, causing the above capacity crowd to search for the exits. that's where many of them were crushed. unconscious fans were carried out of the stadium to the ambulances which had begun arriving to get them to hospital. this survivor described choking on tear gas. it was everywhere, he said. inside and outside the stadium, even in the shops and stalls nearby. indonesian presidentjoko widodo ordered an immediate investigation, and for all premier league matches to be suspended. "i hope this will be the last tragedy of this kind in our country," he said. outside the stadium, the burned shells of police trucks bore witness to the anger of the crowd. indonesian football has long been troubled by fan violence and poor management.
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but the way the police handled the crowd trouble in malang, in particular the use of tear gas inside a packed stadium, must surely be the main focus of this investigation. jonathan head, bbc news. russia says it has destroyed seven artillery and missile depots in the south and east of ukraine. the attacks took place in kharkiv, zaporizhzhia and mykolaiv, as well as donetsk, one of the regions which president putin says has been annexed by russia. it follows the retreat of russian forces from a key town, lyman, after ukraine launched a successful counter—offensive. people in brazil are voting in the first round of a presidential election which could see one of the world's biggest democracies switch from a far—right to a left—wing leader. presidentjair bolsonaro is seeking a second term after four years in power. he's facing a strong challenge from the socialist former president
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luiz inacio lula da silva, who has a big lead in the opinion polls. more than 40,000 people have been taking part in this year's london marathon. in the women's elite race, 23—year—old yalemzerf yehualaw has became the youngest ever winner, despite a dramatic fall with six miles to go. our sports correspondent joe wilson reports. you will know these footballers — starting lionesses. celebrate the beginning. after this weekend's rail strikes they were there on time for their hours on london's roads. watch out to for the speed bumps. at back of this pack you can spot yalemzerf yehualaw, tripping and falling. well, she rose. by buckingham palace, she had lost the rest of the field. the mall has been the setting for such a scope of emotion in recent weeks. it was a 23—year—old ethiopian born to run, and to win. she is the champion
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in london in 2022. from kenya, amos kipruto, the men's winner, two hours four minutes, 39 seconds in his first london marathon. the men's wheelchair race, daniel romanchuk had been waiting for his moment. tucked in, letting the leader marcel hug do the work, mile after mile. now was that finally a gap? oh, no! hug of switzerland held off the american, to win in a course record time. prize money has risen to record levels for these wheelchair racers. this was catherine debrunner, another swiss winner, in another course record in the women's event. it seemed like spring. next year the marathon returns to april. its soul always lies with charity. joe wilson, bbc news. you can see more on all of today's stories on the bbc news channel. the next news on bbc one is at ten to five. bye for now.
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accordian music plays sniffs ooh! sniffs there was another whiff of something there. sniffing i don't know — grapefruits? is it the sea? today, i'm having a rather smelly experience
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while trying to solve a mystery from history. this is one of the most famous shipwrecks in the world. the mary rose was king henry viii's favourite warship, and, in 1545, while battling the french, it sunk under mysterious circumstances. for more than 400 years, it lay on its side at the bottom of the river solent. but amazingly, the starboard half was preserved under the silt, which led, in 1982, to one of the most complex maritime salvage operations in history. and now, exactly 40 years on,
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i've donned a bluetooth—connected backpack that will release different smells as i chase around the mary rose museum in portsmouth, trying to work out why the ship went down. right in the bowels of the ship now and i'm smelling tar. it's like the roadworks outside my house! we've got a genuine mystery here. we don't know why the mary rose sunk on 19th july 1545 and now we're giving you the chance to, through following these clues, work it out for yourself. my dad was a sailor for the spanish merchant navy. he's from the sahara desert in north africa originally. myjob is to meet the characters and watch the scenes that might explain the sinking. i think i'm going to fire the cannon now, which is going to put a hole in that wall. he chuckles getting the smell. a bit of gunpowder there. he laughs the backpack is loaded with different scent bottles, each triggered by the scenes
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in the augmented reality app, the idea being to make this whole experience even more immersive. in terms of where we process smell in the brain and where we process memory in the brain, they�* re very closely connected, they're linked, they're in close proximity. so, actually, that's why smell and memory work together. so, you smell a smell and it'll take you back maybe to your childhood. you know, you might smell cabbage cooking and it will remind you of school dinners in the canteen. it's kind of very subtle. it's not in your face, cos it's literally not in your face, it's just around you, so there's just that kind of ambience of, in this case, a recently fired canon. yes! looks like you owe me three groats. glass smashes ooh, stale beer! is that you or me? the smells themselves have been created specially by a perfume company whose task was, let's say, not to be sniffed at.
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sometimes they send the scent and you smell it, and you're like, "yeah, i did not want a soil—inspired perfume, "i actually want soil," you know, "so could you just go again on that?" and they tried to make us some rotten meat for in the hulls — the cook's clue, if you got to that clue — and itjust smelt nothing like rotten meat. it smelt like a really nice, you know, austin, texas barbecue. and i was, like, "guys, yeah, it's not gonna fly," so then we changed that one because they also stored the beer and the meat together, so we were like, "ok, we're not going to get rotten meat." some things are really hard to, you know, recreate. we'll go with the beer, so, yeah. the ship is heaving dangerously. she doesn't feel stable. ooh, she's doing a sharp left turn. i think she's going to lose it on the bends. yep, she's going down. shouting at the end of the experience, the mary rose is doomed to sink once more, for reasons that we'll never know for sure. but this time, having met
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an incompetent captain, a vengeful shipmate and heard about the many mistakes that were made on board, visitors get to give their thoughts on why the ship went down. ok, time for a look at this week's tech news now, and the ceo of apple, tim cook, has told the bbc there's no good excuse for the lack of women in the tech sector. he said more needs to be done to educate young people in the skills that they need for the industry, such as coding. nasa says it could be a couple of months before it knows if an experiment to change the course of an asteroid has worked. it crashed the dart probe in the rock deliberately to see if the same technique would work to stop future objects from hitting earth. over the next two months, we're going to see more information from the investigation team on what period change did we actually make, because that's our number two goal.
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number one was hit the asteroid, which we've done, but now, number two is really measure that period change and characterise how much ejector we actually put out. london's natural history museum is going to digitise their environmental research onto the cloud for the first time. they say the new data platform will give hundreds of scientists access to their resources, allowing them to track and respond to the biodiversity crisis. and this camera could unlock a whole new underwater world. how? well, it doesn't need a battery. it's wireless, allowing it to go deeper and for longer than cameras have gone before, and engineers at mit have designed it to convert sound travelling through water into power. artificial intelligence. it trawls through data faster than humans can. and it learns, making suggestions our brains
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might not have considered. so, a! has the potential to make any industry smarter. but here in the netherlands, it's being used to sniff out something i am especially keen to explore. more than 10 million data points are being used to try to create any person's unique personalised perfume. first up, some questions in the centronics app. "if you could be somewhere else right now, where would that be?" hmm. ooh, by the ocean. some directly related to perfume, but others, not so much. we cast a pretty wide net of questions because in the long run we're also a bit of a science adventure and project to really understand, you know, why is it that we like what we like. the ai generates three scent recipes using algorithms that scan the data in different ways.
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i named mine after my daughter, zena, kitty, our producer, and click, obviously. with some automated magic, ingredients are pumped out on demand. it is a complicated craft and so technology is sort of giving it a little push to get started. my mini perfumes are made in minutes. i was pretty impressed with the essence of zena. mmm! oh, i really like it! and my second scent was a pleasant surprise. here's kitty. ooh, my gosh! that's so different. very rich and deep and woody. and now i'm going to hand you over click. so, this is the first ever bbc click perfume. this is not nice. it's sophisticated, like the click team, but i wouldn't buy this. two out of three isn't bad, though.
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the app asks for feedback to improve and 40,000 people have already used the machine. will the ai learn over time, get smarter and be more likely to give three bottles that i love? all three. that is the ambition, to ultimately one day not even have to give you three. of course, i thought i could outsmart the a! by tweaking the formula of my favourite scent. you know... you prefer the other one! i prefer the other one! i would've thought that by adding what i thought my preferences were, it would enhance the scent. but actually, i prefer the original. so, for now, i think when it comes to perfume, i am prepared to put my preferences in the hands of ai. away from the shop floor, i wonder, could this system really dent the $40 billion perfume industry?
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hi. how are you? this is where we really build the machines. so, this is basically giving you the possibility, really, to dive in deep and it has over 200 — 10 to 20 ingredients. you know, the urban legend is 700 people are deciding for 7 billion people how the world smells. so, by developing their own system that cuts costs and sits away from the beauty aisle, the team are opening up to new audiences and genders. this is our next thing that we're going to do. if people do it online, then they can follow it with cameras on a machine. but the machine has some way to go to understand the eclectic global demand. when it's really geographically far apart, then the system has to be retrained. it develops new preferences for certain, in certain areas, and so that's one of the reasons actually really why we're travelling around, to get more input from different people,
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totally different cultures. this intelligence may be artificial, but it does appear to have real power to recognise and interpret the essence of you. and on that note...get it? ido! that's it for the short version of the programme. the full—length one can be found on iplayer. thanks for watching. hello. for most of us what is left of sunday will be dry and spells of sunshine. more of a breeze across the north—west of scotland bringing light showers. with clear skies and
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light showers. with clear skies and light wins, temperatures will fall very quickly overnight. western areas, more cloudy later, but colder for eastern scotland, eastern england and the midlands. those are the temperatures in towns and cities. colder in the countryside. the coldest night over the week ahead. cloud and wind coming into scotland and northern ireland. gail is in the north—west later. that is where we will find most of the rain. some hazy sunshine at times for england and wales, temperatures are still up to 18, 19. could be quite a mild week ahead but it will be windy. not much rain in the south—east, other parts of the uk will see some rain at times.
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this is bbc news. i'm ben boulos and these are the latest headlines: britain's prime minister admits to the bbc that she should have laid the ground better for announcements that sparked chaos on the financial markets and divisions in her own party. ido i do stand by the package we announced and i stand by the fact that we announced it quickly, because we had to act, but i do accept that we should have laid the ground better, i do accept that. the sheer risk of using borrowed money— the sheer risk of using borrowed money to— the sheer risk of using borrowed money to fund tax cuts, that is not conservative. one of the world's worst stadium disasters. at least 125 people have died in a stampede at an indonesian football match after police tear—gassed pitch invaders.
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