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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 2, 2022 5:00pm-5:30pm BST

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in our country," he said. outside the stadium, the burned shells of police trucks bore witness to the anger of the crowd. indonesian football has long been troubled by fan violence and poor management. but the way the police handled the crowd trouble in malang, in particular the use of tear gas inside a packed stadium, must surely be the main focus of this investigation. jonathan head, bbc news. brazilians are voting in the first round of a presidential election which could see one of the world's biggest democracies go from a right—wing populist leader to a left—wing former president. jair bolsonaro, the current president, is seeking a second four—year term and facing a strong challenge from luiz inacio lula da silva, a former trade union leader who first won the presidency 20 years ago.
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a minister has said suggestions that the government ordered the king not to travel to the climate summit in egypt are simply not true. buckingham palace confirmed today that the king will not be attending the summit after seeking advice from downing street and said that there was agreement he should not attend. our royal correspondent sarah campbell has more. in november last year, the then prince charles was a conspicuous presence when the un's climate change conference, cop26, was held in glasgow. it was hardly surprising. he had been raising the issue for discussion long before climate change became a prominent political concern. later that month prince charles travelled to egypt, the location of cop27. the united kingdom will be with egypt in our struggle to protect our environment. was widely presumed that the king
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would want to attend egypt's cop27, but buckingham palace has said that will not be the case. the sunday times quoted a senior palace is also said the prime minister advised the king not to go. this has been dismissed today are simply not true by a government minister. instead, but the palace and the government say there was agreement on both sides and it was unanimously decided that he should not attend cop27. much has changed over the past year, as he made plain in his first address to the nation as king — out there are new roles and responsibilities, meaning less time to devote to issues he cares passionately about. that won't stop them from supporting environmental causes, according to a former adviser. 50 causes, according to a former adviser. ., ., , , causes, according to a former adviser. . ., , , ., adviser. so i have absolutely no doubt he will _ adviser. so i have absolutely no doubt he will use _ adviser. so i have absolutely no doubt he will use the _ adviser. so i have absolutely no doubt he will use the position i adviser. so i have absolutely no i doubt he will use the position he's in at the moment to make those views known to people whenever he can, but he will do it in a different way than he did it as prince of wales, and that's perfectly clear, and the fact that he is not going to be in sharm el—sheikh in egypt probably
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gives a very strong signal that he recognises the difference. earl? gives a very strong signal that he recognises the difference. early in his reiun, recognises the difference. early in his reign. this _ recognises the difference. early in his reign, this has _ recognises the difference. early in his reign, this has shown - recognises the difference. early in his reign, this has shown the - his reign, this has shown the delicate balancing act required between his public role and private passions. sarah campbell, bbc news. now, with news of manchester city's latest triumph and the rest of the sport, here's chetan pathak at the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. we've seen nine goals at the etihad stadium where hat—tricks from phil foden and erling haaland have helped manchester city beat manchester united by six goals to three in the premier league. joe lynskey was watching: this was the derby day in manchester that turned into a rout. united had won their last four in the league. they hope would fade on seven minutes. phil foden swept city to a leader that kept growing, through a striker who keeps scoring. erling haaland's first just crossed striker who keeps scoring. erling haaland's firstjust crossed the line, his second was emphatic. that was his 13th of the season in just
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eight league games, a staggering start to his time here and to this match. for united, it wasjust like brentford in august, 4—0 at half—time. but while somewhat staid to bear it, some fansjust half—time. but while somewhat staid to bear it, some fans just left. they missed this stunning goal back from anthony, but city hadn't finished. a hat—trick for haaland, this match meant so much to him and his dad. soon too foden had his third goal, and although united scored two more light on, it didn't matter. this remarkable derby had seen two had tricks butjust one clear winner. there were first—time winners in both the men's and women's elite races at today's london marathon. more than 40,000 runners took part, as our sports correspondent joe wilson reports. you'll know these footballers — starting lionesses. celebrate the beginning. after this weekend's rail strikes, they were there on time for their hours on london's roads.
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watch out for the speed bumps. at back of this pack, you can spot yalemzerf yehualaw, tripping and falling. well, she rose. by buckingham palace, she'd lost the rest of the field. the mall has been the setting for such a scope of emotion in recent weeks. here was a 23—year—old ethiopian born to run — and to win. she's the champion in london in 2022. and from kenya, amos kipruto, the men's winner — two hours, four minutes, 39 seconds in his first london marathon. in the men's wheelchair race, daniel romanchuk had been waiting for his moment. tucked in, letting the leader marcel hug do the work, mile after mile. now, was that finally a gap? oh, no! well, hug of switzerland held off the american to win in a course record—time. prize money has risen to record levels for these wheelchair races. this was catherine debrunner, another swiss winner, in another course record in the women's event. it seemed like spring.
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next year, the marathon returns to april. its soul always lies with charity. and red bull's sergio perez has won the singapore grand prix. but he is being investigated by the stewards for a potential safety car infringement. perez overtook pole sitter charles leclerc at the start and led thereafter. leclerc had to settle for second, with his ferrari team—mate carlos sainz third. championship leader max verstappen finished seventh. that's all the sport for now. there's more throughout the evening on the bbc news channel. we're back with the late news at ten.
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hello. this is bbc news. let's return to our top story this hour, as the prime minister has said her government should have "laid the ground better" before announcing major tax cuts in the recent mini budget, which led to days of turmoil in the financial markets. however liz truss stood by the plans, saying they would promote economic growth. there is an issue that interest rates are going up around the world and we have to face that. i do want to say to people, i understand their worries about what has happened this
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week and i do stand by the package week and i do stand by the package we announced and i stand by the fact that we announced it quickly because we had to act but i do accept we should have laid the ground better. i do accept that. and i have learnt from that. i have learnt from that. and i will make sure that in future, we do a betterjob of laying the ground. let's speak to our political correspondent, helen catt. what are the highlights so far? what has caught people's attention? that admission this _ has caught people's attention? twat admission this morning from liz truss that she could have perhaps done this better, that there was a communication problem around the mini budget. ithink communication problem around the mini budget. i think that is a recognition that certainly that is something we have been hearing from a number of conservative mps, who are concerned about what was announced and the effect that we saw then with the turmoil in the markets in the days following the announcement, the changes in the mortgage market for example, so i
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think there was a bit of a sense of liz truss trying to calm things, a bit of a sense of reassurance, at her first conference as leader, and i think that is good to be a bit of a feature. but she is saying they have added is a communication issue, they are going to do better. there are some conservative mps who do not agree with that, who think it is a policy issue and michael gove, the former cabinet minister, this morning, came out against one particular policy, committee 45p tax rate that is being abolished for higher earners, he says that is a policy problem. have a listen to him. there are two things that are problematic — two major things that were problematic with the fiscal event. the first is the sheer risk of using borrowed money to fund tax cuts. that is not conservative. then, the second thing is the decision to cut the 45p rate and indeed at the same time to change the law which governs how bankers are paid in the city of london. ultimately, at a time
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when people are suffering, and you're quite right to point out the concerns people have notjust over mortgages but over benefits. when you have additional billions of pounds in play, to have as your principal decision the headline tax move, "cutting tax for the wealthiest," that is a display of the wrong values. it sounds right now, - if things carry on as they are, you won't be able to vote for these measures as a conservative mp. . well, the good thing... there are many good things in what liz said. i do welcome the broader points she made about growth. will you vote for it as it stands? the critical thing is liz has acknowledged that with hindsight, with welcome hindsight, mistakes were made in the preparation for friday. i notice you're carefully avoiding my question . about whether or not you'll vote for this in house of commons. i well, i don't believe it's right. it is quite an extraordinary thing for a conservative mp to come out and say on the first day of the
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conservative party conference, we should say there is no love lost between michael gove and liz truss, but what is interesting to see is if that emboldens other conservative mps who do not like this policy to come forward and say publicly what they have been saying behind the scenes. we will have to see if others follow suit and just this afternoon, damian green, another cabinet minister —— former cabinet minister, has said the conservatives will lose the next general election if we end up painting ourselves as the party of erect. he also said he has been coming to conferences for more than a0 years and this was more difficult than many. the conference programme has opened in the last couple of hours with quite a different tone in the hall, not far from where i am standing. just as the labour opened —— opened with a trivet to the queen, here led by penny mordaunt. ailiilur trivet to the queen, here led by penny mordaunt.— trivet to the queen, here led by penny mordaunt. trivet to the queen, here led by penn mordaunt. ., ., ., . penny mordaunt. our late monarch did not stamp her —
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penny mordaunt. our late monarch did not stamp her personality _ penny mordaunt. our late monarch did not stamp her personality on _ penny mordaunt. our late monarch did not stamp her personality on the - not stamp her personality on the nation _ not stamp her personality on the nation. she is the one shaped by as, by all_ nation. she is the one shaped by as, by all of— nation. she is the one shaped by as, by all of us, — nation. she is the one shaped by as, by all of us, her people. the stoic dignified. — by all of us, her people. the stoic dignified, kind, patient,, dutiful, queue— dignified, kind, patient,, dutiful, queue loving british people. that is why she _ queue loving british people. that is why she was the best of us. as we mourned, — why she was the best of us. as we mourned, we leaned on our constitution, on our traditions, and on our— constitution, on our traditions, and on our planning, we saw the pride, the pebble. — on our planning, we saw the pride, the people, causes and organisations she cherished and the —— that this nation _ she cherished and the —— that this nation was — she cherished and the —— that this nation was the cradle for. a she cherished and the -- that this nation was the cradle for.- nation was the cradle for. a start with a bit of _ nation was the cradle for. a start with a bit of unity _ nation was the cradle for. a start with a bit of unity at _ nation was the cradle for. a start with a bit of unity at the - nation was the cradle for. a start. with a bit of unity at the beginning of this conference but there is going to be an awful lot to chew over as the politics returns was a blast week we saw labour take its strongest league in the polls for 20 years, the fallout from the mini
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budget, discussions about how the government is communicating and even its direction. a lot to think about over the next few days. let's return to indonesia, where at least 125 people have been killed in a stampede at a football stadium, which began after police fired tear gas at fans who had invaded the pitch. valdya baraputri from the bbc�*s indonesian service has just sent us this report from the stadium. this stadium bore witness to the tragedy after a football match between two rivals of the indonesian first division league. you can still see the signs from the chaotic night. the night ended with a defeat to the home club and then supporters went to the pitch to express their disappointment to players and officials. and then indonesian police released tear gas to the crowd and people ran to the exit only to find that they were closed. i want to show you one of the exit gates over here. you can see that there's a hole in the wall. a witness told me that people made
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this hole to try to get out from the stadium. it shows how desperate people tried to get out from the stampede. and next to the hole in the wall, there's an exit gate. you can see from the slanted door the level of force from the inside. and this gate is still very much shut. there are some candles put by supporters to remember the victims. indonesian police said that 3a people died in this stadium and the rest at the hospital, making this event one of the worst football stadium tragedies in the world. the headlines on bbc news... britain's prime minister admits to the bbc that she should have laid the ground better for announcements
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that sparked chaos on the financial markets. one of the world's worst stadium disasters. at least 125 people have died in a stampede at an indonesian football match after police tear—gassed pitch invaders. brazilians are voting in the first round of an election which has seen a bitter campaign between past and present presidents. a man is due to appear in court tomorrow, charged with the murder of nine—year—old 0livia—pratt—korbel, who was shot at her home in liverpool in august. 3a—year—old thomas cashman from west derby, has also been charged with the attempted murder of olivia's mother cheryl and joseph nee, who he's alleged to have chased into olivia's home. judith moritz reports. it's six weeks since 0livia pratt—korbel was killed — six weeks of her family grieving... i feel i'm on it as well. ..and the police hunting
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for the gunman responsible. at last, a breakthrough, announced at a hastily arranged media conference. the crown prosecution service has authorised merseyside police to charge thomas cashman, 3a, from grenadier drive, west derby, with the murder of nine—year—old 0livia pratt—korbel, also the attempted murder ofjoseph nee and cheryl korbel on the 22nd of august 2022. 0livia was shot when a gunman burst into her home in the liverpool suburb of dovecot in august. he'd been chasing another man when they both ran through the front door, which olivia's mum cheryl had opened, wanting to see why there was so much noise outside. olivia's death has shattered the community where she lived. another man, a0—year—old paul russell, has also been charged in connection with the shooting, accused of assisting an offender. both men will appear at liverpool magistrates court on monday. judith moritz, bbc news.
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a leading expert in infectious diseases has said the uk's fight against the monkeypox virus is looking "very positive". professor neil ferguson said vaccines and vigilance have helped to drive down the number of cases from its peak injuly to below 100 new infections a week. our global health correspondent, naomi grimley, has more. painful lesions, long self—isolation periods and queues for vaccines. for many men who have sex with men, the monkey pox outbreak has caused huge worry, and even triggered a worldwide public health emergency as cases multiplied on a scale not seen it before. sam, who has asked us to keep his identity private, fell ill with the virus in the first few weeks of the outbreak. since then, he's noticed a change in the social scene he's part of.
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lots of gay men are having a lot less sex, and are having sex with less people. some people i know have been avoiding going out to places like sex clubs. the idea of going out, meeting lots of people in the dark, and then you not swapping contact details with them, i think people are just thinking a bit about how much risk they are willing to take on. after an initial cluster of infections in the spring, the uk saw a steady crescendo in new cases throughout the early summer, but a peak was reached injuly and since then cases have been falling again. other european countries like france and germany have followed this pattern. at the moment, everything is looking very positive. one of britain's top infectious disease experts who has also been advising the government thinks the latest data is good news. we are not completely sure of exactly why vaccination started to be rolling out probably had some effect but it does not explain it all.
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the likely hypothesis, and there is some circumstantial data but not good data, is that there was quite a big change in behaviour in the most affected community, namely men who have sex with men, gay and bisexual men. are we now at a point where we can wipe our brow and think, this is not going to become endemic? if it is going to persist it will probably persist at sporadic levels. we should not be complacent. if it has been driven mostly by behaviour change that we have to be alert to the possibility that once case numbers are much lower may people are less vigilant and we start to see a resurgence. the uk says it is ready to start giving second doses of the monkey pox vaccine to those at high risk. sexual health services are still under huge pressure, but the wider picture is looking hopeful. naomi grimley, bbc news. the cost—of—living crisis is hitting people living in rural areas harder than those living in towns and cities, according to a new report.
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the rural services network, says people in the countryside are spending more on essentials like heating, transport and housing. joanne writtle has more. like many rural villages, welshampton, near ellesmere, doesn't have mains gas. great—grandad ian fletcher relies on heating oil, and the price has shot up. we've no other alternative. we've got to buy the oil or we freeze, basically, and can't cook. so, we've got to make sure we have the oil in at all times. he gets a small discount through a community bulk—buying scheme and has solar panels. the government has said householders off the gas grid will receive £100. the north shropshire mp says that's not enough, as oil prices have doubled in a year. for an average household, that's about £1,200 more and the government have only offered them £100, which isn't going to be enough to meet that challenge.
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and if we look at the impact of last friday's budget, where sterling has collapsed and oil is traded in dollars, there's a risk that those prices are going to go even higher over the next few weeks. so, you're saying a £100 payment isn't enough but where would the money come from to pay for more? well, we'd like to see the energy price cap extended to people who are off—grid, and we've been very clear that we'd like to see that paid for with a windfall tax. the department for business and energy told us further details will be announced shortly. meanwhile in prees, log seller richard evans says this year is his busiest in a decade of trading as people with open fires stock up. normally, we would start deliveries approximately now — end of september, running into october. this year, it started on the first week ofjuly and it went absolutely crazy and it has not stopped since. he's increased prices slightly but not enough, he says, to cover his soaring electricity costs. joanne writtle, bbc news.
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king charles will not attend the cop 27 climate change conference in egypt next month, buckingham palace has confirmed. it follows reports that the uk prime minister liz truss had advised him to stay away. in response, the palace confirmed advice had been sought by the monarch and given by liz truss. the king, who's campaigned for environmental causes for decades, had been planning to attend. let's speak to george monbiot, the guardian columnist, and environmental campaigner. how much of a difference does the presence or absence of the king make at an event like that? it is presence or absence of the king make at an event like that?— at an event like that? it is hard to tell. it at an event like that? it is hard to tell- it can — at an event like that? it is hard to tell. it can have _ at an event like that? it is hard to tell. it can have significant - tell. it can have significant symbolic importance. i don't hold out much hope for the cop26 process, but having him there, well, you never know, he can command the
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respect of some governments and may be swing things around. it is a real shame. {iii be swing things around. it is a real shame. .., , .,, shame. of course, when he was involved in _ shame. of course, when he was involved in cop26, _ shame. of course, when he was involved in cop26, in _ shame. of course, when he was involved in cop26, in glasgow, | shame. of course, when he was - involved in cop26, in glasgow, that was when he was aired to the throne, the prince of wales. now he is king, different role, different rules, you would argue, but that would leave a number of other senior royals able to attend and give it the weight and credibility that they bring. yes. credibility that they bring. yes, but i credibility that they bring. yes, but i think _ credibility that they bring. yes, but i think having _ credibility that they bring. yes, but i think having the _ credibility that they bring. yes but i think having the king there does count for something. i am not a big fan of the monarchy, i don't believe we should be sending our politics through royal channels, but if we have got them there, we might as well make best use of them and if as well make best use of them and if as he did, he wanted to attend, he has been a powerful advocate for environmental issues, it seems absolutely shocking to me that the government has advised him not to attend. why? the only reason i can come up with is that it seems to be
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part of its wider environmental —— and anti—environmental agenda, it is ripping down 570 environmental rules in its relocation bill, jacob rees—mogg, the energy secretary, has said he wants to extract every cubic inch of gas from the north sea, liz truss has removed a ban on fracking. altogether, it looks like an absolute environmental disaster area, this government and this pretty well tops it off. i5 area, this government and this pretty well tops it off.- area, this government and this pretty well tops it off. is there an arc ument pretty well tops it off. is there an argument to _ pretty well tops it off. is there an argument to be _ pretty well tops it off. is there an argument to be made _ pretty well tops it off. is there an argument to be made perhaps i pretty well tops it off. is there an l argument to be made perhaps that some of those measures that you have outlined are necessary in order to secure the uk energy security, reduce reliance on imports from russia and elsewhere, and that actually once things have stabilised, the green agenda can resume and enthusiastically be embraced once again question mark it is exactly the opposite. the embraced once again question mark it is exactly the opposite.— is exactly the opposite. the more locked into _ is exactly the opposite. the more locked into fossil _
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is exactly the opposite. the more locked into fossil feels _ is exactly the opposite. the more locked into fossil feels we - is exactly the opposite. the more locked into fossil feels we are - locked into fossil feels we are adding more reliant we are on a source of energy which can only do us harm, notjust through climate breakdown, which is the biggest source of insecurity of all, but also because any local resources we develop are not going to affect the oil price at all, but if that development is part of the agenda of keeping us hooked on fossilfuels, then we remain dependent on some very unpleasant regimes elsewhere in the world, notjust russia, but some of the really nasty autocracies in the middle east. if we want genuine energy independence, that means switching the mode of our suppliers well, and using our abundant resources of renewable energy which we have loads of, and which liz truss seems completely uninterested in optimising. i truss seems completely uninterested in optimising-— in optimising. i know you started on soundin: a in optimising. i know you started on sounding a note _ in optimising. i know you started on
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sounding a note of— in optimising. i know you started on sounding a note of pessimism, - sounding a note of pessimism, perhaps limiting expectations about what 27 can achieve, but in terms of the context in which these leaders will meet next year, they are grappling with so much more than they were during cop26, the landscape has changed dramatically, what if anything do you think can be achieved from it? it what if anything do you think can be achieved from it?— achieved from it? it has never been achieved from it? it has never been a riori . achieved from it? it has never been a priority- lt — achieved from it? it has never been a priority. it should _ achieved from it? it has never been a priority. it should been _ achieved from it? it has never been a priority. it should been one. - achieved from it? it has never been a priority. it should been one. the. a priority. it should been one. the survival of earth systems should be front and central to all political efforts because without them, we have nothing and even huge issues such as war and recession actually are trifling by comparison to the loss of the habitable planet. unfortunately, there has never been a time when governments have put environmental issues above other issues and this government, well, it seems to be right at the bottom of its entry. seems to be right at the bottom of
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its ent . , ., ., ~ i. its entry. 0k. george, thank you very much _ its entry. 0k. george, thank you very much indeed. _ its entry. 0k. george, thank you very much indeed. thank - its entry. 0k. george, thank you very much indeed. thank you - its entry. 0k. george, thank you very much indeed. thank you forj very much indeed. thank you for joining us on bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren bett. what's left of sunday will be dry. these are the temperatures. more of a breeze across scotland. the showers will get moved away. temperatures will fall very quickly overnight. western areas turning more cloudy later on but it will be called for eastern scotland, eastern england and into the midlands. those are the temperatures in towns and cities but in the countryside, it will be called than that. that be the coldest night over the week ahead. we have cloud and wind coming into scotland and northern ireland. gales in the north—west later and thatis gales in the north—west later and that is where we will find most of the rain. england and wales quieter after the actually start. hazy sunshine at times. temperatures
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getting up to 18 or 19 degrees. looks like it could be quite a mild week ahead but it will be windy. not much rain in the south—east but other parts of the uk will see rain at times.
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hello this is bbc news. the headlines: the prime minister admits to the bbc she should have laid the ground better for announcement that sparked chaos on financial markets and divisions in her own party. mr; chaos on financial markets and divisions in her own party. my do stand by the _ divisions in her own party. my do stand by the package _ divisions in her own party. my do stand by the package we - divisions in her own party. my do i stand by the package we announced and i stand by the fact that we announced it quickly, because we had to act. but i do accept we should have laid the ground better. i do accept that. the turmoil comes as the conservative party arrives in birmingham for liz truss' first party conference as leader. penny mordaunt opened the event by paying
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tribute to the late queen elizabeth. 0ne tribute to the late queen elizabeth. one of the worst football stadium disaster is at an indonesian football match after police tear gassed pitch invaders. king charles will not be at the climate change conference in egypt after reports the prime minister liz truss advised him not to attend. now on bbc news, molly russell: a father's journey. a warning some viewers may find details in this programme disturbing. molly is always going to be our molly, but we're always going to miss her. and her story is known by more people. it doesn't stop her being our molly.

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