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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  March 2, 2020 3:00am-4:01am PST

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breaking news. infections spike and coronavirus fears spread. in the u.s., the pacific northwest hardest hit. a nursing home there the site of the nation's first death. today a call for calm. >> risk to average americans remains low. >> we're all in this together. >> overseas, tourists flee. venice empties, and the louvre shuts down. even the faithful were parse this sunday. south carolina! >> also tonight, joe biden's big win. south carolina gives him reason to celebrate. what it might mean for his democratic rivals and super tuesday. plus sport of their own.
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high school girls win their toughest fight for recognition. and later, a unique path on the road to recovery with no strings attached. >> and it's just going to keep getting bigger and bigger. ♪ >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." >> a warm welcome to the "overnight news," everyone. i'm errol barnett. the deadly coronavirus continues to spread both overseas and here in the u.s. rhode island reports its fist case of the virus. the victim is a man who traveled to italy last month. 74 cases are now reported nationwide across ten states. and the first death this past weekend in washington state, where the virus may have been circulating undetected for weeks. this morning a nursing home is at the center of a state and federal investigation. our jonathan vigliotti is there. >> reporter: errol, the elderly inside this center are among the most vulnerable to the
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coronavirus, and there is good reason to believe more people will test positive in the coming days. now the question is how did this virus take root here in kirkland, washington, and how many of the so-called walking well, people with the virus but not showing symptoms exist here in the state. the state's public health officials have ordered tests on a quarter of lifecare's 108 patients and 25 staffers, all exhibiting coronavirus-like symptoms. two elderly patients already tested positive. officials say a number of the senior center's residents were recently treated at nearby evergreen hospital, where the 50-year-old man died. how that man got so sick is now the subject of a federal/state investigation. >> we do not know how he contracted the virus yet. that's why we and the state of washington are deployed out there to try to trace who he had contact with and how he might have gotten the virus. we don't have a discernible connection to any travel to korea or china or any other
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impacted area. >> reporter: but in kirkland, washington, alarm here has spread. one fire station is shuttered, and seven firefighters have been quarantined after several of them responded to the lifecare center without protective gear. and nike announced it's closing its oregon headquarters for what it called a deep cleaning out of an abundance of caution, even without indication there had been exposure there. and two more cases of coronavirus have been confirmed here in the state. we are told both are men in their 60s. they are hospitalized in critical condition. that brings the total number of confirmed cases here in washington state to six. errol? >> all right, jonathan, thank you. president trump's response to the virus has come under close and sometimes harsh scrutiny, but again today his administration pushed back. natalie brand is at the white house. >> the united states is more prepared than any other nation in the world. >> reporter: a sunday morning show of force as two leaders of the trump administration of the
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president's task force tried to allow concerns. >> the risk to average americans remains low. >> reporter: but the health and human services secretary acknowledges transmission of additional cases is inevitable. >> we will have more and more community cases. it's simply a matter of math. >> reporter: some state leaders, including california's governor sounded the alarm last week over a shortage of testing kits. >> within the next week or two, we'll have a radical expansion beyond that of the testing that's available. >> reporter: vice president mike pence, put in charge of the coronavirus response, says despite the fda approving an expedited process, a vaccine will likely not be available this season. >> we are clearing the red tape out of the way. the fda is providing great leadership on this front to have a vaccine for the american people by next year. >> we very much need seniors, who are the most susceptible population to be able to get it. >> reporter: senate minority leader chuck schumer says he expects an emergency funding
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package to be introduced early this week. >> i hope the administration has now gotten the music after we pushed them that we have to do a lot more and a lot more quickly. all hands on deck, all party, all people fighting it. >> reporter: president trump says he'll be meeting with pharmaceutical companies at the white house tomorrow, a previously scheduled meeting, but the subject of vaccines is expected to come up as well as new concerns over drug shortages due to disruptions of china's supply chain. errol? >> thank you, natalie. now to europe, where the virus and fear around it are spreading fast. today in paris, the louvre closed with workers concerned they'll be sickened by the thousands of daily visitors. at least 64 countries now reporting cases with italy the hardest hit outside asia. charlie d'agata is in rome. >> reporter: with italy's cases now surging to nearly 1700 people, even the numbers of the faithful were noticeably down at the pope's address today.
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for crowds gathered here at st. peter's square to catch a glimpse of the pope, it's always exciting to see him appear at the window. but today it's also mixed with a sense of relief. because on ash wednesday, the pope was seen coughing and blowing his nose, which normally wouldn't and shouldn't be a big deal, but it comes at a time of heightened fears about the coronavirus. vatican officials tell us he's simply suffering from a slight disposition, essentially, a pretty bad cold. >> amen. >> reporter: nikki and pauline keating from ireland weren't put off taking a cruise here. and they're taking certain precautions on that cruise? >> big-time. >> heat teak issing thermometers to take your temperature and every time you turn a corner, wash your hands. >> reporter: france has banned all large gatherings. even the louvre shut its door,
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although these marathon runners in paris flouted the ban. with 12 new cases popping up in britain, the government unveiled a battle plan that could see medical workers pulled out of retirement. everyone's preparing for the worst, with fears spreading faster than the virus itself. charlie d'agata, cbs news, rome. now chicago, where a police shooting is under scrutiny tonight. video of the incident shows police struggling to arrest man. now he broke free, but one officer shot and wounded him as he fled. the man is reported in critical condition tonight, and the officers placed on administrative leave. chicago mayor lori lightfoot called their actions, quote, deeply concerning. in salinas, california, thick black smoke filled the sky saturday after a truck knocked a power line into a plastics factory. several bundles of plastic rolls caught fire, as you see there. crowds gathered to watch, even as officials warned them those fumes were toxic. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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♪ >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." >> to politics now. after his poor showing in south carolina's primary, pete buttigieg tonight suspended his campaign. a new cbs news battleground tracker poll ahead of super tuesday shows bernie sanders leading in two big prizes. in california, 31% of likely primary voters say he's their
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top choice. in texas, the same is true, although it's a much tighter race. still, former vice president joe biden is basking in his big win in south carolina. here is nikole killion. >> reporter: heading into a competitive super tuesday, the democratic presidential candidates paused for a brief show of unity to commemorate the 55th anniversary of bloody sunday in selma, alabama. >> how we choose -- >> reporter: former vice president joe biden was full of praise after his resounding victory in south carolina. >> i can win in places where i don't think bernie can win in a general election. >> reporter: biden on a blitz suggested it's down to a two-man race with bernie sanders. but the front-runner continues to outspend him on the ground, announcing a whopping $46.5 million raised in february. >> it is not only the amount of money that we raise, and that is a phenomenal amount. it's how we raised it. we don't have a superpac like
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joe biden. >> reporter: with 14 states voting tuesday and more than 1300 delegates at stake, all of the candidates are trying to stay in contention. pete buttigieg met with former president jimmy carter, who seemed to make a candid slip about the former mayor's chances. >> he doesn't know what he's going to do after south carolina. >> reporter: former new york city mayor mike bloomberg will be on the ballot for the first time since the contest began. >> have i been in 27 state, 67 cities in the last ten weeks, and we'll see what happens. >> reporter: he faced an icy reception at the selma service as some parishioners turned their backs in protest. bloomberg has spent about half a billion dollars advertising in super tuesday states. tonight he is taking out two three-minute ads to deliver an address in primetime. errol? >> all right, nicokole killion, thank you.
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looking ahead to super tuesday, anthony, what does senator sanders and vice president biden's strengths? >> errol, let's start with what we saw in south carolina. for vice president biden we saw a very strong performance among african american voters that is a key strength for him. he is going to try to parlay that across these super tuesday states. by comparison, bernie sanders, his strength is enthusiasm. his voters are the most enthusiastic of any top candidate, and that could translate to strong turnout for him, errol. >> now some still see this as a two-way race. but really, rights now it is still bigger than that, right? >> it is bigger than that. there are other candidates, namely mike bloomberg, elizabeth warren, all will be competing to pick up delegates. the exciting thing about super tuesday is the democrats don't just all hand out their delegates to the top candidate. >> thank you very much. a real nationwide event is coming up. take a look at this programing
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note. norah o'donnell will anchor cbs news' live coverage of super tuesday results tuesday night beginning at 8:00 eastern, right here on cbs. another feel-good story for you here. a record lottery prize. 22-year-old gregory matto won $72 million, the biggest jackpot in quebec's history. he bought the ticket at the store where he work, bagging groceries. those lottery millions are tax-free in canada. all right. straight ahead, eye on america, why the homeless may be badly undercounted. plus, young women on the mat, wrestling with tradition. and later, making music on the road to recovery.
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♪all strength, we ain't stoppin' believe me♪ ♪go straight till the morning look like we♪ ♪won't wait, we're taking everything we wanted we can do it♪ ♪all strength, no sweat cbs news is shining a light on the nation's homeless crisis. with tonight's eye on america, cbs news contributor, maria elena salinas traveled to a small town in texas, where the
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homeless population is exploding. >> reporter: jenny stafford's mission over the next 24 hours -- >> there he is. >> reporter: is to count all of the homeless people in her town of victoria, texas. >> give me one and i'll take these two your side. >> we're not trying to be rich. we're not trying to be donald trump or anything. we're just trying to survive and have a life. >> a good hot meal here, every day except sunday. >> reporter: is this the first time you've been homeless? and where are you sleeping tonight? >> i'm not sure. but last night i slept under a carport. >> reporter: this yearly census-like count of the homeless is used by the department of housing and urban development to allocate funding nationwide. the homeless population here in victoria has tripled since 2018. >> it's almost like it caught us asleep. we were not prepared, i don't believe, for what we're experiencing today. >> reporter: part of the problem is that there is no universal definition of homelessness. >> if you're sleeping somewhere with a roof over your head tonight, hud doesn't consider you homeless. now we know better than that.
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>> so we don't really have a clear picture of how many people are homeless in the country? >> probably not. >> reporter: here is an example. hud reports more than 500,000 total homeless people in the country while the department of education says there are more than 1.3 million homeless children alone. do you consider yourself homeless? >> yeah, because next week we don't know what's going to happen. >> reporter: this family was not counted today. they were living in a motel at the time. their two children are among the more than 600 homeless students in the school district. have you ever had to worry about what your children are going to eat? >> yes. >> yeah. >> reporter: that day? >> it breaks my heart. >> yeah. >> reporter: so they would be the invisible homeless? >> absolutely. you should count anyone that does not have their own residence. if they are hopping the way our families have to hop, moving 10 to 12 times in a school year, if that's not homelessness, i don't know what is. >> reporter: maria elena
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salinas, cbs news, victoria, texas. >> it could happen to anyone. still ahead, young women pinning with over 75 years of savings and service, geico is the easy choice. we could even help you with homeowners... oh! not again! oh, thanks! you know automated lights are just the beginning. pretty soon they're gonna have eyes... everywhere. well goodnight. geico. over 75 years of savings and service. geico. ♪ ♪ ♪ the calming scent of lavender
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by downy infusions calm. laundry isn't done until it's done with downy. ition and we broke through. olay's retinol24 complex hydrates better than the #1 retinol. visibly smoother brighter skin in just 24 hours. new olay retinol24. so the state of kansas made history this past week. more than 100 high school girls competed in their first ever state wrestling championship. jamie yuccas on their heard fought victory. >> reporter: she's a country girl, no stranger to hard work. and nothing can keep her down. on the farm --
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>> get there quick. >> reporter: or anywhere else. >> time! 18-year-old nicky moore has been wrestling boys for years on the nickerson high varsity squad. she is an aggressive wrestler who once beat out a boy for a spot on the team. >> it makes you work harder when you get beat by a girl because people have the mentality you shouldn't be getting beat by a girl. >> reporter: so did he thank you? >> i don't think he's ever thanked me for beating him out, but we're cool now. >> reporter: it's the kind of confidence and swagger that wasn't always there. moore still remembers being bullied as a kid. >> i was real reelly quiet. i kind of walked with my head down. i stayed by myself. >> reporter: why? >> i didn't think i was good enough to be where i am today. >> reporter: where she is today is number one in the state in her female weight class and third in the nation. a hopeful for the 2024 olympics. hey, how did that feel? >> it feels pretty good.
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i'm excited. >> reporter: her mother angel is her biggest cheerleader. she says wrestling was a godsend. >> she is now top of her class. she just got signed to a college. can you wish for anything more for your kid? >> reporter: a kid poised to take her first state title. >> i think i've shown that i deserve one seed at state. >> reporter: that's only possible here in kansas buzz of this father-daughter duo who went to the mat to give girls a sport of their own. >> it kind of takes a girl that's serious about wrestling to convince a coach that it's a worthy endeavor. >> reporter: coach doug kretzer thought his daughter mya would be a team manager, but she decided she wanted in on the action her freshman year. >> it was never easy. and competing on a team full of boys, day and night, you wrestle with these people, it's really difficult. >> reporter: it would take four years for girls wrestling to become an official sport, too late for mya, but not for o cf1o
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hundreds of others. like nickerson heavyweight maddi miller, who says wrestling gave her self-confidence. >> i don't think i would be such an outgoing and a happy person like i am now if i didn't do wrestling. >> reporter: miller walked into regionals undefeated. what is the strategy? >> i want to go get a state title as a freshman. let's go! >> i didn't have to look very far today to see a lot of girls with big smiles on their faces and excited about her wins and heartbroken when they lost because they felt like they had a chance to compete. >> reporter: do you wish you had been able to participate in something like this? >> it's my girls now, they can definitely go take the championship. so i definitely just excite they'd can do that. >> reporter: the nickerson lightweight now a state champ, paving the way for a new generation of girls. so you're all in with this? >> i am all in, yes. this is what i want to do for the rest of my life. >> reporter: jamie yuccas, cbs news, mcpherson, kansas.
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>> and a quick footnote. we can congratulate nicole moore as she won the state title for her weight class, which is just awesome. next, a sound of
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for many of us, music can be an escape. but for the people you're about to meet, music is providing a pathway to a brand-new life. don dahler reports from heinemann, kentucky. >> reporter: here on the banks of troublesome creek, music is being made, with power tools and sandpaper. >> i belive that's got it. >> reporter: tabt tabitha
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moseley is learning how to make a ukulele. >> this is just the beginning. this is just the start, kind of like my life. >> reporter: an addiction to opioids forced her to give up her four children. making an instrument is helping her heal. >> it's teaching me how to build things, and it's going to bring joy to somebody else. >> reporter: this school is designed to give people like moseley a second chance. >> making it helps keep me focused. ♪ >> reporter: music has deep roots in this part of apalachicola. but so do poverty, drugs and alcohol abuse. >> i've lost family and friends to addiction. >> reporter: doug naselroad runs a nonprofit company down the road from the school. >> there is clinical evidence that when people apply their hands to a task that demands concentration, it actually begins to rewire the brain. >> this isn't necessarily the cure for addict, but kit be a part of that. >> we think of it more as a
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hedge against recidivism. >> i've been clean a little over two years now. >> reporter: take nathan smith and jeremy heaney, two recovering addicts naselroad hired after they finished classes. smith is a former coal miner who used opioids to get through the backbreaking work underground. heaney took drugs to mask the pain and helplessness and des peres of homeless. >> my recovery is something i continue to do every day, but this job here really gave me a sense of direction and a sense of purpose. >> reporter: just as the school has done for moseley. she's now 16 months sober and back with her children. the ukulele emerging in her hands she believes is instrumental to her future. >> and it's just going to keep getting better and better. > reporter: don dahler, cbs news, heinemann, kentucky. >> and that is the "overnight news" for this monday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us later for the morning news and
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of course "cbs this morning." from the cbs broadcast center here in new york city, i'm errol barnett. ♪ >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." >> a warm welcome to the "overnight news," everyone. i'm errol barnett. the dead lly coronavirus contins to spread both overseas and here in the u.s. rhode island reports its fist case of the virus. the victim is a man who traveled to italy last month. 74 cases are now reported nationwide across ten states. and the first death this past weekend in washington state, where the virus may have been circulating undetected for weeks. this morning, a nursing home is at the center of a state and federal investigation. our jonathan vigliotti is there.
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>> errol, the elderly inside this center are among the most vulnerable to the virus, and there is good reason to believe more people will test positive in the coming days. now the question is how did this virus take root here in kirkland, washington, and how many of the so-called walking well, people with the virus but not showing symptoms exist here in the state. the state's public health officials have ordered tests on a quarter of lifecare's 108 patients and 25 staffers, all exhibiting coronavirus-like symptoms. two elderly patients already tested positive. officials say a number of the senior center's residents were recently treated at nearby evergreen hospital, where the 50-year-old man died. how that man got so sick is now the subject of a federal/state investigation. >> we do not know how he contracted the virus yet. that's why we and the state of washington are deployed out there to try to trace who he had contact with and how he might have gotten the virus. we don't have a discernible
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connection to any travel to korea or china or any other impacted area. >> reporter: but in kirkland, washington, alarm here has spread. one fire station is shuttered, and seven firefighters have been quarantined after several of them responded to the lifecare center without protective gear. and nike announced it's closing its oregon headquarters for what it called a deep cleaning out of an abundance of caution, even without indication there had been exposure there. and two more cases of coronavirus have been confirmed here in the state. we are told both are men in their 60s. they are hospitalized in critical condition. that brings the total number of confirmed cases here in washington state to six. errol? >> all right, jonathan, thank you. president trump's response to to the coronavirus has come under close and sometimes harsh scrutiny, but again today his administration pushed back. natalie brand is at the white house. >> the united states is more prepared than any other nation in the world. >> reporter: a sunday morning show of force as two leaders of
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the trump administration's coronavirus task force tried to allay criticism and concerns. >> the risk to average americans remains low. >> reporter: but the health and human services secretary acknowledges transmission of additional cases is inevitable. >> we will have more and more community cases. it's simply a matter of math. >> reporter: some state leaders, including california's governor sounded the alarm last week over a shortage of testing kits. >> within the next week or two, we'll have a radical expansion beyond that of the testing that's available. >> reporter: vice president mike pence, put in charge of the coronavirus response, says despite the fda approving an expedited process, a vaccine will not likely be available this season. >> we are clearing the red tape out of the way. the fda is providing great leadership on this front to have a vaccine for the american people by next year. >> we very much need seniors, who are the most susceptible population to be able to get it.
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>> reporter: senate minority leader chuck schumer says he expects an emergency funding package to be introduced early this week. >> i hope the administration has now gotten the music after we pushed them that we have to do a lot more and a lot more quickly. all hands on deck, all party, all people fighting it. >> reporter: president trump says he'll be meeting with pharmaceutical companies at the white house tomorrow, a previously scheduled meeting, but the subject of vaccines is expected to come up as well as new concerns over drug shortages due to disruptions of china's supply chain. errol? >> thank you, natalie. now to europe, where the virus and fear around it are spreading fast. today in paris, the louvre closed with workers concerned they'll be sickened by the thousands of daily visitors. at least 64 countries now reporting cases with italy the hardest hit outside asia. charlie d'agata is in rome. >> reporter: with italy's cases
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now surging to nearly 1700 people, even the numbers of the faithful were noticeably down at the pope's address today. for crowds gathered here at st. peter's square to catch a glimpse of the pope, it's always exciting to see him appear at the window. but today it's also mixed with a sense of relief. because on ash wednesday, the pope was seen coughing and blowing his nose, which normally wouldn't and shouldn't be a big deal, but it comes at a time of heightened fears about the coronavirus. vatican officials tell us he's simply suffering from a slight disposition, essentially, a pretty bad cold. >> amen. >> reporter: germany's cases have doubled overnight. france has banned all large gatherings. even the louvre shut its door, although these marathon runners in paris flouted the ban. >> there has been a significant increase in the number. >> reporter: with 12 new cases popping up in britain, the government unveiled a battle
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plan that could see medical w k workewor workers pulled out of retirement. 7 everyone's preparing for the worst, with fears spreading faster than the virus itself. charlie d'agata, cbs news, rome. to politics now. after his poor showing in south carolina's primary, pete buttigieg tonight suspended his campaign. a new cbs news battleground tracker poll ahead of super tuesday shows bernie sanders leading in two big prizes. in california, 31% of likely primary voters say he's their top choice. in texas, the same is true, although it's a much tighter race. still, former vice president joe biden is basking in his big win in south carolina. here is nikole killion. >> reporter: heading into a competitive super tuesday, the democratic presidential candidates paused for a brief show of unity to commemorate the 55th anniversary of bloody sunday in selma, alabama. >> how we choose -- >> reporter: former vice president joe biden was full of praise after his resounding victory in south carolina. >> i can win in places where i
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don't think bernie can win in a general election. >> reporter: biden on a blitz suggested it's down to a two-man race with bernie sanders. but the front-runner continues to outspend him on the ground, announcing a whopping $46.5 million raised in february. >> it is not only the amount of money that we raise, and that is a phenomenal amount. it's how we raised it. we don't have a superpac like joe biden. >> reporter: with 14 states voting tuesday and more than 1300 delegates at stake, all of the candidates are trying to stay in contention. pete buttigieg met with former president jimmy carter, who seemed to make a candid slip about the former mayor's chances. >> he doesn't know what he's going to do after south carolina. >> every day we'll do the math. >> reporter: former new york city mayor mike bloomberg will be on the ballot for the first time since the caucus and primary contest began. >> i have been in 27 state, 67
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cities in the last ten weeks, and we'll see what happens. >> reporter: he faced an icy reception at the selma service as some parishioners turned their backs in protest. >> the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. to be honest a little dust it never bothered me. until i found out what it actually was. dust mite matter! eeeeeww! dead skin cells! gross! so now, i grab my swiffer sweeper and heavy-duty dusters. duster extends to three feet to get all that gross stuff gotcha! and for that nasty dust on my floors, my sweeper's on it. the textured cloths grab and hold dirt and hair no matter where dust bunnies hide. no more heebie jeebies. phew. glad i stopped cleaning and started swiffering. when the murray's go to work...
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♪ >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." >> i'm errol barnett, and we've got a lot more to tell you about this morning, beginning with the coronavirus. the potentially deadly virus continues to spread around the world, most notably south korea,
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iran and italy. here in the u.s. there has been one death reported and a lot of fear. our dr. jon lapook puts things in perspective. >> reporter: coronavirus began in china several months ago, and since then the virus and fear of it have been spreading around the world. there is no vaccine for coronavirus yet, but there is a treatment for fear. it's called facts. and here is a dose of them. coronavirus causes a rash of symptoms a custody covid-19. an infected person coughs or sneezes, seconding droplets through the air. somewhere nearby say up to six feet away breathes those droplets and can become infected. the virus can also spread hand to hand. you touch an object that has the virus on it, and then touch your mouth, nose perhaps, even your eye.
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scientists are studying how long the coronavirus can survive on various surfaces, or whether there are other ways it can spread. just two days ago, a study from china of nearly 1100 patients with covid-19 reported a mortality rate of 1.4%. that means of every thousand people infected, 14 will die. the death rate with flu is about 1 in a thousand. but some scientists feel the actual rate with coronavirus may be lower and in fact closer to flu because there are likely many cases we don't know about, either because they're mild or the patients have no symptoms at all. also, people who are older or who have other ailments such as diabetes or lung disease appear to be at greater risk for getting a severe case of coronavirus. but for some reason, children seem to be relatively spared. right now there is a shortage of testing kits for the virus. when more testing is available, we'll get a better idea of how widespread this virus is. we'll be able to screen communities for both active infection and evidence of past infection. here in the united states, we're starting to hear about a small
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number of cases of covid-19 from what's called community spread. that means there is no clear source of infections such as travel to an affected region or close contact with a patient. this is not at all surprising, especially since people will likely not have effective immunity to this new type of coronavirus. we should expect the number of these community-spread cases to continue to rise. vaccines are being developed at record speed, and several will begin clinical testing in the coming weeks, but it will take time to confirm their safety and their ability to protect against the virus. so they're not expected to become widely available for at least a year. antiviral drugs and other therapies are also being studied, but for now the main treatment involves supportive care, including breathing tubes in cases of severe lung damage. where does that leave us? what can you do to protect yourself? here are a few suggestion. get the flu vaccine and get your family protected. the flu can mimic coronavirus and make you think you have
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covid-19 when you don't. now stuff your mother could have told you. wash your hands, including the tips of your fingers for 20 seconds. i know that's a long time, but do the best you can. keep your hands away from your face. cough boo the crook of your arm, not into your hand or worst of all right into the air. stay home if you're sick. you're not doing the boss a favor by coming to work and making everyone else sick. stay informed. a great source of information is the cdc website, cdc.gov. it's especially helpful for information and advice about travel. what about those surgical face masks so many people are wearing? they may give some partial protection by catching droplets containing virus, but the virus is so tiny, it can go right through the mask or around it. if you're sick, a mask might help protect others, but the cdc does not recommend it for routine use. what should we expect in the future? since then is a new type of coronavirus, it's very difficult
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to predict. respiratory viruses often like cold, dry air and may possibly start to die down with warmer, moister weather. but we don't know that for sure. and there could be more waves of infection to come. bottom line, there is no way of knowing right now how long coronavirus will remain a problem. one thing we should definitely expect is anothe outbreak of another type of virus. covid-19 is just the latest example of a deadly viral disease jumping from animals to people. arrest sars, mers and ebola are others. we need to study why this is happening. in asia, deforestation may have increased contact between humans and bats, which could carry the virus that causes sars or covid-19. and we must think globally about how to prevent and respond to future outbreaks. >> the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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you're doing more to keep your body healthy for the future. shouldn't your toothpaste do the same for your mouth? future proof your whole mouth with new crest pro/active defense. its active defense technology neutralizes bacteria to shield against potential issues. crest. our bargain detergent couldn't keep up. with us, turns out it's mostly water. so, we switched back to tide. one wash, stains are gone. [slurping]
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[laughing] don't pay for water. pay for clean. it's got to be tide. discover a new world ♪ discover what's good - pantene nutrient blends now in case you missed it, saturday was february 29th, making this a leap year. they come around every four years, just to keep our calendars from slipping. but what exactly is a leap year, and why are some people trying to change it? jeff glor has some answers.
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♪ >> reporter: since the beginning, humankind has been obsessed with tracking time. ♪ take time >> reporter: and nearly every civilization has tried to squeeze that time into an accurate calendar. but for thousands of years, we were missing one crucial element. ♪ time keeping on slipping, slipping, slipping ♪ >> reporter: the leap year. >> i think that time is very confusing sometimes when you have to thigh about it. >> reporter: jackie is an astrophysicist at the american museum of natural history's hayden planetarium in new york city. when people think about the day, february 29th, what should they think about? >> we're placing a human construct around what is an astronomical phenomenon of the earth moving around the sun. so it's kind of a celebration of the fact that we'd really like to be better timekeeper, and we
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haven't quite figured out how to do it correctly. >> reporter: the calendar we juice uze includes leap years because of how long it really takes the earth to orbit the sun, i which is not 365 days. it's about 365 and a quarter. people are fascinated by this. >> it's a fascinating topic. what can be more fascinating than how we fit in with time and our relationship with the universe. >> reporter: alexander boxer is the author of a new book, "a scheme of heaven", to today's big algorithms, including how we organize dates. when people think heap year today, what should they think of? >> they should think our calendar is a fascinating product of many civilizations, each of who tried to contribute a piece to make sure we stay in sync with the seasons. and the leap year marked the end of the attempt to sync up the cycles with the monday night football and the acceptance of a
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calendar that was purely solar. >> reporter: it was the egyptians who first made the leap around 2500 b.c. but it wasn't until julius caesar until the calendar began to take the form we know today. it still wasn't quite right. that led to the gregorian calendar, which set the leap year pattern we've used since the 16th century. but some think it's high time for another big change. you guys have been working on this calendar for how long? >> decades. and so far nada. >> reporter: interdict henry and steve hankie, professors at johns hospital kins university and the current biggest backers of a brand-new calendar, one that eliminates leap years and standardizes the days and weeks to always be the same each year. >> january 1 is always on a monday, forever. >> forever? >> forever. >> reporter: in addition to starting every year on a monday,
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the hankie-henry permanent kald worry also set your birthday and the holidays to the same day of the week every year, except for october 31st, which along with all friday 13th would vanish. in place of leap year, every five or six years an extra week is inserted at the end of december, sort of an extended christmas vacation. variations of this idea have been discussed for more than a century, but to no avail. there is no such thing as a perfect calendar. you just think this is better than what we have now. >> ours is very close to perfect. >> the thing jerks around by a day or two. and think how many people around the world and sports schedules and all these things that jump and jerk and jerk around. >> reporter: but aren't quirks and eccentricities part of the human existence? >> we could make things worse and then you'd be happier. >> well, they cost a lot, though. >> reporter: henry and hankie say their calendar is more efficient because it makes
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school calendars more predictable and evenly divides business quarters which would simplify financial calculations. they say it would save on average every person $575 a year. what you're saying is i'm not going get $575 in my pocket if this change happens, but it is going to save both workers and companies money and time? >> general efficiency. it's real. >> reporter: if it's real, why do you think it hasn't changed until now? >> people are in a rut, and it's very, very hard to change your thinking. >> reporter: besides ditching leap year, hankie and henry also want to eliminate time zones. >> it's already implemented for all the airline piles. a they use greenwich time. if they're fry flying across the mississippi, they change their watch and change. it's ludicrous. >> i wish you guys got passionate about this. >> look, i'm stuck on the planet with the rest you have. and i see us having a silly system here that is costing us. >> it may be costing us money.
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the question is whether a new calendar would cost us some of our identity. either you can see the calendar as this pristine sense of how the universe works, or you can see it as a human product that really represents the contributions of people over thousands of years to try and incrementally improve our knowledge of where we are in the universe. >> does it make sense to get rid of a leap year or leap seconds? >> calendar changes people i think are resistant to because of what it means from the infrastructure of how we all live our lives. the earth doesn't really care what day you call it. it knows where it is. it's going around the sun, doing the thing it always does, and i really just want to know where is the earth in reference to the sun right now. ♪ take time >> reporter: in new york city, jeff glor, cbs news.
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history was made in kansas. the state just wrapped up the nation's first ever all female wrestling championships. jamie yuccas spoke to some of the happy winners. >> reporter: she's a country girl, no stranger to hard work. and nothing can keep her down. on the farm -- >> get there quick. >> reporter: or anywhere else. >> time! >> reporter: 18-year-old nicky moore has been wrestling boys for years, one of five girls on the nickerson high varsity squad. it's the kind of confidence that wasn't always there. moore still remembers being bullied as a kid. >> i was really quiet. i kind of walked with my head down. i stayed by myself. >> reporter: why? >> i didn't think i was good enough to be where i am today.
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>> reporter: where she is today is number one in the state in her female weight class, and third in the nation. a hopeful for the 2024 olympics. >> hey, how'd that feel? >> it felt pretty good. i'm excited. >> reporter: her mother angel is her biggest cheerleader. she says wrestling was the biggest godsend. >> she is now top of her class. she just got signed to a college. can you wish for anything more for your kid? >> reporter: a kid poised to take her first state title. that's only possible here in kansas because of this father-daughter duo, who went to the mat to give girls a sport of their own. >> it kind of takes a girl that's serious about wrestling to convince a coach that's it's a worthy endeavor. >> reporter: coach doug kretzer thought his daughter mya would be a team manager, but she decided she wanted in on the action her freshman year. >> it was never easy competing and being on a team full of boy, day and night.
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you wrestle with these people, like, it's really, like, different. >> reporter: it would take four years for girls wrestling to become an official sport, too late for mya, but not for hundreds of others. like nickerson heavyweight maddi miller, who says wrestling gave her self-confidence. >> i don't think i would be such an outgoing and a happy person like i am now if i didn't do wrestling. >> reporter: miller walked into regionals undefeated. what is the strategy? >> i want to go get a state title as a freshman. let's go! >> i didn't have to look very far today to see a lot of girls with big smiles on their faces and excited about their wins and heartbroken when they lost because they felt like they had a chance to compete. >> reporter: do you wish you had been able to participate in something like this? >> it's my girls now, they can definitely go take the championship. so i definitely just excite they can do that. >> reporter: the nickerson lightweigh now a state champ,
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paving the way for a new generation of girls. so you're all in with this? >> i am all in, yes. this is what i want to do for the rest of my life. >> reporter: jamie yuccas, cbs news, mcpherson, kansas. . it's it's monday, march 2nd, 2020. this is the "cbs morning news." a second coronavirus death in the u.s., growing concern in the pacific northwest after two people died. researchers say the virus may have been circulating for weeks undetected as more cases are confirmed nationwide. i am making the difficult decision to suspend my campaign for the present. >> mayor pete is out. the list of candidates for the democratic presidential nomination is one shorter ahead of super tuesday. who's leading now? and after a month's long hiatus, n k

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