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Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings

Audio, and early video, and records, and entertainment. The beginnings of an industry that is still with us, slowly engulfing (or being engulfed by) the computer industry.



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Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
by Gene Pressler
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A scene from "Oberon" illustrates just how great the Columbia Grafonola record player will sound reproducing grand opera. From a 1920 magazine. Artist: Gene Pressler Source: Renita Ivey Restoration by: Renita Ivey
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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Atwater Kent in full glory, with everything you need for radio listening. Published in the October, 1927 issue of GOOD HOUSEKEEPING. Source: Mariangela Buch Restoration by: Mariangela Buch
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets, tuner,...
An ad for a catalog, invoking all the spirits of radio at one of it greatest times. Names like Hallicrafters, RCA, Weston, Airline, Brush. Published in the December, 1936 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets, amateur,...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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Your basic product ad, the thing that sells itself. Bilateral symmetry helps. Published in the March, 1925 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets, receiver,...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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Olive Fremstad now making recordings exclusively for Columbia. Try playing them on the Columbia Grafonola "Minion," at $150. Published in the April 15, 1911 issue of SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN. Source: Steve Kirch, collector, and creator of a great website about SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN in the past Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Records and...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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Magic brain, and magic eye. Published in the September 28, 1935 issue of COLLIER'S WEEKLY Artist: Source: Brian Bennett Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets, magazine...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
by Brett
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Columbia double-disc records can be played on your disc machine no matter what make. An early argument for cross-platform format compatibility -- no DRM involved! Happy dancers of all ages fill up the room. Published in the May 2, 1914 issue of JUDGE. Artist: Brett Source: Mariangela Buch Restoration by: Mariangela Buch
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Records and...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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The three vital features of your Christmas Grafonola: Tone (or Fidelity as we would call it), Tone Control, and Convenience. Happy family sits in front of the new Grafonola, looking at the Christmas tree (with unopened presents underneath it), and listening to the music of the season. One might want to move the machine away from the fireplace. Published in the December, 1915 issue of HEARST'S MAGAZINE. Artist: Source: Charles Perrien Restoration by: Charles Perrien
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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Ad for Columbia Grafonola phonographs, from a 1914 issue of LIFE, the Humor Magazine. Man in uniform, but this one is early. Happy family setting, playing their new Christmas music machine. Source: Mariangela Buch Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Ad for Hallicrafters television sets, distributed and retailed by Henry Radio. Published in the January, 1949 issue of RADIO & TELEVISION NEWS, which featured this set on the cover.
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Television, magazine...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
by H. A. Weiss
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Unexpected concatenation of philosopher Lao Tzu and a new factory building, as Grebe Radio expands to fill the need, and their "Doctor Mu" holds forth about their new dwelling. Published in the October, 1922 issue of RADIO NEWS. Artist: H. A. Weiss Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets, Chinese,...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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Page two of the two-page spread shows the Frost Radio items themselves: headset, cords, plugs, and a lightning protector. Published in the October, 1922 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Experimenters...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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Beautiful Jeanne Gordon sings "Habañera" from "Carmen," and dances seductively; and this machine will play it for you. Published in the November, 1920 issue of the PEOPLE'S HOME JOURNAL. Artist: Source: Charles Perrien Restoration by: Charles Perrien
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Build a B-T Nameless, the five-tube circuit that hasn't got a name. Low loss, low cost. Published in the March, 1925 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Experimenters...
Classic Wimshurst static machine, sold by the Anderson Light and Spec. Company of Chicago. Get a wireless lesson for free, with purchase of $1.00; get all twenty. Boys in Chicago, come in and visit and see our line; Western distributors for the Electro Importing Co. [Gernsback]. Published in the August, 1913 issue of MODERN ELECTRICS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Experimenters...
Happy technogeek praises high-efficiency receivers (which we could call headphones) at quick-sale price. Did you know Briggs & Stratton made headphones? It's not just engines any more (or then). That's BASCO. Published in the October, 1922 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Experimenters...
Ad for the Victor Victrola with the goose-neck arm tone arm. Published in the April, 1921 issue of the WOMAN'S HOME COMPANION.
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Just a hint of Waldo in this one, as crowds of people perform in your new "Leader" model. Published in the October 4, 1913 issue of SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN. Source: Steve Kirch, collector, and creator of a great website about SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN in the past Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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Headliners all: Al Jolson, Nora Bayes, Van and Schenck, Bert Williams, Harry Fox -- all shown playing around on Columbia records. Best played in a Columbia Grafonola. Published in the February, 1920 issue of the PEOPLE'S HOME JOURNAL. Artist: Source: Charles Perrien Restoration by: Charles Perrien
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Records and...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
by Guernsey Moore
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So in 1905 it's a good time for Japonisme as seen with this explicitly Japanismic illustration for the Edison Phonograph. From an unidentified magazine, about 1905. Artist: Guernsey Moore Source: Mariangela Buch Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Singers swarm into your living room to delight you, when you buy Victor for Christmas. The great artists send their warm Christmas greetings; they cannot be with you on Christmas Day, but they can visit you through the Victrola. Published in the December, 1919 issue of the PEOPLE'S HOME JOURNAL. Artist: Source: Charles Perrien Restoration by: Charles Perrien
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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The Super Sky Rider designs, for every amateur of that generation. Direct calibration tuning! Published in the December, 1936 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets, ham,...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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Looking somewhat old-fashioned in 1920, and the woman perhaps a bit dowdy, the Dalion seems to be aiming at the middle class who wants it all, no worries. "My Five Tests for Phonograph Buyers." Published in the October, 1920 issue of PHOTOPLAY. Artist: Source: Charles Perrien Restoration by: Charles Perrien
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Give music this Christmas, as Santa brings down a sleighful of singing stars, courtesy of the Columbia Graphophone Co. Great visual over the top of the town. Published in the December, 1920 issue of the PEOPLE'S HOME JOURNAL. Artist: Source: Charles Perrien Restoration by: Charles Perrien
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
You can buy full kits from Sleeper, to construct your own radio receiving set. Brand new super-regenerative receiver kit, based on the Armstrong patents, for only $59.65. That's several hundred dollars in today's depreciated currency! Published in the October, 1922 issue of RADIO NEWS.. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Experimenters...
The Air-Way Electric Appliance Corporation, of Toledo, Ohio, had a line of radio components, and some assembled radio sets. Published in the October, 1922 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets, receiver,...
Stalwart pictorial ad, preparing the boys what kind of bettery ehty'd need when they got their first radio set. Ask any radio engineer. Published in the June, 1926 issue of AMERICAN BOY. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Experimenters...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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Classy engraving-like drawing of the De Forest Radiophone, a movable radio which requires no external antenna. Published in the March, 1925 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets, portable,...
Low-loss, frame, performance, engineers. Published in the March, 1925 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Experimenters...
You command all of the music of all of the world with a Grafonola. Looks more like "Where's Waldo" in the sphere of music. A desktop and a console are offered. Published in the October 12, 1912 issue of SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN. Source: Steve Kirch, collector, and creator of a great website about SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN in the past Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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Just two ways of hearing violinist Ysaye; live performance, or on Columbia records. Try playing them on the Grafonola "De Luxe," price $200. Published in the April 5, 1913 issue of SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN. Source: Steve Kirch, collector, and creator of a great website about SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN in the past Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Records and...
Early on in Victor's ad campaigns, and it's almost solid black on black. (Had to bump it up in Photoshop to make the disk more visible.) Here we see a Monarch disk, with the "Victor Dog on Every Record" because "If you don't get the dog, you can't get the best results." This one is Monarch 2556, Richard Jose performing "Silver Threads Among the Gold". From a 1904 issue of BOOKLOVER'S MAGAZINE. Source: Mariangela Buch Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Records and...
Happy family sits in the living room and listens to the new radio from General Motors, which has just introduced a line of radio sets. You probably thought they only made cars, eh. Beautiful furniture, Visual Tone Selector. Published in the December, 1930 issue of the LADIES' HOME JOURNAL. Artist: Source: Robert, KD4HSH Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets, castle,...
Combination detector and one stage amplifier, major components of a build-it-yourself radio receiving set, from the Signal Electric Mfg. Co. of Chicago. Published in the October, 1922 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Experimenters...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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Just like your bloodhound, the Ultradyne senses the signal where others find none. Phenix Radio Corporation, of New York City. Published in the March, 1925 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets,...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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A small radio, simple to operate and low in battery drain, the CH5 from the W. R. Cramer Co., of Omaha, Nebraska. Published in the October, 1922 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets, pioneer,...
Great wartime illustration art: ships, naval officers, relaxation, wardroom, carrying the song of victory across the seas. Carry your victrola anywhere ... even onto the battlefield. Published in an unidentified magazine, circa 1918. Artist: Source: Mariangela Buch Restoration by: Mariangela Buch
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
The greatest artists are victor artists, so buy a Victrola to hear them best. Example: Jeritza, whose appearance at the Metropolitan Opera season was one of the sensations. Published in the September, 1922 issue of the PEOPLE'S HOME JOURNAL. Artist: Source: Charles Perrien Restoration by: Charles Perrien
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
We've put this modular receiver design here, but it could have gone in with the "Radio Sets" just as well. Published in the October, 1922 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Experimenters...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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Simple declarative ad for a radio reproducer. Member RMA, Radio Manufacturer's Association. Published in the March, 1925 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Experimenters...
Classical design and layout, of squares and rectangles. A beautiful piece of furniture, and the beauty of the human voice. Just as sounds are gathered and controlled in the living human throat, so are sound vibrations gathered and controlled in the acoustic throat of The Cheney. Published in the October, 1920 issue of PHOTOPLAY. Source: Charles Perrien Restoration by: Charles Perrien
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
by Ignatz Sahula
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Jazz Age! The spirit of modern music, modern cars, modern art, modern lifestyles. Pick this brand new brand (unknown yesterday, today without peer). Published in the October, 1927 issue of the GOLDEN BOOK. Artist: Ignatz Sahula Source: Cynde Georgen, Trail End Historic Site, Sheridan Wyoming Restoration by: Cynde Georgen
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Ad for the Victrola, from the December, 1921 issue of the AMERICAN REVIEW OF REVIEWS. Source: Magazineart.org Physical Archives Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
by Mishkin [Photographer]
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Two photographs, and you know immediately what this ad is about. Victor Recording Laboratory; Caruso's voice played on the Victrola. Is that a twelve-inch Red Seal? Published in the March, 1923 issue of the PEOPLE'S HOME JOURNAL. Artist: Mishkin [Photographer] Source: Charles Perrien Restoration by: Charles Perrien
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Records and...
A rather more neo-classical ad for the Victor, even including the dog with his master's voice logo. Heavy reliance on the Pan-American Exposition judging. From a 1904 issue of HARPER'S MONTHLY. Source: Mariangela Buch Restoration by: Mariangela Buch
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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Yes, it claims to be an ad from the December, 1922 issue of SCIENCE AND INVENTION, but it's actually from RADIO NEWS! The legend at the bottom and the accompanying article talk about how one goes about appealing to radio fans other than the geeks who get off on pieces of hardware. This is "what a real radio advertisement should look like -- an ad that can be understood by the merest tyro." Emphasis is on what you can get out of it: news, opera, jazz -- FREE!. Published in the...
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets, forecast,...
Now that's a kit that will attract attention anywhere. Operates on city 110-volt power lines. Shipping weight of 100 pounds, and purchase price of $51.00 (a lot of money in those days). You needed to be serious about your interests. Published in the 1917 Sears-Roebuck electrical experimenter's / radio catalog (an early one, indeed). Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Experimenters...
GE Focused Tone radio that autotunes in the stations, and has coverage of "every radio service on the air." The high-end model, at $750 in 1936 dollars, was a bit pricey. Published in the December, 1936 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets,...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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A bumper crop of radios from Crosley, a long-term manufacturer and still currently a brand name used on imported hardware. One for every price range! Published in the March, 1925 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets,...
Operating broadcast (AM) radio station KZY, from San Francisco, this set had a handle and was designed to be portable. The two-color design features an electrified knight in steel armor apparently zapping the box with radio waves, with sprays of glowing light coming up from where it hits; somewhat more frightening than hopeful, in retrospect. Published in the October, 1922 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets, ground...
You wondered what Hetro-Magnetism was? Well, it went a thousand miles, and it might get London. S. Debnel Radio Equipment Mfg. Co. Published in the March, 1925 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets, distance,...
A cheery home, a Grafonola, and the needle touched down to the record. Tone. Warmth, resonance, reality. Published in the September, 1917 issue of NEEDLECRAFT. Artist: Source: Cynde Georgen, Trail End Historic Site, Sheridan Wyoming Restoration by: Cynde Georgen
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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Campers listen happily to records played on the portable Columbia "Favorite" Grafonola. Another in the series of this design type. Published in the July, 1915 issue of HEARST'S MAGAZINE. Source: Charles Perrien Restoration by: Charles Perrien
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Records and...
The best friend of a hostess is the Victrola. Here we see the hostess welcoming a troupe of visiting opera singers, carried in on records, to amuse her party. Published in the February, 1914 issue of the PEOPLE'S HOME JOURNAL. Artist: Source: Charles Perrien Restoration by: Charles Perrien
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Look under the lid and be sure it has the right trademarks! Pay lots of money? Get what you paid for! Published in the November, 1920 issue of the PEOPLE'S HOME JOURNAL. Artist: Source: Charles Perrien Restoration by: Charles Perrien
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
by Norman Price
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You can have marching bands, but you can also have quiet nights at home listening to classical music with wife and daughter. Dark retro-Victorian design, understated text to grab the high end of the argument. Published in the February, 1920 issue of the PEOPLE'S HOME JOURNAL. Artist: Norman Price Source: Charles Perrien Restoration by: Charles Perrien
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
If you believe in the power of music to elevate your thoughts...and just look at this picture of Pan, and his pipes, and the mythic tradition of musical parties. Nice border; straightforward pictures of the product. Published in the November, 1913 issue of the WOMAN'S HOME COMPANION. Artist: Source: Charles Perrien Restoration by: Charles Perrien
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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not widely known, but collectors have plenty of radios made by Ozarka. If a six-year old can tune in stations on an Ozarka, then surely you can. Published in the March, 1925 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets, simple,...
Radio Corporation of America too long, so Radiola as a trade mark for ads. Here's the Radiola III, with two tubes; expansion sets available. Published in the June, 1924 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets, loud,...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
by John Newton Howitt
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Not printed in color, but a jazz-age toy delineated by a well-known artist. You can dance till the very last note. And why not? Ah, this machine automatically stops itself at the end of the record, and you don't have to stop dancing and go over and lift the needle off. Of this convenience are new designs made. Published in the April, 1920 issue of the PEOPLE'S HOME JOURNAL. Artist: John Newton Howitt Source: Charles Perrien Restoration by: Charles Perrien
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Drop-in, protective cartridge. Published in the March, 1925 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Experimenters...
Right half of a two-page spread. You can still put your own radio "system" together with these modules: the RA Short-Wave Regenerative Tuner, the DA Tube Detector with Two-Stage Amplifier, and the combination RC Short-Wave Regenerative Receiver. These look pretty neat. Published in the March, 1922 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets, modular,...
Ad for the Radio Shack Ambassador 3-tube radio construction kit, as published in the March, 1925 issue of THE EXPERIMENTER. The address for this operation is 55 Vesey St., NYC, and the main Radio Shack store in Boston had already been in operation since 1921, so this is presumably a mail-order address for them.
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Experimenters...
Elegance emphasized in this lacework ad, with a technical drawing to satisfy the gramophone nerds in the audience. The ultimate in phonograph music was not yet available; but on a relative scale, maybe. The Ultona plays all records, allowing you to switch ... presumably between side-to-side and hill-and-dale recording ... by flipping over the tone-arm head. The Amplifier is just a resonating chamber. From the Brunswick-Balke-Collender Company. Published in the October, 1919 issue of the...
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Metaphor gone mad, or what were they smoking in the art department? The twelve world judges at the Pan-American Exposition (Buffalo, 1901) all voted for the Victor, oritinal makes of the Gram-O-phone. There's the world to judge and the judges to be the jury. From a 1904 issue of BOOKLOVER'S MAGAZINE. Source: Mariangela Buch Restoration by: Mariangela Buch
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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Not a long-term survivor, the Amplex DX-5 shows a happy listener (note five o'clock shadow) using the volumeter. Published in the March, 1925 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets, receiver,...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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Miss Columbia, in a patriotic July 4th, celebrates victory with songs and marches from the world war. Ad for Columbia Grafonola gramophone, from the July, 1919 issue of the LADIES' HOME JOURNAL.
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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In this ad the kids are getting it on, listening to the latest dance music with no adults in sight. From the June, 1915 issue of HEARST'S MAGAZINE. Source: Charles Perrien Restoration by: Charles Perrien
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Records and...
Look under the lid! aka under the hood. See the label and know that the dependable brand Victrola is what you need. Here is a detailed picture showing just what to look for in a branded talking machine. Published in the November, 1921 issue of NEEDLECRAFT. Artist: Source: Cynde Georgen, Trail End Historic Site, Sheridan Wyoming Restoration by: Cynde Georgen
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Phonographs and...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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Ad for the Heath Company's war-surplus sales branch. Also published in the January, 1949 issue of RADIO & TELEVISION NEWS.
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Experimenters...
The time-tested method for attracting the attention of a techno geek is to shows pictures of all the wonderful parts he can buy. As then, now today. New York Coil Comapny radio products are built to work -- not just to sell. Transformers, variocouplers, variable capacitors/condensers, and even a full receiving set of tuner, detercot, and two stages of amplification. Published in the October, 1922 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Experimenters...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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Nice ad for the E. H. Scott line, from the October, 1932 issue of RADIO DIGEST. Source: University of Wiscon Libraries; photograph by magscanner Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets, quality,...
Magazine Art: Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings
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Society woman and man hanging up a Christmas wreath, entranced, as are two other women and two young girls, by the beautiful sounds coming from the new Radiola Super-Heterodyne. The Radiola 67 radio-phonograph will set you back $690, which is about $45,000 in today's currency, and that price is without the tubes (!). Published in an unidentified magazine in 1928. Artist: Source: Robert, KD4HSH Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets, class,...
Left page of a two-page spread. Every family can now have a radio with which they can "Listen In." Complete Aeriola radio sets that can be used with the Vocarola horn (as a loudspeaker) so that the music and words come out just as they do from a phonograph. Any novice can do it. Published in the March, 1922 issue of RADIO NEWS. Source: Magazine collector Steve Davis Restoration by: magscanner
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Sets, radio,...
A Valve Detector is not an instrument for detecting valves, but a Detector module for reception, using a valve (a radio tube, an evacuated glass envelope with a diode function). This one comes with a crank on the side that looks like an automotive starting crank, but is just a control on an external rheostat for controlling voltage and current. Size not indicated, but figure those terminal points are about a quarter of an inch across for starters. Published in the August, 1913 issue of MODERN...
Topics: Advertising Art in Magazines, Radio, Television, Phonographs, and Recordings, Radio Experimenters...