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INTRODUCTION 


3 


Thanks to a new switching principle developed by KCS it has become 

possible to put software outside the Commodore 64 memory. On the 

basis of this technique KCS has designed the POWER CARTRIDGE. 

The powerful 16K machine code offers you as user an optimal exten¬ 
sion to your standard computer. 

Some of its facilities are: 

a. a powerful BASIC TOOLKIT (aid) that considerably simplifies 
programming and the detection of errors in programs. You can 
use the TOOLKIT commands in your own programs. 

b. a quick-loader for DISK as well as TAPE which can also load the 
more ambitious programs and games. 

c. a monitor that is always at your disposal and which gives you 
access to all memory areas of your Commodore. 

When you program, or intend to program, in machine language, the 
POWER CARTRIDGE is an ideal aid. 

d. a PAUSE key with which you can stop any program temporarily. 

e. an extensive graphic printer interface with which you can make a 
print of the screen (HARDCOPY) at any time and from any program. 
The uniqueness of this cartridge is that afterwards you can con¬ 
tinue the interrupted program. 

f. a TOTAL BACKUP facility. This implies that you can save a program 
available in the memory at any time and load it again at a later 
time. After this you can continue the program. 


We are sure that this purchase will add a new 
dimension to your computer hobby. 


DORDRECHT/HOLLAND, 1989 
THE POWER CARTRIDGE TEAM, 

PETER VERHEY 
KRIJN KOLFF 
BAS VAN ROSSEM 
PAUL HOPPER 


















4 


(C) COPYRIGHT 


This manual is copyrighted in 1986 by KCS. 

No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval 
system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, 
mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior 
written permission of KOLFF COMPUTER SUPPLIES B.V. 


All rights reserved under the Dutch Copyright Act and the 
international copyright conventions. 


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 


COMMODORE is a registered trademark of COMMODORE BUISINESS MACHINES Inc 

POWER CARTRIDGE is a registered trademark of KOLFF COMPUTER SUPPLIES BV 

TOTAL BACKUP is a registered trademark of KOLFF COMPUTER SUPPLIES BV 

KCS is a registered trademark of KOLFF COMPUTER SUPPLIES BV 

The information in this manual has been reviewed and is believed to be 

reliable. 

No responsibility, however is assumed for inaccuracies. 

The material in this manual is for information purposes only, and is 
subject to change without notice. 




TABLE OF CONTENTS 


SUBJECT: PAGE 


INTRODUCTION 3 
COPYRIGHT 4 
TABLE OF CONTENTS 5 
INSTALLATION 6 
TOOLKIT COMMANDS 7-17 
DISK COMMANDS 18-20 
TAPE COMMANDS 21-22 
POWERMON INTRODUCTION 23 
POWERMON COMMANDS 24-33 
POWER RESET COMMANDS 34-37 
PRINTER TOOL COMMANDS 38-40 
PARTICULARS 41 
PRINTER CABLE DIAGRAM 41 
INDEX 42 


• • 






INSTALLATION 


6 


First of all switch off the Commodore 64, then insert the POWER 
CARTRIDGE (sticker up) into the cartridge port of your computer. 
Viewed from the back, this is the farthest left connector. 

Then switch on the Commodore 64 once more. Within a few seconds the 
usual announcements will now appear on the top side of the screen. 
In the centre of the screen the 'KCS LOGO' will be depicted. After 
pressing a key the logo will disappear, after which you can start 
using the many extra facilities of the POWER CARTRIDGE. 

In case of non-function, the POWER CARTRIDGE has probably not been 
inserted properly into the connector and you will have to start all 
over again. 





TOOLKIT COMMANDS 


7 


TOOLKIT is an aid when programming in BASIC. 
AUTO 


For the automatic generation of line numbers. 

Example: 

AUTO 10,5 starts with line 10 and the following line numbers will 

increment by 5 each time. 

AUTO (without any addition) starts with line 100 and the 

following line numbers will be 10 higher each time. 

When you wish to stop the input of lines, press the 'RETURN' key. 

This AUTO function also checks and warns when double line numbers are 
used. An example: 

Line 100 is already there. E.g.: 100 gosub 500 

You type in AUTO 100,5. Line 100 will now be used for the second time 
which implies that the existing line 100 would be taken off. 

Therefore you will see the number 100 printed reversed on the screen 
as a warning. When you then press the 'RETURN' key, the existing line 
100 will be maintained. However, when you type on, line 100 will be 
overwritten. 


COLOR 


With this function you can change the color(s) of the background, the 
border and the cursor. 

Example: 

COLOR 0 will give a black background. 

COLOR 0,2 will give a black background and a red border. 

COLOR 0,2,1 will give a black background, a red border, and a white 

cursor. 

COLOR will give the standard Commodore colors. 


There are 16 different color possibilities. 

The color values go from 0 up to and including 15. 












OEEK 


8 


DEEK means "double byte peek". 

This implies that you will be able to call in the contents of two 
memory addresses at the same time. 

Example: 

?DEEK (32768) will show in decimals the sum of the contents of the 
addresses "32768" and "32769". 

PRINT DEEK(address) equals: 

PRINT PEEK(address) + PEEK (address + 1)*256. 

7DEEK ($8000) will now show in decimals the sum of the contents of 
the addresses mentioned above. 

?HEX$ (DEEK(32768)) will then show in hexadecimals the sum of the 
contents of the addresses mentioned above. 

?HEX$ (DEEK($8000)) will then show in hexadecimals the sum of the 
contents of the addresses mentioned above. 

Instead of the PRINT statement ('?') you may also call DEEK from a 
program. 

Example: 

100 A$=HEX$ (DEEK($8000)) 
or: 

100 A=DEEK ($C000):B=DEEK (32768) 


DELETE 

DELETE means remove. 

With this instruction parts of a basic program may be erased at one 
go. The syntax is the same as that of LIST , although with DELETE 
a range should always be given, as well. This is to avoid that you 
should lose the entire program accidentally. 

Example: 

DELETE 1000-1500 will erase all lines from 1000 up to and including 
1500. 

DELETE 1000- will erase all lines from 1000 up to and including 

the end. 

DELETE -1000 will erase all lines from the beginning up to and 

including 1000. 












DOKE 


9 


DOKE means "double byte poke". 

This implies that you can poke a value in two memory addresses at one 
go. So in fact you execute two pokes at one go. 

Example: 

POKE 32768,4097 pokes at address 32768 a 1 and at address 32769 the 
value 16. To verify this we can calculate: 

16 x 256 + INT(value address 32768(=1)). 

Outcome being 4097. 

DOKE $8000,$1001 pokes the same values at the addresses mentioned 
above. 

A general description for DOKE is: 

DOKE address,value equals the instructions.... 

POKE address,value - INT(value/256)*256 followed by.... 

POKE address + 1,INT(value/256 ). 

Example: 

DOKE $8000,$2FFF equals: 

POKE $8000,$2FFF-INT($2FFF/256)*256 and 
POKE $8001,INT($2FFF/256) 

The DOKE command can also be used in a basic program. 

Example: 

100 DOKE $0000,826 

Equals POKE 49152,58 and POKE 49153,3. 

(Verification: 58 plus 3*256 =826). 


DUMP 

DUMP will show on the screen a list of all single variables with 
their positive and/or negative values. 

Example: 

100 A=5:B=3:C=-20 

110 A$="POWER CARTRIDGE" 

120 END 
130 X=A-B 

After a run of this program we do a DUMP. Then we will see: 

A=5 

B=3 

C=-20 

A$="POWER CARTRIDGE" 

The variable X will not be given, as the program was cut off by END 
in line 120 and at that moment the variable X had not been reached. 






FIND 


10 


To facilitate the search for a piece of text, a basic instruction or a 
variable in a basic program. 

Example: 

FiNP Hullo will search for the Hullo text in a basic program and 
will show the line number(s) containing the word Hullo . 

FIND GOSUB 500 will show all lines containing GOSUB 500 . 

FIND A$ will show all lines containing the variable A$. 


HARDCAT 

HARDCAT is short for HARDCOPY of a CATALOG. 

This means that you can print on the printer a directory (catalog) of 
a diskette. Any basic program that may be available in the memory will 
not be overwritten. 

Example: 

HARDCAT will print all program names of a diskette on the printer. 


HARDCOPY 

With this function you can send the content of the screen to a prin¬ 
ter. 

For more information on 'HARDCOPY' see under PRINTERTOOL commands. 












HEX$ 


11 


HEX$ is a BASIC function and not a statement. 

This is to say that HEX$ ( ) cannot serve as an independent instruc¬ 

tion. So it has to be used in a LET- or PRINT statement. 

(LET may also be left out). 

The HEX$( ) function is a STRING function, so LET A= HEX$( ) will 

give 'TYPE MISMATCH ERROR'. Instead of LET A you will have to use 
LET A$. A numeric variable or EXPRESSION should be placed between the 
brackets ( ). 

By EXPRESSION is meant: 

ALL arithmetical operations, with equivalent variables and/or num¬ 
bers. 

The HEX$( ) function converts a number into hexadecimal. 

Example: 

?HEX$ (255) will show the hexadecimal value of 255, so "FF". 

?HEX$ ($FF+160) will show the hexadecimal sum of "$FF+160", so $019F. 
?HEX$ ($D000-$C000+3) will show the hexadecimal value $1003. 

Or starting from a basic program: 

100 LET A$ = HEX$(255) 

200 LET B$ = HEX$(2 56* 3+$FCE2-$C2EA) 

300 PRINT HEX$($FF+160) 


INFO 

INFO will display all available toolkit functions on your screen. 

This auxiliary menu can be printed on a printer by means of the 
HARDCOPY command. 


KEY 


KEY will display all functions 


FI = LIST: (CR) 

F3 = RUN: (CR) 

F5 = DLOAD (CR) 

F7 = DIR: (CR) 

The functions with a (CR) will 
pressing the relevant function 


defined under the function keys. 

F2 = MONITOR:(CR) 

F4 = UNNEW: (CR) 

F6 = LOAD"",2(CR) 

F8 = DISK" 

be executed immediately after 
key. 












MERGE 


12 


MERGE means join together. 

With MERGE two basic programs may be coupled or joined together. 

Example: You have the following program in your computer: 

100 PRINT"Hullo" 

200 PRINT"Peter" 

300 PRINT"does it operate ?" 

You have the following program, called "PART 2", on tape or disk: 

150 REM 

250 PRINT"and Rob" 

400 REM 

500 PRINT"Regards Krijn" 

Now it is possible to load the latter program from tape or disk and to 
join it to the program that is present in the memory of the computer. 

Users of tape will type in the following: 

MERGE"PART 2" (slow loading), 

of MERGE"PART 2",2 (quick loading). 

Users of disk will type in the following: 

MERGE"PART 2",8 (quick loading). 

MERGE"PART 2",9 (quick loading from DEVICE 9). 

MERGE"PART 2",48 (slow loading from DEVICE 48). 

MERGE"PART 2",49 (slow loading from DEVICE 49). 

Viewing the listing after this MERGE instruction, we see the 
following: 

100 PRINT"Hullo" 

150 REM 

200 PRINT"Peter" 

250 PRINT"and Rob" 

300 PRINT"does it operate ?" 

400 REM 

500 PRINT"Regards Krijn" 

It may occur that a program to be loaded contains a line number that 
has already been used in the program present in the computer. 

Example: 

Line 100 has been used in both program parts. After a MERGE command 
line 100, already present in the computer, remains intact. Line 100 
has been removed from the second (loaded) part. 



PAUSE 


13 


Up to now programming a pause was rather cumbersome. 

For instance: FOR I = 1 TO 2000 : NEXT I 

By means of the POWER CARTRIDGE making a pause in your basic program 
will be easy. 

Example: 

PAUSE 3 wait 3 seconds. 

PAUSE 10 wait 10 seconds. 


PLIST 

PLIST is short for PRINTERLIST. 

This will allow you to send a listing of a basic program to a printe 
and print it out. Whether all CBM characters will be printed depends 
on the make and/or type of printer. 

The POWER CARTRIDGE self-detects whether a serial or a centronics 
printer has been connected to your computer. 

Example: 

PLIST prints out a basic listing on the printer. 


PSET 

PSET stands for SET PRINTER. 

For more information on 'PSET' see under PRINTERTOOL commands. 








RENUM 


14 


RENUM is short for RENUMBER. 

It is used for the renumbering of a basic program or a part of a pro¬ 
gram. The THEN, LIST, GOTO, GOSUB and ON X GOTO/GOSUB instructions 
will also be adapted. 

Example s 

RENUM Will renumber the entire program. The first line will become 

number 100 and the following lines will increase 10 at a time. 

RENUM 50 As above; however, the numbering will start with line 50 
and will increment 10 at a time. 

RENUM 50,5 As above; however, the numbering will start with line 50 
and will increment 5 at a time. 

It will also be possible to renumber a part of a program or even to 
shift it. 

Example: 

100 REM 

120 PRINT" Is a product of: 

140 PRINT"Kolff Computer Supplies BV" 

160 PRINT" POWER CARTRIDGE" 

180 PRINT" (c) 1986 

Suppose we wish to place the lines 100 up to and including 140 behind 
line 180, starting from line 200 with a line distance of 20. 

This can be done by typing in the following: 

RENUM 100,140,200,20 Viewing the listing of the program, we then 
see the following: 

160 PRINT" POWER CARTRIDGE" 

180 PRINT" (c) 1986 

200 REM 

220 PRINT" Is a product of: 

240 PRINT"Kolff Computer Supplies BV" 

In case we omit the last digit (which is now 20) behind the RENUM 
instruction, the renumbered part will have a line distance of 10. 

This RENUM function will check and warn you whenever you give a RENUM 
instruction that would result in an existing line being over written. 

Example: 

100 REM 

110 PRINT"Programming" 

120 PRINT"can be fun " 

130 PRINT" too. 







(RENUMBER continued) 


15 


Suppose you wish to renumber lines 110 up to and including 130, star 
ting from line 100 with a line distance of 10. 

So RENUM 110,130,100,10 

The following information will appear on your screen: 

CREATE DOUBLE LINE NUMBERS ! 

100—110 

This means that line 100 already exists and that line 110 cannot be 
renumbered into 100. Should you require this, line 100 should be 
given a different number or be removed. 


REPEAT 


Makes nearly all keys of your keyboard recursive. 
Example: 

REPEAT (1st time) will switch on REPEAT function. 
REPEAT (2nd time) will switch off REPEAT function 
etc. 


SAFE 

Will switch off the RUN/STOP and the RESTORE keys. 

This may be useful when you want to avoid a break in a basic program 
caused by touching these keys by mistake. 

Example: 

SAFE (1st time) will switch off the RUN STOP and RESTORE keys. 

SAFE (2nd time) will switch on the RUN STOP and RESTORE keys 
e tc. 


TRACE 

TRACE will allow you to run slowly through a basic program. 

The program line numbers that have been executed will be seen to 
appear in the right-hand top corner of the screen. When the 
'SPACE BAR' is kept pressed down, the program will be continue. 

Example: 

TRACE 100 with a RETURN will start the program from line 100. 

TRACE with a RETURN will start the program from the first line 
number. 












UNNEW 


16 


You can lose a basic program in various ways. 

For instance: after you have typed in NEW or after there has been a 
RESET. A Reset can be effected in 2 ways by means of the POWER CAR¬ 
TRIDGE, i.e. by means of the choice of 'RESET* or 'RESET ALL* from 
the RESET menu. 

With the UNNEW command you will be able to restore a basic program. 
Example: 

UNNEW followed by a push on the 'RETURN' key will restore the pro¬ 
gram. 

UNNEW will also be executed by pressing the function key F4. 

In case you have lost your basic program through one of the above- 
mentioned causes, always type in UNNEW first, before using other 
(Toolkit) functions. 


QUIT 

QUIT will switch off the POWER CARTRIDGE. 

QUIT 1 will switch off the DISK and TAPE quick-loading/save routines 
and the driver software for centronics printers. 

QUIT 2 will switch off the POWER TOOLKIT, causing the switching-off 
of all POWER CARTRIDGE commands. 


When to use QUIT, QUIT 1 or QUIT 2 ? 

QUIT in the case of programs containing their own quick-loader/ 
saver and toolkit 

QUIT 1 in the case of programs that have a quick-loading/save routine 
of their own. 

QUIT 2 in the case of TOOLKIT programs and programs defining their 
own character set. 






$ 


17 


Thanks to the POWER CARTRIDGE difficult calculations need no longer be 
made. 

is a numerical variable. 

That is to say that cannot serve as an independent instruction !!! 

So it has to be used in a LET, PRINT, POKE or SYS statement. 

(LET may also be omitted). 

The function will convert a hexadecimal number into a decimal one. 

Example: 

PRINT $FF will show the decimal value of $FF, so "255". 

SYS $C000 will jump to the hexadecimal address $C000, 

i.e. decimal 49152. 

POKE $D020,10 pokes at address 53280 (decimal) a 10. 

POKE $D020,$0A pokes at address 53280 (decimal) a 10. 

?PEEK ($C000) will show the contents value of memory address $C000. 

Or from a basic program: 

100 PRINT $FCE2 : REM outcome = 64738. 

200 POKE $D020,10 : REM equals POKE 53280,10. 

300 POKE $D020,$0A : REM equals POKE 53280,10. 

400 A=PEEK($C000) : REM equals A=PEEK(49152). 

500 B=$FF+1 : REM equals B=255+l. 

600 PRINT $A0+$B0 : REM outcome = 336 (decimal). 








DISK COMMANDS 


18 


DLOAD 

For the quick-loading of program files from disk, by means of 
DEVICE 8. 

Example: 

DLOAD"pr ogram name" will load a program from disk 5 to 6 times 
fasterT 

DLOAD can be used from a program and is defined under the function 
key ' F5 1 . 

When the directory is on-screen you can go with the cursor to the 
name of the program to be loaded and press the function key ' F5' 
(DLOAD), after which the program will be loaded quickly. 

DLOAD without program name will load the first program from disk. 

DLOAD can be compared with LOAD" : * " , 8,1. 

Quick-loading from disk can also be done by means of the normal LOAD 
instruction. 

Example: 

LOAD"program",8 (loading 5 to 6 times faster). 

LOAD"program",9 (loading 5 to 6 times faster, from disk, by means of 
DEVICE 9). 

When a program consists of several program files, these will automa¬ 
tically be loaded quickly. 

(With the exception of a few programs whose safety devices cut out the 
quick-loading routine. Loading will then proceed at normal speed). 

Different makes of serial diskdrives, which are not compatible with 
quick-loading routines, are also on the market. 

Therefore KCS has ascribed two new DEVICE numbers. 

Viz. : 

LOAD"program name",48 (normal loading from disk with DEVICE 8). 

LOAD"program name",49 (normal loading from disk with DEVICE 9). 

When you wish to load slowly with the Commodore 1541 diskdrive, 

you may also make use of DEVICE 48 or 49. 








DSAVE 


19 


For the saving of program files to disk. 

Example: 

DSAVE"program name” will save a program to disx. 

DSAVE can be used from a program. 

Saving to disk can also be done by means of the normal SAVE 
instruction. 

Example: 

SAVE"program",8 (save to disk). 

SAVE”program",9 (save to disk by means of DEVICE 9). 


DVERIFY 

For the verification of a program file saved to disk. 

Example: 

DVERIFY"program name" 

DVERIFY can also be used from a program. 

You may also VERIFY from disk by using the normal VERIFY instruction. 
Example: 

VERIFY"program",8 (VERIFY from disk). 

VERIFY"program",9 (VERIFY from disk by means of DEVICE 9). 


MERGE (disk) 


For more 


information on MERGE, 


see under POWER TOOLKIT commands 




DIR 

The DIR command will display the directory on the screen, without, 
however, disturbing any program present in the memory. 

DIR can be used from a program and has been defined under the func¬ 
tion key 'F7' . 

You may interrupt this function by pressing the 'RUN STOP' key, after 
which you may load a program from the displayed directory by means of 
DLOAD. 


The DIR function may also be stopped (paused 
BAR. The DIR function will continue when the 
once more. 


by pressing the SPACE 
SPACE BAR is pressed 








DISK 


20 


DISK is a function for the execution of shortened disk commands. 

This command can be used starting from a program and has been defined 
under the function key 'F8'. 

Example: 

DISK followed by a RETURN will display the status announcement on 
your screen. 

DISK followed by a disk instruction will replace the following 
series of instructions: 


OPEN 1,8,15 

PRINT#1,"disk instruction" 
CLOSEl 


Any disk command may be used for 'disk instruction', such as: 


DIS K " I 

DISK"N:diskname,id 
DISK"R:new name=old 
DISK"S:name 
DISK"UI 
DISK"V 


name 


Initialize disk. 

Formatting diskette. 

Change of program name. 

Removal of a program from diskette. 
Diskdrive reset. 

Validation of a diskette. 


In case the light of your diskdrive remains lighted when using 
DISK"UI" when there is an ERROR announcement, you had better switch 
it off for a moment and then switch it on again. 

For more information on disk commands and error codes we refer you to 
your diskdrive manual. 


DEVICE 


This command will give the device number 9 to a CBM 1541 diskdrive. 

In case two 1541 diskdrives are connected to your computer, you 
should disconnect one drive, before you type in the DEVICE command. 

Example: 

> 

DEVICE will change device 8 into 9. 

In case two drives are used, the second drive should be re-connected 
after the DEVICE command. There will now be one drive with the device 
number 8 and one drive with the device number 9. 







TAPE COMMANDS 


21 










The quick-loading/save routine of the POWER CARTRIDGE are compatible 
with nearly all existing quick-loaders. 


QUICKLOADING 

Allows a 10 times faster loading of program files from tape. 
Example: 


LOAD"program" (normal loading from tape). 

LOAD"program",1,1 ( " " " ). 


LOAD"program",2 
or LOAD"",2 
LOAD"program",2,1 
or LOAD"",2,1 


(QUICKLOADING 

II II 


( 

( 


II 

II 


II 

II 


from tape) 

" ). 

" )• 

" ). 


When a program consists of several program files, these will be loa¬ 
ded quickly and automatically, provided device 2 is placed after the 
LOAD instuction. 


Quick-loading can only be done when the program on tape has once 
been saved quickly first. This implies that programs saved in the 
normal (slow) way CANNOT be read by using LOAD"name",2. 

In emergencies the quick-loading may be interrupted by typing on the 
RUN/STOP and RESTORE keys. 


QUICKSAVE 


Allows a 10 times 

Example: 

SAVE"program" 
SAVE"program",2 
or SAVE"",2 


faster saving of program files 


(normal saving to tape). 
(QUICKSAVING to tape). 

/ II II II \ 


to tape. 


Quick-saving may also be done from a program. 

Once a program has been saved quickly, it can solely be loaded by 
means of LOAD"name",2. 

In emergencies the quick-saving can be interrupted by typing on the 
RUN/STOP and RESTORE keys. 














QUICKVERIFY 


22 


Allows a 10 times faster verification of program files from tape. 
Example: 

VERIFY"program" (normal verification from tape). 

VERIFY"program",2 (QUICK VERIFICATION from tape). 

Quick verification may also be done from a program. 

Once a program has been saved quickly, it can solely be verified by 
using VERIFY"name",2. 


MERGE (tape) 

For more information on MERGE see under POWER TOOLKIT commands. 


AUDIO 

AUDIO is a command that the signal of the cassette recorder makes 
visible on the viewing screen by means of dashes and which is at the 
same time sent on to the loudspeaker of the TV/monitor. 

It is extremely handy when you want to look up specific passages on 
tape. 

To stop this function, press the Commodore key. 

You may also type in: 

AUDIO:LOAD"name" or AUDIO:LOAD"name",2 or AUDIO:LOAD"",2 . 


As soon as you hear or see the first signal of a program, you can 
load the program by pressing the SPACE BAR. 









POWERMON INTRODUCTION 


23 


POWERMON is a machine language monitor/assembler. 

This monitor will enable you to query, change and shift memory par¬ 
titions. It will enable you to program the 6510 microprocessor in 
its operating language. Your programs will be executed hundreds of 
times faster than if you were to write them in basic. 

This manual is not a machine language textbook from which you can 
learn machine language. For that purpose there are various suitable 
books on the market. 

You may call POWERMON in various ways: 

a. From basic (also from a program) by typing in MONITOR. 

b. By pressing the function key F2. 

c. From the RESET MENU, by pushing the reset button. 

When calling POWERMON, the following will appear on your screen: 


POWERMON 

PC CR NV-BDIZC AC XR YR SP 
;CO3F 37 10110000 El 00 B6 F8 

(The real values in the registers may deviate). 


What is so special about POWERMON is that you will not encounter it 
anywhere in the memory. You will be free to program in any area you 
like. (Of course anywhere the Commodore allows). 

It is also possible to view and use the RAM under the BASIC ROM 
(from $A000), under the KERNAL ROM (from $E000) and under the I/O 
area (from $D000). -> 

For more information on this see explanation 'Register display'. 




POWERMON COMMANDS 


24 


A 

A stands for assembly. 

Example :• 

You wish to give the BACKGROUND and the BORDER of your display 
screen the color black and the CURSOR white. 

We type in the following: 

A C000 LDA #$00 
A CO02 STA $D020 
A C005 STA $D021 
A CO08 LDX #$01 
A CaOA STX $0286 
A C00D RTS 

Once you have given the A command and have an input instruction, 
after closing by means of RETURN, the following address will automa¬ 
tically appear on the next line, after which you may go on with your 
input. To stop assembly, press RETURN. 

We can try out the routine printed above by making a jump from the 
monitor by means of X followed by a RETURN. We have now returned to 
basic. You may call the routine printed above by means of SYS $C000. 
The screen should now be entirely black and the cursor white. 

This routine can also be called from the monitor by typing in the 
following: 

J C000 followed by RETURN. 

For more information on 'J' see explanation 'Jump' command. 


C 

C stands for Compare. 

Example: 

You wish to compare two memory partitions to see if they are the 
same. Let us assume that the memory area between $8000 and $8FFF is 
to be compared with the memory area between $C000 and $CFFF. 

We type in the following: 

« v 

C 8000 8FFF C000 

This function will now compare these two areas and when differences 
are found the addresses that are not alike will be printed on your 
display screen. 


D 


25 


% 


D stands for Disassembly. 

This command can be compared to the LIST command from basic. 

Example: 

You wish to view the memory area between $C000 and $C22E. 

We type in the following: 

D CO00 C22E 

The machine language from $C000 will be disassembled to the address 
$C22E. Pressing the 'CTRL' key will slow down disassembly, pressing 
the 'SPACE BAR' will stop (pause) disassembly, till the 'SPACE BAR' 
is pressed once more. Pressing the 'RUN STOP' key will stop disas¬ 
sembly . 

After pressing the 'RUN STOP' key you can change the on-screen 
disassembled listing, in the HEX column as well as in the ASCII 
column, by moving up to it by means of the cursor keys and typing 
across it. Any line that has been modified should be closed by 
pressing the 'RETURN' key. The reverse printed column is the HEX 
column, after that you can see the ASCII column. 


F 

F stands for FILL. 

It is possible to fill a certain memory range with a specific value. 
Example: 

You wish to fill the memory range between $C000 and $D000 with NOPS. 
(HEX value is EA). 

We type in the following: 

F C000 CFFF EA 

To check correctness type in D C000 CFFF followed by a RETURN. 


G 


26 


G stands for GO RUN. 

This commands sees to it that a machine language program is execu¬ 
ted, up to the next following BRK code (00). 

Example: 

G 1000 will start a machine language program from address $1000. 

G without any addition will start from the address that is taken 
from the PC (=program counter). 


H 

H stands for HUNT. 

With the HUNT instruction it will be possible to search for HEX and 
ASCII values in the memory. 

Example: 

H C000 CFFF 'POWER CARTRIDGE 

will search for the ASCII text POWER CARTRIDGE in the memory range 
between $C000 and $D000. 

H C000 CFFF 50 4F 57 45 52 20 43 41 52 54 52 49 44 47 45 

will search for the HEX values 50 4F 57 etc. in the memory range 
between $C000 and $D000. 

At most you can query 2 lines HEX or ASCII values at the same time. 
The HUNT can be interrupted by pressing the 'RUN STOP' key. 





I 


27 


I stands for INTERROGATE MEMORY. 

This function will allow you to view the memory of your computer. You 
will see eight rows of HEX values and eight ASCII values side by side. 

Example: 

I 8000 800F 

will give 2 lines of eight HEX and eight ASCII values each on-screen. 

I 8000 9FFF 

This example will give on-screen HEX bytes and the corresponding ASCII 
text from $8000 up to $A000. You can slow down the on-screen display 
by pressing the 'CTRL' key, pressing the 'SPACE BAR' will pause the 
display, till the 'SPACE BAR' is pressed once more. Pressing the 
'RUN STOP' key will stop this function. 

After pressing the 'RUN STOP' key you can modify the on-screen HEX and 
ASCII values by moving up to them by means of the cursor keys and ty¬ 
ping across them. Each modified line should be closed by pressing the 
'RETURN' key. 

If you wish to input a lot of 'text', there is a simple method to do 
so. Suppose you wish to input the text 'POWER CARTRIDGE' to address 
$8000. 

You type in: 

:8000 POWER CARTRIDGE (followed by a RETURN). 

Note ! After :8000 press the 'SHIFT' key and the 'SPACE BAR', 

otherwise you cannot input any normal text. 


J 

J stands for JUMP. 

JUMP is comparable to GOTO. This commands sees to it that a subrou¬ 
tine is executed, up to the next following RTS code (60). 

Example: 

J C000 

will jump to a subroutine starting at address $C000. 

J without any addition will start from the address taken from the 
PC (=program counter). 




L 


28 


L stands for LOAD. 

By means of L you can load programs from tape or disk. 

You can load quickly or slowly. 

(Unless, to this end, you have typed in QUIT or QUIT 1 from basic). 
Example: 

L"program name",xx 

For "xx" you may select: 

01 = slow loading from tape. 

02 « quick loading from tape. 

08 = quick loading from disk. 

09 = quick loading from disk by means of device 9. 

30 - slow loading from disk by means of device 8. 

31 = slow loading from disk by means of device 9. 

This way of loading is comparable to the loading from basic by means 
of load"program name",x,l. 

It is also possible to load the program to a location you opt. 

For instance: 

L"program name",08,cOOO 

The program will now be loaded from address $C000. 


M 

M stands for MEMORY display. 

This function is the same as function I (INTERROGATE MEMORY). 


> 






p 


29 


P stands for PRINT. 

With this command it is possible to print out on paper anything you 
normally see on-screen. Whether all CBM characters will be printed 
depends on the make and/or type of printer. 

The POWER CARTRIDGE self-detects whether a serial or a centronics 
printer has been connected to your computer. 

Example: 

Suppose we want to print out on paper the memory range between 
$4000 and $5000, disassembled. 

Type in the following: 

POx 

To which end x may be the value 4 or 5, dependent on your printer 
operating with device 4 or 5. 

After this type in the following: 

D 4000 5000 followed by a RETURN. All text will now be sent to the 
printer. 

Other functions can also be printed out in this way. 

Example: 

I 4000 5000 followed by a RETURN will send HEX and ASCII values to 
the printer. 

It is also possible to select the way of printing from basic. 

For more information on this see 'PSET' at PRINTERTOOL commands. 

When you want to stop printing, type in the following: 

P03 This instruction will empty the printerbuffer first by sending 
a carriage return, then will subsequently close the print file and 
after that will again display all text on-screen, as usual. 


R 


30 


R stands for REGISTER display. 

The R command will show the contents of the microprocessor 
registers and will enable you to change these. 

The numbers beneath the abbreviations show the contents of the 
registers or counters at the time the R command is typed in. 

PC CR NV-BDIZC AC XR YR SP 
;CO3F 37 10110000 El 00 B6 F8 

PC* the program counter. 

CR= the I/O register in the 6510 CPU (shows the value of the 
address $0001). 

NV-BDIZC (the flag register): 

N= Negative 
V= Overflow 
-= no function 
B= Break 
D= Decimal 
1= Interrupt 
Z= Zero 
C= Carry 

AC* the value in the accumulator. 

XR= the value in the X register (index register X). 

YR= teh value in the Y register (index register Y). 

SP* the stack pointer. 


Example: 

By changing the last figure of the CR value into a different value 
(from 0 up to and including 7) you may change the memory configura¬ 
tion. 

The table given below will show how all this will look. 


CR-value: 

x7 
x6 
x5 
x4 
x 3 
x2 
xl 
xO 


$AQ00: 

BASIC ROM 
RAM (8K) 
RAM (8K) 
RAM (8K) 
BASIC ROM 
RAM (8K) 
RAM (8K) 
RAM (8K) 


$D000: 

I/O 

I/O 

I/O 

RAM (4K) 
CHARGEN 
CHARGEN 
CHARGEN 
RAM (4 K) 


$EQ00; 

KERNAL ROM 
KERNAL ROM 
RAM (8K) 
RAM ( 8 K ) 
KERNAL ROM 
KERNAL ROM 
RAM (8K) 
RAM (8 K) 






s 


31 


S stands for SAVE. 

By means of S you can save programs to tape or disk. 

Saving to tape can be done quickly or slowly. 

(Unless, to this end, you have typed in QUIT or QUIT 1 from basic). 
Example: 

S"program name",xx,initial address,final address (for instance:) 
S"program name",xx,2000,31EA 


For "xx" you may select: 

01 = slow saving to tape. 

02 = quick saving to tape. 

08 = saving to disk. 

09 = saving to disk by means of device 9. 


T 

T stands for TRANSFER. 

By means of the T command you may transfer one or several bytes or 
a partition of the memory to a different location in the memory. 

Example: 

T 2000 2002 3000 

Will transfer three bytes at the memory locations, $2000, $2001 and 
$2002 to the address $3000. 

T 2000 4000 6000 

Will transfer 8K bytes from $2000 to $6000. 





V 


32 


V stands for VERIFY. 

By means of V you may verify programs from tape or disk. 

From tape this may be done quickly or slowly. 

(Unless, to this end, you have typed in QUIT or QUIT 1 from basic). 
Example: 

V'program name",xx,initial address,final address (for instance:) 
V"program name",xx,2000,31EA 

For "xx" you may select: 

01 = slow verification from tape. 

02 = quick verification from tape. 

08 = verification from disk. 

09 = verification from disk by means of device 9. 


W 

W stands for WALK (walk through machine language). 

This command sees to it that a machine language program is executed 
step by step, and after each instruction the computer will wait until 
you press a certain key for continuation. This is ideal for viewing 
at ease how a program is executed and for any possible debugging. 

Example: 

W 1000 Will start a machine language program from address $1000. 

You may adjust the speed by means of the 'SPACE BAR'. 

'SPACE BAR' step by step execution of a program. 

'SPACE BAR' KEPT PRESSED DOWN for a quicker walk-through. 

W without any addition will start from the address taken from the 
PC (^program counter). 


v 


X 

X stands for EXIT (exit monitor). 

The command X followed by a push on the 'RETURN' key will see to it 
that you leave the POWERMON and return to basic. 


33 


£ 

$ is the DIRectory command. 

Example: 

$ followed by a push on the 'RETURN' key will give the directory on¬ 
screen. By means of the 'CTRL' key you can slow down the display. 
Pressing the 'RUN STOP' key will interrupt this function. By pres¬ 
sing the 'SPACE BAR' you can pause the display, till the 'SPACE BAR' 
is pressed down once again. 


is a function to execute shortened disk commands. 

Example: 

-•-followed by a RETURN will give the status announcement on-screen. 

-•-followed by a disk command will replace the following instruction 
series: 

OPEN 1,8,15 

PRINT#1,"disk instruction" 

CL0SE1 


For 'disk instruction' you may use any disk command, such as: 


—I 

-*-Nrdiskname, id 
-«-R:new name=old name 
-*-S: name 
-*-U I 
—V 


Initialize disk. 

Formatting diskette. 

Change of program name. 

Removal of a program from diskette. 
Diskdrive reset. 

Validation of a diskette. 


For more information on disk commands and error codes we refer you 
to your disk drive manual. 


34 


POWER RESET COMMANDS 


A RESET switch is situated at the back of the cartridge. 

You will enter a special menu by pressing the button. 
This function will operate from any program. 

The following options will appear on the screen: 


CONTINUE 

BASIC 

RESET 

BACKUP DISK 
RESET ALL 
BACKUP TAPE 
HARDCOPY 
MONITOR 


After pressing the RESET switch you will always see a 'Hand' 

(or pointer) depicted for the 'CONTINUE' function. 

You may lower the hand by means of the F7 function key and raise 
it again by means of the FI key. 

When you wish to execute 'RESET ALL', you position the hand in 
front of this function and then press the 'RETURN' key, after 
which 'RESET ALL' will be executed. 

We advise you NOT to press the RESET switch-button during the loa¬ 
ding of a program ! Should you do so, the chances are that you will 
have to load the program once more. 


We will now discuss all 'MENU' options. 


CONTINUE 

By pressing the RESET switch it will be possible to stop a program 
temporarily. The program or game may be continued by choosing 
CONTINUE. 

This also holds good after the printing by means of 'HARDCOPY'. 


BASIC 

Return to BASIC retaining all variables. 

This is an emergency solution, in case the RUN STOP and RESTORE keys 
no longer operate and the 'SAFE' command can no longer be executed. 





RESET 


35 


This is a normal RESET function, giving the standard start display 
once more. Naturally all variables will be lost in this way. 

Some programs are provided with an autostart code. (Usually games). 
This implies that these programs cannot be interrupted by means of 
the 'RESET' function; however, this can be done by means of 
'RESET ALL'. 


BACKUP DISK 

This is a very special function of the POWER CARTRIDGE. 

We advise you to read the following attentively, to prevent disap¬ 
pointments . 

First of all we will explain the operation of the 'TOTAL BACKUP'. 

You have loaded and started a program. Now it is possible, imme¬ 
diately after the start or in the course of some time, to make a 
TOTAL BACKUP of the program present in the computer. 

Suppose you are in one of the following situations: 

You are: 

a. playing a game program. 

b. engaged on a chess program. 

c. renumbering a basic program. 

d. at work with a word processor or database. 

e. programming. 

When you are in one of the above-mentioned situations or in any 
other situation, it will, at any time desired, be possible to press 
the RESET button and to save the entire memory, or only the memory 
used, by means of a 'BACKUP DISK', storing all other important 
information, such as variables, colors, information on the viewing 
screen, zeropage information, etc. 


Afterwards, as soon as you are loading the TOTAL BACKUP file once 
more, you will always return in the RESETMENU. Using 'CONTINUE', you 
will return to the same situation where you were last. 

Which means that you may continue your game or chess program. 
Everything will simply go on from where you last broke off. 


'TOTAL BACKUP' 
your computer, 
any more after 


always functions, no matter what program is present in 
However, there are programs that cannot fully function 
a 'TOTAL BACKUP'. 


Which programs cannot function properly after a 'TOTAL BACKUP' ? 

Programs that keep reading other files from disk during their ope¬ 
ration (eg Adventure games) and programs that check regularly 
whether a special code has been put on disk. 




(TOTAL BACKUP continued) 


36 


A 'TOTAL BACKUP' file will always be saved under the name 'BACKUP#', 
unless you have loaded the program by means of 'ILOAD'. 

As with normal saving, with 'TOTAL BACKUP' you cannot twice save the 
same name to disk. 

It is also possible to save only the essentials to disk, instead of 
the entire memory, but in that case you should pre-arrange for this. 
To do this, the first time you load a program you will have to load 
by means of the 'ILOAD' command. 

(For more information on this see explanation at 'ILOAD'). 

What will you have to do to load a 'TOTAL BACKUP* file again and how 
will you recognize 'TOTAL BACKUP' files on disk ? 

A 'TOTAL BACKUP' is recognizable in the directory of the disk as 
three 'USR' files. The last character of the file name is always 
a #, a $ and a %. 

If, since the switching-on of the computer, you have not made use 
of the commands DLOAD or ILOAD, the 'USR' file names on disk will 
be "BACKUP#", "BACKUP$" and "BACKUP%". 

Each time you use 'DLOAD' or 'ILOAD' the file name you give here will 
be used in the next following 'TOTAL BACKUP'. 

You CANNOT give the three 'USR' files on disk different names. You 
CANNOT give the three files the same name, either I So the name with 
which the 'TOTAL BACKUP* is saved is final. 

In case, after selecting 'BACKUP DISK', you have pressed the RETURN 
key, the 'HAND' (the pointer) will start to flicker. You can still 
undo the selection by pressing the FI key. 

After pressing the F7 key the BACKUP procedure will start. 

So you should see to it that there is a formatted diskette in the 
drive, containing sufficient space (at least 265 blocks) and not 
already containing a file with the same name as the one with which 
the new 'TOTAL BACKUP' will be saved. It is recommended always to 
have at hand a formatted blank disk ! 

After pressing the F7 key the viewing screen will go haywire. How¬ 
ever, this is normal ! After some time the saving to disk will start. 

Loading the 'TOTAL BACKUP' files back may be done by means of the 
command: BLOAD"name#" or BLOAD"name#",8 (also from the directory). 
After the loading you may go on with the program by means of 
'CONTINUE'. 


RESET ALL 


37 


ALWAYS resets any program. Of course at the loss of all variables. 

It will cause any program with an autostart routine to be switched 

off. The autostart routine can be retrieved by means of 

POKE $8005,$C2 and a start can be made by means of 'RESET' (from the 

RESETMENU). 


BACKUP TAPE 

For more information we refer you to 'BACKUP DISK'. 

Where the word disk is used, please read tape. 

Some things are a bit different, however. For: 

As soon as the hand (the pointer) starts to flicker in front of the 
text 'BACKUP TAPE', the procedure will only start when you have 
pressed the 'RECORD and PLAY' keys of your cassette recorder. 

You should make sure that there is sufficient space on your tape to 
enable you to save at most 65K (about 80 tape counting numbers). 

The return loading of 'BACKUP TAPE' files may be done by means of: 

BLOAD or BLOAD"BACKUP#",2 

Of course a different file name may also be used. 

I LOAD 

The 'ILOAD' command also has to do with 'TOTAL BACKUP'. 

This has the advantage that in the matter of a 'TOTAL BACKUP' only 
the memory used will be saved. 

Consequently the shortest possible BACKUP is 15 blocks (= +/- 4 K 
BYTES). 

For the rest the 'ILOAD' command may be used in the same way as LOAD 


FUNCTION KEYS F3 and F5 

From the 'RESETMENU' you may continue your program by means of 
'CONTINUE'. When you have given QUIT or QUIT 1, the DISK and TAPE 
quick-loading routines and the CENTRONICS routine are switched off. 
Some programs can also switch off these routines. 

You can retrieve these routines by pressing the RESET button. 

After pressing the RESET button, you may do the following: 

'CONTINUE' = continue the program. 

'F3 key' = continue the program + activate the quick-load routines 
'F5 key' = continue the program + activate the quick-load routines 

and the CENTRONICS driver software. 






HARDCOPY 


PRINTERTOOL COMMANDS 


38 


This function allows you to make, from a program or in Basic, a 
printout of the viewing-screen on a printer. This may be either 
LORES or HIRES. 

The POWER CARTRIDGE self-selects whether to print LORES or HIRES 
and self-determines whether to print serially or parallel. 

Serial printers which, are directly compatible with the 
'HARDCOPY' routine, are : Commodore MPS 801, 802 (!!) and 803, 
SEIKOSHA GP-100VC and EPSON GX-80. However, these should be 
adjusted to DEVICE 4. 

Centronics printers which, are directly compatible with the 
'HARDCOPY' routine, are : EPSON RX/FX and LX-80, PANASONIC 1090 and 
1091, BROTHER HR-5, STAR GEMINI 10X and SG10, AVT FAX80/100, CP80 and 
SMITH-CORONA FASTEXT 80/100, CITIZEN 120-D and various other types of 
these brands. 


Centronics printers may be connected to the user port via a 
printer cable. All serial and centronics printers should have a 
'Bit image' mode, however. (Consult your printer manual). 

Centronics printers should be EPSON compatible. 

However, in practice there will always be printers that have been 
constructed. That are just a bit different, which may give rise to 
problems with the 'HARDCOPY'. Unfortunately we cannot attend to that. 

How to use HARDCOPY ? 


At any time you can make a 'HARDCOPY' of your display by pressing 
the RESET key. You will then position the 'Hand' (the pointer) in 
front of 'HARDCOPY' and press the RETURN key. 

(You may undo the 'HARDCOPY' selection by pressing the RETURN key 
once more and make a different option). 


Subsequently you may choose from the following possibilities: 


FUNCTION 

key: 


Result on Serial 

and Centronics Printers: 


FI Large image-Reverse 

F3 Large image-Normal 

F5 Small image-Reverse 

F7 Small image-Normal 


When printing a small image no account is taken of color combina¬ 
tions. If you are not satisfied with the result of the HARDCOPY, 
try 'Reverse' or 'Normal* version. 


The printing may be interrupted by keeping the RUN STOP key pressed 

down for a few seconds. This causes a return to the RESET 

menu and you may then continue your program by using 'CONTINUE'. 




(HARDCOPY continued) 


39 


There is also a BASIC command 'HARDCOPY', with which a print of the 
display can be made without pressing the POWER CARTRIDGE button. 

The way of printing may be indicated by typing a number after it. 
Possibilities: 

HARDCOPY 1 equals function key FI. 

HARDCOPY 3 " " " F3. 

HARDCOPY 5 " " " F5. 

HARDCOPY 7 " " " F7. 

HARDCOPY with no number has the same function as HARDCOPY 1. 

In the case of a large image the colors of the image are converted 
into shades of grey. In this way a very good approximation is achie¬ 
ved of the real image on-screen. In the case of a small image. 

There are no grey values. In the case of a small image it may 

therefore occur that something is visible in the HARDCOPY that is 
invisible on-screen. 

MOBS or SPRITES are removed from the display before a HARDCOPY is 
made. 

SPLIT-SCREEN is a technique that changes the display so quickly 
that it is imperceptible to the human eye. You may have one half of 
the screen in HIRES and the other half in LORES. 

When you interrupt such a program the screen will be 'frozen' in one 
of the two states. Consequently one of the two halves is in reversed 
position and the other half in normal position. 


PSET 

'PSET' has a large number of variations which are all related to the 
printing. 


PSETO 


PSET1 

PSET2 

PSET3 

PSET4 


This is the 'automatic' position. 

When a printer has been connected to the user port, this 
will be driven in the EPSON way. When a printer has been 
connected to the SERIAL BUS, this will be driven in the 
MPS801/MPS803 way. 

Always drives in the EPSON way, no matter where this is 
connected. 

Always drives in the SMI TH CORONA way, no matter where 
this is connected. 

Always drives in the EPSON way, no matter where this is 

connected; however, "LARGE” size HARDCOPIES are printed 
vertically. 

HARDCOPY setup for MPS 802/1526 printer. 

















PSET B 


: Printing in BIT IMAGE graphic mode. 


40 


The printing of UPPER and lower case on EPSON compatible printers, 
connected to the USER PORT, will operate after OPEN 1,4,7 and 
the printing of 'CAPITAL LETTERS' and 'GRAPHIC' characters after 
every OPEN 1,4,0 or OPEN 1,4. 

However, this does not operate in the transparent mode. 

PSET C : UPPER/lowercase conversion. 

This position has many variations, which may be set by 
means of the secondary address. 


Sec address: 


UPPERCASE/lowercase according to display position, 
UPPERCASE only. 

UPPERCASE as well as lowercase. 


Control characters are filtered out (not transmitted to the printer), 
but transmission is possible by increasing the value of the secondary 
address by 8: That is 8,9 and 15 respectively. 

PSET T : Transparent mode (via the USER PORT). 

All information is simply transmitted to the printer. 

None of the above-mentioned PSET commands have anything to do with 
'HARDCOPY' printing, but solely with: 

OPEN 1,4:CMD1:L1ST 
or PRINT#1; PLIST and HARDCAT. 

PSET LI : Will give an extra LINEFEED at each line. 

(Applies only to 'EPSON' compatible printers). 

Use this command when the printer prints out all lines 
overlapping. Most printers are equipped with a DIPSWITCH 
for this purpose. This is often indicated by CR/LF or by 
AUTOFEED XT. 


PSET L0 


Will undo PSET LI. 


PSET Sx : 'x' determines the 'SECONDARY ADDRESS' with a 'HARDCOPY'. 

This only holds good when a printer has been connected to 
the SERIAL BUS and when the printer in question is an 
'EPSON' compatible printer with a printer interface in- 
between. Which value you will have to fill in at 'x' can 
be found in your printer interface manual under 
'TRANSPARENT MODE'. 

PSET U : In case you have connected a Modem, Eprom programmer or 
a different device to the USER PORT of your Commodore, 
please type in PSET U , when you have connected a printer 
to the SERIAL BUS. 


In the cases of RESET and RESET ALL , all 'PSET' settings will be 
maintained. When switching the computer on, the various 'PSET' set¬ 
tings have the following values: PSETO, PSET SO, PSET L0 and PSET B. 
This means you won't have to set anything for an EPSON (or compatible) 
printer connected to the USER PORT, nor for an MPS 801/803 printer 
connected to the SERIAL BUS. 













PARTICULARS 


41 


'IF THEN ...' 

In case you want to use a TOOLKIT command in an IF THEN statement, 
you will have to place a colon after THEN. 

Example: 

10 IF A = 2 THEN : INFO 
20 IF B = 0 THEN : DIR 


'LISTING' 

You can stop the listing of a program by pressing the 'SPACE BAR'. 
By pressing it once more the listing will continue. 

If you want to slow down the listing a little, you may do so by 
keeping the 'SPACE BAR' pressed down during the listing. 


'POWER CARTRIDGE' commands 

You may abbreviate all commands to the second or third letter. 
Example: 

COLOR 0,2,1 is also possible with CO(shift L) 0,2,1 
DLOAD is also possible with D(shift L) 


PRINTER CABLE DIAGRAM 


To connect a centronics printer to the USER PORT you will need a 
12-core cable. These cables are obtainable in the market. 

However, in case you wish to make this cable yourself, you will 
find the connecting data you need below 


CBM 64 USER PORT 
PLUG GAUGE: 


CENTRONICS CONNECTOR 
PLUG GAUGE: 


A 

B 

C 

D 

E 

F 

H 

J 

K 

L 

M 

N 


16 

10 


2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 
9 
1 


17 


to: 


















INDEX 


42 


TOOLKIT 

PAGE: 

POWERMON 

PAGE 

AUTO 

7 

Introduction 

23 

COLOR 

7 

A(ssemble) 

24 

DEEK 

8 

C(ompare) 

24 

DELETE 

8 

D(isassemble) 

25 

DOKE 

9 

F( ill) 

25 

DUMP 

9 

G(o) 

26 

FIND 

10 

H(unt) 

26 

HARDCAT 

10 

I interrogate) 

27 

HEX$ 

11 

J(ump) 

27 

IF THEN : 

41 

L(oad) 

28 

INFO 

11 

M(emory) 

28 

KEY 

11 

P(rint) 

29 

LIST 

41 

Registers) 

30 

MERGE 

12 

S(ave) 

31 

MONITOR 

23 

T( ransfer) 

31 

PAUSE 

13 

V(erify) 

32 

PLIST 

13 

W(alk) 

32 

RENUM 

14/15 

e(X)it 

32 

REPEAT 

15 

$ (directory) 

33 

SAFE 

15 

(shortened 

dos) 33 

TRACE 

15 



UNNEW 

16 



QUIT 

16 



$ 

17 




DISK 

PAGE: 


TAPE 

PAGE 

DLOAD 

18 


LOAD"", 2 

21 

DSAVE 

19 


SAVE"",2 

21 

DVERIFY 

19 


VERIFY"",2 

22 

DIR 

19 


MERGE 

12 

DISK 

20 


AUDIO 

22 

DEVICE 

20 


I LOAD 

37 

MERGE 

12 


BLOAD 

37 

I LOAD 

37 




BLOAD 

36 

> 




POWER RESET 

PAGE: 

PRINTER 

PAGE 

CONTINUE 

34 

HARDCOPY 

38/39 

BASIC 

34 

PSET 

40 

RESET 

35 

LINE FEED 

40 

BACKUP DISK 

35/36 

CABLE DIAGRAM 

41 

RESET ALL 

37 

PLIST 

13 

BACKUP TAPE 

37 



HARDCOPY 

38/39 










POWER CARTRIDGE 


A special KCS switching technique allows a program to be stored completely outside the memory of your 
Commodore 64/128. Using this system KCS developed the POWER CARTRIDGE. The 16K Cartridge, 100% 
machine code, gives the user an ideal extension to his normal computer. 


POWER TOOLKIT 


A powerful BASIC-Toolkit (Additional 
helpful commands) that considerably 
simplifies programming and debugging. 

AUTO HARDCAT RENUMBER 
AUDIO HARDCOPY REPEAT 

COLOR HEXS SAFE 

DEEK INFO TRACE 

DELETE KEY UNNEW 

DOKE PAUSE QUIT 

DUMP PLIST MONITOR 

FIND I LOAD BIOAD 

RENUMBER Also modifies all the 
GOJO's GOSUB's etc. 
Allows part of a program 
to be renumbered or 
displaced. 

PSET : Set up of printer type. 

HARDCAT : Prints out Directory. 

The toolkit commands can be used in 
your programs. 


DISK TOOL 


Using POWER CARTRIDGE you can load 
up to 6 times faster from disk. 

The Disk commands can be used in your 
own programs. 

DLOAD DVERIFY DIR 

DSAVE MERGE DEVICE 

DISK 

MERGE : Two BASIC programs can 
be merged into one. 

DISK : With DISK you can send 

commands directly to your 
disk. 


TAPE TOOL 


Using POWER CARTRIDGE you can work 
up to 10 times faster with your data 
recorder. The Tape commands can be 
used in your own programs. 

LOAD SAVE VERIFY 

MERGE AUDIO 

POWERMON 

A powerful machine language monitor 
that is readily available and leaves all of 


your Commodore memory available for 
programming. 

Also works in BASIC-ROM, KERNAI and 
I/O areas. 


A 

ASSEMBLE 

1 INTERPRET 

S 

SAVE 

C 

COMPARE 

I |UMP 

T 

TRANSFER 

0 

DIS¬ 

l LOAD 

V 

VERIFY 


ASSEMBLE 

M MEMORY 

w 

WALK 

F 

FILL 

P PRINT 

X 

EXIT 

G 

GO 

R REGISTER 

* 

DIRECTORY 

H 

HUNT 



DOS Commands 


PRINTERTOOL 

The POWER CARTRIDGE contains a very 
effective Printer-Interface, that self 
detects if a printer is connected to the 
Serial Bus or User-POrt. 

It will print all Commodore characters on 
Epson and compatible printers. 

The printer-interface has a variety of set¬ 
up possibilities. It can produce 
HARDCOPY of screens not only on Serial 
printers (MPS801, 802, 803 etc) but also 
on Centromc printers (EPSON, STAR, 
CITIZEN. PANASONIC, etc). 

The HARDCOPY function automatically 
distingishes between HIRES and LORES. 
Multi-colour graphics are converted into 
shades of grey. The PSET functions allow 
you to decide on Large/Small and 
Normal/Inverse printing. 

The printer PSET functions are: 


PSET 0 • Self detection Serial/Centronics. 
PSET 1 EPSON mode only. 

PSET 2 - SMITH CORONA mode only. 
PSET 3 - Turns the printing 90 degrees!! 
PSET 4 HARDCOPY setting for 
MPS802/1526. 


PSET B - Bit-image mode. 

PSET C • Setting lower/Upper case and 
sending Control Codes. 

PSET T - All characters are printed in an 
unmodified state. 

PSET U - Runs a Serial printer and leaves 
the User-port available. 

PSET Sx - Sets the Secondary address for 
HARDCOPY with Serial Bus. 


PSET LI - Adds a line-feed, CHRS (10), 
after every line. 

PSET L0 Switches PSET LI off 


POWER RESET 



m 


On the back of the POWER CARTRIDGE 
there is a Reset Button. Pressing this 
button makes a SPECIAL MENU appear 
on the screen. 

This function will work with any 
programme. 


CONTINUE - Allows you to return to 
your program. 

BASIC - Return to BASIC. 

RESET Normal RESET 

TOTAL - Saves the contents of the 
BACKUP memory onto a Disk The 

DISK program can be reloaded 

later with BIOAD tolhnwd 
by CONTINUE. 

RESET of any program 
As BACKUP DISK but to 
TAPE. 


RESET ALL 
TOTAL 
BACKUP 
TAPE 

HARDCOPY 


At any moment, prints out 
a Hardcopy of the s< reen 
Using CONTINUE 
afterwards you can return 
to the program. 

Takes you into the Machine 


...its dynamite! 


copyright and registered trademark: 
KOLFF COMPUTER SUPPLIES B.V 
Dordrecht - Netherlands