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Bernal Journal 



August/September "94 



Serving the Bernal Heights Neighborhood of San Francisco 



Volume 31 • Number 5» Free! 



A Call For Neighborhood Action 

Raising a stink 

Tensions mount over proposed Crosstown Tunnel and sewer vent 



By Phil Chang and 
Jeff Manner, Committee 
Against the Crosstown 
Tunnel members 

The Department of Public 
Works' Crosstown Tunnel, a pro- 
posed sewage tunnel that would 
origi nate from the S ou theast Treat- 
mentCenterin Bayview/Hunter's 
Point, flowthroughBernal Heights 
and emit from an ocean outfall by 
the zoo, needs our immediate at- 
tention. 

Bernal Heights residents are 
concerned about the possibility of 
the tunnel's vent on top of Bernal 



Hill that would emit gases from 
over half of the city's wastewater. 
Most San Franciscans, however, 
don't know that the tunnel is one . 
linchpin in a far-ranging plan to 
dump agricultural and industrial 
waste from the Central Valley and 
South Bay cities 4 1/2 miles off 
our coast. 

DPW tries to close off public 
comment 

As Bernal neighbors wage 
grassroots efforts to question the 
health, safety and environmental 
responsibility of proposal, the 



DPW tries to close off the public 
comment period for citizens to re- 
spond to the proposal. Neighbors 
who formed the Committee 
Against the Crosstown Tunnel re- 
alize that this comment period is 
critical and have been urging resi- 
dents to respond. Lobbying the 
Mayor, S.F. Board of Supervisors 
and the DPW is one of the last 
means of forcing the DPW to with- 
draw their "flawed" Environmen- 
tal Impact Report and produce 
more complete studies. 
"It would be tragic if this sloppy 
- Continued on page 4... 



s 




if the Department of Public Works has its way, the Bernal Hilltop would have a tunnel drilled through it along with shafts 
to vent out sewer gases as part of its Crosstown Tunnel proposal. 




Carlos Navarro Sr., and daughter Ruby bring the martial arts and fitness to 
Bernal Heights through their family run gym. 



People on the Hill 

In shape 
with the 
Navarro 
Family 

By Vicki Victoria 

It's 5:30 p.m. on the clock an- 
nouncing "It's time to work out" 
on the facade of 3470 Mission 
Street. Looking through the large 
glass windows, you can see 
women moving to funky aerobic 
beats, children putting on their 
karate gees or a man working up 
a sweat on a lifecycle. This is the 
home of Navarro's Fitness Cen- 
ter, a family-owned gym that is 
the neighborhood's longtime re- 
source for getting in shape and 
learning the martial arts. 

The gym doesn' t have the neon 
and pastel colors of the larger 
and flashier downtown gyms, but 
it does have solid weight and 
Continued on page 5 




^;:::?;:.:;'-yv;>.^-:^ . Photo by Viekt Victoria ' : ' 

Counter clockwise from left: GPP Counselor Rudy Corpuz, program 
participant Eddie, GPP counselors Reynaldo Berrios and Tori Eva and 
GMC Coordinator Joy Ferguson. ; :, 

Summer with the Gang Prevention Program...pagei2 



Bernal issues 
voiced to the City 

Town Meeting addresses concerns 
of the '94 Community Congress 

by Helen Heifer, BHNC Executive Director 



On July 14, the Bernal Heights 
Neighborhood Center (BHNC) 
and neighbors from around the 
hill held a town meeting with rep- 
resentatives from several city of- 
fices. The purpose was to press for 
action on the issues raised at the 
BHNC's Community Congress, 
the 26 house meetings we held 
around the hill last spring and new 
concerns raised at the town meet- 
ing. 

Present from the city were: 

• Street Environmental Services: 

John Roumbanis, 
superintendent, 695-2015 
Chris Montgomery, 
district supervisor for 
Bernal Heights, 695-2178 

• Department of Parking and 

Traffic, Julie Lau, 554-2310 



• Department of Heat Light and 
Power, Dee Lemmon, 554-0731 

• Department of Public Works 

Robert Mason, 
Street Paving Section, 
554-8251 
Robert Quan, 
Sidewalk Section, 
554-5797 
Some of the hot issues raised 
included: 

• Better lighting under the High- 
way 101 underpass at the foot of 
Cortland Avenue, the 500 block of 
Moultrie and throughout Bernal 
Heights. 

• Establishing a stop sign at the 
corner of Cortland Avenue & Ne- 
vada Street and a slow sign on 
Cortland. 

Continued on page 16... 



Don't Miss Bargains Galore 
on Saturday, August 13*++ 

Hillwidc Garage 
Sale Map! page «... 



Neighborhood Shopping Guide & Classifieds: Pages 10& 11 



2 



New Bernal Journal, August/September '94 



IBernal Journal 

616 Csrtbod Jtarniuc, San Rmisct, CM 94110 • (416) 208-2144 

The New Bernal Journal \s a bi-monthly neighborhood newspaper sponsored by the 
Bernal Heights Neighborhood Center. It is dedicated to providing the people of Bernal 
Heights with community news, ideas, issues, and events that support the Center's 
mission: 'To empower people in efforts to preserve the ethnic, cultural, and economic 
diversity of Bernal Heights and improve the economic condition of low and moderate 
income people in Bemal Heights." The NewBemalJournal\s distributed door to door, 
free in Bemal Heights. Articles express the views of contributors and not necessarily 
those of the Bemal Heights Neighborhood Center. 

For Advertising Call: 206-2144 

Next Issue: October/November '94 Distribution Date: 10/8/94 

Deadlines: Editorial/Submission: 9/16/94 
Advertising Reservation: 9/23/94. Camera Ready Ads: 9/30/94 

We reserve the right to edit for clarity or space. 

Circulation for this Issue: 8,000 

New Bernal Journal Staff/Volunteers 

Editor Vicki Victoria 

Youth Assistant Julio Ramirez 

Photos Helen Heifer, Vicki Victoria 

Victoria Graphics 

David Rogers & a cast of hundreds! 
Jeff Marnier, Phil Chang, Helen Heifer, Mauricio Vela, 
Ed Roper, Jessica Murray, Arlene Rodriquez, Joy 
Ferguson, Barbara Pitschel, Kathleen Dunphy 
Patrick Twohy, Ellen Egbert 

Copyright 1994 by Bemal Heights Neighborhood Center 
Member of the S.F. Neighborhood Newspaper Association. 

Call 206-2144 for information about advertising discounts in 
12 neighborhood newspapers in San Francisco. 



Art Production 

Distribution 

Contributors 



Editorial Assistance 



Ja 




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OUR NEW BERNAL HEIGHTS STUDIO: 

626 Cortland Avenue • SF 
641-1692 



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From the Editor's Desk 

Neighborhood 
newspapers 
demand apology 

The San Francisco Bay Guard- 
ian reported in their July 1 3 issue 
that the San Francisco Neighbor- 
hood Newspaper Association was 
"bought off" by the Committee on 
Jobs in their campaign to question 
the feasibility of 

maintaining a city 

budget based on 
an outdated City 
Charter written in 
1932. The 
Guardian's main 
evidence to sup- 
port this claim 
was that advertis- 
ing space was 
purchased in 
these neighbor- 
hood newspapers 
by the Committee on Jobs. The 
Guardian charged that the neigh- 
borhood newspapers' editorial 
content was directly influenced 
by accepting this advertising. 

C'mon, guys, the simple act of 
purchasing advertising space in a 
newspaper means that you auto- 
matically buy them off? If the 
Guardian was to apply this outra- 
geous claim to their own advertis- 
ing, they would have to seriously 
question their own integrity. 

I suppose that the pornography 
industry has "bought off the Bay 
Guardian, with the back pages of 
their publications chock full of 1- 
900 telephone ads like "Nasty girls 
do it live," "Women want to rub 
you in all the right places, " or 
"Horny women on 24 hours, 7 
days." These women-as-sex-ob- 
jects ads are quite a contrast to the 



Guardian's usual stories of the 
empowerment of, and rights and 
equality for women. Even the S.F. 
Chronicle/Examiner had the de- 
cency to lessen their exploitation 
of women by printing the faces 
only of women clad in trashy lin- 
gerie in ads placed in their papers 
for the sex show industry. Now, to 
find these types of degrading ads, 
you only have to pick up a Bay 
Guardian to see slobbering women 
in fishnet bodysuits clasping then- 
breasts. The Guardian has been 
called a telephone sex service with 
a news depart- 
ment. Does the 
Bay Guardian, 
by its ad accep- 
tance policy, 
advocate the ex- 
ploitation and 
degradation of 
women? 

The Bay 
Guardian owes 
an apology, in 
the form of a re- 
traction in their paper to the San 
Francisco Neighborhood News- 
paper Association for its malicious, 
unfounded attacks. These neigh- 
borhood newspapers, including the 
New Bernal Journal, NewFilmore, 
NewBayview, MarinaTimes, West 
of Twin Peaks, Richmond Review, 
Sunset Beacon and New Mission 
News, provide an important voice 
for their residents and communi- 
ties, printing stories about their 
neighborhoods that the big dailies 
and weeklies don't think are im- 
portant or trendy enough to cover. 
The Guardian shouldn ' t feel threat- 
ened by the success of neighbor- 
hood papers in securing their share 
of advertising from major corpo- 
rations and neighborhood busi- 
nesses not won by the the 
Guardian's own ad sales staff. 

- Vicki Victoria, Editor 



Does the Bay 
Guardian, by its 
ad acceptance 
policy, advocate 
the exploitation 
and degradation 
of women? 



Bernal Wish List 



You can make a change in the 
quality of life for our neighbor- 
hood youth by donating today! 

Precita Center Wish List 
Sports Equipment 
12 Basketballs** 
24 Baseballs 

2 Computers (any model) 
1 Printer 

1 VCR** 
Tumbling Mats 

3 full-size mirrors 
Parts and Labor to repair 
Nautilus Machine 
5/10/15/20 Lb. Dumb Bells** 
6 Baseball Gloves (new or used) 
1 Catcher's Mitt 

1 Throat Protector 
12 Athletic Cups 

4 Bats 

Games & Recreational: 

4 Tents 

Folding Tables 

Games**: board, video, 
puzzles 

Paint Brushes, Paint 
1 Gallon Elmer's Glue 
Jump Ropes**, Hula-Hoops, 
Badmitton Equipment 
Pool Cues 

Educational Materials: 
Arithmatic drills, spelling prac- 
tice books, reference books. 
Resume /Job Prepreparation 
Books 

**Urgently needed 
People Power 

Publicity Help: Walking the 
neighborhood, phone trees. 
Volunteers: Tutors, Art & 
Crafts, Coaches, Referees, 
Weight Room Assistants, Nu- 
trition/Health Educators, Youth 
Leadership Developers. 
Help upgrading the building: 
painting, building, repairing. 
If you can donate or help, please 
call Karen at the Precita Cen- 
ter 206-7756. 




The Bernal Deli 



Auntie Pasta ^^^=s=^^^^^^ 
Fusilli with Brocolli & 
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■reg 4.99 lb. 

Nonna's 

Old Fashion' Cole Slaw or 
Creole Potato Salad $1.99 lb. 

-reg 2.49/2.99 lb. 
Fresh 

Turkey Meatloaf $5.29 lb. 

-r Cg5 .99,b. Fresn Cut c neese 




Jarlsberg Lite .; $4.99 lb. 

-reg 5.49 lb. 

Smoked Baby Swiss $4.89 lb. 

-reg 5.89 lb. 

Canadian Cheddar $4.29 lb. 

extra sharp reg 4.89 lb. 

Gorgonzola $3.99 lb. 

-reg 4.99 lb. 

Sale Prices effective August 2 - August 22, 1994 



Fresh Sausages 



Gerhard's 

Chicken Apple wACuiry ..$3.99 lb. 

■reg 4M.^f$ml,/F,.. *%, It;;:. . ; .Z*W 

Srn^P Country French^ lb. 

with rastttit^.ff^f 5jfj^f&;.>- <eJ$ 

95 lb. 

-reg 5.99 lb. ~""-> — 

Juice & Beverages 

R.W. Knudsen Vts^frty*™^' 
Natural Lemonade $1.59 

32 oz. -reg 1.99 

Cranberry Lemonade ... f\ .. $1.89 

32 oz. -reg 2.39 



>.... A ..$1.; 



Calistoga 
Mineral Juice , 

28 oi. -rtg 1.39 
+ CRV 



... 89c 

We Accept 



ATM Cards 
MasterCard & Visa 
Cash & Checks 
Food Stamps 



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Store Hours 



Monday - Saturday 
9:00 am - 8:00 pm 

Sundays 
10:00 am - 6:00 pm 



Snacks & Treats 



Bearitos 

Cheddar Puffs 

Regular or Lite 
4 oz. -reg 1.75 




$1.19 



Newman's Own 

Organic Pretzels $1.35 

slicks or twists 8 oz. -reg 1.69 



4 for $1.00 




NEW! 

People Pops 

no sugar! -reg 35t 



Cascadian Farms 

Chocolate Dipped 
Ice Cream Bars .^7. 99C 

Choc. Vanilla ■ Choc. Raspberry - Choc. Cherry 




Made with Lowfat ice cream, 
Organic milk & fruit, 
Organic dark chocolate 



Breakfast Supplies 

^Philadelphia 

Fat Free Cream Cheese $1.69 

8oz. -reg 1.95 

Lite Cream Cheese $1.39 

8oz. -reg 1.69 

Bar-S 

Bacon [f&^)f7\\ $ a - 29 

16 oz. -reg 1.79 
Cotari 

Large Brown Eggs $1.55 

dozen -reg 1.79 





Good Groceries 




Arrowhead Mills 

Puffed Cereals ..)^ZZ^:. 99c 

Wheat - Com - Rice 
6 oz. -reg 1.09 



:.. $1.39 




Fantatic Foods 
Couscous .. 

Regular or Whole Wheat 
6 oz. -reg 1.99 

Middle East 

Pita Bread $1.09 

Regular or Whole Wheat 
12 oz. reg 1.29 

i Tuterri's Handmade Pasta 
Linguini $1.99 

Black Pepper - Mushroom ■ Lemon Dill - Pepper Trio 
8 oz. -reg 2.89 




Food from the 'Hood 
Straight Out 'the Garden 
Creamy Italian Dressing $1.99 

Imported from South Central LA 
12 oz. -reg 2.89 



Dairy & Yogurt 



Clover Stornetta 

Lowfat Gallons 

1% fat -reg 2.39 



Mello Bros. 
Nonfat Yogurt 

ail flavors 
8 oz. reg 75t 




$1.99 



59c 



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New Bernal Journal, August/September '94 



3 



Neighbors' help sought to 
find missing elderly woman 

On January 20, Ruth K. Adams, 81, was 
abducted from the Valley Manor Rehabilita- 
tion Center in Concord, California. Her empty 
wheel chair was found in the parking lot. 
Witness accounts confirm that Ruth' s daugh- 
ter, Katherine Adams, removed Mrs. Adams 
from the care facility. Mrs. Adams is still 
listed as missing and "at medical risk" by the 
Concord Police. 

Until the Spring of 1992, Mrs. Adams 
lived with her daughter and legal guardian, 
Susan Bugher, in her home on Mullen Street 
in the northeast section of Bernal Heights. 






Katherine W. Adams was last seen with Ruth 
Adams and was most likely to have abducted 
her mother from her nursing home. 



She attended the Bernal Heights Senior Pro- 
gram regularly with assistance of a hired 
companion. An advanced degenerative ill- 
ness with symptoms resembling Alzheimer' s 
eventually required that Mrs. Adams re- 
ceive constant skilled nursing, medication 
and regular monitoring which the Valley 
Manor provided. 

"When my mother was abducted, her 
medication and personal effects were all left 
behind," says Bugher. "Katherine has since 
told people that my mother died in Mexico." 



81 years old Ruth K. Adams is still 
missing and at medical risk. 

Adams, also known as "Kathy," had once 
abducted her mother before in 1992 and 
threatened the family that she might "do a 
Thelma and Louise" with her mother. After 
moving her mother to various locations 
around the country, Adams was finally per- 
suaded to bring her mother to Michigan, 
Mrs. Adams' former home. A court hearing 
appointed Bugher as Mrs. Adam's legal 
guardian at the request of other family mem- 
bers. Bugher was advised that Mrs. Adams 
would be safer in the nursing home if Kathy 
didn't know where her mother was. 

"I believe Kathy my mother because she 
was not allowed to see her. ," says Bugher. 

Ruth Adams is 5' 5" tall, 1 1 8 lbs. with blue 
eyes and brownish-gray hair. "She is very 
disoriented and requires help to walk," says 
Bugher, "The stress of her current situation 
and the absence of her medication may 
cause her to hallucinate and react hysteri- 
cally." 

Katherine Adams is 5' 7" tall, 180 lbs. 
with blue eyes and shoulder length, salt and 
pepper black hair. She is believed to be 
driving a 1972 beige motor home with Ne- 
vada plate #611 FFG or a 1981 dark blue 
Toyota pick up with a camper shell, Nevada 
plate #592 FFE. Anyone with any informa- 
tion to contact Detective Dan Schmidt, Con- 
cord Police Department, (510) 671-3214. 



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D 

ysRNew Bernal Journal, August/September '94 




The Crosstown Tunnel would run through Bemal Hilltop. Residents fear the 
odors and pollutants that would be emitted from four sewer vents on the hill. 



Crosstown 
Tunnel 

Continued from page 1 



planning by the city puts us on the 
wrong path for decades," says 
Bernal neighbor Gail Williams. 
"This is the time for residents to 
get involved and this is the time to 
call." 

Why the rush? 

Neighbors are questioning why 
the DPW rushed to close public 
input, but at the same time re- 
quested a three year extension for 
a final decision from the Regional 
Water Quality Control Board. 
"Residents have been rushed to 
respond to a 750 page EIR, and yet 
the Planning Commission has 
asked for a three year stay for their 
cease and desist order for their 
water export plan from the water 
control board." says Beth Abrams, 
a Bernal resident and Committee 
Against the Tunnel member. 

"A complete study of real solu- 
tions needs to be done," says 
Abrams. She says that environ- 
mental report doesn't present any 
alternatives that stops sewage over- 
flow into the Bay and therefore 
does not offer any real solutions. It 
should also be noted the majority 
of the EIR analyzes only four "al- 
ternatives" that dump poorly 
treated sewage into the bay or cross- 
town into the ocean. The fifth al- 
ternative fortertiary watertreament 
is barely mentioned. 



It is important to understand that 
the Board of Supervisors will be 
deciding on a course of action 
based solely on what gets into/or 
doesn't get into the final environ- 
mental report. 

If legal action is required, only 
what gets into the record during 
the public comment period can be 
used for legal challenge against 
the Crosstown Tunnel. Lawyers 
working with concerned neighbors 
say that so much critical analysis 
has been left out of the EIR, that 
the only legal recourse is to re- 
write it and recirculate it to the 
public. 



An emerging environmental 
disaster 

The more that is learned about 
the Crosstown Tunnel, the more it 
looks like an environmental disas- 
ter, not just for Bernal but for all 
San Francisco. The current EIR 
from the Planning Commission 
loosely refers to a water reclama- 



tion project that would allow for 
export of treated agricultural wa- 
ter. Agricultural wastes contain 
dangerous amounts of selenium 
and other heavy metals, pesticides 
and other pollutants. The environ- 
mental impact of agricultural waste 
was well illustrated in the 1985 
state ordered shut down of 
Kesterson Bay, in which Central 
Valley agricultural runoff poisoned 
the wildlife preserve and ecosys- 
tem. Residents of Bernal Heights 
ought to know what will travel 
underneath them and be vented 
among us — and what effect it may 
have on our ocean. 



Clean-water activists, though, 
are sniffing out another use for that 
system. Central Valley farmers and 
the South B ay cities for years have 
been clamoring for a way to get rid 
of their wastewater. They envision 
another system of tunnels that 
would carry that waste from the 
Central Valley, up the peninsula to 



the Southeast Treatment Center 
where it would connect with the 
Crosstown Tunnel and be carried 
through Bernal Hill and out to the 
ocean. 

One reason the city is proposing 
a Crosstown tunnel is that during 
wet weather, up to 100 million 
gallons of wastewater overflows a 
day at the treatment center in 
Bayview/Hunter's Point. While 
ignoring the possibility of separat- 
ing rainwater from wastewater, or 
fixing the current treatment center 
at Bayview/Hunter's Point, the 
Planning Commission' s report ex- 
plores the possibility of a tunnel 
with a capacity of 590 million gal- 
lons per day. There is no mention 
of other waste being sent through 
the tunnel, nor any indication that 
it would be treated. 

South Bay cities were previously 
prevented from digging a waste- 
water tunnel to Monterey Bay. The 
South Bay Dischargers, a conglom- 
erate of South Bay interests, is 
involved in the water "reclama- 
tion" project, which has been 
granted a three-year extension for 



"It would be tragic if 
this sloppy planning 
by the city puts us on 
the wrong path for 
decades. " 

- Gail Williams 



a feasibility study, while the Plan- 
ning Commission is attempts to 
close its current report for public 
comment. 

In other words, the Crosstown 
Tunnel is close to being approved. 
Considering that the tunnel would 
cost $230 million, the city could be 
considering other financial sup- 
port for the Crosstown Tunnel, as 
long as they had the permission to 
build it. 

Neighborhood effort begins 
change 

On June 23 , after facing a packed 
house and 3 1/2 hours of "the most 
sophisticated public testimony F ve 
heard in three years on this," Plan- 
ning Commissioner Sidney 
Eunobsky granted a 17 day exten- 
sion. A few days later, in response 
to a resolution from Supervisor 
Carole Migden, the Planning Com- 
mission offered another 14 day 
extension, to August 5. At the writ- 
ing of this article, the DPW suc- 
ceeded in closing public comment. 
The Committee Against the Cross- 
town Tunnel is urging the Board of 
Supervisors to rescind that admin- 
istrative decision and withdraw, 
revise and circulate a new study to 
the public. 

- continued on page 5... 



Why be 
concerned? 

Bernal neighbors from the 
Committee Against the Cross- 
town Tunnel responded to the 
750-page Environmental Im- 
pact Report with only 30 days 
to prepare for the only public 
hearing on the plan. These 
were main concerns brought 
to the Planning Commissions. 
Air Emissions 

Seventy-five percent of the 
city's sewage would flow 
through the Crosstown Tun- 
nel, Bernal Hill having the 
only ventforthe system. Ques- 
tions about odors and assur- 
ances that levels of toxic emis- 
sions were safe were further 
heightened when the environ- 
mental study found major 
flaws in the air emissions re- 
port. 

For example, air samples 
used to predict what might be 
in the emissions did not take 
into account that 150 million 
gallons of untreated sewage 
could be coursing through the 
system during heavy rain. The 
air emissions study did not 
fully take temperature, pres- 
sure and motion into consider- 
ation — all factors that could 
increase emissions. 

The report's health-risk as- 
sessments were based on 
healthy white males. Diverse 
Bernal Heights also has frail 
seniors/Children with asthma 
and neighbors with compro- 
mised immune systems. New 
studies show that viruses can 
survive secondary treatment 
and escape detection. Neigh- 
bors are concerned about the 
possibility of the viruses be- 
ing sent up through the tunnel* s 
vent. 

Sound Alternatives 

A serious study of wastewa- 
ter alternatives, rather than a 
single, centralized, high-cost, 
technological fix, should pre- 
vail. Some of the alternatives 
that should be explored in- 
clude: 

• Urban runoff prevention 
strategies and conservation 
techniques such as low-flush 
toilets and rain catchment sys- 
tems to reduce the amount of 
wastewater. 

•Advanced, lower cost, bio- 
logically superior wastewater 
treatment techniques, such as 
integrated pond systems, wet- 
lands, and solar aquacell/ 
greenhouse systems. 

• Conventional, centralized, 
high-tech tertiary treatment 
plants. 



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Residents are wary about the Resuse Project's agricultural drainage 
ocean disposal option which could threatens to dump pollution in the 
ocean. 



New Bernal Journal, August/September '94 



5 



Immediate action 
needed to stop 
Crosstown Tunnel 

Call or write to extend the 
public comment period and to 
demand' that a full study of 
alternatives be done: 

Department of Public Works 
1680 Mission Street 
SF,CA 94103 
Call: 554-8224 

Mayor's Office 
Room 200 
City Hall 
SF, CA 94102 
Call: 554-6141 

Board of Supervisors 
Room 235 

City Hall, SF, CA 94102 
Call: 554-5184 
( Clerk can give you individual 
supervisor phone or fax num- 
bers.) 



Crosstown 

Continued from page 4... 

Immediate citizen action needed 

Because the exploration of waste 
treatment and water recovery al- 
ternatives is inadequate in the re- 
port, we are pursuing three strate- 
gies: 

1) Presenting alternatives and 
inadequacies as written comments. 

2) Lobbying the Board of Su- 
pervisors and the Mayor's Office 
to oppose the Planning Commis- 
sion. Our goal is to force the Plan- 
ning Commission to withdraw the 
report and issue one that explores 
alternatives fully, with ample op- 
portunity for public comment. 

3) Building a coalition of people 
who want to see real solutions 
through the Coalition for Real 
Wastewater Solutions. We are in a 
race against the clock. 

Some of the alternatives we are 
presenting include advanced tech- 
niques for ecologically sound waste 
treatment, rain catchment plans and 
additional treatment facilities at 
Bayview/Hunter's Point. Other 
residents are pointing out the need 
for further study of gases emitted 
from waste and the absence of stud- 
ies of other waste that could travel 
through the tunnel. We need more 
experts and more written com- 
ments. Possible seismic issues need 
to be addressed, for instance. 

If you know anyone with exper- 
tise in city politics or the local 
press, environmental, scientific, 
lobbying, fundraising, graphic arts, 
printing/copying, please contact 
The Committee Against the Cross- 
town Tunnel. • 



Against the 
Crosstown Tunnel 

What: Volunteers needed for 
neighborhood action opposing 
the Crosstown Tunnel. 
Call: Jeff Manner, 285-2429 
Beth Abrams, 282-6177 
Write: 3435 Army Street, #208 
SF, CA 94110 



Navarro's 

Continued from page 1... 

exercise machines for those look- 
ing for a serious, no-hassle work- 
out. You also don ' t have to wait in 
line to use the treadmill, soak in 
the Jacuzzi or relax in the steam of 
the sauna. 

Located on Mission Street right 
off Cortland Avenue, neighbors 
often walk or do a short, easy 
drive from their homes to this 
multiservice gym. "We keep our 
clients happy and that's why we've 
remained alive and well as a busi- 
ness for so long," says owner 
Carlos Navarro. 

He displays a framed page from 
the S .F. Chronicle' s Top 1 00 Busi- 
nesses for 1994 feature. "You get 
on this list for being a successful 
business in existence for a long 
time," says Navarro. "But, they 
also interview your clients to make 
sure that you're running a good 
business. Ourclients gave us great, 
positive reviews!" 

Serving the neighborhood since 
1967, Navarro's Gym continues 
to expand to meet the needs and 
interests of the community. Sev- 
eral years ago, when women dis- 
covered aerobics was a fun way to 
get fit, Navarro ' s brought on board 
several certified aerobics instruc- 
tors. The gym's latest addition is 
Thai boxing, or more specifically, 
"Muay-Thai." It includes rich tra- 
ditions and philosophies of Thai 
music and rituals, as opposed to 
simple "kick-boxing" which is the 
sacriligeous result of foreigners 
who misinterpreted and exported 
Muay-Thai. 

Many of the classes at the gym 
are taught by members of the 
Navarro family. The family ' s pas- 
sion and expertise for physical fit- 
ness are clearly displayed through 
the trophies from local, national 
and international competitions, 
some as high as 6 feet, that line 
their gym walls. 

At 60, Navarro, sports a full 
mane of silvery hair, a toned, 
tanned body and a handsome smil- 
ing face all of which makes him 
look easily 15 years younger. He 
also acts like someone much 
younger, having competed against 
"the young ones" in national mar- 
tial arts competitions. An accom- 
plished martial artist, Navarro has 
earned the high rank of Professor 
of Kenpo Karate 

Born in El Salvador, Navarro 
learned the martial arts from his 
father, Jose, who informally taught 
the young boy. In 1954, Navarro 
came to San Francisco for college 
and to develop his martial arts 
skills. He eventually opened a 
Kenpo Karate studio next to what 
is now Cesar's Latin Palace and 
later expanded it to a full-service 
gym in its present location at 3470 
Mission Street. Today, this love 
for the martial arts has become a 
family tradition, as all of his four 
children and his wife, Elba, are 
skilled in Kenpo Karate, a Chi- 
nese style of martial arts. 

"I was born into Kenpo," says 
Navarro's daughter, Ruby. "For 
me, that' s what everything was all 
about... and as long as I kept good 
grades in school, my parents let 
me continue to study it." 

Ruby, a 4th-degree black belt, 
reached the pinnacle of her sport 
after winning the bronze medal in 
the Pacific League Championship 



Precita 

House 

Opens 



By Arlene Rodriguez, 
BHHC Project Developer 

On July 6, the Bernal Heights 
Housing Corporation (BHHC) 
once again celebrated the partner- 
ship between nonprofit housing 
developers, supportive service 
providers, government agencies 
and the business community to 
provide resources for people with 
special needs. Over 40 people par- 
ticipated in the festivities and 
opening of Precita House, the sec- 
ond BHHC acquisition and rehab 
for people with HIV/AIDS. 

In July 1993, BHHC acquired a 
two-unit home on Holly Park 
Circle with Housing Opportunity 
for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) 
funds through the San Francisco 
Redevelopment Agency, and from 
the Low Income Housing funds 
from the Low Income Housing 
Fund. The Black Coalition of 

in 1991. This accomplishment 
earned her an alternate position on 
the U.S . Karate Team for the 1 992 
Olympic Games. Today, Ruby 
contributes her skills at the gym as 
a Kenpo instructor, aerobics 
teacher and the gym' s manager. 

Everyone in the Navarro family 
helps to run the gym, including the 
muscular body builder of the fam- 
ily, Carlos Navarro Jr., who as- 
sists those worki ng out i n the gym' s 
weight room. In addition to the 
weights, Navarro, Jr. determines 
the gym's floor plan to efficiently 
utilize every space as effectively 
as possible in the equipment 
packed center. 

The talented family also in- 
cludes Frank Navarro, who be- 
came a neighborhood celebrity in 
1989 when he wrote, directed and 
starred in a martial arts motion 
picture entitled, "Flask." Filmed 
in the neighborhood, the film broke 
down racial stereotypes featured 
many Bernal Heights locations. 
Also a skilled musician, dancer 
and composer, Frank under his 
stage name of "El Salsero," re- 
cently released his latest Salsa, 
Hip-Hop CD , "Sangre Nueva." 
And in keeping with the Navarro 
tradition, Frank also holds a Black 
Belt in karate. 

The Navarro family also be- 
lieves solidly in community ser- 
vice and volunteers with groups 
such as the Mission Economic & 
Cultural Association, Police Ac- 
tivities League and Real Alterna- 
tives Program. A wall of snap- 
shots near the gym' s juice bar high- 
lights the youth outings and sports 
that the Navarro's have helped 
raise funds for, organize and lead. 

"I can't say no to the youth," 
says the elder Navarro. "There's 
less and less for them out there. 
Here, in the gym, they can do 
something positive." 

Navarro and his family welcome 
the community. "People always 
feel welcome here because we treat 
them wi th friendliness and respect, 
" says Navarro. 

As one of Bernal Heights' most 
enduring business operators, the 
Navarro Family continues to be in 
great shape in more ways than 
one. • 




Helen Heifer, BHHC Executive Director, Vince Tang, General Contractor and 
Randy Gerson, Asian Neighborhood Design enjoy the open house celebrations 
in the newsly landscaped backyard of Precita House. 



AIDS/Rafiki House is providing 
social services for the people liv- 
ing there. 

In the Fall of 1993, BHHC ac- 
quired a second two-unit home, on 
Precita Avenue, for persons with 
HIY/AIDS. Again through the co- 



operation of the Redevelopment 
Agency and HOPWA, the com- 
munity supports the opening of 
Precita House. The Black Coali- 
tion on AIDS again agreed to join 
forces with BHHC to provide ser- 
vices to the people living at this 
house. 




Certificates of Honor were awarded to Joy Rucker and Gerald Lenoir of Black 
Coalition on AIDS for their collaborative efforts with BHHC in providing 
supportive services for Precita House. 



Meet the results-oriented, 
professional realtor who lives 
right in the neighborhood. 



PHIll 




Jeanne King 



A dedicated, fifteen year Bernal Heights resident- 
realtor can offer you an accurate perspective and market 
value on your property. Jeanne King knows Bernal 
Heights as few realtors do. She'll put her experience to 
work for you. Call 7 7 1 - 7 1 00 ext. 1 6 for an appointment 
and complimentary market evaluation. 

JON 

DOUGLAS" 

THE SIGN OF RESPECT 




6 



New Bernal Journal, August/September '94 



Bernal Heights Hillwide Garage 
Sale Saturday, August 13! 



Avenue, the Bernal Heights Branch 
Library at 500 Cortland Avenue 
and at all the garage sale sites 
throughout the hill. See page 



For more information about the 
Bernal Heights Hillwide Garage 
Sale, call 206-2145. 



Bernal Heights will be a garage 
sale lovers dream on August 13, 
as over 35 neighbors bring out 
their second hand treasures for the 
Bernal Heights Hillwide Garage 
Sale from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. 

Garage Sale locations through- 
out the hill will be identified with 
a Hillwide map, produced by the 
Bernal Heights Neighborhood 
Center, the non-profit community 
organization hosting this 
fundraising event. 

Colorful collectibles, good 



books, garden tools, surplus furni- 
ture, funky clothes, outgrown toys 
and other assorted good stuff will 
line the hills of sunny Bernal 
Heights. Bargain hunters will also 
enjoy exploring Bernal Heights' 
hilly, charming streets and friendly 
neighbors, as well as discover the 
village like atmosphere of Cortland 
Avenue, the neighborhood's up 
and coming business area full of 
delicious restaurants and a wide 
variety of shops and services. 
The Hillwide Garage Sale is a 



community fundraiser to benefit 
Bernal Heights Senior Services, 
which provides social, nutritional 
and recreational services and pro- 
grams to over 500 senior citizens 
in Bernal Heights. 

See page 15 of this issue of the 
New Bernal Journal for the loca- 
tions of the garage sales through- 
out the hill. 

Additional free maps to the sale 
will be available for pick up after 
8/5/94 at theBernalHeightsNeigh- 
borhood Center at 515 Cortland 




An older person. A home- 
less pet. They belong to- 
gether. Our Pets and Older 
People Program unites peo- 
ple over 65 with a lifelong 
animal companion, abso- 
lutely free of charge. 




For more information, contact: \ 
The San Francisco SPCA 2500 16th Street San Francisco. CA 94103 415-554-3000 



Paid Advertisement 




Every summer it's the same. San 
Francisco city government 
scrambles to bridge a multi-mil- 
lion dollar budget gap with new 
business taxes. In some years, 
these taxes hit small businesses 
especially hard, in others they hit big 
employers. But the effect is the same: 
businesses are closing or leaving San 
Francisco, and they're taking jobs with 
them. And when businesses and jobs 
leave a neighborhood they trigger a 
domino effect — economic decline, 
diminished city services and tumbling 
property values. 



The Tax Spiral 



The Mayor and the San Francisco 
Board of Supervisors have raised busi- 
ness taxes twice during the last two 
years: a total of $30 million in 1993 
and $12 million in 1992. Raising the 
City's already high business taxes won't 
even begin to solve the City's long- 
term structural budget problems, but it 
will cost jobs. 



What effect will 
higher payroll taxes 
have on neighborhood 

businesses? 



He 



vhy: 



San Francisco's business taxes are 
already high. 

The City's per capita business taxes are 
3.5 times the national average for 16 
major cities, according to the Mayor's 
Fiscal Advisory Committee. A recent 
Committee On JOBS survey found that 
San Francisco businesses can cut their 
tax bills by 9 to 18 percent by relocating 
to other Northern California cities, such 
as South San Francisco, Walnut Creek, 
Oakland, Sacramento and Santa Rosa. 

San Francisco can't afford to lose 
more jobs. 

A study commissioned during the Agnos 
administration estimated that San 
Francisco loses 2,800 manufacturing and 
wholesale jobs with every tenth of a percent 
increase in the payroll/gross receipts tax. 
We can't afford to lose more high-wage 
positions. According to the Department of 
City Planning, between 1991 and 1992, 
San Francisco lost more than 30,000 jobs. 

Excessive taxes levied on one business 
sector hurt the whole local economy. 

The fortunes of small and big busi- 
ness are intertwined because many 



neighborhood businesses depend on 
large employers for contracts. 
Consider TCB Builders in the South 
of Market district. TCB does every- 
thing from office remodeling to con- 
crete work for San Francisco-based 
companies, such as Bank of America, 
Chevron, Pacific Gas & Electric and 
Pacific Telesis Company. 

"The payroll tax is a tax on jobs," says 
TCB General Manager Tom Barnes. 
"We have been in business in San 
Francisco for close to 20 years. We have 
20 employees and more than two dozen 
San Francisco-based vendors. Between 
60 and 70 percent of our work comes 
from local corporations. We can't afford 
to lose these major employers." 

If you agree that it's time for City Hall 
to make ends meet by cutting costs, not 
by taxing jobs out of the City, voice 
your concern. Clip and send in the 
attached coupon to the Board of 
Supervisors. 

A strong local economy 
requires more than just big 
business or small business- 
it tahes all business. 



i 1 

Yes, I want a long-term solution to 
the City's fiscal crisis. The Board of 
Supervisors should pursue cost-cut- 
ting plans before it contemplates 
more taxes. 

Name 

Address 



San Francisco zip code 



Send to: Members 

San Francisco Board of Supervisors 
City Hall, Room 235 
San Francisco, CA 94102 



Yes, I am interested in learning 
more about ways to solve the City's 
fiscal crisis, including budget and 
Charter reform. Please send me 
more information. 

Name 

Address 



San Francisco zip code 



Send to: Committee On JOBS 

550 Kearny Street, Suite 1010 
San Francisco, CA 94108 



Sponsored by: 



JOBS 



Stephen Cornell 

San Francisco Council of District Merchants 

A Coalition of 32 Neighborhood Merchant Associations 



Members of the 



SAN FRANCISCO 
Neighborhood Newspaper Association 

Marina Times; New Bayview; New Fillmore; New 
Mission News; North Beach Now; Richmond Review; 
Sunset Beacon; West of Twin Peaks Observer. 



New Bernal Journal, August/September '94 



Around the Neighborhood With 6loria Men 



Pearl's House 



One of the joys of living is getting to know our neighbors; another is the appearance 
of so-called coincidences in our lives. The other day I was "steaming away" on the 
treadmill at my exercise class when neighbors, Ricardo Borrero and Danny O'Deay, 
who were peddling away on their stationary bikes nearby, recognized me from my 
photo in a real estate brochure that I had sent to them. 

Ricardo, who was born in the Caribbean warmth of Colombia and was working as 
an engineer for Bechtel, invited me for tea and cake and conversation that afternoon. 
As I ascended the stairs of their home on Nevada Street, the fragrant lingering smell 
of jasmine greeted me. Inside the old home, I was surrounded by timeless eclectic 
beauty — a vibrant, light-filled space. Danny, a painter/photographer, toured me 
through this rhythmical house, which is really two houses on three lots. He was kind 
enough to give in to my impatient curiosity before serving tea, a delicious mixed green 
salad and sweet white corn from the Alemany Farmer's Market. 

The original house was built around 1896. Pearl Crooker, daughter of the home's 




Danny O'Deay and Ricardo Borrero live in Pearl's house 
on Nevada Street. 



original owner, 
this house. Be- 
porter, Pearl's 
Roger, used 
wood from 
boxes to ex- 
home, creating 
signs in the 
room in the 
rented to a sea 
in his spare 
the family an 
mahogany cre- 
bling the 
sailing vessel, 
liant bunch of 
t u r t i u m s 
sides. 

Pearl spent 
in this house — 
sonanddaugh- 
ing the union to 
at the Empo- 
she worked, 

her three husbands. In the 60s, Pearl rented out rooms and the house got the reputation 
of being a "hippie house." Her home was where People's Bakery was started and was 
also used as a half-way house for American Indians. 

Pearl wanted to die in her beloved home, specifying that she would only leave it 
"feet first." In 1 976 the Ricardo and Danny bought the property from Pearl ' s daughter, 
Lynn. A dramatic smile lights up Ricardo' s face as he says "we also bought Pearl, 
too!" Pearl remained in the rental apartment upstairs. 

Ricardo and Danny moved in August around Pearl's 80th birthday with a 10-year 
mortgage and plans for the first of nine birthday parties for Pearl. She was their friend 
and their inspiration and they lovingly cared for her until three days before her 90th 
birthday, when she fell asleep peacefully and did not wake up for the communion that 
was regularly brought to her. 

Ricardo and Danny redesigned and expanded their home and created the lush and 
lovely tropical garden surrounding the large windows opening up the house to the 
elements. They furnished it with carpets and paintings, antiques and the mementos of 
living — so full and yet so organized. 

There is an inescapable peacefulness and playfulness that permeates the atmo- 
sphere. Time seemed to disappear and be irrelevant as I sat in the kitchen at the long 
marble table, next to a huge Wolf range. Eating pineapple molasses upside down cake 
and drinking strong tea I listened to my new-found friends dramatize stories of life at 
Pearl's house.* 



was born in 
ing an im- 
father, 
scraps of 
shipping 
pand his 
intricate de- 
process. A 
home was 
captain who, 
time, built 
elegant dark 
denzaresem- 
cabinetryofa 
Today,abril- 
orange nas- 
adorns its 

herentirelife 
raising her 
ter, introduc- 
the cafeteria 
rium where 
and surviving 




Bernal Heights Neighborhood Center 

Board and Committee Meetings 



Fundraising Committee 

Monday, August 15, 6:00 p.m. 
Children, Youth & Families Coalition 
Tuesday, August 16, 7:00 p.m. 

Outreach Committee 
Tuesday, September 6, 7:00 p.m. 

Senior Committee 
Monday, September 12, 4:00p.m. 
Fundraising Committee 
Wednesday, September 14, 6:00 p.m. 
BHNC Board Meeting 
Monday, September 19, 7:00 - 9:00 p.m. 
Children, Youth & Families Coalition 
Tuesday, September 20, 7:00 p.m. 



Having a party? 





Baptism reception? 



Community event 
or meeting? 





Book four next party or event 
at the Bernal Heights 
NeighborhoodCenter! 



Located on Cortland Avenue at Andover Street, you and your friends, 
family or group can afford our diningroom rates for as low as $50 per 
hour or a meeting space for as low as $5 per hour. 

Call Jess Dugan at the Neighborhood Center 

(415) 206-2140 



All meetings held at the Bernal Heights Neighborhood Center 
515 Cortland Avenue. Call 206-2140 for more information. 



She is the Vfernal Heights 
Real Estate Specialist 

Personal & Professional Service 

Property of the Month 

Sunny Bernal Heights Home! 
662 Banks Street 

Two Bedrooms, one bath, garage 
plus storage and room and bath 
downstairs. 

JjB%§0l£ Reduced to $159,000 



Whether you are buying 
or selling a home, call 
the Realtor with over 
12 years of experience 
to achieve your goals. 






We Sell San Francisco 



Gloria Allen 

Broker Associate 

1700 California Street, Suite 260 
San Francisco, CA 94109 
Bus (415) 441-0656 x 227 
Res (415) 921-2815 



EVANS 



PACIFIC 




REALTOR 



New Bernal Journal Advertising: 206-21 44 



8 



New Bernal Journal, August/September '94 



Fiesta on the Hill! 

Annual festival can not happen this year without the 
support of Bernal residents and merchants 

By Mauricio E. Vela, Center Director and Demece G. Garepis, Fiesta '94 Chair 



It's Fiesta time in Bernal 
Heights, and the Bernal Heights 
Neighborhood Center is in the 
midst of organizing the 6th annual 
"Fiesta On The Hill" Saturday, 
October 22nd 10:00 a.m. - 6:00 
p.m. - 6:00 p.m. at the Bernal 
Playground (Cortland and 
Moultrie). The Fiesta is our an- 
nual multi-cul- 
t u r a 1 , 
intergenerational 
community 
celebration 
showcasing 
our neighbor- 
hood perform- 
ing and visual 
artists. In addi- 
tion to the art- 
ists, we will 
have food ven- 
dors, arts & 
crafts, commu- 
nity informa- 
tion tables and 
organized 
children's ac- 
tivities. We will also recognize 
our outstanding community vol- 
unteers. Fiesta is an opportunity 
to celebrate all of the past year's 
community accomplishments. 

This Fiesta marks the BHNC's 
1 6th year anniversary serving your 
needs. The Neighborhood Center 
has worked very diligently to 
maintain and expand services with 
the help of the community. Come 
celebrate this past year's accom- 
plishments including: 

•Led a joint collaboration with 
Mission Y and Mission Commu- 
nity Legal Defense, Precita Cen- 
ter and Enterprise for a 300K grant 
to provide childcare, recreational 
afterschool activities, job training 
and placement and gang preven- 
tion. 

•BEST (Bernal Elders Support 
Team) joined our ongoing senior 
service programs at BHNC, wid- 



ening our services to frail at home 
elderly. 

•Sponsored the 6th annual Com- 
munity Congress which drew from 
the input of 26 house meetings 
,400 people, and over 150 con- 
gress attendees. 

•Launched Bernal Jobs Cam- 
paign as mandated by the Con- 




gress to create jobs for Bernal 
youth, targeting 500 additional jobs 
annually. 

•Provided 400 Bernal youth with 
part-time training and employment 
opportunities. 

•Organized a successful hillwide 
DPW (Dept. of Public Works) 
meeting as mandated by Congress, 
featuring DPW representatives and 
local civic improvement groups 
with a follow up meeting in Octo- 
ber. 

•Sponsored "THE HEIGHTS", 
our co-ed little league baseball team 
bringing families and 20 8- 1 0 year 
olds together for weekly recre- 
ation. 

•Completed our beautiful 2 year 
Mural project on Andover and 
Ellert in conjunction with Mission 
Cultural Center. 

•Coordinated with NIT-AMP 



(Neighborhoods in Transition, - A 
Multicultural Partnership) to ini- 
tiate a young women's outreach 
program "Ladies First." 

•Sponsored IstannualMerchant/ 
Youth Reception honoring mer- 
chants and our college bound youth. 

•Continued to provide technical 
assistance to many neighborhood 
groups such as 
the Precita Val- 
ley Coalition and 
Moultrie Street 
Neighbors. 

•Largest em- 
ployer on the 
Bernal Hill with 
over 25 staff 
members. 

•Working with 
Bernal Dwell- 
ings tenants and 
neighborhood as- 
sociations to put 
together a com- 
prehensive plan 
for services and 
development 

support 

•Initiated a new program , EMP 
(Emergency Meals Program) to 
serve meals to frail home bound 
elders. 

•Sponsored Bernal youth and 
families on our float at Carnaval, 
1st annual Cinco de Mayo dinner, 
and our 3rd annual Soul Food Din- 
ner. 

•Work in collaboration with our 
sister organization BHHC (Bernal 
Heights Housing Corporation) to 
ensure future affordable housing 
opportunities in our community. 

Now more than ever, we are 
depending on your early support. 
Without your early support we 
won 't be able to produce a Fiesta 
our neighborhood deserves. 

For more information, call the 
Bernal Heights Neighborhood 
Center, 206-2140. 



f? 




We need your early 

/support to coordinate 
f to bring FIESTA 94 
to Bernal Heights 

Early contributions deadline is Friday, August 12, 1994. 

Please make your check out to "BHNC ■ FIESTA" 

Support the Fiesta by becoming a: 
()Patwn$500.00 () Sponsor $250499 

()CamadwlCompaare$101-249 () Fiesta Amiga/Amigq $25-100 
QFiestaFan $5-24 Your contribution is tax deductible! 



Name: . 
Address: 



Phone: 



Zip: 



THANK YOU FOR BRINGING FIESTA '94 TO BERNAL HEIGHTS! 
Please sendta BHNC, 515 Cortland Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94110 



Youth and Local 
Business Reception 

By Mauricio Vela, Center director 

On June 15th the Bernal Heights Neighborhood Center's (BHNC) 
Outreach and Organizing committee sponsored a tribute to our college- 
bound youth and an appreciation for the businesses in our community 
who hire local youth. 

Lester Zeidman of Good Life Grocery on Cortland Avenue, Linda 
Andrakin of Cole Hardware on Mission Street, and Kirk Sanders of 

Goodman 
Lumber Co. 
on Bayshore 
Boulevard 
were on hand 
to receive 
their "thank 
you" gift 
packages, 
which in- 
cluded a 
handmade 
belt crafted 
by BHNC 
board mem- 
ber and 
Cortland 
merchant 
David 
Rogers. 

Board Member Julian Navarro donated gifts for ten youth packages, 
including school supplies, toiletries and a gift certificate from Pizza 
Express. 

Outreach Committee Chairperson, Patricia Fasano and Bill Sorro, 
board president, hosted the celebration. John Osaki from New Ways 
Workers and Glenn Eagleson from the Mayor's Youth Employment and 
Education Program were also on hand, as was Alan Silverman from 
Heartfelt and Vincent Montenelli from McDonald's on Bayshore Bou- 
levard. 

Thirty youths attended the reception, which included an ice breaker 
where youths and merchants got to know one another, and the presenta- 
tion of awards. The reception was part of the BHNC's 1994 jobs 
campaign to develop 500 subsidized and nonsubsidized jobs by the end 

Continued on page 12... 




Lester Zeidman of Good Life Grocery receives an award for 
his role in hiring neighborhood youth. 




Karina 
Cordona, a 
MYEEP 
participant, 
accepts her 
award for 
completing two 
successful 
years in the 
youth program 
and going on to 
San Jose State 
University. 



SUBSCRIBE! 



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mailed to your 
home or business! 



Help support your bi-monthly community newspaper! 

( ) $9.00 for one year ( ) $17.00 two years 

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to help produce our community paper! 

Name: Phone: _ 

Address: 

Send to: New Bernal Journal 
515 Cortland Avenue 
San Francisco, CA 94110 



New Bernal Journal, August/September '94 



9 



Nonprofit Housing 
Development Corporations: 

Community-Based Success 



by Ann Ostrander, 
BHHC board member 

Many people equate low-income 
housing with rundown public hous- 
ing built immediately after World 
War II. They do not know that in 
the past twenty years, a different 
type of housing has been devel- 
oped that success- 

fully serves the 
1 o w - i n c o m e 
population but re- 
duces many of the 
problems of pre- 
vious subsidized 
housing. 

Community- 
based nonprofit 
organizations 
have produced 
quality in-fill housing that is inte- 
grated so well with neighborhoods 
that residents often are not aware 
that it is subsidized for low-in- 
come households. Rehabilitation 
of an area's buildings is also part 
of this effort. The nonprofit spon- 
sors develop housing that ad- 
dresses concerns of their neigh- 
borhood. Community-based 
nonprofits have a stake in ensur- 
ing that the housing does not be- 
come a nuisance. 

Many of these development cor- 
porations were formed in the 1 960s 
and 1970s under federal programs 
such as the Model Cities Program. 



In light of discussion lately ques- 
tioning the value of government 
aid to cities, the track records of 
development corporations such as 
the Bernal Heights Housing Cor- 
poration (BHHC) attest to the suc- 
cess such programs can achieve. 
BHHC was founded in 1991 as 



velopment for low-income fami- 
lies, begins this summer. 

This work is intended to address 
the gap in the private housing mar- 
ket between rents and what San 
Franciscans can afford to pay. 
According to the city's Compre- 
hensive Housing Affordability 
Strategy, over 83,000 low-moder- 
ate-income renter households pay 
more for housing than they can 
afford. This problem is especially 
severe for extremely low-income 
households, of whom over half 
pay more than 50 percent of their 
income for rent. With over half of 
an already 



funding has been very tight over 
the past several years, forcing or- 
ganizations to scramble for other 
sources to cover basic operations. 
The BHHC and its sister organiza- 
tions operate on extremely limited 
budgets with salaries far below the 
industry standard for comparable 
work in the private sector. 

There is no doubt, however, that 
these organizations provide a ser- 
vice that for-profit developers can- 
not provide. Little money can be 
made from these developments and 
the chance of being financially 
compensated is small for long hours 
of community education and the 



requisite tours of the successful, 
though "invisible," existing 
projects. Non-profit developers 
across the country have been bridg- 
ing the gap left by for-profit devel- 
opers for over twenty years. Its 
"invisibility" — a desired sign of 
success — can ironically work 
against it. If more people knew of 
it, communities could be brought 
together more easily over this 
much-needed resource for low-in- 
come people.* 

For more information, call the 
Bernal Heights Housing Corpora- 
tion, 206-2140. 



"Over 83,000 low-moderate-income 
renter households pay more for 
housing than they can afford... 
over half pay more than 50 percent 
of their income for rent. " 



part of the Bernal Heights Neigh- 
borhood Center. The neighborhood 
center was established in 1978 and 
embarked on housing development 
in 1981 to rehabilitate six single- 
family homes. Since then, 94 
homes have been rehabilitated for 
low-income homeowners. Three 
other buildings, housing 18people, 
have been acquired and 
rehabiliated in the neighborhood. 
Fifty-three new units have been 
created, including Coleridge Park 
Homes for seniors in 1989 and 
Holladay Avenue Homes, a lim- 
ited-equity homeo wnership project 
completed in 1984, Construction 
on Market Heights, a 46-unit de- 



tight budget 
being re- 
served for 
rent, many 
San 
Franciscans 
find it diffi- 
cult to cover 
other essen- 

tials such as 

food, trans- 
portation costs and medical ex- 
penses. Nonprofit developers com- 
mit to keeping rents affordable for 
low-income people so tenants can 
afford to keep a roof over their 
head while also covering other es- 
sentials. 

Funding to build this housing 
comes from federal, state, local 
and private financing. The opera- 
tions of the BHHC and organiza- 
tions like it are funded through a 
variety of sources, including the 
federal government's Comunity 
Development Block Grant 
(CDBG) program, a successor to 
the Model Cities program. CDBG 




BHHC 



LOW INTEREST LOANS 
FOR HOME REPAIRS 

The City of San Francisco and the Bernal Heights Housing 
Corporation are working together to offer the Community Housing 
Rehabilitation Program to low income homeowners in Bernal 
Heights. Loans of up to $40,000 are available at only 3% interest 
to help homeowners correct life threatening hazards and health and 
safety code work. Loans may be deferred for ten years; senior 
citizens may defer repayment indefinitely. Bernal Heights prop- 
erty owners who have owned their house for at least one year and 
qualify under the following maximum family income guidelines 
are eligible: 



Family of 1: $27,800 
Family of 2: $31,750 
Family of 3: $35,750 
Family of 4: $39,700 



Family of 5: $42,900 
Family of 6: $46,050 
Family of 7: $49,250 
Family of 8: $52,400 



Call BHHC at 206-2151 or 206-2147 for more information. 




Dear Bernal Heights Neighbors 
and Farmer's Market Shoppers, 

Last month we received our building permit to 
begin construction of Market Heights, our afford- 
able housing development on the hillside behind 
the Farmer's Market. Some of you who shop at 
the Market may have noticed the temporary fence 
around the site. We plan to start construction in 
late August, but want to assure everyone - par- 
ticularly our neighbors who regularly shop at the 
Market - that it will not be interfered with in 
any way during the 12-14 months of housing 
construction. 

In fact, for those of you who may be new to 
Bernal Heights, we encourage you to shop at 
Farmer's Market on Alemany Boulevard, and for 
those of you who may be interested in applying to 
live at Market Heights, please feel free to call us 
at 206-2140 for a Housing Interest Form or fur- 
ther information. 



Sincerely, 

Helen Heifer 
Executive Director 
Bernal Heights Housing Corporation 




Emergency Care 
With Less Waiting 




When an emergency health problem strikes, come 
to St. Luke's Hospital. You'll get emergency care with 
less waiting. 

Within 1 0 minutes after you arrive, an emergency 
nurse will check your symptoms. For less urgent health 
problems - like a sprained ankle, a cold or the flu - 
you'll be examined by a doctor and on your way, 
typically, within an hour. 

Each year, St. Luke's provides more emergency 
care than almost any other San Francisco hospital. 
That's why we have a specially trained doctor 
available 24-hours a day just 
for children. 



We're specialists at Emer- 
gency Care. We hope you'll 
never need an emergency 
room. But if you do, why not 
go to the best? 



""j ^ HOSPITAL 

Emergency Department 
Army & Valencia 

Se Habla Espanol 



10 



New Bernal Journal, August/September '94 



CLASSIFIEDS 



HOME CARE 

Handyman/Carpenter: Repair a door, hang a kitchen cabinet, add 
a room, build a fence or a deck or even trim a tree. I'm handy, skilled 
and do good work at a resonable price. Robert, 824-1634. (Bernal 
references). 

Furniture stripped and refinished: Excellent work quickly done, 
e.g., dresser w/mirror $1 50, with pick-up & delivery. Jim, 621-4390. 

Handyman - repairs, painting, building shelves, decks, fences. 
References, reasonable rates. Harry Irving 986-2654. 

Home Repairs: Windows, doors, deadbolt locks, weatherstrip- 
ping, small carpentry and household repair jobs. Free estimates. 
Local references. City Window Service. 337-9327 - ask for Don. 

Expert Affordable House/Office Cleaning by mature women. 
References. Domestic referral services. A non-profit community 
service. (Options for Women over Forty) 626-21 28. 

Highly efficient housecleaner. Thorough, reliable, honest. Local 
references, reasonable rates. Regular or one-time. Move-outs. No 
minimum. You call the shots. Chris 641-4902. 
Peaches Painting. Ad color to your life (inside/outside). Service 
with care, at rates that are fair. Since 1980. License 618693. 25% 
off with mention of this ad. 641-9434. 

Looking for an experienced, reliable, housecleaner? Stop your 
search! Call KJ, 285-3014. 

Licensed Painter - Exterior & interior. Small & lage jobs. Cracks 
fixed, water damage repaired. Expert plaster & drywall repairs. 
License # 497-214. References & free estimates. Please call Ed at 
995-4666. 

I am an experienced house and office cleaner. You are a busy 
person. Don't be ashamed of your dirt. I'll take care of it. Guilt free 
cleaning. Kieran, 864-3842. 



PROFESSIONAL SERVICES 

The Traveling Mechanic: Tune-ups, brakes, general repairs, 
foreign and domestic, used car evaluations. 18 years extensive 
experience, all work guaranteed. $40 per hour, house calls. Giorgio, 
647-3403. Licensed and certified. 

Custom upholstery and/or slipcovers. Excellent work quickly 
done, photos & references. One-Eyed Jacks, 621-4390. 

Quick-Quality Typing & Transcription Service: Micro/Regular/ 
Video Cassette/Phone Dictation. Reports, letters, flyers, resumes, 
Manuscripts, etc. Same day service available. FAX. Call Nancy, 
821-2293. 

Moderns Graphics/Desktop Publishing. Newsletters, brochures, 
business cards, catalogs, menus, t-shirts, logos, newspapers, ad 
design. Free consultation. 282-7955. 

Piano Lessons Bernal Heights location. Doctor of Musical Arts/ 
Juillard graduate offering expert instruction in piano and music 
theory. (415)641-7088. 



REAL ESTATE/ RENTALS 

Attention First-Time Home-Buy ersl We are the specialists. We 
can find you a reasonably priced home here on Bernal Heights, or 
elsewhere in the City. Special loan programs for first-time 
homebuyers. Call Kristin at Brown Bear Realty 285-5700. 
Summer Tahoe Getaway! Beautiful Tahoe home in prestigious 
Incline Village. Hiking, golf, tennis, swimming, boating and beaches! 
20 minutes to South Shore Casinos and shows. Large kitchen, 3 
bedrooms, 2 baths, steam/sauna room, livingroom with fireplace, 2 
decks, garage, all appliances & laundry. Call 282-7955. 
Attention Home Owners! Thinking about selling? Prices in Bernal 
Heights have been going up. We at Brown Bear Realty are your 
neighbornood Realtors. Call us for a free market evaluation of your 
home. Ask for Kristin or Bob : (415) 285-5700. 

Two Lots for Sale - North Slope Bernal Heights. Price: $1 15,000 
each. Zone R-1. 1766 Alabama, corner of Ripley. 1750 Alabama, 
level. Have sewer and view. Lot sizes 25 x 80 each. Ed Lingsch 
Realty, 648-1516. 

Attention Landlords! Where have you been? We have propectjve 
tenants inquiring about rentals every day. Post your rental informa- 
tion on our bulletin board for free - call Kristin at Brown Bear Realty: 
(415)285-5700. 



CHILDCARE/ELDERCARE 

Eldercare in your home. Reasonable prices, flexible 
hours. Companionship, grocery shopping, light housekeeping. 
Bilingual in Spanish and English. Good Bernal Heights references. 
Available immediately. 285-071 1 . 

Childcare available in Bernal Heights Infant to school age. Healthy 
meals & snacks. Fun & educational toys & activities. Licensed, 
excellent references. Call 647-1427. 



PET CARE 

Does Rover need training? Exercise? A ride to the vet? Want to 
be sure Fluffy is content while you're away? Positively Pets can 
help! Training, problem solving, pet sitting, geriatric care, exercise, 
transportation. 10 years experience. Bonded. References available. 
Senior discounts. 647-2463. 

Tender Loving Care. Since 1983, experienced compassionate 
animal lover offering peace of mind and personalized pet care in 
your home. Mid-day dogwalking available for busy professionals. 
Reasonable, reliable, references. 695-051 1 . 



Bernal Heights 

YEAR ftotlND APPOINTMENTS 
REASONABLE RATES 




INCOME TAX 

FEDERAL & STATE 
NOTARY PUBLIC & BOOKKEEPER 



FLORA L. ALEXANDER, TP: 

501 CORTLAND AVENUE 
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94110 



(415)641-4922 
RES. (41 5) 993-6811 



DON'T LET YOUR 
MEMORIES FADE 
AWAY 

Bring us your photos, old, new, black & white or color, or 
instants and we'll make photographic duplicates of them: 

• Right here in our store • While you wait 

• No negative required • Reduce or enlarge 



mi/zon 

ONE HOUR PHOTO 



2859 Mission Street (btwn 24th&25th) 
San Francisco, Ca 941 10 
(415) 648-6698 
ONE HOUR COLOR PRINT FILM DEVELOPING 
Open 7 days 





P^^^teiUC. 562716 


WffifflBfflffi 


lernmlm 


< PROTECT 1 
YOUR INVESTMENT 
ANO 

^ YOUR HCALTH ! 




CNOT NECESSARILY^ 
L IN THAT ORDER) J 






PLUMBING - 355-2415 

DESIGN»INSTALLATION»REPAIR»MAINTENANCE 



HEALTH 

Creating a life that makes more sense is a six-session evening 
class & circle in creating lives grounded in our values and our caring 
about the world. Relationships, community, social change, work, 
money, time, connection to self, nature and spirit. Thursdays, Aug. 
25 - Oct. 6 (no class on Yom Kippur) or Wednesdays, Sept. 21 - Oct. 
26. A new class begins each month. Taught by a former Heights 
resident, Karen Mercer (510) 658-1307. 



VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES 

Volunteer in Video! The Bernal Heights Housing Corporation, the 
neighborhood's nonprofit developer of housing for low income 
people, is putting out a short video on our work. We are looking for 
accomplished editors, camera crew or others with experience in 
video production to assist us. Please call Chloe at 206-2151 . 



CLASSIFIED ADS 

ONLY 200 per word! ' 



TOTAL 



. words @ 20c per word = $_ 



TOTAL ENCLOSED 
$4.00 minimum. Hyphenated words count as 2 words. A phone number 
counts as 1 word. Placement order of an ad is at random at can not be 
requested. If you desire a tear sheet after publication, send a self-addressed 
stamped envelope and include a $2.00 handling fee with your payment. If 
we misprint your classified ad and the error effects the value or content of 
your ad, we will repeat a corrected version in our next issue. PLEASE PRINT 

CLEARLY! 



NAME: 



ADDRESS: 

DAY PHONE: 

Send this form along with complete payment to the: 

New Bernal Journal, 515 Cortland Avenue, SF, CA 94110 

Don't miss our next issue of the 
New Bernal Journal 
October/November '94 

(delivered on 10/8/94) 

NEXT CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE: 9/30/94 




BERNAL H 



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• Dental Insurance Accepted 

• General Dentistry 

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Member: ADA, CDA, SFDS, UOP & UC 



New Bernal Journal, August/September '94 I 





k 

DEOS 



\LES 



Open 
7 Days 
11am to 9pm 



s 

30 

ins 

Bennington) 



SAN FRANCISCO 
AUTO REPAIR 
CENTER 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC 
AUTO REPAIRS 

. NOW OPEN 7 DAYS! 

• Dependable Work - Honqst Prices 

• Basic Auto Repair Classes 

• A Community - Oriented People's Garage 

• Men & Women Mechanics 

• Official California Smog Station 

611 FLORIDA ST. (Near 18th), S.F., 285-8588 




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$10.00 Off Smog Test 



SAN FRANCISCO AUTO REPAIR CENTER 



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When You Are Ready- 
to Buy or Sell 
Call Margret Maker 




MARGRET MAKER 

REALTOR* 
COLD WELL BANKER 
(415) 563-41 11 ext. 310 



Choose a real estate agent who 
knows Bernal Heights, who lived 
here for 1 5 years, who cares about 
the neighborhood and cares 
about you. 



USINESS 



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rtise in the 
nal Journal 
2144 



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Breakfast & Lunch 
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Hours: 7am-3pm, Mon., Wed thru Fri. 
Sat. & Sun. 8am-3pm • Closed Tuesdays 



PIZZA EXPRESS 

RESTAURANT 





919 Cortland Ave. 
San Francisco, CA 941 10 



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San Francisco, CA 94110 



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I New Bernal Journal, August/September '94 



Summer with the Gang 
Prevention Program 

By Joy Ferguson, GMC Coordinator 



When Eddie, a bright eighth 
grader at Aptos Middle School 
wasn't doing so well in school, he 
was referred to Rudy Corpuz, a 
Gang Prevention Program (GPP) 
counselor at the Bernal Heights 
Neighborhood Center. Eddie is 
one of fifty-one youth who are 
currently working with Gang Pre- 
vention Counselors to guide them 
towards the right choices to do 



well in school and stay away from 
the negative effects of gangs. 

Eddie likes to hang out with his 
friends and go to parties, which is 
not unusual for a young man of his 
age. However, he has gotten into 
trouble before. Rudy Corpuz cited 
the fact that the youth may not 
have been receiving enough sup- 
port, attention, and help to see that 
being "bad" is not the only way to 




GGP participants enjoy a ferry boat ride to Alcatraz. Back row from left: Eddie, 
Rudy, Joseph, Alberto, Art Jr. Front: Eric Boy, Andrew, Bryant, Jessie. 




GPP counselor Rudy Corpuz raps with Eddie to find out how his summer is going. 



go. Eddie estimated that 
about 90 percent of the 
students at his school 
have had some sort of 
gang involvement, in- 
cluding "wannabes", or 
claiming ties with the 
same gang that an older 
brother or sister claims. 
He has a younger 
brother who he worries 
will get involved with 
gangs. But Eddie says 
that he will do whatever 
it takes to keep his little 
brother out of trouble — 
even if it means moving 
out of the city. 

The Gang Prevention 
Program works to keep 
the doors of the future 
open and hopeful to 
youth who are at-risk, 
focusing on keeping 



youth in school and out of trouble. 
This summer the counselors have 
been very busy encouraging the 
youth in summer school (half day 
program), getting summer jobs, and 
going on outings. The outings, such 
as a trips to Alcatraz, Angel Island, 
and a rafting trip, have been do- 
nated from the Willie Brown Task 
Force, the Mayor's Criminal Jus- 
tice Council and a fishing trip from 
the S.F. Youth Fishing Program. 
The outings give the counselors 
and the youth a chance to spend 
time togetherin new environments. 

This summer Eddie has enjoyed 
the outings offered to youth par- 
ticipating in the Gang Prevention 
Program. In order to keep on the 
right track, he talks with his coun- 
selor Rudy four or five times a 
week. Eddie says that he is glad 
that Rudy came along, "He's re- 
ally helped me out and put my 



mind to better things. I want to 
thank him." 

Rudy is very qualified to pro- 
vide counseling and support to 
Eddie. Rudy has been where Eddie 
is now. Rudy, coaching Eddie 
during his interview says for him 
to, "Tell her how you want to go 
back to school and do really well. 
I'm his agent, I'll speak for my 
client". Eddie smiled, but backed 
him up, and said it was true that he 
is going to make more of an effort 
in school. He doesn't know what 
he wants to do when he gets out of 
school. He is thinking about art 
school. 

Eddie says that his mother has 
also been one of his greatest 
sources of support. "She gives 
very good advice to help me out 
of problems." When he, however, 
"gets busted" for bringing home 
failing grades, it is hard for his 
mom to listen. 

Rudy says that the young people 
have a hard time relating to adults 
at their schools. As a part of La 
Raza Club at Aptos Middle 
School, Eddie worked with a 
group of students to resolve is- 
sues like these at the school. They 
worked with other ethnic clubs to 
work through racial tensions on 
campus. He likes participating in 
La Raza because they get together 
and talk and work on making 
things better for the students. 

Today, Eddie plays soccer, and 
like so many World Cup fans of 
the Mexico team, was disap- 
pointed to see Mexico go out so 
'early. Lately, he's been spending 
a lot of time with his girlfriend 
and staying out of trouble. He 
looks forward to more outings 
and activities with the Gang Pre- 
vention Program this summer. 



WIN A PORTABLE SONY CASSETTE PLAYER! 





PLEASE HELP SUPPORT THE 

SUMMER YOUTH 

AT THE 

BERNAL yESOHTS 

OEIMTER 



glfi^ ID) 



BY PURCHASING A 
RAFFLE TICKET at $1 .00 EACH 
OR GIVING A DONATION! 

Winners drawn on 8/25/94. Need not be present to win. 
PROCEEDS BENEFIT: 

• Awards Dinner 
• Youth Dance 



College Scholarships 




Thanks for your support! 

For more Information callthe BHNC Youth Program: 




Youth & Business Reception 



of the year. This goal was established as a result of the March 1994 Community 
Congress which mandated the BHNC to find jobs for idle youth. 

During May, 40 youths completed the Mayor's Youth Employment and Education 
program (MYEEP) and 16 were placed in nonsubsidized positions. June provided 100 
youths with subsidized placements in our Summer Youth Employment and Training 
program. Twelve more youth were placed in nonsubsidized positions. July and August 
should be just as successful with the hiring of Job Developer Natashia Lopez, who 
replaces Raul Rodriguez as our new Ready For Work counselor. 

With the community's continuous support, the staff of the BHNC will continue to 
succeed in placing youths in jobs. Neighbors with any employment leads are invited to 
call Ready For Work at 206-2150. • 



Back to school 
training for volunteers 



The San Francisco School Volunteers are offering a free training 
to those interested in serving in the schools as a volunteer. The 
"Back to School Training Institute" offers instructive workshops 
will enhance skills as well 
as orientate new school volunteers. 



"Motivating Students to Learn," "Reading Strategies," "Introduction to Working with 
Youth," and "Working One-on-One With Children" will provide techniques and ideas to 
guide volunteers toward working with students of all levels. 

The training will be held on 
September 10, 1994 

from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon 
at Raphael Weill Elementary School at 1501 OTarrell. 
Register before September 2 by calling 

S.F. School Volunteers at 274-0250 



New Bernal Journal, August/September '94 I 



Lending a hand to 
our elders 

Emergency Meal Program volunteers 
deliver more than food 



The names of elders and last 
names of volunteers in this story 
are not given in order to protect 
the privacy of program partici- 
pants 

Since Bernal Heights Senior 
Services implemented its Emer- 
gency Meal Program in January, 
over 14 frail elders too weak or 
incapacitated to prepare their own 
food received 258 free frozen meals 
and 542 pounds of shelf staples 
from caring community volunteers. 

"Bernal Heights is really a great 
community that cares," says Bernal 
Heights Senior Services Director, 
Vicki Victoria. "Whenever we get 
the word out that our seniors need 
help, neighbors always respond 
and are eager to help our elders." 

"I've seen frail seniors on the 
city's Meals on Wheels waiting 
list wait eight to twelve weeks, 
even longer, before they begin re- 
ceiving their home delivered 
meals," says Victoria. Budget limi- 
tations create these long waits for 
such an important service, she says. 
"We developed the Emergency 
Meal Program because we feel a 
frail senior should not have to go 
hungry because of a waiting list." 

"Thanks to a grant from the 
Mrytle V. Fitschen Charitable 



Trust Fund and several incredibly 
caring volunteers from the com- 
munity, these frail seniors can have 
the meals they need to become 
well again." 

A couple these wonderful vol- 
unteers are Brad and Mary, who 
have been delivering meals to a 
frail couple, Mrs. and Mr. "M," 
both in their mid-80' s. Until her 
recent hospitalization, Mrs. M 
managed to take care of her elderly 
husband. Upon her discharge, she 
was too weak to cook. A constant 
supply of frozen meals in Mrs. M' s 
freezer reassured her that a hot 
meal was only a few minutes away 
in a microwave. 

In addition to delivering meals, 
Brad and Mary also spend time 
talking with Mrs. and Mr. M, not 
only to provide a friendly ear, but 
also to learn of any other needs that 
the elders may have. These needs 
are reported to the Senior Services 
staff. Often additional services, so- 
lutions to problems with in-home 
support care and arranging trans- 
portation to medical appointments 
result from these visits. 

Susan is another volunteer who 
delivers meals to a wheelchair- 
bound frail elder. Discharged from 
a care facility because her medical 



Birthday Party 
& Dance 

Monday, 10 - 2 
August 29, 1994 

in the St Kevin's Church Hall 



/mac/, to music nv noii sou/a: 



All Senior Citizens Are Welcome to our Party! 



coverage ran out, Mrs. "G" be- 
came too weak to lift herself in and 
out of her wheelchair. One day 
Susan learned that Mrs. G had 
spent the night lodged in her wheel 
chair because her regular atten- 
dant stopped coming to put her 
into bed. Susan notified the Bernal 
Elder Support Team staff, who 
helped getMrs. Gproper and regu- 
lar care. This care and concern by 
the program's volunteers and staff 
helped to turn around an unfortu- 
nate situation. 

In a time of limited social ser- 
vices budgets, the Emergency 
Meal Program succeeds because it 
benefits from a rich neighborhood 
resource: community volunteers 
who have a sense of duty to those 
in need. Bernal Heights neighbors 
continue to answer this call and 
are again needed today. 

"Seniors who live alone are of- 
ten discharged from hospitals with- 
out anyone being notified. There 
is no safety net waiting for them 
when they get home ," says Nic 
Griffin, a social aide at the Bernal 
Heights Senior Program. "This is 
why we need to find and keep 
good, dependable volunteers on 
board who are ready to help se- 
niors when the need arises." 



Aging Successfully through 
the Free and Easy Method 



Older adults can take charge of 
their health by learning simple tech- 
niques that cost nothing and are 
available to everyone. Developed 
and taught by Diane See, this lively 
class offers a variety of experi- 
ences to encourage good health, 
positive thinking, and general well- 
being. 

Each Wednesday morning an- 
other aspect of health and relax- 
ation will be covered in an infor- 
mal discussion group. Topics in- 
clude: benefits of better breathing; 
importance of reducing tension in 
the body; how thoughts and atti- 
tudes affect your immune system, 
and how to change them. Practical 
exercises are offered for each topic. 

Each class also includes gentle 
exercises based on t'ai chi. These 
slow and easy movements will 



improve flexibility, balance and 
stamina. They are beneficial for 
people at all levels of physical abil- 
ity. 

Diane also leads the class in sing- 
ing nostalgic songs before lunch 
each week. She will return on Au- 
gust 24th with her lively Wednes- 
day morning class, from 9:30 a.m. 
to 12:00p.m. at theBernal Heights 
Senior Program, 5 1 5 Cortland Av- 
enue. There are no requirements 
forthesenon-creditclasses, no fees, 
and no commitment is necessary. 
Come and try it. Everyone is wel- 
come. 

City College of San Francisco 
offers many other free classes for 
older adults at Senior Centers 
throughout the City. For informa- 
tion call Terry Bloom at 550-44 15. 



BMFflMCy Mill PNBfMI 

What: Volunteers needed to 
deliver frozen" meals to frail 
elders in Bernal Heights. 
Call: B.H. Senior Program, 
Nic Griffin, 206-2142 
Elders in need: Bernal Elder 
Support Team, 206-9177 '$ 



For information about senior activities, 

programs and services 

in Bernal Heights, call; 

Bernal Heights Senior Program: 206-2145 
Bernal Elder Support Team: 206-9177 



The Bernal Heights Senior Program Invites Seniors to our 




CAKE & CORSAGE 
FOR BIRTHDAY 
CELEBRANTS! 



Join us for lunch! 
Roast Beef Au Jus 

$1.25 suggested'senior donation 



ADMISSION 
FREE 



Take the #24 MUNI bus to Ellsworth Street & Cortland Avenue! 



w 

E 
D 
N 
E 
S 
D 
A 
Y 

N 
I 

G 



BINGO 



$150 

SOCKOS! 



TWO 

$250 

JACKPOTS! 



$25 
FREE 
GAME 



CARDS: 
- $1 ea 

$5 min. 



DOOR 
PRIZES! 



$100 

10 games 

Good Neighbors 

" $150 ~ 

4 games 

Good & Good Good 
Neighbors 



DOORS OPEN 6pm • 1st GAME 7:30 pm 



A Fundraising Benefit for Bernal Heights Senior Services 

Filipino Bavvio 
Fiesta Dinner! 

Friday, 6:00-9:00 pm 

August 26, 1994 





• A celebration of the 
song, dance and food 
of the Philippines. 

Chicken Adobo, 
Lumpia, Pancit, rice . 
& Guinatan 

Tickets: 
Adults $10.00 
Seniors/Youth $5.00 



Bernal Heights Neighborhood Center 

515 Cortland Avenue, San Francisco • 206-2142 



ST. KEVIN'S PARISH HALL 

I'.I.LSW ORTH OH'" CORTLAND • 64X-575I 



14 



New Bernal Journal, August/September '94 



Take a Walk. . Down Cortland 

Taste and Style come to Bernal 

By Kathleen Dunphy and Vicki Victoria 



New Beauty Mark on the Hill 

For 10 years, Bernal Heights 
customers traveled to Isa's at their 
24th Street location in Noe Valley 
for hair and beauty care. To serve 
their loyal and new customers more 
better, owners Isa and Mickey 
Muhawieh have opened a second 
studio at 626 Cortland Avenue, 




right next to Nicco's Cafe. 

A hair cutting specialist for 15 
years, Isa's was one of six salons 
chosen city wide by Nordstroms to 
participate in their annual hair styl- 
ist event hosted by Sebastians. The 
community is proud to welcome 
such renowned talent here on 

Cortland Avenue. 

Isa's is a full ser- 
vice Hair Studio and 
Beauty Center, of- 
fering hair design, 
color and perm ser- 
vices as well as 
children's cuts and 
fine hair products. 
The studio's three 
year plan includes 
developing the 
building's upstairs 
area into more salon 
space to make room 
for facial services 
and more beauty 
products. 

Isa and Mickey's 
good business sense 
led them to chose 
Cortland Avenue as 
the sight of their new 
studio, saying that it 
reminds them of 
what Noe Valley 
was like ten years 



ago. "There's a lot of opportunity 
and business will grow as it did on 
24th Street," says Isa. "We really 
like the community spirit of Bernal 
Heights." 

Isa' s motto is "We Bring Out the 
Best in You," and their staff is 
ready to serve you daily from 1 0:00 
a.m. - 7:00 p.m., Saturdays until 
6:00 p.m. and closed Sundays. Call 
641-1692. 

Culinary Academy Grad 
on Cortland 

Since June, Bernal Heights has 
discovered delightful Ricotta 
cheese and crouton omelettes, sa- 
vory salmon and sun-dried toma- 
toes for lunch and filling vegetar- 
ian specials daily at The Barking 
Basset Cafe at 803 Cortland Av- 
enue. A graduate of the California 
Culinary Academy whose 1 1 year 
cooking experience in San Fran- 
cisco includes the South Park Cafe, 
owner Wayne Matson's impres- 
sive resume reveals why his food 
is well above average. 

Pancakes with fraiche and ber- 
ries, French Toast with steamed 
apples, whipped cream and wal- 
nuts or a goat cheese, apples, wal- 
nuts and citrus vinaigrette salad 
are all enjoyed on linen covered 
tables in a light, airy room. With 
mouth watering entrees like these, 
The Barking Basset Cafe is des- 
tined to become one of Bernal 
Heights' favorite culinary treats. 

"I've been watching Cortland 
Avenue's business district grow 
and felt that it was a good time to 



Bernal resident Wayne Matson opened the Barking Basset 
Cafe in June. His culinary skills have made breakfast on the 
Hill a delectable morning experience. 



*45»000 INCOME/ 3% DOWN' ASK US HOW??? 



What can I afford to buy? Can I qualify for a loan? 
What equity do I need to borrow against my house? 
Is now a good time to buy or sell a home? 



To find out the answers 
and MORE... 
Come to our 
FREE seminar at: 

BenalHeigfos Branch Library 
500 Cortiand Avenue 
Tuesday, 7:00p.m. 

September 21, 1994 





CHARLES MORGANSTERN 

Vanguard Properties 
(415) 864-7800 



JUNE L. DAVID 

Allsource Financial 
(415) 583-1600 




Isa Muhawieh brings over 10 years of hair styling experience to the Hill, 
as well as providing top of the line beauty products to the community. 



open acafe," says Wayne, aBemal 
resident who named his new cafe 
after his two basset hounds. The 
cafe will feature the work of a 
different neighborhood artist ev- 
ery other month beginning with 
the ceramics of Beverly Koenig 
currently displayed this month. 
Breakfast can be enjoyed start- 



ing at 7:00 a.m. weekdays and 
8 :00 a.m. on weekends. Fresh cof- 
fee, pastries and muffins are ready 
for folks on the go. Lunch, beer, 
and wine are served until 3:00 
p.m. daily except Tuesdays, when 
the cafe is closed to give its 
hardworking staff a well deserved 
break. 



Goodbye, Joe! 

Youth take action against 
tobacco advertising 



The tobacco industry has imple- 
mented a successful advertising 
and promotion campaign target- 
ing youth to replace 3,000 smok- 
ers that quit or die each day. Chil- 
dren under 6 years old recognize 
Joe Camel as easily as Mickey 
Mouse. 

The tobacco industry has been 
accused of luring kids into smok- 
ing with advertising campaigns like 
Joe Camel. This cool, fun loving 
cartoon figure can be seen on bill- 
boards leaning against fancy sports 
cars or being admired by beautiful 
women.. .always with a cigarette 
in his mouth. 

Youth of in San Francisco, par- 
ticularly children of color, are be- 
ing coerced into smoking and have 
easy access to tobacco products. 

"Nine out of 10 youth in San 
Francisco can buy cigarettes," says 
Karen Licavoli, Director of Envi- 
ronmental Health Programs of the 
San Francisco American Lung 
Association. "60% of billboards in 
African American neighborhoods 



and 40% of billboards in Latino 
ones promote tobacco compared 
to only 30% citywide." 

As a result, the youth committee 
of the Tobacco Free Coalition will 
address the issue of tobacco and 
youth by reducing access to to- 
bacco and restricting or eliminat- 
ing advertising through model li- 
censing and advertising policies. 

The policy includes that stores 
do not post tobacco ads or promo- 
tional items in the store and that all 
tobacco products be kept behind a 
counter or in a display case, so that 
the buyer must ask for them. 

Model advertising policies in- 
clude establishing a one mile ra- 
dius from schools and playgrounds 
for billboards advertising tobacco 
products, as well as restricting these 
ads from taxis and public buses. 

To get involved or for more in- 
formation, call Karen Licavoli at 
543-4410. 

By Vicki Victoria 



quo nvra oua qv/ej rsvra GV/a ov/a gvjtej tjv/a ouzr tsvsr CsVrs evho ovra vsvna evra wvra svjq 




COOPERATIVA POPULAR 

TEODOSIA 

HANDMADE CRAFTS AND ART 

Come Visit Our Unique Gift Shop/Artists Co-Op, 
Showcasing Handmade Crafts And Artwork. 
We Feature The Work Of Both New As Well 
As Established Local Artists From A Wide 
Range Of Backgrounds And Cultures. 



iFREE AGUINALDOi! 

Just for Stopping By! I; 



II 

l_ 

I 



With this coupon :• Coupons cannot be Combined 
with any other offer' 



r^::-^ — 7 : " — <^ 

v other offer • Expires 9/30/94 j-jj 

| Any Purchase of $10 or more f a 



I 



430 A CORTLAND AVE. 

642-9223 

Monday - Friday 11 AM - 8 PM 
Saturday & Sunday 11 AM - 7 PM 



With this coupon • Coupons cannot be Combined 
■*nh any other offer' Expires 9/30/94 



HANDMADE CARDS, GIFTS, CANDLES, 
JEWELRY, ARTWORK, CERAMICS, 
CRAFTS, CHIMES, LEATHER MASKS, 

MIRRORS AND MUCH MORE. Qatnrriaw a. Q lav i . &M . 7 PM J »"« any offer « txpires wsam I gj 

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$5 OFF 

t Any Purchase of $25 or more 

| With this coupon • Coupons cannot be combined 
with any other offer 'Expires 9/30/94 



-i: 



To 
Advertise 

in the 
New Bernal 
Journal 
call 
206-2144 





Garage Sale Locations: 



G 

Saturday 9 - 3pm 
August 13, 1994 




South West 

170 Highland Avenue 
198 Park Street 
11 & 15 Newman Street 
130 Newman Street* 
136 Newman Street 
249 Bocana Street* 
301 Bocana Street* 
Bernal Elder Support Team 
402 Cortland Avenue 
Four Star Videos 
430-A Cortland 
Cooperativa Teodosia 

South 



. Cross Street(s) 

(Holly Park Cir.) 

(Holly Park Cir.) 

(Holly Park Cir.) 

(Bennington) 

(Andover) 

(Cortland) 

(Cortland) 

(Bennington) 

(Wool) 



515 Cortland Avenue* 
Bernal Heights -Neighborhood 
304 Moultrie Street 
115 Ellsworth Street* 
644 Anderson Street 
463 Ellsworth Street 
240 Gates Street 
3763 Folsom Street 

South East 



(Andover) 
Center 

(Eugenia) 

(Powhattan) 

(Ogden) 

(Jarboe) 

(Cortland) 

(Eugenia) 



208 Banks Street 
210 Banks Street 
64 Prentiss Street 
248 Nevada Street 
196 Putnam Street 

West/North West 

219 Bonview Street 
250 Bonview Street 
147 Elsie Street 
217 Elsie Street 
Cortland Ave. @ Prospect 
229 Coleridge Street* 
250-256 Coleridge Street* 
130Bartlett Street* 



North/North East 

79 Elsie Street* 
57B Manchester Street* 
Multi-family sale 
1698 Alabama Street 
358 Mullen Street* 
634 Peralta Street 



(Eugenia) 

(Cortland) 

(Chapman) 

(Jarboe) 

(Tompkins) 



(Eugenia) 
(Cortland) 
(Eugenia) 
(Eugenia) 
(Prospect Garden) 
(Virginia) 
(Heyman) 
(23rd St) 



(Coso) 
(Bessie) 

(Norwich St.) 

(Alabama) 

(Esmeralda) 




*Pledged to donate a portion of their sale proceeds to Bernal 
Heights Senior Services, which assists frail & homebound 
elderly in the community. 



• The Bernal Heights Neighborhood of San Francisco • 

A Fundraising Event for Bernal Heights Senior Services 
For additional maps or more information: 

Bernal Heights Neighborhood Center 

515 Cortland Ave., S.F., CA 941 10 • (415) 206-2145 



How do you reach 8,000 residents 
in Bernal Heights? 

By advertising in the New Bemal Journal! 

Ad space reservation deadline for the October/ November '94 issue is 9/23/94. Call: 206-2144 



16 



New Bernal Journal, August/September '94 



Vernal Hilltop Natural History 



Tarweeds Help Reclaim 
Weedy Bernal Quarry 



By Barbara M. Pitscel 




This month I am diverging from my usual habit of telling 
you about lovely, relatively uncommon, somewhat threat- 
ened native wildflowers to discuss a workhorse native plant. 

The tarweeds, members of the Heliantheae (sunflower 
tribe) of the Asteraceae of Compositae (aster or sunflower 
family) receive their common name from glands that emit 
abundant strongly scented, viscid secretions. This family is 
characterized by heads that look superficially like large 
single flowers. The outer, or ray, flowers look like petals, 
and the central, or disk, flowers look like clusters of floral 
reproductive structures. Daisies, chrysanthemums, and dahl- 
ias are among the familiar members of this family, which 
includes many summer and fall bloomers. 

In recent years, our Bernal restoration work parties have 
succeeded in removing large quantities of three invasive weeds, wild radish {Raphanus sativus), fennel 
(Foeniculum vulgare), and yellow star thistle (Centaurea solstitialis), from the quarry near the 
southeastern end of the hilltop. These exotics were taken out to prevent them from reseeding, despite the 
fact that there were no natives available to plant in their place. Individuals of these species will continue 
to need removal, but populations are definitely on the decline. Often such activity allows for the 
appearance of other later successional weedy species, so we weren't sure what to expect. We are 
delighted to see that a native tarweed, Madia Sativa, has taken over as the dominant species on the site. 

Madia sativa 's several common names, "common tarweed," "coast tarweed," or "Chile tarweed," are 
indicative of the broad range of this species. It inhabits coastal grasslands, brushlands, and roadsides in 
both natural and disturbed habitats from Alaska to Baja California. A disjunct population is also found 
in southwestern South America. Chile is the type locality where the species was first described, but this 
tarweed is considered to be native in its entire range. Its incredible adaptability probably explains its 
ability to recolonize Bernal's inhospitable quarry. It is common throughout San Francisco where it 
blooms from May to October. 

Due to shallow Bernal soils, ours are on the short side, usually not exceeding a foot or two. The flowers 
are not conspicuous, owing to the small ray flowers; the flower heads are sessile (stemless) or on short 
stalks. Narrow leaves are rather crowded on the stout stems of bristly, hairy, sticky plants. You will be 
best able to recognize these plants by their "tar," strong-smelling, very sticky secretions from yellow to 
black glands. 

Join us in removing weeds and improving habitat for tarweed and other native species at Bernal Hilltop 
Native Grassland Restoration work parties 1 1 a.m. on the third Sunday of each month. Call me at 282- 
5066 for details. 

Correction: Last month I told you about the reintroduction of Bernal 's "farewell-to-spring. " I called 
it Clarkia amoena, but the correct current botanical name is Clarkia rubicunda. Sorry for the confusion! 



ROCK and ROSE 
LANDSCAPING 



Planting 
Irrigation 
Carpentry 
Stonework 




Design 
Installation 
Maintenance 
Consultation 



Garden Craftsmanship 
DREAM A LITTLE DREAM... 

A COLORFUL GARDEN AN EDIBLE GARDEN 

A CHILD'S GARDEN AN HERB GARDEN 

A ROOFTOP GARDEN A FRAGRANT GARDEN 

A SHADE GARDEN A ROCK GARDEN 

A CUT-FLOWER GARDEN A WATER-WISE GARDEN 

FOR THE GARDEN 
OF YOUR DREAMS, CALL: 

824-3458 

Mike Boss, Botanist, Contr. Lie. #562817 
1615 Cortland Avenue, SF, CA 941 10 



Gardening on the Kill 

Vegetables to Plant in August 

By Rose Blum 

Because of our colder than usually "summer" in the City, many 
Bernal gardeners have told me that their vegetable gardens have not 
produced as well this year. Well, take heart and take advantage of 
the gray skies to plant cool weather loving veggies now. 

Lettuce: Leaf lettuces are more tolerant of both cold and hot 
water than are head types and are therefore the preferred choice of 
gardeners in our fickle San Francisco weather. Another advantage 
of leaf lettuces is that you can continually harvest the outer leaves 
without removing the entire plant. Plant leaf type lettuce 6 inches 
apart and protect them with shade during very hot weather (it does 
happen a couple a times a year in San Francisco !) which causes them 
to go to seed quite rapidly. 

Peas: Since their production time is short and not as bountiful as 
other vegetables, chose the edible pod types to enjoy the delicious, 
sweet pods too 
peas themselves, 
peas require 
trellis for best 
which will also 
aesthetic touch 
The roots of your 
very sensitive, 
plant the seeds 
ground instead 
ing. Plant 2 
and 2 inches 




and not just the 
Vine types of 
staking or a 
production, 
add a lovely 
to your garden, 
pea plants are 
so it is best to 
directly in the 
of transplant- 
inches deep 
apart. 

Spinach: August is the month that begins the growing season for 
spinach on the hill. Plant spinach 1 inch apart and thin to 3 inches 
when plants are 3 inches tall. Keep on planting up to February for 
regular harvests. 

Beets: Soak seeds in water a day before planting, to help germi- 
nation. Sow in moistened soil, 1 inch apart and later thin to 3 inches. 

Cabbage: Set transplants deep, close to the first leaves, 2 feet 
apart. Cabbages love water, so provide them with abundant amounts. 

Take care when transplanting 

Many gardeners purchase vegetable plants from nurseries to help 
to ensure success. Started plants are commonly sold in "Six Packs" 
or 4" containers. Be sure to chose these carefully, selecting only the 
healthy looking plants that do not have weak, faded leaves from lack 
of water or insect infestation. Also look under the plant's container 
to see if its roots are crawling through the drain holes, indicating that 
the plant has sat on the shelves too long. Find out when your nursery 
will receive their shipments of new stock for the best and most 
healthiest selections. 

Although blooms on a vegetable plant are attractive and look to 
promise immediate produce, try to select plants that have not yet 
gone to bloom. Your new transplants need to develop strong roots 
systems firmly in your garden bed before they begin producing 
blooms, which take a lot of energy from a young plant. It may be 
hard to do psychologically, but you should pinch off these blooms 
in order to allow your plant to concentrate on building a strong 
foundation first to ensure a bountiful harvest later. 



Bernal Concerns 

7... 



• A left hand-turn signal 
eastbound on Alemany Boulevard 
onto Putnam Street. 

• A stop light at the corner of 
Mission Street and Highland Street. 

• Signs on Bernal Hilltop for "No 
Dog Poop." 

• More public trash receptacles 
on Cortland Avenue, as well as the 
rest of the hill. 

• Repaving the 300 through 700 
blocks of Gates Street. 

For a complete list of concerns, 
call Jess Dugan at the Bernal 
Heights Neighborhood Center, 206- 
2140, and also feel free to call the 



representatives listed above. We 
encourage you to also add to the 
list. We will publish all the accom- 
plishments from our town meet- 
ing in the October/November '94 
issue of the New Bernal Journal 
along with the work not completed 
or addressed by the city. The re- 
sponse from the city representa- 
tives at the meeting was very posi- 
tive, and we look forward to see- 
ing results in the coming months. 

Special mention of appreciation 
goes to Patty Fasano, our outreach 
chair, who moderated the meet- 
ing, and to Charles Bolton, co- 
chair of the Northwest Bernal 
Block Club, who participated on 
the panel as a neighborhood advo- 
cate.* 




handmade. 
Sandals & 
Shoes 

Custom Fit, 
Unlimited Styles 

David Rogers 826-5089 
813 Cortland Ave., SF, CA 



New Bernal Journal, August/September '94 I 



Plastics Recycling - 
What's The Real Story? 



By David Assmann, 
Public Outreach Coordinator, San Francisco Recycling Program 



"My plastic container has a recycling 
arrow on the bottom, so why won't the 
recycling collectors accept it?" This is one 
of the questions the San Francisco Recy- 
cling Program gets asked frequently. To 
answer this question, we need to look at 
how plastics are made and how they are 
recycled. 

One-third of all plastic is used for items 
with a lifespan of less than one year. We 
now use more than 1 billion barrels of oil 
a year just to make plastics. The largest 
single use for plastic is for packaging, with 
a significant percentage being used for 
"convenience" packaging. In fact, we now 
spending more for packaging our food 
than farmers receive in net income. 

Today there are 200 different plastic 
resins, but most consumer products made 
from plastic fall into one of 6 different 
categories. These six resins, #1 - Polyeth- 
ylene Terephthalate (PET), #2 - High Den- 
sity (HDPE), #3 - Polyvinyl Chloride 
(PVC), #4 - Low Density Polyethylene 
(LDPE), #5 - Polypropylene (PP) and #6 - 
Polystyrene (PS) are all manufactured us- 
ing different processes and cannot be mixed 
together and recycled. So, for example, if 
one shampoo bottle is included with a load 
of soda bottles, it could contaminate the 
whole load and make it unrecyclable. 

The Society for the Plastics Industry 
came up with a labeling system for plastics 
a number of years ago. This system, which 
uses the above numbers (from 1 to 7) 
surrounded by recycling arrows, was de- 
signed to identify the different types of 
plastic resins so that they could be more 
easily recycled when recycling system 
came into place. 

However, even though most plastics are 



technically recyclable, the recycling infra- 
structure for plastics is in its infancy. Less 
than 3 percent of the 60 billion pounds of 
plastic produced every year are actually 
recycled. And although plastics made up a 
minute percentage of the waste stream in 
1 960, by 1 992, plastics occupied more than 
20% of landfill space nationwide. This 
percentage is continuing to grow, and the 
Environmental Protection Agency esti- 
mates that a quarter of our garbage will be 
plastic by the turn of the century. 

As a result of this low recycling rate, and 
lack of recycling facilities for plastic, envi- 
ronmentalists and recyclers have been pres- 
suring the plastics industry to change their 
recycling symbols, arguing that the sym- 
bols mislead the public into believing that 
plastics are easily recyclable. 

How does that relate to what's recy- 
clable in San Francisco? Well, the highest 
recycling rate for aplastic resin is 24% - for 
PET (#1) plastic. A combination of factors 
(including the California redemption value 
given to plastic 2-liter soda bottles) have 
resulted in a reasonable market for this 
kind of plastic. That's why we can accept 
#1 plastic two-liter soda bottles in our 
recycling program citywide. However, 
since there's not a well established market 
for many of the other plastic resins (four of 
the six resins have a recycling rate of less 
than 1%), we currently can't accept any 
other kinds of plastic. 

If market conditions improve the San 
Francisco Recycling Program will be able 
to accept other kinds of plastics. But until 
that happens, if you have the choice be- 
tween plastic and an alternative recyclable 
material (like glass), choose the recyclable 
material. • 



St Luke's 
neighborhood clinic 

We treat you 
like family 

Low Cost Medical Care 

• Medical clinic for children 
and adults 

• Low cost sliding fee scale for 
patients with no health 
insurance 

• Medi-Cal and Medicare 
welcome 

Special Services for Women 

• Offering a full range of health services for women 
• Free pregnancy testing 

• Free pregnancy education classes for Medi-Cal patients 
• Free referrals to private doctors at St. Luke's 

Helping with Medi-Cal 

If you are a patient at the Neighborhood Clinic, we can help you 
get Medi-Cal benefits. 

Call Today for an Appointment 

Same day appointments may be available. Most appointments 
within one week of calling. 

Call (415) 641-6500 to make an appointment 

Se Habla Espanol 




Geographical History of the Hill 

Moonlighting Soldiers Named Bernal's Streets 

By Ed Roper 

This is the second of a three part series exploring the geography and origins of 
Bernal Heights and its streets. 

Many of the streets in the greater Mission, and particularly in Bernal Heights, were 
named and surveyed by "moonlighting" junior engineer officers from the Presidio 
Army Base. 

In naming the streets, the engineers chose the names of battles and military officers 
from five different wars fought in America. One lowly corporal with De Anza's 
troop, Gabriel Peralta, crashed this "officer's club" on the hill. 

Major Robert Anderson (1805-1871) was in command of a garrison of only 75 
men at Fort Sumter in Charleston, S.C., when the opening battle of the Civil War 
began. Anderson's pleas a month earlier for increased troops and supplies were 
denied. Prior to 1909, Anderson Street's name was Kosciuszko, for the Polish 
volunteer General Thadeus K. who fought in the Revolution. 

Horatio Gates 
American Revolu- 




(1727-1806), an 
tion general was 
He joined the 
Revolutionary 
was also part of an 
Washington as 
Chief. 

Prentiss Banks 
politician and a 
the Civil War, was 
Mass. Defeated at 
Stonewall Jack- 



born in England, 
colonists when the 
Wars began. He 
intrigue to remove 
Commander-in- 
Nathaniel 
(1816-1894), a 
Major General in 
born in Waltham, 
Fort Royal by 

son, and again by Jackson at the second battle of Bull Run, Banks later aided Grant 
in the opening up of the Mississippi River at Fort Hudson. 

Bennington, Vermont, was chartered as a town in 1749. In 1777, British General 
John Burgoyne sent a column of Hessians to raid Bennington, but they were badly 
beaten by Nathan Hale's Green Mountain Boys, one of the first victories for the 
colonists in the war. 

Bonview Street was originally named Buena Vista, a battle in 1846 during the 
Mexican-American War. Elsie and Winfield Streets were also originally named for 
battles of this war, Cherubusco and Chapultepec respectively, where Winfield Scott 
prevailed as the victorious general. • 

Ed Roper has taught social studies for over 30 years in the city's public school 
system. He continues to research and study the history and geography of the city's 
streets and neighborhoods. 



Conserving Resources Means More 
Than Putting Out Your Recycling 



Move Beyond Curbside & Apartment Recycling By: 



SOURCE REDUCTION: 

The first of the three R's is reduce. To find 
out how you can use fewer resources when 
you shop, call 554-6193 and leave your 
name and address. We'll mail you, free of 
charge, a copy of The Environmental Shop- 
ping Guide, a San Francisco Recycling 
Program guide to keeping the environment 
in mind when you shop. 

BUYING RECYCLED PRODUCTS: 

Close the recycling loop by buying prod- 
ucts made from recycled materials. To find 
out where you can buy products made 
from recycled materials in San Francisco, 
call 554-6193 and leave your name and ad- 
dress. We'll mail you, free of charge, a 
copy of Recycled Products in San Fran- 
cisco, a guide to buying recycled products, 
published by Sustainable City. 

COMPOSTING: 

Composting is nature's way of recycling. 
Compost your food scraps in a compost 
bin, or if you live in an apartment building, 
in a worm bin. Don't know if composting is 
for you? Come to a free Composting Work- 
shop at the Garden for the Environment, at 
7th and Lawton in the Sunset District. 
There will be three composting workshops 
in August - August 13, 21 and 27th. Call 
285-7584 for information. 



San Francisco 





RECYCLING 



PROGRAM 



1 145 Market St. #401 
San Francisco, CA 94103 



18 



New Bernal Journal, August/September '94 






I 

Theraputic Massage 




Stress Reduction 




Have TableWill Travel 


James Rich 


(415) 282-T544 


Certified Massage Th 


erapist Page 202-9306 



TELEPHONE TECHNICIAN Co. 
Telephone Installation 



• Home/Business 

• Interior Wiring 

• Phone Systems 




415/824 -7122 'igBp 



BERN AL_ HEIGHTS RESIDENT SINCE 1974 

Jeannine R. Reininger, Associate 
(Res.) (415 ) 285-9186 

601 Van Ness Ave. E-3101 
San Francisco, CA 94102 




AMBER 
REALTY 



999C Edgewater Bl., Ste. #109 
Foster City, CA 94404 

Office Phone (415) 571-0399 



Bcmal Library News 



By Dorothy Coaktey, Children's librarian 



A Gift To The Bernal library . . . 



The Bernal Heights Branch has a large paperback collection of children's books dedicated in honor of 
individuals. Every day young browsers leaf through our collection and check out books purchased in 
honor of individuals. 

Books purchased to remember the lives, marriages, anniversaries, births or other special moments of 
honorees are all stamped with an insignia that bears the inscription "a gift to the Bernal Heights Library." 
These loved but dog-eared copies reflect the dedication of our patrons to their branch. They also provide 
a lasting tribute to people who have themselves, shared their talents generously with the community. 

In Honor Of Nicole White "Kid 




Nicole White (far left) with her fellow Kid Power participants at the 
Bernal Library in 1988. 



Power Volunteer." In the summer of 
1988 at the age of ten, Nicole White was 
one of twenty Kid Power volunteers at 
the library. She was a popular child who 
always smiled. Nicole became the group 
secretary after a spirited election and 
logged countless hours patiently help- 
ing younger children get summer read- 
ing prizes. She visited the library through 
the years, as calm and sunny as she had 
been as a small child. When a car acci- 
dent claimed her this year, many of her 
teenaged friends added books in her 
name to our collection. 

In Gratitude To Dr. Bill Eisman. A 
children's dentist, who founded a den- 
tal clinic in Vietnam, Bill was an active 
patron at our branch until he was fatally 
injured in a fall from a ladder. He ar- 
ranged for a display of Vietnamese 



children's art work, generously provided paper and art supplies for the children's activities and donated 
a Wednesday night program to the library. Active in providing medical supplies to El Salvador, Bill often 
said "Don't you dare say I am retired, I'm working harder now than I ever have!" 

To Remember Mark Turner, Origami Expert. Mark brought the Bay Area Folders to the Bernal Heights 
Branch, where they continue to meet once a month. He made his skill available to young origami folders, 
and conducted a special class for children one winter at the library. He provided a rotating exhibit of 
origami in the foyer of the branch and had recently published a book on paperfolding, when he succumbed 
to a debilitating illness. 

In Memory of Angus Mackenzie, Journalist. Angus Mackenzie was a founding member of the Center 
for Investigative Reporting. An amazing collection of newspaper clippings, files, data, alternative press 
material and information, the Center continues to be a primary resource for journalists seeking background 
information for newspaper articles and books. Angus shared his expertise freely with the Bernal Heights 
Library. His wife is currently preparing to write his biography. 

Like each of the people memorialized in this article, our children's paperback collection dedications 
acknowledges the special attributes of each member of our Bernal Heights community. Nicole, Bill, Mark, 
Angus...weTl always remember you. 



Battle's not over for 
Bernal Library 



By Ellen Egbert, Save the 
Bernal Library Committee 
Although voters passed Propo- 
sition E in June, the Bernal Branch 
Library will not automatically gain 
more "open hours" when new li- 
brary schedules become effective 
in January, 1995. 

Proposition E, the Library Pres- 
ervation Fund, amended the City 
Charter to ensure that the city sets 
aside 2 1/2 cents for each $100 of 
assessed property value tax col- 
lected each year. The passing of 
Proposition E promised increased 
hours at branch libraries which 
would, however, be determined 
on a city-wide basis. This could 



mean that some branches would 
receive more hours while others 
could stay the same or even have 
their current open hours reduced. 

Revised library schedules will 
be determined by the Library Com- 
mission based primarily on their 
perception of community need and 
desire. Branch surveys that are 
currently nearing completion. The 
Commission will also hold meet- 
ings in late August or September at 
each branch to hear from commu- 
nity members. It is important that 
residents from Bernal Heights at- 
tend our meeting to ensure that our 
branch does not get lost in a re- 
scheduling shuffle: 



1) Watch for an announcement 
of the date and time of the commu- 
nity meeting to be held at the Bernal 
Branch Library; 

2) Attend this meeting and use 
your community spirit and enthu- 
siasm to show how important the 
Bernal Library is to you; 

3) Speak up at the meeting to let 
the Library Commissioners know 
that the Bernal Heights community 
supports and uses its branch. Tell 
them that we need more open hours 
and tell them why; 

4) Use your Bernal Branch Li- 
brary and use it often! Circulation 
statistics can play a major role in 
determining which branches re- 
ceive more or less open hours. 

For more information, visit the 
library, come to the Save the Bernal 
Library Committee meeting tenta- 
tively planned for Monday, Au- 
gust 29,at 7:00 p.m. in the library 
or call me at 824-8925. 



ifc D U T7 |] 50 Point Safety Inspection^ 

! 1 JX. Lm Lm I With every 32499 O" Change g*j£ . Up (o 5 quar(s o[ , [ 

i i srvfm m sewa* * i Most cars • Toxic waste disposal and tax extra ...... 



Lubricate chassis 



CALirCCNIA 

Autc 
Repair 



CALL FOR AN 
APPOINTMENT 
TODAY! 



5502600 

1525 Cortland Avenue 

San Francisco, Near BayshoreBlvd. 

Monday - Friday, 8:00 - 5:00, Saturdays by appointment 



New Bernal Journal, August/September '94 



19 



Bernal Calendar 



Hillwide Garage Sale 

Saturday, August 13, 9:00 - -3:00 p.m. 
Bernal Heights will be a garage sale lovers 
dream as over 30 households participate 
throughout the hill in this sale to benefit 
Bernal Heights Senior Services. For a free 
map, send a S.A.S.E. before 8/10/94 or 
drop by the Neighborhood Center at 515 
Cortland Avenue. 206-2145. 

Latin American Music 
at the Library 

Saturday, August 13, 2:00 p.m. The Bernal 
Branch Library invites neighbors to a free 
performance of Latin American Music, 
exuberantly performed by "Colibri." 500 
Cortland Avenue. 695-5160. 

Literature for Kids 

Tuesday, August 16, 2:00 p.m. Children 3 
years and older are welcome to participate 
in "Word-for-Word," a special literature 
program for kids at the Bernal Branch 
Library. 500 Cortland Avenue. 695-5160. 

YMCA Flea Market 

Saturday, August 20, 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 
p.m. If you are a bargain hunter and enjoy 
searching for unique treasures then don't 
miss this sale ast the Mission YMCA. 
Table rentals space available for $10.00. 
4080 Mission Street near Silver Avenue. 
586-6900. 

Community Health 
Education Talks 

Saturdays, 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. St. 
Luke's Hospital invites you to come to 
their free Community Education Programs 
each month. The August 20 presentation is 
"Nose Woes II: Treating Allergies," Sep- 
tember 10 is "Women & Heart Disease," 
and September 17 is "Preparing for a 



Healthier Pregnancy." To register call 
821-DOCS (821-3627). 

Filipino Barrio 
Fiesta Dinner 

Friday, August 26, 6:00 - 9:00p.m. Enjoy 
folk dance, song and food at the Filipino 
Barrio Festival Dinner. A cultural and 
fundraising dinner to benefit Bernal 
Heights Senior Services. Tickets: $10/ 
adults, $5/seniors or youth. 515 Cortland 
Avenue. 206-2145. 

Dining Out, Helping Out 

Tuesday, September 20. Many of the 
city's top restaurants will be taking a bite 
out of hunger by donating 10 percent of 
this day's proceeds to the San Francisco 
Food Bank, which helps feed the hungry. 
Giribaldi Cafe, Pizzeria Uno and Scott's 
are just a few of the participants. For a list 
of participating restaurants call 1-800- 
200 DINE. 

Miraloma Open House 

Sunday, September 25, 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 
p.m. Meet Miraloma Nursery's teachers, 
parents and children during an open house 
in their "little red school house." Dis- 
cover a wide range of activities for chil- 
dren 2.9 to 5 years of age at this parent- 
run cooperative. 443 Foerster Street, one 
block north of Monterey Boulevard. 585- 
6789. 

Senior Birthday 
Party & Dance 

Monday, September 26, 10:00 a.m.-2:00 
p.m. Folks 60 years and better are invited 
to dance to live music and celebrate the 
birthdays of the month. Admission is 
free, $1.25 donation for a hot lunch. St. 
Kevin's Hall, Ellsworth off Cortland. 
Bernal Heights Seniors, 206-2145. 



Astro Rap 



By Jessica Murray 



The planet Pluto makes a station on August 5th, and power will be in the air. 

This tiny, distant planet stands for the most intense forms 
of power imaginable: particularly the forms we cannot see. 
Thus it is that Pluto, named for the god of the Underworld, 
governs the very powers we would just as soon not see. 
Pluto rules underground missile silos, volcanoes, under- 
ground crime, and the myriad repressions of human sexu- 
ality. 

When Pluto is strong in the sky, as it will be the first week 
of August, whatever power plays we have going will move 
from covert to overt. 
Individuals with planets or angles in the latter degrees of 
fixed signs will be strongly affected. 
Jessica Murray is available for consulation at Lodestar Books, 864-3746, and 
at her office: 626-7795 




nXffany s 

2TOE WHMIES(§5 SFIEIITS 

A WOMAN-OWNED BUSINESS SINCE 1976 

A Cozy Wine 
Shop in the 
Glen Park Village 

Our Specialty: 
_ _ _ _ _ The best wines we can 

rMentionthisacTl find for $4 99 to $6 99 
! andset „ . , , 

10% off • 15% off wine by the case 

0 • We also carry beer, spirits & sake 

\_a Mtle^ojwine! | 

Open everyday 10am - 8pm, Fri. & Sat. to 9pm 

678 CHENERY STREET 

(415) 587-2649 • San Francisco 




Call the 



SHAGLEYS 



for 



REAL ESTATE 

Your Bernal Heights Professional Realtor 
14 YEARS OF REAL ESTATE EXPERIENCE 





Car en Shagley 
415/474-1845 x287 



Earl Shagley 
415/863-7500x156 




<SHANTA 

CARPENTRY 
& CONSTRUCTION 

Since 1974 
£k remodeling 
.A kitchens 7 baths 
A elec. I plumbing 
A Victorian restor 
A repair I dry rot 
A additions 

Lie. No. 442S70 



foundation to finish 



821 -4091 





I New Bernal Journal, August/September '94 




SUPER 



I 



820 CORTLAND AVENUE, S.F. 



GROCERIES 




DOVE 
LIQUID 
DETERGENT 


MARIETTAS 

LEMON, DUPLEX, PEANUT 
BUTTER, VANILLA CREAM 
COOKIES 

32 OZ 

$1.99 


ALHAMBRA 
DRINKING WA- 
TER 

GALLON 

790 


UULla llCKa 

10 PK. FRUIT FLA- 
VORED DRINKS 

990 


BONNffi 
HUBBARD 

TOMATO 
SAUCE 

8 OZ CANS 

5/$1.00 


BERKELEY FARMS 
MILK 

GAL.. HOMO OR VITA 

$2.49 

BUTTER i# cubed 

990 


GAMESA 

DELUXE 
ASSORTMENT 

COOKIES 

ASST. , 28.2 OZ PKG. 

$4.99 


SANI-CAT 
PREMIUM 
LITTER 

10# BAG 

$1.49 


C & H 

SUGAR 

5# BAG 

$1.89 


STAR KIST 

TUNA 

OIL OR WATER, 6.5 OZ. 

790 


BIGELOW TEA 

ALL FLAVORS 

20 CT. BOX 

$1.75 


TREETOP 
APPLE 
JUICE 

. 64 OZ. 

$1.69 


PURE-N-GENTLE 
BABY WIPES 

$2.49 

REFILLS 

$2.19 


JARRITOS 

SODA DRINKS 
FROM MEXICO 
2LTR. ALL FLAVORS 


LAURA 
SCHUDDERS 
POTATO CfflPS 

TWIN PACK 

990 


ORCHARDS 
COCONUT MILK 

990,„ z 

MANDARIN SEGMENTS 

890ii oz. 


FRISKIES 
CAT FOOD 

BUFFET SIZE 

3/$1.00 


OLSON 
LARGE EGGS 

18 PACK 

$1.39 

12 PACK 

.990 






FRESH PRODUCE 



MANGOES 


3/S1.00 


TOMATOES 


290/lb 


POTATOES o#bag 


990each 


ORANGES 


4lb/$1.00 


ONIONS YELLOW, DRY 


5lb/$1.00 


LETTUCE 


390/each 


CANTELOUPES 3/$ 1.00 



USE YOUR VISA, MASTERCARD OR ATM CARD 



VISA 




EXPLORE'! 



New Store Hours! 
Open 7 Days a Week, 7:00 am - 9:00 pm 

Groceries: 648-4656, Meat Department: 648-4657 



MBBBR meats 



$.79/lb 

DRUMSTICKS value pack $.99/lb 



WHOLE FRYERS 

PICNIC PACK THIGHS & 




GROUND CHUCK 

FAMLLY PACK $ 1 .29/LB 



NY STEAKS $2.99/LB 
T-BONE OR PORTER HOUSE 



STEAKS 

SIRLOIN TD? STEAKS 
PRIME RIB STEAK 
MARKET STEAK 




$3.99/LB 
$2.99/LB 
$5.29/LB 

$4.99/lb 



PORK CHOPS - CENTER CUT 
PORK NECK BONES 
PIGSFEET 

MEXICAN CHORIZO- our own $2.99/LB 
PORK SAUSAGE - our own $1.79/LB 



$2.69/LB 
490/LB 
490/LB 



PORK SPARE RIBS $1.29/LB 



BEFF BACK RIBS $.89/LB 



LIQUOR 



KORBEL BRANDY 750 ml 

$7.99 LESS $3.00 MAIL IN COUPON = $4.99 

ROYAL GATE VODKA liter $6.29 

BRUGAL DOMINICAN RUM, LITER $9.99 

SEAGRAM 7 LITER $10.99 
MARTELL fine cognac liter $20.99 
JIM BEAM BOURBON liter $9.99 

RANAL NAPOLEAN FRENCH BRANDY, LTR $12.99 



WHITE HORSE 

SCOTCH 750 ML 



$9.98 



WINE 




A UGUST SEBASTANI 

PROPRIETORS COUNTRY 750 ml $7.99 
SUTTERHOME WINES 750 ml $4.99 
BEL ARBORS WINES 750 ml $4.39 
FETZER PREMIUM red or white 1.5 lt. $6.99 



BEER 



BUDWEISERi2 OZ i2PK 

$6.99 LESS $3.00 matl in coupon = 


$3.99 +C rv 


PETE'S WICKED ALE OR LAGER 

12 OZ BOTTLES, 6 PK $5.99+CRV • 22 OZ $1.99+CRV 


MOOSEHEAD import j 

12 OZ BOTTLES, 6 PK 5 


S 


^CRV 



V\\\\ Ihi' < jlil'ipfni;! 



PRICKS KFFKCTIVE THKOU(;H 8/14/94 

MANY MORE SPECIALS THROUGHOUT STORE! 

WL ARli NO'I" RESPONSIBLE I -'OR PRINTING ERRORS 






CORTLAND 


AVENUE 




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