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KEEPING YOUR 
ENGINE COOL J 


* - 


Step-by-step guide to servicing 
your cooling system 


TESTED 

TENSION GAUGES 

DIY rig tweaks with 
repeatable results 

PLUS Flip-down 
dinghy wheels 


Cure for a cracked 
encapsulated keel 


Fixing up an old car 
engine as a spare 


Making a safe space in 
a tender for a toddler 

PLUS How Mini Transat 
racers influence cruising 


-s 






trw 


. i* 




MOORING UNDER SAIL 

Tips, tricks and techniques 


INNOVATIVE LIFTING KEEL 

Practical improvements to a gaff cutter 





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A Passion for Sailing 







® Contents 


Welcome to the April 2016 issue 


REGULARS 


5 Waiting for the tide 

The editor’s welcome to this month’s PBO 

6 News 

Storm Imogen batters parts of Britain, PBO 
Project Boat winner announced... and more 

10 Regional news 

Improvements to Ros an Mhfl Harbour, 
Carbost facilities boost... and more 


20 How Mini Transat racers 
influence cruising 

Fresh ideas from the cutting edge 

61 Innovative lifting keel 

Practical improvements to a gaff cutter 

28 Mooring under sail 

Tips, tricks and techniques 



MAINTENANCE • PROJECTS • GEAR REVIEWS • SEAMANSHIP • CRUISING 


TESTED 


radical g 4% 

oat Owner. 


KEEPING YOUR 
ENGINE COOLl 


Cure for a cracked 
encapsulated keel 


Step-by-step guide to servicing 
your cooling system 


TENSION GAUGES 

DIY rig tweaks with 
repeatable results 


Fixing up an old car 
engine as a spare 


Making a safe space in 
a tender for a toddler 


PLUS How Mini Transat 
racers influence cruising 


PLUS Flip-down 
dinghy wheels 


MOORING UNDER SAIL 

Tips, tricks and techniques 


INNOVATIVE LIFTING KEEL 

Practical improvements to a gaff cutter 


12 Readers' letters - your views 
14 Dave Selby 

Maldon becomes Tinseltown 

16 Sam Llewellyn 

It’s crane day in the yard 

18 Andrew Simpson 

Take care to guard your own 

86 Ask the experts 

Getting to the bottom of paint blisters, 
plus more reader queries answered 

91 PBO products and services 

Books and plans from the PBO Shop 



26 Flip-down dinghy wheels 

Which wheels are best suited to 
different types of terrain? 

53 New gear 

PBO looks at the latest marine products 

92 Rig tension gauges 

DIY rig tweaks with repeatable results 


■Ji mm 


74 Cure for a cracked 
encapsulated keel 

Repairing a split keel on an Albin Ballad 

70 Fixing up an old car 
engine as a boat spare 

Repurposing an old Maestro lump 

78 Retro-fitting spring cleats 

AND sorting out loose locker lids, 
plus more reader projects and tips 

82 Keeping your engine cool 

A step-by-step guide to servicing 
your cooling system 

90 A toddler-friendly dinghy 

Make a toddler-safe space in a dinghy 


60 More Sticky situations 

Seamanship tips from Sticky Stapylton 

80 A day I'll never remember 

A reader succumbs to transient 
global amnesia while at the helm 


tzmm 


66 Rhyl life 

Times are changing for this 
historic harbour in North Wales 

98 Cape of Storms 

200 miles from Cape Town, a reader prays 
for a change in wind strength or direction 


2016 

Marina 

Price 

Guide 

Costs and 
facilities 
near you - 
see page 34 


The 2016 


Marina Price GuiriP 


British Isles. Listings compiled by StohSSS and' R 

&■» 




96 Budget dinghy repairs 

Transforming a neglected, rotting, 12ft sailing 
dinghy into a perfectly safe and serviceable craft 

110 Anchor locker design 

Hints and tips from the PBO Sketchbook 


Cover photo: Cascadeur, a Jeanneau Sun Voyager 




Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


3 










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CONTACT PBO EDITORIAL 

By email: pbo@timeinc.com 
Via our website: www.pbo.co.uk 
By post: PBO, Time Inc. (UK) Ltd, Westover House, 
West Quay Road, Poole, Dorset BH15 1 JG 
By phone tel: +44 (0)1202 440820 
By Fax: +44 (0)1202 440860 


Editor 
Editor’s PA 
Deputy Editor 
Art Editor 
Production Editor 
News Editor 
Contributing Editor 
Technical Illustrator 
Charts and maps 
Publishing Director 
Managing Director 


David Pugh 
Roz Jones 
Ben Meakins 
Kevin Slater 
Marco Rossi 
Laura Hodgetts 
Sarah Norbury 
Graham Smith 
Qrystof 
Simon Owen 
Oswin Grady 


Editorial 

Waiting for 
JP the tide 


with the editor 


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A projectless PBO: but not for long 


I t's been quite a busy month. In the 
aftermath of London Boat Show, 
it's been all hands to the pump to 
find our Project Boat Hantu Biru's 
new owner, a mere matter of 
processing several thousand 
competition entries filled in from the 
magazine, online or from the forms 
handed out at boat shows around the UK. 
We've had a tremendous response, and 
I'd like to thank all those readers who 
have taken such a lively interest in the 
project, visited us on the boat and made 
the 46 days the PBO team have spent 
standing at boat shows both interesting 
and enjoyable. During the competition, 
many of you made such convincing 
cases for winning the boat that we could 
have given her away many times over: 
by the end, we were grateful that a 
random number generator would make 
the final decision! 

But the wait is now 
over, and it's finally 
time for Hantu Biru to 
move on to her new home. And, I have to 
say, our concerns that the boat might be 
won by some serial competition enterer 
just itching to put this 'luxury yacht' on 
eBay, proved ultimately unfounded. We 
couldn't have asked for a more suitable 
winner in Anna Millington, the lucky 
young lady whom fate chose to be the 
new owner of what must be the smartest 
Snapdragon 23 afloat. 

You can read her story in full on page 6, 
but, in short, Anna and her partner 
Andrew have been enjoying the water 
for the past couple of years on board a 
Fletcher 19 powerboat. They recently 
decided that sailing was more their style, 
and had decided to sell their existing 
boat and fund a mid-20ft sailing boat 
with the proceeds when Anna saw 
Hantu Biru at Southampton and entered 
the competition on the off-chance that 
she might win. If you ever needed a 
definition for serendipity, this is it. 

We met Anna and Andrew a few days 


after the competition was drawn, and it 
was a great vindication of the four years' 
work we have put into the boat to see 
someone so enthusiastic to make use of 
her. So enthusiastic, in fact, that Ben 
Meakins and I will be towing Hantu Biru 
to Southampton this week for her first 
launch in new hands - at least a month 
earlier than most boats will manage! 

We'll be catching up with Anna and 
Andrew later in the year, but I wish them 
a fun-filled season, and formally forgive 
them if they scratch the paint - so long 
as it's not too much! 

Meanwhile, we're temporarily 
projectless. It's not a situation which can 
last - your interest in Hantu Biru has made 
that clear and, to be honest, neither Ben 
nor I are that good at sitting at a desk 
when there's a chance of getting our 
hands dirty on some boat work. The only 
question, of course, is 
'what next?' On that, 
however, I'll have to 
remain silent a little 
longer, but suffice to say that we're most 
of the way to negotiating a very different 
project, but one which we think will be 
every bit as engaging. I'll say no more for 
now, but next month I hope to be able to 
announce Hantu Biru's successor. 

In the meantime, in company with most 
other practical boat owners, we're working 
hard getting our own boats ready for the 
season, and setting some time aside to get 
ahead with some of the more demanding 
equipment tests and seamanship articles 
we have planned for 2016. 

All this to come, but for now I hope you 
enjoy this issue. Our annual Marina Price 
Guide gives you an at-a-glance reference 
to find the best-value berthing in your 
area, while elsewhere in the magazine 
we're tackling keel repairs, top-overhauls 
for engines, and tools to help tweak your 
rig. And, my personal favourite, Will 
Steynor's onboard innovations on page 61. 

Fair winds, 

David Pugh 


PBO is also available on these digital platforms 

kindle fire NOOK 


It’s time for Hantu Biru to 
move on to her new home 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


5 







SEND US YOUR 5T0RIES 

Email news editor Laura Hodgetts at 
newspbo@timeinc.com, tel: 01202440825 


News and current affairs from the world of boating 






w 

And the winner of the 
PBO Project Boat is... 


Universal Yachting in 
Southampton. They’ve also been 
kitted out with polo shirts, JB01 
deck trainers and jacket tops 
thanks to Adidas Sailing. 

Anna and Andrew plan to 
berth Hantu Biru at Town Quay, 
Southampton. Anna said: 
‘Everything is working out 
amazingly. There probably isn’t 
another boat in the country that’s 
had as much work done on it or 
so many pages written about it 
as Hantu Biru. I’ll be happy if 
people recognise her, I’m always 
happy to talk about boats.’ 

‘Super-excited’ 

She added: ‘ Hantu Biru is 
palatial by comparison to our 
little speedboat: she’s exactly 
what we were after. Our favourite 
place to go is Osborne Bay, 
where we usually travel up the 
river by stand-up paddleboard 
to the pub. We’re super-excited 
that Hantu Biru has a wind-up 
keel; we’ll be able to take her 
down Newtown River. I can’t 
believe I’ve won a boat. I’m 
so excited and so grateful to 
everyone who’s worked on her. I 
once won a cake at school, but 
this is a bit different.’ 

PBO editor David Pugh said: 

‘All of us at PBO are delighted 
that Hantu Biru is giving a young 
couple the chance to learn 
about and enjoy sailing. 

She’s the perfect boat for 
pottering around the creeks 
and anchorages of the Solent, 
and Anna and Andrew’s 
enthusiasm suggests that 
she’ll be getting plenty of use. 

‘We couldn’t have asked for 
a better outcome.’ 


exactly what we were after’ 


A knock on the head while surfing convinced 29-year-old 
Anna Millington that she was dreaming when she was 
later notified about winning the PBO Project Boat 


PBO Project Boat 
winner Anna Millington 
with her partner 
Andrew Ellison 


A nna Millington, an 
electronics engineer 
from Ferndown, Dorset, 
has won the PBO Project Boat, 
the Snapdragon 23 Hantu Biru. 
She had been following the 
boat’s restoration since 
becoming a PBO subscriber a 
year ago as a birthday present. 

The PBO Project Boat free 
prize draw attracted almost 
6,000 entries via magazine entry 
forms, online at pbo.co.uk and 
at the Southampton, Scotland 
and London boat shows. All the 
entries were added to a database 
by an independent company, and 
the winner was picked at random. 

Anna said she was ‘absolutely 
made up’ to win Hantu Biru after 
entering online, and can’t wait to 
learn to sail with her partner 
Andrew Ellison. She said: ‘For 


the last few years we’ve had a 
19ft Fletcher speedboat. We 
haven’t really done much sailing 
before, but the week before we 
found out I’d won, we’d decided 
we were going to sell our Fletcher 
and get a small cruising yacht: so 
the fact that I should get an email 
from PBO later that week to say 
I’d won Hantu Biru was a 
complete shock, I can’t believe 
the serendipity of it.’ 

She added: ‘I’d been surfing 
that morning and taken a knock 
to the head. I was a bit dazed and 
confused, and when I saw the 
email I ran in to see Andrew and 
he didn’t believe me at first. It’s 
only just sunk in.’ 

Anna said she had enjoyed 
dinghy sailing with her sister 
when she was younger. She said: 
‘Just being around this sailing 


lark appeals to Andrew and I so 
much, we really want to learn.’ 
Since winning Hantu Biru, 

Anna and Andrew have kindly 
been offered a half-price RYA 
Competent Crew course, by 


Anna, Andrew and Hantu Biru. ‘She’s 


6 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 




News 


DIY 

antifouling 

conference 

R epresentatives from the 
UK’s leading paint 
manufacturers, along with 
PBO, attended a meeting at 
the Southampton Hilton in 
early February to discuss the 
results of a comprehensive 
survey to study the DIY use 
of antifouling (AF) paints. 

Ahead of the possible 
implementation of EU regulations 
that could restrict the application 
and use of antifouling paints to 
professional applicators, the 
British Coatings Federation 
(BCF) commissioned a survey, 
which was completed by just 
under 2,500 boat owners. 

The survey confirmed that over 
90% of those surveyed are well 
aware of the hazards involved in 
the application of AF paints, and 
use the appropriate personal 
protective equipment. It also 
highlighted areas where 
improvements could be made, 
including provision of training 
courses, guidance on disposal 
of waste paint, and minimising 
the risks of skin contact with AF 
paint during its application. BCF 
members and interested parties 
discussed ways to proceed, with 
a strategic action plan to defend 
the continued use of AF paints 
by the DIY applicator. 

Watch this space, and go 
online at www.pbo.co.uk to find 
out how to continue safely 
applying antifouling yourself. 


PBO Ask the Experts LIVE! returns 
to the Beaulieu Boatjumble 



International Paint’s Kate Moss and Roger Bolton’s demonstration 
at PBO Ask the Experts LIVE! at last year’s Beaulieu Boatjumble 


P ractical Boat Owner 
magazine will once again 
be bringing a team of marine 
industry experts to Beaulieu 
Boatjumble for a day of 
free practical talks 
and demonstrations. 

Held on Sunday 24 April 
between 9am-5pm, within the 
grounds of Beaulieu Estate in 
Hampshire, the Boatjumble is the 
largest event of its kind in the UK 
and annually attracts thousands 
of bargain hunters. Following the 
success of last year’s inaugural 
PBO Ask the Experts LIVE! we will 
once again be hosting a large 
marquee close to the show’s main 
gate, where visitors can enjoy free 
practical demonstrations and 
talks, plus the chance to quiz the 
experts with boating questions. 

International Paint’s chemist 
Kate Moss will return to Experts 
LIVE! for a second year, this time 
to share her expertise on how to 
prep and apply varnish to boats. 
Kate said: ‘Last year’s event was a 
great success, with hundreds of 
people coming to get practical 
help on all aspects of painting 
their boat. 

The focus for the demonstration 
this year is varnishing, and we 
will be covering various topics - 
from surface preparation and old 
varnish removal, to application 
and repair techniques - as well 
as maintenance during the 
season. We look forward to 
seeing you there!’ 

Viking Life-Saving Equipment 


will be hosting a liferaft inflation 
demonstration, Paul Singer of 
British Marine South West will be 
sharing top tips and revealing 
the pitfalls of buying and selling 
boats, and Sika’s technical 
services expert Gareth Ross will 
demonstrate how to use sealants 
for bonding and waterproofing on 
board. Gareth said: ‘Last year’s 
event was a huge success for us, 
and we enjoyed a very positive 
response from those that attended 
and a huge amount of interest 
in our products and how to 
correctly apply them.’ 

An expert from Wessex Resins will 
demonstrate the safe and effective 
handling of epoxy products in the 
repair and fit-out of wood and 
glassfibre on your boat, and David 
Wells from South Devon College 


will show how tasty, inventive 
dishes can be prepared on just 
one or two gas burners in limited 
galley space. Meanwhile, Golden 
Arrow Marine’s Dave Hill will 
stage a practical demonstration 
on keeping diesel engines in 
tip-top shape, RNLI community 
safety resources and development 
coordinator Mike Hannam will 
hold a free lifejacket clinic, and 
PBO tester Alan Watson will 
offer his expertise about 
electronics on board. 

■ Visit www.pbo.co.uk/ 
expertslive for updates. 

Quote PB0MAG16 for 15% 
off boatjumble tickets. For 
further information about 
Beaulieu Boatjumble visit 
www.beaulieu.co.uk/ 
events/boatjumble. 


Storm Imogen batters parts of Britain 


A low-pressure system, 
named Storm Imogen, 
brought ‘phenomenal sea 
states’ off the south-west coast 
of Britain in early February. 

The Met Office issued an amber 
‘be prepared’ national severe 
weather warning for very strong 
winds on 8-9 February as Storm 
Imogen moved across southern 
England and South Wales. At 
sea, waves topped 16m (52ft 6in) 
and a wave of 1 9.1 m (63ft) was 
recorded off St Ives, the Met 
Office said. Fastnet lighthouse, 
off the south-west of County 
Cork, recorded sustained winds 
of up to 1 21 mph, and Met Office 
forecaster Emma Sillitoe said 
winds had hit 96mph at the 
Needles off the Isle of Wight. 


FI 

J 



One manifestation of the dramatic effects of Storm Imogen: a huge 
wave breaks over the pier behind Porthcawl RNLI 


Boat Register 
goes public 

T he Old Gaffers Association 
is opening up its online 
Boat Register to the public. 

The OGA has collected details 
on members’ boats for nearly 
50 years, with nearly 4,000 
boats in the archives. At present 
over 1 ,000 are visible, but only 
to logged-in members on the 
OGA website. With the exception 
of ownership details, these 
records will be available to the 
public after some modifications, 
and when members have been 
given the option to request that 
their boat is not made public. 
Extensive paper archives will be 
added to the online database. 

■ www.oga.org.uk 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


7 




£;?(} News 


‘Nine' lifeboat rescues is ‘grossly 
exaggerated’ says Nora skipper 


T he skipper of the American 
yacht Nora, who faced 
national condemnation for 
multiple encounters with British 
rescue services, says reports of 
‘nine rescues in seven months’ 
is ‘grossly exaggerated’. 

Steve Shapiro, aged 71 , says 
only three were emergency 
call-outs, and the rest were just 
friendly assistances by lifeboat 
volunteers passing by. Steve is 
on a voyage from Scandinavia to 
North America in the 1 2m (40ft) 
Colin Archer gaff cutter with crew 
Bob Weise, a retired lieutenant 
colonel army pilot - also in his 
70s. They have prompted lifeboat 
assistances in Norway, Scotland, 
Ireland and England since setting 
sail last July. 

Nora’s latest assistance, on 26 
January, occurred when the boat 
tipped over in low water at Hayle 
Harbour’s East Quay and an 
unattended candle reignited and 
set a pile of clothing alight. The 
blaze, which was extinguished by 
the fire service, caused ‘cosmetic 
damage’ to the boat. A week 
earlier, Nora had been towed into 
Hayle by St Ives RNLI lifeboat when 
‘the power suddenly stopped’ 
while leaving St Ives. 

Steve, who has been sailing 
since he was nine, said: ‘Only 
three of the rescues were really 
distress calls, and those were 
at the beginning of the journey, 
then we had things under 
control. Even if the boat 
was broken we 
could’ve fixed it, it’s 
very seaworthy.’ 

Steve added: ‘I don’t 
fault my seamanship, 
and there’s no way 
anyone else could. 

We were advised 

A 



Fire services attend to a clothing blaze on Nora in Hayle Harbour 



to keep in touch with the 
coastguard and to call for 
assistance. The rescuers are 
there for anybody without 
prejudice. They weren’t dangerous 
call-outs except for one in the 
North Sea: all the others didn’t 
demand anything more than 
routine training. I don’t make 
light of it, we’re very grateful 
for them being there, and I’m 
very appreciative.’ 

The rescues occurred off Norway 
when the boat began to leak in 
strong seas after it ran over fishing 
lines and the propeller shaft got 
caught, creating a hole; when 
approaching Wick, northern 
Scotland as they still had a ‘pretty 
bad leak’; and in the middle of 
the Moray Firth when the engine 
transmission failed. Lifeboat 
assistances took place when 
they ran aground going into 
Helmsdale, Scotland and at 
Red Bay, Northern Ireland, 
although in both cases 
they had to wait for 
the rising tide to 
float free. 


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‘A bad rap’ 

At Wicklow, meanwhile, they ran 
‘aground for a couple of seconds’ 
and a lifeboat assisted them 
alongside: and upon leaving 
Kilmore Quay en route for Land’s 
End, Nora struck a sandbar and a 
nearby lifeboat pulled her free, then 
‘happily escorted’ them out of the 
harbour. In St Ives, Cornwall, lifeboat 
volunteers assisted by tying Nora 
to a RNLI buoy. When leaving for 
Hayle, the yacht lost propulsion and 
was taken under tow. Steve said: 
‘Some articles have counted those 
as rescues. I think that’s a bad rap.’ 
In total, Steve says he and Bob 
had spent five months of their 
seven-month voyage enjoying ‘very 
pleasant sailing’. He admitted a lack 
of familiarity from buying a new boat 
didn’t help, and said Nora was ‘more 
worn than advertised. We’ve brought 
it up to date and made repairs.’ 

At the time of going to press, 
Steve and Bob were ‘waiting for 
clear weather’ to leave Hayle and 
continue their voyage to Maine, 
USA. Steve said: ‘I’m not trying to 
set records or have an adventure, 
I’m just sailing my boat home.’ 

‘Should be detained’ 

Peter Haddock, harbour master 
in Hayle where Nora is currently 
situated, believes the boat should 
be detained by the UK Coastguard. 
He said: ‘I’d be very surprised if 
they made it across the Atlantic, it’s 
been a disaster ever since they left 
Scandinavia. They’re oblivious to 
danger and to the problems they’ve 
created: it’s really frightening.’ 

A spokeswoman for the Maritime 
and Coastguard Agency said: ‘We 
have not been made aware of any 
grounds that would lead to 
detaining this vessel.’ 


Ocean 
Cruising 
Club award 
winners 
announced 


T he Ocean Cruising Club 
(OCC) has named the 
2015 winners of its awards, 
recognising outstanding 
achievements of blue 
water sailors. 



The top award, the Barton 
Cup, went to Michael Johnson, 
s/v Gitana, for his successful 
two-year transit of the 
Northwest Passage. Sailing 
from Chesapeake Bay, 

Virginia to Nome, Alaska, 
the passage took place in 
a particularly challenging 
period due to icy conditions. 


Michael Johnson, winner of the 
OCC’s top award, the Barton Cup 


The OCC Award of Merit 
was shared among multiple 
members and the OCC Port 
Officer Representative, who 
contributed exceptional efforts 
to assist the people of Vanuatu 
after the devastation caused 
by Hurricane Pam. The OCC 
Award went to Tom and Vicky 
Jackson, s/v Sunstone, for 
their many cruising and racing 
achievements, amounting to 
34 years and almost 200,000NM 
aboard their 12m (40ft), 
Sparkman & Stephens- 
designed, 50-year-old sloop. 

Australian doctor John 
Vallentine, s/v Tainui, scooped 
the Vasey Vase for interesting 
and challenging voyages over 
a 10-year period, during which 
he devoted half of each year 
providing medical services to 
remote Aboriginal outstations 
in the western Australian 
deserts, and the other half 
sailing mostly to cold climates 
and isolated locations. 

The OCC Seamanship Award 
recognized Bob and Mona 
Jankowski, s/v Continuum, for 
the heroic rescue of Randy and 
Dawn Ortiz from s/v Nirvana. 


8 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 




News ; j 


Two die in yacht capsize off 
the South African coast 



The yacht Tara was found broken up on the Western Cape shoreline 


Scottish man and an 
Irish woman died when 
their yacht capsized off the 
West Coast, Western Cape, 
South Africa. 

On 1 February, National Sea 
Rescue Institute (NSRI) crews 
were activated by the Transnet 
National Ports Authority (TNPA) 


Fairline’s 

future 

secured 

T he future of British-based 
boatbuilders Fairline Boats 
has been secured, thanks to a 
deal that sees the firm’s assets 
bought out of administration for 
an undisclosed sum. 

The new company, Fairline 
Yachts, is funded by two UK-based 
Russian investors, who are both 
experienced in managing and 
developing marine businesses 
and in the production of hi-tech 
products, IT and media services. 

Russell Currie has been 
appointed as managing director. 
A Fairline dealer since 1998, 
Russell is CEO of Fairline North 
Mallorca, where he has achieved 
more than £90million of sales. 

The new company will operate 
from its manufacturing facilities 
in Oundle, Northamptonshire, 
saving 1 00 jobs from the 450 
that were housed at three sites 
before its administration. 


following reports of a yacht 
capsized between Bokpunt and 
Gansekraal. The yacht Tara was 
found broken up amongst rocks 
on the shoreline. It is unknown 
what caused the yacht to run 
aground, and it could not be 
confirmed if it had capsized before 
running aground. The South 


T he first episode of the 
World Sailing Show 
has been broadcast. 

The new show will look at the 
past, present and future of sailing 
across the globe, from non-stop 
round-the-world racers to Olympic 
campaigners, and from seasoned 
professionals to grass-roots 
weekend warriors, with the 
latest action afloat. The first 
show explores how the world’s 
biggest trimaran, Spindrift 2, 
took three world records but 
narrowly missed out on the 
record the crew really wanted. 

It also visits the Sailing World 
Cup in Melbourne to report on 


African Maritime Safety Authority 
(SAMSA) will investigate. 

There were three crew members 
on board, reportedly sailing from 
Langebaan to Cape Town. A 
66-year-old Irishman, a resident 
in the Western Cape, had 
managed to get to shore and 
raised the alarm. He was 
uninjured. The bodies of a 
61 -year-old Scotsman and 
a 49-year-old Irishwoman, 
both residents in the Western 
Cape, were recovered from the 
scene. An inquest docket has 
been opened by police. 

A spokesman for Sea Rescue 
South Africa said: ‘Family are 
being assisted by foreign 
consulates, and sincerest 
condolences are expressed 
to family and friends by all 
emergency services involved 
in the operation.’ 


five sibling teams and catch up 
with the latest in the Paralympic 
classes, before heading to 
Malaysia to find out how Olympic 
aspirations are a family affair, 
while also taking a glimpse into 
the future at the Youth World 
Championships. The new head 
of World Sailing, Andy Hunt, also 
reveals what makes him tick. 

■ www.sailing.org/tv 


DIARY DATES 


■ Essex Boat Jumble, 28 

February, Ardleigh Showground, 
Ardleigh, near Colchester, C07 
7QR. Entry £4. 

■ RYA Suzuki Dinghy Show, 5-6 

March, Alexandra Palace, London, 
www.rya.org.uk 

■ Pre-Season Boat Show 
at Swanwick Marina, 

5-6 March, 10am-4pm, 
www.premiernnarinas.conn 

■ Kent Boat Jumble, 6 March, 

The Hop Farm, Paddock Wood, 
Tonbridge, Kent. TNI 2 6PY Entry £4. 

■ Peter Leonard Marine boat 
jumble and boat clearance sale, 
20 March from 9am, Newhaven, 
www.plmarine.com 

■ Fish & Ships, 9-10 April, 

Osprey Quay, Portland, with 
new and used boats for sale, 
watersports demonstrations, 
sailing opportunities and food 
stalls and musical entertainment, 
in aid of local charities. 

■ Irish Boat Jumble, 10 April 
2016, Carrickfergus Sailing 
Club, Rodger’s Quay, 

Carrickfergus, Co. Antrim, 
www.irishboatjumble.org 

■ West of Scotland Boat Jumble, 
1 May, opens 10am, 

Scottish Maritime Museum, 

The Harbourside, Irvine. 

Admission £4. Accompanied 
children and car parking free. 
www.wsbj.co.uk 

■ Beaulieu Boatjumble, 24 April, 
9am-5pm, www.beaulieu.co.uk/ 
events/boatjumble 

■ London On-Water Yacht & Boat 
Show, 4-7 May, Old Billingsgate 
and St Katharine Docks, London. 
New and used boats on display. 
www.londononwater.com 

■ Push The Boat Out, 1 4-22 May, 
UK-wide event with sailing clubs 
and venues offering discounted 
and free taster sessions, email 
ptbo@rya.org.uk 

■ Poole Harbour Boat Show, 
20-22 May, 

www.pooleharbourboatshow.co.uk 

Send your diary dates to pbo@ 
timeinc.com, see more online at 
www.pbo.co.uk/events 


www.pboxo.uk 


Visit the revamped PBO website to find more free practical content 
online than ever before. Plus breaking news, gear tests, seamanship 
advice, reader forums and your questions answered, www.pbo.co.uk 



World Sailing Show begins 




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Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


9 



3 Regional News 


MoiAIC Iffllll" miicina Zkl ail Send us your local news stories. Email PBO news editor Laura Hodgetts at 

IvwWb iron your WUIlMll | died newspbo@timeinc.com, tel: 01202 440825, or write to the address on page 5 



DEVASTATING BLAZE 

A large accidental fire at Medina 
Village industrial estate, Cowes 
destroyed 30 boats - including 
two classic yachts whose 
restorations were nearing 
completion. The explosive blaze 
started in a car repair workshop 
and swept through industrial and 
storage units on 25 January. 

Among the yachts lost were 
the Dunkirk Little Ship Vere, 

15 Etchell keelboats, seven 
XOD One Designs, five Dragon 
keelboats, the Mylne yacht 
Fedoa, which was being 
restored by Moreton Marine, 
and the Sibbick yacht Witch 
that was being restored by 
Martin Nott on the same 
premises. Site owner, the 
Harrison Trust, said Medina 
Village has reopened, and 
demolition work is under 
way to make the site safe. 


TALENT PROGRAMME 

The British America’s Cup challenger 
and its partner Land Rover have 
launched a talent programme to find 
and support young British sailors, 
and create a pathway into the 
America’s Cup. The first intake into 
the academy will see a squad of 12 
sailors competing in the Extreme 
Sailing Series, which takes high- 
speed catamaran sailing close to city 


centres all over the world and uses 
a foiling multihull, the GC32. 

Chosen from an ongoing selection 
policy, the academy sailors will have 
regatta costs paid for, access to 
expertise and facilities at Land Rover 
BAR’S Portsmouth headquarters, 
mentoring and support. Applicants 
need to be aged between 1 9 and 
24 on 31 December 2017. 
www.landroverbar.com/academy 


CHANNEL ISLANDS 


MARINA PLANS AXED 

A multi-million-pound proposal to 
redevelop Alderney’s harbour area 
and create a marina has been 
dropped. Alderney Developments 
Ltd, the company behind the 
scheme at Maggie’s Bay, has cited 
uncertainty over the future of the 
breakwater as the reason. 

The fate of the breakwater 
remains in doubt, as Guernsey 
States - responsible for its 
maintenance - has yet to decide 
whether to continue its current 
maintenance programme or shorten 
the existing breakwater and build a 
new limb to ensure that a sheltered 
harbour remains. Guernsey States 
says that the breakwater, built on a 
rubble mound, has a finite life as it is. 


SOUTH-WEST 


TRANSAT PREPARATIONS 

Preparations are in full swing in 
Plymouth to host the start of the 
14th edition of the world’s oldest 
solo transatlantic race - the Transat. 
Plymouth was the first city to play 
host to the race, and the fleet will race 
3,000 miles to Brooklyn in New York, 
where the Transat first finished 56 
years ago. From 24 April, a week of 
events will include a new Ocean City 
Blues Festival, an air show and a 
fireworks display, before the 
40-strong fleet set sail on 2 May. 


This year’s race has attracted 
Vendee Globe competitors 
Sebastien Josse and Armel Le 
Cleac’h in the IMOCA60, Transat 
Jacques Vabre winner Erwan Le 
Roux and Route du Rhum winner 
Thomas Coville on the flying 
multihulls and seasoned offshore 
competitors Miranda Merron and 
Thibaut Vauchel in the Class40. 
www.visitplymouth.co.uk 

DRIFTING CARGO SHIP 

A Dutch warship joined RNLI lifeboat 
volunteers to rescue a stricken 300ft 
cargo vessel that was drifting close to 
the North Devon coast amid rough 
seas and Force 8 gales. The stricken 
cargo ship, Verity, was carrying 
3,000 tonnes of scrap metal. The 
ship’s engine failed four miles off 



Cargo ship Verity under tow from 
Padstow Lifeboat 


; Hartland Point. With support from 
I the Appledore RNLI crew, Padstow 
: lifeboat established a tow to the 
: ship, which later parted, but the 
; crew managed to reattach it. The 
I tow was maintained until the Dutch 
! frigate HNLMS De Ruyter arrived 
: on scene. The Dutch warship then 
\ began the slow tow towards Lundy 
\ Island to await a tugboat. Verity was 
j later towed to Swansea for repairs. 


WALES 


TIDAL LAGOON SWANSEA 
BAY SCHEME DELAY 

Plans to generate energy from 
Swansea Bay lagoon face further 
delays as the UK energy minister 
has announced a six-month review 
of the sector. 

Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay 
has welcomed the launch of a 
government review into the potential 
for tidal lagoon energy across the 
UK, but expressed concern about 
delays to the scheme. Mark Shorrock, 
chief executive, said: ‘We have built a 
team, secured planning permission, 
secured equity sponsors, prepared 
a delivery team and a supply 
chain. We have received 
overwhelming support for this project 
locally, nationally and internationally. If 
tidal lagoon power at scale is to be 
a real option for the longer term, we 
need to start work now, otherwise 
the opportunity will be lost and the 
review will be all for nothing.’ 


IRELAND 


ROS AN MHIL 
IMPROVEMENTS 

Major improvements are being 
carried out to Ros an Mhil Harbour 
in Connemara. The €3.5million 
project includes the creation of a 
new small craft harbour, the design 
and construction of a new slipway, 
and the design, evaluation, 
consultation and preparation works 
for development of the harbour’s 
existing quay. Funding is being 
provided by the Irish Local Authority 
Fund for Harbours and Piers. 

Nl MCZ CONSULTATION 

A consultation is under way for four 
new Marine Conservation Zones 
in Northern Irish waters. The four 
proposed sites (pMCZs) are 
Rathlin, Waterfoot, Outer Belfast 
and Carlingford Lough. Potential 
management measures to protect the 
marine habitats in these areas include 
limits on anchoring and mooring, and 
at Rathlin a speed restriction zone 
and proposals to limit expansion of 
the existing marina facilities. 

The Royal Yachting Association 
(RYA) and the Royal Yachting 
Association Northern Ireland (RYANI) 
have been working closely with the 
Department of the Environment 
Northern Ireland (DOENI) to ensure 
that the views of recreational boaters 
are considered in the plans. The 
RYA and RYANI will now consider 
whether the proposed management 
measures are proportionate, 
enforceable and effective. 

The consultation closes on 1 1 
March 2016. Visitwww.doeni.gov.uk/ 
consultations/marine-conservation- 
zones-consultation. 


NORTH-WEST 


WHITEHAVEN MARINA 
SEA LOCK CLOSURE 

Whitehaven Marina in Cumbria has 
confirmed that its two-week annual 
lock closure takes place between 
Monday 22 February and Monday 
7 March 2016. The sea lock at 
Whitehaven Marina, and the 
265-year-old breakwaters, form 
an integral part of the marina and 
town’s sea defences. Mark Bowden, 
operations director for Whitehaven 
Marina, said: ‘We will be spending 
in excess of £35,000 to ensure all 
aspects of the sea lock are serviced 
and checked. Having seen the 
increase in frequency of powerful 
storms and tidal surges in recent 
years, this work will ensure that the 
marina and town will be kept safe.’ 


10 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 












SCOTLAND 


VILLAGE FACILITIES BOOST 

Loch Harport, on the west side of the j 
Isle of Skye, has provided a safe haven j 
for seafarers for centuries, but until : 
recently there have been precious 
few facilities for visiting boats. Thanks ! 
to the efforts of a local community 
company, the village of Carbost now 
offers berthing alongside the renovated \ 
pier, visitor moorings and, by summer \ 
201 6, overnight pontoon berths. A new \ 
building housing toilets and showers 
will also be completed this summer. 

For seafarers arriving by road, a 
new slipway allows launching and 
recovery of boats at all but low water 
Springs, and ample parking for 
towing vehicles and trailers. Carbost 
boasts a shop, post office, waterfront 


inn and a local seafood takeaway. It is 
also home to the Talisker distillery, 
which welcomes visitors throughout 
the year. 

Contact: tieu p@carbost-pier.org . uk 
or visit www.facebook.com/ 
CarbostPierLtd. 


NORTH-EAST 


WORLD’S LARGEST 
OFFSHORE WIND FARM 

DONG Energy has confirmed it will 
build the giant Hornsea Project One 
offshore wind farm off the Yorkshire 
coast after taking a final investment 
decision. With a capacity of 1 .2 
gigawatts (GW), Hornsea Project One 
is capable of powering more than a 
million UK homes and will be the 
world’s largest offshore wind farm. It 


will be located 120km off the 
Yorkshire coast, spanning an area 
of approximately 407km 2 , with up 
to 240 turbines, each 190m tall. 

Siemens, which has a factory 
in Hull, has been named the 
preferred supplier for the seven 
megawatt (MW) turbines. A 
£25million contract has also been 
awarded to UK infrastructure 
company Balfour Beatty for the 
construction of the onshore 
substation. Hornsea Project 
One is expected to be fully 
commissioned in 2020. 


SOUTH-EAST 


FUTURE NAVIGATION 

The General Lighthouse Authorities 
(GLAs) of the UK and Ireland are 
holding an event to explore the mix 
of technologies for future maritime 
navigation in 2030 and beyond, and 
identify potential complements to 
Global Navigation Satellite Systems 
(GNSS). The event, at Trinity House, 
London, will run from 10am-5pm on 
2 March and will be held jointly with 
the Knowledge Transfer Network and 
the Royal Institute of Navigation. 

Presenters will include mariners, ship 
operators, navigation specialists and 
technology providers, and delegates 
will have the opportunity to network 
and participate in a Q&A session. 

The event is free, but delegates must 
register in advance at www.eventbrite. 
co.uk/e/innovation-in-maritime- 
navigation-tickets-20751 532392. 


INLAND 


HUNGERFORD MARINA 
PLANS APPROVED 

\ Plans for a 1 20-berth marina in 
| Hungerford have been approved. The 
i marina will cover an 1 1 -acre site with 
[ anti-slip, recycled plastic jetties with 
| water, electricity and Wi-Fi to each 
; berth. Shoreside facilities will include 
; an amenities building with a reception 
■ area, toilets, showers and laundry 
j. facilities, a cafe restaurant and three 
I residential flats. 


EAST 


WHALE DEATHS 

The UK Coastguard responded 
when six sperm whales were 
washed up and died along the East 
Coast of England within a fortnight. 
A bull sperm whale and a female 
sperm whale beached themselves 
on Hunstanton Beach, Norfolk 
on 22 January and 4 February 
respectively, while three whales 
were found dead on a beach 
near Skegness, Lincolnshire and 
another whale was washed up 
near Wainfleet, Lincolnshire on 
25 January. They are all believed to 
be from the same pod. A seventh 
whale was reported in difficulty 
in shallow water off the coast of 
Mundesley, Norfolk on 9 February. 
The search was stood down when 
it was later spotted moving back 
out to deeper water with the tide. 


UNCHARTED WRECK 

The uncharted wreck of a First 
World War German submarine has 
been officially identified three years 
after being discovered off the coast 
of Norfolk and Suffolk. Survey 
teams from Scottish Power 
Renewables (SPR) and Vattenfall 
spotted the wreck in September 
2012 while seabed scanning for 
wind farm development projects. 

On 21 January, the wreck was 
officially identified as submarine 
U-31 , which left for patrol on 13 
January 1915, never to return. The 
wreck is roughly 90km offshore, but 
sits on the seabed at a depth of only 
30m. As an official military maritime 
grave, U-31 will remain in its final 
resting place: plans for any wind 
farm development will be progressed 
ensuring no disturbance to the area. 



Two dead whales washed up on the beach near Skegness 



PRACTICAL 


A high-speed tender 

■ The fastest flubber in the west? 

Plus 

■ Understanding metal fatigue 

■ Gas safety on board 

■ Fitting a folding prop 

■ Car engine as boat spare, part 
two - renovation and reassembly 


TESTED 


Cordless drills 

■ An essential tool for any boat 
owner - but which to choose? 

Pulse compression radar 

■ Does it live up to the claims of sharp 
imagery and easy Wi-Fi connectivity? 


BOATS 


Allures 45, Exploration 45 

■ Two very different, French-built, 
aluminium-hulled cruising yachts 

31 -33ft cruisers 

■ Some groundbreaking early 
GRP designs 


SEAMANSHIP 


Modern navigation 

■ Get the best from digital and paper 

The Bermudan rig 

■ Everything you need to know 


CRUISING 


The Hebridean triangle 

■ A bracing week-long charter 
sail in the Hebrides 

Torquay 

■ What to see and do if you’re 
sailing into the ‘English Riviera’ 


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Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


11 


Contents subject to change 
























fbc) Letters 


Email pbo@timeinc.com 


or write to us at the address on page 5. 
Photos are appreciated, letters may be edited. 


Readers share their thoughts and opinions 


HOW DRILLING A HOLE FIXED A LEAK IN A CONTESSA 32 


Curing troublesome leaks - you know the drill 


■ Re Tracing those tricky leaks’ 
(PBO February), Ben Meakins 
invited comment on techniques 
for fixing leaks - which 
prompted me to mention the 
time I fixed a leak by drilling 
another hole in my Contessa 32. 

I was lumping my way round 
the Lizard, single-handed, 
having left the Helford with a 
south-westerly Force 4, and 
had been hard on the wind on 
starboard for a couple of hours. 
Once through the rougher stuff 
immediately off the headland 
(and well clear) I’d tacked, 
eased sheets and set her on 
course for Newlyn. I had just 
gone down below to mark a 
position on the chart, just for 
form’s sake: I knew very well 
where I was. 

At this point, I found myself 


paddling: the saloon was 
ankle-deep with water. Now, I 
quite like the sea, but I regard it 
as fundamental to our continued 
relationship that each of us should 
stay in our proper places - the sea 
outside the boat and me in it. So, 
with a seamanlike expression of 
fright, I scampered back into the 
cockpit, grabbed the bilge pump 
and started pumping away like a 
thing demented, composing a 
Mayday signal while doing so. 

From force of habit I counted 
the strokes and, once I’d got to 
1 00, put my head back down the 
companionway in hopes of seeing 
some progress. Fortunately, 
progress was indeed apparent: I 
was clearly winning over the leak. 

I returned to the pump and, as 
panic subsided, started giving the 
matter some thought. I hadn’t hit 


anything, at least not very much or 
very recently, so a complete new 
hole in the hull seemed unlikely. 
After another 100 or so strokes, 
matters improved to ‘soggy’ rather 
than ‘awash’, so I sampled the 
remaining puddle: salt. It was 
definitely water ingress rather 
than a tank problem. 

I then checked the seacocks. 
Most of them were off, my normal 
seagoing order. The two on the 
cockpit drains were open, again 
as they should be, and there was 
no sign of any leakage. However, 

I then noticed that the lid on the 
anchor well was somewhat askew. 
It never had been watertight, but 
it now showed a large gap. I’d 
certainly been taking seas over 
the bow, so water must have been 
filling the anchor well. I had two 
navel pipes from the well down 


into the forepeak, one for each 
of the two anchors: all of this 
was to stow the cables below 
while I could use whichever 
anchor I wanted. 

This indeed turned out to 
be the source of the trouble. 

I’d failed to stuff the pipes with 
rags, and I certainly should 
have done, but a more 
fundamental problem also 
became apparent: there was 
only one drain from the anchor 
well, on starboard. As I’d been 
hard on starboard tack this had 
been up in the air, and the 
anchor well must have been 
full most of the time - draining 
merrily down the navel pipes. 
There is now a nice new hole 
in the boat; a port-side drain 
to the anchor well. 

Chris Mason, by email 


Plymouth 
heralded 

■ I read your piece 
on Plymouth (PBO 
March) with interest, 
but noted that there 
was little information 
given about the 
western entrance to 
the River Tamar past 
Drake’s Island. This 
passage is used 
only by shallow- 
draught boats, 
both pleasure and 
commercial, and is 
locally known as ‘The 
Bridge’. It is marked by three 
pylons and one yellow conical 
buoy in the place of the No2 
pylon, which was damaged by 
the marines! 

No attempt should be made 
to enter this passage other than 
through the bridge, as there are 
underwater obstructions left over 
from the Second World War on 
either side of the bridge. This 
passage gives easy access to the 
marinas to the west of Plymouth 
and the dockyard, but be aware 
that the whole area is an 
operational port for commercial 
and military movements. 

Len Baddeiey 

Cargreen Yacht Club 




Greg 
Goulding 
replies: 

There is 
indeed a 
western route 
past Drake’s 
Island. While 
local sailors 
and fishermen 
are familiar 
J with the depths 
and routes , as 
you say it’s 
littered with 
obstructions , is 
too shallow for 
many boats at 
most states of tide and the 
markers are unclear at best. 

While we mentioned this route 
to the west, we really don’t want 
to encourage visiting skippers to 
try it, and with a draught of 7ft 6 
on our boat, we decided that 
taking the long route would be 
preferable. But with such a lot to 
look at, it’s no hardship. 




Plane sailing? 

■ I have just enjoyed my monthly 
dose of PBO, and would like to add 
an alternative twist to the piece by 
Andrew Simpson (‘In search of 
fresh horizons’) in the March issue. 


The question of the distance to 
your boat is an important one for 
the personal reasons mentioned, 
but I cannot think of jumping on an 
aeroplane without worrying about 
the consequences. 

We have seen the terrible effects 
of climate change, from typhoon 
Haiyan killing over 6,000 in the 
Philippines in 2013 to cyclone 
Pam in the Vannatu islands in 
March 2015. Here in the UK, 
this winter’s storms have been 
devastating. That this is man-made 
climate change has long been 


beyond reasonable doubt. 

If the fate of others does not 
stir us, then we may think of the 
consequences for our hobby of 
sailing: from established issues like 
a shortening season in Scotland 
to the more recent problems of 
sargassum in the Caribbean, 
climate change is affecting us all. 
As relatively wealthy people, most 
of us are significant contributors 
to climate change; and the worst 
thing of all that we can do is to fly. 

Richard Proud 
l By email 



12 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 





Letters <3> 



www.twitter.com/p_b_o 




Face book 


www.facebook.com/practicalboatownermag 




Mike Taylor catches up with thi 


Fastnet rescues? 

■ Being a long-time supporter of 
the RNLI, I read with interest the 
article detailing the magnificent 
work and rescues performed by 
Matt Lethbridge and his trusty 
Watson lifeboat Guy and Clare 
Hunter (‘A blaze of glory’, PBO 
February). To my dismay there 
was no mention of the role played 
by Matt and his crew in the 
dramatic 1979 Fastnet Race 
rescues. An entire article could 
have been filled with the rescues 
executed in that storm alone. 

Perhaps we can look forward to 
such a tribute in a future issue. 

David Hill, Isle of Man, Former SHS Peel Lifeboat 


famous HTeDoai uuy ™ - 

rhrp Hunter now in private hands, which continues 
"be Ely maintained in her original condition _ 


: 


Keeping the birds 
outside the cage 

■ Re Ivor Durrant’s Heavenly Twins 
restoration (PBO December 2015), 

I too am refurbishing a catamaran - 
a Summer Twins 25. 1 purchased 
what was virtually an empty shell, 
and it required a complete rebuild. 



A stainless steel cage around the 
tricolour deters feathered friends 


accepting that the Echomax would 
have to go elsewhere (ideally on 
the A-frame at the stern) when I 
saw a news item advising that 
Echomax were now mounting the 
tricolour on top of the Echomax 
aerial. I contacted Echomax 
immediately, and they were very 
helpful. As a result, I sent off my 
tricolour to them: they fitted it to an 
aerial and returned it within a few 
days. I am very pleased with the 
result, and also with Echomax’s 
first-class service. I have since built 
a small stainless steel cage and 
fitted it around the tricolour so 
that our feathered friends are not 
provided with a nice smooth perch. 

R Smith, Fleet, Hants 



PUZZLE 


Taken to task 

■ Martin Bence-Wilkins’ letter in 
PBO December about careless 
workmanship struck a chord with 
us. We too have employed so-called 
professionals’ to work on our boat 
and have been let down several 
times. Last April we had radar fitted, 
and the engineer failed to place 
grommets where the cable enters 
and exits the mast. We have asked 
him many times to return and fit 
them, but to no avail. Sadly, we paid 
In full before spotting the problem. 

In addition, we purchased an 
engine repower at Southampton 
Boat Show last September: work 
began in early November and was 
scheduled to take two to three days 
(replacing one Volvo engine and 
saildrive with an upgrade). However, 
the job still hasn’t been completed. 
Other issues include leaving the 
electrics in an unsafe condition (all 
circuits were live with the two battery 
keys removed); the engine oil was 
overfilled by 50mm above the full 
mark and incorrect oil was placed 
in the saildrive, causing the clutch 
to slip - despite a red label next to 
the filler hole stating 1 5/40 oil only. 

Currently, the exhaust hose also 
moves violently, causing resonance, 
and the company claim this is not 
part of the contract. Needless to 
say, we have escalated the matter. 

We really enjoy PBO and find the 
articles informative and useful: 
keep up the good work. 

Sue and David Long, Kent 


200 


Amongst many jobs that needed 
doing was providing a new outfit 
for the mast. Standing and 
running rigging were simple, 
but the masthead was a challenge. 

I wanted to put an Echomax at 
the top plus navigation lights, a 
radio aerial and a wind speed/ 
direction transducer. 

The main problem was finding 
the most suitable arrangement for 
the Echomax and the tricolour, as 
they seemed to obstruct each other 
regardless of whatever layout I 
came up with. I was at the point of 


Q Match the cardinal symbols, colours and light characteristics to 
the compass points. Colours are listed top down; B denotes 
black and Y denotes yellow. For example, YB has a yellow top. 


North 

A t 

\ 

a: BYB 

1* 

East 

8 f 

b: BY 

2. 

South 

C,f 

\ 

c: YB 

3 . 

West 

o f 

\ 

&. YBY 

4. 

■ Find the solution at the bottom of pagi 




] 

■ 

- 

; 

; 

: 

: 

\ 

\ 


SEADOG OF 
THE MONTH 



■ This is Wilson, our 
miniature schnauzer, enjoying 
a day out on our boat on the 
River Calder. 

Jeff Tune 


Seadogs 
galore! 

Visit our seadog gallery at 
www.pbo.co.uk/seadogs or scan 
this QR code with your smartphone. 

Send us your seadog photos for our 
web gallery and your pet may be 
lucky enough to become Seadog 
of the Month and win you £30 




Yesterday’s flares 

■ Readers may envy the simplicity 
of disposing of out-of-date flares 
at a well-known marina in the 
south of France. You just put them 
in the cardboard box provided, 
and they disappear when the 
box is full. Simple! 

Les Sherry 

Winchester 



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VECTA MARINE •Tel: +44 (0)1672 564456 • www.vectamarine.com • sales@vectamarine.com 


H 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


13 








Dave Sel by 


Mad about the boat 


Dave Selby is the proud owner of a 5.48m (18ft) Sailfish, which he keeps 
on a swinging mooring on the picturesque Blackwater estuary in Essex 


A 



‘Can’t say I noticed a Sailfish in the 
last James Bond movie, but we’ll 
bear you in mind...’ 


C MYA"n 


The Firth dimension 

When the movie circus rolls into town, Darcy-fanciers vainly search 
for Colin Firth - although Dave and Bart are the real stars-in-waiting 


M aldon has 
become 
Tinseltown, 
the go-to 
destination 
for nautical 

big-screen dramas. In fact, if 
we had a hill in Essex, we'd 
probably put up a 'Maldonwood' 
sign. The latest movie epic to 
be filmed here is the tragic story 
of Donald Crowhurst's ill-fated 
effort to win the Golden Globe 
trophy for the first sailor to sail 
non-stop single-handed around 
the world, directed by James 
Marsh who made The Theory 
Of Everything. But celebrity 
hasn't gone to our heads; it's 
gone to our lips! And that 
really is pretty weird. 

The star of the movie is the 
historic Downs Road Boatyard, 
which carried out the first 
refit on Noah's Ark, and 
where owner Jim Dines and 
his crew have just created a 
fully-functioning full-size 


replica of Crowhurst's trimaran, 
Teignmouth Electron, which by 
all accounts is far better built 
and more seaworthy than the 
original. For the movie the 
boatyard was also transformed 
into the 1960s, which required 
considerable modernisation. 
Apparently even some of the 
Grade 2-listed cobwebs had 
to go as they were considered 
a bit too Disney, and not at 
all authentic. 

Now, I'm not starstruck, but 
my dog is. And every day the 
film crew were here, Bart forced 
me to dress up in my old man's 
1960s clobber and parade up 
and down Downs Road, on the 
off-chance he might get a gig as 
an extra. I have to say Bart let 
himself down yet again, not 
least because he's the most 
untrained, most high-pitched 
and vocal Jack Russell in the 
world. If they were making a 
silent movie featuring a dog in 
a strait jacket he might have 


stood a chance, but as it was 
they passed on the opportunity 
and asked if I could walk Bart 
elsewhere, Kent for example, 
as he was blowing fuses on the 
sound equipment. Next, Bart 
made me putt-putt by in my 
pork-pie helmet and dad's 
old anorak on my 1960s moped 
with Bart in the basket on the 
front. This time they suggested 
Norfolk. I went to the Queen's 
Head instead, and that's where 
I came across the oddest 
spectacle I'd ever seen. 

The bar was heaving with 
a rare sub-species known as 
women. In fact, I never knew 
Maldon had so many of 
them. What's more, the few 
I recognised had antifouled 
their lips with scarlet boot- 
topping - 1 think the correct 
nautical term is lipstick. They 
also had something wrong 
with their necks, probably 
caused by the precarious 
high-heeled splatchers which 


gave them the posture of 
meerkats as they craned to look 
over my shoulders out of the 
steamed-up windows. 

When I asked one what was 
going on, she mentioned there 
was a rumour that Colin Firth 
might be popping into the 
Queen's Head. Now, I don't 
know who Colin Firth is as he 
doesn't own a Sailfish 18, but 
from what I gather he's an actor 
who made his name in a TV 
series about a frilly wet white 
shirt. Further research revealed 
that his character's name 
was Darcy, so in the spirit of 
willingness I started asking the 
men if they were Colin Firth. 

This was no easy task, for as 
in all pukka historic and honest 
waterfront towns, most men in 
Maldon wear grey beards, partly 
to preserve their modesty, as 
well as a host of other practical, 
personal, financial and legal 
reasons. Beards strain lumps out 
of beer, while also concealing 
identity from husbands, the 
authorities and the King's 
Revenue men, all of whom 
spend most of their time 
hunting down a bloke with 
a beard as a result of tip-offs 
from helpful citizens. 

Needless to say, my first foray 
for Firth drew a blank. Next 
I tried asking if anyone was 
Darcy, but in the hubbub 
of the pub it seems the 'D' 
wasn't always heard, which 
involved me being invited 
outside by some and having 
to buy others several pints to 
calm the situation. 

Turns out Darcy Firth never 
made an appearance, but the 
Queen's Head did very well that 
night. But if some elements of 
Crowhurst's sad story remain 
a mystery, there was another 
one that remains unsolved. 

Why had men who normally 
wear fish-splattered smocks 
for a night on the town chosen 
to wear white shirts on a day 
when none of them were in 
court? Some people really 
are desperate! © 



14 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 






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Sam Llewellyn 


Flotsam and jetsam 


Sam Llewellyn is editor of The Marine Quarterly, www.marinequarterly.com, 
and author of nautical thrillers. Three years ago he bought a Corribee on eBay 



I dislike the cut of his jib 

Action and intention can all too easily diverge, in the 
heat of the moment, when crane day rolls around 


pring is slightly in 
the air, and all over 
northern Europe it is 
crane day down at 
the yard. The crane 
hire folk have finally 
given up telling everyone that 
what with the Government's 
construction stimulus they 
may be able to fit them in in 
October. They have decently 
accepted double money, and it 
arrived early this morning, or 
anyway at about 1 1 o'clock. 
And now here is Eric Jenkins 
getting his Westerly Pageant 
ready to re-enter its native 
element with the help of a 
Romanian crane operator 
who has never seen the sea. 

The slings have been fitted 
under the hull, and Eric is 
hobbling round on the deck 
trying to put the loops on the 
crane hook. Eric has recently 
had a hip operation, so perhaps 
those are scowls of sympathy 
on the faces of the other 28 
owners impatiently waiting 


their turn. Or perhaps they 
are just scowls. 

The slings are on, and Eric has 
made a circular gesture with his 
upraised finger, implying that 
he wishes the hook to rise. It 
rises. As he heads for the ladder 
he is making a movement of 
the hand implying that he has 
forgotten the hand signal for 
'stop.' The hook continues to 
rise. Eric extends his arm 
downward, 
forefinger 
pointing down, 
and moves his 
hand in small horizontal circles. 
The Romanian may not speak 
any English, but he is fluent in 
crane, and he lowers away like a 
good 'un. The slings fall off the 
hook and Eric makes fierce 
throat-cutting gestures, 
which speak volumes to the 
Romanian, who is also fluent 
in violence. They start again. 

This time the slings stay on. 
Eric dives for the ladder and 
lands on terra firma wiggling 


the finger. The boat rises, props 
falling away. Eric taps his hand 
on his head, because he thinks 
it looks professional. The 
Romanian looks at him as if he 
was mad, because this means 
'use main hoist' and he has 
only got a main hoist. The 
boat dangles in the air. It is 
beginning to rain. 

Eric extends an arm, fingers 
closed, thumb pointing 


upward. This means 'raise 
boom'. The Romanian raises 
boom. Eric points in the 
general direction of the sheet 
of mud-coloured water with 
one hand, and places the other 
hand motionless in front of 
it, seeking to imply that the 
crane should move slowly. 

The Romanian does nothing, 
because the motionless hand 
is in front of the moving hand, 
so he cannot see it. Someone in 


the crowd shouts that Eric 
should get a move on. Eric 
waves them away. The crane 
driver's eyes light up: an 
order at last. The boat swings 
violently towards the crowd, 
which dives for cover. Eric 
waves his hands in front of 
him in a stop-that-now gesture. 
The Romanian jams on the 
anchors. There is a fearsome 
graunching as the slings shift. 
Flakes of newly-applied 
antifouling float down 
like bloody snow. 

Eric now seeks refuge in 
prayer. A devout Catholic, 
he crosses himself, spectacles, 
testicles, wallet and watch. 

The crane driver, raised under 
Communism, knows nothing 
of this gesture and takes it as 
an instruction to lower away. 
The keel hits the ground with a 
crunch. Eric flings his hands in 
the air. The boat shoots into 
the sky. Everyone in the crowd 
is now yelling and pointing 
at the water. The Romanian, 
a person of excitable 
temperament, swings the boat 
over the water and hits the 
release button. The boat 
plunges in from a height of 20 
feet with a splash like a bomb 
bursting in which can be seen 
the masthead light, detached 
and hurtling towards the 
horizon. You cannot hear Eric's 
sobs over the roar of the crane's 
engine and the sound of 
everyone in the crowd telling 
everyone else in the crowd 
that it is his turn next. 

The yard boat tows Eric's boat 
out of the way, and someone 
says there, there, and they will 
get the crane to reinstall the 
masthead light. But at the 

sound of the word 
'crane' Eric starts 
running away, 
hip and all, and 
does not stop. He is later 
seen at Dan's Vans, shopping 
for motorhomes. 

But sleep and a couple of 
pints knit up the ravell'd sleeve 
of care, and by the next day 
he is sucking his teeth as he 
watches the other boats craned 
in, and filling up with diesel, 
and planning an Atlantic 
circuit, or anyway a nice picnic 
with the children on the 
beach at Blyton Bay. 



The slings fall off the hook and Eric 
makes fierce throat-cutting gestures 


16 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 



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Andrew Simpson 


Monthly musings 


Yacht surveyor and designer Andrew Simpson cruises with his wife Chele in his 
own-design 1 1 ,9m (39ft) yacht Shindig. Read his blog at www.offshore-sailor.com 



Take care to guard your own 

A couple of simple initiatives might minimise the risk of 
sailors having their dinghies and outboard motors stolen 


T here are few 

more pleasurable 
cruising spin-offs 
than sitting on 
the veranda of a 
waterfront bar 
watching crews from the 
nearby anchorage arrive, either 
in pursuit of stores from the 
shops or simply to enjoy the 
cool pleasures offered for their 
amusement. The photo that 
heads this page shows a scene 
in Grenada, the southernmost 
of the Windward Islands 
which, together with the 
Leeward Islands further north, 
stand sentinel at the eastern 
end of the Caribbean. 

In such places, inflatable 
dinghies are comparable to 
the family car - essential bits 
of equipment in a sailing 
environment where, if only 
on the grounds of cost alone, 
anchoring is often the 
preferred choice over the 
marinas. This particular 
anchorage is Prickly Bay, a 
south-facing bay well protected 
from the easterly trade winds 
and boisterous seas that come 
in from over the Atlantic. 
Somewhere out there is Shindig. 


As the photographer, of 
course, I have succumbed to 
temptation and am in the bar. 

In view of their importance, 
value and mobility, dinghies 
and their outboard motors are 
often stolen - not usually by 
the locals, Tm told, but by 
impoverished cruisers bent on 
bolstering their cruising funds 
by dint of some improvised 
pilfering. Apparently, a French 
yacht was boarded by customs 
last year en route to Costa Rica. 
It was found to have a dozen or 
so outboards 
on board. By 
way of 
explanation, 
the skipper 
claimed to be afflicted with a 
rare psychological disorder 
that caused him to have an 
obsessive compulsion to 
collect them. I am not a thief, 
he claimed, but sick and 
deserving of sympathy. 

Of course, such incidents 
aren't confined to the 
Caribbean. While we were 
cruising the Ionian we heard 
of an Italian boat bound for 
Calabria containing a similar 
number of inflatable dinghies. 


The risks for both areas are 
probably comparable. 

Although intensely irritating, 
these are relatively minor 
criminal acts, more disruptive 
than dangerous. However, very 
much more serious crimes do 
occur. Back in 2004, we were 
heading south down the west 
coast of Portugal and put into 
Peniche, a busy fishing port. 
Hospitable as ever, the 
Portuguese had provided a 
handful of visitors' berths 
where we found an empty 


slot and tied up. On the other 
side of the pontoon was a 
British yacht neatly secured 
and with a hefty lock on its 
main hatch. Its general tidiness 
somehow had almost the look 
of some permanence about it. 
Later that day we were to 
understand why. 

It seems that the boat had 
put into Peniche about three 
weeks earlier. Its sole occupant, 
a genteel Englishman nudging 
towards elderly, was in a state 


of some distress. He said his 
wife had vanished overboard 
while standing a solitary night 
watch. His VHF was out of 
order so he could summon 
no assistance. He had spent 
the whole of the next day 
retracing their course in an 
effort to find her. 

The response amongst the 
locals was generous in its 
compassion and magnanimity. 
Fellow sailors sorted out the 
boat for him; the local priest 
arrived to console him; the 
whole town joined him in his 
grief. Until the news broke a 
few days later that a fishing 
boat had recovered a woman's 
body in its nets; more 
specifically, a woman with 
her arms tied behind her 
back and her ankles bound. 
Identification was swift. On 
their boat were photographs of 
the pair together. Never before 
had sympathy evaporated so 
quickly. Our worthy gent was 
now in prison awaiting trial. 

But back to our dinghies: how 
can one minimise the risk of 
theft? You hardly ever see it in 
Europe, but tethering them 
securely is the Caribbean 
response - either with stainless 
steel chain or plastic-coated 
flexible wire (such as is used for 
guardwires) with swaged loops 
at each end. Pass one end of 
the tether through suitable 
places on both dinghy and 
outboard, and padlock the 
other end to a convenient 
cleat ashore. 

Then there's the defacement 
deterrent. Your boat's name on 
the dinghy is a favourite ploy 
and may help 
identify you as 
the owner if a 
miscreant is 
apprehended. For 
short-term use you can even 
use an indelible felt-tip pen. 
Their ink fades rapidly in 
the sun, but it takes no more 
than a few minutes to restore 
it. As for outboards, many 
sailors apply stickers - the more 
garish the better, and readily 
available in the form of 
promotional logos. 

So the irony is that 
adornments designed to 
attract might actually deter 
the light-fingered. <25 


As for outboards, many sailors apply 
stickers - the more garish the better 


18 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 








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3 Boats 


The Revolution 22. Designed by David Raison, these 
aluminium-hulled and scow-bowed cruisers look 
like nothing else afloat. Internal volume - thanks to 
‘that’ bow - is astonishing in both the 22 and the 29 


Mini Transat- 
inspired boats 



The Mini Transat race has been at the cutting edge of boat design since its 
inception in 1977. Peter K Poland discusses the influence the event’s ‘flying 
machines’ have exerted on ocean racers and modern production yachts alike 


E very two years, 
many sailors 
(mostly young) set 
sail from the French 
coast in high- 
performance 6.50m 
yachts to race single-handed to 
the Canaries and then on across 
the Atlantic. Some people reckon 
they are loonies. Others - myself 
included - believe they are the 


maritime equivalent of ‘those 
magnificent men (and women) 
and their flying machines’. Over 
the years, many of these intrepid 
Mini Transat sailors have gone on 
to become international sailing 
superstars, while the unfettered 
development of their ‘flying 
machines’ has exerted a major 
and ongoing influence on 
modern production yachts 
and ocean racers of all sizes. 


And fly these machines do. In 
the 2015 Mini Transat, Julien Pulve 
managed a day’s run of 278. 7NM 
at an average speed of 1 1 .6 knots 
in his Ofcet 6.50 production 
(Series) class yacht, while overall 
winner of the Proto Class Ian 
Lipinski covered 3,285 miles at an 
average of 9.25 knots. Out of the 
2015 entry of 72 boats (26 Proto 
and 46 Series), only two needed 
external assistance due to 
damage. All the others made port 
under their own steam, proving 
that these Mini Transat 6.50s have 
come a long way since the hairy 
early days when some sailors lost 
their boats and others their lives. 

Like the original OSTAR 
(Observer Single-Handed 


Transatlantic Race), invented 
by former Cockleshell Hero 
Blondie Hasler and first won by Sir 
Francis Chichester, and the first 
non-stop solo Round the World 
race - the Sunday Times Golden 
Globe, won by Robin Knox- 
Johnson - the Mini Transatlantic 
race was also dreamt up by a Brit. 
We have always had an aptitude 
for inventing things, be they the 
computer, the jet engine, the 
internet or single-handed yacht 
races: we just don’t seem to be 
so adept at cashing in on them. 

Early entrants 

Bob Salmon invented the Mini 
Transat in 1977, aiming to bring 
trans-ocean solo sailing back 



ABOUT THE AUTHOR 


Peter K Poland crossed the Atlantic in a 7.6m 
(25ft) Wind Elf in 1968 and later spent 30 
years as co-owner of Hunter Boats. He is 
now a freelance journalist. 


20 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


Mini Transat-inspired boats ( ^ T T ) 




A typical production Mini 650 interior... plenty of space, but not a lot 
of creature comforts. The lighter they are, the faster they go! 


The Muscadet, a successful 
competitor in many early 
Mini Transat 650 races 
across the Atlantic 


prototypes from crossing the 
Channel. So they had to sneak 
across unobserved. 

Amongst the inaugural 1977 
Mini Transat fleet were many 
slightly modified production boats 
that still give good service today. 
An early Finot-designed Reve de 
Mer took third, a Dufour-designed 
Sylphe did well and the Harle- 
designed hard-chine plywood 
‘boite’ better known as the 
Muscadet enhanced its name 
with five finishers, two of which 
were in the top 10. 

The second Mini Transat in 1979 
saw the first prototype yacht built 
specifically for the race: and it 
wasn’t French! American Norton 
Smith commissioned American 
Express as a downwind flyer with 
broad beam, special running sails 
and twin water ballast tanks, and 
duly showed the French the way 
home. More interesting was the 
new Gros Plant design developed 
by Philipe Harle, based on his 
mighty Muscadet. Still with a 
hard chine plywood hull, the 
Gros Plant boasted many new 
features including a considerably 
wider stern. Jean-Luc Van Den 
Heede piloted one to second 
overall and designer Harle took 
the helm of another, coming 
fourth. This race also saw 
Beneteau enter the fray with a 
couple of modified First 22s. 

Further down the fleet, the Brit 
John Tomlinson put up a fine 
performance in a modified Julian 
Everitt-designed E-Boat, Smiling 
Tree. A slightly shortened stem, 
extra laminate, beefed-up rig and 


heavy-duty rudder were the main 
changes. John gave a lucid 
description of what it was like to 
undertake a Mini Transat in those 
early days, writing: ‘In the week 
before the start, the other boats 
begin to arrive. With only three 
main rules (the boats must 
be 6.5m maximum length, be 
self-righting and carry no more 
than six sails) there is a great 
diversity of designs, from Norton 
Smith’s American Express to 
Margaret Hicks’ Hurley 22 
Anonymous Bay, with the E-Boat 
coming halfway along the scale 
in terms of speed and weight. 

‘It is obvious that I am not going 
to win the race. Just one look at 
the assembled machinery makes 
that absolutely clear, but to do well 
amongst the production boats 
would be an achievement. We 
manage to pass scrutineering OK, 
which is more than can be said for 
some of the others. Smiling Tree 
is well prepared. There are one or 
two boats here that I wouldn’t take 
for a trip on the River Thames. It is 
difficult enough being only 6.5m 
long and having 4,000 miles of 
ocean in front of you: but to build 
and rig your chosen steed like an 
Osprey dinghy, as some of these 
guys have, is asking a bit too 
much of lady luck. You have to 
try to stack the cards in your 
favour, even if you don’t know 
how they will be dealt.’ 

He describes events shortly after 
the start, saying; ‘Enda O’Coineen 
is just behind me in the Limbo 6.6 
Kilcullen 2. The next day, in light 
winds, I cross tacks with Bob 


within the budget of ‘ordinary’ 
sailors. Ignoring detractors and 
prophets of doom, he completed 
the inaugural race from the 
Penzance Sailing Club to Antigua 
in an Anderson 22. Having 
suffered rudder failure just outside 
English Harbour, drifted onto a 
reef, been towed clear and then 
sculled by Salmon across the 
line, Anderson Affair was the first 
British entry home. 

Predictably, a large French 
contingent took part. Since Eric 
Tabarly had become a national 
hero after winning the second 
OSTAR in 1964, his countrymen 
took to long-distance solo sailing 
with a vengeance. It was no 
surprise, therefore, that the 
first Mini Transat was won by 
a Frenchman - Daniel Gilard in 
a Serpentaire class cruiser. 
Ironically, the major problem for 
many of the French competitors 
was just getting to Penzance to 
start the race, because the 
Affaires Maritimes forbade 



Jeanneau’s Sun 2000, and some smaller Firsts, show a Mini Transat influence with their upright stems and sleek lines 



Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


21 


Peter K Poland 






i J j Boats 


Salmon’s Anderson Adventurer, 
but he is not on deck so he does 
not see me. It is a good job 
someone is awake around here. 

‘Middle of the night, October 6. 
The wind is up to full gale plus a 
bit, from the south. I have three 
reefs in the main and no jib on 
at all. Heading west at about 
four knots on the log, the noise 
down below is ear-splitting, 
with the flat-bottomed bow 
slamming into every breaking 
wave. I cannot sleep or cook any 
food. I am living on GORP (good 
old raisins and peanuts). It is 
very uncomfortable.’ 

Later, he writes: ‘A horrible black 
morning... squally, wet and windy. 
Then a real gale, then flat calm 
again. Very frustrating, and not 
much progress. Changing 
rig continuously all day. Up 
spinnaker. Only for a few hours, 
though. Drop the kite, sheets in 
again. So it goes on, day after 
day. Feeling a need now for 
fellow human beings.’ 

Then, approaching Tenerife: 

‘I have to scull the last two miles 
in the dark. Elapsed time is 16 
days, 12 hours, 42 minutes. Too 
long, really: however, only 12 
boats are in before me so I am 
not the slowest. American Express 
arrived first, nearly four days 
ago, followed by a bunch of 
the French boys.’ 

From Tenerife to Antigua, John 
took 25 days. He writes: ‘I am just 
a few short steps from my first 
Planters Punch. A lot of the other 
boats are in and the welcome is 
beautiful. I only manage to finish 
19th on this leg but hold my 13th 
place overall, which is about 
fourth production boat. I feel quite 
pleased with myself. I have sailed 
over 4,200 miles, single-handed, 
in an overgrown Enterprise 
dinghy, at an average speed of 
just under 5 knots - and that’s 
not slow by any standards.’ All of 
which sums up the highs and 
lows of Mini Transat racing. 

Exciting innovations 

In the next Mini Transat (1981), 
Brian Sanders took Smiling Tree 
(renamed Age of Steam) on a 
second successful jaunt, joined by 
Ian McDonald who raced another 
E-Boat called Ocean Delivery 
across. And this was no mean 
feat, because cyclone Irene 
wreaked havoc on the first leg of 
the race, with only 1 3 of the 29 
entries completing the course. 

The overall winner was a 
prototype designed by the 
young Jean Berret. 

In 1985, the French took over 
the race. Founder Bob Salmon 


Coco class Mini Transat yachts before the start of the Vannes-Azores-Vannes race in the 1990s 


had followed his dreams and - 
against all the odds - established 
an event that had become a 
success. But now he felt it was 
time to hand over the reins, and 
journalist Jean-Luc Gamier 
set about convincing the 
establishment that the event 
was well founded. He obtained 
the support of the town of Brest, 
and the Mini Transat rules became 
tighter - including ‘unsinkability’ 
and specifying compulsory safety 
equipment. Yves Parlier won 
overall, becoming the first sailor 
to use a carbon mast: an 
innovation that soon became 
commonplace on leading race 
boats around the world. 

The 1 987 event saw another 
breakthrough. Coming second 
overall and first production boat, 
the new Harle-designed Coco 
class, sailed by the great Laurent 
Bourgnon, had a pronounced 
rounded bow. 

Since the very first Mini Transat 
in 1977, many of the boats had 
adaptations that were way ahead 
of the times. This largely trade 
wind race encouraged the use of 
features such as twin rudders, 
twin daggerboards and movable 
ballast. In 1991 Michel Desjoyeaux 
pioneered the use of asymmetric 
spinnakers set on a long bowsprit 
on a Fauroux-designed Mini that 
also featured a canting keel and 
pivoting carbon mast. 

However, the 6.50 class now 
realised that there was a risk 
attached to all these exciting 
yet high-cost innovations. There 
was a chance that the boats 
could become so expensive that 
‘normal’ sailors would become 
excluded, so the Minis were 
divided into Prototype (Protos) 
and Production (Series) classes. 
The Protos are custom-built while 
the Series class is for production 
boats, featuring a simpler ‘box 
rule’ that stipulates alloy spars, 


The Yaka 650, an example of a neat twin-keel French cruiser 
developed from a Mini Transat 6.50 racer 


GRP or wood (no carbon) 
construction, fixed keels, less 
draught and shorter rigs etc. Put 
simply, the Protos now represent 
the cutting edge of innovation 
while the Series boats have 
wider appeal. Indeed, there are 
now several new Series designs 
that are not only much cheaper 
than Protos but also boast 
desirable modern design 
features - and several of these 
boats give the exotic Protos a 
real run for their money. 


Adventure 
and intensity 

So, are any Brits making 
names for themselves in these 
remarkable little yachts these 
days? The two most famous in 
recent years have both been 
female. Back in 1997, a very 
young Ellen MacArthur took 
her first step on the ladder of 
international solo-sailing fame by 
coming a creditable 17th in a Mini 
called Le Poisson that she bought 
second-hand then refitted herself 


British sailor Nikki Curwen and her Proto Mini 650 


22 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


Peter K Poland Peter K Poland 





Mini Transat-inspired boats 



David Raison’s revolutionary TeamWork Evolution ran away with the 201 1 race 



Lizzie Foreman on her Pogo 2 Hudson Wight at the start of the 
2014 Royal Southern YC cross-Channel Mini race 


in a French boatyard, later saying: 
‘It is this race that gave me the 
taste for offshore racing. I will 
never forget it.’ Then in the 2001 
edition Sam Davies came 11th, 
saying: This is a very difficult 
race, but it is awesome. The 
atmosphere and the spirit of 
this race really made a deep 
impression on me. Even if you’re 
a foreigner, everyone helps you 
and everyone supports everyone. 
We all share the same wish and 
the same motivation.’ 

In the 2015 race, two more 
British women joined the fray. 

Nikki Curwen, 27, is a ‘chip off the 
old block’ Mini sailor: her father 
Simon finished second overall in 
the 2001 race. She entered her 
Go Ape! Live Life Adventurously 
and finished a creditable 12th in a 
very hot fleet. When I asked what 
appealed most about Mini sailing, 
she replied: ‘I love the adventure 
and intensity of the racing, and the 
boats are incredible to sail. I much 
prefer the long-distance races to 
the Azores, Caribbean etc. I’ve 
owned the Mini since the 
beginning of 2014 and sailed 
around 12,000 miles in her, with 
a mix of races and deliveries. The 


Mini is the most enjoyable boat 
I’ve ever sailed: so responsive but 
also stable, you can really push 
the limits. I will admit upwind in a 
bit of chop isn’t ideal, but then it 
isn’t for any boat, really! Minis are 
just giant surfboards, 3m wide, 
6.5m long. They are designed to 
surf down the waves, and can 
reach speeds exceeding 20 
knots. What’s not to love? 

‘Almost everything in the 
boat can be controlled from the 
cockpit. With a reefable main and 
jib they are very manageable, 
even in heavy weather. While they 
are tiny, and people say I’m crazy 
to cross the Atlantic in such a 
small boat, I can honestly say the 
Mini is the safest and most robust 
boat I’ve ever sailed.’ 

Lizzie Foreman joined the 2015 
Mini Transat fray in the Series 
division, sailing the borrowed 
10-year-old Pogo 2, Hudson 
Wight. She told me: ‘I didn’t get 
into Mini sailing until I was 22, 
helping out with the Artemis 
Academy’s Pogo 2,’ adding: The 
Artemis Offshore Academy really 
is the place to gain solo offshore 
racing experience.’ 

To get her Mini campaign off the 


ground, Lizzie moved to Brittany 
to train with Lorient Grand Large 
and lived in her van (and the boat) 
to compete on the circuit. Much 
as Ellen MacArthur and Sam 
Davies before her, she went 
native to hone her solo sailing 
skills in France. ‘I love Mini racing 
because it’s so pure. We have the 
bare basics for communication 
and navigation - just a radio 
and a GPS, with no cartography 
allowed. This means you have 
to plan well for the offshore 
races, creating quick reference 
cards and lots of waypoints to 
minimise the amount of chartwork 
during the race. 

The solitude is a challenge at 
first, but I’m now accustomed to 
spending 10 days or more at sea 
without making any contact with 
land or other boats. Heavily 
over-canvassed, Minis surf like 
skiffs and require constant 
attention to stay upright! Less 
adventurous sailors who like 
speed should try a Mini - you 
don’t need to cross the Atlantic 
solo to enjoy one. They are easily 


manoeuvrable with an outboard 
engine, the sails are light and can 
be carried around on board and 
ashore by one person, the boat 
can be towed... I can’t really think 
of any boat more fun than a Mini 
for a weekend blast on the water.’ 

Massive changes 

To get an idea of what goes into a 
modern Mini, I spoke to designer 
Simon Rogers. He has made a 
name for himself on the Mini, 

Class 40 and fast superyacht 
circuits. ‘Proto Minis,’ he said, ‘are 
like rally cars. Fast, rugged yet 
light. On the top Protos, scantlings 
can be so light that only tight- 
weave carbon fibre keeps the 
water out. Designers have free 
rein with Protos and can try just 
about anything; canting keels, 
daggerboards, foils, square- 
topped mainsails et al. Minis have 
also brought massive changes to 
power generating with improved 
solar panels and batteries. This 
is essential for autopilots that 
become ever more sophisticated 
and effective.’ 

Electronics manufacturers NKE 
and B&G seem to lead the field at 
this level of high-speed sailing. 
Sophisticated modern autopilots 
have revolutionised solo racing. 
2015 Mini Transat winner Frederic 
Dennis described night sailing in 
heavy winds: ‘I went upstream of 
the fleet, which was a lot of work 
for the autopilot (NKE). At that 
time, the autopilot was better at 
the helm than me, handling the 
power and acceleration of the 
boat. I really increased the gap in 
the race.’ And that’s how you win. 

Simon Rogers is also impressed 
by the latest ‘scow bows’ and 
fuller forward sections, saying: 
‘Short fat hulls tend to stand on 4 
their diagonal and bury the bow. ^ 



Nautipark (Frederic Denis) wins in the 
the daggerboards, canting keel, chine, 


Proto class in 2015. Note 
flat bottom and twin rudders 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


23 




CD) Boats - Mini Transat-inspired boats 


Fuller and “scow bows” put 
volume forward and move the 
bow waterplane further outboard, 
making the boat more stable and 
level fore and aft. They are also 
good upwind because the 
waterplane moves out and the 
bow doesn’t bury. Off the wind 
they generate extra lift and earlier 
planing. They also add greatly 
to interior volume.’ 

David Raison’s ‘scow-bowed’ 
Magnum set the cat amongst the 
pigeons on the 201 1 Mini Transat. 
His logic was that width added to 
the stern gives more power; so 
why not at the bow as well? When 
heeled, the hull retains the same 
immersed profile, the bow doesn’t 
dig in and wetted area is reduced. 
His computer models showed that 
the concept worked better than 
traditional lines on all points of 
sailing. The proof of the pudding? 
Raison’s TeamWork Evolution 
won by a country mile in 201 1 . 
Renamed Prysmian by Giancarlo 
Pedote for the 201 3 race, it was 
pipped into second place but was 
widely felt to be faster than the 
well-sailed winner. Then in 2015, 
Davy Beaudart’s Flexirub (a 
Raison-designed ‘scow upgrade’) 
won Leg 1 easily and was well 
ahead in Leg 2 before retiring 
with shredded spinnakers and 
a damaged transom. 

Two top production models in 
201 5 - the new Bertrand-designed 
Ofcet 6.50 and Verdier-designed 
Pogo 3 - also feature very full 
bows. They’re not as extreme 
as Raison’s ‘scows’, but far 
fuller-bowed than other ‘series’ 
boats. They are fascinating, and - 
like the more extreme ‘scows’ - 
could have a huge influence 
on future designs. 

Simon Rogers said: The Pogo 3 
and Ofcet 6.50 are not “scows” 
but have big bow radiuses at deck 
level, making the waterline shorter 
when upright but longer when 
heeled. The volume of the 




Davy Beaudart’s Flexirub easily won the first leg of the 2015 Mini Transat before having to retire 
on the second leg with shredded spinnakers and a damaged transom 


The Django 670, a lift-keel cruiser loaded with 
Mini Transat genes 

topsides keeps the bow up and 
improves lift for early planing. The 
only weakness is light airs speed. 

The extra volume is beneficial 
to cruising yachts, provided the 
aesthetics are acceptable. Clever 
styling helps. The chines enhance 
performance on light boats, but 
not on heavier ones. However 
they increase space, stability and 
sail carrying power on cruisers.’ 

What’s out there? 

So, if you fancy some fast fun in a 
production Mini 6.50, what’s out 
there? Regrettably, not a lot in 
the UK - but there’s no shortage 
across the Channel. In addition to 


Ofcet 6.50: one of these won 2015 Mini Transat ‘Series’ 
production class. The rounded bow and chines 
contribute to speed and stability 



The Pogo 3’s rounded bow is efficient upwind and downwind 


the brand new Ofcet and Pogo 
3 models, the slightly older 
Lombard-designed Argo (third 
in 2015), the Nacira 650 (fifth, 
seventh and 1 0th) and the 
evergreen Finot-designed Pogo 
2 (sixth, eighth and ninth) all 
featured in the top 1 0. Edouard 
Golbery (aged 28), who came in 
sixth in his Pogo 2, said: ‘I started 
two years ago. When I bought the 
boat I didn’t even know how to 
make a tack.’ Meanwhile, Thomas 
; Guichard (aged 34), whose Pogo 
2 came eighth, said: Two years 
ago, I came to cross the Atlantic 
and to act out my dream of 
adventure. This year, the sporting 
objective was more important: I 
was less inclined to contemplate 
the sunrises and sunsets, and it 
was incredible to sail the Atlantic 
: at that speed.’ 

Going further back in history, the 
Coco, Rolland-designed Pogo 1 , 
Super Calin, Mistral 650, Dingo, 

Tip Top and Dingo 2 are all great 
little boats. And then there are 
the Mini-influenced fast cruisers. 
French yard Maree Haute has built 
many twin- and lifting-keel flyers, 
from the Django 6.70 and 7.70 
right up to a 12.70m development. 
Pogo Structures has also 
| developed some exciting fast 
cruisers from its Mini Transat and 
Open 40 class racers. You may 


have marvelled at the Pogo 30 
and Pogo 1250 models at recent 
Southampton Boat Shows. 

AFEP Marine’s new Revolution 
22 and 29 models are the 
most dramatic Mini spin-offs. 
Designed by David Raison, these 
aluminium-hulled and scow- 
bowed cruisers look like nothing 
else afloat. Internal volume - 
thanks to ‘that’ bow - is 
astonishing in both the 22 and 
the 29. The French nautical 
magazines already seem 
impressed by the performance 
and potential of the 22. Raison 
told me the Revolution 35 project 
has also just started, saying: This 
is very promising. Freeboard and 
aluminium structure load can be 
better managed at this size. 

The boat will offer enhanced 
performance and comfort with 
light scow aesthetics, and three 
twin cabins.’ The big question is 
whether people will accept these 
aesthetics. Only time will tell. 

The added accommodation is 
undoubtedly a bonus, and the 
French do have a habit of 
breaking with tradition and 
coming up with winners. G? 

NEXT MONTH 

Aluminium-hulled cruisers: the 
Allures 45 and Exploration 45 


24 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


Jacques Vapillon 




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(j? Gear test 



Moving your dinghy around when 
ashore can be a drag, so Ben 
Meakins tests a variety of flip-down 
dinghy wheels and alternatives to 
find out which are best suited to 
different types of terrain 


inghies are in their 
element on the 
water - but drag 
one ashore, and 
you’ll soon find it’s 
as manoeuvrable as a brick. 
Ideally, you want some sort of 
amphibious craft - but unless 
you plan to head down the 
aquacar route, here’s where a 
set of wheels comes in handy. 

Dinghies come in all shapes and 
sizes. If you’ve got a dedicated 


launching trolley, that will make 
life much easier, but flip-down 
wheels mounted on the transom 
have advantages: there’s no 
messing around with trolleys, 
you can move the dinghy 
single-handed, and you can take 
them with you wherever you go. 
We rounded up five options that 
are readily available from the 
chandlery shelves, bolted them to 
the back of a Zodiac Zoom 2.6m 
dinghy, and put them to the test. 



Dinghy wheels on test 


Waveline dinghy 
wheels 

PRICE: £66.99 
A VAILABLE FROM £54.95 

Max load: 125kg 
Contact: www.force4.co.uk 



Dinghy dolly 
wheels 

PRICE: £89.45 
AVAI LABLE FROM £5 9.95 

Max load: 200kg 
Contact: www.force4.co.uk 




This set of wheels is made from a lightweight fibre/nylon mix with 
stainless steel springs and fixings, and has three positions - locked 
down, at 90° (good for manoeuvring a dinghy standing on its transom), 
and locked up for when afloat. They are well made and trundled our 
dinghy around well. They coped admirably with concrete and hard 
sand, but were harder work on gravel, soft sand and shingle, 
as their small size might suggest. 



A similar design to the Waveline dinghy wheels, although from a different 
mould and with thicker ‘arms’, these dinghy dolly wheels can take up to 
200kg. They also have three positions, allowing you to lock the wheels 
up, down or in an intermediate position. In their up position, they sit 
tucked into the transom. Like the similar Waveline wheels, they 
coped well with hard surfaces but struggled 
somewhat with gravel. 


26 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 



Dinghy wheels on test <J7T) 


Dinghy wheels on test 


Inflatable 
boat roller 

PRICE: £19.95 

Max load: 400kg 
Contact: www.force4.co.uk 



Waveline 
transom wheels 

PRICE: £129.95 

Max Load: 100kg 
Contact: www.force4.co.uk 



Harking back to the days when boats were launched on rolling logs, 
these inflatable boat rollers from Trem are a good way to move boats 
around occasionally- whether they’re heavy boats being transported up 
the beach for a spot of painting, or tenders being conveyed to the water. 
This one is made from PVC and can take loads of up to 400kg. Ideally 
you’d have at least two and preferably more, so that you can take the 
one that pops out under the stern and place it under the bow as the 
boat rolls along. We found it a really easy way to move our heavy 
inflatable up the beach, and the thick PVC managed to cope with 
sharp stones as it rolled over them - although regular use might 
cause more damage. These could double up as buoyancy bags 
for a rigid dinghy - a useful multi-purpose role? 



A roller or two proved a 
useful way to move the 
dinghy around 


Eckla Explorer 
260 canoe trolley 

PRICE: £89.95 

Max load: 100KG 
Contact: www.eckla.de/en 



A further option for occasional boat movements is a canoe/kayak trolley. 
This one is designed for large Canadian canoes, and folds up into a 
storage bag. It has a kick-down support to help loading the boat onto 
it, and uses the same wheels as the transom wheels featured above. It 
coped well with all the surfaces we tried it on and, in fact, being able to 
balance the boat with the trolley in the centre made it easy to wheel 
around. The only issue was the boat slipping forward or back, which 
can be countered by lashing it down with a strap. 



These are a different kettle offish, comprising 260mm pneumatic tyres 
mounted on the end of stainless steel legs. These are longer than the 
other Waveline product and the dinghy dolly wheels, allowing you to 
move the boat around with the outboard down. When mounting, take 
care that the brackets are far enough up the transom to allow the wheels 
to fold up clear of the transom. In use, the pneumatic tyres gave us 
much-improved performance compared to the other sets of wheels, 
tackling gravel and soft sand with ease and giving a much smoother, 
quieter ride over hard surfaces, as you’d expect. 

The wheels lock up or down by sliding over a cotter pin, with lugs 
further up the legs locating in cut-outs. We found that these weren’t a 
particularly positive fit, and could jump out while rolling over large lumps. 
However, more weight - particularly an engine - would help with this 
problem. We also found that their long legs meant that you had to 
immerse the boat a long way on a shallow slipway before you could 
climb in. They would be better for steep slipways. 





PBO verdict 


JE II these methods worked X 

well - and your choice will 
^^mdepend on the type of 
boat you wish to transport. 

For inflatables with rigid 
transoms, the Waveline and 
dinghy dolly wheels would work 
well and fold up unobtrusively. 

However, much also depends on the 
type of slipway you’re likely to be 
using. Anything hard and the small 
wheels do well, but as soon as you 
get to soft mud, sand and shingle, 
the bigger wheels would be beneficial. 

The canoe trolley was a useful option that didn’t require bolting 
anything to the boat, and it would work well as long as you’re 
not carrying too much weight. And if you’re in the habit of only 
moving your tender once or twice a year, then the rollers would 
be a good option - but they might not last too long with regular 
use over rough ground. 



As you’d expect, small wheels 
are less good for soft ground 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


27 




ITT ) seamanship 


Mooring under sail 

Picking up and leaving a mooring under sail can be anything from quietly 
satisfying to absolutely essential. David Harding explores some techniques 


ou don’t often see 
people sailing on to a 
mooring these days. 
It’s easier and 
quicker - and safer, in 
many instances - to drop or furl 
the sails and make the approach 
under engine. Nonetheless, 
picking up a mooring under 
sail is a useful skill. 

Engines do break down. Water 
intakes get blocked, impellers give 
up, air gets into the fuel, lines get 
caught around the prop - and so 


on. We have all had these things 
happen to us and there’s never a 
convenient time. 

Even if you’re not forced to sail, 
sometimes it’s simply nicer to 
avoid disturbing the peace and to 
slip in - or away - without firing up 
the donk. The trouble is that there 
are so many combinations of 
wind, tide, obstructions and boat 
behaviour to take into account. 
Established techniques exist for 
wind-with-tide and wind-against- 
tide, but you still have to work out 


the best approach in any 
particular situation, be ready to 
modify it on the hoof and then 
be prepared to have another go 
if it doesn’t work out the first 
time - which there’s a good 
chance it won’t. 

Getting ready 

For our moorings session we went 
out into the harbour with Enigma, 
an MG 346 that’s fitted out more 
for racing than for cruising - hence 
the laminate mainsail and the 
absence of a roller-reefing system 


for the headsail. We deliberately 
under-canvassed her, using an old 
Dacron jib and tucking a reef in 
the mainsail to slow things down 
and minimise the noise and wear 
of flogging sails. 

Our plan was to show the 
correct approach and, in some 
instances, also how not to do it. 

A conveniently empty winter 
harbour meant we didn’t have 
to dodge around other boats - 
a luxury you won’t usually be able 
to enjoy, but one that makes it 
easier to see what’s going on. 



Wind and tide together 


Picking up the mooring 


I n theory, this one of the more 
straightforward manoeuvres. 

There’s still plenty of scope 
for getting it wrong, though, 
whether you make your final 


approach with both sails or under 
mainsail only. In this instance the 
tide was weaker than expected but 
still running in the same direction 
as the wind, from left to right. 




i 


B Although some distance 
away before rounding 
up, she had been moving fast 
and is carrying her way. 
Pushing the mainsail out 
can help act as a brake. . . 


k 



□ ...but it’s not 

enough to stop her. 
There’s no point in trying 
to pick up a mooring at 
this speed. Some boats 
just carry their way 
more than others. 







28 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


Mooring under sail 



\ 


D Rather than position themselves 
further away this time, Ian and 
Neil round up closer downwind. 









* ut 



□ The jib is lowered, both 
to reduce speed and to 
clear the foredeck. If the boat 
doesn’t have enough way to 
reach the buoy, it’s easy enough 
to bear away, build some speed, 
then tack back towards it. 


m 



With the jib out of the way, 
Ian has better visibility from 
the helm and it’s a gentler 
approach. A little ‘mainsail 
braking’ can still be helpful. 


Using the mainsail brake 


I t’s not always easy to know 
how much way a boat is going 
to carry and, therefore, how far 
downwind of a mooring you 
need to be before rounding up 
into the wind. If you stop short 
of the buoy when head-to-wind, 
there’s no way to make up the 
distance. You have to peel 
away on one tack or the 
other and go round again. 

If you’re moving too fast, it 
makes life hard on the foredeck 
and, should you manage to 
pick up the buoy, the boat will 
override the mooring and swing 
round. High-speed pick-ups are 
best avoided where possible. 

The problem is that the speed 
you typically need to maintain 


steerageway on the approach 
will be too much once you have 
reached the buoy. That’s why, 
when using the engine, you 
engage reverse. Under sail 
when head-to-wind, your best 
‘reverse gear’ is the mainsail. 

If you have enough hands to 
push the boom out, make use 
of them. You won’t stop the 
boat dead in the water or kill 
enough way if you’re still 
charging along, but it will 
often be enough to make 
a meaningful difference. 

This isn’t an orthodox 
technique and you always 
need to be careful, both when 
pushing out the boom and 
when letting it go again. 



As the mooring is being picked up, Ian can leave the helm and 
push the boom out to help stop the boat overriding the buoy 



Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


29 




ITT ) seamanship 


Wind and tide together - leaving the mooring 


This should be as straightforward 
as can be, nearby moorings or 
obstructions notwithstanding. 
Most important is to be able to 
determine on which tack you sail 
away. Sometimes it won’t matter; 


on occasions it will be critical. 

In theory, once you have dropped 
the mooring and established 
stern-way you can use the helm 
to steer the boat. In practice, 
however, the wind is more likely to 


blow the bow off one way or the 
other first, making the decision for 
you. So how can you exert any 
influence? If, for example, you want 
to head off on starboard tack, it’s 
often enough just to hang on to the 


mooring, wait for the stern to swing 
to starboard and then drop the 
buoy from the starboard side to 
encourage the boat to go to port. 
Alternatively, try one of the 
techniques shown here. 




B As Neil prepares to let 
go of the mooring, Ian 
holds the boom out to 
starboard and the bow 
swings to port. 




□ With the wind now well 
off the starboard bow, 
Ian releases the boom and 
returns to the wheel. 



Q Safely away on 
starboard tack. 
There was never any 
doubt about which way 
the boat was going to go. 



*4 



Wind and tide together - leaving the mooring 



■ 



n Neil hoists the jib with the 
sheet already around the 
port winch, so it starts blowing the 
bow to starboard straight away. 


R1 The jib is now fully hoisted 
■sU and, in the cockpit, Ian 
sheets it in a little harder. 


□ That’s pretty definite - 
they’re going to be 
heading off on port tack. 


. j 

i 

IN 



□ Now it’s just a matter of 
bringing the jib across. 
Mission accomplished. 




Sailing in astern: how to gain and maintain control 


Leaving a mooring under sail with 
wind and tide together (or with 
no tide, which calls for the same 
general approach) is one of those 
situations when it can be useful to 
know how your boat handles in 
astern. You won’t usually need 
to drop back very far to clear the 


buoy and, if you use one of the 
techniques we’ve just shown, you 
should soon be under control. 

Inevitably, however, there will be 
times when the boat is moving 
astern with the wind on the bow 
and lots of flapping going on. All 
too often you see someone at the 


helm looking bemused, thinking 
the boat is about to head off 
in one direction, getting set 
accordingly and then finding it’s 
actually going the other way. 
There’s rarely a need for this 
uncertainty: by using the rudder, 
pushing out the boom or backing 


the headsail - possibly a 
combination of any of these - you 
should be able to persuade the 
boat to go the way you want. 

Sailing in astern can be such 
a useful skill that we devoted 
a feature to the subject in 
PBO August 2002. 


30 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 




Mooring under sail 


Wind across tide 


Picking up the mooring 


T his can be a tricky one. 
Your approach will be 
determined by factors that 
include the relative strength and 
angle of wind and tide and by 
how easily driven your boat is. 

Here we start by showing a 
definite no-no for this situation, 
which is to approach using both 


sails. Picking up the morning is one 
thing; the problem is what happens 
next. Jib-only is the answer, but you 
still have to work out the angles. 

As you look at the photos in these 
sequences, the tide is running from 
left to right and the wind is coming 
from over your starboard shoulder, 
roughly at right-angles to the tide. 


Strangely enough, our challenge 
was the weakness of the tide and 
the fact that Enigma - a race-tuned 
boat that had just won Class 1 in 
the Poole Winter Series - is very 
easily driven. This precluded the 
‘textbook’ approach - against the 
tide, with the wind on the beam 
under jib only - because she was 


still sailing too fast even with the jib 
flapping. A roller-reefing headsail 
would make life easier because it 
can be rolled away progressively - 
and rolled out again if need be - 
to control speed. Atypical cruising 
yacht also takes more pushing 
through the water, so slowing 
down is less of an issue. 



both sails 


D lan has positioned Enigma 

diagonally downwind from the buoy 
and has let the sails flap to lose drive. 




□ Now he rounds up to make the 
approach on a close reach, so the 


sails can still be sheeted in to provide 
power if needed. 




It’s a nice controlled 
pick-up, making life 
easy for Neil with 
the boathook... 



□ ...but then the 

inevitable happens. 
The boat swings to the 
tide, the mainsail fills 
and she starts sailing 
over the mooring. 


Wind across tide - picking up the mooring 


JIB ONLY 


1 

This time the mainsail is already 
lowered and the approach made from 

3 


further downwind. The wind is on Enigma’s 
port bow and the tide is sweeping her 
gently from left to right. 


Again it’s a 
well-controlled final 
approach for an easy 
pick-up. If the tide swings 
her round and she starts 
overriding the mooring, it 
doesn’t matter because 
now it’s just a matter of 
lowering the jib. 



li i s — i It 



Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


31 





inp seamanship - mooring under sail 


wind across tide - 
leaving the mooring 

This is often undemanding, although elements can always conspire 
to make any manoeuvre more complicated than it should be. 


n First hoist (or 
unroll) the jib... 


Wind across tide - 
picking up the mooring: 

A simpler approach 

Having experienced a wind-across-tide situation where the brisk wind 
and weak tide ruled out the use of orthodox techniques, we sought out 
another mooring where the tide was stronger and the wind lighter. This 
would allow us to demonstrate a more conventional jib-only approach. 

In this sequence the wind is coming from the left of the photos and 
the tide from behind the camera. 



D With the mainsail lowered, 
Enigma approaches from 
down-tide with the wind on 
the beam. The jib is already 
partially eased to reduce speed. 



B . . .then drop the mooring 
and sail away. You can 
round up and hoist the mainsail 
at your leisure. 


0 A gust comes along, so Ian 
lets the jib flap and bears 
away to get further downwind and 
reduce speed on the approach. 




□ Enigma is 

making gentle 
headway directly 
into the tide. The jib 
is producing drive 
even though it’s 
flapping, but can 
always be sheeted 
in to give another 
nudge if there’s a 
lull in the wind. 






pick-up yet. With f 

a light breeze and 
the tide acting as 
a brake, that’s as 
it should be. 



32 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


' 




WflW 


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model, the Mitsubishi Shogun is engineered to conquer 
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We call this Intelligent Motion. 


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MITSUBISHI SHOGUN 

WITH GREAT FINANCE OPTIONS 2 & A 5 YEAR WARRANTY 3 






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1. Prices shown include VAT (at 20%) and exclude VED and First Registration Fee. Metallic paint extra. On The Road prices range from £29,559 to £40,224 and include VED and First Registration Fee. Prices correct at time of going to print. Shogun SG4 LWB model 
shown with accessory 20” black/silver wheels fitted - available at extra cost. 2. Finance is through Shogun Finance Ltd T/A Finance Mitsubishi 116 Cockfosters Rd, Barnet, EN4 ODY and is subject to status to customers aged 18 and over. Finance Mitsubishi is part of 

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CO 2 emissions 245 - 238 g/km. 


The 2016 

Marina Price Guide 


Your comprehensive guide to 266 coastal marinas around the 
British Isles. Listings compiled by Laura Hodgetts and Roz Jones 



St Peter Port Marina on Guernsey: annual berths are just for island residents 


T he PBO Marina Price 
Guide provides 
comprehensive 
regional listings of 
annual berths around 
England, Scotland, Wales, the 
Channel Islands, Shetland 
Islands, Northern Ireland and 
the Republic of Ireland. Since it 
began in 2009, the guide has 
grown from 219 to 266 listings, 
which enable you to compare and 
contrast marina charges, as well 
as the facilities and services 
offered by each marina. 

We only list walk-ashore berths 
with mast-up access from the coast. 
In order to compare the prices 
provided by the hundreds of 
marinas, with varying pricing 
structures, we requested the annual 
berthing costs for yachts of 7m, 

1 0m and 1 3m LOA, and worked 
out an average per-metre price. 

The sums we quote, which include 
VAT, may not be exact for your 
particular boat but are intended 
to be representative overall. 

National rankings start at 1 for the 
most expensive. To help you plan 
your access, we give the depth of 
water at the pontoon and in the 
approaches at Mean Low Water 
Springs, allowing us to include 
drying marinas. 

What’s new? 

Marina upgrade works at 
Scotland’s Campbeltown Loch, 
completed last June, have resulted 
in the new 54-berth Campbeltown 
Marina, with an angled concrete 
breakwater to protect the more 
northerly berths and new onshore 
facilities. This represents a huge 
improvement to the previous facility, 
which provided alongside berthing 
for up to 1 8 vessels or up to 38 
when triple-rafting: it was also open 
to strong easterly winds and had 
very limited onshore facilities. 

The marina at Portavadie has 
expanded its offering with a spa 
and leisure experience at its Loch 
Fyne location. The latest features in 
the £1 Omillion development include 


a 1 6m indoor pool, outdoor spa 
pools, a Scandinavian sauna, a 
gymnasium and the largest heated 
outdoor infinity pool in Scotland. 

In Wales, Aberystwyth Marina 
changed hands in September 201 5 
and is now run by The Marine 
Group. On the south-east coast of 
England, Peter Leonard Marine 
have announced plans to expand 
into another boatyard nearby, and 
are investing in a new slipway on 
the Denton Island site, which once 
complete will be able to slip boats 
up to 50 tons. 

Last year, Premier Marinas 
invested £6million in development 
projects across its eight South 
Coast marinas, including a new 
self-storage facility at Swanwick, 
and a new dry stack service for 
RIBs and boats up to 8m (26ft) at 
Falmouth Marina, while Gosport 
Marina’s dry stack was extended 
from 80 boats to 1 48 boats. 


Southsea Marina was updated with 
spa-quality facilities, and Brighton 
Marina became home to a new 
£1 million floating yacht club and 
saw the refurbishment of its West 
Jetty facilities. There was also a 
£75,000 pile replacement scheme 
at Swanwick Marina, a pontoon 
refurbishment at Port Solent and 
a raft of security and equipment 
upgrades at Brighton, plus 
boatyard resurfacing at Eastbourne 
Boatyard. Plans for 201 6 include 
the building of 19 short-term-let 
holiday apartments at Chichester 
Marina, due to be finished in March. 

Nineteen new berths have been 
created at Lymington Yacht Haven, 
the flagship marina for Yacht 
Havens Group, to accommodate 
an increased demand for larger 
berths. Lymington Yacht Haven has 
also completed a large dredging 
operation and has installed a live 
weather system: it was awarded 


UK Coastal Marina of the Year 201 6 
(over 250 berths) by the Yacht 
Harbour Association (TYHA). 

Now in its third year, the awards 
were open to all Gold Anchor- 
accredited marinas both in the UK 
and overseas, and saw marina 
customers cast 4,500-plus votes 
online. Poole Quay Boat Haven 
was crowned best small marina 
‘under 250 berths’, while Overwater 
Marina was named UK Inland 
Marina of the Year 201 6. 

Increasing numbers of harbours 
and marinas are joining TYHA’s 
voluntary Gold Anchor scheme, 
which awards between one and 
five anchors depending on the 
standards of facilities and quality of 
service. Another scheme gaining in 
momentum is the Royal Yachting 
Association’s (RYA) Active Marina 
programme, which encourages 
training, cruising and social 
opportunities for berth holders. 


34 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 



www.pbo.co.uk/marina-guide 


South Coast and the Isle of Wight 


■ Etopnant Boaiyatti 

■ Hamble Pant 

8 Mercury Yacht Harbour 

■ Hambte Yacht services 

■ Deacons Boatyard 

■ Pod Hamble Marina 

■ Swarwick (Mamble'i 


■ Weymouth Harbour 

■ Weymouth Marina 



Hamble River 


I Kemps Quay 
! Ocean Village 

■ Town Quay 

■ Ocean Quay 


I ftcben Manna 
l Universal Mar ma 
I Shamrock Quay 
I sanon Wharf 


I Lata Yard Manna 
I Satans Martha 
I Cobb s Quay Marina 
I Poole Quay Boat Haven 
l Davis's Boatyard 
I Port of Poole Mar ina. 

I Parksione &sy Manna 


Ridge Wharf, 
Wareham 


I Lymington Manna 
I Lymington YH 
I Haven Quay. Lyntmgton 


Portland 




10 


Christchurch 



National ranking 
Regional ranking 
TYHA/TransEurope 

Marina name 

Annual average price 
per metre (£) 

Harbour dues 
Number of berths 

Maximum berth 
depth (m) at MLWS 

Depth (m) in the 
approaches at MLWS 

Telephone 

Water/Power 

Toilets/Showers 

Laundry/WiFi 

Diesel/Petrol 
Gas/Chandlery 
Lift-out tonnage 

73 44 -N 

Bembridge Harbour 

361.38 

Y 350 

2.3 

0.4 01983 872828 YY YY Y0 

NN Y< 5 

64 40 -Y 

Birdham Pool Marina 

378.67 

N 265 

1.9 

1 01243 512310 SS 

YY 

YY 

YY « 30 

14 10 5Y 

Buckler's Hard YH 

624.00 

Y| 116 

2.5 

1 01590 616200 

|yy| 

[yy| 

0 

YY YY 35 

43 31 5N 

Chichester Marina 

460.33 

N 1080 

2 

0.8 01243 512731 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY YY 65 

52 37 -N 

Christchurch Marine 

423.26 

Y 100 

1.5 

0.4 01202 483250 

M 

0 

NO 

YN YY 13 

35 27 5N 

Cobb's Quay Marina 

494.77 

N 850 

2.5 

2.5 01202 674299 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY YY 25 

45 33 -N 

Cowes Yacht Haven 

455.13 

Y 35 

3.8 

5 01983 299975 

|YY 

M 

YY 

« YY 30 

53 38 -N 

Davis's Boatyard 

422.19 

N 94 

>2.5 

>2.5 01202 674349 

YY 

YY 

NY 

YY YY 12 

22 17 -N 

Deacons M & B 

551.67 

Y 112 

2.3 

3 02380 402253 

YY YY 

NY 

« <Y 20 

54 39 -N 

East Cowes Marina 

420.00 

Y 250 

3.5 

2 01983 293983 

YY 

YY 

YY 

« Y< 

i 

C\J 

co 

Elephant Boatyard 

504.15 

N 40 

3 

3 02380403268 

0 

>1 

NN 

« « j 25 

71 42 3N 

Emsworth YH 

365.00 

N 222 

<2 

0 01243 377727 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Y< YY 50 

239 56 -N 

Fareham Marina 

102.32 

Y 50 

3 

3 079 80007727 

YY 

NN j NN 

«.N< 

29 22 5N 

Gosport Marina 

510.92 

Y 477 

3.5 

5 02392 524811 

YY 

YY YY 

YY YY 180 

27 21 4N 

Gunwharf Quays 

536.00 

Y 55 

5.5 

5.5 02392 836732 

YY 

M 

YY 

;< H 

1 1 5N 

Hamble Point Marina 

705.89 

Y 230 

2.5 

2.5 02380452464 

YY 

YY 

YY 

« <Y 75 

9 5 -N 

Hamble Yacht Services 

656.00 

Y 35 

4 

4 02380 201501 

YY 

YY NO 

«[<<] 60 

34 26 -N 

Haslar Marina 

495.00 

Y 650 

6 

6 02392 601201 

YY 

YY 

YY 

« Y< 200 

15 11 -N 

Haven Quay, Lymington 

610.00 

N 4 

I 2 ' 2 

2 01590 677072 

YY 

M 

NN 

[« « 5 

33 25 5N 

Hythe Marina Village 

499.76 

N 206 

2.5 

2.5 02380 207073 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY YN 40 

81 45 -N 

Island Harbour Marina 

340.00 

Y ] 200 

: i 

1.8 01983 539994 

!yy 

M 

YY 

[« YY 50 

83 46 -N 

Itchen Marina 

336.38 

N 80 

0 

2 02380 631500 

YY 

YY 

NN 

|y<^«] 70 

193 54 -N 

Kemps Quay 

174.78 

Y 250 

, 2 - 3 

1 02380 632323 

M 

y 

NN 

<N «] 8 

21 16 -N 

Lake Yard 

558.77 

N 46 

2 

2 01202 674531 

YY 

YY 

NO 

NN NN 50 

CO 

Lymington Marina 

593.75 

N 285 

> 5 

3 01590 647405 

0 

0 

YY 

YY Y< 75 

17 13 5N 

Lymington YH 

586.79 

N 600 

3 

2.5 01590 677071 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY YY 50 

10 6 5N 

Mercury Yacht Harbour 

651.43 

Y 360 

> 

3 02380 455994 

YY 

|yy| 

YY 

« YY 20 

20 15 5N 

Northney Marina 

568.88 

N 228 

2.5 

2.5 02392 466321 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YN Y< 35 


f 

f 

1 

o 

'o> 

cc 

l 

£ 

I 

m 

03 

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if 

3 CD 
c O 

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cd 

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03 

S 

JD 

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CD 

□ 

03 

CD 

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66 

41 

-N 

Ocean Quay Marina 

375.00 

l | 

v 

50 

2.5 

3 

02380 235099 

YY 

YY 

NO 

« 

Y< 


23 

18 

4N 

Ocean Village Marina 

549.26 


375 

25 

2.5 

02380 229385 

YY 

YY 

YY 

« 

Y< 


8 

4 

-N 

Parkstone Bay Marina 

660.69 

N 

50 

i 

0.5 

01202 747857 

w 

YY 

YY 

w 

« 

47 

3 

3 

5Y 

Poole Quay Boat Haven 

695.00 

1 

45 

4.5 

4.5 

01202 649488 

V 

YY 

YY 

« 

« 


2 

2 

5N 

Port Hamble Marina 

705.38 

Y 

310 

,5 

2.5 

02380452741 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 


19 

14 

5Y 

Port of Poole Marina 

575.00 

N 

75 

6 

8 

01202 649488 

YY 

YY 

YY 

« 

« 


30 

23 

5N 

Port Solent Marina 

508.35 

N 

390 

2.5 

2.3 

02392 210765 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

40 

I 42 

30 

5N 

Portland Marina 

463.00 

Y 

280 

4.5 

4.5 

01305 866190 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

50 

I 173 

53 

-N 

Portsmouth M Eng 

199.53 

Y 

130 0 

0 

01329 232854 

YS 

YY 

NO 

NN 

N< 

10 

169 

52 

-N 

Quay Lane Boatyard 

202.35 

Y 

60 0 

0 

02392 524214 

YY 

YN 

NN 

« 

YY 

12 

106 

48 

-N 

Ridge Wharf YC 

295.08 

N 

122 

,5 

1.1 

01929 552650 

SS 

YY 

YN 

YY 

YY 

25 

46 

34 

-Y 

Royal Clarence Marina 

445.33 

Y 

145 

5.2 

4.0 

02392 523523 

y 

YY 

YY 

« 

« 


235 

55 

-N 

Ryde Harbour 

109.00 

Y 

100 

0 

0 

01983 613879 

YN 

YY 

YN 

« 

« 


13 

9 

5N 

Salterns Marina 

637.16 

N 

285 

2 

2 

01202 709971 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

45 

1 26 

20 

-N 

Saxon Wharf 

537.77 

N 

50 

2.5 

2.5 

02380 339490 

YY 

YY 

YY 

« 

« 

200 

39 

28 

5N 

Shamrock Quay 

480.51 

N 

255 

2.5 

2.5 

02380 229461 

w 

YY 

YY 

« 

YY 

75 

! 50 

35 

-N 

Shepards Wharf 

429.10 

Y 

35 ; 

3 

3 

01983 297821 

YY 

YY 

NY 

« 

Y< 

6 

44 

32 

5N 

Southsea Marina 

455.46 

N 

318 

2.5 

1.3 

02392 822719 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

25 

I 25 

19 

4N 

Sparkes Marina 

542.43 

N ! 

140 

2.5 

2.5 

02392 463572 

YY 

YY 

y 

yy; 

YN 

16 

11 

7 

-N 

Swanwick Marina 

644.46 

N 

278 

2 

2 

01489 884081 

w 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

65 

130 

50 

-N 

The Hayling Yacht Co 

259.26 

|n| 

157 | 

2 

4 

02392 463592 

YS 

YY 

YY [ 

N\l 

NY j 

30 

114 

49 

-N 

Thornham Marina 

285.11 


81 

0.5 

0.5 

01243 375335 

YY 

YY 

NO 


cc 

12 

I 51 

36 

4Y 

Town Quay Marina 

427.24 

y| 

130 

3.5 

[ 9 

02380 234397 

YY 

YY 

YY | 

« 

Y < 


12 

8 

-Y 

Universal Marina 

638.60 


249 

3 

>2.5 

01489 574272 

YY 

YY 

YY 

« 

YY 

75 

90 

ffl 

|-N 

Weymouth Harbour 

324.17 

Y 

400 

3.5 

[ 5 . 

01305 838423 

YS 

YY 

)YN | 

Y< 

<Y; 


41 

29 

-N 

Weymouth Marina 

464.33 


300 

2 

2 

01305 767576 

YY 


YY 

« 

cc 


140 

51 

-N 

WicorMarineYH 

244.00 

y[ 

25 

2.2 

>3 

01329 237112 

SS 

YY 

NO 

Y< 

YY i 

12 

72 

43 

-N 

Yarmouth Harbour 

363.15 

[y 

50 ] 

2 

2 

01983 760321 

SS 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Y<J 

5 


This year, Hamble Point Marina 
topped the PBO Price Guide as 
the ‘most expensive’ marina. 

A spokesman said: ‘For sheer 
location alone, Hamble Point 
Marina is hard to beat. Situated 
right at the mouth of the River 
Hamble, with easy access to the 
world-famous waters of the Solent, 

the marina is a magnet for 
competitive sailors from around the 
globe.’ Hamble Point is part of MDL 
Marinas, which has more than 100 
marinas in its cruising network. 

Contrastingly, the Shetland 
Islands are again ranked cheapest 
region, due to their unique annual 
berthing system where berths are 

reserved for years by local 
residents who pay a refundable 
deposit and then smaller annual 
maintenance costs. Annual berths 
at St Peter Port, Guernsey are 
also just for island residents. 

We’re delighted to welcome 
Insworke Mill Quay Harbour to 
our annual guide for the first time. 

If your marina meets our criteria 
but is not listed, please get in touch. 

Details submitted by each marina 
were accurate at the time of going 
to press. A few marinas were 
anticipating tariff changes for 
the new financial year. 

■ Visit www.pbo.co.uk/marina- 
guide for additional information. 

PRICE TABLE NOTES Rates are for the £01 6 season: Prtees are the average per metre (based on prices tor 7m r iGm an a 13m yachts): all prices include VAT 
where applicable Republic of Ireland prices are ranked based on a conversion rate of Cl = €i 2 but listed in euros ; Y = yes. B - some berths, H = no; WI-FI: Y = 
at berth. O = onsite N = no; For services: < = within a mile; Drying heights represented by 0; For depths: > = greater than < = less than: Where the approach 
depth is considerably less than the berth depth it may be the marina has a sill or lock - please check with the marina operator TYHA: - denotes not rated 



Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


35 









Y Lanfa/Aberystwyth 



Ncytafio Yacht H avert upper 
Neytsftf Yacht Haven i cmw 


Swansea 

v 7~ 


Milford Marina 


■ Penartfl Quays *N* 

• caroilt Manna 

i~y 

Cardiff. 


National ranking 

Regional ranking 

TYHA/TransEurope 

Marina name 

Annual average 
price per metre (£) 

CD 

"O 

o 

_Q 

Number of berths 

Maximum berth 
depth (m) at MLWS 

Depth (m) in the 
approaches at MLWS 

Telephone 

Water/Electric 

Toilets/Shower 

Laundry/WiFi 

CL 

"o 

c5 

Gas/Chandlery 

Lift-out tonnage 

98 

6 

-N 

Aberystwyth Marina 

310.27 

V 

168 

2.2 

0.4 

01970 611422 


.YY. 

Y0 

Y< 

YY 

,ii 

137 

9 

-N 

Cardiff Marina 

250.00 

Y 

350 

3 

1.8 

02920 396078 

YY 

YY 

Y0 

Y< 

« 

20 

58 

2 

5Y 

Conwy Quays Marina 

399.26 

Y 

500 

2.5 

0.5 

01492 593000 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

30 

49 

1 

5Y 

Deganwy Quays 

430.46 

Y 

170 

2.5 

0.5 

01492 576888 

YY 

V 

YY 

YY 

« 

' 20 

70 

3 

-N 

Hafan Pwllheli 

365.71 

Y 

420 

2.5 

0.6 

01758 701219 

YY 

y 

YY 

YY 

YY 

50 

95 

5 

-N 

Holyhead Marina 

318.00 

Y 

350 

<4.5 

>3.5 

01407 764242 

YY 

YY 

Y0 

YY 

YY 

15 

139 

10 

4N 

Milford Marina 

246.00 

Y 

328 

>7 

1.1 

01646 696312 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YN 

YY 

12 

91 

4 

-Y 

Neyland YH (Lower) 

321.75 

Y 

420 

2 

2 

01646 601601 

YY 

YY 

' YY 

YY 

YY ' 

35 

150 

12 

-Y 

Neyland YH (Upper) 

229.12 

Y 

420 

2 

2 

01646 601601 

YY 

YY 

v 

YY 

YY 

1 35 

102 

7 

5Y 

Penarth Quays Marina 

301.76 

Y 

320 

3.3 

2 

02920 705021 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

20 

103 

8 

-N 

Port Dinorwic 

300.00 

Y 

140 

2 

0 

01248 671500 

YY 

y 

YY 

YN 

YN 

15 

163 

13 

-N 

Swansea Marina 

206.43 

Y 

550 

3 

3 

01792 470310 

SS 

YY 

YY 

YN 

YY 

20 

147 

11 

-N 

Victoria Dock 

234.23 

Y 

100 

2.2 

0 

01286 672346 

YY 

YY 

Y0 

« 


A° 


National ranking 

Regional ranking 

TYHA/TransEurope 

Marina name 

Annual average price 1 
per metre (£) 

Harbour dues 
Number of berths 

Maximum berth 
depth (m) at MLWS 

Depth (m) in the 
approaches at MLWS 

Telephone 

Water/Power 

Toilets/Showers 

Laundry/WiFi 

Diesel/Petrol 

Gas/Chandlery 

Lift-out tonnage 

209 

26 

-N Bristol Harbour 

153.00 

Y 400 

5.5 

0 

01179 031484 

SS 

YY 

NN 

<N 

. N< 

12 

138 

20 

-N 

Bristol Marina 

246.55 

N 85 

3 

3 

01179 213198 

' YY 

YY 

YY 

Y< 

YY 

50 

48 

10 

5N 

Brixham Marina 

432.67 

Y 485 

2.5 

2.5 

01803 882929 

YY 

YY 

> 

YN 

T<, 

50 

224' 

29 

-N 

Dart Harbour &N A 

134.62 

N 100 

>5 

>7 

01803 832337 

SS 

yy" 

NY 

YY ' 

<< 

35 

4 

1 

0 

Dart Marina Yacht H 

689.20 

! 

N 110 

2 

1.5 

01803 837161 

YY 

YY 

YY 

« 

Y< 


24 

3 

,- N . 

Darthaven Marina 

544.80 

N 270 

3 

3 

01803 752242 

YY 

YY 

YY 

« 

YY 

35 

112 

18 

-N 

Dolphin Haven 

290.45 

N 30 

1.3 

5 

01803 842424 

SS 

YY 

NO 

« 

>' 

10 

38 

7 

-N 

Exmouth Marina 

481.14 

Y 211 

1.5 

1 

01395 269314 

YY 

YY 

' NN 

YN 

NY 

15 

18 

2 

-N Falmouth Haven 

582.86 

N 100 

1.5 

1 

01326 310990 

YS 

YY 

YY 

YY 

:«: 


47 

9 

4N 

Falmouth, Inner 

L J 

445.27 

N 320 

1.5 

0 

01326 316620 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Y< 

YY 

30 

31 

5 

4N 

Falmouth, Outer 

505.40 

N 320 

2 

1.8 

01326 316620 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Y< 

1 YY 

30 

o 

CM 

28 

k 

Insworke Mill Quay 

138.68 

y; 8 

0 

0 

07967 645205 

YY 

YY 

YO 

NN 

« 


62 

J1 

\± 

King Point Marina 

390.00 

y 81 

2.5 

2.5 

01752 424297 

YY 

YY 

YY 

« 

\N 


188 

25 

k 

Malpas Marine 

178.57 

Y 28 

0 

0.5 

01872 271260 

SS 

YY 

NN 

INN 

YY 

3.9 

67 

! 15 

, 5Y 

Mayflower Marina 

370.00 

Y 396 

5 

6 

01752 556633 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

> 

33 

219 

27 

-N 

Multihull Centre 

139.03 

Y 30 

0 

0 

01752 823900 

SS 

YY 

| YN 

NN 

YY 

25 

28 

4 


Mylor Yacht Harbour 

528.00 

Y 180 

2 

2 

01326 372121 

YY 

YY 

> 

yy; 

y 

35 

59 

12 

-N 

Noss Marina 

395.05 

N 180 

4 

4 

01803 839087 

YY 

YY 

YY 

« 

YN 

10 

60 

’ 13 

5N Plymouth YH 

394.89 

Y 450 

>2.2 

>2.2 

01752 404231 

YY 

YY 

' YY 

k 

kj 

. 75 

40 

8 

-N 

Port Pendennis 

480.00 

Y 160 

4.5 

3.5 

01326 211211 

YY 

YY 

YY 

« 

Y< 1 

40 

109 


5Y 

Portishead Quays 

292.01 

Y 280 

7 

0 

01275 841941 

YY 

YY 

> 

~YY~j 

YY 35 

55 

'll 

5N 

Queen Anne's Battery 

416.42 

N 235 

2.5 

2.5 

01752 671142 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 


40 

236 

i 31 

\± 

Sharpness Marine 

108.41 

Y 180 

<3.5 

<3.5 

01453 811476 

YY 

_YY 

YN 

« 

YY 

30 

164 

24 

-N 

Southdown Marina 

205.78 

Y 100 

0 

1.8 

07815 005474 

YY 

YY 

YY 

<N 

!« 

25 

122 

19 

k 

Sutton Harbour 

269.00 

Y 489 

3.5 

2 

01752 204702 

YY 

YY 

> 

Y< 

B 


96 

16 

k 

Torpoint Y Harbour 

317.90 

Y 67 

2 

2 

01752 813658 

YY 

YY 

YY 

« 

i « 

40 

36 

6 

5N Torquay Marina 

489.93 

Y 440 

2.5 

2.5 

01803 200210 

YY 

YY 

YY 

« 



142 

21 

& 

Torquay Town Dock 

241.85 

Y " 192 

3.8 

5.5 

01803 292429 

SS 

yy' 

NY 

YY ' 


10 

162 

23 


Trouts Boatyard 

207.00 

N 44 

0.5 

1 

01392 873044 

YY 

YY 

NY 

Y< 

.YY. 

7 

234 

30 

-N 

Uphill Marine Centre 

113.16 

Y 30 

0 

0 

01934 418617 

ss" 

YY 

NN 

NN 

YN 

5 

143 

22 

^\T 

Watchet Harbour 

240.30 

Y 180 

2.5 

0 

01984 631264 

YS _ 

^YY~ 

Jo' 

^ylT 

y. 

25 

234 

32 

-N 

Uphill Boat Centre 

113.16 

Y 30 

0 

~~0~' 

01934 418617 

'ss 

YY 

NN 

NN 

YN 

5 


The South West 







Sharpness Marine 



IBnstol Marina 
R BihIqI Harbour 


Portishead Quays 


Weston-super-Mare 


I 


x 


Uphill Boat 
Centre 


Watchet Harbour 


Queen Anne s Batlery 
I Sutton Harbour Manna 
I MaytlCNrer Manna 
I Plymouth Yaeftt Haven 
I K?ng Potrf Marina 


Trouts Boatyard 


I Fafnwuth Haven 
V FalrmiuJh Inner 
Ifaimoutfi, Outer 

I Port Pendenm* Manna 


Falmouth 


36 



Malpas Marine 



Portland Marina 


T 


l Torpoint Yacftt Harboui 
I Mutlihuil Centre 
I inworhe Milt Quay 


□art Manna Yach-I Hortwur 
□arttiaven Manna 
N05S Marina 

□art Harbour & Navigation Aulh 


Mylor Yacht Harbour 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 






Yacht Havens 



Yacht Ha v*m 


love a 

BOATING -« 


UK Coastal 

Marina of the Year 2016 

Ovw 250 Berth* 

u* Lyrainflton 

IMA limn ' 


GJWhsuWKe 


0 Marina 
f Dry Stack Marina 



9 Prime Marina Locations., with the most helpful staff 


Whether you're looking for an annual berth, a safe 
winter haven or a visitor berth in a new cruising 
area, you'll find first-rate facilities and 
a warm welcome from our friendly, experienced 
team at whichever Yacht Havens location 
you choose. 

Attractive berthing rates and flexible contracts 
to save you money, superb modern facilities for 
your enjoyment, free Wi-Fi at every berth for your 
convenience, and the freedom to exchange berths 
with other Yacht Havens. 

We can provide you with the best boating 
experience across the UK, and now the 
Netherlands. Just ask us what we can do for you. 


Q Largs Yacht Haven 

Largs, Ayrshire 
Tel: 01475 675333 

£ Troon Yacht Haven 

Troon, Ayrshire 
Tel: 01292 315553 



Neyland Yacht Haven 

Neyland, Pembrokeshire 
Tel: 01646 601601 


^ Haven Quay 

Lymington, Hampshire 
Tel: 01590 677072 

^ Plymouth Yacht Haven 

Plymouth, Devon 
Tel: 01752 404231 

Yacht Haven Quay 

Plymouth, Devon 
Tel: 01752 481190 


A Fambridge Yacht Haven 

River Crouch, Essex 
Tel: 01621 740370 


Jachthaven Biesbosch 

w Drimmelen, Netherlands 
Tel: +31(0)162 68 22 49 


ft Lymington Yacht Haven 

Lymington, Hampshire 
Tel: 01590 677071 



CALL US TODAY OR VISIT www.yachthavens.com 


the perfect home for your boat 





JBy 2016 Marina Price Guide 


The North East 


National ranking 

Regional ranking 

TYHA/TransEurope ' 

Marina name 

S 

11 

it 

Harbour dues 

Number of berths 

Maximum berth 
depth (m) at MLWS 
Depth (m) in the 
approaches at MLWS 

Telephone 

Water/Electric 

Toilets/Shower 

Laundry/WiFi 

Diesel/Petrol 

Gas/Chandlery 

Lift-out tonnage 

128 

3 

-N 

Amble Marina 

260.00 

Y 

260 

2.5 

0 

01665 712168 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Y< 

YY 

50 

216 

9 

-N 

Bridlington Harbour 

144.00 

Y 

66 

0 

0 

01262 670148 

SS 

YY 

NO 

Y< 

<Y 

75 

132 

4 

-N 

Hartlepool Marina 

258.53 

Y 

500 

5 

0.8 

01429 865744 

YY 

YY 

YO 

Y< 

Y< 

40 i 

134 

5 

4Y 

Hull Marina 

255.00 

Y 

249 

4 

1 

01482 609960 

YY 

YY 

YO 

YN 

YY 

50 

127 

2 

4Y 

Royal Quays Marina 

260.81 

Y 

350 

6 

3.5 

01912 728282 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YN 

40 

148 

6 

-N 

Scarborough Harbour 

232.12 

Y 

50 

2 

1.9 

01723 373530 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Y< 

« 

4 

221 

10 

-N 

South Ferriby Marina 

136.38 

N 

18 

2 

2 

01652 635620 

SS 

YY 

NN 

YN 

YY 

20 

178 

8 

-N 

St Peters Marina 

192.00 

Y 

150 

3 

3 

01912 654472 

YY 

YY 

YY 

« 

Y< 

3 

126 

1 

-N 

Sunderland Marina 

264.20 

N 

132 

2 

2 

01915 144721 

YS 

YY 

NN 

Y< 

nn' 

r 

166 

7 

-N 

Whitby Marina 

204.65 

Y 

228 

2 

2.4 

01947 600165 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Y< 

<Y 

15 




Glasson 
Basin Marina 


■ Whitehaven Queans 
£ LQttthei Harbour* 

■ Whrtehaven West Sirsod 


r 

Marypo rt 


ISLE OF MAN 


Douglas 





Lx 


Glasson Basin 


Fleetwood Haven 


— 

A 

■ Oougtas Mai me 

■ Preston Marina 


Preston 


Liverpool 



wu- 



National ranking 

Regional ranking 

TYHA/TransEurope 

Marina name 

Annual average 
price per metre (£) 

Harbour dues 

Number of berths 

Maximum berth 
depth (m) at MLWS 

Depth (m) in the 
approaches at MLWS 

Telephone 

Water/Electric 

Toilets/Shower 

Laundry/WiFi 

Diesel/Petrol 

Gas/Chandlery 

Lift-out tonnage 

206 

9 

-N 

Douglas Marina 

162.18 

Y 

130 

2.5 

0 

01624 687543 

SS 

YY 

NO 

m 

<Y 

12 

222 

10 

-N 

Douglas Marine 

136.00 

Y 

50 

1.8 

0 

01772 812462 

SN 

YY 

NN 

'« 

<Y 

> 

144 

3 

4Y 

Fleetwood Haven 

237.87 

|n 

340 

3 

1.5 

01253 879062 

yy' 

> 

yn; 

YN 

YN 

75 

183 

7 

4N 

Glasson Basin Marina 

186.00 

N 

170 

3 

0 

01524 751491 

YY 

YY 

YN 

YN 

YY 

50 

86 

1 

-Y 

Liverpool Marina 

331.65 

| Y 

340 

4 

2.5 

0151 7076777 

SS 

YY 

Y0 

Y< 

<Y 

60 

174 

5 

3N 

Maryport Marina 

193.76 

Y 

190 

5.6 

0 

01900 814431 

YY 

yy" 

'yy 

Y< 

YN 

25 

195 

8 

-N 

Peel Marina 

173.81 

Y 

120 

2.5 

0 

01624 686612 

yy' 

> 

no' 

Y< 

<N 

12 

182 

6 

-N 

Preston Marina 

189.00 

t Y 

125 

4 

0 

01772 733595 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Y< 

YY 

12 

134 

2 

-Y 

Whitehaven Queens 

255.00 

[7 

220 

7 

0 

01946 692435 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Y< 

YN 

45 

161 

4 

-Y 

Whitehaven West 

207.73 

[y 

180 

7 

0 

01946 692435 

YY 

YY 

Y0 

Y< 

YN 

45 


Shetland Islands 


National ranking 

Regional ranking 

CD 

Q_ 

0 

LU 

1 
£ 

Marina name 

Annual average 
price per metre (£) 


Number of berths 

Maximum berth 
depth (m) at MLWS 

Depth (m) in the 
approaches at MLWS 

Telephone 

Water/Electric 

Toilets/Shower 

Laundry/WiFi 

Diesel/Petrol 

Gas/Chandlery 

Lift-out tonnage 

& 


ra 

1 Aith Marina 

143.05 

P7 

1 38 1 

2.4 

T 2 I 

01595 810378 


N 

[nn] 

N 


m 


264 

7 

-N 

Bridge End, South Voe 

15.99 

N 

24 

4 

4 

01595 859332 

YY 

YY 

NN 

YY 

NN 


259 

2 

-N 

Collafirth Marina 

40.00 

Y 

9 

1.8 

8 

[oi 806 533288 

YN 

YY 

YN 

NN 

[nn 


263 

6 

-N 

Cullivoe Marina 

17.14 

Y 

13 

1.3 

1.2 

01957 744262 

NN 

NN 

NN 

« 

<N 


261 

4 

-N 

Delting Boating Club 

20.59 

Y 

2 

2 

2 

[oi 806 522524 

YY 

YY 

[yo] 

Y< 

j« 

5 

266 

9 

-N 

Hamnavoe Marina 

12.79 

N 

50 

3 

4 

01595 881253 

YY 

YN 

NN 

« 

NN 


267 

10 

-N 

Mid Yell Marina 

10.66 

Y 

36 

1.9 

2 

01957 702317 

YY 

NN 

NN 

« 

'nn 


262 

5 

-N 

Scalloway 

18.39 

Y 

20 

7 

8.7 

01595 744221 

ss" 

YY 

N°| 

YN 

N<] 

250 

265 

8 

-N 

Skeld Marina 

13.86 

Y 

53 

2.5 

2.5 

1 01 595 860287 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Y< 

’<N 

12 

260 

3 

-N 

Vidlin Marina 

21.32 

N 

43 

1.7 

1.7 

[01806 577326 

yy' 

YN 

[nn] 

NN 

nn] 




Delting Boating Club Marina 


38 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 








uj t= k 8 

ulo 5 
DCO§ I 


cc 

LU 


LU 

O 

Z 

LU 

CC 

LU 


LU 


CD 

& 
c r> 

C 

C3 

5 

c/3 

6 

§ 

O 

£ 

C/3 


£ 

T3 g 
C ^ 
^ o 

^ 'S 
c o 

q & 

£ ^ 


^ o 

^ c/3 

;? ^ 

^ o 

O 

K 3 

_ O 



pBo) 2016 Marina Price Guide 


Scotland 


(including the Orkneys) 


National ranking 

Regional ranking 

TYHA/TransEurope 

Marina name 

Annual average 
price per metre (£) 

Harbour dues 

Number of berths 

Maximum berth 
depth (m) at MLWS 

Depth (m) in the 
approaches at MLWS 

CD 

o 

CL 

Water/Electric 

Toilets/Shower 

Laundry/WiFi 

Diesel/Petrol 

Gas/Chandlery 

Lift-out tonnage 

254 

40 

-N 

Anstruther Harbour 

62.20 

Y 

102 

0 

0 

01333 310836 

1 

SY 

YY NN 

NN 

<N 


231 

28 

-N 

Arbroath Harbour 

126.00 

Y 

53 

2.5 

1 

01241 872166 

YY 

YY YN 

Y< 

<N 

120 

88 

5 

-N 

Ardfern Yacht Centre 

330.00 

Y 

90 

5 

5 

01852 500247 

YY 

YY YY 

YN 

YY 

40 

217 

25 

-N 

Banff Harbour Marina 

143.44 

Y 

74 

\TT 

0.8 

01261 815544 

YY 

YY YN 

« 

« 


191 

22 

-N 

Caley Marina 

175.00 

N 

70 

2.4 

2.4 

01463 233437 

YY 

YY NY 

Y< 

<Y 

17 

230 

27 

-N 

Campbeltown Marina 

130.00 

Y 

30 

3 

4 

07798 524821 

YY 

YY YN 

Y< 

Y< 

10 

107 

10 

-N 

Clyde Marina 

294.33 

Y 

280 

4.5 

10 

01294 607077 

YY 

YY YY 

Y< 

YY 

50 

93 

6 

-N 

Craobh Marina 

320.00 

N 

>250 

’ 15 

3.5 

01852 500222 

YY 

YY YY 

YN 

YY 

30 

176 

17 

-n’ 

Crinan Canal 

192.79 

N 

1 35 

2.4 

2.4 

01546 603210 

SS 

YY NO 

NN 

« 


74 

r 3 

5N 

Dunstaffnage Marina 

355.00 

Y 

250 

5 

5 

01631 566555 

YY 

YY Y0 

Y< 

YY 

40 

180 

18 

-N 

Eyemouth Harbour 

191.24 

Y 

40 

1.2 

2.4 

01890 752494 

YY 

YY YY 

Y< 

<Y 


246 

36 

-N 

Gairloch Harbour 

91.63 

Y 

20 

3.5 

10 

01445 712140 

SS 

yy'nn 

Y< 

<N 


251 

39 

-N 

Helmsdale Harbour 

83.74 

Y 

30 

1 

1 

01431 821692 

SS 

YY NN 

YN 

<N 


111 

11 

-N 

Holy Loch Marina 

291.01 

Y 

250 

6 

20 

01369 701800 

YY 

YY YO 

YY 

YN 

23 

165 

15 

4N 

Inverness Marina 

205.00 

Y 

150 

3 

3 

1 

01463 220501 

YY 

YY YY 

Y< 

« 

45 

124 

12 

-N 

James Watt Dock 

266.05 

Y 

130 

5.1 

8 

01475 729838 

YY 

YY YY 

YY 

Y< 

12 

244 

34 

-N 

Kinlochbervie Harbour 

96.67 

Y 

30 

4 

7 

01971 521235 

SS 

YY YO 

Y< 

<Y 

0.5 

69 

2 

-N 

Kip Marina 

366.17 

Y 

600 

3.4 

3.5 

01475 521485 

YY 

YY YY 

Y< 

YY 

50 

248 

38 

-N 

Kirkcudbright 

89.97 

Y 

30 

3.5 

0 

01557 331135 

YY 

YY YN 

« 

« 


186 

20 

-N 

Kirkwall Marina 

180.00 

Y 

95 

3 

5 

01856 871313 

YY 

YY NY 

Y< 

« 


63 

1 

5N 

Largs Yacht Haven 

386.29 

Y 

730 

3 

3 

01475 675333 

YY 

YY YY 

YY 

YY 

70 

246 

36 

-N 

Lochinver Harbour 

91.63 

Y 

30 

. 5 

8 

01571 844265 

YY 

YY YO 

Y< 

<Y 

25 

202 

23 

-N 

Lossiemouth Marina 

166.80 

Y 

102 

1.5 

1.8 

01343 813066 

YY 

YY YY 

« 

<N 

20 

245 

35 

-N 

Naim Harbour 

95.92 

Y 

84 

0.5 

0.5 

01667 456008 

SS 

YY NN 

YY 

YN 


99 

8 

-N 

Oban Marina &YS 

307.13 

Y 

115 

>10 

>10 

01631 565333 

YY 

YY Y0 

YN 

YY 

50 

238 

30 

-N 

Peterhead Bay Marina 

103.20 

Y 

150 

2.4 

2.3 

01779 477868 

YY 

YY YO 

Y< 

YN 

7 

149 

14 

-N 

Port Bannatyne Marina 

231.67 

Y 

108 

2.5 

2.5 

01700 503116 

YY 

YY YY 

NN 

YY 

15 

105 

7 

4N 

Port Edgar Marina 

295.80 

Y 

300 

2 

2 

01313 313330 

YY 

YY YY 

Y< 

YY 

25 

131 

13 

5N 

Portavadie Marina 

259.15 

Y 

230 

12 

>20 

01700 811075 

1 

YY 

YY YY 

YY 

YY 

12 

82 

4 

-Y 

Rhu Marina 

336.68 

Y 

210 

12 

12 ' 

01436 820238 

YY 

YY YY 

YN 

YY 

35 

167 

16 

-N 

Sandpoint Marina 

204.00 

Y 

30 

1.5 

2 

01389 762396 

YY 

YY NN 

Y< 

<N 

40 

183 

19 

-N 

Seaport Marina 

186.00 

Y 

80 

4.1 

1.4 

01463 725500 

YY 

YY YO 

Y< 

« 

10 

207 

24 

-N 

Stornoway Marina 

155.14 

Y 

80 

3 

3 

01851 702688 

YY 

YY YY 

Y< 

<Y 

25 

240 

El 

-N 

Stranraer Harbour 

102.00 

Y 

70 

3 

2.7 

01776 706565 

YY 

YY YN 

« 

<N 


242 

32 

-N 

Stromness Marina 

100.00 

Y 

72 

3 

5 

01856 871313 

YY 

YY YY 

Y< 

« 


187 

21 

-N 

Tarbert Harbour 

178.91 

Y 

200 

8 

8 

01880 820344 

YY 

YY ' YY 

YN 

YY 

12 

94 

7 

4Y 

Troon Yacht Haven 

318.67 

Y 

400 

3 

2.7 

01292 315553 

YY 

YY YY 

Y< 

YY 

55 

242 

>2 

-N 

Westray Marina 

100.00 

Y 

17 

3 

5 ' 

01856 871313 

YY 

YY NO 

<< 

<N 


225 

26 

IN 

Whitehills 

134.39 

Y 

47 

1.5 

1.5 

01261 861291 

YY 

YY YY 

Y< 

Y< 

10 

232 

29 

-N 

Wick Marina 

123.60 

N 

72 

2.3 

2.3 

01955 602030 

YY 

YY YO 

Y< 

<Y 

30 


PRICES 

£62- £386 

3rd cheapest 
egioi 


Westray 




Strom ness Kirkwall 


Kinlochbervie 


Y _ 

Stornoway 


Gairloch 


Helmsdale 


Lossiemouth 
_ , 




r* m 

Nairn — ■ — j j F 


Whitehills 

~7 


NVERNESS 


U Cfltey MaJinFj 

■ irwmess Marina 

■ Seaport Marina 



Oban 


7 

Dunstaffnage 
Holy Loch 
irfvidia / Rhu 


Arbroath 



Campbeltown 


Stranraer 


i m 


Kirkcudbright 


Campbeltown Marina now has 54 berths 


Channel Islands 



56 


-Y 

Beaucette Marina 

75 

, 4 

5N 

Elizabeth Marina 

57 

2 

5N 

La Collette Marina 

68 

3 

5N St Helier Marina 

175 

5 - 

L± 

St Peter Port Marina 


411.33 

353.79 

401.81 

367.18 

193.61 


Harbour dues 

Number of berths 

Maximum berth 
depth (m) at MLWS 

Depth (m) in the 
approaches at MLWS 

Telephone 

Water/Electric 

Toilets/Shower 

Laundry/WiFi 

Diesel/Petrol 

Gas/Chandlery 

Lift-out tonnage 

Y 

100 

9 

o 

01481 245000 

YY 

— 

YY 

YY 

Y< 

M 

13 

Y 

567 

4 

0 

01534 447708 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

« 

65 

Y 

98 

[ 3 

2 

01534 447708 

YY 

y 

YY 

YY 

« 

65 

Y 

[ 142 

3 

2 

01534 447708 

YY 

y 

YY 

YY 1 

YY 

65 

Y 

1200 

\ 1.8 

2 

01481 720229 

33 


YY 

YY 

W 

40 




40 


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K3 v 







2016 Marina Price Guide 


The East Coast 


National ranking 

Regional ranking 

TYHA/TransEurope 

Marina name 

Annual average 
price per metre (£) 

Harbour dues 

Number of berths 

Maximum berth 
depth (m) at MLWS 

Depth (m) in the 
approaches at MLWS 

Telephone 

Water/Electric 

Toilets/Shower 

Laundry/WiFi 

Diesel/Petrol 

Gas/Chandlery 

Lift-out tonnage 

250 

31 

-N 

Bells Dyke 

87.60 

Y 

50 


U 

01603 713109 

NN 

NN 

NN 

« 

« 

25 

185 

22 

-N 

Bells Marina 

182.90 

Y 

75 

1.5 

2 

01603 713109 

YY 

YN 

NO 

« 

« 

25 

155 

i 

-N 

Blackwater Marina 

218.33 

Y 

196 

0 

0 

01621 740264 

YY 

YY 

NO 

Y< 

YN 

18 

233 

30 

-N 

Boston Gateway 

119.63 

N 

49 

1.5 

0 

07480 525230 

YY 

YY 

NN 

« 

<N 


115 

> 

-N 

Bradwell Marina 

283.59 

N 

350 

2.5 

0.3 

01621 776235 

YS 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YN 

45 

190 

23 

-N 

Bridgemarsh Marina 

177.16 

N 

192 

0 

0 

01621 740414 

SS 

YY 

NN 

« 

YN 

10 

178 

21 

-N 

Broom Boats Marina 

192.00 

Y 

100 

' 2 

3 

01603 712334 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Y< 

35 

159 

20 

4Y 

Brundall Bay Marina 

212.33 

Y 

329 

1 

2 

01603 717804 

YS 

YY 

YY 

NN 

YY 

22 

203 

25 

-N 

Burgh Castle Marina 

165.00 

N 

75 

1 

0 

01493 780331 

YY 

w 

YN 

« 

NN 


77 

2 

-N 

Burnham YH 

348.76 

N 

350 

2.5 

3 

01621 782150 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Y< 

YY 

30 

118 

10 

-N 

Debbage Marina 

273.94 

Y 

60 

0.5 

1 

01473 601169 

YS 

YY 

YO 

« 

<Y 

10 

153 

16 

-N 

Eastwood Marina 

221.63 

N 

10 

[ 0.9 

0.9 

01603 781178 

YY 

YY 

YO 

« 

<N 

30 

120 

12 

[± 

Essex Marina 

272.26 

N 

450 

2 

> 5 

01702 258531 

YY 

YY 

w 

YY 

YY 

> 

223 

28 

-N 

Fosdyke Yacht Haven 

135.00 

Y 

50 

1.8 

0.6 

01205 260240 

YS 

YY 

NN 

NN 

NY 

50 

101 

7 

K 

Fox's Marina Ipswich 

303.99 

N 

70 

2 

2 

01473 689111 

YY 

YY 

NO 

Y< 

YY 

65 

196 

24 

-N 

Heybridge Lock 

173.70 

Y 

150 

0 

0 

07712 079764 

SS 

YY 

'yn 

NN 

NN 

18 

80 

4 

5N 

Ipswich Haven Marina 

342.20 

N 

320 

6.4 

5.6 

01473 236644 

YY 

YY 

Y0 

Y< 

YY 

70 

136 

14 

4Y 

Lowestoft Hamilton Dk 

252.00 

Y 

46 

3 

4 

01502 580300 

YY 

YY 

Y0 

« 

« 


146 

15 

4Y 

Lowestoft, School Rd 

234.77 

Y 

140 

4 

3 

01502 580300 

YY 

YY 

YO 

Y< 

Y< 

70 

83 

5 

-N 

Neptune Marina 

336.38 

Y 

150 

7.5 

5.2 

01473 215204 

YY 

YY 

NY 

YN 

YN 

15 

78 

3 

-N 

Shotley Marina 

345.00 

Y 

350 

2.5 

2.4 

01473 788982 

YY 

YY 

Y0 

YN 

YY 

40 

156 

18 

-N 

St Olaves Marina 

215.00 

N 

200 

1.1 

1.4 

01493 488500 

YY 

YY 

NN 

NN 

N< 

50 

85 

6 

r N 

Suffolk Yacht Harbour 

336.30 

Y 

550 

2 

2 

01473 659465 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

75 

128 

13 

4N 

Tidemill Yacht Harbour 

260.00 

y] 

200 

" 2.5 

0.5 

01394 385745 

YY 

YY 

Y0’ 

YN 

YY 

35 

110 

8 

-N 

Titchmarsh Marina 

291.06 

Y 

420 

2 

.I] 

01255 672185 

YY 

YY 

Y0 

YN 

YY 

35 

119 

11 

4Y 

Tollesbury Marina 

273.64 

Y 

250 

2 

0 

01621 869202 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YN 

YY 

20 

215 

> 7 

-N 

Tollesbury Saltings Ltd 

145.00 

N 

90 

0 

» 

07521 318155 

SS 

YY 

NN 

« 

« 

10 

203 

25 

-N 

Walton Yacht Basin 

165.00 

Y 

40 

1.8 

0 

01255 675873 

YY 

YY 

NO 

N\l 

NY 

14 

156 

18 

5N 

Waveney River Centre 

215.00 

Y 

120 

1.5 

m 

01502 677343 

YY 

YY 

YO 

YY 

YY 

35 

229 

29 

-N 

Wisbech YH 

131.24 

N 

128 

2 

0.5 

01945 588059 

YY 

YY 

YN 

Y< 

<N 

75 

61 


5N 

Woolverstone Marina 

390.35 

N 

235 

2.5 

2.5 

01473 780206 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YN 

YY 

10 


Boston Gateway 


Fosdyke YH 


y wii 


■ Sens Dyiw 

■ Sells Manna 

■ Burgh Castle 

I Eastwood Marina 

■ fifundall Bay 

H Broom Boats Manna 

■ Waveney River Centre 

| Norfolk Broads 



St Olaves Marina 


Lowestoft Hamilton Dock/School Road 


I Neptune Quay 
I Woolverstorw Manna 
l Suffolk Yacht Harbour 
I Ipswich Haven 
I fok's Manna 
I Debbage Manna 


Woodbridge 


Ipswich^ 


Shotley Marina 



I BridgemarSh Marina 
I Burnham YH 
l Essen Manna 


Blackwater Marina 



South East 


I Fambridge YH 


Poplar Dock Marina 

LONDON ■/ 

1 


I St Katharine Docks 
I lifnatmuH Batin 
I SOulh DOCk 
I Gallons Point 



■ Chatham Maribma 
I Gillingham Manna 
I Port Medway Manna 
I Port lAferburgh 
I Victory Manna 


I Brighton {Premier 
I Lady Bee Marina 


^Strand Quay 


■ Dover Marina: 
Granville Pock, 
TKlai Harbour. 
Wellmfllon Dock 


Brighton 


Eastbourne 


: \ 


I Meechmg Boats 
I Newnaven Manna 
I Peter Leonard Marine 


I Eastbourne (Premier i 


National ranking 

Regional ranking 

TYHA/TransEurope 

Marina name 

Annual average 
price per metre (£) 

Harbour dues 

Number of berths 

Maximum berth 
depth (m) at MLWS 

Depth (m) in the 
approaches at MLWS 

CD 

O 

-C 

Q_ 

Water/Electric 

Toilets/Shower 

Laundry/WiFi 

Diesel/Petrol 

Gas/Chandlery 

Lift-out tonnage 

65 

.5 

5N 

Brighton Marina 

376.37 

N 

1536 

2 

0.5 

01273 819919 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

i YY 

60 

89 

7 

5N 

Chatham Maritime 

324.70 

N 

412 

2.5 

2.5 

01634 899200 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

. Y< 

16 

201 

24 

k 

Conyer Creek Marina 

168.76 

N 

20 

1 0 

0 

01795 521711 

YY 

YY | 

NO 

<N 

<N 

8 

108 

11 

5Y 

Dover, Granville Dock 

292.29 

Y 

136 

2.5 

2.5 

01304 241663 

YY 

YY 

YO 

Y< 

F 

50 

100 

9 

0 

Dover, Tidal Harbour 

306.95 

Y 

106 


2.5 

01304 241663 

YY 

YY ] 

YO 

Y< 

F 

50 

145 

16 

5Y 

Dover, Wellington Dock 

236.00 

Y 

157 

3 

2.5 

01304 241663 

YY 

YY 

YO 

Y< 

F 

50 

79' 

6 

> 

Eastbourne Marina 

344.08 

Y 

830 

>0 

2 

01323 470099 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

50 

154 

18 

-N 

Gallions Point Marina 

218.93 

N 

120 ’ 

3 

0 

02074 767054 

YY 

YY 

NO 

« 

YN 

2.5 

[97 8 

k 

Fambridge YH 

314.29 

N 

250 1.5 

1 

01621 740370 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

25 

104 

10 

r 5Y , 

Gillingham Marina 

298.00 

N 

480 

| 2.4 

3.2 

01634 280022 

YY 

YY 

YY 

W 

YY 

65 

168 

. 19 

-N 

Highway Marine 

202.80 

N 

90 

1.5 

0.5 

01304 613925 

YY 

YN 

NN 

« 

YY 

10 

123 

14 

-N 

Lady Bee Marina 

268.37 

Y 

80 

2.5 

1.8 

01273 596680 

YY 

YY 

NY 

« 

YY 

25 

5 


3N 

Limehouse Basin 

687.53 

Y 

90 

> 

0.5 

02073 089930 

YY 

YY i 

YY 

« 

« 


252 

28 

-N 

Meeching Boats 

82.19 

N 

80 

0 

0 

01273 514907 

NN 

NN 

NN 

« 

F 


113 

12 

|- N 

Newhaven Marina 

288.00 

Y 

285 

db 

4.5 

01273 513881 

YY 

YY 

NN 

Y< 

<Y 

12 

205 

25 

r N . 

Peter Leonard Marine 

164.10 


30 

0 

0 

01273 515987 

SS 

YY 

YN 

<N 

YY 

12 

5 , 


3N 

Poplar Dock Marina 

687.53 

Y 

89 

i 12 

1 

02073 089930 

YY 

YY i 

YO 

YN 

<N 


172 

22 

-N 

Port Medway Marina 

199.81 

Y 

300 

3 

5 

01634 720033 

YY 

YY 

YN 

« 

YN 

25 

141 

’ 15 

-N 

Port Werburgh 

242.82 

Y 

150 

[ 0 J 

0 

01634 252107 

YY 

YY 

YN 

NN 

NN 

15 

116 

13 

4N 

Ramsgate 

275.40 

Y 

700 

3.1 

3.1 

01843 572100 

YY 

YY 1 

YO 

YY 

<Y 

40 

212 ; 

26 

-N 

Sandwich Marina 

148.02 

N 

50 

1.5 

0 

07974 754558 

SS 

YY 1 

NN 

« 

! y< 

20 

37 

4 

-N 

South Dock Marina 

482.68 

Y 

200 

3 

0 

02072 522244 

YY 

YY 

YN 

« 

E 

17 

7 

> 

b 

St Katharine Docks 

662.33 

Y 

180 

[ 5 

5 

02072 645312 

YY 

YY ] 

YO 

« 

NN 


218 

27 

-N 

Strand Quay 

142.03 

V 

20 

0 

0 

01797 225225 

YY 

YY 

NN 

« 

< N 


171 

21 

k 

Swale Marina 

201.55 

N 

190 

[ 0 

0 

01795 521562 

YY 

YY ] 

NN 

YN 

i YN 

30 

170 

20 

B 

The Embankment 

201.60 

Y 

30 

2 

0 

01474 535700 

SS 

YY 

NO 

Y< 

YN 


151 

JL 

,- n . 

Victory Marina 

227.80 

N 

3° 

[Li 

5 

07785 971797 

YY 

YN 

NO 

cc 

« 


194 

23 

-N 

Youngboats 

174.19 

N 

100 

0 

0 

01795 536176 

YY 

J5L 

NN 

NN 

NY 

10 


42 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 





www.pbo.co.uk/marina-guide @> 


Northern Ireland 


National ranking 
Regional ranking 

TYHA/TransEurope 

Marina name 

Annual average 
price per metre (£) 

Harbour dues 
Number of berths 

Maximum berth 
depth (m) at MLWS 

Depth (m) in the 
approaches at MLWS 

Telephone 

Water/Electric 

Toilets/Shower 

Laundry/WiFi 

Diesel/Petrol 

Gas/Chandlery 
Lift-out tonnage 

214 8 

-N 

Ardglass Marina 

145.20 

Y 20 

2.5 

2.6 

02844 842332 YY 

m 

Y0 « 

:« .1° 

197 5 

-N 

Ballycastle Marina 

171.00 

Y 74 

2.4 

2.8 

02820 768525 YY 

YY 

YY Y< 

<N 

133 1 

5Y 

Bangor Marina 

256.43 

Y 530 

3 


02891 453297 YY 

YY 

YY YY 

YY 50 

158 3 

-N 

Belfast Harbour Marina 

213.87 

Y 55 

4 

5.5 

02890 553014 YY 

YY 

YN « 

« 

152 2 5N Carrickfergus Marina 

227.00 

Y 316 

2.3 

[ 23 ] 

028 93366666 YY 

w] 

YY « 

« 40 

189 4 

-N 

Coleraine Marina 

177.65 

N 76 

3 

3 

02870 344768 YY 

YY 

NN YN 

<N 20 

211 7 


Copelands Marina 

148.29 

Y 50 

0 


07802 363382 YY 

YN 

NO Y< 

<n| 15 

249 11 

-N 

Foyle Port Marina 

87.73 

Y 60 

5 

6 

02871 860313 YY 

YY 

NY « 

« 20 

CO 

oo 

CD 

i± 

Glenarm Marina 

170.00 

Y 48 

3 

. 6 ! 

02828 841285 YY 

YY 

YN Y< 

< N . 

255 12 

-N 

Kinnego Marina 

61.82 

Y 190 

2 

3 

02838 327573 YN 

YY 

Y0 « 

YY 15 

237 10 

-N 

Portaferry Marina 

105.00 

Y 40 

2.5 

. 2 . 

07703 209780 SS 

YY 

NO « 

<N 

256 13 

-n' 

Rathlin Island Marina 

57.00 

Y 40 

2.4 

2.8 

02820 768525 SS 

! YY 

NN NN 

|<N 

257 14 

-N 

Sandy Bay Marina 

53.30 

N 60 

2 

[ 2 ] 

07849 087729 YS 

|yy| 

NN « 

<N 

226 9 

-N 

Seaton's Marina 

134.00 

Y 45 

2.5 

3.5 

02870 832086 SS 

YY 

NO « 

<N 12 


Foyle Port Marina 


Lough Swilly Marina 






V" 


Copelands 

Marina 


Lough 
M BELFAST 



Louth 


Carlingford Marina 


Poolbeg Marina 

DUBLIN 


Malahide Marina 


Dun Laoghaire Marina 




Fenit Harbour 
and Marina 


Kilrush 

Marina 


Lough Derg 


Greystones 

Harbour 


• Wicklow 


Limerick 


Waterford Marina 


Arklow Marina 

New Ross 
Marina 


Wexford 


The Royal Cork Yacht Club 

Dingle 

Marina East Ferr Y 

Cahersiveen 

Marina_ ■ 

Cork 


Castlepark Marina 


'N. 


l Cross haven Boatyard 
l Salve Marin* 


Kilmore Quay 



Carrickfergus Marina can be found on the 
north shore of Belfast Lough 



Republic of 
Ireland 


Waterford Marina is the Republic of Ireland’s cheapest marina 


National ranking 

Regional ranking 

TYHA/TransEurope 

Marina name 

Annual average 
price per metre (€) 

Harbour dues 

Number of berths 

Maximum berth 
depth (m) at MLWS 

Depth (m) in the 
approaches at MLWS 

Telephone 

Water/Electric 

Toilets/Shower 

Laundry/WiFi 

Diesel/Petrol 

Gas/Chandlery 

Lift-out tonnage 

121 

5 

-N 

Arklow Marina 

323.33 

Y 

70 

2.8 

2.5 

+353 872 375189 

YY 

YY 

Y0 

« 

« 

40 

228 

17 

-N 

Cahersiveen Marina 

160.00 

Y 

93 

2.6 

3 

+353 669 472777 

YY 

YY 

Y0 

« 

« 


181 

9 

-M 

Carlingford Marina 

227.90 

Y 

180 

2 

1.8 

+353429 373072 

YY 

YY 

Y0 

YN 

NY 

50 

125 

6 

4Y 

Castlepark Marina 

317.29 

N 

' 15 ° 

13 

10 

+353 214 774959 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Y< 

« 


200 

12 

-N 

Crosshaven Boatyard 

203.58 

N 

80 

4.5 

3.3 

+353 214 831161 

SS 

YY 

NY 

YN 

<N 

40 

210 

14 

-N 

Dingle Marina 

180.00 

Y 

120 

5 

2.6 

+353 669 151629 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Y< 

YY 


76 

1 

5N 

Dun Laoghaire Marina 

423.85 

v 

700 

4 

4 

+353 120 20040 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Y< 

50 

227 

16 

-N 

East Ferry Marina 

160.72 

N 

80 

10 

3 

+353 867 357785 

YY 

YY 

NN 

YN 

NN 


191 

10 

M 

Fenit Harbour & Marina 

210.00 

Y ! 

1 

130 

>5 

>5 

+353 667 136231 

YY 

YY 

Y0 

YN 

<N 

70 

92 

3 

-Y 

Greystones Harbour 

385.00 

Y 

' 150 

5 

7 

+353 128 73131 

YY 

YY 

NO 

<< 

<N 

25’ 

177 

8 

0 

Kilmore Quay 

230.72 

Y 

60 

4.9 

1.1 

+353 539129955 

YY 

yy' 

YY 

YN 

YY 

10 

198 

11 

-N 

Kilrush Marina 

204.00 

Y 

120 

3.5 

2.5 

+353 659 052072 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Y< 

« 

45 

208 

13 

-N 

Lough Swilly Marina 

184.87 

Y 

167 

2.5 

1 

+353 749 360008 

YY 

YY 

NY 

« 

NN 


87 

2 

-Y 

Malahide Marina 

397.00 

Y 

>50 

3 

0.4 

+353 184 54129 

YY 

YY 

YO 

YY 

N< 

30 

241 

18 

0 

New Ross Marina 

120.97 

3 

66 

i 

3.5 

3.5 

+353 863 889652 

YY 

yy' 

YO 

YY 

Y< 

50 

117 

4 

-N 

Poolbeg Marina 

330.00 

Y 

100 

4 

8 

+353166 89983 

'yy 

"yy" 

YY 

Y< 

Y< 


160 

7 

01 

Salve Marine 

252.11 

3 

40 

4.5 

3.5 

+353 214 831145 

YY 

YY 

Y0 

YN 

YY 

7 

213 

15 

5N 

The Royal CorkYC 

176.25 

N 

220 

3.5 

2.2 

+353 214 831023 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

44 

253 

19 


Waterford Marina 

95.19 

7] 

120 

>5 

>Y 

+353 872 384944 

YY 

yy' 

Y0 

« 


30 


© 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


43 









2016 Marina price guide 



Port of 

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MALAHIDE MARINA 

Welcomes Visitors* short-term or lon^-lvrjm 

• 1 0 minutes from Dublin Airport 

• 350 Berth full service marina and Boatyard 

j i 

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Waterford Marina, South Quays, Waterford City 


“Visit historic Waterford - 
Ireland’s oldest City” 

Waterford City Marina cl o Menapia Building, The Mall, Waterford 
Tel +353 761 10 20 20/+353 87 2384944 


Web: http://www.waterfordcouncil.ie/en/ 
Email: jcodd@waterfordcouncil.ie 



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lifiRnif I** ti rvi firing a a. ■ ■ Lr 

www.tiicnmarsnmarma.co . uk 

Ttlchmarsh Marina Lid Col** L an# Wallow -on thA-Naz«. £***1 CD14 SSL 


44 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 








www.pbo.co.uk/marina-guide 







WHAT? A family run boatyard experienced in handling mono and multi-hulls up to 40’ 

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WHERE? One mile WNW of Chichester Harbour Entrance by sea and 5 miles south of 
Havant main line train station & M27/A27(M). 

HOW? Just call us on (0) 2392 464869 or email info@wilsonsboatyard.co.uk 


Pew-, 



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Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


45 



2016 Marina price guide 


325 } 


The welcome in 
Port Ellen Port Ellen will 

always be 
remembered* 



This non - profit marina is not only for the 
promotion of Port Ellen and Islay but 
it provides a safe comfortable haven for 
yachtsmen passing through 
the Sound of Jura. 

Please contact us on : 

Email: portellenmarina@outlook.com or 
phone us on 07464 1 5 1 200 



MARINA BERTHS 


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Example: 25ft boat: all craneage/power wash/three 
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KEMPS QUAY 


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PORTSMOUTH HARBOUR 

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For more details and a brochure contact: 

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The Old Town Quay, Harbour Road, Gosport, Hants PO 1 2 I BJ 

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-also Fax 5862 1 6 

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avis s Boatyar 


The family run Boatyard since 1964 

Ail Boatyard Services available 
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Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 












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Cruising 


Maritime museums 

Charles Warlow recommends 12 British maritime museums which are 
well worth visiting should you happen to be cruising in the relevant locale 


A mongst the very many 
attractions of cruising 
around the coast of the 
UK are not just the pubs, 
restaurants, golf courses, 
swimming pools, scuba 
diving areas, historical sites, castles, 
aquaria, wildlife, bracing walks, beaches, 
chandleries and other less interesting 
shops - but also museums, mostly billed 
as maritime museums. Not just the 


tourist honeypots like the Marie Rose or 
Cutty Sark, but small museums, full of 
local history and interest, run on a 
shoestring (mostly by volunteers), 
cherished by local people and seldom 
crowded. And yet they are rarely if ever 
mentioned in the guides to harbours 
and anchorages that appear in so 
many yachting magazines. 

For a comprehensive list of more or less 
everything out there, there is an excellent 


website: Maritime and Naval Museums in 
Britain and Ireland, people.ds.cam.ac.uk/ 
mhelOOO/marmus. It includes about 300 
museums, with good maps and links, and 
is very useful for making contacts and for 
anyone writing guidebooks (or indeed 
sailing directions). Of course, I have only 
been to a small fraction; but to give you 
a taste of what there is, and to encourage 
you to get off your boats and take a look, 
here are 12 gems. 




ABOUT THE AUTHOR 


1 Maryport 
Maritime 
Museum 


Today, it's hard to equate Maryport in 
Cumbria with its prosperous 19th 
century past: it was once the third-largest 
coal port in England, and home to the 
Holme line of clippers that traded all 
over the world. It currently suffers from 
terrible unemployment, but somehow 
it rises above all that with the friendly 
Life Boat Inn, and right next door is the 
delightful Maryport Maritime Museum. 

It is well laid out, with excellent activities 
for children: for example, they can learn 
the meanings of the code flags and spell 
their names with them. There is also 
a display of games sailors used to play 
on board ship. 

■ www.maryportmaritimemuseum.btck. 
co.uk 


2 The Mull 
Museum, 
Tobermory 


The Mull Museum is easy to miss, even 
though it's bang in the middle of the 
main street along the harbour front. This 
may be because it is small, modest and 
not painted in bright colours like many 
of the surrounding houses. It is a great 
wee place inside, however, with all sorts 
of bits and pieces not just of maritime 
interest, such as the tawse - that leather 
strap once used by teachers to whack 
naughty or ignorant children across 
the palm. You can learn about the 
remarkable story of Neptune 2, a 
Canadian sailing schooner on a 12-hour 
coastal trip round Newfoundland in 
1929 which was blown across the Atlantic 
by a gale to end up nearly wrecked on 
Ardnamurchan Point 48 days later. You 
can also find out about the 'Terror of 
Tobermory', the admiral who trained 
recruits for the Atlantic convoys in the 
Second World War. 

■ www.mullmuseum.org.uk 


Charles Warlow, 72, sails 
a Rustler 36 based at 
Dunstaffnage. He has 
sailed round the UK twice, 
round Ireland and to the 
Faroes, as well as starting 
www.scottishanchorages.co.uk. 



D> , 
O * 



tS * 

O ■ 

* 


Stromness 
Museum 

The main 
street in 
Stromness, 

Orkney, 
known 
simply as 
'the street', 
is a 

museum 
piece in its 
own right, 
and one 

has to walk most of its delightful length 
before reaching the lovely Stromness 
Museum. This records the town's history, 
which has been so wrapped up with the 
sea: whaling (returning sailors had to be 
treated for scurvy), the Hudson's Bay 
Company (in 1800, 418 of the 524 
employees were Orcadians), Arctic 
exploration (John Rae was a son of 
Orkney) and the scuttled German 
First World War fleet in Scapa Flow 
(now a serious tourist destination for 
scuba divers). 

■ www.orkneycommunities.co.uk/ 
stromnessmuseum 





Arctic explorer John Rae in his inflatable boat 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


49 






*3) Cruising 


4 Unst Boat 
Haven 

On the Shetland Islands, the Unst Boat 
Haven must appeal to any serious boatie. 
Inside a large, crowded shed there is an 
impressive collection of historical and 
restored Shetland open wooden boats, 
typically double-ended, which had been 
used for fishing. As ever in Shetland, there 
is a Norwegian connection: the wood to 
build the boats had to come from Norway, 
only 165 miles away, because there wasn't 
any on Shetland (and there still isn't 
any). And after all, Shetland only moved 
from being part of Norway to being part 
of Scotland in the 15 th century. 

■ www.unstheritage.com/web/ 
unst-boat-haven 



Inside the Unst Boat Haven, with its impressive selection of open wooden boats 



The Harwich 
Society 



The Harwich lifeboat museum 


On the surface, there seems little to 
commend Harwich. However, as well 
as the friendly staff at the Halfpenny 
Pier pontoons, there is a rather good 
heritage trail put together by the 
clearly enthusiastic Harwich Society. 

You follow the trail to the lifeboat 
museum, old weather-boarded houses 
dating back to the 15th century, the 
17th century treadwheel crane (with 
no brake, so there were a lot of accidents), 
St Nicholas 


Church and 
the restored 
Electric Palace 
cinema, built 
in the days of 
silent movies. 
The trail 
ends up at 
the old 
lightship 
moored to 
the harbour 

wall, where you can wander around 
brooding on what these things 
must have been like to live on in 
a full-blown gale. 

■ www.harwich-society.co.uk 



The Electric Palace 



The Ramsgate Maritime Museum 

6 Ramsgate 
Maritime 
Museum 


Ramsgate's brilliant, volunteer-run 
Maritime Museum reopened a few 
years ago. It majors on Dunkirk (not 
surprisingly, as so many of the 'little 
boats' sailed from here) and covers 
many other aspects of local history. For 
me, the most fascinating part was a film 
made by an American journalist who, 
because the USA was neutral at the 
time, was able to embed himself in the 
advancing German army. The contrast 
between the laughing, relaxed Germans 
and the beleaguered British troops 
one associates with wartime footage is 
astonishing. It was also good to see a 
model of the original HM schooner Pickle 
which brought the news of Trafalgar and 
Nelson's death to Falmouth, where my 
own Pickle was built by Rustler Yachts. 

■ www.ramsgatemaritimemuseum.org 


7 Hartlepool and 
HMS Trincomalee 



HMS Trincomalee - the oldest warship 
still afloat in the world 


Hartlepool has a convenient marina in 
a vast dock, not in any sense a tourist 
destination from the land or sea, but 
it does boast one rather special sight - 
her tall masts towering above the 
puny modern spars of the yachts on 
the pontoons. 

The Trincomalee, still floating, is 
a fighting ship built in Bombay and 
launched in 1817. Too late for the 
Napoleonic wars, she never fired a 
gun in anger. Personally, I think 
visiting her is preferable to visiting 
the far better-known fighting ship in 
Portsmouth, HMS Victory, or even 
HMS Warrior. 

You can wander around on the 
Trincomalee wherever you like 
(rather than along a pre-defined 
route which you'd have to pay for 
again if you wanted to repeat the 
route, as on HMS Victory), and not 
be overwhelmed by crowds. Moreover, 
she is much more entertainingly 
and informatively displayed, all 
within the context of a reconstructed 
historic dockyard. 

■ www.hms-trincomalee.co.uk/about-us 


50 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 




Nilfanion (own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http:// 
creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], 
via Wikimedia Commons 


Maritime museums © 


8 Chatham Historic 
Dockyard 



HMS Cavalier at Chatham 

The Historic Dockyard is a poignant 
reminder that Britannia once ruled the 
waves. Ships were built here by thousands 
of workers from the time of Elizabeth 1 
until the 1980s, including HMS Victory 
and 57 assorted submarines. The 
dockyard is now a terrific and varied 
museum. It would take a whole day to 
do the place justice, but if you don't have 
that sort of time you should at least have 
a look at HMS Cavalier, a Second World 
War destroyer, and take the tour of the 
quarter-mile-long Victorian ropery. On 
the way out there is a huge RNLI shed 
full of 'stuff' including old lifeboats; a 
treasure trove indeed. 

■ www.thedockyard.co.uk 


U wick Heritage 
Museum 



A display in the Wick museum 


Sailing around the north coast of Scotland, 
or across the North Sea, Wick is one of the 
few safe havens which can be entered more 
or less anytime. It has an excellent marina 
and a fabulous local museum, just a few 
yards away, staffed by helpful, informative 
volunteers who will show you into each of 
the many rooms in case you get lost when 
going round by yourselves. And what a 
wonderful collection of stuff - lighthouse 
memorabilia, old photos by a local family 
of photographers, domestic rooms 
furnished in various styles, information 
about the local printing industry, medals, 
fishing bric-a-brac, model yachts. And to 
cap it all, a lovely garden spreads up the 
hill in terraces at the back, full of flowers. 

■ www.wickheritage.org/index.asp 



Milford Haven 
Museum 


Whether it was early in the season, or just 
very quiet, I don't know: but I was met 
here by a man who proceeded to tell me, 
most entertainingly, the story of Milford 
Haven, in about 10 minutes. Then he 
released me to explore the museum with 
far more insight than I would otherwise 
have had. Does he do this for everyone 
who wanders in off the street? What a 
treat it all was. The museum records the 
town's changing fortunes, from whaling 
to fishing to oil, and who knows where 
next. No wonder Visit Wales awarded it 
their 'Hidden Gem' accolade in 2015. 

■ www.milfordhavenmuseum.co.uk 


9 Royal Navy 
Submarine 
Museum, Gosport 


Inside HMS Alliance 


All of us surface boaties must surely 
wonder what life was and is like in a 
submarine. A good way to find out is 
by visiting the Royal Navy Submarine 
Museum in Gosport, the highlight of 
which is HMS Alliance, a late 1940s 
submarine around which you are guided 
by a retired submariner (outside school 
holidays). It is cramped, complicated, full 
of pipes, dials... and torpedoes. The tour 
includes an audio recording of depth 
charges being dropped all around: how 
very scary that must have been. 

■ www.submarine-museum.co.uk 


Belfast Titanic 
Experience 

In Belfast Lough, it is tempting 
to just pull up in either Bangor or 
Carrickfergus Marina: but if you sail 
on a bit, right into the centre of town, 
you will find pontoons very close to 
the Titanic Experience, opened in 2012. 
Modernistic, sited in the very place 
where the Titanic was built, it not only 
explores the disaster but also celebrates 
the workers who built her. The museum 


uses all the up-to-date tricks of the trade, 
including a terrific ride in a steel bucket 
up through a reconstruction of the 
shipyard as the Titanic was being built. 

■ www.titanicbelfast.com 


■ So there you are. These and many, 
many other museums are out there to 
explore if you can drag yourself away 
from your boat, or the local pub. Visit 
them, discover more about our maritime 
past - and be sure to make a donation 
on your way out! © 



Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


51 


www.wikimedia.org Milford Haven Museum/Pembrokeshire Photography 





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info@asap-supplies. com 

www. asap-supplies. com 

$■ a 









7 ay : rr 

Fin 

:>/.- . ... 


shoe 


The SoftScience Fin shoe 
fj 4 'features a non-marking, slip- 
S ~*s^esistant outsole and a 
washable, odour-resistant, 
^^removable insole. The upper 
* part of the shoe is made of 
a breathable microfibre, with a 
water flow system in the forefoot 
for getting into and out of the 
water without trailing water on your 
deck. It also dries quickly. Priced 
from £58 (€74.95), multiple colours 
available. ■ www.soft-science.eu 


Laura Hodgetts reports on the latest marine products 


WABNET is a 3/4G transceiver 
and Wi-Fi router built into an IP67 
weatherproof enclosure. Designed 
to fit to the top of your mast, it is 
promised to extend connectivity 
range by four times, with reliable 
Wi-Fi within a 300ft radius. You 
can use a duplicate of your SIM 
card on your existing mobile 
network subscription to achieve a 
connectivity range of up to 30 miles 
offshore. Alternatively, you can 
use the private WABNET roaming 
free network. The mounting arm 
is adaptable to any boat, and a 
1 2VDC power supply can be taken 
from the mast headlight or any 
other dedicated power line. Price 
£519. ■ www.wabnetmarine.com 


Pole Position rope 
handling device 

Wade Marine’s Pole Position is a specially- 
designed extendable pole with both pole and 
rope guide attachments, which can be used to 
accurately place mooring lines at a distance 
over a bollard or cleat. The rope guide should 
be attached permanently onto the mooring 
line, ready to connect with the telescopic pole. 
Two prongs on the pole guide grasp the line 
and enable it to slide into the rope guide. 

Once clicked into place, the line can be moved 
wherever is required and quickly released. It 
can also be used on rescue devices. The PP1 
pack (£71 .99) includes two rope guides; the 
PP2 pack (£59.99) includes one rope guide. 

■ www.wademarine.com 


WABNET 
mobile Wi-Fi 


Icom’s IC-M93D 
VHF/DSC 
marine radio 


Said to be the next stage 
of evolution for a VHF/ 
DSC handheld, this 
measures just 1 45mm tall 
and weighs 31 Og. It features 
a 2.4in high contrast dot 
matrix and a backlit LCD 
display, plus menu-driven 
functionality. Active noise- 
cancelling technology uses 
a digital processor to reduce 
background noise. The radio 
is designed to float on its back 
if it falls into the water, with the 
LCD, backlit keypad and distress 
button flashing, for easier retrieval. 
A man overboard function allows 
users to record the MOB time and 
position. An Aquaquake draining 
function clears water away from the 
speaker grill. The IC-M93D will be 
available later this year. Priced around 
£269.99. ■ www.icomuk.co.uk 


SatSleeve+ 
and SatSleeve 


Hotspot 


SatSleeve + and SatSleeve Hotspot, 
from mobile satellite services 
operator Thuraya, offer modern 
solutions for sailors who want to 
stay connected, however remote 
their location. The new SatSleeve 
Hotspot is a portable Wi-Fi hotspot, designed 
to make it easier to check emails, make a phone call or post on social 
media, whether you’re in the North Sea or Indian Ocean. SatSleeve+, 
also new to the market, looks like a phone cover and clips easily onto 
smartphones, turning them into satellite smartphones. Users can make 
calls, send emails and messages, and use their apps directly on their 
smartphone. Both devices have an SOS button that connects to a 
pre-set number of your choice if you find yourself in trouble. 

Both devices use Thuraya’s satellite network across 161 countries in 
Europe, Africa, Asia and Australia, and prices for both start from £400 
(before shipping and local taxes). ■ www.expansys.com 


Load-bearing collar 


Tru Design Load-Bearing Collars are designed for 
use with their skin fittings and ball valves. With the 
collar, the entire assembly is promised to withstand 
a 500lb/227kg static force applied to the tail, for a 
minimum of 30 seconds - complying with ABYC H-27 
rating. The collar was designed to eliminate the need 
for additional fasteners through the hull, and was a 
category winner in last year’s DAME design 
awards. The jury ‘appreciated this entry for its 
design simplicity’. Prices start about £8. 

■ www.bainbridgeint.com 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


53 


i ■ ’) New Gear 


Gybe Tamer 

This is said to absorb the shock loading 
of the mainsheet, particularly when 
gybing. It also reduces shock loads 
during rapid tacking, and minimises 
heeling owing to sudden gusts. Under 
light wind conditions it remains closed, 
but during gusts will extend progressively. 

When gybing, it remains closed until 
the boom passes the boat’s centreline. If this transition is rapid the Tamer will 
extend, absorbing most of the boom’s kinetic energy, before closing again. 
Under heavier winds the Tamer may extend to the maximum position, but this 
can be altered by conventional use of the mainsheet and traveller. On gybing, 
even if fully extended, it will close automatically before extending again to 
absorb the rapid movement, so during unexpected gybes it can potentially 
reduce injuries to crew and damage to rigging. It can be mounted between 
the traveller and mainsheet, or between the mainsheet and boom, using 
6mm shackles. GT-1 , suitable for up to 15m 2 mainsail area, costs £75: GT-2, 
suitable for up to 30m 2 mainsail area, costs £85. ■ www.jdp-marine.co.uk 

WAECO CRX marine 
refrigerator 

The CRX is the first marine refrigerator with 
a removable freezer compartment which 
can slide out to create a larger capacity 
fridge-only unit. Alternatively, the entire unit’s 
temperature can be reduced to 17°F (-8°C) 
to provide a freezer. The CRX features a 
flush-mount electronic thermostat control 
panel, LED illumination and a three-speed 
variable compressor. 

The refrigerator was a category winner at 
last year’s DAME design awards. The jury ‘liked its obvious flexibility and 
also the design detail evident, such as on the door catch that was nice to 
operate: a small but important point on any item of galley equipment’. 

The CRX is available with either a stainless steel door or standard door, 
with six sizes available ranging from 45lt to 136lt. Prices start from £600. 

■ www.dometic.co.uk 





LCJ Capteurs’ latest offerings 


The WindyPlug is a new interface foF 
LGJ Capteurs' ultrasonic wind 
sensors, allowing compatibility with 
existing NMEA 2000 instrument 
networks The WindyPlug also 
features an embedded barometer. 

LCJ Capteurs offer a range of 
ultrasonic wind sensors, wrih both 
wireless and wired connections They 
direct support to some brands, 
notably B&G and Raymarine, but the 
addition of NMEA 2000 opens their 
market to a wider range of equipment 
Another newcomer is the Sonic-Anemo- 
DVC. designed to connect directly to ihe 
wind sensor input on Davis instruments 
This sensor replaces mechanical 
anemometers and windvanes with 
only the need for a power supply 
WindyPlug costs €186 (£134), 
while prices for a sensor with 
WindyPtug start from £798 
{£807 84) The Sonk>Anemo- 
DVC costs €814 0 f £586.70) 
■ wwwJcjcap4eurs.com 


Ursuit FIR 



thermal heating vest 


The impressive technology 
behind this thermal heating vest 
is promised to provide a safe 
method of keeping warm, even 
if it becomes fully immersed in 
water. The Ursuit FIR Deep Heat 
System is based on far infrared 
radiation, an electromagnetic 
radialion that reaches in the 
region of 3-5cm info the body 
and is said to fast longer as it 
heats blood circulation and 
muscles, not just the pad 
touching the heating areas. SO 
your fingers and toes don't 
stay cold. Once charged, the 
lightweight, battery-controlled 
vest stays warm for three to five 
hours, depending on the heal 
level selected. The fleece vest 
has three built-in thermal pads, 
a battery and charger Three 
heat levels, 60 C, 50 "C and 
40 D C. are operated via one 



button, which also turns it on/off 
and locks onto a heat setting 
when you press and hold for 
three seconds. Price £249. 

■ www.andark.co.uk 


PBO verdict 


My mother-in-law Mag Hodgetts, who has been feeling particularly 
cold after knee replacement surgery, put the Ursuit thermal heating 
vest to the test over the winter. Mag was surprised by the four hours it 
took for the unit to charge, but said the vest then warmed up quickly 
She found it comfortable to wear, although the battery pack was ‘a bit 
chunky’ in the pocket. Mag said her top half was kept toasty warm for 
the three hours the vest worked in the highest setting, but not the rest 
of her. My husband Drew also tested out the Ursuit vest and found it 
worked well, changing temperature quickly on different settings. He 
thought the lock function was a bit temperamental - sometimes not 
locking as expected, so he’d have to click back through the settings. 
Drew thought it did the job, but was quite expensive. 

Laura Hodgetts 



FUR AX8 Marine Thermal 
Monitoring System 


The AX8 combines thermal 


and visible cameras in 


a small package, and 
integrates with 
Raymarine LightHouse II- 
powered multifunction 
displays to keep an 
eye on critical 
equipment such as 
engines, exhaust 
manifolds and shaft 


bearings. The system 
was awarded a 


Special Mention at the 

DAME 2015 design awards. The jury commented: The AX8 visually 
highlights changes in temperature caused by hot spots and flooding 
and audibly alerts to them via programmable alarms. It also features 
FLIR’s MSX technology to improve image interpretation.’ 

The recommended retail price is €1 ,095 (£788.50). 

■ www.flir.com 


54 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 



WWW. JimmyGreen . co.uk 

Reliable, Continuous Service since 1981 


On the telephone 
In store 

Online ^4 


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®> Nautical know-how 


Seamanship tips from PBO readers and experts icc^gostortowr^M'us 



More sticky situations 

Sticky Stapylton dispenses a few more hard-won seamanship tips 


TIP 


Engine 

checks 


Daily engine checks 
are an essential part 
of ensuring that you will be able to 
get home or out of trouble when 
the wind dies. The photo (right) 
shows an accumulation of black 
dust in the engine compartment 
where the alternator, cam and 
crankshaft wheels may have 
become misaligned and caused 
excessive wear on the drive belt. 
The belt could be depressed 
at least 3 A\r\ and the engine 
compartment was covered in 
fine black dust, which showed 
that the belt was wearing away. 




Guarding against belt failure 

A close look at the nearer old belt in this photo (left) 
shows that it has worn considerably narrower than 
the new one. If the belt fails there is a chance of 
overheating, engine damage and, almost certainly, 
the need for a new impeller. 



TIP 


umbrellas 
on boats 


There is an old saying that one 
of the most useless things on a 
boat is an umbrella. I disagree. Once, when 
fitting a lifebuoy holder onto the pushpit of a 
boat, I set up my umbrella underneath the 
fixture point. In the cold weather, and with 
a fiddly nut and bolt, I dropped the nut - 
but it was saved by the umbrella! 



Extemporisation 
panned out well 

No anchor ball on board? We used a two- 
handled saucepan to indicate we were at anchor! 


TIP 


Digging in your anchor 


4 


Every now and again I go to 
sea with sailors who do not 
anchor very often. Inevitably, 
with yachts which are more 
reliable than before, and with the plethora 
of marinas giving simple berthing, we are 
encouraged to take the more convenient 
option of a pontoon berth. It is important 
that those who have to anchor are aware 
that the windlass is a device for laying 
and weighing an anchor: it is not to be 
used for digging the anchor in. Many 
years ago I was on a charter boat 
where the anchor had been dug in 
by going astern with some force, I 
assumed with the chain still on the 


gypsy. The windlass had been torn 
completely off its mountings. 

It is essential, therefore, to rig a snubbing 
line which will take the strain when digging 
in your anchor. A good old rolling hitch 
is tied onto the chain and taken to a cleat 
rather than the windlass. It is important also 
that the warp you use for this is nylon, which 
is up to 30% more elastic than polyester. 
Nylon will absorb the energy generated 
when a yacht moves, giving you a more 
comfortable rest when at anchor. Provided 
you have plenty of room to swing at anchor 
and if there is a forecast of a wind increase, 
it is worthwhile letting out more warp to 
give you a greater length of elasticity. 



60 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 







Boats <2) 


Skep has proved to 
be weatherly and fast 


Skep and the 
Steynor Keel 

Ben Meakins is invited aboard Will 
Steynor’s 7.6m (25ft) gaff cutter Skep , 
fitted with Will’s own practical, ingenious, 
space-saving design innovation - 
the Steynor Lifting Keel 


Step’s trial launch, with her keel locked down 


L ifting keels have many advantages - but the 
design has generally not moved on for many 
years. Lift keels are usually one of two 
designs: a plate which hinges up like a dinghy 
centreboard, or a daggerboard which drops 
down through a slot. These have worked for years, but 
have their drawbacks: they take up valuable space in the 
cabin and tend not to lock down, which means that they 
can withdraw should the boat invert. 

That’s the problem that encouraged Will Steynor, a 
retired airline pilot, to come up with his own design. Will’s rfV 
background, flying BA aircraft before his retirement - and 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


61 






^ Boats 


Operating the Steynor Keel 



D This shows the extended keel and the box into which it retracts. In this 
situation, with the keel touching the ground, the keel is locked in position. 



□ Pulling on the 
retraction strap, 
which runs between the 
two plates and 
terminates inside the 
bulb, initially moves the 
top of the aft plate 
rearwards. This 
movement allows the 
top of the aft plate to 
clear the down lock 
stop, which it engages 
with when the keel is 
touching the ground. 



making guitars, cabinet work and 
keeping bees ever since, as well as 
a childhood spent inventing and 
tinkering - led him towards a solution. 
‘Having flown for years, I have never 
boarded an aircraft to find a large box in 
the cabin to house the undercarriage,’ 
he told PBO. ‘On small cruising boats, 
space is at a premium - but with 
swinging or lifting keels there is 
always a keel box in the cabin.’ 

His solution is the Steynor Keel. 
Housed in a shallow box which will fit 
under the cabin floor, the keel is similar 
in principle to an aircraft undercarriage. 
Consisting of two parts that are linked 
with a hinge located in the keel bulb, it 
extends under its own weight, and locks 
into place to become a fixed keel that 
can take the full weight of the boat. 

To retract, a manual or electric winch 
tensions a webbing strap which runs 
down between the two halves of the 
keel, which lifts the bulb, and the top of 
the aft half of the keel runs along rollers, 
allowing the whole assembly to raise 
and retract into its box. This also means 
that the centre of gravity of the keel is 
low even when retracted, making the 
boat nicely stable even with the keel up. 



LEFT The keel was mocked up in plywood, before being cast in iron - seen here in the foundry 


62 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 




Skep and the Steynor Keel <2» 



Q This shows the keel partially retracted. For this boat, 
the strap enters the keel box at the rear. The strap then 
passes over a roller at point X, over the top of Plate 2 and then 
down a slot in the joint between the two plates and is attached 
to the hinged link. The keel bulb houses the hinged link. 



□ The hinged link is now visible, as is the strap connected to it and the slot in 
the front edge of Plate 2. The front plate, Plate 1 , is hinged on a substantial 
shaft and is similar in most respects to a swing keel. The rear plate, Plate 2, 
is connected to Plate 1 by the hinged link at the bottom and at the top is 
supported on a cross shaft with a pair of 2in wheels. The wheels run on 
guide rails which are on the inner faces of the keel box. 




LEFT An electric 
winch raises and 
lowers the keel. 
The webbing is 
about 2m long, 
so a purchase is 
used to act as an 
indicator and to 
operate the limit 
switches (circled) 


INSET The keel is 
controlled by this 
switch, concealed 
to starboard of the 
companionway 



A close look at Skep 


Having built a prototype of the system, 

Will’s next step was to get the keel 
installed in a boat of his own. Having 
always wanted to build his own boat, 
he killed two birds with one stone and 
commissioned designer Stuart Roy 
to design him a 7.6m (25ft) gaffer, 

Into which his revolutionary keel 
coufcJ be installed. 

Skep, named after the domed hives 
used in his beekeeping hobby, was 
the result. She was built over the 
space of three years, and her 
designer had some tricky design 
parameters to work with - the 
boat had to fit through the door 
of Will’s workshop! Built upside 
down, the hull was planked with 
12mm marine plywood, sheathed 
with glass and epoxy and painted 
before being turned over, fitted out and 
the keel added before her trial launch in July 2013. 

Will is delighted with the result, and receives kind comments 
and praise wherever he and Skep go. But there’s more to her 
than meets the eye - Skep is something of a wolf in sheep’s 
clothing. Her fin keel and bulb gives her excellent windward 
performance, but the Steynor keel box, living under the 



Skep’s cabin 
table features a 
marquetry beehive 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


63 




CjJ) Boats - Skep and the Steynor Keel 


floorboards, gives her plenty of space - 
and standing headroom - inside. In fact, 
when we visited her at Poole Yacht 
Haven after the Round the Island Race 
in 201 5, she felt much bigger than her 
25ft dimensions would suggest. 

Will’s lineage - he comes from a 
family of engineers and inventors - was 
much in evidence as he showed me 
around the boat. Some of the tweaks 
and design features are inspired. 

The keel, around which the boat is 
built, can be operated either by a 
manual or electric winch. Will has used 
an electrical winch, operated by a 
switch in the companionway. A system 
of block and tackles operates the limit 
switches for the keel, and provides a 
visual indicator of its position. The winch 
is mounted in front of the engine and is 
contained within the engine box. 


The forepeak 

The forepeak, meanwhile, houses the 
water tanks underneath a generous 
double berth. In common with many 
boats, there is a removable infill piece to 
turn the two single bunks into a double 
berth - but Will’s is different to most in 
that it hinges on its forward edge. 
Underneath, a clever system uses two 
wooden springs and a pull cord to 
make a quick-release and easy-to-store 
locking system for the panel - the flap 
and cushion fold down when not in use. 

Will’s particularly proud of his saloon 
table. When not in use it folds up 
against the bulkhead, with the boat’s 
logo - a bee skep - inlaid into the 
visible face. It folds down and pivots on 
a clever mounting to make a small 
table, but if required this can also fold 
out again to double in size, revealing 
some more marquetry in the form of 
a compass rose. An angled support 
extends from beneath the table. 

In the cockpit, a similar table can be 
removed from its mountings in the 
cockpit locker and fits under the tiller 
with minimal fuss. 


The table can be used half-size, or, as here, folded out to full size 


The forepeak infill piece hinges and slots into place 


The boat’s electronics are nicely 
hidden, too. A Garmin chart plotter 
sits on the forward bulkhead of the 
cockpit, but is on a removable panel 
which can be reversed to protect the 
plotter - which can then be used 
from the skipper’s bunk inside, while 
remaining waterproof. The mounting 
socket and electrical connections for 
the tiller pilot are hidden in a flush- 
mounted box inside the cockpit 
coaming, keeping them out of 
eyesight and out of harm’s way. 


A system of wooden springs and stainless rods secures the infill Gaff cutter rig 


The table stows on the bulkhead 



The Garmin chart plotter can be viewed inside and out 



A cockpit table fits under the tiller 


S/cep’s gaff cutter rig has proved easy 
to handle, and the boat has entered 
two Round the Island Races since her 
launch. In the first of them, lack of wind 
meant that Skep had to retire along with 
more than half the fleet, but last year’s 
was plenty windy, and Will recalls 
passing some production cruising 
yachts whose crews looked surprised at 
being passed by a gaffer - her secret 
weapon hidden well below the water. 

He’s delighted with the boat, and 
particularly the keel, which offers the 
advantages of a fin keel with all the 
benefits of a lifting keel - but none 
of the drawbacks traditionally 
associated with keel boxes and barked 
shins. He would welcome enquiries 
from anyone interested in adding one 
to their own boat, or in licensing the 
keel to boatbuilders. 

■ www.steynor-keel.co.uk 


64 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 




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<2> Destination guide 



Rhyl life 

Times are changing for this 
historic North Wales harbour, 
as Ali Wood discovers 


I n the autumn, yachtsmen 
from Conwy, Anglesey and 
beyond can be seen making 
their way en masse to Rhyl. 
On a clear day, harbour 
master Arthur Davies can see 
them 12 miles away rounding 
Llandudno’s Great Orme and 
arriving, a few hours later, at 
Rhyl’s futuristic lifting bridge, 
which spans the River Clywd at 
the entrance to the inner harbour. 

Why, with its mountain-fringed 
coast, historic towns and quaint 
anchorages, does the Menai Strait 
not keep these boat owners over 
winter? The answer is simple: cost, 
convenience and shelter. Rhyl is 
like a second home for boats; it’s a 
convenient bolt-hole for the north- 
west cities, a pleasant location to lay 
up for winter chores, and the rent is 
reasonable. But even in the spring, 
when the cruisers return to their 
deep-water moorings, Rhyl’s drying 
harbour attracts dinghies, trailer- 
sailers and motorboats, whose 
owners rent caravans for the season 
and launch from the slipways at 
the harbour and Rhyl Yacht Club. 
Built by Edward I to supply 



Rhyl at low water, photographed by harbour master Arthur Davies 


Rhuddlan Castle by sea, Rhyl 
Harbour is over 700 years old. Even 
the yacht club dates to 1 880, when 
the town was a vibrant holiday 
resort with a shipyard and railway 
that crossed the harbour with a 
swing bridge, its train timetables 
scheduled around tides. These 
days the harbour is considerably 
quieter and a popular spot for 
cyclists, walkers and birdwatchers. 

The harbour’s amazing at low 


water,’ says Arthur Davies. ‘You can 
see half a dozen white egrets, 
curlews and oystercatchers, as 
well as turnstones feeding around 
the banks on the flood.’ Adjoining 
the harbour is Horton’s Nose 
nature reserve, one of the last sand 
dune systems on the North Wales 
coast, which is criss-crossed with 
boardwalks and marram grass. 
From here you can spot the odd 
lizard, skylark or harbour seal, and 


i 





: 

| 

: 


can look across to the Victorian 
and Edwardian buildings of Rhyl’s 
West Parade. 

Arthur’s office is the top floor of the 
smart new harbour complex, which 
has a cafe and cycle shop. When 
he’s not boat (and bird) spotting, 
he’s busy lifting the 50m-tall mast 
of Pont y Ddraig (Dragon’s Bridge) 
to let boats in and out, before 
closing it to let cyclists onto National 
Route 5, which crosses the bridge 
and joins Reading to Holyhead. 

When I find Arthur he’s single- 
handedly launching a fishing 
vessel called Eleanor with a 
remote-control hoist. Clad in his 
waders, he reverses the boat down 
the slipway until it floats off its 
slings. Skipper Tony and son 
Simon then motor Eleanor under 
the bridge to the waiting pontoon 
where I join them for a sail. 

I learn that this is Eleanor ’ s first 
outing since she broke her springs 
in the harbour eight weeks ago, 
sustaining hull damage. It was 
blowing less than 20 knots, but the 
combination of wind direction and 
a low-pressure system caused 1 m 
swells on the slipway. 


66 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 





‘It’s best to avoid Rhyl in 
north-westerlies to westerlies over 
Force 4 because of the swells and 
the difficulty getting in,’ advises 
Tony. The channel is very narrow. 
There are lots of sandbars, and it’s 
difficult to control the boat when 
the waves roll in. They pick you 
up and you find yourself surfing.’ 
Because of the damage Eleanor 
sustained, Tony would like to see 
the harbour wall extended. This is 
something Arthur agrees with, as it 
would deflect swells and prevent 
further silting of the harbour, which 
worsened as a result of the bridge 
works. There’s a bank marked by a 
pink buoy, and the silt is being 
dragged away by diggers every 
three months. However, re-profiling 
work needs to be done gradually 
so as not to disturb the ecology, 
which is essential to marine life and 
wading birds. Ideally, Arthur would 
like to see a new marina at Rhyl 
too, which would improve sea 
defences and accommodate 
yachtsmen at all states of the tide. 
Before Christmas there were 
developers on site looking at 
the feasibility. 


Rhyl 





Pilotage - approaching Rhyl 


On a clear day, the Sky Tower on Rhyl seafront can be seen from 12 miles away 


waiting pontoon. However, 
this is used by commercial 
vessels in the day, so is for 
short stays only. 

To proceed to the inner 
harbour, leave the centre 
harbour pontoon to starboard 
(marked with a preferred 
channel to port beacon, 
green conical topmark 
and G(2+1)6s light). 

Pass under the pedestrian/ 
cycle bridge southern span. 

Contacts 

Rhyl Harbour, Horton’s 
Nose Lane, Rhyl LL18 5AX 
Tel: 01824 708400, email: 
rhyl.harbour@denbighshire. 
gov.uk 

■ www.denbighshireleisure. 
co.uk/rhylharbour.html 

■ Rhyl Yacht Club, 
www.rhylyachtclub.co.uk 

Rhyl Harbour 
facilities 

■ 12-ton subhoist boat lift 

■ Boat park and launch 

■ Slipway (65 x 8.5m, 

1 in 10 slope) 

■ Moorings 

■ Visitor pontoons with 
power and water 

■ Cafe, tourist information 
and bike hire 


Rhyl Harbour is located to 
the west of Rhyl and is the 
boundary between Rhyl and 
Kinmel Bay. It has a drying 
height of 4m above chart 
datum, and is only suitable 
for vessels capable of taking 
to the ground. Entry and exit 
by a 1 .5m-draught vessel 
should only be undertaken 
during the period +/- 2 hours 
high water. Access to the inner 
harbour is via the pedestrian/ 
cycle bridge and subject to 
wind strength and tidal height. 
To arrange opening, call the 
harbour office on VHF Chi 4. 

A good 
landmark 

On a clear 
day, the Sky 
Tower on Rhyl 
seafront can 
be seen from 
12 miles away 
and is a good landmark to 
head for from the north. 

If approaching from the 
west, call the harbour master 
to open the bridge when 
reaching the Fairway Buoy 
N53°19.60, W003°32.00. 

If approaching from other 
directions, call the harbour 
master 1 NM from the Seaward 




Seaward Perch 


Perch (Light Q.R), which 
marks the start of the 
channel, N53°19.45, 
W003°30.43. 

Note, when the concrete base 
is covered, there is around 0.9m 
of water in the shallowest part of 
the channel. Stay no further than 
15m from the Perch. Stay close to 
the flashing port-hand beacons. 
Deepest water is between 5m and 
20m from the beacons. If arriving 
out of hours, or if the bridge is 
closed, moor alongside the 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


67 




< 2 ») Destination guide 


‘Strategically, it’s always been 
thought that this is a good area for 
a marina,’ says Arthur. ‘It’s a good 
stopover for Liverpool, which you 
can only access an hour-and-a-half 
either side of high water. It would 
be similar to Conwy, with a moving 
sill.’ In the meantime, plans are in 
place to build a stone groyne to 
the west of the harbour entrance, 
which will break up the wave action 
in westerly to north-westerly winds, 
making the entrance safer and 
reducing sandbanks. 

Tony releases the lines and 
Simon takes the helm, driving out 
past the port beacons that mark 
the entrance to the channel. This is 
a trial run for Eleanor before she 
takes passengers out fishing on 
the weekend. In the distance I 
can see the Rhyl Flats offshore 
windfarm, a 25-turbine operation 
that yachtsmen mostly sail inside 
of unless heading to the Isle of 
Man. Work is still being carried out 
at the site by catamarans, and one 
was brought back to Rhyl Harbour 
recently by the RNLI after a crew 
member slipped and broke his leg 
while trying to put out a fire. 

After a motor along the coast, 
Tony is satisfied that Eleanor's 
running well, and we turn around 
and follow the channel markers 
back into port. Simon points out 
the 240ft Sky Tower, a landmark 
since 1993 when it was acquired 
from Glasgow Garden Festival. He 


i 

3 

; 

I 

■ 

: 

i 

; 


■ 

I 

; 

1 

| 

■ 

i 

: 


3 

i 

! 

3 

; 

! 




Fishing boat Eleanor in a remote-control hoist 


Arthur Davies reverses the hoist down the slipway... 


...until the boat reaches the water 


Eleanor floats free of her slings 


remembers going up the tower 
with his friends, but tells me it’s 
now closed, and the gondola 
removed amid safety concerns. He 
also points out the site of a pub 
where he used to play in a band, 
but that was later demolished. 

They let Rhyl get run down, 
but it’s nice they’re putting it back 


together again,’ he says. There 
was so much that was good about 
this place that they could have 
kept going, and now they’re 
having to redo it all.’ 

Like many Victorian seaside 
resorts that lost out to the package 
tour industry, Rhyl might have 
! seen better times. However, Simon 


] points out the site where work will 
; shortly begin on a new retail and 
leisure park. As we return to port 
| under the lifting bridge, and pass 
the latte-drinking crowds outside 
the Harbour Hub Cafe, I sense the 
: town’s revival is just around the 
corner. And as for a marina? Well, 

[ watch this space! 


Meet the people who make Rhyl work... 


rjL Frank 

Goodchild, 

| ‘I like to go 
out fishing 
from Rhyl. 

You catch a lot of mackerel in 
the summer, and a few cod 
and bass. 

‘We have boats at Rhyl all 
year round, although the 
majority lift out for the winter. 

We mainly go to Conwy from 
here - it takes around five 
hours. Lots of our members 
moor there for the summer but 
lay-up here over winter as we’re 
cheaper than anywhere else. 

It’s easy to park up and there 
are nice walks along the 
seafront, too. 

There are two pubs down 
the road, and both of them are 
pretty good and keep their 
prices down.’ 


Mike George, 
secretary, 

Rhyl YC 

‘It’s really easy to 
keep your boat 
here and launch, 
although the 
harbour can be a 
little challenging at times because 
of the currents. I tend to go out 
on the ebb to the windfarms, do a 
bit of fishing and come back on 
the flood. If I was to go overnight 
I’d head for Conwy. 

‘Rhyl is a private members club, 
but visiting boat owners are 
welcome. We have toilets and 
shower facilities. Any member 
of the club would be pleased to 
welcome you. If you’ve got time 
to explore, you can head down 
the coast to Colwyn Bay and 
Llandudno. St Asaph cathedral is 
also really beautiful, especially 
when there are choral services 
going on. They always make 
you feel welcome.’ 


Arthur Davies, 

harbour 

master 

P ‘Up until the 

flpr \ ’60s this quay 

wall was used 
i by coasters 
bringing timber 
from Scandinavia. The boatyard 
was a timber yard, and it had its 
own railway. Just outside our 
building we have a turntable, and 
that was the old engine shed. 

‘We’re here in the summer from 
8am until 8pm and in the winter 
from 9pm until 5pm. We don’t 
get many visitors. We have a few 
from the Wirral and West Kirby. 
Generally, they’re 26 to 28ft 
bilge- and lifting-keel yachts. 

We have space for half a dozen 
visitors here. When the yacht 
clubs lift out for winter, we’ll get 
a dozen or so rafted up in the 
inner harbour the night before. 

‘It’s not a bad trip to Conwy 
from here. Launch here an 


l hour before high water and you 
can still get in over the banks 
at Conwy, to save you going all 
the way to the Fairway buoy - 
which adds three to four miles.’ 
} (See ‘Convivial Conwy’ 

; PBO October 2015). 



Tony Parry, skipper of 
fishing vessel Eleanor 

f ‘There’s a preferred channel 
marker in the harbour - probably 
the only one in the Irish Sea! It’s 
a preferred channel to port: you 
can use the starboard channel if 
you wish, but this becomes a pain 
in the backside for us when we’re 

l trying to manoeuvre from pontoon 



68 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


Rhyl ( 1 



A view of the Horton’s Nose nature reserve 

Exploring Rhyl and the countryside 


Y ou can pick up a series of 
town trail leaflets at the tourist 
information hub by the cafe in 
Rhyl Harbour. 

Start with Rhyl itself and visit the 
site of Rhyl’s biggest mystery, Little 
Venice. Under the buildings of West 
Parade, where the Queen’s Palace 
arcade and ballroom once were, 
there’s said to have been a flooded 
basement full of gondolas and 
canals! The building was burnt 
down in 1907, but it’s possible that 
Little Venice still survives. 

You can explore Edwardian Rhyl 
at the free art gallery and museum 


The Harbour Hub Cafe 

to pontoon to pick up our 
passengers. We’d prefer leisure 
boats to stick to the other side. 

‘I’ve been sailing around 
Rhyl for 48 years and Simon’s 
been out with me here since 
he was two years old. In fact, 
there’s a picture of me in Rhyl 
Harbour on the front cover of 
PBO in the early ’70s - the 
boat was called Dolphin. 

There are a few good places 


inside the library, see the ballroom 
where The Beatles once played, 
and walk around Marine Lake, the 
only saltwater lake in North Wales. 
Here, steam enthusiasts can also 
hop aboard a vintage locomotive 
and ride the oldest miniature 
railway in Britain, afterwards 
exploring the hands-on museum. 

For family fun there’s the Drift Park, 
with garden, play area, mini golf 
course, open-air theatre, skatepark 
and paddling pool complete with 
. water jets. Nature lovers will enjoy 
the Seaquarium, Horton’s Nose 
nature reserve and walks along the 


to eat around here. The 
Crossroads cafe opens at 
8am - they do a decent 
breakfast, and the Spot On 
cafe, over the bridge in the 
industrial estate, opens at 6am 
in the summer. The Harbour 
Hub cafe is good, too. For 
lunch, I like Mike’s Chippy, 
and for dinner you can do 
‘all-you-can-eat’ for £9.50 
at Bombay Buffet.’ 


three miles of golden sands. 
Nearby in Prestatyn is the start of 
Offa’s Dyke Path National Trail. 

Further afield 

If you’ve packed your folding bike, 
you can cycle alongside the River 
Clwyd, enjoy sea views from 
National Cycle Route 5, or visit one 
of the nearby towns. Three miles 
south of Rhyl is the medieval town 
of Rhuddlan with its castle built by 
Edward I and 700-year-old church. 
It was here that Edward laid down 
the law for the next 250 years and 
presented his baby son to Welsh 
nobility as the first English ‘Prince 
of Wales’. Nearby in Bodelwyddan 
is the ‘Marble Church’ with its 62m 
tower, a masterpiece of the Victorian 
Gothic Revival. Outside are rows of 
pristine white graves containing the 
remains of over 80 Canadian First 
World War soldiers. After the war 
the soldiers were confined at 
Kinmel Camp while waiting for a 
ship to take them home. Many 
succumbed to the Spanish flu 
pandemic, but five lost their lives 
needlessly in a riot over food. 

Six miles from Rhyl, St Asaph has 
the smallest ancient cathedral in 
Britain, but has a big history. It was 
founded by the Normans in the 12th 
century, damaged by Edward I, 
burned by Owain Glyndwr and 
used as a stable by Roundheads 
during the Civil War. It’s also home 
to a real treasure - a 1 6th century 
William Morgan bible, the very 
first to be translated into Welsh, 
helping to preserve one of 
Europe’s oldest languages. 

Set on a rocky hill with views 
across the Vale of Clwyd, the 
historic town of Denbigh has more 
listed buildings than any other 
town in Wales, and is crowned by 
the great walled garrison of Edward 
I and the ruins of his castle. 



Watery 

graves 

■ In 19Q6, the three-masted 
Canadian cargo ship The City 
of Ottawa was abandoned in 
Rhyl Harbour after sustaining 
storm damage. Its timbers 
constitute the biggest remains 
of any Canadian ship of rls 
kind, and Ottawa City Council 
requested they be relumed 
However, while funding was 
scoured for a survey of the 
wreck in 2008. it was deemed 
too cosliy to raise. See 
defence work in 201 1 was 
carried out around the wreck, 
and rt remains on a sandbar 
to (his day. visible at low tide, 

■ Opposite Rhyl's aquarium 
is a memorial to six lifeboat 
crew who drowned when 
thar boat (he Gwytan-y-Mor 
capsized in 1 853. less than 
a mile from the shore 

■ The wreck of Resurgam, 
one of the world's earliest 
powered submarines, was 
discovered five miles offshore 
by a diver in 1995 Built in 
Birkenhead in 1879. this 
steam-powered submersible 
sank while under tow for 
Portsmouth Its name - Latin 
for ) shall rise again - has 
sadly not proved prophetic 

■ in 1939, the Royal Navy s 
worst peacetime tragedy took 
place in Liverpool Bay, just 1 2 
miles off the Great Dime 
Ninety nine men lost their 
lives when submarine HMS 
Thetis flooded during sea 
trials and became trapped on 
the seabed A botched rescue 
attempt and poor conditions 
led to the suffocation of ihe 
men. whose bodies were not 
recovered for another four 
months, aftef World War II 
had broken out 


CHARTS & PILOT BOOK 


■ Admiralty chart 1464 
Menai Strait 

■ Admiralty chart 1463 
Conwy Bay and approaches 

■ Imray chart C52 Cardigan Bay 
to Liverpool 

■ Cruising 
Anglesey and 
Adjoining Waters 
by Ralph Morris, 
published 
by Imray (JTJ) 



Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


69 




FBO practical 


Over to you, Maestro 



Stu Davies bought an oily Perkins Prima lump from 
an old Austin Rover Maestro to use as a spare engine 
for his boat: here, he explains his reasoning and 
carries out a timely strip-down and rebuild 


M y Beneteau Oceanis 
381 Sacha, like other, 
similar boats of its 
age, was fitted with 
the Volvo Penta 

MD22L, a 50hp diesel engine. This, 
and its derivatives - the TMD22 and 
TAMD22 - were based on the Perkins 
Prima engine, which was developed 
for British Leyland’s Maestro and 
Montego cars. It was also fitted to 
the LDV 200 van. 

The important factor for us is that 
most of the spares for these vehicle 
engines fit our boat engines. They 
are a lot cheaper than VP parts! The 
LDV 200 van engine in particular is 
closest to ours, with the freshwater 
pump and in some respects the starter 
motor being the same. The difference is 
that VP used a cable battery negative 
return, ie the block isn’t connected 
electrically, so earthing for the starter 
and alternator is achieved by separate 
cables. The glow plugs utilise a strange 
system: they are earthed through the 


block, so there is a relay in the system 
that temporarily earths the block while 
the glow plugs are used! The relays 
and control box for this can usually 
be seen on the aft port side of the 
engine. In an emergency, I suspect 
that an (early model) LDV 200 van 
starter etc could be pressed into use, 
but some serious temporary wiring 
would have to be done. 

The compression ratios were subtly 
different in the various forms of engines, 
ranging from 17:1 (MD22L) to 17.5:1 
(TAMD22) and 18:1 (MD22P and 
TMD22). The compression ratio on 
the Maestro turbo is 1 8:1 : mine is 
17:1, not enough difference for me 
to worry about. 

The injector pump is a basic Bosch 
EPVE. (The Bosch VE has been fitted 
to millions of vehicle engines, so it is 
familiar to most injector and pump 
service shops.) The injectors are the 
single-injection kind, known to all 
injector workshops and simple to 
test and service. 


The 
cylinder 
head was 
the first 
thing to 
come off 


Sourcing an engine 

Vehicle spares, as I have said, are a lot 
cheaper than VP spares, and over the 
years I have taken advantage of that fact 
to service my engine cheaply and also to 
write articles on which parts fit, where to 
find them and how to fit them. Sacha is 
now 16 years old, and so is the engine. 
Consequently, the vehicle spares are 
getting harder to find. (How many 
Montegos and Maestros do you see 
on the road nowadays?) 

I knew from the green paint on my 
engine fasteners that it had never been 
apart: and while it was still going as well 
as ever, at some point a rebuild would 
be required. While engine parts are 
still available at a reasonable price, 

I decided to look for a second-hand 
Prima engine so that I could rebuild 
the basic block and cylinder head as 


70 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 





Car engine as boat spare 




Once I had got the head off, I could 
see that there was some light By undoing the 10mm socket bolts, the upper half of the 

corrosion on the cylinder walls cam carrier comes off... revealing the camshaft (below) 




Cylinder head removal 

I started the job by stripping off all the 
vehicle stuff. It was interesting to note that 
at the back of the engine, where our raw 
water pump is, they used the take-off for 
the power steering pump - and there 
was a thing driven by the camshaft that 
I found out was a vacuum pump for the 
brakes on the car. There is no vacuum 
on the manifold of an open throttle diesel: 
I hadn’t thought of that! 

The cylinder head was the first thing 
to come off. It was made of aluminium, 
another innovation from the design 
team, and consequently the head bolts 
were very tight. They were 15mm across 
flats, an unusual size. (I had found 
reference to them on a Maestro forum: 
six-point sockets are preferable to use, 
the ordinary ones break.) I have a 2ft, 

V 2 in drive breaker bar in my toolkit, and 
it took my 1 5 stone bouncing on the 
bar to get the bolts undone. There was 
no corrosion, they were just tight! The 
torque for reassembling is 90Nm plus 
a quarter of a turn, done up in stages. 
(The manual is available online: Google 
is your friend.) 

Once I had got the head off I could see 
that there was some light corrosion on 
the cylinder walls from where the engine 
had been standing, but nothing too 
serious. The overhead cam is integral in 
the cylinder head, and by undoing the 
1 0mm socket bolts the upper half of the 
cam carrier comes off: the cam can then 
be removed, giving access to the valve 
buckets. I used a magnet to lift these 
out, exposing the valves and springs. 
The important bit here is to line them in 


a standby. A few years ago, second- 
hand Maestro or Montego engines 
were easy to find on eBay. They were 
sought after by off-road Land Rover 
enthusiasts because they were so 
cheap, fuel-efficient and reliable. 

(The Prima was a surprise to everyone 
when it first came out. With its direct 
injection system, with the combustion 
space in the piston, it rapidly became 
a favourite of the fleet managers of 
the day. It actually came close to saving 
British Leyland: a pity about the styling 
and rustproofing of the cars!) However, 

I digress. Nowadays, finding a second- 
hand example is more difficult. 

I tried looking on eBay for weeks: 
some real dogs came along, and a 
complete van at one point, but none 
of the offerings were good enough. 
Then I struck gold: a turbo Maestro 
engine turned up in a scrapyard at 
Bagillt, not too far away from me. 

I went to have a look. It had been 
described as a low-mileage example 
that had been driven from Caernarfon, 
and it turned over - just! The fact that 
it was a turbo wasn’t a problem: the 
only difference was in the injector pump 
and a slight change in the compression 
ratio. I took a punt on it, and £150 



It’s important to line up the valve buckets in a numbered row 


changed hands. It was a rusting, oily 
mess, but it had the same injectors 
that were fitted to my engine (not all 
of them are, with some having the 
later dual injection point ones), plus 
a turbo that I could flog on eBay to 
help defray my costs. I got it home 
with the help of a friend and his sturdy 
trailer. I had forgotten how heavy the 
older diesels are! 

During my search for spares I also 
discovered www.parts4engines.co.uk, 
based in Birmingham: the proprietor 
is a yachtie, and sources spares for 
the older VP and Perkins engines. 
Where they can, they are actually 
getting parts such as gasket sets and 
bearings made, plus water pumps for 
the MD22 if there is enough demand. 
Check out the website: there are 
lots of bits for our engines there. 



I used my trusty valve spring compressor to compress 
the valve springs one by one 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


71 




fflo PRACTICAL 


a numbered row, then the valve 
clearance adjusting shims can be lifted 
out of their recess on the valve stem 
and kept with their buckets. This is 
important, because otherwise 
reassembly becomes a nightmare, 
with the clearances all messed up. 

I used my trusty valve spring 
compressor to compress the valve 
springs one by one, so as to wriggle 
out the collets. 


■ TOP TIP: I use a socket that is a 
touch bigger than the valve collets 
and stem, and place it on the top of 
the valve, with the valves and head flat 
on the bench so the valve can’t move, 
and give it a tap with a hammer. This 
action loosens the collets, which jam 
because they are tapered, and makes 
using the compressor easier. 


I put the valves with their respective 
buckets and didn’t mix them up. They 
were only lightly begrimed with carbon, 
but needed a bit of work and a light 
grinding. There was no play in the 
stems, but I wanted to change the 
stem seals. 

Other stuff comes off 

While the engine was loose on the floor I 
also undid the main front pulley bolt and 
the flywheel bolts. The front pulley is 
24mm and very tight. I wasn’t going to 
use the injector pump, cam belt or any 
of the ancillary bits, so I didn’t bother 
with timing marks etc while I 
disassembled it. I put two 6mm bolts 
through the injector pump pulley into its 
locking threads and used them to lock 
the engine while I bounced on the 
breaker bar. The flywheel bolts were 
relatively easy to undo. 

I then removed the rest of the bits such 
as the injector pump and mount, engine 
mounts, oil filler and flywheel housing 
backing plate. This is where the car 
engine differs, with a dissimilar housing 
and the starter motor on the opposite 
side to ours. 



This is the flywheel end of the engine: 
the belt you can see is the old steering 
pump belt 



Injectors and glow plugs 

The next job was to remove the 
injectors and the glow plugs. They 
were also tight! The injectors are held 
in place by a single bolt and sprung 
rectangular washers: easy to undo, but 
the combination of an aluminium head, 
stainless shim spacer and steel injector 
is a recipe for corrosion, especially as 
they faced the front of the car and 
the weather. 

I took out the clamp bolts and 
clamps. There were two flats on the 
body of the injector and I used a large 
adjustable spanner on these to try 
twisting them. It took a combination of 
freeing oil, heat from my propane gun, 
brute force and perseverance to get 
them to move: the car was from the 
mid-1990s, and hadn’t ever had a 
spanner on the engine! Eventually 
they came loose and were removed. 
There’s a copper sealing washer on 
the bottom of the injectors: these 
sometimes come out with the injector, 
but sometimes stick. In this instance, 
two did - but I knew how to get them 
out. I took an 8mm threaded bolt, 
ground a small taper on the end and 
screwed it a couple of turns into the 
washer down the hole, and wiggled. 
Out they came on the end of the bolt. 



The glow plugs were the same, 
stainless in aluminium - yuk! They 
have an 8mm spanner head. I heated 
the head around them and used 
lashings of freeing oil, working them 
to and fro until they finally came out. I 
then took a straight rotary wire brush 
and de-coked the head and valve 
pockets. I also cleaned up the injector 
sleeves with a piece of broom pole 
and some abrasive cloth. I found that 
a Scotch pad cloth was superb for 
cleaning up the metal surfaces and 
piston tops. 

I spun the valves in my drill and 


I also cleaned 
up the injector 
sleeves with 
a piece of 
broom pole 



The glow plug looks like this 



Removing the glow plug 


72 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 





Car engine as boat spare 



I gave the valves a light grind with 
smooth grinding paste and 
a valve-grinding sucker 


used the Scotch pad to clean them up, 
then gave them a light grind with smooth 
grinding paste and a valve-grinding 
sucker. All it took, literally, was a few 
turns of the grinding tool to get a nice, 
matt, full-width seat. 

I then washed the whole head down 
in a bath of kerosene. 

The valve stem seals are shaped like a 
top hat, with the brim used as the base 
for the valve spring and the middle bit 
tight on the valve guide. The earlier 
engines used a simple seal which only 
gripped the valve guide and could slip 
off. They usually come with the head 
gasket set, but care must be taken that 
the right ones come with the set: they 
are nearly a fiver each if bought 
separately! The website www. 
parts4engines.co.uk sells a head 
gasket set including both types for £33. 

Reassembly 

Assembly is the reverse of the taking- 
apart process, with lashings of engine oil, 
and I used a blob of grease on the collets 
to hold one in while getting the other in 
place. A quick tap on the top of the valve 
with a hammer beds in the collets. The 
cam bears directly on the head and cam 
carrier cover, with a steel half-moon that 
locates the cam longitudinally. The valve 
clearance has to be checked with the 
cam in place. VP sell special tools for the 
purpose, but I just got some 8mm bolts, 
nuts and washers and drilled a steel bar 
to suit so that I could put the bar across 
the bearings to clamp the cam in place 
and check the clearances. 

Basically, the way the cams are cut, 
it is possible to check two at the same 
time. I put two bases next to the valve 
buckets for checking, pushed my 
feeler gauges in and found them to 
be within tolerance. 

Intake: 0.20-0.40mm (1mm = 

0.040in approx, so 0.008in-0.016in). 

Ex: 0.35-0.50mm (0.014in-0.020in). 

Then I slackened the clamps off, 
turned the cam to the next two and 
continued checking. I was lucky, 
because it had only taken the lightest 
of grinds to optimise the seats: the 
clearances hadn’t gone out of spec. 
Phew! The thought of trying to find 
valve biscuits for an engine this old 
filled me with horror. 

There are seals at both ends of the 




TOP Valve seats 
after grinding, 
showing a full- 
width matt finish 

ABOVE A valve 
clearance ‘biscuit’ 
is used to 
adjust clearances 

RIGHT The front 
cam carrier 
bearing surface 


cam that come with the head set, so I 
placed them near enough into position 
while I assembled it. The handbook 
recommends a 2mm bead of silicone 
on the joint of the cam carrier, so a 
good clean-up and gasket goo got it 
all together. Thereafter, I needed to get 
the seals on the end of the cam into final 
position: I used a 6mm bolt and gently 
tapped them both home. 

One other job that needed doing was 
fabricating a blanking plate out of 6mm 
aluminium to cover the space in the cam 
carrier left by the vacuum pump that we 
don’t use in our engines. 

The glow plugs were tested with a 
battery and a couple of wires: they are 
notoriously difficult to check with a 
meter, with internal shorts giving strange 
readings. Only one warmed up, but 
as this engine is going to be stored I 
decided to use them as blanks until they 
are needed. They are standard, generic 
plugs, so there’s no fear of not being 
able to source them in the future. 

The injectors looked good after I 
cleaned them externally with a brass 
wire brush. I set up the injector pump in 
the vice with a fuel feed from a plastic 
bottle, applied some power to the 


shut-off solenoid (don’t forget, in this 
case the solenoid works the opposite 
way: power on to start rather than power 
on to shut down), attached an injector 
to a pipe and span the pump by hand. 

I could feel the resistance build as the 
air bled out of the system, then bingo, 
creak and squirt, they all worked ok. 

However, I didn’t know if they were 
‘breaking’ at the correct pressure, so I 
phoned Dr Diesel Fuel Injection Services 
in Oswestry. The ‘doctor’ said: ‘Bring 
them in, I will check them for a tenner, 
while you wait’. What a star: a proper 
old-fashioned workshop, all the tackle 
and a nice bloke with it. He put them 
on the tester and flushed them while 
checking them. They were spot-on, so 
they’re ready to go. I am tempted to 
take them out to the boat in Portugal 
and change them as a matter of course, 
bring the old ones back and let Dr 
Diesel work his magic on them. 

So, after all this work, the top end 
is good to go: ready to be used or 
as a spare in storage. 

NEXT MONTH 

Renovating the block and 
reassembling the engine 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


73 




fflo PRACTICAL 


Keel crack repair 


Faced with a split in the front of the keel on his 
Mark Ryan decides on a course of redemptive 



Albin Ballad, 
action and cracks into it 


before 


RIGHT This was the 
crack in the front of the 
keel of Mark Ryan’s 
Albin Ballad 


AFTER 


BELOW The 

completed repair, 
with an application 
of Coppercoat. The 
keel is now stronger 
than it ever was 




y Albin 
Ballad Triola 
suffered from 
a mast truss 
problem that 
led to the truss expanding and 
splitting the front of my keel 
open, with water subsequently 
seeping into the bilges. 

The first thing you need to do 
with any ‘hole’ or split in your 
boat is to figure out exactly what 
caused the split and remedy that 
first - or else any fix you do will 
likely be short-lived, and the 
problem will just occur again. 

My solution for dealing with the 
cause of the split was removing 
the old truss, fixing the crack and 
finally replacing the truss entirely. 

So, how to fix that crack... 


The ideal repair 

I had repaired glassfibre before, 
and knew that the ideal repair 
would have to attain a 12:1 
bevel. Needless to say, the 
hull in this area is reasonably 
. thick at 2cm, so a repair bevel 
would be a whopping 24cm 
radius from its centre: at its 
widest, it would be well north 
of 50cm diameter wide. 

Terror descended at this point, 
so I phoned Wessex Resins 
and they suggested the bevel 
could do with being larger than 
12:1 in this area: however, I 
didn’t need to bevel the whole 
i 2cm depth. 

With my repair design decided 
upon, I got to work fixing the 
crack in my beautiful Ballad. 




This is the final design that we agreed would do the job 


Materials required for the job 

I spoke at length with David Johnson of Wessex Resins, who spent a great deal of time guiding me on the repair and choosing the correct materials 
for the job. (You can source all of these from East Coast Fibreglass Supplies.) 


■ WEST SYSTEM epoxy, not 
polyester resin. Epoxy may be 
five times more expensive, but 
it’s also five times stronger than 
polyester resin. Perhaps more 
importantly, though, it has far 
better secondary bonding 
characteristics (its ability to ‘stick’ 
to something else), so your repair 
will be less likely to drop out! 

■ WEST SYSTEM 402 milled 
glassfibre ‘choppies’. 

■ WEST SYSTEM 406 
colloidal silica. 

■ Acetone. 


■ Peel ply. David put me on to 
this stuff. It is the best favour 
you can do for yourself - and 
I’ll explain why later. 

■ Polyester release 
film (optional). 

■ Light, 300gm biaxial cloth. 

You will need several layers of 
this, but it will go ‘around’ corners 
better and will shape to this 
complex area. Don’t be tempted 
by more exotic materials like 
carbon fibre (unless you have a 
degree in composites engineering) 
to repair your glassfibre boat. 


Glassfibre reinforced with 
high-quality epoxy has an 
elongation to break in 
excess of 4%: carbon fibre 
has limited elongation and 
thus is not as sympathetic to 
your boat’s existing structure, 
and stands more chance of 
breaking away. 

■ Cardboard for tern plating 
your ‘fix’ area. 

■ Good-quality glassfibre shears. 

■ Mixing pots, sticks and 
disposable paintbrushes. 

■ A small consolidation roller. 


■ Cobalt drill bits (HSS will 
certainly do). 

■ A drill. 

■ Ideally, a multi-tool like the Fein 
multi-tool with a diamond cutter. 

■ A grinder with a coarse 
sanding disc. 

■ PPE, loads of PPE. Disposable 
overalls, gloves, a good 
respirator, ear and eye protection. 
You may look like something 

out of Breaking Bad, but you 
will be thankful to not be itching 
for a week after grinding away 
at your boat. 


74 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


Gougeon Brothers Inc 






Keel crack repair p3o 


1: Drilling out the crack 


I n order to repair that tiny 
crack, we needed to drill 
it out. The best method, to 
ensure we didn’t spread the 
crack, was to drill a hole at 
either end. (Do bear in mind 
that what you can see on the 
outside of the hull may be the 
‘thin end of the wedge’, and 
the crack may extend further 
inside the boat.) 

I then drilled holes along 
the crack, checking the angle 



carefully and where the holes 
terminated inside the boat to 
make sure I was drilling straight 
and true in line with the crack. In 
this instance that was quite easy, 
as the boat was cracked along her 
centreline. I used my Fein with its 
diamond disc to ‘join the dots’ 
and tidy the opened-up crack. 

The important thing is ensuring 
you go far enough to find 
good, solid GRP that has 
not been compromised. 


A hole was drilled at either end... 



...and I then drilled holes along 
the crack 


Exploring the extent of the 
damaged GRP around the crack 


2: Bevelling out the edges 


O nce I had confirmed 
the extent of the crack, 

I measured out the 15:1 
bevel and marked it with 
a marker pen. 

Creating a bevel on a flat 
surface is relatively easy to 
do by eye, but creating a 
bevel in an area like this is 
pretty damn tricky! In order 
to ascertain how far I needed 
to grind back, I cut out some 
cardboard templates 
of the area and marked 
on them exactly how far 
I would need to grind back. 

With this done, you can get 
suited up in your PPE, tape 
up your cuffs, get your grinder 
out and carefully grind back 
your bevel. This is an alarming 
job: go slowly and carefully, 
checking often with your 
template. Once you are 
done, you will be left with a 
nice tidy hole and a nice tidy 
bevel ready to be filled and 
glassed over. 



A cardboard template was used to calculate 
the bevelling 





Depth graduations were marked on the template 



The opened-up crack with bevel 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


75 





F0O PRACTICAL 


3: Filling the crack 


= 4: Glass-up the bevel 


T he crack was to be filled 
with a mixture of epoxy, 
milled glassfibre (402 filler) 
to criss-cross the area and 
colloidal silica (406 filler) to 
give the mixture the thickness 
it needed to ‘stick’ in the hole. 

Firstly, the hole was fully cleaned 
with acetone, then the inside of 
the crack was abraded with 80-grit 
paper just to be sure there was a 
really good key in there to which 
the epoxy could adhere. I placed 
a rectangle of polyester release 
film on the inside of the boat, 
taped it down and then weighed 
it down with a couple of out-of- 
date Reeds Nautical Almanacs 
(one of their many uses!) to stop 
the filler mixture escaping into 
the inside of the boat. 

The hole was wetted out with 
unthickened epoxy to give the 
thickened mix a good base for 
gripping. We were now ready to 



Copious amounts of epoxy 
were used in the repair 


mix up the filler and would use a 
plastic spreader to work it into the 
crack, ensuring it made contact 
with all sides of the crack and left 
no voids. 



THE CRACK IS FILLED! If I’d had my head screwed on at this point, I 
would have put peel ply over the top of the crack fill - which is something 
Wessex Resins suggested after I had completed this stage of the process. 
Peel ply would have meant no amine blush (a waxy coating that needs to 
be washed off with water before the next stage of the process) would be 
produced and it would not have needed to be sanded. 


A s a rule of thumb 
(a useful tip from 
the chaps at East Coast 
Fibreglass Supplies), for 
every 1mm of finished 
thickness you will need 
approximately two layers 
of 300g biaxial cloth. 

We needed to build up 
7mm, so now we needed to 
employ some simple maths. 
7mm was 1 4 layers of our 
light 300gm cloth, so we 
needed to divide that by the 
diameter of our bevel and cut 


out the cloth accordingly. I 
used another cardboard 
template and counted on 
being able to stretch my cloth 
around the awkward three- 
dimensional shape of the 
front of the keel. This is the 
reason I always use light cloth: 
it may require more layers, 
but it is more forgiving on 
these complex shapes. I then 
marked each of my 1 4 layers 
on the cardboard template, 
and used this to cut out my 
glassfibre with my shears. 



The template placed over the keel 



The cardboard template, Layers of glass were cut 
appropriately marked up to the template 


The whole area of the repair 
was washed with water and a 
scourer to remove the amine 
blush from the previous fill: this 
is important, as amine blush 
can affect the bond of the 
glassfibre to the substrate. It 
was then cleaned with acetone 
before a final rub-down with 
80-grit paper. (Note: wash the 
surface first, and rub down 
second. This is to avoid 
sanding any contaminant 
into the GRR) We were now 
in a position to start glassing 
in the hole! 

First, we thickened a small 
amount of epoxy with colloidal 
silica to use as the ‘base’ for 
the first layer of GRR This 


ensured any small voids in the 
existing polyester were filled 
and gave a good base for our 
first layer of glassfibre. (You 
should always start with the 
largest layer of glass.) 

If doing this job yourself, 
apply each layer, wetting it 
out fully by ‘stippling’ with the 
brush (do not try and ‘paint’ 
with the brush as you will just 
pull the glassfibre around), and 
use the consolidation roller 
between every other layer. 
Work fast and only mix up as 
much epoxy as you can apply 
within around 10 minutes 
before it ‘gels’. Don’t try to 
apply more than 1 4 or 1 5 
layers of light glass in one go 


76 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 





Keel crack repair p3o 



All layers of glass applied, with peel ply on top 


as epoxy is exothermic, and if 
enough epoxy is present it 
will create a chemical chain 
reaction where the epoxy will 
heat up, which will speed the 
curing process, which will then 
create more heat and so on! If 
your epoxy exotherms it will 
become very brittle indeed - 
not to mention the fact that it 
can catch fire and give off toxic 
fumes - so it is to be avoided. 

If you need to make thicker 
GRR work in stages by putting 
peel ply on top of say, the 1 5th 
layer, let it cure overnight, 
remove the peel ply and 
continue laying up. 

Finally, apply the peel ply 
over the top: make sure the 
peel ply is oversized so you 
will have a corner to grab once 
the epoxy has gone off. Use 
a spreader to squeegee as 
much resin out as you can: 
the less epoxy there is in the 
GRR so long as its all wetted 


out, the stronger your final 
fix will be. In reality, in a 
complicated area like this 
you won’t want to work it too 
much as it is important to get 
the shape back. 

Fairing the hull 

At this point, the repair wasn’t 
quite completed. I hoped I 
had done a good enough 
job that I could put my 
Coppercoat straight over the 
top of the GRR but after pulling 
off the peel ply and sanding it 
down, small bubbles and finger 
depressions were apparent 
that would need filling. 

Once this was completed, I 
patched up the Coppercoat: 
you get very good at 
accurately measuring small 
batches of the stuff for this 
process, and a helpful tip is 
to get some good digital 
scales. The keel is now 
stronger than it ever was. 



Some small voids needed filling before antifouling 


INSIDE THE TRUSS CAVITY 


Glassing up the inside 


O n inspecting the inside 
of the truss cavity, it 
was apparent that the crack 
extended above and below 
the area where it was visible 
on the outside. Before I could 
glass up the inside, this had 
to be ground out back to 
good glassfibre. 

I filled the ground-out sections 
with the same mixture (colloidal 
silica, milled glassfibre and epoxy) 
as I used to fill the crack in the hull. 
Finally, I was ready to glass up the 
inside of the hull. It was even more 
important for me to do this as I 
had been chipping away at a resin 
block that encapsulated my mast 
truss, leaving the whole area 
slightly suspect: polyester resin 
is very brittle and susceptible to 
impact forces, as a microscopic 
process called micro-fracturing can 
occur. Therefore, I painstakingly 
tailored eight layers of glassfibre 
to fit the area inside the hull. 

Once again, the surface was 
cleaned thoroughly with acetone 
and given a base of thickened 
epoxy to create fillets around any 
sharp corners and fill in any voids 
before the first layer of glassfibre 
went down. This time, I actually 
used 404 high-density filler rather 



The extent of the bow crack: 
the ground-out sections are 
shown in yellow 

than 406 colloidal silica as my truss 
would eventually sit on top of this 
glassfibre, so compressive strength 
was a priority. I finished off with peel 
ply once again to make the next 
stage of the process easier and 
avoid any need to wash off amine 
blush, and to leave a keyed surface 
for the next process. Finally, as with 
any structural work I undertake to 
Triola, I had my good friend and 
marine surveyor, Alf Cackett, come 
and survey the repair and write it 
up for my insurance company. 
Phew, job done! 



* 

i me. ' 

The end result: all glassed in, with peel ply on top 


ABOUT THE AUTHOR 


■ r - m Mark Ryan, an IT 

manager for Mortgages 
fwt for Business, has 
j sailed all his life from 
(■ the River Medway and 
™ now cruises with his 
wife Elizabeth, two children (Sophie, 
aged 1 , and Thomas, aged 3) and 
seadog puppy Patch on his 9m (30ft) 
1970s Albin Ballad, Triola. 



Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


77 






Practical projects 



Great ideas and tips from PBO readers 


Email your projects and tips to pbo@timeinc.com or write to us at the 
address at the top of page 5. We pay at least £30 for each one published 


Retro-fitting spring cleats 


Frustrated by a shortfall of spring cleats 
on his Jeanneau Sun Odyssey 32, Bob 
Goode decided to remedy the situation 



The finished cleat. Note how it is positioned and the point of 
maximum beam, avoiding snags on the genoa sheet 


I have long bemoaned the lack 
of spring cleats on our Sun 
Odyssey 32, especially 
when rafted deep in places like 
Guernsey where you quickly 
run out of places to hang a line. 

However, as access to the 
underside of the deck is excellent 
on the SO 32, the solution is 
within the abilities of even the 
most ham-fisted DIYer. In fact, the 
greatest impediment proved to be 
finding cleats to match the original 
Jeanneau ones at a reasonable 
price. Accastillage Diffusion in 
Cherbourg offered the solution at 
€42 each (about £30 at the time). 

The location was selected with 
two points in mind: firstly, the most 
useful position on deck, and 
secondly, keeping the backing 
pads unobtrusive below decks. 
The chosen spot fell within the 
heads on the port side, where a 
fabric headlining would cover a 
large part of the backing pad, 
and just forward of the galley 


bulkhead on the starboard side, 
where they would be under a 
headlining panel behind the 
chart plotter and radar displays. 

The deck moulding is cored for 
the most part and reinforced in 
high-stress areas such as the 
mounting points for deck 
hardware. However, the outer 
edges are solid laminate and sit 
bonded on the hull moulding, 
through which they are bolted 
atthetoerail. 

Genoa track bolts 

There is a narrow zone of 
single-thickness laminate between 
the double thickness of the 
hull-deck joint and the cored 
part of the deck, which is further 
inboard. My plan was to run the 
bolts through in this zone to avoid 
any possibility of disturbing the 
coring and risk of water ingress. 

As the genoa track bolts were 
visible from both above and below 
deck, I used these as a datum for 


measuring where to drill the holes. 
A 1 .5mm pilot hole was first drilled 
in the measured position and a 
needle inserted so that alignment 
could be checked and any 
necessary adjustment made 
before taking the plunge with 
an 8mm drill. Any small 
misalignment would fall beneath 
the cleat base and so be both 
sealed and invisible. 

Once the first 8mm hole was 
opened the cleat was dry-bolted 
into place and used to align the 


second hole for drilling. The 
backing plate was made from 
5mm-thick stainless steel, polished 
on one side as part of this would 
be visible in the heads. C & B 
Marine made these for me for a 
quite reasonable fee. After this, it 
was simply a matter of applying 
a generous layer of sealant and 
lightly tightening the nuts. The 
sealant was left to cure overnight 
before a final tighten with a 
spanner and, bingo - job done. 

Now to find a raft to join! 


HERE’S HOW I DID IT... 



Drilling the 1.5mm pilot hole after 
locating the ideal position using 
the genoa track fixings, which 
are visible below decks. The old 
dodge of using masking tape to 
stop the drill slipping will not 
work as the deck is non-slip 
at this location 



The first bolt coming through the solid 
fibreglass between the hull-deck joint 
(on the left of the photo) and the cored 
section of the deck, just to the left of the 
wooden lining 



The cleat is dry-bolted into place, using the first hole to 
line up the second hole for drilling 


78 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 



Practical projects 


Dedicated fans, all winter 



T his is how I achieve winter 
ventilation on my Westerly 
Centaur - with the use of two 
computer CPU fans, a winter 
weatherboard and the solar 
panel that normally charges 
the batteries. 

The fans are wired directly to the 
solar panel, so they are activated 
when the sun shines, and are off when 
it doesn’t. The cost was £2 for the fans 
from eBay, plus a piece of scrap ply! 

I am thinking of making this a 
permanent fixture for the summer 
season: I would have to cut holes in 
the main washboard and fit louvre 
vents to stop rain ingress, with a 
quick-release plug for the power leads. 
Ray Smith 
Carmarthen 





Loose 
locker lids? 
Strut right 
this way 

O ne of my pet hates 
always occurs when 
a well-meaning crew 
member leaves a locker lid 
open, and it comes crashing down on 
the next roll of the boat with a gelcoat- 
shattering crunch. Sailing with children 
has also heightened my awareness 
of boat safety: one of these days 
someone’s little fingers will be in the way 
as they reach into the locker for a fender, 
and as usual it will be all my fault. 

To this end, when fitting my new kitchen 
over the winter, the gas struts that keep the 
vertically-opening doors in place gave me 
an idea. I have obviously noticed gas struts 
used on everything from car hatchbacks to 
engine bays on huge motorboats, but for 
some reason I had always thought of them 



Pole position confers 
a distinct advantage 




I had been looking for an easier method of sanding off antifouling 
before applying a new coat. 

My usual method of wet-and-dry sandpaper on a sanding block is a guaranteed way 
of getting wet and dirty, particularly as water always runs down your sleeve. So, I 
sourced a decorator’s aluminium sanding pole from a local builders’ merchant: the 
pole extends from 1 .3 to 1 .8m and has a flat head with clamps on a joint. I then 
went online and found sanding mesh: this is much more robust than wet-and- 
dry paper and comes in a 5m roll, which will last for some years. 

In use, I’ve found this method much more comfortable. I can reach 
the underside of the hull without grovelling around too much 
and the pole also keeps one away from any residual dust. A 
bucket of water provides an easy way to dunk ths head of 
the pole to rinse off the mesh. I hope others may find 
this useful! Total cost was about £35. 

Gary Miller 
Ivybridge, Devon 


The pole 
was bought 
from a builders’ 
merchant 


The sanding mesh is more robust 
than wet-and-dry sandpaper 



as expensive. This is not the case: a bit 
of online research yielded a 250mm gas 
strut, available in a variety of strengths 
from 50-150 Newtons (5-1 5kg). The strut 
is supplied with a number of optional 
brackets, with ball and socket joints to aid 
alignment when fitting. One strut with 
fixings, including delivery, costs £1 .99. 

The only additional parts I needed were 
an aluminium plate to spread the stress on 
the hatch lid and a small hardwood block, 
glued to the inside of the locker, to support 
the other end of the strut. The job can be 
completed in a few hours with simple hand 
tools and parts from the ‘that will come in 
handy, one day’ box. 

I realise that the strut isn’t manufactured 
from marine-grade 316 stainless steel, and 
that the salty environment will eventually 
take its toll on the metal components: but 
at £1 .99 each I can afford to replace them 
every season if needed. 

Tim Marsden 

Nantwich, Cheshire £5 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


79 




2) Learning from experience 


A day 111 never 
remember 


Gilbert Park and his wife were en route from 
Douarnenez to Audierne when Gilbert succumbed 
to an episode of transient global amnesia. . . 


M y wife and I decided to 
explore Brittany last 
summer while moving 
our new acquisition, 
a Sabreline 36, from 
Newark to Aigues- 

Mortes in France. We chickened out of the 
long trip from mid-Biscay around Gibraltar 
and up to Le Grau-du-Roi, so the last part 
from La Rochelle to Port Camargue was 
planned to be by lorry. 

The weather that summer was awful 
most of the time, or so it seemed. After 
spending almost a week in 
the inner harbour in 
Douarnenez waiting for the 
Force 9 winds and heavy rains 
to stop, there was a window 
of almost calm weather (my 
definition - not the crew's) to 
leave and continue south. 

The day before leaving, I 
carefully planned our trip to 
Audierne, round Pointe du Raz, marking 
the various waypoints on the chart. I had 
a long chat with the helpful Welsh lady 
harbour master who told me where the 
deep water was in the harbour, and what 
areas to avoid, and I then fully apprised 
my wife of all the passage details. 

The sun was shining when we left, 
and the sea was calm. As we progressed 
along the coast the sea state worsened, 
becoming a little rough but not too bad; 
and opposite Pointe de Lesven I took the 
opportunity to leave the flybridge and 
visit the heads below. I remember coming 
back up to the flybridge, and... that's it, 
until I found myself in an ambulance! 

My wife tells me I behaved quite 
normally, cheering her up as the sea got 


ABOUT THE AUTHOR 


Gilbert Park has been sailing 
for more than 40 years and 
has worked his way through 
almost the entire Drascombe 
range. He now has a 
Sabreline 36 motor cruiser 
and enjoys the tinkering and maintenance 
that goes with owning any sort of boat. 



BREST^/ 



•^Douarnenez 


• Quimper 





rougher around Pointe du 
Raz (which was a part of the 
trip I had always looked 
forward to). She didn't 
know anything was wrong 
until we were outside the harbour 
entrance. There, I spent an hour going 
between the two cardinal markers and 
kept asking her where we were: she would 
reply, and I would immediately ask the 
same question. She quickly understood 
that something was wrong and tried to get 
me to let her helm the boat, with little 
success. She eventually succeeded by 
handing me the radio and letting me 
think I was having a 
stroke, and that we 
needed help. 

My training kicked 
in and I realised that 
I needed to send a 
pan-pan, which I did - mostly in French. 
The coastguard wanted to know where we 
were, so I asked my wife: I couldn't 
remember the answer, so I couldn't tell 
him. He then asked me for my lat and 
long and, once again, my training kicked 
in and I read it off the chart plotter. He 
was surprised that we were in the harbour. 

I told him I was having a stroke and that 
my wife couldn't dock the boat: in fact, 
she could, but not without worrying that 
she would damage either our boat or 
somebody else's - or both! Three customs 
officers in a RIB heard the pan-pan and 



I kept asking my wife 
the same question, 
over and over again 


put the captain on board with another 
officer. The harbour master also heard it, 
was ready to take the warps from the boat 
and had a doctor on the telephone. 

When the boat was secured I was taken 
off by the fire brigade and passed over to 
the paramedics, who took me - and my 
wife - to the hospital at Douarnenez. 
From there, I was later transferred to the 
regional neurological unit at Quimper. 

The neurologist 
explained that my 
memory loss, and 
repeatedly asking the 
same question, were 
classic symptoms of 
transient global amnesia. This is like a 
brain reset, although the cause is not 
known, and it results in an inability to 
form new memories - in my case, for 
about 12 hours. Fortunately, it happens 
only once and there are no long-term 
effects. In particular, there is no need to 
stop driving cars, let alone boats, and I 
can't even use it as an excuse to forget 
presents for birthdays and anniversaries. 
The only lasting effects are that I will 
never remember going around Pointe 
du Raz, and my wife will always be a 
bit worried when I forget things. 


80 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 











A day 111 never remember @ 




Send us 
your real-life 

experience 

~ a pd win a 
Painting of 





nrid 

(i mi 



LESSONS LEARNED 


I My wife has to learn to 
dock the boat without 
worrying that she will 
destroy it: next time there 
may not be any customs 
officers around. To help 
with this, we fitted a stern 
thruster (we already have a 
bow thruster). 


3 Sending a pan-pan 
worked well. There is 
a strong case, however, 
for sending a Mayday. If I 
had been having a stroke, 
a Mayday would have been 
more appropriate, because 
there is a limited time to 
get the right treatment. 


Yankee Lady moored safely in the sunshine 
at Audierne Harbour 


Special thanks go to the staff at Audierne 
Harbour, who secured the boat and rang 
me to say it was all secure and safe. Thanks 
also to Alain Bossenac from the mayor's 
office, who collected my wife from the 
hospital at 2200 and brought her back to 
the boat for the night. Also, I shouldn't 
forget my wife - even though I did that for 
12 hours - who told me what happened 
and looked after me. 


2 Sending a pan-pan in 
French was the right 
thing to do: although the 
coastguard may have 
understood English, the 
customs officers didn’t. 

I will in future have crib 
cards for Mayday and pan- 
pan in the language for the 
country I am in. If it’s a 
language I don’t speak, the 
last sentence will be ‘please 
respond in English: I 
don’t understand...’ 


4 1 was able to use my 
training, even though 
I couldn’t remember new 
events. Fortunately, this is 
stored in a different part of 
my memory: every penny 
of the RYA radio course 
was worth it on that day. 


5 We need to make sure 
we both have the ICC 
certificates, so if I am 
incapacitated my wife can 
‘legally’ helm the boat. 


6 Writing the passage 
plan and pilotage on 
the chart that then lives 
on the flybridge during 
passage meant that all the 
information was available 
to my wife when I couldn’t 
remember it. The detailed 
briefing, especially of the 
harbour, was invaluable. 


7 Passport, EEC cards 
and travel insurance 
documents need to be kept 
in a place known to all. 

We normally store all our 
documents near to the grab 
bag, but because we had 
been ashore so much they 
were all in my ‘man bag’; a 
fact I hadn’t mentioned. We 
now both carry copies of 
our own and each other’s 
documents electronically. 


*Send us your boating experience story and if it’s published you’ll receive the original Dick Everitt-signed 
watercolour which is printed with the article. You’ll find PBO’s contact details on page 5. 


< 3 > 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


81 






fflo PRACTICAL 


How to service your 
cooling system 



Is your boat’s engine beginning to run hotter than normal? It may 
well be time to service the cooling system, suggests Tony Davies 


E ngine cooling 

systems vary in their 
complexity, beginning 
with the cheap and 
nasty direct or raw water 
cooling systems where sea 
or river water passes directly 
through the engine block for 
cooling purposes. 

There is only one advantage 
to this system, and that is 
cheapness. It is seldom seen 
on modern engines, although 
the Americans still seem to like 
it on their big V8s. Raw water 
cooling shortens the engine’s 
life and also significantly 
reduces engine efficiency as 
the engine always runs well 
below its designed running 
temperature of 80-85°C. 



Raw water-cooled engines 


Thermostat 
housing 

Bypass allows 
water to . . 

recirculate , 
when the 
thermostat 
is closed 


Relief valve 


Exhaust manifold 


Water circulating 
inside block 





V 


Strainer | j 


Raw water pump 


For raw water-cooled engines, 
the normal recommended 
running temperature is about 
52°C as this cuts down the 
amount of salts and sediment 
deposits that cling to the 
cooling system walls while 
running. Over a long period 
the cooling system gradually 
becomes clogged and engine 
temperature rises, causing 
hot spots in the areas where 
the water can pass through 
least effectively. Having said 
all this, thousands of engines 


are still running well despite 
being under-cooled 
throughout their lives! 

There is very little that can 
be done to prevent silting of 
the engine block. It is possible 
to occasionally backflush 
the engine by removing the 
hoses and running clean 
water through the system 
as this will remove loose 
debris, and if done regularly 
from new it does make a 
difference to the engine 
cooling passages. 


Fresh water cooling systems 



Raw water 

pump Strainer 


Heat 

exchanger 


Thermostat 


The far more efficient indirect 
or fresh water cooling systems 
allow engines to run at their 
correct temperature of around 
85°C, and by allowing the 
introduction of coolant inhibitors 
and antifreeze into the cooling 
system provide for long and 
efficient engine life. 

Unfortunately it is not all good 
news as a regular service regime 
is required to keep the cooling 
systems of fresh-water-cooled 
engines working correctly. This 
mainly involves cleaning the small 
tubes in the tube stacks located 
within the heat exchanger, the 
engine and gearbox oil coolers - 


and also, on more powerful 
engines, the intercooler that cools 
the turbo and supercharger 
charge air before it enters the 
cylinders. In this latter case, it is 
not only engine temperature but 
also engine performance that 
suffers when the tubes become 
blocked. Heat exchangers, oil 
coolers and intercoolers come 
in many designs, so the method 
of dismantling prior to cleaning 
the stacks will vary slightly 
between engines. The engine 
featured is a home-marinised 
BMC 1 .5 diesel (one of the best 
little diesels of its time) with less 
than 500 hours of running. 


82 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 



Cooling system service 


Clean the heat exchanger 


Clean the oil cooler 


□ The Bowman 
heat exchanger 
is combined with the 
exhaust manifold and 
includes the header 
tank. It is an easy job 
to remove the tube 
stack for cleaning, so 
there is no excuse for 
not doing it every 
couple of years. Undo 
the hose clips on the 

covers at each end of the header tank to free the tube stack, 
which is secured inside the covers by the smaller clips. 




This tube stack 
was filled with a 
gel-like substance, which 
reminded me to flush the 
engine block through 
with clean water. 


Slide the tube 
stack out of the 
header tank. It can 
be removed from 
either end, whichever 
is easiest. 



□ An unwound 
wire coat 
hanger is an ideal 
tool for running 
through the 
tubes as the 
spiral section 
provides a smooth 
scraping action. 

It is important to 
clean each tube 
individually, and 
well worth the 
effort to keep 
the system 
flowing freely. 



□ Flush the tubes through with clean water and also flush the heat 
exchanger body to remove any residue from the heat exchanger. 
Refit the tube stack into the header tank, ensuring that the ends of the 
stack are located in the small sections of the end covers and that the 
hose clips are gripping it securely. 




□ The inlet end 
of the cooler 
is the first point of 
entry after the water 
strainer, and some 
weed has clearly 
bypassed the 
strainer and is 
beginning to 
block the tubes. 

A few minutes 
with the wire coat 
hanger and they 
will be perfectly 
clean again. 



On this engine 
the oil cooler is 
hidden behind the raw 
water pump, which 
has to be removed 
to allow the tubes to 
be cleaned. 


As the raw water pump 
cannot be serviced 
without being removed it has 
to come off anyway, and the 
easiest method of removal 
is to take off the mounting 
bracket and pump as one unit. 



Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


83 






F0O PRACTICAL 


Cleaning the water pump 



□ Once the pump is separated 
from its bracket it is ready for 
servicing, which begins with removal 
of the cover plate. With the screws 
removed, a light tap will usually 
suffice to free off the cover plate. 



Q With the cover off, the amount 
of wear on the inside of the 
cover face can be checked. Where 
there is excessive wear these covers 
can often be fitted inside out. 



Removing the impeller is generally 
an easy job if you use a proper puller. 

This is the latest Jabsco Compact puller. 

If you use screwdriver blades to wrench out the 
impeller you will definitely damage the impeller and probably 
also the edges of the pump body, which may prevent the 
cover from sealing properly when reassembled. 



TOP TIP 

it is not good practice 

me “3« ol waler. S.W 1 ™ 

fe rrrs 

they have not caused any 

overheating problems. 


Q ln normal 

circumstances, once 
the impeller is removed it 
is checked for damage 
and wear and then either 
refitted or replaced. Splits 
like this indicate an impeller 
dose to failure. 


Due to the layout of the engine and 
the impossibility of servicing the 
pump while in place I carry a complete 
spare pump on board ready for a quick 
changeover. In this case it will replace 
the old pump, which will become the 
spare once serviced. 


□ Once the pipework and pulley 
are removed from the old 
pump the new one can be 
assembled in a few minutes, 
starting by installing the hose tails 
into the pump using plumbers’ 
PTFE tape to seal the threads. 




□ The pulley is fitted next. This must 
be lined up with the engine crankshaft 
pulley once the pump is in position, so it 
is left loosely fitted at this stage. 


□ The pump is refitted and the hoses connected. The pulley is lined up with the crankshaft 
pulley and the securing Allen screw tightened. The drive belts can then be renewed. When 
fitting a new belt it is sometimes a little on the short side, and the trick to getting it onto the pulleys 
is to place it round the crankshaft pulley and then push it as far onto the alternator (or pump) pulley 
as possible. Then, while holding the belt in position, turn the engine over with a spanner on the 
crankshaft pulley nut and the belt will roll into place. It can then be tensioned in the normal manner. 


84 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 




Cooling system service 



The quick-change standby 

HOSf CUM 


When using a spare pump as 
the quick-change standby, it 
is important to be able to 
remove the hoses quickly 
and easily. Marine reinforced 
hose, which is used to avoid 
collapse under pump suction, 
hardens over time - and often, 
the only way to disconnect it is 
to cut it off and renew it. This 
is clearly of no use where the 
pump needs to be changed 
quickly. On this installation, 
vehicle hoses are used for the 
final short connections to the 
pump as they never harden 
and are always easy to 
remove. The main pipe runs 
are all domestic copper tubes 
which are cheaper than 
reinforced hose, and there is 
no problem with pipework 
collapse. Where it is essential 


to use convoluted hose, it is 
possible to make up an end 
connection using a copper 
tube stub 4 or 5in long, 
depending on the diameter of 
the hose, in the appropriate 
size to fit inside the hose. The 
end of the convoluted hose is 
warmed slightly in hot water to 
soften it and the copper tube 
is secured halfway into the 
tube with two hose clips for a 
permanent fix. Then, use a 4in 
length of vehicle hose on the 
exposed end of the copper, 
again secured with two hose 
clips. This hose is used to 
make the final connection 
onto the pump with a single 
hose clip and ensures it can 
be fitted and removed very 
easily while still providing a 
reliable seal every time. 


Check the thermostat 


Thermostats are often forgotten 
but they can eventually go 
wrong, and usually in the closed 
position - which means the 
engine overheats quite quickly. 
Less serious is when they fail in 
the open position, as in this case 
the engine simply never reaches 
its correct operating temperature. 
The quickest cure for a closed 
thermostat when away from 
home is to simply remove it 
and fit a replacement at the next 
convenient port of call. For an 
open thermostat, simply keep 


a careful eye on the engine 
temperature to ensure that it 
doesn’t decide to close. Again, 
replace it at the next convenient 
point. Test the thermostat by 
placing it in a pan of hot water and 
watching to see when it opens. As 
long as it opens before the water 
boils, you can assume it is OK. 

For a more accurate test, place 
a thermometer in the water and 
check the temperature when the 
thermostat opens. Thermostats 
usually have the operating 
temperature stamped on the case. 



Thermostats can be mounted in various ways, but generally speaking 
they are easy to get at and can be removed and replaced by removing 
the housing, lifting the old one out and fitting the new one. Fit a new 
gasket to ensure the housing doesn’t leak after replacement. 


The raw water strainers need to be 



□ The raw water strainers need to be 

checked on a regular basis, especially if 
cruising in shallow waters. A quick flush-out 
with clean water is all they need. 



Make sure the pipework to the strainer 
is not partially blocked by rodding it 
through after cleaning the strainer basket. 


B Check the cover seal is in good 

condition and give it a light greasing 
to help it seal when the cover is refitted, 
otherwise the system may not prime. 



checked 


• •• And finally 

The final engine service item, once 
everything has been reconnected, is 
to refill the heat exchanger system 
with a 50-50 mixture of good quality 
antifreeze and water and recheck the 
level after the engine has run up to 
temperature and cooled again. 



TIME TAKEN: Average i day 

COMPETENCE LEVEL Intermediate 

UK COSTS: Spare pump, from 
C1QQ-C1.000 depending on make 
and size of engine 

■ Alternator and pump belts, average 
of E3-E5 per belt 

■ ImpePers. from £1 CF £1 50 depending 
on make and size of engine 

■ Thermostats, less than £10 ^ 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


85 





j Ask the experts 


_ . . m _ _ • Here’s just a selection of the latest questions from 

Got a question? Email pbo@timemc.com PBO readers. Email or write to the address on 

page 5 and our experts will answer your queries 


SURVEY AND CORROSION 


Could stainless steel bolt 
corrosion lead to rig failure? 


Q l am the first owner of a 
now 10-year-old Cornish 
Crabbers Pilot Cutter 30. The 
boat has always been anchored 
or stored ashore in Greece in 
the open, so exposure to UV 
light has been year-round: add 
to this the high temperatures 
and the salinity of the sea 
during the summer in the 
Eastern Mediterranean. 

After putting the boat back 
in the water, I found that the 
head of one stainless steel 
bolt that affixes the samson 
post/bowsprit pivot fitting to 
the foredeck had broken off 
due to corrosion. Since then 
I have found broken-off heads 
of other bolts and screws on 
deck. So far, repairs have been 
easy, and no disastrous failures 
have occurred while sailing. 

Nonetheless, I am worried 
about similar corrosion damage 
elsewhere that might lead to 
a disastrous rig failure. I am 
thinking in this regard about 
the chainplates of the lower 
shrouds that are affixed with 
bolts to the outside of the hull, 
and about all other components 
of the standing rigging - ie the 
shackles with which the upper 
ends of the shrouds are 
attached to the mast, the 
shrouds themselves, the 
turnbuckles, etc. 

Can you please advise 
me how far I should go in 



The head of one stainless steel bolt affixing the samson post/ 
bowsprit pivot fitting to the foredeck of Jacobus Lubsen’s 
Cornish Crabbers Pilot Cutter 30 had rusted off 


preventively replacing 
components of the standing 
rigging? I am torn between 
only replacing the bolts that 
affix the chainplates, and 
renewing everything. 

Jacobus Lubsen 

Paros, Greece 

COLIN BROWN REPLIES: Your 
bolts are suffering from crevice 
corrosion. The process is as 
follows: stainless steel needs 
oxygen to remain stainless, and 
any damage to the surface is 
rapidly healed with available 
oxygen as the chromium 
content oxidises to form the 


familiar shiny surface. Low-oxygen 
conditions, like you might find 
in a deck or hull with water 
collecting under bolt heads, 
are ideal for pitting and crevice 
corrosion. Once this starts, the 
corroding ‘active’ stainless steel 
and the surrounding protected 
‘passive’ stainless steel can form 
a galvanic couple that accelerates 
loss of material at the active site. 

In essence, part of the bolt 
becomes an anode for the 
rest of it. 

This process can be initiated 
by chloride ions present in salt. 

As you have suggested, high 
temperatures and salt have 


been contributing factors. High 
UV levels could also degrade 
the sealant around bolts, 
allowing water to get in and 
start the process. There are 
different grades of stainless 
steel with differing levels of 
resistance to crevice corrosion. 
Marine fittings should be 316 
stainless, but other grades may 
have been used on deck. It is 
difficult to tell the different grades 
apart, but one simple test is 
that 316 stainless steel is not 
magnetic. There are other 
grades that are not magnetic, 
so this test is not definitive. 

In your picture there are visible 
rust stains around the bolts. These 
are an obvious warning sign, and 
you should take out every bolt or 
screw that has stains around it. 
This is less easy with the rigging, 
which will have to be lowered. A 
gaff rig is under much lower stress 
than a Bermudan rig, so the 
often-quoted 10-year lifespan 
for stainless steel rigging would 
normally be considered too 
conservative. In your case you 
should pay close attention to all 
of your standing rigging and 
deck fittings. Take all suspect 
bolts, shackle pins and 
rigging screws apart for close 
examination, and replace where 
any material loss is found. A 
magnifying glass might help here. 

It is possible to reduce 
the chances of the same 
problems arising again by 
using 316 stainless steel, by 
rinsing salt deposits off your 
stainless steel whenever you 
can and replacing sealant when 
it shows signs of weathering. 



86 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 




Ask the experts 



Is my antenna at fault? 


Q After fitting a new 
Lowrance Link-5 
DSC-VHF, a radio check with 
the coastguard reported my 
signal to be weak and barely 
readable. At this time I was 
on my mooring in line of sight 
of the coastguard station, 
approximately 2NM distant. 

A check with my handheld 
received and transmitted a 
good signal. 

Stripping the PL259 plug 
showed the braid to be 
corroded. Removing the 
antenna and stripping the 
RG58 coaxial cable at intervals 
along its length revealed the 
same problem. I purchased 
15m of RG8 cable as 
replacement, as I was informed 
that this coaxial cable had a 
lower loss than the RG58. On 
fitting a short length of the new 
cable for testing, I found (using 
a simple battery and bulb) that 
I had continuity at all the points 
shown in the photo. Is the 



antenna faulty, or is the test rig 
unsuitable for purpose? 

Bob Hatcher 
By email 


: CHRIS ELLERY REPLIES: 

Some VHF antennas have a 
loading coil across the screen and 
: inner connections, so as this aerial 
appears to have one in the picture 
then I am not too surprised at the 
results from your test. Using just a 
bulb and lamp test, though, is not 
really sufficient to test an antenna 
properly. You could connect the 
new length of cable and put a 
VSWR meter in line at the set end. 
The VSWR reading should be less 
than 1.3:1 (typically) on a new 
antenna. These meters are not 
cheap to purchase: one for VHF 
could cost £200, so it would be 
less expensive to contact your 
local marine electronics company 
and get them to test it. It’s often 
cheaper, however, to simply 
replace the antenna with a new 
one. If water has penetrated the 
system once then it could happen 
again, and our recommendation 
would be to renew. The VHF 
radio is an important safety 
device, being one way of 
attracting help in an emergency, 
so we would never try to cut any 
corners in its maintenance. 


Slats the way to do it 


Q l have recently purchased 
a 5.5m (18ft) Plymouth 
Pilot launch: the previous 
owner had been doing her 
up, and replaced the original 
cockpit sole floor with two 
long pieces of plywood - 
one either side of the 
centreline. They are almost 
impossible to lift out with the 
boat ashore, and it’s completely 
impossible to access the bilges 
when on the water. 

My thinking is to replace these 
two plywood pieces with iroko 
slats (to allow drainage to the 
bilge) in sections so each can 


be lifted, giving access below 
the floor. Do you think this idea 
would work, or would a solid 
floor - again in sections - be 
better, with the occasional 
drainage hole? 

Robert Tindall 

Bridgnorth, Shropshire 

TONY DAVIES REPLIES: Your 
proposal sounds excellent. Not 
only will it keep the cockpit clear, 
it will also look superb. I’d 
recommend coating the iroko with 
Burgess Marine Wood Sealer, 
which will give a non-slip surface 
and a smart satin finish. 



These are the duck boards which 
PBO editor David Pugh made for 
the project boat Hantu Biru 



Probing the 
dimensions 


Q l am currently fitting a 
black holding tank to 
my boat, and the hose 
from the tank to the deck 
plate needs to have a slight 
bend in it. Will this be a 
problem for the pump-out 
probe/hose? The hose to 
the tank is 38mm butyl, but 
I haven’t been able to find 
out the dimensions of 
the pump-out probe/hose. 
Can you help, please? 

Bill Jackson 
By email 

GARY SUTCLIFFE REPLIES: 
The probe does not go down 
the tube and into the tank, if 
this is the worry. A number of 
boaters imagine that the probe 
has to reach the base of the 
tank, when in reality the tank 
should be built with a dip tube: 
a hose is attached to this and 
connected at the deck with an 
ISO 8099 deck fitting. The fact 
that the hose from the deck 
fitting is not vertical will not be 
a problem - the probe simply 
sits in the deck fitting, and a 
vacuum seal is made to suck 
the waste up the pump-out 
hose and into the machine. 

Unfortunately, many 
boatbuilders have not adhered 
to the ISO standard on deck 
fittings and the respective part 
of the ROD. This has led to a 
number of non-standard deck 
fittings being installed that 
don’t allow fitting of an ISO 
standard pump-out probe 
or make an effective seal. 

A number of adaptors are 
available to provide the boater 
with the correct fitting of the 
probe in the deck and to 
allow efficient sealing - and 
therefore an empty tank. 



Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


87 




<2») Ask the experts 


SAILS, RIGS AND MASTS 


How should I rig my topsail? 


Q l recently bought a gaff 
cutter, and after a few 
weeks of preparation I was 
ready to sail her home to 
Newport in South Wales from 
Milford Haven. The last job I 
needed to do was attach the 
sails. After some trial and error I 
got the jibs installed and rolled, 
and then came the main: all 
straightforward and without 
problem. At the bottom of the 
mainsail bag I found another 
bag containing a topsail and 
some line and blocks. As the 
boat was new to me I made the 
quick decision to leave well 
alone until I had time to sort it 
all out once I was home. And 
here is the rub: I cannot see 
what all the kit is for or how it 
should be rigged. Searching the 
internet and John Leather’s 
books are no help. 

The gaff has two holes in the 
throat halyard attachment; there 
is no fixing point at the end of 
the gaff; there is an eye at the 
top of the mast through which a 
halyard is passed; there is no 
topmast on board, but the sail 
has eyes fitted. 

The lines shown in the photo 
are 9 and 14m long, and there 
are three small blocks plus one 
triple. I’m hoping that there is 
some way to rig the sail so it 
can be reefed single-handed 
without taking it down. 

Keith White 
Abergavenny 

COLIN ‘PLUM’ STROUD, 

ON BEHALF OF THE 
OGA (OLD GAFFERS 
ASSOCIATION), REPLIES: 

Considering topsails are often the 
smallest sail on a gaffer, they are 
notorious for the numerous ways 
of setting and hoisting them - 
and for the very limited published 


instructions! The photo of your 
topsail shows lacing eyes/ 
grommets running the full length 
of the luff, indicating it should have 
a full-length luff yard attached. 

This arrangement is often referred 
to as a ‘Cornish yard topsail’ and 
is common on the Falmouth 
Working Boats. 

You may not have all the correct 
parts in your kit as topsails usually 
have three lines - halyard, sheet 
and downhaul. For a full 
description of rigging this type 
of topsail, I recommend you 
visitwww.galawebsite.co.uk, and 


after registering (it is free), go 
: to the ‘publications’ page where 
you will see a free publication 
for downloading called ‘Hoist 
i The Topsail’. 

Regarding your question about 
reefing without taking down the 
■ topsail, although there are a few 
exceptions, the topsail is usually 
the first to be removed when you 
need to reduce sail area, and this 
is done by lowering it completely, 
i If you get in touch with your local 
area of the OGA via www.oga.org. 
uk you will find someone happy 
to help you. 




Baffled 
by the 
blisters 


Q The paint has come 
off the fuel tank 
baffles in the glassfibre 
tank on my 1970 Triana 
Tropica. The paint 
appeared to have massive 
bubbles in it, but these 
are hard to press. Could 
this be ethanol, and is 
it a problem? 

Anthony Jordan 
By email 

RICHARD JERRAM 
REPLIES: To repair the 
baffles would not be very 
practical, and it would make 
more sense financially to 
replace your GRP tank with 
a stainless steel or plastic 
one. Firstly, access to the 
tank is very limited, and you 
would have great difficulty in 
reaching all the baffles. Even 
if you had better access, 
you’d still have to remove all 
the gelcoat and then flush 
the tank with fresh water to 
remove all traces of the fuel. 
You would then have to coat 
with a fuel-resistant epoxy, 
ensuring that you achieve at 
least 500 microns dry film 
thickness. This type of 
coating is usually only 
available for large 
commercial vessels and 
would only come in 20lt 
drums. Also, this type of 
coating has to be applied to 
a strict specification, so there 
is a strong likelihood that a 
breakdown could happen 
prematurely. Therefore, a 
stainless steel or plastic 
tank looks to me like the 
more practical route. 


Which driveshaft rubber glue? 


Q l recently had the 

misfortune to get a pick-up 
buoy line caught in the prop of 
my Hurley 24, which resulted in 
a dull thud then no drive. 

On inspection, I found that 
the flexible shaft coupling had 
separated. This consists of two 
metal discs approx 100mm in 


diameter with a rubber core in 
between. It’s not held together 
with any bolts, but simply relies 
on the bond between rubber 
and metal for strength. 

The rubber doesn’t appear to 
be damaged in any way - just 
parted from the metal - and I’m 
wondering if there is a product 


on the market that will bond 
the two surfaces back together 
again with sufficient strength 
to maintain drive? The engine 
is a Yanmar YSE 8, so there’s 
maybe not a huge amount of 
torque involved. 

Paul Kings 

By email 


\ PAT MANLEY REPLIES: 

I wouldn’t advise you to try a 
DIY repair on your coupling. 

The chances of it holding are 
very poor, and you may end 
up losing drive at a really 
inappropriate time. It is possible 
that the incident may be 
covered by your boat insurance 
policy, in which case the cost 
of a replacement might be 
covered - it’s worth a check. 


88 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


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LEADING THE INDUSTRY 




P0O PRACTICAL 






One of the benefits of a clinker 
boat is the endless number of 
tying points. I was going to add 
more eyelets and ties, but a 
quick test drive proved they 
weren’t needed 


Safe, small, open boat trips and young children needn’t be 
mutually exclusive. Jake Frith reports on a low-cost fix that 
has increased confidence on the water for his young family 




* 


The finished area is like a 
marine playpen. A nice flat 
surface to sit or stand on, 
and with the gunwale at 
perfect peering-over height 


A safer open boat - 
for your toddler 


W e often take 

my young son, 
Daniel, for 
gentle trips 
up the river in 
settled weather in Mahogany 
Bob , my 1965 14ft LH Walker 
tender. When he was a small 
baby, things were much easier: 
we popped him into his car 
seat, which jammed nicely 
into the forepeak area forward 
of the bow thwart, and he slept 
through most trips while we 
got on with things. 

Now he’s 18 months old, he 
plays more of an active role in 
proceedings: he is very much up 
and about, and makes short work 
of climbing up over the thwart to 
get into the main part of the boat 
where all the action takes place. 
This is not a great place for him to 
be as we mainly row, so elbows 
are flying about; plus, once he 
gets out of the bow area with its 


Young Daniel in Mahogany 
Bob, his dad’s 14ft tender 

raised floorboards, he’s into the 
bilge with seawater sloshing about 
(this is a clinker boat) so it has 
often ended in wet trousers and 
an about-turn back to the slipway. 

What we needed was a soft 
barrier to stop him coming aft. 

This would also help to keep his 
toys out of the bilge and give him 
an area of the boat that feels like 
his own. Just as importantly, it 


would also help the adults relax 
a bit and get on with the job 
in hand. 

My initial thoughts were to 
cordon off the bow area with a 
fishing net-type mesh. I was at the 
chandlery, about to buy a suitable 
length of the netting usually used 
to keep hank-on genoas inside 
the lifelines at the bow of racing 
yachts, when I was suddenly 
struck by a ‘what if scenario. It 
wasn’t a palatable thought, but 
in the highly unlikely event of a 
capsize, this netting would be 
exactly the right size to tangle a 
toddler’s hand or foot. 

It turned out that the perfect 
material had been sitting at home 
all along. I had a few old vinyl 
advertising banners, made of the 
same heavy vinyl used in truck 
curtain sides and some boat 
covers. This would stop toddler 
and toys moving aft without 
presenting an entrapment hazard. 


The banner had a doubled-over 
hem, so I was able to thread a 
line through the top using a 
sprung claw device designed 
for retrieving lost bolts in car 
engine bays 


Once the top was cut to length, 

I marked then cut the bottom to 
roughly follow the line of the bilge 


Eyelets were placed at strategic 
points to hold the ‘curtain’ to the 
bilge. I used plastic eyelets for 
reasons of corrosion resistance 


90 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 




Adapting a dinghy for a toddler 


Tips and tricks - babies, 
toddlers and open boats 

Only you will know if the very slight risk of taking very 
young children in small open boats is worth it for them 
and your nerves. This is not an exhaustive list, but here 
are a few thoughts and lessons we’ve learned: 


■ Consider the worst-case 
scenario. I can’t make my boat 
capsize by standing on the 
gunwale and jumping up and 
down, but we still have a plan 
in case a collision with a larger 
craft or some other unforeseen 
circumstance could lead to this 
unlikely eventuality. 

■ Bring toys - but not good 
ones. Young children like to 
drop toys and teddies overboard 
then cry in anguished surprise 
about the results, but you will 
probably need to bring such 
items to keep them entertained. 
We combat this with a 
combination of teddies on 
strings (tied to the boat), floating 
toys that we can go back for and 
a bucket full of beach pebbles, 
collected at the start of the trip, 
which he is allowed to drop, 
one by one, over the side. 


■ Aim low. Our first trip was 
just 20 minutes long. I’ve 
heard many stories of young 
children put off boats for life 
by an overenthusiastic Dad 
(or Mum) taking them on a 
three- or four-hour epic. We 
won’t be leaving the safety of 
the river in this boat for many 
years yet as a family. 

■ All children should wear a 
correctly-fitting lifejacket or 
buoyancy aid on all boats. 

Start them young and they 
don’t seem to mind it at all. 

■ Assume all clothes will get 
wet. Bring lots of spares! 

■ Know a lot of songs and 
rhymes. This one’s actually 
pretty useful for any situation 
where children could get bored, 
on land, sea or anywhere else. 



Support from Mummy while Daniel gets used to his new domain 


PBO conclusion 


For what was a zero-cost 
modification that took about half 
an hour to make and fit and is 
completely removable in two 
minutes, this has really 
transformed our time out on the 
river. It’s a special (and for me as 
a lifetime boater, important) sight 
to watch my son waving at other 
boats, and taking in the sights 

and sounds of the river for the very first time in a life that I hope 
will include boats somewhere along the line. This simple addition 
has helped make this easier to achieve. 



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W 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


91 









: j) Gear test 




rig tension 


gauges 



It’s vitally important to ensure that the tension of your 
boat’s rigging is within the correct limits: Alex Bell tests 
four rig tension gauges to assess their accuracy 


G etting the correct 
tension on the 
shrouds on my 
various boats over 
the years has 

always worried me. Too slack, 
and I know that the sails won’t 
be working as efficiently as they 
can: and, worse, the rigging and 
mast fittings can be subjected 
to shock loads and fatigue. 

Too tight results in extra strain 
on the various attachment points 
of the rigging and the shrouds 
themselves, and can distort the 
hull as the loads are transmitted 
through the chainplates. Most 
mast breakages occur when 
the mast is overloaded, either by 
the wind or, more frequently, a 
collision. Modern stainless steel 
shrouds themselves rarely break, 
but the fittings to the mast or the 
boat do fail, with consequent 
failure of the mast. 

Fortunately, there are devices 
available on the market that 
enable one to measure the 
tension and make sure it is set 
within the right limits. There are 
currently three makes of rig 
tension gauge on the UK market 
designed for yacht rigging: 

■ The Loos, which comes in 
Standard and Professional 
models, each in three different 
shroud diameter ranges, from 
2.5 to 10mm. 

■ The SureCheck, which comes 
in four sizes, from 2 to 1 0mm. 

■ New on the market, the 
Spinlock Rig-Sense is only 
available in one size at the 
moment: 2 to 5mm diameter. 

Yacht rigging 

Whether a yacht has a masthead 
or fractional rig, they all have 
common rigging features: a 
forestay and a backstay to 
support the mast longitudinally 
(ie forward and aft), and the 
lateral rigging supporting the 
mast across the boat. Many 
yachts will have an adjustable 
backstay in which the tension can 
be varied: such adjustments will 
always affect the tension in the 
forestay, particularly with a 
masthead rig. The lateral rigging, 
known as the shrouds, requires 
a fixed tension to keep the mast 
upright in the transverse plane. 

Most sloop-rigged yachts will 
carry two sets of shrouds. One 
set will terminate just below the 
spreaders - the lowers. The other 
will pass through the ends of the 
spreaders and terminate at 
the masthead (masthead rig) 
or lower down at forestay level 
(fractional rig) - the cap shrouds. 


92 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


Rig tension gauges 





A larger mast will require more 
spreaders spaced up the mast 
to support it. Spreaders on 
masthead-rig yachts tend to be 
angled transversely across the 
boat, while fractional-rig boats 
usually have the spreaders 
swept back at an angle to 
help support the mast in a 
longitudinal direction. 

Mast theory 

In purely engineering terms, 
yacht masts are structural 
columns designed to resist the 
compressive forces and bending 
moments applied by the loads 
they are subjected to by the 


CO 

I 

"O 
c 
< 

rigging and the wind. Leonhard 
Paul Euler (1 707-1 783), a Swiss 
mathematician and physicist, 
provided the basic theory that 
structural engineers and mast 
designers use. 

Euler established that a column 
will buckle long before the applied 
load would cause it to fail in pure 
compression, and went on to 
prove that the load at which 
buckling failure will occur 
depends on the ‘slenderness 
ratio’. This is expressed as 
the effective length of the 
column divided by the radius 
of gyration of the column 
section - the l/r ratio. 


Shroud construction 
method and material 



Most yachts have shrouds made from 1x19 wire: 
this comprises 19 wires of the same diameter. One 
wire runs up the middle, six wires are wound round it 
and then 1 2 wires are wound in the opposite direction 
around them. 



A variation is Dyform wire, which uses shaped strands 
which fit together in a more compact way. Another is to 
use wire that is itself wound: this can give, for example, a 
7x1 9 wire. Racing yachts also use solid rod to form their 
stays and shrouds, a more expensive option. 


Most stays and shrouds these days are made from 31 6 stainless steel, 
which is specially produced for marine applications because of its ability 
to resist pitting corrosion. While not completely rustproof, the alloy is 
more corrosion-resistant than other common stainless steels. 


How we tested them 



In our test, we wanted to see how the rig tension gauges performed 
over a range of loads. Yacht Production & Surveying student Matt 
Turner (below) and I took a length of 5mm-diameter 31 6 stainless 
steel rigging wire that had both ends fitted with a swaged eye. We 
set this up in an Olsen tensile testing machine in Southampton 

Solent University’s material test laboratory. We 

f programmed the machine to apply five different 
loads progressively on the wire, ranging from 
1 00kg to 500kg. This represents around 4% to 
22% of the wire’s break load. At each load we 
measured the reading on the different gauges 
to see how they performed. 


Adjusting cap shrouds by 
the folding rule method’ 

Selden, in their excel I on l publication Write and advice on rigging 
and tuning ot your Seiden mast (also to be found on their website) , 
suggest this method as an alternative to a ng tension gauge. It 
works on the principle of measuring the extension of the shroud 
under load. You will need: 

■ 2m-lcng measuring rod (a 2m folding rule is ideal) 

■ Vernier callipers 

■ Adhesive tape 

METHOD: Start with both cap shrouds hand -tight. The rig is stayed 
with the lower shrouds and the forestay and backstay Attach the 2m 
rule with the adhesive tape at the top to the starboard shroud about 
5mm from the upper end of the wire terminal Measure the distance 
accurately using the Vernier callipers. Call this measurement x. 
Tension the cap shroud until the distance is x + 1 5mm. noting 
the number of turns required to do this Move acres s to the port 
shroud and tension the rigging screw the same number of turns. 

Return to the starboard side and adjust the tension until the gap is 
X + 3mm. The shrouds are now tensioned to 15% of their breaking 
load H the mast is not straight, adjust the lower shrouds. The folding 
rule method can be used on other stays, such as the backstay and 
forestay (without jib furling system) It can also be used for Dyform 
or rod rigging, but you will need to lake the difference in stretch into 
account compared to 1 *1 9 wire (see the Seiden website) . This 
method works for different diameter wires because the extension 
is proportional to the cross-sectional area and the break toad 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


93 


<2 Gear test 


Rig tension gauges on test 



Loos Standard 


PRICE: £84.95 

Contact: www.force4.co.uk 

Readings are based on 1x19 stainless steel 
cable: two models are available, each 
covering three wire sizes. Manufactured from 
anodised aluminium, the gauge cannot be left 
on the shroud when tensioning as it has to be 
held in position. The gauge comprises two 
aluminium arms which are riveted together at 
the bottom end. The wire is placed in a groove 
at the riveted end, then the gauge is placed 
up against the shroud and a piece of string is 
pulled so that one of the arms extends to a 
maximum value. The reading is then taken 
from the other arm on a scale: this reading is 
then transferred to a scale on the arm which 
enables the tension, in kg, to be read on the 
appropriate diameter scale. 

This gauge is straightforward to use, and 
an instruction sheet is provided. 



A scale on the arm enables the tension, in kg, 
to be read on the appropriate diameter scale 



Loos Professional 


PRICE: £119.95 

Contact: www.force4.co.uk 

The Loos Professional gauges are designed 
to have a higher accuracy than the Standard 
gauges. Readings are based on 1x19 
stainless steel cable, and six models are 
available - three sizes in either metric or 
imperial. The gauges are manufactured 
from anodised aluminium, and supplied 
with instructions and a conversion chart. 

The gauge comprises a flat aluminium plate 
with two fixed spools at the bottom and a 
sliding nylon hook at the top which engages 
the stay. The hook is attached by pulling on 
a string attached to the slider, which works 
against a coil spring. The slider has a pointer 
which runs along a scale. A reading is then 
taken from a table on the plate graduated to 
wire diameter. 

It is simple to use, but care is needed to 
eliminate friction in the slider. The shroud 
tension can be adjusted with the gauge 
attached to the wire. 



The slider works against a coil spring, and 
has a pointer which runs along a scale 



SureCheck 


PRICE: £85.00 

Contact: www.baselinemarine.com 

The SureCheck is calibrated for 1 xl 9 wire. 
Manufactured from stainless steel, the gauge 
comprises two arms pivoted at one end, the 
other being held together by a coil spring. 

A grooved nylon spool is rotated until the 
correct wire size is selected; the gauge is 
then attached to the stay by pulling on a ring 
so that the grooved spool is hooked over the 
wire. The two arms should be squeezed 
together and released. The reading is 
taken against the last red dot exposed by 
the left-hand arm. The load reading is 
obtained from a graph provided as a 
percentage of the break load, based on a 
figure of 2,000kg for 5mm diameter wire. 

The gauge can be left on the shroud while 
adjustments to the tension are made. At the 
top end, the graph provided was difficult to 
get percentage break load readings from 
because the curve flattens out. 

This is a robust and good-value gauge, 
but it is important to ensure the correct 
wire diameter is selected on the spool. 



The reading is taken against the last red 
dot exposed by the left-hand arm 


94 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 




Rig tension gauges (2J) 



Spinlock Rig-Sense 


PRICE: £125.00 

Contact: www.spinlock.co.uk 

The Spinlock Rig-Sense is a new rig-tuning 
tool developed to give consistent and 
repeatable measurement of loads on 
different wire composition as well as fibre. 

It is manufactured from anodised aluminium 
with glass-filled copolymer components and 
a composite leaf spring. The wire grips are 
stainless steel, which should reduce wear and 
give constant readings overtime. The leaf 
spring is calibrated to output load readings 
to a direct linear scale in kg. The Rig-Sense 
allows one-handed operation, and comes 
with a carry bag: an app can be downloaded 
to smartphones or tablets to enable readings 
to be recorded and shared for future reference. 

This is easy to use and gives a direct 
load reading: it can be left in position 
while adjusting the shroud tension. The 
design eliminates friction, which should 
lead to consistent readings. 

It is currently only available for 2 to 
5mm wire. 



The leaf spring is calibrated to output 
load readings to a direct linear scale in kg 


PBO results and verdict 


A s we expected, the readings taken 
from the gauges varied slightly 
from the actual loads. There will be 
a number of reasons for this. 

Firstly, some readings require some 
interpolation between two marks on the 
scale. There is some skill in operating the 
gauge: the effect of friction, which can lead 
to a false reading, has to be reduced. 

From the graph, the SureCheck final 
reading looks suspect, but this was 
probably because the conversion graph 
tended to a horizontal line at the upper 
range which made for larger reading error. 

The Loos Standard gauge was simple to 
use, but could not be left on the shroud 
when it was being tightened. The Loos 
Professional gauge gave a more accurate 
reading than the Standard gauge and 
could remain on the shroud during 
tension adjustment. The SureCheck 
was straightforward to operate, but it 
was more difficult to obtain results at 
the top of its range. 

The Spinlock Rig-Sense was the only 
gauge that allowed the load to be read 
directly and whose design eliminated the 
effect of friction in the mechanism. For 
ease of use it gets the best buy, but 
until the model range is extended to 
accommodate larger-diameter wire, 
it has limited applications. 



The Spinlock Rig-Sense was the only gauge 
that allowed the load to be read directly 



As we expected, the readings taken from the gauges varied slightly from the actual loads 


RESULTS: Shroud 5mm 1x15 

), 316 Stainless Steel, 

Breaking load 22kN* 




Shroud tension 


Gauge readings in kg 

Rdg % break load 

Load kg 


Kg 

N 

As % of 
UTS* 

Loos 

Standard 

Loos 

Pro 

Spinlock 

Rig-Sense 

SureCheck 

SureCheck 

1 

100 

981 

4.5 

109 

120 

140 

4 

80 

2 

200 

1,962 

8.9 

263 

240 

235 

7.5 

150 

3 

300 

2,943 

13.4 

380 

320 

350 

15 

300 

4 

400 

3,924 

17.8 

510 

450 

450 

20 

400 

5 

500 

4,905 

22.3 

650 

550 

580 

42 

840 


* Breaking load and Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS) are taken to be equivalent 


■ Thanks to David Aldridge of Aladdin’s Cave Rigging for providing the 5mm wire used in the test. 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


95 





fflo PRACTICAL 


Budget dinghy repairs 


You don’t have to pursue an award- 
winning finish in order to transform a 
neglected, rotting, 12ft sailing dinghy 
into a perfectly safe and serviceable 
craft, as David Pugh reports 


I f you read last month’s 
feature on forward-looking 
sonar, you might have 
noticed a tatty-looking 
dinghy cowering beneath 
the thousands of pounds-worth 
of equipment on test. 

The dinghy in question is an old 
3.6m (12ft) Tepco sailing dinghy, 
modified years ago for use as a 
tender. My first memories of it date 
back to learning to sail on my 
uncle’s boat as a teenager. One 
day, while heading out to his boat, 
the outboard failed and my 
younger cousin and I started to 
row. Our progress in the heavy 
boat, stuffed with provisions and 
(I have to say) more competent 
rowers, was pitifully slow - so slow, 
in fact, that the passing RNLI 
inshore lifeboat saw fit to offer to 
rescue us. 

In time, its weight and size 
prompted my uncle to replace it 


with a younger, sleeker model. 
Since then, the boat has seen little 
love, spending its time upside 
down first in a hedge and then in 
the PBO car park, after a brief spell 
afloat as part of another test. In 
short, then, it seemed the ideal 
choice when we needed a hull in 
which to drill seven huge holes for 
through-hull transducers. 

Neglect is no friend to any boat, 
however, and as we turned the 
hull the right way up most of the 
timberwork fell off in a shower of 
rotten splinters and woodlice. 

At some point in its history, the 
gunwales and some of the knees 
had been replaced with plywood, 
which had rotted and delaminated 
beyond repair. The forward 
bulkhead and half deck, also 
plywood, were in a similarly poor 
state, but the solid hardwood 
thwart and side benches had 
survived well and could be 



A demolition bar made short work of the rotten gunwales and foredeck 



ABOVE The new bulkhead epoxied 
in place. The lashing holds the hull 
in shape while the epoxy sets 
RIGHT A flush-cutting multi-tool 
removed the original GRP tabbing 


retained. However, the plywood 
panels below them, intended to 
enclose polystyrene buoyancy 
blocks, were scrap. 

Although some of the woodwork 
was cosmetic, knees, gunwales 
and bulkheads provide much of 
the hull’s rigidity, so something 
had to be done. 


Tear down 


Our first step was to rip out all of 
the rotten timber. A demolition bar 
made short work of the gunwales, 
foredeck and plywood panelling; 
the bulkhead put up more of a 
fight, but with the aid of a Bosch 
multi-cutter we cut away the 
glassfibre holding it in place and it 
pulled away. A run round with the 
vacuum cleaner revealed a sorry 
sight, with flaking paint and a crack 
in the port side extending about six 
inches down from the gunwale. 

Clearly, we needed some 
materials, so we headed down 
the road to visit our local builders’ 
merchant, Sydenhams. They 
supplied us with four 4m lengths of 
pressure-treated softwood approx 
40mm x 1 5mm, a sheet of 6mm 
WBP ply and a sheet of 9mm WBP 
ply for £38. The local branch of 
Screwfix provided a box of 200 
stainless steel screws for £1 4: 
these are A2 stainless, so not ideal 
for the marine environment, but we 
reasoned they would probably last 
as long as the softwood. A trip to 
the chandlery to buy an inspection 
hatch, two drain bungs and 1 .5kg 


m- ■,* 

- . ^ jAI 


f 


Transferring the shape of the hull 
to the bulkhead to gain a good fit 

of epoxy set us back a further £50, 
bringing our expenditure to £1 02. 

Minimum restoration 

We started work by repairing the 
glassfibre damage. A thick mix of 
epoxy neatly filled the numerous 
screw holes where the previous 
gunwales had been screwed 
through. The crack in the port 
side we simply ground back and 
reinforced on both sides with 
strips of glass tape wetted out 
with unthickened epoxy. 

The next stage was to make and 
fit a new forward bulkhead. We 
roughly cut a new panel from 9mm 
plywood using the old bulkhead 
to give the shape. However, on 
putting it in place we found that the 


96 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 



Budget dinghy repairs l 



We were able to buy the timber 
in 4m lengths, saving the need to 
scarf two pieces, but found that it 
was not quite flexible enough to 
bend around the forward part of 
the hull. To solve this we built a 
simple steam box using a metre 
length of drainpipe, insulated with 
an old curtain and with a wallpaper 
stripper steamer inserted into the 
bottom of the pipe. 

Prior to steaming, we stepped 
the forward ends of the inner 
gunwales by 6mm to allow for 
the foredeck. We then rigged our 
steamer around an inner and outer 
gunwale pair, aligned with the 


New foredeck spine in CLS softwood - we coated it with epoxy to prevent 
it from rotting. Note the new gunwales, steaming in the curtain (top right) 


hull came away significantly at the 
top - clearly the old bulkhead had 
been partially responsible for 
maintaining the hull shape. To 
resolve this, we ran a lashing 
around the boat to pull the sides 
of the hull in to the bulkhead, then 
used a dummy stick to transfer 
the hull form to the plywood. A 
few tweaks with the jigsaw and 
a block plane gave us an 
adequate fit to the hull. 

We put the new bulkhead in 
place with the hull held to shape 
with a lashing. We then bonded 
the plywood in to the hull using 
wide glassfibre tape wetted out 
with epoxy, and left it to set. 

Once cured, we trimmed the top 
to shape, cut a circular aperture to 
fit a standard dinghy watertight 
hatch and made a drainage hole 
for a bung at the bottom. We then 
made a centre support for the 
foredeck using a length of studding 
softwood and refitted a length of 
the original hardwood to support it. 


A new bung fitting in the transom improved the boat’s seaworthiness 


New gunwales 

To replace the inner and outer 
gunwales, we opted to use treated 
softwood. Although not as durable 
as hardwood, pressure-treated 
softwood is cheap, lasts 
reasonably well and, in this 
case, is easily replaced. 


section of maximum bend. 

As a rule of thumb, timber takes 
about an hour per inch thickness 
in the steam box to become 
flexible. We withdrew the timber 
after 40 minutes and found it bent 
easily around the hull. Working as 
quickly as possible down the hull, 


using clamps to hold the inner and 
outer gunwales in alignment, we 
screwed the two lengths together. 
Once in place, we trimmed the 
ends flush at the transom and 
shaped them at the bow. 


Replacing the deck 

We took the easiest option to gain 
the shape of the foredeck, placing 
the sheet of 6mm plywood over 
the top and drawing around the 
gunwales. Allowing a 20mm 
margin for the outer gunwale, 
we cut it out and offered it up to 
find it fitted adequately well. 

To proof the timber against rot we 
gave the new bulkhead, deck and 
supports a coat of unthickened 
epoxy before screwing the deck 
into position and filling any gaps 
with thickened epoxy. 

Once complete, we gave the 
whole lot a coat of Sandtex 
textured masonry paint, left in 
stock from a non-slip paints test. 



Out on the water, testing forward 
sonar units (PBO March 2016) 


tf 





TV hy 






Clamping the 
freshly-steamed 
gunwales in place 
before screwing 
through to fix them 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


v .*4 


Conclusion 



O ur aim was to get the dinghy afloat for minimum expense 
of time and money, whilst doing so well enough that we 
wouldn’t need to do it again every time we use the boat. 

Everything worked well, with the exception of the Sandtex paint 
which started coming off when scuffed around by feet and seawater, 
leaving a milky residue. We were particularly pleased with how easily 
the gunwales bent into place once we had steamed them. 

We now have a useful, stable and seaworthy dinghy - apart 
from the seven large holes we drilled for the transducers! © 


97 




Cruising Notes 


Readers’ cruising destinations, near and far 


We pay for your published cruising stories and 
harbour updates. Email pbo@timeinc.com or 
write to the address at the top of page 5 


Essaouira: our boat is in 
the middle of the raft in 
the background 



Moroccan spice 


Terysa Vanderloo recommends the unique 
cruising ground of Morocco’s Atlantic coast 


SPAIN 

“71 

Cadiz • 


Mohammedia * * Rabat 


MOROCCO 

Essaouira • 

Agadir \ 



M orocco is less than eight 
miles from Europe at its 
closest point, and yet 
you could not find two cruising 
destinations more different from 
each other. Many cruisers on 
their way south from Europe 
opt for an offshore passage to 
either Madeira or directly to the 
Canaries. However, cruising 
the Atlantic coast of Morocco 
offers a wonderful opportunity to 
explore this fascinating country, 
steeped in history and culture. 

We sailed south from Cadiz and, 
as we reached the African continent, 
the scent of warm spices greeted us. 
Our first port was Morocco’s capital, 
Rabat. After an overnight passage, 
we were thrilled to see Rabat’s 
ancient walled kasbah, standing 
proud on the Atlantic coast. 


ABOUT THE AUTHOR 


It is required that you call the 
marina, either on VHF or by phone, 
before your arrival so they can send 
out a pilot boat to guide you upriver 
to the marina. There are sandbars at 
the entrance, which will occasionally 
be closed due to large Atlantic 
swell. Caution is advised at all times, 
and you should time your arrival for 
HW if possible. Night entry is not 
advised, except in exceptionally 
calm Atlantic conditions. 

Bouregreg Marina is situated on 
the southern side of the River 
Bouregreg in Sale, Rabat’s sister 
town. Rabat, on the northern bank, 
is easily reached by monorail or on 
foot. The marina is very pleasant: 
modern, clean, well-maintained, 
with several upmarket bars and 
restaurants. There is Wi-Fi in the 
office, and 24/7 security. This is an 


excellent place to leave your boat 
for atrip inland. Fez, for example, is 
three hours away by train. 

There are very few tourists in this 
part of Morocco - especially in Sale, 
where we were obviously a bit of a 
novelty - and the medinas are 
fascinating. They sell everything: 
food, jewellery, fabrics, carpets, 
woodwork, clothes and more. The 
fresh produce quarters were truly an 
assault on the senses. If you don’t 
fancy watching your dinner being 
slaughtered in front of you, a large 
and modern Carrefour is a 


10-minute taxi ride away. 

Our next port was 33 miles away, 
a sleepy town called Mohammedia, 
which has a small and very crowded 
marina. We saw many boats turned 
away, and were lucky to get in at all; 
calling to reserve a berth in advance 
is essential. Mohammedia has a 
small medina offering some fresh 
fruit and vegetables, but with few 
restaurants and limited provisioning 
opportunities there is not much else 
here to attract cruising yachts. 

En route to Essaouira 

We then sailed the 195-mile passage 
to Essaouira. It is possible to break 
this up into day-sails: Jadida and 
Safi are both fishing harbours which 
offer berthing for yachts and another 
chance to enjoy the local way of life. 
On approach to 
Essaouira, the inside 
of the harbour is not 
visible. Only after 
rounding the western 
harbour wall does 
this lively fishing port 
come into view. To 
port, there are 
dozens of fishing 
boats rammed in 
together. To starboard, the orange 
lifeboat is available to raft up 
against - clearly it is rarely used 
as an emergency vessel! Past the 
lifeboat was an old Beneteau First 
(used occasionally as a day charter) 
moored up to a pontoon. Rafting up 
alongside is another option. We had 
2m depth underneath us here; it 
was a little deeper next to the 
lifeboat. Despite our initial 
confusion, we had many friendly 
locals directing us where to go and 
helping with our lines. Electricity 
and water are both available on the 
pontoon, and the nearby restaurant 
Chez Sam has unlocked Wi-Fi. 



Terysa Vanderloo quit her job as a paramedic to 
take on the 2015 Atlantic Rally for Cruisers in her 
Southerly 38 yacht Ruby Rose with her partner 
Nick Fabbri. Now enjoying the Caribbean, their 
eventual aim is a circumnavigation. 

Follow Terysa and Nick’s adventures at 
www.rumsodomyandthelash.com 



The medina in Essaouira is home to many small businesses 


98 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 




Cruising Notes ( [jT 



Rabat kasbah as seen from our yacht as we approached 


Essaouira is an ancient town, full 
of activity, with plenty to do and see. 
There are many traditional and 
excellent Moroccan restaurants, and 
local shops sell everything from 
hand-carved wooden ornaments to 
carpets and musical instruments. 
Additionally, this is the place for 
outdoor enthusiasts: kitesurfing, 
horse riding, surfing and quad 
biking are just some of the sports 
on offer. Or simply sit in your cockpit 
and watch the constant spectacle 
provided by the activity of 
Essaouira’s fishing harbour! 

Our final port was Agadir, a 
modern town situated behind a 
large beach. The marina is new and 
very attractive, offering excellent 
shelter. There is also security and 
Wi-Fi in the office, and plenty of 
restaurants in the marina complex 
and along the beachfront. The only 
issue was the state of the showers, 
which were being used as some 
sort of storage facility while we were 
there. The coast to the north of 
Agadir offers some of Morocco’s 
best surfing, and it is a popular 
departure point for the Canaries: 
Lanzarote is 220 miles away. 

It is necessary to clear in and out 
of every port. In some places, like 
Rabat, the process is quick and 
efficient. All the necessary officials - 
police, customs and immigration, 
and the marina staff - board the 
boat and will happily enjoy a chat 
with you as you fill in the paperwork. 
However, some patience and a 
good sense of humour is required 
for other ports, and although the 
vast majority of officials are friendly 


; and helpful, the process may still 
j take longer than you expect. 

The cost of cruising in Morocco 
: is, unsurprisingly, cheaper than 
\ Europe. Our marina fees varied 
! between 200-240 dirhams 
: (£1 2-£1 4 at the current exchange 
rate) per night. Occasionally - 
as in Mohammedia - there was 
an additional port fee of 1 20 
i dirhams (£8). 

I Unique perspective 

Exploring the Moroccan culture is 
one of the delights of cruising this 
coast, and as a cruiser you will have 
a unique perspective. Because you 
! will likely be away from the major 
\ tourist centres, it may be difficult to 
find people who speak English, 

[ even in marinas or customs, 
j French is widely spoken. 

Baksheesh (tipping) is occasionally 
requested. When the owner of the 
Beneteau First in Essaouira helped 
\ us with our lines and kept an eye 
on the boat while we were off 
; exploring the surrounding area, 
l a bottle of wine and a few beers 
; were gratefully received. 

\ Sailing the Atlantic coast of 
Morocco was at times challenging: 

[ the lack of infrastructure for 
yachts and the additional level 
of bureaucracy we had to deal 
with was, at times, frustrating or 
confusing. However, it was an 
j incredibly rewarding experience 
to explore this fascinating and 
friendly country, and I truly hope 
that more yachts consider 
5 making the effort to discover 
■ this unique cruising ground. 



Agadir Marina is ‘new and very attractive, offering excellent shelter’ 


Free anchorage! 

Spurn Bight, River Humber 



Spurn Head is the promontory guarding the mouth of the River Humber 


A good anchorage can 
be found in the north 
channel of the River 
Humber, inside Spurn Head, 
offering shelter in northerly 
and easterly winds. It is 
uncomfortable in strong 
north-westerly winds, 
particularly on a spring ebb. 

The Cruising Almanac 2016, 
compiled by the Cruising 
Association and published by 
Imray, recommends anchoring 
in 1-3.5m, opposite the 
lighthouse off the brickyard 
chimney, north of the pilot boat 
station. The clay bottom gives 
good holding but the ebb can 
be strong. 

According to the Associated 
British Ports website (www. 
humber.com), safe anchoring 


can be found in the Spurn 
Bight, where a yacht buoy is 
available for mooring purposes. 
Care must be taken not to 
interfere with pilot-launch 
operations. Anchoring is also 
possible close to the north bank 
near Hawkins Point. This is the 
only area on the Lower Humber 
where protection can be gained 
from north-westerly winds. 

Safe anchorage can be found 
close inshore between North 
Killingholme and Skitter Haven 
when strong winds are blowing 
from a direction between west 
and south-west. The brickyard 
chimney provides a useful 
landmark. The area close 
inshore at Pauli offers shelter 
from winds coming from a 
northerly 





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99 


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Westerly Chieftan 26* 



1973 for sale. Three sails, three cabin, toilet, 
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Norfolk Gypsy -”Gypsy Mistress” 



Boat 48 - green hull -Yanmar IGM 10 diesel 


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based Ocean Village. Vectran Sails by Hood, Spinnaker, 
Cruising Chute, Snuffer and ATN Tacker. Honda 5HP on 
Teleflex control. Beneteau Mast lowering and raising kit 
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£12750 “Offers” 

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HURLEY 
20 FT. 
1970 


'4 BERTH TWIN KEEL. GOOD CONDITION 
FURLING GENOA + 2 MAIN SAILS 
ORIGINAL LLOYDS CERTIFICATE (3262) 

SAIL POWER 4 - STROKE MERCURY OUTBOARD 
(2 YRS OLD) 

LYING ASHORE PAIGNTON HARBOUR 
£3,200 


, TEL - 01803 293942/ wwbmonty@live.co.uk 



1985 German Frers 36 


1 0.9m x 3.5m, 1 985, Volvo Penta (20 1 0) 

D I -30/ 1 30 S (150 hours); 2 cabins, 7 
berths, hard wood interior finish, 3 sails, 
life boat (new), zodiac with outboard 
motor, bimini, spray hood, Marina 
£23,000 

Telephone +41 079 832 70 31 
Email random.duboisl9@gmail.com 


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£79,000 ono 

Telephone Glyn White 0034 

968199506/ 669263485 

Email - helenwhite522@gmail.com 


SPRING BOAT SHOW 

Sat 23rd & Sun 24* APRIL 
10 am to 4 pm 

Free entry! 

Free parkingl 
Free catalogue! 

Buying? 

Over 50 boats on si 
Ashore & Afloat! 



Selling? 

2 weeks free mooring 
No sale - no fee! 






Woodrolfe Brokerage 
TOLLESBURY MARINA 


Tolies bury, Essex, CM9 BSE 
www.woodrolfe.com 01621 868494 


WwdrJt Dual Pftjtcl 

26ft cMuc-sttm wtHiden yachL bout in 19-iw 
by brotikr Marine. Luvdy prated boat. 
Itarmudan Rig- Uvakd in HulTbridge. 

I w« Online gallery and video here; 
hup ^4>itiy/prpgcctb(*t 
079495 .Ifi 2 26 maltfei-w JkitiwJesign.ui. uk 
I9QQ ~ 

Pioneer 9 metre 

30 ft sailing yacht with 10 hp Volvo aux. 
(1988) built in GRP in UK in 1964 to a 
V de Stadt design, with 4 berths - lying 
Chichester. £4,500 
Tel; 020 8668 2925 
Email: johnwl48@ntlworld.com 


MARINE EQUIPMENT 


Sfrnne parts far y* * 

Seagull^ 

www, brit i s hs eag liLcom 
□1491 B52755 



[THE JACOBS YACHT and boat 

;rad!e LTD. All sizes and types of 
;ratt catered tor. Probably the best 
Jesigned and versatile cradle made 
Tel: 01394 448253 Fax: 01 394 
148408. Email 

- orgejacobs Q ti nyworld . co xi k 
atww. jacobsboa tcradles.com . 
Alternatively send for a brochure. E. 
Jacobs b Sons, The Forge. Kirfen, Nr 
Ipswich. Suffolk :|P 10 ONU 


To advertise call the credit card hotline: FREEPHONE 0800 783 9683 


100 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 

















MARINE DIRECTORY 


IVIMJUFF 

TIME FOR CHANGE 

Celebrating 60 years of MGDUFF with a new look 






As the leading sacrificial anode manufacturer and supplier 
to celebrate 60 years of MGDUFF we have a new state of 
the art website. Built as mobile first it's fully responsive 
allowmg mobile and tablet users to fully utilise the site. You 
will notice the home page is now split into G categories that 
define MGDUFF s business and help you get to the right 
product you need and quickly. As well as being the brand 
leader for 


Yacht & Power Boat sacrificial anodes our Commercial 
Marine and Inland Waterways market fe a large part of our 
business. Many people may also be unaware that MGD (a 
division of MGDUFF) is the largest installer of Aftro hygienic 
Wall Gadding & flooring, if you're fooking for a unique 
coating system that can be thought of as a liquid anode 
check out our separate site for Zinga. 


fe I f- phone ; +44 (0) 1243 533336 Webs www.mgdjfico.uk Em saies@mgduff.co.uk 

1 Timberlaine Estate, Gravel Lane, Quarry Lane, 

Chichester, West Sussex 
P019 8PP 


To advertise call the credit card hotline: FREEPHONE 0800 783 9683 


Practical Boat Owner 598 Aprilw 2016* www.pbo.co.uk 


101 








MARINE DIRECTORY 


Tel: 020 3148 2001 Fax: 020 3148 8316 email: tradeboats ads@timeinc.com 


BERTHS MOORINGS & STORAGE 


PONTOON BERTHS & 
SWINGING MOORINGS 


CHICHESTER HARBOUR 
2016 

Tidal pontoon berths 
£260.00 per metre per annum 
Swinging moorings 
£450 - £1045.00 per annum 
From 1st April to 31 October 


HAYLING YACHT CO LTD 


BOAT NAMES 


TELEPHONE 02392 46 
EMAIL INFO@HAYLINGYACHTCO.UK WE 


i HAYLIN G YACHT CO. UE 


Quay Lane Boatyard I NO BOAT NEEDED 


in Historic Portsmouth Harbour 


Annual Swing Moorings 
from £420 per annum 
starting April 1st. 
Pontoon Berths £1.18 per 
foot per week. 
Storage Ashore available. 
See Website for details. 

www.quaylaneboatyard.co.uk 
02392 524214 





LAKE DISTRICT tfIXSWATER 

S* Biting auarinp j'vojum* 

C(mwu Jennifer |_nile ii I.Uk-num I naK QfTkc 

I ft; ■WMJn 

tiauil. Jill link* 1 iLtli-aiijllu.11111 
v w jldlfnidiiiAiini 


Portsmouth Harbour Berths 


Upper Quay, Fareham, Hanls 
Secure pontoon berths. 
SemRidal 

Pontoon access at all times 
Water & electricity 
From 038 per ft p a. 


Upper Quav Marine, 6 Upper Wharf 
Tet: 07973 S 9 Q 557 Of 07712 199444 
UpfMrqupnarlMl ^gmaiuom 


WEIR QUAY BOATYARD. 


ONE STOP FOR All KARINE TRADES 

www.wiwjiwjfxom - 01813 #48414 


HOO NESS YACHT CLUB 
welcomes boat owners 
and NON boat owners to enjoy 
yacht sailing and crewing in the 
Medway and beyond 
Call Gary today and see what benefits 
membership can give you. 


07702599113 

www.hooness.org.uk 


FENDERING 



f^nderSock KIM 

One kit covers up to six fenders 
Two sizes fit the majority of fenders 
Ten different colours to choose from 
Easy to make - no sewing required 

Small kit 
£28.50 

f UK P&P £5.40 


Large kit 
£36.50 

* UK P&P £5.90 


Ilf 


www. f e nd o r- soc k s c o. uk 
Cmall: ■atealftieridflr-B&cka.co. uli 
01 702 392270 


LIFE RAFTS 


LIFERAFT 

AND EPIRB 


*fa prt Md fbfW kti 

0800 

243673 



RIGGING 


LEATHER WHEEL COVERINGS 

■ * - ■ 99 . . . I I . 


SAC BOAT NAMES 

www.sacboatnames.com 

post@sacboatnames.com 
01384 443744 


Trade Enquiries Welcome 


Names Tapes Decals Canalia 



Supplying Marine Graphics since 1988 


MARINE ELECTRONICS 


SeaRolf LED 


tmtmniuF '.©wfMtfww whim 


< *t 


www.searolf.com Tel. $1283 542718* 

CATALOGUES AVAILABIJY 


PROPELLERS 



OVER 2000 PROPELLERS 




• 2 & 3 Blade 

■ Alloy & Bronze 

• Filed £ Folding 

• Shafts £ Seals 

■ Prop Protector 
Rope Cutter 




SPARS & RIGGING 


SPARS AND RIGGING 

0SELDEN 

FUHLEX 

Z SPARSE*- 

SALES & SERVICE WORLDWIDE 

CRUSADERSAILS.COM 

Tel: *44 (O) 1202 67-0580 
E-mail : info@crusadersails.com 


CHARTS 


r'UC fAO# .'V'tMHl 

J Uflfvw I flatten :□ SMBWtaT, 4 After# 

Clyde Mar inc 

\QiBAtI\BF.COrtt 

fm4 ffllMNIU 


ChartSndTi 

software 


rides 


Funk^^onkey 


funky monk eyboama mes.com 


Design onSne at youi 
One stop boatname shop 

Bnatnames, Hull graph ita 
SSR Number & more 


Contact US I 01590 671974 


TILLERS & RUDDERS 


TONY 

MACKILLICAN 

.CO.UK 

Rudders & Tillers made 
to your requirements 

Tel: 01785 284949 


SURVEYORS 


i\ East Anglia 
Sr Yacht Surveys 

Dnmirm Buckley AssodIMS 

Pre-purchase and insurance surveys 
Few GRP, wfaoil an d steel vnnrli 

Id: 01603 717823 / 079S1 247107 
* s C u btinlrmtft I'um 
* h w Jichboi n ey utmk 


Robert J. Perry, I, Eng . 

AMlMarHST Marne Surveym 
Soulh uresi manic iwi}or KEflf* 
AM I lltii. pn-purcfclse f inMiKuice t 

Robert I Fm, Lyme Re^is. 

Tel: OI2V7 65014, Fa* 01207 6.1141)9 
enquiry* mbparywtertfac tout 


Boat Owner 


To advertise call the credit card hotline: FREEPHONE 0800 783 9683 


102 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 





































MARINE DIRECTORY 



Is your boat 
insurance due? 


Then make sure you get a quote from us 

Everything you need 

One of the most comprehensive policies on the market. 

Outstanding claims settlement 

When it comes to claims settlement our reputation is second to none. 

Incredible value 

Our boat insurance costs less than you think. 


INSURANCE 


gjwdirectco.uk 

AuthortMtf and rsguiatw by FlruflcW Conduct Authority 


craftinsure 

Top Quality Boat Insurance 

for complete peace of mind 

The UK’s first online boat insurance provider. 
Created by boating people for those who 
love their boats! 

• Quick and easy cruiinc quotations and cover 

• 24 hourdains help line and simple oniine claims tracking 

• Monthly payments for premiums over E1Q0 at NO EXTRA COST! 

• CSjQQOtOQG Third Party liability cover 

• Mu I ti -boat insurance discou nls - insure two or more boats for less 

• Underwritten by Navigators £t General 

a tending Iiamt of IlVlCh tiSur^nw pfc 


www.craftinsure.com 

or call: 03452 607888 

Authorised and rtgultf cd by the Financial Conduce Author ity 



* 


Whatever vessel you own, make sure it's 
properly protected against unexpected 
mishaps, in and out of the water. 


Agreed value insurance 

Up to £3 million third 
party liability 


Cover for loss or 
damage while your 
vessel is in transit. 


If you are 50 or over, call 

0800 559 3194 

stating reference GP2527 

saga.co.uk/boat 




KA-TR0I25 


To advertise call the credit card hotline: FREEPHONE 0800 783 9683 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


103 











Engl no Coding - Bilge - Pressure Wsler System 
Shqis* Dtiln -lump Drain ■ FuelTrsmter 


MARINE DIRECTORY 


Tel: 020 3148 2001 Fax: 020 3148 8316 email: tradeboats ads@timeinc.com 


UL 


T.NORRJSTw 

IPStLSl 


MAMJXE 


wwwjnonUinaHrie.co.i4 

Tel: 020 0500 2453 


hS i 




6 Wood Lane, 
Isleworth, 
Middlesex, 
1W7 5ER 
020 0500 7440 


PROPELLERS 


Fixed A FokHnjj- Hinufaclurt 


Steioleti Heel ihitti made Id order 


Stuff I no boxu ■ Ciitiou bcorfnoft ■ iooxv Tut#® 
^Plidiele -Vep P S^ £fi U - 
Glind pecking - Remote greasers 


GEARBOX SPARES « REPAIRS 


we her* lull workshop ladlHle* ter repair 
ind menutecture to your tequlmwite 


Skin Fittings - Ssscodc* - Stnlnsr* * V*N** - 
HoeeTsibi ■ Elbows *Tees * Plugs - C-epi ■ 
Comprasster Fittings - Copper Pipe 


ALL PRODUCTS AVAILABLE FOR 
COLLECTION OR BY MAIL ORDER 


OSMOSIS 

South's leading osmosis centre 


Using 5 HOTVAC machines to give 
faster, more efficient treatments 
Plus optional 5 year guarantee 
With full repair yard facilities also 
available 

CALI 02392 463592 

w *hfl wwwtayMmiyKHa) iA 


TRANSPORT 


PLANS 


ANTI-FOULING 


To advertise call the credit card hotline: FREEPHONE 


783 9683 


Sim SEAR 


PIPE FITTINGS 


SHUT YOUR TRAP 

Catch loosters. crabs, prawns etc in 
our folding traps & creels. 

See the range at 
www.interextrading.com or 
www.yachtypot5.com or 
email info@interexint.co.uk 
Tel: Ot 254 703516 


GEL COAT PEELING AND GRIT 
BLASTING. 

Ybur drying out problems solved with our 
SUCCESSFUL SELF BUILD STEAM 
CLEANING KIT, INFO AVAILABLE. No 
VAT, Diagnostic service and bee advice 
for DJ V Proven epoxy systems and 
expert assistance up lo complete repair 
available with work retard LYMINGTDN 
AND CHICHESTER BASED. For friendly 
advice covering all your gel coal prob- 
lems please call Adrian on: 023BC 
Ml 35/ 67885 175 534 or Jon 
(Chichester) on: 0754038 5365 
www.advancadoemoalB.co.uN; 

AdvoiiK h 8 gmill.com 
FULL BEFITS undertaken with 
undercover facilities Chichester, 
Featured In PBO March 2012 


CALORIFIERS TOILETS A HOSES * SOUND - HttULATOH - FENDERS FLlEUWATEfi 
SEPARATORS -ZINC A MAGNESIUM ANODES AND MORE 


*' A R 

BOAT TRANSPORT BY 
SQUIRREL MARINE***.. 
WITH JIM BUTTS EXPERTISE 

BuH to Kbm, 0M4b|liwn t hi^ bii lW I X 

www^quirrtlmarlae.ctJia 

JamJnBdnMHIkknlMBrLH^ndi. 
JtMfTWllI XU 
este »hii Hid iop» mrt <*f 


ANTIFOUL REMOVAL 

Low pressure system, no damage 
to gel coat/epoxy. Grit blasting 
of keels available, gel peeling, 
osmosis treatments/repairs etc. 
www.symblast.com 
Tel: 01202387289 or 
07957 655978 


USB 


I pjuiiuhc iwvnno * rtwjuw unw dwm * riiumni ■ 
f llpni • Elutdbuflte - Flndbte Englm Mountings 


Watoftocfcs - Gootenecka - Slknem - 
Eihunt Moao - Ho*a Clip* ■ Anti Siphon vents 


PUMPS 


CREW WANTED 


CrewSeekers 

international 


We have a wide variety of exciting 
Crewing opportunities wiyldwide, 
for amateur and proUlMonM sailm 

From deysaNing to transowen 
All experience levels welcome 
Yacht Owners register free. 

Jem online today at 

wvyw.crewseekers.net 


lA boat plans 

Catalogue with almost 
400 designs for the 
home boat builder- 
canoes, dinghies, 
dayboats, yachts and 
1 launches -now on a CD 
as PDF files with many 
colour photos 
£7 + £2 p&p or 
visit our web site at 

www.selway-fisher.com 

CONSTRUCTION MANUALS 
Stitch & Tape Boat Construction 
Strip Plank Boat Construction 
Clinker Ply Boat Construction 
Plywood Boat Construction for Larger Craft 
- all manuals £18 + £4 P&P each 
SELWAY FISHER DESIGN 

B 15 King St, Melksham, SN12 6HB 
Tel. 01225 705074 


INSURANCE 


Why splash out more 
than you need to on 

boat insurance? 


With our fast, online quote builder you can shape your 
insurance quote entirely around you and your boat. 

Plus: 

Save up to 25% with our no claims discount 
Enjoy 0% APR on monthly payments 
Lowest Price Guarantee 
Get an instant quote today, visit: 

www.insure4boats.co.uk/PBC36 

Or call our UK based Customer Service team on 

0800 668 1661 (quoting PBC36) 


insure boats' 


l nun m 

Pl.tVSlRKRVH r\M K\\(» 

I 

raffords 

LIMITED 


TclfpHntir; il!5Zf T|7lN5 

J in Ail: i iif@ .1 a 


ELECTRONICS 


BASIC BOAT LIABILITY COMPANY 
1 UK’S NUMBER 1 MARKET LEADER [ 
IN BOAT LIABILITY INSURANCE 

• THIRD PARTY LIABILITY • NO EXCESS • 

• £5M LIABILITY • £50K WRECK REMOVAL • 


03333 219 430 

WWW.BASIC-BOAT.COM 


Quality Low Cost Marine Insurance Quotation in 5 Clicks and 30 Seconds 


insurance-A-boats 

co.uk 

Our name says it all! 

For quick, instant quotations and cover for all type of marine craft contact us on 


PERSONAL 


TrR fP 


SWI-TEC Mastlift 

for a safe mast climbing 

www.swi-tec.com 

info@swi-tec.com 


MARINE ENG & ANCILLARY EQUIP 


Date-A-Sailor 


.com 


rule 

UMEtO mto? 


AOUADHIVC - CCNTAFUE* 


THE SHAFT KNIFE 

Propeller A Sum GHr Protector 


£65.00 * vat 


104 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


























MARINE DIRECTORY 




BETA MARINE 


10 to 150 hp - 14 very smooth, multi-cylinder, heat exchanger 
cooled engines 

We offer you the belt, compact, reliable engines at very 
competitive prices! 

Easy engine replacement, we can supply special engine 
feet designed to fit your boat 

Engineered in the UK, at Beta Marine in Gloucestershire, 
we welcome your visit 

Installation, buy through our dealer network for an Installation 
package see our website for dealer listings, or 


To advertise call the credit card hotline: FREEPHONE 0800 783 9683 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016* www.pbo.co.uk 


105 








MARINE DIRECTORY 


Tel: 020 3148 2001 Fax: 020 3148 8316 email: tradeboats ads@timeinc.com 


SPARES 



BETA MARINE Genuine Beta Reliability 
Genuine Tarts Genuine Peace of Mind 




Tel: 01452 723492 •Email: spares@betamarine.co.uk 


MARINE ENGINES INBOARD 



Propulsion engines - 17 - 272 bhp 


Compact, reliable A easy to maintain 


Generators & full installation kits available 


5 Year warranty with International Dealer network 


Englnet Plus Ltd. 



BOAT SCREENS & WINDOWS 


GLASSFIBRE & SHEATHING 


WINDOWS • HATCHES * SCREENS * WASHBOARDS 

PERSPEX - ACRYUC * POLYCARBONATE - CUT PANELS OR SHEETS 
— m FORMED - DfibLLf D • SHAPED - TO YOUfi REQUIREMENTS^ 

22 CLEAR * TINTED * MIRRORED 

00+ ni NEXT DAY DELIVERY UK 

w ■“ SUNLIGHT PLASTICS LTD 

Units 15 and MS, Aston Hoad, Waterloo vllle p Hants POT 7X0 
Website: www.»urkl*ght plastics, co.uk Email: salastf&un NghtplastlCft.co.uk 
Tet: 02302 250500 • Fax: 02392 250400 



*- We are based -• 
in the SOUTH WEST 
and supply replacement 
BOAT WINDOWS 
WASHBOARDS - HATCHES 
vinyl pinspripes - boat names 
contact us 01 752 266599 
info@nusignmarine.co.uk 
wwwnusignmarine.co.uk 


/''PLASI 


PLASTIC BOAT WINDOWS 


. » POLvcAittwin 

at A" JLMJTTMS 3 in THIfhAfCUtS 

UtEEhS wUN&aUfti HlKnli 
KihiXmS At*‘J INJTHjyCNT MMLl 

cumuiftMtixAtc emrillcct 

rtLLiJ] mj- . h 

OLHC < TUFNAIIOOKD 
wrww.prDjictff 4 atiici.ca.uk _ 

WKkiftLAKam, Ri 


E 


Tv (tin) 


frln£*rt 






East Coast 
Fibreglass Supplies 

• Over 3 P 000 products in slock 

• FREE Friendly Expert Advice 

• Great Prices, FAST delivery 

• Over 45 years experience 

• Everything you need in one place 

Online* Phone* Trade Counter 

www.ecFibregfassSupplies.co.uk 

0191 497 5134 



BUSINESS FOR SALE 


SeaClear 


'marine 

windows 


renovation specialists 


i haal hv.ch*s ■ windows * port lights. i 
A wMidiCr'ctni * washboards ■ 


■ cTbisefs ■ sports boats ■ ■ 


Mob 1#: 07 H i btfke: flifiJl 205IS7 

www sea tl-e-uj- cD.ufc * TOleseseAdeAf.EDi.uk 
£••1 ibJtJbeCi iftLi'kvhap £ * Lr riT 


Bo^t Owner 


FOR SALE 

Mallorca Yachting business 
Marine engineering, repairs, 
maintenance & guardianage 
28 Boats 6-20 metres sail and 
power, including charter fleet 
Yacht cleaning, Mobile work- 
shop & chandlery 
Turnover in excess of €350.000 
Owner retiring and wishes 
to sell at reasonable price to 
persons 

that will continue the business 

Email: 

smchartermallorca@gmail.com 



To advertise call the credit card hotline: FREEPHONE 0800 783 9683 


106 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016* www.pbo.co.uk 















MARINE DIRECTORY 


MARINE ENGINE PROPELLERS 



* Smooth JTCJNfWT h greatly 

REDUCED NoT(Rt W 

* Greater stopping po^er 

* Reduced vibration V 

* Huge reduction in ‘prop walk’ with 

ALL TYPES OF HULL/KEEL DESIGN 

* DRAMATIC IMPROVEMENT IN REVERSE 
CONTROL 

* SMOOTH PROPULSION INCREASING 
HELM RESPONSE AND VESSEL 
HANDLING THROUGH THE WATER 

* Improved motor-sailing 

PERFORMANCE 

* Precise handling in shallow 

WATER. MARINAS AND MOORING 

* Fuel consumption reduceo by up 

TO 8 % 

Specialists in marine Propulsion 

AND PROPELLER DESIGN. * * 


JTCJIMIHith g 5 S 5 ?T? 


Tel: +44 (O) 18^2 730 457 

w - _ * -■ 

WWW.AXlOMPROPELLERS.COM 

. tNFO^AXjo^PROPE, LLERS.COM 

yy Developed and produced 
| pr; from jhe UNITED Kingdom. 

,-p# - . ' 7* - > v r 



Axiom Propellers Ltd. 


BOAT JUMBLES 


KENT BOAT JUMBLE- SUNDAY 6th MARCH 
The Hop Farm, Paddock Wood, 

Tonbridge, Kent.TN12 6PY. (J4 M20 & J5 M25) Entry £4.00 
NORTHERN BOAT JUMBLE - SUNDAY 13th MARCH 
Brookfield Farm, Sproston Green. 

Holmes Chapel, Cheshire, CW4 7LN. Entry £3.50 
DORSET BOAT JUMBLE - SATURDAY 26th MARCH 
Canford Park Arena, Magna Road, 

Poole, Dorset, BH21 3AP. Entry £4.00 

Car Boots/Boats from £20; Stalls from £35 

Chaddock & Fox Promotions: 

02392381405-07887771451. 

boat-jumbles.co.uk 


Boat Jumbles 


Humberside 


Z5 


DON'T MISS THE 

NORFOLK BOAT JUMBLE 

NORFOLK SHOWGROUND 
NORWICH NR5 0TT 
A47 Norwich Southern Bypass 

SUNDAY APRIL 3rd 

Opens I0#m 

m Mi Ftntttri WjIu mfi 

ADMISSION ONLY £3.50 
C^i^eri/ParSqr^ Free 

All Eoqulftei - R&gef Bell 014 541566 


TRAILERS & TROLLEYS 


LAUNCHING 
MADE EASY 



lTupgic mlh 


A Front Thmut 

nour mi- 
na#ii*rab^i!tifi inn 


Brat Owner 


6Cier tow n fart 
oEfetechatfe 
CiStrortG 
(. AvarabU? lor 
miry vetudn 

Te fu«Y apamc ante 

th# diflerenni! a 
front lowtai makes 
visa out wets* te for a video oemonst ration 

wiiling-lowbiri co Uk 

01727 873661 



Sunday April 17 

Lightstream Stadium 
Preston Rd, Hull HU9 5HE 
All hardstanding event 

Gates open 10am ** Adults £3.50 
Children/parking free 


Diary Dates 2016 

Devon (Newton Abbot Racecourse) 

Saturday May 28th & Saturday September 10th 
Humberside 
Sunday 25th September 
— I South Wales 

Sunday October 16th 


Find u< on 

face took 


Bring a car boot of 
nautical bits or a boat to sell for just £20 
Call Compass Events 01803 835915 

www.compassevents.co.uk 


To advertise call the credit card hotline: FREEPHONE 0800 783 9683 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 


107 









YACHT CHARTER AND SAILING HOLIDAYS 



DiSOOVOr Q. world Of ^ First f or sa j|j n g holidays in 

sailing with Kiriacoulis the Mediterranean 

w Thp finPQt \/pnnt rhprtprQ 




rii 




The finest yacht charters at the 
best value for money. 

Charter in Greece, France, 
Turkey, Italy, Malta, Croatia 
or the Caribbean. 


MAIN UK AGENTS 

Nautilus Yachting 

The Watermill, 

87 High Street, 

Edenbridge, 

Kent 

TN8 5AU 
t: 01732 867445 

e: charter@nautilusyachting.com 
www.nautilusyachting.com 


I Tenrag Yacht Charters Ltd 

Tenrag House, 

Preston, nr. Canterbury 

CT31EB 

t: 01227 721874 

e: info@tenrag.com 

www.tenrag.com 


www.kiriacoulis.com 


DRASCOMBE LUGGER SAILING 
IN THE GREEK IONIAN 


* 21 * 

t Aft 




S E AFARE R 



FLOTILLA SAILING 
BEACH CLUB HOLIDAYS 
YACHT CHARTER 


GREECE » TURKEY . CROATIA . CARIBBEAN 


Early booking discounts for Lugger / 
Apartment packages now available 
www.dragondrascombe.com 


. • 


4 J) 020 8324 3118 (31 

www.seafarersailing.co.uk 


To advertise call the credit card hotline: FREEPHONE 0800 783 9683 


108 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 









YACHT CHARTER AND SAILING HOLIDAYS 


YACHT CHARTER 


A sailmgholidays.com 

2?flYc6<?AtSailingHolidays.com 

020 8^89 8787 

020 8H38 1133 



YACHTMASTER OCEAN INSTRUCTOR 
AVAILABLE FOR TEACHING 
AL T. RYA COMPETENCES 

All levels of navigational theory taught 
Boat deliveries, own boat tuition, experience cruises, both on 
sailing yachts and motor cruisers, organised. 

All RYA practical courses covered. 

STICKY STAPYLTON 
instructor@sail-help.co.uk 
www.sail-help.co.uk 


| Weston Bay Yacht Club 



Cruise the Bristol Channel 
or relax in our refurbished 
clubhouse near 

Weston super Mare. Member s 
moorings on River Axe 
available - £190 pa 
(including membership) 


Visit our website : 
www.wbyc.co.uk 
info @ wbyc . co . uk 



Mystic Cruuc In bntU 

OwTifortahlc Catamaran nm 4 guests, lotv etHl 
Mil)' I Del 5 hail l J iy rfru.- n gjitaiLmm 


CHARTER 


Bob’s Yachts 

Bareboat & Flotilla Sailing 

from Corfu in the loniaos 

War home abeard on§ d4 cut 
Sui Odysseys 2249 Our high stancards 
and oersonai louche gansc I fw opmet 
m the last 25 fears. wfl ensife you m 

A cut a8ove tAc mf 

Please visit our wfteite 

wyvw, bo bivachts.gr or 
bn ail us at: boblitsa otenetgr 

or call us on: 

FREEPHONE 0800 Oil 2940 
Tel/Fax: 0030 2661 094104 


East Dorset Sailing Club 
in Poole harbour has a 
friendly and family 
atmosphere. EDSC has 
mooring for sailing craft 
available up to 10 meters 
long and “drying and 
non- drying” swinging trot 
moorings. Apply to Hon 
secretary, 352 sandbanks 
road, Poole, BH14 8HY or 
visit 

www.eastdorsetsailingdub.co.uk 


HOYLAKE SAILING SCHOOL 

MERSEYSIDE 

5 DAYS OR 2 WEEKEND THEORY COURSES 
Dayskipper • Coastal Skipper 
Yachtmaster Offshore • 
Yachtmaster Ocean 
STCW Master <200gt 
ONE DAY COURSES 
Diesel Engine • VHF • Radar 
First Aid • Sea Survival 

www.sailorsworld.co.uk 

MARINE HOUSE, 86A MARKET STREET, 
HOYLAKE, WIRRAL, MERSEYSIDE CH47 3BD 

0151 632 4664 
reception@hss.ac.uk 


BOAT SHARE 


Middle aged sailor looking for 2 or 3 
partners to form new boat share this year. 
Potential partners should be competent 
experienced sailors willing and able to 
invest up to £20k to buy and maintain a 
second hand sailing boat (up to 12 me- 
tres) to be based in or around the Solent. 
All enquires will be treated in confidence. 
Please call or text Paul on 07496 666434 


Yacht Fractions Lid (ral. 1991 ) 
The Yacht share special isis 
Shares for sale used and new boat* 
Sew basis supplied for privit* tsr ifiwed 
ownership or Charter maiuffnncpt 
Bavaria. Beneteau. Jearmeiu. 

UK and KM 

www.yatlilfrettlfliiijta.ak 
U 1 326 371135 


Solent Based Sailing School 

RYA Theon anti lYucliatl courses • Solent Charter 

Competent Crew • Day Skipper • Yachtmaster • Boat Handling 
Milebuilding • Own Boat Tuition • Online Theory 

w ww.com modore-yach t i n g .com / 

Tel ; 02392 504443 info® com modore-yach t i up jcom y 


YACHT AND BOAT DELIVERY 



Transport 


Limited 

• UK, France 

• Spain, Scandinavia 

• Boats 20 ’-50’ long 

Tel: 07831 486710 (Mon-sat). 

www.boattransport.co.uk 


SEALAND BOAT DELIVERIES LTD 

Nationwide, Continental, Worldwide 
for 40 years. No weight limit. 24hr 
Lancashire Ops room. Tel: 01254 
705225. ros@poptel.org 
www.btx.co.uk 



BOAT TRANSPORT 


* SpefLaiis! boat haulier 

- Modem pj^pote binli equipment 

* Europe wide deflations 

* Boats bom 7 to 18 metre* 

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Brat Owner 


NEW GEAR 



To advertise call the credit card hotline: FREEPHONE 0800 783 9683 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016* www.pbo.co.uk 


109 















www.dickeveritt.com 



Taking a close look at anchor locker design 




A. Some anchor cables are stowed in a deck locker, where you 
can brace yourself, if you have to haul the cable in by hand. It 
could also have a windlass fitted, which keeps the deck 
clear. But some manufacturers don’t like this, because 
it can’t dry out properly, when surrounded by wet 
lines. Also, in rough weather the locker might 
fill up with water, drowning the windlass , and 
adding a huge weight to the bow. Locker 
drains are often small, and need to be 
kept clear of the mud and weed 
that can come in with the 
anchor cable. 


B. This locker lid has a tunnel for the chain, so the lid can be opened at anchor. 
There have been problems when a second anchor was needed , and it was 
trapped in the locker, because the chain passed over it. 




C. Internal lockers need quick access, just in case the chain jams. Some 
vertical windlasses, or capstans, need quite a ‘free fall’ of chain to keep it 
flowing off the gypsy. A plastic chain pipe can help to keep the splashes off 
the motor. D. Horizontal windlasses often need less ‘free fall’ of chain. 


E. Some people reckon that tall thin lockers, like those used on ships, are less 
likely to get a cable jam. But, because it puts a high weight near the bow, the 
chain might have to be flaked, or faked, back along the bilge on long deep- 
water voyages. F. Slopes and cones have been tried to stow the chain evenly. 



G. With a big open chain locker, 
a crewman can stow the cable 
more evenly, using a stick. 

On ships , matelots were often 
showered with muck and rust! 



I. Moving the weight of the chain aft slightly can improve the handling of some boats. 
This one used a couple of big stemhead rollers to do it. 

J. A few boats have mounted manual windlasses on a strong coachroof. This gets the 
stowed chain weight aft, and makes for a more comfortable winching position. 


H. Extra storm chain, kept aft, 
can be deployed up a big pipe 
to the normal locker 


Original Boat Owner’s Sketchbook volumes 1 to 5 are now available to download from www.pbo.co.uk/sketchbook priced at £4.95 
each. A limited number of printed volumes 3, 4 and 5 of the original Sketchbook series are still available from the PBO Editorial office 
priced at £3.75 each, or all three for £10. Order yours by calling tel: 01202 440830 or email: pbo@timeinc.com 

PUZZLE SOLUTION: North Cbl, East Ba4, South Dc3, West Ad2 


110 


Practical Boat Owner 598 April 2016 • www.pbo.co.uk 




THE NORTHWEST PASSAGE 


Les and Alt Parsons, 

"Arctic Tern" / 

in the challenging ; 

North West Passage 
fully equipped with * * H 

Crusader Sails. 


s V > 


f * 


*t 9 f * 
p f ? 





Whether it's the North West 
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the best quality materials 
available. 


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Call or email now for a 
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specification! 


01202 670580 




NEW TACTICAL & WIRELESS WIND SYSTEMS 


Clipper Tactical Wind System 



In demanding conditions, where high performance is essential, the Clipper Tactical wind system is the ideal choice. With ten updates every second, 
changes in wind speed and direction which occur during tncky manoeuvres are shown almost instantly* 

The mast sensor is supplied complete with a mast mounting kit, 20 metres of light weight cable and ail necessary electrical connectors to complete 
the installation. The output data is in the NMEA 0183 format and can be used to drive any compatible dispfay that utilises the MWV sentence. 


True Wind dispfay unit 

The Clipper True Wind Display shows apparent wind speed and direction, when connected to the NMEA output from a log or GPS, it will also show 
true wind speed and direction. £270 00 Inc vat 


Clipper Wireless Wind System 



Clipper Wind cockpit dispfay 



The popular Clipper wind display unit is now available with a wireless masthead unit. 

The wireless masthead transmitter is powered by an internal battery which is charged from 
ambient light using a small solar panel. 

The masthead transmitter sends data wirelessly to the base unit, which is powered by the 
vessel s 12 Volt supply, the base unit receives wind speed and direction data from the 
masthead transmitter and sends it to the Clipper Wind, 


Clipper Wireless wind is supplied with wireless mast unit, base unit and Clipper Wind display. 


£349,20 inc vat 


Full details see our website 

www.nasamarine.com