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VISITOR BERTH PRICES 


MAINTENANCE • PROJECTS > GEAR REVIEWS • SEAMANSHIP • CRUISING 



Repairing a Volvo 
heat exchanger 


DC-DC converters for 
dimming and charging 


PLUS New Cornish 
Shrimper 21 tested 


New vs old 
autopilots: 
worth the 
money? I 


Made-to-measure 
DIY cockpit cushions 


Tips to hoist, drop 
and reef your saiis 
without crew 


4 A JUMP 
±W STARTER 
PACKS TESTED 


PLUS 





EXPECT 


Performance & Economy 
Plus our 6 Year Warranty^ 


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page 47 


Welcome to the Summer 2015 issue 


Repairing a Volvo 
heat exchanger 


REGULARS 


BOATS 


liTTTa 


24 Getting the Maxi 

Inspiring performance from 
the pen of Pelle Petterson 


New vs oid 
autopiiots: 
worth the 
money? 


42 Cornish Shrimper 21 

How to follow one of the biggest 
success stories in UK boatbuilding 


GETTING THE MAXI 

Inspiring performance from 
the pen of Pelle Petterson 

PLUS 1,200 miles in an inflatable 


SEAMANSHIP 


/Mill 


Waiting for the tide 

The editor’s welcome to this month’s PBO 


6 News 

Update on use of marked ‘red’ diesel 
in private pleasure craft... and more 

10 Regionai news 

South Coast wind farm gets green light, 
Lough Derg Marina up for sale... and more 

12 Readers’ ietters - your views 
14 DaveSeiby 

Practical boat moanership 

16 Sam Lieweiiyn 

Item one: compiling lists prior to sailing 

18 Andrew Simpson 

Bags of trouble 

20 Ask the experts 

Change the cutless bearing in a P-bracket, 
plus more reader queries answered 

7S PBO products and services 

Books and plans from the PBO Shop 


36 Short-handed saii handiing 

Tips to hoist, drop and reef 
your sails without crew 

66 Key responses 

Quick thinking and teamwork save a 
man overboard in Key West, Florida 

94 Sticky situations 

Experienced mariner Sticky Stapylton 
shares some handy seamanship tips 


CRUISING 


Cover photo: Maxi 1 1 00 by Sailing Scenes 


34 New vs old autopilots 

Is an upgrade worth the money? 

51 New gear 

PBO looks at the latest marine products 

78 10 jump starter packs 

Which is best at getting your 
engine started if your battery is flat? 


S8 French canal guide 

Part two of our exploration of an inland 
waterway cruise circuit in rural France 

68 1,200 miles in an inflatable 

A demonstration of the convenience 
and versatility of Zodiac Cadet tenders 

96 Interesting Ithaca! 

A reader loses himself in one of 
the windiest places in the Ionian 


83 Marina visitors’ price guide 

Visitor berth facilities and prices compared 


PRACTICAL 


30 Making new engine bearers 

Fitting them to the hull shape, then 
aligning and glassing them in place 

40 Build a clip-on cockpit table 

PLUS more reader projects and tips 


46 A swing-up engine bracket 

...For a 5hp outboard in a well 



48 Repairing a Volvo heat 
exchanger 

Mending a bodged repair at less than 
half the price of a new outer casing 

65 Using a circular saw 

How to get best results and stay safe 

72 DC-DC converters for 
dimming and chaining 

Make a dimmer control and a trickle-charge 
regulator from cheaply-priced circuits 

76 Made-to-measure DIY 
cockpit cushions 

You too can be comfortably better off 
by improving your cockpit seating 

110 Poling out headsails 

Hints and tips from the PBO Sketchbook 



Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


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Editorial 



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Pubiishing Director 


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Waiting for 
the tide 


r 


urith the editor 


To receive the editor’s monthly email newsletter, sign up on our website: www.pbo.co.uk 


Casino Royale: stirred^ not shaken 


A ccording to Ratty, in his 

famous quote in The Wind 
in the Willows, there's 
nothing in life half so 
much worth doing as 
simply messing about in 
boats. I wouldn't disagree, but sometimes 
the challenges set by sailing at sea lose 
you something of the dreamy, limpid 
tranquillity beloved of Kenneth 
Grahame's Water Rat. 

I was reminded of this fundamental 
difference between river and canal 
boating and the coastal cruising 
undertaken by most PBO readers this 
weekend, when I attended Beale Park 
Boat Show. Set around a lake just off the 
River Thames in Berkshire, Beale Park is 
the embodiment of Ratty's dream. On 
shore, the sun glistened from mirror- 
smooth varnish perfectly applied to 
elegant skiffs and 
dayboats, while 
on the water, 
boats practical and 
impractical jostled for position. A sailing 
coracle bustled around without apparent 
purpose or direction, Dunkirk veterans in 
various states of restoration enjoyed a 
gentle retirement, and the crowds 
gathered on the banks to watch racing 
between home-built boats powered by 
cordless drills and rescues carried out by 
bear-like Newfoundland dogs. Nowhere 
in all of this was to be found the edge 
lent to a sailing situation by tides, lee 
shores and underwater rocks. 

I experienced the calm lent by this lack 
of serious danger first-hand thanks to the 
kind invitation of Matthew, the owner of 
Casino Royale, a beautifully restored 8.8m 
(29ft) Chris Craft motor cruiser converted 
to electric propulsion by PBO contributor 
and owner of the Thames Electric Launch 
Company, Emrhys Barrell. It was a great 
demonstration of how well electric power 
can work in an inland situation as the 
lOkW motor rapidly accelerated and, 
equally importantly, stopped the heavy 


wooden hull with minimum noise and 
fuss. At the stern, unencumbered by the 
huge petrol engine that would once have 
occupied most of the floor space, nothing 
could be heard but the ripple of the water. 

Admittedly, Casino RoyalCs top speed 
is now a fraction of what it once would 
have been, but Matthew spends his time 
pottering up and down the Thames in 
the Henley area, all of which is limited to 
5mph. A powerful petrol or diesel engine 
would hate that, but an electric system 
thrives while making being on board a 
delightfully relaxing experience. 

Looking back through these last 
paragraphs you could be forgiven for 
thinking that Pm considering turning 
my back on sailing at sea, but I can 
assure you that's not just unlikely but 
impossible. I find the anticipation and 
management of potential dangers an 
exciting challenge, 
the wide-open spaces 
liberating and the 
freedom from shore 
an essential tonic. I've tried and enjoyed 
canal boating in the past, while sailing 
the Norfolk Broads will always occupy a 
special place in my heart after spending 
a few months working for and sailing on 
the Hunter Fleet in my twenties. But, for 
me, the sea and its limitless opportunities 
will always call me back. 

Like Ratty, though, the key thing for 
most of us is to be afloat, whether you 
prefer briny or sweet(ish) water. This 
month's issue is a good example of the 
vast range of ways PBO readers choose 
to indulge their need to be afloat, from 
Richard Hare's guide to the French canal 
system to Peter Talbot's adventures in his 
Zodiac inflatable. Even working on a boat 
has a little frisson in that it promises 
freedom to come. 

I wish you all a hugely enjoyable 
summer, simply messing around in boats. 

Fair winds, 

David Pugh 


Nothing could be heard 
but the ripple of the water 


PBO is also available on these digital platforms 


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Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


5 





update on the use of 
marked red diesel in 
private pleasure craft 

Royal Yachting Association urges local marinas to lobby 
Belgian Government on tolerance for visiting British yachts 


T Pie Royal Yacmirig 
Asswatioii (RYA) 
has wHtten to Belgian 
marinaa ehjba with visitor 
mooflnga lo oncoyrage the^ 
to lobby Ihe current Selgfan 
lAintsi&f for Tinanceie reinstaie 
permla^ion for visiting BrlHaih 
yacbta to u»e red diesel. 

In Bi^urn. u&a of 

red rt b priyeto pleasure 
cran is t^lawful regardless of the 
country in ihp dieaol wb& 

pLjrcha$ad.. and an rifririgamant 
of Belgian law carnes the rislc 
of a Fine. In January 2014. in 
re«pon$g to telln® nymbCfS Of 
vrarting British yachts, the then 
Sdgian MirHstar Fu Finance 
Koeo Gwns achriowl edged that 
the Bdgian Govermrient ‘imust 
adopt a pnagn^tic approach' 
to the icsLjo of rod diasofL 
PeiTfiission fer Brilisb ieisuie 
cral^ to have red diesel in their 
fudd tanl($ when visrbfig Bolgiao 
watEFS was gianted up unti 31 
Ocfcsbflf 3014, subject lo the 
provisn that tha skipjpprc^ 
■presom documents to 
dflfTior^lrfitfl thM 
duties ha^ already been paid 
to the Uniled Kingdomi.' Th® 
permesion was extericfed urVlil- 
31 Doceiiibof 2014. but has 
ool been rer>eiwecl stooe. 


Ri&k i>f fjneB 

toe risk of being ftoed ^ 
Bd^n Oustorm remains low. the 
RYA &ay5 the uhoeitainty ceu&ed by 
th6' Belgian Govwmient'g decision 
not to eofleod this permission into 
2d1Bis likely to prwpt many BiYish 
skippers who had intended to wbit 
Beigtom to go elsewhere 
Thn KAanttomc Bngad^ 
says FMift the reason wtoy toe 
Bel^n Govemmeni ciecided ooi to 
erieito ite perrnis^ 

local insersst ^outos (indbdtog local 
booling wgafiiseltons and marina^' 
mooirig oporators) did not ask the 
EBelgian Gcn/erT¥nanl to wend it. 
The RYA hes therefore wfitlen lo 
Ba%iani mariiw and dubs wilh 
ra tor moorings to poinft oUl 
fewer visiting &itish yachfts wifi 
tf>@vitebly r«$ult m a lo^of tocoma, 
and to aneouiaga toom tolohby for 
toe curren? Winistef tor RrMmoe to 
nainslalfl the enpress permBston for 
vi^tiiig. UK yachto to have marked 
'red' diesel in thar mamfud laniks. 

ElsMvhere in Eurdfi# 

While EU member stages now 
si^jpiy only whflo diesd to 
recrefitjonaf cral^. marked red ctesal 
is U5ueiy the only diesel avaiteble to 
prrvBte ptosure craft at the wajSenide 
in the UK - so the ¥ast rri^rity- of 
UK-besed yech;5 have marked red 


die$ol in thea mam tod 1arilf$. The 
piesenoe of red- diesef in a yacht's 
main tod tank does not cause any 
drffiaAy tor Br^h sfcippefS visiting 
any Eia'qpeeriocHjriiry apart fi^ 
Beigkjm, aKhough you should cany 
fiuid&nce thal your diesd was 
purdiased duty-paid to the UK whan 
vistling France and the Hetoerlands. 

UK boaters havo bi^ roquifad to 
pay the fUl rirte of duty on kroi used 
torpropelltog privale ptoasute craft 
stftoa Novembar WtA. Under EU 
bw, the only boftim arttitiad to a 
lobeted rate of duty on diesel ere 
IhosQ who use it for heating and 
atoctiic% geriBration. But even 
when only 60% of marked rod 
diesel purchased is dedared as 
being used for piopidston (the 
60.40 split), UK boaters still pay 
KHighty 10% mom duty than 
tl%tr oountoip^ in f i^n^ 
and Belgium 

Why should private 
pleasure craft use 
marked red diesel in 
the UK? 

to short, to secure the oontjnued 
availaibilTty of diesel tod at tho 
waxfifsida tor all UK boatw. Shoiid 
wateisida: toel suppliers be obbged 
to supply urmarfeed white criesal so 
pAvata [deasua craft thay wifi ba 
boed with Ihecsost of tostaUng a 


Will Belgium 
reinstate 
permission 
for visiting 
UK leisure 
craft to use 
red diesel? 


saoond fuel tank and punping 
eqiiipfTient or i^ioosing wtucN 
Wto suppily- m^ed red or 
unmarked while diesel RYA 
indicates than rough^ 
ofifr-lh^ would tknrt ihe» 
operettontosL^^plytog rnarttito r^ 
cire$el to octoimerr^ en^ 
stop suppiytog pnvale pleasure 
craft altogether., particutarty where 
harbours predomrnantty tor 
lishing Th^ re$g0j^ ^ 
suggests that if this were to 
happen inland, the owners of 
mland wa^sfweys vessel^ 
er>d u p being deniad aocess to 
doasal at tha rebated rata ol duty 
^Jiesel forcfeimeslK use 

Ongoing uncertainty 

Th^ Buppean CommissiOrt 
be&eves that the use d maiked 
rad diosej for propulsion mahos it 
ici.it hx tex authoirti^ to toghto 
impreper use. so privale f^easure 
craft should only use ixtmarkad 
white dtosel for propiisicri . 

Fctowing the press reliease 
is^jed by the CoTfvriiasion to 
JiJy 2D14. tha UK Govarr^nent is 
siflaweilifig offkitel 
from the Commission toes it 
ntmifs to taka th# UK to the 
European Ooufl of Justice tor 
'ncri property applying the mtes 
on fi^ mafking of M'- 
to toe meafitime . there is 
no indicartiQn thart tha UK 
Governmant intends to (redify its 
lofig-stending si^aporiive sianoe. 
and the RfYA will oonflinue to 
lobby tor tho oonttouod s^upfy 
a< rnarked red diesel in the UK. 


6 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 



News 






Teen recovering well 
after speedboat crash 


The speedboat crash on Southampton Water. INSET Peter Dredge 


A teenager who suffered 
serious injuries when a 
speedboat crashed into a 
cardinai marker and capsized 
in Southampton Water is said to 
be making ‘positive progress’. 

Crew member Simon Dredge 
was on board the £1 million VR40 
prototype powerboat, on a 
scheduled test run with his father 
Peter Dredge and two other 
experienced powerboaters when 
the dramatic crash happened just 
outside the Hamble River, close to 
the Warsash Maritime Academy. 
UK Coastguard received multiple 
999 calls from members of the 
public on 13 May, reporting the 
incident. The Search and Rescue 
helicopter from Lee-on-Solent and 
Calshot RNLI lifeboats attended. 

In addition to former RYA 
powerboat racing manager Peter 
Dredge and his 1 7-year-old son 
Simon, experienced powerboat 
racer Simon Wood-Power and 
engineer Lee Hurst were on board 
the VR40 prototype, which was 
being tested for one of Vector 
World’s clients. All four men were 
taken to Southampton General 
Hospital, and two required medical 
care. A spokesperson for Vector 
World said: ‘We are pleased 
to report that crew member 
Simon Dredge continues to 
make positive progress and is 
expected to make a full recovery. 


‘Simon was very much part of the 
crew despite his young age. This 
was by no means his first outing.’ 

Peter Dredge, aged 52, was 
hailed by the rescue services as 
hero of the hour. However, he has 
not yet offered any comments 
regarding this, as his main concern 
is the recovery and wellbeing of his 
son. Calshot RNLI helmsman Mark 
Weatherhead said; ‘We arrived 
within minutes to find a nearby 
workboat had managed to pull all 
four occupants of the speedboat 
from the water. Our RNLI crew 
members, which included a 
paramedic, immediately went 
aboard and began treating the four 
injured people. Three had suffered 
head injuries, with one serious. A 
rescue helicopter winched down a 
paramedic to our RNLI lifeboat to 
help treat the injured.’ 

All four casualties were taken 


ashore to Warsash where 
they were met by waiting 
paramedics. They were taken 
to hospital by ambulance. 

RYA powerboat racing manager 
Jeni Jelf said: ‘Peter Dredge and 
Simon Wood-Power are both 
highly regarded within the 
powerboat racing community, and 
both are extremely knowledgeable 
and experienced in this type of 
craft. Although the incident was 
not in conjunction with any RYA 
activity or event, the persons 
involved have a long-standing 
connection to the association. 

‘On behalf of the Powerboat 
Racing Department, along with its 
associated competitors, clubs and 
committee members, we would 
like to convey our thoughts and 
best wishes to those involved, 
especially those still receiving 
medical care and their families.’ 


If you 
navigate 
with an 
iPad, 
read on 


D «»plle the confusion 
on online roruins md 


pmofiQ many iPflds 

have Ihelr 


Dfim QPS - but ih«ir eheaper 
cousins, the Wt'R-on^v 
rari^ of IPads, don't 
it hsg baen jwsiblti 
Ep oorwed ihs dwpw 
WW-cnly tPad . usjfig a Bad 
Hi or similar piug-in thind-psrty 
GPS But the to 

Apple’s operating system. 
rOS S 3, hm oai£od many 
third-party positiorwig dovioes 
to slop walking with she iPad. 

So, if yau'm hoading out on 
th£> water' and pkin 10 a 
W4-fi-onty iPad as e chan 
plotter using a third-pafty 
GPS. it'$ pfobafafy So 
deiey upgrading to iOS 8 .3 
unli you're safely back 
ashoie-: Of. if yOuve already 
uraradeG. to check the 
compatitiilrty di your 
thwd'party GPS with your iPad 
navigation app betore you 
need it. Bad Sf, who sell a 
rango of third-party tfsvicas. 
have a consiBntly-upde^eG 
blog detailing the latest in 
th^ to gat it all wodcing 
again at hfttpj7b0ehal^.c3OfTi/ 
btogs^bad-elf 
iPads VHlh thoir cfvwii GPS 


Devices 

that transmit posilion and 
NMEA over WkPi are 


also unel^ecled 


Officiai report into fatal 
yacht and dredger crash 


A n official report has been 
published almost a year 
after the fatal collision between 
a cruiser and a dredger off the 
coast of Felixstowe. 

On 8 June 2014, the dredger 
Shoreway and the sailing yacht 
Orca collided seven miles offshore, 
causing Orca to sink rapidly. The 
yacht’s skipper was rescued by 
Shoreway’s rescue boat but the 
skipper’s wife, Bernadine Ingram, 
could not be found. Her body was 
recovered from the yacht by divers 
the following day. 

A Marine Accident Investigation 
Branch (MAIB) investigation has 
established that the vessels collided 
in good visibility as neither the chief 
officer, alone on the bridge of 
Shoreway, nor the skipper of Orca, 
who was below deck in the cabin. 


were maintaining a proper lookout. 

The report said: 'Orca had 
generated a clear target that had 
been visible on Shoreway’s radar 
display for 1 1 minutes prior to the 
collision. Shoreway’s chief officer 
had not recognised the need to look 
at the radar or make use of its ARPA 
function, so Orca’s target had not 
been seen, acquired or plotted.’ 

Orca’s skipper saw Shoreway 
approximately 1 .6NM away but 
judged there to be no risk of 
collision, and decided to engage his 
autopilot and briefly go below. The 
report concludes: ‘Boskalis should 
adopt a more proactive approach 
to developing a more positive 
safety culture in respect of bridge 
watchkeeping practices on board its 
vessels.’ Read the full report online 
at: www.maib.gov.uk 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


Orca is recovered 
INSET The aftermath 
of the fatal crash 




News 


T he International Sailing 
Federation (ISAF) is to 
campaign for disabled sailing’s 
inclusion in the Tokyo 2020 
Paralympic Games and 
has appointed VERO 
Communications to advise 
and support its campaign. 

The decision to press the 
International Paralympic 
Committee (IPC) to add sailing 
to the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic 
Games follows ISAF formally 
taking over the management of 
disabled sailing in November 
2014, and the integration of the 
International Association for 
Disabled Sailing (IFDS) into ISAF 
ISAF president Carlo Croce said; 
This is a new era for disabled 
sailing, with ISAF now able to 
fully utilise its technical, financial, 
promotional and strategic 
resources to bring significant 
benefits to disabled sailing. For 
example, we are now working 
hard to put in place a much 
enhanced, professional and 
aligned four-year competition 
programme for disabled sailing, 
as well as generating greater 


media, broadcast and promotional 
opportunities for the sport 
following integration into ISAF’s 
wider communications planning 
and activities. 

Tm delighted that we have 
the proven expertise of VERO 
Communications to support us 
in this cause. Our focus now is 
to build the case for disabled 




sailing’s inclusion in Tokyo 2020, 
much of which will be centred 
around new evidence, as well 
as stressing some of the unique 
attributes of disabled sailing - 
including the fact that it is the 
only sport where athletes with 
the highest level of disability can 
compete equally against athletes 
with other disabilities.’ 


Miss Isle sailor Natasha Lambert 
completes Capital Venture voyage 


I nspirational disabled teenager 
Natasha Lambert has 
completed her latest challenge: 
sailing from the Isle of Wight to 
London and then completing a 
lap of the Square Mile. 

The 1 7-year-old athertoid 


cerebral palsy sufferer, who is 
on a fundraising drive to start a 
new sip-puff school for disabled 
sailors, reached central London’s 
only marina, St Katharine Docks, 
on 1 June after eight days’ sailing, 
She then swapped her specialist 


Artemis 20 Mini Transat boat 
Miss Isle for her Flart Walker to 
complete a journey on foot 
around the city’s financial district, 
visiting Trinity House and the 
Bank of England. 

Miss Isle’s sip and puff 
technology, designed by 
Natasha’s father, enables her 
to sail using a straw that turns 
the rudder right when sipped and 
left when puffed. At the time of 
going to press, Natasha had 
more than doubled her target, 
raising £2,460 for the new charity 
being set up to teach disabled 
people to sail at the ‘Miss Isle 
School of Sip-Puff Sailing’. 

Capital Venture is the latest in 
a long list of achievements for 
Natasha. In 2014, she undertook 
the ‘Sea and Summit’ challenge 
which saw her sailing more than 
500 miles from Cowes to South 
Wales and climbing Pen y Fan in 
the Brecon Beacons. 

See www.missisle.com 


You can't 
see, smell, 
taste or 
touch It - 
but It kills 

C arbon monoxida (CO) 
HJKs - <m aver ago - one 
person a waak In England 
and WateK and aboiri 200 
pfr&plfr a n««d tn b* 

tahtn to hogpflal after 
suffering rta effocta. 

The Maritime arid 
CoaetgLfird Agmcy 
issued a safety wgirwig to 
boaters about CO, which gets 
into tho through 

the kings, bkx^nngltie 
oxygen your body needs. 
Prdbnged &cpo$ure or* very 
qtadi to high 

conoertralions can kill you 
Symptoms, of CO poisaning 
tocfixfe irntp^ed eyes, 
headache, nausea, weakness 
and dizztoess. 

confused wnh seasicKnes^or 
toa- much drink, so peopfe 
who it often don't 

Causes of CO buikH^^ in you 
boat include inadequate 
vertUabon. exhaust g&s ftbrn 
engines - yours or scmeone 
ofso'E- fflTd- heater oLrttets. 

Mafwie surveyor Tony 
Skearts of Ihe Bellasl Marine 
Office adviaes: 'Keep you 
boat wdl vontilaled and wofl 
niairrtoirTed - rtot only Ihs 
engine, but also water pumps 
and oookng "wnt 

exhausts*. Haveyotir gas 
systems serviced by a ‘"Gas 
Sde Engtiwr'. Remernbec if 
you can smel ekhai^ furr^ 
you SH being exposed to CO. 

'Wa;ch out iof the 
synr^ptoftis. If you 
any. get out on deck and get 
modical att)enljori.iLritess you 
ere absoltitoly ceflain rt's not 
CO poBoning. The best 
advioQ to buy a c^bon 
monoxide afeim - preteratsfy a 
marine one as they lasf longer 
- bRjt make sue ochrVorms to 
iha BS and EU standards. 
BSEN 50291-2 
Fof moffi mfumation on CO. 
the and maintananCB cA 
gas inslafia^ions and a Rsl of 
snandards visit www. 
bcetsflfetyscheme.aeg 



ISAF to campaign for disabled sailing's 
Inclusion In Tokyo 2020 Paralympic 
Games 



8 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 




News 



Push The Boat Out 2015 


Push the Boat Out 


T housands of people of all 
ages and abilities took to 
water over nine days to 
experience saiiing and 
windsurfing with RYA Push 
the Boat Out 2015. 

The national event took place 
from 9-1 7 May and saw more than 
340 sailing clubs and training 
centres opening their doors to 
welcome people with ‘have a go’ 
taster sessions and open days. 

RYA club support advisor Jackie 
Bennetts said: ‘We’re now hoping 
that those who enjoyed their time 
on the water will be making plans 
to continue to go sailing.’ 

One of the clubs to take part was 
Hill Head Sailing Club in Hampshire. 
Vice Commodore Tomes Price 
said: ‘It has been a great opportunity 
to open our doors and get people 
to enjoy the sport we’re all mad 
about. Every person that volunteers 
at the club gets a kick out of getting 
others on the water, and everyone 
is happy that it went so well.’ 

Strong winds failed to stop more 
than 200 people taking to the water 
at Port Edgar Watersports, where 
special guests included Clympic 
silver medallist Luke Patience and 
his sailing partner Elliot Willis as 
well as GB Sailing Team member 
Eilidh MacIntyre. Nairn Sailing Club 
were also challenged with some 
windy conditions but, with a great 
team effort from their members and 
a good back-up plan, they were 
able to get people out in boats 
and having a great time. 

Club spokesman Buchan Main 
said: ‘We took out 30 people from 


young kids to senior citizens, 
signed up two family memberships, 
one old member rejoined and three 
forms were taken away to be filled 
in. It was a lot of hard work, but it 
was worth every moment: even 
the local dolphins put in an 
appearance to entertain the sailors’. 


DIARY DATES 


■ Hartlepool Marina June Boat & 
Auto Jumble, 21 June, from 10am, 
the Morris Minor club will also be in 
attendance. All welcome. 

■ Golowan Maritime 
Festivai, 26-28 June, 
www.golowanmaritimefestival.co.uk 

■ Round the isiand Race 2015, 

27 June, Isle of Wight, 

WWW. roundtheisland.org.uk 

■ Fisher Owners Association 
(FOA) 45th anniversary raiiy to 
Middeiberg in the Netheriands, 29 
June-3 July, www.fisherowners.org 

■ inaugurai Swaiiow Boats Raid, 
June 29 to 3 July, Mylor, Falmouth, 
http://swallowboats.com/ 
programme-for-swallow-boats-raid- 
201 5-at-mylor-fal mouth 

■ Titchfieid Boat Jumbie, 5 July, 
Hound Hill Farm, Titchfieid, 
Hampshire. P01 5 5DY Entry £4, 
WWW. boat-j u m b I es . CO . u k 

■ America’s Cup Worid Series 
in Portsmouth, 23-26 July, 


www.americascup.com 

■ Torbay Royai Regatta, 21 - 26 
August, www.torbayroyalregatta.co.uk 

■ Portsmouth Boat Jumbie, 23 
August. Fort Purbrook, Cosham, 
Hampshire. P06 1BJ. Entry £4, 
www.boat-jumbles.co.uk 

■ Hoiyhead Traditionai Saii Festivai, 
28-31 August, www.oga.org.uk 

■ Essex Boat Jumbie, 30 August, 
Battlesbridge Antiques Centre, SS1 1 
7RF Entry £4, www.boat-jumbles.co.uk 

■ Northern Boat Jumbie, 6 
September, Brookfield Farm, 
Middlewich, Cheshire. CW4 7LN. 

Entry £3.50, www.boat-jumbles.co.uk 

■ PSP Southampton Boat 
Show, 11-20 September, 
www.southamptonboatshow.com 

■ Scotiand’s Boat Show, 9-1 1 
October, Kip Marina, 
www.scotlandsboatshow.co.uk 
Send us your diary dates to 
pbo@timeinc.com. See more 
oniine at www.pbo.co.uk 




Improved permit renewal system for 
cruisers in Turkey 


A new online e-Resldence 
applicfflion system is 
making H «asl«t iot cruisAfa 
k\ the Re^bllc df TuitcBy Iq 
renew (twir pennlts. 

The Ocean Qryising Club 
has bwn advisad hy tha OCC 
Finike Port Offroer Swuel 
Qofgsci that a new onAirw 
e-ftesidefice syslem 15 maSqng il 
assier and fester fw foreigners 
to apply taf residefwe pemiils 
and renqw or\\mm. 

Renewfli prooedtjres ete now 
being processad etec*irofticalfy 
without going to thp 
Dffectarateso^ Migretw 
Managemefi!. A valid mobile 
ntimhor end ^naif address 
rnust be ptfOwdOd veWalion 
and iioyricaiion. 

The CCC this is a 
weioorTie dw&bpment et the 
start of tw enjis^ season 
in the Meoriertar^n. Ftfi&t 
applioalKxis and applioations 
tor transfer between residence 


It IS now easier to renew 
permits for cruisers in 
Turkey thanks to an 
online e-Residence 
application system 


pemi^ aie received eiecticNiical^, 
printed ^ $Ubminod in haid 
copy wfth backup doctmienftatiDn: 
foretgn«s ana given an 
appointment fOr whig 

the applications are (Hooessed 
Fiofaig^ra must present M 
tha Rrovindal Oirectofate of 
Migration Managernent on the date 
of the appointment to compleie the 
procedural Theappoiritnrieiite 


^iven by the Foreigners' 
Departments prior to 1 8 May 
20 1 5 wfl be carried ficrcss to 
the new system. 

An instnxJional booktet 
can be ibiiKJ online at 
www.90c.gov.l1 - dowr^oad 
the necessary ^orms and 
follow the inslFuctians 
CpresfifTied in English] at 
hrtiK VVe-#(amet.goc.g w.tr 



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stainless steel boss • adjustable pitch • zero blade corrosion 

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Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


9 




^ Regional News 


MoiAfC IfAIIK /*i*llicin0 send US your local news stories. Email PBO news editor Laura Hodgetts at 

I rUIII yUlir Lruislllg died newspbo@timeinc.com, tel: 01202 44O825, or write to the address on page 5 


SOUTH 


WIND FARM GO-AHEAD \ 

The green light has been given | 

for construction to begin on the 2 

1 1 6-turbine Rampion Offshore Wind j 
Farm. The 400MW-capacity Rampion \ 
project is set to become the first I 
offshore wind farm off the South ; 

Coast of England. It will be situated \ 
1 3km off the Sussex coast, between s 
East Worthing and Brighton. E.ON \ 
has confirmed that it will invest in and I 
build the £1 .Sbillion development, I 
alongside its project partner, the UK [ 
Green Investment Bank pic (GIB). I 

When complete, the wind farm could I 
provide enough electricity to supply i 
the equivalent of around 300,000 : 

homes and reduce CO2 emissions 1 
by up to 600,000 tonnes a year. 2 

RTIR ON TV I 

Improved television coverage of this ; 
year’s Round the Island (RTI) race 2 
will include live streaming to a global [ 
audience. An outside-broadcast \ 

production unit will provide live, i 

commentated coverage of the 11 \ 

starts from the Royal Yacht Squadron 2 
and early finishes on race day, 5 

Saturday 27 June. Also new for this I 
year are two ‘Hub Clubs’ at the Royal [ 
Southern YC in Hamble and the 2 
Royal Lymington YC in Lymington, : 

where competitors can meet with \ 

friends and families after the race. ; 

Race footage - broadcast on 2 

EventTV in Cowes, at the Race Hubs ; 
and on the official race website - ] 

will also include interviews with key ] 
competitors and race officials, audio ; 

interviews with leading competitors, ] 

live fleet tracking graphics, key results I 
and weather updates, www.rtir.me | 



/no’s rescued crew at Trinity Landing I 


SOLENT SINKING 

Seven people were rescued from the ■ 
water after their yacht sank following ] 
a collision east of Bramble Bank, in ; 
the Solent. A full-scale rescue 2 

operation was launched on 6 June 2 
after a Mayday call was received by ■ 
Solent Coastguard. The seven, ] 

including two women, were aboard \ 
the Cowes-based Corby 36 yacht Ino, 2 
which was in collision with the yacht J 



SOUTH-WEST 


LONE SAILOR RESCUED 

A lone sailor was rescued after his 
yacht’s rudder became entangled 
with fishing gear in rough conditions 
off the coast of Cornwall. The 1 1 m 
(36ft) Nauticat Thalassa ran into 
difficulties while on a trip from 
Falmouth to Fowey on 16 May. The 
sailor had been motor-sailing in a 
Force 4 to 5 wind and spotted the 
fishing gear too late to avoid it. He 
cut the engine and took down the 
sail but conditions were too rough 
for him to use his dinghy to free the 
rudder, so he called the Coastguard. 

Fowey’s all-weather lifeboat 
arrived on scene within 30 minutes. 
A tow was attached to turn the yacht 
into the wind and tide and help 
free the obstruction. During this 
operation the fouling rope parted, 
and the lifeboat towed the yacht 
into Fowey. Adam Russell, on his 
first shout as duty mechanic, said, 
‘It was a good service: the sailor 
had done everything he could, 
then sensibly waited for help 
rather than endangering himself.’ 


BOAT DONATION 

A rescue boat donated to the 
village of Muchelney in the 
Somerset Levels by marine 
businesses has been given a new 
home on the Somerset coast. 
When Muchelney was completely 
cut off by flooding in 2013 for the 
second year running, exhibitors at 
London Boat Show bought a 
Rigiflex Newmatic 360 Safety 


Rescue Boat for the village. Earlier 
this year, a 500m stretch of road into 
Muchelney was raised by 1 .2m (4ft). 
Now that the villagers are confident 
they will no longer be cut off by 
flooding, they are permanently 
lending the boat to BARB (Burnham 
Area Rescue Boat) Search & Rescue. 
BARB spokesman Roger Flower said: 
‘The new boat doubles our capacity 
to help with flooding and rescues.’ 


Members of BARB and Muchelney Parish Council with the donated boat 


Valkyrie. Although Ino sank very 
quickly, fortunately all seven crew 
were already wearing lifejackets. 
They were picked up by a passing 
RIB then transferred to the Gosport 
independent lifeboat and taken to 
Trinity Landing, Cowes. 


CHANNEL ISLANDS 


IMPROVED BERTHING 

Improvement work to visitors’ berths 
and holding pontoons at St Helier 
Harbour, Jersey has been completed. 
An old link-span bridge within St 
Helier Marina has also been replaced 
by a 52m-long pedestrian bridge to 
improve access. The £3million project 
started in late September 2014 and 
was completed in April 2015. More 
than 20,000 yachtsmen visit St Helier 
each year and this development is 
promised to offer a significant 
enhancement of facilities for all 
harbour users. 


WALES 


TIDAL LAGOON: PREFERRED 
BIDDERS NAMED 

The British construction industry is set 
to play a leading role in the delivery 
of the £1 billion Swansea Bay Tidal 
Lagoon following the conclusion of 
one of the project’s main civil 
engineering and construction 


package tenders. Laing O’Rourke 
has been named as preferred bidder 
for the estimated £200million contract 
to deliver the lagoon’s 41 Om turbine 
house and sluice structure block. 

Following advanced works and value 
engineering, a fixed price contract 
will be signed later this year for the 
main build. 

Tidal Lagoon Swansea Bay 
Pic has also named Welsh civil 
engineering company Alun Griffiths 
Ltd as preferred bidder for the 
£25million public realm ancillary 
works contract, which includes the 
breakwater surface, roads, slipways, 
utilities and landscaping. 

Meanwhile, China Harbour 
Engineering Company Ltd (CHEC) 
has been named as preferred bidder 
for the £300million contract to provide 
marine works for the world’s first tidal 
lagoon power plant. Approximately 
50% of contract value will be spent 
on a British workforce, partners and 
supply chain. 


IRELAND 


MCIB ISSUE SAFETY 
RECOMMENDATIONS 

The Irish Marine Casualty 
Investigation Board (MCIB) has 
issued safety recommendations 
i following a fatal capsizing incident 
\ off Cork. The MCIB recommends 


that the manufacturers of the 
Drascombe Lugger - an undecked 
open dayboat - investigate retrofitting 
a system to keep the vessel’s 
centreplate deployed in the event of a 
capsize. The Drascombe Association 
is urged to highlight the possibility 
of these boats capsizing in certain 
conditions, and to encourage owners 
to upgrade their vessels to meet 
recent safety regulations. 

Cn 13 August 2014, Doug Perrin, 

66, drowned after his Drascombe 
Lugger Zillah gybed unintentionally 
and capsized. His two friends 
managed to swim ashore. 

See www.mcib.ie 


NORTH-WEST 


PEEL MARINA DREDGING 
PROJECT COMPLETED 

A seven-week project to remove 
1 8,000 tonnes of silt from Peel Marina 
has been completed, restoring the 
depth of water around the pontoons 
‘to the correct level’. The dredging 
project, which cost several hundred 
thousand pounds, was undertaken 
to address a build-up of silt that 
prevented berths from being used. 
Investigations are continuing with the 
aim of finding a permanent solution 
for the storage of the river sediment. 

A site at Rockmount is being used 
as a temporary storage facility. 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


10 














This home-made boat was found 
submerged off the Isle of Lewis 


SCOTLAND 


BOATING FATALITY 

The body of a man who went missing \ 
in a home-made boat off the Isle of ■ 
Lewis in the Outer Hebrides has been | 
found. The submerged boat was also i 
located following a major search and [ 
rescue operation involving Stornoway | 
RNLI Lifeboat, numerous Coastguard [ 
rescue teams, Coastguard Helicopter j 
R948, Hebrides Search and Rescue [ 
and Police Scotland. j 

On the evening of 26 May, \ 

Stornoway Coastguard received a [ 
report of an overdue boat, which had \ 
left Brevig Pier at 7am. At 8.50am the ; 
following morning, the missing boat I 
was found submerged by Stornoway \ 
RNLI off the area of Point, Isle of 1 


Lewis. A Maritime and Coastguard 
Agency spokesman said: The man’s 
next of kin have been informed. Our 
thoughts are with his family.’ 

ARBROATH SEA FEST 

Preparations are well under way for 
Arbroath Sea Pest 2015, one of the 
biggest summer events on the east 
coast of Scotland. More than 25,000 
people are expected to flock to 
Arbroath Harbour on August 15-16, 
where the Limelight musical theatre 
school will undertake a series of flash 
mob performances, RNLI fundraisers 
will sell burgers, hot dogs and drinks, 
and Arbroath Ladies Lifeboat Guild 
will offer cream teas. Highlights will 
also include the launch of the RNLI 
Lifeboat, a raft race, a strongman 
competition and a pie eating contest. 


NORTH-EAST 


LIFERAFT RESCUE 

Two men took to a liferaft when their 
small cabin cruiser sank in The Wash 
between Skegness and Hunstanton. 
Skegness and Hunstanton lifeboats 
launched on 19 May following reports 
of the stricken vessel, and the 
Coastguard helicopter Rescue 91 2 


EAST 


I was also scrambled. After a brief 
i search, the liferaft was spotted almost 
I seven miles away from its last 
1 reported position by Rescue 91 2. 
j Hunstanton lifeboat took the two 
• sailors on board and then ashore to 
T Hunstanton where they were checked 
j over by ambulance crews. 

I In another rescue, two men made a 
j Mayday call when their yacht began 
I taking on water, north of the wind 
i farm at Skegness. Lifeboat crews 
i from Humber and Skegness were 
I launched on 1 2 May and were guided 
j to the stricken cruiser by a passing 
] wind farm vessel. Helicopter 91 2 
i airlifted the two sailors ashore as they 
j were suffering from the cold. The 
I yacht was towed into Grimsby. 


SOUTH-EAST 


I MUD RESCUE 

I A sailor was rescued from mud up to 
j his shoulders at Oueenborough, Isle 
I of Sheppey, after running aground 
! and attempting to lay out a kedge 
j anchor. Coastguard rescue teams, 

I firefighters and lifeboat crews were 
j alerted by the sailor’s wife on 6 June, 
i The 74-year-old man had sunk into 
i deep mud about a quarter of a mile 
j from the shore. He was suffering from 
i the cold but otherwise uninjured. 


MILES TO MALDON 

Tow your trailer-sailer to Maldon 
to sail in the historic Essex town’s 
regatta on the River Blackwater 
on September 19 and you could 
be in with a chance of winning the 
coveted PBC Miles to Maldon 
Trophy for the trailer-sailer that’s 
been towed the furthest to take 
part. PBC’s Dave Selby, who 
lives in Maldon, will be on hand 
to advise on launching sites and 
arrange berths, either overnight or 
for longer periods. Last year, when 
Gwilym Newnham towed his 4.9m 
(16ft) Winkle Brig from west Ireland, 
he set a new record of 503 miles. 

Contact Dave Selby at dave@ 
rollingassets.com (tel: 01621 



Last year’s winners Gwilym and 
Eva Newnham on their 4.9m (16ft) 
Winkle Brig Constance 

854978). For entry forms and 
information about the Maldon 
Town Regatta, visit www. 
maldonregatta.co.uk 


INLAND 


COUNCILLORS SOUGHT 

The Canal & River Trust is calling for 
people to stand for election to the 
charity’s governing council. 
Nominations open on 1 1 September 
2015 before voting takes place in 
November. The council is made up of 
40 nominated, co-opted or elected 
members as well as the chairpersons 
of the waterway partnerships. This 
year’s elections will decide four posts 
representing the interests of private 
boaters, boating businesses, a post 
representing the trust’s staff, elected 
posts for volunteers and people who 
make a regular donation to the trust. 
Find out more at www.canalrivertrust. 
org.uk under About Us’; ‘Governance.’ 



PRACTICAL 



■^Fettling Hantu Biru's engine, Utlfng 
a shaft seal and final alignment 


Plus 


fl Drop keel removal and repair 

■ Upgrading circuit breakers 

B How to remove stubborn fixings 

■ How to mend an outboard handle 

■ Making a windlass work with a 
deck-mounted chain locker 


TESTED 


Tiller tamers 

■ Tiller locks, clamps and clutches 
to give you an extra hand on board 

Snatch blocks 

■ Useful and versatile to have on 
board: but which works best? 


BOATS 


Automated sailing 

B Could two daggerboards and a 
laptop change sailing forever? 

Tug yacht test 

■ ‘A proper little ship’ 


SEAMANSHIP 


Shore lines in the Med 

■ How to safely take a line ashore 

Emergency sail repairs 

■ Tips for get-you-home repairs 


CRUISING 


Ramsgate 

B A Kent port with distinguished 
maritime heritage 

Sailing the north-east 

■ On an East Coast gaffer for a leg 
of the OGA Round Britain Challenge 


AUGUST ISSUE ON SALE 
THURSDAY JULY 16 




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Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


11 


Contents subject to change 
























Letters 

Email pbo@timeinc.com 

or write to us at the address on page 5. 
Photos are appreciated, letters may be edited. 

Readers share their thoughts and opinions 



FURTHER BENEFITS OF CROTCH STRAPS 


The benefits 
are clear 

■ I very much enjoyed your 
helpful article ‘How effective 
are crotch straps’ (PBO June), 
summarising the RNLI’s 
findings. The benefits are clear. 
Although the article focused 
on the main benefits, helping 
the lifejacket to do its primary 
job of keeping the wearer 
afloat and upright, there are 
two other pluses which should 
not be overlooked. 

Firstly, if the lifejacket is fitted 
with a safety harness becket, 
crotch straps will help to 
prevent the jacket from being 
pulled over the wearer’s head 


Keeping our 
seadogssafe 

■ Re ‘Paws for thought’ (Letters, 
PBO April), I have always tethered 
my dog in the cockpit with a lead 
or a piece of rope etc. However, 
a heartbreaking incident last year 
involving a friend’s dog made me 
reconsider this completely. He had 
tied his new pup in the cockpit 
and went ashore to get rid of 
some rubbish. He was only gone 
minutes, but returned to his boat 
to find the pup hanging over the 
side, dead, with its neck broken. 

He was devastated, and could only 
surmise that it had tried to follow 
him, ending in tragedy. 

Only days after we heard about 
this, our own dog Molly fell down 
the companionway on our boat. 
Luckily I had tied her on with a 
piece of rope that, by chance, 
was just long enough to let her fall 
uninjured onto the cabin floor. This 
made us completely reconsider 
how we tied Molly in the cockpit. 

Now we make sure that the 
tether is short so that she can’t 
get out of the cockpit, and we also 
ensure that it’s fastened so that 
she can’t get to the top of the 
companionway either. We have 
managed to do this in such a 
way that she can still sit on the 
seat beside us. 

In addition, she is never aboard 
without wearing her orange 
lifejacket which has a carrying 


in the unfortunate event of 
him/her going over the side 
while attached to a safety line. 

Secondly, if the poor soul has 
taken a dunking, and some kind 
person is trying to lift them back 
aboard, it is not uncommon to 
grab the first item of kit that comes 
within reach - and this just might 
be the lifejacket. In this case, 
crotch straps will help to ensure 
that the wearer doesn’t disappear 
downwards, leaving just the 
jacket to be rescued. 

Of course, it’s better to stay 
safely on board in the first place: 
and as with the lifejacket itself, the 
old adage of ‘useless unless worn’ 
applies to the crotch straps too. 
Besides which, a crotch strap that 


handle on the back. It doesn’t bear 
thinking about, but at least this 
would give you something to grab 
or snag with a boathook or similar 
in the event of her falling into the 
water. We all love our dogs. Please 
keep them safe. 

David and Elaine Crane 

Astar of Down, Tobermory 




Let’s face it, please 

■ While sailing across the English 
Channel from St Peter Port to 
Brixham recently we were being 
pushed to the east by tide and 
wind, so before reaching the first 
shipping lane we decided to tack 
and head west for a few miles. 
Doing this put us on a collision 
course with another yacht sailing 
approximately half a mile behind 
us to port. With our boat now on a 
starboard tack and the other vessel 
on a port tack, we expected the 
other vessel to give way. As we 
got closer it was obvious this 
would not happen, so we 
diverted to pass behind. 

In doing so, the reason became 
very apparent. The two persons 
on board were both relaxing in the 
cockpit, facing backwards, reading 
books. It was not until we were 
almost past the boat that they 
noticed us. At only 10m from their 
stern our boat was quite hard to 
miss, being 12m long with a 
14m mast and big white sails. 





Is flying teoso In wind fJko 

a tail is at best a nuisance, and 
at worst a serious snagging 
hazard. Perhaps PBO or the 
RNLI might follow this study 
with some views on the extra 
benefits of lifejacket sprayhoods 
as well? 

Brian Oswald 
Wickham, Hants 


Later in the day we heard a 
merchant ship calling up the 
same yacht asking them to 
change course, probably 
because the crew were still 
facing the stern, engrossed in 
their books, paying no attention to 
what was going on around them. 

I will not name the yacht, but I 
will say they were flying a blue 
ensign and should have known 
better. Had we taken the same 
attitude to our watch there would 
have definitely been a catastrophic 
collision. The moral of this is not 
to expect other sailors to keep 
a good lookout or to obey the 
anti-collision regulations. 

Neil Payne 
By email 

To cap it all 

■ I read Hugh Morrison’s 
‘Troubleshooting an overheating 
engine’ article (PBO June) with 
interest. I tried everything to cure 
the overheating problem on my 
Volvo 2003 diesel engine, only to 
finally discover that it was a failing 
pressure cap on the cooling water 
header tank. I could literally blow 
through it! This allowed the water 
to boil at a lower temperature and 
caused the engine to overheat. 

I know this is an unlikely cause, 
but it’s worth checking. 

Mike Knowles 
N Wales 


Layllnes, got me 
on my knees 

■ I was interested to read Ben 
lAeakins’ article on sailing plotters 
and their functions (PBO July). I am 
confused, however, by the concept 
of ‘historic laylines’. I currently sail 
without electronic wind instruments, 
but as a rookie club racer I feel I 
may be missing something. 

Thanks for a great article and 
e very enjoyable magazine. 

Phil Bryce-Grainger 

Dinas Mawddwy, Gwynedd 

Ben Meakins replies: 

‘Historic iaylines’ refers to a second 
set of iaylines which show what the 
wind has been doing over a period 
of time. When sailing towards a 
mark, this shows you the range that 
the wind has been shifting through 
so you can make a decision on 
when to tack for your final approach 
to take the likely wind shifts into 
account. Hope that helps! 


The best kind of 
smear campaign 

■ Re ‘Log impeller is fouled at 
every turn’ (Ask the experts, PBO 
July), I experienced the same 
problem as reader Mike Kearley: 
and, as Richard Jerram replied, 
some manufacturers advise 
against the use of solvent-based 
antifouling. After trying several 
‘remedies’, as did Mike, I smeared 
my paddle wheel with Vaseline, 
which I keep on board for 
battery terminals and electrical 
connections. It worked, and has 
done so these last 1 0 seasons! 


Troubleshooting an 
overheating engine 




12 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 



Letters® 







PEYTON’S PICK FROM THE PAST 


SEADOG OF 
THE MONTH 


Taken from Practical Boat Owner July 1980 


PUZZLE 191 


Several friends have tried nny 
solution with similar results. Give 
it a try, Mike: what’s to lose? It’s 
cheap and effective. 

Bob Hatcher, by email 


More on the rocks 

■ Re Sam Llewellyn’s excellent 
article on the various types of rocks 
he has encountered (PBO July), 
if he ever ventures north of 
Ardnamurchan Point he will have 
to proceed with extra caution. 
Beyond there, we have two other 
types of rocks not described. 

1 . Moving rocks: These can move 
considerable distances, depending 
largely on which direction you 
approach them from - especially at 
night. The only way to combat this 
effect is modern technology, ie a 
chart plotter. This has a stabilising 
effect and will render most rocks 

of this type immobilised. 

2. Magnetic rocks: Even the 
engine block on a modern yacht is 
sufficient for the boat to be drawn 
on to a magnetic rock. Our boat MV 


Meridian is steel-hulled, and we 
can be aware of a magnetic rock 
several cables away! They can 
also affect the compass - on 
those boats that still use them. 

For those of you who say ‘what 
a load of old rubbish,’ I say come 
and find out for yourselves; but 
proceed with extreme caution! 
David Johnson 
Ross-shire 
Scotland 


When the wind changes direction, it is said to 
veer or back, depending on which way it shifts. 
A (red) 

B( green) 

Which of these is: 

1 . Backing (Northern Hemisphere) 

2. Backing (Southern Hemisphere) 

3. Veering (Northern Hemisphere) 

4. Veering (Southern Hemisphere) 


I Find the soiution at the bottom of page 110 


I 

) 


Knot, for 
publication 

■ Re your deck shoes test (PBO 
June) I thought I should reveal my 
‘secret’ knot for tying laces, which 
won’t come undone except when 
you want it to. We all know that to 
make a reef knot you go ‘left over 
right’ and then ‘right over left’, right? 
But the secret here is that after the 
‘right over left’ you make one more 
turn: see A in the photo, where for 
clarity I have omitted the bows. In B, 
the bows have been included, and 
in C the knot has been neatly worked 
up, which results in nicely squared- 
off bows. When you get into the 
habit, you may be able to use this 
knot for mainsail reef ties as well! 

Dermod O’Brien, Co. Cork 


Dermod O’Brien’s ‘secret’ knot 
is claimed not to come undone 
except when you want it to 


This is our cocker spaniel 
Hertta, enjoying the winds 
on the Finnish archipelago. 

Tomi Pasanen 


Seadogs 
galore! 

Visit our seadog gallery at 
www.pbo.co.uk/seadogs or scan 
this QR code with your smartphone. 

Send us your seadog photos for our 
web gallery and your pet may be 
lucky enough to become Seadog 
of the Month and win you £30 


Fist desist 

■ Re ‘A fine fist of it’ (Practical 
projects, PBO June), Charles 
Morland describes using a golf ball 
as a weight in a monkey’s fist and 
says that he plans to use a wooden 
weight in another one. The UK 
Code of Safe Working Practices for 
Merchant Seamen, Chapter 25 
(25.3.2) states: ‘Vessels’ heaving 
lines should be constructed with 
a “Monkey’s Fist” at one end. To 
prevent personal injury the “fist” 
should be made only with rope 
and should NOT contain added 
weighting material’. The Oueen’s 
Harbour Master Portsmouth’s 
LNTM No14/15 prohibits their 
use in the dockyard port. 

Antony Hollinghurst, Fareham 




Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


13 










Dave Selby 


Mad about the boat 


Dave Selby is the proud owner of a 5.48nn (18ft) Sailfish, which he keeps 
on a swinging mooring on the picturesque Blackwater estuary in Essex 


The art of 
practical boat 
moanership ^ 

Top of the moaning to you 

all. ‘Mustn’t grumble’ isn’t a ^ ' 

recognised adage round here 



S ometimes I surprise 
myself, because just 
occasionally - not 
often - something 
goes right. Fm not 
talking about 

actual sailing, 'cos although 
I have survived on several 
occasions Fve never had a 
day on the water totally free 
of recrimination, self-doubt, 
guilt, fear, shame or a pontoon- 
bashing cock-up. In fact, 
that was a good day. 

Most of the same, apart from 
the pontoon bashing, applies 
on land: for while there's no 
doubt my Sailfish is practically 
a boat, Fm not really a very 
practical boat owner. Fm more 
of a Practical Boat Moaner, 
which strikes me as a good name 
for a magazine as it spells out 
the bottom-line fundamental 
truth of boat moanership, a 
field in which I consider myself 
virtually professional, if not an 
outright Olympic contender. 

For a start, as everyone 
knows, B.O.A.T stands for 
Bring On Another Thousand. 
Admittedly, it's difficult to 
spend a grand on anything as 
modest as a Sailfish, but Fve 
managed to, frequently and 
regularly, pretty much on 
a monthly basis. Most of 
all though, I hate boat 
maintenance. Nevertheless, 
over the last year Fve been 
making a concerted effort. 
Firstly, I got my winter 
boat cover on early, in late 
March, which means it 
didn't shred until early April, 
which in my time frame is 
about the time it's supposed 


The man’s a genius... told me I need a list to starboard as well as a list to port!’ 


to come off. Job done. 

Then, like you're supposed 
to, I sat down to make a 'to 
do' list but I couldn't find the 
comprehensive article in PBO 
that explains how. Another job 
done. In fact, when I had a 
look at my boat, she looked 
fine to me, so I compiled a 
'to-don't' list, which was very 
satisfying. That was until local 
shipwright Adi, who runs the 
local boatyard's care in the 
community programme for 
delinquent boat owners, 
took me aside and gave 
me an inspiring 
motivational pep 
talk, which was 
very depressing. 

Turns out I had loads to do if 
I was to get on the water in 
time for the Maldon Town 
Regatta in September. 

Daily, for a whole day, I 
turned up in the boatyard 
and asked Adi what to do. 

He walked round my boat, 
pointing, tsking and tutting 
and sucking through his teeth, 
until my eyes glazed over and 
my mind went a bit foggy. I 
think the gist of it was 'pull 
your finger out.' Feeling 
depressingly motivated, 

I decided to varnish the 
coachroof grab rails. They 
didn't actually need doing, 
but as I had an old shred of 
sandpaper and didn't fancy 
lying under the boat to do 
the stuff that actually needed 


doing, I set to with a relish 
bordering on vigour. 

After what seemed like 
seconds I got a bit bored 
and joined the queue of the 
clueless for Adi's wise counsel. 

I grabbed a ticket from the 
dispenser outside his workshop 
and eventually, when my 
number came up, was ushered 
in. After I showed him my 
hands to prove I'd been doing 
manual labour, he nodded 
and said: 'I wouldn't bother 
varnishing today, there's too 
much moisture in the air and it 

Craven and cowed, I crawled back on my 
knees to Adi’s workshop with the spiodge 

looks like rain'. My heart 
soared, but just when I thought 
I'd got off he instructed me to 
buy some exotically-priced 
brown splodgy-flex to fill in 
under the grab rails before 
the rain came. 

My shoulders sagged as I 
trudged to the chandlery, but 
my spirits rose again when I 
discovered they'd run out of 
brown. With a skip in my step I 
reported back to Adi, who said: 

'No, go back and look again: 
you'll find the brown in among 
the white or black. What 
happens is that shirkers like 
you go to the chandlery, pick 
something up, get distracted 
talking to all the other slackers, 
forget what they've gone in 
for, then put it back on the 


wrong shelf. Try again.' 

Damn it, Adi was right. 
Craven and cowed, I crawled 
back on my knees to his 
workshop with the splodge, 
which turned out to be the 
right colour but fortunately 
was entirely the wrong stuff. 

My fault. I returned it with a 
heavy heart, but was almost 
euphoric moments later to find 
they really had run out of the 
right stuff. Joy. They even 
gave me a reband. Double joy. I 
skipped back to Adi's workshop 
for further instruction, hoping 
I'd exhausted 
his patience 
and ingenuity. 
And then it 
started to rain, just like he 
said it would. 'What shall 
I do now?' I said, with an 
expression of irrepressible 
eagerness. Adi saw through me, 
sighed, shook his head wearily 
and said: 'Go home, Dave, and 
have a cup of tea'. 

And so came to a close the 
cheapest and most productive 
day Fve ever spent working on 
my boat. In fact, I don't really 
know what I was moaning 
about. Fm obviously a lot more 
practical than I thought. ^ 



14 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 
















^ Sam Llewellyn 


Sam Llewellyn is editor of The Marine Quarterly, www.marinequarterly.com, 
and author of nautical thrillers. Three years ago he bought a Corribee on eBay 


Flotsam and jetsam 


Inventory invalidity, inevitabiy 

Shall we list the number of times we have finished compiling a list only to 
discover, when it’s too late, that something of vital import has been omitted? 



‘Normally, I forget everything not actually bolted to the boat. This time, I was going to make lists’ 


T he clock said 
quarter to four 
in the morning, 
and a thin light 
was crawling 
in through the 

curtains. Under normal circs I 
would have ignored it, rolled 
over and collapsed into the 
welcoming pillow. But the circs 
were far from normal. In two 
short days we were off on the 
first cruise of the season, and 
there were lists to make. 

Normally I forget everything 
not actually bolted to the 
boat. This time, I was going 
to make lists. Sails list: three of 
them, this year's treat, lovely 
and new from Crusader, cream, 
with a big cruising chute in 
cheerful red. Lazarette list: 
kedge and warp. New fenders, 
to protect the new paint. How 
can fenders cost that much? 
Don't get distracted. Warps, 
harnesses, tools, fishing stuff. 
Electrics list: solar panel, so I 
can pursue my sailing-only 
policy without running down 
the battery that runs the LED 
nav lights, the ancient echo 
sounder, the VHF and the stuff 
that you plug into an electric 
fag lighter socket. 

List of pluggables-in: Tablet, 
with plotter on. iPod, for music. 
Phone for sending consoling 
text messages to nearest and 
dearest. Charts, paper, for use 
as backup. Breton plotter. 

Er. . . that's it. 

List of home comforts: 
sleeping bag. All right, two 
sleeping bags, because there is 
still snow on the mountains 
and we will put one inside the 
other and hope for the best. 
Spare gas for Coleman lamp 
that provides heat as well 
as light. Hundreds of spare 
batteries, all sizes. List of books. 
PBO Almanac, small size, bless 
its heart. Reeds Almanac for 
1988, which still contains 
tables for dipping lights and 
much other excellent pre-GPS 


stuff. Pilot books, heavily 
Sellotaped. Trashy novels, 161b. 
Bleak House by Charles Dickens 
in case of dull days at anchor 
with gale screaming in shrouds. 
Book about gardening for days 
when weather so bloody awful 
that it is necessary to pretend 
we are not on the sea at all. 

Oh, all right, logbook. 

Fun: guitar, obviously. Wine, 
more the merrier, plus whatever 
has been hanging around 
in the bilges since 
last year. Radio 
for listening to 
cricket on long 
tedious passages. 

Food: tins of tomatoes. Tins of 
mackerel. Tins of sardines, for 
baiting lobster pot (pull lid half 
off, and Bob's your uncle). Oil, 
vinegar, salt, pepper, dear me, 
this lists business is boring. A 
few extras: Parma ham, foie 
gras, a touch of Beluga caviar, 
and perhaps a spot of Bollinger 
to wash it down? Here I notice 
that I have stopped writing, 
and am staring into space, 
eyes unfocused, the words, 
'Dream on, baby,' ringing in 
the mental ears. Deep sigh. 


A few tins of beer, then. 

Now. Big bit of paper needed, 
for the list of stuff not to take. 
Once, we started cruises 
practically bubbling with good 
resolutions. The lazarette would 
be full of buckets of wax polish, 
lockers crammed with little 
plastic boxes of electric stuff 
we were definitely going to get 
round to installing on those 
long quiet evenings far from 
civilisation. This year's not-to- 


take list says yacht wax, devices 
requiring installation with drills 
and screwdrivers, most tools 
except Swiss Army knife. 

Which leads us to a list of 
stuff to take off the boat: about 
five miles of UV-degraded 
polypropylene line, bags of 
galvanised shackles shedding 
zinc like dandruff, two anchors 
of a design never before seen 
by land or sea. A towed log 
without its spinner, four broken 
burgees, courtesy flags for 
Croatia and Oman. Three wet 
cardboard boxes of stuff so 


rusty that it is hard to say what 
it is, or was. Done. 

Wash iron oxide off hands, 
place lists in folder. Off to shops 
and recycling centre. Home 
again, feeling smug. Then away 
across the wine-dark sea to the 
islands of the blest, where all is 
orderliness and watery joy... 

I am fizzing along on a broad 
reach. The sails are drawing 
beautifully. The lazarette is a 
model of tidiness and economy. 

The cabin is in 
apple pie order, 
books on the 
shelves, among 
them the fat folder full of lists 
which has made life so smooth 
and easy. How I love lists. I will 
engage the self-steering and go 
below, and make myself a cup 
of coffee with a chocolate 
digestive biscuit. . . 

I cannot find the chocolate 
digestive biscuits. Check folder. 
The chocolate digestive biscuits 
got left off the ruddy list. The 
nearest chocolate digestive 
biscuit is 20 miles away upwind. 
Life without chocolate digestives 
is inconceivable. Ready about? 
Lee-oh. Lists? Waste of time. 


Among the books is the fat folder of lists 
which has made life so smooth and easy.. 


16 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 



synonymous with yachting since 1877 

The Shlpyartt, Balh Ftoad, Lymingtoft, Hampshire 9011 3YL 


Fblkw us on Twiner and Like us on Faoebooh @BerthonGroup 
Phone 44 (|0| 1590 673312 Email anquirfe5eb«rthon.co.uk 


Summer AfterwoDn; 

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Monthly musings 


Yacht surveyor and designer Andrew Simpson cruises with his wife Cheie in his 
own-design 1 1 .9m (39ft) yacht Shindig. Read his biog at www.offshore-saiior.com 



Bags of 
trouble 

Surely high-end 
products deserve 
protection of 
connparable quality 
and value? 


R egular readers 
of this column 
might recall Cheie 
and I hunting 
for a Hypalon 
inflatable dinghy 
back in 2013 to replace the 
Avon we lost the year before, 
hurriedly quitting an anchorage 
that had suddenly become 
dangerous. The vast majority 
of today's dinghies are made 
of PVC, which is susceptible 
to sunlight and its deleterious 
effects. Hypalon (more correctly 
called chlorosulfonated 
polyethylene) is almost 
immune and, therefore, much 
preferred where the sun is fierce. 

The hunt was fmstrating, but 
not fruitless. Thanks to Simon 

Tenfold frimd Short space of time, the webbing 

and energetic Straps had become so weak they couidn’t 

even be used as grab handies 


RYA sailing instructor and Lanzarote liveaboard 
Keith Darbyshire adapted this vintage sailbag 
by sewing up the original end and fitting a 
coupie of zips to enabie the dinghy to be put in 
from the side. iNSET The webbing straps on our 
originai dinghy bag frayed after a mere 14 weeks 


out of the way, and I reassured 
myself that it would suffer very 
little damage, we left it there 
while we generally pottered 
and readied Shindig for sea. 

By the time our early July 
departure date approached, 

14 weeks had sped by. 

Or I should say only 14 weeks, 
for we were astonished to 
discover that in this short space 
of time, the webbing straps 
securing the bag had become so 


maritime 
entrepreneur, a 
Caribe dinghy made in 
Venezuela was shipped into 
Barcelona and eventually 
delivered to us in Torrevieja. Its 
journey wasn't altogether a 
happy one. A Venezuelan 
customs official, with a craft 
knife rather sharper than his 
brain, slashed the box open to 
inspect the contents, thereby 
putting a six-inch gash in the 
dinghy's bottom. No matter. 

The dinghy was professionally 
repaired and we were offered a 
very reasonable discount. 

If memory serves, the dinghy 
was delivered in March and lay 
on the coachroof in its rainproof 
bag until we arrived in mid- 
April. Since it was conveniently 


weak they couldn't even be 
used as grab handles. In our 
attempts to lug that inert lump 
to its designated position just 
forward of the mast the bag 
sort of burst as one strap after 
another parted, spilling acres 
of Hypalon in all directions. 

Never mind, we told ourselves, 
we still have the old Avon bag. 
So we dug that out, and were 
disappointed to discover that 
this too had suffered. The straps 
could be torn apart by hand, 
but not as readily as the Caribe's 
bag; and clearly it had served 
for a much longer period. 
Nonetheless, to start with a 
problem that could only get 
worse would be a certain road 


to future troubles. In the short 
term we simply wrapped the 
deflated dinghy in an old 
acrylic awning. 

This brought us to the point 
where our squirrelling instincts 
proved to be a godsend. While 
clearing out a forepeak locker I 
came across an old sailbag that 
could have been around during 
the scourge of the Viking 
marauders. Where it came from 
is beyond memory but, stained 
and weathered 
though it is, the 
fabric is as stout 
as any I've seen. 
Now, I'm sure 
you will have noted that I've 
used the word 'bag' very 
imprecisely. Things like rigid 
transoms and bottom boards 
have made the traditional 
stuffing of a bag impracticable. 
When opened up flat or nearly 
so, the modern enclosure is 
usually of cmciform shape on 
which the rolled-up dinghy 
is placed. Opposing flaps are 
then laid over each other, 
rather in the manner of a paper 
envelope, and webbing straps 
then hold the whole secure. 

We tried stuffing the dinghy 
into the open maw of our 
vintage sailbag, but it was a 
considerable struggle. Clearly, 
we needed a better arrangement. 


At this point fortune favoured 
us with the arrival of Keith 
Darbyshire, RYA sailing 
instructor and Lanzarote 
liveaboard. 'No problem,' he 
said while I continued my head 
scratching. 'Leave it to me. I'll 
sew up the original end and fit a 
couple of zips so the dinghy can 
be put in from the side. It'll cost 
you a beer.' And so he did, as 
you can see in the main photo. 

So it is considerable gratitude 
to Keith for contriving an easy 
solution, but a distinct thumbs- 
down for manufacturers of 
high-end products that don't 
believe they deserve protection 
of comparable quality and 
value. The difference in cost 
between, say, durable polyester 
and vulnerable polypropylene 
webbing is negligible: derisory 
when compared to the value 
of a top-class inflatable such as 
the Caribe. Feeling somewhat 
aggrieved, I went public with 
my moaning and was dismayed 
to learn how many others had 
suffered similarly. 'Lifespan of 
a fruit fly,' one disgmntled 
skipper told me. 'I would rather 
they hadn't bothered.' 

All of which should concern 
the manufacturers, don't 
you think? Q 


18 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 



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Ask the experts 


^ • Here’s just a selection of the latest questions from 

Got a question? Email pbo(I)timeinc.com PBO readers. Email or write to the address on 

page 5 and our experts will answer your queries 


Upgrading the tube network 


Q On my Horizon 273, the 
fuel lines are of reinforced 
PVC between the primary and 
secondary filters and on the 
fuel return to the tank. The tube 
from the fuel tank to the primary 
filter via the fuel cut-off valve is 
narrow-gauge, non-reinforced 
PVC. This was as installed 
when I bought her five years 
ago and no comment was 
passed on by the pre-purchase 
survey, although more recently 
eyebrows have been raised. It 
is possible these tubes are 
now 20 years old, and they 
are quite hard. 

Replacing the reinforced tube 
is not difficult even if thicker- 
walled tube of ISO7840 is used, 
since the tube is the external 
part of the connection, held 
by Jubilee clips. However, the 
thinner tube seems to have 
some form of compression 
fitting that requires fairly 
thin-walled tube so as to fit 
within the connection, and I 
suspect that BS fuel tube will 
be too big. I assume that 
something similar goes down 
the inside of the tank since the 
fuel line to the engine comes 
out at the top. The tank itself is 
plastic, but I guess not PVC. 

How wise is it to be using this 
type of tube to start with, and do 
I need to replace the existing? 
Can you comment on the 
smaller-diameter tube and 
how the connection is made? 
Phil Hanley 
Southsea, Hants 


PAT MANLEY REPLIES: 

It is not unusual to see this type of 
fuel pipe used in boats the age of 
your Horizon. In an ideal world, 
these days you would use a pipe to 
connply with the relevant ISO, but 
unless you are using the boat on 
the UK inland waterways under the 
Boat Safety Scheme there is no 
compulsion. I think it likely that the 
tube inside the tank will be rigid. 
The thin-walled tube could be 
replaced by copper tubing with the 
appropriate compression fittings or 
a ‘like for like’ replacement with 
similar plastic tube, which can be 
obtained from Hose World (www. 
hoseworld.com). This type of PVC 
tubing is compatible with normal 


MASTS AND RIGS 



The large- 
diameter tuba 
is the fuel tank 
overflow, which 
looped. The thin fuel out is in 
the centre and the medium-sized 
return is on the right 

compression joints, but ensure the 
tube and fitting sizes are compatible. 

I see that the fuel delivery tube 
passes through a hole in the 
bulkhead that has no anti-chafe 
protection grommet: this could 
potentially cause chafe and failure 
of the tube. I would strongly advise 


The fuel cut-off valve, with the 
fuel delivery tube passing 
through the bulkhead 

that you provide suitable protection 
wherever the tubing passes through 
any bulkhead or similar. Ideally you 
would use a bulkhead fitting at 
each bulkhead (available 
from www.asap-supplies.com). 


Should I be getting rid of slugs? 


Q My British Foikboat has a 
hoiiow wooden mast: i’m 
buying a new mainsaii, and am 
wondering about the feasibiiity 
of using nyion siugs in the spar 
grooves, and not a boit rope. 
This wouid mean that i couid 
ieave the iuff of the saii on the 
mast when iowered, and it 
wouid make raising and stowing 
the saii much simpier. What 
might be the drawbacks? 
Someone mentioned the 
possibiiity of the siugs making 
point ioads aiong the wooden 
iip of the groove, which couid 
cause a faiiure at those points. 
Aiso, if in a wooden groove. 


even a weii worn one, couid the 
siugs be more iikeiy to jam than if 
in a metai channei? 

David Jenkins 
By email 

MIKE COATES REPLIES: 

I wouldn’t recommend using a slug 
in a wooden sail track: as you say, if 
the track is worn the slug could jam. 
This is likeliest when the sail is being 
lowered as there would be less 
tension on the luff, which may allow 
the slug to cockle sideways in a worn 
area. It could also cause point 
loading damage to the luff groove, 
especially if the spar is made of a 
soft timber such as spruce. It may 


even split away the outer edge of 
the luff groove due to the small 
bearing area of the slug compared 
to the load of the sail being taken 
by a continuous luff rope. 

It’s difficult to comment on your 
spar without seeing it, but it may 
be possible to fit an external track 
such as an Allen A26 (using the 
appropriate sail slide) to sit across 
the back of the current luff groove 
by planing a small flat across it, 
just wide enough to accept the 
track, and centre-screwing it into 
the back wall of the mast. Or, 
Allen’s A626 has wings that could 
be screwed down the edge of 
the existing luff groove track. 


THE PBO EXPERTS To ask a question email pbo@timeinc.com and include your address. Pictures are helpful 




SEA SAFETY 

Will Stephens is 
Staff Officer 
Operations (Coastal 
Safety) at the RN LI 


BOAT BUYING 

David Harding is a 
regular contributor 
to PBO: his photo 
archive is at www. 
sailingscenes.co.uk 


CRUISING 

Stuart Carruthers 
is the RYA Cruising 
Manager and has 
sailed extensively 


SAILS 

Ian Brown of the 
International 
OneSails loft group 
is an expert on sails 


MASTS & RIGS 

Mike Coates worked 
in the spar and 
rigging business for 
many years 


SURVEY AND 
CORROSION 

Colin Brown runs 
a marine survey and 
consultancy company, 
CB Marine Services 


ELECTRICS 

Paul Holland is 
chairman of the 
BMEA and MDof 
Energy Solutions (UK) 



ENGINES 

Pat Manley is 
a diesel engine 
course instructor 
and marine author 


20 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


Heads up and overheating 



Q l own an Orkney 520 
powered by a 30hp long 
shaft four-stroke Yamaha. I also 
have a 2.2hp Honda auxiliary. 

When the boat is under way, 
the bow rises considerably 
even though the outboard is 
trimmed right forward. This is 
with two adults well forward 
and all extra gear stowed in 
the forward locker, while other 
heavy items like battery and 
reserve fuel tank are in the 
midships lockers. I contacted 
the manufacturers to enquire 
about the possibility of fitting 
foils to the outboard to keep 
the boat more level in the water. 
They advised against this and 
went on instead about propeller 
size. Would there be a problem 
with fitting the foils? 

A second question concerns 
the outboard steaming when 
I have been under way for a time 
at 75% throttle. I have had the 
impeller changed and have 
flushed through with fresh water 
more than once. The telltale has 
a good pressure and the engine 
otherwise seems to go well. 

The manufacturer advised 
that it could be sea temperature 
causing this, but nobody else 
seems to have the same snag. 
This has occurred during July 


and August off the west end of 
the Isle of Mull, so the sea is not 
that cold. Any suggestions? 
Keith Brill 

North Kessock, Inverness 


PAT MANLEY REPLIES: 

With regard to weight distribution, 
you seem to be doing all the right 
things about trimming your boat. 

I had a look at some photos of 
Orkney 520s under way, and 
although a few do show a 
bows-high attitude, others 
show it is perfectly possible to 
trim the hull properly. 

A possible problem with fitting 
foils to the outboard leg is to do 
with the extra load put on the leg 
and engine mountings. Maybe a 
finer-pitch prop would allow higher 
rpm and more thrust to get you 
‘over the hump’. It would be 
worthwhile having a chat with 
Yamaha about the trim and prop, 
as obviously the boat 
can be trimmed properly. 

It could even be that with 
the loaded displacement 
of your boat, you just 
need more thrust 
(horsepower), although 
I note that the maximum 
recommended for 
the Orkney 520 is 
35hp - only a little 


more than you already have. 

It could be worth taking all 
equipment except the essentials 
off the boat and trying it again. 


steamed up 

Regarding your second question, 

I note that the telltale seems to 
show a good flow of water. The 
‘steam’ from it at high power 
could suggest overloading, and 
I wonder if a finer-pitch prop would 
allow more rpm and better flow 
with less loading? 

Otherwise, the ‘steam’ suggests 
that the engine cooling waterways 
are partly blocked. Once this 
occurs, it is quite difficult to 
clear them. Have you checked 
the cooling water intakes in the 
leg for any blockage? Perhaps 
your dealer would let you borrow 
a finer-pitch prop for a trial - 
that may help troubleshoot 
both problems. 


ABOVE Keith Brill has 
queries about the 30hp 
long shaft four-stroke 
Yamaha he uses to 
power his Orkney 520 


LEFT When the boat is 
under way, the bow 
rises considerably even 
though the outboard is 
trimmed right forward 


Ask the experts 

Scale of 
chargcsfl 

Q l have a 
Maxim 38 
catamaran with 
two Yanmar 
3GM30 engines 
and a 12V system: 
each engine hai lb V 

own start battery. ** 

The household battery 
bank is used for the fridge, 
autopilot, windlass and 
converter. We have no shore 
power and no generator. We 
live on the catamaran in 
Kenya and want to sail to 
Mozambique in a month. I 
have six 1 20W solar panels 
as a roof over the back of the 
boat, and this works well: but 
if there are a few days of rain 
the batteries lose charge. 

I would like to connect the 
two outputs from the engines 
to a charger which charges 
the different battery groups. 

The household battery group 
is eoOAh. What would be the 
best option, bearing in mind 
that I want to buy a generator 
and have shore power? 

Kees van Velzen 
By email 

PAUL HOLLAND REPLIES: 

A voltage-sensitive relay would 
work well here. These join two 
batteries together when they 
detect a charging voltage and 
then isolate them when the 
voltage drops back. This 
allows you to use the engine 
alternators to charge other 
banks without modifying the 
wiring. The fact that the relay 
drops out when the batteries 
are not under charge means 
that you will not accidentally 
discharge the starter batteries. 



50 of the most frequently asked boating questions are answered by our experts on the PBO website. Visit www.pbo.co.uk 



GAS FITTINGS 


Peter Spreadborough, 
of Southampton 
Calor Gas Centre, 
has 20 years in 
the industry 



PAINT AND 
ANTIFOULING 

Richard Jerram is 
former UK technical 
manager of 
International Paint 



YACHT DESIGN 

Andrew Blyth is a 
naval architect with 
interest in stability 
and buoyancy 



TOILETS AND 
PLUMBING 

GarySutciiffe of Lee 
Sanitation knows 
about hoiding tanks, 
toilets and plumbing 



TRAILER- 

SAILING 

Colin Haines is a 
design engineer 
who has trailer- 
sailed for 25 years 



ELECTRONICS 

Chris Ellery of 
Greenham-Regis 
Electronics is a 
former Merchant 
Navy officer 



BOATBUILDING 

Tony Davies has 
been building and 
repairing wooden, 
GRP and steel boats 
for 40 years 



WOOD 

Richard Hare is a 
wood technologist 
and long-time 
wooden-boat owner 



Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


21 






Trp Ask the experts 


TRAILER-SAILING 


A direct bearing on boat launching 


Q l run the Sea Scouts in 
Whitby and recentiy bought 
a second-hand iaser SB3 for me 
to race and them to day-saii in. 
i previousiy owned two Soiings 
which needed a crane for 
iaunching, a iarge RiB on a roiier 
coaster traiier and assorted 
dinghies on combined traiiers. 
i was never happy to immerse 
wheei bearings, especiaiiy if 
they contained brakes. The SB3 
is marketed as a traiier-saiier, 
but if iaunching from a siip 
the whoie wheei assembiy is 
submerged, and as the boat 
weighs about 700kg, the traiier 
is braked, i seem to recaii the 
Hunter Medina, a simiiar sized 
boat, having a piggyback 
system which avoided this 
situation. Can you suggest 
how i shouid proceed? 

Alan Holmes 
By email 

COLIN HAINES REPLIES: 

My second trailer-sailer required 
the trailer axles to be subnnerged 
about 3ft during launch and 
recovery. Changing the bearings 
was easy, fortunately, because 


they sometimes didn’t last for a 
year. Heavy ‘marine’ grease and 
fancy industrial greases with 
specialised performance claims 
were little help, apart from the 
sadly-missed Keenol grease 
which enabled the last set of 
bearings to survive for about three 
years. The hubs were fitted with 
grease nipples and the grease was 
retained inside the hubs by dust 
covers over the outboard ends of 
the axles. The inboard end of the 
hub carried a rawhide shaft seal 
rather than the more common 
rubber seal. My final method was 
to completely fill the hubs with 
grease: I only stopped pumping it 
in when grease came out of the 
dust-cap ventilation holes. A 
small internal pressure may have 
deflected the rawhide outwards 
slightly, so when water pressure 
pressed it against the axle, it 
improved the seal. Obviously, 

I didn’t dunk warm hubs into 
cold water in case there was 
any remaining air inside to cool 
and contract when submerged, 
because water would then be 
sucked in. 

Water on brakes generates two 


Bearing races packe*! 
with a dollop of grease 

problems, the obvious ora 
being reduced brakiri^ 
capacity. The simple wfiy erf 
eliminating the water lo low 
the trailer with the handbrake partly 
applied: friction rapidly heats up 
the brake drum and the water 
evaporates. About 1 00 yards of 
very slow towing was normally 
more than enough. 

The other effect is corrosion due 
to seawater. My answer was to 
drill a hole in the backplate of the 
brake assembly, and then hold a 
hosepipe against the hole to flush 
out the seawater. I also applied 
zinc-rich paint to all static interior 
surfaces. Moving parts got a 
smear of Copperslip grease over 
the contact faces. I later saw a 
better trailer made with mountings 
on the spine for Hozelock-type 
connectors, prior to galvanising. 
Flexible pipes ran from the 
connectors to the brake 
backplates, thereby eliminating 
the sousing I got when washing 
out the brake drum interiors. 

As regards the Bowden cables 



actuating the brake shoes, 
hanging them vertically and 
pouring oil down inside them 
delayed corrosion of the steel wire 
cores. The cable ends naturally 
lifted up towards the brake drums, 
so the oil could not drain out and 
affect the friction between brake 
shoes and drums. 

Obviously, a launching trolley 
would render the above comments 
irrelevant, but with your boat’s 
1 .5m draught, making a trolley to 
provide adequate support would 
result in a heavy bit of kit. More 
weight would be added to the 
trailer when tracks for the trolley’s 
wheels were added, so a stronger 
and heavier axle would be 
required. Your boat may weigh 
700kg, but care will be needed 
not to make the trailer and all the 
kit it carries exceed 1 ,800kg, the 
maximum allowable weight for 
a single-axle trailer. 



Cutless bearing 
replacement 


Q rm looking for info 
with regard to changing 
the cutless bearing in the 
P-bracket on my Princess 
33. I’m hoping I don’t have to 
pull the shaft, so if you can 
pass on any tricks or tips - 
everything from finding the 
holding-in lugs to fitting the 
new ones - that would be 
much appreciated. 

Michael Powell 
By email 


PAT MANLEY REPLIES: 

I’m not familiar with the shaft 
configuration on your boat: 
there seem be to a few different 
alternatives. The cutless bearing 
is likely to be held in place by two 
grub screws, often completely 
hidden under layers of antifouling 
paint. If you strip off the antifoul 
you should see the grub screw 


Some engineers fabricate a tool 
like this to drive out the bearing 

heads: they normally have hexagon 
sockets, which will also need to be 
cleaned out. They are quite small, 
so take care not to lose them. 

You will need to remove the 
prop so that you can remove the 
bearing. You can try using a small 
hammer and some sort of tool 
to try knocking the bearing 


The prop will need to be removed so the bearing can be taken out 


backwards out of the P-bracket, 
but it may be a tight fit. Some 
marine engineers fabricate a tool 
to help drive the bearing out of its 
housing, and you may be able to 
borrow or hire one. Otherwise 
you may need to improvise! 

When driving the bearing out, 
get a second person to hold a 


heavy tool - a large ‘lump’ 
hammer is ideal - against the 
rear of the P-bracket to absorb 
the impact of the blows and 
prevent damage to the hull. 

This procedure is detailed 
in my book Simple Boat 
Maintenance (Fernhurst 
Books, pages 112/113). 


22 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 



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D£ACONS 


Fully Serviced Family Owned Marina 
Prime Position on River Hamble 
Competitive Rates ■ Sheltered Location 
Close to Jnct 8 of the M27 
and Bursledon station 
i Less time travelling J 

\ More time on the water * 


www.deaconsmarina.com 
V Tel: 02380 402253 ^ 



i lk J 



Boats 


or performance’: Peter K Poland sail 
axi boats designed by Pelle Petterso 


M ention 

Scandinavian- 
built cruisers in 
general and 
Swedes in 
particular, and 

solid stalwarts like Hallberg-Rassys, 
Najads and Malos spring to mind. 
Such quintessentially Swedish 
craft, with substantial displacement- 
to-length ratios and elegant 
interiors with rich joinery and blue 
upholstery, evoke dreams of blue 
water voyaging. And all have found 
great favour down the years with 
cruising sailors, even if they cost 
more than volume production 
cruisers from France and Germany. 


i But the most prolific Swedish 
builder and designer of cruising 
yachts followed a slightly different 
path. Indeed, the first world-beating 
design drawn by Pelle Petterson 
didn’t even float. He studied 
design at the Pratt Institute in New 
York, and then - while a student of 
Pietro Frua - he drew the most 
successful sports car ever built by 
Volvo. Called the P1800, it even 
featured on the TV series The Saint 
starring Roger Moore. 

I However, competitive sailing 
was Petterson’s real passion. He 
twice represented Sweden in the 

I Olympics in the Star class, winning 
silver and bronze medals; he won 
World Championship medals in 


i the Soling class; he skippered 
: Swedish America’s Cup challengers 
I twice; and he won the 6 Metre 
I World Championships in 6s of his 
i own design. Latterly, he received 
: the King’s Medal for his outstanding 
I contributions as a sailor and boat 
j designer, and most of these boats 
I go by the name of Maxi. 

! As one would expect from a 
designer who collects awards for 
a sports car and wins yacht races 
galore, the Petterson-designed 
: Maxis don’t resemble the heavier 
I and more traditional HRs, Najads 
I and Malos. They combine Swedish 
I flair with superior performance and 
I volume production methods (at 
I least in the early days) . And - as 
I with other Scandinavian brands - 
I there’s not a bilge keel in sight. 

i Hitting the bullseye 

I In 1 972, the Maxi 77 (7.8m/25ft 6in 
I LOA) set the ball rolling. Its transom- 
j hung rudder, bulbed fin keel and 
I sleek full-width coachroof were 


unusual for its era. A conventional 
saloon, aft galley and separate 
forecabin (with WC located under 
the berth) gave plenty of space, 
while its DLR of 150, ballast ratio of 
49% and sporty SA/displacement 
ratio of 18.15 ensured above- 
average all-weather performance 
for a volume-built family cruiser. 

And how did the market react 
to this trendsetting yacht? An 
astonishing 3,900 were sold. 
Petterson hit the bullseye with his 
first Maxi. When asked 30 years 
later how he viewed the Maxi 77, 
Petterson modestly replied; ‘I see 
that many boats seem to be well 
cared for and that the owners 
enjoy their sailing in it. That it still 
seems to fill its need is clear when 
owners tell of how happy they are 
with their boats.’ 

Larger (the 8.7m/28ft Gin Maxi 
87) and smaller (the 6.8m/22ft 4in 
Maxi 68) models soon followed. 
Both shared the 77’s looks, the 
distinctive blue flash on the 



ABOUT THE AUTHOR 


Peter K Poland crossed the Atlantic in a 7.6m 
(25ft) Wind Elf in 1968 and later spent 30 
years as co-owner of Hunter Boats. He is 
now a freelance journalist. 


24 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 






Pelle Petterson^s Maxi boats 


/ 





Maxi 1050: available 
second-hand 
from £70,000 


Maxi 84: available 
second-hand 
from £4,500 


coachroof and coaming sides, and 
good performance. The smaller 68 
boasted a ballast ratio in excess 
of 40%, a DLR of 205 and SA/ 
displacement ratio of 14.99. These 
figures, combined with a fin-keel 
draught of 4ft Sin, gave sailing 
qualities that ‘same era’ owners of 
similarly-sized bilge-keelers like 
Westerlys and Snapdragons could 
only dream of. In total, 1 ,295 Maxi 
68s were sold. 

The 1976 Maxi 95 (9.7m/32ft 
LOA) introduced another ‘first’ for 
Petterson - a separate twin-berth 
stern cabin and a centre cockpit - 
but these new characteristics were 
not allied to a heavy long-keeler 
(as on similar-sized early HRs). 

The sleek 95 has a low 
coachroof, skeg-hung rudder and 
sharply raked fin keel. The engine 
lives well forward, placing its 
weight low and in the centre of the 
yacht to maximise stability and 
minimise pitching. The saloon is 
comfortable and practical, with an 
enclosed heads compartment and 


galley situated aft on either side 
of the companionway steps. 

Once again, Petterson went for 
a moderate DLR of 222 and 
high-ish SA/disp ratio of 15.49 
to ensure sharp performance. 

Maxi 95 owner Richard Shardlow 
says: ‘It’s very spacious, certainly 
living up to the nickname of the 
Swedish Tardis. We have a cockpit 
enclosure that means the rear 
cabin is very useable even in 
inclement weather while in port. 
This gives privacy to guests. 

Would I buy her again? A very 
definite yes!’ 

Another owner, Rob Watt 
(cruiser captain at Greenwich 
Yacht Club), adds: ‘My wife Kim 
and I were looking for a good 
boat with comfortable, spacious 
accommodation that the two 
of us could handle without any 
problems. I also wanted something 
that could hold its own in club 
races.’ A 95 fitted the bill, and as 
Rob observes, ‘she’s an excellent 
boat, handles well in all conditions 
and is a good club racer. When 
we are on our four-week summer 
cruise the rear cabin becomes 
Kim’s wardrobe and dressing 
room. The one problem was 
leaking windows: the design is “of 
the era” and they tended to flex. 
They have now been sealed and 
then bonded with Sikaflex.’ 


Runaway success 

The 1977 Maxi 84 (8.5m/28ft) 
was another runaway success, 
and around 1 ,350 were built. The 
Petterson Maxi recipe evolved with 
a slightly wider beam (2.9m/9ft 8in), 
slightly lower ballast ratio (37.5%) 
and more substantial DLR (268). 
The layout remained practical and 
traditional with amidships heads 
and L-shaped galley aft. A Volvo 
saildrive provides powered push, 
and it remains a marvellous cruiser 
to this day. 

A subscriber to an online forum 
recently asked: ‘I’m looking at a 
Maxi 84 which seems well specc’d 
and is a good price. Has anyone 
any experience of these boats? We 
are looking for something that will 
go well round the cans but will also 
cope with west of Scotland 
cruising.’ One respondent replied: 

‘I have had two 84s, one in the UK 
and now another in Norway. It’s a 
safe family boat: good in a blow, 
easily sailed single-handed and 
with lots of room inside. 

‘Fast? Yes, if you sail it right. I’ve 
had 7, 8 and even 9 knots both 
up and downwind and won 
handicap regattas! The latest win 
was last year. Total ownership is 
more than 20 years.’ 

Another sailor replied: ‘The Maxi 



Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


25 



Boats 



Maxi 999: available 
to buy second-hand 
from £29,000 



84 is about as close to the ideal 
boat for the uses you describe in 
terms of pleasure per buck spent. 
Not the fastest in light airs, but it’s 
competitive in moderate winds 
upwards. If there’s a good No3 
with the boat that can be sheeted 
inside the shrouds, it will point 
really well in a blow and little 
can touch it. The windward 
performance is useful and the 
boat will keep you out of trouble 
due to its stiffness. Like all boats, 
some will have issues, so caveat 
emptor applies!’ This particularly 
applies to elderly Volvo diesels. 
Spare parts can be expensive. 

Maxi 84 owner Alan Jeans says: 
Tve owned my 84 Snowgoose for 
about six years. I have cruised 
extensively in the Clyde, the east 
coast of Ireland, the Irish Sea and 
North Channel including Rathlin 
Island, and up the west coast of 
Scotland as far as Tobermory. I 
bought the Maxi because I was 
really impressed with the build 
quality, the space inside and the 
sailing abilities. I would happily 
recommend Maxis to anyone 
considering purchasing a boat - 
especially an older one - as they 
are so well built.’ 

By the time the 84 was built. 
Maxis were also gaining popularity 
for charter in the Med. Those were 
the days when boats around 30ft 
were the norm rather than the 
exception in flotilla fleets. Popular 
charter company Sailing Holidays 
Ltd - winners of The British Travel 
Awards 201 4 ‘Best Holidays 


Company to Hellenic Europe’, 
silver in the ‘Best Activity Holiday 
Company’ category and bronze 
in the ‘Best Family Holiday 
Company’ category - now buys 
fleets of brand-new yachts for its 
flotillas. However, it still uses its 
older Maxis as lead boats crewed 
by its employees. 

Amy Neilson (daughter of 
founder and MD Barrie) says: ‘All 
our lead boats are still Maxis, a 
mixture of 95s and 1 00s. They 
have been our lead boats since 
1990 and are still going strong. We 
have bought a number since then 
and each crew has added its own 
modifications over the years. 

‘They offer unrivalled solidity, 
and have excellent onboard 
storage room that is essential for 
carrying spare parts to keep our 
flotillas running smoothly. These 
models have a fantastic layout for 
three crew members to live on 
board. The centre cockpit splits 
the living area, and the aft cabin - 
affectionately known as the “dog 
box” - offers more space and 
privacy than found on other 
boats of a similar size.’ 

A desirable yacht 

As the 1980s approached, 
Petterson launched the Maxi 1 08 
(1 1 m/36ft LOA). This centre- 
cockpit fast cruiser adopted a new 
look, substituting a conventional 
coachroof for its earlier full-width 
cabin top. It’s a desirable yacht 
that sails well, thanks to a DLR of 
220, ballast ratio of 38% and SA/ 


disp ratio of 1 7.5. The 9.4m/30ft 
lOin Maxi 100, introduced in 1982, 
followed a similar format with the 
addition of a fixed wheelhouse 
‘lid’ over the front of the cockpit. 

When he introduced the 8.3m/ 
27ft 3in Maxi Fenix 8.5 in 1981 , 
Petterson changed to fractional rig 
for this performance fin-keel cruiser. 
He also updated the styling. The 
change was obviously well 
received, because around 1 ,300 
were sold. The accommodation 
plan features a separate forecabin, 
a heads area just aft of this, and a 
choice of a dinette or conventional 
layout in the saloon. Large quarter 
berths with an optional infill (to 
convert this to a cosy double) 
stretch back under the cockpit. A 
DLR of 1 92 and ballast ratio of 35% 
ensure that the Fenix 8.5 is a 
sporty rather than staid yacht. 

Fenix owner Graham Bremer 
says: ‘I was looking for a modern, 
easily-handled yacht for the two of 


: us retired folks which would offer 
I effort-free coastal cruising. 

: ‘Before then I was a wooden- 

i boat enthusiast, but there was 
: too much labour! I needed an 
i easily-maintained GRP yacht 
I with a well-crafted wooden 
i interior, and found a Fenix with 
s a new engine and saildrive! 

‘Maxi yachts have a reputation 
^ for build quality, safety and 
‘ performance, and all the criteria 
were met. The yacht handles easily 
1 and predictably, both under sail 
f and under power in the marina. 

The self-tacking jib arrangement 
I is a joy: no more winch grinding 
t and, allied to a powerful fully- 
battened main, provides 
I progress even in Force 2.’ 

1 This move towards more 
! contemporary styling, a choice of 
i cruising or racing accommodation 
i layouts, fractional rig and 
I pepped-up performance continued 
i with the 1 0.5m/34ft 6in LOA Maxi 


26 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


Sailing Scenes Sailing Scenes 


Pelle Petterson^s Maxi boats 


Mixer in 1983. A DLR of 188, 
ballast ratio of 40% and SA/disp 
ratio of 20.0 tell the tale. Petterson 
said that finish quality moved to a 
higher level when Maxi production 
moved under the wing of Swedish 
motor-cruiser builder Nimbus, 
and added: ‘Buyers now wanted 
higher quality and more elegant 
styling on the boats. By launching 
the Maxi name and making boats 
that differentiated themselves from 
the older versions, we hoped to 
meet this demand. 

‘It’s possible our move came 
a little late; the competition had 
increased and it was difficult to 
build quality boats at good prices. 
Even if Mixer did not become a 
great commercial success, its 
lines still bear appreciation today.’ 

This change of tack continued 
with the 1 985 Maxi 999 
(9.9m/32ft 6in LOA), the 1986 Maxi 
909 (9m/29ft 6in), the 1988 Maxi 39 
and the 1990 Maxi 33, which was 
a more ‘cruisey’ development of 
the 999. All were fine yachts and 
were finished more luxuriously 
than earlier Maxis, but they sold 
in smaller numbers. 

True to the classic 
Scandinavian look 

By the time the Maxi 1 000 
(1 0.2m/33ft Gin LOA) hit the water 
in 1993, the new look had definitely 
come of age and this model was 
a great success. The conventional 
modern accommodation with 
forecabin, spacious saloon, 
forward-facing chart table area 
and aft double cabin and heads 
is beautifully finished. Extensive 
gleaming joinery and blue 
upholstery are true to the 
classic Scandinavian look. 

To get an owner’s view, I asked 
Charles Price why he selected a 
Maxi 1000. He said: ‘I was looking 
for a good-quality sailing boat 
around 10m which I could race if 
I wanted, but primarily as a quick, 
good-handling cruiser. I read 
reviews and looked at a number of 
boats and narrowed it down to a 
Maxi 1000 or a Westerly Storm. A 
friend had sailed Maxis for some 
time and was very impressed, so 
that helped. 

‘She handles very well in 
heavy weather. She is a fin-keeler, 
inevitably more lively than a long 
keel. You need to get your sails 
balanced and make sure you reef 
in time, but otherwise there’s no 
problem at all. There’s very little 
weather helm, and I have yet to 
find conditions where she will not 
heave to, which is very useful 
when short-handed.’ 

When I asked if she had lived up 
to expectations, Charles replied: 



‘In a word, yes. I occasionally look 
at other boats at shows and so on, 
but have yet to find one that ticks 
any more boxes for me. I have 
decided to keep her until I need 
to downsize, so I have gradually 
been refitting/upgrading with new 
sails, a heating system, a cockpit 
enclosure, bowsprit etc. 

‘Though she’s built to sleep 
seven she’s very comfortable for 
two couples over a prolonged 
period. The aft cabin is a good 
size and the forecabin ample too. 
Cne other great feature is good 
locker space, particularly in the 
cockpit with a huge sail locker 
and two very spacious lazarettes. 
She’s just a really well-designed 
boat and fun to sail!’ 

David Williams, who enjoys 
cruising his Maxi 1000 as well 
as taking part in the increasingly 
popular two-handed races run 
by the Royal Southampton YC, 
is another satisfied owner. His 
previous boat was an X ^-Tenner 
and he changed to the Maxi five 
years ago because ‘I had sailed 
on one and also knew one of the 
most successful owners in the 
JCG fleet who had three Maxis. 

It’s an all-round boat that does 
everything: it can be a single- 
handed or a couples boat, or 
a long-distance cruiser.’ 

He has fitted a bowsprit to fly 
small and large asymmetries, 
adding: ‘The small sail is ballistic in 
its sweet spot but a nuisance if you 
have to run, as it is cut to fly on a 
spinnaker pole, so gybing is a big 
work-up. The larger asymmetric 
does not fly effectively below 1 50°, 
and despite being easy to gybe I 
don’t think it pays unless you have 
a planing hull. So this year I’m 


I going back to a symmetric kite.’ 

Many ARC and Transquadra 
i sailors come to the same 
j conclusion. Unless a yacht 
: planes, continuously gybing an 
i asymmetric down a deep run 
; can be a pain; while a good 
i old-fashioned symmetric spinnaker 
can gobble up the miles with the 
wind almost dead astern. When 
asked if he would consider 
I changing boats, David replies: 

; ‘Maybe. I would go down to a Maxi 
999 and keep hold of my gear.’ 


An exceptional 
fast cruiser 

As the millennium loomed, 
Petterson brought out the 
10.5m/34ft 7in Maxi 1050. With 
a DLR of 167 and SA/disp of 18, 
this elegant and comfortable yacht 
has excellent performance. As 
with other more recent Maxis, this 
is combined with a high-quality 
finish, making the 1050 an 
exceptional fast cruiser. A bulbed 
fin keel puts the CG low and 
ensures good stability. 




Maxi 1000: available 
second-hand from £47,500 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


27 


Sailing Scenes Sailing Scenes 




Boats - Pelle Petterson’s Maxi boats 




Transatlantic voyages prove 
the point. In the 2009 ARC, 
the family-crewed 1050 called 
Minimaxi won Class F and came 
7th overall out of 158 monohull 
cruising entries. She also won the 
prize for Best Performance by a 
Family Boat. 

Loosely translated, the French 
skipper wrote about one squally 
night wherein ‘we decided to play 
with the surrounding clouds. The 
first of these was no big deal, but 
the second was unreal. Ronan 
was on the helm, Laurent held 
on to the spinnaker sheet, the 
yacht’s stem played torpedoes for 
minutes on end and our three-day- 
old speed record of 15.3 knots fell 
as M/n/max vibrated from masthead 
to keel tip, hitting 17.3 knots’. 

That must have been some ride, 
and proves once again how a well- 
built family production cruiser- 
racer can cross oceans 
at surprising speeds. 

Another French owner, Eric 
Bompard, entered his Maxi 
1 050 Bouiinou in the 201 4/1 5 
Transquadra race. This event, 
very popular in France although 
it is yet to attract much British 
interest, is open to amateur crews 
who are over 40 years old, sailing 
IRC-rated yachts up to around 
40ft. There are separate classes 
for solo and two-handed crews 
and the race kicks off from two 
starts, one in Barcelona and 
the other in Saint-Nazaire. 

Stage one stops in Madeira 
then the combined fleets sail 
on to Martinique. 

Eric’s solo transatlantic trip took 
1 7 days 1 6 hours and he won 
his division. Via another loose 
translation, he said that at one 
stage ‘I made a magnificent tack 
of a bit over 1 ,000 miles under 
spinnaker on port at 1 55° to the 
wind. My arms and the halyard 
were well worn, but all went well. 

I limited breakages to just one 


ripped genoa. This was satisfying 
when I saw the problems some 
had. Boats adrift, shipwrecks... 

I wasn’t there to experience that 
sort of thing! 

‘My boat’s hull form gave me an 
advantage compared to some of 
my competitors.’ 

Eric beat a JPK 9.60 into second 
place and an A31 into third, both 
of these brands being dedicated 
racers compared to Eric’s trusty 
Maxi 1 050 fast cruiser. 

The Maxi 1100 (11m/36ft) 
that followed is very much a 
development of the 1050; elegant, 
beautifully finished and no slouch. 
Gary Fleward says he bought a 
2000 example, attracted by its 
build quality, pedigree, 
performance and reputation as a 
cruiser racer. He is another owner 
to enjoy double-handed racing 
with the RSYC, saying: ‘I won 
offshore series in IRC class 2 


last year. I also started racing ; 

single-handed with SORC in 2014. 
After the Solo RlOW, I took part in 
the solo Celtic challenge from I 
Falmouth to Kinsale, then round | 
to Dingle and a long leg back to | 
Plymouth - 52 hours. ^ 

‘In the Yachting Monthiy Triangle I 

event I was first in class 2 and I 

I 

second overall, beaten by a J/1 05. \ 
An X332 was our closest rival. It \ 
was a light weather race; wind ! 
more constantly above Force 4 | 

would have suited us better.’ | 

When I asked what he likes j 

about the boat, he replies: ‘It’s I 

a real cruiser-racer - good 
accommodation, nimble and j 

performs well, particularly upwind | 

in strong winds. During the | 

Triangle Race I was asked \ 

why we did so well with a full \ 

complement of crockery and | 

the cockpit table onboard!’ I 

Having owned boats ranging i 


from a Hunter Impala 28 to a 
Sigma 362, Matt and Jean Findley 
also went for a Maxi 1 1 00. In 
addition to cruising. Matt entered 
the RSYC two-handed series, 
winning comfortably in a fleet of 
30 yachts that included strong 
opposition from J/1 05s and J/1 1 0s. 

With his son Mathew as crew 
he also won Class 1 in the 
two-handed Yachting Monthiy 
Triangle race, all of which goes to 
prove that a well-designed quality 
Swedish cruiser can hold its own 
against sporty and spartan 
racer-cruisers, thereby offering 
the best of both worlds. 

Nicely finished 

After being built (briefly) by Najad 
when Nimbus ran into financial 
troubles. Maxi has now been taken 
over by the successful Delphia 
yard in Poland. Two models - the 
recent Maxi 1 300 and new Maxi 
1 200 40-footer - are currently 
available. Both are designed by 
Pelle Petterson, and the new 1200 
has an attractive interior design 
from Tony Castro. Andy Horwood 
of the Maxi Owners Association 
(and owner of a Maxi 1 1 00 that he 
cruises extensively from Hamble 
and races in the RSYC double- 
handed series) went to the 201 5 
DCisseldorf Boat Show to look at 
the first Delphia-built 1200. 

‘We were pleasantly surprised,’ 
he says. ‘Initial thoughts are that 
the new boat definitely has the 
“Maxi feel”. It was nicely finished 
with thought to detail, albeit with 
a few teething issues you might 
expect in any new model.’ 

The construction methods 
follow the Maxi ‘way’. Carbon 
reinforcements beef up the grid 
that takes loads from keel and 
rig, while the hull and deck are 
laminated in vinylester resin 
around a PVC core. Designer 
Pelle Petterson comments: ‘The 
Maxi 1 200 is meant to be very 
fast and very comfortable, 
elegant and easy to handle.’ 

She certainly looks the part, 
and all bodes well for the new 
UK dealer Russell Hodgson of 
Regatta Yachting Ltd, who says 
the new Maxi 1 200 comes to Port 
Hamble in late July and makes its 
UK premiere at SIBS. The price 
looks attractive, so these new 
models have every chance of 
maintaining Maxi’s enviable 
reputation for producing 
desirable fast cruisers. 


NEXT MONTH 

Nordic Folkboats, Marieholms, 
Arconas, Albin Vegas and 
Ballads... and more 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


28 




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Bearers of 
good news 



H antu Biru’s original engine bearer 
was a simple affair - a single 
hardwood board glassed in place 
straight across the engine space, 
with the engine bolted down to it. 
The glassfibre work was probably carried out 
with the engine in position, which would have 
been an easy proposition with a lightweight, 


With the propitious 
stroke of luck that Hantu 
Biru has a right-handed 
prop, it’s time to glass 
in new engine bearers, 
fit a shaft seal and 
align the engine. 

David Pugh reports 



The original engine bearer was fixed transversely 
across the engine space, shown partially cut out 


flat-bottomed unit such as the Watermota 
Super Shrimp originally fitted. Our BMW D7, 
though light by diesel standards, is heavy to 
move in a confined space, and has the usual 
arrangement by which the engine is slung 
between four mounts, making a flat board 
impracticable. To install it, we needed to 
completely strip out the old engine bearer 
and come up with a new design. 

The original glassing in had been carried 
out using polyester resin long after the hull 
had cured, and had not bonded well: once 
the engine mounting board was cut in two, 
most of the glassfibre simply peeled away. 

This left us with the hull shape on which to 
build our bearers. Hantu Biru’s bilge is steep 
at this point, so they would need to cling on 
at angles of 45° or more - a tricky proposition 
when working with slippery resin. 

Veering to starboard 

An additional complication which we realised 
part way through the process is that the original 
shaft log is not aligned with the boat’s centreline, 
offsetting the propeller slightly to starboard. For 
a right-handed propeller this would alleviate 
paddlewheel effect, but for a left-handed prop it 
would exacerbate it. We were lucky - our engine 
rotates anticlockwise viewed from aft, but the 
gearbox reverses the rotation, giving us a 
right-handed prop. Had the opposite been true 
we might have had to re-drill the shaft log and 
pack the fittings, but as it is we hope the slight 
offset will aid handling. It does, however, mean 
that to obtain correct alignment at the coupling 
the engine is not quite straight in the engine 
space, which explains any asymmetry you 
may spot in the photos. 


30 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 






Initial alignment 

L ast month, we made L-shaped steel brackets to fit the horizontal rubber bushes at the rear of the engine, and strips with welded studs onto which all 
four mounts bolt down. To support these, we opted to make boxes from 18mm plywood, shaped to fit the hull and with rebated tops to house the metal 
strips so that they sit flush with the timber. The mounts are fitted to the bellhousing and gearbox, so we left the rest of the engine off for ease of handling. 



WM The first step was to make the rebated 
plywood strips on which the bearers fit. 
The metal is bolted to the plywood - we later 
encapsulated it in glassfibre. 



0 We bolted these to the engine mounts and 
put the gearbox in position. A stretcher bar 
with a car jack temporarily supported the front. 
The corners of the beds are in contact with the 
\ hull: we needed them as low as possible. 



j After our first offer-up we held the aft 
j mounts apart with a plywood stretcher 
] bar to prevent them sagging together. 


Building the boxes 

T he fronts of the plywood boxes were the most critical parts, as they needed to be shaped to fit the hull, and to be as close to vertical as we 
could make them in order to transfer the load evenly. Before starting, we checked that the boat was level port-to-starboard - she was, or 
close anyway - and aligned the engine so that the propshaft coupling mated evenly. 




With the hull marked, we measured 
and noted the height of each side of 
the bearer... 


. . .then used a profile gauge to record 
the profile of the hull between the 
! marks. These were sufficient to mark and 
i cut the shape. 


Using a small spirit level, we marked the 
hull vertically below the front corners of 
each bearer. We checked this with a square 
to see if the bearers were level - they were. 


s 

1 


3 

3 


n After 
few trial 
fits, mainly to 
hollow out 
the bevel 
with a belt 


Sander... 



H Once both 
fronts 

were made, we 
secured them to 
the top sections 
with screws 
and cautiously 
backed away the 
jack. The engine 
sat snugly in 
place, retaining 
its alignment 
with the shaft. 




Careful measurement showed that the f 
side pieces of the boxes were almost [ 
exactly triangular, so we cut triangles to shape [ 
and chamfered the edges to fit the hull. ■ 


We first dry-assembled the boxes 
with woodscrews... 


□ ...before dismantling them again and 
gluing them together with filled epoxy, 
t We also filleted the inside corners of the box 
! with an epoxy mix. 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


31 


PRACTICAL 




Fitting the bearers 

T he bearers were already strongly constructed thanks to their internal fillets, but to waterproof them and add strength we now needed to epoxy 
them to the hull and cover them with glassfibre. While the initial fillets set, we kept the engine in place to ensure the alignment couldn’t slip. 



position and aligned it with the shaft coupling, 


then drew around the bearers. 


I QWe 
j applied 
j a generous 
I layer of epoxy 
\ to the hull, 

I following our 
^ marks, before 
3 putting the 
j engine back 
j into position 
3 and 

I realigning it. 




□ With the engine in place we carefully 
filleted around the bearers, then let 
the epoxy harden before removing the 
engine again. 


□ To 

remove 
amine blush 
and any 
rough 
patches we 
gave the area 
a sand with 
40-grit paper, 
then wiped 
over with 
acetone. 




...before covering the whole area with 
glass cloth and stippling epoxy into it 
until it was fully wetted out. 




I 

3 

I 




m AII that remained 
was to check 
that the engine still 
aligned - which, to 
our relief, it did! 


NEXT MONTH 

Cleaning and 
painting the 
engine, fitting a 
shaft seal and 
final alignment 


32 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 






1 1 r f r/ 1 •' j '■ 

I'ltEiML- 

1 1 








H 

n / 

— - 1 



■7 I'A 'r 

\lnSI 


IT’S BETTER BY 


PA RASA I LOR 


IS Tec 


SEA TEACH LIMITED, EMSWORTH 

www.se^teach.Com/p'ara&aMor * 


01243 37S774 


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J 





ABOUT THE AUTHOR 


The course 
computer is 
connected to 
the rest of the 
system via 
SeaTaik"^ 


iNSETThe 
new EV1 
heading sensor 


Upgrading 

autopilot 

Alan Watson rethinks the autopilot 
system on his 40-year-old Nelson 42 


e-series display, Class B AIS and 
a new fishfinder module, and this 
year it was the turn of the autopilot. 
I had fitted the Ray marine 400G 
autopilot soon after I bought 
the boat and it has performed 
flawlessly for all these years. It 
can steer the boat better and 
with less effort than I can, 
particularly in following or 
quartering seas when the 
Nelson can be a bit twitchy. 

After some experience with 
the new Raymarine EV1 
heading sensor on another 
vessel, I decided to upgrade 
with the expected benefits 
of more accurate heading 
information and a better display 
on the p70 controller as well as 
improved autopilot performance. 
The improvement to heading 
information should in turn lead to 
better performance on MARPA, 
which is very dependent on stable 
and accurate heading information. 


T rinity Star is a Nelson 
42, now just over 
40 years old. I have 
owned her for 12 
years and in that time 
have steamed over 7,000 miles 
and done a great deal to her 
including fitting new engines 
and stern gear, rewiring, 
re-plumbing and several 
changes of electronics. 

Last year the navigation system 
was upgraded to the Raymarine 


Alan Watson 
is an ex- 
merchant 
navy radio 
officer and 
broadcast 
consultant. 
He runs Trinity Star, a 12.8m 
Nelson 42 powerboat. 


System implications 


Thft400G autopiksl cortaisis of 
a course compuleF unit whcfh 
■is connected lo ttie tiydraulc 
njchder octuMci', a hiddar 
posHion sensor, a Fliixgate 
compass and the two control 
tMvrts. The course oomputft* is 
itien connected lo the main 
naviigatk^n system via 
NMEA01 8^ or SeaTalk. When 
them&n^yslam was upgraded 
last year, most of the Sea Talk 
was replaced by SealaHir^, a 
very stieightfofwefd Eystem of 
reody-maae leads arxJ juncUon 
bo«e& ba$ad on NMEA2aOO. 


The system has a backbone 
with spur cables to each unit 
on the system. For the new 
evolution autopilot there is a 
SeaTalk"9 connection from 
the course computer, which 
also connects to the pump 
and rudder position sensor. 
The heading sensor and the 
two control units connect to 
the SeaTalk 
network 
rather than 
to the 
course 
computer. | 


34 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 






Upgrading an autopilot 


% 


Planning the installation 


As thie leads are ready-frade, 
Sdmacardlijl nnAa£uriiV9 
necessefy ~ and it is also wofth 
checfcifig w^hat comes in eacti 
bon as many ccnftarn a lead, 
and if you biyone of t3>ij 
system kits rt comes vyrih quile 
a selectian. of leads and fitlings . 

One good pweoe of news is 
shat the new pTOcontrote fils 
tha same siia panel hole as 
the oW one. saving msjgf 
carpentry Thgrg ere two lypes 
of conlroilef, one wilh buttons 
□tiqfldod forsailifkg vie$setl$ and 
one with e rotary conlrol for 
power: I went tor the rotfliry one. 




The rudder sensor could be 
reused, and provided a useful 
reference to check alignment 


ABOVE I planned the system carefully, especially measuring 
the lengths of leads required for the SeaTalk backbone 
RIGHT Initial calibration was a simple process 


The rudder position sensor is 
the same too, so the old one 
was left in place (which saved 
a lot of work). 

Before I started pulling things 
apart I noted the heading from 
the old system to give a starting 
point for setting up the new and 
also centred the tiller, although I 
could use the alignment mark on 
the heading sensor which was 
staying put. 

The first task was extending the 
SeaTalk backbone (blue cables) 
to the upper helm position where 
the 170 and the heading sensor 
were connected. I was grateful 


that the locking collar for the 
connections is on the module 
and not the cable, which meant 
the cables would go through a 
1 2mm hole. The work to put in 
the rest of the system was very 
straightforward and resulted in 
a simpler system with a big 
heap of cabling removed. 

The SeaTalk"^ network requires 
a single source of 1 2V to power 
it: this can either be fed direct on 
to the network via a red cable or 
can be sourced from the course 
computer. I elected to use the red 
cable so that the whole network 
remains powered even if the 



autopilot is switched off for any 
reason, so I made sure that the 
little slide switch on the course 
computer was set to ‘off’. The 
system powered up with no 
drama, and the initial setup 
was amazingly simple. All I had 
to do was tell the system what 
sort of boat it was fitted to and 
set the rudder centre point and 
limits. To do a rough setting of 
the compass, I rotated the 
sensor in its mounting until 
the reading was the same as 
I noted on the old system, 
and then clipped in the bezel 
to lock it in place. 


Sea trial 

The final task was to go to sea and 
set up the compass before seeing 
how well the system performed. 
The Evolution will establish and 
store its own deviation curve over 
time, but I wanted to get this done 
immediately. No button pushing 
is necessary: you just do a few 
slow circles and then check it 
has stored a figure (it’s under 
‘diagnostics’). Mine showed 5° of 
deviation, which was the same as 
the previous system. It was then 
a case of setting the compass to 
align correctly with north. The 
easiest way to do this is to put on 
some speed and go with the tide, 
and set the compass to agree with 
COG. The heading can then be 
fine-tuned manually, but I found 
it was spot-on. 

Having done this, I checked on a 
couple of transits and then put the 
radar to overlay the chart plotter. 
As long as the radar heading line 
has been set correctly when 
installed, the overlay should be 
perfect - and mine was. I then 



ABOVE MARPA is now noticeably 
more accurate, and you can see 
that the radar overlay lines up 
perfectly with the chart 


enjoyed myself for the afternoon, 
playing with my new toy. The new 
autopilot held course well, picked 
up routes from the chart plotter 
and did everything I expected. The 
new facility of ‘power steer’, where 
I was able to drive the vessel from 
the knob on the p70, could prove 
useful. It was a fairly calm day 
but Calshot corner obliged with 
a few bumps, so I was able to try 


the course holding from 
different directions and it 
lived up to expectations. 

The last test was of MARPA, and 
this was particularly pleasing with 


more stable vectors and data 
than the old system. Over the 
season the system will get a 
thorough testing, but initial 
results were excellent. 


BELOW the new 
autopilot picked up 
routes and tracks 
from the chart 
plotter straight away 


Raymarine is offering up to 
£400 cashback on autopilot 
systems until 30 June 2015 - 
visit www.raymarine.co. 
uk/summer15 cashback 
for more details. 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


35 




Shortening sail 
single-handed 


; Seamsinship 


36 



Being able to reef quickly and easily can take a lot of the 
stress out of sailing single-handed. Ben Meakins tries 
out some of the options for shortening sail on your own 


With a boltrope 
mainsail, it can be 
helpful to hoist the sail 
using the bight of the 
halyard so that you’re 
close enough to the 
mast to sort out any 
snags or jams... 


mainsail 


Even hoisting the main can be 
daunting for a first-time single- 
hander. Bolt rope mainsails are 
particularly troublesome. You 
can make life a lot easier by 
converting a mainsail to sliders, 
so that they are held captive 
at the mast as the sail is being 
hoisted. Better still, sliders and 
a lazyjack system will really 
simplify things. But if a bolt rope 
sail is all you have, make sure 
you have a good pre-feeder, 
which will keep the luff lined up 
with the luff groove. Life is made 
somewhat easier if your halyards 
are at the mast, but even with 
them led aft you can lead one 
round a winch and take it forward 
with you, or use the bight of the 
halyard as it heads aft to hoist 
the sail, taking up the slack later. 


I n Pete Goss’ classic 
account of his Vendee 
Globe campaign, Close 
to the Wind, he tells 
the tale of a boat 
show encounter with 
a member of the public who 
assumed that single-handed 
sailing meant sailing with one 
hand tied behind your back. 

Sailing alone isn’t usually quite 
that difficult - and once you’re 
out there, the sailing part of 
single-handed sailing is relatively 
simple. What is more daunting 
is what happens when you get 
closer to land, or need to come 
alongside, and carry out the sail 
handling jobs on board which 
usually take a full crew. 

We’ll cover coming alongside 
in another article, but there’s 
nothing worse than attempting to 
reef in a rising breeze when you 
could really do with another six 
arms. Here are some ways 
to make short- or single-handed 
sail handling much easier. 


Shortening sail single-handed 



With your reefing lines led aft you can have full 
control of the tension from the cockpit 


INSET We’ve also added a downhaul to the luff 
cringle, which is led to a footbloci^and aft to a cleat 


If you’re happy 
working on deck, 
having the halyards 
and reefing lines at 
the mast can make 
life easier 


Mainsail reefing 


Most reefing systems are 
designed for full crews, but there 
are things you can do to make 
reefing the main single-handed 
much easier. We’ve used a 
slab reefing main as found on 
many boats, but in-mast furling 
and single-line reefing mains 
will obviously make life easier, 
although these systems do 
have their drawbacks. 

Lead lines aft... 

With the addition of a couple of 
foot blocks, you can lead your 
reefing lines aft to a clutch in 
the cockpit. This has the major 
advantage that you can tension 
the reefing pennants from the 
safety of the cockpit, and use 
a winch to tension the lines if 
necessary. You can also add 
downhauls to the luff cringles 
and lead these aft too (inset, 
above right). This means you’ll 
have reefing lines, luff downhauls 
and main halyard all in the same 
place - the cockpit - and can reef 
easily from there. In the picture 
above they are led through the 
gap in the boom casting aft of 
the gooseneck, down to the mast 
foot and back to the cockpit. 


you have everything to hand and 
are in the right place to hook on 
cringles, pull down stuck slides 
and sort out any problems. 

...Or, if they are split... 

If the halyard is aft and the 
reefing lines are forward, you 
can take the halyard round a 
winch and take the end forward 
with you, so you can ease it 
down with one hand and pull 
the sail down with another, 
secure the cringle, then make 
off the halyard. 


Even with lines lead 
aft, you can take the 
tail of the main halyard 
around a winch and 
forward with you 




...Or you could move 
everything forward... 

Another option, which depends 
upon your boat’s set-up and your 
mobility, is to move everything 
forward to the mast. This might 
seem a little odd, but if you’re 
happy working on deck, it makes 
sense. With halyards at the mast. 


Reefing horn securing ideas 


Reefing horns work well, but 
have an irritating habit of 
throwing off the cringles at the 
worst possible moment. That’s 
why a way of securing the 
cringle onto the horn is useful. 

Here are some ideas - send 
us yours if you have a way that 



A doorstop ‘bung’ on the reefing 
horn holds the cringle well 


works for you! One trick is to use 
a rubber doorstop, pushed on to 
the horn, to secure the cringle. 
These cost £2.48 for two from 
B&Q, and they work really well. 


■ Another option is to add a 
snap shackle to the horn, either 



Snap hooks make a useful and 
secure alternative to reefing horns 


by lashing it on or getting 
one welded on, to provide a 
positive method of attachment 
that won’t shake loose. 


■ Another simple option is to 
use a sail tie or length of shock 
cord to secure the cringle. 



If nothing else, a sail tie can be 
used to secure the cringle 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


37 





The best solution for a short- 
or single-handed sailor is a 
roller-furling headsail, which 
can be deployed or put away 
at a moment’s notice: a roller 
headsail means that you can 
easily reef and unreef to suit the 
wind. If single-handed, it can 
be worth putting a smaller jib 
on the furler if you’re expecting 
heavy weather. This not only sets 
better than a large headsail that’s 
reefed, but also means that if the 
furler fails and releases the whole 
sail, you have much less flogging 
sailcloth to deal with. 


more easily sort out problems. 
But even if your halyards are led 
aft, there are things you can do. 

Hoisting 

Hoisting can be tricky, but: 

■ Make sure you have a good 
pre-feeder. 

■ Carefully flake the sail on 
deck so that it will hoist as 
easily as possible. 

One useful trick is to have 
shock cord on the deck to 
secure the sail, but with a ‘trip 
line’ rigged to a snap shackle for 
a quick-release system. Here, 



Non-roiier headsails 

Despite the proliferation of roller- 
furlers, many boats - especially 
cruiser racers - still have hanked- 
on jibs or headfoils. You can still 
use these single-handed, but 
they need a bit more planning. 

It’s best to be conservative with 
the choice of headsail - you 
can always let some more 
mainsail out to compensate. 

Once again, if you’re happy 
working on deck, halyards at the 
mast can make things easier - 
you’re nearer the sails and can 


For boats without roller headsails, a snap shackle (circled) and shock 
cord works well. INSET A halyard cleat on the mast also helps 


Poling out the jib - 
the safe way 

If it’s too windy for a 
spinnaker, or you’re not 
happy flying one, then poling 
out the jib is the next best 
thing. Here’s a way to set up 
the pole safely. The pole is 
clipped on to the windward 
spinnaker sheet, which is 
then taken to the jib’s clew. 

Attach the pole to the mast, 
then lift it over the windward 
rail. You can now go back to 
the cockpit and do everything 
else from there - easing off 
the leeward jib sheet and 
pulling on the new windward 
sheet (we’ve used a spinnaker 
guy here). You can also adjust 
the up- and downhaul to make 
it fly right. The important part 
is that you can do it all from 
the cockpit, out of harm’s way. 

■ For a diagram of how to set 
the pole like this, see page 1 1 0. 


Here, the pole Is set up 
ready for you to make your 
way back to the cockpit and 
goosewing the Jib safely 




I 



we’ve tied a snap shackle to the 
pulpit rail, with a light line led aft 
through the stanchion bases. 

A pull on the line releases the 
shock cord and lets the jib free. 

One thing that can help if 
you’re happy working at the mast 
is to fit some halyard exits on 
the mast, along with a cam 
cleat. These mean that you 
can hoist the sail from the 


mast, cleat it off and then take 
up the slack in the halyard from 
back in the cockpit. 

Dropping the headsail 

With the autopilot on, a good way 
to drop a hanked-on or headfoil 
jib is to take the halyard forward 
with you and ease as you collect 
the sail. This makes it controlled 
and very easy to retrieve the sail. 



Taking the tail of the halyard forward with you makes for a controlled 
headsail drop - but make sure you flake it first to avoid tangles 


38 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 



Shortening sail single-handed 


Short-handed spinnaker drops 


You don’t see many single- 
handers flying spinnakers - 
hardly surprising, as the thought 
of what happens when they go 
wrong is enough to bring anyone 
out in a cold sweat. But used 
in moderate conditions, and 
knowing how to drop it safely 
and in a controlled manner, 
a spinnaker can still be flown 
single-handed. Here’s howto 
drop it safely. 

Bear away until you’re just 
above dead downwind, so that 
the main blankets the spinnaker. 



With the pole eased so you can 
reach it and the sheet on hard... 


Pull the sheet in hard. If you have 
twinning lines on the spinnaker, 
pull the leeward one on hard too, 
so that the clew of the sail is held 
firmly on the gunwale. 

Lower the pole and ease it 
forward until you can reach the 
snap shackle from the bow. 

Pull the pin on the guy’s snap 
shackle to release the tack. 

The spinnaker should now float 
happily behind the mainsail, and 
you can take your time to make 
your way back aft and collect the 
sail, lowering the halyard slowly. 



...you can puii the pin on the 
snap shackie 



This iets you coiiect the spinnaker easiiy and without too much drama 


Autopilots 
and tiller 
tamers 

A good autopilot makes single- 
handed sailing much easier: add a 
remote and you’ll have control from 
anywhere on board. But if the budge, 
doesn’t stretch that far you could consadef a 
tiller lock (see next month’s PBO for a test of those on the market, 
plus some DIY alternatives). These let you leave the helm for short 
periods of time - and on long-keelers and well-balanced boats, 
they’ll give you some freedom to leave the helm. 



The spinnaker is 
held tight along its 
leech and sits happily in 
the lee of the mainsail 




you all the time in the world 
to reef the mainsail. Back the 
jib and lash the helm, and 
once the boat has settled 
down you can reef the main 
at your leisure. 


Heaving to 

With a good autopilot, you 
can just reef while maintaining 
a course. But a more 
seamanlike approach is to 
heave to. This will slow the 
boat to a slight drift and give 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


39 




^ Practical projects 


Great ideas and tips from PBO readers 


Email your projects and tips to pbo@ipcmedia.com 
or write to us at the address at the top of page 5. 
We pay at least £30 for each one published 




Keep your cool 


Peter Lyle blows hot and cold to make 
his fridge more efficient 


A t times, I suspect that our 
Jeanneau 36i was designed 
around its fridge, it (the 
fridge) is huge. Unfortunateiy, it 
aiso uses an awfui iot of eiectricity: 
despite a domestic battery bank 
of four 80Ah batteries, we need 
to top them up every couple of 
days if the fridge is on. And all of 
this is while sailing in Scotland, 
where’s it’s rarely tropical. 


A large computer fan was screwed directly onto the frame around 
the heat exchanger. INSET The fan itself cost a mere £10 



Warm air was sucked from the saloon 


Realising that this was a bit silly, 

I had a look at how the fridge 
cooling was set up, and found 
that the fan on the heat exchanger 
was arranged so that warnn air 
was sucked from the saloon, and 
heated a little further by the heat 
exchanger’s radiator before being 
blown under the fridge and into 
the nice cool bilges. I tried 


swapping over the wires to the 
fan in an attempt to reverse the 
situation, but found that the 
type of fan fitted to the fridge 
was non-reversible. 

The answer was to buy a large, 
cheap computer cooling fan 
and screw this with self-tappers 
directly onto the frame around the 
heat exchanger. I disconnected 


the electricity supply from the 
original fan and used this to 
power the new one. The new fan 
sucks cool air from the bilges 
through the heat exchanger and 
into the saloon. This seems a 
better way of doing things! Our 
electricity consumption is now 
much reduced, and the fridge 
is nice and cold. 



A fter deciding to 

undertake another 
singie-handed round-UK 
trip - Roger Oiiver has a iot to 
answer for! - i decided to fit an 
Echomax refiector plus an AIS 
transponder as my boat was 
nearly ploughed into on a 
previous circumnavigation. 

I didn’t want to incur the cost of 
lowering the mast, nor did I want 
to interfere with my existing VHP 
setup by inserting an aerial splitter. 
Placing both items on the pushpit 
would be an easier option, and 
the transponder antenna would 


A different aerial view 


The masts for Sam Longley’s Echomax reflector and AIS transponder rise about 5ft above deck or 
nearly 8ft above sea level. INSET The curve offsets the upright just enough to lead into the deck gland 


double as a spare in the event 
of a dismasting. 

Stainless steel is expensive, but 
luckily I had a broken extending 
aluminium sailboard boom in 
my garage. Part of it was quite 
straight, and the aluminum was 
of good quality. I cut it just after 


the end of the curve for maximum 
length, and the curve offsets the 
upright just enough to lead into the 
deck gland. The parts fit together 
with stainless steel U-bolts. The 
extending pieces can be used to 
raise the aerial or reflector another 
2ft, but as my AIS comfortably 


picks up coasters at over 10 
miles, and my wife can see 
me on Vessel Finder almost all 
the way across the Irish Sea, I 
deem it sufficient. The masts 
come out at 5ft above deck or 
nearly 8ft above sea level, 
and can be extended to 1 0ft. 


Sam Longley 
opts to install 
his Echomax 
reflector and AIS 
transponder on 
the pushpit 


40 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 



Practical prefects 



Paul Farr builds a table that needs no 


additional fixings 


L arge enough for four 

people, this cockpit table 
stores flat when not in use 
and is attached to the cockpit 
without the need to drill any 
holes or for additional fixings. 
The tabletop is made from a 
900mm x 600mm laminated 
kitchen unit door and fitted with 
oak fiddles on four sides - the 
fiddles were probably the most 
expensive item on the table! 

The folding bracket comprises 
alloy angle, tube, stainless screwed 
rod and stainless dome-headed 
hexagonal nuts. The whole 
mechanism is screwed to the 
underside of the table. Also on the 
underside are two UPVC angles 



The cockpit tabie stores fiat for 
easy stowage when not in use 



The tabie iegs iocate onto two iugs 
and are heid by swing-down hooks 

which locate centrally over the tiller. 
A rubber door stopper fixed 
underneath the table sits on top of 
the tiller so as not to damage the 
tiller’s varnish. The table legs are 
located on the two bobbin-type 
lugs in the transom gate (I’m not 
sure of the correct name for these). 
When attached, two simple locking 
mechanisms are swung over the 
bobbins, effectively locking the 
table into position and supported 
by the tiller. 

I’ve used this table for around four 
years on Supernova, my Jeanneau 
Sun Odyssey 29.2. It is bigger and 
better than a lot of commercial 
cockpit tables, and it folds flat for 
easy stowage. I made it with simple 
hand tools - no specialist tools or 
equipment were required. With all 
the bits and pieces the cost was 
approximately £50, but you could 
do it for less if you could scrounge 
the parts for free. 


Displaying 
charts: irs a 


hanging 


Peter Talbot 
devises an 
adaptable holder 
for displaying charts 
and maps at home 


L ooktrig for a Vfay to 
display jc»r Slcir«) your 
favourite cherts ®if>d 
maps al Nwrift whijia planning 
ygur n^yt trip? Thlsad^lable 
well holder can be made 
chaaply to display eftads; 
maps of varying Eiisee, on e 
lempof eiy Of perniarient 
basils, withoor dafnaging 
either yOur Chad Or wall 
ftofT? scfewl ng Jn a 
plot LIT* hook, unless yoo 
uss an existing One). 

The chart holder is made from 
a 2cnr\ x 2.5cmK 1 tOcm pir>e 
oftctrt. ire?o which I've screwed six 
cup hooltS qqudisiso? its 
length. FokJback bulldog 
aro than hung from tho hodcs, 
and the idTahs dpperf b. I (^riigd 



matteii 


I 


Bulldog clips are hung from the 
hooks, and the charts clipped in 

two holes through the offeut, a 
quarter of the way in from each 
end, to thread string through 
and hang it from a picture hook 
high on my wall. One hook is 
sufficient, but using two helps 
keep it level when you’re 
swapping charts, and helps 
‘shorten’ the string so you can 
place it nearer the ceiling if you 
want to display larger maps. 

Painting it would help it blend 
better with your decor, but you 
can just leave it unpainted. The 
total cost was £5 for the hooks/ 
clips: I already had everything 
else. The component parts are 
transferable if you ever fancy 
upgrading to a larger version. 



Readers' Ti 


WASHBOARD 

STORAGE 

The standard washboard on 
my Jeanneau 29.2 is a clear 
polycarbonate which is easily 
scratched and damaged if left 
lying around when not in use. 

This simple arrangement neatly 
stores the washboard in the 
locker, taking up minimal space. 

A 600mm-long L-shaped piece of 
varnished wood is screwed to a 
locker bulkhead, thereby creating 
a slot into which the bottom of the 
washboard can be located. The 
top of the washboard is pressed 
against the bulkhead onto a 
piece of foam which has been 
glued into position. A simple 
latch is then swung down to 


secure the washboard. I made 
the latch from a uPVC offeut 
and glued it to the bulkhead - 
the uPVC is fairly soft and 
unlikely to scratch the 
polycarbonate. The latch swivels 
around a drilled and tapped 
6mm stainless dome-headed 
screw. The washboard is easily 
put into position and removed 
using one hand. 

Paul Farr 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


41 






/Boats 




It’s never easy to make a near 
full-width coachroof attractive 
from every angle, but the new 
Shrimper doesn’t disappoint 




Meet the S||rimper’s 
big sister 


How do you follow one of the biggest 
success stories in British boatbuilding? 
David Harding went to the home of the 
Cornish Shrimper to find out 




W hether or not 
you have ever 
had reason to 
take an interest 
in smaii traiiabie 
gaffers, it wouid be hard to 
ignore the Cornish Shrimper. 

Over 1 ,1 00 of these distinctive 
1 9-footers have been launched 
since the late 1970s and have 
spread so widely as to be instantly 
recognisable by almost everyone 
who sails in the UK. The Shrimper 
isn’t just a boat: she’s an institution. 

One reason for this popularity is 
her versatility. As a Poole-based 
owner put it after moving to a 
Shrimper from a racing keelboat, 


s ‘I chose a Shrimper because I 
I could cruise it, camp in it, race it, 

: sail it single-handed, take five 
i people for a sail, go to Wareham 
5 for lunch, explore the shallows in 
i Poole Harbour and trail it if I want 
\ to go anywhere else.’ 

I For him, as for many others, 

I the Shrimper does pretty well 
i everything and everything pretty 
: well. The people facing the 
: challenge were her builders: what 
: would their Shrimper owners move 
: up to should they ever want to 
: move up? And what would potential 
^ Shrimper owners buy if 1 9ft was 
: just a bit too small for them? 

: Next in the range came the 


Crabber 22 - deeper in the 
draught, nearly a ton heavier and 
more than twice the price. If you 
had the budget and, as a Shrimper 
owner, wanted to go from a 
traiiabie weekender to a pretty 
coastal cruiser with a slim hull, 
a low coachroof and beautifully 
finished but not particularly 
spacious accommodation, the 
Crabber 22 was a good choice. If, 
on the other hand, you wanted 
something closer to what you had 
already only with more space and 
pace and without spending nigh 
on £70,000 - well, that’s what got 
Cornish Crabbers thinking. 

The result is the Shrimper 21 . 

Yes, there’s now another Cornish 
Shrimper and it has the potential 
to confuse everyone. Even the fine 
folk at Cornish Crabbers can still 
sometimes be heard referring to 
the 19 as ‘the Shrimper’, so it’s 
going to take a while to get used to 
the idea of Shrimpers in the plural. 
This is no small deal: a new boat 
that has the temerity to adopt the 
name of a sister who has become 


; a legend in her own lifetime. 

I And there’s more, because the 
i Crabber 1 7 has been renamed the 
; Shrimper 1 7. Can you imagine the 
I exchanges between these three 
i boats in the corner of the fit-out 
j shop after everyone has gone 
I home for the evening? If boats 
j were capable of such things, it 
I would be pistols at dawn. 

; Crabbers’ idea is that the smaller, 
I traiiabie models in the range are 
i now all called Shrimpers (unless 
; they have Bermudan rigs, in which 
; case both they and the Crabbers 
: become Adventures). The larger 
i models, from the 22 upwards, are 
; called Crabbers - unless they’re 
i Adventures. It’s all perfectly logical, 
i even though one suspects that 
i there will be always be ‘the 
J Shrimper’. Nothing is going to 
j change that in a hurry. 

i 

I Coming of age 

i So, the plan was to create a 
i bigger Shrimper. That meant 
; incorporating features that have 
i made the 1 9 so successful, 

: making improvements where 
■ improvements could be made, 

: and increasing size while keeping 
[ towing, rigging and launching 
] as straightforward as possible, 
f Roger Dongray - designer of the 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


42 





Broad teak cappings make for a comfortable perch on the 
coamings should you choose to sit up 
t'i ‘ INSET The ‘track and strap’ 
I system for the mainsail 


original Shrinnper and nnany of the 
other boats in the range - drew 
the lines and developed the 21 in 
conjunction with David Thonnas 
Yachts. Although David Thomas 
sadly died last year, the company 
that bears his name continues. 

With David’s son Peter now in 
charge of Cornish Crabbers and 
Peter’s nephew, David Thomas 
Jnr, putting his engineering and 
design skills to good use in his 
role as general manager. Crabbers 
have plenty of in-house expertise 
at their disposal. 

Importantly - and not 
surprisingly, given Dongray’s flair 
for drawing pretty boats - the 
new Shrimper looks the business. 
There’s no mistaking her pedigree. 
Yet there are differences between 
her and her little sister. Some are 
obvious from a quick glance at the 
profile drawing: the vertical stem 
and more upright stern for a more 
modern appearance and longer 
waterline, the extended coachroof 
for greater accommodation, a 
more pronounced sheerline, a keel 
that’s cut away at its aft end to give 
greater manoeuvrability, a higher 
aspect-ratio centreplate for better 
performance and a balanced 
rudder for a lighter helm. 

Other differences are confirmed 


Cornish Shrimper 21 tested 


five adults with reasonable 
comfort, it has high coamings 
topped by broad teak cappings 
that provide a comfortable perch. 

Beneath the sole is a 9hp Yanmar 
diesel if, as have most owners to 
date, you plump for the inboard 
option. Alternatively, an outboard 
(4-6hp would be ample) can be 
hinged clear of the water in a 
central well that occupies the 
space otherwise used for the 
Yanmar’s diesel tank in the stern. 

Engine choice comes down 
to preference and budget. It’s 
significant that Crabbers have 
managed to keep the starting price 
for the outboard version the same 
as for an inboard-powered 19. 
That’s good going given the 
difference in size and is the 
result of her being designed 
and engineered for production 
efficiency in ways that the 1 9 never 
was. For example, the ballast (iron 
encapsulated in resin) is poured 
into the hull after the interior 
moulding has been fitted, so it can 


RIGHT Hardware 
is efficient and 
unashamedly 
modern 
throughout 


or revealed once you see her in 
the flesh. For a start, the profile 
gives few clues that this is a pretty 
high-volume hull. Providing a 
generous amount of space below 
decks was a priority, though the 
waterline is relatively narrow and 
the volume is created by flared 
topsides coupled with a coachroof 
that’s both long and wide. 

Despite her greater size, the 21 is 
only around 7001b (31 7kg) heavier 
than the 19, so owners who 
upgrade their boats will often be 
spared the need to upgrade their 
tow-car. Once you’ve reached the 
slipway, her builders reckon the 21 
is appreciably quicker to rig: with 
practice she should need around 
30 minutes rather than the hour or 
so for which the 19 will typically 
keep her owners occupied. 

A whole host of factors 
contributes to the speedier 
launching. For example, there’s 
no need to attach and detach 
the boom because a higher 
tabernacle allows it to remain 


on the gooseneck with the mast I 
lowered. Bending on the mainsail [ 
is easier, too: it slides into a track [ 
on the yard rather than being E 

laced in the conventional manner. \ 
Similarly modern thinking has ; 
been applied to the luff between 
the gooseneck and the throat, I 
where we find webbing straps with : 
hook-and-loop fastening around : 
the mast. Crabbers have dubbed ; 
this the ‘track-and-strap’ approach ■ 
and, while there will doubtless be E 

E 

those who disapprove, it should [ 
save a lot of fiddling. ■ 

Add a hinge-up bowsprit for E 
single-handed raising and lowering [ 
of the mast, and a flexible carbon ■ 
headfoil from Aeroluff instead of E 
the stiffen heavier and easily- [ 

damaged conventional aluminium 1 
extrusion, and it’s easy to see : 
why big sis gets to splash first. \ 

I 

Expanding the options ^ 

Where you really feel the extra : 
size of the 21 is in the cockpit. ^ 
Self-draining and able to swallow 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


43 




Boats 


Tech spec 

Cornish Shrimper 21 

Price: From £33,600 (outboard version)/£42,250 (inboard) 
Length including bowsprit: 7.57m (24ft 10in) 

LOA: 6.40m (21ft Pin) 

LWL: 6.09m (20ft Pin) 

Beam: 2.40m (7ft10in) 

[^ught^ centreplate down: 1^35rn^(4ft 5in) 

- centreplate up: 0.6m (1ft 1 Pin) 

Displacement: 1,400kg (3,086lb) 


Ballast: 425kg (937lb) 

Sail area: 23.6 sq m (254sq ft) 

Displacement/length ratio: 172 
Sail area/displacement ratio: 19.15 
BCD category: C 

Engine: 4-8hp outboard or Yanmar 9hp diesel inboard 
Headroom: 1 .32m (4ft 4in) 

Designer: Roger Dongray/David Thomas Yachts 
Builder: Cornish Crabbers, www.cornishcrabbers.co.uk 


GZ CURVE 


Tl^tii1«1Si160170 180 


* 

RM@1°-0.018 


be distributed according to 
whether an inboard or outboard 
version is chosen. The engine is 
fitted afterwards too, the cockpit 
moulding remaining the same 
either way (unlike on the 19, which 
has to be built to accommodate 
one engine or the other). This 
flexibility simplifies production 
and planning enormously. 

There’s no headliner in the cabin. 
Who needs one? It makes sense 
to save both the cost and, 
importantly in a trailable boat, 
the weight. With mass-volume 
builders, production expediencies 
sometimes result in restricted 
access to systems and perhaps 
to structural compromises. That 
doesn’t appear to be the case 
here: it’s about allowing production 
to flow in a way that minimises 
waste and keeps delivery times as 
short as possible once an owner 
has chosen his or her specification, 
be it for an inboard-powered 
Shrimper 21 or an Adventure 
version with an outboard. 

What matters most is that the 
21 looks and feels like a bigger 
version of the 19. She has 
varnished spars and (as standard) 
tan sails, now made rather nicely 
by Freeman Sails in a loft just 
across the estuary in Padstow. 
Exterior trim is teak. Hardware 
is principally from Selden, with 
the addition of a pair of Barton 
winches, a Houdini forehatch 
and clutches from Spinlock. 

It’s all simple and it works, as 


I found on a trip to Rock to sail 
Shrimper 21 No2. Despite not 
being officially Nol , she was the 
first to hit the water. It often works 
this way in boatbuilding, 
i Our sail had to be fitted between 
i the boat’s initial trials and her 
: departure to her new home in 
Plymouth. It also had to coincide 
with middle-of-the-day high tides 
: (you could walk or wade most of 
the way to Padstow at low water) 
i and a suitable weather window. In 
: the end it all came together and 
: the Camel Estuary is a lovely 
i place to sail, even if flat water and 
: extremely shifty winds do impose 
i a few restrictions when it comes to 

i putting a boat through her paces. 

: 

I A modern gaffer 

Many new-generation gaffers aim 
to blend traditional charm with 
;; modern convenience. In this they 
broadly succeed, though I have 
often thought they would have 
; wider appeal if only they were 
a little lighter and more nimble 
. to sail. While long keels and 
unbalanced rudders are what you 
■ expect on traditional working craft, 
a lighter helm and greater 
; manoeuvrability would surely 
make modern classics more 
attractive to owners who accept 
; that what they really want is 
a modern boat dressed in a 
. traditional costume. Who would 
; buy a retro-styled modern car if 
it drove like the original? 

If you’re after a shoal-draught 


gaffer like this you have to live 
with some compromises in 
; , performance - first with the gaff rig 
: (see our comparison between the 
Shrimper and Adventure 1 9 in 
; PBO August 201 3) and then with 
the combination of a long shallow 
keel and flat steel centreplate. 

;; That’s the nature of the beast. At 
: the same time, there’s no reason 
why your flat steel centreplate 
^ shouldn’t be deeper in the draught 
: and shorter in the chord, as on the 
: 21 . Neither is there any reason why 
: the keel shouldn’t be a little shorter 
i as well, though it makes sense to 
: have a keel to protect the prop and 
: stern gear on a boat that’s trailed, 
sailed in shallow water and often 
: kept on a drying mooring. 

And then there’s the rudder. 

: Sailing a gaffer shouldn’t mean 
; having your shoulders ripped out 
of their sockets when the wind 
comes abaft the beam. That’s 
definitely not part of the charm. 
Gaffers are prone to developing 
weather helm off the wind because 
. of the length of the boom, but 
throw an unbalanced rudder into 
I the equation and sailing can 
become hard work. 

You’re less likely to become 
: friendly with your physiotherapist if 
you own a Shrimper 21 . Instead of 
i, sitting inboard, bracing your feet 
on the opposite side of the cockpit 
and using all your strength to 
; wrestle with the tiller, you can enjoy 
: sitting on the coaming - if you so 
i: choose - and steering with the 


Cooker with a cover: the neat 
two-burner gas hob 

■ extension while creaming along on 
E a broad reach at 6.5 knots. Hurrah 

■ for a bit of balance. 

I The new Shrimper doesn’t sail 
E like a sporty fin-keeler and still 
[ needs a firm shove on the helm 
I to bring her through the wind. 

E Spinning on a sixpence is not in 
[ the repertoire of boats like this and 
} is not intended to be. On the other 
1: hand she’s surprisingly light and 
I responsive, combining satisfying 
i performance with a high degree 
; of tolerance and forgiveness. 

We started out in a gentle breeze 
i that picked up to 1 5-1 7 knots by 
: the end. It was enough to let us 
i push the boat reasonably hard 
: and might have encouraged some 
: owners to think about reefing. 

: Upwind we clocked between 5 and 
: 5.5 knots most of the time. Even 
: allowing for a tacking angle that’s 
; probably no less than 90° - it was 
: impossible to judge in the shifty 
: conditions - that’s not bad going. 

: With the sheets eased we soon 
; stopped commenting when 6.5 
: knots showed on the dial, though 
: the appearance of 7 knots did 
[ elicit a reaction, as did the minimal 
I wash. Mr Dong ray appears to 
i have given the new Shrimper a 
[ nicely slippery hull combined 
: with plenty of stability. 

: Between them, he and Crabbers 


44 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 



Cornish Shrimper 21 tested 




The forecabin berth is iong and 
wide enough for two iarge aduits 


Water neat idea: two smaii water 
bottles with Hozelock connectors 


With four full-length berths, a separate forecabin, comfortable sitting 
headroom and a galley and toilet, the new Shrimper offers plenty of space 
for a trailable 21 -footer. Extra stowage units can be fitted in the saloon 


[ 

! 

[ 

I 

I 


L 

I 

I 


have also bestowed her with 
remarkably good manners. Spun 
through 360° with the sheets 
pinned in so she came out of the 
circle virtually dead in the water, 
she regained speed quickly and 
with little tendency to stall. On 
the wind she could be pinched 
mercilessly without losing 
steerageway. If we bore away in 
the strongest gusts we could find 
without easing the sheets, only 
rarely did the rudder lose grip. 

All told, the big Shrimper proved 


E to be an engaging and rewarding 
[ boat to sail; one that’s capable of 
; satisfying those who enjoy sailing 
E for sailing’s sake, while doing 
I nothing to frighten owners who 
I want something roomy, practical, 

\ easy to handle and slightly trad in 
I which to enjoy simply bobbing 
\ about on the water. 

\ It’s not only in sailing mode that 
\ her manners are in evidence. 

[ Under power we could describe a 
E figure-of-eight in astern with a brisk 
E wind on the bow. The Yanmar 


should provide ample power in 
most conditions, even if some 
owners might be tempted to 
replace the two-bladed fixed prop 
with a folder or, at the very least, to 
align the blades behind the keel. 


E 

i 

E 


; Stacks of stowage | 

: In the cockpit is a full-depth locker | 
I each side. The battery lives in the \ 
I starboard one and a gas locker [ 

T is built into its after end. At the f 

I forward end of the port locker are [ 
[ two bottles for the fresh water, [ 


Other boats to look at 



BayCruiser 20 

{ Kite 

I Meaban 

PRICE: £35,940 

\ PRICE; £31,950 

\ PRICE; £POA 

Yawl-rigged, much lighter than 
the Shrimper and with water- 
ballast to minimise the trailing 
weight, she’s different in many 
ways but still likely to be 
compared because of her 
modern-classic appearance 
and similar size. 
www.swallowboats.com 

j Also lighter than the Shrimper and 

1 sportier in nature, this new design 
: by Andrew Wolstenholme has a 
; large cockpit, a relatively small 
; cabin and a single-chined hull. 

: Auxiliary propulsion is from an 
i outboard only. Full production 
i is just starting. 

1 www.demonyachts.co.uk 

E Built in wood-epoxy near St 
[ Malo, this pretty 22-footer is 
\ designed for easy trailing, 

\ offered with gaff or Bermudan 
i rigs and available for home 
\ completion too. Four berths, 

[ space for a cooker and loo; 

\ outboard engine. 

: www.gomarine.co.uk 


I 


fitted with Hozelock connectors so 
the pipe can easily be switched 
from one to the other. The idea, 
first used on the Hunter 20 when 
Cornish Crabbers owned Hunter 
Boats, is that it’s easier to carry 
two smaller bottles aboard than 
one big one. 

A hinged hatch in the cockpit 
sole gives access to the engine. 
The whole sole can be unscrewed 
and lifted out if necessary. In the 
bow is a deep anchor well, a 
Samson post on its after face 
providing a pivot point for the 
bowsprit (which, incidentally, is 
shared with the Shrimper 19). 

Accommodation 

The pictures tell the story here. In 
summary it’s neat and functional, 
finished in white-painted tongue- 
and-groove-effect timber and 
varnished trim. Up to bunk level 
the accommodation is formed 
by the interior moulding. 

Both berths in the saloon are 
1 .9m (6ft Sin) long. Between them 
and the main bulkhead is the 
galley: sink to port and cooker, 
complete with hinge-down cover 
to leave a near-flush surface, to 
starboard. If you want a table in the 
saloon, lift out the infill board from 
the aft end of the forecabin berth 
and fix it up on its bracket - or use 
it to bridge the space between the 
two sides of the galley and you 
have a seat. 

Access to the forecabin, with a 
berth that’s over 2m (6ft 6in) long 
and almost as wide at the aft end, 
is easy because there’s no central 
compression post. A bit of design 
work has seen to that and also 
kept the centreplate’s case shorter 
than you would expect. 

With 1 .32m (4ft 4in) of headroom 
and a sea toilet with holding tank - 
or a chemical loo if you prefer - 
under the fore berth, the new 
Shrimper provides pretty civilised 
accommodation for a 6.4m (21ft) 
trailable gaffer. 


PBO verdict 


S imple efficiency is what 
the new Shrimper is all 
about, but simple efficiency 
doesn’t happen on its own. 
Everything about the boat 
has been carefully calculated 
and, from the order book to 
date, it looks as though the 
calculations have been to 
good effect. If I were a 
Shrimper 19, 1 think I would 
perhaps be just a little 
envious of my new big sister. 



Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


45 





PRACTICAL 




A S the owner of an 
outboard-powered 
Cornish Shrimper, i feei 
sure that i am not the first to 
ponder the idea of fitting a 
swing-up outboard motor 
bracket to this type of boat. The 
advantages are obvious: it wouid 
enabie you to keep the prop out 
of the water when the boat was 
not in use, and aiieviate the 
chore of removing and returning 
a heavy outboard motor to and 
from the cockpit iocker each 
time you went saiiing. 

We tried leaving the outboard 
on our Shrimper Pixie for a whole 
season but found a build-up of tiny 
crustaceans inside the water intake 
which, if not removed, could have 
restricted the flow of cooling water 
and hence could have caused 
engine overheating problems. 

Another option would have been 
to simply change the engine for a 
much lighter one. We do have a 
2hp Yamaha outboard which will 
push our Shrimper along quite 
happily in calm conditions: however, 
2hp would not be sufficient to propel 
her through the Poole Harbour 
entrance against an ebb spring tide, 
so another solution had to be found. 


bracket that doesn’t 
cost a packet for their 
Cornish Shrimper 


The engine in parked-up position: the skeg is resting 
on a piywood piug. LEFT The new swing-up bracket 


the outboard motor on to the plug. 
Importantly, the weight and thrust 
of the outboard motor would still 
be transmitted through the 
original angle iron steel brackets, 
which would remain in their 
original position. 


We made a second prototype 
from mild steel, painted it up and 
fitted it to our Shrimper. It worked 
very well, and we didn’t once have 
to remove our outboard during the 
sailing season. We have made 
another bracket now, from 


marine-grade 316 stainless steel, 
which was welded together for 
us by Hood Engineering of 
Broadmayne. This final bracket 
includes a couple of modifications 
over the original design, to make it 
easier to use. 


The original outboard bracket in 
the Shrimper’s rather snug well 


The new swing-up bracket installed. 
A wing nut retains the bottom part... 


...which when released allows the 
bracket to swing up and fold flat 


An upwardly 
mobile bracket 

Alex and Angeline Crook 
design a swing-up 
outboard motor 



After making a few rough 
sketches on paper, a design 
emerged which looked as though 
it might work. Our first prototype 
bracket was made from aluminium 
angle and plywood. There is not 
much room inside the outboard 
well of a Mkl Shrimper, so this 
caused a bit of head scratching. 
The bracket had to lift up high 
enough and swing forward 
sufficiently that the prop cleared the 
cutout aperture to the water. Once 
the prop was clear, it would be a 
simple matter of inserting 
a plywood plug into the cutout 
aperture and resting the skeg of 



with the engine In elevated position, the prop can clear the cutout aperturt-. 
INSET The new bracket. The bottom rail Is fixed to the original brackets 


46 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 





SUMMER SALE 

I 



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FOR SAILORS 

Brand-new gear to help you 
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Step-by-step guide to making perfect, 
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Fitting a shaft log 
and engine moun ts 


How to reef 
efficiently 


SWEDISH BEAUTIES 

Thoroughbred designs from 
Najad, Malo and Hallberg-Rassy 

PLUS FRENCH CANAL GUIDE 


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Exploring 
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PRACTICAL 




Repairing a Volvo heat 
exchanger 


Steve Francis mends 
a disastrously bodged 
Volvo TMD60A heat 
exchanger at less 
than half the price of 
a new outer casing 


D uring my time running 
a marine engineering 
company in Falmouth 
I was contacted by 
a boat owner who 
had just bought an Ocean 42 and 
wanted my opinion on it. I had been 
carrying out pre-purchase surveys 
for some years, so I was quite happy 
to take a look. The boat had suffered 
from poor DIY repairs and maintenance 
plus overlooked leaks in the cooling 
system: one bad leak was on the raw water 
side of the header tank on the starboard 
Volvo TMD60A. It was mid-season, so I 
made a temporary repair using plastic 
metal and left it until the season’s end. 

Somehow the owner and I never got round to 
a proper fix, and I then moved on to working on 
superyachts so we lost contact. However, I was 
reunited with the boat and owner this year as I 
am now retired and just do odd jobs to relieve 
boredom. It seemed my repair had lasted for 
several years, and when it finally gave in the 
owner, unable to contact me, had called in a 
glassfibre expert to bodge it properly. The end 
of the heat exchanger that was leaking was 
underneath a fixed bench seat so it was 
pretty well inaccessible. 


The heat exchanger 
as removed from the 
boat, showing the bad 
epoxy repair that was 
leaking. The epoxy had 
been put on top of the 
paint instead of a key being 
made so it had not adhered 


INSET The heat exchanger repair had 
been done in situ where the underside 
could not be viewed, so it was a mess 


the seawater cooling as the seal was missing. 
Enquiries were made, and a new outer casing 
was found to be obtainable at a heart-stopping 
£1 ,800 and a new matrix at £1 ,400, plus of 
course a further 20% tax. 

With nothing to lose, I suggested having a 
go at repairing what was left with a budget 
price of £600. The heat exchanger took some 
considerable time to remove as salt water had 
been spraying around everything for a couple 
of seasons, corroding every nut and bolt head. 
This made a difficult job much longer as every 
fixing had to be wrestled off. 

With the heat exchanger removed, the extent 
of the bodge and damage was revealed. The 
epoxy had not bonded at all to the underneath 
so the casing end was virtually gone, and the 


matrix tube ends had been badly knocked about. 

The force of the raw water entering the engine 
had dislodged the thermostats so they were 
not working. The matrix was firmly stuck in 
place by a mixture of silt and salt and required 
a lot of soaking and pressure-washing to get it 
free and removed. 

Having stripped out the assembly, I had 
the outer casing shot-blasted to remove what 
epoxy remained, and all corrosion, to get back 
to clean metal and see exactly what needed 
doing. Most of the end and some of the side 
had completely gone, and the matrix would 
require a new end plate with in and out spigots. 

The first part to repair was the matrix end, 
which was done using some cupronickel plate 
and tube. Tubes were silver-soldered to the 


Assessing the damage 

I had removed the heat exchanger to effect 
my temporary repair several years earlier, but 
the glassfibre man had done it in situ with 
disastrous results, allowing raw water into the 
engine’s fresh water circuit. One of the big 
problems was that he had not gone back to 
bare metal to obtain a key for the epoxy, so it 
was not adhering. There was a constant leak 
into the bilges, which had corroded the outer 
casing to a point where there was nothing left to 
locate the heat exchanger matrix and stop the 
two different coolants from mixing. Volvo uses 
a push-in type of connection rather than the 
conventional worm drive clip. The fresh water 
engine side was constantly being topped up by 



The leaking raw (salt) water had severely 
corroded the water pump and its barely 
accessible fixing bolts, making the removal 
of the heat exchanger and pump a long 
and difficult process 


Thermostats had become dislodged 
from their seats by the force of raw 
water entering the fresh water system 



48 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 



Repairing a Voivo heat exchanger 


plates over pre-made holes and the assembly 
was soft-soldered onto the end of the matrix, 
having had the bad end cut off. Different 
solders were used because they have different 
melting points so there would not be so many 
parts to try locating and fixing at the same time. 
The matrix was then pressure-tested for leaks. 

Outer casing end 

This done, I was able to proceed to the outer 
casing end. I obtained some marine-grade 
aluminium angle profile and cut this to suit the 
casing that I had trimmed back to give square 
edges onto which I could fix. I overlapped the 
corrosion on the side to get to good casting 
onto which I could weld. I marked out and cut 
the holes through the plate for the matrix 
spigots to come through and then assembled 
the units together to make sure it would all fit. 

After this, the end plate was tack-welded to 
the casing and the matrix removed as cast 
aluminium welding gets extremely hot, and I 
didn’t want to melt the soft solder. The end 
plate was finally welded on and allowed to 
cool. The spigots from the matrix have to seal 
against the new end plate, and to achieve this I 
fitted thick section 0-rings that compressed as 
the unit was bolted together. 

The unit was subsequently reassembled and 
pressure-tested, then fitted back to the engine. 

I also had to fit new bearings to the belt 
tensioner pulley and the water pump, plus new 
vee belts as the rust on the pulley surfaces had 
worn them out. The total cost was less than half 
of the price of a new outer casing. 




The whole assembly after epoxy removal 
and shot-blasting corrosion away to see if 
enough metal remained to enable a repair 
to be attempted 


New cupronickel spigots were silver- 
soldered onto cupronickel plate, which 
was then soft-soldered onto the old heat 
exchanger matrix. Silver solder has a much 
higher melting point than soft solder so it 
enabled the spigots to remain fixed during 
soft-soldering 


A piece of unequal angle marine-grade 
aluminium was cut and holes bored to accept 
pipes. Aluminium angle was cut to cover 
badly corroded parts and overlap onto good 
casing. The casing was also trimmed to give 
a straight edge as a reference point. Before 
welding, it was all put together to check the fit 


With the welding finished, the 
components are ready for assembly 



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49 









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New Gear 


Laura Hodgetts reports on the latest marine products 


■j 



HELIX 5 compact HD 
widescreen fishfinder 


The Humminbird HELIX 5 family of compact fishfinders features an HD 
widescreen colour display that is promised to capture the breadth of the 
underwater landscape. The units can be bracket- or flush-mounted with 
optional kits. Each model supports 200/83kHz transducers, plus an optional 
50kHz XD variant for extreme deep-water use. The chart plotter and all GPS 
models include Humminbird UniMap base maps and are compatible with 
Humminbird LakeMaster charts including Autochart and Navionics Gole^ 
HotMaps. All models except the HELIX 5 chart plotter feature a water suftaoo 
temperature gauge built into the transducer. Prices start at £249.99. 

■ www.marathonleisure.com 


LiveSavers lifejacket 
attachment 


One of the biggest worries for sailing couples is how 
they would get their partner back on board if they 
were to fall in: which is where LiveSavers come in. 

A LiveSaver is a 3m x 3mm length of bright yellow 
Dyneema hand-spliced into a loop, with a triangle 
formed in one end. The other end is attached with 
a strap hitch knot to the lifting becket in a lifejacket. 
The LiveSaver is folded into the lifejacket and the 
cover closed. When the lifejacket deploys, the 
LiveSaver floats out onto the water. The rescuer 
returns to the MOB and stops the boat alongside, 
and by using the boathook, grabs the LiveSaver 
and secures it to a cleat on board. Now, with the 
MOB attached to the boat, the rescuer can rig 
their preferred MOB retrieval system. 

The Dyneema is promised to be strong enough 
to lift a Mini car and four adults so it should be 
more than enough for one MOB, and it tucks into 
the cover of a lifejacket without taking up much 
space. The floating, bright yellow LiveSaver 
shows up well against the water by day and 
at night under torchlight. The cost is £19.99. 

■ www.livesavers.co.uk 



Meridian Zero 
inflatable Solar 
LED lantern 



This inflatable, waterproof lantern by Meridian Zero comes 
with a solar-powered, rechargeable lithium battery. Made of 
PVC, it features 10 LED lights with brightness of up to 80 lumens, and weighs 130g. A 
button switch offers three settings: low, bright and flashing LEDs. The built-in 5V/1 20mAh 
battery provides six to 1 2 hours’ light when fully charged by the solar panel. It has a 
diameter of 13cm and the height goes from 10cm inflated to 3cm collapsed. The lantern is 
promised to have a working lifetime of 30,000 hours. 

■ www.marinesuperstore.com 



Verdict 

This sturdy, lightweight lantern is incredibly handy. It 
deflates to virtually nothing at ail, is easy to inflate and 
boasts an attractive, multi-purpose design. With 
handles on each end, the lantern can be strung up 
or tied on - and it should be if used on a boat as there 
is a risk it could just blow away in a breeze. It is so 
lightweight it would surely float if lost overboard! 

Waterproof and solar-powered, it worked well as a 
icirch on two camping holidays and as an outdoor 
lantern, but could also be a useful bedside light for 
reading. The only improvement I would wish for is to 
have a quick ‘off’ switch (perhaps by pressing and 
holding the button) rather than having to flick through 
all three settings. The price is £1 1 .95. Recommended. 

Laura Hodgetts 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


51 



New Gear 





Swimming Buddy 

This visibility aid is designed to be 
suitable for any swimmer: human or 
canine. Invented by Armando Rositas 
after he nearly struck a child with his boat 
because the child was not visible enough 
in the water after falling from a jet-ski, the 
brightly coloured, reflective, floating 
visual aid clips easily to lifejacket straps 
or clothing. Once in the water it bobs and 
sways, making swimmers substantially 
easier to see in the water, and is 
designed to stay out of the way so as not 
to impede motion. It costs $14.99 (£10). 

■ www.swimmingbuddy.com 



Designed to be worn during summer months, the Sea Trekker 
Navigator is a gilet-style sleeveless jacket with a concealed hood 
that features a built-in, self-righting, 170 Newton lifejacket inflation 
system, designed to automatically inflate when immersed. Should 
the wearer go overboard, this gilet would become a potentially 
life-saving lifejacket in less than five seconds. 

Made from an outer fabric of red over beige microfibre, it also 
has a rear black mesh panel which allows air to flow through the 
garment. Other features include front webbing straps (useful to 
hold a compass or clip on a VHF), retro-reflective tape over the 
shoulders, a lifting becket with stainless steel D-ring, a crotch strap 
with detachable clip, a SOLAS-approved automatic light, a gusset 
pocket with Aquapac mini phone case attached, a flare pocket, a 
knife/Maglite holder under a Velcro flap, a radio microphone loop at 
the top of an oral tube cover and two outside-zipped fleece-lined 
pockets. Priced at £249.95, and available in sizes from XS up to XXXL 
the jacket can be ordered directly from the factory at Cowes on the Isle Wght. 
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routes from a directory of 200 waypoints, a much larger screen and increased 
battery capacity, from 1 ,150mAh to 1 ,800mAh. It also offers a Group Monitoring 
function, allowing the positions of up to nine other HX870E users to be shown 
an the screen’s compass-style display, plus a Man Overboard soft key icon 
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The HX870E has a submersible waterproof rating of IPX8 (5ft for 30 minutes). 
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opeiation, a DSC test call facility and automatic DSC channel 
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Canvas bucket 


The traditional yachtsman’s canvas 
bucket has been an essential on many 
boats for decades. The benefit of canvas 
is that it doesn’t scratch the hull or deck 
when fetching water - although plastic 
doesn’t either! It’s also easy to stow 
because the material collapses. In 
addition, you can leave the retrieval 
line attached to the handle and it stores 
easily in the bucket. Canvas buckets 
are reasonably watertight, particularly 
when ‘seasoned’. 

At the time of going to press, the 
cheapest canvas buckets we could 


find online were available on the 
Jimmy Green Marine website, with a 
1 0lt (2gal) capacity. Nowadays they are 
manufactured from man-made polycotton 
acrylic so they won’t rot like traditional 
canvas. Lanyards are made using 8mm 
3-strand hempline and are 2m long, 
including a soft loop handle spliced at 
one end and the other end spliced 
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Canvas buckets are traditionally used to 
carry water, but they could also be used 
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toiletries, as beach bags or even as ice 


buckets for your wine and 
beer. Canvas buckets are 
also fairly simple to make, 
as detailed in PBO’s step- 
by-step guide published in 
January 1 995, available 
free on our website at 
www.pbo.co.uk/3x perl'fidvnt 
or to buy from the PBO 
Copy Service by calling 
01202 440832. 

Canvas buckets are priced 
at £1 2 (or £1 6 with lanyard) 
on www.jimmygreen.co.uk 




52 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 



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France 


Cruisin 


In this second article, 
Richard Hare completes 
his guide to an inland 
waterway cruise circuit 
deep into rural France 


River Seine 
downstream 
from Oise 
intersection 
to sea iock 


Canal de 
Briare 


Mantes- 

la-Jolie 


Canai 

Du 

Loing 


Dole 


• Arbois 

River 

aone 


Gannay-sur-Loire 


Canal 
Lateral a 
la Loire 


Trip top tip! 

Whether a passage plan is to follow 
this cruise circuit or the shorter one 
that includes only the Somme, the 
Oise and the Seine, it is best to enter 
at the Somme. This way the uphill 
passage is predominantly in small 
leisure locks, leaving the big ones - 
and the leviathans - for the easier 
downhill legs. 


ABOUT THE AUTHOR 


Richard Hare grew up in 
Essex, where he iearned 
to saii. He and his wife 
Janie iive in Suffoik, 
where they fitted out 
their Goiden Hind 31, 
Keppel, which they have 
since saiied in the Med and the Aegean. 


H aving made passage along 
six rivers and canals from 
St-Valery-sur-Somme on 
the coast (see last month's 
PBO), we're embarking 
on the final southern 
leg of our journey on the River Saone. 

This guide is for the benefit of anyone 
considering such a journey, which can 
be made mast-down on keelboats with 
a draught of 1.2m or less. References to 
deep water can be taken to mean sufficient 
for a 1.2m draught, while mention of 
canal weed means the weed filter should 
be inspected routinely and cleaned at 
least once a day. When swimming, 
take the precaution of keeping water 
out of ears and mouth. 

My observations on bank mooring 
and depth are based on a Golden 
Hind's far-from-ideal keel configuration - 
one long keel and two bilge plates. 


58 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 





Cruising French canais, part 2 



} 


River Sadne 


Dole 

• Arbois 


• Lyon 


riversides for lunch or fishing. A berth on 
Seune pontoon cost €12, excluding electricity. 

Water quality 

The river water is weed-free and clean, a 
wonderful relief after the Bourgogne. The 
Rhone au Rhin is reported as being a bit 
weedy, so a suck-it-and-see approach might 
be best applied here for Dole. Charter boat 
business at Dole suggests that weed might 
only be a temporary problem. 

Overall 

From Saint-Jean to Chatillon, the two locks 
over 23km were easily done in two half 
days. Our sojourn on the Saone was too 
brief: my only regret is that we were 
unable to press on down to Lyon and 
its confluence with the Rhone. 


Scenery and settlements 

This is a proper river, clean and sparkling in 
the summer sunshine. South of Saint-Jean- 
de-Losne to Chalon-sur-Saone, the river 
meanders through a pastoral landscape. 

Saint-Jean's architecture reflects its 
proximity to the Jura (stone buildings and 
fancy tiled roofscapes). With good budget- 
conscious restaurants and all shopping 
needs covered it's great for over-wintering. 
South towards the Canal du Centre there 
are few towns, but Seurre was attractive 
and offered all amenities. 

A half-day sortie upriver to Auxonne i-s 
well worth it for the well-mn Port Royal 
Marina. For those who fancy a taste of 
the Alps, climb the eight locks up the 
Canal du Rhone au Rhin (about an 
hour north of Saint-Jean) to the pukka 
Jura town of Dole. Public transport 
can then access lovely hill towns like 
Arbois where there are good B&Bs, 

Louis Pasteur's house and the finest 
Comte cheese in the world. 


Lock procedure 

Between St Jean and the entrance to the 
Canal du Centre there are only two locks, 
one of 3.2m, the other of 3.7m. Call on 
VHF, wait for the green light, enter, sling 
warps around bollards, remain on board, 
and let the keeper do the rest. Locks are 
one peniche wide, and of moderate size. 


ABOVE The 
church roof at 
Saint-Jean-de- 
Losne hints at 
its proximity 
to the Jura 


LEFT True Jura - 
Doie, up the 
Canai du 
Rhone au Rhin 


Ambience 

With seemingly little commercial traffic, 
well-provisioned towns and a few holiday 
charter boats, our trip down a short section 
of the Saone was a very relaxed affair. 


Moorings 

Bankside mooring is forbidden, but there 
are towns with official leisure berthing. We 
saw several locals who anchored towards 



and adjacent picnic area. 
I here's also a restaurant. 


Lock procedure 

The huge canal entrance lock 
at the eastern end was almost 
Saone a disaster for us due to the 
fierce outflow of water from 
the 10.8m-deep lock. This 
needn't have mattered were 
it not for the lock-keeper tying 
KeppeVs two warps to a solitary 
on a wooden quay with 
heehoard of about 6in. 

As the water ripped out it caught KeppeVs 
keel and she strained to the 'quay', her 
port quarter compressed onto the wood. 
Mercifully no damage resulted, and by 
the time our protests registered with the 
operative up in his mighty tower the 
huge slug of water was all but spent. 

Upstream, the run-of-the mill automatic 
locks were not easy to climb. There are no 
staithes to speak of for crew to disembark 
and the tiled, sloping banks make 
disembarkation impossible for anything 
other than flat-bottom boats. The only 
option was for Janie to climb the ladders 
within the lock. This contravenes all 
guidance, but there was no alternative. 
Most ladders were neglected but just usable. 
One didn't have a handhold at the top 
beyond a clump of grass. 

Auto sensors alerted the lock to our arrival 


Canal du 


Centre 


Scenery and settlements 

This had arguably the best scenery on 
the return journey, mostly undulating 
pastureland hosting herds of grazing 
Charolais cattle. Many of the settlements 
are attractive. Chagny is fairly nice, but 
has an off-putting dock area with the 
worst mosquito problem of our entire 
passage, so arrive with means of 
protection beforehand and enjoy a 
well-provided town beyond. 

Genelard has a deep water quay in 
a pretty village setting, excellent for a 


: RIGHT Paray- 
[ le-Monial is an 
attractive town 
which is aiso a 
[ piigrimage centre 


I barbecue, but be sure to arrive stocked 
■ appropriately as it has no shops. 

\ Paray-le-Monial is a gem of a town, 

[ boasting a river, plenty of shops, several 
I restaurants and, opposite the deep town 
\ quay, a petrol station across the bridge. At 
I its heart is a magnificent triple-towered 
; Romanesque basilica. 

I Saint-Julien-sur-Dheune has a deep-water 



Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


59 


Cruising 


and we then followed the traffic lights. j 
Although lock gate activation pull cords 5 
were situated within the locks these were ■ 
usually positioned just inside the gates, i 
far from ideal for a yacht with a mast ; 

protmding fore and aft. With Janie ashore, | 
lockside, our solution in shallower locks i 
was for me to cast both warps up to her ; 
with the stern warp returned for me to 
manage onboard. In deeper locks (5.2m-ish) 

I would pass the stern warp over a floating 
bollard as I passed it. There would be two | 
of these but they were always spaced too 
far apart for Keppel and nowhere near the ; 
pull-cord, so with the stern warp sorted Fd | 
hurl the forward warp up to Janie. 

Many of the locks had crumbling sides, 
providing fender traps to the ascending 
boat. This called for strenuous leg exercise = 
to keep guardrail failure at bay. In several 
cases the inmsh of water was halfway \ 

along lockside walls, which caused Keppel 
to be pushed brusquely away from the i 

walls. Fine, but it then meant vigorous ■ 



The Canal du Centre meanders through 
charming open rural countryside 


warp action to prevent her from grinding 
up the opposite side. Flat-bottomed boats 
would fare better. 

Locks are small to moderate size. 
Southern entry lock aside, nearly all are 
under 3m but a few are just over 5m. 

Ambience 

IFs a pity that the former towpath was 
converted into a main road. It's hard to 
find a place to moor up for the night 
without traffic spoiling the tranquillity 
and, consequently, the mral landscape. 


I Mooring 

: The canal sides are usually tiled and at an 
I angle of 45°, so overnight stops were often 
i alongside dedicated deep-water quays, 
i many of which are pleasant enough 
i spots. Finding them wasn't a problem. 

i 

I Water quality 

I The claimed depth of 1.8m was met, 
j although water depth towards the banks 
j usually diminished to next to nothing, 
j There was no particular weed problem. 

I Overall 

I At 1 12km it's a moderate-length canal with 
: 61 locks. We completed the distance in six 

i comfortable days. The town Fragnes proved 
i disappointing. The only shop was a bakery, 
i and a neighbour had his bike stolen despite 
I the place being lit up like a Christmas tree. 

! With difficult locks, this is a commercial 
j canal designed for much larger, straight- 
: sided hulls with next to no draught. 


Canal Lateral 
a la Loire 



Scenery and settlements 

Mostly attractive rolling landscape, pasture 
farming and a lot of Charolais cows. At its 
southern end is the large town of Digoin 
(€6.20 plus ablutions, water and power) 
and an Intermarche within walking 
distance. A nicer big town stop is to be 
found at Decize (€9 plus extras in marina) 
although there's free mooring out on 
the canal bank, which is also near an 
Intermarche. The marina had a restaurant 
with an excellent €15 menu. 

Keelboats are best advised to moor in the 
marina or on the bank rather than further 
into the town on the river. Shingle banks 
in Loire are constantly in a state of flux. 

Beaulon offered just enough water for 
free mooring in a pretty setting, as did 
Gannay-sur-Loire with its free hot showers. 
Between is the useful deep-water quay at 
Garnat/Engievre. Shady Chevenon 
combined a peaceful setting and deep 
water, and Chatillon-sur-Loire is a good 
historic town with charm and provisioning. 

Lock procedure 

Locks are mostly of moderate size and all 
were manned by lock-keepers, although 
we were expected to organise our warps 
throughout. None were difficult, and sides 
were mostly fender-friendly. Outside, there 
is usually a staithe to disembark a crew 
member: the exception is the large deep 
lock that drops from the canal to the Loire 
at Decize. Going down would be fine, but 
we were loath to put our keelboat through 
what could easily be an anarchic ascent. 
Few keelboats use this lock as, at 1.2m, the 
Canal du Nivernais beyond is too shallow. 


Gannay-sur-Loire was brilliant - good depth and 
free water, electricity and hot showers! 

i Most locks had good ladders within and 
; acceptable handholds at the top. Some 
i were set into the ground and nerve-wracking 
3 as a result. The keeper manually operates 
3 all four independent gates, so progress can 
\ be slow. Most eclusiers welcome sailors 
3 lending assistance. The locks are small to 
3 moderate size: nearly all are under 3m but 
j one was about 9m, albeit in two steps. 

\ 

; Ambience 

] Many towns were devoid of shops, bars 
3 and restaurants. That said, with little traffic 
3 and sufficient places to moor in acceptable 
j depth - some with free electricity and water, 

3 and enough villages with basic provisioning 
3 - this is a peaceful canal with much to offer 
j so long as provisioning is maintained. 

3 

I Mooring 

j Halts are spaced regularly enough 
3 and nearly always afforded sufficient 


; Beaulon was a good stop with just 
I enough depth and facilities 

I depth, but some informal mooring spots 
i (random bollards/mown grass) could 
I be just as good. With locks closing 
I between 1200-1300, the pressure can 
I be on to find a place to tie up, but 
i some locks were left open, which 
I solved the problem. 

I 

I Water quality 

I There was no weed of any consequence, 

I and depth was pretty much a constant 2m. 
: As in the Canal du Centre, tiled bank edges 
j at 45° excluded us from some pretty spots. 

I Overall 

j At 196km it's a fairly long canal with a 
I mere 37 locks. We completed the distance 
I in 10 comfortable days. 


60 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 



ising French canals, part 2 


Briare 


Canal de Briare t 


Ambience 

The towns are nice, but the scenery is 
underwhelming. In dull weather it's a 
bit oppressive. 


Moorings 

1 here are sufficient straight-sided deep 
qu^iys. The Locaboat yard at Rogny charges 
€11 (basic) to moor up anywhere 
in town: they also expect you wait 
around until the office opens. 

Chatillon-Coligny was much 
more welcoming and offered a 
pontoon berth that appeared to 
be free of charge. Mooring in 
Montargis was €7 (all in), 
although there were free 
moorings with just enough depth 
near the bridge south of the town. 
There's not much scope for 
rural mooring to land anchors, or for 
barbecues. 


Water quality 

The 1.8m depth was maintained 
throughout, and we had no weed problems. 


Overall 

At 54km it's a short canal, but with 32 locks 
it's quite labour-intensive. We completed 
the distance in four comfortable days. The 
Briare is a canal that's best for its historic 
town berths, as mral barbecue 
opportunities are few and far between. 


Scenery and settlements 

Much of the canal runs through deeply 
wooded banks and is rather dull. Quite 
narrow, it can feel oppressive in gloomy 
weather. The famous Briare aqueduct 
compensates, though. 

Rogny is well worth a stop to see the 17th 
century lock staircase constmcted during 
the reign of Henry IV. We had an excellent 
four-course dinner (€18) with a huge buffet 
starter at the more local-looking of the two 
restaurants close to lock 18. There's a small 
supermarket too. 

Chatillon-Coligny is an attractive historic 
town worth visiting, with reasonable shops 
and a mini-market. Montargis is a fine 
town with a network of shallow canals. 

We had an excellent €11 lunch at the 
unprepossessing bistro Le Grignotiere. 


RIGHT The locks 
were all manned 
and small 

Lock procedure 

All locks were manned but, again, progress 
through them can be slow as all four gates 
are manually operated. Keepers welcomed 
help when it was safe and possible to do so. 
: Although the ladders were reasonably well 
maintained, many lock sides were badly 
: pitted, some with horrendous fender traps 
for the uphill passage-maker. Vigilance and 
foot fending was essential. 

An advantage was that most locks had 
disembarkation staithes, again a positive 
plus for uphill-going boats. Locks are small 
to moderate size, averaging around 4m. 



E 

E 

E 

c 

[ 

i 

E 

I 

I 


Moorings 

There are several steep-sided quays, and 
plenty of lock staithes that might be used - 
unofficially - for overnight stops. If you 
don't hog them during daytime there's 
seldom a problem. Banks are usually too 
shallow for a keelboat. 

Water quality 

The 1.8m depth is maintained, and there 
are no weed problems. 

Overall 

At 49km and a mere 18 locks this can be 
knocked off in just over a day. We completed 
the distance in 2.5 very relaxed days. 


Canal du 


Loing 


Moret-sur- 

Loing 

8 


Scenery and 
settlements 

Scenery is 
unspectacular, but 
the jewel of Moret- 
sur-Loing at its 
northern end makes 
up for everything. 

Particularly associated with 
impressionist painter Alfred 
Sisley, Moret lives up to 
expectations. Smart new 
wooden jetties provide safe 
mooring on clear river water 
(€10, showers extra) and are 
located just downstream of 
the lock, a short walk from 
the picturesque town. Less 
convenient free mooring with 
adequate depth is upstream of the lock. 

Lock procedure 

All locks were in the process of becoming 
totally automatic. Walls have been 
rendered and are as smooth as a baby's 
proverbial. Passage is fast, efficient and 
stress-free as both gates at each end operate 
in unison. There are good ladders with safe 


ABOVE Narrow and 
heavily wooded, the Loing 
can feel claustrophobic 

LEFT The Porte 
de Samois in 
Moret-sur-Loing 


Tops' and all locks should have staithes 
both upstream and downstream. Locks are 
small to moderate size, t 5 q)ically between 
1.5-3m deep. Northbound is downhill. 

Ambience 

Very wooded and quiet. Devoid of much 
open landscape, it is a bit oppressive. 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


61 



LidI and was within waiking distance of 
Monet’s house and garden at Giverny 






The yacht ciub at Veronette had an adjacent 


PARIS 


River Seine downstream 
from Oise intersection 
to sea lock 


Scenery and settlements 

Banks are populated by towns and villages. 
Beyond there tends to be open countryside 
with rolling hills, mostly wooded. 

Conflans-Saint-Honorine is a riverfront 
town with a great market, but mooring 
can be tricky for smaller boats due to huge 
quays. Scenery is pleasant but not 'deep 
rural'. The towns are nice enough, and 
many are good for provisioning. 

Lock procedure 

The industrial-scale locks, large enough to 
take two peniches abreast, are seldom full 
and are operated by lock-keepers in turrets. 
Traffic lights govern movements and 
peniches always take priority. Bollards are 
usually countersunk into smooth walls, 
but some have cormgated sheeting that 
necessitate a fenderboard. 

Descending, we opted to return long 
for'ard and aft warps to the boat and paid 
out as we were lowered. Others choose to 
'bollard-hop' - less of a problem for larger 
boats and those with little or no keel. 

Ladder climbing in these locks would 
be extremely foolhardy and could well be 
punishable. Locks range from 2.8m-5.1m. 

Ambience 

Constant vigilance for peniches means 
there's no scope for complacency. From 
Vernonnet it's a 3km walk to Monet's garden 
at Giverny, which also includes a very good 
impressionists' gallery. There are sensibly- 
priced restaurants too. It all makes for a 
pleasant day out with the confidence of a 
secure mooring away from the main channel. 

Moorings 

Huge peniche wake makes sheltered 
mooring places few and far between, but 


there are sufficient. Mooring on lock quays 
for the night is prohibited. Peniches operate 
after nightfall. An easy day's motoring 
seaward from the Oise confluence is Limay, 
totally sheltered and with shops (although 
Mantes-la-Jolie, over the bridge, is better). 
We had free mooring, and there's a tap. 

A further day's motoring seaward offers 
attractive Vernonnet with its sailing 
club pontoons at €15 for one night, 

€10 thereafter. Water and electricity are 
included but ablutions were seldom open 
when needed. The big plus is the adjacent 
Lidl with a petrol station. 


Another day's motoring downstream 
is Poses and the huge Amfreville sea 
lock. This artists' town has no shops, 
so arrive provisioned. There's free mooring. 
With no restaurants, it's a good place 
for a barbecue, although Vernonnet and 
Limay are better. 

Water quality 

Depth is no problem and the water was 
clean. The only weed was the floating 
variety, and that was scant. In spate, 
the current is strong and governs small 
boat navigation. The channel location 
is provided in the guide and needs no 
more than routine attention. 

Overall 

The current governs speeds, but at 132km 
and just three locks we completed this 
stretch downstream in four days, allowing 
two nights for Monet's garden. Upstream 
passage would need an extra day. There 
are no tide concerns. 



62 





Cruising French canais, part 2 


Tidal Seine: Amfreville to Le Havre 



Ambience 

The river is wide, the scenery unremarkable. 
There are few if any peniches, but there are 
ships. With its tric% tide calculations, this 
stretch is hardly relaxed. 

Moorings and passage pianning 

Mooring and anchoring is forbidden on 
this stretch of the Seine. Yachts must 
complete the passage in two hits, with 
Rouen the one stop. Great care is needed 
over passage planning, and few skippers 
will depart Rouen at the same time. We 
based our plan on guidance from the 
Fluviacarte 1 book La Seine Aval. 

One tidal flood has to be taken on the 
nose, and most skippers ensure they reach 
the lower stretches with an ebb under 
them. It was Springs, and with the engine 
delivering 5.5 knots through the water 


KeppeVs GPS read 7.2 knots on departing 
Rouen at 0730. At Duclair, speed over 
ground was 7 knots, but a couple of 
kilometres further on it was breaking even 
at 5.3 knots (1030 slack water). She averaged 
about 3 knots until the flood's grip weakened 
at Retival, and we then did over 8 knots for 
most of tidal rush down to the estuary. 

With a stiff westerly producing a vicious 
wind-over-tide chop we swung into the 
River Risle at 1730. Omitting Honfleur, we 
took dinner in a homely muddy creek 
with inquisitive cows peering at us from 
the saltmarsh banks above. We made our 
passage to Le Havre the following day. 

Care must be taken regarding the little 


Scenery and settlements 

The countryside is open, with a 
few small riverside towns against a 
backdrop of fairly large hills with 
limestone bluffs. Quays are fitted 
out for luxury holiday cruise 
boats, not small yachts. Rouen 
is the one main town, useful 
for mast-stepping (€112) and 
lowering. The yard is in the 
Gervais basin, as is the marina 
(€14 all inc). It's a 30-minute walk 
into town, although there are some 
restaurants not far from the marina. 
There's a supermarket within about 
20 minutes' walk. There are small 
enclaves of medieval architecture 
around the cathedral. 


Lock procedure 

After the huge Amfreville lock at Poses, 
there are no locks - you're back in the 
land of tides. 


Duclair 

Rouen 

Poses 



The tidal rush down to the sea took us through some considerable gorges 


I The Amfreville lock is awesome in size, but 
i since the lock will be entered near HW it’s 

\ a comparative pussycat going downhill 

[ 

E 

[ red car ferries that crab across the fast- 
[ flowing water with little or no warning. 

\ Suggested guidance? Start calculation 
[ with a boat speed through the water of 
[ 5.5 knots and allow 12 hours absolute max 
\ for Neaps. Apply the tide data from your 
I PBO Almanac to estimate where you 
\ should be, and when, at any given time. 

[ Water quality 

= Plenty of depth, but echo monitoring is 
r essential, particularly on inside bends. No 
: debris. Watch for wind-over-tide seaward 
: of the Tancarville Bridge. The River Risle 
i almost dries at Springs, but the mud is soft. 

[ Overall 

I With the tide under her, Keppel did the 
E 43km from Amfreville to Rouen in 5 
[ hours. She took 10 hours for the 100km 
I from Rouen to the River Risle just 
\ beyond the Tancarville Bridge. 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


63 



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PRACTICAL ^ 



Power saws make light work of big and repetitive cutting jobs, 
but to get the best from them and stay safe you should follow 
some simple rules, as Julian Peckham explains 


T here’s no need to be frightened 
of a circular power saw, but 
you do need to treat it like 
you treat the sea - with the 
utmost respect. 

Never take chances, and always 
think safety first: keep fingers and loose 


clothing well away from the spinning 
blade, and always wear eye protection. 
Ear defenders are a good idea too. 
Make sure you’re using a sharp blade, 
and be particularly careful if you’re 
swinging the blade guard out of the 
way manually before starting a cut. 


Using a circular saw 


CUT TO THE CHASE: TIPS TO OPTIMISE YOUR CIRCULAR SAW 



Adjust the depth so the blade is cutting only slightly deeper 
than the thickness of wood you’re sawing - the depth of 
one saw tooth is about right. This avoids unnecessary 
friction on the blade, allowing it to spin more freely and 
reducing the likelihood of kickback - as well as keeping 
the blade cooler and putting less strain on the motor 



Ensure that whatever 
you’re cutting is well 
supported along its 
entire length, either with 
more trestles or, ideally, 
clamped to another, 
thicker plank for 
support underneath 



When making either crosscuts or 
ripping along a length, let the saw 
do the work and allow the motor 
to keep its revs up - don’t force 
it forwards too quickly 


Make frequent checks underneath 
your work to ensure you’re not 
sawing into your supporting 
trestles or plank - it sounds 
obvious, but sooner or later 
everyone does it! 


Most saws come with a rip fence 
attachment for sawing lengths of 
timber, but the short fence means 
the saw can easily wander a bit, 
and you’ll end up with a cut that’s 
not terribly straight 



If cutting wide boards or plywood, 
your saw’s rip fence may not extend 
wide enough for your cut, so clamp 
a straight-edged board to the Job as 
a fence. Ensure the fence is clamped 
or supported in the middle: if not, 
the board can bow and the saw’s 
shoe wander beneath the fence - 
then your cut won’t be straight 



For accuracy, a clamped-on fence 
is particularly useful when making 
angled cuts - otherwise the saw 
can easily wander 


Common mistakes 



A common mistake is to simply 
leave the saw at full cutting depth 
and plough straight into the Job. 
However, having the whole blade 
spin through the thickness of wood 
puts undue stain on the saw and 
increases the danger of kickback, 
where you lose control and the 
saw tries to kick away from the cut 



This is easily remedied, though. 
Screw a straight strip of timber 
to the fence to extend its length - 
this will improve sawing 
accuracy considerably 



If you’re ripping along the 
length of a long plank, it’s not 
enough to simply have a trestle 
supporting either end - there’s 
a strong risk the plank will start 
to judder, the saw catch and 
kick back dangerously 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


65 







^ Learning from experience 


Key responses for 
a successful-rescue 


Alex Bell and fellow crew members react quickly 
to save a man overboard in Key West, Florida 


F our of us - owner/skipper 

Martin, his brother Ed, Bob and 
myself - had brought the yacht 
Zennora to Key West from the 
Bay Islands, off Honduras. It 
had been a mixed passage on 
the 16.4m (54ft) Skye, the last evening 
being particularly memorable with a 
violent thunderstorm which resulted in 
us taking sail down and running almost 
bare-poled with the wind, cowering from 
the storm and keeping away from the 
chain plates. 

The following day we got into Key 
West, right at the bottom tip of the Florida 
Keys; the most southerly part of mainland 
USA. Having checked in with Homeland 
Security, we were anchored off the main 


ABOUT THE AUTHOR 


Ex-merchant navy officer 
Alex Bell sails a Beneteau 
M - First 305 and lectures in 

IL l maths and engineering 

^ at Southampton Solent 
JH University. He is a regular 
contributor to PBO. 


marinas out of the channel. I was sharing 
the aft cabin of the ketch with Bob. One 
night, at about 2.30am, I vaguely became 
aware of cries for help. Bob also heard the 
cries: we were not dreaming. 

We both sprang into action. Bob grabbed 
the handheld searchlight and went to 
the aft deck, from where he located the 
casualty being swept in the ebb tide past 
our stern. Bob kept the 
light on him while I 
called skipper Martin, 
who was sharing the 
forward cabin with 
his brother Ed. I went 
forward to launch our RIB, which was 
suspended on a halyard hauled out of the 
water. I eased the halyard on the mast 
winch until the RIB was floating in the 
water alongside, detached the snap shackle 
on the end of the halyard from the lifting 
strops, then released the painter and 
brought it aft in time for Martin and Ed 
to step down into it. They set out to 
where Bob was illuminating the casualty, 
rapidly moving out of sight in the fast 
channel current. Martin's last instruction 
was for me to call the coastguard and 
seek assistance. 


Confident that Martin and Ed would be 
able to locate the casualty, who by now 
had drifted downstream and was probably 
about 300m away, I made a Pan-Pan 
Medico call using a handheld VHP radio. 
The coastguard immediately answered my 
call. I gave them our location and described 
the situation, requesting assistance. 

By now the casualty had been swept out 
of the range of the 
searchlight but Martin 
and Ed located him, 
with some difficulty, 
using the RIB torch. 
Once they had grabbed 
hold of him they tried to ascertain how 
long he had been in the water, but his 
replies were unintelligible: Martin and 
Ed thought he was either exhausted or 
hypothermic. Two fit men were unable to 
get him into the RIB, so he was draped 
across a sponson and they returned to 
Zennora. The casualty, a heavily-built male 
in a semi-conscious state, was incapable 
of assisting himself. Once the RIB was 
secured alongside we put a lifejacket on 
him and proceeded to haul him on board 
using a halyard on the same mast winch 
as is used to haul the RIB out of the water. 


We located the casualty 
being swept in the ebb 
tide past our stern 


66 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 




MOB rescue in Key west 





polite and proper, first asking permission 
to come alongside. A paramedic came on 
board and examined the casualty. He was 
then lifted on board the coastguard boat 
on a stretcher: they took him to the dock 
and subsequently, we learned, to hospital. 
(I remembered to tell them that we 
would like our lifejacket returned!) 

Having returned the tender to its night 
storage position we retired to our bunks, 
wondering what revelations the following 
day would bring. 

On rising, we noted that on the aft cleats 
of a power boat anchored some 50m away, 
a small skiff was lying inverted, tied to 
the stern with some other tenders. We 
surmised that the casualty may have left 
the 'party' early, possibly having had a 
few too many drinks, and had capsized 
the skiff, finding himself being carried 
downstream by the tide. Luckily for him 
he was swept past a boat with two people 
sleeping lightly enough to hear his cries 
for help. 


Reflecting on the questions the 
coastguard asked, we came to the 
conclusion that someone might have 
reported a missing person: we were not 
aware of any tender putting out from the 
power boat during the incident. Later on, 
the coastguards returned our lifejacket and 
proceeded over to the power boat. When 
their vessel returned someone was sitting 
in the stern with his hands behind his 
back, looking like he was handcuffed 
and appearing very sorry for himself. 

Two days later, the same man - without 
handcuffs - stopped by in his tender to say 
that the casualty had made a full recovery. 
He offered no account of the incident. The 
man we rescued, and whose life we almost 
certainly saved, never came to thank us 
personally, although he apparently wasn't 
a frequent sailor and had vowed never to 
go out again. We never found out precisely 
what happened, and the local press carried 
no account of the incident. Just another 
night in paradise? 


attaching a snap shackle to the harness 
attachment D-ring. Opening the guardrail 
gate reduced the height required for the 
lift, and we soon had the casualty laid out 
on the side deck. He was breathing and 
slightly delirious. Bob put him into the 
recovery position and started checking 
him for injuries. Martin and Ed fetched 
blankets and clothing to cushion the 
casualty and keep him warm. 

I had a quite long radio exchange with 
the coastguard, during which I was asked 
to describe the casualty and what he was 
wearing. When Bob asked him who he 
was he gave his first name, but we had 
trouble eliciting a surname from him. Bob 
had by now concluded that he was drunk 
and cold but uninjured, apart from a small 
cut on his head. The coastguard then 
requested me to ask him a very pertinent 
question that had not hitherto occurred to 
me: 'Was there anyone else in the water?' 
The reply to this was vague, seeming to 
suggest that there might be. That bit was 
worrying, but the coastguard did not 
pursue this line of questioning. 

After a while, a coastguard cutter arrived: 
we had already tied our tender off aft and 
had fenders ready. The crew were very 


LESSONS LEARNED 


I lf you think you hear 
someone calling for 
help, assume it’s for real. 
If Bob hadn’t wakened 
I might have thought I 
was dreaming and the 
cries would have become 
inaudible as the casualty 
was carried away by the 
ebbing tide. 

2 At night, always keep 
a powerful torch or 
handheld searchlight 
handy. Ours was a 
rechargeable one and 
it eventually ran out of 
charge: luckily the tender 
crew had a torch with them 
and were able to locate the 
casualty in the dark. 


3 If possible, always 
send two people on 
a rescue mission: in this 
instance, one person 
would not have been able 
to lift the casualty on 
board the RIB. 

Have an MOB 
recovery plan. Our 
casualty was unable to 
sit up, let alone climb 
up a boarding ladder. 

The lifejacket with its 
built-in harness gave us 
something to which we 
could attach the halyard. 

5 Always call for 
assistance from 
the rescue services as 


specialist medical help 
can make the difference 
between life and death. 

In Key West, the sea is 
very warm: in other waters 
this might have been a 
hypothermia case. 

6 Having a handheld 
radio meant that I 
could communicate 
while on deck with 
a full view of the 
unfolding scene. 

7 We had an 

experienced crew of 
four people: with one or 
two people this would 
have necessitated a 
full Mayday scenario. 


*Send us your boating experience story and if it’s published you’ll receive the original Dick Everitt-signed watercolour which is 
printed with the article. You’ll find PBO’s contact details on page 5. 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


67 






ABOUT THE AUTHOR 


Cruising 


MAiN infiatabies iined up among the dinghies 
on a pontoon in Tobermory, Muii. iNSET Peter 
takes the heim, with the distinctiveiy coiourfui 
frontage of Tobermory behind him 

coastal waters when the weather was 
favourable. After several years with my 
first boat 1 upgraded to a 3.1m (10ft 2in) 
Zodiac Cadet with wooden floor panels 
over an inflatable keel, coupled with a 
6hp Suzuki outboard. 

The Lake District 

My first Zodiac's maiden voyage was 
on Ullswater in June 2005. This proved 
it was feasible to load the boat into my 
hatchback at the start of the day and then, 
within 60 minutes of parking up, inflate 
it, launch it and head off for a day on 
the water, before reversing the process 
in the evening. 

Over the years I've had numerous 
trips to the Lake District, boating on 
Ullswater, Windermere, Derwent Water 
and Coniston between March and the 
end of October. Ullswater is the prettiest in 
my opinion, with impressive mountains 
close by. Windermere is the largest and 
boasts shoreline amenities including a 
campsite at Low Wray and shops/cafes 
at various places. Coniston Water is 
famous for its connection with Donald 
Campbell, and also boasts Peel Island (aka 
Wild Cat Island from Arthur Ransome's 
Swallow and Amazons) complete with its 
'secret harbour'. 

The shallow draught of the Zodiac allows 
you to visit such islands - but check 
beforehand that landing is permitted - 
and also enables a journey half a mile 
down the often extremely shallow River 


The tender 


Peter Talbot has been 
boating for over 30 
years. He holds RYA 
Advanced Powerboat 
and Safety Boat 
certificates, and helps 
to helm the rescue boat 
of his local Sea Scouts when 
he’s not out in his Zodiac. 


A perfect fit! No road trailer is required, so 
transportation (and storage) is easy and cheap 


touch 

Peter Talbot has 
travelled over 1 ,200 
miles in Zodiac Cadet 
inflatable tenders in 
the last 10 years. Here 
he outlines the benefits 
of this type of craft, 
and describes some 
of his favourite 
locations for trips 


H aving asked if I had a boat, 
the London Boat Show 
salesman asked: 'Where 
do you keep it, on the 
South Coast?' 'No, in 
the loft,' I answered. 
Presumably surmising that I wouldn't 
be buying one of his large, gleaming, 
multi-berth motorboats that afternoon, 
he smiled politely and moved on. 

I was bitten by the boating bug aged 
three, on the local park lake, and my 
interest in all boat-related matters grew 
rapidly. Trips on my parents' 4.9m (16ft) 
Microplus motor-cruiser on the river/canal 
network in Yorkshire were followed by 
holidays on the Norfolk Broads. A 
second-hand 'toy' inflatable boat used 
on the river near our caravan (and an 
avid interest in Jacques Cousteau films) 
planted an idea, and led me to buy my 
first Zodiac inflatable 15 years later - a 
2.6m/8ft 6in Cadet with a slatted floor 
and a 4hp Suzuki outboard. I thought 
the Zodiac would allow me a low-cost, 
low-maintenance way of getting on the 
water with friends and family, to explore 
a range of inland waterways and some 


68 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 




1,200 miles In Zodiac tenders 





between Oxford and Richmond with my 
friend Lee. As with my journey the year 
before along the Caledonian Canal - 
a 60-mile route along the Great Glen, 
linking Fort William to Inverness via 
Lochs Lochy Oich and Ness - we carried 
all our gear on board and camped as we 
went. We camped at a mix of commercial 
sites (Clifton Hampden and Staines), on 
an island at Cookham Lock and also on 
the Mapledurham estate, all with prior 
arrangement. Mapledurham was used as a 
location in the film The Eagle has Landed 
and we camped near the watermill. 


Of the lakes in the Lake District on which you can use powered craft, Windermere is the only one 
where they need to be registered. INSET Peter’s friend Graeme on Ullswater 


Leven, at the southern end of 
Windermere, to Newby Bridge. 
Windermere is the only lake requiring 
powered boats to be registered. Based on 
hull length, my annual fee is £15 a year. 
Bear in mind that the Lakes can be up 
to one mile wide, so they can be affected 
by strong winds: Fve experienced waves 
of around 2ft on Ullswater, which can 
make things lively. 


Inland waterways 

The Canal & River Trust manages 2,000 
miles of canals and rivers in the UK. As 
well as being interesting destinations in 
their own right, rivers and canals offer 
more sheltered boating - particularly 
useful at the start or end of a season when 
the weather is less reliable. Day licences 
can be bought online at the last minute, 
once weather forecasts have been checked. 
For my boat, these cost £15 for a day on 
both the canal and river network. Longer- 
term options are available, as are Tiver 
only' options. The automated email 
response provides proof of payment. 

One of my longer day journeys was the 
route from Ripon to York. This starts on 
the canal, then joins the River Ure at 
Oxclose lock before becoming the River 
Ouse. All the locks on the 30-mile route 
are self-operated, so you need to know 
what you're doing and take a windlass 
lock key. We made a day of the journey, 
with good weather all the way, and got 
to York at 6pm. Mooring right in the city 
centre, we had a quick look round and 
then motored downriver to the campsite 
owned by York Marine at Bishopthorpe, 
catching the bus back to Ripon the next 
day to retrieve the car. 

My next river journey was a five-day, 
130-mile trip down the River Thames 


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E 

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E 

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E 

c 

E 

E 


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E 

E 

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E 

E 

E 

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E 

E 


c 

E 

E 

E 

E 

E 

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expecting Michael Caine to burst 
round the corner at any moment. 

All 38 locks we passed through on the 
journey were operated efficiently by 
lock-keepers, as on the Caledonian Canal. 
We experienced a few heavy downpours - 
including our heaviest in 10 years of 
boating! - but enjoyed passing through 
places like Reading, Henley, Eton and 
Windsor. Although lacking the mountains 
found along the Caledonian Canal, the 
countryside was nevertheless attractive 
and we saw a range of wildlife - our record 
being three kingfishers, three herons and 
three red kites on day two, all before 
10am! Boat licences for the River Thames 
are bought from the Environment Agency. 

Coastal trips 

The coastal area I most frequently visit is 
the north-east, launching at the public 
slipway at South Shields (for which a fee 
is payable). In good weather. I've enjoyed 
return trips north as far as Newbiggin by 
the Sea, and south as far as Sunderland. 

Planning is important with all trips, and 
never more so than on the sea. I've had 
sea-kayaking experience in the past, and 


: Mapledurham Watermill was used as a location 
E in the 1976 film The Eagle Has Landed 


Operating a lock on a day trip from Ripon to York 
INSET Camping on the Mapledurham estate 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 


www.pbo.co.uk 


69 




Cruising 



there are a lot of crossover skills - eg 
assessing weather/tide/wave height, 
identifying boltholes just in case and 
carrying the correct emergency gear. 

On the west coast of Scotland we spent a 
week at Resipole campsite, on the shore of 
Loch Sunnart. It's a great place from which 
to explore the full length of Loch Sunnart, 
and we enjoyed seeing seals and porpoises 
near the boat - a benefit of coastal 
cruising. We also had a memorable day 
trip over to the colourfully-painted 
Tobermory on the Isle of Mull. This was 
a 3 3 -mile round trip, first down the loch 
and then across the Sound of Mull. There 
was only a very light wind and a few 
clouds, but we had a couple of showers as 
we neared the campsite on the way back. 

Scandinavia 

The portability of the boat by car, coupled 
with the experience I've built up over the 
years, has enabled boat journeys to be 
made further afield. After a trip to Sweden 
in the car, my friend David and I travelled 
150 miles inland from Soderkoping along 
the Gota Canal/lake network over six days, 
camping from the boat as we went, having 
left the car at Soderkoping. Some of the 
lakes are among the largest in Europe. 

Last year I completed a five-day, 135-mile 
boat journey with my old school friend 
Graeme in the Norwegian fjords. Camping 
keeps the price down, and the cost of 
these trips is largely that of getting the 
car to and from the start point of the 
boat journey. The success of these trips 
highlights the practical benefits of such 
craft as the Zodiac, and also gets me 
thinking about potential future journeys. 


1 Unique experiences 

2 On a small open boat you're close to the 

3 environment, so while this means that 

■ you get wet when it rains and you need 
i a sun hat when it's sunny, it helps you 

3 appreciate where you are. In Sweden, 

■ we saw ospreys circling their nest, 

j watched a water vole swimming near 
3 the canal bank and saw a grass snake 
3 swim across the canal in front of us. I 
\ doubt we'd have noticed them all from 

3 inside a wheelhouse. 

3 


Tliere's also a great camaraderie with 
other boat users. 'We started out in a boat 
like that,' the owners of a 15m Grand 
Banks trawler-style motorboat told me in 
Inverness. A man who'd upgraded from 
my size of Zodiac to a 3.8m (12ft 6in) RIB 
told us he wished he'd kept his smaller 
boat as well, as his RIB always needed a 
slipway to launch - unlike the lightweight 
inflatable. Shore-bound fishermen often 
ask how much the boat cost - 1 could 
probably have sold several - and we've 



70 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


1,200 miles In Zodiac tenders 




had the owner of a large motorboat 
disembarking to enquire if we wanted our 
lines caught as we approached the other 
side of the same pier. 

On Ullswater, we've ferried crew out to 
a yacht when shallows prevented them 
being picked up from a nearby jetty, and 
received an invite to their barbecue. We've 
become adept at retrieving hats, including 
a fisherman's on Loch Ken, one belonging 
to a boater by Goring Lock on the River 
Thames, and one of our own on Loch 
Ness. I've been grateful of a lift back to 
the car from a kayaker after deteriorating 
weather on Ullswater shortened one of 
our earlier day trips, and returned the 
favour by towing canoes through a lock 
on the Caledonian Canal, saving their 
owners a portage. 


Just about to pass beneath a lifting bridge on Sweden’s Gota Canal 


Modifications 

I've read that Zodiac have built more 
than three million inflatables since they 
started making them in the 1950s, so they 
obviously have a lot of experience. The 
boats come ready to use, but I've made 
a few alterations over the years. 

I've had launching wheels fitted to the 
transom, which is useful when launching 
from slipways. When afloat, they're either 
stored vertically or, more often, easily 
removed to improve aesthetics! A 
detachable, home-made plastic bulkhead 
on my first Zodiac was attached between 
the seat and the closest floor slat to keep 
my bags/fuel tanks up front. In my current 
boat, metal loops on the floor panels 
beneath the seat hold a quick-release strap 
which passes through the handles of my 
fuel tank to keep it in position. 

I've also converted an old DIY Workmate 
into a stand for flushing out my outboard 
after salt water use (as featured in Practical 
Projects, PBO July 2013). On longer 
journeys I use an elastic cargo net to keep 
my waterproof canoe bags in place and 
have made a quick-release, camouflage- 
coloured boat cover from plastic tarpaulin: 
this helps the boat blend in when moored 
overnight, and keeps rainwater out. 

Owning a SIB 

Operating small 
Zodiacs in the way I 
have for the last 10 
years is probably not 
the typical usage for 
this form of craft. 

Most inflatables of a similar size act as 
tenders to larger boats, being either towed 
or stored on deck or in lockers for the 
majority of their lives, with sometimes 
only occasional use. 

The relative low cost of these boats when 
compared with larger options makes them 
attractive to those wanting to get on the 
water. I decided to buy new from the very 
helpful Phil and Mark at PA Lynch Ltd, my 
local Zodiac dealers, and Traded in' when 
upgrading as there's a strong market for 
second-hand outboards. Zodiac and 
similar companies do a range of soft 
inflatable boats (SIBs) like mine, with 


Fitting the thwart and preparing to inflate the 
boat at the start of the trip 

differing hull lengths and floors - eg slats, 
inflatable floors, or wooden or aluminium 
floor panels. 

It's thought that a 15hp engine is 
around the maximum size which is 
easily portable. SIBs can be stored and 
transported while they're rolled up so 
they can fit in the back of a car and 
don't need a road 
trailer. This makes 
transportation and 
storage easier and 
cheaper: no mooring 
fees or trailer storage/ 
maintenance are required. 

Setting the boat up is straightforward, 
and involves installing the wooden floor 
panels then inflating the two tubes and 
keel using a foot pump. The process takes 
about 30 minutes. When ready, the boat 
can be carried by two people - or one if 
you're using the launching wheels - so 
with the necessary permissions, it can be 
launched in a range of locations without 
always needing a slipway. 

The boat is cheap to run, with the main 
ongoing yearly costs being an engine 
service at around £95 (to ensure it's ready 
for the next season) and insurance cover at 


One of the two manually operated locks 
on the Gota Canal 

I £60 - theft protection plus third party 
j liability cover, which is required by some 
i waterway authorities. Maintenance of 
S the boat can be limited to a wash with a 
j hosepipe every now and again if you wish. 
3 My Suzuki engines - both my 6hp and 
3 the earlier 4hp - have been extremely 
\ reliable. The 6hp is economical: with two 
I people aboard, plus camping equipment/ 

\ supplies for a few days, we use around 
j 0.341t of petrol per mile. This results 
i in low running costs and means that 
■ although refuelling on multi-day trips 
; needs to be planned, it isn't a limiting 
: factor: the amount of fuel we're looking 
i for can easily be carried from a nearby 
3 petrol station. 

} The boat does of course have its 
] limitations: it's obviously not as 
3 seaworthy, fast or spacious as an 8m 
I (26ft) RIB with a 150hp outboard! Careful 
j: planning and consideration of weather 
3 conditions is required, while the correct 
] safety equipment must be carried and 
I the appropriate clothing worn. 

3 It's said that every boat is a compromise 
I of initial cost, practicality, size and so on. 
j However, I'm very happy with my choice, 

3 and see no reason to change. 


I’m very happy with 
my choice, and see 
no reason to change 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


71 




I PRACTICAL 


Preaching to the converted 


David Berry praises and demonstrates the efficiency and versatility of 
DC-to-DC converters, using circuits bought from the internet to make 
a dimmer control and a simple, economical trickle-charge regulator 


M y first contact with a DC 
converter was one I could 
have done without. I was 
an apprentice serving time 
in the company garage, 
and the mechanic who was teaching me 
decided I needed waking up. The induction 
coil ignition on our forklift trucks was a 
DC converter that took 1 2V from the 
battery and converted it to about 1 0kV 
to jump the spark plug gap or, to the 
delight of the assembled mechanics, 
jump into a dozing apprentice’s finger: 

‘just touch that screw in the distributor 
cap to see if it rotates...’ Luckily there 
wasn’t a lot of power in the spark, or the 
world’s garages would be littered with 
dead apprentices. 

Now, much later, the same induction coil 
technique is applied to low-voltage converters 
that can, for example, power your laptop from 
a 12V socket by boosting the voltage to 
somewhere around 20V (and then, inside 
the laptop, another DC converter drops it 
again to the 5V or 3V the logic circuits use). 

If you have an MPPT controller on your solar 
panel circuit then you will have a DC converter 
inside it to transform the panel’s output into 
the battery with the minimum of power loss. 



I used a DC-to-DC converter to make an LED light dimmer control 


Rapid switching 




A range of low-power DC-to- 
DC converters, each costing 
about £1 . At the top is a 
version with a built-in voltmeter that 
will measure input or output volts; at 
left is a version with a current limit; on 
the right are two similar-looking devices 
that will drop (‘buck’) or increase 
(‘boost’) the output voltage, and at 
the bottom is a tiny device that will 
nevertheless handle 3A 


Trio tbHutyCif current (AC), the 

Stuff you have in your hame, is that it can easily 
ba UBnarfomiad tom arm voltage to another - 
oftKec yp or down - by a simple inductive 

csIWk uoirriaginaiively, a transformer. 
iTHTisfbrmflra offer near-perfect conversion of 
power, losing only o lew per cent of the 
pow0f they franfirntt. 

In cantraSt, changing the voltage of a 
Olneot cuwn (DQ had, in the past, 
ita oonvorsion to AC then 
trarBlofinmg ft before converting it 
back lO DC at Uie required voltage. 
These days, Iha availability of 
high-powsr tWd-effect transistors 
(MOSFETe) allow DC converters to 
usa rapid Swffchlrtg - fiundreds of thousands 
of cydes per second - to produce the output 
voltaga. Poww can be fad into an induction 
COU, then (ha souroe disconnected by the 
FET and the coil IfeW collapses, creating a 
high vottaga which la conditioned and fed to 
tfw output at whatavor value is required. 

So, DC converters are like ‘DC transformers’ 
and are about as efficient, transforming power 
with very little loss. You need to think in terms 
of power, however: since power is the product 


of volts and amps, if the volts are, say, doubled 
by the converter, the amps available will be 
approximately halved. Conversely, and often 
usefully, if the voltage is halved the amps are 
doubled. You could compare this with linear 
regulators, which are simpler but can result in 
significant power loss as they dump all the 
power the load can’t handle as heat. 

Like AC transformers, DC converters can 
either decrease voltage (‘buck’ types) or 
increase voltage (‘boost’ types). You might 
already have few about your boat. If you run 
your laptop from the 12V supply, then you 
probably do so through a DC converter that 
boosts the voltage to whatever your laptop 
requires, and you can buy these off the shelf at 
Maplin and many other places. If you run or 
charge devices from a USB supply plugged 
into a 1 2V socket then again you have a DC 
converter, but this time it will drop the voltage 
to a stable 5V. 

But what if you want to do something a bit 
more bespoke? I had two requirements on 
our Moody Eclipse 33Aderyn Glas which 
could best be met with circuits bought from 
the internet: the first was a simple regulator 
for trickle-charge solar panels and the 
second was an LED light dimmer. 


72 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 



DC-to-DC converters 


Making a trickle-charge regulator 



Connection is simpie: on the reverse side, the input and output connections are marked. Before 
connecting the output to anything the voitage has to be set by twiddiing the pot (the round metai 
device near the ‘+’ sign) untii the output voitage is the required vaiue. This wiii cap the voitage at 
a safe ievei but wiii not increase the voitage if the input faiis beiow the capped vaiue 


I was shocked when I found that nny 1 5W 
trickle-charge solar panel was capable of 
delivering enough energy to the 105Ah 
starter battery to take its voltage into the red 
zone, getting near to 1 7V. This was really 
unexpected and probably unusual, but I 
needed to ensure it wouldn’t happen again 
if I wasn’t around to monitor the situation. So 
I used a postage stamp-sized DC converter 
and a Schottky diode to make an efficient 
voltage-limiting regulator. 

These little circuits can deliver 3A, though 
you should de-rate them down to 2A just 
to remove the stress - so they are good for 
trickle-charging only. They are no substitute for 
a full-sized regulator for a serious solar panel 
setup (see PBO January 2015 for more about 
that). A distinct advantage is that they have no 
current-draining LEDs which, over the timescale 
my trickle-charger is used, can make a dent in 
the battery’s capacity. 

Unless you are certain that your solar panel 
setup has a diode in the circuit to prevent 



The smallest 3A DC converter I’ve ever seen 


reverse current flow from the battery to the 
panel, you should add a Schottky diode 
between the regulator and the battery in 
the positive line (marked ‘-i- out’). Use one 
which has 3A or greater capacity. 

The converter has four connections labelled 
‘-I- in’ and - in’ and ‘-i- out’ and - out’, so all 
you have to do is connect the -i- and - from the 
panel to the ‘in’ side and the battery -i- and - to 
the ‘out’ side. With the panel delivering power, 
but before connecting the unit to the battery, 
measure the output voltage and tweak the pot 
to set the maximum output voltage at whatever 


you want it to be: mine is set at 1 4.4V. 

The chances are that when you connect the 
unit to the battery, the battery will absorb all the 
current available - it is a trickle-charge after all - 
so the voltage will not reach 14.4V. However, 
if you have a situation like I did last autumn, 
then this device, costing less than a pound, 
will act as a safety valve. 

A cheap bench 
power supply 

Y ou may not have a bench 
power supply on your wish 
list, but there might be times 
when you want to play with bits of 
kit at home and wish you had a 
variable supply available. The cost of 
a bench supply is enormous, 
but luckily there are cheap DC 
converters which you can feed from 
a switched mode supply from a 
laptop, for example, and these 
come with a built-in voltmeter which 
you can point to either the input or 
output voltage. 

By now you won’t need me to tell 
you how to connect the unit, so go 
ahead and connect the four wires. 

Make sure the output is turned down 
to a voltage below that required for 
whatever you want to connect to it, and 
always return the output to a low value 
when you’ve finished using the supply. 
This is just good practice, and prevents 
you from accidentally turning the unit 
on when you’ve left it set at a high level, 
with consequent damage to whatever 
you’re testing. 



The whole thing fits into a tiny box which, on my boat, piugs between the panei and battery 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


73 




^ PRACTICAL 


Making a dimmer control using a DC converter 


M any people now use LED strings either internally to light areas 
such as the galley and heads, or externally - ie in the cockpit. 
We do the latter, and I wanted a dimmer control to allow us 
to wind the light level up and down. LEDs are essentially current- 
sensitive devices, and although the output brightness can be 


controlled by changing the supply voltage, when the level 
is changed frequently it’s better to control current. 

Luckily there are DC converters which come with current 
limiting as standard, so I adapted one of these for my 
dimmer control. 



Here’s the DC converter with the current- 
limiting feature identified by a second screw- 
type pot (at the tip of the screwdriver). To 
make the device more user-friendly I 
removed the pot and replaced it with one 
that can be adjusted with the fingers 



The pot comes out easily with a bit of tooth- 
pulling, leaving behind small wire legs 
soldered to the PCB 



The legs are best left in place since they 
may be used to connect the top and bottom 
surfaces of the PCB: modern PCBs are a 
multi-layer sandwich 



The new larger pot is a bit special. The 
perceived brightness level is not linear and 
the controlling pot needs to compensate for 
this, so we need a 10k logarithmic pot. These 
are reasonably rare, and I found mine on eBay. 
The pot must be a ‘reverse log C pot’ which 
will be marked ‘Cl OK’ (an ‘A10K’ is not the 
same). Buy a suitable knob at the same time 



The wires are soldered to the pads that 
previously had the screw pot legs soldered in 
place. It’s important that the centre pad goes 
to the centre contact of the new pot and the 
other wires are connected as shown 



As always, use a fine-tipped soldering 
iron and support the Joints with 
heatshrink sleeving to avoid fatiguing 
the soldered Joint 



The logarithmic pot must be oriented a particular way, 
or the range of movement over which the LED dims will 
be small. Have a careful look at this photo, and make 
sure you wire the three tags to the three PCB pads in 
the same order 


The output voltage must be set using the other blue screw pot. I set mine to 12V, 
but if the battery voltage drops anywhere near that the output light level may dim a 
little, so it may be necessary to set the output lower to get a consistent light level. 
Add a 12V cigar lighter plug (if that’s what you want to use) to the ‘in -H’ and ‘in -’ 
terminals of the convertor and mount the whole thing in a suitable case 


74 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 












DC-to-DC converters ^ 


How to select and buy 


U sed with due care, eBay 
is as good a source of DC 
converters as anywhere 
else, and you’ll generally find them 
for a fraction of the cost of a unit 
from the large retailers. You get 
no warranty, of course, so be 
sceptical - and don’t use anything 
you have a doubt about on 
something that is precious. 

Do also ascertain whether the 
supplier specialises in this type of 
equipment. Recently I checked out 
a supplier of DC converters from 
China, only to find this was the 
only electronics item sold by a 
shop specialising in sex toys. 

What an eye-opener! 

There are genuine UK-based 
suppliers on eBay, 
but I suspect that 
the quality of the 
devices is no 
different from the 
native Chinese 
version - they are 
clearly the same 
circuit - although 
you will get them 
more quickly. 

As always. I’m 
not going to 
recommend any 
particular supplier, 
but here is what you 
need to search for: 

‘Buck’-type DC converters output 
a voltage lower than the input. The 
ones for sale seem to be mainly 
based on the LM2596 chip, so a 
search on eBay for ‘buck DC 
converter LM2596’ will bring up 
a selection. For a similar device 
but with more current capability, 
search for XL4005 in place of the 
LM2596. This is the chip in my 
LED dimmer circuit. 

‘Boost’-type DC converters 
output a voltage greater than 
the input. These will be based 
on LM2577 or XL6009: the latter 
supersedes the former, but 
either is fine. 

To select the right size you 
need to know a few things about 
the device you are connecting 
to; the LED string or the solar 


panel, for example. In my 
trickle-charger case I knew the 
solar panel maximum voltage 
(the open circuit voltage) was 
about 22V and its maximum 
power was 1 5W; the battery 
was a standard 1 2V unit, so its 
maximum sustained voltage 
shouldn’t exceed 14.4V. Therefore 
I needed a DC converter with an 
input range exceeding 22V and 
capable of delivering 1 5W. 

The output would be determined 
by the battery and set by me to 
14.4V, so this would make the 
current 15W divided by 14.4V, 
giving a little over 1A. I chose a 
converter that would handle 2A 
to give a little leeway. 


Selection of the converter for 
the LED string was simpler. I knew 
the LEDs needed 1 2V and 1 2W, 
so I only had to find a converter 
that would output that wattage 
(again, converting this to current 
we get 1A) and with an output 
voltage range that included 12V 
and an input voltage range that 
covered the battery volts, say 
1 5V max. 

Finally, DC converters were 
notorious for interfering with 
radios. I’ve never noticed any 
problem with the ones I’ve used, 
but I do take care to position them 
some distance from the radios 
on the boat. If your radio is 
affected, try moving the converter 
physically further from the radio, 
or shield the converter within a 
grounded box. 


ri 

- 


1 


■ly 


Searching on eBay for ‘buck DC converter 
LM2596’ will bring up a selection 


A quart from a pint pot 

I was asked recemty wtwihof It was posable to (ler lye 24V Uom 
me 12V battery supply. Tbo sofulion la a aeconm typo ot DC 
qpitverlor {0 'bPOSi' COrtveftOf) whith up VOllOge 
applied 1e if, lUe connwdons of every siinplen and again, Iw awe 
ItiBl Ihe circuit you buy Js capable of contlmjously defivering the 
current requEred the eulput votlago. to ael n up^ connect me 
Input Oie^n twiddte the pel to gel the correct output voltage. Then 
connect the output and check die voltage again. M 


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Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


75 


Discounts for subscribers 












^ PRACTICAL 


How to make 
cockpit cushions 

Paul Vellacott discovers that making cockpit cushions saves 
money and is comfortably within everyone’s capabilities 



W e have owned our 9m 

(30ft) Feeling 306 for about 
six years. The cockpit 
seating is well designed 
for our needs, but each 
year we have found ourselves longing for 
something a little more comfortable than 
GRP. We considered teak or its man-made 
substitutes, but eventually opted for fitted 
cushions. We decided to try making them 
ourselves, primarily for cost reasons, and 
to our delight the finished cushions provide 
not only much-improved comfort but also a 
feeling of greater security while sailing. 

We started by enquiring at several boat shows 
about the materials normally used by suppliers 
along with general design requirements. We 
quickly realised that we needed to list our own 
key design needs, which were: 

■ Sailing the boat shouldn’t be hampered in 
any way. 

■ The cushions had to be not too thick in 
case they got in the way of lines/sheets into 
the cockpit. 

■ They had to be strong enough to be walked 
upon quite often. 

■ They had to stay in position either when being 
stepped upon or when the boat was heeling. 

■ They had to be not too light so the wind 
wouldn’t grab them. 

■ They had to be reasonably water-resistant 
and tolerant of salt water. 

■ They had to be comfortable for up to six 
people eating at the cockpit table. 

■ They had to be divided so as to allow for 
ease of storage, easy access to cockpit lockers 
under seats and maximum versatility of usage 
either as squabs or backrests. 

As with so many DIY projects, it helps 
enormously to plan out the job and be prepared 


ABOUT THE AUTHOR 





past few years. He 
lift-keeler from the 


Paul Vellacott 
is a retired 
engineer who, 
always liking a 
challenge, has 
moved from 
dinghy sailing 
to yachts in the 
sails a Feeling 306 
River Hamble. 



The cushions are comfortable and 
readily adaptable 


Some 


to change your plans as you proceed, 
of our design requirements became honed 
through this process. For example, we ended up 
dividing the cushions into three each side of the 
cockpit so that they would not only split at the 
cockpit lockers but would also be an exact 
mirror image of each other on either side of the 
boat (except for accommodating the autopilot). 
This not only improved their versatility, but 
simplified the task of making them. 


These are most 
of the tools and 
materials we used 


RIGHT The 
cushion fabric 
with one of the 
paper templates 
we made to 
ensure the 
cushions would 
fit snugly 


The finished cockpit cushions 
In Paul Vellacott’s Feeling 306 


76 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 




How to make cockpit cushions % 


Choosing and preparing the foam J The results 


W e considered using closed-cell 

polyurethane, but soon ruled this out 
as too hard to sit upon. We had been advised 
by a cushion supplier that for open-cell foann 
we would need a thickness of Sin. However, 
we felt that this would be too bulky and get in 
the way, so via the internet we found an 
open-cell foann designed for pub seating and 
the like, which is adequately dense for a 
thickness of 2in. This foann had the added 
advantage of being quite heavy. 

We made up thick paper templates on the 
boat to ensure that the cushions would fit snugly 
in position. We ordered the foam to be cut as 
two long strips, one for each cockpit seat. Even 
though we had made the templates, we decided 
to take the foam to the boat and shape them 



The foam was cut and shaped to size 



of the wrapping : 

there to fit. For this task we were advised that 3 
an electric carving knife is best, but we used a | 

sharp bread-knife. We rounded the front lip of | 

each cushion to minimise the risk of lines and 3 
sheets catching on them. [ 

To make the cushions reasonably water- [ 

resistant we wrapped the foam in pallet wrap, \ 
and found that three layers is about right. 

Since this is cheap we will be able to renew j 
it each year if necessary, but judging by its i 

perfect condition after one month’s continuous j 
usage we think it might last several years \ 

before renewal. 3 


Assembling the cushion covers 


T o ensure that the cushion covers were 
adequately hard-wearing, we made them 
from an acrylic fabric similar to that used for 
sprayhoods. This we could just about sew 
using our domestic sewing machine. We also 
used heavy-duty corrosion-proof zips, again as 
used for sprayhoods, but on reflection we could 
perhaps have used something a little lighter. 

To ensure that the cushions wouldn’t slip we 
bought a non-slip material online that we sewed 
to the underside of each. 

We had very little experience of making 
cushions and found that there was a lot of trial 
and error for the first cover, and a fair amount for 
some of the others too: it does not help having 
to machine them inside out. Pinning the fabric 
before machining was the most practical way, 
except for some of the tightest bends where 
we used tacking (ie hand-sewing first). 

The great thing about using such a strong 



Tacking was used for some of the curves 
to be machined 



The covers were machined inside out 


fabric is that you can remove the stitches quite 
easily and have another go. The zips were the 
most difficult bit to get right, in such a way that 
the ends were covered by the fabric: this was 
to prevent the zippers rubbing and marking 
the GRP seating surfaces. To make the fabric 
fit neatly around the foam, it is necessary to 
make the covers a little smaller than the foam: 
between 1 -2cm smaller was about right. 

Another area we found very fiddly to sew was 
the cushion that accommodates the autopilot. 
The hole for the autopilot pillar was particularly 
difficult. For tight curves, stretching the fabric 
along its edge (but being careful not to tear it) 
before machining helped. The foam for this 
cushion needed to be in two parts to fit round 
the hole. 



O ur new cushions look smart and have 
already been a real boon both for sailing 
and relaxing. We are particularly pleased with 
the non-slip material, which is so effective that 
we have now decided against our original plan 
of fitting straps. The 2in thickness has proved 
to be just right with the particular foam we 
bought. Of course, the quality is probably not 
as good as most cushion suppliers would 
achieve, but the cushions do the job admirably: 
and there is nothing like the satisfaction of 
making something yourself. 

Since completion, the cushions have seen 
considerable usage including being out in a 
sudden storm halfway across Lyme Bay, where 
it was necessary to quickly put in two reefs. 

In the process of moving fore and aft the 
cushions gave as much grip as the original 
seat, if not more, and they stayed solidly in place 
throughout. Although they were put away when 
it really started to pour, the condition of tw peM 
wrapping erffor 30 iruch to us thet 

they could hah/9 stayed out wtdi thefoarri 
remaining dry. 


‘There is 

nothing 

iike the 

satisfaction 

of making 

something 

yourseif’ 


Cockpit cushion tips 

■ Do plenty of research, and don’t just 
accept everything the experts tell you. The 
internet is a mine of useful information. 

■ To get the hang of things, make up one 
of the easier cushions first. 

■ If at first you don’t succeed, then try again. 
We got through a whole reel of thread before 
we had finished. A stitch unpicker turned out 
to be an essential tool! 

■ It’s better to buy too much fabric than 
too little, to allow for mistakes. 


What it cost 

Foam 

SO-den&^COnrirTiarciat $Bal:in9 foam 
TW Foam Ltd 

C41 

Cmhion tabiic, xipa an<l tlireail 

Acfyfic cafivaa (uncoated) 

Heavy-duty UV thread 

Mabtfta House Uct 

£76 

Non-slip fabric 

StayPut ECO PER fina-mash 

PfEcHcal SiLTriaceware 

£25 

; Pallet wirap 

One black roll 

£6 

TOTAL: £148 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


77 












jump 

starters 



Ennrhys Barrell tests 10 jump starters/power packs 
intended to get your engine started if your battery is flat 


ABOUT THE AUTHOR 


H Emrhys Barrell 
has worked 
in boatyards 
including 
Macwester, 
Groves & 
Guttridge and 
Palmer Johnson, and built 
Great Britain 1 1 for Chay 
Blyth. He was technical editor 
of Motor Boat & Yachting 
then launched Motor Boats 
Monthiy, followed by Luxury 
Yacht and Canai Boat & 
iniand Waterways. He lives 
beside the Thames in Goring. 


H ave you ever come 
down to the boat 
and found your 
engine start battery 
flat? It could be that 
someone has left a light on in 
the cabin, or the bilge pump float 
switch has stuck on, or just that 
the battery has been losing 
capacity over the years and 
the first start of the season 
has killed it. Whichever, you 
are stuck: and unlike with a car. 


you can’t just pull another 
one alongside and use a set 
of jump leads. 

The answer is a portable jump 
starter or power pack. This 
consists of a half-size 1 2V battery 
in a plastic case with a carrying 
handle, and short jump leads 
permanently connected across its 
output terminals. You just clip the 
crocodile clips across your dead 
battery, wait a minute or two, then 
turn over your engine. 

Jump starters come in a variety 


of sizes to suit small or large 
engines, and can also have 
extra features giving them other 
uses on board. These include 
12V outlet sockets, compressors 
and even 230V inverters. Most 
are either gel or AGM lead acid, 
so they will not spill if they are 
tipped over. We also tried two of 
the latest lithium power packs. 
Super-light and compact, they are 
mainly aimed at car use, but we 
wanted to have a look at the 
latest technology. 


78 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 




Jump starters on test 





How we tested them 


12V vacs in parallel 
provided a load bank 
equal to IkW and 
2kW starter motors 


INSET A clamp 
ammeter measured 
current delivered 
by each pack 


cranking time, as we considered 
this the minimum that would be 
necessary to pull the fuel through 
if you have run out, or to bleed the 
system, or just to get the engine 
turning over fast enough to start, 
with a couple of restarts in reserve. 

With some of the units, it is 
recommend that you only crank for 
10 seconds at a time, then wait 2 
minutes for the battery to recover - 
but when we tried this, we were 
surprised to find it did not make 
any significant difference to the 
overall cranking time. 


Lead acid battery technology 


The units on test quoted 
output ratings either in 
ampere-hours (Ah) or 
maximum cranking current, 
but neither of these is realistic 
for what we want to know. 
Cranking amps are defined 
in one of two ways. Cold 
Cranking Amps, CCA, are 
defined as the maximum 
current a battery will deliver for 
30 seconds at -1 8°C, before 
the voltage drops to 7.2V. 
Meanwhile, Marine Cranking 
Amps, MCA, are defined as the 
maximum current the battery 
will deliver for 30 seconds at 
0°C, before the voltage drops 
to 7.2V. 

However, what we want to 
know is how long the jump 
starter will crank a typical 
engine at typical temperatures: 
in our case 15°C. So we 
looked at two different engine 
sizes, and then tested how 
long each pack would crank 
them for. To do this we had 
to work out the actual power 
taken by a typical starter motor 
when you are turning the 
engine. A 10-20hp diesel, as 
found in many sailing boats, 
will have a 1 kW starter motor. 
This will take around 90A from 
the battery when cranking. A 
40-50hp diesel, as found in 
many river cruisers and narrow 
boats, will have a 2kW starter, 
taking 180A. In petrol engine 
terms, a 2,000cc engine will 
have a 1 kW starter, while a 
4,000cc engine will have a 
2kW starter. 

Rather than actually using 
a starter motor, which would 
give varying results as the 
engine turned over, we set up 
a fixed load bank. We worked 
out that a 12V vacuum cleaner 
takes around 12.5A, so seven 
of these in parallel would take 
a consistent 90A, while 14 
would take 1 80A. (And in case 
you are wondering why I have 
got 14 vacuum cleaners in my 
loft, that is another story from 
my past life!) We then hooked 
up each jump starter in turn 
to a flat battery that we had 
discharged to 10V, and timed 
how long they delivered power 
until the voltage dropped to 
7.2V. We did this for each 
unit at 90A, then 1 80A, 
recharging the units for 48 
hours in between using their 
mains chargers. 

Realistically we were looking 
for at least 5-6 minutes’ 


Seventy-five per cent of batteries 
sold today are still lead acid. 
Cheap, simple and reliable, their 
weight penalty is not an issue 
in most applications. Lead ore 
is widely found worldwide, and 
its low melting point makes it 
cheap and easy to smelt. In 
its solid form it has a very low 
environmental impact, and it is 
almost 95% recyclable at the 
end of the battery life. 

The first lead acid cell was 
invented by Gustav Plante in 
1859, and the principle has 
remained virtually unchanged 
ever since. He found that 
when a plate of lead (Pb) and 
a plate of lead oxide (Pb 02 ) 
were immersed in sulphuric 
acid (H^SO^) they developed 
a potential difference of 2.1V, 
causing a current to flow in a 
circuit connected across them. 


As the process continued, both 
plates turned to lead sulphate 
(PbSOJ and the sulphuric acid 
to water (H 2 O). At the end of the 
process, if a reverse current was 
applied, the plates reverted to 
their original composition and the 
water turned back to acid. 


With AGM batteries, the acid is 
heid in spongy glassfibre mats 
between the piates 


Put six cells in series and 
you have a 12.6V battery. 

Add more plates to each cell, 
and you increase the overall 
capacity of the battery. 

Since then, the only major 
changes have been in how the 
acid has been fixed. Originally 
it was a free liquid, so if the 
battery was tipped over or 
holed it leaked out, and the 
battery was called a wet cell. 
The next step, in the 1930s, 
was to gellify the acid. This 
meant that if it was tipped or 
holed, nothing would run out. 

The final step in the 1970s 
was what is called absorbed 
glass mat, AGM. Here the acid 
is held in spongy glassfibre 
mats between the plates. 
Again, even though it is still a 
liquid, if the battery is tipped 
or holed, nothing runs out. 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


79 


Gear test 


Jump starter products on test 


Clarke JS900 

PRICE: £65 

Contact: www.clarketoolinf.co.uk 


Clarke JSlOlO 

PRICE: £110 

Contact: www.clarketooling.co.uk 


A basic unit with 
permanently live clips, a 1 2V 
socket and light, plus a 
handy pocket in the back so 
the instructions are always 
with it. (Now why does 
every piece of equipment 
we test not have this 
feature!) It has hefty clips, 
good-size cables (1 .1 m 
long), and it gave 6 minutes 
cranking time for our smaller 
diesels at a very competitive 
price. It weighs 8kg. 


Clarke 5 in 1 




Moving up the Clarke range, fiis 
has an on/off switch for tha cUpS, 
a 1 2V socket, a light and 
a compressor. The 1 m 
cables are a good 
diameter, with hefty 
clips. This unit gave 
8 minutes cranking for 
a small diesel and nearly 
5m for a 40-50hp, but at 
a price 50% more than 
the JS900. It weighs 9kg. 


Clarke JS4000 


PRICE: £125 


PRICE: £140 


Contact: www.clarketooling.co.uk 


Contact: www.clarketooling.co.uk 



As its name implies, this has 
everything. Two 1 2V two 

USB sockets, a compies^, 
a 300W inverter and a light 
It has an internal relay to 
switch the power on. 

The cables are only 
middling size and aro 
0.9m long, but itgavn 
a healthy 7m 30s of 
1kW cranking time, 
at a weight of 10kg. 



If you want maximum bang for 
your buck, then this is the 
one. There’s no frills - just a 
light, a 1 2V socket, a pair of 
the thickest cables (we would 
estimate 35sq mm) which 
are 1 .2m long with hefty 
clips, plus an on/off switch 
for the power. On test it gave 
nearly double the nearest 
competitor’s cranking time at 
1 9 minutes for the 1 kW and 1 Q 
minutes for the 2kW starter. Tha 
weight of 1 7kg explains whero 
all this power comes from. 


Sealey RSl 


Hilka RAC 


PRICE: £130 


PRICE: £35 


Contact: www.sealey.co.uk 


Contact: wvwn,Wlkiuco.uk 



This is a basic ufVft 
with permanently 
live leads and a 
1 2V socket. It 
gave 8 minutes 
cranking time 
at 1 kW and 4 
minutes 30 
seconds at 
2kW, and 
weighs 9kg: 
but for the 
price you would 
have expected 
more features. 



The smallest, 
lightest (5kg} and 
cheapest of tha 
lead acid 
models, this 
would give 
you 1 kW at a 
pinch for 2 
minutes 30 
seconds, but 
realistically it 
is probably Of 
more interest 
to car owners. 


80 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 




Jump starters on test 


Ring RPP160/170 


PRICE: £105/£135 

Contact: www.ringautomotivqrco.uk 

Ring makes a huge range of 
automotive equipment and 
many models of power packs: 
we have just chosen four to giv* 
an idea of the options. The 
RPP1 60 and 1 70 are the same 
model, but the 1 70 has extra 
features. The 1 60 is a basic 
jump starter with a 1 2V socket, a. 

USB socket and a light, plus an. 
on/off switch for the power. Tho 
1 70 adds a compressor and a 
3CWWtmeil0rroraneKtra!EW Tha 
mid-size cables are 0.8m long, wAh very strong croc clips. Both 
jump starters gave nearly 6 minutes of 1 kW power, and 2 minutes 
30 seconds of 2kW. Weights are 8.5kg and 9kg. 



Ring Li RPP900 


PRICE: £85 

Contact: www.ringautomotive.co.uk 


This has the latest Wthlum 
ion battery technoksgy, 
making it light and 
small. As mentiori#d 
earlier, it is not realty 
appropriate for a 
boat, givEfig only 1 
minute 15 
seconds , 

cranking at 1 kW, 
but it would be 
handy to keep 
in the car 
for emergencies. 



Ring RPP265 

PRICE: £150 



Contact: www.ringautomoltvf.ea.iJk 

This is double the weight and 
power of the 1 70, with a 
corresponding increase in 
performance. The 265 doea 
not have the compressor, 
but it does have a 300W 
inverter and all the other 
features. It gave 10 minutes 
cranking at 1 kW and 5 
minutes at 2kW: however, 
whan you compart its Oulput 
to the similar capacity Clarke 
4000, it is well down. The 1 .2m 
cables are a good size, with 
very strong croc clips. 



Sealey Li 405A 


PRICE: £160 


Contact: www.seaiey.co.uk 


This also uses lithium ion battery technology, this time with a bit more 
power, and gives 1 minute 30 seconds cranking at 1 kW, but it’s still not 
really up to what we would be needing on board, and has a high price to 
go with it. However, both this and the Ring LI RPP900 could be the shape 
o4 ihinga to coma, ar^d wa ara gfslaSui for the cbarvca to look a4 tham. 


Jump starters at a glance 


Model 

Claimed output 
Ah/A 

PBO tested 10-20hp 
cranking time 

PBO tested 40-50hp 
cranking time 

Weight 

Perm live 
leads 

1 2V socket 

USB socket 

Compressor 

I 

230V 

inverter 

Light 

Price* 

Clarke JS900 

400A 

6ni Os 

2m 45s 

8kg 

Yes 

Yes 

No 

No 

No 

Yes 

£65 

Clarke JS1010 

17Ah/400A 

8m Os 

4m 45s 

9kg 

No 

Yes 

No 

Yes 

No 

Yes I 

£110 

I Clarke 5 in 1 

18Ah 

7m 30s 

3m 15s 

10kg 

No 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

300W 

Yes 

£125 

Clarke JS4000 

38Ah 

19m Os 

1 10m Os 

17kg 

No 

Yes 

No 

No 

No 

Yes 

£140 

[ Sealey RSI 

300A 

8m 10s 

4m 30s 

9kg 

Yes 

Yes 

No 

No 

No 

No 

£130 

Hilka RAC 

10Ah/400A 

2m 30s 

n/a 

i 5kg 

Yes 

Yes 

No 

No 

No 

No 

£35 

Ring RPP160 

17Ah 

6m Os 

2m 45s 

8.5kg 

No 

Yes 

Yes 

No 

No 

Yes 

£105 

Ring RPP170 

17Ah 

5m 45s 

^ 2m 30s 

9kg 

No 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

200W 

Yes 

£135 

Ring RPP265 

33Ah 

10m Os 

5m 15s 

17kg 

No 

Yes 

I Yes 

No 

300W 

Yes 

£150 

Sealey Li 405A 

405A 

1m 30s 

^ n/a 

1.2kg 

No 

No 

I No 

No 

No 

Yes I 

£160 

! Ring Li RPPgOO 

230A 

1m 15s 

, n/a 

1kg 

No , 

No 

Yes 

i 

No [ 

No 

Yes 

£85 


* Average online prices 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


81 






If oxygen and 
hydrogen 
collect Inside 
the battery 
case, they can 
form an 
explosive 
mixture 


Battery gassing 

To recharge a nominal 12.6V 
battery, you have to apply a 
greater voltage to force the 
current backwards. This voltage 
is typically 1 .0-1 .5V above the 
level of the battery. As the end of 
the charge cycle is reached, to 
completely recharge the battery, 
this voltage rises still further. 

When it passes 1 4.4V the acid 
starts to break down, releasing 
hydrogen gas at the negative 
plate and oxygen at the positive 
plate. This is often incorrectly 
called boiling, as what is being 
heard are the bubbles of gas 
forming at the plates. 

In a wet cell, these bubbles rise 
through the acid and escape 
above the plates, then out into 
the atmosphere. In the 
meantime, the level of the acid 
gradually goes down. If the rising 
gases collect, either in the case 
or in the space above, they can 
form an explosive mixture. 

Hydrogen and oxygen are highly 
reactive, and will recombine if 
the mixture is between 4-70% 


hydrogen and a spark is 
introduced. This explosion must 
not be underestimated. If it takes 
place over the plates, it will blow 
the top off the case. If it is in a 
battery compartment, I have 
seen a radio battery room on a 
ship where a steel watertight 
door was blown clean off its 
hinges. Likewise, in the battery 
store in my boatyard, when the 
engineer came in one Monday 
morning and disconnected the 
charging clips, the resulting 
spark triggered an explosion 
which blew the roof off the store. 

In a gel battery, the bubbles 
still form at the plates, but as 
they are forced slowly through 
the gel they recombine. Any that 
reach the top are prevented from 
escaping by sealed caps. 

If the plates have failed or there 
is serious over-voltage, the vents 
will release gas slowly, but then 
the battery is finished. Similarly 
with AGM, the gases recombine 
so none are given off to the 
compartment. 


Extra features 

As previously stated, some of 
the units come with useful extra 
features. The first is a 1 2V outlet 
socket which allows you to use 
the starter as a power pack to 
run anything that plugs in with a 
cigarette lighter plug, and the next 
is a USB charging outlet (circled in 
photo). Most units will have a light - 
important if you’re connecting 
the leads in a dark engififi spaca 
- and some will hava a 
compressor, but this to 4 

only high-pressure, 
so it’s useful for 
pumping up your 
trailer or car tyres, 
but not for inflating 
the dinghy. However, 
a cheap inflator will 
plug into the socket, 
serving the same 
purpose. 

Some will have a 230V 
inverter outlet, making the 
unit very versatile but only giving 
200-300W power. Also, beware 
that some bucket shop units may 
give a very ‘dirty’ AC waveform that 
will damage delicate equipment. 

The units varied widely in the 
thickness and length of the supply 
cables. Thicker, shorter cables 
have less voltage drop so these 
will give better performance, 
but extra length makes them 
more convenient. However, the 
most important feature to note is 
whether the crocodile clips are 
permanently live or not. In some of 
the cheaper models the clips are 
live - ie with 1 2V always connected 
across them - so when you 
connect them to the battery there 
will be a spark as the second clip 
touches the battery terminal. This 
could ignite hydrogen gas inside 
the case or in the compartment. 



Tested cranking time for a 10-20hp diesel 


Clarke JS4000 
Ring RPP265 
Sealey RS1 
Clarke JS1 010 
Clarke 5in1 
Clarke JS900 
Ring RPP160/170 
Hilka RAC 
Sealey Li 405A 
Ring Li RPPOOO 



0:00 2:00 4:00 6:00 8:00 10:00 12:00 

Time (minutes) 


14:00 


16:00 


18:00 20:00 


The instructions with these units 
tell you not to connect the second 
clip directly to the battery, but 
instead to the car’s engine block 
or chassis. This means that any 
spark will be away from the battery. 
However, in most boats the engine 
will be too far from the battery, or 
on the other side of a bulkhead. 
You may find the terminal on the 
hack erf the battery master 

switch, but this will only 
f^uce the risk 
€ff an explosion 
within the battery, 
not within the 
j compartment. 

^ IT you buy one 
oi these, ensure 
the engine space 
Is well ventilated 
Ikfft, and that the 
bertiery caps have 
be*n opened. The 
better models either have 
internal circuitry that only lets the 
current flow after the clip has been 
connected, or an on/off switch 
serving the same purpose. 


PBO verdict 


Overall, we were Impressed. 
Most units divide into 
approximately 17Aii or 35Aii. 
The 17Ah units all gave 
1 kW for at least 5 minutes, 
making them ideal for a 10- 
20hp diesel or a 2,000cc car. 
The 35Ah units would crank 
your 40-50hp for at least 5 
minutes. The lOAh RAC unit 
may be too small for your 
boat, but at 5kg and £35 
would be useful back-up in 
a small car. 

Similarly, the two lithium 
units were probably not 
appropriate for boat use, and 
again in fairness the makers 
did suggest this might be 
the case, but we still asked 
them to send them along 
for us to look at: and at 
1 kg each, they would sit in 
the glovebox of a car for 
emergency use. 

The numbers give you the 
information you require to 
make a decision. For sheer 
power the Clarke JS4000 
wins out, and of course this 
would also start a larger 
engine, up to 85hp. If you 
want the extras, then the 
Clarke 5 in 1 and the Ring 
RPP170 are neck-and-neck, 
while for a basic 1 kW starter 
the Clarke JS900 offers the 
best value: it’s just shame 
about its live leads. 


82 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 







2015 marina visitors’ price guide 




302 

marina 
listings 


THE@>2015i 

MARINA 

VISITORS' 

PRICE 
GUIDE 


Our handy guide to 302 visitor 
berth listings from coastal marinas 
offering cruising sailors a warm 
welcome - see our online version 
for full details about local 
attractions and special offers at: 
www.pbo.co.uk/marina-guide 


ow in its seventh year, PBO’s 
unique marina visitors’ price guide 
aims to showcase the coastai 
marinas and harbours offering 
overnight berthing around the 
United Kingdom, Channei isiands and Northern 
ireland. With comparative prices and detaiis of 
faciiities for 302 iocations, we hope this heips 
cruising saiiors to pian a few nights ashore 
during this summer’s adventures. 

Criteria 

We only list walk-ashore visitor berths with 
nnast-up access from the coast. In order to 
compare the many differing pricing structures, 
we’ve worked out an average per-metre price 
(including VAT) based on quotes for yachts of 
7m, 1 0m and 1 3m LOA. To help you to plan your 
access we give the Mean Low Water Springs 
(MLWS) depth of water at the pontoon and in the 
approaches. Drying marinas are listed as zero 
depth - be sure to check the tides! 


What’s new? 

Many improvements were reported this year, 
such as Bembridge Harbour’s new 24/7 live-feed 
tide height data, recording the height of water 
at the entrance channel bar, updated every 60 
seconds and displayed on the harbour website 
and at the berthing office. 

One of the most important aspects for visiting 
sailors is the prospect of a hot shower ashore! 
Southsea Marina (Premier) is celebrating new 
luxury berth holder and visitor amenities this year. 

New shower, toilet and laundry facilities are 
also being opened at Girvan Harbour, at the 
Kyle of Lochalsh pontoons and at Mallaig 
Marina later this summer. 

Port Ellen Marina recently celebrated the 
completion of 20 new berths, thanks to a 
Coastal Communities Fund grant. 

The official opening of the new Scalloway 
Community Pontoon was held in April 2015. 

Milford Marina’s completed multi-million-pound 
lock gate investment means cruisers can sail 


access the marina with even greater ease. 

Every year, the PBO marina guides aim to 
improve. Gravesend and Insworke Mill Quay 
marinas are among the new 201 5 visitor 
listings - if you know of a missing marina that 
fits our criteria, please contact us so that we 
can include it online and in 201 6. 


Extra details online 

Details about local attractions that 
could tempt sailors to each marina, 
from idyllic locations, bustling city 
centre attractions, whisky distilleries 
in Scotland and Viking trails in the 
Shetland Isles - plus special price 
deals and services offered by the 
marinas - can be found at the 
revamped PBO website, along with 
photos, Facebook and Twitter links. 



For more information please visit www.pbo.co.uk/marina-guide 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


83 



2015 marina visitors’ price guide 


Price table notes 


Rates are for the 201 5 season 

Prices are the average per metre (based on prices for 7m, 1 0m and 1 ^ 

All prices include VAT where applicable 
Y = yes, S = some berths, N = no 
WiFi: Y = at berth, O = onsite, N = no 
For services: < = within a mile 
Drying heights represented by 0 
For depths: > = greater than, < = less than 

Where the approach depth is considerably less than the berth depth, ft mary be 
the marina has a sill or lock - please check with the marina operator 
For annual berthing prices see PBO’s April 201 5 issufl: 



Westray 





Stromness Kirkwall 


Kinlochbervie 


Stornoway 


Scotland 

(including Orkney) 



Marina name 

Price per metre (£) 

Maximum berth 
depth (m) at MLWS 

Depth (m) in the 
approaches at MLWS 

VHF channel 

Telephone 

Water/Electric 

Toilets/Shower 

Laundry/WiFi 

Q 

g' 

ca 

O 

cS 

CD 

1 

Anstruther Harbour 

2.87 

Z] 

0 

11,16 

01333 310836 

YY 

YY 

NN 

NN 

<N 

« 

1 Arbroath Harbour 

2.35 

2.5 1 

1 

11 

01241 872166 

YY 

YY 

YN 

Y< 

<c 

y< 

Ardfern Yacht Centre 

2.30 

5 

5 

80 

01852 500247 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YN 

YY 

« 

Ardglass Marina 

2.31 

2.5 

i 2.6 

37,80 

02844 842332 j 

YS 


YO 

<< 

<< 

« 

Ballachulish Marina 

1.50 

3 

6 

6 

07570 014733 

YY 

YY 

NO 

<< 

<N 


[Banff Harbour Marina 

2.43 

^ 1.8 1 

0.8 

12 

01261 815544 

YY 


YN 

<< 

<< 


Bowling Basin, Forth & Clyde Canal 

3.40 

1.8 

t ■ 

, 1-8 

80 

01389 877969 

YY 


YO 

Y< 

<N 

« 

Caley Marina 

1.75 

2.4 

2.4 


01463 236539 

YY 

SL 

NY 

Y< 

<Y 


Campbeltown Marina 

2.26 

3 

4 

13 

07798 524821 


YY 

YN 

Y< 

Y< 

w 

Clyde Marina 

2.65 

4.5 

10 

80 

01294 607077 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Y< 

YY 

rt 

Craobh Marina 

2.46 

6.5 

^ 3.5 

37,80 

01852 500222 

S^ 

YY 


YN 

YY_ 

Tv" 

1 Crinan Canal 

2.25 

2.4 1 

2.4 

74 

01546 603210 

YY 


NO 

NN 

<-1:1 

« 

Dunstaffnage Marina 

2.48 

5 ^ 

5 

37 

01631 566555 

YY 

YY 

YO 

Y< 

YY ' 

w 

Eyemouth Harbour 

2.33 

1.2 i 

2.4 

12 

01890 752494 

SS 

YY 

YY 

Y< 

<Y 


Gairloch Harbour 

1.90 

' 3.5 

! 

12 

01445 712140 

YY 

YY 

NN 

Y< 

<N 

YY 

Girvan Harbour 

2.50 

2 

1 

12 

01465 713648 

SS 

YY 

YN 

<< 

<t 

YY 

Helmsdale Harbour 

1.90 

1 

1 

13 

01431 821692 

YY 

YY 

NN 

YN 

<N 

Yf 

Holy Loch Marina 

2.20 

6 

20 

80 

01369 701800 

YY 

YY 

YO 

YY 

YN 

YY 

Inverness Marina 

2.50 

3 

3 

12 

01463 220501 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Y< 

<< 

<< 

James Watt Dock Marina 

2.30 

5.1 

8 

80 

01475 729838 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Y< 

<< 

Kinlochbervie Harbour 

1.76 

4 

i ^ 

14 

01971 521235 

YY 

YY 

YO 

Y< 

<¥ 

« 

Kip Marina 

2.35 

3.4 

3.5 

80 

01475 521485 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Y< 

YY 

Y< 

Kirkcudbright 

1.71 

3.5 

|| 0 

12,16 

' 01 557 331135 

YY 

YY 

YN 

<< 

«_ 

JL 

Kirkwall Marina 

2.12 

3 ! 

5 

14 

01856 871313 

YN 

V" 

NY 

Y< 


« 

Kyle of Lochalsh Pontoons 

2.00 

3 

: 6 

11 

^01599 534306 

YY 

YY 

YN 

YY 

yy' 


! Largs Yacht Haven 

3.00 

3 1 

3 

80 

01475 675333 

YY 


YY 

YY 

YY 


Lochaline Harbour 

2.35 

6.7 ] 

' 2-1 

80 

07583 800500 

YY 

YY 

YY 

<< 

<N 

<< 

Lochinver Harbour 

1.90 

5 1 

8 

12,16 

01571 844265 

YY 

YY 

YO 

Y< 

<Y 


Lossiemouth Marina 

2.13 

1.5 

' 1.8 

12,16 

01343 813066 

YY 

YY 

YY 

<< 

<N 

Y< 

Mallaig Marina 

2.40 

2 

3 

9,37 

07824 331031 

W 

"VT 

YY 

<< 

<< 

<< 

Nairn Harbour 

1.87 

' 0.5 

^ 0.5 

9,16 

01667 456008 

SY 

YY 

NN 

YY 

YN 

YY 

1 Oban Marina & Yacht Services 

2.35 

>10| 

>10 

oo 

o 

01631 565333 

YY 

YY 

YO 

<< 

YY 

YY 

Peterhead Bay Marina 

1.75 

r2.4T2.3 J 

14 

'^01779477868 

YY 

YY 

YO 

Y< 

YN 

<< 

Port Bannatyne Marina 

2.00 

2.5 1 

: 2.5 

37 

01700 503116 

YY 

YY 

YY 

NN 

YY 

<Y 

Port Edgar Marina 

2.90 

2 ] 

2 

80 

01313 313330 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Y< 

YY 

Y< 

Port Ellen Marina 

1.54 

3 

4.5 


01496 302071 

YY 

YY 

YN 

<< 

Y< 

YY 

Portavadie Marina 

2.50 

12 

^ >20 

80 

01700 811075 

SN 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Portpatrick Harbour 

1.66 

2.5 

2.5 


07565 102096 

YY 

YY 

NN 

<N 

NN 

YY 

Rhu Marina 

2.60 

12 

■ ‘'2 

37,80 

01436 820238 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YN 

YY 

Y< 

Sandpoint Marina 

1 1.28 

1.5 1 

2 


01389 762396 

YY 

YY 

NN 

Y< 

<N 

<< 

Seaport Marina 

I 1.07 

4^1 1 

1.4 

74 

01463 725500 

YY 

YY 


Y< 

<< 

<< 


\ 

Stornoway 


Gairloch 


Nairn 1“ 


JL 

~=S-^ 


Helmsdale 

Lossiemouth 

\ 




Portree ^ / 

^ Mallaig 




INVERNESS 


Banff 


Tobermor^Loc^line 

)ban NjfcA 



■ Cfttoy Marins 
, ■ irwvtrvH Miifina 
; ■ UmdU 




Oban I Dunstaffnage 

Holy Loch 



Anstruther 


EDINBURGH Eyemouth 



Marina name 

Price per metre (£) 

Maximum berth 
depth (m) at MLWS 

Depth (m) in the 
approaches at MLWS 

VHF channel 

Telephone 

Water/Electric 

Toilets/Shower 

Laundry/WiFi 

Diesel/Petrol 

Gas/Chandlery 

Cafe/Shop 

Stornoway Harbour 

2.30 

3 

3 

12,16 

01851 702688] 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Y< 

<Y 

<< 

Stranraer Harbour 

1.61 

3 

2.7 


01776 707500] 


YY 

YN 

< < 


<< 

Stromness Marina | 

2.12 

3 

5 

14 

01856 871313 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Y< 

<< 

<< 

Tarbert Harbour 

2.50 

8 

8 

14 

01880 820344 

NN 

YY 

YY 

YN 

YY 

<< 

Tayport Harbour i 

1.40 

0 

1 


01382 553799 

YY 

YN 

NN 

NN 

<N 

YY 

Tobermory Harbour 

2.46 

6 

10 

12 

07917 832497 

YY 

YY 

Z 

Y< 

YY 

YY 

Troon Yacht Haven 

2.77 

3 

2.7 

37,80 ' 

' 01 292 31 5553 

YS 

YY 


Y< 

YY 


Westray Marina 

2.12 

3 

5 

14 

01856 871313 

YY 

YY 

NN 

<< 

<N 

<< 

Whitehills [ 

j 2.10 

1.5 

1.5 

14,16 

01261 861291 

YY 

[yT 

K 

Y< 

Y< 

YY 

Wick Marina 

1 2.29 

' 2.3 

2.3 

14,16 

' 01955 602030 

YY 

YY 

YO 

Y< 

<Y 

Y< 


84 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 










www.pbo.co.uk/manna-guicle (fW) 




The Shetland 
Islands 


Collafirth 


Cullivoe Marina 


■ Burri.vw 

■ EejtVu-MdctM 


Mid Yell 


North Haven Pier 


Voe 


Aith 


Vidlin 


Skeld 


Scalloway 

Hamnavoe 


Mibinp I 
l^iHwtClc Hflrbdu' 


. Ness BC 


Bridge Endf 


Marina name 

Price per metre (£) 

Maximum berth depth (m) 
at MLWS 

Depth (m) in the 
approaches at MLWS 

VHF channel 

Telephone 

Water/Electric 

Toilets/Shower 

Laundry/WiFi 

Diesel/Petrol 

Gas/Chandlery 

Cafe/Shop 

Aith Marina i 

1.10 

^ 2.4 

i ^-2 , 

16 

’01595 810378^ 


YY 

NN [ YN J 

j NN ] 

£ 

Bridge End Marina, South Voe 

0.64 i 

4 

1 4 


01595 859332 

lYY 

YY 

NN YY ' 

1 NN 1 

1 NY 

Burravoe Marina 

1.07 j 

1.7 

1 2-5 


^01957 722315 

E 


YN” YN 

1 NN ] 

N^ 

Collafirth Marina 

Free ; 

1.8 

1 8 


' 01 806 533288 

|YY 

YY 

YN NN 

1 NN 1 

nT 

Cullivoe Marina 

1.21 1 

’ 1.3 ' 

^ 1.2 J 


•01957 744262 " 

^NS 

nn' 

NN%<] 

S 

'n< 

Belting Boating Club Marina 

1.07 : 

2 

1 2 

6 i 

01806 522524 

:yY 

YY 

YO Y< 

N< 

< < 

^ Voe Marina 

0.53 J 

4.5 

1 ' 


^07769 571022 

[W] 

'm 

NN^<J 

1 NN ] 


twWe 

Free 

' 4 

1 20 

1 

01595 760222' 

>YN 

YY 

NN NN ; 

1 NN 

<N 

Marina (Lerwick) 

1.36 

. j 

1 ^ j 

12 

' 01 595 697146 ' 


Im 

ny”n< 

<< ] 

<* 

I4iniuty« Marina 

0.53 


1 4 _ 


01595 881253 

yy' 


NN << 

\~m] 

Nir 

UniKh mruour 

0.90 I 

^ 6 

9 ' 

12,16' 

' 01595 69299r 

V 

yy' 

Yoi <y] 

1 <Y 1 

' yt" 


1.07 ; 

1.9 

2 


01957 702317 

YY 

NN 

NN <<' 

! NN ! 



0.75 

^ 1 

1 ^ 

16 

^07778460016' 

m. 


N0*<<] 

1 NN ] 

N< 


1.23 

4.5 

1 5 1 


"^01595 76022r 

YN 

NN 

NN NN 

1 NN 1 

« 

Sciimq¥ 

1.28 

7 

8.7 ^ 


01595 744221 


YY 

NO ' YN 

E 

YY 

Scdie^y Pub 

1.60 : 

2.5 

9 


01595 880409 

lYY 

YY 

YN <<i 

i Y< ! 

<V 


1.07 

2.5 

2.5 


! 01595 860287 

[E 

YY 

YY/< 


'm 


1.07 

1.7 

1.7 

11 

’ 01806 577326 

YY 

YN 

NN NN i 

~m] 

NY 

m Hnta 

0.53 

‘ 3.7 

3.7 


01806 588392] 



nn'<< 

~m] 

Y<' 


1.07 , 

2 

1.5 


' 01 595 80931 r 

;YY 

YN 

NY << 

N< 1 

Hi 


The North East 


Marina name 

Price per metre (£) 

Maximum berth 

depth (m) at MLWS 

Depth (m) in the 

approaches at MLWS 

VHF channel 

Telephone 

Water/Electric 

Tollets/Shower 

Laundry/WIFI 

Diesel/Petrol 

Gas/Chandlery 

Cafe/Shop 

Amble Marina 

2.50 

2.5 

0 

80 ' 

01665 712168' 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Y< 

YY 

<Y 

Bridlington Flarbour 

2.13 

0 

0 

12,16 

01262 670148 

SS 

YY 

NO 

Y< 

<Y 

Y< 

Flartlepool Marina 

1.95 

5 

' 0.8 ' 

37,80 

01429 865744 

YY 

YY 

YO 

Y< 

Y< 

YY ' 

Flull Marina 

2.80 

4 

1 

80 

01482 609960 ' 

YY 

YY 

YO 

YN 

YY 

Y< 

FlumberCA Marina 

2.00 

2.5 

2 

74 

01472 268424' 

yy‘ 

YY 

YO 

Y< ' 

<N 

<< 

Newcastle City Marina 

2.28 

5.2 

' 5.2 

12 

01912 211348 

YY 

YY 

NN 

N< 

NN 

YY ‘ 

Royal Northumberland YC 

2.05 


' 6.8 

^12 J 

01670 353636 

YY 

YY 

NY 

NN ' 

NN 

Y< 

Royal Quays Marina 

2.55 

7 

3.5 

80 

01912 728282 

YY 

YY 


yy' 

YN ' 

<< 

Scarborough Flarbour ^ 

2.77 

2 

! ' 

12 ] 

01723 373530 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Y< 

<< 

<< 

South Ferriby Marina Ltd 

0.73 

2 

2 


01 652 635620 ' 

SS 

YY 

NN 

YN 

YY 

<< 

St Peters Marina 

2.00 

2 

0 

80 

01912 654472 

YY 

YY 

YY 

<< 

<< 

Y< 

Sunderland Marina 

2.36 

2 

2 

37 

01915 144721 

YS’ 

YY 

NN 

Y< ' 

NN 

Y< 

Whitby Marina 

2.79 

2 

2.4 

11 

01947 600165 

YY 

YY 

YY 

'y< 

<Y 

<< 


Amble 



Royal Northumberland YC 




Bridlington 


Hull 


Scarborough 


St Peters 


Hartlepool 




1 ^HlOu«|rs 


Sunderland 



The North West 


i 

J 

E 

i 

5 

■t 

£ 

& 

ii: 

SS 

C/D 

5 

n ^ 

■= f 
- « 

11 

O) 

C 

C 

Telephone 

Water/Electric 

Toilets/Shower 

Laundry/WIFI 

Diesel/Petrol 

Gas/Chandlery 

Cafe/Shop 


jm] 

“1 

1 » J 

lit] 

[01624 687543 J 








r^SIbf Mpm 


14 1 

1 9 

n 

1 01772 8124621 



NN 

yR 

M 

«l 





R-zH 

[o?»3 8790621 

FR 



yh\ 

M 

- 


GlHtVI 3i«1 


1 ' 

: ^ 


751491 1 

YY 

YY 

YN 

YN 

YY 

<< 

lAaipoufAitni 


h ' 


37 

1 SIM7D-T677^ 


YY 

' YO 

Y< 

' <Y 

Y< 


seo 

ht 1 


1! 

j^l9W#1«31 

iYY 

YY 

YY 

. Y< 

YN 

<< 



3«3 


1 » 

13 ia 

[0ieJ4WW12 

YY 

YY 

NO 

Y< 

<N 

<< 



* \ 

B 


1 Birra 

YY 

YY 


Y< 

YY 

Y< 

WtiMHn 


3 

B 

F3 

[BlBo^ 6^431 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Y< 

YN 

<< 

Wtririiivvi. WhI Stind 


T j 

B 


1 BI9I1»2435, 

YY 

YY 

YO 

Y< 

YN 






Glasson Basin 


Maryport 


ISLE OF MAN 


Peel 


Whitehaven 


Douglas 


Glasson Basin 


Fleetwood Haven 




a E3^ta$ 


—j# Preston 


Liverpool 


'v 


Practicat Boat Owner589 Summer 2015 * www.pbo.co.uk 


85 






2015 marina visitors’ price guide 



Find us on Facebook 


• Visitor loyalty discount 
scheme continues 

• Beautiful harbour and beaches 

• Free yearly events 

• More than just a stop over 




Or for less 


on the South Coast 


Perfect location; 5 minutes walk to the 
town centre, golden sandy beaches, 
an array of activities to suit visitors and 
opportunities to explore Weymouth, the 
Jurassic Coast and the surrounding areas. 


Relocating your boat? Take advantage 
of our great value berthing package, 
comprising no annual tie-ins and free use 
of the slipway and drying grid. 


Contact us on 01 305 838423 or visit 
http://harbour.weymouth.gov.uk 



Haw you considered a permanent mooring at the 
Royal Harbour Marina, Ramsgate? 


- Kesri pnms nuntu aiHruiA lue soMUif 3^ diyf * vw mU- wapm odutiii 

- 44 Vsom bout bdA 

vlfit «ir w«bdtq A iw^.porixrfTwiA|ile;04.ul; ^ hit Iki -uid clw9» 



56 Harbour 


* -t-j-nti VUidte iiai i tiwlii hig,ihii1iiHii ■ ii wh 


MALAHIDE 

V\tk‘ni^iH?> ViHilur«.*>hiirt-i4rfn or luni'-u-i^ 


minutes from Dublin Airport 
• 350 Berth full service marina and Boatyard 

— -r- . 1,1 

LGiia isiejn Company desitmatjqn.j 



www.maiahidemaK iria;nfe 
iD3Slli4] 











2015 marina visitors’ price guide 





www.gwynedd.gov.uk 


Harbour 01 286 672118 
Victoria Dock 0(286 672346 


(^0 Welcome to the hospitality of 
our harbours and anchorages 


Gwynedd Coundi welcomes you to the ghrious tondscapes, the vost 
coost/ine and magnificent harbours and marinas of Gwynedd 


Victoria Dock 


Aberdaron 


Aberdyfi 

Porthmadog 


Barmouth 


Snuggled into the corner ofTremadog Bay. 
Porthmadog offers a tranquillity which turns many 
a short visit into an extended stay, enjoying the 
uniqueness of the town, the beauties of the 
Snowdonia countryside and the splendours of 
Portmeirion. 

Harbour 01 766 512927 

Pwllheli 

Only seven miles from Porthmadog across 
Tremadog Bay, Pwllheli is the centre of sailing 
excellence, the location of one of the country's 
most sought after marinas and the home for many 
national and international championships. 

HarbourfMarina 0 1 758 70 1 2 (9 


Caernarfon 

The River Seiont. overlooked by Caernarfon 
Castle lies in the centre of this historic royal 
town. From here you can explore the North 
Wales coast and catch the mountain train to 
Porthmadog and beyond 






|0) 2015 marina visitors’ price guide 



120 berths and fully serviced boatyard. 


Keep your boat on the west coast of Ireland 
and fly. To Shannon Airport for less than the 
cost of a South coast Marina. 

Ph 00353 65 9052072 
E Mail info@kilrushmarina.ie 



JkThe Hayling Yacht Co 


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FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CALL 02392 463592 

info@haylingyacht,co,uk www.haylingyacht.co.uk 



HOLYHEAD MARINA 

HOLYHEAD MARINA LTD, NEWRY BEACH, HOLYHEAD, ANGLESEY LL651YA 
01407 7642 EAX. 01407 769152 E.MAIL info@holyheadmarina.co.uk 


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Example: 25ft boat: all craneage/power wash/three 
months ashore and annual mooring from 

£1582.50 inc VAT 



marypor 


Cumbria's only Gold Anchor 
awarded marina 


Arbroath Harbour has 59 floating pontoon berths with 
i i security entrance which are serviced with 
'4 electricity and fresh water to accommodate all types of 

. leisure craft. Half height dock gates with a walkway are 
located between the inner and outer harbours, which 
open and close at half tide, maintaining a minimum of 2.5m of water in 
the inner harbour. Other facilities at the harbour include free 
parking, toilets and showers, fuelling facilities, a nearby chandlery shop 
and boat builders’ yard.. The town of Arbroath also offers a variety of 
social and sporting amenities to visiting crews and a number of quality 
pubs, restaurants and the famous 12th century Abbey and Signal Tower 
Museum are located close to the harbour. The railway and bus stations 
are only 1km from the harbour with direct north and south connections. 

Arbroath harbour 

Harbour Office. Arbroath. DD11 1PD 
Harbourmaster: 

Tel: 01241 872166 Fax: 01241 878472 

Email: harbourmaster@angus.gov.uk 



1 - 


TYHA 
Gold Anchor 
Aw$rd S-cheme 


Tel. No. 01900 814431 
or 

e n q u I re s@mafy portm arina. com 
WWW. mary porimari na.c □ m 






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Wales 


Marina name 

Price per metre (£) 

Maximum berth 
depth (m) at MLWS 
Depth (m) in the 
approaches at MLWS 

VHFchannei 

Teiephone 

Water/Electric 

Toiiets/Shower 

' Laundry/WiFi 

■ Diesel/Petrof 

Gas/Chandlery 

If 1 

Q. 

O 

CO 

o 

Cardiff Marina 

2.40 

3 

1.8 

37 

02920 396078 

YY 

yy| 

YQ 

Y< 

<< 

<< 

Conwy Quays Marina 

2.75 

2.5 

0.5 

80 

01492 593000 

YYj 

YY. 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Deganwy Quays Marina 

2.75 

2.5 

0.5 

80 

01492 576888 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

<< 

Y< 

Hafan Pwiiheii 

2.47 

2.5 

0.6 

80 

01758 701219 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Y< 

Hoiyhead Marina 

2.60 

<4.5 

>3.5 

37 

01407 764242 

YY 

yy| 

]yo 

Y< 

YY 

YY 

Miiford Marina 

3.50 

>7 

1.1 

14 

01646 696312 

YY| 

YYi 

1 YY 

YN 

YY 

Y< 

Neyiand Yacht Haven (Lower) 

2.80 

2 

2 

37,80 

01646 601601 

YY 


[yy 

YY 

YY 

Y< 

Neyiand Yacht Haven (Upper) 

2.20 

2 

2 

37,80 

01646 601601 

yyI 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Penarth Quays Marina 

2.60 

3.3 

2 

80 

02920 705021 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Y< 

Port Dinorwic 

2.13 

2 

0 

80 

01248 671500 

yy| 

YYi 

YY 

YN 

YN 

Y< 

Swansea Marina 

' 2.20 

3 

3 

18,80 

01792 470310 

SS 

YY 

YY 

YN 

YY 

YY 

Victoria Dock 

2.36 

2.2 

0 

16,80 

01286 672346 

YY 

yyI 

Iyq 

<< 

<Y 

Y< 

Y Lanfa (Aberystwyth) 

I 3.00 

2.2 

0.4 

80 

01970 611422 

YY 

yyI 

1 YY 

Y< 

YY 

<< 



Y Lanfa/Aberystwylt’- 


Penarth Quays 



m hvfwid 'fteiH KMn •mvMi 
a Iw^wid VlfeCtid MMfl <L0 w4 


Swansea 


l 


Milford Marina 



Cardiff, 


The South west 


Marina name 

Price per metre (£) 

Maximum berth 
depth (m) at MLWS 

Depth (m) in the 
approaches at MLWS 

VHFchannei 

Teiephone 

Water/Eiectric 

Toiiets/Shower 

Laundry/WiFi 

Diesei/Petroi 

Gas/Chandiery 

Cafe/Shop 

jBridport Harbour (West Bay) 

2.26 1 

[ij; 

1.5 

11,16. 

01308423222 

HJ 

|yy 

YN 

0 : 

<Y 

YY 

jBristoi Harbour 

1.75 1 

5.5 

0 

14,73 

01179 031484 

SS 

1 YY 

NN 

<N 

N< 

<< 

jBristoi Marina 

2.42 1 


3 

73 ; 

01179 213198 

R 


YY^ 


YY 

<< 

i Brixham Marina 

3.78 

2.5 

2.5 ’ 

80 ’ 

01803 882929 

jYY 

; yy' 

YY 

YN 

Y< 

y < ' 

Dart Harbour & Navigation Athy 

1.35 

l5- 

>5 ' 

11 

01803 832337 

0 

[W 

NY 


N< ' 

<< 

[Dart Marina Yacht Harbour 

3.00 I 

2 

1.5 

80 

01803 837161 

YY 

YY 

YY 

< < 

Y< 


Darthaven Marina 

3.00 

E 

3 

80 

01803 752242 

0 

YY 

YY, 

0 

YY ' 

<< 

Doiphin Haven 

1.72 1 

1.3 

5 


01803 842424 

,SS 

YY 

NN 

<< 

<Y 

0 

Exmouth Marina 

4.23 

tit 

1 

14 

01395 269314 

0 

YY 

~M 

\w 

NY 

YY 

Faimouth Haven Marina 

2.80 ! 

2.5 

1 

12 

01326 310991 

!YS 

: YY 

YY 

YY 

<< 

0 

Faimouth, Inner Basin (Premier) 

3.25 1 


1.5 

80 

01326 316620 

0 

E 

YY 

[0 

YY ^ 

YY 

Faimouth, Quter (Premier) 

3.25 1 

2 

1.8 

80 

01326 316620 

YY 

1 YY 

YY 

Y< 

YY 

S 

Insworke Miii Quay Marina 

1.49 [ 

E 

0 


07967 645205 

0 

[rT 


NN 

N< 

<< 

King Point Marina 

3.25 1 

2.5 

2.5 

12 

01752 424297”" 

lYY 

; YY 

YY 

<< 

YN 


Lyme Regis Harbour 

2.26 

[TT 

1.4 , 

14 

01297 442137 

0 

YY 

NN 

<Y 

Y< 

<< 

jMayfiower Marina 

3.15 1 

6 

6 

80 

01752 556633 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 


Muitihuii Centre 

1.45 

, 0 

0 


01752 823900 

0 

YY 

W 

0 

YY 

<< 

Myior Yacht Harbour 

3.50 

2 

2 

37,80 

01326 372121 

.YY 


YY 

YY 

YY 


|noss Marina 

2.98 1 


^^4 

"^80 

01803 839087 

0 

y7 

yy" 

0 

’ YN^ 

\< ' 

’Penmariam Quay 

2.25 ! 

2.5 

7 

12 

01726 832471 

ISN 

: YY 

NY 

<< 

YY 

""yT 

jpiymouth Yacht Haven 

3.25 1 

|>2.2 

>2.2 

80 • 

01752 404231 

0 


YY 

[0 

YY 

YY 

[Port Pendennis Marina 

^ 3.25 1 

4 . 5 ' 

3 . 5 " 

80 " 

01326 211211 

YY 

yy' 

yy' 

<< 

Y< ' 

<< 

[portishead Quays Marina 

2.78 I 


0 

80 

01275 841941 

0 

YY 

"yT 

pYY" 

YY 

YY 

: Queen Anne's Battery 

3.78 1 

2.5 

2.5 

’ 8 O'" 

01752 671142 

Iyy 

yy' 

yy' 

yy’ 

YY ' 

0 

Royai Wiiiiam Yard Harbour 

3.25 

[T 

1.5 

13 ' 

01752 659252 

0 


NO 

Et 

'<n' 


'Saicombe Harbour Authority 

2.30 1 

1.5 

1.5 

14 

01548 843791 

SS 

1 YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY ' 

Sharpness Marine 

1.71 1 


<3.5 


01453 811476 

0 

1”^ 

YN 

El 

YY 

N< 

^Southdown Marina 

2.66 1 

0 ; 

1.8 


07815 005474 


1 YY 

YY 

<N 

<< 



Marina name 

Price per metre (£) 

Maximum berth 
depth (m) at MLWS 

Depth (m) in the 

approaches at MLWS 

VHF channei 

Teiephone 

Water/Eiectric 

Toiiets/Shower 

Laundry/WiFi 

Diesei/Petroi 

Gas/Chandiery 

Cafe/Shop 

Sutton Harbour Marina 

3.75 1 

1 3.5 ' 

1 ^ 

0 

[ 01752 204702’ 


YY 

E 

E 

E 

E 

Torpoint Yacht Harbour 

2.66 

2 

1 2 


01752 813658 

lYY 

YY 

YY 

< < 

< < i 

< < 

Torquay Marina 

3.78 1 

t0 

Ui- 


01803 200210 

[W 

YY 

0 

[0 

E 

Ei 

Torquay Town Dock 

1.89 

3.8 

i 5.5 

14 

01803 292429 

iss 

YY 

NN 

YY 

YY i 

Y< . 

Trouts Boatyard 

2.35 1 

01 

1 

0 

1 01 392 873044' 

0 

yy" 

E 

01 

[0 

Ei 

Turf Basin, Exeter Ship Canai 

1.35 

3 

1.5 

12 

01392 265791 

lYY 

YY 

NN 

NN 

NN 

YN 

Uphiii Marine Centre 

1.47 1 

0] 

0 

0 

01934 418617 

SS 

YY 

E 

E 

E 

E 

Watchet Harbour Marina 

2.33 

2.5 

0 

80 , 

, 01984 631264 

Y^ 

YY 

.YY 

YN 

YY 




Sharpness Marine 




■ Srvfgl mrint 

■ Ktslai HaobOui 


Portishead Quays 


Weston-super-Mare 


Watchet Harbour 


B Oaimrt Aiww'a Bitftrv 
■ AvyiilWriam 'AuiQlHfwilKiv 
r Sulhlfi hlAfCQul MAJtTd 
rMsyfka#Af Marna 

I P^TTwyiii H*vw 


m Falmpylft firtiflil 
m FadfTHiim [Qiritfh 
B Ftf Hwpn 
■ Pai PfftQffvm iibaim 


y Mylor Yacht 
n^arbour 

Falmouth 



Torquay 

Brixham 
Dartmouth^ 

Salcombe A 


Plymouth 



I Tbrpqfrt YlcfA HbiE^hm 

I ftWWgrK* MiD Oi«y 
I SCxitfsKHifl Mama 


B VfcW hla^gij 

B DWIOWV 
B Manqa 

B DttlE HaJWa & AiTtf 


90 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 












South Coast and the Isle of Wight 


Hamble River 


m Hwnbh Po^t 
m Hitmijn ’rtOTf 
m Udic^HV \tk:hi IWb^ 
m mnKBfnbia 
m SwflmrefcWflfiini 

■ UftvMtdf Udrm« 

a Jvtty 


■ Kjvfipi QtiBy 

■ OcNnOuw 

aOOt^nWloOfl 

■ SsuonW^arr 
aShprni wfc (XJsy 

■ r^wflOuiiy 


Southamptoffi- 


■ Cobb's Quty Miiini^^ 

■ tJwvm Lsiicff Stvpyird 
a Pttrhtkir^eAy tJlintA 

■ PvK?f&n mtiA HiMtn 

■ 9[7« Hmmn 
m Potol PoohUkliu 

■ SanerJti Mr^il 


Emsworth YH 


Farehanf 


Buckler’s Hard 


■ LyfrmgtenTH 


Gosport 


Christchurch 


Southsea 


m NcrfliF^ 


Ridge Wharf, 
Wareham 


■ Weyrr^Ti Hirbotji 

■ W^ppnflLflfi MptUm 


Poole 


Yarmouth 


Island Harbour, 
Newport 


Bembridge Harbour 


Portland Marina 


East Cowes 


Gunwharf Quays 


■ HBflIV Hirpna 

■ Oupy ten? 

m RoyaJ Chfffice 



/ 

■ PQfiSoM 


Marina name 

Price per metre (£) 

Maximum berth 
depth (m) at MLWS 

Depth (m) in the 
approaches at MLWS 

VHP channel 

Telephone 

Water/Electric 

Toilets/Shower 

Laundry/WiFi 

Diesel/Petrol 

Gas/Chandlery 

Cafe/Shop 

Bembridge Harbour 

, 1 

E 

0.4 1 

80 

01983 872828 

YY 

YY 


NN 

E<| 

<Y 

Birdham Pool Marina 

fzii" 

1.9 

1 

80 

01243 512310 

SS 

YY 

YY 

YY 

<< 

<< 

Buckler's Hard Yacht Harbour 

3.05 I 

E 

1 i 


01590 616200 

V 

YY 


YY 

YY 


Chichester Marina (Premier) 

1 3.20 

1 

0.8 

80 

01243 512731 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 1 

YY 

Christchurch Marine 

2.83 ] 

E 

' 0.4~| 


'01 202 483250 1 

yy' 

YY 


YN ; 

E 

<< 

Cobb's Quay Marina 

, 3.78 

2.5 

2.5 

80 

01202 674299 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YYi 

ET 

Cowes Yacht Haven 


E 

5 i 

80 

01983 299975 1 

[y7 

YY 


<< 

YY 

Y< 

Davis's Boatyard 

L3.13 

>2.5 

>2.5 


01202 674349 

YY 

YY 

NY 

”yy" 

YY 

YY 

Deacons Boatyard 

: 3.50 I 

E 



'02380402253^ 

YY 

YW 

"ny| 

<< i 

~<y' 

"yE 

Dorset Lake Shipyard 

[ 4.51 

2 

2 

37 

01202 674531 

YY 

YY 

NO 

"nIT 

NN 

Y< 

East Cowes Marina 

"^3.10 1 

1 3.5 ' 

2 1 

80 ^ 

01983 293983 

y 

YY 

"Yf[ 

<< 

Y<’ 

_Y< ^ 

Elephant Boatyard 

1.98 

. 3 

3 


02380403268 

YY 

YN 

NN 

<< 

<< 

Y< 

Emsworth Yacht Harbour 

! 2.80 j 

E 

0 


01243 377727 J 

|y7 

~YY 


"yT 

YY 

EE 

Gosport Marina (Premier) 

3.20 

3.5 

1 5 

80 

02392 524811 

YY 

YY 

YY 


YY ! 

Y< 

Gunwharf Quays Marina 


\TP 

5.5 1 

80 

02392 836732"^ 


YY 


<< 

<< 

YY 

Hamble Jetty 

1 1.75 

1.5 

3 

68 

01489 576387 

NN 

M 

NO 

<< 

<< 

Y< 

Hamble Point Marina 


E 

E 

80 

02380 452464 J 




<< 

<Y 

Y< 

Hamble Yacht Services Ltd 

1 , 

E 

4 ’ 

80 

02380454111 

YY 

yy' 

NO 

<< 

<< 

’y<* 

Haslar Marina 

, 3.10 

E 

6 ' 

80 

[02392 601201 "yyI 

YY 

"yy] 

<< ; 

Y< 

ET 

Hythe Marina Village 

f ! 

2.5 

2.5 ’ 

80 

02380 207073 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YN 

Y< 

Island Harbour 

f 2.70 1 

E 

' 1.8 1 

80 

01 983 539994 1 

[y7 

YY 


<< 

YY 

YY 

Kemps Quay 

2.98 

2.3 

1 


02380 632323 

YN 

YY 

NN 

ET 

<< i 

<< 

Lymington Marina 


E 

3 ; 

80 

01590 647405 j 


y7 

"yyI 

Ey" 

E 

EE 

Lymington Yacht Haven 

1 , 

3 

2.5 ' 

80 

01590 677071 

YY 

YY 

YY 

' YY 

YY ! 

' YY 

Mercury Yacht Harbour 

r [ 

E 

3 ; 

80 

02380 455994 [ 

S 


"yy] 

<< 

YY 

EE 

Northney Marina 

' 3.78 

2.5 

2.5 

80 

02392 466321 

YY 


YY 

EiT 

Y< ; 

<Y 

Ocean Quay Marina 

W[ 

E 

3 1 


02380 235099 


YY 


<< 

Y< 

<< 

Ocean Village Marina 

[ 3.78 

2.5 

2.5 

80 

02380 229385 

YY 

YY 

YY 

<< 

YN 1 

YY 


Marina name 

Price per metre (£) 

Maximum berth 

depth (m) at MLWS 

Depth (m) in the 

approaches at MLWS 

VHP channel 

Telephone 

Water/Electric 

Toilets/Shower 

Laundry/WiFi 

Diesel/Petrol 

Gas/Chandlery 

Cafe/Shop 

I Parkstone Bay Marina [ 

4.00 

E 

0.5 

37,80 

‘01202 747857' 

[E 

E[ 

E] 

[W 

«lY< 1 

Parkstone Yacht Haven 

' 3.32 

: 2 j 

2 

37 

01202 738824 ' 

YY 

yy: 

YY 

Y< 

YY YY : 

[ Poole Quay Boat Haven 

[ 3.27 

E 

4.5 

80 

01202 649488"! 

[E 

E] 

E] 

<< 

< < 1 < < 1 

1 Port Hamble Marina 

3.78 

2.5 

2.5 

80 

02380452741 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY Y< 

Port of Poole Marina 

[ 3.07 

E 

8 . 

80 

01202 649488' 

[w 

E! 

El 

F 

«|«j 

1 Port Solent Marina (Premier) 

3.20 

, 2.5 

2.3 

80 

02392 210765 

YY 

yy" 

YY 

YY 

YY YY 

^rtland Marina | 

. 

E 

5 

80 

01305 866190] 

E 

E 

0 

0 

YY 1 YY ] 

[Portsmouth Marine Engineering 

2.19 

, 0 

0 


01329 232854 

YS 

YY 

NO 

NN 

N< << ^ 

Quay Lane Boatyard j 

[ 0.54 

E 

0 


02392 524214^ 

[E 

E| 

El 

F 

YY |y< 1 

1 Ridge Wharf Yacht Centre 

2.82 

1.5 

1.1 


01929 552650" 

YY 

E* 

YN 

YY 

YY <<' 

I Royal Clarence Marina J 

[ 2.75 

E 

5.2 

80 

02392 523523 ' 

[E 

El 

[0 

F 

EF 

1 Ryde Harbour 

Tts 

' 0 ! 

0 

1 80 1 

01983 613879 

YN 

YY 

YN 

<< 

<< YY ; 

Salterns Marina 

[ 3.50 

E 

2 

37,80 1 

01202 709971 ' 

[E 

El 

0 

[E 

YY 1 YY 

Saxon Wharf 

' 3.78 

2 5 

2.5 

80 

02380 339490 

YY 

YY 

YY 

<< 

< < < < 

Shamrock Quay j 

' 3.78 

E 

2.5 

80 [ 

02380 229461 ' 

fE 

E| 

0 

<< 

YY |y< j 

jshepards Wharf Marina 

' 2.90 

: 3 

3 

80 

01983 297821 

SS 

YY 

NY 

<< 

Y< Y< 

Southsea Marina (Premier) 

3.20 

E 

1.3 


02392 82271 9 [ 

E 

E] 

0 

0 


jSparkes Marina 

3.78 

2.5 

2.5 

80 1 

02392 463572 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YN YN 

[ Swanwick Marina, Hamble 

3.72 

E 

2 

80 

01489 884081 , 

E 

E] 

0 

[E 

YY 1 Y< 1 

[The Hayling Yacht Co 

1.82 

2 

4 


02392 463592 

YS 

YY 

YY 

NN 

NY YN 

[ Town Quay Marina 

' 3.20 

] 3.5 

9 

80 [ 

02380 234397 ' 

IE 

'Ej 

0 

<< 

Y< [y< 

[universal Marina 

’ 3.28 

1 3 

>2.5 

80 1 

01489 574272 

YY 

YY 

YY 

<< 

YY Y< ■ 

Warsash Jetty 

' 2.00 

E 

4 

68 

01489 576387' 

E 

EP 

0 

F 

FIF 

[Weymouth Harbour 

2.50 

3.5 

5 

12 ! 

01305 838423 

YS 

E" 

YN 

Y< 

<Y Y< 

Pweymouth Marina ] 

' 2.95 

E 

2^ 

80 I 

' 01 305 767576 * 

[yy 

yy] 

0 

F 

<<!<< 

[ WicorMarine Yacht Haven 

[ 1.50 

; 2.2 

>3 

1 

01329 237112 

SS 

YY 

NO 

Y< 

YY YY ■ 

[Yarmouth Harbour ] 

[ 3.08 

rr 

2 " 

1 

El 983 760321 ' 

[ss 

yy] 

0 

1 YY 

T<0E 


Marina name 

Price per metre (£) 

Maximum berth 
depth (m) at MLWS 
' Depth (m) in the 
approaches at MLWS 

'VHP channel 

Telephone 

i Water/Electric 1 

Toilets/Shower 

Laundry/WiFi 

Diesel/Petrol 1 

Gas/Chandlery 

Cafe/Shop 

Beaucette Marina 

2.40 

CO 

o 

80 

'i 01481 245000 

YY 

yy]yy 

Y< 

Y< 

Y< 

Elizabeth Marina 

3.15 

4 [ 0 

14 

01534 447708 

YY 

YYjYY 

YY 

<< 

YY 

St Helier Marina 

3.15 

' 3 1 2 ' 

14 

*^01534 447708 

YY 

yy|yy 

YY 

YY 

YY 

St Peter Port Marina 

2.64 

^ 1.8 2 

12,18" 

" 01 481 720229 

YS 

YYiYY 

yy' 

YY 

yy' 

Victoria Marina 

2.59 

1.8 1 2.2 

80 

01481 725987 

YS 

yyIIyy 

YY 

YY 

YY 



Channel 


Islands 


Beaucette Marina 


Guernsey 


T 


1 3t :^tr -Pwl 


I 9j hWwt IftaivU 
I Eleabtin Mftnm 


, ^ 

fl ^ J^ey 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


^ 91 







2015 marina visitors’ price guide 


South East 




The East Coast 


Marina name 

Price per metre (£) 

Maximum berth depth 

(m) at MLWS 

Depth (m) in the 

approaches at MLWS 

VHP channel 

Telephone 

Water/Electric 

Toilets/Shower 

Laundry/WiFi 

Diesel/Petrol 

Gas/Chandlery 

Cafe/Shop 

Brighton Marina (Premier) j 

3.20 

E 

2 ^ 

80 

] 01 273 81 991 9 

YY 


YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Chatham Maritime Marina 

; 3.00 

! 2.5 

~tr\ 

80 

101634 899200 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Y< 

<Y 

Conyer Creek Marina 

I 2.07 

[X 



01795 521711 

[yyJyy 

NO 

<N 

<N 

<N 

Dover, Granville Dock 

2.62”^ 

2.5 


"80 ' 

m304 241 66r 


YY 

|Y0" 

~Y< 

<< 

Y<' 

Dover, Tidal Harbour 

2.93 

2.5 

2.5 ^ 

80 ^ 

01304 241663' 

YY^ 

E 

|Y0 

Y< 

<< 

Y< 

Dover, Wellington Dock 

2.30 

3 

2.5 ' 

80 

101304 241663 

YY 

YY 

Iyo 

Y< 

<< 

Y< 

Eastbourne Marina (Premier) 

I 3.09 


2 

17 

[01323 470099 ' 

yy' 

K 

[yy 

YY^ 


YY 

Gallions Point Marina 

; 2.65 

■ 3 

0 

37,80 

; 02074 767054 

YY 

YY 

■NO 

< < 

YN 

< < 

t 

Gillingham Marina ] 

I 2.71 

1 2.4 

3.2 ^ 

80 ^ 

[ 01 634 280022 


K 


YY 


Y< 

Gravesend Pontoon 

; 2.77 

1 2.5 ^ 

6 


107949 750236’ 

YY 

NN 

INN 

<< 

In 

Y<1 

Highway Marine 

1.49 

[it 

0.5 ' 

8 

01304 613925 

W 

E 


<< 

IT 

YY 

Lady Bee Marina 

; 2.92 

■ 2.5 

1.8 

14 

’01273 596680 

YY 

YY 

:ny 

<< 

YY 


Limehouse Basin Marina 

3.60 

2.4 

0.5 ^ 

80 

[02073 089930" 


K 

[yn' 

<< 

<< 

<Y 

Newhaven Marina 

2.26 

0 

4-5 

12,80 

101273 513881 

YY 

YY 

INN 

Y< 

<Y 

YY 

Ramsgate 

2.93 

3.1 

3.1 

14,80 

01843 572100 

YY^ 

E 


YY 


Y< 

Sandwich Marina 

, 2.13 

1.5 

0 ] 


1 07974 754558 

YY 

YY [nnI 

<< 

Y< 

<< 

South Dock Marina 

3.24 

3 

0 ' 

14,37’ 

02072 522244 



E 

<< 

<< 

<< 

St Katharine Docks Marina 

; 5.84 

5 ^ 


80 

; 02072 645312 

YY 

YY 

;yo 

<< 

NN 

YY 

Strand Quay | 

1 1.98 

^0 

0 

I4 ' 

1 01 797 225225^ 

[yyIyy 

\m 

<< 

In" 

YY 

Swale Marina 

, 1-77 

E 

0 


101795 521562 

YY 

YY 

INO 

YN 

YN 

<N 

The Embankment Marina 

3.64 ' 

El 

0 ^ 


01474 535700 

ll 


E 

Y< 

YN 

<< 

The Shipyard 

i 2.65 

E 

~rj 


01903 713327 


W 

INY 

< < 

<< 


Victory Marina 

I 2.79 

E 

5 


07785 971797 




< < 

<< 

Y< 

Youngboats 

iToT* 

L“-l 



[01795 536176 

Is" 


|NN 

NN 

NY 

IE 


Marina name 

Price per metre (£) 

Maximum berth depth (m) 
at MLWS 

Depth (m) in the 
approaches at MLWS 

VHP channel 

Telephone 

Water/Electric 

Toilets/Shower 

Laundry/WiFi 

Diesel/Petrol ' 

Gas/Chandlery 

Cafe/Shop 

Blackwater Marina 

1 1.60 

0 

0 

80 

01621 740264 


YY 

NQ 

Y< 

YN 1 

YY 

Boston Gateway Marina 

: 0.82 ' 

1.5 

0 

12 

07480 525230 

YY 

YY 

NN 

<< 

^n] 

)Y< 

Bradwell Marina 

I 1.95 

2.5 

0.3 

37,80 

01621 776235 

lYS 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YN 

Y< 

Broom Boats Marina 

1.47 

2 

3 


01603 712334 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YN 1 

NN 

Brundall Bay Marina 

E 

1 

2 


01603 717804 


YY 

YY 

NN 

YY 

Y< 

Burgh Castle Marina 

2.13 

1 

0 

98 i 

01493 780331 

SS 

YY 

YN 

<< 

NN 

<< 

Burnham Yacht Harbour 

1 2.72 [ 

2.5 

3 

80 

01621 782150 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Y< 

YY 


Debbage Marina 

, 1.60 

0.5 

1 


01473 601169 

YS 

YY 

YQ 

<< 

<Y 

< < 

Eastwood Marina 

[6.18 

0.9 

0.9 ^ 

12 

01603 781178 

YY 

YY 

YQ 

<< 

<N 

<< 

Essex Marina 

2.13 ' 

2 

>5 


01702 258531 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY i 

Y<^ 

Fambridge Yacht Haven 

2.62 

1.5 

1 

80 

01621 740370 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Fosdyke Yacht Haven 

2.28 

1.8 

0.6 


01205 260240 

YY 

YY 

NN 

NN 

NY 

YN 

Fox's Marina Ipswich 

2.64 

2 

2 

80 

01473 689111 

YY 

YY 

NO 

Y< 

YY 

Y< 

Halfpenny Pier 

.1.73 ^ 

2 

2 


01255 243030 

YN 

YY 

NN 

NN 

N< 

Y< 

Heybridge Lock 


0 

0 

80 

01621 853506 

SS 

YY, 

YN 

NN 

NN 

<< 

Ipswich Haven Marina 

2.50 

6.4 

5.6 

80 1 

01473 236644 

YY 

YY 

YQ 

Y< 

YY 1 

Y< 

Lowestoft Haven, Hamilton Dock 

Hi 

3 

4 

80 

01502 580300 

YY 

YY 

YQ 

<N 

<< 

<< 

Lowestoft Haven, School Road 

2.25 

4 

3 

80 i 

01502 580300 

YY 

YY 

YQ 

YN 

Y< 

Y< 

Neptune Quay 

I 3.08 

7.5 

5.2 

37,80 

01473 215204 

YY 

YY 

NY 

YN 

YN 

YY 

Royal Harwich Yacht Club 

2.75 ^ 

2 

2.3 

77 1 

07742 145994 

1y 

YY 

NO 

<< 

<< 

Y< 

Shotley Marina 

2.60 

2.5 

2A 

80 

01473 788982 

YY 

YY 

YQ 

YN 

YY 

YY 

Suffolk Yacht Harbour 

2.70 

2 

2 

80 j 

01473 659465 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY j 

YY 

The Royal Norfolk & Suffolk YC 

2.50 

3 

2 

14,80 

01502 566726 

YY 

YY 

YY 

Y< 

Y< 

Y< 

Tidemill Yacht Harbour 

2.94 ^ 

2.5 

0.5 

80 

01394 385745 

YY 

YY 

YQ 

YN 

YY 

YY 

Titchmarsh Marina 

1 2.01 

2 

1.3 

80 

01255 672185 

YY 

YY 

YQ 

YN 

YY 

YY 

Tollesbury Marina 

2.09 

2 

0 

37,80 

01621 869202 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YN 

YY 

YY 

Tollesbury Saltings Ltd 

El 

0 

0 


07521 318155 

li 

YY' 

NN 

<< 

<< 

Y< 

Walton Yacht Basin 

1.92 

1.8 

0 

80 

01255 675873 

YY 

YY 

NO 

NN 

NY 

' YY 

Waveney River Centre 

E 

1.5 

2 


01502 677343 

SS 

YY 

YO 

YY 

YY 


Wisbech Yacht Harbour 

1.60 

1.5 

0.5 

9,37 ! 

01945 588059 

YY 

YY 

YN 

Y< 

<N 

<< 

Woolverstone Marina 

3.00 

2.5 

2.5 

80 1 

01473 780206 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YN 

YY 

YN 


Boston Gateway Marina 


Fosdyke YH 


H A 

^ Wi 


■ Qtwn Uar^M 

■ EttfWHd M«r^ 

■ 'Mrmtwrf HjW CUfHim 



Norfolk Broad-f 





I LiMdcfi Hamilwi DoA 
I IxmM 5;cl¥>al N9*d 


■ lUf^unp Qu^ 

■ tJittma 

■ SutMi YH 

■ Mirui« 

■ lp s* i <A I#w*ft 

■ RH'flMairina 


Woodbridge 


Tidemill YH 


R&yal Harwich YC 


IpSWtcPlA 


Halfpenny Pier 


m Mmtna 

m Siimgi 


larwich 




Marina 


■ Wtiton Xbetv BA&n 

■ ¥4cF¥Ti«rfti Mvin« 


X 


Blackwater Marini 


Essex Marina 


Walton-on-itai^ 

the-Naze 


LONDON 


Heybridge Lock 


River Crouch 


■ BuinhimVK 

fl 


92 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 










www.pbo.co.uk/manna-guicle 



Foyle Marina 


Northern Ireland 


Marina name 

Price per metre (£) 

Maximum draught 
(m) at MLWS 

Depth (m) in the 
approaches at MLWS 

VHF channel 

Telephone 

Water/Electric 

Toilets/Shower 

Laundry/WiFi 

Diesel/Petrol 

Gas/Chandlery 

Cafe/Shop 

Ardglass Marina | 

2.31 

2.5 ^ 

2.6 

1 37,80 1 

02844 842332 

YY 

YY^YO 

<< 

<< << 

Ballycastle Marina 

2.32 

2.4 

2.8 

E 

02820 768525 

YY 

YY YY 

Y< 

1 <N YY ' 

Bangor Marina 

\ 2.60~ 

3 

4 

E 

02891 453297 

YY 

YY YY 

YY 

YY U< 

Belfast Harbour Marina 

1.79 ! 

1 4 

5.5 

1 12 ■ 

02890 553014 

SS 

YY_YN 

<< 

r<< << 

Carrickfergus Marina 

’ 2.60 

[IT 

2.3 

[E 

' 02893 366666 

YY 

yy'yo 

Y< 

!<<“ YY 

Coleraine Marina 

2.35 

3 

3 1 

1 37 

02870 344768 I 

lYY 

YY NN 

YN 1 

<N << 

Copelands Marina 

1.98 

H 

0 

□ 

07802 363382 

YY 

YN NO 

Y< 

_ <N 1 << 

Foyle Port Marina 

1.93 

5 

6 ! 

14 

02871 860313 

YY 

YY NY 

<< 

[<< ■ Y< ' 

Glenarm Marina I 

' 2.30 J 


® J 

_ 80 J 

^02828 841285 

YY 

YY YN 

Y< 

<N 1 <Y , 

Kinnego Marina 

1.07 

2 

3 

77 

02838 327573 ! 

!yn 

YY YY 

'«! 

! YY Y< 1 

Portaferry Marina J 

1 2-15 ] 


2 

n 

07703 209780 

SS 

yy|no 

<< 

^ <n[ <Y 

Rathlin Island Marina 

2.13 

2.4 

2.8 

80 

02820 768525 

YS 

YY NN 

NN 

<N YY 1 

Sandy Bay Marina 

' 2.13 

s 

2 

E 

07849 087729 

YS 

YY^NN 

<< 

<N ' N< 

Seaton's Marina 

1.60 ’ 

2.5 

3.5 


02870 832086 

SS 

YY NO 

<< 

1 <N <<, 

Strangford Yacht Haven | 

2.00 

[T 

4 

E 

’ 02844 881 222 

YY 

1 YY^NN 

NN 

. <N 1 YY 



a Msm 

a Sari bn tUaiiira ! 

Rathlin Island Marina 

\ y 




Belfast Harbour Marina 

Kinnego Lough 
Marina Neagh- BELFAST. 

Strangford YH 


G lenarm Marina 

Carrickfergus Marina 

Bangor Marina 

Copelands 
Marina 


Portaferry 

Marina 


\ 


Ardglass Marina 


Galway City Marina 


' Galway 


Louth 


Poolbeg Marina 


\ 


Carlingford Marina 

Malahide Marina 
-Howth Yacht Club 


DUBLIN 


Greystones Harbour Marina 




■ i^ti Marrfia 

■ Ow^tYt: 


Lough Derg 



Kilrush Marina 


Fiinit Harbour and Marina 


Limerick 


• Wicklow 


Arklow Marina 


DinglP 

Marina 


a ^ 


m Dorit Ht/bM 
• Th? Cork vtstt Cu- 


Waterford Marina 


3^ 


I 


m QuflepMH 
■ M^rm 


Atlantic Boating 


\ 


East Ferry 

.V ~r~ 

Cork^. ~ 




\ 

Dunmore East/ 
Waterford SC 


Cahersiveen 

MariJia 


m O ekKityi^id 

■ hUjgh C4vBn«y Pi^i 

■ 5ilhv IMI«W 



The Republic of Ireland 


Marina name 

Price per metre (€) 

Maximum draught 
(m) at MLWS 

Depth (m) in the 
approaches at MLWS 

VHF channel 

Telephone 

Water/Electric 

Toilets/Shower 

Laundry/WiFi 

Diesel/Petrol 

Gas/Chandlery 

Cafe/Shop 

Arklow Marina 

1 3.36 

2.5 

2.5 


1+353 872 375189 

[w 

YY 

Y0’<< 


<< 

Atlantic Boating 

12.26 

2.5 

2.5 

9 

1+353 872 351485 

Iyy 

YY 

NY YN 

YY 

YY 

Cahersiveen Marina 

2.50 

^ 2.6 

3 

37,80 

+353 669472777 

YY 

YY 

Y0’<< 

<< 

N< 

Carlingford Marina 

3.50 

2 

1.8 

37 

^ +353 429 373073 

YY 

YY 

YO YN 

NN 

Y< 

Castlepark Marina 

3.50 

13 

10 

14,39 

+ 353214774959 ' 

E 

YY 

YY Y< 

<< 

<< 

Cork City Marina 

'2.52 

3.5 

5.2 

! 12 

1+353 214 273125 

YY 

NN 

NY << 

I << 

<< j 

Cork Harbour Marina 

2.86 

6 

7.6 

E 

+353 873 669009 ' 

yy" 

YY 

NO <<' 

E 

<< 

Crosshaven Boatyard 

[2.05 

4.5 

1 3.3 

1 

1+353 214 831161 

SY 

1 YY 

NY YN 

i <N 


Dingle Marina 

2.00 

^ 5 

[ 2.6 

[ 14,37 

+353 669 151629' 


YY 

YN ' Y< 

E 

YY 

Dun Laoghaire Marina 

3.60 

4 

i 4 

37,80 

+353120 20040 

YY 

YY 

YY YY 

i Y< 

<< 

Dunmore East/Waterford HbrSC 

2.50 

' 2.6 ' 

2.6 

12 

+353 513 83166 

SS 

YY 

yo^n 


YY 

East Ferry Marina 

h.83 

10 

1 3 

1 

i +353 867 357785 

YY 

YY 

NN YN 

' NN 


Fenit Harbour & Marina 

I 2.63 1 

>5 

>5 

14,16* 

[+353 667136231^ 

YY 

YY 

YO ' YN 


<< 

Galway City Marina 

2.06 

4.5 

3.4 ^ 

12 

; +353 915 61874 

YS 

NN 

NO << 



Greystones Harbour Marina 

4.05 

5 

6 

37,80 

+353128 73131 ' 

YY 

YY 

N0'<<' 

[El 

<< 


Marina name 

Price per metre (€) 

Maximum draught 
(m) at MLWS 

Depth (m) in the 
approaches at MLWS 

VHF channel 

Telephone 

Water/Electric 

Toilets/Shower 

Laundry/WiFi 

Diesel/Petrol 

Gas/Chandlery 

Cafe/Shop 

Howth Yacht Club 

3.38 1 

2.5 

1.9 

37,80 

+353183 92777 

YY 

yy; 

YO 

YY 

<< 

Y< ! 

Hugh Coveney Pier Pontoons 

2.35 

4 

3 


+353 863100095 

YS 

El] 

YN 

Y< 

Y< 

<< 1 

Kilmore Quay 

2.86' 

4.9 

1.1 

9,16 

+353 539129955 

YY 

YY| 

YY 

YN 

YY 

YY : 

Kilrush Marina 

2.10 

3.5 

2.5 

80 

+353 659 052072 

YY 

E] 

YY 

Y< 

<< 

<< 

Kinsale Yacht Club Marina 

3.10 

12 

3 

37,80 

+353 876 787377 

YY 

yy! 

YY 

<< 

<< 

Y< ; 

Lough Swilly Marina 

2.13 

2.5 

1 

6,16 

+353 749 360008 

YY 


NY 

<< 

NN 

Y< 

Malahide Marina 

3.90 

3 

0.4 

37,80 

+353184 54129 

YY 

yy| 

YO 

YY 

N< 

<< 

New Ross Marina 

1.78 

3.5 

3.5 

16 

+353 863 889652 

YY 

~w~| 

YN 

YY 

Y< 

<Y 

Poolbeg Marina 

2.44 

4 

8 

37,16 

+353166 89983 

YY 

YY| 

YY 

Y< 

Y< 

<< i 

Rathmullan Pontoon 

2.13 

4 

10 

8 

+353 872 480132 

SN 

ETj 

Im 

NN 

YN 

<< j 

Royal St George Yacht Club 

3.00 

5 

5 

37 

+353128 01811 

YY 

yy: 

NY 

YY 

YY 

YY ; 

Salve Marine 

1.91 

4.5 

3.5 

37 

+353 214 831145 

YY 

E] 

YO 

YN 

YY 

YY 

The Royal Cork Yacht Club 

3.15^ 

3.5 

2.2 

37 

+353 214 831023 

YY 

YY' 

YY 

YY 

YY 

YY 'j 

Trident Marina 

3.00 

4 

4 

9 

+353 214 774145 

YY 


1 NY 

Y< 

< < 


Waterford Marina 

2.07 J 

>5 

>5 


+353 87 2384944 

YY 

YY! 

YO 

<< 

<< 

YY i 



Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


93 









Seamanship 



Sticky situations 

Sticky Stapylton draws upon his considerable experience 
to share some useful seamanship tips with PBO readers 


Using an inflatable dinghy 



Do you have an inflatable dinghy, 
and if so, when did you last use 
it? I recently pulled the dinghy 
from a charter yacht’s stern 
locker to find it had no seat 
and two holes in it, each the 
size of a 1 0p piece. (Another 
dinghy, pictured right, had a 
missing rowlock.) To add insult 
to injury, the glue in the repair 
kit was rock-hard, so a trip to 
the chandlery was necessary to 
repair the holes. 

With yachts based in marinas 
and sailing from base to another 
harbour where you can walk 
ashore, some tenders will rarely 
see the light of day. It is therefore 
that much more important that 
your dinghy is regularly checked. 
If kept at the bottom of a locker 
it would be easy for the kedge 


anchor or a heavy spare fuel can 
to be dropped onto the tender, 
possibly puncturing the fabric. 

Using a dinghy may seem a 
simple affair, but it is worthwhile 
having some basic rules. 

■ Before inflating, tie the dinghy 
on by the painter - it may get 
blown away. 

■ Secure the dinghy bag too, in 
case the same might happen. 

■ Inflate the dinghy so that it 
is rigid, but not too rigid; the 
standard dinghy pump will 
not over-inf late. 

■ Always launch stern first: it will 
be easier to hold onto the painter. 

■ If using an outboard motor, 
ensure that it is secure before 
lowering it into the dinghy, and 
then tie the lanyard onto a 
secure point in the dinghy. 


■ Fill the outboard tank on the 
parent boat, which is more stable. 

■ Items to take with you: bailer, 
oars and rowlocks, anchor and 
warp, lifejackets (to be worn), 
torch, dinghy pump, handheld 
compass, repair kit, handheld 
flares, handheld VHF radio, 
spare fuel. (Some may argue 


that this is a lot of kit to carry to 
the pub or restaurant and could 
well disappear if not secured. 
Common sense will tell you 
which items are appropriate 
according to the circumstances.) 
■ Load the dinghy evenly, and 
do not take too many crew with 
you for the weather conditions. 



Hooking on 

I frequently board boats 
and find that there are no 
hook-on points which can 
be reached from inside the 
companionway steps. In a 
heavy sea, I have actually 
seen someone coming up 
through the companionway 
and, failing to hook on, 
being catapulted by a 
seriously pitching boat 
into the backstay aft of the 
helm. We were lucky that we 
did not have a split backstay. 

The majority of sailors may 
never be at sea in conditions 
which warrant hook-on points 
close to the companionway. 

But what happens if you get 
the weather forecast wrong, 
or if there is a time imperative 
for getting back to work 
after a long weekend sailing 
across the Channel? If fitting 
jackstays, just be aware that 
a slack jackstay may well be 
able to sustain higher loads 
than one which is fitted taut: 
read the instructions which 


Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


steps, and have it positioned 
so that anyone coming on 
deck can hook on before 
coming up. Once the 
person boarding is in the 
cockpit, the dedicated 
strop on the lifejacket can 
be used to secure the crew, 
and the spare strop can 
be placed back over the 
washboard for anyone else 
to use. If I am sailing on a 
boat with large cockpit, I 
organise the strops so that 
crew always have the ability 
to remain hooked on. 


come with your jackstays. 

Consider also the pros 
and cons of webbing straps 
against wire: the former can 
degrade in sunlight, and some 
manufacturers recommend 
straps are removed at the end 


of a passage or day-sail. The 
latter, meanwhile, can easily roll 
underfoot and may result in an 
unnecessary slip. 

Whenever possible I always 
tether a spare strop to a pad 
eye close to the companionway 


There are 
sufficient pad 
eyes and strops 
for crew to 
be secure 
anywhere in 
the cockpit 


iNSET The 
spare strop is 
positioned so 
that anyone 
coming on deck 
can hook on 
before coming up 




Choking 
the luff 

The sailing expression 
‘choking the luff’ describes 
a system of preventing 
movement between two 
blocks by inserting part of 
the line which connects 
them between a sheave of 
one of the blocks and the 
line which runs through it. 
The arrow on the drawing 
indicates where the fall has 
been trapped. 

This is an essential safety 
drill when anyone is 
working on the boom 
at sea: the mainsheet 
should not be eased, 
because the boom 
will swing and could 
throw crew overboard 
if not prepared. In the 
photograph, part of the 
fall has been coiled and 
threaded in between 
the lines connecting the 
mainsheet blocks. The 
end from the jammer is 
taken over the helm 
(yellow arrow in photo) 
and is controlled by 
the helmsman. 



The end from the jammer is 
taken over the helm, indicated 
by the arrow, and is controlled 
by the helmsman 

On some yachts, as the 
mainsail comes down, even 
though the topping lift is 
triced up before lowering, 
the mainsheet slackens 
Y- a bit; and again, the 
- boom can swing. 

So, skippers should 
have a hand ready 
by the mainsheet in 
case slack needs taking up. 
With a lot of modern boats 
where the mainsheet runs 
\\\ through a jammer by the 
companionway, and with only 
two on board, it should be 
= ' standard procedure for 

' ' the fall of the sheet to be 
passed to the helm so that 
slack can be taken up as 
the mainsail is lowered. 

The arrow indicates where 
the fall has been trapped 



Carry a spare impeller 


Stripped impeller vanes can resufft 
in an overheating engine and lead 
to an unnecessary, eye-watering 
bill. The photo shows an impellw 
before and after a plastic bag had 
been sucked into the raw water 
inlet; the first thing we knew of a 
problem was the engine alarm 
going off. 

Luckily we were in shallow 
water, so we dropped the anchor. 
Then, after removing the housing 
cover, we found the now vaneless 
impeller. If this happens to you, 
it is important that you check 
thoroughly to verify whether or 
not the broken-off vanes have 
disappeared into the cooling 
system. An inspection will do 
for starters; and having cleared 
all visible debris, counting the 
vanes recovered and replacing 
the housing cover, you can think 
about topping up with coolant 
after a good wait for the engine to 
cool down. 

We did this, replaced the 
impeller, then ran the engine for 10 
minutes to check that the system 
was clear. Luckily the boat’s owner 
had a spare impeller on board. 



TTi« varws on Ihv rvfl-Twrtil Iknpalfer 
broke off after a plastic bag was 
sucked into the raw water inlet 

On the subject of engine spares, 
a prudent skipper will also carry 
a complete engine oil change, oil 
and fuel filters and an alternator 
belt. On a Contessa 32 some 
years ago, our alternator belt frayed 
through, and we had no spare. 
However, a bright young lady 
volunteered her spare tights, and 
on a windless passage back 
from Alderney the engine worked 
perfectly all the way to Gosport. 

It’s also good practice to turn 
off your engine’s raw water inlet 
seacock when leaving the boat. I 
always used to, and would hang 
the ignition key from the seacock 
handle. This formed a useful 
reminder to turn the seacock back 
on, as I could not start the 
engine without the keys. 





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Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


95 





Cruising Notes 


Readers’ cruising destinations, near and far 


We pay for your published cruising stories and 
harbour updates. Email pbo@timeinc.com or 
write to the address at the top of page 5 



Interesting Ithaca! 

Phil Johnson loses himself in one of the windiest places in the Ionian 


S teeped in mythology, this 
magical island linked with 
Odysseus and ancient 
heroes has a wide range of 
ports and bays in which to lose 
yourself for a week or more. It’s 
one of the windiest places in 
the Ionian too, and some of the 
ports can make for challenging 
afternoon sailing and late 
mooring: but it’s worth the effort. 

Sitting next to its big sister 
Cephalonia, Ithaca stands tall 
and proud: its steep-sided hills 
run through its spine and separate 
its 46 square miles. There are 
four main ports plus numerous 
bays, and the urban legend that 
is ‘Rat Island’. 

Coming from the north, along the 
east coast, the first port of call is 
Frikes. It sits at the end of a large 
bay with a gap in the hills behind 
it, and that means wind funnels 


ABOUT THE AUTHOR 


Phil Johnson is 
a former BBC 
and ITV producer 
and reporter. He 
is the author of 
the children’s 
book The Little Blue Boat 
and the Marsh Man’s Gold! 
and tries to spend three 
months of the year cruising 
the Ionian with his wife Fi 
in their HR 34, Panacea. 


\ through in the afternoon, which 
; can make mooring difficult. The 
i flotillas come here during the 
; week and often tie together or 
: raft up along and inside the 
: mole at the entrance. 

There is often space to go 
: alongside on the northern side of 
! the quay, but beware - ferry wash 
i can be an issue, so leave space 
i between you and the quay. Better 
i still, as well as putting your fenders 
I out, you should also deploy a 
; boarding plank strapped alongside 
\ the fenders to stop them (and you) 
j from bashing the rough concrete 
\ quay. There’s a broken, floating 
: pontoon here too, but I’ve never 
: seen anyone use it; and flotilla and 
: charter skippers tell me it is best 
: avoided. The little port itself is 
; delightful, with some lovely 
: tavernas, supermarkets/shops 
i and showers. There is also a 
; memorial to the Greek resistance 
; fighters who, during the Second 
; World War, attacked a Nazi 
i warship moored here. 

Just outside Frikes on the north 
: side is a small bay which is a 
i favourite of ours: you’ll see a 
\ ruined boat on the shore painted 
1 in ‘rasta’ colours. The seabed 
i shelves quickly and it’s only good | 
I in settled conditions, but we’ve : 
I had many a nice night there. 

I Just a mile or so around the 
j headland to the south are the three ] 
i windmills at the entrance of Port i 


! Kioni, one of the most attractive 
: ports in the Ionian with its pretty 
i houses and shops on the sunny 
j waterfront. There’s water on the 
: quayside when the ‘water man’ 
i comes along in the morning 
i and turns it on. 

The problem with Kioni is 
: you probably won’t get in after 
; lunchtime in high season. There’s 
! little room, and when flotillas 
: come in they tend to bag a fair 
I bit of it. Again, weekends are 
] best as seven-day flotillas are on 
1 ‘turnaround’ back at base. Go in 
i bows-first to the quay if you have a 
j deep draught: it gets shallower the 
1 closer in to the town you go. You 
I can anchor and take a line ashore 
i opposite the quay, and there are 
\ metal rings on the walkway to tie 


; to: however. It's imporiant to leave 
i a good space between you and 
: the flat quayside. Ferry wash 
; comes in here all night at regular 
: intervals, and I’ve seen boats 
i lifted up and their sterns smashed 
I down on the quay. You can also 
: moor out and swing, but it does 
i get deep very quickly. It is a 
; charming spot and a lovely 
: place to spend a night or two. 
i Leaving Kioni and heading 
; south, you will enter the Molos 
: Gulf. Here the wind funnels 
i down in the afternoon, and it 
; can be quite strong. The island’s 
: capital Vathi offers fuel, water, 
i supermarkets and shelter. There is 
; a taverna on the east side as you 
; come in which is a flotilla favourite, 

= and it has a quay. There’s plenty of 




96 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 





Cruising Notes 




Poiis has a very shallow little harbour with a small mole for local boats 
INSET An unintentionally thought-provoking sign in Polls 


room to swing inside the large bay F 
around which Vathi is built. You j 
can also go stern- or bows-to on ■ 
the town quay to the west side. F 
There are port police here too. I 

E 

Rat Island 

South of Vathi, along the east t 
coast, there are a couple of little : 
hideaways and then Pera Pigadhi, F 
known as ‘Rat Island’. Ten years i 
ago we were told of giant cannibal i 
rats which had survived various j 
attempts to remove them from this ! 
pretty lump of scrub-filled rock i 
close to Ithaca. We heard the | 
locals had rounded up stray dogs ! 
and cats and put them on the i 
island one winter, and when they ! 
returned in the spring the rats were ! 
still there, but there were just the i 
bones of the dogs and cats! I 

‘Rat Island’ has a concrete quay I 
which we moored to many years i 
ago, and there was plenty of rat ; 
poo in evidence and a rustling I 
in the scrub. We didn’t stay! ■ 

However, I’m told that the rats 1 
have now gone and it’s safe to I, 

moor there. We saw a couple [ 

of boats moored there overnight F 

in September. [ 

Just to the south of the island is [ 
a wide bay which is worth a stop F 
provided the winds are ok. Lay I 
plenty of chain, and be prepared \ 
for the occasional bounce from I 

ferry wash. There is said to be a [ 
mythical spring in the hill, and the i 
atmosphere here is quite special. j 
If you go around the southern tip I 
of the island there’s a bay big | 
enough for a few boats with clear \ 
signs of an ancient settlement. j 
Now it’s just the goats who [ 

seem to live there. It’s sheltered i 

except from the south and it’s [ 

a reasonable spot, but again ■ 

busy in season. j 

[ 

Anchor and swing 

On the west coast of Ithaca, I 

opposite Cephalonia, is Poiis. Here F 
you can anchor and swing; you i 


can also take shore lines back to 
rocks on the north and south 
sides of the bay. You often get a 
north-westerly blow at the end of 
the afternoon here: as always, be 
sure to check the weather first. If it 
does get up from the north-west 
you can always pop across the 
narrow channel to Cephalonia 
where there are a number of small 
bays offering protection, but the 
wind usually goes at sunset. 

Polls has a little harbour with 
a small mole although this is for 
local boats, and it’s very shallow. 
There’s a lovely sign here which 
reads ‘Birth Place for Fishing 
Boats’. I always thought they 
were made, not born! There is 
a tap by a cafe on the quayside 
but, as the locals will tell you, 
it is ‘only for horses’ so it’s not 
recommended unless you’re 
running in the 2:45 at Newmarket. 

An uphill walk with great views 
across the bay will take you, after 
about a mile, to the village. There’s 
a nice square which features a 
model of an archaeological ruin 
being excavated nearby, along with 
shops, a pharmacy, ice creams 
and tavernas (including a lovely 
one set in a garden, to the right of 
the main street). The village also 
has a small museum. 

British archaeologists made a 
famous find in the 1 900s in a cave 
in the bay at Poiis: the cave is still 
there, but the roof has fallen in. 
Centuries ago the locals used it as 
a hideaway for treasures including, 
it is said, evidence of Odysseus 
being there. That treasure is now 
on show at the museum. 

Poiis is very different to the main 
ports on the east coast of Ithaca, 
but it has charm and a real sense 
of history. They say there’s a 
sunken city at the entrance of 
the bay. I’ve yet to find someone 
who’s seen it, but just knowing it 
could be there adds another layer 
of mysterious allure to this jewel 
of an Ionian island. 


Free anchorage! 

The Cove, Isles of Scilly 



Holding on sand is good, but avoid patches of weed 


I n the right conditions, 
the anchorage known 
as The Cove, which lies 
between St Agnes and Gugh, 
is one of Scilly’s finest 
anchorages - although you’ll 
need to be prepared to clear 
out if it comes on to blow 
from the south. 

Shelter is excellent from west, 
north and east - 
although 
improved in 
northerlies once 
the causeway 
between the 
two islands is 
uncovered. 

Holding is 
good, on sand; 
but make sure 
you avoid any 
patches of 
weed, the odd 
mooring and 
a telephone 


cable, which is marked on the 
chart. Approach is easy - deep 
water and no hazards if you 
stick to the middle of the bay. 

A good pub, the Turk’s Head, 
is ashore, a short walk away on 
St Agnes, and offers food, drink 
and free WiFi. The odd golf cart 
aside, the island is a tranquil 
place to spend a while. 



Do you have a favourite free anchorage? 


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Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 


97 


Ben Meakins 



bodrolfe 


r 0 kerage 

atT II c^burj Mari nil 




Carter 30, 1 978, fin, Northshore build, here Etap 2 1 i, 2007, tandem keel, superb 

£ / 2,250 example, Solent, Hants £ / 7,500 



Etap 32s, 2001, fin, excellent example, ready to Hunter Channel 2 7, launched 200 1, twin, fully 
sail. Here £49,950 equipped, France £28,500 


Hanse 370E 

£67,750 

Cromarty 36 

£57,950 

Etap 38i 

£55,000 

Moody 34 

£36,750 

Elan 31 

£39,000 

Elan 210 

£26,995 


Rossiter Pintail 27 

£17,900 

Moody 27 

£16,500 

Beneteau First 26 

£14,000 

Westerly Centaur 26 £1 1,250 


Holman Sovereign 3 1 £10,750 


Etap 221 Lift keel 

£6.950 

Hunters, Elans & Etaps needed! 





www.woodrolfe.com 

The Yacht Harbour, Tollesbury, Essex CM9 8SE • Tel: 01621 868494 




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MARIEHOLM32E £17,950 


GRAMPIAN 37 £32,500 


DUFOUR 38 CLASSIC £59,950 H BENETEAU OCEANIS 35 £124,500 



1979. Swedish built, long keel, tiller steered sloop. 28HP 



1979. Aft Cockpit, fin keel, skeg rudder. 29HP 


2000. Well Equipped, fin keel, sloop. 40HP 




WEST' OCEANQUEST35 £63,000 ■ HUNTER LEGEND 36 £95,000 


2015. Single oft cabin cruiser. Fin keel. Sloop. 29HP 


BENETEAU FIRST 25.7 £29,950 


1991. Well built, aft cockpit, wing keel, sloop. 37HP 





A' ■ 


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1997. Ed Dubois, twin keel, sloop, six berth. 28HP 2010. Single Aft Cabin, Huge accom. Bilge keel, 29HP 2005. Sloop, lift keel. Spin gear, tiller pilot. 14HP 


LARGE SELECTION OF NEW AND BROKERAGE YACHTS BASED AT IPSWICH. 
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www.foxsyachts.co.uk 
















CRAFT FOR SAlf 


HND A BOAT 



“Quartet” Fin keel. Sleeps 6 in comfort. Refurbished 2010, new mast, boom, standing rigging, 
running rigging, instruments (inc GPS, chart plotter, radar, Navtex and AIS receiver) 2 winches 
and upholstery throughout. Sails - main, genoa. No I jib (furling) and cruising chute with stack- 
pack/lazyjack for main. Volvo engine. In good order, ready to sail, no headlining problems. Owner 
retiring from sailing so inventory can include charts, lifejackets, pilot books, crockery, binoculars 
etc. Pictures available. Lying Hayling Island, Hants. Price £32,500. 

Also available Walker Bay rigid RID IOft“T/T Quartet” £700, including mast and sail, and Mariner 
3.5 outboard £400. 

Contact: Richard Foreman email: rcforeman@btinternet.com 


Mirage 28 Mkll bilge keels 



She was built by THAMES MARINE 1 981. One owner from 
new and used her as a family cruiser mainly on the East 
Coast. Berthed atWoolverstone Marina, always Wintered 
ashore. Engine is aYANMAR 2 CYL 18/20 HP new 1994. 
Sails are roller reefing genoa. Behind the mast roller reefing 
mainsail new 2002. Sails include a cruising chute and a 
storm jib.The tender is an AVON REDCREST.2.5 HP 
MARINER new 2003. PLASTIMO galley cooker with flame 
failure, 2 burners, grill, thermostatically controlled oven. The 
instruments include fixed VHP with DSC red button, hand 
held VHP new 2005, Puruno GPS, Garmin chart plotter new 
2009, Echo depth sounder, autopilot (I2v) boom tent. Six 
berths include the option of 2 double berths. Headroom in 
saloon is over 6 feet. Now fitted out for the 20 1 5 Season 
£10,950 

Alun Roberts 01494-872809 
alunandmavis@waitrose.com 


HUNTER HORIZON 26 
YEAR 1990 - £9,950 



Length 26ft • Beam 9ft • Draught 
3.4ft displacement 209 1 kg 
Engine: Yanmar IGM lOHP 


Inboard diesel. 

Twin keel, GRP hull expoxied from 
new, 6 Berth, fully equipped. Zodiac 
tender included, lying atTopsham, 
Exeter, Devon. 

Phone 07595 030352 


^Therapy’ 2005 Build 
Jeanneau Sun 2000 

1 Owner, excellent condition, 
overhauled road trailer, new 
cream cockpit/interior uphol- 
stery, new mast, rigging, new 
crusader sails 2011. £8000 spent. 
Ashore Dorset. 

For sale £13,250 
Tel: 01202738052 


Twister 28, 1979 



Much-admired and well-maintained classic yacht. 
GRP hull with teak detailing, carved companion- 
way entrance and beautiful bespoke interior. New 
Beta 1 6hp engine and self-steering windvane, 
2007. Wintered ashore. Featured in PBO getting 
to the Med series; raced on the UK south coast. 
Owned since 2006; two previous careful owners. 
£19,500 ONO. 

Lying South of France, near Marseille. 

Tel: 07726 2324 1 2 

Email: sarahclareconlon@gmail.com 


CATALINA CAPRI 16 TRAILER 



GRP Sloop bit c. 1 998.Braked trailer with spare 
wheel. Main+2furling jibs. Yamaha 4str Outboard. 
Fin/winged keel. Sprayhood.Anchor,loads of 
warps+fenders. Boom tent .Winter cover. 

Porta PottieWC.2berths in cabin. Depth 
sounder+nav Its. Ashore ConwyValley N. Wales 

£3950 

Tel: 01492 650727 

Email: bnan@penygader.plus.com 


BOATS FOR SALE. Buy in Greece 
with confidence. British owner 
operated brokerage. Quality Service. 
Also bareboat yacht charter. Details 
at www.pinnacleyachtsales.conn or 
tel: 0030 6947 040767 


Browner 


Halmatic 880 Motor Sailer 



Reluctant sale due to Health/Age 
of owner, very well equipped and 
maintained. 14 years in my 


ownership, but little used this year 
or last. Berthed at Plymouth. 

£9000 for quick sale 

Tel: 07990 553783 

Email: rogercroome34@gmail.com 


Jaguar 27 



Year 1973 Length 26’ 10” Beam 8’ 10” 

Draught Fin Keel 4’4” 

New Beta 1 6 Hp engine with 
about 4 hours on the clock 
Too many new parts to list here. 

Full description plus photographic views 
can be found on 

http:/jaguaryachts.co.uk.g8seq.com/forsale.html 

Out of the water at Blyth RNYC. No obligation Viewing 

can be arranged. 

Contact 01 670 510345 
£8950 


Sadler 25 



Excellently resuscitated 1978 David Sadler 
designed yacht with more than £22,000 spent 
on upgrades. In excellent condition, new Nanni 
l4Hp diesel stern-drive engine, new rigging, 
new Raymarine auto-pilot, new ICOM VHS 
radio. Standard Horizon GPS and AIS and many 
extras, such as charts, safety equipment and sails. 
Surveyed April 20 1 5. 


£1 1,500 O.N.O 
Call: 07900213720 






BEjjTIISy^^ 

Quay Lane Boatyard 

in Historic Portsmouth Harbour 


Summer Offer 
on Storage Ashore 
See Website for details 

Swing Moorings, from £410 to £954 
per annum. 

Tidal pontoon berths are available in 
sheltered waters 
£ 1 . 1 5 per foot per week. 

All Prices include VAT 

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02392 524214 


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Based in Portsmouth on a swinging 
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We are looking for a person to take over 
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the use. It is likely that this arrangement will 
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email : david@thackers.co.uk call 
David Thacker on 07885 068159 or 
Matthew Parry on 0775 I 653 462 


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MARINE DIRECTORY 



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MARINE DIRECTORY 


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MARINE DIRECTORY 


vViJ 


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103 







MARINE DIRECTORY 


Tel: 020 3148 2001 Fax: 020 3148 8316 email: privateboats.ads@timeinc.com 


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BOAT NAMES 


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105 





























MARINE DIRECTORY 


Tel: 020 3148 2001 Fax: 020 3148 8316 email: privatebeats.ads@timeinc.cem 


ROAT & EQUIP 

■ 

SELF STEERING 

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SURVEYORS 1 

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Fairey Fisherman, 1964 



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ADVENTURE HOLIDAYS 



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107 












YACHT CHARTER AND SAIUNG HOLIDAYS 



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AFLOAT! 




Be sure 

to rate 
& review. 


i nstanTly^n your 
iPad or iPhone 

pbo.co.uk/digital 


Cruising on a 
shoestring A 

f ifH I'm Low-CHf ifliilnt 

6 tH3fKlirs for M M 

tietlfrVVJf^J Jr If 

froen shore If ■ 


Ratcliet 






B 3KT0 DOWNLOAD I 
EASYJOUSE^^ 
AVAILABLE WORLDWIDE 



Also available on 

NOOK'Bua Google play kindle fire #zmio“ 










www.dickeveritt.conn 



Sketchbook 


by Dick Everitt 


I ^ ^ ^ ^ 1 3 1 H m : T1 


Pole position for poling out headsails 



A. Whew ruhhiwg before the wind, 
with the sails ‘wmg-ow-wmg’ or 
‘goosewiwged’ (set either side of the 
boat) , you might want to pole out the 
headsail to stop it flopping about. 

Oh small boats you caw often just 
stick a boathook into a knot in the 
sheet, and lash the pole to the 
rigging with a slip knot. 

B. On bigger boats you need to use the 
spinnaker pole and be more careful to 
avoid damaging the boat, or crew. 
Depending on how it’s rigged, one way 
is to attach all the lines to one end, 
while it’s still fixed to the deck. Then 
raise the other end up the mast. 






G. If you are on a boat 
without poles, you 
can still run before 
a strong wind with 
a small headsail by 
poling it out with the 
boom. Fix a block on 
the end of the boom 
and run the sheet 
through it. A nylon 
preventer, running 
forward from the 
boom end and then 
aft, is good as it gives 
a bit if you dip the 
boom into the water. 


C. The idea is to get the pole in 
position and held there with a 
fore guy (I) after guy (2) and 
topping lift (3). Then pull the 
sail to it. The ultra-safe way 
of doing so is to use an extra 
sheet (4), not the lazy sheet. 
This avoids possible chafe 
and snags with the guardrail. 


D. With the headsail blanketed by the main, 
attach the extra sheet and puli it across to the 
pole. If the fore guy runs through a block, and 
then back aft, the pole can be adjusted from 
the cockpit. If you have to change course 
quickly, leave the pole and adjust the sheets. 


E. Twin poled-out headsails can be made to 
steer the boat downwind, in steady conditions. 

F. To reduce the rolling effect of poled-out 
sails, some people use a twizzle rig. This 
fixes the poles to a stay, which gives slightly. 


Original Boat Owner’s Sketchbook volumes 1 to 5 are now available to download from www.pbo.co.uk/sketchbook priced at £4.95 
each. A limited number of printed volumes 3, 4 and 5 of the original Sketchbook series are still available from the PBO Editorial office 
priced at £3.75 each, or all three for £10. Order yours by calling tel: 01202 440830 or email: pbo@timeinc.com 


PUZZLE SOLUTION: 1: B, 2: A, 3: A, 4: B 


110 


Practical Boat Owner 589 Summer 2015 • www.pbo.co.uk 



ICOM 


IC-M423G 


VHF/DSC with Integrated GPS Receiver! 

NEW INNOVATION FOR THE NEW SEASON 



RX<Qi 

42^ 49 . 7000N 
10M9.880@£ 
OCT 01 12:34 


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HI/LQTCHAN 



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STANDARD HORIZON 


The New 
HX870E 




5PS 


HX870 


Handheld DSC VHF Radio 


Your safety in your hands 

Standard Horizon's new handheld DSC VHF radio, the HX870E 
Offers a rnuUtiude of features to increase your safety at sea 
With a very large bacHlit screen, you can riow navigate and 
plot routes from a directory of 200 waypoints, communicate 
with other HX870E users via the Group Monitoring function, 
and there's also a Man Overboard soft key. Waterproof to a 
rating of IPKS, the radio features an aulomaltc distress strobe, 
which will flash a bnght SOS the moment the radio hits the 
water, even if powered off at the time, Plus, there's 6W high 
output power, a long lasting lithium-ion battery, and three 
year warranty. 

With a price of under £230, it's well worth the investment. 


Email us at sales^standardhorizon co uk 

or call us on +44 (D}1962 86&667 


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