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ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 



OCTOBER 1966 









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The Executive Board of the Alumnae Association 



A a 



President 



Vice-Presidents 



Clerk 



Treasurer 



Executive Secretary 

Delegates-at- Large 



Alumnae Trustee 
1963-1969 

Alumnae Trustee 
1966-1972 



1 966 - 1 968 

Mrs. James F. Mathias 

( Barbara Lord) 

Glendale Rd., Harrison, N.Y. 

Mrs. Leonard M. Fowle 

(Nancy Kimball) 

36 Norman St., Marblehead, Mass. 

Mrs. John E. Cain, Jr. 

(Aagot Hinrichsen) 

21 Lantern Lane, Weston, Mass. 

Mrs. Malcolm S. Loring 

(Anne Russell) 

Pepperell Rd., Kittery Point, Me. 

Mrs. E. Hartley Smith 

(Deborah Redfield) 

4 Jefferson St., Marblehead, Mass. 

Mrs. Gage Olcott 

(Helen O'Brien) 

40 Oakridge Rd., Wellesley, Mass. 

Miss C. Jane Sullivan 

20 Buswell St., Lawrence, Mass. 

Mrs. Robert L. Bettinger 

(Fredericka Brown) 

133 Rhoda Ave., Fairfield, Conn. 

Miss Elizabeth F. Bulkeley 

340 Mill Hill Terr., Southport, Conn. 

Mrs. Walter I. Scott, Jr. 

(Janice Lenane) 

12 Orchard Circle, Greenwood, Mass. 

Miss Alice C. Sweeney 

35 School St., Andover, Mass. 

Mrs. John B. Ogilvie 

( Donna Brace) 

14 Circle Rd., Darien, Conn. 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 



OCTOBER 1966 



VOLUME 35, NUMBER 1 



Published four times yearly, October, February, May and September, by Abbot Academy, Andover, Massachusetts. Entered as 
second class .natter December 12, 1933, at the post office at Andover, Massachusetts, under the act of August 24, 1912. 




Miss Eleanor Morin Tucker is acting as principal 
of Abbot Academy this year during Mrs. Crane's 
absence on sabbatical. Miss Tucker, a graduate of 
Smith College, also holds a Master's Degree from 
there. Since coming to Abbot in 1936 as a teacher 
of chemistry and mathematics, she has served as 
director of studies and as vice-principal. For the 
past three summers Miss Tucker has been dean of 
girls at the Phillips Academy Summer Session. Miss 
Tucker is a member of the Northern Area Com- 
mittee of the Northfield League and a trustee and 
secretary of the Methuen Memorial Organ Hall. 



a^^ 



From the desk of Miss Tucker . . . 

Each year is similar yet different. Our numbers are larger and the majority of the girls 
are younger than in other years. We started a week earlier and were settled before Phillips 
Academy started. This has resulted in a more leisurely coordination with them in extra- 
curricular activities and with the Greater Lawrence service program. The early opening date 
also gave us a beautifully mild day for the school picnic at Ipswich Beach. 

The Handbook was revised thoughtfully and wisely by two trustees, Mrs. Lenert W. 
Henry (Helen Allen, '32) and Mrs. John M. Kemper (Abby Castle, '31), and a teacher, 
Miss Goodwin. As it states, "Rules as such are minimized in comparison with emphasis on 
a high sense of honor, honesty, individual responsibility, a constructive attitude, considera- 
tion of another's rights and feelings, and lady-like behavior". In this spirit all of us are 
trying to live in our community this year. The Student Council is alert and positive and the 
entire senior class, with Miss Goodwin as their advisor, are eager to be leaders in a friendly, 
confident way. 

Come to Abbot when you are in this area. Remember that Sunset Lodge is an alumnae 
house. I look forward to greeting you. 



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INTRODUCTION 

PHILIP K. ALLEN 
President of the Board of Trustees 



As President of the Board of Trustees and 
on behalf of that Board, I welcome all of 
you to the Old South Church . . . this lovely 
place . . . and on this beautiful "Abbot" 
day . . . for the culminating exercises in 
the graduation of the Class of 1966 at 
Abbot Academy. 

May I also on behalf of the Board convey 
to Headmistress Mary Crane our best wishes 
for a bon voyage and a pleasant, fruitful 
and restful year in Greece. Can you call a 
busman's or rather buswoman's holiday 
restful? 

And may I finally pay tribute to a 92- 
year young man who has marched with us 
today as he has proudly over a span of 60 
years. No more loyal supporter of Abbot 
exists than Burton S. Flagg, Treasurer and 
Trustee Emeritus. I would ask that we all 
rise in recognition of his long and unselfish 
devotion to Abbot Academy. 

And now to the introduction of our 
speaker who needs less introduction than 
probably any who has ever appeared here. 
For Norman Thomas is known and admired 
by more people who have disagreed with 
him than perhaps even he can believe 
possible. 

For the record, though, and to refresh 
your memories . . . especially those who 
have not studied American History recently 
... he has been and still is the leader of 
the Socialist Party, and has been a Presi- 
dential candidate on six separate occasions, 
yet has never occupied public office. 

He was born in Marion, Ohio, 82 years 
ago, was a Phi Beta Kappa at Princeton, 
being Valedictorian of the Class of 1905. 
Ordained a Presbyterian minister in 1911, 
he joined the Socialist Party in 1918 and 
since that time ... he resigned his ministry 
in 1931 . . . he has been the "voice of 
dissent" and the advocate of social reforms 
which, in large measure, he has been 
privileged, as few have, to see come to 
pass in his own lifetime. 



two 



Two statements by Mr. Thomas sum up, 
it seems to me, the substance of the man 
. . . his sly humor and his strength. Both 
were given in recent interviews. 

One: "I have only one request of the 
world — which hasn't, of course, much ear 
— and that is to let me go out with a bang, 
not a whimper." 

The other: "I suppose it is an achieve- 
ment to live to my age and feel that one 
has kept the faith or tried to ... to be 
able to sleep at night with reasonable satis- 
faction ... to have had a part in some of 
the things that have been accomplished in 
the field of better race relations and the 
rest of it. It is something of an achieve- 
ment, I think, to keep the idea of socialism 
before a rather indifferent or even hostile 
American Public. That's the kind of achieve- 
ment that I have to my credit. As the world 
counts achievement, I have not got 
much." 

I leave it to you people to judge whether 
or not our speaker has "got much"! 

I consider it a rare privilege to introduce 
to you Mr. Norman Thomas, Grandfather 
of the Year of the Class of 1966 (Welling 
Thomas, a member of the graduating class, 
is his granddaughter), whose motto might 
be as a symbol of his life and dedication, 
in his own words, "to tear a question open 
and riddle it with light". Mr. Thomas .... 



ADDRESS 

NORMAN THOMAS 

An old man may be excused for begin- 
ning with a little reminiscence . . . Sixty- 
five years ago about this time I graduated, 
or should I say was graduated, from Marion 
Ohio High School. It was a so-so occasion. 
We had on incredibly dull speaker; he 
spoke an incredible length of time about 
something I don't remember. Actually, we 
were pretty cheerful that we had graduated 
— were graduated. The rush to college 
wasn't on — very few of us thought of 
going to college, but we were pretty content 



with the world. God was in His heaven; 
William McKinley was in the White House. 
That lively and charming man, Teddy 
Roosevelt, was wandering around keeping 
himself more or less conspicuous without 
the undue flattery of his chief. In other 
words, the country was rather prosperous. 
But the point I am really talking about 
isn't that. It's this. None of us, including 
men far older and wiser than I, could 
possibly imagine that this is the world that 
you and I live in in 1966. Nobody could 
imagine that while we sit here we should 
all have somewhere in the back of our minds 
a hope and a prayer that the astronauts 
are landing safely. Perhaps they have al- 
ready, I don't know. Astronauts in outer 
space, astronauts — a few of many who 
have traveled 'round the world over and 
over again, even walked in space. Nobody 
could imagine that for the second time 
men, and in this case men from a different 
nation, have soft-landed a satellite on the 
moon — a satellite which is sending back 
messages, photographs to us here on earth. 
These things are incredible and they ore 
accompanied by other things almost as in- 
credible — triumphs of men over the forces 
of nature. 

One would think, if he knew only this 
part of the story, that there would be a 
kind of perpetual dancing in the streets, 
dancing that would last for many millen- 
niums of times. We men on this little 
earth, in this little galaxy, in this all but 
infinite space, we men have achieved so 
much. But there isn't dancing in the streets. 
We rejoice, yes, but scarcely with the kind 
of joy that one might expect, and perhaps 
you can understand why, when you know 
that the same papers that carry the news 
of these magnificent achievements of men, 
carry news of a very different sort. It is 
not so long ago that some 300,000 Indo- 
nesians, probably most of them of Chinese 
origin or parentage, without trial or hearing, 
were massacred. Not the kind of crime per- 
petrated by Communists, but against Com- 
munists for alleged Communism, and 
nobody uttered a protest of any effect in 
the world. While we sit here, who knows, 
perhaps some other Buddhist monk or nun 
in South Vietnam is practicing that power- 
ful right of self-immolation as so many 
have already done — in a country to which 



three 



we have sent our sons, under conscription, 
to fight for freedom. This kind of thing is 
going on not only in protest against the 
South Vietnamese goverment, but against 
us in one way or another for our alliance. 

And, of course, there are other things 
that could be said about our times. If you 
look at our literature today, it is not a 
literature of great rejoicing, or of great 
hope. Back in the early days of this century, 
one of the things that characterized us was 
that while we disagreed on many things, 
I think we all, if we thought at all, had 
a great faith in progress with a capital P; 
I think we all had a place in our atlas for 
Utopia of some sort, arrived at in some way 
or another. That's no longer true. Our 
literature, on the whole, has a kind of 
miasmatic quality. We are concerned about 
frustrations and about alienations and 
about the war between the generations 
and — you can fill out the program for 
yourself. Our arts and even our music re- 
flect to some extent this attitude of men, 
this confusion, this turmoil. We are aware 
that we are in a world shrunk by our own 
great achievements and yet not yet well 
tied together by any true bonds of fratern- 
ity. 

We are afraid, afraid that we may yet 
perish by the very magnitude of our own 
inventions in nuclear war. 

This is where we are at the present time. 
Now I could exaggerate this, but I don't 
want to. I am not implying that we haven't 
done things of value since the times of 
William McKinley. I am not Mr. Buckley. 
I think that there have been many things 
done that are very much to our credit. The 
increased interest in education is a form 
of progress I think very much to our credit. 
And I could go on with a long list, but I 
need not bother you for you know yourselves 
that these are true. The trouble is that we 
haven't caught up with ourselves; at least 
that is one trouble — there are others. 
Preachers and Commencement speakers 
will go through a whole list before this June 
is out. One of the problems that I'm quite 
sure is worth mentioning is this: consciously 
or subconsciously we are aware of the lag 
between what we have been able to do with 
things, with energy, with nature, as com- 
pared with what we have been able to do 



with our human nature and with our human 
institutions. Not that we have done nothing. 
I think we have, but the contrast is very 
striking. It has only been within a com- 
paratively short time, as history counts 
time, that men have had the rational ap- 
proach and the inquiring mind which gave 
birth to science. This field also was a field 
once afflicted with magic and all kinds of 
superstition, but we have been able to 
become pretty rational about our control 
of things and of energy. After all, these 
are somewhat divorced from our inner 
nature. After all, we can have laboratory 
experiments in science as we cannot have 
in history to find out just what cause pro- 
duces just what effect. And so we have 
gone very much faster ahead, but we have 
to catch up with ourselves because of the 
real danger in our time. 

It seems almost inappropriate on an oc- 
casion like this, on what I am told is an 
Abbot day and which I appreciate, to 
remind you, as I must, that all of us of every 
generation have to face very serious 
problems now to see if we can catch up 
with ourselves and control ourselves. There 
are many aspects of that — psychological, 
and I dare to say, spiritual. I want to speak 
of two or three that are socicl, political, 
if you like, which have to be faced. No 
amount of academic education, no amount 
of training in the appreciation of beauty, 
which I trust you have, will make up for the 
failure to use your education the better to 
look at life and to see it whole with its 
beauty, yes, and its ugliness as well. 

Now let me talk about the three areas 
very briefly to which I want tc call your 
attention. 

The first is the area of civil rights. Here 
we have been making progress, I want to 
emphasize that, but it has been slower than 
slow. We have probably gone about as far 
as we can by legislation, and now it comes 
to us and to our own selves, to a struggle 
within our own selves against our own 
prejudices, to a struggle socially to realize 
the balls we have been passing for our- 
selves. We Americans have to face an ugly 
fact. We have had many glorious things 
to record in our history, and I for one am 
very proud of the Declaration of Independ- 
ence, but it is alf so hypocritical because 



four 



it begins, "We hold these truths to be self- 
evident, that all men are created free and 
equal and are all entitled to life, liberty 
and the pursuit of happiness." What the 
framers of that noble document really 
meant was: we hold these truths to be self- 
evident, that men are born almost all equal, 
if they are white, but not if they are black, 
and there were many slaves in the United 
States at that time. The Constitution of 
the United States later adopted, protected 
the infamous slave trade until 1880. The 
United States is, I think, the only great 
nation that had to abolish the institution 
of slavery by a terribly costly war, the re- 
sults of which we still suffer. This is the 
fact about us that we have to remember. 
We have much to atone for as a people 
and we shan't be able to wipe out all the 
facts by a few generous and appropriate 
actions now. We will have to learn patience; 
we will have to learn how to co-exist and to 
do more than co-exist. We will have to 
learn to judge ourselves more harshly than 
we judge others in this because it is an ab- 
solute necessity that, if the things you 
regard most highly, the things that Abbot 
stands for, are to be realized in the world, 
they have to be spread out; they cannot 
be the property of a few; they cannot even 
be the property of that minority which calls 
itself the white race. It was by a strange 
combination of events that the white race 
so mastered the world in the 19th century, 
but that time has gone — we have to face 
the revolution of rising expectations which 
perhaps is most of all an expectation of 
other races than white to share in the bene- 
fits of the world of which they think they 
have been deprived. It's a challenge, a 
challenge to what we do every day in our 
own personal lives, what we do in our homes 
and the towns where we live, what we do 
and think about matters of employment 
and education and the rest. You have heard 
so much that I need not emphasize this 
except to point out the necessity of every 
educated person to realize that there is no 
alternative. Your education is not of much 
value and your own security is not true 
security unless you join in this struggle 
against your own prejudices and against 
social prejudices for the kind of ideal that 
the founders of our country expressed more 



nobly in thought than they expressed in 
action in the Declaration of Independence. 
Then we have another point. There's not 
much virtue in the equality of poverty and 
unemployment. We come from a world 
where men dimly see that it is no longer 
true, as the Scriptures say, that the poor 
we have always with us because there is no 
help for it. There wasn't enough knowledge 
or enough skill then to conquer poverty. 
There IS enough knowledge and enough 
skill now to conquer poverty. There's got to 
be. It can't be done over-night. And when 
I talk about conquering poverty, I am not 
thinking just of our own slums, rural and 
domestic, I'm thinking of the world. I've 
recently come back from Santo Domingo 
and I can see almost vividly some of the 
things I saw there in contrast to what we 
have here. Now, I'm not talking about an 
easy task or one upon which men can easily 
agree, but the effort must be made and I 
think it is not wrong to say that, if we 
will learn to control the population explo- 
sion, if we can learn to protect properly 
our natural resources, if we can learn to 
control the pollution of water and air and 
manage to supply water for the ever in- 
creasing population, and if we can then 
use what modern science and technology 
have brought to us by way of tools and 
knowledge, it will be possible to conquer 
bitter politics, it will be possible to eradi- 
cate plagues and great disasters of disease, 
it will be possible, I think, to wipe out 
illiteracy which has to be wiped out because 
literacy is a necessary tool for the individual 
and for society in these modern times. I 
am telling you about what is difficult, but 
I want you to believe that I am talking at 
least to young people. Doing what I say is 
a challenge and not just a discouragement. 
This is something our ancestors couldn't do, 
what we can't do in a moment, but it's 
something to start on the way to being 
done. It's not appropriate to discuss here 
and I shall not be discussing details about 
what is called the war against poverty or 
the great society, but I remind you of its 
great importance and I remind you, further- 
more, that I do not think it possible to 
achieve in a kind of American isolation 
the great society needed in a troubled, con- 
fused and bitter world. 



five 



There is, of course, the third thing that 
concerns us perhaps most of all because 
it's the most immediately serious. Men say 
that they love peace and you can find, for 
instance, in the Scriptures, yes, you can 
find even in the ILIAD, I think, some 
beautiful references, particularly Hector's 
effective speech to Andromache which 
show how men really long for peace, but 
they also loved war; let's not fool ourselves. 
We're so strangely made that we're capable 
of strange love-hate combinations and men 
have cherished war. Out of it have come 
glory and honor and pride for the winner. 
Out of it have come songs and music and 
poems. Out of it has come victory for MY 
side against the other fellow's side. Out 
of it has come victory for MY class, for 
MY exploiting group, against the great mass 
of people. And all of a sudden, after two 
terribly costly wars, the United States has 
discovered a bomb in the development of 
which lay the end of war, because it is 
impossible to use the best weapons that 
we have without causing the destruction of 
mankind, and because there could never 
be a major war in which these weapons will 
not be used, no matter how many contrary 
statements are made at the present time. 

You who are graduating today from 
Abbot must remember that you also have 
a contribution. Little as we seem in com- 
parison with government, we have a con- 
tribution. I am a Socialist who is no longer 
so sure that you can appeal from govern- 
ments to people. At the present time, for 
instance, I think the government is ahead 
of public sentiment in the effecting of civil 
liberty and civil rights, not behind. Quite a 
change from the McCarthy age, perhaps, 
but this is a fact now. And I do not con- 
sider that men in Washington, guiding the 
policy of which I am extremely critical are 
worse than the run of the mill American. 
In some ways they are better. I never 
listened to an official speech quite as stupid 
as some unofficial speeches that I have 
listened to where praise is made the official 
point of view. Just as I am not discussing 
in detail the war against poverty, so I am 
certainly not discussing in detail at this 
time the Vietnamese war. My opinions are 
pretty well known, and I think that those 
who would disagree with my opinions have 



in their hearts, the same terrible longings 
that I have — that the United States should 
reassert the position of leadership for peace 
and some sort of co-existence and not the 
cooperation that has resulted in the terrible 
anguish of what is happening now without 
producing the results that we want in Viet 
Nam. I want you to realize that I do not 
think that Viet Nam is an isolated problem, 
but rather evidence of a mistaken policy. 
I do not think that the great aim of Ameri- 
can Foreign Policy should be the military 
containment of Communism, not because 
there are not things in Communism which 
I emphatically reject, but because I do not 
think you kill ideas this way, and because 
I think you can deal better with Com- 
munism when your great priority is to find 
an alternative to war in a world that can 
no longer afford war at all. We have got 
to find those alternatives and we've got to 
find them in other ways than sheer brute 
force to correct some of the evils of the 
world, other ways than sheer brute force to 
show that it is possible to share the know- 
ledge and the skill we have in cooperative 
fashion for the conquest of poverty, illiter- 
acy and disease. All I know, as I have 
always known, is that you do not get Utopia 
simply in terms of material achievement. 
I also know that inequalities of material 
achievement, that the unnecessary suffer- 
ing of multitudes is completely opposed to 
any spiritual gain that you can get in our 
troubled world. And, therefore, I am plead- 
ing, pleading for the kind of education — 
you have had some — for more of that 
kind of education in school, in life, in what 
you feel and what you see, the kind of edu- 
cation that you yourselves may understand 
that we human beings are curiously named. 
We wouldn't be here at all on this earth 
if we hadn't developed a genius for some 
degree of cooperation. It is commonplace 
now to say that the reason that men rose in 
the evolutionary struggle was quite largely 
that they had to stick together to protect 
their interests. It was the very helplessness 
of human infants, the very prolongation of 
infancy that made it necessary for men to 
cooperate. Some of that cooperation has 
been very noble, both in primitive times 
and in our own age, but it has also been 
true that men are very much addicted — 



six 



and in this case the word "men" embraces 
the women — that men are very much ad- 
dicted to conflict. We have had all sorts 
of conflicts: conflicts of religion, some of 
the cruelest of wars, conflicts of facts, con- 
flicts of race, conflicts of nations, but con- 
flicts. We have developed a great capacity, 
I say, for cooperation, and we have lived 
pretty much by our loyalties, but our loyal- 
ties somehow haven't been big enough and 
aren't big enough today. Somehow we have 
got to have a loyalty to the human family 
and do more than say in words that above 
all nations, is humanity. It is not easy. It 
does not mean that you cease to love your 
nation any more than the love of your 
family requires you to reject the love of 
your nation. We have got to find a way to 
think in terms of the glory and the sorrow 
of the whole human family, and there is 
no education of great value, there is no 
education that will bring you enduring satis- 
faction, that doesn't accept that particular 
fact at the present time. 

I can imagine that some of you will be 
saying on this beautiful day, why not talk 
a little bit about the more cheerful things 
of life. Of course, they exist. I am not call- 
ing on the graduates of this year to live the 
life of anchorites in a world where there 
is so much to appreciate and to enjoy. I 
am thankful to high heaven that we do live 



in a world where, in the midst of much of 
our own ugliness, there is so much beauty; 
in the midst of so many of our own mistakes 
and sins, there has been so much devotion, 
so much loyalty. I am thankful we live in a 
world where you can form the kinds of 
friendships which you must have formed in 
Abbot while you have been here, and this 
sort of friendship gives meaning even to 
lives which are not blessed with all the 
satisfactions of the world. It is a wonderful 
world, a puzzling world, a curious world, 
but a world that has enough proof of what 
men can do to make it worthwhile to press 
on with an insistence that the times ab- 
solutely require, that before we fight the 
world by our own hands and by our own 
skills, we be able to deal with the ancient 
evils of war, the ancient evils of hate, racial 
prejudice, and unjust inequality which are 
so tragically evident in our present world. 
Everyone of us can help. I know it is dis- 
couraging. We are little and the tasks are 
big, but it is the sum of our own little 
efforts very largely, of the way we use the 
power we have, what influence we have, 
what personality we have. It is to that that 
you must trust, that in this race — and I 
say it advisedly — this race between better- 
ment and destruction, humanity proves at 
least that if it cannot build Utopia in a day, 
it can get out of the mire in which we are 
bogged at the present time. 





TO 
THE 
ABBOT 
CAMPUS 



come boarding students from many states and foreign countries. This year the following 
states and countries are represented: 



California 1 

Colorado 2 

Connecticut 17 

Delaware 1 

District of Columbia 4 

Florida 7 

Hawaii 1 

Illinois 4 

Indiana 2 

Iowa 1 

Kansas 1 

Louisiana 1 

Maine 12 

Maryland 4 



Massachusetts 39 

Michigan 7 

Missouri 1 

Mississippi 1 

Montana 1 

New Hampshire 15 

New Jersey 7 

New Mexico 1 

New York 24 

North Carolina 3 

Ohio 5 

Oklahoma 1 

Pennsylvania 9 

Rhode Island 1 



Tennessee 1 

Vermont 4 

Virginia 7 

Braiil I 

England 1 

Germany 2 

Guatemala 1 

Hong Kong 1 

Lebanon 1 

Mexico 1 

Nicaragua 2 

Puerto Rico 2 

Saudi Arabia 2 

Venezuela 1 



eight 



come relatives of alumnae from many classes: 



SUSAN BARTON— cousin of Elizabeth Walworth Ross, 1930, 
and Ellen Ross, 1966 

HILARY BENNETT — sister of Victoria Bennett, 1967, and 
niece of Mrs. John Bennett, Teacher at Abbot 

SARAH BOWEN — daughter of Sally Burns Bowen, 1936; 
niece of Nancy Burns McArdle, 1939; cousin of Nancy 
McArdle, 1965, and Susan McArdle, 1969 

BARBARA CAMP — cousin of Elizabeth Parker Powell, 1956 

KITTREDCE CARY — step-sister of Diana Stevenson Bren- 
gel, 1953, and Laura Stevenson, 1964 

MARGARET CHENEY — daughter of Sally Leavitt Cheney, 
1945, and sister of Dorothy Cheney, 1968 

MARILYN DOW — sister of Carolyn Dow, 1962, and Bar- 
bora Dow, 1965 

KATHERINE DURHAM — sister of Mary Durham, 1964 

ANNE GARES — daughter of Nancy Marsh Gares, 1934, and 
cousin of Jean Marsh Coombs, 1947 

LAURA GARVAN — daughter of Virginia Jones Garvan, 
1940; granddaughter of Jessie Wightman Jones, 1911; 
niece of Doris Jones Hannegan, 1941, and Rosemary 
Jones, 1948, and cousin of Judith Hannegan, 1967 

ELIZABETH GIFFORD — niece of Anisia Allen Gifford, 1952 

MARGARET HOWES — sister of Candace Howes and Pris- 
cilla Howes, 1967 

PAMELA MALLEN — cousin of Claudia Arragg, 1967 

JACQUELINE MATHIOT — cousin of Marlena Comas Rod- 
riguez, 1955, Lucia Comas, 1958, and Amelia Comas, 
1960 

ELISABETH MILLER — sister of Anita Miller, 1963 



CYNTHIA NIZIAK — sister of Gail Niziak, 1967 

ALISON NOURSE — niece of Virginia Nourse Salomon, 1936 

NANCY ROBERTS — great-great-granddaughter of Octavia 
Dole Edwards, 1849 

SUZANNE ROWEN — sister of Elizabeth Rowcn, 1969 

KATHERINE SACKETT — niece of Carolyn Sackett Cole- 
burn, 1947 

MARY STICHNOTH — sister of Susan Stichnoth, 1969 

LORRAINE TODD — sister of Alison Todd, 1966, and Made- 
leine Todd, 1968; great-grandniece of Bertha Bailey, 
former headmistress of Abbot, niece of Joan Todd 
Hathaway, 1937, and cousin of Susan Wilkinson Lees, 
1960 

SANDRA URIE — sister of Karen Urie, 1968 

CATHERINE VIELE — daughter of Nancy Emerson Viele, 
1944, and great-grandniece of Lillian Ellis Emer- 
son, 1889 

SANDRA WAUGH — daughter of Sarah Allen Waugh, 1946; 
granddaughter of Hazel Goodrich Waugh, 1913, and 
Mary Button Allen, 1919; niece of Judith Allen, 1949, 
Joan Waugh Campbell, 1941, and Jeanne Waugh Har- 
ney, 1939, and cousin of Joan Harney, 1964, and 
Susan Harney, 1965 

HEIDI WEJMAN — niece of Aagot Hinrichsen Cain, 1944, 
and cousin of Carolyn Cain, 1969 

BELINDA WHIPPLE — cousin of Frances Jones, 1966, Mettle 
Whipple, 1966, and June Hamilton Withington, 1958 

LINDSAY WHITCOMB — daughter of Nancy Thomas Adams, 
1946; niece of Hope Whitcomb Gaillard, 1946, and 
Elizabeth Marshall Thomas, 1949 



NEW 

ALUMNAE 

RELATIVES 





FROM 
THE 
ABBOT 
CAMPUS 



the 1966 graduates have gone to colleges in many states and countries: 



Barnard 


Rose Jane Bendetson 
Margaret Donaghy 
Barbara Paris 


Beloit 


Ayer Chamberlin 


Bennett 


Lorinda Burling 
Karen Fuller 
Frances Jones 


Boston University 


Ida Rock 


Bradford 


Beth Humstone 


Carnegie Tech 


Bonnie Ware 


Centenary 


Elizabeth Walker 


Chatham 


Ellen Sobiloff 


Clark University 


Jean Lippincott 


Colby Junior 


Pamela Sevey 


Connecticut 


Mauricia Alvarez 
Judith Bricker 
Martha Church 
Lee Johnson 
Ellen Ross 
Deborah Stone 
Janet Waring 


Cornell 


Bethe Moulton 
Judith Mustille 


Goucher 


Cornelia Gaines 
Blake Hazzard 
Erica Ritter 


Hiram Scott 


Valerie de Peyster 


Hood 


Susan Doucett 


Lake Forest 


Cynthia Zollner 


Mary Washington 


Cynthia Taylor 


Mills 


Drewry Hanes 


Mount Holyoke 


Barbara Roediger 
Nancy Warlick 
Donna Wlodkoski 


Northwestern University 


Nancy Valentine 
Dawn Woodworth 


Pembroke 
Pratt Institute 


Susan Lebach 
Ann Gould 


Rodcliffe 


Martha Bayles 
Alison Todd 


Randolph-Macon 


Nancy Werth 



Skidmore 
Smith 

Stanford University 

Stephens 

Syracuse University 



University of California, 
Berkeley 

University of Michigan 



University of North Carolina 
University of Pennsylvania 

University of Pittsburgh 
University of Vermont 
University of Wisconsin 

Vassar 

Washington 

Wellesley 



Wheaton 

William and Mary 

Wilson 

* indicates abroad for a year 



Beverly Armsden 
Marcia Watson 

Paula Cortes 
Melinda Miller 
Barbara Timken 

Barbara Hazard 
Louise Shimmel 

Julie Dupont 

Joyce Abbott 
Ann Garten 
Ruth Sisson 



Deborah Little 

Nancy Byam 
Mary Livingston 
Sallie Watling 

Judith Froeber 

Margaret Ryder 
Barbara Slaymaker 
Martha Wies 

Lee Haselton 

Laurie Thomson 

Lonnie Somers 
-Nancy Whitehead 

Charlotte Erwin 

Mary Elizabeth Wilson 

Lucy Crane 
Sarah Downs 
Mary Porter 
Kathleen Roan 

Laurel Hinckley 

Louise Fletcher 

Lucy Thomson 

before college 



SCHOOL ABROAD 
Helen Ashley Academic Year in Paris 

Nora Theoharopoulos University of Athens 

Welling Thomas St. Clare's, England 



ten 



Introducing . . . 




ALUMNAE TRUSTEE 

The Board of Trustees elected Mrs. John 
B. Ogilvie (Donna Brace, 1930) to serve 
as Alumnae Trustee from 1966-1972. 

Donna is active in numerous civic activ- 
ities. She is vice-president of the national 
board of directors of Girls Clubs of America 
as well as president of the Stamford Girls 
Club. She is vice-president of the Stamford 
Hospital Auxiliary. From 1958-1960 she 
was on the board of directors of Harcourt, 
Brace and World, Inc. 

Her husband, Dr. John B. Ogilvie, is 
assistant chief of surgery at Stamford 
Hospital. She has two daughters and one 
son. Her sister, Katharine Brace Cummings, 
is also an Abbot alumna. 



PARENTS' CHAIRMAN 

Mr. Guerin Todd has been named chair- 
man of the Parents' Committee of the 
Abbot Development Fund. 

Mr. Todd is president and board chair- 
man of Capitol Area Investors, Inc. of 
Washington, D.C. and Fairfax, Va. He at- 
tended Princeton, Swarthmore and Yale, 
graduating from Yale Law School in 1941. 
He was subsequently law clerk to Supreme 
Court Justice William J. Brennan, Jr. and 
infantry staff officer to General Douglas 
MacArthur. For six years he was Special 
Assistant to the Secretary of the Army in 
the Pentagon, and for three years general 
counsel to the St. Lawrence Seaway Corpo- 
ration. 

His Abbot connections are numerous. 
Miss Bertha Bailey, former headmistress, 
was his great-aunt. One daughter, Alison, 
graduated last year, and two other daugh- 
ters, Lorraine and Madeleine, are members 
of the present student body. His sister, Joan 
Todd Hathaway, was a member of the class 
of 1937. His niece, Susan Wilkinson Lees, 
graduated from Abbot in 1960. 




eleven 




■ 




MISS LOUISE ROBINSON 

Retired in June, 1966 



DR. HANS SIDON 

Retired in June, 1966 



Faculty Retirements 



The people who watch Abbot's Com- 
mencement procession will miss seeing her 
among the first of the faculty group. Forty- 
one times she marched with the school. 
Louise was faithful and honest as Financial 
Secretary to Mr. Flagg and later to Mr. 
Sutton. She began her service as Miss J. 
Hope Baynes' assistant. 

Many a girl learned to balance her check 
book under Miss Robinson's gentle tutelage. 
Many a girl remembers being challenged 
to account for the necessity of withdraw- 
ing a certain large amount for a frivolity. 

Other girls realized she was a musician 
when they saw her as one of the judges 
in the final music examination The faculty 
who sat beside her in chapel knew she had 
a beautiful singing voice. 

We already miss her smiling presence at 
Abbot. 

E. M. T. 



He opened the Bible for the girls and 
presented the Judaeo-Christian religion to 
them with forceful candor. His Vesper 
services and Commencement programs were 
filled with truth and beauty. 

The faculty, especially, knew that he 
was a merry fellow. His annual presenta- 
tion of the faculty Christmas gift tc Miss 
Hearsey at the Sunset Lodge party was 
always humorous and original. 

Dr. Sidon is a teacher, a scholar, a pastor 
and a friend. We hope God will give him 
the strength to continue his pastoral work 
for several years. 

E. M. T. 



twelve 



FACULTY FACTS 



Miss Blair Danzoll who taught Latin from 
September, 1961, to June, 1966, was mar- 
ried August 20th to John E. Stambaugh. 
He is a faculty member at Williams College, 
and is a doctoral candidate at Princeton 
University. Blair is teaching fifth grade at 
the Pine Cobble School in Williamstown. 
All her Abbot friends extend best wishes 
to them for every happiness. Address: Stet- 
son Road., Apt. 1, Williamstown, Mass. 

Joining the Abbot faculty this year are 
the following: 

Reverend A. Graham Baldwin, former 
Chaplain of Phillips Andover Academy, is 
an instructor in Religion. He is a graduate 
of Williams College and Yale Divinity 
School, and received an Honorary D.D. from 
Williams in 1948. 

Mrs. Allan Gillingham, a graduate of 
Memorial University College, St. John's, 
Newfoundland, has joined the French de- 



partment. She has taught at The Pike 
School in Andover and The Winsor School 
in Boston. 

Mrs. Timothy Home is teaching English. 
She received an A.B. degree from Vassar 
and an M.A.T. from Stanford University. 
She has taught in Oakland and San Francis- 
co public schools. 

Mrs. Jon Kaiser is a member of the Latin 
department. She is a graduate of Wellesley 
and has done graduate work at Harvard. 

Mrs. Richard Merrill, a graduate of the 
University of Guanajuato, Mexico, is teach- 
ing Spanish. She has taught at Proctor 
Academy and in the Adult Evening Division 
of the Scituate (Massachusetts) Schools. 
She was co-director of the Bradford Junior 
College Summer Seminar held in Mexico. 

Mrs. Guy Howe and Mrs. George Nevens 
are assistants in residence. 



Mrs. Crane's address is Box 472, Pierce College, Athens, Greece 



^G^O 



NEWS FROM THE CLUBS 

The BOSTON Abbot Club had its fall meeting at Abbot on September 28th. Luncheon 
was served in the Gymnasium. Malcolm Davidson, vice-president of Thomas Long Co., 
Jewelers, and son of DOROTHY WILLIAMS DAVIDSON, Abbot 1922, discussed gems, 
illustrating his talk with rings containing precious stones. 

The NEW YORK Abbot Club is planning cocktail parties on December 2. CYNTHIA 
JAMES THAURAUD '32 and CAROL HARDIN KIMBALL '53 will be hostesses at their 
homes. Watch for your invitation, and plan to attend alone, or with swain or spouse. For 
reservations call or write Mrs. James M. Ruedin, 55 Farm View Road, Flower Hill, Port 
Washington, L.I., N.Y. Tel. 516 MA 7-3177. 



thirteen 



Praises Ringing... Here's to you 

Dale Barraclough '64 — Dean's List — Wheaton College 

Elizabeth Bruns '62 — Dean's List — Pembroke College 

Mary Concemi Sommer '62 — Dean's List — Connecticut College 

Polly Danos '64 — Dean's List — Radcliffe College 

Emily Davis '65 — President of Sophomore Class — Connecticut 
College 

Carolyn Dow '62 — B.A. degree, Phi Beta Kappa and Cum Laude 
— Connecticut College 

Gloria Haselton '62 — B.A. degree, Phi Beta Kappa and Magna 
Cum Laude — Wheaton College 

Elizabeth Lage '65 — Dean's List — Wheaton College 

Lee Porter '64 — Dean's List — Wheaton College 

Ingrid Quarck '62 — Dean's List — Pembroke College 

Joanne Schwiebert '64 — Dean's Award and President's Cup — 
Pine Manor Junior College 

Katherine Staples '65 — Dean's List — Wheaton College 

Alison Todd '66 — National Merit Finalist 

Mary Wilkins '63 — Dean's List — Wheaton College 



Prizes Awarded at Last Chapel, June 1965 



Isabel Hancock Special Award for Contri- 
bution to the School 

Priscilla Bradley Award for Excellence in 
Art 

Betsy Waskowitz Rider Award for Further 
Study in Art 

Prize for Set Designing 

Prize for Assistant in Set Designing 

Class of 1955 Sportmanship Award in 
Athletics 

Emily Hale Drama Prize 

Dawes History Prize 

Phillips Award for Interest in Latin 

Phillips Award for Improvement in Latin 

Isabel Hancock Mathematics Award 

Kate Friskin Music Award 

Departmental Award in Music 



Beverly Armsden 

Mettie Whipple 

Martha Bayles 
Deborah Little 

Julie Dupont 

Lorinda Burling 

Bethe Moulton 
Drewry Hanes 
Mary Porter 
Erica Ritter 
Dawn Woodworth 
Kathleen Roan 
Martha Wies 
Charlotte Erwin 



fourteen 



1889 

Mary K. Webber died April 25, 1966, in Ivory- 
ton, Conn., at the age of 93. 

1892 

Ethel Craighead (Mrs. S. Thornton Hollinshead) 
was reported dead in June. 

1899 

Mary Young (Mrs. Channing Cox) died August 
4, 1966, in Boston, Mass. Our sincere sympathy is 
extended to her husband and to her daughter, 
Nancy. 

1900 

Ethel Austin (Mrs. Roy L. Grant) was reported 
dead in June. 



S. Gregory) died 
extended to her 



1903 

Anne J. Mason (Mrs. Keith 
July 31, 1965. Our sympathy is 
daughter, Mercer. 

1904 

Nellie Bampton was reported dead in June. 

1908 

Katharine Wurster (Mrs. Clement Ray) was re- 
ported dead in May, 1966. 

1914 

Eleanor Hale (Mrs. Ernest A. Nordon) died 
September 20, 1966, in Barcelona, Spain. Sincere 
sympathy is extended to her husband and sons, 
and to her sister, Helen, Abbot 1901. 

Katherine Selden (Mrs. Charles D. McDuffie) 
died September 9, 1966, in Andover after a long 
illness. Our sincere sympathy is extended to her 
daughter, Sally, Abbot 1947. 

1920 

Carolyn Grimes (Mrs. Benjamin Whittier) died 
May 28, 1966, in Southern Pines, S.C., after a 
prolonged illness. Our sincere sympathy is extended 
to her son, Stephen T. Whittier, II, and to her 
two daughters. 

1924 

Marjorie Wolfe (Mrs. Ernest O. H. Reed) died 
August 6, 1966, in Clinton, Conn. Our sincere 
sympathy is extended to her mother, her husband, 
and her daughter, Martha. 

1929 

Mary Jones died last October in Billerica, Mass. 

fifteen 



■• 



MMtmmm 

... ,-:. 



y/ssy.'A-A- 



News from the Classes 



1911 

The class extends its sympathy to MIRIAM HOWARD 
BUSHNELL whose husband died June 30th. 

1912 

ETHEL SWAIN SMITH sends a report of her grandchildren: 
John H. Reid graduated from Yale in 1966. Catherine Reid 
is a sophomore at Wellesley. Nancy Smith is at Mary Burn- 
ham School; Bette Smith is a graduate of Connecticut State 
College; Robert Smith is at Holdemess, and Sally Reid is at 
the Oxford School. 

1913 

The class will be sorry to learn that GLADYS ESTABROOK 
BLANCHARD'S husband died last January after a long illness. 
She writes that her daughter, Sally, was married last Octo- 
ber; Dana is a fine English teacher; Edward, Jr., a busy 
advertising executive and the grandchildren are growing 
up all too rapidly. 

1919 

CATHARINE COE TAYLOR and her husband spent five 
weeks in Portugal, Switzerland and England last Spring. 

GRACE KEPNER NOBLE'S husband is three years beyond 
retirement, but they are still "going strong" at Syracuse 
University. 

VIRGINIA McCAULEY OTIS and RUTH EATON RICHARD- 
SON (1918) cruised on the Gripsholm to Spain, France, 
Holiand, England and Scotland. They leave next January 
for a cruise to West Africa and South America. 

1920 

The class extends its sympathy to ISABEL SUTHERLAND 
KURTH whose husband died in August. 

1922 

ELIZABETH HUTCHINSON BLUNTSCHLI now has seven 
grandchildren. She spent 6 weeks in Hawaii recently, and is 
now in Hong Kong with the International Golf Group. 

1923 

The class extends its sympathy to MARGERY MOON 
ZIEGFELD whose husband died last January. 

FLORENCE PRICKETT WARREN'S son, David, has been 
named director of the nation's newest museum, the Bayou 
Bend Museum in Houston, Tex. 

1924 

RUTH BEACH NEWSOM and her husband have just re- 
turned from four months abroad. Their daughter, Nancy, 
joined them in Paris, and went with them on their tour of 
England and Scotland. 

1925 

ELAINE BOUTWELL von WEBER is spending the winter 
in Mont Vernon, N.H. for the first time in many years. 

1928 

GEE GEE GAY D'ELSEAUX announces the birth of her 
sixth grandchild, Christopher Scott Kausel — a second son 
for Virginia. 

1930 

The class extends its sympathy to KAY FOSTER RAIN- 
BOLT whose husband died in July. 

1931 

MARY BACON left in September, and after a trip to 
Egypt. W 'H settle in her beloved Italy for a year: Address: 
C/o American Express, Piazza de Spagna, Rome. 

FRANCES SCUDDER GLISSON, her husband, daughter and 
youngest son sailed July 30 for a 5 weeks trip in Europe. 
Then they and their son went to India to work for 3 months 
at Vellore Christian Medical College in Southern India. 



Charles will teach Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Fran will 
help to expand the work in Cytopathology. They will fly 
home via the Pacific for Christmas. 

MARION VAN der VEER is Beauty Editor of McCall's 
magazine under the name of Babs Lee. She has published 
several mystery novels. 

1933 

The class will be sorry to learn that KATHLEEN PALMER 
RACE'S mother died last March. Kathleen's daughters are 
both living in Bath, Me. She has two grandchildren, aged 
6 and 5. 

1934 

KATHARINE DAMON REED'S daughter, Stephanie, was 
married in June to James M. Markham, 4th. He is a Rhodes 
Scholar, and they will live in England. 

1935 

DORIS ANDERSON CLARK'S son, David, is a student at 
The College of Wooster, Ohio, and her son, Myron, is at 
Williams College. 

HELEN HEALD RADER writes that her son, John, is in 
10th grade, Philip in 9th, and daughter, Betsy, in 7th. 
Helen's main interests are the Republican Party, the Uni- 
tarian Fellowship, and the S. C. Council on Human Relations 
as well as the P.TA. She is president of the Richland 
County Council of the P.TA. 

ELEANOR JOHNSON DuTOIT'S daughter, Ellen, graduated 
Phi Beta Kappa from George Washington University in June, 
and was married June 25, to Robert B. Buskin, a third-year 
medical student at Johns Hopkins. Ellen is doing graduate 
work in clinical psychology at George Washington. Charley 
is enjoying Bucknell. Rob, 5th grade, spent the summer at 
camp. El lie would be glad to give anyone information about 
this camp which is small, but excellent. 

1936 

ANNE RUSSELL LORING'S husband is teaching at Traip 
Academy in Kittery, Me. 

PAULINE SPEAR CHAPIN'S daughter, Virginia, was mar- 
ried in August to Richard Swett, a senior at Yale Medical 
School. 

1937 

The class will be sorry to leam that THELMA CUTTER 
LEUENBERGER'S husband died suddenly in July. 

MARY EMILY PETTENGILL SMITH-PETERSON'S son, David, 
was married in May to Alinda Belz of St. Louis, Mo. 

1939 

PATRICIA GOSS RHODES lives in her exciting new home 
in Paradise Valley near Phoenix, Ariz, during the school 
year, with her 3 youngest children. Her eldest son, Scott, 
is in his second year at M.I.T. She hopes any Abbot friends 
vacationing in Arizona will call her. 

MARY KOCH DANOS writes that her daughter, Polly, is 
on the Dean's List at Radcliffe. She is involved in an inter- 
disciplinary major. 

FLORENCE MOONEY DOTY has been living in Switzerland 
for several years. She travels throughout Europe and the 
Middle East with her husband who is European Editor of 
Aviation Week magazine. 



1940 

SUSAN PLACE DUNCAN'S daughter, 
Syracuse this fall. 



Barbara, entered 



A biography of Octave Thanet 
(Alice French, Abbot, 1868) was pre- 
sented to the Abbot Library by the 
author, George McMichael. 



sixteen 



1941 

SKIP BIART WARREN writes, "Our eldest daughter, Sally, 
is a freshman at Lasell Junior College; Suzy, 15, is a 
sophomore at Wilton, Conn.; Betsy, 11, is in 6th grade; 
Davey, our one son, just turned a delightful three." 

1942 

The class extends its sympathy to CAPT. MARGARET 
R. McFARLIN, U.S. Army Nurse Corps, whose mother died 
in June. 

LUCIA TUTTLE FRITZ was selected Regent of the Tor- 
rington, Conn. Chapter of the N.S.D.A.R. for a three-year 
term. 

1944 

RUTH KIRSTEIN TURKANIS writes that her son, Michael, 
19, is a sophomore at Boston University, Dickie, 15, is a 
sophomore at Swampscott High, Barry, 12, is in Junior 
High, and Joan, 10, is in fifth grade. 

1947 

GERALDINE TREADWAY DAMPIER writes, "Am very 
busy settling my new 'glass house', which is a modern-type 
house with a lovely view of a meadow and pond. All major 
rooms have plate glass walls overlooking same. The house 
was designed by Elliot Noyes for his family's domicile when 
he was a struggling young architect in the 1940's — when 
I was at Abbot." 

1948 

LEE BOOTH WITWER has three daughters, Grace, 13, 
Sally, 11, and Violette, 10, Her son, George, 7, is now in 
school. Lee directed a Girl Scout day camp this summer. 

HANNAH RICHMOND HAMMER spent the summer in 
Jaffrey, N.H. with her husband and two children, John, 8, 
and Beth, 6. 

1950 

SUE MORGAN ROLONTZ writes that she has two children, 
Lee-Lee, 4, and Robert Morgan, 1 5 months. Her husband 
is now advertising and publicity director of Atlantic-Atco 
Records who record such stars as Sonny and Sher, Otis 
Redding and The Young Rascals. 

1951 

PATRICIA SMITH LANGDON's husband teaches history at 
Vassar. Patty is working part-time in the Vassar Alumnae 
Office. They have two blond sons, aged 7 and 5. 

1952 

Born to JULIA MERR I WETHER GRANGER, a second son, 
David Andrew, April 16,1696. 

1953 

DIANA STEVENSON BRENGEL writes, "We had our third 
child and first son, Christopher Stevenson, last September. 
I am kept busy with the children, playing concerts, and 
keeping up with acres of gardens." 

1955 

Dear Classmates — I do hope that each of you had as 
grand a summer as the Kings. Erie was perfectly beautiful 
and still is at this writing. The Presque Isle State Park, 
affectionately called the peninsula, was the site of most 
of our picnics. We sailed at every opportunity and enjoyed 
a bit of golf. Our landscaping projects kept us well exer- 
cised and a vegetable garden in the country kept us full. 
Our eight-year old son, Jac, decided to try his skill at 
shooting. Instead of using a paper target he chose my copper 
collection on the living room bookshelves. Result — one boy 
with excellent eye and sore bottom. Carolyn, our older 
daughter, has been preparing for first grade and Elizabeth 
has been observing each of us in her very special two-year 
old way. Now I have arrived at the happiest news of our 
summer — William Hanna Bradbury King was welcomed 
aboard on August 27. "Brad" came complete with the radar 
needed to tell him he's fourth in line for attention from 
Mom and Dad unless 't's time to feed the dog — then 
he's fifth!! 

Two other members of our class welcomed new arrivals. 
MARY ANN YUDICKY GOODRICH had a son, Peter Stevens, 
born May 21, and NANCY OGDEN ROGERS had a second 
son, Edwin Ogden, born April 15. 



SUE BLAKE included Jack and me among her wedding 
guests for August 20th, but we were unable to make the 
trip. Sue and Billy Northcutt of Birmingham, Alabama were 
married in Wakefield and greeted their guests at a re- 
ception given in the Blake's home. Billy is a graduate of 
Livingston College and they plan to live in Honolulu. 

I wish so much I could reprint in its entirety a dear letter 
from LEE SAWYER KLAESON. She sounds so perfectly happy 
with everything from traveling now and then as an assistant 
to her "architect husband" right down to the headlights on 
her Mustang convertible. Renovating her house is keeping 
her very busy but not too busy to give many hours to the 
beautification projects in Seekonk, Mass. In fact, Lee was 
actually the founder of the Seekonk Gardeners . . . not just 
a ladies' tea-drinking and flower arranging society but a 
real Doing Something Club. I'd better not start quoting 
because I'd never find an end. A most delightful letter . . . 
Many thanks, Lee! 

And so . . . everyone else . . . Unless you want this 
to turn into "The Adventures of the King Family", please 
write a word or two! Save me! 

Happy, happy season ahead to all, 

DEE FLEMING KING 

(Mrs. John A. C, 3rd) 

603 Nevada Dr., Erie, Penna. 16505 

1956 

News notes from reunion sent by BETSY PARKER POWELL: 
JANE TATMAN CONNELLY and Guy have been busy ad- 
ding onto their home and landscaping. Guy is now assistant 
cashier at the Indianapolis National Bank. 

PEG MOORE TIFFANY looked mighty chic in her olive 
green leather sheath. You wouldn't know that she has a 7- 
month old boy, Shack, who crawls, rocks and eats dandelions. 
Peg reports that she hasn't become used to the Virginian 
countryside yet and still exclaims at the horses and cows 
that abound in the pastures. 

CEMMIE KELTON RYLAND and husband Mike are the 
greatest of skiers. They rented a house in Vermont and 
skied every week end at Straton from Christmas to Easter 
with their two wee ones — Than, almost 3, being an ac- 
complished skier and Kyle, at 6-months, riding piggy back 
on Mike. Mike city-plans all day while Cemmie scrubs boats 
(they own a nifty 24-foot sloop). 

Straton for skiing has been the George Maclver's haven 
this winter too. For summer MARGE ORR MaclVER, George 
and their two daughters take to the waters and sail. Marge, 
on the side, has found time to spend one hour on horseback 
this year and claims she has never been the same since. 

Our questionnaire compiler par excellence, PEG OLIVER 
HEDEMAN and husband have just become the proud owners 
of a handsome stone home on 111 Pine Tree Land, Rad- 
nor, Penna. Ricky Hedeman, a little terror on all fours at 
1 1 -months, now has scads of room in which to hide from 
busy tennis-playing Peg. 

MARGARET ROTH wins the prize for the most fashionable 
and sophisticated reunioner! Margaret just returned from a 
vacation in St. Croix this May and has now returned to 
her work of restoring paintings in Washington, D.C., draw- 
ing and gallery-eyeing. She is now living at 1518 26th St., 
N.W., Washington. 

Biggest news from LYNN DOWLIN VOSS and Peter is the 
purchase of a new house a year ago. Peter is president of 
Northeast Incorporated and Lynn is the new head of the 
puppet committee for the Junior League of Canton, Ohio. 
They have two children — Bristol, 4 1/2, and Peter, 3- 
months. Despite a hectic flight schedule which required a 
private plane flight from Canton to Cleveland and then 
arrival in Boston at 3 A.M., Lynn and Peter burned up the 
Abbot tennis courts. 

ANNE WOOLVERTON OSWALD and Bob visited Cemmie 
and Mike Ryland for 2 1 /2 days before coming to reunion. 
Bob is a kitchen snooper superb — he sells gas commercial 
cooking equipment. Ann, Jane and Amy (only 3, not 4 
children as mistakenly reported in recent Bulletin) Oswald 
plus 2 cats keep Woolvie and Bob jumping in South Bend, 
Indiana. 

The sensational event in LEE PELTON MORRISON and 
Bill's life is the purchase of a 28-foot Pearson fiberglass 
boat. Bill is a partner in Peat, Marwich Or Mitchell and with 
much business in Boston, plans to join Lee and their two 
sons, Billy and Jimmy, in Narragansett and Buzzards Bay 
this summer. 

CAROL REED KARNOPP and Dean talked of their 2 boys, 
their skiing, naturally, and Dean's brilliant work at MIT 

ANNE TRIPP HOPKINS supported by her intern husband, 
Hop, looked great! She was beaming with expectant mother- 
hood. Now I can report that she had o daughter, Julia 
Chase, born June 23rd. 



seventeen 



NANCE SMITH KING looked stylish in her white wool suit. 
Her community activities kept her and Bill from joining us 
for dinner — they were chairmen and organizers of their 
Couples Club Spring Dance that night. 

Funny prize goes to JUDE WARREN KIELY for digging up 
the craziest of photos from our years at Abbot. I trust her 
good husband, Dennis, did not see those photos ahead of 
time or I doubt that he would have joined us the 14th. Did 
you know that Jude and Dennis have a 2-year old son, 
Ross; that Dennis is chairman of the Fine Arts Department 
of Keene State College, but will be moving to a similar 
Chairmanship next at Westfield State College, that they 
had a whizzy time in California last year while Dennis took 
his sabbatical year at Berkeley and wrote "6 Cyclic Masses 
of the Polyphonic Period From Machaut to Palestrina". and 
that Jude gave a dinner party for 50 Monday night after 
reunion. Dennis has organized our Jude! 

GRACE CALLAHAN HAGSTROM had a second child and 
first daughter, Allison, born May 2nd. 

VIDI DAKIN is now Mrs. Robert K. Scott and is living in 
Plymouth, N.H. 

Don't forget to send news bulletins to Mrs. Alden T. 
Bryan (PHOEBE ESTES), Box 155 R.D. No. 1, North Wil- 
liston Rd., Williston, Vt. 05495. 

1957 

News Secretary: Mrs. John H. Lewis, Jr., 422 Penn Valley 
Rd., Penn Valley, Narberth, Penna. 

Hi Fellow 57ers! 

Another wonderful summer has passed for you all, I trust. 
I am certain that many of you traveled, held exciting jobs, 
etc., so please do write me about such activities. Despite 
questionnaires I sent to you last spring, the news from most 
everybody has been very scarce. Please — won't you help 
me out — remember — the next person responsible for the 
news could be YOU! 

LYN MCLAUGHLIN MOUGHTY misses her Wall Street job 
at times, but is completely enjoying her role as Mother to 
Elizabeth Anne (born on Labor Day '65), "who has had 
her daddy wound around her little finger since the day she 
was born." 

My old roomie, JACQUIE GOODSPEED, sounds as if she will 
soon be a tycoon or a politician. Early last year she left 
the country for St. Lucia, where she assumed the administra- 
tive and sales end of a 3,000 acre estate being developed 
by an English contractor. At this point Jacquie wrote: "Ifs 
all quite exciting as I want to get into real estate — the 
earning potential is better than any secretarial position I 
could ever find." Ending with an invitation to fly down for 
a Caribbean vacation — visions of sandy beaches and 
tropical nights raced through my mind when we received 
another note informing us that when Edward Brooke of 
Mass. cast in his political hat, Jacquie flew back to Boston 
where she is now actively engaged in his campaign. So 
gals — on election night, do be certain to look for Jacquie 
when the television cameras go to the Brooke headquarters. 

In June I received a lovely note from MARCIA COLBY 
FRAME. I only wish there was space to quote it. The most 
exciting news from the Frame household is that they are 
now proud parents of a second child and first daughter, 
Melissa. Michael, who is now nearly 3, sounds like all the 
good things little boys are made of. As Marcia writes: "We 
are truly blessed to have two such happy, healthy children." 
One of the many projects for Marcia and Hank this year 
has been the construction of a laundry room and family 
room in what already sounds like a most attractive house. 
Marcia has had lunch with SUE RAIRDON ALLEN, and re- 
lates that Sue's two daughters are "beautiful children and 
incredibly bright." 

As you know from the last issue of the Bulletin, MARY 
WELLMAN BATES and I are now neighbors within 5 minutes 
of each other. It's such fun to see her, and I am pleased 
to report that our husbands have also gotten together for 
tennis and squash. Morsh completes his work at Wharton 
at the end of this year, and already has had some fine job 
offers. At the moment they are unsure of location, but I'm 
happy to report that Philadelphia may have an inside 
chance. The Bates children are very busy and keep Mary 
more than busy. Lauren is now in school and loves every 
minute of it. Christopher — alias Critter, is 2 1/2 and a 
great truck and train enthusiast — a "hobby" he shares 
with my son Peter who will be 3 in November. Mary is also 
involved in a wonderful art course that is given by the 
famous Barnes Foundation. 

KAREN JONES writes, "I have just returned from Cocha- 
bama, Bolivia, where I spent three years as teacher and 
dormitory director at a Methodist Mission school. I am now 
employed as educational assistant at Wesley Methodist 
Church in Coral Gables." 



VALERIE OGDEN was in a serious motorcycle accident 
last spring in London. She had gone to Europe to launch 
a new career in the theater after studying with the Lincoln 
Center Repertory Group. 

DEBORAH SMITH REGAN writes, "Every time a Bulletin 
arrives, I turn immediately to 1957, and am disappointed 
not to see pages of news because I love to read what every- 
one is doing. Finally realized I am as guilty as the rest 
for keeping silent for years, so here I am — I've lived in 
Los Angeles for 4 1 /2 years with Jay. We have a baby 
daughter, Pamela Christine, who was born March 3rd this 
year. After working in computer programming and systems 
design, being at home is a delight. Los Angeles is an 
exciting city, and we certainly love being Californians." 

JANET McLEAN HUNT has returned to Maine from 
Hawaii. Her husbnd is studying at the University of Maine 
Law School. 

As for the Lewis family, we happily anticipate number two 
child in late January or early February. John continues to 
enjoy his law firm which has been kept quite busy with 
negotiations on the airline strike. He is also teaching Air 
Force Law at o local university in connection with the 
reserve program. Aside from this, we are both engaged in 
the usual local activities. We have also run into PARRY 
ELLICE ADAM Abbot '58 and her husband at Skytop Club 
in the Poconos. They have just purchased a 1700's house in 
Flemington, New Jersey on 10 acres. Bruce is with a stock 
company whose main office is in Newark. Besides our week 
at Skytop, John, Peter and I spent 3 weeks at my parents' 
summer home in Lake Mohawk, N.J., where all the Spur- 
geon clan had a wonderful reunion with Ned and his wife 
flying in from California. 

I hope wherever you all are you will write me soon. As I 
have said many times, I personally look forward to hearing 
from you, and it is extra delightful to share your letters 
with everyone. 

Love to you — 
"Sammy" 

MARRIED 
DIANE DANE to James H. Chasteen, December 26, 1965. 
He is a graduate of Dade Junior College, and is a design 
engineer for Hill York Corp. in Miami. 

CAROLYN M. GAINES to Samuel Arndt Roberson, June 4, 
1966, in Fairfield, Conn. 

BORN 

To PATRICIA BRENNAN KFOURY, a third child and first 
daughter, Kate Ellen, June 17, 1966 

To SALLY LAWRENCE KAUDER, a daughter, Nancy Anne, 
February 26, 1966. 

To PAULA SLIFER ZANDSTRA, a second son, Timothy 
John, July 1, 1966. Paula visited MARY LEE CARTER and 
her two sons last January in Chicago. 

1958 

ANNE BOSSI TROIE and her husband were co-producers 
at the Orleans (Mass.) Arena Theater again this year. Anne 
acts as stage director. 

JOYCE FINGER EVERS writes, "After c year in Geneva, 
where I taught English at the International School, we have 
moved to Brussels. My husband is in the import-export 
business." 

MONICA MORAN co-starred with Jeffrey Lynn in "Any 
Wednesday" on the summer circuit this summer. 

ENGAGED 
BEVERLY BLACK to Gordon L. Barclay of Haworth, N.J. 
He was graduated from the Lawrenceville School, the Uni- 
versity of Geneva, and the Centre d'Etudes Industrielles in 
Geneva. He is with Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample, Inc., adver- 
tising agency in New York. 

MARRIED 
ROSEMARY OZOONIAN to Moses Arkoian of Silver Spring, 
Md., August 21, 1966, in Lawrence, Mass. Rosemary is em- 
ployed by the Department of Defense in Washington. Moses, 
an alumnus of American University, is a sales representative 
for Univac Data Processing Center in Silver Spring, Md. 

BORN 
To FREDERICA LINDBECK HAMMERSTROM, a daughter, 
Kirsten Nord, June 29, 1966. Rica's husband is a graduate 
student at Washington University School of Architecture. 

To JUNE HAMILTON WITHINGTON, a second child and 
first daughter. Heather Lee, July 18, 1966. Tripp is now 2 
years old. 



eighteen 



To ANNE METCALF REISS, a second son, Christopher 
John, August I, 1966. 

To NANCY RUSSELL CURRAN, a second son, William 
Russell, June 9, 1966. 

1959 

The class extends its sympathy to SUE CALNAN BATES 
whose mother died in October. 

JOAN FISHER CHAMBERS writes, "My husband graduated 
from law school in June, and is practicing in Olathe, Kan. 
— right outside Kansas City. I'd love to see any of you all 
passing through the heartland." 

MARRIED 

SANDRA MOULTON to Trevor David Burridge, August 6, 
1966, in Beaurepaire, Quebec. 

BORN 
To MARY LOUISE LOCKWOOD RUSTIN, a second son, 
John Lockwood, August 26, 1966. 

To BARBARA QUIMBY GILDEHAUS, a fourth child and 
third son, Christopher, May 27, 1966. 

To JOAN SANDFORT SWARTZ, a daughter, Laurayne 
Edythe, August 9, 1966. Joan's husband is the owner and 
operator of a 1 ,000 acre dairy farm with 300 head of 
registered Holstein cattle in Poland, N.Y. 

1960 

AMELIA COMAS received a B.S. degree from Newton 
College of the Sacred Heart in June. 

ENGAGED 

JUDITH BEECHER to James Patrick Andrews of Hemp- 
stead, L.I., N.Y. James is a graduate of Yale and an em- 
ployee of the Benton and Bowles advertising agency. Judy 
is an assistant editor of HARPER'S BAZAAR. 

MARRIED 

MARCIA SALIBA to Frederick Waltz Newcomb of Ran- 
dolph, Mass., July 7, 1966, in Lawrence, Mass. Kathy Stevens 
was maid of honor. Frederick is a graduate of Thayer 
Academy and Boston University, and is employed by General 
Motors in Boston. 

BORN 

To ALEXANDRA CRANE FRISHMAN, a second child and 
first son, Benjamin Adam, July 16, 1966. Steve graduated 
from Clark in June, and is now with a Marine Geology group 
in Antarctica. Lexa is living on the Cape with the children. 



1961 

News Secretary: Andrea Lynch, 144 East 84th St., Apt. 
7B, New York, N.Y. 10028. 

CAROLINE MARSHALL received an A.B. degree from 
Vassar in June. 

SYBIL SMITH received a B.A. degree in History form the 
University of Vermont in June. She is now working at 
Harvard in the Housing Office — renting apartments for on- 
campus faculty. She would love to see anyone in the area. 

ENGAGED 
PHYLLIS ROGDE to Paul F. Gleason of Duxbury, Mass. He 
was graduated from Admiral Farragut Academy and Williams 
College. He received his master's degree from New York 
University in June, and is now a student at Northeastern 
Graduate School of Electrical Engineering. 

MARRIED 
LAURINDA BARNES to Paul M. Morway of Thompson, 
Conn., June 25, 1966, in Plymouth, Mass. Phyllis Rogde was 
one of the bridesmaids. Laurinda received her master's 
degree from the Harvard Graduate School of Education in 
June. Paul groduated from Willimantic State College in 
Connecticut. 



1962 

SALLY ALLEN graduated from the University of Rochester 
with a B.A. in English, and is now working for McCALL'S 
magazine. 

REBECCA BARTLETT received a B.A. in English from 
Wellesley in June. 

BRENDA BRADLEY is attending Boston University this 
fall. 

BETSY BRUNS received a B.A. degree in Human Biology 
from Pembroke in June. 



MARY LOUISE CURRIER received on A.B. degree from 
Mount Holyoke in June. She is teaching French in the high 
school in Rochester, N.H. 

CAROLYN DOW was awarded a B.A. in Mathematics by 
Connecticut College. She is currently working in Newark, 
N.J. with IBM as a systems engineer. She had worked with 
them the three previous summers, and liked it so much she 
decided to make it a permanent occupation. 

CYNTHIA EVERETT is studying for an M.A. in Astronomy 
at Wesleyan University. She received a B.A. in Astronomy 
from Mount Holyoke in June. 

EDNA FOSTER graduated from Boston University College 
of Liberal Arts with a B.A. degree in English Literature. 

KAREN GRANT received a B.A. degree in Sociology from 
Smith College in June. She is working for Western Electric 
Company in New York doing data processing. 

KATHARINE GRANT received a B.A. degree in History 
from Middlebury College. She has been working for the 
American Field Service in New York since last June. 

PAULINE GRAY KEYES writes that she has a son, Austin 
Dahle, who was one year old on September 9th. Her husband, 
a graduate of Princeton, is in investment banking in San 
Francisco. 

NANCY HILL graduated from Boston University in August 
with a B.S. in Elementary Education. She is teaching third 
grade in Hopkinton, Mass. 

EILEEN KEEGAN received a B.A. degree from Simmons 
School of Social Science in June. 

KATHRIN KRAKAUER graduated from Simmons College 
in June. She is working in New York doing medical research 
at New York University Medical Center. 

LAUCHLAN LEARNED received a B.A. in English from 
Vassar in June. She is teaching Junior High School English 
in Harlem this year. 

SUSAN MALLORY ROBERTS reports that she has a son 
named "Bean". She is living in New York City. 

MARTHA MASON received a B.A. degree in Economics 
and Sociology from Mount Holyoke in June. She spent three 
weeks in Russia and Scandinavia last summer. She is now 
working for Associated Merchandising Corp. in New York. 

CAROL ANN MOORE received a B.A. degree from Welles- 
ley in June. She is working now for an MAT in Chemistry 
at Stanford University. 

INGRID QUARCK received an A.B. degree from Pembroke 
in June. She majored in Chemistry. She is studying at 
Harvard Graduate School. 

MARY WELLS received a B.A. in English from Jackson 
College. She is studying for an M.A. in Elementary Education 
at Bank Street College of Education in New York City. 

GRETCHEN WHITEHEAD graduated from the University of 
Michigan in May, and is traveling in Europe with her family 
this year. 

CATHLYN WILKERSON received a B.A. in Political Science 
from Swarthmore in June. She is presently working for 
Congressman Bob Kastenmeier as special campaign assistant 
in the 2nd Congressional District of Wisconsin. After the 
election she will work on a program protesting the War in 
Vietnam for Students for a Democratic Society. She plans to 
go to graduate school in American studies next year. 

ELIZABETH WOOD graduated from Mount Holyoke in 
June with a B.A. in Biology. She is now working in New 
York City as a Junior Research Assistant at Cornell Uni- 
versity Medical College. 

ENGAGED 

GLORIA HASELTON to A. Abbott Ikeler of Pittsburgh, 
Penna. Gloria graduated from Wheaton in June, and is 
working for an M.A. at the University of Pittsburgh. Abbott 
is a graduate of Middlesex and Harvard College. He received 
a master's degree from Pittsburgh University where he is a 
doctoral candidate in English. 

JENNIFER HESKETH to Rodger Thompson, a graduate of 
MIT. He is now working on a Ph.D. in Physics at M.I.T. 
Jennifer received a B.A. in the Social Sciences from Simmons 
in June. She is attending Simmons Graduate School of Busi- 
ness this year. 

CAROLYN SHAW to John Frederic Shaw, Jr., a former 
classmate at Oberlin. They plan to be married in November 
after completing a Peace Corps Training Program at UCLA. 
She writes, "If ony of you will be in Washington in Novem- 
ber, please let me know. I may miss our fifth reunion, 
and would love to have you at my wedding." Carolyn grad- 
uated from Oberlin in June with a B.A. in English, and 
spent the summer taking education courses ot George 
Washington University. 



nineteen 



BARBARA STONE to Stuart Smith of Roanoke, Va. He is 
a graduate of Washington and Lee University, and is study- 
ing for his MBA at Michigan State University this year. 
Barbara graduated from Hollins College in June. 

MARRIED 
MARY CONCEMI to Fred T. Sommer of Racine, Wis., 
September 3, 1966, in Lawrence, Mass. Mary graduated 
from Connecticut College in June, and Fred is an alumnus 
of Yale University. 

VALERIE CRANE to Richard L. Monley of Manchester, 
Vt., August 27, in Manchester. Valerie graduated from 
Bennington College in June. Richard is director of Bromley 
Ski School. 

JULIE GILBERT to Ens. Edward S. Trail, USN, of Chambers- 
burg, Penna., September 24, 1966, in Hamden, Conn. Julie 
received a B.A. degree from Wilson College in June. Edward 
graduated from Shippensburg State College in Pennsylvania, 
and graduated from Naval Officer Candidate School the day 
before the wedding. 

CAROL ANNE FIELD to Edmund C. Bennett, June 11, 1966. 
He is a graduate of the University of Bridgeport, and is 
studying at George Washington University Law School. Carol 
Anne received a B.S. in Business from Simmons in June. 

ANNE C. MacDOUGALL to Paul G. Ballou, September 9, 
1966, in Ipswich, Mass. Anne received an A.B. degree from 
Randolph Woman's College in June. She and Paul are both 
studying at Syracuse University this year. 

FREDERICA MULLER to Kenneth Rolf Aalto, June 18, 
1966, in Newton, Conn. Kenneth is a graduate of Exeter 
and the University of Pennsylvania. Frederica graduated 
from Wilson College in June with a B.A. in Sociology. 

SUSAN NIEBLING to Donald Franz Hendrie, Jr., of San 
Antonio, Tex., June 18, 1966, in Exeter, N.H. Sue graduated 
from Sarah Lawrence College in June. Donald prepared at 
Phillips Exeter for Stanford University. He is now a candi- 
date for a master's degree at the University of Iowa. 

LINDA SWANBERG to William L. Musser, Jr., of New York, 
N.Y., in New Canaan, Conn, September 9, 1966. William, a 
graduate of Choate School and Princeton University, was a 
recent Fulbright Scholar at the University of Lisbon. He is 
a senior at the Harvard Graduate School of Business Ad- 
ministration. 



1963 

News Secretary: Ann Harris, Briarcliff College, Briarcliff 
Manor, N.Y. 10510. 

After a trip out west and several weeks at Stanford Sum- 
mer School, SA HOLBROOK and MAIDY WILKINS are back 
at Wheaton where they are majoring in Philosophy and 
History of Art respectively. Both girls anticipate post-grad- 
uation trips to Europe. 

SUZY BURTON has been in Europe since June. After two 
months of touring she has settled in Paris for a year of 
study in conjunction with the Academic Year Abroad Pro- 
gram. 

BETTINA PROSKE spent her summer working in a dress 
boutique in Germany. 

SUE ARCHER traveled in Europe after studying French 
in Tours for four weeks. 

ANITA SCHENCK spent part of her summer working for 
Headstart in New York City and part on a trip to the west 
coast with SUE COOLIDGE and a friend of Sue's from 
Goucher. 

MIMI DEAN was in Cohasset where she worked part-time 
in a furniture shop. This year she is living in the French 
House at C.U. 

JOAN CARTER became engaged in August to Ronald G. 
Green of Providence, R.I. Ronald graduated from Loomis 
School and is now a Junior at Brown University. 

EMILY MOULTON became engaged in August to Cadet 
John R. Hall, 2nd of Rye, N.H. John prepared at Phillips 
Exeter for Dartmouth College, asd is now a member of the 
senior class at West Point. EM is a senior at Hood. 

LINDA RICHARDSON was married to Francis Irenee du 
Pont, 3rd, of Greenwich, Conn, on June 18, 1966. Francis, 
a graduate of Woodberry Forest School, is a senior at the 
University of Richmond. 

ELIZABETH CADBURY was married to David Montagu on 
September 6, 1966 in Farmington, Conn. David, who has 
been a concert violinist and a member of the music de- 
partment at Cornell, will head the violin department at the 
O'erlin Conservatory of Music. He was graduated from the 
University of Chicago, the Juilliard School of Music and the 
Fontainebleau School of Art and Music in France. 



I was at C.U. Summer School again. There I investigated 
five new areas including Cartography which I hope to 
pursue further. 

Since this is our senior year, let's make a valiant attempt 
to hear from everyone before names and present addresses 
are changed entirely. 

Ann Harris 

1964 

News Secretary: Susan Stafford, 4103 Spruce St., Box 
1397, Philadelphia, Penna. 19104. 

ALINE HILL has gone to Paris to study this year. She 
decided to forget sending postcards back and forth across 
the Atlantic and therefore appointed me as the News Secre- 
tary. I did not send you postcards this fall. It was decided 
to initiate a new system and ask you all to please send 
your own postcards to me at: 42 Portland St. Keene, N.H. 
by January 1st. If you write before December 20, the ad- 
dress is: Box 1397, 4103 Spruce St., Philadelphia. 

As far as summer activities go, PRIS PEDERSON was a 
mothers-helper in Greenwich Conn. MARTY FOLEY was in 
Europe. SUKEY STAFFORD went to Denmark with the Ex- 
periment in International Living, learned a little Danish, 
and had a very interesting time. 

JO SCHWIEBERT graduated from Pine Manor last year, 
after two outstanding years. She was president of her class 
as a freshman. Last year she was president of the Student 
Government. For her two years there, she had the highest 
scholastic average of any student ever to attend Pine 
Manor. The college recognized the exceptional nature of 
her accomplishments by awarding her the "Dean's Award", 
the "Award for Distinction in French Literature", the 
"Marie Warren Potter Award" for outstanding scholarship, 
and the "President's Cup" for citizenship, academic achieve- 
ment, and college spirit. Jo certainly deserves our congra- 
tulations. 

MELINDA BATEMAN graduated from Green Mountain 
College in June. She is working as a translator-secretary 
in the Air Force Foreign Liaison Office in the Pentagon. 
LEE CLARK graduated from Bennett College in June and is 
studying at the University of Aix-en-Provence this year. 
GRETCHEN OVERBAGH graduated from Green Mountain 
College in June. She taught in Operation Headstart this 
summer. She is now attending St. Joseph's College in North 
Windham, Me. and plans to teach after graduation. 

CORLISS HEWITT is engaged to Jan Philip Askman of 
South Hamilton, Mass. He prepared at Phillips Andover 
Academy for the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. 

MERIDITH LOW was married to Ronald Emmons of West 
Long Branch, New Jersey on June 25, 1966, in Cohasset, 
Mass. LORING LOW, '61, was maid of honor. Ronald is a 
graduate of Monmouth College in New Jersey. 

SUSAN TRAFTON was married to Arthur Lowell Edmunds, 
III, on June 23, 1966 in Auburn, Me. 

JOAN WHIPPLE was married to Peter Rice on June 12, 
1966 in Locust Valley, New York. MOLLY WEBSTER '64 
and DALE THOMSON '64 were in the bridal party. 

Good luck, and be sure to send me your news. 

Sukey 

1965 

News Secretary: Gail Goldstein, Connecticut College, New 
London, Conn. 

ELLEN HUNTINGTON spent the summer in Sweden with 
the Experiment in International Living. 

1966 

News Secretary: Ellen Sobiloff, Chatham College, Box 
103, Pittsburgh, Penna. 15232. 
Dearest Everyone, 

I was looking through old pictures a couple of weeks 
ago and found some real beauties . . . like the Sunday 
night last winter when we had that mad snowball fight 
in the courtyard and then came back into the parlor . . . 
and the sad, but memorable occasion of Anna Reyam's 
funeral. Those pics are all priceless! 

Anyway, the news has been pouring in from all parts. 
Guess you're all pretty well settled, as I am at Chatham. 
This is really a beautiful campus (the old Andrew Mellon 
Estate), the atmosphere is informal, the girls are great and 
the faculty-student relationship is marvelous. 

On to business: DEBBIE LITTLE wrote a lengthy letter 
from her new home in Ohio: "For six weeks this summer 
my job was teaching educationally handicapped children . . ." 
and she loved every minute. 



twenty 



JAN WARING writes that she saw Jerry almost every 
day and she got her braces off . . . excitement! Saw JUDY 
BRICKER this summer (amongst others) at Newport. She 
then spent two weeks in Bermuda and some time in Maine 
visiting with Mouse at her summer home. PEIGI DONAGHEY 
took typing lessons at U. of Vermont this summer plus three 
courses — one of which was the Russian language. We 
have a prospective ambassadress (?) in our midst! 

From SHELLEY ERWIN: "I want to tell everyone that my 
Dad lost his bid for Republican gubernatorial nomination 
last June. We were of course disappointed but it wasn't 
such a personal loss as it was a public one — Proud here!" 
Also from Maine: Pinky and Lee spent the summer waitress- 
ing at a Restaurant. Pinky says: ". . . made lots of dinero 
— plenty of trips to West Point!" She is now at B.U. 

JULIE DUPONT visited them both. Lee and I got together 
for lunch the other day . . . It's so great to be near '66-ers!! 
Ran into BONNIE WARE at a Carnegie Tech fraternity 
party. She and I spent the day in Pittsburgh shortly after 
that. Will be spending a lot more time with those two. 

As you know, saw NEE, JUDY MUSTILLE and FRANCIS 
at Newport, too. (Lucy and I drove up together). We 
stopped to see WINKIE, but she was out gallivanting on the 
GAINES' boat. Winkie is now in England at school and 
she spent the summer at an acting workshop at Salve 
Regina College in Newport — "learned much about tech- 
nique and theater and very much about convent life which 
was completely new to me!" 

From our own bewitched ANN: "I have spent most of 
my time running between Long Island and the city — have 
been going to the American Academy of Dramatic Art and 
will work part-time for a music composer." 

LUCY THOMPSON popped into the STANDARD-TIMES 
office (I tried to look official . . . ) a couple of times this 
summer to say "Hello" while on a break from her busy 
schedule at a day camp in Brewster. She loves Wilson and 
hos run into GAY STEIMLE and JOEY FOSTER C64). ELLEN 
ROSS taught sailing at a girls' camp in Maine. PEMOLD 
visited her for a while — BETHE was a camp counselor 
in the White Monutains. Unfortunately, she had to take 
time out to recuperate from a back operation, but is just 
fine now. 

Saw MARGY a few times at the end of August. She lived 
with the Froebers in Winston and worked as a waitress 
(wears her hair up now and it's very becoming, but she 
looks so much older . . . Marg???!!!). 

JUDY F. spent time traveling with her family to Okla- 
homa and then to Richmond to visit JEANIE. Spoke to 
DREWRY and Jeanie twice — they sounded as though 
they were having a blast! 

THUG and MARK were on Cape Cod for a while — Un- 
fortunately, I missed seeing them. Thug took a six week 
typing course and saw Mark every day! 

BLAKEMAN had some news first from Canada! HUMPER 
spent time with her up there) and then from Goucher: 
"Goucher is unbelievable — super liberal and super exciting 
and super fun ond super experimental." She may come to 
Pittsburgh to visit in the near future. BARB PARIS had 
an interesting job . . . keypunching for an IBM place 
in St. Paul! Also — her guardian in New York is none 
other than JOHN SEBASTIAN of lovin' spoonful fame!!!! 

MARILEE, DEBBY STONE, JANIE MINOR and BARB all 
were in Mexico at one point for a happy reunion. 

AYER wrote me from Beloit during Orientation Week: 
"Lovely dorm — Don't we love those washing machines and 
beautiful lounges! (Yes!!)" 

From MARY PORTER: "Came out at a local cotillion in 
June. Went to New Hampshire in July and traveled around 
Italy in August with my parents and sister." KAYE ROAN 
says that her summer was quiet, but fun. TIMMIE had a 
fantastic time in Europe. She spent a few days in Germany 



with the Lebachs. She loves Smith and keeps running into 
MELINDA and PAULA. Speaking of SUSIE LEBACH, her 
summer sounded just marvelous. She worked again in a 
factory and had a tremendous social life. 

MARC I A had an unbelievable time touring ten European 
countries, but ". . . from August 18-24 we were crossing on 
a German ship . . . and I had the BEST time of the whole 
summer!" BEV and MARC I A are rooming together at Skid- 
more — Bev worked this summer "in a restoration project 
. . . and was supposed to act as if I lived anywhere from 
1750-1810. My knowledge of local history is gaining « . ." 

BARBARA HAZARD was constantly on the go this sum- 
mer — per usual — first working with emotionally dis- 
turbed children in Calif, then "a fascinating trip through 
Bulgaria . . . Vienna, Paris, Lisbon, and Coimbro, Portu- 
gal." Wheew! 

From our U. Penn group, BABS worked for a while as a 
"fullerette" — a Fuller Brush woman! LONNI just loves 
U. Wisconsin and had a most rewarding trip cross-country 
with her family. 

My dear ol' roommate, LIZZIE C, worked in Dennis on 
Cape Cod for the month of August, so I saw her a couple 
of times. She loves Centenary — especially the location. 

From the international scene: I have received two lenghty 
letters from DUCK IE containing magnificent descriptions of 
their travels in Europe thus far. At the moment she ond 
her sister are taking an 8-week German course at the 
Goethe Institute in Munich. I only wish I could repeat every 
word of her letters; it sounds as though the Whiteheads are 
having a most memorable experience. If anyone wishes to 
read them, please write and tell me, as I promised Duckie 
that I would pass them around. She misses everyone and 
would LOVE to get mail. Her address until Novemebr 30 is: 
Goethe Institute, 7902 Blaubeuren, Muhlweg 18, Villa Lang, 
West Germany. Otherwise write to: American Express, Mu- 
nich Germany. 

From LUCY: "It's a great feeling to be relatively free 
of studies although I am taking two courses with . . . 
College Year in Athens . . . But I do miss the friendly 
sort of comradeship of school ... I am not dying of 
loneliness, but I do miss you all and would love hearing 
from you." She, Ju-Ju and Mrs. Crane drove through Hol- 
land, Belgium, France and Italy. Their address in Athens: 
Pierce College, Box 472. NOW — I have the privilege of 
making a most exciting announcement. From JANIE MINOR: 
"Remember when I caught the bouquet at Miss Danzoll's 
shower? Well ... I won't be going to college this fall 
with the rest of the class: I'm engaged to my best friend's 
brother-in-law! Anthony and I will be married next April 
and will attend the University of Mexico afterwards. I'm 
really excited, to say the least. This summer has been spent 
making plans. Wish us luck in carrying them out!!!" 

Speaking for the entire class, we ALL do, Janie! 

So, gang, that's about it. I can't begin to say how 
marvelous it has been hearing from all of you — please 
keep it coming! Oh — our little Achilles is doing fine from 
all reports. 

A parting comment: Before I came to Chatham, I firmly 
decided to abandon all my nicknames, affectionate though 
they may have been (?). However, I arrived here to discover 
that my roommate's name is ELLEN. So, I will sign off 
— as ever, 

Sobie 



The class of 1966 presented the 
school with a porter's wheel and kiln 
for use in the Art Department. 



twenty-one 



Changes of Address 



ARIZONA 

Patricia Goss (Mrs. Patricia G. Rhodes) 

7328 Black Rock Trail, Phoenix 85018 



1939 



COLORADO 

Marion Badoian (Mrs. Constantinos B. Emmanuel) 1954 

2825 Kenyon Circle, Boulder 80302 

Susan Kassler (Mrs. Frederick A. Matthews) 1960 

P. O. Box 498, Boulder 80301 

Nancy Marsh (Mrs. Victor A. Gores) 1934 

738 Pearl Street, Denver 80203 



CALIFORNIA 



1944 



Alva Houston (Mrs. John M. Pafford) 

1514 Claire Street, Corcoran 93212 

Dorothy Perkins (Mrs. Burk Estobrook) 

7101 Woodrow Wilson Drive, Los Angeles 90028 

Martha Warner (Mrs. Daniel C. Olson, Jr.) 

1833 Woodhaven Way, Oakland 94611 

Gail Turner (Mrs. William P. Slover) 

6293 Arch Way, Riverside 92506 

Pauline Gray (Mrs. Robert W. Keyes) 

2820 Clay Street, San Francisco 94115 

Carol Ann Moore 

3-E Hulme House, Escondido Village, Stanford 94305 

Laurie Smith 1959 

c/o Art History Dept., Stanford University, Stanford 94305 



1913 



1951 



1956 



1962 



1962 



CONNECTICUT 

Jeanne Skillin (Mrs. Charles R. Moore, Jr.) 

88 Tamara Circle Avon 06001 

Mary Ann Yudicky (Mrs. John A. Goodrich) 

1 1 Devonshire Drive, Darien 06820 

Marjorie Orr (Mrs. George A. Maclver, Jr.) 

148 Field Crest Road, New Canaan 06840 

Janet Bowden (Mrs. Claude A. Wilson, Jr.) 

13 Oval Avenue, Riverside 06878 
Patricia Skillin (Mrs. Henry V. Pelton) 

14 Pinecrest Drive, Simsbury 06070 
Grace DeLong (Mrs. Richard C. Einsel) 

26 Sunrise Hill Drive, West Hartford 06107 
Louise Yeomans (Mrs. Robert C. Steinmetz) 
23 Laurel Lane, Wilton 06897 
Mary Concemi (Mrs. Fred T. Sommer) 
473 King's Highway, Woodmont 06460 

FLORIDA 

Karen Jones 

4105 S.W. 16th Terr., No. 3, Coral Gables 33134 

Amelia Comas 

1378 So. Venetian Way, Miami 33139 

Elizabeth Whittemore 

32 Field Road, Sarasota 33581 

HAWAII 

Susan Blake (Mrs. Billy J. Northcutt) 

494 Kalanianaole Highway, Honolulu 96821 

ILLINOIS 

Helen Angevine (Mrs. Howard E. Smith, Jr.) 

1092 Cherry Street, Winnetka 60093 

IOWA 

Shirley Rhodes (Mrs. Robert W. Lowe) 

16 Imperial Court, Davenport 52807 

KANSAS 

Joan Fisher (Mrs. Stephen Chambers) 

478 East Lovla, No. 104, Olathe 66061 



1955 
1955 
1956 
1953 
1954 
1948 
1960 
1962 

1957 
1960 
1922 

1955 

1955 
1944 
1959 



MAINE 

Joan Whipple (Mrs. Peter Rice) 
Cape Neddick 03902 

Anne Russell (Mrs. Malcolm S. Loring) 

Pepperell Road, Kittery Point 03905 

Janet McLean (Mrs. M. Roberts Hunt) 

19 Capesic Street, Portland 04102 



MARYLAND 

Rosemary Ozoonian (Mrs. Moses Arkoian) 

8100 Gorman Avenue, Laurel 20810 



MASSACHUSETTS 



Nancy Hill 

25 Oxford Circle 



Belmont 02178 
(Mrs. Benjamin S. 



Bates) 



Billerica 01821 



Boston 02128 



Jr.) 



Susan Calnan 

Pondover Street 

Sally Babb 

241 Webster Street 

Jennifer Hesketh 

1163 Boylston St., No. I, Boston 02215 

Linda Swanberg (Mrs. William L. Musser, 

87 Revere Street, Boston 02114 

Edna Foster 

1305 Commonwealth Avenue, No. 7, Brighton 

Janet A. Humphrey 

22 Prescott Street, No. 15, Cambridge 02138 

Ingrid Quorck 

Graduate Center 114, 6 Ash Street, Cambridge 

Charlotte Leland (Mrs. James Hamill) 

9 Morgan Court, Cohasset 02025 

Susan Boynton (Mrs. Kenneth C. Koerber) 

379 Main Street, Groveland 01884 

Ruth Stott (Mrs. Lovett C. Peters) 

95 Suffolk Road, Newton 02167 

Annette Curran (Mrs. Arthur J. Conlon, Jr.) 
120 Crofert Street, Pittsfield 01201 
Judith Warren (Mrs. Dennis K. Kiely) 

Blandford Stage Road, Russell 01071 

Susan Lothrop (Mrs. Roland J. Koster) 

18 Austin Court, Saugus 01906 

Eleanor Widen 

28 Beaver Dam Road, Scituate 02066 

Sybil Smith 

7 Arnold Court, Somerville 02143 

Muthoni Githungo 

c/o Konrad Monti, 74 Durfee 

Mabel Rhodes (Mrs. Mabel R. Manter) 

46 Elm Street, South Weymouth 02190 

Lois Lindsay 

The MacDuffie School for Girls 

165 Central Street, Springfield 01105 

Esther Shinn (Mrs. Kenneth F. Caldwell) 

5 Fairview Street Ext., Westfield 01085 

Constance Kassikas (Mrs. John J. Hohenadel, Jr.) 

5 Waconah Road, Worcester 01609 



1964 
1936 
1957 



1958 



1962 



1959 



1960 



1962 



1962 



1962 

02134 

1960 

1962 

02138 

1944 
1962 
1934 



St. 



1942 



1956 



1960 



1923 



1961 

1963 

Southbridge 01550 

1907 



1918 



1915 



1961 



MINNESOTA 



Caroline Mashall 

1915 Marshall Avenue, St. Paul 55104 



MONTANA 

Susan Bradley (Mrs. Richard V. Lee) 

P.H.S. Indian Health Center, Poplar 59255 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Mary Louise Currier 

Allain's Apts., No. 207, Rochester 03867 



1961 



1956 



1962 



twenty-two 



NEW JERSEY 



Meredith Low I Mrs. Ronald Emmons) 

78 B. Eaton Crest Drive, Eatontown 07724 

Parry El lice (Mrs. Bruce Adam) 

Pleasant Run Road, No. 3, Flemington 08822 

NEW YORK 

Elixabeth Artz (Mrs. David O. Beim) 

80 Willow Street, Brooklyn Heights 11201 

Sally Allen 

145 East 27th Street, New York 10016 

Rebecca Bartlett 

301 East 69th Street, New York 10021 

Hilary Field (Mrs. Price Gripekoven) 

30 West 60th Street, New York 10023 

Karen Flack 

179 East 70th Street, New York 10021 

Karen Grant 

25 West 13th Street, No. 6-C North, New York 

Katharine Grant 

151 East 36th Street, New York 10016 

Elizabeth Horan 

179 East 70th Street, New York 10021 

Lauchlan Learned 

526 West 11 lth St., No. 5BB, New York 10025 

Susan Mallory (Mrs. Michael J. Roberts) 

106 Forsyth Street, New York 10002 

Mildred Merriman (Mrs. Sydney Vere-Smith) 

30 East 65th Street, New York 10021 

Mary Wells 

55 Perry Street, New York 10014 

Elizabeth Wood 

301 East 75th Street, New York 10021 

Barbara Cooper (Mrs. David E. Jordan) 

8 Timberlake Drive, Orchard Park 14127 

Joan Sandfort (Mrs. Howard H. Swartz) 

RFD 1, Box 158, Poland 13431 

Ann MacDougall (Mrs. Paul G. Ballou) 

686 West Onondaga Street, No. 3, Syracuse 13204 



OHIO 

Nancy Baylor (Mrs. Edward F. Little) 

1004 So. Locust Street, Oxford 45056 



PENNSYLVANIA 

Susan Fox ( Mrs. Robert H 

52 Revere Rood, No. 14 
Drexel Brook Apts., Drexel 
Danna MacCorkle 
Box 145, Skytop 18357 
Frances Williams (Mrs. Danie 
Box 145, Skytop 18357 



CasteMini) 
Hill 19026 



S. MacCorkle) 



1964 
1958 



1958 
1962 
1962 
1962 
1963 

1962 

0011 
1962 

1957 

1962 

1962 

1909 

1962 

1962 

1960 

1959 

1962 



1944 



1959 

1961 
1924 



TENNESSEE 

Cynthia Smith (Mrs. Brady D. Holcomb) 

116 Briar Road, Oak Ridge 37830 

TEXAS 

Audrey Taylor (Mrs. Robert A. MacLean) 

602 Hallie Drive, Houston 77024 

VERMONT 

Susan Appleton (Mrs. Peter A. Evans) 

Main Street, Norwich 05055 

Valerie Crane (Mrs. Richard L. Manley) 

South Dorset 05263 

VIRGINIA 

Carolyn Shaw 

1301 So. Scott St., No. 611, Arlington 22204 

Melinda Bateman 

3409 So. Carlyn Spring Road, No. T-3 

Falls Church 22041 

Sarah Foote (Mrs. David G. Hubby) 

1105 Waverly Way, McLean 22101 

WISCONSIN 

Sandra Nicholson (Mrs. David D. Booth) 

321 West Mifflin Street, No. 5, Madison 53703 
Cathlyn Wilkerson 

Box 336, Watertown 53094 

BELGIUM 

Jacqueline Van Aubel (Mrs. Eric Janssens) 

3 av. Victor Gilsoul, Bruxelles 15 
Joyce Finger (Mrs. Hubert C. Evers) 

51 Rue D'Arlon, Bruxelles 4 



FRANCE 



Lee Clark 

c/o Madame Lanes 

17 rue Cardinale, Aix-en-Provence 



ITALY 

Margaret 

Villa Del 



Hill (Signora Margaret H. Magherini) 

Poggiale, Poggio A Caiano, Firenze 



SWITZERLAND 

Florence Mooney (Mrs. Laurence L. Doty, Jr.) 

113L Route de Jussy, 1226 Moillesulaz, Geneva 

TUNISIA 

Cynthia Austin (Mrs. J. Stewart Cox) 

Villa Chante le Vente 

Lotissement Montevideo, Cremieux Ville 



1960 

1953 

1955 
1962 

1962 
1964 

1960 

1961 
1962, 

1963 
1958 

1964 

1942 
1939 
1947 




THE 

SCHOOL 

CALENDAR 



September 13 
September 14 

September 1 7 
October 1 

October 8 

October 21 

October 23- 
November 1 5 

October 29 

November 2 

November 9 

November 11-12 

November 16 

November 20 

November 20- 
December 1 5 

November 22 

November 23-27 

December 3 

December 9-14 

December 14 

December 1 5- 
January 4 



Arrival and registration of all students 

First Chapel 
Regular classes begin 

School picnic 

Phillips Academy Mixer at Abbot 

Speaker: Mr. Gordon Hall — "Extremism: Sickness of 
the Sixties" 

Phillips Academy Celebrity Series: Metropolitan Opera 
Studio 

"Watercolors" by Virginia Powel — Abbot Art Instructor 

John-Esther Gallery 

Groton Mixer at Abbot 

Dance with Tilton at Abbot 

Juniors — "Taming of the Shrew" in Boston 

Parents' Week End 

Speakers: Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Stott, Phillips Academy 

Seniors — "Hamlet" in Cambridge 

Concert with Phillips Academy in Methuen, Mass. 

"Boston Printmakers 1966" — John-Esther Gallery 

Thanksgiving Service 

Thanksgiving Week End 

Bennett Performing Arts Tour — Gym — Morning 
Senior-Mid Play 

Fall Term Examinations 

Christmas Vespers and Christmas Dinner 

Christmas Vacation 



twenty-jour 



Did we miss your name? 

Engagements ? Marriages ? 

Children ? Travels ? Careers ? 

We'd love to add it to the class news — please send to the 
Alumnae Office before January 25, 1967 



Ma i den N a me Class. 

Married Name 

Address _ 

Zip Code 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 

Andover. Massachusetts 

return requested 



ENTERED AS 
SECOND-CLASS MATTE 

AT THE POST OFFICE A"| 

ANDOVER. MASSACHUSE1 




ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN — February 1967 



Ss # # # * ! S^S§feS-^ # fo # 4, /\ 
^«w 1778- 

PHILLIPS ACADEMY 




OLIVERWENDELL-HOLMES $ 



LI B R ARY 



* 



SJ21£^££Hj. i- iJ!iJf^2£_Ji ^ 



8> 

* # >^ >^ #^^8i£*# >^ i> S> & *J 



The Executive Board of the Alumnae Association 



President 



Vice-Presidents 



Clerk 



Treasurer 



Executive Secretary 

Delegates- at- Large 



Alumnae Trustee 
1963-1969 

Alumnae Trustee 
1966-1972 



1 966 - 1 968 

Mrs. James F. Mathias 

( Barbara Lord) 

Glendale Rd., Harrison, N.Y. 

Mrs. Leonard M. Fowle 

(Nancy Kimball) 

36 Norman St., Marblehead, Mass. 

Mrs. John E. Coin, Jr. 

(Aagot Hinrichsen) 

21 Lantern Lane, Weston, Mass. 

Mrs. Malcolm S. Loring 

(Anne Russell) 

Pepperell Rd., Kittety Point, Me. 

Mrs. E. Hartley Smith 

(Deborah Redfield) 

4 Jefferson St., Marblehead, Mass. 

Mrs. Gage Olcott 

(Helen O'Brien) 

40 Oakridge Rd., Wellesley, Mass. 

Miss C. Jane Sullivan 

20 Buswell St., Lawrence, Mass. 

Mrs. Robert L. Bettinger 

(Fredericka Brown) 

133 Rhoda Ave., Fairfield, Conn. 

Miss Elizabeth F. Bulkeley 

340 Mill Hill Terr., Southport, Conn. 

Mrs. Walter I. Scott, Jr. 

(Janice Lenane) 

12 Orchard Circle, Greenwood, Mass. 

Miss Alice C. Sweeney 

35 School St., Andover, Mass. 

Mrs. John B. Ogilvie 

(Donna Brace) 

14 Circle Rd., Darien, Conn. 



FEBRUARY 1967 



VOLUME 35, NUMBER 2 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 

Editor: C. JANE SULLIVAN 
Published four times yearly, October, February, May and September, by Abbot Academy, Andover, Massachusetts. Entered as 
second class matter December 12, 1933, at the post office at Andover, Massachusetts, under the act of August 24, 1912. 



Front Cover Picture and Musical Photography 
by Richard D. Graber, Andover, Massachusetts 



rom the desk of Miss Tucker . . . 



While you are busy with your winter activities you might be interested 
to read of some of Abbot's extra-curriculum. 

The Junior Class is rehearsing one of Shakespeare's plays. The senior 
co-directors are doing this job for English projects. Miss Warner is directing 
the Abbot choir and some Phillips boys in "Yeomen of the Guard". Varsity 
and sub-varsity basketball teams will play other schools. 

The Brooks School debate team came here and lost, but coffee and 
cookies afterward salved their spirits. Some of our girls are rehearsing on 
their campus for a winter play. 

The Spanish department is active. Miss Carole Buhler, a Beloit College 
junior, is a half-year teaching assistant and an Abbey House resident faculty. 
In Baronial Hall three evenings this term, the Advanced Spanish girls and 
P.A. boys gather for a seminar by three different teachers speaking on their 
field of interest followed by discussion. Our chapter of the Spanish Honorary 
Society was installed in November. Some student members were initiated 
then; others were taken in this month followed by a reception for the girls 
and their parents. One Friday evening the Latin American Girls sang and 
danced while the audience ate at an ice cream sundae bar. Admissions went 
to a Spanish children's charity and the lively affair was called a "Yom-Yom". 

The girls and teachers organized and carried out most efficiently 
"Operation-P.A. Bakesale" to benefit World University Service, a charity for 
foreign students. Enough cake, brownies and cookies were baked and sold 
to give us a total income of $277 in an hour's sale. 

The variety of our activities develops student discrimination; the activ- 
ities themselves generate team-work and self-confidence. They also produce 
very healthy student-teacher cooperation and involvement. 

New England had a green January. All of us are anticipating a swirling 
blizzard and the ensuing winter snow games and sculpturing contest. If the 
temperature stays cold after such a day, the campus looks very gay with 
the imaginative, colored frozen figures created by the girls. 



three 







.1 



I 



, 






II 



III 



^ 



u 




ABBOT 



RINGS 



WITH 



by Miss Margot Warner 

Head of the Music Department, Choral Director and 

Teacher of Voice, Music Theory and History of Music 



MUSIC 



For those of us who followed Miss Kate 
Friskin in the music department at Abbot, 
a high standard of musical taste and per- 
formance had been firmly established. How 
lucky her students were that an artist of 
like calibre had seen fit to devote so much 
time to teaching in a preparatory school. 

Abbot rings with music — formally and 
informally — 

Since we go to Cochran Chapel on Sun- 



days and are now sharing the service with 
Phillips, Fidelio sings joint anthems with the 
boys' chorus about four times a term. This 
enables us to work on an important choral 
composition such as Haydn's Lord Nelson 
Mass. This autumn we used certain choruses 
from the great work as anthems and then 
put them together for a very successful con- 
cert with Phillips in the Organ Hall at 
Methuen. Rarely does one have the good 



five 



fortune to seriously prepare an important 
work before reaching college. Abbot and 
Phillips are very fortunate in this. 

Joint concerts for Fidelio with boys' 
schools continue. By the end of this year we 
shall have sung with Lawrence Academy, St. 
Paul's, Exeter, St. Mark's and Phillips. 

Private lessons in piano, violin, flute, 
voice, etc. continue to be given in Home- 
stead, which some will remember as having 
been a dormitory. We now have mid-year 
and final exams for students of applied 
music. A group of five judges listens to 
each student and evaluates her technique, 
style and stage deportment. The judges' 
grades are averaged and the student is 
given an idea of how her work appears to 
be progressing. 

A half-year course for Juniors in Basic 
Music has turned into a sort of appreciation 
or audio-perception course and precedes the 
visual-perception art course given that class 
the second half-year. 

Musically inclined and talented Preps and 



Juniors try out for A Cappella and learn 
some of the tricks of choral singing in this 
group. They perform at Student Recitals 
and on Rally Night. 

Since there is no regular Vespers Service 
here, the Choir now prepares an anthem for 
the Friday morning chapel. This group also 
acts as the back-bone of a Gilbert and Sul- 
livan performance during the winter term. 
Last year, assisted by students from Phillips, 
we presented "The Gondoliers". This year 
we are preparing "Yeomen of the Guard". 
Three performances are scheduled — one 
of these being a young people's matinee. 
This is an attempt to reach out into the 
community and invite the children to be 
entertained. 

Senior and Senior-Mid singing groups, 
which are as always, student inspired and 
student trained, continue to be a constant 
source of pleasure when they perform. 

Yes — there is music in the air at Abbot 
and it is not "canned". What more can 
you ask? 





six 



ALUMNA 
IN NIGERIA 



by Carol Hardin Kimball, 1953 

Carol and her husband, Geoffrey, spent three and 
one-half years in Nigeria where he was associated 
with Mobil International Oil Company. Carol is 
pictured here with calabash carvers in Western 
Nigeria. 




A 19th century British adage once warned the traveler to West Africa: 
"The Bight of Benin, the Bight of Benin, 
There's few who come out though many go in." 



Nigeria is not the land of the safari, of 
roaming herds of big game, or of pictur- 
esque mountains; its diversity, however, is 
great. Shining skyscrapers, open sewers; 
chaufferred limousines, barefoot bicyclists; 
finely sculpted 1 5th century bronzes, dense 
rain forests; gaily patterned fabrics, drab 
tin-roofed huts — a barrage of extremes 
assault the foreigner's eye and ear on ar- 
riving in Lagos, the capital of West Africa's 
largest nation. 

Although the contrast between public 
affluence and private poverty is common to 
the whole continent, it is dangerous to 
generalize about Africa. Two West African 
characteristics strongly influence the daily 
lives of native and expatriate alike: its 
enervating climate and the lack of white 
settlers in the former British colonies of 
Nigeria, Ghana, Sierra Leone and Gambia. 
Individual Britons were never permitted to 
develop private farms or plantations (as 
they were encouraged to do in East 
Africa); racial relations are consequently 
more positive than elsewhere on the con- 
tinent. 

White men were not allowed to colonize 
largely because of the infamous climate — 



until World War II the "White Man's 
Grave" of ravaging malaria. Today mosqui- 
to boots and pith helmets are rarely seen, 
but other diseases are still a threat. 

Four times larger than the United King- 
dom, Nigeria's population of 55 million 
breaks down into seven major languages 
and four provinces: the Northern, Eastern, 
Western and Midwestern Regions. English 
is the official language, understood and 
spoken to some extent by nearly everyone. 
I once took a stab at learning Yoruba, the 
major tongue of the Western Region. Its 
tonality, infinite subtle ways of expressing 
a simple "Good Morning", and colorful use 
of proverbs soon defeated me. 

The constant high humidity (75% -90% 
year round) of Lagos and the coastal areas 
saps one's energy and leaves little appetite 
for creative effort. We were pleased there- 
fore to be initially transferred to the some- 
what drier climate of Enugu, the bustling 
provincial capital of Eastern Nigeria. 

The Ibos, an individualistic, independent, 
energetic and aggressive people, constitute 
the major tribe of the Eastern Region. As a 
housewife, I soon became aware of Ibo 
energy and salesmanship through my daily 



seven 



contact with a stream of visitors on bicycles: 
the barber, tailor, vegetable man, egg man, 
and bottle man (colorful glass necklaces 
are made from melted pop bottles) . We 
developed a taste for bargaining with the 
itinerant Muslim traders of the Hausa tribe, 
peddling African antiquities and handi- 
crafts. Thousands of I bos were recently 
murdered in the feudal Muslim Northern 
Region, in part because of profound resent- 
ment of their monopoly of the better jobs 
(postal and railway clerks, service station 
owners, petty traders) and consequent rela- 
tive wealth. 

We lived in a handsome new bungalow 
with two air-conditioned bedrooms, ceiling 
fans in the living and dining rooms, and 
terrazzo floors. Colorful lizards and opaque 
geckos lodging behind the curtains and 
pictures were well-fed on the constant sup- 
ply of flying bugs and tiny crab-like ants. 
We employed a cook, Titus, who did all 
the baking, boiling and filtering of drink- 
ing water, and most of the cooking. Our 
steward, Ethelbert, waited on table, and did 
all the cleaning, washing and ironing. He 
later became cook-steward when we moved 
to Lagos, where we also had a nanny to 
help care for our baby, Jennifer. Ethelbert's 
colorful English gave us an insight into the 
animist practice of imputing personality to 
objects: "What of this door, Madam, which 
do not agree to close?", or "We have no 
Corn Flakes against tomorrow". 

Every house has both an employer-pro- 
vided gardener and a night-watchman. The 
former, Fidelis, lived up to his name in 
helping to transform our acre of bare red 
earth, in one year, into a lovely garden of 
four foot hibiscus hedges, ten foot flame 
trees, jasmine, gardenias and bougainvillea. 
(Gardening is a rewarding tropical pastime 
because of the rapidity with which every- 
thing prows.) Most nightwatchmen ('watch- 
nights') sleep soundly, their flashlight and 
machetes ('torch and machet') beside them. 
However, our nightwatch, Kano, was quite 
active. He killed snakes that ventured out 
of the six foot bush grass on one side of 
our house during the dry season; several 
times we awakened to find a small python 
or cobra on our doormat, proof of an alert 
night's work. 

During our year in Enugu Geoff drove 
about 2,000 miles a month. I'd often ac- 
company him, taking along our food, drink, 



and masses of Wash 'n Dris to combat the 
red dust. Sometimes he would have an ap- 
pointment to see someone, only to be in- 
formed on arrival, "Sorry, Master, he is 
not on seat". That evocative phrase meant 
the speaker knew only that the man had 
left his office, but where he'd gone or for 
how long was anybody's guess. 

Road traffic consists mainly of bikes and 
trucks, known as "Mammy Wagons", 
generally owned by women (hence the 
title), usually with a wooden body and 
Mercedes engine, which transport every- 
thing and everybody everywhere. Often so 
out of alignment that they appear to move 
sideways, they travel at great speeds with 
little regard for other traffic. Many display 
a humorously fatalistic motto painted on 
the cab in "pidgin English". It is discon- 
certing to see one hurtling towards you, 
labeled "One with God is Majority", "Son 
of Whether", "God's Case — No Appeal", 
or "Nothing can Please the World". 

Once at our destination, I'd often wander 
around the local market, a vivid visual and 
olfactory experience. Cassava roots soaking 
in large pots and piles of dried Scandinavian 
stockfish in the sun are unpleasantly pun- 
gent. But the many varieties of green and 
red peppers, rice, onions, corn and various 
leaves for wrapping or eating were colorful 
and artistically displayed. The cosmetic 
section offered henna, powdered antimony 
for use as eyeshadow, and short wooden 
combs with four inch teeth. There was 
always a "ju-ju" or black magic stall where 
dried rats, monkey's paws and assorted in- 
nards could be purchased to ward off evil. 

In smaller villages I was always sur- 
rounded by groups of curious giggling chil- 
dren, hoping to touch me or shake hands, 
fiddling with their chewing sticks — pieces 
of wood with which they deftly massage 
their gums and beautiful teeth. As a white 
woman in such a situation I was less con- 
cerned about my personal safety than I am 
here in New York. Only once during our 
stay in Nigeria was I aware of violence 
being directed specifically at white people 
during the Lumumba riots in Lagos in early 
1961. The recent civil disorders are inter- 
tribal; Nigeria has no equivalent of the 
Mao-Mao in Kenya. 

In Enugu I was fortunate to have the 
opportunity to teach French at Queen's 
School, the best Nigerian girls' boarding 



eight 



school in the Eastern Region. Because only 
the top 10% of Eastern Nigerian students 
attend secondary school, it is an honor to 
be accepted and the girls are keen and 
well motivated. This positive attitude made 
up for the difficulty of teaching French to 
students whose grounding in English was 
not always firm. The "culture gap" further 
complicated the learning experience. The 
English textbooks were not aimed at a young 
African girl raised in tropical heat. For 
example, poetic flights in praise of spring 
were meaningless. 

The Headmistress was Scotch, the wife 
of an Anglican missionary. The faculty 
numbered 12, of whom half were English 
women and the other half Nigerian. At the 
time I was the only American; a Peace 
Corps teacher joined the staff towards the 
middle of 1962. The curriculum included 
Latin, Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Most 
girls hoped to continue their studies, either 
at one of Nigeria's four universities or 
abroad. 

I stopped teaching after our first baby 
was born and was often housebound in 
Lagos. Realizing how easily I could give in 
to ennui, I discovered a diversion high in 
the oil palm trees of our front yard in the 
form of Matthew Babatunde, the palm wine 
tapper. Nigerians drink palm wine as we 
drink Coca-cola, beer or bourbon. An 
opaque effervescent liquid — the sap of the 
tree — palm wine ferments rapidly; most 
Nigerians drink it the day it is tapped when 
it is refreshing and light. Some prefer it as 
the strong intoxicant it becomes after 24 
hours. 

Tall and lean, with tribal scarifications 
on his cheeks, Matthew came twice a day, 
his bike laden with the tools of his 
trade. These comprised assorted calabashes 
(gourds) in which to transport the wine, a 
machete, small pruning axe, and a hoop of 
strong vine with which he girded the tree 
and hitched himself up the trunk. The wine 
collected in old beer bottles which had been 
wedged into taps incised by the machete 
cmong the fronds. 

Matthew sold directly to his own clien- 
tele, every day supplying about twenty 
people with two to four bottles. Workina 
twenty trees at a time, netted about $125 
per month, a high wage for an uneducated 
man. (Our cook-steward, with a 5th grade 
education, made only $32 per month.) 




However, palm wine tapping is strenuous, 
hazardous, and seasonal; Matthew's ambi- 
tion was to buy a small shop in downtown 
Lagos and sell Patent Medicines. 

With four friends we flew to Kano, 800 
miles north of Lagos, to attend the installa- 
tion of the 13th Emir of Kano, Alhaji Ado 
Bayero. Thirty-five years old and a former 
Nigerian Ambassador to Senegal, the tall 
Emir was an imposing man with magnificent 
large eyes and a soft-spoken but authorita- 
tive manner. Appointed for life, the Emir 
of Kano became spiritual and temporal 
leader of five million people. He owed 
allegiance to the Sardauna of Sokoto, Mus- 
lim leader of Nigeria and Niger. The Sar- 
dauna, Alhaji the Honourable Ahmadu 
Bello, K.B.E., also happened to be Premier 
of Northern Nigeria; he was subsequently 
assassinated. 

The bone-dry air of this ancient mud- 
walled city was a delight after the sticky 
humidity of Lagos. I even wanted to wear 
a sweater in the evening, and experienced 
the nearly-forgotten sensation of sparks 
flying when I brushed my hair. 

The southern terminus of trans-Saharan 
camel caravans, Kano has been known since 
the Middle Ages as a great emporium, 
famous for its slave market and prisons. 
Today astronauts converse with the world 
through the United States tracking station 
near the city. 

The brilliant installation pageant began 
at 8:15 a.m. because of the heat and dust 
of midday. The Sardauna's powder-blue 
Cadillac entered the far end of the horse- 
shoe shaped stadium, followed by the Emir 
on horseback shaded by a yellow umbrella. 



nine 



Then the procession to pay homage — the 
durbar — commenced. Two thousand horses, 
bedecked in ornate leather and cloth trap- 
pings and brass stirrups, paraded slowly 
around the field. Their riders represented 
all 26 Kana Emirate subdivisions, each of 
which had its own musicians and dancers 
on foot. The Emir's own bodyguard wore 
chain mail dating from the Crusades. Niger 
Republic, to the north of Nigeria, sent a 
delegation of nomadic Touaregs on camels, 
their heads so heavily swathed in turbans 
that only their eyes were visible. 

At the conclusion of the stately durbar 
began the "jafi" or salute at the full gallop. 
Eight horsemen abreast raced in six waves 
the entire length of the field, one arm con- 
stantly raised in salute, coming to a sud- 
den halt just in front of the dais. 

In the evening we attended the Emir's 
reception where cakes and orange pop were 
served. No Muslim women were present, 
but the men were superbly dressed in flow- 
ing embroidered robes. Their turbans were 
of cheesecloth, white netting or pastel cot- 
ton. Years of chewing kola nuts had stained 
many of their teeth red. There was no 
receiving line, the Emir preferring to circu- 
late informally around the floodlit outdoor 
court. Northern Nigerians dropped to their 
knees in homage to the new Emir as they 
departed. 

Except for such occasional exciting side- 
trips, few outlets exist for amusement. For 
this reason (and because everyone has 
servants) there is a heavy round of parties. 
Dinners are usually four course affairs with 
wine, preceded by a lengthy cocktail hour 
and followed by liqueurs and brandy. Even 
so, we found it refreshing to attend parties 
that were mixed in terms of age, race .and 
nationality. In Nigeria social relations are 
probably as relaxed as they are anywhere. 
We were delighted to get to know a number 
of American Negroes who were in business, 
foundation work, or with our AID programs. 
We made some close British friends, but 
found the average Briton to be less ad- 
venturous in getting to know Nigeria and 
Nigerians than his American counterpart. 

During our final 18 months in Lagos we 
had more opportunity to develop Nigerian 
friendships. It is relatively easy to get to 
know Nigerians, but the initiative usually 
is up to the foreigner. African society is 
not as rigid and ingrown as is, for example, 



that of Latin America. Although the sexes 
tend to separate for conversation, Nigerian 
parties are relaxed and very gay, often with 
dancing to the earthy shuffling rhythms of 
the West African "high life". 

Emphasis on materialism is very marked, 
unhappily, largely due to economic pres- 
sures faced by an educated African. A 
Nigerian who has studied abroad (a "been 
to") and returns to a job has already "made 
it" in the eyes of his rural relations. He is 
often immediately expected to find jobs 
for members of his extended family, and to 
support others through school. An African's 
"family" includes not only his immediate 
relations (usually complicated by halt- 
brothers and sisters), but also all those 
whom we would consider very distant kins- 
men. At their collective expense he may 
have been sent abroad. Even the palm wine 
tapper was putting his uncle's children 
through school. The wives of most of our 
Nigerian friends in the Civil Service not 
only worked full time, but raised chickens 
as well. Many Nigerians feel tempted to 
"fiddle" the books of their employers in 
order to live up to colonial standards set by 
well-paid foreigners. Most of us, in turn, 
were better housed and served than we 
could afford to be at home. 

Living for any length of time in a less- 
developed part of the world sharpens one's 
understanding of the sensitivity of Africans. 
For example, most Nigerian women are 
fully clothed; they dress beautifully in 
graceful long skirts and elegant head ties. 
It is no wonder that they would be offended 
by the connotation of advertisements in the 
N.Y. Times for the current fad of African 
prints headlined "Go Primitive". Perhaps 
they would think of the white women who 
wear shorts to go shopping in downtown 
Lagos. 

For most of us, it is an unaccustomed 
joy to be relieved of the usual domestic 
chores. At the same time, it is easy to be- 
come apathetic in the heat, to "go 'round 
the bend" as a result of debilitating leisure. 
However, the idealism of the Peace Corps 
(with more than 500 volunteers in Nigeria 
alone) has exerted a positive influence on 
the expatriate community. Many American 
wives teach part-time, write, do volunteer 
work with the International Women's Soci- 
ety, or further their own studies by corres- 
pondence. 



ten 



BITS 

AND 

PIECES 



Excerpts from 

THE JOURNAL OF AN ABBOT ACADEMY GIRL 

by Harriet Chapell Newcomb, 1876 

Her daughters are Ruth Newcomb, 1910, and Cornelia Newcomb Lattin, 
1917, and her granddaughter is Harriet Lattin Dunlap, 1950. 



This is a Theologue who went by this 
morning with his valise strapped on his 
back. I was shocked and surpised to find a 
holy theologue partaking in such a worldly 
custom. But the world is gradually going to 
ruin, I believe: — we are a degenerate race, 
the philosophers say. 

The Seniors had a little spread last night 
that was very jolly, I guess. They saved 
their money and had cream and confections 
from Boston, then made the substantial 
cake themselves and had a gay time down 
in the kitchen. They had made up study 
hours for several days, and such confusion 
as reigned yesterday over there I never saw 
in sober Abbot before. The parlors and 
music room looked just as pretty as could 
be, and so did the dressing rooms, they say. 
Mr. Abbot, Lizzie's cousin from Yale — he 
is a friend of our Seniors — came on and 
also Birdie's friend from Harvard. They did 
not want to go over there very much, so 
called here for a long time, and seemed 
to be enjoying themselves muchly. 

The Davis Hall girls had a sleighride 
yesterday: — started off for Haverhill in a 
rain and the snow melting as fast as it 
could. The driver telegraphed to know how 
he should get them back, and Mr. Carter 
sent word to have them come in the train; 
so about ten o'clock they rode up from the 
station in the omnibus and a sleigh and 
came around to serenade the Smith Hall 
guests. They were pretty damp, I believe, 
but still I know they had a gay time, for 
they are all real gay girls. 

All yesterday I felt in my bones that Alf 
E. was coming to see me, but I was mad all 
the time because I knew how almost impos- 



sible it was for him to be here. But about 
half past nine Lizzie Aiken came up to say 
that he was downstairs and wanted to see 
me. You may be sure I hurried down, for 
it was late then; and I only stopped to 
prink a little. I had a very pleasant time 
indeed, and it was real fun to talk over the 
nice times we used to have so long ago 
together. He is a fine looking fellow — broad 
shouldered and burnt as brown as can be, 
and with handsome teeth. He said he had 
heard I was engaged, and offered congratu- 
lations, but I told him frankly how the affair 
stood, and he said he was glad I had told 
him just how it was. 




I could not draw either of us or the sofa 
very well, but I have given an idea of the 
state of affairs at least. 

The class of '72 at Phillips had their 
supper here last night: — from that state- 
ment you can judge the amount of excite- 
ment we have passed through here in Abbot 
Academy. At midnight, Thursday we had a 
firework serenade, that frightened most of 
us half to death, and gave Cornelius work 
to clean the burnt papers from the grass 
the next morning. Yesterday the weather 



eleven 



was perfect, and somehow, everything went 
smoothly with me all day. Such an inunda- 
tion of fellows as we experienced here 
yesterday in our afternoon walk you cannot 
imagine very easily; and it did seem like 
living to see some grown-up specimens of 
mankind around Andover. 




They clustered as above around Davis 
Hall driveway while we were walking after 
supper, and acted like loons with the girls 
who favored them with smiles. I believe 
every one of the third story blinds was tied 
with a blue necktie yesterday and today, 
while all the girls had one color or another 
tied on their umbrellas out walking. 

Lizzie and Wennie and I were delayed 
in the village until very near five o'clock, 
and were in a tearing hurry to get up to the 
Hall before study hour. Well, two of the 
boys got just in front of us, and there they 
stayed, filling up the path between the piles 




of snow, so all we could do was to walk 
along behind their majesties. Ugly things — 
they knew from our ravings that we were 
in a terrific hurry, but you see they had us 
completely in their power. We tried to 
dodge past whenever anyone came the op- 
posite way, but no, they had their opinion 
in the matter, and they would be suited at 
any cost. When we came to Love Lane they 
turned down and looked around to see us 



turn to follow them; but I went ahead on 
to Green St. as cool as you please, so they 
missed their guess for once at least. 

Yesterday, Tilly and I went into Boston, 
and we had a gay time, I tell you. In the 
first place, while I was dressing very leisure- 
ly, up rushed Tilly to say the coach was at 
the door, as the train went ten minutes 
earlier than we thought. But we rode down 
and got to the city all right. You see, we 
did not either of us know a scrap about the 
streets, but I had several landmarks to steer 
along by, so we did not have to ask our way 
once. I suppose we made a lot of blunders, 
but we did not know them all, so went 
ahead in blissful ignorance. There are one 
or two little jokes that we shall keep to our- 
selves, but truly we did succeed splendidly, 
considering our inexperienced youth. It was 
fun enough in the photographer's. I thought 
I never should be able to straighten my face, 
for Tilly got me in a regular gale there. But 
after the business actually commenced, I 
was as sober and correct as could be de- 
sired. 

The boys came around last night about 
two o'clock and cut the wire of the electric 
bell near the Davis Hall shed, then went to 
Ruth Caldwell's room and shook her window 
as hard as they could. She and Charlotte 
Moseley were dreadfully frightened, and 
spent the rest of the night with Josie 
Richards. I don't believe Mr. Bancroft can 
find out who did it, but he says they shall 
be expelled when he does discover them. 

This afternoon Prof. Churchill came to 
give us a little drill in elocution. The whole 
school looked so funny working their jaws 
at the same moment in the same direction. 




twelve 



Praises Ringing.. . Here's to you 

Beverly Armsden '66 — President of Freshman Class — Skidmore 
College 

Beverly Brown '62 — B.A. degree with distinction — Stanford 
University 

Joan Carter '63 — Dean's List — Smith College 

Deborah Fitts '63 — Dean's List — Smith College 

Joan Harney '64 — Associate degree in Arts Cum Laude, Briar- 
cliff College 

Aline Hill '64 — Dean's List — Smith College 

Karen Kaiser '62 — Library Award — Wells College 

Susan Localio '64 — Dean's List — Smith College 

Morley Marshall '63 — Dean's List — Smith College 

Anita Miller '63 — Dean's List — Bates College 

Susan Spongier '65 — Alpha Lambda Delta National Scholastic 
Honorary Society for Freshman Women — Purdue University 

Nora Theoharopoulos '66 — President of Freshman Class — Pierce 
College, Athens, Greece 



Club Comments 



The BOSTON Club's mid-winter luncheon was held January 
21, at the Women's City Club in Boston. Elliot Norton discussed 
the productions of the present theatre season in Boston. 

The FAIRFIELD County Connecticut Club will meet for des- 
sert, March 2, at the home of Mrs. Ery W. Kehaya, Jr. (Elsie 
Williams, 1944), 994 Oenoke Ave., New Canaan, Conn. Miss 
Tucker, Miss Minard and Miss Sullivan will be there to dis- 
cuss all aspects of Abbot. Make reservations with Mrs. Kehaya 
(no charge!) . 

The annual spring luncheon of the NEW YORK Club will be 
Saturday, March 4 at 12:00 noon, at the Smith College Club in 
the Berkshire Hotel on Madison Avenue and 52nd Street. Nancy 
Eastham lacobucci, 1955, will speak on "A Lady Lawyer in Wall 
Street". Make reservations with Mrs. Geoffrey Kimball, 70 East 
96th Street — luncheon $2.50. Any Abbot girl in the vicinity of 
New York on March 4 is welcome. 

thirteen 



1893 Mary A. Thompson died November 24, 1964, in 

Exeter, N.H. 

1895 Bessie Baldwin (Mrs. Bertram R. Hopkins) died 

July 1 1, 1966, in Ayer, Mass. 

1897 Martha Emerson died in September in Ithaca, 

N.Y. Our sincere sympathy is extended to her sister, 
Emily Emerson Day, Abbot 1901. 

1899 Ruth Childs (Mrs. Ernest Young) died October 4, 

1966, in Brookline, Mass., after a long illness. 

Georgia Whitney (Mrs. Charles S. Drake) died 
July 31, 1966, at her home in Wichita, Kan. Our 
sincere sympathy is extended to her daughter, 
Virginia Drake Hubbard, 1929. 

Mary E. Ryder died in Harrison, N.Y. in 1963. 

1901 Faith Leonard (Mrs. Miles C. Holden) died 

September 22, 1966, at the home of her son, Wil- 
liam, in West Simsbury, Conn. Our sincere sym- 
pathy is extended to William, and her other sons, 
Ralph and Paul. 

1904 Amy Slack (Mrs. Percy A. Crafts) died October 

17, 1966, in Brookline, Mass. Our sincere sympathy 
is extended to her sister, Beatrice Slack Farrar, 
1903. 

1908 Jean Dascomb (Mrs. Charles D. Higgins) died 

December 5, 1 966, in Bellows Falls, Vt., after a long 
illness. Our. sympathy is extended to her daughter, 
Jean, and her son, Daniel. 

1913 Kathryn McLaughlin (Mrs. James C. Barry) died 

October 17, 1966, in Landenberg, Penna. 

1918 Mary Kunkel (Mrs. Jules K. French, Jr.) of 

Douglaston, N.Y. died September 26, 1966, after 
a long illness. Our sincere sympathy is extended to 
her husband and two daughters, and to her sister, 
Lydia Kunkel Howard, 1921. 

1925 Charlotte Kitchin (Mrs. Charlotte K. Sears) died 

December 9, 1966, in Bedford, Mass. 

1935 Alice Cooper (Mrs. Howard Armstrong) died 

May 27, 1966, in Reno, Nev. Our sincere sympathy 
is extended to her mother, Leonora Parsons Coo- 
per, 1 907, and to her daughter, Leonora Colby 
Salaway, 1958. 

1937 Thelma Cutter (Mrs. Harold W. Leuenberger) 

died suddenly January 24, 1967, in McLean, Va. 
Our sincere sympathy is extended to her daughter, 
Jessica, president of the Junior class at Abbot. 



3rt JHemoriam 



fourteen 



News from the Classes 



1898 

BEULAH LOOMIS HYDE has two grand- 
daughters in Wellesley College and one 
grandson at Pitzer College in Claremont, 
Calif. Another grandson is studying at 
Charles Wright Academy in Tacoma, 
Washington. 

1899 

LILIAN MOOERS SMITH writes that her 
grandson, Lt. George Clark, is in Vietnam. 

1903 

EDITH BURNHAM ROBERTS writes that 
her grandson, Bruce Roberts, is a freshman 
at Dartmouth. He was a National Merit 
Finalist and a Presidential Scholar. 

1904 

MARY BYERS SMITH visited friends in 
Portugal, England and Scotland during the 
summer of 1966. MARY DAVIS LEE divides 
her time with a son in Southern France and 
her daughter who teaches in Surrey, Eng- 
land. Address: 3 Leatherhead Rd., Ash- 
stead, Surrey, England. 

1907 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Arthur R. Leeds 
(Clara Hukill) 155 20th Ave. So., Naples, 
Fla. 33940 

The class extends its sympathy to MOLLY 
BALL BIGELOW whose husband died sud- 
denly on August 7, 1966. 

1909 

EDITH GARDNER TOBEY is playing in 
the Colby Community Symphony Orchestra 
for the 1 3th year. 

1911 

DOROTHY BIGELOW ARMS returned re- 
cently from a Mediterranean cruise, and is 
now in Florida for four months. 

ANN BOYNTON HEMENWAY spends 
her winters in Boston and Springfield since 
the death of her husband two years ago. 
She has four grandchildren ranging in age 
from 3 to 16. 

1913 

HELEN BOYD HIGGINS and her husband 
have recently moved into a one-floor house 
which they find very pleasant. She is 
busy writing juvenile books, giving talks to 
schools, and serving on the board of the 
Indianapolis Home for the Aged. 



GLADYS ESTABROOK BLANCHARD has 
moved back to Fairfield, Conn. Her older 
son, Dana, is head of the English Depart- 
ment in Fairfield. 

LOUISE THOMPSON COTTRELL writes 
that she has two sons, seven grandsons and 
two granddaughters. 

1914 

MARGARET WYLIE WARE'S son, John, 
has just finished his 23-year career in the 
USAF, and will retire in March. 

1915 

MATTIE LARRABEE WHITTEMORE and 
her husband recently celebrated their Gold- 
en Anniversary. They have four married 
children, sixteen grandchildren and two 
great-grandchildren. 

JESSIE NYE BLODGETT writes, " I am 
living quietly in the reflected glory of chil- 
dren and grandchildren. Frederic is a doctor 
in Connecticut, Sara in Social Welfare 
Work in Braintree, Mass., and Donald, 
Executive Director of Special Education in 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

ARLINE TALCOTT TURNER and her 
husband travel a great deal. They went to 
Hawaii twice this past year. Her husband is 
still active as president of the Glastonbury 
Bank. 

1916 

MARGARET PERRY JAMES writes that 
her son, Perry, has returned safely from 
Vietnam, so she is especially happy. He is 
in training as a pilot for Pan American Air- 
ways, and will live in Milford, N.Y. Her 
daughter, Barbara, has a new daughter, 
Elizabeth Ann Mueller. 

1917 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Myron S. Chel- 
lis (Miriam Bacon), 15 Raymond Avenue, 
Beverly, Mass. 01915. 

Greetings to all girls of 1917 — Plan now 
to be at Abbot May 13 for our 50th re- 
union. Come and help make this the best 
reunion yet. Miriam 

BETTY BACON SWAIN lost her husband 
4 years ago. She is now living in San Fran- 
cisco keeping house for her unmarried son. 
Her address is 2599 Sacramento St., San 
Francisco. 



fifteen 



1918 

The Margaret Bailey Speer Library and 
Classroom Building at the Shipley School 
was dedicated in October. An oil painting 
of Margaret was presented to the school at 
that time. She was headmistress of Shipley 
from 1944-1965. 

Margaret writes "Retirement seems 
chiefly to mean a happy variation in busy- 
ness." 

1919 

JO HAMILTON LEACH is spending the 
winter in Tucson, Arizona, and will return 
to Florida in April. 

THELMA MAZEY GAGER and her hus- 
band are spending February on a Caribbean 
cruise, and March at Captain's Island, Fla. 

NADINE SCOVILL YOUNG'S husband is 
retired, and they have been living in Texas 
for two years. They like being away from 
the ice and snow, but miss seeing the seven 
grandchildren. 

1920 

PAULA MILLER PATRICK lives alone in 
Rock Hill, S.C., and in the summer at Edisto 
Beach, S.C. Her oldest son teaches at Yale, 
her next son is in Rock Hill, and her daugh- 
ter is in New York. All visit her at the beach. 

LOUISE ROBINSON and KATHERINE 
KINNEY HECOX are spending the winter 
in Sarasota, Fla. 

CHARLOTTE VOSE CLARK writes that 
her husband retired 3!/2 years ago, and they 
are busy having a grand time. They go to 
Florida each winter, and Maine each sum- 
mer. 

HELEN WALKER PARSONS writes, "Am 
just back from 3 months in Europe. October 
in Vienna was a real treat — lots of operas 
and concerts. My husband taught at the 
Institute for Advanced Study. We visited 
Prague and Warsaw, where the sociologists 
were much interested in American develop- 
ments. We also drove and saw quite a bit 
of Austria, France and Northern Italy." 

1921 

ELINOR COCHRANE KNIGHT writes, 
"Second grandchild born in March, 1966, 
to son, Nick, who is now Assistant Professor 
of English at Wesleyan University. For 
myself — active as librarian and Sunday 



School in First Church of Christ Scientist 
in Manchester, Conn." 

FRANCES GASSER STOVER writes, "We 
spent four months in Europe last year, April 
through August. We visited the continent, 
and then took a coastal steamer up the 
coast of Norway, then on to Sweden and 
Denmark. Visited Phil Hinckley Bishop in 
London, and saw Jane Allen Kilby, also. 

WINIFRED SIMPSON WORGAN is 
spending the winter months playing golf in 
Florida. A second grandson arrived last 
September. 

PATTIE THOMPSON HEELY'S portrait 
hangs in the Lawrenceville School Infirmary 
near the wing named in her honor. Her 
husband was the headmaster of the Law- 
renceville School from 1934 to 1959. 

The class will be sorry to learn that 
LEONORE WICKERSHAM MILLS' husband 
is completely helpless from a paralytic 
stroke. He has been in a hospital in Fletcher 
N.C. for a year and a half. 

1922 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. William H. 
Vance (Olive Howard), 68 Maple Dell 
Lane, Holliston, Mass. 01746. 

Reunion time again! Many of you are 
freer than you were ten — even five years 
ago, and I do hope that all of our "regulars" 
who have enthusiastically returned during 
the past forty-five years (shocking isn't it?) 




Susono Welborn Osborn '22, and Florence Matile Bishop '20 



sixteen 



will surely come this May. Round up the 
girls in your area now! 

If you haven't been back for some time, 
all the greater reason to make the effort 
now — you will find you pick up the old 
friendships immediately. Write, phone, 
drive, fly or hire a bus — but COME assured 
of a warm welcome! 

Olive Howard Vance 

The class extends its sympathy to GER- 
TRUDE FRANKLIN LOWELL whose hus- 
band died in November after a long illness. 

SUSANA WELBORN OSBORN writes, 
"Florence Matile Bishop '20 visited me last 
summer from England. We hadn't seen 
each other for years, and we had a marvel- 
ous time. Jimmy Burr Sanders stayed with 
me last winter on her way to visit her daugh- 
ter in Orlando." 

1923 

ELIZABETH MAXWELL KILLIAN is 
finishing her 1 5th year in the office of 
Vocational Rehabilitation. She is also stage 
manager for the Lawton Community Thea- 
tre. 

MARY ELIZABETH RUDD is having fun 
in her retirement. She summers at Cape 
Cod, and is spending five months in Florida 
this winter. In the meantime, she visits her 
nieces and their families. 

The class extends its sympathy to MARY 
CATHERINE SWARTWOOD SINCLAIRE 
whose husband died suddenly on October 2, 
1966. 

MIRIAM SWEENEY McARDLE retired in 
December as supervisor of music in the 
Andover School Department. She was hon- 
ored at a testimonial given by Andover 
school administrators and associates. 

ELIZABETH THOMPSON HENRY made 
two trips to foreign lands last year. In the 
spring she went to the Middle East and in 
the fall she covered the periphery of Europe. 

ESTHER WOOD PEIRCE writes, "I am 
almost personally supervising the prepara- 
tion for your visits to Expo when I drive my 
husband to his office in the Administration 
Bldg. (This is his new challenge in retire- 
ment) . I hope you are coming and will call 
me so I can arrange to see you. You will 
need a week — try to plan your time now, 
and arrange your accommodations." 



1924 

DOROTHY CONVERSE writes, "Took an 
interesting trip through New Brunswick and 
Nova Scotia this past summer with my sister 
and a friend. Our itinerary included a few 
days on the French Island of St. Pierre where 
the inhabitants, whose ancestors came 
mainly from Brittany, Normandy and the 
Basque country, speak beautiful French, 
having retained the pure French language 
as it was spoken in the time of Louis XVI. 
A summer school has opened there within 
the last few years where students come from 
different parts of Canada and the United 
States to learn the pure French language as 
it is spoken there. 

Our sympathy goes to SUSANNA SMITH 
BOWLER whose husband died in August. 



1925 

LILIAN GROSVENOR JONES is very 
much interested in promoting the teaching 
of speech to deaf children. She has been a 
member of the Board of Trustees of the 
Clarke School for the Deaf at Northampton, 
Mass. since 1953, and of the Alexander 
Graham Bell Assoc, for the Deaf in Wash- 
ington, D.C. since 1952. She has two grand- 
sons and two granddaughters. 

FRANCES HOWARD O'BRIEN writes that 
she is always disappointed when there is no 
news from the class, so she is contributing 
some, and hopes others will do likewise! 
"After all these years, I am still working as 
an Occupational Therapist at the Univers- 
ity of Kansas Medical Center in the Psychia- 
tric Department. I have finally retired from 
the Naval Reserve. Offices in the Occupa- 
tional Therapy Association at the state and 
local level keep me busy." 

The class extends its sympathy to 
EUNICE HUNTSMAN whose father died 
last February after a long illness. 

NESTA JOHNSON MAGNUSON and her 
husband traveled last summer to the Orient, 
visiting many places in Japan, Philippine 
Islands and Hong Kong. They went to Ice- 
land, Scotland and Ireland in the fall. 

ELIZABETH RIGHTER FARRAR'S son, 
William, was married in October to Gret- 
chen W. Watkins. They are living in Cald- 
well, N.J. after a three-weeks honeymoon 
in Europe. 



seventeen 



ELIZABETH WARD SAUNDERS writes 
that her son, Gordon, was married last June 
to Isabel Champion of Switzerland. He is 
teaching history at the Bancroft School in 
Worcester, Mass. Her son, Donald, is teach- 
ing history at Ohio University. 

1926 

MARION BURR SOBER writes a Therapy 
Crafts Bulletin which is published six times 
a year. It contains projects to make with in- 
expensive equipment, and is used by nurs- 
ing homes, rehabilitation centers, and 
schools. 

1927 

Reunion Chairman: Miss Sydna White, 
Vineyard Haven, Mass. 02568. 

Dear girls of '27: Please come back this 
May. Don't wait for our 50th, it may never 
happen! You can't tell. Come back and see 
the school, and see how the girls look today, 
if mini-skirts are the thing, and whether 
the rage is to look like waifs or elegant 
senoras with added hairpieces. I remember 
my hairpiece I had at Abbot, a bun to cover 
the ugly ends of my hair while it was grow- 
ing out. It kept slipping in class and I would 
pull it off and put it in my pocket, much 
to the entertainment of those behind me. 
AND our skirts were the shortest in history, 
and actually were not equaled until now. 

If you just can't manage to come, please 
write us a good, fat newsy letter that we 
can read at our class dinner so that we have 
a feeling of contact with you at our 40th 
reunion. 

You have all had a letter from me, so 
now let us hear from you — Preferably that 
you will be with us May 13th. 

Greetings from Sydna 

CHARLOTTE CHASE HANSCOM writes, 
"Spent all last summer restoring an authen- 
tic old Federal house in the Georgetown 
area of Washington. It was built in 1820. 
We moved into it in October, and we are 
now 'old house buffs.' We spend Christmas 
in California every year with our 3 grand- 
children, and we usually spend one month 
each year traveling." 

MIM HOUDLETTE WALSH writes, "The 
warmth of Abbot friendships certainly en- 
dures. Had a brief visit this summer from 
Betty Whitney Binkley '28 and her hus- 



band, Johnny, who were on from the West 
coast. The same week my daughter and I 
went to see Edna Russell Watson '27 and 
Herb at their lovely new summer place at 
Sunapee, N.H. It's hard to believe it's 40 
years since we were all in school together. 
Surely we don't look it! Hope everyone plans 
to come back to reunion. It is such fun 
catching up on the news, the years just 
roll back." 

MARION IRELAND CONANT writes, 
"Our older son was married in September to 
Mary Faith Davidson, daughter of Dorothy 
Williams Davidson '22. Our younger son is 
a senior at MacMurray College in Illinois." 



1928 

MARGARET NIVISON CHASE and her 
husband still play the cello and violin with 
the Little Falls Symphony Orchestra. Their 
son, Robert, a voice major at the University 
of Syracuse working toward a master's de- 
gree in music education, appeared with the 
orchestra in December singing an aria from 
"The Messiah." 



1929 

The class will be sorry to learn that 
KATHERINE BIGELOW HEBERTON'S 
father died last August. 

KATHERINE BLUNT POLSBY writes, "It 
was fun to chat with Abby Castle Kemper 
at a PA dinner in Denver in November. 
After a year in Colorado we love it, but 
miss the eastern foliage very much. 

CATHERINE BOWDEN BARNES writes 
that her son graduated from Yale last June, 
and is teaching at Noble and Greenough. 
He was married to Carol Lumb from Bristol, 
R.I. Catherine and her husband had a grand 
summer in Oxford where Fred worked with 
D. F. Krebs in the Biochemistry Laboratory. 

POLLY FRANCIS LOESCH and Russell 
spent 3 weeks touring the Holy Land early 
last year. Bob graduated from Yale Divinity 
School in June, and has a parish in Canaan, 
Conn. He and his wife had a daughter on 
October 3, so Polly is now the proud grand- 
mother of Shelley Lynn. Son, Bill, is student- 
Chaplain at the Columbia Point Housing 
Project in Dorchester, Mass. Russell re- 
ceived a Doctor of Divinity from Yankton 
College (South Dakota) last June. 



eighteen 



DESPINA PLAKIAS MESSINESI writes 
that she has had a glorious, busy year dart- 
ing around the world. She was in Athens in 
April to photograph the Royal Family for a 
feature published in the September 15th 
issue of Vogue. In July, she was on the 
Aegean yachting on commercial boats, Au- 
gust in Hawaii, October in Seattle and Mt. 
Ranier, and in between, Paris and the Virgin 
Islands. 

GRACE STEPHENS travels a great deal. 
Last spring she spent about six weeks in 
Greece. 

MARTHA TUTTLE HAIGIS writes that 
her husband is Director of Chemistry and 
Metallurgical Laboratory at Stanley Works 
in New Britain. She does volunteer work at 
the Hospital, and serves on the church 
finance committee. Her younger son is in 
the Navy, and her older son has two chil- 
dren. 

1930 

RUTH BAKER JOHNSON is enjoying her 
retirement on the Cape. She does some 
substitute work in the kindergarten just to 
keep her "Hand in". 

KATHIE FELLOWS INGRAHAM writes, 
"Would love to read more news of the '30 
class in the Bulletin, so I'll tell my news 
to start it rolling. I started a new career 
last year, and love it. I'm secretary to the 
head of a marketing and research company 
in Washington. I have 4 gorgeous grand- 
daughters, too." 

1931 

MARY BLISS CRUTCHER'S husband re- 
tired from the Navy last March, and is now 
working for Todd Shipyards in New York. 
Mary's daughter, Connie, is in California 
and has a son. Susan is a sophomore at 
George Washington University; Nancy is a 
high school junior, and Marny is in ele- 
mentary school in Westport, Conn. 

CHUB GRAHAM HOLLAND is a "tour- 
director" — she has booked an exclusive 
Wednesday Matinee Group for a series of 
six shows at the Fisher Theater in Detroit. 
Her son, Hugh Henry, is a student at the 
University of Michigan, and Francis is a 
student at Williams College. 

MARY HENDERSON LEE writes, "We're 
renting a home in Tryon, N.C. while having 



a new one built — a retirement home about 
10 years too soon as we still have two chil- 
dren in school. One son is a freshman at 
the University of North Carolina, and the 
other a junior at Spartanburg Day School. 

1932 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Richard M. 01- 
ney (Marjorie Prest), The Cider Mill, Dun- 
stable, Mass. 01827. 

HELEN ALLEN HENRY writes,"Our third 
son, Dick, was married to Anne Marshall 
of Greenwich, Conn., June 25, 1966. They 
are house-parents at Milton Academy where 
Anne is teaching Math while Dick is at 
Harvard Graduate School of Design in 
Architecture. Bill and family are living in 
Southwest Africa where Bill is managing 
an exploration company. John and family 
thoroughly enjoy living in the Philadelphia 
area. Len and I had a heavenly lazy trip 
to the British Isles in the fall." 

DOROTHY ROCKWELL CLARK writes, 
"With both girls away at school, I am now 
working full-time at the University of Mary- 
land, teaching one section of Freshman 
English and doing a variety of things in 
the University Counseling Center such as 
conferring with students about study or 
reading problems, and running Writing 
Workshops. 

HARRIET WRIGHT MILLER'S daugh- 
ter, Edith, is in Laos teaching English under 
International Voluntary Services and U. S. 
AID. Her son, Dusty, graduated from Yale 
Law, and is now practicing law in Worces- 
ter, Mass. 

1933 

ANN COLE GANNETT writes that she 
has five grandchildren! 

1934 

CASSANDRA KINSMAN DEXTER has 
just returned from a trip around the world. 
Her husband had to attend the World Con- 
gress of Cardiology in New Delhi, so they 
took this chance to see the Far East and 
Iran. 

NANCY MARSH GARES is now living in 
London where her husband is Director of 
Information Services at the French Em- 
bassy. Her son, Paul, is a junior at Governor 



nineteen 



Dummer Academy and Ann is a prep at 
Abbot. Her younger daughter is with her 
in London. 

BEVERLY SUTHERLAND MIDGETT 
writes that her first granddaughter was born 
last March. Bev writes, "Why don't you 
come visit me? We have four bedrooms, 
3 1/2 baths, and the Atlantic Ocean at every 
door! Address: Marionfield, Warwick, Ber- 
muda." 

1935 

ELEANOR JOHNSON Du TOIT writes, 
"Am enjoying being a Case Aide at Metro- 
politan State Hospital. I strongly urge all 
Abbot girls to investigate this relatively new, 
challenging and most worth-while field. 
Also hope they might join their local Mental 
Health Associations." 

1936 

GRACE NICHOLS KNIGHT writes that 
her son, Christopher, is a junior at Yale, 
Doug, Jr., a freshman at Wesleyan, and 
Tom, an upper middler at Exeter. Steve, 10, 
stays at home to explain the buttons and 
mechanics of the new President's House at 
Duke to his mother! 

The class will be sorry to learn that ANNE 
RUSSELL LORING'S brother died suddenly 
in October. Anne is working as a teacher's 
aide in Portsmouth. 

1937 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Arthur W. Tuc- 
ker, Jr. (Martha Ransom), 25 Jefferson 
Rd., Chestnut Hill, Mass. 02167. 

JEANNETTE PARTRIDGE HARRISON 
writes that both children are in college. 
Mike is a Junior at the University of Colo- 
rado, and Susie is a freshman at the Uni- 
versity of California at Berkeley. 

1938 

PHYLLIS ENGLAND LETTS writes that 
her son, Malcolm, is with the Marine Air 
Division at electronics and radar school in 
Jacksonville, Fla. Her daughter, Dee Dee, 
a senior Honor Roll student at Nauset High 
School, attended the 1965 National Girl 
Scout Round-up in Idaho. 

ANNE SIMPSON WHITE writes, "Oldest 
girls, twins, graduated from college and are 
now working. Muffy is a sophomore at Wil- 



son College, and Pam is a freshman at 
Carleton. The 13, 11, and 7-year-old girls 
are keeping me in touch with local PTA's." 

1940 

FRANCES CHANDLER FUTCH writes 
that Chuck is now 1 9, and is studying at 
Clemson University in South Carolina. Su- 
san, 1 5, is in the 9th grade. 

MOLLY CHASE FOSTER writes, "My son, 
Rob, is a junior at Williams College, and 
Deb is a freshman at Connecticut College 
for Women. Suddenly left at home with 
nothing to do, I decided to take training 
on Alcoholism, and am now involved (as a 
counselor) in a pilot project here in Fair- 
field County, Conn, treating alcoholics." 

RACHEL WHITNEY DAVIS is President 
of the Danvers (Mass.) Garden Club. Her 
oldest son, Marshall, 16, is a junior at Til- 
ton, Douglas, 13, is in the eighth grade, 
and Rebecca, 9, is in fourth grade. 

1941 

DOROTHY FISKE WINNETTE is living 
in Dallas, Tex. Her oldest son, Mark, is a 
freshman at Cornell Engineering School, 
three other boys are in high school, and 
her daughter is in the fourth grade. 

ELOISE PERKINS BECK will become 
school librarian in Macon, Ga. next Septem- 
ber. Her daughter, Pam, is a sophomore at 
Tift College. 

SUE LONG REED had a trip to New York 
in November. She saw Maggie Hintz Lo- 
renze, and spent the day with Marnie Mar- 
tin Martin. 

1942 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. David J. Heg- 
arty (Gloria Caldarone), 7716 Anchor Dr., 
Liverpool, N.Y. 13088. 

Let's make our 25th a terrific success! 
By now you have all received the letter on 
our 25th reunion. We hope you will be here 
— let's make this our biggest reunion. Please 
send back your postal cards as soon as 
possible so I can get on idea of how many 
to expect. If you can't attend, send news 
about you and yours for all to read. See 
you May 13th. G|orJQ 

SUE BATES HEATH writes that her 
daughter, Susan, a graduate of Colby Junior 
College was married in August to Oliver S. 



twenty 




Margaret Sime Espeland's daughter 

Everett who is teaching at Webb School for 
Boys in Claremont, Calif. Margi Stuart 
Beale attended the wedding. 

ANNETTE CURRAN CONLON is now 
living in Pittsfield Mass. where her husband 
is with the Eaton Paper Co. She has 3 
children, Joyce 7, Gary, 4, and Stephen, 
2V2. She would love to see any Abbot girls 
in the vicinity. 

MARGARET McFARLIN is now a Major 
in the Air Force. 

MARGARET SIME ESPELAND is living 
in Oslo, and has a full-time job at the U. S. 
Embassy. Her husband is very busy with a 
new mine being developed in the midst of 
the mountains. Last fall they spent two 
weeks in Italy. 

1944 

NAN BULAND KOERNER is living in 
Portland, Ore. where her husband is with 
Omark Industries. Nan is a guide at the 
Portland Art Museum. They have four chil- 
dren, Mark, 9, Matthew, 6, Martha, 4, and 
Michael, 2. 

NANCY NICHOLAS WENGERT'S son, 
David, will graduate from Phillips Academy 
in June. Her other children are Ann, 14, 
Carol, 12, and Martha, 9. 

BORN 
To EMILY McMURRAY MEAD, a third 
child and second son, Malcolm Winslow, 
October 4, 1966. 



ELIZABETH DICKERMAN LOVATT 
writes, "Ron is just finishing his tour as 
second-in-command of 39 Missile Regi- 
ment, Royal Artillery. No news yet as to 
our next posting — it could be anywhere. 

"Most of our time for the last nine years 
has been spent living in Germany, with a 
two and a half year tour in England. It has 
given us plenty of opportunity to travel. 
The most memorable experiences, I think, 
have been: ski-touring in Norway — a whole 
day spent climbing a glacier, crossing the 
top of a mountain range, and skiing down 
again in completely uninhabited country; 
the Salzburg Festival in 1965 and, best of 
all two glorious months in Greece last sum- 
mer. 

"We also had two months skiing last 
winter while Ron trained and led the regi- 
mental langlauf team. And we're off to 
southern Germany next week for two weeks 
while Ron lays the courses for the divisional 
meet — skiing again. 

"Do you remember senior-mid year when 
I became an "uncle". Well, Peter is getting 
married in April and I'll be home for the 
wedding and, I hope, for a long visit as 
well. Then, probably a new house (we've 
had eight in nine years) and possibly a new 
country." 

1945 

JOAN HOLDSWORTH MAXWELL 
writes, "Somebody in our class must have 
more exciting news than I ! Routine house- 




Betty Rcid Buzby's three children 



twenty-one 




Rosalie Benton Lee with husband and 
their three children 



work, child-raising here. Love to see any 
alumnae who are in or near Pasadena." 

LOIS WHIFFEN DUNNAM writes, "My 
husband is an engineer at Wright Patter- 
son Air Force Base. I have started an in- 
terior decorating business. My son, Curt, 
is a senior at Western Reserve Academy, 
Nancy, 12, is in grade school." 

1947 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. John B. Abbot 
(Martha Morse), Hopkinton, N.H. 03301. 

NANCY BARNARD SOULE has two 
adopted children, Marcy MacNaughton 
born November 23, 1965, and Trippy, 3. 
Her son, Chris, is 1 3. 

PEGGY KIMBALL MONTGOMERY 
writes, "We are enjoying a year in New 
England. The children are learning to skate 
and ski. I am a mass of bruises from the 
latter. Bob is a visiting professor at Wil- 
liams College." 

JEAN RITCHEY BORA'S two children 
are in school, and Jean has gone back to 
school, too. She is taking a part-time course 
of study for a Master's in Religious Educa- 
tion at New York University, and finds it 
very stimulating. 

CAROLYN SACKETT COLEBURN writes, 
"Ann Flowers Howlett and I are making 
plans to come to Abbot in May for reunion. 
We hope to find many of our classmates 



there, all looking as young and lovely as 
we do, of course!" 

GERRY TREADWAY DAMPIER writes, 
"Sue's about to 'graduate' from 8th grade, 
Kate is in 6th grade, and Billy manages to 
endure the day in 5th grade until hockey 
or . . ." Gerry tutors one day a week in a 
Stamford school. She spent two weeks with 
her family in Florida in January. 

1948 

MARIEL MELLERSH TOYNBEE writes, 
"We now have a school boarding house of 
our own — my husband being housemaster. 
There are 52 boys between 13 and 18 in 
the house. We sometimes have an exchange 
American student here from Exeter. This 
stirs up many memories of my happy stay 
in 1945. Two years ago we came to the 
States on a fleeting visit and saw Salley 
Macartney Osborn." 

SALLEY MACARTNEY OSBORN writes, 
"We have built a new home in Hampden, 
Mass. I am teaching 4th grade. My hus- 
band is a psychiatrist in Springfield and 
Hampden. Our daughter, Wendy, is a fresh- 
man at the MacDuffie School, and our son, 
David, is in 2nd grade. We are also raising 
Golden Retrievers — any orders?" 

MARY MARTON DAVENPORT is busy 
with Girl Scout work. Last summer she was 
Hospital Director of a Girl Scout Day Camp 
for 150 girls and leaders, and plans to do 
it again this year. Her husband is with 
Wean Industries and IBM School. She has 
5 children, George, 1 3 Vz, Bill, 12, Kay, 11, 
Bob, 9, and Eric, 8. 

The class extends its symDathy to MARY 
CARROLL SINCLAIRE MORRIS whose 
father died suddenly in October. 




Martha Morse Abbot's two children 



twenty-two 



1949 

PREMI ASHIRVATHAM LATIMER 
writes, "Owing to the uncertain future 
there, we finally decided to leave India, 
and returned to England last summer. Geof- 
frey is now working for IBM, and I am 
quite enjoying working as a primary school 
teacher for the Inner London Education 
Authority. We've rented a quaint old 
(1830) cottage in Richmond. Adrian, now 
5, attends an excellent school just 5 minutes 
from our cottage. Our current address: 83 
Sheen Rd., Richmond, Surrey, England." 

BARBARA HAMBY McLANE is working 
Vz time as Coordinator on Family Life Edu- 
cation for the Family and Children's Service 
in Minneapolis. She writes, "My parents 
say laughingly that my education has 
finally paid off, as this is the little known 
field in which I got my master's! We still 
enjoy our house on Lake Minnetonka and 
take advantage of its many sports. We see 
Sally Stevens MacMillan off and on — some 
of her four daughters look like Stevie when 
she was at Abbot." 

1950 

The class extends its sympathy to CAROL 
BERNSTEIN HOROWITZ whose father died 
in December. Three of Carol's girls are at 
Thayer Academy in Braintree, Mass. 

ANNE DUNSFORD HOCKMEYER writes, 
"We moved last spring into a four-year- 
old house. I loved the charm of our old 
house, but love even more the warm kitchen 
floor of the new one!" 

The class will be sorry to learn that 
HELEN SINCLAIRE BLYTHE'S father died 
suddenly in October. 





Carolyn McLean Bly's husband and their two daughters 



Jane Jackson Parks' three boys 

1951 

SALLY MASON CROWELL writes that 
she had a delightful luncheon date at Boi- 
ling Air Force Base in November with Lydia 
Eccles Page, Marcia Crane Starcher, and 
Madeleine Kimberly Miles. She writes, 
" 'Twas such fun catching up on all these 
years, husbands, small fry, etc. We hope 
to get together again soon." 

1952 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. P. Tapley Ste- 
phenson, Jr. (Joan Wood), 26 Mostyn St., 
Swampscott, Mass. 01907. 

From the response I've received the 
general feeling is toward the Rolling Green 
Motor Inn. We have two daring and gener- 
ous people who would be DELIGHTED to 
"have" us all for a pre-dinner cocktail 
party . . . Nancy Faraci Shionis (in her 
new house) and Sarah Emmons Warren 
(on the Andover campus ... of all things!) 
How this will be worked out I'm not yet 
sure but I've contacted both Nancy and 
Sarah and we'll let everyone know. Many 
thanks to you all for responding so quickly. 
Further reunion plans will be sent to you 
as the time approaches. Do make a special 
effort to come. 

Here's the news I have received: 

CONNIE HAMILTON was married on 
November 20 to William D. Greenspan. Bill 
is a graduate of Princeton, and is currently 
a partner with the Center for Management 
Technology, Inc. in New York City. They 
will be living at Connie's apartment until 
they can find a new place in the crowded 
city. 



twenty-three 



LORNA BALL PRESCOTT won't be able 
to make our 15th since her husband must 
make a business trip East in April. And 
guess what . . . Lorna is "producing" (or 
already has) her very own "wee" one 
around Xmas. That makes three faces 
around the tree this year! We know your 
New Year will be fantastic. 

PERSI GOODNOW has moved to New 
York to study for her master's degree at 
Bank Street College in Greenwich Village. 
Her new address is 210 East 75th St., New 
York 10021. Good luck Persi! 

GUSSIE NOSS HOWE is enjoying a view 
of Union Bay and the peaks of the Olympics 
in their new house (as of 2 years). She is 
most anxious to have any Abbot "gals" 
visit if they chance to be in the Northwest. 

NANCY JAYNE LINGAMFELTER also 
has a new address — 2041 Willow Leaf, 
St. Louis, Mo. She has been working in a 
Thrift Shop (with 2 children at home, mind 
you! Oh, to have spare time). Nancy went 
to Randolph-Macon and then to Univ. of 
North Carolina . . . claims there is no 
comparison between that and an all 
woman's college. Agreed! 

Congratulations to CONNIE MARKERT 
DAY ... a new Election Day baby boy — 
Robert William. Their daughter, Susan, 4, is 
delighted to have a hand at boys' toys. Isn't 
that always the way? 

PATTY RANDALL BAKER has built a 
beautiful house in Orlando — Nancy Jayne 
sent me that news, Patty . . . why so modest? 
Patty is very busy with Whit, 9V2, Bo, 
8 1/2, Rebecca, 6V2, Logan, 3, 1 Pointer, 
1 Great Dane, 2 turtles, and a cat. Wow! 
They can't get North since her husband 
must keep close to Merrill Lynch. We'll 
miss you. 

SIMONE MATHEY STACKPOLE is living 
the country life in Franconia, N.H. with 
her two babes. Skiing all winter . . . what 
a life! 

BARBARA CHURCH SHEFFER has three 
children: Linda, 10, Pete, 8, and Susie, 4. 

ANNE SPENCER STALLMAN also has 3 
children — Betsy is in kindergarten, Nancy 
in nursery school, and David, Jr. is 1 V2. 

SALLY BINENKORB ZILBER won't be 
able to be with us at reunion. San Francis- 
co is pretty far away and with getting three 
daughters organized it is understandable. 



Sally has easy access to the Sierra Nevadas 
and dependably dry summer weather finds 
them back-packing to the mountains. Sally 
says it is hard to keep up with the 3 little 
girls. 

HELEN NEISSER de MODENESI saw 
Debbie Snover Evans in Europe last year as 
Debbie's husband is now working in Brus- 
sels. Helen and husband spent the month 
of December in Fort Lauderdale. They left 
their four children (girls 1 0, 9, 8 and boy 
6) at home. Sitter needed a rest when they 
got back! Helen saw Natalie Starr Lee in 
New York and Carol Burton Biggs and hus- 
band in Lima. The Biggs vacationed in Lima 
and Helen entertained them at her home. 
Helen may be going to Hong Kong in 
November for Outboard Marine Convention. 

BETSY ALDRICH STEWART and Bob are 
planning a trip home in August since their 
6-year old is in kindergarten and they must 
wait for vacation time. They love Durham 
and she sends best regards to all at the 
reunion. 

Here are some new addresses for all those 
concerned: Ethel Kenah Bowman (Mrs. 
Charles H.), 8219 Post Rd., Allison Park, 
Penna. 15101; Deborah Snover Evans (Mrs. 
David M.), 39, Beau-Sejour, Brussels 18, 
Belgium; Susan Hunter, 17 DeVeve Gar- 
dens, London West 8, England and Joan 
Wall Potter (Mrs. John S., Jr.), 13 F Pok- 
fulan Rd., Flat No. 3, Hong Kong, BCC. 

Joan 
1953 

MUFFY GRANT LYNCH writes that her 
fourth daughter was born September 7, 
1966. 




Barbara Schroedel Ackerman's 
two children 



twenty-four 




3 roommates — Julie Gaines Phalen, Betsy Hitzrot 
Evans and Muftie Grant Lynch with their 9 daugh- 
ters i 3 each). 

SALLY SWAYNE JENNINGS writes, 
"Ted is teaching English at Duke, and I 
am busy taking care of our new house, 
kitten, turtle, puppy and third daughter, 
Eleanor Swayne, September 13, 1966." 

CORNELIA WELDON LeMAITRFS hus- 
band was drafted for two years' service. He 
is now chief of Surgery at McDonald Army 
Hospital at Ft. Eustis, Va. They are enjoy- 
ing a mild Virginia winter! 

BORN 
To DEBORAH BETHELL ZOBEL, a fourth 
child and second daughter, Sarah Bellin, 
November 30, 1966. Her other children 
are John, 6, David, 4, and Elizabeth, 2. 

To AUDREY TAYLOR MacLEAN, a 
fourth child and third daughter, Susan 
Elizabeth, December 5, 1966. Audrey 
writes, "One boy keeps me busy enough, 
for he just turned two, and is a handful." 



1954 

MARY LOU DUFFY ABATA'S husband 
received his Ph.D. from Indiana University 
last August, and is now doing research in 
Radiotrons at Brookhaven National Labo- 
ratory. Her daughter, Catherine Mary, was 
one year old on December 21st. 

ANN HUNT GRAF writes that they now 
have their own house in Bedford, N.H. with 
7 acres of roaming space for two lively boys. 

WINIFRED JOHNSON SHARP and her 
husband are both lawyers and practice 
law in Orlando, Fla. They have two chil- 
dren, Jennifer, 4, and Rebecca, 9 months. 



GRETCHEN KASE SMITH'S fourth child 
and first son, Timothy Kase, was born on 
November 22, 1966. 

MARGARET MOORE ROLL has four chil- 
dren, three girls and one boy. Her youngest 
daughter, Carolyn Marie was born May 8, 
1966. 

MARIS OAMER NOBLE and her husband 
are teaching at Durham Academy in Chapel 
Hill. They miss the snow drifts and the 
mountains. 

PAT SANBORN is assistant professor 
of Philosophy at the University of New 
Mexico in Albuquerque. 

VICKY SCHWAB ARONOFF, her hus- 
band and three children spent 3 weeks last 
summer in Torremolinos, Spain, visiting 
Vicky's father who has retired there. Stan 
was elected to his first term in the Ohio 
Senate. 

MOLLY YOUNG SAUEREISEN writes 
that she has just moved into a new home in 
the woods. There was even a doe at the 
kitchen door. Ferd is building a new plant, 
so they are both busy. 

BORN 
To PATRICIA SKILLIN PELTON, a third 
child and first son, Henry Varick IV, Aug- 
ust 3, 1 966. 

1955 

NANCY EASTHAM IACOBUCCI: Two 
very exciting things to report — Frank has 
received his diploma in International Law 




Marion Badoian Emmanuel's daughter 



twenty-five 




Molly Young Sauereisen's two children 

from Cambridge University and Nancy 
qualified for her first diploma in mother- 
hood. Andrew Eastham was born January 

16, 1967. 

JEANNE SKILLIN MOORE: About a year 
ago Jeanne and Charles did, indeed, go to 
Europe! I was beginning to think that I was 
imagining things again! But five weeks, 
seven countries and 500 slides later Jeanne 
reports that it was "wonderful". Skiing in 
winter and sailing a sunfish in summer 
must have seemed too leisurely to Jeanne 
after six years in the business world so she 
really signed up for a long-range involve- 
ment with Jeffrey Walter, 8lbs. 2oz. as of 
November 8, 1966. May I extend the 
warmest wishes for happiness with your 
little one from everyone. 

PAT CORYELL HUMPHREY: I received 
a lovely Christmas greeting from Pat saying 
that she had moved again last June. De- 
spite a "short vacation in the hospital" she 
sounded quite chipper. I had asked her 
about Suky Schleman but she seems to have 
disappeared not only from Pat but from 
Abbot as well. 

ANNE CLEVELAND LANGE: Signed her 
note from all the Langes including Ring, 
her new horse! 

MARCIA COOPER LEE: I am enclosing 
the picture which appeared on her card for 
the Christmas season this year. I hope you 
can capture these twins ... I have been 
following the changes each year since the 
Christmas they were expected. I remember 
the two bright red question marks on the 
first even though Marcia didn't know it 
would be twins and since then . . . well, see 



for yourselves! Marcia and Bob were in 
Idaho to visit Bob's family and then on to 
Massachusetts via Canada to visit with the 
Coopers at Manchester-By-The-Sea. This 
taking place last summer left Marcia rush- 
ing back to Montana just in time for the 
boys to begin kindergarten. 

JOAN LAMPREY VAN WHYS: Our first 
news from Joan came from "the four of us". 
Joan and Dick have two sons, Roger born 
September 22, 1965 and Richard, Jr. born 
November 6, 1966. Busy?? . . . not until 
you come to the part about the three 
Siamese cats and two poodles. The Girl 
Scouts and church comprise her volunteer 
hours in their new location on the penin- 
sula, south of San Francisco. They had 
spent the last 2'/2 years in Reno, Nevada. 
From my point of view up here in snow- 
bound, wind-blown Erie, I am having 
trouble envisioning Joan relaxing in her 
swimming pool BUT I CAN BELIEVE IT!! 

SUE BLAKE NORTHCUTT: . . . Speaking 
of sunshine and water, not too far away 
from Joan is Honolulu. And there we find 
Sue. She and Bill have a house 20 feet 
from the ocean and it looks as if we may 
never see Sue anywhere else in the world 
again because as she says about her home 
"it's like a continual vacation". 

SUE APPLETON EVANS: Lots of news 
from Sue . . . the tour with the Navy is 
finished and Pete is completing his last 1 Vz 
years of specialty training at the Dartmouth 
Hospitals. Apparently Sue and Pete arrived 
back in Vermont just a bit late to see Sue 
McGuire McGrath who is now in Paris but 
will return to Vermont in the fall of 1967 
(if I understood correctly). It must be true 
of all of us from Abbot . . . Good suggestions 
lead to busy women, HA! HA! All any of 
us have to do is say something and we find 
ourselves in charge. Well, add Sue to the 
list . . . she entered Mark in Nursery School 
and herself as its President!! Besides en- 
tertaining, Sue is taking pottery classes to 
keep herself busy. She also reports that her 
husband's brother was with the same com- 
pany for which Nancy Eastham lacobucci 
worked. I suppose each of us has had the 
fun of meeting "new" people in our respec- 
ts communities onlv to discover an old 
Abbot girl or an Andover man. 

PAT FRYLING PETIT comes to Erie fairly 
often and I saw her at the Jr. League's 



twenty-six 



Holiday Ball just after Christmas. She is 
enjoying Andover and still has the cottage 
on the Cape. I adore Lake Erie but what is 
it about the Atlantic that is so inviting. 
Also MARY WEIR SKALA, Abbot '54, lives 
here. This is her home anyway and judging 
by her plans for their new house I'd say that 
Erie will continue to be her home! She and 
Paul are expecting No. 3 baby very soon. 

GAIL BALDWIN WHIPPLE'S husband, 
Ollie, is now in Viet Nam with the 1st 
Marine Division. He will return home in 
October. 

ANNE ENGLISH STONER does volunteer 
work at the Connecticut Society for the Pre- 
vention of Blindness. They are building a 
vacation house in Yarmouth County, Nova 
Scotia. 

JOLYNE FOURNIER was married Octo- 
ber 1, 1966, to Joseph P. Boyle of Salem, 
Mass. Barbara Emmons was one of the 
bridesmaids. Joseph, a graduate of St. 
John's Prep and Holy Cross College, is em- 
ployed by the National Shawmut Bank in 
Boston. 

MARTHA CLARK OLT had a third child 
and second daughter, Catherine, July 27, 
1966. 

MARY EARHART HORTON is living in 
Aspen, Colo, in a house 9000 feet up on a 
mountainside overlooking the whole valley. 

JUDITH CARPENTER RACKEY had a 
son, Scott, December 14, 1966. Judith has 
"retired" from teaching. Her husband is 
with Johnson and Higgins in New York. 

The Kings started off another new year 
just as happy and busy as ever. There are 
many civic duties that we can and do share 





Marcio Cooper Lee's twin sons 



Susan Wickham Grover with her daughter and son 

which makes it fun and now we have 
another. Since Jack has been President of 
the Harvard Business School Club of North- 
western Pennsylvania (how's that for a 
title) shall we say that he has been per- 
suaded to include the wives in more of the 
cocktail-dinner meetings. It is enlightening 
as always to have the opportunity to hear 
speakers chosen mainly for the "young 
executive" instead of primarily for women. 
Outside of all the activity in Erie we were 
able to get to Weldon Springs, Mo. for the 
1966 National Retriever Field Trial Cham- 
pionships in November. Genoa was not en- 
tered but her grandfather sired the dog that 
took the championsrip and so you can 
imagine what added interest that provided. 
It was too exciting to describe . . . but a 
beautifully trained Labrador is quite a sight 
to see. We then spent Thanksgiving with 
my aunt and uncle in St. Louis . . . Now 
that all the Holiday decorations are packed 
away its time to look over the Burpee Seed 
Catalogues ... I'd better stop right here 
or it will be Christmas again. 

Happy 1967!! Please reserve at least one 
hour of the new year to write to all of us 
through the Bulletin. 

With fondest memories of you all, Dee. 



1956 

News Secretary: Mrs. Alden Taylor Bryan 
(Phoebe Estes), North Williston Rd., Wil- 
liston, Vt. 05495. 

NANCY SMITH KING writes that Bill 
was made vice-president of C. G Sargent 
Sons Corp. last spring, and both of them 



twenty-seven 




Jane Totman Connelly with husband and their two 
children, and Betsy Parker Powell and husband with 
their son. 



are busy in community affairs. Scott is in 
the first grade and Tammy is in kinder- 
garten. 

GAIL TURNER SLOVER and husband 
have moved west and their new address is 
6293 Arch Way, Riverside, California 
92506. Everyone seems to be moving out 
there. 

MARGARET ROTH WELL KLEIN plans to 
be in California for several years while 
Dieter works on his doctorate at the Uni- 
versity of California at Berkley. 

Other new California addresses: MOLLIE 
LUPE LASATER, 4320 Bermuda Circle, San 
Diego, Calif. 92107. RACHEL R. KIMBALL, 
2505 Hilgard Avenue, Berkeley, California 
94709. 

JANE TATMAN CONNELLY writes that 
she saw SUE BRAGG KRAAS over Thanks- 
giving when she and husband were visiting 
in Indianapolis. Bill and Sue live in Cali- 
fornia. 

ELAINE EXERJIAN de GONZALEZ is 
living in Santiago, Chile, with her husband 
and two children. She is studying philoso- 
phy at the University of Chile. 

MARILYN EMSLEY BETTS writes that 
she is on full scholarship in the Music 
School of the University of Miami on a part- 
time basis. She is studying organ and is the 
organist at the Presbyterian Church in 
Boca-Raton, Fla. Her boys, 4 and 5, are 
both in kindergarten. 

SUSAN RICHMOND HOAGLAND has 
three children, two girls and one boy, Stew- 
art, who was one year old in January. 



BETSY PARKER POWELL writes "Marty 
Roth visited us early in November to see 
the Barnes Museum . . . We had a grand 
time and she also saw Boat." Betsy also saw 
WEEZ DAY COOK who was east with her 
two oldest children. 

NELL EUBANKS TEMPLE is now in Flori- 
da with her family. Address: 4339 Fender 
Court, Jacksonville, Fla. 32210. Van re- 
turned from Vietnam about a year ago after 
flying 131 combat missions; he received 
the Distinguished Flying Cross, Navy Com- 
mendation, and other medals of recogni- 
tion. We send him our highest respects. 

LEE PELTON MORRISON and Bill took 
a trip to Puerto Rico in November and JANE 
TATMAN CONNELLY and Guy went to 
Cosumel, off the Yucatan peninsula in 
January. Me, I'm grading papers for over 
100 students at the University of Vermont 
(even have an Abbot girl in one of my 
classes), and I hope you'll call when in 
Vermont for the fine skiing. Otherwise, 
please write me. 

Happy new year. Phoebe 

1957 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. James W. Cut- 
ler, Jr. (Lucinda Sulzbacher) , Notch Hill 
Road., North Branford, Conn. 06471. 

"Please don't forget May 13th for our 
tenth reunion. I've loved hearing from so 
many of you, and hope to hear from even 




Nancy Smith King's son and daughter 



twenty-eight 



more saying they will be at Abbot for re- 
union festivities. It should be such fun 
catching up on 10 years of news of jobs, 
husbands, babies, etc. Remember — we'll 
never have another 10th Abbot reunion, so 



don't miss it." 



Lulu 



News Secretary: Mrs. John H. Lewis, Jr. 
(Mary Ann Spurgeon), 422 Penn Valley 
Rd., Penn Valley, Narberth, Penna. 

CAROLYN GAINES ROBERTSON'S hus- 
band is a graduate of Williams and is pres- 
ently working on doctorate in architectural 
history at Yale (in absentia this year). He 
is teaching at Princeton, and Carol is work- 
ing at Educational Testing Service in Prince- 
ton. 

MARRIED 

BARBARA BRADLEY to Paul H. Caswell 
of Rye, N.H., January 6, 1967, in Andover, 
Mass. Paul is a graduate of the University 
of New Hampshire, and is general plant 
operations supervisor for the New York 
Telephone Company. 

BORN 

To SANDRA WILES MARQUIS, a daugh- 
ter, Amy Westwood, September 6, 1 966. 

To LOUISE WOOLDREDGE WIELAND, a 
second daughter, Jennifer Dashiell, Novem- 
ber 17, 1966. 

1958 

ELEANOR TAFT ETHRIDGE'S husband 
is working with Terry Sanford on a project 
financed by Duke University and the Ford 
Foundation on a study of state governments. 
They have two sons, William, 4 and Nath- 
aniel, 1 . 

ENGAGED 

SHIRLEY SLATER to John Marshall Cros- 
man of Bryn Mawr, Pa. Shirley graduated 
from Smith, and received a master's degree 
from Columbia University. She was a staff 
lecturer at the Toledo Museum of Art. John 
attended Haverford College, and is on the 
production-management staff of Libby- 
Owens-Ford Glass Co. 



MARRIED 

ROSAMOND GRANGER to Charles G. 
Kanges June 30, 1966. He is a graduate 
of U.C.L.A. and Boston University. 

BORN 
To SANDRA CASTLE DuPUY, a second 
child and first son, Alfred Castle, August 
22, 1966. Cathy, 4, is in Nursery School. 
Sandy is doing private speech therapy, and 
is involved in Republican organization 
work. Jack is a CPA with Arthur Ander- 
son & Co. in Chicago. 

To JANE CHRISTIE SMITH, a son, Tim- 
othy Drinkwater, December 11, 1966. 

1959 

ELSIE KELLOGG MORSE'S husband is 
now an assistant professor at the University 
of Maryland. She would be most hoppy to 
see anyone who comes to Washington. 

LAURA McGEHEE is engaged to Philip 
Brady, Jr., of Locust Valley, L.I., N.Y. Missy 
is a fashion editor at Good Housekeeping 
magazine. Philip is vice-president of the 
Henry Brady Co., a real estate concern in 
New York. He is a graduate of the Ports- 
mouth Priory School, and attended Colum- 
bia University. 

HOLLY ROBERTSON CHALMERS and 
her husband both work at Washington 
Cathedral, he as Librarian for Rare Books 
and Holly as head of the National Cathe- 
dral School Development Office. Holly plans 
to work on her piano and organ playing 
again. 

ANN TRAVERS BUTLER announces the 
birth of her daughter, Mary, July 10, 1966. 
Scott is 3. 

ENGAGED 

DUNCAN MOOSE to Frank Chase Ripley 
of Palm Springs, Calif. They are both study- 
ing for doctorates in economics at Harvard 
University. Frank was graduated from Har- 
vard magna cum laude in 1964, and spent 
last year as a research student at Jesus 
College of Cambridge University. 



Keep us informed of your changes of address. A new ruling from the 
Post Office requires us to pay 10 cents for each Bulletin returned because 
of incorrect address. 



twenty-tiinr 



BORN 
To ALICE IAMS KITTREDGE a second 
child and first son, William Gliolson, II, 
September 27, 1966. 

1960 

RUTH COX is working in Boston for The 
Architects Collaborative doing Public Rela- 
tions work. 

LEXA CRANE FRISHMAN left the Cape 
January 24 with Susana, 4, and Benjamin, 
6 months, to drive to Austin, Tex., where 
she met Steve on his return from New 
Zealand. Steve is now studying at the Uni- 
versity of Texas. 

ANN TWITCHELL is working in New 
York as secretary to the vice-president of 
Mitsui Ox Co., Ltd. 

BRENDA WALKER HIRSCH is working 
at the Council on Foreign Relations and her 
husband George, is with TIME. 

ENGAGED 
AMELIA COMAS to Robert O'Brien of 
Washington, D.C. He is a graduate of 
Georgetown University. Amelia is working 
for a freight forwarding firm in Miami. 

PAULETTE DUFAULT to Charles Reeve 
Miesmer of Haworth, N.J. He attended 
Colorado College, and is a senior at Colum- 
bia University. 

MARRIED 
JANE HUMPHREY to Christopher Lee 
Adams of Lugano, Switzerland, December, 
1966, in Milan, Italy. Christopher is a 
graduate of Stanford University. 

TERRY HYDEMAN to David Alan Sew- 
ard, December 28, 1966, in Chilmark, 
Martha's Vineyard, Mass. 

BORN 
To BARBARA COOPER JORDAN, a 
daughter Elizabeth Crawford, October 1, 
1966. 

To SARAH FOOTE HUBBY, a daughter, 
Elizabeth Adams, June 14, 1 966. Sarah and 
her husband had a trip to 6 South and 
Central American countries in November. 

To SUSAN LOTHROP KOSTER, a daugh- 
ter, Tanja, September 23, 1966. 



1961 

News Secretary: Andrea Lynch, 144 East 
84th St., Apt. 7B, New York, N.Y. 10028. 

ANDREA LYNCH is working in the Pro- 
motion Department of Vogue magazine. 
Since September she has been in charge of 
fabrics in Vogue's American Fabrics Award 
Competition. 

CAROLINE MARSHALL spent the sum- 
mer in England after graduating from Vas- 
sar with a BA. in English. She is now study- 
ing to be certified to teach High School 
English. 

ENGAGED 
ANNE D. SAVAGE to Alexander D. van 
Eyck of Larchmont, N.Y. He is a graduate 
of Notre Dame, and a senior at Fordham 
Law School. 

MARRIED 

DANNA MacCORKLE to Eugene E. Kore- 
lich, October 7, 1966, in New York. 

STEPHANIE STOUFFER to Lawrence A. 
Kahn, November 26, 1966, in Old Green- 
wich, Conn. Larry, a graduate in sculpture 
at the Rhode Island School of Design, re- 
ceived a fellowship from the Rinehart 
School of Sculpture at the Maryland Insti- 
tute in Baltimore. 



1962 

Reunion Chairman : Miss Sally Allen, 1 45 
East 27th St., Apt. 8C, New York, N.Y. 
10016. 

5th reunion plans are well underway, and 
the rejection and acceptance postcards have 
been jamming my mailbox. Astounding how 
many of us have become expatriates, tem- 
porary and permanent. There are still plenty 
of '62's in the USA, and many have already 
made their bid for a seat at lunch on May 
13th. Registration is at 11:30, and after 
lunch there is a meeting, the auction, 
bazaar, cocktail party and dinner. All tardy 
postcard-writers, please let me know what 
your plans are. Come see the expanding 
waistlines of your classmates May 13th. 

See you then, Sally 

SUGAR ABBOTT BEHRENS and her hus- 
band graduated from Rollins College last 
June. They were both on the Dean's List. 
Sugar majored in Elementary Education. 



thirty 



After graduation they traveled around the 
U.S.A. for 3 months. They are now back 
in Winter Park. Bruce is studying for his 
M.A. 

BETH CRANE ACCETTA writes that she 
is taking two courses at Vanderbilt, and also 
working. Tony is at law school, and is a 
member of the staff of the Law Review. 
They were in Barnstable for Christmas with 
Lex. 

CYNTHIA EVERETT is studying for a 
master's degree in astronomy at Wesleyan 
University. She also works 15 hours a week 
as part of a research assistantship for the 
astronomy department. 

KAREN KAISER graduated from Wells 
College last June, and is working for 
Houghton-Mifflin. 

POLLY LARNED writes, "After graduat- 
ing from the University of California, Santa 
Barbara, I worked all summer as a Pas- 
senger Service Representative for United 
Air Lines. I am now at Grace Ball Secre- 
tarial College in San Francisco. It is a 
great city, and I hope to see Pauline Gray 
Keyes soon. When school is finished in 
August, and I am an 'executive secretary' 
I hope to find a job where I can make use 
of my French major and music." 

DARCY WHEELER was married June 14, 
1966, to Kenneth Bacon. Darcy is working 
toward an M.A. at Columbia in the teach- 
ing of history internship program. This in- 
volves teaching three classes of American 
and Latin history in a high school near 
Peekskill, N.Y. each morning and returning 
to Columbia for classes in the afternoon and 
evening. Kenneth is a business and journa- 
lism student at Columbia. 

GRETCHEN WHITEHEAD is having a 
wonderful year in Europe. She writes, 
"After 2!/2 months in Munich, we are now 
in Austria learning how to ski! We will 
head south to Greece this spring, and hope 
to catch a glimpse of Mrs. Crane. I saw 
Lee Clark '64 in Munich. Small World!" 

ENGAGED 
NANCY ELWELL to Rufus Griscom of 
Syosset, L.I., and New York. He is a grad- 
uate of Brown University and will receive 
an M.A. in Slavic Languages in June from 
Brown. Nancy will receive a B.S. from Cor- 
nell University School of Nursing in June. 



MARRIED 
CHARLOTTE BLAKE to William L. Gal- 
lagher of California, Pa., November 26, 
1966, in Bradford, N.Y. Rebecca Bartlett 
was one of the bridesmaids. They are living 
in Lima, Peru, where Bill is the third secre- 
tary and vice-consul of the embassy. He is 
a graduate of Northwestern and received a 
master's degree from the Fletcher School 
of Law and Diplomacy of Tufts University. 

GLORIA HASELTON to A. Abbott Ikeler 
of Pittsburgh, Pa., December 28, 1966, in 
Augusta, Me. Lee Haselton was maid of 
honor. Abbott is a graduate of Middlesex 
School and Harvard University. He received 
his master's degree from the University of 
Pittsburgh, where he is a candidate for 
the doctoral degree in English. 

BETSEY WORCESTER to Robert W. Num- 
rich of Aurora, III., September 3, 1966. 
Betsey graduated last August from the Uni- 
versity of Illinois having taken her Senior 
year at George Washington University. Ro- 
bert, a graduate of the University of Illinois, 
did graduate work at M.I.T. They entered 
the Peace Corps in October, and flew to 
Ghana in January weher they are teaching 
in secondary school. 

1963 

News Secretary: Ann Harris, Briarcliff 
College, Briarcliff Manor, N.Y. 10510. 

ANN HARRIS has a job in an architect's 
firm for the summer, and plans to study 
design and architecture at Penn next year. 

BETSY CADBURY MONTAGU and her 
husband are living in Oberlin for one year 
— David is visiting professor and head of 
the violin department at the Music Con- 
servatory. She writes, "I'm studying music 
and will finish my degree at Cornell next 
year." 

LORNA FISHER was married December 
27, 1965 to Arthur C. Daily. Lorna is a 
senior at Colorado University, and Art is a 
second-year law student at Colorado Uni- 
versity. 

BARBARA HOFFMAN spent the sum- 
mer cruising to Scandinavia, Russia and 
Western Europe with her parents. This year 
she is house mother in a dorm of 125 stu- 
dents and president of the Theater Society 
at Elmira. 



t flirty-one 



MARY JOHNSON was married June 10, 
1 965, to Robert O. Turek. He is an alumnus 
of Washington and Lee University, and 
Mary is enrolled at Madison College where 
she is majoring in Psychology. 

HELEN WATSON COLLISON will receive 
a B.S. in Physical Therapy from the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania in June. Terry got 
his Master's in City Planning last June. 

ENGAGED 
JACQUELYN SUTTON to Andrew Bruce 
Cleverly of Whitinsville, Mass. He is a grad- 
uate of Phillips Academy and is studying at 
Washington and Lee University. 

MARRIED 

IRIS VARDAVOULIS to Alan R. Black- 
mer, Jr., December 28, 1966, in Andover, 
Mass. Alan is a graduate of Phillips Acad- 
emy, and received a B.A. and M.A. from 
Harvard University. He attended Christ 
Hospital, England. He is working in Cleve- 
land, Ohio, for the Board of Education. Iris 
is studying at Boston University. 



1964 

News Secretary: Susan Stafford, 4103 
Spruce St., Box 1397, Philadelphia, Penna. 
19104. 

JOAN HARNEY is a junior at the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, and "loves it." 
She graduated from Briarcliff last June. 
She and Sue flew home to Holland for 
Christmas. 

SUE LOCALIO writes, "I spent last sum- 
mer at Camp Treetops in Lake Placid, and 
am planning to return again for my third 
year as counselor. I am majoring in English 
at Smith and plan to teach." 

LEE PORTER has been accepted for the 
Experiment in International Living Program 
in India next summer. 

BARBARA SYKES is working at F.A.O. 
Schwarz in Boston and attending Boston 
University at night. 

ENGAGED 
DALE BARRACLOUGH to Charles Lee 
Munson, 3rd of Quincy, Mass. He is a stu- 
dent at Princeton University. 



MARRIED 

DALE THOMSON to Jeffrey Milne of 
Hanover, N.H., December 31, 1966 in 
Swampscott, Mass. Laurie Thomson was 
maid of honor. Jeffrey was graduated from 
the Holderness School and attended Dart- 
mouth College. 



1965 

News Secretary: Gail Goldstein, Box 
1815, Connecticut College, New London, 
Conn. 06320. 

Well, '65ers, this month I have a very 
exciting bit of news for all you prospective 
wives. Last month I received an interesting 
little note from Claudette (Mrs. Bruno Nico- 
lai ) . It seems that as of November 1 4 there 
is a new member of their family — Jean 
Marc ! ! ! Claudette reports that she and Bru- 
no are off to Zurich as of the beginning of 
January. 

Last Thanksgiving I had quite a surprise. 
I met KATHY ABLER in Boston at a lun- 
cheon given by a pre-Abbot friend who 
lived with Kathy last year in Paris. Abler 
was brimming over with enthusiasm for the 
life she was leading. A pleasant surprise 
to say the least. 

SUE SPANGLER writes profusely from 
Purdue. She's excelled beyond anyone's 
wildest imagination . . . even her own. She's 
been honored for "high scholastic attain- 
ment." As Sue said, "It just shows what I 
can do when I'm happy." How true! This 
New Year's Day, did you notice her familiar 
face in the stands at the Rose Bowl? That 
was Sue, cheering her team on! 



MARGRI 
interesting 
vironment 
Crafts coun 
rence. This 
State Road 
where Hopi 
an invitatio 



T KRAKAUER writes about her 
summer ... in an all-male en- 
(for a change) as an Arts and 
selor at a YMCA camp in Law- 
year she's living at 191 Bay 
in Boston and studying at BU 
e has joined her. She extends 
n to all Abbot girls in the area. 



ROBIN GAMBLE writes reams and reams 
from home ... all about her eventful sum- 
mer. She still plans to transfer to Hollins 
for the following year. "It seems funny to 
be a senior again so soon" was her com- 
ment. 



thirty-tioo 



SUE WINET is "still at Scripps — hoping 
to spend next year in Geneva." She worked 
there last summer in the U. S. Embassy 
snack shop and served a hamburger to 
de Gaulle. Not bad. 

Melanie spent the summer working for 
Howard Johnson's. Jessie had the same job 
in Hyannis. I ran into her one day when I 
was off from work. ( I was a camp counselor 
on the Cape. Taught canoeing no less.) 
Anyway, Mel's major is Latin American 
Concentration. 

Another news flash from Fales! SALLY 
UMPHREY is married to the Clint Farmer 
that Mel used to date. Mel introduced them 
one summer. Sal's new address: Ensign and 
Mrs. Clint Farmer, 2900 W. Brainard St., 
Pensacola, Florida. Congratulations to Sal! 

I spent a few days with CAROL REISCHE 
in New Hampshire at the beginning of the 
summer, and saw her again during July. 
She loves BMC; we spent many long hours 
comparing our respective schools. 

And from downstairs (would you be- 
lieve?) Wende writes, "Well, with everyone 
else in our class, pinned, engaged, married, 
or a mom, I just thought you'd like to 
know I'm going steady. His name is Ron 
Chambers, and I have his Princeton ring 
and he has my Abbot ring." Actually, 
Ron's in the Navy in the Mediterranean 
now . . . but I've seen the ring! 



Emily is still president of our class, but 
her term expires about February 10. "Every 
thing is just fine" is her report. 

As for me, well, over Christmas I got to 
see the Holy Land. I went on a ten-day 
tour of Israel with my parents. It was one 
of the most exciting trips I've ever taken. 

Anyone in the Connecticut vicinity had 
better stop in — that's an ultimatum for 
ALL Abbot girls!! And please keep the 
letters coming; my next deadline is 

A P ril ] 5- Gail 

ENGAGED 

ALLISON MORRILL to Donald Frederick 
Anspach of Harrisburg, Pa. Don was grad- 
uated from Franklin and Marshall College 
and is a candidate for his Ph.D. at Western 
Reserve University. Allison is studying at 
Mather College, Western Reserve. 



1966 

News Secretary: Ellen Sobiloff, Chatham 
College, Box 103, Pittsburgh, Penna. 15232. 

The class extends its sympathy to KATH- 
LEEN ROAN whose father died on Christ- 
mas Day, 1 966. 

ELLEN ROSS is dorm representative to 
Athletic Association at Connecticut Col- 
lege, and is on the intercollegiate sailing 
team. 



^Q^TD 



COLLEGE TRANSCRIPTS 

Due to the increasing number of alumnae requests for transcripts to 
colleges, it has become necessary to charge a one dollar fee per transcript. 



thirty-three 



THE 

SCHOOL 

CALENDAR 



January 7 
January 8 

January 1 1 

January 1 3 

January 14 

January 1 5 

January 18 

January 20 

January 21 

January 22 

January 28 
January 29 

February 1 -26 

February 4 
February 5 



February 1 1 

February 12 

February 17-18 

February 19 



February 24 
February 25 
February 26 



March 



1 



March 3 

March 5 



March 
March 
March 



March 
March 



8 
11 
12 



16 

17 



Film, "On The Waterfront" 

Dance at Phillips Academy for Preps 

Vespers at Phillips Academy, The Rev. James Whyte, 

Phillips Academy Chaplain 
Film, "Woman Doctor in Viet Nam" 
Celebrity Series at Phillips Academy, Judy Collins 
Supper Dance at Exeter 

The Rev. Scott Bartchy, Chaplain at Dana Hall 
WUS Bake Sale at Phillips Academy Gymnasium 
Spanish Club Open House 
Dance with Governor Dummer at Abbot 

Vespers at Phillips Academy, The Rev. A. Graham 
Baldwin, Teacher of Bible at Abbot 

Fidelio at Lawrence Academy 

Vespers at Phillips Academy, The Rev. Roger Barnett, 
Chaplain at Williston Academy 

World Exhibition of Photography — John-Esther Art 

Gallery 
Dance with Exeter at Abbot 

Vespers at Phillips Academy, The Rev. Frederick Pease, 
Jr., Associate School Minister at Phillips Academy 

Mary Lou Graves Concert 

Fidelio at St. Mark's 

Film, "Training Porpoises For Fun And Science" 

Vespers at Phillips Academy, The Rev. Robert Curry, 
Headmaster at The Lenox School 

"Yeomen Of The Guard" — Abbot Academy Choir and 
Phillips Academy Students for the benefit of Scholar- 
ship Fund 

Vespers at Phillips Academy, The Rev. James Whyte, 
Chaplain at Phillips Academy 

Orin and Gerald Grossman — Chamber Music Concert 

Shakespeare Play at Phillips Academy 

Senior Prom 

Vespers at Phillips Academy, The Rev. William Coffin, 
Chaplain at Yale University 

"La Femme" — Art Prints from De Cinque Graphic Art 
Collection 

Basketball Game at Dana Hall 

Vespers at Phillips Academy, The Rev. John Crocker, 
Headmaster Emeritus at Groton School 

Student Recital 

Greek Play at Phillips Academy 

Fidelio at St. Paul's 

Vespers at Phillips Academy, The Rev. Frederick Pease, 

Associate School Minister at Phillips Academy 
Student Recital 
Basketball Game 
Spring Vacation 



thirty-four 



Don't Move . . . 

Physically Statistically 

Educationally Professionally 

Without Notifying Us! 

Send to the Alumnae Office by April 25, 1967 



Maiden Name. .. Class 

Married Name 

Address 

Zip Code 

thirty- five 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 

Andover, Massachusetts 
Return Requested 



ENTERED AS 
SECOND-CLASS MATTER' 

AT THE POST OFFICE AT 

ANDOVER. MASSACHUSETTS 










COME WITH "fOUR HUSBAND AND CHILDREN 1 



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From the desk of Miss Tucker . . . 



A- B- B-O-T — 1966- 1967 

The year began with most of the faculty and staff who had been 
here last year. Two hundred and sixty-one girls arrived in September, 
two hundred of them are boarders. 

'A' is for the academic life of Abbot. The teachers now have time 
to attend professional meetings on Friday evenings or Saturdays. Mile. 
Arosa will be the President of the Eastern Chapter — American 
Association of Teachers of French; Miss Judd is one of five members 
of the Spanish Committee of the National Association of Independent 
Schools. 

More individual projects are done by the girls in English, history, 
mathematics, etc. Result = less fuss, more fun. 

College acceptances now have this variation. Two seniors will 
attend a state university or a two-year college the first semester and 
then go to one of the large women's colleges in February, 1968. 

'B' is for Bodily Exercise. Our usual intra-mural sport program con- 
tinues. This year we compete with other schools as well. 

'B' is for Beauty — aesthetic and spiritual. We worship chiefly at 
Cochran Chapel. There is a Studio Art major course for seniors; much 
has been created in photography and ceramics. We have had a program 
in Sex Education that included lectures by an expert doctor, movies por- 
traying confused young people, discussions led by faculty and ministers. 

'O' stands for Others. Many of our girls have volunteered time and 
energy in Lawrence at the General Hospital, the YWCA Turtle Program 
and the Third Baptist Church in Lawrence. 

HP is for Total result. We look for the girl who is a comfort to 
herself and to others — a girl who uses things and not people; a girl 
who loves people and not things. 

A-B-B-O-T spells out a school that states, "Enter into under- 
standing that you may go forth into nobler living." 

two 



Excerpts from speech made by 

PHILIP K. ALLEN 
President of the Board of Trustees 

at the 

Annual Meeting of the Abbot Alumnae Association 
Davis Hall — May 13, 1967 



The academic year of 1966-67 has been 
a difficult one for Abbot, as well as for 
other schools, Phillips Academy included. 
An unsettled world has produced unsettled 
students, and we have to cope with and 
guide our share of them - - - 

Eleanor Tucker, Acting Principal, has 
performed superbly in that capacity - - - 

Your Board of Trustees has been actively 
searching for a new principal, using the 
services of a committee made up of Mrs. 
Jordan, Mrs. Henry, Mrs. Kemper, Mr. Dow, 
and myself. This committee has been 
charged with finding the very best person 
available, and is proceeding with dispatch 
yet with care, rather than caution - - - 

The challenge is a very real one to the 
Trustees, but also to the people being con- 
sidered because of the exciting possibilities 
of coordinate education with Phillips Acad- 
emy - - - 

I was interested to find, when reading an 
early history of Abbot, that there is really 
a closer connection between the academies 
than that of geography! Mrs. Sarah Abbot, 
the founder of the female seminary, was 
the granddaughter of the Reverend Samuel 
Phillips, the founder of P. A. ! - - - 

We approach the concept of coordination 
with great interest, but with real delibera- 
tion. It does, however, seem as if we could 
"have our cake and eat it too," since we 
feel that we can have all the advantages of 
co-education, with none of the disad- 
vantages — can preserve our identity as a 
girls' school, and P. A. its identity as a boys' 
school 

As for the development of Abbot and its 
physical characteristics, although perhaps 
not evident from the outside, much has 
been done. Highlights of a 6-page mimeo- 
graphed list (distributed to returning alum- 
nae) were: new chairs in Davis Hall (ap- 



preciated by the alumnae!) — wall-to-wall 
carpeting in the main corridors in Draper, 
as well as a new elevator, and redecorated 
drawing room — basement of McKeen 
renovated — new outdoor skating rink and 
tennis courts rebuilt — houses at 15 and 
17 Abbot Street, and 19 School Street, 
purchased, renovated and rented — 9 
Abbot Street, the house formerly occupied 
by Mrs. Crane, re-designed by Trustee J. R. 
Abbot, will be occupied next year by 1 1 
girls and a married teacher - - - 

The Chapel on the top floor of Abbot 
Hall has been changed into a fairly large 
meeting room and a classroom of standard 
size. We were forced by the Building Code 
of the Town to do this because the floor 
was found to be unsafe for the numbers 
which were then occupying the Chapel. 
This change has disappointed many alum- 
nae, but the Trustees had no other choice 
but to comply with the Code, and to assure 
the safety of the students - - - 

Plans for next year include renovations 
to the second and third floors of Draper 
Hall and a possible expansion of the library 
facilities 

In the meantime, your Alumnae Associa- 
tion, together with the Parents' Association, 
have given increasingly generous financial 
support to Abbot, and the Trustees are in- 
deed grateful to all of you - - - 

The next ten years can be the most ex- 
citing and rewarding in Abbot's history, and 
we want the alumnae to share this excite- 
ment with us. We must hold fast to the 
traditions that have meant so much to 
countless Abbot generations, but at the 
same time face squarely the requirements 
of a new world, which is sometimes frighten- 
ing, sometimes frustrating, but in which 
there will be, we all hope, an important 
role for the well-educated woman of 
tomorrow, and your trustees know that 
Abbot can meet this challenge. 



three 



Introducing . . . 




Lovett Chase Peters, executive vice presi- 
dent and director of the Cabot Corporation, 
has been appointed to the Board of Trustees. 
A resident of Chestnut Hill, Mr. Peters is 
currently a director of the Boston Safe De- 
posit and Trust Company and of the Boston 
Company, Inc. He is also treasurer and 
trustee of the Foundation for Economic Edu- 
cation, Inc. and is on the council of the 
University of Chicago Business School. 

From 1 953 to 1 966 Mr. Peters was asso- 
ciated with the Continental Oil Company. 
Starting as financial vice president, he be- 
came vice president of coordination and 
supply, vice president of transportation and 
supply, later group vice president and 
finally vice president and world-wide co- 
ordinator of new business developments. 

Mr. Peters prepared at Phillips Academy 
for Yale University where in 1936 he grad- 
uated a member of the Phi Beta Kappa 
society. 

He is married to the former Ruth Stott, 
Abbot 1934. They have four children, 
Charles, Daniel, Samuel and Ruth. 



Notice To the Alumnae 

(Reprinted from Cynosure, May 13, 1967) 



Alumnae of Abbot, this article is written 
totally, unquestionably and completely for 
you. Whether you be an alumna of one, 
two, ten or twenty years, you are undoubt- 
edly going to notice that changes have 
taken place in your old Alma Mater. Physi- 
cally there are new facilities and new equip- 
ment. But when you think back on your 
days at Abbot, it is unlikely that memories 
of the buildings will be foremost in your 
minds. Instead, you will most likely be 
reminiscing over your individual lives at 
Abbot, your day-to-day activities. In order 
to give you a fair idea of what is really 



going on at Abbot today, what the modern 
generation is doing behind the austere ex- 
terior of Abbot's hallowed halls, the follow- 
ing week of normal events and activities 
has been compiled. Rather than follow one 
unsuspecting Abbot girl through her week, 
you will be able to follow all, and perhaps 
retrace many of your own footsteps. 

The week begins with Sunday, the day of 
rest, and indeed a day of rest it was winter 
term, when students attending the 5 o'clock 
service at Cochran Chapel were allowed to 
sleep, undisturbed by annoying bells, until 
noon. In the Spring, however, the variety 



jour 



of services to be chosen from are held 
earlier (so that all may benefit from the 
exhilarating freshness of an early Spring 
morning.) Two services are offered at Phil- 
lips, one Jewish and one nondenomina- 
tional. After services, Phillips boys may 
come down to Abbot for one half hour, from 
12 to 12:30, and you may often find 
couples sitting on the grass somewhat cross- 
eyed and looking slightly green — mere 
signs of dizziness caused by too many trips 
around the sacred circle. After lunch, and 
during the Senior, Senior-Mid smoking 
hour, boys, other than those from Andover, 
may come down from 2 to 4 for the week- 
end's last set of calling hours. Sunday din- 
ner is buffet, and is usually followed by an 
evening of post-week cramming. 

All meals are still obligatory, though 
Monday morning breakfast still seems to 
be the most difficult to get to on time. Due 
to the increase in the size of the studenf 
body, Chapel is now unfortunately held 
daily in Davis Hall rather than in the old 
Chapel, which has been transformed into a 
lecture-type class room. Classes are also 
held in both Ripley and Baronial as well as 
McKeen and Abbot Hall. Tie shoes, by the 
way, are still required . . . WITH shoe laces. 

Major courses have not changed con- 
siderably. Except for the addition of German 
the curriculum has generally remained the 
same. However, the variety of minor 
courses, morning and afternoon, offered 
throughout the week, may be of interest 
to you. Greek, Modern Art, Visual Percep- 
tion, Art, Basic Music and Bible (now 
taught by faculty members from PA) are 
among the courses offered at Abbot, while 
a major course in Chinese held at Phillips 
is also offered to Abbot girls, two after- 
noons a week. In fact, throughout the week 
there are many activities in which Abbot 
girls are given the opportunity to use 
Andover's facilities. There are continually 
slide tapes and movies in nearly all courses, 
American History, History of Art, etc. 



shown at Andover and offered to all classes. 
Once you have left the classroom, and 
move on to extra-curricular activities, there 
are numerous events in which Abbot and 
Andover jointly participate. The PA Drama 
Workshop, which just presented 'Lysistrata', 
the Debate Workshop, the Folk Society, the 
Madrigal Society and the glee clubs are but 
a few of such organizations. Recently too, 
there have been small groups of girls going 
to Phillips for faculty-supervised discussions 
on topics ranging from sex to religion to 
Communism to Art. 

As the simple week-day activities draw 
to a close, there are more opportunities for 
"cultural enrichment" which begin to ap- 
pear for the weekend. Often on Friday 
nights, Abbot takes a group of girls into 
Boston for a play (usually at The Charles 
Street Playhouse) , ballet, or concert. Should 
a girl decide not to take advantage of such 
offers, she may go up to PA for swimming 
or simply stay at Abbot, relax and watch 
television. 

With Saturday, come bus trips into 
Boston for the upper two classes, and trips 
to the Peabody Shopping Center open to 
all. Day leaves extend from 10:30 to 6:00, 
and girls may meet boys in Boston, should 
they so desire. There are also calling hours 
from 2-4 at Abbot, generally used by Phil- 
lips' boys. Saturday evening brings dances 
for select (or not so select) groups, lectures, 
movies, or other entertainments to which 
boys may be invited by seniors. So ends 
the week. 

Although the impression you have re- 
ceived of today's Abbot girl is not a very 
serious one, there are sides to our lives 
which have been left out. We still "burn 
the midnight oil," but do have more diver- 
sions, which help us to plan our time better. 
Abbot has only tried to keep up with the 
pace of the world around it. 

MARGERY GOLDMAN '61 
Editor 



Keep us informed of your changes of address. A new ruling from the 
Post Office requires us to pay 10 cents for each Bulletin returned because 
of incorrect address. 



five 



Reporting— Abbot Clubs 

Promoting the interests and welfare of the school are the Abbot Clubs in 
the East. We are happy to report their growth, activities, and their invaluable 
support. 

BOSTON 

On April 25, under the leadership of Jane MUNRO Barrett, '54, president of 
the Boston Club, the annual meeting was held at the Boston Yacht Club in 
Marblehead. Officers for 1967-1969 were installed: President, Mrs. Albert 
G. Tierney, Jr. (Elisabeth Colson, 1944); 1st Vice President, Mrs. Byron 
Lingeman (Suzanne Larter, 1954); 2nd Vice President, Mrs. J. Robert 
Haskin, Jr. (Miriam Bickford, 1921); Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. Joseph 
Wilcox, (Sandra Liberty, 1954); Recording Secretary, Mrs. Gerald T. Ma- 
honey (Deborah Huckins, 1954). 



FAIRFIELD COUNTY, CONN. 

Elsie WILLIAMS Kehaya, '42 (Mrs. Ery W.) entertained the alumnae with a 
delicious dessert and coffee in her home in New Canaan on March 2nd. 
Miss Eleanor Tucker, acting principal, Miss Jane Sullivan, Alumnae Secretary, 
and Miss Mary Minard, chairman of the History Department, attended from 
Abbot. 



NEW YORK 

On March 4th at the Smith College Club in the Berkshire Hotel in New York 
the annual spring meeting was held under the direction of Nancy EDMONDS 
Luce, '53, president. Nancy EASTHAM lacobucci, '55, a graduate of Harvard 
Law School, spoke on "A Lady Lawyer in Wall Street", and Miss Tucker, 
acting principal, brought news of the school. 



WASHINGTON 

Miss Helen Ripley, '30, former Alumnae Trustee, entertained the alumnae 
in her home in Washington on March 20th. Barbara LORD Mathias, '30, 
president of the Alumnae Association and Miss Jane Sullivan discussed 
school activities. 



six 



Praises Ringing... Here's to you 



Miss Marguerite C. Hearsey, Principal Emeritus — one of eight 
noted women awarded the first Hollins College Medals 

Dale Barraclough '64 — Dean's List — Wheaton College 

Laura Beckvold '65 — Vice President of Student Government — 
Bennett Junior College 

Allis Brooks '64 — Dean's List — Syracuse University 

Emily Davis '65 — Dean's List — Pembroke College 

Judith Froeber '66 — Secretary of Freshman Class — University 
of North Carolina 

Elizabeth Humstone '66 — High Honors — Bradford Junior College 

Amy Johnson '64 — Woodrow Wilson Fellowship for Graduate 
Study 

Mary JOHNSON Turek '63 — Dean's List — Madison College 

Ruth KELLEY Perry '24 and her husband, Elwyn, a professor of 
geology and mineralogy at Williams College, received the 
Human Relations Award of the Northern Berkshire Chapter 
of the National Conference of Christians and Jews in Febru- 
ary. They were honored for their work in the field of mental 
retardation. 

Elizabeth Lage '65 — Dean's List — Wheaton College 

Lee Porter '64 — Dean's List — Wheaton College 

Sharon Seeche '63 — Dean's List — Wheaton College 

Katherine Staples '65 — Dean's List — Wheaton College 

Alicia Stillman '65 — Dean's List — Wheaton College 

Gwyneth Walker '64 — Winner of Music Award and Dean's List 
— Pembroke College 

Mary Wilkins '63 — Dean's List — Wheaton College 



Cam Lau.de— 1967 

Faith Beane Ann Miller Elizabeth Rudman 

Marilyn Hadley Claire Moore Juliet Schneller 

Gerda Ray 

seven 



Annual Meeting of the Alumnae Association 

The Abbot Academy Alumnae Association held its annual meeting, May 13, 1967, at 
1 1 :30 in Davis Hall. Barbara LORD Mathias called the meeting to order, and welcomed 
200 alumnae. 

The Senior Class marched in singing their class song. Mrs. Mathias welcomed them as 
new members of the association and said there were 24 out of 73 alumnae relatives in the 
graduation class. The list follows: 



Julia Alvarez — daughter of Julia TAVARES 
Alvarez, 1 944; sister of Mauricia Alvarez, 
1966; niece of Felicia TAVARES Angulo, 
1948; cousin of Mariana ESPAILLAT 
Crouch, 1949, Rosario ESPAILLAT El- 
mudesi, 1952, Julia CABRAL Thomen, 
1960, Maria Pastoriza, 1963, and Rosa 
Tavares, 1967 

Claudia Arragg — cousin of Pamela Mallen, 

__ 1970 

Sarah Beale — daughter of Margaret 
STUART Beale, 1942, and granddaughter 
of Harriet SANDFORD Stuart, 1919 

Victoria Bennett — sister of Hilary Bennett, 
1970, and niece of Mrs. John D. Bennett, 
teacher of mathematics at Abbot 

Sarah Birdsall — sister of Emily Birdsall, 
1965, and grandniece of Esther MILLI- 
KEN Fraties, 1918 

Anstiss Bowser — niece of Anstiss BOWSER 
Wagner, 1926, and Elizabeth BOWSER 
Smith, 1929 

Linda Cregg — niece of Claire CREGG Derby, 
1935, and cousin of Natalie CREGG Bal- 

_ lard, 1941 

Sara Delano — cousin of Pauline GRAY 
Keyes, 1962, and Lee BURNETT Peter- 
son, 1940 

Judith Hannegan — daughter of Doris 
JONES Hannegan, 1941; granddaughter 
of Jessie WIGHTMAN Jones, 1911; niece 
of Virginia JONES Garvan, 1940, and 
Rosemary Jones, 1948; and cousin of 
Laura Garvan, 1970 

Carolyn Hansen — daughter of Carolyn 
GUPTILL Hansen, 1933 

Catherine Hoover — sister of Elizabeth 
Hoover, 1969 

Candace Howes — sister of Priscilla Howes, 
1967, and Margaret Howes, 1969; great- 
granddaughter of Anne Dl NSMORE 
Blunt, 1850 

Priscilla Howes — sister of Candace Howes, 
1967, and Margaret Howes, 1969; great- 
granddaughter of Anne Dl NSMORE 
Blunt, 1850 



Louisa Huntington — sister of Ellen Hunt- 
ington, 1965 

Marjory Kaplan — cousin of Lucille LE 
VINE Fairbanks, 1933 

Wendy Morrisey — great-great-grandniece 
of Abigail BALLOU Robinson, 1848, and 
Alpha BALLOU Brown, 1848; grandniece 
of Marion Brown, 191 1; niece of Barbara 

_ BROWN McKallagat, 1940 

Gail Niziak — sister of Cynthia Niziak, 1970 

Jane Phillips — great-granddaughter of Mar- 
garet DUNCAN Phillips, 1 868, and cousin 
of Marguerite HALL Ross, 1940 

Barbara Read — Cousin of Antoinette Hop- 
kins, 1965 

Susan Stichnoth — sister of Mary Stichnoth, 
1969 

Linda Sullivan — daughter of Frances SUL- 
LIVAN Sullivan, 1930; sister of Nanci 
Sullivan, 1963, and Rosemary Sullivan, 
1965 

Rosa Tavares — niece of Julia TAVARES 
Alvarez, 1944, and Felicia TAVARES 
Angulo, 1948; cousin of Mariana ESPAIL- 
LAT Crouch, 1949, Rosario ESPAILLAT 
Elmudesi, 1952, Julia CABRAL Thomen, 
1960, Maria Pastoriza, 1963, Julia Al- 
varez, 1967, and Mauricia Alvarez, 1966 

Jane von der Heyde — sister of Sarah von 
der Heyde, 1960, and Abby VON DER 
HEYDE Summersgill, 1962 

Roxanna Wolfe — daughter of Virginia 
LAWTON Wolfe, 1932; cousin of Carol 
WHITTEMORE Fellows, 1938, and Anne 
Fellows, 1968 

The seniors sang to the 50th and 25th 
reunion classes. All joined in singing "Fair 
Alma Mater" and then the seniors marched 
out singing their class song. 

The report of the Clerk, Deborah RED- 
FIELD Smith, 1950, and Treasurer, Helen 
O'BRIEN Olcott, 1936, were accepted. 

The group paused for a moment in re- 
membrance of the alumnae who had died 
since the last meeting. 



eight 



Aagot HINRICHSEN Cain, 1944, Chair- 
man of the Alumnae Fund, reported that 
1,171 alumnae have given $24,672.25 
since June 20, 1966. Bequests totaling 
$21,810 have been received this year. The 
Class of 1921 received the bowl for the 
highest percentage of contributors, 84% 
and the highest number of contributors, 42, 
Elizabeth Bulkeley, Class Fund Secretary, 
accepted the award. 

Jane Sullivan, Alumnae Secretary, intro- 
duced Miss Hearsey, Principal Emeritus, 
and Constance Parker Chipman, former 
Alumnae Secretary. She welcomed Harriett 
Chase Newell, 1902, and three members of 
the class of 1907. She presented gifts to 
the Class of 1917 from the Alumnae Asso- 
ciation. Barbara Hill Kennedy, 1942, from 
Escondido, Calif, who had come the greatest 
distance also received a remembrance. 

Miss Eleanor Tucker, acting principal, 
discussed Abbot in 1967 from the princi- 
pal's point of view. 

hAr. Philip K. Allen, president of the 
Board of Trustees, described briefly Wie 
members of the Board and introduced those 



who were present: Mrs. Lenert W. Henry 
(Helen Allen '32), vice-chairman; Mr. 
Everett W. Smith, treasurer; Miss Jane 
Baldwin, '22; Mrs. John M. Kemper (Abby 
Castle, '31); Mrs. Horatio Rogers; Miss 
Alice C. Sweeney, '14, and Mrs. John B. 
Ogilvie (Donna Brace, '30) alumnae trus- 
tees. Mr. Allen discussed the physical plant, 
coordinate education, and development. 

The Abbot Choir under the direction of 
Miss Margot Warner sang selections from 
"Yeomen of the Guard" by Gilbert and 
Sullivan. 

Barbara LORD Mathias announced the 
formation of on Abbot Antiquities Com- 
mittee to classify and prepare for sale the 
"treasures in the attic." Mary Minard '55, 
head of History Department, is chairman. 
She will be assisted by Alice Sweeney '14, 
Helen Hamblet Dyer '14, and Phyllis 
Crocker England '40. 

The meeting was adjourned for luncheon 
in the Bailey Dining Room. 

C. JANE SULLIVAN 
Executive Secretary 



Treasurers R eport — / 9 6 6 - / 9 6 7 

May 13, 1966 Balance in Merrimack Valley National Bank . $460.46 

RECEIPTS 
Interest from Invested Funds ...... $493.10 

Total $953.56 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Alumnae Day Expenses, 1966 ......$ 74.31 

Dues for Alumnae Presidents' Council (1966-1967) . . $25.00 

Dues for American Alumni Council ..... $100.00 

Travel Expenses to Alumnae Presidents' Council ... $ 68.38 

Alumnae Association Expenses ......$ 25.00 

Dues for Alumnae Presidents' Council (1967-1968) . $25.00 

Total $317.69 

Balance in Merrimack Valley National Bank — May 13, 1967 $635.87 

Helen O'BRIEN Olcott, Treasurer 

I have examined the accounts and found the balance to be correct. 

Mary DOOLEY Bragg, Auditor 



nine 



Alumnae Fund Report 

September 1, 1966 — May 16, 1967 

1,222 ALUMNAE HAVE CONTRIBUTED 
$25,068.22 

Once again, I wish to thank each alumna who 
has made it possible for us to attain this total, 
the highest ever reached by the alumnae in one 
year. 

C. JANE SULLIVAN 
Alumnae Secretary 



REUNION GIFTS 

Number of 



Class 


Amount Contrib 


1907 


$396 


11 


1912 


$298 


8 


1917 


$400 


23 


1922 


$754 


21 


1927 


$510.35 


28 


1932 


$325 


16 


1937 


$359 


20 


1942 


$695.34 


25 


1947 


$361.25 


23 


1952 


$162.75 


17 


1957 


$170 


14 


1962 


$196 


17 



Marjory Bond Crowley 

Miriam Bacon Chellis 
Gwendolyn Bloomfield Tillson 
Margaret Nay Gramkow 
Priscilla Donnell Anderson 
Frances Connelly Dowd 
Barbara Sanders Dadmun 
Barbara French Brandt 
Clara Reynolds Palmer 
Mary Ann Spurgeon Lewis 
Dorothy Wheeler Bacon 



The Andover Alumnae and Mothers of the Day Students raised $400 at their 
annual Dessert Bridge held in Davis Hall on April 5, 1967. 



ten 



decent Pequesfts to &bbot 

Abbot lists the following bequests with pride and 
deep gratitude. They reveal the devotion of the 
alumnae to the school and their abiding faith in 
the value of an Abbot education. 



Mary Thompson 


1894 


$ 2,046 


Grace Dorr 


1895 


$ 2,000 


Frieda Billings Cushman 


1901 


$ 5,000 


Evelyn Carter Giles 


1901 


$10,000 


Katherine Scott 


1903 


$ 1,000 


Margaret Wilkins 


1913 


$ T,000 



A gift of $1 ,000 has been received in memory of Katharine Selden McDuffie 
(Mrs. Charles D.) , Abbot 1914, The gift was made by her daughter Sarah W. 
McDuffie, Abbot 1947, and her sons, Charles H. and Frederic C. McDuffie. 



eleven 



1895 

Marion Somers (Mrs. Arthur C. Wise) died 
March 20, 1966, in Hingham, Mass. 

1896 

Rubie McGown (Mrs. Rubie M. Dorr) was re- 
ported dead in March 1967. 

1905 

Amy Blodgett (Mrs. Beveridge H. Moore) died 
February 26, 1967, in Maryhaven Village, Glen- 
view, III. 

1907 

Jean McEwen (Mrs. Harold S. Brown) died De- 
cember 5, 1966, in Norfolk, Conn. Our sincere 
sympathy is extended to her son. 

1908 

Edith Gutterson (Mrs. Edith Gutterson) died 
April 17, 1967, in Santa Barbara, Calif. She served 
at the school as a secretary for one year. She was 
one of five sisters who attended Abbot. Our sincere 
sympathy is extended to her sister, Hildegarde Gut- 
terson Smith, Abbot 1914, and to her two sons. 

1916 

Myrtle Dean (Mrs. S. Alger M. Lewis) died 
March 19, 1967, in Silver Springs, Fla. on her way 
home from a Florida vacation. Our sincere sym- 
pathy is extended to her husband. 



3fa Jfflemortam 



1919 



Dorothy Evans was reported dead in March. 



1924 

Helen Epler (Mrs. Sherman T. Baketel) died 
February 26, 1967, in Portsmouth, N.H., after a 
long illness. Our sincere sympathy is extended to 
her husband, her parents, and her two daughters. 

Past Faculty 

Miriam Titcomb, who taught at Abbot from 
1906-1908, died February 27, 1967, in Augusta, 
Me. She was the first principal of the Hillsdale 
School in Cincinnati, Ohio. 

twelve 






News from the Classes 



1903 

HARRIET REID STEWART is living in 
Dudley, Mass. near her daughter. She has 
one grandson, Stewart, a junior at Nichols 
College, and a daughter, Carol Ann, a first- 
grade teacher in Webster, Mass. 

1904 

HELEN FRENCH writes, "I read aloud 
once a week to a paralyzed lad. I am in- 
terested in a Home for Aged Women — I 
was on the board of directors for 25 years". 

1906 

ALICE BARBOUR MERRILL'S daughter 
is president of the Recording for the Blind 
for blind students at Yale. 

1910 

CLARISSA HALL HAMMOND'S daugh- 
ter, Carol, was married recently to James 
Warren, Jr., and they are living in Illinois. 

RUTH MURRAY MOORE spent three 
weeks in Florida last winter. 

LYDIA SKOLFIELD PARSONS is on the 



board of the New England Home for Little 
Wanderers, and is also on the board of the 
Red Cross. 

1913 

HELEN BOWMAN JANNEY writes, "I 
have been living alone since my husband's 
death in 1964. I keep busy with reading, 
sewing, and cooking (I make fancy sand- 
wiches for my friends). A darling grand- 
child, Tiffany, 2, is at my home often. After 
my home, church is my great interest. I 
attend many concerts and stage plays at 
Muncie University." 

1915 

ELIZABETH ALLEN BELKNAP spent 
Christmas with her daughter, Martha, in 
Madrid where she is teaching, and two 
weeks traveling in Spain and Portugal. She 
spent 3 weeks this spring in San Mateo, 
Calif, visiting her son and his 6 children, 
ages 4-18. 

The class will be sorry to learn that RENA 
ATWOOD BENSON'S husband died June 2, 
1966. 



1902 and 1907 

Mabel Allen Buxton '07, Marjory Bond Crowley '07, Alice Webster Brush '07 and Harriett 
Chase Newell '02 











i 




f 



TO 



"o^a.- 






Mr 




1917 

Alice Littlefield Legal, Miriam Bacon Chellis, Bernice Boutwell Parsons, Frances Gere, 
Dorothy Newton, Edith Marsden and Carita Bigelow Moore 



The class will be sorry to learn that FRE- 
DA JOSLIN SPRAGUE'S husband passed 
away December 31, 1966. 

GERTRUDE SHACKLETON HACKER 
and her husband take trips every year. Last 
year they spent 2 months in Australia and 
New Zealand, and this year they are in 
the Orient. 

1916 

The class will be sorry to learn that 
GRACE MERRILL EMERY'S husband died 
suddenly last June. She traveled through 
six European countries last September and 
October. Her son, Tom, is at the Naval War 
College in Newport, R.I. 

ALICE PRESCOTT PLUMB spent the 
winter in Hawaii. She works as a volunteer 
in Queen's Hospital in Hawaii. 

EMMA STOHN LARRABEE'S husband is 
supposedly retired, but does part-time work 
as treasurer and accountant. Emma does a 
good deal of rug-hooking. Her daughter, 
Marie, is a secretary in Cambridge, and her 
daughter, Janet, is living in Madison, Wis., 
where her husband is studying for a degree 
in the philosophy of teaching. 



1917 

REUNION REPORT 

"Abbot's Blue" in school and sky was a 
most welcome sight to the 50-year class 
and all returning alumnae on May 1 3th. We 
attended the alumnae meeting in Davis 
Hall made interesting by Miss Tucker's talk 
and Mr. Allen's report. Adding to our 
pleasure were songs by the school choir 
and a serenade to 1917 by the senior class. 
Their fresh young voices and faces were a 
joy to hear and see. 

A gold friendship-circle pin presented to 
each member of the class was a total and 
thrilling surprise. 

We were joined at lunch by Miss Tucker 
and CONSTANCE PARKER CHIPMAN '06 
— another pleasure. Corsages in our class 
color were brought by MIRIAM BACON 
CHELLIS and ALICE LITTLEFIELD LEGAL 
made our place cards. 

After lunch we met to read notes from 
classmates unable to attend and to bring 
ourselves up-to-date on professional, busi- 
ness and mother careers, and children and 
grandchildren. Reminiscing was fun "Re- 
member the monocles worn on a ribbon 
(black) around the neck (a must), hair in 



fourteen 



"cootie cages" over the ears and spats (Op- 
tional) ." 

The class dinner at night brought to a 
close a day that comes to us just once in 
a life time. 

Our grateful thanks to Miriam for the 
many hours of preparation for the day, to 
Miss Tucker, Miss Sullivan, the girls and 
the weatherman for a delightful reunion. 

Bernice Boutwell Parsons 
1918 

LOUISE BACON FULLER has 6 grand- 
children, 3 boys and 3 girls. 

CLARISSA HORTON SANFORD is finish- 
ing her seventh year as teacher in the Mass. 
Clinical Nursery School for the Retarded. 
It is operated by the Mass. Department of 
Mental Health. 

JULIE SHERMAN TIBBETTS writes, "My 
husband is semi-retired, but we seem busier 
than ever. We have 10 grandchildren. 

1919 

GERTRUDE LOMBARD McGINLEY has 
retired after 20 years teaching in Spring- 
field, Mass., and Brewer, Me. Her son, 
Frank, is Public Relations Supervisor of Bell 
Telephone in the Philadelphia area. 

VIRGINIA McCAULEY OTIS had another 
cruise on the Gripsholm this winter with 
RUTH EATON RICHARDSON, 1918. They 
went to West Africa and South America. 

1920 

BETTY BABB BEVERIDGE and her hus- 
band had an Abbot reunion last October 
with HELEN THIEL GRAVENGAARD and 
her husband. 

KAY HAMBLET writes, "I had 2 glorious 
weeks in Greece in October with my nephew 
and his family (son of MARION HAMBLET 
GREENE, 1915), an Aegean cruise and 2 
weeks in Teheran visiting nephew who is 
in American Embassy there. I met my sister, 
HELEN HAMBLET DYER, 1 91 4 in Italy and 
returned on the Independence." 

HILDA HEATH SAFFORD'S first grand- 
child was born last August to her son, 
Nicholas, and his wife. Nicholas is with 
David L. Babson Co. of Boston, Investment 
Counsellors. 

1921 

MARGARET ALLING WARD writes, 
"Hugh and I had a nice visit with PHIL 



HINCKLEY BISHOP in England last sum- 
mer. Her home and gardens are beautiful. 
My husband is interested in soil conserva- 
tion. We spent a week at New Bells Farm 
in Hanchley, and visited Weston Park 
owned by Lord Bradford, the president of 
the Soil Association." 



1922 



REUNION REPORT 



This truly was our best reunion to date! 
I heard from thirty-five of you and fifteen 
returned to Abbot by lunch time. Unex- 
pectedly we had a lovely, sunny day and it 
was fun from the moment we picked up 
fat envelopes containing facts, program 
data and lovely pictures of the school at 
Davis Hall to the time we reluctantly 
separated after dinner at the Merrimack 
Valley Motor Inn in North Andover! 

Since I have only this Mother's Day 
evening to get this report together and off 
to the Alumnae Office it may help to curb 
some of my eloquence. We enjoyed the 
Alumnae Meeting and the delicious buffet 
luncheon as guests of the school. The 
Bazaar was well under way before we had 
our pictures taken and drifted into ever- 
changing groups to inspect the new build- 
ings, the alterations and charmingly dec- 
orated rooms in the places we remembered 
so well — quite changed and much im- 
proved. 

We all settled down at HELEN KNIGHT 
WILKINSON'S lovely old home in North 
Andover at five o'clock for cocktails, talk- 
ing a mile-a-minute of course, and often 
at the same time! She persuaded the young 
men in her family to tend bar for us, and 
we had time to meet her young grand- 
daughters and daughters — tiny and cute 
like Helen. Wilkie remembers our names 
and is such a genial host! It would not 
have been such a successful reunion with- 
out her efforts and hospitality. She made 
all the arrangements for our dinner in a 
private room just the right size — and so 
delicious. Thanks Helen! 

During cocktails I asked for volunteers 
for Reunion Chairman in '72 — and you 
never heard a more complete silence! BARB 
SANDS SHERMAN agreed to serve as Class 
fund Secretary for 1967-72 so you will be 
hearing from her once a year. Lack of com- 
petition kept me in the first job. I'd like 



fifteen 



to see news of our class in every issue of 
the Alumnae Bulletin. Do share your joys 
with us — and even your sorrows; we have 
been friends a long while you know — 
altho' we were agreed we wear our years 
well and felt like girls again for a few hours. 

JANE BALDWIN is still a most charming 
member of the Board of Trustees at Abbot. 
In 1965 she retired after 35 years at the 
Irving Trust Co. in N.Y., administering 
estates and trusts. She and CAROL IRE- 
DELL live in their home on the river in 
Essex, Conn, in the summer but spend the 
winter in Florida. During the last five years 
they have taken some wonderful trips 
through Europe. I can't imagine a reunion 
without either of them, — don't believe 
they have missed one. 

A letter from LAURA BEGGS was waiting 
at school, the first one for ages. She has 
filled the years with a variety of activities: 
art school, business courses, years of travel, 
volunteer work in radio and publicity for 
several organizations. Her hobbies even- 
tually led to a professional job as Land- 
scape Designer and Consultant with a large 
nursery firm in Columbus. Sharing this work 
is her present position as Executive Director 
of the Licking County Museum. No wonder 
she enjoys her busy life! 

GWEN BLOOMFIELD TILLSON is 
another of the faithful. Tils retired several 
years ago and she claims they get "lazier 
and lazier" but they sound busy to me. They 
spent some time in Florida this spring. Both 
sons are in the investment field and Deb- 
bie, since receiving her R.N. in '62, is in 
the Intensive Care Unit at Falmouth on the 
Cape — and loves it. 

SALLY BODWELL HOUGHTON found 
the 1 3th too early to join us, for she and 
her husband spend their winters in Florida 
— will be back next week. I think this is 
the first time Sally has not been with us 
and we missed her. 

BETTY BREWSTER THOMPSON lost her 
husband in 1966; has kept her job (volun- 
teering three days a week) in the hospital 
in Derby, Conn. She maintains the Red Cross 
office and keeps the BP records. She and 
her daughter took time off for a few weeks 
in Florida this spring. 

"C. P." DAMON MASON was taking 
care of her son's children this weekend 
while their parents attended a convention. 
There are two married daughters and nine 



grandchildren. C. P. does Red Cross work 
too, and is a hospital volunteer. Since she 
lost her husband she tries to keep busy and 
cheerful. In March she was in Florida and 
plans a Scandinavian cruise in June. 

KAY DAMON KLETZIEN picked up a 
virus in February and has felt under par 
since — also had surgery on her neck re- 
cently. Kay's husband and children are busy 
people — Seymour with a new job as a bio- 
chemist at the Crozer - Chester Medical 
Center a few miles from home. He was with 
the Cooper Hospital in Camden for 14 years. 
Their children have "flown", — both 
daughters are married, supplying 6 grand- 
children. Both sons are bachelors, one with 
the Peace Corps Headquarters in Washing- 
ton, D.C. and the other, after graduating 
from Syracuse University last June is now 
a graduate student in Hospital Administra- 
tion at Duke University Medical Center in 
N.C. 

RUTH DEWEYYORK came from 
Marblehead where she taught for 35 years, 
retiring recently. Her son is with the Air 
Force in Germany. Last year Ruth toured 
Europe; she also was in Folrida this spring. 

DOT FLAGG SMITH had hoped to be 
with us. Her husband is a semi-invalid now 
and it depended on how he was feeling. 
She reported that all their six grandchildren 
will be in High School next year! We missed 
her. 

KAY GAGE was in the Philippines, at the 
convent of her order in Sagoda, in the 
mountains of Luzon for fifteen months. 
This year she has been teaching in the 
convent school and novitiate in Peekskill, 
N.Y. 

HELEN GOODALE FARLEY hasn't been 
back for years and now that she and Joe 
have both retired from their jobs with the 
Girl Scout movement, I'd hoped to see them 
this year — but they went in the opposite 
direction in April, to Hawaii. 

BARB GOSS was with us for luncheon 
but could not stay for dinner. She retired 
in June of '63; is very busy now caring 
for her elderly father. Like the rest of us 
her hair is gray but those brown eyes snap 
as usual ! 

Now for a story confession! A wonder- 
fully newsy greeting came from RUTH HILL 
ENGLISH while Bill was hospitalized this 
sprinq — and I misplaced it! A frenzied 
search over the last few days has failed to 



sixteen 



&'01ft JMi* 






1922 

Front row — Mary Elizabeth Rudd '23, Elizabeth Ohnemus Hicks, Ruth Dewey York, Helen 
Knight Wilkinson, Gwendolyn Bloomfield Tillson, Barbara Goss, Dorothy Williams 
Davidson and Alice Sweeney, '14, Alumnae Trustee 

Back row — Jane Baldwin, Trustee, Olive Howard Vance, Margaret Potter Kensinger, Bar- 
bara Sands Sherman, Cecelia Kunkel Payne, Alice Van Schmus Smith, Geneva Burr 
Sanders and Carol Iredell 



discover its hiding place on my snowed- 
under desk. Ruth, do forgive me and send 
your news to the Alumnae Office. Five years 
ago I know both your girls were married 
and you had three grandchildren; also that 
your husband is a writer and that you divide 
the year between Merion and Skytop, Pa. 

PEG HOPKINS WETHERELL sent a fine 
letter, with pictures of her husband, daugh- 
ter, two lovely grandchildren and her houses 
in Conn, and Florida. As Peg reported her 
history since '22, "she was married 12 
years, a widow 12 years and has been mar- 
ried to Roland 12 years". Her own picture 
doesn't show much change — hope she's 
back in 1972! 

LIB (Bubbles) HUTCHINSON BLUNT- 
SCHLI has become a most proficient golfer. 
She traveled to the Orient last year and 
spent this past winter in Honolulu and 
Mexico. In March she went to Florida and 
is now on a two-week trip to Virginia. In 
the summer she and C.P. Damon get to- 
gether at the beach. I know she had five 



grandchildren in '62 but she didn't give me 
a recent count-down. 

One of the nicest things about this years' 
reunion was having CELIE KUNKEL PAYNE 
back for the first time since graduation. 
Scys she rattles around in her house much 
of the time since her husband's death but 
has several grandchildren to come to visit. 
She has promised to come in '12. and we 
shall hold her to it! 

I was pretty excited at the prospect of 
seeing "Slip" MacPHERRAN WORCESTER 
after all these years, but a gall-bladder 
operation prevented her coming. Both her 
daughters are married and she has one 
grandson. Her daughter Betsy and her hus- 
band are with the Peace Corps in Ghana. 

You may cross DOT MOXLEY PITMAN 
off your "Lost" list — don't know how we 
ever lost her for her address is the same as 
in '62 in the summer and SALLY BODWELL 
located her winter one, as follows: Ocean 
Breeze Park, 29 Key Line Drive, Jensen 
Beach, Florida 33457. Their two daughters 



seventeen 



are married and there are four grandchil- 
dren. Good to hear from her directly. 

Another real pleasure was having ELIZA- 
BETH OHNEMUS HICKS return at last — 
and she brought her roommate from the 
Class of '23, MARY ELIZABETH RUDD! 
Both look fine and are busy gals, — Rudd 
traveling a lot and Ohnemus busy with 
church work and bridge among other things. 
She and Clyde summer at their home in E. 
Brewster and take winter vacations in 
Florida. They've seen ALEX WILKINS TAL- 
MADGE several times en route and she had 
pictures of Alex's grandchildren with her. 
Alex was counting on coming back this 
year so it was a disappointment all around 
when a hospital check-up discovered arth- 
ritis and necessitated physical therapy at 
once. Both Alex's daughters are married 
and certainly the grandchildren are ador- 
able judging by their pictures. 

BUG POLK OVERSTREET didn't send 
much news beyond the fact she was looking 
forward to a trip to Europe this month. She 
wished she could see us all and sent her 
love. 

PEG POTTER KENSINGER drove up from 
Lynnfield to take in the events, bless her! 
They moved from Melrose when Syd retired 
a while ago and Peg is still trying to fit a 
houseful of furniture into a ranch. She has 
stayed with the Red Cross blood procure- 
ment program in Melrose but has good in- 
tentions regarding "taking it easier". 

We were glad to have another husband 
around now and then. BARB SANDS SHER- 
MAN brought hers from Chatham, on the 
Cape, where they built a house when Sherm 
retired from the Navy. One son, Jim, lives 
in Andover and we saw his three handsome 
children during the bazaar. The other two 
sons are also in the Navy, — Peter has 
just been made commanding officer of an 
attack squadron flying off the Enterprise, 
and his wife and four youngsters are in 
California. John is a Lt. Commander now 
in Navy P. J. School in Monterey with his 
wife and son. 

AL VAN SCHMUS SMITH is another of 
the faithful from the New York area. She 
and Sam have just returned from a trip to 
Spain. All three of their daughters are mar- 
ried and Al had beautiful snapshots of her 
five grandchildren. 

MARIAN RUGG CAYWOOD was expect- 
ing her daughter's family for a two-week 



visit when she wrote (doctor-husband and 
3 children). Each summer Rugg and her 
husband visit them in Honolulu, which they 
all love. 

I had an interesting telephone call from 
JANET WARREN WINSLOW a while ago. 
Their two daughters are married and there 
are lively grandchildren not too far away. 
Jan and Red are planning to build in Maine 
if she can persuade him to retire. However 
he won the Million Dollar Round Table 
again — in insurance — and they leave for 
a convention in Switzerland and a tour of 
Europe in a few days. 

SUZIE WELBORN OSBORNE doesn't get 
back but she is among the faithful with 
letters and it was wonderful to find a fat 
one waiting for us at Abbot, enclosing pic- 
tures, too. She claims the beautiful grand- 
son and granddaughter are even cuter than 
their pictures. Can't see much change in 
Suzie though — hope she can come back 
in '72! 

ANNE WHINERY wrote that she has re- 
tired. Would love to see us all, but was 
planning a trip to Toledo and Chicago 
about this time. 

BETTY WHITTEMORE retired last Jan- 
uary (no one ever says from what!) and 
is enjoying her own little house in Sarasota, 
with bridge, golf and gardening to keep her 
busy. 

DOT WILLIAMS DAVIDSON is glad to 
have some of her family living nearby. She 
retired from all but volunteer jobs after 
Allen died — Enjoys "gardening, birds, 
symphonies and wonderful friends." Her 
son is in the family business (Thomas Long 
Jewelers) and lives in Needham. The older 
daughter and family live in Syracuse, N.Y. 
The younger married Marian Ireland's son 
last September, (she was Abbot '27). 
Grandchildren total five. This was Dot's 
first return in a long time and it was so 
good to have her with us. 

MILLICENT BARTLETT HOLMBERG 
hasn't been able to come back but she has 
been quick to write. Her Antique Shop ties 
her down completely. She has six grand- 
children — the oldest girl was married last 
month and the youngest is eighteen months. 

JIMMY BURR SANDERS lives a couple 
of towns away and I certainly enjoyed hav- 
ing her company on the trip to Andover. 
Both her girls are married and Jimmy is 
with her daughter Barbara, in Framingham, 



eighteen 



quite often. A year ago Jimmy was in the 
hospital for a month for a serious abdominal 
operation and still isn't quite up to par. 
I don't believe she has ever missed a re- 
union either. 

So I come to my own family — as many 
of you know Bill has been on crutches for 
ages and I've been a most willing chauffeur 
for six years. Our four children are very 
busy with their careers and families. We 
nearly lost Peter in February with pneu- 
monia but he is built like his mother and 
gained rapidly. The eldest of our thirteen 
grandchildren was married fourteen months 
ago and has just left Vietnam waters after 
his third trip there. He will be released from 
the Navy in July — we hope. Bill has been 
in the hospital twice this spring but is 
making definite progress — altho' it is 
much too slow to suit him. He has been 
able to keep working which keeps him 
happy. 

This has been written in fits and starts 
and I hope it is coherent. Your welcome 
messages have warmed my heart and I feel 
very close to you all. Do begin planning to 
be with us in 1972 — and keep the letters 
coming! 

Love to you all, 

Olivia. 

1923 

LIBBY FLAGG DOW writes, "I was in 
Athens at the American School of Classical 
Studies for 4 months. Sterling is having his 
sabbatical from Harvard and is serving as 
Annual Professor at the school. I returned 
early as father was hospitalized from a fall 
on the ice. He is at home now, and I am 
staying with him." 

CHARLOTTE HUDSON WHITE is one of 
1 2 women members of the Maine State 
Legislature. She is a member of the legisla- 
tive committee on Health and Institutional 
Services. At the present session she has bills 
before the legislature which would expand 
the homemaker service; increase allow- 
ances for the widows of Superior and Su- 
preme Court Justices, extend the Gover- 
nor's Advisory Council on the Status of 
Women; and a department bill dealing with 
the welfare of prisoners. She serves as House 
chairman of the Retirements and Pensions 
Committee, and during her first term was 



a member of the Committee on Legal 
Affairs. 

DOROTHY TAYLOR BOOTH writes, "I 
now have 7 grandchildren, 4 in Kendall- 
ville, Ind., and 3 in Laos. Sorry I seldom 
see any of my old Abbot friends." 

1924 

RUTH KELLEY PERRY'S son, Richard, is 
studying for his doctorate at George Wash- 
ington University. He is a research ocean- 
ographer with the Environmental Science 
Services Administration of the U. S. De- 
partment of Commerce, and was one of two 
members of this department to compile 
maps of the sea floor surrounding the Aleu- 
tian Islands. 

1926 

ELINOR COLBY MAHONEY'S son, 
Philip, is Curator of Maritime History at 
Peabody Museum in Salem, Mass; he also 
lectures and does historical writing, and 
has made several appearances on the edu- 
cational TV network. Most important of all, 
he made Elinor a grandmother on April 4, 
when he and his wife had a daughter. 



1927 



REUNION REPORT 



Dear Absent Girls of '27: 

We've had a surprisingly good turnout 
of the class on this 1 3th of May. Those 
present have written their own notes for the 
Bulletin. You absentees were somewhat 
sorely missed — but only somewhat. We've 
had fun. I have been in contact with all of 
you and don't have to write it all again. 
Thanks for sending in your messages from 
which the following notes are taken. 

Cordially, 

Sydna White 
Notes from those present: 

MIRIAM HOUDLETTE WALSH (Mel- 
rose, Mass.), "I'm still interested in Abbot 
affairs and have been active in the Boston 
Abbot Club. The usual community jobs take 
a lot of my time. I'm doing publicity for 
the YMCA Auxiliary, secretary for the Mel- 
rose Visiting Nurse Association and window 
display chairman for the Kappa Swap Shop. 
My daughter is 16 and a junior in high 
school. My husband is a metallurgist and 
sales engineer. We are all going to Switzer- 
land this summer for three weeks." 



nineteen 



NANCY KIMBALL FOWLE (Marble- 
head, Mass.), "In 1963 I followed Mim 
Houdlette Walsh as President of the Boston 
Abbot Club. Mim stayed on the Board and 
gave me moral support which was much 
appreciated! At home I'm kept busy as a 
housewife, mother, daughter, daughter-in- 
law, niece, dog-keeper and secretary — so 
life is full — almost too full for a fortieth 
reunionite!" 

JERRIE MILLER BELLOWS (Plainfield, 
N.J.), "1927 grads looked surprisingly 
well preserved — faces not seen for 40 
years looked quite familiar on second glance 
— with exception of Nancy Kimball Fowle 
who is the same except for some gray in 
the hair. Sydna still has her beautiful vofce 
and manages to keep us in line." 

PEG NAY GRAMKOW (Wellesley, 
Mass.), "I have three grandsons and am 
active in Red Cross. My husband is still 
practicing law and we spend our summers 
on Cape Cod." 

AYLMER STANTIAL KEMPTON (Mel- 
rose, Mass.), "It's so exciting seeing each 
other again, all that has happened the past 



five years seems insignificant! I am still a 
working girl — Child Welfare Specialist 
with the Massachusetts Division of Child 
Guardianship. Highlights for the past: a 
Caribbean Cruise, hostess at the New York 
Worlds Fair, reading to a blind Hindu work- 
ing for his M.A. degree in Education at 
B.U." 

Notes from those absent: 

MARY AYERS HOWER (Akron, Ohio), 
"Am in Europe on a 6 week trip with my 
husband and then am planning to go to 
Alaska this summer. We are doing a lot 
of traveling all over the world now that our 
two sons are married and established in the 
family-owned business. First grandchild, a 
boy, was born last October — so not Abbot 
material." 

PERSIS BEAN MURPHY (Lincoln, 
Mass.), "I live in Lincoln, Mass. where my 
husband is a painter. I am interested in 
the Audubon Society and we summer in 
Chatham on the Cape." 

BETTY LEE BURNS LAYMAN (Pasa- 
dena, Calif.) writes, "Haven't been in 
Massachusetts since Virginia Smith Fuller's 



1927 

Front row — Ellen Faust, Miriam Houdlette Walsh, Emily House Maidment, Nancy Kim- 
ball Fowle, Aylmer Stantial Kempton and Jane Fitch Roland 

Back row — Margaret Nay Gramkow, Kendrick Bellows, Sylvia Miller Bellows, Sydna White, 
Nathalie Cushman Allen and Edwin Roland 




older daughter was married (the latter is 
the mother of 3) . Stayed on for a visit and 
fell, biting my cheek on the corner of a 
baseboard. The resulting triple-fractured 
cheekbone and nerve damage has resulted 
in 5 surgeries. Our elder son is being mar- 
ried in June in the San Gabriel Mission 
near Pasadena." 

HELEN CONNOLLY McGUIRE (New 
London, Conn.), "Our Yale sophomore son 
is playing lacrosse with Harvard May 13th 
but will plan to come to the next reunion 
or the one after that. I have Garden Club, 
Museum and Hospital work. We have one 
son in the Army and two daughters married. 
Susan McGuire McGrath C55) is married 
to a teacher at Dartmouth and has 4 chil- 
dren. They are in Europe for the year. 
Elizabeth McGuire Enders C57) has 2 chil- 
dren." 

PEG CREELMAN NELSON (Lusby, Md.), 
"I am teaching in a special project in the 
public schools in Lusby. I have just finished 
a semester of courses in reading at 
Teacher's College in New York. Life on 
Chesapeake Bay is wonderful. We have a 
married son who has 3 "marvelous kids". 
He is a crack racing skipper and hopes to 
be in the Block Island races in June." 

KAY FARLOW HUTCHINSON (Grand 
Junction, Colo.) writes, "Am grandmother 
of 9 and live on the western slope of Grand 
Junction which is the most wonderful 
climate year-round in the entire country. 
My husband, a mining-engineer, is director 
of raw materials, Atomic Energy Commis- 
sion in Grand Junction." 

DOT FRENCH GRAY (East Sandwich, 
Mass.), "Hoped to be with you, but my 
husband had a coronary attack and though 
he is doing well, this is no time to leave 
him. We live in East Sandwich and hope to 
do some cruising on our boat this summer." 

RUTH HARVEY HART (Winchester, 
Mass.) The sad news from Ruth is that her 
husband died this Spring from throat cancer. 
Ruth has a son in Tenafly, N.J. and another 
in Sao Paulo, Brazil whom she plans to visit 
this Fall. 

JUNE HINMAN MARQUES (Weehaw- 
ken, N.J.) — June is in her 7th year in 
charge of the Junior Department of the 
Weehawken Library. She and her husband 
have 5 grandchildren. Her husband has been 
with the railroad for 40 years. 



POLLY HUMESTON CARTER (Engle- 
wood, N.J.) Polly and husband also are out 
of the country — in Bermuda for a couple 
of weeks. 

LOIS KIMBALL (Remsenburg, L.I., 
N.Y. ) — Lois lives on the South Shore of 
Long Island and enjoys birding there — 
watching, feeding and sketching. She says 
she's very well but has had to take to a 
hearing aid, chiefly because her old Irish 
setter no longer announces anyone's arrival, 
being deafer than she is. It's obvious her 
enjoyment of whimsy is still intact. 

EDNA MARLAND (Andover, Mass.) re- 
ports that she is running the gift shop in 
Andover, and that she is importing from 
Holland, West Germany, Mexico and India. 
She is still doing some teaching. 

MARY BELLE MAXWELL D E S K I N S 
(Ardmore, Oklahoma) writes, "I have a 
daughter graduating from Okla. Univ. in 
June who is an artist and wants to be a 
fashion designer." 

RUTH NASON DOWNEY (Birchdale, 
Minn.) — Ruth writes that life in the Cana- 
dian border country is very different from 
city living — logging and marginal farming 
being the chief activities there. Ruth's hus- 
band is a minister there in Birchdale. She 
says there is much meaningful living among 
the people. Ruth plays the piano for church 
and also teaches the piano. She finds chal- 
lenge in Christian education at the state 
level. 

LOUISE POPE BOWSHER (Shaker 
Heights, Ohio), "I am starting my eighth 
year at a dress shop, "a natural" as I have 
always loved clothes." Louise couldn't come 
to reunion this year as she took time out 
last year to go on a Mediterranean cruise 
including the Greek Islands. Her son, Pren- 
tice, is with the Providence Journal. 

ALICE ROGERS GOVE (Winchester, 
Mass.) writes, "Beginning to live again 
after winning a 5-year struggle with a 
broken hip that had kept me on crutches 
a lot of that time." She and her husband 
have bought a little house on the coast of 
Maine where they hope to retire eventually. 
Meanwhile they use it weekends and enjoy 
their daughters and 4 grandchildren who 
live near-by. 

EDNA RUSSELL WATSON (West Hart- 
ford, Conn.) writes, "Latest count — six 



twenty-one 



grandchildren from 18 months to 18 years. 
Between them and club and church com- 
mittees, we can't find enough hours in the 
day! Who said life slowed up after 60!" 

FLORA SKINNER (Wakefield, Mass.) — 
Flora has been 30 years with the oldest law 
firm in Boston. Her mother died 2 years 
ago. Her father had his 70th reunion at 
Phillips Andover last year. 

DOROTHY TAYLOR PRINCE (Carmel, 
Calif.) Dorothy writes, "Haven't been East 
for 30 years. As you can see, I love Cali- 
fornia very much. I would love to see my 
Abbot classmates." Dorothy has a shop, 
Gadgets Unlimited. 

1928 

LOIS DUNN MORSE writes, "Since be- 
coming a widow in 1965, I have returned 
to being coordinator of the Hanover School 
of Practical Nursing in Hanover, N.H." 

BETTY JACKSON KENNEDY who has 
recently moved to South Deerfield, Mass. 
will celebrate her 34th year doing Social 
Work — most of which has been in Public 
Welfare in various local offices throughout 
the state. 

BETTY RYAN HILL has four grand- 
children. She plans to tour the Canadian 
Rockies this summer. 

1929 

The class will be sorry to learn that GER- 
TRUDE CAMPION SOUTAR'S husband 
died suddenly in March. 

LOIS HARDY DALOZ writes, "We're 
loving life in Peterborough. Our daughter, 
Connie is teaching in the School Camping 
Program in Newton, Mass. Son, Larry, is 
teaching high school in Hawaii for a year. 
Son, Charles, is a sophomore at Amherst." 

JANE LINN GALE writes, "Dana is a 
senior at Northwestern and Deborah is a 
freshman at Wells. We have one grand- 
daughter, daughter of our son, Kenneth, a 
captain in the Air Force, and an instructor 
in nuclear physics at the Air Force Acad- 
emy. Our married daughter lives in Detroit, 
and is junior curator of the Detroit Art 
Museum." 

ELIZABETH McKINNEY SMILEY is an 
active worker for the Republican Party in 
Massachusetts. She has 6 grandchildren 
between the ages of 3 and 1 0. 



BETTY OSBORNE BACON'S son, Deni- 
son, is studying at Wesleyan. She has one 
grandchild who is 1 Vz years old. 

ROSAMOND WHEELER PUTNAM has 
enrolled in a course for guides at the Essex 
Institute's complex of houses, and is looking 
forward to seeing 1929ers among the tour- 
ists in Salem. 

1930 

DONNA BRACE OGILVIE, vice president 
of the Girls Clubs of America, was chair- 
man of the 22nd annual conference of the 
organization held in New York in April. 
She and her husband recently returned from 
a three-week trip to South America where 
they visited a son who is working for AID 
in Rio de Janeiro. 

ALICE CANOUNE COATES is a grand- 
mother! Sara was born to her daughter, 
Nancy, in October. Alice is active in com- 
munity affairs and is State President of the 
New Jersey branch of Kings Daughters. 
Her daughter, Marian, will graduate from 
Connecticut College in June. 

FLORENCE GARDNER BALI US visited 
MARY McCASLIN GILES in Pottstown, 
Penna. last September. She "looks exactly 
the same!" 

EVELYN HAMILTON WHITE'S son, 
George, is a graduate of University of Mary- 
land Law School and is practicing in Salis- 
bury, Md. Her daughter, Deborah, is teach- 
ing in New Haven. She is to be married 
this summer. Evelyn became a grandmother 
in January. 

MARGERY HART CORY'S daughter, 
Suzanne, is at Simmons College; her son, 
Chappell is an engineer with General Elec- 
tric; Stephen is a high school Junior. 

BETTY QUINBY PARMELEE is the proud 
grandmother of a 15-month old girl. 

MARIANNA SMITH HILE'S daughter, 
Jo Ann, will enter nurse's training in a Ft. 
Wayne Hospital next fall. 

1931 

RUTH CANN BAKER now has 3 grand- 
children. Susan Baker McCoy had a son last 
November. 

CHUB GRAHAM HOLLAND is doing 
promotion work for a travel agency. She 
took 14 women to Europe last fall on a golf 
tour. Her son, Jeep, graduated from the 
University of Michigan, and Jomp will grad- 
uate from Williams College in June. 



twenty-two 




1932 

Erwin Miller, Harriet Wright Miller, Betty Holihan Giblin, Ruth Tyler Smith, Everett 
W. Smith, Trustee, Isabel Arms, Katharine Brigham, Suzanne Welte AuBois, Helen 
Cutler Appleton and Helen Allen Henry, Trustee 



1932 



REUNION REPORT 



Eight of us returned to Abbot on the 1 3th 
of May to celebrate (?) our 35th! We 
found it hard to believe too! 

Present: HELEN ALLEN HENRY (though 
she had to sit with the Trustees) , HARRIET 
WRIGHT MILLER, and her handsome doc- 
tor husband, KAY BRIGHAM (VIP from 
Life Magazine), SUZANNE WELTE AU- 
BOIS (teaching French in Newport, R.I); 
RUTH TYLER SMITH whose real nice hus- 
band, Everett Ware Smith, is an Abbot 
trustee; ISABEL ARMS looking quite 
charming; your co-chairmen and very wel- 
come guests at the Abbot Luncheon table 
Miss Kate Friskin and Mrs. Juthe (formerly 
Miss Bean) of the history dept. at Abbot 
when you and I were there. 

Bazaar . . . meeting friends, acquaint- 
ances, students . . . 

5:00 p.m. Cocktails at PRISCILLA DON- 
NELL ANDERSON'S lovely home. 

7:00 Dinner at Lanam Club where we 
joined forces with 1937 and Miss Tucker. 

Said they'd come but didn't: CLAIRE 
O'CONNELL SULLIVAN (busy sefling a 



house); MARIE HOLIHAN FOLEY (going 
to Europe); HILDA LYNDE WYLIE (we 
never did find out what happened); CYN- 
THIA JAMES THARAUD . . . ?; MARY 
THOMPSON SHERMAN . . . ? 

Heard from : DOROTHY ROCKWELL 
CLARK. PATRICIA HALL STRATTON — 
daughter Pat is a junior drama major at 
Skidmore; daughter Ann is married. Pat is 
associated with an advertising agency in 
Boston. Cynthia's two daughters are at 
Cornell, son, Lucien, at St. Mark's; the 
lady herself is Assistant Director of the 
Language Labs at Columbia. BETTY BIG- 
LER DeMASI is a secretary, a grandmother 
(5) and sorry she couldn't make it. LOUISE 
WALLBURG KNEELAND, Florida, has 9 
grandchildren. FLORENCE DUNBAR RO- 
BERTSON really keeps busy with church 
work, choral singing and family. Sympathy 
is extended to LOUISE HOLLIS BLACK on 
the death of her husband suddenly Octo- 
ber 1966, and father same year. Daughter 
at U. of Arizona. Note of greetings from 
FRAN HARVEY STARKWEATHER— sorry 
she couldn't get away. GINNY ARNOLD 
from Peabody, DOT RICHARDSON from 
Billerica, GRACE ANN KING LINCOLN 



twenty-three 



wrote — daughter married living in Rock- 
port, Mass. MIN HYDE deMILLE has 5 
grandchildren; daughter, Anne, in Kansas 
City, has 4 children, and Bob has 1 daugh- 
ter. For goodness' sake, plan now for our 
'40th'!!! 

Helen and Betty 

HELEN CUTLER APPLETON 
BETTY HOLIHAN GIBLIN 
Co-Chairmen 

1933 

HELEN BUTTRICK LIVESEY'S son, John, 
is treasurer of First Bank and Trust Co. of 
Haverhill. 

OLIVE FRENCH SHERMAN writes, "We 
bought an apartment in Naples, Fla. All 
our children are married and we have 6 
grandchildren. The oldest, 8, will visit Eng- 
land this summer. Our older son is doing In- 
dustrial Development in Manchester, N.H., 
and our younger son is teaching the history 
of African civilization at Muhlenberg and 
Moravian colleges in Pennsylvania." 

HELEN RICE WILES now has two grand- 

MARIATTA TOWER ARNOLD is still 
Guidance Counselor at West Essex High 
School in North Caldwell, NJ. She is also 
area representative for the American Field 
Service. 

1935 

JANE DAWES McCLENNAN'S daughter, 
Joanne, graduated from Wheaton, and is 
now studying for a M. Ed. at Tufts. She is 
engaged to Richard Phillips of Shreveport, 
La., a Ph.D. candidate at Tufts. 

1936 

SYLVIA WRIGHT McNAIR writes, "I 
am in my second year of teaching, and ex- 
pect to receive Master's degree in Element- 
ary Education in August. My daughter, 
Barbara, is a junior at High Point College. 
My son, William, has been married for a 
year and is in his last year of law at the 
University of Florida. Don't come to Florida 
without telling me!" 



1937 



REUNION REPORT 



MARTHA RANSOM TUCKER, reunion 
chairman, compiled these notes: MARGE 
BOESEL VAN WINKLE'S oldest daughter, 



Beth, graduated from Abbot in 1960 and is 
married and has two children. Her younger 
daughter, Susan, graduated in 1964 and 
is a junior at Connecticut. They live in Rye 
and summer in Litchfield, Conn. Marge was 
touring the British Isles at reunion time. 
NANCY BURNS McARDLE attended re- 
union. Nancy has 4 children — Nancy who 
graduated from Abbot in 1965 is now at 
Hollins, John at Brooks, Susan, a junior at 
Abbot, and Peter at Pike School in Andover. 
FRAN CONNELLY DOWD has two sons. 
Jim, a navy pilot, graduated from New York 
Military Academy and B.C. is married and 
has two children. He just returned from 
Vietnam with 3 air medals! Tom, who grad- 
uated from Lawrence Academy and B.U., 
is an insurance broker. Fran is working at 
Library of Research and Development in 
Cambridge as technical director and libra- 
rian. PEACHY EVANS SMITH — busy as 
V.P. of Virginia Skyline Council of Girl 
Scouts. Her husband is with Lane Furniture 
Hope Chests! Their son, Clup, is a sopho- 
more at William £r Mary. DOT HAMILTON 
GAMMON — hoped she could come but 
number 1 son, Jeffrey, was coming home 
from 3 years in the service. Scott, number 
2, just finished Babson and is in the Air 
Force and daughter, Sharon, is in high 
school. Dot sends her love! CYNTHIA HOL- 
BROOK SUMNER will be attending two 
graduations — Charles from Yale and 
Steve from High School. They hope to move 
to the shore in Conn. JAY PARTRIDGE 
HARRISON wishes us luck and will be look- 
ing for our picture in the Bulletin! — Ugh! 
MARY PERROT WHITEHILL has an M.S. 
in Library Science and is working as a 
librarian. Son, a 2nd Lt. in Air Force and 
daughter at Cortland State. She also has one 
son in high school and one in junior high. 
Mary is active in Girl Scouts and wishes she 
could be with us. BETTY INMAN KIRK- 
PATRICK — hopes to be with us. She is a 
grandmother twice — has 2 sons and a 
daughter at Northfield. MARY PETTEN- 
GILL SMITH - PETERSEN postponed her 
visit at the last minute due to a sick child. 
BARBARA PIERPOINT CRAIG'S daughter, 
Tally, is a sophomore at Radcliffe and 
younger daughter college - looking. PRI- 
RICHARDS PHENIX works as a church 
secretary in Durham, N.H. where she lives. 
She has 2. BUNNY RISLEY STEVER — Hi 
to all. Lives in Pittsburgh where husband is 



twenty-four 




1937 

Frances Connelly Dowd, Nancy Burns McArdle, Alice Brennan Rock, Priscilla Richards 
Phenix, Priscilla Wonson Hahn, Lucy Hulburd Richardson and Martha Ransom Tucker 



president of Carnegie Tech. They have 4 — 
Son, Guy, is at Colgate, Sarah, at Sarah 
Lawrence, Margo and Roy. Bunny is on 
Board of Pittsburgh Symphony Y. W. C. A. 
ANNE SAWYER GREENE has 8 kids! She 
has two married daughters and 4 grand- 
children (Boys), one son a Lt. in Marines, 
daughter about to be married, son at OCS 
in Army, daughter at Garland, son at home 
and daughter at school in Dobbs Ferry. 
JANE STEVENSON WUNSCH has 5 chil- 
dren — 2 living at home. Jane lives in 
Trovers City and loves it. BETTY SWINT 
McFARLAND has three children still at 
home. Betty is expecting a grandchild. 
BETTY JOOST TODD has 2 daughters in 
school in Baltimore. Betty runs a horse farm 
for racing and raising horses. MARY WIL- 
SON BROWN'S daughter graduated from 
Middlebury last year and son and wife live 
in New Haven where he is in law school. 
TON I WILSON BENFORD has recently mar- 
ried a doctor. Her 4 teenagers are keeping 
her young! PRIL WONSON HAHN has 2 
children — boy in 5th grade and girl in 
3rd. She is library trustee in Lynnfield and 
a member of League of Women Voters. 
ALICE BRENNAN ROCK has 7-6 boys and 
a girl — says she really doesn't do anything 



much!! LIZ McARDLE McDERMOTT'S 
daughter, Anne, graduated from Abbot in 
1965 and is finishing her second year at 
Manhattanville. I just moved to a small 
house, planned and designed by Art. I am 
still working in Cancer Diagnostic Lab. Both 
daughters are married and we have one 
grandson — 10 months old. 

1938 

MARGARET COMSTOCK BAYLDON'S 
husband is chief of radio-visual news at the 
United Nations, and Margaret is doing 
public relations. Her daughters are in 6th 
and 4th grades at the Dalton School. 

1939 

CHERRIE KOCH DANOS writes, "I am 
working on my M.A. in Spanish from Mid- 
dlebury, running my household and plan- 
ning an August wedding for my Radcliffe 
daughter, getting ready for the high school 
graduation of our younger daughter; and 
summer school at Middlebury; entertain- 
ing business people when necessary and 
keeping up with 5 foster children." Cherrie 
lives in Madrid. 



twenty-five 



1940 

TINK DOWNEY BOUTIN writes, "Sue is 
graduating from Stanford this spring; Steve 
is a sophomore at Occidental College in Los 
Angeles. We still have 4 boys at home to 
keep us company." 

VIRGINIA JONES GARVAN writes, "My 
daughter, Laura, is an Abbot Prep. John is 
a junior at Yale, and Michael, a freshman 
at Boston University. 

LIBBY TRAVIS SOLLENBERGER writes, 
"We have a new home in the outskirts of 
McLean, Va. Gus has retired from the Navy 
and is job-hunting. I'm back at American 
University in graduate school. If we stay 
on here I'll hopefully get my master's in 
music. The boys have great fun comparing 
marks with "co-ed Mom." Rob graduates 
from Naval Academy in June — he's a 6'1 " 
version of my blind-date midshipman Gus 
25 years ago! Dick, 17, is at Mercersburg 
Academy, and is dreaming of the day he 
becomes a doctor. He keeps up his music 
crashing away on drums and timpani." 



1941 

MARY ELIZABETH ERKERT ALTORFER 
writes, "We are having the interesting ex- 
perience of being host family to our AFS 
student at Richwoods High School. He is 
from Caracas, Venezuela. Since our son, 
Dan and he are both seniors, we know what 
it is to have twins!" 

1942 

REUNION REPORT 

Our 25th reunion has come and gone, 
but I'm sure it will be long remembered by 
the girls who traveled from far and near to 
celebrate. BARBARA HILL KENNEDY 
traveled the farthest coming from Escon- 
dido, Calif, with her 2 daughters, Kate, 16, 
and Ellen, 14. 

Our beloved Miss Hearsey was at our 
table for luncheon, and Jane Sullivan joined 
us for dinner at the Inn. It was lots of fun, 
lots of gossip, and lots of laughs. Jane 
Sullivan turned the clock back when she 
scolded us for not electing a Class Fund 
Secretary — we all looked like guilty Preps! 
Jane Rutherford was drafted to serve as 



1942 

Earline Simpson, Suzanne Bates Heath, Marilyn Menschik Westaway, Elsie Williams Keha- 
ya, Barbara Hill Kennedy, Joyce Yoffa Rudolph '43, Jane Rutherford, Marjorie Dean 
Marsden, Gloria Caldarone Hegarty, Lucia Tuttle Fritz, Pam Bolton Henderson, Char- 
lotte Leland Hamill '44, Ruth Rathbone Hildreth and Margaret McFarlin 




CFS, and I will be reunion chairman for 
our 30th. Hope we'll have a good turnout. 

Gloria 
News items: 

PAM BOLTON HENDERSON'S husband 
is chairman of the Classics Dept. at Smith. 
Her oldest daughter, Andy, is a senior at 
the Univ. of North Carolina, Chip is a 
sophomore there, Willie is aboard the Air- 
craft Carrier Bennington, and Posie is a 
freshman at Smith College Day School. 
MARGARET McFARLIN is now a Major, 
and is stationed at Westover Field. RUTH 
RATH BONE HILDRETH and her husband 
have rejuvenated an old house in Old Say-- 
brook, Conn. They have one daughter, 
Kathy. RHODY WIND STONE is in her last 
year at B.U. School of Social Work. We were 
sorry to learn that her father died in May. 
Our sympathy also is extended to NAT 
CURRAN CONLON whose mother died in 
April. MARGI STUART BEALE'S daughter, 
Sarah, will graduate from Abbot in June. 
MIDGE DEAN MARSDEN'S daughter, 
Lynn, is a Senior-Mid. BUNNY S H AW 
CONNOR writes, "I work on the SS Argen- 
tina. My husband died in 1962. My daugh- 
ter is 16, and I have 10-year old twins who 
are in a home for asthmatic children in 
Arizona. My oldest son is in college, and 
the other 4 are hard-working teen-agers. 
At age 18 I weighed 218, and at 42 I 
weigh 142 — you wouldn't recognize me!" 
ELSIE WILLIAMS KEHAYA is busy with 
the usual community projects. She works 
one day a week at the school library, and 
is one of the first lady elders in the Pres- 
byterian Church in New Canaan. Ery travels 
9- 1 months of the year. Whit is at Virginia 
Episcopal School, and Lisa, 1 1 , is in 6th 
grade. They have a house on the beach in 
North Carolina. JANICE LENANE SCOTT 
is in a Sears Roebuck Management Train- 
ing Program. Georgia is a junior in high 
school and the twins are freshmen. Her 
husband, Scotty, heads the computer divi- 
sion of New England Mutual Life. JANE 
BISHOP FAHEY writes, "We still stand at 
2 adults, 3 children (now all in school), 
but have added 1 dog, 2 mice on which our 
youngest is doing genetic studies under the 
tutelage of her father and 1 hamster. I 
keep busy with 3 PTA's, a troop of Junior 
Girl Scouts, school nursing, and an oc- 
casional dabble in politics. John is fully 



occupied as chief of the Immunology Branch 
of the National Cancer Institute." DIAN- 
THA HAMILTON McDOWELL'S husband 
is superintendent of the U.S. Naval Ob- 
servatory in Washington, D.C. He is a Cap- 
tain in the Navy. Melissa, 17, and Deborah, 
15, are in high school in Alexandria, Va. 
MARJORIE MARTIN MARTIN has finished 
her master's degree in Home and Family 
Life. GRETCHEN ROEMER GAYTON is 
teaching college algebra 9 hours a week at 
Younostown University. THIRSA SANDS 
FUIKS writes that her daughter, Susan, is a 
sophomore at Newton College of the Sacred 
Heart, son, Kimball, 18, is at Canterbury 
School, and Matthew is a sixth grader. 

1943 

NANCY CORWIN WINTTER and her 
family have moved into a new house over- 
looking Long Island Sound which they de- 
signed and built. Her son, Frederick, 12, is 
in 7th grade, and Carolyn, 5 Vi, is in kinder- 
garten. 

JOYCE YOFFA RUDOLPH'S daughter, 
Ronda, 19, is a junior at Bates College, 
James, 16, a junior at Governor Dummer, 
and Deedie, 1 5, is entering Abbot in Sept. 

1944 

BETTY REID BUZBY, her husband and 
four children spent the past year in England. 

MARGARET TRAVIS ATWOOD and her 
family had a Christmas trip to the Carib- 
bean, and in June they plan to spend 3 
weeks in Spain at the Granada music festi- 
val. 

1945 

BARBARA BALL BACON'S two older 
children are away at school; Lindsay is at 
Rogers Hall, and Todd is at Hotchkiss. The 
whole family spent spring vacation in Cov- 
entry, England, with Don's father. 

MARION MARSH BIRNEY writes, 
"Would you believe we are making the col- 
lege tour this spring. I'm really too young 
to be the mother of a college kid!! 

The other four Birney children are 14, 
1 2, 1 and 8, and eating us out of the pro- 
verbial house and home. We traveled to the 
West Coast and back last summer (all 7 
of us) . So, this year the old folks are taking 
it easy and just 'beaching' it while the 
younger children go to camp and our oldest 
will spend his time in Sweden with the Ex- 



twenty-seven 



periment in International Living. My hus- 
band is still Assistant to the Episcopal 
Bishop of Delaware who is on a sabbatical 

— so back at the ranch we are in charge. 
Anybody working for Du Pont in Delaware 

— come see us." 

JESSAMINE PATTON KENNEDY is now 
living in the East. Her older son, Charles, is 
at Kent, and Dan is at Hackley. Her two 
girls, Jamey and Susan, are beginning to 
think of coming to Abbot. 

1946 

SALLY ALLEN WAUGH'S oldest daugh- 
ter, Sandra, is an Abbot Prep; Stephen, 1 5, 
is at Governor Dummer; Sarah, 11, is in 
Gr. 6, Frederic, 9, in Gr. 4, and Amy 4, at 
home. All are avid skiers and tennis players. 



1947 



REUNION REPORT 



In New Hampshirese our 20th reunion 
"were a hummer". See the picture of those 
who returned. JOY KOLINS BERGLUND was 
voted Mrs. 20th reunion! NANCY SCRIP- 
TURE GARRISON and NANCY HAMIL- 
TON EGLEE each brought their two daugh- 
ters. JANE LEWIS GLEASON was elected 
Class Fund Secretary and I will continue as 
reunion chairman. A reunion album has 
been started that is priceless (would still 
like photos from some of you!) 

Our special thanks go to NANCY and 
Larry Soule who gave our reunion cocktail 
party at their most attractive home. Thanks 
to Jerry (Santa Claus) Gleason who 
topped off the reunion with champagne for 
everyone at Rolling Green. (Larry Soule 
and Jerry Gleason are our "volunteer re- 
union chairmen" for the 25th!) Special 
mention is due Don Eglee, the only husband 
to hold forth (and handsomely) during the 
(dry) day-long sessions. 

Being reunion chairman has been fun 
and I thank the many '47ers who have taken 
time to respond to THE CALL by letter and 
in person. If you missed this reunion, plan 
now for the 25th — it is absolutely not to 
be missed! 

Mouse 

JOY KOLINS BERGLUND is now doing 
part time work in advertising production 
for the Syracuse Herald Journal. Joy has 
three children: two boys, 15 and 13; and a 
girl, 10. 



B U N T Y GODDARD THEG could not 
make reunion because she was in Minne- 
sota on a business trip with Pete. Bunty is 
now a very successful real estate agent with 
a local agency. She has three children aged 
14, 1 2 and 11. 

MACKIE HALL KERNAN'S four children 
keep her busy, but she also finds time to 
devote to the Junior League. She was first 
chairman and now serves on the Com- 
munity Board for the Junior Museum of 
Oneida County. This science and history 
museum, started by the Junior League, is 
for children in the third through sixth 
grades. 

GERRY TREADWAY DAMPIER has been 
busy with the Junior League School Tutorial 
and Enrichment program, working with a 
3rd and a 6th grader in a Stamford school. 
This spring she organized the program for 
the Association of Women's College Clubs 
meeting on "Continuing Education oppor- 
tunities for Fairfield County Women". Gerry 
has been involved with a variety of volun- 
teer teaching and is now interested in pur- 
suing her own education with a view to be- 
coming a professional. She and Bill took 
a trip to the Virgin Islands in March. 

NANCY BARNARD SOULE'S three chil- 
dren are Chris, 13; Trippy, 3; and Marcy, 
15 months. The Soule's moved into their 
house a year ago and have had great fun 
decorating it. They look forward to their 
summers at Kennebunkport, Maine, where 
they have a house right on the water. Nancy 
hopes that anyone in that area this sum- 
mer will stop by and visit — the welcome 
mat is always out. 

CYNTHIA AUSTIN COX writes from 
Tunisia that her husband, Stewart, is estab- 
lishing a large entertainment center on the 
beach at Sousse, one of Tunisia's best re- 
sorts. It will have everything from dis- 
cotheque to golf and is creating quite a 
stir in that semideveloped land. Cynthia 
says she is being a housewife "Arab, French 
and American style" ... "I have the 
help(?) of Bedouin maids and an Arab 
house boy and I am not certain who is 
teaching whom the most. Having mastered 
French (Mile. Arosa would FAINT!), I've 
moved on to Arabic". She is also teaching 
some native girls to sew and cook at a 
local school and is visited periodically by 



twenty-eight 




1947 

Nancy Hamilton Eglee, Barbara Dean Bolton, Jane Lewis Gleason, Beverly DeCesare Nassar, 
Martha Morse Abbot, Ann Flowers Howlett, Geraldine Treadway Dampier, Mackie 
Hall Kernan, Joy Kolins Berglund, Carolyn Sackett Coleburn, Donald Eglee, Nancy 
Barnard Soule, Joyce Huntington Knights, Susanne Robbins deWolf, Nancy Scripture 
Garrison, Sally Humason Bradlee and Jane Weldon Boland '46 



Ambassador Russell and guests such as the 
Edward Kennedys. 

MAUD SAVAGE writes from New York 
where she is working in the editorial de- 
partment (religious books) at Doubleday. 
For the past two years she has been spon- 
soring, through Save the Children, "a young 
Navajo Indian sprout who goes by the 
thoroughly American name of Emerson 
Watson (age 93^ — a real charmer who 
writes me lovely cliff-hanger letters". 
Maud heartily recommends sponsorship to 
anyone who is at all interested in the fate 
of our first Americans — her experience 
has been rewarding and interesting, "and 
on occasion slightly frustrating"! 

One of our busiest bees is GINNY EASON 
WEINMANN. She is teaching Sunday 
School; is a United Fund worker; a room 
mother at Country Day School; on the 
Junior League Finance and Community 
Research committees; 1st vice-president of 
the Women of Trinity Church (in charge of 
programs) ; and chairman of the Junior 
League project of guiding at The Presby- 
tere, an historical museum through which 



15,000 children have toured this year! All 
this on top of being a mother of four chil- 
dren, 9, 7, 6, and 2 years old! 

ANN CLEMENS LOWMAN writes that 
she is now teaching senior high school Eng- 
lish in Milwaukee and loves it. She has 
"one class of 20 non-college bound boys 
that is a challenge beyond anything that 
Abbot ever taught us." Ann has hopes that 
her daughter, Katie, will be at Abbot in 
about 2 years' time. 

EDITH FLATHER writes about her in- 
teresting trip to the Antarctic and South 
America. This summer she will attend the 
Astronomical Union meetings in Prague 
and may return to the Antarctic next Janu- 
ary. She has taken up folk dancing and has 
even done some exhibition dancing . 

EMILY HEMSATH McELROY is sorry to 
miss reunion, but her teaching duties will 
not permit her to attend. 

From Alaska comes word from EMILY 
GIERASCH SAVAGE, who has been active 
this past year as Republican precinct com- 
mittee woman as well as leader of a second 
grade Blue Bird group. She reminds the 



twenty-nine 



travel-minded that 1967 is Alaska's Pur- 
chase Centennial year, with a full sched- 
ule of events planned throughout the state. 
Em has three girls: Karyn in junior high; 
Annie in second grade; and Janet in first 
grade. 

CAROL McLEAN BLY and her husband 
still run their publishing house and Ameri- 
can Writers vs the Vietnam War. Carol has 
three children: Bridget, Mary, and Noah 
(born January 14, 1967). 

B. J. FRENCH BRANDT writes that Roger 
is still with American Can Co. and will be 
assistant director at the new R&D plant 
in Batavia. They will move to St. Charles 
where they will build a house. They spend 
the summer at Lake Ozonia in St. Regis 
Falls, N.Y. at the family camp and invite 
anyone in the vicinity to drop in. She also 
writes "we are still shaky from last week's 
tornado — the main path was only 50 ft. 
away — a smaller funnel danced around 
our street causing broken windows, ripped 
roofs, and was seen by neighbors jumping 
over our house . . . The road blocks are 
down now and we have power and telephone 
but the big scars will be here for some 
time." 

DIMP HANLY MURRAY is recuperating 
from pneumonia and could not make re- 
union. She and her political reporter hus- 
band moved to Wilmette last summer when 
he joined the Chicago Sun-Times. Dimp 
writes that her 14 year old step-daughter 
and young David and Katie keep her busy. 

B. A. MITCHELL GORT writes that they 
were in Europe last summer but plan to do 
a little boating on Lake Ontario this sum- 
mer. They will be away from Buffalo next 
year as her husband will be a Visiting Pro- 
fessor at Northwestern University in Evans- 
ton, III. 

At N.Y. University is JEAN RITCHEY 
BORA, who is studying hard for exams 
towards her Master's in Religious Educa- 
tion. Jean's children are Doug, 14, and 
Carolyn, 9. She also writes that she does 
"mucho volunteer work and swimming at 
the Y". 

MARGOT MEYER RICHTER and her 
family moved into their new "easy- 
care house" last summer. The horses are 
gone (I can't believe it!) but the pool is 
an attraction. Margot is busy with the 4 
children (6, 8, 10, and 16 years) as well 



as active in the Junior League and on the 
board of the Family Service-Travelers' Aid. 
The family still all ride and hunt with their 
1 5 beagles! 

JO CAMPBELL CROCKER'S husband has 
had to spend so much time in Vermont on 
business that they have bought an 1 8th 
century bricked farmhouse with lots of 
acreage in Springfield, Vt. and will move 
there the end of June. 

NANCY HAMILTON EGLEE, husband 
Don, Katie 12, and Betsy 10 came to re- 
union. Don has just been made a vice presi- 
dent at the First New Haven National Bank. 
Hammy's son, Chic, is a freshman at Wil- 
liston Academy. 

SUE ROBBINS deWOLF flew up from 
Washington for reunion. Sue was recently 
elected to the Vestry of her church, the 
first woman to hold this position in any of 
the three Episcopal Churches in McLean. 
Congratulations! 

SALLY HUMASON BRADLEE moved to 
Manchester, Mass. the first of May. Sally's 
two babies, Mary and Timothy, keep her 
busy. 

DOLLY SHARP FISKE is in demand as a 
speaker on birds and conservation. She is 
on the Board of Directors of the Illinois 
Audubon Society and is the Vice-President 
of Extension. She is also President of the 
McHenry County Bird Club, an I.A.S. chap- 
ter, and a Founding Director of the North 
Central Audubon Council. Dolly is active 
in the Woodstock Fine Arts Association, the 
Fine Arts Chorale, the Methodist Church, 
and serves on the County Board of the 
American Cancer Society. Her hobby of 
collecting folk music has led her into the 
performing field, though this is somewhat 
curtailed by her busy schedule and family 
of three girls, aged 10, 7, and 3. 

MARY LOU MILLER HART'S whole 
family is involved with Little League 
which put the kibosh on her reunion plans. 
Reeve's is vice-commissioner of the League, 
David plays, Mary Lou runs the refreshment 
stand, and daughter Nancy works there too. 
Mary Lou also works one day a week at a 
school for emotionally disturbed children; 
is program chairman for her circle at 
church; is vice-president of the civic asso- 
ciation; and plays in two bridge groups. 

MARY EMERY BARNH ILL'S husband is 
in the Communications Center at Syracuse 
University. 



thirty 



LOIS DERBY TAYLOR sent the following 
letter: 
Dear Friends of the Abbot Class of '47, 

It is with real regret that I must write 
to you rather than join you. But living in 
Arabia has at least one major drawback and 
that is the 8000 miles that separates us 
might as well be a million on such occasions. 
However neither time nor distance has 
erased the wonderful memories I have of 
Abbot. The fun we had and the things I 
learned stood me well over these two dec- 
ades and many times I've driven through 
the grounds and indulged in pleasant remi- 
niscences of those grand carefree days of 
long ago. Sometimes it seems a shame that 
we didn't fully realize then what a pleasant, 
responsibility-free time we were having and 
I remember how it seemed we'd never finish 
and rush on to the future — as the old 
saying goes: "if I knew then what I know 
now" I'd have taken the time to enjoy those 
short brief years so much more. 

My husband who has been the senior 
surgeon for Aramco for many years was re- 
cently awarded the added responsibility for 
the entire clinical medicine division. Now, 
according to him, he operates all morning 
and listens to gripes all afternoon. One of 
the big advantages here is the great life 
for kids. The American community re- 
sembles a country club, on sand of course, 
with tennis which I've learned to love, and 
swimming, beaching, water skiing and great 
fun careening hither and yon over the 
desert in a trusty Land Rover (English jeep) . 
We play at archaeology and go potpicking. 
The other day I found a Roman coin dated 
about 1 100 A.D. Finally I never thought I'd 
live to see the day, but we've traveled 'til 
it's up to our ears. Around the world, back 
and forth over Europe and every little nook 
and cranny of the Middle East. We just 
returned from a month's safari in East 
Africa and if my husband shoots a rifle like 
he does a camera we'll never go back for 
game. 

My son, Scott, is big and boisterous, 
Sandra 8, is small and cute. Bill says they 
inherited the Derby personality and his 
looks. 

All in all its been a marvelous exhilarat- 
ing experience, but we've had almost 
enough of the endless sands and the re- 
lentless shamals blowing through the dunes. 
The passing of time was brought sharply 



and painfully to my attention by the pas- 
sing of my father on Christmas eve. I was 
very fond and very proud of him and I miss 
him very much, but there is nothing to do 
but march on. 

I fully intend to be present at our next 
major reunion, and I also intend to show 
all my slides. What an awful thought! 

My best to all, 
LOIS DERBY TAYLOR 

MOUSE MORSE ABBOT was bitten by a 
"little green bug" 14 years ago and has 
been involved in Girl Scouting ever since. 
In May she completed the Volunteer 
Trainers course under the new LTD design; 
completed 3 terms as neighborhood chair- 
man; and serves as a Council delegate. She 
is active in the Concord Junior Service 
League where she produced "Pinocchio" 
(5 performances, S.R.O. ) for their chil- 
dren's theatre in March. She was elected 
President of the League this month. Mouse 
is chairman of her Woman's Club project: 
the adopted 75 man ward at N.H. Hospi- 
tal; active in local scholarship foundation 
work; serves on her church's altar guild; is 
4th grade room mother; and has served as 
crafts, greens, and general chairman for 
her church Christmas Fair in the last 3 
years. Anyone going to EXPO is invited to 
drop in — Hopkinton is only 10 minutes 
west of Concord via Interstate 89. 

Changes of Address 

SALLY HUMASON 

Mrs. Sargent Bradlee, Jr. 

Windemere Park Extension 

Manchester, Mass. 01944 
BARBOURA FLUES 

3901 Tunlaw Rd. 

Washington, D.C. 
MARY EMERY 

Mrs. Richard B. Barnhill 

3745 Rippleton Rd. 

Cazenovia, N.Y. 
CAROL McLEAN 

Mrs. Robert Bly 

RFD 2, Madison, Minn. 56256 
CYNTHIA AUSTIN 

Mrs. J. Stewart Cox 

Villa Chante le Vente 

El Menzah, Tunisia 
ANN CLEMENS 

Mrs. Ann Lowman 

6260 So. Lake Drive 

Cudahy, Wisconsin 53110 



thirty-one 



I 




1952 

Nancy Faraci Shionis, Maxine Seidel Lindemuth, Clara Reynolds Palmer, Emma Willman, 
Anne Merchant, Joan Wood Stephenson, Betsy Griffiths McCurdy, Barbara Church 
Sheffer and Sarah Emmons Warren 



JOANNA CAMPBELL 
Mrs. Weyman S. Crocker 
French Meadow Rd. 
Springfield, Vt. 

1948 

After returning from a year in Iran, which 
included a trip to Russia, ROSEMARY 
JONES settled in Tucson, Ariz, for the 
winter. The spring thaw should see her back 
at her apartment in New York. 

NANCY RICHMOND HAMMER'S hus- 
band is a Financial Vice President of Con- 
trol Data Corp. in Minneapolis. She has 
two children, John, 9, and Beth, 7. 

1949 

FREDDY BROWN BETTINGER writes, 
"Bob is Chaplain to Protestant students for 
the Campus Ministry at Bridgeport. His 
primary work is at the University of Bridge- 
port, but he also serves at Fairfield Uni- 
versity, a Roman Catholic school. It is a 
varied, challenging and exciting job. Our 
four children are full of school and extra 
activities. Mark, 10, is an archery and 
swimming enthusiast; Ann, 9, is a guitarist; 
Ruth, 7, a ballet dancer; Sarah, almost 5, 
is eagerly awaiting kindergarten. When 



I'm not keeping up with the above, I am 
director of Christian Education at St. John's 
Episcopal Church in Bridgeport." 

1950 

BETTY CALDWELL BADERTSCHER has 
3 children, Heidi, 9, Eric, 6, and Mark, 3. 
She sees JOAN ALDRICH ZELL occasion- 
ally. 

CORALIE HUBERTH SLOAN'S husband 
has left the foreign service and is happily 
engaged in photography. They have 3 
children, Christopher, 8, Tamara, 5, and 
Emily, 1. 

1951 

CONNIE HALL STROHECKER is living 
in Hinsdale, III., and would love to see any 
Abbot alumnae who come to Chicago. 

1953 

ANN KENNEDY IRISH writes, "Dave is 
part owner and manager of The Irish Boat 
Shop in Harbor Springs, Mich. He teaches 
skiing at Bayne Highlands during the 
winter. I'm busy with three girls, Tracy, 7, 
Susie, 5!/2, and Perry, 2. I am going to 
Aspen in April to visit PATTY EARHART 

HELEN MARVELL HENKELS writes, "I 
lead a life of children, ponies (3), and cop- 



// 



thirty-two 



ing with an old dilapidated house — every- 
one seems to thrive. Ann is 8, Cathy, 5V2, 
and Christopher, 1 ." 

ANNE OLIVER JACKSON had her third 
child and second daughter last October. 

JUDITH PINKHAM BASSICK had her 
third child and second son, David Russell 
March 21. Rebecca is AV2, and Christian 
is 21/2. 

1954 

MARIS OAMER NOBLE'S husband is a 
teacher at Durham Academy in Durham, 
N.C. Maris teaches there, and is also tak- 
ing courses in sociology at Chapel Hill. 
Stephen, 4, goes to pre-school, and Alex- 
andra "is preparing for Abbot at baby 
school." 

BORN 

To EDITH WILLIAMSON BACON, a 
second daughter, Rachel Price, April 3. 

1955 

DIANE SOROTA O'DWYER'S husband 
is the navigator on a polaris nuclear sub- 
marine. He is on patrol now, and Diane is 
living in Groton, Conn. 

1956 

News Secretary: Mrs. Alden Taylor Bryan 
(Phoebe Estes) North Williston Rd., Wil- 
liston, Vt. 05495 

MONA MINOR THOMPSON writes that 
"We have been completely remodeling the 
old home place and will be moving in, we 
hope, by April or May." Her new address is 
Lynwood Farm, Lebanon Road, Danville, 
Kentucky. Jim has recently been made an 
assistant vice-president in his work, and 
Mona is busy with their three children. 

Congratulations to BETSY PARKER 
POWELL, who has been elected to the 
Women's Board of the Institute for Cancer 
Research. She has also been busy with Smith 
activities, the Junior League Children's 
Theatre, and Independence Hall guides in 
Philadelphia. With all this, she and Dave 
took a skiing trip to Aspen in January. 

TON I FENN McKEE writes that she, 
Bunt, and their three year old daughter will 
be moving to Illinois in the late summer, 
where he will get his Master's degree in 
music. He plans to teach on the college 
level and have time to sing professionally. 
Through Toni, I learned that DEE FENN 
BOWEN is living in Connecticut; and 



besides their two children, she and Tad are 
busy raising Gordon setters and participat- 
ing in field trials and shows. 

SUE WATEROUS WAGG and family have 
moved back to Montreal after three years 
in Sherbrooke. Tim is with Consolidated 
Paper Corp., and they have two children: 
Sandra (4) and Geoffrey (1 ). She is work- 
ing on a project of the Montreal Museum 
— giving art lectures to school children. 

The class wishes to extend its deepest 
sympathy to PAT HIPPLE KUDER, whose 
father died shortly before Christmas. 

Tidings: Born to LEE PELTON MOR- 
RISON: John Henry, third son, on Febru- 
ary 22, 1967. She and Bill are off for Ber- 
muda the end of May. 

NANCY SWIFT GREER had a third child 
and second son, December 27, 1966. Bob 
is now Executive Officer on the USS Luce, 
a guided missile destroyer leader, and they 
are living in Mayport, Fla. 

JANE TATMAN CONNELLY is on the 
board of a cooperative nursery in Indiana- 
polis which Kevin, 4, attends. She and Guy 
spent a week in Cozumel, Mexico in Jan. 

JUDY WARREN KIELY writes that they 
are enjoying Massachusetts, where Dennis 
is chairman of the music department at 
Westf ield State College. Young Ross is three 
years old, and "a holy terror." 

BARBARA WELLS PERCY writes that 
they continue to enjoy Florida, where Jim 
is with Anaconda Copper. The Percys, in- 
cluding daughters age 6 and three, will be 
in Massachusetts this summer visiting Bar- 
bara's father. 

I hope you will all notice that the Bryans 
are enroute to Expo '67, and that you'll 
call when you come through Vermont. Wil- 
liston is nine miles out of Burlington, and 
we hope to hear from you. Best wishes for 
a pleasant summer. 

Phoebe 
1957 

REUNION REPORT 

What a great day we had and we missed 
all of you who couldn't be here. We had a 
group of about 20 at the meeting and 
luncheon. It was a fun day for all of us, but 
as you can imagine I for one had laryngitis 
on "the morning after". We went to DINAH 
HALLOWELL'S for cocktails and supper. 
SUE RAIRDON ALLEN was elected chair- 
man for our next reunion and L Y N N E 



thirty-three 



Mclaughlin moughty win serve as 

news chairman and class fund secretary. 
Send news to her before September 20th for 
the next Bulletin. After June 26 her address 
will be Mrs. John J. Moughty, Cedar Lane, 
Ridgefield, Conn. 06877. See you at the 
15th — 

Love, 

Lulu 
News Tidbits: 

First of all I had a son, Peter Noble, 
January 25, 1967. He joins brothers, Jimmy 
and Alec. LYDIA CORNWALL BISHOP has 
three children, two sons and a daughter, 
Kathryn Bates, born September 6, 1966. 
FRANCES YOUNG TANG had her third 
child and first son, Kevin Christopher, 
March 15, 1967. MARY W E L L M A N 
BATES' husband finished Wharton Grad- 
uate School in December, and is working 
with a consulting firm in Philadelphia. Her 
daughter, Lauren, is 5, and Christopher is 
3. MARCIA COLBY FRAME has a boy, 3!/ 2/ 



and a girl, 1 V 2 . SUE RAIRDON ALLEN has 
2 girls, Katie, 5, andJoan, 3. SANDY WILES 
MARQUIS has an 8-month old baby girl. 
ANNE GRAMKOW DEANE has a one-year 
old son. CECI ERICKSON MACTAGGART 
has two girls, Mara and Fiora, and a boy, 
Alastair. Ceci and her family are crusing 
for 3 months on a houseboat in the Baha- 
mas. We were sorry to hear that her father 
died suddenly in May. We were also sorry 
to hear that PAULA SLIFER ZANDSTRA'S 
father died April 27, 1967. JUDY MEDWED 
STAHL'S household consists of Debbie, 4!/2, 
John, 1 Vi, and Marquis, a 140 pound Ger- 
man Sheperd. Her husband has two auto- 
mobile dealerships which manage to keep 
him very busy. MARTHA BUCKLEY FAH- 
NOE and her husband are enjoying Cali- 
fornia immensely. They see NANCY DAVI- 
SON MILLER frequently. Nancy has a 
daughter, Kathey, 3 1 /2, and a son, Clay, 
who is all "tiger". PAT BIJUR CARLSON'S 
husband is working in Army Security. Her 
daughter, Valerie, is 1 Vz years old. GWEN 






1957 

Front row — Janet McLean Hunt, Louisa Lehmann Birch with Sarah, Frances Young Tang 
with Tracy and Dana, Lulu Sulzbacher Cutler, Judy Medwed Stahl with Debbie, Mar- 
cia Colby Frame, Beverley Lord, Ellen Parker, Judy Botnick Carmody and Glee Wool- 
dredge Wieland 

Back row — M. Roberts Hunt, Oscar Tang, Sandra Wiles Marquis, Lynne McLaughlin 
Moughty, Thomas Allen, Sue Rairdon Allen, Anne Gramkow Dean, Dr. John Carmody 
and Jackie Goodspeed 




ODDY BECK has two girls, 4 and 3. CARO- 
LYN GREEN was married to Gregory F. 
Wilbur of San Francisco, Calif., on April 
29th. Gregory, a graduate of Stanford, re- 
ceived his master's degree from Stanford 
Graduate School of Business Administra- 
tion. He is a partner in the San Francisco 
investment firm, Irving Lundborg & Co. 
Carolyn is presently executive director of 
Young Audiences in San Francisco. KAREN 
JONES has returned from Bolivia after 4 
very enriching years as teacher and coun- 
selor in a Methodist Mission School. She 
is now in youth work and serving as an 
Educational Assistant in a Methodist 
Church in Coral Gables, Fla. CAROLYN 
GAINES ROBERSON and her husband are 
living in Princeton where he is working on 
his Ph.D. dissertation and teaching, and 
she is working for Educational Testing 
Service. ELLEN PARKER is working for an 
architect in New York City. JOAN PELLE- 
TIER ISABEL'S husband works for Colgate 
and they are now living in Managua, Nica- 
ragua. She writes that she has never seen 
so much construction of new houses as there 
is in Managua. She has two children, Mark 
and Margo. WIGS CARTER STANIAR, 
Wade and their son and daughter, are mov- 
ing to New York in June. 

1958 

BEVERLY BLACK was married April 15, 
1967, to John G. Barclay of Loudonville, 
N.Y. ELIZABETH ARTZ BEIM, CAROLINE 
GREENE DONNELLY, and ANNE MOUL- 
TON ANDERSON were attendants. John is 
a graduate of Lawrenceville School, the 
University of Geneva and the Centre 
d'Etudes Industrielles in Geneva. 

LINDA CARR writes, "I'm still living in 
a house in Chelsea (London) with 3 Eng- 
lish girls. I am working as a copywriter for 
a medical news magazine." 

NORA COLBY SALAWAY has a home 
in Port Washington not for from SUSIE 
TIDD AUGENTHALER. She has 3 children, 
Tracey, 5Vi, Charles, 41/2 and Peter, 1 V2. 
Her husband is a stock broker in New York 
City. 

PRISCILLA GRANT FLOOD'S first 
daughter, Deborah Collins, arrived Decem- 
ber 28, 1966. 

JUDY HART SHAW had a son, Gregory 
Mason, December 22, 1966. 



VICTORIA KOHLER is engaged to Wil- 
liam Harvey Webster, Jr. of West Hart- 
ford, Conn. He was graduated from Deer- 
field Academy, Amherst College and Har- 
vard University Law School. 

SALLY LEAVITT BLACKBURN'S hus- 
band is in Vietnam. She and the children, 
Lyn, 5, and Mike, 3, are living in Augusta, 
Ga. 

CAROLYN PHILLIPS BROWN had a 
second child and first daughter October 8, 
1966. Paul has recently been promoted to 
Lieutenant Commander, and they are living 
in Virginia Beach where he is stationed 
aboard a submarine. 

CLAUDIA SANDBERG WYLLIE had her 
second child and first son, Glenn Peter, 
April 27, 1967. 

SHIRLEY SLATER was married in Farm- 
ington, Conn. March 4, to John M. Cros- 
man, Jr. of Toledo, Ohio. John, who at- 
tended Haverford College, plans to join the 
Libbey-Owens-Ford Glass Company in 
Mason City, Iowa. 

1959 

LINDA LOBB TIMMINS is back in Cali- 
fornia — she misses the antique auctions 
of the East. 

JUDY AGOR AYDELOTT is very busy 
with real estate and piano lessons. 

SUSAN FOURNIER BAKER had her first 
child, a daughter, Jennifer Louise, August 
22, 1966. Her husband works for Ernst & 
Ernst, an accounting firm in Boston, and 
Sue is teaching first grade. 

ALICE IAMS KITTREDGE had a son, 
William Gholson, September 27, 1966. Her 
daughter, Avelina is 2!/2. 

CONSTANCE LAURENCE BRINCKER- 
HOFF had a daughter, Elizabeth Ann, De- 
cember 17, 1966. Connie is working for her 
Ph.D. in Bacteriology at the University of 
Buffalo. Her husband is studying for his 
Ph.D. in Philosophy. 

TINA SAVELL BARKER'S husband is on 
the Polaris Submarine, and they are living 
in Charleston, S.C. They have a new son, 
Edward Phillips, February 3, 1967. 

LAURIE SMITH has received a grant 
from the French government to study late 
medieval manuscripts in France next year. 

WINKIE WARD KEITH and her husband 
spent a month in South America and An- 
tartica. They spent 3 weeks on an Argen- 
tina ship touring the Palmer Peninsula of 



thirty-five 



Antartica looking for penguins, seals and 
whales. Then they traveled by truck through 
Terra del Fuego, Argentina. 

1960 

ANNA DUDLEY was married in Andover 
on February 5, to Leroy James Egan of 
Northampton, Mass. He is a candidate for 
a Ph.D. degree at Duquesne University. 

CAROLYN KENT is teaching History and 
Economics at the University of Vermont. 
She received a Master's in History from 
Brown last June, and spent last summer at 
Missouri University at the NSF Institute in 
Economics. 

JOYCE NASSAR became engaged in 
February to John P. Leary of Lowell, Mass. 
He graduated from Keith Academy and the 
University of Massachusetts. 

1961 

SHERRY CRAIG writes, "I graduated 
from the University of Colorado last August, 
and have been living in San Francisco since 
then. LIBBY HOLLOWAY is 1 Vz blocks 
away. It's a small world to room together 
for 2 years, not see each other for 6 years, 
and end up so close together. I'm working 
at Mt. Zion Hospital in the Pediatric Clinic. 
Would love to hear from any Abbot girls 
near here." 

BETH HYDE WASHBURN'S husband is 
teaching English at the Browne and Nichols 
School in Cambridge. Beth is teaching Eng- 
lish at the Acton- Boxborough Regional 
High School. 

JUDITH PURSER became engaged in 
February to Michael F. J. O'H. Sibley of 
London, England. He was graduated from 
Stonyhurst College in England, and heads a 
public relations agency in London. Judy is 
working with Seaworth Properties Ltd., a 
property investment company in London. 

LINDA SCOTT GIBBINS is living in Nep- 
tune Beach, Fla. Her husband has taken 
over as the Exchange Officer at the May- 
port Naval Station. 

KRISTINA STAHLBRAND was married 
May 28, 1967, in Hamilton, Mass. to Dean 
Bradstreet Pineles. He was graduated from 
Mount Hermon School and Brown Univers- 
ity, and is studying at Boston University 
Law School. 

1962 

BARBARA BICKLY SEGRAVES writes, 
"My husband has interrupted his M.D. to 



take a Ph.D. in Psychology at the Maudsley 
Hospital in London. We have a charming 
little flat in 'swinging' Chelsea, and we're 
doing a lot of traveling. This spring we 
plan to travel overland to India, and this 
summer should find us in Moscow for 
language study. There are advantages in 
marrying a professional student!" 

MARY CONCEMI SOMMER is a social 
worker for the Connecticut Welfare De- 
partment. 

NANCY ELWELL was married to Rufus 
K. Griscom, March 25, 1967, in Pelham 
Manor, N.Y. ANNE RIPLEY was the maid 
of honor. Rufus is an alumnus of Brown 
University, and will receive his master's 
degree in Slavic languages from Brown in 
June. Nancy will graduate from Cornell- 
New York Hospital School of Nursing in 
June. 

CYNTHIA EVERETT is engaged to Lt. 
Jonathan W. White, USA, of Lexington, 
Mass. He was graduated from Belmont Hill 
School and Dartmouth, and is now stationed 
at Ft. Campbell, Ky. Cynthia is studying for 
a master's degree in astronomy at Wesleyan 
University. 

CLAUDIA KERR GROSE had a daughter, 
Carolyn Bronia, on November 26, 1966. 
They returned to Moscow in mid-March. 

NANCY MATTHEWS is engaged to 
Bruce Macleod of Darien, Conn. He is a 
graduate of Deerfield and Williams Col- 
lege, and is attending Harvard Graduate 
School of Business Administration. 

LYNNE MORIARTY is engaged to An- 
drew Langlois of Groton, Conn. He was 
graduated from Carnegie Institute of Tech- 
nology, and Harvard Graduate School of 
Business Administration. He is with General 
Dynamics Corp. 

FREDERICA MULLER AALTO and her 
husband will be on the Oregon coast for 
the summer where Ken will be doing field 
work for his master's degree. 

1963 

ANN HARRIS sent the following news 
items: 

SUSAN ARCHER announced her engage- 
ment in October to David Rehder of Water- 
loo, Iowa. Dave received his B.A. from 
Northwestern last June, and expects to re- 
ceive an M.A. from the New York School 



thirty -six 



*£ 



<ft$k&'1 





1962 

Rebecca Bartlett, Kathrin Krakauer, Sally Allen, Carolyn Dow, Martha Mason, Elizabeth 
Wood, Mary Lou Currier, Charlotte Abbott Behrens, Sue Boynton Koerner and Lynne 
Moriarty 



of Journalism this June. They will be mar- 
ried in St. Paul's School Chapel on June 24. 

MARGIE BROWN worked as a trainee 
for retardation in Social Work Careers Pro- 
gram last summer. She tutored retarded 
children at the Lawrence Guidance Center. 

SUE BURTON is studying art and lang- 
uage in Paris with Academic Year Abroad. 
She plans to return in June, and will be with 
her family in North Andover. 

JUDITH BUTLER writes, "Having com- 
pleted 2 summers as stage manager in 
stock theatre, I am now living in New York 
and working for GMAC. I am doing oc- 
casional work Off- Broadway." 

KATHERINE HILGENDORFF was mar- 
ried to Ens. Mark W. Blanchard U.S.N., 
April 15, 1967, in Fairfield, Conn. Mark is 
a graduate of the Loomis School and Dart- 
mouth College, and is assigned to the USS 
Finch. Kathy will graduate from Vassar in 
June, and plans to join Mark in Guam. 

JACKIE VAN AUBEL JANSSENS and 
her son, Olivier, are coming to the states 
this summer. She will be staying with her 
sister, Mrs. Banbury, Prospect Dr., Madi- 
son, Conn, from July 24 to August 14, and 



would love to see any friends who are near 
there. 

CAROLYN HOLCOMBE is majoring in 
Sociology at Beloit. There she is currently 
serving as president of Theta Pi Gamma 
Sorority. 

From Elmira BARB HOFFMAN writes of 
her challenging and rewarding experience 
as a residence counselor for underclassmen. 
She is also active in the Art and Photography 
Club and is president of the Theater Asso- 
ciation. She is considering graduate school 
or museum work for next year. 

MARIA PASTORIZA was engaged at 
Christmas time to Roberto Bonetti whose 
home is also the Dominican Republic. 
Roberto attended Lawrenceville and was 
graduated from Yale in 1965. He also at- 
tended the Berkeley Graduate School in 
Engineering. He is currently working in the 
peanut oil industry in the Dominican Re- 
public where he and Maria plan to make 
their home. 

1964 

News Secretary: SUSAN STAFFORD, 
4103 Spruce St., Box 1397, Philadelphia, 
Penna. 19104 



thirty-seven 



ALLIS BROOKS is in the School of Edu- 
cation at Syracuse, and is majoring in Ele- 
mentary Education. She spent last summer 
as a camp counselor near Tulsa, Okla., and 
enjoyed "everything except the scorpions, 
centipedes, and copperhead snakes!" She 
visited GAIL GRUVER and her family in 
Corpus Christi, Tex. 

MARTHA COLEMAN spent the spring 
semester in Rome at the Intercollegiate 
Center for Classical Studies. 

BRIDGET PARSON is engaged to James 
A. Saltonstall of North Andover. He studied 
at Le Rosey, Rolle, Switzerland, and was 
graduated from Brooks School. He is 
a senior at Harvard. 

GWYN WALKER is head of basketball 
and sinas in the Chattertocks at Pembroke. 

LAURIE WALTUCH is studying in France 
this year. 

1965 

News Secretary: GAIL GOLDSTEIN, Box 
1815, Connecticut College, New London, 
Conn. 06320 

KATHY STOVER studied for 5 months at 
the University of Copenhagen with many 
side trips including a week in Rome and 
another in Berlin. She is now at Pitzer Col- 
lege rooming with SUZE VOORHEES. Her 
main concern is how to get back to Europe! 

1966 

News Secretary: ELLEN S O B I L O F F , 
Chatham College, Box 103, Pittsburgh, 
Penna. 15232 

I'm very sorry that there was so little 
news in the last BULLETIN. Things got sort 
of messed up with the deadlines. There is 
much to tell this time, though .... 

First of all, a most unbelievable coinci- 
dence has occurred: a group of girls are 
selling Kathryn Beich candy in my dorm! 
I may never escape it, although I haven't 
invested in a can yet! While in New York 
City last January, I spoke to both PEIGI 
DONAGHY and FRAN JONES who were 
both happy at their respective schools and 
studying hard for exams. Shortly after that 
I called SALLY WATLING at Michigan who 
was loving it, despite the bitter cold. She 
sees NAN BYAM and MARY LIVING- 
STON. BETH HUMSTONE came to Pitts- 
burgh in February and stayed at Chatham 
for the week end. She looks marvelous and 
loves being near Boston. 



In March I went to Johns Hopkins and 
stayed in Blake's room at Goucher. She is 
very happily pinned to a boy at Johns Hop- 
kins and loving school. Also saw NEE a few 
times — still smiling — who said that 
MARTY BAYLES loves Radcliffe. 

I speak to MARGY quite often who just 
adores U. Penn (too much!) . She'll be there 
this summer at the summer school. Heard 
from BABS a while ago that she may be 
going to Mexico City this summer. She's 
happy and in love — spent some time with 
JEANNIE at Clark. 

LAURIE HINCKLEY sounds thrilled at 
Wheaton. She was in Florida during Spring 
vacation as were JUDY BRICKER, LUCY 
THOMSON, LIZZIE BLAKE, KAREN FUL- 
LER and MARGY. MOUSE ran into NANCY 
WERTH in the Washington airport who's 
"fine and seems happy at Randolph Ma- 
con." MOUSE is trying to organize a re- 
union in either Boston or New York in the 
near future — I'll be there wherever it is! 

DREWRY loves Mills and is very active 
there. She spent time skiing at Squaw Val- 
ley during vacation and was home in Win- 
ston for a while. When SALLY WATLING 
went home during her break, DREWRY 
came up and visited her. 

Received a newsy letter from AY E R 
CHAMBERLIN. She left Beloit for a week 
due to illness, but is fine now. While home, 
she saw "reams of Andies" and JUDY 
FROEBER who is reported to be fine and 
happy. AYER is very active in student or- 
ganizations and has even started one of her 
own: Peace Education — War Opposition 
— which is "doing quite well and hopes to 
grow in time." She's also honorary house- 
mother of a local fraternity — "my family 
has been increased by 45 brothers!" She'll 
be at her school apartment all summer and 
invited anyone up for some "southern hos- 
pitality." 

LEE HASELTON and I saw each other 
much too infrequently this year mainly due 
to differences in schedules. But she is doing 
quite well at U. Pittsburgh and has been 
dating the captain of next year's football 
team. She is home now for the summer and 
will be seeing PINKY and others around 
the New England area. She hears that JU- 
LIE DUPONT is pinned and happy at Ste- 
vens. 



thirty-eight 



DUCKIE and I have been corresponding 
often. She and her family are now in Rome 
and will be moving to Florence where they 
will meet with LUCY CRANE. The WHITE- 
HEADS just spent quite a while in Greece 
visiting the CRANES and traveling around 
the country. LUCY and the WHITEHEADS 
spent a lovely day with our Greek boy, 
Achilles, and his family. From LUCY'S and 
DUCKIE'S descriptions, it was much like 
the day I spent there with MRS. CRANE in 
1964. The family and village are prosper- 
ing and it seems, from the bi-annual report 
that I receive from the Save the Children 
Federation, that they will only need our 
support for one more year (I think that's 
just about all we'll be able to afford!). 
Achilles, who does farmwork during the 
daytime, will be attending evening classes 
at a Technical School for a three-year 
electrician's course. Catherine was en- 
gaged last December and is planning to 
marry in a year, while little Anthony is 
getting straight A's and will continue on 
to high school. 

I wish I could include the entire descrip- 
tion of the day in Aghios Georgios from 
LUCY'S letter, but I'm afraid it can only 
be minimal: 

. . . The Aidinises have doubled their in- 
come each year for about the past three 
years by buying ewes and selling the lambs 
and then buying land or more ewes. Now 
they are contemplating buying olive trees 
which will produce in six years. Anyway 
you look at it, they have done well. Their 
house is new and about the cleanest in the 
village. They do have electricity meaning 
mostly one light bulb in each room, but no 
running water. But the out-house is lovely 
and clean (both Duckie and I can testify!) 
... I would say, from observation only, that 
they are the best off family in the village 
. . . Mr. Aidinis attached himself to me 
because I kept trying to speak a little 
Greek. He was very profuse in his thanks 
and kept trying to show his gratitude by 
enormous smiles and double helpings of 
food . . . Generally, the entire family was 
the essence of hospitality and gratitude. 
They are the kind of Greeks that make this 
the country that we can't help but love . . . 

By three o'clock, when we were still eat- 
ing, there must have been at least thirty 
kids pushing for a place near the window 



where they could see these strange visitors 
. . . Food and more food was brought in. 
We had the typical country mezedes, or 
appetizers of feta cheese and sausage and 
homemade bread. Then in came fried pota- 
toes and platters of chicken and lamb and 
salad and a pitcher of homemade retsina, 
resinated wine. Yum. Needless to say, we 
followed Greek rules of guestship and stuff- 
ed. It was superbly delicious ... It was a 
really nice day and now we know that we 
are helping a lot and they know that we 
all do care . . . 

LUCY reports that she has stopped going 
to classes "mainly because I did want to 
travel and because I felt it was a little too 
much like what I was trying to get rid of 
this year. Having talked to Duckie, I am 
inclined to agree that with a set up like 
this, the best thing to do is study part of 
the time either steadily or in periods and 
then travel or independent study the rest 
of the time." She is planning to travel to 
Lebanon, Damascus, and Jerusalem in May 
and will be returning home by boat on 
August 22nd. Nancy and her family are 
now traveling through Italy, then to So. 
France, Spain and then back to Germany. 
They will arrive in New York on the fif- 
teenth of August. 

My family and I spent a wonderful two 
weeks in Nassau during vacation at which 
time I met JOAN BRAZER ('65) . We spent 
time together reminiscing — both agreed 
that we miss Abbot and all our old friends! 
On my way home, I was standing by a mail- 
box in the Miami airport, when who should 
come by but BARBARA TIMKEN! She was 
heading back to Smith after a marvelous 
vacation in Naples, Italy, and Greece. It was 
quite a surprise! 

This summer I will be taking two English 
courses — both on poetry — for credit at 
Harvard Summer School. Happily, Lizzie 
and I will be roommates again in the Har- 
vard dorms and venturing to Cape Cod on 
the weekends (hopefully). Liz will be tak- 
ing courses in photography and art history. 
If anyone is in the Cambridge vicinity (or 
Hyannis) PLEASE come to visit! 

PAST FACULTY 

Many alumnae will be sorry to learn that 
Helen Bean Juthe's husband died March 4, 
in Altamonte Springs, Fla. 



thirty-nine 



Did we miss your name? 

Engagements ? Marriages ? 

Children ? Travels ? Careers ? 

We'd love to add it to the class news — please send to the 
Alumnae Office before September 25, 1967 



Maiden Name Class. 

Ma rr ied Name 

Address 

Zip Code 

forty 



MARGUERITE HEARSEY 

Abbot Academy's story from 1936 through 1955 is told by Alice Curtiss 
Sweeney in her book, Marguerite Hearsey. The book includes excerpts from 
Miss Hearsey's speeches which reveal the positive influence of this vigorous 
woman on the girls who were at Abbot Academy just before, during and 
after World War II. 



Enclosed please find $3.25 for copy of Marguerite Hearsey. 
(Make check payable to Abbot Academy) 

Maiden Name - 

Married Name _ 

Address 

Zip Code _ 



This is a limited edition. Send order to Alumni Office by June 15, 1967. 

Book will be mailed September 1. 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 

Andover. Massachusetts 

return requested 



ENTERED AS 
SECOND-CLASS MATTER 

AT THE POST OFFICE AT 

ANDOVER. MASSACHUSETT! 










/fit 



IJU- 



ABBOT ^ 

ACADEMY 

BULLETIN 



Annual Giving Report 

— Alumnae Fund 
— Parents' Fund 
— Other Gifts 



^sp *£ # # *5^^^-^ * * * ^ * 






.4/mo 1778 



4 
* 



PHILLIPS ACADEMY 



i 




i" OLIVER-WENDELL- HOLMES 4 

I LIBRARY ! 

* A # 

# _ 

4 $ iff # 






^-#S># ##5 



The Executive Board of the Alumnae Association 



President 



Vice Presidents 



Clerk 



Treasurer 



Executive Secretary 

Delegates -at -Large 



Alumnae Trustee 
1963-1969 

Alumnae Trustee 
1966-1972 



1 966 - 1 968 

Mrs. James F. Mathias 

( Barbara Lord) 

Glendale Rd.. Harrison, N.Y. 10528 

Mrs. Leonard M. Fowle 

( Nancy Kimball) 

36 Norman St., Marblehead, Mass. 01945 

Mrs. John E. Cain, Jr. 

(Aagot Hinrichsen) 

21 Lantern Lane, Weston, Mass. 02193 

Mrs. Malcolm S. Loring 

(Anne Russell) 

Pepperell Rd., Kittery Point, Me. 03905 

Mrs. E. Hartley Smith 

(Deborah Redfield) 

4 Jefferson St., Marblehead, Mass. 01945 

Mrs. Gage Olcott 

(Helen O'Brien) 

40 Oakridge Rd., Wellesley, Mass. 02181 

Miss C. Jane Sullivan 

20 Buswell St., Lawrence, Mass. 01841 

Mrs. Robert L. Bettinger 

(Fredericka Brown) 

133 Rhoda Ave., Fairfield, Conn. 06430 

Miss Elizabeth F. Bulkeley 

340 Mill Hill Terr., Southport, C ^490 

Miss Alice C. Sweeney 

3 5 School St., Andover, Mass. 01810 

Mrs. John B. Ogilvie 

( Donna Brace) 

14 Circle Rd., Darien, Conn. 06820 






VOLUME 35, NUMBER 4 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN SEPTEMBER 1967 

Editor: C. JANE SULLIVAN 

Asst. Editor: MRS. FRANK DiCLEMENTE 
Published four times yearly, October, February, May and September, by Abbot Academy, Andover, Massachusetts. Entered as 
second class matter December 12, 1933, at the post office at Andover, Massachusetts, under the act of August 24, 1912. 

PRINTED AT EAGLE-TRIBUNE PRINTING. LAWRENCE, MASSACHUSETTS 









To Alumnae, Parents and Friends of Abbot: 

A word of thanks to the Development Fund Committee — to Mary Howard 
Nutting, '40, Chairman, to Guerin Todd, Parents' Chairman, and to Aagot 
Hinrichsen Cain, '44, Alumnae Chairman — for a job well done. The Trustees 
are most appreciative of the time and effort they and the Class Fund Secretaries 
spent in Abbot's behalf — and, of course, the result in dollars is most en- 
couraging. 

I think everyone will be pleased at what has happened to the physical 
plant at Abbot this summer. Not the least is white trim on Draper! You have 
to look at it from the gates to see what a difference paint makes. Then the 
library has been renovated, an arcade constructed to give direct access to the 
dining hall, a new classroom has been built in the basement of McKeen and 
extensive work done on the second and third floors of Draper — all this from 
imaginative and skillfully drawn plans by our long-time trustee, J. Radford 
Abbot. 

Abbot Hall's classrooms have been painted, the labs and halls have new 
linoleum floors — and all in all the money from the Development Fund, we 
feel, has been spent wisely and carefully. 

The Committee to select a new Principal has also been active this summer 
and I hope that we will have an announcement to make by the end of the 
Fall Term. 

Again — the thanks of the Trustees go out to the loyal alumnae and 
parents of Abbot. Come and see these improvements with your own eyes! 

Philip K. Allen 
President, Board of Trustees 



three 



ABBOT 

DEVROPMSNT 

FUND 



July 1, 1966 — June 30, 1967 





TOTAL — $77,797.21 






ALUMNAE 




Annual Giving 


1,345 contributors 


$27,843.95 


Bequests 




$21,810.30 


Total 


$49,654.25 




PARENTS 






261 contributors $26,260.16 






FRIENDS 






$1,882.81 





four 



CLASS 

HONOR 

ROLL 



1930 
1948 

1953 
1954 
1922 



Largest Dollar Total 



Frances Sullivan Sullivan 


§3,000.47 


Rosemary Jones 


$1,282.46 


Genevieve Young Sun 




Mary Grant Lynch 


$1,022.74 


Molly Young Sauereisen 


$ 840.00 


Gwendolyn Bloomfield Tillson 


$ 754.00 



Largest Number of Contributors 

1956 Lynn Dowlin Voss 29 

1958 Caroline Greene Donnelly 29 

1921 Margaret Ailing Ward 28 

Marian Ailing Bradley 

1930 Frances Sullivan Sullivan 28 

1942 Barbara Sanders Dadmun 27 

1948 Rosemary Jones 27 

Genevieve Young Sun 



Highest Percentage of Participation 

1917 Miriam Bacon Chellis 88% 

1907 Marjory Bond Crowley 84% 

1903 Margaret Wilson Gerber 78% 

1915 Jessie Nye Blodgett 72% 

1919 Kathryn Beck Dow 71% 

five 



c 



c 



Abbot Development Fund 

July 1, 1966 — June 30, 1967 

Alumnae 

Percentages below class numerals indicate per cent o£ a class contributing 
to Fund and the amount represents the total contribution from the class. 

t Regular 

* Contributed prior to death 



1893 
100% — $110 

tCharlotte Conant Nicholls 
•Elizabeth Nichols Bean 



1895 


25% — $15 


tFannie Lewis Shattuck 


1896 


20% — $25 


•flsabel Chapin Gould 


1897 


29% — $60 



fFrances Hinckley Quinby 
fLillian Miller Troutman 
t Marion Priest Fuller 

1898 
40% — $110 

tLucy Hartwell Peck 
fBeulah Loomis Hyde 

1899 

60% — $75 

In memory of Ruth 

Childs Young 
fLilian Mooers Smith 
tHarriet Wanning Frick 

1900 
25% — $5 
tEthel Hazen Lillard 

1901 

In memory of Faith 

Leonard Holden 
t Helen Buck 
t Lilian Dodge Brewster 
tLeila Fraser Gilbert 
tHelen Hale 
t Isabel Herrick Klous 

1902 
25% — $25 
tCatharine Deacon Palmer 



1903 
78% — $80 

fEdith Burnham Roberts 
fRuth Cobb Bryant 
tAletta Hegeman 
tHelen Packard McBride 
Harriett Reid Stewart 
t Olive Williams Parke 
t Margaret Wilson Gerber 

1904 

70% — $200 

fElizabeth Case Staege 
tHelen Childs Baldwin 
tSarah Field 
tHelen French 
t Sophie Gibbs Sage 
tElizabeth Schneider 
tMary Byers Smith 
tGrace Speirs Sodergren 
t Emily Stearns Giese 

1905 
18% — $25 

tFrances Cutler 
Knickerbocker 
tFanny Hazen Ames 

1906 
50% — $55 

Alice Barbour Merrill 
tPersis Mackintire Carr 
tConstance Parker Chipman 
tRena Porter Hastings 
tMargaret Sherman Neef 
tMaud Sprague 

1907 
84% — $396 

tMabel Allen Buxton 
tMary Ball Bigelow 
t Marjory Bond Crowley 
tMargaret Hall Walker 
tLaura Howell 
tClara Hukill Leeds 
tLeonora Parsons Cooper 
tAnna Richards Folsom 
tLouise Richards Rollins 
Grace Spear Noble 
tAlice Webster Brush 



1908 
45% — $422 

tHelen Buss Towle 
tGertrude Caunt Barnes 
Mary Cheney Chase 
Thirza Gay Hunt 
tHelen Hulbert Blague 
tWinifred Ogden Lindley 
t Esther Parker Lovett 
Esther Stickney Alley 
t Dorothy Tayior 
tElizabeth Watts 

1909 
44% — $123 

tMary Bourne Boutell 
tElizabeth Fuller 
tEdith Gardner Tobey 
tjanet Gorton 
tMarjorie Hills Allen 
tSarah Knox 
tMarjorie Soule Byers 

1910 
65% — $123 

tLois Bradford Marvin 
Margaret Gooch Barney 
tClarissa Hall Hammond 
tLaura Jackson Austin 
tGrace Kellogg 
tPersis Mclntire Downey 
tRuth Murray Moore 
tRuth Newcomb 
tEthel Reigeluth Darby 
tEdith Seccomb Young 
tLydia Skolfield Parsons 

1911 

70% — $190 

t Dorothy Bigelow Arms 
tPersis Bodwell Millspaugh 
tAnna Boynton Hemenway 
t Marion Brown 
tOlivia Flynt 
tMary Hall Lewis 
Borghild Hofj Lyman 
tMiriam Howard Bushnell 
tEdith Johnson Donald 
t Rebecca Newton Weedon 
tFrances Pray 
tMargaret Strong Hill 
tEthel Swain Smith 
t Henrietta Wiest Zaner 



1912 
53% — $298 

+Anne Blauvelt Sanderson 
tMildred Chutter 
tRuth Draper Hyde 
tLucy Kilby 
tAbbie Laton 
tBarbara Moore Pease 
t Dorothy Simpson Faith 
tNora Sweeney 

1913 

50% — $240 

tMary Helen Boyd Higgins 
tMildred Bryant Kussmaul 
tHelen Dan forth Prudden 
tGladys Estabrook 

Blanchard 
Doris Furber 
t Hazel Goodrich Waugh 
tHelen Hersey Heffernan 
tDoris Sawyer Smith 
tLouise Thompson Cottrell 

1914 
35% — $431 

In memory of Katharine 

Selden McDuffie 
tMarion Clark Myerscough 
tMary Flynn Bernardin 
tHelen H amble t Dyer 
tMary Hildreth 
tAlice Sweeney 
t Bertha Wessel 
t Marie Winsor Appleby 
Margaret Wylie Ware 

1915 
72% — $197 

tElizabeth Allen Belknap 
Rena Atwood Benson 
tMarion Barnard Cole 
tEleanor Bartlett Atwater 
tMarian Bayley Buchanan 
tMarion Brooks 
tPhyllis Brooks Stevens 
tAurelia Hillman Sanders 
Freda Joslin Sprague 
tMattie Larrabee 

Whittemore 
tElizabeth Leach 
tjessie Nye Blodgett 



SIX 



tGertrude Shackleton 

Hacker 
tEsther Shinn Caldwell 
tArline Talcott Turner 
tAda Wilkey Bull 
tMarion Winklebleck Hess 
tHarriette Woolverton 

Robinson 

1916 
65% — $327 
In memory of Myrtle 

Dean Lewis 
tCharlotte Eaton 
t Eleanor Frary Rogers 
tLillon Hamer Atkinson 
tHelene Hardy Bobst 
Miriam Huntington Ripley 
tMildred Jenkins 

Dalrymple 
tEsther Kilton 
tLouise Kimball Jenkins 
tLouise King Childs 
tlnga Little Bouve 
tMarion Mellor Dean 
tGrace Merrill Emery 
tDorothy Niles 
t Katharine Odell Randall 
tBernice Overend Merrill 
t Margaret Perry James 
tDorothy Pillsbury Bartlett 
tAlice Prescott Plumb 
tHelene Sands Brown 
tEmma Stohn Larrabee 
tEsther Van Dervoort Howe 
tjosephine Walker 

Woodman 
tElizabeth Wood Gage 

1917 
88% — $420 

t Miriam Bacon Chellis 
t Harriet Balfe Nalle 
Irene Baush Greene 
Carita Bigelow Moore 
Bernice Boutwell Parsons 
t Frances Cartland 
t Marguerite Dunaway 

Baldwin 
Frances Gere 
tGertrude Goss 
Elizabeth Graves Hill 
Sarah Humason 
Lucy Lane Church 
Alice Littlefield Legal 
tjulia Littlefield 
tEdith Marsden 
tHarriet Murdock Andersson 
Cornelia Newcomb Lattin 
Dorothy Newton 
tCornelia Sargent 

Battershill 
tMarjorie Smithwick 

Parsons 
Janet Tenney Smith 
Mary Elizabeth Wuichet 

De Armon 
Catharine Yeakle Burnell 



1918 

50% — $410 
Margaret C. Allen 
tRuth Allen Healy 
t Irene At wood 
tLouise Bacon Fuller 
tGwendolen Brooks 

Reynolds 
tKathryn Cooper Richards 
tElizabeth Gray Coit 
tClarissa Horton Sanford 
Avalita Howe Brown 
tMarion Hubbard Craig 
tEmmavail Luce 

Severinghaus 
tMarion McPherson 
jMartha Miller Reese 
t Katharine Righter Jenkins 
Julia Sherman Tibbetts 
tHelen Snow Murdick 
t Margaret Speer 
tDorothy Stalker 
tMargaret Van Voorhis 
t Virginia Vincent Phillips 



1919 



71% 



$331 



In memory of Grace 

Francis Jenkins 
tKathryn Beck Dow 
tMarea Blackford Fowler 
tEthel Bonney Faber 
tGwendolen Bossi Henson 
tGretchen Brown Knights 
Marion Chandler 
t Katharine Coe Taylor 
tMary Cole Day 
tCharlotte Copeland Gray 
tDorothy Cutler Burr 
tMildred Daniels Cary 
tCora Erickson Ayers 
tMildred Frost Eaton 
tGladys Glendinning 

Loveland 
tjosephine Hamilton Leach 
tHarriette Harrison 
tjane Holt Atkinson 
tMuriel Johnson Lovejoy 
tDorothy Korst Blodgett 
tWinifred LeBoutillier 

Tyer 
Gertrude Lombard 

McGinley 
tElisabeth Luce Moore 
tMary Martin 
tThelma Mazey Gager 
tVirginia McCauley Otis 
Helen Meigs van Dyck 
tGladys Merrill 
tCaroline Richardson Korst 
tNadine Scovill Young 
Elizabeth Sjostrom Thomson 
tEleonore Taylor Ross 
tMargaret Taylor Stainton 



1920 
61% — $388 

tMargaret Ackroyd Hunt 
tHope Allen Brown 
tElizabeth Babb Beveridge 
tEdna Dixon Mansur 
Helen Donald Coupe 
tVivien Gowdy Larabee 
tLillian Grumman 
tKatherine Hamblet 
tElizabeth Hawkes Miller 
t Hilda Heath Safford 
tAnna Ruth Hussey 
tKatherine Kinney Hecox 
tDoris McClintock Taylor 
tPaulina Miller Patrick 
tMuriel Moxley Hubbard 
tLucy Pratt Rutherford 
tLouise Robinson 
tElizabeth Stewart Pieters 
tlsabel Sutherland Kurth 
tHelen Thiel Gravengaard 
tDorothy Tyler 
tCharlotte Vose Clark 
tHelen Walker Parsons 
tRuth Winn Newhall 
tBertha Worman Smith 
tMargaret Worman 
Thompson 

1921 
56% — $311 

tMargaret Ailing Ward 
Marian Ailing Bradley 
tMiriam Bickjord Haskin 
tElizabeth Bulkeley 
tDorothy Carr 
tElinor Cochrane Knight 
tEthel Dixon McGee 
t Frances Gasser Stover 
t Frances Keaney Rickard 
tMarion Kimball Bigelow 
tKatherine Kriight Fassett 
tDorothy Martin Buracker 
Eunice Meigs Pease 
Margaret Neelands Parsons 
tHelen Nor pell Price 
tEdith Page Bennett 
t Marian Parker Paulson 
tMary Peirce Smith 
tHelen Roser 
t Jessamine Rugg Patton 
tWinifred Simpson Worgan 
tElizabeth Thompson 

Winslow 
tFrances Thompson Heely 
tHenrietta Thompson Beal 
tAgnes Titcomb Henderson 
tAlma Underwood Udall 
tElizabeth Weld Bennett 
tMary Williams Cochran 

1922 
49% — $754 

tjane Baldwin 

tPhyllis Bankart Paulsen 



tGwendolyn Bloomfield 

Tillson 
tGeneva Burr Sanders 
Catherine Damon Mason 
tKatherine Damon Kletzien 
tDorothea Flagg Smith 
tBeatrice Goff 
tBarbara Goss 
tMargaret Hopkins 

Wetherell 
tOlive Howard Vance 
tElizabeth Hutchinson 

Bluntschli 
tCaroline Iredell 
tLois Kirkham Hart 
tHelen Knight Wilkinson 
tMary Mallory Pattison 
tElizabeth MacPherran 

Worcester 
Mary Elizabeth Polk 

Overstreet 
tMargaret Potter Kensinger 
tBarbara Sands Sherman 
tAlice Van Schmus Smith 
tSusana Welborn Osborn 
tAnne Whinery 
tDorothy Williams Davidson 

1923 
57% — $607 

In memory of Dolores 

Osborne Hall 
tElisabeth Adams Ross 
tNathalie Bartlett 

Farnsworth 
tMartha Buttrick Rogers 
tBarbara Clay Crampton 
tEdith Damon Bugbee 
tAnne Darling Whitehouse 
tSarah Finch Hartwell 
tElizabeth Flagg Dow 
tFrancelia Holmes 
tRuth Holmes Durant 
tElizabeth Maxwell Killian 
tCatherine Miller 

McCurdey 
t Margery Moon Ziegfeld 
tNatalie Page Neville 
tMary Elizabeth Rudd 
tMary Scudder Marshall 
tMartha Snyder Purrington 
tMary Catherine 

Swartwood Sinclaire 
tMiriam Sweeney McArdle 
tDorothy Taylor Booth 
tElizabeth Thompson Henry 
tEmily Van Patten 

Blackmore 
tEleanor Widen 
tEsther Wood Peirce 

1924 
34% — $202.50 

tjane Allen Kilby 
tSybil Bottomley Talman 
tMargaret Colby Williamson 
tDorothy Converse 



seven 



tCaroline Hall Wason 
tAdelaide Hammond 

Johnson 
tKatherine Hart Mitchell 
tHelen Keating Ott 
tRuth Kelley Perry 
fMargaret MacDonald 

Vester 
t Margaret McKee De Yoe 
tElsie Phillips Marshall 
tRuth Pritchard de Rivera 
fMary Elizabeth Ward 
tVictorine Warner Knox 
t Frances Williams 

MacCorkle 

1925 

44% — $214 

fEleanor Bodwell Pepion 
tElaine Boutwell von Weber 
tElizabeth Burtnett Horle 
tRuth Connolly Burke 
tRuth Davies Van Wagenen 
tAnnie Estes Mayo 
Lilian Grosvenor Jones 
tFrances Howard O'Brien 
tEunice Huntsman 
Nesta Johnson Magnuson 
tTheodate Johnson Severns 
Hildegarde Mitteridorff 

Seidel 
tElizabeth Rightcr Farrar 
Hildred Sperry Raymond 
tElizabeth Ward Saunders 

1926 

44% — $733 

Florence Allen Needham 
tAdelaide Black 
tBarbara Bloomfield Wood 
tCatherine Blunt Pierson 
Anstiss Bowser Wagner 
tEdith Bullen Creden 
t Marion Burr Sober 
t Katharine Clay Sawyer 
tRuth Deadman McLennan 
tLouise Douglass Hill 
tRuth Farrington 
Dorothy Gillette Henley 
tPatricia Goodwillie 

Blanchard 
tEdith Ireland Wood 
tHelen Larson 
tLucie Locker Rash 
tSuzanne Loizeaux 
tEdda Renouf Gould 
tSylvea Shapleigh Curtis 
tCarlotta Sloper 

1927 

51% — $515.35 

Class Gift 

tHelen Amesse 
tMary Ayers Hower 
tHelen Connolly McGuire 
tMargaret Creelman Nelson 



Nathalie Cushman Allen 
tKatherine Farlow 

Hutchinson 
tEllen Faust 
Dorothy French Gray 
tPersis Goodnow Brown 
tjane Graves Howard 
Ruth Harvey Hart 
tjune Hinman Marques 
tMiriam Houdlette Walsh 
tEmily House Maidment 
tPauline Humeston Carter 
tMarion Ireland Conant 
tLois Kimball 
tNancy Kimball Fowle 
Sylvia Miller Bellows 
tRuth Nason Downey 
tMargaret Nay Gramkow 
tRuth Perry 
Alice Rogers Gove 
Edna Russell Watson 
tAylmer Stantial Kempton 
Sydna White 

1928 
34% — $290 

tRuth Cushman Hill 
Lois Dunn Morse 
tVirginia Gay d'Elseaux 
tFrances Gould Parker 
Elizabeth Jackson Kennedy 
tBeatrice Lane Mercer 
tMary Alice Mcintosh 
tMargaret Nivison Chase 
Josephine Paret Barrett 
tSusan Ripley Ward 
Elizabeth Ryan Hill 
tEmily Sloper Shailer 
Elizabeth Small 
Jean Swihart Sherwood 

1929 

68% — $436 

tin memory of Elizabeth 

Bowser Smith 
In memory of Dorothe 

Gerrish 
tin memory of Bettina 

Rollins Wheeler 
tin memory of Louise 

Tobey Dean 
tLouise Anthony Castor 
tKatherine Blunt Polsby 
tCatherine Bowden Barnes 
tGertrude Campion Soutar 
tGrace Castle 
tFrances Cobb Russell 
tMary Eaton Graf 
tOlive Elsey Weigle 
tBarbara Folk Howe 
tPolly Francis Loesch 
t Harriet Gilmore Yoh 
tLois Hardy Daloz 
tjeannette Hubbard 
Helen Hurlburt Whittles 
tjoyce Jarman McNamara 
tEleanor Jones Bennett 



tGwenllian Jones Hamblin 
tRoberta Kendall Kennedy 
tEstelle Levering Chestnut 
Jane Linn Gale 
tMary Elizabeth Macdonald 
Elizabeth McKinney Smiley 
tDorothy Newcomb Rogers 
tElisabeth Osborne Bacon 
tDespina Plakias Messinesi 
tRuth Shulze Clement 
Edith Smith Hilljf 
tMillicent Smith Uppvall 
tGrace Stephens 
tElizabeth Taylor Amazeen 
Martha Futile Haigis 
t Rosamond Wheeler 
Putnam 



1930 
60% — $3,000.47 
tRuth Baker Johnson 
tKatharine Bigelow 

Heberton 
t Donna Brace Ogilvie 
tElizabeth Brewer Dericks 
tAlice Ca7ioune Coates 
tRosamond Castle Olivetti 
tHor tense Dunbar 
tKathryn Dulton Leidy 
tKathie Fellows Leiserson 
tKatharine Foster Rainbolt 
tFlorence Gardner Balius 
tCornelia Gould Scott 
tGrace Hadley MacMillan 
Evelyn Hamilton White 
Margery Hart Cory 
tChristine Hollands Struck 
tBarbara Lamson Cummings 
tBarbara Lord Mathias 
tjanice Lovell Jenkins 
tMary Jane Owsley Warwick 
tElizabeth Perry Lewis 
Elizabeth Quinby Parmelee 
tHelen Ripley 
tMarianna Smith Hile 
tElizabeth Southworth 

Sutton 
tVivian Southworth 

Gertstell 
tDoris Sturtevant Bacon 
tFrances Sullivan Sullivan 



1931 
40% — $370 
tKatherine Allen Babson 
tMary Angus 
tMary Bacon 
Metta Bettels Smith 
tKatharine Brace Cummings 
tRuth Cann Baker 
tNancy Carr Holmes 
tFaith Chipman Parker 
Barbara Graham Holland 
tMary Henderson Lee 

#Gift matched by J. M. 
Huber Corp. 



tDorothy Hunt Bassett 
tLisette Micoleau 

Tillinghast 
tMarcia Rudd Keil 
Frances Scudder Glisson 
tMary Smead Homlar 
tjane Sullivan 
tNanine Wheeler Allender 
tMarie Whitehill 



1932 
31% — $330 

tHelen Allen Henry 
t Isabel Arms 
tElizabeth Bigler deMasi 
tHelen Cutler Appleton 
tPriscilla Donnell 

Anderson 
tFlorence Dunbar 

Robertson 
tConstance Hoag Porter 
tElizabeth Holihan Giblin 
tMarie Holihan Foley 
tMary Hyde deMille 
tEunice Randall 
tDorothy Richardson 
tGeorgia Thomson 
tRuth Tyler Smith 
tAtossa Welles 
tMarietta Whittemore 

Bartlett 
tHarriet Wright Miller 



1933 

29% — $251 

tMargaret Chase Johnson 
tRozilla Chase Roberts 
tAnn Cole Gannett 
Olive French Sherman 
tMarcia Gaylord Norman 
tCarolyn Guptill Hansen 
t Kathleen Palmer Race 
tHelen Rice Wiles 
tjane Ritchie Shaw 
t Ethel Rogers Foster 
tAlice Schultz Valkenburgh 
t Maria tta Tower Arnold 
tMargaret Walker Whittier 
t Betty Weaver Van Wart 
tKathryn Whittemore 
Knight 



1934 
32% — $425 

Elizabeth Caldwell Hastings 
tKatharine Damon Reed 
Margaret Estes Ballantine 
tMary Flaherty Savage 
tEleanor Harryman 

McQuarie 
tCassandra Kinsman Dexter 
Nancy Marsh Gares 
tMargaret Morrill Wilkins 



eigh t 



tRuih Stott Petersjf 
Beverly Sutherland 
Midgett 

1935 
37% — $222 
tDoris Anderson Clark 
tCathleen Burns Elmer 
tLaura Cliedel Miller 
Jane Dawes McClcnnan 
tElaine Eaton Ferine 
t Helen Heald Racier 
tSnsan Hildreth Goodwin 
tEleanor Johnson DuToit 
tGeraldine Johnson 
tElizabeth Jordan 
tElizabeth Morgan Foster 
tLncia Nunez Mason 
tClaire Oppenheim Marum 
tEllen Rivinius Hill 
tShirley Smith King 
tEliese Strahl Cutler 
tMargit Thony 
Helen Tower Stritmatter 

1936 
43% — §194 
tSally Burns Beckwith 
tMary Dooley Bragg 
Lucy Hawkes Lamson 
Frances Mahoney Gay 
t Grace Nichols Knight 
fVirginia Nourse Salomon 
tHelen O'Brien Olcott 
tBarbara Reinhart 

Livingston 
tElinor Robinson Goodwin 
tCaroline Rockwell Stevens 
tElizabeth Sargent 

Crandell 
tSally Scates Phclan 
tPauline Spear Chapin 
tMary Swan 
tMary Trajton Simonds 

1937 
43% — $369 
In memory of Thelma 

Cutter Leuenberger 
tMarjorie Boesel 

Van Winkle 
tCorinne Brooks Cornish 
t Nancy Burns McArdle 
tCatherine Forbush Bass 
Dorothy Hamilton Gammon 
Lucy Hulburd Richardson 
Elisabeth Joost Todd 
t Nancy Kincaid Breslin 
tElizabeth McArdle 

McDermott 
tElizabeth Melcher 

Anderson 
tjeannette Partridge 

Harrison 
tGeraldine Peck Rockwell 
tBarbara Pierpoint Craig 

8 Gift matched by 
Cabot Foundation Inc. 



t Martha Ransom Tucker 
tPriscilla Richards Phenix 
tLouise Risley Stcver 
tAnne Sawyer Greene 
Lillian Seilcr Willins 
tGrace Vibberts Conlin 

1938 
26% — $267 

tMarjorie Coll Fields 
t Margaret Comstock 

Bayldon 
tAnn Dooley 
tMary Elliot Brown 
tPhyllis England Letts 
tSue Anne Eveleigh McVie 
tRosa Fletcher Crocker 
tElizabeth Garvey Murphy 
tMarjorie Holt Campbell 
tElizabeth McBride 

Chapman 
tSara Peck 

tAnne Simpson White 
tCarol Wliittemore Fellows 

1939 
31% — $350 

tBarbara Bellows Kaiserjf 
tLucia Buchanan 

Livingston 
Frances Cross Jones 
Virginia Halstead Lightfoot 
t Dorothy Heidrich Lockhart 
tjoan Hubbard Lawson 
tMary Koch Danos 
tBarbara Leland Pearson 
tMarjorie MacMullen 

Brewer 
tPolly Pancoast Tunkey 
tAdelle Sawyer Wood 
tjcanne IVaugh Harney 

1940 
45% — $623 

tLee Burnett Peterson 
Joan Carlson Hutchison 
tFrances Chandler Futch 
Mary Chase Foster 
tjeanne Coiules 

Fleischmann 
tPhyllis Crocker England 
tCarolyn Cross Robbins 
tCharlotte Downey Boutin 
t Patricia Elliot Ettele 
t Elisabeth Ellis Chase 
tDorothy Garry Warlick 
Margit Hintz Lorenze 
tMary Hoxvard Nutting 
tVirginia Jones Garvan 
t Margaret Meyer Hayncs 
tMarietta Meyer Ekbcrg 
Jean Moir Miller 
Susan Place Duncan 
tChristine Robinson Likins 



JfGift matched by Miehle- 
Goss-Dexter Foundation 



tElizabeth Travis 

Sollcnberger 
tRachcl Whitney Davis 
tPriscilla Williams Dorian 
Jane Wilson Lindberg 
tNancy Wilson Ainslie 

1941 
31% — $212 
tHarrict Beach Zeitung 
tjoan Belden McDonough 
tNancy Eccles Roome 
Mary Elizabeth Erkert 

Altorfer 
tAlda Grieco Cesarini 
tDoris Jones Hannegan 
tNancy Kelley Park 
tjoan List Van Ness 
tSuzannc Long Reed 
t Margery Martin Martin 
Eloise Perkins Beck 
tjane Philbin Dreyfuss 
Emily Ruth Poynter 
tLuella Sommer Vermeil 
tFrances Troub Roberts 
tAdeline U'aterhouse 

MacKay 
tNancy Whittier Atkinson 

1942 
43% — $705.34 
tlrene Abbott MacPhcrson 
Suzanne Bates Heath 
tjane Bishop Fahey 
tjane Bittel Weil 
Ethel Bolton Henderson 
Gloria Caldarone Hegarty 
tAnnette Curran Conlon 
tPatricia Daniels Hanson 
tMarjorie Dean Marsden 
Miriam Douglas Sanncr 
t Janet Dwight Nickerson 
tDiantha Hamilton 

McDowell 
t Betty Hardy Verdery 
tBarbara Hill Kennedy 
tjanice Lenane Scott 
tLouise Leslie Loud 
t Margaret McFarlin 
t Marilyn Menschih 

Wcstaway 
Ruth Rathbone Hildreth 
tjane Rutherford 
tBarbara Sanders Dadmun 
tThirsa Sands Fuiks 
tEarline Simpson 
tRuth Snider Bernstein 
t Margaret Stuart Bcale 
Lucia Tuttle Fritz 
tElsic Williams Kchaya 

1943 
21% — $260 
tMary Beckman Huidekopcr 
tjean Craig Fitzgerald 
tAmelia Daves Kopald 
tElizabeth Garratt Taylor 
tjean Hansen Ashhaugh 
tMargarct Howard Long 



• Viin Loughridge Konstam 
tElizabeth Rowley 

Titlmanng 
tBcttye Rutherford 

McCouch 
tThemis Sarris Ellis 
tjoyce Yofla Rudolph 

1944 
50 % — $397 
tNancy Baylor Little 
Anne Buland Koerner 
tjacqueline Calvin Johnson 
tElisabcth Colson Tierney 
Patricia Damon Niswandcr 
tNancy Emerson Viele 
tRuth Goodall Pitslick 
tAagot Hinrichsen Cain 
tCynthia Holmes Spurr;^ 
tLouise Honnen Tutt 
tMarianna Hubbard 

Mercer 
tRuth Kirstein Turkanis 
tRuth Lyons Hickcox 
tFrances MacDonald 

Thompson 
tAlma Mastrangelo 

Strabala 
tNancy Nicholas Wengert 
tKatherine Pendleton 

Phelan 
Elizabeth Reid Buzby 
tMarion Stei>ens Harris 
tNancy Stone Heymann 
tjulia Tavares Alvarez 
Margaret Travis Atwood 
tShirley W'oodams 

HoestereytfJMf 

1945 
38% — $403 
tBarbara Ball Bacon 
tBarbara Beecher Carl 
t Rosalie Benton Lee 
t Esther Bufjerd Watstein 
Elizabeth Dickerman Lovatl 
tjoan Holds-worth Maxwell 
tMary Jane Kurth 

Longabaugh 
tSally Leavitt Cheney 
tAndrcc Luce Cooney 
tMarion Marsh Birney 
tMarjorie Milne Winston 
Helen Norris Stearns 
tHilary Paterson Cleveland 
Jessamine Patton Kennedy 
t Janet Redman Hill 

tCynthia Smith McFalls 
tShirley Sommer Holzwarth 
tjoan Sweeney 

• Mary Taylor Shcrpick 
tBcatricc Van Cleve Lcc 
Lois Whiffen Dunnam 



if Gift matched bv Olin 
Mathieson Chem. Corp. 

t" (.ift mate lied bv 
Bank of New York 
JJJCift male lied b\ lord 
Educational Fund 



nine 



1946 
39 % — $330 
tSallr Allen Waugh 
tPatricia Bonne 

Rickenbacker 
tEllen Brumback 
-Mary Burton Blakney 
-Louise Doyle Collins 
tBarbara Graf Robinson 
Ann Hellweg Warren 
Elsa Hinchman Clark 
-Mary Howe Brumback 
tKatherine Johnson 

Robbins 
tPatricia Keefer Stoeffel 
tGreta Leinbach Smith 
tFrances Little Schonenberg 
tCynthia Noone 
tMarjorie Sommer Tucker 
tGail Sullivan Fleming 
tCarolyn Teeson Keller 
-Nancy Thomas Adams 
-Marian Troub Friedman 

1947 
42 % — $391.25 
Nancy Barnard Soule 
- Barbara Dean Bolton 
-Helen Dowd Richards 
^Virginia Eason Weinmann 
tEdith Flather Swan 
tBarbara French Brandt 
-Emily Gierasch Savage 
tDiane Gould Berkeley 
tDorthea Hall Keman 
tCorallie Hanly Murray 
tSally Humason Bradlee 
Joyce Huntington Knights 
-Margaret Kimball 

Montgomery 
tjov Kolins Berglund 
tjane Leu-is Gleason 
Sarah W. McDufBe 
tCarol McLean Bly 
tMargot Me\er Richter 
tMary Lou Miller Hart 
tMartha Morse Abbot 
tjean Ritchey Bora 
tSusanne Robbins de Wolf 
tCarolyn Sackett Coleburn 
tMaud Savage 
tGeraldine Tread way 

Dampier 
tMarion White Singleton 

1948 
40% — $1,282.46 

In memory of Estelle 

DuBois Hoy 
tMartha Ball Geiken 
tMartha Barber Lowrance 
t Katharine Bigelow 

Fitzgerald 
tBrigid Bisgood Galusha 
tLee Booth Witwer 
tNadine Cookman Price 
t.Alice Cooper Wright 
Beth Dignan McGinty 



tMary Farrar Bonotto 
tFairheld Frank DuBois 
tjosephine Hildreth Mirza 
t Rosemary Jones 
t Jacqueline Kay Schlosser 
-Jane Kenah Dewey 
Tina Koines Grange 
tMary Lackey StowellJ 

• Man Marton Davenport 
Mariel Mellersh Toynbee 
t Elizabeth Ogden Tod 
tHannah Richmond 

Hammer 
tAnn Robinson Joyce 
Julie Schauffler Bucklin 
Barbara Shulze Baldwin 
tMary Carroll Sinclaire 

Morris 
tHelen Tasche North 
tFelicia Tavarcs Angulo 
tEleanor Wallis 

1949 
19% — $115 
Helen Appell Norton 
t Mercy Barnes 
Fredericka Brown 

Bettinger 
tCarlotita Gonzalez Mann 
Jovce Hall Bell 
Barbara Hamby McLane 
Joan Oven Betts 
tCamilla Titcomb 
tDeborah Williams 

Troemner 
Jane Woolverton Wrench 

1950 
45% — $305 
Anonymous 

tCarol Bernstein Horowitz 
tMary Bixb\ Lamb 
tNoelle Blackmer Beatty 
tElizabeth Bradley 

Hubbard 
tPatricia Burke Wright 
-Bettv Caldwell 

Badertscher 

• Anne Dunsford Hockmeyer 
tCynthia Faigle Quinn 

t Beverley Flather Edwards 
t Roberta Gibbon Coates 
Mary Jane Greenwald 
Denzer 

• Ann Higghts Bride 
tCoralie Huberth Sloan 
■^Caroline Kimberly Loring 
tDorothv Lampert 

Feigenbaum 
tAnn Merriwether 

Disharoon 
tSusan Morgan Rolontz 

• Ann Moser Hughes 
tElizabeth Moss Schmidt 
tDeborah Redfield Smith 



Gift matched bv 
Pitney-Bowes, Inc. 



tBarbara Somers Dorsey 
tSarah Stei'ens MacMillan 
t Gloria Yoffa Portnoy 

1951 
21% — $185 
tjoan Barnard Lynch 
"Gwendolyn Barrington 

Nichols 
t Alison Faulk Curtis 
tSylvia Finger Marlio 
tCarolin Furst Carlson 
tBarbara Gibson Roth 
tEdna Grieco Thomas 
^Constance Hall Strohecker 
t Paula Holden Palmer 
tSusan Kimball Wheelock 
tSally Mason Crowell 
tHarriette McConnel 

Soule 
Cora Alice St. John 

Gebhardt 
tAnn Taylor van Rosevelt 

1952 
32% — $162.75 

"Martha Artz Barrett 
Joan Baird 
tLorna Ball Prescott 
tSally Binenkorb Zilber 
t Barbara Church Sheffer 
tSarah Emmons 'Warren 
tNancy Faraci Shionis 
Elizabeth Griffiths McCurdy 
Cornelia Hamilton 
Greenspan 
tElizabeth Hammons 

Sullivan 
tAnn Lyons Litz 
Anne Merchant 
tNancy Muth Clements 
tClara Reynolds Palmer 
tSandra Smith Lisk 
Deborah Snover Evans 
Anne Spencer Stallman 
tjoan Wood Stephenson 

1953 
30% — $1,022.74 
tMargit Andersson Clifford 
Caroline Benedict Ferguson 
tPatricia Earhart 
tNancy Edmonds Luce 
tjulie Gaines Phalen 
t Mars' Grant Lynch 
tCarol Hardin Kimball 
t Polly Jackson Townsend 
Ann Kennedy Irish 
Helen Marvell Henkels 
tNatalie Starr Lee 
tDiana Stevenson Brengel 
tAnn Stoddard Saunders 
tAudrey Ta\lor MacLean 
t Cornelia Weldon 

LeMaitre 
Judith Wilcox Martin 
tjane Wilson Mann 



1954 
38% — $840 

tElizabeth Beeson Tafel 
tAudrey Davis Trowbridge 
tNancy Donnelly Bliss 
Man Lou Duffy Abata 
Helene Dunn Bodman 
Sarah Harrington 

Anna Hewlett James 
tAnn Hunt Graf 
Winifred Johnson Sharp 
Linda Jones Campbell 
Sarah Jones Easter 
Gretchen Kase Smith 
Suzanne Larter Lingeman 
Margaret Moore Roll 
Jane Munro Barrett 
tDoris Xiemand Ruedin 
Frances Xolde Ladd 
t Maris Oamer Noble 
tPaula Prial Folkman 
tjudith Prior Adame 
t\'icky Schwab Aronoff 
tPatricia Skillin Pelton 
tSvlvia Thayer Zaeder 
tEdith Williamson Bacon 
tMolly Young Sauereisen 

1955 
35% — $251 

tGail Baldwin Whipple 
tStarr Best Hope 
tjudith Carpenter Rackey 
Martha Clark Olt 
Mary Earhart Horton 
tNancy Eastham Iacobucci 
iBeisy Elliott Winkler 
tAnne English Stoner 
t Dorothy Fleming King 
tjolyne Foumier Boyle 
Sarah Graf Fish 
tDeborah Green West 
Margaret Holbrook Birch 
Jane Kent Rockwell 
t Katharine Lloyd 
tSusan McGuire McGrath 
tMary Minard 

Karen Olson Smith 
Jeanne Skillin Moore 
tDiane Sorota O'Dwyer 
tKatherine Stirling Dow 
tMary Ann Yudicky 
Goodrich 

1956 
44% — $287 
Susan Bradley Lee 
Grace Callahan Hagstrom 
Lynn Dowlin Voss 
Elizabeth Edmonds 
t Marilyn Emsley Betts 
Phoebe Estes Bryan 
Nell Eubanks Temple 
Mary Anne Faggiano 
Hendren 
tDeborah Holbrook 

Winthrop 
Barbara Hurd 



ten 



tSusan Kauer Schofield 
tCarol Kelton Ryland 
tMollie Lupe Lasater 
t Margaret Oliver Hedcman 
tMarjorie Orr Maclver 
tElizabeth Parker Powelljf 
Patricia Pearce Brodersen 
tCarol Reed Karnopp 
Sue Richmond Hoagland 
Margaret Rothwell Klein 
tEleanor Rulon-Miller York 
Sarah Sullivan McCain 
t Nancy Swift Greer 
tjane Tatman Connelly 
tAnne Tripp Hopkins 
tPoinier Wadsworth Perry 
tjudith Warren Kiely 
tSusan Waterous Wagg 
Susan Wickham G rover 

1957 
36% — $190 
t Martha Buckley Fahnoe 
tMary Lee Carter Staniar 
Cecile Erickson Mactaggart 
Carolyn Gaines Roberson 
t Miriam Ganem Reeder 
Jacqueline Goodspeed 
Carolyn Green Wilbur 
tPenelope Holbrook Reid 
Sally Lawrence Kauder 
Louisa Lehmann Birch 
Beverley Lord 
tjanet McLean Hunt 
tjoan Pelletier Isabel 
tPaula Slifer Zandstra 
tDeborah Smith Regan 
tMary Ann Spurgeon Lewis 
tLucinda Sulzbacher Cutler 
tDeborah Tillson 
tMary Wellman Bates 
tSandra Wiles Marquis 
tLouise Wooldredge 

Wieland 
tFrances Young Tang 

1958 
37% — $284 
tElizabeth Artz Beim 
tBeverly Black Barclay 
tLinda Carr 
tSandra Castle DuPuy 
tjane Christie Smith 
Leonora Colby Salaway 
tAnne Cole Warren 
t Lucia Comas 
tAgnes Daley Rothrock 
tNancy Dick 
tAnn DiClemente Ross 
t Parry Ellice Adam 
tBetsy Gardner Riley 
tPriscilla Grant Flood 
t Harriet Gray 
tCaroline Greene Donnelly 
tjudith Hart Shaw; 

$ Gift matched by 
General Electric 
jf&Gift matched by The 
Chase Manhattan Bank 



tSally Lawrence Hopkins 
tSara Leavitt Blackburn 
Nancy Miller Connolly 
tSusan Moore Ferris 
tAnne Moulton Anderson 
tEdith Olson Davies 
tFrederica Owsley Thomas 
t Wynne Paffard Delmhorst 
Carolyn Phillips Brown 
tClaudia Sandbag Wyllie 
tMary Steketee MacDonald 
tNancy Stevenson Jackson 
tSusan Tidd Augenthaler 

1959 
31% — $208 
tjudith Agor Aydelott 
Gale Barton Hartch 
tElizabeth Bell 
Hetherington 
tSusan Bradley 
tFaith Critchley 
tMary Feltwell Gordon 
tjoan Fisher Chambers 
tAlma Grew 
tjay Holland^ 
Alice lams Kittredge 
Elizabeth Kellogg Morse 
Linda Lobb Timmins 
tPatricia Marvin 
tNona Porter Gallant 
tHolly Robertson Chalmers 
Elisabeth Savell Barker 
tKate Sides Flather 
Laurie Smith 
tAnn T ravers Butler 
Winifred Ward Keith 
Nancy Wardwell 
tCatherine Watson Rapp 

1960 
19% — $116.50 
Alice Anthony Poinicr 
Amelia Comas 
tAlexandra Crane Frishman 
tAnna Dudley Egan 
tSarah Foote Hubby 
Kristianne Graham Bumpus 
Jane Humphrey Adams 
Terry Hydeman Seward 
tCarolyn Kent 
tjoyce Nassar Leary 
t Barbara Non- 
Ann Valkenburgh Kindred 
Sarah von der Heyde 
tBrenda Walker Hirsch 
Susan Wallace Fraim 

1961 
20% — $98 
Sharon Craig 
Stephen ie Davis Erickson 
Lee Erickson 
tSusan Fox 
tAnn Fahnestock 
tGray Hodges 

t Gift matched by 
Textron, Inc. 



tElizabeth Hyde Washburn 

Eileen Keegan 

Andrea Lynch 

t Phyllis Rogde Glcason 

Susan Rothwell 

Linda Scott Gibbins 

Mary Jane Sheppard 

Markley 
tjoan Spurgeon 

1962 
26% — $220 

Charlotte Abbott Behrens 
tSally Allen 

Barbara Bickly Segraves 
tBetsy Bruns Eaton 
Mary Concemi Sommer 
Nancy Elwell Griscom 
Cynthia Everett White 
tCarol Ann Field Bennett 
Hilary Field Gripekoven 
Pauline Gray Keyes 
Claudia Kerr Grose 
tKathrin Krakauer 
t Martha Mason 
Frederica Muller Aalto 
tlngrid Quarck 
Linda Swanberg Musser 
Dorothy Wheeler Bacon 
tGretchen Whitehead 
tElizabeth Wood 

1963 
22% — $101.50 
Margaret Brown 
tSuzanne Burton 
tjudith Butler 
tElizabeth Cadbury 

Montagu 
Em i lie Dean 
t Karen Flack Bonnell 
Jacqueline Goehring 

Hielsberg 
tAnn Harris 
tBarbara Hoffman 
tMorley Marshall 
tBettina Proske 
tAnita Schenck 
tCynthia Sorensen 
tChris Stern 
Letitia Upton 
Jacqueline Van Aubel 

Janssens 
tHelen Watson Collison 

1964 
15% — $51 
Martha Coleman 
Joan Harney 
Margaret Hinckley 
Amy Johnson 
Kristina Jones 
Elfriede Laafj Koenig 
Susan Localio 
Gretchen Overbagh 
Edith Paffard 
Lee Porter 
Molly Webster 



1965 
16% — $82.73 
Alhson Davies 
Deborah Downs 
Constance Goehring 
Claudia Hall 
Susan Harney 
Margrit Krakauer 
Anne McDermott 
Olivia Motch 
Carol Reische 
Becky Reynolds 
Karen Smith 
Rosemary Tyler 
Susan Voorhees 

1966 
32% — $247 
Beverley Armsden 
Lorinda Burling 
Martha Church 
Paula Cortes 
Valerie de Peyster 
Susan Doucett 
Sarah Downs 
Judith Froeber 
Lee Haselton 
Barbara Hazard 
Jean Lippincott 
Bethe Moulton 
Mary Porter 
Erica Ritter 
Kathleen Roan 
Ellen Ross 
Pamela Sevey 
Barbara Slaymaker 
Lonnie Somers 
Dorothy Van Duzer 
Janet Waring 
Sallie Watling 
Marcia Watson 
Nancy Werth 
Mary Wilson 

1967 

$1000 

Class Gift 

Past Principal 
(Marguerite C. Hearsey 

Past Faculty 
In memory of Isabel 

Hancock 
tHelen Bean Juthe 
+ Esther Comcgys 
Hope Coolidge 
Ruth Elvedt 
tKate Friskin 
+ Barbara Humes Fusion 
Dorothy Patten Min.inl 

Gertrud Rath 
Virginia Rogers Miller 

Clubs 
t Boston Abbot Club 
tXt -w York Abbot Club 



eleven 



Parents, Trustees and Friends of the School 



Mr. J. Radford Abbot 

Mr. and Mrs. Roland Achin 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Q. Adams 

Dr. and Mrs. William H. Ainslie 

Mr. and Mrs. Heath Allen 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip K. Allen 

Dr. and Mrs. Eduardo Alvarez 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Antonopoulos 

Dr. and Mrs. Fred Arragg 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip Babb 

Mr. George Baird 

Miss Jane B. Baldwin 

Mr. and Mrs. John Barclay 

Mrs. F. B. Baylor 

Dr. and Mrs. John Beal 

Mr. and Mrs. James M. Beale 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Belcher, Jr. 

Mr. G. Grenville Benedict 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Bergh 

In memory of Maurice Bernstein 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Bertsche 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Best 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Bever 

Dr. and Mrs. John Bisbing 

Mrs. Thomas Bogardus 

Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Bolton 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Bowne 

Mrs. Walter Bradley 

Mr. and Mrs. Eric Brainerd 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Brazer 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Breed, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. John Brown 

Mr. and Mrs. David Brumback 

Mr. and Mrs. John Brumback 

In memory of Samuel H. Bufferd 

Mr. Robert Bushnell 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Kenrick Butler 

Mr. and Mrs. Dexter Butterfield 

Mr. and Mrs. B. Bartram Cadbury 

Mrs. John E. Cain, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Myron Carmer 

Dr. and Mrs. Henry Carr 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Carter, Jr. 

Mr. Lyndall Carter 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Castle 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Cecere 

Professor and Mrs. Raymond Cerf 

Dr. and Mrs. Maurice Chagnon 

Mr. and Mrs. John Chamberlain 

Mr. and Mrs. William Chamberlin 

Mrs. Gladstone Chandler 

Mr. and Mrs. E. Barton Chapin 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward R. Cheney 



Mrs. Sara Chisholm 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Church 

Mr. Charles Cleaver 

Dr. and Mrs. Manuel Coggan 

Mr. and Mrs. Jason Cohen 

Dr. and Mrs. Angelo Contarino 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Cook 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Cooper 

Dr. and Mrs. Daniel Coughlan 

Miss Margaret Curran 

Mr. and Mrs. James Curtis 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Daley, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leo Daley 

Mr. and Mrs. John Dean 

Mr. and Mrs. Warren Delano 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Demarest 

Mrs. Rachel Demarest 

Mr. and Mrs. Roland Derby 

Dr. and Mrs. Alexander Dick 

Mr. and Mrs. Tyree Dillard, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Dow 

Mr. and Mrs. James Dow 

Mrs. James Draper 

Mr. and Mrs. George Driscoll, Jr. 

Miss Alice Driver 

Dr. and Mrs. Richard Durham 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Earhart 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Eidam 

Mr. and Mrs. Clinton Eklund 

Dr. and Mrs. Dexter Elsemore 

Mr. and Mrs. David Elwell 

Mr. and Mrs. Pedro Espaillat 

Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Everett 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Ewald 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Faro 

Mrs. Edwin R. Fellows, II 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Finbury 

Mrs. Frederic Fiske 

Mr. and Mrs. Dudley Fitts 

Mr. and Mrs. James Flack 

Mr. Burton S. Flagg 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Flesh 

Mr. and Mrs. Hyman Forrest 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Furneaux 

Mr. and Mrs. Pierce Gaines 

Mr. and Mrs. Victor A. Gares 

Mr. and Mrs. John Garvan, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Giblin 

Mr. and Mrs. Nathaniel Gifford 

Mr. and Mrs. William Goldman 

Mrs. Dixie Goss 

Mrs. Bruce Graves 

Mr. and Mrs. Deane Gray 



Dr. John Green, III 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Greene 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Greene, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Grieco 
Mr. and Mrs. William Gurganus 
Mr. and Mrs. John Halford, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. John Hamilton 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Hamm 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hammond 
Mrs. Roland Hammond, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Gordon Hanes 
Mr. and Mrs. Roberts G. 

Hannegan, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. Hansen 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Hartmann 
Mr. and Mrs. Lincoln Haynes 
Mr. and Mrs. John Hazard 
Mr. and Mrs. Carroll Hebbel 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Heifetz 
Mrs. Lenert W. Henry 
Mrs. Forrest Hill 
Mr. and Mrs. Erik Hinrichsen 
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Hoffman 
Mr. and Mrs. James Holland^ 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Hoover 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hughes 
Mr. and Mrs. Otis Humphrey 
Mr. and Mrs. Millard Humstone 
Mr. Robert I. Hunneman 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Huntington 
Mr. Joubert Hurd 
Mr. and Mrs. Simeon Hyde, Jr. 
Mrs. Rose Jenkins 
Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Kaplan 
Mr. and Mrs. George Karelitz 
Mr. and Mrs. Stuart Kay 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Kelley 
Mrs. Waters Kellogg 
Mr. John Kelton 
Mrs. C. Carleton Kimball 
Mrs. William Koch 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Kohler 
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Kolins 
Mr. and Mrs. Bomas Kramer 
Mr. and Mrs. George Laaff 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Lackey, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Lacouture 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Lambert 
Mr. H. Warren Lawrence 
Mr. and Mrs. John Learned 
Mr. and Mrs. Laurence Leavitt 



$ Gift matched by 
Textron Foundation 



twelve 



Mr. and Mrs. Edmund Leland, Jr. 

Mr. Nicholas Liberatore 

Mr. and Mrs. Stafford Lindsay 

Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Loughridge 

Mr. Evelyn Luquer 

Mr. and Mrs. Duncan Maclntyre 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert MacLeod, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. James Major 

Dr. and Mrs. John Mallen 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Mansfield 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Markley 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Marshall 

Mr. and Mrs. Hans Marum 

Mrs. George Marvell 

Mrs. Edwin Marvin 

Mr. and Mrs. John Mason 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Masters, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Massengale, III 

Mrs. Rene Mathey 

Dr. and Mrs. John J. McArdle, Jr. 

Mrs. Donald Mclvor 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
McLaughlin, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. J. Wister Meigs 

Mr. and Mrs. Andre Meyer 

Mr. and Mrs. Cord Meyer, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Miller 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Minard 

Mrs. Emily Minor 

Dr. and Mrs. Jay Moses 

Mr. and Mrs. John Moxon 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Mugler 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Naman 

Mr. and Mrs. Karl Nelson 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Newcomb, II 

Mrs. Edgar Nichols 

Mr. and Mrs. David NimickJ 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis Niziak 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin Norr 

Mr. and Mrs. Chester Nourse, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fletcher Nyce 

Mr. and Mrs. Fredric O'Brien 

Mrs. John B. Ogilvie 

Mr. and Mrs. John Overbagh 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Owen 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederic Paflard, Jr. 



$ Gift matched by 
Rust Engineering Co. 



Mrs. Scott Paradise 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Patch 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Payne 

Dr. and Mrs. Frank Perkin 

Mr. and Mrs. Lovett C. Peters 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Phillips 

Mr. and Mrs. Alberto Pico 

Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Porter 

Mrs. Brooks Potter 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Rafton 

Mr. and Mrs. Smith Rairdon 

Mrs. Dorothy Randall 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Richards 

Mrs. Charles F. Rimmer 

Miss Helen Ripley 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Robinson 

Mrs. Arthur Rogde 

Mrs. Horatio Rogers 

Mr. and Mrs. David Rudman 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Sackett 

Mr. Orson St. John 

Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Samel 

Dr. and Mrs. Juan Santos 

Mr. and Mrs. Angelo Sapienza 

Mr. and Mrs. George F. Sawyer 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfio Scandura 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank J. Schiavoni 

Mr. and Mrs. Herman Schnepel, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Schoettler 

Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm Sedgwick 

Mr. and Mrs. John Sevey 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Sharp 

Dr. and Mrs. Dane Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. Everett Smith 

Mr. Mortimer Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Snelling 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Snover 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen Solomon 

Mr. and Mrs. Leon Somers 

Mr. and Mrs. John Spaulding 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Stahlbrand 

Dr. and Mrs. O. Sherwin Staples 

Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Steimle 

Mr. and Mrs. Campbell Steketee 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip Stevens 

Mr. and Mrs. Stoddard Stevens, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Stichnoth 

Mr. and Mrs. John Sturgeon 

Mrs. William Sturgis 



Mr. and Mrs. James L. Sullivan 
Mr. and Mrs. Gardner Sutton 
Miss Alice C. Swenney 
Mr. and Mrs. Kneeland Swenson 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Sykes 
Mr. Martin Tananbaum 
Dr. and Mrs. Leslie Tasche 
Mr. and Mrs. Juan Tavares 
Mr. Clarence Taylor 
Mr. and Mrs. William Thomas 
Mr. John Thompson 
Mr. and Mrs. Philip Thomson 
Mrs. G. Mean Timken 
Mrs. Samuel Titcomb 
Mr. and Mrs. Guerin Todd 
Miss Juliette Tomlinson 
Mr. and Mrs. Guy Ule 
Mr. and Mrs. Leroy Vandeveer 
Mr. and Mrs. Sheldon T. Viele 
Mr. and Mrs. M. Jennings 
von der Heyde 

Mrs. Creigh Wagner 

Mr. and Mrs. John Walker 

Mr. and Mrs. John B. Walker 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Wallwork 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Wannop 

Mr. and Mrs. Thayer Warshaw 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Waterhouse 

Mr. and Mrs. Chester Waterous 

Mr. and Mrs. Stuart Watson 

Mr. and Mrs. William Watson 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Waugh 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Weber 

Mr. and Mrs. Dean Webster, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Webster 

Mr. John Webster 

Dr. and Mrs. John G. Webster 

Mr. and Mrs. James Weidenman 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Wejman 

Mr. Scott Wells 

Mr. and Mrs. William Weston 

Mr. and Mrs. Grant Whipple 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Whitehead, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Frederick Wies 

Mr. and Mrs. John Withcrspoon 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Wohlgcthan 

Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius Wood 

Dr. George W. Wood, III 

Mr. and Mrs. Leander Yeaton. Jr. 



^£^0 



thirteen 



Alumnae pkquesite 

July 1, 1966 — June 30, 1967 



Abbot lists the following bequests with pride and deep gratitude. They 
reveal the devotion of the alumnae to the school and their abiding faith in 
the value of an Abbot education. 



Mary Thompson 

Grace Dorr 

Frieda Billings Cushman 

Evelyn Carter Giles 

Katherine Scott 

Vera Lesure Perry 

Margaret Wilkins 



1894 


5 2,046 


1895 


S 2,000 


1901 


S 5,000 


1901 


§10,000 


1903 


$ 1,000 


1908 


S 764 


1913 


S 1,000 



fourteen 



3)id ate miM, yaun, name ? 

eUUdtett? It&uell? Camera? 

We'd love to add it to the class news — please send to the 
Alumnae Office before January 25, 1968 



Maiden Name Class 

Married Name 

Address 

Zip Code -. 



Alumnae Office 
Abbot Academy 
Andover, Mass. 01810 



U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

Andover, Mass. 
permit no. 26 




V 






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f PHILLIPS ACADEMY 



■* 







* OLIVER- WENDELL- HOLMES # 

I LIB RARY I 

* 

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The Executive Board of the Alumnae Association 

1 966 - 1 968 



President 



Vice Presidents 



Clerk 



Treasurer 



Executive Secretary 

Delegates -at- Large 



Alumnae Trustee 
1963-1969 

Alumnae Trustee 
1966-1972 



Mrs. James F. Mathias 

( Barbara Lord) 

Glendale Rd.. Harrison, N.Y. 10528 

Mrs. Leonard M. Fowle 

(Nancy Kimball) 

36 Norman St., Marblehead, Mass. 0)945 

Mrs. John E. Cain, Jr. 

(Aagot Hinrichsen) 

21 Lantern Lane, Weston, Mass. 02193 

Mrs. Malcolm S. Loring 

(Anne Russell) 

Pepperell Rd., Kittery Point, Me. 03905 

Mrs. E. Hartley Smith 

(Deborah Redfield) 

4 Jefferson St., Marblehead, Mass. 01945 

Mrs. Gage Olcott 

(Helen O'Brien) 

40 Oakridge Rd., Wellesley, Mass. 02181 

Miss C. Jane Sullivan 

20 Buswell St., Lawrence, Mass. 01841 

Mrs. Robert L. Bettinger 

(Fredericka Brown) 

133 Rhoda Ave., Fairfield, Conn. 06430 

Miss Elizabeth F. Bulkeley 

340 Mill Hill Terr., Southport, Conn. 06490 

Mrs. Walter I. Scott, Jr. 

(Janice Lenane) 

12 Orchard Circle, Greenwood, Mass. 01880 

Miss Alice C. Sweeney 

35 School St., Andover, Mass. 01810 

Mrs. John B. Ogilvie 

(Donna Brace) 

14 Circle Rd., Darien, Conn. 06820 






ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 



MAY 1967 



VOLUME 35, NUMBER 3 



Editor: C. JANE SULLIVAN 

Asst. Editor: MRS. FRANK Di CLEMENTE 

Published four times yearly, October, February, May and September, by Abbot Academy, Andover, Massachusetts. Entered as 
second class matter December 12, 1933, at the post office at Andover, Massachusetts, under the act of August 24, 1912. 

Senior class positive on page 3 and solarized negative on front cover are 
identical! Photography by Richard D. Graber, Andover. 



PRINTED AT EAGLE-TRIBUNE PRINTING, LAWRENCE, MASSACHUSETTS 



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ABBOT 
ACADEMY 
BULLETIN 



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# PHILLIPS ACADEMY 

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I LIBRARY * 

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The Executive Board of the Alumnae Association 



President 



Vice Presidents 



1 966 - 1 968 

Mrs. James F. Mathias 

(Barbara Lord) 

Glendale Rd.. Harrison, N.Y. 10528 



Mrs. Leonard M. Fowle 

(Nancy Kimball) 

36 Norman St., Marblehead, Mass. 01945 

Mrs. John E. Cain, Jr. 

(Aagot Hinrichsen) 

21 Lantern Lane, Weston, Mass. 02193 

Mrs. Malcolm S. Loring 

(Anne Russell) 

Pepperell Rd., Kittery Point, Me. 03905 



Clerk 



Mrs. E. Hartley Smith 

(Deborah Redfield) 

4 Jefferson St., Marblehead, Mass. 01945 



Treasurer 



Mrs. Gage Olcott 

(Helen O'Brien) 

40 Oakridge Rd., Wellesley, Mass. 02181 



Executive Secretary 



Miss C. Jane Sullivan 

20 Buswell St., Lawrence, Mass. 01841 



Alumnae Trustee 
1963-1969 



Miss Alice C. Sweeney 

35 School St., Andover, Mass. 01810 



Alumnae Trustee 
1966-1972 



Mrs. John B. Ogilvie 

( Donna Brace) 

14 Circle Rd., Darien, Conn. 06820 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN OCTOBER, 1967 



VOLUME 36, NUMBER 1 



Editor: C. JANE SULLIVAN 

Asst. Editor: MRS. FRANK DiCLEMENTE 
Published four times yearly, October, February, May and September, by Abbot Academy, Andover, Massachusetts. Entered as 
second class matter December 12, 1933, at the post office at Andover, Massachusetts, under the act of August 24, 1912. 

Front Cover Picture by Richard D. Graber, Andover, Massachusetts 



PRINTED AT EAGLE-TRIBUNE PRINTING. LAWRENCE, MASSACHUSETTS 



From the desk of Miss Tucker . . . 



A New Year's Greeting to the Abbot Alumnae 

As the school year of 1967- 1968 begins at Abbot, I consider the 
distinguishing characteristics of this particular period of time. Last June the 
trustees voted to spend a considerable amount of money to update our 
plant. The building improvements were completed just as the girls arrived. 
The observant ones coming around the circle noticed with delight the white 
window-frames of Draper Hall. The new carpet on the first and third floors 
and the more fairly apportioned rooms on the third floor unobtrusively 
make the girls more comfortable and less affected by the presence of others. 
The Means Memorial Library has been redecorated and enlarged. New 
carpet and draperies have been installed and modern carrels will come 
soon. The Bailey Dining Room may now be entered through a glass-enclosed 
arcade that provides an art gallery wall and also a lovely view of the 
flowers and fountain in the courtyard. This arcade's chief function is to 
make the Library a quiet place. 

On the ground floor of McKeen Hall we have an additional classroom. 
English is taught where once you racked your skis. 

Mrs. Crane's house now contains eleven girls and the house parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Lovely. Everything about the house is new, even its 
name, Cutler House. 

I invite each of you Old Girls to drive through the Merrill Gate to see 
for yourselves how lovely the campus and the students look. We hope they 
are "entering into understanding so that they, too, may go forth to nobler 
living." 

In conclusion I ask you to use your imagination and influence in ap- 
pealing to industries, foundations, or individuals with a desire to help our 
nation by educating Negroes to be constructive leaders. Abbot needs funds 
for scholarships for able Negro girls. Our first ABC (A Better Chance) 
graduate, Rhonda Carrington, is now a freshman at Hollins College. We 
hope to graduate two more ABC girls this year. The Office of Equal Op- 
portunity will continue to support only those students who were enrolled last 
year. Any Negro students who enter Abbot from now on depend on us for 
all of their financial support. I remind you of Mount Holyoke's fund- 
raising slogan "When you educate a woman you educate a family." 

one 



r 



O 



M 



M 



INTRODUCTION 

There are two ways to introduce a 
speaker: a right way, and a wrong way; 
this may be the latter! I am merely going 
to say two things: 

One: this young man is the son of Mrs. 
Quintal who has long and loyally served the 
Academy as its Bookstore Manager and 
Purchasing Agent, and, as all of you know, 
can be seen in the glass cage at the end 
of the Main Corridor in Draper. 

Two: this young man is an extraordinary 
example of a real mind at work. At thirty- 
one, with graduate degrees including a 
Ph.D., from Harvard and Oxford, he is 
Assistant Professor of History at Amherst, 
and we are proud to note that he started 
all of this off up the street at a neighbor- 
ing boys' school . . . Mr. John Ratte. 



N 



r 



F 



M 



N 



T 



ADDRESS 

JOHN RATTE 

Once upon a time there was a teeney- 
bopper named Hermengild. She had a 
lemon and green Mustang, forty-two fuschia 
pants suits, and six psychedelic boy friends 
of whom four were real musicians, mem- 
bers respectively of rock and roll groups 
called the Frozen Fingers, Voltaire's Under- 
wear, The Flower and Vegetable Show, and 
Hamlet's Omlet. Hermengild was seven- 
teen, and though she never smoked grass, 
she didn't mind those who did and was, 
as they used to say in the old days, a 
swinging kid. She was weary of Leary, she 
turned off on what the other kids called 
cool because she could spot a new sound 
before it had even made the scene. She 
was in the van, man, and if the hair of all 
her six boy friends were laid end to end, it 
would have sheathed Dorothy Parker, whom 
some of you may recall in the olde days 
was prone to arrange Yale men and their 
prom dates around the world. 

What a way to start a speech. What 
happened to Hermengild? I'll tell you, and 
it will be a relief. She won a National 
Scholarship to study astro-physics at Rad- 
cliffe, and subsequently became head of the 
Rand Corporation. She took a job as a 
Vogue stringer in Florence and saved four 
Titians and three Botticellis from the floods, 
and subsequently became Secretary of 
Health, Education, and Welfare. She went 



two 



to Smith, ran the mile with the Amherst 
track team, and got six medals at Mexico 
City; subsequently she worked with Vista 
for two years and then started a school for 
retarded children. She majored in French 
literature at Barnard, married her child- 
hood sweetheart from Manhasset, had five 
children by the Lamaze method and brought 
them all up to be free and generous human 
beings; and subsequently, she was still loved 
by her husband, who knew her as a person 
and not as an institution. She worked in 
summer stock and subsequently played 
Mother Courage at the Yale Drama School 
and joined the Lincoln Rep Company. 

Are you relieved? Of course you are, and 
so am I. For we all want Hermengild the 
teeney-bopper and all the rest of the Abbot 
girls and Andover boys and Amherst men 
and Wellesley girls and all the kids at 
Tuscaloosa and UCLA and Goddard and 
Catholic U. and C.W. Post and Michigan 
State to do well, grow up, take the respons- 
ibility that we ancient mariners know is 
the other side of the hard currency of free- 
dom. We all want them to know something 
of an older, grimmer world in which taking 
a trip means going somewhere on a train 
or a plane or a bus. Of course we have some 
problems along this line: problems of com- 
munication. Many of you probably read 
two particularly poignant statements of this 
failure in the New York Times Magazine 
section of May 28. The authors of an article 
on the youth scene in the Village tell us 
about Iris, 

"a pretty high-school senior who has made 
the village scene for some years, argues 
that the big problem is that the teeney- 
boppers have to lead double lives because 
they can't get through to their parents. 
They say, 'Oh mom, I'm going to hang 
around at the corner,' and they come 
down here and smoke (that's not tobac- 
co) and have sex, and its all very teeney. 
And they go home and they're Miss 
Goody-Goody again, and come Friday 
night and it's 'I'm going to the corner of 
the park' again. Because they can't 
say to their parents, 'This is what I am 
and what I want to do.' So a lot of them 
lead a kind of double life. How can you 
go home and when your mother says, 
'What did you do tonight, dear?' say 
'Ma, tonight I smoked grass.' " 



More dramatic and more upsetting, because 
it is a more extreme form of failure of 
communication, is this short story: 

"... a big Lincoln pulled up in front of 
the Cafe What and a large matron 
stormed out, went up to the doorman and 
screamed 'Where's my daughter? Get her 
up here, you bum! Get her out of this 
evil place!' She then marched inside and 
found her daughter talking to a long 
haired youth of perhaps 15: 'You spend 
all your time with these disgusting 
queers?' The daughter took one look and 
ran off down Macdougal Street. Her 
mother went tearing after her at a re- 
markable speed and in a few minutes 
reappeared, dragging the girl, in tears, 
back to the car. An hour later, much to 
the amusement of the regulars on the 
street, the daughter was back, strolling 
casuallly. She explained: 'I ran into the 
subway and lost the . . .' " 

The first statement, by Iris, is serious; the 
story of the matron in the Lincoln is of 
course grotesque. In both cases there has 
been a failure of communication, but the 
second is more extreme. No one likes to be 
asked the question which we address to our 
priests, our counselors, our psychiatrists, or 
even our secret selves, namely, what can 
we do, as parents and children, to become 
loving and compassionate and honest with 
each other? But better to ask that question 
in generalities than to have to ask it in a 
specific, final case, especially one in which 
we sense that now nothing can be done. 

We all have a suspicion, I think, that 
this crisis of communication between gener- 
ations is only part of a larger problem. We 
certainly know that music and dress styles 
and hair styles are not the whole of the 
manifestations of a failure of language and 
trust between parents and children. We also 
know that the rifts in our society cut 
through that barrier summed up in the pass- 
word of the world of the hippie, the 
screamie, and the teeney-bopper: trust no 
one over thirty. Not only ministers and 
professors, rabbis and artists, beatniks and 
pediatricians, but small businessmen, veter- 
ans, and US senators think that we are 
over-extended in Southeast Asia. College 
students are going to jail rather than to 
Vietnam, but they are being encouraged, 
within the limits of the law, and sometimes, 
against it, by men who fought on the Rhine, 



three 



and on the islands of the Pacific. Tradi- 
tional interest groups are talking up change 
outside their own world: priests and nuns 
are beginning to argue for contraception 
in the Catholic church, and lay people are 
worried about the unhappy celibacy of 
priests and nuns. 

Not only do we recognize this confusion 
and diversity of protest, but I think we also 
recognize some common causes. Our social 
commentators and critics, and our common 
sense, tell us that we are in danger of losing 
control of our technology. The spook story 
told by the pastoral-minded critic of 
modernity has always been the robot who 
one day takes over. The dismantled car- 
casses of these cybernetic threats are scat- 
tered through thousands of pages of 
science-fiction. But the story of the robot- 
boss is a symbol. Today we are threatened, 
not by the single machine that thinks it is 
man, but by the aggregate of our machines 
and the problems of polluted air and water, 
ravished forests and crowded suburbs they 
have made. We have gone through a great 
sea change in the last two decades. There 
have been qualitative as well as quantitative 
revolutions in our society and in our world 
view since the end of World War II. It was 
only a few years ago that we began to 
become aware of what was happening to 
us. The emergence of the civil rights move- 
ment was the turning point in our con- 
sciousness, and the election of John F. 
Kennedy was the symbol of a transforma- 
tion only partly understood even by those 
who wished to shape and direct it. We dis- 
covered that in all our affluence and power 
we had troubles. We discovered that the 
world of social tension and of cybernetics 
had not stood still while we fought World 
War 1 1, the Korean War, and the Cold War. 
There was no going back to that wonder- 
ful Deanna Durbin world where all Negroes 
were happy entertainers or retainers hold- 
ing Clark Gable's coat, where everyone 
lived in a small town or a clean city, except 
the people who read the New Yorker, who 
lived in suburbs; where poor people lived 
only in India, the moon was only of interest 
to poets, and our allies were also our clients. 
In discussing the possibility of a free society 
today Arthur Schlesinger recently summed 
up the change I am describing. He writes, 
". . . the issues of the New Deal were 
fundamentally those of quantitative liber- 
alism. The New Deal program tackled 



the elementary needs of the American 
people — a job, a suit of clothing, three 
meals a day, a roof over one's head, and 
a measure of security for old age. 
Because the New Deal secured the basis 
of life for so many, contemporary liber- 
alism has been able to move on to new 
qualitative tasks — to measure, in other 
words, designed to improve the quality 
of life in an industrial society. These are 
the issues of civil rights, of civil liberties, 
of education, of urban planning, of the 
state of the arts and the beauty of the 
environment. And, in addition, foreign 
policy, which until the end of the Thirties 
was a subordinate and marginal con- 
sideration, has now become a central 
issue in our politics and lives." 

For dear Hermengild, wild sister of Abbot, 
class of '67, there are other things to be 
added to the list. For hers is a generation 
occasionally puzzled by the fact that adults 
often say one thing about sex, justice, and 
true charity, and then do another thing. 
They — you — are challenged by a new 
freedom in literature and the films. They 
are given — you are given — examples of 
experimentation in the use and abuse of 
the body and life of the mind which are so 
obvious and so repeated that it is no longer 
possible to close our eyes and wish that 
they would go away. And in the face of all 
this they are in effect told — that is, you 
are told — that the best thing they can do 
— you can do — is to be like those who 
have gone before them: who have in fact 
not had the same problems, the same chal- 
lenges, the same bizarre decisions, or non- 
decisions, to make. So they are troubled and 
unquiet. Some of them are hopelessly out 
of it, not only by square standards, but even 
by their own generation's. I mean the people 
who have taken the trip once and for all 
and made protest and revolt and rejection 
not the means to a new kind of life and a 
new kind of community but things of value, 
final answers, final solutions. These cats 
do not head out into the suburbs, the urbs, 
the mountains of Appalachia and despair. 
When they turn off on the big people they 
turn off on the rest of mankind. By the 
standards of their own passion they are 
wrong but often they have not even made 
the whole choice. 

Others of them, the very best, people like 
many of you, we know, we hope, are very 



four 



much in it indeed. They are making the 
scene all over. They have put themselves 
as much on the line as they have put the 
line on us. I might mention that these 
splendid people who are doing the things 
that will make the creed of individualism 
into a faith again, and the works of altruism 
a habit rather than a philosophy, have high 
standards and clear codes and the first 
principle of view of the real world is that 
adults talk too much. And it's true, we do. 
But mainly to improve ourselves, I hope. 

What I want to say has a double face, 
of course, and perhaps it would be best if 
I spoke in turn to each part of what is 
today, a real unity — by the lovely pressure 
of the occasion, by the special grace God 
gives to his people when they celebrate 
great endings and great beginnings. The 
message is really very simple. To what my 
daughter who is three calls the "growmips" 
I would say again what you know anyway: 
behind every long beard there is as much 
of a heart and a mind as there is behind 
every shiny chin and close-cropped head 
— on the average. You saw Galahad on the 
front page of the New York Times last 
week: high on LSD he walked the stony 
walk above six floors of sheer death, obliv- 
ious. Behind him in the photo was the 
jagged skyline, not of that bustling glorious 
Manhattan of martinis and guide books, 
but of warehouses and tenements. But if 
you read beyond the headlines, and even 
the main lines, you found something bizarre 
and beautiful. "Rules are few and simple 
at commune for diggers," yes, and some of 
those simple rules seem to work as no 
shouting from a Lincoln Continental can 
any more. We read: 

"From time to time Galahad has re- 
turned to their parents minors who have 
strayed into the East Village and sought 
shelter in the commune. 

One such parent, Mrs. Selma Donnelly, 
the mother of a 13-year-old boy from 
Queens, came to the commune Saturday 
night with Galahad's wallet, which he 
had left at her home when he took her 
son home. She put $5 in it 'because you 
paid for the carfare to get him home.' 

'Thanks for my wallet,' Galahad said. 

'Thanks for my son,' Mrs. Donnelly 
replied. 



There is also a radio and a television 
set in the commune, both the gifts of 
grateful parents. 

The TV set was a gift from a textile 
executive in New Jersey, whose 14-year- 
old daughter, Nicki, had been talked 
into returning home by Galahad. He then 
panhandled enough money for two bus 
tickets to New Jersey, rode out with her 
and then hitchhiked home. 

The radio was a gift from the mother 
of a 1 5-year-old boy from the Bronx. 

Each time Galahad takes a youngster 
home, he talks with the parents, telling 
them 'what was wrong, why the kid left, 
what he doesn't like and what they can 
do.' 

One of the mothers verified this, 
saying: 'I've had no trouble at all with 
Celia since Galahad talked with us.' She 
said that Galahad had 'made sense to 
all of us.' The parents of another child 
said much the same thing." 

The feeling I got from this was not that 
all beats were beautiful. Though many are: 
you probably recognize, behind that hair 
and that guitar, Jimmy Jones or Irving 
Schwartz and other boys next door. What 
struck me with great force is that new 
demands on human life and society call 
forth new people, as well as new ideas. 
There is something great and good for the 
future being born in the middle of sane 
and sensible middle class America, and the 
revolution of quality about which social 
critics and reformers speak is not goina to 
wait for birth until we reconcile ourselves 
to the notion that new problems not only 




demand new solutions, but that the rhythm 
of human life provides new people as well. 
If we think we have gone over-board on 
permissiveness and are now suffering for 
it, we might do well to think, not that we 
have allowed our children to grow up too 
quickly, but not quickly enough. Or not 
honestly enough. 

By 15, children in our society are still 
children. Why? Because they think that 
adults are perfect. That is why they crit- 
icize them without compassion: because 
deep within them there is the faith that 
underneath all those obvious human weak- 
nesses there lurks, or lingers, or lasts, a 
lovely true ideal, the perfect momma, the 
perfect poppa. For some, it never changes. 
The real mother and father are never dis- 
covered as human beings, except possibly in 
tragedy, or moments of extreme happiness, 
death, childbirth, love, marriage. This is 
sad for many reasons. It is sad because 
parents and children should know each 
other as human beings; we should be able 
to begin the difficult and joyful process of 
learning that all men are our brothers and 
sisters with our parents. It is sad because 
adults just don't have that many friends 
that they can afford to lose the understand- 
ing and compassion of their children. It is 
sad because death is never so far away that 
we do not need to be reminded that the 
logic of our life includes our death, and 
that the surest way to welcome it is to be 
reminded that there are others in our place. 

Now I know that all of you are aware 
of all these things, and I am not being 
entirely facetious when I say that I men- 
tion them only to let the girls know that 
we are not as square as they think. 

To this graduating class, I speak for 
Abbot Academy, and for your parents, when 
I congratulate you on your achievements, 
applaud you for your ambitions, and wish 
you well in the next stage of your educa- 
tion, and in the real world beyond. As 
women you face all the challenges of your 
generation and then some. In the school, 
college and the university to which you turn, 
the principle of freedom of inquiry will test 
the knowledge and the self-discipline you 
have acquired here, even as it enlarges your 
range of friendship and responsibility. Any 



generation of women would envy your chal- 
lenges and joys. Of course the privileges 
of your beginnings subject you to great ex- 
pectations by others. And you can at least 
expect contradictions in their advice or de- 
mands. You will be expected to have chil- 
dren who are not extensions of yourself 
and your husband, but freely developing 
personalities; but you will also be expected 
to love them with a tribal devotion, de- 
pending on which psychologist you read. 
You will be told to have your family and 
then have your career, have your career 
and then have your family, or have both at 
the same time. Your husband will resent 
being expected to share fully in the domes- 
tic as well as the moral responsibilities of 
child-rearing, but he will expect you to 
share fully in the problems and pleasures 
of his work. You will be expected to pull 
your own oar in a consumer society and at 
the same time be chided for your material- 
ism and your affluence. You will be told 
that you are alienated and beat when you 
are simply bursting with commitment and 
normalcy. You will be told you're full of en- 
thusiasm for the status quo by the cynics 
and scoffers of your own age, and then you 
will be told that you are too impatient, too 
intolerant, too callous by a minority of older 
people who have forgotten that young 
people are different, thank God. 

But you have a great secret, a secret 
weapon, a special device available to you 
whereby you will prevail. No one knows 
what it is or how to name it: the closest 
word, I suppose, is joy. You get a sense of 
it in these words, the farewell of a young 
man of 1 8 who was sentenced to three years 
in prison for refusing to serve, Tom Rodd, 
of Philadelphia. After making his moral 
and legal case, Rodd concluded like this: 

"Last, I reiterate what anybody who 
knows me should know: that I am an 
incorrigible optimist, that I love life, and 
that I drink beer, play banjo, and daily 
toss my head and tap my feet to the 
romping, stomping, all-pervading beat of 
human existence. That's all I wanted to 
say, and I wish everyone a Happy New 
year." 

And that's all I want to say, except to wish 
you all Godspeed. 



six 



FROM 
THE 
ABBOT 
CAMPUS 




the 1967 graduates have gone to colleges in many states and countries: 



Appalachian State 


Laurel Brown 


Barnard 


Candace Howes 
Mary Jane Major 
Jane von der Heyde 
Margaret Wilde 


Beaver 


Nancy Porosky 


Beloit 


Judith Hannegan 


Bennett 


Sandra Stewart 


Bennington 


Felice Forrest 


Bradford 


■"Linda Cregg 
Nancy Hoehn 
Jane Phillips 


Briarcliff 


Alice Robertson 
Rosa Tavares 
Margaret Wilde 


Carnegie Tech 


Marjory Kaplan 


Chatham 


Ruth Chamberlin 


Colby 


Nancy Howe 


Connecticut 


Julia Alvarez 
Susan Gallagher 
Linda Sullivan 


Dickinson 


Dorsey Green 


Emmanuel 


Claudia Arragg 
Diane DeNuccio 


Goucher 


Elizabeth Bonan 
Anstiss Bowser 
Jean Haley 
Joan Marks 
Gail Niziak 


Hollins 


Rhonda Carrington 


Hood 


Diana Bonnifield 


Marymount 


Rita Achin 


Mills 


Charlotte Elmenhorst 
Christina Lambert 


Mount Holyoke 


Wendy Morrissey 
Susan Shapiro 



* Will enter Smith in February 



Newcomb 
Pembroke 

Pine Manor 

Radcliffe 

Randolph-Macon 

Rollins 

Simon's Rock 

Skidmore 

Smith 

Syracuse University 

Tufts Engineering 

University of 

British Columbia 

University of California 

< Berkeley) 

University of Colorado 

University of Denver 

University of Florida 

University of Michigan 

University of New Hampshire 

University of Pennsylvania 

University of Rochester 

University of Vermont 

Wellesley 



Wheaton 

Whittier 

William Smith 

•* Will enter Mt. Holyoke in 



Alison Hurst 

Sara Delano 
Gerda Ray 

Candace Eidam 

Juliet Schneller 

Carolyn Hansen 

Lissa Pendleton 

Elizabeth Turtle 

Elizabeth MacGregor 

Margery Goldman 

Rachel Maclntyre 

Susan Smith 

Joyce Wannop 

Marilyn Hadley 

Pamela Jones 

Catherine Hoover 

Louisa Huntington 

Laurian Cannon 

Priscilla Howes 

Jill Singer 

Susan Stichnoth 

Georgia Halt 

Warren Osbome 

Faith Beane 
Ann Miller 
Claire Moore 
Elizabeth Rudman 

Victoria Bennett 
Sarah Birdsall 
Laurie Wollwork 
February 



seven 




TO 
THE 
HALLS 
OF 

ABBOT 



come boarding students from many states and foreign countries. This year the following 
states and countries are represented: 



Alaska 2 

California 3 

Colorado 1 

Connecticut 23 

Delaware 2 

District of Columbia 2 

Florida 6 

Hawaii 1 

Illinois 5 

Indiana 2 

Iowa 1 

Kansas 1 

Louisiana 1 

Maine 12 



Maryland 4 

Massachusetts 34 

Michigan 6 

New Hampshire 16 

New Jersey 6 

New York 23 

North Carolina 2 

Ohio 7 

Pennsylvania 7 

Rhode Island 1 

Vermont 3 

Virginia 6 

Algiers 1 

Canada 1 



Colombia 2 

England 2 

Ghana 1 

Guatemala 1 

Hong Kong 2 

India 2 

Laos 1 

Lebanon 1 

Peru 1 

Puerto Rico 1 

San Savador 2 

Saudi Arabia 3 

Venezuela 2 

Virgin Islands 1 



eigh t 



come relatives of alumnae from many classes: 



GAY ARMSDEN — sister of Beverly Armsden, 1966 

KATHARINE BOYNTON — sister of Marion Boynton, 1970, 
and cousin of Catherine Sandford, 1899 

MARIAN BOYNTON — sister of Katharine Boynton, 1969, 
and cousin of Catherine Sandford, 1899 

SUSAN BRIGHTMAN — daughter of Marion Altreuter Bright- 
man, 1939 

SALLY BROWNING — granddaughter of Mildred Akerley 
Browning, 1915 

DEBORAH COLLINS — daughter of Louise Doyle Collins, 1946 

CLAUDIA COMINS — niece of Alda Grieco Cesarini, 1941, 
and cousin of Edna Grieco Thomas, 1951 

SUSAN CURRY — daughter of Martha Wotkins Curry, 1944 

NANCY ETTELE— daughter of Patricia Elliot Ettele, 1940 



MARY LOUISE KETCHAM — sister of Suzanne Ketcham, 
1962, and Marsha Ketcham, 1963 

SANDRA LINDGROVE — cousin of Dorothy Fiske Winnefte, 
1941 

DENISE MALLEN — sister of Pamela Mallen, 1970, and 
cousin of Claudia Arragg, 1967 

MARY FRANCES McCABE — grandniece of Katherine Toye 
McCabe, 1913 

HELEN PAFFARD — sister of Wynne Paffard Delmhorst, 1958, 
Jane Paffard, 1961, and Edith Paffard. 1964 

SANDRA PERKIN — sister of Linda Perkin, 1964 

DEBORAH PRUDDEN — daughter of Constance Thurber 
Prudden, 1938 

RUTH RASER — cousin of Marianna Hubbard Mercer, 1944 



JACQUELYN FRAZ I ER— daughter of Gretchen Fuller Fraiier, 
1945 

ELIZABETH GAINES — sister of Dorothy Gaines, 1965, and 
Cornelia Gaines, 1966; cousin of Julie Gaines Phalen, 
1953, and Carolyn Gaines Roberson, 1957 

CYNTHIA JOHNSON — daughter of Dorothy Dean Johnson, 
1941; granddaughter of Marion Mellor Dean, 1916; 
grandniece of Sarah Dean Farley, 1934; niece of 
Eleanor Johnson Du Toit, 1935, Marjorie Dean Mars- 
den, 1942, and Barbara Dean Bolton, 1947; cousin of 
Susan Bolton, 1968, and Lynn Marsden, 1968 



ENID ROCKWELL — cousin of Dorothy Rockwell Clark, 1932, 
Mary Rockwell Stewart, 1934, Caroline Rockwell Ste- 
vens, 1936, and Katherine Stevens, 1960 

ANDRA RUDOLPH — daughter of Joyce Yoffa Rudolph, 1943, 
and niece of Gloria Yoffa Portnoy, 1950 

MARTHA STONE — sister of Barbara Stone, 1962, and 
Deborah Stone, 1966 

DURRIE WATSON — sister of Helen Watson Collison, 1963, 
and Marcia Watson, 1966 



C^^SCLS^ 



Alumnae Relatives Pictured on Front Cover 



Top row: Ruth Raser, Susan Curry, Mary McCabe, and 
Claudia Comins 

2nd row: Gay Armsden, Denise Mallen, Sandra Lindgrove, 
and Marian Boynton 

3rd row: Nancy Ettele and Helen Paffard 

4th row: Deborah Collins, Sally Browning, Cynthia Johnson, 
and Katharine Boynton 



5th row: Susan Brightman, Andre Rudolph, Sandra Perkin, 
and Elizabeth Gaines 



6th row: Martha Stone, Deborah Prudden, Mary Louise 
Ketcham, and Jacquelyn Frazier 



Durric Wotson 



nine 




Hats Off To Abbot Alumnae 




Number of Contributors 



Amount Contributed 



$49,654 



1,488 



860 



220,181 



1,345 




1952 1957 1962 1967 

Comparison of alumnae participation and contributions, 1952- 1967 

Warmest thanks to each one of you who has helped to produce this 
outstanding record of progress, and to the Class Fund Secretaries who 
played a key role in achieving this result. 

Jane Sullivan 
Alumnae Secretary 



CT^g, 



NEWS FROM THE CLUBS 

The BOSTON Club held its Fall meeting on the Abbot campus on September 28th. 
Luncheon in the Gymnasium was followed by an illustrated talk, "The Museum Story". 
Mrs. Warren Point, a member of the Ladies' Committee of the Boston Museum of Fine 
Arts gave a delightful presentation of many aspects of the Museum program. 

The FAIRFIELD COUNTY (Conn.) and the WESTCHESTER COUNTY (N.Y.) Clubs 
were entertained at a coffee at the home of Mrs. James F. Mathias (Barbara Lord '30), 
President of the Alumnae Association, on October 17th where informal reports about 
Abbot were read and club plans discussed. 



ten 



Praises 
Ringing . . . 
Here's to you 



Mauricia Alvarez '66 — Dean's List — Connecticut College 
Beverley Armsden '66 — Corresponding Secretary College Govern- 
ment Association — Skidmore College 
All is Brooks '64 — Dean's List — Syracuse University 
Joan Carter Green '63 — B.A. Magna Cum Laude — Smith College 
Valerie de Peyster '66 — Dean's List — Hiram Scott College 

Charlotte Erwin '66 — Dean's List and Matthew Vassar Scholar 

— Vassar College 

Marie Fox '63 — B.A. with distinction and Wellesley College 

Scholar — Wellesley College 
Amy Johnson '64 — B.A. Cum Laude and Woodrow Wilson Fellow- 
ship — Radcliffe College 
Susan Lebach '66 — Dean's List — Pembroke College 
Susan Localio '64 — Dean's List — Smith College 
Anita Miller '63 — B.A. Cum Laude — Bates College 
Margaret Power '63 — B.A. Magna Cum Laude and 4-year 
National Institute of Mental Health Fellowship at M.I.T. 

— Radcliffe College 

Melissa Scott '65 — Dean's List — Smith College 

Luella Sommer Vermeil '41 — Coronet Lady of Year — Peoria, 

III. (See class notes) 
Allison Todd '66 — Dean's List — Radcliffe College 
Susan Van Winkle '64 — Dean's List — Connecticut College 
Marcia Watson '66 — President of Sophomore Class — Skid- 
more College 
Mary Wilkins '63 — B.A. Cum Laude and Phi Beta Kappa — 
Wheaton College 



vQ^O 



MARGUERITE HEARSEY 



Abbot Academy's story from 1936 through 1955 is told by Alice Curtiss 
Sweeney in her book, Marguerite Hearsey. The book includes excerpts from 
Miss Hearsey's speeches which reveal the positive influence of this vigorous 
woman on the girls who were at Abbot Academy just before, during and 
after World War II. 

Some copies of this book are still available. Mail the attached coupon 
to the Alumnae Office. 

Enclosed please find $3.25 for copy of Marguerite Hearsey. 
(Make check payable to Abbot Academy) 

Maiden Name 

Married Name - — 

Address — 

_ Zip Code 

eleven 




MESSAGE 
FROM 
1893 
ALUMNA 



Protected 'Fern Sen-is' of the 1 890's 



The following letters were received during the summer by Mr. Philip K. Allen, Presi 
dent of the Board of Trustees from Charlotte Conant Nicholls, Class of 1893. 



My dear Mr. Allen: 

I read the last issue of the Abbot Bul- 
letin with my customary interest and (es- 
pecially of its formative years) and in its 
great change of policy in relation to the 
Andover boys — 

When I was a girl under its protective 
wings in 1893 — we were absolutely for- 
bidden any acquaintance with any boys. 
My father and mother were very far sighted 
and did not approve of the policy. They saw 
that men and women probably would spend 
the greater part of their lives together in 
marriage and it was far better to get used 
to each other in their youth. 

Some of the happenings of my day are, 
so ludicrous now — they can easily bring 
forth gales of laughter. 

My father escorted me to the school in 
the beginning and as we sat in the living 
room waiting to be received — such was the 
curiosity of the girls — that amid giggles 
they tried to climb to the transom and peek 
to see what gentleman was there. Again 
later on — father returned to see how I was 
getting on, and when the girls heard his 
manly tread down the hall, they threw notes 
under the door, "Tell us who it is — we 
can't wait". 

Fortunately for me, my best friend of 
Abbot was a day student and lived with 
her parents in the village. They being old 
and respected citizens, several of us were 
invited to their home to meet the Andover 
boys. In that way I met several of them 
and I became quite well acquainted with 
one whose name I have now forgotten. 
When my birthday rolled around he sent 
me a bouquet of American Beauty roses 
— they were the popular flower of the day. 



My greatest sin while there was that I threw 
one of the flowers that night out my win- 
dow into the hands of an Andover boy 
waiting below. I wrote my parents about 
it and they replied that they were glad I 
had that much "spunk". 

Draw your own conclusions — but I will 
add that at the ripe age of 95 I am still 
a respected member of society. 

I am always interested in Abbot and I 
want to reiterate that I very much enjoyed 
my visit there to celebrate my 70th reunion. 
I enjoyed meeting the principal and Miss 
Jane Sullivan was most kind. I was very 
proud to find that my Alma Mater had de- 
veloped into one of the finest preparatory 
girls' schools in the country. 

With all good wishes for the school and 
reiterating that I enjoyed your articles 
very much. 



My dear Mr. Allen: 

You may be interested to know that I 
was asked by a unanimous vote to be the 
"Queen" for the grand parade in the July 
4th celebration. I was dressed in a royal 
purple robe with a tiara on my head and a 
large bouquet of roses on my arm. I sat up 
very straight in the back seat of an open 
car and with my gloved hand I waved to 
thousands of onlookers and I felt every inch 
a veritable Queen — it was great fun. They 
chose me partly for my age, 95, and partly 
for my long summer residence in the town 
where my father and mother were almost 
the first resorters — Leland, Mich. Here I 
would like to say that we are lineal descend- 
ants of Roger Conant who settled Salem, 



twelve 



Mass. in 1624 and very proud of the Boston 
atmosphere. This may have been one of the 
reasons why my parents chose Abbot for 
me. Also I would like to pay tribute to the 
fore-sightedness of my parents in building 
this cottage in 1902 which was just as 
evident as in their Abbot decision. Who in 
1902 thought about picture windows for 
one thing? They built their cottage on the 
top of an old Indian burying ground 80 feet 
high and known then as "Round Top" — 
the same as it is today. 

Also, who else would have thought of 
putting the bedrooms downstairs and the 
living room, dining room, kitchen and large 
porch upstairs just to get the heavenly 
view of Lake Michigan, Lake Leelanan and 
the surrounding forests. 

They gave the cottage to me after my 



husband's death many years ago as a better 
place to raise my large family. I have loved 
it with a devotion hard to describe. It is 
still very unusual and unique with its large 
fireplace made of blue slag picked up from 
the deserted iron foundry on the beach. It 
is the center of a large living room with its 
picture windows deliberately placed so that 
there is a picture in each one. The room 
is not plastered but the rough hewn beams 
are exposed and it gives a unique place to 
exhibit our antiques and treasures. 

I fear I am writing too much in detail, 
but I can't seem to stop. I love every inch 
of it and it makes a perfect place for family 
reunions. At the present there are eleven 
of us here. 

With very best wishes, 

Charlotte Conant Nicholls 



Prizes Awarded at Last Chapel— June 1967 



Isabel Hancock Special Award for Contri- 
bution to the School 

Priscilla Bradley Award for Excellence in 
Art 

Betsy Waskowitz Rider Award for Further 

Study in Art- 
Class of 1955 Sportmanship Award in 

Athletics 

Emily Hale Drama Prize 



Dawes History Prize 
English Prize 
French Awards 



Phillips Latin Award 
Isabel Hancock Mathematics Award 
Kate Friskin Music Award 
Department Award in Music 
Medals for Excellence in Spanish 



Elizabeth Rudman 

Rita Achin 

Elizabeth Bonan 
Susan Stichnoth 

Dorsey Green 

Dorsey Green 

Jane von der Heyde 

Victoria Bennett 

Ann Miller 

Julia Alvarez 
Anne Gares 
Carla Johnson 
Claire Moore 

Linda Sullivan 

Marilyn Hadley 

Joyce Wannop 

Candace Eidam 

Susan Bolton 
Gerda Ray 



thirteen 




Faculty 
Facts 



EDITH TEMPLE JONES 

This lady retired from teaching French in June, 1967, after serving 
at Abbot Academy for thirteen years. Although her students on reading 
this tribute may wince at the memory of grammar drill, they recall with 
gratitude their developing acquisition of the French language under her 
patient, kindly direction. Others of you will remember her as the house- 
mother of French House who provided the necessary ingredients for jolly 
corridor parties and counselled with calm wisdom. Miss Jones, unbeknownst 
to her students, wrote excellent reports of them, describing each girl with 
fairness and clarity. 

The best qualities of a Vermonter are embodied in Miss Jones — 
humor, integrity, hospitality. We rejoice with her many friends who cross 
the threshold of her home in Fair Haven, Vermont because Edith Temple 
Jones loves people and we wish her many happy years as a homemaker. 

NEW FACULTY 



Joining the Abbot faculty this year are 
the following: Gordon Lameyer of Exeter, 
N.H., has been appointed assistant aca- 
demic dean. A graduate of Amherst College, 
he received his M.A. degree at Columbia 
University and previously taught at Colum- 
bia College, Columbia University and the 
University of New Hampshire. He will also 
teach in the Abbot English department. 

Mr. George Andrews, a graduate of 
Trinity College and a member of the Phillips 
Academy faculty, is teaching a senior 
course, "Contemporary Problems in Modern 
Literature". 

Mrs. James Whyte, a graduate of Michi- 
gan State University, will teach physics and 
Mrs. Robert Hoyt will teach chemistry. 
Mrs. Hoyt is a graduate of Denison College 
and received her master of science degree 
at MIT. 

Miss Wendy Snyder, a graduate of Smith 
College, has been named curator of the 
John Esther Art Gallery and will also teach 
visual perception. She received her M.A.T. 
degree at Harvard. 



Mrs. Peter Kehrli, comes to Abbot from 
the Northfield School. She will teach history 
of art and arts and crafts. She is a grad- 
uate of Moore College of Art and attended 
the Beaux Arts in Paris. 

Miss Ruth M. Harris, a graduate of 
Keene State College, will join the mathe-. 
matics department. She received her 
M.A.L.S. degree from Wesleyan University 
this year. 

Miss Meriby Sweet Abbot '62 and June 
graduate of the University of Maine, will 
teach speech and drama. 

Mrs. Robert Lovely, Jr. will teach physical 
education. She taught at Colby Junior Col- 
lege and is a graduate of the University of 
Colorado. She attended the American Uni- 
versity in Cairo. 

Mrs. Mildred Bartlett, who came from 
Chapel Hill school, is now a housemother 
in the new wing of Draper. 



fourteen 



1892 Ethel Whipple (Mrs. Arthur C. Heublein) died 
May 22, 1967, in West Hartford, Conn. Our sin- 
cere sympathy is extended to her daughter, Mrs. 
W. H. Sterg O'Dell. 

1893 Elizabeth Nichols (Mrs. Norwin S. Bean) died 
May 23, 1967, in Manchester, N.H. She was a 
former officer of the Alumnae Association, and 
had been Fund Secretary for her class since the 
beginning of the Alumnae Fund. 

1895 Beatrice Farnsworth (Mrs. Grover F. Powers) 
died September 4, 1967, in Hamden, Conn. Our 
sympathy is extended to her husband, Dr. Grover 
F. Powers, and to her son. 

Laura Wentworth (Mrs. Byron U. Richards) died 
August 30, 1967, in Providence, R.I. Our sympathy 
is extended to her son and daughter. 

1896 Isabel Chapin (Mrs. J. Avery Gould) died July 
9, 1967, in Andover, Mass., after a long illness. 
Our sincere sympathy is extended to her brother, 
E. Barton Chapin, former President of the Abbot 
Board of Trustees. 

1905 Mildred Cleworth (Mrs. Elbridge G. Davis) died 

May 29, 1967, in Rockledge, Fla. Our sincere 
sympathy is extended to her daughter, Clara. 

Myra Dean (Mrs. Myra D. Anthony) was re- 
ported dead in June, 1967. 

1918 Helene Bennett (Mrs. John N. Jordan) died in 

March, 1967, in Norwell, Mass. 

Elizabeth Holmes (Mrs. Roy E. Wyatt) was re- 
ported dead in April, 1967. 

1921 Elizabeth Bulkeley died suddenly June 23, 1967, 

in Montreal while visiting Expo. Our sincere sym- 
pathy is extended to her sister, Florence. Elizabeth 
was on the Alumnae Association Board, and was 
Class Fund Secretary for many years. 

1923 Dorothy King (Mrs. D. K. Pitcher) was reported 

dead in June, 1967. 

1933 Catharine Campbell (Mrs. Richard S. Wisner) 

died in April in Santa Fe, N.M. Our sincere sym- 
pathy is extended to her sister, Jane Campbell 
Breivik, Abbot 1934. 

1937 Geraldine Peck (Mrs. Henry D. Rockwell, Jr.) 

died suddenly September 30, 1967, in Andover, 
Mass. Our sympathy is extended to her husband 
and to her father. 

The alumnae will be sorry to learn that Mrs. 
Burton S. Flagg died September 30, 1967, after a 
long illness. Our sympathy is extended to Mr. 
Flagg, long-time treasurer of Abbot, and to her 
daughters, Dorothea Flagg Smith, '22, Elizabeth 
Flagg Dow, '23, and Frances Flagg Sanborn, '26. 

fifteen 




3fa JWemoriam 



News from, the Classes 



1900 

The class will be sorry to learn that 
ETHEL HAZEN LILLARD'S husband died 
in June. He was a former headmaster of 
Tabor Academy in Marion, Mass. 

1908 

HELEN CHAFFEE MANVILLE has been 
living in Europe with her daughter for the 
past five years. She writes, "During winters 
spent in Bremen, Germany, we have visited 
many places of interest. Switzerland is de- 
lightful, and the majestic Alps a sight never 
to be forgotten." 

WINIFRED OGDEN LINDLEY writes, 
"Big news in 1967 was the happy celebra- 
tion of our Golden Wedding Anniversary. 
Our three children gave us a party with all 
of them with us, as well as five of our 
eleven grandchildren. Two grandchildren 
graduated from the University of Vermont 
and one from Tufts University in June." 

1914 

LOUISE MURRAY RODLIFF is recover- 
ing from a fractured hip. 

1915 

This past Spring BETTY FRYE LEACH 
attended The International Outdoor Poetry 
Show of New Orleans at which she had a 
new display of her verse hung on the palings 
of famous Jackson Square. Exhibited at 
the same time was a copy of the Scroll she 
and Catherine presented to the Dean of 
Westminster Abbey when in London last 
year they took greetings of the Poets who 
conduct the Show to The Abbey on the 
occasion of its 900th anniversary. While 
waiting at Heathrow Airport they found the 
presentation mentioned in the LONDON 
TELEGRAPH'S "London Day by Day 
Column". On her return when speaking at 
The Women's City Club to fellow returned 
vacationers, Betty parlayed the incident 
into a "How To Get Into The London Papers 
Without Really Trying" a highpoint ex- 
perience of the Leach trip. Betty continues 
as a volunteer educational therapy worker 
at The Veteran's Hospital and Catty con- 
tinues as a working girl with long summer 
vacations, going this year to The Vineyard 
and Vermont with Betty. 



1917 

SALLY HUMASON is doing free-lance 
writing and occasionally publishes fiction 
in magazines. The last one was in Ladies' 
Home Journal in October, 1965. She also 
directs plays for the local community 
theatre. 

JANET TENNEY SMITH is a widow, and 
has 4 children and 1 1 grandchildren. 

1918 

GERTRUDE GRAY DAVIS writes that 
she had been nursing for 17 years in Au- 
burn, Me., but had to give it up last year 
because she had a coronary attack. She has 
recovered well, and went to Expo this sum- 
mer. She would love to hear from some of 
her Abbot friends. 

KATHARINE RIGHTER MORRIS was 
married April 15, 1967, to A. Sidney Jen- 
kins of Philadelphia. 

The class extends its sympathy to 
KATHERINE TOUGAS LOMBARD whose 
husband died in August. 

1919 

GLADYS GLENDINNING LOVELAND is 
traveling in Switzerland, Austria and Italy. 

1923 

ELIZABETH THOMPSON HENRY and 
her sister, MIRIAM THOMPSON KIMBALL 
had a delightful week in Montreal visiting 
ESTHER WOOD PEIRCE and her husband. 
They attended Expo, and then spent the 
week end with them at their Vermont 
country home. They are now on a tour of 
the Orient. 

1925 

DORRIS KRUM LITTLE writes, "We 
never had any children. In 1954 we took 
a 'Fresh Air Child' and she came to visit 
us every summer for 1 3 years. She is now 
working in New York, and when she mar- 
ried in August, my husband gave her away." 

1926 

ELINOR MAHONEY SMITH'S son, 
Philip, is Curator of Maritime History at 
Peabody Museum in Salem, Mass; he also 
lectures and does historical writing, and 
has made several appearances on the edu- 



sixteen 



cational TV network. Most important of all, 
he made Elinor a grandmother on April 4, 
when he and his wife had a daughter. 

FRANCES FLAGG SANBORN and her 
husband who was on sabbatical from Phil- 
lips Academy spent last year traveling. 
Their first trip was a seven-week tour of 
Europe; their second included an auto trip 
south then west through Texas and Cali- 
fornia, and three weeks in Hawaii return- 
ing through all the major western ski areas; 
next they flew to Mexico City and Panama; 
their last trip took them to Alaska where 
they went above the Arctic Circle. 

1929 

CATHERINE BOWDEN BARNES writes, 
"The great excitement with us is a first 
grandson born September 5, 1967. He is 
quite exceptional, of course! I continue to 
be employed part-time as Medical Social 
Consultant at the Providence District Nurs- 
ing Association." 

1930 

KATHIE FELLOWS INGRAHAM was 
married May 12, 1967, to Alfred R. Leiser- 
son. They are living in Cambridge, Mass. 

H. RIPLEY will spend two months in 
Ethiopia and East Africa, followed by Christ- 
mas in Sicily. 

1933 

The class extends its sympathy to HELEN 
BUTTRICK LIVESEY whose husband died 
in July after a long illness. 

BETTY WEAVER VAN WART'S daugh- 
ter, Gretchen, was married in June to Wil- 
liam R. Tunkey, son of POLLY PANCOAST 
TUNKEY, Abbot 1939. 

MARTHA WIND FINGER went to Brus- 
sels for the birth of her first grandchild 
— it was a son, Stephan Frederic, for 
JOYCE FINGER EVERS, Abbot '58. 

1934 

MARION ROGERS WHEAT is now living 
in Hanson, Mass. Her husband works for 
Quinn Freight Lines. Her son, A. Franklin 
Wheat was married in June to Susanne 
Weast of Bar Harbor, Me. 

1935 

ANN CUTLER BRECHEEN writes, "Hav- 
ing waited until the advanced age of 39 to 
have any children I have no college grads 
or grandchildren to report. However, my 
husband, Joel, 56, went back to college for 



a teacher's certificate, and now enjoys 
himself with captive audience teaching 
high school English. Back at the ranch, 
Leigh, 12, Laurie, 11, and mother keep 
busy with 4 lambs, feeder calves, and 7 
rather idle, but always hungry horses." 

1936 

SALLY BURNS BOWEN was married to 
Irving H. Beckwith, April 9, 1967, in 
Boston, Mass. 

1938 

ELISE DUNCAN DANFORTH is teach- 
ing English and art with the adult educa- 
tion program in Jacksonville, Fla. Her hus- 
band is a lawyer. 

MARION LAWSON ARCHER has moved 
to Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. Three of her six 
children are married and she has five 
grandchildren. 

1939 

DOROTHY HEIDRICH LOCKHART 
writes, "This fall our eldest son, Michael, 
will be an Upper Middler at Exeter, our 
second son, Frank, will be in 9th grade at 
Hotchkiss, and Jim will be in 8th grade 
here at home. Our only daughter, Nancy, 
will be in 4th grade. It's a busy and 'fun' 
age group." 

POLLY PANCOAST TUNKEY'S son, Wil- 
liam, was married in June to Gretchen 
Van Wart, daughter of BETTY WEAVER 
VAN WART, Abbot, 1933. 

1940 

PRISCILLA RUSS SHANNON writes, 
"Peter graduated from Phillips Academy in 
June, and is now at Columbia. We have a 




Joan Carlson Hutchinson's daughter, Janet 



seventeen 



9-month-old daughter, Sarah, adopted last 
October at 7 weeks. These, plus hospital 
work and an oil painting group make life 
interesting." 

1941 

The class will be sorry to learn that SUE 
LONG REED'S father died in August. Sue 
is living in Falls Church, Va. 

LUELLA SOMMER VERMEIL was named 
"Coronet Lady of the Year" by the Women 
of the Peoria Advertising and Selling Club. 
The citation read; "Her willingness to do 
the small as well as the large job, her 
avoidance of personal recognition, her de- 
votion to family, her gentility and gracious 
bearing are outstanding traits; and her 
quiet and effective leadership is an in- 
spiration." 

1942 

ANN BACON REINHEIMER writes, "Am 
divorced and am working as a medical 
technician. I have a little house in Arling- 
ton, Va. where I've lived for the past lOVi 
years. Son, David, 21, in Navy; daughter, 
Jan, 19, a junior at William Smith College; 
Betty, 17, a freshman at American Uni- 
versity in Washington; Peggy, 16, at home 
and a junior in high school. I have space 
for anyone passing through!" 

MARGARET STUART BEALE'S daugh- 
ter, Sarah, who graduated from Abbot in 
June, was married September first to George 
F. T. Yancey, Jr., a senior at Bowdoin Col- 
lege. 

1947 

MARGOT MEYER R I C H T E R writes, 
"Nothing terribly exciting. Harry and I at- 
tended Expo opening and I took the chil- 
dren back in June. The rest of the summer 
has been filled with transporting children 
(about 100 miles a day) to swimming, 
tennis, riding, etc. I took a course in Read- 
ing Dynamics, and Harry spent 5 weeks at 
IBM executive school." 

MARY LOU MILLER HART writes, 
"Reeves was promoted to Production Super- 
intendent of the Dupont Graselli Works in 
Linden, N.J. The children are getting older, 
but we tell ourselves we are not! Nancy is 
14 and a freshman in high school. David 
is 12, and in 7th grade." 




Priscilla Stevens Rutherford with her 
husband and family 



MARRIED 

EDITH FLATHER to George Swan of 
Madison, Wis., August 5, 1967, in North 
Andover. DRUSILLA FLATHER COLBY '53 
was matron of honor and KATE SIDES 
FLATHER '59 was one of the bridesmaids. 
George was graduated from the University 
of Strathclyde and received his doctoral 
degree from the University of Glasgow. He 
is a Visiting Professor at the U.S. Army 
Mathematics Research Center at the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin. 



1948 

KATHARINE BIGELOW FITZGERALD 
writes, "Katharine Deane was born June 
12, 1967. Her three brothers are Terry, 9, 
Jim, 7, and Geoffrey, 2. Ten days before 
her arrival I was at Smith reunion and saw 
SUKI DAKE JOHNSON and ANN ROBIN- 
SON JOYCE." 

BRIGID BISGOOD G A L U S H A writes, 
"Having lived for 3 years in the so-called 
'inner city', we have been bitten by the 
desire for wide-open spaces — so we've 
bought a lovely big house on 120 acres, 
and are the proud owners of 70,000 Christ- 
mas trees! Also 2 horses, 1 cat, 4 children. 
This is the happy year when all my chil- 
dren are in school all day — Christopher 
is in first, Jeff, 3rd, Tim, 6th, and Alison, 
a freshman. Neal and I went to Jamaica 
last Spring, and I ended the trip by break- 



eighteen 



ing my wrist on the dance floor. I also wish 
to report that I have given up smoking — 
from 2 packs a day to none!" 

JULIE SCHAUFFLER BUCKLIN writes, 
"We've just bought a summer house in 
Millbrook, N.Y. complete with Shetland 
pony and her foal. We think it will keep 
two boys, 8 and 2, and one aged mother 
busy!" 

1949 

PREMI ASHIRVATHAM LATIMER 
"We are frightfully busy moving from one 
extreme to the other — from a century-old 
cottage in Richmond to a new house in 
Burnham. I shall continue teaching, and 
will have a class of 6-year-olds. Adrian, 6, 
is attending a thatched school in Drop- 
more." 

1951 

LOIS ANN LOVEJOY had her second 
child and first son, Peter Johnson, April 
26, 1967. 

HARRIETTE McCONNELL SOULE writes, 
"We have just had a little girl to add to 
our family of two boys, aged 3 and 5. We 
are moving to Pittsburgh, and would like 
to see other Abbotites in the area. Address: 
24 Highland Dr., Pittsburgh. 

1953 

HELEN GLIDDEN CEBIK had twin 
daughters, Pamela Kerr and Jennifer Wes- 
ley, July 8, 1967. 

DIANA STEVENSON BRENGEL has been 
working as a computer programmer since 
last January. She writes, "Although things 
are a bit hectic with 3 children and some 
left over musical commitments — not to 
speak of 9 German Shepherd puppies — 
I enjoy it very much." 

MARRIED 

BARBARA LEE EMMONS to Ralph G. 
Hanscom of Melrose, Mass., July 15, 1967, 
in Andover, Mass. Ralph is affiliated with 
the Automotive Distributing Corp. in 
Gloucester. 

1954 

MARTHA CHURCH LANG'S husband 
entered active duty in the Air Force in July 
after completing his residency in neurolo- 
gical surgery. They are stationed at Keesler 
Air Force Base in Mississippi. 

BEVERLY GRAMKOW MELINN had a 
second son, Douglas Robert, May 10, 1967. 



DORIS NIEMAND R U E D I N had her 
second child and first daughter, Nancy 
Irene, January 29, 1967. 

Congratulations to PAULA PRIAL FOLK- 
man's husband who is Surgeon-in-Chief 
at Children's Hospital Medical Center, 
Boston, and Professor of Surgery at Har- 
vard Medical School. Among his accom- 
plishments are a new method of heart re- 
pair and the development of an isolated or- 
gan perfusion system making possible lor^ 
term studies of growth rate and metabol- 
ism of human solid tumors and leukemia. 
Paula is still active musically, and Laura is 
in Nursery School. 

PATTI SKILLIN PELTON had her fourth 
child and second son, David Ski II in, July 
26, 1967. 

1955 

JANE ANNE ENGLISH STONER had a 
third child and second daughter, Virginia 
Anne, May 16, 1967. 

1956 

News Secretary: Mrs. Alden Taylor Bryan 
(Phoebe Estes) North Williston Rd., Willis- 
ton, Vt. 05495. 

In June, BETSY PARKER POWELL was 
hostess for a luncheon for BOAT RULON- 
MILLER YORK, PEG OLIVER HEDEMAN, 
and WEEZ DAY COOK, who was East with 
her family. 




Louise Day Cook with Dana, Boat Rulon- 

Miller York, and Peg Oliver 

Hedeman with Ricky 



nineteen 



At the end of August, Betsy flew to the 
Rhode Island shore with Parker to visit with 
LEE PELTON MORRISON and her three 
sons. 

After October 27, the Morrisons will have 
a new address: 10 Knolls Lane, Flower Hill, 
Manhasset, New York, 1 1 030. 

JANE TATMAN CONNELLY and family 
have moved and their new address is 6276 
Buxton Lane, Indianapolis, Indiana, 46220. 

MARRIED 
MARGARET ROTH to James Lee Brown, 
August 26, 1967, in the Bethlehem Chapel 
of Washington Cathedral. The Browns will 
attend the American Institute for Foreign 
Trade, and Margie hopes to continue her 
work restoring paintings. 

BORN 
To MOLLIE LUPE LASATER, first child, 
Garland M. Lasater, III, June 18, 1967. 

To ELEANOR MORGAN R O D I N I , a 
second child and first son, Mark Lawrence, 
December 8, 1966. 

To PEG OLIVER HEDEMAN, a third 
child, Nancy Anne, June 10, 1967. 

Phoebe 

1957 

News Secretary: Mrs. John J. Moughty, 
Jr. (Lynn McLaughlin) , Cedar Lane, Ridge- 
field, Conn. 06877 

This September 24th deadline came 
sooner than expected, so I don't have as 
much news as I had hoped. Plan to do 
better next time . . . with your help. 

MARCIA COLBY FRAME and family 
(Michael, 4 and Melissa, 1 Vi) spent a 
rather hectic summer in Westport Harbor, 
Mass. — what with redecorating their sum- 
mer house (a new roof was only half on 
the house when torrential rains hit which 
meant having to break down the kitchen 
door to bail out the 3 inches of water which 
had accumulated on the first floor — fun 
and games!) and then Hank had to un- 
dergo a major operation in early August. 
He has recuperated nicely and is now back 
at work. Marcia, bless her, found time to 
be a one man welcome wagon to us new- 
comers to Ridgefield. She had a friend call 
on me while she was in Westport Harbor, 
and then, when home briefly in August 
for Hank's operation, she managed to 
squeeze in time to see me. It certainly is 
nice having a friend to turn to when settling 
into a new town. 



MARY LEE CARTER S T A N I A R and 
family moved from Northbrook, III. to 
Darien, Conn, in July. This is about their 
8th move since they were married 5 years 
ago. Naturally, they've been up to their ears 
getting settled — making repairs, painting, 
installing a second bath, etc. Wade com- 
mutes to New York City and sells paper to 
textbook publishers for S. D. Warren Paper 
Co. Scott (4) has just started nursery 
school while Kim (2 1/4) helps Wiggs keep 
thin at home. 

Wiggs and I spent a delightful few hours 
with a long, lost friend — CECILE ERICK- 
SON MACTAGGART while she was home 
visiting her mother in Greenwich in early 
August. While our respective children were 
having a well-supervised lunch at one end 
of the house, we (Mrs. Erickson, Cecile, 
Wiggs and I) had a peaceful, uninterrupted 
visit at the opposite end of the house. 
Cecile and Sandy had just spent several 
months on two houseboats anchored off 
some little islands they own in the Exemas 
and were enroute home to Edmonton, 
Alberta. We missed seeing Sandy who had 
taken a quick trip to see Expo, but we did 
meet the three Mactaggart children — 
Mara (4 1 /2>, Fiora (3), and Alastair (1) 
— which was a real treat. Wiggs and I left 
with the reassuring feeling that Cecile is the 
same wonderful friend that we knew at 
Abbot. We hope we will be able to have 
more of a visit with her the next time she 
comes to Greenwich. 

ELLEN PARKER spent 3 weeks in Europe 
this summer. 

ELIZABETH HORAN was married to 
David L. Edgerly of Brownsville, Vt. July 
1, 1967, in Cornwall, Conn. David, an 
alumnus of Phillips Academy and Brown 
University, served as a Peace Corps volun- 
teer in Turkey. He is studying for an M.A. 
at Columbia University and expects to be- 
come an associate director of the Peace 
Corps in Turkey. 

FRANKIE YOUNG TANG has both 
daughters Tracy (5!/2) and Dana (3Vi) 
in school while son Kevin (6 mos.) keeps 
her from getting too lonesome at home. 
Frankie is taking oil painting lessons one 
morning a week, and also on the creative 
side, plans to decorate Oscar's new office 
when his firm moves to a new location. 



twenty 



SUE CHRISTY HERPICK had a second 
son, Jonathan Wright, May 2, 1 967. 

ANNE LUQUER BOSWELL had a healthy 
7 lb. 10 oz. daughter on August 24, 1967. 
Son Thomas thinks his little sister is wonder- 
ful as do both parents, of course. John has 
just left his law firm in order to work for 
the Civil Disorders Commission in Washing- 
ton, D.C. Anne and John will be renting 
"a newly painted, bore house with a de- 
lightful garden" in Georgetown. 

The class will be sorry to learn that 
JUDY MEDWED STAHL'S mother died 
this summer. 

LUCINDA SULZBACHER CUTLER has a 
busy fall ahead of her other than keeping 
track of her three sons — Jimmy (4), 
Alex (2), and Peter (9 mos.) They have 
just sold their house in North Branforcf 
which had suddenly gotten too small for 
them and have to find a new house and 
move by December 1 . They are hoping to 
find a place in nearby Madison or Guilford. 

We MOUGHTYS are enjoying living in 
our new house after being apartment 
dwellers for four years. Beth (2) loves all 
the added space to run around in while 
Mon isn't sure she likes the added ground 
work when it comes to fielding toys. John 
doesn't feel cooped up on week ends any 
more as we have a good acre of land to 
shape up as it was a pasture and farm land 
a year ago. I have an unlimited amount 
of indoor projects waiting for him on rainv 
days. Could be he may start wishing he 
were back in the apartment! Our new ad- 
dress is Cedar Lane, Ridgefield, Conn, 
should anyone like to volunteer information 
about themselves. I am planning to send 
self-addressed post cards to everyone in 
hopes of helping people to volunteer news 
so when you get your card please take the 
time to say a few words. 

Best to all, 

Lynne 

1958 

JANE CHRISTIE SMITH writes, "My 
husband has been granted a fellowship from 
the German government to work on his 
dissertation in Religious studies. David, 
Timothy and I leave Yale in August sailing 
on the Bremen to be in Marburg one year. 
We plan to be in England for awhile for me 
to do research on my dissertation in English 
History." 



JOYCE FINGER EVANS had a son, Stefan 
Frederic, July 1, 1967, in Brussels, Bel- 
gium. 

1959 

KATE SIDES FLATHER had a daughter, 
Kate Meredith, March 22, 1967. 

On June 3, 1967, SUE WHOLEY FIELD 
had her first child, a son, E. Lincoln, II. 
Marshall is now parcticing law. 

MARRIED 
DUNCAN MOOSE to Frank C. Ripley in 
Cambridge, Mass., in June, 1967. Frank 
graduated Magna Cum Laude from Har- 
vard. He studied for a year at Jesus 
College, Cambridge, England, and is study- 
ing for his doctorate at Harvard. After 
graduating from Wellesley, Duncan studied 
for a year at the University of Cologne as 
a Fulbright Scholar. In 1966 she received 
her master's degree from Harvard where 
she was both a Wood row Wilson Fellow and 
a National Science Foundation Fellow. She 
is now a doctoral candidate at Harvard. 

1960 

AMELIA COMAS was married to Robert 
O'Brien of Washington, D.C, October 7, 
1967, in Miami Beach, Fla. He is a grad- 
uate of Georgetown University. 

MARGARET WILKINS NOEL is in 
Chicago where her husband has an intern- 
ship at the University of Chicago Hospital. 
Mig works for the Encyclopedia Britannica 
editing educational film strips. 

MARRIED 
JOYCE NASSAR to John P. Leary of 
Lowell, Mass., June 24, 1967, in Andover, 
Mass. John is an alumnus of Keith Acad- 
emy, Lowell Technological Institute and a 
graduate of the University of Massachu- 
setts. 

1961 

News Secretary: Andrea Lynch, 144 East 
84th St., Apt. 7B, New York, N.Y. 10028. 

BARBARA DAUGHERTY DERMODY had 
a second child and first daughter, Andrea 
Marie, July 12, 1967. Peter is 8. 

SUE FOX is working for her master's 
degree in Business Administration at the 
University of Michigan. 

PERSIS McCLENNEN is a candidate for 
the Master of Arts in Teaching degree at 
the Harvard Graduate School of Education. 



twenty-one 



PAT REPPERT LE CRAVER has two 
daughters, Joelle, 2, and Graenaelle, 5 
months. Jean Paul received a degree in 
Political Science in 1966, and is now in 
law school in Paris. They would love to see 
any travelers. Address: G319, RUA, Antony 
92, France. 

ENGAGED 

JOAN SPURGEON to Dr. B. Lawrence 
Brennan. He is a graduate of Princeton 
and University of Pennsylvania Medical 
School. He is a Captain in the USAF. 

MARRIED 

JUDITH PURSER to Michael Francis 
John O'Heney-Sibley of Hampstead, Lon- 
don, England, June 3, 1967, in London, 
England. He was graduated from Stony- 
hurst College in England. They will live in 
New York City where Michael is in Public 
Relations. Judith received a B.S. degree 
from Columbia in January, 1966, and 
worked in London for 15 months. 

PHYLLIS RODGE to Paul F. Gleason of 
Sarasota, Fla., July 1, 1967, in Winchester, 
Mass. Paul is an alumnus of Admiral Far- 
ragut Academy, Williams Collge and New 
York University Graduate School. He is 
now a graduate student in Electrical En- 
gineering at Northeastern University. 

1962 

News Secretary: Mrs. Andrew P. Langlois 
(Lynne Moriarty), 107 Niles Hill Road, 
New London, Conn. 06320. 

CAMMY MOORE received her master's 
degree from Stanford in June in the Second- 
ary Teacher Education Program. She is now 
working toward a Ph.D. in Educational Psy- 
chology at Stanford. 

FREDERICA MULLER AALTO and Ken 
spent the summer in Oregon where Ken 
was doing field research for his master's 
degree at the University of Wisconsin. 

ANNE RIPLEY writes, "I moved to Ber- 
keley this fall to work and experience a 
'stimulating campus-town'. Cornell Univers- 
ity Nursing School provided a job. If any 
of you have the urge to come West, do 
look me up, and I'll show you what I can. 
It's great here." 

MER I BY SWEET graduated from the Uni- 
versity of Maine in June. She is teaching 
Speech and Drama at Abbot. 

ELIZABETH WOOD is teaching Biology 
and English at the Brimmer and May School 
in Boston. 



ENGAGED 
KITTY GRANT to Anthony George Galai- 
tis of Veroia, Greece. Anthony graduated 
from City College, New York, and is cur- 
rently doing graduate work at M.I.T. in 
Nuclear Physics. Kitty went to Greece this 
summer to meet his family. 

MARRIED 

BETSY BRUNS to Peter Eaton, June 10, 
1967. Pete is a graduate of Colgate and re- 
ceived an M.A.T. from Brown in 1967. He 
teaches History at Cushing Academy in 
Ashburnham, Mass, and they are living in. 
a boys' dorm. Betsy is helping with girls' 
physical education and various other 
projects. They spent their honeymoon 
traveling in France, Holland and England. 

CYNTHIA EVERETT to Jonathan W. 
White of Lexington, Mass., July 15, 1967, 
in New London, N.H. Jonathan attended 
Belmont Hill School and Dartmouth College. 
He is now a lieutenant in the Army. They 
are living in Clarksville, Tenn. 

JENNIFER HESKETH to Rodger I. 
Thompson, June, 1967. Rodger is studying 
for a Ph.D. in Astrophysics at M.I.T. Jen- 
nifer is a secretary at M.I.T. in the Political 
Science department. 

NANCY MATTHEWS to Bruce MacLeod 
of Darien, Conn., June 10, 1967, in New 
Canaan, Conn. LINDA SWANBERG MUS- 
SER was one of the bridesmaids. Bruce is a 
graduate of Deerfield Academy and Wil- 
liams College, and is attending Harvard 
Graduate School of Business Administra- 
tion. 

LYNNE E. MORIARTY to Andrew P. Lan- 
glois of Andover, June 18, 1967, in Ando- 
ver. MARY LOU CURRIER was one of the 
bridesmaids. Andrew is a graduate of Car- 
negie Institute of Technology and Harvard 
Business School. He is employed by General 
Dynamics. 

1963 

News Secretary: Ann Harris, 32 River 
St., Boston, Mass. 02108. 

ELIZABETH BARTELINK graduated 
from Smith College in June with a B.A. 
degree in Art History. She is working in 
Leiden, The Netherlands as a secretary in 
the Netherlands Office for Foreign Stu- 
dent Relations. 

MARGARET BROWN graduated from 
the University of Pennsylvania in June with 
an A.B. in Education. She is working for a 



twenty-two 



master's degree in Education at the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania. 

SUE BURTON has returned from a year's 
study of Art in Paris, and is working in 
Washington for the National Geographic, 
in editorial layout. 

SUSAN COOLIDGE graduated from 
Goucher College in June with a B.A. in 
History of Art. She is working as a photog- 
rapher for the Museum of Fine Arts in 
Boston. 

MIMI DEAN graduated from the Univers- 
ity of Colorado in June with a B.A. degree 
in International Affairs. She spent the sum- 
mer as a tour leader for a group of 16-18 
year old girls traveling in Europe. This fall 
she and Morley Marshall are traveling 
together in Europe. 

DEBORAH FITTS graduated from Smith 
with a B.A. degree in June. She is now in 
Israel in the Volunteers for Israel Program. 
Her first project was an archaeological dip 
in the Negeve, and she is now working and 
living on a Kibbutz. 

MARIE FOX received an A.B. degree with 
Distinction from Wellesley in June. She is 
doing graduate work in Architecture at 
Mass. Institute of Technology in Cambridqe. 

MUTHONI GITHUNGO received a B.S. 
from Annhurst College in June. She is work- 
ing at the University of Pennsylvania School 
of Veterinary Medicine doing clinical re- 
search in animal virology. 

JAN GLEASON received a certificate 
from the New York School of Interior De- 
sign in June. 

LOIS GOLDEN STERN received a B.A. in 
Art History from Barnard College in June. 

KARLA HAARTZ received an A.B. 
degree from Mount Holyoke in June. She is 
teaching Mathematics at the Northfield 
School this year. She spent the summer at 
Mount Holyoke working in the ABC pro- 
gram. 

ANN HARRIS received a B.A. degree in 
Urban Studies from Briarcliff in June. She 
is studying at Katharine Gibbs School in 
Boston. 

BARBARA HOFFMAN received an A.B. 
degree from Elmira College in June. Hei' 
major was History of Art. She is teaching 
History and History of Art this year at St. 
Margaret's School in Waterbury, Conn. 

SARAH HOLBROOK received a B.A. in 
Philosophy from Wheaton in June. She is 
studying at Katharine Gibbs School in New 
York this year. 



CAROLYN HOLCOMBE received a B.A. 
in Sociology from Beloit. She also received 
a certificate for one year of study at the 
Institute for American Universities at 
Aix-en Provence, France. She is an assist- 
ant in the Social Service department at 
the Children's Hospital in Boston. More 
specifically she is a case aide for a re- 
search program entitled, The Maternal and 
Infant Health Study. 

CAROL HUMSTONE received a B.A. 
degree in Art from Hollins College in June. 

MARSHA KETCHAM graduated from 
Sweet Briar College in June. She is attend- 
ing Katharine Gibbs School, and is living 
at home. 

CHERYL KRIPPENDORF received a B.A. 
degree from the University of New Hamp- 
shire in June. She majored in Mathematics. 
She spent the summer as a trainee for IBM 
as a systems engineer in Boston. She is now 
working in Hartford, Conn. 

MORLEY MARSHALL received an A.B. 
in History from Smith College in June. She 
and MIMI DEAN are traveling in Europe 
this fall. 

PATIENCE MEIGS will graduate from 
Bryn Mawr next year. She spent her Junior 
year out to study Music ond Medieval Art 
in Strasbourg, France, and this year she is 
also at Strasbourg majoring in French and 
Medieval Art and History. 

FREDERICA MOXON graduated from 
Vassar with a B.A. in History. She will be 
teaching English in a small Mexican town 
this year. She would welcome anyone who 
wants to take a vacation in a lovely town 
on the coast. Address: c/o Harry Milton 
Holt, Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco, Mexico. 

MEG POWER received an A.B. Magna 
Cum Laude in Social Relations from Rad- 
cliffe in June. She is in the doctoral pro- 
gram at M.I.T. in the Political Science De- 
partment having received a four-year 
National Institute of Mental Health Fellow- 
ship to do doctoral studies in the field of 
Urban Affairs. It's a new field and involves 
state and local government. 

SANDRA PRICE BISHOP had a daughter, 
Cristina, August 11, 1967. 

BETTINA PROSKE graduated from 
Mount Holyoke College with an A.B. in 
German Literature. She is teaching German 
and English at a French-speaking "Inter- 
national" school in Neuchatel, Switzerland. 



twenty-three 



SHARON SEECHE received a B.A. degree 
from Wheaton College in June. 

LAUREL STEVENSON graduated from 
the University of Arizona in June, and is 
studying at the University of Illinois. 

MARY WILKINS received a B.A. degree 
from Wheaton College in June cum laude 
and Phi Beta Kappa. She is doing graduate 
work in Medieval Art at the University of 
Munich. 

ENGAGED 

ANITA MILLER to Andrew Peter White 
of Auburn, Me., a graduate of Bowdoin 
College. He is now in a managerial train- 
ing program with Casco Bank in Maine. 
Anita graduated from Bates College in 
June with a B.A. degree Cum Laude and 
Departmental Honors in English. She is 
teaching third grade this year. 

MARRIED 

^ CYNTHIA BENNETT to Jonathan F. 
Callendar of Pasadena, Calif., August 6, 
1967 in Pasadena. IRIS VARDAVOULIS 
BLACKMER was one of the bridesmaids. 
Jonathan is a graduate of California In- 
stitute of Technology, and is attending 
Harvard Graduate School. Cynthia is work- 
ing at Widener Library, Harvard Univers- 
ity. 

JOAN CARTER to Ronald J. Green, June 
24, 1967, in Plainfield, N.J. Ron is a senior 
at Brown. Joan received a B.A. degree 
Magna Cum Laude from Smith in June, 
and is doing cancer research at the Rhode 
Island Hospital in Providence. 

KAREN FLACK to Thomas H. Bonnell 
of Wallingford, Penna., June 17, 1967, in 
Tryon, N.C. Karen received her B.A. degree 
from Bryn Mawr in June, and is studying 
biology at Temple University. Thomas, an 
alumnus of Haverford College is working 
for his Ph.D. in History at Temple. They 
are living at Swarthmore as chief residents 
in an all girls' dorm. 

MARY JASPER to Elliott Anderson in 
August, 1966. Mary graduated from Beloit 
in August, 1966, and trained for the Peace 
Corps at Columbia University. She and her 
husband departed for Kenya in January, 
1967. They are teaching in a girls' second- 
ary school, and love it — they may never 
come home. 

MARGARET MOORE to Jordan David 
Pearl. Peggy graduated from Northwestern 



in June with a B.A. in History. Jordan 
graduated from Roosevelt University, and 
is District Manager of Lundia Myers In- 
dustries, Inc. in Michigan. 

EMILY MOULTON to Lt. John R. Hall, 
II, U.S. Army, June 24, 1967, in Salem, 
Mass. John graduated in June from West 
Point. Emily graduated from Hood College 
in June. They are stationed at Fort Richard- 
son, Alaska. 

MARIA PASTORIZA to Roberto Bonetti, 
September 9, 1967, in Santiago, Dominican 
Republic. Maria graduated from Briarcliff 
in June. Roberto attended Lawrenceville 
and graduated from Yale. He is working 
in the peanut oil industry in the Dominican 
Republic. 

EILEEN SCHOCK to Jude Peyton Laspa, 
July 8, 1967. Eileen graduated in June 
from Scripps College where she majored in 
Political Science. 

JACQUELYN SUTTON to Andrew Bruce 
Cleverly of Whitinsville, Mass., August 5, 
1967, in Chatham, Mass. CAROL HUM- 
STONE was maid of honor. Jackie received 
an A.B. degree from Hollins in June. She 
is teaching in Rockbridge Co., Va. Bruce 
graduated from Phillips Academy and is a 
senior at Washington and Lee University. 

NATALIE WARE to Marion Wayne Ry- 
herd of lola, Kan., July 2, 1967, in New 
London, N.H. PATRICIA WARE was maid 
of honor. Nat is head of the design de- 
partment of H. L. Miller Co., a dress manu- 
facturer in lola, Kan. Marion is a graduate 
of Fort Scott Junior College. 

1964 

News Secretary: Susan Stafford, 4103 
Spruce St., Box 1397, Philadelphia, Penna. 
19104. 

LEE PORTER spent the summer in India 
with the Experiment in International Living, 
and "it was very successful." 

ENGAGED 

JO-ANWYL FOSTER to Gary Rowland 
Myers of Camp Hill, Penna. Jo will be a 
senior at Wilson College. Gary was grad- 
uated from the University of Delaware and 
will enter his senior year at the Dickinson 
School of Law in the fall. 

NANCY V. POYNTER to Malcolm W. 
Sandberg of Andover. Nancy is a senior at 
Briarcliff. Malcolm attended Bates College, 
and recently completed a tour of duty with 



twenty-four 



the U.S. Army Special Forces in the Panama 
Canal Zone. He is studying at Boston Uni- 
versity. 

MARRIED 
DALE BARRACLOUGH to Charles L. 
Munson, 3rd of Quincy, Mass., September 
9, 1967, in Andover. MOLLY WEBSTER 
was one of the bridesmaids. Charles is a 
student at Princeton. 

CORLISS HEWITT to Jan P. Askman of 
South Hamilton, Mass., July 1, 1967, in 
Huntington, N.Y. Jan is a graduate of 
Phillips and the U.S. Military Academy. 
Corliss is a senior at Wellesley this year. 

BRIDGET PARSON to James A. Salton- 
stall of North Andover, September 9, 1967, 
in North Andover. HOPE PARSON was maid 
of honor, and LEE CLARK was one of the 
bridesmaids. Bridget will be a senior at 
Simmons College. James is a graduate of 
Brooks School and Harvard College. 

1965 

News Secretary: Gail Goldstein, Box 
1815, Connecticut College, New London, 
Conn. 06320. 

Well, C. FAYE and I are going to col- 
laborate on this installment of the news, 
because it seems as though she is seeing 
more of our class than I am. 

First of all, Connecticut's news 

WENDE is at Indiana awaiting her forth- 
coming wedding which will take place De- 
cember 28. Her fiance is Robert W. Cham- 
bers, Jr., Princeton '65, and he is enrolled 
in a graduate program at Indiana Drama 
School. "Hello from the Elkhart General 
Hospital. Am I bored! The doctor said 'No 
job.' I must rest. I have an ulcerated colon." 
"Went to Chicago and got my going away 
outfit. I told my Mom all I needed was a 
new pair of Levis, but she nixed that." 
We all wish Wende and Rob the VERY 
best!!! 

EMILY was sick again last spring, and 
as a result is taking this year off, and plans 
to work for VISTA. Our class at Conn, is 
awaiting her return next fall. 

And speaking of Conn., I walked into 
the bathroom the first day of classes (I 
returned to school late because I went on 
a short trip to Spain with my parents dur- 
ing the early part of September) and ran 
into JULIE ALVAREZ ('67). 



And this note from LIZ EDER, who has 
returned from Tobago. "My address is 516 
E. William Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 
48108." 

BECKY REYNOLDS writes, "I hope I'm 
in time to get my news in the next bulletin. 
I'm engaged!" Her fiance is Jim Hackett, 
a senior at Duke. They were engaged on 
September 10, 1967. They plan to be mar- 
ried in June, 1969, after Becky's gradua- 
tion. And another one bites the dust. 

(Now for C. FAYE'S contributions . . .) 
"I am majoring in Asian Studies, was in 
Europe this summer. Ran into CLAIRE 
MOORE '67 at Pitti Palace, CICI STILL- 
MAN at the Medici Chapel. We spent a 
few days together in Paris reliving LAU- 
RIE SMITH'S Art History. JOAN BRAZER 
was over there too . . Cici saw her in 
passing. SUZE VOORHEES was in Sweden 
with the Experiment." Suze is at Sarah 
Lawrence now. 

POLLY OSBORNE graduated from Katie 
Gibbs this spring . . . and last we heard 
was unemployed. 

LANGDON (Leigh to us) was in Cam- 
bridge this summer, working for the Girls 
Club and running a Great Books seminar. 
She shared an appartment with SUE 
SPANGLER. 

(C. Faye again . .) "I saw DEBBIE 
DOWNS last year with Jim at the Prince- 
ton-Yale game. And ANN McDERMOTT, 
who looked fantastic, at Yale. ROS IE TYLER 
in a restaurant in Hartford." 

BARB DOW is majoring in Biology at 
Goucher and is very happy. C. Faye saw 
SARAH MASSENGALE at a Harvard re- 
union and she is still pinned. She was in 
Europe too this summer with her family. 

And from CATHIE CHOY: "First of all, 
I am enjoying NU very much. I managed 
to get on the Dean's List Fall and Spring 
quarters last year (A-average). As for 
myself, I'm always the faithful student but 
enjoying many social activities. I spent 
June in Hawaii, just love it. Everything liter- 
ally blooms there. At the Royal Hawaiian 
Robert Horton asked me for a swim. I 
worked for a bridal salon, was a model for 
Modern Bride and Mademoiselle. Was it 
ever fun. Being a fashion model has tauaht 
me grace and poise, a good experience for 
all young girls. I saw CLAUDETTE on her 
way to Switzerland. She looks well, and 



twenty-five 



her little boy is cute. I may be going to 
Harvard summer school next summer." 
Many thanks to CATHIE for her very in- 
teresting letter. 

As for me . . . I'm still at Conn. . . . 
and that's a step in the right direction. I'm 
majoring in American History (much to 
Miss Minard's surprise). And this summer 
I taught canoeing again at a camp on the 
Cape . . . would you believe it??? 

Last, but definitely not least, I got a 
wonderful and long letter from TALO last 
spring. She is still acting and dancing and 
sinaing and painting. She's still at Saint 
Olaf's and is having a ball. 

That's about it this time . . . please keep 
those letters coming, I just love getting 
mail in my cob-webbed mailbox. C. Faye 
and I are in the same dorm again, so the 
cycle has come to full turn. 

Stay happy! 

Gail Golstein 

LUCINDA BUXTON graduated from 
Bennett College in June. 

ROBIN GAMBLE graduated from 
Mount Vernon Junior College in June, and 
is now studying at the University of Colo. 

KATHY STAPLES has transferred from 
Wheaton to Boston University. 

SARAH WATSON has transferred to the 
University of Hartford. She spent the sum- 
mer at a ranch in Wyoming taking charge 
of 18 girls and supervising the ranch kit- 
chen. 

MARRIED 

LESLIE VEASEY to Frederick T. Schade 
of Fort Washington, Penna., August 12, 
1967 in Haverhill, Mass. Fred was grad- 
uated from William Penn Charter School 
and attended Syracuse University. 

1966 

News Secretary: Ellen Sobiloff, Chatham 
College, Box 188, Pittsburgh, Penna. 15232. 

Congratulations to BONNIE WARE on 
her marriage to John Steppan on August 
4th. They are attending school in England 
for the year. 

Congratulations also to MARTHA 
CHURCH on her engagement to Mark 
Moore (Andover '65), a Junior at Yale. 

While at Harvard this summer, I met 
wth or bumped into numerous Abbot alum- 
nae. LIZ WALKER and I roomed together, 



and in nearby dorms were P E I G I 
DONAGHEY and MARY MARGARET 
LIVINGSTON. SUE SPANGLER was also in 
Cambridge in an apartment with LANG- 
DON LEARNED '65. FRAN JONES and 
BARBARA PARIS were working in Cam- 
bridge and sharing an old house with ANN 
RAH ILLY, CINDY BUXTON and BETSY 
LAGE '65. 

During the summer LIZ, PEIGI, LEE 
HASELTON and PINKY ROCK, who were 
both living at home and working in Maine 
(Lee also attended Colby Summer School 
and took German II) MARTY WE IS and I 
spent a week end on Cape Cod. A small re- 
union, but the memories included all 
'66-ers. LONNI SOMERS stopped in Cam- 
bridge one afternoon along with RUTH SIS- 
SON who loves Syracuse; they see JOYCE 
ABBOTT often. Lonni is very happy at Wis- 
consin. BEV ARMSDEN also visited us in 
Cambridge — she looks marvelous. She 
and MARC I A WATSON are at Skidmore 
where Marcia is President of the Sophomore 
class. Liz spent a week end visiting with 
LAURIE HINCKLEY and JUDY BRICKER 
at Mouse's summer home in Maine Poor 
Mouse developed a case of mumps. Judy 
worked in a New York hospital. I received 
a post card from KAYE ROAN this sum- 
mer while she and her mother were in 
Europe. They spent some time with Mile. 
Barratte in France. 

DAWN WOODWORTH was also a visitor 
this summer. She had an apartment nearby 
and did some organ work. At Northwestern 
she received the Freshman prize for the 
student showing the most musical ability 
and promise. Congratulations! 

BARBARA HAZARD spent the summer 
in Hong Kong where she taught English and 
did welfare work on a project sponsored by 
Stanford. PAM SEVEY worked this summer 
in Puerto Rico at EL Guncio, a Christian 
Service Center. CAROL LASH NITS is study- 
ing at Boston University. She spent the 
summer in Sweden with the Experiment in 
International Living. BETTY BARKER is at 
the University of Colorado. She taught ten- 
nis at a country club in Denver this sum- 
mer. DREWRY HANES writes that she had 
a good summer. From the west coast, SAL- 
LIE WATLING spent the summer on a 
cruise to Hawaii. At the end of the summer 
MARGY RYDER, who looks wonderful, came 
to visit me in Cambridge before leaving for 






twenty-six 



Philadelphia. She will be working there 
this year. MARCIA and JUDY FROEBER 
went to see her in Phi I ly this summer where 
she was going to summer school at the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania. Judy is an orienta- 
tion counselor at the University of North 
Carolina. 

JEAN LIPPINCOTT is now going to the 
University of Richmond. I saw LUCY 
CRANE after she returned from Greece. 
Needless to say, it was an unforgettable 
year for her and her family, and she 
thoroughly succeeded in making me jealous. 
She is now at Wellesley. I have also heard 
from NANCY WHITEHEAD since she re- 
turned. Her reactions are mixed — very 
disappointed to leave Europe, and yet, very 
excited to get to the University of Wis- 
consin. 

LIZ and FRAN are sharing an apartment 
in Cambridge where they will be working 
this year. AYER CHAMBERLIN will be with 
them until December as she is taking off a 
semester to work at the Children's Medical 
Center in Boston. She spent her summer 
taking courses at Beloit. 

As for myself, I took two marvelous 
English courses this summer. I love 
Chatham and am extremely pleased with 
my subjects — even Italian at Carnegie 
Tech. 

Please everyone, I genuinely want to 
hear from you and to know what you are 
doing. Write! 

Love, 

Ellen 

1967 

News Secretary: Judith Hannegan, Al- 
drich Hall, Beloit College, Beloit, Wis. 
53511. 

Oh! the good times when we were so un- 
happy. — DUMAS 
Greetings from the Indian territory of 
Beloit, Wisconsin. It seems strange that 
we're not all together once again for another 
year at Abbot. Graduation seems so long 
ago, I can't help but feel old!!!! Nostalgia 
at such a tender age is frightening indeed! 
I've been receiving many letters unfolding 
the tales of eventful summer lives, and will 
try to include as much as possible. 

First and foremost comes news from 
Newark, New York, the September 1 wed- 
ding of SARAH BEALE to George Fleming 



Tagger Yancy, otherwise known as Jeff. 
Sarah is keeping up a home of her own 
in Brunswick, Me. On behalf of the class, 
our congratulations and felicitations, Mrs. 
Yancy. 

I received a letter from JULIA ALVAREZ 
enthusiastically relating a memorable sum- 
mer. A telegram from Santo Domingo and 
three quick days of shopping sent her down 
to the Dominican Republic to present her- 
self to society for the annual debutante 
ball. She returned "reformed" (???) with 
hopes for a return trip next summer. 

DIANA BONN I FIELD spent most of her 
summer at home with her family with the 
exception of a trailor trip to Expo '67, which 
provided her with a "perfect opportunity 
to take lots of pictures." She returned in 
time to take summer school courses at her 
nearby high school. Aside from that she 
participated in "the usual summer occupa- 
tions — babysitting, swimming, and read- 
ing." 

In contrast, GEORGIA HALL seems to 
have spent most of her summer away from 
home. She sounded enthusiastic about 
Rochester's orientation, and afterwards 
spent some time on the Cape, seeing MITSI 
MAJOR and "various P. A. men". She was 
with SALLY BIRDSALL in Rockport at 
"Sally's Shack", as was BEE READ. 

I heard from DORSEY GREEN at the 
beginning of the summer. She had to give 
up Tigger (remember? — our little kitten) 
and at that point hadn't "done a thing 
except typing class", however she seemed 
to be enjoying a chance to relax. I later 
heard from LAURIE WALLWORK that Dor- 
sey spent some time with her during her 
Dickinson orientation. Laurie sends reports 
of a "wonderful wonderful summer" 
waitressing at a coffee shop near her home 
in New Jersey. She had also seen SUE 
SMITH and FELICE FORREST. Felice spent 
some time with Laurie and then saw off 
LIZ BONAN and VAL BROWN who 
traveled to Florence on the Michelangelo. 

WEEZIE HUNTINGTON writes that she 
enjoyed the Northfield Conference, "the 
ministers were fantastic and the kids great. 
I loved it." Discussions at the conference 
included Viet Nam, the inner city, black 
power, and sex. Quite a combination!!! 
From there she traveled to Monterey and 
Pittsfield, Mass. to visit friends and rela- 
tives, and then home to take courses in 



twenty-seven 



tennis and sewing, (there's another com- 
bination!) A second letter revealed more 
plans of travel. 

CHRISSY LAMBERT spent an unusual 
summer working at an amusement park in 
Oklahoma City. "I worked in a place called 
the Pink Garter, wearing a skimpy costume 
and the most uncomfortable shoes I can 
find." In a later letter she claimed that 
her work had become "rather discouraging", 
but that she had made an interesting friend 
(leave it to Chrissy!) who "has broadened 
my outlook on life enormously". At that 
point California was "getting to her", but 
now that she's there, let's hope she's en- 
joying it. 

MARGIE KAPLAN was "bored to tears" 
according to her mid-summer letter. She 
went to Maine to visit friends and had been 
in contact with MITSI MAJOR, who ap- 
parently spent some time with Jeff. She 
also said that MARGIE GOLDMAN Was on 
Cape Cod and that LAURIAN CANNON 
was working as a cashier at a supermarket. 

I heard from ANN McKEEVER, who had 
"no really stimulating news to report". She 
enjoyed taking courses in Economics and 
Sociology, but didn't say where. She and 
HANNAH WHITNEY have moved into their 
apartment in Boston by now. She too went 
to Expo '67, and seemed to enjoy it, despite 
having to wait in line. 

I received a "newsy" letter from CLAIRE 
MOORE who spent her summer touring in 
Europe. She traveled through France toward 
the Riviera by way of the Chateaux de la 
Loire, to Pisa, Rome, and Florence, where 
she ran into FAYE GREEN (Abbot '65) 
who had likewise run into C. C. STILLMAN 
(Abbot '65), From Florence she traveled 
to Venice, Geneva, and Switzerland, back 
home in time to prepare for college. 

WENDY MORRISSEY worked as a 
waitress in Ogunquit, Maine, putting in 
fifty-six hours a week. She bumped into 
quite a few "Andies" as well as some 
Abbotites, namely FAITH BEANE, SHEL- 
LEY ERWIN, BEV ARMSDEN, and NANCY 
WARLICK (Abbot '66); also Miss Von E. ! 
Working at the same spot were RITA 
ACHIN and NANCY HOWE. She enjoyed 
herself working hard during the day and 
taking in the night life. 

WARREN OSBORNE spent some time at 
the University of Vermont for orientation 
and seemed a bit terrified of her courses. 



She flew to Spain in July and had a fan- 
tastic time in Madrid, where she visited 
the Prado Museum. From Madrid she 
traveled to Barcelona, Granada, Marbella, 
Seville, Lisbon, and then to London where 
she hoped to spend a day with L I Z 
MacGREGOR, who too traveled through 
France and England. 

LISSA PENDLETON wrote me a short 
note relating a trip she had taken to San 
Francisco, reporting a "marvelous time". 
ALICE ROBERTSON also spent some time 
in California, in Carmel, and Sacramento, 
where she served as a bridesmaid in a 
wedding. She enjoyed San Francisco but 
her favorite spot turned out to be Sausalito, 
"an artist's colony across the Golden Gate 
from Frisco". She was on the Cape for six 
weeks helping out at a new coffee house in 
Hyannis. She got together with PRISCILLA 
HOWES in late August when Priscilla had 
terminated her job as a summer camp 
counselor in Michigan. Alice is planning on 
rooming with ROXIE WOLFE this year at 
Briarcliff. Roxie worked in New Jersey as a 
babysitter for "three children who keep me 
busy". 

JANE PHILLIPS made her debut at 
Hamilton Hall in June, and the following 
week served as a bridesmaid with four other 
Abbot graduates in EMILY MOULTON'S 
wedding. (Abbot '63). For the remainder 
of the summer she worked in a counselor- 
training group in Casco, Me. Working with 
her was her Greek foster sister. On the side, 
she climbed Mount Washington and the 
Presidential Range, and participated in a 
three-day canoe trip down the Penobscot 
River. That's an unusual summer! 

NANCY POROSKY visited LIZ BONAN 
and worked in her father's office before 
leaving on the Putney European Travel 
Camp with ANN MILLER. Both she and Ann 
had a great time touring mainly in France 
and making many new friends. She attended 
a Mass in Notre Dame and visited Mont St. 
Michel as well as Luxembourg and Switzer- 
land, returning in time to head off to 
school in Pennsylvania. SANDY STEWART 
sent reports of v/orking at Bergdorf Good- 
man for three months last summer. Part of 
the time she commuted from home, and 
later she moved into an apartment in New 
York, along with a friend. She has seen LIZ 
MacGREGOR in New York, and is rooming 
with PR ILLY HAMMOND at Bennett. 



twenty-eight 



JANE VON DER HEYDE visited Harvard 
for three days after graduation, and then 
went to New York to work for the New 
York Stock Exchange for three weeks. In 
August she spent some time with Geoff in 
New Hampshire before she headed off for 
Barnard. FELICE FORREST, SUE GALLA- 
GHER and SUE LANDO got together with 
her in Connecticut in June. 

Since school started I've been receiving 
various reports from various parts of the 
country reporting the trials and tribulations 
of college life. CANDY HOWES is rooming 
with MAGGIE WILDE at Barnard, and is 
thoroughly enjoying herself, associating 
with lots of Andover people; feeling right 
at home. She spent a month with me this 
summer working at a Y.M.C.A. camp in 
Mukwonage, Wis. She visited JULIET 
SCHNELLER at Radcliffe a few weekends? 
ago with plans of returning with Maggie 
very shortly for an "old home week". She's 
spent some time with TILLY LAVENAS 
who has an apartment in New York, "right 
down the street" from Barnard. GERDA 
RAY, too ran into Tilly a few times in the 
city. She also has reports of Andover boys 
near her at Pembroke. 

WENDY MORRISSEY is slowly but surely 
adjusting to her newfound freedom at 
Mount Holyoke, and seems to enjoy her 
classes. She reports that her bridge game is 
rapidly improving!! 



CLAIRE MOORE is rooming with ANN 
MILLER at Wellesley, and already has 
found a friend at Harvard. She seems to 
be enjoying her courses. 

NANCY POROSKY too is adjusting and 
has overcome the pangs of nostalgia which 
overcome all of us from time to time. She 
is at Beaver and has already seen SUE 
STICHNOTH at the University of Pennsyl- 
vania, LIZ BONAN at Goucher, and MAR- 
GIE GOLDMAN at Smith. 

As for me, well, I enjoy the solitude of 
my own teepee, after having counseled 
hundreds of "beasts" last summer at camp 
and study on the Indian burial mounds 
which surround me at Beloit. I am enjoying 
all of my courses and have made many new 
friends. I'll be attending school next sum- 
mer because of a new plan which has been 
incorporated here. I've been dating an 
"Andie" (one of two on campus) and hope 
to get East sometime within the next two 
years. I hope to be hearing from all of our 
class, and possibly complete a booklet of 
addresses and birthdays; so do write and 
let me know what's new. Best of luck to you 
wherever you may be. I'm looking forward 
to hearing from everyone!!! 

Judy 

PAST FACULTY 

Many alumnae will be sorry to learn that 
Miss Kate Friskin's brother, James Friskin, 
died in March in New York City. 



ABBOT COOK BOOK 

The Alumnae Association is planning to publish a cook book con- 
taining your recipes and many of Abbot's traditional favorites. Share your 

quick and easy recipes as well as your gourmet specialties. Aagot Hinrich- 

sen Cain, 1944, is the editor. 

Mail recipes to Mrs. John E. Cain, Jr., 21 Lantern Lane, Weston, Mass. 
01893, before January 1, 1968. 



twenty-nine 



Changes of Address 



ARIZONA 

Margaret Roth (Mrs. James L. Brown) 1956 

The American Inst, for Foreign Trade 

Box 191, Phoenix 85001 

Esther Davis (Mrs. Andrew R. Smith) 1917 

Eleven Arches, P.O. Box 5693, Tucson 85703 

CALIFORNIA 

Anne Ripley 1962 

39 Roanoke Rd., Berkeley 94705 

Phyllis Rairdon i Mrs. James M. Wilce) 1946 

4195 Tenango, Claremont 91711 

Anne Flaherty < Mrs. William R. Leathers) 1938 

182 Corte Anita, Greenbrae 94904 

Marian Stewart I Mrs. Joseph Williams) 1931 

11715 Prager Ave., Lakeview Terrace 91342 

Hope Hamilton (Mrs. Robert P. Pettegrew) 1957 

98 Central Ct., Los Gatos 95030 

Jacquelin Chase (Mrs. Jaquelin C. Horodko) 1956 

474 Connecticut St., San Francisco 94107 

Eileen Schock (Mrs. Jude P. Laspa) 1963 

2355 Greenwich St., San Francisco 94123 

Constance Rundlett (Mrs. Constance R. Huston) 1928 

2716 El Prado, Santa Barbara 93105 



ILLINOIS 

Francine Fenn (Mrs. Richard D. McKee, II) 
1711 W. University Ave., Champaign 61820 
Margaret Wilkins (Mrs. Gordon L. Noel) 
1450 East 55th PI., No. 81 7S, Chicago 60615 
Anne K. Selden (Mrs. Robert S. Lowe) 
829 Michigan Ave., Evanston 60202 
Rosamond Graves (Mrs. David Carroll) 
332 Windsor Ave., Glen Ellyn 60137 
Barbara French (Mrs. Roger Brandt) 
Wild Rose Lane, St. Charles 60174 
Corallie Hanly (Mrs. David Murray, Jr.) 
400 Isabella Ave., Wilmette 60091 

INDIANA 

Martha Clark (Mrs. Robert D. Oft) 

7425 Hazelwood Ave., Indianapolis 46260 

KANSAS 

Natalie Ware (Mrs. Marion W. Ryherd) 

1 1 No. Walnut, lola 66749 

Joan Fisher (Mrs. Stephen Chambers) 

5334 Mission Woods Rd., Shawnee Mission 66205 



1956 
1960 
1941 
1939 
1947 
1947 

1955 

1963 
1959 



COLORADO 

Nancy Smedley (Mrs. Jock A. Arney) 1953 

313 14th, Alamosa 81 101 

CONNECTICUT 

Mary Carter (Mrs. G. Wade Staniar) 1957 

8 Casement St., Darien 06820 

Janet Bowden (Mrs. Claude A. Wilson, Jr.) 1953 

65 Patterson Ave., Greenwich 06830 

Carolyn Phillips (Mrs. Paul L. Brown) 1958 

c/o LCDR PL. Brown, Submarine School 

U.S. Sub Base, Groton 06340 

Barbara Hoffman 1963 

St. Margaret's School 

565 Chase Parkway, Waterbury 06708 

DISTRICT of COLUMBIA 

Suzanne Burton 1963 

2813 Dunbarton Ave. N.W., Washington 20007 

Amelia Comas (Mrs. Robert A. O'Brien) 1960 

P.O. Box 8828, Washington 20003 

Sally Leavitt (Mrs. Edward R. Cheney) 1945 

Bombay, c/o Dept. of State, Washington 20521 

Florence Mooney (Mrs. Laurence L. Doty, Jr.) 1939 

c/o Laurence L. Doty, Jr. 

Aviation Week & Space Tech., National Press Bldg. 

Washington 20004 



MARYLAND 



FLORIDA 

Anne Dudley (Mrs. Gray M. Blandy) 
311 Magnolia Dr., Clearwater 33516 
Marion Lawson i Mrs. Fred V. Archer, Jr.) 
1500 N.E. 26th Ave., Ft. Lauderdale 33304 
Elise Duncan (Mrs. Alan H. Danforth) 
3215 Oak St., Jacksonville 32205 
Nancy Swift (Mrs. Robert E. Greer) 
657-B Oriskany St. 

Mayport Naval Station, Jacksonville 32227 
Linda Lynch (Mrs. William M. Smoak, Ml) 
4320 Palmarido, Miami 33146 
Jane Hurlbut (Mrs. John N. Foster) 
320 Palmer Pk., Palm Beach 33480 

GEORGIA 

Darlene Gibbons (Mrs. David L. Farnsworth) 

2028 Tycoon Rd., No. E, Chamblee 30005 



1932 
1938 
1938 
1956 

1961 
1934 

1949 



Martha Grimshaw (Mrs. Arthur C. Bivens) 

Landover Gardens Apt., No. F 

7428 Landover Rd., Landover 20785 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Elizabeth Bruns (Mrs. Peter H. Eaton) 

Cushing Academy, Ashburnham 01430 

Lee Clark 

235 Commonwealth Ave., Boston 02116 
Kathie Fellows (Mrs. Alfred R. Leiserson) 

9 Hawthorne PI., Boston 02114 

Leslie Veasey (Mrs. Frederick Schade) 

337 Beacon St., Boston 02116 

Cynthia Bennett (Mrs. Jonathan F. Callender) 

115 Mt. Auburn St., Cambridge 02138 
Carol Clements (Mrs. John L. Standish) 
509 Franklin St., Cambridge 02138 
Mary Comstock (Mrs. Peter B. Evans) 

23 Elmer St., Cambridge 02138 
Susan Coolidge 

2 Ware St., Cambridge 02138 
Marie Fox 

1039 Massachusetts Ave., No. 3-B 
Jennifer Hesketh (Mrs. Rodger I. 
11 -D Eastgate, Cambridge 02139 
Carolyn Holcombe 

4 Ellsworth Ave., No. 44, Cambridge 02139 
Persis McClennen 
34 Bates St., Cambridge 02140 
Constance Nassikas (Mrs. John J. Hohenade 
101 Western Ave., No. 74, Cambridge 02141 
Nancy Sullivan 

24 Concord Ave., No. S-405, Cambridge 02138 
Elizabeth Wood 

61 Garfield St., Cambridge 02138 

Anisia Allen (Mrs. George H. Gifford, Jr.) 

24 Spooner Rd., Chestnut Hill 02167 

Karla Haartz 

Northfield School, East Northfield 01360 

Marion Rogers (Mrs. Arthur Wheat) 

14 Surry Lane, Hanson 02341 

Elizabeth Reid (Mrs. J. Milton Buiby, Jr.) 

951 Longmeadow St., Londmeadow 01106 

Louise Bacon (Mrs. Francis S. Fuller) 

8 Skinner's Path, Glover Landing, Marblehead 01945 

Terry Hydeman (Mrs. David A. Seward) 

Menemsha 02552 



Cambridge 02138 
Thompson) 



Jr.) 



1948 



1962 
1964 
1930 
1965 
1963 
1959 
1964 
1963 
1963 
1962 
1963 
1961 
1961 
1963 
1962 
1952 
1963 
1934 
1944 
1918 
1960 



thirty 



Joyce Nossor (Mrs. John P. Leary) I960 

52 Farrwood Ave., North Andover 01845 

Susan Lothrop (Mrs. Roland J. Koster) 1960 

207 High St., Reading 01867 

Frances McTernen (Mrs. Prescott Coan) 1935 

RFD, Sheffield 01257 

Constance Laurence (Mrs. Robert Brinckerhoff ) 1959 

45 Bellevue Rd., Swampscott 01907 

Sandra Wiles (Mrs. Donald E. Marquis) 1957 

35 Mohawk Dr., West Acton 01720 

Lois Ann Lovejoy (Mrs. Burdette A. Johnson, Jr.) 1951 

Pepperell Rd., West Groton 01472 

MICHIGAN 

Margaret Moore (Mrs. Jordan D. Pearl) 1963 

2566 Somerset Blvd., Troy 48084 

MISSISSIPPI 

Martha Jane Church (Mrs. Edward R. Lang) 1954 

c/o Copt. Edward R. Lang FV 31 1 26 90 
USAF Hospital, ATC, Keesler AFB 39534 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Carolyn Jenkins 1948 

266 No. Main St., Concord 03301 

Cornelia Jones (Mrs. Dale S. Gephart) 1959 

10 Woodmore Dr., Hanover 03755 

Helen Bruce (Mrs. Arthur W. Butler) 1915 

2 Clark Rd., Tilton 03276 



NEW JERSEY 

Dale Barraclough (Mrs. Charles L. Munson, 3rd) 1964 

28 Witherspoon St., Princeton 08540 

Potricia Jaffer (Mrs. William Abernethy, Jr.) 1947 

3 Conova Lane, Rumson 07760 

Mary Louise Miller (Mrs. Reeves W. Hart, Jr.) 1947 

23 Highlander Dr., Scotch Plain 07076 

Penelope Holbrook (Mrs. Watson D. Reid) 1957 

175 Serpentine Rd., Tenafly 07670 

NEW MEXICO 

Maj. Margaret R. McFarlin 1942 

6580 USAF Hosp., Hollomon AFB 88330 

NEW YORK 

Tina Koines (Mrs. James A. Grange) 1948 

111 So. Carll Ave., Babylon 11702 

Elizabeth Beat (Mrs. James D. Brown, Jr.) 1955 

14 Elm St., Clinton 13323 

Doris Olswang (Mrs. W. Clement) 1946 

2750 Colonial Ave., Merrick 11560 

Helen Meigs (Mrs. Louis B. van Dyck) 1919 

6 Appletree Lane, Newtonville 12128 

Betsy Elliott (Mrs. Robert C. Winkler) 1955 

2 Washington Square Village, New York 10012 

Jan Gleason 1963 

511 East 80th St., No. 9-H, New York 10021 

Sarah Holbrook 1963 

345 East 79th St., No. 11-H, New York 10021 

Paula Holders Mrs. Michael C. Palmer) 1951 

132 Hendy Creek Rd., RD No. 1, Pine City 14871 

Sister Ann Norwood 1954 

693 East Ave., Rochester 14607 

Miriam Ganem (Mrs. Larry Reeder) 1957 

353 Old Mamaroneck Rd., White Plains 10605 

OHIO 

Susan Fox (Mrs. Robert H. Castellini) 1959 

1310 Suncrest Dr., Cincinnati 45208 

Alice lams (Mrs. Tylor F. Kittredge) 1959 

8705 Camargo Club Dr., Cincinnati 45243 

Alice Russell (Mrs. James E. Farner) 1950 

2981 Washington, Cleveland Heights 44118 



PENNSYLVANIA 

Leane Albert (Mrs. Williaai L. Harrington) 

18 Pilgrim Dr., Lancaster 17603 

Margaret Brown 

2101 Chestnut St., No. 615, Philadelphia 19104 

Muthoni Githungo 

c/o J. Waiguchu, 215 No. 36th St., No. 2-B 
Philadelphia 19104 

Nancy Stevenson (Mrs. Richard H. Jackson) 

404 Sylvan Dr., State College 16801 
Karen Flack (Mrs. Thomas H. Bonnell) 
Woolman House, Box 703 
Swarthmore College, Swarthmore 19081 
Catherine Watson (Mrs. William E. Rapp) 
307 Upper Gulph Rd., Strafford, Wayne 19087 

RHODE ISLAND 

Joan Carter (Mrs. R. Gregory Green) 

3 1 1 Thayer St., Providence 02906 

TEXAS 

Sandra Price (Mrs. Richard L. Bishop) 

3117 Springwood Lane, No. 112, Dallas 75233 

VERMONT 

Carolyn Kent 

135 Cliff St., Burlington 05401 
Ann Twitched 

259 Flynn Ave., Burlington 05401 

VIRGINIA 

Suzanne Long (Mrs. Long Reed) 

6334 Cavalier Corridor, Falls Church 22044 

Jacquelyn Sutton (Mrs. A. Bruce Cleverly) 

27-C Hillside Terr., Lexington 24450 

WASHINGTON 

Patricia Goss (Mrs. Patricia G. Rhodes) 

5561 N.E. Ambleside Rd., Seattle 98105 

WISCONSIN 

Edith Flather (Mrs. George W. Swan) 
1029 Spruce St., Madison 53715 

CANADA 

Nancy Eastham (Mrs. Frank lacobucci) 

231 Old Orchard Grove, Toronto 12, Ontario 

CHILE 

Susan Kimball (Mrs. Keith Wheelock) 

American Embassy, Casilla 27 D, Santiago 

ENGLAND 

Premi Ashirvatham (Mrs. John G. Latimer) 

9 Ashcroft Ct., Burnham, Buckinghampshire 

Karin Magid 

8-12 Broadwich St., London W-l 

GERMANY 

Helen Chaffee (Mrs. E. Perry Manville) 

10 Brokstrasse, Bremen 28 

THE NETHERLANDS 

Elizabeth Bartelink 

Rapenburg 6 (c/o NBBS) Leiden 



1956 
1963 
1963 

1958 
1963 

1959 

1963 

1963 

1960 
1960 

1941 
1963 

1939 

1947 

1955 

1951 

1949 
1961 

1908 

1963 

1963 



SWITZERLAND 

Bettina Proske 

La Chatelainie, Saint-Blaise, Nei_chatel 

WEST GERMANY 

Mary Wilkins 1963 

Goethe Institut, Herzogstand weg 43, Kochelamsee 8113 



thirty-one 



THE 




SCHOOL 




CALENDAR 




September 


12 


September 


13 


September 


16 


September 


28 


September 


30 


October 


7 


October 


14 


October 


15 


October 


20 


October 


21 


October 


25 


October 


28 


October 


31 


November 


2 


November 


3-4 


November 


4 


November 


10-12 


November 


18 


November 


21 


November 


22-25 


December 


2 


December 


3 


December 


8 


December 


9 


December 


8-13 


December 


13 


December 


15- 


January 


2 



Arrival and registration of all students 

Classes begin 

School picnic 

Boston Abbot Club Meeting at Abbot 

Phillips Academy Mixer at Phillips 

Outdoor dance and Bar-B-Que 

Dinner Dance at Tilton 
Movie — "Lafayette" 

Joint Anthem with Phillips Academy 

Phillips Academy Celebrity Series: Ian & Sylvia, Folk 
Singers 

Mr. Rowland Sturges — Lecture Recital 

Hockey and Tennis at Cushing Academy 

Dinner Dance at Groton 
Movie — "Jane Eyre" 

Hockey at North Shore Country Day 

Mrs. Oswald Lord — U.N. 

Visit of Abbot Trustees 

Movie — "Sunday Last Summer" 

Parents' Week End — Speaker: Jean-Pierre Hallet, Ex- 
plorer, Sociologist, Naturalist, Linguist, Art Collector, 
Animal Trainer, and Author of "Congo Kitabu" 

Fidelio Concert with Phillips at Abbot 

Thanksgiving Service 

Thanksgiving Week End 

Senior-Mid Play 

Student Recital 

Phillips Academy Celebrity Series — Emlyn Williams 

Dance at Exeter 

Movie — "A Christmas Carol" 

Fall Term Examinations 

Christmas Dinner and Service 

Christmas Vacation 



thirty-two 



Did we miss your name? 

Engagements ? Marriages ? 

Children ? Travels ? Careers ? 

We'd love to add it to the class news — please send to the 
Alumnae Office before January 25, 1968 



Maiden Name Class 

Married Name „ _ 

Address 

Zip Code 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 

Andover. Massachusetts 

Return Requested 



ENTERED AS 
SECOND-CLASS MATTER 

AT THE POST OFFICE A1 

ANDOVER. MASSACHUSET 




Visual 
Syncopation 



The Lonely 

Hearts 

Club 




-¥^£ if it 



f IrASM 




"■ 


in 


i*9 




Abbot 

Academy 

Bulletin 



* 



% « ! %> # # 



Anno 1778 



# # * # #^ 

# 



* PHILLIPS ACADEMY # 







» OLIVER-WENDELL- HOLMES i 

I LIB R ARY I 



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§ # i *^^€=^* 5 # # # ^ 



The Executive Board of the Alumnae Association 

1 966 - 1 968 



President 



Vice Presidents 



Clerk 



Executive Secretary 
Delegates-at-Large 



Mrs. James F. Mathias 

( Barbara Lord) 

Glendale Rd.. Harrison, N.Y. 10528 



Mrs. Leonard M. Fowle 

(Nancy Kimball) 

36 Norman St., Morblehead, Mass. 01945 

Mrs. John E. Cain, Jr. 

(Aagot Hinrichsen) 

21 Lantern Lane, Weston, Mass. 02193 

Mrs. Malcolm S. Loring 

(Anne Russell) 

Pepperell Rd., Kittery Point, Me. 03905 



Mrs. E. Hartley Smith 

(Deborah Redfield) 

4 Jefferson St., Morblehead, Mass. 01945 

Mrs. Gage Olcott 

(Helen O'Brien) 

40 Oakridge Rd., Wellesley, Mass. 02181 

Miss C. Jane Sullivan 

20 Buswell St., Lawrence, Mass. 01841 



Mrs. Sargent Brodlee, Jr. 
(Sally Humason) 
Linden Cottage, Walker Rd. 
Manchester, Mass. 01944 

Mrs. J. Robert Haskin, Jr. 
(Miriam Bickford) 
6 Redstone Lane 
Morblehead, Mass. 01945 

Mrs. Harry Maidment 
(Emily House) 
99 Robert Rd. 
Manchester, Conn. 06040 



Alumnae Trustee 
1963-1969 



Miss Alice C. Sweeney 

35 School St., Andover, Mass. 01810 



Alumnae Trustee 
1966-1972 



Mrs. John B. Ogilvie 

(Donna Brace) 

14 Circle Rd., Darien, Conn. 06820 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN FEBRUARY, 1968 



VOLUME 36, NUMBER 2 



Editor: C. JANE SULLIVAN 

Asst. Editor: MRS. FRANK DiCLEMENTE 
Published four times yearly, October, February, May and September, by Abbot Academy, Andover, Massachusetts. Entered as 
second class matter December 12, 1933, at the post office at Andover, Massachusetts, under the act of August 24, 1912. 

Front Cover Photo by members of Visual Perception Class 
Marsha Lawton, Sandra Lindgrove, Maura Markley, and Susan Stein 



PRINTED AT EAGLE-TRIBUNE PRINTING. LAWRENCE. MASSACHUSETTS 



year algebra. 
Miss Tucker 
teacher" on 



In June, 1967 Miss Tucker completed 
her thirtieth year at Abbot, and it is to 
mark that anniversary that the Alumnae 
Association takes this occasion to express 
the appreciation and affection which hun- 
dreds of Abbot girls feel for her. She has 
served the school in a great variety of ways 
and far beyond the ordinary conception of 
duty. 

Miss Tucker came to Abbot from Smith 
College where for the two years following 
her graduation she had been an assistant 
in the chemistry department and took her 
M.A. Her initial work here was teaching 
two sections of chemistry and also first 
All during the early years 
was also resident "corridor 
the first floor old wing, a 
strategic location which meant that she 
could easily be called upon for assistance 
whenever an emergency of any nature 
arose. She served as fire captain; she 
assisted the athletic department, and for 
a good many years was one of the teachers 
who accompanied the seniors on their winter 
trip to Intervale. 

A great deal of Miss Tucker's success in 
directing and in maintaining friendly au- 
thority over the girls in her charge came 
from her experience as counselor in the 
Blazing Trail Camp. It also came from her 
open and direct manner and evident good 
will. 

In 1957 Miss Tucker took on the duties 
of director of studies in addition to teach- 
ing. Her chief responsibility in the new 
work has been to see that each senior has 
made appropriate plans for study after 
graduation and also to see that all the in- 
formation required about the candidates 
has been supplied to the colleges concerned. 
It is a complicated and time-consuming 
task, and it has increased steadily with the 
growing school. 

Another of her duties was to assume 
charge of the school whenever the principal 
had to be away, and it was in recognition 



Tribute to Miss Tucker 



of that fact that the trustees appointed her 
vice-principal in 1965. In the summer of 
that same year she was asked by Phillips 
Academy to serve as dean of the girls' 
section of their summer school, and she 
held the same position the following sum- 
mer. The position enabled her to become 
more widely acquainted with various mem- 
bers of the P. A. faculty, and also to see the 
advantages and possibilities of more inter- 
school activities. Thus in a very real sense 
she has been a link between the two schools, 
as she has also become known to some 
degree to townspeople ever since she es- 
tablished a residence in Andover for her 
parents and herself. While the time she can 
give to various organizations outside the 
school is very limited, she is known to be an 
active and interested citizen. 

I n the school year 1 966- 1 967 Miss Tuck- 
er became acting principal in the absence 
of Mrs. Crane, and she was asked to con- 
tinue to fill that position this year. 

With the advent next September of the 
newly appointed principal, Mr. Donald Gor- 
don, Miss Tucker will resume her former 
standing, and it is hoped that she will con- 
tinue to serve in the school for many years 
to come. But it seems appropriate at this 
time for those many former students whose 
smooth progress through the school and suc- 
cess in college depended in many ways on 
Miss Tucker's unflagging interest and self- 
less willingness to serve in any role she was 
needed to express to her their appreciation 
and affectionate gratitude. 



one 




Departmental Doings 



The broad areas of human achievement 
constitute a unity. For too long we teachers, 
for our own convenience, have constructed 
artificial barriers dividing the areas into 
separated compartments. These dividing 
lines are, of course, to an extent necessary 
for the purposes of limiting subject mater- 
ial to something comprehensible. However, 
in too many cases, the barriers have been 
built so high that the student finds it dif- 
ficult to see any relationship between one 
subject and another. The History Depart- 
ment's aim this year has been, and is, to 
destroy those barriers as far as possible. 




The ninth and tenth grade history teach- 
ers have worked with the English teachers 
to correlate the content of their courses. 
While the ninth graders read the "Odyssey" 
in English class, they were studying about 
5th century B.C. Greece in Ancient History. 
An assembly program, presented by a mem- 
ber of the History Department, broadened 
the picture with a glimpse of Classical 
Greek sculpture and architecture 

The senior-mids may elect to take 
Modern European History. Instead of being 
assigned only textbook analyses of political 
developments of the nineteenth century, 
the students read "The Cherry Orchard" by 
Chekhov to widen their understanding of 
Imperial Russia; they studied the French 
Impressionists as part of their assignment 
on the Third French Republic; they read the 
poetry of Tennyson, Browning, and Mat- 
thew Arnold as part of their assignment 
on Victorian England. 

These are only samplings of the inter- 
departmental and intra-departmental ex- 
periments in which the History Department 
is involved. As a result, the students are, I 
think, beginning to see and appreciate that 
they should not isolate some facts and skills 
for history class and another set of facts 
and skills for some other class. The past 
and the present, are very complex; the 
many aspects are related parts of a whole 
and colorful picture. 



MARY S. MINARD 
Head of History Department 



two 




CAROLYN E. GOODWIN 
Head of Mathematics Department 



English is really the only MUST in the 
curriculum, so we know the importance of 
wooing the student. First we try to capture 
her interest, relate what she is learning to 
her experience and of course stimulate her 
desire to think and write clearly, correctly 
and hopefully with originality and inspira- 
tion. Notice the active involvement in the 
classroom — acting, panel discussions and 
aural perceptions: — witness the slide- 
tapes, the theater efforts, the photography 
and movies. 

I am interested in film-making and am 
at the moment taking a course at the de- 
Cordova Museum in Lincoln so I can help 
the girls at Abbot in their future film ex- 
periments. Of course the new interests in 
visual perception connects our department 
with the Art Department in various ways: 
slide-tapes, photography, as well as movie- 
making. We are also combining with the 
History Department in the study of Greek 
culture and mediaeval culture, and hope to 
stimulate the students with an exploration 
of Romanticism through Art and Music, as 
well as through History and Literature. 



BARBARA SISSON (Mrs. John H.) 
Head of English Department 



The year 1 968 finds the Mathematics 
Department engaged in taking stock of its 
chosen position, that of trying to offer the 
understanding and fun found in modern 
mathematics without losing the interesting 
details and skills of the traditional ap- 
proach. Courses are offered from the re- 
quired algebra and plane geometry through 
an elective first year of the calculus. 
Greater informality has been gained by 
joining forces with the Art Department in 
its Visual Perception Course which com- 
bines the sensory and the geometric worlds. 
On the other hand, hard work and strict 
attention to detail are occasionally re- 
warded by scores of 800 on the College 
Boards. 

May we take this opportunity to beg all 
alumnae to help us take stock? We will be 
more than grateful for suggestions and 
ideas from those of you who now have 
school-age children as well as from those 
still in college who wish they had had more 
calculus, no calculus, more theory, more 
drill, or perhaps even computer training. 
Please share your views with us. 



three 





The Spanish Department continues to 
keep active with regular courses, plus Ad- 
vanced Stream work in Level II, Advanced 
Placement study for the seniors, and plans 
in the making for more seminars with the 
students from Phillips Academy. 

Both members of the department, Miss 
Judd and Mrs. Merrill, are very pleased 
with the results of the structural approach 
which is now being used in both Levels I 
and II. With this approach the students 
are gaining more quickly the desired facility 
in speaking, and their overall control of the 
idiom is quite adequate. In Level III the 
entire grammar review is done orally, and 
the students seem to like this. 

This year the Spanish IV students who 
plan to take the Advanced Placement exam- 
ination have a real challenge. They must 
study in depth several authors from the 
new A. P. list in order to prepare themselves 
for the new type of examination which will 
appear for the first time this year. 

With the initiation of new members into 
the Sociedad Honoraria Hispanica in Feb- 
ruary, this group is now ready to launch its 
program of projects to raise funds for 
schools in Latin America. 

Miss Judd is a member of a team of 
authors now preparing textbooks and other 
materials for a well known publishing house 
in New York City. 

DOROTHY Y. JUDD 
Head of Spanish Department 



GERMAINE AROSA 
Head of French Department 



I think I can say in all honesty that the 
French Department is doing well. French is 
still in demand in spite of "Le General". 
We have 21 3 students and four of us teach 
them — Mile. Barratte, Mrs. Gillingham 
whom many of you remember from Pike, 
Mrs. Frederick and myself. 

We offer about the same courses, but there 
is a demand for more advanced courses 
due to the fact that some 9th graders come 
to us with some knowledge of French. For 
a few years now I have taught a French V 
which could be equivalent to college level 
in which we study the 19th century from 
Chateaubriand to the Symbolists. 

Our aim and philosophy is to give to the 
students as much love for knowledge about 
France as is possible. The reports we get 
are good, but if you have any suggestions, 
please write me. 

This fall Mile. Arosa received the deco- 
ration of "Chevalier dans I'ordre des Palmes 
Academiques" from M. Jacques Massonet, 
French consul general. This award, given 
by the French Department of Education, 
was presented for her contribution in bring- 
ing to the young people of this country 
a better understanding of the culture of 
France. 




Vtv. 



Travel comforts 
collected by a cagey 
traveller 

by 

DESPINA PLAKIAS MESSINESI 

Abbot 1929 

Travel Editor of Vogue 

Reprinted from Vogue; Copyright © 1966 

by 

The Conde Nast Publications Inc. 

My travel training began when I was a child 
. . . Then, I remember, we never moved 
without those fat, unwieldy rolls with 
steamer plaids and baby pillows — one for 
each member of the family — and there 
were four of us: my brother, our mother, 
our governess, and myself. In the rolls, the 
governess packed candles, a saucepan, a 
tin of cocoa plus a can of Sterno to use for 
cocoa making, for heating water for hot- 
water bags, and for warming curling-iron 
tongs . . . For certain destinations, she 
would squeeze in mosquito nets and flea 
powder . . . Many years and many miles 
later, insect repellent was among the things 
I packed on a recent trip to the Middle 
East . . . Here, a few comforts which I would 
not be without on a trip — and why. 

THINGS WHICH GO EVERYWHERE — on 
a country weekend, on jets, trains, ships. 

1. Flashlight. Even before that monumental 
East Coast blackout, I carried a small one. 
For me it is as indispensable as the candles 
my governess never forgot. Parked on a bed- 
side table, the flashlight, lying alongside a 
small triptych ikon and my Cartier travel 
clock, gives me the feeling I'm settled . . . 
One warm midnight last September in an 
Israel Jerusalem hotel, when the city 
plunged into darkness — no panic — I lighted 
my way to the balcony to see the entrancing 
view of minarets, church domes, ancient 
walls, and hills of Jerusalem outlined only 
by moonlight against the Chagall-blue sky. 

2. Transistor radio. Turning on my tran- 
sistor radio the moment I walk into a hotel 
room gives me immediately the mood, 




rhythm, and flavour of a place. Although 
radios and television sets are standard 
equipment in most new hotels and aboard 
ships, their channels are limited, nor do 
they seem to be handy to breakfast in bed. 
Tuning-in in Dubrovnik, I remember the 
moving minor-key melodies; in Madeira, 
the talky French newscasts beamed from 
North Africa; in Athens, the station call, a 
liquid ripple of shepherds' flutes. 

3. Earplugs. Unlike some people who can 
not stand earplugs, I find they produce 
enormously effective soundproofing, plus a 
glorious floating sensation in a private pad- 
ded world . . . When I'm away from home, 
any sounds not familiar, even pleasant ones 
— the murmuring Pacific, the crowing cocks 
in Lisbon at dawn, trains stuttering to a 
stop — disturb me. 

4. Flask. Edna Woolman Chase, Vogue's 
late Editor-in-Chief, a warm person with 
foresight and common sense, gave me my 
first flask before I left for Paris . . . Spirits 
in flask are handy to help me swallow pills 
when tap water is risky, or to apply on 
scratches, insect bites, or to take against 
chills such as one which happened last 
January when I was driving from tropical 
Acapulco to Cuernavaca in a blizzard. 

5. Lip Salve. A thin film helps dry lips af- 
fected by flying, fatigue, and change of 
climate. 

6. Raincoat and rain hat. Squeamish as a 
cat about getting wet, I keep my thin rain- 
coat and rain hat folded up in a tote bag 
no farther away than my elbow ... In 
places where rain, like Christmas, should 
happen only once a year, I've never failed 
to be rained on — in dry season, in summer 



five 



Italy, in Tahiti, and during droughts . . . 
In the 110-degree blast of the Negev 
Desert, my rain hat, a brimmed gabardine 
with ventilated crown, doubled as a sun hat. 

7. World address book. From Leonard 
Lyons, the New York columnist, and his 
wife Sylvia, I copied the idea of their ad- 
dress book indexed according to countries 
. . . Grounded in Brussels with the Lyonses 
last spring, I watched them reshuffle four 
weeks of European plans by telephone and 
cable. 

8. Rubber bands, felt-tip pen, and scissors. 
These three serve as a portable desk. The 
first two compel me to keep papers clearly 
identified, and tidily assorted . . . Scissors 
slash open everything from new perfume 
bottles to cellophane-wrapped bathroom 
glasses. They cut flower stems, luggage 
tags dangling on suitcase handles, and clip- 
pings to airmail home. 

9. Mystic tape. Instead of attempting to 
describe my luggage to porters, I choose to 
identify every piece with green Mystic tape. 
A band of green stuck on every side, even 
the bottom, is bound to show ... In antici- 
pation of extra packages, I keep a few 
yards with me. 

10. Quarters. In spite of the vigorous train- 
ing in currency exchange my brother and I 
learned firsthand as children — converting 
from dollars to francs to lire to Deutsche 
marks to drachmae — now I shortcut the 
immediate problem of tipping in foreign 
countries by carrying a purseful of quarters, 
sometimes five dollars' worth, sometimes as 
much as ten . . . Travelling around America, 
I add a few dimes for public telephones 
... So far, the system hasn't failed, even 
though the bag of silver coins last March 
did puzzle Russian officials. 

1 1 . To carry for a day at the ... To enjoy 
unplanned invitations — "and bring your 
bathing suit" — I pack at the bottom of my 
suitcase a nylon-net market bag weighing 
little and remarkably sturdy. On most trips, 
it serves as a bag for a camera (along with 
guidebook and sweater) , or as a flower 
basket or, in snow countries, as a slipper 
bag for evening shoes. 



12. String. About six feet of heavy white 
string — precious as a rope of pearls — 
pinch-hit for me on one dire occasion as a 
belt. At other times it secures disintegrat- 
ing packages. 

PLANE STRATEGY. Specifically on long 
flights (my definition: over four hours) I 
add five items which help me to arrive 
rested and uncrumpled. Like diplomatic 
couriers who travel with their wrists chained 
to government sacks, I keep my bag of 
travel specials slung over my left arm. 

1 . Dark glasses. Obviously no problem re- 
membering this summer accessory in sum- 
mer. In winter, dark lenses soothe eyes 
switching from cold greyness to neon-white- 
ness thirty thousand feet up. 

2. Dark kerchief. As ostriches bury their 
heads, I cover my face with a dark kerchief 
to rest, hopefully to sleep. Both passengers 
and crew respect this evidence of retreat, 
as if it were a "don't disturb" sign outside 
a bedroom door. 

3. Day/night shift. The cool satisfaction of 
stepping off a plane uncreased, especially 
in summer, is worth the discipline of switch- 
ing into "something else" for overnight and 
long day flights . . . My solution for years: 
a dark, easy, beltless cotton or wool sheath 
depending on the season . . . Last summer, 
when my luggage went temporarily astray, 
this simple plane outfit filled in incon- 
spicuously during the interlude. 

4. Cashmere cardigan. Flying anywhere 
without a cashmere cardigan seems as un- 
likely to me as flying to a foreign country 
without a passport . . . Temperatures in 
plane cabins tend to be cool and draughty 
at all seasons, and at night, the air acquires 
a chilly snap. 

5. Duty-free extras. Unlike most travellers 
who go on duty-free buying sprees in 
foreign terminals, I reverse operations. 
Before taking off for foreign places, I stock 
up at New York's Kennedy airport with 
cigarettes for myself, and liquor to give 
. . . No red tape involved: Salesmen limit 
the quantities to the customs' regulations 
of the country marked on the boarding pass 
and purchases are delivered to the plane. 



six 



LOST 
ALUMNAE 



Dorothy Adams, 1924 

Marion Alley, 1913 — Mrs. Clarence Martens 

Margaret Beecroft, 1933 — Mrs. Edward I. Pratt, Jr. 

Ann Bellows, 1954 

Mary Elizabeth Bentley, 1943 — Mrs. Kenneth E. 
Spaulding, Jr. 

Juliette Breese, 1927 — Mrs. Harold C. Bennett 

Ann Budd, 1951 — Mrs. Edward R. Cushman 

Virginia Camp, 1921 — Mrs. Dudley W. Moor, Jr. 

Susan Carr, 1957 

Elizabeth Case, 1904 — Mrs. Stephen A. Staege 

Mary Church, 1917 — Mrs. Mary C. Allen 

Noma Clayton, 1946 — Mrs. Weston Flint 

Muriel Closson, 1905 — Mrs. Paul Andrews 

Elizabeth Clough, 1935 — Mrs. Hugh Barndollar 

Ann Colby, 1956 — Mrs. Carl V. Stager 

Mildred Collens, 1937 — Mrs. Henry Laurens, Jr. 

Miriam Dearborn, 1945 — Mrs. Vincent Dunn 

Mary Elizabeth deWindt, 1908 — Mrs. J. Odell 
Hauser 

Judy Draper, 1961 — Mrs. Michael Cottrell 

Elizabeth Dunn, 1920 — Mrs. George D. Wahl 

Florence Durfee, 1935 — Mrs. Rodger M. Urquhart 

Jane Forte, 1934 — Mrs. Richard O. Post 

Grace Getty, 1933 — Mrs. John McMillan 

Lois Golden, 1961 — Mrs. Lois Stern 

Cecilia Gomez, 1958 

Charlotte Gowing, 1911 — Mrs. Charlotte G. Cooper 

Louise Greenough, 1920 — Mrs. Henry L. Jones 

Dorothy Harvey, 1941 — Mrs. Hugh J. Learning 

Katherine Haskell, 1927 — Mrs. Walter Morse 

Margaret Hawkes, 1925 — Mrs. Ralph W. Schusler 

Elizabeth Hawkins, 1948 — Mrs. Christopher May 

Frances Heffernan, 1934 — Mrs. Frances H. Moore 

Virginia Hollands, 1935 — Mrs. Frederick Preu 



Kathryn Humphreys, 1936 — Mrs. John F. 
Requardt, Jr. 

Edith Jackson, 1889 — Mrs. Frederick W. Lewis 

Edna Jennings, 1910 — Mrs. Ellsworth D. Cushman 

Monica Keith, 1931 — Mrs. Louis H. Langill 

Barbara Kidder, 1931 — Mrs. Fernando Aldana 

Elizabeth Killian, 1941 — Mrs. James Roberts 

Jill Laf ferry, 1952 

Lois Lindsay, 1918 

Doris McClintock, 1920 — Mrs. Alson P. Taylor 

Janet Mclvor, 1947 

Kathryn McKown, 1917 — Mrs. Freling Foster, Jr. 

Gertrude Maguire, 1908 — Mrs. Elton T. Norris 

June Marble, 1951 — Mrs. Anthony L. Vydra 

Jane Miller, 1954 — Mrs. Donald A. Adley 

Esther Milliken, 1918 — Mrs. Esther Fraties 

Vivien Mitchell, 1915 — Mrs. Nathan L. Hall 

Cornelia Mott, 1901 — Mrs. Joseph W. Green 

Harriet Nash, 1927 — Mrs. John R. Ruliffson 

Margaret Newton, 1904 

Anne Persson, 1945 

Louisa Pevey, 1 905 — Mrs. Bruce Naylor 

Diana Pierce, 1959 — Mrs. Stephen Bridge 

Adele Pigeon, 1 896 — Mrs. John A. Loud 

Ruth Pike, 1925 

Ruth Pond, 1938 — Mrs. Charles W. Junker 

Althea Robillard, 1943 — Mrs. Althea R. Forman 

Mary Roys, 1929 

Marjorie Rutherford, 1937 

Carol Upham, 1929 — Mrs. James M. Fox 

Julie Van Eman, 1953 

Mary Jane Varney, 1935 — Mrs. Richard M. Roberts 

Edna Wadsworth, 1908 

Mary Watson, 1918 — Mrs. W. Alexander Rogers 

Emelyn Wright, 1929 — Mrs. John P. Rimbach 



can you kelp us 
find them? 



seven 



1894 Marcia Russell (Mrs. C. Calvin Burgess) died in 
Pittsburgh, Penna. in January, 1963. 

1895 Harriet Forsyth (Mrs. Harriet F. Jillson) died 
September 29, 1967, at the age of 94, in Newton 
Highlands, Mass. Our sincere sympathy is extended 
to her daughter. 

1896 Sarah W. Burnham (Mrs. George W. Holmes) 
died March 10, 1967, in Lincoln, Nebraska- 

1904 Elizabeth Winsor (Mrs. William O. Pettit) died 

January 20, 1968, in Highland Park, N.J. Our sin- 
cere sympathy is extended to her daughter and to 
her sister, Marie Winsor Appleby, Abbot 1914. 

1908 Isabella Seaton (Mrs. Arthur W. Humphrey) 
died October 2, 1967, in Ashland, Ky. Our sym- 
pathy is extended to her daughter, Janet, Abbot 
1943. 

1909 Florence E. Schmidt (Mrs. John W. Wheatcroft) 
died June 25, 1967, in Victoria, B.C., Canada. 

1913 Jane Newton (Mrs. Samuel D. Sheldon) died 
September 12, 1967, in Red Wing, Minn. Our 
sympathy is extended to her husband and children 
and to her sister, Rebecca Newton Weedon, Abbot 
1911. 

Helene Syrrrmes (Mrs Frank Halliday) died in 
January, 1967. 

1914 Harriet Bowman (Mrs. Howard R. Meeker) died 
suddenly October 13, 1967, in Indianapolis, Ind. 
Our sincere sympathy is extended to her husband 
and to her son and daughter, and to her sister, 
Helen Bowman Janney, Abbot 1913. 

Marion Grant (Mrs. J. Donald Duprey) died 
October 25, 1967, in Falmouth, Mass. 

1920 Muriel Moxley (Mrs. Beverly Hubbard) died 

December 24, 1967, in Princeton, N.J. Our sym- 
pathy is extended to her husband and to her 
sister, Dorothy Moxley Pitman, Abbot 1922. 

Louise Robinson died January 5, 1968, in Lake- 
ville, Conn., following a long illness. She had been 
Class Fund Secretary since the beginning of the 
Fund. Our sincere sympathy is extended to her 
brother, Francis Robinson of Detroit, Mich. (See 
1920 class notes) . 

1923 Mary Newton (Mrs. Henry H Favor) died Jan- 

uary 12, 1968, after a long illness. Our sincere 
sympathy is extended to her husband. 

1929 Ann Miller (Mrs. Benjamin Ludlow, Jr.) died 

suddenly November 26, 1967, in Oyster Bay, LI., 
N.Y. Our sincere sympathy is extended to her hus- 
band and her two sons, and to her sister, Sylvia 
Miller Bellows, Abbot 1927. 

1938 Nancy Forman (Mrs. N. F. Hall) was reported 

dead in December, 1967. 

eight 



3n Jfflemoriam 






News 
from 

the 
Classes 



1899 

LILIAN MOOERS SMITH'S grandsons are in the 
Army. George has just returned from 6 months in 
Viet Nam and Talbot is a medical officer in Stuttgart, 
Germany. 

1901 

LILIAN DODGE BREWSTER has a new great- 
granddaughter. 

1904 

MARY DAVIS LEE writes from England that she is 
not very active, but she does journey across the 
Channel to France each year to visit her son in 
Bordeaux. She has taken up the painting of flowers. 

SOPHIE GIBBS SAGE'S son is vice-president of the 
investment department of Aetna Insurance Co. in 
Hartford. His son, is married to ANN SAMPLE, 
Abbot 1962. 

1906 

CONSTANCE PARKER CHIPMAN spent the month 
of February in Florida. 

1908 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Walter L. Alley (Esther 
Stickney), 166 Essex St., Beverly, Mass. 01915. 

MARY CHENEY CHASE'S son, Irving, is president 
of the Massachusetts Association for Mental Health. 

Cur best wishes to DOROTHY TAYLOR who was 
in a serious automobile accident last fall. 

1909 

MARY BOURNE BOUTELL visited the East last 
summer for the first time in 17 years. She lunched 
with ANNE BLAUVELT SANDERSON, MARION SAN- 
FORD, MADELEINE BURRAGE, and SALLY KNOX. 

1910 

RUTH MURRAY MOORE has 4 granddaughters, 
one is a Colby Junior College freshman, and an- 
other plans to enter the University of Maine next year. 



ETHEL REIGELUTH DARBY returned in September 
from a 3-month trip on the continent and Scotland. 
One of her granddaughters is a sophomore at Pomona 
College. 

1911 

ETHEL SWAIN SMITH became a great-grand- 
mother last April. 

DOROTHY BIGELOW ARMS is spending four 
months in Florida. 

1913 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Henry S. Kussmaul (Mil- 
dred Bryant), 815 Belmont St., Brockton, Mass. 
02401. 

HELEN BOWMAN JANNEY'S husband died in 
1964. One daughter lives in Champaign, III. and is 
connected with the Veterinary Science Dept. of the 
University of Illinois. One daughter lives in Machias, 
Me. One son is a business man in Muncie, and 
another is in the production end of the theatre in 
New York. 

GLADYS ESTABROOK BLANCHARD is doubtful 
about coming to reunion, but she says, "Life is full 
of surprises." 

MARION GOULD SMITH has an apartment in 
Spokane, Wash, near her son, Ted. She moved there 
at the insistence of her son after she had three 
major bouts with surgery. 

BETTY SAWYER SMITH writes that she is in the 

southwest again getting material for another dog- 

and-travel book. If she returns in time she plans to 
attend reunion. 

LOUISE THOMPSON COTTRELL writes, "I'm still 
fair, fat, but not forty, and thank goodness have 
good health. I have nine grandchildren, and one 
grandson is getting married, so maybe some day I'll 
be a great-grandmother. What a forbidding sound 
that is. My husband had a heart attack a few years 
ago, but is quite active and independent." 

GLADYS FOLTS WOODS, LOUISE COE SPIER and 
EDNA FRANCIS LEVITT send best wishes to every- 
one. 

1914 

URSULA KIMBALL JORDAN spent 2 months with 
her daughter in Buenos Aires. 

MARIE WINSOR APPLEBY writes that MARIE AP- 
PLEBY (1938) SEVERANCE'S daughter is at Kent 
School and her son is in South Kent School. 

MARGARET WYLIE WARE writes that her son, 
John, retired from the USAF after 23 years' service. 
He received an oak leaf cluster medal "for meritor- 
ious service as a non-commissioned officer in main- 
tenance squadron in Strategic Air Command." 

1915 

MARION BARNARD COLE writes that her son, 
Donald, his wife and children are living in Pacific 
Palisades, Calif, while Donald is on a professorship 
at U.C.L.A. He will resume his teaching of historv 
at Exeter Academy next Fall. His two oldest boys 
will also be students at Exeter. Marion's daughter, 
Constance, teaches the first grade at Pike School in 
Andover. 

MATTIE LARRABEE WHITTEMORE has 16 grand- 
children and 3 great-grandchildren. 



nine 



JESSIE NYE BLODGETT'S son, Dr. Frederic 
Blodgett is Professor of Pediatrics at Marquette Uni- 
versity, and Director of Children's Hospital in Mil- 
waukee. Her other son, Dr. E. Donald Blodgett, is 
executive director of Special Education in the public 
schools of Milwaukee. 

GERTRUDE SHACKLETON HACKER and her hus- 
band traveled to East Africa and England in January. 
Last year they went to the Orient. Gertrude writes, 
"We want to see as much of the world as we can 
before the rocking chairs get us!" 

1916 

ALICE PRESCOTT PLUMB and her husband are 
spending the winter in Hawaii as they have for the 
last ten years. 

1917 

ALICE LITTLEFIELD LEGAL has bought a home 
in Jupiter, Fla., near her son. 

1918 

Reunion Co-Chairmen: Irene Atwood, 180 Com- 
monwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 02116, and Mrs. 
Francis S. Fuller (Louise Bacon), 8 Skinner's Path, 
Glover's Landing, Marblehead, Mass. 01945. 

The class will be sorry to learn that MARGARET 
MORRIS CLAUSEN'S husband died in December. 

MARGARET SPEER recently spent three weeks in 
South Afica where one of her nieces is an ethnologist. 

1919 

MARY COLE DAY'S son, Willis, is in the Trust 
Dept. of a bank in Grand Rapids, Mich., and Richard 
is an instructor with "Outward Bound" School in 
North Carolina. Paddy, one of our English Evacuees, 
is married, and her brother, John Cannon, is the 
Episcopal Chaplain of Columbia University at the age 
of 32. 

GRACE KEPNER NOBLE has moved from a large 
house to an apartment — her husband has retired. 
They have 14 grandchildren. 



1920 



IN REMEMBRANCE 



The Class of 1920 has suffered a very great los^ 
in the death of Louise Robinson on January 5, 1968. 
She had a very serious operation and died three weeks 
later. Her spirits were good os she was still planning 
on our third annual sojourn to Sarasota, Florida. 
Louise was my dearest and closest friend and she was 
one of Abbot's most faithful friends and a very loyal 
alumna. She was looking forward to our fiftieth re- 
union in 1970 and often talked about it. Louise's in- 
terest in Abbot was never-failing. She was responsible 
for establishing the 50th reunion fund for our class. 
All of you of 1920 recall the many personal notes 
we have had from her every year for the Abbot Alum- 



nae Fund. Louise's activities were numerous. She was 
Clerk of the Salisbury Congregational Church for 
twenty years and her interest and service to many 
Boards and Organizations in Lakeville and Salisbury, 
Connecticut are really too numerous to recount. Both 
towns mourn her loss. She is survived by a brother, a 
nephew and two nieces. 

Katherine Kinney Hecox 

PAULA MILLER PATRICK'S son, Hugh, is teaching 
economics at Yale, Wayne is running a newspaper in 
Rock Hill, S.C., and her daughter, Elizabeth, is sing- 
ing in New York. 

LUCY PRATT RUTHERFORD spends her winters in 
Laguna Beach, Calif. Her mother died in October at 
the age of 98. Lucy now has 9 grandchildren. 

MARGARET WORMAN THOMPSON had a serious 
operation in October, but was able to return to her 
work as a baby nurse in December. 

1921 

MARY PEIRCE SMITH is once again spending the 
winter on a ketch at Halifax River Yacht Club in 
Daytona Beach. 

The class will be sorry to learn that JESSAMINE 
RUGG PATTON'S husband died in October 

WINIFRED SIMPSON WORGAN is spending the 
winter again this year in Sarasota, Fla. 

MARY WILLIAMS COCHRAN will retire in August 
as Director of the Hannah Harrison School of the 
YWCA in Washington, D. C. The school offers two 
programs, Institutional for middle-aged women, and 
Practical Nursing for younger students. She plans to 
return to Massachusetts, and will live with her sister, 
Dorothy Williams Davidson, in Wellesley for a time. 

1922 

The class will be sorry to learn that DOROTHEA 
FLAGG SMITH'S husband died in October, one month 
after her mother's death. 

ELIZABETH HUTCHINSON BLUNTSCHLI was 
married in July to H. Freeman Matthews, and they 
spent 3 months in Europe. 

1923 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. John H. White (Charlotte 
Hudson), Dover Rd., Guilford, Me. 04443. 

The class extends its sympathy to BARBARA CLAY 
CRAMPTON whose mother died in December at the 
age of 86. 

ELIZABETH FLAGG DOW is back in Cambridge 
after a year's absence, part of which was spent at the 
American School of Classical Studies where her hus- 
band was the Visiting Professor. 

ELIZABETH MAXWELL KILLIAN is working with 
the Lawton, Okla. office of Vocational Rehabilitation 
for the 16th year, and is also stage manager for the 
Community Theatre. She visited Mexico City and 
Taxco in the Fall. 



APOLOGIES 

The class of 1919 had the highest number of contributors to the 1966-1967 
Fund with 36 donors. The class of 1929 was second with 32 donors. 



ten 



MARY Ei IZABETH RUDD writes, "Here I am in 
Florida at Ft. Myers Beach for 5 months enjoying 
my many friends. Golf and bridge every day. I spent 
four weeks this fall at East Brewster, Mass. with my 
roommate, OHNIE." 

ELIZABETH THOMPSON HENRY and her sister 
took a tour of the Orient last fall. They also spent a 
week in Montreal visiting ESTHER WOOD PEIRCE 
and her husband and enjoying Expo. 

1924 

The class will be sorry to learn that SYBIL BOT- 
TOMLEY TALMAN'S mother passed away in July at 
the age of 88. Sybil is Administrative Assistant at 
the United Fund in Attleboro, Mass. 

BARBARA LOOMER has been appointed executive 
director of the Greater Lawrence Chapter of the 
American Red Cross. She has had extensive experi- 
ence in all phases of Red Cross work including disas- 
ter work. 

SUSANNA SMITH BOWLER spent a few days last 
September with ELEANORE IRELAND SAUNDERS and 
her husband at their cottage on Canada Lake. 

1926 

BARBARA BLOOMFIELD WOOD has a new grand- 
son — her total now is 6 grandsons and 1 grand- 
daughter. 

The class will be sorry to learn that KATHARINE 
CLAY SAWYER'S mother died in December at the age 
of 86. 

SUE LOIZEAUX is New Hampshire vice-chairman 
for the Heart Fund campaign. 

1927 

The class extends its sympathy to JANE FITCH 
ROLAND whose daughter, Janet, died last February 
from cancer. 

The class will be sorry to learn that EMILY HOUSE 
MAIDMENT'S husband died suddenly in August. They 
had a three months trip to the Mediterranean last 
spring returning in time for reunion. 

SYLVIA MILLER BELLOWS is spending the month 
of February in the Leeward and Windward Islands. 

1928 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Edmund H. Sears, Jr. 
(Mary Piper), 32 Rice Rd., Sudbury, Mass. 01776. 

Calling all '28ers. Life will begin anew (we hope) 

at our 40th reunion in May. How about putting a 

great BIG RED STAR by the date, May 11, 1968, 

and plan now to come. GEE GEE GAY D'ELSEAUX, 

EMILY SLOPER SHAILER and I (the old stand-bys at 

reunions) would like to see you. All of you will be 

hearing from me very shortly regarding our reunion 

plans. DO COME. .. " D . c 

K Mary Piper Sears 

BEATRICE LANE MERCER'S four children are all 
married and they have nine grandchildren. Her hus- 
band is one of the top senior amateur golfers. 

1929 

POLLY FRANCIS LOESCH wrote two weeks of 
daily devotions for the United Church of Christ bi- 
monthly periodical, "Family Devotions." 

ESTELLE LEVERING CHESTNUT'S daughter, Judy, 
was married last May. 




Jane Fitch Roland '27 and her husband, Ret. 
Adm. Edwin J. Roland, cutting the ribbon to 
open The Roland Field House at the Coast 
Guard Academy in New London, Conn. 

1930 

FLORENCE GARDNER BALI US and her daughter, 
Priscilla, went to the Grand Canyon and Hawaii last 
summer. 

RUTH BAKER JOHNSON is now director of the 
Scargo Cooperative Nursery School in South Dennis, 
Mass. She just couldn't retire! 

MARIANNA SMITH HILE writes, "It finally came 
to pass! We have pulled up stakes after 20 years 
in Fort Wayne. My husband is retired and wanted to 
get away from winter weather. New challenges in life 
can be fun and rewarding, but it was mighty hard to 
leave our girls and grandchildren. KATHIE FELLOWS 
LEISERSON and I had lunch together in Boston last 
July. She looks absolutely marvelous, young, pretty 
and slim as ever. She does a lot of traveling." 

1931 

KIT ALLEN BABSON has 3 grandsons and 1 grand- 
daughter. Her youngest, Gig, is a junior at Vassar. 

1932 

MIN HYDE DE MILLE'S whole family was together 
for Christmas for the first time in 8 years at the home 
of her daughter, Anne, in Kansas City. Peter and his 
bride came from Sacramento, Bob, his wife and small 
daughter drove from Milwaukee, and Min and her 
husband flew from New Jersey. 

1933 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Frank L. Wiles (Helen 
Rice), 11 Bates Rd., Lexington, Mass. 02173. 

Reunion time again! Many of you ore freer than 
you were ten — even five years ago, and I do hope 
that you will surely come this May. Round up the 
girls in your area now! 

If you haven't been back for some time, all the 

greater reason to make the effort now — you will find 

you pick up the old friendships immediately. Write, 

phone, drive, fly or hire a bus — but COME assured 

of a warm welcome! ■ • ■ 

Meien 



eleven 




VISUAL PERClJ 



Top — 
VARIATIONS ON CHOIR ROBES 

by Deborah Bernton, Susan Brightman, Melanie Rosen, 
and Adrienne Snelling. 




ASS PHOTOS 



die— 

'INDOW RHYTHMS 

by Janon Bailey and Marian Boynton. 



Bottom — 



ANALAGIES 



by Virginia Knapp. 



ROZILLA CHASE ROBERTS writes that her daugh- 
ter, Polly, was married in June to Richard W. Can- 
ning. "I had the good fortune to be appointed 
assistant to the president of W. E. Andrews Co. last 
February. Bad news along with the good — my hus- 
band has been ill since May, but is on the mend 
now." 

ANN COLE GANNETT'S daughter, Deborah, be- 
come engaged in December to David C. Brooks of 
Weston, Mass. 

LOUISE McCLARY is program director for the 
newly formed TB-RD Association of the Seaway Area 
in Ogdensburg, N.Y. She travels in four counties or- 
ganizing programs in tuberculin testing and school 
personnel chest X-ray surveys. 

ETHEL ROGERS FOSTER and her husband attended 
the General Convention of the Episcopal Church in 
Seattle. Their son, Frank, is a freshman at Bates. 

1934 

MARY FLAHERTY SAVAGE'S daughter, ANNE, 
Abbot '61, was married July 23, 1967, to Alexander 
van Eyck. Her son, Peter, was married in June to 
Nancy Furey. He is in the Army at O.C.S. 

CASSANDRA KINSMAN DEXTER'S older son is 
finishing his Army duty in El Paso, Tex. — he has two 
children. Sandy is teaching remedial reading in Dor- 
chester, and is secretary for the Episcopal Church- 
woman's Diocesan Board. 

RUTH STOTT PETERS'S daughter, Ruth, was mar- 
ried Feb. 3, 1968, in Houston, Tex. to C. Blalock 
Stephenson of Houston. 

1935 

ELLEN RIVINIUS HILL'S daughter, NANCY, Abbot 
1962, became engaged in November to John Lyons 
of Newton Centre, Mass. 

1936 

LUCY HAWKES LAMSON is a part-time secretary 
at Belmont Hill School, and plays tennis and skis. 
Her daughter, Fay, graduated from Radcliffe last June 
and is now working in Los Angeles. Betsy is a junior 
at Smith and Peter is a freshman at the University of 
Pennsylvania. 

MARY TRAFTON SIMONDS writes that her 
daughter, Babs, is in college and Bill is at Tabor. 
Gina is at home until her husband is commissioned, 
and is Mrs. Pusey's social secretary at Harvard. 

1938 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Harold S. Small (Joan 
Brown), 266 South Main St., Cohasset, Mass. 02025. 

CONSTANCE THURBER PRUDDEN'S daughter, 
Penelope, is engaged to Richard B. Redfield, Jr. of 
West Hartford. Connie's daughter, Deborah, is a Jun- 
ior at Abbot. 

1939 

LUCIA BUCHANAN LIVINGSTON writes, "At the 
moment I am keeping busy as President of the Emer- 
son Hospital Auxiliary in Concord, Mass. My son, 
Kipp, is at Tabor Academy and my daughter, Marnie, 
is in Junior High. I manage to corral MARY CURTIS 
VERNA for lunch every March when I make an an- 
nual trip to New York." 




The daughters of Marietta Meyer Ekberg '40 

CAROLYN FISHER CADMAN'S son, Anthony, was 
married last July to Kathryn Pond of Haddonfield, 
New Jersey. 

MARY KOCH DANOS writes, "To my family's vast 
relief, I did get my M.A. in Spanish last August at 
Middlebury. Daughter, POLLY, Abbot '64 graduated 
from Radcliffe in January. She plans to work for a 
while before going on to graduate school." 

JEANNE WAUGH HARNEY'S daughter, SUSAN, 
Abbot 1965, is engaged to E. Stirling Lathrop III. 

1940 

MYNDIE HOWARD NUTTING'S son, Steve, is a 
senior at Cushing Academy and son, Phil, is a fresh- 
man at Lawrence Academy. 

MARIETTA MEYER EKBERG and her family spent 
last June in a rented Japanese home in Hawaii. 
Judy, 18, is at Lawrence University. Nancy, 15, Mari- 
etta, 13, Peggy, 10, and Susan, 7, keep Marietta busy 
at home. 

DANNA WHITLOCK DE BRAGGA'S son, Dick, at- 
tends St. George's School. She has two daughters, 
Julie, 12, and Josette, 9. 

1941 

SUE LONG REED is living in Falls Church, Va., 
and would love to hear from any Abbot girls in the 
area. 



fourteen 



ELOISE PERKINS BECK writes, "I finally finished 
my library courses this summer, and am now the first 
white librarian in a colored elementary school. The 
faculty and students have completely accepted me 
with so much cooperation I've been almost floored. 
As time passes I'm sure the educational gap between 
the white and Negro in the South will cease. My 
daughter, Pom, is a junior at Tift College." 

AMELIA SHIELDS GUIROLA writes, "I live on a 
coffee farm and love it. My two oldest children are 
studying in the States — Eduardo is a sophomore at 
Boston College and Tommy is at Mercersburg Acad- 
emy. My 9-year-old girl is at home with me. I would 
be delighted to see any Abbot girls who come to Sal- 
vador." 

1942 

BETTY HARDY VERDERY is teaching children who 
have learning problems. Her children are Kathy, 19, 
a sophomore at Reed College, David, 18, a high- 
school senior, and Margaret, 6, a first grader. 

PATRICIA DANIELS HANSON'S daughter, Dawn, 
is a foreign exchange student from Bellevue, Wash. 
High School. She is attending a private school in 
Frankfurt, Ger. Dan is in the Air Force in Alaska. Ray 
has been made Vice-president of the Adhesives and 
Chemical Division of the Borden Chemical Co., and 
they are moving to Manhattan. 

MARILYN MENSCHIK WESTAWAY'S daughter. 
Sue, is in her second year at Marjorie Webster Jun- 
ior College, and her daughter, Joan, is attending 
Converse College as a freshman. 

ELSIE WILLIAMS KEHAYA is a ruler elder in the 
Presbyterian Church in New Canaan, and is busy set- 
ting up a new Nursery and Kindergarten which will 
begin in 1969 in a new building. 

1943 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Robert P. Rudolph (Joyce 
Yoffa), 3 Hopkins Ave., Beverly, Mass. 01915. 

Don't forget May 1 1 for our 25th reunion. It has 
been great hearing from so many of you and hope to 
hear from even more saying they will be Abbot for the 
festivities. It should be such fun catching up on 25 
years of news. Remember we will never have another 
25th Abbot reunion, so don't miss it. 

Joyce 

Here is some of the news I have received: HELEN 
BARSS SCHNEIDER — "I'll try to keep the family 
home from our N. H. retreat and come to reunion. 
Bill has been teaching Abbot string students for 17 
years in addition to P. A. duties. The Abbot girls 
play in the Phillips orchestra and band, and the choir 
is integrated with frequent joint anthems. Children, 
John in 7th and Beth in 6th, play drums and flute 
respectively." 

NANCY CORWIN WINTTER — "Enjoying our new 
home but find lots of work such as new lawn, etc. 
An eighth grader and a first grader make life very 
interesting." 

JEAN HANSEN ASHBAUGH— "I'll try to come 
to reunion. Have two sons at Deerfield, Rusty a 
Junior and Shawn, a Freshman. I am a trustee at 
Stanley Clark School in South Bend and am currently 
working on a fund drive there. Our two younger sons, 
Hans and Tony, attend the school." 



MARGARET JANSSEN GRAY — "I am teaching 
nursery school and love it. Son, Jamie, is almost 16 
and is a sophomore in Bronxville High. I will come 
to reunion if at all possible." 

ANN LOUGHRIDGE KONSTAM — "It is hard to 
believe that twenty-five years have gone by. They 
have been good ones for us. We have two children 
— Trace who will graduate from Monticello College in 
June and Bob wil graduate from Mercersburg Acad- 
emy. I see PATSY PETTENGILL WHITAKER and her 
three wonderful boys whenever they come up skiing. 
My best to you all and hope I can make the reunion." 

CORNELIA McMURRAY BROOKS — "Daughter, 
Emily, will graduate from The Chapin School in June 
and son, Candler, attends Brooks School in North An- 
dover." 

BETTY ROWLEY TITTMANN — "How I wish I 
could definitely say I'd be there on the 1 1th. At this 
point we hope to be vacationing in Hawaii then. The 
two eldest girls are away at school — one at House in 
the Pines and the other at Newport School for Girls. 
Maybe the youngest may make Abbot. We now have 
bought land in St. Maartens for our "rocking chair" 
days. Other than that I'm just fatter, grayer, slower, 
and lazier. My best to all." 

BETTYE RUTHERFORD McCOUCH— "I am saving 
May 1 1 th and expect to join the group. Here, life 
goes on at its customary hectic pace — children going 
in four different directions and one direction is Abbot 
next fall as a Junior." 

As for news of the RUDOLPHS — Deedee is a Jun- 
ior at Abbot, Jim is a Senior at Governor Dummer, 
and Ronda will graduate from Bates in June. 




Barbara Ball Bacon '45 with her husband, Don, 
and their three children, Lindsay, Todd, and 
Douglas 



fifteen 




The children of Greta Leinbach Smith '46 
Robin, Douglas, Sandra, and Steven 

1944 

ALVA HOUSTON PAFFORD'S daughter, Annette, 
is singing the part of Mabel in the "Pirates of Pen- 
zance" which is being produced at Abbot this year 
with students from Phillips Academy. 

NANCY NICHOLAS WENGERT had her fifth child 
and fourth daughter, Sally Lynn, June 20, 1967. She 
joins Martha, 1 1, Carol, 13, Ann, 15, and David, 18, 
a sophomore at Harvard. 

1945 

BARBARA BEECHER CARL writes, "PTA, wood- 
carving and publicity work for UNICEF keep me busy. 
Tony is in second grade. We're just enjoying the good 
life that can still be found here before Southern Cali- 
fornia is completely ruined by progress." 

ELIZABETH DICKERMAN LOVATT writes, "We're 
back on Salisbury Plain and once again our view in- 
cludes an archaeological site — this time an Iron Age 
camp. For once Ron's job makes few demands on me 
so I'm spending most of my time as a student at the 
Salisbury College of Art. Ron is due to go to Canada 
this summer, so I'll be crossing the Atlantic too." 

EDITH WALKER UPHAM'S husband works on Cap- 
itol Hill in Washington. They have three teen-age 
daughters, two at Holton Arms and one at Forman in 
Litchfield, Conn. 

LOIS WHIFFEN DUNHAM'S son, Curt, is a fresh- 
man at Cornell School of Engineering. 

1946 

GRETA LEINBACH SMITH writes, "We're happy to 
announce the arrival of our fourth child and second 
son, Steven Wahl, Oct. 1 1, 1967." They moved to a 
new and larger home in August. 



1947 

CORALLIE HANLY MURRAY writes, "David has 
just completed a political biography of Chuck Percy, 
to be published by Harper & Row on April 10 — its 
title "Percy of Illinois." We hope to go East this 
spring to do some book promotion. Davy, 5, is enjoy- 
ing kindergarten, and Katie, 2, is keeping me busy 
running after her." 

1948 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Thomas M. Fitzgerald, Jr. 
(Katharine Bigelow), 24 College Road, Wellesley, 
Mass. 02181. 

JANE JACKSON PARKS spent two months last 
summer touring the Orient and Hawaii with the Amer- 
ican Bar Association. Her three sons attend Admiral 
Farragut Academy. Jane is active in the real estate 
business in Naples, Fla. 

1949 

BARBARA BACKES NORTH'S daughter, Susan, is 
13, and her son, David, is 12. 

TITA GONZALEZ MANN writes, "Busy life in Los 
Angeles suburbia is compensated in our family of six 
by enjoying the backpacking, camping and glorious 
scenery of our Sierra Nevadas." 

1950 

TOVE DITHMER OSTERBERG writes, "When PEG 
DOANE CALVERT and her husband visited New 
York, JANE POPE BERTONI and her husband, and 
Bill and I saw them frequently. PEG LURTON 
KAHLE and her husband are living in Scarsdale and 
we enjoy their proximity." 

CYNTHIA FAIGLE QUINN'S husband has been 
named president of Richardson-Merrell's Mexican 
Company. They spent two months in East London, 
South Africa, visiting Paul's family on the way from 
Rio to Mexico City where they are now living. They 
have four children who speak Portuguese fluently. 
Cynthia hopes they will not have too much difficulty 
picking up Spanish. 




Randy, Ben, and Harry, sons of 
Jane Jackson Parks '48 



sixteen 




Lynn Olney Paglee '49 with her husband, Bob, Robin 
Ann, 2 1/2, Jane Lynn, 2 1/2, and Susie, 11 

ALICE RUSSELL FARNER'S husband is a fellow at 
the Cleveland Clinic. He will finish his studies in 
July and return to South Bend, Ind. to practice. 

1951 

BARBARA DAUGHERTY DERMODY had her sec- 
ond child and first daughter, Andrea Marie, July 12, 
1967. 

BARBARA GIBSON ROTH is working on a profes- 
sional degree in music at Columbia Teacher's College. 
She is organist and choir director at church and gives 
a few piano lessons. She has three children, Allen, 
11, Douglas, 6, and Margot, 1. 

SHELIA SWENSON WEIL has a two-year-old son, 
Wayne, Jr. 

1952 

BETSY ALDRICH STEWART lives in Durham, N.C. 
where her husband is an insurance agent. Betsy has 
been teaching elementary school. She has two chil- 
dren, Scott, 6, and Doug, 3. 

ANNA STEFAN I SANFORD is living in Germany 
and studying at the University of Bonn. 

1953 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Herbert S. Ham (Dorothy 
Giles), Sanborn Rd., Hampton Falls, N. H. 03844. 

Greetings, once again, from the Forest Primeval!! 
The mailman finally arrived on snowshoes with some 
news for us. 

BERNIE BOYLE GUTTER writes, "Bob is Conductor 
of Des Moines Symphony and Associate Professor of 
Music at Drake University teaching conducting. It's 
a great life — we love it! February 1, we leave for 
Warsaw, Poland where Bob will guest conduct and 
make a recording, and I will go on to tour Moscow 
and Leningrad, USSR before coming home three weeks 
later. We're leaving Debbie (5) and Sheryl (2) be- 
hind this time." Bernie's new address is 2937 Wil- 
lowmere Drive, Des Moines, Iowa 50321. 

JANET BOWDEN WILSON says, "Still renovating 
our old house and will be for the next twenty years 
at the rate we're going. If we con ever get most of 
the water out of the cellar, we can have a mushroom 
farm, it's that damp. Fun though and a real chal- 



lenge. Lisa, the two-year-old, is all over the place. 
She reached the terrible twos six months ahead of 
time." 

ANN KENNEDY IRISH writes, "I doubt if I'll 
make it East in May. Dave has to go to the New York 
Boat Show next month (he's in the Marina business 
when he's not teaching skiing in the winter), so 
Tracy (8 in March) and I will go along. Hope to be 
in touch with CAROL HARDIN KIMBALL. We also 
have two other girls, Susie, 6, and Perry, 3. Had our 
boy, Colin, just 7 months ago. So busy but loving 
every minute of it." 

CONNIE WELDON LeMAITRE says, "Our two years 
in the U.S. Army are over, thank heavens, and George 
will resume practice (Doctor) in Lawrence, this time 
without interruption, I hope. Have girl 5, boy 3, and 
expecting #3 in June, so I should look fabulous on 
May 11." Connie's new address in Andover is 17 
Arundel Street, Shawsheen Village, Andover, Massa- 
chusetts. 

CORNELIA NYCE KITTREDGE is living in Athens, 
Ohio, where John teaches Architecture at Ohio Uni- 
versity. Cornelia is trying to work on a master's de- 
gree in the midst of washing, cleaning and the social- 
ization of four children. 

MARY WILLIAMS KING is living in Burlington, 
Vt. while Peter gets his degree in History from the 
University of Vermont. Their son, John Russell, was 
born July 11, 1967. 

Those of you who did not send news, I am certain 
are planning to be present at our 1 5th Reunion on 
May 1 1, 1968, where we can catch up on your activi- 
ties. Please remember to set that day aside for a 
good time. We'll send you further information on 
specific plans as soon as your fellow classmates from 
this area have met to discuss details. 

In the meantime, if any of you are passing through 
on your way to Ski Country, Hampton Falls is a 
little village located just east of Exeter. We'd be hap- 

Py t0 See yOU " Dorothy 

1954 

VICKY SCHWAB ARONOFF has moved to a 75- 
year old Victorian house in Cincinnati. The five little 
Aronoffs "are enjoying new found space and 12-foot 
ceilings." 

1955 

News Secretary: Mrs. John A. C. King, 3rd (Doro- 
othy Fleming), 603 Nevada Dr., Erie, Penna. 16505. 

SUE APPLETON EVANS will move to Brunswick, 
Me. in July where her husband will join a group of 
doctors. 




Scott, Peter, and Lisa 
children of Anne Dunsford Hockmeyer '50 



seventeen 




Elizabeth, Kimmy, Melissa, and Cynthia 
children of Mary Grant Lynch '53 

MARTHA CLARK OLT is now living in Indianapolis 
having made four moves in four years. Her husband 
is with Union Carbide, and they have two daughters, 
Marnie, 5, and Katie, 2. 

NANCY EASTHAM lACOBUCCI'S husband is now 
an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Law of the 
University of Toronto. Nancy writes, "Andrew is a 
delight." 

HELEN GARDNER was married in October to 
Charles E. Hejde of Westminster, Colo. He is an 
Agronomist-Statistician Analyst. Helen is working as 
a Systems Analyst for Neodata, Inc. 

HARRIETTE McCONNEL SOULE had a third chlid 
and first daughter, Susan, Feb. 8, 1967. 

SUSAN McGUIRE McGRATH, her husband and four 
children are back in Vermont after their year in 
France where Bob wrote a book. He had a faculty 
grant from Dartmouth for a year of research in med- 
ieval art history. 

MARY MINARD is working toward a M.A.L.S. de- 
gree from Wesleyan University. At Abbot she has 
been assisting Mrs. Duncan in the Admissions Office. 

DIANE SOROTA O'DWYER is writing an editorial 
column about food and fashions for Shoreline Festi- 
val, a regional magazine of Southeastern Connecticut. 
She is also doing some advertising copy and layout 
for several clients. 

MARTI BELKNAP returned in August from 27 
months in Spain where she taught English to Span- 
iards in Barcelona and Madrid as well as studying 
Spanish. This year she is teaching English to foreign 
children in the Cambridge public schools. She would 
love to see any Abbot girls in the area. 

1956 

News Secretary: Mrs. Alden Taylor Bryan (Phoebe 
Estes) North Williston Rd., Williston, Vt. 05495. 

The class extends its deepest sympathy to MARDY 
ROTH BROWN, whose husband, Jim, died November 
19, 1967, after a tennis accident. Mardy is now living 
at home: c/o C. C. Roth, 2500 Massachusetts Ave., 
N. W., Washington, D. C. 20008. Our thoughts and 
love are with her. 



JUDY WARREN KIELY and husband, Dennis, have 
had a busy past year: they spent last June in Ireland, 
and built a new home. Their address is 47 Butternut 
Road, Westfield, Massachusetts 01085. Judy is ac- 
tively preparing a nursery for the Kiely addition in 
March. 

NANCY SMITH KING was busy this past fall, 
despite a slipped disc and the subsequent six weeks 
of bed rest: she was chairman of the Crafts' table for 
the Church Fair, and she writes, "I gave directions 
for my tri-weekly Fair Workshops from my bed, but 
even so we ended up making a substantial sum for 
the Church." 

NELL EUBANKS TEMPLE writes "Carlton gets out 
of the Navy in a few months and will start Ole Miss. 
Law School in the summer. A third little Temple is 
due in March so (it) promises to be a busy 1968." 

Tidings: Clare Madeline Powell, born to BETSY 
PARKER and Dave Powell, December 28, 1967. 

SUSAN BRADLEY LEE'S husband will finish his 
two years of service with U. S. Public Health at Fort 
Peck Reservation in July. They will then move to 
Chester, Mont, where he will be in private practice. 
Susan is involved part-time in the Head Start Program 
on the reservation. 

MARILYN EMSLEY BETTS is working on a M. Ed. 
in Secondary School English at Florida — Atlantic Uni- 
versity. 

SIDNEY HENRIQUEZ GLOVER has been teaching 
English at Boston University. Her husband teaches at 
Belmont Hill. They have a daughter, Alexandra. 

BARBARA HENRY was married to Dr. Graham 
Parry, Nov. 4, 1967. Graham is a lecturer in English 
Literature at Leeds University in England. 

PATRICIA PEARCE BRODERSEN'S husband is 
sports editor of the Norwalk, Conn, newspaper, and 
Patti works on the paper part-time. They have two 
boys, Jeff, 7, and Robbie, 1 . 




Samuel, Alison, and John P., Jr. 
children of Sylvia Thayer Zaeder '54 



eighteen 



BOAT RULON-MILLER YORK writes, "Am on the 
Parents' Council Board of Laurie's school and the 
board of a local church day school. It's terrific keep- 
ing up with schooling. I feel the class of 1956 meth- 
ods are 100 years old!" 

WINNIE WARD HENCHEY has two children, Win- 
nie, 5, Hope, 2. Winnie is teaching sports part- 
time, and is chairman of volunteers at the Sheriff's 
County Jail in Valhalla, N. Y., an institution for the 
short-term woman offender. They plan for the pris- 
oner's needs while in jail and after release. "It is a 
fascinating job and I love it." 

LINDSAY JOHNSON BRINTON'S husband is an 
artist, and they are living in a converted schoolhouse 
near Phoenixville, Pa. They have two children, Gene- 
va, 7, and John, 5. Lindsay is teaching. 

Alden and I visited the Morrisons one Sunday last 
autumn, and enjoyed seeing Lee, Bill, their three sons, 
and elegant new home. News seeps slowly into 
northern Vermont, and thus I do not have sufficient 
details about the various activities and recent events 
of classmates. Please resolve to drop me a post card 
soon; I'd love to hear from you, as would the rest 
of the class. All best wishes for a splendid new year. 

Phoebe 





Michael and Elizabeth 
children of Nell Eubanks Temple '56 



Michael and Timothy 
sons of Paula Slifer Zandstra '57 

1957 

News Secretary: Mrs. John J. Moughty, Jr. (Lynne 
McLaughlin), Cedar Lane, Ridgefield, Conn. 06877. 

NANCY RUHLIN PLUMMER is teaching second 
grade at Voorheesville Elementary School while John 
is a mathematician with the Dept. of Public Works 
for the State of New York. Spare time is spent collect- 
ing antiques, bowling, and enjoying their home. 

MARTHA BUCKLEY FAHNOE mixes being a "lady 
of leisure" with some interesting and fun temporary 
work through Manpower where she has learned a lot 
about many different companies. Martha and Norman 
saw NANCY DAVISON MILLER and Duane in Mon- 
terey in early December. The Millers are adjusting 
to Army life, and Duane, being a doctor, is very lucky 
not to be overseas. 

CAROL GAINES ROBERSON and Sam are leading 
a frantic life of work and study in Princeton, N. J. 
They hope to stay next year so Sam can finish his 
thesis research. "No babies yet, but we have two 
cats! We have to wait for the degree before expand- 
ing any further." She is working at the Educational 
Testing Service in foreign students correspondence and 
is studying Arabic in hopes of Sam's teaching in the 
Middle East some day. 

LUCINDA SULZBACHER CUTLER moved on Dec. 
1st, so their Christmas was spent amidst the chaos of 
"boxes, paint and boys." The Cutler's new address is 
Flintlock Rd., Madison, Ct. 

"GLEE" WOOLDREDGE WIELAND is kept busy at 
home by her very active one-year-old, Jennifer, while 
Betsy (3) is in nursery school three days a week with 
AGNES DALEY ROTHROCK'S C58) little girl. A third 
little Wieland is expected in early May. 



nineteen 



KAREN JONES has a most challenging job as edu- 
cational assistant in a Methodist Church in Coral 
Gables, Fla. The church has two congregations: 
Spanish and English. Her work with both congrega- 
tions is educational and social in nature, and is 
focused particularly on the youth groups. This coming 
summer Karen will be co-ordinating an enrichment 
program five days a week from 9 A.M. to 5 P.M. 
for 100 neighborhood children, many of whom are 
"parentless" as both parents work during the day. 
Most of the children are Cuban, so Karen is most 
grateful for her four years in Bolivia where she 
learned Spanish. "I keep up my interest in music, 
and play the organ for the Sunday, 8:30 A.M. serv- 
ice." 

DEBORAH SMITH REGAN writes from Pacific Pali- 
sades, Calif, that she and her husband are very busy 
trying to get a house they recently bought into liv- 
able shape, plus keep up with their lively two-year- 
old, Pamela Christine. They took a beautiful trip to 
Hawaii this past fall, so are not completely house- 
bound! 

Best wishes to JODY BRADLEY who became Mrs. 
Jonathan James Bush on Dec. 2, 1967 in New 
Canaan, Ct. PENNY HOLBROOK REID was one of 
her attendants. After a delightful two weeks in Jamai- 
ca, Jody and John settled into their apartment at 
130 E. End Ave., N. Y. C. John, a graduate of Yale 
College, class of '53, is a general partner in G. H. 
Walker & Co., members of the New York Stock Ex- 
change. Jody continues working as a curatorial assist- 
ant at the Museum of Modern Art in N. Y., but on a 
part-time basis. 

HOPE HAMILTON PETTEGREW and family recent- 
ly moved to Los Gatos, Calif. (98 Central Court) 
when Bob was hired away from IBM to work for Con- 
trol Data Corp. Bob sells the service of computers — 
scientific systems specifically — to NASA, Lockheed, 
and Philco-Ford's space re-entry division. Daughter 
Caroline is 3 and enjoying nursery school while 14 
months old Ann tries hard to keep up with her big 
sister. 

PENNY HOLBROOK REID will be moving from 
Tenafly, N. J. to Virginia in 5 months. Watson, an 
M. D., will be doing research with the National Insti- 
tute of Health in Washington, D. C. The Reids have 
two daughters, Cindy (2) and Megan (1). 

ANNE BOWDEN MORRIS has two children, Cathy 
almost six who is in kindergarten and "quite a prolif- 
ic little artist" and a son, Robbie (3) who attends a 
Montessori school in Glenview, III. Husband Bob sells 
computers for Honeywell and just fniished his MBA. 
Anne spends her spare time doing volunteer work: 
church school, Bradford Club, Republican Party. For 
fun she plays indoor tennis, skis and skates. 

SUSIE CHRISTY HERPICK has been on the move: 
In August '66 to Hawaii and then on Feb. 1, 1967 
back to the "mainland" — Laguna, Calif. In October 
they moved again to a new house in Laguna Niguel 
and are enjoying a rural atmosphere with sheep graz- 
ing on the hillsides. One more move might take 
place (what's a little more painting and remodel- 
ing?!) to be closer to Stan's office, a Newport Beach 



branch of the United California Bank. Stan's work is 
mostly with commercial banking. The Herpicks have 
two sons, Dean (5) and Jonathan (9 mos.) (Present 
address: 24672 La Plata Drive, Laguna Niguel, Calif. 
92677) 

JOAN PELLETIER ISABEL was home on leave last 
summer in New Hampshire. They spent Thanksgiving 
in Costa Rica. Mark is in kindergarten and Margo in 
Nursery School. 

LUCY BEEBE TOBIAS writes "We finish surgery 
residency 1 July 1968 and then go Navy medical 
corps for two years, destination unknown yet. We are 
adopting a boy, Philip, 8 mos. old who has lived with 
us as a foster child for 7 mos. We have Christopher 
5, in kindergarten and Martin, almost 4, a cat, and 
two goldfish." As for "Tobias, the artist, as dis- 
tinguished from Tobias, the dishwasher, etc.", Lucy 
keeps up with her love of art in a big way. Last sum- 
mer she was "an artist in action at the Edmonds Art 
Festival and the Pacific Northwest Arts and Crafts 
Fair." She has had exhibits in the Seattle-Tacoma 
area and won several prizes. Her work (mainly water 
colors, acrylics, pen and ink, and collage) may be 
regularly seen at The Art Stall and The Little Galler- 
ies in Seattle. Husband Joel and Lucy do all their 
own mat and frame work "while their children and 
the family cat give advice." The Tobias home has a 
beautiful view of ferryboats and Mt. Rainier, when 
it isn't raining! 

A most Happy New Year to everyone! 

Lynne 

1958 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Edward S. Shaw (Judith 
Hart), Chapel Rd., Waccabuc, N. Y. 10597. 

NANCY DICK is working in New York for Careers 
Incorporated. 

_ LINDA FLESH KEILY is working for the Ohio Bell 
Telephone Company. She would like to hear more 
about her classmates. Write! 

JOAN FOEDISCH ADIBI had her second child and 
first son, Camron Foedisch, Dec. 26, 1967. 

CAROL GREENE DONNELLY had a second daugh- 
ter, Caroline Wittenmyer, July 29, 1967. 

ANNE HITCHCOCK WIES had a daughter, Dyana 
Hitchcock, in October, 1966. Her husband graduated 
from Duke Law School in 1966, and is now working 
for the New Haven Legal Assistance Association. 

VICTORIA KOHLER spent the summer in East 
Greenland collecting Triassic ammonites. She loved 
the cold weather with no summer. The nearest town 
was 1 hours away by boat. 

MARY O'CONNOR is engaged to Ronald J. Sears 
of Lawrence, Mass. He is a graduate of Northeastern 
University, and is studying for his master's degree at 
lona College, and is employed as a senior engineer 
by the American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 

Don't forget that on May 1 1 th our class has its 
10th reunion. You all should have received a letter 
concerning tentative plans and a post card to indicate 
your ideas and or whether you might be able to at- 
tend. Please use these cards soon so that we can 
start making some definite arrangements. In case the 
card has been misplaced, just drop me a line. 

Judy 



twenty 



1959 

ELIZABETH BELL HETHERINGTON had her first 
child, a son, Alexander Gunn, June 2, 1967. 

SUSAN FOX CASTELLINI had a daughter, Eliza- 
beth Ann, Feb. 10, 1967. They are living in Cincin- 
nati. 

DOROTHY HENRY was married July 29, 1967, to 
John Pazereskis, instructor of English at Marquette 
University in Milwaukee, Wis. 

ALICE IAMS KITTREDGE'S husband is in Viet 
Nam, and she and her two children, Aveline, 6, and 
Willy, 1, are spending the winter with her parents in 
New Jersey. 

LYNN MAHONEY EDELSTEIN will be in Paris for 
a year while Stu does research at the Pasteur Insti- 
tute. He received his Ph.D. in biochemistry from the 
University of California at Berkeley last June. 

NONA PORTER GALLANT is having a glorious 
time traveling on business and pleasure with Wade. 
This past year they were in London, Paris, Rome and 
Morocco on business, and in Mexico and Kenya for 
fun. 

HOLLY ROBERTSON CHALMERS in now Alumnae 
Secretary at the National Cathedral School in. Wash- 
ington. She is also a regular organist and choir direc- 
tor at a small Episcopal Church in Maryland. John is 
head of the Rare Book Library at the National Cathe- 
dral. 

JOAN SYNNOTT was married to James S. Ardrey, 
January 13, in Stamford, Conn. Jim attended St. 
Mark's School in Dallas and graduated from Hotchkiss 
and the University of Texas. He received an M.A. 
from New York University, and is assistant editor of 
The Saturday Evening Post. Joan is assistant secretary 
to the chairman of the board of Time, Inc. 

WINKIE WARD KEITH, her husband and daughter, 
Lucy, 3, are in Australia and New Zealand for six 
weeks. 

CATHERINE WATSON RAPP had her first child, a 
son, William Watson, Nov. 27, 1967. 

1960 

SALLY BARNGROVE McQUILKIN'S husband has 
recently started his own film company and will be in- 
volved in the production of feature films. 

ELIZABETH DEXTER was married Aug. 6, 1967, 
to Richard T. Potsubay, in Lake Placid, N. Y. They 
are living in Buffalo where Dick works for the Asso- 
ciated Press. 

MARGARET ELSFMORE SIPPLE is studying at the 
Episcopal Seminary in Berkeley, Calif., and Peter is 
a Ph.D. candidate in the School of Education. 

KRISTI GRAHAM BUMPUS is living in Woods 
Hole, Mass., where her husband is working in marine 
contracting. Heidi is one year old. 

TERRY HYDEMAN SEWARD had her first child, a 
son, William Leon, Jury 20, 1967. 

LORING LOW is working for Gillette Company as 
Administrative Assistant to the Western Hemisphere 
Marketing Department. 

CYNTHIA SMITH HOLCOMB had a second child 
and first son, Timothy Jones, Nov. 17, 1967. 

NANCY SMITH became engaged in January to 
Richard A. Intersimone of Crawfordsville, Ind. He 
graduated from Pinceton, and is assistant director of 



admissions at Wabash College. Nancy is a case work- 
er with the Hartford Department of Public Welfare. 
SARAH VON DER HEYDE is engaged to Timothy 
W. Richards of St. Louis, Mo. He is a graduate of 
Loomis and Cornell, and has a master's degree in 
operations research from Cornell. He is assistant to 
the president of Photronix, Inc. in St. Louis. Sarah 
is a senior at Jefferson Medical School, and will in- 
tern in St. Louis. Sarah spent 8 weeks working in a 
hospital in India in January and February. 

BREND^^ WALKER HIRSCH'S husband is publisher 
of New York Magazine which will appear in the 
early spring. It is an independent weekly magazine 
which will be about New York City, its cultures, its 
problems. Jimmy Breslin and Tom Wolfe are con- 
tributing editors. 

SUSAN WALLACE FRAIM had her first child, a 
daughter, Stephanie Lyon, Nov. 24, 1967. 

1961 

News Secretary: Andrea Lynch, 144 East 84th St., 
Apt. 78, New York, N. Y. 10028. 

MUFFET MARSHALL was married to George Vo- 
gel, Aug. 5, 1967. Morley was maid of honor for her 
sister. George is a graduate of the University of 
Minnesota College and Law School, and is now prac- 
ticing law in Red Wing. Muffet is teaching English 
and speech at Red Wing High School and continuing 
to work on her M. Ed. degree. 

ANNE SAVAGE was married July 23, 1967, to 
Alexander van Eyck. LINDA BACON was one of the 
bridesmaids. Alex has just passed the bar. 

1962 

News Secretary: Mrs. Andrew P. Langlois (Lynne 
Moriarty), 107 Niles Hill Rd., New London, Conn. 
06320. 

Dear Sixty-Two: 

It was great to hear from some of you. If you 
received a postcard from me and didn't get around 
to sending it back do send it in for the next Bulletin. 
If you didn't get a postcard you will be getting one 
in February or March. Please take the time to send 
them back. 

BECKY BARTLETT is working at McCall's as sec- 
retary to the editor-in-chief and is most enthusiastic 
about her job and being in New York. Becky met 
Lynda Bird Johnson Robb at McCall's and went to the 
White House wedding. 

SUE BOYNTON KOERBER is living in Groveland, 
Massachusetts. Sue had a daughter, Sara Ruth, on 
April 26, 1967. Sara is very energetic and is keeping 
Sue very busy. 

VAL CRANE MANLEY is living in Dorset, Vermont 
where she is teaching fifth grade during the week 
and skiing on weekends with her husband, Ace. She 
has also been doing graduate work at UVM for her 
master's degree in Elementary Education. Val plans 
to finish her Master's this summer. 

NANCY ELWELL GRISCOM is living in New York 
on the West Side with her husband, Rufus and their 
three-month-old son. Rufus is studying at Columbia 
Law School. Nancy is working t^o days a week at 
Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic. 



twenty-one 



HILARY FIELD GRIPEKOVEN is also a new mother. 
The Gripekoven's daughter, Ashley Abbott, was born 
on Christmas Day. Ashley sounds just like Hilary — 
long blonde hair and blue eyes. 

NATALIE GILLINGHAM, who left us after our 
senior-mid year, is now in France. Nat graduated 
from McGill, taught French for a year at Northfield 
before going abroad. She wrote her thesis on Robbe- 
Grillett for a D.E.S. (a French degree) from the Uni- 
versity of Aix-en-Provence. She is presently teaching 
English at a school in a Parisian suburb. Nat spent 
Christmas vacation skiing in Austria. She is planning 
to go to Spain this summer and then come back to 
Andover. 

PAULINE GRAY KEYES writes that her husband 
has been promoted to Assistant Manager of the Smith, 
Barney office in Dallas and that they will be leaving 
San Francisco shortly. The Keyes have a two-year-old 
son. 

JEN HESKETH THOMPSON has travelled quite a 
bit since Abbot, spending two summers in Melbourne, 
Australia and one summer and Christmas vacation in 
Tokyo. Jen was married this summer and honey- 
mooned in the Bahamas. 

SUE MALLORY ROBERTS writes that she and her 
husband, Michael, have two children, a boy and a 
girl. Sue is presently very much occupied with the 
children but is hoping to go back to work after they 
reach school age. Sue's husband is a photographer. 

CONNIE MATTHEWS McLEOD writes that she 
went to Pierce College in Athens for two years after 
Bennett and received her B.A. Connie "travelled all 
over creation for two summers, coming back to the 
U.S. for Foxy's wedding in September, 1966." She 
then worked as a Sales Assistant for Merrill, Lynch in 
New York. Connie was married in June and is living 
in Brighton, Mass. Connie is working for Massachu- 
setts Investors' Trust and her husband, Bruce, is in his 
second year at Harvard Business School. 

FOXY SWANBERG MUSSER is living in New York. 
Foxy's husband, Bill, graduated from Harvard Busi- 
ness School in June and they spent the summer on a 
camping trip through the U.S. and Canada, visiting 
PAULINE GRAY KEYES in San Francisco. Foxy is do- 
ing personnel work with Philip Morris, International. 

JUDY THURBER CANDON is living in East Hamp- 
ton, Connecticut. The Condons had a son in March, 
1967. Judy would like any news of CARRIE THOMAS 
who is presently on our lost list. 

MARY CONCEMI SOMMER is in Minneapolis, Min- 
nesota. Her husband, Fred, is working for his Ph.D. 
in Chemical Engineering. Mary is doing social work. 

NANCY HILL became engaged in November to 
John Lyons of Newton Centre, Mass. He is a graduate 
of the Cambridge School in Weston, Mass. and the 
College of Liberal Arts at Boston University. Nancy 
graduated from Boston University School of Education. 

GRETCHEN WHITEHEAD is working for a news- 
paper in Detroit, Mich. 

I was married in June and had a marvelous wed- 
ding trip to Ireland. We had planned to go to both 
England and Ireland but we went to Ireland first and 
loved it so much that we cancelled our reservations 
in England and extended our stay in Ireland. I am 
now teaching at Norwich Free Academy. N.F.A. is 
quite a change from Abbot and Pingree (where I 



taught last year). There are 3100 students! I do like 
it, though and still love teaching. 
Do write if you have any news. 

Best 

Lynn Moriarty Langlois 

1963 

Reunion Co-Chairmen: Sharon Seeche, 16 Adding- 
ton Rd., Brookline, Mass. 02146 and Karla Haartz, 
Northfield School, East Northfield, Mass. 01360. 

News Secretary: Ann Harris, 32 River St., Boston, 
Mass. 02108. 

SUSAN ARCHER was married June 24, 1967, to 
David Rehder. ANN HARRIS was maid of honor, 
and SUE BURTON was one of the bridesmaids. David 
is a graduate of Northwestern with a master's degree 
in Journalism. He is working for Greg Advertising in 
New York. Sue received a B.A. in French and Italian 
from Northwestern in June. 

BETSY CADBURY MONTAGUE and David are back 
in Ithaca where Betsy is continuing work on her de- 
gree in English Literature at Cornell and David is 
teaching and performing. 

_ MORLEY MARSHALL is studying German at the 
Goethe Institute in Bad Aibling. 

BETTINA PROSKE is teaching at Neuchatel, an in- 
ternational school in Switzerland. She is teaching Eng- 
lish and some courses in German literature. 

HELEN WATSON COLLISON and Terry are living 
in Los Angeles where Terry is an urban planner with 
General Electric. Their first child, Blaine Bradford, 
was born Nov. 15, 1967. 

1964 

IVERS BEVER became engaged in December to H. 
Reed Witherby of Boston. He is a graduate of the 
Groton School and is a senior at Harvard. 

AMY JOHNSON is doing graduate study in English 
at Girton College of Cambridge University on a Don's 
Russell Scholarship. "I must confess I spend half my 
time in London." Amy graduated from Radcliffe last 
June magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa, and a 
Wood row Wilson fellow. 

SUSAN LOCALIO is still at Smith, and is doing 
practice teaching at Northampton High School. She 
plans to return to Treetops again this summer. 

PATRICIA ROVERSI graduated from Randolph 
Macon Woman's College last June. She is working in 
New York for Shell Chemical Co. 

JOANNE SCHWIEBERT is engaged to Robert Birge, 
a senior at Yale. They are planning a summer wed- 
ding. 

1965 

News Secretary: Gail Goldstein, Box 1815, Connect- 
icut College, New London, Conn. 06320. 

ALLYSON DAVIES is majoring in American His- 
tory at Goucher, and is doing volunteer research for 
historical restoration - preservation project in Balti- 
more. 

SUSAN HARNEY is engaged to Earle S. Lathrop, 
3rd, of Wassenaar, Holland. Earle attended Berkshire 
Academy and Washington and Lee University. 

ALLISON MORRILL was married Aug. 25, 1967, 
to Donald F. Anspach in Spartansburg, N. C. PAT 
MORRILL was maid of honor. They honeymooned in 
Antigua and Haiti. 



twenty-two 



ROBIN WOOD was married June 17, 1967 to 
David Bertsche of Decatur, Ga. 

Well, on Thursday, December 28, WENDE TRE- 
NEER added to the ranks of married '65ers. She and 
Robert William Chambers, Jr. were married in St. 
John's Episcopal Church in Elkhart, Indiana. C. FAYE 
was there, as was LANGDON, and LIVVY MOTCH. 
Even the wedding announcement made me teary-eyed, 
so I can sympathize with C. Faye who cried a lot. 
Wende and Rob are both going to Indiana now (he's 
doing graduate work in drama). I'm sure we ALL 
wish them every happiness. 

All I can say now is thank goodness for Christmas! 
Otherwise it seems as though I might not hear from 
any of you. I got lovely cards from SUZE VOORHEES 
and CAROL REISCHE. Suze is at Sarah Lawrence 
now, Carol still at Bryn Hawr. CLAUDETTE CHIP- 
MAN NICOLAI added "No new addition to the fam- 
ily yet!! but one never knows." She, Bruno, and little 
Jean-Marc are living in Switzerland now: new address 
for them: Terrassen-Wyssenlluh, 8832 Wollerdu, Can- 
ton Schwyz, Switzerland. 

DERYL FLEMING writes, "For the record, I am 
still surviving — not by much, but I'm still here. Skid- 
more is really piling on the work." (as is everywhere 
else from my experience.) She is majoring in physical 
education, and has spent a lot of time doing teach- 
ing — both at Skidmore and now in a fifth and seventh 
grade class in town. 

Harvard-Yale this year was once again a meeting 
place for aid Abbot girls. I ran into LUCY CRANE 
C66) and ANN HARRIS ('63 ) . And one day when I 
was sitting bells here (acting receptionist) DIANA 
KIARSIS C64) walked in. It certainly was a surprise! 

C. FAYE and I are holding down the fort at Con- 
necticut — and finishing up with exams. EMILY is 
working for Vista now. And that's about all for my 
news. PLEASE write so I'll have more next time!!! 
My deadline is April 15th! 



Take care, 



Gail Goldstein 



1966 

News Secretary: Ellen Sobiloff, Box 188, Chatham 
College, Pittsburgh, Penna. 15232. 

JUDY FROEBER has pledged Delta Delta Delta at 
the University of North Carolina. She hopes to work 
with MARCIA on Nantucket next summer. 

LUCY THOMSON has transferred to Connecticut 
College. 

Here it is, the beginning of another semester . . . 
I spent a lively week after exams traveling and 
living out of my suitcase — literally! First stop, Phil- 
adelphia at U. of Penn. MARGY RYDER is working 
as a medical receptionist for Curtis Publishing Co. 
and will be taking Russian History as a night course 
this semester. Spent a day with Babs Slaymaker, 
who took me to her History of Art class. Both 
Margy and Babs are QUITE content (Larry and Jim- 
my, respectively) and report that MARTY WEIS is 
fine, (I tried to get in touch, Mart!). From Phi I ly I 
went to Cambridge where I spent a few days at 48 
Eustis (Apt. 2) with LIZ WALKER, FRAN JONES 
and CINDY BUXTON ('65 ) who has moved in since 
AYER CHAMBERLIN returned to Beloit. Liz is now a 



teller at the Cambridge Trust. Fran is working at the 
Caravan Theater and Cindy is attending Boston Uni- 
versity. Their apartment is a haven for Abbot girls 
and Andies alike ... I spoke to PINKY ROCK briefly 
while I was staying at B.U. She is majoring in gov- 
ernment and still very much devoted to Jon. Learned 
that HOLLY ASHLEY is also at B.U. Spoke to MELIN- 
DA MILLER at Smith, who is also majoring in govern- 
ment with an emphasis on African studies. She says 
she loves it "even more than last year "and sees BAR- 
BARA TIMKEN and PAULA CORTES every so often. 
LUCY CRANE is crazy about Wellesley. Sorry that I 
didn't have more opportunity to talk with her about 
the adjustment (if any) after her year abroad. She's 
still dating John! 

WINKIE THOMAS is now at Bryn Mawr after a 
year at Oxford where she studied with both European 
and American students. She traveled through some 
northern European countries, spent close to five weeks 
in Spain and, although she is quite settled in Pennsyl- 
vania, misses England very much. 

NANCY WHITEHEAD misses all Abbot friends, but 
she has a "rather crazy bunch of friends and we do 
all sorts of crazy things together." In addition, she 
has borrowed one of her father's old cameras and has 
taken up photography . . "since I can't write or com- 
pose, a camera may be my means. I'll let you know 
whem I'm famous, but don't hold your breath!" 

From JULIE DUPONT — The last I heard, she was 
dating a member of the Stephens Ballet Company, 
very active in the theater and VERY content with 
life in general. She spent the summer in Colorado 
at a Stephens summer theater and dance school. 

BLAKE HAZZARD sees KAREN FULLER (who is 
at Rollins). Blake says of school: "I'm really disap- 
pointed in myself as far as this last term goes . . . now 
revving up to study like mad. Human-relationship- 
wise, I made super progress, and learned so much 
from my history course, but otherwise . . .WORK in 
'68!" 

DREWRY HANES wrote that she's beginning to 
have slight pangs of homesickness, although she loves 
Mills. She saw JUDY FROEBER and MARCIA WAT- 
SON during vacation. Lots of parties and lots of fun. 

One night in late fall I was sitting all by my 
lonesome, when the phone rang and a distant voice 
said, "Pudge? ..." I paused in horror — unable to ima- 
gine how THAT nickname could have possibly 
leaked out — when JEANIE LIPPINCOTT and LOUISE 
FLETCHER revealed themselves. They were calling 
from Fletch's home in Sperryville, Virginia. Both are 
at the University of Richmond and seeing quite a lot 
of each other. Since that time Babs, Margy and I 
called Jeanie for her birthday and we're trying to 
formulate a reunion for sometime during the month 
of February — when we all have time (????). Jeanie 
and Fletch see Miss Stevenson on occasion. Learned 
that BLAIR STAMBAUGH is doing graduate work at 
Smith where she and her husband ore dorm parents. 

PEIGI DONAGHEY and ROSE JANE BENDETSON 
are busy at Barnard and running around New York. 
Peigi and I surprise each other occasionally by tele- 
phone. Received a card from BETHE MOULTON. She 
loves Cornell, and living in her sorority house, Kappa 
Delta — "a great switch from dorm living. Aiming for 
Biology major but haven't applied myself. Farewell 



twenty-ihrrc 



Dean's List." She spent Christmas vocation in Cali- 
fornia. 

That's it, folks. Just wont to send out a BIG final 
plea: WRITE ! ! ! ! I want to hear from more of you! 

Love, 

Sobie 

1967 

News Secretary: Judith Hannegan, Aldrich Hall, 
Beloit College, Beloit, Wis. 53511 

Hello again class of '67! I've scraped together as 
much as possible in the line of news, for it seems that 
everyone is either working too hard or having too 
much fun at college to write. I shall excuse only the 
latter condition. 

From SARAH BEALE YANCEY I received a Christ- 
mas card with news of a baby on the way for her 
and Geff. Best of luck to the forthcoming parents! 
Sarah is very happy in her new homestead. Being at 
Bowdoin, she is not lacking in an academic atmos- 
phere and has been taking some art courses. She men- 
tioned that JEAN HALEY had paid her a visit some- 
time last fall. 

WEEZIE HUNTINGTON is in love with Denver and 
lives for the weekends when she takes ski trips or 
even rafting trips down the Arkansas River. She flew 
home at some point during the fall and got together 
with DORSEY GREEN. She also sees a great deal of 
CATHY HOOVER who is in Colorado and apparently 
very happy there. 

I've received several letters from LIZ MACGREG- 
OR, and she is very happy at Skidmore. She went to 
Colorado in the early fall and took a side trip to see 
CATHY HOOVER. She doesn't seem to be suffering 
socially and sends reports of busy weekends at the 
various men's colleges. She went to Antigua to soak 
up some sun over Christmas vacation and managed 
to live through two earthquakes. 



WENDY MORRISSEY has been busy with the work 
at Mount Holyoke but has managed to get up to 
Boston to visit FAITH BEANE and CLAIRE MOORE. 
She spent a good deal of Christmas vacation on the 
ski slopes where she encountered RUTH CHAMBER- 
LIN and JANE PHILLIPS, who is apparently very 
happy at Bradford. 

I managed to receive a chain letter from NANCY 
POROSKY among a few others. She is very happy at 
Beaver, has made some fastastic friends and sees 
FELICE FORREST and SUE STICHNOTH from time to 
time. She visited MARGIE GOLDMAN at Smith one 
weekend and also got together with SUE SHAPIRO 
in Boston over Christmas vacation. She sounds very 
happy. 

I received a letter from LINDA SULLIVAN which 
brought me up to date since graduation. During the 
summer she worked as a waitress in Yellowstone Na- 
tional Park and on her way back, she stopped off to 
see SARAH BEALE'S wedding. Also present at the 
wedding were RHONDA CARRINGTON, VICKI BEN- 
NETT, JEAN MARKS, and FELICE FORREST. Linda 
also visited with PAM JONES and JOYCE WANNOP, 
who was on her way to British Columbia. She sounds 
busy, but happy at Connecticut, mentioned that she 
was looking forward to a vacation. She made some 
remark about seeing JULIA ALVAREZ ... in the li- 
brary. 

I've been quite happy at Beloit and am unusually 
busy this term. I had a great Christmas vacation 
and flew up to Detroit to visit CANDY HOWES, who 
is having a good time at Barnard. I just went through 
rush, and to my surprise decided to pledge, am now 
a Pi Beta Phi, so should be kept busy. I am hoping 
to go East over spring vacation in late April, and if 
I do will be sure to see some of the old gang. Mean- 
while keep sending those letters in so we can know 
if you're still alive. 

Judy 



a^s, 



Praises Ringing... Here's to you 

Susan Archer Rehder '63 — Dean's List — Northwestern University- 
Sally Birdsall '67 — Vice-president of Freshman Class — Whittier 
College 

Catherine Choy '65 — Dean's List — Northwestern University 
Elizabeth Lage '65 — Dean's List — Wheaton College 
Susan Lebach '66 — Dean's List — Pembroke College 
Bethe Moulton '66 — Dean's List — Cornell University 
Gerda Ray '67 — Dean's List — Pembroke College 
Alicia Stillman '64 — Dean's List — Wheaton College 



twenty-four 



A 
Memorial 



A scholorship in memory of Ann Miller 
Ludlow, 1929, will be given to the daugh- 
ter of an alumna with funds received 
from her family and friends. 



Mrs. P. Livingstone Armstrong 

Mr. and Mrs. Kendrick F. Bellows 

Miss Mary H. Bevan 

Mr. and Mrs Lyman C. Bleecker 

Mr. and Mrs. Bern Budd, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Carter, Jr. 

Mr. Jean Cattier 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence D. Cavanagh 

Mr. Ronald M. Craigmyle 

Mr. and Mrs. James L. Crider, Jr. 

Mrs. James Dartt 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald C. Death 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond deClairville 

Miss Sybil K. Dukehart 

Mr. Martin Dwyer, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Ehlers, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank R. Finlayson 

Mr. and Mrs. David S. Foster 

Miss Mary E. Fox 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Fulton 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Gardner, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clifford R. Gillam 

Mr. and Mrs. Anderson F. Hewitt 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry B. Holmes 

Mr. Benjamin K. Ludlow, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John D. Maxwell 

Mr. and Mrs. William T. Moore 

Officers and Directors of The First Boston Corporation 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Outhwaite 

Miss E. Helen Pendleton 

Mrs. Collier Piatt 

The Robinson-Duff Family 

Mr. and Mrs. Leon A. Rushmore, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Franz Schager 

Mr. and Mrs. Ludwig F. M. Schulze 

Mr. and Mrs. Gardner Sutton 

Mr. Francis K. Thayer, Jr. 

Mrs. H. Chandlee Turner, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elisha Walker, Jr. 

Mrs. Robert E. Walker 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard C. Weeks 

Mr. and Mrs. Ichabod T. Williams 

Mr. Thomas R. Williams 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 

Andover. Massachusetts 
Return Requested 



ENTERED AS 

SECOND-CLASS MATTER 

AT THE POST OFFICE AT 

ANDOVER. MASSACHUSETTS 




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OLIVERWENDELLHOLMES I 

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\<pa> ampUenii •> 

^ ■ 



The Executive Board of the Alumnae Association 

1968- 1970 



President 



Vic* Presidents 



Clerk 



Executive Secretary 

Delegates -at- Large 



Mrs. Leonard M. Fowle 

(Nancy Kimball) 

36 Norman St., Marblehead, Mass. 01945 



Mrs. Malcolm S. Loring 

(Anne Russell) 

Pepperell Rd., Kittery Point, Me. 03905 

Mrs. David E. Rickenbacker 
(Patricia Bowne) 
5 Glenside Terrace 
Upper Montclair, N.J. 07043 

Mrs. F. N. Ladd 

(Frances Nolde) 

2 South Lane, Hingham, Mass. 02043 



Mrs. Benneville N. Strohecker 

(Constance Hall) 

Ballast Lane 

Marblehead Neck, Mass. 01945 



Mrs. Gage Olcott 

(Helen O'Brien) 

40 Oakridge Rd., Wellesley, Mass. 02181 



Miss C. Jane Sullivan 

20 Buswell St., Lawrence, Mass. 01841 



Mrs. Sargent Bradlee, Jr. 
(Sally Humason) 
Linden Cottage, Walker Rd. 
Manchester, Mass. 01944 

Mrs. J. Robert Haskin, Jr. 
(Miriam Bickford) 
6 Redstone Lane 
Marblehead, Mass. 01945 

Mrs. Harry Maidment 
(Emily House) 
99 Robert Rd. 
Manchester, Conn. 06040 



Alumnae Trustee 
1963-1969 



Miss Alice C. Sweeney 

35 School St., Andover, Mass. 01810 



Alumnae Trustee 
1966-1972 



Mrs. John B. Ogilvie 

(Donna Brace) 

14 Circle Rd., Darien, Conn. 06820 



MAY, 1968 



VOLUME 36, NUMBER 3 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 

Editor: C. JANE SULLIVAN 

Asst. Editor: MRS. FRANK DiCLEMENTE 

Published four times yearly, October, February, May and September, by Abbot Academy, Andover, Massachusetts. Entered as 
second class matter December 12, 1933, at the post office at Andover, Massachusetts, under the act of August 24, 1912. 



FRONT COVER — Candid Photographs of Reunion Chairmen 

PRINTED AT EAGLE-TRIBUNE PRINTING. LAWRENCE. MASSACHUSETTS 



From, the desk of Miss Tucker . . . 



Dear Alumnae, 

The Class of 1968 marched into Davis Hall where your Annual 
Meeting was held recently. As they sang, these sixty-five Seniors 
looked healthy, attractive, alert and spirited. Soon they will be going 
down to South Church for their graduation exercises. I am confi- 
dent that they will go out from Abbot Academy to use their talents 
at home and abroad as you alumnae are doing. Have faith in their 
generation. Be patient and loving as well as firm in your convic- 
tion that there ARE standards for living a joyous, abundant life. 

I am grateful to all of you for your generous support of the 
school through the years. Thank you also for your gift to me of 
an Abbot captain's chair and a check for books for the Emily Means 
Library. But it is the constancy of your love for your Alma Mater, 
expressed in many different ways, that makes me content to be asso- 
ciated with you through the years. As Willa Cather wrote in MY 
ANTON I A, "That is happiness, to be dissolved into something com- 
plete and great." 

ELEANOR M. TUCKER 
Acting Principal 

May 13, 1968 



one 



Annual Meeting of the Alumnae Association 

The Abbot Academy Alumnae Association held its annual meeting, May 11, 1968, at 
1 1 :30 in Davis Hall. Barbara Lord Mathias called the meeting to order, and welcomed 
200 alumnae. 

The Senior Class marched in singing a school song. Mrs. Mathias welcomed them as 
new members of the association and said there were 22 alumnae relatives in the graduat- 
ing class. The list follows: 



of Claire Cregg 

Cregg Ballard, 

1967 

of Mary Elliot 



Barbara Ainslie — daughter of Nancy Wil- 
son Ainslie, 1940 

Susan Barton — cousin of Elizabeth Wal- 
worth Ross, 1930, and Ellen Ross, 1966 

Susan Bolton — daughter of Barbara Dean 
Bolton, 1947; granddaughter of Marion 
Mellor Dean, 1916; grandniece of Sarah 
Dean Farley, 1934; niece of Marjorie 
Dean Marsden, 1942, Dorothy Dean 
Johnson, 1941, Harriet Bolton Allen, 
1932, and Pam Bolton Henderson, 1942; 
cousin of Cynthia Johnson, 1971, and 
Lynn Marsden, 1968 

Elizabeth Briggs — cousin 
Derby, 1935, Natalie 
1941, and Linda Cregg, 

Jane Brown — daughter 

Brown, 1938; sister of Margaret Brown, 
1963; niece of Nancy Elliot Stewart, 
1948 

Barbara Camp — cousin of Elizabeth Par- 
ker Powell, 1956 

Dorothy Cheney — daughter of Sally Leavitt 
Cheney, 1945; sister of Margaret Che- 
ney, 1970 

Caroline Cleaver — daughter of Rosamond 
Graves Carroll, 1939 

Bonnie Cook — great-granddaughter of 
Helen Hudson Bowers, 1877; grand- 
daughter of Marion Lovering Linton, 
1907 

Juliana Crane — daughter of Mrs. Alex- 
ander Crane, former Headmistress of 
Abbot Academy; sister of Alexandra 
Crane Frishman, 1960, Bethiah Crane 
Accetta, 1962, and Lucy Crane, 1966 

Annette Davis — daughter of Alva Houston 
Pafford, 1944; cousin of Dale Barra- 
clough Munson, 1964 



Anne Fellows — daughter of Carol Whitte- 
more Fellows, 1938; granddaughter of 
Mattie Larrabee Whittemore, 1915; niece 
of Emma Stohn Larrabee, 1916; cousin 
of Virginia Lawton Wolfe, 1932, and 
Roxanna Wolfe, 1967 

Elizabeth Handy — granddaughter of Leo- 
nora Keeney Handy, 1902 

Lynn Marsden — daughter of Marjorie 
Dean Marsden, 1942; granddaughter of 
Marion Mellor Dean, 1916; grandniece 
of Sarah Dean Farley, 1934; niece of 
Dorothy Dean Johnson, 1941, and Bar- 
bara Dean Bolton, 1947; cousin of Susan 
Bolton, 1968, and Cynthia Johnson, 1971 

Jacqueline Mathiot — cousin of Marlena 
Comas Rodriquez, 1 955, Lucia Comas, 
1958, and Amelia Comas O'Brien, 1960 

Nancy Roberts — great-great-granddaugh- 
ter of Octavia Dole Edwards, 1 849 

Diane Russell — cousin of Helen Watson 
Collison, 1 963, and Marcia Watson, 1 966 

Joanne Sapienza — cousin of Edna Grieco 
Thomas, 1951 

Madeleine Todd — sister of Alison Todd, 
1966, and Lorraine Todd, 1970; great- 
grandniece of Bertha Bailey, former 
Headmistress of Abbot Academy; niece 
of Joan Todd Hathaway, 1937; cousin 
of Susan Wilkinson Lees, 1960; daughter 
of Mr. Guerin Todd, Trustee 

Lynn Trenbath — daughter of Mrs. G. H. 
Trenbath, assistant in residence 

Karen Urie — sister of Sandra Urie, 1970 

Katherine Wies — sister of Martha Wies, 
1966; sister-in-law of Anne Hitchcock 
Wies, 1958 



The seniors sang to Mrs. Mathias and Miss Tucker. The officers of the class presented 
gifts to the class of 1918 and then sang to the 50th and 25th reunion classes. All joined 
in singing "Abbot Beautiful" and the seniors marched out singing their class song. 

The report of the Clerk, Deborah Redfield Smith, 1950, and Treasurer, Helen Marie 
O'Brien Olcott, 1936, were accepted. 



two 



The group paused for a moment in remembrance of the alumnae who had died since 
the last meeting. 

Aagot Hinrichsen Cain, 1944, Chairman of the Alumnae Fund, reported that 1,110 
alumnae had given $26,206.41 since June 30, 1967. Bequests totaling $1 1,250 have been 
received this year. The Class of 1917, Miriam Bacon Chellis, Class Fund Secretary, re- 
ceived the bowl for the highest percentage of contributors last year, and the class of 1929, 
Polly Francis Loesch, Class Fund Secretary, received the award for the highest number of 
contributors. Mrs. Cain announced that the new Abbot Cookbook was now on sale. 

Mr. Philip K. Allen, president of the Board of Trustees, greeted the alumnae. In re- 
ferring to the changes which have taken place at Abbot, he said, "The Board of Trustees is 
heartily behind all these changes, physical, educational, and, shall we say, social!" 

Mr. Allen continued, "It is fitting indeed 
that we should honor Eleanor Tucker to-day 
. . . She has always uncomplainingly and ef- 
fectively carried out any assignment asked of 
her, and special recognition should be taken 
of her present task as acting Principal, a task 
which she has performed cheerfully and with 
great success for nearly two years. 

"As you all know, Tuck agreed to be the 
acting Principal during Mary Crane's absence 
on sabbatical leave in 1966-67. When Mrs. 
Crane resigned in October, 1966, Tuck con- 
tinued in that capacity while the Trustees con- 
ducted a search for a new Principal. She was 
naturally one of those being seriously con- 
sidered, and, I may say, I still have the letters 
many of you sent in her behalf. For personal 
reasons, however, she later asked that she not 
be considered, but reiterated her willingness 
to continue as acting Principal. And you now 
know the outcome of that search, and the 
new principal, Donald Gordon, will arrive next 
month to take over. 

"But the Trustees want you Alumnae to know how deeply appreciative they are of 
Tuck's devoted service over all these years, but more especially during the last two most 
difficult ones. Her steady hand and influence have left an indelible mark on the school 
and on the girls. 

"When she becomes again Vice Principal and Dean, she will do so with the deep 
thanks of every one for a job well done. 

"And may I add a very personal note: because of the nature of our two positions at 
Abbot, you must realize how closely we have had to work together . . . and I say with great 
feeling that it has been both a pleasure and a rare privilege to have worked with Eleanor 
Tucker on such generous and friendly terms . . . The hot line between Abbot and One High- 
land Road has been always 'on the ready'!" 

Mrs. Mathias expressed the appreciation of all the alumnae to Miss Tucker for her de- 
voted service to Abbot and presented her with a check and an Abbot chair. Miss Tucker 
thanked the alumnae and discussed some of the changes that have taken place at Abbot. 

Mrs. Mathias thanked the Antiquities Committee for their work in classifying and pre- 
paring for sale "the treasures in the attic". 

Jane Sullivan, Alumnae Secretary, reported on the year's activities in the Alumnae 
Office and introduced the Reunion Chairmen who announced the reunion gifts. 




PHILIP K. ALLEN 



three 



The Nominating Committee presented the following slate of officers for the years 
1968-1970: President, Nancy Kimball Fowle, 1927; Vice Presidents, Anne Russell Loring, 
1936, Patricia Bowne Rickenbacker, 1946, and Frances Nolde Ladd, 1954; Clerk, Con- 
stance Hall Strohecker, 1951; Treasurer, Helen Marie O'Brien Olcott, 1936; Executive 
Secretary, Jane Sullivan, 1931; Delegates-at-large, Miriam Bickford Haskin, 1921, Sally 
Humason Bradlee, 1947, and Emily House Maidment, 1927. These officers were duly 
elected. 

Mrs. Fowle, the new president, presented Mrs. Mathias with a gift in appreciation for 
her work for the past four years. 

The meeting was adjourned for luncheon in the Bailey Dining Room. 

C. Jane Sullivan 
Executive Secretary 



Treasurer's Report - 7967- 1968 



May 13, 1967 Balance in Merrimack Valley National Bank $ 635.87 



RECEIPTS 



Interest from Invested Funds 
Total .... 



$ 510.00 
$1,145.87 



DISBURSEMENTS 
Alumnae Day Expenses, 1967 .... 
Dues American Alumni Council (1967-1968) 
Dues for Alumnae Presidents' Council 
Travel Expenses to Council and Miscellaneous Expenses 
Mailing and Miscellaneous Expenses 
Expenses for New York Abbot Club 
Repair of Abbot Antique .... 

Gift to Abbot Library ..... 

Total ........ 

Balance in Merrimack Valley National Bank — May 1 1, 1968 



$ 


59.60 


$ 


110.00 


$ 


25.00 


$ 


46.59 


$ 


48.14 


$ 


36.95 


$ 


5.00 


$ 


50.00 


$ 


381.29 


$ 


764.58 



HELEN O'BRIEN OLCOTT, Treasurer 



I have examined the accounts and found the balance to be correct. 

MARY DOOLEY BRAGG, Auditor 
four 



Vibrant Administrator 



Elisabeth 
Luce 
Moore 
1919 




Reprinted from The New York Times 
January 31, 1968 

Elisabeth Luce Moore's close friends seem 
unable to resist comparing her with her 
older brother, the late Henry R. Luce. 

"She's an extraordinarily able woman/' 
said Mrs. Moore's sister-in-law, Clare Booth 
Luce. "But if she had been a man, she would 
have been as good, if not better, than her 
brother." Since Henry Luce's death last 
year, his widow said in an interview, "Beth 
Luce has taken on the entire burden of 
keeping the Luce family in touch with one 
another." 

Governor Rockefeller also compared Mrs. 
Moore to her brother today, as he an- 
nounced her appointment as chairman of 
the board of trustees of the State Univer- 
sity. Noting that the appointment marked 
the first time the chairmanship had been 
given to a woman, Mr. Rockefeller said: 

"She has the same drive, the same dedi- 
cation, the same imagination, that led him 
(Henry Luce) to build one of the greatest 
communications organizations in the 
world." 

When describing the personality of the 
slender, gray-haired Beth Moore, her friends 
repeatedly use the words "enthusiastic," 
"charming," "articulate" and "intellec- 
tual." 

"I've never seen anybody so enthusiastic 
or more deeply concerned with the affairs 
of the university," said Samuel B. Gould, 
the university chancellor. "Her attendance 
at meetings lifts up the whole board." 

Mrs. Moore was born on April 4, 1903 in 



Shantung Province, China, the daughter of 
Henry and Elisabeth Luce, who were Protes- 
tant missionaries. 

Mrs. Moore spent the first 10 years of 
her life in China, before attending schools 
in Germany and the United States. She was 
graduated from Abbot Academy in 1919 
and from Wellesley College in 1924 and 
was married to Maurice T. Moore, a lawyer, 
two years later. 

From 1926 to 1930 Mrs. Moore worked 
as a writer and researcher for two of her 
brother's magazines, TIME and FORTUNE. 
She still writes book reviews and magazine 
articles on various subjects. 

She is a former chairman of the board 
of the Institute for International Education 
and of the International Young Women's 
Christian Association. She is a trustee of 
Wellesley and holds honorary degrees from 
Trinity University and Western and Adelphi 
Colleges. 

Mrs. Moore is also a trustee of the United 
Board for Christian Higher Education in 
Asia and was awarded the order of the 
Brilliant Star of the Republic of (Nationalist) 
China. 

She and her husband are in Governor 
Rockefeller's small circle of close friends. 
Mrs. Moore was co-chairman of the Gover- 
nor's first election campaign in 1958 and 
later turned down an offer by Mr. Rocke- 
feller of a high post in his administration. 

The Moore's have an apartment at 1 000 
Park Avenue and a summer home in Wes- 
ton, Conn. Mrs. Moore collects Chinese art, 
and she and her husband occasionally at- 
tend the opera, concerts and ballets. They 
have two sons, Thompson, who is a business- 
man in California, and Michael, who 
teaches "classics" at Columbia. 

Mrs. Moore, holding a light blue hand- 
kerchief and eyeglasses with frames of the 
same color, spoke with vision and humor 
yesterday as she accepted her appointment 
in the Red Room of the State Capitol. She 
summarized her idea of a university by re- 
calling that her son Michael had reminded 
her recently that "the word college comes 
from the Latin 'collegium,' which simply 
means colleagues . . . just colleagues, stu- 
dents and teachers working together in 
search of the truth." 

"There's so much happening that it's an 
exciting time to have even a small part in 
the university development," Mrs. Moore 
said. 



five 



Praises Ringing... Here's to you 



Julia Alvarez '61 — Dean's List — Connecticut College 

Mauricia Alvarez '66 — Dean's List — Connecticut College 

Beverly Armsden '66 — President of Junior Class — Skidmore 
College 

Virginia Bertsche '65 — Dean's List — Augusta College 

Lucy Crane '66 — Treasurer of College Government — Wellesley 
College 

Mary Curtis-Verna '39 — Hollins Medal for her work as a member 
of the Metropolitan Opera 

Valerie de Peyster '66 — Dean's List — Hiram Scott College 

Charlotte Erwin '66 — Matthew Vassar Scholar — Vassar College 

Jo-Anwyl Foster '64 — Dean's List — Wilson College 

Elizabeth Humstone '66 — High Honors — Bradford Junior 
College 

Patricia Morrill '64 — Durant Scholar — Wellesley College 

Rosemary Sullivan '65 — Wellesley College Scholar — Wellesley 
College 

Lucy Thomson '66 — Dean's List — Connecticut College 

Susan Van Winkle '64 — Dean's List — Connecticut College 

Janet Waring '66 — Dean's List — Connecticut College 

Suzanne Woodward '64 — Phi Beta Kappa — University of Maine 



Cum Laude- 1968 



Susan Bolton Hollis Hebbel *Nancy Roberts 

Dorothy Cheney Katharine Nelson Karen Seaward 

Elaine Finbury :: Katherine Wies 

* Alumnae Relatives 

six 



Alumnae Fund Report 

September 1, 1967 — May 11, 1968 

1,123 ALUMNAE HAVE CONTRIBUTED 
$26,540.41 

Once again, I wish to thank each alumna who 

has made it possible for us to attain this total, 

the highest ever reached by the alumnae in one 

year. 

C. JANE SULLIVAN 

Alumnae Secretary 



REUNION GIFTS 







Ni 


umber of 




Class 


Amount 


Contributors 


Class Fund Secretary 


1893 


$5 




1 




1898 


$110 




2 




1903 


$45 




5 


Margaret Wilson Gerber 


1908 


$495 




8 


Helen Buss Towle 


1913 


$225 




10 




1918 


$1,051 




24 


Irene Atwood 


1923 


$685.85 




27 


Elizabeth Flagg Dow 


1928 


$405 




20 


Virginia Gay d'Elseaux 


1933 


$244 




16 


Jane Ritchie Shaw 


1938 


$187 




11 


Phyllis England Letts 


1943 


$253 




14 


Marjorie Lehmann Moats 


1948 


$1,567.08 


33 


Rosemary Jones 
Genevieve Young Sun 


1953 


$922 




17 


Mary Grant Lynch 


1958 


$278 




29 


Caroline Greene Donnelly 


1963 


$65 




9 


Anita Schenck 



The Andover Alumnae and Mothers of the Day Students raised $450 at their 
annual Dessert Bridge held in Davis Hall on April 16, 1968. 



seven 



1894 Mary Abby Mathes (Mrs. Fred W. Smith) died 

January 28, 1968, in West Caldwell, N.J. at the 
age of 92. Our sympathy is extended to her two 
daughters, five grandchildren and seven great- 
grandchildren. 

1901 Helen A. Whittemore died February 12, 1968, 

in Kingston, R.I. after a short illness. 

1903 Nancy Holland (Mrs. Robert A. Hubbard) died 

January 24, 1967, in Burlington, Vt. Our sincere 
sympathy is extended to her daughter. 

1905 Katherine I. Woods, author, editor, and trans- 

lator died February 5, 1968, in New York City. 
She was best known for her translations of Antoine 
de Saint-Exupery's "The Little Prince" and "The 
Masterpiece". 

1907 Gladys Dudley (Mrs. Emil F. Stephan) died sud- 
denly August 13, 1967 at her home in New Haven, 
Connecticut. 

1908 Marguerite Sylvester (Mrs. Marguerite Veerhu- 
sen) was reported dead in January, 1968. 

1911 Frances Pray was reported dead in March, 1968. 

1921 Margaret Ailing (Mrs. Hugh A. Ward) died 
suddenly of a heart attack January 14, 1968. She 
was serving as Class Fund Secretary for her class. 
Our sincere sympathy is extended to her husband, 
her daughter, Winifred Ward Keith '59, and her 
twin sister, Marian Ailing Bradley '21. 

1922 Mary Bott (Mrs. Robert Dale) died February 25, 
1968, in Harwich Port, Mass. Our sympathy is ex- 
tended to her husband. 

1929 Beatrice Throckmorton (Mrs. Charles Vander- 

meer) died September, 1966, in Freehold, N.J. 

1933 Grace Getty (Mrs. John McMillan) died tragic- 

ally several years ago. She is buried in Arlington 
National Cemetery and is one of the last WAC's 
to be so honored. 

1951 Faith Taylor (Mrs. Harry R. Harwood) died 

December 29, 1967, in New Canaan, Conn. 

eight 



3n iMemoriam 







1908 

Dorothy Taylor, Helen Buss Towle, Esther Parker Lovett, and Winifred Odgen Lindley 

1900 

ETHEL HAZEN LILLARD'S daughter Barbara, is 
editor of the Winchester, (Mass.) Star, the first 
woman editor of this paper. Her daughter Barbara's 
husband will be a guest research doctor at Cambridge 
University next year, and Virginia's husband is presi- 
dent of New York State University in Albany. 



News 
from 
the 
Classes 



1906 

PERSIS MACKINTIRE CARR is busy as district 
manager for Doncaster of Rutherfordton, N.C. She 
finds and trains new representatives. She reports that 
EVALINE KORN COOKMAN is in the hospital after 
a massive coronary. 

1907 

CLARA HUKILL LEEDS has moved permanently to 
Florida. She writes, "I walk on the Gulf beach or 
swim daily. I sew for the migrant Indians, paint 
weekly with a big class of Emile Gruppe of Rockport, 
and have a steady open house for my Abbot and 
Cleveland friends. CONNIE PARKER CHIPMAN 
visited in February." 

The class extends its sincere sympathy to ALICE 
WEBSTER BRUSH whose husband died March 23rd 
in Haverhill, Mass. 

1909 

The class will be sorry to learn that MARJORIE 
HILLS ALLEN'S husband died December 14, 1967. 

1915 

The class will be sorry to learn that BESSIE GLEA- 
SON BOWEN'S husband died last year after a long 
illness. 



nine 



1916 

ELEANOR FRARY ROGERS writes, "My husband 
and I still seem to keep busy with a number of things 
even tho we are over that age. After much pleading 
on my part Phil has consented to retire from the 
school board. I will not have a hard time keeping 
him busy tho. Living near a college town there seems 
to be a choice of three things to do each evening. 

"His bird banding seems to be the main activity 
right now. Yesterday we banded 1 3 evening gros- 
beaks besides some chickadees and tree sparrows, 
There is a very good Audubon Society here and we 
both take part. I also have Garden Club and Mush- 
room clubs to keep me busy. Conservation and town 
affairs fill his time." 

"I still do some silver and gold work and various 
crafts. We have this in common too. Our 45th was 
last year and Phil's 50th comes this year!" 

LILLON HAMER ATKINSON'S husband has re- 
tired from the practice of medicine, and they are 
living in Deerfield Beach, Fla. 

MARGARET MARKENS HAND has two children 
and seven grandchildren. 

The class extends its sincere sympathy to JOSE- 
PHINE WALKER WOODMAN whose husband died 
last September after a long illness. 

HELEN WARFIELD BAKER and her husband are 
now living in Southern Pines, N.C. They have seven 
grandchildren. 



1917 

The class will be sorry to learn that MIRIAM 
BACON CHELLIS'S husband, Myron, passed away in 
January. 

EDITH MARSDEN and her brother spent the month 
of March touring Portugal and Spain in a Volks- 
wagen. 



1918 



REUNION REPORT 



Well, it's all over . . . we'll never have another 
fiftieth . . . and it really was great fun as well as 
being intensely interesting. It is a school to be proud 
of. The Bulletin has given you a fine picture of Ab- 
bot's progress, development and excellent educational 
standing. 

Fifteen came back for the reunion plus five brave 
husbands. Our biggest regret is that IRENE ATWOOD 
couldn't be with us, after all she did in preparation 
for this reunion. She is recuperating from an opera- 
tion at a cousin's home in Dover, Mass. She wrote, 
"Please give my best to one and all and have a 
wonderful time. Just sorry not to be there." DOT 
STALKER has been in Japan for "two fantastic weeks" 
and is now in Honolulu. MARGARET SPEER has re- 
cently returned from South Africa and was sorry not 
to be here. Although she has retired, she has many 
commitments. EMMAVAIL LUCE SEVERINGHAUS 



1913 

Helen Danforth Prudden, Hazel Goodrich Waugh, and Mildred Bryant Kussmaul 











r5f 




1918 

Lyman Richards, Helen Martin Thomas, Kathryn Cooper Richards, Mariette Goodrich Page, 
Margaret Morris Clausen, Helen A. B. Robertson, Julie Sherman Tibbetts, Philip K. 
Allen, Margaret Van Voorhis, Louise Bacon Fuller, Clarissa Horton Sanford, Virginia 
Vincent Phillips, John Sanford, Marion Hubbard Craig, Ruth Clark Weaver, Avalita 
Howe Brown, Sidney Jenkins, Katharine Righter Jenkins, and Velma Rowell Cutler 



and her husband now live in Coconut Grove, Fla. and 
since his retirement they have been to South East 
Asia and just two weeks ago, returned from Africa 
. . . Travel mileage in Africa . . . 5,200 by car, 
1,300 by train and 6,000 by air! She writes, "A 
welcome here awaits any of you who will come this 
way." MARGARET VAN VOORHIS returned from 
Puerto Rico in time to join us. We do get around, 
don't we? 

LOIS LINDSAY is at Bay Path Junior College, 
Longmeadow, Mass. and as this is her busiest time of 
year, she could not be here. Quote from MARTHA 
SWALM HOLDEN, "In January 1966 we sold our 
house here in Chatham and moved into an apartment 
in the new Portside Garden Apartments development. 
It is lovely here. We still enjoy our own little yard 
and gardens that go with each first floor apartment 
and enjoy our winters in Florida." FAITH WILLIAMS 
BISSON wrote, "We are so proud of our son, Thomas, 
who with his lovely young wife and 8 months old 
daughter, are at Berkeley, Calif, teaching in the 



history department. Our daughter and son-in-law and 
3 wonderful little boys are at the University of 
Michigan Psychology Department." HORTENSE YORK 
spends winters in Florida — and had a wonderful 
trip to the Orient and Far East in 1967. KAY 
RIGHTER JENKINS and her husband drove PEG MOR- 
RIS CLAUSEN and VIRGINIA VINCENT PHILLIPS 
to Andover and it was wonderful to see them. 

Our meeting took place in the charming living 
room of Morton House where we really felt at home. 
What we thought to be a one-half hour meeting . . . 
brief to the point . . . became so stimulating that it 
lasted one and a half hours. So many interests were 
evidenced, as one after another spoke of her varied 
activities. They are giving generously of their many 
talents ... it might be political, educational, altru- 
istic, or maternal. It is plain to be seen that these 
fifteen members of 1918 are very much a part of the 
world today. 

Louise Bacon Fuller 
Margaret Van Voorhis 



eleven 




1923 

Miriam Thompson Kimball, Martha Snyder Purrington, Elizabeth Flagg Dow, Clarence Pur- 
rington, Martha Buttrick Rogers, Anne Darling Whitehouse, Miriam Sweeney McArdle, 
and Mary Elizabeth Rudd 



1919 

The class will be sorry to learn that MILDRED 
DANIELS CARY'S husband died last May when they 
were returning from Florida. 

DOROTHY SHAPLEIGH MEADER writes, "We had 
a thrilling time planning and building a cape not 
far from our old home. We now have 5 granddaugh- 
ters." 

1920 

The class extends its sympathy to HILDA HEATH 
SAFFORD whose husband died in February. Hilda 
spent the month of April visiting relatives in Cali- 
fornia and Hawaii. 

1921 

ALMA UNDERWOOD UDALL and her husband 
spend 6 to 8 months at their home in Largo, Fla. 
their daughter, Janet, was married in February to 
Rudolph Schaefer, president of Schaefer Brewing Co. 

1922 

DOROTHY WILLIAMS DAVIDSON'S son, Malcolm, 
is in Japan buying cultured pearls for Long's, Boston 
jewellers. Dorothy has a new grandson the child of 
her daughter, Margie. 



1923 

Although our group was not large, we had lots of 
fun exchanging news. After the meeting and luncheon 
at school, we went to NAT BARTLETT FARNS- 
WORTH'S for refreshment and then on to the Lanam 
Club for dinner where ROSAMOND MARTIN JOHN- 
SON and her husband joined us. 

Start planning now to come and celebrate our 
50th. 

EDITH DAMON BUGBEE keeps busy in church, 
Y.W. and two AAUW study groups. 

SALLY FINCH HARTWELL'S husband retired re- 
cently and they spent the month of May touring the 
west with friends. 

CHARLIE HUDSON WHITE is the secretary of the 
House Committee on Health and Institutional Services 
in the Maine legislature. 

RUTH HOLMES DURANT and her husband spent 
two weeks in Florida visiting FRAN HOLMES. 

MARY CATHERINE SWARTWOOD SINCLAIRE 
reports that the 50th reunion fund stands at $618.65. 

WOODIE and CARLTON PEIRCE visited "M.C." on 
St. Croix in March. They were charmed by the island 
and plan to return. Carleton has retired, but is a 
medical consultant for "Man and His World". Woody 



twelve 



writes, "Though 'Man and His World' will not be the 
same as Expo. I feel we can recommend it to anyone 
who is coming to Canada. I do hope that any of the 
class who comes here will let me know so we can 
make some plans." 

DOROTHY TAYLOR BOOTH has seven grand- 
children, 4 boys and 3 girls. 

1924 

BETTY BRAGG KING and her husband are enjoy- 
ing retirement in Florida. Last summer they spent 3 
months in Europe, and visited Betty's son, David, an 
Air Force doctor in Weisbaden, Germany. Her son, 
Alan, a teacher in Bakersfield, Calif., will be married 
in May, so they will have another trip. 

KATHERINE HART MITCHELL is president of the 
Woman's Club. One of their projects is knitting 
afghans for the Viet Nam wounded at Ft. Devens — 
so far they hove mode 75. 

1926 

ELIZABETH BUTLER ALLEN keeps busy with com- 
munity projects and activities. She has four children 
and four grandchildren. 

RUTH FARRINGTON is a member of the new 
Laurel (Md.) Art Guild. Their gallery opened in 
March. 

1927 

The class extends its sympathy to NANCY KIM- 
BALL FOWLE whose mother died in March. 

1928 

May 1 1th dawned bright and beautiful in Andover 
for our 40th. I only wish that more of you could 
have been with us. Abbot has made many improve- 
ments which gives it a New Look which we oil 
thought was great.JEAN SWIHART SHERWOOD and 
her sister, Mignon, arrived late. PEG GRAHAM 
GREENLEAF and her husband had planned to come 
but couldn't at the last minute. Jean held the record 
for the greatest distance. 

FRAN GOULD PARKER sent the following tele- 
gram: Love and greetings to all — completely un- 
done when 40th Reunion realization took hold — 
involved to-day — Oldest daughter's shower — mar- 
riage. 

I thought everyone looked great — Well Pre- 
served! 

GEE GEE GAY d'ELSEAUX: "35 1/2 years married 
to the same guy who is now nearly retired, but busier 
than ever working on our house in Marblehead, 
where we moved year round four years ago. The 
three girls happily married to three nice young men. 
Each family has two children, so we have six grand- 
children, four girls and two boys ranging from 6-2. 

JEAN SWIHART SHEERWOOD: "Living in an 
apartment in Redwood City. Nick, Administrative 
Manager, Industrial Indemnity, San Francisco, com- 
muting. I am Children's Librarian in Redwood City 
— I enjoy it. I am past president of the Children's 
Services Division of the California Library Associa- 
tion, and am organizing chairman of the new San 
Francisco Chapter of the Women's National Book 
Association. Two sons — Norm, married, 3 children, 
Lynn, 11, Billy, 9, Danny, 7, living on o ranch in 



Carbondale, Colorado; Norm, teoching History at 
Rocky Mountain School and ranching. Dan, Marine 
Corps, Tried banking now returning to College and 
working — lives near us in Menlo Park." 

MARY PIPER SEARS: "Husband retired four years 
ago and is happy as a clam working around the place, 
buliding stone walls and making a 3-hole golf course. 
Son, E.H.S., 3rd, is a Management Consultant working 
and living in Boston — 31 unmarried. Daugnier, Les- 
lie, married and lives in Hingham — has two chil- 
dren — David, 5, and Stephanie, 3." 

WINIFRED DUDLEY BURNHAM writes: "May 
1 1 th is 'Dad's Day' at North Yarmouth Academy, 
where I function as librarian, so I can't make any 
definite plans for reunion. If I can possibly break 
away for the day, I'll come for the meeting ond 
luncheon — it would be fun. Grandchild roster now 
stands at eleven, with two more due this summer — 
!!! — can this be ME? Greetings to all, and I'll 
really make the old school try to get there." 

ELIZABETH HOLLIS SUTTON says: "Sorry I can't 
make reunion. Statistics: Children; Edmund Hollis 
Sutton m. GRACE BAYARD STEVENS January 13, 
1968 in N.Y. — Elizabeth m. ALASTAIR McDON- 
ALD STUART 6-20-65. received her Ph.D. at U. of 
Chicago in 1967. Expecting 1st child. They are going 
to Australia in August where Dr. Stuart will be doing 
research at Canberra for 1 year. Patricia, graduated 
from Beloit, December 1, 1967. Now teaching in 
Rockford. Going to Graduate School in September 
1968. Chief interest: Bridge. Feel my oge — but when 
I contemplate Current Events don't regret it." 

ELEANOR LEECH WILLIAMSON writes: "Plans for 
reunion sound great. I do plan to be there. Steve has 
to work that day so I'll come alone. Brief news: I'm 
teoching Nursery School at R.I. School for the Deaf 
and am the proud grandmother of twin boys in one 
family and a single boy in the other." 

A nice note from ELIZABETH SMALL '28 Aff. 
which says; "Sorry I won't be able to be at our 
40th, but it was nice to hear from you. I remember 
so well your haircut and ANNE ROSS' eyebrows, as 
you lived across the hall from JEAN HUBBARD '29 
and me. (in Homestead) I also specially remember 
BOBBY WENTWORTH, JAN CUNNINGHAM and 
FRANCES GOULD. LOUISE HYDE was my 'welcomer' 
— 1 don't remember what the term was then. Have 
been a secretary with a consulting engineering or- 
ganization for almost the 40 yeors. Our present name 
is Jackson Or Moreland Division of United Engineers 
& Constructors Inc." 

Received the following news from CONNIE RUND- 
LETT HUSTON; "My husband having retired for the 
second time we seem to be here rather permanently! 
'Chuck' is Army Career and he and Elizabeth are 
about to have their 6th child. Martha and Robert 
have three children. Tommy is doing his Navy bit at 
Underwater Demolition quite enthusiastically. Re- 
cently someone colled me a 'tradition' at the Menlo 
School for Boys Fashion Show — do not feel such a 
'thing' yet; so perhaps our 50th will find me joining 
you oil! Meantime, best wishes for Abbot and her 
'Girls' ". 

It was nice to hear the following from JANET 
BROWN MALCOLM '28 Aff. "So nice to hear from 



thirteen 



you after 40 years. As you see my name has been 
changed in fact fourteen years now — I lived in 
Northampton till I married. I married a widower — 
Vice President of Chapman Valve now a part of Crane 
Co. It would be fun to see you all again but my 
husband had a bad heart attack in October and I stay 
close to home never knowing when I can go anywhere. 
We did travel a great deal all over the world before. 
I guess I look the same but I don't carry the heavy 
weight I did at Abbot. In fact I was skin and bones 
until I put on twenty-five pounds in the last 10 years. 
I have six step-children — four boys and two girls. 
They are just great and I have had a wonderful life 
— also 14 grandchildren. They live all over the world." 

From BETTY RYAN HILL: "Sorry I can't make our 
40th — nothing new here — husband Highway 
Engineer with U. S. Gov't. 4 darling grandchildren." 

A card from THEO TALCOTT SLATER to say: 
"Good wishes to all returning members of 1928 and 
wish I could be with them. I'll ever value my Abbot 
education." 

PEG GRAHAM GREENLEAF wrote: "Bob is vice- 
president of Chrysler Air-Temp and runs the Nash- 
ville operation. We have two daughters: Gale is mar- 
ried to Dr. Spencer Shropshire. They have two red 



headed children, Allen and Spencer, III. Judith is 
married to Charles Hamlin and is now living in Togo, 
West Africa. He is a Director in the Peace Corps. Dr. 
Shropshire has been serving in the Air Force as a 
Captain and his duties have been in Air Space Medi- 
cine Research. He will begin to serve his Residency 
at Parkland in Dallas, Texas in June. I am just re- 
covering from a cataract operation and am not too 
sharp." 

From MARGARET NIVISON CHASE: Their son, 
Robert, was married to Miss Mary Chandler in Syra- 
cuse April 13th 1968. Both teach music, Mary strings 
and Bob vocal. "We haven't learned to avoid the 
great rat race, so are up to our necks in all sorts of 
activities, mostly musical, and serving as trustee of 
several instiutions." 

A note from EMILY SLOPER SHAILER says: May 
1, 1967 I retired (after 35 years) from New Britain 
Gas Lt. Co. job at the age of fifty-nine. In the 
autumn we began renovating Russell's two hundred 
year old birthplace at Haddam on the west bank of 
the Connecticut River. By next Christmas we hope to 
be permanently settled at Shailerville, Haddam Conn. 
The latch string is out now!" 

BETTY JACKSON KENNEDY: Now that the 40th 
Reunion is fast approaching, it now appears I must 



1928 

Eleanor Leech Williamson, Austin Chase, Margaret Nivison Chase, Emily Sloper Shailer, 
Virginia Gay d'Elseaux, and Mary Piper Sears 




change my own tactics; namely, no longer can I 
borrow Jack Benny's favorite statement 'I am 39'. I 
celebrate 35 years in Social Work on April 10, 1968 
— my experience has included both public and pri- 
vate social agencies, both in Massachusetts and New 
York State. I enjoyed my best years in Child Pro- 
tective Services. I am now in charge of the Intake 
Division of the Greenfield Board of Public Welfare. 
Betty was sorry not to be able to attend our 40th 
but her husband has not been too well and she has a 
90 year old mother she must also attend to but she 
said to say "Hi" to all." 

From JO PARET BARRETT: "Here sits this card in 
my unanswered correspondence, and I can't remem- 
ber whether I was supposed to send it only if I could 
come to reunion, or in any case?? I can't (involved 
in teaching and doing further study in Creative Dra- 
matics) but I'll be thinking of you all. Children are 
both still, happily, in the Washington area: Colin is 
associate editor and writer for TRAFFIC WORLD, re- 
cently passed, top of the list, the exam to practice 
law before the ICC. He and his wife, Ann, delivered 
food in the recent riots and he wrote a featured article 
on it. Alison is ass't, personnel manager of a govn't 
agency. Dick is retired Air Force, on GWU faculty, 
plus outside lecturer, plus Master's thesis reader! Best 
to dear old '28 (where does the time go!)" 

The word from SUE RIPLEY WARD is; I certainly 
don't feel it could be our 40th at Abbot. What's 
more I am sure I don't look it! Sorry not to be able 
to attend in May but we ore expecting a visitor from 
Scotland about that time. We are happy to know that 
Phil has been accepted at Arizona State U. next fall, 
and that they plan to send a couple of major league 
scouts to his high school here to watch him play this 
spring. They evidently take baseball very seriously — 
though it is still not a major. I plan to attend a 
leadership training course with the Inner Peace Move- 
ment in Iowa in July. This training can be very help- 
ful in establishing a sense of inner poise and balance. 
It goes to the root of things and is very practical. 
No one tells another what is the trouble — one be- 
comes aware of it oneself. Then life changes! Say 
an enthusiastic hello to the whole gang." 

Here are a couple of late ones — so glad to hear 
from them. BEA LANE MERCER: "Sorry, but we just 
don't get back to New England before June and then 
not for long. My 4 children all married and have 9 
grandchildren — another one due in December. 6 
weeks thru N.W. Canada and Expo last summer, this 
summer a bus and air trip thru our National Parks, 
Las Vegas, L.A. and San Francisco and maybe on to 
Hawaii, or back to Penticton, B.C. for the Square 
Dance Jamboree 1st of August. We square dance, 
travel, play bridge. John is a real good golfer and 
we live in Sarasota, Fla. from October to June. Love 
to all." 

LOIS "Laddie" DUNN MORSE: "Sorry not to at- 
tend the 40th — shall hope to attend the 50th. My 
Dad who has lived with me for two years died 1 
days ago — had company for dinner — he was 
telling a story and he left in a twinkling of an eye. 
How fortunate his manner of parting. I'm busy help- 
ing to plan Health Occupation Courses for a Voca- 
tional Institute being built in Claremont, N.H. won- 



derful to have a challenging job. My best wishes to 

all classmates — have a gay reunion." 

Mary Piper Sears 
Reunion Chairman 

1929 

MARGARET ESTY SEAMNS writes, "We spend 5 
months each year at Water Cove, Bailey's Island, Me., 
where we sail fish and enjoy the woods, sea, and the 
wild birds. We have a large and varied number par- 
ticularly at migration time. John works with his 
father and Betsy is a head nurse at the Boston 
Children's hospital." 

POLLY FRANCIS LOESCH writes that her son, 
Bill, will be ordained in June. He is Protestant Chop- 
lain at the Columbia Point Housing Development in 
Dorchester, Mass. 

We were sorry to learn that BETTY McKINNEY 
SMILEY'S husband died suddenly in April, 1967. 

The class extends its sympathy to GWEN JONES 
HAMBLIN whose husband, Judge David Hamblin, 
died in March. He became Superior Court Judge in 
August. Gwen's daughter, Frances, was married in 
October and her son, James, was married in Feb. 

1931 

Evan Collins, husband of VIRGINIA LILLARD COL- 
LINS is president of the State University of New York 
in Albany, and received the insignia of Officer of 
the Academic Palms from the French Government 
last November. 

MARC I A RUDD KEIL and her husband were in 
Europe this winter. Her son, his wife and family are 
safely home from Greece and Nigeria. 

1932 

DOROTHY ROCKWELL CLARK is now the Assist- 
ant Director of the Reading and Studing Skills Lab- 
oratory at the University of Maryland. It is port of 
the Counseling Center. Her teenage girls are happy 
and busy. 

MARIETTE WHITTEMORE BARTLETT'S son, 
Peter, will return in June from Japan where he has 
been with the Armed Forces; Drew is at the Uni- 
versity of Colorado; David is a freshman at Lea 
College in Minnesota; Debby is a junior at Madison 
High School. 

HARRIET WRIGHT MILLER and her husband took 
a trip around the world last fall. They spent a week 
with their daughter who is teaching English at the 
National Education College in Laos. She is with In- 
ternational Voluntary Service under controct to U.S. 
A.I.D. 

1933 

REUNION REPORT 
There were 4 of us at reunion: HELEN BUTTRICK 
LIVESEY, OLIVE FRENCH SHERMAN, MARIATTA 
TOWER ARNOLD and myself. Mariatta's husband 
was with us which was nice and also we were de- 
lighted to have Miss Friskin join us for lunch and 
our class picture. Olive missed her picture as she left 
early to care for a sick husband. 



fifteen 



3i 



ew- 



5^V5*: 



fert 









,-Iflt" 




1933 

Helen Rice Wiles, Helen Buttrick Livesey, Miss Friskin, Mariatta Tower Arnold, and Far- 
land Arnold 



Following is some news I gleaned from your cards: 
JANE RITCHIE SHAW had planned to attend but it 
was also Parents Day at her daughter Susan's college 
so was unable to join us. MARIATTA TOWER AR- 
NOLD is still a guidance counselor and it was wonder- 
ful having her husband with us. HELEN BUTTRICK 
LIVESEY went to Puerto Rico this winter. OLIVE 
FRENCH SHERMAN and her husband spend the 
winters in Florida. The 3 children are married and 
she has 8 grandchildren. Ann, her daughter, raises 
and trains Irish setters, the youngest son is a college 
teacher and the oldest son is doing industrial develop- 
ment for the city of Manchester. 

KATHLEEN PALMER RACE, we missed you! Kay 
had planned to attend. DOROTHY WRENN DUFFEY 
is a busy lady. She works at Southampton College 
and is a real estate broker on week ends. Her two 
oldest are married and she has 4 grandchildren. Two 
boys have been in Vietnam and are now in college 
and her daughter is a senior at Northfield. MARION 
HOUGHTON RONSTADT has three granddaughters 
and two grandsons. Her son is with the Navy in 
Danang. Living in Mexico she is looking forward to 
the Olympics. JANE BURNHAM CURRY is busy 
opening up their "Curry's Cottages" in Centerville 
for the season. 

CLARA SHAW IZMIRIAN'S son, Peter, is a fresh- 
man at Morningside College in Iowa. Clara works 
at the church office. ALICE HILL TURNER lives in 



New York City and has a pre- revolutionary house on 
the Hudson near Poughkeepsie. She has a married 
daughter living in London. The younger daughter is 
in publishing in New York. 

My daughter Sandra, Abbot 1957, just had her 
second daughter. My youngest daughter has a son 
and teaches fifth grade. 

Hope we see more of you at Abbot in 1973. 

Helen Rice Wiles 

1934 

The class will be sorry to learn that SARA MAX- 
FIELD is totally disabled with emphysema, ulcer and 
arthritis. She has been hospitalized since August, 
1966. Address: Lahoma Hospital, 6312 North Port- 
land, Oklahoma City, Okla. 73 1 1 2. 

MARY ROCKWELL STEWART writes, "Paul, 17, 
is in the 1 1 th grade at Rivers Country Day, and 
Amy, 14, is in the 9th grade at Wellesley Junior 
High. Bob is still winning tennis tournaments! I am 
working part-time, and playing squash and tennis." 

1935 

CATHLEEN BURNS ELMER still writes — she re- 
cently sold a story to INGENUE Magazine. Her hus- 
band is a consulting engineer whose specialty is 
optics for illumination. Ned is in the fourth grade 
at Dexter. 



sixteen 



FRANCES McTERNEN COAN'S daughter, Hillary, 
is a freshman at Wells College, and her son, Jeffery, 
is a sophomore at Franklin Pierce College. 

BETTY MURPHY GARRISON'S son, Mark, is a Lt. 
jg aboard a destroyer, and will be married in July. 
Son, Roy, is a medic in the Army. Bink is a sopho- 
more at Princeton, Mike a fourth former at Hoosac 
School. 



1939 

MARGE MacMULLEN Brewer's son, Howard is a 
freshman at Lawrence Academy. Bill and David 
"keep things buzzing at home." 

POLLY PANCOAST TUNKEY writes, "We have 
moved to Pompano Beach, Fla., and I am thrilled 
to be 'home'. Four of our five children are in board- 
ing school. Our oldest, Bill, married the daughter of 
BETTY WEAVER VAN WART, Abbot, 1933, last 
June. He is getting his law degree. Our second son 
was married in March, and they are attending Florida 
Atlantic College." 

1941 

ADELINE WATERHOUSE MacKAY'S son, Dave, is 
a freshman at Erskine College. Ann is a senior in high 
school. Addie is busy with church and hospital work. 

DOROTHY WHITE WICKER and her husband 
spent 3 weeks touring Europe last fall. Johnny is 
working as a stock broker, Rob is a junior at Texas 
Tech, Roger is in the 10th grade, and Mary Wynne 
is 10. Dorothy entertained for Mr. Gordon at her 
home in Dallas in March. 



1943 



REUNION REPORT 



Happiness and nostalgia prevailed as the Class of 
1943 met for its 25th reunion. Sorry to report that 
there were just a handful of us, plus one brave 
husband who managed to return for this auspicious 
occasion. It was great to get together and to catch 
up on all the news, and we hope that more of our 
class will be able to attend the 30th. However, 
greetings to you all and the Heavenly Goo was still 
"heavenly". 

In response to my last letter, I have the following 
bits of information to report: HELEN BARSS SCHNEI- 
DER hoped to attend but at the last minute couldn't 
make it. NANCY CORWIN WINTTER says that they 
are enjoying their new home. She has an eighth 
grader and a first grader to make life interesting. 
MIMI DAVES KOPALD wants to be remembered to 
everyone. She has one 19-year old daughter who 
attends the University of Colorado and three sons, 
17, 14, and 10. She wrote that she is "thankful to 
say that so far all our problems have been small, our 
illnesses small and our life joyful and busy". LOS 
SWENNING WEINRICH was unable to attend at the 
last minute but said she would be thinking of us and 
wishing she were here. Her oldest son, 23, a first 
year law student, will be married in August. (I think 
that makes Los the first mother-in-law in our class!) 
Her son, Karl, is in the 1 2th grade at St. Andrews 
College and Eric will attend a school in Upper Canada 
so their house will be very quiet next year. She is a 
very busy volunteer, loves Ontario, and says that she 
is a walking Chamber of Commerce. She has a 
"wonderful husband who loves his work, plays golf, 



1938 

Joan Brown Small, Constance Thurber Prudden, Mary Elliot Brown, 

and Phyllis England Letts 



«£ 





1943 

Margaret Janssen Gray, Marjorie Lehmann Moats, Elizabeth Bennett Ewing, Joyce Yoffa 
Rudolph, Themis Sarris Ellis, Bettye Rutherford McCouch, Jean Craig Fitzgerald, Gor- 
don McCouch, and Jean Hansen Ashbaugh 



gardens, and is very good to me. I was a lucky 1 8- 
year old bride". 

MARGARET JACOBUS JAECKEL has been living 
in Europe for 5 1 /2 years where her husband is re- 
gional director of U.S.T.S. for Benelux. Her daughter 
attends school in Paris and her son is in college in 
Virginia. BETTYE RUTHERFORD McCOUCH was the 
brave gal who brought her husband and we were 
thrilled to have him join us. Her four children are 
off in all different directions and "one direction will 
be Abbot in the fall". MARGI JANSSEN GRAY came 
up with GERRY LEHMANN MOATS. Margi teaches 
school and her son, Jamie, will be attending Choate 
in the fall. Gerry has a twenty-year old son who 
attends Dartmouth and two other sons who will be 
away next year to school. 

JEAN HANSEN ASHBAUGH came all the way from 
Michigan to be with us. Two sons are attending 
Deerfield Academy and two are at an independent 
day school in South Bend. JEAN CRAIG FITZGERALD 
also came all the way from Michigan. Her mother 
was attending her 50th Abbot reunion! Jean has two 
girls and two boys — all teenagers, so needless to 
say, she leads a very busy life. 

As for the Rudolph family, we, too, lead a very 



busy and hectic life. Our twenty-year old daughter, 
Ronda, will graduate from Bates College in June as 
a member of the first three year class. She plans to 
attend the University of Arizona graduate school of 
Sociology. Jim, our 17 1/2-year old will graduate 
from Governor Dummer Academy in June and will go 
to the University of Denver. Deedee is a Junior at 
Abbot and I am proud to say that she is the president 
of her class! 

Hope that more of you will be able to make the 
next reunion and until then, I wish you all good luck, 
happiness, and good health. 

Most sincerely, 

Joyce Yoffa Rudolph 

1944 

SHIRLEY WOODAMS HOESTEREY writes, "1967 
was a busy year for us! We all went to Taxco, 
Mexico City and Acapulco in the spring for a family 
vacation. In the fall Howie and I went to Europe for 
a business-pleasure trip on two weeks' notice. Now 
we settle down to the business of college. At one 
point we'll have all three going at once. It's a good 
thing we did our traveling last year." 






eighteen 



1945 

CYNTHIA SMITH McFALLS spent two weeks in 
April touring the islands of Hawaii. 

1947 

BARBARA DEAN BOLTON'S daughter, Susan will 
graduate from Abbot in June, Bill is a sophomore at 
Kimball Union, and Betsy is a seventh-grader at Pike 
School in Andover. 

CAROLYN McLEAN BLY and her husband and 
children sailed March 13th for a 3-month stay in the 
Essex village, Thaxted, where they lived a few years 
ago. They were in New York for two months where 
Robert is founder of an authors' royalties fund for 
medical care of wounded Vietnamese childhren. Robert 
had a book of poetry entitled "The Light Around 
The Body" published in March by Harper & Rowe. 

An interesting coincidence — DIMP HANLEY 
MURRAY'S husband David, also has a book on the 
Harper List, "Percy of Illinois", a biography of Sen. 
Percy. 

The coincidence was pointed out by GENEVIEVE 
YOUNG SUN, 1948, an editor for Harper & Rowe! 

1948 

REUNION REPORT 
Praises Ringing: 33 members of the class of 1948 
have contributed $1,567.08 to the Alumnae Fund, 
the largest gift of any class! 

Eight members of the class gathered to view Abbot, 



over-eat a delicious luncheon, patronize the Bazaar 
and reminisce at Sunset. MARY FARRAR BONOTTO 
came from New Jersey for her second consecutive 
reunion. She brought Michael, 8, and a nephew with 
her. TODDY COOKMAN PRICE is very involved with 
the Fitchburg Art Museum where she has been taking 
painting lessons for six years. Her husband is in the 
lumber business and has recently opened a branch 
in North Andover. Her daughter hopes to attend 
Abbot. SALLEY MACARTNEY OSBORN brought her 
husband, son and daughter with her. They live in 
Hampden, Mass. and spent the week end with Salley's 
family. 

PAT BARNARD LALLY lives a few blocks from 
Abbot and visits often. She has two boys. GRACE 
DeLONG EINSEL came with her daughter, Lynne, 
from West Hartford for her first look at Abbot in 
twenty years! JANE KENAH DEWEY is enjoying life 
in Worcester and playing lots of tennis. Her three 
daughters are "quite delightful". GENE YOUNG SUN 
stopped in Andover en route from Los Angeles to 
New York where she is an Editor at Harper & Rowe 
and lives in Great Neck. Her "biggest thrill" was 
learning to fly a plane. 

I brought my husband, Tom, and the boys, Terry, 
10, Jim, 8, and Geoffrey, 3 1/2, leaving Kate, 11 
months at home. My other interests are Wellesley 
Junior Service League and Smith College projects. 
Tom is vice president of the First National Bank of 
Boston in charge of International Factoring, and I 
have had two trips to Europe. We will move July 1st 
to a house with room for four children. 



1948 

Katherine Bigelow Fitzgerald, Salley Macartney Osborn, Genevieve Young Sun, Nadine 
Cookman Price, Jane Kenah Dewey, Mary Elizabeth Farrar Bonotto, Miss Hearsey, 
Patricia Barnard Lolly, and Grace DeLong Einsel 



' 




Those who were unable to return for reunion had 
some very good reasons. CARRIE ENGLAND WAN- 
SKER had hoped to make reunion and bring Charlie, 
Debbie, 1 4, who is interested in Abbot, Chip, 1 2 1 /2, 
and Sandy, 5. She had 1 days of golf in Florida 
this spring and plays tennis constantly, indoors and 
out. Carrie does substitute teaching (P.E.) in West- 
port schools, is active with PTA Board, Republican 
Women, children's sports, and has renewed interest 
in art. DODIE HILDRETH MIRZA also hoped to get 
to Abbot but spent most of May 1 1 th at the Republi- 
can convention in Bangor. She has stopped teaching 
history and is working on her brother's congressional 
campaign. 

MARTY BARBER LOWRANCE was unable to come 
to reunion at the last minute. Everyone was deeply 
saddened to learn of her husband's sudden death in 
May '67, and the class extends to Marty its sincere 
sympathy. PAT HAMMOND DUFFY wrote an in- 
teresting letter from Mulhouse, France where they 
moved in January. Bob is Manager of Finance for 
Bull-Gen. Electric. Scott, 15, and Mark, 13, are in 
school near Geneva, Susan, 9, is in a local school 
where no English is spoken, and Nancy, 7, and Peter, 
5, will start in September. Mulhouse is "minutes" 
from both Germany and Switzerland, and they plan 
to camp all over Europe during their 2-3 year tour. 
However, this July they will be at their summer place 
on Lake Champlain. 

NANCY NALLE ULRICH is expecting a baby very 
soon. SUE DAVIS SNYDER is busy entertaining John's 
sister and brother-in-law from Australia. JACKIE 
KAY SCHLOSSER'S older son broke his femur March 
3rd, and after five weeks in the hospital, won't be 
out of "waist down" plaster till early June. 

Travel, too, prevented many from being at Abbot. 

TOOTIE SINCLAIRE MORRIS and her husband 
are in England hoping to enter their boat in the 
Singlehanded Transatlantic Race June 1st. M. K. 
LACKEY STOWELL is in Colorado Springs at the 
Annual Junior League Conference. She and Sam have 
five children, ages 13, 7, 6, 5, and 2. JANE JACK- 
SON PARKS is at the Cotton Carnival in Memphis. 
She and lawyer husband have 3 sons at Admiral 
Farragut Academy, and Jane owns Gult Realty Co. 
In spare time she was Chairman of White Elephant 
Sale for hospital which grossed $23,000, also has 
been Jr. State Conservation Chairman for Fla. Fed. of 
Women's Clubs, and V-P of Naples Civic Assoc. All 
48ers are welcome in Naples. JUDY ERDMANN 
MAKRIANES and her husband are on a business trip. 
ANN ROBINSON JOYCE is camping with the Girl 
Scouts. Daughter, Annie (9 1/2) hopes to go to 
Abbot. She also has two sons 7 and 11. Jack is 
building a barn single handed. Ann sees MARY FAR- 
RAR BONOTTO at the Princeton A & P. 

SUKI DAKE JOHNSON and SALLY LUNT WEA- 
THERALL were both at the League of Women Voters 
Convention in Chicago. Suki is on the N.J. State Board 
as Voter Editor. She also is on Jr. League Committees, 
Guide at a Nature Center, Fund Agent for Smith Class 
'52 etc., and in free time plays tennis, sails, and 
takes care of "divine husband", children 13, 11, 
and 8, dog, cat, and bird! Sally is equally busy as 
President of Garden Club running a Benefit, May 
11th. Her children are 8, 6, and 5, and she plays 



tennis, rides, skis and plays volleyball. This fall she 
will be part time secretary to Episcopal Rector. 

Those pleading distance included: NANCY RICH- 
MOND HAMMER who moved to Wayzata last sum- 
mer where her husband is Financial V-P of Control 
Data. Her children are John 10 and Beth 8 and she 
has been involved in many activities for the Junior 
League. MARGUERITE MOSS HEERY has two boys, 
Rip, 1 5, and Rusty, 1 2. Her husband is a merchant, 
and she teaches Sunday School and is Chairman of the 
Athens Jr. Assembly's Eye and Ear Clinic. LISH 
COOPER WRIGHT also wrote that Georgia was too 
far but sent her love to all. LEE BOOTH WITWER 
says they are all well and happy in Indiana. E. B. 
OGDEN TGD would like to see classmates passing 
thru Ohio. David, 1 1, Lili, 9, and Bruce, 7, plus dogs 
and cats keep her busy. NANCY ELLIOT STEWART 
was unable to come from N.J. She sees Suki oc- 
casionally. DEBBIE VOSS HOWARD and ROSEMARY 
JONES both wrote they were sorry not to come. 
MARY RICH OHWEILER wrote that Florida is just 
too far away. They have been living there for 7 
years. She writes, "If any of 'y'all' come here on 
vacation, please call me. Her husband is manager of 
the Data Processing Division of the Florida National 
group of banks. HELEN TAYLOR DODD had a new 
baby in March, — her fourth child, so she couldn't 
make it. 

Seventy three cards were sent out and only twenty- 
three returned, so if you have been interested to hear 
about your classmates, and have not yet sent back 
your card, do so now with news for the next Bulletin. 

Kitty Bigelow Fitzgerald 

1949 

ELINOR BOZYAN WARBURG writes, "Singing in 
choral group; juggling schedules and homework of 
3 boys (aged 9, 7, 3) at three different schools; 
taking refuge week ends in newly acquired thatched- 
roof cottage in the country chiseling paint out of 
ancient beams." 

_ NANCY JEFFERS WHITTEMORE'S husband is with 
Chevrolet in New York. Nancy "suffers from the 
standard suburban affliction which strikes all mothers 
— driving children places." William is a junior at 
Morristown Prep, James will enter Dunbarton Prep 
next fall, Kim is in 7th grade, and David, 8, is in 
2nd grade. 

1950 

PEG DOANE CALVERT'S husband is president of 
the National Bank of Commerce in San Antonio. Peg 
is a "struggling art student at Trinity University." 
Her children are Karen, 8, and Tobin, 6. 

SUE MORGAN ROLONTZ writes, "Bob is adver- 
tising and publicity director for Atlantic Atco Records. 
I'm still with Tobe Assoc. Last summer I was sent 
to Paris to see the couture collections — it was a 
fascinating experience." Sue's children are Lee, 6, 
and Morgan, 3. 

ELIZABETH MOSS SCHMIDT had her third child 
and second son, William Moss, February 5, 1968. 



1952 

LIZ . 
with a two-year o 



LIZ ARTZ BARRETT writes, "Life is rather busy 
fk „ +v., n _t,o- old and too many activities! Had 



twenty 




1953 

Polly Jackson Townsend, Cornelia Weldon LeMaitre, Ellen Smith, Janet Bowden Wilson, 
Mary Scandura McCloskey, Dorothy Giles Ham, and Carol Hardin Kimball 



dinner recently with LORNA BALL PRESCOTT and 
her husband — all is well with their family." 

JANE EDWARDS HOLBROOK writes, "My 3 
youngest children and I shall spend the month of 
July with my mother, Mrs. William J. Hearn, Main 
St., Centerville, Mass. My husband and eldest son 
will be camping with the Boy Scouts in New Mexico. 
I would love to see any Abbot people who are on 
the Cape." 

JOAN WOOD STEPHENSON and her husband went 
on a fishing trip in March to British Honduras, and 
then spent a week in Florida with her family. 



1953 

REUNION REPORT 

Greetings, once again, from the Forest Primeval!! 
It's apple blossom time here in Hampton Falls, and 
the town is just one beautiful white blanket. 

Those of us who attended our Fifteenth Reunion 
had a marvelous time, and we missed all of you 
who were unable to be with us. 

MARY GOODNOW FOX writes, "Have a new baby 
girl, Abigail, seven months. Been living in Maine 
over two years now. Older children, Carol and Caleb, 
attend three-room (7 grades) school in No. Edge- 
comb, where we're remodeling the summer home of 
my great-grandfather and trying to live amid the 
debris. My husband operates a new factory across 



from the Wiscasset airport and close to the site now 
being cleared for the new atomic power plant .... 
sadly looking for a buyer for our beautiful old home 
in Brewster, Cape Cod — but have become ardent 
Mainiacs, and always have been country bumpkins." 

"Up to my ears in this, that, and the other things" 
writes HELEN MARVEL HENKELS, and regrets that 
she was unable to attend reunion. 

JANE WILSON MANN writes, "Carolyn is now 
10, Sally is 8, and Nancy is 6. I have a Brownie 
Troop of 20 girls meeting weekly here at my house 
which keeps me on my toes, also active with Junior 
Scouts . . . Built a new home this year, so I didn't 
have time for golf . . . Love to see anyone out 
Michigan way. Will see all of you at our 20th." 

NATALIE STARR LEE writes, "Peter, age 2, Katie, 
age 1, probably speaks enough for my major activ- 
ities. I'm assisting one day a week with the children's 
program at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, sewing and 
trying to hold an old house together with bandaids 
. . . 1830 was a vintage year." 

From Shaker Heights, Ohio, comes word from 
WENDY ALLEN WHEELER. "Husband Bob teaches 
American and Greek history at Hawker School. We 
hove four children, Daniel, 7, Andrew, 5, Amy and 
Beth, 1 1 /2 . . . involved with The Council on 
Human Relations, The Council on World Affairs, and 
taking piano lessons." 

TISH MILLER DAVIS writes, "Doing lots of volun- 
teer work for the public school, the church and a local 



twenty-one 



hospital — in addition to trying to keep careful 
track of young Beth (1st grade) and John, Jr. 
(Kindergarten) and their activities." 

DIANA STEVENSON BRENGEL writes, "I am still 
programming for computers,, only now I am work- 
ing part time at home, which works out much better 
for the children and myself. We have moved from our 
lovely old house (a road is going through it) to a not 
so old house with 1 1 acres for my 2 horses, 3 German 
shepherds, and 3 children." 

ELLEN R. SMITH writes, "I'm teaching second 
grade in the Wellesley, Mass. public schools and liv- 
ing in Cambridge." 

From Houston, Texas, comes word from AUDREY 
TAYLOR MacLEAN, "We enjoyed a chance to meet 
Mr. Gordon last week when he and Miss Judd were 
in Houston for the NAIS meetings. He is a marvelous 
person and a wonderful asset to Abbot. It was such 
fun to see Miss Judd again and catch up on what 
has been going on up there." 

DEE SCHOONMAKER MILLER writes, "Am work- 
ing towards an M.A. in history . . . have two little 
girls, 7 and 3, and naturally they keep me busy." 

RUTH SIDON FLEISCHMANN writes of her new 
home in Fairport, New York. "Karl has just taken 
on a new position with Xerox in Rochester and little 
Karl is now in first grade. (Peter is 2 1/2). In ad- 
dition, I am contralto soloist in one of the down- 
town churches . . . Perhaps some members of the 
class heard my Dad suffered a heart attack on March 
8th. He is doing very well and will be able to re- 
sume his pastoral duties this summer." 

We are enjoying the first spring in our new home 
in the hills and woods of New Hampshire. David 
and Lisa are 8 1/2, Giles is 7, and Caleb is 3. As a 
licensed Real Estate Broker, I am gradually working 
my way into my own business. By the time Caleb is 
in school, I shall be able to devote time to a field 
in which I am interested (country property, farms, 
mainly antique). See you at the 20th Reunion. 

Dorothy Giles Ham 

1954 

LINDA JONES CAMPBELL is living in Monterey, 
Calif, where her husband is stationed at the U. S. 
Army Hospital at Ft. Ord. 

1955 

News Secretary: Mrs. John A. C. King, 3rd (Doro- 
thy Fleming), 603 Nevada Dr., Erie, Penna. 16505. 

ANN CLEVELAND LANGE has 2 daughters, aged 5 
and 3. Ann is a Remedial Reading tutor, and an 
exhibitor in flower shows. She gives courses in flower 
arrangement. In addition she is busy training her new 
Arabian horse. 

CYNTHIA KNOX WATTS had her second child, 
Thomas Alden in October. David is now director of 
the Passenger Dept. of the B & O - C & O RRs. They 
went to Mexico in May. 

1956 

News Secretary: Mrs. Alden Taylor Bryan (Phoebe 
Estes) North Williston Rd., Williston, Vt. 05495. 
VIRGINIA DAK IN SCOTT writes, "Bob, Elizabeth 



(born July 13, 1967), our two Scotch terriers and I 
have bought a house outside Concord, N.H. in order 
to be nearer Bob's accounting office there. Life is 
quiet and good surrounded by pines, squirrels, water 
and hills making us feel almost sinfully removed from 
the turmoil abounding elsewhere." 

1957 

News Secretary: Mrs. John J. Moughty, Jr. (Lynne 
McLaughlin), Cedar Lane, Ridgefield, Conn. 06877. 

CAROLYN COOPER BIRD'S husband is teaching 
American History at Avon Old Farms School. They 
have a son, Stephan Gregory, born December 1 8, 
1967. 

DIANA HALLOWELL is studying at Columbia and 
plans to get a degree in Anthropology this summer. 
She is very enthusiastic about being a student again. 

PENELOPE POST received her M.A. from Yale last 
June after four years of studying art history in 
Florence, Cambridge University and London Univers- 
ity, and Yale. She is now teaching at Quinnipiac 
College in New Haven. 

SANDRA WILES MARQUIS had a second daugh- 
ter, Melissa Wiles, March 25th. Amy is 20 months 
old. 

The class extends its deepest sympathy to LULU 
SULZBACHER CUTLER whose father died early in 
March after a brief illness. 

SALLY LAWRENCE KAUDER writes, "My husband 
Lou is a tax attorney with U. S. Dept. of Justice. I 
am busy fixing up our new house and addressing 
envelopes for the McCarthy campaign while waiting 
for the arrival of child No. 2 at the end of the 
summer. Daughter Nancy is just 2 years old." 
( All is well with PAULA S L I F E R ZANDSTRA. 
"Michael, who will be 5 in August has been in 
Nursery School this year and starts Kindergarten in 
the Fall. Tim, who will be 2 in July is still in that 
'getting into everything stage' . . . Judd still works 
for Whirlpool in St. Paul, Minnesota and we love 
this part of the country." 

PAT BIJUR CARLSON is looking forward to July 
when her husband gets out of the army, at which 
time they (Pat, Carl and 2 1/2 yr. old Valerie) will 
be moving to Chapel Hill, N.C. where they have 
bought a house. (Do send us your new address, 
Pat.) Carl will be working for his Ph.D. in Classics 
at the University of N.C. 

This is almost two years behind time, but our very 
best wishes to BITSY LEECH who became Mrs. F. 
Lee Jacquette on September 16, 1966. At that time, 
Lee was on the faculty of New York University, was 
Assistant Comtroller of Chemical Bank, and was work- 
ing on his doctorate in economics, and the Jacquettes 
were living at 200 E. 17th, NYC 10003. Please 
bring us up to date on 'your' news Bitsy. 

MARY WELLMAN BATES has just returned from 
a month's vacation with Marsh and their two chil- 
dren at Lido Beach, Florida where Mary and her 
sister and brother own a family cottage. 

JUDY BOTNICK CARMODY and her husband and 
daughter will be in Ireland next year. John has been 
offered a surgical residency there. Sounds most ex- 
citing, Judy. Please send us your new address when 
you have it, and let us hear about your experiences. 

Last news of JACQUIE GOODSPEED was that she 
was living in Boston and working with the Sym- 
phony Orchestra in public relations. 



twenty-two 




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1958 



June Hamilton Withington, Nathan Withington, Caroline Greene Donnelly, Joseph Don- 
nelly, Faith White Tibbetts, John Wyllie, Susan Tidd Augenthaler, Warren Augen- 
thaler, Claudia Sandberg Wyllie, Henry MacDonald, Mary Steketee MacDonald, Ira 
Thomas, Frederica Owsley Thomas, Gilbert Riley, Betsy Gardner Riley, Arthur Delm- 
horst, Agnes Daley Rothrock, Edward Shaw, Wynne Paffard Delmhorst, Sandra Castle 
DuPuy, and Judith Hart Show 

Front row — James Rothrock, Katherine Lockwood, Elizabeth Artz Beim, and David Beim 



MARY ANN 'Sammy' SPURGEON LEWIS writes, 
"I have been taking an antiques course, teaching 
Sunday School (2nd grade) and grass-roots political 
campaigning for a good friend who ran in the pri- 
mary for Pa. Assembly . . . John does both criminal 
trial and corporate work. He was recently appointed 
to the American Arbitration Board. He also is doing 
voluntary defender work and is Chairman of a com- 
mittee to bring about junevile court reform in Phila- 
delphia . . . Last summer we had a spectacular 
month's vacation. We went by cargo passenger ship 
to the west coast of South America as far as Lima, 
Peru, and by plane up in the Andes Mountains. We 
had the good fortune to meet a wonderful Peruvian 
family who showed us great hospitality and who 
have invited us for a return visit." — ("This August 
the American Bar Association meets in Philadelphia. 
If any '57ers who have attorney husbands come 
along, please call and come and see us. Also, I shall 
be an aide at the Monday fashion show for wives so 
I'll keep an eye out for any Abbotites attending. 

We are looking forward to seeing more of OSCAR 
and FRANKIE YOUNG TANG as they have just 
bought a summer house in Pound Ridge, N.Y., only 
ten minutes away from us here in Ridgefield. 

With the exception of my husband's broken heel 
which has caused all major outdoor work to grind to 
a halt, everything is fine with us Moughtys. We now 



number four — thanks to the happy addition of Ken- 
neth Alan born on February 28th. Ken gave us a bit 
of a fright by arriving a month early, but fortunately 
was a healthy 5 lbs. 9 1 12. oz. Happy spring and 
summer to all. 

Lynne 



1958 



REUNION REPORT 



We really had a grand reunion, thanks to all of you 
who came. To those of you who weren't able to join 
us, let me say, you missed out on a lot of fun so, 
try to make it back for the next one. You won't regret 
it. To try to describe the week-end is difficult never- 
theless I shall briefly sum up the events. We "signed 
in" around 10:30 and then went on a tour of Draper. 
The husbands were quite taken with the fashions 
sported by Abbot students, so no protests were heard 
when this tour was mentioned. We saw the many 
innovations (radios and record players in the girls' 
rooms and telephone on each floor) although I am 
sorry to report we never did find the new freight 
elevator. We then went to the Alumnae Meeting, 
after which we proceeded to the dining room for 
lunch. We were served a delicious lunch and we 
wives took advantage of the fact that we didn't 
have to cook it nor do the dishes. Miss Ritchie, Miss 



twenty-three 



Goodwin and Mrs. "D" sat with us and it was fun to 
hear first-hand all the changes that have taken 
place in these past 10 years. We then wandered 
around the bazaar which was a big success. AGNES 
DALEY ROTH ROCK and her husband Jim gave us a 
lovely cocktail party later in the afternoon at Mr. 
and Mrs. Daley's home in Andover. We were in a 
party mood, so needless to say, all was very gay. 
From the Daleys, we found our way to Valle's Steak 
House where we had our own dining room (The 
Dragoon Room if you can believe it). We had a 
marvelous dinner and we were able to table hop 
which gave us a chance to talk to everyone and really 
catch up. After dinner most of us gathered at the 
motel where a group of us stayed and the party 
lasted until the wee hours of Sunday morning. Sun- 
day breakfast found us weary from lack of sleep and 
aching from laughter. What better measure for a very 
wonderful evening. I think the husbands should be 
thanked and congratulated for their spirit and en- 
thusiasm (They have decided that they will hold 
THEIR Second Reunion next year). 

We did manage to squeeze in some business which 
I would like to report. BETSY GARDNER RILEY will 
be our new Class Fund Agent. She will be writing to 
you to remind you about contributing, so please don't 
let her down. 

Your Chairman for our next Reunion is FAITH 
WHITE TIBBETTS. When that time arrives, please 
give her your support and cooperation. We now 
know how much fun our reunion can be and I hope 
that our next one will see many many more of us 
there. 

Also, SANDY CASTLE DuPUY is our new Class 
Secretary. I think all of us agree our Bulletin notes 
are pretty sad so Sandy will be the one who will be 
writing our Alumnae News. I can't urge you enough 
to please write to her; tell her what you're doing — 
not only engagements, weddings and babies, but per- 
sonal glimpses. We don't see each other very often, 
so this is the best way to keep in touch. Her ad- 
dress is: Mrs. James N. DuPuy, 905 Forest Avenue, 
Evanston, III. 60202. 

So, Betsy, Faith and Sandy thank you for being 
willing to take on these tasks. I hope we all can 
make it worthwhile for you. 

We were all so busy, we didn't have a chance to 
fill out our information sheets, so I'll try to remem- 
ber what I can to keep you posted. 

LIZ ARTZ BEIM and David have bought a brown- 
stone in Brooklyn Heights and will be moving this 
summer. They're renting half of it. 

JUNE HAMILTON WITHINGTON and Nuff are 
at last back East after 5 years in Texas. Nuff has just 
accepted a position with Hornblower & Weeks in 
Boston. They are looking for a house, and until they 
find one they will be in Plymouth. 

WYNNKIE PAFFORD DELMHORST and Art are in 
Brooklyn Heights, Wynnkie is a librarian at the Metro- 
politan Museum and Arthur is in commercial real 
estate in N.Y. 

AGNES DALEY ROTHROCK and Jim just had their 
third daughter on the 30th of March. Her name is 
Kristen. Mother, father and family doing fine. 

TIKI OWSLEY THOMAS and Ira are in Youngs- 
town where Ira has his own advertising agency. 



BETSY GARDNER RILEY and Gil are in Wilton, 
Conn. They built their own home, so with 3 children 
and a dog, they say it's chaos all the time. (Is there 
any other way to run a house?) Gil is with Pitney 
Bowes in Stamford. 

CAROLE GREENE DONNELLY and Joey live on on 
8-acre farm in Medfield, Mass. I'm told they have 
all kinds of animals so the rising hour is dawn in 
that household. Joey is working at Harvard Medical 
School in the financial department. 

MARY STEKETEE MacDONALD and Jerry live in 
Burnt Hill, (that's almost as good as Waccabuc) 
N.Y. near Schnectady. Jerry is a C.P.A. with G.E., so 
they do quite a bit of traveling. 

KAKI LOCKWOOD is working in the library at 
Brown University in Providence. 

SUSIE TIDD AUGENTHALER and Warren are 
moving soon to a bigger house in Port Washington. 
They just had their second son, Keith. Warren in 
addition to his liquor store business has expanded 
into the milk business. He says "he gets them from 
infancy to old age". By the way, after this week- 
end Susie's new interest is the study of turtles — 
fascinating don't you think, Susie? 

CLAUDIA SANDBERG WYLLIE and Jack are in 
Westford, Mass. Jack bravely baby-sat with their two 
children while Claudia attended the events of the day. 
I'm happy to say Jack joined us for the evening's 
activities. 

FAITH WHITE TIBBETTS is living in Barrington, 
R.I. She is about to enter the wrapping paper business. 
Quite a venture and we wish you well, Faith. 

SANDY CASTLE DuPUY is living in Evanston. 
They have a 9 room apartment there, so with her 
family, I'd say that it's ideal. 

Ned and I are living in Waccabuc, N.Y. (pro- 
nounced WALK-A-BUCK) with our 1 1/2 year old 
son, Greg and 2 year old German Shepherd, SheDa, 
we're quite busy. We're 50 miles north of N.Y. City, 
so Ned's commute is long. He's a commercial loan 
officer with the Chase Manhattan Bank. We live on 
a dirt road, and literally in the woods. We love it. 

I want to thank all of you who came for making 
this reunion such a grand success. I hope you en- 
joyed it as much as Ned and I did. It has just il- 
lustrated my feeling that ours was a wonderful class 
and Abbot never will have a better vintage year 
than 1958. 

Judy Hart Shaw 

1959 

JUDY AGOR AYDELOTT'S husband is attending 
law school. Judy is selling real estate and giving 
piano lessons. They have a daughter, Amy, born in 
March, 1967. 

ELIZABETH EVANS ELMER is working for on 
M.A. in Anthropology at the University of Pennsyl- 
vania. Her husband is working in Geology. They 
have two children, Charles and Eva. 

LINDA LOBB TIMMINS lives near the Los Angeles 
smog. Next year Bill plans to attend the American 
Institute of Foreign Trade in Phoenix, and Linda 
plans to take some language and area study courses. 

SUSAN GOODWILLIE received an M.A. in Inter- 
national Law and Economics from the Fletcher School 
of Law and Diplomacy in 1 966, and is now an ex- 
ternal relations officer with the United Nations De- 



twenty-foiiT 



velopment Programme in New York. She travels to 
Europe twice a year. 

ELSIE KELLOGG MORSE had a son, William Perry, 
March 8, 1968 

1960 

CORKY AUXIER STARZ had a daughter, Bretton 
Auxier, July 17, 1967. 

JANET DENNISON was married to William H. 
Frake. He is a graduate of Harvard College, Boalt 
School of Law at the University of California and 
Boston University Graduate Law School. 

GINNY PRATT is engaged to John Herbert 
Michael Agar of Southampton, N.Y. He graduated 
from Milbrook School and from the School of Foreign 
Service at Georgetown University. He is now the 
managing director of Accion en Venezuela in 
Caracao. 

1961 

News Secretary: Andrea Lynch, 144 East 84th St., 
Apt. 7B, New York, N.Y. 10028. 

We have just received word that PRISCILLA ED- 
SON is married to Robert W. Knighton. They are 
living at Whitmore Lake, Mich. 

CORDELIA O'BRIEN was married in Andover on 
March 23rd to Donald Joel Thomas. He received his 
degree from San Francisco State College where he is 
now a graduate student. 

LINDA SCOTT GIBBINS and her family are in 
Washington, D.C. where Don is working on Admiral 
Rickover's staff. Donna is two years old. 

JOAN SPURGEON was married last September to 
Larry Brennan, a graduate of Princeton and the 
University of Pennsylvania Medical School. They are 
currently living in Wichita, Kan. where Larry is work- 
ing for Uncle Sam. In November they will return to 
New York where Larry will start a residency in 
internal medicine at St. Luke's Hospital. 

1962 

News Secretary: Mrs. Andrew P. Langlois (Lynne 
Moriarty) 107 Niles Hill Rd., New London Conn. 
06320. 

Dear 62'ers 

Although the response from those of you whom I 
contacted in March were not as numerous as those 
which I received in January, they were certainly from 
more distant corners of the world. 

SALLY ALLEN was married on August 17, 1967, 
to Barry Mandel, a graduate of the University of 
Rochester. He is now a second-year law student at 
Boston University. 

BETSY BRUNS EATON and her husband Pete are 
the proud parents of a son, Andrew Meader Eaton 
who was born February 17, 1968. Pete has been 
promoted to chairman of the History Department at 
Cushing Academy for next year. Betsy is working as 
secretary to the Independent School Association of 
Massachusetts and they are also in the process of 
moving to a house off-campus. 

ANDY CONRAD wrote that she is living in New 
York and working as a translator for a publisher. 
Her first translation is about to appear, MELINDA 
by Gaia Servadio, which Andy describes as a book 
"which could be the funniest I've ever read." Andy 



also sent news of CARRIE THOMAS and her address. 
Carrie is at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts in 
London, 62-64 Gower Street, London W.C. I. 

BETH CRANE ACCETA and her husband Tony 
and their son Randy are now anxiously awaiting 
Tony's final graduation from Vanderbilt Law School. 
They are planning to move to New York while Tony 
takes a Bar Review Course and Beth and Randy visit 
family on the Cape. They then plan to take another 
camping trip out West before settling down in New 
York. Beth is hoping to go back to college this fall, 
as Randy will be starting kindergarten. Tony will be 
with Sherman and Stearling and friends can get in 
touch with the Accettas through him there. 

CAROLYN DOW is still working happily os a 
systems engineer for IBM's New Jersey Manufactur- 
ing Office in Newark and skiing whenever possible. 
She sends a warning to all: "Newark is NOT where 
the boys are." 

CINDY EVERETT WHITE writes that she is living 
at home in Concord, New Hampshire and working in 
the data processing center of a local insurance firm. 
Cindy was married in July and she and her husband, 
Jon, lived in Clarksville Tennessee for five months 
while he was stationed with the 101st Airborne 
Division Army at Fort Campbell which was sent to 
Viet Nam in mid- December. 

JUDY GILBERT TRAIL wrote that she and her 
husband are living in Great Lakes, Illinois. Her hus- 
band, Edward, has just been promoted to Lieutenant, 
j.g. and is working teaching Navy recruits. Judy is 
teaching first grade and loves it, but her teaching 
career will be coming to a close shortly, as the Trails 
are expecting a baby in September. 

BONNIE HASELTON IKELER writes that she re- 
ceived her M.A. from the University of Pittsburgh 
last July. She and her husband, Bott, have moved to 
London where Bott is working for his Ph.D. at King's 
College, University of London. Bonnie is working for 
the First National Bank of Boston in London. They 
ore living at 6 Dalebury Road, Tooting Bee, S.W., 17. 
"If anyone is in the neighborhood and in need of 
anything." 

POLLY LARNED writes, "Actually, my life has 
been pretty exciting what with starting work at 
McDonnell-Douglas Corporation Missile and Space 
Systems Division here in Huntington Beach, Califor- 
nia. I have a job as staff secretary to a Branch 
Manager on a special, classified project. 

"Unfortunately, or fortunately, depending on how 
one looks at it, I am going to have to quit my job 
around the middle of July to make the last-minute 
preparations for my WEDDING! Yes, I have finally 
gotten engaged. As I figure it, I am the last of all 
my roommates and practically the last of all my best 
friends to make the big step. 

"My fiance is Mr. Arthur Winslow Adams of San 
Francisco, the chief Government (that includes Fed- 
eral, State, County, and City) Account Salesman for 
the Business Products Division of Minnesota, Mining, 
and Manufacturing (3M). We were engaged the 
17th of March and plan the wedding for July 20. 
It will be a small, family, and close friend type 
wedding with my sister, Ann Marix, as Matron of 
Honor. If I lose another five pounds, I shall be able 
to wear her wedding dress. After the honeymoon, 
we will probably live in San Mateo so that he can 



twenty- five 



be near his work, and I can be near the airport — 
I plan to go to work for United Air Lines." 

MARTHIE LYMAN is living in Cambridge and 
working at Harvard on a Systems Design project. She 
spent last year working at University of Denver Col- 
lege of Law and last fall travelling in Europe. 

LYN SHAW SHAW and her husband, John are 
in the Peace Corps in Kano, Nigeria, a tour of duty 
which will be over in December. She writes: 

"We've enjoyed teaching and Kano is a fascinat- 
ing place to live. Last Fail we went to East Africa 
for a month — actually mostly Kenya, although we 
spent some days in Northenr Tanzania exploring 
game reserves — needless to say we had a great 
time. 

"Soon after we returned to Kano we moved to 
another house; we'd been in a Gov't-built bungalow 
affair and we moved into a traditional-style Hausa 
compound. We love it because we're in the middle of 
things instead of watching from a distance; our 
language is improving if only because we have much 
more cause to speak Hausa now that we're in a 
Hausa neighborhood. Our house is built to retain the 
heat because cold kills whereas heat is just plain 
uncomfortable. All the walls are over a foot thick. 
We have an entrance room, where Hausas meet 
their guests, and four other rooms in a line, plus 
separate kitchen room and bathroom. We also have 
an abundance of animal life — two male cats and 
eight dogs (1 momma dog and 7 pups). 

"The house is wired for electricity, although it is 
the only house with power on the 'block'. We buy 
water at tuppence a tin; it is carried by water sellers 
from Tudun Wada (the name of the section) pump 
or, if the pump is shut off, from the well at the end 
of the street. We take fantastic baths in a metal 
washtub. 

"We teach both in a local teacher training school 
and in an inservice course for primary school teachers: 
The school has a closed circuit TV system which is 
just being opened and I'm very excited about teach- 
ing one of my classes on TV next term . . . Hello 
to all, Lyn." 

ABBY VON DER HYDE SUMMERSGILL and her 
family have moved to Tallahasee, Florida where her 
husband, Bob, is with McGraw Hill Publishers. Abby 
writes that she is "presently a housewife (ugh) a 
mama; and general handyman." The Summersgill's 
son, Christopher is eighteen months old. 

KIM WELLS spent last year living in New York 
and doing graduate work in Elementary Education at 
the Bank Street College of Education. Kim has moved 
to Cambridge and is teaching third grade in Wilming- 
ton, Mass. and planning on writing her thesis this 
summer. 

I received a long letter from GRETCHEN WHITE- 
HEAD the day after I sent Miss Sullivan the class 
news for the last BULLETIN, so here it is, a bit 
belatedly. Gretchen graduated from Michigan with a 
History of Art major in April, 1966. She "received 
her degree along with thousands of classmates that 
she'd never seen, let alone met. No honors — just 
pretty parchment." 

Gretchen spent from August 1 2, 1 966 to August 
15, 1967 abroad with her family. Her itinerary 
sounded great and even included visits from LEE 
CLARK '64 in Austria and with the Cranes in Athens. 



Gretchen returned to the U. S. and went to 
Detroit to visit college friends and was offered a job 
with the Detroit Free Press. After Gretchen had 
settled into her new job and new apartment and 
decided that she loved her job, there was a strike 
and the Free Press employees were locked out. She 
soon found a job on a strike paper, The Detroit 
Daily Press, which turned out to be even better than 
her first job. Gretchen would love to hear from any 
classmates who are in, or passing through Detroit. 

Andy and I had dinner last week with MARY 
LOUISE CURRIER and her fiance, Roger A. Gagnon. 
Reg is a graduate of St. Anselm's College in Man- 
chester, N.H. and received his master's degree from 
Villanova. He is teaching history and coaching foot- 
ball in Manchester. Mary Louise is teaching French in 
Rochester, New Hampshire. They are planning a late 
summer wedding. 

Many thanks to all of you who wrote and a plea 
to the rest of you for news. If any of you are plan- 
ning to be in the New London area this summer 
please get in touch. Have a happy summer. 

Best to all, 

Lynne 

1963 

REUNION NEWS 

JAN GLEASON is a stewardess for Pam Am based 
in Washington and will fly to London, Paris, Frank- 
furt, San Juan, etc. In June she will move back to 
New York City to join Carol Humstone in an apart- 
ment. TISH UPTON is working for CRIA in Florence. 
BARBARA HOFFMAN is teaching at Saint Margaret's 
School, Waterbury, Conn. LOIS GOLDEN STERN'S 
husband, David, is studying for his M.A. in architec- 
ture at M.I.T. MARY JOHNSON TUREK'S husband 
is in graduate school. KAREN FLACK BONNELL and 
husband are both in graduate school. IRIS VARDA- 
VOULIS BLACKMER is moving back to Cambridge 
this summer as Alan has taken a job with Harvard. 
ANN HARRIS is living on Beacon Hill, and is trying 
to activate spirit of '63 on an informal basis in 
Boston. MEG POWER has been active in a Roxbury, 
Mass. organization in addition to graduate study at 
M.I.T. C. C. KIMBALL is finishing at Boston Uni- 
versity as a psychology major. 

MIMI DEAN is working at home on summer tours 
to Europe "for boys and girls" — one of which she'll 
lead this coming summer. ANN SAMPLE BATES is 
finishing her senior year at Smith in addition to wifely 
and motherly duties. Daughter, Katie, was born a year 
ago April — she is extraordinarily busy! Her husband, 
Bill, is working for Connecticut General Insurance 
Company in Hartford. Ann commutes to Smith from 
West Hartford. 

WENDY JOLINE was married to Gerald Speck in 
August. She is living in Hightstown, N.J. 

MARIA PASTORIZA BONNETTI is living in Santo 
Domingo where husband, Roberto, is an executive 
with Sociedad Industrial Dominicana, a peanut-oil 
producing company. She would like anybody down this 
way to stop in. 

I am working in Boston for a small advertising 
agency, working my way up past the busy-work. I 
am a paste-up artist with overtones of assistant Art 
Director. "If you suspend ethical considerations, ad- 
vertising is a great business." 



twenty-six 




1963 

Ann Harris, Carolyn Holcombe, Anita Miller White, Mimi Dean, Sharon Seeche, Barbara 
Hoffman, Susan Archer Rehder, Suzanne Burton, Marsha Ketcham, Betsy Cadbury 
Montagu, Cynthia Sorensen, Margaret Power, and Karla Haartz 



DANICA MILLER was sorry to miss our 5th re- 
union, but since her graduation from Oberlin, she 
has been traveling through various continents. She is 
presently visiting in Africa. EMILY MOULTON HALL 
and her husband are in Alaska for three years. John 
is with the Army outside of Anchorage. Emily extends 
an invitation to any 63'ers in the area to stop in. 
She says the country is beautiful! ANITA MILLER 
WHITE is teaching third grade in Bridgton, Me. She 
is married to Andrew White, Bowdoin '66. After 
graduating from Reed College in June, 1966, MUR- 
IEL DE STAFFANY spent a year in France. Now she 
is at Indiana University working on an MA in Math. 

MARGARET BROWN is finishing her master's 
degree in English at the University of Penn. She will 
be married in June. KARLA HAARTZ is teaching 
Math at Northfield. She will spend the summer 
doing the same thing at Mt. Holyoke in the ABC 
program. 

At the reunion a news secretary, SUE BURTON, 
was elected. From now all bits of news should be 
sent to her at 2813 Dunbarton Ave., N.W., Washing- 
ton, D.C. 20007. CINDY SORENSON was elected 
Class Fund Secretary and SHARON SEECHE and 
KARLA HAARTZ will serve as co-chairmen for the 
tenth reunion. Hope to see the entire class there. 

Karla and Sharon 

1964 

JOAN EMERSON is in Paris for a year of study 
with A. Y. A. 

JO-ANWYL FOSTER is engaged to Gary Myers, 
a senior at Dickinson Law School. They plan to be 
married in July. 



BARBARA HUGON graduated with an M.A. from 
St. Andrews University last June. She is engaged to 
Anthony John Edge who hopes to graduate as a 
doctor in June. They will be married August 3rd, 
and spend the first 6 months in Dundee. Barbara has 
been teaching French and Spanish in a girls' boarding 
school in Devon. Her address: Meadfort Rise, llsham 
Rd., Torquay, Devon, England. 

ELFRIEDE LAAFF KOENIG is attending Boston 
University, and her husband has another year in the 
Coast Guard. 

AMY SHLOSSBERG is engaged to Michael Lewis 
Wolfram of Dallas, Tex. He is a graduate of Harvard 
College and is a student at Columbia Law School. 

MARY TRAVERS spent last summer in Europe with 
her brother and sister-in-law, CYNTHIA NICHOLS 
TRAVERS, '59. She is majoring in Fine Arts at Syra- 
cuse University. 

1965 

TONI BRAINERD is engaged to Harry G. Tsou- 
kanelis of loannina, Greece. Harry graduated from 
Phillips Academy and Columbia University, and is a 
graduate student at Harvard Business School. 

ANNE RAHILLY is studying at Jacksonville Uni- 
versity in Jacksonville, Fla. She writes that Florida is 
sunny, but there is nothing like New England. 

1966 

News Secretary: Ellen Sobiloff, 1282 Highland 
Ave., Fall River, Mass. 02720. 

As always, I was hoping to hear from more of 
you about news, summer plans, transfers, etc. To 
those people in particular who have not written since 
graduation — how 'bout a postcard?? 



twenty-seven 



LORINDA BURLING was married to Bernard J. 
Gannon in February, 1968. JAN WARING is engaged 
to Bruce Harris, a junior at Yale. She writes, "I'm 
just ecstatic — couldn't be happier!" They plan to 
marry in June, 1970. 

From Athens, NORA THEOHAROPOULOS writes: 
"I got engaged on the 25th of December. His name 
is Alexis Caljopoulos and he is studying in Munich 
to get the degree of a civil engineer and architect 
. . . our plans are to get married next summer. Then 
I will go with him to Munich to finish my college 
studies in Business Administration . . . For the time 
being I am at Pierce College and also taking two 
courses at the University of Maryland (European 
Division) . In the morning I have an office job and 
twice a week a German lesson. I am busy and work- 
ing hard, but very satisfied with my life so far!" 

NANCY WHITEHEAD may be spending part of 
the summer in San Francisco living with her sister 
and the other half in South Dartmouth, Mass. She's 
still taking pictures! 

BLAKE H A Z Z A R D saw LUCY THOMPSON, 
KAREN and ELLEN ROSS in Florida during vacation. 
Blake's new address is Jaffrey Center, Jaffrey, New 
Hampshire. Outside of school, a Marine is taking 
up all her time! 

LIZ WALKER is now living at 90 Pinckney St. 
in Boston, in her own little apartment. For the month 
of July she has a job near New Bedford, Mass. and 
then will be in Boston. 

FRAN JONES just came back from the Barbados, 
where she spent an entire month. I hear that her 
dream is to go back there to live (and I dream of 
Italy!!). 

JUDY BRICKER has been visiting everyone in 
Cambridge. 

CHARLOTTE ERWIN was one of 23 Vassar stu- 
dents selected to take part in the Vassar Medieval 
Seminar in France from March 15-31. 

MARCIA WATSON was queen of the Williams 
College Winter Carnival. 

AYER CHAMBERLIN spent some time visiting 
with FRAN and CINDY BUXTON. She keeps herself 
pretty busy: "My major is psych and I'm finally 
getting advanced enough in the field so that I can 
do some interesting things. This summer I shall be 
getting credit for working with nine mentally re- 
tarded families in our county's rural areas . . . Next 
fall I hope to be in L.A. working at the U.C.L.A. 
Neuropsychiatric Institute . . . they are doing some 
really exciting studies in behavioral therapy and I 
think I'd find it really exciting." 

Ayer has also been quite active in Beloit's Student 
Senate and her Peace Education Group is flourish- 
ing. As for myself, I have an apartment in Cambridge 
for the summer (308 Brookline St.) and will be 
taking secretarial courses in Boston. That will leave 
some free time in order to do volunteer work for 
some of my "extra-curricular passions." I can be 
reached at the above address after the middle of 
June. Please drop me a note — or stop by. You're 
always welcome! 

Sobie 

1967 

News Secretary: Judith Hannegan, 893 College 
St., Beloit, Wis. 53511. 

Here I sit at Sunset Lodge, and was just informed 



about the deadline for this month's BULLETIN. 
Gathering inspiration from familiar surroundings I 
shall try to recall as much as possible from letters 
and visitations. First and foremost is the news of 
the marriage of THEDA BRADDOCK on February 26, 
1968 to Steven dos Remedios at St. John's College 
in Annapolis. They are both sophomores and are still 
planning on finishing college. We wish them the best 
of luck. Just as exciting is the birth of Jennifer 
Knight Yancey to Jeff and SARAH BEALE YANCEY 
on March 6, 1968. Congratulations to the proud new 
parents. 

I have heard from many of you and have seen a 
few over my SDring vocation. I flew into New York 
last week and walked off the plane right into BEE 
READ who is now living on Long Island and is an 
assistant to a veterinarian. Unfortunately I wasn't 
able to speak with her for very long, but she seemed 
happy with her new job. While in New York I 
visited MITSY MAJOR and MAGGIE WILDE in the 
midst of the Barnard-Columbia revolution. Both are 
very happy and enjoying themselves. Mitsy is now 
dating an old Andover man and was looking forward 
to the arrival of ANSTISS BOWSER. I also saw CAN- 
DY HOWES and JANE VON DER HEYDE. Jane 
seemed happy and Candy is great, having much fun 
(isn't that right Candy?). She plans on returning to 
Wisconsin os a craft director at a YWCA camp this 
summer. From New York I flew down to Boston and 
spent some time with CLAIRE MOORE and ANN 
MlLLER at Wellesley. I also had an opportunity to 
speak with LIZ RUDMAN and FAITH BEANE. All 
of them are working hard and seem to be quite con- 
tent with their surroundings. ANN and NANCY 
POROSKY are planning on an apartment in Cam- 
bridge this summer while they take courses at Har- 
vard. I wasn't able to see Nancy but I have received 
a few letters from her. She's gone "Clean for Gene" 
and has been canvassing and working at McCarthy 
headquarters for his cause. 

I was hoping to get up Skidmore way but just 
didn't have the time or money. However I talked with 
LIZ MacGREGOR last night. She spent some time in 
Florida over spring vacation and seems to be tied 
up on week ends visiting the various and sundry 
neighboring men's colleges. 

I finally heard from WARREN OSBORNE. In Feb- 
ruary she came out at the Plaza in New York. Ap- 
parently it was quite successful despite all the ap- 
prehensions expressed to me beforehand. 
_ Out Colorado way WEEZIE HUNTINGTON and 
CATHY HOOVER seem to enjoy new lives. Weezie 
sends reports of excellent ski conditions and lots of 
good times. 

That's all the news I have first-hand. I've heard 
that most everyone is pleased at her respective col- 
lege. However I shall wait to hear first-hand news of 
that. Please write any news you have concerning 
either college or summer plans. I'd love to hear from 
you. You should not have any trouble as to my ad- 
dress this summer as I shall be at Beloit. This fall 
I'll be off on my work term and hope to get an 
apartment somewhere in the Boston area. I am plan- 
ning to work with mentally retarded children. So 
until next fall have fun and please, please write. 

Love, 
Judy 



twenty-eight 






f?fe@^ 




- - 



4 




RECIPES GARNERED 

By THE ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

This new Abbot Cookbook is filled with favorite Abbot 
receipts and many precious "family receipts" never before 
divulged. Price is only $2.25 including postage. 

ORDER ONE TODAY 



Enclosed find $ for 



Cookbooks. 



Name 



Address 



Zip Code 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETJH 

Andover. Massachusetts 
return Requested 



ENTERED AS 
SECOND-CLASS MATTER 
AT THE POST OFFICE AT 
ANDOVER. MASSACHUSETT 




ABBOT 

ACADEMY 

BULLETIN 



&/ 



/ I fi>< 






Annual Giving Report 

— Alumnae Fund 

— Parents ' Fund 

— Other Gifts 



The Executive Board of the Alumnae Association 

1968- 1970 



President 



Vice Preiidents 



Mrs. Leonard M. Fowle 

I Nancy Kimball) 

36 Norman St., Marblehead, Mass. 01945 



Mrs. Malcolm S. Loring 

(Anne Russell) 

Peppered Rd., Kittery Point, Me. 03905 

Mrs. David E. Rickenbacker 

( Patricia Bowne) 

5 Glenside Terrace 

Upper Montclair, N.J. 07043 

Mrs. F. N. Ladd 

(Frances Nolde) 

2 South Lane, Hingham, Mass. 02043 






Clerk 



Mrs. Benneville N. Strohecker 

(Constance Hall) 

Ballast Lane 

Marblehead Neck, Mass. 01945 






Treasurer 



Mrs. Gage Olcott 

(Helen O'Brien) 

40 Oakridge Rd., Wellesley, Mass. 02181 



Executive Secretary 

Delegates -a t-Large 



Miss C. Jane Sullivan 

20 Buswell St., Lawrence, Mass. 01841 



Mrs. Sargent Bradlee, Jr. 
(Sally Humason) 
Linden Cottage, Walker Rd. 
Manchester, Mass. 01944 

Mrs. J. Robert Haskin, Jr. 
(Miriam Bickford) 
6 Redstone Lane 
Marblehead, Mass. 01945 

Mrs. Harry Maidment 
(Emily House) 
99 Robert Rd. 
Manchester, Conn. 06040 



Alumnae Trustee 
1963-1969 



Miss Alice C. Sweeney 

35 School St., Andover, Mass. 01810 



Alumnae Trustee 
1966-1972 



Mrs. John B. Ogilvie 

(Donna Brace) 

14 Circle Rd., Darien, Conn. 06820 



VOLUME 36, NUMBER 4 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN SEPTEMBER, 1968 

Editor: C. JANE SULLIVAN 

Asst. Editor: MRS. FRANK DiCLEMENTE 

Published four times yearly, October, February, May and September, by Abbot Academy, Andover, Massachusetts. Entered 
second class matter December 12, 1933, at the post office at Andover, Massachusetts, under the act of August 24, 1912. 



as 



PRINTED AT EAGLE-TRIBUNE PRINTING, LAWRENCE. MASSACHUSETTS 



70 ALUMNAE, 
PARENTS 
AND FRIENDS 
OF ABBOT 



I look forward to soon meeting personally as many of you as 
possible — to thank you for the generous support you are giving to 
Abbot and to deepen my involvement with the school. In the brief 
months since our arrival in Andover, I have been struck by the 
breadth of the sensitive concern for the school's health and growth: 
Abbot is very fortunate indeed to have such loyalty. 

The need for such support, of independent schools everywhere, 
does not need to be presented as any sort of phenomenon: we are 
now well acquainted with it. That it must continue, and grow, and 
be ever more skillfully managed and applied — this bears rein- 
forcing constantly. At a time when schools like Abbot need greater 
financial aid than ever before, they stand at the near edge of their 
greatest opportunity to fulfill their traditional mission more fully 
and more truly. You are helping greatly to equip us to do our best, 
and everyone here is profoundly grateful. 

DONALD A. GORDON 
Principal 



three 



ABBOT 

DEVELOPMENT 

FUND 



July l f 1967 — June 30, 1968 
TOTAL — $75,856.92 





ALUMNAE 




Annual Giving 


1,312 contributors 


$29,081.41 


Bequests 




$11,000.00 


Total 


PARENTS 


$40,081.41 




255 contributors $31,306.40 






FRIENDS 






$1,159.60 






MATCHING GIFTS 






$1,309.51 





four 



CLASS 

HONOR 

ROLL 



LARGEST DOLLAR TOTAL 

1930 Frances Sullivan Sullivan $3,213.00 

1948 Rosemary Jones $1,637.00 

Genevieve Young Sun 

1918 Irene Atwood $1,206.00 

Louise Bacon Fuller 

1953 Mary Grant Lynch $1,093.00 

1926 Edith Ireland Wood $ 842.00 



LARGEST NUMBER OF CONTRIBUTORS 



Polly Francis Loesch 


37 


Kathryn Beck Dow 


34 


Rosemary Jones 


34 


Genevieve Young Sun 




Caroline Greene Donnelly 


31 


Jane Lewis Gleason 


29 


Joan Aldrich Zell 


29 



1929 
1919 
1948 

1958 
1947 

1950 



HIGHEST PERCENTAGE OF PARTICIPATION 

1907 Marjory Bond Crowley 83% 

1911 Edith Johnson Donald 80% 
1919 Kathryn Beck Dow 76% 

1912 73% 
1915 Jessie Nye Blodgett 72% 



five 



Abbot Development Fund 

July 1, 1967 — June 30, 1968 

Alumnae 

Percentages below class numerals indicate per cent of a class contributing 
to Fund and the amount represents the total contribution from the class. 

t Regular Contributor 

* Contributed prior to death 



1893 
50% — $5 

tCharlotte Conant Nicholls 

1895 
20% — $35 

In memory of Laura 

Wentworth Richards 
tFannie Lewis Shattuck 

1897 

60% —$135 

tFrances Hinckley Quinby 
tLillian Miller Troutman 
tMarion Priest Fuller 

1898 

50% —$110 

tLucy Hartwell Peck 
tBeulah Loomis Hyde 

1899 

48% — $55 

tLilian Mooers Smith 
tHarriet Wanning Frick 

1900 

25% — $5 
tEthel Hazen Lillard 

1901 
33% — $60 
tHelen Buck 
tLilian Dodge Brewster 
tLeila Fraser Gilbert 
*t Isabel Herrick Klous 

1902 
20% — $100 

tCatharine Deacon Palmer 

1903 

44% — $45 

tEdith Burnham Roberts 
tAletta Hegeman 
tHelen Packard McBride 
tOlive Williams Parke 
tMargaret Wilson Gerber 

1904 

45% — $100 

Mary Davis Lee 
tSarah Field 



tHelen French 
tSophie Gibbs Sage 
tGrace Speirs Sodergren 

1905 
22% — $35 

Fannie Erving Arundale 
tFanny Hazen Ames 

1906 
70% —$175 

tMary Jordan Goodrich 
tEvaline Korn Cookman 
tPersis Mackintire Carr 
tConstance Parker Chipman 
tRena Porter Hastings 
tMargaret Sherman Neef 
tMaud Sprague 

1907 
83% —$271 

In memory of Grace 

Spear Doble 
\ Mabel Allen Buxton 
tMary Ball Bigelow 
tMarjory Bond Crowley 
tMargaret Hall Walker 
tLaura Howell 
tClara Hukill Leeds 
tLeonora Parsons Cooper 
tAnna Richards Folsom 
tAlice Webster Brush 

1908 
50% —$500 

tHelen Buss Towle 
tGertrude Count Barnes 
Mary Cheney Chase 
tHelen Hulbert Blague 
tWinifred Ogden Lindley 
tEsther Parker Lovett 
Esther Stickney Alley 
tDorothy Taylor 
tElizabeth Watts 

1909 

60% — $175 

tMary Bourne Boutell 
tElizabeth Fuller 
tEdith Gardner Tobey 
tJanet Gorton 
tMarjorie Hills Allen 
tSarah Knox 



Louise Norpell Meek 
Cora Soule Robinson 
tMarjorie Soule Byers 

1910 
67% — $112 

tLois Bradford Marvin 
Margaret Gooch Barney 
tClarissa Hall Hammond 
tLaura Jackson Austin 
tGrace Kellogg 
tPersis Mclntire Downey 
tRuth Murray Moore 
tRuth Newcomb 
tEthel Reigeluth Darby 
Marion Sanford 
tEdith Seccomb Young 
tLydia Skolfield Parsons 

1911 
80% —$190 

tDorothy Bigelow Arms 
tPersis Bodwell Millspaugh 
tAnna Boynton Hemenway 
tMarion Brown 
tOlivia Flynt 
Marion Rhoda Green 
tMary Hall Lewis 
Borghild Hoff Lyman 
tMiriam Howard Bushnell 
tEdith Johnson Donald 
tDorothy McCormick 

Mosser 
tRebecca Newton Weedon 
*tFrances Pray 
tMargaret Strong Hill 
tEthel Swain Smith 
tHenrietta Wiest Zaner 

1912 
73 % — $3 1 8 

tAnne Blauvelt Sanderson 
tMildred Chutter 
tRuth Draper Hyde 
tLucy Kilby 
tAbbie Laton 
tBarbara Moore Pease 
tDorothy Simpson Faith 
tNora Sweeney 

1913 

50% —$235 

tMary Helen Boyd Higgins 
tMildred Bryant Kussmaul 
tHelen Danforth Prudden 



tGladys Estabrook Blanchard 
Doris Furber 

tHazel Goodrich Waugh 
tHelen Hersey Heffernan 
tDoris Sawyer Smith 
tLouise Thompson Cottrell 

1914 

36% — $456 

tMarion Clark Myerscough 
tMary Flynn Bernardin 
tHelen Gilbert Rich 
tHelen Hamblet Dyer 
tMary Hildreth 
tAlice Sweeney 
tBertha Wessel 
tMarie Winsor Appleby 
tMargaret Wylie Ware 

1915 
72% —$175 

tElizabeth Allen Belknap 
tRena Atwood Benson 
tMarion Barnard Cole 
tEleanor Bartlett Atwater 
:: TMarian Bayley Buchanan 
tMarion Brooks 
tPhyllis Brooks Stevens 
tBessie Gleason Bowen 
tMattie Larrabee 

Whittemore 
Catherine Leach 
tElizabeth Leach 
tJessie Nye Blodgett 
tGertrude Shackleton 

Hacker 
tEsther Shinn Caldwell 
tArline Talcott Turner 
tAda Wilkey Bull 
tMarion Winklebleck Hess 
tHarriette Woolverton 

Robinson 

1916 

70% —$297 

tAda Brewster Brooks 
tCharlotte Eaton 
tEleanor Frary Rogers 
Dorothy Gilbert Bellows 
tLillon Hamer Atkinson 
tHelene Hardy Bobst 
tMiriam Huntington Ripley 
tMildred Jenkins Dalrymple 
tEsther Kilton 
tLouise Kimball Jenkins 



SIX 



tLouise King Childs 
tlnga Little Bouve 
Margaret Markens Hand 
tMarion Mellor Dean 
tGrace Merrill Emery 
tDorothy Niles 
tKatharine Odell Randall 
tBernice Overend Merrill 
tMargaret Perry James 
tDorothy Pillsbury Bartlett 
tAlice Prescott Plumb 
tHelene Sands Brown 
tEmma Stohn Larrabee 
tEsther Van Dervoort Howe 
tJosephine Walker 

Woodman 
tHelen Warfield Baker 

1917 
54% —$165 

tMiriam Bacon Chellis 
Carita Bigelow Moore 
tFrances Cartland 
tMarguerite Dunaway 

Baldwin 
tFrances Gere 
tGertrude Goss 
Elizabeth Graves Hill 
Alice Littlefield Legal 
tJulia Littlefield 
tEdith Marsden 
tHarriet Murdock 

Andersson 
tCornelia Sargent 

Battershill 
tMarjorie Smithwick 

Parsons 
Mary Wuichet De Armon 

1918 
71% — $1,206 

Margaret B. Allen 
tRuth Allen Healy 
t Irene Atwood 
tLouise Bacon Fuller 
tGwendolen Brooks 

Reynolds 
tKathryn Cooper Richards 
tMariette Goodrich Page 
tElizabeth Gray Coit 
tClarissa Horton Sanford 
Avalita Howe Brown 
tMarion Hubbard Craig 
tEmmavail Luce 

Severinghaus 
tHelen Martin Thomas 
tMarion McPherson 
tMartha Miller Reese 
Margaret Morris Clausen 
tKatharine Righter Jenkins 
Velma Rowell Cutler 
tJulie Sherman Tibbetts 
+ Helen Snow Murdick 
tMargaret Speer 
tDorothy Stalker 
Martha Swalm Holden 
tMargaret Van Voorhis 
Virginia Vincent Phillips 
Faith Williams Bisson 
Hortense York 



1919 
76% —$370 
In memory of Grace 

Francis Jenkins 
Ruth Alley Rohrbach 
tKathryn Beck Dow 
tMarea Blackford Fowler 
tEthel Bonney Faber 
tGwendolen Bossi Henson 
tGretchen Brown Knights 
Marion Chandler 
tKatharine Coe Taylor 
tMary Cole Day 
tCharlotte Copeland Gray 
tDorothy Cutler Burr 
tMildred Daniels Cary 
tCora Erickson Dudley 
tMildred Frost Eaton 
tGladys Glendinning 

Love land 
tJosephine Hamilton Leach 
tHarriette Harrison 
tJane Holt Atkinson 
tMuriel Johnson Lovejoy 
tGrace Kepner Noble 
Dorothy Korst Blodgett 
tWinifred LeBoutillier Tyer 
tElisabeth Luce Moore 
tMary Martin 
tThelma Mazey Gager 
tVirginia McCauley Otis 
Helen Meigs van Dyck 
tGladys Merrill 
tNadine Scovill Young 
Dorothy Shapleigh Meader 
Elizabeth Sjostrom Thomson 
tEleonore Taylor Ross 
tMargaret Taylor Stainton 



1920 
56% —$235 

In memory of Louise 

Robinson 
tMargaret Ackroyd Hunt 
tHope Allen Brown 
tEdna Dixon Mansur 
Helen Donald Coupe 
tVivien Gowdy Larabee 
tLillian Grumman 
tKatherine Hamblet 
tElizabeth Howkes Miller 
tHilda Heath Safford 
tDoris McClintock Taylor 
tPaula Miller Patrick 
"tMuriel Moxley Hubbard 
tLucy Pratt Rutherford 
tElizabeth Stewart Pieters 
tlsabel Sutherland Kurth 
tHelen Thiel Gravengaard 
tDorothy Tyler 
tCharlotte Vose Clark 
tHelen Walker Parsons 
tRuth Winn Newhall 
tBertha Worman Smith 
tMargaret Worman 

Thompson 



1921 

52% —$307 

tMarian Ailing Bradley 
tMiriam Bickford Haskin 
tDorothy Carr 
tElinor Cochrane Knight 
tEthel Dixon McGee 
tFrances Gasser Stover 
tFrances Keany Rickard 
tKatherine Knight Fassett 
tEunice Meigs Pease 
tMcrgaret Neelands 

Parsons 
tHelen Norpell Price 
tEdith Page Bennett 
tMarian Parker Paulson 
tMary Peirce Smith 
tHelen Roser 
tJessamine Rugg Patton 
tWinifred Simpson Worgan 
tElizabeth Thompson 

Winslow 
tFrances Thompson Heely 
tHenrietta Thompson Beal 
tAgnes Titcomb Henderson 
tAlma Underwood Udall 
tElizabeth Weld Bennett 
tMary Williams Cochran 

1922 

46% —$763 

tJane Baldwin 

tPhyllis Bankart Paulsen 

tGwendolyn Bloomfield 

Tillson 
tGeneva Burr Sanders 
Catherine Damon Mason 
tKatherine Damon Kletzien 
tDorothea Flagg Smith 
tBeatrice Goff 
tMargaret Hopkins 

Wetherell 
tElizabeth Hutchinson 

Matthews 
tCarol Iredell 
tLois Kirkham Hart 
tHelen Knight Wilkinson 
Celia Kunkel Payne 
tMary Mallory Pattison 
tElizabeth MacPherran 

Worcester 
Mary Elizabeth Polk 

Overstreet 
tMargaret Potter Kensinger 
tBarbara Sands Sherman 
tAlice Van Schmus Smith 
tAnne Whinery 
tDorothy Williams 

Davidson 

1923 
62% — $686 

In memory of Dolores 

Osborne Hall 
tElisabeth Adams Ross 
tNathalie Bartlett 

Farnsworth 
tMartha Buttrick Rogers 
tBarbara Clay Crampton 



tEdith Damon Bugbee 
tAnne Darling Whitehouse 
tSarah Finch Hartwell 
tElizabeth Flagg Dow 
tFrancelia Holmes 
tRuth Holmes Durant 
Charlotte Hudson White 
Rosamond Martin Johnson 
tElizabeth Maxwell Killian 
tCatharine Miller McCurdey 
tMargery Moon Ziegfeld 
tNatalie Page Neville 
tMary Elizabeth Rudd 
tMartha Snyder Purrington 
tMary Catherine 

Swartwood Sinclaire 
tMiriam Sweeney McArdle 
tDorothy Taylor Booth 
tElizabeth Thompson Henry 
Miriam Thompson Kimball 
tEmily Van Patten 

Blackmore 
tEleanor Widen 
tEsther Wood Peirce 

1924 
46% —$243 

tJane Allen Kilby 
Ruth Beach Newsom 
tSybil Bottomley Talman 
Elizabeth Bragg King 
Lila Clevenger Burke 
tMargaret Colby 

Williamson 
tDorothy Converse 
tCaroline Hall Wason 
tAdelaide Hammond 

Johnson 
tKatherine Hart Mitchell 
tRuth Kelley Perry 
tMargaret MacDonald 

Vester 
tMargaret McKee De Yoe 
tElsie Phillips Marshall 
tGenevra Rumford 
Marian Shryock Wagner 
Susanna Smith Bowler 
tConstance Twichell 
tMary Elizabeth Ward 
tVictorine Warner Knox 
tFrances Williams 

MacCorkle 

1925 
36% —$119 

tEleanor Bodwell Pepion 
tElaine Boutwell 

von Weber 
tElizabeth Burtnett Horle 
tRuth Connolly Burke 
tRuth Davies Van Wagencn 
tFrances Howard O'Brien 
tEunice Huntsman 
Natalie Jova Howell 
Dorris Krum Little 
tHildegarde Mittendorff 

Seidel 
tElizabeth Righter Farrar 
Hildred Sperry Raymond 



seven 



1926 
53% —$842 

tAdelaide Black 
tBarbara Bloomfield Wood 
tCatherine Blunt Pierson 
tAnstiss Bowser Wagner 
tEdith Bullen Creden 
tMarion Burr Sober 
Elizabeth Butler Allen 
tKatharine Clay Sawyer 
tRuth Deadman 

McClennan 
Jean Donald Manus 
tLouise Douglass Hill 
tRuth Farrington 
tFrances Flagg Sanborn 
tDorothy Gillette Henley 
tPatricia Goodwillie 

Blanchard 
Caroline Hopkins McLean 
tEdith Ireland Wood 
tHelen Larson 
t Lucie Locker Rash 
tSuzanne Loizeaux 
M. Alice Perry 
tEdda Renouf Gould 
Olive Rogers Smith 
tSylvea Shapleigh Curtis 
tCarlotta Sloper 
Gretchen Vanderschmidt 



1927 
46% —$464 
tMary Ayers Hower 
tHelen Connolly McGuire 
tMargret Creelman Nelson 
tKatherine Farlow 

Hutchinson 
tEllen Faust 
Jane Fitch Roland 
tPersis Goodnow Brown 
tJane Graves Howard 
Ruth Harvey Hart 
tJune Hinman Marques 
tEmily House Maidment 
tPauline Humeston Carter 
tMarion Ireland Conant 
tLois Kimball 
tNancy Kimball Fowle 
Marjorie Knowlton Hollis 
tSylvia Miller Bellows 
tRuth Nason Downey 
tMargaret Nay Gramkow 
tRuth Perry 
Edna Russell Watson 
tA^lmer Stantial Kempton 



1928 
61% —$405 
tRuth Cushman Hill 
Lois Dunn Morse 
tVirginia Gay d'Elseaux 
tFrances Gould Parker 
Margaret Graham Greenleaf 
Dorothy Jennings Crocker 
tBeatrice Lane Mercer 
Eleanor Leech Williamson 



tMary Alice Mcintosh 
tMargaret Nivison Chase 
Josephine Paret Barrett 
Mary Pipers Sears 
tSusan Ripley Ward 
Constance Rundlett 

Huston 
Elizabeth Ryan Hill 
tEmily Sloper Shailer 
Elisabeth Small 
Jean Swihart Sherwood 
Theodore Talcott Slater 



1929 
65% —$357 

In Memory of Elizabeth 

Bowser Smith 
In memory of Dorothe 

Gerrish 
In memory of Ann 

Miller Ludlow 
In memory of Bettina 

Rollins Wheeler 
In memory of Louise 

Tobey Dean 
tLouise Anthony Castor 
tKatherine Blunt Polsby 
tCatherine Bowden Barnes 
tGertrude Campion Soutar 
tGrace Castle 
tFrances Cobb Russell 
tMary Eaton Graf 
Marjorie Ellis Porter 
tOlive Elsey Weigle 
Margaret Esty Seamans 
tPolly Francis Loesch 
tBarbara Folk Howe 
tHarriet Gilmore Yoh 
tLois Hardy Daloz 
tJeannette Hubbard 
tJoyce Jarman McNamara 
tEleanor Jones Bennett 
tGwenllian Jones Hamblin 
tRoberta Kendall Kennedy 
tGertrude King Bedard 
+ Estelle Levering Chestnut 
tMary Elizabeth Macdonald 
tBetty McKinney Smiley 
*tAnn Miller Ludlow 
+ Dorothy Newcomb Rogers 
tElisabeth Osborne Bacon 
tDespina Plakias 

Messinesi 
tRuth Shulze Clement 
tMillicent Smith Uppvall 
tGrace Stephens 
tElizabeth Taylor Amazeen 
Martha Tuttle Haigis 



1930 
53% — $3,213 

tRuth Baker Johnson 
tKatharine Bigelow 

Heberton 
tDonna Brace Ogilvie 
tElizabeth Brewer Dericks 
tAlice Canoune Coates 



tRosamond Castle Olivetti 
tHortense Dunbar 
tKathryn Dutton Leidy 
tKathie Fellows Leiserson 
tKatharine Foster Rainbolt 
tFlorence Gardner Balius 
tCornelia Gould Scott 
tGrace Hadley MacMillan 
Barbara Healey Holland 
tBarbara Lamson Cummings 
tBarbara Lord Mathias 
tJanice Lovell Jenkins 
tMary Jane Owsley 

Warwick 
tElizabeth Perry Lewis 
tHelen Ripley 
tMarianna Smith Hile 
tElizabeth Southworth 

Sutton 
tVivian Southworth 

Gerstell 
tDoris Sturtevant Bacon 
tFrances Sullivan Sullivan 
Elizabeth Tarr Morse 

1931 

34% —$318 
Doris Allen Carroll 
tKatherine Allen Babson 
tMary Angus 
tMary Bacon 
tKatharine Brace 

Cummings 
tRuth Cann Baker 
tNancy Carr Holmes 
tAbby Castle Kemper 
tDorothy Hunt Bassett 
tLisette Micoleau 

Tillinghast 
Margaret O'Leary White 
tMarcia Rudd Keil 
tMary Smead Homlar 
tJane Sullivan 
tNanine Wheeler Allender 
tMarie Whitehill 



35% 



1932 
;% _$449 

tHelen Allen Henry 
t Isabel Arms 
tElizabeth Bigler deMasi 
Katharine Brigham 
tHelen Cutler Appleton 
tPriscilla Donnell 

Anderson 
tFlorence Dunbar 

Robertson 
tElizabeth Holihan Giblin 
tMary Hyde deMille 
tEunice Randall 
tDorothy Richardson 
Dorothy Rockwell Clark 
tGeorgia Thomson 
Barbara Tucker 
tRuth Tyler Smith 
tAtossa Welles 
tMariette Whittemore 

Bartlett 
tHarriet Wright Miller 



1933 
40% — $144 

tHelen Buttrick Livesey 
tMargaret Chase Johnson 
tRozilla Chase Roberts 
tAnn Cole Gannett 
Olive French Sherman 
tMarcia Gaylord Norman 
tKathleen Palmer Race 
tHelen Rice Wiles 
tJane Ritchie Shaw 
tEthel Rogers Foster 
tMariatta Tower Arnold 
tMargaret Walker Whittier 
Hazel Walters Klothe 
tBetty Weaver Van Wart 
tKathryn Whittemore 

Knight 
Martha Wind Finger 

1934 
24% — $549 

tElizabeth Barnes 

Callender 
tKatharine Damon Reed 
tMary Flaherty Savage 
tEleanor Harryman 

McQuarie 
tCassandra Kinsman Dexter 
tNancy Marsh Gores 
Mary Rockwell Stewart 
tRuth Stott Peters 

1935 

35% —$253 
tCathleen Burns Elmer 
tLaura Chedel Miller 
Ann Cutler Brecheen 
tElaine Eaton Perine 
tHelen Heald Rader 
tSusan Hildreth Goodwin 
tEleanor Johnson Du Toit 
tGeraldine Johnson 
tElizabeth Jordan 
Frances McTernen Coan 
tElizabeth Morgan Foster 
Elizabeth Murphy 

Garrison 
tLucia Nunez Mason 
tClaire Oppenheim Marum 
tEllen Rivinius Hill 
tShirley Smith King 
tEliese Strahl Cutler 
tMargit Thony 

1936 
40% —$191 

tSally Burns Beckwith 
tMary Dooley Bragg 
Lucy Hawkes Lamson 
tGrace Nichols Knight 
tVirginia Nourse Salomon 
tHelen O'Brien Olcott 
tBarbara Reinhart 

Livingston 
Elinor Robinson Goodwin 
tCaroline Rockwell Stevens 



eight 



Elizabeth Sargent Crandell 
tSally Scates Phelan 
tPauline Spear Chapin 
tMary Swan 
tMary Trafton Simonds 



1937 

38% —$383 

In memory of Thelma 

Cutter Leuenberger 
tMarjorie Boesel 

Van Winkle 
tCorinne Brooks Cornish 
tNancy Burns McArdle 
Lucy Hulburd Richardson 
Elisabeth Joost Todd 
tNancy Kincaid Breslin 
tElizabeth McArdle 

McDermott 
tElizabeth Melcher 

Anderson 
tJeannette Partridge 

Harrison 
tMartha Ransom Tucker 
tPriscilla Richards Phenix 
tLouise Risley Stever 
tAnne Sawyer Greene 
Lillian Seiler Willins 
Ellen Simpson Martin 
tPriscilla Wonson Hahn 



1938 
26% —$197 

tMarjorie Coll Fields 
tMargaret Comstock 

Bayldon 
tAnn Dooley 
tMary Elliot Brown 
tSue Anne Eveleigh McVie 
tElizabeth Garvey Murphy 
tMarjorie Holt Campbell 
tElizabeth McBride 

Chapman 
tSara Peck 

tAnne Simpson White 
tMary Toohey Kruse 
tCarol Whittemore Fellows 



1939 
28% — $285 

tLucia Buchanan 

Livingston 
tFrances Cross Jones 
Carolyn Fisher Cadman 
Virginia Halstead 

Lightfoot 
tJoan Hubbard Lawson 
tMary Koch Danos 
tBarbara Leland Pearson 
tMarjorie MacMullen 

Brewer 
Ann Oakman Deegan 
tPolly Pancoast Tunkey 
tJeanne Waugh Harney 



1940 
34% —$272 

tLee Burnett Peterson 
Joan Carlson Hutchison 
tFrances Chandler Futch 
Mary Chase Foster 
tJeanne Cowles Fleischmann 
tCarolyn Cross Robbins 
tElisabeth Ellis Chase 
tDorothy Garry Warlick 
Margit Hintz Lorenze 
tMary Howard Nutting 
tVirginia Jones Garvan 
tMargaret Meyer Haynes 
tMarietta Meyer Ekberg 
Susan Place Duncan 
tChristine Robinson Likins 
Danna Whitlock DeBragga 
tRachel Whitney Davis 
tPriscilla Williams Dorian 
tNancy Wilson Ainslie 

1941 
33% — $213 

tJoan Belden McDonough 
tNancy Eccles Roo'me 
Mary Elizabeth Erkert 

Altorfer 
tAlda Grieco Cesarini 
tDoris Jones Hannegan 
tNancy Kelley Park 
tJoan List Van Ness 
tSuzanne Long Reed 
tMargery Martin Martin 
Eloise Perkins Beck 
tJane Philbin Dreyfuss 
tEmily Ruth Poynter 
Amelia Shields Guirola 
tLuella Sommer Vermeil 
t Adeline Waterhouse 

Mac Kay 
Dorothy White Wicker 
tNancy Whittier Atkinson 

1942 

34% —$456 

f Irene Abbott MacPherson 
Mary Bertucio Arnold 
tJane Bishop Fahey 
tJane Bittel Weil 
Ethel Bolton Henderson 
tAnnette Curran Conlon 
tPatricia Daniels Hanson 
tMarjorie Dean Marsden 
Miriam Douglas Sanner 
tBetty Hardy Verdery 
tJanice Lenane Scott 
tMargaret McFarlin 
tMarilyn Menschik 

Westaway 
Ruth Rathbone Hildreth 
tJane Rutherford 
tBarbara Sanders Dadmun 
tThirsa Sands Fuiks 
tEarline Simpson 
tRuth Snider Bernstein 
tMargaret Stuart Beale 
tElsie Williams Kehaya 



1943 
28% — $243 

tMary Beckman 

Huidekoper 
Eleanor Cole Paine 
tJean Craig Fitzgerald 
tAmelia Daves Kopald 
tMargaret Howard Long 
Margaret Janssen Gray 
tSara Ann Loughridge 

Konstam 
tMarjorie Lehmann 

Moats 
Ann Richards 
tElizabeth Rowley 

Tittmann£ 
tBettye Rutherford McCouch 
tThemis Sarris Ellis 
Marilyn Tapper Mountain 
tJoyce Yoffa Rudolph 



1944 

33% — $385 

tNancy Baylor Little 
Elizabeth Bertucio 

Martuscello 
tElisabeth Colson Tierney 
tNancy Emerson Viele 
tRuth Goodall Pitstick 
tAagot Hinrichsen Cain 
tCynthia Holmes Spurr'f 
Alva Houston Pafford 
tMarianna Hubbard Mercer 
tRuth Kirstein Turkanis 
tFrances MacDonald 

Thompson 
Emily McMurray Mead 
tAlma Mastrangelo 

Strabala 
tNancy Nicholas Wengert 
tNancy Stone Heymann 
tShirley Woodams 

HoestereySJiJf 

1945 

32% — $450 

tBarbara Ball Bacon 
tBarbara Beecher Carl 
Elizabeth Dickerman Lovatt 
tJoan Holdsworth Maxwell 
tMary Jane Kurth 

Longabaugh 
tSally Leavitt Cheney 
tAndree Luce Cooney 
tMarion Marsh Birney 
tMarjorie Milne Winston 
tHilary Peterson Cleveland 
Jessamine Patton Kennedy 



JJ Gift matched by Olin 
Mathieson Chem. Corp. 

£2 Gift matched by Bank 
of New York 
*;£ Gift matched by Ford 
Fund Educational 
Aid Program 



tCynthia Smith McFalls 
tShirley Sommer Holzwarth 
tJoan Sweeney 
tMary Taylor Sherpick 
tBeatrice Van Cleve Lee 
tEdith Walker Upham 
tLois Whiffen Dunnam 



1946 
36% —$401 
tSally Allen Waugh 
tPatricia Bowne 
Rickenbacker 
tEllen Brumback 
tMary Burton Blakney 
tJenny Copeland Dufford 
tLouise Doyle Collins 
tBarbara Graf Robinson 
tMary Howe Brumback 
tKatharine Johnson Robbins 
tPatricia Keefer Stoeffel 
Greta Leinbach Smith 
tFrances Little Schonenberg 
tCynthia Noone 
tMarjorie Sommer Tucker 
tGail Sullivan Fleming 
tCarolyn Teeson Keller 
tNancy Thomas Adams 
tMarian Troub Friedman 



1947 
50% —$456 

In memory of William 

E. Dampier 
Nancy Barnard Soule 
tNancy Brumback Kruvand 
tBarbara Dean Bolton 
tHelen Dowd Richards 
tVirginia Eason Weinmann 
tEdith Flather Swan 
Ann Flowers Howlett 
tEmily Gierasch Savage 
Barbara Goddard Theg 
tDiane Gould Berkeley 
tDorthea Hall Kernan 
Nancy Hamilton Eglee 
tCorallie Hanly Murray 
tSally Humason Bradlec 
tMargaret Kimball 

Montgomery 
tJoy Kolins Berglund 
tJane Lewis Gleason 
tCarol McLean Bly 
tMargot Meyer Richter 
tMary Lou Miller Hart 
tMartha Morse Abbot 
tJean Ritchey Bora 
tSusanne Robbins de Wolf 
tCarolyn Sackett Coleburn 
tMaud Savage 
tGeraldine Treadway 

Dampier 
tChristine von Goeben Curtis 
tMarion White Singleton 



nuit' 






1948 

53% — $1,637 

Beverley Adkins Wells 
tMartha Ball Geiken 
tMartha Barber Lowrance 
Patricia Barnard Lally 
tKatharine Bigelow 

Fitzgerald 
tLee Booth Witwer 
tNadine Cookman Price 
tAlicia Cooper Wright 
Barbara Dake Johnson 
Susan Davis Snyder 
tMary Elizabeth Farrar 

Bonotto 
tFairfield Frank DuBois 
Martha Grimshaw Bivens 
tJosephine Hildreth Mirza 
tRosemary Jones 
tJacqueline Kay Schlosser 
tJane Kenah Dewey 
tMary Lackey Stowelllf 
tMary Marton Davenport 
Marguerite Moss Heery 
Nancy Nalle Ulrich 
tElizabeth Ogden Tod 
Mary Rich Ohlweiler 
tHannah Richmond 

Hammer 
tAnn Robinson Joyce 
Ann Sarolea Bartholomew 
Julie Schauffler Bucklin 
tBarbara Shulze Baldwin 
tMary Carroll Sinclaire 

Morris 
tHelen Tasche North 
tFelicia Tavares Angulo 
Helen Taylor Dodd 
tEleanor Wallis 
Genevieve Young Sun 

1949 
24% — $155 

Barbara Backes North 
Honor Banks MacLean 
Elinor Bozyan Warburg 
Fredericka Brown Bettinger 
Martha Davis 
Sally Gibbs Sachs 
tCarlotta Gonzalez Mann 
tBarbara Hamby McLane 
Nancy Jeffers Whittemore 
tJoan Oven Betts 
tCamilla Titcomb 
tDeborah Williams 

Troemner 
tJane Woolverton Wrench 



1950 

50% —$333 

tAnonymous 

tCarol Bernstein Horowitz 
tMary Bixby Lamb 
tNoelle Blackmer Beatty 



t Gift matched by 
Pitney-Bowes, Inc. 



tElizabeth Bradley Hubbard 
tPatricia Burke Wright 
tBetty Caldwell Badertscher 
Tove Dithmer Osterberg 
Margaret Doane Calvert 
tAnne Dunsford Hockmeyer 
tCynthia Faigle Quinn 
tBeverley Flather Edwards 
tRoberta Gibbon Coates 
Mary Jane Greenwald 

Denzer 
tAnn Higgins Bride 
tCoralie Huberth Sloan 
tCaroline Kimberly Loring 
Margaretta Kitchell Stabler 
tDorothy Lampert 

Feigenbaum 
tAnn Merriweather 

Disharoon 
tSusan Morgan Rolontz 
tAnn Moser Hughes 
tElizabeth Moss Schmidt 
tDeborah Redfield Smith 
Alice Russell Farner 
tBarbara Somers Dorsey 
Eva Sontum Pahnke 
tSarah Stevens MacMillan 
tGloria Yoffa Portnoy 



1951 
37% —$315 

tJoan Barnard Lynch 
tGwendolyn Barrington 

Nichols 
Dorothy Colburn Rice 
Barbara Dougherty 

Dermody 
Patricia Driscoll Vielehr 
Abbie Emmons Penfield 
tSylvia Finger Marlio 
tCarolin Furst Carlson 
tBarbara Gibson Roth 
tEdna Grieco Thomas 
tConstance Hall Strohecker 
tPaula Holden Palmer 
Carolyn Hummel Read 
tSusan Kimball Wheelock 
tSally Mason Crowe 1 1 
tHarriette McConnel Soule 
Cora Alice St. John 

Gebhardt 
Shelia Swenson Weil 
tAnn Taylor van Rosevelt 
tMargaret Whittall 

Hoadley 

1952 
32% —$188 

tMartha Artz Barrett 
Joan Baird 
tLorna Ball Prescott 
tSally Binenkorb Zilber 
tBarbara Church Sheffer 
Mary Edson Whiteford 
Jane Edwards Holbrook 
tSarah Emmons Warren 
tNancy Faraci Shionis 



Elizabeth Griffiths 

McCurdy 
Mary Hawes Kohler 
Ethel Kenah Bowman 
tAnn Lyons Litz 
tNancy Muth Clements 
Jaquelin Perry Fleet 
tClara Reynolds Palmer 
tSandra Smith Lisk 
tJoan Wood Stephenson 



1953 
34% — $1,093 

Elizabeth Allen Wheeler 
tMargit Andersson Clifford 
Elain Audi Macken 
Caroline Benedict Ferguson 
tPatricia Earhart 
tNancy Edmonds Luce 
tJulie Gaines Phalen 
tCarol Hardin Kimball 
tPolly Jackson Townsend 
Ann Kennedy Irish 
Cornelia Nyce Kittredge 
Anne Oliver Jackson 
Mary Scandura McCloskey 
tNatalie Starr Lee 
tDiana Stevenson BrengelJ 
tAnn Stoddard Saunders 
tAudrey Taylor MacLean 
tCornelia Weldon LeMaitre 
tJane Wilson Mann 
Ann Zuill Williams 



1954 
36% —$816 

tElizabeth Beeson Tafel 
Martha Jane Church Lang 
tAudrey Davis Trowbridge 
tNancy Donnelly Bliss 
Mary Lou Duffy Abata 
Beverly Gramkow Melinn 
Sarah Harrington 
tAnna Hewlett James 
tAnn Hunt Graf 
tLinda Jones Campbell 
tSarah Jones Easter 
tGretchen Kase Smith 
tSuzanne Larter Lingeman 
tMargaret Moore Roll 
tJane Munro Barrett 
tDoris Niemand Ruedin 
tFrances Nolde Ladd 
tPaula Prial Folkman 
tVicky Schwab Aronoff 
tPatricia Skillin Pelton 
tSylvia Thayer Zaeder 
Marilyn Towner Dodd 
tEdith Williamson Bacon 
tMolly Young Sauereisen 



% Gift matched by Mobil 
Foundation Inc. 



1955 
37% —$211 

tSusan Appleton Evans 
tGail Baldwin Whipple 
Louise Bell 

tJanet Starr Best Hope 
t Judith Carpenter Rackey 
Martha Clark Olt 
Ann Cleveland Lange 
tNancy Eastham lacobucci 
tBetsy Elliott Winkler 
tDorothy Fleming King 
tSarah Graf Fish 
tDeborah Green West 
tMargaret Holbrook Birch 
tGretchen Jordan Smith 
tJane Kent Rockwell 
Cynthia Knox Watts 
tSusan McGuire McGrath 
tMary Minard 
tKaren Olson Smith 
tDiane Sorota O'Dwyer 
Louise Stephenson 

Haldeman 
tKatherine Stirling Dow 
tMary Ann Yudicky 

Goodrich 



1956 
38% —$639 

tSusan Bradley Lee 
tGrace Callahan 

Hagstrom 
Virginia Dakin Scott 
tLynn Dowlin Voss 
tMarilyn Emsley Betts 
tPhoebe Estes Bryan 
tNell Eubanks Temple 
tMary Anne Faggiano 

Hendren 
Barbara Henry Parry 
tDeborah Holbrook 

Winthrop 
tSusan Kauer Schofield 
tMollie Lupe Lasater 
tMargaret Oliver Hedeman 
tMarjorie Orr Maclver 
tElizabeth Parker Powell 
Patricia Pearce Brodersen 
tCarol Reed Karnopp 
Margaret Rothwell Klein 
tEleanor Rulon-Miller York 
tNancy Swift Greer 
Sarah Sullivan McCain 
tAnne Tripp Hopkins 
Winifred Ward Henchey 
tJudith Warren Kiely 
tSusan Waterous Wagg 
Ellen Welles 

1957 

47% —$335 

Anne Bowden Morris 
Josephine Bradley Bush 
tMartha Buckley Fahnoe 
tMary Lee Carter Staniar 
Suzanne Christy Herpick 









ten 



Carolyn Cooper Bird 
Cecile Erickson Mactaggart 
tCarolyn Gaines Roberson 
tMiriam Ganem Reeder 
Jacqueline Goodspeed 
tAnne Gramkow Deanetf 
tDiana Hallowell 
tPenelope Holbrook Reid 
Karen Jones 

tSally Lawrence Kauder 
Lynne McLaughlin Moughty 
tJanet McLean Hunt 
tJoan Pelletier Isabel 
Susan Rairdon Allen 
tPaula Slifer Zandstraftf 
tDeborah Smith Regan 
tMary Ann Spurgeon Lewis 
tLucinda Sulzbacher Cutler 
tDeborah Tillson 
tMary Wellman Bates 
tSandra Wiles Marquis 
tLouise Wooldredge 

Wieland 
tFrances Young Tang 



1958 
40% —$293 

tElizabeth Artz Beim 
Sandra Bensen Calhoun 
Anne Bossi Troie 
tSandra Castle DuPuy 
tAnne Cole Warren 
tLucia Comas 
tAgnes Daley Rothrock 
tNancy Dick 
tAnn DiClemente Ross 
Linda Flesh Keily 
tBetsy Gardner Riley 
tPriscilla Grant Flood 
tCaroline Greene Donnelly 
t Judith Hart Shaw### 
Victoria Kohler 
tSally Lawrence Hopkins 
tSara Leavitt Blackburn 
tSusan Moore Ferris 
tAnne Moulton Anderson 
tEdith Olson Davies 
tFrederica Owsley Thomas 
tWynne Paffard Delmhorst 
Patricia Parrish Banks 
Carolyn Phillips Brown 
Jean Reynolds Belmonte 
tClaudia Sandberg Wyllie 
Phoebe Sherman Elliott 
tMary Steketee MacDonald 
tNancy Stevenson Jackson 
tStephanie Thrall Smith 
tSusan Tidd Augenthaler 



t Gift matched by 
McGraw Hill 

£$ Gift matched by 
Whirlpool Corp. 
t't Gift matched by the 
Chase Manhattan Bank 



1959 
35% —$256 

tJudith Agor Aydelott 
Gale Barton Hartch 
tElizabeth Bell 

Hetherington 
tSusan Bradley 
tFaith Critchley 
Elizabeth Evans Elmer 
tMary Feltwell Gordon 
tJoan Fisher Chambers 
Susan Fox Castellini 
Susan Goodwillie 
tJay Holland^ 
Alice lams Kittredge 
Linda Lobb Timmins 
tPatricia Marvin 
Duncan Moose Ripley 
Adelia Ann Morris Stack 
tNona Porter Gallant 
tHolly Robertson Chalmers 
tKate Sides Flather 
Elsie Taylor Cummings 
tAnn Travers Butler 
tWinifred Ward Keith 
Nancy Wardwell 
tCatherine Watson Rapp 
Susan Wholey Field 



1960 

14% — $76 

Sally Barngrove 

McQuilkintS 
tAlexandra Crane Frishman 
Elizabeth Dexter Potsubay 
tAnna Dudley Egan 
Margaret Elsemore Sipple 
tSarah Foote Hubby 
Kristianne Graham Bumpus 
Terry Hydeman Seward 
Sarah von der Heyde 

Richards 
tBrenda Walker Hirsch 
Susan Wallace Fraim 



1961 
16% —$102 

Cynthia Eaton 

tAnn Fahnestock 

Martha Farnsworth 

tSusan Fox 

tGray Hodges 

tElizabeth Hyde Washburn 

Loring Low 

Sandra Nicholson Booth 

Susan Rothwell 

Linda Scott Gibbins 

tJoan Spurgeon Brennan 



£ Gift matched by 
Textron, Inc. 
tit Gift matched by 
McQuilkin Films 



1962 
29% —$170 

tSally Allen Mandel 
tBetsy Bruns Eaton 
Mary Concemi Sommer 
Linda Corson Corson 
Carolyn Dow 
Nancy Elwell Griscom 
Cynthia Everett White 
Sherrill Farr Bray 
Hilary Field Gripekoven 
Pauline Gray Keyes 
Jennifer Hesketh 

Thompson 
tKathrin Krakauer 
tMartha Mason 
Carol Ann Moore 
Lynne Moriarty Langlois 
Frederica Muller Aalto 
tlngrid Quarck 
Anne Ripley 
tMary Wells 
Dorothy Wheeler Bacon 
tGretchen Whitehead 
tElizabeth Wood 



1963 
12% — $65 

tJudith Butler 
tElizabeth Cadbury 

Montagu 
tAnn Harris 
tBarbara Hoffman 
Maria Pastoriza de Bonetti 
tBettina Proske 
tCynthia Sorenson 
Letitia Upton Brown 
tHelen Watson Collison 



1964 
21% — $90 

Martha Coleman 
Martha Foley 
Jo-Anwyl Foster Myers 
Joan Harney 
Amy Johnson 
Elfriede Laaff Koenig 
Susan Localio 
Patricia Morrill 
Gretchen Overbagh 
Edith Paffard 
Linda Perkin 
Lee Porter 
Susan Stafford 
Mary Travers Munger 
Molly Webster 



1965 

15% — $58 

Katherine Abler 
Virginia Bertsche 
Allyson Davies 
Deborah Downs 
Claudia Hall 



Susan Harney Lathrop 

Margrit Krakauer 

Anne McDermott 

Anne Rahilly 

Carol Reische 

Becky Reynolds Hackett 

Karen Smith 



1966 
15% — $196 

Judith Bricker 
Martha Church Moore 
Paula Cortes 
Lucy Crane 
Sarah Downs 
Judith Froeber 
Drewry Hanes 
Jean Lippincott 
Bethe Moulton 
Mary Porter 
Ellen Ross 
Pamela Sevey 
Lucy Thomson 



1967 

14% — $80 

Sarah Beale Yancey 
Ruth Chamberlin 
Sara Delano 
Priscilla Howes 
Christina Lambert 
Rachel Maclntyre 
Joan Marks 
Jane Phillips 
Gerda Ray 
Elizabeth Rudman 
Susan Shapiro 



1968 

$1,000 
Class Gift 

Past Principal 

tMarguerite C. Hearsey 

Past Faculty 

In memory of 

Isabel Hancock 
tHelen Bean Juthe 
tMary Carpenter Dake 
tEsther Comegys 
Blair Danzoll Stambaugh 
tKate Friskin 
tEmily Hale 

tBarbara Humes Euston 
Katherine MacDonald 
tDorothy Patten Minard 
tVirginia Rogers Miller 

tAbbot Alumnae 

Association 
tBoston Abbot Club 
tNew York Abbot Club 



eleven 



Parents, Trustees and Friends of the School 



Mr. J. Radford Abbot 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Q. Adams 

Dr. and Mrs. William Ainslie 

Mr. and Mrs. Heath L. Allen 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip K. Allen 

Mrs. Michael J. Amore 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur C. Anton 

Mr. and Mrs. Douglas J. Armsden 

Mr. and Mrs. Phillip S. Babb 

Dr. and Mrs. Donald W. Bailey 

Mr. George Stewart Baird 

Miss Jane Baldwin 

Mr. and Mrs. John Barclay 

Mrs. Irving Beckwith 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Belcher, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin Bendetson 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin D. Bergh 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin C. Bertsche 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard L. Best 

Dr. and Mrs. John Bisbing 

Mr. and Mrs. John Blomquist 

Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Bolton 

Mr. and Mrs. Freeman Boynton 

Mrs. Walter Bradley 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilson M. Brazer 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard P. Breed, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. John Brown 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer R. Burling 

Mr. and Mrs. Dexter D. Butterfield 

Mr. and Mrs. B. Bartram Cadbury 

Mrs. John E. Cain, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Myron Carmer 

Mrs. David M. Carroll 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Carter, Jr. 

Mr. Lyndall Frederic Carter 

Dr. and Mrs. Gilbert B. Causey 

Professor and Mrs. Raymond Cerf 

Mr. and Mrs. John P. Chamberlain 

In memory of E. Barton Chapin 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward R. Cheney 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas T. Church 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald J. Clark 

Mr. and Mrs. William B. Cleveland 

Dr. and Mrs. Manuel Coggan 

Mr. and Mrs. Jason S. Cohen 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur A. Collins 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Conrad 

Dr. and Mrs. Angelo R. Contarino 

Dr. and Mrs. Daniel W. Caughlan 

Miss Margaret Curran 

Curtis McGraw Foundation 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick M. Daley, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leo F. Daley 



Mr. and Mrs. Warren Delano 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Demarest 
Mrs. Rachol F. Demarest 
Mrs. Roland Derby, Sr. 
Dr. and Mrs. Alexander C. Dick 
Mr. and Mrs. Bayard H. Dillingham 
Mr. and Mrs. Nathan D. Dondis 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold E. Dow 
Mr. and Mrs. James K. Dow 
Mrs. James Avery Draper 
Mr. and Mrs. George T. Driscoll, Jr. 
Miss Alice J. Driver 
Dr. and Mrs. Richard A. Durham 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Earhart 
Mr. and Mrs. Louis C. Eidam 
Mr. and Mrs. Clinton L. Eklund 
Dr. and Mrs. Ralph S. Emerson 
Mrs. Gardner G. Emmons 
Mr. and Mrs. Pedro R. Espaillat 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry T. Ewald 
Mrs. Edwin R. Fellows, II 
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert W. Finbury 
Mrs. Frederic Palmer Fiske 
Mrs. Dudley Fitts 
Mr. Burton S. Flagg 
Mr. and Mrs. John G. Fleming 
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred L. Flesh 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Furneaux 
Mr. and Mrs. Pierce W. Gaines 
Mr. and Mrs. Victor A. Gares 
Mr. and Mrs. John Garvan, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. John Giblin 
Mr. and Mrs. Clifford C. Goehring 
Mr. and Mrs. John M. Goodnow 
Mrs. Dixie I. Goss 
Mr. and Mrs. Deane B. Gray 
Dr. John S. Green, III 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. Greene 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward 
McVitty Greene, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. William R. Gurganus 
Mr. and Mrs. Karl Haartz 
Mr. and Mrs. John H. Halford, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. John D. Hamilton 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur E. Hamm 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank H. Hammond 
Mr. and Mrs. John J. Hammond 
Mrs. Roland B. Hammond, Jr. 
Miss Martha Hancock 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Gordon Hanes 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas B. Hartmann 
Mr. and Mrs. Wallace M. Haselton 
Mr. and Mrs. Lilcoln W. Haynes 



Mr. and Mrs. Edward Heifetz 

Mr. and Mrs. Lenert W. Henry 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Hershfield 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick A. Higgins 

Mrs. Forrest Hill 

Mr. and Mrs. Erik C. Hinrichsen 

Mr. and Mrs. David T. C. Ho 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth L. Hoffman 

Mr. and Mrs. James Holland^ 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph S. Hooverjftf 

Mr. and Mrs. John Howard 

Mr. and Mrs. Otis Humphrey 

Mr. and Mrs. Millard Humstone 

Mr. Robert I. Hunneman 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas F. Huntington 

Mr. Joubert Hurd 

Mr. and Mrs. Simeon Hyde, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Ingram, Jr. 

Mrs. Rose E. Jenkins 

Mr. and Mrs. Milton S. Johnston, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm B. Jones 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph E. Jones 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. Jones 

Mr. and Mrs. Andre Joseph 

Mr. and Mrs. George Karelitz 

Mr. and Mrs. George T. Kattar 

Mr. and Mrs. Stuart E. Kay 

Mrs. Waters Kellogg 

Mr. and Mrs. John Kemper 

Mr. Howard Ketcham 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul C. Kilborn 

Mrs. C. Carleton Kimball 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence E. Knapp 

Mrs. William C. Koch 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Kohler 

Mr. Bomar G. KramerJ^ 

Dr. and Mrs. Frank J. Kropp 

Mr. and Mrs. George Laaff 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul E. Lacouture 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Lambert 

Mr. H. Warren Lawrence 

Mr. and Mrs. Laurence G. Leavitt 

Mr. and Mrs. Edmund F. Leland, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Roger M. Lindgrove 

Mr. and Mrs. Stafford A. Lindsay 



$ Gift matched by 
Textron Corporation 

$£ Gift matched by 
Hoover Foundation 
Educational Aid Program 

£$$ Gift matched by 

General Tire and Rubber 



twelve 



Mr. and Mrs. Ralph E. Livingston 

Mr. and Mrs. Glenn E. Loughridge 

Mr. Evelyn P. Luquer 

Mr. and Mrs. Duncan M. Maclntyre 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Mack 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank MacManus 

Dr. and Mrs. John Mallen 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Mansfield 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Markley 

Mr. and Mrs. Hans Marum 

Mrs. George Marvell 

Mrs. Edwin Marvin 

Mr. and Mrs. John Mason 

Mr. and Mrs. John E. Massengale, III 

Mrs. Rene Mathey 

Dr. and Mrs. John McArdle 

Mrs. Donald Mclvor 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. 

McLaughlin, Jr. 
Mr. Charles R. McLean 
Mrs. Donald Merriam 
Mr. and Mrs. Andre Meyer 
Mr. and Mrs. Cord Meyer, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. John P. Miller 
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Minard 
Mr. Charles F. Moore 
Dr. and Mrs. Jay B. Moses 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur E. Motch 
Mr. and Mrs. John Moxon 
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Naman 
Mr. and Mrs. Karl J. Nelson 
Mr. and Mrs. Frederick 

M. Newcomb, II 
Mr. and Mrs. David A. NimickJ 
Mr. and Mrs. Francis J. Niziak 
Mr. and Mrs. Martin Norr 
Mr. and Mrs. Fletcher E. Nyce 
Mr. and Mrs. Fredric S. O'Brien 
Dr. and Mrs. John B. Ogilvie 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Owen 
Mr. and Mrs. Frederic Paffard, Jr. 
Mrs. Scott H. Paradise 
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Patch 
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel B. Payne 
Dr. and Mrs. Frank S. Perkin 
Mr. and Mrs. Lovett PetersJJJf 



$ Gift matched by Rust Foundation 
tt Gift matched by Cabot Foundation 



Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Peters 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Phillips 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Phillips. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alberto Pico 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold W. Pope 

Mr. and Mrs. Clifford L. Porter 

Mrs. Brooks Potter 

Mrs. Robert G. Potter, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dietrich W. Proske 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Rafton 

Mr. and Mrs. Smith L. Rairdon 

Mrs. Dorothy Randall 

Captain and Mrs. George B. Raser 

Mr. and Mrs. E. Benjamin Redfield, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John I. Reynolds 

Mrs. Charles F. Rimmer 

Mr. Frank D. Robinson 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph D. Robinson 

Mrs. Arthur Rodge 

Mrs. Horatio Rogers 

Mr. and. Mrs. Irving E. Rogers, Sr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Sidney W. Rosen 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Rudolph 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur W. Ruff 

Mr. and Mrs. Theodore L. Russem 

Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Samel 

Mr. and Mrs. Angelo A. Sapienza 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles N. Sarris 

Mr. and Mrs. Clark J. Sawyer 

Mr. George F. Sawyer 

In memory of Mrs. Alfio Scandura 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank J. Schiavoni 

Mr. and Mrs. Herman H. Schnepel, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. William W. Seaward 

Mr. and Mrs. John C. Sevey 

Mr. and Mrs. Byron H. Smith 

Dr. and Mrs. Dane F. Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. Everett Ware Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Rodney Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. Myer N. Sobiloff 

In memory of Mrs. Irving Southworth 

Mr. and Mrs. John P. Spaulding 

Mr. and Mrs. James R. Schoettler 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen H. Solomon 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Stahlbrand 

Dr. and Mrs. O. Sherwin Staples 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Steele 

Mr. and Mrs. Campbell Steketee 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip E. Stevens 



Mr. and Mrs. John A. Stichnoth 

Mr. Orson L. St. John 

Mr. and Mrs. Hoffman Stone 

Dr. and Mrs. David A. Straus 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Streett 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Sturgeon 

Mrs. William A. Sturgis 

Mr. and Mrs. Kneeland Swenson 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Sykes 

Dr. and Mrs. Leslie W. Tasche 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert A. Tatelman 

Mr. Clarence W. Taylor 

Mr. and Mrs. James G. Taylor 

Mr. and Mrs. Rainey S. Taylor 

Mr. and Mrs. William S. Thomas 

Mr. John Thompson 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip Van R. Thomson 

Mr. and Mrs. D. Stephen Thrall 

Mrs. G. Mead Timken 

Mrs. Samuel Titcomb 

Mr. and Mrs. Guerin Todd 

Miss Juliette Tomlinson 

Mr. and Mrs. Guy Ule 

Mr. and Mrs. Sheldon T. Viele 

Mrs. Creigh C. Wagner 

Mr. and Mrs. John B. Walker 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert E. Wallwork 

Mr. and Mrs. Thayer S. Warshaw 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Richard 

Waterhouse 
Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert L. Watson, II 
Mr. and Mrs. Stuart D. Watson 
Mr. and Mrs. William Watson 
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel G. Waugh 
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Weber 
Mr. and Mrs. Dean K. Webster, Jr . 
Mr. John Webster 
Dr. and Mrs. John G. Webster 
Mr. and Mrs. James W. Weidenman 
Mr. and Mrs. Manuel M. Weinberg 
Mr. and Mrs. William B. Weston 
Mr. and Mrs. George W. Wheeler 
Mrs. Howard Wheeler 
Mr. and Mrs. Grant Whipple 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Whitehead, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Martin William 
Mr. and Mrs. John Witherspoon 
Mr. and Mrs. Leander G. Yeaton, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. B. Frederick Yoffa 



'G^D 



thirteen 



A 

Memorial 



A scholarship in memory of Ann Miller 
Ludlow, 1929, has been given to the 
daughter of an alumna with funds re- 
ceived from her family and friends. 



Mrs. P. Livingstone Armstrong 

Mrs. Norval F. Bacon, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kendrick F. Bellows 

Miss Mary H. Bevan 

Mr. and Mrs. Lyman C. Bleecker 

Mr. and Mrs. Bern Budd, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Carter, Jr. 

Mr. Jean Cattier 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence D. Cavanagh 

Mr. Ronald M. Craigmyle 

Mr. and Mrs. James L. Crider, Jr. 

Mrs. James Dartt 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald C. Death 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond deClairville 

Miss Sybil K. Dukehart 

Mr. Martin Dwyer, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Ehlers, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank R. Finlayson 

Mr. and Mrs. David S. Foster 

Miss Mary E. Fox 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Fulton 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Gardner, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Garvan 

Mr. and Mrs. Clifford R. Gillam 

Mr. and Mrs. Anderson F. Hewitt 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry B. Holmes 

Mr. Benjamin K. Ludlow, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John D. Maxwell 

Mr. and Mrs. William T. Moore 

Officers and Directors of The First Boston Corporation 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Outhwaite 

Miss E. Helen Pendleton 

Mrs. Collier Piatt 

The Robinson-Duff Family 

Mr. and Mrs. Leon A. Rushmore, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Franz Schager 

Mr. and Mrs. Ludwig F. M. Schulze 

Mr. and Mrs. Gardner Sutton 

Mr. Francis K. Thayer, Jr. 

Mrs. H. Chandlee Turner, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elisha Walker, Jr. 

Mrs. Robert E. Walker 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard C. Weeks 

Mr. and Mrs. R. V. C. Whitehead, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ichabod T. Williams 

Mr. Thomas R. Williams 






fourteen 









fUumnae Pequesite 

Abbot lists the following bequests with pride and deep gratitude. 
They reveal the devotion of the alumnae to the school and their 
abiding faith in the value of an Abbot education. 

Elizabeth Nichols Bean 1893 $10,000 

Elizabeth Jeffers Hobbs 1905 $ 1,000 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 

Andover. Massachusetts 01810 
Return Requested 



ENTERED AS 
SECOND-CLASS MATTER 
AT THE POST OFFICE Al 
ANDOVER. MASSACHUSETI 







9 m 



• * 



... turn 



The Executive Board of the Alumnae Association 

1968- 1970 



President 



Mrs. Leonard M. Fowle 

(Nancy Kimball) 

36 Norman St., Marblehead, Mass. 01945 



Vice Presidents 



Mrs. Malcolm S. Loring 

(Anne Russell) 

Pepperell Rd., Kittery Point, Me. 03905 

Mrs. David E. Rickenbacker 

(Patricia Bowne) 

5 Glenside Terrace 

Upper Montclair, N.J. 07043 

Mrs. F. N. Ladd 

(Frances Nolde) 

2 South Lane, Hingham, Mass. 02043 



Clerk 



Mrs. Benneville N. Strohecker 
i Constance Hall) 
8 Harbor Ave. 
Marblehead, Mass. 01945 



Treasurer 



Mrs. Gage Olcott 

(Helen O'Brien) 

40 Oakridge Rd., Wellesley, Mass. 02181 



Executive Secretary 
Delegates-at-Large 



Miss C. Jane Sullivan 

20 Buswell St., Lawrence, Mass. 01841 



Mrs. Sargent Bradlee, Jr. 
(Sally Humason) 
Linden Cottage, Walker Rd. 
Manchester, Mass. 01944 

Mrs. J. Robert Haskin, Jr. 
(Miriam Bickford) 
6 Redstone Lane 
Marblehead, Mass. 01945 

Mrs. Harry Maidment 
(Emily House) 
99 Robert Rd. 
Manchester, Conn. 06040 



Alumnae Trustee 
1963-1969 



Miss Alice C. Sweeney 

35 School St., Andover, Mass. 01810 



Alumnae Trustee 
1966-1972 



Mrs. John B. Ogilvie 

( Donna Brace) 

14 Circle Rd., Darien, Conn. 06820 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 



OCTOBER, 1968 



VOLUME 37, NUMBER 1 



Editor: C. JANE SULLIVAN 

Asst. Editor: MRS. FRANK DiCLEMENTE 
Published four times yearly, October, February, May and September, by Abbot Academy, Andover, Massachusetts. Entered as 
second class matter December 12, 1933, at the post office at Andover, Massachusetts, under the act of August 24, 1912. 



PRINTED AT EAGLE-TRIBUNE PRINTING. LAWRENCE, MASSACHUSETTS 



A SPECIAL ISSUE OF THE BULLETIN WILL BE PUBLISHED 
IN NOVEMBER COVERING THE INSTALLATION OF 

DONALD ANDERSON GORDON 
AS SEVENTEENTH PRINCIPAL OF ABBOT ACADEMY. 



one 




TO 

THE 

HALLS 

OF 

ABBOT 



come boarding students from many states and foreign countries. This year the following 
states and countries are represented: 



Alabama 2 

Arizona 2 

California 5 

Colorado 1 

Connecticut 21 

Delaware 3 

District of Columbia 2 

Florida 3 

Georgia 1 

Illinois 2 

Indiana 3 

Kansas 1 

Maine 12 



Maryland 4 

Massachusetts 6 

Michigan 6 

New Hampshire 15 

New Jersey 8 

New York 24 

North Carolina 2 

Ohio 15 

Pennsylvania 8 

Rhode Island 1 

Vermont 2 

Virginia 4 

Washington 2 



El Salvador 2 

England 2 

Ghana 1 

Guatemala 1 

Hong Kong 2 

India 1 

Laos 1 

Lebanon 1 

Peru 2 

Puerto Rico 3 

Saint Thomas 1 

Saudi Arabia 2 

Thailand 1 

Venezuela 3 



two 



come relatives of alumnae from many classes: 



ROBYN BODENRADER — sister of Bonnie Boden- 
rader, 1969 

ELEANOR BRADSHAW — sister of Ann Bradshaw, 
1965 

KRISTINA BRAINERD — cousin of Toni Brainerd 
Tsoukanelis, 1965, and Diana Brainerd, 1969; 
granddaughter of Mrs. Frank Brainerd, Past 
Faculty 

LEIGH BRECHEEN — daughter of Ann Cutler Bre- 
cheen, 1935; niece of Dorothy Cutler Burr, 1919 

MARGARET COUCH — daughter of Mrs. James 
Couch, Abbot Librarian, and sister of Carol Couch, 
1965 

SUZANNE DAMPIER — daughter of Geraldine 
Treadway Dampier, 1947 

ALISON GALUSHA — daughter of Brigid Bisgood 
Galusha, 1948; cousin of Ann Bacon Reinheimer, 
1942 

SARAH GAY — sister of Margaret Gay, 1969 

JULIA GIBERT — daughter of Anne Wadleigh Truitt, 
1949; cousin of Bridget Hayes, 1958, Deborah 
Hayes, 1959, Delia Hayes, 1965, and Hilary 
Hayes, 1963 



ABIGAIL HALE 
Faculty 



cousin of Miss Emily Hale, Past 



MARGARET HASKELL — cousin of Miss Maria 
Stockbridge Merrill, Past Faculty 

SUSAN HOY — daughter of Estelle DuBois Hoy, 1948 

DEBORAH HUNTINGTON — sister of Ellen Hunt- 
ington, 1965, and Louisa Huntington, 1967 

ABIGAIL JOHNSON — daughter of Margaret Chase 
Johnson, 1933; cousin of Polly Bullard Holden, 
1924 

HELEN LACOUTURE — sister of Linda Lacouture, 
1969 

SUSAN McCOUCH — daughter of Bettye Rutherford 
McCouch, 1943; niece of Jane Rutherford, 1942 



FRANCESCA MOULTON — sister of Katrina Moul- 
ton, 1969 

ADELLE NICHOLSON — cousin of Claire Oppen- 
heim Marum, 1935, and Deborah Marum, 1969 

KAREN NOURSE — sister of Alison Nourse, 1969; 
niece of Virginia Nourse Salomon, 1936 

CYNTHIA OLIVE — cousin of Jane Dawes McClen- 
nan, 1935 

ANN PHILLIPS — sister of Jane Phillips, 1967; 
great-granddaughter of Margaret Duncan Phillips, 
1868; cousin of Marguerite Hall Ross, 1940 

ALETA REYNOLDS — sister of Rebecca Reynolds 
Hackett, 1965 

MARCIA RICKENBACKER — daughter of Patricia 
Bowne Rickenbacker, 1946 

MARTHA ROGERS — granddaughter of Martha But- 
trick Rogers, 1923; grandniece of Helen Buttrick 
Livesey, 1933, and Helga Lundin Buttrick, 1923; 
great-grandniece of Janet Buttrick Irving, 1 898 

JEANNIE RUSSELL — sister of Diane Russell, 1968; 
cousin of Helen Watson Collison, 1963, Marcia 
Watson, 1966, and Durrie Watson, 1970 

BETH SHAPIRO — sister of Susan Shapiro, 1967 

MARGARETTE STEVER — daughter of Louise Risley 
Stever, 1937 

ALICE SWEENEY — grandniece of Alice Sweeney, 
1914, Alumnae Trustee and former Dean of Studies, 
Louise Sweeney, 1908, Past Faculty, Mory Swee- 
ney, 1911, and Nora Sweeney, 1912, Past Faculty, 
Miss Bertha Grimes, Past Faculty; niece of Joan 
Sweeney, 1945, and Martha Sweeney Read, 1937; 
cousin of Elizabeth Schneider, 1904 

ANNE TAYLOR — niece of Mary Taylor Sherpick, 
1945; cousin of Helen Taylor Dodd, 1948, and 
Mary Jordan Goodrich, 1906 

MEGAN TRENEER — sister of Jennifer Treneer, 
1969, ond Wendy Treneer Chambers, 1965; niece 
of Jean Hansen Ashbaugh, 1943 

BARBARA WALKER — doughter of Ann Walen 
Walker, 1945 



ALUMNAE RELATIVES PICTURED ON FRONT COVER 

Seated in front: Ann Phillips 

First row: Abigail Johnson, Alison Galusha, Leigh Brecheen, Marcia Rickenbacker, Susan Hoy 

Second row: Margarctte Stever, Barbara Walker, Julia Gibcrt, Susan McCouch, Suxanne Dampier 

Third row: Helen Lacouture, Anne Taylor, Martha Rogers, Margaret Couch, Jcannie Russell 

Fourth row: Adelle Nicholson, Beth Shapiro, Sarah Gay, Karen Nourse, Cynthia Olive 

Fifth row: Alice Sweeney, Margaret Haskell, Deborah Huntington, Francesco Moulton, Eleanor Bradshai 

Last row: Alcta Reynolds, Abigail Hale, Robyn Bodcnrader, Megan Treneer, Krishna Brainerd 



three 




FROM 
THE 
ABBOT 
CAMPUS 



the 1968 graduates have gone to colleges in many states: 



American University 
Barnard 

Boston University 

Bradford Junior 

Carleton 
Chatham 
Colby 
Connecticut 



Duke 

Finch Junior 
Florida State 
Goucher 



Green Mountain Junior 
Lake Forest 

Marjorie Webster Junior 

Middlebury 

Mills 

Mount Holyoke 

New York University 
Occidental 



Christine Harley 

Paula Atwood 
Diane Russell 

Cheryl Hammond 
Margaret Howard 

Simone Huval 
Patricia Rockwood 

Kathryn Schoettler 

Marguerite Schnepel 

Nancy Carmer 

Barbara Ainslie 
Lynn Black 
Barbara Camp 
Elaine Finbury 
Jacqueline McGinty 

Elixabeth Briggs 

Joanne Sapienza 

Margaret Adams 

Susan Barton 
Toby Dondis 
Martha Shapiro 
Deborah Webster 

Karen Sawyer 

Connie Coughlan 
Lynn Marsden 

Lynn Trenbath 

Cynthia Johnson 

Ann Doty 
Louise Hunter 
Madeleine Todd 

Bonnie Cook 
Anne Moses 

Cheryline Lewis 

Caroline Payne 



Pine Manor Junior 

Reed 

Rollins 

St. Andrews 

Skidmore 



Smith 



Stephens Junior 

Syracuse 

University of Colorado 
University of Massachusetts 
University of New Hampshire 

University of Rochester 

University of 

Southern Nevada 

University of Vermont 

Vanderbilt (Nursing) 

Wellesley 

Wells 

Westmont Junior 
Wheaton 
Wheelock 

* Will enter Smith in February 



Judith Dillingham 
Shirley Sullivan 

Karen Seaward 

Jacqueline Mathiot 

Mary Blomquist 

Julia Carlson 
Caroline Cleaver 
Deborah Daley 
Pamela Weidenman 

Susan Bolton 
Hollis Hebbel 
Katherine Wies 

Florence Newcomb 
Karen Urie 

Jane Brown 

Anne Robinson 

'Juliana Crane 

Ann Finn 
Marcia Owen 

Katharine Nelson 

Janice O'Neal 

Anne Fellows 

Sally Homm 

Dorothy Cheney 
Joanna Frost 
Nancy Roberts 

Sharon Hughes 

Annette Davis 

Claudia Whitney 

Diane Driscoll 
Elizabeth Handy 



four 



PrCUSeS Mauricia Alvarez '66 — Dean's List — Connecticut College 

Catherine Choy '65 — Outstanding Junior and Dean's List — 
Rinninn Northwestern University 

" y • • • Martha Church '66 — Dean's List — Connecticut College 

Here S to VOLL Linda Cregg '67 — Dean's List — Smith College 

" Charlotte Erwin '66 — Dean's List and Matthew Vassar Scholar — 

Vassar College 
Jo-Anwyl Foster Myers '64 — Dean's List — Wilson College 
Linda Perkin '64 — B.A. cum laude — Barnard College 
Gerda Ray '67 — Dean's List — Pembroke College 

Laura Stevenson '64 — B.A. with highest honors — University of 
Michigan 

Lucy Thomson '66 — Dean's List — Connecticut College 

Anna Thai '65 — Dean's List — Boston University 

Sarah von der Heyde Richards '60 — M.D. — Jefferson Medical 

College 
Gwyneth Walker '64 — B.A. with honors — Pembroke College 



NATIONAL MERIT SEMIFINALISTS 

Diane Best Susan Cohen Diane Coggan 

Joan Faro Catherine Viele 



RECIPES GARNERED 

By THE ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

This new Abbot Cookbook is filled with favorite Abbot 
receipts and many precious "family receipts" never before 
divulged. Price is only $2.25 including postage. 

ORDER ONE TODAY 

Enclosed find $ for Cookbooks. 

Name _ — 

Address . 

Zip Code 

five 



1894 Hannah Greene (Mrs. Edgar G. Holt) died April 16, 1968. 
She had served as Class Fund Secretary for many years. Our 
sympathy is extended to her daughters, Jane Holt Atkinson, 
1919, and Emily Holt Muckow, 1923. 

1895 Frances Edwards (Mrs. William F. Quayle) died December 
26, 1965, at the age of 90. 

1898 Nellie Flint (Mrs. Joseph A. Rand) died May 26, 1968, in 
Hanover, N.H. 

Grace Varnum (Mrs. John G. Allgrove) died in May at her 
home in Old Orchard Beach, Me. Our sympathy is extended 
to her husband and to her daughter. 

1901 Rebecca Baxter (Mrs. Kenneth Dirlan) died in the spring 
in New Haven, Conn. 

Isabel Herrick (Mrs. Henry Klous) died June 29, 1968, in 
Methuen, Mass. after a long illness. 

1903 Jessie Corbin (Mrs. Hamilton C. Bates) died June 27, 1968> 
in New Haven, Conn. Our sympathy is extended to her five 
children. 



1904 Helen Childs (Mrs. Alden W. Baldwin) died May 3, 1968, 
in Springfield, Mass. Our sympathy is extended to her 
daughter. 

1907 Mabel Rhodes (Mrs. M. R. Manter) died May 13, 1968, in 
Taunton, Mass. after a short illness. Our sincere sympathy 
is extended to her four daughters. 

Grace Spear (Mrs. Charles F. Doble) died March 12, 1968, 
in Harwich Port, Mass. Our sympathy is extended to her 
husband. 

1909 Beatrice Twiss (Mrs. George G. Brown) died June 29, 1968, 
at her home in Andover after a long illness. 

1910 Louise Tuttle (Mrs. William D. Abbott) was reported dead 
in June, 1968. 

1911 Charlotte Gowing (Mrs. Charlotte G. Cooper) died July 4, 
1966, in Akron, Ohio. 

1913 Dr. Elizabeth M. Hincks died May 14, 1968, in Cambridge, 
Mass. She was formerly chief psychologist for the New 
England Home for Little Wanderers. 

1915 Marian Bayley (Mrs. Edwin P. Buchanan) died suddenly 
on a European trip on May 21, 1968. Our sincere sympathy 
is extended to her daughter, Lucia Buchanan Livingston, 
Abbot 1939. 

1920 Marjorie Damon (Mrs. Frederick W. Smith) was reported 
dead in June, 1968. 

1925 Margaret Hawkes (Mrs. R. W. Schusler) died April 2, 1968, 
in Corning, N.Y. after a long illness. Our sympathy is ex- 
tended to her mother and to her sister. 

six 







News from, the Classes 



1906 

CONSTANCE PARKER CHIPMAN has moved to 
1220 No. Washington, Hutchinson, Kansas 67501. 
She writes, "Greetings from Kansas and this moment 
from Switzerland Park, Colo. My grandson-in-law 
brought me a just caught trout for breakfast this 
morning. My apartment at home is comfortable and 
convenient, very near a shopping center and library; 
I shall soon get into some activities. I am very glad 
I made the big move." 

1908 

HELEN HULBERT BLAGUE is teaching French in 
the Springfield elementary public schools. She also 
gives singing lessons. She has six grandchildren. 

WINIFRED OGDEN LINDLEY'S granddaughter, 
Priscilla was married recently to Mr. Kyle Grosz. 

1917 

The class will be sorry to learn that GERTRUDE 
GOSS'S father died in July at 98 years of age. 

CORNELIA NEWCOMB LATTIN entertained her 
3 granddaughters for a month this summer. They 
are the children of HARRIET LATTIN DUNLAP, 
Abbot '50. 



1918 

The class extends its sympathy to IRENE ATWOOD 
whose mother died July 15th. Irene has moved to 
260 Beacon St. in Boston. 



1921 

MARIAN ALLING BRADLEY was married Sept. 
25, 1 968, to Hugh A. Ward of New York City. Mr. 
Ward was previously married to Margaret Ailing, 
twin sister of Marian. 

ELINOR COCHRAN KNIGHT'S husband is vice- 
president in charge of the' Personnel Dept. of the 
Conn. Bank and Trust Co. Her son, William, was 
awarded his doctorate in English by Indiana Uni- 
versity, and is assistant professor of English at Wes- 
leyan University. 

EUNICE MEIGS PEASE writes, "My daughter, 
Barbara, lives in Virginia, and enjoys being the wife 
of a man who raises thoroughbreds, also enjoys 
teaching her 2 little tots the art of horsemanship— 
she won the national championships before her 
marriage." 

HELEN ROSER retired in January from her posi- 
tion as Associate Director of the Hartford Hospital 
School of Nursing. She is now living at 37 Olde 
Stage Rd., Glastonbury, Conn. 06033. She recently 
returned from a trip to Portugal, Spain, and also 
Morocco. 

1922 

The class extends its sympathy to BARBARA 
GOSS whose father died in July at the age of 98. 



1930 

ELIZABETH BREWER DERICKS writes, "We have 
a house in St. Maarten, Netherlands West Indies, 
and also an interest in the Simpson Bay Village 
Hotel. Look us up." 

1932 

HELEN ALLEN HENRY writes, "We have just 
welcomed our sixth grandchild. Our youngest son, 
Dick, and his wife are in Tunisia with the Peace 
Corps, and Len and I have returned from a visit 
with them in Tunisia and Italy." 

1935 

HELEN HEALD RADER writes, "As the Republi- 
can member of the Richland County board of voter 
registration, I am the sole Republican working in the 
county court house, and take quite a bit of kidding." 
Helen also serves as a guide for the Historic Colum- 
bia Foundation. 

ELLEN RIVINIUS HILL'S daughter, Nancy, Ab- 
bot '62 was married June 29th to John D. Lyons 
of Newton Centre, Mass. 

1937 

MARJORIE BOESEL VAN WINKLE'S daughter, 
Susan, Abbot '64, was married in June to James 
Pollock of Rosemont, Penna. 

JEANNETTE PARTIRDGE HARRISON'S husband 
is president of Loomis Sayles Cr Co., and they are 
living at 780 Boylston St., Boston, Mass. 02199. 
Their son, Mike, was married in June, and their 
daughter, Susie, is a sophomore at the University 
of California at Berkeley. 

1938 

MARY ELLIOT BROWN'S daughter, Margaret, 
Abbot '63 was married in June to George W. Wolf 
of Elizabeth, N.J. 

SUE EVELEIGH McVIE'S son, Alexander, will 
graduate from Williams in June, daughter Sue will 
graduate from Tudor Hall in Indianapolis, and 
Douglas is in the 10th grade. 

SALLY SUTOR PARSONS is Urban Renewol Re- 
location Director in Waterville, Me. 

CONSTANCE THURBER PRUDDEN'S daughter, 
Penelope, was married to Richard B. Redfield, Jr. 
of West Hartford, Conn. 

1939 

JOAN HUBBARD LAWSON writes, "Our oldest 
son, Jud, finished his first year at Rutgers Graduate 
School and is now in the service. Bruce has been 
accepted at George Washington University. Gail is 
6 years old." 

1940 

LIBBY TRAVIS SOLLENBERGER writes, "Gus has 
retired from the Navy and we are living in Avon, 
Conn. I'll be organist at First Church of Christ in 



seven 



West Hartford and will also be finishing work on 
my M.A. in music. Rob is Navy officer aboard a 
Guided Missile Frigate. Dick graduated from Mercers- 
burg in June (He was selected outstanding boy in 
class), and is now at Brown." Address: 52 Old 
Wood Rd., Avon, Conn. 06001. 

1942 

JANE BISHOP FAHEY writes, "Every year we live 
in Washington we are more aware of being at the 
heart of things. It isn't all bad — many good 
things are going on in the inner city. The most 
interesting new thing in my life has been joining a 
volunteer group teaching ecology to 4th and 5th 
grades. We are sponsored by the Audubon Society 
and have met with very rewarding enthusiasm and 
success." 

PAM BOLTON HENDERSON writes, "One son 
back in the U.S.A. after 3 years of Navy duty; 
eldest son in Vietnam as a medic with the 9th 
Infantry; one daughter working in a Boston bank 
and another entered Green Mountain College in 
September; youngest son is a Junior at Tilton." 

MIRIAM DOUGLAS SANNER'S oldest daughter, 
Ellen, is attending Southern Seminary Junior College 
in Buena Vista, Va. 

1946 

NANCY BURNS BRELIS is now Mrs. Robert Jay. 
She is doing graduate work in anthropology and 
her husband is a professor of social anthropology at 
Brown University. Have you seen Nancy's book? It is 
for children and is entitled "Mummy Market" 
published by Harper & Row. 

1947 

EDITH FLATHER SWAN had a daughter, Melanie, 
July 13th. She is now in Dundee, Scotland where 
her husband is teaching at the University. 

1948 

MARCY GRIMSHAW BIVENS is back at Gales 
Ferry, Conn, where Art is Captain of the U.S.S. Sam 
Houston, a fleet ballistic submarine (Polaris-nuclear) . 
They spent 3 months in Washington while he was 
studying with Admiral Rickover. 





Ann Robinson Joyce's husband with their children 



Ruth Sidon Fleischmann's sons, Peter and Karl 



1951 

PAT DRISCOLL VIELEHR writes, "We are now 
settled in the south — we'd love to see anyone who 
comes to Atlanta. I now have 4 boys and one 
daughter and an Indian ayah to help keep us on 
an even course. Quite a menage!" Address: 157 
West Wesley Rd. N.W., Atlanta, Ga. 30305. 

CAROLYN HUMMEL READ writes, "Summer on 
the Cape ever busy with 3 little ones, Elizabeth, 
5 1/2, Bridget, 3 1/2, and 10-month-old Christopher. 
My husband is busy campaigning for his second term 
as a member of the Mass. House of Representa- 
tives." 

1952 

BARBARA CHURCH SHEFFER had a son, Andrew 
Brendel. She now has four children, Lindy, 1 1, Pete, 
10, and Susy, 6. 

PERSIS GOODNOW was married August 17th in 
Swanzey Center, N.H. to Charles F. Hamilton of 
New York City. Charles is a graduate of Phillips 
Exeter and Williams College. He is on the staff of 
the Fairfield Country Day School in Fairfield, Conn. 

MARY HAWES KOHLER has four little ones who 
keep her hopping — Rob, 5, Neil, 4, Molly, 2 1/2, 
and Jimmy, 9 months. 

1953 

NATALIE STARR LEE has kept active in the baby 
business reporting the arrival of Katie a year after 
2-year-old Peter. Nat teaches grade school children 
in the greenhouse of the Brooklyn Botanic Garden 
as well as taking a course in tailoring. 

CORNELIA WELDON LeMAITRE had triplets, 
James, Matthew and Ellen on June 10th. Connie 
reports that Ellen is the most active. 

1955 

News Secretary: Mrs. John A. C. King, 3rd 
(Dorothy Fleming), 603 Nevada Dr., Erie, Penna. 
16505. 

MARY ANN HOLDEN McNEILL describes Raleigh, 
N.C. as "A most lively town." She and Jack are not 



eight 



only working actively for the community interests 
but ore taking advantage of boats, beaches and 
mountains. Gardiner, 7, is off to school; Molly, 1, 
now permits mother's going back to school (after 
being editorial page assistant on the RALEIGH NEWS 
and OBSERVER and reporter and feature writer on 
THE RALEIGH TIMES). Mary Ann will return to 
graduate English at North Carolina State where 
Jack teaches Microbiology. 

JANET KENT ROCKWELL writes of a new address 
— 166 West Canton St., Boston 02118 and a new 
baby. Andrew, first son, was born May 4, 1968. 
Our best wishes to all. 

MARLENA COMAS RODRIGUES writes, "We have 
been living in Caracas since last November. Jorge 
is working in Marketing for the Latin-American 
division of 3M. All of us including the three boys 
love it down here." 

News from GAIL BALDWIN WHIPPLE, "Ollie 
arrived home safely from Vietnam last October. He 
was awarded the Bronze Star twice, and also re- 
ceived the Purple Heart. He is now a major and is 
working at Marine Headquarters in Washington." 
Address: 5401 Moultrie, Rd., Springfield, Va. 22151. 

DEE FLEMING KING has had a marvelous year. 
This included many long week ends in interesting 
places because Jack invited me along 
business trips. This also meant being 
Chicago THE week end this summer 
demonstrations I saw were musical. Dove season is 
now in full swing in Erie and we anticipate more 
hunting in Missouri late in the fall. We had a 
fabulous summer — 4 kids, 4 animals and 1 tired 
Mother. 



on a few 

present in 

The only 



More again soon, I hope. 



Dee 



1956 

News Secretary: Mrs. Alden Taylor Bryan (Phoebe 
Estes) North Williston Rd., Williston, Vt. 05495. 

GAIL TURNER SLOVER writes that "We have 
made a move back East to the Hartford Hospital," 
where Bill has joined a radiology group. Cheryl is 
now 4 and Greg is 2 1/2. Their new address is: Dr. 
and Mrs. Wm. P. Slover, 66 West Point Terrace, 
West Hartford, Connecticut 06107. 

Congratulations to DEE FENN BOWEN'S five year 
old champion Gordon, who took Best of Breed ( in a 
field of over 68 dogs) at the Trenton show last 
spring. 

And congratulations to our champion, PEG OLIVER 
HEDEMAN, who won the Merion Cricket Club Tennis 
Mixed Doubles with her husband, Bill. She also won 
the Ladies Grass Court Doubles championship. 

TON I FENN McKEE and family are living at 1711 
West University Avenue, Champaign, Illinois 61820. 
Their second daughter, Janet, was born August 8, 
1967. 

NANCY SWIFT GREER and her family are now 
living in Monterey, Calif, where Bog will attend the 
Navy's post-graduate school for 2 years. This is 
their fifth move since 1966. 

SUSAN WATEROUS WAGG writes, "We are still 
happily settled in Montreal. Tim is a planning econ- 



omist for Consolidated-Bathurst. I am a volunteer 
art-slide lecturer for the Montreal Museum. Sandra, 
5, takes ballet lessons and Geoffrey, 2 1 II, gets 
into mischief." 

The Bryans were in Philadelphia this summer for 
the American Bar Association meeting, and enjoyed 
spending part of a day with BETSY PARKER POWELL 
and her attractive family. We also saw the Hede- 
mans briefly before they left for a vacation in Maine. 

Phoebe 

1957 

News Secretary: Mrs. John J. Moughty, Jr. (Lynne 
McLaughlin), Cedar Lane, Ridgefield, Conn. 06877. 

The class will be sorry to learn that PAULA SLIFER 
ZANDSTRA'S mother died in May after a long illness. 

MARY WELLMAN BATES spent a month in Sara- 
sota this spring and returned refreshed to launch 
a home fix-up program. 

1958 

News Secretary: Mrs. James N. DuPuy (Sandra 
Castle) 905 Forest Ave., Evanston, III. 60202. 

JANE CHRISTIE SMITH writes "We are having a 
marvelous year in Germany. Marburg is a lovely small 
university city with lots of narrow winding streets 
and marvelous walks, a castle and all — I love 
having good butchers and bakers on every corner. 




Jane Christie Smith's son, Timothy, 1 1 12. 



nine 




Nora Colby Salaway's children 



David is hard at work doing thesis research for his 
Ph.D. I'm supposed to be doing the same, but 1 year 
old Timothy and learning German are keeping me 
very busy. We have a nice apartment — the upstairs 
of a private home — large yard with small swim- 
ming pool and a housekeeper (who belongs to our 
landlady, but) who teaches me German cooking and 
babysits free evenings for Timmy. We have been to 
Zurich and plan a trip to Amsterdam." They are 
now living at 733 Orange St., New Haven, Conn. 
06511. 

We have just learned that MONICA MORAN is 
now Mrs. Michael Shalette. 

INGRID STAHLBRAND KASSLER had a son, Karl 
Stone, August 31st. Ingrid is living in Boulder, Colo, 
where her husband is engaged in the real estate 
business. 

RICA LINDBECK HAMMERSTROM is in St. Louis 
were her husband Frank is doing graduate work. 

RUTH GRAY SWITZER'S husband started a train- 
ing program with Smith, Barney, Inc. in New York 
and commutes home on week-ends. He will continue 
this until September and then they will be moving 
to the Boston area. Their third daughter Deidre was 
born on January 28th. Kimberly is 4 1/2 and Pamela 
is 2 1/2. 

SALLY LAWRENCE HOPKINS writes "Giff is work- 
ing on a second Masters degree. I teach just three 
classes here at Jasper (Jasper Central School in 
Jasper, New York) ." They have two daughters. 

SALLY LEAVITT BLACKBURN'S husband returned 
from Vietnam around Christmas. They have just 
moved to Washington, D.C. and her husband is now 



working at the Pentagon. Address: 432 No. Armis- 
tead St., Alexandria, Va. 22312. 

ANNE MOULTON ANDERSON and Donald moved 
into their first house in January. They have been 
remodeling, etc. and find it fun but quite a task 
Their first child, Albert Moulton was born May 18th. 
Address: 15 Division Avenue, Summit, N.J. 07901. 

MARY O'CONNOR was married April 20th to 
Ronald J. Sears of Lawrence, a senior engineer with 
AT&T in White Plains. Address: 16 Leroy Avenue, 
Valhalla, N.Y. 10595. 

NANCY RUSSELL CURRAN had her third son, 
Richard Timothy, in June. 

1959 

HOLLY ROBERTSON CHALMERS had her first 
child, Carrie Teale, August 8th. 

ADELIA ANN MORRIS was married August 31st 
to Christopher Stack of Chicago, a graduate of the 
Hill School and Stanford University. He is attending 
Northwestern University Graduate School of Business 
Administration. 

LEE ONTHANK was married September 14th in 
Annisquam, Mass. to Donal B. Barrett of New York 
City. WENDY BOLTON was one of the bridesmaids. 
Lee is now working with a decorator firm, and her 
husband is practicing law in New York City. 

1960 

News Secretary: Mrs. David G. Clark (Lynne Fur- 
neaux) c/o W. H. Fumeaux, 19 Rockland St., South 
Dartmouth, Mass. 02748. 

My husband will be getting his Master's from 
Naval Post Graduate School in December, and as yet 
don't know where we will be stationed. We have a 
son, David Furneaux, born June 7th. Lisa Anne is 
now 3 years old. PLEASE send me some news. 

Lynne 

VIRGINIA PRATT was married June 16, 1968, to 
John H. M. Agar of Southampton, L.I. John is a 
graduate of the Millbrook School and the George- 
town University School of Foreign Service. He is the 
director of Accion in Caracas, Venezuela. 

SARAH von der HEYDE was married to Timothy 
Richards of St. Louis on June 8th. Sarah received 
an M.D. from Jefferson Medical College of Phila- 
delphia in May, and is interning at St. Louis Uni- 
versity Group Hospitals. Timothy, a graduate of 
Loomis School, Cornell College and Graduate School, 
is assistant to the president of Photronix, Inc. in 
St. Louis. 

1961 

CAROLYN BUTLER was married October 5th to 
Robert W. Lisle of Roslyn Harbor, N.Y. JANE BENE 
DICT WHISNANT was one of the bridesmaids. He 
is a graduate of Friends Academy and Williams Col- 
lege, and is now a fourth year student at the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University. 
After Carolyn's graduation from Wheaton, she re- 
ceived an M.A.T. from Harvard. 

STEPHENIE DAVIS ERICSON'S husband is Vice- 
President of Precision Chemical Corp. She is an asso- 



ten 



ciate editor at Cahners Publishing. Address: 4505 E. 
1 7th Avenue Parkway, Denver, Colo. 80220. 

ELIZABETH ELY is engaged to Dr. Robert S. 
Potter of Bridgewater, N.H., a graduate of Deerfield 
Academy, Dartmouth College, and Tufts University 
School of Dentol Medicine. He is chief of Dental 
Service at the New Hampshire Hospital in Con- 
cord, N.H. 



1962 

News Secretary: Mrs. Andrew P. Langlois (Lynne 
Moriarty) 107 Niles Hill Rd., New London, Conn. 
06320. 

Dear Sixty-two, 

I am afraid that there isn't very much news in 
this issue. I'll try to send you postcards for next 
issue's news. If you still have postcards addressed 
to me, use them! 

SUGAR ABBOTT BEHRENS writes that their son, 
Scott Cantrell, was born September 29, 1967. Sugar 
is planning on going back to school this fall for her 
Master's degree in Education. 

SANDY DAVISON is living in Washington, D.C. 
and working as a research assistant at the Bureau 
of Social Research, Inc. Sandy has seen MARILYNNE 
WEPSALA fairly regularly. Marilynne is living in 
New York. 

CAROL LAAFF has returned from her second Peace 
Corps assignment. Carol was in Chad. When I last 
heard from Carol she was taking courses at Harvard 
Summer School and planning on going job hunting 
in the fall. 

MARTHA MASON went on a safari in East Africa 
this summer — "no hunting — just looking at the 
animals." Martha is still working in merchandising 
in New York and still enjoying it. 

SUSAN NIEBLING HEBDRIE had a son, Nathan 
Zed, April 29, 1968. 

I am still teaching at Norwich Free Academy — 
and also still enjoying it. It is wonderful to start 
the year knowing the ropes! I had a lazy summer 
during which I took full advantage of being within 
walking distance of the beach. 

MARRIED 

MARY LOUISE CURRIER to Roger Armand Gag- 
non on August 10, 1968 in Newburyport, Massa- 
chusetts. The Gagnons are living in Derry, New 
Hampshire after a wedding trip to Canada. Mary 
Louise is teaching French in the Salem New Hamp- 
shire schools and Roger is teaching History and 
coaching football in Manchester, New Hampshire. 

KATHARINE GRANT was married January 27, 
1968 to Anthony Galaitsis. He is a graduate student 
at M.I.T. and Kitty is working at Harvard Business 
School getting her P.H.T. ("Putting Hubby Through") 

NANCY HILL was married June 29th in Bedford, 
N.Y. to John D. Lyons of Newton Centre, Mass. 
MARTHA LYMAN was one of the bridesmaids. John, 
a graduate of the Cambridge School and Boston Uni- 
versity, is attending graduate school at the University 
of Michigan. 



POLLY LARNED was married July 20th to Arthur 
W. Adams of San Francisco. He is the chief govern- 
ment account salesman for the Business Products 
Division of 3M. 

Best to you all, 

Lynne 

1963 

News Secretary: Suzanne Burton, 1241 28th St., 
N.W. Washington, D.C. 20007. 

Your replies to my desperate pleas for news were 
certainly welcome and much fun to read. Thank you 
all for sharing your involved lives with the rest of 
Abbot. 

CAROLYN HOLCOMBE has been my spy in Boston 
where so many of you seem to have settled after 
college. Having spent a year as a social worker with 
the Children's Hospital, Carolyn took a short but 
well-deserved vacation before beginning her Master's 
in Elementary Education at B.U. In June, she and 
MIMI DEAN braved the aftermath of the riots and 
came) down for a visit in Washington. Carolyn's new 
address is 63 Highland Avenue in Cambridge where 
she and three others have been madly converting a 
huge apartment in an old house into "something 
livable." Carolyn has informed me that ANN Mac- 
CREADY is teaching art in Lexington and CINNY 
DAVISON is a stewardess with Mohawk. SUE BOU- 
TIN, also a stewardess, is based in Miami and flies 
Pan Am to South America and the Caribbean Islands. 

ANN HARRIS' success at Katherine Gibbs has 
earned her a fascinating job at Arthur D. Little in 
Cambridge where, as Gal Friday to the Sales Head 
of Engineering, she uses her French to assist her Swiss 
boss in the handling of foreign accounts. Ann has 
seen SUSAN ARCHER REHDER and MEG POWER, 
but apparently the postcard she returned was too 
small for details. Ann has moved a few doors down 
from her previous apartment and is now living at 
16 River Street, Boston, Mass. 02108. 

LUCINDA HANNON was married in August to 
Peter Arvydas Janus, a Cornell graduate and a second 
year law student at B.U. Their new address is 2 La 
Rose Place, Apartment 5, Brighton, Mass. 02135. 

DJAMILLAH AIMAQ attended summer college at 
B.U. Following a visit with her brothers in Hamburg, 
Germany, she returned for her last semester at Wag- 
ner College. 

KARLA HAARTZ was a math teacher with the 
ABC Program at Mount Holyoke during the summer. 
She is now working towards an M.Ed, in Math Educa- 
tion at Northeastern with plans to teach minority 
groups. 

SHARON SEECHE is living at Whitney Plaza, 16 
Whites Avenue, Apartment 46, Watertown, Mass. 
She sounds extremely happy as an assistant art di- 
rector for an ad agency. 

I received a very interesting card from MARIE 
FOX who is enthusiastically pursuing Graphics at 
Rhode Island School of Design with the hopes of 
becoming a Graphic designer after graduation in two 
years. Following last year's courses of architecture at 
at M.I.T. , physics at B.U., and drawing and sculpture 
at the Boston Museum School, she and her family 
cruised in the West Indies for ten days in June. 



eleven 



JOAN IE CARTER GREEN writes, "Please have it 
noted in the BULLETIN that I did NOT graduate 
MAGNA CUM LAUDE — I wrote Ann MAGNA CUM 
LOUSY, but she read it too quickly." Our opologies. 
She and her husband, Greg, are in Providence where 
Joanie teaches second grade at a boy's private school 
and Greg teaches eighth grade advanced English and 
studio art at a progressive coed private school. This 
not being enough to keep them busy, they also have 
acquired a Newfoundland and an alley cat and are 
looking forward to the arrival of a new member of 
the Green family. 

Several girls have settled in New York having 
recently returned from Europe. MAIDY WILKINS 
studied art history at the University of Munich and 
now plans to find a job in a museum and room with 
SARAH HOLBROOK. ANITA SCHENCK combined 
both studying and teaching in Hamburg and is now 
open for job and apartment suggestionss in either 
Boston or New York. BIZZY BARTELINK'S new 
address is 420 E. 80th Street, Apartment 7-B, New 
York City 10021 in case anyone is still writing her 
in the Netherlands, as I did. She is presently work- 
ing for NBBS, the Netherlands Office for Foreign 
Student Relations. 

BETSY CADBURY MONTAGU was in New York 
during August while David played in the Mozart 
Festival at Lincoln Center. This fall finds them back 
at Cornell where David teaches and Betsy finishes 
her B.A. in English. Congratulations on making the 
Dean's List last term! 

JACKIE SUTTON CLEVERLY has moved from 
Lexington, Virginia, to Venice, Florida, where her 
husband, Bruce, is training as a stock broker until 
November when he goes into the Army as a Second 
Lieutenant, in Military Intelligence. Jackie is teaching 
seventh grade geography and is continuing work on 
her Master's at the University of Southern Florida. 

TISH UPTON has upheld the honor of our class 
by marrying James Kingsbury Brown, PA '63 and, 
incidentally, Yale "68. As her husband begins med. 
school, Tish is enrolled in the Johns Hopkins grad- 
uate art history program. Their present address is 
4410 Roland Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland. 

LORNA FISHER married Arthur C. Daily and is 
living at 1953 Ivy, Denver, Colorado 80220. Lorna 
graduated in June from the University of Colorado 
as an art major and Arthur graduated with top 
honors from the Law School. 

EMORY WOOD attended the Salzburg Music Festi- 
val during August and returned to become a secretary 
to the McCarthy organization in Pennsylvania. She 
may be reached at 41 16 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 19104. Emory brings us our most recent news 
of MUTHONI GITHUNGO who was last seen as a 
research technician in virology at the university. 
Muthoni is on our lost list, however, as is MAUREEN 
O'ROURKE, so if anyone has news of their where- 
abouts, please contact Miss Sullivan at Abbot. 

Our sincere condolences to BARBARA HOFFMAN 
whose father has recently passed away. Barbara 
hopes to return to the University of New Mexico in 
February where she is studying for an M.A. in Pre- 
Columbian Art. Her present address is Dudley Home- 
stead, Raymond, New Hampshire. If anyone is in the 
area, she'd love to see or hear from you. 



JUDY BUTLER quit her job in New York after 
three years and is now studying for a B.A. in archi- 
tecture at the University of New Mexico where she 
saw Barbara during the summer session. Her address 
is 2121 Gold S.E., Apartment 15, Albuquerque, New 
Mexico 87106. 

FREDDIE MOXON taught school in Mexico last 
year, and returned as Court Interpreter at the 
Criminal Court Sessions in Berks County, Pennsyl- 
vania. To add a little diversion, she sold encyclopedias 
for the grand total of one week, did volunteer work 
for Planned Parenthood, and evenings taught English 
to Puerto Ricans. By now Freddie should be heading 
for southern California where she plans to seek her 
fortune. 

JACKIE van AUBEL JANSSENS writes, "Eric and 
I took Olivier skiing in March at Loch in Austria. 
Since December 20, we have a new member of the 
family, Gaetan. Eric is now working for Corning, 
and we're moving to a lovely re-done farm house." 

ROSEMARY EUSTACE was married in November, 
1966 to Manuel Munz. She writes, "We honey- 
mooned in Europe and are now living in Mexico City, 
where Manuel is a mining engineer. We have a son 
who is now a year old. This does not mean that I 
have become a humdrum housewife, for I plan to 
continue my studies in law or philosophy." 

Our two greatest world voyagers are MARGIE 
BROWN and CHARLOTTE WITTS. Following her 
marriage in June to George William Wolf, III, Margie 
and George traveled to the Mt. John Observatory 
near Christchurch, New Zealand. Charlotte and her 
husband, David Bright, are en route to Australia 
where they will be living at 91 Gover Street, North 
Adelaide, South Australia. 

MORLEY MARSHALL has just returned from a 
year's study in Germany. MIMI DEAN, having worked 
all winter in Cohasset as secretary to several tours 
in Europe, was seen acting as guide and driving a 
VW busload of girls around Europe and Russia and 
ending in the Loire Valley outside of Paris where 
she met Morley. At last I've been successful in luring 
friends to Washington, for Mimi and Morley are now 
rooming with me in our tiny Georgetown house. I've 
just completed a year in the Editorial Layout de- 
partment of NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC where we do 
the layout of the magazine as well as design exhibits, 
birthday and Christmas cards, and thousands of mis- 
cellaneous projects. My family has moved to North 
Andover, so I'm still a day student at heart despite 
my affiliation with Washington. 

I enjoyed hearing from all of you. Thank you for 
your news, and please continue to write for the next 
BULLETIN! 

Sue 

1964 

AINSLIE ANDERSON was married May 4, 1968, 
to George B. Turner of Mystic, Conn. George is a 
graduate of Burdett College. 

CAROL BARKER majored in Physical Education at 
the University of California at Berkeley where she 
was awarded a B.A. in June. She is now attending 
graduate school at the University of Colorado School 
of Education. 



twelve 



MELINDA BATEMAN is working for Houghton 
Mifflin Co. in Boston. She graduated from Green 
Mountain College two years ago. Address: 285 
Massachusetts, Arlington, Mass. 02174. 

ALLIS BROOKS is engaged to Daniel A. Hanley of 
Tulsa, Okla. He attended St. Gregory's College in 
Shawnee, Okla. and Syracuse University. He is with 
the Air Force in Turkey, and they plan to be mar- 
ried next year. Allis received a B.S. in Education 
from Syracuse, and is now in the Syracuse Urban 
Teacher Preparation Program. She is teaching half- 
time while taking graduate courses to earn an M.A. 

CONSTANCE CHAMBERLAIN was married in 
June, 1967 to David R. Dimond, a Dartmouth grad- 
uate who is now attending University of Michigan 
Law School. Connie received a B.A. in History of 
Art from the University of Michigan, and has begun 
a 3-year graduate program in Landscape Architecture 
at University of Michigan. Address: 619 Oxford Rd., 
Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104. 

MARTHA COLEMAN is attending the Columbia 
Graduate School of Journalism. She was awarded an 
A.B. degree by Barnard College in June, and her 
major was Greek. 

HESTER COOLIDGE graduated from Colby College 
with a B.A. in History. She is attending graduate 
School at Brown University to get an M.A. in the 
fields of archaeology and anthropology. 

MARGARET DEUTSCH is studying at Harvard 
Graduate School in the Department of Fine Arts. She 
graduated from Barnard in June with an A.B. in 
Art History. 

LUCY EYNON is now Mrs. Harry T. Whitin, III. 
Harry works for the Worcester (Mass.) TELEGRAM 
and they have a son, Hank. Address: 548 Lincoln 
St., Worcester, Mass. 01605. 

MARGARET FINNIGAN received a B.A. from Cor- 
nell in Sociology with concentration in Demography. 
She plans to work in the Berkeley area. 

MARTHA FOLEY received a B.A. from Smith in 
June, and is studying for her M.A.T. at Simmons 
this year. 

JO-ANWYL FOSTER was married July 25, 1968, 
to Gary R. Myers of Camp Hill, Penna. FRIEDEL 
LAAFF KOENIG was one of the bridesmaids. Gary 
received his degree in chemical engineering from the 
University of Delaware, and in June received the 
degree of Juris Doctor from the Dickinson School of 
Law. He is serving in the legal branch of the Judge 
Advocates' Corps of the U. S. Army. Jo-Anwyl re- 
ceived a B.A. degree from Wilson College in June. 
Address: 5 Pheasant Ct., Mechanicsburg, Penna. 
17055. 

SARAH FROEBER received a B.A. in Psychology 
from Duke University in June. She is doing graduate 
work in Psychology at Columbia this fall. 

^ ELISABETH GRISWOLD is now Mrs. Richard Mc- 
Carthy. She received a B.A. in Drama from Syracuse 
University, and is now studying for a master's degree 
in Drama at New York University. Address: 7 West 
14th St., New York, N.Y. 10011. 

JOAN HARNEY received a B.A. degree from the 
University of North Carolina, and is attending Hickox 
Secretarial School in Boston for 6 weeks before 



entering the business world. Address: 395 Broadway, 
Cambridge, Mass. 02139. 

CORLISS HEWITT ASKMAN received a B.A. in 
Art History from Wellesley College in June. She 
writes, "We are having a marvelous time in Ger- 
many — anyone in Augsburg should stop in!" Cor- 
liss hopes to visit Amsterdam while her husband is 
on maneuvers in Grafenwohr. 

MARGARET HINCKLEY was married August 23rd 
to Benjamin L. Smith, a student at the University of 
Louisville School of Dentistry. Margaret graduated 
from Randolph-Macon Woman's College in June 
with an A.B. in Sociology and Asian Studies. 

REBECCA MARTI is completing B.S. at Columbia 
University School of General Studies, and is also an 
assistant kindergarten teacher. 

JACQUELINE MEYERS was awarded an A.B. de- 
gree by Wells College. She is now a management 
trainee at the National Shawmut Bank in Boston, 
and is working toward her master's degree. Address: 
212 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 02116. 

PATRICIA MORRILL graduated from Wellesley 
with a B.A. in French. She is working in New York 
for a French governmental agency which coordinates 
scientific research inside and outside France. Address: 
435 East 79th St., New York, N.Y. 10021. 

BRIDGET PARSON SALTONSTALL received a B.A. 
in the department of publications from Simmons in 
June. 

GRETCHEN OVERBAGH received a B.A. in English 
from St. Joseph's College in June. She is settling in 
California. 

PRISCILLA PEDERSEN specialized in Medieval 
Philosophy and Philosophy of Religion at Bryn Mawr 
College where she was awarded a B.A. in June. She 
writes, "I am now at the Stanford administered 
Inter University Center for Japanese Language Studies 
in Tokyo, beginning a 10-month course of intensive 
training in Japanese. I have had 3 years of Japanese 
already at the University of Penna. and Columbia." 
Next year she plans to begin work for the M.A. 
in Religion at Columbia. 

LINDA PERKIN received a Columbia University 
Fellowship for work on M.A. in School of Interna- 
tional Affairs at Columbia. Her major at Barnard 
where she received her B.A. cum laude was in 
Foreign Areas — China. 

LEE PORTER received a B.A. degree from Wheaton 
and is studying at Katherine Gibbs School in Boston. 
Address: 107 Antrum St., Cambridge, Mass. 02139. 

NANCY POYNTER was married June 1st to Mal- 
colm W. Sandberg of Andover. Nancy graduated from 
Briarcliff in June. Malcolm is a student at Boston 
University having completed his tour of duty with 
the Army Special Forces. 

ROBIN RICHARDS was married September 14th to 
Peter Harvard, a graduate of Amherst with a B.A. 
in Technical Theatre. Robin majored in Diplomacy 
and World Affairs at Occidental where she received 
a B.A. degree in June. Address: 118 Murlyn Rd., 
Mt. Carmel, Conn. 06518. 

AMY SHLOSSBERG was married September 21st 
to Michael Wolfram of Dallas, Tex. He is a grad- 



thirteen 



uote of Harvard and is in his second year at the 
University of Texas Law School. Amy received a 
B.A. in Physics from Smith and plans to work in 
physics research in Austin as well as do graduate 
work. Address: 1800 Lavaca, Austin, Tex. 78701. 

GAY STEIMLE was awarded an A.B. degree by 
Wilson College in June. She is now in the Teacher 
Corps at Temple University. 

LAURA STEVENSON graduated with highest 
honors in History from the University of Michigan. 
She is working on a Ph.D. in Tudor and Stuart 
History at Yale. 

MARY TRAVERS was married August 17th to 
Craig L. Munger who is a graduate of Syracuse 
University. He received an M.B.A. from Syracuse in 
June and is working for Griffiss Air Force Base. Mary 
received a B.F.A. from Syracuse School of Art in 
June. Address: Oneida Garden Apts., Seneca St., 
MR 9, Oneida, N.Y. 13421. 

SUSAN VAN WINKLE was married June 22nd to 
James Pollock of Rosemont, Penna. BETH VAN 
WINKLE BOYNTON "60 was matron of honor and 
LEE PORTER was one of the bridesmaids. Jim grad- 
uated from Lehigh this year and is working for Price 
Waterhouse in Philadelphia. Sue received a B.A. in 
Economics from Connecticut, and is working for the 
Willington Fund. Address: 46 Righters Mill Rd., 
Narberth, Penna. 19072. 

GWYNETH WALKER received a B.A. from Pem- 
broke with honors in Music Composition. She is 
doing graduate work at Hartt College of Music in 
Hartford, Conn. 

LAURIE WALTUCH received a B.A. in French and 
History from Stanford University. She is attending 
the University of Chicago Graduate School in the 
department of Romance Languages. Address: 5528 
Hyde Park Blvd., Chicago, III. 60637. 

ELISA WRIGHT was awarded a B.A. degree by 
Connecticut College in June. She is working as a 
news reporter and photographer. 

1965 

TONI-LYNNE BRAINERD was married June 1st 
to Harry G. Tsoukanelis of loannina, Greece. DIANA 
BRAINERD was maid of honor. George is a graduate 
of Phillips Academy, Columbia University and Harvard 
Graduate School of Business. Address: 2 Peabody 
Terr., Cambridge, Mass. 02138. 

CATHIE CHOY is president of her sorority, Alpha 
Gamma Delta, at Northwestern. Cathie studied at 
Columbia this summer. 

SUSAN HARNEY was married June 26th to E. 
Stirling Lathrop of Wassenaar, Holland. JOAN HAR- 
NEY was maid of honor. Stirling attended Berkshire 
Academy and Washington and Lee University. Susan 
is studying Japanese and Stirling is studying Korean 
in Monterey, Calif. Address: 800 Alice St., Monterey, 
Calif. 93940. 

ELLEN HUNTINGTON is engaged to Stephen Hues- 
tis who graduated from Harvey Mudd College. He 
is now doing graduate work in oceanography at 
Scripps College. Ellen worked for TWA at Newark 
Airport. 



JOANNE HYDE was married September 7th to 
Andrew S. Innes of Andover in the Brooks School 
Chapel. Andrew, a graduate of Brooks School, is a 
senior at Harvard College. Betsy Giblin and Anne 
McDermott were in the wedding party. Joanne is 
working at the Harvard Trust Co. Address: 52 Trow- 
bridge St., Cambridge, Mass. 02138. 

LANGDON LEARNED is engaged to Mark W. Hol- 
loway of Fostoria, Ohio. Mark was graduated from 
Ohio State University and is studying for a master's 
degree at Columbia Graduate School of Business. 
They will be married late in November. 

NANCY McARDLE is engaged to Frederic P. 
Worthen, Jr. of North Andover. He is a graduate 
of Kimball Union and is now on active duty with 
the Naval Reserve. 

REBECCA REYNOLDS was married June 8th in 
Pelham, N.H. to James Davis Hackett. James grad- 
uated from Duke University and is now studying at 
Harvard Business School. 

ALICIA STILLMAN is engaged to Jefferson D. 
Stewart, 3rd of Louisville, Ky. Donald is a grad- 
uate of Middlesex School and Harvard College. He is 
now studying at Vanderbilt University Law School. 
They are planning a November wedding. 



1966 

News Secretary: Ellen Sobiloff, 1208 Mass. Ave., 
Apt. 3, Cambridge, Mass. 02138. 

MARTHA CHURCH and Mark Moore (PA '65) 
were married last June. MARGY RYDER was a 
bridesmaid and MARCIA WATSON was at the 
wedding. The Moores are living in New Haven while 
Mark finishes his senior year at Yale and Martha 
commutes tc Connecticut College three days a week. 

ELIZABETH WALKER and Lawrence Cohn were 
married June 28 in Ft. Lauderdale. They are now 
living in Bloomington, Ind. and attending classes at 
University of Indiana. Liz is very busy painting the 
apartment which she describes as being very "Cam- 
bridge-y." She says, "I'm afraid some of my more 
homey habits have scared away "L's" friends . . . 
but I don't run a . . . soup kitchen . . . It's my 
HOME and I'm terribly homey!" 

FRAN JONES and CINDY BUXTON C65) are still 
living at 48 Eustis St. Frannie is teaching pre-school 
art at PROJECT in Cambridge — and loving it. Also 
in Cambridge is ALISON DODD C65), who is at 
B.U. 

MARY MARGARET LIVINGSTON spent her sum- 
mer at home ("and the accent is thicker than ever") 
with side-trips to Florida, New Orleans, and Cam- 
bridge. She is "wild" about Michigan where she is 
"majoring in Philosophy and English, working on the 
Constitutional Convention, restructuring Student Gov't, 
as a delegate from the literature school, on the Joint 
Judiciary Council busily acquiting everyone, and pre- 
paring for another chilly Michigan winter." 

NEE GAINES traveled around the U.S. this sum- 
mer and stopped in Cambridge briefly on her way 
home. LUCY CRANE also spent the last few weeks 
of the summer out west, including Texas, New 



fourteen 



Mexico, Arizona, Colorado and Wyoming. "Wished 
I could have stopped in to see '66-ers, but was 
pushing. Loved this country and am a little en- 
couraged . . . John's in the Ivory Coast (Peace 
Corps) . . . and I miss him — unusual?" 

MELINDA MILLER and MARTY WEIS traveled 
around Europe this summer. They visited with BON- 
NIE WARE STEPPAN and her husband, John, in Ox- 
ford, England. 

PEIGI DONAGHY and ROSE JANE BENDETSON 
had an apartment in New York City for the summer. 
Peigi was on the fashion board at Macy's and Rosie 
took a course in Chemistry at Columbia. They both 
did some hostessing at Blum's (YUM!) 

SHELLEY ERWIN writes that she is quite en- 
thused about her courses. "Quite a feeling to know 
you're half way through. Vassar's going co-ed as 
soon as I graduate! Waaah! . . . This has been 
the only sour note of my college career so far." 

From LEE JOHNSON: "I feel a little isolated out 
here. I left Connecticut College and I'm a VISTA 
volunteer in Laredo, Texas. My new address is 3516 
San Agustin, Laredo, Texas 78040. I'll be here until 
August '69 and then go back to Colorado to finish 
school." 

PAM SEVEY graduated from Colby Jr. and is now 
at Wheaton along with BETH HUMSTONE, who 
graduated from Bradford Jr. 

SANDY DOUCETT is at Hood majoring in Early 
Childhood Education. She spent the summer working 
at a camp for physically handicapped children and 
adults. "It was fascinating work . . . After graduation 
I'm going into special education, so the summer 
really proved to be a worthwhile experience." 

MARY PORTER worked this summer with three 
and four year olds at a Head Start program. In 
addition, she took a course in drawing and one in 
painting at C.W. Post College. 

LUCY THOMSON was in Cleveland working in a 
white Appalachian ghetto. "It was a very exciting, 
broadening experience and I hope it may lead to 
something for the future. Six of us lived right in 
the neighborhood in an apartment and supervised 
programs for the kids as well as community organiza- 
tion for the adults through art and music." 

ELLEN ROSS writes: "I've been doing Freshman 
Orientation and loving every minute of it. Conn, is 
great -!— am majoring in Botany! I spent the sum- 
mer at a camp in Vermont teoching nature (every- 
bod/ laughs about that one!)." 

JUDY BRICKER also loves Conn. College where 
she is a "House Junior" to welcome Freshmen. She 
spent the summer at home and took Organic Chem- 
istry at University of Bridgeport. The Brickers are 
moving to Delray Beach, Fla., in January, "so, any- 
one, please come down spring!" LONNI SOMERS, 
who visited with Judy, studied this summer at the 
University of Barcelona in Spain and is now back at 
Wisconsin. 

BARBARA HAZARD worked with a professor at 
Stanford this summer on her writing. "Feel en- 



couraged because I may get a few things published 
in literary magazines out here . . . Although I have 
now completed a Chinese major, I have decided to 
change to an interdisciplinary major in Philosophy 
and Religion in which I will try to compare and 
contrast certain notions common to Eastern and 
Western religious thought. So I will continue to have 
a very heavy schedule ... I am engaged (informally) 
to a Stanford graduate who is going into VISTA for 
two years ... At present I am a "sponsor" (an 
upperclassman living in all-freshmen dorm) which 
demands all my time . . . Undone things stay un- 
done, at least for the moment." 

DAWN WOODWORTH is engaged to William B. 
Von Gillernof, Morton Grove, III. Dawn is a junior 
at Northwestern School of Music, and her fiance is a 
senior at the same university. 

KATHY ABLER graduated from Bennett Junior 
College in June, and is now in the Peace Corps Train- 
ing Program. 

LEE HASELTON is back at the University of Pitts- 
burgh after working in a clothing store in Maine 
this summer. She loves all her courses and is starting 
on a double major of English and History of Art. 
"Don't have to worry about curfews. The only thing 
I dislike is that I can't open my window and have 
to use an air-conditioner — rough life!" 

KAREN FULLER was at Harvard Summer School 
and is now at B.U. along with HOLLY ASHLEY. I 
have seen both of them and they look wonderful. 
Also bumped into JOAN HARNEY and MARGARET 
DEUTSCH (both '64) who are living in Cambridge. 
Joan is taking secretarial courses at Hickox in Boston 
(which is what I did this summer) and Margaret is 
getting her Master's Degree in Art History at Harvard. 

Also saw CHRISTINE HARLEY C68) last June in 
National Airport in Washington, D.C. where she was 
working as a hostess for American Airlines. Abbot 
girls everywhere!! 

JEANNIE LIPPINCOTT is now attending Brigham 
Young University in Utah. 

NANCY WHITEHEAD spent a day in Cambridge 
with Ayer and me. She worked for a family in South 
Dartmouth this summer. She is now back in Wis- 
consin in her own little apartment. 

As you know, AYER CHAMBERLIN and I have on 
apartment in Cambridge while I commute to B.U. 
every day for classes in journalism. I am beginning 
to realize what an open field it really is. The switch 
from the all-girl, small college atmosphere is still 
causing my head to spin. So many people!. And do I 
love it!! Ayer is working at Holyoke Center in the 
Harvard Alumni Records office. Her thumb gets a 
bit sore at times, but she's happy and managing 
quite successfully. She's a Psychology mojor at Beloit 
and will return there in January. 

In any case, it was wonderful to receive your cards. 
It was just a little reminder to keep in touch. I 
enjoy hearing from you! 

Hope it's a good year for all. 

Love, 
Ellen 



fifteen 



1967 

News Secretary: Judith Hannegan, 893 College 
St., Beloit, Wis. 53511. 

LAURIE WALLWORK has transferred to George 
Washington University. 



1968 

News Secretary: Marcia Owen, Stillings No. 809, 
University of New Hampshire, Durham, N.H. 

It seems strange that we all aren't returning once 
again to Abbot for another year together. It's still 
hard to believe that the long awaited June 1 has 
actually come and gone leaving us as graduates! 
I hadn't realized until this summer what poor cor- 
respondents we all are. What ever happened to that 
deluge of mail that I was supposed to receive in 
August? The letters I have gotten have proven to 
be very newsy; I'll try to include as much as pos- 
sible. 

CHER LEWIS spent her summer in Newport News, 
Virginia working as a lab assistant breaking equip- 
ment beyond measure. She professes that buried 
under tons of paper work from N.Y.U. she remains 
an ultra-conservative — quiet, shy, etc. in contrast 
to BARBARA AINSLIE "who has been fighting hip- 
pies in Haight Ashbury." 

JODY FROST seems to have won the "best job 
of the summer" award. She has been working at the 
Harvard Law School Alumni Center as a "glorified 
file clerk," i.e., half secretary and half "record 
storage engineer." She has spent time visiting with 
NANCY ROBERTS and with members of the class of 
'67 who were living in Cambridge this summer. The 
remaining part of her summer has been spent sailing 
on the waters of Buzzards Bay and the Cape. 

Immediately following graduation NANCY CAR- 
MER, BETSY HANDY, and KATHY SCHOETTLER 
left for a 1 day vacation at the Carmer's home 
on St. Croix, Virgin Islands. Needless to say it was 
an "unforgettable trip" for them and they enjoyed 
every minute of it. Nancy spent the rest of her 
vacation showing her Quarter Horse at State Fairs 
and horse shows in New York continuing to win 
prize money and trophies. Betsy returned to a job 
in Hingham where she worked with 1 3 kindergarten- 
aged underprivileged children for six weeks. 

PAULA ATWOOD worked at Lord and Taylor in 
West Hartford in their shoe department. She also 
tutored for the Revitilization Corps in the North end 
of Hartford. 

TOBY DONDIS writes that her summer was great. 
She worked for her father part-time and the rest of 
the time just enjoyed herself. She spent a delightful 
two weeks with PATTY ROCKWOOD in Michigan. 
They had a great time and together took an over- 
night trip to Canada and a two day trip to Chicago. 

BETTY BRIGGS was still "pushing hamburgers" at 
Avco's Missile Systems Division in Wilmington. She 
says there's no better place to be surrounded by 
men — "if you happen to like them over forty, 
overly intelligent, and overweight. After all there's 
nothing like a mad love affair with a dishwasher to 
add a new dimension to your life." 



Miss Minard will be happy to hear that her 
efforts hove not gone unrewarded. CARY CLEAVER 
spent her summer incredibly interested in a summer 
school course: second semester American history. She 
can now distinguish the first from the second world 



wars 



ANNETTE DAVIS has moved to Beverly Hills and 
writes that "California is a wonderful place with all 
different types of people." She has only seen one 
movie star — Warren Beatty. What a shame! She 
maintains that "the East is still the Greatest" and 
misses it and all her friends C68). She had a job as 
a receptionist at a stock broker's office in L.A. for 
the month of July and spent the rest of her sum- 
mer at the beach getting the best tan she's ever had. 

FLORENCE NEWCOMB spent most of her summer 
living with CLAUDIA WHITNEY in New York work- 
ing for Russell Stover Candies — a tempting job 
for anyone. Wonder how long her diet lasted? Her 
old roommate ANNE FELLOWS also held a pre- 
carious position diet-wise. She and a girl friend ran 
"Girls Friday Summer Service" a catering service for 
any occasion. 

KAREN URIE had a job in summer stock in Maine 
and did very well. She was talented enough to gain 
the role equivalent to that of Ophelia in a modern 
version of HAMLET. Congrats, Karen! Keep up the 
good work. 

I spent my summer working at Rye Beach, N.H. 
and had the chance to see LEE SULLIVAN, KATHI 
WIES, and ANN FINN several times. They worked 
together in a shop at Ogunquit, Maine not far from 
Miss Von E. and Miss Sweet. 

JANICE O'NEAL dropped in on me one night at 
work and told me all about her fantastic summer. 
She spent her time in England with the Experiment 
in International Living bumping into "Andies" all 
along the way. 

NANCY ROBERTS' whole summer was "absorbed 
and consumed" by the Mystic Seaport, the local 
tourist attraction in Mystic, Conn. In short, she was 
a slave, as several of us were, to the American 
touring public. MAGGIE ADAMS was a part of that 
public. She spent her time travelling between Canada, 
Illinois, and Florida. 

I ran into JANE BROWN in Boston and she told 
me all about her summer. She was lucky enough to 
get a job in the merchandising department of Jordan 
Marsh in Boston and loved every minute of it. She 
spent her "early mornings and late afternoons" com- 
muting between Andover and Boston but says that 
it was worth it. 

KAREN SEAWARD left early for college so that 
she could spend some time seeing the country. She 
flew to Montreal and then took a train to Oregon. 
She had a great summer working as a chambermaid 
— babysitter in Maine but was anxious for her trip 
to start when I last saw her. 

That's all the news that I have to report. Please 
everyone, I genuinely want to hear from you. Let 
me know how college and life are treating you! Even 
if it's only a postcard!! Please, please write. 

Love, 

Marcia 



sixteen 



Don't Move . . . 

Physically Statistically 

Educationally Professionally 

Without Notifying Us! 

Send to the Alumnae Office by January 25, 1969 



Maiden Name Class 

Married Name .._ 

Address 

Zip Code 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 

Andover. Massachusetts 
return requested 



ENTERED AS 
SECOND-CLASS MATTE 

AT THE POST OFFICE 

ANDOVER. MASSACHUSE 




♦ « 



_ 




Vt 







<^y 






t 






The Executive Board of the Alumnae Association 

1968- 1970 



President 



Mrs. Leonard M. Fowle 

(Nancy Kimball) 

36 Norman St., Marblehead, Mass. 01945 



Vice Presidents 



Mrs. Malcolm S. Loring 

• Anne Russell) 

Pepperell Rd., Kittery Point, Me. 03905 

Mrs. David E. Rickenbacker 

(Patricia Bowne) 

5 Glenside Terrace 

Upper Montclair, N.J. 07043 

Mrs. F. N. Ladd 
( Frances Nolde) 
2 South Lane, Hingham, Mass. 02043 



Clerk 



Mrs. Benneville N. Strohecker 
(Constance Hall) 
8 Harbor Ave. 
Marblehead, Mass. 01945 






Treasurer 



Mrs. Gage Olcott 

(Helen O'Brien) 

40 Oakridge Rd., Wellesley, Mass. 02181 



Executive Secretary 

Delegates-at-Large 



Front Cover: 

Mrs. Harford Powel and 

Mrs. John Bennett in Polyhedra 



Alumnae Trustee 
1963-1969 



Miss C. Jane Sullivan 

20 Buswell St., Lawrence, Mass. 01841 

Mrs. Sargent Bradlee, Jr. 
(Sally Humason) 
Linden Cottage, Walker Rd. 
Manchester, Mass. 01944 

Mrs. J. Robert Haskin, Jr. 
(Miriam Bickford) 
6 Redstone Lane 
Marblehead, Mass. 01945 

Mrs. Harry Maidment 
< Emily House) 
99 Robert Rd. 
Manchester, Conn. 06040 



Miss Alice C. Sweeney 

3; School St., Andover, Mass. 01810 



Alumnae Trustee 
1966-1972 



Mrs. John B. Ogilvie 

I Donna Brace) 

14 Circle Rd., Darien, Conn. 06820 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 



FEBRUARY, 1969 



VOLUME 37, NUMBER 2 



Editor: C. JANE SULLIVAN 

Assr. Editor: MRS. FRANK DiCLEMENTE 

s ublished four times yearly, October, February, May and September by Abbot Academy, Andover, Massachusetts. Entered as 
second class matter December 12, 1933, at the post office at Andover, Massachusetts, under the act of August 24, 1912. 

Photographer — Richard D. Graber, Andover, Mass. 



PRINTED AT EAGLE-TRIBUNE PRINTING. LAWRENCE. MASSACHUSETTS 



FROM THE PRINCIPAL 



We are all familiar, I think, with the notion 
that a new man in an important job enjoys what 
is somewhat inappropriately called a "honey- 
moon", which amounts to a gentle breaking-in 
period designed to help acquaint him with the 
school and also give its staff a chance to get 
acquainted with a new person and style. It is a 
genial concept, and perhaps something we should 
preserve if we can. But the pace of development 
in our society today is so great that what used to 
be a leisurely, comfortable shake-down cruise 
has been transformed into a short hasty period 
best characterized by brave assaults on the con- 
fusion. Richard Nixon enjoyed possibly a full 
week of honeymooning before reality began to 
set in; given the laughably smaller scale of my 
position here, I would say that the honeymoon 
lasted about four months, the first three consist- 
ing of last summer. The grappling has been in 
dead earnest ever since then! 

While those who have been in the school for 
some time are busy analyzing and evaluating the 
new man, he is busily evaluating and analyzing 
the organization that he has inherited. Abbot is 
a basically sound, very traditional institution 
which is in a state of delayed transition, one 
might call it. It has been girding itself for neces- 
sary and important change for a number of years, 
and due to circumstances, has been unable to 
take the actual steps until now. It is conscious of 
this need, and is fretting a bit, trying hard to 
contain a full head of pent-up steam, namely 
ideas about change. For years the school has 
been understaffed in some areas, in terms of 
enough people to do the job comfortably — by 
comfortably I mean so that all staff members by 
virtue of the schedule may enjoy a reasonably 
normal work week — and that it badly needs 
new or at least renovated facilities in many areas. 
And the working conditions of its faculty and 
staff, principally in the area of salaries and per- 
quisites, needs urgent attention. In short, it 
needs a good thorough over-hauling, and in most 
areas the need is great enough so it should be 
done, ideally, right now. 

We all know that everything can't be done at 
once, nor could we pay for all of it now even if 
the accomplishment itself were possible. But we 
are taking what steps we can manage. We have 
examined the descriptive studies made in recent 
years by the faculty for the evaluators from the 
N. E. Association of Schools and Colleges with an 
eye to translating them into appropriate pro- 
graming for Abbot's future. A faculty com- 
mittee on curriculum is studying our existing 
program and preparing proposals to recommend 



to the Development Committee of the Board of 
Trustees. A parallel committee on the physical 
plant is preparing suggestions regarding land 
use and the up-dating of our buildings and 
equipment. The emphasis will be primarily on 
improving the quality of the existing operation, 
rather than any impulsive increase in school 
size, which would only add to our overhead and 
leave us with fewer resources proportionately to 
devote to qualitative development. We have 
taken a few steps this year: the first floor of one 
of our properties, four Morton Street, has been 
renovated for use as a social area, both for the 
girls themselves and also for coordinate use with 
Phillips Academy boys. And recently we pur- 
chased fifty Phillips Street, which is a very 
large house with a fine barn and small shed 
on an approximately three acre corner lot im- 
mediately adjacent to our athletic fields. We 
have not yet determined the exact use of this 
house, but it is a fine addition to the School, 
both by virtue of its location and its size and the 
attractive character of the buildings. 

We are also in the midst of discussing with 
Phillips Academy concrete proposals for coordi- 
nating certain classes next year. There is hope 
that in Art and in some other areas we may be 
able to actually combine operations. At this point 
it is impossible to chart exactly the dimension 
and character of our ultimate involvement with 
P. A., but it is certain that more rather than less 
joint activity will come about. We are in a fortu- 
nate position because we may do as little or as 
much on a joint basis as seems feasible and at- 
tractive educationally, without necessarily hav- 
ing to commit wholly to the full apparatus of co- 
education, as so many schools and colleges 
seemingly have no choice but to do. The prevail- 
ing disposition at both schools is that more co- 
ordinate activity, rather than less, will be bene- 
ficial to both the boys and girls. 

Overall, then, we are pursuing a more open, 
stimulating environment in which more respons- 
ibility will fall to the student, in a free and more 
natural atmosphere. We cannot see that any- 
thing important will be lost in terms of Abbot's 
historic dedication to helping educate well-in- 
formed, mature, and self-reliant young women, 
but rather that a vastly more challenging and 
stimulating environment here will dramatically 
improve the degree of our success in accomplish- 
ing our overall mission. 



No Man Is An Island 

Panel discussion at Parents' Week End, November, 1968 

MISS CAROLYN GOODWIN 
Head of Mathematics Department, Moderator 



MISS GOODWIN: Parents and teachers 
have a common purpose — to provide a 
climate in which an individual child can 
grow, learn, and appreciate the world about 
him. We sometimes hear about your half 
of the process. We should like to be sure 
that you are well-informed about our half. 
Our theme, "No Man Is An Island", applies 
to our students and to the faculty. While 
hoping that each girl will become a unique 
individual, not forced into a mold or made 
to conform to a rigid pattern, we trust that 
she will not be an isolated individual. Just 
as socially she must relate to other people, 
so academically she must relate many 
branches of learning one to another if any 
one is to be meaningful. Hence the faculty 
strive to pin point connections between one 
subject field and another, to use material 
from one discipline to enchance another, or 
even to use bait from one department to 
engender interest in another. Departments 
can no longer remain unrelated islands. 

The art department has taken a lively in- 
terest and leads in cooperative ventures. 

MRS. POWEL: The art department offers 
a course in visual perception, which is ex- 
perienced by all Abbot Academy second 
year girls. The definition of visual percep- 
tion is that it is a new course of exercises 
at Abbot, but it is a course with old con- 
cepts of education in that its purpose is to 
increase awareness, and consciousness of 
relationships, and to provide opportunities 
for discovery. 

There are similar systems of order existing 
within the different fields of study. Once 
the student becomes aware of these like- 
nesses, patterns of growth, and organiza- 
tional connections, understanding is en- 
larged. The ultimate desire is that all sub- 
jects become an integral part of a whole 
education, rather than isolated sections of 
information. 



For illustration of the kind of disciplined 
exercies of visual perception, the "figure- 
ground problem" seems most comprehen- 
sive. Using a black piece of paper and a 
white piece of the same size and tearing 
a shape out of the black paper and placing 
it upon the white piece, one immediately 
becomes conscious of the relationship of one 
to the other. Parents should try to solve this 
problem at home; to make a figure ground 
composition in which the black shapes, 
placed upon the white background, create 
white shapes. Depending upon the way in 
which one views the finished result, the 
figure and ground can change position. 

MRS. BENNETT: In the mathematics de- 
partment, we try to capitalize on and 
enhance the "figure-ground" exercise by 
analyzing the mathematical concepts of 
symmetry and reflection. The underlying 
principle that makes the problem "work" 
involves reflecting the black shapes in the 
white; and vice versa. The symmetries 
established create a tension on and in the 
surface of the composition. This study can 
lead to a discussion of geometric trans- 
formation, in general. 

Another exercise involves optical illusions. 
The girls are asked to place the same 
colored squares on different colored back- 
grounds, so that the center squares appear 
to be different colors after all. This is fol- 
lowed by other illustrations of length and 
size, that involve the principles or projec- 
tion and perspective. The purpose of these 
exercises is to make the girls aware that 
you do always "see" what you think ycu 
see. In geometry it is very important not to 
reason from the figure or drawing, but 
rather to prove a hypothesis that would 
be valid without the picture. 

Still another example requires a three- 
dimensional construction based on congru- 
ent shapes. Having chosen one or two basic 



two 



figures as a building block or module, the 
student is required to construct a three 
dimensional object. Hopefully, the project 
will make the student more aware of her 
surroundings and the three dimensional 
relationships there. This exercise also leads 
to a study of polyhedra and their properties. 

"The square, the circle, and the triangle — 
whether combined, broken apart, or dis- 
torted — are the components of the endlessly 
shifting kaleidoscope that is art." This 
quotation summarizes and symbolizes the 
connection between art and mathematics 
that we here at Abbot are trying to make 
more real and tangible through these and 
other exercises. 

MISS GOODWIN: Many school systems 
today are experimenting with schedules 
designed to fit the individual student, rather 
than trying to fit the student to the 
schedule. By varying the time and size of 
section meetings, large group lectures can 
be supplemented by smaller discussion ses- 
sions. The ultimate in serving the eager in- 
dividual student is a schedule made to free 
time for independent study. Since Abbot 
has always had classes small enough to 
permit discussions and to encourage indi- 
vidual differences, we have not been forced 
to move as fast as some schools in changing 
our schedule. But this year we have intro- 
duced certain innovations. 

MISS MINARD: Like some of the other aca- 
demic departments, the history department 
is experimenting with longer class periods, 
meeting less often. The senior history 
students have an 80 minute class and two 
60 minute classes a week and the schedule 
for the 11th graders is similar. There are 
two of us teaching American history; our 
sections are scheduled simultaneously. It 
is possible to meet our own sections — 
twenty or so girls — individually, combine 
them into one larger group or divide our 
own sections for half a period or 40 minutes. 

The longer classes have enabled us to at- 
tempt projects which are aimed at breaking 
down the barriers which are so frequently 
erected, both by the student and the 
teacher, between the various academic 
disciplines. While we were studying the 
new United States of the 1 790's, a group 
of girls volunteered to read a play, "The 



Contrast", written by Royall Tyler in 1787. 
This was combined with the singing of some 
music by William Billings, a contemporary 
of Tyler's. This involvement in the actual 
culture of the past made the period much 
more vivid than simply reading about it 
could have done but it could not have been 
attempted in the more conventional 40 
minute period. 

When we studied Napoleon in the 11th 
grade Modern Europe History, we looked at 
him as an example of a figure-ground study. 
Napoleon was considered as the figure; 
French and European society as the ground. 
What was the historical and political (rather 
than artistic) relationship between the two? 
History is very complex. Too often, partic- 
ularly when one is 17, one's approach to, 
and definition of, history is simplistic and 
absolutistic. We hope by referring to, and 
establishing relationships with, other dis- 
ciplines through the medium of the longer 
class period, to make more of the rich com- 
plexity and texture of history and of man. 
As Mrs. Powel said, "The ultimate desire is 
that all subjects become an integral part 
of a whole education, rather than isolated 
sections of information." 

MISS GOODWIN: The English department 
in its courses for seniors is also working 
with new blocks of time. 

MRS. CEELY: To bring life and interest 
into the study of subjects in the classroom, 
it is necessary to offer the student a variety 
of experience. In the study of English the 
student will have a richer and more satis- 
fying experience if all the senses respond to 
literature. This liveliness can be induced in 



Miss Mary Minard 





Mrs. Robert Ceely, Miss Carolyn Goodwin 
and Mrs. John Sisson 



a number of ways: movies, both large scale 
commercial productions for which field trips 
are made and more modest "underground" 
efforts which can be brought into one class- 
room; acting in class also works well as 
does the presentation of skits and panel dis- 
cussions. The visual exercises used in the 
art studio are also relevant to some aspects 
of the analysis of literature and have been 
used effectively. 

When one student's whole being is brought 
into the learning experience, she gains not 
only in factual knowledge, but through the 
play of imagination in a sense of her cul- 
tural history and her place in it. 

MRS. SISSON: Since we feel that education 
is a process of life, not just a preparation, 
we want to set up an environment that can 
engage the whole person. To reinforce the 
close reading of a book, we used more 
audio-visual aids last year, both intra- and 
inter-department. For example, I presented 
a slide-tape on the subject, the develop- 
ment of the modern novel, concentrating 
on visual analogies of paintings and sculp- 
tures from the Impressionist to the Modern 
Period. My senior class, after viewing the 
then current film, "Far From The Madding 
Crowd" outlined a scenario for Hardy's 
"Mayor of Casterbridge," which they were 
reading in class. We attempt to make class- 
room study of plays come alive through 
readings of plays, acting scenes with 
students and excursions to live theater. 

We hope to expand these audio-visual ex- 
periences during the winter and spring term 



of 1969, particularly in showing some new 
experimental films, both long and short 
ones, which will stimulate a new vocabu- 
lary and expand perception. Some students 
can understand and create line and form 
and design through the medium of film 
both as a viewer and as a maker-of-films, 
better than through the written word. 

Therefore a showing of short films such as 
"Clay", "Orange and Blue" and "Sky" can 
expand the student's perception. Films 
named "Why Man Creates", "Time Is", 
and "The Eye of the Beholder" can teach, 
among other things, concepts of point of 
view, stream of consciousness, time dis- 
placements which they meet in literature. 

Films are yet another dimension of experi- 
ence to help the student see that the learn- 
ing process is all of life, to make her relate 
her studies to everything she does and en- 
courage on adventure in education for her 
whole life. 

MISS GOODWIN: As schools seek to serve 
individuals better, they face the need for a 
great variety of materials and resources. 
In recognition of this fact libraries are now 
often called 'research centers'. 

MRS. COUCH: No man is an island. How 
does this apply to a school library? It is in 
the library — in one of the carrals (an island 
more or less — in itself) that a girl becomes 
acquainted with the great philosophers, 
artists, scientists — the great thinkers of the 
past. It is here that she learns of her own 
heritage. It is here — that she can — by her- 
self — come to understand the interlocking 
goals of her various classes — or preferably 
of her teachers, and how each class in some 
way hinges on other classes and leads into the 
future. This is the reason the library houses, 
not only the classics and materials dealing 
with the past, but also tries to be contem- 
porary and up-to-date in its outlook. We 
do subscribe to some fairly radical periodi- 
cals. We do buy some, not all, of the 
modern novels. We have displayed on our 
bulletin board some of the radical pamph- 
lets dealing with the past election. In these 
ways, as well as others, we hope to be able 
to help the girls learn — to understand — 
not only their heritage, but their own times 
and perhaps to help them plan for and 
dream of the future. 



four 



Now, to be more concrete: The Abbot 
library has in the past year or two been 
enlarged. It is now carpeted, has more and 
smaller tables and 32 corrals — small indi- 
vidual study islands. We have a carpeted 
study room, a work room, and a periodical 
room in the basement as well as a large 
area of stacks where books that are used 
only occasionally are kept. 

This year, it has been decided to house 
and catalog audio-visual materials in a 
central place other than the library. For 
the present at least, the library remains a 
housing place for the printed word. It is 
not an "instructional resources center"! 

We do have a fine collection of periodicals. 
For example, we have in bound volumes all 
issues of the "Atlantic Monthly" — from 
Volume 1, dated 1857, of "Harper's'- from 
Volume 4, dated 1851. How fascinating to 



be able to read a magazine published in 
the early 1 860's if one is doing a term 
paper on some phase of the Civil War. 

One of the smaller sections of the library 
that is used to a great extent is that where 
we keep college catalogs and books about 
college admissions, scholarships — how to 
apply for and receive one — and how to go 
about training for a specific career. 

We work closely with the academic de- 
partments — buying those books requested 
by teachers — and also, often, buying books 
requested by the students. 

MISS GOODWIN: Science has its own 
peculiar problems. Cooperation with other 
disciplines is certainly desirable, but 
frequently difficult and overly time con- 
suming. 



Mrs. James Couch 











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MRS. SALON: The science department 
seems to be an island apart from other dis- 
ciplines; it seems to me that basic science 
does not lend itself to extensive inter dis- 
ciplinary work — especially since few girls 
choose more than one year of science (the 
minimum requirement for graduation). 
Our main aim in this one year is to impart 
to the student a feeling for the nature of 
scientific inquiry through experience. 

We do, however, borrow from other disci- 
plines at times. Some examples are: 

1. reference to history intellectural 
climate into which "radical" scienti- 
fic ideas were introduced. 

2. basic familiarity with quantitative 
concepts — in other words we use 
arithmetic and algebra. 

3. ability to perceive intellectually and 
physically in laboratory work is sharp- 
ened by experience in the visual per- 
ception course and other art courses. 

This year for the first time we plan to try 
to incorporate science, visual perception, 
and some photography using still pictures, 
films made by us, and specific exercises in 
perception using biological subjects. 

We would like to think that we could do 
more in science education — that we can 
make science a relevant and integral part 
of every student's life after she leaves 
school. 

1 . She should be aware of ecological 
changes wrought by man in changing 
the landscape and/or polluting it. 
She should be able to vote intelli- 
gently on these matters — or even in- 
itiate needed legislation. 

2. She should be aware of the principles 
involved in birth control. 

3. She should be able to read of new 
breakthroughs in scientific discovery 
and be able to judge their signifi- 
cance. These are reported at some 
length in the "New York Times" for 
the intelligent and informed lay 
reader. 



4. She should be able to deal intelli- 
gently with the physical world; for 
example, she should know about mo- 
mentum before she drives a car. 

5. She should feel comfortable living in 
a scientific age — our girls bring a 
real fear and suspicion into the 
science classroom. 

6. She might even choose a science 
career. 

In my opinion, we cannot do this in one 
year. Two years of science should be a min- 
imum. If a girl is truly interested in going 
on in science, I would judge three or even 
four years to be appropriate. 

Girls are coming to our science island in 
greater numbers than ever before — that 
is, we have more taking two or three years of 
science. Our facilities and staff cannot 
accommodate all those who would come. 
We are pleased to be joining the mainland. 
Apparently the girls are giving up their 
fears and are learning some of the joys of 
learning science — because it seems to them 
to be relevant. 



Mrs. Joel Salon 



SIX 




Abbot Away from Andover 



CALIFORNIA 

California alumnae have been invited to attend a regional alumnae 
conference and luncheon on March 5, 1969, at the Katharine Branson School 
in Ross, Calif. Mr. Donald A. Gordon, Principal, will join Abbot alumnae and 
those of fifty-eight other schools to hear "The Case for Independent Educa- 
tion" discussed by a distinguished group of educators. Abbot alumnae will 
have luncheon together and will be joined by Mr. Gordon, and Mary Howard 
Nutting '40, a board member of the Alumnae Presidents' Council, the 
sponsors of the conference. 

A cocktail party for alumnae and parents in the San Francisco area 
will be held in the Ohja Cocktail Lounge in the Suehiro Restaurant at the 
Japanese Cultural Center, 1737 Post St., on Wednesday evening, March 5, 
from 5-7 p.m. Martha Ball Geiken '48 and Jane Woolverton Wrench '49 
are in charge of the arrangements. 

On Sunday evening, March 9, a cocktail party and reception for Mr. 
and Mrs. Donald Gordon will be held at the Beverly Wilshire in Beverly 
Hills from 5-7 p.m. Charlotte Gonzalez Mann '49 is making the plans for 
this meeting. 

NEW YORK 

The New York Abbot Club's annual meeting will be held, March 13, 
from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the Yale Club, 50 Vanderbilt Ave. Mr. Donald A. 
Gordon, Mr. Philip K. Allen, President of the Board of Trustees, and Miss 
Jane Sullivan will attend. 

F LOR I DA 

Miss Jane Sullivan will attend two meetings in Florida. On March 25 
at 6 p.m. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Robinson will give a cocktail party for parents, 
alumnae and husbands at their home, 570 Seminole Drive, Winter Park. 

On March 28, a luncheon will be held in the Las Olas Room of the 
Riverside Hotel, 620 Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale. 

If you are vacationing in either area, contact Mrs. J. Walter Tucker 

(Marjorie Sommer '46), 740 Palmer Ave., Winter Park, or Mrs. Kenneth 

C. Dow (Kathryn Beck '19) , 2 Isle of Venice, Ft. Lauderdale, for reservations. 

BOSTON 

The Spring luncheon of the Boston Abbot Club will be held April 17 
at the Pillar House in Newton. Hazel Erb will speak on "Little Known Wives 
of Great Men." 

seven 



Class 
Fund 
Secretaries 



1903 Mrs. 
1906 Mrs. 



1907 


Mrs. 


1908 


Mrs. 


1909 


Miss 


1910 


Miss 


1915 


Mrs. 


1916 


Mrs. 


1917 


Mrs. 


1918 


Miss 


1919 


Mrs. 


1920 


Mrs. 


1921 


Mrs. 


1922 


Mrs. 


1923 


Mrs. 


1924 


Mrs. 


1925 


Mrs. 


1926 


Mrs. 


1927 


Mrs. 


1929 


Mrs. 


1930 


Mrs. 


1931 


Mrs. 


1932 


Miss 


1933 


Mrs. 


1934 


Mrs. 


1935 


Mrs. 


1936 


Mrs. 


1937 


Mrs. 


1938 


Mrs. 


1939 


Mrs. 


1940 


Mrs. 


1941 


Mrs. 


1942 


Miss 


1943 


Mrs. 


1944 


Mrs. 


1945 


Mrs. 


1946 


Mrs. 


1947 


Mrs. 


1948 


Mrs. 


1949 


Mrs. 


1950 


Mrs. 


1951 


Mrs. 


1952 


Mrs. 


1953 


Mrs. 


1954 


Mrs. 


1955 


Mrs. 


1956 


Mrs. 


1957 


Mrs. 


1958 


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1959 


Miss 


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Miss 


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1967 


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1968 


Miss 



R. Clyde Gerber (Margaret Wilson) 

215 So. Mariposa Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 90004 
Reeve Chipman (Constance Parker) 

1220 No. Washington, Hutchinson, Kan. 67501 

J. Edward Crowley (Marjory Bond) 142 High St., Reading, Mass. 01867 

Franklin T. Towle (Helen Buss) 

137 Mt. Vernon St., West Roxbury, Mass. 02132 

Janet L. Gorton 87 W. Cedar St., Boston, Mass. 02114 

Grace F. Kellogg 5 Blueberry Hill Rd., Centerville, Mass. 02632 

Frederic S. Blodgett (Jessie Nye) 18 School St., Bucksport, Me. 04416 

Philip D. Dalrymple (Mildred Jenkins) 27 Bridge St., Salem, N.H. 03079 

Myron S. Chellis (Miriam Bacon) 15 Raymond Ave., Beverly, Mass. 01915 

Irene Atwood 260 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 02116 

Kenneth C. Dow (Kathryn Beck) .... 2 Isle of Venice, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 33301 

H. Dunham Hunt (Margaret Ackroyd) R.D. 4, Ballston Spa., N.Y. 12020 

Hugh A. Ward (Marian Ailing) 1192 Park Ave., New York, N.Y. 10028 

Frank J. Sherman (Barbara Sands) .... Captain's Walk, Chatham, Mass. 02650 

Sterling Dow (Elizabeth Flagg) 159 Brattle St., Cambridge, Mass. 02138 

Charles Bowler (Susanna Smith) .... 132 Waldwick Ave., Waldwick, N.J. 07463 

Ariel F. Horle (Elizabeth Burtnett) 3210 Polk, El Paso, Tex. 79930 

Morris B. Wood (Edith Ireland) Strathmere Club, Amesbury, Mass. 01913 

Kendrick F. Bellows (Sylvia Miller) Nepawin Lane, Plainfield, N.J. 07060 

Russell T. Loesch (Polly Francis) 77 Young Ave., Cedar Grove, N.J. 07009 

James L. Sullivan (Frances Sullivan) .... 91 Concord St., Nashua, N.H. 03060 

Carl Keil (Marcia Rudd) 337 Middlesex Rd., Darien, Conn. 06820 

Isabel Arms 21 Metcalf St., Worcester, Mass. 01609 

Warhis Shaw (Jane Ritchie) 125 Underwood Ave., Warwick, R.I. 02888 

Lewis Dexter (Cassandra Kinsman) ... 108 Upland Rd., Brookline, Mass. 02146 

Prescott Coan (Frances McTernen) RFD, Sheffield, Mass. 01257 

Gage Olcott (Helen O'Brien) 40 Oakridge Rd., Wellesley, Mass. 02181 

James R. Dowd (Frances Connelly) .... 140 Lovejoy Rd., Andover, Mass. 01810 

Malcolm A. Letts (Phyllis England) Box 104, East Brewster, Mass. 02640 

Frank V. Deegan (Ann Oakman) 59 1st St., Garden City, N.Y. 11530 

Louis M. Warlick (Dorothy Garry) 12 Judson Rd., Andover, Mass. 01810 

Long Reed (Sue Long) 6334 Cavalier Corridor, Falls Church, Va. 22044 

Jane Rutherford 174 Pennsylvania Ave., Crestwood, N.Y. 10707 

David W. Ewing (Elizabeth Bennett) 

195 Cambridge St., Winchester, Mass. 01890 
Edgar T. Mead, Jr. (Emily McMurray) .... 3 Clement Rd., Hanover, N.H. 03755 
William E. Sherpick (Mary Taylor) .... 101 Main St., Farmington, Conn. 06032 
Charles B. Jones (Sally North) .... Shore Rd., Box 424, Ogunquit, Me. 03907 

Jerome Gleason (Jane Lewis) 9 Devens St., Concord, Mass. 01742 

Jack B. Joyce (Ann Robinson) 

RD 3, Box 368, Cortelyou Lane, Somerset, N.J. 08873 
William E. Whitney (Mercy Barnes) .... 105 Juniper Rd., Belmont, Mass. 02178 
William A. Zell (Joan Aldrich), 187 Woodstock Rd., Southbridge, Mass. 01550 

Elton Carlson (Carolin Furst) 45 Church St., Port Allegany, Penna. 16743 

Alexander Warren (Sarah Emmons) .... Taylor Hall East, Andover, Mass. 01810 
Claude A. Wilson, Jr. (Janet Bowden) 

65 Patterson Ave., Greenwich, Conn. 06830 
Ferd J. Sauereisen (Molly Young, 1 10 Marvelwood PI., Pittsburgh, Penna. 15215 
James K. Dow, Jr. (Katherine Stirling) .... 173 Holt Rd., Andover, Mass. 01810 

Peter E. Voss (Lynn Dowlin) 2935 Woodcliffe N.W., Canton, Ohio 44718 

Henry L. Frame (Marcia Colby) 6 Tanton Hill Rd., Ridgefield, Conn. 06877 

Gilbert N. Riley (Elizabeth Gardner) 43 Cedar Rd., Wilton, Conn. 06897 

Susan Bradley 128 Chestnut St., No. 24, Boston, Mass. 02108 

Carolyn V. Kent 135 Cliff St., Burlington, Vt. 05401 

Gray Hodges 144 Sudbury Rd., Weston, Mass. 02193 

Roger Gagnon (Mary Louise Currier) 

95 East Broadway, No. 44, Derry, N.H. 03038 

Cynthia I. Sorensen 49 Putnam Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 02138 

Joan Harney 395 Broadway, No. 446, Cambridge, Mass. 02139 

Elizabeth Giblin Man/mount College, Tarrytown, N.Y. 10591 

Barbara Timken Smith College, Northampton, Mass. 01060 

Juliet Schneller Radcliffe College, Cambridge, Mass. 02138 

Elizabeth Handy Wheelock College, Boston, Mass. 02215 



eight 



1893 Agnes Smith was reported dead in November, 1968. 

1894 Katherine Lahm (Mrs. Frank Parker) was reported dead in 
December, 1 968. Our sincere sympathy is extended to her 
daughter, Katherine, Abbot, 1926. 

1898 Sarah Patrick died December 27, 1968, in Willimantic, Conn, 
after a long illness. She was for many years an instructor 
in Industrial Arts at Teachers College at Columbia, and she 
was one of the prime movers in the organization of the 
Industrial Arts Cooperative Service in New York. 

1905 Nancy Gilcrest (Mrs. Nancy G. Avery) was reported dead 
in October, 1968. 

1907 Louise A. Kiniry (Mrs. Arthur H. Badeau) was reported dead 
in November, 1968. 

Anna May Richards (Mrs. H. Lloyd Folsom) died September 
27, 1968 at her home in Old Lyme, Conn, after a long illness. 
Our sympathy is extended to her son, Rev. Henry T. Folsom, 
and to her daughter, Eleanor Barschall. 

Louise Richards (Mrs. D. Sidney Rollins) died November 18, 

1968, in Newport, N.H. Our sincere sympathy is extended 
to her daughter, Linda Rollins Harwick, 1931. 

1912 Ruth Draper (Mrs. Joseph L. Hyde) was reported dead in 
October, 1968. 

1915 Esther Rutter (Mrs. Edwin R. Thomas) was reported dead 
in December, 1968. 

1924 Elsie Draper (Mrs. Lee W. Court) died November 12, 1968, 
in Canton, Mass. Our sincere sympathy is extended to her 
husband. 

1928 Ruth Cushman (Mrs. H. Eric Hill) died November 18,1968 
after a long illness. Our sincere sympathy is extended to 
her husband and four children. 

1930 Cornelia Gould (Mrs. George V. Scott) died January 20, 

1969, in Richmond, Va. after a brief illness. Our sincere 
sympathy is extended to her husband and to her mother. 

1932 Dorothy Reinhart (Mrs. Robert R. Rossiter) died in her sleep 
in her home in Honolulu, Hawaii, in March, 1968. Our 
sympathy is extended to her mother and to her sister, Barbara 
Reinhart Livingston, 1936. 

1934 Sara Maxfield died July 12, 1968 in Oklahoma City after a 
long illness. Our sympathy is extended to her son and 
daughter. 

1941 Elizabeth Maytag (Mrs. Michael Revyuk) died March 9, 
1965. 



nine 



3n jHemortam 



News from the Classes 



1897 

FRANCES HINKLEY QUINBY is thoroughly en- 
joying her four children and ten great-grandchildren. 

1904 

EMILY STEARNS GIESE has 14 grandchildren and 
2 great-grandchildren. She writes, "At 84, I am 
more or less a disabled veteran." 

1906 

PERSIS MACKINTIRE CARR'S granddaughter, 
Christine, graduated from Smith last June and was 
married in July. 

1907 

The class will be sorry to learn that MARJORIE 
BOND CROWLEY'S husband died last August. 

1910 

RUTH NEWCOMB teaches simple clay modeling 
to children at the Leyman Allyn Museum in New 
London. She is also chairman of the historical 
museum. 

1911 

The class extends its sympathy to DOROTHY 
BIGELOW ARMS whose husband passed away last 
June. 

ANNA BOYNTON HEMENWAY has four grand- 
children. 

1913 

HELEN BOYD HIGGINS still enjoys writing and 
works on the board of the Indiana Home for the 
Aged. 

1915 

JESSIE NYE BLODGETT'S grandson and his wife 
are in the Peace Corps in Ghana. Jessie "enjoys the 
simple life and is in many small town activities." 

1916 

ELEANOR FRARY ROGERS and her husband took 
their son and family to Hawaii last summer. 

The class extends its sympathy to LOUISE KING 
CHILDS whose husband died last June. 

1917 

JULIA LITTLEFIELD, who retired 3 years ago as 
a teacher of Music and Dramatics, is now associated 
with the New York Association of Retired Teachers 
as secretary. 

1918 

The class extends its sympathy to KATHRYN 
COOPER RICHARDS whose husband died last June. 
He attended the 50th reunion of the class in May. 

MARGARET SPEER, retired head of The Shipley 
School, is supervising a tutoring program in Phila- 
delphia for 70 inner city children who are tutored 
once a week by an equal number of suburban 
high school students. 



1919 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Warren O. Taylor (Kath- 
arine Coe) 25 Juniper Rd., Belmont, Mass. 02178 

We are celebrating this momentous occasion on 
Friday and Saturday, May 9th and 10th. Plan to 
arrive in Andover on Friday afternoon. We are in- 
vited to be over-night guests of the school. 

On Saturday, the Alumnae Meeting is at 11 :30 
followed by luncheon for alumnae and husbands as 
guests of the school. Then the Bazaar and a class 
meeting with an opportunity to reminisce. 

Our 50th Reunion Class Dinner will be on Satur- 
day evening, May 10th, and all husbands are in- 
vited. Acceptances have already come in. 

We look forward to seeing you all. 

Kitty 
Some news gleaned from replies: 

ELIZABETH ARMSTRONG'S special hobby is hand- 
weaving. Last year she joined a tour of Japan 
especially for hand-weavers. She made an altar 
cloth 29 Vi inches wide and 3 yards long for her 
church. The weave is 12 harness Bronson lace with 
a pattern of Greek crosses in plain weave. 

GRETCHEN BROWN KNIGHTS took a tour to 
the South Seas last winter, and she is spending this 
winter in Jamaica. 

CORA ERICKSON AYERS was married last Febru- 
ary to George Dudley. 

The class will be sorry to learn that JOSEPHINE 

HAMILTON LEACH'S husband died last September. 
Two weeks after his death Jo fell and received 
several fractures which necessitated her being in the 
hospital for five weeks.. 

HARRIETTE HARRISON is on a cruise down the 
east coast of South America. 

GERTRUDE LOMBARD McGINLEY retired from 
teaching a year ago, and now raises blueberries and 
bird-dogs. Her son, Franklin is public relations super- 
visor for Bell Telephone in Philadelphia, and her 
daughter, Susan, is wardrobe mistress for Hartford 
Stage Co. 

We are a traveling class. THELMA M A Z E Y 
GAGER will be in the Caribbean for 2 months, VIR- 
GINIA McCAULEY OTIS plans to be in Arizona 
and Florida, and GERALDINE MURRAY STANTON 
is on a world tour. 

GLADYS MERRILL recently spent two months 
in the Far East. 

1920 

IRENE FRANKLIN FOSTER still works with the 
blind. She has 10 grandchildren. 

KAY HAMBLET writes that her nephew, Dr. 
Ernest T. Greene, son of the late Marion Hamblet 
Greene, 1915, is Consul of Tabriz, Iran. 

GERTRUDE HOFFMAN BLISS (Lady Bliss) and 
her husband visited New York last fall. Her hus- 
band is the Queen's music master. 

LUCY PRATT RUTHERFORD spends her winters 
in Laguna Beach, Calif., and her summers in Con- 
necticut and Michigan. 



ten 



Mercy Barnes, Abbot '49, daughter of MIRIAM 
ROWELL BARNES, was married December 21, 1968, 
to William E. Whitney. 

Charles Parsons, son of HELEN WALKER PAR- 
SONS, is a visiting lecturer in Philosophy at Har- 
vard this year. He is an Associate Professor at 
Columbia, and was married last September. 

1921 

FRANCES GASSER STOVER and her husband 
spent Christmas with their daughter and family in 
Lake Forest, III. Last spring they along with her 
sister, Josephine Gasser Hansen, '25, traveled 
through Italy, Switzerland and England. 

1922 

DOROTHEA FLAGG SMITH enjoyed water color 
lessons with Eliot O'Hara last summer. 

ELIZABETH HUTCHINSON MATTHEWS and her 
husband are on the Kungsholm tour of Australia 
and Japan this winter. She hopes to see Taye Hirooka 
Kanda. 

1923 

MARY ELIZABETH RUDD is back at Ft. Myers 
Beach, Fla. for the winter. 

MARY CATHERINE SWARTWOOD SINCLAIRE 
writes, "Esther Wood Peirce and her husband were 
visiting me last March when 'Cheers', the V.I. 
entry in single-handed Transatlantic Crossing, took 
off for Plymouth, England. 'Cheers' was backed by 
my daughter, Tootie Sinclaire Morris, Abbot '48, 
and came in third at Newport in July." 

1924 

45th REUNION 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Ernest W. Mitchell (Ka- 
therine Hart) Box 24, Shirley Center, Mass. 01465 

Gals of '24: How about taking a few minutes to 
jot down a bit of news and return the card to me. 
I've only received 15 answers to the 63 cards I sent 
out. We'll have a "Happy Hour" at Sunset before 
we go to Butcher Boy for dinner. Don't forget to 
bring your husband. Also bring any memo books 
and pictures of the good aid days so we can have 
a good laugh. 

See you May 10th. 

Kay 

Our sincere sympathy is extended to Lee Winslow 
Court in the loss of his wife, ELSIE DPAPER, who 
passed away in November after an illness of two 
years. 

Our sympathy is also extended to "Mad" SHEP- 
ARD in the loss of her husband, Conn Curry. Conn 
passed away in October after a severe heart attack, 
and also our sympathy to ELSIE PHILLIPS MAR- 
SHALL whose husband, Roscoe, died in December. 

ELIZABETH TUTTLE BURG and her husband who 
is now retired are busy with their greenhouse. They 
have a son and two daughters, and are the proud 
grandparents of nine grandchildren. 

PEGGY McKEE DE YOE and her husband have 
just visited with MARTY STEVENS CORY and her 
husband in Florida, and are now sailing around 
South America until the end of March. 

DOTTIE HALLETT DION and her husband have 
moved back to Maine and hope to come back for 
our reunion. 



LUCY SHAW SCHULTZ regrets she cannot re- 
turn for our 45th. She is busy with all sorts of com- 
munity activities — not to mention grandchildren, 
golf, gardening and bird-watching. 

TOMMIE THOMPSON JAMES sends regrets — 
we're sorry too, Tommie. 

SUE SMITH BOWLER writes that she made her 
usual visit this past summer with ELEANOR IRE- 
LAND SAUNDERS at Canada Lake, N.Y. and to 
Chatham, Mass. to visit with RUTH KELLEY PERRY. 
She has two fabulous cats which really keep her on 
her toes. They are more like children than cats and 
much more spoiled! 

BECKY GEORGE has just retired after being an 
anesthetist for twenty-five years — happy retire- 
ment Becky! 

Last year at ELSIE PHILLIPS MARSHALL'S for- 
tieth class reunion from Wellesley, she had the honor 
of having the youngest child in the class. Her son, 
Joey, is just fourteen. Another son, William, is 
eighteen now, and has just entered the Navy. Her 
daughter is twenty-one and has one year more to 
go in her five-year nursing course at Simmons Col- 
lege. Hope to see you, Elsie. Maybe you will have 
the same honor at Abbot as last year at Wellesley. 

PEGGY BOYD RANEY plans to come to reunion 
and bring one of her two granddaughters with her. 
She also has one grandson. Her granddaughter may 
be a future Abbot girl. 

SYBIL BOTTOMLEY TALMAN is also planning to 
return. She had a lovely trip this summer to Austria, 
Poland and Czechoslovakia, leaving Prague just two 
weeks before the invasion. Sybil retired in June, 
1968, as Administrative Assistant in the United 
Fund after 1 6 years. 

RUTH BEACH NEWSOM and her husband expect 
to be in Europe at the time of our reunion. They 
have four grandchildren. Their son and his family 
have just built a new home close by, so the two 
little grandchildren are constant visitors. Their 
daughter has two children also, one of whom is a 
talented musician and enters colllege next fall. The 
other daughter will enter college the following year. 
We wish you Bon Voyage, Ruth. 

MAD SHEPARD CURRY, who is presently living 
in Florida, writes that her plans are indefinite. If I 
can persuade her to accept my hospitality, then she 
may be with us in Andover. 

POLLY BULLARD HOLDEN is now living in New- 
ton, Mass. She resigned her job at Goddard College 
in Plainville, Vt. in 1965, then worked with her 
husband for nearly two years at the Educational 
Development Center in Newton. They have two 
children, both of whom are married. Their daughter, 
Bonnie, presented them with a grandson in October. 
She plans to join us in May too. 

BETTY HARRINGTON WILSON'S husband has 
now retired and they find traveling a most enjoyable 
pastime. Their daughter has two children, and their 
son three. She hopes to make reunion. 

ADELAIDE HAMMOND JOHNSON'S son, Alex- 
ander Noel, now 20, is a beginning student at The 
School of Architecture, Boston Architectural Center. 

As for me! Since Ernest retired five years ago, we 
are busier than ever — between community activ- 
ities, an occasional trip, hobbies — glass collecting, 



eleven 



bird-watching, and now, reunion chairman, I never 
have a dull moment. 

Kay Hart Mitchell 

1925 

ELIZABETH BURTNETT HORLE'S daughter who 
was widowed in the Vietnam War remarried last 
May. 

RUTH DAVIES VAN WAGENEN and her husband 
who is retired spend their winters in Santa Barbara, 
Calif. Her son, Robert, received his Ph.D. in Mechan- 
ical Engineering from the University of Washington, 
and he and his family live in Seattle. 

1926 

CAROLYN BRIDGHAM RICARD writes, "My elder 
son, Gilbert, Jr., is studying for his doctorate in 
psychology at the University of California in Berkeley. 
Younger son, Jules, is studying glassblowing." 

LOUISE DOUGLASS HILL has moved to the Chand- 
ler Nursing Home in Bangor, Me. 

EVELYN GLIDDEN was married on April 5, 1968, 
to Kimball C. Stevens of Vero Beach, Fla. They spend 
their winters in Florida and their summers in Water- 
town, Mass. 

SUE LOIZEAUX has been appointed state chair- 
man of the Heart Fund Campaign. 

EDDA RENOUF GOULD is deeply concerned over 
conservation and environmental control, and is help- 
ing the Sierra Club spread the word. She is also 
serving as president of Stanford Medical Faculty 
Wives. Her son, Andrew was married last summer 
and he and his wife are doing graduate work at 
U.C.L.A. in Near East. Her daughter, Katherine 
started the new generation last September, and is 
teaching Anthropology and studying for her M.A. 

1927 

We are sorry to learn of the death of HELEN 
AMESSE'S nephew, Dr. John C. Amesse, who was 
killed in June in a mountain climbing accident. He 
had just graduated with honors from the University 
of Colorado Med. School. He was the 4th M.D. in 
the family 

The class extends its sympathy to PEG NAY 
G R A M K O W whose husband died suddenly last 
March. 

1928 

WINIFRED DUDLEY BURNHAM has 13 grand- 
children. Who can beat this record? BETTY RYAN 
HILL has only 5 grandchildren. 

1929 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Alfred P. Putnam (Rosa- 
mond Wheeler), 27 Broad St., Salem, Mass. 01970 

CATHERINE BOWDEN BARNES writes that her 
daughter, Susie, is a freshman at Wheaton, Andy 
it as Harvard Business School — he and his family 
live in Concord, Mass. 

POLLY FRANCIS LOESCH, her husband and son, 
Bill, toured the Holy Land and the Mid East last 
year. Bill was ordained last year and is at the 
Christian Center in Dorchester, Mass. 

BETTY McKINNEY SMILEY'S husband died very 
suddenly two years ago. Betty writes, "Fortunately 
both my married daughters live near, and I enjoy 
them and my 6 grandchildren. I have been working 
as a real estate broker for the last year. It certainly 
is interesting and time-consuming." 



KAY STEWART EMIGH'S son is an Instructor at 
Brown University and her daughter teaches elemen- 
tary school in Wilton, Conn. Kay and her husband 
are free to travel now that the children are self- 
supporting. 

1930 

ALICE ECKMAN MASON has 2 grandchildren. 

JANICE LOVELL JENKINS writes that her hus- 
band has been in Y.M.C.A. work for 40 years. Their 
youngest son, Richard, graduated from Penn State 
University last June with a degree in Electrical 
Engineering. Another son, the father of six, received 
his doctorate from Cornell last June. Janice now 
has 1 1 grandchildren. 

ELIZABETH PERRY LEWIS writes that her son, 
Bob, a sophomore at Georgetown Medical School, 
was recently awarded a prize for being one of the 
two top students in his class. 

MARIANNA SMITH HILE loves living in Sara- 
sota. Her youngest daughter is in nurse's training 
and is also engaged. 

ELIZABETH STOUT VOLZ and her husband 
visited Abbot in October. Her son, Alex, graduated 
from Centre College last June, Harry is a senior at 
Princeton, and Virginia is a sophomore at Tudor 
Hall in Indiana. 

1931 

DORIS ALLEN CARROLL reports the birth of her 
fourth grandchild. 

NANCY CARR HOLMES writes, "Since my health 
has become too bad to teach, my husband and I 
have moved to Mt. Dora, Fla. Alice graduated from 
Methodist University and is studying for an M.A. 
at the University of Arizona. My son is a senior 
at Methodist." 

FAITH CHIPMAN PARKER sends the following 
news: She is living in a desert atmosphere as their 
adobe house is surrounded by palms, eucalyptus and 
a large pear cactus at the kitchen door. Lili is 17 
and will finish high school this year. Ellen, Abbot 
'57 is working for an architectural firm in London. 
Connie, 27, and Julian are in Oakland, Calif. Chip, 
23, works at the University book store in Tucson. 
Ed continues his real estate and land investment 
business. Faith has retired from office work, and is 
painting once more. 

EVELYN FOLK RAMSDELL is involved in "in- 
novative education: as guidance counselor in New- 
ton, Mass. Her biggest news is the arrival of her 
first grandchild. 

MARCIA RUDD KEIL'S son, Charles — is teach- 
ing at Pauppate University, and has 2 children. 

MARIE WHITEHILL has been with IBM for 15 
years in the Development Laboratory. She has just 
purchased a small 7 room house in Newburgh, N.Y. 
with a magnificent view of the H'idson. 

1932 

HARRIET WRIGHT MILLER'S son, Erwin, was 
married last June, and her daughter, Edith, was 
married in July in Frankfort, Germany. 

1933 

ANN COLE GANNETT was elected Representative 
to the Mass. General Court last November. Four 
of her children are married. One son, 17, is at 



twelve 



home. The class will be sorry to learn that Ann's 
husband died of cancer last May. 

KATHLEEN PALMER RACE now has 5 grand- 
children. 

MARIATTA TOWER ARNOLD and her husband 
had a wonderful tour of Europe last summer. It was 
a spur-of-the-moment decision, and they were sched- 
ule-free. 

1934 

CASSANDRA KINSMAN DEXTER writes that it 
has been great fun being a grandmother, but hard 
work. She learned this since her son and his family 
(2 children) lived with them temporarily after his 
return from the army. 

1935 

DORIS ANDERSON CLARK'S son, David, is spend- 
ing the second semester in London. Myron is at 
Williams and Corolyn is at Northfield. 

BETSEY ARMINGTON ARMS is living in Cam- 
bridge where her hsuband is working with Techni- 
cal Education Research Center. She is a fund raiser 
for the Fogg Museum's Fine Arts Library. Rick, Jr., 
is Asst. Professor of Art History at Univ, of III. 
Jon has just returned from Vietnam, and David is 
in his 3rd year at Princeton Graduate School of 
Architecture. 

ELEANOR JOHNSON DU TOIT is enjoying her 
new role as grandmother as Susan had a baby boy 
in February, 1968. Charlie is a junior at the U. of 
Mass. El lie and her son, Rob, 7th grade, had a 
wonderful trip to San Francisco this past summer 
where they visited Ellen and Bob. 

1936 

VIRGINIA NOURSE SALOMON'S daughter, Suzie, 
is a freshman at Smith. 

PATRICIA SMITH MAGEE writes of her family: 
Heidi graduated from Colby Junior College last June; 
Jonathan is in 3rd year at Univ. of Mass.; Mark is 
a flying instructor in Puerto Rico. 

1937 

PRISCILLA RICHARDS PHENIX writes that her 
son, Alan is a Junior at the University of New 
Hampshire. Loring graduated from Dean Jr. College 
in June. Kathy, 16, is a high-school Senior. 

1938 

MARJORIE COLL FIELDS and her husband are 
building a small home since all the boys have gone 
from the nest. 

CAROL WHITTEMORE FELLOWS is proud to be 
a grandmother four times. Her son, Russ, has 3, 
and daughter, Janie, has 1 . Her other daughter, 
Anne, Abbot '68, is a freshman at the University 
of Vermont. Carol still reports for the RUTLAND- 
HERALD. 

1939 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Ralph E. Livingston 
(Lucia Buchanan), Wilson Rd., Concord, Mass. 
01742 

FRANCES CROSS JONES writes, "I've gone back 
to active nursing, and it's the most rewarding ex- 
perience I've had in many years. Ted, 16, holds up 
his end at home, and keeps one as busy as any 
other teenager's mother." 



JOAN HUBBARD LAWSON'S husband is Presi- 
dent of Rotron, Inc. in Woodstock, N.Y. 

MARY WOODMAN O'HAGAN moved to Pieter- 
maritzburg, Natal, after the death of her husband 
to be near her married daughter whose husband is 
a lecturer at Natal University. Her son, John, is a 
Roman Catholic priest in Pretoria. Tim works in an 
insurance company. Her youngest daughter finishes 
school this year, and plans to care for mentally 
handicapped children. Mary is working to complete 
a B.A. degree, and is also painting water colours 
in her spare time. 

1940 

MARIETTA MEYER EKBERG is in training as a 
marriage counselor and working on a master's degree. 
Bill covers half the state of North Dakota with radio 
and TV stations. Daughter, Judy, is studying in 
Germany. 

1941 

JOSEPHINE HARTWELL BODDINGTON'S son, 
John, is a senior at the University of Colorado, 
and Tim is a freshman at Lake Forest College. Jo 
is working in a travel bureau, and also works for 
the Institute of International Education on the 
"Short Term Visitor Program." Bill still owns and 
operates his own lumber company. 

The class extends its sympathy to MARTHA TYER 
CURTIS whose husband died last May. Martha has 
three children. 

1942 

MAJOR MARGARET McFARLIN is now a flight 
instructor. She says it's a lot of fun teaching others. 

1944 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Jerry L. Mercer (Molly 
Hubbard), 21341 Aberdeen Rd., Rocky River, Ohio 
441 16 

Hi Gals! Remember back in 1944 when we saw 
the women return to school for their twenty-fifth? 
We never dreamed we'd ever, ever reach that stage! 
You all have received your letters about the date, 
so let's hear from more of you — that you'll come 
with or without your canes! Also bring husbands 
and children! 

Heard from ALMA MASTRANGELO STRABALA 
that she's become an avid tennis player (she'll need 
no cane). ELLIE CAHILL GEORGOPULO writes that 
she and her husband are planning to come back; 
she has gotten her Ph.D. BETTY COLSON TIERNEY 
also will be back as will B. J. BERTUCIO MARTUS- 
CELLO. INES ORTEGA has traveled just about around 
the world in these past twenty-five years and best 
wishes are in order for her since on September 8, 
1968 she became Mrs. John P. Kinnane. CHAR- 
LOTTE TROW YOUNG has written telling of her 
experiences in Maine; her husband is studying at 
Bangor Theological Seminary as well as attending 
the University of Maine. JULIE TAVARES ALVAREZ 
is returning and is hoping that her two daughters 
who graduated from Abbot will be able to be with 
her. TUT BAYLOR LITTLE says that only a major 
disaster will keep her away. Her husband is working 
on his Ph.D. BUNNY PENDLETON PHELAN writes 
that she won't be able to come. She's busy looking 
after two daughters and working part time as a 



thirteen 



librarian at the local library. PRISCILLA STEVENS 
RUTHERFORD writes that they are planning a trip 
to Italy in May but that if plans go awry, she'll 
be with us. 

FRANNIE McDONALD THOMPSON'S son is at 
the Berkshire School, and her daughter, Dana, is at 
St. Mary's in the Mountains. This enables her to 
travel with her husband. The family has taken 
many camping trips. 

EMILY McMURRAY MEAD writes, "Our move 
to Hanover, N.H. was a big success. Edgar is an 
investment adviser with Vanden Broeck, Lieber & 
Co., and also runs Steamtown, USA, in Bellows Falls, 
Vt., the largest steam locomotive collection in the 
world. We've all taken up cross-country skiing ex- 
cept 2 year-old Malcolm." 

MARGI TRAVIS ATWOOD writes, "Our son, Jeff, 
returned from an exchange year at Kingswood School 
in South Africa. The rest of us met him in London 
and then went to see Miss Dorothy Baker in Bath. 
I can tell any of you who remember with what speed 
Miss Baker used to do the Draper corridors, that she 
can still outrun all of us." 

Let's hear more news and better yet, let's see 
more of you on May 10th. 

Love, 
Molly 

1945 

ELIZABETH DICKERMAN LOVATT'S husband has 
retired, and they are living on Vancouver Island. 

BETTY GRAVES BRIGHAM and her husband spent 
Christmas in California with their son who is a 
student at the University of Pacific and hopes to 
study in Bangalore, India next year. Betty taught 
French this summer in the Peace Corps and is now 
teaching at the Community College in Denver. 

JOAN HOLDSWORTH MAXWELL and her hus- 
band had one "leave the nest" in September. They 
have five children — Jay, 18, a freshman at U. of 
C, Neale, 10th grade, Chris, 5th, Bonnie, 2nd, 
and "baby Beth", kindergarten. 

HILARY PATERSON CLEVELAND had her 5th 
child and second girl, Susan, in June 1968. Her 
other children are 16, 15, 14, and 12. Hilary says 
"Susan practically seems like a grandchild." 

1946 

GRETA LEINBACH SMITH'S husband was made 
vice-president of his firm last May. Greta keeps 
busy with her wobbly toddler who is 14 months old. 

1947 

The class will be sorry to learn that BARBARA 
GODDARD THEG'S husband died in November 1967. 
Barbara is now a real estate broker in Stamford, 
Conn. She has 3 children, Kathleen, 16, Steven, 14, 
and Ellen, 12. 

MARGOT MEYER RICHTER saw NANCY BRUM- 
BACK KRUVAND last summer in Dallas. "She hasn't 
changed a bit in lo these 21 years!" 

1948 

MARY FARRAR BONOTTO will be living in Sao 
Paulo, Brasil for the next 2 to 3 years. Her hus- 
band is with the Union Carbide of South America. 

PATRICIA HAMMOND DUFFY writes, "We came 
to France a year ago. Scott, 1 5 and Mark, 1 3, are 
in boarding school near Geneva. Susan, 10, Nancy, 7, 



and Peter, 6, are in local French-speaking schools. 
My husband is with Bull-General Electric. We are 
using every spare minute to see all of Europe, and 
so far have been to 7 countries. We come back each 
summer to our cottage on Lake Champlain, just to 
make sure we stay Americanized. If there are any 
alumnae in this area I would be very happy to see 
them." Address: 14 rue de I'industrie, 68 Mulhouse, 
France. 

MARY MARTON DAVENPORT spent the summer 
at the Girl Scout Day Camp as a leader and Assist- 
ant Director. She is still active in Cub Scouts, 
volunteer at hospital, Red Cross, and chiefly Girl 
Scout work. Mary and her husband are planning on 
taking several Cadettes on a sixteen-day canoe trip 
and tour of northern Minnesota next summer. 

1949 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs.. John L. Whittemore 
(Nancy Jeffers), 52 Tarn Dr., Morris Plains, N.J. 
07950 

MERCY BARNES was married December 21, 1968 
to William E. Whitney in Plymouth, Mass. William 
is a graduate of Harvard College and is a pro- 
fessional engineer. 

NANCY ROGAL COHEN'S son, Stephen is 14, and 
her daugther, Annie is 8V2. She and her husband 
are doing their PTA "stint." Al spends several 
months each year teaching pediatric cardiology at 
Children's and Beth Israel in Boston. 

1950 

NOELLE BLACKMER BEATTY and her husband 
ran into CYNTHIA FAIGLE QUINN and spouse at 
a bullfight in Mexico City, and afterward had a 
pleasant evening with them. 

TODDIE HUBERTH SLOAN is busy with nature 
photography, and is also helping in a Head Start 
Program. 

1951 

BARBARA GIBSON ROTH completed a Profes- 
sional Diploma at Columbia Teachers College last 
May. She continues her musicar interests, and is 
putting on a folk mass with the young people in 
her choir in February. 

The class will be interested to know that MINOLA 
HABSBURG KOTTULINSKI'S mother, Princess lleana, 
has established the first English-language convent 
for nuns of the Greek Orthodox faith in Wurtem- 
burg, Penna. She is the superior of this convent. 

1952 

JOAN BAIRD is teaching first grade this year in 
Wayland, Mass. She had a marvelous 3 weeks in 
Greece last summer. 

HARRIET BROWN DeLONG writes, "I am 
thoroughly enjoying my non-working status and 1 1 
month-old Mark David. David is pursuing his own 
work, sculpture with fiber glass, teaching and study- 
ing." 

JULIE GAINES PHELAN hopes that anyone skiing 
at Stowe or Sugarbush will call her — she's only 
a stone's throw away. BUNTY BENEDICT FREGU- 
SON stopped by last summer. 

ETHEL KENAH BOWMAN had a fifth child and 
first daughter, Lisa May, May 22nd. 

CLARA REYNOLDS PALMER had her eighth child 
and sixth son, John Edward Mills, July 6, 1968. 



fourteen 



i. James, Ellen and Matthew, triplets of Cornelia Weldon LeMaitre '53. 
). Martha Barber Lowrance '48 with Laurie. 

Sons of Mary Farrar Bonotto '48. 
I. Children of Lorna Ball Prescott '52. 
i. Jennifer and Andrew, children of Carol Hardin Kimball '53. a 

Carolin Furst Carlson '51 with her family. 
|. Children of Corallie Hanly Murray '47. 













1953 

PAT EVELETH BUCHANAN writes, "Mostly tend- 
ing family — John, 5, Lisa, 3, and Nancy, 8 months. 
This is an off year for outside activities." 

ANN KENNEDY IRISH is head of the American 
Association of University Women in her area. Her 
family now boasts 3 girls, 8V2, 7, and 4, 1 boy, 
1 I2, 2 Labradors, and 1 calico cat." 

MARY WILLIAMS KING had a second child and 
first daughter, Mary Clark, October 27, 1968. 

1954 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Byron Lingeman (Su- 
zanne Larteri, 9 Edmunds Rd., Wellesley Hills, 
Mass. 02181 

The following people are planning to come to 
reunion: MARTHA BELKNAP, MOLLY YOUNG 
SAUEREISEN, DORIS NIEMAND RUEDIN, DEBBIE 
HUCKINS MAHONEY, PAULA PRIAL FOLKMAN, 
FRANNIE NOLDE LADD, PAT SKILLIN PELTON, 
BETSEY BEESON TAFEL, GAIL HUSTED EHRHARDT, 
NANCY DONNELLY BLISS, PEGGY MOORE ROLL, 
MARION BADOIAN EMMANUEL and Me. VICKY 
SCHWAB ARONOFF and KAREN KEATING GRAVES 
hope to come.. Why don't you plan to come too — 
remember lots of husbands are planning to attend. 
See you May 1 0th, I hope. 

Here is some pre- reunion news! 

MARY WOOLVERTON is a social worker on the 
staff of Fitzsimmons Army Hospital. She also owns 
and operates Victory Farms in Littleton, Colo., and 
has done much to promote the excellence of the 
Morgan horse in that area. In her spare time she 
hosts orphan children at her farm. MARION BA- 
DOIAN EMMANUEL and Mary see one another 
frequently. 

FRANNIE NOLDE LADD writes that Laurel, 6, 
is in 1st grade and Alexis, 4, is in nursery school 
at Derby Academy in Hingham. Frannie has com- 
pleted a second exhibition of her paintings and has 
sold a few too. 

CORNEY ST. JOHN LEWIS is living in Green- 
wich in an old 1 829 house which they enjoy putter- 
ing with on week ends. They have two children — 
a boy, 4, and a girl, 2. Her husband is an invest- 
ment counselor in New York City with Scudder, 
Stevens, and Clark. 

EDIE WILLIAMSON BACON is expecting baby 
No. 3 in April and therefore sent her regrets for 
the reunion. 

LEE CARROLL BERKMAN'S second child, Alex- 
andra, was born during the October Olympics. They 
have hopes for her future as an athlete. Mexico is 
reported to be a very exciting place to live. 

LYNN TOWNER DODD finally had a girl, Debo- 
rah Lynn, after having three boys. 

SISTER ANN NORWOOD is a chaplain on the 
staff of the University of Rochester. She finds work- 
ing with the men and women of the college com- 
munity interesting and challenging. 

MARY LOU DUFFY ABATA writes that her hus- 
band has recently accepted a position as a radiologist 
at Meadowbrook Hospital on Long Island. They have 
a new baby, Michael John, their third. 

MARTHA BELKNAP who has lived in Spain for 
two years has returned to Boston and is now teach- 



ing English to foreign students in the Cambridge 
public schools. 

KAREN KEATING GRAVES has three children, 
5, 6, and 7. She is active in the Mount Holyoke 
club and is president of the Welcome Wagon of 
Port Washington. Her husband is an attorney in 
New York City. 

LESLIE BURGIEL was married, October 10, 1968, 
to Michael Moore of London, England. I was matron 
of honor. Michael, son of Sir Rodney Moore of Ascot, 
England, was graduated from Eton College, Oxford 
University and Harvard University Graduate School 
of Business Administration. He is with the London 
Merchant Banking firm of Hill, Samuel & Co. 

VICKY SCHWAB ARONOFF writes, "Stan won a 
resounding re-election to the Ohio State Senate for 
a four-year term. We are happily settled in our 80- 
year old Victorian house." 

PAT SKILLIN PELTON is enjoying life in Farm- 
ington, Conn, and has become involved with restor- 
ing the Mark Twain Memorial which is the home 
he built during his years in Hartford. 

PAT SANBORN had a book published, "Existen- 
tialism" — one of a series, Traditions in Philosophy, 
published by Pegasus in cooperation with Educa- 
tional Resources Corp. 

POLLY STRAW THAYER and family have re- 
turned to Dover, Mass. after two years in Scotland. 
Polly's husband has recently been made a comp- 
troller at Polaroid. 

GAIL HUSTED EHRHARDT sent a picture of 
herself with her three lovely children taken in front 
of Abbot Hall last summer en route to Maine. 

Sue 

1955 

News Secretary: Mrs. John A. C. King, 3rd 
(Dorothy Fleming), 4 Rolling Hill Dr., Morristown, 
N.J. 07960 

SUE APPLETON EVANS has moved to Maine 
where her husband has joined the Merry Meeting 
Medical Group. He is also chief of Medicine at 
Regional Hospital. Sue has set up a pottery studio. 

ELEANOR EASTON was married February 22nd in 
London, England to David W. Flaxen of Manchester, 
England. He graduated from Oxford University with 
Honours in Physics. He is a statistician with the 
British Government Department of Employment and 
Productivity. Eleanor is teaching in London after 
pursuing a course of studies at the Shakespeare In- 
stitute in Stratford-on-Avon. 

JEANNE SKILLIN MOORE had a second son, 
Gregory Charles last September. 

MARY ANN YUDICKY GOODRICH had a second 
child and first daughter, October 24, 1968. 

1956 

News Secretary: Mrs. Alden Taylor Bryan (Phoebe 
Estes), 280 North Williston Rd., Williston, Vt. 
05495 

Tidings: Beckner Lewis Bryan, second son, born 
to PHOEBE (ESTES) and Alden Bryan, 9-21-68. 
Although he was born six weeks early at the be- 
ginning of the semester, he is doing well and 
mother is surviving. 

Robert Sullivan, second child and first son, born 
to SARAH SULLIVAN McCAIN, June 26th. 



sixteen 



Emily Renton, daughter, born to ANN TRIPP 
HOPKINS, Noember 12th. 

CAROL REED KARNOPP writes "I have spent the 
entire past year in politics. I ran with a group for 
Democratic Town Committee in the spring, worked 
for a man running for congress during the summer 
(a primary fight), and for a man running for state 
representative in the fall. After losing all 3 races, 
I'm a little battle fatigued, but not discouraged." 

The Temples have moved, and NELL EUBANKS 
TEMPLE'S new address is 21 1 Stone Road, Route 
No. 3, Oxford, Miss. 38655. Van is studying law 
at Ole Miss, while Nell is involved in all kinds of 
community projects. She writes "I succeeded in 
getting a Story Hour at the public Library on Fri- 
day afternoons for lst-4th graders and it has been 
a tremendous success. I also have made puppets, 
stages, etc. and work with them for various children's 
groups . . . visit Michael's kindergarten tomorrow 
and 2 Head Start groups Wednesday." Nell is also 
serving on the Council on Human Relations, working 
with Negro children, and teaching Sunday School 
Class. All this plus taking care of their 3 children. 
Bill, the youngest, was born last spring. 

SUE WATEROUS WAGG reports that Tim was 
elected a school commissioner in June, and she is 
busy with museum work in Montreal. "I will begin 
guiding in the museum in January, in addition to 
the slide talks I already give in the schools." 

MART IE ROTH BROWN was sent by the Preserva- 
tion Office of the Library of Congress to the Museum 
of Modern Art in New York, where she studied their 
conservation course. 

Before the McCains' second child was born, 
SARAH SULLIVAN McCAIN free-lanced as a com- 
puter programmer and systems analyst. 

I suspect that many members of the class are 
doing interesting things along with their family 
obligations. Please let us hear about them, since 
others will be interested in hearing about your 
activities, and perhaps more importantly, will be a 
source for good ideas. All best wishes tor the new 
year. 

Phoebe 

1957 

News Secretary: Mrs. John J. Moughty, Jr. (Lynne 
McLaughlin), Cedar Lane, Ridgefield, Conn. 06877 

MARY WELLMAN BATES has a new address as 
of August '68: RFD No. 1, Church Rd. at Dixon 
Lane, Malvern, Pa. 19355. She and Marsh are 
enjoying country living in their 10 yr. old stone 
and stucco house. When Marsh isn't working extra 
hard as a consultant with Edward N. Hay & Asso- 
ciates, he can often be found 'playing' with his 
tractor-lawn mower on which the two children 
love to have rides. Lauren, 7, and Christopher, 5, 
are great animal lovers and are saving their money 
to buy a horse. Mary keeps busy with church work, 
Brownies, gardening, an antique study group, and 
house settling. When the courts are dry, she and 
Marsh spend a lot of time playing tennis, and they 
hope to teach the children how to ski this winter. 

MIMI GANEM REEDER is back in Abbot country: 
14 Aspen Circle, Andover, Mass. Larry is very happy 
working for G. S. Grumman & Assoc, Investment 
Counselors for Banks and Institutions. I'm guessing, 
but sons Adam and Jason must be about 3 Vi and 2. 



JOAN PELLETIER ISABEL and family are still liv- 
ing in Managua, Nicaragua, but were home (N.H.?) 
for Christmas this year. They are about to give up 
their 'gypsy life' and return to the U.S. after school 
ends in April for Mark (6'/2?) and Margo (AVz?) 
. . . probably working in the New York area and 
living in Connecticut. Let us know your new address 
when you arrive, Joan. 

ELLEN EDMONDS FLEENOR'S address as of May 
'68 was: Mrs. Ellen T. Fleenor, 152 Moffitt St., 
San Francisco, Calif. 94131. Her two children, Jen- 
nifer and John-Henry are 4 and 2. 

ANNE GRAMKOW DEANE writes: "Have moved 
to 91 Green Hill Rd., Longmeadow, (Mass. 01106) 
— large 4 bedroom Colonial — expecting another 
child in Moy . . . Am involved in sewing classes, 
bowling once a week, but mainly kept busy by a 
dog, canary and my all-boy son ClVi) . Bob is 
actively involved in town politics, is a Park Com- 
missioner and we still chase fires (not as much 
fire activity here as was in the Boston area)." (In 
case everyone doesn't know the story, Anne met 
her husband at a fire which they had both chased). 
We are sorry to hear that Anne's father died last 
March. 

LOUISA LEHMANN BIRCH still lives in Weston, 
Mass. but moved last June to the other side of town: 
6 Fairhope Road. David is teaching at the Harvard 
Business School. .Sarah loves kindergarten, and the 
Birches are eagerly awaiting the arrival of a baby 
in April. 

I received the nicest letter from NANCY DAVI- 
SON MILLER last June, and I 'dropped the ball' 
by missing the September bulletin deadline, so my 
apologies for this being six months old. Duane heads 
up a psychiatric ward at the Army Hospital at Fort 
Ord, and is finding it fairly interesting. A nice 
fringe benefit is flying space available so they had 
a beautiful 2 week vacation in Hawaii last May. 
The Millers are renting a 25 yr. old post adobe 
until Duane's military committment is up in August 
'69 (address: 47 Castro Rd., Monterey, California 
93940). Their home has a lovely patio and yard 
and is marvelously situated on the 13th green of 
the oldest golf course on the West Coast, and 'since 
we are both golfers, especially Duane, we get a lot 
of practice in after dinner.' Cathy, 5'/2, started 
kindergarten in September, and Clay, 3 Vz, is in 
nursery school. 

From Maine all sounds well with JANET McLEAN 
HUNT and family. Gini is now 5 Vi and the 'baby' 
in the family is Mr. Kai, a beautiful labrador re- 
triever. Bob finishes up law school in June so a 
move might take place then. They wouldn't mind 
moving back to Hawaii, though will probably stay 
in Maine. 

As of October "68, HOPE HAMILTON PETTE- 
GREW'S new address is 7799 Ranett Rd., Hudson, 
Ohio 44236. They moved from California when Bob 
was given a nice promotion to become Sales Manager 
for Control Data in Cleveland. Hope stayed behind 
for six weeks with the girls (Carol 4 and Ann 2) 
to sell the house and move, while Bob found them 
a nice Cape Cod style house in Hudson which is a 
charming New England type town. Two disappoint- 
ments were not being able to vote in the election, 
and they moved too late to find a place in nursery 
school for Carol. 



seventeen 



Alexandra, daughter of Deborah Green West '55. 

Children of Audrey Davis Trowbridge '54. 

Monica, daughter of Jean Reynolds Belmonte '58. 

Sons of Carol Reed Karnopp '56. 

Daughters of Jane Woolverton Oswald '56. 

Clare and Parker, children of Betsy Parker Powell '56. 







t 










BEV LORD writes: "Am living in Ft. Lauderdale, 
Fla. (608 N.E. 11th Ave.) teaching French at 
Nova High School, one of the top 10 high schools 
in the U.S. The students go to school lOVi months 
and progress at their own rate of speed. I have met 
wonderful people here, and adore living in the 
warmth of the sun." Sounds like a nice change from 
Cambridge, Mass., Bev. Wouldn't mind a little of 
that sun myself. Speaking of which . . . 

MARCIA COLBY FRAME and Hank are deserting 
Ridgefield and spending the whole month of Feb- 
ruary in Delray Beach, Florida with their two 
children, Michael, 5 and Melissa, 3. 

On January 18th in Darien, MARY LEE CARTER 
STANIER and Wade held a miniature Abbot reunion 
which was happily attended by Marcia and Hank 
Frame, Lydia and Sam Bishop, Lulu and Jerry Cutler, 
and John and me. Between the pink squirrels and 
a game called Careful we had a lot of laughs and 
a grand evening. Lydia and Sam are still living in 
Guilford, Conn, and their children Timothy, Peter 
and Katie are 8V2, 6V2 and 2'/2. Lulu has decided 
that her 3 boys (Jimmie 5Vi, Alec 3 and Peter 2) 
don't keep her busy enough (ha!) and has managed 
to find time for some at home business selling 
Doncaster dresses. She and Jerry are planning a 
week's vacation in Puerto Rico in February. All is 
well with the Staniar family, tho' Wiggs has felt 
a little house-bound with Scott 5 V2 going to kinder- 
garten in the afternoons, and Kim 3 V2 going to 
nursery school in the morning. 

JACKIE GOODSPEED is fund director for the 
Walker Home for Children which is a residential 
school and treatment center for emotionally disturbed 
boys. She spent Christmas in Aberdeen, Scotland 
with JUDY BOTNICK CARMODY and her husband 
and daughter. Judy and the family will be there 
through June, 1969, while John is a resident at the 
hospital in Aberdeen. 

DIANA HALLOWELL graduated with a B.S. in 
Anthropology from Columbia in October, 1968. 

SALLY LAWRENCE KAUDER had a second daugh- 
ter, Carol Lawrence, September 5, 1968. 

BARBARA LEECH JACQUETTE'S husband was just 
made Treasurer of the Carriegie Corp. of New York 
and the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement 
of Teaching. She is working for the New York Life 
Insurance Co. in public relations. 

ELLEN PARKER is working in London for a firm 
of architects and loves it. 

My hobby, besides trying to keep one step ahead 
of Beth 3 V2 and Ken 1 1 mos., is trying to re- 
member to send the class news in on time IF I have 
any news. My thanks to those who have periodically 
volunteered information and those who answer my 
post-cards (keep it up!), but how about hearing 
from you other 80 percent? 

Best to all, 

Lynne 

1958 

News Secretary: Mrs. James N. DuPuy (Sandra 
Castle), 905 Forest Ave., Evanston, III. 60202 

Happy New Year, 58'ers. I sincerely hope 1969 
brings you all good health and much happiness. I so 
enjoy hearing from everyone — I wrote letters to 



half the class, and will write the remaining letters 
for the next bulletin. Do ler me hear from ALL of 
you. On with the news: 

SANDRA VEEDER writes that all is well and she 
is presently working on Wall Street and enjoying it. 

NORA COLBY SALAWAY writes that she and her 
family love Port Washington, where they have lived 
for two years. Her husband, Robert, commutes to 
Wall Street and E. F. Hutton and Co., Inc., while 
her two oldest children, Tracey, 7, and Charles, 6, 
go to school. Peter, 3, stays home to keep his mother 
company! They went to Europe in 1967, mostly 
through Italy, and on five dollars a day! They go 
to Bermuda each spring, sans dependents, thanks to 
an obliging employer. Nora is active with the PTA, 
plays indoor tennis, art class, and teaches Sunday 
school. Rather busy, to say the least. 

JUNE HAMILTON WITHINGTON and family have 
a new home in Hanover, Massachusetts — 1 59 East 
St. to be exact. They have 2 1 /3 acres, so certainly 
not crowded, yet close enough for her husband, 
Nuff, to commute to Boston. 

HARRIET GRAY is "still in school" but with a 
post-doctoral fellowship in the Dept. of Physiology 
at the University of Miami. Quote — "am playing 
games with houseflies, looking at endocrine glands 
and flight muscles." Yours truly is impressed and 
pleased there is a reason for flies! 

MARGARET ERICKSON ELLSWORTH is in Seattle, 
Washington with her husband and children, DeWelle, 
III, 3, and Elizabeth Inez, 1. Margaret is a full- 
time radio announcer and music programmer for a 
classical music FM radio station. "We built our own 
house, a couple of years ago, and find you can't 
beat Pacific Northwest living." 

JUDY HART SHAW and Ned have become paddle 
tennis enthusiasts. They also "had a wonderful vaca- 
tion at Harbour Island, a very small island off 
Eleuthra." 

JANE CHRISTIE SMITH is busy settling her family 
in an apartment in New Haven, where David is on 
his last leg of Ph.D. work at Yale. Jane is trying 
to complete her Ph.D. in English History but it seems 
her son, Timothy, keeps progressing, so English 
History is slower than usual." 

Robert Bensen Calhoun now graces the household 
of the Calhoun family, as of June 14th, 1968. 
Andrew is three. SANDY BENSEN CALHOUN enjoys 
her work with the Smith Prospective Student Com- 
mittee and does volunteer work at an elementary 
school. 

RUTH GRAY SWITZER and family have moved to 
Duxbury, Massachusetts. "Kirt commutes to Boston 
where he sells securities for Smith, Barney and Co., 
Inc." Their three daughters are Kimberly, 5, Pamela, 
3, and Deidra, 1 . 

CAROL GREENE DONNELLY sends the good news 
of a new son, Charles Brough Donnelly — "to chal- 
lenge his two older sisters." 

BEVERLY BLACK BARCLAY is full of news about 
Germany, where her husband is assigned with Ameri- 
can Home Products. She teaches and is organizing 
an international club for the charitable purpose of 
volunteer aid, which she says is literally unheard 
of in Europe. In between, they travel as much as 
possible. 



nineteen 



JOAN GRONBLAD BLACKWELL writes from 
Panama where her husband, Bill, is in the tobacco 
business. They have two children, Courtney, 6, and 
Cynthia, 5. They have been in Panama for eight 
years but will be in the United States for a vacation 
and hope to travel from North Carolina to New 
York, to Boston and Scituate. Have a wonderful 
time. (Her address is Mrs. Wm. Blackwell — Apar- 
tado A-2; 9- A, Republic de Panama.) 

ROZ GRANGER writes she is living and working 
in Hanover, New Hampshire, her home. 

A nice card from JOYCE FINGER EVERS states 
they are permanently settled in Brussels, "which 
aside from the continual fog and rain, is an exciting 
city with quite a large American colony". Her Belgian 
husband is in his own import-export business and 
their son, Stefan, is 1 Vi and speaks a combination 
of French and English. 

BETSY GARDNER RILEY says there is no news as 
there is no new Riley baby but wishes all a Happy 
New Year! 

PAT PARRISH BANKS writes of her job as mem- 
bership chairman of the League of Women Voters, as 
well as volunteer work, plus keeping up with her 
4'/2 year old son, Mark. 

PRISCILLA GRANT FLOOD, better known as 
"Pixie", is working as an editor for Horizon Maga- 
zine. The Flood family have a new address — 175 
Riverside Drive, New York, N.Y. 10025. 

Evanston, Illinois is still here and so are the Du- 
Puys'. Our daughter, Catherine, has first grade by 
the tail and minus two front teeth to boot. "Alfie" 
is 2V2 and is always in mischief, but with a grin 
that allows his mother to "follow him anywhere". 
Jack is now a manager with Arthur Andersen and Co. 

Take care and let me hear from you. 

Sandy 

1959 

Reunion Chairman: Mrs. Charles Flather (Kitty 
Sides), 46 Chestnut St., Boston, Mass. 02108 

I've had a marvelous response from so many of 
the vintage year of '59 and am delighted to say that 
a great number of you are definitely coming or hop- 
ing to come back on May 10th. It really will be a 
wonderful day, judging from your enthusiasm. 

JUDY AGOR AYDELOTT writes that her husband 
is in his second year of law school. Debbie is now 
4 and Amy 21 months. 

GALE BARTON HARTCH is loving every minute 
of family life and volunteer work in Greenwich where 
Tom is practicing law after receiving his Masters in 
Public Administration. 

SUSIE BRADLEY has moved to my street in Boston 
but she still seems to commute to New York so often 
that I've only caught up with her once. 

SUE CALNAN BATES is keeping busy with Benjy 
(2), one large nondescript dog, the Billerica League 
of Women Voters and substitute teaching at the 
Junior High School. 

MARILYN FAIRFAX WAITE sends news from 
Hanover, N.H. that CHICA EVANS ELMER has 
moved to Winchester, Mass. and has a son, Charles, 
4, and a daughter, Eva, 1 V2. Marilyn is working for 
her Ph.D. in virology at Dartmouth Medical School 
and Steve is teaching at Dartmouth and working on 
his thesis for the Classics Department at Harvard. 
CONNIE JONES GEPHART also lives in Hanover and 



perhaps by now Baby Gephart has arrived? She and 
Dale will be there another year and a half and love 
the wonderful country "in our own back yard." 

Elizabeth Malott Chambers arrived last March to 
join her mother, JOANNIE FISHERS CHAMBERS, 
her dad, Stephen, and sister, Stephanie, 3. 

DIANE GERROS writes that she is sorry to miss 
our 10th but "I'll be somewhere in Europe by then. 
Hope it's a ball and is written up in detail for those 
of us who can't make it." 

SUSIE GOODWILLIE hopes to come if she is still 
on home soil by May 10th. If not, she will have 
been assigned "to the field" with the U. N. She adds 
that ZELINDA MAKEPEACE is in Plainfield, Vermont 
on a "self-styled sabbatical after teaching for five 
years and directing Headstart in Roxbury last year. 

ALMA GREW has just moved to a new apartment 
in Cambridge and BETSY HARRIMAN TANNEN and 
Dick will be moving to Burlington Vermont in March. 

MISSY IAMS KITTREDGE and Tyler plan to dig 
up all the copper in Panama for the next three years 
but says she'll try to make the 15th. 

CONNIE LAURENCE BRINCKERHOFF and Bob, 
Elizabeth Ann (2) and Laurence Hamilton (9 
months) moved from Buffalo to Putney, Vermont 
where Bob is Assistant Professor at the Antioch- 
Putney Grade School. Both of them picked up Ph.D.'s 
in Buffalo. 

LINDA LOBB TIMMINS and Bill are both studying 
at the American Institute for Foreign Trade in Phoe- 
nix, emphasizing Latin American studies and hope 
eventually to go to South America. 

DIANE MONTGOMERY RICE brings us up to date 
on the last five years. She lived in Paris for a year 
after Wellesley and got a Masters in French with 
the Middlebury Program, then worked in New York 
City for a year, married Charles D. Rice on De- 
cember 31, 1965 and went to California and Seattle 
while Charles finished his six months in the Army. 
She now teaches high school French about forty 
minutes outside New York. 

CYNNY NICHOLS TRAVERS and John expect to 
finally come home this June from London. Last 
winter they skied in Zermatt and spent six weeks in 
Morocco. 

NONA PORTER GALLANT is still working as a 
model and is traveling to Mexico and then Kenya 
on a safari. 

HOLLY ROBERTSON CHALMERS and John had a 
daughter on August 4. 

LAURIE SMITH is studying for her Ph.D. in art 
history at the Institute of Fine Arts in New York 
City. Remember at our 5th what fun it was to tour 
Laurie's classroom and the Art Gallery when she was 
teaching at Abbot? 

JANE THOMPSON MUDD has been heading up 
the German Department at Lindenwood College as 
an Assistant Professor. The Mudds are taking a few 
weeks off this winter for some skiing at Sun Valley. 

WINKIE WARD KEITH had a second daughter, 
Lesley Pruet, August 5, 1 968. Lucy is now 5 V2, and 
attends nursery school. 

SHERRY WEYMOUTH was an Experiment leader 
for an academic semester abroad in Montpellier, 
France (near the Riviera) last spring and since has 
been working for a new magazine, CHANGE, com- 
ing out just about now. Catch it. 



twenty 



SUE YUDICKY HUGHES and Jerry report the 
birth of Theresa, who arrived October 3, 1968. 

I hope all those "Tentative Reunioners" will move 
over into the "Definitely Yes" column and maybe 
some of the "Doubtfuls" can reconsider between 
now and May 10 to make this the gayest gathering 
ever. 

Kitty Sides Flather 

1960 

News Secretary: Mrs. David G. Clark (Lynne 
Furneaux) c/o W. H. Furneaux, 19 Rockland St., 
South Dartmouth, Mass. 02748 

BARBARA COOPER JORDAN had twins, Mark 
David and Shelley Stewart, October 20, 1968. 

BARBARA HEINDEL was married June 28, 1968, 
to Dr. Garrett O'Brien. He is interning in Genesee 
Hospital in Rochester, N.Y. Prior to her marriage 
Barbara was working as an assistant editor of the 
FDC Reports in Washington, D.C. 

RUTH COX was married February 22nd to Robert 
J. Crocker from Boston. They plan to spend their 
honeymoon skiing in Europe. Bob went to Tabor 
Academy and Babson Institute and is with the 
management department of R. M. Bradley. Ruth 
works for the same company. 

JOYCE NASSAR LEARY had a son, John P., 
September 1 9th. 

BARBARA NORR is living in Cambridge and is a 
graduate student in Architectural History at MIT. 

BETH VAN WINKLE BOYNTON writes, "We 
have moved into our 'dream house', a large rambling 
colonial which we have been fixing up. Billy, 6, is 
in the first grade and Meghan is 3. Oren is with 
the U. S. Trust Co. I am busy with many things — 
Great Books, piano lessons and a driver in the local 
ambulance corps." 

LOUISE YEOMANS STEINMETZ writes, "We have 
just moved into our new home which my husband 
designed. Bob is an architect practicing in New York 
and Connecticut. We have 3 children, Tracey, IVl, 
Brooke and Douglas, 4. Address 1 88 Sturges Ridge 
Rd., Wilton, Conn. 06897." 

1961 

BETH ELY was married October 19, 1968 to 
Robert S. Potter. He is the son of Mrs. Dorothy 
Potter, a former administrative assistant at Abbot. 
He is a graduate of Deerfield Academy, Dartmouth 
College and Tufts University School of Dental Medi- 
cine. He is practicing in Meredith, N.H. 

SUSAN FOX received an M.B.A. from the Uni- 
versity of Michigan in December. She majored in 
Marketing. 

LORING LOW is doing Marketing and Advertising 
for Gillette International. 

JANE PAFFARD was married November 30, 1968 
to Webb Nichols in Stonington, Conn. HEIDI PAF- 
FARD was maid of honor, WYNKIE PAFFARD 
DELMHORST and HELEN PAFFARD were brides- 
maids. Webb is a graduate of Exeter and Cornell 
University School of Architecture, and is an architect 
in Boston. 

JUDY PURSER O'HENEY-SIBLEY is a computer 
programmer for Time, Inc. Her husband is working 
as manager of French Trade Shows in New York, 
and travels back and forth to Europe. 



1962 

News Secretary: Mrs. Andrew P. Langlois (Lynne 
Moriarty), 107 Niles Hill Rd., New London, Conn. 
06430 

BARBARA BICKLY SEGRAVES writes that her 
husband has just completed his Ph.D. in Psychology, 
and they plan to return to the States in March for 
the completion of his M.D. Their first son is one, 
and another little one expected in February. 

TAFFY CORSON CORSON had a daughter, Sa- 
mantha Robinson, on August 3, 1968. 

BETH CRANE ACCETTA and Tony are living on 
Staten Island. Tony is practicing law in New York, 
and Beth is studying at Wagner College for her 
B.A. Randy, 5, is going to kindergarten. 

NANCY ELWELL GRISCOM, her husband and son, 
Rufus, 1 Vi, will spend the summer in Amsterdam. 
Rufus, Sr., has a scholarship to study there. 

CYNTHIA EVERETT WHITE'S husband has re- 
turned from Vietnam, and they are now at an Army 
training center in Ft. Ord, Calif. 

ALICE HELFFERICH was married last year to 
Loren M. Orsini. They are living in a small log 
cabin in the woods near College, Alaska. She writes, 
"4 below zero weather, wood stove, our neighbor 
has a pet wolf, and an outdoor toilet. I am still 
painting and hope to exhibit." 

INGRID QUARCK is engaged to John G. Mann- 
ing, who graduated from Brown, and is studying for 
a Bachelor of Laws and Master of International 
Affairs degrees at Columbia. Ingrid is a marketing 
research analyst with the Hooker Chemical Corp. 
in New York. They plan a June wedding. 

GRETCHEN WHITEHEAD has been in San Francis- 
co since last May with a west coast brokerage firm. 
She would welcome any Abbot people at 2027 Hyde 
in SF. 

1963 

News Secretary: Suzanne Burton, 1241 28th St., 
N.W. Washington, D.C. 20007 

MORLEY MARSHALL and MIMI DEAN have now 
settled in Washington with me. Morley is doing re- 
search in Urban Housing at Brookings Institution 
while Mimi coordinates orientation programs for 
Middle Eost Services. I'm still enjoying my work as I 
try to meet the deadlines at National Geographic. 

PAISHY MEIGS contacted us after the lost Bul- 
letin was published. It turns out that she lives only 
two blocks away at 2805 Dumbarton Avenue. Paishy 
spent two years studying in Strasbourg, skiing at 
Val d'lsere and Kitzbuhel whenever possible. She 
teaches French to four and five-year olds at a bi- 
lingual primary school in Georgetown, but manages 
to escape now and then to New York where she 
saw BIZZY BARTELINK. 

Morley and I met TISH UPTON BROWN for 
lunch at the National Gallery before Christmas. She's 
working towards her Master's in art history while 
Jim is in med school. We all have one major ques- 
tion, "Where is Weezie Kase?" Morley also saw JAN 
GLEASON who was down from New York for a week- 
end — says she looks just wonderful and apparently 
enjoys being a Pan Am stewardess — who'd complain 
about a New York-Paris route, and now the Carib- 
bean! CAROL HUMSTONE is Jan's roommate in 
New York. 



twenty-one 



SUSAN ARCHER REHDER came by in the fall 
when she was visiting a roommate from North- 
western. I was really sorry to have missed her visit, 
but at least Mimi was home to see her. 

Before Christmas Mimi saw BETTINA PROSKE 
who's going to Katy Gibb's in New York. She'd just 
returned from teaching at La Chatelainie in Saint 
Blaise, Switzerland. 

HELEN WATSON COLLISON is back in the East. 
She, Terry and Blaine stopped only momentarily in 
Chestertown before moving to Schenectady. 

We talked to CAROLYN HOLCOMBE who's half- 
way through getting her Master's in teaching at B.U. 
She sounds excited about starting her student teach- 
ing and hopes that she'll be able to do some sub- 
stitute teaching in the Boston area this semester. 

ANN HARRIS adores her job at Arthur D. Little 
in Cambridge. Joan Harney just began working there 
this past week. 

SUE BOUTIN is working as a stewardess for 
Pan Am. 

BARBARA HOFFMAN has returned to the Uni- 
versity of New Mexico to continue her studies in 
Pre-Columbian Art History. 

MARGARET MOORE PEARL had a daughter, 
Pamela Lesley, March 6, 1968. 

EMILY MOULTON HALL enjoys living in Alaska. 
She hopes anyone in the Anchorage area will stop in! 

I received a few cards which arrived late for the 
last Bulletin. LINDA RICHARDSON DUPONT spent 
25 days in Hawaii with her husband, Rip, who was 
on R and R from Korea. She's living with her family 
in Greenwich until he returns in March. 

KATHY HILGENDORFF BLANCHARD writes: 
"I'm now in Guam waiting for my husband to get 
home from another six-month cruise. He's a Lt. JG 
on the USS Finch homeported here. So far I've 
managed to meet him in Japan and Hong Kong — 
I'm STILL trying for Taiwan . . . Between trips I 
teach at Headstart." Kathy's present address is: 

Mrs. Mark Blanchard 

26 Turner Road 

Nimitz Hill 

FPO San Francisco, California 96630 

Having spent the summer in California, CINDY 
BENNETT CALLENDER moved into a new house at 
37 Roberts Road, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 
and is taking courses at Lesley College. 

Sue 

1964 

MARY- 1 VERS BEVER was married December 26th 
to Ens. Horace Reed Wetherby of Boston. Horace is 
a graduate of the Groton School and Harvard College. 

LAURIE GRISWOLD McCARTHY and her husband 
spent Christmas in Australia (his country) . They 
will eventually move there permanently. Laurie is 
doing graduate work in Drama at NYU. 

ELFRIEDE LAAFF KOENIG is a senior at Boston 
University where she is majoring in Biology. 

SUSAN LOCALIO graduated from Smith in June 
and spent another summer at Treetops. She is now 
teaching 6th and 7th grade English at Berkshire 
Country Day School. 

SUSAN STAFFORD was married October 12th to 
Peter J. Oberfest, a graduate of the University of 
Pennsylvania. He is presently a candidate for a 



doctorate in political science at the New School for 
Social Research in New York. Sue received an A.B. 
degree from Pennsylvania last June. 

GRETCHEN OVERBAGH graduated from St. 
Joseph's College last June, and then went to Ireland 
for a month. She taught Victorian Lit. at College 
de St. Louis of Canada for 2 months. She has been 
in San Francisco since last August working for GEICO 
and Criterion (Auto Ins.) 

ALICIA STILLMAN was married November 16, 
1968 to Jefferson Stewart, 3d in Darien, Conn. 
JANE TOWNE was one of the bridesmaids. Jeff is a 
graduate of Middlesex School and Harvard College, 
and is a student at Vanderbilt University School of 
Law. Alicia is studying at Vanderbilt. 

MOLLY WEBSTER was married June 8th to Wil- 
liam Pugh of San Francisco. They are planning to 
spend 3 months in Europe this spring. Will plans to 
start studying veterinary medicine at the University 
of California in Davis. 

MARY STURGEON WRIGHT is living in Fayette- 
ville, Ark. Her husband has completed 4 years of 
active duty in the Air Force. He is going back to Law 
School, and Mary is working on an M.A. in Spanish. 
They have a son, Jeff, born March 11,1 968. 

1965 

EMILY DAVIS is working for Vista in Rapid City, 
So. Dakota. 

KATHY STOVER was married December 28, 1968, 
to Brad Lee Holian of Cheyenne, Wyo. Brad grad- 
uated from the California Institute of Technology, 
and is now working for his Ph.D. at the Univ. of 
California at Berkeley. Kathy is continuing her studies 
at Berkeley. 

SUSAN VANDERLINDE was married June 29th 
to Michael Monaghan, a graduate of the University 
of Pennsylvania. KATHY STAPLES was maid of honor 
and ROSEMARY SULLIVAN and ELLEN ADAMS 
were among the bridesmaids. Michael is in Vietnam, 
and Susan is continuing her studies at Penn. 

1966 

News Secretary: Ellen Sobiloff, 566 Common- 
wealth Ave., Apt. 701, Boston, Mass. 02215 

I've moved again, but will be settled here for at 
least two years. 

BLAKE HAZZARD and John Allen are engaged 
and will be married June 7, 1969 in Annapolis, 
Maryland, where John is a senior at the Academy. 
I was in Palm Beach during vacation and spent an 
evening with Blake and her fiance. 

On the Cambridge scene, I bumped into BETH 
HUMSTONE late last fall, looking very well and 
enjoying Wheaton. Also saw SARAH DOWNS 
briefly at the Harvard-Yale game in November. At 
that time she was interested in going into journalism. 

Ayer is back at Beloit. She has hopes of being 
in London for the summer. Fran is still teaching at 
PROJECT and has threatened to journey westward 
sometime in the near future . . . LIZ WALKER and 
"L.C." Cohn spent Christmas in San Francisco. 
"L.C." is a senior at U. of Indiana. They both hope 
to be in Boston for the summer. 

JEAN IE LIPPINCOTT is engaged to Jim Anderson 
from Salt Lake City and hopes to be married in 
June. 



twenty-two 






LORINDA BURLING GANNON had a baby girl, 
Heather Anne, September, 1968. 

JUDY FROEBER, a junior at the University of 
North Carolina, was crowned Homecoming Queen at 
the UNC-UV football game last October. 

MARY LIVINGSTON is on the student government 
council at the University of Michigan — she was 
the only girl on the ballot. 

NANCY WHITEHEAD has applied for a Junior 
Year Abroad in Freiburg and is keeping her fingers 
crossed until March when she hears. Now I know 
that Abbot grads are not keeping me informed of 
their antics and accomplishments. I spied LUCY 
CRANE one night on the 1 1 o'clock News being in- 
terviewed on the Wellesley campus by a roving re- 
porter. If you think I was surprised, you should have 
seen Lucy's expression! 

That's all for this issue. I've received so much 
mail from all of you that I'm going to build a 
special, extra-large filing cabinet to hold it all. 
(Please don't drive me to sarcasm . . . WRITE!) 

Ellen 

1967 

News Secretary: Judith Hannegan, 843 College 
St., Beloit, Wis. 53511 

FAITH BEANE is working in Moscow this year. 
She writes, "It's strange to hear the Abbot 'Alma 
Mater' used for its original purpose — though no- 
one has shown much national fervor recently." 

DIANA BONNIFIELD has her own business at 
Hood — portrait photography. 

THEDA BRADDOCK DOS REMEDIOS had a daugh- 
ter, Jennifer, September 16th. Theda and her daugh- 
ter flew east when the baby was only 5 days old! 

ANN MILLER is engaged to George D. Kinder of 
St. Clairsville, Ohio. He is a graduate of Phillips 
Exeter and attends Harvard College. Ann is a Soph- 
omore at Wellesley. 



ALICE ROBERTSON is engaged to Stephen G. 
Brown of Tucson, Ariz. Stephen, a graduate of Ando- 
ver, attends Yale, and Alice is a Sophomore at 
Briarcliff College. They plan to be married in June. 

1968 

News Secretary: Marcia Owen, Stillings No. 809, 
University of New Hampshire, Durham, N.H. 
"Play for more than you can afford to lose, and you 
will learn the game." 

— Unknown 

There's not much news this time. With school and 
the holidays everyone has been kept pretty busy. 
FLORENCE NEWCOMB was involved in a tragic 
automobile accident last August, and won't be able 
to go to college this year. She is back on her feet now 
and tells me she is going to be O.K. MARTHA 
SHAPIRO spent a "fabulous" winter vacation in 
London with her folks. She likes Goucher and sees 
TOBY DONDIS, DEBBIE WEBSTER, and KATHY 
SACKETT often. BARB CAMP and LYNN IE BLACK 
are rooming together at Connecticut College. KAREN 
SEAWARD was in her home territory over Christmas 
vacation and says that Reed College is fantastic! 
JACKIE MATHIOT is still in love with guess who! 
(She also loves Rollins.) Heard from LYNN MARS- 
DEN, she enjoys Lake Forest (with its co-education) 
— though she still misses the East — and sees 
CONNIE COUGHLIN frequently. Lynn saw JOANNE 
SAPIENZA in N.Y.C. and says she likes school and 
is "great." I've heard through the grapevine that 
some of "us" are thinking of transferring but that 
as yet, nothing is definite. Let me know! 

I hope that most everyone is happy at their re- 
spective colleges and that all is going well. Help fill 
my mailbox — write. 

Love, 

Marcia 



Alumnae Fund Report 

September 1, 1968 — February 1, 1969 



687 CONTRIBUTORS $17,947 



ALUMNAE BEQUESTS $ 4,500 



tiventy-threc 



REUNIONS 




COHE. WITH YOUR HUSBAND AND CHILDREN 



Did we miss your name? 

Engagements ? Marriages ? 

Children ? Travels ? Careers ? 

We'd love to add it to the class news — please send to the 
Alumnae Office before April 25, 1969 



Maiden Name — Class 

Married Name _ 

Address - — — . 

_ Zip Code — 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 

Andover. Massachusetts 
Return Requested 



ENTERED AS 
SECOND-CLASS MATTER* 
AT THE POST OFFICE A 
ANDOVER. MASSACHUSET* 




€? 



^■v 









Mr. James K. Dow, Jr., Trustee 

and Mrs. Nancy Kimball Fowle, Abbot, 1927, Alumnae Association President 



DECEMBER, 1968 



S 



CONVOCATION ISSUE 3 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 

Editor: C. JANE SULLIVAN 

Asst. Editor: MRS. FRANK DiCLEMENTE 
Published four times yeorly, October, February, May and September, by Abbot Academy, Andover, Massachusetts. Entered as 
second class matter December 12, 1933, at the post office at Andover, Massachusetts, under the act of August 24, 1912. 



Photographer — Mr. Richard D. Graber 



PRINTED AT EAGLE-TRIBUNE PRINTING, LAWRENCE, MASSACHUSETTS 



!!! 



THE ORDER OF EXERCISES FOR 



THE INSTALLATION 



OF 



DONALD ANDERSON GORDON 



AS 



PRINCIPAL OF ABBOT ACADEMY 



ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 



THE SOUTH CHURCH 



FRIDAY NOVEMBER EIGHTH 



NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-EIGHT 



Miss Dorothy Y. Judd, Convocation Chairman, 

directing delegates to their seats 



«M 



Mi., 







:n 



Order 

of 

Exercises 



Philip K. Allen 
President of the Board of Trustees, Presiding 



PRELUDE 



Chorale in A Minor 



Cesar Franck 



PROCESSIONAL 

The Academic Procession includes, in order, Delegates, 
Faculty, Trustees and Former Trustees, and the Platform Party 



Anthem: O, Clap Your Hands R. Vaughan Williams 

The Fidelio Society 

INVOCATION 

The Reverend Sidney Morss Lovett 

Chaplain Emeritus, Yale University 

Former member, Abbot Academy Board of Trustees 



THE INDUCTION 

Philip K. Allen 
President of the Board of Trustees 

THE ACCEPTANCE 

Donald Anderson Gordon 



GREETINGS 

In Behalf of the Faculty 

Eleanor Morin Tucker, Director of Studies 

In Behalf of the Students 

Wendy Taylor Ewald, President of Student Government 

In Behalf of the Alumnae 

Nancy Kimball Fowle, President of the Alumnae Association 

In Behalf of Phillips Academy 

John Mason Kemper, Headmaster 

In Behalf of the Town of Andover 

Robert Alexander Watters, Selectman 



two 



Hymn: Hymn of Praise (entire assembly) R. Vaughan Williams 

We lift to Thee our Joyous hymn of praise 
Who are the light and joy of all our days, 
Who through the vcars hast guided all our w.ns. 
Alleluia! 

We praise Thy name for all Thy servants true, 
Who loved Thy will, sought here Thy work to do, 
Through their hra\e lives our purpose we renew. 
Alleluia! 

For homes we love, for friendship's glowing light, 
For future paths that stretch before us bright, 
We lift our praises over, day and night! 
Alleluia! 

For cares that daily give to life its zest, 
For work that calls us ever to our best, 
We thank Thee, our leader in life's quest! 
Alleluia! 

O lead us on! We pledge our lives to Thee. 
Ours not to choose, ours not the way to see. 
Only we ask that we may faithful be. 
Alleluia! 

Bertha Bailey, Former Principal of Abbot Academy 

ADDRESS 

Richard B. Sewall, Master 
Ezra Stiles College, Yale University 

Hymn: O God, Our Help in Ages Past (entire assembly) William Croft 

O God, our help in ages past, 

Our hope for years to come, 
Our shelter from the stormy blast, 

And our eternal home, 

Before the hills in order stood, 

Or earth received her frame, 
From everlasting Thou art God, 

To endless years the same. 
O God, our help in ages past, 

Our hope for years to conic. 
Be Thou our guide while troubles last, 

And our eternal home. 

Amen. 

THE PRINCIPAL'S ADDRESS 
Donald Anderson Gordon 

A Blessing Martin Shaw 

The Fidelio Society 

BENEDICTION 

The Reverend A. Graham Baldwin 

School Minister Emeritus, Phillips Academy 

POSTLUDE 
Now Thank We All Our God Helmut Walcha 

three 



Board 

of 
Trustees 



Philip K. Allen, President 



John Radford Abbot 



Jane Baldwin 



Mrs. John Kemper 



Lovett Peters 



G. Grenville Benedict 



E. Benjamin Redfield, Jr. 



James K. Dow, Jr. 



Mrs. Horatio Rogers 



Donald A. Gordon, Principal George Ffrost Sawyer 



Mrs. Lenert W. Henry 



Everett Ware Smith, Treasurer 



Mrs. Wilbur K. Jordan 



Gardner Sutton, 

Comptroller and Clerk 



Guerin Todd 



Burton Sanderson Flagg, Trustee Emeritus 

Alumnae Trustees 
Alice C. Sweeney Mrs. John B. Ogilvie 



CT^ 



Honored 

Guests 



Mrs. George Ezra Abbot 



Mrs. E. Barton Chapin 



Mrs. George Bixby, President 
Andover Smith Club 

Mrs. Dudley Fitts 



A. Ralph Gordon 



Mary Byers Smith 



four 



Official 
Guests 



Marguerite Capen Hearsey 



Mary Hinckley Crane 



Burton Sanderson Flagg 



Former Principal of Abbot 
Academy 

Former Principal of Abbot 
Academy 

Trustee Emeritus of Abbot 
Academy 



<L3L? 



Mrs. Herbert P. Carter .... Former Trustee of Abbot Academy 

Mrs. Reeve Chipman Former Trustee of Abbot Academy 

Robert I. Hunneman Former Trustee of Abbot Academy 

Helen Ripley Former Trustee of Abbot Academy 

Stoddard Stevens Former Trustee of Abbot Academy 

Mrs. H. Guyford Stever .... Former Trustee of Abbot Academy 

Sally Humason Bradlee .... Executive Board, Alumnae Associa- 
tion 

Frances Nolde Ladd Executive Board, Alumnae Associa- 
tion 

Anne Russell Loring Executive Board, Alumnae Associa- 
tion 

C. Jane Sullivan Executive Secretary, Alumnae Asso- 
ciation 

Dorothy Y. Judd Chairman of the Installation Com- 
mittee 

The Reverend J. Everett Bodge . The South Church, Andover 

The Reverend J. Allyn Bradford . Free Christian Church, Andover 

The Reverend Norman E. Dubie West Parish Church, Andover 

The Reverend J. Edison Pike . . Christ Church, Andover 

Rabbi Harry A. Roth Temple Emanuel, Lawrence 

The Reverend Richard Woodman . Unitarian-Universalist Church, 

Andover 



<scl? 



William Hart, Principal .... West Junior High School 

Mrs. Walter H. Partridge, Principal East Junior High School 

Philip F. Wormwood, Principal . . Andover High School 

George E. Haselton Chamber of Commerce, Town of 

Andover 

five 



Delegates 



ABC Program 

Cum Laude Society .... 
Educational Records Bureau . 
The Headmasters' Association 
Headmistresses Association . . 



William D. Berkeley, Executive Director 
Dr. Wilson Parkhill, President General 
John G. Hodgdon 
John M. Kemper 



of the East Margaret A. Johnson 



Independent Schools Associa- 
tion of Massachusetts 

National Association of 
Independent Schools . . 

New England Association of 
Colleges and Secondary 
Schools 



Secondary School Admission 
Test Board 



Bradford Lamson, President 

Mrs. Peter Eaton (Betsy Bruns 
Abbot 1962) 



Ralph O. West 

John G. Pocock, President 



C5£? 



Andover Public Schools . . . Edward I. Erickson, Superintendent 

Brooks School Frank D. Ashburn, Headmaster 

Concord Academy Sylvia Mendenhall 

Cushing Academy Peter Eaton 

Dana Hall Winifred L. Post 

Lawrence Public Schools . . James A. Griffin 

Assistant Superintendent 



Merrimack College .... 

Milton Academy Girls School 

The Nashoba Country Day 
School 



Northampton School for Girls 
North Andover Public Schools 
Phillips Academy .... 
The Pike School .... 
St. Augustine's School . . 
Smith College Day Schools 
Stoneleigh-Burnham School 
University of Pennsylvania 
Walnut Hill School . . . 
The Winsor School . . . 



The Reverend John A. Coughlan, O.S.A. 
Margaret A. Johnson, Principal 

Suzanne Morse 

Nathan A. Fuller, Headmaster 

Peter V. Garafoli, Superintendent 

John M. Kemper, Headmaster 

William H. Harding, Headmaster 

Sister Mary Rosalie, S.N.D., Superior 

Nelson Ohmart, Director 

Edward E. Emerson, Headmaster 

Beverly Bennett 

Brian Walsh 

Adele D. Bockstedt 



six 



INTRODUCTION 

Philip K. Allen 
President of the Board of Trustees 

It is indeed a pleasure for me to welcome 
this gathering on this historic occasion. And 
I wish I could officially recognize many people 
who have meant much to Abbot, as well as 
the representatives of other institutions of 
learning who are here present. That, however, 
is manifestly impossible. May I, nevertheless, 
record with gratitude the presence of two 
former Principals of the Academy: Miss Mar- 
guerite Hearsey and Mrs. Alexander Crane, 
and also Mrs. Reeve Chipman, former Trustee 
who came from Kansas to be with us today. 

May I lastly convey to Miss Dorothy Judd 
and her hard-working Committee the thanks 
of the Board of Trustees for the extraordinary 
efficient and effective handling of the myriad 
details and planning of this ceremony. 




The Reverend Sidney Morss Lovert 



INVOCATION 

The Reverend Sidney Morss Lovett 

Chaplain Emeritus, Yale University 

Former member, Abbot Academy Board of Trustees 

Now let us join in prayer. Let us pray. 

Almighty God, who maketh the outgoings of the morning and the evening to 
rejoice, we ask Thy blessing upon this company come together in this place 
and in Thy presence. We give thanks, O God, for Abbot Academy whose lines 
are gone through all the world. Praise belongeth to its goodly succession of 
teachers, to the associations of devoted alumnae, to the host of benefactors, 
those who have given much and those who in giving less have given more. 
Praise becometh today's students whose increase in grace and wisdom will insure 
the unblemished name of the Academy in the years ahead. Now on this festal 
day, O God, we evoke our special blessing upon thy servant, Donald Anderson 
Gordon, whom we delight to honor as the head of this house of learning. 
Multiply the gifts he already brings, grant him so much patience that he may 
never be weary, assure him and his family of the glad devotion of all who stand 
about him, and in all seasons. O God, grant him a good digestion and a sense 
of humor and the joy of a good conscience. Now do Thou present each one of 
us, O God, in these turbulent but exciting times with Thy light and Thy 
truth. Help us to hear what the years say over against the moments, seal our 
lips from frantic boast and foolish words. Help us to be masters of ourselves 
that we may be the servants of others. Thus may knowledge and compassion be 
the stability of our time and our deepest trust be in Thee, O God, both now 
and forevermore, Amen. 



seven 



INDUCTION 

Philip K. Allen 
President of the Board of Trustees 

We have now arrived at the reason why 
we are assembled here in this lovely place 
which has seen the graduation exercises of 
Abbot Academy every year since 1858: the 
formal and official induction of the 17 th 
Principal, Donald Anderson Gordon. 

By virtue of the authority vested in me as 
President of the Board of Trustees, it is a 
great privilege and a personal pleasure to 
invest you officially as Principal of Abbot 
Academy. We place full confidence in you 
and pledge to you our support in the exciting 
years that lie ahead. And I further charge 
you to observe the words of the Constitution 
of our school: 

"The primary objects to be aimed at in this 
school shall ever be to regulate the tempers, to 



improve the taste, to discipline and enlarge 
the minds, and form the morals of the youth 
who may be members of it. To form the im- 
mortal mind to habits suited to an immortal 
being, and to instil principles of conduct and 
form the character for an immortal destiny, 
shall be subordinate to no other care. Solid 
acquirements shall always have precedence of 
those which are merely showy, and the useful 
of those which are merely ornamental ..." 



THE ACCEPTANCE 

Donald Anderson Gordon 

Mr. Allen, I accept the charge of the 
Trustees of Abbot Academy with humility 
and with gratitude for the opportunity to 
serve both our goals of education and the 
aspirations of our young people. 



Mr. Allen and Mr. Gordon 




\ 



INTRODUCTION OF THE SPEAKER 

Philip K. Allen 

When the Trustees asked Don Gordon whom 
he would like to give his inauguration address 
he had no hesitation in picking a former 
teacher of his, Richard B. Sewall, Professor 
of English and Master of Ezra Stiles College 
at Yale ... It seems most fitting for a grad- 
uate of Exeter and Williams to speak at these 
ceremonies honoring a graduate of Andover 
and Yale ... it shows a certain catholicity of 
taste! As a matter of fact, though, there is a 
tinge of blue about this platform since four 
out of five males you see here have or have 
had close connections with New Haven. Suf- 
fice it to say, however, that we welcome Pro- 
fessor Sewell to Andover on the eve of the 
Exeter Game . . . Professor Sewell 



ADDRESS 

Richard B. Sewall 

Professor of English and 

Master of Ezra Stiles College, Yale University 

What should an address like this be? We are 
all familiar with the rhetoric of such occasions, 
the old-timers of us perhaps a little too famil- 
iar. Should it be a charge to the new Principal 
to carry on the torch? To the trustees and 
faculty and students to rally round the new 
leader? To the alumnae and parents to re- 
double their interest and concern in this time 
of transition, difficult for any school? Or 
should it reach out farther (to involve a few 
more cliches) — to Abbot's place in the 
American educational picture (that of the 
private, independent school as it struggles to 
maintain itself in a time of seething socio- 
logical change); or (more general still and 
perhaps to get down to brass tacks) should 
it deal with the purpose and methods of the 
kind of education Abbot offers in an age 
when almost everything about the American 
Educational Establishment is under heavy 
fire? I don't like that word Establishment any 
more than you do and that is what I am 
afraid I am and we all are. 

Thinking over these possibilities, I decided 
on no one of them, mainly because it is im- 
possible to say anything solid about any one 
of them without involving all the others. So I 
decided to tackle them all, starting with the 
last first — that is, with the most general, the 



one that includes them all. So no one will 
escape — Principal, students, faculty, trustees, 
alumnae, parents, friends. Not even, as you 
will see, the speaker himself. (Such a dragnet 
it is that I am about to cast!) 

I was going to call this speech, "Abbot on 
the Spot," and still will, if I may reassure you 
at once that "Abbot on the Spot" is merely 
short-hand for Yale or Williams, Harvard, or 
Exeter or Andover or Miss Porter's School on 
the spot. Or, for that matter, to get really 
serious, America on the spot. 

If any one here thinks all this is a little too 
alarmist, or far out, I urge you to extend 
your reading a little more to the left, or to 
spend a couple of weeks on any American 
campus, and I don't mean just Columbia or 
Berkeley. As to reading matter, here is a 
sample of what I have in mind. I got it out 
of the New York Times Magazine section. It 
is by Julian Beck, founder and director of 
The Living Theatre, and is an attack on one 
of our leading educational institutions, the 
Broadway theatre. Change the nomenclature, 
and, if you have been aware of what's been 
happening on many campuses recently, you 
will hear some familiar sounds. Here is the 
cry, I suggest, of many students these days, 
who, having suddenly sensed the terrible dis- 
crepancy between the world they see and the 
world they are taught about in school, realize 
their frustration, sense hypocrisy in all around 
them, turn violently anti-intellectual, and 
join the march on the Administration Build- 
ing. I admit that when I first read this I was 
furious and I couldn't help feeling a sort of 
patronizing contempt; then I decided to think 
it over, and I am presenting it to you as an 
example of the kind of thing Abbot and 
Donald Gordon will be facing, the kind of 
thing we are all facing. Julian Beck has at 
least heard the cry. Listen to him as he would 
wipe the Broadway slate (and a good deal 
else) clean: 

"The theater of Broadway and all of its 
confreres will disappear because they support 
the intolerable life, they serve its needs, sup- 
port it psychologically and morally, and offer 
entertainment to soothe and anesthetize the 
spectator exhausted from his quotidian life. 
In a horrible way it offers distraction from 
life; and life, though more painful, is certain- 
ly more interesting ... It is a theater which 
refuels people for a life they ought not to be 
leading. That is why it must go, that is why 
it is called the theater of lies . . . 



nine 



"All forms of the theater of lies will go. 
Shakespeare with his Anglo-Saxon heroes, 
those model heroes with all the wrong values, 
who rationalize and reason, who even when 
they rail and rant, King Lear and all, hold 
up to us examples of royal virtue which men 
can do without. We don't need that kind of 
image any more than we need the images of 
advertising or the state. We don't need Shake- 
speare's objective wisdom, his sense of tragedy 
reserved only for the experience of the high- 
born. His ignorance of collective joy makes 
him useless to our time. It is important not to 
be seduced by the poetry. That is why Artaud 
says, Burn the Texts. 

"In fact the whole theater of the intellect 
will go. The theater of our century, and centu- 
ries past, is a theater whose presentation and 
appeal is intellectual. One leaves the theater 
of our time and goes and thinks. But our 
thinking, conditioned by our already condi- 
tioned minds, is so corrupt that it is not to 
be trusted . . . 

"The mental theater in which the body is 
only a thing that carries a head around on the 
stage must mutate into a theater in which the 
body unites with the brain to create a sensa- 
tional state of being in which all the senses 
operate, receive experience profoundly, and 
resolve experience according to the truth of 
profound feeling." 

What a blast! What is wrong with it all 
hardly needs pointing out, though, to save 
any confusion about my own attitude, I think 
I'd better do it. There is a strong streak of 
nihilism here, the rejections are too absolute, 
the charges simply unsupportable. If the 
"theatre ... of centuries past," including 
Shakespeare's, can be called intellectual, it is 
intellectual in the sense that it uses words 
that must be apprehended by the mind. Beck 
would substitute, I gather, gestures and action; 
violent audience involvement; the shock-effect 
of nudity; a march out of the theatre into 
the streets — that is, into "life" — as happened 
a month or so ago in New Haven. He under- 
estimates the capacity of the human imagina- 
tion to project itself, to experience things 
imaginatively vicariously. (Robert Frost once 
remarked that, if a poet wants to write about 
falling water, he doesn't have to go to Niagara, 
all he has to do is turn on the tap.) Beck has 
split the human personality with unwarranted 
simplicity into "mind" and "body" and would, 
at least temporarily, throw the mind away. 



This leaves us with the raw stuff Hitler turned 
to his use, undifferentiated feelings, unex- 
amined drives, what Euripides was talking 
about in The Bacchae. And hovering in the 
wings is that terrible power that grips des- 
perate men when in their despair they make a 
virtue of destruction, the kind of thing — 
nihilism — that Dostoevski first defined for 
the western world in his novel The Possessed, 
and the kind of thing that is erupting all 
too frequently in our ghettos and on our 
campuses. Students can be caught by this 
infection, too. All this and more is wrong 
with what Beck says, including, I would say, 
a gross caricature of what Shakespeare gets at 
through his tragic heroes, "those model heroes 
with all the wrong values." And here I rise to 
defend my profession! I suggest that before 
Beck burns the texts, he read them again. 
And as for "the truth of profound feeling" 
arrived at through "profound experience", 
I've known it, in class, when things go right, 
to crack the plaster on the walls, and all 
through the power of words and the projec- 
tion of the imagination, the power of truth 
arrived at through profound feeling. What 
else is "The pity of it, Iago" or Hamlet's "The 
readiness is all"? But that was a truth arrived 
at only through "profound experience," but it 
was the product of an extraordinary mind 
that could make distinctions, that knew a 
hawk from a handsaw and a Hyperion from 
a satyr. 

Need I go farther? Feelings have to be 
analyzed, and distinguished one from the 
other, and understood, and (by the poet or 
dramatist or any one of us) ultimately ex- 
pressed if the human experiment is to go 
forward, if we are to live civilly with one 
another. We can't just stare at each other 
and make gestures and noises, no matter how 
"profound" our "feeling." We must use words, 
which are the only agents so far developed for 
a discrimination that is at all adequate. (Mr. 
Beck, incidentally, uses them with consider- 
able power however loosely.) We must, so 
help me, think. 

But all that is easy. The next question is, 
Is there any truth in or behind Mr. Beck's 
attack; and, if there is, what is its meaning 
for us of the Educational Establishment? or, 
for that matter, for us Americans? For, make 
no mistake, this is no mere attack on a badly 
sagging theatrical establishment. It is an 
attack on an entire culture — to use Beck's 
words, "an intolerable life" ... a life we 



ten 



"ought not to be living," on a way of think- 
ing "so corrupt that it is not to be trusted." 
Mr. Beck's "theatre of lies" is just another 
term for the familiar "credibility gap." It is 
an echo of the cry from millions of Americans 
(and most recently, young Americans) for 
more integrity, not only in our political life 
but in the sources of all phases of national 
power: industry, finance, business, and the 
Educational Establishment. Mr. Beck, as I say, 
has heard the cry; and if he joins in it too 
shrilly for our taste, that is not to say there 
is no truth in it. And the truth that I find in 
it has considerable relevance to what we are 
all doing at Abbot and Yale and Exeter and 
Miss Porter's School. 

What ails us? What is wrong with our 
"thinking"? Why does Mr. Beck find it "cor- 
rupt"? What is so "intolerable" about the life 
that we are living and, generally speaking, 
training our young people to live? There are 
many nice things about it and many nice 
people. There are happy marriages and liberal 
politics and houses in the country. There are 
swimming pools and yachts and tennis lessons 
and great green golf courses and the Junior 
League and bridge tournaments for charity. 
There are hospitals and schools and churches 
and great foundations that give away fan- 
tastic sums for worthy purposes. There are 
housing projects and urban renewals and 
slum clearances. There are thousands of men 




and women devoting their lives or giving their 
substance to these good works. Yet Mr. Beck 
cries out that our life is "intolerable," our 
thinking "corrupt." 

And we'd better listen. If you think Mr. 
Beck rejects us too summarily, remember 
that he is simply operating in a fine old pro- 
phetic tradition. "Woe to them that are at 
ease in Zion," thundered old Amos, and he 
could turn on the exaggerated rhetoric: "they 
that drink wine in bowls, and annoint them- 
selves with the chief ointments: . . . for they 
are not grieved for the affliction of Joseph." 
And Amos was no more popular with the 
Establishment than Mr. Beck is now. (He 
was told to move on, to go prophesy some 
place else.) But it was to the credit of the 
people of Israel that they not only produced 
a prophet but had the sense to listen to him. 
So I say we'd better listen now, even if it 
hurts. 

What is the burden of Mr. Beck's criticism 
for us of the Educational Establishment? 
What usable truths can we take away from it? 
Among his many rejections, there are a few 
affirmations. They are embodied, but not de- 
veloped, in such phrases as when he speaks of 
Shakespeare's alleged "ignorance of collective 
joy" (he's wrong here too about Shakespeare, 
but let it go) and in his final remarks, which 
I've already said I agreed with, about ex- 
perience "received profoundly, answered pro- 
foundly, and resolved according to the truth 
of profound feeling." 

Here is where our soul-searching might 
begin. Let's take the notion of "collective 
joy." I'm not sure I know what Mr. Beck 
means, but here is a try. Ours is a competitive 
society, with great stress on individual suc- 
cess. This has many virtues, but it has many 
evils, too. In the drive for personal success, 
the sensibilities often get blunted, the sym- 
pathies narrowed, the area of felt responsibil- 
ity gets less and less. On the national scene, 
we put profits ahead of national needs; we 
compete with Russia to get to the moon; we 
measure our growth by car-loadings. To what 
extent are we rearing a race of competitors, 
with our marking systems and prize contests 
and individual recognition? Are we urging 
our young people to do things for the sake of 
doing them, for the joy in them and their 



Dr. Sewall 



creative value — or for ulterior motives 
largely personal, often selfish? To what extent 
are we looking in this sense of "collective 
joy"? How in our schools and colleges can 
we temper the intense individualism our cul- 
ture seems to demand? We have made gains 
in recent years, but we have only begun. The 
students' demands for increased participation 
in the making of decisions regarding their 
education is an indication of their feeling 
about the problem. They want to be in on 
their education as a collective undertaking. 
Again and again comes the cry for more 
"relevance," — relevance, that is, to the great 
social changes of our time. Students want to 
feel in some way in their education the 
"collective joy" that comes from involvement 
in these changes. They feel that in our formal 
and convention-ridden system we have lost 
touch with what they call "realities." They 
are tired of being exclusive, detached, pro- 
tected, as witness their extraordinary involve- 
ment in public matters recently, from Civil 
Rights and anti-war demonstrations to New 
Hampshire and the heroic courage they 
showed at Chicago. How in our education 
can we relate more and more firmly and 
powerfully what we of the Establishment feel 
to be "real" with what they feel to be "real"? 
How can teacher and student bridge the 
generation gap and the conventional student- 
teacher gap and bring more collective joy to 
the learning process? 

Perhaps an answer lies in Mr. Beck's notion 
of experience "received profoundly, answered 
profoundly, and resolved according to the 
truth of profound feeling". To hear students 
talk these days you would think that all "pro- 
fundity" and all "feeling" have gone out of 
their education. I think they underestimate its 
potentials, and my appeal to them is not to 
close the iron door — as some of them have. 
I don't think that Shakespeare is done for or 
that our education is an "education of lies". 
(Beck used the term '"theatre") The failure 
must be one of communication. Are we losing 
the power to communicate profound feeling? 
Are the old words losing their meaning? If so, 
how charge them with meaning again? I don't 
think the answer lies so much in new pro- 
grams, new courses, visiting lectures by El- 
dridge Cleaver, Mark Rudd, and Herbert 
Marcuse — although all this might help. Let's 
not us close any doors, either — as I am trying 
to keep one open for Mr. Beck. We must ex- 
plore all resources, inner and outer. 



But mostly the resources are in ourselves 
— all of us — administrators, teachers, parents, 
students. (And here goes my dragnet!) Tre- 
mendous new forces are loose in our country. 
Our young people are involved in them, 
whether we like it or not. On our part angry 
rejection is not the way. We must all get up 
a lot earlier in the morning, do a lot more 
soul-searching, re-examine all our methods 
and purposes — all this if what is good in 
the new movement is to be incorporated 
creatively into our presently creaking systems, 
what is false and destructive eliminated or 
transformed. Business cannot go on as usual, 
either at Abbot or Yale. It is a great deal 
later than most of us seem to think. As for 
the students, it is up to them to do some 
soul-searching, too, to examine their motives 
and clarify their purposes. Mere "protest" is 
not enough. Unanalyzed, unexamined, it can 
lead straight to nihilims and destructiveness. 
How retrieve the power and the glory, the 
profundity and the feeling? Has academia 
become bloodless? Joseph Conrad has a fine 
passage in his Preface to the Nigger of the 
Narcissus where he defines his purpose as an 
artist. (In my moments of despair, when I 
think that after thirty-five years of teaching 
I'd better mark my stock down to zero and 
begin all over again, I say it over to myself.) 
"My task [wrote Conrad] is by the power of 
the written word to make you hear, to make 
you feel, to make you see — that is all, and 
it is everything." And the word "see" is under- 
scored to stress its double meaning: to see 
visually and to see with the inward eye; that 
is, to understand. ". . . to make you hear, to 
make you feel, to make you see . . ." We must 
all listen more acutely these days, feel more 
profoundly, see more understandingly. We 
oldsters must take off the blinders of our set 
ways; you youngsters must beware of the 
blindness of mere rebellion. You must culti- 
vate patience, you must cultivate discipline, 
you must be willing, as Dostoevski puts it in 
a wonderful passage about his young Alyosha 
Karamazov — you must be willing to give 
over a few years of what he calls, "your 
seething youth" to these purposes simply to 
render you competent to deal with the prob- 
lems of our age. What we need, perhaps, to 
sum it all up, and this I think is what Julian 
Beck and Conrad and Dostoevski were getting 
at — what we need in a way is more imagina- 
tion. 

This is the word I would leave you with. 
Lear's Gloucester, in one of those rantings 



twelve 



Mr. Beck might have paid more attention to, 
condemns "the superfluous and lust-dieted 
man . . . who does not see because he does 
not feel." That is because he has no imagina- 
tion. I sometimes feel that this country is 
managed by people with computerized minds 
and computerized imaginations; that is, they 
think quantitatively. When I contemplate 
Vietnam and when I saw the young people 
being clubbed in Chicago, I couldn't help 
thinking of Couchon's great remark to DeSto- 
gumber in Bernard Shaw's St. Joan: "Must a 
Christ die in every generation to save those 
with no imagination?" 

So, to Abbot and all you good people young 
and old (including myself), I have entangled 
in my dragnet: Let us do everything we have 
been doing — but do it with more imagina- 
tion. Let us listen to voices we have heretofore 
perhaps been partly deaf to. Let us try to feel 
more acutely than ever what it is to be young 
in this very difficult time. Let us try to under- 
stand the educational enterprise at Abbot and 
at Yale as part of a tremendous national 
movement whose significance and importance 



we are only beginning to realize. Only when 
our young people are convinced that we are 
in it and with it, will these sinister "gaps" 
of our day be breached and we can move 
forward together in an approximation, at 
least, of "collective joy." 

Thomas Carlyle defined his hero as he with 
"the great heart and the clear deep-seeing 
eye." (His own way of defining the imagina- 
tion!) Heroism is rare but not so rare as you 
might think. America is not bankrupt! I am 
asking for student-heroes, teacher-heroes or 
heroines, and last but not least, the Principal 
as Hero. Make no little plans, Don, this is a 
boiling and seething age, think deeply and 
radically in the best sense of going to the 
roots of things, and think feelingly. Never 
avoid the suffering, never lose your sense of 
humor or your digestion. You are young, you 
are strong, you are tall, and I know (because 
I taught you once) that you have that price- 
less quality without which nothing, and that 
is imagination. The future of Abbot seems to 
me very bright indeed. 



Mr. Gordon, Dr. Sewall and Mr. Allen 




.-"♦^ - 




rrv <S 



Mr. Guerin Tod 

Mr. George F. Scr 

Mr. Gardner Sutl 




Mr. Robert I. Hunneman, Past- President- of Board 
and Miss Jane Baldwin, Abbot 1922 



I 



Miss Marguerite Hearsey 






PAST 
PRINCIPALS 



tfAtfff* 






Mrs. Alexander 
Crane 




Mrs. Donna Brace Ogilvie 
Abbot 1930 




TRUSTEES 



\r. Benjamin E. Redfield, Jr. and Mr. Melville Chapin 




Mrs. Abby Castle Kemper 
Abbot 1931 



Mr. Philip K. Allen and Mrs. 
Helen Allen Henry, Abbot '32 




Introduction of the 
Principal 

Phillip K. Allen 

A few minutes ago we inaugurated the 17th 
Principal of Abbot Academy. It is significant 
to note that this "Female Seminary" has come 
full circle in inducting here to-day a male 
head. As some of you may not know, the 
Trustees, 115 years ago, in 1853 "determined 
on committing the headship of Abbot Acad- 
emy to a woman." There had been a series 



of male principals since its founding in 1829. 
The chroniclers of the History of Abbot, 
Philena and Phoebe McKeen added in 1897 
that this action "was not inconsistent with 
the time-honored conservatism of 'mossy' 
Andover!" I will leave it to future historians 
to comment on the actions of the present 
Board of Trustees! 

We do, however, feel that this young man 
has the breadth of vision and depth of un- 
derstanding to guide our younger troubled 
generation and to meet the challenges of to- 
day's and tomorrow's world . . . We are 
already proud of him. Donald A. Gordon 



The 

Principal's 

Address 



DONALD ANDERSON GORDON 



I have long felt that when seeking counsel 
on nearly any important matter, a headmaster 
should include his students among those he 
asks for advice. One of our seniors happened 
to stop by the house Monday afternoon, and 
found me hunched over my desk, like an old 
fern, confronting the question of what to say 
today. We talked about this and that, and 
then turning to the weekend's events I asked, 
"What would you say to such a group if you 
were in my shoes?" 

She looked at the ceiling briefly, and then 
said, "Love me or leave me!" 

The more I've thought about that, the less 
sure I've been that I could improve on it. 
But she set me on my way, and now I am 
here in this lovely place with you. Suddenly 
the events of the past year are culminating 
in a beginning — for me, and for Abbot. 



Beginnings are wonderful for their freshness, 
and partly because of this I feel much like my 
students, whose work is just beginning, who 
have everything ahead of them, and who are 
establishing their private beachheads on the 
point where the future and their own dreams 
meet. Particularly for an American, that point 
is always the central one: it recedes before 
us, gently eluding our grasp much of the 
time, beckoning but never mocking us, flat- 
tering our innocence. It is about these be- 
ginnings that I wish to speak today. 

Life is a great adventure and exploration, 
and in times such as ours it is even more so. 
We find ourselves bluntly reminded that we 
don't live our lives so much as we are lived, 
by whatever powers we believe in. So it is 
with schools. 

The American independent school — a 
unique mixture of the classic English model 
and our democratic imperatives — stands 
today in an unprecedented position in re- 
lation to its past history: bravely if somewhat 
clumsily it is poised, on the one hand, before 
the stark possibility of its imminent demise, 
and, on the other, its greatest opportunity for 
self-realization. If certain challenges, partic- 
ularly economic, are successfully met, it can, 
possibly for the first time, truly approximate 
the proud rhetoric of its catalogue. For that 
rhetoric has always obligated it to purposes 



sixteen 



that are surely as public as they are private 

— the education of, for example, the most 
promising, deserving boys and girls in our 
society, wherever we can find them. And many 
such young people exist, in the time-honored 
Horatio Alger sense, in an endless variety of 
locales and contexts. If our commitment to 
this goal can be greatly broadened, and our 
methods freshened and imaginatively em- 
ployed to meet their needs, we can properly 
claim that vital relevance without which we 
will deserve to pass quietly from the Ameri- 
can educational scene. 

It is important to set the independent 
school against the situation of our country. 
Since 1960 a number of specific revolutions 

— stemming from specific issues such as civil 
rights, the war in Vietnam, the cultural 
malaise that offends our most sensitive youth 

— have gradually coalesced into a single, 
comprehensive revolution which threatens not 
so much to destroy as to improve American 
life if it is peaceably granted some measure 
of success. We are entering a new Romanti- 
cism of sorts, a reaction of spirit against what 
Jacques Barzun describes as the over-organized 
paralysis of our culture. Acts have conse- 
quences, and many of the things we have done 
for the sake of quantitative progress have 
failed to satisfy our spirit: as a result im- 
portant segments of our population have lost 
their belief in man and his ability to set goals 
that are humanistic, let alone implement 
them. When we insist on regarding our stu- 
dents as "America's prime natural resource" 
we defile man generally: man should be edu- 
cated but not used. 

And what of our youth? They have been 
dealt a very strange hand indeed: it was 
really half a hand, for along with the per- 
missivist pedagogy of the past generation 
should have gone a proportionate increase in 
the responsibility level of adults — freedom 
and responsibility are inseparable, and those 
families who know it have survived this era 
better than some others. The fashionable 
counter-attack now among many is to "get 
tough with the kids," or to try to; but the 



real point is that we haven't completed the 
original task. Greater responsibility, namely 
involvement with the young, is what is needed. 
The willingness to participate, to share, to 
confront, to care, to truly listen, must be there. 
The outcome could be the recovery — in 
better form — of what we have lost: namely 
a single community, comprised of old and 
young alike, instead of two communities split 
between what we deceitfully call "senior 
citizens" and an alienated teen culture, 
managed by a 15 billion-dollar-a-year youth 
industry manned by cultural hucksters. Speak- 
ing of the "issue beyond the beards," as he 
put it, Norman Cousins, writing recently in 
the Saturday Review, said "their morality is 
not so much a departure from the developed 
and traditional forms as it is a literal expres- 
sion of them . . . they are measuring their 
parents by the parents' own yardsticks and 
found them wanting . . . what young people 
tend to reject, therefore, is not so much the 
'old' morality as what they believe to be the 
distortion of morality by society as a whole." 
He goes on to say that "young people need 
to be confronted — not in absentia or in the 
abstract, but face to face. They are open to 
serious criticism and they will listen — once 
they are convinced they will be listened to." 
It is sobering to remember that in fact we do 
learn what we are taught, and we teach what 
we want them to know. 

Given all this, we have a rather special 
obligation to the young. A brilliant original 
thinker of our time, Eric Hoffer, has said 
"A social order is stable so long as it can give 
scope to talent and youth. Youth itself is a 
talent — a perishable talent." He goes on: 
"A fateful process is set in motion when the 
individual is released 'to the freedom of his 
own impotence' and left to justify his exist- 
ence by his own efforts. The autonomous in- 
dividual, striving to realize himself and prove 
his worth, has created all that is great in 
literature, art, music, science and technology. 
The autonomous individual, also, when he can 
neither realize himself nor justify his exist- 
ence by his own efforts, is a breeding call of 



seventeen 



frustration, and seed of the convulsions which 
shake our world to its foundations." 

"The individual on his own is stable only 
so long as he is possessed of self-esteem. The 
maintenance of self-esteem is a continuous 
task which taxes all of the individual's powers 
and inner resources . . . When for whatever 
reason, self-esteem is unattainable, the auto- 
nomous individual becomes a highly explosive 
entity. He turns away from an unpromising 
self and plunges into the pursuit of pride — 
the explosive substitute for self-esteem. All 
social disturbances and upheavals have their 
roots in crises of individual self-esteem, and 
the great endeavor in which the masses most 
readily unite is basically a search for pride." 

If a certain quality of self-esteem is so im- 
portant, then, you should not be surprised to 
hear me argue strenuously for an even greater 
attention to the humanities as the center of 
what we have called liberal education. The 
humanities put man at the center of things, 
where he belongs; as Mr. Brewster of Yale has 
said, "To be a man (and I would have to add, 
a woman also) is to matter to someone outside 
yourself, to something greater than yourself." 
With the improvement of our elementary edu- 
cation, and the increasing professionalization 
of our colleges and universities, it is clearer 
than ever that the crucible of liberal educa- 
tion lies within the secondary school and the 
early years of college. This span of years is 
now being rightly seen as a specific, integrated 
period of time and development: it is here 
that the humanizing of the adolescent animal 
must go on. We begin with what the individ- 
ual human spirit needs, rather than looking 
only at what our nation-state may require. If 
in addition to being knowledgeable and com- 
petent, we are truly humane, the countrv 
cannot fail to benefit in any case. And it will 
not be enough to merely earn.- on the human- 
ities in the same manner as in the past; we 
must introduce anthropology early, for exam- 
ple, and build our study of history upon a 
more thorough understanding of man himself. 
The purpose of education today is, more than 



ever, to render the student both civilized and 
brave: he must be sensitive enough to identify 
what it is that is worth saving, and tough 
enough to manage its implementation. In this 
sense all good education is religious, and the 
student's capacity for strengthening his own 
spirit must be developed to the fullest. 

The independent school is, potentially, 
better equipped perhaps to accomplish this 
than any other form of secondary institution. 
The question is, as always, one of process. 
Whatever it does, it must remember to be 
conservative when dealing with people, but 
fearlessly revolutionary when dealing with 
systems and methods. It must set itself the 
task of cultivating the capacity to change, 
and yet anchor a positive approach to evaluat- 
ing change. In seeking to develop the utmost 
personal strength in its students, it must re- 
member that it is knowledge and experience 
together, rather than knowledge alone, which 
yields lasting lessons for an individual. The 
impact lies in the union of the two; we must 
seek to provide the maximum impact during 
these formative years. Actually the revolution 
in our country has not gone far enough; we 
will either be a truly pluralist society or we 
will have nothing more than chaos. Education 
today involves us in an urgent search for 
ground rules for how to teach and learn in a 
truly diverse society — a society intended to 
liberate individuals, not constrain them. In a 
world shot through with sham and organized 
deceit, their willingness and capacitv to trust 
both themselves and others has been endan- 
gered: this capacity needs renewal by the only 
teaching tool of value — our trust and example. 
C. G. Jung has said this perhaps better than 
anyone: "... our approach to education 
suffers from a one-sided emphasis upon the 
child who is to be brought up, and from an 
equally one-sided lack of emphasis upon the 
deficient upbringing of the adult educator . . . 
Children are educated by what the grown-up 
is and not bv his talk . . . We think of our 
efficient teacher with a sense of recognition, 
but those who touched our humanity we re- 



eighteen 



member with gratitude." We cannot leave it 
to systems or rules themselves, but rather the 
demonstration must be concrete: namely, we 
ourselves, working trustfully with them, 
demonstrating daily the interdependent com- 
munity that we inhabit from birth to death. 
Performance, not prescription, will succeed for 
us. There is nothing so dazzling as a close 
relationship with someone who says what he 
means and means what he says. The school in 
its own performance must not contradict 
what it is trying to teach in the classroom; 
values are taken on only through concrete 
experiences — we don't have values, we value 
things. And none of us can value anything 
until we first value ourselves, until we have 
that essential, private, triumphantly unique 
self-esteem that makes living greatly an actual 
possibility for us. Without this, we endanger 
ourselves and the world. 

The consequences of this for the inde- 
pendent school are that it must be a leader 
in a swiftly changing world. It must be ever 
awake to the fact that it will be impossible to 
keep man at the center of our concern unless 



we are prepared to change wisely and de- 
cisively, to remember that the test of tradition 
is its relevance for the student today, tomor- 
row and the day after tomorrow. If the aim 
of education is to enlarge the exchange be- 
tween the teacher and the student, known 
barriers to that exchange must be broken 
down, and good facilities established. As Dr. 
Gillies in Thornton Wilder's The Eighth Day 
explained, "education is the bridge man 
crosses from the self-enclosed, self-favoring 
life into a consciousness of the entire com- 
munity of mankind." 

These are bright hopes that I have for 
Abbot on this memorable day. They are not 
greatly different, I think from the main thrust 
of Abbot's 140-year-old charter: "The primary 
object . . . shall ever be to . . . discipline and 
enlarge the minds, and form the morals of 
the youth." I pledge you my utmost efforts in 
seeking to achieve these ends, and hope very 
much that you will join me in Abbot's quest 
for an ever greater role in helping young 
people realize their best selves in the years 
ahead. 



Benediction 

The Reverend A. Graham Baldwin 
School Minister Emeritus, Phillips Academy 



Our heavenly father, we commend unto 
Thee Abbot Academy and its principal leader, 
and we pray that the light of true learning 
may continue to burn brightly, and that the 
search for wisdom and understanding remain 
strong and free in the hearts and minds of 
those who teach and learn here. 

Give, we pray, a sense of Thy support to 
those who plan and administer the affairs of 
this scholarly community; and as all of us 
seek for more truth and greater justice, by 
Thy spirit stir and guide us, with Thy love 
inspire us, and in Thy mercy receive us, now 
and ever more. Amen. 



nineteen 



Mr. Philip K. Allen 




Mr. and Mrs. Gord 

receiving citation fr 

University of Pennsyh 



ev. Sidney Lovett 
ev. A Graham Baldwin 
Frederic A. Pease 



ev 



Mr. Gordon being 
congratulated by h 
father A. Ralph Got 
(Mrs. Philip K. Alle 
background) 



Miss Emily Hale, Mrs. Weston Flint, Miss 

Kate Friskin and Miss Hope Coolidge, 

former faculty 





R 
E 
E 

T 
I 



N 
G 



Mr. John M. Kemper 
admaster, for Phillips Academy 



Miss Tucker, for the faculty 



. Robert A. Watters, for the Town of Andover 




Wendy Ewald, for the students 




ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 

Andover. Massachusetts 01810 
Return Requested 



ENTERED AS 
SECOND-CLASS MATTER 

AT THE POST OFFICE AT 

ANDOVER. MASSACHUSETTS 









ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 






ABBOT 

ACADEMY 

BULLETIN 







a* 









Annual Giving Report 

— Alumnae Fund 
— Parents 9 Fund 
— Other Gifts 



The Executive Board of the Alumnae Association 

1968- 1970 



President 



Mrs. Leonard M. Fowle 

(Nancv Kimball) 

36 Norman St., Marblehead, Mass. 01945 



Vice Presidents 



Clerk 



Mrs. Malcolm S. Loring 

(Anne Russell) 

Pepperell Rd., Kittery Point, Me. 03905 

Mrs. David E. Rickenbacker 
( Patricia Bowne) 
5 Glenside Terrace 
Upper Montclair, N.J. 07043 

Mrs. F. N. Ladd 
' Frances Nolde) 
36 Hawthorn St. 
Cambridge, Mass. 02138 



Mrs. Benneville N. Strohecker 
I Constance Hall) 
8 Harbor Ave. 
Marblehead, Mass. 01945 



Treasurer 



Mrs. Gage Olcott 

(Helen O'Brien) 

40 Oakridge Rd., Wellesley, Mass. 02181 



Executive Secretary 

Delegates -at- Large 



Miss C. Jane Sullivan 

20 Buswell St., Lawrence, Mass. 01841 



Mrs. Sargent Bradlee, Jr. 
(Sally Humason) 
Linden Cottage, Walker Rd. 
Manchester, Mass. 01944 

Mrs. J. Robert Haskin, Jr. 
(Miriam Bickford) 
6 Redstone Lane 
Marblehead, Mass. 01945 



Alumnae Trustee 
1966-1972 



Mrs. John B. Ogilvie 

(Donna Brace) 

14 Circle Rd., Darien, Conn. 06820 



Alumnae Trustee 
1969-1975 



Mrs". Edmund W. Nutting 

(Mary Howard) 

14 High St., Rockport, Mass. 01966 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 



SEPTEMBER, 1969 VOLUME 37, NUMBER 4 



Editor: C. JANE SULLIVAN 

Asst. Editor: MRS. FRANK DiCLEMENTE 
Published four times yearly, October, February, May and September, by Abbot Academy, Andover, Massachusetts. Entered as 
second class matter December 12, 1933, at the post office at Andover, Massachusetts, under the act of August 24, 1912. 



PRINTED AT EAGLE-TRIBUNE PRINTING. LAWRENCE. MASSACHUSETTS 



TO ALUMNAE, 
PARENTS 
AND FRIENDS 
OF ABBOT 



We are all grateful indeed for the success of this year's annual 
giving, not simply because it represents an increase over last year, 
but because it is an expression of the attitude held toward the 
Academy by its supporters. The growth and confidence shown 
matches the energetic development taking place at Abbot these 
days. 

I wish to thank particularly Mrs. Frances Nolde Ladd, Mr. 
Guerin Todd, and all the class fund secretaries for their hard work 
and loyalty in helping bring the year's fund to a successful con- 
clusion: the concern — felt and applied — of these people is a major 
element in the health and vigor of the School. 

In these times of severe challenge and cultural upheaval, the 
steadiness of the support for institutions such as Abbot is a reassur- 
ing foundation on which to base our efforts to pursue our mission 
with young people more effectively. Faith, trust and daring com- 
bined are the ingredients of our opportunity to better serve the 
educational needs of our students. The degree of help we need is 
greater than ever before; the potential successes and rewards are 
also greater than ever. Thank you for the confidence and help you 
have demonstrated — very much. 

Principal 



three 



ABBOT 

DEVELOPMENT 

FUND 



July 1 # 1968 — June 30, 1969 



TOTAL $78,601.45 



Annual Giving 
Bequests 
Matching Gifts 
Total 



ALUMNAE 



1,410 contributors 



$29,681.97 
$ 5,500.00 
$ 845.16 
$36,027.13 



PARENTS AND FRIENDS 



Parents 


252 contributors 


$28,999.32 


Friends 


5 contributors 


$ 1,475.00 


Matching Gifts 




$ 600.00 


Special Gift 




$11,500.00 


Total 




$42,574.32 



four 



CLASS 

HONOR 

ROLL 



LARGEST DOLLAR TOTAL 

1930 Frances Sullivan Sullivan $2,659.13 

1953 Janet Bowden Wilson $2,122.81 

1948 Ann Robinson Joyce $1,592.98 

1907 Marjory Bond Crowley $1,532.00 

1919 Kathryn Beck Dow $1,212.00 



LARGEST NUMBER OF CONTRIBUTORS 

1919 Kathryn Beck Dow 40 

1929 Polly Francis Loesch 40 

1930 Frances Sullivan Sullivan 31 

1920 Margaret Ac kroyd Hunt 30 
1948 Ann Robinson Joyce 30 
1953 Janet Bowden Wilson 30 

1957 Marcia Colby Frame 30 

1958 Elizabeth Gardner Riley 30 

1959 Susan Bradley 30 



HIGHEST PERCENTAGE OF PARTICIPATION 

(after 1900) 

1919 Kathryn Beck Dow 70% 

1920 Margaret Ackroyd Hunt 63% 

1929 Polly Francis Loesch 60% 
1923 Elizabeth Flagg Dow 59% 

1930 Frances Sullivan Sullivan 56% 



five 



Abbot Development Fund 

July 1, 1968 — June 30, 1969 

Alumnae 

Percentages below class numerals indicate per cent of a class contributing 
to Fund and the amount represents the total contribution from the class. 

t Regular Contributor 

* Contributed prior to death 



1893 
100% — $5 

tCharlotte Conant Nicholls 

1895 

66% — $1,025 

Marjory Clark Barker 
tFannie Lewis Shattuck 

1896 

33%— $25 

Eleanor Thomson Castle 

1897 

38% —$135 

tFrances Hinckley Quinby 
tLillian Miller Troutman 
tMarion Priest Fuller 

1898 
17% —$10 

tLucy Hartwell Peck 

1899 

22% —$70 

tLilian Mooers Smith 
tHarriet Wanning Frick 

1900 
33% —$10 

tEthel Hazen Lillard 
tMay Lottie Redford 

1901 
13% —$40 
tHelen Buck 
tLilian Dodge Brewster 

1902 
1 1 % —$100 

tCatharine Deacon Palmer 

1903 
31%— $57 

tEdith Burnham Roberts 
Ruth Cobb Bryant 
tAletta Hegeman 
tHelen Packard McBride 
tMarjorie Wilson Gerber 



1904 

50% —$220 

Mary Davis Lee 
tSarah Field 
tSophie Gibbs Sage 
tGrace Speirs Sodergren 
*tEmily Stearns Giese 
tElizabeth Schneider 
tMary Byers Smith 

1905 
36% —$90 

tFrances Cutler 

Knickerbocker 
Fannie Erving Arundale 
tFanny Hazen Ames 
Ruth Pringle 

1906 

35%*— $75 
Alice Barbour Merrill 
tPersis Mackintire Carr 
tConstance Parker 

Chipman 
tRena Porter Hastings 
fMargaret Sherman Neef 
tMaud Sprague 

1907 
47% —$1,532 

tMabel Allen Buxton 
tMary Ball Bigelow 
tMarjory Bond Crowley 
tLaura Howell 
tClara Hukill Leeds 
tLeonora Parsons Cooper 
tAlice Webster Brush 

1908 

35% —$765 

tHelen Buss Towle 
tGertrude Count Barnes 
Mary Cheney Chase 
tWi lifred Ogden Lindley 
tEsther Parker Lovett 
Katharine Raymond 

Andrews 
tEsther Stickney Alley 
tDorothy Taylor 
tElizabeth Watts 



*Contributed prior 
to death 



1909 

30% —$235 

tMary Bourne Boutell 
Madeleine Burrage 
tElizabeth Fuller 
tEdith Gardner Tobey 
t Janet Gorton 
Helen Hazlewood 
tMarjorie Hills Allen 
tSarah Knox 
Cora Soule Robinson 
tMarjorie Soule Byers 

1910 

48% —$137 

tLois Bradford Marvin 
tClarissa Hall Hammond 
tLaura Jackson Austin 
tGrace Kellogg 
tPersis Mclntire Downey 
tRuth Murray Moore 
tRuth Newcomb 
tEthel Reigeluth Darby 
Marion Sanford 
tEdith Seccomb Young 
tLydia Skolfield Parsons 



1911 

43% —$135 

tDorothy Bigelow Arms 
tPersis Bodwell Millspaugh 
tAnna Boynton Hemenway 
tOlivia Flynt 
Marion Rhoda Green 
tMary Hall Lewis 
tMiriam Howard Bushnell 
tMargaret Strong Hill 
tEthel Swain Smith 
Mary Sweeney 
tHenrietta Wiest Zaner 
Corinne Willard Dresser 



1912 

29% —$83 

tMildred Chutter 
tLucy Kilby 
tAbbie Laton 
tDorothy Simpson Faith 
tNora Sweeney 



1913 
21%— $175 

tMary Helen Boyd 

Higgins 
tMildred Bryant Kussmaul 
tGladys Estabrook 

Blanchard 
tHazel Goodrich Waugh 
tHelen Hersey Heffernan 
tLouise Thompson Cottrell 



1914 

21 % — $487 

tMarion Clark Myerscough 
tHelen Hamblet Dyer 
tMary Hildreth 
tAlice Sweeney 
tBertha Wessel 
tMarie Winsor Appleby 
tMargaret Wylie Ware 



1915 

49% —$177 

tElizabeth Allen Belknap 
tRena Atwood Benson 
tMarion Barnard Cole 
tEleanor Bartlett Atwater 
tMarion Brooks 
tPhyllis Brooks Stevens 
Helen Bruce Butler 
Aurelia Hillman Sanders 
tMattie Larrabee 

Whittemore 
tCatherine Leach 
tElizabeth Leach 
tJessie Nye Blodgett 
tGertrude Shackleton 

Hacker 
tArline Talcott Turner 
tAda Wilkey Bull 
tMarion Winklebleck Hess 
tHarriette Woolverton 

Robinson 



1916 

52%— $289 

tAda Brewster Brooks 
tCharlotte Eaton 
tEleanor Frary Rogers 
Marjorie Freeman Heck 
tLillon Hamer Atkinson 



SIX 



tMildred Jenkins Dalrymple 
tEsther Kilton 
tLouise Kimball Jenkins 
tDoris King Childs 
tlnga Little Bouve 
Margaret Markens Hand 
tMarion Mellor Dean 
tGrace Merrill Emery 
tDorothy Niles 
tKatharine Odell Randall 
tBernice Overend Merrill 
tMargaret Perry James 
tDorothy Pillsbury Bartlett 
tAlice Prescott Plumb 
tHelene Sands Brown 
tEsther Van Dervoort Howe 
tJosephine Walker 

Woodman 
tHelen Warf ield Baker 



1917 

34% —$198 

tMiriam Bacon Chellis 
Harriet Balfe Nalle 
tFrances Cartland 
Esther Davis Smith 
tMarguerite Dunaway 

Baldwin 
tFrances Gere 
Sarah Humason 
Alice Littlefield Legal 
tJulia Littlefield 
tHarriet Murdock 

Andersson 
tCornelia Sargent 

Battershill 
tMarjorie Smithwick 

Parsons 
Mary Wuichet De Armon 



1918 

32%— $385 

t Irene Atwood 
tLouise Bacon Fuller 
*tGwendolen Brooks 

Reynolds 
tKathryn Cooper Richards 
tMariette Goodrich Page 
tElizabeth Gray Coit 
tMarion Hubbard Craig 
tEmmavail Luce 

Severinghous 
tHelen Martin Thomas 
tMarion McPherson 
tMartha Miller Reese 
tKatharine Righter 

Jenkins 
tHelen Snow Murdick 
tMargaret Speer 
tDorothy Stalker 
tVirginia Vincent Phillips 




FRANCES NOLDE LADD '54 
Alumnae Fund Chairman 



•"Contributed prior 
to death 



1919 
70%— $1,210 

In Memory of Grace 

Francis Jenkins 
Class Gift 
Anonymous 
Ruth Alley Rohrbach 
tKathryn Beck Dow 
tMarea Blackford Fowler 
tEthel Bonney Faber 
tGretchen Brown Knights 
tMarion Chandler 
tKatharine Coe Taylor 
tMary Cole Day 
tCharlotte Copeland Gray 
tDorothy Cutler Burr 
tMildred Daniels Cary 
tCora Erickson Dudley 
tMildred Frost Eaton 
tGlddys Glendinning 

Love land 
Joyce Graham Taylor 
tJosephine Hamilton 

Leach 
tHarriette Harrison 
tJane Holt Atkinson 
tGrace Kepner Noble 
Dorcas King Fox 
tDorothy Korst Blodgett 
tWinifred LeBoutillier Tyer 
Gertrude Lombard McGinley 
tElisabeth Luce Moore 
tMary Martin 
tThelma Mazey Gager 
tVirginia McCauley Otis 



tHelen Meigs van Dyck 
tGladys Merrill 
* Marguerite Morgan Judy 
Geraldine Murray Stanton 
Kathreen Noyes Pettit 
Caroline Richardson Korst 
tNadine Scovill Young 
Dorothy Shapleigh Meader 
tEleonore Taylor Ross 
tMargaret Taylor Stainton 



1920 

63% —$414 

tMargaret Ackroyd Hunt 
Edith Adams Culver 
tHope Allen Brown 
Elizabeth Babb Beveridge 
Ellinor Blymyer Boyd 
tEdna Dixon Mansur 
Helen Donald Coupe 
Lucy Ford McCorkindale 
Irene Franklin Foster 
*tVivien Gowdy Larabee 
tLillian Grumman 
tKatherine Hamblet 
tElizabeth Hawkes Miller 
tHilda Heath Safford 
tKatherine Kinney Hecox 
Constance Ling 
Mildred Linscott 

Havighurst 
tDoris McClintock Taylor 
tLucy Pratt Rutherford 



Miriam Rowell Barnes 
tElizabeth Stewart Pieters 
t Isabel Sutherland Kurth 
tHelen Thiel Gravengaard 
tDorothy Tyler 
tCharlotte Vose Clark 
tHelen Walker Parsons 
Leonora Wickersham Mills 
tRuth Winn Newhall 
tBertha Worman Smith 
tMargaret Worman 
Thompson 



1921 

42%— $357 

tMarian Ailing Ward 
tMiriam Bickford Haskin 
tDorothy Carr 
tElinor Cochrane Knight 
tEthel Dixon McGee 
tFrances Gasser Stover 
Marion Kimball Bigelow 
tKatherine Knight Fassett 
Dorothy Martin Buracker 
tMargaret Neelands 

Parsons 
tHelen Norpell Price 
tEdith Page Bennett 
tMarian Parker Paulson 
tMary Pierce Smith 
tHelen Roser 
tJessamine Rugg Patton 
tWinifred Simpson Worgan 
Mary Talcott Luster 
tElizabeth Thompson 

Winslow 
tFrances Thompson Heely 
tAgnes Titcomb Henderson 
Louise Van Dervoort Sweet 
tElizabeth Weld Bennett 



1922 

38% —$909 

tJane Baldwin 
tGwendolyn Bloomfield 

Tillson 
tGeneva Burr Sanders 
tCatherine Damon Mason 
tKatherine Damon Kletzien 
tDorothea Flagg Smith 
tMargaret Hopkins 

Wetherell 
tOlive Howard Vance 
tElizabeth Hutchinson 

Matthews 
tCarol Iredell 
tLois Kirkham Hart 
Celia Kunkel Payne 
tMary Mallory Pattison 
tElizabeth MacPherran 

Worcester 
Mary Elizabeth Polk 

Overstreet 
tMargaret Potter 

Kensinger 
tBarbara Sands Sherman 
Elinor Sutton DeFord 



seven 



tAlice Van Schmus Smith 
Janet Warren Winslow 
tAnne Whinery 
tDorothy Williams 
Davidson 



1923 
59% —$905 

In memory of Dolores 

Osborne Hall 
tElisabeth Adams Ross 
tNathalie Bartlett 

Farnsworth 
tMartha Buttrick Rogers 
tBarbara Clay Crampton 
tEdith Damon Bugbee 
tAnne Darling Whitehouse 
tSarah Finch Hartwell 
tElizabeth Flagg Dow 
tFrancelia Holmes 
tRuth Holmes Durant 
Charlotte Hudson White 
Rosamond Martin Johnson 
tElizabeth Maxwell Killian 
tCatharine Miller 

McCurdey 
tMargery Moon Ziegfeld 
tNatalie Page Neville 
tMary Elizabeth Rudd 
tMary Scudder Marshall 
tMartha Snyder Purrington 
tMary Catherine Swartwood 

Sinclaire 
tMiriam Sweeney McArdle 
tDorothy Taylor Booth 
tElizabeth Thompson Henry 
Miriam Thompson Kimball 
Dorothy Upton Jesson 
tEmily Van Patten 

Blackmore 
tEleanor Widen 
tEsther Wood Peirce 



1924 
39% —$286 

In memory of Helen 

Epler Baketel 
tJane Allen Kilby 
tSybil Bottomley Talman 
Margaret Boyd Ramey 
Polly Bullard Holden 
Lila Clevenger Burke 
tMargaret Colby 

Williamson 
tDorothy Converse 
tCaroline Hall Wason 
tAdelaide Hammond 

Johnson 
tKatherine Hart Mitchell 
tRuth Kelley Perry 
tMargaret MacDonald 

Vester 
tMargaret McKee De Yoe 
Olive Mitchell Roberts 
tElsie Phillips Marshall 
Ruth Pritchard de Rivera 
tGenevra Rumford 
Marian Shryock Dillenbeck 



tSusanna Smith Bowler 
Ethel Thompson James 
tMary Elizabeth Ward 
tVictorine Warner Knox 
tFrances Williams 

MacCorkle 
Elizabeth Wilson Naetzker 



1925 
30% —$286 

tEleanor Bodwell Pepion 
tMadelaine Boutwell 

von Weber 
tElizabeth Burtnett Horle 
tRuth Connolly Burke 
tRuth Davies Van Wagenen 
Annie Estes Mayo 
tFrancis Howard O'Brien 
tEunice Huntsman 
tTheodate Johnson Severns 
Sarah MacPherran Hartley 
tHildegarde Mittendorff 

Seidel 
Barbara Potter Lamed 
tElizabeth Righter Farrar 
tHildred Sperry Raymond 
Doris von Culin Breyer 



1926 
39% —$862 

Florence Allen Needham 
tAdelaide Black 
tBarbara Bloomfield Wood 
tCatherine Blunt Pierson 
tAntiss Bowser Wagner 
tEdith Bullen Creden 
tMarion Burr Sober 
Elizabeth Butler Allen 
tKatharine Clay Sawyer 
Jean Donald Manus 
tLouise Douglass Hill 
tRuth Farrington 
tFrances Flagg Sanborn 
Evelyn Glidden Stevens 
tPatricia Goodwillie 

Blanchard 
tEdith Ireland Wood 
tHelen Larson 
tLucie Locker Rash 
tM. Suzanne Loizeaux 
tEdda Renouf Gould 
Geraldine Rickard 
Olive Rogers Smith 
tSylvea Shapleigh Curtis 
tCarlotta Sloper 



1927 

38%— $547 

tHelen Amesse 
tMary Ayers Hower 
tHelen Connolly McGuire 
tMargaret Creelman Nelson 
tKatherine Farlow 

Hutchinson 
tEllen Faust 
Jane Fitch Roland 
Dorothy French Gray 



tPersis Goodnow Brown 
tJane Graves Howard 
tJune Hinman Marques 
tMiriam Houdlette Walsh 
tEmily House Maidment 
tPauline Humeston Carter 
tMarion Ireland Conant 
tLois Kimball 
tNancy Kimball Fowle 
tSylvia Miller Bellows 
tRuth Nason Downey 
tMargaret Nay Gramkow 
tRuth Perry 
Edna Russell Watson 
Virginia Smith Fuller 
tAylmer Stantial Kempton 



1928 

23%— $295 

In memory of Ruth 

Cushman Hill 
Christine Bliss Billings 
Winifred Dudley Burnham 
Lois Dunn Morse 
Virginia Gay d'Elseaux 
tFrances Gould Parker 
tBeatrice Lane Mercer 
tMary Alice Mcintosh 
tMargaret Nivison Chase 
tJosephine Paret Barrett 
tSusan Ripley Ward 
Elizabeth Ryan Hill 
tEmily Sloper Shailer 



1929 
60% —$730 

In memory of Elizabeth 

Bowser Smith 
In memory of Dorothe 

Gerrish 
In memory of Ann Miller 

Ludlow 
In memory of Bettina 

Rollins Wheeler 
In memory of Louise 

Tobey Dean 
tLouise Anthony Castor 
tKatherine Blunt Polsby 
tCatherine Bowden Barnes 
tGertrude Campion Soutar 
tGrace Castle 
tFrances Cobb Russell 
tMary Eaton Graf 
Marjorie Ellis Porter 
tOlive Elsey Weigle 
Margaret Esty Seamans 
tBarbara Folk Howe 
tPolly Francis Loesch 
tHarriet Gilmore Yoh 
tLois Hardy Daloz 
tM. Jeannette Hubbard 
tJoyce Jarman McNamara 
tEleanor Jones Bennett 
tGwenllian Jones Hamblin 
tRoberta Kendall Kennedy 
Katherine Kennedy 

Beardsley 
tGertrude King Bedard 
tEstelle Levering Chestnut 



Jane Linn Gale 
tMary Elizabeth Macdonald 
Catherine McDonnell 
tElizabeth McKinney Smiley 
tDorothy Newcomb Rogers 
tElisabeth Osborne Bacon 
Cleone Place Tiffany 
tDespina Plakias 

Messinesi 
tMillicent Smith Uppvall 
tGrace Stephens 
Katherine Stewart Emigh 
tElizabeth Taylor Amazeen 
tMartha Tuttle Haigis 



1930 
56%— $2,659.13 

tRuth Baker Johnson 
tKatharine Bigelow 

Heberton 
tDonna Brace Ogilvie 
tElizabeth Brewer Derricks 
Elizabeth Brown Guild 
tAlice Canoune Coates 
tRosamond Castle Olivetti 
tHortense Dunbar 
tKathryn Dutton Leidy 
Alice Eckman Mason 
tKathie Fellows Leiserson 
tKatharine Foster Rainbolt 
tFlorence Gardner Balius 
*tCornelia Gould Scott 
tGrace Hadley MacMillan 
tChristine Hollands Struck 
tBarbara Lamson 

Cummings 
tBarbara Lord Mathias 
tJanice Lovell Jenkins 
tMary Jane Owsley 

Warwick 
tElizabeth Perry Lewis 
Jeanette Quimby Daly 
Mary Richards Bethune 
tHelen Ripley 
tMarianna Smith Hile 
tElizabeth Southworth 

Sutton 
tVivian Southworth 

Gerstell 
tDoris Sturtevant Bacon 
tFrances Sullivan Sullivan 
Elizabeth Tarr Morse 
Elizabeth Walworth Ross 



1931 

35%— $393 

Doris Allen Carroll 
tKatherine Allen Babson 
tMary Angus 
tMary Bacon 
Metta Bettels Smith 
tRuth Cann Baker 
tNancy Carr Holmes 
tAbby Castle Kemper 
Evelyn Folk Ramsdell 
Mary Henderson Lee 
tDorothy Hunt Bassett 
Virginia Li I lard Collins 



eight 



tLisette Micoleau 

Tillinghast 
tMargaret O'Leary White 
tMarcia Rudd Keil 
Elizabeth Sharp de Sieyes 
tMary Smead Homlar 
Dorothy Stevenson Russell 
tJane Sullivan 
tNanine Wheeler Allender 
tMarie Whitehill 



1932 

26% —$530 

tHelen Allen Henry 
tlsabel Arms 
tElizabeth Bigler deMasi 
Elizabeth Boyce 
tKatharine Brigham 
tKatharine Cook HowlandS 
tHelen Cutler Appleton 
tFlorence Dunbar 

Robertson 
tMarie Holihan Foley 
Louise Hollis Black 
tMary Hyde de Mille 
Cvnthia James Tharaud 
tEunice Randall 
tGeorgia Thomson 
tRuth Tyler Smith 
tMariette Whittemore 

Bartlett 
tHarriet Wright Miller 



1933 

31% —$203 

Mary Elizabeth 

Burnham Gazlay 
tMargaret Chase Johnson 
tRozilla Chase Roberts 
tAnn Cole Gannett 
tMarcia Gaylord Norman 
Carolyn Guptill Hansen 
tKathleen Palmer Race 
tHelen Rice Wiles 
tJane Ritchie Shaw 
tEthel Rogers Foster 
tMariatta Tower Arnold 
tMargo Walker Whittier 
Hazel Walters Klothe 
tBetty Weaver Van Wart 
tKathryn Whittemore 

Knight 



1934 
10%— $1,045 

tElizabeth Barnes Callender 
tCassandra Kinsman 

Dexter 
tNancy Marsh Gores 
tMargaret Morrill Wilkins 
tRuth Stott Peters 



SGift matched by 
Allied Chemical 



1935 
24%— $219 

In memory of Alice 
Cooper Armstrong 
tDoris Anderson Clark 
tCathleen Burns Elmer 
tLaura Chedel Miller 
Ann Cutler Brecheen 
Georgeanna Gabeler Selden 
tSusan Hildreth Goodwin 
tGeraldine Johnson 
tElizabeth Jordan 
tLucia Nunez Mason 
tEllen Rivinius Hill 
tShirley Smith King 
tEliese Strahl Cutler 
tMargit Thony 
Cecile Van Peursem Lane 



1936 
35% —$140 

tMary Dooley Bragg 
Phyllis Fisher Tobey 
Frances Mahoney Gay 
tGrace Nichols Knight 
tVirginia Nourse Salomon 
tHelen O'Brien Olcott 
tBarbara Reinhart 

Livingston 
Anne Robins Frank 
tElinor Robinson Goodwin 
tCaroline Rockwell Stevens 
tElizabeth Sargent 

Crandell 
tPauline Spear Chapin 
Patricia Smith Magee 
tMary Swan 
tMary Trafton Simonds 



1937 
22% —$260 

tMarjorie Boesel 

Van Winkle 
tCorinne Brooks Cornish 
Catherine Forbush Bass 
tLucy Hulburd Richardson 
t Elisabeth Joost Todd 
tNancy Kincaid Breslin 
tElizabeth McArdle 

McDermott 
tElizabeth Melcher 

Anderson 
tPriscilla Richards Phenix 
tAnne Sawyer Greene 
Lillian Seiler Willins 
Ellen Simpson Martin 
Betty Swint McFarland 



1938 

18% —$190 

tMarjorie Coll Fields 
tMary Elliot Brown 
tPhyllis England Letts 
tSue Anne Eveleigh McVie 
Rosa Fletcher Crocker 
tElizabeth McBride 
Chapman 



tAnne Simpson White 
Constance Thurber Prudden 
tMary Toohey Kruse 
tCarol Whittemore Fellows 

1939 

22%— $285 

tBarbara Bellows Kaiser* 
tLucia Buchanan 

Livingston 
tFrances Cross Jones 
Patricia Goss Rhodes 
tVirginia Halstead 

Lightfoot 
tJoan Hubbard Lawson 
tMarjorie MacMullen 

Brewer 
Ann Oakman Deegan 
tPolly Pancoast Tunkey 
tAdelle Sawyer Wood 
tJeanne Waugh Harney 

1940 
31% —$305 
tLee Burnett Peterson 
tFrancis Chandler Futch 
Sarah Cole Tuckerman 
tJeanne Cowles 
Fleischmann 
tPhyllis Crocker England 
tCarolyn Cross Robbins 
tElisabeth Ellis Chase 
tDorothy Garry Warlick 
tMargit Hintz Lorenze 
tMary Howard Nutting 
tVirginia Jones Garvan 
tMargaret Meyer Haynes 
tMarietta Meyer Ekberg 
tChristine Robinson Likins 
Doris Sawyer Gordon 
tRachel Whitney Davis 
tPriscilla Williams Dorian 
Jane Wilson Lindberg 
tNancy Wilson Ainslie 

1941 

27% —$213 

tJoan Belden McDonough 
Dorothy Dean Johnson 
tMary Elizabeth 

Erkert Altorfer 
tAlda Grieco Cesarini 
Josephine Hartwell 

Boddington 
tDoris Jones Hannegan 
tNancy Kelley Park 
tJoan List Van Ness 
tMargery Martin Martin 
Harriet Means Kleiser 
tEloise Perkins Beck 
tLuella Sommer Vermeil 
tFrances Troub Roberts 
tAdeline Waterhouse 

MacKay 
Dorothy White Wicker 
tNancy Whittier Atkinson 



1942 

28% —$668 

t Irene Abbott MacPherson 
tJane Bishop Fahey 
tAnnette Curran Conlon 
tPatricia Daniels Hanson 
tJanet Dwight Nickerson 
tBetty Hardy Verdery 
tBarbara Hill Kennedy 
tJanice Lenane Scott 
Elizabeth Lovett 

Wilkinson 
tMargaret McFarlin 
tMarilin Menschik 

Westaway 
Ruth Rathbone Hildreth 
tJane Rutherford 
tBarbara Sanders Dadmun 
tThirsa Sands Fuiks 
tEarline Simpson 
tRuth Snider Bernstein 
tMargaret Stuart Beale 
Juliette Weston Suhr 
tElsie Williams Kehaya 



1943 
21 % — $264 

tMary Beckman 

Huidekoper 
Elizabeth Bennett Ewing 
tJean Craig Fitzgerald 
tAmelia Daves Kopald 
Gertrude Hamper Barry 
tMargaret Howard Long 
Janet Humphrey 
tSara Ann Loughridge 

Konstam 
Cornelia McMurray Brooks 
tElizabeth Rowley 

Tittmann* 
tThemis Sarris Ellis 
Isabel Wiggin McDuffie 



1944 
33% —$795 

Elizabeth Bertucio 

Martuscello 
tElisabeth Colson Tierney 
tNancy Emerson Viele 
tAagot Hinrichsen Cain 
tCynthia Holmes SpurrSJ 
tMolly Hubbard Mercer 
tRuth Kirstein Turkanis 
tRuth Lyons Hickcox 
tFrances MacDonald 

Thompson 
tAlma Mastrangelo 

Strabala 



SGift matched by Miehle. 
Goss. Dexter Foundation 



^Matching gift by Olin- 
Mathieson Charitable 
Trust 

JCGift matched by The 
Bank of New York 



nine 



tEmily McMurray Mead 
tNancy Nicholas Wengert 
Ines Ortega Kinnane 
tKatherine Pendleton 

Phelan 
Elizabeth Reid Buzby 
tShirley Woodams 

Hoestereyjf 

1945 

27% —$509 

tBarbara Ball Bacon 
tBarbara Beecher Carl 
tElizabeth Dickerman 

Lovatt 
Barbara Haserick Dodge 
tJoan Holdsworth 

Maxwell 
tMary Jane Kurth 

Longabaugh 
tSally Leavitt Cheney 
tAndree Luce Cooney 
Grace Lurton 
tMarion Marsh Birney 
tMarjorie Milne Winston 
tHilary Paterson Cleveland 
tCynthia Smith McFalls 
tShirley Sommer Holzwarth 
tJoan Sweeney 
tMary Taylor Sherpick 
tBeatrice Van Cleve Lee 
tLois Whiffen Dunnam 

1946 

21 % — $465 

tSally Allen Waugh 
tMary Burton Blakney 
tEllen Brumback 
Ann Hellweg Warren 
tMary Howe Brumback 
tKatharine Johnson 

Robbins 
tPatricia Keefer Stoeffel 
tGreta Leinbach Smith 
tFrancis Little Schonenberg 
tCynthia Noone 
Luetta Robertson Kolflat 
tMarjorie Sommer Tucker 
tCarolyn Teeson Keller 
tNancy Thomas Adams 
tMarion Troub Friedman 

1947 

43%— $465 

Jane Brown Reynolds 
tJanice Cole Johnson 
tBarbara Dean Bolton 
tVirginia Eason Weinmann 
tHelen Dowd Richards 
tEmily Gierasch Savage 
Barbara Goddard Theg 
tDiane Gould Berkeley 
tDorthea Hall Kernan 
tCorallie Hanly Murray 
Emily Hemsath McElroy 
tSally Humason Bradlee 
Patricia Jaffer Abernethy 



Joan Karelitz Brisson 
tMargaret Kimball 

Montgomery 
tJoy Kolins Berglund 
tJane Lewis Gleason 
tCarol McLean Bly 
tMargot Meyer Richter 
tMay Lou Miller Hart 
tMartha Morse Abbot 
tJean Ritchey Bora 
tSusanne Robbins de Wolf 
tCarolyn Sackett Colebum 
Darlene Sharp Firke 
tChristine von Goeben 

Curtis 
tMarion White Singleton 
Mary Lo White El-Shahawy 

1948 
42% —$1,592.98 

In memory of Estelle 

DuBois Hoy 
Beverley Adkins Wells 
tMartha Ball Geiken 
tMartha Barber Lowrance 
tKathorine Bigelow 

Fitzgerald 
tLee Booth Witwer 
Frances Brumback 
tNadine Cookman Price 
tSusan Davis Snyder 
Beth Dignan McGinty 
tFairfield Frank DuBois 
tJosephine Hildreth Mirza 
tRosemary Jones 
tJacqueline Kay Schlosser 
tJane Kenah Dewey 
tMary Katharine 

Lackey StowellJt 
tMary Marton Davenport 
Elizabeth McConnel Barnett 
tMarguerite Moss Heery 
tElizabeth Ogden Tod 
tMary Rich Ohlweiler 
tNancy Richmond Hammer 
tAnn Robinson Joyce 
Ann Sarolea Bartholomew 
Mackay Selden Bush 
tBarbara Shulze Baldwin 
tMary Carroll Sinclaire 

Morris 
tHelen Tasche North 
tEleanor Wallis 
Genevieve Young Sun 

JJGift matched by 
Pitney-Bowes, Inc. 

1949 

13% —$145 

Mercy Barnes Whitney 
Margaret Black Dintruff 
Mariana Espaillat Crouch 
tBarbara Hamby McLane 
Jane Noss Bidwell 
tJoan Oven Betts 
Nancy Rogal Cohen 
tCamilla Titcomb 



JfGift matched by Ford 
Fund Education Aid 



*Gift matched by The 
Bank of New York 



1950 
26% —$302 

tAnonymous 

tCarol Bernstein Horowitz 
tNoelle Blackmer Beatty 
tElizabeth Bradley Hubbard 
tPatricia Burke Wright 
tElspeth Caldwell 

Badertscher 
tAnne Dunsford 

Hockmeyer 
tCynthia Faigle Quinn 
tBeverley Flather Edwards 
tRoberta Ann Gibbon 

Coates 
tCoralie Huberth Sloan 
tSusan Morgan Rolontz 
tAnn Moser Hughes 
tElizabeth Moss Schmidt 
tAlice Russell Farner 
tBarbara Somers Dorsey 
tSarah Stevens MacMillan 
tGloria Yoffa Portnoy 



1951 
19% —$393 

tJoan Barnard Lynch 
tGwendolyn Barrington 

Nichols 
Agnes Bergh Beverley 
Dorothy Colburn Rice 
Barbara Dougherty 

Dermody 
Patricia Driscoll Viehler 
tAlison Faulk Curtis 
tCarolin Furst Carlson 
tBarbara Gibson Roth 
tEdna Grieco Thomas 
tConstance Hall Strohecker 
tPaula Holden Palmer 
tSusan Kimball Wheelock 
tAnn Taylor van Rosevelt 



1952 

31% —$212 

tMartha Artz Barrett 
Joan Baird 
tLorna Ball Prescott 
tSally Binenkorb Zilber 
Harriett Brown DeLong 
Molly Edson Whiteford 
tNancy Faraci Shionis 
tElizabeth Griffiths 

McCurdy 
Cornelia Hamilton 

Greenspan 
tAnne Lord 
tAnn Lyons Litz 
Constance Markert Day 
Julia Merriwether Granger 
tNancy Muth Clements 
Jaquelin Perry Fleet 
tClara Reynolds Palmer 
tSandra Smith Lisk 
Randi Sontum Fegley 
Anne Spencer Stallman 
tJoan Wood Stephenson 



1953 
43% —$2,122.81 

In memory of Dunster 

Pettit 
tMargit Andersson 

Clifford 
Elaine Audi Macken 
Nancy Bailey Nickerson 
Caroline Benedict Ferguson 
Deborah Bethel Zobel 
Janet Bowden Wilson 
tPatricia Earhart 
tNancy Edmonds Luce 
Patricia Eveleth Buchanan 
tJulie Gaines Phalen 
tMary Grant Lynch 
tCarol Hardin Kimball 
Elizabeth Hitzrot Evans 
tPolly Jackson Townsend 
Ann Kennedy Irish 
tCornelia Nyce Kittredge 
Anne Oliver Jackson 
Judith Pinkham Bassick 
Mary Scandura McCloskey 
Doris Schoonmaker Miller 
Ellen Smith 
tNatalie Starr Lee 
tDiana Stevenson Brengeljf 
tAnn Stoddard Saunders 
Sally Swayne Jennings 
tAudrey Taylor MacLean 
tCornelia Weldon LeMaitre 
Judith Wilcox Martin 
tJane Wilson Mann 



1954 

39%— $637.84 

Marion Badoian Emmanuel 
tElizabeth Beeson Tafel 
Martha Belknap 
Martha Jane Church Lang 
Elizabeth Cooper Washburn 
tNancy Donnelly Bliss 
Margaretta Furst Stewart 
Beverly Gramkow Melinn 
tAnna Hewlett James 
tAnn Hunt Graf 
tLinda Jones Campbell 
tSarah Jones Easter 
tGretchen Kase Smith 
tSuzanne Larter Lingeman 
tMargaret Moore Roll 
tJane Munro Barrett 
tDoris Niemand Ruedin 
tFrances Nolde Ladd 
Maris Oamer Noble 
tPaula Prial Folkman 
tJudith Prior Adame 
tVicky Schwab Aronoff 
tPatricia Skillin Pelton 
tSylvia Thayer Zaeder 
Marilyn Towner Dodd 
Joan Wheeler Kaufman 
tEdith Williamson Bacon 
tMolly Young Sauereisen 



#Gift matched by 
Mobil Foundation, 



Inc. 



ten 



1955 
30% —$193.75 

tSusan Appleton Evans 
tGail Baldwin Whipple 
Louise Bell 
tStarr Best Hope 
tNancy Eastham lacobucci 
tBetsy Elliott Winkler 
tAnne English Stoner 
tDorothy Fleming King 
tSarah Graf Fish 
t Deborah Green West 
tMargaret Holbrook Birch 
tSusan McGuire McGrath 
Mary Munroe Stahl 
Elizabeth Sawyer Klaeson 
Jeanne Skillin Moore 
tKatherine Stirling Dow 
Carol StratonJt 
tMary Ann Yudicky 
Goodrich 

1956 
36%— $318 

tSusan Bradley Lee 
tGrace Callahan Hagstrom 
Virginia Dakin Scott 
tLynn Dowlin Voss 
Elizabeth Edmonds 
tMarilyn Emsley Betts 
tNell Eubanks Temple 
tMary Anne Faggiano 

Hendren 
tDeborah Holbrook 

Winthrop 
tSusan Kauer Schofield 
tMollie Lupe Lasater 
tMarjorie Orr Maclver 
tElizabeth Parker Powell 
tCarol Reed Karnopp 
Sue Richmond Hoagland 
tEleanor Rulon-Miller 

York 
Nancy Smith King 
tSarah Sullivan McCain 
Jane Sweetsir Ferguson 
tNancy Swift Greer 
tJane Tatman Connelly 
tAnne Tripp Hopkins 
tSusan Waterous Wagg 
tJudith Warren Kiely 
Ellen Welles 
Anne Woolverton Oswald 

1957 

48% —$584.16 

Josephine Bradley Bush 
tMartha Buckley Fahnoe 
tMary Lee Carter Staniar 
Marcia Colby Frame 
Carolyn Cooper Bird 
Celia Curry Saunders 
Cecily Dickson 
Campbell-Smith 



tCecile Erickson 

Mactaggart 
tCarolyn Gaines Roberson 
tMiriam Ganem Reeder 
Jacqueline Goodspeed 
tAnne Gramkow DeaneS 
Carolyn Green Wilbur 
tDiana Hallowell 
tPenelope Holbrook Reid 
tSally Lawrence Kauder 
Barbara Leech Jacquette 
Louisa Lehmann Birch 
Lynne McLaughlin Moughty 
tJanet McLean Hunt 
Joy Partridge 
Penelope Post 
Susan Rairdon Allen 
tPaula Slifer ZandstraJHt 
tDeborah Smith Regan 
tLucinda Sulzbacher Cutler 
tMary Wellman Bates 
tSandra Wiles Marquis 
tLouise Wooldredge 

Wieland 
tFrancis Young Tang3£$ 



1958 

36% —$323 

tElizabeth Artz Beim 
Sandra Bensen Calhoun 
Jane Christie Smith 
Nora Colby Salaway 
tAnne Cole Warren 
tNancy Dick 
t Agnes Daley Rothrock 
tAnn DiClemente Ross 
tParry Ellice Adam 
tBetsy Gardner Riley 
tHarriet Gray 
Ruth Gray Switzer 
tCaroline Greene Donnelly 
t Judith Hart ShawSJHMf 
Anne Hitchcock Wies 
tSally Ann Lawrence 

Hopkins 
tSara Leavitt Blackburn 
Frederica Lindbeck 

Hammerstrom 
Jacqueline Locke Willimon 
Valerie Matthews 
tSusan Moore Ferris 
tEdith Olson Davies 
tFredericka Owsley 

Thomas 
tWynne Paffard Delmhorst 
Patricia Parrish Banks 
tClaudia Sandberg Wyllie 
tMary Steketee MacDonald 



tfGift matched by 
Rockefeller Family and 
Associates 



SGift matched by 
McGraw-Hill, Inc. 

JMfGift matched by 
Whirlpool Corp. 

SSJGift matched by 
The DU Foundation 

SJMfSGift matched by The 
Chase Manhattan Bank 
Foundation 



tSusan Tidd Augenthaler 
Sandra Veeder 
Doris Ward Lawson 

1959 
38% — $301 

tJudith Agor Aydelott 
Gale Barton Hartch 
tElizabeth Bell 

Hetherington 
tSusan Bradley 
Susan Calnan Bates 
tFaith Critchley 
Elizabeth Evans Elmer 
tMary Feltwell Gordon 
tJoan Fisher Chambers 
Susan Fox Castellini 
tAlma Grew 

Elizabeth Harriman Tannen 
Dorothy Henry Pazereskis 
tJay Hollands 
tAlice lams Kittredge 
Cornelia Jones Gephart 
Linda Lobb Timmins 
tPatricia Marvin 
Diane Montgomery Rice 
Duncan Moose Ripley 
Ann Patch Hill 
tNona Porter Gallant 
tHolly Robertson Chalmers 
tKate Sides Flather 
Laurie Smith 
Nathalie Taft Andrews 
Elsie Taylor Cummings 
tAnn Travers Butler 
tWinifred Ward Keith 
tCatherine Watson Rapp 

1960 
15%— $126 

tAlexander Crane Frishman 
Margaret Elsemore Sipple 
tSarah Foote Hubby 
tKristianne Graham 

Bumpus 
Jane Humphrey Adams 
Terry Hydeman Seward 
Lindsay Knowlton 
Jill Kohler Garbacz 
tJoyce Nassar Leary 
tBarbara Norr 
Ann Valkenburgh Kindred 
tBrenda Walker Hirsch 
Susan Wallace Fraim 

1961 

15%— $145 

Deborah Carpenter 

Thompson 
Stephenie Davis Ericson 
tAnn Fahnestock 
tGray Hodges Wexelblat 
Loring Low 
Andrea Lynch 
Phyllis Rogde Gleason 
Susan Rothwell 



Linda Scott Gibbins 

Sybil Smith Smith 

tJoan Spurgeon BrennanS 

1962 
21%— $182 

Barbara Bickly Segraves 
tBetsy Bruns Eaton 
Mary Concemi Sommer 
Bethiah Crane Accetta 
Carolyn Dow 
Nancy Elwell Griscom 
Cynthia Everett White 
Sherrill Farr Bray 
Katharine Grant Galaitsis 
Pauline Gray Keyes 
tKathrin Krakauer 
Frederica Muller Aalto 
tlngrid Quarck Manning 
tMary Wells Fitzgerald 
Dorothy Wheeler Bacon 
tGretchen Whitehead 

1963 
29% —$165 

Susan Archer Rehder 
Elizabeth Bartelink 
Jonell Briggs Crook 
Margaret Brown Wolf 
tSuzanne Burton 
tElizabeth Cadbury 

Montagu 
Susan Coolidge Wolkoff 
tKaren Flack Bonnell 
Karla Haartz 
Lucinda Hannon Janus 
tAnn Harris 
tBarbara Hoffman 
tMorley Marshall 
Anita Miller White 
Emily Moulton Hall 
Fredericka Moxon Perez 
Sandra Price Bishop 
tBettina Proske 
tAnita Schenck 
Eileen Schock Laspa 
tCynthia Sorenson 
Jacquelyn Sutton Cleverly 
Mary Wilkins 

1964 

27% —$181 

Allis Brooks 

Virginia Clemens Bryant 
tMartha Coleman 
Margaret Deutsch 
Martha Foley 
Elizabeth Griswold 

McCarthy 
tJoan Harney 
tAmy Johnson 
tElfriede Laaff Koenig 
tSusan Localio 
tPatricia Morrill 



SGift matched 
Textron, Inc. 



by 



SGift matched by 
The United States Trust 
Company of New York 
Foundation 



eleven 



tGretchen Overbagh 

tHeidi Paffard 

Bridget Parson Saltonstall 

Linda Perkin 

tLee Porter 

Gay Steimle 

Laura Stevenson 

Susan Van Winkle 

Pollock 
Laurie Waltuch 
tMolly Webster Pugh 
Elisa Wright 

1965 
20% —$83.50 

Katherine Abler 

Deborah Downs 

Deryl Fleming 

Elizabeth Giblin 

Laura Halford 

Claudia Hall 

Ellen Huntington 

Margrit Krakauer 

Anne McDermott 

Anne Rahilly 

Carol Reische Seltzer 

Rebecca Reynolds Hackett 



Karen Smith 
Alicia Stillman Stewart 
Rosemary Tyler 
Susan Vanderlinde 

Monaghan 
Leslie Veasey Schade 



1966 

20%— $225 

Beverley Armsden 

Judith Bricker 

Martha Church Moore 

Paula Cortes 

Lucy Crane 

Sarah Downs 

Drewry Hanes 

Jean Lippincott 

Bethe Moulton 

Mary Porter 

Ellen Ross 

Margaret Ryder Del Isola 

Welling Thomas 

Lucy Thomson 

Janet Waring 

Mettie Whipple 

Nancy Whitehead 



1967 

15%— $210 

Elizabeth Bonan 
Diana Bonnifield 
Susan Gallagher 
Catherine Hoover 
Christina Lambert 
Elizabeth MacGregor 
Jane Phillips 
Nancy Porosky 
Gerda Ray 
Elizabeth Rudman 
Susan Sticknoth 
Jane von der HeydeS 
Laurie Wallwork 

1968 
20% —$117 

Barbara Ainslie 
Susan Barton 
Jane Brown 
Deborah Daley 
Toby Dondis 



SGift matched by 
Kidder Peabody Foundation 



Anne Fellows 
Elizabeth Handy 
Hollis Hebbel 
Louise Hunter 
Jacqueline Mathiot 
Anne Moses 
Katharine Nelson 
Florence Newcomb 
Marcia Owen 
Marguerite Schnepel 

Past Principal 

tMarguerite Hearsey 

Past Faculty 

In memory of Isabel 

Hancock 
Hope Baynes 
tHelen Bean Juthe 
tMary Carpenter Dake 
tEsther Comegys 
tKate Friskin 
tBarbara Humes Euston 
Katherine Macdonald 
Maud Morgan 

tBoston Abbot Club 
tNew York Abbot Club 



The class of 1969 presented $1,000 to Abbot for an ABC 
scholarship. 



Matching Gift Companies 

Allied Chemical 

The Bank of New York 

The Chase Manhattan Bank Foundation 

The D L J Foundation 

Ford Fund Education Aid 

General Foods, Maxwell House Division 

General Tire & Rubber 

Hoover Foundation 

Kidder Peabody Foundation 

Litton Foundation 

McGraw-Hill, Inc. 

Miehle. Goss. Dexter Foundation 

Mobil Foundation, Inc. 

Olin-Mathieson Charitable Trust 

Pitney- Bowes, Inc. 

Rockefeller Family & Associates 

Textron, Inc. 

The United States Trust Company of New York Foundation 
Whirlpool Corp. 



twelve 



Parents, Trustees and Friends of the School 




GUERIN TODD 
Parents' Chairman, Abbot Development Fund 



Mr. John Radford Abbot 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Q. Adams 

Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton Allen 

Mr. and Mrs. Heath Allen 

Mrs. Michael Amore 

Mr. and Mrs. James Andrews^ 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Anton 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Axelrod 

Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Babb 

Dr. and Mrs. Donald Bailey 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Baird 

Mr. George Baird 

Miss Jane B. Baldwin 

Mr. and Mrs. Angel Behrends 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Belcher, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin Bendetson 

Mr. G. Grenville Benedict 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Bertsche 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Best 

Dr. and Mrs. John Bisbing 

Mrs. DeWitt Bleecker 

Mr. and Mrs. John Blomquist 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Bowne 

Mr. and Mrs. Freeman Boynton 

Mrs. Walter Bradley 

Mr. nod Mrs. Wilson Brazer 

Mr. and Mrs. Joel Brecheen 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Breed, Jr. 



^Matching Gift — Maxwell House 
Div. of General Foods 



Dr. and Mrs. Edward Broaddus 
Mr. and Mrs. John Brumback 
Mr. and Mrs. Dexter Butterfield 
Mrs. John E. Cain, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. James Calvin 
Dr. and Mrs. Myron Carmer 
Dr. and Mrs. Henry Carr 
Mr. Lyndall Carter 
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Castle 
Dr. and Mrs. Gilbert Causey 
Dr. and Mrs. William Caverly 
Professor and Mrs. Raymond Cerf 
Dr. and Mrs. Maurice Chagnon 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Church 
Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Clark 
Mr. and Mrs. William Cleveland 
Dr. and Mrs. Manuel Coggan 
Mr. and Mrs. Jason Cohen 
Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Comley 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Conrad 
Dr. and Mrs. Daniel Coughlan 
Miss Margaret Curran 
Mr. and Mrs. James Curtis 
Mr. and Mrs. Leo Daley 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Damon 
Mr. and Mrs. Warren Delano 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Demarest 
Mrs. Roland Derby 
Dr. and Mrs. Alexander Dick 
Mrs. Tyree Dillard, Jr. 
Mrs. Philip Dorenbaum 



Mr. and Mrs. Harold Dow 

Mr. and Mrs. James K. Dow 

Mrs. James Avery Draper 

Mr. and Mrs. William DuBois 

Dr. and Mrs. Richard Durham 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Earhart 

Mr. and Mrs. Clinton Eklund 

Dr. and Mrs. Ralph Emerson 

Mrs. Gardner Emmons 

Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Everett 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Ewald 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Finbury 

Mrs. Frederic Fiske 

Mr. Burton S. Flagg 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Flesh 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Freeman 

Mr. and Mrs. Victor Gares 

Mr. A. Ralph Gordon 

Mrs. Dixie Goss 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Graf 

Mr. and Mrs. Deane Gray 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Greene, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Grieco 

Mr. and Mrs. William Gurganus 

Mr. J. Gordon Hall 

Mr. and Mrs. John Hamilton 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hammond 

Mrs. Roland Hammond, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Gordon Hanes 

Mrs. Robert Harrington 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Hartmann 



thirteen 



M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

D 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

D 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

D 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 



and Mrs. Lincoln W. Haynes 
and Mrs. John Hazard 

. and Mrs. Edward Heifetz 

s. Lenert B. Henry 

. and Mrs. Joseph Hershfield 

. and Mrs. Frederick Higgins 

. and Mrs. John Hill 

. and Mrs. Erik Hinrichsen 

. and Mrs. David Ho 

s. Kenneth Hoffman 

. and Mrs. James Hollands 

. and Mrs. Joseph Hooverjfjf 

. Francis Horan 

. and Mrs. Thomas Huhn 

. and Mrs. Otis Humphrey 

. and Mrs. Millard Humstone 

. Robert I. Hunneman 

. and Mrs. J. Kenneth Huntington 

. and Mrs. Thomas Huntington 

. Joubert Hurd 

. and Mrs. Simeon Hyde, Jr. 

. and Mrs. George Ingram, Jr. 

s. Rose Jenkins 

. and Mrs. Mitchell Johnson, Jr. 

. and Mrs. Robert E. Johnson 

. and Mrs. Milton Johnston, Jr. 

. and Mrs. Ralph Jones 

s. Virginia H. Jones 

. and Mrs. Andre Joseph 

. and Mrs. George Karelitz 

. and Mrs. George Kattar 

. and Mrs. Stuart Kay 

. and Mrs. John Kemper 

. and Mrs. Charles Kennedy 
and Mrs. James Kiely 

s. C. Carleton Kimball 

. and Mrs. Clarence Knapp 

. and Mrs. William Knapp 

. and Mrs. Robert Kohler 

. Bomar Kramer{{{ 

and Mrs. Frank Kropp 
and Mrs. Jude Laspa 
H. Warren Lawrence 
and Mrs. Laurence Leavitt 
and Mrs. Edmund Leland, Jr. 
and Mrs. Josiah Lilly, III 
and Mrs. Roger Lindgrove 
and Mrs. Stafford Lindsay 
and Mrs. Stuart Lippincott 

. and Mrs. Bennett Lord 

. and Mrs. Glenn Loughridge 

. Benjamin Ludlow, Jr. 

. and Mrs. George Lund 

. Evelyn Luquer 

. and Mrs. Duncan Maclntyre 

. and Mrs. Richard Mansfield 



{Matching Gift — 
Textron Foundation 
{^Matching Gift — 

Hoover Foundation 
{{{Matching Gift — General 
Tire & Rubber Company 



Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Markley 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Marshall 

Mr. and Mrs. Fritz Marti 

Mr. and Mrs. Hans Marum 

Mrs. George Marvell 

Mrs. Edwin Marvin 

Mr. and Mrs. John Mason 

Mr. and Mrs. John Massengale, III 

Mrs. Rene Mathey 

Mrs. Donald Mclvor 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas McLaughlin, Jr. 

Mr. Charles Russell McLean 

Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm Sedgwick 

Mrs. Donald Merriam 

Mr. and Mrs. Andre Meyer 

Mr. Charles Moore 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Morrison, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Motch 

Mr. and Mrs. John Moxon 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Naman 

Mr. and Mrs. David Nimick{ 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin Norr 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederic O'Brien 

Mrs. John B. Ogilvie 

Mrs. George Ott 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Owsley 

Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Padjen 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederic Paffard, Jr. 

Mrs. Soctt Paradise 

Dr. and Mrs. David Parke 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Partridge 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Patch 

Mr. and Mrs. Emil Pattberg, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Payne 

Mr. and Mrs. Karel Pennink 

Mr. and Mrs. Stepehen Phillips 

Mr. and Mrs. Alberto Pico 

Mr. and Mrs. Fong Yue Po 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Pope 

Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Porter 

Mrs. Brooks Potter 

Mr. and Mrs. Dietrich Proske 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Prudden 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Rafton 

Mrs. Dorothy Randall 

Captain and Mrs. George Raser 

Mr. and Mrs. E. Benjamin Redfield, Jr. 

Mrs. Merrill Reische 

Mr. and Mrs. John Reynolds 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Robinson 

Mrs. Arthur Rogde 

Mrs. Horatio Rogers 

Dr. and Mrs. Sidney Rosen 

Mrs. Henry Roth 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Ruff 

Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Russem 

Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Samel 

Mr. and Mrs. Angelo Sapienza 

Mr. George F. Sawyer 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Schiavoni 

Mr. and Mrs. Herman Schnepel, Jr. 



{Matching Gift — 
Litton Foundation 



M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

D 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

D 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

D 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

D 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 



. and Mrs. George Shapiro 
. and Mrs. Arthur Sharp 
. and Mrs. Byron Smith 
5. Dane Smith 

. and Mrs. Everett Ware Smith 
. and Mrs. Lindsay Smith 
. and Mrs. Charles Snelling 
. and Mrs. Allen Solomon 
. and Mrs. John Spaulding 
. and Mrs. Arnold Spinosa 
. and Mrs. Carl Stahlbrand 

and Mrs. 0. Sherwin Staples 
. Douglas B. Steimle 
. and Mrs. Richard Steele 
. and Mrs. Campbell Steketee 
. and Mrs. John Stephenson, III 
. and Mrs. Philip Stevens 
. and Mrs. Carleton Stewart 
. Orson St. John 
. and Mrs. Hoffman Stone 
s. Frederic Stott 

and Mrs. David Straus 

. and Mrs. Robert Streett 

. and Mrs. John Sturgeon 

s. William Sturgis 

. and Mrs. Gardner Sutton 

ss Alice B. Sweeney 

. and Mrs. Kneeland Swenson 

. and Mrs. Peter Sykes 

and Mrs. Leslie Tasche 
. and Mrs. Herbert Tatelman 
. Clarence Taylor 
. and Mrs. Rainey Taylor 
. and Mrs. Sumeth Techapaibul 
. and Mrs. William Thomas 
. John Thompson 
. George Thomson 
s. Samuel Titcomb 

and Mrs. Guerin Todd 
ss Juliette Tomlinson 

and Mrs. George Urdang 

and Mrs. Paul Van Anda 

and Mrs. S. Thompson Viele 
. and Mrs. John Walker 
. and Mrs. Nelson Walker 
. and Mrs. Albert Wallwork 
. and Mrs. Charles Wardwell 
. and Mrs. Thayer Warshaw 
. and Mrs. Gilbert Watson, II 
. and Mrs. William Watson 
. and Mrs. Samuel G. Waugh 
. and Mrs. Herbert Weber 
. and Mrs. George Webster 

and Mrs. John Webster 
. and Mrs. James Weidenman 
. Scott Wells 

. and Mrs. William Weston 
. and Mrs. George Wheeler 
s. Howard Wheeler 
. and Mrs. Grant Whipple 
. and Mrs. Robert Whitehead, Jr. 
. and Mrs. John Witherspoon 
. and Mrs. Cornelius Wood 
. and Mrs. Leander Yeaton, Jr. 
. and Mrs. B. Frederick Yoffa 



fourteen 



& JWemortal 



A fund in memory of Dunster Pettit, 
1953, has been given by her mother, 
her brother and her classmates to assist 
an ABC student at Abbot. Mrs. William 
Pettit and Mr. Foster Pettit generously 
matched all contributions. 



Nancy Bailey Nickerson 
Deborah Bethel Zobel 
Julie Gaines Phelan 
Elizabeth Hitzrot Evans 
Polly Jackson Townsend 
Anne Kennedy Irish 
Cornelia Nyce Kittredge 
Anne Oliver Jackson 
Mr. Foster Pettit 
Mrs. William Pettit 
Doris Schoonmaker Miller 
Ellen Smith 
Natalie Starr Lee 
Ann Stoddard Saunders 
Audrey Taylor MacLean 
Cornelia Weldon LeMaitre 
Jane Wilson Mann 



Alumnae ifequegts; 

Abbot lists the following bequests with pride and deep gratitude. 
They reveal the devotion of the alumnae to the school and the 
abiding faith of the alumnae in the value of an Abbot education. 



Harriett M. Chapman 1907 

Priscilla Chapman Schroeder 1927 



$3,000 
$1,500 



A fund in memory of Helen Epler Baketel, 1924, was established 
by her husband, Sherman T. Baketel. 



fifteeen 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 

Andover. Massachusetts 01810 

ADDRESS CORRECTION REQUESTED 



ENTERED AS 
SECOND-CLASS MATTER! 

AT THE POST OFFICE AT 

ANDOVER. MASSACHUSET 




- is 




The Executive Board of the Alumnae Association 

1 968 - 1 970 



President 



Mrs. Leonard M. Fowle 

(Nancy Kimball) 

36 Norman St., Marblehead, Mass. 01945 



Vice Presidents 



Mrs. Malcolm S. Loring 

• Anne Russell) 

Pepperell Rd., Kittery Point, Me. 03905 

Mrs. David E. Rickenbacker 

' Patricia Bowne) 

5 Glenside Terrace 

Upper Montclair, N.J. 07043 

Mrs. F. N. Ladd 

< Frances Nolde) 

2 South Lane, Hingham, Mass. 02043 



Clerk 



Mrs. Benneville N. Strohecker 
'Constance Hall) 
8 Harbor Ave. 
Marblehead, Mass. 01945 



Treasurer 



Mrs. Gage Olcott 

(Helen O'Brien) 

40 Oakridge Rd., Wellesley, Mass. 02181 



Executive Secretary 
Delegates-at-Large 



Miss C. Jane Sullivan 

20 Buswell St., Lawrence, Mass. 01841 



Mrs. Sargent Bradlee, Jr. 
(Sally Humason) 
Linden Cottage, Walker Rd. 
Manchester, Mass. 01944 

Mrs. J. Robert Haskin, Jr. 
(Miriam Bickford) 
6 Redstone Lane 
Marblehead, Mass. 01945 



Alumnae Trustee 
1963-1969 



Miss Alice C. Sweeney 

35 School St., Andover, Mass. 01810 



Alumnae Trustee 
1966-1972 



Mrs. John B. Ogilvie 

( Donna Brace) 

14 Circle Rd., Darien, Conn. 06820 



ABBOT ACADEMY BULLETIN 



MAY, 1969 



VOLUME 37, NUMBER 3 



Editor: C. JANE SULLIVAN 

Asst. Editor: MRS. FRANK DiCLEMENTE 
Published four times yearly, October, February, May and September, by Abbot Academy, Andover, Massachusetts. Entered as 
second class matter December 12, 1933, at the post office at Andover, Massachusetts, under the act of August 24, 1912. 

Photographer — Richard D. Graber, Andover, Mass. 



PRINTED AT EAGLE-TRIBUNE PRINTING. LAWRENCE. MASSACHUSETTS 



rr 



<JL JVsar ^fttot 



ff 



The remarks of Mr. Donald A. Gordon, Principal, 
to the Alumnae at the Annual Meeting, May 1 0, 1 969 



It is a delight to see so many alumnae 
here on this lovely day, and I do hope you 
will find your view of today's Abbot a re- 
assuring one. The times we live in are 
strange in many ways, and yet I do think 
Abbot is making a very positive kind of 
contribution and at the same time an effort 
to design its own future with as much wis- 
dom as possible. 

I know that you are all interested in 
learning about the current Abbot, and so 
my remarks today will attempt to give you 
a comprehensive picture of the present, and 
our feeling about our future. 

I don't need to remind you that the situa- 
tion our society finds itself in today is a 
convulsive one, although I don't believe an 
unnatural one. We need, certainly, a great 
deal of humor, although it is not, historical- 
ly speaking, a time for humor as such. It 
seems to me that the essence of the humor- 
ist is that he be one who finds joy in his 
acceptance of things more or less as they 
are and acquires that joy in part by poking 
fun at the paradoxes, unhappy and other- 
wise, that surround him. It is this buoyant 
capacity that keeps his sanity operating. 
The reformer, on the other hand, feels — 
and that is the correct verb — that action 
and real change are absolutely vital, and 
it is hard for him to escape the seriousness 
of his feelings. When times are particularly 
challenging, the reformer appears, louder 
and in greater numbers, than at other 
times. In fact, in more comfortable times, 
his voice is simply not one that most people 
can listen to with much interest or respect. 
Thus I think that our own time is one for 
reformers, but at the same moment this 
means that we need more humor ourselves 
than ever. 

Our task as on institution is to relate 
ourselves and our task institutionally and 
personally to the situation that students 
today are in, and certainly to the one that 
they face in the future. Their sense of 
time is very different from ours: ours was 
segregated, so to speak, along a linear line. 



That is to say, we tended to move com- 
fortably from one thing to the next in a 
reasonably quiet and coherent order. For 
the young students today, time is not linear 
at all, but rather vertical and all-inclusive: 
they are aware of many things simultan- 
eously, and do not have the time to deal 
with one major issue at a time, and move 
at a relatively slow pace toward their own 
self-integration. They are trying to make 
sense of themselves all at once, it seems. 
This never was an easy task for anyone, 
and given the peculiar combination of ad- 
vantages and disadvantages that most of 
these students possess, the task is even 
more difficult for them than perhaps it 
was for most of us. 

It is Abbot's attitude today, that to fail 
to be as imaginative as possible in respond- 
ing to this situation would be to literally 
drop out of the important stream of Ameri- 
can education altogether. In my negotia- 
tions with the Board nearly two years ago, 
I kept running into a phrase which was 
dropped by many of the Board members 
auite unconsciously, namely a "new Abbot". 
They seemed to be assuming and directing 
themselves toward something very new, 
without even having planned it in a par- 
ticularly self-conscious fashion. This caught 
my interest and attention, and the result, 
as you know now, is that the two parties 
were able to join hands on the basis of a 
new Abbot for the future. 

I would like to try to give you a picture 
today of the major inaredients of that 
Abbot. There are four maior pieces involved: 
1 ) our approach to students, 2) our aca- 
demic program, 3) our physical plant, and 
4) our approach to personnel. 

There is more attention to students todav 
than perhaps ever, and this is riqhtly so. 
I think we at Abbot are seeking to evolve 
a "new partnership" with students, which 
simply means involving them far more 
than we have in the past in decisions and 
policies which affect the entire Abbot com- 
munity. During this past winter, we have 



one 



created, as a result of student initiative, a 
new government for the school community, 
namely a Town Meeting system. We will 
also seek to give students greater respons- 
ibility in various kinds of committee work 
at our own level, in order to better acquaint 
them with the tasks which confront schools, 
and to develop some appreciation on their 
part and a more vivid knowledge of due 
process in all things. In addition, I e