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ANNUAL REPORT 



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ON THB 



CANALS OF THE STATE. 



TRANSMITTED TO THE LEGISLATURE JANUARY 16, 1873. 



ALBANY : 
THE ARGUS COMPANY, PRINTERS 

1873. 






• • 



4 



I 



STATE OF NEW YORK. 



No. 17, 



IN ASSEMBLY, 



January 16, 1873. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF TH1 



STATE ENGINEER AND SURVEYOR ON THE CANALS OF THE STATE, 



Office of the State Engineer and Surveyor, 
Albany, January 16tfA, 1873. 



I 



Hon. Alonzo B. Cornell, 

Speaker of the Assembly: 

Sir. — I have the honor herewith to transmit to the Legislature 
my Annual Report on the Canals of the State, for the year ending 
September 30th, 1872. 

Tours respectfully, 

W. B. TATLOK, 
State Engineer and Surveyor. 



w4£ GJ\* x 

i-i- i? 



REPORT. 



Office of the State Engineer and Subveyob, ) 
Albany, Jcmuary 16tfA, 1873. ) 

To the Honorable the Legislature of the State of N*w York : 

The State Engineer and Surveyor, in obedience to the requirements 
of act chap. 7.77, Laws of 1850, has the honor herewith to submit his 
annual report for the fiscal year ending September 30th, 1872. 

ENGINEER DEPARTMENT. 

Act chap. 477, Laws of 1865, authorizes the appointment, by the 
Canal Board, of three division, and three resident engineers ; and act 
chap. 794, Laws of 1866, authorizes the appointment of an additional 
resident engineer, in charge of the Chenango canal extension. The 
existing laws, therefore, only recognize seven official engineers. 

The subordinate engineers are employed by the division engineers, 
with the assent of the State Engineer and Surveyor and the Canal 
Commissioner in charge of the division on which they are so 
employed. 

The offices of the division engineers are located as follows : 

At Albany for the Eastern Division. 

At Syracuse for the Middle Division. 

At Rochester for the Western Division. 

At Owego for the Chenango canal extension. 

The expenditures on account of the engineer department for the 
year ending September 30th, 1872, are as follows: 

Eastern Division $40,242 69 

Middle Division 33,575 72 

Chenango canal extension 11,037 00 

Western Division 25,293 92 

i 

Total $110,149 33 



• 



6 Annual Repobt of the 

The following amount of work was performed under the supervi- 
sion of the engineer department during the preceding fiscal year : 

Eastern Division $773*119 85 

Middle Division 4115332 25 

Chenango canal extension 145>710 45 

Western Division 248>543 02" 

Total $1, 578 ? 70 5 57 

The expenditures for engineering have been seven per cent of the 
cost of work performed. 

CANALS. 

The canals of the State are subdivided into three divisions, entitled 
the Eastern, Middle and Western; each being in charge of a Canal 
Commissioner, a division -and resident engineer. The Eastern Divi- 
sion embraces the following State works : 

Names of Canals. Miles. 

Erie canal, from Albany to east bank of Oneida Lake canal, 133. 5& 
Albany basin (called one mile for tolls, by chapter 200, Laws 

of 1849) 77 

Port Schuyler and West Troy side-cut .35 

Pond above Troy dam 3.00 

Champlain canal and Waterford side-cut 66.00 

Glen's Falls feeder and pond above 12 . 00 

Black River canal 35 . 3& 

Black River feeder and pond above dam 12 . 09 

Pelta feeder 1.38 

Black River improvement 42 . 50 

Total 307.00 

This division was in charge of E. H. Crocker, as division engi- 
neer, until February 20th, 1872; Peter Hogan, as resident engineer, 
until February 10th, 1872 ; and, for the balance of the fiscal year, 
has been in charge of W. B. Cooper, as division, and W. W. Jerome 
as resident engineer. 



State Engineer on the Canals. 7 
Middle Division. 

• Name* of Canals. Miles. 

Erie canal, from east side of Oneida Lake canal to east line 

of Wayne county 68 . 58 

Navigable feeders to Erie canal — 

Limestone 80 

Butternut 1 . 55 

Camillus 1.00 

3.35 

Oneida Lake canal 7.00 

Oswego canal 38.00 

Cayuga and Seneca canal ; 22 . 77 

Crooked Lake canal 8 . 00 

Chemung canal and feeder 39 . 00 

Chenango canal 97.00 

Oneida Kiver improvement 20. 00 

Seneca River towing-path 5 . 75 

Baldwinsville canal and improvement, to Jack's Reef 12 . 50 

Cayuga inlet 2 . 00 

Total 323.95 



This division has been in charge of M. S. Kimball and Howard 
Soule, Jr., as division engineers, the former until February 10th, 
1872; and Howard Soule, Jr., and Thomas Goodsell, as resident 
engineers, the latter since February 10th, 1872. 

Western Division. 

Names of Canals. Miles. 

Erie canal,, from east line of Wayne county to Buffalo .... 148 . 50 

Genesee Yalley canal, from Rochester to Millgrove 113 . 50 

Dansville branch of Genesee Valley canal. 11 .00 

Genesee feeder, at Rochester 2 . 25 

Genesee feeder, at Oramel .75 

Total !.. 276.00 



This division has been in charge of Daniel Richmond and J. Fred- 
erick Behn, as division engineers, the former until February 10th, 
1872 ; and J. Nelson Tubbs and B. M. Hanks, as resident engineers, 
the latter since February 20th, 1872. 

From the foregoing statements we ascertain that the navigable 
canals and feeders in the State aggregate a length of 906.95 miles, 
and unnavigable feeders 5.68 miles, excluding the Chenango canal 
extension, which is in part constructed. 



8 Annual Report of the 

The total lengths of navigable waters owned by the State, together 
with lake and river navigation connecting therewith, are .given in the 
following statement : 

Miles. 

Total length of artificial canals and feeders 906 . 95 

Length oi Hudson river, New York to Waterford 155.00 

Lake Champlain, Whitehall to Rouse's Point Ill . 00 

Oneida lake 22.00 

Cayuga lake 39.00 

Seneca lake 35.00 

Crooked lake - 19.00 

Delaware and Hudson canal, in this State 87.00 

Junction canal 18 . 00 

Total 1,392.95 



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Annual Eepobt of the 



Feeders. 

The following table embraces all the available feeders for supplying 
the Erie canal with water during the dry season, with approximate 
cost of each : 



NAME OF FEEDER. 



Mohawk river, at Cohoes , 

Rexford Flat* feeder 

Schoharie Creek feeder , 

Rocky Rift feeder 

Little Falls feeder 

Ilion Creek feeder 

Chenango canal 

Butts 1 creek 

Mohawk feeder, at Rome 

Black River canal, at Rome 

Oneida Creek feeder 

Cowasselon Creek feeder 

Erieville reservoir 

Chittenango Creek feeder 

Cazenovia Lake reservoir 

De Ruyter reservoir, through. . . . 

Limestone creek 

Orville (Butternut creek) feeder. 

Camillus feeder 

Skaneateles Lake reservoir 

Genesee River feeder 

Genesee Valley canal 

Oak Orchard Creek feeder 

Lake Erie, Buffalo 



I 



2 a 



I* 



Source of supply. 



1844 
1845 
1856 
1848 
1888 
1836 
1838 
1868 

• • • • 

1885 
1858 
1850 
1840 
1867 
1863 
1852 
1858 
1843 
1844 
1826 
1842 
1840 
1856 



Champlain canal. 
Mohawk river.... 

Creek 

Mohawk river.... 
Mohawk river.... 

Creek 

Through lock .... 

V/At?CJfc> •■■••••• • • • 

Mohawk river. . . . 

Through lock 

Creek 

Creek 

Reservoir .. 
Creek and outlet 
Reservoir .. 

Reservoir I 

Creek and outlet, j 

Creek 

Creek 

Reservoir 
Genesee river 
Through lock 

Creek 

Lake 



■\ 






!••••< 



51 
78 
87 

go 

110 
124 
125 
125 
140 
143 

15* 
158 



Total cost enlargement feeders 

Total cost original Erie canal feeders. 



■2 » 
•& ft 

P n 
O .3 

►> p 
CO 



6,570 
10,9*9 

6,800 

10,602 

12,648 

800 

911 

1,400 
11,766 

1,294 

1,500 
820 

2,180 
250 

2,631 

8,972 
210 
450 

1,500 

\7,520 

\m 



Total cost 
of feeder. 



$25,000 00 
80,000 00 

190,000 00 

12,500 00 

1,000 00 

53666 

25,976 36 

' '84,49806 

10, 089 65 

86,837 03 

7,555 83 

10,884 73 

158,378 20 
14,871 80 
45,000 00 
11,327 68 
14,927 55 
42,750 54 




Locks. 



NAME OF CANAL. 



Erie canal (57 double, 15 single) . 

Navigable feeders of same 

Champlain canal 

Pond above Troy dam 

Glen's Falls feeder and pond 

Black River canal 

Black River feeders 

Black River improvement 

Oneida Lake canal 

Oswego canal 

Oneida River improvement 

Seneca River towing-path 

Baldwinsville canal 

Cayuga and Seneca canal 

Crooked Lake canal 

Chemung canal and feeder 

Cayuga inlet 

Chenango canal 

Genesee Valley canal and feeder 
Dansville branch 



Length in 
miles of 
canals. 



851 

3 
66 

3 
12 
35 
13 
42 

6 
38 
20 

5 

1 
22 

8 
89 

2 

97 

116 

11 



.78 
.35 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.33 
.47i 
50 
00 
00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.77 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.00 
.50 
.00 



893.70 



Number of 
locks. 



72 

'88' 



109 

1 

7 

18 

2 



1 

11 
27 
53 

1 
116 

114 



565 



\> 



State Engineer on the Canals. 



11 



NUMBER^ extent and approximate cost of structures upon the 
Erie canal at completion of enlargement in 1862. 



Quantities. 



487,869... 
516,269... 
540 sets.. 
540 sets.. 

57 sets.. 
13 single. 

2 single. 

5 single. 
24,235.... 

2,363 

11 

190 

94 



KIND OP STRUCTURES. 



Square feet flooring in 158 iron bridges . . . 
Square feet flooring in 382 wooden bridges 

Bridge abutments 

Bridge embankments, etc 

Double locks, aggregate length 9, 833 feet. 

Locks, aggregate length 2, 415 feet 

Guard locks, aggregate length 845 feet. . . . 

Weigh locks, aggregate length 737 feet 

Lineal feet of trunk in 82 aqueducts. 

Lineal feet of waste walls, waste-weirs . . . 

Stop gates 

Stone arch culverts, aggregate spans 1, 523 
Composite culverts, aggregate spans 435 . . 

Total approximate cost of structures . 



Price. 



1, 
78, 

31, 
23, 

47, 



X 

1, 



$0 81 
038 
750 00 
800 00 
860 00 
660 00 
000 00 
036 00 
810 00 

42 00 
000 00 
000 00 
700 00 



Amount. 



$854, 

196, 

1,485, 

972. 

4,209, 

441, 

46, 

235, 

7,512, 

99, 

22, 

760, 

150, 



673 89 
178 42 
000 00 
000 00 
450 00 
840 00 
000 00 
180 00 
850 00 
246 0O 
000 00 
000 00 
800 00 



$16,494,218 31 



STATEMENT showing the total cost of construction of the New 
York State canals, together with the expenditures for repairs, 
maintenance and collection; also the total amount of tolls received, 
each canal being credited with the amount of tolls upon the ton- 
nage contributed to the Erie, and charged with its proportion of 
repairs and maintenance upon the same, up to and including 1866. 



SAME OP CANAL. 



Erie and Champlain 

Oswego 

Cayuga and Seneca. 

Chemung \\ 

Crooked Lake ....[.". 

Chenango 

Black River '/.'." , 

Genesee Valley [ " 

Oneida Lake *." 

Baldwinsville [ 

Oneida River improvement 
Seneca River towing-path. . 
Cayuga inlet 



Totals 





Expenditures. 




Receipts. 


For construc- 
tion, enlarge- 
ments and 
improvem'ts. 


For repairs, 
maintenance 
and collec- 
tion. 


Total for con- 
struction, 
management, 
etc. 


From tolls. 


$46,018,234 

8,490,949 

1,520,642 

1,273,261 

333,287 

2,782,124 

8,224,779 

6,827,813 

64,887 

23,556 

146,944 

1,488 

2 f 968 


$12,900,833 

4,639,219 

1,200,044 

1,794,649 

459,374 

1,022,026 

498,866 

1,689,803 

123,234 

25,035 

25,005 

20 


$58,918,667 

8, 180, 168 

2,720,586 

8,067,910 

792,661 

3,804,160 

8, 723, 645 

7,517,116 

188,071 

48,591 

171,999 

1,508 

2,968 


$81,057,168 

9,283,230 

2, 184, 300 

2,012,575 

520,416 

737,285 

242,603 

1,306,913 

65,180 

1,261 

204,288 

5,251 

4,596 




$64,710,832 


$24,377,108 


$89,087,940 


$97,625,066 



Total cost of construction, as above $64,710,832 

Total interest on same 93,736,654 

Total cost maintenance, repairs and collection 24,377,114 

Total interest on same 27,268,895 

Total from commencement to completion '. . .$210,093,495 

A gg re gate receipts from tolls, with interest there- 
on 202,619,510 



Present cost to the State of the entire canal system, $7 , 473 , 985 



12 



Annual Report of the 



The number and tonnage capacity of the boats built and regis- 
tered in each year since 1857 have been as follows : 



TEAS. 


Boats. 


Tons. 


Average of 
boats. 


1857 

1858 


839 
355 
806 
408 
619 
850 
771 
899 
300 
485 
530 
887 
398 
369 
194 


87,510 
27,880 
20,160 
48,855 
95,280 
143,470 
119. 170 
66,386 
28,795 
74,630 
80,860 
64,470 
46,640 
43,400 
29,225 


114 

10!J 


1859 


OS 


1860 


120 


1861 


154 

IfiK 


18*3 


1868 


177 
141 
144 


1864 


1865: 


1866 


154 
156 

167 
157 
15? 


1867 


1868 


1869 


1870 


1871 


150 






Total 


6,186 


918,470 


2,165 



Statement showing amount of work performed and improvements 
made on the several New York State canals, under the supervision of 
the engineer department during the fiscal year : 

Names of Canals. Amount. 

Erie canal, eastern division $294? 944 64 

Erie canal, middle division 138>152 14 

Erie canal, western division 232 » 150 81 

$665,247 59 

Champlain canal 445,413 88 

Black Kiver canal 32,761 33 

Oswego canal 141,668 20 

Chenango canal 50, 858 51 

Chenango extension 145 , 710 45 

Chemung canal 48,579 13 

Crooked Lake canal 3,396 11 

Cayuga and Seneca canal. 15,338 16 

Enlargment Oneida Lake canal 1 , 900 00 

Ithaca inlet 11,440 00 

Genesee Valley canal 16,392 21 

Sum total $1,578,705 57 



For specific details of the above work and a full explanation thereof, 
reference is made to the accompanying reports of the division engi- 
neers, wherein minute descriptions of the condition of the canals 
will be shown. 

The following statement shows the amount and extent of bench 
walls now under contract, together with those remaining in the 



State Engineer ok the Canals. 



13 



enlarged Erie canal, for the removal of which no provisiou has been 
made : 



EASTERN DIVISION. 



Prom lock No. 2 to lower Mohawk aqueduct 

From lock No. 2 to, lower Mohawk aqueduct 

From lower Mohawk aqueduct to lock No. 20 

From lock No. 20 to lock No. 31 

From lock No. 20 to Jock No. 31 

From lock No. 31 to lock No. 36 

From lock No. 36 to lock No. 45 

From lock No. 45 to lock No. 46 

From lock No. 45 to lock No. 46 

On long level at Borne 

Amount not under contract » 

Amount under contract ; 

MIDDLE DIVISION. 

Jordan level 

Syracuse level 

Long level 

Total 



Miles on 
tow-path 
■lde. 



Mite* oo 
bermc 
side. 




4.79 
1.14 



6.86 



11.19 
1.82 



13.01 



On the western division the remaining bench walls amount to only 
91-100 of a mile in length. The work is under contrast, and can be 
completed by the opening of the canal next spring, provided an 
additional appropriation of $10,000 shall be made at the coming ses- 
sion of the Legislature. 

I desire to invite special attention to these impediments and uro-o, 
liberal appropriations for their removal. In my judgment alii 
expenditures devoted to the improvement of the prism of the canal 
are the most judicious that could be made, and from which navigation 
would receive the greatest benefit An examination of the foregoing 
statement will show that the larger portion of the bench wall yet 
remaining in the canal is located on the Eastern Division, east of 
the city of Utica, and includes that section of the canal approaching; 
tide-water, which should necessarily be most free from obstructions. 
The prism of the canal between the city of Utica and lock No. 45, 
at Frankfort, is in a very bad condition, in consequence of the 
obstruction caused by the benches. No portion of the canal on this 
division requires improving as much, and immediate steps should be 
taken to remove the benches as rapidly as possible. 

Supply of "Water. 
On the long level extending from Utica to Lodi, a distance of fifty- 
five miles, navigation, from the present insufficient sources of supply,. 

♦Under contract. 



14 Annual Report of the 

cannot be maintained during any ordinary dry season. Various 
efforts Lave been made to procure increased supplies, and, although 
some relief has been obtained, more water is still needed. 

It is well known to all commercial men who are interested in the 
State canals, that Fish creek is the only source from which the 
deficiency can be positively procured. The only opposition to the 
use of this creek for canal purposes is presented by manufacturers 
owning and using water power on the Oswego river. As a simple 
proposition by itself this objection would be entitled to grave consider- 
ation ; but, when all the facts connected with the subject are carefully 
weighed and properly balanced, it will appear that the Oswego river 
is greatly indebted to the State for a large quantity of gratuitously 
furnished water, which is of great value, and far exceeding in benefits 
the slight damage which might result from appropriating the waters 
of Fish creek. The increased flow of water in the Oswego river, as 
furnished by the State during the season of minimum flow in midsum- 
mer, aggregates about 15,000 cubic feet per minute ; the loss to the 
river from the use of Fish creek would not exceed 3,000 cubic feet per 
minute, and the balance (of the 8,000 cubic feet per minute) would be 
restored to the river through Oneida lake and Oneida river, still leav- 
ing 12,000 cubic feet per minute flowing steadily into said river from 
waters furnished by the State. Hon. Van R. Richmond, focmer State 
Engineer, thus refers to the subject, in his report on the canals, trans- 
mitted to the Legislature January 1st, 1872: 

"Improvements Recommended. 

" In regard to an additional supply of water upon and east of the 
long level, I still retain the opinion expressed in my last two annual 
reports, upon the construction of Fish Creek feeder. Objections 
against this important improvement have been made by the citizens 
of Oswego. In reply to those, I quote from my last report the fol- 
lowing passage on this question : 

" ' It has been shown in former official reports that the State, by the 
construction of the Erieville, De Ruyter, Cazenovia Lake and Skane- 
ateles Lake reservoirs, together with the waters drawn from Lake 
Erie and the Chemung river, has largely increased the flow of the 
Oswego river during the dry part of the year over that of its natural 
drainage. Assuming that no addition to its flow has been contributed 
by the State, then that part of the waters of Fish creek diverted for 
the use of the long level, and not returned to this river through the 
Oneida Lake canal, and at the Lodi lock, is so small that it could be 



State Engineer on the Canals. 15 

easily and fully made up by the construction of compensating reser 
voirs at the head waters of Fish creek, which, it has been ascertained 
by recent examinations, could be constructed at a small expense.' 

" The estimated cost of constructing this feeder, whereby a supply 
of 8,000 cubic feet of water per minute will be secured, is $693,250." 

In 1860 estimates were prepared and presented to the Canal Board 
for constructing Fish Creek feeder, but they were not adopted, and 
during the following season a plan for building De Ruyter reservoir 
was recommended and carried out. 

In 1871 the Canal Commissioners constructed Oriskany Creek 
feeder and are completing Jamesville reservoir. The De Ruyter 
reservoir is estimated to feed water for 100 days, the Jamesville for 
sixty days, while Fish creek would pour its waters into the canal the 
entire season. 

The past and future expenditures of the State for these improve- 
ments will undoubtedly be as follows : 

Construction of De Ruyter reservoir, etc $149 > 699 00 

Land damages for De I&uyter reservoir, etc 30 > 737 00 

Oriskany Creek feeder 32,340 00 

Damages for same (estimated) 100,000 00 

Jamesville reservoir (estimated) 100,000 00 

Damages for same (estimated) 25,000 00 

* Total • $437,766 00 

Bad the above amount oeen devoted to the construction of the 
Fish Creek feeder, and the additional requirements provided therefor, 
the long level would now have an abundant supply of water for all 
time. 

EnlAegement of the Champlain Canal. 

Act chapter 788, Laws of 1870, provides for the enlargement of 
this canal " in such a manner as to give, throughout the entire length 
of such canal, a uniform depth of seven feet of water, and width of 
forty-four feet on bottom and fifty-eight feet at water surface, except 
as in the opinion of the Canal Board it may be required for business 
purposes, when, in that case, the walls may be made vertical, but 
retaining the same depth of water and width at water surface ; and 
no part of said appropriation ($400,000) shall be applied on or for any 
other object or purpose until the above enlargement shall be made 
and completed." 



16 Annual Report of the 

During the last fiscal year the Canal Board has confined itself 
strictly to the requirements of the act, and, from time to time, has 
authorized the construction of said enlargement at such points as 
faere supposed to advance the best interests of navigation and facili- 
tate the passage of boats. 

The importance of this work, both as regards canal revenues and 
the immense traffic from the north, is so fully conceded by the public 
that it is not necessary for me to say anything in its behalf but merely 
to urge sufficient appropriations to promptly carry forward and com- 
plete the improvement. 

During the season of navigation great difficulty has been experi- 
enced by the Commissioner and his employes in keeping the canal in 
a condition to accommodate the largely increased number of boats 
engaged in business upon it, which conclusively proves not only the 
wisdom of the State in directing the enlargement, but also the 
necessity of having it rapidly completed. 

In consequence of the waste or discharge gates not having been 
adapted to pass the surplus waters caused by freshets, numerous 
breaches almost annually occur and cause heavy damages to the adja- 
cent lands. In many cases the canal is located along the bases of 
hills whose water shed is precipitated into the prism, which by 
overflowing ruptures the ba*nks. 

During the last season, waste-weirs with large discharge gates have 
been constructed on two of the levels, where the greatest danger was 
anticipated, namely, at Smith's and Dunham's basins, and since their 
completion no difficulty has been experienced in fully controlling 
the water on these levels. The want of such structures in preceding 
seasons has caused more delays to navigation than are traceable to 
any other one cause, and has also entailed upon the State large outlaya 
for damages to property adjoining. 

Black River Canal. 

Act chap. 850, Laws of 1872, appropriated $18,000 " for construc- 
tion of a dam across Moose river at the old ' Brown's tract forge,' at 
foot of Fulton chain of lakes, to raise the water in the lakes to supply 
deficiency on Black river improvements, pursuant to chapter 181, 
Laws of 1851, in dry season, if, in the opinion of the Canal Board, 
the State is under equitable obligations to construct said dam, and if, 
in the opinion of said board, it is, under all the circumstances, expe- 
dient to do said work, provided the owners of said lakes and lands 
adjoining release to the State all damages for use of said lakes, and 



> 

i 



State Engineer on the Canals. 17 

damages to lands to be flowed in consequence of the construction of 
said dam." 

The Canal Board, at a meeting held August 6th, 1872, passed the 
following resolution : 

"Hesolved, That, in the opinion of the Canal Board, the State is 
under equitable obligations to construct a dam across Moose river at 
the old * Brown's tract forge, 5 at the foot of Fulton chain of lakes, to 
raise the water in the lakes to supply the deficiency on Black river 
improvements in dry seasons, pursuant to chap. 181, Laws of 1851, 
as provided in act chap. 850, Laws of 1872, and that it is expedient, 
under all the circumstances, to do said work, provided written and 
valid releases to the State, by the owners of said lakes and lands 
adjoining, be first furnished to this board, of all damages for use of 
said lakes and damages to lands to be flowed in consequence of the 
construction of said dam." 

The construction of the dam has not been authorized by the Canal 
Board, the releases required by the enactment not having been filed 
and accepted. 

Jordan Level. 

This level, for its entire length, was originally constructed with 
bench walls on both sides of the canal. There yet remain to be 
removed on the towing-path side four and three-fourths miles, and on 
the berme side eleven miles. In consequence of the quicksand base 
upon which the bench walls rest, it has been exceedingly difficult to 
maintain good navigation on this level, and it is of the greatest import- 
ance tli at appropriations should be made at the next session of the 
Legislature, so that the benches may be removed and walls extending 
to canal bottom be inserted, especially on the towing-path side of the 
canal. Each season in bottoming out the level, the walls are frequently 
undermined and slide into the prism, thus annoying and obstructing 
navigation. 

Cayuga and Seneca Canal. 

On this improvement, at Waterloo and Seneca Falls, are located 
large and extensive manufactories, which, in connection with the 
canal, are entitled to use the waters flowing in the Seneca river and 
canal. For several years the supply of water has not been sufficient 
for the wants of both parties ; consequently, during the minimum 
flow in midsummer, boats have not been permitted to float with the 
full draft contemplated when the enlargement of this canal was 
authorized. 

This has been a serious damage to those who rely upon this channel 

[Assem. No. 17.] 2 



18 Annual Report of the 

for transporting their freight, the fcoal traffic being heavy and increas- 
ing. The enlargement of this canal was made to give the boats six 
feet draft of water, similar to the Erie and Oswego ; but, owing to 
the circumstances previously described, the canal officials, at one time 
during the last season, restricted the draft to four and three-fourths 
feet. It will be readily seen that such a restriction must of necessity 
greatly damage and annoy navigators. 

At Waterloo the mills draw directly from and to the bottom of the 
canal ; consequently, when the water is low and the supply insufficient 
for both purposes, the canal is drawn down, but the mills continue to 
run. 

From a careful examination of the rights of the mill-owners and 
the State, I am fully of the opinion that the latter is entitled to the 
first use of the waters to the extent necessary for canal purposes, and 
the balance only is to be controled by the mills, which have only the 
right to the surplus waters, to be taken at such points as may be 
designated, but in a manner to be governed by the State. 

I would therefore i;ecomradhd that the State assume full control of 
the water, separate and apart from the mills, and for their use con- 
struct dams and weirs of such form as will furnish the surplus waters 
from the surface of the water in the canal, and not, as at present, 
from its bottom. These dams and weirs should be constructed of 
such height as would at all times secure seven feet depth of water in 
canal prism. 

For a detailed and more specific description of this important sub- 
ject, I would call attention to Division Engineer Soule's report. 

Oneida Lake Canal. 

Act chapter 850, Laws of 1872, appropriates " the sum of $50,000 
to complete the Oneida Lake canal ; but no portion of this sum shall 
be expended unless the Canal Commissioners can make a contract 
within such sum, on public notice of letting to the lowest bidder, for 
all the work necessary to make the said canal and its work and struc- 
tures safe, and secure good navigation, the modified plan of the work 
to be determined by the Canal Commissioners and State Engineer." 

Under my direction the division engineer estimated the cost to 
complete the work on the present plans, at present 'contract prices, 
which are low and amount to $78,000. The work was not advertised 
and let, as the present contractors are entitled to continue it until 
their contracts shall have been canceled ; but as this could not be 
accomplished without their consent, the law has not been carried out. 



State Engineer on the Canals. 19 

Chenango Canal Extension. 

During the summer season a very small amount of work has been 
performed on this public work, and that only at such locations as 
required protection from freshets and streams. 

The estimate to complete the extension as originally designed is 
$800,000. 

Buffalo and Black Rock. 

The work of " deepening and improving " the channel of the Erie 
canal between Buffalo and Black Rock has assumed such importance, 
that I especially desire to call attention to it. That portion of the 
canal from the head of Black Rock harbor to a short distance 
below Ferry 6treet, in length about 5,700 feet, is only seventy 
to eighty feet in width ; yet through this narrow channel water has 
been forced, not only for feeding the canal from Lake Erie to Monte- 
zuma, a distance of 150 miles, but also for supplying the immense 
mills on the pier and at lower Black Rock harbor. The current thus 
created is so strong, that it has often been impossible to secure to the 
canal, water in sufficient quantities to maintain navigation. 

These mills hold perpetual leases to use only the surplus waters 
from the harbor, but practically they have appropriated all they 
required, without regarding the interests of the State or the conse- 
quent damage to navigation, and this state of things has been in 
operation for many years. 

Another serious difficulty has been the low stages of water in the 
lake. In August, 1871, the surface of the lake ranged from eighteen 
to twenty-six inches below its usual height, and during the past season 
of navigation varied from fifteen to twenty-seven inches. On the 
recommendations of the division and resident engineers, and approval 
at Hon. John D. Fay, Canal Commissioner in charge, the Canal Board 
resolved to remedy these difficulties by changing the original work 
and adopting a general plan for constructing the canal through Black 
Rock harbor, so as to make it independent of the harbor and the sup- 
ply for the mills ; in fact, by means of a division bank or cribs, to form 
two channels, one for the canal and the other for the mills, the chan- 
nel for the former to be about 125 feet wide, and through it the water 
for feeding the canal will pass, the prism being deepened so as to 
leave navigation uninterrupted by low water in the lake. 

Act chap. 850, Laws of 1872, appropriated for this work $125,000, 
and directed that the work should be prosecuted in accordance with 
the plan adopted by the Canal Board. 



20 Uepobt of the State Engineer on the Canals. 

The division engineer, J. Fred. Behn, recommends an additional 
appropriation * of $150,000 to finish the improvement, contem- 
plating its completion at the opening of navigation, 1874. I would 
join him in recommending that the sum sought be appropriated for 
the purpose named. 

W. B. TAYLOR. 



SCVW tC 



EASTEKN DIVISION. 



DIVISION ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF 



WILLIAM B. COOPER, DIVISION ENGINEER, FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 

ENDING SEPTEMBER 80, 1872. 



Division Engineer's Office, 

Albany, October 1st, 1872 



} 



Hon. W. B. Taylob, 

State Engineer and Surveyor : 

gut. — l n accordance with the regulations established under act 

chapter 169, Laws of 1862, 1 have the honor to present to you my 
annual report. 

The navigable canals, river improvements and feeders, remain the 
same as last year and are as follows : , 

Title. Miles. 

Erie canal from Albany to east bank of Oneida Lake canal, 133.58 

Albany basin (called 1 mile for tolls, chap. 200, Laws of 1849), .. 77 

Port Schuyler and West Troy side cuts .35 

Pond above Troy dam 3 . 00 

Champlain canal and Waterford side cut 66 . 00 

Glen's Falls feeder and pond above 12.00 

Black River canal 35.33 

Black Kiver feeder and pond above dam 12 . 09 

Delta feeder. 1 .38 

Black river improvement 42.50 

Total 307.00 

Feeders not Navigable. 

Title. Miles. 

Mohawk river at Eexford Flats m 0.39 

Schoharie creek 0.63 

Mohawk at Rocky Rift 3.92 

Mohawk, south side, at Little Falls , 0.19 

Mohawk, north side, at Little Falls, partly navigable . 50 

Mohawk at Rome , 0.05 

Oriskany creek (temporary) . 53 

Total 6.21 



24 



Annual Report of the 



During the past summer the supply of water for this division 
has been increased by the completion of the Sand Lake reservoir. 
With this exception, the sources of supply remain the same as per 
last report, and are as follows : 

Reservoirs. 



title. 



Woodhull 

North Branch (can be filled twice yearly) 
8outh Branch 

Sand Lake 

* 

Totals 



Area of sur- 
face in acres. 



1,896 
438 

518 



2,177 



Average area 
in acres. 


Depth 
in feet. 


1,118 
877 
879 
806 


18 
88 
86 

• * 


8,073 


• ■ 



Capacity in 
cubic feet. 



876,560,000 
810,000,000 
431,190,000 
199,830,000 

1,807,680,000 



The water furnished by the reservoirs is drawn only in the very 
dry season, and passed down through the natural channel of Black 
river and Woodhull, about twenty miles each, to the pond above 
dam at head of Black River feeder, thence the necessary quantity is 
taken into said feeder and conveyed to the summit level of the Black 
River canal at Boonville. From this point the canal is supplied both 
ways, and the balance, designed for the use of the Erie canal, is dis- 
charged by a waste-weir into the Lansing kill at the south end of the 
summit, thence into the Mohawk river, and from it into the Erie 
canal by the feeder at Rome. 



Feeders, Erie Canal. 



title. 



Champlain canal from Mohawk river at Cohoes 

Mohawk river at Rexf ord Flats 

Schoharie creek 

Mohawk river at Rocky Rift 

Mohawk river at Little Palls 

Ilion creek 800 

Chenangb canal 911 

Bntts creek, two and a half miles east of Rome 1,400 

Mohawk and Black rivers at Rome 11,766 V 

Black River canal 1,894 

Wood creek at Rome 185 

Oriskany creek 4, 300 




a 

►» © as 
cl • O.SS 




6,570 
10,979 

6,800 
10,60% 
1**643 



80,596 



68.190 



State Engineer on the Canals. 



25 



Feeders, Champlain Canal. 

From the junction with the Erie canal at West Troy to a point 
one mile north of Waterford, a distance of five miles, the 6upply is 
from the Mohawk river at Cohoes. From one mile north of Water- 
ford to the crossiiig of the Hudson river, two and a quarter miles 
south of Fort Miller, a distance of twenty-five miles, the supply is 
from the Hudson river at Saratoga dam ; from that point to White- 
hall, a distance of thirty-five miles, the supply is from Glen's Falls 
feeder and Wood creek. 

Feeders, Black Eiyeb Canal. • 

From the junction with the Erie canal at Borne to lock No. 9, 
seven miles, the supply is from the Delta feeder, taken from the 
Mohawk river ; from lock No. 9 to lock No. 34, ten miles, the supply 
is from the Lansing kill feeder ; from lock No. 34 to lock No. 102, 
seventeen miles, the supply is from the Black Kiver feeder ; from 
lock No. 102 to lock No. 109, one and a third miles, the supply is 
from the pond above dam at Lyon's Falls. 

Engineer Department. 

The eastern division was in charge of E. H. Crocker, as division 
engineer, until February 20, 1872, and Peter Hogan, as resident 
engineer, until February 10, 18t2. Since these dates, William B. 
Cooper and Walter W. Jerome have acted as division and resident 
engineers. 

Table No, 1. 
The following statement shows the total amount of work done dur- 
ing the year, total outlay for engineering, and the per Centage of cost 
of the same : 



DESCRIPTION op work. 


Work done 
daring the 
fiscal year. 


Engineering. 


Per centage 


Ordinary and extraordinary repairs, Erie canal 


$394,944 64 

282,458 88 

32,761 83 

171, 109 56 


$28,874 19 

7,184 65 

664 77 

9, 119 06 


7 924 


Ordinary and extraordinary repair^ Champlain canal 

Ordinary and extraordinary repairs, Black River canal .... 
Enlargement Champlain canal 


8.090 
1.723 
5.829 








$731,268 85 


$40,243 69 


5.603 



Table No. 2, 

Is a detailed statement of the appropriations, progress, etc., of the 
various works superintended by engineers and now under contract on 



26 



Annual Report of the 



this division of the canals ; following is a synopsis of the same, classi- 
fied nnder the head of the accounts to which payments are charged. 

Extraordinary Repairs, Erie Canal. 

Work done tinder this head during the fiscal year amounts to 
$215,762.64. The following, authorized by Laws of 1871, have been 
completed and settled, viz. : " Constructing 1,000 lineal feet vertical 
wall east of guard lock, Utica, and constructing 800 lineal feet verti- 
cal wall in Utica." The following have been completed, but the 
final payments have not been made : " Rebuilding lock No. 2, iron 
sidewalk bridge at Cohoes, stone abutments for bridge one mile above 
Sprakers," wooden bridge with iron chords at Crescent. 

Removal of Wall Benches. 

This work has been prosecuted as vigorously as the appropriation 
would admit. The following table shows the location and length of 
bench walls not removed : 





Miles berme. 


Miles 
tow-path. 


Fron 

44 


i lock No. 2 to lock No 

44 It 44 44 
44 g 44 44 
44 O 44 44 
44 J4 44 44 
44 Jg 44 44 

" 18 to lower ac 
lower aqueduct to lock 
look No. 19 to lock No 

44 Og 44 44 

** 25 " •* 

44 4J7 44 44 

44 28 " ** 

44 ^ 44 

44 80 ** " 
44 3J 44 44 

44 Jg •* ** 

44 g) 44 44 
44 04 44 44 
44 35 44 44 
44 4Q 44 44 
44 4J 44 44 

44 42 " u 

44 40 44 44 
44 42 44 44 
44 4g 44 44 


6 , 


♦.66 1 
8.29 ( 

♦.80 


♦.65 
♦.009 


44 


8 


♦.3ft 


44 


10 


♦.45 


44 


15 


♦.018 

♦.014 

♦2.675 




44 


17 




44 




♦2.675 


44 


No. 19 


*.812 


44 


.20 




♦1.962 


44 


28 


.50 
.75 
.60 
1.25 
1.00 
*.25 
8.00 
5.00 
2.00 
4.00 
4.00 


.50 


44 


26 


.75 


44 


28 


.60 


44 


29 


1.25 


44 


80 


1.00 


44 


82 


.25 

3.00 


44 


88 


5.0» 


44 


84 


2.00 


44 


85 : 


4.00 


44 


86 


4.00 


44 


41 


♦.06 


44 


42 




♦.75 


44 


48 


*.20 
♦.08 
♦1.68 
4.44 
1.60 1 


♦.20 


44 


46 




44 


46 


♦.95 


44 


46 


4.12 


Lone 




1.60 

















The necessities of commerce imperatively call for the prompt 
removal of these obstructions to navigation, and I would most ear- 
nestly recommend such legislation as will most certainly and speedily 
conduce to that end. 



♦ Under contract. 



State Engineer on the Canals. 27 

EXTRAORDINARY REPAIRS, ChAMPLAIN CaNAL. 

"Work done tinder this head during the year amounts to $127,860. 

The Glen's Falls feeder dam has been completed and settled, and 
the engineering was done by this department. The work was exe- 
cuted by the day, and, together with the materials furnished, was paid 
for by the Canal Commissioner. 

The following have been completed, although the final payments 
have not been made : • 

Vertical wall at Sandy Hill. 

Improvement at Waterford. 

Bri.dge over the Mohawk at Cohoes. 

The completion of the two locks at Waterford, and the guard lock 
at Wood creek, which is expected in time for the opening of naviga- 
tion, will be an important event in the history of the Champlain 
canal. The full measure of benefit from the enlargement of the 
locks will not be realized until the completion of the canal enlarge- 
ment. Nevertheless, an increase of thirty-three and one-third per 
cent in the carrying capacity of boats cannot fail to produce largely 
augmented revenues. 

The stone dam at Cohoes has been finished during the fiscal year, 
at a cost to the State (exclusive of legislative awards) of $220,529.88. 
This structure is built of masonry, composed of massive blocks of 
stone laid in hydraulic cement, in the most careful and thorough 
manner. It is 1,616 feet between abutments, and contains, including 
amounts carried away by freshets, 18,100 cubic yards. 

I would recommend rebuilding the north guard lock at Cohoes, it 
being an old wooden structure and in a very dilapidated condition. 
Its reconstruction seems a matter of pressing necessity. 

From the abutments of the Cohoes dam to the new bridge the 
river banks, on both sides, should be protected with cement walls, the 
heavy freshets of the Mohawk rendering substantial protection neces- 
sary. 

The old wooden lock on the Glen's Falls feeder is in a very pre- 
carious condition, liable to fail at any time. I would recommend 
that it be rebuilt of stone. 

Extraordinary Repairs, Black River Canal. 

The iron bridge at Boonville and wooden bridge at Thomas street, 
Rome, have been finished and settled. 

The bridge over Black river at Parker's landing is completed for 
travel, but final payment has not been made. 



28 Annual Report of the 

Sand Lake reservoir, built by days' work, and paid for directly by 
the Canal Commissioner, is completed and tlie road to this and other 
reservoirs, which was previously barely passable, put in good con- 
dition. 

Enlargement, Champlain Canal. 

This important work has been commenced during the year. Sec- 
tion work has been gtarted at Whitehall and Fort Edward, and con- 
siderable progress made with the enlargement from Saratoga guard 
lock to Schuylerville. At Salisbury's and at Bemis Heights, waste- 
weirs at Smith's and Dunham's basins have been entirely rebuilt on 
enlarged plan, and two spill-weirs for the relief of the twelve-mile 
level in time of freshets, nearly completed. The beneficial effect of 
these improvements has already been sufficiently experienced to 
demonstrate the wisdom of constructing them. 

Act chap. 788, Laws of 1870, authorizes this enlargement and 
appropriates therefor the sum of $400*000 00 

Of this amount there have been expended as follows : 

As per Table No. 2 $171,109 55 

Engineering as per Table No. 1 9,119 08 

180,228 63 

» ^~ ■— ~^~ ~ ~— ■ 

Unexpended balance of appropriation $219,771 37 

The necessity for the prosecution of this work having been 
acknowledged by the passage of the foregoing law, and the value of 
the Champlain canal to the State as a source of increasing revenue 
being more fully demonstrated every year, it would seem to be super- 
fluous to urge the benefit, to the State, of appropriations sufficient to 
complete the same as soon as possible. 



• ^ 



State Engineer on the Canals. 



2& 



TABLE No. 1. 



Showing the number and compensation of Engineers employed on 
the Eastern Division of the Jyew York State Canals, together with 
the incidental expenses from October 1st, 1871, to September 3Qth, 
1872. 

REPAIRS ERIE CANAL. 



NAMES. 



E. H. Crocker 

E. H. Crocker 

Peter Hogan 

Peter Hogan 

G.W.Chase 

W. B. Cooper 

W.B.Cooper 

W. W. Jerome 

W.W.Jerome 



Rank. 


No. of 
days. 


Rate of 
compens'n. 


Amount. 


Total. 


Travel 




$2,400 00 
2,000 00 


$470 00 
136 20 
522 22 
221 01 
108 00 
666 67 
234 04 
700 00 
314 34 




Travel 






Assistant engineer 


27 


400 
2,400 00 

2,000 00 




Travel 




Travel 










$8,371 48 


Incidental expenses. 


$628 62 

24 30 

58 33 

21 20 

163 6C 

314 10 


Fuel 






















Postage and telgraph 


• • • • ■ • 












• • • • • 


. 


1, 110 21 






Total Erie canal . 


$4,^81 69 









REPAIRS CHAMPLAIN CANAL 



E. H. Crocker . 
E. H. Crocker . 
Peter Hogan... 
Peter Hogan.., 
W. B. Cooper. , 
W.B.Cooper. 
W. W. Jerome 
W. W. Jerome 
C. H. SherrM 



Division engineer 

Travel 

Resident engineer 

Travel 

Division engineer 

Travel 

Resident engineer 

Travel 

Chainman 



Incidental expenses. 
Postage and telegraph . 
Miscellaneous 



Total Champlain canal. , 



$2,400 00 

"2,' 666' 66 

"2,466 66 

"2,066*66 

306 



$300 00 

96 12 

150 00 

66 11 

650 00 

250 76 

507 53 

118 14 

3 00 



$25 39 
33 10 



REPAIRS BLACK RIVER CANAL. 



E. H. Crocker . 
E. H. Crocker . 
Peter Hogan... 
Peter Hogan... 
W. B. Cooper.. 
W. B. Cooper. . 
W. W. Jerome 
W. W. Jerome 



Division engineer. 

Travel 

Resident engineer 

Travel 

Division engineer. 

Travel 

Resident engineer 
Travel 



Total Black River canal. 



$2,400 00 

2J666 66 
"2*46666 
"2,666 66 



$163 33 
45 58 
50 00 
17 00 
150 00 
54 36 
50 00 
34 50 



W. B. Cooper...... 

C. M. Thompson .. 
George M. Barnes . 
Robert J. Hilton... 

John A. Allen 

Stephen Thorne . . . 
P. H. Baerman 

John C. Hersey 

Charles D. Burrus . 

F. R. Sargent 

M. H. RoDerts.. .. 
Leslie Smyth 



ENLARGEMENT CHAMPLAIN CANAL. 



Assistant engineer. 
Assistant engineer. 
Assistant engineer. 
Assistant engineer. 
Assistant engineer. 
Assistant engineer. 
Assistant engineer. 
Assistant engineer. 
Assistant in office . 
Assistant engineer. 

Draughtsman 

Office assistant 



17 
17 
79 

155 
18 

208 
74 

181 
26 

145 
61 
33 



$6 00 


$ 102 00 


6 00 


102 00 


6 00 


474 00 


5 00 


775 00 


5 00 


90 00 


4 00 


936 00 


4 00 


296 00 


4 00 


724 00 


5 00 


130 00 


4 00 


580 00 


5 00 


255 00 


3 50 


115 50 



$2,140 66 



58 49 



$2, 199 15 



$564 7? 



30 



Annual Report of the 



TABLE No. 1— (Continued). 

ENLARGEMENT CHAMPLAIN CANAL-<Continued). 



NAME8. 


Rank. 


No. of 
days. 


Rate of 
compens'n. 


Amount. 


Tota'. 
« 


Levi Carriagton 

Orlando F/Doolittle. . . . 
Win. H. Youne 


Leveler 


145 
88 

107 
88 
18 
01 
87 
87 
79 
17 

189 
78 

104 
96 
65 


$8 50 
8 50 
8 50 
350 
8 00 
800 
360 
8 50 
8 00 
650 
400 
350 
400 
400 
400 


$507 50 

887 00 

374 50 

115 50 

54 00 

873 00 

98 60 

t*7 50 

158 00 

110 50 

566 00 

858 00 

416 00 

884 00 

860 00 




Rodman 




P. H. Cantwell 


T^vlynan 

Rodman 




John T. Parker 


Ifrpdnmn 




Pred. H. Well* 


R*Klm*n 




John A, Wilkin* 




Wm. L. Sheirill 

Caleb Wells 


Inspector 




A. L. Pinne 


Inspector 




Patrick Mnllln 

James H. Sherrill 






John Somen 


Inspector 




Joines Bennett 


Inspector 






Incidental expenses. 
Stationery 


$8,487 50 




875 88 
84 00 
75 00 
77 68 
79 68 




Fuel 










Office rent 








t 


Postage and telegraph 

Miscellaneous 


■ • • • • • 














Total Champlain canal. . 


• • • • • • 




631 58 








$9, 119 08 









EXTRAORDINARY REPAIRS ERIE CANAL. 



W. B. Cooper 

C. M. Thompson 

8. E. Babcock 

James E. Willard 

John A. Cooper 

John A. Cooper 

Geo. M. Barnes 

Geo. Cnshing, Jr. 

R. J. Cantwell 

R.J. Cantwell 

R. J. Cantwell 

S. D. Shepard 

Stephen Thorne 

R. J. Hilton 

Chas. D. Burrus 

P. H.Walworth 

Leslie Smyth 

John L. Woodin, Jr. . . 

M. H. Roberts 

M. H. Roberts 

P. J. Kinney 

W. H.Newkirk 

Samuel Monk 

Samuel Moak 

B. S. Frisbie 

B. S.Frisbie 

John A. Watkins 

Henry M. Johnson 

Henry M. Johnson 

Zenas Taylor ". . . 

M. J. Manning 

Wm. F. Lentz 

i. B. Tinkham 

Edward Vaughan 

Isaac Thomas 

Alex. Robertson 

Dana Reed 

F. R. Osborne 

Thomas Foley 

•Giles Hawley 

J. L. Plttman 

8. E. Spoor 

Benjamin Lovejoy 

8. D. Trull 

Gitas Hawley 



Assistant engineer. , 
Assistant engineer., 
Assistant engineer. 
Assistant engineer. . 

Draughtsman , 

Draughtsman , 

Assistant engineer. . 
Assistant engineer. . 
Assistant engineer. . 
Assistant engineer. . 
Assistant engineer. . 
Assistant engineer.. 
Assistant engineer. . 
Assistant in office . . 
Assistant in office . 
Assistant in office . , 
Assistant in office . . 
Assistant in office . . 

Draughtsman , 

Draughtsman , 

Leveler , 

Leveler 

Leveler , 

Assistant engineer. . 
Assistant engineer. , 

Rodman 

Rodman 

Rodman 

Rodman 

Rodman 

Rodman 

Rodman 

Rodman 

Inspector 

Inspector 

Inspector 

Inspector 

Inspector 

Inspector 

Inspector 

Inspector 

Inspector 

Inspector 

Inspector 

Inspector 



Total Erie canal 



86 

105 

818 

81 

68 

86 

884 

166 

181 

104 

86 

78 

68 

105 

188 

78 

68 

70 

78 

157 

184 

818 

105 

104 

167 

84 

99 

189 

68 

16 

15 

108 

61 

78 

48 

68 

78 

78 

104 

85 

87 

183 

87 

75 

49 



$6 60 


600 


6 00 


6 00 


600 


600 


600 


500 


6 00 


500 


4 60 


600 


450 


4 50 


500 


800 


8 50 


3 60 


400 


500 


400 


4 50 


400 


500 


400 


860 


850 


800 


860 


860 


8 00 


800 


S 50 


400 


400 


400 


400 


400 


4 00 


4 00 


860 


400 


400 


400 



350 



$143 00 
630 00 

1.878 00 
186 00 
360 00 
156 00 

1,404 00 
885 00 
786 00 
680 00 
117 00 
890 00 
884 00 
473 60 
690 00 
834 00 
185 50 
175 00 
313 00 
785 00 
636 00 

L406 60 
480 00 
580 00 
688 00 
119 00 
347 50 
417 00 
183 00 
40 00 
45 00 
809 00 
313 50 
313 00 
168 00 
908 00 
813 00 
813 00 
416 00 
140 00 
304 60 
498 00 
348 00 
300 00 
171 50 



$18,893 50 
$18,892 60 



State Engineer on the Canals. 



31 



TABLE B[o. 1— (Continued). 

EXTRAORDINARY REPAIRS CHAMPLAIN CANAL. 



NAMES. 



W. B. Cooper 

W. B.Cooper 

Stephen Thome 

A. J. Watkins 

R. J. Hilton 

Samuel Moak , 

H. C. H. Ellis 

J. C. Laas , 

M. H. Roberts 

P. J. Harris 

W. H. Young 

John L. Woodin, Jr, 

John Coffer 

Wm. L. Sherrill ... 

Geo. B. Fay 

H. A. Smith 

George Dunn 

James Dempsey..., 
Patrick Gallagher . . 
Dennis P. Nye 



Rank. 



Assistant engineer 
Assistant engineer 
Assistant engineer 
Assistant engineer 
Assistant engineer 
Assistant engineer, 

Draughtsman 

Draughtsman .... 

Draughtsman 

Leveler 

Rodman , 

Rodman 

Axeman , 

Chainman 

Office assistant 

Inspector 

Inspector 

Inspector 

Inspector , 

Inspector 



Total Champlain canal. 



No. of 
Days. 



52 
27 
58 
53 
58 

104 

106 
17 
27 
59 
78 

104 

4 

78 

103 
78 
78 
36 
67 
40 



Rate of 
compens'n. 



$5 50 
600 



50 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



8 50 
3 50 
8 00 
3 50 



3 
4 
4 
4 
4 



00 
50 
00 
00 
00 



3 50 

4 00 



Amount. 



00 
163 00 
338 50 
360 00 
265 00 
5*20 00 
530 00 

85 00 
135 00 
306 50 
373 00 
313 00 

10 00 
156 00 
459 00 
813 00 
313 00 
104 00 
199 50 
160 00 



Total. 



$4,985 50 



$4,965 60 



Summary of Table No. 1. 



NAME OP CANAL. 


Engineering 
proper. 


Incidentals. 


Amount. 


Total. 


Repairs Erie 


$3,871 48 

3,140 66 

664 77 

8,487 50 

18,893 60 
4,985 50 


$1, 110 31 
58 49 


$4,481 69 

•2, 199 15 

664 77 




Repairs Champlain 




Repairs Black river 






631 58 


$7,245 61 
9,119 08 


Enlargement Champlain 


$9,119 08 




$18,893 50 
4,985 50 


Amount paid by division engineer 


$16,864 69 






Extraordinary repairs Champlain 












$38,878 00 










28,878 00 








$40,242 69 









Annual Report of the 



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1 



MIDDLE DIVISION, 



DIVISION ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



ANNUAL KEPORT 



or 



HOWARD B. SOULE, Jb., DIVISION ENGINEER, FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 

ENDING SEPTEMBER 80, 1872. 



Division Engineer's Office, 
Syracuse, September 3(WA, 1872 



} 



Hon. William B. Taylor, 

State Engineer and Surveyor : 

Sir. — In pursuance of law, I herewith present a report of the work 
done, engineers employed, and general condition of the canals upon 
the middle division of the New York State canals for the fiscal year 
ending September 30th, 1872. 

Length of Completed Canals and .Navigable Feeders, Middle 

Division. 

Miles. 

Erie canal, Higginsville to east line Wayne county . 68.58 

Limestone feeder, Erie canal to Fayetteville 0. 80 

Butternut feeder, Erie canal to Dunlap's Mills 1 .55 

Camillus feeder, Erie canal to Camillus 1 . 00 

3.35 

Oneida Lake canal, Higginsville to Oneida lake 7.00 

Oswego canal, Syracuse to Oswego 38 . 00 

Cayuga and Seneca canal, Montezuma to Cayuga and Seneca 

lakes 22.77 

Crooked Lake canal, Seneca lake to Crooked lake 8 . 00 

Chemung canal, Watkins to Elmira 23.00 

Chemung Canal feeder, Horseheads to Corning 16.00 

Chenango canal, Utica to Binghamton 97.00 

Ithaca inlet, Cayuga lake to Ithaca 2 . 00 

Baldwinsville canal and improvement to Jack's Reefs 12. 50 

Seneca River towing-path, Jsaldwinsville to Mud lock 5.75 

Oneida River improvement, Oswego canal to Oneida lake 20 . 00 

Total miles 323.95 



40 Annual Report of the 

The canals upon this division are supplied with water from the 
following named sources : 

Erie Canal. 
Long level : *g*£$S? 

Oneida Creek feeder 1 > 500 

Cowassalon Creek feeder 320 

Limestone Creek feeder 500 

Butternut Creek feeder , 500 

Cazenovia Lake reservoir (for 100 days) 3>115 

Erieville reservoir (for 100 days) 2)526 

De Ruyter reservoir (for 100 days) 3>891 

Jamesville reservoir — in progress (sixty days) 2? 000 

Jordan level : 

Nine-Mile Creek feeder 800 

Carpenter Brook feeder 200 

Skaneateles Lake reservoir 8? 766 

Otisco Lake reservoir 5? 146 

Port Byron and Montezuma levels : 

Putnam Brook feeder ; 200' 

Owasco Creek feeder 4? 033 

Owasco Lake reservoir 10*267 

Lake Erie , 4,000 

Oswego Canal. 

Seneca river 54*000 

Oneida river (approximate quantity) 20>000 

Erie canal ." 10,000 

Cayuga and Seneca Canal. 

Seneca lake 18,000 

Erie tonal J^£22 

Chemung Canal. 
Chemung river 8^000 

Crooked Lake Canal. 
Crooked lake and outlet (approximate) 4? 000 

Chenango Canal. 

* Madison Brook reservoir. 
■* Bradley Brook reservoir. 

* Eaton Brook reservoir. 

* Kingsley Brook reservoir. 

* Woodman's pond. 

* Hatch's lake. 

* Leland's pond. 

* Chenango river, to summit level. 

* Supplies not measured. 



j 



H* 



State Engineer on the Canals. 41 

* Chenango river, at Smith's Valley. 
• * Chenango river, at Sherburne. 

* Chenango river, at Norwich. 

* Chenango river, at South Oxford. 

* Chenango river, at North Oxford. 

* Chenango river, at Chenango Forks. 

Engineer Department. 

This division of the canals was under the charge of M. S. Kimball 
up to the 10th of February last, and, since that date, H6ward Soule, 
Jr., has been division engineer, and Thomas Goodsell resident engineer. 

Until March 1st the Chenango Canal- extension was in charge of 
Charles L. McAlpine, and since that date Thomas Goodsell has been 
resident engineer. 

During the fiscal year the total amount of work done under the 
supervision of the engineer department is as follows, ordinary repairs 
not included : 

Eriecanal $138,152 14 

Oswego canal % 141,668 20 

Chenango canal * 50,858 51 

Chenango Canal extension ; 145,710 45 

Chemung canal '. 48,579 13 

Crooked Lake canal 3,396 11 

Cayuga and Seneca canal .• 15,338 16 

Enlargement Oneida Lake canal 1,900 00 

Ithaca inlet 11,440 00 

Total \ $557,042 70 

Cost of engineering upon both ordinary and extraordi- 
nary repairs $44,612 72 

Deduct amount chargeable to ordinary repairs 6,733 75 

Total for extraordinary repairs ; $37, 878 97 

Per centage, six seven-tenths. 

Table No. 1, annexed, exhibits in detail the cost of engineering 
during the fiscal year, the names of the persons employed, term of 
service, and compensation of each. 

Table No. 2 gives an account of extraordinary repairs and new 
work under contract during the fiscal year. 

Table No. 3— an account of miscellaneous work not under contract, 
but done under the general supervision of this department and by 
the superintendent or Commissioner in charge. 

* Supplies not measured. 



42 Annual Espobt of the 

GENEEAL CONDITION OF THE CANALS. 

Erie Canal. 
Ordinary Repairs. 

Repair sections Nos. 7 and 9 are in charge of superintendents. 
Section No.. 8 is still under contract, which expires January 1st, 1874. 

The repairs have generally been well done and navigation has been 
uninterrupted. The timber trunks to Limestone, Butternut, Seneca 
Eiver, and Crane Brook aqueducts must be renewed next winter. 

The principal hindrance to perfect navigation on this division is 
the old bench wall. A thorough removal of sediment almost inva- 
riably results in the sliding of the bench and wall into the canal, par- 
ticularly in the quicksand bottom of the Jordan level. 

On the 20th of July, a breach occurred in the wooden trunk cul- 
vert under the canal in the village of Canastota, which, for a time, 
threatened a suspension of navigation. This was only prevented by 
the prompt action of the superintendent, acting under the advice of 
the engineers. Large quantities of brush, stolle and gravel were used 
in stopping the breach, completely filling one-half of the prism of 
the canal, leaving barely room for one boat to pass. A permanent 
tile drain has been constructed by the State, thus obviating the neces- 
sity of maintaining this culvert, which should be entirely removed. 

Last spring, much anxiety was felt by the officials in charge of the 
canals, owing to the limited amount of water in the reservoirs. 
Copious rains during the season contributed to the scanty supply on 
hand, yet the most rigid economy in its use and distribution was 
necessary to meet the demands upon this important canal. 

Extraordinary Repairs. 

Under the provisions of act chapter 343 of the Laws of 1872, to 
furnish additional water to the long level of the Erie canal, the Canal 
Commissioners have commenced the construction of the Jamesville 
reservoir, situated on Butternut creek, about one-half mile south of 
the village of Jamesville, in the county of Onondaga, and about 
three miles from the Erie canal. The depth of the proposed reser- 
voir is forty-three feet at the dam, its surface area 240 acres ; area of 
drainage 30,000 acres, and its capacity 170,000,000 cubic feet, which 
will supply to the canal for sixty days in the dry months 2,000 cubic 
feet of water per minute. The dam is to be of masonry, founded 
on rock. The estimated cost to complete the entire work, exclusive 
of land damages, is $100,000. 



State Engineer on the Canals. 43 

This reservoir mil discharge into the canal through the present 
feeder at Orville, four miles east of lock 47, and will be of great 
value, as a regulator, in keeping a full depth of water at the west end 
of the long level, which is often reduced during the prevalence of 
westerly winds and rapid lockages, so as to seriously obstruct naviga^ 

tion. 

Last spring tow-path locks 47 and 48 were widened two feet at a 
cost of $20,000, and double locks 49 were widened in 1869. This 
improvement enables heavily-laden eastward bound boats to pass these 
locks rapidly, preventing the accumulation of crowds and delays in 
locking as heretofore. 

Heath's patent tumble-gates have been inserted at the head of 
double locks 47 and 48. They work satisfactorily and leak less than 
the miter gates. 

Pursuant to chapter 583 of the Laws of 1872, the dam at the 
Owasco Lake outlet has been raised three feet for the purpose of 
storing water in the Owasco lake for feeding the Port Byron level of 
the Erie canal. The dam has been raised with a framed timber bulk- 
head, having gates extending the fall length of the spillway, to be 
closed only after the spring freshets have subsided to a point three 
feet higher than the ridge of the permanent dam. 

The timber bulk-head at the east end of the dam has also been rebuilt. 

This lake is ten miles from the canal at Port Byron, its surface 308 
feet above the canal bottom, its length fourteen miles and width about 
three-fourths of a mile. Its computed area is 6,800 acres; drainage 
basin, 120,000 acres; available head, five feet ; capacity, 1,480,000,000 
cubic feet. Including the natural flow from the drainage basin, after 
deducting evaporation from lake surface, this will supply, for 100 
days, 14,300 cubic feet of water per minute. 

The Otisco Lake reservoir was completed during the fiscal year, 
and its full supply realized during the season of navigation. This is 
an important addition to the water supply upon the Jordan level, and 
is taken into the canal (twelve miles distant) through the Nine-mile 
Creek feeder. 

This lake is situated in the town of Spafford, in the county of 
Onondaga. Its area, at low water, 1,500 acres. It has been raised 
ten feet and flows 2,200 acres. Its average area, between high and 
low water, is 1,800 acres, with an available depth of ten feet. Drain- 
age basin, 26,000 acres; capacity, 784,000,000 cubic feet. Including 
the natural flow in the dry months, it will supply, for 120 days, 5,146 
cubic feet of water per minute. 



44 



Annual Repobt of the 



A law of last winter appropriated $5,000 for raising the road-bed 
at the head of Otisco Lake reservoh*. This road crosses the valley at 
the head of the lake. In raising the surface ten feet, it overflows the 
road to a depth of about seven feet. In the construction of the 
reservoir, the plan was to abandon this road, and construct a new one 
across the valley, outside of the flow line, one mile further south. 
This will add two miles to the distance traveled in crossing the valley, 
and, at the request of the residents interested, the construction of the 
new road was abandoned until legislation could be obtained. The 
estimated cost of raising and protecting the old road is $20,000. The 
cost of the new one, for construction and land damages, is $5,000. It 
is clearly the duty of the State to construct one of these roads. 

The progress and condition of the works not mentioned above can 
be found in tables JSTos. 2 and 3, hereto annexed. 

An appropriation of $8,000 was made last winter for the construc- 
tion of an iron bridge over the Erie canal at Catharine street, Syracuse. 
This sum is inadequate for the purpose, and a further appropria- 
tion of $3,000 will be necessary to carry out the object of the law. 



Bench Walls. 

The following tabular statement gives the original length of bench 
wall, the length removed, and the length remaining, together with 
the estimated cost of completing the removal of all the old, and sub- 
stituting new wall to canal bottom. 



LOCATION. 



Jordan level... 
Syracuse level . 
Long level, 



On Towing-Path. 



Total 



Jordan level... 
Syracuse level. 
.Long level 



On JBmne. 



Total 

Total for the division. 



6fl3 


■Stf 


e* 


|| 


1- 


*1« 


rigina 
of be 
chain 




o • 


tJ 


986 


563 


138 


91 


145 


74 


918 


98 


146 


146 


866 





■8 A 

2*2 

,fiSd 



883 
83 
71 



895 
'356 



"t 



stZs 



Wl 



00 



$70,000 
13,000 
13,000 



$96,000 



$155,000 
""45,666 



$300,000 



$396,000 



From the above, it will be seen that there have been about nine 
miles of bench removed and new wall substituted upon the towing- 
path, and two miles upon the berme side of the canal. 



State Engineer on the Canals. 45 

It is of the greatest importance that the entire removal of this bench 
should be accomplished at an early date. In the quicksand cuts of the 
Jordan level, where the principal part of this bench is located, it is 
impossible to thoroughly bottom th<e canal without undermining the 
banks and greatly aggravating the difficulty. I would earnestly 
recommend an appropriation, by the next Legislature, of $70,000, to 
be applied exclusively to removing the bench wall, and substituting 
full slope wall on the towing-path side of the Jordan level ; no por- 
tion thereof to be expended upon the berme until the towing-path 
wall shall have been completed. 

I would also recommend an appropriation of $15,000 for the same 
purpose upon the long level, and a like sum upon the Syracuse level, 
and that, in the discretion of the Canal Board, vertical wall may be 
substituted through the city of Syracuse. 

Oswego Canal. 

Ordinary Hepairs. 

Section No. 1 is in charge of the superintendent. 
Section No. 2 is still under contract, which will expire January 
1st, 1874. 

This canal is in very good repair, and during the past season navi- 
gation was unobstructed. 

Last spring a large amount of sediment was removed from the 
Syracuse and Liverpool levels. Several new bridges were built and 
other general repairs made. 

Extraordinary Repairs. 

The reconstruction of the high dam on the Oswego river was let 
July 14th, 1869, on the plan of a timber crib dam. Subsequently, by 
a resolution of the Canal Board, the plan was changed to a stone dam. 
About 300 feet of the crib work and apron were built last year. 

The injury done to the aproii by the ice, last spring, demonstrated 
that another change iii the plan was necessary, in order to prevent 
further trouble of a like nature. This was done under a resolution 
of the Canal Board, and the damaged apron has been taken up, 
repaired and renewed at considerable cost. A large amount of the 
masonry has been laid, and the work progressed so far as to insure 
its completion next season. 

Estimates have been made of the* cost of constructing this dam, 
including the changes of plan and cost of repairing the damaged 
apron, amounting, in the aggregate, to $220,000. 



46 Annual Report of the 

The total amount expended, up to the close of the fiscal year, is 
$137,480; leaving $82,520 remaining to be done. The total amount 
appropriated, thus far, is $160,000 ; leaving a deficiency of $60,000 
required to complete the work. This amount should be appropriated 
next winter. 

The following works under contract have been completed and set- 
tled during the fiscal year : Stone dam at Minetto ; vertical wall on 
enlargement section No. 4, and culvert at Salina. 

The following have been completed, and will be settled as soon as 
the final accounts can be perfected : Raising banks of the Oswego 
canal ; rebuilding docks at Salina. 

Miscellaneous works ordered by the Canal Commissioner, under 
special laws, have been done as follows : Rebuilding composite lock 
at Salina ; constructing ditch above culvert at Salina ; vertical wall 
near Bradley brook; new docking at Cold Spring; pile docking at 
New Bridge and Three-River Point; removing cemented gravel from 
the bottom of canal, below Hinmanville ; iron bridge at Lee's ; tern- ' 
porary dam at Oswego ; iron chord bridge at Atthouse's ; iron road 
bridge at Minetto. 

Cayuga and Seneca Canal. 

Ordinary Repairs. 

Considerable work was done by the State dredge in the harbor, at 
Geneva, last winter, and on the river levels below, in removing bars 
and sunken rocks. New gates were inserted in many of the Jocks, 
the towing-path and change bridges at Seneca Falls were rebuilt, and 
many other important repairs made. 



Extraordinary Repairs. 

The following works, authorized by special laws, have been com- 
pleted and settled during the fiscal year : Protecting berme "bank oi 
Cayuga and Seneca canal along the shore of Seneca lake ; iron needle 
beams in iron bridge at Seneca Falls ; iron culvert at Waterloo ; sluice 
around lock No. 11 at Montezuma. 

This canal extends from Seneca lake at Geneva to Montezuma. The 
canal leaves the lake through an artificial channel, about two miles in 
length, forming a junction with the Seneca river, which is the natural 
outlet of the lake. From the junction to the foot of Cayuga lake, 
slack-water navigation is formed by locks and dams in the river. 
From Cayuga lake to Montezuma the canal is independent of the 
river and is fed from the Erie canal. 



State Engineer on the Canals. 47 

At Waterloo, about seven miles from Geneva, occurs the first and 
principal dam, which governs the water in the river and lake, and is 
the key to navigation upon this canal. 

At Seneca Falls, four miles further down the stream, is another 
dam, governing the water level between the last named places. 

At these dams are located immense manufacturing interests that 
for power depend upon the water there supplied. In later years 
these interests have largely increased. Machinery has been multi- 
plied, and additional water is required to operate it. The canal has 
been enlarged, its business increased, and more water demanded ; yet, 
unfortunately for these growing interests, the supply is no greater 
now than it was forty years ago. 

The dry season, protracted through the winter of 1871, left the 
surface of Seneca lake, on the 25th of March last, seventeen inches 
lower than was ever before observed. There was no accumulation of 
snow, and the lake raised but very little in the spring. 

Owing to this extreme low water, at the opening of navigation the 
draft of boats was restricted to four and three-fourths feet. The rains 
occurring during the season raised the surface of the lake, barely 
enabling boats, at the close of the year, to attain a draft of five and 
a half feet. The coal and other commercial interests dependent upon 
the navigation of this canal were, for a time, sorely crippled by this 
uncontrollable condition of affairs. 

Under perfect navigation, 4 this canal is the natural and the cheapest 
outlet to the people of this State for the great and rapidly growing 
coal trade of Pennsylvania. The present tonnage through it is large, 
increasing every year, and must continue to augment, in order to 
meet the consumption consequent upon a multiplying population and 
rapid development of manufactures. In a commercial point of view, 
the importance of this canal to our own people cannot well be over- 
estimated ; and if they would preserve it and retain its commerce, 
they must see that its wants and demands for the material element 
upon which its vitality wholly depends are, in the future, fully and 
abundantly supplied. Already lines of railway are projected for the 
purpose of diverting its trade into other channels. Once built and in 
successful operation, a trade equal to their carrying capacity will be 
permanently lost to the canal. 

The practical remedy that presents itself is for the State to assume 
the entire and independent control of the water. Hydraulic rights 
should take their quotas over weirs from the surface, and not as now 
through gates drawing nearly to canal bottom. These weirs should be 



48 Annual Kepobt of the 

not lower than seven feet above canal bottom, reserving that depth 
exclusively for the canal, to be drawn no faster than may be required 
to maintain navigation on the levels below, and for no other purpose. 

In doing this, the State should endeavor to do justice to the manu- 
facturing interests, and should construct a new and tight dam at 
Waterloo ; the permanent spillway to be of the same height as the 
present one (eight feet above canal bottom), with large flood-gates 
therein. Provision should be made for holding the water in the lake 
to a medium level, by constructing a bulk-head and gates on top of 
the spillway of the dam, extending its entire length. The gates to be 
controlled by the State and opened during floods, but to be closed, 
and no water permitted to waste after the lake shall have subsided to a 
medium high-water level. This point should be determined by sur- 
vey, but may now be approximately stated at two and one-half feet 
below the high water of 1870, and five feet above the lowest point 
reached last spring. 

Permanent monuments should be established in the lake, indicating 
this height, and, in order to insure unobstructed navigation, the canal 
and river between the lake and Waterloo should be deepened two feet 
below present bottom line, thus forming a sub-reservoir aa a con- 
tingent supply beyond the possibility of partnership with hydraulic 
interests. 

Water rights at Seneca Falls should be made to draw over weirs, in 
like manner as proposed at Waterloo and the discharge over them should . 
be controlled, so that none of the waters of the sub-reservoir to be 
made by deepening the canal and river, as above proposed, could be 
used for hydraulic purposes at either point. 

The estimated cost of the dam and bulk-head is .$20,000, and of 
deepening the canal and river, $70,000. 

The plan above proposed would secure good navigation, and, it is 
believed, would not damage, hydraulic powers or the lands bordering 
upon the lake. 

Chemung Canal. 
Ordinary Repairs. 

Uninterrupted navigation has been well maintained during the 
season. 

One aqueduct, five waste-weirs and four bridges should be rebuilt 
before the opening of the canal. 

At Elmira there are five self-acting swing bridges that are worthless 
and the old pier at the entrance of the canal into Seneca lake needs 





State Engineer on the Canals. 49 

extensive repairs. Many lock-gates must be renewed and bulk-heads 
repaired next winter. • 

Extraordinary Repairs. 

Contracts for bridge abutments at Watkins, iron bridge at Havana, 
extending breakwater and dredging harbor at Watkins, have been 

settled. 

The contract for raising and extending breakwater, etc., at Watkins, 
will be completed next year. 

The authorized work done by Canal Commissioner or superintend- 
ent, supervised by the engineers, is as follows : Constructing dam at 
Narrow's creek, at Gibson ; protecting bank at Mill creek and repair- 
ing bridge at Watkins ; rebuilding waste-weir at Horseheads ; iron 
"bridge superstructure over old abandoned canal at Watkins ; swing 
bridge over feeder at Horseheads ; constructing road bridge at lock 
No. 48 ; enlarging State ditch at Big Flats ; constructing light-house 
in harbor at Watkins ; dredging between lock No. 1 and Seneca lake ; 
rebuilding docking at Corning; turning waters of Chemung river 
into Seneca lake. 

The docking in the Chemung river, at Corning, is considerably 
decayed, and is constantly failing ; and a large annual outlay must be 
incurred in rebuilding and repairing it. This docking is about sixty 
chains in length and sixteen feet in height. It is built of timber 
cribs, founded on piles. Aside from decay, failure is induced from 
its being too narrow to resist the pressure of the bank behind it. It 
is understood that the foundation for this dock was laid for a height 
of twelve feet only, but that it was subsequently carried four feet 
higher, which accounts, in part, for its weakness. The course pursued 
in repairing it has been to rebuild of greater width such portions as 
have utterly failed, and to strengthen weak points by piles in front, 
secured at top with iron ties attached to anchor piles driven far in the 
rear. 

It is believed a better and more permanent plan would be to sub- 
stitute a strong slope wall as fast as the dock fails. Lumber being 
the chief product shipped at this point, could be loaded over a slope 
wall without serious inconvenience. 

Crooked Lake Canal. 

Ordinary Repairs. , 

This canal is still under contract for repairs. 

At the opening, last spring,, there were only twenty-three inches of 
water on the lower miter sill of the lock at Dresden. Crooked lake 
fAssem. No. 17.] 4 



1 

50 Annual Report of the f 

was also very low, and for nearly one-half the season boats have been 
limited to a draft of two feet of water. 

Locks Nos. 14, 20, 21, 22 and 23 are in bad condition. The foot 
and chamber walls have been forced inward, making it difficult for 
boats to enter. These locks mast soon be rebuilt. 

Locks Nos. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 25 and 26 can be repaired so as to last for 
a few years longer. 

Nos. 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 24, 27 and 28 have been 
rebuilt on an improved plan of stone, laid in cement. No. 1, at Dres- 
den, originally built of stone, is a good structure. 

Extraordinary Repairs. 

Under special laws, work has been done through the Commissioner 
and superintendent, as follows: Brush and stone protection to the 
banks of the canal ; dredging in harbor at Dresden, and bottoming 
down the level below guard lock at Penn Yan. 

Chenango Canal. 

Ordinary Repairs. 

Sections Nos. 1 and 3 are in charge of superintendents. No. 2 is 
under contract. 

The delays to navigation upon this canal equal in the aggregate 
seven days. 

Breaches have occurred through head walls of lock No. 30 ; at head 
of lock 28 ; and at the stone arch culvert at Earlville, which was 
damaged so that a new structure will be required next spring. 

There are 114 locks upon this canal, and within the last twelve 
years thirty-one of them have been rebuilt on an improved plan of 
cement masonry. At least twelve more should be rebuilt in the next 
two years. Of the balance, it is safe to say that not more than twelve 
are in good condition. This leaves about fifty locks that require 
extensive repairs. In most cases the timber lining is in a deplor- 
able state, and should be renewed without further delay. This will 
cost at least $2,000 per lock. 

By pursuing the patching process in vogue for the last few years, a 
few of them might perhaps be made to operate a short time longer, 
but the matter is only deferred and must soon be fully met, or the 
canal abandoned. ' 

Many of the aqueducts and culverts have failed in their masonry and 
foundations. ' The bolstering method cannot avail them much longer. 

If this canal is to be perpetuated, a large annual expenditure will 
be required to rebuild the old and dilapidated structures. 



State Engineer on the Cabals. 51 

JExtraordiiiary Repairs. 

The following works, under superintendent or Commissioner's con- 
tracts, have been completed during the fiscal year : Rebuilding locks 
Nos. 7, 17, 27, 47, 51, 101, 107, 108 and 110; iron bridge at Bouck- 
ville, and repairing waste-weirs on section No. 1. The following 
contract work has made good progress and will be completed before 
the first of January next: Swing bridges at Pleasant street, Hamil- 
ton ; State street, Sherburne ; Main street, Norwich ; and Madison 
Brook Reservoir dam. 

This latter work was authorized by the Board of Canal Commis- 
sioners under special laws, and consists in restoring the reservoir to a 
condition of usefulness, which had never been 7 realized until now, 
except for a short time after its original construction, when the pipes 
became clogged and the flow therefrom in great part obstructed. 
Two new sixteen-inch cast-iron pipes have been inserted at a depth of 
thirty-seven feet below the flow-line. A paved waste and over-falls 
to discharge the surplus water have been constructed, and the inner 
face of the dam protected with rip-rap. 

There are seyen artificial reservoirs and one natural feeder discharg- 
ing upon the summit level, and, should circumstances ever require it, 
they could be made available as feeders to the Rome level of the Erie 
canal. 

Ithaca Inlet. 

The sum of $12,500, appropriated by chapter 715, Laws of 1871, 
for finishing the work and improvements at the head of Cayuga lake, 
has been expended, and the contract ordered dosed. A further appro- 
priation of $10,000 was made by chapter 773 of the Laws of 1872, 
for additional dredging, etc. The work has been let and is now in 
progress. It will consist chiefly in securing seven feet depth at low- 
'est water. 

Enlargement of Oneida Lake Canal. 

Work upon this canal was suspended in 1871, for want of funds, 
and nothing has been done during the fiscal year, except to secure the 
pier in the harbor at Oneida lake from further damage by the ice. 
Only one engineer has been employed during the year, making com- 
putations for final accounts and caring for the property of the State, 
under the direction of the Commissioner. * 

The work upon this* canal was let in five sections. Section No. 2 is 
completed, and the final account settled. The contracts for sections 
Nos. 1, 3 and 5 are still in force. 



52 Annual Report of the 

The estimated cost to complete this canal, at the time of the suspen- 
sion, was $71,000. To this should be added $10,000 for repairing the 
unprotected works damaged in consequence of the suspension, and 
$9,000 for engineering, making the total cost to complete, under the 
present contracts, $90,000. 

A law of last winter appropriated $50,000 to complete this canal, 
under the condition that " no portion of this sum shall be expended 
unless the Canal Commissioner can make a contract within such Bum, 
on public notice of letting to the lowest bidder, for all the work neces- 
sary to make the said canal and its works and structures safe, and 
secure good navigation ; the modified plan of the work to be deter- 
mined by the Canal Commissioner and the State Engineer." 

Nothing has been done under this law, nor can there be until the 
present contracts shall have been canceled, the contractors' assent 
thereto being necessary. The amount appropriated is insufficient to 
accomplish the object of the law, upon any plan that would make the 
structures safe and secure good navigation. 

Extension of Chenango Canal. 

During the past season, work upon this canal has been prosecuted 
only at such points between Binghamton and Owego as, on account 
of their unfinished and exposed condition, were most liable to injury 
from freshets in the river. 

During the fiscal year the following works under contract have 
been completed, and final accounts for them are now being made out : 
Dam and guard lock at Binghamton; Tracy and Apalacliin aque- 
ducts, and all remaining culverts on sections Nos. 1 to 20, inclusive. 

The following contracts have been completed and the final accounts 
rendered : Section No. 4 and part of 3 ; section No. 5 ; section No. 
6 and part of 7, and Choconut aqueduct. 

The estimated cost to complete the canal between the junction with 
the old Chenango canal, at Binghamton, and Owego, is as follows : 

Completion of section No. 1 $5>000 

Locks Nos. 1 and 3, and guard lock 32?000 

River bank section 10 > 000 

Railroad bridges at Binghamton 45 ,000 

Bridges between Binghamton and Owego 34 > 000 

Repairing section work once completed 17>00O 

$143,000 
Engineering and contingencies 17*000 

Total to complete between Binghamton and Owego . . $160? 000 



State Engineer on the Canals. 53 

The estimated cost to complete the entire canal from Binghamton 
to Pennsylvania line is shown in the following summary of tables 
Nos. 2 and 4 : 

Work done and to be done, nnder contract $2 > 007* 095 16 

Work to be done and not under contract •. . . 340 > 163 00 

Total amount done and to be done $2, 347 > 258 16 

Amount done 1,600,889 19 

$746,368 97 
Add for engineering and contingencies 53,631 03 

Total to complete, Binghamton to Penn'a line. . $800,000 00 

The tables hereto annexed show, in detail, the condition of the 
entire work. 

In April last, while the work was in progress, a breach occurred in 
the contractor's coffer dam, used in building the guard lock at Bing- 
hamton, carrying out a portion of the bank in the rear of the lock, 
and breaking out of the canal through the towing-path bank into the 
river below. No damage resulted to the mechanical structures. The 
breach was repaired by the contractor, and work resumed upon the 
lock, which has since been completed. 

Removing Obstructions from the Outlet of Cayuga Lake and 

Channel of Senega River. 

The Legislature of 1872 appropriated $20,000, and reappropriated 
the sum of $30,000, for removing obstructions from the outlet of 
Cayuga lake and the channel of Seneca river. 

It is understood that, on account of a defect in the original law, 
the appropriation of $30,000 is void, leaving available only the $20,000 
appropriated last winter. The work has been put under contract, 
but nothing has yet been done. The estimated cost is $50,000. 

The final maps of the Oswego and Cayuga and Seneca canals are 
incomplete. It is of great importance that they should be finished 
without further delay, and I would respectfully recommend an appro- 
priation of $1,500 for that purpose. 

Respectfully submitted. 

HOWARD SOULE, Jr., 
Division Engineer, Middle Divitwn. 



54 



Annual Report of the 



TABLE No. 1. 



ST A TEMENT of engineering upon repairs of Middle Division of 
New York State Canals, with incidental expenses for the fiscal 
year ending September 30th, 1872. 



BRIE CANAL. 



NAME. 



M.S. Kimball 

M. S.Kimball 

Howard Soule, Jr. 
Howard Soule, Jr. 
Howard Soule, Jr. 
Howard Soule, Jr. 
Thomas Goodsell . 
Thomas Goodsell . 



Bank. 



Division 

Division 

Division 

Division 

Resident 

Resident 

Resident 

Resident 



engineer .... 

engineer 

engineer. 

engineer 

engineer 
engineer 
engineer.... 
engineer 



! 

a 



Salary 
Travel 
Salary .., 
Travel 
Salary 
Travel 
Salary . . . 
Travel... 



Incidental Expenses. 

Stationery 

Postage, telegraph and express 

Fuel and light 

. Miscellaneous 



Total for Erie canal. 



6 a 
S3 



$*,400 

• • • * • « 

3,400 

• • ■ • • • • 

2,000 

• • • • • • • 

3,000 



i 


$310 00 
100 00 
660 00 
110 00 
860 00 
60 00 
600 00 
170 00 


$1)7 86 

190 63 

98 06 

397 87 





3 



$3,140 00 



718 79 



$3,853 79 



CHENANGO CANAL. 



NAME. 



M. 8. Kimball 

M. S.Kimball 

Howard 8oule, Jr. 
Howard Soule, Jr. 
Howard Soule, Jr. 
Howard Soule, Jr. 
Thomas Goodsell . 
Thomas Goodsell . 



Rank. 



Division 
Division 
Division 
Division 
Resident 
Resident 
Resident 
Resident 



engineer 

engineer 

engineer 

engineer 

engineer .... 
engineer 
engineer .... 
engineer .... 



I 



I 

& 



Salary ... 
Travel... 
Salary ... 
Travel... 
Salary . . . 
Travel ..., 
Salary .... 
Travel.... 



Incidental Expenses. 

Stationery , 

Postage, telegraph and express 

MisceDai 



ineous. 



Total for Chenango canal. 



I 

II 

s 



$3,400 

3,000 

.... >••• 

3,000 



I 
4 



$140 00 
00 00 

180 00 
41 38 

116 00 
30 00 

843 33 

149 13 



3 

o 



$1,047 83 



$60 94 

14 04 

980 



67 78 



$1,116 40 



State Engineer on the Canals. 



55 



TABLE No. 1— (Continued). 

CROOKED LAKE CANAL. 



NAME. 


Rank. 


1 


Rate of compen- 
sation. 


• 
• 

i 


• 

1 


Howard Soule, Jr 


Division engineer. . . . 


Salary .... 
Travel... 


$2,400 


$140 00 
81 00 




Howard Soule, Jr 


$17100 




$9 99 


Incidental Expenses. 
Postage, telegraph and express 






999 






Total for Crooked Lake canal 




$180 99 





CHEMUNG CANAL. 



NAME. 



M. 8. Kimball 

M.S.Kimball 

Howard Soule, Jr. 
Howard Soule, Jr. 
Howard 8oule, Jr. 
Howard Soule, Jr. 
Thomas Goodsell , 
Thomas Goodsell 



Rank. 



Division 
Division 
Division 
Division 
Resident 
Resident 
Resident 
Resident 



engineer. , 
engineer. , 
engineer. , 
engineer. , 
engineer , 
engineer , 
engineer , 
engineer , 



i 



I 



Salary .... 
Travel.... 
Salary .... 
Travel .... 
Salary .... 
Travel.... 
Salary .... 
Travel... 



§0 
o 



5 



$2,400 

I • • • • • • • 

\2,400 

> • • • • • • 

9,000 
2,000 



Statl onery 

Postage, telegraph and express 



Incidental Expenses. 



Total for Chemung canal . 



1 


$180 00 
60 00 

806 00 
48 00 

115 00 
90 00 
60 00 
90 00 


$16 68 
98 98 





$648 00 



46 61 



$688 61 



56 



Annual Report of the 



TABLE No. 1— (Continued). 

CAYUGA AND SENECA CANAL. 



NAME. 



M.S. Kimball 

M. 8. Kimball 

Howard Soule, Jr. 
Howard Soule. Jr. 
Howard Soule, Jr. 
Howard Soule, Jr. 
Thomas Goodsell . 
Thomas Goodsell . 



Bank. 



Division 

Division 

Division 

Division 

Resident 

Resident 

Resident 

Resident 



engineer 

engineer 

engineer 

engineer 

engineer 
engineer ... 
engineer 
engineer.... 



o 

2 



Salary .. 
Travel . . 
Salary .. 
Travel . . 
Salary . . 
Travel . 
Salary .. 
Travel.. 



Incidental Expenses. 

Stationery 

Postage, telegraph and express 



Total for Cayuga and Seneca canal. 



8 

I' 

S3 

I 



tt,40O 

• • • • • • • 

2, 400 

■ • • • • • 

2, 000 

• • • • • 

2, 000 



• • • • • 



a 



o 

I 



$80 00 
80 00 

178 89 
64 88 
75 00 
15 00 

230 00 
94 40 



$89 70 
12 81 



a 

o 



$752 01 



58 51 
$804 5s 



OSWEGO CANAL. 



NAME. 



M.S. Kimball 

M: 8. Kimball... . 
Howard Soule, Jr. 
Howard Soule, Jr. 
Howard Soule, Jr. 
Howard Soule, Jr. 
Thomas Goodsell . 
Thomas Goodsell . 



Rank. 



Division 
Division 
Division 
Division 
Resident 
Resident 
Resident 
Resident 



engineer . , 
engineer.., 
engineer. . . 
engineer. . . 
engineer . , 
engineer . , 
engineer . . 
engineer . , 



i 



Salary 
Travel 
Salary 
Travel 
Salary 
Travel 
Salary 
Travel 



Incidental Expenses. 

Stationery 

Postage, telegraph and express 

Office rent and fuel 

Miscellaneous 



Total for Oswego canal 

Repairs for Middle Division 



I 

M 

St 

s 

& 



tS.400 

• • > • • • • 

9,400 

• • • • • • 

2,000 

• • • • • • • 

3,000 



a 



$806 66 
108 92 
185 00 

68 00 
67 
11 

100 00 

69 70 



22 
22 



$50 02 

T» 10 

64 03 

10 57 



1 



$906 72 



183 72 
$1,090~44 
$6,733 75 



State Engineer on the Canals. 



57 



TABLE No. 1— {Continued). 

STATEMENT of assistants employed upon' ordinary and extraor- 
dinary repairs during the fiscal year ending September 30tfA, 1872, 
cmdpaidbythe Commissioner under act chapter 447, Laws of 1865. 



name. 



Denniton Richmond . 
Dennison Richmond. 
E. L. Luddington. . . . 
E. L. Luddington.... 

J.S.Killaly 

A. V. Meeker ....... 

A. V. Meeker 

W. D. Dunning . . . 

M. J. Dolphin 

J. V. Norton 

C. R. Breed. 

Barney Becker 

David Fields 

Alexander Evarts 

H. M. Race 

C. H. Maxson 



M. S. Kimball.. 
B.J.Kimball... 
B.J. Kimball... 
Emil Laa88. ... 

H. H. Coats 

Joseph Wilbur.. 
George Briggs.. 
Jacob Benghart. 
Patrick Murphy 



D. E. Whitford. 
Calvin Shelton.. 
H. T. Beach 
O. H.Wright.., 
H.R. Wright... 



I. T. Herrick . . 
T. L. Hopkins. 
H. R. Wright.. 



D. E. Whitford. 
D. E. Whitford. 
Calvin Shelton.. 
H. T. Beach.... 
O. H. Wright... 
H. R. Wright... 



H. M. Race. 



Wm. V. Van Rensselaer , 

Wm. V. Van Rensselaer 

H. M. Race 

A. J. Hackley , 

M. N.Campbell , 

James Thompson 

Edward P. Edwards , 

J. W. Clark. . „ 



Total 



Canal. 



Erie 
Erie 
Erie 
Erie 
Erie 
Erie 
Erie 
Erie 
Erie 
Erie 
Erie 
Erie 
Erie 
Erie 
Erie 
Erie 



Oswego, 
Oswego , 
Oswego , 
Oswego , 
Oswego , 
Oswego , 
Oswego 
Oswego , 
Oswego 



Chemung & Crooked Lake, 
Chemung & Crooked Lake, 
Chemung & Crooked Lake, 
Chemung & Crooked Lake, 
Chemung & Crooked Lake, 



Cayuga and Seneca . 
Cayuga and Seneca . 
Cayuga and Seneca . 



Chemung 
Chemung 
Chemung 
Chemung 
Chemung 
Chemung 



Ithaca Inlet. 



Chenango 

Chenango 

Chenango 

Chenango 

Chenango. 

Chenango 

Chenango 

Chenango , 



OD 



o 



114 
199 
114 
199 
108 
114 
199 
118 
126 
196 

53 
178 

40 
167 

36 

79 



199 

114 

199 

97 

13 

131 

48 

86 



63 
53 
63 
39 
53 



813 
84 
63 



199 
300 
361 
360 
36 



183 



114 

199 

104 

354 

7 

30 

27 



o 3 

© S3 



$5 00 
560 



4 
5 
5 
8 
8 
5 
5 
6 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 



60 
00 
00 
60 
00 
60 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



00 
60 
00 
00 
60 
350 
3 00 
300 
3 60 



600 
400 
400 
800 
400 



500 
4 60 
8 00 



500 
600 
400 
400 
3 00 
400 



400 



5 
5 
4 
4 



00 
60 
00 
00 



8 60 



4 
4 
4 



00 
00 
00 



3 
p 






$570 00 
1,094 60 
513 00 
995 00 
515 00 
899 00 
597 00 
649 00 
630 00 
975 00 
308 00 
713 00 
160 00 
638 00 
104 00 
316 00 



$1,194 00 
513 00 
995 00 
485 00 
64 00 
423 60 
144 00 
258 00 
60 00 



$360 CO 

306 00 

208 00 

87 00 

308 00 



$1,665 00 
168 00 
156 00 



$310 00 

1,194 00 

800 00 

1,044 00 

750 00 

104 00 



$733 00 



$570 00 

1,094 50 

416 00 

1,016 00 

34 50 

80 00 

106 00 

308 00 



2 

o 



$9,066 69 



4,136 60 



971 00 



1,874 00 



4,302 00 
733 00 



8,517 00 
$34,488 00 



58 



Annual Report of the 



TABLE No. 1 — (Continued). 

STATEMENT of engineering upon construction of Oneida Lake 
canal, together with incidental expenses, for the fiscal year ending 
September 3(WA, 1872. 



NAME. 


Bank. 


i 

1 


i 

Id 
8 o 
Z* 
©* 

.1 


Amounts. 


? 


8. L. Briarsrs 


Assistant 


818 

284 

6 

9 


$4 60 

^60 
9 60 
2 60 


$1,406 60 

819 00 

16 00 

82 60 










Axman 






$2,266 0* 




$18 06 

997 

72 04 

88 


Incidental expenses. 






















• 














88 9T 






Total for Oneida Lake caital 


$2,868 97 













State Engineer on the Canals. 



59 



TABLE No. 1 — {Continued). 

STATEMENT of engineering and incidental expenses upon exten 
sion of the Chenango canal for the fiscal year ending September 
30th, 1872, as authorized by act chap. 185, Laws of 1864. 



NAME. 



C. L. McAlpine . . 
C. L. McAlpine . . 
O. F. Whitford . . 
Thomas Gtoodsell 
J. S. Killaly 

F. Leach. J r 

G. 8. Field 

T.O. Bristol 

,J. W. Clark 

E. P. Edwards . . . 

F. Farrington. . . . 

J. 8. Thorn 

L. L. Johnson.... 

P. Leach 

P. Leach 

H.Odell 

C.H. Sweet 

R.Botts 

L. H. Spencer 

J. H. Decker 



Labor 

Stationery 

Fuel 

Light.. 

Office rent 

Postage and telegraph 
Miscellaneous 



Rank. 



Resident engineer .... 
Resident engineer .... 

Assistant 

Assistant 

Draughtsman 

Leveler 

Leveler .■ 

Rodman 

Rodman 

Rodman 

Tapeman 

Tapeman 

Annan 

Axman 

Inspector 

Inspector 

Inspector 

Inspector 

Inspector . . 

Inspector 



1 

I 



Incidental expenses. 



Tqtal for Chenango Canal extension. 



The above amount was paid as follows : 

By C. L. McAlpine, resident engineer 

By Howard Soule, Jr., division engineer. . . 
By William W. Wright, Canal Commissioner. 



Total 



Salary 

Travel 

818 

121 

S10 

166 

105 

156 

261 

69 

156 

106 

106 

15 

8 

156 

87 

53 

84 

87 



h 

.5 



3 



$2,000 00 



50 
50 
00 
50 
50 
00 
00 
00 
8 85 
8 26 
2 BO 
2 50 
8 00 
4 00 

4 00 
8 00 
8 00 

5 00 



S 

i 



$888 88 
248 48 

1,721 50 
665 50 

1,060 00 
702 00 
472 60 
624 00 

1,044 00 
208 00 
507 00 
841 25 
262 50 
87 60 
24 00 
624 00 
848 00 
156 00 
102 00 
485 00 



$18 50 

87 78 
68 60 
66 00 

295 88 
65 29 

88 94 






$10,401 50 



685 44 



$11,087 00 



$8,246 70 

1,880 28 

910 07 



$11,087 00 



SUMMARY OF TABLE No. 1. 

Engineering proper for the whole division $6,788 75 

Engineering for repairs, ordinary and extraordinary 24,488 00 

Engineering for the construction of the Oneida Lake canal, and closing final accounts ... 2, 858 97 

Engineering for the Chenango Canal extension 11,087 00 

Total $44,612 72 



Annual Report of the 



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State Engineer on the Canals 



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68 Report of the State Engineer on the Canals. 

, TABLE No. 4. 

STATEMENT showing the work remaining to be done, not under 

contract. 

EXTENSION OF THE CHENANGO CANAL. 
Character of work. Engineer's estimate. 

Repairing sections Nos. 8 to 17, and 19 to 23 inclusive, $17 > 000 00 

Four wooden locks, including guard locks 91 > 573 00 

"Wappasena aqueduct 25*000 00 

Little Wappasena aqueduct 20,000 00 

Ellis aqueduct 25,000 00 

Culverts en sections Nos. 31 to 38, inclusive 38 > 000 00 

Railroad bridges at Binghamton 45,000 00 

Bridges between Binghamton and Owego 34? 390 00 

Bridges on sections Nob. 31 to 38, inclusive 44? 200 00 

Total. . . ; $340,163 00 



SUMMARY. 
Amownt of work done during the fiscal year. 



*•. \ 



CANAL. 



Erie (including Otisco Lake reservoir) 

Oswego 

Chenango 

Chenango extension 

Chemung 

Crooked Lake 



Cayuga and Seneca 

Oneida Lake enlargement. 
Ithaca Inlet 



Total 



Work under 
contract. 



$88,768 87 
100,540 31 

60,858 51 
117,808 88 

17,813 65 



7,687 78 

1,900 00 

11,440 00 



$895,818 00 



Work upon 

miscellaneous 

repairs. 



$49,888 87 
41,1*37 89 

"28,* 401*57 

31,265 48 

8,896 11 

7,660 88 



Totals. 



$138,15214 

141,668 20 

50,858 51 

145,710 45 

48,579 13 

8,896 11 

15,838 16 

1,900 00 

11,440 00 



$161,224 70 $567,042 70 



WESTERN DIVISION. 



DIVISION ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



or 



J. FRED. BEHN, DIVISION ENGINEER, FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 

ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1872. 



Division Engineer's Office, 

Rochester, October 1st, 1872 



.1 



Hon. "William B. Taylor, 

State Engineer and Surveyor : 

Sir. — In accordance with the regulations established under act, 
chapter 169, Laws of 1862, 1 have the honor to present you my 
annual report for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1872. 

The canals embraced in this division are as follows, viz. : 

Miles. 

Erie canal from east line of "Wayne county to Buffalo 148£ 

Genesee Valley canal, from Rochester to Mill Grove 113£ 

Dansville branch of Genesee Valley canal 11 

Total 273 



The navigable feeders are as follows : 

■ 

Genesee River feeder at Rochester 2J 

Genesee River feeder at Oramel . .• f 



Total 



3 



The canals on this division are supplied with water from the follow- 
ing sources : 

Erie Canal. 
Lake Erie. 

Tonawanda creek, at Pendleton. 
Oak Orchard and Tonawanda creek, at Medina. 



72 Annual Report of the 

Genesee Valley canal, at Rochester. 
Genesee river, at Rochester. 

Genesee Valley Ccmal. 

Allen's creek, at Scottsville. 

Genesee river, at Mount Morris. 

Canaseraga Greek feeder, two miles north of Dansville. 

Mill creek at Dansville. 

Wiscoy Creek feeder. 

Genesee river, at Oramel. 

Rockville reservoir, near Belfast. 

Two branches of Black creek, on Summit level. 

Oil Creek reservoir on Summit, two miles north of Cuba. 

Champlain and Griffin creeks, at Cuba. 

Ischua feeder from Ischua creek, at South end of Summit. 

Oil Creek feeder at foot of lock No. 101. 

Haskell creek on extension. 

Dodge creek on extension, at Portville. 

Oswayo creek on extension, south of Portville. 

Allegany river, at head of canal at Mill Grove. 

Engineering Department. 

During the past fiscal year this division has been under the charge 
of Daniel Richmond, up to February 10th, 1872, and J. Fred. Behn, 
from 6aid date, as division engineers ; also J. Nelson Tubbs, up to 
February 20, 1872, and Byron M. Hanks from said date as resident 
engineers. 

Table No. 1, hereto annexed, is a statement containing the names 
of engineers temporarily employed on this Division for the fiscal 
year, both on ordinary and extraordinary repairs, together with an 
exhibit of the time of service and rate of compensation of each. 

Table No. 2, annexed, is an exhibit of the character and condition 
of the work under contract during the year. 

Table No. 3 is an exhibit of work of a miscellaneous character for 
which appropriations were made by the Legislature, but have not yet 
been ordered let by the Canal Board. 

Table No. 4 is an exhibit of like character, done under the super- 
vision of this department. 

During the fiscal year the total amount of work done under the 
supervision of this Department, not including ordinary repairs, is as 
follows : 



State Engineer on the Canals. 73 

Erie canal $262,492 96 

Genesee Valley canal » . . 16,392 21 

$279,885 17 

Total amount expended for engineering on both ordi- 
nary and extraordinary repairs $25,293 92 

Erie Canal. 
Ordinary Repairs. 

That portion of the Erie canal known as superintendents' sec- 
tions Nos. 10, 11 and 14, has been in charge of repair contractors ; 
Noe. 10 and 11, up to January 1, 1872, when the contracts 
expired, and No. 14 to June 1, 1872, when the repair contractor 
surrendered his contract, which surrender was accepted by the Canal 
Board on the 30th May, 1872. After the above named time, these 
sections, as well as sections Nos. 12 and 13, were kept in repair 
through the agency of superintendents. With the exception of a 
small break which, on the 10th day of August, occurred two miles 
east of Newark, and which was fully repaired in two days, no deten- 
tion to navigation occurred during the season, except on the Lake 
Erie level, between Buffalo and Black Eock. The exceedingly low 
water in Lake Erie varying during the entire season from fifteen to 
twenty-seven inches, seriously interfered with and delayed navigation 
on this part, and obliged owners to send their boats, during extreme 
low stages of water, down Niagara river to re-enter the canal at 
Tonawanda. 

Dredges were employed by the superintendent to lower the bed of 
the canal, which was done, except where rock occurred. The deepen- 
ing and improving of these portions are now under contract, and by 
opening of navigation in 1873 a sufficient depth of water will be 
secured to admit of the unobstructed moving of boats on the Lake Erie 
level. 

An additional appropriation of $150,000 is required to finish the 
division bank between the canal and Black Rock harbor, in order to 
make an independent canal of an average width of 125 feet, and with a 
depth of ten feet of water between Buffalo and Black Eock. The 
importance of this work of dividing the canal from Black Eock har- 
bor, which harbor is used principally as a mill-race, has often been 
set forth in the reports of the Canal Commissioner and my prede- 
cessors. 



74 Annual Eepokt of the 

Another serious defect on the above named level is, that the 
canal is made the main receiving sewer of the city of Buffalo. 
The peculiar location of the canal, running parallel with the Buffalo 
river and Lake Erie, cutting off nine-tenths of the territory which 
naturally would drain into said river and lake, the drainage now, by 
numerous sewers, empties into the canal, and it is found impossible, 
even with the aid of two powerful steam dredges, to remove the mate- 
rial so deposited in the prism of the canal and Black Rock harbor. 
I would therefore recommend the construction of a receiving sewer, 
running parallel with the canal and emptying into Niagara river at 
or near Albany street, by means of a tunnel or culvert under the 
canal and Black Bock harbor. Whether this sewer should be con- 
structed by the State or by the city, is a question of equity te be 
decided by the proper authorities. 

The navigation of the canal is also seriously affected by the diversion 
of its waters for mill purposes, and the experience of many years has 
strengthened my opinion, that the Erie canal has no surplus water at 
any time ; the modes adopted up to this time to prevent the unneces- 
sary waste of water have proved ineffective, and it is recommended 
that stringent laws, to prevent the diversion of any water from the 
Erie canal, for any purpose, be enacted by the Legislature. 

The accumulations of deposit in the Erie canal, from Lockport to 
Clyde, have been the source of many complaints from forwarders and 
boatmen. Several methods to remove the same, without seriously 
interfering with navigation, are proposed, principally the constructing 
and working of steam dredges, but there are serious objections 
to this plan. The accumulation of the deposit, except occasional 
bars, being on the foot and at the toe of vertical and slope walls, the 
present dredges in use could not be so operated as not to injure 
said walls on their foundation, and in consequence thereof would 
cause great injury to them. It is believed, however, that dredges 
may be constructed to avoid this danger, and that a ditch may 
be dredged below bottom some distance from the toe of the 
wall ; but even this will require great care so as not to injure the 
culverts and lining where it occurs. The material deposited on 
the wall may be scraped into the ditch by peculiarly constructed 
scrapers attached to a lighter or steam tug, but the cost of remov- 
ing these deposits by dredging will necessarily be large per ciibic yard, 
as the dredge will have to gfo over so large an area to get sufficient 
material in quantity for an ordinary day's work. 

The present mode of removing bars and deposit from the prism by 



State Engineer on the Canals. 75 

superintendents and contractors has not proved sufficiently effective, 
on account of the limited time during the interval' between the close 
and opening of navigation that work could be done, and the scarcity 
of laboring men at that part of the season. But, understanding that 
responsible and practical men believe and propose that they can 
remove said deposit from the prism of the canal at a less price than 
it can be moved in the ordinary way by steam dredges, it is respect- 
fully recommended that appropriation be made for that purpose. 

Extraordinary Hepairs. 

The following contracts have been completed during the fiscal year : 

Doubling guard lock at Black Bock. 

Receiver for White's creek near Wayneport. 

Extending, raising and strengthening division bank, Lower Black 
Bock. 

Deepening and improving Narrow canal, Black Bock harbor. 

Stop gate between Adams' basin and Spencerport. 

Improving and protecting discharge from. Newark waste-weir. 

Iron bridge near Leach's mill at Lyons. 

Stop gate in Erie canal at Holley. 

Crib work and vertical wall, and cutting off bend or projection in 
towing-path on guard-lock section, and clearing out mill-race, etc., at 
Black Bock. 

Constructing pipe sewer along Erie canal to State ditch, Tona- 
wanda. 

Inserting iron needle beams in bridges at Eagle harbor and Young's, 
near Lockport. 

Vertical wall and bridge across State ditch at Macedon. 

Constructing guard piers and protecting and securing swing bridge 
at Ferry street in Black Bock harbor. * 

Constructing iron road bridge over E. C. Transit street, Lockport. 

Constructing wrought-iron swing bridge over Child's slip, Bochester. 

Constructing waste-weir north side of Bochester aqueduct. 

Constructing retaining walls and piling and sheet-piling, 175 feet 
of dock in front of premises of Taylor & Crate, Ohio basin, Buffalo. 

Eepairing north bank of Erie canal along Tonawanda creek, town 
of Pendleton, and protection of highway. 

The condition of the remaining contracts on this division is fully 
set forth in table No. 2. 

The work of removing old bench walls between Lyons and Lock- 
ville is so far progressed that only seventy-three chains in length 



76 Annual Report of the 

remain to be removed ; and the work will be fully completed by the 
opening of navigation next spring. 

The work of deepening the Erie canal from first lock to Lyell street, 
Rochester, will not be finished this year on account of the water 
being retained in said part of the canal for protection against fire in 
the city of Rochester, pursuant to the resolution of the Canal Board. 

The doubling of the locks on this division is advanced as follows : 
The three locks at Lockville and the guard lock at Black Rock were 
completed previous to opening of navigation, and used during the past 
season. Lock Berlin, Poor-bouse lock, Pittsford lock, and lock No. 1, 
«ast of Rochester, it is hoped will be brought into use next spring. 
The work on the remaining six locks is progressing ; the stone will be 
all delivered by next June, and it is expected that all will be finished 
by the opening of navigation in 1874. Notwithstanding that the 
time for completing the contracts had expired nearly a year before 
my entering upon the duties of the office of division engineer, the 
undersigned, as well as the resident engineer in charge of the work, 
did not recommend the abandoning of the contracts for the following 
reasons : 

The terms of the contracts and the prices for the various items of 
work therein, were, all things considered, very favorable to the State ; 
being only about one-half or two-thirds the prices paid for the same 
kind of work in the years 1838 and 1841, on the western division. 
When the work of enlarging the Erie canal was begun, as reference 
to the final accounts on locks completed in those years show, 
common labor was not more than one-half, and mechanical labor less 
than one-half what it has been during the period covered by 
the contracts for the above work ; besides the difficulty of obtaining 
stone which naturally occurs, as quarries are more extensively worked, 
the severity of the past winter has added greatly to the expense of 
prosecuting all kinds of work necessary to the completion of these 
contracts. Further, the said contractors have at all times manifested 
a desire to finish their work under circumstances not very much to 
their advantage, and, as far as I am able to state, have, at all times, 
with due diligence, performed everything to the satisfaction of my pre- 
decessors, and in all respects according to the requirements of the 
said contract, except as to the time of completing the work. 

The difficulties encountered have been such as experienced con- 
tractors could hardly have been able to foresee, such as extremely cold 
winters and great trouble of protecting their work from water during 
the season of navigation. A large amount of time and money has 



State Engineer on the Canals. 77 

been consumed in protecting the new work from accidents which natu- 
rally result from the imprudence of boatmen and men employed about 
the locks in displacing coffer-dams, flooding and otherwise discommod- 
ing the contractors and causing delays impossible to be foreseen. All 
things being taken into consideration, I have come to the conclusion 
that it would have been unwise in me to have asked for the abandon- 
ment of the said contracts against the best interest of the State, as 
the work was being carried forward with reasonable dispatch, and in 
all respects well done as regards quality. Furthermore, I did not 
think, and still do not believe, that the work could have been relet to 
competent contractors at prices nearly so favorable as those of the 
present contracts. 

The delay in the completion of Sulphur Spring guard lock was 
occasioned by the non-delivery of the coping and cut stone. The 
work is now progressing and will be finished before the opening of 
navigation. 

The work for removing material from prism of canal on sections 
Nos. 207, 208, 209 and 212, as well as for reducing bottom of 
Erie canal on sections Nos. 277, 278, 282, 283, 285 and 286, has not 
been completed on account of the severity of the weather last winter 
and the difficulty in obtaining the necessary help. It is hoped that 
it will be completed before opening of navigation next spring. 

Work recommended to he done. 

Act chapter 766, Laws of 1870, appropriated the aum of $80,000 
for deepening and improving the Narrow canal in Black Rock harbor, 
and for cutting off bend on guard lock section, lower Black Rock. 
From this appropriation there remain unexpended $26,756.04. This, 
with the appropriation of last year, chapter 580, Laws of 1872, 
gives a total amount applicable to this work of $151,756.04. 

Under the present contract of E. B. Van Dusen, this is deemed 
sufficient to complete the improvement to 1,000 feet north of Ferry 
street, from this point to the intersection of the canal with Black 
Rock harbor, a distance of about 5,500 feet. A continuation of the 
work is recommended, for reasons set forth in another part of this 
report, and there should be appropriated this winter $150,000, so that 
this work may progress during the next summer. This amount will 
be sufficient to complete it, and every thing can be done during next 
season. I respectfully recommend an additional appropriation of 
$75,000 to continue the work of protecting the Erie canal against 
the encroachments of Lake Erie. 



78 Annual Report of the 

There remain on this Division twenty-one chains in length below 
the Poor-house lock, and fifty-two chains in length above said lock, a 
total of seventy-three chains in length of bench walls to be removed. 
This work is under contract and will be finished by next opening of 
navigation, bat will require an additional appropriation of $10,000 
to complete it 

In order to secure seven feet or more in depth of water between 
Lockport and the east line of Wayne county, I respectfully recom- 
mend the following improvements to be made. In fact the safe 
condition of navigation requires the banks in several places to be 
raised, even if the water should be kept at the same level it 
now has; and should the experiment of increasing the draft of 
boats be tried another year, then the improvements recommended 
will become absolutely indispensable. The estimated cost of the work 
to accomplish the above results is : 

1st. Raising berme bank and repairing vertical wall and docking 
in the village of Clyde, $3,000. 

2d. Raising tow-path between Clyde lock and Lyons with gravel, 
and raising berme bank at various places between said pointB, $9,000. 

3d. Reducing bottom nine inches below original canal bottom, 
from the head of upper Macedon lock to the east. line of the village 
of Fairport, being and including construction sections Nob. 245, 246, 
247, 248, 249, 250 and 251, $20,000. 

4th. Deepening the canal on sections Nos. 274, 275, 276, 327, 328, 
329, 330, 331 and 332 (partly both sections), $20,000. 

When the work above recommended and the contracts for deepen- 
ing other sections shall have been completed, then by strictly econo- 
mizing the water, it is believed that a depth of seven feet can be 
maintained on the entire Division. 

I respectfully recommend an appropriation of $25,000 for changing 
plans of bridges from wood to iron, and the replacing of wood needle 
beams by iron ones in iron superstructures where the old wood beams 
are broken or decayed, as it would not only be a pecuniary gain to the 
State on account of the largely decreased expense of maintaining the 
same, but it would also decrease the possibilities of accidents. 

" The Heath tumble-gate and platform, which were adopted in the 
construction of the new locks upon this Division, and which have 
been in use the past season in the three locks at Lockville, have 
proved entirely successful in their operation, working more rapidly 
and being much tighter than the old style of gates ; lockage is facili- 
tated, time and water saved, and as a natural sequence navigation is 



State Engineeb on the Canals. 79 

accelerated, and the capacity of the canal increased. I would, there- 
fore, recommend that in renewing the upper gates and miter sill plat- 
forms of the old locks (where the lift exceeds eight feet), the Heath 
tumble-gate and platform be substituted. The upper gates and plat- 
forms of the old Poor-house and lower Macedon locks are in a very 
defective condition, and have caused much delay to navigation the past 
season. I have, therefore, recommended the anticipation of an appro- 
priation of $4,500 for the purpose of making this improvement, and on 
the 5th day of December, 1872, the Board, by resolution, adopted my 
recommendation, and authorized the Commissioner in charge of the 
"Western Division to have said gates constructed ; I would, therefore, 
respectfully ask that an appropriation of $4,500 be made to pay for 
the insertion of said gates, and that a further appropriation of $10,000 
be made for inserting similar gates on other locks where deemed 
necessary on this Division. 

Genesee Valley Canal. 
OrdArmry Repairs. 

There was some delay in opening section Ko. 2 of said canal last 
spring. 

On the first of January last, during a flood in the Genesee river, 
the north abutment and pier next to it were tjarried out, together 
» with two stretches or spans of the Portage aqueduct. This abutment 
and pier were over forty feet in height, and the water, where the 
pier stood, some sixteen feet in depth. To restore the work in the 
shortest time and at the least expense to the State, it was concluded 
to rebuild the abutment, and put in iron trusses resting on said abut- 
ment, and the next pier to csarry the trunk of the aqueduct over said 
two stretches or spans, and thus save rebuilding said pier, which 
would be attended with great difficulty and expense. The work was 
commenced immediately and prosecuted with much -energy, although 
difficult of access, being in the deep gorge of the stream, and at the 
same time reaching high above the foundations of the structure. 

The stone for the high and heavy abutment had to be quarried 
on the opposite side of the river and carted around by a circuitous 
route over the road bridge, and thence down the slope of the hill to 
the work. The iron, timber, cement and other materials were also 
remote, having to be obtained at Buffalo, Tonawanda and Williams- 
ville, and this, together with the severity of the weather and acci- 
dents to the work, caused delays, so that it was not made ready 



80 Annual Report of the 

for navigation until the 22d of June, since which time, and for the 
balance of the season, no delays were experienced at that point. 

Notwithstanding the fact that railroads are now in operation in the 
vicinity, of the canal, and sometimes crossing it, and that others are 
being constructed and projected along its line, the canal is the property 
of the State and requires such reasonable provisions for its maintenance 
as may prevent the destruction of its usefulness. I respectfully 
recommend that a sufficient appropriation be made and placed at the 
disposal of the Commissioner in charge to put said canal in good 
navigable order, and repair its mechanical structures, to be done 
through the agency of superintendents or by contract, as he may 
deem best for the interest of the State. 

The work recommended is as follows: That in addition to the 
ordinary repairs done by superintendents, provision be made for bot- 
toming out said canal at the following points, viz. : 

From the brick-kiln near the rapids to the south end of the six- 
mile level, two miles; the eight-mile level, one mile; five-mile 
level, two and one-half miles; Portage level, six miles; between 
locks 68 and 69, one mile ; Fillmore level, one mile ; summit level at 
Cuba, twelve miles; in all twenty-eight and one-half miles, and 
requiring about 5,000 cubic yards to the mile, which, with raising the 
banks and making the following protections, will be apt to secure four 
feet of water another year. 

Embankment and Protection. 

From lock 11 to lock 60, sixteen miles ; the towing-path should be 
raised on an average of half a foot ; nine-mile level, Portage, wants 
constant watching and raising, as the banks are subsiding and sliding 
more or less all the time. The slide section will undoubtedly require 
some outlay; near lock 69, some 2,000 cubic yards of stone and 
brush protection ; Lent's farm, south of Lattice bridge, where the 
river channel has been changed and a long protection wall built, has 
long ago been carried away to a large extent, and the river is strug- 
gling to make its way back to the old original channel. To renew 
this protection will cost $30,000 or more. If neglected, a large amount 
in the way of damages will have to be paid to Mr. Leet, the owner 
of the land, and ultimately the canal itself will be endangered ; a few 
hundred cubic yards of protection on the Smith farm are also required. 

The tow-path should be raised about one foot for three-quarters <of 
a mile near Burnt Hill, above Olean ; also a small amount of protjec- 



State Engineer on the Canals. 81 

tion should be provided for to save the banks from the aetion of the 
waters of Oswayo creek. 

Bridges. 

Many of the bridges have been standing from twenty to thirty 
years, say sixty in number of this class, four-fifths of which are farm 
bridges and are liable to fall any day ; quite a large number fell dur- . 
ing the season and precipitated men and teams into the canal ; pro- 
vision should be mkde to rebuild these at once, as delaying so to do 
must endanger life and cause destruction of property. 

I would advise their construction on the original plan, sheath- 
ing them, as the life of the bridge is thereby prolonged three-fold. 
I would also recommend that when the bridges at the following points 
shall be rebuilt that iron ones be substituted, viz. : The Scottsville 
bridge, the Piffardinia bridge, the Ouylerville bridge, the lower Brush- 
ville bridge, the feeder bridge at Oramel. 

The lower bridge at Keyserville, on the Dans ville branch, should be 
abandoned and the road extended to the upper bridge, which, being 
rebuilt, will serve the, public better than both bridges do now, as 
thereby a level road will be secured and heavy approaches done away 
with. 

Aqueducts. 

By ordinary repairs all the aqueducts will hold out for some time 
to come, except the one at Portage, which will require a new trunk, 
all except the portion that was renewed last spring, and those parts 
repaired in previous years. At the Fillmore aqueduct, at least a 
portion of the south abutment will have to be taken down, the founda- 
tion repaired and stone work relaid. 

Lochs* 

On the Dansville branch, one stone lock and seven composite ones 
need thorough Repairing, the latter requiring new lining and more 
or less overhauling about the gates, quoins, valves, and about the head 
of the locks, which all leak badly. All the locks on the second super- 
intendent's section are going to decay, as to the gates, miter sills, 
quoin posts and valves. On an average, one new miter sill and one 
or more gates, new bottoming and lining in part or whole at each lock, 
will be required. 

There are sixty-two locks in all, including guard locks, and wind- 
lasses are necessarily used on all of them to open the head gates, and 
on many the lower gates also, so badly do they leak. The locks on 

TAssem. No. 17.1 6 



82 Annual Report of the 

the third superintendent's section are not all as bad, but the same 
imperfections exist in about half of them. 

Waste-weirs. 

The waste-weir near Cedar swamp, eight-mile level, should have new 
woodwork and be brought into use ; also, the one at Sackett's basin 
' should be taken up, relaid and reduced in size — say to a ten-foot 
waste — it being now thirty feet and wholly abandoned. A new waste- 
weir should be built at or near the south end of Portage aqueduct, as the 
one near Dunn's is out of use. The stone could be taken for building 
the one proposed and is on the same level ; also, the one on the four- 
mile level at Fillmore should be repaired. 

Culverts. 

I think, with the culverts now under contract ^completed, and all 
the old ones repaired and cleaned out, the Genesee Valley canal will 
be very well provided for in this respect. 

The work of repairs, specifically referred to, I consider absolutely 
necessary to secure reasonably good navigation during the coming 
year. Work and structures not specifically alluded to, I think, will 
pass with ordinary repairs. Generally speaking, all the aqueducts, 
including the Ischua feeder, will require more or less overhaul- 
ing. In order to maintain navigation this season, the levels have 
been kept very high, the Cuba and Portage levels in particular. With 
ordinary repairs the feeders and dams will do for some time longer. 

Extraordinary Bepaws. 

During the past yd&r there, has not been a large amount of new 
work under contract on this canal. Table No. 2, hereto annexed^will 
sufficiently define its character, extent and progress. 

The following contracts for work on this canal have been settled 
during the year: Deepening Summit level, from lock No. 97 to 
eptrance of feeder, Oil Creek reservoir; clearing out channel of 
Baird's creek below aqueduct ; iron bridge at Fillmore ; iron bridge 
at Hinsdale ; iron bridge at Canawaugus ; iron bridge at Cummings- 
ville; protecting Genesee Valley canal against encroachments of 
Geoesee river about three-quarters of a mile south of Portageville : 
raising dam, embankment of Oil Creek reservoir and facing same with 
loose stone. 

At the last session of the Legislature an appropriation oi 
$10,000 was made for conveying the water of Loon lake into the 



Staje Engineer on the Canals. 83 

Dansville branch as a feeder; that sum will probably be sufficient 
to construct an outlet and bulk-head sufficient to guard a surface 
rise in said lake above the usual surface level of five feet, and to 
drain it down five feet, thereby utilizing about ten ^feet of the 
surface water of said lake, it having an area of about 200 acres. It 
is situated on a summit, about 1,000 feet above the canal at Dansville 
and about eleven miles from said village. It has no visible outlet or 
inlet, unless we call by that name a dry channel of a small creek 
about two miles long upon the south side. 

Heavy rains and deep snows may fill the lake once a year to its 
usual level ; should it ever fill to any extent, say five feet above its 
usual level, in that case, by the improvement contemplated, ten feet 
in depth of its water area could be let down into the Dansville branch. 
I have reason to believe that its sources of supply are from bottom 
springs, and are no more than equal to its evaporation and to the 
underground outlets, that many believe to exist. 

Act chapter 930, Laws of 1871, appropriates $10,000 for moving 
lock No. 44 at Nunda. 

The work contemplated is estimated to cost $32,000. The law 
debars the Canal Commissioner from letting the work until a sufficient 
appropriation shall have been made to complete the same in full ; 
consequently, no action has been taken in the matter. Should the 
Legislature desire the work to be done, I respectfully recommend. the 
reappropriation of the $10,000, and an additional appropriation of 
$22,000 for that purpose. 

RECAPITULATION OF APPROPRIATIONS RECOM- 
MENDED TO BE MADE. 

Erie Canal. 

Continuing the work of constructing division bank and 
otherwise improving the canal in Black Rock harbor, $150>000 

Continuing the work for protecting the canal against 

encroachments of Lake Erie 75 ? 000 

■ Continuing the work of removing bench walls and con- 
structing slope wall and pavement between Lyons 
and Locfcville, and for the completion of other exist- 
ing contracts 10>000 

Changing plans of bridges on the Erie canal 25 , 000 

Raising berme bank and repairing vertical wall and 

docking in the village of Clyde 3>000 

Raising towing-path between tllyde lock to Lyons with 
gravel and raising berme bank at various places 
between said points 9>000 



84 Annual Report of the 

Reducing bottom nine inches below original canal bot- 
tom, from the head of upper Macedon locks to Fair- 
port (sections Nos. 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 250 and 
251) : $20,000 

Deepening/ the canal on sections Nos. 274, 275, 276, 

327, 328, 329, 330, 831 and 332 20,000 

Inserting Heath's tumble-gates in old locks 14,500 

Genesee Valley Canal. 

An additional appropriation for moving lock No. 44 at 

Nunda and the work connected with the same 22,000 

Rebuilding five wooden road bridges of iron 15 , 000 

Respectfully submitted. 

J. FRED. BEHN, 
Division Engineer, Western Division. 



State Engineer on the Canals. 



85 



TABLE No. 1. 

STATEMENT showing name, number of days and compensation of 
engineers upon the repairs of the Western Division of the New York 
State Canals, together with incidental expenses during the fiscal year 
ending September 30tfA, 1872, under act chap. 169, Laws of 1863. 

ERIE CANAL-REPAIRS. 



NAMES. 



Daniel Richmond. 
Daniel Richmond. 

J. Fred. Behn 

J. Fred. Behn 

J. Nelson Tubbs.. 
J. Nelson Tubbs.. 
Byron M. Hanks.. 
Byron M. Hanks.. 



Nature of service. 



Division 

Division 

Division 

Division 

Resident 

Resident 

Resident 

Resident 



engineer 

engineer 

engineer 

engineer 

engineer 

engineer 

engineer 

engineer . . . 



Nnmber 

of 

days. 



i 



Salary .. . 
Travel 
Salary .... 

Travel 

Salary 

Travel 

Salary 

Travel... 



Rate of 
compensation. 



$2,400 
6 cts. per mile 

2,400 
6 cts. per mile 

2,000 
6 cts. per mile 

2,000 
6 cts. per mile 



Amount. 



Stationery 

Fuel, light and office rent 
Postage and telegraph. . . . 
Miscellaneous 



Incidental expenses. 
* 



Total for Erie canal 



Daniel Richmond. 
Daniel Richmond. 

J. Fred. Behn 

J.Fred. Behn 

J. Nelson Tubbs.. 
J. Nelson Tubbs.. 
Byron M. Hanks.. 
Byron M. Hanks. . 



GENESEE VALLEY 

Division engineer 

Division engineer 

Division engineer. . . . 
Division engineer. . . . 
Resident engineer 
Resident engineer ... 

. Resident engineer 

Resident engineer 



CANAL-REPAIRS. 
Salary .... 



$577 77 

216 84 

1,022 23 

682 84 
•637 02 
184 26 
814 81 
328 86 



Total. 



$236 77 
688 70 
187 16 
195 30 



$4,264 63 



1,206 93 



$5,471 56 



Travel 

Salary .... 
Travel .... 
Salary 
Travel .... 
Salary 
Travel ... 



$2,400 
6 cts. per mile 

2,400 
6 cts. per mile 

2,000 
6 cts. per mile 

2,000 
6 cts. per mile 



Stationery 

Fuel, light and office rent 
Postage and telegraph. .» . 
Miscellaneous 



Incidental expenses. 



Total for Genesee Valley canal. 



$288 89 
45 24 
511 11 
149 40 
240 75 
53 62 
407 42 
282 50 




$1,928 88 



598 78 



$2,527 61 



Erie canal 

Genesee Valley canal 



Recapitulation. 



$5,471 56 
2,527 61 

$7,999 17 



86 



. Annual Keport of the 



TABLE No. 1— {Continued). 

STATEMENT showing the assistants temporarily employed on ordi- 
nary repairs, and paid by the Canal Commissioner, during the fiscal 
year ending September 30tfA, 1872. 

ERIE CANAL-ORDINARY REPAIRS. 



NAMES. 


Nature of service. 


Number 

of 

days. 


Rate of 
compensa- 
tion. 


Amount. 


Total. 


\ L. L. Nichols (water but.). 
George Arnoldt 


Assistant engineer 

Inspector 


16 
9 
28 
18 
50 
3 mo. 


$6 00 
600 
5 50 
260 
2 60 

60 00 


$96 00 
64 00 

154 00 
45 00 

125 00 

180 00 




T. R. Perry 




S. T. Oviatt 

S. T. Oviatt 


Inspector 


$654 00 







GENESEE VALLEY CANAL-ORDINARY REPAIRS. 



H. V. B. Barker. . . 
Thomas Evershed 

Byron Holley 

George Arnoldt. . . 
E. A. Judd 



Assistant engineer. 
Assistant engineer. 
Assistant engineer. 
Assistant engineer. 
Rodman 



79 

26 

6 

4 

90 



$5 50 
5 50 
550 
600 
300 



$434 50 

143 00 

. 33 00 

24 00 

90 00 



$724 50 



Erie canal 

Genesee Valley canal. 



Recapitulation. 



$654 00 
724 50 



$1,378 50 



TABLE No. 1 — {Continued). 

STATEMENT showing the assistants temporarily employed on 
ext/raordvna/ry repairs and paid by the Canal Commissioner 
during the year ending September 30tfA, 1872. 

ERIE CANAL— EXTRAORDINARY REPAIRS. 



NAMES. 



J. Nelson Tubbs.. 
George Arnoldt. . . 

Byron Holley 

Byron Holley 

.J. Fred. Behn . . . . 
'J. Fred. Behn .... 
Thomas Evershed 

John Bisgood 

JohnBisgood .... 

R.V. Arnoldt 

R. V. Arnoldt .... 
W. P. Devening . . 
W. P. Devening . . 
A. W. Barrett 
A. W.Barrett.... 
O. W. Nichols 
O.W.Nichols.... 



Nature of service. 



Assistant engineer 

Assistant engineer 

Assistant engineer. . . . 

Assistant engineer 

Assistant engineer. . . . 

Assistant engineer 

Assistant engineer 

Assistant engineer. . . . 

Draughtsman 

Draughtsman 

Draughtsman 

Leveler and surveyor. . 
Leve er and surveyor. . 

Leveler 

Leveler 

Rodman 

Rodman 






o 



83 

215 

230 

68 

36 

78 

24 

69 

204 

147 

139 

53 

83 

79 

234 

116 

20 









$6 00 
600 
600 
5 50 
600 
5 50 
550 
600 



50 
50 
00 
50 
00 
25 
00 
50 
00 



a 

d 

o 

a 
< 



$498 00 

1,290 00 

1,880 00 

374 00 

216 00 

429 00 

132 00 

414 00 

1,122 00 

514 50 

556 00 

238 50 

882 00 

835 75 

986 00 

406 Op 

80 00 



3 

o 



State Engineer on the Canals. 



87 



TABLE No. 1 — (Continued). 

ERIE CANAL— EXTRAORDINARY REPAIRS. 



NAMES. 



G.W.Clark .... 

E. A. Judd 

E. A. Judd 

A. C. Bowen 

George Heath . . 
L. H. Spencer . . . 

JohnHausle 

Jacob Schaub. . 
Jacob Schaub..., 
T. D. Spaulding , 

John Miller 

S. M. Burbank... 
A. H. Towar....: 

John Rodney 

Charles H. Owen 



Nature of service. 



Rodman 

Chairman 

Chainman 

Tapeman 

Mechanical inspector 
Mechanical inspector 

Inspector 

Inspector 

Inspector 

Inspector 

Inspector 

Inspector 

Inspector 

Inspector 

Inspector 





A . 


00 

>» 

OS 

C 

• 

o 
5 


•ft 

£ © 

s 


227 


2 50 


43 


3 00 


142 


2 50 


94 


2 50 


12 


5 50 


120 


500 


209 


4 00 


157 


4 00 


38 


3 50 


40 


8 50 


183 


300 


168 


300 


40 


8 00 


19 


3 00 


18 


300 



O 



567 50 
129 00 
855 00 
235 00 
66 00 
600 00 
836 00 
628 00 
133 00 
140 00 
549 00 
504 00 
120 00 
57 00 
54 00 



GENESEE VALLEY CANAL— EXTRAORDINARY REPAIRS. 



George Arnoldt 

Byron Holley 

Byron Holley 

H. V. B. Barker.... 

John Bisgood 

John Bisgood 

R. V. Arnoldt 

R. V. Arnoldt 

W. P. Devening 
W. P. Devening.... 

O. W. Nichols 

O.W.Nichols 

E. A. Jndd 

E. A. Jndd 

A. C. Bowen 

H. V. B. Barker, Jr. 



Assistant engineer. . . . 
Assistant engineer. . . . 

Assistant engineer 

Assistant engineer 

Assistant engineer. . . . 

Draughtsman 

Draughtsman 

Draughtsman 

Leveler and surveyor. . 
Leveler and surveyor. . 

Rodman 

Rodman 

Chainman 

Chainman 

Tapeman 

Axman 



85 


$6 00 


11 


5 50 


5 


6 00 


91 


5 50 


10 


6 00 


12 


550 


18 


4 00 


9 


3 50 


26 


4 50 


21 


4 00 


10 


400 


5 


8 50 


5 


3 00 


5 


2 50 


5 


2 50 


80 


200 



$510 00 
60 50 
30 00 

500 50 
60 00 
66 00 
72 00 
81 50 

117 00 
84 00 
40 00 
17 50 
15 00 
12 50 
12 50 
60 00 



Erie canal 

Genesee Valley canal 



Becapilidation. 



© 



$14,227 25 



$1,689 00 



$14,227 25 
1,689 00 



$15,916 25 



Summary of Table No. 1, 
Showing engineering expenses for fiscal year ending Sept. 30, 1872. 



NAMES OP CANALS. 


Engineering 
proper. 


Incidental 
expenses. 


Amount. 


Total. 


Repairs proper, Erie canal 


$4,264 68 
1,928 88 

654 00 
724 50 

14,227 25 
1,689 00 


$1,208 93 

598 78 


$5,471 56 
2,527 61 




Repairs proper, Genesee Valley canal 


$7,999 17 


Repairs, ordinary, Erie canal 


$654 00 
724 50 


Repairs, ordinary, Genesee Valley canal 










1,378 50 
15,916 25 


Repairs, extraordinary, Erie canal .*. 

Repairs, extraordinary, Genesee Valley canal. 


$14,227 25 
1,689 00 






Total 


$25,293 92 









Ansual Report of 



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92 Anwual Rkpobt of the State Enqinekb on the Canals. 



TABLE No. 8. 

Statement of miscellaneous work for which appropriations were 
made by the Legislature, but not ordered to be let by the Canal Board. 

Ebie Canal. 

Reconstructing protection railing of iron on berme protection wall 
along South St. Paul street in the city of Rochester. 

Constructing a road bridge over Tonawanda creek at or near Bush's 
place, connecting with Sawyer's Creek road at Martinsville. 

Genesee Valley Canal. 

For conveying water from Loon lake by discharging the same 
through Mill creek into the canal at Dansville, for the purpose of sup- 
plying water to that branch of the Genesee Valley canal, and as a 
feeder to the Erie canal at Rochester. 

TABLE No. 4. 

STATEMENT showing amount of work done under the super- 
vision of the Engineer Department on miscellaneous repairs, 
authorized by the Canal Board and Canal Commissioners, and 
amount paid thereon during the fiscal year ending September 
30,1872. 



— — — *■ 

DESCRIPTION OP WORK. 


Amount 
appropriated. 


Total amount 
done. 


Amount paid 
during year. 


Dredging in Erie basin, city of Buffalo 


$2,320 00 

3,500 00 
2,000 00 

1,600 00 


$2,820 00 

8,051 00 
1,776 80 

1,500 00 


$2,820 00 


Changing towing-path and improving line of canal 
along nigh clay bluff 


554 12 


Waste-weir on three-mile level, east of Brighton. . . 

Constructing vertical wall opposite Thos. Hodge's 

quarry, Albion, Orleans county. 


229 80 
1,500 00 












$4,603 92 











I