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Similar Curves With Variable Transformations 



Mostafa F. El-Sabbagh 
Mathematics Department, Faculty of Science, 
Minia University, Minia, Egypt. 
E-mail: msabbagh52@yahoo.com 

Ahmad T. Ali * 
Mathematics Department, 
Faculty of Science, Al-Azhar University, 
Nasr City, 11448, Cairo, Egypt. 
E-mail: atali71@yahoo.com 

September 6, 2009 



Abstract 

In this paper, we define a new family of curves and call it a family of similar curves 
with variable transformation or briefly SA-curves. Also we introduce some character- 
izations of this family and we give some theorems. This definition introduces a new 
classification of a space curve. Also, we use this definition to deduce the position vec- 
tors of plane curves, general helices and slant helices, as examples of a similar curves 
with variable transformation. 

Math. Sub. Class. 2000: 53C40, 53C50 
Keywords: Classical differential geometry; general helix; slant helices; Intrinsic equa- 
tions, similar curves. 



1 Introduction 

In the local differential geometry, we think of a curve as a geometric set of points, or locus. 
Intuitively, we are thinking of a curve as the path traced out by a particle moving in E 3 . 
So, investigating position vector of the curve is a classical aim to determine behavior of 
the particle (curve). 

'Corresponding author. 



1 



From the view of differential geometry, a straight line is a geometric curve with the curva- 
ture k(s) = 0. A plane curve is a family of geometric curves with torsion r(s) = 0. Helix 
is a geometric curve with non-vanishing constant curvature k and non- vanishing constant 
torsion r [4]. The helix may be called a circular helix or W -curve [10]. It is known that 
straight line (k(s) = 0) and circle (k(s) = a, r(s) = 0) are degenerate-helices examples 
[12]. In fact, circular helix is the simplest three-dimensional spirals [6]. 

A curve of constant slope or general helix in Euclidean 3-space E 3 is defined by the property 
that the tangent makes a constant angle with a fixed straight line called the axis of the 
general helix. A classical result stated by Lancret in 1802 and first proved by de Saint 
Venant in 1845 (see [21] for details) says that: A necessary and sufficient condition that a 
curve be a general helix is that the ratio 

T 
K 

is constant along the curve, where k and r denote the curvature and the torsion, respec- 
tively. General helices or inclined curves are well known curves in classical differential 
geometry of space curves [16] and we refer to the reader for recent works on this type of 
curves [1, 8, 17, 22]. 

Izumiya and Takeuchi [11] have introduced the concept of slant helix by saying that the 
normal lines make a constant angle with a fixed straight line. They characterize a slant 
helix if and only if the geodesic curvature of the principal image of the principal normal 
indicatrix ^ 

a = ( K 2 + r 2)3/2 (-) 

is a constant function. Kula and Yayli [13] have studied spherical images of tangent 
indicatrix and binormal indicatrix of a slant helix and they showed that the spherical 
images are spherical helices. Recently, Kula et al. [14] investigated the relation between a 
general helix and a slant helix. Moreover, they obtained some differential equations which 
are characterizations for a space curve to be a slant helix. 

A family of curves with constant curvature but non-constant torsion is called Salkowski 
curves and a family of curves with constant torsion but non-constant curvature is called 
anti- Salkowski curves [19]. Monterde [18] studied some characterizations of these curves 
and he proved that the principal normal vector makes a constant angle with fixed straight 
line. So that: Salkowski and anti-Salkowski curves are the important examples of slant 
helices. 

A unit speed curve of constant precession in Euclidean 3-space E 3 is defined by the property 
that its (Frenet) Darboux vector 

W =tT+kB 



2 



revolves about a fixed line in space with constant angle and constant speed. A curve of 
constant precession is characterized by having 



I 1 

K = — 

m 


sin[/i s], 


r - — 

m 


cos[/U s 


/i 

K = — 

m 


cos [fj, s] , 


T ~ — 

m 


s'm[fi s 



where and m are constants. This curve lies on a circular one-sheeted hyperboloid 

x 2 + y 2 — m 2 z 2 = Am 2 

The curve of constant precession is closed if and only if n = ^==5 is rational [20]. Kula 

and Yayli [13] proved that the geodesic curvature of the spherical image of the principal 
normal indicatrix of a curve of constant precession is a constant function equals —m. So 
we may say that: the curves of constant precessions are the important examples of slant 
helices. 

Many important results in the theory of curves in E 3 were initiated by G. Monge and 
G. Darboux pioneered the moving frame idea. Thereafter, F. Frenet defined his moving 
frame and his special equations which play important role in mechanics and kinematics as 
well as in differential geometry [5]. 

In this work, we define a new family of curves and we call it a family of similar curves with 
variable transformation or in brief SA-curves. Also, we introduce some characterizations 
of this family and give some theorems. This definition introduces a new classification of a 
space curve. In the last of this paper, we use this definition to deduce the position vectors 
of some important special curves. We hope these results will be helpful to mathematicians 
who are specialized on mathematical modeling as well as other applications of interest. 



2 Preliminaries 

In Euclidean space E 3 , it is well known that to each unit speed curve with at least four 
continuous derivatives, one can associate three mutually orthogonal unit vector fields T, 
N and B are respectively, the tangent, the principal normal and the binormal vector fields 
[9]. 

We consider the usual metric in Euclidean 3-space E 3 , that is, 

(, ) = dx\ + dx\ + dx\, 

where (x\, X2, X3) is a rectangular coordinate system of E 3 . Let ijj : I C R — > E 3 , tp = i/j(s), 
be an arbitrary curve in E 3 . The curve tp is said to be of unit speed (or parameterized by 
the arc-length) if (ip'(s),ip'(s)) = 1 for any s G /. In particular, if ijj(s) / for any s, then 



3 



it is possible to re-parameterize ip, that is, a = ip((/)(s)) so that a is parameterized by the 
arc-length. Thus, we will assume throughout this work that ip is a unit speed curve. 

Let {T(s), N(s), B(s)} be the moving frame along ip, where the vectors T,N and B 
are mutually orthogonal vectors satisfying (T, T) = (N,N) = (B,B) = 1. The Frenet 
equations for -ip are given by ([21]) 



T'(s) - 




k(s) 




r t(«) i 


N'( S ) 




— k(s) t(s) 




N(a) 


B'(5) 




-r(s) 




B(») 



If r(s) = for all s £ I, then B(s) is a constant vector V and the curve ip lies in a 2- 
dimensional affine subspace orthogonal to V, which is isometric to the Euclidean 2-space 
E 2 . 



3 Position vector of a space curve 

The problem of the determination of parametric representation of the position vector of 
an arbitrary space curve according to its intrinsic equations is still open in the Euclidean 
space E 3 [7, 15]. This problem is not easy to solve in general case. However, this problem is 
solved in three special cases only, Firstly, in the case of a plane curve (r = 0) . Secondly, in 
the case of a helix (k and r are both non- vanishing constant). Recently, Ali [2, 3] adapted 
fundamental existence and uniqueness theorem for space curves in Euclidean space E 3 and 
constructed a vector differential equation to solve this problem in the case of a general 
helix is constant) and in the case of a slant helix 




where m = ^j=g , n = cos[0] and <fi is the constant angle between the axis of a slant helix 
and the principal normal vector. However, this problem is not solved in other cases of 
space curves. 

Now we describe this problem within the following theorem: 

Theorem 3.1. Let ip = ip(s) be an unit speed curve parameterized by the arclength s. 
Suppose ip = Y>(0) is another parametric representation of this curve by the parameter 
9 = j n(s)ds. Then, the tangent vector T satisfies a vector differential equation of third 
order as follows: 



4 



where f(9) 



r(8) 



Proof. Let ip = ^>(s) be a unit speed curve. If we write this curve in another parametric 
representation ip = tp(6), where = J n(s)ds, we have new Frenet equations as follows: 



(4) 



where f{6) = ^||y. If we substitute the first equation of the new Frenet equations (4) to 
second equation of (4), we have 



" T'(0) " 




1 




" T(0) ' 


N'(0) 




-1 f{6) 




N(0) 


. B'(0) . 




-/(0) 




. B(f) . 



B(0) 



f(0) 



T"(0) +T(0) 



(5) 



Substituting the above equation in the last equation from (4), we obtain a vector differ- 
ential equation of third order (3) as desired. 

The equation (3) is not easy to solve in general case. If one solves this equation, the 
natural representation of the position vector of an arbitrary space curve can be determined 
as follows: 

ip(s) = J T(s)ds + C, (6) 



or in parametric representation 



k(6) 



T(0) d6 + C, 



(7) 



where = f K,(s)ds and C is a constant vector. 



4 Similar curves with variable transformations 

Definition 4.1. Let if) a (s a ) and ipp(sp) be two regular curves in parameterized by 
arclengths s a and sp with curvatures n a and up, torsion r a and Tp and Frenet frames 
{T a , N a , B a } and {Tp, Np, Bp} . tp a (s a ) and ipp(sp) are called similar curves with vari- 
able transformation A^j if there exist a variable transformation 

s a = J \ a p(sp)dsp (8) 

of the arclengths such that the tangent vectors are the same for the two curves i.e., 

Tp(sp) = T a {s a ), (9) 



5 



for all corresponding values of parameters under the transformation A«. 

Here A^j is arbitrary function of the arclength. It is worth noting that A^A« = 1. All curves 
satisfy equation (9) are called a family of similar curves with variable transformations. If 
we integrate the equation (9) we have the following important theorem: 

Theorem 4.2. The position vectors of the family of similar curves with variable trans- 
formations can be written in the following form: 

M S P) = J T a (8 a (8{,j) dsp = J T a [s^\ids p . (10) 

Theorem 4.3. Let ip a ( s a) and ipp(sp) be two regular curves in E 6 . Then ip a (s a ) and 
ipp(sp) are similar curves with variable transformation if and only if the principal normal 
vectors are the same for all curves 

Np(sp) = N a (s a ), (11) 
under the particular variable transformation 



x , ds l = ^ 
ds a Kp 



of the arc-lengths. 



Proof. (=>) Let ip a {s a ) and ij)p(sp) be two regular similar curves with variable transfor- 
mations in E 3 . Differentiating the equation (9) with respect to sp we have 

ds a 

Kp(sp)Np(sp) = K a (s a )N a (s a )-^. (13) 
The above equation leads to the two equations (11) and (12). 

(<=) Let ipaisa) and ipp(sp) be two regular curves in E 3 satisfying the two equations (11) 
and (12). If we multiply equation (12) by np(sp) and integrate the result with respect to 
sp we have 

J Kp(sp)Np(sp)dsp = J Kp(sp)Np(sp)^-ds a . (14) 
From the equations (11) and (12), equation (14) takes the form 

J np(sp)'Np(sp)dsp = J K a (s a )~N a (s a )ds a , (15) 

which leads to (9) and the proof is complete. 



6 



Theorem 4.4. Let ijj a {s a ) and ^p{sp) be two regular curves in E 3 . Then ip a (s a ) and 
ipp(sp) are similar curves with variable transformation if and only if the binormal vectors 
are the same, i.e., 

Bp(sp) = B a (s a ), (16) 

under arbitrary variable transformations sp = sp(s a ) of the arclengths. 

Proof. (=>) Let Y>a(s a ) and ^p^p) be two regular similar curves with variable transfor- 
mations in E 3 . Then there exists a variable transformation of the arclengths such that the 
tangent vectors and the principal normal vectors are the same (definition 4.1 and theorem 
4.3). From equations (9) and (11) we have 

B^) = Tp{sp) x Np{sp) = T a (s a ) x N a {s a ) = B a (s a ). (17) 

(<^=) Let Va(-Sa) and ipp(sp) be two regular curves in E 3 which the same binormal vector 
under the arbitrary variable transformation sp = sp(s a ) of the arclengths. If we differen- 
tiate the equation (16) with respect to sp we have 

ds 

-Tp(sp)Np(sp) = - Ta (s a )N a (s a )-^. (18) 

asp 

The above equation leads to the following two equations 

Np(sp)=N a (s a ), (19) 
From equations (16) and (19) we have 

Tp{sp) = Np(sp) x Bp{sp) = N a (s a ) x B a (s a ) = T a (s a ). (20) 
The proof is complete. 

Theorem 4.5. Let ip a {s a ) and tpp(sp) be two regular curves in _E 3 . Then ipa( s a) and 
vpp(sp) are two similar curves with variable transformation if and only if the ratios of 
torsion and curvature are the same for all curves 

^(Sp ) K Q (s a )' 

under the particular variable transformations (Xa = ^ = j^) keeping equal total curva- 
tures, i.e., 

Opisp) = j npdsp = j n a ds a = d a (s a ). (22) 

of the arclengths. 



7 



Proof. Let tp a (s a ) and tp a ( s f3) are two similar curves with variable transformation. Then 
there exists a variable transformation of the arclengths such that the tangent and the bi- 
normal vectors are the same (definition 4.1 and theorem 4.4). Differentiating the equations 
(9) and (16) we have 

ds 

Kp(sp)Np(sp) = n a (s a )N a (s a )—^, (23) 

asp 

ds 

-Tp(sp)Np(sp) = - Ta (s a )N a (s a )-^. (24) 

asp 

which leads to the following two equations 

ds 

Kp(sp) = K a (s a )—^. (25) 
asp 

rp(sp) = T a (s a )^. (26) 

The variable transformation (21) is the equation (25) after integration. Dividing the above 
two equations (26) and (25), we obtain the equation (21) under the variable transforma- 
tions (22). 

(<=) Let tpa(sa) and tpp(sp) be two curves such that the equation (21) is satisfied under the 
variable transformation (22) of the arclengths. From theorem (3.1), the tangent vectors 
T a (s a ) and Tp(sp) of the two curves satisfy vector differential equations of third order as 
follows: 

(ik™)' + ( 1 7fr) T ""'» ) - iM™ = °- <27> 

where f a (0 a ) = ^^j, fp{0p) = ^^y, a = f K a (s a ) ds a and 9p = J Kp(sp) dsp. 
The equation (21) leads to 

fp(0p) = fa{0 a ), (29) 

under the variable transformations dp = 9 a . So that the two equations (27) and (28) 
under the equation (21) and the transformation (22) are the same. Hence the solution is 
the same, i.e., the tangent vectors are the same which completes the proof of the theorem. 



5 New classifications of curves 

In this section, we will apply our definition of similar curves with variable transformations 
to deduce the position vectors of some special curves. First we can call the two curves 



8 



ip a (s a ) and tpp(sp) similar curves with variable transformation if and only if there exists 
an arbitrary function A^j = such that the curvature and torsion of the curve ipp are 
the curvature and torsion of the curve i[> a multiplied by this arbitrary function i,e., 

Kp = K a \p, Tp = T a \p. (30) 

Class 1. If the curve is straight line then the curvature is k = 0. Under the variable 
transformation A the curvature does not change. So we have the following lemma: 

Lemma 5.1. The straight line alone forms a family of similar curves with variable trans- 
formation. 

Class 2. If the curve is a plane curve then the torsion is r a = 0. Under the variable 
transformation A the torsion does not change. So we have the following lemma: 

Lemma 5.2. The family of plane curves forms a family of similar curves with variable 
transformations. 



We can deduce the position vector of a plane curve using the definition of similar curves 
with variable transformation as follows: 

The simplest example of a plane curve is a circle of radius 1. The natural representation 
of this circle can be written in the form: 



4>a(u) = (sin[u],-cos[u],o), 



(31) 



where s a — u is the arclength of the circle and the curvature is K a (u) = 1. The tangent 
vector of this circle takes the form: 



T Q (n) = ^ cos[u], sin [it], 0^ . 
From theorem (4.2) we can write any plane curve as the following: 



cos 



us 



, sin 



u[s] ,0^ds. 



where sp = s. From the equation (30), we have 



K/3 



ds a = A^ dsp = — dsp. 



Sa{Sf3) = / — dsp. 

If we put the curvature up = k(s) (sp = s), we have 

u(s) = J k(s) ds. 



(32) 

(33) 

(34) 
(35) 

(36) 



9 



Then the position vector of the plane curve with arbitrary curvature n(s) takes the fol- 
lowing form: 



cos 



k(s) ds 



, sin 



ds. 



(37) 



which is the position vector of a plane curve introduced in [15]. 

Class 3. If the curve ip a is a general helix (^ — to), where to is a constant, in the form 
to = cot[</>] and cj> is the angle between the tangent vector and the axis of the helix. Then 
any similar curve ipp with this helix has the the property ^ = to. So that we have the 
following lemma: 

Lemma 5.3. The family of general helices with fixed angle (ft between the axis of a general 
helix and the tangent vector forms a family of similar curves with variable transformations. 



We can deduce the position vector of a general helix using the definition of similar curves 
with variable transformations as follows: 

The simplest example of a general helix is a circular helix or M^-curve. The natural 
representation of a circular helix is: 



ipa(u) = 1 — n 2 sin[u], —\J 1 — n 2 cos[u],n«j , 



(38) 



where u is the arclength of the circular helix and n = cos [<fi], where (f> is the constant angle 
between the tangent vector and the axis of a circular helix. The curvature of this circular 
helix is n a (u) = \/\ — n 2 . The tangent vector of this curve takes the form: 



T a (u) = [\J 1 — n 2 cos[u], \J\ — n 2 sm[u],nj . 
From theorem (4.2) we can write any general helix as the following: 

ipp(s) -- 



r cos 



U[Sj 



sm 



uls 



n)ds. 



From equation (35) we have 



u(s) 



Vl — n' 



ds. 



(39) 



(40) 



(41) 



where Kp = n(s), (sp = s). Then the position vector of the general helix with arbitrary 
curvature k(s) takes the following form: 



1> 



n 2 cos 



k(s) 



Vl — n- 



-ds 



, y/l - n 2 sin [ f K ^ =ds] , n) ds. (42) 
L J v 1 — n 2 - 1 ' 



which is the position vector of a general helix introduced in [2]. 



10 



Class 4. If the curve is a slant helix then the relation (2) between the torsion and 
curvature is satisfied. Let ip a and ipg be two slant helices such that the transformation 
(22) is satisfied. Using the relation (2) and (22), it is easy to prove that: 

T£ m9p mOg _ Ta_ 

where m is a constant value, m = cot[<p] and 4> is the angle between the principal normal 
vector and the axis of a slant helix. So that we have the following lemma: 

Lemma 5.4. The family of a slant helices with fixed angle 4> between the axis of a slant 
helix and the principal normal vector forms a family of similar curves with variable trans- 
formation. 



Now, we can deduce the position vector of a slant helix using the definition of similar 
curves with variable transformations as follows: 

The simplest example of a slant helix is Salkowski curve [3, 18, 19]. The explicit parametric 
representation of a Salkowski curve ip a (u) = (^i(«),^2(u),^3(u)) takes the form: 



Mu) = 

, Mu) = i^cos[2nt], 



71- 1 



fl cos[(2n + l)t] + |±J_ cos [(2n - l)i] - 2cos[t] 
sin[(2n + l)t] - ^_ sin[(2n _ i) t ] - 2 sm[t] 



(43) 



where t = ^arcsin(mu), m = ^/j=f , n = cos[0] and </> is the constant angle between the 
axis of a slant helix and the principal normal vector. The curvature of the above curve is 
1 and the torsion is 

. mu 
r(«) = tan[nt] = == ■ 
V 1 — m z u z 

It is worth noting that: the variable t is a parameter while the variable u is the natural 
parameter. 

The tangent and the principal normal vectors of the Salkowski curve (43) take the forms: 
T„ (u) = — cos [t] sin [nt] — sin [t] cos [nt] , n sin [t] sin [nt] + cos [t] cos [nt] , — sin [nt] ^ . (44) 

N a (u) = ( \/l - n 2 cos [i] , \A - ™ 2 sin [i] , , (45) 
It is easy to write the tangent vector (44) in the simple form: 



T Q (u) = J~N(u)du = J (\A - n 2 cos[t], \J \ - n? sm[t], njdu. 



(46) 



11 



From theorem (4.2) we can write any slant helix as the following: 



From equation (35) we have 



r cos 



r sm 



[t] , n ) d-u 



(is. 



u(s) = y n(s)ds, du = n(s)ds, 



(47) 



(48) 



where Kg = k(s), (sp = s). Substituting equation (48) in (47) we obtain the position vector 
of a similar curve fpp{s) = (ipi(s), ip2(s), Y>3(s))of a slant helix with arbitrary curvature 
k(s) as follows: 



Ms) = %f 



/"(*) 



-arcsm 



(^m J K(s)di 
J K(s)sin ^arcsin^m J K(s)ds S j 



ds 
ds 



^(s) = n f f n(s)ds 



ds, 
ds, 



(49) 



ds, 



which is the position vector of a slant helix introduced in [3]. 

We hope that we can introduce new classes of similar curves and deduce the position 
vectors of these classes in future work. 



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