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Pseudo-Manifold Geometries with Applications 



Linfan Mao 

(Chinese Academy of Mathematics and System Science, Beijing 100080, P.R.China) 
E-mail: maolinfan@163.com 

Abstract: A Smarandache geometry is a geometry which has at least one 
Smarandachely denied axiom(1969), i.e., an axiom behaves in at least two 
different ways within the same space, i.e., validated and invalided, or only 
invalided but in multiple distinct ways and a Smarandache n-manifold is a n- 
manifold that support a Smarandache geometry. Iseri provided a construction 
for Smarandache 2-manifolds by equilateral triangular disks on a plane and a 
more general way for Smarandache 2-manifolds on surfaces, called map geome- 
tries was presented by the author in [9] — [10] and [12]. However, few observa- 
tions for cases of n > 3 are found on the journals. As a kind of Smarandache 
geometries, a general way for constructing dimensional n pseudo- manifolds are 
presented for any integer n > 2 in this paper. Connection and principal fiber 
bundles are also defined on these manifolds. Following these constructions, 
nearly all existent geometries, such as those of Euclid geometry, Lobachevshy- 
Bolyai geometry, Riemann geometry, Weyl geometry, Kahler geometry and 
Finsler geometry, ...,etc, are their sub-geometries. 

Key Words: Smarandache geometry, Smarandache manifold, pseudo- 
manifold, pseudo-manifold geometry, multi-manifold geometry, connection, 
curvature, Finsler geometry, Riemann geometry, Weyl geometry and Kahler 
geometry. 

AMS(2000): 51M15, 53B15, 53B40, 57N16 
§1. Introduction 

Various geometries are encountered in update mathematics, such as those of Euclid 
geometry, Lobachevshy-Bolyai geometry, Riemann geometry, Weyl geometry, Kahler 
geometry and Finsler geometry, etc.. As a branch of geometry, each of them has 
been a kind of spacetimes in physics once and contributes successively to increase 
human's cognitive ability on the natural world. Motivated by a combinatorial notion 
for sciences: combining different fields into a unifying field, Smarandache introduced 
neutrosophy and neutrosophic logic in references [14] — [15] and Smarandache geome- 
tries in [16]. 

Definition 1.1([8][16]) An axiom is said to be Smarandachely denied if the axiom 
behaves in at least two different ways within the same space, i.e., validated and 
invalided, or only invalided but in multiple distinct ways. 

A Smarandache geometry is a geometry which has at least one Smarandachely 



1 



denied axiom(1969). 

Definition 1.2 For an integer n,n> 2, a Smarandache n-manifold is a n-manifold 
that support a Smarandache geometry. 

Smarandache geometries were applied to construct many world from conservation 
laws as a mathematical tool([2]). For Smarandache n-manifolds, Iseri constructed 
Smarandache manifolds for n = 2 by equilateral triangular disks on a plane in [6] 
and [7] (see also [11] in details). For generalizing Iseri's Smarandache manifolds, 
map geometries were introduced in [9] — [10] and [12], particularly in [12] convinced 
us that these map geometries are really Smarandache 2-manifolds. Kuciuk and 
Antholy gave a popular and easily understanding example on an Euclid plane in 
[8]. Notice that in [13], these multi-metric space were defined, which can be also 
seen as Smarandache geometries. However, few observations for cases of n > 3 
and their relations with existent manifolds in differential geometry are found on the 
journals. The main purpose of this paper is to give general ways for constructing 
dimensional n pseudo-manifolds for any integer n > 2. Differential structure, con- 
nection and principal fiber bundles are also introduced on these manifolds. Following 
these constructions, nearly all existent geometries, such as those of Euclid geometry, 
Lobachevshy-Bolyai geometry, Riemann geometry, Weyl geometry, Kahler geometry 
and Finsler geometry, ...,etc, are their sub-geometries. 

Terminology and notations are standard used in this paper. Other terminology 
and notations not defined here can be found in these references [1], [3] — [5]. 

For any integer n, n > 1, an n-manifold is a Hausdorff space M n , i.e., a space 
that satisfies the T 2 separation axiom, such that for Vjo g M n , there is an open 
neighborhood U p ,p G U p C M n and a homeomorphism (p p : U p — > R n or C n , 
respectively. 

Considering the differentiability of the homeomorphism <p : U — > R n enables us 
to get the conception of differential manifolds, introduced in the following. 

An differential n-manifold (M n ,A) is an n-manifold M n ,M n = [j Ui, endowed 

iei 

with a C r differential structure A = {(U a , tp a )\ct G /} on M n for an integer r with 
following conditions hold. 

(1) {U a ; a G /} is an open covering of M n ; 

(2) For Va, (5 G /, atlases (U a , Lp a ) and (£/g, (pp) are equivalent, i.e., U a f] Up — 
or U a H Up 7^ but the overlap maps 

are C r ; 

(3) A is maximal, i.e., if (U,<p) is an atlas of M n equivalent with one atlas in 
A, then (U, v?) G A. 

An n-manifold is smooth if it is endowed with a C°° differential structure. It is 
well-known that a complex manifold M" is equal to a smooth real manifold M? n 
with a natural base 



2 



_d_ _d_ < . < 

for T P M™, where T P M™ denotes the tangent vector space of M™ at each point p e M™. 



§2. Pseudo-Manifolds 

These Smarandache manifolds are non-homogenous spaces, i.e., there are singular 
or inflection points in these spaces and hence can be used to characterize warped 
spaces in physics. A generalization of ideas in map geometries can be applied for 
constructing dimensional n pseudo-manifolds. 

Construction 2.1 Let M n be an n-manifold with an atlas A = {{U p , tp p )\p G M n }. 
ForWp G M n with a local coordinates (x 1 ,x 2 , ■ ■ ■ ,x n ), define a spatially directional 
mapping uj : p — > R n action on ip p by 

u:p^ ipp(p) = w(<p p (p)) = (uJi,u 2 ,-- -,u n ), 

i.e., if a line L passes through ip{p) with direction angles 9 1 , 9 2 , ■ ■ ■ , 6 n with axes 
ei, e 2 , • • • , e„ in R™ ; then its direction becomes 

Ol - — + <Ti, 9 2 ~ y + (72, • • • , n ~ — + <7„ 

after passing through <p p (p), where for any integer 1 < i < n, uji = fi^modATr) , 
> and 



Oi 



7T, if < UJi < 27T, 

0, if 2n < Ui < 4tt. 



A manifold M n endowed with such a spatially directional mapping uj : M n — > R n is 
called an n-dimensional pseudo-manifold, denoted by {M n ,A U} ). 

Theorem 2.1 For a point p G M n with local chart (U p , (p p ), ip^ = (p p if and only if 
cu(p) = (27rfci, 2nk2, • • • , 2nk n ) with ki = l(mod2) for 1 < i < n. 

Proof By definition, for any point p G M n , if <Pp(p) = <p p (p), then uj((p p {p)) = 
(p p (p). According to Construction 2.1, this can only happens while u(p) = (2nki, 27ik 2 , 
27rk n ) with fcj = l(mod2) for 1 < i < n. \\ 

Definition 2.1 A spatially directional mapping uj : M n — > R n is euclidean if for any 
point p G M n with a local coordinates (xi, x 2 , • • • , x n ), u>(p) = (27T&4, 2%k 2 , • • • , 27rk n ) 
with ki = l(mod2) for 1 < i < n, otherwise, non- euclidean. 

Definition 2.2 Let uj : M n — > R™ &e a spatially directional mapping and p G 
(M n ,A UJ ), uj(p)(mod4:7t) = (uji, uj 2 , ■ ■ ■ , oj n ). Call a point p elliptic, euclidean or 
hyperbolic in direction e i; l<i<nifo<uji< 2ir, uj^ = 2-k or 2-k < uj^ < 4n. 



3 



Then we get a consequence by Theorem 2.1. 

Corollary 2.1 Let (M n ,A w ) be a pseudo-manifold. Then ip^ = ip p if and only if 
every point in M n is euclidean. 

Theorem 2.2 Let (M n ,^4 w ) be an n- dimensional pseudo-manifold and p e M n . 
If there are euclidean and non- euclidean points simultaneously or two elliptic or 
hyperbolic points in a same direction in (U p ,ip p ), then (M n ,A u ) is a Smarandache 
n-manifold. 

Proof On the first, we introduce a conception for locally parallel lines in an 
n-manifold. Two lines Ci,C2 are said locally parallel in a neighborhood (U p ,<p p ) of 
a point p G M n if ip p (Ci) and ip p (C2) are parallel straight lines in R ra . 

In (M n ,A UJ ), the axiom that there are lines pass through a point locally parallel 
a given line is Smarandachely denied since it behaves in at least two different ways, 
i.e., one parallel, none parallel, or one parallel, infinite parallels, or none parallel, 
infinite parallels. 

If there are euclidean and non-euclidean points in (U p , <p p ) simultaneously, not 
loss of generality, we assume that u is euclidean but v non-euclidean, u(v)(modATT) = 
(ui,U2, ■ ■ ■ , oo n ) and u)\ ^ 2n. Now let L be a straight line parallel the axis e! in R n . 
There is only one line C u locally parallel to (/?~ 1 (L) passing through the point u since 
there is only one line (fi p (C q ) parallel to L in R™ by these axioms for Euclid spaces. 
However, if < u)\ < 2n, then there are infinite many lines passing through u locally 
parallel to (p p l (L) in (U p ,ip p ) since there are infinite many straight lines parallel L 
in R n , such as those shown in Fig. 2. 1(a) in where each straight line passing through 
the point u = tp p (u) from the shade field is parallel to L. 




Fig,2.1 

But if 27r < u>i < 4n, then there are no lines locally parallel to Lp~ l (L) in (U p ,ip p ) 
since there are no straight lines passing through the point v = f p {v) parallel to L 
in R n , such as those shown in Fig. 2. 1(b). 



4 




Fig. 2. 2 

If there are two elliptic points u,v along a direction O, consider the plane V 
determined by u(u),u(v) with O in R n . Let L be a straight line intersecting with 
the line uv in V. Then there are infinite lines passing through u locally parallel to 
(fip(L) but none line passing through v locally parallel to </?~ 1 (L) in (U p ,(p p ) since 
there are infinite many lines or none lines passing through u = uo{u) or v — ui(v) 
parallel to L in R™, such as those shown in Fig.2.2. 

Similarly, we can also get the conclusion for the case of hyperbolic points. Since 
there exists a Smarandachely denied axiom in (M n ,A UJ ), it is a Smarandache man- 
ifold. This completes the proof. \\ 

For an Euclid space R™, the homeomorphism tp p is trivial for Vp G R n . In this 
case, we abbreviate (R",^4 W ) to (R n ,u;). 

Corollary 2.2 For any integer n > 2, if there are euclidean and non-euclidean 
points simultaneously or two elliptic or hyperbolic points in a same direction in 
(R n ,cj) ; then (R",cj) is an n-dimensional Smarandache geometry. 

Particularly, Corollary 2.2 partially answers an open problem in [12] for estab- 
lishing Smarandache geometries in R 3 . 

Corollary 2.3 // there are points p, q G R 3 such that uj(p)(modAn) ^ (2n, 2n, 2n) 
but u>(q) (modAii) = (27rfci, 27rk 2 , 27rk 3 ), where ki = l(mod2),l < i < 3 or p,q are 
simultaneously elliptic or hyperbolic in a same direction ofH 3 , then (R 3 ,c<j) is a 
Smarandache space geometry. 

Definition 2.3 For any integer r > 1, a C r differential Smarandache n-manifold 
[M n ,A ul ) is a Smarandache n-manifold (M n ,A u ') endowed with a differential struc- 
ture A and a C r spatially directional mapping ui. A C°° Smarandache n-manifold 
(M n ,A UJ ) is also said to be a smooth Smarandache n-manifold. 

According to Theorem 2.2, we get the next result by definitions. 

Theorem 2.3 Let (M n ,A) be a manifold and oo : M n — > R n a spatially directional 
mapping action on A. Then (M",^) is a C r differential Smarandache n-manifold 
for an integer r > 1 if the following conditions hold: 



5 



(1) there is a C r differential structure A = {(U a , (p a )\ a e 1} 071 M n ; 

(2) cu is C r ; 

(3) there are euclidean and non-euclidean points simultaneously or two elliptic 
or hyperbolic points in a same direction in (U p , Lp p ) for a point p G M n . 

Proof The condition (1) implies that (M n ,A) is a C r differential n-manifold 
and conditions (2), (3) ensure (M n ,A u ) is a differential Smarandache manifold by 
definitions and Theorem 2.2. \ 

For a smooth differential Smarandache n-manifold (M n ,A w ), a function / : 
M n — > R is said smooth if for Vp G M n with an chart (U p , <p p ), 

f o (^r 1 : (vZ)(U p ) ^ R n 
is smooth. Denote by Q p all these C°° functions at a point p G M ra . 

Definition 2.4 Let (M",^4 W ) &e a smooth differential Smarandache n-manifold and 
p G M n . j4 tangent vector v at p is a mapping v : $5 P — > R with these following 
conditions hold. 

(f ) \/g, h G 3f p , VA G R, + A/i) = v(g) + Xv(h); 

(2) V#, /i G 3f p , = v(g)h(p) + g(p)v(h). 

Denote all tangent vectors at a point p G (M n ,A UJ ) by T p M n and define addi- 
tion-!- and scalar multiplication-for Vw, v G T p M n , A G R and / G Q p by 

(« + «)(/) = «(/) + «(/), (A«)(/) = A • «(/). 

Then it can be shown immediately that T p M n is a vector space under these two 
operations+and- . 

Let p G (M n , A u ) and 7 : (— e, e) — > R n be a smooth curve in R n with 7(0) = p. 
In (M n , v/P), there are four possible cases for tangent lines on 7 at the point p, such 
as those shown in Fig.2.3, in where these bold lines represent tangent lines. 




:>■) (b) (c) (d) 

Fi&2.3 

By these positions of tangent lines at a point p on 7, we conclude that there 
is one tangent line at a point p on a smooth curve if and only if p is euclidean in 
(M n , A^). This result enables us to get the dimensional number of a tangent vector 
space T p M n at a point p G (M n ,A^). 



6 



Theorem 2.4 For any point p G (M n ,i u ) with a local chart (U p ,ip p ), (p p (p) = 
(x'iX®, ■ ' ' , x n) > if there are just s euclidean directions along e^, e i2 , • • • , e ig for a 
point , then the dimension of T p M n is 



dimTpM™ = In - s 



with a basis 



d d~ d + 

{q — \ p \ l<j<s} LK^U -fajlp \ l<l<nandl^ij,l<j< s}. 

Proof We only need to prove that 

{^-\ p | 1 < j < s} (J{J^ ^\ P \l<l<nandl^ i jt 1 < j < s} (2.1) 
is a basis of T p M n . For V/ G since / is smooth, we know that 

m = /(p) + i>i-a*)^r(p) 

1=1 OT * 

™ o o d 6i f d tj f 

+ ^ ( Xi ~ x i)( x j ~ X ^~dx~~dx~ ~^ ^ 4, i' "' k 

i : j=l % 3 

for Vx = (xi, X2, • • • , x n ) G Lpp(U p ) by the Taylor formula in R n , where each term in 
Ri,j,-,k contains (xi — x®)(xj — x°) • • • (xk — X®), ei G {+, — } for 1 < / < n but / ^ ij 
for 1 < j < s and q should be deleted for I — ij, 1 < j < s. 
Now let v G T p M n . By Definition 2.4(1), we get that 

n net r 

v(f(x)) = v{f{p))+v{Y,{xi-x»)-±{p)) 

i=l ox l 

n d ei f d" 1 f 

+ v(J2 (m ~ - x ?) 77-77— ) + v(Ri,j,-,k)- 

i,j=i UJy i ux j 

Application of the condition (2) in Definition 2.4 shows that 

«(/(p)) = o, £«(*?)^(p) = o, 

i=l % 



d €i fd £ if 

i dxi dxj 

and 



vC£(x i -x'i)(x j -x'j)- B ±- B ±) = 



7 



v(Rij,...,k) = 0. 

Whence, we get that 

v(f(x)) = E^^fiP) = E^)^U/)- ( 2 -2) 

i=1 ra i i=i ax « 

The formula (2.2) shows that any tangent vector v in T p M n can be spanned by 
elements in (2.1). 

All elements in (2.1) are linearly independent. Otherwise, if there are numbers 
a 1 , a 2 , ■ ■ ■ , a s , af, <4, , ■ ■ ■ , a+_ s , a~_ s such that 

L ft ^ + E a ^ lp = ' 

j=l ^"S i^h,i 2 ,-,i s ,l<i<n udj% 

where G {+,—}, then we get that 

d & 

a io = (E ^- + E <^r) 



for 1 < j < s and 

= (E S + E a? J^) = 

i=l *i i^ii,i2,-",js,l<j<n 1 

for i 7^ ii, i 2 , • • • , i s , 1 < i < n. Therefore, (2.1) is a basis of the tangent vector space 
T p M n at the point p G (M n , A u ). \ 

Notice that dimT p M n = n in Theorem 2.4 if and only if all these directions are 
euclidean along ei, e 2 , • • • , e n . We get a consequence by Theorem 2.4. 

Corollary 2.4([4]-[5]) Let (M n ,A) be a smooth manifold and p G M n . Then 



dimT p M n = n 



with a basis 



{^l,|l<<<n}- 

Definition 2.5 For \/p G (M n ,„4 w ) ; £/ie efotaZ space T*M n is called a co-tangent 
vector space at p. 

Definition 2.6 For / G %, d G T*M n and v G T p M n , the action of d on f, called 
a differential operator d : — > R ; is defined by 

df = v(f). 



8 



Then we immediately get the following result. 



Theorem 2.5 For any point p G (M n ,i u ) with a local chart (U p ,ip p ), tp p (p) = 
(x\X2, • • • , x° n ), if there are just s euclidean directions along e^, e i2 , • • • , e is for a 
point , then the dimension ofT*M n is 



dimT p *M n = 2n 



with a basis 



{dx tj \ p | 1 < j < s}[J{d x p ,d + x l \ p | 1 < I < n and I ^ < j < s}, 

where 

drH (-^—\ ) = S i and d^rH 1 = 

dxj j dxi j 

for 6i G {+, -}, 1 < i < n. 

§3. Pseudo-Manifold Geometries 

Here we introduce Minkowski norms on these pseudo-manifolds (M n ,„4. w ). 

Definition 3.1 A Minkowski norm on a vector space V is a function F : V — > R 
such that 

(1) F is smooth on V\{<d} and F(v) > for Vt> G V; 

(2) F is 1-homogenous, i.e., F(Xv) = \F(v) for\/\ > 0; 

(3) for all y G \^\{0} ; the symmetric bilinear form g y : V x V — > R 

is positive definite for u, v G V . 

Denote by TM n = U T p M n . 

Definition 3.2 A pseudo-manifold geometry is a pseudo-manifold (M n ,A u ) en- 
dowed with a Minkowski norm F on TM n . 

Then we get the following result. 
Theorem 3.1 There are pseudo-manifold geometries. 

Proof Consider an eucildean 2n-dimensional space R 2n . Then there exists a 
Minkowski norm F(x) = \x\ at least. According to Theorem 2.4, T p M n is R s + 2 ( n ~ s ) 



9 



if u(p) has s euclidean directions along e l5 e 2 , • • • , e n . Whence there are Minkowski 
norms on each chart of a point in (M n ,A w ). 

Since (M n ,A) has finite cover {(U a ,ip a )\a G /}, where / is a finite index set, 
by the decomposition theorem for unit, we know that there are smooth functions 
h a , a E I such that 

Y,K = l with < h a < 1. 
Choose a Minkowski norm F a on each chart (U a ,ip a ). Define 

f if pe 

a 1 o, if ^t/ a 

for Vp G (M n ,<^). Now let 

Then F is a Minkowski norm on TM" since it satisfies all of these conditions (1) — (3) 
in Definition 3.1. \ 

Although the dimension of each tangent vector space maybe different, we can 
also introduce principal fiber bundles and connections on pseudo-manifolds. 

Definition 3.3 A principal fiber bundle (PFB) consists of a pseudo-manifold (P, Af), 
a projection n : (P, A() — > (M, Aq^), a base pseudo-manifold (M, Aq^) and a Lie 
group G, denoted by (P,M,u n ,G) such that (1), (2) and (3) following hold. 

(1) There is a right freely action of G on (P,Ai), i.e., forWg G G, there is a 
diffeomorphism R g : (P,Ai) -> (P,Ai) with R g (p u ') = p^g for Vp G (P,Ai) such 
that p UJ (gig2) = (p u 'gi)g2 for Vp G (P,Ai), V(?i,(?2 G G and p w e = p u for some 
p G (P n ,Ai), e G G if and only if e is the identity element of G. 

(2) The map ix : (P,Af) -> (M,Al {uj) ) is onto with Tr" 1 ^)) = {pg\g G G}, 
tiuji = ujqty, and regular on spatial directions of p, i.e., if the spatial directions of p 
are (ui,U2, • ■ • ,w n ), then uji and n(uji) are both elliptic, or euclidean, or hyperbolic 
and |7r -1 (7r(a;j))| is a constant number independent of p for any integer i, 1 < i < n. 

(3) For'ix G (M,AI {UJ) ) there is an open set U with x G U and a diffeomorphism 
T u H ■ (tt)- 1 ^ 7 ^) -> x G of the form T u (p) = (ir(f),s u (fj), where s u : 
7r _1 (?7 7r ^) -> G has the property s u (p"g) = s u (jf)g forWg G G,p G 7r _1 (f7). 

We know the following result for principal fiber bundles of pseudo-manifolds. 
Theorem 3.2 Let (P, M, uf , G) be a PFB. Then 

(P,M,u n ,G) = (P, M, 7r, G) 
if and only if all points in pseudo-manifolds (P, Af) are euclidean. 

10 



Proof For Wp G (P,Ai), let (U p , ip p ) be a chart at p. Notice that u n = n if and 
only if = ip p for \/p G (P, ^4^). According to Theorem 2.1, by definition this is 
equivalent to that all points in (P, ^ ) are euclidean. \ 

Definition 3.4 Let (P, M, uj 7r , G) be a PFB with dimG — r. A subspace family H = 
{H p \p G (P, Ai), dimH p = dimT^M} of TP is called a connection if conditions 
(1 ) and (2 ) following hold. 

(1) ForMp G (P,Ai), there is a decomposition 

T P P = H P ®V P 

and the restriction 7r*|# '■ H p — > T n ^M is a linear isomorphism. 

(2) H is invariant under the right action of G, i.e., for p G (P,Ai), Vg G G, 

(Rg)* p (H p ) = H pg . 

Similar to Theorem 3.2, the conception of connection introduced in Definition 
3.4 is more general than the popular connection on principal fiber bundles. 

Theorem 3. 3 (dimensional formula) Let (P, M,u! w , G) be a PFB with a connection 
H. ForMp G (P,Ai), if the number of euclidean directions of p is X P (p), then 

. (dimP-dimM)(2dimP- X P (p)) 
dimVp = dhnP • 

Proof Assume these euclidean directions of the point p being e l5 e 2 , • • • , e\ p ( p y 
By definition n is regular, we know that 7r(ei), 7r(e 2 ), • • • , 7r(eA P ( p )) are also euclidean 
in (M,Al {u}) ). Now since 

7r _1 (7r(ei)) = 7r _1 (7r(e 2 )) = • • • = 7v' 1 (n(e Xp ( p ))) = /J, = constant, 

we get that Xp(p) = //Am, where Am denotes the correspondent euclidean directions 
in (M, Ai^). Similarly, consider all directions of the point p, we also get that 
dimP = yudimM. Thereafter 

dimM , . , . 

Now by Definition 3.4, T P P = H p ®V p , i.e., 

dimTpP = dimP p + dimV p . (3.2) 

Since 7[*\h p '■ H p T V ^M is a linear isomorphism, we know that dimP p = 
dimT 7r ( p )M. According to Theorem 2.4, we have formulae 

dimTpP = 2dimP — Xp(p) 



11 



and 



dimT n(p) M = 2dimM - A 



= 2dimM - 



dimM 



Ap(p). 



M 



dimP 



Now replacing all these formulae into (3.2) 



we get that 



2dimP - X P (p) = 2dimM 



dimM 



Xp(p) + dimV p 



dimP 



That is, 



dimV^ = 



(dimP - dimM)(2dimP - A P (p)) 
dimP 



We immediately get the following consequence by Theorem 3.3. 
Corollary 3.1 Let (P, M,u*, G) be a PFB with a connection H. Then for Vp G 



if and only if the point p is euclidean. 

Now we consider conclusions included in Smarandache geometries, particularly 
in pseudo-manifold geometries. 

Theorem 3.4 A pseudo-manifold geometry (M n ,(p u ') with a Minkowski norm on 
TM n is a Finsler geometry if and only if all points of (M n , (p u ) are euclidean. 

Proof According to Theorem 2.1, (p p = ip p for Vp G (M n , Lp w ) if and only if p is 
eucildean. Whence, by definition (M n , <p w ) is a Finsler geometry if and only if all 
points of (M n ,^) are euclidean. t] 

Corollary 3.1 There are inclusions among Smarandache geometries, Finsler ge- 
ometry, Riemann geometry and Weyl geometry: 



Proof The first and second inclusions are implied in Theorems 2.1 and 3.3. Other 
inclusions are known in a textbook, such as [4] — [5]. \\ 



Now we consider complex manifolds. Let z l = x l + \J —\y % . In fact, any complex 

manifold M" is equal to a smooth real manifold M 2n with a natural base {^i, ^r} 
for TpM™ at each point p G M". Define a Hermite manifold M" to be a manifold 
M" endowed with a Hermite inner product h(p) on the tangent space (T P M™, J) for 
Vp G M", where J is a mapping defined by 



dimVp = dimP - dimM 



{Smarandache geometries} D {pseudo — manifold geometries} 

D {Finsler geometry} D {Riemann geometry} D {Weyl geometry} . 




12 



W pj dy ilr " { dy ilp) ~ dx ilp 
at each point p G M™ for any integer i, 1 < % < n. Now let 

h(p)=g(p) + V^lK(p), peM™. 

Then a Kdhler manifold is defined to be a Hermite manifold (M™, h) with a closed 
k satisfying 

k(X, Y) = g(X, JY), VX, Y G T P M™, Vp G M c n . 
Similar to Theorem 3.3 for real manifolds, we know the next result. 

Theorem 3.5 A pseudo-manifold geometry (M™,ip w ) with a Minkowski norm on 
TM n is a Kdhler geometry if and only if F is a Hermite inner product on M™ with 
all points of(M n ,ip w ) being euclidean. 

Proof Notice that a complex manifold M™ is equal to a real manifold M 2n . 
Similar to the proof of Theorem 3.3, we get the claim, t] 

As a immediately consequence, we get the following inclusions in Smarandache 
geometries. 

Corollary 3.2 There are inclusions among Smarandache geometries, pseudo-manifold 
geometry and Kdhler geometry: 

{Smarandache geometries} D {pseudo — manifold geometries} 

D {Kdhler geometry} . 



§4. Further Discussions 

Undoubtedly, there are many and many open problems and research trends in 
pseudo-manifold geometries. Further research these new trends and solving these 
open problems will enrich one's knowledge in sciences. 

Firstly, we need to get these counterpart in pseudo-manifold geometries for some 
important results in Finsler geometry or Riemann geometry. 

4.1. Storkes Theorem Let (M n ,A) be a smoothly oriented manifold with the T 2 
axiom hold. Then for Vro G A^~ 1 {M n ), 




This is the well-known Storkes formula in Riemann geometry. If we replace (M n ,A) 
by (M n ,^, w ), what will happens? Answer this question needs to solve problems 
following. 



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(1) Establish an integral theory on pseudo-manifolds. 

(2) Find conditions such that the Storkes formula hold for pseudo-manifolds. 
4.2. Gauss-Bonnet Theorem Let S be an orientable compact surface. Then 

Kda = 2n X (S), 



JL 



is 

where K and x{S) are the Gauss curvature and Euler characteristic of S This for- 
mula is the well-known Gauss-Bonnet formula in differential geometry on surfaces. 
Then what is its counterpart in pseudo-manifold geometries? This need us to solve 
problems following. 

(1) Find a suitable definition for curvatures in pseudo-manifold geometries. 

(2) Find generalizations of the Gauss-Bonnect formula for pseudo-manifold ge- 
ometries, particularly, for pseudo-surfaces. 

For a oriently compact Riemann manifold (M 2p ,g), let 
where Qij is the curvature form under the natural chart {e^} of M 2p and 



Chern proved that^ ® 



1, if permutation ii ■ ■ ■ i 2p is even, 
— 1, if permutation %x ■ • • %2 P is odd, 
0, otherwise. 



M 2 p 



Certainly, these new kind of global formulae for pseudo-manifold geometries are 
valuable to find. 

4.3. Gauge Fields Physicists have established a gauge theory on principal fiber 
bundles of Riemann manifolds, which can be used to unite gauge fields with gravi- 
tation. Similar consideration for pseudo-manifold geometries will induce new gauge 
theory, which enables us to asking problems following. 

Establish a gauge theory on those of pseudo-manifold geometries with some ad- 
ditional conditions. 

(1) Find these conditions such that we can establish a gauge theory on a pseudo- 
manifold geometry. 

(2) Find the Yang-Mills equation in a gauge theory on a pseudo-manifold geom- 
etry. 

(2) Unify these gauge fields and gravitation. 



14 



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