Skip to main content

Full text of "[Report 1895]"

See other formats


TWENTY-SECOND 


ANNUAL REPORT 

ON THE 

CONDITION OF THE COMBINED 

DISTRICT 


WEST SUSSEX, 

FOR THE YEAR 1895, 

BY 


CHARLES KELLY, M.D., F.R.C.P., 

MEDICAL OFFICER OF HEALTH, 

PROFESSOR OF HYGIENE IN KING’S COLLEGE, LONDON. 



THE SOUTHERN PUBLISHING CO., LTD., I30, NORTH STREET. 

1896. 









Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2018 with funding from 
Wellcome Library 


\ 


https://archive.org/details/b30264406 


111 . 


INTRODUCTION. 


This Report gives a general statistical survey of various Rural and 
Urban Districts in West Sussex for a term of twenty years. 

In each Rural District, the growth or decrease in the population 
can be traced in each parish from 1861 to 1891, and also the number 
of inhabited houses at each census period. For each parish, the number 
of deaths during the past twenty years is given, and also the deaths 
from certain well defined groups of diseases. 


In the General Report, the births and deaths in Rural Districts are 
contrasted with those in Urban Districts, and an attempt is made to 
point out some matters of interest dealing with rural life in West 
Sussex. 

The low and declining birth-rate; the distribution of population 
with regard to age and sex ; the excessive proportion of males ; the 
changes in the distribution between 1881 and 1891 ; the excessive pro¬ 
portion of aged persons, and the reduced numbers in middle life as con¬ 
trasted with towns ; the incidence of infectious diseases, the number of 
infectious disorders notified, the case mortality as well as the death-rate ; 
the proportion between the deaths from notifiable diseases, and those 
which are not notifiable, such as measles, whooping cough, diarrhoea, and 
influenza ; these are all dealt with in special reference to rural life. 

/ ; ' 

In contrasting the figures year by year for each district the com¬ 
parison may be made readily and correctly, but when other districts are 
contrasted, one with the other, such a comparison may be fallacious 
unless due allowance be made for age and sex distribution. The male 
death-rate is rather higher than the female death-rate, and therefore in 
places where there is an excess of either sex, the mortality may be 
slightly raised or lowered accordingly. Age has a more important 
influence. In rural parishes, where young adults leave for large centres 
of population, and where there is an accumulation or excess of aged 
persons, the mortality must be raised, because in young adult life the 
death-rate is low, while it is very high in advanced years. 

The presence of many schools in any district lowers the mortality ; 
the presence of a workhouse in any district with its high proportion of 
aged poor raises the death-rate very much ; hence in this report ali 
workhouse deaths are distributed amongst the several parishes whence 
each inmate came. 








IV. 


The distribution of age and sex may raise or lower the mortality as 
much as 2-0 per 1,000 persons living, irrespective of sanitary conditions. 


The mean death-rate in England and Wales for the decade 1881-90 
was 19T5 per 1,000, but if the population had been distributed, as 
regards age and sex, as it was in West Sussex during the same period, 
the rate would have been raised to 20 769 per 1,000. 19T5 divided by 

20*769 —‘92,205 which is the factor for correction for West Sussex. In 
a similar way the factor for each district can be obtained. The follow¬ 
ing table shows the result based on the mean death-rate during the 
•decade 1881-90. 


England and Wales 

Factor. 

1 *00000 

Recorded 

Death-rate. 

19-15 

Corrected 

Death-rate. 

19-15 

West Sussex 

•92205 

14*37 

13-23 

Four Urban Districts 

*97490 

14-38 

14-02 

Seven Dural Districts . . 

*90355 

14-35 

12-97 


Arundel 

*92133 

18-53 

17-07 

o3 

■2 

t=> 

Horsham . . 

•94223 

17-23 

16-24 

Worthing . . 

•99300 

15-05 

14-94 


k Littlehampton 

•99781 

13-36 

13-34 


East Preston 

•85361 

13-69 

11-69 


Westbourne 

•85571 

14-24 

12-11 

r . 

Thakeham 

•86429 

14-00 

12-10 


Petworth 

•87329 

15 75 

13-96 

Ah 

Midhurst 

•91476 

14-48 

13-25 

Is* 

Horsham 

•93960 

13-37 

12-56 


Steyning (West and East) 

•95454 

14-15 

13-51 


The factor for correction is 

the figure by which the recorded death 


should be multiplied so as to allow for the variations of age and 
sex distribution, and the result gives the corrected death-rate. 


In nearly all large towns the factor is above unity, and then the 
corrected rates must be higher than the recorded rates. 


In rural districts, opposite conditions are met with, and the 
corrected rates are lower than those recorded. 







Introduction 


Steyning West District... 1-18 

Population... ... ... 1 

Births and birth-rate ... 4 

General mortality... ... 4 

Infant mortality ... ... 5 

Zymotic mortality ... 6 

Water supply ... ... 7 

Drainage and sewerage ... 7 

Steyning drainage ... 7 

Systematic inspection ... 9 

Scavenging and cleansing 10 

Cowsheds and dairies ... 10 

Miscellaneous ... ... 10 

Inquests ... ... ... 10 

Statistical tables ... ... 11-18 

Steyning East District ... 19-42 

Population... ... ... 19 

Births and birth-rate ... 22 

General mortality... ... 22 

Infant mortality ... ... 23 

Zymotic mortality ... 24 

Drainage and sewerage .. 25 

Mr. Mansergh’s report ... 25 

Messrs. Law and Son’s 

report ... ... ... 27 

Mr. Blaber’s report ... 30 

Systematic inspection ... 34 

Miscellaneous ... ... 34 

Legal proceedings... ... 35 

Inquests ... ... ... 35 

Statistical tables ... ... 36-42 

Horsham District (Rural) 43-62 

Population... ... ... 43 

Births and birth-rate ... 46 

General mortality... ... 46 

Infant mortality ... ... 48 

Zymotic mortality ... 48 

Iheld and Crawley drainage 50 

Systematic inspection .... 52 

Rainfall ... ... ... 54 

Inquests ... ... ... 54 

Statistical tables ... ... 55-62 

Petworth District ... 63-80 

Population... ... ... 63 

Births and birth-rate ... 66 

General mortality... ... 66 

Infant mortality ... .. 68 

Zymotic mortality ... 68 

Water supply . 69 

Drainage and sewerage ... 70 

Systematic inspection ... 71 

Miscellaneous ... ... 72 

Rainfall ... ... ... 73 

Inquests ... ... ... 73 

Statistical tables ... ... 74-80 



Thakeham 

Population... 

Births and birth-rate 
General mortality... 
Infant mortality ... 
Zymotic mortality 
Diphtheria 

Systematic inspection 
Scavenging and cleansing 
Miscellaneous 
Inquests 

Statistical tables ... 



East Preston District ... 105-122 

Population... ... ... 105 

Births and birth-rate ... 110 

General mortality... ... 110 

Infant mortality ... ... 112 

Zymotic mortality .. 112 

Water supply ... ... 113 

Legal proceedings.. ... 114 

Systematic inspection ... 114 

Miscellaneous ... ... 114 

Inquests ... ... ... 115 

Statistical tables ... ... 116-122 


Midhurst District ... 123-140 


Population .. ... ... 123 

Births and birth-rate ... 128 

General mortality ... 128 

Infant mortality ... ... 130 

Zymotic mortality ... 130 

Water supply ... ... 131 

Drainage and sewerage ... 131 

Systematic inspection ... 131 

Legal proceedings ... 132 

Miscellaneous ... .. 132 

Inquests ... ... ... 132 

Statistical tables ... .. 134-140 


Westbourne District ... 141-158 

Population... ... ... 141 

Births and birth-rate ... 144 

General mortality ... 145 

Infant mortality ... ... 145 

Zymotic mortality ... 146 

Water supply ... ... 147 

Drainage ... ... ... 147 

Scavenging and cleansing 148 
Miscellaneous ... ... 149 

Sunshine ... ... ... 150 

Rainfall ... ... ... 150 

Inquests ... ... ... 151 

Statistical tables ... ... 152-158 

Worthing District ... 159-182 

Population... .. ... 159 

Births and birth-rate .. 161 






INDEX (continued). 


vi. 


Worthing District (continued). 


General mortality. 

161 

Infant mortality ... 

163 

Zymotic mortality 

164 

Diphtheria... 

165 

Water supply 

166 

Sewerage and drainage ... 

166 

Systematic inspection 

171 

Inquests 

175 

Statistical tables ... 

176-182 

Littlehampton District ... 

183-196 

Population.. 

183 

Births and birth-rate 

183 

General mortality 

184 

Infant mortality ... 

185 

Zymotic mortality 

185 

Water supply 

186 

Drainage and sewerage ... 

187 

Scavenging and cleansing 

187 

Systematic inspection 

187 

Miscellaneous 

187 

Inquests 

188 

Statistical tables ... 

189-196 

General Report. 


Population 


Births and birth-rate ... 


,, (Rural) ... 


,, (Urban) ... 


General mortality 


„ ,, (Urban) 


,, ,, (Rural) 



Arondel District. 

Population... 

Births and birth-rate 
General mortality 
Infant mortality ... 
Zymotic mortality 
Water supply 
Drainage and sewerage ... 
Miscellaneous 
Inquests 

Statistical tables ... 

Horsham District (Urban) 

Population... 

Births and birth-rate 
General mortality... 

Infant mortality ... 

Zymotic mortality 

Water supply 

Sewerage and drainage ... 

Systematic inspection 

Miscellaneous 

Rainfall 

Inquests 

Statistical tables ... 


Influence of season 
Infant mortality 
Zymotic mortality 
Sale of Food and Drugs Acts 
Meteorology 
Rainfall ... 

Hours of bright sunshine 
Temperature of the noil 

Distribution of population according to age and sex 
Table 1.—Showing the births and birth-rates in the twenty years 
1876-95 . 


Table 2.—Showing the deaths in each month in the twenty years, 
1876-95, and in 1895 

Table 3.—Showing the deaths at various groups of ages in the seven 
Rural Districts in the fifteen years, 1881-95 ... 

Table 4.—Showing the deaths from zymotic diseases in each of the 
seven Rural Districts in the twenty years, 1876-95 ... 

Table 5.—Showing the deaths from zymotic diseases in the seven 
Rural Districts in the twenty-years, 1876-95 
Table 6.—Showing the deaths from zymotic diseases in four Urban 
Districts in the twenty years, 1876-95 
Table 7.—Showing the new cases of infectious diseases notified in the 
Combined District during the five years, 1891-95 
Table 8.—Showing the new cases of infectious diseases notified in the 
seven Rural Districts during the five years, 1891-95, and the 
deaths therefrom ... 


197-208 

197 

197 

198 

198 

199 

200 
200 
201 
201 

202-208 

209-222 

209 

209 

210 
211 
211 
211 
212 
212 

213 

214 
214 

215-222 


223-261 

223 

225 

226 
226 
226 
229 

229 

230 
232 
234 

242 

243 
243 
245 

250 

251 


2-24 


231 

233 

235 


236 


237 

238 


239 


Table 9. — Showing the deaths in the Rural and Urban Districts, from 

five zymotic diseases in the twenty years, 1876-95 ... ... ... 240 

Table 10. — Showing the deaths and death-rate per 100,000 persons 
living in the Combined District from all causes, and from various 
causes, in the twenty years, 1876-95 ... ... ... ... ... 241 

Table 11. — Hours of bright sunshine ... ... ... ... ... 246 

Table 12. — Accumulated heat ... ... ... ... ... ... 247 















INDEX (continued). vii. 

General Report (continued). 

Table 13.—Climate of Worthing ... ... ... ... ... ... 248 

Table 14.—Distribution of population in 1881 ... ... ... ... 252 

Table 15.—Distribution of population in 1891 ... ... ... ... 253 

Table 16. — -Showing the deaths from accidents in each District in the 

twenty years, 1876-95 ... ... . ... ... ... 254 

Table 17.—Showing the deaths and death-rate from accidents in the 

Combined District, in the twenty years, 1876-95 ... ... ... 255 

Table 18.—Showing the deaths from suicide in each District in the 

twenty years, 1876-95 ... ... ... ... ... .. ... 256 

Table 19. —Showing the deaths and death-rate from suicide in the 

twenty years, 1976-95 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 257 

Table A. —Table of deaths during the year 1895, in the Combined 
District of West Sussex, classified according to diseases, 
ages, and localities ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 258-59 

Table B.—Table of population, births, and of new cases of iufectious 
sickness, coming to the knowledge of the Medical Officer of Health 
during the year 1895, in the Combined District of West 
Sussex, classified according to diseases, ages, and localities ... 260-261 



STE^UST I2SJ Or WEST 

RURAL SANITARY AUTHORITY. 


pp. 1 et seq. 


/ 




STEYNING WEST RURAL DISTRICT. 


The Steyning Ttural Sanitary District was divided into two 
portions on the passing of the Local Government Act, 1894. Steyning 
West includes fifteen parishes which are enumerated in the next table, 
while Steyning East includes the remaining seven parishes. Part 
of Edburton is now under its own name in the western division portion, 
while the rest, known as Fulking, is now in the eastern division. The 
change came into effect from January 1st, 1895, and the following figures 
have reference only to this new district in the present and in previous 
years :— 


Population in 1861 . . 

8,732 

„ „ 1871 . 

. . 10,377 

„ „ 1881 . 

.. 10.904 

Population in 1891 . . 

. . 10,810 

Male population in 1891 

5,526 

Female ,, ,, ,, 

5,284 

No. of Inhabited Houses in 1891 . . 

2,193 

„ Uninhabited Houses in 1891 

204 

,, Persons to each Mouse in 1891 

4-93 


The males exceed the females in nearly every parish ; in Lancing 
the existence of a large boys’ school affects the proportion ; in South- 
wick, the numbers were equal at the last census ; in Steyning and in 
Henfield there was a slight excess of females. 


South wick increased very much between 1861 and 1871 ; it then re¬ 
mained nearly stationary, but during the past year several fresh houses 
have been erected ; in the rest of the district the numbers vary but 
slightly from year to year. 


The occupation of the people is chiefly agricultural ; in Southwick 
and Kingston there is a sprinkling of seafaring people ; at Lancing and 
Sompting market gardening and fruit growing form an important 
industry. 


The following tables show the population in each parish over along 
term of years ; and the deaths in each parish from all causes and from 
various causes in four five-year periods:— 











Houses, 1891. Population. 


2 


X 

© • 

G 05 

a oo 

<X> I-1 


x • 

CD ^ 
I—I C5 

J5 QO 


X 

G r J 

05 
M CC 

CD r-r 

Ph 


X 

es 

X 0O 

m co 

'D r-H 

Ph 


X 

G H 

M 00 

© r-H 

Ph 


x 

S3 ^h* 
o rp 

X 

M CO 

© !—I 

Pm 


bJD 

G 


G 

cq 




no 

© 

-P 

• rH 

rG 

ci 


■ p 
© 

-p 

• r-* 

MO 

0 


01 05 r—l 05 i - H i—I CO 
CO r-H CD M Hf Hf CO 
O'! r-H 1 O' r-H CO 


CO t- O O N O rH CO 
CO J> t)h 05 CO i— ihHQO 
CO IM r-H O r-r — 


(M rH tH rH Q o N 
00 CO (M CO lO "M CO 
!M rH t- -H CO 


CO CO O 05 
GO CM CO r-H 
GO Cl r-H 


N H CO CO 
05 GO 

r-H C5 i— 1 r-H 


hH CO VO O © CO O 
CD lO CO CD O CO t— 
VO M CM CM t— 

of <—T 


O5»OCO05-^C)NC> 
CO C* O CD r-H ,o CM VO 
h N lO Cl CO O CO CO 

r-T of 


r-H CM i-H GO CM i—H r-H 

o 0 th rH oo t> a 

VO 0^ CO CM CO 

Cq r-H 


CDCMi— l©l>*©CDCO 
GO N rr O M 05 £— CO 
rH CO CO CM CO GO CO CO 


05 VO 05 VO CO CM r-H 

co nf co go oq 05 oo 

CO Cl o Cl N 

Ol r-H 


COVOOOOCOCOCO 

t- o co n cq vo oo oo 

r-H CO VO rH CO GO CO CO 


00 to o Cl GO M rf 
VO 05 VO GO (M t— VO 
CO 05 (M CO 


05 O CO O 1—I ^1 ^ H 

i-H ci o i> co 0 i> ® 

HOVOHCO00M 


VO 


oq 


oq 


VO CO o 
oq co 


!OIMtJ( 


CO VO 'M 1 VO 
CO r-H 


co t ' 

VO 


CO 


00 CD CO (M (M -rH CO t'~ 

cq th cno io rn r-i co 

VO Oq r-H 


H H N M 05 (M 

l'- (M CO CO 05 CO t— 

CO r-H CO 


H 

a 


Eh 

X 


0 

0 

Zfl 

HH 

<1 

K 

0 

0 

o 

K 
in 


M4 

o 

• r-H 
£ 
_c 

-P 


0 

o 

-p 

X 


b 

0 

HG 

© 


b£ c 

- . c 
biffo 


be 

fl 

'-3 ■ 

o 


X 

MG 

3 1 

'o 


H 

o . 

HH 

Ph • 

eh 

X 

HH 

p 

I 

0 • 
0 • 
zn g 
. © 
O mg 
fc P 


be 

p 

• rH 
- r 0 
. © 
© 

bC CP 

G ^ 


G 

o 

-p 


© 

-p 

o 

© 

G 

0 


t; . j r ——h rj ^ w 

zn ^ kP O zn o PP 


£ 

0 

H 

zn 


0 

m 

pp 


G © P 

Ph_C 

© gl.Gh ^ 

GO £ H ^ Ph 


r n 

o 

o 


© 

cd 

G 

© 


-p 

X 

Ph 


G 

n 

G 

0 

a 


Mh © 

x (— 

<1 m 



























































3 


1891-95. 

*8S«0SI(T 

Sand 

CO H tJH CO H I r-"rH O '—1 N r-i CO 

CO r-H 1 1—1 r—1 

CO 

o 

r—H 


00 ICO I (M 1 1 (NCKNHINOHIN 

r—H | | II r—l 

vo 

VO 

•uuaq'jqdfd 

iO r—1 | | | | | | 1—1 ^ 1—1 | r ”" 1 

os 

‘OSWSId 

OI^OIUA^ 

CO n (M r-l W | 1 1 CO IM (M H lO (N H 

CM r-H | [ 1 

CO 

VO 

1886-90. 

•os^astd 

Sund 

CO CM OO CO Ol I r-H rH i—H CO rH r-H VO OO <M 

CM 1 CO CM 

05 

rH 

rH 

■ 8 J s TW{d 

| COr-1 t> 1 It—1 O >—1 1 CO (M ^ 

i—1 | | | r—1 ! i—1 

C5 

CO 

•Bijgqjqdid 

rH | | | lO | | j r-H | | j r—“1 j C3 

o 

rH 

•as'eaeid 

opoui^j 

Oi r-H CO (M r-H 1 r—1 1 1 r—l r-H Ht* CO hJ -1 

i—H r-H | | r-H | 

tr¬ 

ee 

1881-85. 

*88139SId 

Marl'd 

CO H 05 rH (M |(M 1 U- IOh^VO^ 

(M I 1 <M I r-H 

001 

'^ITOd: 

00 CO lO |CO | 1 COO'f HIMC5 HC^ 

r-H | | | r-H 

05 

CO 

•isusq^qdid 

10|-hHh| | j | | r-H | | JO | | 

t— 

CM 

1 

•aseasid 

oi;oai^2 

05 CM O h* b- 1 1 (MN00H 1 O CO iO 

CM r-H 1 1 r-H | (M 

CO 

rH 

r-H 

1876-80. 

•98'B9Std 

Sand 

CO rH t> I rH rH rH r— 1 • rH 

03 H | 03 rH 03 

CO 

rH 

rH 

•ststq^qd 

oi^ooqoocoHO^QOHGoai^H 

rH *-H rH 

05 

o 

r-H 

"Biiaq^qdrd 

(M t— H r-H | | | | j 

CO 

•9SB98ld 

onoudvg 

1 | 1 CO 03 H 03 03 03 ^ 

03 rH j 1 j r-H rH 

o 

GO 

•s.rea^ X4U8MJQ 
ui 

CO 05 CM t-- (M CO <05 -rH (M O VO CO (N CO 

OOOhnOhhio^OO^NNOh 

I — CO 1—1 VO r-H VO r-H r-H 

3,152 

Deaths from all 

CAUSES IN THE YEARS 

96*1681 

^NCOOCOO(Ml>WcOHt>05NH 

Oi (M GO <M rH 1 —1 CO r-H 1 —1 Od —1 CO 

i—H r-H j—1 

753 

06*9881 

^•^cONOCOlOOO^IMHOOrHOOi 
u H N (M VO i—lO-^i-Hi—! ^COH 

i— 1 r—H j—I 

CM 

GO 

98-IS81 

N^C01>I>C0 10hCO(M 05 00CTiWN 
‘h 5 i —1 CO t— 1 nj-i 1—! "^ iO 1—i c ^(7<vcO 

1—1 1—It—1 

782 

08*9481 

Wh^CONVONGOWoOiMNimov 
< h 5> CO GO r-H VO COvO CM ^O CO CM 

r-H r-H r—i 

835 

Parish. 

South wick 
Kingston.. . 
Lancing . . 

Old Shoreham 
Sompting 

Coombes , . 
Botolphs 

Bramber . . 
Steyning . . 

Upper Beeding . . 
Edburton 
Woodmancote 
Henfield 

Ashurst . . 
Shermanbury 

Total 






































































































4 


BIRTHS AND BIRTH-RATE. 


During the year 1895, the births of 287 children were registered; 
of these 139 were male, and 148 were female. 


Estimating the population in the middle of the year at 11,000, 
the birth-rate was equal to 26T per 1,000 persons living. 


The births and birth-rate in the former district during the past 
ten years have been as follows :— 


Year. 

Births. 

Birth-rate. 

Year. 

Births. 

Birth-rate. 

1885 

. . 524 

. . 28-8 

1890 

. . 484 

.. 25*7 

1886 

. . 513 

. . 28*0 

1891 

. . 561 

. . 29-4 

1887 

. . 470 

., 25-5 

1892 

. . 527 

. . 27-2 

1888 

. . 507 

. . 27*2 

1893 

540 

. . 28*5 

1889 

. . 500 

. . 26-7 

1894 

. , 480 

. . 28-1 


The mean number of births was 510, and the mean birth-rate was 
27'5 per 1,000 of population. 

In England and Wales the birth-rate during the year was 30*3 
per 1,000 persons living, a rate 0'9 per 1,000 below the mean rate in 
the ten years, 1885-94. 


The following table shows the births and birth-rate in each locality 
during the past four years :— 



1892. 

Births. 
1893. 1894. 

1895. 

1892. 

Birth-rate. 
1893. 1894. 

1895. 

Southwick Parish 

81 

85 

86 

89 

31-6 

33-2 

33-1 

32*6 

Rest of Shoreham S.D. 

85 

99 

102 

75 

21-2 

24-7 

25-4 

28-5 

Steyning Parish 

39 

42 

43 

46 

22-8 

24-6 

25-1 

26-9 ! 

Henfield Parish 

39 

32 

43 

39 

19-4 

15-8 

21*1 

19-1 

Rest of Steyning S.D. 

64 

65 

52 

38 

27-5 

28-1 

22-4 

20-3 

Total. . 

308 

323 

326 

287 

27*3 

28-4 

28-6 

261 


GENERAL MORTALITY. 

There were 135 deaths registered in this district in the year 1895, 
but to this number must be added the deaths of 9 persons in New 
Shoreham Workhouse, which is outside the district, leaving the 
corrected figures at 144. 

. The 9 Workhouse deaths have been distributed among the several’ 
parishes whence each inmate came, viz. :— 

Southwick, 2 ; Steyning, 3 ; Ilenfield, 3 ; Shermanbury, 1 ; in 
all 9. J 











5 


Estimating the population in the middle of the year at 11,000, the 
death-rate was equal to 13'1 per 1,000 persons living. 

In country places throughout England and Wales the rate of 
mortality in 1895 was equal to 17’0 per 1,000 of population. 


Shoreham Sub-district :— 


Deaths. 


Death-rate. 



1S92. 1893. 

1894. 1895. 1892. 1893. 

1894. 

1895. 

Southwick Parish . . 

50 38 

38 

41 .. 19-5 14-8 

14-6 

15-1 

Rest of Sub-district. . 

49 52 

35 

34 .. 12-2 13*0 

8*5 

12-8 

Steyning Sub-district :— 





Steyning Parish 

26 17 

20 

23 . . 15*2 9-9 

n-7 

13-4 

Henfield Parish 

24 28 

28 

23 .. 11-9 13-9 

13-8 

11-3 

Rest of Sub-district. . 

40 32 

25 

23 . . 17-2 13-9 

10-8 

12*3 

Total 

189 167 146 

144 16-7 14*7 

12-8 

13T 

The variations in 

the death-rate of the former district 

during 

the 

past ten years have been as follows 

— 



Y ear. Deaths. 

Death-rate. 

Year. Deaths. 

Death-rate. 

1885 .- 260 

: 14-3 


1890 .. 281 .. 

14-9 


1886 .. 291 

. . 15-9 


1891 .. 305 .. 

16-0 


1887 .. 252 

. . 13-7 


1892 .. 317 .. 

16-4 


1888 .- 242 

. . 130 


1893 .. 270 .. 

14*3 


1889 .. 213 

.. 11-4 


1894 .. 201 . . 

11-8 


The mean number of deaths 

was 263 and the mean death-rate 

was 

14’2 per 1,000 of population. 





In each parish the deaths were 

thus distributed :— 



Southwick . . 

41 


. Bramber 

1 


Kingston 

4 


Steyning 

23 


Lancing 

18 


Upper Beeding 

10 


Old Shoreham 

3 


Edburton 

. none 


Sompting 

9 


Woodmancote 

4 


Coombes 

.. none 


Henfield 

23 


Botolphs 

.. none 


Ashurst 

3 


Shermanbury 


5 




Total 


. 144, 




INFANT 

MORTALITY. 




The infant mortality is here given as measured by the number of 
deaths under one year of age to the total number of births in the 
year:— 






















6 


Deaths under Ratio to 


Soutliwick Parish 

Births. 

89 

one year. 
10 

1000 Births. 
112 

Rest of Shoreham Sub-district 

75 

5 

66 

Steyning Parish 

46 

2 

43 

Henfield Parish 

39 

7 

180 

Rest of Steyning Sub-district 

38 

5 

132 

Total 

287 

29 

101 


The mean annual rate in the previous four years, 1891-94, was 90 
per 1,000 registered births. In England and Wales the proportion of 
deaths under one year of age to registered births was 161 per 1,000 
during the past year, the mean proportion in the preceding ten years 
having been 146. 


ZYMOTIC MORTALITY. 


The deaths from zymotic diseases were 6 in the case of those 
which are notifiable, and 6 in the other class where the number of cases 
cannot be obtained. The rate of mortality was therefore equal to 1*09 
per 1,000. 


Small Pox . . 
Scarlatina 
Diphtheria . . 
Membranous Croup 
( Typhus 
I Enteric 
> <■ Continued 
^ 1 Relapsing 
f Puerperal 
Cholera 
Erysipelas 


Cases. 

Deaths. 

none 

none 

9 

none 

14 

1 

1 

none 

none 

none 

18 

3 

none 

none 

none 

none 

none 

none 

none 

none 

7 

2 


Total 


49 6 


In the other class the deaths were as follows :— 

Measles . . . . . . . . 1 

Whooping Cough . . . . . . 2 

Diarrhoea and Dysentery . . . . 3 

Rheumatic Eever . . . . . . none 


Total . . 6 


The Infectious Diseases (Notification) Act, 1889, came into force in 
this district on May 1st, 1891. 


The Infectious Disease Prevention Act, 1890, and the Public 
Health Acts Amendment Act, 1890, camo into force here on September 


29th, 1891. 
















7 


The prevalence in each quarter of each notifiable disease is shown 


in the following table : 

Small Pox 

1st Qr. 

2nd Qr. 

3rd Qr. 

4th Qr. 

Total 

Scarlatina 

— 

6 

— 

3 

9 

Diphtheria . . 

1 

5 

5 

3 

14 

Membranous Croup. . 

— 

— 

1 

— 

1 

Enteric Fever 

3 

— 

2 

13 

18 

Puerperal Fever 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

Erysipelas 

2 

1 

2 

2 

7 

Total 

6 

12 

10 

21 

49 


WATER SUPPLY. 

Southwick, Kingston, and Lancing College are supplied with good 
water from the New Shoreham Waterworks. In other parts of the 
district the supply is from wells or rain water tanks. In each parish 
the water supply is of a satisfactory character. 


SEWERAGE AND DRAINAGE. 

There has been much discussion during the past year as to the 
drainage of Southwick, which is in a very bad condition. The reports 
on this place are dealt with in the Steyning East District with which 
the Portslade drainage is intimately concerned. The question in each 
of these places is of pressing importance, but no conclusion has yet been 
arrived at. 


STEYNING DRAINAGE. 

The following report, made last September, deals with a portion of 
the drainage of this town, but no remedy will be found until the 
drainage of Messrs. Breach’s works is carried by a separate pipe to the 
outfall. At present, in times of flood, the large quantity of water 
passing through the drains from these works causes a block in the main 
sewer, and it is frequently the cause of a nuisance. A new drain will 
be made soon and then the nuisance will be abated. 

There is a stream which flows through that town, and which is 
said to be polluted at times by reason of various products flowing into 
it from the works of Messrs. Breach and Son. 

This stream breaks out at the foot of the South Downs, and just 
before Steyning is reached, it supplies a flour mill ; it then passes on in 
a ditch about six feet wide, through the town, by the side of the above 
named factory, through Gatewicke and then on to the brooks, finally 
running into the river Adur. 





8 


At Gatewicke, about a quarter of a mile below the factory, the 
ditch has lately been diverted and expanded into a small pond, whence 
the water flows over a weir into its former course. 

When the mill is not working, the flow of water along the ditch is 
small, and the depth of the stream may be only six or nine inches; 
when the mill is in use, the flow is considerable, and it is much increased 
in wet weather or in time of flood. 

The various impurities which may enter this stream at different 
times may be seen by following the course from the mill pond to 
Gatewicke pond. Just above the mill there are several ducks, which by 
disturbing the soil on the banks make the water white and turbid at 
this spot. 

In Mouse Lane there is a pigstye in a foul condition, which in very 
wet weather may allow some manure water to enter the stream. 


Near Pompey’s Terrace there is another pigstye and a heap of 
manure, which under similar conditions may pollute the stream. 


As the ditch passes along St. George’s Terrace several persons throw 
in dirty water from their houses, and as ashes and house refuse are 
frequently deposited on the banks of this stream it follows that in very 
wet weather some impurities must be washed in. 

As the ditch passes beneath the main street it receives the washings 
and surface water from the road. 

The above impurities would only be noticed during a heavy rainfall, 
and then the flow of water is so abundant that anything offensive is so 
diluted as not to cause any injurious effects. 


At Mr. Goatcher’s cottage the pigs which caused a nuisance three 
years ago have been long ago removed, but just below this spot some 
ducks make the water turbid by disturbing the bed of the ditch where 
there is much soft mud. 

At Messrs. Breach and Son’s factory I found a considerable 
improvement since 1892. Three iron pipes convey all refuse water into 
the main sewer, and I could not find at my recent visit any pollution of 
the stream from these works. 

At one place a little water, coloured white by the liming process, 
flowed into the ditch, but this could do no harm, and it might easily be 
prevented. 

There is a hole in the wall of a room where the skins are washed, 
whence in times of flood it forms an outlet for the surplus water, but at 
such times the volume of water is so great that any impurities from this 
source would be rapidly carried away. 


9 


The pond at Gatewicke is full of turbid water of a grey colour, but 
when this water stands still for a short time, it becomes clear and 
inoffensive, and the deposit is made up of earthy matter which has 
been washed down from above. 

This deposit is increased by the disturbance of the bed of the ditch 
just above Gatewicke, by cattle going there to drink. 

The bed and banks of this ditch are formed by the upper greensand 
which readily breaks down and gives a grey or chalky looking deposit. 
This deposit is so great as to silt up the floor of the ditch in 
many places, and much of this is carried on to Gatewicke pond 
and causes the turbidity. 

I have taken samples of water from four points: — 1, at the 
mill pond ; 2, at a point just above the factory ; 3, at a point just below 
the factory ; 4, at Gatewicke pond. 

Nos. 1 and 4 were good examples of water from a running stream. 
Nos. 2 and 3 showed in each case a small quantity of organic 
matter. The amount of chlorides varied from 1*5 grs. to T9 grs. 
per gallon. Each sample was cloudy or turbid when taken, but 
when the earthy deposit had settled down, the water was clear, colourless, 
and free from odour. 

My visit was made during dry weather, but I will take an 
opportunity of inspecting the stream again after a heavy rainfall. At 
the present time there is no sufficient evidence to show that the stream 
is injuriously polluted. 


SYSTEMATIC INSPECTION. 

The following is a list of routine work during the year 1895, as 
recorded in the books of the Sanitary Inspector, Mr. T. F. Gates :— 


No. of Houses and Premises inspected .. .. 933 

No. of Houses and Premises reported . . . . 429 

No. of Nuisances abated by verbal and written 

notice . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 

No. of Nuisances abated by notice . . . . . 22 

Houses reported unfit for human habitation . . 6 

Houses closed by owners . . . . , . . . 2 

Houses, closing order . . . . . . . . 4 

Houses cleansed and disinfected . . .. . . 26 

Houses whitewashed.. . . . . . . . . 37 

Water certificates granted for new houses.. .. 39 

Wells cleansed . . . . . . .. . . 4 

Water to 3 houses from spring by gravitation . . 3 

Cases of overcrowding abated . . . . . . 2 

Samples of Water analysed . . . . . . . . 12 

Earth Closets provided . . . . , , . . 4 

Privies altered . . . . . . . . . . 6 

Unwholesome Food seized . . . . . . . . n®ne 




10 


COWSHEDS AND DAIRIES. 

There are 45 cowsheds and dairies frequently inspected and well 
kept. 


BAKEHOUSES. 

There are 20 bakehouses inspected from time to time and kept in a 
clean condition. 


SLAUGHTER-HOUSES. 

There are 10 slaughter-houses inspected at various times and kept 
in a clean condition. 


MARGARINE ACT. 

Very little is sold, and at places where it is sold the clauses of the 
Act have been complied with. 


COMMON LODGING-HOUSES. 
There is no common lodging-house in this district. 


PROCEEDINGS BEFORE THE MAGISTRATES. 

A summons was issued against the owner of four cottages at 
Lancing as being unfit for human habitation, and a closing order was 
granted by the Steyning Bench of Magistrates on December 2nd, 1895, 
under Sect. 32 of the Housing of the Working Classes Act, 1890. 


INQUESTS. 

Inquests were held in fourteen cases:-—Male, 46 years, suicide ; 
male, newly-born, convulsions ; female, 27 years, drowned ; female, 55 
years, disease of stomach ; female, 82 years, accidental fracture of thigh ; 
male, 1 month, accidentally suffocated ; male, 85 years, accidental 
fracture of thigh ; male, 57 years, found drowned in the river Adur ; 
male, 35 years, accidental blow on head ; male, 42 years, acute gastritis ; 
male, 23 years, killed by lightning; male, 66 years, disease of lungs ; 
female, 9 weeks, accidentally suffocated ; male, 57 years, rupture of 
aneurism. 


11 


STEYNING WEST RURAL DISTRICT. 


Table 1.—Showing the Deaths at various groups of ages in the 

year 1895. 



















j- 













S-* 



0) 





cS 

Year. 

CO 

>* 





ft 

be 



• 

io 

io" 



C$ 



»o 

Cl 

CO 




s- 

1C 





f— t 

05 



o 

o 

S3 


cS 

T3 

o 

o 


• 4-2 

eS 


43 

<1 

S 

P 

-M 

*o 

lO 

ic 

d 

iO 

co 

1895 . 

144 

29 

6 

♦ 

3 

12 

32 

62 




















12 


>s 


STEYYING WEST RURAL DISTRICT. 


Table 2.—Showing the Deaths in the six years, 1890-95, from various 

causes. 


Year. 

| Small Fox. 

Scarlatina. 

Diphtheria. 

Membranous Croup. 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 

Measles. 

Whooping Cough. 

Diarrhoea. 

i 

Rheumatic Fever. 

Influenza. 

Total. 

Typhus. 

Enteric. 

i 

Continued. ^ 

&J0 

& 

"m 

Pu 

r o> 

K 

j Puerperal. 

1890. 

— 


2 


— 

4 

— 

— 



1 

1 

5 

1 

— 

6 

20 

1891. 



— 

1 








3 

4 

1 


5 

14 

1892. 



3 


— 

1 

— 





— 

8 

2 


15 

29 

1893. 

— 

1 

3 

1 

— 

5 

— 





2 

— 

1 

— 

5 

18 

1894. 



2 



1 



— 


2 

— 


2 

1 

3 

11 

1895. 


• 

1 



3 





2 

1 

2 

3 


6 

18 

Total... 


1 

11 

o 


14 

— 




5 

7 

19 

10 

1 

40 

110 






















































































13 


STEYNING WEST RURAL DISTRICT, 

Table 3.-—Showing the Deaths and Death-rate from all causes and from* 
various causes in the twenty years, 1876-95. 


•esuesiQ; 

1111 

•esB9si(i Sumj 

'TT 4 O i“H 

-—1 00 I— < 00 

cq r —1 (M i-H 

■SPIW 

CO CO CO 00 

05 (M CM 05 

i—H r—1 r-t 

'0SB9STQ 

aijounf^ 

144 

202 

119 

99 

•S9SB9SI(J py 

1,504 

1,406 

1,390 

1,333 

*9SB9SI(J JJB9JJ 

,iii 

'9SB9SIQ[ Sumj 

05 O 05 CO 

i—i 0> i -1 CD 

r— 1 r— 1 r-— 1 rH 

' s i s wq<i 

05 05 05 lO 

O CO CO iO 

rH 

•0SB9SI(J 

OTJOluX^ 

80 

113 

67 

56 

*S0S«9SI(I py 

835 

782 

782 

753 

•pOTJQjJ JO 
OJppilH 

ui uoijipndoj; 

11,100 

11,180 

11,250 

11,300 


1 e 

A 

■+3 s 
cS • r 4 

<X> 

^ O 

§ 2 - 

S3 ^ 

*<1 f-t 

a> 

& 


ai 
S 
c$ 
a> 

© S 

-£S P 

-P> Pi 
t4H 

&0 
S3 J 

S3 CO 
■73 t- 
03 CO 
^3 «“» 

-p> 

c3 
a) 

P 


Q 

O 

i—i 

P 

P 

P 


o 

o 

o 


CO 

00 

05 

05 

CO 

A 

CO 

rH 


CO 

CO 

05 

00 

00 

00 

00 

I—1 

rH 

rH 

I—H 








































14 


(A)—Table of DEATHS during the Year 1895, in the STEYNING WEST 


Names of Localities adopted for 
the purpose of these 
Statistics; Public Institutions 
being shown as separate 
localities. 

{ a ) 

Mortality from all Causes 

AT SUBJOINED AGES. 

(i) 


02 

© 

t*D 

re 

"eg 

<3 

( b ) 

Ci 

CS 

© 

>> 

u 

© 

T3 

a 

(c) 

co 

u 

© 

••d 

a 

a 

■d 

a 

eg 

( d ) 

u 

© 

dJ 

a 

a 

^ CO 
d5 r_H 

-H 

eg 

cO 

(e) 

Cm 

© 

d! 

a 

a . 

d CM 

a 

a 

CO 

(/) 

c* 

© 

a 

a . 

d CO 

a 

eg 

CO 

tM 

(S') 

• 

» . 
02 
d 
a ch 

§ g 
£ 
CO 

CO 

(A) 

1 

2 

3 

Small Pox. 

Scarlatina. 

Diphtheria. 

South wick Parish 

39 

10 

1 

2 

1 

11 

14 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 




Rest of Shoreharp Sub-district 

34 

5 

3 

— 

4 

5 

17 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 




t U 

Steyning Parish 

20 

2 

— 

1 

2 

5 

10 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 




Henfield Parish... 

20 

7 

I 

— 

4 

1 

7 

Under 5 



1 

5 upwards. 




Rest of Steyning Sub-district 

22 

5 

1 

— 

1 

7 

8 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 




. 








Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 




Totals. 

135 

29 

6 

3 

12 

29 

56 

Under 5 



1 

5 upwards. 





The subjoined numbers have also to be taken into 

Deaths occurring outside the 
District among persons 
belonging thereto. 

9 






Under 5 




6 

0 

5 upwards. 




Deaths occurring within the 
District among persons 
not belonging thereto... 








Under 5 




5 upwards. 


































































































































































































15 


Rural District, classified according to Diseases, Ages, and Localities. 


Mortality from subjoined causes, distinguishing Deaths of Children 

under Five Years of Age. 


4 

5 | 6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

Membranous 

Croup. 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 

Measles. 

Whooping 

Cough. 

Diarrhoea and 

Dysentery. 

Rheumatic 

Fever. 

Phthisis. 

Bronchitis, 

Pneumonia, 

and Pleurisy. 

Heart 

I )isease. 

Influenza. 

m 

V 

• rH 

S-i 

3 

• -—s 

a 

HH 

All Other 

Diseases. 

Total. 

Typhus. 

Enteric or 
Typhoid. 

Continued. 

Relapsing. 

Puerperal. 








1 



1 



1 


1 


7 

11 



1 





1 





4 

3 

2 

1 

2 

14 

28 









1 


1 






1 

5 

8 



1 










2 

1 

5 


1 

16 

26 
















1 


1 

2 



1 










3 

2 


2 

1 

9 

18 










1 




1 



1 

4 

8 













1 

2 

2 

1 


6 

12 










1 

1 



1 




3 

6 













1 

2 

2 


3 

8 

16 


























































































































































I 











































































J| . 






1 

1 

2 

3 



3 


2 

o 

20 

35 

S1 


3 




1 i 





11 

10 

11 

4 

7 

53 

100 

account in judging of the above records of mortality. 

I . 































2 

1 

1 



5 

9 



























1 










































































































































































































































































































































































16 


(B)—TABLE OF POPULATION, BIRTHS, AND OF NEW CASES 
Officer of Health, during the year 1895, in the STEYNING WEST 


Names of Localities adopted 
for the purpose of these 
Statistics; Public Institutions 
being shown as separate 
localities. 

(a) 

Population 
at all Ages. 

a. Registered Births. 

Aged 
under 5 
or 

over 5. 

(«) 

New Cases of Sick- 
coming to the knowledge 

of 

Census 

1891. 

(6) 

Esti¬ 
mated 
to mid¬ 
dle of 
1895. 

(c) 

1 

2 

3 

j 

4 

5 | 6 

Small Pox. 

Scarlatina. 

Diphtheria. 

Membranous 

Croup. 

Fevj 

& 

>> 

EH 

Enteric or gj 

Typhoid. S® 

South wick Parish 

2,564 

2,720 

89 

Under 5 



1 




5 upwards. 


1 

4 



4 

Rest of Shoreham Sub-district 

2,654 

2,660 

75 

Under 5 



L 

1 



5 upwards. 


1 

1 



2 

Steyning Parish 

1,705 

1,710 

46 

Under 5 






1 

5 upwards. 



4 



10 

Henfield Parish... 

2,006 

2,040 

39 

Under 5 



1 




5 upwards. 






1 

Rest of Steyning Sub-district 

1,881 

1,870 

38 

Under 5 


1 





5 upwards. 


6 

2 








Under 5 







5 upwards. 







• 




Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 







Totals . 

10,810 

11,000 

287 

Under 5 


1 

3 

1 


1 

5 upwards. 


8 

11 



17 















































































































































































17 


OF INFECTIOUS SICKNESS, coming to the knowledge of the Medical 
Rural District; classified according to Diseases, Ages, and Localities. 


NESS IN EACH LOCALITY, 

or the Medical Officer 
Health. 


Number of such Cases Removed from their 
Homes in the several Localities for Treatment 
in Isolation Hospital. 


7 

1 8 

1 9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 



Small Pox. 

Scarlatina. 

Diphtheria. 

Membranous 

Croup. 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 



Continued. 

Relapsing. 

Puerperal. 

Typhus. 

Enteric or 

Typhoid. 

Continued. 

Relapsing. 

Puerperal. 

























2 








































O 








































1 

























— 















1 








































1 




















































































































































I 




































































































































7 





























































































































































































































































































































STEYNING 

EAST RURAL DISTRICT. 


pp. 19 et seq 






19 


STEYNING EAST RURAL DISTRICT. 


Population in 1861 . . 

• • • • 

2.242 

„ „ 1871 .. 

• • « • 

3,656 

„ ,,1881.. 

• • • • 

.. 5,272 

„ „ 1891 .. 

• • • • 

• • 6,062 

Male population in 1891 

• • • • 

2,982 

Female „ „ „ 

• . • • 

.. 3,080 

No. of Inhabited Houses in 

1891 .. 

.. 1,160 

„ Uninhabited Houses 

in 1891 

53 

„ Persons to each House in 1891 

5-23 


Nearly the whole of the increase in population is due to the growth 
of Portslade since 1861, and to a much less extent to the growth of 
Patcham ; in the remaining five parishes there has been very little 
change. 


At Portslade there are large numbers of persons who work at 
Brighton or Hove but who live here to avoid the higher rates of 
living in those towns; many are also engaged in agriculture, market 
gardening, and brickmaking, and many are employed at the Brighton 
and Hove Gas Works. At Patcham and West Preston there are a 
considerable number of retired people who live in houses of a suburban 
character; the rest of the district is agricultural. 

The following tables show the population in each parish over a long 
term of years; and the deaths in each parish from all cause* and from 
various causes ki four five-year periods :— 














Houses, 1891 . Population. 


20 


Females, 

1891 . 

co 

OX 

r-H 

I-H 

t— 

XO 

38 

24 

CO 

o 

of 

99 

o 

XO 

r-H 

of • 








(£> r—H 

CO 

CO 

i- 

xO 

OX 


xO 

i—H 

LP 00 

co 

05 

-cH 

XO 

ox 

CO 

r-H 

rs 

OX 

GO 

o 

1—H 

c/T 








«4 

o 

05 


XO 

05 

o 

O 

XO 

CO ^ 
G CO 

© rH 

Pi 

lO 

H 

CO 

o 

#N 

r-H 

05 


hH 

OX 

lO 

r—i 

O 

CO 

af 








g 

O Uq 

CO 

co 

05 

05 

00 

r-H 

CO 

ax 

G GO 

rH 

Ph 

05 

t- 

00 

XO 

t- 

o 

t- 

co 

l-H 

r— • 

CO 


m 

G 

O 

a} 

G 

© 

Ph 


GO 




O 

co 


05 


CO 


HH 

hH 

CO 

•N 

OX 


CO 


05 

05 

OX 


w 

o rr 

CO 

G GO 

O |—H 

pH 


00 

CO 

CO 


05 

XO 


XO 


CO 

O 


o 

co 


CO 

OX 


bO 

G 


cq 


OX 


no 
© 
.1 -p 

C3 *d 

P’S 


05 


CO 


CO 


co 


© 

-p 

Jt^ 

o 

05 

CM 

XO 

00 

05 

r-H 

o 

r-H 

l-H 

OX 

ox 

XO 

a 

I-H 


ox 



CO 




G 

o 

-p 

ax 

© 

g 

Ph 

-p 

ax 

© 


G 

d 

o 

-p 

d 

Pp 


G 

O 

-p 

bJD 

G 

G3 

© 

-1-5 

d 

s 

-p 

00 

© 


G 

o 

-p 

© 

r—H 

bD 

G 

d 

w 


© 

r d 

jd 

r co 

-p 

G 

O 

Ph 


be 

G 

IS 


Pi 


00 

be 

G 

• pH 

r —1 

H 

r^~j 

o 

Ph 












































21 


1891-95. 

•asuasiQ 

Snn'x 

1 

co | 

2 

54 

2 

3 

05 

co 

'SPTWW 


CO | 

7—i sa 1 

oq 



CO 

ca 

•‘euaqqqdiQ 


CO 

1 

00 

r-H 

CM 

r-H 

•asBasiQ 

OI^OUlX^ 

^ 2 

5 

r-H rH r-H 

CO 

t- 

1886-90. ] 

•asuasiQ 

Suivq 

■ 

(M CO 

Ca CO 

hH 

CO 

•sisiq;qd 



* rH 

CO r-H rH 

CM 

CO 

CO 

•euaq;qdi(X 





ca 



ca 

•as'easiQ 

OI^OHI^Z 

ca U- 


O r—1 t-H 

CO 

r-H 

hm 

1881-85. 

‘asBasiQ 

Suiuj 

1— CO 

rH OO 7—H 1 1 

co 

GO 

HtH 



co 

2 

33 

_ 

co 

u- 

•Bijaq^qdiQ 

rH 


JO 



CO 

•8SB9SIQ 

OI^OUI^2 

I— 1 CO i—i r—1 CO 

JO 


OO 

CO 

1876-80. 

’as'Bgsqj 

Surrj 


1 ^ 

1 t-h CO 

CO 

j *o 

00 

'sisiq^qx 


jo 


ca 7—i ^ 

ca 

ca 

CO 

Bijgq^qdiQ 





r-H 



r-H 

■as'easiQ 

01^01X1^2 


JO rH I 

hH Ca rH 

JO 

CO 

CO 

•suea^ £}U9 ayx 
ui pnox 

17 

212 

16 

16 

1167 

40 

77 

1,545 

Deaths from all 

CAUSES IN THE YEARS 

26*1681 

7 

55 

4 

3 

342 

12 

15 

438 

06*9881 

6 

58 

7 

5 

266 

11 

18 

rH 

t— 

co 

S8TS81 

^ t- Ca JO O 05 ^ 

JO t— 1 Ca 

CO 

r-H 

r-H 

hH 

08*9^81 


42 

Q 

O 

3 

249 

• 

8 

20 

325 

Parish. 

p 

H 

K 

vv esc jrreston 

Patcham 

West Blatchington 

Hangleton 

Portslade 

Bulking . . 

Poynings 

Total 



































































































22 


BIRTHS AND BIRTH-RATE. 


During the year 1895, the births of 203 children were registered; 
of these 114 were male, and 89 were female. 

Estimating the population in the middle of the year at 6,800, 
the birth-rate was equal to 30’0 per 1,000 persons living. 


The births and birth-rate in the 
ten years have been as follows : — 


Year. 

Births. 

Birth-rate. 

1885 

. . 524 

.. 28*8 

1886 

. . 513 

. . 28*0 

1887 

.. 470 

. . 25*5 

1888 

.. 507 

. . 27*2 

1889 

. . 500 

. . 26*7 


former district during the past 


Year. 

Births. 

Birth-rate. 

1890 

. . 484 

.. 25*7 

1891 

. . 561 

. . 29*4 

1892 

. . 527 

. . 27*2 

1893 

... 540 

. . 28*5 

1894 

., 480 

. . 28*1 


The mean number of births was 510, and the mean birth-rate was 
27‘5 per 1,000 of population. 


In England and Wales the birth-rate during the year was 30'3 
per 1,000 persons living, a rate 0*9 per 1,000 below the mean rate in 
the ten years, 1885-94. 


The following table shows the births and birth-rate in each locality 
during the past four years :— 

Births. Birth-rate. 



1892. 

1893. 

1894. 

1895. 

1892. 

1893. 

1894. 

1895. 

Portslade Parish 

.. 155 

158 

154 

164 

36*2 

36*5 

35*2 

34*2 

Patcham Parish 

23 

22 

20 

17 

20*9 

19*3 

17*1 

14*2 

Rest of District 

17 

19 

21 

22 

22*3 

24*7 

27-0 

27*5 

Total. . 

.. 195 

199 

195 

203 

31*3 

31*0 

29*4 

30*0 


GENERAL MORTALITY. 

There were 80 deaths registered in this district in the year 1895, 
but to this number must be added the deaths of 4 persons in New 
Shoreham Workhouse, which is outside the district, leaving the 
corrected figures at 75, after deducting nine deaths in Hangleton 
Hospital. 


The four Workhouse deaths occurred amongst inmates who had 
been sent there from Portslade. 


Estimating the population in the middle of the year at 6,800, the 
death-rate was equal to 11*0 per 1,000 persons living. 














23 


In country places throughout England and Wales the rate of 
mortality in 1895 was equal to 17*0 per 1,000 of population. 



1892. 

Deaths. 
1893. 1894. 

1895. 

1892. 

Death-rate. 
1893. 1894. 

1895. 

Portslade Parish 

94 

65 

55 

55 

21-5 

14-4 

11-8 

11-5 

Patcham Parish 

14 

7 

8 

11 .. 

12-7 

6*2 

6-9 

9*2 

Rest of Sub-district.. 

10 

8 

8 

9 .. 

13*0 

10-2 

10-1 

11*2 

Total *. 

118 

80 

71 

75 

18-9 

12-4 

10-7 

11*0 


The variations in the death-rate during the past ten years in the 
former district were as follows : — 


Year. 

Deaths. 

Death-rate. 

Year. 

Deaths. 

Death-rate. 

1885 

.. 260 

.. 14-3 

1890 

.. 281 

.. 14-9 

1886 

.. 291 

. . 15*9 

1891 

.. 305 

.. 16*0 

1887 

.. 252 

.. 13-7 

1892 

.. 317 

.. 16-4 

1888 

.. 242 

.. 13-0 

1893 

.. 270 

.. 14-3 

1889 

.. 213 

.. 11-4 

1894 

.. 201 

.. 11-8 


The mean number of deaths was 263 and the mean death-rate was 
14*2 per 1,000 of population. 


In each parish the deaths were thus distributed :— 


West Preston .. 3 

Patcham . . .. 11 

West Blatchington .. 2 

Bulking 

Total 


Hangleton . . . . 2 

Portslade . . .. 55 

.. Poynings .. • • 1 

• a • . . . 1 

.. 75. 


INFANT MORTALITY. 

The infant mortality is here given as measured by the number of 
deaths under one year of age to the total number of births in the 
year:— 

Deaths under Ratio to 




Births. 

one year. 

1000 Births. 

Portslade Parish 

• • 

.. 164 

18 

110 

Patcham Parish 

• • 

17 

1 

59 

Rest of District 

• • 

22 

3 

136 

Total 

• • 

203 

22 

108 


The mean annual rate in the former district in the previous seven 
years, 1888-94, was 100 per 1,000 registered births. In England and 
Wales the proportion of deaths under one year of age to registered 
births was 161 per 1,000 during the past year, the mean proportion 
in the preceding ten years having been 146. 


















24 


ZYMOTIC MORTALITY. 


There was one death from zymotic diseases in the case of those 
which are notifiable, and three in the other class where the number of 


cases 

cannot bo obtained. Th6 

rate 

of mortality was 

therefore 

to 0’6 

per 1,000. 


Cases. ' ' 

Deaths. 


Small Pox . . 


none 

none 


Scarlatina 


t: 5 

none 


Diphtheria . . 


10 .. 

1 


Membranous Croup 


none 

none 


[ Typhus 


none 

none 

rfi 

1 Enteric 


1 

none 

<D 

> 

i Continued . . 


none 

none 

<D 

j Relapsing 


none 

none 


( Puerperal 


.. none 

none 


Cholera 


.. none 

none 


Erysipelas 


none 

none 

* * 


Total 

• 

16 

1 


In the other class the deaths were as follows 
Measles 

Whooping Cough 
Diarrhoea and Dysentery 
Rlieumatic Fever 


none 

none 

3 

none 


Total 


The Irifpctious Diseases (Notification) Act, 1889, came into force in 
this district on May 1st, 1891. 

o * 

The Infectious Disease Prevention Act, 1890, and the Public 
Health Acts Amendment Act, 1890, came into force here on September 
29th, 1891. 


The prevalence in each quarter of each notifiable disease is shown 
in the following table : 


1st Or. 2nd Qr. 3rd Or. 4th Or. 

Total j 

Small Pox 

— — — — 

Scarlatina 

3 — — 2 

5 

Diphtheria 

12 7 

10 

Membranous Croup. . 

— — — — 

— 

Enteric Fever 

— — 1 — 

1 

Puerperal Fever 

fr O * If 

— 

Erysipelas . . 

• - f, 

— 

Total 

3 13 9 

16 


WATER SUPPLY. 


Portslade is well supplied with good water from the Shoreham 
Waterworks Company, and Patcham has the same supply as Brighton. 




















25 


DRAINAGE AND SEWERAGE. 

Portslade has been in a healthy condition during the past year, but 
the drainage of this town and of South wick, which is adjacent, is in a 
dangerous condition. These places are full of cesspools which are con¬ 
stantly causing a nuisance. This state is the same, if not indeed worse 
now, as described in my previous reports, yet at present no epidemic 
prevalence of disease has appeared. The question of drainage has been 
discussed for the last twenty years, but nothing has been settled. There 
are many difficulties to be overcome, and much time was spent last year 
in discusssing different plans of dealing with the sewage. 


I give the three plans in extenso in the order in which they were 
made, but the diagrams cannot be reproduced. 


Mr. Mansergh’s Report. 

“ On the 5th September, Mr. Cripps wrote me that you wished my 
advice as to the sewerage scheme for the above districts prepared by 
Mr. Barrett, your engineer. Mr. Barrett was good enough to call here 
on the 12th September, when he fully explained his scheme. My 
principal assistant, Mr. Strachan, met Mr. Barrett at South wick on 
the 18th September, and carefully examined the River Adur at the 
parts affected, when the tide was at half ebb, and fully reported to me 
the facts. The scheme, as you are well aware, is to collect the sewage 
of the two districts by gravitation to a point on the left bank of the 
River Adur, about 500 yards from its mouth, and to construct at that 
point a storage tank with a capacity of 209,000 gallons. In the tank 
the sewage is to be collected for a little more than eleven hours, and 
then discharged in one hour after the tide has reached half ebb, and so 
on, tide after tide. The discharge is to be regulated by the opening and 
closing of a penstock by hand labour, and not by an automatic flap 
valve. I understand from Mr. Barrett that the present population to 
be provided for is about 7,000 ; that his scheme provides for an 
increase up to 10,000 persons ; that he proposes to admit into the 
sewers the rain water from the back roofs and yards of the houses only ; 
that the water supply may be taken at 20 gallons per head”; and that 
his estimate of the cost up to I Tver Adur is <£13,000. I have gone 
narefulljr into the principal calculations of the scheme, and, taking 
10,000 persons as a proper number to provide for at present, I find that 
the sewers will carry off rainfall at the rate of three inches per day from 
the back roofs and yards in addition to the maximum flow of sewage ; 
that the storage tank will easily hold the maximum quantity of sewage 
which will flow in eleven hours ; that the tank, together with the 24in. 
and 21 in. main sewers will hold the eleven hours of rainfall at the rate 
of inch per day, in addition to the last-named quantity of sewage, and 
that the whole of the sewage and rainfall stored in eleven hours can be 
discharged in one hour, commencing at half-ebb, together with the 
inflow of the twelfth hour. I regard all this as satisfactory. Mr. 
Barrett’s scheme contemplated the discharge of the sewage into the 
River Adur at the point named, but the Shoreham Harbour Trustees 
have used their veto to prevent this, and have required, as a, condition 
of their consent, that a syphon be constructed under the river from the 
storage tank, and an outfall sewer made on the right bank of the river 














26 


to discharge the sewage on the west side of the jetty into the sea at the 
mouth of the harbour. I understand that with these additions the 
Harbour Trustees have approved the scheme. Your Board, however, 
is apprehensive that the syphon and outfall may interfere with the 
efficiency of the scheme as originally designed, and it is to this point I 
am to particularly address myself. The question is of a somewhat 
technical character, and in order to elucidate it I have prepared a 
diagram showing the storage tank, syphon, and outfall sewer at neap 
tides and spring tides, of which I enclose three copies. I have taken the 
heights of high and low water from the experiments made to determine 
mean tide level at Shoreham by the Ordnance Survey Authorities, and 
I set them out in the following table :— 

High water, spring tides, lO’O feet above O.D. 

Do. neap tides, 5’7 ,, ,, „ 

Low water, neap tides, 5 7 „ below „ 

Do. spring tides, 8*0 „ ,, ,, 

Mean tide level, say equal with O.D. 

If the sewage were discharged into the river at the point proposed by 
Mr. Barrett the action would bn as follows : At half ebb-tide the pen¬ 
stock on the storage tank would be opened, and the pent-up sewage 
discharged into the main body of the tide. In one hour the tank would 
empty itself, and the penstock would be shut down. There can be no 
reasonable doubt, having regard to the float experiments made by Mr. 
Barrett, that in something like twenty minutes the sewage would be 
out of harbour, and travelling away into the Channel, with nearly two 
hours of the ebb-tide to take it well away from the shore. This would, 
practically speaking, apply to spring and neap tides. The addition of 
the syphon and outfall pipe would, however, effect a change. The 
operation of discharging the sewage would be identical to that described 
up to the time when the storage tank was empty and the penstock 
closed. There would then be imprisoned in the syphon and outfall 
sewer some 56,000 gallons of sewage, part of which would inevitably 
discharge itself as the level of the sea fell to low water. By referring 
to the diagram it will be seen that at neap tides the sewage in the 
syphon and outfall sewer would have a level of 2T8 feet below 0 D., 
when the penstock was closed, and that during the two hours to low 
water the outfall sewer would gradually discharge that part of its 
contents between the levels of 2*18 and 5’7 feet below O.D. This 
volume, I calculate to be 26,000 gallons, leaving 30,000 gallons of 
sewage to remain in the syphon and outfall pipes for the eleven hours 
which would elapse till the next period of discharge. In the diagram, 
the portion which would gradually discharge itself as the tide fell is 
shown by single hatching, and the portion which would be imprisoned 
for eleven hours is shown by cross hatching. In the case of the spring 
tides, the volume which would gradually discharge after the penstock 
was closed would be 41,000 gallons, and the volume imprisoned for 
eleven hours would be 15,000 gallons. These are shown on the diagram 
by hatching in the same manner as in the case of the neap tides. If I 
have made the facts clear it will be seen that a volume of sewage, 
varying from 26,000 gallons to 41,000 gallons, would be discharged at 
the mouth of the harbour each tide during the last two hours of the ebb. 
Some of this would flow back into the river. The young flood tide first 
enters the harbour by creeping up the sides of the river, although the 




27 


central body of water may still be ebbing, and would carry back with it 
some of the sewage discharged from the outfall sewer on the last parts of 
the ebb. This, I am sure, is a ver y undesirable thing from the point of 
view of the Harbour Trustees. The syphon has, in addition, a draw¬ 
back from your point of view. A syphon which necessarily has sewage 
at rest in it for eleven hours twice daily must occasion expense 
from time to time to clear out the matters which would deposit in it. 
In my view the suggested syphon and outfall sewer will be a disadvan¬ 
tage to the Harbour Trustees. Such an addition would add 25 per 
cent, to the capital expenditure of the sewage scheme, would increase 
the working expenses, and would be of no advantage to anyone. Strictly 
speaking, having said this much, my duty as consulting engineer has 
been fulfilled. I think, however, I may venture a suggestion as to the 
course you should take. It appears that you are completely in the 
hands of the Harbour Trustees as to the syphon and outfall, and as 
there is no appeal you must come to terms with them if this scheme is 
to be carried out. If, therefore, you offer to construct the syphon and 
outfall sewer, whenever the Harbour Trustees call upon you, provided 
that the scheme for discharging the sewage into the river be allowed to 
go forward, you will be in no worse position than you are now. I 
venture to think that after the Harbour Trustees have seen the scheme 
in work for twelve months the chances of your being called upon to 
construct the syphon and outfall sewer are somewhat remote. The 
liability of having to spend a large sum of money at the pleasure of 
another body is not, of course, a desirable position for you to be in, but 
this much may be said for it, the outlay will not be ultimately increased 
beyond that now facing you, and that part represented by the additions 
may possibly be avoided altogether. Perhaps you will take into con¬ 
sideration the advisability of sending a copy of this Report, with a 
diagram, to the Harbour Trustees, and ask them to meet you in 
friendly conference with a view to arrive at a settlement of the 
difficulty.” 


Messrs. Law & Son’s Report. 


“ Having received from your Clerk, Mr. Cripps, notice that you 
had appointed us as Engineers to report upon the drainage of your dis¬ 
tricts we have now to report as follows :— 


“The several places which are situated upon the Harbour of Shore- 
ham, and which naturally drain into that estuary, are Old Shoreham, 
New Shoreham, Kingston-by-Sea, Southwick, and Portslade. 


“The following statement shows the total area of these several places 
(not including the area occupied by water) and the’population according 
to the census returns in the years 1881 and 1891 :— 



Area in 

Population. 


acres. 

1881. 

1891 

Old Shoreham. 

.. 1805 ... 

248 ... 

263 

New Shoreham .... 

116 ... 

3505 ... 

3393 

Ivingston-by-Sea_ 

.. 778 ... 

262 ... 

239 

Southwick . 

.. 1041 ... 

2561 ... 

2558 

Portslade. 

.. 1951 ... 

3719 ... 

4236 













28 


“ From the proximity of these places to the sea it is obvious that the 
readiest and most economical mode of disposing of their sewage would 
be to discharge it into the sea. 

“But owing to the fact that the whole of the distance comprised by 
these places is cut off from the sea by the Harbour of Shoreham, no 
outfall for the drainage of these places can be carried to the sea without 
either (a) interfering with the property of the Trustees of Shoreham 
Harbour, or (b) being carried through the adjacent district of Aidring- 
ton, situated to the east of Portslade and adjoining Hove. 

“ In the first case (a) in accordance with section 327, sub-sections 
three and six, of the Public Health Act, 1875, no outfall can be carried 
in, through, or under the property of the Trustees of the Shoreham 
Harbour without their consent. And at present time the only consent 
which they have given is contained in the following resolution passed at 
a meeting of the Trustees held in February of the present year, namely:— 
* That, subject to the applicants obtaining the consent of all the Sani¬ 
tary Authorities concerned, including the Corporation of Hove and 
Brighton, and without prejudice to any further action the Trustees 
may deem it advisable to take, their present view is that the outfall 
proposed in connection with the Southwick and Portslade Drainage 
Scheme, should be permitted to pass under the eastern arm of the 
Harbour, as shown on the plan deposited by Mr. W. Lewis Barrett, and 
dated 9th February, 1895, at a depth of not less than eight feet below the 
bed of the river, and to discharge at the extreme south end of the East 
Pier, provided the local authorities undertake all risk of damage, loss, 
or injury by navigation or otherwise, to the works or to vessels using 
the Harbour, and they are to extend the outfall southward if required 
by the Trustees, and also in the events of improvements in the Harbour 
necessitating the alteration of the position of the sewer, the risk and 
expense shall be borne by such local authorities. The discharge of the 
sewage to take place at such times as may be directed by the Trustees, 
and all work to be carried out to their satisfaction, and a proper agree¬ 
ment executed before the works are commenced.’ 

“We applied to Mr. Cripps for the plan referred to in the foregoing 
resolution, but he informs us that Mr. Barrett took it away. He also 
stated that Dr. Fuller had informed him that the Trustees would prefer 
Mr. Blaber’s outfall to Mr. Barrett’s. 

“We have shown on the accompanying plan, Drawing No. 1, and 
Section Drawing No. 2, the outfall sewer above referred to. It 
commences in the Shoreham Road at the eastern boundary of the parish 
of Portslade following the Shoreham Road as far as Church Road, thence 
along the line of the wharves bordering the Canal, m order to avoid 
the deep trench which would be required if continued along the Shore¬ 
ham Road, into which it would be again brought near Southwick Street, 
and thence continued along the Shoreham Road, as far as the road 
leading to Kingston House, it then leaves the high road and is carried 
across the channel leading to the Canal by a syphon passing along the 
side of the east pier and discharging at its extreme southern end. 

“ In order effectually to drain the districts at Southwick and Ports- 
slade the invert of the sewer at the road leading to Kingston House 
was suggested to be at the level of 2'82 above Ordnance Datum. 




29 


“ We obtained from Dr. Fuller a copy of the record kept by the 
Harbour Master of the heights of high water taken at the tide gauge at 
the middle pier of the Harbour for the first six months of the present 
year. The lowest tide recorded rose3'50ft. above Ordnance Datum ; the 
highest rose llTTft above Ordnance Datum, and the mean height was 
7*37ft. above Ordnance Datum. 

“We have prepared a diagram, Drawing No. 3, which shows 
graphically the results of these observations. Upon this diagram we 
have shown the level of the invert of the proposed sewer, for which it 
will be seen that, for a certain time in every tide, the sea will be such a 
level as to prevent the free discharge of the sewage. 

“ Drawing No. 4 shows the rate at which the water falls and rises- 
on an ebb and on a flood tide. 

“ Dr. Fuller furnished us with the results of observations of the 
direction and velocity of the tidal current taken by the Harbour 
Master last July, both off the mouth of the Harbour and off the Wish 
Groyne. As, however, these observations were only made during the 
first half of the ebb tide, while the large amount of the sewage would 
be discharged during the last half of the ebb we have had observations 
taken for the whole range of the tide and these show that although 
during the last part of the flood and first half of the ebb the direction 
of the current is westerly, during the latter part of the ebb the current 
is easterly, and would certainly carry the sewage in the direction of 
Hove and Brighton. 

“ Under these circumstances we cannot recommend that the crude 
sewage should be discharged into the sea as we are of opinion that such 
a suggestion would not meet with the approval of the Local Government 
Board. 

“ If, however, the sewage were first subjected to chemical treat¬ 
ment and all solid matters separated from it, the effluent might then be 
discharged during the ebb tide at the point A on the Plan Drawing 
No. 5 (at the western side of the middle pier in the Harbour) without 
the possibility of creating any nuisance, or of causing any shoals in the 
Harbour. 

“ The main intercepting sewer should be on the line shown on 
Drawing No. 5 commencing opposite the mouth of the Harbour; and 
the tanks for storing the sewage during the flood tide and the first half 
of the ebb should be placed near this spot. If an arrangement could be 
made with the Harbour Trustees the most convenient site would be that 
shown in red colour in Drawing No. 6. The tanks would occupy an 
enclosed space of 125 feet by 250 feet and should be covered over so that 
no nuisance could possibly be created, and the top of the roof need not 
be more than three feet above the level of the Shoreham Road, opposite 
the Harbour mouth and would cause no obstruction to the view sea¬ 
wards. 

“ Assuming that the prospective population would be 10,000 and. 
















30 


that the dry weather flow is 25 gallons per day per head, there would 
be space on the area coloured on the plan to store the maximum flow of 
sewage far ten hours with five times its bulk of rain water. 

“ If the sewage was treated in a similar way to that of London, 
namely with lime and proto-sulphate of iron, the annual cost of chemicals 
for treating the sewage of the present population taken at 7,000 persons 
would be under .£30 per annum. 

“ During the time that the sewage was stored in the tanks the 
solids which were originally in suspension, together with those pre¬ 
cipitated by chemicals, would subside to the bottom. 

“ As soon as the tide had fallen below the level of the water in the 
banks it would be discharged by means of a floating arm into the sea at 
the point shown on the Drawing No. 6, until within about twelve 
inches from the bottom of the tank. 

“ The remaining sludge which would amount to about 3| tons per 
day should be drawn off into a hopper barge which could be taken to 
■sea about every ten days and discharged in deep water at a sufficient 
distance from the shore. 

“ If this mode of dealing with the sewage be adopted there would 
be no interference with the navigation or with any future extension 
of the same, or any possibility of creating a nuisance, and the Councils 
would be relieved from the onerous conditions contained in the resolu¬ 
tion of the Harbour Trustees which was passed by them last February. 

“ By having one combined scheme for both Portslade and South- 
wick the cost to each will be materially lessened, and as the population 
of Kingston-by-Sea increased the most economical mode of dealing 
with it would be to unite it also in the same system.” 


Mr. Blaber’s Deport. 

<c According to the instructions from your drainage Committee, I 
have the honour to report to your Council the position of South wick in 
reference to the drainage of that and the adjacent parishes which has 
occupied the attention of the District Councils of Steyning West and 
Steyning East for some considerable time past with the object of pro¬ 
viding the most efficient system. 

“ The districts and parishes proposed to be sewered are Portslade, 
Southwick, and Kingston, the first being in East Sussex County Council 
division and in the limits of the District Council of Steyning East, and 
the two latter being in West Sussex County Council division and in 
The limits of the District Council of Steyning West. 

“ The parish of Aldrington, the next parish to Portslade on the 
east, has lately been amalgamated with the District of Hove and is now 
under the Hove District Council. 





31 


“ Between the parishes of Portslade, Southwick, and Kingston and 
the sea there is the eastern arm of the Kiver Adur and the Canal and 
Basin forming a portion of the limits of Shoreham Harbour. 


“ This Harbour has its entrance at Kingston, and the tidal 
currents and eddies are such that sewage of any large volume 
discharged within the Harbour would be liable to float and subside in 
the river and convert the same into nothing less than a cesspool, besides 
causing irreparable injury to the oyster beds at Southwick and interfer¬ 
ence with the navigation of the Harbour. 

“ The Harbour Trustees have power to prevent any such dis¬ 
charge within their limits, so that no crude sewage would at any time 
be allowed to flow into the Harbour without their consent. 

“ In dealing with the sewage of the combined districts before 
mentioned it is highly important that Aldrington should be considered, 
as, although now a part of Hove, its only present means of disposing 
of the sewage is through an outfall which now discharges on to the 
foreshore. Hove drains into the intercepting sewer with the outfall of 
Portobello, but, as that sewer was only designed for sewering the 
districts of Brighton, Hove, and Preston (under a special Act of Parlia¬ 
ment), its capacity is not large enough to take in Aldrington. 

“ Messrs. Law and Son have recently submitted a scheme to the 
District Councils of Steyning East and Steyning West for dealing with 
the sewage of the combined parishes of Portslade, Southwick, and 
Kingston-by-Sea. 


“ They provide for a prospective population of 10,000 persons, but 
to deal at present with 7,000. 


“ They propose to construct an intercepting sewer, commencing at 
the eastern boundary of Portslade, to convey the sewage along the 
Shoreham Road to disposal works to be constructed near Kingston Lane, 
and treated with lime and proto-sulphate of iron. 


“ The sludge is to be conveyed by gravitation into barges lying in 
the river, and thence carried out to sea and the effluent discharged into 
the river on the west side of the middle pier of Shoreham Harbour. 

“ This method of precipitation is, I may say, a good one, being the 
same as adopted at the Metropolitan Outfall Works, but it is attended 
with the usual expenses of all chemical treatment. 


“ Messrs. Law and Son estimate the cost of these works, including 
a hopper barge, at <£12,500, but this sum does not include the branch 
sewers required in each district for the necessary drainage of the houses. 
This would cost in addition, for Southwick about £3,000, and for Ports¬ 
lade in proportion. 













32 


“ The cost of treatment and conveyance of sludge is put at about 
,£250 per annum, equal to about 8|d. per head of the population dealt 
with. 


“I think that it will be found that this sum will be much exceeded, 
as, from the last accounts of the London County Council, I find the 
cost of treatment was about 7^d. per head in the Metropolitan area 
affected. And taking into consideration the different conditions at 
Kingston I should put the annual expense at not less than Is. 6d. per 
head, equal to <£525 per annum, against Messrs. Law and Son’s estimate 
of £250. I am confirmed in this opinion by Mr. Santo Crimp, who 
was engaged for some years as one of the Engineers under the London 
County Council and had charge of the main drainage works on the north 
side of the Thames, and who is therefore qualified to give a correct 
opinion upon the annual cost of such works. He also informs me, for 
instance, that at Wimbledon, with a population of about 30,000 people, 
the cost per head is Is. 6d., and with a smaller population it would be 
higher. 

“ The reasons of the increased cost are : (1). The expenses attend¬ 
ing any disposal works are governed by the relative population, thus 
comparatively small works cost much more in proportion than large 
works. (2). On account of the levels required for draining this district 
I think that it will be found impossible to convey the sludge into a 
hopper barge lying in the harbour by gravitation as proposed ; therefore 
either manual labour or pumping power will be necessary for loading 
the barges. In either case, besides the increased cost there will be the 
sweeping and stirring up of the sludge, which is putrescent mud and 
very offensive when exposed. On these points I am also confirmed by 
Mr. Crimp. 

“ Pumping is employed at the Metropolitan Outfall Works, but 
owing to the magnitude of the sludge dealt with, that expense does not 
form so large a proportion to the whole as would be the case at Kingston. 

“ During stormy weather the barges would be unable to go to sea 
for an indefinite period, and as the wet sludge would be 70 tons per 
week, from a population of 7,000, it follows that an accumulation of this 
offensive material would have to be stored upon the works. 

“ Under all the circumstances of the case I can see no reason to 
alter my opinion as to the most effectual way of sewering these districts, 
as no scheme can be complete that does not provide for Aldrington for 
the reasons before named, and this Messrs. Law and Son, I believe, 
were not instructed to take into account. 

“ In my opinion the only natural and proper site for the outfall 
for the Sewers of Portslade and Aldrington is at the “ Wish,” and for 
the sewage to be discharged directly into the sea into deep water, say 
some 2,000 feet from the shore. 

“ This outfall sewer could be constructed in accordance with the 
methods now generally adopted for such works at about £6,000, and 
would effectually discharge the sewage of Aldrington as well as 





I 


33 

Portslade without any danger of nuisance on the coast ; and would also 
do away with the accumulation of sewer gases which always generate 
more or less in long intercepting sewers. 


“ A further reason is that both these parishes are in East Sussex 
and Southwick and Kington-by-Sea in West Sussex, thus doing away 
with overlapping of county boundaries. 


“ From a careful study of the charts of the coast, and from 
opinions given me by seafaring men accustomed to the tides and 
currents at this spot, I find that there will not be the slightest danger of 
any sewage being returned to the foreshore on the line of coast to the 
eastward, including Hove and Brighton, the configuration being such 
that the littoral, or shore currents, will have sufficient force to divert 
any sewage under the worst circumstances of wind and tide from the 
shore in a south-easterly direction out to sea. 


“ This system of carrying outfall sewers is no new form of 
construction, as I have myself been engaged on such works, among 
others that of Bournemouth; and it has been adopted by Engineers of 
the highest eminence, including the late Mr. Hawkesley, and the same 
spot, namely the “ Wish,” was recommended many years ago by an 
Engineer of equal eminence for the outfall of the sewage of Brighton 
and Hove, in preference to Portobello, which latter was finally selected 
by the late Sir John Hawkshaw. 


“ With regard to Southwick and Kingston-by-Sea, I cannot 
suggest a more efficient scheme than I prepared for the discharge of 
the sewage by means of a syphon under the bed of the eastern arm of 
the Biver Adur, with an outfall at the southern end of the east pier of 
Shoreham Harbour, as shown upon the plans and sections submitted. 
I have made careful experiments as to the conditions of the tides 
and currents at this spot, with the result that the sewage would be 
carried out to sea by discharging it during a period of two hours at each 
tide, for which I have provided. I am given to understand also that 
this scheme would not be objected to by the Harbour Trustees. 


“ To confirm my opinion as to the proper working of the syphon, 
I have the authority of Mr. Santo Crimp, who has had experience in 
the construction and working of several syphons, that the syphon I 
propose will work satisfactorily and that it will discharge the sewage 
at sufficient velocity to more than empty the receiving tank within 
the limits of the time during which it is necessary to ensure the sewage 
being carried well out to sea and also to prevent any deposit in the 
syphon. 

“ From the experiments before mentioned I am of opinion that, 
with the large volume of sewage from the combined areas, mentioned 
in Messrs. Law and Son’s Report, the time would be too limited for its 
discharge at the harbour mouth to ensure its being carried out to sea. 
Therefore I consider that only Southwick and Kingston can be thus 
dealt with. 













34 


“ Upon these grounds it is difficult to find any reason why the 
ratepayers of South wick should be burdened with the cost of expensive 
outfall works consisting of precipitating tanks, machinery, hopper 
barges, &c., with the attendant annual charges of repairs, maintenance, 
and working. 

“ There is no such large annual working expenses attending the 
system that I propose.” 


SYSTEMATIC INSPECTION. 

The following is a list of routine work during the year 1895, as 
recorded in the books of the Sanitary Inspector, Mr. T. E. Gates :— 


No. of Houses and Premises inspected .. .. 578 

No. of Houses and Premises reported .. . . 217 

No. of Nuisances abated by verbal and written 

notice . . .. .. .. .. .. 80 

No. of Nuisances abated by notice . . .. .. 23 

Houses reported unfit for human habitation .. 4 

Houses repaired by owners .. .. .. .. 2 

Houses, closing order .. .. .. . . 2 

Houses cleansed and disinfected .. .. .. 7 

Houses whitewashed.. .. .. .. .. 12 

Water certificates granted for new houses.. .. 25 

Cases of overcrowding abated . . .. .. 1 

Earth Closets provided . . .. . . .. 3 

Unwholesome Food seized . . .. . . . . none 


COWSHEDS AND DAIRIES. 

There are 34 cowsheds and dairies frequently inspected and well 

kept. 


BAKEHOUSES. 

There are 14 bakehouses frequently inspected and well kept and 
whitewashed. 


SLAUGHTER-HOUSES. 

There are three slaughter-houses which have been inspected at 
various times and kept in a clean condition. 


MARGARINE ACT. 

Very little is sold, and in places where sold the clauses of the Act 
have been complied with. 









35 


COMMON LODGING-HOUSES. 
There is no common lodging-house in this district. 


PROCEEDINGS BEFORE THE MAGISTRATES. 

A summons was issued against the owner for not obtaining a 
Water Certificate for a house at Portslade, previous to occupation. The 
owner was fined .£1 and costs, but he refused to pay and went to prison 
for seven days. 

A summons was also issued against the owner of a house at 
Portslade for insufficient drainage ; he was fined, and the work was 

done. 

A summons was issued against the owner of two Railway Carriages 
at Patcham, occupied as dwellings unfit for human habitation, and a 
closing order granted. 


INQUESTS. 

Inquests were held in four cases :—Male, 68 years, heart disease ; 
male, 21 years, suicide on railway ; male, 26 years, suicide on railway ; 
infant, age and sex unknown, found on Dyke Hill in a decomposed state. 












STEYNING EAST RURAL DISTRICT. 


Table 1.—Showing the Deaths at various groups of ages in the 

year 1895. 


Year. 

At all ages. 

Under 1 Year. 

1 to 5. 

5 to 15. 

15 to 25. 

25 to 65. 

65 and upwards. 

, ;■ lA 

1895 . 

• ■ 

75 

22 

10 

4 

3 

15 

21 


Table 2.—Showing the Deaths in the six years, 1891-95, from various 

causes. 


Year. 

| Small Pox. 

c8 

a 

• T-4 

4-3 

eg 

72 

o 

m 

Diphtheria. 

j Membranous Croup. 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 

Measles. 

Whooping Cough. 

Diarrhoea. 

Rheumatic Fever. 

Influenza. 

Total. 

Typhus. 

Enteric. 

Continued. | 

Relapsing. 

j Puerperal. 1 

1890. 



— 




— 





1 


5 

— 


6 

1891. 



1 



1 






5 

4 

4 

2 

4 

21 

1892. 



5 


— 

— 



— 

— 

1 

2 

13 

4 


7 

32 

1893. 


2 

4 

3 



— 


— 



1 

2 

5 

1 

1 

19 

1894. 


1 

1 


— 

2 


— 

— 

— 

1 

4 


1 


1 

11 

1895. 

— 


1 











3 

— 

2 

6 

Total... 

— 

3 

12 

3 

— 

3 

— 




2 

13 

19 

22 

3 

15 

95 



































































































37 




STEYNING EAST RURAL DISTRICT. 

Table 3.— Showing the Deaths and Death-rate from all causes and from 
various causes in the twenty years, 1876-95. 


Deaths during the years Annual Death-rate 

1876-95 from per 100,000 living from 

- ^--S r- ^ \ 

•esBesiQ; 

r*H 

| | 1 co 

1 1 t-H 

•osbosiq; Sun^ 

188 

176 

219 

216 


lO Cl CO i — • 

Jt- J-H OO 

i-H I—1 H 

'0SB0SI(J 

oiyomAz 

249 

250 

140 

231 

•S0SC0SI(J \\y 

1,274 

1,508 

1,268 

1,369 

*0SC0SI(J JJB0JJ 

1 1 1 4! 

•osbosiq Sunrj 

48 

48 

64 

69 


32 

47 

33 

26 

‘osbosiq; 

CO GO r—1 ^ 

CO CO 

'SOSBOSIQ py 

325 

411 

371 

438 

•POIJ0J JO 
0{ppim 

ui uoijBjndoj 

5,100 

5,450 

5,850 

6,400 

PERIOD. 

1876-80 

1881-85 

1886-90 

1891-95 











































38 


(A)—Table of DEATHS during the Year 1895, in the STEYNTNG EAST 


Names of Localities adopted for 
the purpose of these 
Statistics; Public Institutions 
being shown as separate 
localities. 

{a) 

Mortality from all Causes 

AT SUBJOINED AGES. 

(i) 


02 

02 

bo 

c3 

<J 

(b) 

^ Under 1 year. 

itS 

u 

© 

'V 

a 

3 

a 

cS 

(d) 

Vi 

© 

a 

p lO 

c5 

iO 

(e) 

u 

© 

3 . 

"3 (M 
3 
eS 

Hi 

(/) 

Vi 

© 

c 

3 . 

'O to 
3 
eS 

iO 

(M 

(fl^) 

o- 

3 

ai 

a 53 

£ 

1C 

CO 

(A) 

1 

2 

3 

Small Pox. 

Scarlatina. 

Diphtheria. 

Portslade Parish 

51 

18 

6 

4 

1 

9 

13 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 



i i: 

Patcham Parish 

11 

1 

— 


2 

4 

4 

Under 5 





5 upwards. 




Rest of District... 

9 

3 

4 

— 


1 

1 

Under 5 





5 upwards. 




Hangleton Hospital ... 

9 

1 

7 

1 

— 

— 

— 

Under 5 



8' 

5 upwards. 












Under 5 



1 

5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 




• 








Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 




Totals..... 

80 

23 

17 

5 

3 

14 

18 

Under 5 



81 

5 upwards. 



2 


The subjoined numbers have also to be taken inti 

Deaths occurring outside the 
District among persons 
belonging thereto . 

4 





1 

3 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 





Deaths occurring within the 
District among persons 
not belonging thereto... 

9 

1 

7 

1 




Under 5 



8 

5 upwards. 



1 































































































































































39 


• Rural District, classified according to Diseases, Ages, and Localities. 


j Mortality from subjoined causes, distinguishing Deaths of Children 

under Five Years of Age. 


4 

5 

6 

1 7 

| 8 | 9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

XIXVlll MX MUV MW 

Croup. 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 

| Measles. 

Whooping 

Cough. 

Diarrhoea and 

Dysentery. 

Rheumatic 

Fever. 

Phthisis. 

Bronchitis, 

Pneumonia, 

and Pleurisy. 

Heart 

Disease. 

Influenza. 

Injuries. 

All Other 

Diseases. 

Total. 

Typhus. 

Enteric or 
Typhoid. 

Continued. 

Relapsing. 

Puerperal. 











2 



5 




17 

24 













3 

6 

2 



15 

27 


















1 

1 











1 



2 

2 

1 

2 

2 

10 

.... 













3 


1 

1 

2 

7 















1 



1 

2 

... 


















8 



















1 

t t . r 
























































































































































|. . .. 



















1: 









































































































2 


8 


1 

1 

20 

40 j 







1 




1 


3 j 8 

5 

1 

o 

18 

40 

1 

icount in judging of the above records of mortality. ; 


I 

• 




* 

! 























1 


•> 

O 

4 













| 






8 

















| 


1 




























































































































































































































































































































































































40 


(B)— TABLE OF POPULATION, BIRTHS, AND OF NEW CASES 
Officer of Health, during the year 1895, in the STEYNING EAST 


Names of Localities adopted 
for the purpose of these 
Statistics; Public Institutions 
being shown as separate 
localities, 

(a) 

Population 
at all Ages. 

a. Registered Births. 

Aged 
under 5 
or 

over 5. 

(e) 

New Cases of Sick- 
coming to the knowledge 

of 

Census 

1891. 

(b) 

Esti¬ 
mated 
to mid¬ 
dle of 
1895. 

(c) 

1 

2 

3 

i 

4 

5 I 

6 

Small Pox. 

Scarlatina. 

Diphtheria. 

Membranous 

Croup. 

Fevj 

m 

A 

& 

EH 

Enteric or g 

Typhoid. 

Portslade Parish 

4,240 

4,800 

164 

Under 5 


1 

1 




5 upwards. 


2 

8 




Patcham Parish . 

1,064 

1,200 

17 

Under 5 







5 upwards. 


2 

1 



. 

Rest of District 

740 

780 

22 

Under 5 







5 upwards. 






1 

Hangleton Hospital ... 

18 

20 


Under 5 








5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 







• 




Under 5 







5 upw T ards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 






— 

Totals . 

6,062 

6,80( 

) 203 

Under 5 


1 

1 



5 upwards. 


4 

9 



1 





































































































































































41 


OF INFECTIOUS SICKNESS, coming to the knowledge of the Medical 
Rural District; classified according to Diseases, Ages, and Localities. 































































































































































































































































































































HORSHAM RURAL DISTRICT. 


pp. 43 et seq. 





43 


HORSHAM 

RURAL DISTRICT COUNCIL. 


The population in this district was 13,400 at the census of 1841 
and 14,018 in 1851 ; partly owing to changes in the area, it rose to 
17,876 in 1861, and to 19,935 in 1871, and then by steady increases to 
22,300 in 1881, and to 24,885 in 1891. 


The above figures, however, include the urban district of Horsham, 
which was formed in 1875, and which had a population of 6,874 in 1881, 
and 8.087 in 1891 ; Crawley was added in 1880. The parish of 
Cowfold was added to this district on the passing of the Local Govern¬ 
ment Act, 1894. 


The following figures relate 

only to 

the late rural 

sanitary 

area : - - 


1861 

1871 

1831. 

1891. 

Area in Statute Acres 

— 

68,798 

69,706 

71,277 

Number of Inhabited Houses. . 

2,375 

2,713 

3,013 

3,410 

„ Uninhabited „ . . 

56 

135 

177 

232 

Population 

13,022 

13,710 

15,426 

16,798. 

Males 

6,872 

7,097 

7,915 

8,585 

Females 

6,150 

6,613 

7,511 

8,213 

Persons to a House 

5*5 

5T 

51 

4*9 


The following tables show the population in each parish ; and also 
the deaths from all causes and from various causes in each parish over 
a long term of years : — 







Houses, 1891. Population, 



44 


CQ 

o> • 

^ 05 

s °° 

<D 1—1 

Ph 


03 

03 r—I 

i—( CTi 

go 


02 

Pt H 

S- (X) 

CD , 

Ph 


02 

pi 

° on 
cq '-O 

Ph go 

O 7—H 

Ph 


xn 

fl r-H 
p- oo 

CD i—I 

Ph 


03 

£ r-4 

Ph OO 
03 i—I 

Ph 


to 

c 

• *—I 

2 

• rH 

2 

CQ 


T 3 
03 
' h-3 

*sJ 

|d 1 s 

Pt 


HO 

03 

-P 

• —H 
rO 
& 
rS 

fl 


COtHtHO 
1>02 OCD 
CO ^ (M 


N CO CO CO CO ^ 
lO 'H H lO CO ^ 
r-H CO CM CM KO 


CO N C3 20 
CCO-HC2 

a io ^ (M 


OO r-H i-H r-H 2 lO CO 

CO -HWM CO X ^ 

on co cm co cm in 


(M r—' CO lO 
00 CO 20 20 
lOOOOlO 


H^NNCOO 
IM OO CO H Hi CO 

rH cq ^ co io o 


cm 


CM 


cohihim 

l>- i-H r-H CQ 

HI H x CD 


CO C2 H M 02 20 

02 O 20 HI co CO 

Cl CO Hi o *o o 

r —I i-H (M rH 


tH t— i-H lO 
tH •rjH ,— i \ct> 
CO H Nl> 


CO OO 2C> 05 05 r- 

hH o co 02 o 

Hi (M 20 CO 20 O 


CO (M N CO 
O h CD 02 
Hi (M 1> t— 


H C-l 

002 C 0 1 >OCO 
O Hn t'- O 02 O 
I—I 1—i -HI ICO 20 O 


eo co 


(M 


CO 


■'H - * i—I 05 CM 
<M (M 


CO O O HH OO r-H 

co i—i i—i co i—i 


co »o co oo 

CQ O i>- I-H 

oq cm i—h i-H 


!M 0200 I >20 
CO N X O H N 
Hfl (M CD r-H (M 


Eh 

O 

H 

Ph 

H 

CQ 

I-H 

o 

I 

P3 

m 


o 

m 


—' i-h GO 2£0 
Htl 20 CO t— 
Hi (M 20 GO 


CM rH 02 CO 
I-H hH O 00 

HI (M CO t> 


co cq t> co 

lO O) N 20 
CO "Hi i— 1 CO 


CO H< CM i-h 

t-— co oq i —h 

NHiHCO 


CD N 02 t> 
02NC0N 
t— CO O HO 


tCl t— CO 20 
20 l>cc >02 
t— CO O Hi 


CO 


I- H±I o 


05 

CO 


X HI H co 
1 > 02 CO CO 
i-H CM CO 





-S 3 

O 

rfl 







HO 

a 

<0 



-P 

03 

o 

M 

« 

H 

-P 

u 

o 

tit) 

Ph 




o 

HH 

rH 

-P 

CQ 


. 

02 

C/J 

W 

£ 

• rH 

• 




H 


• 

• 

S -^ 

« 


ao 

• 

• 

• 


CO 

M 

• rH 
&H 

o 

o> 

-P 

CQ 

Ph 

3 

s 

cS 

PO 

t 

pq 

m 

s 

o 5 

PO 

03 

M 

Ph 


Ph 

03 

a 

d 

-C 

fi 

l 

to 

H-D 

CO 

r—H 

Pin 

-a 

-p 

CQ 

Ph 

w 

CQ 

Ph 

03 

£ 

£ 

t i 

Oh 

xn 

Ph 

Ph 

02 

o 

£ 


P 3 

£ 

O 

w 

&H 

Ph 

O 

o 

w 

O 

rP 

aS 

Ph 

o 

03 

PPl 

I-H 

P 3 

P5 

cS 

£ 

EH 

CQ 

W 


nS 

o 

t+r 

Ph 

• rH 

m 


HO 

^ M 

«fi .a 
58 s? 


- 4-3 

cq 


A 

o 

-4-3 

M 


2 
-a 

i/2 

to 
bJD_g 

PS pq 


£ 


Estimated. 2. Crawley was not in this district until 1880 ; Cowfold is not included. 


















































45 


lO 

Os 

i 

rH 

C2 

GO 


•asiresiQ 

' oiqomk'z 


•8ST38SIQ 

Surrj 


o 'mnna 

_ 

CO \ 


00 

00 


•euaq^tjdiQ; 


T*4 CO I IQ O ^ « lO (Mio I HHO 


CM0OO3C3CO''ci- | C0O''llO-<^CC>xjHiO'^ 
r—l r-H (M r-H j—I 


(MiOxH(^00OI>00NrHO(MC005 


CO 


<M 


•9SB9SIQ 

Sun^j 

t>0000002H>0<M0050NW 
r—1 i—1 H lO <?3 h} 4 rH H (M 

235 

•stspi^j 

GO CO CM 

NH ^ 02 OO 1 r-H CM 

H 1 H H 

82 

\ 

•BuaqcmdiQ 

CM | j 

O ^ (M CO | i—i | i—i CM j 

<m 


CM 


05 

GO 


<M 



•8S'B9SIQ 

OI^OUlA'2 

OJ 02 <M N 00 1> <M O 1 ONfMCOCO 

i—i CM 1 r—t 

o 

rH 

40 
OO 
• / 

s 

GO 

00 

rH 

'9SF9SIQ 

^un^j 

WlQHl>02C0O'IOl>C0Hl002 
j—1 rH r —1 r—1 <M CM I—1 I—• r-H 

CO 

00 

r-H 

' s i s wq<i 

NO02r-i05iCC0i0HC0OiJ)?0'-< 

H rH ' 

t— 

03 

•'Bjjaq^qdtQ 

CO^ | rH | H | ^ | <M OO | 1—1 CM 

03 

(M 

"9SB9SIQ 

O^OUli^ 

COOTtCCOOCKMCOCIN^H^lO 

r-H r—< r-H r-H 

lO 

03 

• 

o 

CO 

CO / 
1" 'N 

oo 

rH 

1 

‘9S<B9SI(J 

§un r j 

CO <—1 <M OO W M 1—H> lO CO CO 00 CO CO 

r—1 r-H 1 —1 CO r-H —t r-H r-H OO (M 

202 

” s ! s . Il I^ l Ic[ 

lOOQOOOo I 1> CO 00 lO CO oo o 

1—i >— 1 1 1—I CM 

o 

CM 

rH 

•^U9q^L|diQ 

H H j 4jl (M j J 

03 

•gsBosiQ 

opouiXz 

QlflOOHN O N 00 CO CO 1> O 

rH 1 i—1 i—H 

hH 

03 

•sa^8^ ^U8AVX 

Ul I^OJ, 

C2<X)(NCOTt<O^00O2NG0l>)ON 
h <M CO 00 CO CO N CO 02 CO H IQ O 
hH CO CM r-H CO CO CO r—( <M <M r-H CO iO 

4,499 

Deaths from all 

CAUSES IN THE YEARS 

-✓V 

26*1681 

OONOGicO’IOo 32 0t)<^I> 

(N Q2 io H 1> CO CO 0 iO (M O Cl 

i—1 CM r-H r-H r-H 

1228 

06-9881 

i> GO **0 1> rH rH 1>» r-H b- CO 

Qi>o^c>ai^GOo^t>iOcoo^ 
rH rH rH 

1142 

28-1881 

oo O Cl (N H lOCO^OOOOCOOOO^ 
OoOCOiO^NtM^iMcONCOCOO 

rH rH r-H rH 

1042 

08-9A8I 

^OOOHIOCOCOOCOCOO)^ 1 ^ 

02 CO O 10 >0 00 H CO 1> lO CO H CO 

r-H rH i—1 r-H 

1087 


03 

t—i 

P3 

◄ 


T3 

a 

QJ 

-4-3 

CO 

a 


-4-3 

02 

?H 


Sh 

o ^ 

<33 ^ 

-4-3 r—j H 

02 Pn’to 

03 * rH r-J 


r^3 rP 
+3 -f> 

H rH 

&£ 
a a 

Cj CC 

-S rfl 
02 02 

!h Im 

o o 

w w 


• H OO 
T3 00 
03 i—I 
03 ' 

m >4 

^ <33 


2 £ ^ P-l £ t-H 

3i—l 02 2 — 

o £ .2 P 03 

HO 


+3 

* r-4 5° 

' O ?H 

cc _ «j=i .2 

03 roc c ^ °u 

P -2 -S tap « 


' a 




m 


o S ~ 

H H 


cC 

•+3 

o 

H 











































































































46 


BIRTHS AND BIRTH-RATE. 


During the year 1895, the births of 432 children were registered; 
of these 228 were male, and 204 were female. 


Estimating the population in the middle of the year at 18,300, 
the birth-rate was equal to 23’6 per 1,000 persons living. 


The births and birth-rate during the past ten years have been as 
follows :— 


Year. 

Births. 

Birth-rate. 

Year. 

Births. 

Birth-rate. 

1886 

. . 496 

. . 31-2 

1891 

. . 467 

.. 27-8 

1887 

. . 452 

. . 28-3 

1892 

. . 399 

. . 23-6 

1888 

. . 454 

. . 28-3 

1893 

. . 394 

. . 23-1 

1889 

. . 418 

. . 26-0 

1894 

416 

. . 24*2 

1890 

. . 420 

. . 26-0 

1895 

. . 432 

. . 23-6 


The mean number of births is 435, and the mean birth-rate is 26 - 2 
per 1,000 of population. 


In England and Wales the birth-rate during the year was 30'3 
per 1,000 persons living, a rate 0*9 per 1,000 below the mean rate in 
the ten years, 1885-94. 

•j / 


The following table shows the births and birth-rate in each locality 
during the past four years :— 



1892. 

Births. 
1893. 1894. 

1895. 

1892. 

Birth-rate. 
1893. 1894. 

1895. 

South Sub-district 

89 

86 

101 

91 

22-0 

21-3 

25-0 

22-6 

Ifield Parish . . 

86 

65 

59 

57 

29-4 

21-6 

19-2 

18*2 

Rest of North Sub¬ 
district . . 

126 

150 

154 

136 

22-0 

25*8 

26-4 

23-0 

West Sub-district 

98 

93 

102 

115 

23-3 

22-1 

24-2 

27-2 

Cowfold Parish 

— 

— 

— 

33 

— 

— 

— 

33-0 

Total. . 

399 

394 

416 

432 

23-6 

23-1 

24-2 

23-6 


GENERAL MORTALITY. 


There were 278 deaths registered in this district during the year 
1895, but from this number must be deducted the deaths of 12 persons 
in Horsham workhouse, who came from the Horsham Urban Sanitary 
District; the remaining 16 workhouse deaths were distributed among 
the several parishes whence each inmate came, viz., West Grinstead 3, 
Nuthurst 1, Horsham 6, Crawley 1, Ifield 1, and Rusper 4, in all 16. 
A death in Horsham Cottage Hospital (Urban) must be added, making 
the total number of 267 deaths. 

Estimating the population in the middle of the year at 18,300, the 
death-rate was equal to 14*6 per 1,000 persons living. 















47 


The variations in the death-rate during the past ten years in the 
former district were as follows :— 


Year. 

Deaths. 

Death-rate. 

Year. 

Deaths. 

Death-rate. 

1886 .. 

291 

.. 18-3 

1891 .. 

240 

. . 14-7 

1887 . . 

209 

.. 13*1 

1892 .. 

289 

.. 17*7 

1888 .. 

219 

.. 13-6 

1893 .. 

235 

.. 13-8 

1889 .. 

213 

. . 13-2 

1894 

204 

.. 11-9 

1890 .. 

210 

. . 12*9 

1895 .. 

267 

.. 14-6 

Thus the 

mean 

annual number of deaths 

is 238, and the mean 


annual death-rate is 14’4 per 1,000 of the population. During the 
same period there were 4,348 births, so that the natural increase of 
population by excess of births over deaths was 1,971. The actual 
increase as shown by the census of 1891 was 1,372, so that a large 
number of persons must have left the district during the past decade. 


In country places throughout England and Wales the mortality 
in 1895 was equal to 17*0 per 1,000 of population. 


In each locality the deaths and death-rate are here shown for the 
past four years :— 



1892. 

Deaths. 
1893. 1894. 

1895. 

1892. 

Death-rate. 
1893. 1894. 

1S95. 

South Sub-district . . 

65 

45 

62 

63 . . 

16-0 

11*1 

15*4 

15-6 

Ifield Parish 

40 

45 

27 

41 . . 

13*7 

15-0 

8-8 

13T 

Best of North Sub¬ 
district 

106 

82 

64 

98 . . 

18-5 

14T 

11-0 

16-6 

West Sub-district . . 

78 

63 

51 

58 . . 

18-6 

14-9 

12T 

13-7 

Cowfold Parish 

— 

— 

— 

7 . . 

-T— 

— 

— 

7-0 

Total 

289 

235 

204 

267 

17*1 

13-8 

11*9 

14*6 


As the occupation and the age distribution of the population are 
very similar in each sub-district, the death-rate does not show much 
variation. 


In each parish the deaths were thus distributed :— 


West Grinstead . . 35 
Shipley . . . . 11 

Nuthurst . . .. 8 

Horsham (south) . . 9 

Horsham (north) . . 51 

Lower Beeding . . 14 

Crawley . . . . 9 


Cowfold 

Total 


Ifield 

. . 41 

Busper 

10 

Warnham . . 

14 

Slinfold 

12 

Itchingfield . . 

6 

Budgwick . . 

21 

Billingshurst 

19 


7 

267. 























48 


INFANT MORTALITY. 

The infant mortality is here given as measured by the number of 
deaths under one year of age to the total number of births in the 
year:— 

Deaths under Ratio to 



Births. 

one year. 

1000 Births. 

South Sub-district 

91 

10 

110 

Ifield Parish . . 

57 

5 

91 

Rest of North Sub-district . . 

136 

14 

103 

West Sub-district 

115 

5 

40 

Cowfold Parish 

33 

3 

91 

Total 

432 

37 

86 


The mean annual rate in the previous seven years 1888-94 was 91 
per 1,000 registered births. 


In England and Wales the proportion of deaths under one year 
of age to registered births was 161 per 1,000 during the past year, the 
mean proportion in the preceding ten years having been 146. 


ZYMOTIC MORTALITY. 

The deaths from zymotic diseases were 10 in number in the case 
of those which are notifiable, and 4 in the other class where the number 


of cases cannot be obtained. 

Cases. 

Deaths 

Small Pox . . 

none 

none 

Scarlatina . . 

18 

1 

Diphtheria . . 

21 

6 

Membranous Croup 

1 

1 

( Typhus 

none 

none 

g 1 Enteric 

4 

2 

> < Continued . . 

7 

none 

^ | Relapsing 

none 

none 

( Puerperal 

none 

none 

Cholera 

none 

none 

Erysipelas . . 

8 

none 

Total 

59 

10 

In the other class the deaths were 

as follows :— 



Measles . . .. . . . . 2 

Whooping Cough . . . . . . none 

Diarrhoea and Dysentery . . . . 2 

Rheumatic Fever .. . . . . none 


Total 


• • 


4 





















49 


Adding the two classes together, there is a total of 14 deaths with 
a zymotic mortality of 08 per 1,000. 


The prevalence in each quarter of each notifiable disease is shown 
in the following table : 


Small Pox .. 
Scarlatina 
Diphtheria . . 
Membranous Croup 
Enteric Fever 
Continued Fever 
Erysipelas . . 


1st Qr. 

2nd Qr. 

3rd Qr. 

4th Qr. 

Total. 

■ 

8 

6 

2 

16 

2 

1 

16 

4 

23 


— 1 — 1 

- — —44 

— 7 — 7 

1—438 


Total 


3 9 34 13 59 


The Infectious Diseases (Notification) Act, 1889, came into 
operation in this district on April 2nd, 1890, and the number of cases 
notified were 33 in 1890, 81 in 1891, 54 in 1892, 103 in 1893, 37 in 
1894, and 59 in 1895. 


Table II. shows the number of deaths from Zymotic Disease in each 
year of the period, 1876-95, but it does not show the number of persons 
attacked. The Notification Act of 1889 gives valuable information on 
this point with regard to eleven of these disorders. In the four years,, 
1892-95, there were 161 cases of Scarlatina with only three deaths, and 
there were 61 cases of Diphtheria with fifteen deaths, the latter disease 
being about thirteen times more fatal than the former. 


Scarlatina, if not less frequent, is of a milder type than in bygone 
years, and during the past twenty years there has seldom been more than, 
one death per annum from this cause. 

In the seven years 1889-95, there was one death at West Grinstead 
in 1890, one at Rudgwick in 1891, one at Ifield in 1893, and one at 
Ifield in 1895. In the remaining ten parishes there were no deaths. 

Diphtheria caused nine deaths in 1876-80, but it caused twenty-nine 
deaths in 1881-85, the years 1884 and 1885 showing a very large increase 
there was still some prevalence in 1886 and 1887 when there was a 
marked decline until 1893, and there has again been an increase in the 
past three years. The mean annual number of deaths from this cause 
is nearly 3*5, or about one death amongst 4,600 persons living. 

The disease has caused one or more deaths in each parish except 
Rusper, but it has never prevailed persistently in any particular area 
it has appeared in a parish for a year or two, and then it has been 
absent from the same place for a number of years. 

At Slinfold there was an outbreak in October and November, 1884, 
when there were seven deaths, but there has been no death there during 
the last ten years. 








50 


In Billingshurst there were several cases in 1884-85, but there 
have been no more deaths there during the past decade. 

In Nuthurst and Itchingfield there has only been one death in each 
parish during the past twenty years. 

In South Horsham there were several cases in 1876-80, but only 
one child has died from this cause in the last fifteen years. Ifield, on 
the other hand, was free in 1876-80, since which time the disease has 
frequently appeared. 

Measles and Whooping Cough are more common disorders, and are 
the cause of several deaths. 

There has been a marked diminution in the zymotic mortality 
during the last five years, due chiefly to the non-prevalence of Scarlatina, 
Measles, and Whooping Cough. 


IFIELD AND CRAWLEY DRAINAGE. 

There is for this joint drainage district a main system of sewerage 
which was carried out in the year 1888, and it has since continued to 
act very well. There is no public water supply, and, therefore, nearly 
all the closets are hand-flushed. The rain water is kept out of the 
drains as far as possible, but even now a large amount of surface or sub¬ 
soil water enters the main system in wet weather. The old outfall in 
Worth Lane, which was the source of constant complaints, is now 
disused, and the present outfall is situated to the north of the area, near 
the Gas Works. It consists of 8^ acres of land, but at first only one 
acre was used, and this was insufficient for the purpose, as the sub-soil 
was found to be very retentive. 

In 1891 seven large pits were made to act as subsiding tanks, the 
sewage flowing through each tank in succession, by which means most 
of the suspended matters are arrested. The effluent then passes over a 
portion of land which has been dug up and sown with rye-grass ; any 
overflow then passes away by an open ditch without causing any nuisance. 
This result has been arrived at by collecting and disposing of the sludge, 
and by much greater care in the cultivation of the land ; until this plan 
was adopted many complaints were made of the effluent after it had left 
the farm. 

On April 19th, 1888, the Local Government Board sanctioned a 
loan to Crawley not exceeding .£432, to be repaid in 21 years, and a loan 
to Ifield not exceeding <£2,068, to be repaid in 30 j^ears. This loan of 
<£2,500, was added to by a loan of <£207 for expenses connected with the 
farm to be repaid in 21 years. At that time the assessable value of 
Crawley was <£1,919, and that of Ifield was £9,198, giving a total of 
£11,117. The contract for the main system of sewers in accordance 
with Mr. Norman’s scheme was carried out by Mr. Cardus for a sum of 
£1,559, and a further sum for extensions in the outlaying portions of 
the district was carried out at a cost of £179 11s. 9d. 






51 


No profit has yet been made out of the farm, but the receipts will 
now increase from year to year. 


Year ending 

March 25th. 

Receipts. 

£ s. d. 


Expenditure. 

£ s. d. 

Deficit. 

£ s. 

d. 

1892 

Nil. 

• • • 

53 14 

1 

... 53 14 

1 

1893 ... 

5 10 0 ... 

• • • 

70 19 

1 

... 65 9 

1 

1894 

14 0 0 ... 

• • • 

62 11 

4 

... 48 11 

4 

1895 ... 

28 14 0 ... 

• • • 

52 16 

8 

... 24 2 

8 


The sale of rye grass brought in £5 10s. for 1893, £1 2 in 1894, 
and £23 5s. in 1859 ; the sale of the sludge brought in £2 in 1894, and 
£5 9s. in 1895. Only one man is employed on the farm ; the labour 
bill amounts to about ,£52 a year, besides which there are other expenses 
for constructing banks, laying out the ground, seeds, tools, &c., which 
vary from time to time. 

The rye grass is sold by tender, it is cut and removed at the 
expense of the farmer whose tender is accepted. 

The above figures do not include any interest or sinking fund on 
the loan originally raised in 1888. 


The following report is the usual annual one sent in by Mr. Moses 
Brooks to the Horsham Rural District Council:— 

“ I beg to lay before you my report and statement of accounts of the 
Crawley and Ifield Sewage Farm, for the year ending 25th March, 1895. 


“ I am pleased to state that during that time I have received no 
complaint whatever as to the condition of the effluent water on leaving 
the sewage farm. 

“ The sum received for the rye grass upon the farm during the year 
was £23 5s., being £11 5s. more than the previous year, but I find the 
severe weather during the past winter 1894-95 has very much weakened 
the plant, and will cause the crop to be about six weeks later, therefore, 
we shall not be able to make so good a price this year. I would suggest 
that tenders be invited for the crop as usual, and that the Parochial 
Committee be empowered to consider and accept the same. 


“ The sludge taken from the tanks during the year has been sold to 
the farmers at is. per load, and it has realized the sum of £5 9s* 

“ By constant care and attention, and by frequently cleaning out the 
seven large pits, and then passing the effluent over the land, I have been 
able to keep the effluent water from becoming a nuisance, and to ensure 
that this is properly attended to I have made 78 visits to the farm 
during the past year, many of them having been special journeys for 
this purpose. 







52 


“ The following is a summary of the receipts and expenditure upon 
the farm during the year, ending March 25th, 1895. 


Receipts. 




Expenditure. 




£ 

s. 

d. 

£ 

s. 

d. 

Sale of Bye Grass as 




Labour for the year 52 

7 


per tender 

22 

0 

0 

Bye Grass seed .. 0 

2 

6 

Sale of Bye Grass as 




Tools, &c. .. .. 0 

7 


per tender 

1 

5 

0 




Sale of Sludge 

5 

9 

0 





28 

14 

0 




Excess of expenditure 







over receipts 

24 

2 

8 





.£52 

16 

8 

^52 

16 

8 


SYSTEMATIC INSPECTION. 

The following is a list of routine work during the year as 
recorded in the books of the Sanitary Inspector, Mr. Moses Brooks. 


No. of Houses, &c., inspected .. .. • • 1340 

No. of Nuisances reported .. . . . . • • 375 

No. of Nuisances abated without notice .. . . 188 

No. of Nuisances abated with notice . . . 176 

No. of Nuisances now in course of abatement . . 11 

Houses reported as unfit for habitation . . . . 5 

Houses closed . . . . . . .. .. I 

Houses disinfected .. . . . . .. .. 33 

Houses cleansed and lime washed . . .. . . 56 

Water certificates granted for new houses . . 46 

New wells dug . . . . . . .. .. 35 

Weils cleaned out . . .. . . .. . . 1^ 

Houses supplied from Horsham Waterworks . . 10 

No. of samples of water analysed . . . . . . 22 

No. of samples of water found polluted . . . . 2 

Cases of overcrowding reported . . . . . . 8 

Cases of overcrowding abated .. . . .. 8 

New closets erected . . .. . . . . . . 12 

Old closets converted into earth closets . . . . 4 

Old closets provided with proper cesspit . . . . 8 

Old closets provided with short hopper and trap . . 6 

No. of gully traps put in to replace old bell traps. . 39 
Houses connected with Crawley and Ifield main 

sewer . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 

Legal proceedings . . . . . . . . . . 3 

No. of registered cowsheds and dairies .. . . 54 

No. of Cows . . .. .. . . . . 732 

No. of visits made to same .. . . . . . . 170 

No. of slaughterhouses .. .. . . .. 21 

No. of bakehouses . . .. . . . . . . 41 


















53 


NEW HOUSES AND WATER CERTIFICATES. 

Forty-six new houses were erected, and water certificates were 
granted by the Sanitary Authority under Sect. 6 of the Public Health 
(Water) Act, 1878, which provides that houses in rural districts are not 
to be erected or re-built without a sufficient supply of wholesome water. 
Only one owner failed to comply with this Act; after several warnings 
he was summoned before the Horsham Rench and fined. 

Twenty-seven new wells were dug to supply forty cottages ; four 
houses were supplied from the Horsham Water Works, and two houses 
were supplied from rain-water tanks. 

The following list shows the houses newly erected or re-built, the 
depth of the wells, and the depth of the water in the wells. 


NEW HOUSES. 

Ifield, Pair of Cottages. Well, 17ft. deep, 15ft. of water. 

Rusper, House. Well, 48ft. deep, 12ft. of water. 

Ifield, Villa. Well, 22ft. deep, 18ft. of water. 

Ifield, Pair of Cottages. Well, 22ft. deep, 16ft. of water. 

Horsham, Pair of Cottages. Supplied from Horsham Water Works. 
Slinfold, Villa. Well, 20ft. deep, 18ft. of water. 

Horsham, Cottage. 24ft. deep, 9ft. of water. 

Ifield, House. Well, 17ft. deep, 14ft. of water. 

Nut hurst, House. Well, 32ft. deep, 20ft. of water. 

Ifield, Pair of Cottages. Well, 22ft. deep, 16ft. of water. 

Warnham, Cottage. Well, 16ft. deep, lift, of water. 

Horsham, Pair of Cottages. Well, 35ft. deep, 10ft. of water. 

Rusper, Cottage. Well, 42ft. deep, 13ft. of water. 

Rusper, Cottage. Water laid on from cistern in Mansion and rain¬ 
water butt. 

Ifield, Pair of Cottages. Well, 20ft. deep, 6ft. of water. 

Horsham, Pair of Cottages. Supplies from Horsham Water Works. 
Warnham, Cottage. Well, 35ft. deep, 8ft. of water. 

Nuthurst, Villa. Well, 12ft. deep, 9ft. of water. 

Horsham, Villa. Well, 13|ft. deep, lift, of water. 

Slinfold, Villa. Well, 42ft. deep, 15ft. of water. 

Slinfold, Villa. Well, 23ft. deep, 15ft. of water. 

Ifield, Three Cottages. Well, 20ft. deep, 12ft. of water. 

Horsham, Villa, Supplied from Horsham Water Works. 

Shipley, Pair of Cottages. Well, 24ft. deep, 18ft. of water. 

Horsham, Cottage. Rain-water Tank, 230 gallons, and water laid on 
from house. 

Ifield, House. Well, 36ft. deep, 16ft. of water. 

Horsham, Cottage. Well, 36ft. deep, 8ft. of water. 

Lower Beeding, Cottage. Well, 39ft. deep, 28ft. of water. 

Horsham, Pair of Cottages. Well, 35ft. deep, 19ft. of water. 

Horsham, Villa. Well, 22ft. deep, 12ft. of water. 

Horsham, Pair of Cottages. Supplied from Horsham Water Works. 
Ifield, Pair of Cottages. Well, 18 It. deep, 16ft. of water. 

Horsham, Cottage. Well, 14ft. deep, 12ft. of water. 






54 


KAINFALL. 


This table showing the rainfall in each month has been kindly sent 
to me by H. Padwick, Esq., M.A., who has made similar observations 
for many years:— 

1895. 1894. 



Fall in 

No. of rainy 

Fall in 

No. of rainy 


inches. 

days. 

inches. 

days. 

January .. 

2-94 

16 

4*83 

24 

February 

0*38 

5 

2*26 

16 

March 

2-33 

15 

1*89 

14 

April 

2-28 

12 

3-28 

14 

May 

0-34 

5 

2*05 

13 

June 

0-28 

6 

2*51 

13 

July 

3-91 

18 

6*92 

22 

August . . 

3-57 

18 

2*69 

16 

September 

0-55 

4 

2*60 

10 

October . . 

4-35 

14 

3*64 

17 

November 

7T7 

22 

6*97 

18 

December 

3*26 

18 

2*54 

12 

Year. 

1895 

31*36 

153 

«■ » • • • • 

Fall in 
inches. 

31*36 

No. of rainy 
days. 

153 

1894 


« » •• • • • 

42*18 

189 

1893 


• • • • •> • 

25*06 

156 

1892 


» » * ► • • 

27*53 

161 

1891 


• • » * » • 

34*84 

178 

1890 


» » * * 

25*37 

.. 143 


INQUESTS. 

Inquests were held in twenty-six cases :—Male, 71 years, heart 
disease; male, 60 years, lockjaw after a fracture of the skull caused by 
an accidental fall; female, 21 years, thrombosis of left pulmonary 
artery ; male, 2 years, accidentally scalded ; female, 1 month, inanition 
consequent on improper feeding ; male, 49 years, accidental fall ; male, 
22 years, accidental gunshot wound ; female, 80 years, fractured thigh 
from an accidental fall ; male, 65 years, accidentally run over by a van ; 
male, 69 years, accidental fall from a carriage ; male, 16 years, embolism 
of the pulmonary artery ; female, 35 years, suicide by hanging; male, 68 
years, found drowned ; female, 70 years, cold and exposure ; female, 70 
years, heart disease ; male infant, fracture of skull at birth ; male, 13 
years, accidentally run over ; female, 2 months, accidental fall from a 
perambulator; female, 28 years, accidentally suffocated ; female, 77 
years, accidental fall; male, 78 years, heart disease ; male, 5 years, 
measles, meningitis; male, 5 months, convulsions brought on by 
improper feeding; male, 46 years, disease of stomach ; male, 45 years, 
found drowned ; male, 4 months, bronchitis. 


There were three deaths returned as “ not certified ” during the 
year :—Female, 85 years, old age, heart disease ; female, 3 months, 
bronchitis; female, 59 years, syncope. 



























55 




HOESHAM RURAL DISTRICT. 


Table 1.—Showing the Deaths at various groups of ages in the 

fifteen years 1881-95. 


Year. 

At all ages. 

Under 1 Year. 

1 to 5. 

5 to 15. 

15 to 25. 

25 to 65. 

65 and upwards. 

1881-85 

1,042 

189 

93 

57 

55 

318 

330 

1886-90 

1,142 

223 

110 

76 

60 

280 

393 

1891 

240 

40 

27 

10 

11 

61 

91 

1892 

289 

49 

25 

15 

16 

80 

104 

1893 

235 

37 

21 

9 

10 

79 

79 

1894 

204 

34 

10 

15 

16 

55 

74 

1895 

267 

37 

19 

21 

10 

71 

109 

Total 

3,419 

609 

305 

203 

178 

944 

1,180 


! 







































56 


HORSHAM RURAL DISTRICT. 


Table 2.—Showing the Deaths in the twenty years, 1876-95, from 

various causes. 


Year. 

Small Pox. 

Scarlatina, 

Diphtheria. 

Membranous Croup. 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 

Measles. 

Whooping Cough. 

Diarrhoea. 

Rheumatic Fever. 

Influenza. 

Total. 

Typhus. j 

I Enteric. 

r 

Continued. . 

Relapsing. 

j Puerperal. • 

1876-80 

1 

9 

9 



9 

3 


3 



17 

23 

19 

1 


94 

1881-85 


4 

29 


1 

3 

3 


4 

— 

6 

5 

20 

16 

4 

— 

95 

1886-90 

1 

9 

11 


1 

3 

2 

— 

— 

— 

2 

27 

28 

21 

2 

3 

110 

1891. 


1 

3 

— 

— 

2 



1 



3 

4 

2 


4 

20 

1892. 






— 





3 

5 

5 

1 

2 

18 

34 

1893. 

5 

1 

6 



1 

— 






3 

3 

— 

6 

25 

1894. 

— 


5 




— 


— 


1 

— 

1 



4 

11 

1895. 


1 

6 

1 


2 

~ 

' 

" 



2 


2 


9 

23 

Total... 

7 

25 

69 

1 

2 

20 

8 


8 


12 

59 

84 

64 

9 

44 

412 






















































































57 


HORSHAM RURAL DISTRICT. 

Table 3. —Showing the Deaths and Death-rate from all causes and from 
various causes in the twenty years, 1876-95. 


r 


<D 

o3 

P 

i 

DP 

-P 

cJ 

CD 

P 

"73 

P 

p 

p 

"5 


a 

o 

p 

t+H 

fen 

p 


< 


o 

o 

o 

o 

o 


p 

a> 

Pd 


v 

r 


tn 

P 

e! 

CD 

cd a 

rC O 
-P S-i 


•0Sn0SI(J 

110 

98 

125 

153 

’8SB8Si(j Sunq; 

274 

228 

226 

275 

* s t s t 

CO CM W 

CD CM 05 

pH I—1 pH 

•0SU8SI(J 

oi^omA^ 

t— O 05 ^ 

CM CM CM CO 

i— i i— t pH 

•S8SB8SIQ; \\Y 

1,418 

1,306 

1,368 

1,233 

•0SB8SI(]; ^JU0J£ 

ph 05 cm 

CO t- O CO 

pH pH 

•0SU8ST(J Sumj 

202 

183 

189 

237 


fen 
P vo J 

h 05 A 


P 

P 

05 

rP 

-p 

c3 

o> 

p 


05 

i 

CO 

l'- 

GO 


•sisiqjqj 

O t>“ pH CO 

CM 05 CM CO 

pH pH 

•0SB8ST(J 

OIJOUI^ 

94 

95 

107 

72 


V 


•S8SU0SI(X ny 


•pOIJQJ JO 
©jppiui 

ui uoijiqndoj 



CM 

CM 

VO 

GO 



CO 

o 

o 

r-H 

CM 

r\ 


#N 


rH 

i—H 

r-H 

r-H 

o 

o 

o 

o 

o 

vo 

vo 

VO 




o 


VO 

to 

fcp 

r-H 

T—H 

r-H 

pH 


P 

O 

i—i 

Ph 

P 

P 


o 

V0 

o 

V0 

00 

CO 

05 

05 

to 

p 

to 

pH 

n- 

00 

oo 

05 

00 

GO 

GO 

GO 

P-l 

pH 

pH 

pH 






































58 


(A)—Table of DEATHS during the Year 1895, in the HORSHAM 


Names of Localities adopted for 
the purpose of these 
Statistics; Public Institutions 
being shown as separate 
localities. 

{a) 

Mortality from all Causes 

AT SUBJOINED AGES. 

(i) 


m 

<x> 

c$ 

»—H 

c3 

< 

(6) 

£4 

oS 

0) 

u 

<v 

a 

(c) 

lO 

S-i 

<D 

Tj 

a 

2 

a 

ei 

pH 

(d) 

u 

<u 

a 

^ lO 

'n * 

H 

f-i 

a 

lO 

(e) 

a> 

Tj 

a 

3 . 

a3 

LO 

r-H 

(/) 

a> 

■d 

a 

d . 

lO 

(S') 

i 

Ph 

S . 

05 

g * 
48 £ 

lO 

50 

(A) 

1 

2 

3 

Small Pox. 

Scarlatina. 

Diphtheria. 

South Sub-district 

59 

10 

3 

4 

4 

15 

23 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 




Ifield Parish ... . 

40 

5 

4 

9 

1 

9 

12 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 


1 

2 

Rest of North Sub-District ... 

87 

13 

7 

7 

4 

27 

29 

Under 5 



1 

5 upwards. 



2 

West Sub-District 

57 

5 

4 

1 

1 

13 

33 

Under 5 



1 

5 upwards. 




Cowfold Parish... 

7 

3 

1 

— 


1 

2 

Under 5 





5 upwards. 




Horsham Workhouse ... 

28 

2 

— 

— 


8 

18 

Under 5 





5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 




Totals. 

278 

38 

19 

21 

10 

73 

117 

Under 5 



2 

5 upwards. 


1 

4 


The subjoined numbers have also to 

be taken into 

Deaths occurring outside the 
District among persons 
belonging thereto. 

1 





1 


Under 5 




5 upwards. 





Deaths occurring within the 
District among persons 
not belonging thereto... 

12 

1 




3 

8 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 

















































































































































































59 


Rural District, classified according to Diseases, Ages, and Localities. 


Mortality from subjoined causes, distinguishing Deaths of Children 

under Five Years of Age. 


4 

5 

6 

1 7 

1 8 

1 9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

Membranous 

Croup. 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 

Measles. 

Whooping 

Cough. 

Diarrhoea and 

Dysentery. 

Rheumatic 

Fever. 

Phthisis. 

Bronchitis, 

Pneumonia, 

and Pleurisy. 

Heart 

Disease. 

Influenza. 

Injuries. 

All Other 

Diseases. 

Total. 

Typhus. 

Enteric or 
Typhoid. 

Continued. 

Relapsing. 

Puerperal. 














2 



1 

10 

13 













1 

7 

9 

1 

8 

20 

46 

1 


1 











2 



1 

4 

9 1 



1 










3 

6 

6 

1 

2 

9 

31 









1 


1 



7 



1 

9 

20 













9 

16 

12 

4 

1 

23 

67 | 














3 


1 


4 

9 









1 




2 

7 

3 

2 

1 

32 

48 1 














1 




3 

4 1 













1 

1 

1 



T— 

3 1 














1 




1 

2 











1 


1 

1 

4 


1 

18 

26 1 































































































































































































1 


1 






1 


1 



16 


1 

3 

31 

57 



1 






1 


1 


17 

38 

35 

8 

13 

102 

221 


account in judging of the above records of mortality. 






































1 

1 


















1 

1 













1 

1 

2 



7 

11 










































































































































































































































































































































































60 


(B)—TABLE OF POPULATION, BIRTHS, AND OF NEW CASES 

Officer of Health, during the year 1895, in the HORSHAM 


Names of Localities adopted 
for the purpose of these 
Statistics; Public Institutions 
being shown as separate 
localities. 

(a) 

Population 
at all Ages. 

a. Registered Births. 

Aged 
under 5 
or 

over 5. 

(e) 

New Cases of Sick- 
coming TO THE KNOWLEDGE 

OF 

Census 

1891. 

(&) 

Esti¬ 
mated 
tomid- 
dle of 
1895. 

(c) 

1 

2 

3 | 4 

i 

5 

6 

Small Pox. 

Scarlatina. 

Diphtheria. 

Membranous 

Croup. 

Fev 

95 

3 

XS 

O' 

>» 

H 

Enteric or ^ 

Typhoid. 5* 

South Sub-District 

4,051 

4,030 

91 

Under 5 



1 




5 upwards. 


1 

1 




Ifield Parish . 

2,817 

3,140 

57 

Under 5 


1 


1 


1 

5 upwards. 


8 

9 



1 

Rest of North Sub-District ... 

5,568 

5,710 

132 

Under 5 


1 

5 




5 upwards. 


6 

3 



2 

West Sub-District . 

4,180 

4,230 

115 

Under 5 



1 




5 upwards. 


1 

1 




Cowfold Parish. 


1,000 

33 

Under 5 







5 upwards. 







Horsham Workhouse. 

182 

190 

4 

Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 







Totals . 

16,798 

18,300 

432 

Under 5 


2 

7 

1 


1 

5 upwards. 


16 

14 



3 


Typh 
































































































































61 


INFECTIOUS SICKNESS, coming to the knowledge of the Medical 
1 District; classified according to Diseases, Ages, and Localities. 


3 in each Locality, 
the Medical Officer 

ILTH. 


Number of such Cases Removed from their 
Homes in the several Localities for Treatmen t 
in Isolation Hospital. 



8 

9 

[0 

11 

12 

13 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 1 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 



Small Pox. 

Scarlatina. 

Diphtheria. 

Membranous 

Croup. 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 




Relapsing. 

Puerperal. 

Typhus. 

Enteric or 

Typhoid. 

Continued. 

Relapsing. 

Puerperal. 





















— 




1 



































— 




4 



































— 




3 











































































— 















































































— 







































— 























































































































— 











































8 
















































































































































































































































































































PETWORTH RURAL DISTRICT. 

* 


pp. 63 et seq. 



63 


PETWORTH 

RURAL SANITARY DISTRICT. 


The population in this registration district was 9,680 at the- 
census of 1841 and 9,629 in 1851 ; chiefly owing to changes in the- 
area, it rose to 10,065 in 1861, but since 1871 there has been a steady 
decline. 

The people are nearly all engaged in agriculture, and live under 
conditions favourable to health. 

The following figures relate to the present rural sanitary area 
which is co-extensive with the registration district. 



1861. 

1871. 

1881. 

1891. 

Area in Statute Acres 

— 

44,747 

45,701 

45,738 ; 

Number of Inhabited Houses. . 

1,970 

2,010 

1,995 

2,000 

„ Uninhabited „ 

72 

64 

120 

119’ 

Population 

10,065 

10,147 

9,594 

9,431 

Males 

5,213 

5,296 

4,857 

4,711 

Females 

4,852 

4,851 

4,737 

4,720* 

Persons to each House 

5-1 

5-1 

4-8 

4*7 


The following tables show the population in each parish ; and also- 
the deaths from all causes and from various causes in each parish over 
a long term of years : — 





Houses, 1891. Population. 


64 


< 


Females, 

1891. 

(MHO 

o©oo 

CO CO N- 

£ • 


0) ' — 1 

N » 

1-1 05 

oq co co 


CO CO CO 


cc 

G 

c 

C0 

£ 

Ph 


05 

GO 


cc 

Pi • 

m QO 
Pi CO 

r“H 

Ph 


05 (M 00 
OT ^ 
©NO 


N O 
OO 05 r-i 

co t— 


H 

O 

i—i 

a 

H 

02 


« 

£ 

C/2 

W 

H 

Ph 

O 


G 

<D 

CD 

P 

o 

pp 

&L 

G 

O 

P 

o 

pp 

02 


© GO O N -H CO O O CO PI 

N CO O N ^ PW 00 lO © N 

iH Tt* i—i I—I Ol 


r—i t — r—l tH 02 05 05 w 
05 CO © N- -H (M — O: 
CO CO i—i 


05 CO 05 
N ©) lO 
r-H oq 


N lO i— 1 — tH N 02 LO lO N 1—i 

© N © lO 00 IQ O N Cl (M CO 

CO N~ r-H! Ol r-H CO i -1 lO 

ob 


cq © © © h CO OO Cl O (M N 

THN05LO©NOCO^NrH 

05 © ,—i oq i—i co i—i io 

oq* 




Persons, 
1871. ' 

co oq co ^oioioHNfqpqHOco 

10005 OC0051H05COCOCOCOXOCO 

n oo ii co co r— h oq ?— i CO r —1 'P2) 

CN »N CV 

i r —l CO 

Persons, 

1861. ' 

OO |Q H COlQCOOOOiOCOO^NOl 

oq GO CO © CO GO © N H io co © © o 

co^r— r-- co © h oq i — 1 CO — o 

r-i i — i co 

bjj 

G 

• r-l 

2 

• »—1 

G 

QP 

r-H r—1 J 

r-H j | 


Un¬ 

inhabited. 

i—1 r—1 CO r—i 

oq oq i—i 

* 

oq i —i | 

H r-H CO r-H r-H 
*-H 

Inhabited. 

opcoco 05 n- op oq io r—i io oq co io -H 

IO © Ohio©hhiqcO©(MH 

CO r-H CO CO i—H i—H 


CD • 

PH • 

% nd 

P 


o 

pp 

-p 

P 

o 


o 

<+H 

■"G 

P 


^ ^ M 


H 

O 

M 

Ph 

EH 

02 


PP 

P> 

zn 

a 

EH 

G> 

O 

w 


pp 

-P 

P 

o 

£ 


S3 

o3 


PP 

-p 

P 

O 

£ 


o 

-p 

bfl 

sP 


£ 

1 ffi £ © O -g * 

cd pb Hr 45 -p p 

"G ^ c3 ^ 


PI 

G o _ . 

§ ^ 

-g'&s o g ^ 
(^PpS^OfPPPPccWPP 



















































65 


1891-95 

•asT?osi(i 

Surrq 

COLONS I 00 (M (M cq 1 SD 1 O* 

i—1 r— 1 r—H I | | 

123 

•spiMPId 

t> C) 00 05 | tH pH j | <M CM (M(M 

co 

50 

"eiJ9q}qdiQ 

co | r-t | |^cq| j j | | 

r-H 

•as'BasTQ 

OI^OUl^ 

O (M oi CO I 50 ^ I I I <M H 1 

l“H 1 III 

GO 

CO 

1886-90. i 

•as'BasiQ 

Sun'j 

00 05 CO ^ H r-1 (H 1 H CO IN CO 1^ 

t —■* cm co )—i 1 1 

t— 

r-H 

r-H 

' s T s PlPld 

10 00(^0 1 ^ r—1 1 HCO 1 (M (M 

rH i—H CM ! | J 

70 

•Bij0q^di(x 

1—1 I—1 i—1 I | | | | | 1—1 ^ | 

rH 

•0SR9SI(J 

OpOLU/f^ 

CDCMOOiOCOr-H [ rH I I | H Ol 

r-H J III 

43 

1881-85. 


•0SB9SI(J 

Snrrj 

CO C£) CM KO r-1 CO CM 1 H PO r" CO rH lo 

IN H CO N j 

CO 

CM 

i—1 

' s I s PDHd 

r-H CO CD r-H 1 r-H [ i—H 1 1 40 r-H 1 

r-H r-H (M | | || | 

69 

•^ijai^qdiQ 

h co j j CM J j | J j | | | 

o 

r-H 

•0SB0SIQ 

OICJOUlX^ 

CO CO CD 00 1 (M 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 CM 

J“H 1 | 1 | 1 1 1 1 

CO 

1876-80. 

•0ST30SI(J 

Sutrj 

r-ilO 00 CO ICiHH 1 -rf CO KO CO KO 

co ci ^ j | 

138 


CO 1> G— | GO I r-H r-H I j 7— H 1 CO 

r-H CO 1 1 II 1 

76 

"BiJ9t[^qdi(j 

HCOCON | | | | | | | j KO 

25 

•0S'B0S[Q 

or} omj^ 

CM GO GO | j CO 1 1 j— H r“H j 

CM | 1 || I 

63 

ui i-b^ox 

ko co r— 05 <m co o i — i ^ co co o o t— 

0 CO O. N (N « ^1 N N 0 CO O lO N 

^ Ol ^ 05 (M T—1 7—1 

3,003 

Deaths from all 

CAUSES IN THE YEARS 

96-1681 

N N N lO (M H CD N CO C'l HN Q 

CM CO lO r-H r—H j—H CM 

r-H r—H CM 

KO 

I—1 

U- 

06-9881 

OcOINOOCi^O^OCOlO 

O 1 ^! co 0^1 KO iO t— 1 CM i—1 CM r—l CO 

>— 1 r—1 CM 

KO 

X- 

G8-IS81 

CO 05 O O co CO 05 CO' CO (M 50 00 CM KO 

CM ^ CO CM ?o i — I <Mi —( 

i—i i—I CM 

749 

08-9181 

OcO^^COCOOOiOxHOiOCOCO 

1 — 1 CO CO U- co I—1 r-H CM 1 ^ 

7— 1 7—H CM 

785 

Parish. 

Wisborough Green 

Nortlichapel 

Kirdford 

Petworth 

Egdean 

Fittleworth 

Stopham 

Coates 

Burton 

Dancton 

Barlavington 

Sutton 

Bignor 

Bury 

Total 





































































































66 


BIRTHS AND BIRTH-RATE. 


During the year 1895, the births of 202 children were registered; 
of these 107 were male, and 95 were female. 


Estimating the population in the middle of the year at 9,400, 
the birth-rate was equal to 21 *5 per 1,000 persons living. 


The births and birth-rate during the past ten years have been as 
follows :— 


Y ear. 

Births. 

Birth-rate. 

Year. 

Births. 

Birth-rate. 

1886 

. . 284 

. . 29-7 

1891 

. . 251 

26’6 

1887 

. . 264 

. . 27-6 

1892 

. . 214 

22-7 

1888 

. . 240 

. . 25-1 

1893 

. . 251 

. . 26-7 

1889 

. . 263 

. . 27-5 

1894 

227 

. . 24-1 

1890 

. . 223 

. . 23-5 

1895 

. , 202 

.. 21-5 


The mean number of births is 242, and the mean birth-rate is 25‘5 
per 1,000 of population. 


In England and Wales the birth-rate during the year was 30‘3 
per 1,000 persons living, a rate 0*9 per 1,000 below the mean rate in 
the ten years, 1885-94. 


The following table shows the births and birth-rate in each locality 
during the past four years :— 


Births. Birth-rate. 



1892. 

1893. 

1894. 

1890. 

1892. 

1893. 

1894. 

1895. 

North Sub-district 

95 

109 

96 

89 

23-7 

27-2 

24-0 

22-2 

Petworth Parish 

Rest of South Sub- 

68 

73 

67 

55 

23-7 

25-5 

23-5 

19-3 

district . . 

51 

69 

64 

58 

20-0 

27-0 

25*0 

22-6 

Total. . 

214 

251 

227 

202 

22-7 

26-7 

24-1 

21-5 


GENERAL MORTALITY. 

There were 154 deaths registered in this district during the year 
1895 ; of these, five took place in Petworth Workhouse, six in 
Wisborough Green Workhouse, and none in Petworth Cottage 
Hospital. These deaths have been distributed amongst the several 
parishes whence each inmate came, viz., Wisborough Green 4, Petworth 
3, Fittleworth 1, Bignor 1, Bury 2, in all 11. 


Estimating the population in the middle of the year at 9,400, the 
death-rate was equal to 16'4 per 1,000 persons living. 












67 


The variations in the death-rate during the past ten years have 
been as follows :— 


Year. 

Deaths. 

Death-rate. 

Year. 

Deaths. 

Death-rate. 

1886 

.. 202 

.. 21T 

1891 

.. 153 

. . 16-2 

1887 

.. 131 

.. 13-7 

1892 

. . 163 

. . 17-3 

1888 

.. 143 

. . 14-9 

1893 

. . 129 

. . 13*7 

1889 

. . 142 

. . 14-8 

1894 

. . 116 

. . 12*3 

1890 

. . 136 

. . 14-3 

1895 

. . 154 

.. 16-4 


Thus there have been during the above period 1,469 deaths and a 
mean mortality of 15'5 per 1,000. During the same period there were 
2,419 births, so that the natural increase of population by excess of 
births over deaths was 950. 


In each locality the deaths and death-rate for the past four years 
are here shown :— 

Deaths. Death-rate. 



1892. 

1893. 

1894. 

1895. 

1892. 

1893. 

1894. 

1895. 

North Sub-district . . 

68 

52 

52 

65 .. 

16-9 

13-0 

13*0 

16-2 

Pet worth Parish 

Pest of North Sub- 

53 

38 

35 

50 . . 

18-5 

13*3 

12*9 

17*5 

district 

42 

39 

29 

39 . . 

16-5 

15-3 

11-3 

15-2 

Total 

163 

129 

116 

154 

17-3 

13-7 

12-3 

16*4 


In country places throughout England and Wales the mortality 
in 1895 was equal to 17’0 per 1,000 of population. 


In each parish the deaths in 

1895 were thus distributed 

I- 

Wisborough Green 

25 

Coates 

1 

Northchapel 

18 

Burton 

1 

Kirdford 

22 

Duncton 

2 

Petworth 

50 

Barlavington 

5 

Egdean 

2 

Sutton 

♦ 

1 

Fittleworth . . 

14 

Bignor 

2 

Stopham 

1 

Bury 

10 


Total 

154. 



The general mortality is shown in Table 3 to be rather lower now 
than it was in 1876-80; there has been a distinct fall in the phthisis 
rate, but lung diseases remain about the same, and there is an increase 
in the mortality from heart disease. The large excess of aged persons 
in this district causes the recorded death-rate to be about 2 per 1,000 
higher than the corrected death-rate. The factor for correction is 
*87329, so that the mortality for 1891-95 is reduced by this correction 
from 15T9 per 1,000 to 13’27. 




















68 


INFANT MORTALITY. 

The infant mortality is here given as measured by the number of 
deaths under one year of age to the total number of births in the 
year:— 



Births. 

Deaths under Ratio to 
one year. 1000 Births. 

North Sub-district 

89 

12 

135 

Petworth Parish 

55 

8 

145 

Rest of South Sub-district . . 

58 

4 

69 

Total 

202 

24 

119 


The mean annual rate in the previous seven years, 1888-94, was 80 
per 1,000 registered births. 

In England and Wales the proportion of deaths under one year 
of age to registered births was 161 per 1,000, the mean proportion in 
the preceding ten years having been 146. 


ZYMOTIC MORTALITY. 


There were eight deaths from zymotic diseases, of which three 
were among notifiable diseases and five in the other class. The rate of 
mortality was therefore equal to 0*85 per 1,000. 


Small Pox . . 


Cases. 

none 

Deaths 

none 

Scarlatina 

* 

1 

none 

Diphtheria . . 

, # 

21 

2 

Membranous Croup 

. • 

none 

none 

( Typhus 

, , 

none 

none 

! Enteric 


1 

1 

' Continued 


none 

none 

j Relapsing 

* , 

none 

none 

f Puerperal 

Cholera 

• • 

none 

none 


none 

none 

Erysipelas 

• • 

14 

none 

Total 

o 

37 

3 


The deaths in the other class were as follows :— 

Deaths. 

Measles . . . . . . . . 2 

Whooping Cough . . . . . . none 

Diarrhoea and Dysentery . . . . 2 

Rheumatic Fever . . . . . . 1 


Total . . 5 

The Infectious Diseases (Notification) Act, 1889, came into 
operation in this district on February 2nd, 1891. 













69 


There were 44 cases notified in 1891 ; 49 in 1892 ; 60 in 1893 ; 
53 in 1894 ; and 37 in 1895. 

Table 2 shows the numbers of deaths from notifiable diseases 
during the past twenty years. 

Small-pox is of rare occurrence. Scarlatina does not often appear, 
and it has caused no death since 1887. Diphtheria has diminished in 
frequency; it was frequently met with in the years 1876-80 in the 
northern parts of the district, but in the last five years it has but 
seldom appeared there ; it is now common in Tittle worth, a parish 
which in the earlier periods was nearly exempt from any outbreak. 
Enteric fever has only been the cause of two deaths since 1890. 


Measles and Whooping Cough seldom prove fatal, perhaps because 
the population is a very scattered one, and there are no crowded areas* 
The mortality from infectious disorders is therefore very low in this 
district, and it is now much lower than it was in 1876-80. 


The prevalence in each quarter of 1895 of each notifiable disease is 
shown in the following table :— 


Small Pox . . 
Scarlatina 
Diphtheria . . 
Enteric Fever 
Puerperal Fever 
Erysipelas . . 


1st Qr. 2nd Qr. Srtl Qr. 4th Qr. Total. 

— — — 1 1 

5 3 5 8 21 

1 — — — 1 

1 4 4 5 14 


Total 


7 9 14 37 


WATER SUPPLY. 

The only place which has a public supply of water is the town 
of Pet worth. This supply was given by Lord Leconfield in 1883. 
Before that time water for ordinary purposes was obtained by pumping 
from the river Rotlier at a spot near Coultershaw Mill, nearly two 
miles south of the town. The water then passed into a reservoir near 
the old Gaol, whence people obtained what they required from taps at 
various places in the streets. There was also a smaller and much better 
supply for drinking purposes to be obtained from a smaller reservoir 
which was fed by a spring in Petworth Park, and known as the 
Conduit water, as distinguished from the first source, which was known 
as the river water. The Conduit supply was supposed to be for 
drinking, while the river supply was used for washing and other 
domestic purposes. The system was very unsatisfactory, as many 
would not take the trouble to fetch water from the Conduit but drank 
the river water, which was always more or less impure. The water 
supply is now of very good quality, and it is obtained from a spring 
in the Lower Greensands beds. Thence it is pumped into a reservoir 
near the Cottage Plospital, whence a main brings it into, and pipes 




70 


distribute it throughout, the town. There seems to be at times a 
considerable loss through leakage, and the Parochial Committee, which 
has now been formed, will no doubt take steps to remedy this. The 
main pipe from the reservoir to the town passes down one steep hill, 
and then up another one, so that the pressure in the valley is very 
great, and leakage has occasionally occurred here to a large extent. 
When the reservoir was first made it was not covered over, so that seeds 
blew in and vegetation followed. Sometimes the vegetation was 
“Carried down the main into the supply pipes and caused them to become 
blocked. This was cured some years ago by covering over the reservoir, 
whereby all dust and seeds were kept out, and the supply was rendered 
purer and cooler. 

In the rest of the district the people depend on deep or shallow 
wells, or dipping holes, springs, or rain water tanks. In many 
outlying places in the Weald the people prefer dipping holes to 
any other source, but they are very liable to fail in dry weather. 
Such water is preferred because it is generally softer and much 
less brackish than that obtained from wells. It is generally of good 
quality, but it is often turbid or of a blueish tint from holding very 
finely divided clay in suspension. Filters are not used, but most 
cottagers boil all the water before it is used for drinking purposes. 

When one well supplies several houses, it is a common practice 
to have one large galvanized iron pail attached permanently to 
the windlass, and then each person fills his pail from the attached one. 
This is a good plan, as it ensures that no water can be drawn in a dirty 
bucket. Except in dry seasons, the district is fairly supplied with good 
water. 


DRAINAGE AND SEWAGE. 

Petworth has greatly improved in recent years. A main system of 
sewerage works and sewage disposal was carried out in 1880, and 
as soon as the waterworks were completed in 1882-83, the house 
connections was made in 1884. 

Nearly all the closets were at once done away with, and out¬ 
door closets, with proper pans and flushing cisterns were substituted. 
There was at once a great improvement in the sanitary surroundings of 
the houses. As the town is situated on the saddle of a hill there are 
two outfalls, one for the north side and one for the south side. 

In the rest of the district there is no main system, nor indeed is 
any required, as there is no large populous place, and the houses are for 
the most part very much scattered about. The usual plan is to build a 
closet in the garden a short distance from the house, provided at 
the side or back with a small covered cesspool, into which earth 
or ashes can be thrown. This must be frequently emptied, as the 
receptacle is small; rain and sunlight cannot enter, while plenty of air 
is allowed to pass through. In former times the closet often was placed 
over a ditch, and being open at the back, large accumulations of 


71 


filth were often seen, and in times of heavy rain this foul matter 
washed away down the ditches into some neighbouring stream, whereby 
much pollution would result. 

In a very few cases, as in some farm houses, water closets are 
in use, but they generally prove to be a nuisance, as the quantity 
of liquid to be dealt with is thereby greatly increased, and the flushing 
arrangements are generally faulty. They should be discouraged or 
forbidden, In country places the object is to minimise as far as possible 
the matter to be dealt with, to keep it dry and in a small compass, and 
to utilise it on the soil. 


The general death-rate in Petworth has not altered since the 
completion of the waterworks and the sewerage system, but the 
zymotic rate and phthisis rate have much diminished, while there 
has been an increase in the lung disease rate ; these changes, however, 
are common to all this district. 


The rates per 100,000 persons living, for Petworth Parish, are here 
contrasted for two periods ; the first for 1875-82, before the new works 
were completed, and the second for 1891-95, when the works had been 


in operation for some years. 

1875 - 82 . 


1891 - 95 . 

General mortality 

1,674 

, , 

1,670 

Zymotic „ 

151 

• * 

91 

Phthisis ,, 

201 

• • 

133 

Lung Disease mortality 

266 

• • 

309 


SYSTEMATIC INSPECTION. 

The following is a list of routine work during the year 1895, 
as recorded in the books of the Sanitary Inspector, Mr. F. Whitcount. 


No. of Houses visited . . . . . . . . 450 

No. of Nuisances reported . . . . . . . . 190 

No. of Nuisances abated . . . . . . . 190 

No. of Nuisances abated without notice . . . . 84 

No. of Notices served . . ... .. .. 106 

Houses cleansed and disinfected . . . . . . 45 

Houses cleansed and limewashed . . . . . . 85 

New closets erected . . . . . . . . .. 40 

Old closets converted . . . . . . . . 35 

Wells sunk . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 

Wells cleansed . . . . . . . . . . 40 

Samples of water collected for analysis . . . . 25 

No. of infectious cases removed to Isolation Hospital none 
Water certificates granted for new houses . . 6 

Overcrowding cases reported . . . , . . none 

Overcrowding cases abated . . . . . . . . none 

New houses built . . .. . . . . .. 6 






72 


MARGARINE ACT. 

Very little margarine is sold here by the grocers, and where it can 
be obtained the regulations of the Act have been complied with. There 
seems to be no demand for this substance on the part of the scattered 
agricultural population. 


BAKEHOUSES. 

These are twenty-five in number, and they have been often 
inspected, and they have been well kept. There is no bakehouse on a 
large scale, and the chief duty is to see that they are frequently 
cleansed and lime washed. In each case there is a good amount of 
light and air, and in no case is there any drain within the building. 


COWSHEDS AND DAIRIES. 

These are in most cases very well kept, care being taken that 
there is an ample supply of good water, plenty of light and ventilation, 
frequent removal of refuse and cleansing of the walls and floors. 


SLAUGHTER HOUSES. 

These are nine in number and they are very well kept as regards 
cleanliness and removal of refuse. In many instances animals are only 
killed once or twice a week, so there is no difficulty in keeping them 
clean and tidy. Each slaughter house is often lime washed, and the 
blood is generally removed at once for use in a garden. 


PROCEEDINGS BEFORE THE MAGISTRATES. 

No proceedings were taken before the Magistrates during the 

year. 


COMMON LODGING HOUSES. 

There is one common lodging-house in the district and this has 
been kept clean. 


ARTICLES OF FOOD. 

No cases occurred in which it was necessary to condemn meat or 
any other article of food. 



RAINFALL. 


The amount of rainfall during the year was taken daily by the 
Rev. Prebendary Holland, M.A., Petworth Rectory, who has kindly 
allowed me to use his tables : — 


Month. 

Total depth 
in inches. 

No. of rainy 
days. 

Rainfall in 

1893. 

Rainfall in 
1894. 

January . . 

2-56 

13 

2-21 

5-80 

February 

0T2 

1 

3-83 

2-14 

March . . 

2-24 

13 

0-63 

2-03 

April 

2-56 

11 

0 06 

2-68 

May 

0-30 

3 

0-64 

1-66 

June 

0-35 

5 

2-43 

2*06 

July 

4*85 

14 

3-47 

5-83 

August . . 

2-90 

18 

0-97 

2-08 

September 

0-84 

4 

2-11 

3-01 

October . . 

3-75 

12 

4-78 

4-21 

November 

6-47 

19 

3-14 :. 

6-70 

December 

3*38 

15 

4-29 

2-51 

Total . . 

30-32 

128 

28-56 

40-71 


INQUESTS. 

Inquests were held in twelve cases: — Female, 3 months, 
inflammation of the kings; female, 73 years, apoplexy; male, 69 years, 
accidentally suffocated ; male, 2 months, natural causes, pericarditis ; 
male, 9 days, bronchitis ; male, 3 days, accidentally suffocated by being 
overlaid during sleep ; male, 80 years, fractured thigh caused by an 
accidental fall; male, 61 years, heart disease; male, 8 weeks, con¬ 
vulsions ; female, 56 years, heart disease ; female infant, still-born ; 
male, 54 years, suicide by hanging.. 


There was one death returned as “ not certified ” during the 
year :—Female, 80 years, bronchitis. 











74 


PETWORTH RURAL DISTRICT. 


Table 1. — Showing the Deaths at various groups of ages in the 

fifteen years 1881-95. 


Year. 

At all ages. 

Under 1 Year. 

1 to 5. 

5 to 15. 

15 to 25. 

25 to 65. 

65 and upwards. 

1881-85 

749 

109 

57 

34 

39 

222 

288. 

1886-90 

754 

102 

47 

32 

39 

226 

308 

1891 

153 

30 

17 

8 

7 

30 

61 

1892 

163 

18 

7 

6 

4 

55 

73 

1893 

129 

17 

6 

8 

6 

48 

44 

1894 

116 

13 

6 

6 

2 

29 

60 

1895 

154 

24 

10 

5 

6 

43 

66 

Total 

2,218 

313 

150 

99 

103 

653 

900 


Table 2.—Showing the Deaths in the twenty years, 1876-95, from 

various causes.. 


Year. 

I Small Pox. 

i 

| Scarlatina. 

i 

Diphtheria. 

Membranous Croup. 

I Typhus. 

Ft 

6 
• r* 

u 

© 

-M 

a 

W 

Continued. / nj 

1 • • 

1 Relapsing. 

j Puerperal. ' 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 

Measles. 

Whooping Cough. 

Diarrhoea. 

| Rheumatic Fever. 

j Influenza. 

i 

Total. 

1876-80 

1 

6 

25 



6 



4 



4 

8 

6 

3 


63 

1881-85 

— 

1 

10 


_ 

5 

— 




4 

— 

7 

6 

1 

— 

34 

1886-90 


2 

14 



7 

— 

— 


— 

2 

4 

8 

6 

— 

— 

43 

1891... 



2 

— 

— 


— 

— 




— 

8 



1 

11 

1892. 



4 


— 

— 

— 

;| 



— 


3 


— 

16 

23 

1893. 

1 




— 

1 

— 

— 




— 

3 



3 

8 

1804. 

— 

— 

6 



— 

— 

— 



— 

— 

2 

— 


6 

14 

1895. 



2 


i 

1 

' 

t 




2 


2 

1 

8 

16 

Total... 

2 

9 

63 

] 


i 

20 

— 


4 


6 

10 

39 

20 

5 

34 

212 

• ; 




















































































































75 


PET WORTH RURAL DISTRICT. 


Table 3.—Showing the Deaths and Death-rate from all causes and fromi 
various causes in the twenty years, 1876-95. 


•8SB8SI(J JJ138JJ 

O 05 ^ CO 

h »o r- co 

I—I I-H j-H i-H 

•8SB8Si(j Sumj 

283 

264 

245 

261 

■sjsRiqd: 

io 4^ co eo 

lO ft Tb i —i 

H r—1 r-H H 

'8SB8SIQT 

orjounOj 

rH o t"H 

Cl C* CO 

r—H 

'S8SB8SIQ J[y 

1,609 

1,572 

1,579 

1,519 

'8SB8SI(J jjuojj 

54 

76 

83 

79 

*8SB9Si(j Sunq; 

138 

126 

117 

123 

* s I s JWl<I 

76 

69 

70 

53 

*8ST38SI(J 

OIJO UI^ 

63 

34 

43 

38 

•S8SU8SIQ; \\Y 

lO 05 4^ lO 

GO "P VO 1-4 

1> b* b- 1> 

•poi-iaj JO 
ojppiui 

ui uoijBjndo^ 

9,800 

9,600 

9,550 

9,410 


r 


a 

® 2 

-P «+H 

TO 

XI P 

43 

o 
, ~5 o 

to o 

go 
£ o 


P 

CL 




CQ 
P 
ej 
<X> 
tP, 

<p s 

P3 O 

43 P 
5+H 

W) 

P lO J 

P co 
<-C t- 
o> CO 
-P 

43 

o3 
o 

ft 


ft 

o 

ft 

ft 

ft 


o 

lO 

o 

Up 

CO 

OD 

05 

05 

co 

ft 

CO 

ft 

b- 

CO 

CO 

05 

00 

00 

CO 

00 

r-H 

r-H 

i-H 

r—1 




































76 


(A)—Table of DEATHS during the Year 1895, in the PETWORTH 


Names of Localities adopted for 
the purpose of these 
Statistics; Public Institutions 
being shown as separate 
localities. 

(a) 

Mortality from all Causes 

AT SUBJOINED AGES. 

(i) 


m 

a> 

U) 

as 

r—H 

<3 

(0 

U 

o 

pH 

u 

r* 

i—1 

P 

(C) 

16 

f-i 

<D 

Tj 

a 

0 

ci 

pH 

(d) 

u 

<D 

a 

-.o 
■■d ^ 

i-h 

(e) 

a> 

'd 

5 . 

d <m 
a 

cS 

LO 

pH 

(/) 

Sh 

© 

d 

a 

a . 
_ no 
d 

o3 

no 

CJ 

(9) 

i 

fr. 

p—; 

CQ 

dd 

5 S 
£ 
>o 
co 

(A) 

1 

2 

3 

Small Pox. 

Scarlatina. 

Diphtheria. 

North Sub-district 

61 

12 

3 

2 


19 

25 

Under 5 





5 upwards. 




Petworth Parish 

47 

8 

4 

2 

3 

18 

12 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 




Rest of South Sub-District 

35 

4 

O 

l 

3 

4 

20 

Under 5 



1 

5 upwards. 



1 

Petworth Workhouse ... 

5 

— 

— 

— 

— 

2 

3 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 




Wisborough Green Workhouse 

6 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

6 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 




Petworth Cottage Hospital ... 








Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 




• 








Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 



. 

Totals. 

154 

24 

10 

5 

6 

43 

66 

Under 5 



1 

5 upwards. 



1 


The subjoined numbers have also to be taken into 

Deaths occurring outside the 
District among persons 
belonging Thereto. 








Under 5 




5 upwards. 




Deaths occurring within the 
District among persons 
not belonging thereto... 

] 







Under 5 





5 upwards. 










































































































































































































Rural District, classified according to Diseases, Ages, and Localities 


Mortality from subjoined causes, distinguishing Deaths of Children 

under Five Years of Age. 


4 

5 I 

6 I 

7 1 

8 I 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

Membranous 

Croup. 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 

Measles. 

Whooping 

Cough. 

Diarrhoea and 

Dysentery. 

Rheumatic 

Fever. 

Phthisis. 

Bronchitis, 

Pneumonia, 

and Pleurisy. 

Heart 

Disease. 

Influenza. 

Injuries. 

All Other 

Diseases. 

Total. 

Typhus. 

Enteric or 
Typhoid. 

Continued. 

Relapsing. 

Puerperal. 











1 



6 



1 

7 

15 













5 

6 

8 

2 

2 

23 

46 









1 


1 



2 




8 

12 



1 






1 




3 

5 

6 

5 


14 

35 














1 



1 

4 

7 












1 

o 

6 

2 

1 

2 

13 

28 



















— 













1 


1 



3 

5 



















— 














1 



1 

4 

6 






























































































































































1 















































































1 


2 


9 



2 

19 

34 



1 






1 



1 

11 

! 18 

17 

8 

5 

57 

120 


account in judging of the above records of mortality. 





































































































































































































































































































































































78 


(B)—TABLE OF POPULATION, BIRTHS, AND OF NEW CASE 

Officer of Health, during the year 1895, in the PETWORT. 


Names of Localities adopted 
for the purpose of these 
Statistics; Public Institutions 
being shown as separate 
localities. 

(a) 

Population 
at all Ages. 

a. Registered Births. 

Aged 
under 5 
or 

over 5. 

(e) 

New Cases of Sica 

COMING TO THE KNOWLEDG 

c- 

Census 

1891. 

(b) 

Esti¬ 
mated 
to mid¬ 
dle of 
1895. 

(0 

1 

2 

3 

j 

4 

5 

6 

Small Pox. 

Scarlatina. 

Diphtheria. 

Membranous 

Croup. 

Fev 

m 

S3 

Cm 

>> 

EH 

ERS 

Sh 

o 

T 
O .. 

•E * 

-St 

a s 

North Sub-District 

3,983 

3,960 

89 

Under 5 







5 upwards. 


1 

9 




Petworth Parish 

2,831 

2,817 

53 

Under 5 







5 upwards. 



1 



1 

Rest of South Sub-District ... 

2,545 

2,560 

58 

Under 5 



1 




5 upwards. 



10 




Petworth Workhouse ... 

33 

30 

2 

Under 5 







5 upwards. 







Wisborough Green Workhouse 

s 

36 

30 

— 

Under 5 







5 upwards. 







Petworth Cottage Hospital ... 

3 

3 

— 

Under 5 







5 upwards. 







* 




Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 







Totals . 

9,431 

9,400 

202 

Under 5 



1 




5 upwards. 


1 

20 



1 








































































































































































)F INFECTIOUS SICKNESS, coming to the knowledge of the Medical 
Jural District; classified according to Diseases, Ages, and Localities. 


NESS IN EACH LOCALITY, 

of the Medical Officer 
Health. 

Number of such Cases Removed from their 

Homes in the several Localities for Treatment 
in Isolation Hospital. 

7 1 

8 

9 

to 

11 

12 

13 

i ! 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 1 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 



Small Pox. 

Scarlatina. 

Diphtheria. 

M embranous 
Croup. 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 



Continued. 

Relapsing. 

Puerperal. 

Typhus. 

Enteric or 

Typhoid. 

Continued. 

Relapsing. 

Puerperal. 

























9 








































1 




















1 




















3 










%■ 










































































































































































































































































































































l 




















13 




















































































































































































































































































THAKEHAM RURAL DISTRICT. 


pp. 81 et seq. 



81 


THAKEHAM RURAL DISTRICT. 


The population in this registration district was 7,765 at the 
census of 1841 and 7,434 in 1851 ; chiefly owing to alteration in 
area, it rose to 8,036 in 1861, since 1871 there has been a steady decline 
in the number living. 


The following figures relate to the present rural sanitary area 
which is co-extensive with the registration district. 



1861. 

1871. 

1881. 

1891. 

Area in Statute Acres 

— 

40,025 

40,636 

40,636 

Number of Inhabited Houses. . 

1,590 

1,689 

1,652 

1,610 

,, Uninhabited „ . . 

64 

79 

131 

113 

Population 

8,036 

8,335 

8,285 

8,049 

Males 

4,121 

4,274 

4,247 

4,194 

Females 

3,915 

4,061 

4,038 

3,855 

Persons to each House 

5-0 

4-9 

5-0 

5-0 


The above figures show that the population in this district is nearly 
stationary ; the males, as is usual in rural areas, exceed the females, 
and there is an excess of aged people. 


The chief occupation is agriculture, but many are also engaged in 
fruit growing, for which produce a market is found in Brighton and 
Worthing. 


The following tables show the population in each parish over a 
term of thirty years, and the deaths in each parish from all causes and 
from various causes during the last twenty years ; few unions, perhaps 
could show less change in the time. Building operations are seldom 
carried on, except when a new T house replaces an old one. The number 
of uninhabited houses is less now than in 1881, but much higher than 
it was in the previous decades : — 




82 


■ 



















CO 

a • 


















r-H r-H 

a os 
£ CO 

r—l 

L- 

cq 

CO 

CO 

o 

OO 

ci 

oo 

40 

O b- Cl 

OO 

02 


o —■- 


pi 

CO 

CO 

cq 

40 

b- 

cq 

oo 

CO 

cq 

CO 

O 

CO 

O 

CO 

O X 



cq 




rH 


oo 

cq 


CO 

rH Cl 


r—H 

r-H 

pi oo 


O 1—1 

Pm 


















r\ 

X 

02 -— 1 

C2 

CO 

cq 

o 

co 

oo 

02 

40 

cq 

co 

OO 

^O P^ 

t- 

o 

02 

X pi 


i—1 02 

40 

oo 

L— 

pi 

CO 

co 

cq 

o 

40 

CO 

CO 

O l- 

oo 


X) 

OO 02 


*5 00 


cq 






02 

OO 


CO 

t—( cq 


rH 

r-H 

pi oo 


x~ 


















a M 

o 

40 

pi 

CO 

-pi 

GO 

cq 


o 

CO 

oo 

cq co 

o 

02 

cq 

X 40 


x 

o 

cq 

O0 

20 

Cl 

oo 

40 

oo 

cq 

40 

C2 

rH CO 

l— 

rH 

40 

CO t— 

<•( 

o 

P CO 

a r-H 

i-H 

40 

rH 


rH 

CO 


b- 

•> 

co 


cq^ 

01 p-i 


cq 

OO 

X 

M 

H 

PM 








rH 



rH 
























a | 


















a 

p 

o 

oT 

a ^ 

o HP 

co 

o 

T—' 

02 

r—H 

02 

GO 

oc 

p-i 

CO 


O P^ 


CO 

b- 

p! X 

Pm 

x c^J 

o 

t- 

CO 

40 

o 

GO 

co 

o 

co 

CO 

40 

O oo 

02 

r—1 

i r> 

PI o 

P GO 

1—1 

40 

r-H 


rH 

CO 


00 

CO 


OO 

cq 40 


cq 

co 

X 


a i—i 


















PM 








rH 



r-H 







#N 

X 


















G rH* 

o r 

40 

40 


o 


CO 

02 

40 

1—H 

40 

pi 

O r-H 

o 

i— 

rH 

GO i-H 


x £r 

02 

oo 

40 

CO 

rH 

cq 

co 

40 

o 

CO 

GO 

40 OO 

-pi 

w 

rH 

O X 


P GO 


40 

rH 


r-H 

pi 


00 

I— 


r—i 

H CO 

rH 

cq 

oo 

02 CO 


<J> --1 








*N 



»N 







PM 








rH 



rH 







of 


















a ,_; 

o HP 

CO 

20 

pi 

_ 

i— 

i— 


cq 

00 

i-H 

pi 

rH Cft 

CO 

p^ 

rH 

X 40 


x 

o 

lO 

C2 

40 

oo pi 

oo 

40 

CO 

b- 

o 

-PI 40 

o 

co 

—i 

O lO 


P 00 


pi 

1-1 



■pi 


GO 

CO 


rH 

cq 40 

rH 

cq 

oo 

02 CO 


Cm r —i 











*-> 





PM 











rH 







be 


















a 


















• i-H 


I 




I 


cq 

cq 







| cq 


na 


1 




I 

I 




























a 

















• 

cq 

















t—h 


















02 


















GO 

T3 

















rH 

02 

















* - / 

■ -P 

a ’a 

l—s HP 

|-J C5 

1 

uo 

rH 

1 

1 

oo 

1 

rH 

oo 

cq 

b- 

40 t- 

cq 

cq 

cq 

8 

5 

02 <. 

1 




1 

I—1 

1 

oo 

r-H 


rH 






H 

















CO 

^a 

















a 

a 

















o 

W 


















•-o 


















a 


















p> 


















IS 

a 

,ja 

rH 

pi 

02 

cq 

oo 

oo 

i- 

o 

-p< 

cq 

CO 

cq co 

co 

i- 

p^ 

ci o 


cq 

i-H 

cq 

H 

cq 

GO 


oo 

pi 

rH 

p^ 

oo co 

rH 

p^ 

co 

PI 40 



r—( 






co 

rH 


cq 





rH rH 


a 

















l 

M 


















EH 

O 


H 

02 


g O 

-+3 

zn 


a 

a 

D 

O 


r£3 
-P 
P 

o O 
PQ £ 
H3 
& 

CM 


K*~} 

<X> 

—H 

P 

<D 

Pb 


£ 

cS 

o 

c3 


£ 

c3 

03 

-P 

c2 

<D 

P 


Cg 

• _a 

• -p 

£PS 

t "a 


<1 Ph d W 6 


* • a 

o 

-p 

bO 

^ Ph V§ 

§ go 

be § -p 
bcaS $ 


H 

O 

M 

C3 

H 

02 


ffl 

M> 

m ; 
o a 

H H 

^ a 

& 'S 

m 2 

a -* 


a 

o 

-p 

be 

a 

• i—i 

p 

p 

o 

-p 


02 P-l ZD 
P 


§ | 

I ~~1 Cw 

b£ -S 

r-| 

.a ^ 
za a 
a 03 
lZ2 EH 


-p 

X 


be 

a 


a 

£ 


a • 

o 

-p 

be a 
a o 
• p -p 

rH C45 

r-*-H . ^ 

CQ K. 


a . 
o . 

"be 

.£ a 

^3 O 
co r a 
a a 








































1891-95 

•0SB0SI(J 

Sniri 

rH t> CO rH pH rH CO 1 H I H r-H Ol iO CO CO 

Ol rH I j—H 1 rH 

CO 

o 

rH 

•steiq^j 

< CO | J | Ol | <M ^ r—1 05 ^ H | <N | CD CO 

45 

•Bijaq^qdiQ 

| r-t | H i-H i— 1 | tD | | r— * | | | 

22 

1 

, 08'B9SI(J 

oi^ora^ 

1 O) I r—1 CO 1 IO Ol 1 CO r—l r—1 1 rH CO 0> O’ 

1 | r- 1 1 1 r— ( r— ( 

56 

•06-9881 

, 0S'R0Sl(j 

^un'q 

rH 00 (M r- ICOi—1 CO Q (N «D r-ICO 1 d 05 CO 

r—l | CO rH 1 

rH 

rH 

* s I s W9d 

| CO 1 1 I—iio I (M CO H CO I Cl I H (M O CO 

III 1 rH i— 1 | | 

rH 

IO 

*BU0q;qdi(j 

! 1 i - 1 1 | m t ~ | ” 1 1 1 ! | -* i 

o 

•0SB08I(J 

OI^OUI^ 

rH lO rH rH 1 (^1 I rH rH I Oi rH Ol rH lO 1 CO <r ^ 

I 1 rH rH J 1 

62 

1881-85. 

: 

■0SB0SIQ 

^atvqr 

COOdrHr-HlO I 00 CO H (M (M CO r-» tH H CO 

rH J pH rH 

IO 

o 

rH 


pH 1 1 CO 1 IO f rH pH | T^l CO CO CO 

II 1 rH I rH I 

CO 

<d 

•BiJoq^qdiQ 

1 1 1 1 1 1 1» II 10 1 1 II II 

CO 

rH 

’0SB9SIQ' 

oi^oui^z 

j IO j | jOqrHIMCq | CqH^lr-iHHCO^ 

45 

i 1876-80. 

*0SB0SI(J 

Sarrj 

| 1 — l h Cl C-UO 1 NCMNNCOOHO^OiO 

1 rH | rH <M 

1 

114 

* 8 J s !TOd: 

1 CO <M 1 | 05 | Ntfi IO 1 (N H (N 110)0 

1 1 1 rH | rH | 

62 

Biaoq^qdtQ 

| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | rH 

rH 

•0SB0SIQ 

oi^oui^z 

hoo(M | | cq ir^io j oioko^dwooo 

II H 1 

73 

£}U0A\.£ 
m pnoj. 

HCUO(MCOCOCOOlO(M\PiOOOM»C01> 
COOilOHCO^ OlOlMOOrtiCqcOOONrtiOO 

i-H rH IO r—l CO rH O') i— 1 

2,462 

Deaths from all 

CAUSES IN THE YEARS 

yv 

96-1681 

0)CTNCOCOCO(M®iiMJOCO(MOOONO)Orti 
■r^rH H CO 1^10 00 H CO (M rH IO 

rH 

653 

06*9881 

OC0NCD)0i0H)0(DONl>00(MN000)00 
IO CO fOrfi O cq (M H IO CO 

rH pH 

575 

S8TS81 

O^^HNOOO^OlO^HTjirHOOfMi^N 
H Ti< H CO CO-rJH rH^cO H (N 

rH rH 

583 

08*9^81 

b-COlXNOONHlNs^iTtuoirWlOOiNCO 
IO H CO ^Hio CO 1— ICOHNHNIO 

rH 

651 

i 

1 

Parish. 

North Stoke 
Amberley 
Packham. . 

Great ham 

Hardham 

Cold Waltham . . 

Wiggonholt 

Pulborougli 

West Chiltington 

Parham 

Storrington 

Sullington 

Thakeham 

Warminghurst . . 

Ashington 

Wiston 

Washington 

Findon 

Total 




















































































84 


BIRTHS AND BIRTH-RATE, 

During the year 1895, the births of 197 children were registered; 
of these 105 were male, and 92 were female. 

Estimating the population in the middle of the year at 8,000 
the birth-rate was equal to 24*6 per 1,000 persons living. 


The births and birth-rate during the past ten years are here 
shown :— 


Year. 

Births. 

Birth-rate. 

Year. 

Births. 

Birth-rate. 

1886 

. . 220 

. . 26-6 

1891 

. . 223 

. . 27*7 

1887 

. . 246 

. . 29-7 

1892 

. . 185 

23*0 

1888 

. . 230 

. . 28-0 

1893 

. . 207 

. . 25-9 

1889 

. . 232 

. . 28-4 

1894 

188 

. . 23-5 

1890 

. . 210 

.. 25-9 

1895 

.. 197 

. . 24*6 


The mean number of births is 214, and the mean birth-rate is 26*3 
per 1,000 of population. 


In England and Wales the birth-rate during the year was 30-3 
per 1,000 persons living, a rate 0*9 per 1,000 below the mean rate in 
the ten years, 1885-94. 


The following table shows the births and birth-rate in each locality 
during the past four years :— 



1892. 

Births. 
1898. 1894. 

1895. 

1892. 

Birth-rate. 

1893. 1894. 

1895. 

Amber ley Parish 

14 

18 

9 

13 

27*0 

34-6 

17*0 

25-0' 

Pulborough Parish . . 

50 

61 

51 

46 

27-9 

34-1 

28-3 

25-5 

Rest of Pulborough 
Sub-district 

29 

37 

34 

45 

20*3 

26-0 

24*1 

31-9 

Storrington Parish . . 

31 

24 

37 

18 

24*4 

19-0 

29*3 

14-3 

Washington Parish . . 

15 

17 

19 

21 

17-8 

20-2 

22-3 

24-7 

Rest of Washington 
Sub-district 

46 

50 

38 

54 

2M 

23-0 

17-6 

25*0 

Total 

185 

207 

188 

197 

23-0 

25-9 

23-5 

24*6- 


There has been a steady decline in the birth-rate during the 
last twenty years; young people leave the villages and find employment 
in large towns, for it is useless for them to remain at home, where 
there can be no demand for work. 


GENERAL MORTALITY. 

There were 123 deaths registered in this district during the year 
1895, but to this number must be added the death of one person 
in Worthing Infimary, belonging to this district. 













85 


Estimating the population in the middle of the year at 8,000, the 
death-rate was equal to 15*5 per 1,000 persons living. 

In country places throughout England and Wales the mortality 
in 1895 was equal to 17*0 per 1,000 of population. 

There were 12 deaths in Thakeham Workhouse, and these have 
been distributed among the several parishes whence each inmate came, 
viz. :—Amberley, 2 ; Cold Waltham, 1 ; Pulborough, 3 ; West Chilting- 
ton, 3 ; Thakeham, 1 ; Ashington, 1 ; Wiston, 1 ; Washington, 1 ; 
and Findon 2 ; in all 15. 

The variations in the death-rate during the past ten years are 
here shown :— 


Year. 

Deaths. 

Death-rate. 

Year. 

Deaths. 

Death-rate. 

1886 

.. 118 

. . 14-3 

1891 

. . 126 

. . 15-6 

1887 

. . 123 

. . 149 

1892 

. . 146 

. . 18-2 

1888 

. . 106 

. . 12-9 

1893 

. . 121 

. . 15-1 

1889 

. . 127 

. . 15*5 

1894 

. . 136 

. . 17-0 

1890 

. . 101 

. . 12-4 

1895 

. . 124 

. . 15*5 


Thus there have been during the above period 1,228 deaths and a 
mean mortality of 15‘1 per 1,000. During the same period there were 
2,138 births, so that the natural increase of population by excess of 
births over deaths was 910. 

In each locality the deaths and death-rate for the past four years 
. are here shown :— 

Deaths. Death-rate. 



1892. 

1893. 

1894. 

1895. 

1892. 

1893. 

1894. 

1895. 

Amberley Parish 

9 

9 

6 

9 . . 

17-3 

17-3 

11-5 

17-3 

Pulborough Parish . . 

42 

31 

37 

34 . . 

23*5 

17*3 

20*5 

18-9 

Pest of Pulborough 
Sub-district 

34 

23 

24 

26 . . 

23-8 

16-2 

17-0 

18*4 

Stori ington Parish. . 

15 

15 

22 

14 . . 

11-8 

11-9 

17*0 

11T 

Washington Parish . . 

9 

17 

13 

16 . . 

10-7 

20*2 

15-3 

18-8 

Rest of Washington 
Sub-district 

37 

26 

34 

25 . . 

17-0 

12*0 

15-7 

11-6 

Total 

146 

121 

136 

124 

18-2 

15*1 

17*0 

15-5 


In each parish the deaths in 1895 were thus distributed :— 


North Stoke 

2 

Parham 

1 

Amberley 

9 

Storrington. . 

14 

Rackham 

2 

Sullington . . 

1 

Greatham 

none .. 

Thakeham . . 

6 

Hard ham 

2 

W arminghurst 

1 

Cold Waltham 

7 

Ashington . . 

2 

Wiggonholt . . 

1 . . 

Wiston 

2 

Pulborough . . 

34 . . 

Washington. . 

16 

West Chiltington 

12 . . 

Findon 

12 


Total 

124. 





















86 




Table 3 shows the variations in the mortality during the last 
twenty years. The general death-rate was higher in 1891-95 than in 
the three previous five year periods, but it is lower than it was thirty 
or forty years ago. 


The zymotic death-rate and the phthisis death-rate show a great 
decline in recent years, but deaths from lung diseases and heart disease 
have increased, owing probably to changes in nomenclature. The 
deaths formerly registered as due to old age are now often put down to 
more definite causes, or to disease of some particular organ. 

The variations in the rates per 100,000 persons living are here 
shown for a long period :— 

1851-60. 1861-70. 1876-85. 1886-95. 

1824 .. 1649 .. 1486 .. 1509 

402 .. 292 .. 144 .. 144 

285 .. 221 .. 150 .. 120 

189 .. 197 .. 263 .. 267 


INFANT MORTALITY. 

The infant mortality is here given as measured by the number of 
deaths under one year of age to the total number of births in the 
year:— 

Deaths under Ratio to 



Births. 

one year. 

1000 Births. 

Amberley Parish 

13 

none 

— 

Pul boro ugh Parish . . 

46 

4 

87 

Rest of Pulborough Sub-district 

45 

7 

155 

Storrington Parish . . 

18 

2 

111 

Washington Parish . . 

21 

none 

— 

Rest of Washington Sub-district 

54 

2 

37 

Total 

197 

15 

76 


General Death-rate 
Zymotic „ 

Phthisis ,, 

Lung Disease ,, 


The mean annual rate in the previous seven years, 1888-94, was 85 
per 1,000 registered births. 

In England and Wales the proportion of deaths under one year 
of age to registered births was 161 per 1,000, the mean proportion in 
the preceding ten years having been 146. 


ZYMOTIC MORTALITY. 

The deaths were 15 in number, of which ten were among notifiable 
diseases, and five in the other class. The rate of mortality was there¬ 
fore equal to 1*87 per 1,000. 







87 



Small Pox . . 

• • 

Cases. 

none 

Deaths... 

none 


Scarlatina . . 

• • 

10 

none 


Diphtheria . . 

• • 

50 

9 


Membranous Croup 

• • 

2 

1 

( Typhus 

• • 

none 

none 

Z/l 

Enteric 

• • 

,1 

none 

a> 

> \ 

Continued 


none 

none 

CD 

Relapsing 

• • 

none 

none 

Puerperal 

• • 

1 

none 


Cholera 

• • 

none 

none 


Erysipelas 

• • 

5 

none 


Total 

• 

69 

10' 


The deaths in the other classes were as follows :— 


Measles 

Whooping Cough . . 
Diarrhoea and Dysentery 
Rheumatic Fever . . 


Deaths. 

1 

1 

3 

none 


Total . . 5 


The Infectious Disease (Notification) Act, 1889, came into opera¬ 
tion on January 1st, 1890, and the number of cases notified were 36 in 
1890, 34 in 1891, 21 in 1892, 43 in 1893, 41 in 1894, and 69 in 1895. 


The prevalence in each quarter of each notifiable disease is shown 
in the following table :— 



1st Qr. 

2nd Qr. 

3rd Qr. 

4th Qr. 

Total- 

Scarlatina 

2 

— 

2 

6 

10 

Diphtheria 

1 

2 

3 

44 

50 

Membranous Croup 

— 

— 

1 

1 

2. 

Enteric Fever 

— 

1 

— 

— 

1 

Puerperal Fever 

— 

— 

1 

— 

1 

Erysipelas 

3 

— 

1 

1 

5 

Total 

6 

3 

8 

52 

69 


Table 2 shows the variations in the prevalence of zymotic diseases- 
during the last twenty years. Scarlatina was frequently met with 
in the first half of that period, but ib has only caused one death since 
1889. Diphtheria, on the other hand, was rare from 1876-80, but now 
it is much more frequent, and it has caused twice as many deaths as 
Scarlatina. Enteric Fever is seldom, and Small Pox is still more rarely 
a cause of death. Measles was fatal in only two cases in the whole 
period. Whooping Cough mortality was very high in 1876-80, but it 
has declined very much in recent years; it still stands first in the list 
amongst zymotic diseases. 










88 


Since the passing of the Infectious Disease (Notification) Act, 
1889, the number of persons attacked, as well as the number of deaths, 
<3an be ascertained. In the six years, 1890-95, there were 69 cases of 
Scarlatina with only one death, 110 cases of Diphtheria with 22 deaths, 
and 29 cases of Enteric Fever with 8 deaths. Most of the Enteric 
Fever cases were imported into the district when this disease was rife 
in 1890 and 1893 in two neighbouring towns. 


DIPHTHERIA. 

An outbreak of Diphtheria appeared in the autumn in the parishes 
of Washington and Findon, and in one house in Asliington. The spread 
of the disease was chiefly due to school attendance, and not to defects 
in drainage, or impure water supply or infected milk. 

Washington. 

The population is almost stationary, and the mean number living 
in this parish amounts to 840 persons. There were 243 deaths from 
all causes during 1876-95, so that the mean annual death-rate is 14'5 
per 1,000. The zymotic mortality averaged P7 per 1,000 in the twenty 
years. During this period there were 17 deaths from notifiable, and 
12 deaths from non-notifiable diseases. 

U 

m <d 



Small Pox. 

Scarlatina. 

Diphtheria. 

Membranou 

Croup. 

<x> 

o 

CD 

£ 

Til 

*3 

’3 

W 

Measles 

Whooping 

Cough. 

c3 

8 

£ 

o 

Total. 

1876-80 .. 

— 

1 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

6 

1 

8 

1881-85 . . 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

l .. 

— 

— 

2 

3 

1886-90 . . 

1 

— 

4 

— 

— 

— 

1 

2 

— 

8 

1891-95 . 

— 

— 

7 

— 

3 

- . . 

— 

— 

— 

10 

Total 

1 

1 

11 

— 

o 

O 

l .’. 

1 

8 

3 

29 

The death 

from 

Small Pox was registered 

© 

as such in 

1886, but 


it was a very doubtful case, and there was no history of infection and 
no spread of the disease. No death has been caused by Scarlatina since 
1877. Two out of the three Enteric Fever deaths were due to cases 
sent home ill from outside places; Measles, Whooping Cough, and 
Diarrhoea have in recent years seldom been a cause of mortality. 

The parish has been in a very healthy state until the appearance of 
Diphtheria, for the first time in November and December, 1887. In 
those two months the disease appeared in six houses occupied by 
14 adults and 19 children ; of the 14 adults three had Diphtheria 
and recovered, while one or two others -were unwell for a day or 
two with sore throats ; of the nineteen children living in these six 
houses, fourteen were attacked, and four of them died. An account of 
this outbreak will be found in my Fourteenth Annual Report. In the 





89 


next two years there were no deaths. In 1890 there were five cases and 
one death, but there were no cases during the two following years; in 
1893 there were three cases and one death, but in 1894 the parish was 
free from the disease, and it remained so until the end of September, 
1895. 

Case 1. Alice T., 4 years old, was a delicate child and she did not 
attend school after September 11th. On September 15tli she went to 
Brighton and stayed there two days ; on September 17th she came back 
by train to Worthing and after walking about there for two hours, she 
was driven home. On September 12th she had been to Wiston 
Flower Show, and she felt poorly on September 14th the day before 
she left home. On September 28th she fell ill with Diphtheria and she 
died on October 2nd. She lived at Poplars in a semi-detached cottage 
on some low-lying ground at the foot of the Downs, and next door to 
the house where Diphtheria first appeared in 1887 These cottages are 
reached by passing from the main road across a large meadow which is 
often in a wet and swampy condition. They are about three-quarters 
of a mile distant from, and to the east of the school. 

Case 2. William G., 3^ years old, was taken ill on September 
30th and he died on October 1st; he last attended school on September 
26th. He lived in Washington Street about 200 yards distant from 
the school. 

Case 3. Robert G., 4| years, was attacked on October 2nd with a 
bad cold and a sore throat; on October 9th he was notified as having 
Diphtheria and he died on October 14th ; he last attended school on 
October 4th. He lived at Montpelier, in one of a group of six houses, 
about three-quarters of a mile north of, and distant from, Washington 
School. 

Case 4. James M., 4 years old, fell ill on October 3rd, and he last 
attended school on September 26th. He dwelt in a cottage in a lonely 
situation by the side of the main road, about one and a quarter 
miles north of the school, and one and a half miles north of Montpelier. 

Case 5. Kate R., 11 years old, was attacked on October 4th, and 
she last attended school on September 30th. She lived at Pigland in 
one of a pair of cottages, in a lonely spot about a mile north-west of the 
school and more than half-a-mile west of Montpelier. 

Case 6. Harriett B., 10 years, failed on October 4th, and she was 
last at school on September 26th. She lived in one of a pair of cottages 
at Sandy Road, about quarter of a mile north of Montpelier, and 
nearly one mile north of the school. 

The public elementary school was closed on October 2nd, at the 
commencement of the outbreak, and it was re-opened on November 8th. 

After the first six cases, other children and a few adults fell ill 
from exposure to those who had been attacked. 

The district nurse constantly visited the infected houses, and a 
second nurse was obtained at the end of October to assist in the w T ork. 


90 


Their services were of great value, and the expenses were defrayed by 
private subscription. 

The following table shows the number of houses affected, and the 


number of inmates and 

persons 

attacked. 






Houses. 

Inmates. 

Adults. Children. 
M. F. M. F. 


Attacks. 

Adults. Children. 

M. F. M. F. 

Deaths. 

Adults. Children. 

M. F. M. F. 

1 . . 

1 

1 

— 

1 


-- 


— 

1 


— 

— 1 

2 . . 

4 

1 

2 

5 


2 — 


1 

2 

. . - 

— 

1 — 

3 . . 

1 

1 

1 

1 


-- 


1 - 


. . - 

— 

1 — 

4 . . 

1 

1 

3 

— 


— — 


1 - 


. - 

— 

— — 

5 . . 

3 

1 

1 

3 


— — 


— 

1 

. . — 

— 

— — 

6 .. 

4 

1 

2 

2 


— — 


— 

1 

. . — 

—• 

— — 

7 . . 

1 

1 

2 

4 


-- 


1 - 


. . - 

— 

1 — 

8 . . 

1 

— 

1 

1 


— — 


— 

1 

. . - 

— 

— 1 

9 .. 

1 

1 

4 

— 


_ — 


1 - 


. . — 

— 

— — 

10 .. 

2 

1 

— 

— 


— 1 


— _ 


. . - 

— 

— — 

11 . . 

3 

1 

— 

— 


— — 


— 

1 

. . - 

— 

— — 

12 ... 

1 

2 

— 

1 


— 1 


— - 


. . — 

— 

— — 

13 . . 

1 

1 

1 

1 


— — 


1 - 


. . - 

— 

1 — 

14 . . 

2 

2 

— 

1 


1 — 


— - 


. . - 

— 

— — 

15 . . 

3 

1 

4 

— 


— — 


1 - 


• • 

— 

1 — 

15 families 29 

16 

21 

20 


3 2 


7 

7 

— 

— 

5 2 


45 

41 


5 


14 




7 




j 


V 


V 




_ ; 




86 




V" 

19 




V" 

7 



Findon. 

Findon, like Washington, is situated on the main road from 
London to Worthing, but about two miles more southerly. The houses 
are built on the chalk downs, and North End is a small hamlet about 
one mile North of Findon Village. 

The population has been slowly increasing during the last ten 
years before which time it varied but slightly from year to year ; the 
mean number living in this parish amount to 750 persons. There were 
187 deaths from all causes during 1876-95, so that the mean annual 
death-rate is 12’5 per 1,000. The zymotic mortality averaged 1*5 per 
1,000 in the twenty years. During this period there were 12 deaths 
from notifiable, and 10 deaths from non-notifiable diseases. 






£ 

u 

<D 







X 

o 

£ 


<x> . 

5 p< 

CD 

Pm 

cc 


bo 

C-! 

c3 



PU 

"3 

S 

03 

• rH 

72 

a 

o 

CO 

<D 

rC 

Oh 

S 

^ £ 
So 

<x> 

a 

<D 

3 

w 

% 

*oq 

>* 

u 

w 

Measles. 

Whoopii 

Cough. 

B 

u 

c3 

5 

Total. 

1876-80 . . 

— 

1 

1 

— 

_ 

— 

1 

2 

1 

6 

1881-85 . . 

— 

— 

2 

_ 

- - 

— 

— 

— 

— 

2 

1886-90 .. 

— 

2 

— 

— 

1 

— 

— 

1 

— 

4 

1891-95 .. 

— 

— 

3 

i 

1 

— 

. — 

o 

O 

2 

10 

Total . . 

_ 

3 

6 

i 

2 


! i 

6 

3 

22 
















91 


£mall Pox and Erysipelas have caused no deaths. There was one 
death from Scarlatina in 1876, and two more from the same cause in 
1887, but none during the last eight years. There was a small out¬ 
break of Enteric Fever at a cottage at North End in 1887, where a 
woman and six out of seven children fell ill, and one child died. This 
was the only death from this cause in the parish amongst the residents 
in twenty years ; for the case in 1893, was that of a girl sent home ill 
with the fever from a neighbouring town. Measles seldom proves 
fatal, but Whooping Cough is a much more frequent cause of death. On 
the whole a very healthy parish, with an occasional appearance of in¬ 
fectious disease. 

Diphtheria caused one death in 1879 in a cottage at a lonely spot 
on the Downs. In July, 1883, it caused the death of two children in a 
well-built cottage at North End ; the parents and the three other 
children were not attacked nor anyone else in the parish. For the 
next twelve months no death occurred from this disorder, but there 
were two cases of this disease in 1892, and one case in 1894; these- 
three children recovered, and there was no spread. 


The first case was notified on October 3rd, 1895, in a cottage at 
North End, a small hamlet about one mile north of the village of. 
Findon ; the second case was notified on October 11th, at a well-built 
isolated house at Muntham, about half-a-mile west of North End. A 
third case occurred at North End on October 16th, and a fourth case 
appeared on October 25th, in the house first affected. In each instance 
the disease appeared amongst children, and of the four attacked, one 
died. As the only cause common to all these cases appeared to be 
school attendance, the elementary school at Findon was closed on 
October 17th, and it was re-opened on November 4th, except for those 
children who came from the hamlet of North End, and these were to 
be kept away for a month. 

Although these four children were the only ones notified, there 
was another cottage at North End where early in September, 1895, 
three young children had ulcerated sore throats, followed in one case by 
paralysis of the palate, and a child next door had a sore throat shortly 
afterwards. These children were not considered at the time to be 
suffering from Diphtheria, and when Findon School re-opened aftei* the 
harvest holidays, they attended the school, and in this way I consider 
the outbreak occurred, for the initial cases were infectious, though the 
nature of the disease was not recognized. 


Soon afterwards the disorder appeared in Findon. On November 
4th, a cook at Mr. W.’s house had Diphtheria, and his son also had a 
sore throat, but he was not notified. A boy from North End who 
dwelt in a cottage near to the first case there, was employed by Mr. 
W. in stable work, and he used to have his tea in the kitchen every 
day. He thus came daily in contact with the cook, but this fact did 
not come out until some weeks afterwards. 

On November 20th, a child named Lambourne was taken ill at 
North End, four houses distant from the first case. This cottage 



92 


had been empty, and Lambourne came here with his wife and a large 
family on October 14th. The parents were poor and the children 
underfed. The boy who now fell ill had been at work in the fields 
engaged in picking up stones during wet and inclement weather; 
he died the same day that he was notified. Three other children in this 
cottage were subsequently attacked, and one of them died, aged 11 
years, on December 7th, from a weak heart. 


On November 29th, Thos. Hewlett, the boy who worked at Mr. 
W.’s, fell ill at North End, and there were two other cases in Eindon 
Village. On this day Eindon School was again closed, and it was 
not re-opened until the outbreak was over. 


The disease then appeared in four other houses, in three of which 
school attendance seemed to be the cause; in the fourth instance 
the father was first attacked, shortly after he had opened a cesspit 
at Mr. W.’s, into which the excreta from the patients had passed ; 
his wife and two young children were afterwards attacked, but they all 
recovered. 


There were then no fresh cases for three weeks. On January 1st, 
1896, a third child was attacked in the cottage where the first case 
occurred, and on January 2nd, two children of Mr. W.’s coachman 
were attacked, and one of them died on January 11th. 


The epidemic then ceased, and there has been no fresh case 
notified since. 


During this period 23 persons were attacked in thirteen 
houses; in eight houses, only 1 case appeared in each cottage ; 
in one house, 3 cases ; in two houses, 4 cases ; and in two houses, 
2 cases. 


Besides closing the school, I advised that trained nurses should be 
provided for the sick, and that a fund should be at once raised in 
the parish to meet the expenses. This was done, and a sum of about 
£75 was raised. Four nurses were obtained, two worked at North 
End from November 23rd to the last week in December, and two 
more worked at Eindon from November 30th until the close of the 
year. 


As there was no infectious hospital, the plan of home nursing was 
of great value. 


Disinfectants were freely supplied, and each house was fumigated 
when the inmates recovered. 




93 


Inmates. 


Attacks, 


Deaths. 


Houses. 

Adults. 

M. F. 

Children. 
M. F. 

Adults. 
M. F. 

Children. 
M. F. 

Adults. 
M. F. 

Children! 
M. F. 

1 . . 

1 

1 

2 

3 

.. 1 


1 

1 

. . — — 

— 1 

2 . . 

1 

1 

6 

2 

. . — 


1 

— 

. . — — 

— — 

3 . . 

1 

1 

1 

— 

. . - 


1 

— 

. . - — 

—- 

4 . . 

1 

3 

2 

— 

. . - 

1 

1 

— 

. . — - 

—- 

5 . . 

1 

1 

3 

— 

. . — 

1 

3 

— 

. . - - 

2 — 

6 . . 

1 

1 

2 

1 

. . - 


1 

— 

. . — - 

— — 

7 .. 

2 

3 

1 

1 

. . 1 


— 

— 

. . •— — 

— — 

8 . . 

2 

1 

2 

1 

. . — 


1 

— 

. . - - 

— — 

9 .. 

3 

1 

3 

o 

O 

. . - 

1 

— 

1 

. . — - 

— — 

10 . . 

1 

1 

1 

2 

.. 2 

1 

1 

1 

• • • 

— — 

11 . . 

1 

2 

— 

5 

. . — 


— 

1 

. . — - 

— — 

12 . . 

1 

1 

— 

1 

. . — 


— 

1 

. . - - 

— — 

13 . . 

1 

1 

2 

2 

. . — 


1 

1 

. . — — 

1 — 

13 families 17 

18 

25 

21 

3 

4 

11 

6 

—— - 

3 1 


35 

i 

46 

7 


17 


4 

T —" 


81 


24 


Ashington. 


At Ashington five cases were notified in one family. Allen 1ST. with' 
his wife and six children, lived in a semi-detached cottage in an isolated 
spot. Frederick, 5 years, failed on November 4th, and up to November 
11th, he had attended school where he probably caught the disease, as- 
he sat next another boy, who, though apparently well, came from a 
cottage where his parents and four children were suffering from bad 
throats. These cases were of a mild character and they were not 
recognised as Diphtheria. 


Annie N., 3 years, and James N., 9 years, failed on November 11th, 
being apparently directly affected from their brother. Albert N., 16years, 
and Mary N., 13 years, fell ill on November 19th r having been in the 
cottage all the time with the other children. The water supply was- 
good, and it was drawn from a well 30 feet deep which was fed from a 
spring. The children before their illness drunk daily condensed milk 
in small quantities. The pair of cottages stood on high and dry ground 
with plenty of fresh air around. The family next door, consisting of the 
parents and five young children did not catch the disorder. All the above 
five cases recovered, and then the whole family left and went to a 
cottage at Shipley, a few miles distant, on December 19th, on which day 
the baby, 6 months old, was attacked and in due course recovered. In 
this instance each child in turn fell ill, but their parents and next door 
neighbours escaped. No other cases were notified; from Ashington but 
there were several cases of sore throat. 















I 


94 

Summary. 




Inmates. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Adults. 

Children. 

Adults. 

Children. 

Adults. Children. 


M. 

F. 

M. 

F. 

M. F. 

M. 

F. 

M. F. M. F. 

Washington. . 

29 

16 

21 

20 

..32 

7 

7 

..-5 2 

ifindon 

17 

18 

25 

21 

..34 

11 

6 

..-3 1 

Ashington .. 

2 

1 

3 

2 

.. 1 — 

2 

2 

. — — — — 


— 

— 

— 

— 

. . - 

— 

— 

. . — — — — 

29 families .. 

48 

35 

49 

43 

..76 

20 

15 

..-8 3 


83 

92 

13 

35 

— 11 



175 


48 


1 r 

11 


An adult is a person aged 15 years and upwards; a child is anyone 
living under 15 years of age. In these 29 houses there were 48 male 
adults to 35 female adults, and this excess is due to the fact that there 
were several youths from fifteen to twenty years of age living at home 
and engaged in farm work, while the girls at these ages leave home and 
go into service. Amongst the children the numbers are more nearly 
equal. 


Amongst the 48 male adults seven were attacked, of whom five 
were youths between fifteen and seventeen years of age, and two were 
aged respectively 32 and 39 years. 


Amongst the 35 female adults, six were attacked between 32 and 
42 years of age, most of whom were engaged in attending on the sick 
children. There was no initial case amongst adults, and none of the 
adults died. 


The attacks amongst the children were far more numerous ; 20 
boys out of 49 fell ill, or nearly 41 per cent.; 15 girls out of 43 failed, 
or nearly 35 per cent. 


The case mortality was much higher amongst boys than girls ; 8 
boys died out of 20 who were attacked, or 40 per cent ; 3 girls died 
out of 15 who were attacked, or 20 per cent. 


The case mortality amongst the children of both sexes was 31*4 
per cent. 


The ages of those attacked and the ages of those children who died 
ure here given in more detail, where it is shown that no child under 
two years of age fell ill, and that the greater number of deaths occurred 
between 4 and 8 years of age. 










95 


The incidence on age and sex is clearly shown in the following 
table :— 

Cases. 2-3 -4 -5 -8 -7 -8 -9 -10 -11 *12 *13 -14 -15 -16 -17 30 and over; Total. 


M. —244—421—1—1123 2 27 

F. 311—11—122—21 - 6 21 

Total. 3354152223—3223 8 48 

Deaths. 

M. —131 — 1-1-- 1-— 8 

F. -1 — 11 -—-— 3 

Total. — 14112-1-1-— 11 


The incidence of the disease varied much in different families. In 
■one cottage, five out of six children were attacked, and the sixth had 
the disease after the family had recovered ; in another double cottage, 
with twelve inmates, there were five cases. On the other hand, there 
was one cottage with nine inmates and one case ; another with eight 
inmates and one case, and a third with ten inmates and only one case. 


In October there were 19 cases and 6 deaths. 


In November there were 16 cases and 2 deaths. 


In December there were 13 cases and 1 death. 


In the three months there were 48 cases and 9 deaths. 


Two of the December cases died early in January 1896, making 11 
death in all. They are included here so as to complete the history of 
the outbreak. 


With a few exceptions, the disease appeared in clean, well-built 
cottages, the surroundings of which were in good sanitary condition. 

The influence of soil did not affect the spread, and cases were met 
with on the chalk, on the upper and lower greensand, and a few on the 
gault. 


WATER SUPPLY AND DRAINAGE. 

These are in the same condition as detailed in my Annual Report 
for 1891, so that they need not be repeated here. There are no public 
waterworks, and the people have to rely on shallow or deep wells, 
springs, and rain-water tanks. There is often a scarcity of water in dry 
summers for houses built on the chalk Downs, and then water has to be 
obtained from a long distance. The supply of water in this district is, 
with the above exception, good as regards quantity and quality. 



96 


SYSTEMATIC INSPECTION. 

The following is a list of routine work during the year, as recorded 
in the books of the Sanitary Inspector, Mr. Statham r— 


No. of Houses visited . . .. . . • • 116 

Nuisances reported ... . . . . . . . • 31 

Nuisances abated without notice . . . . . 12 

Nuisances abated with notice . . . . . . 7 

Houses reported unfit for habitation . . . . 1 

Houses closed 

Houses cleansed and limewashed . . . . .. 1 

Houses disinfected . . . . . . . . . . 43< 

New closets built . . . . . . . . . . 4 

New houses built . . . . . . . . . . 4 

Water certificates granted . . . . . . . . 6 

Samples of water analysed . . . . . . . . 4 

Cases of overcrowding abated .. . . . . 4 


SCAVENGING AND CLEANSING. 

In the Parish of Storrington the contractor collects the ashes and 
empties all pail closets every Saturday morning. During the year he 
has emptied and removed the contents of 90 ash pits, 89 cesspools, 56 
privies, and 2,340 pails. 


COWSHEDS AND DAIRIES. 

The sixteen cojvsheds are in most cases well kept, care being taken 
that there is good water, ventilation, light, and frequent limewashing. 


SLAUGHTER HOUSES. 

The twelve slaughter houses are kept in a fair condition. 


BAKEHOUSES. 

The fifteen bakehouses have been often inspected, and they are 
kept in a clean condition. 


INQUESTS. 

Inquests were held in sixteen cases :—Male, 20 years, congestion of 
the lungs ; male, 72 years, angina pectoris ; female, 83 years, accidental 
fall; female, 37 years, accidental fall; female, 23 years, heart disease; 
male, 80 years, old age; male, 16 days, prematurely born; female, 26 









97 


years, disease of the lungs ; female, 19 years, consumption ; male, 66 
years, suicide by hanging; male, 17 years, peritonitis; male, 41 years, 
accidental fall; male, 2 days, prematurely born ; female, 3 years, enteritis 
from eating unripe apples ; male, 50 years, accidental fall; female, 33 
years, haemorrhage after childbirth. 


There were no deaths returned as “ not certified ” during the year. 




THAKEHAM RURAL DISTRICT 


Table 1.—Showing the Deaths at various groups of ages in the 

fifteen years 1881-95. 


Year. 

At all ages. 

Under 1 Year. 

* 

ic 

o 

5 to 15. 

15 to 25. 

1 

25 to 65. 

65 and upwards. 

1881-85 

583 

80 

58 

30 

27 

182 

206 

1886-90 

575 

85 

56 

23 

28 

166 

217 

1891 

126 

25 

6 

5 

6 

33 

51 

1892 

146 

16 

7 

6 

5 

50 

62 

1893 

121 

18 

9 

10 

11 

35 

38 

1894 

136 

16 

7 

13 

8 

35 

57 

1895 

124 

15 

11 

9 

6 

30 

53 

Total 

1,811 

255 

154 

96 

91 

531 

684 


Table 2.—Showing the Deaths in the twenty years, 1876-95, from 

various causes. 


Year. 

Small Pox. 

Scarlatina. 

i 

] 

Diphtheria. 

Membranous Croup. 


Fevers. 


Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 

Measles. 

_ 

Whooping Cough. 

Diarrhcea. 

Rheumatic Fever. 

Influenza. 

i 

Total. 

Typhus. j 

'6 

G 

Continued. 

1 Relapsing. 

j Puerperal. 

1876-80 


11 

1 


1 

2 





3 

4 

39 

11 

1 


r- 

JO 

1881-85 


8 

13 

— 

1 

4 

— 

— 

o 

— 

5 

1 

5 

5 

1 

— 

45 

1886-90 

1 

5 

16 

— 


6 

— 

— 

4 


4 

3 

14 

9 


4 

66 

1891 . 

— 

1 




1 





— 


2 

o 

1 

1 

8 

1892. 

— 


2 

- 

- 

— 

— 

— 


— 


1 

3 

1 

1 

20 

28 

1893. 

— 

— 

4 



4 

— 

— 

— 

— 

1 

— 

4 

o 


1 

16 

1894 . 

— 


ry 

7 


— 

2 

— 

— 

— 

— 


— 

1 

— 

1 

1 

12 

1895. 



9 

x 

— 

— 


— 


— 


1 

1 

3 

— 

8 

23 

Total... 

1 

_ 

25 

52 

i 


19 

— 


6 


13 

10 

69 

33 

5 

35 

271 














































































































99 


Table 3 . 


THAKEHAM RURAL DISTRICT. 


— Showing the Deaths and Death-rate from all causes and from 
various causes in the twenty years, 1876-95. 


a 

© 2 

05 

X * 

ts:s 

® O 

3 o 
a cT 

32 

< x 

CD 

&. 




CO 
f-t 

c3 
<D 

© a 
as o 
-a> a 

=+H 

tQ 
flioy 
r C5 \ 

^ i 

D O 

'-a L'— 

rJl 


Cw 

CD 

Q 


•0SU9SI(J J.IU0J-J 

134 

104 

140 

202 

’0suasi(j Suivj 

co co co 

1— vo vO 

ca ca ca oq 


148 

152 

128 

112 


•0SU0SI(J 

OIJOUL^ 


•S0SC0SIQ jjy 


■0SU0SIQ jjuajj 


•0SB0si(j Sumy 


•sisigYlct 


•0SU0SI(J 

oijouU^ 


•S0SU0SI(J \\y 


•poi.i 0 j; jo 
ajppiui 

ui uoiyrjndoj 


A 

O 

hH 

Pp 

W 


o 

GO 


co 


o 

VO 


CO 

VO 


CO 


o 

tn 


r-H 

H 


vo 

o 


■rJH 


01 


co 

CO 


VO 


CO 


VO 


C0 

co 


CTi 

co 


co 

O 

Gi 

05 

CO 

r—H 

oc 

ca 

vo^ 


CO 

co^ 

I—i 

r-H 

i—r 

I— 1 


o 

GO 


vo 


VO 


co 

VO 


1 — 1 
vo 

CO 

583 

vo 

t— 

vo 

653 

o 

o 

o 

o 

CO 

GO 

o 

o 

co 

Ol 

Ol 


GO*' 

co 

goT 

gcT 


< 3 > 

vo 

O 

vo 

GO 

co 

05 

05 

CO 

1 — 1 

CO 

i—i 

r— 

GO 

oo 

05 

GO 

CO 

CO 

CO 

i—l 

r—l 

1 — 1 

r-H 


« 




































TOO 


(A)—Table of DEATHS during the Year 1895, in the THAKEHA1V 


Names of Localities adopted for 
the purpose of these 
Statistics; Public Institutions 
being shown as separate 
localities. 

(«) 

Mortality from all Causes 

AT SUBJOINED AGES. 

(i) 



m 

o 

60 

cs 

r c$ 

4-5 

<1 

(b) 

IT Under 1 year. 

to 

u 

<D 

s 

O 

'O 

a 

c£ 

r-H 

(d) 

<D 

0 

^ to 

Si 

tO 

(e) 

r— 15 and under 

b 25. 

s- 

<D 

r C 

d 

d . 

_ »o 

s 

cS 

tO 

Ol 

ig) 

i 

cu 

s . 

CO 

'ri r o 

§ * 
55 £ 
to 
«© 

(h) 

1 

2 

3 

Small Pox. 

Scarlatina. 

«8 ■ 

t- . 

a) 

XI 

X 

o* 

£ 

Amberley Parish 

7 

I 

— 

— 

2 

i 

4 

Under 5 





5 upwards. 




Pulborough Parish 

31 

4 

3 

2 

2 

7 

13 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 




Rest of Pulborough Sub-District 

22 

7 

1 

l 

1 

4 

8 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 




Storrington Parish 

14 

2 

— 

— 

1 

7 

4 

Under 5 





5 upwards. 




Washington Parish 

15 

— 

4 

3 

— 

5 

3 

Under 5 



L 

5 upwards. 




Rest of Washington Sub-district 

19 

2 

3 

3 

— 

3 

8 

Under 5 





5 upwards. 




Thakeham Workhouse 

15 


— 



2 

13 

Under 5 





5 upwards. 












Under 5 





5 upwards. 




• 








Under 5 





5 upwards. 








* 




Under 5 





5 upwards. 












Under 5 





5 upwards. 




Totals. 

123 

15 

11 

9 

1 

r ' 

29 

53 

Under 5 




5 upwards. | 




The subjoined numbers have also to be taken in 


Deaths occurring outside the 
District among persons 
belonging thereto. 

1 



— 

— 

1 — 

Under 5 





5 upwards. 




Deaths occurring within the 
District among persons 
not belonging thereto... 







Under 5 





5 upwards. 






































































































































































































































101 


Rural District, classified according to Diseases, Ages, and Localities. 


Mortality from subjoined causes, distinguishing Deaths of Children 

under Five Years of Age. 


4 

5 6 

7 | 8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

Membranous 

Croup. 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 

Measles. 

Whooping 

Cough. 

1 Diarrhoea and 

| Dysentery. 

Rheumatic 

Fever. 

Phthisis. 

Bronchitis, 

Pneumonia, 

and Pleurisy. 

Heart 

Disease. 

Influenza. 

02 

<X> 

• pH 

Sh 

J3 

* ’—5 

S3 

l—I 

All Other 

Diseases. 

Total. 

Typhus. 

Enteric or 
Typhoid. 

Continued. 

Relapsing. 

Puerperal. 

. 





























1 


1 


2 


1 

2 

7 











1 



2 




4 

7 













O 

*> 

1 

6 

3 

1 

10 

24 










1 




2 




5 

8 













1 

4 

1 


1 

7 

14 














i 




1 

2 













o 

2 

l 

2 

1 

4 

12 



















4 













2 

2 

2 

1 


2 

11 

1 













1 




3 

5 









1 




1 

3 

2 



4 

14 





























. 

1 



2 

4 

2 


6 

15 
























— 







































! 



























■ 





























































1 









1 

1 


6 




13 

26 









1 


2 


10 

14 

18 

8 

4 

35 

97 


account in judging of the above records of mortality. 





































1 


1 






































































































































































































































































































































































































































.02 

, BIRTHS, AND OF NEW CASE! 

iring the year 1895, in the THAKEHA 

Registered Births. 

Aged 
under 5 
or 

over 5. 

(«) 

New Cases of Sicxir 

COMING TO THE KNOWLEDGE 

0) 

i 

2 

3 | 4 

.1 

5 

6 

Small Pox. 

Scarlatina. 

Diphtheria. 

Membranous 

Croup. 

Fev 

bo 

5 

6 

■H 

ERS 

u 

o 

E £ 

£ 

s u 

13 

Under 5 







5 upwards. 

r 






46 

Under 5 



1 

2 



5 upwards. 

. 

3 

2 




45 

Under 5 


- 

. 




5 upwards. 



. 

1 




18 

Under 5 


1 





5 upwards. 


3 

9 




21 

Under 5 



4 




5 upwards. 



14 



1 

54 

Under 5 


2 

6 




5 upwards. 



20 





Under 5 







5 upwards. 


1 



. . . 



Under 5 







5 upwards. 








Under 5 







5 upwards. 








Under 5 







5 upwards. 








Under 5 







5 upwards. 







197 

Under 5 


3 

11 

2 



5 upwards. 


7 

39 



1 


Population 

I AT ALL AGES. 


Names of Localities adopted 
for the purpose of these 
Statistics; Public Institutions 
being shown as separate 

localities. Census 

1891. 


Esti- 


dle of 
1895. 


(a) 


( 6 ) 


Amber ley Parish 


525 


Pulborough Parish 


.. : 1,787 


Rest of Pulborough Sub-district 1,434 


Storrington Parish 


...I 1,293 


Washington Parish 


838 


Rest of Washington Sub-district' 2,095 


Thakeham Workhouse 


1,800 


1,410 


850 


2,090 


78 


70 


Totals 


8,049 


8,000 

































































































































































































7 INFECTIOUS SICKNESS, coming to the knowledge of the 


Medical 


iral District ; classified according to Diseases, Ages, and Localities. 























































































































































































































































































































































EAST PRESTON RURAL DISTRICT, 


pp. 105 el seq. 











EAST PRESTON RURAL DISTRICT. 


The population in this registration district was 17,568 at the 
census of 1841, and 18,746 in 1851 ; owing chiefly to changes in the 
area, it declined to 17,423 in 1861 ; after which period it rose to 21,579 
in 1871, to 26,364 in 1881, and to 32,394 in 1891. These figures, 
however, include the urban districts of Worthing and Littlehampton, 
which rapidly increased during this period, and Arundel with its almost 
stationary population. 


The following figures show 
the district :— 

only the changes in 

the rural 

part of 


1861. 

1871. 

1881. 

1891. 

Area in Statute Acres 

— 

30,520 

30,696 

30,637 

Number of Inhabited Houses.. 

1,355 

1,467 

1,662 

1,805 

,, Uninhabited „ .. 

45 

77 

87 

75 

Population 

6,716 

7,675 

8,025 

8,692 

Males 

3,450 

3,900 

4,065 

4,371 

Females 

3,266 

3,775 

3,960 

4,321 


The males exceed the females, but to a less extent now than in 
former periods, as some parts of the district are semi-urban in character. 


West Tarring has increased rapidly during the last decade, and it 
now forms a suburb of Worthing, with which, before long, a portion of 
the parish should be incorporated. 

That portion of Lyminster, known as Wick, forms a suburb of 
Littlehampton, and it contains a numerous and poor population. 


The chief occupation is agriculture, but a great many are also 
employed in fruit growing, or in the cultivation of gardens. 

The following tables show the population in each parish ; and also 
the deaths in each parish from all causes and from various causes over a 
long term of years :— 




Houses, 189L. Population. 


02 

© 


P 05 

a 22 

CD i -1 

PH 


o? * 
02 r—I 

i“H © 
■ 2 00 


02 

P 

o 

02 


© 

P-i 


cq 

§ sS 

02 5x 

Ph CO 

© i—i 

Ph 


CQ 

Sh GO 

0} r—I 

Ph 


02 

O r "^ 

Ph CO 

0 T“H 

Ph 


bC 

P 

• r-H 

HO 


1=3 

p 


TS 

© 

© ■+=» 
CJ 'P 

,P 

P 


^3 

© 

©5 


r =2 

(3 

^3 

P 


106 


CO 

CO 

o 


05 


o 

©q 


■rH 

co 

©i 


iO 


©1 


CO 


©1 CO © 


o 

©I 

©1 


CO 


©1 


io 


CO 

CO 


05 

©1 


lO 


Eh 

O 


Ph 

Eh 

02 


O 

©1 


©1 ©1 r-H 

O ©J 

©l ^ <50 


CO 


o 

©i 

1© 

r-H 

co ©q 

H 

05 

00 

1 -HH 

KO 

00 

t© 

r-H 

H i—1 


05 


io 

r-H 


©1 

r-H 

©q 


© 


i—1 

CO 

i 

o 

CO 

r -h 

CO 

co 


CO 

o 

05 

r-H 

co 

1© 

iO 

CO 

©q 


i— i 

00 

©q 

GO 

O o 

©q 

1—H 

iO 

©q 



oo 

co 


i— i 

co 

co 

05 

r-H 

00 

©q 

t*h O 

co 

00 


IO 

co 

CO 

00 

©q 

co 

co ©q 


i© 

00 

1—1 

i© 

©q 

t-H 

iO 

©q 


oo 

1—H 


00 

i—i co 

CO 

lO 


1© 

i© i—i 

i—i 

i—i 

OO 

iO iO 

tH 

co 

CO 

CO 

©q co 


1© 

©q 

1-i CO 

©q 

i—i 

"dH 

©q 

co 

O 

o 


1—1 

© 

© 

© 

r-H lO 

CO 

iO 

© 

CO 

r-H 

co 

tH 

O 


i© CO 

iO 


©q 

o 

© 

CO 

r-H © 

©q 

1 -H iO 

©q 


CO 

© 

oo 


^ CD Vft 


©1 


lO 


co © 
CO 1© 
r-H - ©I 


Q 

i 

« 

P> 

m 


i 

pq 

P 

m 


& 

& 


w 

Eh 

P3 

O 


Ph 

© 

©5 

d 

£ 

d 

O 

Ph 

P 


fee 

P 


©T 

ph 

Pi 

d 

EH 


© 

o 

©3 

* 

• 

EH 

bn 

EH 

© 

P 

d 

be 

P 

be 

be 

rH 

a 

<3 

o 

t-H 

Ph 

Eh 

p 

+3 

.P 

• r-H 
£h 

p 

• © 

H 

© 

© 

w 

Cfi 

© 

£ 

© 

3 

Ph 

P 

P 

• r-H 

pH 

O 

o 

Ph 

Ph 

© 

Ph 

(P 

EH 

02 

© 

P 


P 

o 

©> 

02 

be 

P 


p 

o 

+3 

CQ 

© 

Ph 

Ph 


©> 

Ph 

d 

P-( 


©3 

$-1 

d 

Ph 


be 

p 


ph 

© 


u 

© 

©3 

m 

P 


©> 

02 

. , d 

w p 


be 

P 


P 



















































107 


X* 

co 



hH 


HH 

05 

05 

00 


m 

05 

T* 

rH 

in 


in 

o 

05 

in 

cq 

t- 

co 

CO 

GO 

CM 

-H 



—H 

cq 



H 


rH 



O 

GO 

00 


HH 

05 


cq 

rH 

rH 

CO 

CO 

in 

05 

CO 



CO 

co 

00 

t'- 


oo 


CO 

GO 

r-H 

rH 



r-H 

i-H 



rH 


rH 



HH 

rH 

cq 


GO 

CO 

00 

rH 

o 

05 

o 

T—! 


CO 

in 

o 


CO 


t- 

CO 

r- 

m 

co 

co 

e- 

TjH 

Oq 

i-H 


cq 

CO 

rH 

rH 

cq 

rH 

cq 

rH 

rH 

o 

o 

o 


in 

05 

05 

m 


GO 

co 

co 

CO 

to 

I— 

o 


co 

o 

i— 

co 

fc— 

cq 

GO 

co 

05 

CO 

cq 

r-H 


rH 


rH 

t-H 

cq 

rH 

cq 

rH 

rH 



















co 


co 






05 

r-H 

co 


CO 




GO 

05 

"cH 

00 

05 

in 

CO 

t- 


co 



| 

CO 

m 

O 

o 

00 

co 

cq 



rH 




cq 

rH 

CO 

rH 

rH 

o 

r-H 

cq 


cq 


CO 

i 

m 

t- 

CO 

rH 

m 


co 

CO 


rH 


O 


e- 

o 

in 

rH 

CO 

co 

co 



rH 


cq 


cq 

rH 

cq 

rH 

rH 

rH 

1 



co 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

lO 

CO 



rH 

CO 

1 

rH 

cq 

CO 

- 

l 

1 

1—1 

TH 

o 


GO 

rH 

co 


m 


cq 


co 

05 

in 

cq 


o 

GO 


cq 

m 

co 

in 

cq 

CO 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

1 













f 


co^ 


co 





- 




Eh 




^— s 









o 


/'“N 


H-h 






• 

• 

• 

1H 

• 

H-h 

• 

o 

• 

• 

* 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

Ph 

• 

O 

• 

4-3 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 




EH 


4-3 


Ph 









02 


Ph 


c3 









M 

Cl 


o3 


O. 


Ph 









Cd 




a 


<x> 

O 

4-3 


d 

o 

4^ 

• 

be 

• 

m 

d 

02 

ton 

Ph 

O 

• 

be 

d 

• rH 

be 

d 

c3 

o 

be 

a 

on 

bO 

d 



bj D 

~w 


<D 

M 

d 

d 

02 

4-3 

d 

• r-1 

4-3 

02 

d 

P3 

• rH 

P4 

a 

* rH 

B 

Ford 

d 

d 

A 

d 

P4 

d 

•i—l 

4-3 

Ph 

O 

EH 

d 

• rH 

d 

rH 

Poling 

a 

be 

d 

<1 

• rH 

rd 

o 

4H 

d 

Ph 

• rH 

d 

pH 

o3 

£ 

dn 

Ph 

d 

PP 

a 

4-3 

d 

o 

02 

rd 

be 

d 

o 

H 




<1 











in 

GO 


d 

• i-H 

b£ 

a 

•p-t 

rd 

4-3 

Ph 

o 

£ 

o 

-4-3 


Q 

Ph 

pH 

<x> 

«4-l 

02 

d 


c3 

pH 

4^ 

d 

CD 

•4-3 


o3 


£ 


HO 

c3 

O 

Ph 


PP 


«H-H 

O 


•443 

Ph 


PH 



(2) Rural part of Heene transferred to the Borough of Worthing in 1890. 

(3) On October 1st. 1883, parts of the parishes of Angmering and Lyminster were transferred from the Sub.district of 
Littlehampton to that of Arundel. 


























108 


*8S«9SI(J 

dV\OwR.% 


^U0AVX 

m x'B'jox 


zn 

P Pfi 
O < 

< W 

S H 

O 2 
oj W 

S * , 

M M ^ 

g £ 

1- 

W t> 

ft < 

© 


26-1681 


06-9881 


28*1881 


08*9^81 


w 

02 

t-H 

tf 

<1 

ft 



•8SB9BIQ 

XO 

1 

as 

cq 

cq 

as 

cq 

| 

cq 

-cH 

a^» 


Surrj 

r—1 


r-H 







t-H 

cq 

xO 

CS 

' B \ s mnd 

CO 

1 

as 

r-H 



| 

| 

| 

CO 

o 

r—1 

rH 













os / 












cq 

00 > 

rH 


1 

1 

1 

1 

r-H 

1 

1 

r-H 



•0SX?9SI(J 

XO 

1 

CO 

t-H 

r-H 

co 

| 

1 

cq 

cO 

CO 


OI^OUIA^ 

r-H 


cq 




1 

1 



!—H 


•98X?0gIQ 

o 

1 

cq 


r-H 

XO 


cq 

co 


as 



i—i 


r-H 



/ 




r-H 

r-H 



00 

cq 

co 

r-H 

, 

co 

cq 

r-H 

co 

CO 

00 

05 

' B I 8 TTOd 




1 





C5 / 












CO \ 











ft 

oo 

oo 

•BiJ9q;t[dr(j 

1 — 1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

r-H 

t-H 

! 

1 

1 


•9si39siq; 

GO 

| 

XO 

cq 

| 

t-H 

t— H 

I 


ft 

r—H 


oi^ora^z 











r-H 


*9SB9SI(J 


r-H 

XO 

cq 

co 

o 

cq 

i 

cq 

I- 

t- 



r ~ l 





t-H 





t-H 

id 
00 
' > 

’ S ! S WH<1 

CO 

r-H 

H-! 

r-H 

1 

XO 

r-H 

r-H 

r-H 

cq 

iO 

r-H 

bo N 
co 

•i3U9q^qdi(7 

r-H 

1 

1 

l 

r-H 

GO 

1 

1 

l 

r-H 

cq 


*9SX?9Sl(| 


r-H 

CO 

r-H 

r— i 

r-H 

r-H 

1 

r-H 

ft 



Ol^OUI^ 

r-H 





r-H 







*9S129SI(J 

as 

cq 

i- 

cq 

xo 

CO 

cq 

1 

co 

r-H 

co 


§unq 








1 


t— H 

r-H 

• 

o 

oo 

•eisiq^qcj 

10 

CO 

xo 

cq 

r-H 


cq 

| 

xo 

xo 

16 

KO J 













i- S 
00 
t—f 

'«U9q^qdtQ 

1 

r-H 

1—1 

1 

i 

1 

1 

i 

1 

CO 

CO 


as 

as 


co 


co 


io 




as 


o 

co 


o 

t- 


o 

CO 


o 

cq 


o 

CO 


cq 


xo 


co 

cq 


xo 

XO 


cq 

t- 


XO 


xo 


as 


as 


co 


XO 


o 

CO 


as 

co 


cq 


co 

co 


as 


cq 


cq 

XO 


co 


cq 


as 


xo 

l- 


%■* 

as 

■+3 

aS 

£ 

c3 

O 

O 

ft 


be 

0 


P 

o 


as 

P 

as 

as 

w 


rH 

c3 

Eh 

a 

c3 

-p 

bJO 

0 

be 

biD 

p 

o 

-p 

OQ 

as 

£ 

*P 

Oh 

Cj 

O 

• rH 

i-> 

u 

p 

ft 

0 
• rH 

O 

o 

O 

Ferrir 

m 

be 

0 
• fH 


p 

o 

•p 

m 

as 

Sh 

ft 

-p 

as 

oS 

ft 


bD 

a 

. n-i 

as 

a 

be 

P 

< 


XO 

CO 

O 

r—i 

cq 

rH 

CO 

cq 

r-H 

co 

20 

O 

o 

cq 

r-H 

00 

CO 

os 

r-H 

o 

XO 

i—i 

XO 

oo 

i- 

XO 


co 

r-H i>- 

xo 

XO 

co 


cq 



r-H 



cq 

ft 


cq 


os 

oo 


CO 


t- 

cq 


o 

as 

-P 

05 

P 


►C. 

ft 






















































































109 


VO 

co 


CO 

CO 


| 


| 

rH 

rH 

CO 

hH 

Ol 













rH 


tH 

rH 

1 

1 

r-H 

| 

rH 

1 

CO 

rH 

r-H 

OO 



1 

1 


1 


1 





l 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

l 

1 

I 

l 

1 

l 

1 

05 

CO 

r-H 

I 

_ 

I—1 

■ 

| 

1 

1 

rH 

, 

| 

O 



1 



1 

1 

1 

1 


1 


t- 

H 

co 

r-H 

CO 


1 

1 

rH 

CO 

co 

rH 

Cl 

CO 






1 

1 






05 

1 

rH 

• 

rH 

1 

rH 

r-H 

• 

I 

"cH 

1 

CO 


1 


1 


1 



1 

1 

1 



i 

■ 

1 

r-H 

CO 

■ 

■ 

rH 

1 

. 

rH 

1 

CO 

1 

1 

1 



1 

1 


1 

‘ 


1 

r-H 

CO 

1 

r-H 

co 

CO 

rH 

r-H 

rH 

1 

rH 

co 

rH 



1 











VO 

to 

CO 

1 

r-H 

rH 

co 

rH 

co 

rH 

co 

1 

CO 

H4 



' 








i 


00 

CO 

rH 

1—4 

| 

VO 


1 

| 

1 

pH 

rH 

CO 





1 



1 

1 

1 




VO 

1 

co 

r-H 

1 

| 

■ 

1 

. 

1 

1 

1 

1 


1 



1 


1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

rH 

T—i 


rH 

| 

rH 

CO 

1 

1 

rH 

rH 

I 

1 

VO 




1 



1 

1 



1 

1 

VO 

CO 

r—H 

1 

1 

1 

VO 

1 

CO 

| 

co 

co 

co 

—i 




1 

1 


1 


1 




00 

co 

rH 

1 

1 

1 

CO 

I 

co 

i 

1 

CO 

rH 

00 



1 

1 

1 


1 


1 

1 



CD 

1 1 ! 1 1 > 1 1 1 1 1 I 

00 

■ 

rH 

i 

co 

1 

rH 

1 

CO 


rH 

rH 

i-H 

CO 



1 


1 


1 






tD 

CO 

CO 

rH 


CO 

00 

co 

05 


oo 

CD 

oo 

CO 

05 

t- 

CO 

VO 

CO 

1— 

r-H 

l— 

CO 


'rH 

VO 

O 












VO 













CO 

co 

05 

00 

00 

vO 

CO 

co 


00 

05 

CO 

VO 

05 

CO 

CO 


r—t 

CO 

CO 


r-H 


rH 

rH 

rH 

05 













CD 

rH 

o 

VO 

co 

VO 

05 


oo 

o 


rH 

>o 

1 50 

CO 

r-H 


r-H 

CO 



rH 

rH 

co 

r-H 

r-H 














1 « 

05 

CO 

• co 

rH 

CO 

o 

co 

VO 

CO 

00 

o 

rH 

co 

CO 

CO 


r-H 

rH 

CO 


CO 


rH 

r—H 

r-H 

o 













CD 

co 

05 

vo 

VO 

1 

t- 

1 

05 

1 

t- 

co 

t- 


CO 



rH 

1 

CO 

| 

rH 

1 

rH 

r-H 

r-H 

CO 













CD 

• 











• 










Ah 

rH 









'N W P' 




s 


<x> 

M 

o 

4-5 


4-5 

a 

o 

-P 

bC 

be 

• 

fl 

o 

-m 

t4 

<D 

4-5 

• 

be 

fl 

• rH 

• 

be 

03 

o 

be 

• 

a 

pH 

>H 

o 

o 

EH 

A 


be 

OQ 


H 

fl 

fl 


02 

45 


G 

• rH 

-P 

CO 

S3 

Ph 

PU 

S 

• pH 

s 

Ford 

fl 

•rH 

•+5 

ft 

o 

EH 

fl 

• pH 

a 

h 

Poling 

a 

to 

fl 

• pH 

r^I 

o 

-p 

Ph 

• pH 

fl 

«3 

£ 

<-A 

Ah 

A 

fl 

PP 

rfl 

4-5 

fl 

O 

02 

rfl 

be 

3 

O 

w 













































110 


BIRTHS AND BIRTH-RATE. 


During the year 1895, the births of 278 children were registered; 
of these 125 were male, and 153 were female. 


Estimating the population in the middle of the year at 9,200, 
the birth-rate was equal to 30'2 per 1,000 persons living. 


The births and birth-rate during the past ten years are here 
shown :— 


Year. 

Births. 

Birth-rate. 

Year. 

Births. 

Birth-rate. 

1886 

. . 246 

. . 28-8 

1891 

.. 244 

.. 28-0 

1887 

. . 241 

.. 28-1 

1892 

. . 204 

. . 23-3 

1888 

. . 226 

.. 26*2 

1893 

. . 260 

. . 29*5 

1889 

. . 230 

. . 26*5 

1894 

,, 269 

.. 30-0 

1890 

. . 204 

. . 23-4 

1895 

.. 278 

.. 30-2 


The mean number of births is 240, and the mean birth-rate is 27*4 
per 1,000 of population. 


In England and Wales the birth-rate during the year was 30*3 
per 1,000 persons living, a rate 0*9 per 1,000 below the mean rate in 
the ten years, 1885-94. 


The following table shows the births and birth-rate in each locality 
during the past four years :— 

Births. Birth-rate. 



1892. 

1893. 

1894. 

1895. 

1892. 

1893. 

1894. 

1895. 

Worthing Sub-district 

81 

113 

Ill 

117 

24-5 

33-8 

32*6 

32-9 

Littlehampton Sub- 









district 

83 

103 

102 

103 

24-0 

29-8 

29-3 

29-2 

Arundel Sub-district 

40 

44 

56 

58 

20-0 

22*0 

26-7 

27*3 

Total 

204 

260 

269 

278 

23-3 

29-5 

30-0 

30-2 


In the Arundel Sub-district there is a thinly scattered agricultural 
population with an excess of people at advanced periods of life ; hence 
the birth-rate is low. 


GENERAL MORTALITY. 


There were 172 deaths registered in this district during the year 
1895, but from this number must be deducted the deaths of ten persons 
belonging to urban areas, outside this district. Of these ten persons, 
five came from Worthing, four from Littleliampton, and one from 
Arundel. 
















Ill 


There were also eleven other deaths in the Workhouse, and these 
have been distributed among the several parishes whence each inmate 
came, viz., Broadwater 2, West Tarring 1, Clapham 1, East Preston 1, 
Angmering 2, Lyminster 1, Climping 2, Ford 1 ; in all 11. 


There must be added the deaths of two persons in Worthing 
Infirmary, of whom one belonged to Broadwater and one to Wick. 
The total number of deaths belonging to this district amounts therefore 
to 164. 


Estimating the population in the middle of the year at 9,200, the 
death-rate was equal to 17’8 per 1,000 persons living. 


In country districts throughout England and Wales the rate of 
mortality in 1895 was equal to 17*0 per 1,000 of population. 


The variations in the death-rate during the past ten years are 
here shown:— 


Year. 

Deaths. 

Death-rate. 

Year. 

Deaths. 

Death-rate. 

1886 

.. 106 

.. 12*4 

1891 

. . 123 

. . 14*1 

1887 

. . 114 

. . 13*3 

1892 

. . 143 

. . 16*3 

1888 

.. 108 

.. 12*5 

1893 

. . 145 

.. 16*5 

1889 

.. 116 

. . 13-4 

1894 

.. 124 

. . 13*8 

1890 

. . 122 

. . 14-0 

1895 

. . 164 

.. 17*8 


The mean number of deaths is 126, and the mean death-rate is 
14*4 per 1,000. During this decade there were 2,402 births, so that the 
natural increase of births over deaths was 1,137. 


The actual increase at the last census was 817, but as Heene with 
its 150 people was transferred to Worthing in 1890, the real increase 


was 667. 


The following table shows the deaths and death-rate in each 
locality during the past four years :— 

Deaths. Death-rate. 



1892. 

1893. 

1894. 

1895. 

1892. 

1893. 

1894. 

1895. 

Worthing Sub-district 

65 

63 

54 

66 .. 

19-7 

18*9 

15*9 

18*6 

Littlehampton Sub¬ 
district .. 

41 

55 

53 

63 .. 

11*9 

15*9 

15*2 

17-8 

Arundel Sub-district 

37 

27 

17 

35 .. 

18*5 

13*5 

8*1 

16*5 

Total 

143 

145 

124 

164 

16*3 

16*5 

13*8 

17-8 
















112 


In each parish the deaths in 1895 were thus distributed 


Broadwater . . . . 20 

West Tarring . . 24 

Clapham .. .. 5 

Durrington .. . . 5 

Goring . . . . 8 

Ferring . . . . 4 

Kingston . . . . none 

East Preston . . 5 

Angmering (south) .. 9 

Lyminster (south) . . 32 

Rustington .. . . 6 


Total 


Climping . . .. 9 

Ford .. .. 2 

Tortington .. .. 4 

Lyminster (north) .. 8 

Poling .. .. 7 

Angmering (north). . none 
Patching . . .. 3 

Warningcamp .. 3 

Burpham . . .. 7 

South Stoke . . none 

Houghton .. .. 3 

164. 


INFANT MORTALITY. 

The infant mortality is here given as measured by the number of 
deaths under one year of age to the total number of births in the 
year:— 

Deaths under Ratio to 



Births. 

one year. 

1000 Births. 

Worthing Sub-district, 

.. 117 

9 

77 

Littlehampton Sub-district .. 

.. 103 

16 

155 

Arundel Sub-district. . 

58 

5 

86 

Total 

.. 278 

30 

108 


The mean annual rate in the previous seven years, 1888-94, was 86 
per 1,000 registered births. 


In England and Wales the proportion of deaths under one year 
of age to registered births was 161 per 1,000, the mean proportion in 
the preceding ten years having been 146. 


ZYMOTIC MORTALITY. 

There were 2 deaths from zymotic disease in the case of those 
which are notifiable and there were 5 deaths in the other class where 
the number of cases cannot be obtained. 

Adding the two classes together, there is a total of 7 deaths with 
a zymotic mortality of 0*76 per 1,000. 











113 


Small Pox . . 
Scarlatina 
Diphtheria 
Membranous Croup 

{ Typhus 
Enteric 
Continued . . 
Relapsing 
Puerperal 
Cholera 
Erysipelas 

Total 



Cases. 

Deaths. 

• • 

none 

none 

• * 

42 

none 

• « 

16 

2 

• • 

none 

none 

• • 

none 

none 

• • 

3 

none 


none 

none 

• • 

none 

none 

• • 

none 

none 

« • 

.. none 

none 

• • 

10 

none 

9 \ 

61 

2 


The deaths in the other classes were as follows :— 


Measles 

Deaths. 

1 

Whooping Cough 

.. none 

Diarrhoea and Dysentery . . 

4 

Rheumatic Fever .. 

none 


Total „. 5 


The Infectious Disease (Notification) Act, 1891, came into opera¬ 
tion in this district on March 1st, 1891, and on the same day the 
Infectious Disease (Prevention) Act, 1890, also took effect. 

On March 21st, 1891, the Public Health Acts Amendment Act, 
1890, Part III, came into operation. 


The prevalence in each 
shown :— 

Scarlatina 
Diphtheria . . 
Enteric Fever 
Erysipelas . . 


quarter of each infectious disease is here 

1st Qr. 2nd Qr. 3rd Qr. 4th Qr. Total. 

24 8 5 5 42 

— 1 — 5 6 

1 2 — — 3 

3 1 1 5 10 


Total 


28 12 6 15 61 


There were 6 cases notified in 1891, 54 in 1892, 156 in 1893, 40 in 
1894, and 61 in 1895. 

The Schools at Angmering were closed in the early part of the 
year in consequence of several cases of Scarlatina occurring among the 
children ; all cases were isolated as far as possible ; and no death 
occurred. The Schools were opened again in April, after being disin¬ 
fected and cleansed. 


WATER SUPPLY AND DRAINAGE. 

These are in the same condition as detailed in last year’s report. 











114 


LEGAL PROCEEDINGS. 

The London and Brighton Railway Company allowed two new 
cottages to be occupied without first obtaining a water certificate. 
Proceedings were taken against them at the Arundel Bench, on 
February 25th, 1895, when a conviction was obtained and they were 
fined £1 and costs in each case. 

The cottages were afterwards supplied with good water. 


SYSTEMATIC INSPECTION. 


The following is a list of routine work during the year, as recorded 
in the books of the Sanitary Inspector, Mr. Vail 


No. of Houses visited . . .. .. . . 425 

Nuisances reported ... .. . . . . . . 127 

Nuisances abated without notice . . . 105 

Nuisances abated with notice . , . . . . 22 

Houses cleansed and limewashed .. . . .. 43 

Houses disinfected . . . . . . . . . . 32 

Water certificates granted .. .. .. .. 37 

Wells cleaned . . . . .. .. . . 11 

New wells . . . . . . . . .. . . 7 

Wells closed . . . . . . .. .. . . 3 

Samples of water analysed . . .. .. .. 9 

Samples of water polluted . . . . . . .. 3 

Cases of overcrowding abated . . .. . . 5 

Privies altered .. . . . . .. . . 14 

Drains re-laid . . .. .. .. .. 5 

House unfit for habitation .. .. .. .. 1 


SCAVENGING AND CLEANSING. 

The Parochial Committees of Broadwater and West Tarring meet 
frequently and they supervise the work of scavenging which is carried 
out by a contractor. 


BAKEHOUSES. 

The fifteen bakehouses have been frequently inspected, and they 
have been well kept. 


SLAUGHTER HOUSES. 

These are six in number, and they have been kept in good order, 
but they require frequent inspection to see that no nuisance arises* 

COWSHEDS AND DAIRIES. 

The twenty-six cowsheds have been regularly inspected and kept 
clean ; no disease of any animals was recorded during the year. 











115 


LODGING HOUSES. 

There is no Common Lodging House in the district. 


INQUESTS. 

Inquests were held in twenty cases :—Male, 23 years, accident at 
the Waterworks ; male, 6 years, inflammation of the brain ; male, 90 
years, disease of the stomach ; male, 6 hours, debility, male, 54 years, 
accidentally run over; male, 18 months, pneumonia; female, 5 years, 
tumour upon the brain ; female, 70 years, heart disease ; male, 4 hours, 
born prematurely ; male, 2 hours, born prematurely; male, 59 years, 
syncope ; male, 55 years, drowned; male, 22 years, drowned ; male, 22 
years, drowned ; male, 22 years, drowned ; female, 88 years, old age; 
male, 5 months, congestion of the lungs ; male, 12 hours, prematurely 
born ; male, 87 years, accidental fall; male, 35 years, found drowned. 

There was one death returned as “ not certified ” during the year:— 
male, 1 day, prematurely born. 








116 


EAST PRESTON RURAL DISTRICT. 


Table 1. — Showing the Deaths at various groups of ages in the 

fifteen years 1881-95. 


Year. 

At all ages. 

Under 1 Year. 

1 to 5. 

5 to 15. 

15 to 25. 

25 to 65. 

65 and upwards. 

1881-85 

603 

100 

53 

35 

28 

185 

202 

1886-90 

566 

82 

50 

30 

34 

149 

221 

1891 

123 

25 

8 

5 

6 

35 

44 

1892 

143 

19 

11 

7 

6 

41 

59 

1893 

145 

23 

16 

15 

11 

43 

37 

1894 

124 

21 

17 

9 

6 

33 

38 

1895 

164 

30 

17 

11 

10 

39 

57 

Total 

1,868 

300 

172 

112 

101 

525 

658 


Table 2.—Showing the Deaths in the twenty years, 1876-95, from 

various causes. 


Year. 

| Small Pox. 

i 

I Scarlatina. 

Diphtheria. 

Membranous Croup. 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 

Measles. 

Whooping Cough. 

Diarrhoea. 

Rheumatic Fever. 

Influenza. 

Total. 

| Typhus. 

1 Enteric. 

i 

Continued. 

1 l 

1 Relapsing. 

1 

j Puerperal. - 

1876-80 


11 

8 



9 

1 




2 

4 

8 

19 



62 

1881-85 


8 

17 



1 

— 


1 


2 

9 

8 

7 

2 


55 

1886-90 


5 

13 



1 

— 

— 

1 

— 


1 

17 

16 



54 

1891. 




— 

— 

2 

— 

— 

— 


2 

2 

2 

2 


4 

14 

1892. 



2 


— 

2 

— 

— 





1 

1 


8 

14 

1893. 


1 

3 

2 


22 

— 




— 

2 

3 

5 


1 

39 

1894. 

— 

— 

2 



1 

— 





— 

3 

3 


1 

10 

1895. 



2 


■' 

1 






1 


4 


6 

13 

Total... 


25 

47 

2 


38 

1 


2 


6 

19 

42 

51 

2 

20 

261 j 

























































































































117 


EAST PRESTON RURAL DISTRICT. 


Table 3. —Showing the Deaths and Death-rate from all causes and from 
various causes in the twenty years, 1876-95. 


•0SB9SI(J JXtteJJ 

00 05 CO Cq 

^ ■tH cq i— i 

r—l i—1 H r—t 

*0SC8si(j Sunq 

209 

201 

209 

279 

•STSiq^q^ 

co o o co 

.t— CO o o 

pH pH pH pH 

*8SB8SI(J 

oqoinXz' 

ph co eo GO 

co co cq io 

pH pH p—1 pH 

•S0SB8SI(J \\Y 

1,645 

1,452 

1,286 

1,571 

•8SC0SI(J q.JB9JJ 

57 

62 

56 

50 

•0SB9Si(j Sunq 

81 

84 

92 

124 

’ S J S TM<I 

68 

54 

44 

48 

*0S'B0SI(J 

oqoraiC^ 

02 

55 

54 

70 

*S9SB9SI(J {[Y 

634 

603 

566 

699 

•P0IJ9J JO 
8|ppiUI 

ui uoijqndoj; 

7,710 

8,330 

8,620 

8,800 


S 

CD g 

I*** 

:g.S 

^ O 
"1 O 

go* 

§2 

•< 

© 

PH 




02 

HH 

o3 
© 

02 3 

O 

-+3 Sh 
*+-< 

W) 
p IP ^ 

r p a 

tj ' 

P CO 
'p fcp 

02 29 

rP 

■+3 
o3 
<D 


ft 


ft 

o 

h-1 

ft 

ft 

ft 


• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

o 

• 

io 

• 

o 

lO 

CO 

00 

05 

05 

CO 

r ■ ^ 

CO 

i — 1 

1— 

02 

CO 

05 

CO 

00 

CO 

00 

r-H 

r-H 

r-H 

r-H 











































118 


(A)—Table of DEATHS during the Year 1895, in the EAST PREST01 


Names of Localities adopted for 
the purpose of these 
Statistics; Public Institutions 
being shown as separate 
localities. 

(a) 

Mortality from all Causes 
at subjoined Ages. 

(0 


M 

<D 

&0 

ci 

% 

(b) 

Sh 

c 8 

CD 

u 

<x> 

rO 

a 

p 

(c) 

lO 

u 

CD 

n3 

Cl 

d 

r d 

d 

c3 

(d) 

a> 

'd 

a 

d 

^ id 
V r ~ i 

-H 

pH 

c3 

lO 

(e) 

u 

CD 

TS 

a 

d . 

d 

<3 

»o 

r-H 

(/) 

tH 

<D 

d 

d . 

<3 

id 

CM 

(S') 

i 

a, 

s . 

01 

■73 r d 

a S 
cs g 

lO 

ZD 

(h) 

1 

2 

3! 

x 

o 

Oh 

p—H 

3 

s 

m 

• 

«8 

d 

•pH 

ej 

o 

02 

• 

rt 

’S 

o 

-d- 

43. 

ff 

• l-l. 

o 

Worthing Sub-District 

61 

9 

6 

5 

3 

14 

24 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 



c. 

Littlehampton Sub-District ... 

55 

16 

6 

1 

2 

17 

13 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 




Arundel Sub-District ... 

35 

5 

5 

3 

3 

7 

12 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 




East Preston Workhouse 

21 

— 

— 

1 

1 

2 

17 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 




• 








Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 




• 








Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 




Totals. 

172 

30 

17 

10 

9 

40 

66 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 



i 


The subjoined numbers have also to be taken ini 

Deaths occurring outside the 
District among persons 
belonging thereto. 

2 

— 

— 

1 

1 

— 

— 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 





Deaths occurring within the 
District among persons 
not belonging thereto... 

10 

— 

— 

— 

— 

1 

9 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 



















































































































































































119 


Rural District, classified according to Diseases, Ages, and Localities. 


Mortality from subjoined causes, distinguishing Deaths of Children 

under Five Years of Age. 

4 

5 

6 

1 7 

8 

1 9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

Membranous 

Croup. 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 

Measles. 

Whooping 

Cough. 

Diarrhoea and 

Dysentery. 

Rheumatic 

Fever. 

Phthisis. 

Bronchitis, 

Pneumonia, 

and Pleurisy. 

Heart 

Disease. 

Influenza. 

Injuries. 

All Other 

Diseases. 

Total. 

Typhus. 

Enteric or 
Typhoid. 

Continued. 

Relapsing. 

Puerperal. 











3 



4 




8 

15 











1 


5 

7 

3 

5 

2 

21 

46 














6 




16 

22 













3 

4 

5 

1 

2 

18 

33 









1 





3 




6 

10 














3 

1 


4 

17 

25 
































1 

2 

1 



17 

21 






































































































































































































































f 













































1 


3 


13 




30 

47 











1 


9 J 16 

10 

6 

8 

73 

125 

account in judging of the above records of mortality. 





































2 

2 
































1 


1 



8 

10 





















































































































































































































































































































































120 


((B)—TABLE OF POPULATION, BIRTHS, AND OF NEW CASES 
Officer of Health, during the year 1895, in the EAST PRESTON 


Names of Localities adopted 
for the purpose of these 
Statistics; Public Institutions 
being shown as separate 
localities. 

(a) 

Population 
at all Ages. 

a. Registered Births. 

Aged 
under 5 
or 

over 5. 

(e) 

New Cases of Sick- 
coming to the knowledge 

of 

Census 

1891. 

(6) 

Esti¬ 
mated 
to mid¬ 
dle of 
1895. 

(c) 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

Small Pox. 

Scarlatina. 

Diphtheria. 

Membranous 

Croup. 

Typhus. ^ 

. <1 

Enteric or S 

Typhoid. ^ 

Worthing Sub-district 

3,261 

3,550 

117 

Under 5 



o 




5 upwards. 


4 

3 



2 

Littlehampton Sub-district .. 

3,285 

3,350 

103 

Under 5 


9 





5 upwards. 


29 

1 



1 

Arundel Sub-district. 

1,984 

2,120 

58 

Under 5 







5 upwards. 







East Preston Workhouse 

162 

180 


Under 5 








5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 







Totals . 

8,692 

9,200 

278 

Under 5 


9 

2 




5 upwards. 


33 

4 



3 









































































































































































121 


INFECTIOUS SICKNESS, coming to the knowledge of the Medical 
al District ; classified according to Diseases, Ages, and Localities. 


is in each Locality, 
the Medical Officer 

alth. 

Number of such Cases Removed from their 

Homes in the several Localities for Treatment 
in Isolation Hospital. 

8 

9 

10 

In 

12 

13 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 



Small Pox. 

Scarlatina. 

Diphtheria. 

Membranous 

Croup. 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 



Relapsing. 

Puerperal. 

Typhus. 

Enteric or 
Ty phoid. 

Continued. 

Relapsing. 

Puerperal. 























1 






































7 












































































2 
















































































































































































































































































































10 















| 






















































































































































































































































































































MIDHURST RURAL DISTRICT. 


pp. 123 et seq. 


\ 


f 




123 


MIDHURST RURAL DISTRICT. 


The population in this registration district was 13,325 at the 
census of 1841, and 13,599 in 1851 ; there was then a decline owing to 
alterations in the area, and from 1861 onwards there has been a steady 
increase, as is shown in the following statement. 


The figures here given relate to the present rural sanitary area 
which is co-extensive with the registration district:—- 



1861. 

1871. 

1881. 

1891. 

Area in Statute Acres 

— 

65,695 

66,571 

66,744 

Number of Inhabited Houses.. 

2,473 

2,621 

2,801 

2,919 

,, Uninhabited „ .. 

88 

79 

136 

188 

Population 

12,608 

13,042 

13,965 

14,236 

Males 

6,545 

6,767 

7,185 

7,216 

Females 

6,063 

6,275 

6,780 

7,020 


The males exceed the females in number, but the excess is not so 
great as in former years. There is a great increase in the number of 
empty houses, although there is also an increase in the number of 
occupied dwellings. In most of the parishes, the population is stationary 
or declining, and year by year the older houses cease to be occupied. 


In Easebourne, however, considerable building operations have 
been going on in recent years, and the increase in the population and in 
the number of inhabited houses is wholly due to the growth on this 
area. 


The following tables show the population in each parish ; and also 
the deaths in each parish from all causes and from various causes over a 
long term of years :— 




124 


■* 



o 

M 

H 

< 

p 

o 

Pi 

O 

Pw 


C5 
00 

»-< 
w ' 

co 
0 
o 

w 


•T3 

CD 

- 1-5 

• r-l 
02 
d 

p 


c/2 

<£> 

• 














r-H 

rH 

co 

CO 

CM 

■rH 

CM 

CO 

o 

00 

CM 

CO 

oo 

co 

<M 

c3 

C^» 

05 

CM 

H -1 

O 

CM 

CO 

oo 

05 

05 

CO 

o 

CO 

05 

a 

GO 


rH 


CO 


r-H 

i—i 

r-H 

00 

rH 




© 

r—H 





























co • 

<D r-H 

VO 

VO 

05 

rH 

CO 



rH 

CM 

CO 


o 

co 

rH 05 

00 

05 

05 

CM 

hH 

CM 

CM 

CM 

vo 

CO 

i- 

GO 

o 




tH 

CO 


CM 

CM 

CM 

t- 

r-H 

co 

rH 
















#X 

© 














S r-H 

o 1 

rH 

GO 

r-H 

VO 

CO 

CO 

i— 

05 

'cH 

r-H 

CM 

CO 

o 

W Oi 

05 

rH 

j>- 

hH 

tH 

05 

O 

hH 


CO 

05 

GO 

r- 

Pi co 

r-H 

<M 

GO 

CO 


co 


tH 

co 

CO 

CO 

r-H 

r-H 

© 1—1 











rx 



Ph 









rH 


t-h 



♦n 

CO 














o ^ 

rH 

r-H 

CD 

CM 

05 

00 

CO 

hH 

VO 

CM 

CO 

■^H 


§ CO 

CM 

VO 

CO 

OO 

hH 


r-H 

1- 

r-H 

CO 

hH 

CM 

co 

Pi oo 

(M 

r-H 

CO 

CO 



tH 

0 

CO 

CO 

o 

r-H 

r-H 

O r-H 









#X 


*x 



Ph 









i — 1 


r-H 



#N 

CO 














P H 
o H 

O 

vo 

CO 

o 

hH 

CO 

UP 

CO 

VO 

CO 

r-H 

r-H 

' 00 

© !>■ 

r-H 

05 

hH 

CO 

CO 

GO 

co 

05 

CO 

o 

00 

VO 

CO 

Pi GO 

CM 

rH 

OO 

CO 


CO 

hH 

"CH 

hH 

CO 

GO 

T—l 

r-H 

© i—i 














Pi 









rH 





rx 

CO 














o r? 

o 

co 

00 

05 

CO 

CO 

CO 

o 

o 

00 

05 

CO 

rH 

CO ^ 

05 


o 

CM 

CM 

05 

r-H 

co 


co 

VO 


rH 

Pi co 

r-H 

r-H 

05 

co 

r-H 

co 

tH 


co 

CO 

co 

r-H 

r-H 

<X> rH 








cx 





Ph 









r-H 





th 














M 

• rH 

1 

CO 

1 

CO 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

rH 

| 

1 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 


1 

r 

• rH 














P 














cq 














r d 














© 














1 H-3 

| 

hH 

00 

CO 

| 

05 

CM 

05 

CO 

1 

hH 

rH 

CM 

tS-i 

1 


. 

r-H 

1 




CO 

1 

r-H 



-P 














P 














• rH 















CO 

co 


t- 


vo 

05 


VO 


oo 


05 


00 


o 

05 


CO 

co 


CO 

co 


co co 

CM 


Eh 

o 

M 

« 

Eh 

co 

IH 

P 

I 

ffl 

0 

m 

EH 

CO 

P3 

P> 

w 

P 


p 

o 

-45> 

b/D 

fl 

• r-l 
> 
d 

1-3 

4-5 

CO 

d 


P 

o 

■4-5 

tJD 

P 

• rH 
> 
a 

-p 

co 

05 

£ 


P 

-p 

-455 

• 

4-3 

d 

• 

455 

O 

- 45 > 

Pi 

o 


4-5 

o 

p 

d 

OD 

CO 

Pi 

tJD 

& 

Selhan 

,P 

-P 

P 

P 

P 

» rH 

• rH 

r . 

C“. 

co 

T 3 

O 

H 

co 

& 

w 

ctt 

d 

Pi 

O 

• rH 

rO 

o 

o 

O 

-P 

r O 

• rH 


&G 

P 

• r-H 

13 

CD 

r£ 

O 

o 


© 

p 

Pi 

p 

o 

_Q 

© 

CO 

Ip 


p 

d 

rP 

CO 

Pi 

© 

p 

a 

c 

rP 

4-5 

p 

o 

m 


CM 

co 


&4 

o 

I—I 

Ph 

Eh 

co 

i—i 

P 

P 

P 

cc 

Eh 

CO 

Ph 

P 

R 

£ 

P 

P 


a 

d 

r-P 

M 

Pi 

© 

rO 

a 

rP 

-U5 

Pi 

O 

5 







































732 , 762 , 416 


125 


•co 

t- 

JO 

o 

t- 

JO 

00 

co 

o 

CM 

co 

CM 

co 

1— 1 

JO 



fc— 

JO 

05 

JO 

CM 

'cH 

05 

fc— 

o 

o 

JO 

CO 

<M 

CO 

JO 



CM 

CM 

CM 

r—t 



CO 

rH 



rH 




CO CO 00 

00 w ^ 

JO 1-H 


i— i 

JO 

CO 

rH 

o 

r—1 

co 

05 

OO 

o 

OO 

CO 

1— 

CM 

JO 

o 

00 

fc— 

OO 

JO 

co 

CO 

CM 

CM 

CM 

i—1 

1—1 


co 




rH 


CO 

co 


JO 

co 


00 

05 


00 

o 

I—1 

fc- 

o 

co 

05 

r-H 


r-H 

CO 

JO 

co 

JO 

05 

05 

JO 

fc- 

C^» 

r-H 

CO 

co 

JO 

JO 


CM 

r—1 

05 

(M 

r-H 

rH 


CM 


rH CO 

05 

O co 


05 

05 


lO 


CO 

JO 

"'f 

JO 

co 

hJH 

oo 

fc— 

JO 

05 

CM 

O 

co 

oo 

00 

fc- 

o 

Hf 

CO 

CO 

JO 


CO 

r-H 

05 

CM 

*N 

1 - 1 

CM 

1—1 


<M 


(M 

t- 

CO 

r-H 

<M 

T—C 

05 

JO 

<M 

05 

t- 

JO 

CO 

HjH 

o 


05 

o 

r-H 

o 

CM 

05 

05 

CO 

05 

i— 

fc— 


05 

<M 

1- 

00 

co 

r-H 

JO 

JO 

CO 

CM 

r-H 

05 

CM 

?H 

rH 


CM 


£- 

JO 

co 

r-H 

o 


CM 

JO 

CM 

o 

fc- 


CO 

JO 

r-H 

CM 


00 

rH 

CO 

O 

JO 

rH 

JO 

05 

'H -1 

fc- 

CM 

00 

rH 

.fc- 

00 

CM 

r-H 

JO 


HlH 

CM 

rH 

05 

iM 

**■ 

r-H 

r—1 

iH 




CM 


o 

JO 


co 

00 

i- 

CO 

co 

CM 

rH 

"cH 

CO 

CO 

co 


rH 

rH 








rH 

rH 





CO 

CM 

fc- 

rH 

CM 

co 

CO 

o 

CO 

Jt>» 

oo 

O 

CO 


05 


CO 

CO 

CM 

<M 

o 

oo 

CO 

co 

o 

t- 


CM 

rH 


r-H 

(M 



r-H 

rH 




CM 

<M 





• 

• 

• 

• 













cS 

r-H 

-rH 

m 

O 

be 

P 

0 

H 


-P 

02 

P 

d 

d 

P 

© 

P=H 


© 

P 

© 


rd 

o 

d 


H 

O 

i—i 

P3 

H 

02 
I—I 

fl 

i 

« 

a2 


i-d 

o 

c3 

be 

© 

f—i 

M 


d 

d 

H 

© 

• i—i 

• rH 

H 

P3 

Hi 

-p 

m 

i—i 


d 

o 

-p 

-p 

o 

p 

EH 


-p 

S/2 

P 

d 

p 

• rH 

~d 

O 


o 

» rH 

£ 

P 

© 

EH 


© 

-p 

c3 

be 

o 


be 

d 

• rH 

-P 

P 

c6 


03 

© 

P 

S/2 


Ph W w 


T3 

P 

O 

«H 

© 

P 

EH 


be 

d 


w 


d 

o 

-p 

CP 

© 

PQ 


























126 


1891-95 

•aS'BGSIQ 
' Sun^j 

r- 1 «D 50 lOCOCOOHOCOCOCq 

i—i I Oq 


| CO O JC- | <M | ^ GO i-H i—t r-( | 

) 

•'Buaq^HdiQ 

y—t J rH | | 1—1 | | ^ ^ ^ 

*9S'B0SI(J 

oi^oui^z 

rH O CO 1 Cl Ir-HO-^O 1 1 

1 | Cl • i—ill 

1886-90. 

' •0S'B0SI(J 

Surri 

r-iCOOi-H 1 lfl 1 t— N (M ^ CO i—I 

rH 1 | i—1 1 —1 


i-h loco | i cq cq o cq io ico 

1 rH | | Cl 


tH | | | | | | | CO 

•©s^siq; 

oi^oui^z 

rH rH ^ CO 1 d d CO CO rH d Id 

rH 

1881-85. 

•0SU0SI(J 

^urvj 

Cq llOCOC^OCMlO'^-^sji 1 Cq 

1 cq 1 


N (M O O j Ol lO rH Ci r—1 u- | CO 

•'Bij0q^qdi(j 

1 1 — 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1—1 

•0SB0SIQ 

oi^oui^2 

i-h,— iocq 1 cq co co ^ co o 1 i-h 

I rH 1 

1876-80. 

•©S'BOSTQ 

Surrq 

t— cq | o hH in o o t- oq 

•sisiq^qj 

H I lO GO 1 rH i>» lO rH d 

1 H 1 rH | 

■'Biaai^qdtQ 

i i H i r i ii i m 

'©SBOSIQ 

OI^OUI^ 

d j 1 h CO 1 d CO d O CO rH j-H j-H 

J-H 

•sji 20^ ifynoAvj, 
ui i-e^ox 

48 

51 

291 

220 

13 

132 

120 

140 

561 

96 

339 

38 

34 

Deaths from all 

CAUSES IN THE YEARS 

S6-I68I 

rH Cq CO CO rH H tH rH CO CO OS t— 1 lO 

i—i cq go *o co cq co ^ cq as h 

1 

06-9881 

11 

8 

71 

49 

2 

27 

34 

33 

130 

12 

91 

8 

9 

S8-IS81 

codoocodo^c^cocococo 

j—H j-H lO CO CO ' T ^ d b- H 

rH 

08-9i8l 

coascqco^cqcqcoHtHcocooiH 

rH CO CO CO ^ CO CO t— rH 

. rH 

Parish. 

East Lavington . . 
West Lavington . . 
Tillington 

Lodsworth 

Selham 

Heyshott .. 

GrafFham 

Cocking . . 

Midhurst .. 

Woolbeding 

Easebourne 

South Ambersham 

North Ambersham 









































































127 


in 

o> 

rH 


rH 

CO 

05 

CO 

Hh 

CM 

in 

CO 

rH 

I 

CM 

i 

CO 

r-H 

CO 

rH 

in 

CO 

co 

rH 

CO 


1 

rH 

rH 

<M 

m 

l 

r—* 

i 

CO 

75 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

co 

rH 

l 

i 

CM 

26 

rH 

00 

oq 

rH 

1 

rH 

1 

l 

1 

rH 

rH 


l 

i 

H 

oo 

rH 

rH 

o 

CM 

CM 


o 

rH 

CM 

CO 

CO 

CM 

rH 

CO 

rH 

CM 

CO 

1 

CO 

CO 

m 

r-H 

m 

CO 

rH 

CM 


r —4 

CO 


CM 

co 

co 

H 

(M 

rH 

* 

rH 

m 

05 

CM 

cm 

CM 

1 

rH 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

rH 

l 

i 

1 

l 

i 

(M 

rH 


o 

rH 


1 

rH 

M 

<M 


CM 

CO 

! 

<M 

1 

rH 

i 

M 

t- 

CO 

CO 

H 


1 

co 

00 

m 

CO 

in 

o 

H 

rH 

CO 

rH 

rH 

h 

o 

m 

T—H 

05 

00 

1 

<M 

| 

CM 

co 


rH 

co 

m 

CO 

1 

CM 

rH 

CM 

o 
















|H 

rH 

m 


1 

1 

1 


1 

1 

1 

M 

1 

i 

i 

1 

27 

hH 

IO 

rH 

m 

1 

CO 


oo 

! 

1 

hH 

.CO 

rH 

r-H 

H 

CM 

hH 

o 

05 

rH 

rH 


1 

co 

m 

CO 

CM 

co 

rH 

CO 

H 

CM 

rH 

1 

CO 

H 

rH 

O 

rH 

rH 

rH 

1 

m 

CM 

hH 

CM 

rH 

m 

00 

co 

CM 

rH 

rH 

119 


CO 

tH 

1 

1 

i 

1 

i 

1 

1 

H 

1 

1 

1 

1 

rH 

05 


M 

1 

(M 

oq 

m 

rH 

1 




1 

rH 

i 

79 

207 

338 

99 

28 

co 

i- 

T—4 

o 

m 

rH 

130 

85 

49 

278 

413 

65 

47 

32 

75 

4252 

54 

87 

27 

o 

rH 

43 

33 

rH 

CO 

CM 

M 

<m 

rH 

59 

in 

rH 

rH 

05 

05 

in 

CO 

rH 

M 

05 

O 

<m 

76 

CO 

(M 

05 

42 

48 

32 

23 

CM 

rH 

CM 

t- 

88 

rH 

r -H 

'CM 

rH 

co 

t- 

r-H 

loot 

54 

96 

rH 

cm 

CO 

39 

44 

33 

23 

CO 

rH 

76 

GO 

o 

T“ H 

21 

M 

rH 

o 

rH 

22 

1096 

57 

79 

25 

co 

49 

25 

34 

rH 

12 

rH 

102 

24 

r-H 

H 

rH 

rH 

1063 

Lurgashal] 

Fernhurst 

Linchmere 

Linch 

Stedham . . 

Iping 

Trotton . . 

Chithurst. . 

Terwick .. 

<x> 

-t-> 

bo 

o 

Ph 

Harting .. 

Elsted 

Treyford . . 

Didling .. 

Bepton 

Total 




























































128 


BIRTHS AND BIRTH-RATE. 

During the year 1895, the births of 345 children were registered 
of these 184 were male, and 161 were female. 


Estimating the population in the middle of the year at 14,350 
the birth-rate was equal to 24’0 per 1,000 persons living. 


The births and birth-rate during the past ten years have been 
as follows :— 


Year. 

Births. 

Birth-rate. 

Year. 

Births. 

Birth-rate. 

1886 

. . 419 

. . 29-5 

1891 

.. 353 

. . 24-7 

1887 

. . 345 

. . 24-3 

1892 

.. 356 

. . 24-9 

1888 

.. 399 

. . 28-0 

1893 

.. 393 

. . 27-5 

1889 

. . 366 

. . 25-7 

1894 

,, 371 

. . 25-9 

1890 

. . 348 

. . 24-4 

1895 

.. 345 

. . 24-0 


The mean number of births is 370, and the mean birth-rate is 25’9 
per 1,000 of population. 


In England and Wales the birth-rate during the year was 30*3 
per 1,000 persons living, a rate 0’9 per 1,000 below the mean rate in 
the ten years, 1885-94. 


The following table shows the births and birth-rate in each locality 
during the past four years :— 



1892. 

Births. 
1893. 1894. 

1895. 

1892. 

Birth-rate. 
1893. 1894. 

1895. 

Midhurst Parish 

41 

47 

40 

42 

24-4 

28-0 

23-7 

24-7 

Easebourne Parish . . 

38 

32 

37 

33 

26-6 

22-0 

25-2 

22-1 

Rest of Midhurst Sub¬ 
district . . 

99 

112 

98 

89 

26-4 

29-9 

26-1 

23-7 

Fernhurst Sub-district 

65 

73 

68 

65 

25-8 

29-0 

27-0 

25-8 

Harting Sub-district. , 

113 

129 

128 

116 

23T 

26’4 

26-2 

23*8 

Total 

356 

393 

371 

345 

24-9 

27-5 

25-9 

24-0 


GENERAL MORTALITY. 

There were 198 deaths registered in this district during the year 
1895, and of these, thirteen took place in Easebourne Workhouse. 
These thirteen deaths have been distributed amongst the several 
parishes whence each inmate came, viz., Tillington 1, Lodsworth 1, 
Heyshott 1, Cocking 1, Midhurst 2, Woolbeding l,Eernhurst 2, Trotton 
1, Chithurst 1, Harting 1, Bepton 1, in all 13. 


Estimating the population in the middle of the year at 14,350, the 
death-rate was equal to 13*8 per 1,000 persons living. 

















129 


In country districts throughout England and Wales the rate of 
mortality in 1895 was equal to 17*0 per 1,000 of population. 


The variations in the death-rate during the past ten years have 
been as follows :— 


Year. 

Deaths. 

Death-rate. 

1886 .. 

243 . . 

17-1 

1887 .. 

219 . . 

15-4 

1888 .. 

191 ... 

13*4 

1889 .. 

157 . . 

11*0 

1890 .. 

191 .. 

13-4 

The mean 

number of 

deaths is 


per 1,000 of population. 


Year. 

Deaths. 

Death-rate. 

1891 

.. 267 

.. 18-7 

1892 

.. 247 

.. 17-3 

1893 

.. 183 

.. 12-8 

1894 

.. 197 

.. 13-7 

1895 

.. 198 

.. 13-8 


209, and the mean death-rate is 14.7 


There have been during this decade 3,695 births, so that the natural 
increase of population by excess of births over deaths was 1,602. The 
actual increase as shown by the Census returns was 271, so that a large 
number of persons must have left the district. 


The following table shows the deaths and death-rate in each 
locality during the past four years :— 




Deaths. 


Death-rate. 



1S92. 

1893. 

1894. 

1895. 1892. 

1893. 

1894. 

1895. 

Midhurst Parish 

31 

22 

30 

26 . . 18*4 

13T 

17-7 

15*3 

Easebourne Parish. . 

31 

10 

20 

14 .. 21-7 

6-9 

13*6 

9-4 

Pest of Midhurst Sub- 








district . . 

72 

60 

44 

45 .. 19*2 

16-0 

11-7 

12*0 

Fernhurst Sub-district 

39 

26 

38 

37 .. 15*5 

10-3 

15-1 

14*7 

Harting Sub-district 

74 

65 

65 

76 .. 15*1 

13-3 

13-3 

15-6 

Total .. 247 

183 197 

198 17*3 

12-8 

13*7 

13-8 

In each parish the deaths were thus distributed 




East Lavington 


2 

• • 

t 

Fernhurst . . 


16 

West Lavington 


3 

• 9 

Linchmere . . 



6 

Tillington 


10 

• • 

Linch 



1 

Lodsworth 


10 

• • 

Stedham 


8 

Selham 


1 

• • 

Iping 



i 

Heyshott 


5 

• • 

Trotton 


10 

Graffham 


3 

• • 

Chithurst 



5 

Cocking 


8 

• • 

Ter wick 



2 

Midhurst 


26 

• » 

Pogate 


11 

Woolbeding . . 


2 

• • 

Harting 


27 

Easebourne . . 


14 

• • 

Elsted 



3 

>South Ambersham 


1 

• • 

Treyford 



2 

North Ambersham 

• • 

1 

• « 

Eidling 



L 

Lurgashall . . 

• • 

13 

• • 

Bepton 


3 


Total 

• t 

198. 




























130 


Table 3 shows the slight variations in the mortality during the 
past twenty years; when a longer period is taken there is a marked 
improvement, except in lung diseases, from the rates of thirty or 
forty years ago :— 



1851-50. 

1861-70. 

1876-85. 

1886-95. 

General Death-rate .. 

1,818 

1,761 

1,546 

1,443 

Zymotic ,, 

321 

243 

135 

106 

Phthisis „ 

275 

215 

159 

112 

Lung Disease „ 

176 

194 

191 

216 


INFANT MORTALITY. 

The infant mortality is here given as measured by the number of 
deaths under one year of age to the total number of births in the 
year:— 


Deaths under Ratio to 




Births. 

one year. 

1000 Births. 

Mid hurst Parish 

• • 

42 

3 

71 

Easebourne Parish 

• • 

33 

4 

121 

Rest of Midhurst Sub-district 

89 

7 

78 

Fernhurst Sub-district 

• • 

65 

6 

92 

Harting Sub-district. . 

• • 

116 

12 

103 

Total 

• • 

345 

32 

92 


In England and Wales the proportion of deaths under one year 
of age to registered births was 161 per 1,000, the mean proportion in 
the preceding ten years having been 146. 


The mean annual death-rate in the previous seven years 1888-94, 
was 88 per 1,000 registered births. 


ZYMOTIC MORTALITY. 


The deaths from zymotic disease were 3 in the case of those 
which are notifiable, and 4 in the other class where the number of cases 
cannot be obtained. 


Adding the two classes together, there is a total of 7 deaths with, 
a zymotic mortality of 0*49 per 1,000. 


Cases. Deaths. 

Small Pox . . . . . . . . none none 

Scarlatina. 15 none 

Diphtheria. 10 1 

Membranous Croup . . . . none none 









131 



Typhus 

♦ • • • • • 

none 

none 

32 

Enteric 

• • • • « • 

9 

2 

<D 

> \ 

Continued 


none 

none 


Relapsing 

• • • • • • 

none 

none 


Puerperal 

• • • • • • 

.. none 

none 


Cholera 

• • • • • • 

.. none 

none 


Erysipelas 

• • • • • • 

8 

none 



Total 

42 

3 

In the other 

class the deaths were 

as follows :— 



Deaths. 

Measles . . .. .. .. 1 

Whooping Cough .. .. .. 1 

Diarrhoea and Dysentery .. .. 2 

Rheumatic Fever .. . . .. none 


Total .. 4 

The prevalence in each quarter of each infectious disease is here 
shown in the following table :— 



1st Qr. 

2nd Qr. 

3rd Qr. 

4th Qr. 

Total. 

Scarlatina 

— 

— 

2 

13 

15 

Diphtheria . . 

2 

— 

2 

6 

10 

Enteric Fever 

— 

2 

3 

4 

9 

Puerperal Fever 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

Erysipelas 

2 

— 

4 

2 

8 

Total 

4 

2 

11 

25 

42 


The Infectious Disease (Notification) Act, 1889, came into opera¬ 
tion in this district on January 1st, 1890. There were 55 cases notified 
in 1890, 83 in 1891, 100 in 1892, 85 in 1893, 39 in 1894, and 42 in 
1895. 


WATER SUPPLY AND DRAINAGE. 

These are in the same condition as detailed in my last annual 
report, so that they need not be repeated here. 


SYSTEMATIC INSPECTION. 

The following is a summary of routine work during the year, as 
recorded in the books of the Sanitary Inspector, Mr. A. G. Gibbs :— 

No. of Premises visited .. .. .. . . 293 

No. of Nuisances . . . . .. .. .. 126 

No. of Nuisances abated without notice .. .. 116 

No. of Nuisances abated with notice .. .. 10 














132 


No. of Houses unfit for habitation .. .. .. 11 

No. of Houses closed .. .. .. . • 1 

No. of Houses repaired on notice .. .. .. 9 

No. of Houses disinfected . . .. .. .. 28 

No of Houses whitewashed . .. . . .. 35 

Cases of overcrowding . . . . .. .. 6 

Cases of overcrowding abated . . .. .. 5 

Samples of water analysed .. .. .. .. 10 

Samples of water polluted . . .. .. . . 1 

Wells dug or rain water tanks constructed .. 6 

Water certificates granted . . .. .. .. 14 

No. of notices to provide water supply ... .. 7 


LEGAL PROCEEDINGS. 

An occupier of a house, consisting of one bedroom containing 692 
cubic feet, and one living-room, with man, wife, mother, and six 
children, aged 14J, 11, 9, 7, 4 years, and 10 months respectively, was 
summoned to abate the overcrowding. The case was heard on the 19th 
September, 1895. No order was made. 


BAKEHOUSES. 

The bakehouses are limewashed twice a year. They are very well 
kept, and in no case is there any drain within the building. 


SLAUGHTER HOUSES. 

The ten slaughter houses are very fairly kept, and any refuse or 
ofial is removed as soon as possible ; the walls are regularly limewashed. 


ARTICLES OF FOOD. 

No Article of Food was condemned during the year. 


INQUESTS. 

Inquests were held in twelve cases:—Male, 44 years, lockjaw, 
.following a broken leg ; female, 59 years, strangulation, suicide; male 










133 


5 years, accidental fracture of skull; male, 39 years, accidental injury 
to spinal cord ; male, 37 years, suicide by gunshot; male, newly-born, 
accidentally strangulated; male, 45 years, accidentally thrown from 
cart; male, 18 months, accidentally scalded; male, 64 years, suicide by 
drowning; male, 28 years, accidentally run over by a waggon; male, 
10 years, accidentally drowned while bathing; male, 44 years, rupture 
of bladder. 

There were three deaths returned as ‘ 6 not certified ” during the 
year:—Male, 30 minutes, premature birth; female, 73 years, heart 
disease ; female, 15 months, passive congestion of the liver. 



134 


MIDHURST RURAL DISTRICT. 


Table 1, —Showing the Deaths at various groups of ages in the 

fifteen years 1881-95. 


Year. 

At all ages. 

Under 1 Year. 

1 to 5. 

5 to 15. 

15 to 25. 

25 to 65. 

65 and upwards. 

1881-85 

1,096 

184 

Ill 

64 

65 

306 

366 

1886-90 

1,001 

150 

88 

43 

45 

285 

390 

1891 

267 

45 

26 

16 

10 

69 

101 

1892 

247 

38 

24 

13 

17 

78 

77 

1893 

183 

28 

16 

10 

12 

46 

71 

1894 

197 

36 

15 

10 

16 

46 

74 

1895 

198 

32 

12 

5 

5 

59 

85 

Total 

3,189 

513 

292 

161 

170 

889 

1,164 


Table 2.—Showing the Deaths in the twenty years, 1876-95, from 

various causes. 


Year. 

| Small Pox. 

i 

| Scarlatina. 

i 

Diphtheria. 

Membranous Croup. 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 

Measles. 

Whooping Cough. 

Diarrhoea. 

Rheumatic Fever. 

Influenza. 

Total. 

| Typhus. 

Enteric. 

Continued. 

1 

1 Relapsing. 

j Puerperal. / 

1876-80 

4 

3 

14 


1 

10 

2 


1 


3 

7 

17 

12 

5 


79 

1881-85 

6 

22 

27 

— 

— 

10 

— 


1 


10 

7 

13 

10 

4 

— 

110 

1886-90 


2 

12 

— 

— 

12 

— 

— 

2 


1 

11 

23 

5 

4 

5 

77 

1891. 



4 

1 

— 

— 

— 


— 


— 

1 

7 


2 

12 

27 

1892. 

— 


12 


— 

— 

— 




1 


7 

1 

1 

25 

47 

1893. 



5 



1 

— 



— 

3 

5 

2 



9 

25 

1894. 


1 

6 

1 


6 






5 

2 



5 

26 

1895. 



1 



2 

' 


' 


— 

1 

1 

2 


9 

16 

Total... 

10 

28 

81 

2 

1 

41 

2 


4 


18 

37 

72 

30 

16 

65 

407 












































































































135 


MIDHURST RURAL DISTRICT. 

Table 3.—Showing the Deaths and Death-rate from all causes and from 
various causes in the twenty years, 1876-95. 


•esuesiQ 

182 

147 

150 

141 

•esBesiQ; £umj 

170 

211 

207 

225 

•sisiq^j 

^ co co io 

t- (M O 

rH r— 1 iH >-H 

*esc8si(j 

OlJOUnCz' 

lO CO CO 

rH IO Cft rH 

rH rH rH 

'S9SB0SI(J jjy 

1,552 

1,540 

1,356 

1,529 

’esc8si(j q.JU8jj 

CO ICi) rH i—t 

cq CO rH O 

I— 1 rH rH i—( 

•8SB8Si(j Sunq; 

117 

150 

153 

161 


Cl CM TO TO 

rH O 05 i>“ 

rH rH 

•8SU8SI(J 

DIJCXhAV^ 

05 O rH 

r— i—i t>» co 

rH 

•S8SU8SI(J \\Y 

1,063 

1,096 

1,001 

1,092 

•P0IJ9J JO 
9[ppiUI 

ui uoi^ndoj 

13,690 

14,130 

14,210 

14,280 




© cl 

t O 

A ^ 

* 

<X> w 

ft ft 

rH ft V 

1:3 s 

a ® 

a 

<j o 
^ o 
d h 

© ^ 


72 
M 

c3 
CD 

© s 

^3 O 
£h 

t+H 

W) 

a o y 
ft ^ 

-73 |>. 

02 

J3 r_H 

o3 
© 

ft 


ft 

o 

I—I 

ft 

ft 

ft 


O 

lO 

o 

lO 

OO 

CO 

05 

05 

CO 


CO 

rH 

1— 

CO 

CO 

05 

CO 

00 

OO 

00 

rH 

rH 

rH 

rH 

































136 


(A)—Table of DEATHS during the Year 1895, in the MIDHURS1 


Names of Localities adopted for 
the purpose of these 
Statistics; Public Institutions 
being shown as separate 
localities. 

{a) 

Mortality from all Causes 

AT SUBJOINED AGES. 

(0 


3 : At all ages. 

3 Under 1 year. 

su 

a> 

3 

3 

r d 

a 

g3 

i—t 

id) 

u 

CD 

a 

^ 10 
T3 

1 -H 

PH 

lO 

(e) 

u 

<D 

O 

3 . 

*3 (M 

3 

C3 

K) 

pH 

(/) 

u 

CD 

Ti 

3 

3 . 

3 

lO 

(9) 

1 

p> 

3 . 

05 

r 3 

g s 

43 £ 
10 

CD 

(A) 

1 

2 

3 

Small Pox. 

Scarlatina. 

Diphtheria. 

Midhurst Parish . 

24 

3 

2 



10 

9 

Under 5 






5 upwards. 




Easebourne Parish . 

14 

4 




4 

6 

Under 5 







5 upwards. 




Rest of Midhurst Sub-District 

40 

7 

2 

3 

2 

10 

16 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 




Eernhurst Sub-District 

35 

6 

2 


1 

13 

13 

Under 5 





5 upwards. 




Harting Sub-District. 

72 

12 

6 

2 

2 

17 

33 

Under 5 



11 

5 upwards. 




Easebourne Workhouse 

13 

— 

— 



5 

8 

Under 5 






5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 




• 








Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 




Totals . 

198 

32 

12 

5 

5 

59 

85 

Under 5 



11 

5 upwards. 






The subjoined numbers have also to be taken int 

Deaths occurring outside the 
District among persons 
belonging thereto. 








Under 5 




5 upwards. 





Deaths occurring within the 
District among persons 
not belonging thereto...! 








Under 5 




5 upwards. 







































































































































































































137 


Rural District, classified according to Diseases, Ages, and Localities. 


Mortality from subjoined causes, distinguishing Deaths of Children 

under Five Years of Age. 


4 

5 | 6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

Croup. 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 

Measles. 

Whooping 

Cough. 

Diarrhoea and 

Dysentery. 

Rheumatic 

Fever. 

Phthisis. 

Bronchitis, 

Pneumonia, 

and Pleurisy. 

Heart 

Disease. 

Influenza. 

m 

• r“H 

j-i 

3 

5 

a 

b-t 

All Other 

Diseases. 

Total. 

Typhus. 

Enteric or 
Typhoid. 

Continued. 

Relapsing. 

Puerperal. 














3 




2 

5 



1 










1 

4 

4 


1 

8 

19 


















4 

4 











1 


2 


2 


1 

4 

10 











1 



3 




5 

9 



1 










4 

1 

2 

2 

2 

19 

31 









1 





3 



1 

3 

8 













1 

7 

2 

3 

1 

13 

27 










1 




3 


1 

1 

11 

18 













2 

5 

7 

3 

3 

34 

54 
































1 

5 



1 

6 

13 



























































<* 












































































































































1 

1 

1 



12 


1 

o 

25 

44 



2 




j 



1 


11 

22 

17 

8 

9 

84 

154 


icount in judging of the above records of mortality. 











































































































































































































































































































































138 


(B)—TABLE OF POPULATION, BIRTHS, AND OF NEW CAS 
Officer of Health, during the year 1895, in the MIDHUE 


Names of Localities adopted 
for the purpose of these 
Statistics; Public Institutions 
being shown as separate 
localities. 

(a) 

Population 
at all Ages. 

a. Registered Births. 

Aged 
under 5 
or 

over 5. 

(e) 

New Cases of Sici: 

COMING TO THE KNOWLEDO 

Census 

1891. 

(b) 

Esti¬ 
mated 
to mid¬ 
dle of 
1895. 

(c) 

1 

2 

3 

A 

4 

5 

6 

Small Pox. 

Scarlatina. 

Diphtheria. 

Membranous 

Croup. 

Fever 

Typhus. 

Enteric or 

Midhurst Parish 

1,674 

1,700 

42 

Under 5 







5 upwards. 


1 





Easebourne Parish 

1,296 

1,400 

31 

Under 5 







5 upwards. 







Rest of Midhurst Sub-district 

3,769 

3,760 

89 

Under 5 


2 





5 upwards. 


10 

3 




Fernhurst Sub-district 

2,514 

2,520 

65 

Under 5 







5 upwards. 


1 





Harting Sub-district ... 

4,887 

4,880 

116 

Under 5 



2 




5 upwards. 


1 

5 




Easebourne Workhouse 

96 

90 

2 

Under 5 







5 upwards. 







• 




Under 5 






• • 

5 upwards. 





* 





Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 







Totals . 

14,236 

14,350 

345 

Under 5 


2 

2 




5 upwards. 


13 

8 






















































































































































































139 


INFECTIOUS SICKNESS, coming to the knowledge of the Medical 
•al District; classified according to Diseases, Ages, and Localities. 


ss in each Locality, 
the Medical Officer 

3ALTH. 

Number of such Cases Removed from their 

Homes in the several Localities for Treatment 
in Isolation Hospital. 

i 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

0 

10 

11 

12 

13 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 

* 


Small Pox. 

Scarlatina. 

Diphtheria. 

Membranous 

Croup. 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 




Relapsing. 

Puerperal. 

Typhus. 

Enteric or 

Typhoid. 

Continued. 

Relapsing. 

Puerperal. 





















— 




1 



























































































































































* 




7 




































— 























































































































— 






































• 

— 



















































































8 






1 





















































































































































































































































































WESTBOURNE RURAL DISTRICT, 


pp. 141 et seq. 
















141 


WESTBOURNE RURAL DISTRICT. 


The population in this registration district was 6,669 at the 
census of 1841, and 6,944 in 1851 ; it then rose steadily up to 1881,- 
since which period it has declined ; this decrease is not to be accounted 
for by any change in area. 


The following figures relate to the present rural sanitary area 
which is co-extensive with the registration district. 



1861. 

1871. 

188J. 

1891. 

Area in Statute Acres 

— 

32,886 

32,040 

32,040 

Number of Inhabited Houses. . 

1,427 

1,495 

1,533 

1,516 

,, Uninhabited „ . . 

43 

56 

66 

112 

Population 

6,957 

7,221 

7,420 

7,084 

Males 

3,502 

3,611 

3,742 

3,678 

Females 

3,455 

3,610 

3,552 

3,532 


The number of males, as is usual in rural districts, exceeds the 
females, and there was a decline in the population in the decade 
1888-91 ; up to that time there had been a steady increase in the 
previous thirty years. 


The number of uninhabited houses shows a marked decrease, while 
at the same time there is an increase since 1861 in the number of those 
which are occupied. 

The people are chiefly engaged in agriculture, but many are en¬ 
gaged in fishing at Bosham and Hermitage ; most of the cottages are in 
good order, and surrounded by a good garden. 

The following tables show some interesting facts about the popula¬ 
tion of each parish and the deaths from all causes and from various 
causes for a long term of years :— 




Houses, 1891. Population. 


M2 


© 

© 


03 05 

B <*> 

<D '— 1 

P 


© ' 

<D i— 1 

r-H 05 

<5 co 


© 

G 

X 

r-H 

© 

P 


02 

G p 

02 ^ 
G CO 

(X) r-H 

P 


CO 

G 

O 

co 

G 

© 

Pm 


CO 


< 


02 

G 

o 

co 

G 

© 

P 


CO 

CO 


bJD 

G 


G 

CP 


T3 

02 
I -4-3 

-G 

G 


ho 

02 

-4-3 

• r-H 

O 


co co 

03 CO 
<M 


■H 


VO 

CM 

CM 

vO 

03 



co 

GO 

CO 

VO 

M 

CO 

r —H 

CO 

CM 

CM 

T— 1 


VO 

CO 

r-H 


CM 


VO 

r—i 

eo 


co 

CO 


vo 

CM 


03 

co 


03 

CO 

00 

VO 

03 

■H 

CO 

co 

1—4 

co 


03 

r-H 

CM 

GO 

CO 

co 

r-H 


'cH 

co 

7~H 


r—4 


r-H 

r-H 

r-H 

03 

o 

rH 

CO 

o 

o 

co 

r-H 

o 

03 

cs 

r-H 

L- 

co 

r— 4 

O 

CO 

o 

CM 

VO 


VO 

o 

CO 

CO 



CO 

CO 

(M 

r-H 


CM 

(M 

r-H 


1—H 







T—H 

Cx 

r-H 



cm" 


<M 

CO 

L- 


03 


03 

co 


CO 

co 

03 

r— 

co 

VO 

CO 

r-H 

o 

CO 

CM 

co 

03 

o 

VO 

CO 

CO 

VO 

co 

co 

CM 


1—1 

CM 

Cx 

CM 

r-H 

rH 

cx 

(M 


co 

r-H 

t— 

vo 

CO 

CO 

1— 

VO 


rH 

r-H 

VO 

co 

CO 

CM 

CO 

o 

CO 

03 

CO 

oo 

r-H 

CO 

CO 

CO 



co 

co 

CM 


O' 

r-H 

CO 

r —h 

co 








r-H 

r—H 



CM~ 


r—1 CO 
GO CO 
CO 


CO 

CM 


co 

co 

co 

vo 

03 

CO 

o 

CO 

CO 

CO 

03 

03 

vo 

r-H 

OO 

CO 

CM 


O" 

r— 1 

r-H 

co 


CO 

03 


VO 

CO 

r-H 

cm' 


(M CM 


CO 


CM 




CM 

CM 


CM 


co 


o 

CM 


CO 


VO) 

CO 


o 

CM 


CO 


(M 

CM 


I— 

co 

(M 


t- 

CM 


CO 

VO 


CO 


o 

vo 


E-t 

Q 

M 

« 

H 

02 

l-H 

P 

w 

£ 

G 

G> 

O 

PQ 

H 

02 

W 


G 

«5 

0) 

p 

-4-3 

© 

© 

£ 


G 

© 


e6 

«sH 

<4 

-4-3 

© 

a 

P 


G 

© 

r x3 

G 

<G 




G 

© 


cs 


P 


G 

o 

-4-3 

"So 

G 

O 

-13 

02 


G 

o 

-1-3 

G-4 

s 

o 

O 


o 

-4-3 

§ 

Ph 


G 

o 

-1-3 

bo 

G 

• r-H 

-4-3 

G 

G 

Ctj 


G 

c3 

i—G 

© 

O 

P 


o3 

<-! 


GG 

O 


© 

G 

G 

O 

rG 

H 

-+3 

© 

© 


© 

G 


O 

GG 

-4- > 

m 

CD 


•S £ 
























































143 



•as^asid 

Surrj 

to 

i 

rH 

iO 

rH 

rH 


rH 

CO 

rH 

rH 

ft 

rH 

59 

OS 

r-H 

rH 

lO 

03 

•sisii[;qx 

r-H 

i 

i 

rH 

co 

1 

i 


ft 

co 

i—i 

CO 

rH 

39 

z* N 

OS 

OO 

H 

•■BiJaipqdiQ 

i 

i 

i 

r-H 

hH 

CO 

i 

— 

co 

rH 

i 

o 

rH 

26 


*8S'B9SI(J 

oi^om^z 

CM 

i 

i 

CO 

CO 

ft 

rH 

CO 

00 

r-H 

CM 

(M 

23 

68 

i 

•QS'RaSIQ^ 

^utrj 

K 

i 

r-H 

co 

t- 

CO 

i 

ft 

r-H 

26 

CO 

rH 

34 

CO 

o 

d 

ct> y 

■ s ! s TTOd 

CO 

i 

1 

CM 

■H 

rH 

rH 

G3 

rH 

rH 

CM 

1 

a* 

rH 

52 

co N 
cc 

OO 

•r?iJ8q;qdi(j 

i i i i i i i i i i r 



•as'BasiQ 

oi^oui^z 


i 

l 

rH 

rH 

rH 

1 

a> 

rH 

rH 

% 

rH 

tH 

rH 

39 


•as'easif]; 

^arrj 

H 

rH 

l 

hH 

o 

rH 

CO 

rH 

20 

K0 

rH 

rH 

l 

co 

CO 

00 

03 

id 

00 
' y 


CO 

1 

l 

cm 

ft 

CM 

l 

lO 

ft 

ft 

l 

rH 

CM 

CO 

ft 

co > 
oo 

rH 

"Bijaq^qdiQ 

1 

l 

1 

rH 

CM 

rH 

l 

o 

rH 

rH 

! 

l 

co 

CO 

rH 


•0SB8St(J 

opoui^z 

CO 

l 

l 

cm 

CO 

rH 

(M 

CM 

rH 

CM 

rH 

CO 

1 

rH 

rH 

52 

•sji28^ Haa^jix 
ui pnox 

CO 

CO 

r—1 

t— 

rH 

r-H 

rH 

59 

o 

co 

1—1 

99 

CO 

rH 

| 240 

rH 

rH 

CO 

ft 

m 

rH 

602 

1655 

ALL 

CO 

P3 

< 

W 

|SH 

S6-I68I 

r-H 

rJH 

in 

■H 

rH 

<M 

44 

20 

co 

75 

109 

rH 

CM 

o 

rH 

226 

582 

O 

P$ 

pH 

a 

w 

S3 

£ < 
1—1 

06-9881 

GO 



22 

36 

co 

CM 

co 

rH 

co 

88 

ft 

r-H 

ft 

194 

CM 

(M 

in 

53 D 

ft 3 

O 

S8-IS8I 

44 

00 

CO 

CO 

rH 

50 

CM 

CM 

t- 

oo 

rH 

rH 

20 

rH 

182 

rH 

in 

in 


a 

m 

M 

P3 

< 

ft 


p 

o> 


c3 

03 

ft 

+3 

CO 

a> 


a> 

ps 

in 

C3 

ps 

c8 

£ 

P 

<D 

PS 

£ 

p 

o 

4-3 

ft 

ton . . 

• 

• 

a 

c 

-P 

bO 

P 

a 

-H 

m 

a 

ft 

-t-> 

O 

a 

a. 

tcO 

p 

o 

1 

ft 

a 

o 

o 

4-3 

o 

Co 

• rH 

-P 

S3 

P 

c3 

ft 

CG 

o 

ft 

£ 

ft 

02 

O 

ft 

ft 

ft 


cS 

H 

"3 


ft 

<D 

p 

u 

o 

ft 

EH 

■+3 

CO 

o> 


o 

£ 

P 

o 

ft 

- 1-3 

CO 

a> 


& & 


<P 

+3 

o 

EH 














































































144 


BIRTHS AND BIRTH-RATE. 


During the year 1895, the births of 165 children were registered; 
of these 94 were male, and 71 were female. 


Estimating the population in the middle of the year at 7,000, 
the birth-rate was equal to 23’6 per 1,000 persons living. 


The births and birth-rate during the past ten years have been 
as follows :— 


Year. 

Births. 

Birth-rate. 

Year. 

Births. 

Birth-rate. 

1886 

. . 208 

. . 28-6 

1891 

.. 194 

.. 27-4 

1887 

. . 225 

.. 311 

1892 

.. 203 

. . 28-8 

1888 

. . 204 

. . 28-4 

1893 

. . 183 

.. 26-0 

1889 

. . 203 

.. 28-4 

1894 

.. 199 

.. 28-3 

1890 

. . 207 

. . 29-1 

1895 

., 165 

. . 23-6 


The mean number of births is 199, and the mean birth-rate is 28-0 
per 1,000 of population. 


In England and Wales the birth-rate during the year was 30’3 
per 1,000 persons living, a rate 0’9 per 1,000 below the mean rate in 
the ten years, 1885-94. 


The following table shows the births and birth-rate in each locality 
during the past four years :— 


Funtington Parish . . 
Bosham Parish 
Westbourne Parish . . 
Rest of Westbourne 
District 

Total 


1892. 

Births. 
1893. 1894. 

1895. 

1892. 

Birth-rate. 
1893. 1894. 

1895. 

24 

23 

22 

24 

28-8 

23-0 

22-0 

24-0 

51 

29 

43 

41 

40-5 

23-0 

33-8 

32*3 

62 

70 

66 

54 

25-7 

29'2 

27-5 

21*4 

66 

61 

68 

46 

27-8 

25-7 

28-8 

19-6 

203 

183 

199 

165 

28-8 

26-0 

28-3 

23-6 


GENERAL MORTALITY. 


There were 110 deaths registered in this district during the year 
1895, and of these, ten took place in Westbourne Workhouse. 
These deaths have been distributed amongst the several parishes 
whence each inmate came, viz., West Dean 2, Funtington 2, Bosham 1, 
Westbourne 5, in all 10. 


Estimating the population in the middle of the year at 7,000, the 
death-rate was equal to 15’7 per 1,000 persons living. 

















145 


In country districts throughout England and Wales the rate of 
mortality in 1895 was equal to 17*0 per 1,000 of population. 


The variations in the death-rate during the past ten years have 
been as follows : — 


Year. 

Deaths. 

Death-rate. 

Year. 

Deaths. 

Death-rate. 

1886 

.. 132 

. . 18-2 

1891 

.. 124 

. . 17-5 

1887 

. . 108 

. . 14-9 

1892 

. . 116 

.. 16*4 

1888 

96 

. . 13-4 

1893 

.. 126 

.. 17*9 

1889 

89 

. . 12-4 

1894 

. . 106 

. . 15-1 

1890 

97 

. . 13-6 

1895 

. . 110 

.. 15*7 


The mean number of deaths is 109, and the mean death-rate is 15.5 
per 1,000 of population. 


There have been during the decade 1,991 births, so that the natural 
increase of population by excess of births over deaths was 897. The 
census returns, however, show a decrease of 336, so that large numbers 
must have left the district in the past decade. 


The following table 

shows the 

deaths 

and 

death-rate in 

each 

locality during the past four years :— 

Deaths. 

1892. 1893. 1894. 

1895. 

1892. 

Death-rate. 
1893. 1894. 

1895. 

Funtington Parish . . 

12 

21 

13 

17 .. 

14*4 

21 0 

13-0 

17-0 

Bosham Parish 

23 

21 

21 

22 . . 

18-2 

16*7 

16-5 

17*3 

Westbourne Parish. . 

49 

44 

36 

46 .. 

20*4 

18-3 

150 

19*3 

Rest of Westbourne 
district . . 

32 

40 

36 

25 . . 

13-6 

16-9 

15-2 

10*6 

Total 

116 

126 

106 110 

16-4 

17-9 

15*1 

15*7 


In each parish the deaths were thus distributed :— 


West Dean .. 

.. 5 .. 

Racton 

1 

East Marden 

none .. 

Funtington . . 

17 

North Marden 

.. none .. 

Bosham 

22 

Up Marden . . 

6 

Chidham 

4 

Stoughton 

7 

West Thorney 

1 

Compton 

1 .. 

Total 

Westbourne 

110. 

46 


INFANT MORTALITY. 


The infant mortality is here given as measured by the number of 
deaths under one year of age to the total number of births in the 
year:— 




















146 


Deaths under Ratio to 



Births. 

one year. 

1000 Births. 

Funtington Parish . . 

24 

4 

166 

Bosham Parish 

41 

3 

73 

Westbourne Parish . . 

54 

14 

259 

Rest of Westbourne District 

46 

4 

87 

Total 

165 

25 

151 


The mean annual death-rate in the previous seven years 1888-94, 
was 88 per 1,000 registered births. 


In England and Wales the proportion of deaths under one year 
of age to registered births was 161 per 1,000, the mean proportion in 
the preceding ten years having been 146. 


ZYMOTIC MORTALITY. 

The deaths from zymotic diseases were 5 in the case of those 
which are notifiable, and 8 in the other class where the number of cases 
cannot be obtained. 


Adding the two classes together, there 

is a total of 13 

deaths with 

zymotic mortality of 1 ’85 per 1,000. 





Cases. 


Deaths. 

Small Pox . . 

none 


none 

Scarlatina 

none 


none 

Diphtheria . . 

17 


3 

Membranous Croup 

none 


none 

( Typhus 

none 


none 

g ! Enteric 

22 


none 

> < Continued 

1 


none 

p2j Relapsing 

none 


none 

( Puerperal 

2 


1 

Cholera 

none 


none 

Erysipelas 

8 


1 

Total 

50 


5 

In the other class the deaths were as follows 





Deaths. 


Measles 

• • 

none 


Whooping Cough . . 

• • 

1 


Diarrhoea and Dysentery . . 

• • 

7 


Rheumatic Fever . . 

• • 

none 



Total . . 8 


I he prevalence in each quarter of each infectious disease is here 
shown in the following table :— 


















147 


Scarlatina 

1st Qr. 

2nd Qr. 

3rd Qr. 

4th Qr. 

Total. 

Diphtheria 

8 

3 

4 

2 

17 

Enteric Fever 

— 

1 

7 

14 

22 

Continued Fever 

— 

1 

— 

— 

1 

Puerperal Fever 

— 

1 

1 

— 

2 

Erysipelas 

2 

4 

1 

1 

8 

Total 

10 

10 

13 

17 

50 


The Infectious Disease (Notification) Act, 1889, came into opera¬ 
tion in this district on December 31st, 1891. There were 30 cases 
notified in 1892, 85 in 1893, 60 in 1894, and 50 in 1895. 


WATER, SUPPLY. 

The water supply is derived from deep and shallow wells, from 
springs and streams, and in a few places from tanks. In the villages 
on the chalk downs, the wells are often very deep, but the water so 
obtained is of good quality. Near the sea the water is often so brackish 
as to be unfit for drinking purposes. 


In such cases one may have to bore for a hundred feet or more 
before good water can be obtained. 

The flow of the sub-soil water in this district is from the north¬ 
west to the south-east, so that in sinking a well this fact must be borne 
in mind. 


There is no public water supply for any place in this district. At 
Hermitage and Bosham a better supply is required, but the cost of any 
scheme, however simple, has hitherto proved an obstacle. 


DRAINAGE. 

The drainage at Westbourne, Bosham, and Hermitage, remains in 
precisely the same condition as before. In recent years, a great many 
closets have been altered or constructed with a view to make them less 
offensive. The water system is out of the question, as without a 
system of water carriage, the quantity to be dealt with would be 
enormously increased and rendered most difficult to be dealt with. 


If received in cemented cesspools, these would required to be 
constantly emptied ; if in cesspools with porous sides, the water supply 
would almost surely be polluted. The earth system or the pail system 
finds no favour amongst the people of the district. 





148 


The authority*have settled on a system, which consists of a small 
ventilated cesspit, which by its size rendered it necessary to be cleaned 
out often, while dry earth or ashes could be thrown in by those who 
would take the trouble. 


This, although by no means a perfect plan, is a great improvement 
on the old method. 


A printed circular was issued stating the following points, which 
should be attended to in the construction of closets. 

1. —The cesspit should be small, not exceeding the following 
dimensions :—depth, 12 inches ; length and width, 3 feet. Frequent 
cleansing out is thus rendered necessary. It is best that the cesspit 
should not be excavated, but be entirely above ground. 

2. —-Thorough ventilation of closet and separate ventilation of cesspit. 

3. —Provision for frequent throwing of earth or ashes into the 
cesspit to deodorise deposit. 

4. —Prevention of soakage from cesspit, and of access of rain 
water to it. 


SCAVENGING AND CLEANSING. 

The houses in this district are so scattered, that it is not difficult 
to deal with all the house refuse by utilising it in the garden which 
surrounds the dwelling. 


All uncooked vegetable matter might accumulate in a heap to form 
in due time vegetable mould 


The cinders could be sifted, so that the fine ash could be thrown on 
the ground to lighten the soil, while the larger pieces could be reburnt. 


Any cooked matter might be thrown into the fire and burnt. The 
rest of the material which forms house refuse, could be dug in the 
ground or removed to some convenient spot. 


At places like Bosham which are more populous, and the gardens 
or back yards are very small, I have often recommended that the refuse 
should be removed under sect. 42 of the Public Health Act, 1875, but 
without avail. Each occupier in such a case removes the material at 
intervals, but it is not done frequently enough as a rule. 





149 


LEGAL PROCEEDINGS. 

One small cottage at Walderton, in the parish of Stoughton, was 
closed under Sect. 32 of the Housing of the Working Classes Act, 1890, 
and it has since been used as a store. 


LODGING HOUSES. 

There is one Common Lodging House at Hermitage in which a few 
lodgers are taken,; this is very well kept. 


COWSHEDS AND DAIRIES. 

There is now twenty registered Cowsheds and dairies but many of 
them are on a very small scale; they are well kept. 


MARGARINE. 

Margarine is not in much demand, but in such cases the regulations 
of the Act are complied with ; the sale seems to decrease. 


BAKEHOUSES. 

The Bakehouses are sixteen in number ; they are often inspected, 
and they are kept in a clean condition ; one new one has been erected, 
and one old one has been closed; one which had been disused is now 
used again. 


SLAUGHTER HOUSES. 

There are five Slaughter Houses which are very well attended to 
three of these are small and used occasionally. 


ARTICLES OF FOOD. 

There was no case in which it was necessary to condemn meat or 
^any other Article of Food. 


150 


SUNSHINE. 


The following figures have been kindly sent te me by the Rev. L. 
B. Birkett, M.A., from the observations taken by him at Westbourne 
Rectory. 


1893. 1894. 1895. 



r 

' N 

Sunless 


Sunless 


Sunless 


Hours. 

days. 

Hours. 

days. 

Hours. 

days. 

Jan. . . 

39*3 

.. 15 

86*3 

. . 9 

937 

.. 6 

Feb. . . 

82*3 

.. 6 

96*4 

.. 10 

123*3 

.. 6 

Mar.. . 

232*1 

. . 2 

219*1 

. . 2 

159*3 

.. 6 

April 

305-7 

.. 0 

188*2 

.. 1 

163*0 

. . 2 

May . . 

257*5 

.. 0 

223*3 

.. 1 

314 2 

. . 1 

June.. 

256*0 

..2 

177*3 

.. 3 

248*7 

. . 0 

July . . 

212*1 

..2 

192*3 

.. 3 

194*2 

.. 3 

Aug. . . 

248*9 

.. 1 

162*5 

.. 1 

223*8 

.. 1 

Sept.. . 

169*7 

..3 

140*2 

.. 6 

248*8 

. . 0 

Oct. . . 

136-3 

..7 

96*4 

.. 5 

108*6 

6 

Nov. . . 

65*5 

..8 

91-1 

.. 10 

53-7 

.. 9 

Dec. .. 

64*6 

. . 8 

67-8 

.. 14 

51*4 

.. 18 

Total. . 

2,070*0 

54 

1,740*9 

65 

1,982*7 

58 


In 1890, there was 1,773*8 hours of bright sunshine, and 68 sun¬ 
less days ; in 1891, the numbers were 1,682*8 and 61; and in 1892, the 
numbers were 1859-8 and 65 respectively. 


RAINFALL. 


1893. 1894. 1895. 



Amount in No. of rainy 

Amount in 

No. of rainy 

Amount in No 

. of rainy 


inches. 

days. 

inches. 

days. 

inches. 

days. 

Jan. 

.. 1*68 

..16 

5*37 

..22 

2*99 . 

. 18 

Feb. 

. . 3*18 

..24 

2*01 

..15 

0*19 . 

. 3 

Mar. 

. . *60 

. . 7 

1*65 

. . 14 

2*13 . 

. 16 

April 

. . *07 

..2 

2*26 

. . 14 

2*25 . 

. 14 

May 

. . *95 

.. 7 

1*01 

..11 

*18 . 

. 4 

June 

.. 1*29 

. . 7 

1*75 

..13 

*70 . 

. 6 

July 

.. 4*55 

.13 

5*38 

..20 

4*78 . 

. 16 

Aug. 

.. 1-10 

. . 9 

2*14 

..17 

3*23 . 

. 18 

Sept. 

.. 2-04 

..16 

3*19 

.. 12 

•92 . 

. 6 

Oct. 

.. 7.08 

..22 

6*10 

..16 

3-43 , 

. 13 

Nov. 

.. 2*31 

..17 

5*96 

. . 20 

5*34 . 

. 24 

Dec. 

. . 2*90 

..18 

2*22 

.. 18 

3*20 . 

. 20 

Total 

. .27*75 

158 

39*04 

192 

29*34 

158 


The rainfall in 1890 amounted to 24*1 Sin., in 1891 to 35*94in.,. 
and in 1892 to 26-05in. 


































151 


INQUESTS. 

Inquests were held in two cases:—Male, 70 years, pneumonia, 
supervening on a rib accidentally fractured ; female, 65 years, syncope. 

There were thirteen deaths returned as “ not certified ” during the 
year:—Female, 52 years, heart disease ; female, 5 minutes, premature 
birth ; female, 20 minutes, premature birth ; female, 1 minute, prema¬ 
ture birth; male, 3 hours, premature birth ; female, 59 years, heart 
disease ; female, 59 years, apoplexy ; female, 8 days, debility from birth 
male, 5 months, convulsons ; male 61 years, diarrhoea ; male, 65 years,, 
hernia; male, 79 years, old age; female, 50 years, syncope. 



152 


WESTBOURNE RURAL DISTRICT. 


Table 1.—Showing the Deaths at various groups of ages in the 

fifteen years 1881-95. 


Year. 

At all ages. 

Under 1 Year. 

1 to 5. 

5 to 15. 

4 

15 to 25. 

25 to 65. 

65 and upwards. 

1881-85 

551 

91 

42 

33 

23 

152 

210 

1886-90 

522 

90 

45 

16 

25 

140 

206 

1891 

124 

17 

10 

9 

7 

30 

51 

1892 

116 

22 

9 

10 

3 

27 

45 

1893 

126 

26 

14 

11 

6 

30 

39 

1894 

106 

15 

10 

6 

3 

27 

45 

1895 

110 

25 

5 

6 

4 

27 

43 

Total 

1,655 

286 

135 

91 

71 

433 

639 


Table 2.—Showing the Deaths in the fifteen years, 1881-95, from 

various causes. 



































































































































153 


WESTBOURNE RURAL DISTRICT. 

Table 3. —Showing the Deaths and Death-rate from all causes and from, 
various causes in the fifteen years, 1881-95. 


Deaths during the years Mean Annual Death-rate 

1881-95 from per 100,000 living from 

A. A 

' > ' . — ■ — ^ 

*9SB0SI(J JJB0JJ 

t-H Oi l£t> CO O r—1 GO 
r—1 i—l i—1 i—H 

• 0 sresi(j Sumy 

H 05 T|H 05 (M O 

to 1> 05 ?o ^ 00 O 
(N cq CO cq (M CO 

* s i s iqpici 

CO to 05 CO oo to N 
cq co 05 i—I oq io o 

I-H T—1 1—1 l— 1 f-H 

*0SB0SI(J 

oo co 05 to co ono 

CO Q to Id H Tfi 00 
i—1 i—l i—l i— ! CO i—l r—l 

’S0SB0SIQ py 

co to o 50 oq oo i — i 

l>N50^C5 0t- 
CO N tO N 50 O 

#N «\ r\ «N *N 

1—1 i—l i—l rH 1 —1 i—l 1 -H 

•0SB0SI(J JJBejJ 

t— ^ CO b- 00 CO 
^ CO i—I 

•0SB0Si(j Sun^y 

(X) CO 50 CO 1> O H 

O CO 0^1 r i 0^1 

rH 

■ S T S !UT<I 

to cq N OO 05 H ^ 

^ 50 1-H 

*0SB0SI(J 

oijo vak'Z 

(MQ(Mh(MOCO 

lO CO rH r- H oq r-H rH 

•S0SB0SI(J \\Y 

h cq ^ to to to o 

1Q(M(Mh(MOh 

ICO lO rH rH rH rH i—l 

•poiaej jo 

0[PpiUI 

ui uoigcjudoj; 

O O HjH o o o o 
to 00 OO O CO CO o 

CO r-H o O O O O 
t-T j>T U U t-T i-T u 

PERIOD. 

lO o 

oo cc5 i—i cq co hJh io 

'' 05 05 05 05 05 
^ ^ OO 00 00 00 OO 

oo S ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 

rH H 













































154 


(A)—Table of DEATHS during the Year 1895, in the WESTB0URN1 


Names of Localities adopted for 
the purpose of these 
Statistics; Public Institutions 
being shown as separate 
localities. 

{a) 

Mortality from all Causes 

AT SUBJOINED AGES. 

(*) 


3 At all ages. 

u 

eS 

© 

»- 

<D 

'C 

a 

0 

(c) 

\6 

S-i 

<v 

T5 

3 

£ 

f-H 

(d) 

<x> 

"O 

a 

* 

—H 
r* 

C3 

O 

(e) 

r- 15 and under 

b 25. 

25 and under 

S 65. 

t 

& 

3 . 

W 

1 * 

43 £ 
iO 

CO 

(A) 

1 

2 

3! 

X 

o 

Pm 

s 

w 

Scarlatina. 

Diphtheria. 

Funtington Parish 

15 

4 

1 


1 

3 

6 

Under 5 



<*« • » 

5 upwards. 



Bosham Parish 

21 

3 

1 

4 

— 

5 

8 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 



1 

Westbourne Parish 

41 

14 

1 

1 

2 

11 

12 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 




Rest of District... 

23 

4 

2 

1 

1 

6 

9 

Under 5 



1 

5 upwards. 



] 

Westbourne Workhouse 

10 

— 

— 

— 

— 

2 

8 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 





—.— 







Under 5 




5 upwards. 











Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 




Totals . 

110 

25 

5 

6 

4 

27 

43 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 



d 


The subjoined numbers have also to be taken in: 

Deaths occurring outside the 
District among persons 
belonging thereto . 








Under 5 




5 upwards. 






Deaths occurring within the 
District among persons 
not belonging thereto... 








TJnder 5 




5 upwards. 

























































































































































































































155 


Eiural District, classified according to Diseases, Ages, and Localities. 


Mortality from subjoined causes, distinguishing Deaths of Children 

under Five Years of Age. 


Croup. | 

O I 6 1 

7 | 8 | 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 

Measles. 

Whooping 

Cough. 

Diarrhoea and 

Dysentery. 

Rheumatic 

Fever. 

Phthisis. 

Bronchitis, 

Pneumonia, 

and Pleurisy. 

Heart 

1 flsease. 

Influenza. 

Injuries. 

All Other 

I Hseases. 

Total. 

Typhus. 

Enteric or 
Typhoid. 

Continued. 

Relapsing. 

Puerperal. 











2 



1 




2 

5 














3 

3 

1 


3 

10 


















4 

4 

— 







1 






3 

2 



10 

17 









1 

2 



2 




10 

15 






1 







3 

3 

7 

3 

1 

8 

26 











2 







3 

6 













1 

3 

1 

4 


7 

17 






























1 



6 




3 

10 












































































































































































| ■ 

























































• 









1 

6 



3 




19 

30 

| 1 





1 


1 



1 


4 

i 18 

13 

8 

1 

31 

80 


:ount in judging of the above records of mortality. 








































































































































































































































































































































































156 


(B)—TABLE OF POPULATION, BIRTHS, AND OF NEW CASE 
Officer of Health, during the year 1895, in the WESTBOURN 


Names of Localities adopted 
for the purpose of these 
Statistics; Public Institutions 
being shown as separate 
localities. 

(ot) 

Population 
at all Ages. 

a, Registered Births. 

Aged 
under 5 
or 

over 5. 

(«> 

New Cases of Sick, 

COMING TO THE KNOWLEDG] 

01 

Census 

1891. 

(b) 

Esti¬ 
mated 
to mid¬ 
dle of 
1895. 

(c) 

1 

2 

3 I 

i 

4 

5 j 6 

Small Pox. 

Scarlatina. 

Diphtheria. 

Membranous 

Croup. 

Fev 

33 

3 

Cl, 

>> 

H 

ERS. 

u 

O 

S j 

<0 

43 C 

a i 

Funtmgton Parish . 

1,020 

1,000 

24 

Under 5 







5 upwards. 



1 




Bosham Parish ... 

1,258 

1,270 

41 

Under 5 







5 upwards. 



1 




Westboume Parish . 

2,269 

2,250 

52 

Under 5 



1 



2! 

5 upwards. 



7 



201 

Rest of Westbourne District 

2,397 

2,350 

46 

Under 5 



1 




5 upwards. 



6 




Westbourne Workhouse 

140 

130 

2 

Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 







• 




Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 






— 





Under 5 






5 upwards. 







Totals _ 

7,084 

7,O0C 

165 

Under 5 



2 



< 

4 

5 upwards. 



1 15 



2( 





















































































































































157 


INFECTIOUS SICKNESS, coming to the knowledge of the Medical 
>an District; classified according to Diseases, Ages, and Localities. 

















































































































































































































































































WORTHING URBAN DISTRICT. 


pp. 159 et seq. 





159 


-u 

WORTHING URBAN DISTRICT. 



1861. 

1871. 

1881. 

1891. 

Area in Statute Acres 

584 

584 

979 

1,425 

Number of Inhabited Houses.. 

1,051 

1,331 

1,959 

3,015 

,, Uninhabited „ . . 

51 

129 

178 

174 

„ Building „ . . 

7 

11 

82 

39 

Population 

5,805 

7,413 

10,976 

16,606 

Males 

2,497 

3,174 

4,701 

6,874 

Females 

3,308 

4,239 

6,275 

9,732 


The area of this Urban Sanitary District was extended to include 
the civil parish of Heene, and the District was incorporated as a 
Municipal Borough by a charter dated 15th August, 1890. 

The above figures, previous to 1891, only deal with the old Local 
Board District of Worthing. 

Heene forms now the West Ward of the new Borough, and it is 
more commonly known as West Worthing ; there was, however, a por¬ 
tion of Heene in the rural district of East Preston up to 1890, but now 
the whole parish is incorporated. 

The Borough of Worthing is formed out of two parishes ; it com¬ 
prises part of Broadwater and the whole of Heene ; the rest of Broad¬ 
water is in the rural district of East Preston. 

Part of 



Broadwater. 

Heene. 

Total, 

Area in Statute Acres .. 

999 

426 

1,425 

Houses Inhabited 

2,742 

273 

3,015 

,, Uninhabited 

132 

42 

174 

„ Building 

Population, 1891 :— 

31 

8 

39 

Males 

.. 6,300 

578 

6,878 

Females 

8,615 

1,113 

9,728 

Persons 

.. 14,915 

1,691 

16,606 

Persons in 1881.. 

. . 10.976 

/ 

845 

11,821 


Worthing has thus increased its numbers by addition of area as 
well as by the growth of population. 








160 


The figures of these different areas at each census period are here 
shown :— 


Year. 

Total. 

Worthing 

Urban. 

West Worthing 
Urban 

Rural Heene, 

1871 

7,840 .. 

7,413 

276 . 

. 151 

1881 

.. 1 .,821 .. 

10,976 

689 . 

. 156 

1891 

16,606 

14,915 

.. 1,541 . 

. 150 


Thus it will be seen that Worthing Urban District increased by 
3,563 between 1871 and 1881, but these figures include the addition of 
600 persons by taking in a portion of rural Broadwater. The increase 
from 1881 to 1891 with no change of area, was 3,938. Rural Heene 
remained stationary, while in West Worthing district, or Urban 
Heene, the increase was very rapid, there being nearly six times as 
many people in 1891 as there was in 1871. 


When, on September 3rd, 1890, Worthing became a municipal 
borough, the whole area was divided into five wards. 


The mean number of persons in each house in each ward at the 


last census 

is here shown :— 

Houses. 

Mean No. of Inmates 
per House. 

1 . 

East Ward 

510 

5-4 

2. 

Central Ward 

1,091 

5-7 

3. 

North-east Ward 

566 

5-6 

4. 

North-west Ward 

575 

5-0 

5. 

West Ward 

273 

6-1 


Total 

. . 3,015 

5-4 


The West Ward is the least over-crowded of all, as the houses are 
on the average much larger than in the rest of the district, and a large 
number of servants are kept; there are also some large schools which 
increase the average in each house. 


The following figures show the number of houses and the number 
of inhabitants at the census of 1891. The excess of females is well 
marked, and doubtless this is owing to the number of schools, lodging 
houses, and private residences, where several female servants are kept. 
This is, in this district, a vast excess of unmarried females, and thus- 
the birth-rate is low. 


No. Ward. 

Inhabited 

Houses. 

Male. 

Female. 

Total 

1. East . . 

510 

1,171 

1,621 

2,792 

2. Central 

1,091 

2,572 

3,697 

6,269 

3. North-east . . 

566 

1,283 

1,653 

2,936 

4. North-west . . 

575 

1,270 

1,647 

2,917 

5. West 

273 

578 

1,114 

1,692 

Total . . 

3,015 

6,874 

9,732 

16,606' 
















161 


BIRTHS AND BIRTH-RATE. 

During the year 1895, the births of 362 children were registered; 
of these 191 were male, and 171 were female. 

Estimating the population in the middle of the year at 18,500, 
the birth-rate was equal to 19'6 per 1,000 persons living, against a rate 
of 23-4 in 1891, 22-4 in 1892, 21*4 in 1893, and 19*2 in 1894. 

The rate varies very much in each Ward, and it depends upon the 
distribution of married women living at the child-bearing ages. Eor 
this reason the rate is low in the West Ward, and high in the North¬ 
east and North-west Wards. 


In each Ward the births for the past five years are here shown :— 


No. 

Ward. 

1891. 

1892. 

1893. 

1894 

1895. 

1 . 

East . 

69 

63 

69 

59 

62 

2. 

Central . 

. . 133 

128 

119 

93 

118 

3. 

North-east .... 

94 

82 

77 

69 

55 

4. 

North-west .... 

76 

96 

88 

97 

101 

5. 

West . 

20 

17 

20 

21 

26 


Total.... 

. . 392 

386 

373 

339 

362 


The general birth-rate is low, and it has been steadily declining 
for several years. 

In England and Wales the birth-rate during the year was 30’3 
per 1,000 persons living, a rate O’9 per 1,000 below the mean rate in 
the ten years, 1885-94. 

It is of interest to compare the variations in the birth-rate during 
the last ten years under the Local Board, bearing in mind that the 
addition of the West Ward has slightly helped to lower the rate. 


Year. 

Births. 

Birth-rate. 

Year. 

Births. 

Birth-rate. 

1881 

. . 324 

. . 29-2 

1886 

. . 366 

.. 27-7 

1882 

. . 355 

. . 30-7 

1887 

. . 327 

. . 24-5 

1883 

. . 313 

. . 25-7 

1888 

. . 322 

. . 23-3 

1884 

. . 352 

. . 27-8 

1889 

362 

. . 25-6 

1885 

. . 327 

. . 25*0 

1890 

. . 338 

.. 23*1 


GENERAL MORTALITY. 

There were 286 deaths registered in this district during the year 
1895, but to this number must be added the deaths of five persons 
belonging to this district in East Preston Workhouse, which is outside 
the area. From this total number of 224 there must be deducted the 
deaths of three persons in the Worthing Infirmary, who came from 
outside the district, leaving a total of 288 deaths. 




















162 


Estimating the population in the middle of the year at 18,500, the 
death-rate was equal to 15’6 per 1,000 persons living ; excluding persons 
not belonging to the district, the rate was equal to 14*3 per 1,000. 


The variations in the death-rate in the Local Board District during 
the ten years previous to 1891 were as follows :— 



Deaths. 

Death-rate. 

A 


Including 

Excluding 

r 

Including 

Excluding 

Year. 

Visitors. 

Visitors. 

Visitors. 

Visitors. 

1881. 

170 

150 

15-3 

13-5 

1882. 

160 

142 

13-8 

12-3 

1883. 

164 

151 

13-4 

12-4 

1884. 

205 

177 

16-2 

14*0 

1885. 

178 

161 

13-6 

12-3 

1886. 

228 

210 

17-2 

15-9 

1887. 

231 

206 

17*3 

15-4 

1888.. 

220 

187 

15-9 

13-5 

1889. 

179 

145 

12*6 

10-2 

1890. 

218 

181 

14-9 

12-3 


The following tables show the deaths in each Ward occurring in a 
population estimated in the middle of the year at 18,500; it includes 
the deaths of all persons not belonging to the district, and also the five 
workhouse deaths. The corresponding figures for the four previous 
years are also given. 


DEATHS. 


No. 

1 . 

Ward. 

East 

1891. 

52 

1892. 

28 

Deaths. 

1893. 

76 

1894. 

53 

1895. 

44 

2. 

Central 

136 

103 

139 

82 

100 

3. 

North-east 

72 

42 

76 

27 

41 

4. 

North-west 

56 

49 

94 

44 

71 

5. 

West 

25 

26 

41 

16 

32 


Total 

341 

248 

426 

222 

288 


The mortality in each quarter of the past four years is here 
shown: — 



Total. 

Total. 

Total. 

Total. 




1892. 

1893. 

1894. 

1895. 

Male. 

Fem 

First Quarter 

86 

73 

55 

97 

43 

54 

Second Quarter . . 

50 

112 

53 

60 

23 

37 

Third Quarter 

54 

181 

47 

62 

31 

31 

Fourth Quarter . . 

58 

60 

67 

69 

35 

34 

Total 

248 

426 

222 

288 

132 

156 




























163 


The deaths in each quarter at various groups of years are here 
shown :— 


Under 65 and 



1 year. 

1 to 5. 

5 to 15. 

15 to 25. 

25 to 65. 

, over. 

Total. 

First Quarter 

14 

3 

3 

4 

33 

40 

97 

Second Quarter .. . 

6 

5 

3 

2 

17 

27 

60 

Third Quarter 

19 

7 

2 

2 

14 

18 

62 

Fourth Quarter .. 

10 

13 

11 

1 

17 

17 

69 

Total . . 

49 

28 

19 

« 

9 

81 

102 

288 


INFANT MORTALITY. 

The infant mortality is here given as measured by the number of 
deaths under one year of age to the total number of births in the 
year :— 


No. 

Ward. 

Births. 

Deaths under Ratio to 
one year. 1,000 Births 

1892. 

Ratio in 
1893. 

1894. 

1 . 

East 

62 

6 

97 

32 

159 

102 

2. 

Central 

118 

11 

93 

109 

84 

107 

3. 

North-east 

55 

8, 

145 

49 

143 

101 

4. 

North-west 

101 

13 

128 

95 

227 

144 

5. 

West 

26 

11 

42 

> 

59 

100 

95 


Total 

362 

49 

135 

78 

145 

115 


The mean ratio for the past five years is 123 deaths to 1,000 
births. 


The rate of infant mortality in the Local Board District for the 


years, 1881-90, was 

in. 





Year. 

Ratio. 


Year. 


Ratio. 

1881 

86 

• • 

1886 

• • 

147 

1882 

95 

• • 

1887 

• • 

100 

1883 

105 

• • 

1888 

• * 

93 

1884 

122 

* 

• • 

1889 

• * 

77 

1885 

88 

• • 

1890 

• • 

136 


Giving a mean ratio for that decade of 105 deaths to 1,000 births. 


In England and Wales the proportion of deaths under one year of 
age to registered births was 161 per 1,000 during the past year, the 
mean proportion in the preceding ten years having been 146. 















164 


ZYMOTIC MORTALITY. 

The deaths from zymotic diseases were 29 in the case of those which 
are notifiable, and 18 in the other class where the number of cases cannot 
be obtained, or a total of 47 deaths in all, with a zymotic mortality of 
2-54 per 1,000. 



Cases. 


Deaths. 

Small Pox 

none 


none 

Scarlatina 

5 


none 

Diphtheria .. 

92 


26 

Membranous Croup. . 

none 


none 

[ Typhus 

none 


none 

* | Enteric 

2 


none 

® < Continued . . 

1 


none 

{§ Relapsing 

none 


none 

[ Puerperal 

none 


none 

Cholera 

none 


none 

Erysipelas . . 

10 


3 

Total 

110 


29 

In the other class the deaths were as follows:— 





Deaths. 

Measles 

• • 

1 


Whooping Cough 

• • 

none 


Diarrhoea and Dysentery . . 

• • 

17 


Rheumatic Fever 

• • 

none 


Total 

• • 

18 



There were also 20 deaths from Influenza during the year. 

The Infectious Disease (Notification) Act, 1889, came into force on 
August 3rd, 1890. There is no Isolation Hospital in the district. 

The Infectious Disease (Prevention) Act, 1890, came into operation 
on July 4th, 1891. 

The Public Healths Acts Amendment Act, 1891, came into opera¬ 
tion on July 4th, 1891. 

The prevalence in each quarter of each notifiable disease is shown 
in the following table : — 


Small Pox 

1st Qr. 

2nd Qr. 

3rd Qr. 

4th Qr. 

Total. 

Scarlatina 

— 

2 

2 

1 

5 

Diphtheria 

2 

2 

19 

69 

92 

Enteric Fever 

— 

— 

f 1 

1 

2 

Continued Fever 

— 

— 

— 

1 

1 

Puerperal Fever 

— 

— 

— 

— 

— 

Erysipelas 

5 

2 

1 

2 

10 

Total 

7 

6 

23 

74 

110 

















t 


165 


DIPHTHERIA. 

An outbreak of Diphtheria appeared in the course of the autumn, 
It began in August amongst children living in the North-west Ward, 
and the disease was probably brought here by some infected children 
who came from London. In the house in which these children stayed, 
four young inmates were attacked, and of these, three died in August. 
In the next house three more children were attacked, but they 
recovered. In September a few more cases occurred, all of which could 
be traced to pre-existing cases. In October and November the disease 
spread with more rapidity, and it appeared in other parts of the town. 


The notifications and deaths up to the end of the year were thus 
•recorded :— 


August . . 

• * 

Notifications. 

5 

Deaths. 

3 

September 

• • 

a • 

12 

• • 

1 

October 

» • 

• ♦ 

33 

• • 

10 

N ovember 

• » 

• • 

22 

• • 

6 

December 

• • 

• < 

14 

• • 

6 

Total 

• • 

• V 

86 

■ • 

26 

Of the 86 cases, 36 
deaths, 13 were amongst 
15 out of the 86 cases 
were persons who had 
viously attacked. There 

were male and 50 were female ; of the 26 
males and 13 were amongst females. Only 
were over fifteen years of age, and these 
been in close contact with children pre- 
was no death of any one above ten years of 


age. 


On October 2nd, two hospital tents were erected at the east end of 
the town, and 41 patients were admitted, of whom 10 died. Holy 
Trinity schools were closed for six weeks and no child from any infected 
house was allowed to go to any other school. On the approach of 
winter, the Town Council purchased a large private house, standing in 
seven acres of ground at a place called Swandem, distant about three 
miles from the town, and this place was used as an Isolation Hospital. 
Thither the 11 children who were in the tents were removed on 
December 7th under the charge of two trained nurses. 


Neither the closing of the schools, nor the quick removal to the 
hospital seemed to stop the progress of the disease, nor did the weather 
appear to have any influence. School attendance no doubt was one 
cause of the spread, and many caught the disorder from the children 
who had sore throats which were not recognised as of an infectious 
nature. The epidemic did not cease at the end of the year, so that a 
full account of its behaviour and persistence must be deferred until the 
outbreak is over. 




166 


A 


WATER SUPPLY. 

The new works, which were described in my last year’s Annual' 
Report, were proceeded with during the year. The sinking of the well 
has been carried out, water mains have been laid in the town, and a 
reservoir is in course of erection. Some delay has taken place, but it is 
expected that the whole work will be completed in the coming year, 
when a full report will be given. 


In the meantime excellent water is being supplied to the Borough 
from the Broadwater wells. 


SEWERAGE AND DRAINAGE. 

The main system of sewerage, designed by Mr. Mansergh was 
completed in the course of 1894, and the sewage tanks, &c., at the out¬ 
fall were completed in the summer. An account of these works was 
given in my last Annual Report. I now append Mr. Mansergh’s 
Report on the third portion of the system, dealing with the branch 
services and manholes in various parts of the town. 

“ Condition of Branch Sewers. —It is with a slight feeling of 
reluctance that I commence my report on the condition of the 
branch sewers in the Borough. A reference of this kind does 
not admit of a very definite answer, for it is not possible to say that 
sewers are quite right unless every part is bared for actual examination, 
and such a thing is out of the question. 

“ On the other hand it is comparatively easy to make a long list of 
the faults of a system of sewers which has grown piecemeal with 
a town. Hence, in a report of this nature, the statements as to 
the defects are clear and definite, while those as to the sufficiency 
and efficiency of the sewers must of necessity be qualified, not so 
much from mental reservations, as from lack of positive knowledge 
that every part is right. 

“ It may happen that the impression left on the mind upon 
a perusal of this report is worse than the facts warrant. 

“ There are ways of obtaining a good general idea of the state 
of a system of sewers without opening every part out, and these I 
propose to describe, so that the conclusions I have come to may 
be appreciated at their right value. 

“ In the first instance Mr. Aspinall, the Borough Surveyor, 
prepared a plan showing all the sewers, with the sizes and such 
of the invert levels as could be obtained at the existing manholes. 

“ An examination of this plan showed that there were many sewers 
on which inverts could not be obtained in that manner, and I therefore 
asked that in 21 places the ground should be opened out and the levels 





167 


of the sewer inverts taken. This was done, and though of course it did 
not give information as to every sewer where it was lacking, the 
probabilties were very strong that the like results would be obtained 
from the adjoining sewers which were not opened out. 

“ From the invert levels so obtained I have been able to determine^ 
which of the sewers have gradients so slack as to prevent them being 
self-cleansing—that is, of course, on the assumption that the inverts 
are laid to true inclinations between known points. This is a fair 
sample of the qualifications one must make in matters of this kind. 

“In addition to this, whenever a sewer has been opened, a record 
of its construction has been kept, and also of its condition as revealed 
at that point. 

“ These openings were made in the usual routine of drain connec¬ 
tions, etc., and they are therefore free from any suspicion of being 
selected to show either the good or the bad state of the sewers. 

“ The defects of the branch sewers may be summarized as under : 

“ (a.) Some have too little fall, that is, are too slack in their 
gradient. 

“ ( b .) Some have defective and leaky joints. 

“ (c.) Some have silt or deposit in them. 

“ ( d .) Some have the house drains connected to them in a very 
defective manner. 

“ (/?.) Many of them have insufficient means of access or control.. 

“ (f) Some of them are not laid on the best and on what one may 
call their natural route. 

“ These I think represent the main heads in the indictment of 
your branch sewerage system. I shall deal with them shortly in the 
order named. 

“ I send herewith a copy of the plan of the sewers on which I have 
laid my suggestions as far as they can be shown on a plan. 

“ ( a ). Slack Gradients. —The sewer in St. Botolph’s Hoad to 
Mill Boad is so flat that the natural velocity due to the gradient is not 
sufficient to carry the solids away with the sewage, and 1 was not 
surprised to find that when this sewer was opened there was six inches 
of deposit in it. The whole of the sevier in this road should he relaid. 

“ The sewers in the roads north of the railway are laid with 
gradients which are somewhat below the standard of self-cleansing ones, 
and as the sewers have (very properly) been laid of a size sufficient for 
some future growth, I think it is quite possible they are at present not 


168 


so clean as is desirable. I do not see how steeper gradients are to be 
reasonably obtained, but here is a typical case where systematic flushing 
of the sewers with town water would do what is necessary . This is a 
simple and easily applied remedy. 

“ In Shelley Road and Downview Road, north of Windsor Road, 
there are short sewers to which systematic flushing may with advantage 
be applied. 

“ Such, so far as I am aware, are all the sewers to which exception 
.may be taken on the score of slack gradients. 

“ ( b ) Sewers with Defective and Leaky Joints.— There are 
many of the pipe sewers in which the joints are made simply with clay. 
At some of these, no doubt, there is infiltration of subsoil water, and it 
is quite possible that when the level of the sewage in the sewers rises 
above the height of the land water, sewage may pass from the sewers 
into the subsoil. It would be better, of course, if the joints were all 
watertight, but it is a very strong measure to suggest that every sewer 
with joints which may not be watertight should be taken up and relaid. 
I can easily remember the time when clay joints in pipe sewers repre¬ 
sented the best practice of the day, and I have no doubt whatever that 
there are hundreds of miles of such sewers in the towns of this country 
which are, and have been, useful and successful. I do not think a 
sewer should be condemned merely because if laid to-day it would be 
put together in a sounder manner or bya different methodof construction. 

“ I shall, under the head (e.), recommend that a large number of 
manholes be built on the sewers, and it must necessarily follow that 
during their construction reliable information as to the sewers will be 
obtained. If a sewer is found to leak, or to have tree roots in it, or to 
allow sewage to escape into the subsoil, it ought to be relaid where it is 
defective ; but if its only fault is that the joints are of clay, I hardly 
think that a sufficient reason for relaying it. This appears to me a 
proper and reasonable alternative to the heroic policy of relaying all 
sewers with clay joints. 

“ (c.) Sewers with Deposit on them.—I was quite prepared to 
learn that many of the sewers had considerable deposit on their inverts, 
for this was a probable result of the tide-locking which formerly pre¬ 
vailed. When the outlets were closed by the rising of the tide the 
sewage was brought to a more or less quiescent state in the main sewer 
and in the branches affected by the tide-locking, with the result that 
the solids were deposited and accumulated in those sewers. 

“ A proof of this has been furnished by the experience gained in 
the new main sewer laid last year. That sewer gives, as you are aware, 
a better outlet to the branch sewers, and as it is not subject to tide¬ 
locking, owing to the pumping which has been temporarily done at the 
Park, the branch sewers have cleaned themselves of deposit to such an 
extent that nearly fifty loads of silt have been taken out of the new 
main sewer by hand labour since the branches were connected to it. 
The fact is, that bottle-tight sewers would have accumulated silt under 



169 


the old conditions, and the experience in the new main is what will 
happen to all the sewers which were tide-locked when the new pumping 
plant and sewerage works are in operation, as they will be in a few 
months’ time. 

“ My distinct advice to you under this head is to wait till the new 
pumps have been at work for six months or so and give the branch 
sewers time to clear themselves. If after that any sewers are found to 
contain deposit, it may reasonably be concluded that this is occasioned 
by defects, and these ought then to be discovered and remedied. 

“ ( d .) Defective House Junctions.— In several cases where 
house drains have been opened out for examination or reconstruction it 
has been found that the junction with the sewer has been effected by 
cutting a hole in the sewer pipe and inserting the drain pipe into the 
hole, instead of making the connection with proper junction pipes. The 
job made by cutting a pipe is bound to be a bad one, and leakage into 
and out of the sewer is almost certain to take place there. It is also 
not unusual in such cases for the drain pipe to project into the sewer, 
and so cause obstruction to the flow. I have no words but those of 
condemnation for such scamped work, and where conditions of this kind 
are known to exist they ought to be opened out and remade in a proper 
manner. It is of course probable that those which have been discovered 
are but specimens of others undiscovered, but how you are to ascertain 
whether this is so or not, and, if so, which are the faulty connections,- 
without opening down to every house junction in Worthing, is more 
than I am able to say. Such a remedy is impracticable. My advice 
under this head is that, whenever a bad connection is found in the 
ordinary course of opening to the sewers, it should be put right. For 
the future, however, I have the most definite advice possible. Your 
system of inspection of house drains must be so thorough that such 
disgraceful work is rendered impossible. 

“ ( e .) Insufficient Access and Control. —I have marked on the 
plan 241 places where manholes ought to be constructed. In doing so 
I do not wish to convey the idea that if they are not all made 
immediately the health of Worthing will suffer. At the same time the 
sewers will not be under control until these means of access are obtained. 
During the construction of the manholes a great deal of reliable informa¬ 
tion as to the existing sewers will be obtained, and, by that light, the 
sewers which need further attention will become known. 

“ (f.) Improper PtoUTES or Lines. —An extreme instance of this 
occurs in Windsor Lane, south of Church Walk. If sewage was put 
into the Windsor Lane sewer at the upper end it would flow in a 
southerly direction to Brighton Road, then in a westerly direction 
through the sewer in Brighton Pvoad, then in a more or less northerly 
direction through the sewers in High Street, Upper High Street, 
Tower Road, and the Park, and ultimately in an easterly direction 
through the main sewer to the sewage works, and after having travelled 
2,700 yards, it would pass a point only 500 yards north of the starting 
point. 


“ This circuitous route is a result of the piecemeal manner in which 






170 


the branch sewers have been laid. Although it is an obvious defect, I 
-cannot say that anyone suffers in health from it, for the gradients are 
at every part self-cleansing, and the sewage, therefore flows on without 
depositing the solids on its course. A longer time, is taken by the 
sewage to get to the works than is necessary, but as the time taken is 
not sufficiently great to set up decomposition, no serious disadvantage 
ensues. 


“ Another and different instance occurs in the Heene portion of 
the Borough. When Heene was a district separate from Worthing 
and governed by its own Local Board, the sewerage system was laid out 
so as to discharge all the sewage into the sea at the Heene sea front. 
The former Heene district may be said to have a ridge running east and 
west near the middle, and hence surface water on the south side of that 
ridge would gravitate southwards over the surface to the sea, and that 
which fell to the north would gravitate northwards to Tarring Road. 

“ If there had been an available sewage outlet in Tarring Hoad I 
have no doubt the sewerage system would have been designed in two 
parts, each falling with the natural inclination of the surface. 


“ As there was not then an available outlet the ridge had to be cut 
through at a considerable depth in order to enable the sewers on the 
south to command the sewage from the houses on the north. 


“Now, however, Heene is Incorporated with Worthing, and, by 
continuing the existing sewer in Tarring Hoad into the Heene portion 
of the Borough a more suitable outlet may be obtained. 


“ This I have shown on the plan, and for any future sewers in the 
Heene district north of the ridge the outlet should be into it. 

“ It may be useful if I now summarize the recommendations I 
have made under each head. 

“ ( a .) Slack Gradients. —Relay the sewer in St. Botolph’s Road. 
Specially flush the sewers north of the railway and in Shelley Road 
and Down view Road. 

“ (b.) Defective Joints. —Relay the sewers which are found to 
have leaky joints. 

u (c) Deposit in Sewers. —Ascertain the effect of the new 
pumping scheme ; if then there are any branch sewers with deposit in 
them after the new system has been at work for six months, they ought 
to be relaid. 

u ( d ..) Defective House Injunctions. —Remedy all that are found 
to be wrong, and by efficient inspection ensure that no more defective 
junctions are made. 







171 


u (e.) Access and Control.— Increase the number of manholes, 
.•as shown on my plan. 


“ (/.) Improper Koutes. —See that in future the branch sewers 
are laid as shown on my plan. 


“ In addition to these recommendations dealing with specific defects, 
I have two others to add. The first of these is to urge that the 
flushing of all the branch sewers should be done regularly and 
systematically. The second and more important is to strongly press 
upon you the importance of constant and adequate supervision of 
all new work in the Borough. 


“ My estimate of the cost of constructing the new sewers in Tarring 
Road, St. Botolph’s Road, and Windsor Road, and also the new 
manholes, as shown on the plan, is <£3,550 (three thousand, five 
hundred and fifty pounds).” 


SYSTEMATIC INSPECTION. 

The following is the report of Mr. C. T. Gardner, the Sanitary 
Inspector, for the year 1895. 

I beg to submit my Fifth Annual Report, showing the work 
■carried out in this department during the year ending December 
31st, 1895. 


SLAUGHTER HOUSES. 

» 

Slaughtering is carried on in five premises within the Borough ; 
they have been frequently visited and found clean. Clause 13 of the 
bye-laws is not enforced. 


BAKEHOUSES. 

These have been periodically visited and found clean. 


COMMON LODGING HOUSES. 

During the first part of the year there were three registered 
Common Lodging Houses within the Borough, one of which 
called the Travellers’ Rest has been turned into a private Boarding 
House, the other two have been frequently visited and found clean. 
The keepers have complied with the bye-laws. 









172 


DAIRIES AND MILK SHOPS. 

The regulations in force within the Borough are observed. The 
five cowsheds within the district have been kept in clean condition. 


BUTCHERS’ SHOPS. 

These were visited and found generally clean and well-kept. 


PISH SHOPS. 

These were frequently visited and found clean and free from offal. 
The market on the foreshore was also occasionally visited. 


MEAT INSPECTION. 

The various shops, slaughter houses, and railway station have been 
visited to ascertain whether any meat was exposed for sale or in course 
of preparation for sale which was unfit for human food. 


In one instance a quantity of beef, mutton, and veal was found 
exposed for sale which was unfit for human food. After being 
condemned by a Justice of Peace the order for destruction was complied 
with. The owner was prosecuted and fined. 


POOD INSPECTION. 

# 

The various grocers, greengrocers, and general stores were visited, 
and in one case some cherries were found which, in my opinion, were not 
up to the standard for human food. By request the owner destroyed 
them in my presence, and promised to be more careful in future. 


No samples of canned food were purchased for examination. 


MARGARINE ACT. 

The provisions of this Act are observed where margarine is sold. 


SALE OP POODS AND DRUGS ACT. 

No samples of food or drugs were purchased for analysis. 





173 


COMPLAINTS. 

Only twenty-six complaints were received ; these were promptly 
investigated and where necessary a notice was served and the nuisance 
abated. 


INFECTIOUS DISEASE. 

There were one hundred and ten cases of infectious disease enquired 
into; fifty-two patients were moved to the Corporation Isolation 
Hospital. Disinfectants were supplied free of charge where necessary. 
Disinfection was carried out and the premises cleaned on the certificate 
of the Medical Officer of Health. 


PUBLIC ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 

These were visited and their sanitary fittings found to be in good 
order. 


FACTORIES. 

There are no large factories within the Borough. Many of the 
small workshops now included in the Factories and Workshops Acts 
have been visited and found generally in good condition. Owing to 
more important work the workrooms have not been surprised as I would 
like, but I propose to make a thorough examination of all premises that 
may be classed as Factories or Worshops, and report to your Committee 
in detail at an early period. 


HOUSES UNFIT FOR HUMAN HABITATION. 

Three were reported as unfit for habitation, viz., 68, Montague 
Street, 11, King’s Row, and a house at back of Chapel Fields. Notices 
were served by your direction ; in two cases the owners promised not to 
let the houses for dwelling purposes, and proceedings are pending in the 
other case. A part of a house in Warwick Road was also reported 
unfit for habitation, the owner has since put it in good condition. The 
demolition of the houses in Cook's Row was completed during the year. 


HOUSE TO HOUSE SURVEY. 

This work has been proceeded with as occasion permitted during 
the year, and the summary will show the amount of work carried out 
during the year. 


174 


WATER INSPECTION. 

- Eight samples of water were taken for analysis, one from the new 

well at Broadwater was sent to Dr. Klein, F.R.S., six from the same 
source were sent to Dr. Dupre, F.R.S., and one from the surface water 
outfall opposite Warwick Road was sent to Mr. Moore, of Brighton. 
The reports on the above were sent to your Committee. 


SUMMARY. 

Notices Served.— One hundred and seventy-eight notices were 
served for the abatement of nuisances, remedying of sanitary defects, 
and separation of drinking water from water closets that were supplied 
direct. 

Five hundred and eighty-nine letters were written in conjunction 
with these matters. 

W.C.’s Supplied Direct From Water Mains.— r lhose that were 
found supplied in this manner were disconnected and supplied by 
means of siphon flushing cisterns. 

W.C.’s Foul and Defective. —Such w.c.’s were replaced by new 
pans and traps or cleansed. 

Houses Redrained. —One hundred and ninety-seven houses were 
redrained with watertight drains, and easy means of access provided 
by inspection chambers, of these it was found necessary to make several 
new connections to the public sewers ; where necessary, intercepting 
chambers were provided. 

Drains Stopped. —Twenty-seven were found to be choked, these 
were opened up and examined, the defects were remedied, and the 
drains put in good order. 

Drains Unventilated. —One hundred and thirty-five drains were 
ventilated by shafts 4in. in diameter carried to a safe distance above all 
windows. 

Waste Pipes, Baths, and Sinks Connected with Sewers.— 

1 wenty-three were disconnected and made to discharge outside houses 
into channels leading to trapped stoneware gullies. 

\ ards Unpaved and Undrained. —Sixty-five were repaved and 
redrained. 

Rain Water Pipes Connected with Drains. —Fifty-seven were 
cut oft and made to discharge into trapped stoneware gullies. 

Absence of Dust Bins. —Sixty-nine new galvanised iron dust bins 
were provided. 







175 


Unwholesome Houses. —On the certificate of the Medical Officer 
of Health one house was ordered to be cleansed and whitewashed; the 
notice was complied with. 

Overcrowding. —Two cases were abated. 

Offensive Accumulations. —Twenty-three such accumulations 
were ordered to be removed, and the notice in each case was complied 
with. 

Offensive Pools. —One offensive cesspool was dealt with, and an 
earth-closet provided. 

Animals so kept as to be a Nuisance. —One case was dealt with 
where a person was keeping a pig in the basement ef a house in Bath- 
place. 

Proceedings before the Magistrates. —In the case of unsound 
meat it was necessary to prosecute. The person proceeded against was 
fined £i and 10s. costs. 

In conclusion, I beg to draw the Committee’s attention to the 
increasing nuisance at the goods-yard of the railway station, owing to 
the large quantity of manure brought here from London and elsewhere, 
which at times is very offensive. 

Provision should be made for unloading this material at the north¬ 
east of the Borough, where there are very few houses. 


INQUESTS. 

Inquests were held in twelve cases:—Female, 69 years, syncope; 
female, 10 years, inflammation of lungs; female, newly born, accident¬ 
ally suffocated ; female, 8 weeks, convulsons; female, 15 months, 
accidental fall; male, 55 years, suicide by hanging; male, 49 years, 
suicide by hanging ; female, 56 years, heart disease ; male, 2 years, 
accidentally scalded ; female, 55 years, heart disease ; males, newly-born 
twins, shock and haemorrhage during birth. 

There was one death returned as “ not certified ” during the year:— 
Female, 75 years, heart disease. 

The climate of Worthing will be given in the General Beport. 


176 


WORTHING URBAN DISTRICT. 


Table 1.—Showing the Deaths at various groups of ages in the 

ten years 1886-95. 


Year. 

At all ages. 

Under 1 Year. 

| 

1 to 5. 

5 to 15. 

15 to 25. 

25 to 65. 

65 and upwards. 

1886 

228 

54 

43 

10 

5 

63 

53 

1887 

231 

33 

18 

13 

16 

74 

77 

1888 

220 

30 

28 

10 

6 

76 

70 

1889 

179 

28 

15 

7 

10 

63 

56 

1890 

218 

46 

18 

4 

18 

63 

69 

1891 

341 

55 

44 

16 

9 

114 

103 

1892 

248 

30 

14 

7 

24 

86 

87 

1893 

426 

54 

32 

44 

73 

141 

82 

1894 

222 

39 

22 

8 

9 

71 

73 

1895 

288 

49 

28 

19 

9 

81 

102 

Total 

2,601 

418 

262 

138 

179 

832 

772 


Table 2.—Showing the Deaths in the twenty years, 1876-95, from 

various causes. 


Year. 

Small Pox. 

i 

Scarlatina. 

i 

Diphtheria. 

Membranous Croup. 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 

Measles. 

Whooping Cough. 

Diarrhoea. 

Rheumatic Fever. 

Influenza. 

Total. 

Typhus. 

Enteric. 

Continued. 

1 / 

B elapsing. 

j Puerperal. / 

1876-80* 


19 

7 



7 

1 


3 


1 

13 

25 

28 

2 


106 

1881-85* 


7 

8 



9 

— 


1 

— 

2 

13 

8 

21 

5 


74 

1886-90* 


8 

11 


— 

6 




— 

3 

7 

46 

22 

2 


105 

1891+ 


1 




— 



1 

— 

0 

40 

5 

4 


9 

62 

1892+ 


1 

3 



3 





3 

1 


3 


15 

29 

1893+ 

— 

1 

3 



172 





2 

1 

7 

18 

1 

2 

207 

1894+ 



2 

— 


— 

— 


1 



1 

6 

— 


3 

13 

1895+ 


— 

26 



— 



— 


3 

1 

— 

17 


20 

67 

Total... 


37 

60 

— 


197 

1 


6 


16 

77 

97 

113 

10 

49 

663 


* Local Board +Municipal Borough. 

























































































































177 


WORTHING URBAN DISTRICT. 

Table 3. —Showing the Deaths and Death-rate from all causes and from 
various causes in the twenty years, 1876-95. 


•esuasi(j 

NHOOlM lO (M co o> 
kO CO d 1> 

r—1 r4 r-4 r—4 i—4 r—4 i—1 r—1 

•esuesiQ; Stnvj 

COOIXM rH CO OO O 

00 05 r-4 r—1 i>» b* 05 05 

i—) i—4 d d r—1 r—I t— 1 r1 

•sisrq^qj 

-04 CO r-4 CO N 00 O N 

00 TH CO 20 20 d r-4 O 

r—H i—1 r—1 i—l i—4 i—4 i—4 r—4 

•0SB0SI(J 

opoinXz 

05 Cl CO t— CO 4)4 20 4)4 

HdlOt- O r-4 4*4 20 

d r-4 i—l CO <d r—l r—4 CO 

•sesuestQ \\y 

20 O O 1>* CO i-4 r—l d 
05iaco4j4 10051010 

CO 4*4 20 1>- lO dCOW 

«s r« r\ »4 r> r> r* 

i—4 r-4 r-4 r-4 rH r—l r-4 r-4 

*0SB0Si(j (preojj 

t— OO i>“ r4 r—4 CO CO r4 
t— 05 CO lO NCOOCO 

i—1 r-4 r-4 r-4 

•0SB0si(j Sun^ 

CO lO 02 >o O CO CO 

05 r-4 4*4 CO CO O CO CO 

r—4 r-4 r—l r—4 r—4 r—l 


onhco n co co eo 

05 QO r4 r—4 t'— t— t— 05 

r-4 r-4 

*0SU0SI(J 

oi^o in 

l> 4)4 CO 05 05 05 GO O 

Ot^Od 05 CO 05 r-4 
r—4 i—l CO CO 

•S0SU0SIQ \\y 

i>- CO 20 O H O) CO 

d NN d CO CO d C5 

CO CO O O N N CO lO 

•4 #> «N 

rH r—H r—i 

•P°F 9 <I J° 

0[ppiLU 

ui uot^ujndo^ 

OOOO OOdO 
OGOOO ooooo 

d r—4 00 4*4 dr—' GO 4*4 

r\ r\ #\ r> r« rv r. fv 

Odcor- © d co i>- 

r—4 r-4 r4 r—t i—4 r-4 r4 r4 


r 


<D 

cS 

U 

i 

-d 

cS 

ft 


a 

o 

fH 

544 

bQ 

a 

> r-t 

> 


c3 _ 
d O 
d o 
§® 
o 
^ o 
d 

o3 ^ 
® © 
S- a* 




I 3 
5 2 

54-1 

© 

-d kO 

05 

bfico 
d t- 
•rj oo 
d 1—11 
"d 


< 


03 

44> 

c3 

<£> 

Q 


72 

(-> 

o3 

o> 


a 

O 

t—i 

Ph 

P3 

Ph 


o no o o 

CO 00 05 05 
iiii 
O H o H 
t- 00 00 O) 
00 CO 00 00 


bo 

d M 

;d *4 

o 

d -+J 


O lO o no 

00 CO 05 05 

• III 

CO r—I CO —4 

NCOCOO 
00 OO OO 00 


^ * 

d oc 

id 

T3 o 

d -e 


o m 
I—I P* 


g .23 

M K* 

a P* 


W 









































178 


(A)— Table of DEATHS during the Year 1895, in the WORTHING 


Mortality from all Causes 

AT SUBJOINED AGES. 


Names of Localities adopted for 
the purpose of these 
Statistics; Public Institutions 
being shown as separate 
localities. 

(a) 

GO 

O 

c3 

r-H 

c3 

-4-^ 

<3 

(b) 

Sh 

0) 

u 

<D 

r C 

a 

P 

(c) 

lO 

■73 

s 

t3 

a 

r"H 

(d) 

ti 

<u 

r v 

a 

1 rH 

>P> 

(e) 

r- 15 and under 

b 25. 

u 

<x> 

’-C 

a 

s . 

O 

a 

kO 

io) 

i 

p., 

CO 

e u 

58 £ 
«o 

CD 

(h) 

(*) 

1 

2 

< 

» 

Small Pox. 

Scarlatina. 

C 

• r * 

t 

c 

X 

r 

I 

East Ward . 

42 

6 

3 


— 

12 

21 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 




Central Ward 

94 

11 

1 

8 

6 

3 

32 

34 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 




North-East Ward . 

39 

8 

■ 

4 

! 1 

— 

11 

15 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 




North-West Ward 

69 

13 

10 

10 

3 

14 

19 

Under 5 



1: 

5 upwards. 



11 

West Ward 

31 

a 

2 

2 

1 

8 

7 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 




Infirmary 

11 


1 

i 

3 

4 

2 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 




• 

I 







Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 




Totals. 

286 

49 

28 

20 

10 

81 

08 

Under 5 



u 




11 


5 upwards. 

The 

subjoined numbers have also to 

be taken ini 

Deaths occurring outside the 
District among persons 
belonging thereto. 

5 





1 

4 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 




Deaths occurring within the 
District among persons 
not belonging thereto... 

26 

2 

2 

1 

4 

11 

6 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 



— 


T» fh* 


















































































































































































































179 


Urban District, classified according to Diseases, Ages, and Localities. 


Mortality from subjoined causes, distinguishing Deaths of Children 

under Five Years of Age. 

4 

5 

1 6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

o.l 

1U OU1 yjL aiiUUO 

Croup. 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 

Measles. 

Whooping 

Cough. 

Diarrhoea and 

Dysentery. 

Rheumatic 

Fever. 

Phthisis. 

Bronchitis, 

Pneumonia, 

and Pleurisy. 

Heart 

Disease. 

Influenza. 

Injuries. 

All Other 

Diseases. 

Total. 

Typhus. 

Enteric or 
Typhoid. 

Continued. 

Relapsing. 

Puerperal. 









1 


2 



3 




2 

9 













2 

3 

7 

5 


16 

33 











3 



1 



2 

10 

19 








1 





5 

8 

16 

4 

1 

40 

75 











4 





1 


7 

12 













1 

4 

6 

3 

1 

12 

27 











5 



1 




7 

23 








1 





5 

2 

6 

4 


18 

46 








1 



3 





1 

2 

6 

13 













3 

1 

2 

2 


‘ 8 

18 

















1 


1 

















1 

9 

10 












































— 




- - 























1 





































































. 



i 






































: 





i 











, 

1 

1 


17 


5 


2 

5 

32 

77 








2 





16 18 

37 

18 

3 

103 

209 

count in judging of the above records of mortality. 



| 











| 


















1 ! 

1 




4 

5 


• 









2 





1 


1 

4 



i 





• 





5 

1 

7 


I 

8 

22 




















































































































































































































































































































































































180 


(B)—TABLE OF POPULATION, BIRTHS, AND OF NEW CASI 
Officer of Health, during the year 1895, in the WORTH IIS' 


Names of Localities adopted 
for the purpose of these 
Statistics; Public Institutions 
being shown as separate 
localities. 

(a) 

Population 
at all Ages. 

a. Registered Births. 

Aged 
under 5 
or 

over 5. 

(e) 

New Cases of Sice 
coming to the knowledg: 

oj: 

Census 

1891, 

(b) 

Esti¬ 
mated 
to mid¬ 
dle of 
1895. 

(c) 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

Small Pox. 

Scarlatina. 

Diphtheria. 

Membranous 

Croup. 

Fev 

02 

3 

>> 

H 

ERS, 

u 

o 

o .3 

'E c 
£ -c 

c 

a u 
~ E- 

East Ward . 

2,767 

3,170 

62 

Under 5 



2 




5 upwards. 


o 

4 




Central Ward ... 

6,269 

6,400 

118 

Under 5 



6 




5 upwards. 


2 

14 



1 

North-East Ward 

2,936 

3,200 

55 

Under 5 







5 upwards. 



l 




North-West Ward 

2,917 

3,400 

101 

Under 5 



17 




5 upwards. 


1 

45 



1 :J 

West Ward 

1,692 

2,300 

26 

Under 5 



3 




5 upwards. 







Worthing Infirmary ... 

25 

30 


Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 







% 




Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 







Totals . 

16,606 

18,500 

362 

Under 5 



25 




5 upwards. 


5 

67 



2 . 






































































































































































181 


INFECTIOUS SICKNESS, coming to the knowledge of the Medical 
an District; classified according to Diseases, Ages, and Localities. 



Number of such Cases Removed from tiieir 

Homes in the several Localities for Treatment 
in Isolation Hospital. 

13 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 


Small Pox. 

Scarlatina. 

Diphtheria. 

M embranous 
Croup. 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 



Typhus. 

Enteric or 
Typhoid. 

Continued. 

Relapsing. 

Puerperal. 
























































































































































































































































































— 

























































3S in each Locality, 
the Medical Officer 
;alth. 


8 


10 11 12 13 


Fevers. 


60 

pH 

• pH 

m 

ft 

cS 

r-H 

a> 

ft 


sS 

s- 

CD 

ft 

(H 

<D 

0 

ft 


ei 

Sh 

<D 

^■H 

O 

-C 

Q 


02 

ft 

• pH 
02 
>> 
u 

ft 


2 


1- 


3 

1 





























































































































































































































































































LITTLEHAMPTON URBAN 

DISTRICT. 

pp. 183 et seq. 





183 



LITTLEHAMPTON URBAN DISTRICT. 



1861. 

1871. 

1881. 

1891. 

Area in Statute Acres 

925 

925 

925 

925 

Number of Inhabited Houses. . 

497 

624 

743 

851 

,, Uninhabited ,, . . 

36 

52 

46 

73 

„ Building „ 

3 

4 

17 

15 

Population 

2,350 

3,266 

3,926 

4,452 

Males 

1,112 

1,569 

1,865 

1,962 

Females 

1,238 

1,697 

2,061 

2,490 


BIRTHS AND BIRTH-RATE. 

During the year 1895, the births of 110 children were registered; 
of these 46 were male, and 64 were female. 


Estimating the population in the middle of the year at 4,700, 
the birth-rate was equal to 23*4 per 1,000 persons living. 


The variations in the birth-rate during the past ten years have 
been as follows :— 


Year. 

Births. 

Birth-rate. 

Year. 

Births. 

Birth-rate. 

1886 

89 

. . 21-4 

1891 . 

93 

.. 20-8 

1887 

. . 116 

.. 27*7 

1892 . 

. 81 

. . 18-0 

1888 

99 

. . 23*5 

1893 . 

. 105 

.. 23'l 

1889 

. . 104 

. . 24*4 

1894 , 

98 

.. 21-3 

1890 

89 

. . 20-7 

1895 . 

. 110 

.. 23*4 


The mean annual number of births is 98, and the mean annual 
birth-rate is 23*4 per 1,000 persons living. 

In England and Wales the birth-rate during the year was 30'3 
per 1,000 persons living, a rate of O'9 per 1,000 below the mean rate in 
the ten years, 1885-94. 
















184 


GENERAL MORTALITY. 

There were 74 deaths registered in this district during the year 
1895, but to this number must be added the deaths of four persons 
in the East Preston Workhouse, which is outside the district, making 
the total of 78 deaths; of these 32 were amongst males, and 46 amongst 
females. 

These 78 deaths include the deaths of nine visitors. 

Estimating the population in the middle of the year at 4,700, the 
death-rate was equal to 16‘6 per 1,000 persons living. 

In country places throughout England and Wales the rate of 
mortality in 1895 was equal to 17*0 per 1,000 of population. 

The mean annual number of deaths during the last ten years was 
62, and the mean annual death-rate is 14T per 1,000 persons living. 

The variations in the death-rate during the past ten years have 
been as follows :— 



Deaths. 

Death-rate. 



a 

A 





r 



Including 

Excluding 

Including 

Excluding 

Year. 

Visitors. 

Visitors. 

Visitors. 

Visitors. 

1886. 

50 

48 

12-0 

11-5 

1887. 

59 

51 

14T 

12*2 

1888. 

58 

55 

138 

13-1 

1889. 

65 

59 

15-3 

13-9 

1890. 

38 

37 

8*8 

8-6 

1891. 

84 

79 

18-8 

17-7 

1892. 

59 

56 

13T 

12-4 

1893. 

57 

56 

12*5 

12-3 

1894. 

72 

69 

15-6 

15-0 

1895. 

78 

69 

16-6 

14-7 


In each quarter of 

the 

past five 

years 

the 

deaths 

were thus 

gistered:— 








1891. 

1892. 

1893. 

1894. 

1895. 

Total. 

First Quarter 

22 

17 

20 

21 

19 

99 

Second Quarter . . 

25 

17 

12 

13 

23 

90 

Third Quarter 

15 

10 

16 

13 

25 

79 

Fourth Quarter . . 

22 

15 

9 

25 

11 

82 

Total 

84 

59 

57 

72 

78 

350 


INFANT MORTALITY. 


The infant mortality is here given as measured by the number of 
deaths under one year of age to the total number of births in the 
year :— 






















185 


Year. 

Births. 

Deaths under 
one year. 

Ratio to 
1,000 Births. 

1886 

89 

10 

112 

1887 

116 

8 

69 

1888 

99 

10 

101 

1£89 

104 

6 

58 

1890 

89 

4 

45 

1891 

93 

10 

107 

1892 

81 

8 

99 

1893 

105 

. . 5 

.48 

1894 

98 

8 

81 

1895 

110 

13 

118 

Mean 

98 

8-2 

84 


The thirteen infantile deaths included one from diarrhoea, one 
from tuberculosis, four from convulsions, one from enteritis, two from 
marasmus, and one from exposure ; two infants were born prematurely, 
and one died from exposure. 


In England and Wales the proportion of deaths under one year of 
age to registered births was 161 per 1,000 during the past year, the 
mean proportion in the preceding ten years having been 146. 


ZYMOTIC MORTALITY. 

There were four deaths from zymotic disease in the case of those 
which are notifiable, and three in the other class where the number of 
cases cannot be obtained. The zymotic mortality was at the rate of L5 
per 1,000. 





Cases. 

Deaths, 


Small Pox 


none 

none 


Scarlatina 


13 ' 

none 


Diphtheria . . 


7 

3 


Membranous Croup. . 


none 

none 


Typhus 


none 

none 


Enteric 


none 

none 

> s 

Continued . . 


none 

none 

<x> 

Relapsing 


none 

none 


Puerperal 


none 

none 


Cholera 


none 

none 


Erysipelas . . 


19 

1 


Total 


39 

4 


In the other class the deaths were 

as follows 

Deaths. 

Measles 

• « • « 

1 

Whooping Cough 

* * • f 

none 

























186 


Diarrhoea and Dysentery . . . . 1 

Rheumatic Fever 


Total . . 3 


There is no Isolation Hospital in this district. 


The Infectious Disease (Notification) Act, 1889, came into operation 
on March 25th, 1890. 


The Infectious Disease (Prevention) Act, 1890, came into operation 
on March 25th, 1891. 

The Public Healths Acts Amendment Act, 1891, came into opera¬ 
tion on March 25th, 1891. 


The prevalence in each quarter of each notifiable disease is shown 
in the following table : — 

Scarlatina 
Diphtheria . . 

Membranous Croup 
Enteric Fever 
Erysipelas 

Total 


A detailed account of the waterworks will be found in my annual 
reports for 1879, 1888, and 1890, so that it need not be here repeated. 
The water is of very good quality, so far as chemical analysis can show. 
It is obtained from fissures in the upper chalk, and hitherto there lias 
always been an abundant supply. Many years ago a well was sunk, 
and a tube bored about 500 feet into the grey chalk ; this was not 
successful as no gain was obtained by boring so far. The upper chalk 
with flints is the true source for water, which will be found abundantly 
in the numerous fissures which are met with in this stratum. The 
upper chalk is about 80 to 100 feet in depth, and beneath it there is a 
dense mass of grey chalk, which contains neither flints or fissures, ami 
through which water gradually passes, but without forming any springs 
or appearing in any volume. Therefore it is of no use to seek for a 
water supply in the grey chalk. 


1st Qr. 2nd Qr. 3rd Qr. 4th Qr. Total. 

6 2 3 2 13 

2 3 117 


ITER SUPPLY. 


6 


19 


12 


10 


8 


9 


39 


By degrees all old wells are being done away with, and about 
three-fourths of the houses are now supplied from the public mains. 





187 


DRAINAGE AND SEWAGE. 

A detailed account of the system of sewerage adopted will be found 
in my annual report for 1888. 


All the sewage flows by gravitation into the mouth of the river 
whence it is carried away to sea. 


The sewers are well flushed, and occasionally river water is sent 
through, so as the more effectually to cleanse them. All new houses 
are well drained and ventilated in accordance with the model Bye-laws. 


SCAVENGING AND CLEANSING. 

The work is well done and the streets are kept very clean and well 
watered. The health of the town, as usual, was in a very satisfactory 
condition during the year. 


SYSTEMATIC INSPECTION. 


The routine work done during the year by Mr. Howard, the Town 
Surveyor, is shown in the following summary :— 


Number of houses inspected and visited. . 
Nuisances of various kinds remedied 
Drains cleared and repaired 
Number of houses fumigated 

,, cleansed and limewashed 


310 

42 

11 

7 

6 


SLAUGHTER HOUSES, BAKEHOUSES, AND COWSHEDS. 

The number of Slaughter Houses, Bakehouses, and Cowsheds 
remains the same, and they are periodically inspected and found gener¬ 
ally in a well kept state. The town water is laid on to all these 
premises. 


COMMON LODGING HOUSES. 


There is now only one Common Lodging House; this is often 
nspected, and it is kept in a clean condition, 








188 


CASES OF OVERCROWDING. 

There were no cases of overcrowding abated during the year. 


PROCEEDINGS BEFORE THE MAGISTRATES. 

No Proceedings were taken before the Magistrates during the year. 


INQUESTS 

Inquests were held in four cases:—Male, 4 weeks, accidentally 
suffocated in bed ; female, 69 years, influenza and congestion of the 
lungs; female, newly born, found dead; male, 22 years, found drowned. 


There were two deaths registered as “ not certified ” during the 
year:—Female, 8 weeks, convulsions; female, 5 days, convulsions. 






LITTLEHAMPTON URBAN DISTRICT. 


Table 1 . —Showing the Deaths at various groups of ages in the 


ten years 1886-95. 


Year. 

At all ages. 

1 

Under 1 Year. 

1 to 5. 

5 to 15. 

15 to 25. 

25 to 65. 

65 and upwards. 

1886 

50 

10 

7 

2 

1 

12 

18 

1887 

59 

8 

3 

2 

5 

18 

23 

1888 

58 

10 

7 

3 

3 

16 

19 

1889 

65 

6 

6 

3 

3 

18 

29 

1890 

38 

4 

2 

1 

5 

14 

12 

1891 

84 

10 

11 

5 * 

2 

22 

34 

1892 

59 

9 

4 

4 

2 

20 

20 

1893 

57 

5 

3 

4 

6 

16 

23 

1894 

72 

8 

11 

1 

2 

29 

21 

1895 

78 

13 

5 

5 

4 

21 

30 

Total... 

620 

83 

59 

. 30 

33 

186 

229 






































190 


LITTLEHAMPTON URBAN DISTRICT. 


Table 2.—Showing the Deaths in the twenty years, 1876-95, from 


various causes. 


Year. 

Small Pox. 

Scarlatina. 

Diphtheria. 

Membranous Croup. 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 

Measles. 

Whooping Cough. 

Diarrhoea. 

Rheumatic Fever. 

Influenza. 

i 

Total. 

Typhus. 

Enteric. 

Continued. 

_ .... .. .... i 

Relapsing. 

| Puerperal. , 

1876-80 


7 

3 






1 


1 

2 

1 

5 

1 


21 

1881-85 

— 

— 

1 



1 

3 


— 


2 

4 

4 

4 



19 

1886-90 

1 


1 


— 


— 




1 

4 

8 

7 

1 

1 

24 

1891 

— 


— 



— 

— 




— 

— 

6 




6 

1892 


— 




— 

— 




— 

2 

1 

2 

1 

— 

6 

1898 


• 




1 

— 




— 


— 

2 

— 

— 

3 

1894 


— 

1 

— 


— 

— 





4 

1 



— 

6 

1895 


1 

3 






— 


1 


— 

1 

1 


7 

Total... 

1 

8 

9 

— 

— 

• 

2 

3 


1 


5 

16 

21 

21 

4 

1 

92 


























































































191 


LITTLEHAMPTON URBAN DISTRICT. 


Table 3. —Showing the Deaths and Death-rate from all causes and from 
various causes in the twenty years, 1876-95. 



r 

•0SU8SI(J qjT30JJ 

© vo oo oo 

CO CO OT 1C) 
r—I r—1 r—1 

i—i vo © vo 
© or © h*h 

J-H J—1 7—1 

iual Death-rate 
'0 living, from 


•esBastQ; Sumj 

^ t- 

00 C (M 03 

i—i or or i—i 

GO VO © © 
t— ©> 7-H GO 
t—H 7— I or r-H 


•sisiq^qj 

lOONCO 
OO CO CO r—i 

7“ H 7-H I— 1 f—H 

vo or t-h 
or © © 

r—H 7—H r—H r-H 

a © 

<1 © 

M r—1 

c3 . 

(£) ?H 

s s. 


•0SE8SI(J 

DICpui^Z 

^ ^ O fO 

r—H CJi r-H Ol 

i-H r-H r-H 

© © © or 

© t— GO r—H 
r-H 7-H 

< 

•S 0 S 88 St(j qy 

© r-H (M ^ 

r-H OO GO © 

© or vo 

*v ^ «rs 

r-H r-H r-H r-H 

© r-H or 

i—i oo H 

CO © 1—H HjH 

r* f\ fs r> 

r-H r—H r-H r-H 


r 

•9SB0SI(J ^XU0JJ 

go t— r— © 

r-H or oq © 

vo © © 
i —h or cm © 

a d 
® 3 

£ p 
^ £ 

CD 


• 0 SG 8 S’i(j Sunq; 

VO 

CO -vH njH -rH 

CO CO r-H 

CO CO ^ ^ 

~* i -> R-i) 

CS 

• 1—l V>* 

a oo 

a i—i 



© © os r- 
© or or or 

or to go © 

© or or or 

deaths d 
years 


'9ST39Sl(J 

OipUXA^ 

i — 1 os co co 
or t-h or or 

© © GO © 

or i — i t-h or 

H 

V 

•S0SU9SIQ qy 

r-H oo © © 
© £— £— vO 
or or or' © 

GO <M © Oi 

rf © vo or 

CM or CM © 



•poi.rad jo 

9[ppiUI 

ui uorpqidoq 

co © © © 
co © © © 
©~ o 

©~ 

co ©> © ©> 

CO © © vo 
©^ ©^ op vo 

© ’HjH -9H 



2 

o 

hh 

f 1876-80 .. 
1881-85 .. 
1886-90 . . 
1891-95 . . 

r 1876-80 

1881-85 .. 
1886-90 . 
1891-95 .. 



PH 

w 

P-1 

Including j 
Visitors. 

: 

I 

Excluding 

Visitors. 




















































192 


(A)—Table of DEATHS during the Year 1895, in the LITTLEHAMPTON 


Names of Localities adopted for 
the purpose of these 
Statistics; Public Institutions 
being shown as separate 
localities. 

{a) 

Mortality from all Causes 

AT SUBJOINED AGES. 



m 

<x> 

r—I 

cS 

< 

(6) 

u 

«8 

0> 

.-H 

u 

<o 

■73 

a 

p 

(c) 

lO 

u 

<o 

■73 

3 

r n> 

a 

<3 

P*H 

id) 

5 and under 

- 15. 

p 15 and under 

b 25. 

(-i 

a> 

33 

»-H 

3 . 

■73 ;o 
3 

c6 

iO 

cs 

iff) 

&■ 

02 

TS'g 

§ * 
* ^ 
lO 

<r> 

(h ) 

1 

2 

3!: 

Small Pox. 

Scarlatina. 

cS : 

• 14 * 

U - 

© ; 
J5 : 

43 1 

^3: 

ft; 

ft. 

Littlehampton Urban District 

74 

13 

5 

5 

4 

21 

26 

Under 5 


1 

li 

5 upwards. 



2 









Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 






✓ 






Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 












Under 5 




5 upwards. 




Totals. 

74 

13 

5 

5 

4 

21 

26 

Under 5 


1 


5 upwards. 



k 


The subjoined numbers have also to be taken ini 

Deaths occurring outside the 
District among persons 
belonging thereto. 

4 






4 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 




Deaths occurring within the 
District among persons 
not belonging thereto... 

9 


1 


3 

3 

2 

Under 5 


1 


5 upwards. 



— 






















































































































































































193 


Urban District, classified according to Diseases, Ages, and Localities. 


Mortality from subjoined causes, distinguishing Deaths of Children 

under Five Years of Age. 

4 

5 6 

1 7 

1 8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

m 

S3 

O 

i 

!-§ p. 
;§ § 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 

Measles. 

Whooping 

Cough. 

Diarrhoea and 

Dysentery. 

Rheumatic 

Fever. 

Phthisis. 

Bronchitis, 

Pneumonia, 

and Pleurisy. 

Heart 

Disease. 

Influenza. 

Injuries. 

All Other 

Diseases. 

Total. 

Typhus. 

Enteric or 
Typhoid. 

Continued. 

Relapsing. 

Puerperal. 











1 



1 



2 

12 

18 








1 




1 

5 

9 

4 

4 

1 

29 

56 













































































I . 














- 





























































































































































•. 















































































































































1 

! i 



2 

12 

18 








1 




1 5 I 

1 

9 

4 

4 

1 

29 

56 

count in judging of the above records of mortality. 











I 

























4 

4 



















1 













2 

2 

1 

1 

l 

1 

8 













































































































































































































































































































































































































194 


(B)—TABLE OF POPULATION, BIRTHS, AND OF NEW OASES 
Officer of Health, during the year 1895, in the LITTLEHAMPTO) 


Names of Localities adopted 
for the purpose of these 
Statistics ; Public Institutions 
being shown as separate 
localities. 


Population 
at all Ages. 


Census 

1891, 


Esti¬ 
mated 
to mid¬ 
dle of 
1895. 


(«) 


(b) 


Totals 


4,452 


4,700 


o» 

A 

43 

S-i 


PC' 


<D 

S-I 

<v 


tJ3 

<X> 

PS 


(c) ' (d) 


Littlehampton Urban District 4,452 4,700 HO 


110 


Aged 
under 5 
or 

over 5. 


(e) 


Under 5 


5 upwards. 


Under 5 


5 upwards. 


Under 5 


5 upwards. 


Under 5 


5 upwards. 


Under 5 


5 upwards. 


Under 5 


5 upwards. 


Under 5 


5 upwards. 


Under 5 


5 upwards. 


Under 5 


5 upwards. 


Under 5 


5 upwards. 


Under 5 


5 upwards. 


Under 5 
5 upwards. 


New Cases of Sick- 
coming TO THE KNOWLEDGE 

0E 


X 

o 

P-I 


s 

m 


«e 

a 


43 

c3 


u 

eS 

o 

CO 


3 


10 


10 


3 


sS 


J-l 

o 

43 

Xi 

ft 




ft 

o 

Sh 

O 


Fevers. 


02 

s 

ft 

>> 

H 


43 

a 

a 


Tvnhoid. 

_ 



























































































































































































195 


9F INFECTIOUS SICKNESS, coming to the knowledge of the Medical 
Jrban District; classified according to Diseases, Ages, and Localities. 


NESS IN EACH LOCALITY, 

of the Medical Officer 
Health. 


Number of such Cases Removed from their 
Homes in the several Localities for Treatment 
in Isolation Hospital. 


7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

1 8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 



Small Pox. 

Scarlatina. 

Diphtheria. 

Membranous 

Croup. 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 



Continued. 

Relapsing. 

Puerperal. 

Typhus. 

Enteric or 

Typhoid, 

Continued. 

Relapsing. 

Puerperal. 





2 




















17 













































































































































































































































• 











































































































































. 












































2 




















17 








































































































































































































































































































ARUNDEL URBAN DISTRICT. 


pp. 197 et seq. 





197 


ARUNDEL URBAN DISTRICT. 



1861 . 

1871 . 

1881 . 

1891 . 

Area in Statute Acres 

1,969 

1,969 

1,969 

1,969 

Number of Inhabited Houses. . 

528 

546 

552 

550 

,, Uninhabited „ . . 

23 

14 

5 

20 

„ Building „ 

— 

1 

1 

1 

Population 

2,498 

2,956 

2,748 

2,644 

Males 

1,201 

1,466 

1,357 

1,327 

Females 

1,297 

1,490 

1,391 

1,317 


BIRTHS AND BIRTH-RATE. 

During the year 1895 the births of 76 children were registered ; 
of these 39 were male, and 37 were female. 


Estimating the population in the middle of the year at 2,640, the 
birth-rate was equal to 28-8 per 1,000 persons living. 

The variations in the birth-rate during the past ten years have 
been as follows :— 


Year. 

Births. 

Birth-rate. 

Year. 

Births. 

Birth-rate. 

1886 

66 

. . 23T 

1891 

59 

. . 22-3 

1887 

64 

. . 23-2 

1892 

69 

. . 26-1 

1888 

76 

.. 28T 

1893 

78 

.. 29-5 

1889 

62 

. . 23-0 

1894 

76 

.. 28-8 

1890 

79 

. . 29-2 

1895 

76 

.. 28-8 


The mean annual number of births is 70, and the mean annual 
birth-rate is 26'2 per 1,000 persons living. 


In England and Wales the birth-rate during the year was 30-3 
per 1,000 persons living, a rate of 2’0 per 1,000 below the mean rate in 
the ten years, 1885-94. 













198 


In each quarter of 

the past 

five 

years 

the 

births 

were thus 

registered :— 








1891. 

1892. 

1893. 

1894. 

1895. 

Total. 

First Quarter 

8 

16 

24 

22 

15 

85 

Second Quarter . . 

11 

20 

18 

21 

22 

92 

Third Quarter 

22 

15 

18 

18 

22 

95 

Fourth Quarter . . 

18 

18 

18 

15 

17 

86 

Total 

59 

69 

78 

76 

76 

358 


GENERAL MORTALITY. 

There were 31 deaths registered in this district during the year 
1895, but to this number must be added the death of one person in 
the East Prest >n Workhouse, which is outside the district, so that the 
total number of deaths amounts to 32 ; of these 17 were male and 15 
were females. 


Estimating the population in the middle of the year at 2,640, the 
death-rate was equal to 12*1 per 1,000 persons living. 

In country places throughout England and Wales the rate of 
mortality in 1895 was equal to 1 T*0 per 1,000 of population. 


The variations in the death-rate during the past ten years have 
been as follows 


Year. 

Deaths. 

Deatli-rate. 

Year. 

Deaths. 

Death-rate. 

1886 

42 ’ 

. . 15-2 

1891 

51 

. . 19-3 

1887 

77 

. , 28-0 

1892 

45 

. . 17-0 

1888 

56 

.. 20-7 

1893 

46 

. . 17-4 

1889 

. . 47 

. . 17*4 

1894 

32 

.. 12-1 

1890 

70 

. . 25-9 

1895 

32 

.. 12T 


Thus there have been during the above period 498 deaths, and a 
mean annual mortality of 18 5 per 1,000 of population. During the 
same period there were 705 births, so that the natu-ral increase of 
population by excess of births over deaths was 207 ; there has, however, 
been a decrease of 104, so that a considerable number must have left 
the district in the past decade. 


INFANT MORTALITY. 


The infant mortality is here given as measured by the number of 
deaths under one year of age to the total number of births in the 
year:— 











199 


Year. 

Births. 

Deaths under 
one year. 

Ratio to 
1,000 Births. 

1886 

66 

6 

96 

1887 

64 

8 

125 

1888 

76 

1 

13 

1889 

62 

9 

145 

1890 

79 

18 

228 

1891 

59 

11 

186 

1892 

69 

4 

58 

1893 

78 

9 

115 

1894 

76 

6 

79 

1895 

76 

3 

39 

Mean 

71 

7-5 

108 


The three infantile deaths included one from measles, one from 
convulsions, and one from lung disease. 


In England and Wales the proportion of deaths under one year of 
age to registered births was 161 per 1,000 during the past year, the 
mean proportion in the preceding ten years having been 146. 


ZYMOTIC MORTALITY. 

There were no deaths from zymotic disease in the case of those 
which are notifiable, and one in the other class where the number of 
cases cannot be obtained. The zymotic mortality was at the rate of R38 
per 1,000. 





Cases. 

Deaths. 


Small Pox 


.. none 

none 


Scarlatina 


none 

none 


Diphtheria . . 


.. none 

none 


Membranous Croup. . 


.. none 

none 


Typhus 


none 

none 

m 

Enteric 


3 

none 

<n 

> \ 

Continued 


none 

none 

© 

£ 

Relapsing 


none 

none 


Puerperal 


none 

none 


Cholera 


none 

none 


Erysipelas . . 


1 

none 


Total 

• • 

4 

none 


In the other class the deaths were as follows o :— 

Deaths. 


Measles 

Whooping Cough 
Diarrhoea and Dysentery 
Rheumatic Fever 


1 

none 

none 

none 


Total 


• * 


1 































200 


There is no Isolation Hospital in this district. 


The Infectious Disease (Notification) Act, 1889, came into operation 
on May 13th, 1891. 


The Infectious Disease (Prevention) Act, 1890, came into operation 
on March 16th, 1891. 


The Public Healths Acts Amendment Act, 1891, came into opera¬ 
tion on March 16th, 1891. 


The prevalence in each quarter of each notifiable disease is shown in 
the following table :— 


Scarlatina .. 

1st Qr. 2nd Qr. 3rd Qr. 

4th Qr. 

Total. 

Diphtheria . . 

— - - 

— 

— 

Membranous Croup 

2 — — 

1 

3 

Enteric Fever 

— — 1 

— 

1 

Erysipelas 

— — — 

— 

— 

Total 

2 — 1 

1 

4 


There were five cases notified in 1891 ; 7 in 1892 ; 52 in 1893 ; 16 
in 1894, and 4 in 1895. 


WATER SUPPLY. 


An excellent supply of good water has now been given to the town 
free of cost by the Duke of Norfolk. The amount is limited to 75,000 
gallons a day. The houses on each side of the river can now be 
supplied, and the water mains are extended to Crossbush and 
Tortington. 


DRAINAGE AND SEWAGE. 

The main system of sewerage' proposed by Mr. Baldwin Latham, 
and described fully in my Annual Report for 1894, was commenced in 
the autumn, and it is expected to be completed in the course of the vear 
1895. 







201 


BAKEHOUSES. 

These are six in number, and they are very well kept. There is 
no bakehouse on a large scale, and the chief duty is to see that they are 
frequently cleansed and lime washed. In each case there is a good 
amount of light and air, and in no instance is there any drain within 
the building. 


SLAUGHTER HOUSES. 

These are five in number, and they are very well kept as regards 
cleanliness and removal of refuse. One old one has been pulled down 
and a new one has been erected on another site in a more isolated 
position. The meat in all cases has seemed to be of very good quality. 


COMMON LODGING HOUSES. 


These are three in number, but the number of inmates is very 
small. The houses are very well kept. 


PROCEEDINGS BEFORE THE MAGISTRATES. 
No legal proceedings were taken during the year. 


INQUESTS. 

Inquests were held in two cases:—Female, 53 years, heart 
disease ; male, 64 years, heart disease. 

There was no death returned as “ not certified ” during the year. 











202 


ARUNDEL URBAN DISTRICT. 


Table 1. —Showing the Deaths at various groups of ages in the 

ten years, 1886-95. 


Year. 

At all ages. 

Under 1 Year. 

1 to 5. 

5 to 15. 

15 to 25. 

25 to 65. 

65 and upwards. 

1886 

42 

6 

3 

3 

4 

16 

10 

1887 

77 

8 

7 

3 

3 

35 

21 

1888 

56 

1 

13 

6 

4 

16 

16 

1889 

47 

9 

— 

1 

4 

16 

17 

1890 

70 

18 

8 

3 

6 

20 

15 

1891 

51 

11 

3 

o 

1 

12 

22 

1892 

45 

4 

3 

2 

3 

13 

20 

1893 

46 

9 

3 

2 

2 

14 

16 

1894 

32 

6 

1 

3 

— 

9 

13 

1895 

32 

3 

— 

1 

1 

16 

11 

Total... 

498 

75 

41 

26 

28 

167 

161 


Table 2.—Showing the Deaths in the thirteen years, 1883-95, from 

various causes. 


Year. 

Small Pox. 

i 

Scarlatina. 

i 

Diphtheria. 

Membranous Croup. 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 

Measles. 

Whooping Cough. 

Diarrhoea. 

Rheumatic Fever. 

Influenza. 

i 

Total. 

m 

3 

rC 

A 

H 

Enteric. 

Continued. 

1 

Relapsing. 

Puerperal. / 

1883 












1 





1 

1884 



1 







— 



1 

2 



4 

1885 




— 

— 

— 





— 


— 

1 



1 

1886-90 


16 

7 



11 

1 


1 


1 

1 

1 

3 

1 

2 

45 

1891 





— 


— 




— 


1 

1 


1 

3 

1892 

— 


— 



— 

— 




— 


— 



4 

4 

1893 


1 

— 

— 


2 






— 

— 

2 


3 

8 

1894 

— 

1 

— 

— 


— 



— 

— 



— 



9 

Am 

3 

1395 


— 




— 

— 



— 


1 




1 

2 

Total... 


18 

8 

— 


13 

1 


1 


1 

3 

3 

9 

1 

13 

71 


























































































































































203 


Table 3 


ARUNDEL URBAN DISTRICT. 

—Showing the Deaths and Death-rate from all causes and from 
various causes in the ten years, 1886-95. 


j P 
O 

H 

I 


-P , £ 

cu p 

ft V 

• r-H 

P ' ' 

P o 
P O 
- © 
<3 o 
a 2 

P . 

CL) iH 

w_| CD 

^ CM 


< 


§ s 

o 

(D P 
rS ^ 

P ~ 

bi °S 

p , j 

*S < 

S GO ' 
Ph 00 

° r-H 

02 

_P 02 

-P ~ 

P P 

CD d> 

A ^ 


J 

•esc9si(j jjbojj 

(MOQtM^HCOHON 

COOMCOIOIOH^Oh 

r-H r-H r-H CM r-H HH CO r-H "HI 

•esu9S[(j Sump 

0— U— r-H CO r-H CO r-H L— t — lO 
■ CM CM OO H CO t— lO CM CM t© 
COCOrH(U<UCOrH<U(U(U 

•sisrq^qj 

(MNMUOPWOOOCOM 
OONIO^OHOMPH 
i— 1 "pH (M rH r-H r-H r-H r-H 

•0SS8SI(J 

oiqomAz 

lO (M 00 05 (X) O 1 GO GO 

| 00 CO CO 

r-H CO r-H CO r-H 

•S0SBOSI(J {[Y 

NOMON05^(M(N(M 

NOJSMOIMO^rtH 

iQcooiSiocai>i>(M(M 

r-H 01 Od r-H Od r-H rH r-H r-H r —* 

•9scasi(j 

iOHtHion^hQOh 

rH rH r-H 

•0SB8SI(J Sunrj 

02C510<©00OMipiPJ> 

r—■l 

■ s j s iut<i 

lOPNMWMlOHHM 

rH 

•0S138SI(J 

otjouiA’^ 

^ (M N CO N (M 1 1CHH 
r-H i— 1 1 

•S0SB9SI(J \\Y 

(MSCONOHlOtOfMIM 
■HH t— lO ^ L— JO ^ CO CO 

•poiaad jo 
ojppiui 

ui uoijBjndo^ 

OOOOO^HOOOO 

iokoooo^h-^^m^m^h 
i'- i— t— o— r- <^cco <p^o^o 

of o f CM cT of of of of of of 


A 

o 

I—I 

PS 

w 

Pm 


ONCOPOHIMCO^IO 
OO 00 CO CO O) O) O 05 05 Ol 

oooocoooooooooooooco 




























































204 


(A)—Table of DEATHS during the Year 1895, in the ARUM DEL Urban 


Names of Localities adopted for 
the purpose of these 
Statistics; Public Institutions 
being shown as separate 
localities. 

[a) 

Mortality from all Causes 

AT SUBJOINED AGES. 

(i) 


zn 

CD 

60 

-P 

<1 

(6) 

sf 

© 

r-H - 

S- 

® 

03 

a 

£> 

(c) 

to 

© 

03 

p 

P 

o3 

p 

c3 

(d ) 

© 

p 

^ kO 

—i 

e3 

iO 

(e) 

u 

© 

03 

• 

03 (N 
P 

UO 

rH 

(/) 

Si 

© 

03 

C 

P . 

o3 co 
P 
cS 

tO 

Ol 

(9) 

i 

Q* 

P . 

m 

o3 

§ 5 
£ 
lO 

co 

(*> 

1 

2 3: 

Small Pox. 

Scarlatina. 

Dinhthfiria. 

Arundel Urban District . 

31 

3 

— 

1 

1 

16 

10 

Under 5 



5 upwards. 











Under 5 



5 upwards. 











Under 5 



5 upwards. 











Under 5 



5 upwards. 











Under 5 



5 upwards. 











Under 5 



5 upwards. 











Under 5 



5 upwards. 











Under 5 



5 upwards. 



% 








Under 5 



5 upwards. 











Under 5 



5 upwards. 











Under 5 



5 upwards. 



Totals. 

31 

3 

— 

1 

1 

16 

10 

Under 5 



5 upwards. 




The subjoined numbers have also to 

be taken i: 

Deaths occurring outside the 
District among persons 
belonging thereto. 

1 






1 

Under 5 



5 upwards. 



Deaths occurring within the 
District among persons 
not belonging thereto... 








Under 5 



5 upwards. 


-- 




























































































































































































205 


District, classified according to Diseases, Ages, and Localities. 


Mortality from subjoined causes, distinguishing Deaths of Children 

under Five Years of Age. 


4 

5 

1 6 

1 7 

1 8 

1 9 

10 

11 

12 | 13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

1VA C i 11 LJl uuu u s 

Croup. 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 

Measles. 

Whooping 

Cough. 

Diarrhoea and 

Dysentery. 

Rheumatic 

Fever. 

Phthisis. 

Bronchitis, 

Pneumonia, 

and Pleurisy. 

Heart 

Disease. 

Influenza. 

Injuries. 

All Other 

Diseases. 

Total. 

Typhus. 

Enteric or 
Typhoid. 

Continued. 

Relapsing. 

Puerperal. 









1 





1 




1 

3 













3 

6 

11 

1 


7 

28 


















































































































































































































— 











































































_ 





































































































1 

1 




1 




1 

3 







j 

1 





3 

6 

11 

1 


7 

28 


fount in judging of the above records of mortality. 












































































































































































































































































































































































206 


(B)—TABLE OF POPULATION, BIRTHS, AND OF NEW CASES 
Officer of Health, during the year 1895, in the ARUNDEL 


Names of Localities adopted 
for the purpose of these 
Statistics; Public Institutions 
being shown as separate 
localities. 

(«) 

Population 
at all Ages. 

a. Registered Births. 

Aged 
under 5 

or 

over 5. 

(e) 

New Cases of Sick- 
coming TO THE KNOWLEDGE 

OF 

Census 

1891. 

(b) 

Esti¬ 
mated 
to mid¬ 
dle of 
1895. 

(c) 

1 

2 

3 

.i 

4 

5 

6 

Small Pox. 

Scarlatina. 

Diphtheria. 

Membranous 

Croup. 

Fevers. 

Typhus. 

Enteric or 

Typhoid. , 

Arundel Urban District 

2,644 

2,640 

76 

Under 5 







5 upwards. 






3 





Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 







* 




Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 






* 

5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 







Totals . 

2,644 

2,640 

76 

Under 5 







5 upwards. 






3 




















































































































































































207 


f INFECTIOUS SICKNESS, coming to the knowledge of the Medical 
dban District; classified according to Diseases, Ages, and Localities. 


rEss in each Locality, 

•f the Medical Officer 
Iealth. 


Number of such Cases Removed from their 
Homes in the several Localities for Treatment 
in Isolation Hospital. 


7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 ! 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

Fever s. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 



Small Pox. 

Scarlatina. 

Diphtheria. 

Membranous 

Croup. 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 



Continued. 

Relapsing. 

Puerperal. 

■ 

Typhus. 

Enteric or 

Typhoid. 

Continued. 

a 

* f—< 

02 

Q« 

c3 

. PS 

Puerperal. 

.... 
























1 
















| . . . . 




















— 








































■ 




















L... 




























































— 






































































/ 





















































































































































































































1 


















































































































































































































































































































HORSHAM URBAN DISTRICT. 


pp. 209 et seq. 






209 


HORSHAM URBAN 


Area in Statute Acres 
Number of Inhabited Houses 
,, Uninhabited „ 

,, Building „ 

Population 
Males 
Females 


1881. 

1891. 

833 

839 

1,396 

1,657 

113 

156 

12 

18 

6,874 

8,087 

3,223 

3,796 

3,651 

4,291 


BIRTHS AND BIRTH-BATE. 

During the year 1895, the births of 221 children were registered ; 
of these 114 were male, and 107 were female. 


Estimating the population in the middle of the year at 8,580, the 
birth-rate was equal to an annual rate of 25*8 per 1,000 persons living. 


The births and birth-rate in the district during the past ten years 
are here shown :— 


Year. 

Births. 

Birth-rate. 

Year. 

Births. 

Birth-rate. 

1886 

.. 235 

. . 31*4 

1891 

. . 232 

.. 28-6 

1887 

. . 201 

. . 26-4 

1892 

.. 211 

. . 25-7 

1888 

. . 220 

. . 28-5 

1893 

. . 220 

. . 26-3 

1889 

. . 236 

. . 30-1 

1894 

.., 229 

. . 27T 

1890 

. . 227 

. . 28-5 

1895 

.. 221 

. . 25-8 


The mean annual number of births is 223, and the mean annual 
birth-rate is 27*8 per 1,000 persons living. 


In England and Wales the birth-rate during the year was 30'3 
per 1,000 persons living, a rate of 0 f 9 per 1,000 below the mean rate in 
the ten years, 1885-94. 








210 



In each quarter of 

the past four 

years 

the births 

were thus 

istered :— 

1892. 

1893. 

1894. 

1895. 

Total. 

First Quarter 

51 

60 

67 

59 

237 

Second Quarter . . 

53 

68 

58 

55 

234 

Third Quarter 

53 

51 

54 

49 

207 

Fourth Quarter . . 

54 

41 

50 

58 

203 

Total 

211 

220 

229 221 

881 


GENERAL MORTALITY. 

There were 136 deaths registered in this district during the year 
1895. but to this number must be added the deaths of twelve persons in 
Horsham Workhouse, which is outside the urban area, and from this 
number must be deducted one death in the Cottage Hospital belonging 
to the rural district, leaving the corrected total at 147. 

Estimating the population at 8,580, the death-rate was equal to an 
annual rate of 17T per 1,000. 

In each quarter of the past four years the deaths were thus 
recorded 

. 

1892. 1893. 1894. 1895. 

First Quarter. 78 . . 37 . . 31 . . 45 

Second Quarter . 33 . . 43 . . 27 . . 33 

rrn • l s~\ 1 r\ t r\ r\ c\ 


Third Quarter. 22 .. 40 .. 29 .. 30 

Fourth Quarter . 30 ... 41 . . 25 . . 39 

_ _ _ _ 

Total .. 163 161 112 147 


The deaths and death-rate in the past ten years are here shown : — 





Year. 

Deaths. 

Death-rate. 

Year. 

Deaths. 

Death-rate. 

1886 

. . 184 

.. 24-7 

1891 

.. 163 

.. 20T 

1887 

.. 110 

14-5 

1892 

.. 163 

.. 19-8 

1888 

. . 106 

.. 13-7 

1893 

.. 161 

.. 19-3 

1889 

. . 106 

. . 13-5 

1894 

. . 112 

. . 13-2 

1890 

. . 131 

.. 16-4 

1895 

.. 147 

.. 17T 


In 1886 the high mortality was due to measles and lung diseases ; 
in 1891-93 influenza and lung diseases were prevalent. 


The mean annual number of deaths is 138, and the mean annual 
death-rate is equal to 17‘2 per 1,000 persons living. 





















211 


INFANT MORTALITY. 

There were 24 deaths of infants under one year of age, and as 
there were 221 births, the rate of infant mortality was equal to 109 
per 1,000, a figure which is high for a district of this kind, the rate for 
the whole of the combined district being 84. 

In 1892 the ratio was 123, in 1893 it was 136, and in 1894 it was 
118 per 1,000 registered births. 

In England and Wales the proportion of deaths under one year of 
age to registered births was 161 per 1,000 during the past year, the 
mean proportion in the preceding ten years having been 146. 


ZYMOTIC MORTALITY. 


The deaths from zymotic diseases were 

nil in the case of those 

which are notifiable, and eighteen in the other class where the number 
of cases cannot be obtained. The zymotic mortality was at the rate of 

2T per 1,000 persons living. 

Deaths. 

Small Pox 

none 

Scarlatina 

none 

Diphtheria . . 

none 

Membranous Croup. . 

none 

( Typhus 

none 

g 1 Enteric 

none 

® < Continued ... 

none 

j Relapsing 

none 

( Puerperal 

none 

Cholera 

none 

Erysipelas . . 

none 

Total 

none 

In the other class the deaths were from 



Deaths. 

Measles 

9 

Whooping Cough 

.. 6 

Diarrhoea and Dysentery . . 

3 

Rheumatic Fever 

none 

Total 

18 


The Notification Act of 1889 is not yet in force in this district. 


WATER SUPPLY. 

The water holds its level in the well very satisfactorily. It 
is proposed to clear out the headings and reservoir, lining the former 
with brickwork, and altering the connections at the reservoir in such a 
manner as shall allow of the water being pumped into the top instead 
of the bottom as at present. The mains will also be re-arranged so to 
give a better supply and pressure in the town. 












212 


The hydrants now being used are of the screw down type, instead 
of the hall hydrants which have hitherto been fixed. 

The severe frost in February and March burst the Sin. cast iron 
mains in eight places, and 127 service pipes were split on the Council’s 
side of the stop taps. 


SEWERAGE AND DRAINAGE. 

The proprietors of the Tannery have connected their drains to the 
main sewer, thereby greatly improving the state of the river. Under 
the advise of Messrs. Taylor, Sons, and Santo Crimp, of Westminster, 
they have built precipitation tanks, sludge pits, &c., for dealing with 
their waste liquors. The precipitant used is Alumina Ferric. 

A new sewer has been laid at the backs of the houses on the south 
side of West Street. This replaces two old drains laid one on top of the 
other, and which were in a very bad state. The lower one, supposed to 
be a storm water drain, had seven w.c.’s, one urinal, four sink wastes, 
and a fellmonger’s works discharging into it, and thence into the river. 

The storm water drains are rendered very foul from the number 
of sink wastes connected to them. 

Last summer the exceptionally dry weather caused the state of the 
river in the vicinity of the flood gates to become very bad. At the 
Sewage Outfall Works a Centrifugal Pump and Engine were specially 
erected for dealing with the effluent, enabling it to be pumped on to the 
old filtration beds, and which discharge below the flood gates. 


SYSTEMATIC INSPECTION. 

The following statement shows the routine work carried out 
during the year as recorded by Mr. Ren wick, the Town Surveyor. 

No. of new Houses completed and certificated . . 34 
No. of new water services laid for domestic use . . 97 
Gallons of Water pumped to “ Star ” 

Reservoir , . . . . . . . . , 62,643,500 

Greatest No. of gallons pumped in one day (May 
14th) . 1,446,000 


No. of Nuisances reported to the Council . . . . 56 

No. of Notices served . . . . . . . . 17 

Defective w.c. fittings . . . . . . . . 7 

Overcrowding . . . . . . . . . . 4 

Insanitary w.c. . . . . . . . . . . 1 

Cleansing orders . . . . . . . . . . 3 

Dangerous building . . . . . . . . ' . . 1 

Defective trap ., . . . . . . .. 1 











213 


No. of houses in an insanitary condition . . .. 4 

No. of houses without any water supply . . . . 1 

No. of house drainage systems re-arranged through¬ 
out by advice and under supervision of Inspector 4 
Room in basement rendered insanitary from de¬ 
fective w.c. next door . . . . . . . . 1 

Unsuitable premises used as dwelling house . . 1 

Insufficient w.c. accommodation . . . . . . 1 

Common Lodging House closed . . . . . 1 

Baby farm inspected . . . . . . . . 1 

Cases of overcrowding . . . . . . . . 4 

Defective w.c. fittings . . . . . . . . 12 

Defective w.c. drains . . . . . . . . 4 

Closets rendered insanitary for want of flushing- 

apparatus . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 

Defective sink drains . . . . . . . . 1 

Defective traps ,. . . . . . . . . 8 

Cesspools abolished . . . . . . . . . 4 

Cesspools cleansed . . . . . , . . . . 6 

Nuisance from domestic chimney . . . . . . 1 

Domestic chimney causing danger from fire . . 1 

Nuisance caused by burning waste tan . . . . 1 

Pig stye nuisances . . . . . . . . . . 4 

Unregistered cow-keepers . . . . . . . . 2 


PUBLIC ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 

There are five Public Elementary Schools which are in a fair 
condition. 


COMMON LODGING HOUSES. 

There are three Common Lodging Houses, two of which are well 
kept. One old house was closed during the year. 


SLAUGHTER HOUSES. 

There are seven Slaughter Houses in the district, and these have 
been inspected during the year and kept fairly. 


COWSHEDS AND DAIRIES. 

There are ten Cowsheds and Dairies, but they are nearly all on a 
small scale. 











> 

214 

PROCEEDINGS BEFORE THE MAGISTRATES. 

»i 

No Proceedings were taken before the Magistrates during the year. 


RAINFALL. 

The following figures have been kindly sent to me by H. Pad wick, 
Esq., M.A., from the observations taken by him ac the Manor House, 
Horsham. 


1894. 1895. 



Fall in 

No. of 

Fall in 

No. of 

Month. 

Inches. 

Rainy Days. 

Inches. 

Rainy Days. 

January 

4-83 

24 

2*94 

16 

February . . 

2-26 

16 

0*38 

5 

March 

1-89 

14 

2*33 

15 

April 

3*28 

14 

2*28 

12 

May 

2-05 

13 

0*34 

5 

June 

2-51 

13 

0*28 

6 

July 

6-92 

22 

3*91 

18 

August 

2*69 

16 

3*57 

18 

September . . 

2*60 

10 

0*55 

4 

October 

3*64 

17 

4*35 

14 

November . . 

6-97 

18 

7*17 

22 

December .. 

2-54 

12 

3*26 

18 

Total 

42*18 

189 

31*36 

.. 153 

Year. 


Amount in Inches. 

No. 

of Rainy Days. 

1895 

• « * • 

31*36 

• • • • 

153 

1894 

• • • • 

42*18 

• • • • 

189 

1893 

• • • # 

25*06 

• • • • 

156 

1892 

• « • • 

27-53 

• • • • 

161 

1891 

• • • • 

34*84 

• • • • 

178 

1890 

• • • • 

25*87 

• • • • 

143 


INQUESTS. 

Inquests were held in six cases:—Female, 12 years, accidental 
fall; male, 8 years, accidentally drowned ; female, 2 years, accidentally 
strangled ; female, 59 years, heart disease ; female, 4 years, accident¬ 
ally burnt; male, 36 years, accidentally struck by a piece of wood. 


There was one death returned as “ not certified during the year :— 
Male, 16 months, measles. 
























HORSHAM URBAN DISTRICT. 


Table 1.—Showing the Deaths at various groups of ages in the 

four years, 1892-95. 


Year. 

At all ages. 

Under 1 Year. 

1 to 5. 

5 to 15. 

15 to 25. 

25 to 65. 

65 and upwards. 

1892 

163 

26 

20 

6 

9 

42 

60 

1893 

161 

30 

21 

10 

5 

47 

48 

1894 

112 

14 

7 

3 

3 

44 

41 

1895 

147 

24 

21 

6 

8 

43 

45 

Total... 

583 

94 

69 

25 

25 

176 

194 







































216 


HORSHAM URBAN DISTRICT. 


Table 2. — Showing the Deaths in the four years, 1892-95, from 

various causes. 


Year. 

Small Pox. 

. 

Scarlatina. 

Diphtheria. 

Membranous Croup. 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 

Measles. 

Whooping Cough. 

Diarrhoea. 

Rheumatic Fever. 

Influenza. 

\ 

Total. 

GO 

X 

!>■> 

EH 

Enteric. 

Continued. 

i 

Pv elapsing. 

Puerperal. 

1892 

— 


o 




— 





— 

4 

3 

1 

12 

22 

1893 

4 


3 

2 


3 




— 

1 

1 

2 

3 



19 

1894 


— 

2 


— 




1 



— 

— 



i 4 

7 

1395 






— 

— 




— 

9 

6 

3 


5 

23 

Total... 

4 

— 

7 

o 

— 

3 

— 

— 

1 

— 

1 

10 

12 

9 

1 

21 

71 

































































217 


HORSHAM URBAN DISTRICT. 

Table 3. —Showing the Deaths and Death-rate from all causes and from 
various causes in the four years, 1892-95. 


Deaths during the Mean Annual Death-rate 

years 1892-95, from per 100,000 living, from 

- N .■-^- 1 

•osuosiq jjbojj 

CO b- O 

O lO b- 

CN r-H r—1 i —1 

•0SB9sr(j Sun^j 

437 

300 

142 

291 


i 

134 

180 

118 

128 

*0SC0SI(J 

oiq.ouiiC^' 

121 

227 

35 

210 

•S9SC9SI(][ \\Y 

! 

1,980 

1,928 

1,324 

1,713 

•0SC0SI(J PI130JP 

t— CO o 

r-H r-H r-H r-H 

'0SB0SI(~[ Sunrj 

36 

25 

12 

25 


r-H lO CO r-H 

r-H r-H r-H r-H 

’9S‘B9ST(J 

oiq.ouiA'z' 

O cn co oo 

r—1 r—1 rH 

•S0SB9ST(J PY 

CO rH Cl b~ 

CO CO r—* Tft 

p—l rH i-H H 

’pOLIod JO 
ojppnn 

UI UOTpCpidoj 

8,230 

8,350 

8,460 

8,580 

PERIOD. 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 










































218 


(A)—Table of DEATHS during the Year 1895, in the HORSHAM Urban 


Names of Localities adopted for 
the purpose of these 
Statistics; Public Institutions 
being shown as separate 
localities. 


{a) 


Horsham Urban District 


Horsham Cottage Hospital. 


Totals. 


Mortality fkom all Causes 

AT SUBJOINED AGES. 


m 

© 

&D 

cS 


s« 

< 




133 


136 


^ Under 1 year. 

lO 

u 

© 

a 

a 

'TS 

a 

cS 

f-H 

(d) 

© 

a 

'XS ^ 

eH 

cS 

1C 

(«) 

r-" 15 and under 

b 25. 

23 

21 

6 

8 









































23 

21 

6 

8 


© 


r O ZO 


K2 

<N 


(9) 


38 


Ph 

a . 

C C 

p ^ 


Ct 


O 


( h) 


37 


41 


37 


(i) 


Under 5 
5 upwards. 


Under 5 
5 upwards. 


Under 5 
5 upwards. 


Under 5 
5 upwards. 


Under 5 
5 upwards. 


Under 5 
5 upwards. 


Under 5 
5 upwards. 


Under 5 
5 upwards. 


Under 5 
5 upwards. 


Under 5 
5 upwards. 


Under 5 
5 upwards. 


Under 5 
5 upwards. 


o 


cS 

S 


cS 

a 


cS 


u 

e3 

© 

05 


3' 


rC 


a 

p 


The subjoined numbers have also to be taken it 


Deaths occurring outside the 
District among persons 
belonging thereto. 

12 

i 




3 8 

Under 5 



5 upwards. 



Deaths occurring within the 
District among persons 
not belonging thereto... 

m 

i 





1 

Under 5 



5 upwards. 




eria 
























































































































































































219 


District, classified according to Diseases, Ages, and Localities. 


Mortality from subjoined causes, distinguishing Deaths ok Children 

under Five Years of Age. 

4 

5 | 6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

Membranous 

Croup. 

Fevers. 

Cholera, 

Erysipelas. 

Measles. 

Whooping 

Cough. 

Diarrhoea and 

Dysentery. 

Rheumatic 

Fever. 

Phthisis. 

Bronchitis, 

Pneumonia, 

and Pleurisy. 

Heart 

I )isease. 

N 

S3 

<D 

S3 

q3 

/•H 

f—l 

m 

o> 

• i—( 

u 

S3 

• 

13 

1—1 

All Other 

Diseases. 

2 

< 

Eh 

r o 

r-i 

Typhus. 

Enteric or 
Typhoid. 

Continued. 

Relapsing. 

Puerperal. 









8 

6 

2 



9 



2 

17 

44 









1 


1 


10 

15 

10 

5 

2 

45 

89 




































1 

2 

3 
































































































, 































































































i . 

























































1 *. 

1 












































































. 



























8 

6 

2 



9 



2 

17 

44 









1 


1 


10 

15 

10 

5 

3 

47 

92 

(account in judging of the above records of mortality. 


















1 

1 













1 

1 

2 



7 

11 





















1 

1 

! 















1 

1 


















































































































































































































































































































































220 


(B)—TABLE OF POPULATION, BIRTHS, AND OF NEW CASES 
Officer of Health, during the year 1895, in the HORSHAM 


Names of Localities adopted 
for the purpose of these 
Statistics; Public Institutions 
being shown as separate 
localities. 

(a) 

Population 
at all Ages. 

a. Registered Births. 

Aged 
under 5 
or 

over 5. 

(e) 

New Cases of Sick- 
coming to the knowledge 

of 

Census 

1891. 

(b) 

Esti¬ 
mated 
tomid- 
dle of 
1895. 

0) 

1 

2 

3 | 4 

j 

5 

6 

Small Pox. 

Scarlatina. 

Diphtheria. 

Membranous 

Croup. 

Fev 

CO 

S3 

>» 

ERS. 

u 

°T3 
o .5 h 

(D 

A 

O >» 

a H 

Horsham Urban District 

8,087 

8,580 

221 

Under 5 







5 upwards. 







Horsham Cottage Hospital ... 




Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 



The 

Inf 

ecti 

ous 

5 upwards. 





is 

not 

. 




Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 








N 



Under 5 







5 upwards. 











Under 5 







5 upwards. 







Totals . 

8,087 

8,580 

221 

Under 5 







5 upwards. 














































































































































































221 


)F INFECTIOUS SICKNESS, coming to the knowledge of the Medical 
Urban District; classified according to Diseases, Ages, and Localities. 




























































































































































































































































































COMBINED WEST SUSSEX DISTRICT. 

GENERAL REPORT. 


pp. 223 et seq. 





223 


GENERAL REPORT 

ON THE 

HEALTH OF THE COMBINED DISTRICT 

OF WEST SUSSEX. 


POPULATION. 

The corrected results of the Census, taken on April 6th, 1891, 
show that there were 106,476 persons in the combined district, against 
88,038 on the same area in 1871, and 97,879 in 1881. Arundel, Mid¬ 
hurst, and Westbourne have joined the combination since 1871, but 
for comparative purposes, the population of all the districts in the 
present area are given at each of the last three census periods. 


District. 

Census, 1871. 

Census. 1881. 

Census, 1891. 

Steyning R. S. D. 

14,060 

16,325 

19,110 

Horsham R. S. D. 

13,710 

15,426 

16,798 

Petworth R. S. D. 

10,147 

9,594 

9,431 

Thakeham R. S. D. 

8,335 

8,285 

8,049 

East Preston R. S. D. 

7,674 (a) .. 

8,025 (a) .. 

8,692 

Midhurst R. S. D. 

13,042 

13,965 

14,236 

Westbourne R. S. D. 

7,221 

7,420 

7,084 

Worthing U. S. D. (c) 

7,677 (b) .. 

11,665 (b) .. 

16,606 (a) 

Littlehampton U. S. D. 

3,266 

3,926 

4,452 

Arundel U. S. D. 

2,956 

2,748 

2,644 


88,038 

97,379 

107,102 


(a) Including Heene, Rural. (b) Excluding Heene, Rural, 
(c) Including West Worthing at each census periods. 


For the purposes of this Report the population in the middle of the 
undermentioned periods is taken as the basis of the calculations. 


Period. . 
7 Rural 
districts 
4 Urban 
districts 


1881-85. 

80,450 

19,780 


1886-90. 1891. 1892. 1893. 1894. 1895. 

82,820 83,436 83,750 84,200 81,930 84,050 

22,200 23,830 32,620 32,940 33,350 34,420 


Total. . 100,230 


105,020 107,266 116,370 117,140 115,280 118,470 


The rural population has been increased since 1880 by the 
addition of Westbourne with 7,420 persons and it has been diminished 
by the transference of Aldrington to Hove in 1893 ; the urban popula¬ 
tion has been increased by the addition of Arundel, since 1882, with 
2,748 persons, and by the addition of Horsham, since 1891, with 8,087 
- persons. 


























Table 1. — Showing the Births and Birth-rates in the twenty years, 1876-95. 


224 


Annual 

birth- 

rl 

CD O 

CO 

fl &b 


r—! 


o 

00 

PO 

o 

GO 

05 

rH 


CLO 

0 ) o 

-+3 — 

o a 

02 .P 

pH t> 


po 

© 

PO 

05 

i— 

PO 

ip 

PO 

co 

rH 

00 

iP 

© 

iP 

CM 

4h 

o 

cb 


oj 1—1 

U 

02 -P 
a,'-' 


co 

<M 

CM 

CM 

CM 

CM 

CM 

CM 

03 






00 

PO 

GO 

t— 

iP 

hH 

CM 

00 

00 

o 





rH 

IP 

IP 

co 

CO 

o 

05 

L"— 

t- 

o 




H 

CO 

IP 

GO 

oo 

00 

o 

00 

oo 

PO 

rc 





CM 

rH 

CO 

CM 

CM 

co" 

CM 

CM 

ip" 

o 





H 

rH 

r-H 






ip 

r-H 


hi 



1 

1 

| 




1 

1 

iP 



<5 



CM 


GO 

CO 

PO 

CO 

rH 

CM 

CO 



H 


• 

I" 

o 


05 

r-H 

IP 

CM 

05 

©_ 

• 


O 



CM 

o 

r- 

CO 

CO 

rH 

rH 

co 

1— 

• 


EH 



ex 

PO 

•X 

1— 

ex 

PO 

•x 

rH 

e» 

r-H 

ex 

1—H 

ex 

r-H 

r-H 

CM 






PO 

05 

o 

rH 

05 

r-H 

GO 

PO 

CO 





• 

rH 

rH 

00 

rH 

rH 

VP 

PO 

GO 

rH 





g 

ip 

iP. 


rH 

ip 

IP 

rH 

rH 

PO 

ex 

* 





PO 

rG 


r-H 

r-H 

r-H 

rH 

rH 

CO 

CM 






PO 

o 

05 

GO 

T—1 

CM 

05 


CM 

ov 


• 


• f 

1- 

o 

05 

1- 

00 


PO 

t- 

iP 

CO 


Pi 

W 

H 


EH 

l—H 
rs 

IP 

ex 

co 

ex 

PO 

PO 

PO 


PO 

iP 

rH 




CO 

CO 

CO 






CO 

CM 


Ph 



. 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

| 

rH 



< 





1 


1 

I 


1 




0> 



(M 

ip 

GO 

ip 

PO 

r-H 

r-H 

rH 

CM 



a* 



o 


PO 

CO 

CM 

CM 


CM 

PO 





iP 

t— 

PO 

CO 

CO 

co 

co 

CO 

iP 

• 


w 

H 



ex 

r—1 

ex 

r—i 

ex 

r-H 






po" 



P3 




>p 

r-H 

CO 

iP 

r-H 

oo 

co 

o 






t— 

oo 

co 

rH 

ip 

ip 

05 

iP 




W 

Pq 


a 

PO 

•x 

r- 

ex 

i— ^ 

co 

CO 

CO 

co 

CO 

05 

ex 

• 

• 





H 

r-H 

rH 






PO 






rH 

rH 

rH 

CO 

o 

CCJ 

05 

rH 

rH 

GO 





CM 

r-H 

GO 

rH 

r-H 

PO 

oo 

05 

GO 

iP 


P3 


Eh 

H 

•> 

PO 

ex 

CO 

ex 

t- 


tr 

PO 

PO 

PO 

4h 


S 



CO 

CO 

CO 






co 

(M 


H 






. 




. 



Pi 



1 

1 

1 


| 

| 

| 








05 


1 

05 

—H 

IP 

rH 

CM 

05 



a* 


&H* 

o 

ip 

rH 

t-. 

IP 

PO 

CO 

CO 

co 

co 

00 

co 

co 

CO 

iP 

CO 

co 

PO 

• 


A 

Pi 

HH 



ex 

1—1 

ex 

r-H 

ex 

r— 4 






po" 





CM 

co 

CO 

rH 

05 


GO 

05 

lO 



W 



rH 


CO 

t— 

i'- 

1— 

iP 

CO 




H 


s 

PO 

co 

t- 

CO 

CO 

CO 

CO 

co 

o 

• 





ex 

ex 

ex 






ex 

• 





rH 

*"■ 

rH 






i-- 






o 

CO 

o 

CO 

rH 

t- 

i- 


GO 

PO 


# 



rH 

05 

t- 

iP 

CO 

PO 

t— 

CM 

iP 

M 


Pi 

W 

Eh 


EH 

CM 

CN 

ip 

e* 

ip 

ex 

i— 


l— 

PO 



VP 




CO 

CO 

CO 






rH 

<M 


Pi 



t 

1 

. 

1 

1 

1 

I 

| 

rH 



◄ 



1 

! 


1 


1 






P 



O 

co 

o 

05 

05 


rH 

co 

iP 



G> 



05 

05 

co 

IP 

iP 

PO 

CO 


r— 





IP 

PO 

i>. 

CO 

CO 

CO 

CO 

co 




p 

Sa5 



ex 

rH 

ex 

r-H 

ex 

r-H 






ex 

PO 



o 

o 



o 

o 

o 

rH 

ip 

o 

co 

rH 

CO 



w 

QQ 


# 

ip 

o 

rH 

05 

fcx» 

o 

hH 

00 

CO 




a 

PO^ 

05 

ex 

oo 

co 

CO 

rH 

co 

co 

CM 

• 





rH 

rH 

r-H 












rH 

05 

ip 

co 

o 

CO 

t— 

PO 

rH 

rH 




4 

GO 

rH 

o 

05 

rH 

o 

o 

oo 

GO 

CO 




Eh 

OT_ 

cq. 

•p_ 

PO 


CO 


t— 

CO 

ex 

iP 


« 



co 

co 

co 






rH 

CM 


H 



. 



1 

| 

1 

I 

1 

r-H 



pi 








1 

1 








r-H 

CO 

05 

o 

o 

o 

00 

CO 

05 



p 



r- 

ip 

CM 

PO 

o 

OO 

00 

w 

VP 



G* 


P 

PO 

00 

1>- 

co 

co 

CO 

co 

co 


# 


H 



r-H 

rH 

rH 









co 














Pi 



o 


PO 

co 

o 

CO 

05 

co 

o 



M 

Ph 



r-H 

05 


CO 

rH 

CM 

PO 

r-H 

<M 





PO 

05 


CO 

rH 

rH 

CO 

rH 

CO 

* 





ex 

■ex 

ex 






ex 

• 





r—1 

rH 

rH 






L- 



P 



• 

• 

o 

ip 

o 



• 

• 

• 

C3 

-U 

rt 


o 



GO 

1 

00 

05 

i 


(M 

CO 



-*-> 


KH 



rH 

hH 

iP 

o 

<X> 


Pi 



PO 

7—H 

PO 

05 

05 

05 

05 

05 

Gh 

O 


P 



r- 

GO 

oo 

GO 

oo 

GO 

CO 

oo 


u 


Ph 



GO 

GO 

GO 

r-H 

r-H 

rH 

r—1 

r-H 


02 

Ph 




r-H 

rH 

rH 












































225 


BIRTHS AND BIRTH-RATE. 

Daring the year 1895, the births of 2,878 children were registered ; 
of these 1,486 were male, and 1,392 were female. 


Table 1 shows the various changes in the birth-rate during the 
twenty years 1876-96. There has been a gradual decline in the 
number of births, and this decline is general throughout the country. 


The births and 
shown :— 

birth-rate in each 

Births 

of the past 

five years 

are here 

Rate 

Year. 

Population. 

Male. 

Female. 

Total 

per 1,000. 

1891 .. 

107,266 

. . 1,444 . . 

1,393 .. 

2,837 .. 

26-58 

1892 .. 

116,370 

.. 1,519 .. 

1,316 .. 

2,835 .. 

24-36 

1893 .. 

117,140 

. . 1,551 . . 

1,453 .. 

3,004 .. 

25-80 

1894 .. 

115,280 

.. 1,468 .. 

1,424 .. 

1,392 .. 

2,892 . . 

25-08 

1895 . . 

118,470 

.. 1,486 .. 

2,878 .. 

24-29 


The birth-rate shows a gradual decline since 1879, when it was 
equal to 31T per 1,000 persons living. 

The marriage-rate throughout the country reached its lowest point 
in 1886, when it was 14*2 per 1,000 ; it rose to 15-5 in 1890, and to 
15*6 in 1891 ; it declined to 15-4 in 1892, and to 14-7 in 1893, but in 
1894 and in 1895 there was a slight rise. 


In each quarter of the year the births were thus distributed :— 



Male. 

Female. 

Total. 

Per cent. 

First Quarter .... 

.. 413 

373 

786 

27-3 

Second Quarter . . 

.. 381 

343 

724 

25-2 

Third Quarter. . . . 

. . 339 

352 

691 

24-0 

Fourth Quarter . . 

.. 353 

324 

677 

23-5 

Total 

1,486 

1,392 

2,878 

100-0 

The mean annual birth-rate in 

this combined district 

is here con 

trasted with similar figures for England and Wales. 


Period. 

Births. 


Birth-rate. 


West Sussex. 

West Sussex. 

England. 

1876-80 .. 

12,818 

• • 

30-61 

35-4 

1881-85 . . 

14,556 

• • 

29-63 

33-5 

1886-90 .. 

13,858 

• • 

26-70 

31-4 

1891-95 .. 

14,446 

• • 

25-22 

30-5 

1876-95 .. 

55,678 

• • 

28-04 

32-7 


The diminution in the birth-rate is not confined to large towns or 
urban districts ; the following table shows the changes in the rate in 
the seven vutclI areas which form part of this combined district. 























226 



SEVEN RURAL 

DISTRICTS. 


Period. 

Population. 


Births. 

Mean Annual 
Birth-rate. 

1876-80 .. 

69,760 

• • 

10,875 

' 31*19 

1881-85.. 

80,450 

• • 

12,136 

30*15 

1886-90.. 

.. . . 82,820 

• • 

11,196 

27*02 

1891-95.. 

84,200 

• • 

10,868 

26*04 

1876-95.. 

— 

• • 

45,075 

28*60 


The four remaining urban districts of the combination give a 
similar result; in their case, the annual rates are lower owing to the 
age and sex distribution of the population, and there is also a great 
excess of unmarried females. 


FOUR URBAN DISTRICTS. 


Period. 

Population. 

Births. 

Mean Annual 
Birth-rate. 

1876-80 .. 

14,040 

1,943 

27-68 

1881-85 .. 

19,780 

2,420 

24*46 

1886-90 .. 

.... 22,200 

2,662 

24*00 

1891-95 

32,940 

3,578 

22*98 

1876-95 .*. 

.... — 

.. 10,603 

24*78 

Births are 
year advances. 

more frequent in 

the spring and 

they decline as t 



BIRTHS 

IN 1876-95. 



• 

Male. 

Female. 

Total. 

Per cent. 

First Quarter . . 

7,325 

7,059 

14,384 

25*84 

Second Quarter 

7,283 

6,775 

14,058 

25*26 

Third Quarter . . 

7,045 

6,639 

13,684 

24-58 

Fourth Quarter 

6,990 

6,562 

13,552 

24*32 

Total . , 

28,643 

27,035 

55,678 

100*00 


GENERAL MORTALITY. 

During the year 1895, the deaths of 1,781 persons were registered, 
and of these 891 were male, and 890 were female. 

Estimating the population in the middle of the year at 118,470 
the death-rate was equal to 15‘03 per 1,000 persons living. 






















227 


District. 

Population. 

Deaths. 

Death-rate. 

Steyning West 

11,000 

144 

13*10 

Steyning East.. 

6,800 

75 

11*03 

Horsham. 

18,300 

267 

14*60 

Petworth. 

9,400 

154 

16*38 

Thakeham .... 

8,000 

124 

15*50 

East Preston . . 

9,200 

164 

17*82 

Midhurst .... 

14,350 

198 

13*80 

Westbourne 

7,000 

110 

15*71 

Worthing .... 

1—i 

00 

Oi 

o 

o 

• 

• 

\ 288 
i 265* 

15*57 

14*32* 

Littlehampton 

4,700 .. \ 

78 

69* 

16*60 

14*68* 

Arundel.. 

2,640 

32 

12*12 

Horsham. 

8,580 

147 

17-13 

Total.... 

118,470 1,781 

1,749* 

15*03 

14*76* 


* Excluding Visitors. 


There were 1,777 deaths actually registered in the whole district 
but to this number should be added the deaths of 39 persons occurring 
outside the district among persons belonging thereto ; from this total 
of 1,816 there should be deducted the deaths of 77 persons occurring 
within the district among persons not belonging thereto, leaving the 
total number at 1,739. Of these 77 persons, 42 were visitors at 
Worthing and Littlehampton, while 35 were persons who died in 
Workhouses, and who came from places not included in the combination. 
The 42 deaths among visitors added to the above number of 1,739 
make a total of 1,781 deaths. 


The deaths and also the death-rates in each of the past five years 
are here shown :— 


Deaths. 


Rate 


Year. 

Population, 

Male. 

Female. 

Total. 

per 1,000. 

1891 

.. 107,266 . . 

951 

.. 863 .. 

1,814 

.. 16*9 

1892 

.. 116,370 .. 

990 

. . 946 

1,936 

.. 16*6 

1893 

.. 117,140 .. 

961 

.. 938 .. 

1,899 

.. 16*3 

1894 

.. 115,280 .. 

770 

.. 752 .. 

1,522 

.. 13*2 

1895 

.. 118,470 .. 

891 

.. 890 .. 

1,781 

.. 15*0 


The death-rate in England and Wales in 1895 was equal to 18*7 
per 1,000 persons living, the rate, however, being higher in large towns 
than in small places :— 

Death-rate in 1S95. Mean, 1886-94 

Town Districts . 19’5 . . 19 8 

Country Districts .. 17*0 . 17*3 

England and Wales . . 18*7 „ . 18*9 


The death-rates in this district during the twenty years, 1876-95 
are here contrasted with the rates in England and Wales ; there is a 
general rise in recent years over the low rates prevailing in 1886-90. 































228 


Year. West Sussex. 

Town Districts. 

Country Districts. 

England 

1876-80 15*4 

22-4 

21-2 

20-8 

1881-85 14-6 

20-4 

17-5 

19-4 

1886-90 14*5 

20-0 

17*1 

18-9 

1891-95 15-6 

19*5 

17-3 

18-8 

1876-95 15-0 

20*6 

18 3 

19-5 

In each quarter of the 

past year the deaths were thus distributed 


Male. 

Female. Total. 

Per cent. 

First Quarter 

. . 308 

293 601 

33-7 

Second Quarter . . 

. . 200 

214 414 

23-3 

Third Quarter 

.. 183 

187 370 

20-8 

Fourth Quarter . . 

.. 200 

196 396 

22*2 

Total 

.. 891 

890 1,781 

100-0 


Deaths are more frequent in the cold months than in the warm 
months of the year ; hence the death-rate is highest in the first quarter, 
it declines through the second quarter, reaching its lowest point in the 
third quarter, and again rising as winter advances. This ordinary 
distribution of deaths was disturbed in 1893 by exceptional circum¬ 
stances, and chiefly by the prevalence of enteric fever. 


In each quarter of the previous ten years the deaths were thus 
recorded :— 


Period. 

1st Qr. 

2nd Qr. 

3rd Qr. 

4th Qr. 

Total. 

1876-80 * .. 

1,864 

1,645 

1,468 

1,519 

6,496 

1881-85 

1,978 

1,790 

1,686 

1,741 

7,195 

1886-90 

2,237 

1,829 

1,664 

1,820 

7,550 

1891-95 

2,893 

2,113 

1,946 

2,000 

8,952 

1876-95 

8,972 

7,377 

6,764 

7,080 

30,193 

Per cent.. . 

29-71 

24-43 

22-41 

23-45 

100-00 


The deaths at different groups of years are here shown not only for 
the whole district but also for the urban and rural portions separately. 


It is necessary to separate the urban and rural rates, as the distribu¬ 
tion of the population, as to age and sex, is so different in the two areas. 


In towns there is an excess of females over males, which slightly 
lowers the rate, and there is also a great excess of persons in adult and 
middle life which still further helps to lower the rate. The opposite 
conditions obtain in rural life, so that the death-rate is raised from 1 to 
2 per 1,000 simply from the presence of these conditions and quite apart 
from sanitary circumstances. 








229 


COMBINED 

DISTRICT, 

1895. 




Under 

1 year. 

1 to 5. 

5 to 15. 

15 to 25. 

25 to 65. 

65 & over. 

Total. 

Eirst Quarter . . 

97 

28 

21 

22 

166 

267 

601 

Second Quarter 

67 

36 

21 

14 

104 

172 

414 

Third Quarter. . 

74. 

31 

21 

25 

102 

117 

370 

Fourth Quarter 

65 

49 

32- 

17 

105 

128 

396 


Year. 

1895 .. 

303 

144 

95 

78 

477 

684 

1,781 

1894 .. 

242 

120 

79 

71 

445 

565 

1,522 

1893 .. 

308 

169 

139 

159 

574 

550 

1,899 

1892 .. 

300 

164 

88 

102 

577 

705 

1,936 

1891 .. 

321 

186 

87 

66 

495 

659 

1,814 

1890 .. 

256 

110 

59 

88 

414 

553 

1,480 

Total 

1,730 

893 

547 

564 2,982 

3,716 

10,432 

Per 10,000 . . 

1,658 

856 

524 

541 2,859 

3,562 

10,000 


V 

FOUR URBAN DISTRICTS. 


Year. 

Under 

1 year. 

1 to O* 

5 to 15. 

15 to 25. 

25 to 65. 

65 & over. 

Total. 

1890 .. 

71 

28 

11 

29 

103 

100 

342 

1891 .. 

76 

58 

23 

12 

148 

"159 

476 

1892 . . 

69 

41 

19 

38 

161 

187 

515 

1893 .. 

98 

59 

60 

86 

218 

169 

690 

1894 . . 

67 

41 

15 

14 

153 

148 

438 

1895 . . 

89 

54 

31 

22 

161 

188 

545 

Total 

470 

281 

159 

201 

944 

951 

3,006 

Per 10,000 . . 

1,564 

935 

529 

668 

3,140 

3,164 

10,000 


SEVEN RURAL DISTRICTS. 


Year. 

Under 

1 year. 

1 to 5. 

5 to 15. 

15 to 25. 25 to 65. 

65 & over. 

Total. 

1890 .. 

185 

82 

48 

59 

311 

453 

1,138 

1891 .. 

245 

128 

64 

54 

347 

500 

1,338 

1892 . . 

231 

123 

69 

64 

416 

518 

1,421 

1893 .. 

210 

110 

79 

73 

356 

381 

1,209 

1894 .. 

175 

79 

64 

57 

292 

417 

1,084 

1895 . . 

214 

90 

64 

56 

316 

496 

1,236 

Total 

1,260 

612 

388 

363 

2,038 

2,765 

7,426 

Per 10,000 . . 

1,697 

824 

522 

489 

2,744 

3,724 

10,000 

























230 


The death-rates in the urban and rural districts are here contras'ed 
over a term of twenty years:— 



COMBINED 

DISTRICT. 


Mean Annual 

Period. 

Population. 

Deaths. 


Death-rate. 

1876 80 

83,800 

6,496 

• • 

15-52 

1881-85 

100,230 

7,195 

• • 

14-36 

1886-90 

105,020 

7,550 

• 0 

14-38 

1891-95 

117,140 

8,952 

• • 

15-61 

1876-95 

• • • • 

30,193 

• 0 

14-97 

The recorded 

death-rates for these two areas are 

here given : — 


FOUR URBAN DISTRICTS. 







Mean annual 

Period. 

Population. 

Deaths. 


Death-rate. 

1876-80 

14,040 

1,108 

• • 

15-78 

1881 85 

19.780 

1,321 

0 0 

13-36 

1886-90 

22,200 

1,711 

0 0 

15-41 

1891-95 

32,940 

2,664 

0 0 

16-17 

1876-95 

• • • • 

6,804 

0 0 

15-18 


SEVEN RURAL DISTRICTS. 







Mean Annual 

Period. 

Population. 

Deaths. 


Death-rate. 

1876-80 

69,760 

5,388 


15-45 

1881-85 

80,450 

5,874 

0 • 

14-60 

1886-90 

82,820 

5,839 

0 • 

14-10 

1891-95 

84,200 

6,288 

0 0 

14-94 

J 876-95 

• • .... 

23,389 

0 0 

14-77 

The table should be compared 

with a similar table 

for the urban 


and rural birth-rates given above. 

The deaths as a rule, are most frequently in the first quarter, and 
least frequent in the third quarter of the year. The year might also 
be divided into three parts according to temperature ; the following 
scheme gives the percentage of deaths at each period for the twenty 
years 1876-95 :— 


Cold. 

Deaths. 

Per cent. 

December to March. . 

Moderate. 

11,560 

38-3 

April, May, October, November 

Hot. 

9,691 

32-1 

June to September 

8,942 

29-6 

Total 

30,193 

100-0 


Cold weather is most fatal while hot weather is the least fatal. 
Table 2 gives the deaths in each month of the years 1876-95, and from 
this table the above results are abstracted. 















Showing the Deaths in each Month in the twenty years, 1876-95, and in the year 1895. 


231 


cq 

H 

m 

◄ 


o 

GO 

i 

co 

CO 


P3 

-u> 

a 

o 

s 


Cq 

co 

Ci 

rH 

o 

hH 

CO 

r—* 


co 

05 

t- 

CO 

co 

05 

o 

id 

05 

CO 

T—1 

cq 

t- 

t— 

CO 

CO 

CO 

id 

CO 

o 

•'cH 


lO 

id 

''H 


id 


>-» 

u 

d 

P 

P 

d 


d 

P 

CD 


^3 

o 

u 

d 


<1 


P 


<D 

P 

P 

Hi 


P 

Hi 


+3 

o 

-O 

rH 


B 

a> 

rQ 

MmaA 

b 

cd 

-O 

CC 

p 

a> 

3 

p 

P 

SJO 

P 

<D 

CU 

05 

O 

-4-3 

O 

o 

t> 

o 

B 

CD 

O 

CD 


GO 


lO 

07) 

i" 

Jfoq 

cq 

i . 

id 

cq 


O 

t- 

co 

id 

00 

CO 

r-H 

GO 

o 

CO 

CO 

00 

co 

05 

cq 

rH 

co 

co 

r-H 


oo 

rH 

rH 

rH 

cq 

rH 

rH 


rH 

rH 

— 1 

r-H 

r-H 

r-H 

t—^ 














r-H 

id 















rH 

cq 

cq 

CO 

CO 

05 

oo 

05 


rH 



co 


vb 

rH 

cq 

ib 


<x> 


ib 


cq 

cq 

• 

07) 

05 

^ i—i 

id 


id 

CO 

cq 

o 

o 

rH 

r-H 

r-H 

rH 

cq 

o 

rH 

rH 

rH 

rH 

r-H 

rH 

rH 

r-H 

rH 

r-H 

rH 

r-H 

Id 














r-H 

id 














r— 1 

<H • 

cq 

id 

id 

CO 

co 

co 

1— 

05 

00 

co 

05 

CO 

CO 

-b to 

o 

oq 


o 

05 

i— 

id 

rH 

00 

1 

Hhi 

oo 

05 

_o t- 

rH 

GO 

O 



rH 

rH 

co 

Cl 

cq 

cq 

id 

r-H 

Eh go 

rH 

co*' 

cq 

CO 

cT 

cq 

of 

of 

of 

of 

of 

cq** 

cq 

o 

CO 

id 














OS 

1 

o 

o 

co 

CO 

o 

lO 

rH 

05 

CO 


oo 

id 

cq 

rH 

05 

CO 

rH 

»o 

CO 

CO 

o 

cq 

id 

lO 

co 


r-H 

co 

id 

>—* 

ex 

00 

05 

t- 

t- 

co 

co 

CO 

CO 

CO 

co 

t- 

05 

ex 

r-H 

rH 












co 

o 














05 














CO 

00 

00 

t- 

co 


CO 

o 

CO 

o 

o 

hH 

CO 

cq 

o 

o 


cq 

CO 

05 


05 


CO 

CO 

00 

CO 


id 

co 

t- 

00 

CO 

CO 


lO 

Id 

Id 

id 

Id 

co 

id_ 

rH 














id 

CO 

1 














CO 

05 

CO 


CO 

CO 

co 

05 


id 

o 

CO 

id 

I—I 

CO 

CO 

00 

rH 

tH 

cq 

o 

co 

CO 

GO 

CO 

CO 

05 

r-H 

05 

CO 

CO 

CO 

CO 

CO 

id 

lO 

Id 

id 

id 

Id 

CO 

r-H 

ex 

r-H 













1>- 


CO 

05 

ex 

CO 


P 

-u 

O 

EH 






















































232 


INFANT MORTALITY. 

During the year 1895 there were 303 deaths of infants under one 
year of age, out of a total of 1,781 deaths from all causes ; of these 170 
were male and 133 were female. 

There were 2,878 births, so that the infant mortality, as measured 
by the number of deaths under one year of age to every 1,000 children 
born, was 105 against a rate of 87, 112, 84, 77, 77, 97, 113, 106, 102, 
and 84 in the ten preceding years. 

Throughout England and Wales the rate of infant mortality in 
1895 was equal to 161 per 1,000, the mean proportion in the preceding 
ten years having been 146. In large towns the infantile death-rate is 
very much higher. 


In each district the rate of infant mortality during the past five 
years was as follows :— 



1891. 

1892. 

1893. 

1894. 

1895. 

Mean. 

Steyning. 

112 

.. 131 

.. 113 

. . 83 

..104 .. 

108-6 

Horsham .... 

85 

.. 122 

. . 94 

. . 82 

.. 86 . . 

93-8 

Petworth .... 

119 

. . 84 

. . 68 

.. 57 

..119 .. 

89-4 

Thakeham .... 

112 

. . 86 

. . 87 

.. 85 

.. 76 .. 

89-2 

East Preston . . 

102 

, . 93 

. . 88 

. . 78 

.. 108 .. 

93-8 

Midhurst .... 

127 

.. 107 

. . 71 

.. 97 

.. 92 .. 

98-8 

Westbourne . . 

87 

.. 108 

.. 142 

.. 75 

..151 .. 

112-6 

Worthing . . . 

140 

.. 78 

.. 145 

.. 115 

..135 .. 

122-6 

Littlehampton 

107 

.. Ill 

.. 48 

.. 81 

.. 118 .. 

93-0 

Arundel. 

186 

.. 58 

.. 115 

. . 79 

. . 39 v .. 

95-4 

Horsham. 

— 

.. 123 

.. 136 

.. 118 

..109 .. 

121-5 

Mean .... 

113 

106 

102 

84 

105 

102-0 


It will thus be seen that the rate of infant mortality is much higher 
in the urban than in the rural districts. The death-rate of male infants 
is much higher than that of female infants; it is true that more boys 
than girls are born, the ratio being 103 male births to 97 female births 
in the twenty years, 1876-95, or in the proportion of 106 boys to 100 
girls, but this will not account for the great disparity in the death-rates. 


Year. 

Under 1 year. 

M. F. 

M. 

1 to 2. 

F. 

2 to 
M. 

5. 

F. 

1890 . . 

159 

97 

29 

30 

27 

24 

1891 . . 

189 

132 

56 

40 

49 

41 

1892 . . 

170 

130 

44 

49 

37 

34 

1893 .. 

178 

130 

41 

40 

45 

43 

1894 .. 

145 

97 

38 

37 

22 

23 

1895 .. 

170 

133 

36 

35 

32 

41 

Total. . 

1,011 

719 

244 

231 

212 

206 

Rural deaths 

752 

508 

170 

159 

145 

138 

Urban deaths 

259 

211 

74 

72 

67 

68 


Under one year of life there is a great preponderance of male 
deaths, and a similar excess, but in a much diminished degree, may be 
noticed up to five years of age, after which period the numbers are more 
nearly equal. 



























Table 3.—Showing the Deaths at various groups of ages in the seven Rural Districts in the fifteen years, 1881-95. 


233 


02 










’-O 










£ £ 

CO 

O 

o 

h 

00 


03 

00 

lO 


w 

00 

o 

00 

lO 

to 

co 

03 

lO 

gft 

rH 

r-H 

03 

to 

to 

rH 

to 

co 

lO 

rH 

r-H 




rH 


CO 

co" 

id 










CO 

to 


co 

t-H 

o 

03 

co 

rH 

to 

o 

i- 


lO 

co 

03 

co 

co 

o 

o 

©3 

o 

03 

to 

lO 

o 

GO 


cq 

oq 

o 

r— 1 







lO 

03 

03 










id 










03 

CO 

00 

CO 

r-H 

rH 

o 

rH 

t— 

00 

o 

00 

L— 

o 

03 

o 

t— 


03 

03 

+3 

r— < 

r-H 

r-H 


r-H 

t-H 


oo 

H 

lO 










T—4 










id 

co 

CO 

03 

to 

03 

rH 

rH 

1C 

lO 


CO 

o 

03 

03 

rH 

to 

03 

tH 

03 

o 

©3 

r-H 

CM 



rH 

rH 


03 

lO 

lO 




















id 

1> 

lO 

o 


03 

03 

HO 

lO 

CO 

o 

03 

o 

lO 

lO 

t© 

03 

co 

co 

o 

©3 


CO 

r-H 

rH 

rH 

03 

rH 

cq 

03 

rH 








rH 


year. 










OS 

03 

co 

lO 

o 

CO 

CO 

lO 

00 

r—1 

C3 

o 

r-H 

o 

o 

rH 

00 

t— 

o 

u 

N 

to 

CO 

03 

co 

uo 

03 

cq 


02 








co 

rH 










fl 










£ 










02 

<D 

tUD 










r-H 

03 

00 

r-H 

00 

03 

lO 

t-H 

o 



rH 

rH 

r-H 

to 

OO 

lO 

o 

o 

r—H 

o3 

ao 

-rH 

03 

co 

CO 

t-H 

cq_ 

cq 

o 

CO 

CO 

03 

i—i 

rH 

cd” 

rH 

00 

o 

©3 








rH 














• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 


m 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 


ci 










W 









• 

no 









_o 

0 





* 



* 

Tl 

oi 









CO 

©a 









• 1—1 
ft 

su 

C/5 

<D 

£ 

• 

• . 

8 

• 

a 

fl 

o 

©3 

m 

© 

-1-3 

02 

© 

d 

u 

P 

r-H 

©3 

o 

o 

o 

cq 

cT 

rH 

(3 

rt 

• pH 

£ 

t-i 

O 

© 

Sh 

Ph 

' S-l 

P 

o 

EH 

u 

© 


w 

© 

©3 

02 

02 

O 

M 

£ 

CD 

PH 

•a 

XI 

Eh 

■s 

c3 

3 

X 

• rH 

a 

©3 

co 

© 

£ 


PH 









I 

i 


















































234 


ZYMOTIC MORTALITY. 

Oat of 1,781 deaths from all causes in 1895, 153 were due to this 
class of disorders, or D29 per 1,000 persons living. 

In England and Wales the rate from only the seven principal 
zymotic disorders was equal to 2-14 per 1,000 persons living, against 
2*22, 2T4, 1*90, 2*00, 2*52, and L81 in the six preceding years. 

There were in this district 74 deaths from diseases in 1895, which 
are notifiable, and 79 deaths in the other class, where the number of 
cases cannot be obtained. 


Notifiable. f Not-notifiable. 


Diseases. 


Deaths. 

Diseases. 

Deaths. 

Small Pox 


none 

Measles . . 

19 

Scarlatina 


2 

Whooping Cough 

11 

Diphtheria 


54 

Diarrhoea and Dysentery 

47 

Membranous Croup 


2 

Rheumatic Fever 

2 

/Typhus 


none 



g Enteric 


8 



® “J Continued . . 


none 



1 Relapsing 


none 



' Puerperal 


1 



Cholera . . 


none 



Erysipelas 


7 *» 




Total 

74 

Total 

79 


There were 86 deaths from Influenza. 

The Infectious Disease (Notification) Act, 1889, came into operation 
at various periods in the years 1890 and 1891, and now it is adopted 
throughout the whole area except in the Urban Sanitary District of 
Horsham, which only joined the combination at the end of the year 
1891. 


In each quarter of 1895 the new cases of Infectious Disease were 


thus registered :— 

1st Qr. 

2nd Qr. 

3rd Qr. 

4th Qr. 

Year. 

Small Pox 

_ 

- 

_ 

_ 

_ 

Scarlatina 

35 

25 

21 

35 

116 

Diphtheria 

23 

21 

57 

149 

250 

Membranous Croup 

. . — 

— 

3 

1 

4 

Enteric Fever 

7 

6 

14 

37 

64 

Continued Fever 

# . - 

1 

7 

1 

9 

Relapsing Fever. . 

, . - 

— 

— 

— 

— 

Puerperal Fever . . 

. . - 

1 

2 

— 

3 

Erysipelas 

23 

17 

23 

27 

90 

Total .. 

88 

71 

127 

250 

536 

Urban cases 

21 

16 

32 

84 

153 

Rural cases 

67 

55 

95 

166 

383 













Table 4.—Showing the Deaths from Zymotic Diseases in each of the seven Rural Districts in the twenty years, 1876-95. 


235 


Total. 

A 

r 

*r»m 

665 

* 

412 

212 

271 

261 

407 

200 

1 

00 
i ^ 

I cq~ 

•0[q^i^ou-uoj^ 

419 

! 

260 

108 

152 

140 

220 

117 

1 

! ^ 

1 rH 


246 

152 

104 

119 

121 

187 

83 

1,012 

6 

r—H 

Xi 

yd 

t< 

a 

i 

a 

o 

r 

"uzuenpaj 

05 -rf VO O VO r—1 

j vo co co cq ^ 

298 

•J0A0J 

O* lO O Cl CO iO 

| rH i—1 

54 

•U9oqjj^i(j 

05 O CO O rH 

CO CO Cq CO VO CO Cq 

rH 

394 

•ifSnoo 

Suidooq^ 

© 05 05 Cq Cq VO 

CO 00 CO CO ^ l>* CO 

rH 

rH 

t- 

T*H 

•S8[S^0J\[ 

V 

05 05 O O OS t— vo 

VO rH rH M CO rH 

05 

05 

rH 

Notifiable. 

.... 

r 

•S'BjedisXjg; 

CO <M CO CO CO CO 00 

cq rH r—l rH 

86 

co 

<A 

m 

Eq 

r 

quiedjen^ 

O CO rH CO Cq ^ Cl 

rH 

36 

•ponm^uoQ 

co co | | rH cq 

rH 

•0ij0^ug[ 

Cq O O C5 00 rH Cq 

co cq cq rH co ^ cq 

222 

( 

•snqdiCx 

i 

co cq | cq | r-n 

CO 

rH 

•dnoaQ 

snouBjqui0]^[ 

... __ i 

vo rH | —< cq cq cq 

CO 

rH 

"BiJ0q^qdi(j 

i 

o os co cq t— i — i co 

CO CO CO VO O0 

440 

i 

, 'Cm^T3[.I'C0g 

rH VO 05 VO VO 00 rH 

vo cq cq cq cq 

CO 

r-H 

•xoj tp ra S 

r— 1 1> Cq rH 1 Cd 

i— 1 

1 

rH 

Period, 187 6 L 95. 

Steyning (W. k E.) 

Horsham 

Petworth 

Thakeham 

East Preston 

Mid hurst 

Westbourne 

(1881-95). 

Total 
















































































Table 5.—Showing the Deaths from Zymotic Diseases in the seven Rural Districts in the twenty years, 18 1 6-95. 


236 


r-H 

3 

ti 

e per 

03 

d 

o 

03 

is . 


*r«m 

1 00 

I 2 

1 

o 

■h 

i—i 

co 

Cq 

l-H 

168 

278 

r-H 

cq 

cq 

iO 

co 

t-H 

cq 

CO 

r-H 

1 co 
ia 

r—i 

C 

d 

fl 

d 

© 

a 

1 

-a ° -2 

4-2 O 


•©iq^p 

-I(}QU-U0]^ 

1 CO 

1 oo 

1 

09 

80 

CO 

CM 

r—l 

229 

o 

r-H 

rH 

65 

114 

89 

© < 
a: 

3 

3 

—i 


' 0 iq^D°hT 

62 

85 

46 

42 

49 

co 

o 

I—1 

70 

00 

1 

CO 





•pm 

1 t- 

1 s 

1 

583 

523 

140 

233 

CO 

co 

r-H 

o 

t-H 

r-H 

CO 

co 

r—1 

2428 


-4^ 



•0[qB 

qpou-uojs^ 

300 

242 

r—H 

co 

CO 

iO 

o 

r-H 

cq 

as 

t-H 

97 

53 

96 

1416 


o 

H 



‘ a iq^TD°JS[ 

1 t- 
i i—i 

1 <M 

1 

r-H 

eo 

Cq 

OS 

i“H 

ia 

CO 


89 

57 

40 

1012 


f 



*czu0npuj 

1 

1 

22 

00 

co 

<M 

cq 

r-H 

34 

26 

56 

298 

d 

•jaAO^ oiqi3inn0qp[ 

O 

H 

lO 

T—1 

o 

r-H 

co 

o 


CO 

r-H 

54 

• r-> 

■§ < 
d 

/ 

^ "eaoqjjm(j 

118 

92 

105 

CO 

r-H 

cq 

22 

co 

26 

394 

a 

o 

£ 

•qSnoQ Suidooq^ 

Cq 

r-H 

o 

o 

H 

co 

co 

r-H 

co 

44 

CO 

rH 

os 

lO 

rH 

t- 

hH 


•saisua]^ 

48 

35 

58 

H 

as 

00 

r-H 

as 

00 

as 

as 

I-H 


•sc[9disXjg; 

rH 

36 

CO 

CO 

o 

o 


co 

86 



qumdaonj 

lO 

H 

r-H 

r-H 

00 

r-H 

1 

1 

1 

r-H 

36 


m 

Ph 

W , 

>• \ 
K| 

H 

•penuiquoQ 

o 

rH 

uo 

cq 

l 

l 

1 

1 

1 

t- 

rH 

-2* 

* 


•oi.i0^ ag[ 

46 

57 

CM 

lO 


CO 

t— 

CO 

<M 

r-H 

00 1 

222 

JO 

d 

yn < 

• *—i \ 

! 



•snqd^x 


lO 


l 

1 

1 

| 

I 

1 

CO 

rH 

o 

£ 



•dno.iQ 

snoucjqm0j^ 

i 

i 

1 


1 

CO 

co 

cq 1 

CO 

rH 




*'Bij0qq.qdt(j 

99 

t— 

hH 

r-H 

CO 

00 

O 

Cq 

33 

30 

36 

25 

440 


•uuipqjBDg 

56 

73 

25 

cq 

1 

lO 

cq 

rH 1 

164 




• 

xo j n^ ra s 

CO 

L- 

cq 

1 

i 

1 

CO 

1 

i 

rH 

Period. 

1876-80.. 

»o 

OO 

1 

r-H 

00 

00 

1886-90.. 

1891 .. 

1892 .. 

1893 .. 

1894 .. 

1895 .. 

Total . . 
































































Table 6.—Showing the Deaths from Zymotic Diseases in four Urban Districts in the twenty years 1876-95. 


237 


Mean annual 
Death-rate per 
100,000 persons 
living. 

W°X 

184 

105 

162 

298 

150 

720 

87 

300 

r-H 

a* 

r-H 

*0[qBijpou 

" U0 N 

i to CO r -1 1 —l CO CO CO i-h 

Ir-HCOOGOr-HCqCOO 

| H r—< cq r—( r-H Cq 

1 o 
i <—> 

1 ^ 


71 

37 

61 

17 

37 

592 

24 

99 

81 


129 

104 

180 

71 

49 

237 

29 

103 

902 

Total. 

• 0 [qmjpou 

lai>iMNNNHaj 

iNtOH^CO^WtO 

1 

494 

•8iqt!g!?o^ 

Ot^OO^tMlOOD^ 

*cs co co r— i 05 co 

r-H 

408 

Non-notifiable. 

•Bzuonpaj 

1 1 CO o o> lO 05 o 

1 1 1—1 r—1 CO 

-1 

76 

•j0A0j[ oi^mnnoqy; 

CO lO i-O | (M r-H | r-H 

r-H 


CO CO 1C QO VC5 1 r-H 

co oq co cq | cq 

o 

r-H 

•qSnoQ Suidooqy^ 

t'-'^iocquocsh-co 
cq j— i ics i-h 

>o 

CO 

rH 

^ *S 0ISB0Jft 

lcsocoococqicsr-H 

H oq r—1 r-H 

05 

o 

r-H 

Notifiable. 

' *sc[0dis^jg; 

cq ^ io cq co to | ^ 

23 

Pevers. 

qBJ0da0n ( j 

r— ^ r— 1 i— 1 | | Cq 

05 

•p0nui^aoQ | 

i—t CO r-H | | j | | 


•oij0^ug[ 

t- cq | co go | | 

r-H r-H I 1 1 

i- 

r-H 

cq 

•snqd^x j 

II II 1 1 II 

1 

•dnojQ | 

snouBaqaiepj 1 

| | | | j cq | | j 

cq 

•B[J0q;qdi(x j 

O O 05 J O CO iO 05 

r—l 1 —1 r-H | Cq j 

GO 

‘BUipqJBOg 

CO t— r—1 r-H Cq r-H r-H 

cq cq 

CO 

CO 

•xojiprag j 

I i - i r i i 

vrs 

Period. 

1876-80. . 

1881-85. . 

1886-90. . 

1891 .. 

1892 . . 

1893 . . 

1894 . . 

1895 _ 

Total .. 
















































































Table 7. — Showing the New Cases of Infectious Diseases notified in the Combined District during the five years, 1891-95, 

and the deaths therefrom. 


238 


1895. 

1 ^ 

© 

03 

=0 | 

rH I>- 

— 

74 

34 

© 

^cH 


CO 

03 

CO 

O'! 1 

r-H -rjH 

CM 

© 


03 

1 

CO 


*H 


CO 


© 

oo 









T—H 









co 

CO b- 

CO 

CO 

<m | 

1 | b- 

rH 

03 

03 

03 


CO 


?H 

I 1 

t- 

00 

CO 

oo 




03 


03 

rH 


rH 









03 

rH 

CO 

| 

CO I 

1 1 00 

rH 

© 

rH 

© 


co 


1 

| 1 

© 

rH 


OO 









rH 










EG 

rP 

4-3 

c3 

© 

ft 


H 

05 

CO 

H 

1 

CO 

20 

03 

b- 

1 

' 

03 

no 

39 


35 

_p 

CO 

CO 

03 

CO 

no 

■ 

, 

'Xf 

rH 

t- 

no 

EM 

C3 


rH 

GO 

rH 





co 

© 

CO 

© 

"o 



rH 


EM 






03 

EM 

1 Eh 








- 






CO 

03 

rr 

EM 

03 

H 

r—l 

© 

© 

00 

CO 

© 

C5 

03 

CO 

GO 

(M 

© 

rH 


EM 




b- 

o 


03 

00 


CO 





r-H 

© 

rH 

EH 





rH 






H 

EM 

UO 

, 

co 

© 



© 

, 

CO 

© 

© 

CO 

© 

<03 


rH 

no 


© 




© 

CO 

© 

00 

CO 


rH 

EM 







no 

rH 

CO 

rH 













■H 


rH 

03 

no 

N 

| 

rH 

no 

CO 

« 

b- 

© 

03 


rH 

© 


no 

i 



00 

co 


© 

CO 


rH 

rH 









CO 

rH 













CO 

rH 

b- 

co 

GO 

© 

, 


00 

rH 

b- 

© 

rH 

03 

03 

co 

b- 


no 




EM 

(M 

CO 


00 


co 

rH 


no 




rH 

EM 

tH 

b- 

rH 





rH 





cT 

rH 


03 

, 

b- 

i— 

CO 

© 

, 


03 

© 

b- 

-eH 

CO 

03 


co 

CO 






© 

co 

03 

rH 

co 


rH 

rH 







no 

rH 


rH 













rH 

H 

CO 

© 

03 

CO 

03 

1 

EM 

oo ! 

no 

co 

EM 

03 


o 

© 




1 


^ 1 

f—H 

co 

CO 

00 

• 

03 

rH 






1 


rH 

03 

rH 

l 














• 

. 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 


© 

© 

• i—i 

-n> 

o 

£ 

eg 

© 

eg 

c3 

o 

£ 

© 


M 

o 

Ph 

Zfl 


o3 

P 

* P—< 

TJ 

© 

GO 


cJ 

• i—i 

u 

© 

© 

•4-3 

HP 

Ph 


a. 

p 

o 

u 

O 

EG 

P 

O 

P 

c3 

pH 

© 

s 

© 


p s 


© 

© 

> 

© 

Ph 

© 

• pH 

u 

© 

P 


u 

© 

> 

© 

Ph 

T3 

© 

P 

P 

• pH 

^U> 

P 

o 

O 


© 

© 

> 

© 

pH 

be 

p 

• pH 

in 

Ph 

'a? 

Ph 


© 

© 

© 

Ph 


c3 

U 

© 

Ph 

U 

© 

P 

PP 


EG 

cS 

r © 

Ph 

• rH 

EG 

P‘3 

u 

w 


c3 

4-3 

O 


EG 

© 

EG 

ci 

© 

P 

c3 

© 

U 

£ 


EG 

© 

EG 

Ch 

© 

c3 

?H 

P 

Ph 


Not including two deaths in 1892, thirteen in 1893, and three in 1894, in Horsham Urban District. 






















































Table 8.—Showing the New Cases of Infectious Diseases notified in the Seven Rural Districts during the five years, 1891-95, 

and the deaths therefrom. 


239 



lO 


r-H 

*o 

cq 

00 


r-H 

co 

o 


05 

1 


cq 



1 1 





CO 

1 





1 1 





r-H 











ft 


Cl 

to 

co 

cq 

• 



L— 


05 

| 


co 


r-H 

| I 

I 


LO 


00 

1 





1 1 

1 




r—H 










4 

CO 

co 

LO 

o 

co 




LO 

05 


05 



co 


co 

1 j 



00 

03 

oo 






1 

1 



^ J r-H 










-45> N 











c3 











o 

ft 

cq 

05 

■ 

j 

33 

J 

co 

| | 

j 

LO 

41 


00 

1 

1 


1 


1 1 

1 




r-H 













cq 

o 

cq 

t- 


r-H 

CO 

LO 


05 

1 


cq 



1 1 



CO 


OO 

1 





1 1 





r-H 











_• 

to 

o 


co 

t- 


cq 

o 

cq 


C3 


r-H 


r-H 

CO 



cq 

CO 


"o 



T“H 



1 1 



cq 


H 











• 


cq 

00 

r-H 

cq 

O cO 

cq 

co 

LO 



Ct 


CO 

cq 

05 

r-H 

i—i 

o 

t- 


o 


50 * 

L— 


CO 



CO 

r-H 


H 








cf 


ft 

* 

oo 

i—H 


05 

oo 

CO 

o 

CO 


05 


05 

lO 


LO 

1 


CO 

CO 


00 

1 


r-H 



1 



co 

ft 

co 

cd 

• r— 1 

r-H 










ft 

cq 

CO 

00 


o 

co 

cq 


CO 


05 


05 






CO 

LO 

fc J 

CO 

r-H 



r-H 



1 



co 

\ 












CO 

CO 

cS 

o 

£ 

1893. 

r-H 

cq 

240 

166 

00 

210 

i 

LO 

1 

r-H 

O* 

r-H 

hi 

i- 

CD 












cq 


i— 

oo 

CO 

CO 


r-H 


CO 


05 


cq 

CO 


LO 



OO 

r-H 


00 * 

| 

t-H 

r-H 



1 

1 

LO 

H 


r-H 











r-H 

r-H 

Hi 

LO 

cq 


cq 

r-H 

o 

cq 


05 

* 

r-H 

o 


cq 


i 

1 

co 

00 


GO 


r-H 

r-H 




1 


cq 


r—H 













• 


• 






CD 

02 

• 

• 

• 

Oh 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

* 

Og 




r—• 







CD 




O 



5h 

?H 



T Jl 

• 1 




i-i 


CD 

02 

CD 



ft 

• - 

• 

• 

O 

rH 

> 

<D 

> 

02 

CD 

• 

* 


• 

• 

• 

in 

0 

<D 

> 

ft 

ft 

ft 

• 

'* 


X 

o 

ft 

d 

• rH 

+5 

c3 

* rH 

CD 

03 

■+3 

o 

0 

C3 

?H 

rO 

<D 

ft 

O 

• rH 
fH 

03 

CD 

0 

d 

• rH 

be 

d 

• rH 

in 

Pl, 

r—H 

c3 

U 

CD 

Oh 

m 
c0 

(—H 

02 

Ph 

. rH 

Total 


r " j 

r . 

rO 

d 

CD 

-1-3 

eg 

U 

02 



cz 

£ 

m 

H 

o 

04 

• rH 

ft 

Sh 

CD 

a 

-1-3 

d 

ft 

d 

o 

O 

B 

ft 

02 

d 

ft 

K*~l 

Sh 

ft 




































































Table 9.—Showing the Deaths in the Rural and Urban Districts from five Zymotic Diseases in the twenty years, 1876-95 


240 


A 

<! 

« 

PS 


’■waEpqjBOg 


CO 

oq 


cq 


co 


a 

o 

•rl 

-P 

3 

a, 

o 

Pm 


o 

o 

o 

o 


GO 

o 

tM 

o. 


cq. 

05, 

T}T 

of 

oT 

of 

rH 

»—i 

Cq 

to 


co 

CO 




•B0OqjJBI(J 

CO 

00 

cq 

CO 

CO 

05 

lO 

157 

05 

if- 


a 

•qgnoQ 

8uidooq^ 

Ol 

r-H 

KO 

io 

05 

CO 

o 

co 

rH 

00 

cb 











03 / 

,G N 
-P 
<3 

•S8|SB0J\[ 

lO 

rH 

o 

cq 

CO 

rH 

r-H 

CO 

05 

O 

rH 

io 

lb 


•Bi.i8q!}qdi(j 

O O 05 lO 

i—1 rH rH hM 

00 

cq 


CO 


< 

u> 

Pm 


G 

o 

• r-H 

-P 

3 

a. 

o 

PM 


o 

o 

o 

o 

CO 

lO 

cq 

o 



00, 

o^ 

Os'' 

o' 

of 

hM 

CO 

GO 

oo 

GO 


a 

o 

u 

«4H 

CO 

mG 

-P 

oj 

® 

ft 




00 


oq 

05 


iO> 

o 


o* 

t- 


05 

CO 


1— 

05 


•qgnoQ 

8uidooq^ 

124 

100 

136 

111 

T~H 

J— 

hm 

lO 

cb 

cq 

*S0[S88J£ 

48 

35 

58 

58 

05 

05 

r—H 

o 

© 

rH 

*BU8q^qdt(j 

66 

147 

83 

144 

440 

22-0 

•■Bui^BiacDg 

CO CO 10 O 

o t— cq i-H 

hH 

CO 

r-H 

oq 

cb 


« 

o 

H 

Pi 

w 

Pm 


• 


• 

• 

• 


• 


• 


* _ 

p 

03 

_G 

1 

• 

•m 


• 


• 

3 

G 

G 

G 

© 

lO 

o 

lO 

-P 

rs 

<1 

00 

00 

1 

05 

o 

1 

Eh 


1 

1 

£ 

CO 

r-H 

CO 

r-H 


c3 

r— 

GO 

CO 

05 


03 

GO 

GO 

00 

00 


PM 

r-H 

rH 

r-H 

f—H 






















































































241 


a 

o 

u 

UH 

p 

cS 

CD 

© 

CD 

P 

c3 

a 


c3 

a 

o 

£ 

■8 

• ** 
M 
•4-i 

co 


nO 

0) 

A 

• l-^ 

rO 

a 

o 

O 

© 

P3 

S3 

• pH 

a 


© 

o 

CD 

o' 

O 


tf 

H 

P-i 

S 

H 

H 

P5 

I 

W 

H 

H 

ft 


VO 

05 

I 

to 

t— 

CO 


•9SB0SI(J JJ3J0JJ 

131 

131 

147 

152 

172 

137 

160 

160 

r-H 

r-H 

•os'bosiq Satvp 

225 

216 

230 

322 

295 

193 

189 

236 

230 


OGOOO^tOi>*t^iO 
-£-«• CO CO rH rH 03 05 05 

i--1 r —( r-H i— 1 rH rH 

139 

Zymotic 

9[q3?gijou-uojsj 

90 

61 

84 

160 

197 

111 

64 

139 

03 

05 

*0[q^pijojsi 

64 

75 

50 

36 

45 

242 

56 

62 

05 

co 

•S0S130SI(J J[Y 

1,552 

1,436 

1,438 

1,691 

1,663 

1,629 

1,320 

1,503 

1,497 


CD 

> 5s 
•h cj 

— © 
CD 

P 

.9 ►* 

C/2 +3 

p a 

s-i 

O -43 

© ® 
X-.P 

O +5 

o 

'“ H P 

P "~* 

© CD 
Oh © 

CD 


<32 

-P 

o3 

P 

I 

Pi 

+3 

05 


P 

o3 

© 

CD 

p 

o 


© .pH 

ft 'S 


os 

p 

c2 

CO 

Pp 

-t-5 

c3 

© 

ft 

© 

pP 

-+5> 

P 

* 

O 


CO 

w 

H 

h< 

W 

ft 


w 

p 

PQ 

◄ 

H 


•poiaad 

t[OT30 JO 0[ppiOI 
0l[J UI UOIJiqndoj 


•0ST30SI(J JJB0JJ 


•0SB0Si(j[ Survq 


o 

o 

o 

CO 

o 

o 

o 

o 

o 

CO 

03 

CO 

1— 

HjH 

CO 

t— 

00 

op 

cp 

Op 

c<p 

r-H 

Op 

np 

Co" 

©" 

vnT 

ift 

co" 


vo" 

oo" 

oo 

o 

o 

o 

r-H 

r-H 

1—1 

rH 


r-H 

r-H 

rH 

t-H 

r-H 

7-H 

r*H 


549 

655 

772 

co 

CO 

r-H 

r— 1 

o 

03 

160 

184 

190 

| 2,874 

o 

r-H 

CO 

CO 

CO 

CO 

00 

05 

05 

o 

00 

o 

hH 

hH 

03 

r-H 


hH 

05 

©^ 

r—H 

03 

r\ 

r-H 

CO 

CO 

Ol 

03 

03 

CO 




05 

co 


vo 

<03 

1- 


CO 

03 


VO 

co 


05 

HiH 


03 


03 


to 

I- 

e> 

03 


Zymotic 

©iq'eijijou-uoyj 

2 

CO 

309 

443 

172 

229 

139 

74 

VO 

CO 

rH 

1,910 

•oiq^pijo^ 

t- 

co 

03 

00 

V'- 

co 

260 

39 

53 

284 

65 

1- 

1,420 


*S3S'B0STQ[ qy 

6,496 

7,195 

7,550 

1,814 

1,936 

1,899 

1,522 

1,781 

co 

05 

rH 

O 

CO 





• 








ft 











O 











P 











© 

o 

o 

o 






1—H 


ft 

00 

1 

oo 

i 

a* 

i 

r-H 

03 

CO 


iO 

c2 

HH 



CO 

r-H 

CO 

05 

05 

05 

05 

05 

O 



I' 

CO 

00 

oo 

00 

00 

00 

00 

H 



oo 

oo 

oo 

r-H 

1—1 

r-H 

rH 

r—< 




r-H 

r-H 

r-H 


















































242 


SALE OF FOOD AND DRUGS ACTS, 1875 AND 1879. 

Summary of the report of the Public Analyst, Otto Hehner, Esq., 
appointed for the County of West' Sussex, upon the articles analysed by 
him under the above Acts during the year, 1895. 


First Quarter, ending March 31st, 1895. 

Article. Result. 

Milk, 14 samples .... Twelve genuine, 2 adulterated with 7 and 

8 per cent, of water. 

Butter, 14 samples . . Thirteen genuine, 1 adulterated with 75 

per cent, margarine. 

Total number of samples analysed during the Quarter, 28. Adulterated,3. 


Second Quarter, ending June 30th, 1895. 


Butter, 9 samples 
Pepper, 7 samples 
Olive Oil, 4 samples . . 

Spirits, 6 samples 

Oatmeal, 2 samples 
Total number of samples 


All genuine. 

All genuine. 

One only genuine, 3 consisted entirely 
cottonseed oil. 

Two genuine, 4 adulterated with 1|, 2, 6, 
and 23 per cent, water. 

Both genuine. 

analysed during the Quarter, 28. Adulterated, 7 


Third Quarter, ending September, 30th, 1895. 

Ground Coffee, 14 samples All genuine. 

Olive Oil, 7 samples . . Five pure, 2 consisted entirely of cotton¬ 
seed oil. 

Whiskey, 6 samples . . Five genuine, 1 watered to the extent of 

2'6 per cent. 

Total number of samples analysed during the Quarter, 27. Adulterated, 3. 

Fourth Quarter, ending December 31st, 1895. 

No articles submitted. . Nil. 

Total number of samples analysed during the Quarter, 0. Adulterated 0. 

There were sent for analysis during the year 83 samples, and of 
these 13 or 15 ‘6 per cent, were adulterated. 

Twelve convictions were obtained :—Four of whiskey, one of 
butter, two of milk, and five of olive oil. 




243 


The total costs incurred under these Acts during the year were :— 

£ s. d. 

Fees for analysis .. .. . . . . ' 43 4 0 

Carriage, postage, &c. .. .. .. 0 17 9 

Expenses incurred in obtaining samples, &c. 9 3 9 

Printing .. .. .. .. .. 053 

Total . £53 10 9 


METEOROLOGY. 


The following tables give the 

a. Amount of Rainfall. 

b. Hours of Bright Sunshine. 

c. Accumulated Heat in Day Degrees. 

d. Earth Temperature. 

e. Climate of Worthing. 


RAINFALL. 

The rainfall at different places in the combined district is here 
contrasted for a term of years :— 

Worthing, Petworth. 

^ ■ ■ ————ii ■■ ■ - -Tr.ii ■ ■■■■■ 


Year. 

Inches. 

Rainy Days. 

Inches. 

Rainy Days. 

1881 

.. .. 29-97 

.. 161 

34-89 

.. 115 

1882 

.. .. 32-70 

.. 191 

35-69 

.. 145 

1883 

.. .. 28-10 

.. 170 

35-80 

. . 142 

1884 

.. . . 24-75 

.. 119 

26-65 

.. 115 

1885 

.. . . 29-28 

.. 150 

33-30 

.. 124 

1886 

.. .. 31-89 

.. 164 

38-09 

.. 147 

1887 

.. .. 21-30 

.. 127 

28-57 

.. 103 

1888 

.. .. 25-73 

.. 175 

35-38 

.. 116 

1889 

.. .. 23-10 

.. 159 

28-35 

.. 141 

1890 

. . .. 22-74 

.. 149 

29-30 

.. 139 


Worthing. 

Petworth. 


Author. 

Rev. Preb. Holland, M.A. 

Year. 

Inches. 

Rainy Days. 

Inches. 

Rainy Days. 

1891 

.. .. 29-86 

.. 172 

42T5 

.. 164 

1892 

.. ... 23-73 

.. 141 

31-02 

.. 135 

1893 

.. .. 25-12 

.. 142 

28-56 

. . 129 

1894 

.. .. 35-71 

.. 184 

40-71 

.. 173 

1895 

. . . . 26*09 

.. 161 

30-32 

. . 128 


Westbourne. 

Horsham. 


Rev. L. B. 

Birkett, M.A. 

H. Padwick, Esq., M.A. 

Year. 

Inches. 

Rainy Days. 

Inches. 

Rainy Days. 

1891 

.. .. 35-94 

.. 198 

38-84 

.. 178 

1892 

.. .. 26-95 

.. 155 

27-53 

.. 161 

1893 

.. .. 27-75 

.. 158 

25-06 

.. 156 

1894 

.. . . 39-04 

. . 192 

42-18 

. . 189 

1893 

.. .. 29-34 

.. 158 

31-36 

.. 153 












































244 


The exceptionally cold period which commenced on December 30th, 
1894, and terminated on March 9th, was broken by a week’s mild 
weather, from January 14th to 20th, otherwise the cold would have 
been continuous for 70 days. 

The lowest temperatures were met with from February 5th to 
February 19th. 


The weather was mild and pleasant from March 10th to 25th, and 
unsettled and wet during the remainder of the month. 


The weather was cold during the first week of April, but pleasant 
and mild during most of the rest of the month. The temperature 
during the first half of May was above the average, especially from the 
12th to the 14th. A cold spell prevailed from the 16th to the 25th, 
after which a period of fine, dry weather set in and continued to June 
11th. Temperature was below the average from the 12th to the 19th, 
after which warm weather prevailed to the end of the month. The 
quarter, as a whole, was characterised by warm, dry, and bright 
weather, the sunshine being abundant and the rainfall deficient. 


The third quarter showed much variety in the weather. In July 
and up to the middle of August there was a deficiency of sunshine, and 
for the greater part of the time the weather was dull and wet. The 
rest of the quarter was dry and bright, the last week in September 
being exceptionally hot and dry. 


On October 1st the conditions changed, and for the first ten days, 
dull, wet weather was met with, accompanied by rough gales. 


The last week in October was remarkably cold and in marked 
contrast to the last week of the preceding month. 


In November and December the weather was dull, wet, and mild, 
and in the last month especially there was a great deficiency of sun¬ 
shine. 


The wet weather in the last quarter of the year made up for the 
deficiency in the previous nine months. 


The extreme cold in February accounts for the large number of 
day degrees of accumulated heat below 42° F., and thus vegetation 
was extremely backward up to the end of April; no green food was 
obtainable, and the pastures were brown and dry. 


The following tables give many interesting particulars as to the 
sunshine, the rainfall, and the temperature in each month. 






245 


HOURS OF BRIGHT SUNSHINE. 



Westbourne. Brighton. Hours of 

Rev. L. B. Birkett, M.A. Dr. Newsholme. Sunless Possible 

Hours. Sunless Days. Hours. Days. Sunshine. 

January 

93*7 .. 

6 .. 71-81 .. 

5 

.. 260 

February 

123-3 .. 

6 .. 99-42 .. 

5 

.. 276 

March 

159-3 .. 

6 .. 125-32 .. 

6 

.. 364 

April 

163-0 .. 

2 .. 149-54 .. 

6 

.. 410 

May 

314-2 .. 

1 .. 278-30 .. 

3 

.. 475 

June 

248-7 .. 

0 .. 271-39 .. 

0 

.. 486 

July 

194-2 .. 

3 .. 196-39 .. 

2 

.. 487 

August 

223-8 .. 

1 .. 242-48 .. 

1 

.. 443 

September 

248-8 .. 

0 .. 254-21 .. 

0 

.. 373 

October 

108-6 .. 

6 .. 128-13 .. 

8 

.. 327 

November 

53-7 .. 

9 .. 57-82 .. 

9 

.. 264 

December 

51-4 .. 

18 .. 42-13 .. 

16 

.. 241 

Year 

.. 1,982-7 .. 

58 ..1,916-94 .. 

61 

4,406 


Westbourne. 

Hours. 

Brighton. Greenwich. 

Hours. Hours. 

South of England. 
Hours. 

1890 

1,773-8 

1,708-8 1,255-0 


1,491-0 

1891 

1,682-8 

1,717-6 1,231-0 


1,563-0 

1892 

1,859-8 

1,756-6 1,277-6 


1,684-0 

1893 

2,070-0 

1,971-7 1,454-0 


1,875-0 

1894 

1,740-9 

1,716-8 1,051-3 


1,579-0 

1895 

1,982-7 

1,916-9 1,225-4 


1,776-0 

Mean 

1,851-7 

1,798-1 1,249-0 


1,661-3 


The observations at Westbourne are taken with a Jordan Photo¬ 
graphic recorder; at the other stations the Campbell-Stokes recorder is 
used. 

In Table 11, the hours of bright sunshine are given for a period of 
ten years and also the percentage of possible duration. Clear, bright 
weather does not, however, always mean warm weather, and Table 12 
has, therefore, been constructed so as to show the amount of heat above 
and below a certain fixed value which has been experienced during the 
past ten years. In this Table of Accumulated Heat the value is given 
in day degrees. 




















Table 11.—BRIGHT SUNSHINE. 


246 



























































12.—ACCUMULATED HEAT. 


247 


H 

P3 

< 

H 












OO 





(TO 

O 

CO 

r-H 


00 

pH 

05 

05 

pH 

t— 



r-l J 

cd 

CO 

o 

04 

40 

04 

40 

40 

00 

04 

04 

o 



■ 6 

tr~ 

oo 

*- / 

co 

4-— 

t— 

t— 

40 

co 

05 



£3 ® 










e- 



4 p 













IH 

-2 d 










% 



0 

co 

O 


e- 

00 

40 

40 


CO 

CO 

40 

tH 


H 

05 

oi 

t- 


o 

CO 

40 

e- 

o 

40 



' T T I 

• -p 

40 

40 

40 


CO 

40 

40 

co 

co 

e- 


£ 

S3 & 
d ® 













o 

r—H 

1-5 <72 













® 














^ l 














02 > 














® 














® 

bC ' 
® 
r O 

K*% 

d 

ft 

O . 

-P o 













co 

o 


r- 

00 

40 

40 


co 

co 

40 



1 ® 
d g 

d ft 

H> H> 

05 

04 

i— 

rcH 

o 

CO 

40 

l— 

o 

40 

05 

05 


lO 

40 

40 


co 

40 

40 

co 

co 

fc- 



O . 

pH 














CO 

40 

CO 

4— 


pH 

40 

o 

co 

o 

pH 

04 



r-H 

40 

40 

pH 

04 

4- 

pH 

05 

40 

o 

04 




. p 

S3 d 

4^ 

40 


40 

Th 

04 

40 


CO 

co 

L— 

CD 



o . 














•+-= r-H 














CO 

00 

co 

CO 

4— 

40 

^H 

co 

05 

co 

O 

00 



i—l 


co 

t> 

4— 

00 


40 

05 

o 

o 




: ci 

CO 

o 

00 

04 

04 

r-H 

o 



TjH 

CD 



Jar 

De 

CO 

CO 

of 

cd" 

CO 

CO 

CO 

co" 

CO 

cd 

04 

ex 

CO 


ft 

3 © 













o 

CO 

00 

05 

co 

co 

04 

00 

40 

t- 

04 


pH 


. ^ 

r—l 


04 

CO 


O 

40 

00 

04 

04 

05 

• 


• -p 

d ® 


fc- 

co 

00 

00 

co 

CO 

co 

00 

00 

l> 

00 


® 

> 

o 

oi 

oT 

04 

of 

04 

04 

of 

CO 

04 

04 



t-o W 











of 


rQ 














d / 













02 














® 














® 

o . 













Sh 

-p o 













be 

r-H 00 


04 

pH 

o 

£— 

GO 

pH 

05 

04 

04 

CD 


<X> 

<x> 

co 

co 

rcH 

o 

04 

04 

co 

4- 

OO 


40 

05 



D S 

Ha ^ 


r-H 

05 

CO 

04 

pH 

pH 

40 

04 

pH 


d 5 

ft 

r-H 

r—1 


pH 

pH 

pH 

pH 

pH 

rH 

pH 

pH 

ex 

pH 



3hH 

co 

t- 

05 

co 

05 


40 

CO 

04 

oo 

co 

CD 



1 - 1 

o 

4- 

GO 


40 

40 

40 

o 

05 

o 

do 



c J 

4 s 

l 

H 

H 


r-H 

04 

pH 

pH 

co 

04 

pH 

r- 













pH 



P 

d 

® 











• 



to 

t— 

00 

05 

O 

pH 

04 

CO 


40 

d 

® 




oo 

00 

00 

co 

05 

05 

05 

05 

05 

05 



00 

oo 

00 

00 

GO 

00 

00 

00 

GO 

oo 

a 




r-H 

r-H 

pH 

pH 

pH 

pH 

pH 

pH 

pH 

pH 
















































Table 13.—CLIMATE OF WORTHING. 


248 



*H 

• 


o 

02 



pD 


o 

03 

• 

£ 

P 

w 




◄ 

Ph 


-p> 

P 

p 

o 

B 


w 

Eh 

H 

Ph 

a 

n 

EH 


oo cq 


CO iO 05 CO 


Cq 


O 

cq 


+3 

P 

P 

o 


02 

© 

rP 

© 

el 


02 

» 

8 

H 

P3 

EH 

X! 

P 


02 

£ 

■< 

H 


w 

Eh 

O 


05 


00 

rH 

cq 


cq 

cq 

cq 

CO 


t- 


ID 

co 

rH 

go 


cq 

o 

© 

cq 

05 

cq 

CO 

b- 

cq 

© 

rH 

dq 

© 

© 

cb 

dq 

© 

P 

H 

cq 


p 

p 

0 

3 


T$< 

• 

rH 

cb 

7-0 

o 

b- 

IO 

p 

cq 

ib 

7-0 

0-9 

CD 

cb 

0-9 

c 

cb 

o 

cb 

M 

si) 

id 

t— 

cq 

cq 

00 

05 

cq 

CO 

i— 

ID 

CO 

rH 

c3 

© 

rH 

cq 

do 

P 

dq 

b- 

• 

o 

rH 

b- 

05 

o 

P 



ID 


id 

CD 

t- 

i— 

i— 


L'- 

CD 

CD 

IO 

d 

tb 

r-H 

cq 

05 

CO 

o 

ID 

05 

CO 

00 

CD 

ID 

co 


© 

cb 

co 

cb 

cq 

b- 

© 

cb 

cb 

cb 

CO 

cb 

oo 


'TP 

cq 

rH 

cq 

CO 

CO 




tH 

cq 

co 

cq 

• 

fl 

c3 

&b 

co 

• 

cq 

cq 

rH 

OO 

cq 

CD 

rH 

© 

ip 

cq 


© 

© 

id 

o 

rH 

b- 

p 

05 

© 

rH 

dq 

cb 

05 

rH 


’"P 

co 

CO 



IO 

IO 

CD 

CD 

CD 

T* 



©' 









« 





b£ 

bic 

CO 

CD 

cq 

rH 

oo 

cq 

O 

OO 

rH 

ID 

CD 

o 

fl 

g3 

© 

05 

© 

• 

rH 

cq 

cb 

b- 

cq 

rl, 

cb 

cb 

05 

o 

Ph 



r-H 

rH 

rH 

rH 

rH 

rH 

rH 

rH 

rH 


rH 

M 

bb 

cq 

ID 

CO 

cq 

cq 

co 

CD 

o 

rH 

Cq 

O 


C3 

H 

© 

o 

o 

cb 

cb 

cb 

b- 

cb 

b— 

© 

ib 

P 

cb 



■HH 

CO 


ID 

CD 

CD 

CD 

CD 

i— 

ID 

ID 


• 

fl 

bb 

05 

05 

CD 

rH 

■HjH 

CD 

CD 

cq 

o 

t- 



^ * 

© 

© 

P 

ib 

r-H 

cb 

© 

P 

ib 

p 

H 


cb 



CO 

cq 

co 



IO 

IO 

o 

IO 



co 

a 

bb 

o 

co 

CD 

CO 

05 

05 

rH 

w 

ID 

o 

co 

ID 

o3 

© 

ib 

© 

rH 

b- 

cb 

H 

P 

cb 


05 

05 

rH 


'"O 

CO 

co 



1d 

CD 

CD 

CD 

CD 





^.* U f, 

>, t ■ ■ ■ ■ • • j§ ^ $ s 

S S ^ • • • | a s a a 

§ £ § - c fe> £ >> a. Is > § 

§ ® ^ 9* w S3 5 S' O O « 

l-5p^S<jSl-5H5^ajO!^P 
























































249 


rH 


t- 

r-H 

<M 

© 

05 

l-H 

t- 

'tH 

to 

to 

Hj4 

o 

<M 

© 

00 

eo 


t— 


no 

00 

co 

«o 

no 

<M 


00 


T—1 

H 

rH 

rH 

r-H 

r-H 

r~* 

r-H 

rH 

rH 

rH 

rH 

rH 

r-H 

rH 


05 

rH 

to 

co 

co 


Ol 

00 

00 

05 

05 

r— 4 

no 

no 

o 

o 

h- 

i- 


DO 

oo 

05 

00 

Ol 

GO 

o 

HO 

O 

co 

co 

cb 

KO 

cb 

cb 

05 

bi 

cb 

ib 

rH 

rH 

cb 

cb 

cb 

bi 

05 

(M 

co 

0-1 

Cl 

Ol 

Ol 

Ol 

(M 

Ol 

CO 

CM 

Ol 

CM 

co 

Ol 



CO 

no 

oo 

05 

Ol 



t- 

00 

r— 

00 

t- 

00 

co 

cb 

cb 

ib 

lb 

ib 

cb 

cb 

cb 

ib 

ib 

ib 

ib 

no 

ib 

ib 


77-9 

80-2 

i- 

•4c 

CO 

76-0 

77-0 

78-0 

81*5 

78*8 

o 

bi 

00 

78-0 

81*7 

CO 

cb 

oo 

75-7 

© 

r-H 

00 

82-0 

Ol 

05 

Ol 

Ol 

no 

05 

05 

Ol 

7* 

Ol 

Ol 

© 

CO 

CO 

no 

CO 

bi 

00 

o 

cb 

4* 

rH 

o 

i- 

cb 

ib 

b- 

cb 

cb 

cb 

rH 

rH 

rH 

Ol 

rH 

r-H 

Ol 

Ol 

rH 

Ol 

Ol 

Ol 

Ol 

Ol 

rH 


Ol 

65 
^cH 

50*3 

50-9 

Ol 

' cb 

hH 

48-4 

Hi! 

do 

GO 

do 

47-8 

47-9 

49-6 

hH 

05 

Ol 

I-H 

1* 

49-9 

50-8 

Ol 

05 

no 

05 



Ol 

Htl 

rH 

05 

no 

Ol 


Ol 

© 


CO 

Ol 

©> 

cb 

bi 

bi 

bi 

bi 

© 

Ol 

rH 

r-H 

rH 

bi 

r-H 

rH 

r-H 

rH 

rH 

t-H 

rH 

r-H 

rH 

rH 

r-H 

i-H 

rH 

rH 

r-H 

rH 

r-H 


no 

ib 

no 

GO 

ib 

no 

57-7 

no 

4 

no 

GO 

4 

no 

© 

4 

no 

00 

4 

no 

53*3 

rH 

4 

no 

55-2 

l-H 

ib 

no 

56-8 

C5 

ib 

no 

no 

cb 

no 

© 

ib 

no 

© 

05 

© 

CO 


Ol 



co 

© 

1 — 

© 

05 

rH 


co 

4 

4 

4 

bi 

bi 

bi 

bi 

rH 

4 

cb 

ib 

cb 

ib 

cb 

















no 

Ol 

© 

i-H 

7^ 


no 

© 


© 

© 

© 


CO 

co 

© 

rH 

bi 

05 

05 

05 

05 

cb 

cb 

o 

© 

bi 

© 

i-H 

© 

no 

no 

lO 







no 

no 

no 

no 

no 

no 


no 


co 

Ol 

rH 

© 

© 

CO 


© 

no 


co 

(M 

rH 

05 

© 

05 

05 

© 

© 

CO 

00 

GO 

CO 

oo 

00 

CO 

00 

OO 

CO 

GO 

CO 

00 

CO 

GO 

CO 

00 

OO 

oo 

00 

GO 

co 

00 

00 

i-h 

r , 

I-H 

rH 

i—t 

I-H 

I-H 

I-H 

i-H 

rH 

»“H 

I-H 

rH 

rH 

I-H 

rH 

H 

01 

#N 

»s 


- 

•X 


r. 



r» 



r> 



!* 

































250 


THE TEMPERATURE OF THE SOIL. 

The temperature of the soil at 9 a.m., one foot below the surface 
of the ground at Worthing, was taken daily up to August, 1894, by 
the late W. J. Harris, Esq., F.R. Met. Soc., and since November, 1894, 
by G. B. Collet, Esq., who has kindly given me the use of his tables; 
the results for each month of 1895, and also for a term of years, are 
here given : — 




1895. 


1891. 

1892. 

1893. 

1894. 


Mean 

Maximum 

Minimum 

Mean 

Mean 

Mean 

Mean 


degrees. 

degrees. 

degrees. 

degrees. 

degrees. 

degrees. 

degrees. 

January . 

37*1 

41*7 

35-1 

35*1 

37-5 

35-7 

39-5 

February . 

33-5 

34-8 

32-8 

39-3 

40-4 

42-0 

42-6 

March . . 

39-8 

44-8 

33-2 

40-6 

39-6 

44-7 

44*2 

April . . . 

48-5 

52-7 

44-1 

45-1 

47*1 

51-8 

52*2 

May . . . 

56-3 

60-9 

52-1 

52-6 

53-1 

58*5 

54*2 

June . . . 

61-2 

63-0 

59-7 

56-9 

59-8 

63'7 

58-1 

July . . . 

62-3 

63-6 

61-0 

62-1 

61*6 

65-0 

66*2 

August . . 

63-3 

66*0 

60*7 

60*6 

62-7 

— 

61*8 

September 

61-5 

64-9 

57*8 

59-7 

586 

— 

58-5 

October . . 

. . 51-5 

61-2 

42-4 

53-8 

48-7 

— 

52*9 

November 

45-5 

52-2 

45-0 

48-8 

47-9 

45-2 

49-1 

December. 

43-2 

47-7 

40-2 

42-6 

40-1 

42-3 

43-2 


Year 50*3 

66*0 

32-8 

48-9 

49-8 

__ 

51-7 


In 1882 . . . . 

Mean 

degrees. 

. . 51-8 

Maximum 

degrees, 

.... 66*5 . . . . 

Minimum 

degrees. 

36-0 

In 1883 .... 

. . 51-4 

.... 67-2 

37-0 

In 1884 . . 

. . 52-6 

. . . . 71-0 . . . . 

38-4 

In 1885 . . 

. . 50-8 

.... 67-2 .... 

361 

In 1886 .... 

. . 50-6 

.... 67-2 . . . . 

34-3 

In 1887 .... 

. . 49-3 

.... 67-2 .... 

35-0 

In 1888 .... 

. . 49*3 

.... 64-2 .... 

34-6 

In 1889 .... 

. . 50-5 

.... 65-9 .... 

35-3 

In 1890 .... 

. . 50-3 

.... 63’9 .... 

33-8 

In 1891 .... 

. . 48'9 

.... 65-4 .... 

32-4 

In 1892 

. . 49-8 

.... 65*3 .... 

34-4 

In 1893 .... 

• • 

.... 70-5 .... 

33 3 

In 1894 

. . 51-7 

.... 65*9 .... 

34-9 

In 1895 . . . . 

. . 50-3 

.... 66’0 .... 

32-8 

























251 


DISTRIBUTION OF POPULATION ACCORDING TO AGE 

% / 

AND SEX. 

The distribution of age and sex may raise or lower the mortality as 
much as 2*0 per 1,000 persons living, irrespective of sanitary conditions. 

The mean death-rate in England and Wales for the decade 1881-90 
was 19T5 per 1,000, but if the population had been distributed, as 
regards age and sex, as it was in West Sussex during the same period, 
the rate would have been raised to 20-769 per 1,000. 19T5 divided by 

20*769 = ‘92,205 which is the factor for correction for West Sussex. In 
a similar way the factor for each district can be obtained. The follow¬ 
ing table shows the result based on the mean death-rate during the 
decade 1881-90. 


England and Wales 

• • 

Factor. 

1-00000 

Recorded 

Death-rate. 

19-15 

Corrected 

Death-rate, 

19-15 

West Sussex 

• • 

•92205 

14-37 

13-23 

Four Urban Districts . . 

• • 

*97490 

14*38 

14-02 

Seven Rural Districts . . 

• • 

*90355 

14-35 

12-97 

• 

a 

" Arundel 

• • 

•92133 

18-53 

17-07 


Horsham 

• • 

•94223 

17-23 

16-24 


Worthing . . 

• • 

•99300 

15-05 

14-94 


_ Littlehampton 

• • 

•99781 

13-36 

13-34 


East Preston 

• • 

•85361 

13-69 

11-69 


W estbourne 

• • 

•85571 

14-24 

12-11 

"gl 

Thakeham 

• • 

•86429 

14-00 

12-10 

q ■<[ Pet worth . . 

• • 

•87329 

15 75 

13-96 

Ph 

Midhurst 

• • 

•91476 

14-48 

13-25 

t— 

Horsham . . 

• • 

•93960 

13-37 

12-56 


^ Steyning (West and 

East) 

•95454 

14-15 

13-51 


The factor for correction is the figure by which the recorded death 
should be multiplied so as to allow for the variations of age and 
sex distribution, and the result gives the corrected death-rate. 


In nearly all large towns the factor is above unity, and then the 
corrected rates must be higher than the recorded rates. 


In rural districts, opposite conditions are met with, and the 
corrected rates are lower than those recorded. 


The distribution of the population is given on pages 252 and 253 











Table 14.—DISTRIBUTION OF POPULATION IN 1881. 


252 




H 

03 

© 

r-H 

© 

© 


© 

<M 

© 


© 


© 

• 


CM 


© 

co 

© 

© 


© 

© 

© 


© 

© 

© 

d 


03 

o 

© 

r-H 

00 

© 



M 

© 


© 

© 

© 

O 


oT 

© 

© 

r-H 

00 

© 


P 

iso' 

© 


CO 

f-H 

© 

H 



iO 

© 

ISO 


© 


'rf 

ISO 

© 



VO 

© 





r-H 



r-H 




r-H 




r-H 

















• © 


o 

© 

© 

r-H 

t- 

GO 


© 

© 

© 


(M 


© 

>• 


to 

VO 

H 


00 

CM 


GO 

r-H 

© 


© 

r-H 


o 


© 

— 

CM 

(M 

© 

© 


<M 


© 


© 

VO 

VO 

©S 

fl 


CO 

co 

co" 

CO* 

© 

©‘ 


CM 

© 

ISO 


(M 

CM 


d 
















VO 
















© 
















id 



CM 

© 

to 

CM 

co 


r-H 

CM 

© 


© 

H 

tH 

to 


to 

CM 

oo 


CM 

to 


r-H 

ISO 

© 


to 

r-H 

t— 



to 


CO 

© 

© 

to 


03, 

r-H 

© 


L'- 

VO 

CM, 



P” 

p 

VO 

oo 

p 

ISO 


VO 

oo 



to 

P 






r—1 



r-H 




r-H 




f-H 

VO 
































vo 


CO 


© 

© 

00 



H 

© 



CM 

VO 


tH 


VO 

r-H 

i— 

T* 

vo 

© 


CM 

(M 

''f 



VO 

CM 



CO, 

CO 

CO, 

VO, 

t- 

co. 


VO 


CM 




03, 



f-H 

CM 

CO 

r-H 

r-H 

© 


© 


id 


CM 

© 

VO 



rH 

H 

CM 

r-H 

r-H 

CM 


r-H 

rH 

<M 


r-H 

r-H 

CM 

VO 
















CM 
















VO 


VO 

no 

© 

© 

H 

© 


© 

© 

© 


VO 

VO 

© 

CM 


eo 

co 


© 

© 

© 


© 

© 

© 


© 

© 

© 

o 


CO, 

M 

00 

!>-, 


CM 


03, 

VO 



rH 

© 

00 

+3 


00 

co' 

to 

GO 

p 

© 


P” 

f-H 

© 


©~ 

© 

oo 





f-H 



f-H 



r-H 

r-H 




r-H 

VO 
















r—1 
















VC 


CO 

CM 

iso 

© 

CM 

CO 



© 

© 



f—H 

oo 



VO 

© 

© 

CM 

GO 


r-H 


© 


© 

© 

© 




GO, 

CM, 

VO 

03, 



© 

CM 

r-H 




00 

o 

+2 


<M 

r-H 

XjH 

<M 

r-H 



r-H 

r-H 

© 


r-H 

rH 

CM* 



f-H 

H 

CM 

r-H 

f-H 

CM 


r-H 

r-H 

<M 


r-H 

rH 

CM 

VO 


* 
















to 

co 

© 

© 

© 

CM 


© 

© 

© 



CO 

VO 

vo 


00 

o 

GO 

© 


GO 



co 

CM 


© 

00 

VO 

Q 



oo 

vo 

© 

© 

00 


r-H 

r-H 

CO 



t— 

VO 

-u 


to 

CO 

CO 

CO 

©' 

© 


© 

© 

CM 


©” 

to 

co 





rH 



f-H 




r-H 





o 


















• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

& 

• 

• 

1 

• 

• 

• 

GO 

• 

• 

• 








cc 




w 








H 



H 




1-3 






• 

• 

O 

• 

• 

b 

• 

• 

• 

<5 

• 

9 

• 


| 

• 

• 

* s 

H 

• 

• 

M 

P3 

H 

• 

• 

• 

£ 

• 

* 



H 



a? 

►H 



03 

iH 




P 





63 

02 

02 

L> 

• 

• 

CD 

r-H 

ft . 

CO 

p p 

<x> 

r-H 

02 

P 

ft 

55 

• 

• 

© 

02 

P 

£ 

< 

(0 

• 

• 

© 

02 

0 


02 

H 

02 

H 

K*. 

Male 

et 

a 

© 

P 

Perso 

Rura 

Male 

cj 

a 

© 

p 

o 

02 

Sh 

© 

P 

« 

P3 

P 

Male 

d 

a 

© 

p 

o 

CZ2 

S* 

© 

P 

55 

◄ 

P 

O 

Male 

d 

a 

© 

p 

O 

co 

u 

© 

p 












P 






































Table 15.—DISTRIBUTION OF POPULATION IN 1891. 



253 




rH 

05 

o 


co 


0 



co 

0 



CO 

0 

<— 

d 


CO 

co 

o 


CO 

co 

0 


cq 

p- 

0 


10 


0 


CO 

co 

o 


'cH 

lO 

0 


05 

O 

0 



10^ 

0^ 

O 


cd 

rH 

o' 


O 

05" 

o' 


CO 

co' 

cd 


00 

rH 

0 

EH 



lO 

o 


lO 

•rH 

0 



10 

0 


'cH 

10 

0 

1 




rH 




rH 




rH 

» 



rH 

u 

















© 

















►> 


05 

CO 

lO 


p- 

10 

cq 


cq 

05 

rH 


r-H 

rH 

cq 

o 


t- 

CO 



o 

co 



cq 

0 

CO 


05 


co 

’xi 


rH 

«<*' 

CO 


nO 

eo. 

00 


co 

oo_ 

rH 


O 

co_ 

N 

p 


cd 

cd 

cd 


cd 

co 

CO 


cq 

cd 

CO 


cq’ 

cq 


d 

















lO 

















co 

















id 




00 


r-H 

CO 

t— 


00 


cq 


10 

00 

CO 

<x> 



Cq 

CO 


r-H 

co 

p- 


i 

0 

cq 


CO 

10 

cq 

o 

• 

lO 


05 


o 

1 —< 

rH 


co 

rH 



p—^ 

no 

co_ 

-+2 


p— 

oo' 

ICO 


GO 

00 ' 

<d 


cd 

05 

10 


CO 

pd 


no 




rH 




rH 




rH 




rH 













- 





id 


CO 

t- 

CO 


no 

r-H 

CO 


0 

O 

0 


GO 


cq 



eo 

05 

CO 


o 

0 

0 


CO 

cq 

10 


lO 

H 

p^ 

o 


CO 

O 



CO 

■Hfl 

0 


CO 

05 

10 


P- 

GO 

no 



rH 

CO 

'H 


r-H 

cq" 



0 

P 

id" 


cq 

cd 

cd 

l o 


rH 

rH 

cq 


rH 

rH 

cq 


rH 

r-H 

cq 


rH 

rH 

cq 

Cq 

















id 

Cq 


p~ 

p~ 



o 

05 

05 


co 

lO 

rH 


CO 

i— 

0 


eo 

CM 

co 


i— 

05 

CO 


co 

cq 

05 


10 


0 

O 


no 

P- 

cq 


oo 

CO 

0 


CO 


O. 


co 

05 

CO 



go' 

00 

pd 


co' 

p- 

cd" 


p- 

rH 

cd 


05 

05 

05 ~ 

lO 




rH 




r-H 



rH 

rH 




rH 

rH 

















id 


CO 

p— 

o 


CO 

0 

CO 


CO 

CO 

05 


co 

OO 

rH 

H 


Cq 

05 

cq 


P'- 

cq 

05 


CO 

p— 

CO 


05 

cq 

cq 

o 


<M p 

t'- 

o 



05 

co 


10^ 

''d 

O 


CO 


00 



Cq 

rH 



cq 

rH 

'H' 


rH 

rH 

CO 


rH 

rH 

cq 

lO 


rH 

iH 

cq 


r-H 

rH 

cq 


rH 

rH 

cq 


rH 

rH 

cq 

id 


Cq 

oo 

o 


o 

co 

CO 


10 

cq 

p- 


'cH 

co 

cq 

o 



Cq 

p^ 


o 

rH 

rH 


cq 

-cH 

CO 


05 

10 

no 



CO 

00 

CO 


o 

0 

0 


TjH 

CO_ 

p-^ 


O 

rH 

cq 

o 


lO 

id' 

r-H 


co~ 

cd 

cq~ 


id 

id 

0 


CO 

CO 

cq~ 





r-H 




rH 




rH 




rH 






1 




I 




ot 



• 


1 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

i 

02 

Eh 

O 

M 

Ph 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

1 

OT 

EH 

O 

M 

Ph 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

W 

a 

◄ 

£ 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 


M 




Eh 

CO 




H 

Ul 




p 





W 

OT 

ot 

P 

• 

• 

© 

CO 

fl 

t-H 

A 

P 

• 

© 

02 

S3 

M 

A 

• 

© 

02 

G 

<5 

P 

• 

• 

JD 

OT 

S 3 


CC 

CD 

d 

o 

02 

Ph 

© 

Ph 


© 

d 

O 

W. 

<1 

© 

d 

O 

!z 

© 

d 

O 


Eh 

ot 

H 

'd 

a 

B 

© 

PH 

Ph 

P 

Ph 

*d 

a 

B 

© 

PH 

Pi 

<D 

Ph 

© 

Ph 

P 

£ 

B 

© 

in 

© 

PH 

P 

O 

*d 

a 

a 

© 

u 

© 

Ph 


£ 




p- 




'HH 











































Table 16.—Showing the Deaths from Accidents in each District in the twenty years, 1876-95. 


254 


K m 

Pm* 

d05050>coc0t^0 ! 

e- J 


H g M 

i ® 

vocovO^M^H^Htivo 

t-H 




i—i i—i r—i 1 

e- 

! 


1 



H 


• 

Pm 

Ol-H05i—lOVOOO 

t- 



CO CO «—* t-H r-H r-H r-H 

r-H 


<5 

H 1 




t-H 


d 00 o X) « 00 N o 

CO 

e- 

O 

H 

a 

(MCM(NCOCO(MCO^ 

r-H r— j—1 

vo 


i 

•an 

Pm 

| d CO 

VO 

1 

05 

niBqsjojj 

( 

M. 

H r-H Ol 

1 


an 

Pm 

i e ’ - i i i i 

co 

1 

t- 

{epunay 

I 

a 

i ct i i r i 

. H 

1 


TTIl 

Pm 

Cl | CO j r-H | | | 

O 1 

1 

CO 

uo^dnieq©^!^ 

M. 

00 CD ^ H | r-H CO d 

*- ! 
d 

CO 

an 

Pm’ 

(M^lOfOHOHCO 

d 

d 

05 

gui^JOM 

M. 

OCOCOdCOHjiHfd 

I- 

L— 


r-H i-H i—1 

VO 


aa 

Pm 

lO CO j | (M 

O 

r-H 

co 

0n.inoq^S8^Y 

M. 

t>» CO i—H r-H r -h j—h 

co 

d 

co 

'an 

Pm 

h h | j co ci | 

o 

d 

CO 

^s.mqpijy 

M. 

HOlOCONCT^OO 

no 

GO 


r—i i—1 i—1 



a'n 

Pm 

co co co | i—i i— i | j 

r-H 

r-H 

CO 


M. 

VO CO CO CO r-H Cl GO 

VO 



r-H ~H r-H 

CO 


an 

Pm 

■tH CO Cl J t-H d | d 

H 

i d 

ureqeyeqjp 

u-h 

O O N d d d d 

CO 

t'- 

a 

d I-H 

VO 


an 

Pm 

^ O CO CO CO H j 

1 

o 

d 

i d 

q^aoM^oj 


NOCO-^HtH 1 CO 

1 

d 




t-H 1 —1 r-H 

VO 

| 


• 

t^OOODr—li-Hd'^H^ 

1 

1 co 

l 

I 

a it 

Pm 

CO 

d 



1 

d 

TOBqSJOJJ 

t-H 

^CO^COt-COM-OO 

CO 

r-H 


a 

d d I-H 

CO 


an 

Pm 

vo CO CO Cl i-H H CO 

1 « 

i 

00 

guraX8}g 

M. 

OOr-HdOClCO^^t 1 

! © 

cn 

I-H 


d d d r-H 

t-H 

1 

fi 


. 


• . 

o 

i—i 

P5 


Sc£a5’“ lG ^ c0 ^ 10 
^ 1 ,0000)0) 



W 


CO i-h CO GO 00 CO CO CO 


c3 

Ph 


t-- GO CO I-H I-H I-H I-H i-H 

1 

hh 

Q 


CO GO GO 

1 




I-H I-H 1—1 

























































Table 17.—Showing the Deaths and Death-rate from Accidents in the Combined District in the twenty years, 1876-95. 


255 


§ a 
^ c3 o t> 


CM 






• 




zz ^ • rH 

0 1 O 1 - 1 


o 

cp 

05 

05 

ip 

ip 


CO 


ti rO O m 


to 

id 

© 

id 

to 

to 

o 

to 

id 


a -e a 


CO 

CO 

co 


CO 

co 



oo 


<1 O § 
























A CD 












o. 












_ OQ 

<3 W w 


<M 

05 

05 

05 

CO 

co 

ip 

ICO 

ip 


& ^ M 


lO 

to 

ICO 

•H* 




i£0 

r-H 


O O H 

H « OD 


rH 

rH 

r-H 




ip 





Ph 



05 



lO 


lO 



* 

o 

r-H 

rH 

O 

o 

rH 


W 

<1 

CO 

tH 

CO 

r-H 

rH 

rH 

rH 

r-H 

ip 

ip 










--1 

r-H 

Eh 

O 

H 

• 

CM 

00 

o 

00 

co 

00 

ip 

o 

to 

ip 


CM 

CM 

CM 

co 

co 

CM 

co 






r-H 

r-H 

r-H 






lO 


i 

o. • 

r? 02 

Ph 

(M 

lO 

rH 

CM 

co 

, 

CM 

co 

CO 


o ^ ^ 






1 



rH 

o 

00 -d £ 




lO 

| 

• 

CO 

■ 

co 

<M 


§ * 





' 

' 


' 


CM 


O 00 

° o 

Ph 

00 

CM 

o 

rH 

CO 

to 

lO 

rH 

*0 

CO 

ICO 

ICO 

CM 

lO 

rH 

lO 

CO 

CO 

ip 

CO 

rH 

r-H 

-1-3 

a 

CM 

r-H 

r-H 






Ip 


• 

Ph 

lO 



CM 

1 

■rH 

CM 

, 

rH 


—^ < ^ > 





1 




CM 

tp 

O co 
* o 

# 

Ip 

CO 

CO 

CM 

H-c 

rH 

to 

ip 

CO 

CO 

r-H 

•+3 

a 

CM 

CM 

CM 

r-H 


r—< 



r-H 

r-H 


. 

pi 

CO 

rH 

CO 

rH 

r-H 

r—* 

rH 

co 

■'tfi 


o 











o 

ICO 











]—i 

^ o 

• 

CO 

o 

05 

ICO 

X* 


to 

no 

CO 

r-H 

H-3 

a 

CM 

<M 

rH 




r-H 


05 


- id 

Ph" 

7—H 

r-H 

| 

1 

rH 

r-H 

| 

| 



lO CM 











X> 

^ o 

• 

CO 

00 

CM 

(M 

00 


to 

ip 

o 


+3 

a 

rH 

r-H 

CM 






00 


id 

Ph 

rH 

CO 

ip 

r-H 

, 

| 

rH 

r-H 



rH 






1 



rH 

ip 

o 











ip 

-p 

• 

CM 

lO 


ip 

ip 

CM 

CM 

H" 1 

CO 


lO 

a 

r-H 

r-H 

rH 






to 


id 

Ph 

<M 

o 

co 

r-H 

1 

CM 

1 

co 


CO 


rH 

r-H 






CO 

o 











OO 

-p 

• 

r—H 

o 

o 

tH 

co 

1 

r— * 

co 

CM 


r-H 

a 

l—1 

CM 

r-H 



1 



ICO 


p 

® S 

Ph 

oo 

ip 

ICO 

CO 

CM 

CM 

CM 


co 

co 

co 

"5 CD 











ip 

a ^ 

• 

o 

to 

CM 

co 

CM 

1 

rH 

CO 

o 


U),p 

a 

r-H 

r-H 



1 



■Hi 


p 






• 

• 






o 












M 












Ph 


o 

lO 

o 








Ph 


00 

oo 

C* 

i 




tJh 

lO 


_ _, 


to 

r-H 

to 

r-H 

CM 

co 


o3 




oo 

oo 

05 

05 

05 

05 

05 


-t-3 



00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

GO 

00 

oo 


o 



r-H 

rH 

rH 

rH 

r-H 

r-H 

rH 

rH 















































































Table 18.—-Showing the Deaths from Suicide in each District in the twenty years, 1876-95. 


256 


H M 

< £ w 
£ £ X 

O O a 


HOHHOCOCO 

cq 



CO CO r-H r—1 r—1 r—1 r—i 

co 





cq 



Cxj 

ooiooOHcqwNN 

r-H 



H 

h 


< 




cq 

E-i 




CO 

Q 

• 

OOMOCOO^CO 

r-H 

cq 



CO 50 50 H r—1 r-H r-H 

CO 





r-H 


•an 

P=i 

1 1 

cq 



• 



CO 

inuqsjojj 

a 

1 ~ II 

r-H 


an 

ph 

il.il 

| 






H 

ppiraay 

a 

1" 1 1 11 



an 

P=H 

1 1 1 i 1 i 1 1 

1 






t- 

uo^duiuqop^iq; 

a 

H j J j r—1 r-H j 

b- 


•an 

• P=i 

r-H CO | j 

CO 

50 

Sniqcpio^ 

M. 

IOOCO^CO(M 1 CM 

r“H | 

29 

n 

an 

pci 

~ i M ii i 

r-H 






o 

ouanoqpe^ 

a 

^ M i M 

50 


an 

Pci 

(M CO | H | | Cq r-H 

05 

CO 

pjnqpij^ 

M. 

lO CO CO H I j | Cq 

r-H 

cq 

*an 

Ph 

<M CO <M | 1 j J 


t- 

uopejqj pug- 

M. 

r-H ^ b- | r-H cq 10 | 

20 

cq 

*an 

pci 

^ 1 1 1 1 ~ 1 ! 

cq 


ureipsfeqj. 

M. 

CO b- hJH r-H cq r-H | r-H 

o 

r-H 

cq 

•a*n 

pci 

1 1 1 1 1 1 

CO 

r-H 

ipJOAVpj 

M. 

(MCOtHh I | r-H cq 

GO 

r-H 

cq 

an 

pci 

r-H Cn r-H J r-H r-H J r-H 

t- 

CO 

muqsjojp 

M. 

co no cq h | cq h cq 

r-H 

29 

co 

an 

pci 

1 1 II 1 1 


CO 

SuiU.fo^ 

M. 

oooocqcqi-nioH 

r-H i— ( 

cq 






« 

• 

p 

o 


S OD S ^ ^ ^ ^ ° 



M 


i i , o o o o a 


c3 

Oh 


COr-HCOOOOOOOOOOD 



P 


N GO GO r-H i— H r-H i—1 r-H 


o 

Ph 


CO GO GO 


H 



I — 1 i-H H 












































































Table 19.—Showing the Deaths and Death-rate from Suicide in the twenty years, 1876-95. 


/ 

257 


o fco 

d c3 O > 


OO 










r, t 

P 7 O ^ 


o 


CO 

CO 

rH 

05 

b- 



5 o M 


d 

cb 

rH 

d 

oo 

rH 

cb 

CM 

rH 


O -t-3 r— I ri 



r-H 

rH 

rH 


7—1 

rH 

rH 

rH 


^ © P S 












"3 ® £ 












PR <d 












Pr 












<U E H 

H EH M 













rH 

TO 

rH 

rH 

o 

CO 

CO 

TO 

CM 

CO 

CM 

- 

O O M 

H 



CO 

CO 

rH 

rH 

rH 

r-H 





00 

TO 

oo 

r-H 

CM 

co 

CM 

<M 

t 


p 

Ph 


rH 








(M 

H 

• 

CO 

o 

CO 

O 

CO 

o 


co 

rH 

CO 

CM 

O 

H 

a 

CO 

to 

TO 

rH 


rH 

rH 

rH 

o* 

r-H 

SH «2 

pR 

a 

1 

rH 


| 

1 



1 



80 
and u 
ward 

I 

1 

i 


1 

1 

1 

| 

l 

! 

1 

| 

h 

TO 

d 


rH 

lO 

CM 

i 

1 

rH 

CM 

i 

1 



O GO 










CO 

<° o 

a 

CO 

TO 

05 


<M 

r—i 

CM 

co 

CM 

t- 

+3 

r-H 

rH 

rH 






CO 


d 

O CO 

& 

CM 



| 

r—' 

rH 

1 

rH 

00 

rH 

CM 

^ o 



o 

o 

TO 

(M 

t- 

O 

GO 

05 

05 

■* 



cm 

CM 




rH 


t- 


d 

pR* 

(M 

CO 

rH 

r-H 

1 

rH 

| 

r 

05 


to ^ 






' 





05 

N o 

a 

CO 

o 

CO 

rH 

CO 

CM 

rH 

rH 

o 

CO 



rH 







CO 


d 


1 

rH 

rH 

1 

rH 

1 

1 

■ 

co 


TO CM 

1 



1 


1 

i 

1 


05 

rH o 

M. 


TO 


1 

rH 

I 

rH 

rH 

to 

rH 

rH 

d 

rH 

PR* 

1 

rH 

1 

l 

l 

1 

i 

1 



o 

-P > 

a 

| 

| 

| 

| 

l 

| 

| 

1 

1 


TO 











d 

pR 

1 

| 

1 

1 

| 

1 

| 

1 

1 

| 

o 












4^ 

r-H 

a 

1 

I 

1 

1 

l 

1 

i 

1 

1 

1 

P r' 

o P 

rr-l P 

<X> 

PR 

1 

i 

1 

I 

1 

1 

1 

i 

1 

1 

i 


a 

1 

i 

1 

l 

l 

1 

i 

i 

j 

i 

p 






• 





IS 

o 


• 

• 

- 

* 

• 

• 




+3 

M 











o 

« 

H 

Pr 


O 

00 

1 

TO 

OO 

1 

O 

05 

l 

rH 

o* 

<M 

05 

co 

05 

05 

TO 

05 


EH 


co 

rH 

CO 

oo 

00 

GO 

oo 

00 





1>- 

00 

00 

rH 

rH 

rH 

rH 

rH 





oo 

00 

GO 










rH 

rH 

rH 









* 







































































258 


(A)—Table of DEATHS during the Year 1895, in the COMBINED DISTRICTS 


Names of Localities adopted for 
the purpose of these 
Statistics; Public Institutions 
being shown as separate 
localities. 

(«) 

Mortality from all Causes 

AT SUBJOINED AGES. 

• 

| 

\ 

i 

(i) 


03 

<D 

W> 

rt 

rt 

<3 

(b) 

t- 1 
eS 

0> 

f-H 

hi 

o> 

T3 

r< 

(c) 

irS 

u 

<D 

'd 

a 

p 

•Xi 

p 

rt 

r— < 

id) 

u 

<u 

'd 

a 

'd ^ 

rt 

(e) 

ht 

Q) 

a 

P . 

rt 

*o 

i-H 

(/) 

u 

a> 

"d 

a 

p . 

•d CD 
d 
rt 

iO 

iff) 

• 

Pt 

z . 

03 

s rt 

68 £ 
lO 

CD 

W 

1 

2 

3 

Small Pox. 

Scarlatina. 

Diphtheria. 

Steyning West R.D. ... 

135 

29 

6 

3 

12 

29 

56 

Under 5 



1 

5 upwards. 




Steyning East R.D. 

80 

23 

17 

5 

3 

14 

18 

Under 5 



8 

5 upwards. 



2 

Horsham R.D. ... 

278 

38 

19 

21 

10 

73 

117 

Under 5 



2 

5 upwards. 


1 

4 

Petworth R.D. ... 

154 

24 

10 

5 

6 

43 

66 

Under 5 



1 

5 upwards. 



1 

Thakeham R.D. 

123 

15 

11 

9 

6 

29 

53 

1 Under 5 



4 

5 upwards. 



5 

East Preston R.D. 

172 

30 

17 

10 

9 

40 

66 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 



2 

Midhurst R.D. ... 

198 

32 

12 

5 

5 

59 

85 

Under 5 



1 

5 upwards. 




Westbourne R.D. 

110 

25 

5 

6 

4 

27 

43 

Under 5 



1 

5 upwards. 



2 

Worthing U.D. 

286 

49 

28 

20 

10 

81 

98 

Under 5 



14 

5 upwards. 



12 

Littlehampton U.D. ... 

74 

13 

5 

5 

4 

21 

26 

Under 5 


1 

1 

5 upwards. 



2 

Arundel U.D. 

31 

3 

— 

1 

1 

16 

10 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 




Horsham U.D. ... 

136 

23 

21 

6 

8 

41 

37 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 




Totals . 

1777 

304 

151 

96 

78 

473 

675 

Under 5 


1 

33 

5 upwards. 


1 

30 


The subjoined numbers have also to be taken into 

Deaths occurring outside the 
District among persons 
belonging thereto. 

39 

1 

— 

1 

1 

10 

26 

Under 5 




5 upwards. 




Deaths occurring within the 
District among persons 
not belonging thereto... 

35 

2 

7 

2 

1 

6 

17 

Under 5 



8 

5 upwards. 



1 

















































































































































































































259 



0 


! 

i 

: 

i 


t! 

i 


j. 


j 




of West Sussex, classified according to Diseases, Ages, and Localities. 


Mortality from subjoined causes, distinguishing Deaths of Children 

under Five Years of Age. 

4 

5 

6 

I 7 

- 8 

1 9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

Membranous 

Croup. 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 

Measles. 

Whooping 

Cough. 

Diarrhoea and 

Dysentery. 

Rheumatic 

Fever. 

Phthisis. 

Bronchitis, 

Pneumonia, 

and Pleurisy. 

Heart 

Disease. 

Influenza. 

© 

. p —* 

f-t 

3 

•r-3 

a 
(—1 

All Other 

Diseases. 

Total. 

Typhus. 

Enteric or 
Typhoid. 

Continued. 

Relapsing. 

Puerperal. 








1 

1 

2 

3 



3 


2 

2 

20 

35 



3 





1 





11 

10 

11 

4 

7 

53 

100 











2 



8 


1 

1 

20 

40 











1 


3 

8 

5 

1 

2 

18 

40 

1 


1 






1 


1 



16 


1 

3 

31 

57 



1 






1 


1 


17 

38 

35 

8 

13 

102 

221 









1 


2 



9 



2 

19 

34 



1 






1 



1 

11 

18 

17 

8 

5 

57 

120 

1 









1 

1 



6 




13 

26 









1 


2 


10 

14 

18 

8 

4 

35 

97 









1 


3 



13 




30 

47 











1 


9 

16 

10 

6 

8 

73 

125 


< 







1 

1 

1 



12 


1 

2 

25 

44 



2 








1 


11 

22 

17 

8 

9 

84 

154 










1 

6 



3 




19 

30 






1 


1 



1 


4 

18 

13 

8 

1 

31 

80 








1 

1 


17 



5 


2 

5 

32 

77 








2 





16 

18 

37 

18 

O 

O 

103 

209 











1 



1 



2 

12 

18 








1 




1 

5 

9 

4 

4 

1 

29 

56 









1 





1 




1 

3 













3 

6 

11 

1 


/ 

28 









8 

6 

2 



9 



2 

17 

44 









1 


1 


10 

15 

10 

5 

3 

47 

92 

2 


1 





2 

15 

11 

39 



86 


7 

19 

239 

455 



7 



1 


5 

4 


8 

2 

110 

192 

188 

79 

56 

639 

1322 

account in judging of the above records of mortality. 









| 









1 

1 













4 

2 

5 


1 

26 

38 


















1 

9 













2 

1 

3 


1 

18 

26 





































































































































































































































































































































































260 


(B)— TABLE OF POPULATION, BIRTHS, AND OF NEW CASES 
Officer of Health, during the year 1895, in the COMBINED DISTRICT 


Names of Localities adopted 
for the purpose of these 
Statistics; Public Institutions 
being shown as separate 
localities. 

(«) 

Population 
at all Ages. 

a. Registered Births. 

Aged 
under 5 
or 

over 5. 

(e) 

New Cases of Sick- 
coming TO THE KNOWLEDGE 

OF 

Census 

1891. 

(b) 

Esti¬ 
mated 
to mid¬ 
dle of 
1895. 

(c) 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

Small Pox. 

Scarlatina. 

Diphtheria. 

Membranous 

Croup. 

Fev 

X 

P 

-e 

Cl, 

H 

Enteric or ^ 

Typhoid. 5® 

Steyning West R.D. ... 

10,810 

11,000 

287 

Under 5 


1 

3 

1 


1 

5 upwards. 


8 

11 



17 

Steyning East R.D. 

6,062 

6,800 

203 

Under 5 


1 

1 




5 upwards. 


4 

9 



1 

Horsham R.D. ... 

16,798 

18,300 

432 

Under 5 


2 

7 

1 


1 

5 upwards. 


16 

14 



3 

Petworth R.D. 

9,431 

9,400 

202 

Under 5 



1 




5 upwards. 


1 

20 



1 

Thakeham R.D. 

8,049 

8,000 

197 

Under 5 


3 

11 

2 



5 upwards. 


7 

39 



1 

East Preston R.D. 

8,692 

9,200 

278 

Under 5 


9 

2 




5 upwards. 


33 

4 



3 

Midhurst R.D. 

• 

14,236 

14,350 

345 

Under 5 


2 

2 




5 upwards. 


13 

8 



9 

Westbourne R. D. 

7,084 

7,000 

165 

Under 5 



2 



2 

5 upwards. 



15 



20 

Worthing U.D. . 

16,606 

18,500 

362 

Under 5 



25 




5 upwards. 


5 

67 



2 

Littlehampton U.D. 

4,452 

4,700 

110 

Under 5 


3 

3 




5 upwards. 


10 

4 




Arundel U.D. ... 

2,644 

2,640 

76 

Under 5 







5 upwards. 






3 

Horsham U.D. 

8,087 . 

8,580 

221 

Under 5 







5 upwards. 







Totals . 

112951 

118470 

2,878 

Under 5 


21 

57 

4 


4 

5 upwards. 


97 

191 



60 










































































































































































261 


OF INFECTIOUS SICKNESS, coming to the knowledge of the Medical 
of West Sussex; classified according to Diseases, Ages, and Localities. 


NESS IN EACH LOCALITY, 

of the Medical Officer 
Health. 


Number of such Cases Removed from their 
Homes in the several Localities for Treatment 
in Isolation Hospital. 


7 

S 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 



Small Pox. 

Scarlatina. 

Diphtheria. 

Membranous 

Croup. 

Fevers. 

Cholera. 

Erysipelas. 



Continued. 

Relapsing. 

Puerperal. 

Typhus. 

Enteric or 

Typhoid. 

Continued. 

Relapsing. 

| Puerperal. 

























7 












































































7 




8 




















1 




















13 






































1 


5 








































10 








































8 




































1 


2 


8 




















1 
















1 




9 




















2 




















17 








































1 




















The 

Inf 

ecti 

ous 

Dise 

ases 

(Not 

ifiea 

tion 

) Ac 

t (18 

89) 










is 

not 

yet 

in f 

orce 

in t 

his 

Dist 

rict. 











4 
















9 


3 


86 






































































































































































































































































































































' 


I 

r'-V ' 

h 


' 

1 , 


■ 


r ' f -A y 

■; 












* 





; 1 . / % 



■ 


















■ 


















V- ' 

" 

£ '? ' ■ 








. 










* 

v ' 








' 

■ 


% 













































r:v- 












4 < ' 

: 






























«v Jr , i 

»:* , .