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National Semiconductor IMD 1ft DDDM 

Order No. IMP-16P/955A llVIr" IO I II V/ 1 VI 

Pub no 4200055A Programmer 

y Reference Manual 




Integrated Microprocessor 
IMP-16 



Publication No. 4200055A 
Order No. IMP-16P/955A 



IMP-16 



PROM 



PROGRAMMER 



REFERENCE MANUAL 



JULY 1974 



National Semiconductor Corporation 
2900 Semiconductor Drive 
Santa Clara, California 95051 



PREFACE 



This publication provides the information necessary to use the IMP-16 PROM Programmer software package 
with IMP-16L or IMP-16P Microcomputers. 

The PROM Programmer may be used to program either National Semiconductor MM4203/5203 or MM4204/ 
5204 PROMs. 

The information in this manual is for information purposes only and is subject to change without notice. 

Copies of this and other National Semiconductor publications may be obtained from the sales office listed on 
the back cover. 



CAUTION 

Do not power up or remove power from the system with a PROM 
in either of the two programming sockets. This may destroy the 
contents of the last word of the PROM. 



ii 



CONTENTS 



Chapter Page 

1 GENERAL INFORMATION 1-1 

1.1 INTRODUCTION 1-1 

1.2 SYSTEM CONFIGURATION , . 1-1 

1.3 LIMITATIONS 1-1 

1.4 CONVENTIONS 1-2 

2 SOFTWARE 2-1 

2.1 GENERAL 2-1 

2.2 COMMUNICATIONS 2-1 

2.3 COMMAND DESCRIPTIONS 2-1 

2.3.1 SET MODE Command 2-1 

2. 3. 2 CHECK MODE Command 2-2 

2.3.3 READ PROM Command 2-2 

2.3.4 READ BINARY Command 2-3 

2.3.5 READ P/N Command 2-4 

2.3.6 READ LM Tape 2-5 

2.3.7 READ LM Cards 2-7 

2. 3. 8 GO TO HEX Command 2-8 

2.3.9 MOVE DATA Command 2-8 

2. 3. 10 FILL BUFFER Command 2-9 

2. 3. 11 LIST PROM Command 2-9 

2.3.12 LIST BUFFER Command . 2-9 

2. 3. 13 PROM CHECKSUM Command 2-10 

2. 3. 14 BUFFER Checksum 2-10 

2.3. 15 PROGRAM PROM Command. . 2-10 

2. 3. 16 CHECK AND PROGRAM Command 2-11 

2. 3. 17 VERIFY Command 2-12 

3 OPERATION 3-1 

3.1 INITIALIZATION 3-1 

3. 1. 1 IMP-16 Paper Tape Initialization 3-1 

3. 1. 2 IMP-16 Card Deck Initialization 3-1 

3. 2 PROM DESCRIPTION 3-2 

3 . 3 PROM HAND LING 3-2 

3.4 PROM PROGRAMMING 3-2 

3.4.1 General . 3-2 

3.4.2 Duplicating an existing PROM 3-2 

3.4.3 Programming from P/N paper tape 3-3 

3.4.4 Programming from complemented binary paper tape 3-3 

3.4. 5 Programming from LM paper tape 3-4 

3.4.6 Programming from LM cards 3-4 

3.5 HOW TO ERASE A PROM 3-4 



iii 



CONTENTS (Continued) 



Chapter Page 

4 HARDWARE — PROM PROGRAMMER 4-1 

4.1 PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION 4-1 

4.2 SPECIFICATIONS 4-1 

4.3 PROGRAM LOGIC CONTROL 4-1 

4.3.1 Data Transmission Flags 4-2 

4.3.2 User Branch-on Condition 4-2 

4.3.3 User Program Voltage Control Flags 4-3 

4.4 PROGRAM VOLTAGES 4-3 

4.5 PROGRAMMING SEQUENCE 4-3 

4.6 PIN LIST AND BACK PANEL WIRE LIST 4-3 

A APPENDIX — PROM TAPE FORMATS A-l 

A. 1 COMPLEMENTARY BINARY FORMAT A-l 

A. 2 P/N FORMAT A-l 

B APPENDIX — COMMAND SUMMARY B-l 

C APPENDIX — PIN OUT LISTS C-l 

C. 1 PROM PROGRAMMER PIN OUT LIST C-l 

C. 2 IMP-16 PIN OUT FOR PROM PROGRAMMER C-2 

C. 3 IMP-16 BACK PANEL WIRE-LIST OPTIONS REQUIRED C-3 

D APPENDIX — REFERENCE SYSTEM PUBLICATIONS D-l 



ILLUSTRATIONS 

Figure Page 

4-1 Data Transmission Format 4-2 

4-2 Illustration of Writing to PROM 4-4 

4-3 Typical Programming Voltages 4-5 



TABLE 

Table Page 
4-1 PROM Programmer Functions . ... . . 4-1 



iv 




144-PIN EDGE CONNECTOR 




1-0 



Chapter 1 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



1.1 INTRODUCTION 

The PROM Programmer is packaged on a 13-1/2 by 11-inch printed circuit card inserted in the IMP-16 Micro- 
computer. Two low -insertion force 24 -pin sockets are provided. One accepts the National Semiconductor 
MM4203/5203 PROM and the other accepts the MM4204/5204 PROM. The PROM Programmer PC card con- 
tains all the logic and high-voltage power supplies necessary to program either PROM. 

This publication provides a user all the information necessary to program a National Semiconductor MM4203/ 
5203 or MM4204/5204 PROM on either the IMP-16L or the IMP-16P Microcomputers. 

Provisions are available to accomplish the following: 

• Duplicate an existing PROM. 

• Verify a previously programmed PROM. 

• Read a paper tape in either P/N, complemented binary, or absolute LM format into memory. 

• Read a card deck in absolute LM format into memory. 

• Program a PROM from memory. 

For additional information on the PROM Programmer the user is referred to Chapter 4 (Hardware -PROM Pro- 
grammer) of this manual and to the publications listed in appendix D. Physical descriptions of the IMP-16 Micro- 
computer and its peripherals are contained in the IMP-16 users manuals (see appendix D, Reference System Pub- 
lications). Detailed descriptions of the hardware/software environment is beyond the scope of this document. 



1. 2 SYSTEM CONFIGURATION 

The basic operating environment requires the PRMSFT software package and the following hardware components: 

• IMP-16L or IMP-16P Microcomputer 

• PROM Programmer PC board 

• Teletype with paper tape reader 

• Card reader (optional) to read LM card decks 



1.3 LIMITATIONS 

Two types of PROMs may be programmed: National Semiconductor MM4203/5203 and MM4204/5204. The 
sockets are not interchangeable. Only the MM5203 may be plugged into the MM5203 socket, and only the 
MM5204 may be plugged into the MM5204 socket. If a PROM is plugged into the wrong socket, either the 
PROM or the PROM Programmer may be damaged. It may be advisable to put tape over the unused socket. 



1-1 



CAUTION 



Power should always be turned off before the PROM Programmer 
board is inserted or removed from the system. When turning off 
power, make sure no PROMs are plugged in as some locations in 
the PROM may inadventently be programmed. 

The programming time is dependent upon the temperature of the PROM. The hotter it is, the longer the PROM 
takes to program. A fan may be employed to cool the PROM for faster programming. Typically, the MM5203 
may be programmed in less than 5 minutes. 



1.4 CONVENTIONS 

The following notation is used for command descriptions and examples in this manual: 

• Mixed upper/lower-case characters indicate notes and comments. 

• Nonunderlined characters, numbers, and symbols indicate computer -generated output. 

• Underlined characters, numbers, and symbols indicate user -generated input; lower-case 
represents the general format, and upper-case represents the specific case. 

• Circled, upper -case characters represent the operation of Teletype keys which do not 
generate a printed character. 

The basic elements of the PRMSFT commands are defined as follows: 

<a> specifies an operand f a f of a command. 

[a] indicates the operand f a ! is optional. 

The following meaning is assigned to the term used in the general case form of the command: 

<hex number > is defined as from one to four digits from the hexadecimal set. Leading zeros 
are suppressed. 



1-2 



Chapter 2 



SOFTWARE 



2. 1 GENERAL 

PRMSFT is a supervisory program used to program either the National Semiconductor MM4203/5203 or the 
MM4204/5204 PROMs. The PRMSFT software starts at location X ! 0000 and uses less than 2K of memory. A 
fixed Buffer Area is used to read from and write to the PROM. The Buffer Area is from X'OEOO to X'OFFF. 
For the MM5203 PROM, only the lower buffer is used (X f 0E00 to X'OEFF). 



2. 2 COMMUNICATIONS 

The user communicates with PRMSFT through the Teletype. When PRMSFT takes control, it types a question 
mark (?) to indicate it is ready to accept a command. The user may then enter PRMSFT commands. All 
commands must be terminated by a carriage return (6?) . To abort a command before execution, the (ALT MODE) 
key may be pressed at anytime before the (65) . There are several error messages that may be generated 
during the command execution process. These conditions are discussed in relation to the relevant command. 

During the processing of certain commands, PRMSFT continuously checks for keyboard input during the output 
process. If any input character is detected, the printing is terminated and the user is prompted for a new com- 
mand. This feature is particularly useful for terminating excessive or undesirable output. 



2. 3 COMMAND DESCRIPTIONS 

2.3. 1 SET MODE Command 
? S (^j) 

This command sets the mode of operation for the type of PROM being programmed, either National Semicon- 
ductor MM4203/5203 or the MM4204/5204. After the command is issued, a message is typed explaining the 
options. If other than the requested inputs are typed, the message is repeated. If more than one hexadecimal 
digit is typed only the last digit is used. The default mode after PRMSFT software initialization is for the 
MM5203. The following examples illustrate the use of the SET MODE command. 

1. This example sets the mode for MM5203. 
? S (j5S) 

MM5204 4K PROM. TYPE 4 (CR). 
MM5203 2K PROM. TYPE 2 (CR). 
2 (CE) 

MM5203 2K PROM. 
? 

2. Error, operator terminates command. 

? S 0 (ALT MODE) 

? X. 

^ Bad input. 



2-1 



3. This example sets the mode for MM5204. 



? s @§ 

MM5204 4K PROM. TYPE 4 @ 
MM5203 2K PROM. TYPE 2 @ 
3 (Sr) Bad input. 

MM5204 4K PROM. TYPE 4 (CR). 
MM5203 2K PROM. TYPE 2 (CR). 

1234 (6r) -< Only the last digit is used. 

MM5204 4K PROM. 
? 

2.3.2 CHECK MODE Command 



This command is used to check the mode of operation being used. The following examples illustrate the CHECK 
MOPE command. 

1. In this example the mode is previously set for MM5203. 
? -« 

MM5203 2K PROM. 
? 

2. In this example the mode is previously set for MM5204. 
? -« 

MM5204 4K PROM. 
? 

2. 3. 3 READ PROM Command 
? H (CR) 

This command is used to read from an existing PROM into the Buffer Area. After the command is entered, a 
message is sent to the Teletype requesting the operator to insert the PROM into the socket and to type a space 
@ when ready. The data words are read into memory and then read again for verification. If the read is 
correct, the checksum of the PROM is typed out. If the PROM and memory Buffer Area do not agree, the data 
read from the PROM are typed out followed by the data from the Buffer Area and the addresses which do not 
agree. The following examples illustrate the use of the READ PROM command. 

1. In this example the PROM is read correctly. 

? H ^R) 

PUT PROM IN SOCKET. 

HIT SPACE WHEN READY. ^ 

CKSM = FE61 

DATA IN MEMORY CORRECTLY. 
TYPE P OR Y TO PROGRAM PROMS. 
? 



2-2 



2. In this example memory and the PROM are not in agreement at address X'010. 



? H 

PUT PROM IN SOCKET, 
HIT SPACE WHEN READY. 

OOFF 0010 BAD PROM AT ADDRESS 0010 
DONE. 



Data read from PROM is X T FF. Data is Buffer Area is X ! 10. 



This command reads a complemented binary paper tape into the Buffer Area. The operator loads the tape and 
types the command. PRMSFT responds with a message to load the tape and hit space when ready. The routine 
reading the tape assumes a rubout character immediately precedes the data. If there is no rubout character 
at the beginning of the tape, the tape may be positioned to the first record and then a rubout typed before turn- 
ing on the tape reader. A total of 256 or 512 8-bit words are read into the Buffer Area, depending upon which 
mode is selected. When the tape is read into memory, the checksum is typed out, and the operator is given 
the option of reading again to verify the tape. The following examples illustrate the use of the READ BINARY 
command. 



1. In this example the tape is read correctly twice. 

? I @ 

LOM) TAPE. 

HIT SPACE WHEN READY, (ffy 

CKSM - 646B 

VERIFY TAPE? Y OR N 



VERIFY TAPE TO MEMORY. 

LOAD TAPE. AGAIN. 

HIT SPACE WHEN READY. (Si) 
DATA IN MEMORY CORRECTLY. 
TYPE P OR Y TO PROGRAM PROMS. 



2. In this example the tape is read correctly once. 

? I 

LOAD TAPE. 

HIT SPACE WHEN READY, (flj) 
CKSM - 646B 
VERIFY TAPE ? Y OR N 



? 



2.3.4 



READ BINARY Command 




Y (gR) 




TYPE P OR Y TO PROGRAM PROMS. 
? 



2-3 



3. In this example the tape and memory are not correct. 

? I 0 

LOAD TAPE 0 

HIT SPACE WHEN READY. ^ 
CKSM = 64C1 
VERIFY TAPE? Y OR N 
Y @ 

VERIFY TAPE TO MEMORY. 
LOAD TAPE. AGAIN. 
HIT SPACE WHEN READY. ^ 
TAPE AND MEMORY NOT CORRECT TRY AGAIN. 



2. 3. 5 READ P/N Command 



? N (CR) 

This command reads a paper tape in the P/N format into the Buffer Area. To load a tape, the operator enters 
the command. The system responds with a message to load the tape and hit space (sp) when ready. After the 
tape is read, the operator is given the option of reading again to verify the tape. Either 256 or 512 8-bit words 
are read, depending upon which mode is set. If an error is detected when verifying, an error message is sent 
to the Teletype. If the P/N tape contains any character other than P or N between the start and stop characters 
(B and F), the tape is bad and an error message is generated. The tape format is shown below. 



Tape format for the MM5203 and MM5204. 



Carriage return, line feed allowed 
between F and B. 



Start Stop 

Character Character / Data Field* MSB LSB 

I I / \ \ 

BPPPNPPNNFBNNPPNNPPF...BNPNPNNNPF 
V ^ A J \ S J 



word 0 
All Address Inputs LOW N 



word 1 



word 255 



'All Address Inputs HIGH N 



*Data Field: Must have only Ps and Ns typed between B and F (no! nulls or rubouts). Must have exactly eight 
P and N characters between the F stop character and the B start character. If an error is made preparing the 
tape, the entire word including the B and F start and stop characters must be rubbed out. Data for exactly 
256 words must be entered, beginning with word 0, for the MM5203, and exactly 512 words for the MM5204. 
The P/N format stands for positive/negative voltage, with P = 1 or positive and N = 0 or negative. 

The following examples illustrate the use of the READ P/N command. 



1. This example shows correct operation reading the tape once. 

? N(^R) 

LOAD TAPE. 

HIT SPACE WHEN READY . @ 

P/N TAPE READ IN. 
VERIFY TAPE ? Y OR N 
N 

TYPE P OR Y TO PROGRAM PROMS. 
? 



2-4 



2. This example shows correct operation reading the tape twice. 



? N 

LOAD TAPE. 

HIT SPACE WHEN READY. ^> 

P/N TAPE READ IN. 
VERIFY TAPE ? Y OR N 
Y^ 

VERIFY TAPE TO MEMORY. 
LOAD TAPE. 

HIT SPACE WHEN READY. ^ 
DATA IN MEMORY CORRECTLY. 
TYPE P OR Y TO PROGRAM PROMS. 
? 

3. In this example the P/N tape is read twice and memory does not agree. 

? N (6^ 

LOAD TAPE. 

HIT SPACE WHEN READY, (fl) 

P/N TAPE READ IN. 
VERIFY TAPE ? Y OR N 
Y (gjj) 

VERIFY TAPE TO MEMORY. 
LOAD TAPE. 

HIT SPACE WHEN READY. ^ 
TAPE AND MEMORY NOT CORRECT TRY AGAIN. 

? 

4. This example shows bad data on the tape. 

? N (@) 

LOAD TAPE. 

HIT SPACE WHEN READY . @ 

P/N TAPE BAD. 
? 

2.3. 6 READ LM Tape 
? L (^R) 

This command reads an absolute LM paper tape into the Buffer Area. The operator enters the command L @ . 
A message is sent requesting that the operator load the tape and hit space when ready. The read routine 
assumes the tape is absolute and fits into 512 words of contiguous memory. The routine uses the lower 9 bits 
of the loading address to determine where to put the data in the Buffer Area. If bit 8 is a one, the data words 
are loaded into locations X T 0F00 to X ! 0FFF. If bit 8 is zero, the data words are loaded into locations X'OEOO 
through X'OEFF. These two buffers are called the upper 256 (X ! 0F00-X ! 0FFF) and the lower 256 (X'OEOO- 
X T 0EFF). The operator is given the choice of programming from either the upper or lower 256 words and 
either the right or left 8 bits. All records are checked for checksum, and when an error is detected, a 
message is printed. The following examples illustrate the use of the READ LM TAPE command. 



2-5 



1. This example shows the correct reading of an absolute tape. 

? L @ 

LOAD TAPE. 

HIT SPACE WHEN READY . © 
UPPER 256 U (CR) 
LOWER 256 L (CR) 

U (65) Bit 8 of the data address = 1 

LEFT BYTE TYPE L (CR) 
RIGHT BYTE TYPE R (CR) 
R 

DONE. 

? 

2. This example shows an LM read with the operator typing the wrong inputs. 
? L (6r) 

LOAD TAPE. 

HIT SPACE WHEN READY. © 
UPPER 256 U (CR) 
LOWER 256 L (CR) 

H @ Bad input 

UPPER 256 U (CR) 
LOWER 256 L (CR) 

L§. 

LEFT BYTE TYPE L (CR) 

RIGHT BYTE TYPE R (CR) 

L (g) 

DONE. 

? 

3. This example shows an LM read with a checksum error. 

? L © 

LOAD TAPE. 

HIT SPACE WHEN READY. ^ 
CHECKSUM ERROR. 
TRY AGAIN? Y OR N 
Y © 

LOAD TAPE. 

HIT SPACE WHEN READY. © -< Tape repositioned 

UPPER 256 U (CR) 
LOWER 256 L (CR) 
U © 

LEFT BYTE TYPE L (CR) 
RIGHT BYTE TYPE R (CR) 
R 

DONE. 

? 



2-6 



2.3.7 READ LM CARDS 



? J 

This command reads absolute LM card deck into the Buffer Area. When the operator types the command, a 
message is returned to load the cards, ready the reader, and type a space @ when ready. The read routine 
assumes the load module (LM) is absolute and fits into 512 words of contiguous memory. The routine uses 
the least significant 9 bits of the loading address to determine where to load the data in the Buffer Area. If 
bit 8 is a one, the data words are placed in the upper buffer (X'OFOO to X'OFFF). If bit 8 is a zero, the data 
words are put in the lower buffer (X'OEOO to X'OEFF). The operator is given the choice of either the upper 
or the lower 256 words as well as the right and left byte. All records are checked for correct checksum, 
and an error message is typed if an incorrect checksum is found. The last card must contain an * in column 1. 
The following examples illustrate the use of the READ LM CARDS command. 

1. This example shows the normal operation. 
? J ^ 

MAKE CR READY. 
HIT SPACE WHEN READY. 
UPPER 256 U (CR) 
LOWER 256 L (CR) 

HA 

LEFT BYTE TYPE L (CR). 
RIGHT BYTE TYPE R (CR). 

L (6r) 

DONE. 

? 

2. In this example the LM deck is greater than 512 words. 
? J 

MAKE CR READY. 

HIT SPACE WHEN READY. ^ 

RLM TOO LARGE. 

? 

3. In this example an LM card is not correct. 
? J (6r) 

MAKE CR READY. 

HIT SPACE WHEN READY. ^ 

INVALID CHAR. 

? 

4. In this example there is a transmission error. 
? J 

MAKE CR READY. 

HIT SPACE WHEN READY, (g^ 

TRANSMISSION ERROR. 

? 



2-7 



5. This example shows a recovery from a bad checksum. 



? J @$ 

MAKE CR READY. 
HIT SPACE WHEN READY, 
CHECKSUM ERROR. 
TRY AGAIN? Y OR N 

IM. 

MAKE CR READY Put the bad card back in the card reader 

HIT SPACE WHEN READY. ^P) 
UPPER 256 U (CR) 
LOWER 256 L (CR) 

LEFT BYTE TYPE L (CR) 
RIGHT BYTE TYPE R (CR) 
L (Sj) 
DONE. 

? 



2.3.8 GO TO HEX Command 

? G <hex address> (6r) 

This command transfers control from the PRMSFT software to the hexadecimal address specified. This com- 
mand is used to transfer control to a user's program. The following examples illustrate the use of the GO TO 
HEX command. 

1. Jump to a user's program at X f 4300. 
? G4300 @ 

2. In this example the operand is missing. 



Control was not transferred. 




2. 3. 9 MOVE DATA Command 

? M [<hex number >] {Sr) 

This command moves data from the hex address specified to the Buffer Area (X ! 0E00). Either 256 or 512 
words are moved depending on which mode is used. The address range wraps around memory; so if the 
starting address given is X f FF01 or greater, then, after word X ? FFFF is moved, the next address is X f 0000. 
If an address is not given, the move starts at zero. Either the left or right byte must be specified to be 
moved. The following example illustrates the use of the MOVE command. 

1. This example moves data from X ! 0120 through X f 021F and uses the left byte. 

? M 120 @) 

LEFT BYTE TYPE L (CR). 
RIGHT BYTE TYPE R (CR). 
L @§ 

DONE. 
? 



2-8 



2. 3. 10 FILL BUFFER Command 



? W [<hex number >] @ 

This command fills the Buffer Area with the last four digits of the hexadecimal number given. Either 256 or 
512 words are filled depending on the mode used. The default is zero if the operand is missing. The following 
examples illustrate the use of the FILL BUFFER command. 

1. In this example the left byte of the buffer is filled with X'FF. 

? W FF (6e) 

DONE. 
? 

2. In this example the buffer is filled with X f 00. 

? W (j^ Defaults to X'OO 

DONE. 

? 

2. 3. 11 LIST PROM Command 

? R [<hex address >] @ 

This command reads a PROM and lists its contents starting at the given hexadecimal address within the PROM. 
If no address is given, the default address is zero. The format of the printout is the address followed by 8 
hexadecimal words. The printout is either 256 or 512 words long, depending on the mode. Printing may be 
terminated by hitting any key on the keyboard. The following examples illustrate the use of the LIST PROM 
command. 

1. This example shows a printout starting at address X f 20. 
? R 20 (6^) 

0200 00FF 00FF 00FF 00FF 00FF 00FF 00FF 00FF 
0028 00FF 00FF 00FF 00FF 00FF 00FF 00FF 00FF 

? Operator hits A 

keyboard ' 

2. In this example the PROM contents are listed starting at address X T 00. 
? R 

0000 00FF 00FF 00FF 00FF ^ ^ Operator hits keyboard 

2. 3. 12 LIST BUFFER Command 
? T [<hex address >j @ 

This command is used to type out any memory location starting at the hexadecimal address given. If 
the operand is missing, the Buffer Area is typed out. Either 256 or 512 words are typed out, depending 
on the mode. The listing may be terminated with a space @ . The following examples illustrate the 
use of the LIST BUFFER command. 

1. This example shows a listing starting at memory location X ! E20. 

? T E20 (6% 

0E20 0080 0000 004F 0081 0006 001C @$ ■< Operator hits a space 

? 



2-9 



2. In this example the write buffer is listed. 



? T (C^) 

OEOO 004C 0000 0029 008D 0087 0065 0036 0083 

0E08 0011 00D3 004B 004A 0021 008D ^ - ^-Operator hits a space 



? 



2. 3. 13 PROM CHECKSUM Command 
? Q (cq) 

This command computes and types out the checksum of the PROM. The following example illustrates the use 
of this command. 



2. 3. 14 BUFFER Checksum 

? x 

This command computes and types out the Buffer Area checksum. The following example illustrates the use 
of the command. 



2.3.15 PROGRAM PROM C ommand 
? Y [<hex address>] @) 

This command is used to program a PROM starting at the hexadecimal address given. If the operand is miss- 
ing, the default address is zero. In this mode the command does not check if the PROM is erased. On the 
IMP-16L, both the address being programmed and the data read from the PROM are displayed on the control 
panel. The address is displayed using the program counter memory address lights on the control panel. The 
data read from the PROM are displayed using the data display lights. On the IMP-16P, the operator may 
observe memory location X f 0023 (the PROM address currently being accessed) to get a positive indication that 
the programmer is working. A message is printed at the start of programming. Hitting any key on the key- 
board terminates programming, and a message is typed along with the last address programmed. If an 
address cannot be programmed, programming ceases and an error message is typed. This error message 
contains the data read from the PROM, and the data from the Buffer Area, along with the bad address. After 
the PROM is programmed, a message is typed to the operator along with ringing the TTY bell. If an error 
exists, an error message is typed. The following examples illustrate the use of the PROGRAM PROM com- 
mand. 



? Q 

CKSM = FFOO 
? 



? X (@) 

CKSM = 4585 
? 



1. This example shows the correct operation starting at address X f 00. 




PROGRAMMING NOW. 
PROM PROGRAMMED. 
CKSM = FFOO 
PROM IS CORRECT. 
? 



2-10 



2. 



In this example the operator terminates the programming at X T 0A. 



? Y @ 

PROGRAMMING NOW. (ffy ^ Operator hits keyboard. 

PROM AT ADDRESS OOOA 
? 

3. Restart at X 1 OA. 
? YA@ 

PROGRAMMING NOW. 
PROM PROGRAMMED. 
CKSM = FFOO 
PROM IS CORRECT. 
? 

4. In this example the PROM could not be programmed at address X ! 02. 
? Y ®) 

PROGRAMMING NOW. 

OOFF 0002 BAD PROM AT ADDRESS 0002 

? 



2. 3. 16 CHECK AND PROGRAM Command 
? P^ 

This command programs a PROM starting at PROM location zero after checking to see if the PROM is erased. 
After the check, this command functions exactly as a PROGRAM command with no operand (starting address 
zero). The following examples illustrate the use of the CHECK AND PROGRAM command. 

1. This example shows the correct operation. 
? P (cr) 

PROGRAMMING NOW. 
PROM PROGRAMMED. 
CKSM = FFOO 
PROM IS CORRECT. 
? 

2. This example shows the PROM is not erased at address X ! 00. 
? P (CR) 

PROM NOT ERASED AT ADDRESS 0000 
? 

3. In this example the operator terminates programming with the keyboard. 
? P (CR) 

PROGRAMMING NOW. (S^ 
PROM AT ADDRESS 0007 
? 



2-11 



4. In this example the PROM could not be programmed at address X T 02. 



? P (cr) 

PROGRAMMING NOW. 

OOFF 0002 BAD PROM AT ADDRESS 0002 




Data read Data in 
from PROM Buffer Area 



PROM address 



2. 3. 17 VERIFY Command 




This command is used to verify a PROM is written correctly. When the operator types the command, the con- 
tents of the PROM are compared with the contents of the Buffer Area. If the PROM and the Buffer Area agree, 
the checksum of the PROM is typed as well as a message. If the PROM and Buffer Area are not in agreement, 
an error message is output. All bad words are listed unless terminated by the operator hitting the space key. 
The following examples illustrate the use of the VERIFY command. 



1. 



This example shows the correct operation. 



? V (CR) 



CKSM = FFOO 
PROM IS CORRECT. 
? 



2. 



In this example, there is a bad word at address X f 02. 




OOFF 0002 BAD PROM AT ADDRESS 0002 




Word read Word in 
from PROM Buffer Area 



PROM address 



3. In this example, there are multiple bad addresses and operator terminates. 




OOFF 0055 BAD PROM AT ADDRESS 0000 

OOFF 0055 BAD PROM AT ADDRESS 0001 

OOFF 0055 BAD PROM AT ADDRESS 0002 @ M- 

? 



Operator hits key 



2-12 



Chapter 3 



OPERATION 

3.1 INITIALIZATION 

There are two ways of loading PRMSFT software, from paper tape or from cards. The paper tape initializa- 
tion is the same for both the IMP-16P and the IMP-16L Microprocessors; however, the card deck initializations 
are different. 

3. 1. 1 IMP-16 Paper Tape Initialization 

The Absolute Paper Tape Loader (ABSPT) is resident in Read-Only Memory (ROM) on the IMP-16 Micropro- 
cessors. The procedure for loading from paper tape is as follows: 

1. Press INIT on the IMP-16 panel. 

2. Place the LM paper tape in the reader. 

3. Press LOAD PROG on the IMP-16 panel. 

4. Turn on paper tape reader. 

5. Wait for tape to be read and processing to halt. 

6. Press RUN to begin execution of PRMSFT. 

3. 1. 2 IMP-16 Card Deck Initialization 

In the IMP-16P the Absolute Card Reader Loader (ABSCR) is resident in ROM. In the IMP-16L it is resident 
in memory, starting at the location specified by the user. The procedure for loading the IMP-16P from cards 
is as follows: 

1. Press INIT on the IMP-16P panel. 

2. Set PC (program counter) to X f 7F00. 

3. Set display selector to PROG DATA. 

4. Load card deck into card reader. 

5. Press RESET on card reader. 

6. Wait until green ready light is on. 

7. Press RUN on the IMP-16P panel. 

The procedure for loading the IMP-16L from cards is as follows: 

1. Press INIT on the IMP-16L panel. 

2. Put two CRBOOT cards in the card reader. 

3. Put ABSCR card deck next. 

4. Put PRMSFT card deck next. 

5. Put a GO card at the end. 

6. Press RESET on the card reader. 

7. Wait until the green ready light is on. 

8. Press AUX 1; one card is read in. 

9. Press RUN on the IMP-16L panel. 



Upon successful completion of any of the appropriate loading procedures control is transferred to PRMSFT. 
PRMSFT outputs the program name, then a prompt character (question mark): 



PRMSFT 05/01/74 
? 

To restart the system, the operator may push the initialize (INIT) and run (RUN) buttons. 



3.2 PROM DESCRIPTION 

The National Semiconductor MM4203/5203 is a 256-word by 8-bit PROM and is pin compatible with the 
National Semiconductor MM4213/5213 ROM. The National Semiconductor MM4204/5204 is a 512-word by 8-bit 
PROM and is pin compatible with the National Semiconductor MM4214/5214 ROM. 



3.3 PROM HANDLING 

A few rules must be adhered to when handling PROMs: 

1. The PROM sockets are not interchangeable. If an MM4203/5203 is plugged into a 5204 socket or 
an MM4204/5204 is plugged into a 5203 socket, the PROM and/or the PROM Programmer may be 
damaged. Be careful to plug the PROM into the correct socket . 

2. Never power-up or power-down the system with a PROM in the programmer. Such action alters 
the contents of the PROM. 



3 . 4 PROM PROGRAMMING 
3.4.1 General 

This section is intended as a guide for programming the PROM. It is suggested the user familiarize himself 
with the PRMSFT commands before using the section. The examples given in the following sections are typical 
usage; they should not be construed to be the only usage of those commands . 

3. 4. 2 Duplicating an existing PROM. 

PRMSFT 05/01/74 
? S (cr) 

MM5204 4K PROM. TYPE 4 (CR). 
MM5203 2K PROM. TYPE 2 (CR). 
2 (CR) 

MM5203 2K PROM. 
? H @) 

PUT PROM IN SOCKET. 
HIT SPACE WHEN READY. 
CKSM=FE61 

DATA IN MEMORY CORRECTLY. 
TYPE P OR Y TO PROGRAM PROM. 
? P (5g) 

PROM NOT ERASED AT ADDRESS 0000 
? P @) 

PROGRAMMING NOW. 
PROM PROGRAMMED. 
CKSM = FE61 
PROM IS CORRECT. 
? V @ 
CKSM = FE61 
PROM IS CORRECT. 



System initialization. 

Set the mode for MM5203 PROM. 



Read PROM into Buffer Area. 



Check if erased then program. 
Forgot to change PROM. 
New PROM to Program. 



Verify the PROM is written correctly. 



Finished. 



3.4.3 Programming from P/N paper tape. 



MM5203 2K PROM. 
? S @ 

MM5204 4K PROM. TYPE 4 (CR). 
MM5203 2K PROM. TYPE 2 (CR). 
4 (CR) 



MM5204 4K PROM. 
? N 6^ 

LOAD TAPE. 

HIT SPACE WHEN READY. ^ 

P/N TAPE READ IN. 
VERIFY TAPE? Y OR N 
Y (CR) 



Check the mode. 

Set the mode for MM5204 PROM. 



Read in the tape. 



VERIFY TAPE TO MEMORY. 
LOAD TAPE. 

HIT SPACE WHEN READY. (gP) 
DATA IN MEMORY CORRECTLY. 
TYPE P OR Y TO PROGRAM PROMS. 
? T (CR) 

0E00 004C 0000 00FF 00FF 00FF 00FF 00FF 00FF 
0E08 0011 00D3 00FF 00 8D 00 8 7 00 6 5 003 6 00FF 
0E10 00FF 00FF ffy 

? Y (C 



PROGRAMMING NOW. 
PROM PROGRAMMED. 
CKSM = F014 
PROM IS CORRECT. 
? G4300 (S 



Reload tape to verify. 

List the Buffer Area. 

Operator terminates listing. 
Program the PROM. 

Go to the user's program. 



3. 4. 4 Programming from complemented binary paper tape. 



PRMSFT 05/01/74 

? S (cr) 

4K PROM. 
2K PROM. 



MM5204 
MM5203 
4 (CR) 
MM5204 
? I (CR) 



TYPE 4 (CR). 
TYPE 2 (CR). 



4K PROM. 



LOAD TAPE. 

HIT SPACE WHEN READY. ^ 
CKSM = 0203 
VERIFY TAPE? Y OR N 
N (CR) 

TYPE P OR Y TO PROGRAM PROMS. 
? P (CR) 



PROGRAMMING NOW. 
PROM PROGRAMMED. 
CKSM = 0203 
PROM IS CORRECT. 
? V (CR) 
CKSM = 0203 
PROM IS CORRECT. 
? 



System initialization. 

Set the mode to 4K PROM. 



Read binary tape. 



Program the PROM. 

Verify the PROM. 
Finish. . 



3-3 



3. 4. 5 Programming from LM paper tape. 

? < Check the mode. 

MM5203 2K PROM. 
? L @) 

LOAD TAPE. Read the LM tape. 

HIT SPACE WHEN READY, 
UPPER 256 U (CR) 
LOWER 256 L (CR) 



U (cr) 



LEFT BYTE TYPE L (CR) 
RIGHT BYTE TYPE R (CR) 

R (CR ) Program the PROM. 

DONE. 
? P (CF 



PROGRAMMING NOW. 
PROM PROGRAMMED. 
CKSM = 0411 
PROM IS CORRECT. 

? Finished. 

3.4. 6 Programming from LM cards. 

? < Checks the mode. 

MM5203 2K PROM. It f s ok. 

? J (cr) Read cards. 

MAKE CR READY. 

HIT SPACE WHEN READY. 
UPPER 256 U (CR) 
LOWER 256 L (CR) 

U (cr) 

LEFT BYTE TYPE L (CR). 
RIGHT BYTE TYPE R (CR). 



R (CR) 



DONE. 

? x Q Print the buffer checksum. 

CKSM = 061E Ok. 

? Y (cr) Program the PROM. 

PROGRAMMING NOW. 

PROM PROGRAMMED. 

CKSM = 061E 

PROM IS CORRECT, 

? W (CR) Zero the buffer. 

DONE. Finished. 

? 



3. 5 HOW TO ERASE A PROM 

PROMS with the quartz window may be erased using short-wave ultra-violet light of approximately 253. 7 nano- 
meters shining directly on the window for half an hour. 



3-4 



Chapter 4 



HARDWARE — PROM PROGRAMMER 



4. 1 PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION 

The PROM Programmer logic is packaged on a single 13-1/2 by 11-inch printed circuit card. Two low-inser- 
tion-force 24 -pin sockets are provided; one accepts MM5203/4203 and the other accepts MM5204/4204 PROMs. 
This logic card contains all the logic and high voltage power supplies required to program the above PROMs. 
The high voltages needed to program a PROM are derived from its -12 -volt power supply. 



4.2 SPECIFICATIONS 

Size of board: 

Two low-insertion-force 
24-pin sockets 

Input power: 

Temperature: 

Humidity: 

Interface characteristics: 

4.3 PROGRAM LOGIC CONTROL 



13-1/2 inches by 11 inches 



+5V at 1. 3 amperes 
-12V at 1. 5 amperes 

Operating 0°to 50°C 
Storage -20° to 125° C 



Maximum of 90% relative humidity 
without condensation 

4 user flags - 2 for data transmission 

2 for controlling program voltages 
1 user branch-on condition 



All communication between the CPU and the PROM Programmer is accomplished with four user control flags 
and one user branch-on condition. The PROM Programmer hardware is compatible with all IMP microcom- 
puters 5 only the software requirements are different. Table 4-1 shows the functions of the PROM Program- 
mer. 



Table 4-1. PROM Programmer Functions 







Control Bits 






Functions 


Start 
Bit 


1 

RD 


2 

EV 


3 
EP 


4 

ET 


5 

DV 


Address Bits 


Data Bits 


Read Data 


1 


1 










Required 


From PROM 


Program PROM 


1 




1 


1 




1 


Required 


From memory 


Overtemperature 


1 








1 


1 


Not Required 


8 clock pulses 
to keep in sync 



4-1 



DATA TRANSMISSION FORMAT 



COMMAND WORD 



DATA WORD 



start 



First bit 
sent 



0 


1 1 t T T 5 


6 


7 t t t i ? t 


.15 


16 1 t t t t , ,23 




control 


X 




data 



^— spare 
COMMAND WORD FORMAT 

0 Start Bit (SB) 



DATA WORD FORMAT 



5 control 
bits 



9 address 
bits K 



1 Read Data command (RD) 

2 Enable Voltage (EV) 

( 3 Enable Program voltage (EP) 

4 Enable Temperature check (ET) 

^5 Disable V BB voltage (DV) 



8 data 
bits 



Last bit 
sent 



6 Spare 



7 Address bit 8 MSB for MM5204 

8 Address bit 7 MSB for MM5203 

9 Address bit 6 

10 Address bit 5 

11 Address bit 4 

12 Address bit 3 

13 Address bit 2 

14 Address bit 1 

15 Address bit 0 LSB of address 



16 


Data 


bit 7 MSB 


17 


Data 


bit 6 


18 


Data 


bit 5 


19 


Data 


bit 4 


20 


Data 


bit 3 


21 


Data 


bit 2 


22 


Data 


bit 1 


23 


Data 


bit 0 LSB 



Note: Data sent to program the MM5203 must be complemented . 
Data words are not complemented for the MM5204. 



Figure 4-1. Data Transmission Format 



4.3.1 Data Transmission Flags 

Two user flags transfer data between the processor and the PROM Programmer. User flag 1 is for data, and 
flag 2 is used as a clock for transferring the data. All data transfers are 24-bit serial; the first 16 bits are the 
command word and the last 8 bits are the data word. Data sent to program the MM5203 must be complemented; 
data words are not complemented for the MM5204. Initialization resets all transmission lines. The data 
transmission format and bit description are shown in figure 4-1. 



4. 3. 2 User Branch-on Condition 

When reading from the PROM Programmer, the user branch-on condition is used to determine if the received 
bit is a logic f l f or a logic ! 0 f . A true on this line (a branch) corresponds to a logic f 0 T received. A true on the 
line is also used to indicate over temperature on the PROM. After the received bit is determined to be a ! l f or 
a f 0 f ,the clock flag is pulsed to receive the next bit. When monitoring overtemperature, the clock flag must be 
pulsed eight times, after the command word is received, to keep the hardware in synchronization (data word 
is not used for overtemperature). 



4-2 



4.3.3 User Program Voltage Control Flags 

To program a PROM, two additional flags are needed to control the programming voltages. The command word 

enables the voltages to program the PROM. Flag 3 sets the correct voltage levels for Vgg, V LL and V-g-g. 
Flag 4 programs the PROM. 



4 . 4 PROGRAM VOLTAGES 

An inverter power supply powered from the -12V line generates the voltages to program the PROM. These 
voltages consist of a raw +70V at 200 milliamperes constant drain which can be pulsed to 600 milliamperes 
for 10 milliseconds with a 3-volt drop. From the +70V the V BB voltage is derived +58V at 100 milliamperes. 
Vgg is derived using V33 as a reference. V$s is HV less than V-QB during programming. The program vol- 
tage is 0V. Initialization resets all programming voltages. Figure 4-2 shows the relationship of programming 
voltages to user flags. 



4. 5 PROGRAMMING SEQUENCE 

Figure 4-2 illustrates the relation of the control flags (USER 1 and USER 2) required to program PROM loca- 
tion X f 67 with the value of X ! 70. Once the entire command word and data word sequence are transmitted to 
the programmer, the actual programming voltages must be delivered to the PROM. Figure 4-3 illustrates 
how user flags 3 and 4 are used for this function. 



4. 6 PIN LIST AND BACK PANEL WIRE LIST 

Refer to appendix C for the PROM Programmer edge connector pin list and IMP-16P system back panel wire 
list. 



4-3 



ENABLE 
ENABLE PROGRAM 
VOLTAGE VOLTAGE 



DISABLE 
VOLTAGE 



FLAG 1 



FLAG 2 



10 



11 



12 



START 
BIT U 



COMMAND WORD (16 BITS) - 
SPARE 



ADDRESS OF PROM 



CONTROL BITS 



13 



14 



15 



16 



17 



18 



19 



20 



21 



22 



23 



24 



COMMAND WORD 



ADDRESS OF PROM 



DATA WORD 



COMMAND WORD = x'B467 WHICH IS WRITE TO ADDRESS x'067 
DATA WORD = x' 70 



Figure 4-2. Illustration of Writing to PROM 



FLAG 3 



BB- 



dd- 



CS 
DATA 

"0"- 

V LL 
FOR - 
MM5203 

V LL 
FOR 
MM5204 



pc \ 



tt 0 tt 



FLAG 4 



PROG 
VOLTAGE - 



+58V 



+47V 



+47V 



-+5V 

-+5V 
OV 

—12V 
-+5V 



+47V 
36V 



+5V 

I ov 

OV 

12V 



447V 



+47V 



■ov 



■+5V 



-OV 



NOTE: LEVELS NOT DRAWN TO SCALE 



Figure 4-3. Typical Programming Voltages 



4-5 



Appendix A 



PROM TAPE FORMATS 



A.l 



COMPLEMENTARY BINARY FORMAT 



For each word in the PROM, there is one character on the paper tape. So for the MM5203 PROM there are 
256 characters punched on the paper tape. The first character corresponds to location 000 in the PROM and 
the last character corresponds to decimal location 255. Since each word is specified by 8 bits of data, each 
character is used to fully define the data word. For this reason, there is no parity for each word. Also the 
character actually punched on the paper tape is the ones -complement of the data actually programmed into the 
PROM. The following paper tape is an example of a valid complementary binary PROM tape. 




••••••••• 

• ••••• 
••••••••• 

• • • • 
•••••••• 

• • •••• 
••••••••• 





• LEADER 
RUBOUT 

-WORD 1 CONTENTS OF PROM = x f 43 

' WORD 2 CONTENTS OF PROM = x ! 00 



-WORD 256 CONTENTS OF PROM = x'OO 
-TRAILER 



A. 2 P/N FORMAT 

For each word in the PROM, there are ten consecutive characters punched on the paper tape. The first 
character is a f B T with the next eight being either a T P f or an T N f . Each ! P T stands for a logic T 1 T and each 
f N f stands for a logic ? 0 ! . The most significant bit is the first character and the last character corresponds to 
the least significant bit of the data word. The eight data characters must then be followed by an T F T . All other 
characters prior to the next T B T are ignored. 



Each paper tape contains a-leader section. This consists of an adequate number of nulls followed by 32 RUB- 
OUT characters. The trailer is similar in that it consists of 32 RUBOUT characters followed by an adequate 
number of null characters. 



A-1 



The following is an example of the printout of a single word in P/N format: 

BNPNPNPNPF 

The PROM contents for this word is X f 55. 

The following is an example of the leader section of the paper tape along with its first data word: 




Contents of PROM = X f 05 at address X f 00 



Appendix B 



COMMAND SUMMARY 



C ommand 

Set Mode 
Check Mode 
Read PROM 
Read Binary 

Read P/N 
Read LM Tape 
Read LM Cards 
Go to Hex 
Move Data 
Fill Buffer 
List PROM 

List Buffer 
PROM Checksum 
Buffer Checksum 
Program PROM 



Check & Program 
Abort 
Verify 



Symbol & Format 
S 

H 

I (rubout first) 

N 
L 
J 

G <hex address > 

M [<hex address >] 

W [< hex address >] 

R [<C hex address 

T (<hex address >] 

Q 
X 

Y [<hex address>] 



f ALT MODE) 
V 

NOTE: Command terminator is carriage return (cr) 



Description 

Set mode for PROM type. 

Check mode for PROM type. 

Read from PROM to Buffer Area. 

Read from complemented binary paper tape 
to Buffer Area. 

Read from P/N paper tape to Buffer Area. 

Read from LM paper tape to Buffer Area. 

Read from LM cards to Buffer Area. 

Go to hexadecimal address. 

Move data starting at hexadecimal address. 

Fill Buffer Area with hexadecimal number. 

Read and list PROM starting at hexadecimal 
address. 

List memory starting at hexadecimal address. 

Print PROM checksum. 

Print Buffer 'Area checksum. 

Program PROM starting at hexadecimal 
address. 

Check if PROM erased; then program. 
Terminate keyboard request. 
Verify PROM to Buffer Area. 



B-1 



Appendix C 



PIN OUT LISTS 



C.l 



PROM PROGRAMMER PIN OUT LIST 



PINS 

1-4 
5-8 
16 
27 

28 
30 

31-32 
33 

41 



43 

49 
53 

54 
57 



SIGNAL 

GND 

+5v 

FLAG 7* 
ENBL* 
WRSTR 
AdO 

-12v 

SYSENBLO 
FLAG 6 



FLAG 7 

FLAG 6* 
SYSENBLO* 

BOC* 
FLAG 3 



59 
63 



INIT* 
SYSENB 



FUNCTION 

All systems 

All systems power 

User with IMP-16L UFLAG B* 

Used with IMP-8P for selective enable 

Used with IMP-8P for selective enable 

Used with IMP-8P for selective enable 

1/ O disable/ enable 

All systems 

Buffered output of selective enable 
I/O enable/disable 

All systems user flag input enable voltages 

IMP-16P user flag F14 

IMP-16L ground this pin 

IMP-8P user flag User 3 

All systems user flag input program pulse 

IMP-16 user flag F15 

IMP-8P user flag User 4 

Used with 16L UFLAGA* 

Selective enable output open collector 

I/O disable/ enable 

Used with IMP-16L UJCNDA + user jump -on condition data 
branch if data 0, temperature branch if overtemp 

All systems user flag input data input for data transmission 
IMP-16P user flag Fll 

IMP-16L user flag FLAG 11 

IMP-8P user flag User 1 

All systems 

Selective enable input I/O enable/disable all flag inputs, run/stop 
inverter power supply 



C-1 



PINS SIGNAL FUNCTION 

64 FLAG 0 All system user flag input used as a clock for data transmission 

IMP-16P user flag F8 

IMP-16L user flag FLAG 8 

IMP-8P user flag User 2 
71-72 GND All systems 

99-100 -12v All systems 

111-112 -12v All systems 

120 BOC Used with IMP-16P, IMP-8P user branch-on condition data branch 

if data 0, temperature branch if overtemp 

IMP-16 user jump-on cond JC 15 

IMP-8P user jump-on cond USER JC 
137-140 +5v All systems 

141-144 GND All systems 



C.2 IMP-16 PIN OUT FOR PROM PROGRAMMER 



C. 2. 1 IMP-16 L Pin-Out for PROM Programmer 
SIGNAL ON PROM 



PIN 


PROGRAMMER 


SIGNAL ON 


1 


GND 




2 


GND 




3 


GND 




4 


GND 




5 


+5V 




6 


+5V 




7 


+5V 




8 


+5V 




16 


FLAG 7* 


UFLAGB* 


31 


-12V 




32 


-12V 




41 


FLAG 6 


GND 


43 


FLAG 7 


GND 


49 


FLAG 6* 


UFLAGA* 


54 


BOC* 


UJCONDB* 


57 


FLAG 3 


FLAG 11 


59 


INIT* 


INIT* 


64 


FLAG 0 


FLAG 8 


71 


GND 





C-2 



C.2.2 



PIN 


SIGNAL ON PROM 
PROGRAMMER 


SIGNAL ON IMP-16L 


72 


GND 




99 


-12V 




100 


-12V 




111 


-12V 




112 


-12V 




137 


+5V 




138 


+5V 




139 


+5V 




140 


+5V 






n\rn 




142 


GND 




143 


GND 




144 


GND 




IMP-16P Pin -Out for PROM Programmer 


PTN 


olCjrJNAlj UJN PROM 
PROTtRAMM tcr 

X XV V-rVJT J-VtV 1VX XVX XUX \ 


lSTONA T, ON TMP-1 


1 


GND 




2 


GND 




3 


GND 




4 


GND 




5 


+5V 




6 


+5V 




7 


+5V 




8 


+5V 




31 


-12V 




32 


-12V 




41 


FLAG 6 


F14 


43 


FLAG 7 


F15 


57 


FLAG 3 


Fll 


59 


INIT* 


INIT* 


64 


FLAG 0 


F8 


71 


GND 




72 


GND 




99 


-12V 




100 


-12 V 




111 


-12V 





C-3 



C.3 
C.3.1 



PIN 


SIGNAL ON PROM 
PROGRAMMER 


SIGNAL ON IMP-16P 


112 


-12V 






120 


BOC 


JC15 




137 


+5V 






138 


+5V 






139 


+5V 






140 


+5V 






141 


GND 






142 


GND 






143 


GND 






144 


GND 






IMP-16 BACK PANEL WIRE-LIST OPTIONS REQUIRED 


IMP-16L Wire List 






SIGNAL 


FROM STA 


TO 


STA COMMENTS 


FLAG 7* 


CPU-60 [TJ 


PRP-16 


2 


= UFLAGB* 


FLAG 6 


PRP-41 


PRP-43 


= GND (PP) 


FLAG 7 


PRP-43 


PRP-71 


= GND (PP) 


FLAG 6* 


CPU-59 


PRP-49 


= UFLAGA* 


BOC* 


CPU-54 


PRP-54 


= UJCNDB* 


FLAG 3 


CPU-57 


PRP-57 


= FLAG 11 


INIT* 


CPU-136 


PRP-59 




FLAG 0 


CPU-56 


PRP-64 


= FLAG 8 


-12 VA 


PRP-99 


PRP-100 


= -12V (PP) 


-12 VA 


PRP-100 


PRP-111 


= -12V (PP) 



[Tj "CPU" stands for the card 
position for the IMP-16L CPU 



"PRP" stands for the card 
position chosen for the PROM 
Programmer. 



C-4 



C.3.2 



IMP-16P Wire List 










SIGNAL 


FROM 


STA 


TO 


STA 


COMMENTS 


FLAG 6 


CPU-134 


m 


PRP-41 




= F14 


FLAG 7 


CPU-132 


PRP-43 




= F15 


FLAG 3 


CPU-133 




PRP-57 




= Fll 


FLAG 0 


CPU-130 




PRP-64 




= F8 


INIT* 


CPU-16 




PRP-59 






BOC 


CPU-107 




PRP-120 




= JC15 



[71 "CPU" stands for the card 
position for the IMP-16C card 



"PRP" stands for the card 
position for the PROM programmer 
card 



NOTE: The ground wire on JC15 at the IMP-16C card before connecting the BOC. 



C-5 



Appendix D 



REFERENCE SYSTEM PUBLICATIONS 



Publication Order Number 

IMP-16L IMP-16L/928X 
Users Manual 

IMP-16P IMP-16P/937 
Users Manual 

IMP-16 Programming IMP-16S/102YB 
and Assembler Manual 



Description 
Operation of the IMP-16L Microcomputer 

Operation of the IMP-16P Microcomputer 

Assemble Language Programming of 
IMP-16 Microcomputers 



D-l 



National Semiconductor Corporation 

2900 Semiconductor Drive 
Santa Clara, California 95051 
(408) 732-5000 
TWX: 910-339-9240 



National Semiconductor GmbH 

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Telephone: (08141) 1371 
Telex: 05-27649 



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Free Trade Zone 
Malacca, Malaysia 
Telephone: 5171 

Telex: NSELECT 519 MALACCA (c/o Kuala Lumpur) 



National Semiconductor (UK) Ltd. 

Larkfield Industrial Estate 
Greenock, Scotland 
Telephone: GOUROCK 33251 
Telex: 778 632 



NS Electronics (PTE) Ltd. 

No. 1100 Lower Delta Rd. 
Singapore 3 
Telephone: 630011 
Telex: NATSEMI RS 21402 



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7349 Sixth Avenue 
Scottsdale, Arizona 85251 
(602) 945-8473 
TWX: 910-950-1195 



CALIFORNIA 

* NORTH-WEST REGIONAL OFFICE 
2680 Bayshore Frontage Road, Suite 112 
Mountain View, California 94043 
(415) 961-4740 
TWX: 910-379-6432 

NATIONAL SEMICONDUCTOR 
♦DISTRICT SALES OFFICE 
Valley Freeway Center Building 
15300 Ventura Boulevard, Suite 305 
Sherman Oaks, California 91403 
(213) 783-8272 
TWX: 910-495-1773 

NATIONAL SEMICONDUCTOR 
SOUTH-WEST REGIONAL OFFICE 
17452 Irvine Boulevard, Suite M 
Tustin, California 92680 
(714) 832-8113 
TWX: 910-595-1523 



CONNECTICUT 

AREA OFFICE 
Commerce Park 
Danbury, Connecticut 06810 
(203) 744-2350 

♦DISTRICT SALES OFFICE 
25 Sylvan Road South 
Westport, Connecticut 06880 
(203) 226-6833 



CARIBBEAN REGIONAL SALES OFFICE 
P.O. Box 6335 
Clearwater, Florida 33518 
(813) 441-3504 
TWX: 810-866-0438 



ILLINOIS 

NATIONAL SEMICONDUCTOR 
WEST-CENTRAL REGIONAL OFFICE 
800 E. Northwest Highway, Suite 203 
Mt. Prospect, Illinois 60056 
(312) 394-8040 
TWX: 910-689-3346 



INDIANA 

NATIONAL SEMICONDUCTOR 
NORTH-CENTRAL REGIONAL OFFICE 
P.O. Box 40073 
Indianapolis, Indiana 46240 
(317) 255-5822 



MARYLAND 

CAPITAL REGIONAL SALES OFFICE 
300 Hospital Drive, No. 232 
Glen Burnie, Maryland 21061 
(301) 760-5220 
TWX: 710-861-0519 



MASSACHUSETTS 

*NORTH-EAST REGIONAL OFFICE 
No. 3 New England, Exec. Office Park 
Burlington, Massachusetts 01803 
(617) 273-1350 
TWX: 710-332-0166 



MINNESOTA 

DISTRICT SALES OFFICE 

8053 Bloomington Freeway, Suite 101 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 55420 

(612) 888-3060 

Telex: 290766 

NEW JERSEY/NEW YORK CITY 

MID-ATLANTIC REGIONAL OFFICE 

140 Sylvan Avenue 

Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey 07632 

(201) 461-5959 

TWX: 710-991-9734 

NEW YORK (UPSTATE) 

CAN-AM REGIONAL SALES OFFICE 
104 Pickard Drive 
Syracuse, New York 13211 
(315) 455-5858 

OHIO/PENNSYLVANIA/ 
W. VIRGINIA/KENTUCKY 

EAST-CENTRAL REGIONAL OFFICE 
Financial South Building 
5335 Far Hills, Suite 214 
Dayton, Ohio 45429 
(513) 434-0097 

TEXAS 

* SOUTH-CENTRAL REGIONAL OFFICE 
5925 Forest Lane, Suite 205 
Dallas, Texas 75230 
(214) 233-6801 
TWX: 910-860-5091 

WASHINGTON 

DISTRICT OFFICE 
300 120th Avenue N.E. 
Building 2, Suite 205 
Bellevue, Washington 98005 
(206) 454-4600 



INTERNATIONAL SALES OFFICES 

AUSTRALIA 

NS ELECTRONICS PTY, LTD. 
Cnr. Stud Road & Mountain Highway 
Bayswater, Victoria 3153 
Australia 

Telephone: 03-729-6333 
Telex: 32096 

DENMARK 

NATIONAL SEMICONDUCTOR DENMARK 

Nyhavn 69 

1051 Copenhagen 

Telephone: (1) 153110 

ENGLAND 

NATIONAL SEMICONDUCTOR (UK) LTD. 
The Precinct 

Broxbourne, Hertfordshire 

EN 107 HY 

England 

Telephone: Hoddesdon 69571 
Telex: 267-204 



NATIONAL SEMICONDUCTOR FRANCE 
EXPANSION 10000 
28 rue de la Redoute 
92-260 Fountenay Aux Roses 
Telephone: 660.81.40 
Telex: NSF 25956F + 

GERMANY 

NATIONAL SEMICONDUCTOR GmbH 
8000 Munchen 81 
Cosimastr. 4/1 
Telephone: 089/915027 
Telex: 05-22772 

HONG KONG 

NS ELECTRONICS (HONG KONG) Ltd. 

4 Hing Yip Street 

Cheung Kong Electronic Bldg. 

5-1 1th Floor, Kwon Tong 

Kowloon, Hong Kong 

Telephone: 3-438281-4 

Telex: Hx 3866 

Cable: NATSEMI 



JAPAN 

♦NATIONAL SEMICONDUCTOR JAPAN 
Nakazawa Building 
1-19 Yotsuya, Shinjuku-Ku 160 
Tokyo, Japan 
Telephone: 03-359-4571 
Telex: J 28592 

SWEDEN 

NATIONAL SEMICONDUCTOR SWEDEN 
Sikvagen 17 

13500 Tyreso-Stockholm 
Telephone: 08/7 1204 80 



'Microprocessor System Specialist Available 



T10M84 C1974 NATIONAL SEMICONDUCTOR CORP. PRINTED IN U.S.A.