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HEADMASTERS  OFFICE 

P:-''  ...  *  4  DEMY 
ANDOVER,  M  ....  J;810 


Digitized  by 

the  Internet  Archive 

in  2013 

http://archive.org/details/catalogueofphill00phil_16 


CATALOGUE 

PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 

Andover,  Massachusetts 


1966 


ONE  HUNDRED  E  I  G  H  T  Y  -  E  I G  H  T  H  YEAR 


Published  by  Phillips  Academy,  Andover,  Massachusetts 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 

ANDOVEH,  MA35ACHU5E  TT5 


INDEX  TO  NUMBERS 

24.  McCurdy  House 

49.  Isham  Infirmary-Hospita 

74.  Williams  Hall 

25.  Eastman  House 

50.  16  Stall  Garage 

75.  Junior  House 

26.  Bennel  House 

51 .  Pemberton  Cottage 

76.  Tilton  House 

27.  Merrill  House 

52.  Eaton  Cottage 

77.  Davison  House 

28.  Bulfinch  Hall 

53.  Andover  Cottage 

78.  Work  Shops 

29.  Borden  and  Memorial 

54.  Phelps  House 

79.  Heating  &  Lighting  Pla 

55.  Pease  House 

80.  Draper  Cottage 

30.  Hardy  House 

56.  Churchill  House 

81.  Cheever  House 

31.  Memorial  Tower 

57.  Bishop  Hall 

82.  Jackson  House 

32.  Newman  House 

58.  Adams  Hall 

83.  Goodhue  House 

33.  Cooley  House 

59.  Johnson  Hall 

84.  Coy  House 

34.  Cose  Memorial  Building 

60.  Rockwell  House 

85.  America  House 

36.  Pearson  Farm 

61.  Bancroft  Hall 

86.  Carter  House 

37.  Gould  House 

87.  Greene  House 

38.  Phillips  Gale 

63.  Clement  House 

88  Woods  House 

39.  Stuart  House 

89.  87  Bartlet  Street 

40.  Taylor  Hall 

65'  Graves  Hall 

90.  French  House 

41.  Blanchard  House 

66.  Engineering  Office 

91.  Graham  House 

42.  Jewett  Tucker  House 

67.  Abbot  House 

92.  Fay  House 

43.  Greenough  House 

68.  Park  House 

93.  Stowe  House 

44.  Quincy  House 

69.  Archaeology  Building 

94.  Andover  Inn 

45.  Palmer  House 

70.  Peobody  House 

95.  Cochron  Church 

46.  Lowell  House 

71.  Farrar  House 

96.  Houses  not  owned  by 

47.  Weld  House 

72.  Hayward  House 

The  Academy 

48.  Comstock  House 

73.  Williston  House 

10.  14  School  Street 

11.  Eastham  House 

12.  Seminary  House 

13.  Forbes  House 

14.  Abbot  Stevens  H 

115.  Alfred  E.  Stearn! 

116.  Henry  L.  Stimson 


CATALOGUE 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 

Andover,  Massachusetts 


19  6  6 


ONE    HUNDRED    E  I  G  H  T  Y  -  E  I  G  H  T  H  YEAR 


Published     by     Phillips     Academy,     Andover,  Massachusetts 


1965 

1966 

1967 

SEPTEMBER 

MAY 

JANUARY 

S   M   T   W   T   F  S 

  12     3  4 

5     6    7     8     9  10  11 
12  13   14  15   16  17  18 
19  20  21  22  23  24  25 
26  27  28  29  30   

S   M   T   W   T   F  S 
1     2     3     4     5     6  7 
8     9  10  11   12  13  14 
15    16   17  18   19  20  21 
22  23  24  25  26  27  28 
29  30  31   

S    M    T    W   T   F  S 
1     2     3     4     5     6  7 
8     9  10  11  12  13  14 
15   16   17   18   19  20  21 
22  23  24  25  26  27  28 
29  30  31   

OCTOBER 

JUNE 

FEBRUARY 

 _    1  2 

3     4     5     6     7     8  9 
10  11   12  13  14  15  16 
17  18   19  20  21   22  23 
24  25  26  27  28  29  30 

  12     3  4 

5     6     7     8     9   10  11 
12   13   14  15   16  17  18 

19  20  21   22  23   24  25 
26  27  28  29  30   

  12     3  4 

5     6     7     8     9  10  11 
12   13   14  15   16   17  18 
19  20  21   22  25  24  25 

26  27  28   

NOVEMBER 

JULY 

MARCH 

1     2    3    4    5  6 
7    8    9  10  11   12  13 
14  15   16  17  18  19  20 
21  22  23  24  25  26  27 
28  29  30    ..... 

  1  2 

3     4     5     6     7     8  9 
10   11    12   13    14   15  16 
17  18   19  20  21   22  23 
24  25  26  27  28  29  30 

  12     3  4 

5     6     7     8     9  10  11 
12  13   14  15   16  17  18 
19  20  21   22  23  24  25 
26  27  28  29  30  31 

DECEMBER 

AUGUST 

APRIL 

  12     3  4 

5     6     7     8     9  10  11 
12   13   14  15  16  17  18 
19  20  21  22  23  24  25 
26  27  28  29  30  31 

1     2     3     4     5  6 
7     8     9  10  11   12  13 
14   15    16   17  18   19  20 
21   22  23  24  25  26  27 

28  29  30  31   

2     3     4     5     6     7  8 
9   10  11   12  13   14  15 
16  17  18  19  20  21  22 
23  24  25  26  27  28  29 

30   

JANUARY    •  1966 

SEPTEMBER 

MAY 

2     3     4     5     6     7  8 
9  10  11   12  13   14  15 
16  17  18  19  20  21  22 
23  24  25  26  27  28  29 
30  3  1   

  1     2  3 

4     5     6     7     8     9  10 
'1    12   13   14  15   16  17 
18   19  20  21   22  23  24 
25  26  27  28  29  30 

1     2     3     4     5  6 
7     8     9   10   11    12  13 
14  15   16   17   18   19  20 
21   22  23  24  25  26  27 

28  29  30  31   

FEBRUARY 

OCTOBER 

JUNE 

  1     2     3     4  5 

6     7     8     9  10  11  12 
13   14  15   16  17  18  19 
20  21  22  23  24  25  26 

27  28  

2     3     4     5     6     7  8 
9  10  11   12  13  14  15 

'6   17   18   19  20  21  22 
23  24  25  26  27  28  29 
30  31   „  

  1     2  3 

4     5     6     7     8     9  10 
11    12  13   14  15   16  17 
18   19  20  21   22  23  24 
25  26  27  28  29  30 

MARCH 

NOVEMBER 

JULY 

  1     2     3     4  5 

6     7     8     9  10  11  12 
13   14  15  16  17  18  19 
20  21  22  23  24  25  26 
27  28  29  30  31   

  1     2     3     4  5 

6     7     8     9  10  11  12 
13   14  15   16   17  18  19 
20  21   22  23  24  25  26 
27  28  29  30   , 

2     3     4     5     6     7  8 
9  10  11    12  13   14  15 
16  17  18   19  20  21  22 
23  24  25  26  27  28  29 
3  0  31  

APRIL 

DECEMBER 

AUGUST 

  1  2 

3     4     5     6     7     8  9 
10  11   12  13   14  15  16 

17  18  19  20  21  22  23 
24  25  26  27  28  29  30 

  1     2  3 

4     5     6     7     8     9  10 
11   12  13   14  15   16  17 
18   19  20  21  22  23  24 
25  26  27  28  29  30  31 

  1     2     3     4  5 

6     7     8     9  10  11  12 
13   14  15   16   17  18  19 
20  21  22  23  24  25  26 
27  28  29  30  31   

5 

CALENDAR 


SCHOOL  YEAR  1965-1966 

Fall  term  begins   Friday,  September  17,  196 J 

Mid-term   Rating   Wednesday,  October  27 

Long  Thanksgiving  weekend   Wednesday,  November  24,  to 

5:00  p.m.  on  Sunday,  November  28 

Fall  term  ends   Thursday,  December  16 

Christmas  Recess — 19  days 

Winter  term  begins   8:00  p.m.,  Tuesday,  January  4,  1966 

Long  weekend   Friday-Sunday,  February  11-13 

Winter  term  ends   Thursday,  March  10 

Spring  Recess — 19  days 

Spring  term  begins   °.  :00  p.m.,  Tuesday,  March  29 

Long  weekend   Friday-Sunday,  May  13-15 

Examinations  end   Thursday,  June  9 

Commencement   -Friday,  June  10 

Summer  Session — 1966 

Summer  session  begins   —..^...Wednesday,  June  29 

Summer  session  ends   Thursday,  August  11 

SCHOOL  YEAR — 1966-1967 

Fall  term  begins   Friday,  September  16,  1966 

Fall  term  ends   Thursday,  December  1  5 

Christmas  Recess — 20  days 

Winter  term  begins   8:00  p.m.,  Wednesday,  January  4,  1967 

Winter  term  ends   Thursday,  March  16 

Spring  Recess — 19  days 

Spring  term  begins   8:00  p.m.,  Tuesday,  April  4 

Examinations  end   Thursday,  June  8 

Commencement   Friday,  June  9 

Summer  Session — 1967 

Summer  session  begins   _  Wednesday,  June  28 

Summer  session  ends   ,  Thursday,  August  10 


3 


PURPOSE  OF  PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


'"Phi:  purpose  of  Phillips  Academy  is  to  teach  "the  great  end  and 
real  business  of  living."  According  to  its  Constitution,  signed  in 
1778,  "It  is  expected  that  the  Master's  attention  to  the  disposition 
of  the  minds  and  morals  of  the  youth  under  his  charge  will  exceed 
every  other  care;  well  considering  that,  though  goodness  without 
knowledge  (as  it  respects  others)  is  both  weak  and  feeble,  yet 
knowledge  without  goodness  is  dangerous,  and  that  both  united 
form  the  noblest  character  and  lay  the  surest  foundation  of  use- 
fulness to  mankind."  Adapted  to  conditions  of  modern  life,  the 
aim  of  the  Academy  remains  the  same:  so  to  intensify  and  broaden 
the  capacities  of  its  students  that  they  may  enter  the  larger  world 
with  trained  minds  and  with  a  deepened  sense  of  their  responsibility 
to  society. 

Phillips  Academy  is  dedicated  to  sound  scholarship.  It  endeavors 
first  of  all  to  stimulate  in  its  students  curiosity  about  things  of 
the  mind,  to  induce  in  them  a  desire  to  educate  themselves.  It  at- 
tempts to  foster  the  development  of  discriminating  judgment  and 
independence  of  thought.  It  tries  to  cultivate  the  imagination  and 
emotions  of  its  boys. 

By  long  tradition  Andover  believes  in  education  that  makes 
boys  resourceful  and  independent.  Andover  believes  in  the  value 
of  student  representation  from  all  parts  of  the  country  and  of 
the  world,  and  from  all  walks  of  life.  To  its  boys  it  offers  an  in- 
tellectual and  moral  discipline,  as  well  as  friendly  encouragement 
and  sympathy,  the  best  incentives  to  accomplishment. 

Phillips  Academy  is  a  liberal,  modern  school  with  an  ancient 
tradition.  It  values  the  benefits  passed  on  to  it  by  many  generations. 
It  has  contributed  directly  to  the  development  of  thousands  of 
men,  and  indirectly  to  numberless  aspects  of  our  national  life. 
Thankful  for  its  history,  Andover  focuses  on  the  present  and  on 
the  future.  In  training  American  boys  for  service  and  leadership 
it  seeks  to  preserve  a  flexible  spirit  that  will  test  and  try  the  new 
while  treasuring  the  riches  of  the  past. 


4 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Founded  in  1778  by 
Samuel  Phillips  John  Phillips,  LL.D. 

Samuel  Phillips,  Jr. 

Constitution  and  deed  of  trust  signed  April  21,  1778 

School  opened  April  30,  1778 

Act  of  incorporation  October  4,  1780 

HEADMASTERS 

ELIPHALET  PEARSON,  LL.D.  1778-1786 

EBENEZER  PEMBERTOX,  LL.D.  1786-1793 

MARK  XEWMAX,  A.M.  1794-1809 

JOHX  ADAMS,  LL.D.  1810-183  3 

OSGOOD  JOHXSOX,  A.M.  1  83  3-1  837 

SAMUEL  H.  TAYLOR,  LL.D.  1837-1871 

FREDERIC  W.  TILTOX,  A.M.  1871-1873 

CECIL  F.  P.  BAXCROFT,  Ph.D.,  L.H.D.,  LL.D.  1873-1901 

ALFRED  E.  STEARXS,  Litt.D.,  L.H.D.,  LL.D.  1903-1933 

CLAUDE  M.  FUESS,  Ph.D.,  L.H.D.,  LL.D.  193  3-1948 

JOHX  M.  KEMPER,  A.M.,  L.H.D.,  Litt.D.,  LL.D.  1948- 


5 


HISTORICAL  SKETCH 


T)hillips  academy  is  situated  at  Andover,  in  the  County  of 
Essex,  Massachusetts.  The  Constitution  and  original  deed  of 
gift  of  the  Academy  was  signed  April  21,  1778,  by  Esquire  Samuel 
Phillips,  of  the  north  parish  of  Andover,  and  his  brother,  John  Phil- 
lips, LL.D.,  of  Exeter,  New  Hampshire,  in  the  presence,  and  largely 
at  the  instance,  of  Samuel  Phillips,  Jr.  (then  but  twenty-six  years 
old),  afterward  judge  of  the  Court  of  Common  Pleas  for  Essex 
County,  president  of  the  Massachusetts  Senate,  and  lieutenant 
governor  of  the  Commonwealth.  By  this  act  the  Trustees  of 
Phillips  Academy  became  owners  of  the  land  in  the  south  parish 
of  Andover  on  which  the  chief  buildings  of  the  school  now  stand, 
together  with  other  endowment  comprising  further  lands  and  the 
sum  of  one  thousand  six  hundred  and  fourteen  pounds.  Two 
years  later,  on  October  4,  1780,  the  school  was  incorporated  by 
the  Act  of  Incorporation  passed  by  the  General  Court  of  Massachu- 
setts, signed  by  John  Hancock. 

The  Constitution  was  written  by  Samuel  Phillips,  Jr.,  with  the 
advice  and  aid  of  his  friend,  Eliphalet  Pearson,  who  became  first 
Master.  The  following  passages  are  characteristic: 

A  serious  consideration  of  the  premises,  and  an  observation  of 
the  growing  neglect  of  youth,  have  excited  in  us  a  painful 
anxiety  for  the  event,  and  determined  us  to  make,  in  the  follow- 
ing Conveyance,  a  humble  dedication  to  our  Heavenly  Benefac- 
tor of  the  ability,  wherewith  he  hath  blessed  us,  to  lay  the 
foundation  of  a  public  free  School  or  Academy  for  the  purpose 
of  instructing  Youth,  not  only  in  English  and  Latin  Grammar, 
Writing,  Arithmetic,  and  those  Sciences,  wherein  they  are 
commonly  taught,  but  more  especially  to  learn  them  the  great 
end  and  real  business  of  living. 

The  Master  is  to  give  special  attention  to  the  health  of  the 
scholars,  and  ever  to  urge  the  importance  of  a  habit  of  industry. 

But  above  all,  it  is  expected  that  the  Master's  attention  to  the 
disposition  of  the  minds  and  morals  of  the  youth  under  his  charge 
will  exceed  every  other  care;  well  considering  that,  though  good- 
ness without  knowledge  (as  it  respects  others)  is  weak  and 
feeble,  yet  knowledge  without  goodness  is  dangerous,  and  that 
both  united  form  the  noblest  character,  and  lay  the  surest  foun- 
dation of  usefulness  to  mankind. 


6 


HISTORICAL  SKETCH 


7 


This  Seminary  shall  be  ever  equally  open  to  youth  of  requisite 
qualifications  from  every  quarter. 

And,  in  order  to  prevent  the  smallest  perversion  of  true  intent 
of  this  Foundation,  it  is  again  declared,  that  the  first  and  princi- 
pal object  of  this  Institution  is  the  promotion  of  true  Piety  and 
Virtue;  the  second,  instruction  in  the  English,  Latin,  and  Greek 
languages,  together  with  Writing,  Arithmetic,  Music,  and  the 
Art  of  Speaking;  the  third,  practical  Geometry,  Logic,  and 
Geography;  and  the  fourth,  such  other  of  the  Liberal  Arts  and 
Sciences  or  Languages  as  opportunity  and  ability  may  hereafter 
admit,  and  as  the  Trustees  shall  direct. 

Phillips  Academy  was  opened  for  instruction  April  30,  1778, 
in  a  building  which  had  earlier  been  used  as  a  carpenter's  shop. 
The  first  preceptor  was  Eliphalet  Pearson  (1778-1786),  a  stimu- 
lating teacher  and  stern  disciplinarian,  who  established  high  stan- 
dards of  instruction.  Shortly  before  he  resigned  to  become  professor 
at  Harvard  College,  a  new  and  larger  schoolhouse  was  built.  On 
November  5,  1789,  George  Washington,  President  of  the  United 
States,  visited  Andover  and  addressed  the  students  assembled  on 
the  Old  Training  Field. 

The  fourth  principal,  John  Adams,  raised  the  repute  of  the 
school,  increased  the  attendance,  and  enlarged  the  number  of 
teachers.  During  his  term  as  principal,  the  second  schoolhouse  was 
burned,  on  January  28,  1818,  and  a  new  brick  Academy  designed 
by  the  famous  architect  Charles  Bulfinch  was  erected  within  a 
year.  This  "classic  hall,"  described  in  Oliver  Wendell  Holmes's 
centennial  poem,  "The  School-Boy,"  is  still  in  use. 

The  modern  period  of  the  school's  history  commenced  in  1873 
with  the  election  of  Cecil  F.  P.  Bancroft,  a  man  of  foresight  and 
clear  vision,  patience  and  shrewd  discrimination,  who  was  prin- 
cipal until  his  death  in  1901.  Under  Dr.  Bancroft's  administra- 
tion, attendance  increased  from  262  to  over  400  pupils  and  since 
then  has  never  dropped  below  that  figure. 

Dr.  Bancroft  was  succeeded  in  1902  by  Alfred  E.  Stearns.  The 
purchase  in  1908  of  the  lands  and  buildings  of  the  Andover  Theo- 
logical Seminary  greatly  increased  the  resources  of  the  Academy 
and  made  possible  new  development.  In  the  late  1920's  and  in  the 
1930's  the  school  took  its  present  form  under  a  building  and 
landscaping  program  made  possible  by  the  generosity  of  Thomas 
Cochran,  other  alumni,  and  friends  of  the  school. 


8 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Under  the  administration  of  Claude  M.  Fuess,  Headmaster  from 
1933  to  1948,  the  faculty  was  greatly  enlarged  and  strengthened, 
the  curriculum  was  revised,  a  number  of  buildings  were  added, 
and  the  Andover  Summer  Session  (1942)  and  the  Andover  Eve- 
ning Study  Program  (1935)  began.  In  World  War  II,  Andover 
men  served  in  each  of  the  services,  and  143  gave  their  lives.  Dur- 
ing much  of  the  war,  Henry  L.  Stimson  served  as  president  of  the 
Trustees  as  well  as  Secretary  of  War. 

John  M.  Kemper  was  elected  Headmaster  in  1948.  Since  then, 
substantial  advances  have  been  made  in  three  areas:  curriculum, 
admissions  policy,  and  the  physical  plant  and  resources. 

The  curriculum  has  been  revised  to  provide  increased  flexibility. 
In  1952-195  3,  under  Andover  leadership  and  with  a  grant  from 
the  Ford  Foundation,  the  important  study,  General  Education  in 
School  and  College,  was  completed.  It  has  resulted  in  the  introduc- 
tion into  the  Andover  curriculum  of  new,  advanced,  college-level 
courses.  In  195  5,  in  response  to  the  national  teacher  shortage,  the 
school  inaugurated  the  Andover  Teaching  Fellow  Program  to  re- 
cruit and  train  young  men  for  teaching. 

Concerning  admissions,  the  decision  was  made  in  the  late  fifties 
to  admit  each  year  the  best  250  candidates  regardless  of  their 
ability  to  pay  tuition.  The  effect  of  this  decision  has  been  to  broaden 
still  further  the  school's  basic  policy,  in  the  words  of  its  Consti- 
tution, "to  be  ever  equally  open  to  youth  of  requisite  qualifications 
from  every  quarter." 

In  the  third  area,  physical  plant  and  resources,  several  changes 
are  notable.  The  endowment  has  grown  from  eleven  to  twenty- 
eight  million  dollars.  Meantime  the  enrollment  has  increased  from 
725  to  858. 

During  the  years  1959-61  The  Andover  Program,  a  major  capital 
gift  drive  carried  out  by  alumni  and  parents,  succeeded  in  raising 
$6,750,000  for  new  facilities.  With  these  funds  the  Academy  has 
built  four  new  dormitories,  two  new  faculty  houses,  a  new  science 
building,  an  Arts  and  Communications  Center  with  extensive 
audio-visual  equipment  and  studio  space,  an  enlargement  of  the 
auditorium  stage  and  an  experimental  drama  lab,  a  wing  on  the 
Library,  several  new  athletic  fields,  a  roof  for  the  hockey  rink, 
and  other  athletic  facilities;  existing  buildings  have  been  remodeled 
for  more  classrooms  and  for  sudent  and  faculty  housing. 


TRUSTEES 


HENRY  WISE  HOBSON  '10,  D.D.,  LL.D.,  President 
Elected  1937,  President  since  1947 

JOHN  MASON  KEMPER,  A.M.,  L.H.D.,  Litt.D.,  LL.D.,  Clerk 
Elected  1948 

JOHN  PETERS  STEVENS,  JR.  '15,  A.B.,  Treasurer 
Elected  1948,  Treasurer  since  196) 

JAMES  PHINNEY  BAXTER,  III  '10,  Ph.D.,  Litt.D.,  L.H.D.,  D.Sc. 
Elected  1942 

CHARLES  STAFFORD  GAGE  '21,  A.M. 
Elected  1952 

BROMWELL  AULT  '18,  S.B. 
Elected  19  5  3 

FREDERICK  GOODRICH  CRANE  '15,  A.B. 
Elected  1957 

DONALD  HOLMAN  McLEAN,  JR.  '2  8,  LL.B. 
Elected  195  8 

JOHN  USHER  MONRO  '30,  A.B. 
Elected  195  8 

THOMAS  LEE  PERKINS  '24,  LL.B. 
Elected  1959 

ROBERT  LIVINGSTON  IRELAND  III  *38,  A.B. 
Elected  1960 

WILBUR  JOSEPH  BENDER  '37HF,  A.M.,  LL.D. 
Elected  1963 

STEPHEN  YOUNG  HORD  '17,  A.B. 
Elected  1963 


Cincinnati,  Ohio 

Andover 

Plainfield,  N.  J. 

LL.D. 

Williamstown 

New  Haven,  Conn. 
New  York,  N.  Y. 

Dalton 
Brookline 
Cambridge 
Rye,  N.  Y. 
New  York,  N.  Y. 
Cambridge 
Lake  Forest,  111. 


Alumni  Trustees 


GEORGE  HERBERT  WALKER  BUSH  '42,  A.B. 
Elected  1963  for  three  years 

FRANK  PRAY  FOSTER  '25,  M.D. 
Elected  1964  for  three  years 

LOUIS  FREDERICK  POLK,  JR.  '49,  M.B.A. 
Elected  1965  for  three  years 

GILBERT  HENRY  HOOD,  JR.  '16,  M.B.A. 

Ex  Officio  for  one  year  as  President  of  the  Alumni  Association 


Houston,  Tex. 
West  Newton 
Wayzata,  Minn. 
Winchester 


Trustees  Emeriti 


CHAUNCEY  BREWSTER  GARVER  '04,  LL.B. 
1947-1960 

SUMNER  SMITH  '08,  A.B. 
1956-1960 


New  York,  N.  Y. 

Lincoln 


9 


FACULTY 

fOHN  Mason  Kemper,  A.M.,  L.H.D.,  Litt.D.,  LL.D. 

I  lea  J  master  Elected  1948 


Cii  orgs  I'Ranki  in  French,  A.M. 

Andover 

Instructor  in  French,  Emeritus 

1907-1944 

I  i  si  i  n  Edward  Lynde,  A.M. 

Andover 

Dean,  Emeritus 

1901-1944 

Oswald  Tower,  A.B. 

AUUUVCI 

Dean  and  Instructor  in  Matbema/ic 

s,  Erne 

ritu  \ 

1910-1949 

Alice  Thacher  Whitney 

Andover 

Recorder,  Emerita 

1  vl)i  -  1  7  )U 

1  ESTER  Charles  Newton,  A.M. 

Andover 

Instructor  in  French  and  German, 

Enter ii 

US 

1918-1952 

Henry  Preston  Kelley,  A.M. 

Pepperell 

Instructor  in  Spanish,  Emeritus 

1918-28, 1935-52 

Montviij  e  Ellsworth  Peck 

North  Bridgton,  Me. 

Instructor  in  Physical  Education,  Emeritus 

1916-195  5 

Guy  Johnson  Forbush,  A.B. 

Andover 

Instructor  in  French,  Emeritus 

1917-1920,  1924-1955 

Arthur  Burr  Darling,  Ph.D. 

Washington,  D.  C. 

Instructor  in  History,  Emeritus 

1917-191  8,  1933-1958 

Douglas  Mansor  Dunbar,  A.M. 

Andover 

Instructor  in  Mathematics,  German, 

and  Bible,  Emeritus 

1942-1958 

M.  Lawrence  Shields,  A.B. 

Marblehead 

Instructor  in  Biology  and  Secretary 

of  the 

Academy,  Emeritus 

1923-1960 

Roscof.  Edwin  Everett  Dake,  S.B. 

Andover 

Instructor  in  Chemistry,  Emeritus 

1921-1961 

John  Kingsbury  Colby,  A.M. 

North  Andover 

Instructor  in  Latin,  Emeritus 

1940-1962 

Miles  Sturdivant  Malone,  Ph.D. 

D.iytona  Beach,  Fla. 

Instructor  in  History,  Emeritus 

1937-1962 

Elizabeth  Fades,  A.B. 

Amherst 

Director  of  the  Library,  Emerita 

1929-1963 

KoGl  k  Wolcott  Higgins,  A.M. 

Andover 

Instructor  in  English,  Emeritus 

1933-1963 

Emory  Shelby  Basford,  A.B. 

Rome,  Italy 

Instructor  in  English,  Emeritus 

1929-1964 

Floyd  Thurston  FIumphries,  A.B. 

Naples,  Fla. 

Instructor  in  French,  Emeritus 

1937-1964 

John  Sedgwick  Barss,  A.M. 

Andover 

Instructor  in  Physics,  Emeritus 

1923-1965 

Donald  Miller  Clark,  M.D. 

Williamson,  W.  Va. 

Medu  al  Director,  Emeritus 

1954-1965 

E i.bert  Cook  Weaver,  A.M. 

Madison,  Conn. 

Instructor  in  Chemistry,  Emeritus 

1943-1965 

10 


FACULTY 


1  1 


Alan  Rogers  Blackmer,  A.M.,  L.H.D.  192  5 
Dean  of  the  Faculty 

Kenneth  Smith  Minard,  A.M.  1928 
Assistant  Dean  of  Students 

George  Knight  Sanborn,  S.B.  1928 
Instructor  in  Biology  on  the  Am  mi  Wright  Lancashire  foundation 
Warden  of  the  Moncrieff  Cochran  Sanctuary 

Alfred  Graham  Baldwin,  D.D.  193  0 

Instructor  in  Religion,  Ethics,  and  Social  Problems  on  the  Independence 

Foundation  Teaching  Endowment 
Chairman  of  the  Religion  Department 

"Robert  Edward  Maynard,  S.B.  1931 
Instructor  in  Mathematics  on  the  Jonathan  French  Foundation 

Leonard  Frank  James,  A.M.  193  2 

Instructor  in  History  on  the  Cecil  F.  P.  Bancroft  Foundation 
Chairman  of  the  Flistory  Department 

George  Grenville  Benedict,  A.M.  1930-1  932,1933 

Dean  of  Students 

Douglas  Swain  Byers,  A.M.  193  3 

Instructor  in  Anthropology 
Chairman  of  the  Archaeology  Department 

Bartlett  Harding  Hayes,  Jr.,  A.B.  193  3 

Instructor  in  Art 
Chairman  of  the  Art  Department 

James  Ruthven  Adriance,  A.B.  1934 
Assistant  to  the  Headmaster 

*  Alston  Hurd  Chase,  Ph.D.  19  34 

Instructor  in  Greek  and  Latin  on  the  Samuel  Flarrey  Taylor  Foundation 
Chairman  of  the  Classics  Department 

Norwood  Penrose  Hallowf.ll,  Jr.,  A.B.  1934 
Instructor  in  English  and  Public  Speaking  on  the  Alfred  Lau  rence  Ripley 
Foundation 

Frank  Frederick  DiClemente,  S.B.  193  5 

Instructor  in  Physical  Education 

James  Hooper  Grew,  D.  es  L.  193  5 

Instructor  in  French  on  the  Elizabeth  Milbank  Anderson  Foundation 
Chairman  of  the  French  Department 

Frederick  Scouller  Allis,  Jr.,  A.M.,  L.H.D.  193  6 

Instructor  in  History  on  the  Martha  Cochran  Foundation 
Director  of  Financial  Aid 

Chester  Archibald  Cochran,  A.M.  193  6 

Instructor  in  French 

Frederick  Johnson,  S.B.  1936 
Instructor  in  Archaeology 

Stephen  Stanley  Sorota,  S.B.  193  6 

Instructor  in  Physical  Education 

Stephen  Whitney,  A.M.  1936 
Instructor  in  French 

*  On  leave  of  absence. 


12 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


1  [art  Day  Leavitt,  A.B.  1937 
Instructor  in  English 

William  Hayes  Brown,  A.M.  193  8 

Instructor  in  English  on  the  Emilie  Bel  den  Cochran  Foundation 
Chairman  of  the  English  Department 

Richard  Sawyer  Pieters,  A.M.  1938 
Instructor  in  Mathematics  on  the  Alfred  Ernest  Steams  Foundation 
Chairman  of  the  Mathematics  Department 

Robert  Whittemore  Sides,  A.B.  1938 
Instructor  in  Mathematics 
Director  of  Admissions 

John  Bromham  Hawes,  Ed.M.  1933-1936,  1939 

Instructor  in  English 

Harper  Follansbee,  Ed.M.  1940 
Instructor  in  Biology  on  the  George  Veabody  Foundation 
Chairman  of  the  Biology  Department 

Walter  Gierasch,  A.B.  1941 
Instructor  in  English 

Dudley  Fitts,  A.B.  1941 
Instructor  in  English  on  the  Independence  Foundation  Teaching  Endowment 

Francis  Bertrand  McCarthy,  A.B.  1941 
Instructor  in  English  and  Philosophy 

Cornelius  Gordon  Schuyler  Banta,  S.B.  1944 
Instructor  in  Mathematics 

Joseph  Rittenhouse  Weir  Dodge,  A.M.  1944 
Instructor  in  English 

Alexander  Dunnett  Gibson,  A.M.  1944 
Instructor  in  French 

Frederick  Almond  Peterson,  A.M.  1946 
Instructor  in  English 
Director  of  the  Summer  Session 
Chairman  of  the  Andover  Evening  Study  Program 

Allan  George  Gillingham,  Ph.D.  1947 
Instructor  in  Latin  and  Greek,  on  the  John  Charles  Phillips  Foundation 

Peter  Quackenbush  McKee,  Ed.M.  1947 
Instructor  in  Physics 
Chairman  of  the  Physics  Department 
Scheduling  Officer 

Gordon  Gilmore  Bensley,  A.B.  1949 
Instructor  in  Art 
Director,  Audio-Visual  Center 

John  Richard  Lux,  M.S.Ed.  1949 
Instructor  in  Mathematics 

William  Louis  Schneider,  Mus.Ed.B.  1949 
Instructor  in  Music 

William  Russell  Bennett,  Jr.,  A.B.  1950 
Associate  Dean  of  Students 

William  John  Buehner,  A.M.  1950 
Instructor  in  Latin 

Simeon  Hyde,  Jr.,  A.M.  19 jq 

Instructor  in  English 


FACULTY 


Reagh  Clinton  Tetmore,  M.P.E. 

Instructor  in  Chemistry  and  Physical  Education 

Henry  Waring  Schereschewsky,  A.B. 
Comptroller 

Frederic  Anness  Stott.  A.B. 
Alumni  Secretary 
Director  of  Development 

Philip  Brottnlie  Weld,  M.S. 

Instructor  in  Chemistry  and  Physics 
Chairman  of  the  Chemistry  Department 

*Vtt.tjam  Franklin  Graham.  B.S. 
Instructor  in  Mathematics 

*Fred  Harold  Harrison,  A.M. 

Instructor  in  History  and  Physical  Education 
Chairman  of  the  Athletic  Department 

John  Claiborne  McClement,  Ed.M. 
Instructor  in  Mathematics 

*  Joshua  Levis  Miner,  III,  A.B. 
Instructor  in  Science 

President,  Outtcard  Bound,  Incorporated 

James  Harold  Couch,  A.M. 
Instructor  in  Spanish 
Chairman  of  the  Spanish  Deparrment 

Sherman  Frederick  Drake,  Ed.M. 

Instructor  in  Mathematics,  Mechanical  Drau  :ng, 

Edmond  Emerson  Hammond,  Jr..  Sc.M. 

Instructor  in  Mathematics,  Physics,  end  Chemist, 

Louis  John  Hoitsma,  Jr..  Ed.M. 
Instructor  in  Mathematics 

Robert  Penniman  Hulburd,  A.M. 
Instructor  in  German 
Director  of  College  Placement 

Dalton  Hunter  McBee,  A.B. 
Instructor  in  English 
Admissions  Officer 

Albert  Karl  Roehrig,  Ed.M. 

School  Psychologist 
Robert  Edwin  Lane.  A.M. 

Instructor  in  Latin  and  Russian 

Chairman  of  the  Russian  Department 

Director  of  the  Bureau  of  Self-Hclb 
*Thomas  Michael  Mikula,  A.M. 

Instructor  in  Mathematics 
v Harold  Holmes  O^ten.  Jr.,  A.M. 

Instructor  in  English 
Thomas  Joseph  Regan,  A.M. 

Instructor  in  English 
William  Biggs  Clift,  Jr.,  B.M.Ed. 

Instructor  in  Music 

Chairman  of  the  Music  Department 

*  On  leave  of  absence. 


14 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Frank  McCord  Eccles,  A.M.  1956 
Instructor  in  Mathematics 

Kk  hard  Valentine  Healy,  P.E.  19J6 
Director  of  Physical  Plant 

John  Ward  Kimball,  A.B.  1956 
Instructor  in  Biology 

Harrison  Schuyler  Royce,  Jr.,  M.I. A.  1956 
Instructor  in  History 

*  Gerald  Shertzer,  M.F.A.  1957 
Instructor  in  Art 

John  Frank  Bronk  19J8 
Instructor  in  Physical  Education  ami  Physiotherapist 

George  William  Best,  S.B.  195  8 

Instructor  in  Mathematics 

Clement  Morell,  A.M.  1958 

Instructor  in  Mathematics 
Excusing  Officer 

Frederic  Arnold  Pease,  Jr.,  B.U.  1958 
Instructor  in  Religion 

Philip  Mason  DuBois,  Ph.D.  1959 
Instructor  in  Physics 

John  Richards,  II,  M.A.T.  1959 
instructor  in  History 

Wilj  iam  Abbot  Munroe,  A.B.  1960 
Bursar 

James  Allyn  Bradford,  B.D.  1960 
Instructor  in  Religion 

Gilbert  Burnett,  Jr.,  A.B.  1960 
Instructor  in  Biology  an  J  Science 

John  Patten  Chivers,  A.M.  1960 
Instructor  in  German 
Chairman  of  the  German  Department 

Carl  Edward  Krumpe,  Jr.,  A.M.  1960 
Instructor  in  Classics 

\\  ii  i  iam  Lawrence  Markey,  A.M.  1954-1957,  1960 

Instructor  in  French 

Thomas  Rees,  Ph.D.  1960 

Instructor  in  Chemistry 
Frank  DeWitt  Thornton,  B.M.Ed.  1960 

Instructor  in  Music 

George  Howard  Edmonds,  Ed.M.  1961 
Instructor  in  English 

Edward  Moseley  Harris,  S.B.  1961 

Instructor  in  Spanish 

Executive  Officer,  Schoolboys  Abroad 
Guy  D'Oyly  Hughes,  A.M.  1961 

Instructor  in  English 

Crayton  Ward  Bedford,  A.M.  1962 
Instructor  in  Mathematics 


*  On  leave  of  absence. 


FACULTY  1  5 

Paul- Yves  Colle,  L.  es  L.  1962 
Instructor  in  French 

Alfred  James  Coulthard.  S.B.  1962 
Instructor  in  Physical  Education 

Wayne  Andrew  Frederick,  Ph.M.  1962 
Instructor  in  History 

Robert  Andrext  Lloyd,  Arch.B.  1962 
Instructor  in  Art 

Charles  Waldo  Smith,  A.B.  1962 
Executive  Director,  The  Alumni  Fund 

Alanson  Perley  Stevens,  III,  A.M.  1962 
Instructor  in  German  and  Russian 

Ellsworth  Alfred  Fersch,  Jr.,  LL.B.,  A.M.  1963 
Instructor  in  English 

Thomas  Tolman  Lyons,  M.A.T.  1963 
Instructor  in  History 

Barbara  McDonnell,  A.B.,  S.B.  1963 
Director  of  the  Library 

Robert  Rennie  McQuilkin,  A.M.  1963 
Instructor  in  English 

Jerome  Alec  Pieh,  M.A.T.  1963 
Instructor  in  History 

Meredith  Price,  M.A.T.  1963 
Instructor  in  English 

Alexander  Zabriskie  Tarrhn,  A.B.  1963 
Instructor  in  Mathematics 

Teter  Charles  Beamish,  S.M.  1964 
Instructor  in  Mathematics  and  Science 

Christopher  Capen  Cook,  M.F.A.  1964 
Instructor  in  Art 

William  Sherman  Jardine,  M.A.T.  1964 
Instructor  in  Science 

Gary  Britten  Miles,  A.M.  1964 
Instructor  in  Classics 

Charles  Bartlett  Packard,  M.A.T.  1964 
Instructor  in  Classics 

Vincent  Pascucci,  A.M.  1964 
Instructor  in  Classics 

Daniel  Dretzka  Olivier,  A.M.  1964 
Instructor  in  English 

Assistant  Director,  Schoolboys  Abroad,  Barcelona,  Spain 

Clark  Alvord  Vaughan,  A.M.  1964 
Instructor  in  Spanish 

Director,  Schoolboys  Abroad,  Barcelona,  Spain 
Alan  Rogers  Blackmer,  Jr.,  M.A.T.  1965 

Summer  Session  Director  of  Admissions 
August  Thayer  Jaccaci,  Jr.,  M.A.T.,  M.F.A.  1965 

Instructor  in  Art 

Julian  Stevens  Kaiser,  M.D.  1965 
Medical  Director 


16 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Ronn  Nels  Minne,  Ph.D. 
Instructor  in  Chemistry 

James  Arthur  Quitslund,  A.B. 
Instructor  in  German 

Angel  Maroto  Rubio,  A.M. 
Instructor  in  Spanish 

Nathaniel  Baldwin  Smith,  A.M. 
Instructor  in  Mathematics 

Hale  Sturges,  II,  A.M. 
Instructor  in  French 

Jacques  Georges  Tallot,  Professeur  agrege 
Instructor  in  French 

George  Culbreth  Thomas,  A.B. 

Wtngate  Paine  Fellow  in  Photography 

Thomas  Mark  Brayton,  A.B. 
Teaching  Fellow  in  Classics 

Thomas  Bowen  Coburn,  A.B. 
Teaching  Fellow  in  Religion 

Allin  Carey  Seward,  III,  A.B. 
Teaching  Fellow  in  French 

David  Marshall  Smith,  A.B. 
Teaching  Fellow  in  F.nglish 

John  Neville  Williamson,  A.B. 
Teaching  Fellow  in  Mathematics 


1965 
1965 
1965 
1965 
1965 

19  5  8-60,  re-appointed  1965 
1965 
1965 
1965 
1965 
1965 
1965 


Evans  Science  Building 


ADMINISTRATIVE  DEPARTMENTS 


Correspondence  with  administrative  officers  should  be  addressed  to  them  at  George 
Washington  Hall.  Office  hours:  week  days,  9:00  a.m.  to  12:00  and  (except  Saturday) 
2:00  p.m.  to  5:00  p.m.  Offices  are  closed  on  Saturday  during  the  summer.  Appointments 
should  be  made  in  advance,  if  possible.  For  information,  call  or  see  Miss  Meredith  Thiras, 
Receptionist  (telephone  617—475-3400),  during  office  hours. 

HEADMASTER'S  OFFICE 

John  Mason  Kemper,  L.H.D.,  Litt.D.,  LL.D.,  Hcddmaster 
Mrs.  Amy  R.  Robinson,  Secretary  to  the  Headmaster 

OFFICE  OF  THE  ASSISTANT  TO  THE  HEADMASTER 

James  Ruthven  Adriance,  A.B.,  Assistant  to  the  Headmaster 
Mrs.  Ruth  A.  White,  Secretary  to  the  Assistant  to  the  Headmaster 

ADMISSIONS  OFFICE 

Robert  Whittemore  Sides,  A.B.,  Director  of  Admissions 
Dalton  Hunter  McBee,  A.B.,  Admissions  Officer 

Frederick  Scouller  Allis,  Jr.,  A.M.,  L.H.D.,  Director  of  Financial  Aid 

Harper  Follansbee,  Ed.M.,  John  Richards,  II,  M.A.T.,  Jerome  Alec  Pieh,  M.A.T., 

Albert  Karl  Roehrig,  Ed.M.,  Stephen  Whitney,  A.M.,  Interviewing  Officers 
Mrs.  Vivian  A.  O'Donnell,  Secretary  to  the  Director  of  Admissions 

OFFICE  OF  THE  DEAN  OF  THE  FACULTY 
Alan  Rogers  Blackmer,  A.M.,  L.H.D.,  Dean  of  the  Faculty 

OFFICE  OF  THE  DEAN  OF  STUDENTS 

George  Grenville  Benedict,  A.M.,  Dean  of  Students 

William  Russell  Bennett,  Jr.,  A.B.,  Associate  Dean  of  Students 

Kenneth  Smith  Minard,  A.M.,  Assistant  Dean  of  Students 

Robert  Penniman  Hulburd,  A.M.,  Director  of  College  Placement 

Clement  Morell,  A.M.,  Excusing  Officer 

Peter  Quackenbush  McKee,  Ed.M.,  Scheduling  Officer 

Mary  Elise  Waddington,  Secretary  to  the  Director  of  College  Placement 

Mary  Rokel,  Secretary  to  the  Dean  of  Students 

BUREAU  OF  SELF-HELP 
Robert  Edwin  Lane,  A.M.,  Director  of  the  Bureau  of  Self-Help 

TREASURER'S  OFFICE 

Henry  Waring  Schereschewsky,  A.B.,  Comptroller 
William  Abbot  Munroe,  A.B.,  Bursar 

Richard  Valentine  Healy,  P.E.,  Director  of  Physical  Plant 

Marion  E.  Hill,  Assistant  Bursar 

Evelyn  H.  Gordon,  Director  of  Student  Accounts 

Mrs.  Barbara  L.  Morrison,  Secretary  to  the  Comptroller 

ALUMNI  AND  DEVELOPMENT  OFFICE 

Frederic  Anness  Stott,  A.B.,  Alumni  Secretary  and  Director  of  Development 
Charles  Waldo  Smith,  A.B.,  Executive  Director,  The  Alu  mni  Fund 
Mrs.  Helen  R.  Bronk,  Secretary  to  the  Executive  Director,  The  Alumni  Fund 
Mrs.  Ruth  P.  Ellison,  Secretary  to  the  Director  of  Development 


17 


is 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


DEPARTMENT  OF  HEALTH 

Julian  S.  Kaiser,  M.D.,  Medical  Director 
Albert  Karl  Roehrig,  Ed.M.,  Psychologist 
Mrs.  Vera  B.  Westover,  Administrator 

Local  Consultants 

Douglas  Malcolm  Dunbar,  D.D.S.,  Senior  Dentist 

Herman  DeWilde,  M.D.,  D.M.D.,  Associate  Dentist 

C.  Paul  Bonin,  D.M.D.,  Orthodontist 

John  Paul  Holihan,  M.D.,  Anesthesiologist 

Milton  D.  Howard,  M.D.,  Pathologist 

Robert  J.  Joplin,  M.D.,  Orthopedist 

Richard  Katz,  M.D.,  Pediatrician 

Richard  S.  O'Hara,  M.D.,  General  Surgeon 

Nicholas  D.  Rizzo,  M.D.,  Psychiatrist 

George  V.  West,  M.D.,  Radiologist 

John  F.  Murphy,  B.A.,  Speech  Therapist 

John  F.  Bronk,  Physical  Therapist 

John  F.  Nastasi,  Optometrist 

OLIVER  WENDELL  HOLMES  LIBRARY 

Barbara  McDonnell,  A.B.,  S.B.,  Director  of  the  Library 
Mrs.  Harriet  F.  Burkhard,  A.B.,  Assistant  in  the  Library 
Sylvia  A.  Collin,  S.M.,  Reference  Librarian 
Mrs.  Margaret  B.  Towne,  S.B.,  Assistant  in  the  Library 
Irene  Wilkinson,  A.B.,  S.M.,  Cataloguer 

ADDISON  GALLERY  OF  AMERICAN  ART 

Bartlett  Harding  Hayes,  Jr.,  A.B.,  Director 
Christopher  Capen  Cook,  M.F.A.,  Assistant  Director 
Antoinette  Thiras,  Secretary  and  Registrar 

ROBERT  S.  PEABODY  FOUNDATION  FOR  ARCHAEOLOGY 

Douglas  Swain  Byers,  A.M.,  Director 

Frederick  Johnson,  S.B.,  Curator 

Richard  S.  Macneish,  Ph.D.,  Research  Associate 

Mrs.  Marjory  McC.  Stevens,  Secretary  and  Assistant  to  the  Director 

DEPARTMENT  OF  PHYSICAL  EDUCATION  AND  ATHLETICS 

Fred  Harold  Harrison,  A.M.,  Director  of  Physical  Educatioti  and  Athletics 
John  Frank  Bronk,  Instructor  in  Physical  Education  and  Physiotherapist 
Alfred  James  Coulthard,  S.B.,  Instructor  in  Physical  Education 
Frank  Frederick  DiClemente,  S.B.,  Instructor  in  Physical  Education 
Stephen  Stanley  Sorota,  S.B.,  Instructor  in  Physical  Education 
Reagh  Clinton  Wetmore,  M.P.E.,  Instructor  in  Physical  Education 

DEPARTMENT  OF  MUSIC 

Wm.  Biggs  Clift,  Jr.,  Mus.Ed.B.,  Chairman  and  Instructor  in  Brass  Instruments 
Lorene  Banta,  Ph.D.,  Instructor  in  Organ 
Gerard  Charles  Bellanti,  Instructor  in  Accordion 
Carl  E.  Bochman,  Mus.Ed.B.,  Instructor  in  Drums 
Albion  Metcalf,  Instructor  in  Piano 

Roland  Moore,  Instructor  in  Bass  Viol  and  Classical  Guitar 

William  Louis  Schneider,  Mus.Ed.B.,  Instructor  in  Stringed  Instruments 

DeWitt  Thornton,  Mus.Ed.B.,  Instructor  in  Woodwind  Instruments 


ADMINISTRATIVE  DEPARTMENTS 


19 


SUMMER  SESSION 

Frederick  Almond  Peterson,  A.M.,  Director 

Alan  Rogers  Blackmer,  Jr.,  M.A.T.,  Director  of  Admissions 

Mrs.  Edith  Jako,  Secretary 

SCHOOLBOYS  ABROAD 

Clark  Alvord  Vaughan,  A.M.,  Director  of  Program,  Barcelona 
Edward  Mosely  Harris,  S.B.,  Executive  Officer,  Andover 
Mrs.  Clark  Alvord  Vaughan,  Nurse-Secretary,  Barcelona 

MONCRIEFE  COCHRAN  SANCTUARY 
George  Knight  Sanborn,  S.B.,  Warden 

AUDIO-VISUAL  CENTER 

Gordon  Gilmore  Bensley,  A.B.,  Director 
Mrs.  Ruth  Roehrig,  Coordinator 

Aloystus  Hobausz,  Puskas  T.  Inst,  of  Tele  Communication  (Budapest),  Audio  Technician 

ANDOVER  EVENING  STUDY  PROGRAM 

Frederick  A.  Peterson,  A.M.,  Chairman 
Mrs.  Lucy  Pieh,  Coordinator 


CHAIRMEN  OF  ACADEMIC  DEPARTMENTS 


Archaeology 

Douglas  Swain  Byers,  A.M. 

Art 

Bartlett  Harding  Hayes,  Jr.,  A.B. 

Athletics 

Fred  Harold  Harrison,  A.M. 

Biology 

Harper  Follansbee,  Ed.M. 

Chemistry 

Philip  Brownlie  Weld,  M.S. 

Classics 

Alston  Hurd  Chase,  Ph.D. 

English 

William  Hayes  Brown,  A.M. 

French 

James  Hooper  Grew,  D.  es  L. 

German 

John  Patten  Chivers,  A.M. 

History 

Leonard  Frank  James,  A.M. 

Mathematics 

Richard  Sawyer  Pieters,  A.M. 

Music 

William  Biggs  Clift,  Jr.,  Mus.Ed.B. 

Physics 

Peter  Quackenbush  McKee,  Ed.M. 

Religion 

Alfred  Graham  Baldwin,  D.D. 

Russian 

Robert  Edwin  Lane,  A.M. 

Spanish 

James  Harold  Couch,  A.M. 

GENERAL  INFORMATION 


A  ndover  students,  for  the  most  part,  live  together  by  classes 
in  the  Academy  dormitories  and  houses.  Each  building  is  under 
the  supervision  of  the  resident  faculty  housemaster.  All  boys  eat 
in  their  own  class  dining  rooms  in  the  Commons. 

Juniors  live  in  Williams  Hall  and  Rockwell  House,  or  in  neigh- 
boring houses  and  cottages.  Williams  Hall,  with  its  annexes,  Junior 
House  and  Stott  Cottage,  has  rooms  and  recreation  facilities  for 
fifty-six  Juniors,  who  occupy  single  or  double  rooms.  Rockwell 
House  has  single  rooms  and  recreation  facilities  for  forty  Juniors. 
Juniors  are  subject  to  the  special  regulations  and  the  particularly 
close  supervision  found  helpful  to  boys  of  this  age  in  making  a 
successful  transition  from  home  to  boarding  school  life.  Carefully 
selected  Senior  proctors  play  an  important  part  in  the  activities  of 
the  various  Junior  units. 

Lower  Middlers  live  in  three  of  the  double-entry  brick  dormi- 
tories and  in  a  number  of  smaller  houses  and  cottages,  where  they 
receive  careful  guidance  but  also  enjoy  a  degree  of  independence 
suited  to  their  increased  maturity.  Senior  proctors  are  in  residence 
in  most  of  the  Lower  Middle  units. 

Upper  Middlers  and  Seniors,  having  learned  to  profit  from  rela- 
tively great  independence  and  freedom,  are  housed,  with  a  few 
exceptions,  in  large  brick  dormitories  by  classes,  where  they  are 
permitted  considerable  latitude  in  the  exercise  of  their  daily  affairs. 
In  the  four  newest  dormitories,  the  resident  groups  are  made  up  of 
an  approximately  equal  number  of  Upper  Middlers  and  Seniors, 
who  live  in  the  same  dormitory  for  their  last  two  years. 

FACULTY  COUNSELORS  (housemasters) 

Each  Andover  student  is  under  the  direct  charge  of  a  Faculty 
Counselor,  who,  for  boarding  students,  is  his  housemaster.  He 
knows  the  background,  the  character,  and  the  standing  of  each  of 
his  boys  and  acts  as  his  advisor  in  all  that  concerns  his  welfare  and 
his  happiness.  The  Counselor  is  usually  the  member  of  the  Faculty 
most  intimately  in  touch  with  the  student  and  his  parents.  From 
time  to  time,  he  will  write  the  parents  to  keep  them  informed  of 


20 


GENERAL  INFORMATION 


21 


their  son's  progress.  Parents  should  feel  free  to  write  their  son's 
counselor  if  they  have  any  reason  for  concern  about  their  boy's 
progress.  They  are  encouraged  to  report  to  the  counselor  any  facts 
that  may  affect  the  boy's  work  or  behavior. 

RELIGION 

Phillips  Academy  is  an  inter-denominational  school  whose  ori- 
gin and  traditions  rest  firmly  upon  a  Christian  faith  and  system 
of  values. 

Chapel  services  are  an  essential  part  of  the  Phillips  Academy 
program  and  are  conducted  by  the  Headmaster,  the  School  Minis- 
ters, students,  and  members  of  the  faculty.  Among  the  visiting 
speakers  are  leaders  of  many  denominations.  A  number  of  college 
chaplains  are  invited  to  speak  each  year. 

Attendance  at  chapel  services  is  required,  although  on  Sundays 
boys  may  choose  to  attend  services  at  other  Protestant  or  Roman 
Catholic  churches  in  Andover.  Students  of  Jewish  faith  may  attend 
services  in  the  Sylvia  Pratt  Kemper  Chapel.  Mass  for  Roman  Catho- 
lic students  is  celebrated  in  this  small  Chapel  each  Sunday  at  8:15. 

This  arrangement  emphasizes  two  sets  of  values:  a  close  con- 
nection of  each  boy  with  his  own  denomination,  and  a  program 
of  worship  within  the  life  of  the  school  built  upon  the  common 
elements  of  our  religious  heritage. 

In  a  school  composed  of  students  from  diverse  backgrounds,  it 
is  not  possible  fully  to  satisfy  all  the  special  requirements  of  dif- 
ferent sects  and  denominations.  Therefore  no  boy  should  apply  for 
admission  to  the  Academy  who  feels  that  the  ritualistic  practices 
of  his  own  faith  must  be  literally  followed  in  all  circumstances. 

In  daily  chapel  the  effort  is  to  develop  a  service  that  strengthens 
the  best  aspirations  and  insights  of  students,  while  denying  to  no 
one  the  right  to  hold  fast  his  own  faith.  The  school  tries  to  develop 
devotion  to  God  and  reliance  upon  faith  as  a  source  of  inspiration 
and  strength,  to  confirm  a  boy's  support  of  the  highest  values 
that  our  civilization  has  nurtured,  and  to  increase  his  respect  for 
and  understanding  of  the  beliefs  of  others. 

Those  who  have  minority  religious  status  as  well  as  those  who 
have  majority  status  are  expected  to  work  with  equal  eagerness 
toward  the  goals  by  means  of  which  Phillips  Academy  endeavors 
to  achieve  harmony  and  unity  in  diversity. 


22 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


CULTURAL  OPPORTUNITIES 
Andover  has  always  demanded  a  high  standard  of  accomplish- 
ment in  the  prescribed  course  of  study.  At  the  same  time,  the 
school  believes  that  a  boy's  interest  should  be  widened  as  far  as 
possible  beyond  the  subjects  of  the  curriculum.  Through  the  Oliver 
Wendell  Holmes  Library,  the  Robert  S.  Peabody  Foundation  for 
Archaeology,  the  Addison  Gallery  of  American  Art,  the  Depart- 
ment of  Music,  and  the  Moncrieff  Cochran  Sanctuary,  the  boys 
are  given  a  chance  to  interest  themselves  in  subjects  which  may  in 
later  life  become  delightful  hobbies  or  even  major  pursuits  and 
professions. 

A  number  of  distinguished  men  and  women  are  invited  to  the 
Academy  each  year  as  lecturers  and  guest  artists.  During  1964- 
1965,  Mr.  E.  J.  Kahn,  Jr.,  author  and  staff  writer  of  The  New 
Yorker  deliverd  the  Stearns  Lecture;  writer  and  editor  David 
McCord  visited  the  school  as  the  Hosch  Lecturer;  and  Dr.  Philip 
B.  Gove,  Editor,  Merriam-Webster  Dictionary,  came  to  the  Acad- 
emy as  the  seventh  annual  Lana  Lobell  Fellow.  They  addressed  the 
school  assembly  in  George  Washington  Hall  and  conducted  infor- 
mal conferences  with  students  and  faculty.  Among  other  distin- 
guished guests  who  addressed  the  school  at  Wednesday  morning 
assembly  were  Dr.  E.  Cuyler  Hammond  of  the  American  Cancer 
Society,  on  "Smoking";  His  Excellency  Liu  Chieh,  Permanent  Rep- 
resentative of  the  Republic  of  China  to  the  United  Nations;  Dr. 
Richard  W.  Day,  Principal  of  Phillips  Exeter  Academy;  Dr.  George 
Bell  Dyer,  Professor  of  Political  Science,  University  of  Pennsyl- 
vania; Hans  Christoph  Baron  von  Stauffenberg  of  Risstissen,  Wurt- 
temberg,  Bavaria;  and  Mr.  Nicholas  Piatt,  Consul,  United  States 
Foreign  Service. 

Among  the  guest  artists  to  appear  on  campus  were  Emlyn  Wil- 
liams portraying  Charles  Dickens,  Jean-Leon  Destine  and  his  Hai- 
tian dance  company;  and  The  Esterhazy  Orchestra.  The  thirty- 
seventh  Sawyer  Concert  was  given  by  Eugene  Indjic,  a  member  of 
the  Senior  Class. 

A  Shakespearean  play,  last  year  The  Tempest,  is  produced  ann- 
ually by  the  Dramatic  Club.  A  musical  is  produced  each  spring,  by 
the  school  Chorus,  Orchestra,  and  Dramatic  Club;  The  Music  Man 
was  the  1965  choice,  with  a  combined  cast  and  orchestra  of  over 
175. 


GENERAL  INFORMATION 


2  3 


THE  OLIVER  WENDELL  HOLMES  LIBRARY 

The  Oliver  Wendell  Holmes  Library  (1929)  was  given  by- 
William  Cochran,  class  of  1895  ;  Moncrieff  M.  Cochran,  class  of 
1900;  and  Louise  Cochran  Savage.  It  was  named  in  honor  of  the 
poet  and  physician,  a  member  of  the  class  of  1825. 

The  Copley  Wing,  gift  of  James  S.  Copley,  P. A.,  193  5,  designed 
to  seat  12  5  at  small  tables  and  carrels,  is  used  as  an  American  His- 
tory Reserve  Book  Room. 

The  book  collection,  over  8  5,000  volumes  in  the  liberal  arts, 
supports  and  supplements  the  curriculum  and  provides  many  areas 
for  independent  reading.  A  trained  staff  member  is  on  duty  at  all 
times  to  help  in  the  vise  of  the  Library  and  advise  in  choice  of 
reading. 

Particular  treasures  of  the  Library  are  an  original  elephant  folio 
of  Audubon's  Birds  of  America,  given  by  Thomas  Cochran  of  the 
class  of  1890;  papers  and  books  of  the  poet  Oliver  Wendell  Holmes; 
part  of  the  library  of  Guy  Lowell,  architect  of  many  of  the 
Academy's  buildings;  a  notable  collection  of  2  59  volumes  on  Eng- 
lish Public  Schools;  the  Mercer  Collection  on  sports;  publications 
by  graduates  and  memorabilia  of  the  Academy;  classics  given  in 
memory  of  Allen  R.  Benner;  Early  Americana  given  by  Nelson  S. 
Taylor,  of  the  class  of  1900;  and  historical  map  of  the  Academy  by 
Stuart  Travis,  in  the  Freeman  Room.  Rare  Vergiliana,  gathered 
by  Charles  H.  Forbes,  and  a  handsomely  bound  collection  of 
French  literature,  selected  by  Charles  A.  Parmelee,  are  kept  in 
separate  rooms  open  to  all  who  may  be  interested. 

Housed  in  the  Library  building  are  the  Archives  Department 
and  a  music  record  listening  room. 

THE  ADDISON  GALLERY  OF  AMERICAN  ART 

The  Addison  Gallery  of  American  Art  (1930)  was  established 
in  memory  of  Mrs.  Keturah  Addison  Cobb,  "to  enrich  perma- 
nently the  lives  of  the  students  of  Phillips  Academy,  by  helping  to 
cultivate  and  foster  in  them  a  love  for  the  beautiful."  The  original 
gift  included  important  objects  of  American  art  with  endowment 
for  the  maintenance  and  operation  of  the  building,  and  a  small 
fund  for  additional  purchases. 


24 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


It  is  the  aim  of  the  Addison  Gallery  to  serve  as  a  cultural  center 
for  Phillips  Academy  students  and  outside  visitors.  To  this  end, 
frequent  loan  exhibitions  are  held  throughout  the  year.  Some  are 
directly  related  to  the  courses  in  the  school  curriculum;  others  are 
of  general  interest. 

In  addition  to  its  activities  as  a  part  of  Phillips  Academy,  the 
Addison  Gallery  is  always  open  to  the  general  public  and  offers 
educational  opportunities  to  schools  and  organizations  in  the 
neighboring  communities. 

The  nucleus  of  the  present  collection  of  American  paintings  was 
presented  to  Phillips  Academy  in  1928  by  several  friends  of  the 
school.  The  collection,  now  including  nearly  two  thousand  items, 
is  recognized  as  one  of  the  outstanding  specialized  collections  in 
the  country.  Allston,  Copley,  Morse,  Stuart,  West,  and  others 
represent  the  Colonial  period.  Of  especial  importance  among  the 
many  paintings  of  the  nineteenth  century  are  examples  by  Cole, 
Doughty,  Eakins,  Homer,  Inness,  LaFarge,  Ryder,  Twachtman, 
and  Whistler.  The  early  part  of  the  present  century  is  shown  in 
the  work  of  such  men  as  Bellows,  Davies,  Demuth,  Hassam,  Hop- 
per, Luks,  Marin,  Prendergast,  and  Sloan.  Recent  acquisitions  of 
contemporary  paintings,  sculpture,  prints,  drawings  and  photo- 
graphs complete  an  exceptionally  well-balanced  collection.  Work 
by  Calder,  Lippold,  Moholy-Nagy,  Hofmann,  Marin,  O'Keeffe, 
Pollock,  Shahn,  and  Wyeth  is  included  in  this  latter  group. 

Models  of  American  ships,  built  to  uniform  scale,  are  also  in- 
stalled in  the  Addison  Gallery.  This  collection  forms  a  compre- 
hensive survey  of  American  shipping  in  the  sailing  era,  with  a  few 
examples  from  the  present  day.  In  addition  to  a  collection  of  18th 
Century  American  silver,  that  of  the  James  B.  Neale  bequest, 
received  in  1946,  selections  of  furniture,  glass,  and  textiles  of  the 
Colonial  period  are  on  permanent  exhibition. 

Among  recent  publications  of  the  Addison  Gallery  are  three 
books:  "Layman's  Guide  to  Modern  Art,"  1949-54;  "The  Naked 
Truth  and  Personal  Vision,"  195  5,  and  "The  American  Line," 
1959,  all  based  upon  special  exhibits  arranged  in  connection  with 
the  Upper  Middle  course  in  Art.  "Models  of  American  Sailing 
Ships"  is  a  recent  title  serving  as  a  catalogue  of  the  Marine  Collec- 
tion. All  are  simply  written,  and  intended  for  adult  as  well  as  for 
student  readers. 


GENERAL  INFORMATION 


25 


An  Art  Film  Library  of  some  three  dozen  titles  was  established 
in  19)4  to  serve  schools  and  colleges  in  New  England,  as  well  as 
the  Academy  community. 

THE  ROBERT  S.  PEABODY  FOUNDATION  FOR 
ARCHAEOLOGY 

The  Robert  S.  Peabody  Foundation  for  Archaeology,  estab- 
lished in  1901  by  Robert  Singleton  Peabody,  Class  of  18  57,  sup- 
ports research  in  American  archaeology  and  maintains  a  museum 
in  which  its  collections  are  displayed.  They  have  been  gathered 
through  extensive  programs  of  field  research  in  the  Southwest,  the 
southeastern  states,  New  England,  and  the  Maritime  Provinces. 
Under  grants  from  the  National  Science  Foundation  and  the 
Rockefeller  Foundation,  the  Peabody  Foundation  has  administered 
a  program  of  research  under  Dr.  MacNeish  into  the  origins  of 
native  American  agriculture  and  civilization  in  Mexico.  A  program 
continues  in  New  England  and  the  Maritime  Provinces. 

A  decorative  map  of  North  America  by  the  late  Stuart  Travis  is 
mounted  on  the  stairway.  A  model  of  an  Indian  village  formerly 
located  in  Andover,  and  a  model  of  a  portion  of  the  pueblo  of 
Pecos,  New  Mexico,  are  also  on  display. 

The  Foundation  offers  a  two-hour  elective  course  dealing  with 
the  life  of  the  Indians  and  the  pre-history  of  North  America. 

A  library,  open  to  all,  offers  an  opportunity  for  reading  and 
research  in  the  varied  phases  of  aboriginal  American  life. 

The  Foundation  has  an  extensive  publication  list,  which  is  avail- 
able at  the  museum  office. 

THE  MOXCRIEFF  COCHRAN  SANCTUARY 

The  Moncrieff  Cochran  Sanctuary  is  a  sixty-five-acre  tract  of 
rare  beauty  and  of  great  educational  value,  located  so  close  to  the 
center  of  school  activity  that  it  is  in  fact  an  extension  of  the 
campus.  Landscaped  areas  planted  with  dogwood,  azalea,  rhodo- 
dendron and  laurel  provide  a  succession  of  bloom  that  draws  many 
visitors  from  late  April  to  mid-June.  A  brook  and  two  ponds 
attract  nesting  ducks  and  geese,  and  extensive  natural  wild  areas, 
varied  in  terrain  and  plant  life,  draw  many  species  of  small  land 
birds  and  provide  nesting  places  for  grouse  and  pheasant.  Other 


26 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


areas  are  set  aside  for  student  projects  such  as  demonstration  of 
bird  feeders;  experimental  plantings  for  attracting  birds;  soil 
studies;  and  raising  and  liberating  duck,  quail,  and  pheasant. 
Special  paths  are  designed  and  planted  to  show  local  ferns,  wild- 
flowers,  and  trees  in  their  natural  habitats.  The  Log  Cabin,  a 
rustic  building  with  a  large  stone  fireplace,  kitchen,  flagstone  ter- 
race and  broad  lawns,  provides  an  attractive  setting  for  a  wide 
variety  of  social  events  at  all  seasons.  The  Cochran  Sanctuary  is 
unusual  in  its  ideal  location  and  in  its  varied  facilities  for  conser- 
vation, education,  and  enjoyment. 

STUDENT  ACTIVITIES 
Student  organizations  and  voluntary  enterprises  of  various  kinds 
are  an  important  part  of  life  at  Phillips  Academy.  They  may 
change  from  year  to  year  in  scope  and  intent,  depending  upon 
student  interest.  Among  others,  there  are  literary,  musical,  forensic, 
and  scientific  activities.  Each  group  is  under  student  leadership 
and  is  advised  by  a  member  of  the  faculty.  The  list  that  follows 
is  intended  to  be  representative  rather  than  complete. 

The  Phillipian,  founded  in  1878,  is  the  school  newspaper.  It  is 
published  every  Wednesday  of  the  school  year.  Students  on  the  edi- 
torial and  the  business  boards  gain  experience  in  writing  and  in 
business  practice. 

The  Mirror,  founded  in  18  54,  is  the  undergraduate  literary  maga- 
zine, which  appears  several  times  each  year.  Positions  on  the  literary, 
business,  and  photographic  boards  offer  the  profitable  and  interest- 
ing experience  of  working  toward  the  publication  of  a  magazine 
devoted  to  encouraging  literary  talent. 

The  Pot  Pourri  is  the  Academy  yearbook,  published  after  the  end 
of  each  year.  It  contains  pictures  and  personal  information  con- 
cerning all  Seniors  and  non-returning  Upper  Middlers,  group  pic- 
tures of  all  school  organizations,  and  many  special  features.  The 
three  boards,  editorial,  business,  and  art,  offer  excellent  opportun- 
ities for  the  development  of  literary,  business,  or  artistic  talent. 
This  book  is  the  chief  permanent  record  to  which  alumni  turn  for 
the  account  of  their  years  at  Andover. 

The  Dramatic  Society  is  an  organization  for  all  students  interested 
in  acting,  directing,  stage  design,  scenery  construction,  lighting, 


GENERAL  INFORMATION 


27 


and  business  managing.  The  major  production  each  year  is  a  Shake- 
speare play.  A  considerable  number  of  modern  plays,  both  drama- 
tic and  musical,  are  also  presented. 

One  of  the  most  important  groups  within  the  Dramatic  Society 
is  the  Stage  Crew.  Carpenters,  painters,  shifters,  electricians,  and 
special-effects  men  work  under  a  stage  manager  and  a  chief  elec- 
trician. Their  job  is  to  build  the  sets  and  operate  the  staging  for 
all  the  plays. 

Another  branch  of  the  Society  is  the  Drama  Workshop,  whose 
intent  is  to  offer  further  opportunities  for  students  to  participate 
in  play  readings,  and  the  production  of  both  conventional  and  ex- 
perimental drama,  student  directed  in  the  Drama  Lab.  The  organi- 
zation welcomes  lower  classmen  as  well  as  Uppers  and  Seniors. 

The  language  departments  frequently  produce  plays  in  French, 
German,  Latin,  or  Spanish.  The  language  plays  are  projects  of 
language -inter est  clubs  that  sponsor,  in  addition,  illustrated  lec- 
tures, motion  pictures  from  the  countries  of  their  choice,  and  dis- 
cussions of  history  and  culture.  Occasionally  there  are  language 
tables  in  the  Commons. 

Debating  and  school  forums  are  held  by  Philo,  properly  the  Philo- 
mathean  Society,  founded  in  1825.  Regular  meetings,  held  bi- 
monthly in  the  faculty  room,  normally  open  to  members  only, 
provide  forums  for  the  discussion  of  local,  national,  and  interna- 
tional issues.  From  time  to  time  there  are  debates  against  visiting 
teams,  which  all  students  may  attend.  Each  year  Philo  sponsors  a 
prize  debating  contest.  The  organization  has  also  sponsored  visiting 
lecturers  and  discussion  leaders  to  stimulate  interest  in  economic, 
social,  and  political  problems.  Some  instruction  in  debating  tech- 
nique, in  public  speaking,  and  in  parliamentary  procedure  is 
offered. 

Students  interested  in  art  may  work  in  the  studio  of  the  Addison 
Gallery  with  the  Desigti  Club. 

The  Camera  Club  has  a  dark  room  in  the  new  Arts  Center,  where 
students  may  develop,  enlarge,  and  print  their  own  photographs. 
In  response  to  interest,  groups  meet  for  the  discussion  of  fine 
points  in  the  art  of  photography. 


28 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


The  Radio  Club  has  a  room  in  the  basement  of  Evans  Hall,  where 
radio  sets  may  be  constructed  and  repaired.  It  also  has  facilities 
for  transmitting  and  receiving  amateur  broadcasts.  Code  and 
theory  classes  are  held  in  response  to  need. 

WPAA-FM  is  a  10-watt  educational  FM  station  licensed  by  the 
F.C.C.  to  operate  at  a  frequency  of  91.7  mcs.  It  provides  25  hours 
per  week  of  news,  music,  sports  and  educational  programs  to  an 
area  with  a  population  of  about  200,000.  Its  studio  is  in  the  base- 
ment of  Evans  Hall,  and  its  transmitter  is  on  the  roof  of  the  same 
building.  It  is  completely  student  operated  and  with  its  staff  of 
over  100  is  one  of  the  largest  extra-curricular  activities. 

Students  who  wish  to  construct  furniture,  models,  or  other  articles 
enjoy  the  Woodworking  Shop,  which  is  well  supplied  with  hand 
and  power  tools. 

The  Rifle  Club,  a  large  and  active  organization,  gives  boys  who 
are  interested  in  indoor  rifle  shooting,  particularly  upper-classmen, 
an  opportunity  to  shoot  for  pleasure,  for  National  Rifle  Association 
awards,  and  in  interscholastic  competition.  The  range  is  in  the  base- 
ment of  Pearson  Hall. 

Model  Railroaders  may  meet  in  the  basement  of  Paul  Revere 
Hall,  where  a  layout  has  been  constructed. 

The  chemistry  laboratory  is  open,  on  schedule  and  under  super- 
vision, to  experimenters  in  chemistry  or  physics  (Science  Club). 
Astronomers  will  find  both  a  reflecting  and  a  refracting  telescope 
on  the  campus.  One  of  them  is  housed  in  an  observatory  (Astrono- 
my Club  J.  A  group  interested  in  tapes  and  records  makes  record- 
ing of  school  events  (Audio  Club). 

Modest  lapidary  equipment  is  on  hand  for  those  boys  who  are  in- 
terested in  gems  and  minerals  (Minerals  Club).  Identification  of 
minerals  is  another  interest  of  this  club. 

Outings  in  search  of  Maine  lobsters,  the  best  ski  trails,  or  another 
mountain  to  climb  are  the  principal  activity  of  the  Outing  Club. 
Canoeing,  fishing,  and  rock  climbing  are  also  popular  with  the 
group. 


GENERAL  INFORMATION 


29 


The  Stamp  Club  meets  in  the  tower  room  of  the  Chapel.  The 
club's  program  includes  an  annual  prize  exhibition.  Philatelists  are 
urged  to  bring  their  duplicate  stamps  and  covers  for  trading. 

The  Natural  History  Club  works  in  close  cooperation  with  the 
Biology  Department  and  the  Cochran  Bird  Sanctuary.  There  are 
widely  varied  opportunities  to  study  the  animal  and  plant  life  of 
the  region,  both  in  the  laboratory  and  in  the  field.  Trips  are  taken 
to  nearby  points  of  interest.  The  club  is  licensed  to  carry  on  a 
bird-banding  program. 

The  Asia  Society  has  as  its  aim  the  furthering  of  knowledge  and 
understanding  about  the  peoples  and  nations  of  the  East.  The 
members  meet  for  discussions,  lectures,  and  films. 

The  Phillips  Society  seeks  to  see  more  clearly  the  needs  and  prob- 
lems of  people  and  to  help  meet  those  needs.  Membership  in  the 
Phillips  Society  is  open  to  any  boy  who  wishes  to  participate  in  its 
program  and  activities. 

The  Phillips  Society's  interests  are  suggested  by  a  list  of  some  of 
its  activities: 

Receptions  for  new  boys  and  for  foreign  students 
The  raising  of  money  for  Red  Cross,  United  Fund,  the  Salva- 
tion Army,  the  Grenfell  Association,  national  health  agencies, 
and  other  organizations  and  projects 
Conducting  a  program  of  forums,  conferences,  chapel  talks,  and 

discussion  groups 
Collection  of  old  clothes,  books,  and  other  articles  for  distribu- 
tion to  schools  and  hospitals 
Field  trips  to  hospitals,  factories,  and  recreation  centers 
Sunday  School  teaching  and  deputation  work  in  the  churches  in 
Andover  and  vicinity. 

Among  the  extracurricular  activities  in  the  field  of  music  are  the 
Marching  Band,  the  String  Orchestra,  the  Concert  Band,  and  the 
Chorus  (combining  both  choir  and  glee  club),  which  take  part  in 
many  concerts  as  well  as  in  an  annual  musical  show.  Other  musical 
organizations  are  various  dance  bands,  and  the  Eight  'n'  One 
Octet.  A  well-stocked  record  library  is  located  in  the  Record 
Room,  where  recorded  concerts  are  given  from  time  to  time. 


30 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Dances  of  different  kinds  are  sponsored  by  various  student  groups. 
Student  initiative  and  interest  determine  in  large  part  their  nature 
and  frequency.  Dormitories  often  arrange  informal  dances  with 
girls  from  nearby  schools.  Once  or  twice  a  term  a  club  or  a  class 
sponsors  a  tea  dance  open  to  the  whole  school.  Following  Saturday 
afternoon  athletic  contests,  the  Student  Congress  occasionally 
opens  Graham  House  for  informal  dancing  and  refreshments.  The 
two-day  Spring  Prom  in  May  is  the  climax  of  the  social  season. 

ATHLETICS  AND  PHYSICAL  EDUCATION 

Athletics  and  physical  education  are  important  at  Andover. 
The  physical  education,  intramural,  and  interscholastic  programs 
involve  every  student;  participation  is  required.  The  objective  is 
development  by  each  boy  of  his  physical  capabilities  and  of  such 
qualities  as  courage,  self-confidence,  self-discipline,  and  self- 
control. 

Each  new  boy  must  take  a  swimming  test;  non-swimmers  must 
take  special  instruction  until  they  meet  minimum  standards  of 
proficiency.  During  his  Lower  Middle  year,  every  boy  takes  two 
hours  a  week  of  physical  education  in  addition  to  his  regular  after- 
noon program  of  athletics.  The  morning  program  of  swimming, 
track,  and  gymnastics  attempts  to  develop  early  in  the  boy's  career 
the  self-confidence  and  physical  skills  essential  for  successful 
participation  in  the  more  advanced  phases  of  the  program.  Stan- 
dards of  performance  are  based  on  the  individual's  own  physical 
capacity. 

The  intramural  and  interscholastic  programs  provide  compe- 
tition at  all  levels  in  seasonal  sports.  Outside  games  are  scheduled 
with  neighboring  high  schools,  preparatory  schools,  and  college 
freshmen.  During  the  fall,  the  sports  offered  are  football,  soccer, 
rowing,  cross  country,  and  tennis;  in  the  winter,  basketball, 
swimming,  hockey,  wrestling,  squash,  track,  and  skiing;  in  the 
spring,  baseball,  tennis,  golf,  track,  rowing,  lacrosse,  and  life- 
saving. 

The  Academy  assumes  no  responsibility  for  injuries  sustained 
by  students  while  participating  in  such  exercise  or  sports.  The 
Medical  Director's  services,  however,  will  be  rendered  and  infirm- 
ary care  provided  without  charge  except  for  illnesses  and  accidents 
covered  by  the  Andover  Student  Sickness  and  Accident  Insurance 
Plan  and  by  family  insurance. 


GENERAL  INFORMATION 


31 


The  Medical  Director  and  the  Athletic  Department  strongly 
advise  parents  to  provide  boys  who  wear  glasses  with  shatter-proof 
lenses,  not  only  to  minimize  danger  of  injury  in  athletics  but  also 
to  avoid  loss  of  study  and  reading  time. 

See  page  34  regarding  athletic  equipment. 

HEALTH  SUPERVISION 

Under  the  supervision  of  the  Medical  Director,  every  effort  is 
made  to  improve  each  student's  health,  to  prevent  disease,  and  to 
diagnose  and  treat  illnesses  and  injuries.  Before  school  opens,  every 
student  is  asked  to  have  a  general  physical  examination  by  his 
family  physician  as  well  as  certain  screening  laboratory  procedures, 
tetanus  toxoid,  typhoid-paratyphoid  injections,  smallpox  vaccina- 
tion, and  polio  vaccine.  His  family  is  asked  to  answer  questionnaires 
that  may  reveal  significant  symptoms  or  illnesses. 

Immediately  after  the  student's  arrival  at  the  Academy,  a 
physical  examination  is  done  by  the  school  physicians;  complete 
dental  and  lung  x-rays  are  taken,  and  careful  ear  and  eye  examin- 
ations are  made.  Tests  for  speech  defects,  reading  speed,  and  lan- 
guage disability  are  completed.  The  full-time  Medical  Director  and 
his  associate,  with  the  assistance  of  several  consultants  associated 
with  the  Medical  Department  and  representing  various  fields,  then 
correlate  all  information.  By  this  means  it  may  be  possible  to  form 
an  accurate  estimate  of  the  student's  physical  status  and  ease 
with  which  he  may  be  expected  to  adjust  to  the  school  environ- 
ment. 

The  Isham  Infirmary-Hospital  is  an  eighty-two  bed  institution 
accredited  by  the  Joint  Commission  on  the  Accreditation  of  Hospi- 
tals. The  Isham  Infirmary-Hospital  has  a  modern  x-ray  depart- 
ment, a  clinical  laboratory  and  a  full-time  x-ray  technician.  A  well- 
equipped  physiotherapy  unit  is  under  the  direction  of  a  qualified 
physiotherapist.  Graduate  nurses  are  in  residence  throughout  the 
school  year.  The  Isham  Infirmary-Hospital  is  equipped  to  care  for 
most  serious  medical  and  surgical  emergencies  as  well  as  many  other 
diseases  and  conditions  commonly  encountered. 

Illnesses  and  injuries  are  treated  when  feasible  by  the  Medical 
Director  or  his  associate.  If  highly  specialized  care  is  required, 
local  staff  consultants  and  hospitals  or  Boston  physicians  and 
nationally  known  medical  institutions  are  employed  forthwith. 
Minor  illnesses  are  reported  to  the  parents  by  letter.  Conditions  that 


32 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


require  treatment  under  general  anesthesia  or  approach  major 
proportions  are  reported  by  telephone  to  the  student's  family  by 
the  Medical  Director  as  soon  as  a  working  diagnosis  has  been 
established. 

The  dental  staff  consists  of  three  dentists  representing  the  fields 
of  dental  surgery,  general  dentistry,  and  orthodontistry.  There  is 
a  full-time  dental  hygienist.  The  fields  of  psychiatry  and  psy- 
chology are  represented  by  a  part-time  psychiatrist  and  a  full-time 
psychologist. 

The  Trustees'  Infirmary-Hospital  Committee  meets  with  the 
Medical  Director  every  three  months  to  discuss  policies  of  health 
and  administration. 


DAILY  SCHEDULE 

7:50  A.M. 
8:12  A.M.  to  12:50  P.M. 


Chapel 

Recitation  hours 
tAthletics 
'"Recitation  hours 


WORK  PROGRAM 


2:00  p.m.  to  4:00  p.m. 
4:13  p.m.  to  6:00  p.m. 


Evening  study  hours  begin  8:00  p.m. 

Sunday  chapel  service  11:00  a.m. 

t  The  time  for  athletics  varies  with  the  team,  the  sport,  and  the  season. 
*  Wednesday  and  Saturday  afternoons  are  half-holidays. 


The  Phillips  Academy  work  program,  in  which  every  boy  takes 
part,  has  two  objectives:  to  train  boys  to  do  useful  work  well  and 
to  reduce  the  operating  costs  of  the  Academy.  Under  the  super- 
vision of  members  of  the  faculty,  the  work  program  has  become 
an  essential  part  of  the  democratic  life  of  the  Academy. 

The  work  program  has  three  phases:  (a)  the  daily  care  of 
dormitory  rooms  and  corridors,  under  the  direction  of  house- 
masters, (b)  work  in  The  Commons,  to  which  all  boarding  stu- 
dents are  assigned  for  two  (non-consecutive)  weeks  during  the 
year,  and  (c)  supervised  work  on  the  grounds  or  in  the 
buildings  of  the  school  at  the  end  of  the  Fall  Term  and  at  the 
beginning  of  the  Spring  Term. 


GENERAL  INFORMATION 


33 


GRADES  AND  REPORTS 

Reports  of  the  student's  grades  are  sent  to  the  parents  or  guard- 
ian at  the  Fall  Mid-Term  rating  and  at  the  end  of  each  term. 
Grades  are  based  on  results  of  both  daily  work  and  examinations. 
They  are  recorded  on  a  scale  of  100,  in  which  60  is  the  passing 
mark  and  80  or  over  is  an  honor  grade. 

Counselor's  reports  are  sent  to  parents  at  least  twice  a  year. 

DISCIPLINE 

Phillips  Academy  seeks  to  help  boys  develop  desirable  attitudes 
and  habits  so  that  they  will  be  sound  and  healthy  individuals 
and  good  citizens  of  their  community.  The  Academy  bases  its 
disciplinary  policy  on  the  assumption  that  each  boy  will,  at 
all  times  and  places,  conduct  himself  as  a  gentleman.  The  Academy 
tries  to  inculcate  in  a  boy  personal  integrity,  responsibility  for  his 
behavior,  self-control,  and  a  sense  of  individual  purpose.  It  be- 
lieves that  discipline  should  foster  clear,  independent  thinking, 
good  judgment,  and  sound  scholastic  achievement.  In  each  boy, 
from  the  beginning  of  his  career  in  Andover,  the  Academy  aims 
to  cultivate  a  sense  of  just  pride  in  his  school  and  of  responsibility 
to  an  orderly  society.  The  school  has  made  its  rules  in  accordance 
with  these  principles. 

The  school  expects  boys  to  occupy  themselves  with  their  studies 
and  other  school  work  during  all  study  hours.  A  student  is  ex- 
pected to  meet  all  fixed  appointments,  such  as  recitations,  daily 
chapel  or  assembly,  Sunday  chapel,  required  athletics,  and  study 
hours.  All  appointments  immediately  preceding  and  following 
vacations  and  holidays  the  School  considers  especially  important. 
Six  unexcused  absences  in  a  term  render  a  boy  liable  to  discipline, 
as  does  an  accumulation  of  demerits. 

A  student  renders  himself  liable  to  dismissal  if  he  is  guilty  of 
dishonesty,  of  gambling,  of  possessing  or  drinking  alcoholic  bever- 
ages, if  without  permission  he  is  absent  from  school  bounds  or 
from  his  dormitory  between  10  p.m.  and  5  a.m.,  or  if  he  is  any- 
where or  at  any  time  guilty  of  conduct  unbecoming  a  gentleman. 

Students  may  not  possess,  rent,  or  drive  any  motor  vehicle  with- 
in bounds,  nor  may  they  possess  or  use  firearms  or  explosives  of 
any  sort,  except  as  authorized  under  the  rules  of  the  Academy 


34 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Rifle  Club.  Beginning  with  the  school  year  1965-66,  no  student 
may  smoke.  Only  day  students  may  use  bicycles. 

OUT-OF-TOWN  EXCUSES 

Students  whose  scholastic  standing  is  satisfactory  may  with  per- 
mission take  two  out-of-town  excuses  a  term.  Seniors  are  allowed 
five  if  they  are  passing  all  courses. 

ROOM  EQUIPMENT  AND  CLOTHING 

The  Academy  provides  each  student  with  bed,  mattress,  pillow, 
bed  linen,  chest  and  mirror,  desk,  desk-chair,  and  easy  chair.  In 
double  rooms  they  are  provided  for  each  occupant. 

All  boys  are  required  to  wear  coats  and  neckties  to  recitations, 
meals,  chapel,  and  assembly.  Various  sport  combinations,  includ- 
ing clean  khaki  trousers,  are  permitted;  but  a  suit  with  a  white 
shirt  and  appropriate  socks  and  shoes  is  required  for  Sunday  church 
and  other  formal  occasions.  All  wearing  apparel  and  personal 
effects  should  be  plainly  marked  with  the  student's  name. 

Protective  athletic  equipment  is  furnished  by  the  Academy.  Each 
student  is  urged  to  bring  along  whatever  other  equipment  he 
already  possesses,  but  not  to  buy  new  equipment,  since  substantial 
savings  can  be  made  on  purchases  through  the  Athletic  Depart- 
ment. All  scholarship  boys  will  be  able  to  buy  athletic  shoes  at  half 
price.  Every  student  is  required  to  own  a  pair  of  high  quarter 
sneakers. 

The  Academy  does  not  issue  a  detailed  list  of  necessary  equip- 
ment, but  in  addition  to  the  above,  the  following  are  suggested: 

Two  or  three  blankets  or  the  equivalent 
Warm  overcoat  or  jacket  for  the  winter  months 
Overshoes  and  rubbers  for  the  winter  months. 

The  Academy  is  not  responsible  for  the  loss  of  student's  cloth- 
ing or  personal  effects,  either  during  term  time  or  when  stored 
over  vacation,  unless  deposited  in  the  student  storage  center. 


GENERAL  INFORMATION 


35 


COLLEGE  MATRICULATION  OF  THE  CLASS  OF  1964 


No.  of 

No.  of 

Stud  eft  ts 

College 

Students 

Amherst 

2 

Oberlin 

3 

Beloit 

1 

Ohio  State  University 

1 

Boston  University 

1 

Pennsylvania,  U.  of 

4 

Bowdoin 

1 

Pittsburgh,  U.  of 

1 

Brown 

3 

Princeton 

20 

Carnegie 

1 

Queens  University 

1 

Colgate 

1 

Reed 

Columbia 

Southern  Methodist 

1 

Cornell 

4 

Stanford 

19 

Dartmouth 

Swarthmore 

1 

Drew 

1 

Syracuse 

3 

Duke 

Trinity 

1 

Georgetown 

1 

Tulane 

5 

Hamilton 

Union 

2 

Harvard 

47 

U.S.A.F.A. 

1 

Haverford 

V.M.I. 

1 

Johns  Hopkins 

Virginia,  U.  of 

1 

Lake  Forest 

Washington  &  Lee 

1 

Lawrence 

Washington  University 

4 

Lehigh 

Washington,  U.  of 

1 

M.LT. 

Wesleyan 

Massachusetts,  U.  of 

Western  Reserve 

2 

Menlo 

Williams 

2 

Michigan  State 

Wooster 

1 

Michigan,  U.  of 

Yale 

31 

New  Hampshire,  U.  of 

North  Carolina,  U.  of 

11 

Total 

223 

Northwestern 

Total  Institutions 

53 

FINANCIAL 

A  large  part  of  the  Academy's  operating  income  is  from  the 
investment  of  its  endowment  funds.  These  funds  have  made  it 
possible  for  many  years  to  charge  an  inclusive  fee  lower  than  the 
cost  of  a  student's  education  and  maintenance  and,  in  addition, 
to  make  scholarships  in  varying  amounts  available  to  worthy  and 
qualified  students.  Thus  it  can  be  said  that  all  students,  regardless 
of  the  fee  paid  or  the  scholarship  earned,  have  benefited  by  the 
endowment  funds. 

Few  patrons  of  the  school  in  recent  years  have  met  the  full 
cost  of  their  sons'  Andover  education.  The  total  annual  cost  to  the 
Academy  for  each  student  is  currently  in  the  neighborhood  of 
$3800.  Of  this  figure,  $1800  is  met  by  the  inclusive  fee,  leaving  a 
considerable  balance  to  be  met  by  the  income  from  invested  funds, 
by  gifts  from  alumni,  and  from  other  sources. 

Tuition  Charges 

The  tuition  for  boarding  students  is  $1800;  for  day  students 
(who  must  live  in  the  Greater  Lawrence  area)  $1000:  one  half 


36 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


payable  on  October  1  for  Fall  Term,  one  fourth  on  January  1  for 
Winter  Term,  and  one  fourth  on  April  1  for  Spring  Term.  Ad- 
justed bills  for  scholarship  students  are  payable  on  the  same, basis. 
An  alternative  to  the  above  method  of  payment  is  offered,  whereby 
tuition  may  be  paid  in  ten  equal  monthly  installments  starting 
September  1  and  ending  June  1.  A  service  charge  of  ten  dollars  is 
made  for  this  accommodation.  Each  student,  when  assured  of  ad- 
mission, is  required  to  make  a  deposit  of  $50,  which  is  credited  on 
his  first  bill. 

The  tuition  charge  of  $1800  covers  instruction,  board,  room 
(including  furniture  and  bed  linen),  physical  training  and  athletic 
privileges,  use  of  laboratory  equipment  and  material,  admission  to 
all  authorized  athletic  contests  and  the  authorized  entertainments 
at  George  Washington  Hall,  including  the  Saturday  evening  motion 
pictures. 

It  does  not  include  charges  for  tutoring,  Language  Training, 
special  instruction  in  music  or  athletics,  dental  care,  a  medical  fee 
of  $15.00,  health  insurance  of  $15.00,  personal  laundry,  textbooks, 
dues  to  school  organizations,  or  breakage  and  damage  to  school 
property. 

Bills  for  items  not  included  in  the  regular  school  charge  may  be 
rendered  at  any  time  during  a  school  year.  Any  alteration  in  the 
terms  of  payment  made  necessary  by  the  needs  of  parents  must  be 
arranged  in  advance  with  the  Comptroller.  Classroom  privileges 
may  be  denied  to  students  whose  bills  are  not  settled  when  due. 

No  rebate  for  the  term  in  which  he  leaves  will  be  made  to  a 
student  who  for  any  reason  is  dismissed  or  withdrawn. 

A  student  otherwise  eligible  for  return  in  a  given  school  year 
will  not  be  allowed  to  register  if  his  school  account  for  the  preced- 
ing year  has  not  been  paid  in  full. 

The  diploma  of  the  Academy  will  not  be  awarded  to  a  student 
whose  school  account  is  not  paid  in  full  by  the  date  of  graduation. 

Breakage  Deposit 

Each  student  is  required  to  make  a  deposit  of  $25  to  cover 
breakage  and  other  incidental  obligations  that  may  be  incurred 
during  the  school  year.  The  deposit  is  payable  on  October  1  and 
is  billed  with  the  portion  of  the  normal  charge  due  on  that  date, 
the  balance  remaining  after  charges  for  breakage  have  been  de- 


GENERAL  INFORMATION 


37 


ducted  will  be  refunded  after  the  close  of  the  fiscal  year,  June  30, 
or  credited  on  the  first  bill  for  the  following  year. 

Student  Health  and  Insurance  Program 

All  ordinary  illnesses  and  injuries  under  the  classification  of 
home  care  are  treated  at  the  Isham  Infirmary-Hospital  by  the 
Medical  Director  and  his  staff  and  are  covered  by  the  required 
medical  fee  of  $15.00. 

Parents  are,  however,  responsible  for  the  cost  of  medical  services 
for  the  care  of  illnesses  and  conditions  for  which  they  would  have 
been  responsible  had  the  student  been  treated  by  his  family  phy- 
sician in  his  oivn  home  or  hospital.  The  family  sickness  and  accident 
insurance  policy,  a  personal  policy  of  the  Blue  Cross-Blue  Shield 
type  (or  both)  covering  the  student,  will  meet  most  of  such  Isham 
Infirmary-Hospital  care. 

Additional  cost  to  parents  of  the  broad  medical  services  neces- 
sary for  the  student  is  met  by  the  Andover  Student  Sickness  and 
Accident  Insurance  Plan,  which  provides  coverage  over  the  full 
twelve-month  period,  twenty-four  hours  a  day,  on  campus  and 
off.  It  pays  up  to  $650  for  each  accident  or  illness  that  requires 
treatment  by  physicians  or  hospital  admission  outside  the  school. 
The  cost  is  $15.00  for  all  students  and  is  required,  even  though 
the  student  has  in  force  a  personal  sickness  and  accident  policy,  since 
the  benefits  of  the  Andover  Student  Sickness  and  Accident  Insur- 
ance Plan  are  payable  in  addition  to  any  benefits  a  student  may  ob- 
tain under  any  personal  policy.  Not  infrequently  the  coverage  from 
all  policies  is  necessary  to  meet  the  total  expenses  of  a  protracted  or 
involved  illness. 

The  rates  established  for  the  Student  Medical  Fee  and  the  An- 
dover Student  Sickness  and  Accident  Insurance  Plan  are  for  the 
school  year  1965-1966  and  are  subject  to  change  for  the  following 
year. 


As  a  rough  guide  to  parents  in  budgeting  for  the  total  expected 
expenses  of  each  academic  year,  the  following  low- average  ap- 
proximations of  extras  are  given. 


Extras 


Laundry  (if  done  locally) 
Pressing  and  cleaning 
Books  and  supplies 


$25.00  to  90.00 
15.00 
40.00 


3S 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Dues,  publications,  and  charitable  contributions  20.00 
Medical  fee  (required)  15.00 
Health  insurance  (required)  15.00 
Breakage  deposit  (refundable)  0  to  25.00 

Miscellaneous,  including  spending  money  110.00 

$240.00  to  330.00 

Spending  Money 

Parents  or  students  may  open  an  account  at  the  Treasurer's 
Office  for  personal  expenses  during  the  school  year.  Students  are 
urged  not  to  keep  large  amounts  of  cash  in  their  possession  or  in 
their  rooms. 

Financial  Aid  (See  page  41  for  basic  policy) 

Scholarships  vary  in  amount  according  to  the  applicant's  need, 
ranging  from  $500  to  the  full  amount  of  $1800.  In  addition  to  the 
scholarship  award,  part  of  the  cost  of  travel  (within  the  con- 
tinental limits  of  the  United  States)  is  borne  by  the  school  when 
a  scholarship  student  lives  more  than  about  400  miles  from  An- 
dover.  The  travel  allowance  amounts  to  the  cost  of  three  round- 
trip  railroad  coach  tickets,  less  $2  5  a  trip.  It  is  paid  to  the  parent 
upon  request  after  each  trip. 

Families  whose  need  is  not  great  but  who,  in  the  judgment  of 
the  Admissions  and  Scholarship  Committee,  are  entitled  to  some 
financial  assistance,  will  receive  aid  in  the  form  of  a  loan.  Such 
loans  will  not  bear  interest  while  the  boy  is  at  Andover,  but  interest 
at  the  rate  of  3  %  per  annum  will  be  charged  from  the  time  of  his 
graduation.  Under  normal  circumstances  repayment  of  the  loan 
starts  four  years  after  the  boy's  graduation  from  Andover,  at  a 
time  when,  presumably,  he  has  finished  college.  Normally,  all 
awards  of  $500  or  less  will  be  made  as  loans.  In  some  special  cases 
loans  for  larger  amounts  may  be  arranged;  in  others,  the  award 
may  occasionally  be  part  outright  grant  and  part  loan. 

The  Committee  requires  the  parents  of  all  boys  applying  for  fi- 
nancial aid  to  submit  a  complete  report  of  their  financial  condition, 
which  is  kept  confidential.  All  boys  on  the  Scholarship  List  are 
expected  to  maintain  academic  records  compatible  with  their  abili- 
ty and  to  show  by  their  general  record  at  Andover  that  they  are 
aware  of,  and  deserve,  the  opportunities  that  they  enjoy. 


GENERAL  INFORMATION 


39 


Every  scholarship  boy  is  expected  to  perform  some  useful  ser- 
vice for  the  school  in  partial  return  for  the  aid  he  has  received. 
Accordingly,  the  Bureau  of  Self-Help  exercises  control  over  all 
student  employment,  such  as  campus  concessions  and  work  in  the 
various  departments  of  the  school.  The  revenue  anticipated  from 
such  work  is  included  in  the  overall  scholarship  budget.  Although 
the  boy  can,  in  addition,  find  odd  jobs  about  the  school  that  will 
help  him  with  his  pocket  money,  he  should  not  expect  to  earn  any 
significant  sum. 

A  wide  range  of  prizes  is  open  for  competition.  A  complete 
description  of  each  prize,  together  with  the  names  of  last  year's 
winners,  appears  on  pages  76-84. 

THE  ANDOVER  SUMMER  SESSION 
Dating  from  1942,  the  Andover  Summer  Session  (six  weeks), 
now  co-educational,  is  an  integral  part  of  Phillips  Academy.  In 
1965  its  enrollment  was  440  boys  and  girls;  the  faculty  numbered 
98.  The  ideal  of  the  Summer  Session  is  to  be  a  national  public 
summer  school.  Ranging  in  age  from  thirteen  to  eighteen  and  com- 
ing from  most  of  the  fifty  states  and  from  many  foreign  countries, 
the  students  have  widely  diverse  geographical,  economic,  and  social 
background.  A  few  of  them,  already  admitted  to  the  regular  ses- 
sion, are  strengthening  their  preparation.  The  great  majority,  some 
already  admitted  to  college,  come  to  the  Andover  Summer  Session 
from  public  high  schools  to  combine  the  experience  of  boarding- 
school  life  with  the  opportunity  for  serious  study  in  a  field  of 
special  interest.  Scholarship  and  travel  grants  are  made  on  the 
basis  of  need. 

The  purpose  of  the  Andover  Summer  Session  is  to  provide  an 
opportunity  for  serious  study  to  able  and  qualified  students.  Some 
courses,  such  as  beginning  language  courses,  concentrate  on  the 
acquisition  of  basic  skills  in  a  conventional  manner.  Many  courses, 
wholly  unlike  those  offered  in  the  regular  secondary-school  curri- 
culum, offer  an  academic  experience  in  depth  that  cannot  be  ob- 
tained otherwise.  A  special  feature  of  the  Summer  Session  is  that  no 
academic  credit  is  offered  for  any  course,  and  little  emphasis  is 
placed  on  grades.  A  student  normally  takes  18  course  hours  a  week; 
a  major  course  meeting  twelve  hours  a  week,  and  a  minor  course  in 
English  composition  meeting  six  hours  a  week.  In  addition,  a  parti- 


40 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


cularly  able  student  may  elect  an  optional  six-hour  minor  course. 

The  twenty-fifth  annual  Andover  Summer  Session  will  open 
on  Wednesday,  June  29,  1966,  and  will  close  on  Thursday,  August 
1 1 .  The  Summer  Session  publishes  its  own  catalogue,  which  may  be 
obtained  by  writing  to  the  Director  of  the  Summer  Session, 
Phillips  Academy,  Andover,  Massachusetts. 

SCHOOLBOYS  ABROAD 

Schoolboys  Abroad,  a  program  conducted  during  the  school 
year  in  Barcelona,  Spain,  forms  an  integral  part  of  the  curriculum 
of  Phillips  Academy,  Andover,  and  of  the  Phillips  Exeter  Academy, 
Exeter,  N.  H.,  and  as  such  is  a  joint  educational  venture  of  the  two 
academies.  Its  purpose  is  to  provide  for  qualified  secondary  school 
Upper  Middlers  (11th  graders)  a  year  of  intensive  study  of  the 
Spanish  language  and  culture,  while  at  the  same  time  they  carry  a 
full  academic  program.  The  program  is  open  to  boys  from  any 
accredited  secondary  school.  If  the  student  satisfactorily  completes 
the  course,  it  is  expected  that  he  will  return  to  complete  his  Senior 
year  at  the  school  he  was  previously  attending. 

Candidates  must  have  completed  a  minimum  of  two  years  of 
study  of  secondary  school  Spanish.  The  curriculum  of  the  program 
parallels  that  normally  available  in  college  preparatory  schools  in 
the  United  States  (with  the  omission  of  laboratory  science).  The 
courses  in  European  History,  Spanish  language,  and  Modern  Span- 
ish Literature  are  taught  entirely  in  Spanish  by  three  outstanding 
native  teachers.  The  remaining  courses  are  taught  in  English  by 
two  experienced  members  of  the  faculty  of  Phillips  Academy, 
Andover,  and/or  of  The  Phillips  Exeter  Academy.  One  of  the 
chief  objectives  of  the  Spanish  courses  in  particular,  and  of  the 
program  as  a  whole,  is  thorough  preparation  for  honors  work  in  the 
Senior  year.  Such  preparation  is  ideally  suited  for  those  boys  whose 
interest  in  Spanish  is  such  that  they  may  seek  Advanced  Placement 
in  that  subject. 

Courses  are  conducted  in  facilities  of  the  Instituto  de  Estudios 
Norteamericanos,  Via  Augusta,  123,  Barcelona,  Spain.  The  boys 
live  individually  in  Spanish  homes  throughout  the  city. 

Schoolboys  Abroad  publishes  its  own  catalogue,  which  can  be 
obtained  by  writing  the  Executive  Officer,  Schoolboys  Abroad,  16 
School  Street,  Andover,  Mass. 


ADMISSIONS 


GENERAL  POLICY 

T)hillips  Academy  assumes  that  no  boy  will  be  deterred  from 
applying  for  admission  because  his  family  is  unable  to  pay  the 
full  cost  of  an  Andover  education.  The  Constitution  of  the  Acad- 
emy states,  "This  Seminary  shall  be  ever  equally  open  to  youth 
of  requisite  qualifications  from  every  quarter."  With  this  prin- 
ciple in  mind,  the  Admissions  and  Scholarship  Committee  selects 
each  year  from  approximately  seventeen  hundred  candidates  the 
two  hundred  and  seventy  most  promising  and  deserving  boys,  even 
though  many  of  them  are  unable  to  pay  the  full  $1800  all-inclusive 
fee.  The  academy  calls  this  its  "M.  Q."  or  "Most  Qualified"  pro- 
gram. Thanks  to  the  generosity  of  a  large  number  of  alumni  and 
other  friends,  over  $300,000  is  available  in  1966  to  provide  finan- 
cial assistance  for  those  who  are  judged  eligible  strictly  on  the  basis 
of  need. 

The  basic  requirements  for  admission  to  Phillips  Academy  are 
evidence  of  sound  character  and  a  strong  school  record.  Other 
considerations  are  personality,  breadth  of  interest,  geographical 
distribution,  date  of  application,  and  performance  on  the  Second- 
ary School  Admission  Tests  (see  page  43).  Of  considerable  im- 
portance also  is  the  candidate's  relative  physical,  social,  and  emo- 
tional maturity.  Because  the  Academy  receives  applications  from 
many  more  qualified  boys  than  it  can  admit,  it  must  make  selections 
on  a  competitive  basis,  with  emphasis  on  character,  personal  quali- 
fications, and  promise. 

The  closing  date  for  receiving  applications  (except  for  post- 
graduate candidates)  varies  from  year  to  year.  In  1965  it  was 
January  20.  Strong  priority  is  given  to  those  candidates  who  com- 
plete the  full  admissions  procedure  by  January  15.  It  is  particularly 
important  to  take  the  December  11,  1965  administration  of  the 
Secondary  School  Admission  Tests. 

Boys  are  admitted  annually  to  each  of  the  four  classes.  The  best 
class  for  a  boy  to  enter  depends  on  his  own  maturity  and  needs. 
Experience  indicates  that  success  depends  not  on  the  class  entered 
but  on  a  boy's  readiness  and  commitment. 


41 


42  PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 

A  limited  number  of  postgraduates  are  admitted  each  year. 
They  are  treated  in  all  ways  as  full-fledged  members  of  the  Senior 
Class. 

Financial  Aid 

•  he  basic  policy  is  described  above.  See  page  38  for  details. 

PROCEDURE  IN  APPLYING 

For  priority  consideration,  applicants  must  by  January  15 
of  the  year  of  proposed  admission: 

1.  Have  a  personal  interview. 

2.  Complete  all  forms  described  below. 

3.  Take  the  Secondary  School  Admission  Tests  (College 

Board  Scholastic  Aptitude  Test  or  Preliminary  Scho- 
lastic Aptitude  Test  for  Senior  Class  candidates). 


Application  Forms 

In  applying  for  admission  to  the  Academy  the  parent  or  guard- 
ian should  submit  the  Preliminary  Application  Form  and  Geograph- 
ical Card  at  the  back  of  this  catalogue. 

A  fee  of  $10.00  is  required  of  all  candidates.  A  check  or  money 
order,  payable  to  the  Trustees  of  Phillips  Academy,  should  accom- 
pany the  application.  The  fee  is  not  returnable. 

On  December  1st  before  the  September  of  proposed  admission, 
a  final  application  form  is  sent  to  each  parent  or  guardian  who 
has  filed  a  preliminary  application  and  who  has  indicated  con- 
tinued interest  in  response  to  a  form  letter  mailed  on  October  1. 
After  completion  of  the  first  part  by  the  parent  or  guardian,  the 
application  should  be  submitted  to  the  principal  of  the  school  being 
attended  by  the  applicant,  with  the  request  that  it  be  completed 
entirely  and  returned  directly  to  the  Phillips  Academy  Admissions 
Office  as  soon  as  possible.  Since  applications  received  after  January 
1 5  do  not  receive  the  highest  priority,  parents  must  be  sure  that  the 
school  does  forward  the  application  promptly. 

Personal  Interview 

An  interview  is  required  of  all  students.  The  interview  should 
take  place  by  December  1 5  of  the  year  prior  to  intended  matricula- 
tion. If  a  candidate  cannot  arrange  to  visit  the  Academy,  he  or  his 


ADMISSIONS 


4  3 


family  should  make  an  appointment  with  the  most  conveniently 
located  Alumni  Representative,  as  listed  starting  on  page  92  of  this 
catalogue.  In  either  case,  appointments  should  be  made  in  advance, 
preferably  by  telephone  when  distance  is  not  great.  Attention  is 
called  to  the  Academy  office  hours  listed  on  page  17.  Calls  made  to 
the  Admissions  Office  should  be  directed  to  the  Secretary  to  the 
Director  of  Admissions  at  617-475-3400.  In  order  to  provide  am- 
ple time  for  the  decision-making  process,  it  may  not  be  possible  to 
grant  interview  appointments  at  the  Academy  between  January  1 5 
and  March  1 5 .  Appointments  with  an  alumnus  should  be  made 
directly  with  the  man  himself,  not  through  the  Academy  office. 

In  the  event  a  candidate  is  unable  to  fulfill  the  interview  require- 
ment either  in  Andover  or  with  an  Alumni  Representative,  he 
should  write  the  Admissions  Office  for  instructions. 

Letters  of  Recommendation 

Along  with  the  final  application  blank,  three  Confidential 
Recommendation  Forms  will  be  sent  to  the  parent  or  guardian. 
The  blue  form  should  be  given  to  the  boy's  current  English  teacher, 
the  yellow  to  his  current  mathematics  or  science  teacher,  and  the 
white  to  his  last  year's  English  or  social  studies  teacher.  When  com- 
pleted, the  confidential  recommendations  should  be  returned  by 
the  writers  directly  to  the  Admissions  Office  in  stamped,  addressed 
envelopes  supplied  by  the  candidate. 

Additional  reference  letters  from  any  source  are  welcome,  but 
not  required. 

Student  Questionnaire 

Each  applicant  is  asked  to  complete  a  detailed  questionnaire  sup- 
plied with  the  final  application  form,  He  will  be  given  the  oppor- 
tunity to  enumerate  the  group  (and  individual)  activities  in  which 
he  has  taken  part.  Among  other  things,  he  may  be  asked  to  write  a 
paragraph  or  two  on  some  assigned  topic.  He  should  not  receive  any 
help  in  meeting  this  requirement.  The  questionnaire  should  be  sent 
promptly  to  the  Admissions  Office,  but  separately  from  the  final 
application  form. 

Admission  Tests 

The  Secondary  School  Admission  Tests  are  required  by  all  but 
candidates  for  the  Senior  Class.  It  is  particularly  important  to  take 


44 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


the  December  11  administration  of  the  tests  even  though  the 
candidate  has  taken  them  previously.  They  will  be  given  on  that 
day  by  Educational  Testing  Service  at  centers  throughout  the 
United  States  and  many  foreign  countries.  The  tests  will  be  given 
also  on  February  5  and  April  2,  1966,  but  the  Academy  can  hold 
out  little  hope  of  providing  room  for  boys  who  take  them  in 
February,  and  no  hope  at  all  for  those  who  wait  until  April.  The 
February  and  April  dates  can  be  used  to  provide  a  "trial  run"  for 
1967  candidates. 

Each  applicant  must  complete  a  special  form  (supplied  with 
the  "Bulletin  of  Information  for  Candidates")  and  be  sure  that 
it  reaches  the  Educational  Testing  Service  by  the  deadline  dates 
listed  in  the  Bulletin.  The  cost  is  $7.00  ($10.00  for  candidates  at 
foreign  centers),  payable  to  the  Educational  Testing  Service.  A 
"Bulletin  of  Information  for  Candidates"  will  be  sent  to  all  1966 
candidates  who  have  filed  the  Preliminary  Application  Form. 
Other  applicants  may  obtain  them  by  writing  to  Secondary  School 
Admission  Tests,  Educational  Testing  Service,  Princeton,  New 
Jersey. 

Special  preparation  or  tutoring  for  the  admission  tests  is  neither 
necessary  nor  advisable,  but  a  regular  program  of  general  reading, 
perhaps  a  book  a  week  beyond  school  requirements,  betters  per- 
formance on  the  verbal  sections.  Though  sample  tests  are  not 
available,  the  "Bulletin  of  Information  for  Candidates"  contains 
a  few  typical  questions, 
questions. 

Candidates  for  the  Senior  Class  must  take  the  College  Board 
Scholastic  Aptitude  Test,  preferably  the  current  December  or 
January  series  (or  the  Preliminary  Scholastic  Aptitude  Test  if  an 
eleventh  grader) ,  and  request  the  College  Board  in  writing  after  the 
test  date  to  send  Phillips  Academy  the  results  of  all  Board  tests 
taken.  A  check  or  money  order  for  $1.00  should  accompany  the 
request. 

Action  and  Deposit 

By  agreement  with  a  number  of  schools,  candidates  will  not  re- 
ceive official  notice  of  admission  earlier  than  February  15,  and 
parents  will  not  be  required  to  confirm  the  admission,  by  deposit 
or  otherwise,  before  March  15.  However,  as  soon  as  a  boy  hears 


ADMISSIONS 


45 


favorably  from  his  first-choice  school  he  is  strongly  requested  to 
notify  immediately  that  school  and  all  others  to  which  he  has  ap- 
plied. This  action  will  enable  schools  to  release  more  letters  of  ad- 
mission to  waiting  candidates. 

Phillips  Academy  candidates  for  1966  may  expect  notification 
of  action  as  soon  as  possible  after  February  15,  and  certainly  by 
March  15,  on  all  fully  completed  applications.  Successful  candidates 
who  decide  to  accept  their  admission  are  required  to  pay  a  non- 
returnable  deposit  of  $50.00  (to  be  credited  on  the  first  school 
bill). 

It  should  be  understood  that  admission  is  contingent  upon 
maintenance  of  a  thoroughly  satisfactory  school  record  in  every 
respect. 

Placement  Examinations 

Applicants  who  have  been  admitted  to  the  Academy,  and  who 
have  thereafter  paid  the  required  deposit,  will  normally  be  expected 
to  write  subject-matter  placement  examinations  on  or  about  Friday, 
May  13.  The  Admissions  Office  may  exempt  boys  with  outstanding 
records  and  Secondary  School  Admission  Test  results  from  all  or 
part  of  this  requirement.  Those  who  do  not  live  within  commuting 
distance  of  Andover  may  write  the  examinations  at  their  local 
schools. 

Preparation  for  the  Placement  Examinations 

While  no  special  preparation  for  the  admission  tests  is  expected, 
outside  study  or  tutorial  assistance  in  anticipation  of  the  placement 
examinations  will  usually  be  helpful.  Sample  placement  exami- 
nations are  supplied  without  charge  by  the  Admissions  Office  upon 
receipt  of  the  $50.00  deposit  confirming  acceptance  of  admis- 
sion. Each  sample  examination  lists  the  topics  to  be  covered  in 
preparation  for  the  examination. 

As  a  further  aid  to  candidates  for  placement  in  the  two  lower 
classes,  and  to  those  upper  class  candidates  who  are  currently 
studying  the  first  year  of  Latin,  French,  Spanish,  or  Russian,  the 
National  Association  of  Independent  Schools,  4  Liberty  Square, 
Boston  9,  Massachusetts,  publishes  each  year,  for  $2.00  postpaid,  a 
pamphlet  entitled  "Definition  of  the  Requirements  for  19 — The 
pamphlet  contains  detailed  subject-matter  requirements  in  English, 


46 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Mathematics,  Latin,  French,  Spanish,  and  Russian  for  use  in  grades 
six  through  nine.  The  standards  parallel  closely  those  of  Andover. 
The  previous  year's  examinations  in  each  subject  at  each  level  are 
included. 

The  proper  use  of  the  National  Association  of  Independent 
Schools  pamphlet  should  enable  parents  to  determine  well  in  ad- 
vance whether  their  boys  are  receiving  adequate  preparation  for  the 
Academy.  Please  note  that  Phillips  Academy  encourages  but  does 
not  require  the  study  of  a  foreign  language  in  grades  six  through 
eight. 

Room  Assignment  and  Matriculation  Notices 

Rooms  are  assigned  to  incoming  students  in  early  August,  in  the 
order  in  which  their  admission  applications  are  filed.  A  notice 
regarding  the  opening  appointments  of  the  school  year,  together 
with  various  required  forms,  is  sent  in  August  to  the  parents  or 
guardians  of  all  successful  applicants. 

Parents  are  referred  to  the  section  on  Health  Supervision  (pages 
31-32  for  the  Academy's  regulations  regarding  immunization 
against  certain  infectious  diseases. 

PLACEMENT  REQUIREMENTS  FOR  EACH  CLASS 

The  examinations  ordinarily  required  for  entrance  to  the  four 
classes  are  specified  below.  Each  candidate  should  take  the  exami- 
nations for  which  his  previous  work  fits  him,  irrespective  of  the 
class  groups  in  which  the  subjects  are  listed. 

Junior  Class 

Boys  of  good  scholastic  ability  and  achievement  should  be  able 
to  enter  the  Academy  when  they  have  completed  the  work  of  the 
eighth  grade  and  have  reached  the  age  of  thirteen  or  fourteen. 
Attainment  in  their  studies  will  be  estimated  from  placement  ex- 
aminations in  English  and  mathematics.  Normally,  the  mathe- 
matics examination  will  cover  arithmetic  and  some  elementary 
algebra,  but  a  boy  whose  eighth-grade  course  is  a  standard  first- 
year,  high-school  algebra  course  should  write  instead  the  paper  for 
entrance  to  Mathematics  2. 

Some  acquaintance  with  a  foreign  language  is  helpful,  although 
not  essential.  Boys  who  are  currently  studying  one  should  write 
the  appropriate  placement  examination. 


ADMISSIONS 


47 


Lower  Middle  Class 

For  entrance  to  the  regular  work  of  the  Lower  Middle  year, 
placement  examinations  are  required  in  algebra,  in  English, 
and  in  foreign  languages  currently  being  studied.  The  work 
is  described  on  pages  5  2-75.  In  most  instances  the  courses  offered 
at  Phillips  Academy  in  the  Junior  year  (ninth  grade)  cover 
considerably  more  ground  than  those  given  elsewhere  at  the 
same  level.  For  this  reason  applicants  are  advised  to  note  care- 
fully the  description  of  the  Academy's  Junior  courses,  and  the 
sample  examinations  for  entrance  to  English  2,  Mathematics  2, 
and  the  second  year  of  the  appropriate  foreign  language,  which 
will  be  sent  upon  request  without  charge.  Extra  preparation 
may  be  advisable.  Credit  for  the  History  and  Science  of  the 
Junior  year  may  be  granted  on  the  school  record  without  exami- 
nation. 

Upper  Middle  and  Senior  Classes 

Successful  candidates  for  the  Upper  Middle  and  Senior  Classes 
will  write  the  Academy's  placement  examination  for  entrance 
to  English  3  or  English  4.  Placement  examinations  for  entrance 
to  the  second-  and  third-year  levels  of  a  foreign  language  will 
be  required  of  candidates  planning  to  continue  the  language  at 
the  Academy.  Examinations  in  other  subjects  may  be  required, 
depending  on  the  courses  taken  and  the  quality  of  the  appli- 
cant's record.  Candidates  must  secure  credits,  by  examination 
or  certification,  that  cover  the  work  of  the  Academy's  lower  years, 
Candidates  who  have  taken  College  Boards  should  request  the 
Board  in  writing  after  the  test  date  to  send  the  results  to  the  Phil- 
lips Academy  Admissions  Office.  A  check  or  money  order  for  $1.00 
should  accompany  the  request. 

Postgraduate  Students 

A  limited  number  of  well  qualified  secondary-school  gradu- 
ates are  admitted  each  year.  They  must  take  the  College  Board 
Scholastic  Aptitude  Test,  preferably  the  current  December  or 
January  series,  or  the  Preliminary  Scholastic  Aptitude  Test,  and 
request  the  College  Board  in  writing  after  the  test  date  to  send 
Phillips  Academy  the  results  of  all  Board  tests  taken.  A  check  or 
money  order  for  $1.00  should  accompany  the  request. 


COURSE  OF  STUDY 


he  curriculum  of  Phillips  Academy  combines  a  required  core 
of  studies  believed  to  be  fundamental  to  a  liberal  education  and 
elective  courses  designed  to  fit  the  special  needs  and  interests  of 
the  individual  student.  The  total  program  normally  includes  four 
years  of  English,  three  years  of  mathematics,  three  years  of  one 
foreign  language,  a  year  of  American  history,  a  year  of  a  labora- 
tory science,  one  course  in  art  or  music,  one  course  in  the  Bible, 
and  four  or  five  additional  courses.  Instruction  is  given  in  all 
subjects  required  for  entrance  to  higher  institutions,  whether 
liberal  arts  or  technical. 

Classroom  groups  are  small  enough  to  permit  individual  atten- 
tion, and  students  are  placed  in  sections  fitted  to  their  attainment. 
Honors  and  advanced  courses  offer  particularly  able  and  well- 
prepared  students  opportunity  to  progress  at  a  rate  commensurate 
with  their  ability  and  ambition.  Most  departments  offer  courses 
beyond  the  level  of  preparation  for  college. 

For  full  membership  in  a  given  class,  students  should  have 
credit  for  the  work  of  the  lower  classes  or  its  equivalent.  Boys  are 
rated  as  members  of  a  given  class,  however,  if  their  deficiencies 
for  full  membership  in  it  do  not  exceed  one  major  course. 

Every  boy  is  assigned  to  a  Class  Officer,  who  advises  in  the 
selection  of  courses  designed  to  meet  Andover's  diploma  require- 
ments, college  entrance  requirements,  and  the  student's  particular 
interests.  The  Class  Officer  also  recommends  such  subsequent 
changes  as  are  necessary  or  advantageous.  It  is  highly  desirable 
that,  before  conference  with  the  Class  Officer,  students  and  parents 
acquaint  themselves  as  fully  as  possible  with  the  Academy's  basic 
requirements  and  with  the  possibilities  of  its  flexible  program. 
Also,  all  applicants,  and  especially  those  for  the  Upper  Middle  and 
Senior  classes,  should  familiarize  themselves  at  the  earliest  possible 
date  with  the  entrance  requirements  of  the  colleges  which  they 
may  wish  to  enter. 

Two  additional  descriptions  of  the  Andover  curriculum,  namely, 
"Planning  a  Program  of  Studies  at  Andover"  and  "The  Andover 
Honors  Program,"  are  available  upon  request. 

See  pages  52-75  for  descriptions  of  all  courses. 


48 


COURSE  OF  STUDY 


49 


DIPLOMA  REQUIREMENTS 
The  diploma  requirements  for  students  entering  Phillips  Acade- 
my for  the  full  four  years  are  indicated  below.  Certain  modifica- 
tions are  permitted  for  boys  entering  after  the  Junior  year  (9th 
grade).  The  Admissions  Office  will  welcome  inquiries  concerning 
specific  requirements  for  such  boys. 

4  units  of  English 

3  units  of  mathematics 

3  units  of  one  foreign  language,  either  ancient  or  modern 
1  unit  of  history,  normally  American 
1  unit  of  laboratory  science 

*  l/2  unit  of  ancient  history  in  the  Junior  year 

*  l/2  unit  of  elementary'  science  in  the  Junior  year 
3  units  of  elective  courses 

Bible  in  the  Lower  Middle  year 

Art  or  Music  in  the  Upper  Middle  year 

An  elective  minor  in  the  Senior  year 

In  addition,  candidates  must  pass  all  courses  in  their  Senior 
year  even  though  they  may  be  ahead  in  units. 

THE  NORMAL  FOUR-YEAR  PROGRAM 


Junior  Year  (9th  grade)  Periods  a  u-eek 

English  1  5 

Mathematics  1  5 

Foreign  Language  1  5 

History  1  3 

(or  a  second  foreign  language  replacing  History  and  Elementary  Science) 

Elementary  Science  3 

Total  «  21 

Lower  Middle  Year  (10th  grade) 

English  2  4 

Mathematics  2  4 

Foreign  Language  2  5 

"Elective  (major)  4  or  5 

Bible  1  2 


Total  19-20 


*  Qualified  boys  may  take  a  second  foreign  language  in  place  of  these  two  minor 
courses. 

*  One  elective  major  in  three  upper  years  must  be  a  laboratory  science.  If  a  second 
foreign  language  was  begun  in  the  Junior  Year,  the  elective  in  the  Lower  Middle  Year 
must  be  the  second  year  of  that  language. 


50 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Upper  Middle  Year  (11th  grade) 

English  3 
Mathematics  3 
Foreign  Language  3 

*  Elective  (major) 
Art  or  Music 

Total 

Senior  Year  (12th  grade) 
English  4 

History  4  (American) 

*  Elective  (major) 

*  Elective  (major) 
Elective  (minor) 

Total 


Periods  a  xveek 

4 
5 
4 

4  or  5 
2 


19-20 


4 

5 

4  or  5 
4  or  5 
2 

19-21 


Elective  Majors 

English  5 
Greek  1,  2,  3,  4 
Latin  1,  2,  3,  4,  5 
French  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  6 
German  1,  2,  3,  4,  5 
Spanish  1,  2,  3,  4,  5 
Russian  1,  2,  3,  4 
Chinese  1,  2 
Japanese  2 
Biology 

No  credit  is  given  for  less  than 
language. 

Special  Courses 


4,  4c,  5,  6 


fChemistry 
fPhysics 
fMathematics 
yArt  Major 
fMusic  Major 
"{"Religion 
^History  2 
f  History  3 


a  two-year  sequence  in  any 


foreign 


Special  courses  designed  to  cover  the  work  of  two  years  in  one 
are  open  to  properly  qualified  Juniors  in  mathematics,  French,  and 
Latin;  and  to  Seniors  in  German,  French,  Greek,  Russian,  and 
Spanish. 

*  One  elective  major  in  three  upper  years  must  be  a  laboratory  science.  If  a  second 
foreign  language  was  begun  in  the  Junior  Year,  the  elective  in  the  Lower  Middle  Year 
must  be  the  second  year  of  that  language. 

t  Normally  for  Upper  Middlers  and  Seniors  only. 

$  Not  permitted  after  the  Lower  Middle  year. 


COURSE  OF  STUDY 


51 


Honors  Courses  and  Advanced  Placement 

The  Andover  curriculum  offers  honors  courses  in  most  depart- 
ments. It  also  provides  special  programs  in  mathematics,  Latin,  and 
the  modern  foreign  languages,  designed  to  cover  four  years'  work 
in  three  or  five  years'  work  in  four;  and  a  two-year  honors  se- 
quence in  the  physical  sciences.  The  honors  programs  are  open,  on 
invitation  of  the  departments,  to  especially  able  and  ambitious 
students. 

A  large  number  of  Andover  students  take  College  Board  Ad- 
vanced Placement  Tests  in  May  to  establish  advanced  placement 
in  college  courses  or  credit  towards  the  college  degree. 

Independent  Projects  for  Seniors 

With  the  approval  of  a  faculty  committee,  a  Senior  may  under- 
take a  special  project  of  independent  work  under  the  supervision 
of  a  member  of  the  faculty  in  one  of  three  ways:  (1)  for  the 
Winter  or  Spring  Term,  in  place  of  required  athletics,  (2)  for  the 
Spring  Term,  in  place  of  the  Senior  elective  minor,  or  (3)  for  the 
whole  year,  in  place  of  the  Senior  elective  minor. 

Elective  Minors  (Mainly  for  Seniors) 

English  5:  Composition 
English  5:  Literature 
Public  Speaking 
Studio  Art 

Advanced  Studio  Art 
Chorus 

Concert  Band 
Instrumental  Lessons 
Harmony 

Introduction  to  Music 
Orchestra 

Politics  of  International  Relations 
Introduction  to  Asia 

Ethics 
Philosophy 


Mathematics  L 
Mathematics  S 
Mechanical  Drawing 
Navigation 

Biology  S 
Chemistry  S 
Anthropology 
Physics  S 

Latin  S 
Latin  H 
Greek 

French  3m,  4m,  5m 
German  S 
Spanish  S 


DESCRIPTION    OF  COURSES 


ART 

The  courses  in  Art  are  organized  to  develop  the  visual  perceptions  of 
all  students.  The  basic  course,  Studio  Art,  is  normally  taken  by  a  boy  in 
his  Upper  Middle  year.  He  will  have  the  opportunity  in  his  Senior  year  to 
pursue  his  interests  in  an  elective  course.  Occasional  reading  assignments, 
illustrated  lectures,  and  original  works  of  art  displayed  in  the  Addison 
Gallery  complement  the  experience  of  class  and  studio. 

Studio  Art.  Two  hours.  In  its  emphasis  on  observation,  interpretation, 
and  organization,  the  course  is  designed  to  supply  the  basis  for  a  critical 
understanding  of  contemporary  surroundings.  Four  hours  of  class  work 
count  for  two  hours  credit,  with  no  outside  preparation  required.  Along 
with  continuous  drawing  exercises  and  a  brief  historical  survey,  the  stu- 
dent receives  in  successive  terms  two  hours  a  week  of  experience  in  pho- 
tography and  three-dimensional  construction.  Previous  experience  in  art 
is  not  required. 

Art  Major.  Four  hours.  The  course  includes  the  Advanced  Studio 
course  and,  in  addition,  two  hours  of  lecture  and  discussion  in  the  history 
of  American  Art.  It  allows  a  student  to  combine  an  interest  in  the 
practice  of  art  with  an  interest  in  thinking  and  talking  about  American 
culture  as  a  supplement  to  the  regular  course  in  American  History. 

Advanced  Studio.  Two  hours.  Meeting  four  hours  a  week  in  the 
studio,  the  course  gives  the  student  a  chance  to  pursue  interests  he  may 
have  developed  in  Studio  Art  or  elsewhere.  Such  interests  may  fall  into 
the  categories  (more  fully  described  below)  of  painting  or  drawing,  sculp- 
ture, photography,  architecture,  or  furniture  design  and  construction. 
The  student  has  the  option  of  studying  each  art  form  for  a  minimum  of 
one  term,  although  most  students  prefer  to  stay  with  one  discipline  for 
the  entire  year.  Studio  Art  is  a  prerequisite. 

Painttng.  The  student  may  develop  expression  in  any  medium  of  two 
dimensional  design,  such  as  oils,  watercolor,  collage  drawing.  In  addition, 
he  is  required  to  perform  occasional  exercises  in  an  assigned  medium  (e.g., 
tempera  and  gold-leaf).  He  receives  constructive  criticism  from  a  prac- 
ticing painter. 

Architecture.  A  brief  introduction  to  perspective  sketching  and 
drafting  techniques  leads  to  an  attack  through  assigned  problems  on  some 
of  the  elements  of  architectural  design:  functional  planning,  structural 
articulation,  and  the  overriding  problem  of  relating  function  and  form 
to  human  sensibilities.  A  chance  for  the  student  to  combine  practical 
interests  with  an  aesthetic  and  technical  discipline. 


52 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES 


53 


Furniture  Design.  Combines  all  the  disciplines  related  to  architec- 
ture and  applies  them  to  objects  we  use  rather  than  spaces  we  use,  with 
the  added  experience  of  techniques  of  furniture  construction  in  the  shop 
with  a  design  point  of  view  related  to  sculpture. 

Sculpture.  Offers  an  opportunity  to  work  in  materials  available  to 
the  sculptor  today,  such  as  wood,  stone,  metal,  plastics,  plaster.  It  is, 
therefore,  possible  for  the  student  to  develop  into  sculpture  concepts 
already  begun  in  Studio  Art,  as  well  as  ideas  drawn  from  his  own  ex- 
perience. Individual  criticism  is  stressed.  A  collaborative  project  with  the 
architectural  students  is  usually  arranged  in  the  Winter  Term. 

Photography  uses  techniques  learned  in  Studio  Art  to  continue  work 
on  individual  projects,  such  as  the  photographic  essay,  development  of 
one  subject  idea,  study  of  lighting,  presentation,  or  still-life  material. 

THE  CLASSICS 

The  courses  in  Greek  and  Latin  are  arranged  to  provide  a  four-year 
course  in  Greek  and  a  five-year  course  in  Latin.  The  Department  hopes 
that  a  number  of  boys  with  Classical  interests  will  elect  four  years  of  one 
language  and  three  of  the  other.  However,  the  pressure  of  modern  times 
must  make  it  advisable  for  most  boys  to  take  one  ancient  and  one  modern 
language.  Such  boys  may  elect  either  Greek  or  Latin  in  their  first  year. 
Those  planning  on  a  general  education,  on  the  advanced  study  of  Romance 
languages,  or  on  entering  the  Law,  will  naturally  prefer  Latin;  but  boys 
interested  in  literature,  archaeology,  philosophy,  or  medicine  might  well 
choose  Greek  as  their  ancient  language.  It  is  no  more  difficult  than  Latin 
as  a  first  language. 

Greek 

Greek  1.  Five  hours.  The  course  is  devoted  mainly  to  forms  and  the 
most  essential  principles  of  syntax.  Chase  and  Phillips'  A  New  Introduc- 
tion to  Greek  (Harvard  University  Press)  is  used.  To  aid  the  memorizing 
of  inflections  and  vocabularies  there  are  daily  exercises,  both  oral  and 
written,  enforced  by  incessant  drill.  During  the  second  and  third  terms, 
work  in  the  grammar  is  supplemented  by  lessons  either  from  a  very  simple 
Greek  reader,  or  from  the  initial  chapters  of  Xenophon's  Anabasis. 

Greek  1-2.  Five  hours.  The  course  is  open  to  properly  qualified 
Seniors  and  Upper  Middlers.  It  covers  in  one  year  the  essential  material 
of  Greek  1  and  Greek  2.  The  texts  are  Chase  and  Phillips'  A  New  Intro- 
duction to  Greek;  Xenophon's  Anabasis,  ed.  Mather  and  Hewitt  (Uni- 
versity of  Oklahoma  Press) ;  and  Xenophon's  Hellenic  a,  Books  I  and  II, 
ed.  Edwards  (Cambridge  University  Press). 

Greek  2.  Five  hours.  The  second  year  is  occupied  with  selections  from 
Xenophon's  works  and  with  some  easy  dialogue  of  Plato.  Prose  composi- 
tion in  Attic  Greek  is  studied,  the  grammar  is  reviewed,  and  there  is  much 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


work  in  sight  translation.  The  texts  are  Xenophon's  Anabasis  (ed.  Mather 
and  Hewitt)  and  Plato's  Apology  and  Crito,  ed.  Dyer  and  Seymour,  (Ginn 
&  Co.). 

Greek  3.  Four  hours.  The  third  year  is  spent  mainly  in  reading  select- 
ed books  of  the  Iliad  and  the  Odyssey.  After  the  dialect  is  mastered,  more 
attention  is  given  to  the  literary  side  of  the  poems  and  to  the  translation 
of  Homer  at  sight.  When  the  ability  of  the  class  warrants,  the  Alcesth 
of  Euripides  is  read.  The  texts  are  Benner's  Selections  from  Homer  s 
"Iliad"  (Appleton)  and  Hadley's  Euripides'  "Alcestis"  (Cambridge  Uni- 
versity Press) . 

Green  4.  Four  hours.  The  fall  term  is  devoted  to  selections  from 
Herodotus,  Hippocrates,  and  Plato;  the  winter  to  a  play  of  Sophocles;  the 
spring  to  selections  from  the  Greek  lyric  poets. 

Greek  T.  Two  hours.  A  Senior  elective  that  studies  the  Greek  Old 
and  New  Testaments. 

Greek  Composition.  See  notice  under  Latin  Composition. 

Latin 

Latin  1.  Five  hours.  The  year  is  spent  in  learning  the  basic  forms  and 
syntax  of  the  language  and  a  fundamental  vocabulary.  There  is  constant 
practice  in  sight  reading  and  in  prose  composition  of  simple  sentences. 
The  purpose  of  the  course  is  to  prepare  boys  for  general  reading  in  Latin 
prose,  not  solely  in  Caesar.  The  text  is  A  New  Introduction  to  Latin,  by 
Alston  H.  Chase. 

Latin  1-2.  Five  hours.  Boys  who  are  not  ready  for  Latin  2,  but  who 
make  a  high  grade  on  the  Advanced  Latin  I  Entrance  Examination,  may 
be  placed  in  Latin  1-2  and  thus  given  opportunity  to  complete  two  years 
of  work  in  one.  Those  who  pass  the  course  successfully  are  given  credit 
for  two  years  of  Latin.  The  course  is  reserved  for  boys  who  give  evidence 
of  high  ability.  Texts  as  for  Latin  1  and  2. 

Latin  2.  Five  hours.  During  the  first  term,  the  course  gives  a  thor- 
ough review  of  the  fundamentals  of  Latin  grammar  and  begins  the  read- 
ing of  Caesar.  In  the  last  two  terms,  more  Caesar  is  read,  but  the  reading 
is  varied  by  selections  from  other  Latin  prose  authors  and  from  simple 
poetry.  There  is  practice  in  sight  translation  and  in  prose  composition. 
The  texts  are  An  Intermediate  Latin  Reader,  by  William  J.  Buehner,  and 
John  Colby's  Keview  Latin  Grammar. 

Latin  3.  Four  hours.  The  course  has  a  threefold  purpose.  Linguisti- 
cally, it  teaches  students  to  read  Latin  prose  with  increasing  ease.  His- 
torically, it  presents  a  picture  of  Cicero's  life  and  times  and  compares  his 
period  with  our  own.  Culturally,  it  assesses  the  literary  importance  of 
Cicero  as  the  creator  of  a  prose  style  which  influenced  the  literature  of 
Europe  for  centuries.  Representative  selections  are  read  from  the  writings 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES 


5) 


of  Cicero  as  well  as  passages  from  other  prose  authors.  There  is  constant 
practice  in  sight  translation.  Selections  from  Vergil  and  one  of  the 
Comedies  are  read.  The  text  is  Allan  G.  Gillingham's  Latin  Reader,  Third 
Year  (Merrill  Books). 

Students  who  have  done  high  honor  work  in  Latin  2  and  who  intend 
to  take  only  three  years  of  the  subject  are  allowed  to  choose  either  Cicero 
or  Vergil  for  their  third-year  Latin. 

Latin  4.  Four  hours.  By  a  study  of  selections  from  the  Aeneid  and 
from  other  Latin  poetry,  the  course  attempts  to  introduce  students  to 
both  the  forms  and  the  content  of  classical  poetry  and  to  make  plain  its 
influence  upon  the  poetry  of  the  modern  languages.  The  student  is  given 
constant  practice  in  reading  Latin  verse  aloud.  The  poems  are  studied  as 
literature  and  not  merely  as  exercises  in  translation. 

Latin  L.  Two  hours.  Reading  and  discussion  of  the  Odes  of  Horace 
and  poems  of  Catullus,  with  special  attention  to  the  literary  artistry  of  the 
poems,  to  their  sources  in  the  Greek  Lyrics,  and  to  their  influence  upon 
modern  poetry.  Open  to  properly  qualified  students  who  have  passed 
Latin  3. 

Latin  S.  Two  hours.  This  course,  less  demanding  than  Latin  H,  is 
designed  for  boys  who  have  completed  Latin  3  and  desire  to  keep  in  con- 
tact with  the  language  through  a  minor  course.  The  reading  is  chosen 
from  the  First  Book  of  Livy's  Histories,  the  poems  of  Catullus,  and  the 
Menaechmi  of  Plautus. 

Latin  5.  Five  hours.  Open  to  students  who  have  passed  Latin  4  or 
who  otherwise  satisfy  the  Chairman  of  the  Department  of  their  fitness. 
The  course  is  the  equivalent  of  the  customary  Freshman  Latin  course  in 
most  colleges.  In  the  first  term,  selections  from  Livy's  Histories  are  read 
and  the  reading  of  Horace's  Odes  is  begun,  to  be  carried  on  through  the 
second  term.  In  the  winter,  two  Roman  comedies  are  read;  and,  in  the 
spring,  Catullus'  poems  and  selections  from  Tacitus'  Annals. 

Accelerated  Courses.  At  the  end  of  the  first  term  of  Latin  1,  stu- 
dents of  high  ability  are  offered  the  opportunity  to  join  an  accelerated  sec- 
tion, Latin  IX.  They  will  continue  in  Latin  2X,  and  proceed  in  their  third 
year  into  Latin  4,  thus  gaining  credit  for  four  years  of  Latin  in  three  years. 
Boys  who  drop  out  at  the  conclusion  of  Latin  2X  will  obtain  credit  for 
only  two  years  of  Latin. 

Latin  Composition.  No  regular  course  is  given,  but  special  arrange- 
ments can  be  made  for  any  student  desiring  work  in  advanced  composi- 
tion in  either  Latin  or  Greek. 

ENGLISH 

The  courses  in  English  aim  to  teach  students  to  think  logically,  to  speak 
and  write  clearly,  to  read  with  comprehension  and  appreciation,  and  to 
develop  discrimination  and  taste  in  the  judgment  of  books. 


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PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Courses  at  all  levels  include  frequent  practice  in  speaking  and  writing, 
close  reading,  sustained  attention  to  problems  of  syntax  and  rhetoric,  the 
study  and  discussion  in  class  of  the  principal  literary  types,  and  wide 
collateral  reading.  Classroom  teaching  is  supplemented  by  conferences. 
Sections  vary  in  size  from  ten  to  fifteen.  After  the  Junior  year,  particular- 
ly able  boys  may  enter  honors  sections  and  are  encouraged  to  develop 
their  special  literary  aptitudes. 

In  addition  to  assigned  reading,  students  do  collateral  reading,  guided 
by  the  English  teacher.  In  all  courses  the  Department  encourages  the 
writing  of  story,  poem,  and  essay,  and  sponsors  a  series  of  prize  competi- 
tions to  stimulate  interest  in  original  writing. 

Students  who  have  completed  four  years  of  English  may  elect  a  major 
course  in  American  literature  (English  5),  a  minor  course  in  writing 
(English  5C)  or  a  minor  course  in  contemporary  literature  (English  5L). 
A  student  may  take  English  5C  with  English  5L  as  a  major  course. 

English  1.  Five  hours.  The  work  of  the  course,  both  in  literature  and 
composition,  concentrates  on  narration  and  description.  It  does  not  in- 
clude a  study  of  formal  grammar,  though  it  treats  practical  matters  of 
form  and  usage  as  necessary.  A  study  of  the  growth  of  language,  word 
formation,  and  etymology  is  part  of  the  course.  Whenever  possible,  the 
writing  of  non-expository  themes  corresponds  with  the  literature  under 
study,  for  example,  the  writing  of  fables  along  with  the  study  of  Aesop. 

Representative  texts:  A  Book  of  Short  Stories,  The  Tempest,  Huckle- 
berry Finn,  Animal  Farm,  Lord  of  the  Flies,  Aesop's  Fables,  Narrative 
Poems. 

English  2.  Four  hours.  The  course  concentrates  on  expository  writing 
and  on  the  acquisition  of  a  critical  and  analytical  vocabulary  to  be  used 
in  the  study  of  the  novel,  short  story,  drama,  poetry  and  the  essay.  All 
sections  study  generative  and  transformational  grammar. 

Representative  texts:  Composition  of  the  Essay,  by  Hyde  &  Brown, 
Great  Short  Stories,  ed.  Schramm,  Henry  IV  (Part  7),  The  Oxbow  Inci- 
dent, The  Red  Badge  of  Courage,  Sound  and  Sense,  by  Perrine. 

English  3.  Four  hours.  English  3  and  English  4  form  a  two-year 
sequence  studying  a  group  of  major  English  and  American  literary  works. 
A  student  who  completes  the  two  courses  should  have  both  a  sense  of  the 
chronology  of  English  and  American  literature  and  a  sound  reading  back- 
ground. Both  courses  place  equal  stress  upon  the  study  of  literature  and 
upon  composition,  both  analytical  and  non-expository. 

Read  intensively  by  all  students:  The  Odyssey,  Macbeth,  Gulliver's 
Travels,  Milton,  Pope,  Wordsworth,  Keats,  Hardy.  Other  authors  often 
studied:  Fielding,  Sheridan,  Coleridge,  Dickens,  Thackeray,  Melville, 
Tennyson,  Browning,  Arnold,  Ibsen,  Shaw,  Arthur  Miller. 

English  4.  Four  hours.  The  course  continues  and  completes  the  se- 
quence begun  in  English  3,  requiring  greater  maturity  and  a  higher  level 
of  sophistication  than  English  3. 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES 


57 


Read  intensively  by  all  students:  The  Oedipus  Cycle,  Hamlet,  the  meta- 
physical poets,  Eliot,  Hemingway,  Fitzgerald.  Other  authors  often 
studied:  Chaucer,  Jonson,  Hawthorne,  Twain,  Conrad,  Joyce,  Faulkner, 
Yeats,  Frost,  O'Neill. 

English  3X.  Four  hours.  A  course  for  particularly  able  students  who 
wish  to  do  the  required  work  of  English  3  and  4  in  one  year  and  thus 
qualify  for  specialized  work  in  English  in  their  senior  year.  Students  who 
complete  English  3X  must  take  another  major  English  course. 

English  5.  Four  hours.  An  elective  course  in  American  Literature  open 
to  students  who  have  successfully  completed  four  years  of  secondary- 
school  English  or  who  have  otherwise  (as  by  the  completion  of  English 
3X)  demonstrated  ability  to  do  advanced  work  in  English.  The  anthology 
for  class  use  is  A  College  Book  of  American  Literature,  edited  by  Ellis, 
Pound,  Spohn,  and  Hoffman. 

English  5C.  Two  hours.  An  elective  course  in  which  the  students 
write  at  least  once  a  week  and  submit  at  least  one  finished  work  at  the 
end  of  each  term.  Class  hours  are  spent  chiefly  in  the  analysis  and  dis- 
cussion of  work  submitted  by  members  of  the  class. 

English  SL.  Two  hours.  An  elective  course  devoted  to  reading,  discuss- 
ing, and  occasional  writing  about  contemporary  literature,  chiefly  fiction. 
Representative  authors:  Agee,  Albee,  Baldwin,  Bellow,  Camus,  Cheever, 
Cummings,  Ellison,  Greene,  Kafka,  Katzanzakis,  Lowell,  Updike,  E.  B. 
White. 

ETHICS 

Ethics — Personal  and  Social.  Two  hours.  An  elective  course  for 
Upper  Middlers  and  Seniors.  Readings  are  from  ancient  and  modern  sys- 
tems of  ethical  thought.  Consideration  of  attitudes,  values,  and  codes  of 
conduct  bearing  on  such  subjects  as  individual  freedom,  property  rights, 
the  home,  the  family,  the  community,  individual  integrity,  and  social 
responsibility. 

HISTORY 

The  courses  in  history  have  two  purposes.  They  are  arranged  to  provide 
information  in  company  with  other  subjects;  they  are  developed  consecu- 
tively to  give  increasing  experience  in  precision  of  thinking  and  to  train 
students  in  the  logical  expression  of  what  they  know.  The  system  of 
courses  is  scaled  during  the  first  year  to  the  potentialities  of  the  younger 
students,  stressing  the  topical  approach;  it  becomes  increasingly  mature 
and  analytical  during  the  succeeding  years. 

History  1.  Ideas  in  Motion.  Three  hours.  The  course  is  designed 
to  provide  Juniors  with  a  series  of  stimulating  examples  of  man's  develop- 
ment and  culture.  The  focal  point  is  man's  experiences  and  ability  to 


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PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


adapt  circumstances  to  his  needs,  to  work  with  others  for  common  pur- 
poses. With  this  objective,  the  course  shows  man  in  several  environments: 
Man  and  the  Land — Geography;  Man's  Entrance  into  History — the  River 
Civilizations;  Man  Makes  a  Living — Economics;  Man  Organizes  with 
Others — Government;  Man  Tries  to  Understand  the  Unknown — Religion; 
Man  Resorts  to  Force — War;  Man  Utilizes  Nature — Science. 

The  contribution  of  ancient  civilizations  is  usually  the  starting  point 
of  each  topic,  which  is  carried  through  to  modern  times.  By  this  tech- 
nique the  boy  is  able  to  relate  his  work  to  some  degree  to  his  own  experi- 
ences. Lectures  on  aspects  of  specific  topics  are  occasionally  given  to 
prepare  the  boy  for  later  work  in  this  method. 

Each  topic  is  approached  through  textual  and  supplementary  readings, 
class  discussions,  and  training  in  essay  writing.  Illustrative  material — 
films,  slides,  displays — is  used  wherever  possible.  Students  are  encouraged 
to  pursue  their  own  special  historical  interests  through  reports,  papers,  and 
projects. 

Text:  Wallbank  and  Taylor,  Civilization  Past  and  Present  (Scott  Fores- 
man).  Supplementary  books:  Smythe  and  Brown,  Elements  of  Geography 
(Macmillan) ;  the  editors  of  Life,  The  Epic  of  Man  (Time) ;  Davis,  A 
Day  in  Old  Athens  (Allyn  &  Bacon) ;  Burlingame,  Machines  that  Built 
America  (Signet  Key);  Bradley,  A  Guide  to  the  World's  Religions  (Pren- 
tice-Hall) ;  Butterfield  et  al,  A  Short  History  of  Science  (Doubleday  Dol- 
phin);  Pratt,  Battles  that  Changed  History  (Doubleday  Anchor). 

History  2.  Men  and  Great  Issues  of  History.  Four  hours.  For 
Lower  Middiers,  the  course  is  a  study  of  outstanding  people  and  significant 
events  in  the  history  of  Europe. 

The  course  introduces  the  student  to  historical  concepts,  relations,  and 
problems.  The  student  learns  the  disciplines  of  outlining,  notetaking,  map 
reading,  defining,  analyzing,  and  organizing  evidence  to  prove  generaliza- 
tions. The  textbook  is  used  as  background  material,  usually  in  conjunction 
with  a  weekly  assignment  of  a  biography  or  a  description  of  an  important 
historical  event.  The  course  examines  the  interplay  of  the  influence  of  peo- 
ple upon  their  times  and  the  influence  of  events  upon  a  country  or  a  period 
of  history.  Representative  topics:  Medieval  people  in  Western  Europe; 
Thomas  Becket  and  the  struggle  between  state  and  Church;  Michelangelo 
and  the  Renaissance;  Martin  Luther  and  the  Reformation;  Christopher 
Columbus  and  the  Age  of  Exploration;  Elizabeth  I  and  the  rise  of  the 
national  state;  Richelieu  and  absolute  monarchy;  Louis  XIV  and  the 
Golden  Age;  Peter  the  Great  and  the  emergence  of  Russia;  Robespierre 
and  the  French  Revolution;  Gladstone  and  British  reform. 

Films  and  slide  tapes  are  often  shown.  Members  of  other  departments 
lecture  in  their  special  fields. 

Text:  Brinton,  Christopher  &  Wolff,  A  History  of  Civilization,  (Pren- 
tice-Hall). Supplementary  books:  E.  Power,  Medieval  People  (University 
Paperbacks) ;  J.  Anouilh,  Becket  (Coward-McCann) ;  R.  Bainton,  Here  1 
Stand,  A  Life  of  Martin  Luther  (Mentor) ;  M.  Waldman,  Queen  Elizabeth 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES 


59 


(Collier  Books);  S.  Morison,  Christopher  Columbus,  Mariner  (Mentor 
Books) ;  C.  V.  Wedgwood,  Richelieu  and  the  French  Monarchy  (Collier 
Books);  W.  H.  Lewis,  The  Splendid  Century  (Anchor);  I.  Stone,  The 
Agony  and  the  Ecstacy  (Signet  Books) ;  B.  H.  Sumner,  Peter  the  Great 
and  the  Emergence  of  Russia  (Collier  Books) ;  J.  M.  Thompson,  Robes- 
pierre and  the  French  Revolution  (Collier  Books) ;  F.  Birrell,  Gladstone 
(Collier  Books) . 

History  3.  Modern  Europe.  Four  hours.  For  Upper  Middlers,  the 
course  is  a  background  survey  from  the  15  th  century  to  the  end  of  the 
18  th  century,  and  an  intensive  study  of  events  and  periods  from  the 
French  Revolution  to  the  present  day.  The  course  is  chronological  and 
deals  with  significant  issues.  The  Development  of  Absolutism;  Constitu- 
tionalism; Problems  of  the  Balance  of  Power;  the  French  Revolution  and 
the  Napoleonic  Empire;  Rise  of  the  Middle  Class;  the  Challenge  of  Social- 
ism; Imperialism  of  the  19th  Century;  the  Germany  of  Bismarck;  the 
Diplomacy  of  "World  War  I  and  the  Peace  Settlement;  the  Russian  Revolu- 
tion and  the  Soviet  Union;  the  Dictatorship  and  Politics  of  Fascist  Italy 
and  Nazi  Germany;  World  War  II  and  the  Search  for  Security;  the  Cold 
War;  Issues  of  Foreign  Policy  of  the  United  States  and  the  Soviet  Union. 

The  course  prepares  qualified  students  for  the  Advanced  Placement 
examination  in  European  History. 

Texts:  Palmer  &  Colton,  A  History  of  the  Modem  World  (Knopf) ; 
Gold  win  Smith,  A  History  of  England  (Scribner) ;  Hall  &  Davis,  The 
Course  of  Europe  Since  Waterloo  (Appleton-Century) ;  Black  &  Helm- 
reich,  Twentieth  Century  Europe  (Knopf);  David  Thomson,  Europe 
Since  Napoleon  (Knopf);  H.  S.  Hughes,  Contemporary  Europe:  A  His- 
tory (Prentice-Hall).  Supplementary  readings:  L.  B.  Packard,  The  Age  of 
Louis  XIV,  (Holt) ;  J.  H.  Plumb,  England  in  The  Eighteenth  Century 
(Pelican) ;  G.  LeFebvre,  The  Coming  of  The  French  Revolution  (Vin- 
tage) ;  R.  L.  Heilbroner,  The  Worldly  Philosophers  (Simon  and  Schuster) ; 
H.  Holborn,  The  Political  Collapse  of  Europe;  E.  H.  Harbison,  The  Age 
of  Reformatiofi  (Cornell) ;  Voltaire,  Candide  (Bantam) ;  R.  L.  Heilbroner, 
The  Future  as  History  (Prentice-Hall).  Readings  and  documents  in 
European  History  are  edited  and  supplied  to  the  students  by  members  of 
the  department. 

History  4.  The  United  States.  Five  hours.  For  Seniors,  the  course 
opens  with  the  American  Revolution  and  proceeds  through  the  transition 
from  Confederation  into  Federal  Union,  from  conflict  and  division  to  re- 
union, and  the  growth  of  the  United  States  as  a  world  power.  It  closes 
with  events  of  the  present  time.  It  surveys  the  westward  movement,  the 
plantation  system,  the  development  of  industry,  the  labor  movement,  and 
the  foreign  policy  of  the  American  government. 

Although  public  affairs  are  the  central  theme,  stress  is  placed  upon 
geographical,  economic,  social,  and  governmental  problems;  the  careers 
of  eminent  men  are  examined  in  relation  to  these  problems.  Much  atten- 
tion is  given  to  historical  decisions  of  the  Supreme  Court.  Matters  of 


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PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


literary,  intellectual,  religious,  and  philosophical  import  are  indicated  but 
not  stressed.  Students  with  a  satisfactory  average  may  with  permission 
elect  to  write  a  paper  in  lieu  of  the  final  examination. 
Texts  and  reference  works: 

General:  Morison  and  Commager,  The  Growth  of  the  American  Re- 
public; Randall,  The  Civil  War  and  Reconstruction;  Hacker  and  Ken- 
drick,  The  United  States  Since  1865;  Mitchell  and  Mitchell,  American 
Economic  History;  Malone  &  Rauch,  Empire  for  Liberty;  Blum,  The 
National  Experience. 

Source  Books:  Commager,  Documents  of  American  History;  Mac- 
Donald,  Documentary  Source  Book  of  American  History;  Evans,  Cases 
on  American  Constitutional  Law  (Fenwick  Edition) ;  Bartlett,  The  Record 
of  American  Diplomacy. 

Special  Histories  cited  frequently  throughout  the  Syllabus:  Baily,  A 
Diplomatic  History  of  the  American  People;  Bemis,  A  Diplomatic  History 
of  the  United  States;  Swisher,  American  Constitutional  Development; 
Kelly  and  Harbison,  The  American  Constitution;  J.  W.  Pratt,  History  of 
U.  S.  Foreign  Policy;  D.  Brogan,  Era  of  Franklin  D.  Roosevelt;  H.  U. 
Faulkner,  From  Versailles  to  the  New  Deal;  Allis,  Government  Through 
Opposition;  Frederick,  Slavery  and  the  Breakdown  of  the  American  Con- 
sensus; Ganley,  The  Progressive  Movement ;  James,  The  Supreme  Court  in 
American  Life;  Lyons,  Idealism  &  Realism  in  Wilson's  Peace  Program; 
Presidential  Power  in  the  New  Deal;  Nettels,  The  Roots  of  American 
Civilization;  Van  Deusen,  The  Jacksonian  Era;  Winks,  The  Cold  War; 
Degler,  Out  of  Our  Past. 

Special  historical  works  cited  at  appropriate  places  in  the  Syllabus: 
The  Bassett,  Turner,  McDonald  and  Dunning  volumes  of  the  older  Ameri- 
can Nation  Series;  Nettles,  The  Roots  of  American  Civilization;  Miller, 
The  Origins  of  the  American  Revolution;  Corwin,  John  Marshall  and  the 
Constitution;  Nevins,  Ordeals  of  Union  (2  vols.) ;  Nevins,  Emergence  of 
Lincoln  (2  vols.) ;  Pringle,  Theodore  Roosevelt;  Allen,  Lords  of  Creation; 
Corwin,  The  Constitution  and  What  It  Means  Today;  Mason  &  Leach, 
In  Quest  of  Freedom;  R.  Hofstadter,  American  Political  Tradition. 

History  5.  Politics  of  International  Relations.  Two  hours.  An 
elective  course  for  Seniors.  The  emphasis  is  upon  the  politics  of  20th- 
century  nations  and  their  effects  upon  United  States  foreign  policy  and 
international  relations.  The  course  is  organized  to  introduce  students  to 
the  many  factors  affecting  Great  Power  politics,  and  to  demonstrate  the 
causal  relationships  in  modern  international  events:  the  Fundamentals  of 
International  Relations;  Power  Politics;  National  Interests  and  Objectives; 
Geography  and  World  Politics;  Economics  and  World  Politics;  Significant 
Nations  and  Areas;  Modern  Europe;  the  Soviet  Union;  China;  Emerging 
Africa;  Latin  America;  United  States  foreign  policy,  its  making  and 
execution,  development  since  1945,  the  factors  influencing  it. 

Readings  will  be  selected  from  Overstreet,  What  We  Must  Know  About 
Communism;  Crossman,  The  God  That  Failed;  Benton,  The  Voice  of  Latin 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES 


61 


America;  White,  Thunder  Out  of  China;  Shepherd,  Politics  of  African 
Nationalism;  Osgood,  Alternative  to  War  or  Surrender;  Fulbright,  Pros- 
pects for  the  West;  Fulbright,  New  Myths  and  Old  Realities;  Essays,  The 
Conservative  Papers;  Herzog,  The  War-Peace  Establishment. 

History  6.  An  Introduction  to  Asia.  Two  hours.  Open  to  Upper 
Middlers  and  Seniors.  It  is  the  purpose  of  the  course  to  introduce  the 
American  student  to  Asia  through  study  and  critical  examination  of  the 
histories  of  China  and  Japan.  This  approach  does  not,  nor  can  it  profitably, 
exclude  consideration  of  Asia's  classical  civilization;  but  it  does  tend  to 
place  major  emphasis  upon  the  past  century  and  a  half.  Topics  covered 
include  The  Roots  of  Chinese  and  Japanese  society,  the  Western  Impact 
upon  Asia,  China's  and  Japan's  Response  to  the  West,  the  Rise  of  Asian 
Nationalism,  Japan  as  a  World  Power,  the  Rise  of  Mao  and  the  Chinese 
Communists,  Asia  in  World  War  II,  United  States  Policy  in  Post-War 
Asia. 

The  course  consists  of  reading,  lectures,  class  discussion,  map  exercises 
and  work  projects.  Textual  material  and  supplementary  readings  are  taken 
from  such  works  as  Michael  and  Taylor,  A  History  of  the  Par  East  in 
Modern  Times;  Reischauer,  E.  O.,  Japan  Past  and  Present;  Fairbank,  J.  K., 
The  United  States  and  China. 

MATHEMATICS 

The  courses  in  mathematics  have  two  purposes.  The  first  is  to  give  the 
student  at  each  level  an  appreciation  of  the  mathematical  structure  and 
thus  of  the  essential  aesthetic  quality  of  the  mathematical  field  in  which 
he  is  working.  The  second  but  equally  important  purpose  is  to  assure  a  boy 
a  command  of  the  appropriate  technical  skills  without  which  he  cannot  go 
on  in  higher  courses  in  school  or  college.  Each  year  constant  and  consistent 
problem  work  helps  to  make  concrete  the  abstract  ideas  of  mathematics. 
Each  year  an  attempt  is  made  to  give  the  student  an  idea  of  the  way  in 
which  mathematical  ideas  grow  by  repeated  abstraction  and  generalization 
from  the  physical  phenomena  with  which  he  is  familiar. 

Thus  the  study  of  algebra  begins  with  the  properties  of  the  natural 
numbers  of  arithmetic  and  progresses  to  the  study  of  the  integers,  the 
rational  numbers,  the  irrational  numbers  and  an  introduction  to  the  real 
and  complex  numbers.  An  introduction  to  the  concept  of  proof  in  simple 
algebraic  and  geometric  situations  is  made  early  in  the  first  two  years. 
Later  these  ideas  are  sharpened  and  extended  in  both  fields.  A  basic  con- 
cern with  relations  and  functions  of  numbers  paves  the  way  for  a  system- 
atic study  in  the  last  two  years  of  a  variety  of  continuous  and  discrete 
functions. 

Besides  its  regular  sequence  of  courses  the  Department  provides  ac- 
celerated and  advanced  courses  for  those  boys  able  and  willing  to  move 
faster  than  normal. 

Mathematics  1.  First  Year  Algebra.  Five  hours.  The  course  pro- 
vides an  intensive  study  of  the  procedures  of  elementary  algebra  through 


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the  solution  of  quadratic  equations.  Texts:  Johnson,  Lcndsey  and  Slesnick's 
Modern  Algefoa,  First  Course  ( Addison- Wesley ) . 

Mathematics  1A.  Five  hours.  A  course  for  boys  who  have  had 
approximately  a  half  year  of  algebra  in  the  eighth  grade.  At  the  end  of 
the  fail  term,  qualified  boys  are  invited  into  the  newly  formed  sections  of 
Mathematics  IX.  Texts  are  the  same  as  those  in  Mathematics  1. 

Mathematics  IX.  Five  hours.  A  course  for  very  able  students  who 
wish  to  begin  an  accelerated  program  in  mathematics.  It  is  formed  at  the 
end  of  the  fall  term  of  boys  in  Mathematics  1A.  If  followed  by  Mathe- 
matics 2X,  it  enables  a  student  to  enter  Mathematics  4  in  his  third  year. 
A  major  portion  of  geometry  will  be  covered.  Texts  are  the  same  as  those 
in  Mathematics  1  and  2. 

Mathematics  2  Special.  Five  hours.  A  course  designed  for  Juniors 
and  those  entering  Lower  Middlers  who  have  had  a  full  year  of  algebra  but 
have  not  covered  well  enough  such  topics  as  inequalities,  the  postulates 
and  elementary  structure  of  algebra,  number  systems,  etc.,  to  be  fully 
ready  for  Mathematics  2.  After  special  review  in  such  phases  of  algebra, 
thet  course  undertakes  the  regular  work  of  Mathematics  2,  completing  it 
by  the  end  of  the  year.  Texts  used  will  be  the  same  as  those  in  Mathematics 
1  and  2. 

Mathematics  2.  Geometry.  Four  hours.  This  course  covers  a  pro- 
gram of  plane  geometry  using  both  synthetic  and  analytic  methods. 
During  the  work  with  plane  geometry,  the  natural  extensions  to  solid 
geometry  are  made.  At  the  end  of  the  year  the  student  will  have  a  knowl- 
edge of  methods  of  proof  and  of  geometrical  facts  and  concepts  in  both 
two  and  three  dimensions.  Text:  Moise,  Down's  Geometry  (Addison-Wes- 
ley). 

Mathematics  2XA.  Five  hours.  The  prerequisite  for  the  course  is 
Mathematics  IX.  Work  in  geometry  is  continued  and  that  of  Mathematics 
3  is  undertaken.  Students  who  finish  the  course  satisfactorily  are  in  gen- 
eral required  to  take  one  more  year  of  mathematics  (usually  Mathematics 
4,  in  rare  cases  Mathematics  4C)  to  fulfill  the  school's  diploma  require- 
ment. Texts  used  are  those  of  Mathematics  2  and  3. 

Mathematics  2XB.  Five  hours.  An  accelerated  course  enabling  a 
boy  starting  in  Mathematics  1  to  have  an  opportunity  to  take  the  calculus 
without  sacrificing  the  work  in  Probability  and  Linear  Algebra  of  Mathe- 
matics 4.  With  Mathematics  4X  it  provides  a  sequence  that  by  the  end 
of  the  Upper  Middle  Year  completes  Mathematics  2,  3,  and  4.  Mathe- 
matics 2XB  is  also  open  to  selected  students  entering  the  school  as  Lower 
Middlers.  Students  who  successfully  complete  both  Mathematics  2XB 
and  Mathematics  4X  are  prepared  to  take  Mathematics  5  or  some  other 
elective  in  their  Senior  Year.  The  texts  are  those  of  Mathematics  2  and  3. 

Mathematics  3.  Five  hours.  Algebraic  analysis  and  elementary  trigo- 
nometry. The  course  continues  the  work  in  the  algebra  of  real  numbers 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES 


63 


begun  in  Mathematics  1.  It  extends  and  develops  the  ideas  of  mathe- 
matical structure  and  methods  of  proof  met  in  Mathematics  2.  It  empha- 
sizes the  study  of  the  elementary  functions:  algebraic,  exponential,  loga- 
rithmic and  trigonometric.  It  also  covers  the  elements  of  analytic  trigo- 
nometry. Texts:  Vance's  Modern  Algebra  and  Trigonometry  (Addison- 
Wesley)  . 

Mathematics  3G.  Five  hours.  A  course  in  geometry  for  entering 
students  who  have  had  two  years  of  algebra.  The  course  strengthens  the 
student's  background  in  algebraic  analysis  and  in  trigonometry  to  cor- 
respond to  the  work  done  in  Mathematics  3.  The  texts  are  those  of 
Mathematics  2  and  3. 

Mathematics  4.  Five  hours.  The  regular  senior  course  in  Mathe- 
matics. It  will  consist  of  work  in  elementary  probability  and  statis- 
tics, linear  algebra,  and  limits  of  simple  series  and  sequences.  Besides  open- 
ing up  fields  of  mathematics  increasingly  important  for  industrialists  and 
social  scientists,  the  course  will  increase  a  boy's  mathematical  maturity 
and  will  lay  a  strong  foundation  for  study  of  the  calculus  in  college  or  in 
Mathematics  5.  Entering  students  who  have  not  had  trigonometry  will 
be  placed  in  a  special  section.  Texts:  Mosteller,  Rourke  and  Thomas'  Prob- 
ability (Addison-Wesley);  Kelley's  Modern  Algebra  (Van  Nostrand). 

Mathematics  4C.  Five  hours.  A  course  in  analytic  geometry  and 
the  calculus  open  to  selected  students  who  have  finished  Mathematics 
3  or  3G  and  for  whom  an  early  start  in  calculus  is  justified  by  their 
need  for  it  in  their  study  of  physics  and  chemistry.  The  course  will  move 
somewhat  more  slowly  than  Mathematics  5  because  of  the  lower  mathe- 
matical background  of  its  students,  but  by  the  end  of  the  year,  most  of 
the  boys  should  be  ready  for  the  Advanced  Placement  Examination  in 
the  Calculus.  Text:  Protter,  Morrey's  Calculus  and  Analytic  Geometry 
(Addison-Wesley). 

Mathematics  4X.  For  details  of  the  course  see  the  description  of 
Mathematics  2XB  above.  Completion  of  Mathematics  4X  meets  the  college 
requirements  for  four  units  of  mathematics. 

Mathematics  5.  Calculus  With  Analytic  Geometry.  Four  hours. 
The  course  corresponds  to  the  introductory  course  in  calculus  given  in 
many  colleges  and  universities.  It  is  open  to  those  who  have  completed 
the  regular  four-unit  sequence  in  secondary  school  mathematics.  Com- 
pletion of  the  course  offers  a  student  the  opportunity  to  qualify  for  ad- 
vanced placement  in  college  mathematics.  Text:  Protter,  Morrey's  Calculus 
and  Analytic  Geometry  (Addison-Wesley). 

Mathematics  6.  Introduction  to  Algebraic  Structures  and  Ele- 
mentary Analysis.  Four  hours.  A  course  for  boys  who  have  completed 
a  year  of  calculus.  It  is  designed  to  give  students  a  deeper  understanding  of 
the  basic  concepts  of  elementary  calculus,  an  introduction  to  modern 
algebra,  and  a  background  in  those  topics  of  linear  algebra  useful  in  ad- 


64 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


v  a  need  calculus.  Texts:  McCoy's  Introduction  to  Modern  Algebra  (Allyn 
and  Bacon),  Anderson  and  Hall's  Sets,  Sequences,  and  Mappings  (Wiley). 

Mathematics  L.  An  Introduction  to  Modern  Algebra.  Two 
hours.  An  elective  course  open  to  Seniors  who  have  finished  at  least  three 
years  of  mathematics.  It  may  be  taken  simultaneously  with  either  Mathe- 
matics 4,  4C  or  5,  since  it  does  not  duplicate  but  supplements  the  work 
done  in  those  courses.  The  purpose  of  the  course  is  to  provide  an  introduc- 
tion to  systematic  development  of  algebraic  structures  that  include  groups, 
rings,  fields,  and  vector  spaces;  and  to  study  those  topics  most  useful  in 
the  applications  of  Modern  Algebra  to  other  branches  of  mathematics. 
Text:  McCoy's  Introduction  to  Modern  Algebra  (Allyn  and  Bacon). 

Mathematics  C.  Programming  and  Use  of  a  Computer.  Two  hours. 
An  introduction  to  the  use  of  computers  in  mathematics,  science,  engi- 
neering, medicine,  business,  and  other  fields.  A  study  of  what  the  computer 
can  and  cannot  do.  The  course  is  both  theoretical  and  practical.  Programs 
written  by  the  student  may  be  tried  on  a  large-scale  computer  available  at 
all  times  through  a  teletype  machine  located  in  the  classroom.  The  course 
will  also  consider  elementary  machine  language  and  simple  compiling 
languages. 

MECHANICAL  DRAWING 

Two  hours.  A  technical  drawing  course,  which  includes  the  use  of 
drawing  instruments  and  the  study  of  geometric  constructions,  ortho- 
graphic projection,  descriptive  geometry,  spacial  relations,  isometric  and 
oblique  pictorial  projections,  developments,  assembly  and  detail  engi- 
neering drawings.  Special  stress  is  placed  on  a  thorough  mastery  of  funda- 
mental concepts  and  skills.  Students  of  special  ability  are  given  an  oppor- 
tunity to  do  more  advanced  work  in  a  related  field  of  their  choice.  The 
text  is  French  and  Vierck's  Graphic  Science,  supplemented  by  motion 
pictures. 

MODERN  FOREIGN  LANGUAGES 

All  foreign  languages  offered  by  Phillips  Academy  are  acceptable  for 
admission  to  college.  For  graduate  study,  and  particularly  for  the  Ph.D. 
degree,  French  and  German  are  frequently  required. 

Chinese 

Chinese  1A.  Four  hours.  Open  to  Upper  Middlers  who  will  be  ex- 
pected to  continue  with  Chinese  2A  in  the  Senior  year.  The  program 
does  not  require  summer  study  (see  Chinese  2  below),  but  such  study 
may  be  encouraged,  particularly  following  the  Senior  year.  The  combined 
Chinese  1A  and  2 A,  devoted  to  both  the  oral  and  the  written  language, 
prepare  for  advanced  work  at  the  college  level. 

Chinese  2.  Four  hours.  Open  to  Seniors  who  have  successfully  com- 
pleted Chinese  1A  or  the  eight-week  summer  course  of  Chinese  Language 
(Chinese  1)  at  the  Institute  of  Asian  Studies  for  College  Preparatory  Stu- 
dents. The  Institute,  of  which  Phillips  Academy  is  an  Associated  Member, 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES 


65 


holds  its  summer  session  at  Thayer  Academy,  Braintree,  Massachusetts. 
Chinese  2  works  toward  increased  mastery  of  the  written  and  oral  language 
in  preparation  for  advanced  work  at  the  college  level. 

French 

The  French  Department  offers  a  five-year  course  of  study.  The  first 
four  are  devoted  to  teaching  the  students  to  understand  and  to  speak  the 
language  as  well  as  to  read  and  write  it.  The  methods  employed  parallel 
as  closely  as  possible  the  natural  order  of  language  learning:  hear  it  first, 
then  say  what  you  have  heard,  next  read  and,  finally,  write.  Pronunciation, 
articulation,  rhythm  and  fluency  receive  constant  emphasis  throughout 
each  year.  At  no  time  does  the  Department  teach  the  art  of  translation. 
French  is  used  exclusively  in  the  classroom,  at  all  times  and  under  all 
circumstances,  and  from  the  very  first  day.  In  the  fifth  year,  students  take 
a  Freshman-level  course,  a  survey  of  French  literature  and  the  study  of 
key  writings  from  French  classical  authors,  in  preparation  for  the  Ad- 
vanced Placement  examination. 

Students  who  demonstrate  unusual  aptitude  for  and  interest  in  the 
language  during  their  first  term  of  study  are  invited  to  enter  special  "X" 
sections  which  move  ahead  more  rapidly  without  demanding  more  time. 
Those  who  successfully  complete  this  accelerated  course  of  study  re- 
ceive four  units  of  credit  after  three  years  of  study.  There  is  also  a  special 
fourth-year  class  for  gifted  students  which  prepares  for  Advanced  Place- 
ment. Thus  certain  students  are  able  to  do  college-level  work  after  only 
three,  and  sometimes  only  two,  years  of  study. 

French  1.  Seven  hours.  The  course  has  no  books.  The  students  see 
no  French,  nor  do  they  read  or  write  it.  Classes,  limited  to  15,  meet  seven 
times  a  week,  with  two  different  instructors,  and  are  expected  to  spend 
two  hours  a  week  working  with  records  and  tapes.  The  goal  is  to  acquire 
listening  comprehension  and  the  basic  patterns  of  French  speech.  The 
method  is  the  adaptation  of  FLES  methods  to  older  students. 

French  1-2.  Five  hours.  For  new  boys  who  do  not  qualify  for 
French  2,  yet  who  have  too  much  French  to  start  again  at  the  beginning. 
At  the  end  of  the  first  term,  those  who  find  the  pace  too  swift  drop  back 
to  French  1A.  Those  who  successfully  complete  the  course  enter  French 
3  the  following  year.  Texts:  Mauger,  Cours  de  langue  et  de  civilisation 
francaises,  Book  I,  and  the  Anthologie,  a  collection  of  French  stories,  both 
past  and  contemporary,  which  has  been  compiled  by  the  members  of  the 
Department. 

French  1-2  S.  Six  hours.  Restricted  to  Seniors  who  have  not  previously 
studied  the  language.  The  course  covers  the  work  of  the  first  two  years  of 
the  normal  sequence. 

French  1A.  Five  hours.  For  new  boys  whose  knowledge  of  French 
is  too  slight  to  qualify  for  admission  to  French  1-2,  yet  who  have  had  too 
much  to  start  over  again.  The  course  emphasizes  development  of  the 
aural-oral  skills  and  prepares  for  French  2A  the  next  year. 


66 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


French  2.  Five  hours.  While  continuing  to  develop  the  audio-lingual 
skills,  the  aim  in  the  second  year  is  to  teach  reading,  to  develop  the  ability 
to  understand  non-technical  French  prose  without  recourse  to  translation. 
Besides  the  X  sections  for  the  most  able,  there  are  regular  sections  for 
those  who  have  begun  their  French  at  Andover;  "A"  sections  for  those 
who  come  from  other  schools  but  have  been  taught  by  audio-lingual 
techniques,  and  also  for  those  who  have  completed  French  1A;  and 
"B"  sections  for  new  students  who  have  had  enough  French  to  qualify  for 
a  second-year  course,  but  who  have  been  taught  by  grammatical-transla- 
tion methods.  Texts:  Mauger,  Book  II;  Anthologie. 

French  3.  Four  hours.  Continuing  to  develop  the  three  skills  of 
listening  comprehension,  speaking  and  reading,  the  third-year  course  also 
stresses  writing  and  the  beginnings  of  reading  for  critical  analysis.  Texts: 
Langellier,  Precis  de  Grammaire;  Pagnol,  Topaze;  Aveline,  La  Double- 
Mort  de  Frederic  Belot;  Gide,  La  Symphonie  pastorale. 

French  4.  Four  hours.  Primarily  a  course  in  language,  French  4  intro- 
duces the  student,  through  readings  in  Book  IV  of  Mauger  and  complete 
editions  of  standard  French  authors,  to  contemporary  French  culture  as 
well  as  to  its  literature  from  La  Chanson  de  Roland  to  Sartre. 

French  5.  Five  hours.  The  course  prepares  for  Advanced  Placement. 
There  are  two-hour  minor  courses  in  French  for  those  whose  study  pro- 
grams do  not  permit  a  major  course:  French  3 -Minor  for  those  with  two 
units  of  credit;  French  4-Minor  for  those  with  three;  and  French  5- 
Minor  for  those  with  four.  There  is  also  a  seminar  course,  both  four-  and 
two-hours,  French  6,  for  those  who  have  successfully  completed  the  Ad- 
vanced Placement  courses  (French  4H  or  5 -Major).  Those  who  are  in  it 
arrange  a  special  tutorial  program  with  a  member  of  the  Department. 

Senior  French  Project.  Seniors  taking  an  advanced  French  course 
may  do  apprentice  teaching  during  either  the  Winter  or  Spring  term.  They 
study  the  techniques  and  methods  of  modern  language  instruction;  and 
practice,  under  careful  supervision,  in  beginners'  classes. 

German 

The  German  Department  offers  a  five-year  course  with  the  purpose  of 
developing  the  ability  to  understand  spoken  German,  facility  in  speaking, 
reading  fluency,  the  ability  to  write  German  correctly.  The  more  advanced 
courses  also  give  an  introduction  to  German  literature  since  the  eighteenth 
century. 

From  the  first  meeting,  all  classes  are  conducted  in  German.  English  is 
never  used  as  the  classroom  language. 

The  Department  offers  an  accelerated  course  for  students  who  show 
unusual  ability  in  German  1.  After  completion  of  German  2X,  these 
students  enter  German  4  and  receive  four  units  of  credit  after  three  years 
of  study. 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES 


67 


German  la.  Five  hours.  The  beginning  course  seeks  to  develop  aural 
comprehension  and  oral  expression.  The  basic  patterns  of  the  language 
are  practiced  by  repetition  and  variation.  Texts:  Kessler,  Deutsch  fiir 
Auslander,  Part  I;  Schulz-Griesbach,  Deutsche  Sprachlehre  fiir  Ausldnder 
(Grundstufe) ;  Schulz-Griesbach,  Leseheft  fiir  Ausldnder. 

German  lb.  Five  hours.  This  beginning  course  makes  use  of  the 
audio-lingual  method  to  develop  the  skills  of  listening  and  speaking  the 
language.  Extensive  use  is  made  of  tapes  and  the  language  laboratory. 
Text:  Holt,  Rinehart  and  Winston,  Verstehen  und  Sprecben. 

German  1-2.  Six  hours.  The  course  is  designed  for  qualified  Seniors 
and  Upper  Middlers  who  wish  to  complete  in  one  year  the  material  covered 
in  German  1  and  2.  It  follows  approximately  the  outline  of  those  two 
courses. 

German  2a.  Five  hours.  The  systematic  study  of  basic  patterns  is 
continued  with  Schulz-Griesbach,  Deutsche  Sprachlehre  fiir  Ausldnder. 
Both  close  and  comprehensive  reading  of  modern  German  prose  is  prac- 
ticed extensively.  Elementary  writing  is  introduced  at  this  level,  mostly 
in  the  form  of  summaries  of  the  reading  material.  Some  of  the  books  read 
include  Kessler,  Kurze  Geschichten;  House  and  Malthaner,  Helles  und 
Dunkles;  Schnitzler,  Der  blinde  Geronimo;  Kramp,  Das  Lamm;  Urbaner, 
Das  Karessell. 

German  2b.  Five  hours.  The  audio-lingual  method  of  German  lb  is 
continued  with  special  concentration  on  the  development  of  speaking  and 
reading  skills.  Text:  Holt,  Rinehart,  and  Winston,  Sprechen  und  Lesen. 

German  2X.  Five  hours.  An  accelerated  course  for  qualified  stu- 
dents, covering  material  of  both  German  2  and  German  3.  Successful 
completion  enables  a  student  to  enter  German  4,  but  gives  only  the  same 
unit  credit  as  German  2. 

German  3.  Four  hours.  Throughout  the  year  grammar  is  reviewed 
in  Schulz-Sundermeyer,  Deutsche  Sprachlehre  fiir  Auslander.  The  follow- 
ing texts  are  read:  Durrenmatt,  Der  Richter  und  sein  Henker;  Vessler, 
Mod  erne  Dichtungen;  Aichinger,  Der  Gefesselte;  Borchert,  Draussen  vor 
der  Tiir  und  Ausgewdhlte  Erzdhlungen.  Emphasis  is  placed  on  comprehen- 
sion, vocabulary  building,  and  written  work.  In  the  third  term,  selected 
literary  prose,  drama,  and  lyric  poetry  are  read  and  interpreted.  Text: 
Phelps  and  Stein,  The  German  Heritage.  Work  is  also  assigned  in  German 
newspapers  and  magazines. 

German  4.  Five  hours.  Introduction  to  German  literature.  Through 
detailed  stylistic  analysis  of  a  number  of  outstanding  works,  the  students 
gain  an  acquaintance  with  some  of  the  major  authors  and  most  significant 
trends  in  German  literature  since  1750.  The  works  read  include  Lessing, 
Nathan  der  Weise;  Goethe,  Werther,  Urfaust  and  Iphigenie;  Schiller, 
Maria  Stuart;  Eichendorff,  Aus  dem  Leben  ernes  Taugenichts;  Heine, 
Ausgewdhlte  Gedichte;  Keller,  Kleider  Machen  Leute;  Rilke,  Ausgewdhlte 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Gedichte;  Mann,  Tonio  Kroger;  Kafka,  Das  Urteil  and  Vor  dent  Gesetz. 
Qualified  students  take  the  Advanced  Placement  Examination  at  the  end 
of  the  course. 

German  5.  Four  hours.  Contents  vary  according  to  the  needs  and 
interests  of  the  students.  Probable  texts:  Steinhauer,  Deutsche  Kultur; 
Neuse,  Deutscher  Sprachgebrauch. 

German  S.  Two  hours.  For  Seniors  who  wish  to  continue  German  as 
a  minor  subject.  Contents  vary  according  to  the  needs  of  the  students. 

Japanese 

Japanese  2.  Four  hours.  The  course  is  open  to  Seniors  who  have 
successfully  completed  the  eight-week  summer  course  of  Japanese  language 
at  the  Institute  of  Asian  Studies  for  College  Preparatory  Students.  The 
Institute,  of  which  Phillips  Academy  is  an  Associated  Member,  holds  its 
summer  session  at  Thayer  Academy,  Braintree,  Massachusetts.  Japanese  2 
works  toward  increasing  mastery  of  the  oral  and  written  language  in 
preparation  for  advanced  work  at  the  college  level. 

Russian 

The  courses  in  Russian  develop  skill  in  speaking,  aural  comprehension, 
reading,  and  writing.  The  structure  of  the  language  is  explained  system- 
atically. 

Russian  1.  Five  hours.  An  elementary  course  in  speaking,  reading,  and 
writing  Russian.  Texts:  von  Gronicka,  Essentials  of  Russian,  Fourth  edi- 
tion (Prentice-Hall);  Dawson  et  al.,  Modern  Russian  I  (Harcourt); 
Graded  Russian  Readers  (Heath).  Coordinated  drill  with  tapes  in  the 
Language  Laboratory.  Open  to  Juniors,  Lower  Middlers,  and  Upper 
Middlers. 

Russian  1-2.  Six  hours.  An  accelerated  elementary  course,  presenting 
the  principal  features  of  Russian  in  one  year,  with  intensive  practice  in 
speaking,  reading,  and  writing.  Texts:  von  Gronicka,  Essentials  of  Russian, 
Fourth  edition  (Prentice-Hall);  Graded  Russian  Readers  (Heath).  Co- 
ordinated drill  in  the  Language  Laboratory.  Open  to  Seniors  and,  with  the 
approval  of  Class  Officers,  to  Upper  Middlers  with  a  satisfactory  record 
in  another  foreign  language. 

Russian  2.  Five  hours.  Completion  of  the  elementary  course,  with  con- 
tinued emphasis  on  active  use.  Texts:  von  Gronicka,  Essentials  of  Russian, 
Fourth  edition  (Prentice-Hall) ;  Dawson  et  al.,  Modern  Russian  II  (Har- 
court) ;  Katzner,  A  Russian  Review  Text  (Random  House) ;  Graded  Rus- 
sian Readers  (Heath). 

Russian  3.  Four  hours.  Reading,  conversation,  and  writing,  based  on  a  , 
variety  of  authors.  The  texts  include:  Poltoratzky,  Russkii  Yazyk,  V  tor  ay  a 
Kniga  (Bruce) ;  Katzner,  A  Russian  Review  Text  (Random  House) ;  and 
selected  literary  editions. 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES 


69 


Russian  4.  Four  hours.  Advanced  reading,  conversation,  and  composi- 
tion. The  texts  include  Turkevich,  Masterpieces  of  Russian  Literature 
(Van  Nostrand). 

Spanish 

The  Department  of  Spanish  offers  a  regular  sequence,  normally  of  four 
years,  but  able  students,  by  accelerating,  may  take  five  courses.  The  aim  is 
to  teach  the  students  to  understand  the  language  and  to  speak  it  fluently. 
Spanish  is  used  constantly  in  the  classroom.  The  students  are  also  taught 
to  read  and  write  the  language  with  ease,  and  are  given  a  comprehensive 
introduction  to  the  literature  of  Spain  and  South  America. 

Spanish  1.  Five  hours.  In  keeping  with  the  new  audio-lingual 
approach,  this  course  stresses  understanding  and  speaking  the  Spanish 
language,  with  a  minimum  of  English  used  in  the  classroom.  The  Holt 
series,  beginning  with  Entender  y  Hablar,  by  LaGrone,  McHenry  and 
O'Connor,  provides  the  basic  texts.  They  are  supplemented  by  language 
laboratory  practice  and  other  audio-visual  materials.  Reading  and  writing 
are  introduced  after  the  student  has  acquired  considerable  oral  fluency. 

Spanish  1-2.  Six  hours.  Designed  for  qualified  seniors  who  wish  to 
complete  in  one  year  the  material  covered  in  Spanish  1  and  2.  Texts: 
Entender  y  Hablar  and  Hablar  y  Leer,  both  by  LaGrone,  McHenry  and 

!  O'Connor  (Holt,  Rinehart  and  Winston),  and  El  Gesticulador  by  Usigli 

I  (Appleton-Century-Crofts) . 

Spanish  2.  Five  hours.  A  continuation  course  that  emphasizes  speak- 
ing, reading,  simple  theme  writing  and  vocabulary  building,  including  the 
use  of  synonyms  and  antonyms.  Oral  fluency  is  stressed,  in  accordance 
with  the  principles  of  the  audio-lingual  method.  The  basic  text  is  the 
second  book  of  the  Holt  Series,  Hablar  y  Leer,  by  LaGrone,  McHenry  and 
O'Connor.  Ample  language  laboratory  practice  and  audio-visual  materials 
reinforce  classroom  procedures. 

Spanish  2X.  Five  hours.  Open  to  students  who  have  completed 
Spanish  1  with  honors.  It  covers  the  equivalent  of  the  material  of 
Spanish  2  and  Spanish  3.  Successful  completion  enables  a  student  to  enter 
Spanish  4  but  gives  only  the  same  unit  credit  as  Spanish  2.  Texts  include: 
|  Gramdtica  Espanola  de  Repaso,  by  Ugarte  (Odyssey) ;  Cumbres  de  la 
Civilizacion  Espanola,  by  Giner  de  los  Rios  and  Garcia  Lorca  (Holt,  Rine- 
hart and  Winston)  and  Lluvia  Roja,  by  Goytortua  (Appleton-Century- 
Crofts)  . 

Spanish  3.  Four  hours.  An  advanced  course,  which  continues  to  de- 
velop oral  and  aural  skills  as  well  as  facility  in  written  composition.  Texts 
(supplemented  by  additional  readings) :  Gramdtica  Espanola  de  Repaso, 
by  Ugarte  (Odyssey) ;  Lluvia  Roja,  by  Goytortua  (Appleton-Century- 
Crofts)  ;  and  El  Sombrero  de  Tres  Picas,  by  Alarcon  (Ginn). 


70 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Spanish  4.  Four  hours.  The  course  aims  to  develop  an  appreciation 
of  Spanish  culture  through  the  centuries  in  the  entire  Hispanic  world. 
It  presupposes  a  rather  extensive  knowledge  of  grammar  and  vocabulary 
and  a  fairly  fluent  conversational  ability.  Constant  use  of  the  Spanish 
language  in  the  classroom  discussions  and  written  assignments  is  required. 
Frequent  reference  is  made  to  all  available  types  of  illustrative  material 
or  "realia."  The  basic  texts  are  Ugarte's  Panorama  de  la  Civilization 
Espanola  (Odyssey)  and  del  Rio's  Del  Solar  His  panic  o  (Dryden)  for  cul- 
tural and  historical  background,  as  well  as  grammatical  review.  Among 
the  literary  works  read  in  the  course  are  La  Barraca,  by  Blasco  Ibanez 
(Macmillan)  and  Las  Lanzas  Coloradas,  by  Uslar  Pietri  (Norton),  as  well 
as  novels,  plays  and  essays  found  in  such  collections  as  Biblioteca  Cldsica 
Ebro.  The  study  of  poetry  is  introduced  through  the  reading  and  discus- 
sion of  selections  from  Poesia  Espanola,  by  Marin  (Las  Americas  Publish- 
ing Company). 

Spanish  5.  Four  hours.  For  students  who  have  had  four  years  of 
Spanish  or  its  equivalent.  The  course,  conducted  entirely  in  Spanish,  con- 
centrates upon  various  periods  of  Spanish  and  Spanish  American  literature, 
such  as  Don  Quijote  de  la  Mancha,  the  Golden  Age  Drama,  Romanticism, 
the  Novel,  etc.  Outside  reading  and  written  book  reports  are  required. 
Texts  include:  Cuatro  Comedias,  edited  by  Hill  and  Harlan  (Norton), 
and  Poesia  Espanola,  by  Marin  (Las  Americas  Publishing  Company). 

Spanish  S.  Two  hours.  A  minor  course  open  chiefly  to  seniors  who 
have  had  three  years  of  Spanish.  It  is  designed  to  keep  them  in  contact 
with  the  language  before  they  continue  its  study  in  college,  and  is  con- 
ducted entirely  in  Spanish.  The  basic  texts  are  {De  Que  Hablamos?  by 
Starnes  and  Fernandez  (Appleton-Century-Crofts)  and  El  Sombrero  de 
Tres  Picosy  by  Alarcon  (Ginn). 

MUSIC 

The  aims  of  the  Music  Department  are  to  provide  every  student  with 
a  valuable  experience  in  music  and  to  give  him  an  understanding  of 
the  art.  Its  aims  are  achieved  by  the  study  of  theory  and  by  active  par- 
ticipation in  music  making:  individual  lessons,  recitals,  group  rehearsals, 
formal  and  informal  concerts,  and  one  operetta  or  musical  comedy  pre- 
sented each  year. 

Chorus,  Concert  Band,  Orchestra.  Each  of  these  is  a  minor  course 
not  requiring  outside  preparation  but  counting  for  two  hours  of  aca- 
demic credit.  Each  course  meets  four  periods  a  week:  two  afternoons  at 
4:13  and  two  evenings  between  6:45  and  7:45.  Upper  Middlers  may  take 
any  one  of  these  courses  in  fulfillment  of  the  diploma  requirement  in 
Music  or  Art.  Volunteers,  not  enrolled  in  the  courses  for  credit,  may  join 
the  sessions  of  such  courses  as  an  extracurricular  activity. 

Introduction  to  Music.  Two  hours.  The  purpose  of  the  course  is 
to  help  students  gain  understanding  and  enjoyment  of  various  forms  of 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES 


71 


music.  It  presents  aspects  of  the  development  of  musical  thought,  in- 
cluding examples  of  folk  music  and  the  music  of  the  baroque,  romantic, 
classical,  and  modern  schools,  including  jazz.  The  subject  matter  is  il- 
lustrated with  recordings  and  live  demonstrations. 

Harmony.  Two  hours.  The  course  equips  the  student  with  a  knowl- 
edge of  basic  harmonic  structure,  and  enables  him  to  harmonize  a  melodic 
line  in  traditional  four-part  fashion.  An  ability  to  read  music  is  a  prereq- 
uisite for  the  course.  Open  to  Seniors  only. 

Private  Instrumental  and  Vocal  Lessons.  Two  hours.  Weekly 
instruction  in  keyboard,  orchestral,  and  band  instruments,  or  in  voice, 
may  be  counted  as  a  two-hour  course.  One  half  hour  of  instruction  is 
to  be  supplemented  by  four  hours  of  practicing.  For  advanced  students 
arrangements  can  be  made  for  a  pupil  to  study  in  Boston  with  a  pri- 
vate instructor.  For  piano  and  organ  students  there  is  a  separate  charge 
of  $115  a  year  for  weekly  half-hour  lessons,  and  $200  for  weekly  hour 
lessons,  plus  a  nominal  fee  for  the  use  of  practice  pianos  and  organs.  The 
charge  for  voice  lessons  is  $90  a  year  for  weekly  half -hour  lessons.  Lessons 
are  offered  on  all  band  and  orchestral  instruments  at  $90.00  a  year.  Active 
members  of  the  Band  and  Orchestra  receive  instruction  at  a  reduced  rate. 

Music  Major.  Four  hours,  which  may  be  gained  by  the  combination 
of  any  two  music  courses,  except  that  the  Orchestra,  Chorus,  and  Con- 
cert Band  courses  may  not  be  so  combined. 

Beginner's  Band.  Any  student  who  wishes  to  learn  to  play  a  brass, 
woodwind,  or  percussion  instrument  will  be  lent  an  instrument  and 
may  receive  group  instruction  in  the  Beginners'  Band,  at  no  expense  to 
the  student.  It  is  assumed  that  members  of  this  group  are  interested  in 
eventually  joining  the  advanced  Band  groups. 

NAVIGATION 

Two  hours.  The  course  consists  of  a  term's  work  in  each  of  the  fields 
of  piloting,  nautical  astronomy,  and  celestial  navigation.  Emphasis  is 
placed  on  the  practical  application  to  surface  navigation.  Considerable 
plotting  and  tabular  work  is  done  ha  determining  a  ship's  position  both 
within  sight  of  land  and  on  the  open  sea.  During  the  latter  part  of  the 
year  the  opportunity  to  cruise  may  be  offered  to  members  of  the  class.  The 
textbook  used  is  Dutton's  Navigation  and  Nautical  Astroitomy,  supple- 
mented by  Navy  and  Coast  Guard  films. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Two  hours.  The  course  offers  a  study  of  a  few  central  problems  of 
metaphysics.  The  interdependence  of  metaphysical  views  and  ethical  and 
political  attitudes  is  stressed,  though  the  study  of  ethics  and  politics  is 
not  pursued  so  intensively  as  that  of  metaphysics.  Much  of  the  reading 
of  the  fall  term  is  in  Plato;  thereafter,  the  chief  text  is  Joad's  Guide  to 


72 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Philosophy  and  Metaphysics.  During  the  latter  part  of  the  spring  term 
it  is  customary  to  study  all,  or  part,  of  a  book  by  a  recent  or  contemporary 
philosopher:  for  example,  Santayana,  Whitehead,  Langer.  The  final  as- 
signment is  a  paper  requiring  the  student  to  attempt  a  synthesis  of  his 
views  on  some  of  the  chief  problems  explored  in  the  course,  throughout 
which  the  fundamentals  of  logic  are  strongly  emphasized. 

PHYSICS  (See  Science) 

POLITICS  OF  INTERNATIONAL  RELATIONS  (See  History) 

PUBLIC  SPEAKING 

Two  hours.  An  elective  course  for  Seniors  and  (occasionally)  for 
Upper  Middlers.  It  provides  training  in  voice  production,  articulation,  and 
speech  making.  Impromptu  and  prepared  speeches  help  the  student  to 
develop  poise,  fluency,  and  force.  Two  texts  are  used  for  reference: 
Turner's  Voice  and  Speech  in  the  Theatre  (Sir  Isaac  Pitman  &  Sons,  Ltd., 
London)  and  Sarret  and  Foster's  Basic  Principles  of  Speech  (Houghton 
Mifflin). 

RELIGION 

The  study  of  religion  at  Phillips  Academy  is  intended  to  help  students 
gain  an  understanding  of  the  Judaeo-Christian  heritage,  and  to  develop 
the  capacity  to  relate  man's  religious  insights  to  the  problems  of  everyday 
living.  A  knowledge  of  how  to  read  the  Bible  is  valuable  in  its  own  right, 
and  familiarity  with  its  contents  is  indispensable  for  appreciation  of  much 
of  art,  music,  history,  and  literature.  Acquaintance  with  the  basic  con- 
cepts of  other  religions  adds  perspective  to  the  understanding  of  one's 
own  and  deepens  the  sense  of  the  importance  of  beliefs,  attitudes,  and 
values  in  various  aspects  of  one's  personal  and  social  life. 

Bible  1.  Two  hours.  Required  of  all  members  of  the  Lower  Middle 
class,  the  course  traces  the  development  of  the  basic  religious  concepts  of 
the  Old  and  New  Testaments.  It  acquaints  students  with  many  of  the 
finest  passages  of  the  Bible,  with  its  outstanding  personalities,  with  the 
individual  books  and  their  messages,  and  with  a  sense  of  the  progressive 
discovery  and  revelation  of  religious  truth. 

Senior  Religion.  Four  hours.  An  elective  course  for  Seniors.  It  in- 
cludes a  term's  study  of  some  of  the  living  religions  of  the  world  and 
their  sacred  writings.  A  second  term's  work  involves  the  study  and  dis- 
cussion of  certain  basic  religious  problems  and  of  various  attitudes  toward 
the  meaning  of  life  as  they  are  reflected  in  a  number  of  contemporary 
plays  and  novels.  A  third  term  is  devoted  to  an  investigation  of  Christian 
teaching,  through  New  Testament  writings  and  the  work  of  a  number  of 
contemporary  philosophers  and  theologians. 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES 


73 


SCIENCE 

Beginning  with  Elementary  Science,  a  student  may  pursue  a  four-year 
sequence  of  courses  in  science.  The  departments  aim  to  provide  the  stu- 
dent with  an  understanding  of  science  and  of  scientific  methods  and  think- 
ing as  a  necessary  part  of  his  general  education.  At  the  same  time,  the 
subjects  are  covered  with  sufficient  thoroughness  to  test  his  capacity  and 
interest  and  to  provide  a  sound  foundation  for  later  work  in  college, 
should  his  experience  indicate  the  desirability  of  such  work. 

Courses  designated  by  the  letter  X  are  more  difficult  than  the  regular 
ones,  and  admission  is  granted  only  to  selected  students.  These  courses 
meet  for  one  additional  class  each  week  and  use  texts  of  the  college  fresh- 
man level.  They  thereby  prepare  in  one  year  for  the  advanced  placement 
examinations,  and  consequently  for  advanced  standing  in  college.  Science 
Honors  provides  a  two-year  integrated  course  for  those  capable  of  ad- 
vanced work,  in  both  physics  and  chemistry.  Able  students  who  have 
taken  the  regular  courses  before  their  Senior  year  may  also  prepare  for 
the  advanced  placement  examinations  by  taking  the  minor  courses  indi- 
cated as  S  courses.  In  addition,  the  S  courses  provide  uninterrupted  prog- 
ress for  the  student  who  plans  further  study  in  a  particular  field. 

In  general,  students  are  encouraged  to  take  a  variety  of  courses  and 
to  acquire  a  broad  background  of  knowledge  in  the  different  sciences, 
rather  than  to  specialize  in  any  subject.  Hence  no  second-year-level  courses 
are  offered.  For  the  student  with  special  interests  in  any  one  area,  in- 
dividual projects  are  encouraged  to  the  extent  that  they  are  consistent 
with  safety,  the  equipment  available,  and  the  capacity  of  the  student. 

Elementary  Science.  Three  hours.  The  course  is  designed  to  form 
an  approach  to  the  laboratory  sciences  that  follow  in  the  later  years,  and 
to  acquaint  the  student  with  information  important  to  any  educated  per- 
son. It  is  based  on  a  study  of  the  earth,  considered  from  the  points  of 
view  of  the  geologist,  the  physicist,  the  chemist,  the  biologist,  and  the 
astronomer.  Laboratory  work  is  included  where  possible  and  appropriate. 

Anthropology.  Two  hours.  An  elective  offered  by  the  Robert  S. 
Peabody  Foundation  for  Archaeology,  the  course  is  intended  to  present  a 
brief  consideration  of  the  prehistory  of  North  America.  It  is  composed  of 
lectures  and  reading  on  a  variety  of  subjects  bearing  on  man's  life  in  the 
New  World,  touching  on  geology,  climatic  change  and  attendant  changes 
in  flora  and  fauna,  methods  of  dating  the  past,  as  well  as  archaeology. 
Some  discussion  and  reading  on  aboriginal  societies  brings  the  course  down 
to  the  beginning  of  written  history. 

Biology 

Biology.  Four  hours.  The  course  covers  the  characteristics  of  living 
things;  the  metabolism,  behavior,  reproduction,  growth  and  development 
of  plants,  animals  and  microorganisms;  the  structure  and  functioning  of 
the  human  body;  the  ecological  interrelationships  between  all  living  things, 


74 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


with  special  emphasis  on  the  influence  of  insects,  bacteria,  and  other 
forms  of  life  upon  man's  welfare;  and  the  principles  of  heredity  and 
evolution. 

The  class  meets  four  times  a  week,  three  times  for  discussion  and  once 
for  a  laboratory  period.  The  laboratory  work  includes  training  in  the  use 
of  the  compound  and  stereoscopic  microscopes  and  other  laboratory  equip- 
ment. It  requires  careful  observation,  mastery  of  techniques,  and  accurate 
recording  of  results.  Several  laboratory  periods  are  set  aside  for  field  trips 
featuring  Ecology  and  Conservation,  and  for  work  on  individual  projects. 

Biology  X.  Five  hours.  An  honors  course,  open  upon  invitation  of 
the  Department,  to  a  limited  number  of  able  Upper  Middlers  and  Seniors. 
In  addition  to  the  material  of  the  regular  Biology  course,  Biology  X  offers 
extra  work  in  the  field  of  physiology  in  preparation  for  the  Advanced 
Placement  Examination  of  the  College  Entrance  Examination  Board,  suc- 
cess in  which  leads  to  advanced  placement  in  college  and,  in  some  cir- 
cumstances, to  credit  towards  the  college  degree. 

Biology  S.  Two  hours.  Open  to  Seniors  who  have  completed  the 
standard  course  with  high  grades.  In  addition  to  a  review  of  basic  biology, 
new  material  will  be  presented  as  the  course  progresses.  The  combination 
of  review  and  new  work  prepares  students  for  the  Advanced  Placement 
Examination  of  the  College  Entrance  Examination  Board. 

Chemistry 

Chemistry.  Four  hours.  A  college  preparatory  course  that  includes  the 
systematic  study  of  matter  and  of  the  changes  that  it  undergoes.  Special 
attention  is  given  to  modern  theory.  Emphasis  is  placed  upon  reasoning 
and  general  concepts  rather  than  upon  memorization  of  facts.  The  class 
meets  three  times  weekly  for  lectures,  demonstrations,  or  discussion,  and 
once  for  a  double  period  of  laboratory  work.  Text:  Chemistry ,  An  Ex- 
perimental Science,  prepared  by  the  Chemical  Education  Material  Study. 

Chemistry  X.  Five  hours.  The  course  is  open  to  a  limited  number  of 
able  students  who  have  strong  scholastic  records  in  mathematics  and 
physics.  It  is  essentially  the  equivalent  of  a  first-year  college  course,  and 
prepares  qualified  students  for  the  Advanced  Placement  Examination. 
Text:  Chemistry,  by  Sienko  and  Plane. 

Chemistry  S.  Two  hours.  One  period  a  week  is  for  recitation  and  dis- 
cussion of  review  and  advanced  topics;  the  other  is  a  double  period  for 
laboratory  work.  The  course  is  for  students  who  have  completed  a  regular 
course  with  good  grades.  Qualified  students  are  prepared  to  take  the  Ad- 
vanced Placement  Examination. 

Physics 

Physics.  Four  hours.  The  course  completes  the  requirements  for  en- 
trance to  college  and  prepares  the  student  for  further  work  in  this  or  in 
related  fields.  By  means  of  lectures,  recitations,  experimental  demonstra- 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES 


75 


tions,  and  the  solution  of  numerical  problems,  the  student  is  taught  not 
only  the  fundamental  principles  of  physics,  but  also  the  elements  of 
scientific  method.  Reference  is  made  where  possible  to  the  implications 
and  effect  on  current  thought  of  recent  advances.  The  laboratory  experi- 
ments are  chosen  not  merely  to  afford  training  in  manipulative  techniques 
and  to  illustrate  portions  of  the  text  material,  but  also  to  exemplify  proper 
scientific  practice.  The  use  of  the  slide  rule  is  taught  and  required. 

Physics  S.  Two  hours.  Open  to  Seniors  who  have  completed  a  year 
of  physics,  and  who  have  taken,  or  will  take  concurrently,  a  course  in 
calculus.  The  course  reviews  the  essential  material  of  elementary  physics, 
but  at  the  greater  depth  and  with  the  sophistication  made  possible  by  the 
calculus.  The  course  includes  a  number  of  advanced  laboratory  experi- 
ments. Students  undertake  individual  study  or  laboratory  projects  in  the 
spring.  Physics  S  will  prepare  the  better  students  for  the  Advanced  Place- 
ment Examination  in  Physics. 

Honors  Sequence 

Science  Honors  1  and  2.  Five  hours  each  year.  A  two-year  sequence, 
open,  upon  invitation  of  the  instructor,  to  a  small  group  of  Upper  Mid- 
dlers  who  will  complete  a  year  of  analytic  geometry  and  the  calculus  be- 
fore graduation  and  who  show  promise  of  unusual  capacity  in  science  and 
mathematics.  The  subject  matter  includes  chemistry  and  physics,  both  of 
them  carried  well  beyond  the  elementary  level  in  text  and  laboratory 
work.  It  is  expected  that  the  ablest  students  in  the  sequence  will  be  pre- 
pared to  pass  both  the  physics  and  chemistry  Advanced  Placement  Exam- 
inations of  the  College  Entrance  Examination  Board. 

Science  Honors  1  will  fulfill  the  diploma  requirement  in  laboratory 
science  for  students  who  find  it  inadvisable  for  any  reason  to  continue  to 
Science  Honors  2. 


PRIZES 


Listed  below  are  prizes  open  for  competition  in  each  academic  year. 
Unless  otherwise  stated,  awards  may  be  made  in  cash,  or  in  the  value  of 
the  amounts  listed. 

ENGLISH 

Draper  Prizes.  For  declamation.  Open  to  members  of  English  3,  4,  and  5.  $25,  $20, 
and  $15.  First  awarded  1867.  Funded  1878  by  Warren  F.  Draper,  Class  of  1843.  Awarded 
1965  to  (1)  William  Randolph  Bourne,  (2)  Thomas  Wright  Russell,  III,  (3)  Darreli 
John  Salk. 

Means  Prizes.  For  declamation  of  original  essays.  Open  to  members  of  English  3, 
4,  and  5.  $25,  $20,  and  $15.  First  awarded  1868.  Funded  1879  by  William  G.  Means, 
of  Andover.  Awarded  1965  to  (1)  Richard  Boyce  Olver,  (2)  Everard  Kidder  Meade,  III, 
(3)  Barry  Ko- Young  Tung. 

Robinson  Prizes.  For  debating  between  a  team  of  the  Philomathean  Society  and  one 
chosen  from  the  rest  of  the  school,  or  between  two  teams  chosen  by  the  Philomathean 
Society.  $75  to  the  winning  team.  First  awarded  1896.  Funded  1910  by  Henry  S.  Robin- 
son of  Andover.  Awarded  1965  to  (1)  Nigel  Patrick  Blair,  (2)  Thomas  Wright  Russell, 
III,  (3)  Matthew  Marks  Schneiderman.  ($75  to  be  divided  equally.) 

Schweppe  Prizes.  For  an  examination  on  a  literary  subject.  Open  to  Senior  and 
Upper  Middle  Class.  $30  and  $20.  First  awarded  1912.  Sustained  since  1941  by  John  S. 
Schweppe  in  memory  of  his  father,  Charles  M.  Schweppe,  Class  of  1898.  Awarded  1965 
to  (1)  Timothy  Pence  McKibben,  (2)  Timothy  Sewell  Perry. 

Goodhue  Prizes.  For  an  examination  in  English  literature  and  composition,  including 
the  more  practical  topics  of  elementary  rhetoric.  Open  to  Senior  and  Upper  Middle 
Classes.  $30  and  $20.  First  awarded  1916.  Funded  1936  by  the  family  of  Francis  A. 
Goodhue,  of  Andover,  in  memory  of  his  devotion  to  Phillips  Academy.  Awarded  1965 
to  (1)  Nigel  Patrick  Blair,  (2)  Hibberd  Van  Buren  Kline,  III. 

Clough  Prize.  For  an  essay  by  a  Senior  on  an  assigned  literary  subject.  $40.  First 
awarded  1923.  Funded  1923  by  friends  of  Charles  C.  Clough,  Class  of  1906,  in  memory 
of  his  interest  in  literary  studies  and  his  devotion  to  Phillips  Academy.  Awarded  1965 
to  Daniel  John  Peet  and  Timothy  Sewell  Perry.  ($40  to  be  divided  equally.) 

Langley  Prize.  For  an  essay  on  Charles  Dickens.  Open  to  members  of  the  Lower 
Middle  and  Junior  Classes.  $15.  First  awarded  1929.  Funded  1927  by  Stephen  S.  Lang- 
ley,  Class  of  1863.  Awarded  1965  to  Thomas  Eliot  Weil,  Jr. 

Leonard  Prizes.  For  declamation  of  original  essays.  Open  only  to  Juniors  and  Lower 
Middlers.  Three  prizes  of  books.  First  awarded  1942.  Funded  1957  by  The  Phillipian  in 
memory  of  Arthur  W.  Leonard,  Instructor  in  English  1907-1941.  Awarded  1965  to 
(1)  John  Lathrop  Tucker,  (2)  Stephen  Joseph  McCarthy,  (3)  Thomas  Dickson  Smith. 

Carr  Prizes.  For  skill  in  oral  English.  Open  only  to  Juniors  and  Lower  Middlers. 
$16,  $12,  $8,  and  $4.  First  awarded  1943.  Sustained  by  Donald  Eaton  Carr,  Class  of 
1922.  Awarded  1965  to  (1)  Robert  Morris  Freedman,  (2)  Nicholas  Arthur  Deutsch. 
(3)  Harold  L.  DeFelice,  Jr.,  (4)  James  Slocum  Rogers. 

Burns  Prizes.  For  an  original  poem.  Awarded  to  one  student  in  each  of  the  Senior 
and  Upper  Middle  Classes,  and  to  one  student  of  either  the  Lower  Middle  or  Junior  Class, 
$20  each.  First  awarded  1945.  Funded  1944  by  Mrs.  John  P.  O'Rourke  in  memory  of 
her  son,  2nd  Lt.  Charles  Snow  Burns,  USAAF,  Class  of  1941.  Awarded  1965  to  Senior, 
Terry  Reed  Bagg;  Upper,  David  Armour  Foster;  Lower,  Nicholas  Arthur  Deutsch. 

Sumner  R.  Kates  Prize.  For  an  essay  in  American  literature.  $12  5  in  cash.  First 
awarded  1950.  Funded  1949  by  Sumner  R.  Kates,  Class  of  1938.  Awarded  1965  to 
Robert  Vaughan  Young,  Jr. 


76 


PRIZES 


77 


John  Horne  Burns  Prize.  For  an  original  short  story.  Open  to  all  students.  $3  5  in 
cash.  Funded  in  1961  by  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Joseph  Lawrence  Burns  in  memory  of  their  son, 
John  Horne  Burns,  Class  of  193  3.  Awarded  1965  to  Charles  Sheldon,  II. 

CLASSICAL  LANGUAGES 

Cook  Prizes.  In  Greek.  For  an  examination  in  Homer,  including  translation  at  sight 
and  questions  on  grammar  and  antiquities  suggested  by  the  passage  set.  $30,  $15,  and  $10. 
First  awarded  1879.  Funded  1878  by  Joseph  Cook,  LL.D.,  Class  of  1857.  Awarded  1965 
to  Terry  Reed  Bagg  and  Louis  Rorimer.  ($5  5  to  be  divided  equally.) 

Dove  Prizes.  In  Latin.  For  an  examination  in  the  translation  and  interpretation  of 
Virgil.  Open  to  Seniors  or  members  of  Latin  4.  $30,  $20,  and  $10.  First  awarded  1880. 
Sustained  since  1915  from  the  George  W.  W.  Dove  Fund.  Awarded  1965  to  (1)  Robert 
Wallace  Moody,  (2)  Matthew  Cartwright  Mole,  (3)  Jonathan  Farr  Spooner. 

Valpey  Prizes.  For  Latin  composition  and  Greek  composition.  Open  to  the  Upper 
Middle  Class.  $20  each.  First  awarded  1896.  Funded  1891  from  a  bequest  of  Rev.  Thomas 
G.  Valpey,  Class  of  18  54.  Awarded  1965  to  Samuel  Ray  Miller — Greek.  No  award  this 
year — Latin. 

Johnson  Prize.  For  Greek  composition.  $10.  First  awarded  1924.  Funded  1932  by 
Alfred  Johnson,  Class  of  1890,  in  memory  of  the  Rev.  Alfred  Johnson,  a  graduate  of 
Dartmouth  College.  Awarded  1965  to  Stephen  Joseph  McCarthy  and  James  Joseph 
Paoletti.  ($10  to  be  divided  equally.) 

Weir  Prize.  In  Greek.  For  an  examination  in  the  translation  of  New  Testament  Greek. 
$70.  First  awarded  1928.  Funded  1927  from  a  bequest  of  The  Rev.  William  N.  Weir, 
Class  of  1895.  Awarded  1965  to  Burchard  Jan  Mansvelt-Beck;  Honorable  Mention, 
Laurence  John  Davidson. 

Benner  Prize.  For  excellence  in  first-year  Greek.  $25.  First  awarded  1939.  Funded 
1950  by  the  Rogers  Associates,  Inc.,  in  honor  of  Allen  Rogers  Benner,  Class  of  1888,  for 
forty-six  years  Instructor  in  Greek  in  Phillips  Academy.  Awarded  196  5  to  James  Slocum 
Rogers  and  Robert  Benjamin  Kritzer.  ($2  5  to  be  divided  equally.) 

Department  Prizes.  For  excellence  in  Latin  translation  and  composition,  $10  and 
$5;  for  recitation  from  memory  of  poetry  or  prose,  $10.  First  awarded  1940.  Sustained 
since  1947  from  Winthrop  Fund.  Awarded  1965  to  (1)  Daniel  Franko  Goldman,  (2) 
Anthony  Thomas  Grafton  for  Latin  3  Translation  and  Composition.  Awarded  1965  to 
(1)  Robert  Hall  Arnold,  (2)  Arthur  Groves  Newmyer,  III  for  Latin  2  Translation  and 
Composition.  Awarded  1965  to  Raymond  Francis  Healey,  Jr.,  for  Latin  3  Recitation; 
Honorable  Mention  to  Miguel  Marichal.  Awarded  1965  to  Philip  Lloyd  Nelson  for  Latin 
2  Recitation;  Honorable  Mention  to  John  McMurray  Butte.  Awarded  1965  to  Michael  O. 
Farrell  for  Latin  1  Recitation;  Honorable  Mention  to  Robert  Dick  Kefferstan,  III. 

Catlin  Prize.  To  be  awarded  regardless  of  need,  to  a  member  of  the  Upper  Middle 
Class  of  outstanding  scholarship  and  deportment,  who,  on  completion  of  Greek  2  or 
Latin  3  at  Phillips  Academy,  shall  include  in  his  Senior  program  a  major  course  in  Greek 
or  Latin.  $1,000.  First  awarded  1945.  Funded  1944  from  a  bequest  of  George  H.  Catlin, 
Class  of  1863.  Awarded  1965  to  Louis  Rorimer. 

GERMAN 

Stevenson  Prize.  For  excellence  in  German  composition,  oral  and  written.  Open 
to  the  Senior  and  Upper  Middle  Classes.  $15.  First  awarded  1904.  Funded  1904  by 
Robert  Stevenson,  Jr.,  Class  of  1896,  in  memory  of  his  father.  Awarded  1965  to  Thomas 
Wong  Liu. 

FRENCH 

Taylor  Prize.  For  excellence  in  French  conversation  and  composition.  A  selection 
of  French  books.  First  awarded  1909.  Funded  in  part  1908  by  a  member  of  the  Class 
of  1868  in  memory  of  Frederick  Holkins  Taylor  of  that  class,  son  of  Professor  John 
L.  Taylor,  Treasurer  of  Phillips  Academy  1852-1868.  Awarded  1965  to  Richard  Raymond 
Sieburth. 


78 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Department  Prizes.  For  aural  ability.  To  those  students  in  their  first  and  second 
year  of  French  who  receive  the  highest  marks  on  a  special  examination  to  test  aural 
comprehension.  First  and  second  prizes  in  books.  First  awarded  1946.  Sustained  by  an 
anonymous  donor.  Awarded  1965  in  French  1  to  (1)  James  Samuel  Feldman,  (2)  Charles 
Maxwell  Harrison;  French  2  to  (1)  Oakley  Maxwell  Hall,  III,  (2)  Stephen  Gates  Lis- 
berger. 

Anthony  D.  Graves  Prize.  For  improvement  during  the  first  year  of  the  study  of 
French.  To  the  student  whose  application  and  effort  result  in  the  greatest  over-all  im- 
provement. $25.  First  awarded  1954.  Funded  1954  by  Mrs.  Charles  F.  Pease  in  memory 
of  her  father.  Awarded  1965  to  Thomas  Dickson  Smith. 

Forbush  Prize.  For  excellence  in  French  3.  A  book  or  books.  First  awarded  1956. 
Funded  195  5  by  students  and  friends  of  Guy  Johnson  Forbush,  Instructor  in  French  at 
Phillips  Academy  1917-1920,  1924-1955.  Awarded  1965  to  Nicholas  Arthur  Deutsch. 

SPANISH 

Howard  P.  Hayden  Prize.  For  excellence  in  oral  Spanish.  To  a  member  of  the  first- 
year  Spanish  course  who,  in  the  opinion  of  the  faculty,  has  made  the  greatest  progress  in 
oral  Spanish.  $3  5.  First  awarded  1945.  Funded  1945  by  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Howard  P.  Hayden, 
of  Santiago,  Chile.  Awarded  1965  to  (1)  John  Tomassi,  $25,  (2)  Michael  Bruce  Lemkin 
$10;  Honorable  Mention  to  Thomas  Dynavor  Rees  and  Scott  Rodgers  Wheaton,  Jr. 

Donald  E.  Merriam  Memoriae  Prize.  Awarded  annually  to  the  student  in  the  second 
year  of  Spanish  who,  in  the  opinion  of  the  Spanish  Department,  has  best  combined  the 
qualities  of  proficiency,  interest  and  enthusiasm  in  the  study  of  that  language.  A  book 
and  name  on  plaque.  First  awarded  1965.  Given  by  the  students  of  Spanish  at  Phillips 
Academy.  Awarded  1965  to  Ward  Beecher  Flad. 

HISTORY 

Lauder  Prizes.  For  an  examination  in  Modern  European  History.  $30,  $20,  and  books 
First  awarded  1913.  Funded  1916  by  George  Lauder  in  memory  of  his  son,  George  Lauder, 
Jr.,  Class  of  1897.  Awarded  1965  to  (1)  Francis  Charles  Klein,  (2)  Timothy  Pence 
McKibben. 

Haymond  Prizes.  In  American  History.  To  undergraduates  taking  the  course  in 
History  of  the  United  States,  for  an  essay  on  the  Constitution  of  the  United  States. 
$50,  $25,  $10,  and  books.  First  awarded  1943.  Sustained  by  the  Honorable  Frank  C. 
Haymond,  in  honor  of  his  sons,  William  Stanley  Haymond,  2d,  Class  of  1942,  and 
Thomas  Arnette  Haymond,  Class  of  1943.  Awarded  1965  to  (1)  Laurence  John  David- 
son, Loyalty,  Security,  and  Due  Process,  (2)  David  B.  Roe,  Escobedo  vs.  Illinois, 
(3)   Derek  Huntington,  Connecticut  vs.  Huntington. 

Grace  Prizes.  In  American  History.  For  an  essay  on  the  Bill  of  Rights  or  other 
historical  topic  related  to  our  heritage  of  human  liberty.  $70,  $45,  $3  5,  and  books.  First 
awarded  1953.  Funded  1951  by  Oliver  R.  Grace,  Class  of  1926,  in  memory  of  his 
father,  Morgan  H.  Grace.  Awarded  1965  to  (1)  Hibberd  V.  B.  Kline,  III,  Kline  for 
Congress,  (2)  David  S.  Gast,  John  Birch  Society,  (3)  Lowell  D.  Turnbull,  Corn-Hog 
Policy  of  the  1st  A.A.A. 

Marshall  S.  Kates  Prizes.  In  American  History.  To  undergraduates  taking  the 
course  in  History  of  the  United  States  for  an  essay  on  a  topic  in  the  field  of  American 
History.  $50,  $30,  $20,  and  books.  First  awarded  1953.  Funded  1952  by  Marshall  S. 
Kates,  Class  of  1939.  Awarded  1965  to  (1)  Robert  Charles  Jimerson,  National  Labor, 
Relations  Act,  (2)  Charles  Scott  McLanahan,  Tennessee  Vallvy  Authority,  (3)  Franz 
Schneider,  Jr.,  Requisition  of  Merchant  Ships. 

Webster  Prizes.  For  excellence  in  Ancient  History,  European  History,  or  Contem- 
porary Affairs.  Open  to  all  students  taking  the  courses,  on  the  basis  of  competitive 
examinations  or  proficiency  in  current  work,  at  the  discretion  of  the  department.  $125 
in  money  and  books.  First  awarded  1956.  Funded  1956  by  Dean  Kingman  Webster,  Jr., 
Class  of  1915.  Awarded  1965  to  (1)  Alan  Philip  Oniskor,  (2)  Stephen  Taylor  Edmund- 


PRIZES 


79 


son  in  History  1;  to  (1)  Richard  Raymond  Sieburth,  (2)  Brian  Gunder  Berg  in  His- 
tory 2. 

MATHEMATICS 

Convers  Prizes.  In  Plane  Geometry.  Awarded  on  the  basis  of  an  examination  in 
Plane  Geometry  covering  analysis  on  the  originals,  numericals,  loci,  and  constructions. 
$100,  $75,  $50,  $25,  $10,  and  books.  First  awarded  1898.  Funded  1898  by  E.  B.  Con- 
vers, Class  of  1857,  and  extended  in  1951  by  the  former  prize  men.  Awarded  1965  to 
(1)  Charles  Maxwell  Harrison,  (2)  Robert  Ames  Duncan,  (3)  John  Joseph  Gaffny, 
(4)  Phillip  Lloyd  Nelson,  (S)  David  Allen  Wengert. 

Eaton  Prize.  For  excellence  in  Algebra.  To  a  member  of  the  Junior  Class  outstand- 
ing for  proficiency  in  first-year  Algebra.  $20.  First  awarded  1938.  Funded  1957  by 
bequest  of  Thaxter  Eaton,  Class  of  1904,  in  memory  of  his  father,  George  T.  Eaton, 
Class  of  1873,  for  fifty  years  instructor  in  Mathematics  at  Phillips  Academy.  Awarded 
1965  to  Rowland  Waton  Chang. 

McCurdy  Prizes.  For  excellence  in  Senior  Mathematics.  For  Seniors  in  the  regular 
fourth-year  Mathematics  program.  Awarded  on  the  basis  of  classroom  work  and  an 
examination.  $3  5  and  $25.  First  awarded  1941.  Funded  1940  by  the  family  of  the  late 
Matthew  S.  McCurdy,  in  memory  of  his  connection  with  Phillips  Academy  as  Instructor 
in  Mathematics  1873-1921.  Awarded  1965  to  (1)  Lowell  David  Turnbull,  (2)  Christo- 
pher John  Barry. 

Bailey  Prize.  In  Upper  Middle  Mathematics.  On  the  basis  of  an  examination  at 
the  close  of  the  year.  $3  5.  First  awarded  1946.  Funded  1946  by  Edward  Bailey  Crichton, 
Class  of  1946,  in  memory  of  his  grandfather,  Edward  Bailey,  Class  of  1878.  Awarded 
1965  to  Peter  Cushing  Perdue. 

Watt  Prizes.  In  Elementary  and  Intermediate  Algebra,  Plane  and  Solid  Geometry, 
Plane  Trigonometry  and  Advanced  Algebra.  For  Seniors.  Awarded  on  the  basis  of  a 
comprehensive  examination  covering  the  analytical  work  of  secondary  school  Mathematics. 
$125,  $75,  $25,  and  books.  First  awarded  1954.  Funded  1953  by  J.  Lester  Parsons  with 
the  cooperation  of  William  C.  Ridgway,  Jr.,  Class  of  1925,  and  William  C.  Ridgway,  3d, 
Class  of  1953,  in  memory  of  Frederick  Ellsworth  Watt,  Instructor  at  Phillips  Academy 
1933-1951.  Awarded  1965  to  (1)  Michael  Timothy  Madison,  (2)  William  Benjamin 
Barker,  (3)  Donald  Sloane  Shepard. 

Tower  Prize.  For  excellence  in  Analytic  Geometry  and  the  Calculus.  A  specially 
bound  book  in  the  field  of  Mathematics.  First  awarded  1954.  Sustained  by  John  W. 
Dixon,  Class  of  1924,  in  recognition  of  Oswald  Tower,  Instructor  in  Mathematics  at 
Phillips  Academy  1910-1949.  Awarded  1965  to  Kellogg  Sheffield  Stelle. 

Winfield  M.  Sides  Prize.  For  excellence  in  Mechanical  Drawing.  Awarded  on  the 
basis  of  proficiency  in  classroom  work.  $100  in  cash  and/or  drawing  equipment.  Sus- 
tained by  Donald  A.  Raymond,  Jr.,  Class  of  1932,  in  memory  of  Winfield  M.  Sides, 
Instructor  in  Mathematics  at  Phillips  Academy  1919-1958.  First  awarded  1960.  Awarded 
1965  to  Douglas  Alden  Karlson. 

Joseph  Award.  For  excellence  in  the  area  of  Mathematics.  To  a  member  of  the  Senior 
Class.  A  gold  medal  and  a  book.  First  awarded  1960.  Sustained  by  David  Joseph,  of 
New  York  City,  in  memory  of  hi$  father,  Bernard  Joseph.  Awarded  1965  to  Donald 
Sloane  Shepard. 

Scoville  Prize.     (See  Sciences.) 

SCIENCES 

Scovdlle  Prize.  In  the  Physical  Sciences  or  Mathematics.  To  a  student  or  students 
for  an  original  paper  or  project  exhibiting  creative  thinking  or  ingenuity  in  the  Physical 
Sciences  or  Mathematics,  preferably  not  in  assigned  course  work.  $50.  First  awarded 
1959  by  Anthony  Church  Scoville,  Class  of  195  8,  in  memory  of  his  grandfather,  Herbert 
Scoville.  Awarded  1965  to  Michael  Timothy  Madison. 

Wadsworth  Prize.  For  excellence  in  Physics.  To  the  student  holding  the  highest 
rank  in  Physics  for  the  year.  $30.  First  awarded  1900.  Funded  1952  by  William  S.  Wads- 
wor.h,  M.D.,  Class  of  1887.  Awarded  1965  to  Richard  Kenneth  Dawson. 


80 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Dalton  Prize.  For  excellence  in  Chemistry.  To  the  student  holding  the  highest  rank 
in  Chemistry  for  the  year.  $65.  First  awarded  1915.  Funded  1915  by  Frederick  Goodrich 
Crane,  of  Dalton,  Massachusetts,  Class  of  1884.  Trustee  of  Phillips  Academy,  1912-1923. 
Awarded  1965  to  Bradley  Youle  Smith. 

Marsh  Prize.  For  excellence  in  Biology.  To  a  student  who  has  been  outstanding  in 
interest  and  attainment  in  the  Biological  Sciences.  $25.  First  awarded  1936.  Sustained 
since  195  0  by  an  anonymous  donor  in  memory  of  Othniel  C.  Marsh,  Class  of  1851,  one 
of  the  great  paleontologists  of  his  day.  Awarded  1965  to  Phillip  Lloyd  Nelson. 

Graham  Prize.  For  excellence  in  Science.  To  that  member  of  the  graduating  class 
attaining  the  highest  average  grade  in  ten  hours  of  the  natural  sciences  studied  while 
at  Phillips  Academy.  $1,000.  First  awarded  1946.  Funded  1945  from  a  bequest  of  James 
C.  Graham,  Instructor  in  Science  at  Phillips  Academy,  1892-1937.  Awarded  1965  to 
Donald  Sloane  Shepard. 

Wadsworth  Prize.  For  excellence  in  Biology.  To  the  student  holding  the  highest  rank 
in  Biology  for  the  year.  $30.  First  awarded  195  3.  Funded  1952  by  William  S.  Wads- 
worth,  M.D.,  Class  of  1887.  Awarded  1965  to  Richard  Barry  Weinberg. 

Department  Prize.  For  excellence  in  Physics.  To  that  student  taking  elementary 
physics  who  receives  the  highest  grade  on  a  prize  examination.  Books.  First  awarded 
1956.  Sustained  by  the  Physics  Department.  Awarded  1965  to  Richard  Kenneth  Dawson. 

Department  Prize.  For  excellence  in  Biology.  To  a  student  who  has  demonstrated 
exceptional  interest  and  accomplishment  with  particular  reference  to  laboratory  investi- 
gation. $25.  First  awarded  1964.  Sustained  by  an  anonymous  donor.  Awarded  1965  to 
Robert  Pease  Smith,  Jr. 

MUSIC 

Cutter  Prize.  For  proficiency  in  orchestral,  especially  stringed  instruments.  $5  5. 
First  awarded  1924.  Funded  1925  by  The  Rev.  C.  F.  Cutter,  Class  of  1871,  in  memory 
of  his  father,  Charles  Cutter,  Class  of  1840.  Awarded  1965  to  Dwight  Wayne  Batteau. 

Poynter  Prize.  To  that  member  of  the  Phillips  Academy  Choir  who,  in  the  judg- 
ment of  the  Choirmaster,  has  been  the  most  useful  member  of  that  organization.  $30. 
First  awarded  1945.  Funded  1943  by  Horace  Martin  Poynter,  Class  of  1896,  and  Mrs. 
Poynter,  formerly  of  Andover,  in  memory  of  their  son,  Edward  Pitkin  Poynter,  Class 
of  1940,  who  gave  his  life  for  his  country  in  the  aviation  service  in  July,  1943.  Awarded 
1965  to  Richard  Woodhull  Barnum. 

Jones  Prize.  To  that  member  of  Phillips  Academy  Orchestra  who,  in  the  judgment 
of  the  Director  of  Music,  has  been  the  most  useful  member  of  that  organization.  $25. 
First  awarded  1946.  Established  in  194 J  by  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Edward  T.  Jones,  in  memory 
of  their  son,  Ainsworth  B.  Jones,  Class  of  1939,  who  gave  his  life  for  his  country  in 
the  aviation  service  in  July,  1943.  Awarded  1965  to  Louis  David  Carmichael. 

Collier  Prizes.  For  proficiency  in  the  playing  of  the  piano.  $25.  First  awarded  1947. 
Funded  1946  by  Mrs.  Milton  Collier  and  I.  Alfred  Levy,  in  memory  of  Milton  Collier. 
Awarded  1965  to  Ralph  Paul  Davis. 

Fuller  Music  Prize.  To  a  musical  student  who,  irrespective  of  need,  has  demonstrated 
high  character  and  special  musical  aptitude.  The  recipient  will  assume  responsibility  for 
playing  the  carillon  in  the  Memorial  Tower.  $3  50.  First  awarded  1951.  Funded  1959 
by  Samuel  Lester  Fuller,  Class  of  1894.  Awarded  1965  to  David  Hill  Porter. 

Kibrick  Prize.  To  that  member  of  the  Phillips  Academy  Band  who,  in  the  judgment 
of  the  Director  of  Music,  has  been  the  most  useful  member  of  that  organization.  $50. 
First  awarded  1953.  Sustained  in  memory  of  Herbert  V.  Kibrick,  Class  of  1934,  by  his 
wife.  Awarded  1965  to  Thomas  Paul  Buckman. 

ART 

Morse  Prize.  To  the  student  who  best  combines  native  creative  ability  with  crafts- 
manship, as  evidenced  in  a  developed  personal  style.  $25.  First  awarded  1932.  Funded 
1942  by  Winslow  Ames,  Class  of  1925,  in  honor  of  Samuel  Finley  Breese  Morse,  Class  of 
1805.  Awarded  1965  to  Danny  Marc  Samuels. 


PRIZES 


SI 


Thompson  Prize.  For  improvement  in  drawing  and  painting.  $2  5.  First  awarded 
1932.  Funded  195  5  by  Mrs.  Frances  Thompson  Heely,  in  memory  of  her  brother, 
Augustus  Porter  Thompson,  3d,  Class  of  1928.  Awarded  1965  to  Peter  Dean  Vander- 
warker. 

Addison  Gallery  Associates  Prize.  To  a  student  who  has  distinguished  himself  in 
art  as  well  as  in  other  activities.  $25.  First  awarded  1941.  Sustained  by  the  Addison 
Gallery  Associates.  Awarded  1965  to  Benjamin  Thomas  Hafkenschiel. 

John  Esther  Gallery  Prize.  To  the  student  who  has  shown  through  his  work 
the  clearest  understanding  of  art.  $25.  First  awarded  1943.  Awarded  1965  to  Robert 
Vaughan  Young,  Jr. 

Photography  Fellowship  Prize.  To  the  student  demonstrating  the  greatest  excel- 
lence in  Photography.  $2  5  and  one  week  as  an  apprentice  in  the  photographic  studio  of 
Wingate  Paine.  First  awarded  1964.  Sustained  by  Wingate  H.  Paine,  Class  of  1932. 
Awarded  1965  to  Eugene  Andrew  Stephen  Mazel. 

Ralph  Bradley  Prize.  For  general  excellence  in  art.  $40.  First  awarded  in  1960. 
Funded  in  1964  by  Ralph  Bradley.  Awarded  in  1965  to  Howard  Cutler. 

ATHLETICS 

Faculty  Golf  Cup.  To  the  winner  of  the  Varsity  Golf  Squad  competition.  Winner's 
name  inscribed  on  Cup.  Presented  1927  by  the  Faculty  of  Phillips  Academy.  First 
awarded  1927.  Awarded  1965  to  Christopher  Jude  Gurry. 

Kilpatrick  Trophy.  To  the  winner  of  the  Andover  versus  Exeter  track  meet.  A 
bowl.  Winner's  name  inscribed  on  bowl,  to  be  held  for  one  year  by  the  winning  Academy. 
Replica  to  the  captain  or  co-captains  of  the  winning  team.  Trophy  presented  193  8  by 
John  Reed  Kilpatrick,  Class  of  1907.  First  awarded  1938.  Awarded  1965  to  the  Phillips 
Exeter  Academy. 

Schubert  Award.  To  a  member  of  the  Senior  Class  who  has  excelled  in  varsity 
athletics  and  who  has  best  exemplified  the  qualities  of  sound  character,  cheerfulness, 
and  good  sportsmanship  on  the  athletic  field.  A  gold  medal,  and  winner's  name  inscribed 
on  a  plaque.  Funded  19  51  by  the  Eta  Delta  Phi  Society,  in  memory  of  Edmund  John 
Schubert  of  the  Physical  Education  Department.  First  awarded  1944.  Awarded  1965  to 
John  Randall  Evans. 

Banta  Trophy.  To  be  awarded  annually  to  that  member  of  the  Varsity  Tennis  Team 
who  shows  the  best  sportsmanship,  leadership,  and  character  throughout  the  season. 
Established  1  953  by  the  Tennis  Team  of  Phillips  Academy,  in  honor  of  their  coach, 
Cornelius  Gordon  Schuyler  Banta.  Awarded  1965  to  Stephen  Edward  Devereux. 

Cross  Country  Cup.  To  the  member  of  the  Cross  Country  Team  who  during  the 
season  has  displayed  outstanding  sportsmanship,  performance,  and  team  spirit.  Winner's 
name  inscribed  on  Cup.  Presented  1952  by  the  members  of  the  cross  country  squad  in 
honor  of  their  coach,  Norwood  Penrose  Hallowell.  First  awarded  195  3.  Awarded  1965 
to  Peter  Normann  Dennehy. 

Basketball  Trophy.  To  the  club  basketball  player  who  has  contributed  most  to 
club  basketball.  Winner's  name  inscribed  on  trophy.  Presented  1953  by  the  members 
of  the  Varsity  Basketball  Team.  First  awarded  195  3.  Awarded  1965  to  James  Truesdell 
Kilbreth,  III. 

Fagan  Squash  Racquets  Trophy.  To  the  winner  of  the  Fagan  Trophy  Tournament. 
Winner's  name  inscribed  on  Trophy.  Presented  in  1954  by  Charles  Aloysius  Fagan,  III, 
Class  of  1954,  in  honor  of  his  father,  Charles  Aloysius  Fagan,  Jr.  First  awarded  1954. 
Awarded  1965  to  Courtlandt  Palmer  Dixon,  III. 

Reagh  Wetmore  Swimming  Award.  Awarded  annually  to  a  senior  member  of  the 
Varsity  Swimming  Team  excluding  the  Captain  who  has  best  exemplified  the  spirit  of 
Andover  swimming.  Winner's  name  inscribed  on  plaque.  Established  by  the  1964  swim- 
ming team.  Awarded  1965  to  John  Work  Garrett  Phillips. 

Lacrosse  Trophy.  To  the  lacrosse  player,  excluding  the  captain,  who  through 
enthusiasm  and  love  for  the  sport  has  inspired  his  teammates  with  the  will  to  win. 


82 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Winner's  name  inscribed  on  trophy.  Presented  in  1954  by  the  members  of  the  lacrosse 
squad  in  honor  of  their  coach,  John  Richard  Lux.  First  awarded  1954.  Awarded  1965 
to  John  Randall  Evans. 

Smith  Hockey  Cup.  To  a  member  of  the  hockey  team,  exclusive  of  the  captain, 
who  is  in  good  scholastic  standing  and  who  during  his  association  with  hockey  has 
contributed  most  to  the  sport  and  to  the  school  by  representing  its  ideals  through 
sportsmanship,  endeavor,  and  ability.  A  silver  cup.  Funded  1954  by  Sumner  Smith,  Class 
of  1908.  First  awarded  1954.  Awarded  1965  to  Henry  Walker  Comstock,  Jr. 

Crew  Cup.  To  the  student  who  has  contributed  most  in  the  way  of  team  spirit  and 
sportsmanship  to  the  crew.  Winner's  name  inscribed  on  cup.  Presented  195  5  by  the 
members  of  the  rowing  squad,  in  honor  of  their  coach,  William  Hayes  Brown,  Class  of 
1934.  First  awarded  195  5.  Awarded  1965  to  Charles  Shelden,  II. 

Track  Trophy.  To  the  member  of  the  winter  and  spring  varsity  track  squad  who 
exhibits  outstanding  character  and  will  to  win.  Winner's  name  inscribed  on  trophy. 
Presented  by  the  members  of  the  195  5  winter  and  spring  track  squads  in  honor  of  their 
coach,  Stephen  Stanley  Sorota.  First  awarded  195  5.  Awarded  1965  to  Colby  Hopewell 
Snyder. 

Press  Club  Trophy.  To  the  student  who  has  proved  through  his  performance  on 
the  athletic  fields  to  be  the  most  capable  athlete  of  the  whole  year.  Winner's  name 
inscribed  on  trophy  and  winner  receives  replica  of  trophy.  Trophy  presented  1956  by 
the  members  of  the  Press  Club  of  Phillips  Academy  and  replicas  sustained  by  the  club. 
First  awarded  1956.  Awarded  1965  to  Daniel  Warren. 

Sheridan  Medal.  To  the  student  who  has  contributed  most  to  the  intramural  ath- 
letic program.  A  gold  medal.  Funded  1956  by  bequest  of  Fannie  J.  Sheridan,  in  memory 
of  her  grandson,  Harold  Joseph  Sheridan,  Jr.,  Class  of  1943,  who  gave  his  life  for  his 
country  as  a  member  of  the  United  States  Marine  Corps  in  September  1944.  First 
awarded  1957.  Awarded  1965  to  Warren  Kempton  Clark. 

Football  Trophy.  To  the  two  members  of  the  Junior  Varsity  1  Team  who  con- 
tributed most  to  Andover  football  below  the  Varsity  level.  Presented  in  195  5  by  the 
members  of  the  Junior  Varsity  1  Football  Team.  Awarded  1965  to  (1)  Edward  Righter 
McLean,  Jr.,  and  (2)  Richard  Lawrence  Stewart. 

Richard  S.  Pieters  Varsity  Wrestling  Award.  To  that  member  of  the  Varsity 
Team,  excluding  the  Captain,  who  demonstrates  throughout  the  season  outstanding  ability 
and  enthusiasm  for  the  sport.  Winner's  name  inscribed  on  plaque.  Awarded  1965  to 
Thomas  Edmund  McEwan. 

Peter  Q.  McKee  Ski  Bowl.  Awarded  annually  to  a  member  of  the  Varsity  Ski 
Team  who  has  contributed  the  most  to  the  team  and  to  the  sport  of  skiing.  Winner's 
name  inscribed  on  bowl.  Awarded  1965  to  Richard  Lewis  Trafton. 

Raymond  T.  Tippett  Memorial  Award.  Awarded  annually  to  a  senior  member 
of  the  varsity  football  or  baseball  team  whose  loyalty,  courage  and  modesty  exemplify 
the  character  of  Ray  Tippett  and  the  best  traditions  of  Andover  athletics.  Established 
in  1962  by  members  of  the  class  of  1945  for  a  prize  in  memory  of  their  classmate, 
Raymond  T.  Tippett.  Winner's  name  inscribed  on  plaque.  Awarded  1965  to  Douglas 
Preston  Woodlock. 

OTHER  PRIZES 

Aurelian  Honor  Society  Prize.  To  a  member  of  the  graduating  class  who,  in  the 
opinion  of  the  Faculty  and  his  classmates,  is  outstanding  in  sterling  character,  high 
scholarship,  and  forceful  leadership.  Books.  First  awarded  1936.  Sustained  by  the 
Aurelian  Honor  Society.  Awarded  1965  to  Todd  Harrison  Everett. 

Ayars  Prize.  To  a  member  of  the  Senior  Class  who,  through  work,  perseverance 
and  seeking  after  excellence,  has  created  for  himself  a  position  of  respect  and  admiration 
in  the  school  community.  $50.  First  awarded  1956.  Funded  1957  by  Mr.  and  Mrs.  James 
S.  Ayars,  in  memory  of  their  son,  James  Sterling  Ayars,  Jr.,  Class  of  1949.  Awarded 
1965  to  Timothy  Sewell  Perry. 


PRIZES 


S3 


Bierer  Prize.  To  a  student  who  is  outstanding  in  character  and  personality.  $25. 
First  awarded  1944.  Sustained  by  Eugene  S.  Bierer,  Class  of  1943.  Awarded  196 J  to 
Stephen  Edward  Devereux. 

Faculty  Prize.  To  that  member  of  the  graduating  class  who  during  his  Senior  year 
attained  the  highest  academic  average.  $100.  First  awarded  1912.  Funded  1923  by  Sanford 
H.  E.  Freund,  Class  of  1897,  and  increased  in  195  5  by  his  sister,  Miss  Camille  E.  Freund. 
Awarded  1965  to  James  Brian  Haley. 

Federation  of  Harvard  Clubs  Prize.  To  an  outstanding  member  of  the  Upper 
Middle  Class  who  combines  excellence  in  scholarship  with  achievement  in  other  fields. 
A  book.  First  awarded  in  1911.  Sustained  by  the  Harvard  Club  of  Andover.  Awarded 
1965  to  Vinton  Douglas  Tompkins. 

Fuller  Prize.  To  a  member  of  the  Senior  Class  who,  having  been  at  Andover  not 
less  than  two  years,  has  best  exemplified  and  upheld  in  his  life  and  work  at  Andover  the 
ideals  and  traditions  of  the  school.  A  gold  medal.  First  awarded  1912.  Funded  1959  by 
Samuel  Lester  Fuller,  Class  of  1894.  Awarded  1965  to  Todd  Harrison  Everett. 

Hopper  Prize.  To  a  student  worker  in  the  Commons  who  is  outstanding  in  industry, 
cooperation,  and  unselfishness.  $100.  First  awarded  19  54.  Funded  195  3  by  friends  of 
Henry  Hopper  who,  for  thirty-eight  years,  served  Phillips  Academy  with  industry, 
cooperation,  and  unselfishness.  Awarded  1965  to  Richard  Mason  Boydston,  Jr. 

Improvement  Prize.  To  a  member  of  the  Senior  Class  who  has  been  a  student  at 
Andover  for  at  least  two  years  and  who  has  shown  the  greatest  development  of  character 
and  scholarship.  $100.  First  awarded  1941.  Sustained  by  a  member  of  the  Class  of  1916. 
Awarded  1965  to  Howard  Albert  Austin,  III, 

Keyes  Prize.  To  a  boy,  who  in  his  Lower  Middle  year  shows  outstanding  qualities 
of  character,  leadership,  scholarship  and  athletic  ability.  $50.  Funded  195  8  by  Langley 
C.  Keyes,  Class  of  1920.  First  awarded  1959.  Awarded  1965  to  Thomas  Graham  Sin- 
clair, Jr. 

Kingsbury  Prize.  To  a  student  of  outstanding  character,  who,  in  the  judgment  of 
the  headmaster  is  especially  distinguished  for  perseverance  and  resolution.  $100.  First 
awarded  1943.  Funded  1945  by  Dr.  and  Mrs.  John  A.  Kingsbury,  in  memory  of  their 
son,  John  Adams  Kingsbury,  Jr.,  Class  of  1934.  Awarded  1965  to  Howard  Jan  Stanback. 

Library  Prizes.  For  the  best  student  libraries  collected.  $30  and  $15.  Sustained  by 
the  Friends  of  Oliver  Wendell  Holmes  Library  since  1956.  Awarded  1965  to  (1)  Stephen 
Joseph  McCarthy,  (2)  no  award. 

Lord  Prize.  To  a  Senior  who  during  his  residence  at  Phillips  Academy  has  displayed 
in  his  daily  actions  and  personal  contacts  a  genuinely  fine  character.  A  selection  of  books. 
First  awarded  1947.  Sustained  by  Mason  Faulconer  Lord,  Class  of  1944.  Awarded  1965 
to  Donald  Sloane  Shepard. 

Phillipian  Prize.  For  outstanding  service  rendered  to  the  Phillipian.  $50.  First 
awarded  1931.  Funded  1931  by  James  Q.  Newton,  Class  of  1929,  and  Business  Manager 
of  the  Phillipian  during  his  Senior  year.  Awarded  1965  to  David  Benson  Roe. 

Redpath  Prizes.  For  the  most  interesting  libraries  of  paperback  books  collected  by 
students.  $30,  $15  and  $10.  First  awarded  1960.  Sustained  by  Robert  U.  Redpath,  Jr., 
Class  of  1924,  in  memory  of  his  parents.  Awarded  1965  to  (1)  Anthony  Michael  Alofsin, 
(2)  Christopher  Hayes  Wilbur,  (3)  Philip  Thompson  Aranow. 

Schweppe  (Richard  Jewett)  Prize.  To  a  member  of  the  Senior  Class  in  recognition 
of  an  unusual  spirit  of  cooperation  and  friendliness.  $100.  First  awarded  1947.  Funded 
1946  by  Mrs.  Richard  J.  Schweppe,  in  memory  of  her  husband,  Richard  Jewett  Schweppe, 
Class  of  1896.  Awarded  1965  to  Louis  Rorimer. 

Stearns  Prize.  In  honor  of  Dr.  Alfred  E.  Stearns,  Class  of  1890.  Headmaster  of 
Phillips  Academy  1903-193  3,  to  a  student  who,  through  conscientious  effort,  high  ambi- 
tion and  courage,  outstanding  character  and  excellent  deportment,  has  made  Phillips 
Academy  a  better  and  more  friendly  place  in  which  to  live.  $100.  First  awarded  1951. 


84 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Supported,  beginning  in  19  59,  by  the  Roger  C.  Sullivan  Fund,  established  in  1921  by 
Boetius  H.  Sullivan,  Class  of  1905.  Awarded  1965  to  Eugene  Indjic. 

Abbot  Stevens  Prize.  To  a  member  of  the  Senior  Class,  upon  recommendation  of 
the  faculty,  who  through  his  character  and  leadership  has  made  a  significant  contribu- 
tion to  the  Academy  and  to  his  classmates.  $100.  Funded  195  9  by  Mrs.  Abbot  Stevens, 
in  memory  of  her  husband,  Abbot  Stevens,  Class  of  1907.  Awarded  1965  to  John  Randall 
Evans. 

Stiles  Prize.  To  the  member  of  the  Upper  Middle  Class  whose  judgment  and  loyalty 
to  the  school  have  been  exemplary.  $50.  First  awarded  1960.  Funded  1960  by  Mrs. 
Russell  Stiles,  in  memory  of  her  husband,  Class  of  1908,  and  his  father,  Sumner  Burritt 
Stiles,  Class  of  1872.  Fund  increased  1960  by  her  son,  William  S.  Stiles,  Class  of  1942, 
and  David  Stiles,  Class  of  1936.  Awarded  1965  to  James  Farnham  Fabiani. 

Sullivan  Prizes.  To  those  members  of  the  Senior,  Upper  Middle,  Lower  Middle,  and 
Junior  Class  who  made  the  greatest  improvement  in  scholarship  during  the  previous 
school  year.  Four  prizes  of  $200  each,  awarded  in  the  fall.  First  awarded  1921.  Funded 
1921  by  Boetius  H.  Sullivan,  Class  of  1905,  in  memory  of  his  father,  Roger  C.  Sullivan. 
Awarded  1965  to  Senior,  Marvin  Hayne  Kendrick,  Jr.,  Upper,  Christopher  John  Hallett, 
Lower,  William  Lyon  Eakland,  Junior,  Wade  Hampton  Saunders. 

Van  Duzer  Prizes.  Two  prizes  of  $3  50  each,  awarded  as  outlined  below,  (a)  Andover- 
Harvard.  "The  income  is  awarded  annually  on  the  basis  of  high  scholarship  to  a  mem- 
ber of  the  incoming  Senior  Class  who  is  preparing  for  Harvard,  the  award  to  be  announced 
at  the  close  of  the  student's  Upper  Middle  year  on  the  basis  of  his  record  up  to  that  time." 
Awarded  1964  to  Lloyd  Allan  Wells,  (b)  Harvard-Andover.  "The  income  is  avail- 
able for  a  graduate  of  Phillips  Academy  during  his  Freshman  year  in  Harvard  College, 
the  award  based  on  high  scholarship,  to  be  announced  at  the  close  of  the  recipient's 
Senior  year  in  the  school."  Awarded  1964  to  Stephen  Bradner  Burbank.  First  awarded 
1912.  Funded  1928  from  a  bequest  of  Henry  S.  Van  Duzer,  Class  of  1871. 

Warren  Prize.  To  a  member  of  the  Senior  Class  preparing  to  enter  Amherst  College 
who,  on  the  basis  of  character  and  scholarship,  is  deemed  most  deserving  of  the  award 
by  the  faculty.  $50.  First  awarded  1926.  Funded  1925  by  Frank  Dale  Warren,  Jr.,  Class 
of  1915,  in  memory  of  his  father,  Class  of  1879.  Awarded  1965  to  John  Work  Garrett 
Phillips. 

Wells  Prize.  To  a  member  of  the  Junior  Class  who  has  displayed  the  outstanding 
qualities  of  loyalty,  perseverance,  and  sterling  character  which  characterized  the  boy 
in  whose  memory  the  prize  is  given.  $50.  First  awarded  1953.  Sustained  by  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
J.  Brent  Wells,  in  memory  of  their  son,  Anthony  Peters  Wells,  admitted  to  the  Class  of 
1956.  Awarded  1965  to  Alan  Philip  Oniskor. 

Yale  Bowl.  To  that  member  of  the  Senior  Class  who  has  attained  the  highest  pro- 
ficiency in  scholanship  and  athletics.  First  awarded  1902.  Sustained  by  the  Yale  Club 
of  Boston.  Awarded  196  5   to  Daniel  Warren. 


SCHOLARSHIP  FUNDS 

Scholarships  are  provided  by  the  Trustees  from  the  income  of  the  fol- 
lowing funds: 

*Hon.  William  Phillips  (1795;  1804).  Begun  with  a  gift  from  Hon.  Wil- 
liam Phillips  and  increased  by  his  bequest  of  $4,000    $    4,63  3.3  3 

"Students'  Educational  Fund  (1854).  Begun  with  a  gift  of  one  hundred 
dollars  from  the  Senior  Class  of  18  54.  Since  then  increased  by  the  accu- 
mulation of  income  and  by  other  gifts,  including  one  of  $1,000  from 
Edward  Taylor,  Treasurer  of  Phillips  Academy,  1868-1889    7,762.64 

*Samuel  Farrar  (1865).  Bequest  of  Samuel  Farrar,  1803,  Treasurer  of 
Phillips  Academy,  1808-1840.  (A  part  of  this  fund  is  for  other  pur- 
poses)  22,000.00 

*Jane  Aiken  Clarke  (1870).  James  G.  Clarke,  Class  of  1839,  in  memory 

of  his  mother    1,200.00 

IPeter  Smith  Byers  (1878).  John  Byers,  Class  of  1848,  in  memory  of  his 

brother,  Class  of  1847   5  00.00 

*Class  of  1878  (1878).  Senior  Classical  class    1,200.00 

■("Jonathan  Taylor  (1878).  Edward  Taylor,  Treasurer  of  Phillips  Acad- 
emy, 1868-1889,  in  memory  of  his  father    1,000.00 

*  Hiram  W.  French  (1879),  Class  of  1839    1,000.00 

^Caroline  Parker  Taylor  (1880).  Mrs.  Alpheus  Hardy,  in  memory  of 
the  wife  of  Dr.  Samuel  H.  Taylor,  Principal  of  Phillips  Academy,  183  8- 
1871   _   1,000.00 

*Gerard  Sumner  Wiggin    (1882).  Bequest  of  Lady  Elizabeth  Sumner 

Buckley-Mathew  Fleming,  in  memory  of  her  son,  Class  of  1875    1,000.00 

*Stone  Educational  Fund  (1882).  Mrs.  Valeria  G.  Stone  of  Maiden    26,400.00 

*  Richards  (1889).  Mrs.  Mary  A.  Richards,  of  Andover,  in  memory  of  her 

sons,  Charles  Thomas  Richards,  assistant  in  the  Treasurer's  Omce  of 

Phillips  Academy,  and  Edward  Stanley  Richards,  Class  of  187  5    1,450.14 

*\Carren  F.  Draper  (1890),  Class  of  1843    1,000.00 

^Charles  L.  Flint  (1890).  Bequest  of  Charles  L.  Flint,  Class  of  1845   5,000.00 

"Henry  P.  Haven   (1890).  Trustees  of  Henry  P.  Haven  estate,  of  New 

London,  Conn   1,000.00 

"Emma  Lane  Smyth  (1890).  Gov.  Frederick  Smyth,  of  New  Hampshire, 

Class  of  1839,  in  memory  of  his  wife    1,000.00 

*  James  and  Persis  Taylor   (1890).  Mrs.  Mary  E.  Fairbanks,  sister  of 

Dr.  Samuel  H.  Taylor,  in  memory  of  her  father  and  mother    1,000.00 

IjosEPH  Dowe  (1892).  Bequest  of  Joseph  Dowe,  Class  of  1817    3,097.98 

IJohn  Cornell  (1894).  Bequest  of  John  Cornell.  Recommended  by  the 

School  Committee  of  Andover   _   5,000.00 

Awarded  1964-1965  to  Jay  Zachary  James,  Jr. 

*  James  Calvin  Taylor  (1895).  Mrs.  Mary  E.  Fairbanks,  in  memory  of 

her  brother,  Class  of  1840    1,000.00 

*  For  general  scholarship  purposes. 

t  For  general  scholarship  aid  for  boys  from  Andover. 

^  For  general  scholarship  aid;  preference  to  boys  from  Middleton. 


8  5 


86 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


:Mary  W.  Holbrook  (1900)    5  00.00 

*  Carter   (1906).  Mrs.  Ruby  A.  Carter,  of  Andover,  in  memory  of  her 

husband  and  daughter    1,5  00.00 

"Herman  Verhoeff  Hartwell  (1907;  1926).  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Frank  N. 

Hartwell,  in  memory  of  their  son,  Class  of  1908   „   5,000.00 

"George  Ripley  (1908).  Bequest  of  George  Ripley  „   2,500.00 

|T.  Augustus  Holt  (1909).  Bequest  of  T.  Augustus  Holt    26,003.24 

*James  Huntington  (1910;  1931).  The  widow  and  daughter  of  James 

Huntington,  Class  of  1848    -    2,000.00 

'Allan  Morse  Penfield  (1913).  Bequest  of  Allan  Morse  Penfield,  Class 

of  1904  ..    1,000.00 

*  George  B.  Knapp   (1914).  Katharine  Knapp  estate,  in  memory  of  her 

brother,  Trustee  of  Phillips  Academy,  1899-1910   ^  „   5,000.00 

"Thomas  A.  Emerson  (1917).  Rev.  Thomas  A.  Emerson,  Class  of  1859, 

and  Mrs.  Emerson    2,000.00 

Robert  Henry  Coleman  (1919).  Mrs.  John  Coleman,  in  memory  of  her 
son,  Class  of  1912,  who  died  in  the  military  service  of  the  United 

States,  1918    6,000.00 

"The  income  is  awarded  annually  at  the  end  of  his  Junior  year  to  a  stu- 
dent of  limited  means,  who,  in  the  judgment  of  the  Headmaster,  has 
displayed  the  most  promise  of  maintaining  the  highest  standard  of  worth, 
measured  by  character,  scholarship,  and  general  influence  in  the  school." 
Awarded  1964-1965  to  Mark  Joseph  Logsdon. 

George  Xavier  McLanahan  (1919).  His  mother  and  sister,  in  memory  of 

George  Xavier  McLanahan,  Class  of  1892   10,000.00 

"The  income  is  used  annually  for  the  assistance  of  a  worthy  student  or 
students  of  limited  means." 
No  award  in  1964-1965. 

Gordon  Ferguson  Allen  (1920;  1957).  James  F.  Allen,  of  Meriden,  Conn., 
and  his  sons,  Parker  B.  Allen,  Class  of  1914,  and  Theodore  F.  Allen, 
Class  of  1915,  in  memory  of  Gordon  Ferguson  Allen.  Increaed  in  1957 

by  Theodore  F.  Allen   10,000.00 

"The  income  is  awarded  annually  to  a  deserving  student  of  character 
and  promise  and  of  limited  means." 
Awarded  1964-1965  to  Louis  James  Heifetz. 

*Rev.  William  Henry  and  Ellen  Cary  Haskell  (1920;  193  6).  Rev. 
William  Henry  Haskell,  Class  of  1856,  and  his  five  sons,  Classes  of  1883, 
1888,  1890,  and  1895   3,000.00 

"Harriet  L.  Erving  (1922).  Bequest  of  Miss  Harriet  L.  Erving,  of  Andover, 

for  thirty  years  assistant  in  the  Treasurer's  Office    1,500.00 

*  Samuel  M.  Evans  (1922).  Class  of  1887.  (A  part  of  the  fund  is  for 

other  purposes)   „   2,000.00 

Charles  C.  Clough  (1923).  Princeton  University  classmates  and  friends 

of  Charles  C.  Clough,  Class  of  1906   ..       5,000.00 

"The  income  is  awarded  annually  on  recommendation  of  the  Senior  Class 
to  that  member  of  the  Upper  Middle  Class  who  is  of  limited  means, 
and  who  most  embodies  those  qualities  of  manliness,  loyalty,  cheerfulness, 
high  purpose,  and  clean  living  which  were  conspicuous  in  the  character 
of  him  in  whose  memory  this  scholarship  was  established." 
Awarded  1964-1965  to  Richard  Mason  Boydston,  Jr. 
*  For  general  scholarship  purposes. 

t  For  general  scholarship  aid  for  boys  from  Andover. 


SCHOLARSHIP  FUNDS 


87 


*  Frank  Butler  Walker  (1923).  Bequest  of  Mrs.  Mary  C.  B.  Walker,  in 

memory  of  her  son,  Class  of  1889     1,425.00 

*  Abraham  B.  Coffin  (1924).  Bequest  of  Abraham  B.  Coffin,  Class  of  1852  2,000.00 

Alfred  Howlett  Durston  (1926).  Marshall  H.  Durston,  Class  of  1900, 

in  memory  of  his  brother,  Class  of  1897    ~   5,000.00 

"The  income  is  awarded  annually  to  a  student  of  limited  means  who, 
in  the  judgment  of  the  Headmaster,  embodies  the  best  ideals  of  student 
life,  scholarship,  character,  and  influence." 
Awarded  1964-1965  to  Michael  Robert  Scheineman. 

Smith  Lewis  Multer,  Jr.  (1926).  Smith  Lewis  Multer,  in  memory  of  his 

son,  Class  of  1923   ~   5,000.00 

"The  income  is  awarded  annually  at  the  close  of  his  Upper  Middle  year 
to  a  worthy  student  of  limited  means  who,  in  the  judgment  of  the 
Headmaster,  has  exhibited  promise  in  scholarship  and  qualities  of  leader- 
ship and  wholesome  influence  in  the  general  activities  of  the  school." 
Awarded  1964-1965  to  Douglas  Preston  Woodlock. 


*Amasa  J.  Whiting  (1927;  1955).  Bequest  of  Mrs.  May  C.  W.  Speare,  in 


memory  of  her  father  _  „   5,159.50 

*James  H.  Haste  (1930;  193  3-34;  1944).  Bequest  of  James  H.  Haste,  Class 

of  1894   241,074.18 

William  Thompson  Reed  Memorial  (1930;  1957).  His  father  and  mother 
and  members  of  his  family,  in  memory  of  William  Thompson  Reed, 

Class  of  1929     12,565.34 

"The  income  is  awarded  annually  to  a  student  of  character  and  promise 
at  the  beginning  of  his  Senior  year." 
Awarded  1964-1965  to  Mark  Giles  Carnevale. 

*  Henry  Waldo  Greenough   (1931;   1937).  Bequest  of  Henry  Waldo 

Greenough,  Class  of  1889   „   2,000.00 

*Moncrieff  M.  Cochran  (1932).  Bequest  of  Moncrieff  M.  Cochran,  Class 

of  1900  „....„     2,500.00 

*  Bancroft  (1933).  Bequest  of  Cecil  K.  Bancroft,  Class  of  1887,  Registrar 

of  Phillips  Academy  1906-1932,  in  memory  of  his  father,  Dr.  Cecil  F.  P. 

Bancroft,  eighth  Principal  of  Phillips  Academy    2,000.00 

Schuyler  Bussing  Seryiss  Memorial  (1936).  Mrs.  Charlotte  B.  Serviss, 

in  memory  of  her  son.  Class  of  1898  ...  „   5,000.00 

Awarded  1964-1965  to  Hubert  Bennett  Jerman,  Jr. 

*  Osgood  Johnson  (1937).  Bequest  of  Helen  O.  Sprague,  in  memory  of  her 

grandfather,  Principal  183  3-37,  and  her  father,  Class  of  1848.  For  New 
England-born  students   „   500.00 

|David  and  Lucy  Hayward  Shaw   (1939).  Bequest  of  Lucy  Hay  ward 

Shaw  (Mrs.  David)     „   10,000.00 

Augustus  Porter  Thompson   (1942).  Mrs.  Augustus  P.  Thompson,  of 

Andover,  in  memory  of  her  husband,  Class  of  1892   „   5,000.00 

"The  income  is  awarded  annually  to  a  boy  who,  in  the  judgment  of 
the  Headmaster,  is  outstanding  in  intelligence  and  character." 
Awarded  1964-1965  to  Danny  Marc  Samuels. 

"Sumner  Smith  (1943),  Class  of  1908.  Balance  of  income  after  the  Smith 

Hockey  Cup   _  „  m   1,142.31 

Julia  E.  Drinkwater  Memorial  (1944-5  6).  Arthur  Drinkwater,  Class  of 

1896,  and  William  Drinkwater,  Class  of  1900,  in  memory  of  their  mother  10,443.12 

*  For  general  scholarship  purposes. 

t  For  general  scholarship  aid  for  boys  from  Andover. 


8cS 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


"The  income  is  awarded  annually  to  deserving  students  oi  character  and 
promise  and  limited  means." 

Income  from  the  William  Drinkwater  Fund  currently  added  to  that  of 
this  fund. 

Awarded   1964-1965   to  Robert  Joseph  Horwitz  and  Richard  Henry 
Bennett,  Jr. 

Charles  W.  Carl  (1944-46;  1950-53;  1955-56),  Class  of  1910   „   25,000.00 

"Income  to  be  used  during  his  Senior  year  by  an  outstanding  student 
who  is  a  member  of  an  Academy  athletic  team,  and  who,  in  a  previous 
year,  has  received  other  scholarship  aid  from  the  Academy  and  has  in- 
dicated his  intention  to  enter  Yale  University." 
Awarded  1964-1965  to  James  Robert  Eller,  Jr. 

::Louis  S.  Owsley  (1944-1946;  1948-1949).  Bequest  of  Louis  S.  Owsley, 
Class  of  1890.  Income  partially  subject  to  an  annuity;  balance  for  scholar- 
ships and  special  education  purposes    39  5,746.8  5 

Richard  Strong  Foxwell  (1945).  Mrs.  Gilbert  M.  Foxwell,  in  memory 

of  her  son,  Class  of  1922    2,500.00 

"Income  to  be  awarded  annually  to  a  deserving  student  of  limited  means 
to  meet  the  regular  expenses  of  the  school." 
Awarded  1964-1965  to  Peter  Wesley  Kitson. 

-  Arthur  L.  Kerrigan  (1945),  Class  of  1915    2,500.00 

*  Abbott  Stevens  (1945-46),  Class  of  1907.  Trustee  193  5-58;  Treasurer 

1949-58    20,000.00 

Herbert  E.  Stilwell  (1945;  1954).  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Charles  E.  Stilwell,  of 
Cleveland,  Ohio,  in  memory  of  their  son,  Class  of  1941,  who  was  lost 

in  the  English  Channel  on  a  mission  during  the  war    19,720.17 

"Income  to  be  awarded  annually  to  a  student  of  limited  means  who,  in 
the  judgment  of  the  Headmaster,  gives  evidence  of  those  qualities  of 
character,  initiative,  leadership  and  loyalty  which  contribute  to  real 
American  citizenship." 

Awarded  1964-1965  to  Gregory  William  Johnson. 

*  Cecil  K.  Bancroft  (1946).  Bequest  of  Mary  E.  Bancroft,  in  memory 

of  her  brother,  Class  of   1887,   Registrar  and  Instructor   at  Phillips 

Academy,  1906-1932    3,000.00 

* Leonard  A.  Hockstader  (1946),  Class  of  1896    2,500.00 

Moses   Austin   Cartland   Shackford    (1946).   Professor  Martha  Hale 

Shackford,  of  Wellesley,  Mass.,  in  memory  of  her  brother,  Class  of  1891  5,000.00 
"Income  to  be  awarded  annually  to  a  boy  of  good  character  and  of 
limited  means,  preferably  from  New  Hampshire  and  preferably  pursuing 
a  classical  course." 

Awarded  1964-1965  to  John  William  Dineen. 

Macintyre  (1946-47;  1951).  John  Livingston  Macintyre,  of  the  Class  of 
1942,  Mrs.  John  L.  Macintyre,  and  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Mackenzie  Macintyre, 

of  Aurora,  111.,  in  memory  of  Mackenzie  Macintyre's  parents    12,100.34 

"Net  income  is  awarded  annually  to  a  worthy  student  of  limited  means 
who,  in  the  judgment  of  the  Headmaster,  has  exhibited  promise  in 
scholarship,  qualities  of  leadership  and  wholesome  influence  in  the  gen- 
eral activities  of  the  school." 
No  award  in  1964-1965. 

'Robert  D.  Mills  (1947).  Bequest  of  Robert  D.  Mills,  Class  of  1893   «   5  00.00 

|George  F.  Roberts  (1948).  Bequest  of  Mary  A.  Roberts    2,000.00 

::"  For  general  scholarship  purposes. 

t  For  general  scholarship  aid  for  boys  from  Andover. 


SCHOLARSHIP  FUNDS 


Ray  A.  Shepard  (1949-1950;  1953  ;  1960-61).  Friends  of  Ray  A.  Shepard, 

Athletic  Director  of  Phillips  Academy,  1919-1949   

"The  income  is  awarded  annually  to  a  boy  of  limited  means  who  has 
shown  evidence  of  excellent  character  and  marked  ambition." 
No  award  in  1964-1965. 

Suisman  Foundation  (1949-50;  1953;  195  5-56).  The  Suisman  Founda- 
tion, Inc.,  Edward  A.  Suisman,  John  R.  Suisman,  Class  of  19  5  5,  Michael 

Suisman,  Class  of  1947,  and  Richard  Suisman,  Class  of  1950   

"Income  is  to  be  awarded  annually  to  a  student  selected  by  the  Scholar- 
ship Committee." 

Awarded  1964-196  5  to  Thomas  Paul  Buckman. 

*Newton-Hinman  (1950).  Ahlers  Association,  in  honor  of  Frederick  E. 
Newton,  Class  of  1893,  and  George  W.  Hinman,  Class  of  1894,  former 
instructors  at  Phillips  Academy  and  faculty  guardians  of  the  PBX 
Society   

*  Society  Scholarships.  The  following  funds  for  scholarship  purposes  were 

established  through  the  generosity  of  the  Secret  Societies  at  the  time  of 
their  dissolution. 

*AGC  Society  (1950).  The  Rogers  Associates,  Inc  

Balance  of  income  after  the  Benner  Prize 

*AUV  Society  (19  50).  AUV  Corporation   

*EDP  (1950).  The  Eta  Delta  Phi  Society   

Balance  of  income  after  Schubert  Award 

*FLD  Society  (1950;  1956).  The  Davison  Associates,  Inc  

*KOA  Society  (1950).  The  Blodgett  Association   

:'PAE  Society  (1950).  The  Cooley  Association   

*PBX  Society  (1950).  (See  Newton-Hinman,  above)   

*PLS  Society  (1950).  Phi  Lambda  Sigma  Association   

*  Anonymous  (1951)  -  

Richard  Jewett  Schweppe  Memorial  (1951-53;  1957-58).  Mrs.  Richard 

J.  Schweppe,  in  memory  of  her  husband,  Class  of  1896   

"Income  for  a  scholarship (s)  to  be  awarded  annually  to  a  student  who 
shows  promise  of  leadership,  responsibility  and  enthusiasm,"  and  for  a 
prize. 

Awarded  1964-1965  to  Mark  Giles  Carnevale,  Hugh  Walz  Cuthbertson, 
Miklos  Jako  and  Marcus  Wayne  Wright. 

*  Isabel  C.  McKenzie  (19  52).  Bequest  of  Mrs.  Isabel  C.  McKenzie   

"AUV  Society- James  C.  Graham  Memorial  (  195  5  ).  AUV  Corporation, 
in  memory  of  James  C.  Graham,  instructor  at  Phillips  Academy,  1893- 
1937  _  

Chauncey  O'Neil    (1955-1959).  Edward  O'Neil,  II,  Class  of   1927,  in 

memory  of  his  father,  Class  of  1899   

"The  income  to  be  awarded  annually  to  a  boy  or  boys  from  Western 
Pennsylvania." 

Awarded  1964-1965  to  Kennneth  Braden  Blake  and  Thomas  William 
Bottonari. 

Horace  Martin  Poynter  (195  5-59).  His  wife,  Elsie  P.  Poynter,  and  his 
sisters,  Juliet  J.  Poynter  and  Harriet  R.  Poynter,  in  memory  of  Horace 
Martin  Poynter,  Class  of  1896,  instructor  at  Phillips  Academy  1902-1945. 

Income  partially  subject  to  an  annuity   

Awarded  1964-1965  to  Richard  James  Sharpies. 

*G.  Louise  and  Nelson  Robinson  (195  5;  1957).  Bequest  of  Mrs.  G.  Louise 
Robinson  de  Dombrowski;  and  in  memory  of  her  uncle,  Nelson  Robinson 
*  For  general  scholarship  purposes. 


89 

2,630.3  5 
1  5,000.00 

22,243.17 

24,461.94 

35,000.00 
5,000.00 

18,1  15.14 
35,176.17 
35,000.00 

17,000.00 
1,000.00 

38,000.00 

25,000.00 

10,500.00 
27,000.00 


23,481.25 
^90,767.77 


90 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Walter  Brooks  Memorial  (1956).  The  Walter  Brooks  Foundation,  in 

memory  of  Walter  Brooks    -    30,000.00 

Hamilton  (1956-1964).  John  D.  Hamilton,  Class  of  1913,  in  memory  of 

his  father,  J.  D.  M.  Hamilton    „     20,647.19 

"The  income  is  to  be  used  to  assist  a  boy  or  boys  who  may  be  in  need 
of  financial  aid  and  who  reside  in  the  United  States  west  of  the  Mississippi 
River." 

Awarded  1964-1965  to  David  Spruance  MacCuish. 

Evert  W.  Freeman  (1956-58).  Bequest  of  Evert  W.  Freeman,  Class  of 

1917   „  -  _  .....      -  -   29,380.23 

"The  income  to  be  awarded  annually  to  a  student  who  shows  promise 
of  substantial  accomplishment,  but  who  for  the  time  being  is  in  financial 
need." 

Awarded  1964-1965  to  Robert  Luke  Tanner. 

Joseph  Kaplan  (1956-59;  1962).  Joseph  Kaplan  and  other  donors    19,765.00 

"The  income  is  awarded  annually  at  the  end  of  the  Senior  year  to  a 
student,  or  students,  of  limited  means  for  use  in  the  freshman  year  at 
college,  the  award  to  be  made  with  due  regard  to  fine  character  and 
promise  of  adult  usefulness." 

Awarded  1964-1965  to  Howard  David  Reines  and  Kent  Newberry  Ross. 

*Louis  N.  Bennett  Memorial  (1957-58).  Bequest  of  Mrs.  Josephine  C.  S. 

Blaisdell,  in  memory  of  her  brother,  Class  of  1893  -   1,000.00 

Alexander  Angus  McDonell,  Jr.  (1957-58;  1964).  Mrs.  Alexander  Angus 
McDonell,  in  memory  of  her  son,  Class  of  193  5,  who  gave  his  life  for 
his  country  as  a  member  of  the  United  States  Air  Force  on  June  20, 

1944  .......     23,721.85 

Awarded  1964-1965  to  John  Christopher  Harris. 

-Putney  (1957).  R.  Emerson  Putney,  Class  of  1928    5,067.82 

•Edmund  B.  Cabot  (1957-61).  Thomas  D.  Cabot    9,230.93 

William  Drinkwater  (1958).  Bequest  of  William  Drinkwater,  Class  of 
1900.  Unrestricted.  Income  currently  added  to  that  of  the  Julia  E. 
Drinkwater  Memorial  fund  „   25,111.11 

Indiana  (1958-59).  Bequest  of  James  C.  Thornton,  Class  of  1904.  Prefer- 
ence to  boys  from  Indiana.  Income  added  to  fund   „   10,480.18 

*  Alfred  O.  Hitchcock,  Jr.  (1959).  Bequest  of  Alfred  O.  Hitchcock,  Jr., 

Class  of  1895    _  ...  .....  .....  600.00 

*Helen  Davis  Hood  (1959-60).  Bequest  of  Helen  Davis  Hood  (Mrs.  Gil- 
bert H.).  Increased  in  1960  by  Gilbert  H.  Hood  Memorial  Fund   6,000.00 

May  T.  Morrison  (1959).  May  T.  Morrison  Estate  „   10,000.00 

Awarded  1964-1965  to  Charles  Scott  McLanahan. 

*  Henry  Mann  Silver  (1959).  Bequest  of  Henry  Mann  Silver,  Class  of 

1868   _    _       4,206.46 

William  Madison  Wood  (1959-60).  Cornelius  A.  Wood,  Jr.,  Class  of  1937, 

in  memory  of  his  grandfather.  Income  added  to  fund   ....  —   3,103.67 

*  Horace  D.  Bellis   (1960).  Bequest  of  Horace  D.  Bellis,  director  of 

gymnasium  1901-02   _  „     108,080.05 

Harvey  Dann  (1960-61;  1963).  Income  added  to  fund   940.41 

*  Francis  F.  Patton  (1962).  Bequest  of  Francis  F.  Patton,  Class  of  1908  5,000.00 

*Jack  Moon   (1963).  Mrs.  Wayne  Hayward  in  memory  of  her  father, 

Sumner  Gilbert  Moon,  Class  of  1895    13,427.95 


*  For  general  scholarship  purposes. 


SCHOLARSHIP  FUNDS  9  1 

Henry  T.  Mudd,  Jr.  (1963-64).  Henry  T.  Mudd,  Jr.,  Class  of  1960    12.63J.46 

Awarded  1964-1965  to  Leslie  Hugh  Powell. 

Edward  A.  and  Samuel  C.  Suisman  (1963-65).  Edward  A.  and  Samuel  C. 

Suisman   „  .„  _     5,909.97 

Awarded  1964-1965  to  Richard  Kenneth  Dawson. 

Ralph  B.  Carter,  III  (1964).  Bequest  of  Ralph  B.  Carter,  III,  Class  of 

1941  _  _   14,261.66 

Awarded  1964-1965  to  Gary  Andrew  Ahrens. 

John  W.  Weber  (1964).  Bequest  of  Ralph  B.  Carter,  III,  Class  of  1941   14,261.65 

Awarded  1964-1965  to  James  Farrand  Flowers. 

Sanford  H.  E.  Freund  (1964).  Bequest  of  Sanford  H.  E.  Freund,  Class  of 

1897  ......  .....  ......  „  ......   60,920.40 

Francis  F.  O'Donnell  (1964).  Bequest  of  Francis  F.  O'Donnell,  Class  of 

1921   .......  „   100,000.00 

Charles  H.  Sullivan  (1964).  Bequest  of  Joseph  C.  Sullivan,  Class  of  1913  10,000.00 
Awarded  1964-1965  to  James  Francis  Grillo. 

Mary  E.  Sullivan  (1964).  Bequest  of  Joseph  C.  Sullivan,  Class  of  1913   10,000.00 

Awarded  1964-1965  to  Ronald  Wayne  Takvorian. 

"Charles  F.  Oberhauser   (1965).  Bequest  of  Charles  F.  Oberhauser  of 

Somerville,  Mass  _   1,03  9.61 


ANNUAL  GIFT  SCHOLARSHIPS 

Alan  Fox  Scholarship.  "To  be  awarded  each  year  in  the  amount  of  $500  to  that 
boy  in  need  of  financial  assistance  who  in  the  opinion  of  the  faculty  gives  promise  of 
attaining  the  same  breadth  of  character  and  intellect  as  had  the  man  in  whose  memory 
this  scholarship  is  given."  Sustained  (since  1942)  by  Joseph  C.  Fox,  Class  of  1934,  in 
memory  of  his  father,  Alan  Fox,  Class  of  1899.  No  award  in  1964-1965. 

Philip  B.  Stewart  Scholarship (s).  $2,500.  To  be  used  for  not  more  than  two 
scholarships  in  the  Senior  class.  Sustained  (since  1959)  by  the  Sarah  Frances  Hutchinson 
Cowles  Fund,  Inc.,  in  memory  of  Phillip  B.  Stewart,  Class  of  1882.  Awarded  1964-1965 
to  Samuel  Laeger  Alberstadt  and  Warren  Kempton  Clark. 


*  For  general  scholarship  purposes. 


ALUMNI  REPRESENTATIVES 


(Arranged  alphabetically  by  state.  Foreign  countries  at  end  of  listing) 


A  personal  interview  is  required  of  all  candidates.  Whenever  possible,  it  is  highly 
desirable  that  candidates  come  to  Andover  for  a  personal  interview  with  the  Director  of 
Admissions,  the  Admissions  Officer,  or  one  of  the  Interviewing  Officers.  Candidates  unable 
to  visit  Andover  may  themselves  arrange  an  interview  at  a  mutually  convenient  time 
with  one  of  the  Alumni  Representatives  listed  below.  A  definite  appointment  for  an 
interview,  whether  in  Andover  or  elsewhere,  should  be  arranged  in  advance.  Candidates 
who  would  find  it  a  real  hardship  to  get  to  any  of  the  centers  listed  should  communicate 
with  the  Admissions  Office  about  the  possibility  of  seeing  a  representative  not  listed 
below. 


ALABAMA 

Birmingham 

Robert  B.  Donworth,  Jr.,  '42 
1  5  00  Brown  Marx  Bldg. 
Mobile 

Frank  M.  Hicks,  Jr.,  '41 

P.  O.  Box  78 
Montgomery 

Peter  C.  Mohr 

273  9  Colonial  Dr. 

ALASKA 

Anchorage 

John  V.  Munroe,  Jr.,  '48 
1814  Scenic  Way 
Juneau 

Cadmus  Z.  Gordon,  Jr.,  '16 
Box  2571 

ARIZONA 

P/joenix 

Howard  K.  Brown,  Jr.,  '31 

P.  O.  Box  190 
Jeremy  T.  Johnstone,  '48 
Bethlehem  Steel  Company 
1219  Guaranty  Bank  Bldg. 
3  5  50  North  Central  Ave. 
Sahuarita 

Keith  S.  Brown,  '31 

Box  8,  Santa  Rita  Ranch 
Tucson 

John  S.  Greenway,  '42 
1634  North  Olsen  Ave. 

ARKANSAS 
Little  Rock 

George  M.  Hampton,  '2  5 

5  02  Union  National  Bank  Bldg. 
Mose  Smith,  III,  M.D.,  '48 
7  Cantreli  Rd. 


CALIFORNIA 
Dai  is 

Donald  M.  Reynolds,  '3  8 
Department  of  Bacteriology 
University  of  California 
Hollyuood 

Richard  A.  Moore,  '32 
5  746  Sunset  Blvd. 
La  J  oil  a 

William  T.  Adams,  '2  8 
5911  Waverly  Ave. 
Los  Angeles 

Otis  Chandler,  '46 
Los  Angeles  Times 
Times-Mirror  Square 
Walter  L.  Farley,  Jr.,  '2  8 

12300  1st  Helena  Dr. 
H.  Burt  Reiter,  '2  5 

The  Prudential  Insurance  Co. 
5757  Wilshire  Blvd. 
Marysville 

Harold  S.  Edwards,  '28 
770  Rameriz  Rd. 
Pacific  Palisades 

Benjamin  H.  Dorman,  '2  5 
1515  San  Remo  Dr. 
Sacramento 

Charles  A.  O'Brien 
Department  of  Justice 
Library  and  Courts  Bldg. 
San  Diego 

George  E.  Mumby,  '24 
5001  College  Ave. 
San  Francisco 

John  P.  Austin,  '32 

Morrison,  Foerster,  Holloway,  Shu- 
man  &  Clark 
Crocker  Bldg. 
Hamilton  W.  Budge,  '46 
Brobeck,  Phleger  &  Harrison 
111  Sutter  St. 


92 


ALUMNI  REPRESENTATIVES 


93 


Sherman  Checkering,  '29 

111  Sutter  St. 
William  S.  Creighton,  '39 

2939  Divisadero  St. 
Santa  Barbara 

Mancel  T.  Clark,  Jr.,  '28 

605  San  Ysidro  Rd. 

COLORADO 

Colorado  Springs 

Capt.  Frank  Zagorski,  '44 

Quarters  45  07  E 

U.  S.  Air  Force  Academy 
Denver 

Richard  M.  Davis,  '29 

860  Gaylord  St. 
John  F.  Malo,  '40 

245  5  South  Jackson  St. 
John  C.  Mitchell,  2nd,  '34 

2601  South  Sheridan  Blvd. 
David  C.  Wilhelm.  '3  8 

1408  East  47th  Ave. 

DELAWARE 

Wilmington 

Hon.  Caleb  R.  Layton,  III,  '26 

P.  O.  Box  46 
Edward  R.  McLean,  '34 

E.  I.  duPont  deNemours  &  Co.,  Inc. 

International  Dept. 

DISTRICT  OF  COLUMBIA 
Washington 

George  W.  Beatty,  '5  0 
Lee.  Toomey  &  Kent 
1200  Eighteenth  St.,  N.W. 
Lawrence  C.  Dalley,  Jr.,  '45 
888  17th  St.,  N.W. 

FLORIDA 

Clearwater 

William  H.  Fenn,  '48 

5  8  North  Pine  Circle,  Belleair 
Jacksonville 

Laurence  F.  Lee,  Jr.,  '40 
Peninsular  Life  Insurance  Co. 
Miami 

D.  Pierre  G.  Cameron,  '21 

Ransom  School 

3  575  Main  Highway 

Coconut  Grove 
David  J.  Williams,  II,  '3  8 

1  395  5  S.W.  82nd  Ave. 
Ponte  Vedra  Beach 

Arthur  W.  Milam,  '45 

P.  O.  Box  632 


Sarasota 

Parker  C.  Banzhaf,  '3  8 
343  5  Sea  Grape  Dr. 

GEORGIA 

Atlanta 

Herbert  R.  Elsas,  '28 

3  510  Paces  Ferry  Rd.,  N.W. 
Frank  F.  Ford,  '32 

1015  Chattahoochee  Ave.,  N.W. 
Columbus 

M.  C.  Jennings,  '36 
Box  2121 

HAWAII 

Honolulu 

Nathan  F.  Banfield,  3d,  '3  6 
P.  O.  Box  3200 
First  Nat'l  Bank  of  Hawaii 

IDAHO 
Lewiston 

George  F.  Jewett,  Jr.,  '45 
320  21st  Ave. 

ILLINOIS 
Chicago 

Gardner  Brown,  '24 
White,  Weld  &  Co. 
3  0  West  Monroe  St. 
David  A.  Dudley,  '28 
Director  of  Admissions 
Illinois  Institute  of  Technology 
3  300  South  Federal  St. 
Lake  Forest 

Barry  C.  Phelps,  '49 
1699  Riverwoods  Rd. 
Northfield 

W.  Newton  Burdick,  Jr.,  '3  5 
217  Dickens  Rd. 
Rock  Island 

George  T.  French,  '29 
1230  36th  Ave. 
Skokie 

R.   N ei son   Harris,  '32 
9444  Skokie  Blvd. 
Peoria 

Charles  H.  Kellogg,  '3  5 

908  Stratford  Dr. 
Evansville 

Reginald  B.  Collier,  '45 

7300  Newburgh  Rd. 

INDIANA 
Indianapolis 

David  Moxley,  '42 
Kiefer-Stewart  Co. 
Capitol  Ave.  at  George  St. 


94 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


C.  Perry  Griffith,  '45 
499  Forest  Blvd. 


IOWA 

Davenport 

Alan  S.  Howard,  '27 
118  Ridgewood  St. 


Grand  Rapids 

Paul  F.  Steketee,  Jr.,  '26 
2700  Reeds  Lake  Blvd. 
Grosse  Pointe  Farms 

Carlton  M.  Higbie,  Jr.,  '3  5 

93  Kenwood  Rd. 
David  W.  Kendall,  '20 
179  Earl  Ct. 


KENTUCKY 

Anchorage 

Samuel  S.  Caldwell,  Jr.,  '29 
Lincoln  Lane 
Louisville 

William  H.  Abell,  '28 

Commonwealth  Life  Insurance  Co. 
4th  and  Broadway 

LOUISIANA 

Metaivie 

Marshall  L.  Posey,  Jr.,  '5  5 
3201  Richland  Ave. 
New  Orleans 

C.  Horton  Smith,  II,  '28 
108  Duplessis  St. 
Shreveport 

Donald  A.  Raymond,  Jr.,  '32 
1132  Erie  St. 

MARYLAND 

Annapolis 

H.  Richard  Duden,  '43 
Perry  Farms 
Baltimore 

Leonard  M.  Gaines,  Jr.,  M.D.,  '45 

213  South  Tyrone  Rd. 
Bethesda 

William  C.  Hart,  '40 

7504  Hampden  Lane 

MICHIGAN 

Ann  Arbor 

Charles  H.  Sawyer,  '24 

2  Highland  Lane 
Birmingham 

Frederick  G.  Bahr,  '47 

540  Berwyn  St. 
Donald  H.  Parsons,  '48 

Emery,  Parsons  &  Bahr 

1100  North  Woodward 
Detroit 

William  G.  Butler,  '30 

3456  Penobscot  Bldg. 
George  H.  Hunt,  Jr.,  '37 

223  8  Buhl  Bldg. 
Russell  H.  Lucas,  '12 

83  3  Penobscot  Bldg. 


MINNESOTA 

Minneapolis 

Louis  Polk,  Jr.,  '49 

General  Mills,  Inc. 

9200  Wayzata  Blvd. 
A.  Lachlan  Reed,  '3  5 

Minneapolis-Honeywell  Regulator 

Co. 

275  3  4th  Ave.,  S. 
Arne  L.  Schoeller,  '48 

1924  James  Ave.,  S. 
J.  Kimball  Whitney,  '46 

Whitney  Land  Co. 

907  First  Nat'l  Bank  Bldg. 
Wheelock  Whitney,  Jr.,  '44 

Box  50,  Route  5,  Wayzata 

MISSISSIPPI 
Jackson 

Donald  K.  Cameron,  Jr.,  '48 

California  Oil  Co. 

P.  O.  Box  822 
William  D.  Lynch,  '3  8 

134  Chippewa  Circle 

MISSOURI 
Clayton 

Eugene  F.  Williams,  '42 
21  St.  Andrews  Dr. 
Columbia 

George  C.  Miller,  '3  5 
600  South  Greenwood 
Kansas  City 

Stephen  W.  Harris,  '3  8 

4700  Belleview 
Richard  H.  Sears,  '20 
The  Barstow  School 
495  0  Cherry  St. 
St.  Joseph 

Robert  A.  Brown,  Jr.,  '49 
Brown,  Douglas  and  Brown 
Tootle-Enright  National  Bank  Bldg. 
F.  Gregg  Thompson,  Jr.,  M.D.,  '47 
902  Edmond  St. 
St.  Louis 

Peter  B.  Hubbell,  '50 
5154  Westminster  PI. 
John  Shepley,  '42 
503  Locust  St. 


ALUMNI  REPRESENTATIVES 


95 


MONTANA 

Pbilipsburg 

F.  William  Vietor,  '37 
Rocking  Chair  Ranch 

NEBRASKA 
Omaha 

James  A.  C.  Kennedy,  Jr.,  '3  3 
1502  City  National  Bank 

NEVADA 
Deetb 

William  B.  Wright,  Jr.,  '50 
Mary's  River  Ranch 
Reno 

Robert  S.  Kimball,  3d,  '51 
P.  O.  Box  3117 

NEW  JERSEY 

Metucben 

John  P.  Stevens,  III,  '44 
181  Maple  Ave. 

NEW  MEXICO 

Albuquerque 

Gregory  H.  Illanes,  Jr.,  '3  8 

Quinn  &  Co. 

200  2nd  St. 
John  P.  Eastham,  '45 

Rodey,  Dickason,  Sloan,  Akin  & 

Robb 

First  National  Bank  Bldg. — West 
Santa  Fe 

Walter  M.  Mayer,  '15 
P.  O.  Box  851 

NEW  YORK 

Amsterdam 

Leon  H.  Young,  '20 
22  Summit  Ave. 
Buffalo 

Walter  F.  Stafford,  Jr.,  M.D.,  '3! 

24  Tudor  PI. 
John  N.  Walsh,  Jr.,  '39 
85  Highland  Ave. 
Cazenovia 

Robert  B.  Simonton,  '50 
West  Lake  Rd. 
Ithaca 

Andrew  Schultz,  Jr.,  '32 
631  Highland  Rd. 
Mamaroneck 

Bernard  L.  Boyle,  Jr.,  '27 
1120  Cove  Rd. 
New  York  City 

Bromwell  Ault,  '18 
50  East  77th  St. 


Prescott  S.  Bush,  Jr.,  '40 

Johnson  &  Higgins 

63  Wall  St. 
Nathaniel  M.  Cartmell,  Jr.,  '42 

McGraw-Hill  Publishing  Co. 

330  West  42nd  St. 
Joseph  C.  Fox,  '34 

Kidder,  Peabody  &  Co. 

17  Wall  St. 
William  D.  Hart,  '36 

Parker,  Duryee,  Benjamin  Zunino 

&  Malone 

1  East  44th  St. 
Richard  D.  Lombard,  '49 

Lombard,  Vitalis  &  Paganucci,  Inc. 

Ill  Broadway 
Frank  L.  Luce,  Jr.,  '27 

300  Park  Ave. 
John  D.  Lynch,  '46 

Vanden  Broeck,  Lieber  &  Co. 

125  Maiden  Lane 
J.  Quigg  Newton,  Jr.,  '29 

1  East  75  th  St. 
William  C.  Ridgway,  Jr.,  '25 

Crum  &  Forster 

110  William  St. 
Rochester 

Bruce  B.  Bates,  '49 

87  Grosvenor  Rd. 
John  H.  Castle,  Jr.,  '34 

Ritter  Co.,  Inc. 

400  West  Ave. 
Samuel  P.  Connor,  Jr.,  '24 

Amsden-Connor-Mitchell,  Inc. 

146  Broad  St. 
Martin  H.  Donahoe,  Jr.,  '31 

343  State  St. 
Gordon  P.  Small,  '42 

1237  Midtown  Tower 
Syracuse 

William  O.  Airman,  M.D.,  '42 

1117  East  Genesee  St. 
David  H.  Northrup,  '32 

205  DeWitt  St. 

NORTH  CAROLINA 

Charlotte 

E.  Osborne  Ayscue,  '51 

800  North  Carolina  Nat'l  Bank 
Bldg. 
Durham 

Peregrine  White,  '29 
39  Kinberly  Dr. 

NORTH  DAKOTA 
Fargo 

Thomas  L.  Powers,  '20 
1617  Seventh  St.,  S. 


96 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


OHIO 
Akron 

Wayne  F.  Anderson,  '37 

5  04  Delaware  Ave. 
Cincinnati 

William  Hausberg,  2d,  '32 

2600  Willowbrook  Dr. 
Rt.  Rev.  Henry  W.  Hobson,  '10 

405  Albion  St.,  Glendale 
Fletcher  E.  Nyce,  '26 

The  Central  Trust  Co. 

WlLFORD  L.   ROMNEY,  '19 

7  Sylvan  Ln.,  Wyoming 
Cleveland 

Thomas  J.  Keefe,  '50 

3290  Glencairn  Rd. 
James  C.  Miller,  II,  '50 

2347  Tudor  Dr. 
James  R.  Stewart,  '27 

1144  Union  Commerce  Bldg. 
Cleveland  Heights 

Edward  Bartlett,  '2  5 

2572  Stratford  Rd. 
Edward  D.  Yost,  '47 
3137  Fairfax  Rd. 
Dayton 

Vernon  E.  Midgley,  '42 
Martin  Company 
131  North  Ludlow  St. 
Gates  Mills 

George  Oliva,  Jr.,  '39 
West  Hill  Dr. 
Granville 

George  W.  Chessman,  '37 
Briarwood  Rd. 

OKLAHOMA 

Bartlesville 

Carl  M.  Elkan,  '3  5 
3  501    Woodlawn  Rd. 
Oklahoma  City 

John  H.  Edwards.  '22 

2205  Liberty  Bank  Bldg. 
Dr.  Stewart  G.  Wolf,  Jr.,  '31 
644  N.E.   14th  St. 
Tulsa 

James  M.  Bird,  '3  5 
Box  1590 
c/o  Seism 


Edmund  Hayes,  Jr.,  '44 

42  56  S.W.  Patrick  Pi. 
Frederick.  J.  Kingery,  M.D.,  '45 

22  5  0  N.W.  Flanders  St. 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Allentoun 

Charles  D.  Snelling,  '49 
2949  Greenleaf  St. 
Bradford 

Thomas  M.  Rodes,  '54 
6  5  Walker  St. 
Chambersburg 

John  M.  Sharpe,  Jr.,  '46 
63  0  Philadelphia  Ave. 
Indiana 

Joseph  N.  Mack,  '44 
Farmers  Bank  Bldg. 
Narberth 

Tolbert  N.  Richardson,  Jr.,  '27 

50  Righters  Mill  Rd. 
Philadelphia 

Henry  R.  Hallowell,  '39 

12  South  12th  St. 

c/o  Gray  &  Rogers 
James  M.  Mead,  '47 

3 1  East  Springfield  Ave. 
Amory  M.  Sommaripa,  M.D.,  '48 

302  West  Springfield  Ave. 
Pittsburgh 

Robert  S.  Kimball,  Jr.,  '27 

136  Beech  St. 
Edward  O'Neil,  '27 

P.  O.  Box  1692 
John  M.  Phillips,  Jr.,  '3  0 

Phillips  Corp. 

700  Clairton  Blvd. 
Scranton 

W.  Lawson  Chamberlin,  '34 

Chamberlin  &  Clarke 

Northeastern  Nat'l  Bank  Bldg. 
Waverly 

James  W.  Vipond,  '30 

Waverly  Dalton  Rd. 
Wayne 

Robert  Schafer,  '29 

73  0  Mancill  Rd. 


Henry  C.  Williams,  '3  8 
5159  East  31st  St. 

OREGON 

Portland 

Broughton  H.  Bishop,  '45 
Pendleton  Woolen  Mills 
218  S.  W.  Jefferson  St. 


SOUTH  CAROLINA 

Charleston 

McColl  Pringle,  '3  3 
E.  H.  Pringle  &  Co. 
Columbia 

John  R.  Craft,  '29 

Columbia  Museum  of  Art 
Senate  and  Bull  Sts. 


ALUMNI  REPRESENTATIVES 


97 


Orangeburg 

Benner  C.  Turner,  '23 

South  Carolina  State  College 

SOUTH  DAKOTA 

Keystone 

James  E.  Liles,  '5  5 

Mount  Rushmore  Nat'l  Memorial 
Porcupine 

Rev.  George  P.  Pierce,  '49 
Pine  Ridge  Indian  Reservation 
Sioux  Falls 

Hiram  G.  Ross,  '21 
Box  423 

TENNESSEE 
Knoxville 

John  Muldowny,  '44 
University  of  Tennessee 
Dept.  of  History 
Memphis 

Henry  Loeb,  III,  '39 
365  Colonial  Rd. 
Nashville 

Robert  L.  Gwinn,  '29 
1719  West  End  Dr. 
Brush,  Hutchinson  &  Gwinn 

;  TEXAS 

Amarillo 

Edward  L.  Roberts.  '06 
2211  Harrison  St. 
Dallas 

N.  Bruce  Calder,  '41 

9211  Guernsey  Ln. 
William  F.  Neale,  Jr.,  '44 

1010  Hartford  Bldg. 
John  R.  Sears,  '36 

Republic  Nat'l  Bank  of  Dallas 
El  Paso 

John  D.  Mason,  Jr.,  '42 

4208  North  Stanton  St. 
Fort  Worth 

Edwin  S.  Ryan,  '49 

1700  Catalina  Dr. 
Houston 

George  H.  W.  Bush,  '42 

1701  Houston  Club  Bldg. 
Lovett  C.  Peters,  '32 

P.  O.  Box  2197 
San  Antonio 

John  M.  Bennett,  Jr.,  '27 
National  Bank  of  Commerce 

UTAH 
Ogden 

Roderick  H.  Browning,  '44 
2641  Washington  Blvd. 


Salt  Lake  City 

Lincoln  D.  Clark,  M.D.,  '42 

156  Westminster  Ave. 
C.  Chauncey  Hall,  M.D.,  '41 

2652  East  6200  South 

VIRGINIA 

Charlottesville 

Gardner  W.  Smith,  M.D.,  '49 
University  of  Virginia  Hospital 
108  Woodstock  Dr. 
McLean 

Herbert  Scoville,  Jr.,  '3  3 
101  Old  Georgetown  Pike 
Norfolk 

Jere  A.  Klotz,  M.D.,  '41 
5  534  Lakewood  Dr. 
Richmond 

Thomas  Walker,  M.D.,  '28 
Richmond  Memorial  Hospital 
1300  Westwood  Ave. 

WASHINGTON 

Bellevue 

Walter  S.  Kimball,  M.D.,  '30 
3407  76th  Ave.,  N.E. 
Evergreen  Point 
Seattle 

Lucius  H.  Biglow,  Jr.,  '42 

1900  Washington  Bldg. 
Pendleton  Miller,  '28 

711  Central  Bldg. 
Holt  W.  Webster,  '39 

2000  12th  Ave.,  E. 
Snoqualmie  Falls 

Frederick  W.  Hayes 

P.  O.  Box  97 
Spokane 

Samuel  L.  Galland,  '25 

West  1612  Marc  Dr. 
Tacoma 

Howard  S.  Reed,  '45 

7502  North  St.,  S.W. 

WEST  VIRGINIA 

Charleston 

William  A.  Pugh,  '39 
15  Grosscup  Rd. 
Wheeling 

Marshall  T.  Gleason,  Jr.,  '3  3 
Shawnee  Hills 

WISCONSIN 
Madison 

Professor  Williams  L.  Sachse,  '30 
1105  Waban  Hill 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Milwaukee 

Robert  A.  Uihlein,  Jr.,  '34 
23  5  West  Galena  St. 
Racine 

John  H.  Batten,  3d,  '31 
Twin  Disc  Clutch  Co. 
1  328  Racine  St. 

WYOMING 
Casper 

J.  A.  Padon,  Jr.,  '39 
213  Cottman  Bldg. 

Story 

Maurice  Leon,  Jr.,  '42 
Box  6 

BERMUDA 

Hamilton 

Hugh  C.  Masters,  '40 
Box  139 

BRAZIL 

Sao  Paulo 

John  R.  Thompson,  '41 
Industria  de  Pneumaticos 
Firestone  S.  A. 
Caixa  Postal  8177 

BRITISH  CROWN  COLONY 
Hong  Kong 

Kenneth  K.  Chun,  '44 

4/4  A  Des  Voex  Rd.,  Central 
Malayan  Insurance  Co. 

CANAL  ZONE 
Balboa 

Robert  J.  Boyd,  Jr.,  '48 
Box  2013 

COLOMBIA 

Bogota 

William  Adams,  III,  44 

First  Nat'l  City  Bank  of  New  York 
Apartado  Aereo  No.  4134 

ENGLAND 

London 

Laurence  W.  M.  Viney,  '3  8 
44  Great  Queen  St.,  W.C.  2 

FRANCE 
Paris 

Charles  C.  de  Limur,  '40 
Bankers  Trust  Co. 
16  Place  Vendome 


Seine  et  Oise 

Patrick  G.  Nollet,  '51 
28  Rue  des  Sablons 
La  Celle  Saint  Cloud 

GUATEMALA 

Guatemala  City 

John  L.  Whitbeck,  '40 
4 A  Ave.  Sur  14 

MEXICO 

Mexico  City 

Samuel  C.  Dysart,  Jr.,  '46 

Goldsmith  27-8 
C.  Andrew  Kaiser,  '45 

General  Electric  Co. 

S.A.  de  C.V.,  Apartado  403 

PHILIPPINES 

Manila 

C.  Parsons,  '41 
Box  886 

PUERTO  RICO 

Bayamon 

Guillermo  E.  Gonzalez,  Jr., 
Hastings  BA-9,  Extension 
Garden  Hills 
San  Juan 

Ricardo  A.  Gonzales,  '5  3 
Box  2272 

SWITZERLAND 
Geneva 

David  M.  Watt,  '27 
14  Rue  Robert  de  Traz 

THAILAND 

Bangkok 

Piya  Chakkaphak 
572/1  Phasuk  Lane 

VENEZUELA 

Caracas 

Alberto  J.  Vollmer,  '42 
Edf.  Polar-piso  13 
Plaza  Venezuela 


STUDENTS  —  1  9  6  4  -  6  5 


GEOGRAPHICAL  REPRESENTATION 


Alabama 

6 

Nebraska 

2 

Bahamas 

Arizona 

4 

New  Hampshire 

4 

Bermuda 

Arkansas 

5 

New  Jersey 

46 

Brazil 

California 

26 

New  Mexico 

1 

Canada 

Colorado 

3 

New  York 

130 

Colombia 

Connecticut 

90 

North  Carolina 

1 1 

Ecuador 

Delaware 

3 

North  Dakota 

1 

El  Salvador 

District  of  Columbia  10 

Ohio 

26 

England 

Florida 

13 

Oklahoma 

2 

France 

Georgia 

2 

Oregon 

1 

Germany 

Illinois 

16 

Pennsylvania 

33 

Greece 

Indiana 

1 

Rhode  Island 

12 

Holland 

Iowa 

17 

South  Carolina 

5 

India 

Kansas 

2 

South  Dakota 

1 

Italy 

Kentucky 

S 

Tennessee 

6 

Japan 

Louisiana 

2 

Texas 

20 

Mexico 

Maine 

12 

Utah 

1 

Philippines 

Maryland 

11 

Vermont 

7 

Puerto  Rico 

Massachusetts 

216 

Virginia 

11 

Spain 

Michigan 

16 

Washington 

4 

Taiwan 

Minnesota 

i  c\ 

West  Virginia 

2 

Thailand 

Mississippi 

3 

Wisconsin 

6 

Uruguay 

Missouri 

4 

Wyoming 

2 

Venezuela 

Montana 

3 

West  Indies 

CLASSIFICATION 

Seniors 

262 

Upper  Middlers 

255 

Lower  Middlers 

210 

Juniors 

131 

Total  Students 

858 

Boarding  Students 

783 

Day  Students 

75 

Total  Students 

858 

A 

U    Abbott,  Andrew  Lelano 

s 

Alberstadt,  Samuel  Laeger 

Sherborn,  Mass. 

Bethesd 

i  34,  Md. 

.1     Abbott,  Ernest  Bennett 

s 

Albertson, 

Carl  Eric 

Somerville,  Mass. 

Newtonville  60,  Mass. 

U     Abernethy,  Joh 

n  Lloyd,  Jr.  J 

Albright, 

Edward  Ware 

Charlotte  9, 

N.  C. 

Bedford,  N.  Y. 

U     Adler,  Edward 

Andrew 

Koeppel  U 

Alden,  John  Malcolm,  Jr. 

Kings  Point, 

L.  I.,  N.  Y. 

Athcrton,  Calif. 

U     Ahrens,  Gary  Andrew 

U 

Allen,  Frederick  Lewis,  III 

Boone,  Iowa 

Bronxville,  N.  Y. 

99 


100 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


L      Allen,  Henry  Randall 

Watertown,  Conn. 
U     Allen,  Hoyt  Eaves,  Jr. 

Westport,  Conn. 
S      Allen,  Stephen  Church 

Beverly,  Mass. 
S      Allen,  Thomas  Heckel 

Mamaroneck,  N.  Y. 
U     Almquist,  Eric  Lucien 

Valentine,  Neb. 
L      Alofsin,  Anthony  Michael 

Memphis,  Tenn. 
L     Alsina,  John  Charles 

Rochester  10,  N.  Y. 
J      Anderson,  Brandt  Charles 

Hyannis  Port,  Mass. 
L     Anderson,  David  Groves 

Akron,  Ohio 
L     Anderson,  Peter  Gunard 

Naugatuck,  Conn. 
J      Anderson,  Robert  Gardner,  Jr. 

Chicago  11,  111. 
J      Andrews,  Duncan  Trumbull 

Greenwich,  Conn. 
S      Andrews,  Peter  Underwood 

Greenwich,  Conn. 


S      Bacalao,  Armando 

Caracas,  Venezuela 
L      Bacalao,  Enrique 

Caracas,  Venezuela 
L      Backman,  Daniel  Gustav 

North  Reading,  Mass. 
J      Bacon,  Carter  Smith,  Jr. 

Hyannis  Port,  Mass. 
U     Badman,  Lawrence  Scott 

Riverside,  Conn. 
S      Bagg,  Terry  Reed 

Holyoke,  Mass. 
J      Baird,  Gordon  Prentiss 

New  York  16,  N.  Y. 
L      Baird,  Jonathan  Raymond 

New  York  16,  N.  Y. 
U     Bakalar,  John  Stephen 

Swampscott,  Mass. 
S      Baker,  Brock 

New  York  28,  N.  Y. 
U     Baker,  Warren  von  Credo 

Princeton,  N.  J. 
S      Ballard,  William 

Norwich,  Vt. 
S      Barker,  William  Benjamin 

New  Canaan,  Conn. 
S      Barnum,  Richard  Woodhull 

Bethlehem,  Pa. 


L     Angelosante,  Michael 

Old  Orchard  Beach,  Me. 
L      Apitz,  Christopher  Lee 

Morris,  Minn. 
U     Arabie,  Clay  Phipps 

Kingsport,  Tenn. 
S      Aranow,  Philip  Thompson 

Hastings-on-Hudson,  N.  Y. 
J      Armstrong,  Rex  Edwin 

Portland  1,  Ore. 
L     Arnold,  David  Bullard,  111 

Concord,  Mass. 
L     Arnold,  Robert  Hall 

Arlington,  Va. 
S      Arras,  Robert  Edward,  Jr. 

Madrid,  Spain 
L     Asher,  James  Michael 

Leominster,  Mass. 
L      Atkinson,  Edward  Page 

Brookline  46,  Mass. 
S      Austin,  Howard  Albert,  III 

New  York  29,  N.  Y. 
U     Avery,  Theodore  Paul,  Jr. 

Oil  City,  Pa. 


B 

S      Barrett,  Steven  Alan 

Bethesda,  Md. 
U     Barringer,  William  Henry 

Scarsdale,  N.  Y. 
S      Barry,  Christopher  John 

Methuen,  Mass. 
U     Basile,  Alfred  Charles 

Haverhill,  Mass. 
U     Bass,  Robert  Muse 

Fort  Worth  7,  Tex. 
L      Bassett,  John  Bruce 

Cos  Cob,  Conn. 
S      Batteau,  Dwight  Wayne 

Cambridge  3  8,  Mass. 
S      Beach,  Robert  Edgar,  Jr. 

Manchester,  Conn. 
L      Beardsley,  Jeffry  Sumner 

Elkhart,  Ind. 
U     Becker,  Joseph  Michael 

Fort  Davis,  Tex. 
U     Belida,  Alexander  James,  Jr. 

Dayton  24,  Ohio 
S      Benjamin,  David  Joel,  III 

San  Francisco  15,  Calif. 
U     Bennett,  Daniel  Gates 

Menlo  Park,  Calif. 
L      Bennett,  John  Mirza,  IV 

San  Antonio,  Tex. 


STUDENTS 


101 


S      Bennett,  Richard  Henry,  Jr. 

Richland,  Wash. 
S      Bennett,  William  Russell,  III 

Andover,  Mass. 
L     Berg,  Brian  Gunder 

Cavalier,  N.  D. 
U     Berg,  Edward  Henry,  Jr. 

Newark,  Del. 
L     Berlow,  Bruce  Alfred 

Silver  Spring,  Md. 
S      Bcrnblum,  Bennett  Jay 

Milford,  Conn. 
L     Bernhart,  John  Kelso 

San  Francisco,  Calif. 
U    Best,  Eric  Prentice 

Dunstable,  Mass. 
L     Bidwell,  John,  Jr. 

Greenville,  S.  C. 
L     Bigelow,  Franklin  Thomas,  Jr. 

Carpenteria,  Calif. 
U     Billings,  Roger  Frank 

Falmouth,  Mass. 
L     Bird,  James  Raymond,  Jr. 

Plainfield,  N.  J. 
S      Bisset,  William  Thompson 

Andover,  Mass. 
S      Blair,  Nigel  Patrick 

Thuro,  England 
j      Blake,  Kenneth  Braden,  Jr. 

Murrysville,  Pa. 
L     Blakeslee,  Guy  Farlow 

Palm  Beach,  Fla. 
L     Bloom,  David  Allen 

Lawrence,  Mass. 
L     Bloombergh,  John  Hollis,  Jr. 

Rockport,  Mass. 
U     Bolyai,  John  Zoltan 

Fall  River,  Mass. 
S     Bond,  Joe  John,  III 

Fert  Worth  7,  Tex. 
S      Bonnett,  William  Stanton 

Wellesley  Hills,  Mass. 
U    Borgstrom,  Howard  Gustave 

Alexandria,  Va. 
J      Bossany,  Robert  John 

Chetek,  Wis. 
L     Bostian,  William  Jollitfe 

Richmond  29,  Va. 
U     Bottonari,  Kenneth  Charles 

Pittsburgh  36,  Pa. 
S      Bottonari,  Thomas  William 

Pittsburgh  36,  Pa. 
S      Bourne,  William  Randolph 

Danville,  Va. 


S      Bowen,  Stephen  Gardner 

Woods  Hole,  Mass. 
S      Boydston,  Richard  Mason,  Jr. 

Des  Moines  12,  Iowa 
J      Boynton,  Carter  Reid 

Stockbridge,  Mass. 
L     Bradley,  Michael  Allen 

North  Smithfield,  R.  I. 
U     Brand,  Peter  Schuyler 

Washington,  D.  C. 
U     Brewster,  Walter  Rice.,  Jr. 

New  York  21,  N.  Y. 
S      Briggs,  Alba  Houghton,  III 

Chadron,  Neb. 
S      Brown,  Judson  Brooks 

Andover,  Mass. 
S      Brown,  Malcolm  McDougal 

Lake  Forest,  111. 
J      Biown,  Paul  Brooks 

Andover,  Mass. 
L      Brown,  Paul  Cameron 

North  Kingstown,  R.  I. 
L      Brown,  Stephen  Dennis 

Wellesley  Hills,  Mass. 
L      Brown,  Stephen  Gardner 

Sahuarita,  Ariz. 
U     Browne,  Robert  Mallory 

Louisville,  Ky. 
S      Browning,  John  Donald 

Sea  Cliff,  N.  Y. 
U     Buchin,  Peter  Jay 

Forest  Hills  75,  N.  Y. 
S      Buckman,  Thomas  Paul 

Le  Center,  Minn. 
S      Bump,  Morrison  McKeivy,  Jr. 

Ashland,  Ky. 
L      Burdick,  Winfield  Newton,  III 

Northfield,  111. 
U     Burke,  Stephen  Johnson 

Far  Hills,  N.  J. 
S      Burkhard,  Peter  Allen 

Andover,  Mass. 
S      Burns,  Matthew  Wallace 

Montgomery,  Ala. 
L      Burns,  Richard  Randolph 

Marblehead,  Mass. 
S      Burr,  Peter  Merritt 

Concord,  Mass. 
L      Butte,  John  McMurray 

Austin,  Tex. 
J      Buttenfield,  Philip  Martin  Pfeil 

Pittsburgh  32,  Pa. 
L      Byers,  Robert  Kern,  Jr. 

Gilroy,  Calif. 


102 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


c 


u 

Caffrey,  Augustine  Joseph,  III 

L 

Cohan,  Robert  David 

Andover,  Mass. 

Worcester,  Mass. 

s 

Call,  William  Herbert 

J 

Cohen,  Rip 

New  York  City,  N.  Y. 

Millburn,  N.  J. 

J 

Cambal,  Dennis  Hayden 

L 

Cohen,  Todd 

Waltham,  Mass. 

Millburn,  N.  J. 

s 

Cameron,  Gerard  Guyot,  II 

L 

Coit,  Daniel  Grosvenor 

Princeton,  N.  J. 

Washington,  Conn. 

u 

Campbell,  Robert  Johnson 

U 

Colby,  Alexander  MacGregor 

Andover,  Mass. 

West  Boxford,  Mass. 

u 

Carmichael,  Louis  David 

s 

Cole,  Robert  Albert 

New  York  28,  N.  Y. 

Andover,  Mass. 

s 

Carnevale,  Mark  Giles 

L 

Coleman,  Edward  Francis 

Arkansas  City,  Kan. 

Andover,  Mass. 

J 

Carr,  John  Henry,  Jr. 

U 

Coleman,  John  Michael 

Salem,  Mass. 

Memphis  16,  Tenn. 

u 

Casey,  Richard  Andrew,  Jr. 

L 

Colle,  Pierre  Emmanuel 

North  Andover,  Mass. 

Andover,  Mass. 

L 

Chamberlin,  Fletcher  Coleman,  Jr. 

L 

Collier,  Charles  Whitney 

Sherborn,  Mass. 

Wellesley,  Mass. 

S 

Chamberlin,  William  Laverack 

L 

Combs,  Craig  Skidmore 

Sherborn,  Mass. 

Eatontown,  N.  J. 

J 

Chang,  Patrick  St.  Clair 

S 

Comstock,  Henry  Walker,  Jr. 

New  York  27,  N.  Y. 

Buffalo  22,  N.  Y. 

J 

Chang,  Rowland  Waton 

J 

Comstock,  Lyndon  Brent 

Youngstown  12,  Ohio 

North  Muskegon,  Mich. 

J 

Chapin,  Edward  King 

U 

Conant,  Jonathan  Brewster 

Manchester,  Conn. 

West  Newton  6  J,  Mass. 

J 

Chapman,  Donald  Redding 

s 

Constantineau,  Peter  David 

New  Canaan,  Conn. 

North  Andover,  Mass. 

u 

Cheng,  Chosen  Tien-chung 

u 

Cooney,  John  Fontana 

Marietta,  Ohio 

Nashville  5,  Tenn. 

L 

Cheng,  DeWitt  Tien-wei 

u 

Corcoran,  William  Joseph,  Jr. 

Marietta,  Ohio 

Cambridge  3  8,  Mass. 

U 

Chimento,  George  Louis 

u 

Cotton,  John  Maurice 

Westerly,  R.  I. 

New  York  21,  N.  Y. 

s 

Chin,  Rockwell  Jaowen 

u 

Cowan,  Spencer  Morris,  Jr. 

Norton,  Mass. 

Boston,  Mass. 

L 

Clapp,  John  Thayer 

L 

Cox,  David  Claridge 

San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Calgary,  Alta.,  Canada 

S 

Clapp,  Peter  Wales 

s 

Cromie,  Richard  James 

San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Andover,  Mass. 

J 

Clark,  Allan  Douglas  Parker 

L 

Cross,  Norman  Campbell,  Jr. 

Chelmsford,  Mass. 

Lunenburg,  Mass. 

s 

Clark,  Warren  Kempton 

J 

Crowley,  Roland  Vincent 

Little  Compton,  R.  I. 

Lowell,  Mass. 

u 

Clarke,  Christopher  Austin  BrufT 

L 

Cunningham,  Daniel  Paul 

Darien,  Conn. 

Cincinnati  3  8,  Ohio 

s 

Clift,  Daniel  Kennedy 

U 

Cunningham,  Stephen  Robert 

Andover,  Mass. 

Cincinnati  3  8,  Ohio 

u 

Clift,  William  Biggs,  III 

U 

Curran,  Bruce  Hammill 

Andover,  Mass. 

New  York,  N.  Y. 

J 

Clinton,  Philip  Leslie 

J 

Currie,  Francis  Sparre 

Andover,  Mass. 

New  York  21,  N.  Y. 

L 

Coburn,  Stephen  Campbell 

u 

Currier,  Michael  Paul 

Bedford,  N.  Y. 

Fort  Kent,  Me. 

STUDENTS  103 


U     Curtiss,  William  Hanford,  III  J      Czarnecki,  John  Jacob 

Woodside,  Calif.  Reading,  Pa. 

S      Cuthbertson,  Hugh  Walz 
Riverside,  Conn. 

D 


L 

Dailey,  William  Jonathan 

L 

Deutsch,  Nicholas  Arthur 

Leonia,  N.  J. 

Cambridge  38,  Mass. 

J 

Daly,  Martin  William,  Jr. 

J 

Devereux,  Edward  Rickert,  Jr. 

Andover,  Mass. 

Ponte  Vedra  Beach,  Fla. 

S 

Davidson,  Laurence  John 

S 

Devereux,  Stephen  Edward 

Cedar  Grove,  N.  J. 

Ponte  Vedra  Beach,  Fla. 

L 

Davis,  Andre  Maurice 

u 

Diamond,  Norman  George 

Baltimore,  Md. 

Waterloo,  Iowa 

L 

Davis,  Churchward,  Jr. 

s 

Dickerson,  Norvin  Kennedy,  Jr. 

Pittsfield,  Mass. 

Monroe,  N.  C. 

U 

Davis,  Geoffrey  Barker 

s 

Dineen,  John  William 

Providence  6,  R.  I. 

Lawrence,  Mass. 

S 

Davis,  Ralph  Paul 

s 

Dixon,  Courtlandt  Palmer,  III 

Washington  15,  D.  C. 

Lawrence,  L.  I.,N.  Y. 

U 

Davis,  William  Michael 

J 

Dodd,  Douglas  Van  Everen 

Northville,  Mich. 

Andover,  Mass. 

U 

Dawson,  Richard  Kenneth 

s 

Doherty,  Thomas  Joseph,  Jr. 

Lawrence,  Mass. 

Andover,  Mass. 

u 

Dawson,  William  Lockhart,  Jr. 

s 

Donaldson,  Robert  Beach 

Arlington  2,  Va. 

Riverdale  71,  N.  Y. 

s 

Deane,  John  Cutting 

L 

Doran,  John  Joseph 

Grand  Rapids  5,  Mich. 

Wellesley,  Mass. 

L 

DeAngelis,  Paul  Thomas 

L 

Dorn,  William  Leary 

Chevy  Chase,  Md. 

Houston  27,  Tex. 

S 

deChaponniere,  Jean  Raphael  Douglas 

J 

Douglas,  Eric  Frost 

Le  Puy  (Haute-Loire),  France 

Glendora,  Calif. 

u 

Deck,  Raymond  Henry,  Jr. 

u 

Duffy,  Robert  Franklin 

Andover,  Mass. 

New  York,  N.  Y. 

J 

DeFelice,  Harold  Louis,  Jr. 

s 

Dun,  John  Spurrier 

New  Haven,  Conn. 

San  Mateo,  Calif. 

L 

Dembski,  Stephen  Michael 

L 

Duncan,  Robert  Ames 

Reading,  Mass. 

Baltimore,  Md. 

J 

Deming,  Ellsworth  Huntington 

L 

Dunham,  Carroll,  Jr. 

Hamden  17,  Conn. 

Old  Lyme,  Conn. 

S 

Dennehy,  Peter  Normann 

J 

Dupont,  Jules  St.  Martin,  Jr. 

Setauket,  L.  I.,  N.  Y. 

Houma,  La. 

L 

Denton,  David  William 

S 

Durham,  Harry  Blaine,  III 

J 

Great  Falls,  Mont. 

Casper,  Wyo. 

Des  Roches,  Daniel  Scott 

L 

Dyer,  Charles  Herbert 

Andover,  Mass. 

Haverhill,  Mass. 

Eakland,  William  Lyon 

Rye,  N.  Y. 
Eaton,  Theodore  Hambleton 

Grosse  Pointe  36,  Mich. 
Eddy,  Lee  Chickering 

Glen  Ellyn,  111. 


Edmundson,  Stephen  Taylor 

Darien,  Conn. 
Edwards,  Leland  Stanford 

Seattle,  Wash. 
Ehrhart,  Robert  Henry 

Orleans,  Mass. 


104 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


J       Ehrlich,  Frank  Chapman 

Kansas  City  12,  Mo. 
U     Eichleay,  George  Frederick 

Pittsburgh  17,  Pa. 
S      Eller,  James  Robert,  Jr. 

Charlotte  3,  N.  C. 
L      Ellis,  Alexander,  III 

Concord,  Mass. 
U     Ellison,  Jonathan  David 

Falls  Village,  Conn. 
L      Engvall,  David  Melville 

Dublin,  N.  H. 


U     Erskine,  John  Emerson,  Jr. 

Racine,  Wis. 
L      Escoruela,  Andres  Joseph 

Forest  Hills  Gardens,  L.  I.,  N. 
S      Evans,  John  Randall 

Demarest,  N.  J. 
J      Everett,  Davis  Burton 

Caracas,  Venezuela,  S.  A. 
S      Everett,  Todd  Harrison 

Caracas,  Venezuela,  S.  A. 


U     Fabiani,  James  Parnham 

Westport,  Conn. 
U     Fairbairn,  J.  Randall 

New  York  24,  N.  Y. 
U     Farley,  David  Wells 

Harvard,  Mass. 
U     Farrah,  Albert  Louis,  Jr. 

Methuen,  Mass. 
J      Farrell,  Michael  O. 

Salisbury,  Mass. 
S      Fay,  John  Bruce 

Dorset,  Vt. 
J      Feldman,  James  Samuel 

Waban  68,  Mass. 
U     Feldman,  Theodore  Sherman 

Waban  68,  Mass. 
U     Field,  Arthur  Maxwell,  III 

Hampden-Sydney,  Va. 
S      Finch,  Stephen  Baker,  Jr. 

Lawrence,  L.  I.,  N.  Y. 
S      Finn,  John  Taylor 

Florence,  Ala. 
J      Flad,  Ward  Beecher 

Youngstown  12,  Ohio 


U     Fletcher,  Michael  Anthony 

West  Windham,  N.  H. 
L      Florenz,  Paul  Andrew 

Methuen,  Mass. 
U     Flowers,  James  Farrand 

Houston  27,  Tex. 
U     Foster,  David  Armour 

Mankato,  Minn. 
S      Fox,  John  Gardner 

Rumson,  N.  J. 
U     Fraker,  Ford  McKinstry 

Princeton,  N.  J. 
J      Francesco,  Steven  Anthony 

Beverly  Farms,  Mass. 
U     Franchot,  Peter  Van  Rensselaer 

Grosse  Pointe  36,  Mich. 
J      Freedman,  Robert  Morris 

Natick,  Mass. 
L    Freeman,  Douglas  Southall,  II 

New  York  21,  N.  Y. 
U     Freeman,  Gordon  Leslie,  Jr. 

North  Andover,  Mass. 
L      Funston,  George  Keith,  Jr. 

Greenwich,  Conn. 


L      Gadsden,  Thomas  Parker 

Short  Hills,  N.  J. 
L      Gaffny,  John  Joseph 

North  Andover,  Mass. 
S      Gallaudet,  Peter  Wallace 

Farmington,  Conn. 
U     Galpin,  Amos 

New  Haven  11,  Conn. 
S      Ganem,  Bruce  Emil 

Methuen,  Mass. 
J      Ganem,  Donald  Emil 

Methuen,  Mass. 
S      Gang,  Robert  Charles 

Huntington  1,  W.  Va. 


U     Gardner,  Ellis  Benjamin,  III 

Darien,  Conn. 
S      Gardner,  Jeffrey  Davis 

Glencoe,  111. 
L      Gardner,  Steven  Hedden 

Weston,  Mass. 
S      Garner,  Thomas  Fleetwood,  Jr. 

Richmond  29,  Va. 
L      Garner,  William  Vaughan 

Richmond  29,  Va. 
S      Gast,  David  Sobo 

Westneld,  N.  J. 
J      Gates,  Donald  Robert 

Des  Moines,  Iowa 


STUDENTS 


105 


T 

L 

oaccs,  Xicucricii.    i.  dyiui,  xn 

L 

C^nnA cr^ppr?    T^rorwiflr  ftp'nifnrrl  T-TfYii«fnn 

it 
U 

Gauntt   ^^illiam  Marshal 

s 

Gorelik,  Gregory  Mordecai 

Mnntpfimerv  /»  Ala 

Gu3y<iQuil?  Ecuador,  S.  A. 

J 

Gegenheimer,  Peter  Albert 

L 

Gould,  Willard  Joseph,  III 

1  UCSUI1,  jTYllZ. 

Hartsdale   N  Y 

TT 
U 

r^^io-pr    A/farrin  Alan 

VJJClgCl,     IVldl  LIU  illdli 

L 

Grafton,  Anthony  Thomas 

T— T  irricnn     "M  "Y" 

riar i ijuii,  in  •    i  ■ 

New  York  21  NY 

TT 

u 

r^prKpr     Tiavirl    "Frpn^rirlf  IT 

s 

Graham,  John  Thomas 

1V11UU1C  IV  W  11)  \»^A11V/ 

Seattle  19,  Wash. 

TT 
L 

(^iKKs    rianrp,<1  C-ifnfTrev 

TJ 

Gray,  James  Cranston,  Jr. 

JjllilIlgJ?  XV1U11L. 

South  Dartmouth  Alass. 

C 

Gibson,  Anthony  Hfcrfick 

s 

Grew,  James  Hooper,  Jr. 

Stamford,  Conn. 

Andover,  Mass. 

L 

Giles,  James  David 

s 

Griffin,  John  William 

Oklahoma  City,  Okla. 

Norwood,  Mass. 

U 

Gillette,  John  Westfield,  II 

u 

Grillo,  James  Francis 

Birmingham,  Mich. 

Andover,  Mass. 

u 

Goldman,  Daniel  Franko 

J 

Gruner,  Robert  Barnet 

Amawalk,  N.  Y. 

New  York  22,  N.  Y. 

u 

Gonzalez,  Fernando  Luis 

u 

Gurry  Christopher  Jude 

Guaynabo,  Puerto  Rico 

Andover,  Mass. 

H 


s 

Hafkenschiel,  Benjamin  Thomas 

L 

Harris,  Alexander  Eisemann 

Bala-Cynwyd,  Pa. 

Atlanta  27,  Ga. 

s 

Hagan,  William  Hart,  Jr. 

U 

Harris,  Arthur,  III 

Louisville  7,  Ky. 

Atlanta  27,  Ga. 

L 

Hairston,  James  Roland 

J 

Harris,  Charles  Clements,  Jr. 

Pittsburgh,  Pa. 

Sewell,  N.  J. 

s 

Haley,  James  Brian 

U 

Harris,  George  Rice 

Nevada  City,  Calif. 

Andover,  Mass. 

L 

Haley,  Mark  Layton 

u 

Harris,  Gerald  David 

Andover,  Mass. 

Victoria,  B.  C,  Canada 

S 

Haley,  Peter  Christopher 

S 

Harris,  John  Christopher 

Belmont,  Mass. 

Westerly,  R.  I. 

J 

Hall,  James  Gilbert,  II 

Harrison,  Charles  Maxwell 

Short  Hills,  N.  J. 

Santa  Fe,  N.  M. 

J 

Hall,  Oakley  Maxwell,  III 

J 

Hart,  Robert  Mayes,  Jr. 

Olympic  Valley,  Calif. 

New  Canaan,  Conn. 

J 

Hall,  Russell  Bruce 

S 

Harte,  Christopher  McCutcheon 

Fort  Hood,  Tex. 

Corpus  Christi,  Tex. 

s 

Hallett,  Christopher  John 

J 

Harward,  Vernon  Judson,  III 

Weston,  Mass. 

Northampton,  Mass. 

s 

Hamilton,  Daniel  Kirk,  Jr. 

L 

Hausberg,  Mark 

Chapel  Hill,  N.  C. 

Cincinnati  37,  Ohio 

L 

Hammond,  William  Edward 

u 

Haviland,  David  William 

Greenwich,  Conn. 

Montclair,  N.  J. 

L 

Hand,  Clark  William 

J 

Hawkins,  John  Richard,  III 

Andover,  Mass. 

Bogota,  N.  J. 

L 

Hanley,  John  Weller,  Jr. 

L 

Hawley,  MacDonald  Steven 

U 

Cincinnati  8,  Ohio 

Wayzata,  Minn. 

Hanson,  David  Taverner 

S 

Hayes,  Grenville  Karl 

Billings,  Mont. 

Fairhaven,  Mass. 

L 

Harness,  Edward  Granville,  Jr. 

u 

Hayes,  James  Stoddard,  Jr. 

Cincinnati  43,  Ohio 

Lancaster,  Pa. 

PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


U     Healey,  Raymond  Francis,  Jr. 

Upper  Montclair,  N.  J. 
|      I  iolcy,  Todd  Stephen 

Upper  Montclair,  N.  J. 
I      I  Icjrcy,  Bruce  Gerard 

Oaklyn  6,  N.  J. 
i       I  leher,  Justin  Garland 

( i recti  Lake,  Me. 
|       Heifetz,  Irvin  Neil 

Andover,  Mass. 
S      Hcifettz,  Louis  James 

Andover,  Mass. 
U     Hemenway,  Andrew  Maine 

Northford,  Conn. 
S       I  lemingway,  John  Moon 

Stamford,  Conn. 
S       1  lenry,  Paul  Wallace 

Middlebury,  Conn. 
S      Herrclko,  David  Alan 

Howie,  Md. 
S      1  lerrmann,  Carl  Procter 

Grafton,  Mass. 
I       Hertz,  Paul  Richard 

Springfield,  Ohio 
|      Hiklcbrandt,  Andrew  Wayne 

I  awrence,  Mass. 
U     H.lley,  John  Lee 

Bedford,  Mass. 
U     Hilsman,  Hoyt  Roger 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
S      llmkle,  Ward  Byington 

New  Canaan,  Conn. 


c 

kJ 

T-Ji«lrlpv     AnHr^w  T-Ialdanp 

J   IlllJVltJC}     X  XlAvii.  V  W      X  laiUUJlL 

Lall L«S  LCI  |    iy  .    X  A* 

\j 

I~Iinman,  Richard  Guild 

A  nnAV^f  A/face 

u 

T 

L, 

T-4r\llrinc     Ton  n  MrH^rrv 

W/vwpII  A/fi^n 

L 

I  lUildDU,    JJUAltl  v^iay 

Greenwich  Conn. 

T 

J 

HnnlnnQ     Krian  lamp*; 

Rome   N  Y 

s 

Horvitz,  Robert  Joseph 

s 

Howe  Frank  Alexander 

Cincinnati  43,  Ohio 

nuyc,  ivuuci  c    vv  diictcc 

WpIImIpv  Hi11<;  81  Mass 

u 

Liudak,  Raymond  John 

l^it-t-cKn  rcrVi    A  T^i 

1  lllNDUIgll     n,    1  vl. 

5 

T-Inrfnpr     A/lir,riif*l    P^t"f"i^*lr  Nwppn**v 

South  Swansea,  Mass. 

J 

Hughes,  Bruce  Allan 

Swampscott,  Mass. 

U 

Hughes,  David  Evan 

Toledo,  Ohio 

s 

Huntington,  Derek  Updegraf 

Hartford  5,  Conn. 

L 

Hutchison,  Robert  Alan 

Carlisle,  Iowa 

Indjic,  Eugene 

Springfield  8,  Mass. 
Ireland,  Thomas  Ellis 

\<  w  York  21,  N.  Y. 


Ives,  Alexander  Frank 
New  York  24,  N.  Y. 


U     Jackson,  Clifton  Edward,  Jr. 

Alexandria,  Va. 
J      Jackson,  Gary  Beggs 

Hot  Springs,  Ark. 
I       lackson,  Thomas  Humphrey 

Kalamazoo,  Mich. 
S      Jako,  Miklos 

Andover,  Mass. 
S      James,  Jay  Zachary,  Jr. 

Andover,  Mass. 
U     James,  Michael  Howard 

Woodbury,  Conn. 
S      Jameson,  John  Thomas 

Katonah,  N.  Y. 
I      Jensen,  Frode,  111 

New  York  71,  N.  Y. 


J 

S      Jerman,  Hubert  Bennett,  Jr. 

Charlotte  7,  N.  C. 
U     Jewell,  Daniel  Ashley 

Locust  Valley,  N.  Y. 
S      Jimerson,  Robert  Charles 

Sinking  Spring,  Pa. 
J      Johanson,  David  Owen 

Wellesley  81,  Mass. 
U     Johnson,  David  Clayton,  III 

Brooklyn,  N.  Y. 
S      Johnson,  Gregory  William 

Venice,  Fla. 
L     Johnson,  Mark  Peter 

Andover,  Mass. 
U     Johnson,  Maurice  Carl,  III 

Winnetka,  111. 


STUDENTS 


107 


S      Johnston,  James  Harvey,  III 

Jackson  6,  Miss. 
L      Johnston,  William  Elliott 

Jackson  6,  Miss. 


U     Jones,  Eric  Wilkins 

Andover,  Mass. 
J      Joseph,  Jean  Paul 

San  Salvador,  Rep.  of  El  Salvador, 
C.  A. 


K 


s 

Kahn,  Ely  Jacques,  III 

J 

Key,  Richard  Ralph 

Scarborough,  N.  Y. 

Chevy  Chase,  Md. 

L 

Kahn,  Joseph  Plaut 

S 

Keyworth,  Richard  Briggs 

Scarborough,  N.  Y. 

Gardner,  Mass. 

u 

Kapur,  Dilip 

L 

Kidd,  Lawrence  Graves 

Pondichery  2,  South  India 

Andover,  Mass. 

s 

Karlson,  Douglas  Alden 

S 

Kilbreth,  James  Truesdell,  III 

St.  Louis  Park  26,  Minn. 

Garden  City,  L.  I.,  N.  Y. 

s 

Katz,  Peter 

u 

Kinsolving,  Thomas  Bruce 

Cambridge  3  8,  Mass. 

New  York  21,  N.  Y. 

s 

Kaufmann,  Rodgers  Passavant 

u 

Kirk,  Selden  Thayer 

Munich  22,  Germany 

Old  Greenwich,  Conn. 

u 

Kaupe,  William  Herbert,  Jr. 

J 

Kirkpatrick,  William  Alexander,  Jr. 

Waccabuc,  N.  Y. 

Carnegie,  Pa. 

J 

Kefferston,  Robert  Dick,  II 

u 

Kitendaugh,  James  Glanville 

Andover,  Mass. 

Greenwich,  Conn. 

L 

Kehoe,  Wilson  Hazelitt 

S 

Kitson,  Peter  Wesley 

Princeton,  N.  J. 

Haverhill,  Mass. 

L 

Keller,  Peter  Gardner 

u 

Klein,  Francis  Charles 

Chestnut  Hill  67,  Mass 

New  York  23,  N.  Y. 

S 

Keller,  Robert  Scott 

S 

Kline,  Hibberd  Van  Buren,  III 

Winnetka,  111. 

Pittsburgh  13,  Pa. 

s 

Kellett,  Mirle  Amory 

J 

Koch,  Daniel  S. 

Wellesley  Hills  81,  Mass. 

Little  Neck,  N.  Y. 

L 

Kellogg,  Stephen  Brewster 

L 

Koch,  James  Paul 

Weston  93,  Mass. 

Larchmont,  N.  Y. 

L 

Kelsey,  Harvey  Marion,  III 

s 

Koehler,  Arnold  Ray 

Rye,  N.  Y. 

Weyerhauser,  Wis. 

J 

Kelsey,  John  Lufkin 

J 

Konecky,  Sean 

Toledo,  Ohio 

New  York  21,  N.  Y. 

U 

Kendrick,  Edmund  Hopkinson,  Jr. 

J 

Krier,  Kenneth  Daniel 

Wenham,  Mass. 

North  Canton,  Ohio 

L 

Kendrick,  Melvin  Southworth 

u 

Krinsky,  Michael  Mayer 

Wenham,  Mass. 

New  London,  Conn. 

S 

Kenna,  Edgar  Douglas,  III 

J 

Kritzer,  Robert  Benjamin 

Beverly  Farms,  Mass. 

Brooklyn  1,  N.  Y. 

J 

Kenney,  Pardon  Robert 

L 

Kubie,  John  Latz 

Andover,  Mass. 

Scarsdale,  N.  Y. 

u 

Keppelman,  Christopher  May 

u 

Kunen,  James  Simon 

Litchfield,  Conn. 

Marlboro,  Mass. 

L 

Ketch,  Lawrence  Levant 

s 

Kutvirt,  Thomas  Otaker 

Denver,  Colo. 

Rochester  18,  N.  Y. 

Lacouture,  John  Edwin  J      Lanius,  Paul  Baxter,  III 
Virginia  Beach,  Va.  Dacca,  East  Pakistan 

Langford,  Charles  Parmelee  S      Lansing,  James  Perrin 
Lindenhurst,  L.  I.,  N.  Y.  Milwaukee  17,  Wis. 


108 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


|       I  jsjicr,  Ike  Kampmann 

lallurnas,  Tex. 
U     Laivn,  Joseph  Michael 

Lawrence,  Mass. 
S      Laughcad,  James  Russell,  Jr. 

Dcs  Moines  10,  Iowa 
|      Lmikr,  Robert  Carl 

St.  Lambert,  Montreal,  Que.,  Canada 
I      Lawrence,  Guy  Bedell 

Stamford,  Conn. 
I.       Lawrence,  Randolph  Thomas 

Pound  Ridge,  N.  Y. 
S      Leary,  Richard  Maxwell 

Arlington  74,  Mass. 
S      Lcderer,  John  Hall 

Hatboro,  Pa. 
L      Lee,  James  Hammon 

Wichita  Falls,  Tex. 
U     Leete,  Kevin  John 

Andovcr,  Mass. 
L      Leinwand,  Ira  Jay 

Manhasset,  L.  1.,  N.  Y. 
U     Leismcr,  John  Alfred 

I'etoskey,  Mich. 
U     l.cmkin,  Jeffrey  David 

Lowell,  Mass. 
|       1  cmkin,  Michael  Bruce 

Lowell,  Mass. 
U      Leone,  John  Joseph 

South  San  Gabriel,  Calif. 
S      Levine,  John  braverman 

Lowell,  Mass. 
1       Lewia,  Rodney  Eldon 

Gibbon,  Minn. 
U     Liang,  Li-Shiang 

Bogota,  Colombia,  S.  A. 


S      McAfee,  Stuart  Reeves 

Irvington-on-Hudson,  N.  Y. 
S      McCabe,  Frederic  Charles,  Jr. 

Lawrence,  Mass. 
L      McCarthy,  Stephen  Joseph 

Marblehead,  Mass. 
S      MacCuish,  David  Spruance 

Riverside.  Calif. 
U     McEvoy,  Earl  Edward,  Jr. 

Rye,  N.  Y. 
S      McEwan,  Thomas  Edmund 

Silver  Spring,  Md. 
U     MacGuire,  Osborne  Ranier 

Montgomery,  Ala. 
U     McKibben,  Timothy  Pence 

Grinnell,  Iowa 
\LLanahan,  Charles  Scott 

u'allingford,  Pa. 


S      Licklider,  Tracy  Robnett 

Mt.  Kisco,  N.  Y. 
U     Lincoln,  Loring  Bills,  Jr. 

Swampscott,  Mass. 
J      Lindley,  Charles  Robert  Denver 

New  York  28,  N.  Y. 
L      Lisberger,  Stephen  Gates 

Ithaca,  N.  Y. 
U     Littlefield,  William  Emery,  Jr. 

Upper  Montclair,  N.  J. 
U     Liu,  Thomas  Wang 

Columbus  2,  Ohio 
L     Logsdon,  Mark  Joseph 

Lake  Forest,  111. 
S      London,  Fredric  Scott 

Saginaw,  Mich. 
U     Lowe,  Frederick  William,  III 

Manchester,  Conn. 
U     Lowell,  Peter  Tappin 

Bridgton,  Me. 
U     Lowell,  Roger  Wells 

Bridgton,  Me. 
U     Lower,  John  Wilson 

Dobbs  Ferry,  N.  Y. 
L      Lucas,  John  Edward 

York,  Me. 
L      Lucas,  William  Charles 

Scarsdale,  N.  Y. 
U     Ludden,  David  Ellsworth 

Chappaqua,  N.  Y. 
J      Lynch,  Dana  Hoyt 

Jackson,  Miss. 
U     Lynn,  Christopher  Gardiner 

Los  Gatos,  Calif. 
L     Lytle,  Jesse  Stewart 

Birmingham  12,  Ala. 


S      McLean,  Edward  Righter,  Jr. 

Greenville  7,  Del. 
U     McLean,  John  Alan 

Summit,  N.  J. 
S      McLean,  Stuart  Thomas 

Pound  Ridge,  N.  Y. 
U     McMullen,  Kelly  Andre 

Somerset,  N.  J. 
J      McNealy,  Roderick  Marshall 

Chicago  14,  111. 
L     MacNelly,  James  Bruce 

Cedarhurst,  L.  I.,  N.  Y. 
S      MacNelly,  Jeffrey  Kenneth 

Cedarhurst,  L.  I.,  N.  Y. 
U     McTernen,  Malcolm  Bodwell,  III 

Peoria,  111. 

U     McWilliams,  Andrew  Alfred  Reeves 
Bloomfield,  N.  J. 


STUDENTS 


109 


s 

Madison,  Michael  Timothy 

T 

L 

Melamed,  Jeffrey  Stephen 

Davis,  Calif. 

TT  •     _1           _ _          XT  *V 

Binghamton,  N.  Y. 

s 

Magruder,  Joseph  Hull,  Jr. 

C 

a 

Melamed,  Mark  Alan 

Fairfield,  Conn. 

Dinghamton,  N.  i. 

c 
a 

Mahoney,  Timothy  William 

c 

a 

Mele,  Peter  Cameron 

White  rlains,  N.  Y. 

barneveJd,  JN.  Y. 

U 

Major,  James  Williamson,  Jr. 

T 

L 

Melendy,  Robert  Gordon,  Jr. 

Willimantic,  v^onn. 

weiiesley  riiiis  si,  Mass. 

T  T 

u 

Makepeace,  David  Walter 

T 
J 

Meller,  Gary  Chester 

Naugatuck,  Conn. 

vt«-                 XT  "V 
Mt.  JSJSCO,  JN.  I. 

s 

Malmg,  Walter  Henry 

T 

L 

\t  I  1  11      T„1  T'  - 1  T- 

Mendennall,  John  lalcott,  Jr. 

Annapolis,  Md. 

Madison,  Wis. 

L 

T                                O .  _  „  1    ^          TT  1 

Mallory,  atephen  Paul 

T 

L 

Menocal,  Luis,  III 

Kansas  City  1,  Kan. 

Mexico,  D.  F.,  Mexico 

c 
a 

Mansvelt  Beck,  Burchard  Jan 

C 

a 

Messick,  Brinkley  Morris,  III 

lhe  Hague,  The  Netherlands 

Dayton,  Ohio 

T  T 
U 

Mar,  James  Christopher 

T  T 
U 

Miller,  Bryan  Crimn 

Lincoln,  Mass. 

Andover,  Mass. 

TT 

u 

Maranzana,  Louis 

I  T 

u 

\  / '  1 1    —     TT  „ .  ^  „    TT  - .  - 1      i  J 

Miller,  leter  raul,  3d 

TT  „  1 1  J      T7 1 

Hollywood,  Ha. 

Swarthmore,  Pa. 

c 
a 

Marble,  Warren  Nickerson 

1  T 

u 

Miller,  Kobert  Craig,  Jr. 

South  Dennis,  Mass. 

✓~M_       1  _      _     r  XT 

Charlotte  5,  N.  C. 

u 

Marichal,  Carlos 

T  T 
U 

Miller,  aamuel  Kay 

Cambridge  4(J.  Mass. 

Miami  Beach  40,  rla. 

L 

Marichal,  Miguel 

s 

T  jf  *  1 1  •  1               /"  •   1      T  T '  1 1  TTT 

Milliken,  Gerrish  Hill,  111 

Cambridge  40,  Mass. 

Greenwich,  Conn. 

c 
a 

Marks,  Andrew  Wilson 

c 

a 

Mills,  Jonathan  Quimby 

Cheswick,  Pa. 

New  Canaan,  Conn. 

T 

JL 

Marks,  atandish  Backus 

c 
a 

Milmoe,  Cornelius  James 

Grosse  Pointe  Shores  36,  Mich. 

/~\  •  1  _     XT  V 

Uneida,  N.  Y. 

J 

Marshall,  Courtney  Allen 

T 

L 

Mintkeski,  Walter  Cleverdon 

Machias,  Me. 

1  f       1                    y       T        XT  "V/ 

Manhasset,  L.  I.,  N.  Y. 

c 

a 

Marshall,  Peter 

u 

Mitchell,  Charles  DeBeaux 

Greenwich.  Conn. 

1  TT  *  1  XT  T 

Glen  Ridge,  N.  J. 

c 

a 

\  I  1      11      c*.       1-           TT  I 

Marshall,  Stephen  Bush 

u 

If*.    1_    11      T»       lAl-  J 

Mitchell,  Paul  Alexander 

Palo  Alto,  Calif. 

Stamford,  Conn. 

it 
u 

Martin,  James  Stuart 

u 

Mol^,  Matthew  Cartwright 

Burlington,  Vt. 

Summit,  N.  J. 

c 

a 

Marvel,  Jonathan  Hopkins 

u 

Moody,  Robert  Wallace 

  -11         t~»  1 

Greenville,  Del. 

Mt.  Lebanon,  Pa. 

T 

Masters,  James  Henry  Peniston 

u 

\  r  1        tt        •  J     tt  1 

Mook,  David  Parker 

Pembroke,  Bermuda 

Tenafly,  N.  J. 

c 

a 

Mathews,  Colin  Dee 

u 

Moore,  Christopher  Lee 

Park  City,  Utah 

North  Tarrytown,  N.  Y. 

T 

L 

Matthews,  Paul  Chandler,  III 

L 

Moore,  James  Daniel,  Jr. 

St.  James,  N.  Y. 

Fort  Bragg,  N.  C. 

T  T 

L 

Maxon,  Earl  Halbert 

L 

Moore,  John  Baker 

El  Paso  12,  Tex. 

Wheaton,  111. 

T 

JL 

Maytag,  Dean  Calvin 

s 

Moore,  Mark  Harrison 

Laurel,  Iowa 

Worcester  9,  Mass. 

s 

Mazel,  Eugene  Andrew  Stephen 

S 

Moore,  Matthew  Swift 

Andover,  Mass. 

Pasadena  3,  Calif. 

s 

Meade,  Everard  Kidder,  III 

J 

Moravec,  Francis  Joseph 

New  York  21,  N.  Y. 

Tuxedo  Park,  N.  Y. 

s 

Means,  Graeme  Donald 

s 

Morgan,  John  William,  Jr. 

Providence  6,  R.  L 

Weiiesley  Hills  81,  Mass. 

L 

Mears,  William  Sargeant 

s 

Morgan,  Peter  Eason 

Litchfield,  Conn. 

Corning,  Ark. 

110 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


U     Morgan,  Philip  Robinson 

Shrewsbury,  Mass. 
J      Moriarty,  John  James 

Andover,  Mass. 
U     Morrill,  William  Henderson 

Barrington,  R.  I. 
L     Morris,  Sidney  Brock 

Pittsburgh  32,  Pa. 
U     Morse,  Jonathan 

Bedford,  N.  Y. 
J      Moulin,  Albert  Edward,  III 

New  Orleans  15,  La. 
U     Mulley,  Albert  George,  Jr. 

Wilmington,  Mass. 


S      Nelson,  Blyth  Covey 

Ste.  Agathe  Des  Monts,  Que.,  Canad; 
L      Nelson,  Phillip  Lloyd 

Pea  Ridge,  Ark. 
1.      Nettleton,  John  Scott 

Fort  Collins,  Colo. 
U     Nevius,  George  Booker 

Red  Bank,  N.  J. 
U     Newbury,  William  Kellogg 

Concord,  Mass. 
U     Newcomb,  Winthrop  Holbrook 

Andover,  Mass. 


S      Ogden,  Herbert  Gouverneur,  Jr. 

Windsor,  Vt. 
U     Ogilvie,  Andrew  Jones 

Brookfield  Center,  Conn. 
U     O'Gorman,  Stephen  Vincent 

Beverly,  Mass. 
L      O'Hern,  Joseph  John 

Barnum,  Iowa 
S      O'Hern,  Patrick  Joseph 

Barnum,  Iowa 
J      Olsen,  Dwight  E.  Stephen 

Bagley,  Minn. 
U     Olson,  Stanley  Howard 

Groton,  Mass. 


J      Paez-Aragon,  Alejandro 

Mexico  10,  D.  F.,  Mexico 
S      Page,  Theodore  Herbert,  III 

Peoria,  111. 
S      Paige,  Clifford  Edward 

Fairfield,  Conn. 
L      Paoletti,  James  Joseph 

Hartford  10,  Conn. 


L      Munro,  David  Badgley 

Jackson,  Mich. 
S      Munroe,  George  Taylor 

New  York  25,  N.  Y. 
S      Munroe,  James  Granger 

Andover,  Mass. 
S      Murray,  Roger  Franklin,  III 

New  York  25,  N.  Y. 
U     Myers,  Douglas  Lee 

Greenwich,  Conn. 
L     Myers,  Gregory  Bruce 

Ottumwa,  Iowa 


N 

U     Newhall,  William  Price,  II 

Riverside,  Conn. 
L      Newmyer,  Arthur  Grover,  III 

Washington  8,  D.  C. 
S      Newton,  Charles  Richard 

Westboro,  Mass. 
U     Noble,  Richard  Cedric 

Jackson,  Mich. 
U     Noll,  Jon  Gray 

Springfield,  111. 
J      Nowell,  Frederick  Nichols,  III 

Andover,  Mass. 


o 

S      Olver,  Richard  Boyce 

Rome,  Italy 
J      Onerheim,  Neil  Eric 

Ottumwa,  Iowa 
J      Oniskor,  Alan  Philip 

Flushing  5  5,  N.  Y. 
S      O'Shaughnessy,  Richard  William 

Columbus,  Ohio 
S      Osterrieth,  Michael  Johannes 

Baden,  Germany 
J      Outerbridge,  Ira  Stuart,  III 

Pembroke,  Bermuda 

P 

L      Park,  Bradford  Stalker 

North  Reading,  Mass. 
L     Parry,  Thomas  Hugh 

Hamilton,  N.  Y. 
S      Parsons,  Jose  Charles 

Manila,  Philippines 
S      Patrick,  John  Joseph 

Methuen,  Mass. 


STUDENTS 


111 


c 
o 

Pppf     Danipl  Inhn 

Tj 

Pieters,  Richard  Sawyer,  Jr. 

W^olverton,  Minn. 

Annrivpf  A/fi«c 

/xixciuvcX|  ivia>s. 

5 

Ppranlt     Pptpr  7anrlpr 

L 

Pike,  Nathan  Howard 

i  IL LSX1C1U ,    1VJ  a  VN. 

X  I  L'Cs  LUi  It ,  XVllIHl. 

IT 
yJ 

PpivJiip     Pf>tf*r  C^n  «nin  it 

s 

Ptrnie,  Douglas  Duryea,  Jr. 

Pnrr  Washington    N  Y 

Yokohama,  Japan 

C 

.j 

1  txx  y,  vjcuxxxty  i/uci 

Piatt    RJrhard  Rnorli 

Mptxt    Ynrlr     TV  Y 

i\ew    1  urjv,  in-  x. 

VJx  vCxx  W  Xl*Il,    V_A.I1 1 1 1 . 

C 

o 

Pprrv      I  1  tn  ntnv   SpwpI  1 
i  vu  V)     x  mn.H n y    Jt  wtu 

L 

Platy     TatnM    Ann  rpw 

X  Idli/j     JdUlt  l  liUUlvYV 

T  syiiicviIIp    7      K  v 

Louio  vine  /,  xv y • 

A  11  fin  rn  A/fp 

U 

pprrv     Wi'nf  nrnn             f  II 

u 

Plimntnn    Chsrlps  Gilhprr  TIT 

X  X1111L/LAJXX,     Vllal  JtJ     VJllUCl  V)  XIX 

Mnntpvinpn     T  Trinyna  v     S  A 

South  Lincoln  Mass. 

L 

1  ClLXaUIl,    XjCC  xviicn 

5 

PfklrrpsQ     A/fipnapl    T  nvn 
x         wjj    l>i  itudti    x-i vvjy  \x 

OIn   T  vmp  Cnnn 

Dobbs  Ferry,  N.  Y. 

I 

J 

Pptpf  enn        nKpft   "Rum  pft 

r 

J 

Pnnfi     Trvcpnn  Frann^ 

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X  l  11  riC  .X,      IN  •        I  . 

St.  John  s,  Newfoundland,  Canada 

I 

J 

Pirlrpff     Riic«p1i  Amp« 

t  lUIVvl-kj     XVUadvXX  X\IilCo 

Prpct/in     AlpTan^pr  T-Tparrl 
x  icotuxx,  xxXCAaxxcxcx  xxcaxcx 

Milton  87,  Mass. 

Middletown,  N.  Y. 

s 

Pidot,  Jeffrey  Robert 

L 

Prichard,  Edward  Allen 

Locust  Valley,  L.  I.,  N.  Y. 

Versailles,  Ky. 

s 

Piehlerjeffrey  Manning 

L 

Priestley,  James  Russell 

^Jforcester  Mass. 

Melrose  76  Mass. 

u 

Pierpont,  Jonathan  Ladd 

J 

Proctor,  Richard  David 

Darien,  Conn. 

Greenwich,  Conn. 

s 

Pierson,  Walter  Baldwin 

U 

Prophet,  Douglas  Wilson 

Greenwich,  Conn. 

South  Norwalk,  Conn. 

L 

Quarrier,  John  Vanderbilt 

Q 

J 

Quinlan,  Michael  Owen 

New  Canaan,  Conn. 

Andover,  Mass. 

R 


u 

Rafferty,  Chirstopher  Lawrence 

U 

Raurell,  Alberto  Miguel,  Jr. 

Farmington,  Conn. 

Miami  45,  Fla. 

s 

Rafferty,  Kevin  Gelshenen,  II 

J 

Rawson,  Christopher  Bennett 

West  Hartford,  Conn. 

Riverside,  Conn. 

L 

Rainey,  Derek  Rexton 

S 

Rebassoo,  Vaho 

Port  Huron,  Mich. 

Decorah,  Iowa 

s 

Rairigh,  Jonathan  Wick 

J 

Reddersen,  John  Allan 

Andover,  Mass. 

Glenview,  111. 

112 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


U     Redman,  Eric 

Seattle  44,  Wash. 
U     Reed,  Elliott  Williamson,  III 

Southport,  Conn. 
L      Reed,  Philip  Dunham,  III 

Westfield,  N.  J. 
L      Rees,  Thomas  Dynevor 

Andover,  Mass. 
L      Reider,  Bruce 

Edison,  N.  J. 
U     Reisner,  Walter  Lewis 

Allegany,  N.  Y. 
J      Rendleman,  Neal  James 

Dysart,  Iowa 
S      Richards,  Gregory  Prestwich 

Darien,  Conn. 
J      Richmond,  Scott  Louis 

Maiden,  Mass. 
J      Riley,  Roger  Del 

Salinas,  Calif. 
J      Ristuccia,  Joel  Manuel 

Andover,  Mass. 
U     Rizzo,  William  Ober 

Cambridge  3  8,  Mass. 
L      Robinson,  Harold  Bernard 

Brooklyn,  N.  Y. 
S      Robinson,  Peter  Burling 

Southampton,  L.  I.,  N.  Y. 
L      Robinson,  William  Wylie 

Lancaster,  S.  C. 


U     St.  John,  Harry  Mark,  III 

West  Hartford,  Conn. 
S      Salk,  Darrell  John 

La  Jolla,  Calif. 
L      Salk,  Jonathan  Daniel 

La  Jolla,  Calif. 
S      Samp,  Edward  Joseph,  III 

Cambridge  40,  Mass. 
J      Samp,  Frederick  Sullivan 

Cambridge  40,  Mass. 
S      Samp,  John  Barnes 

Cambridge  40,  Mass. 
U     Samson,  Charles  Felix,  II 

Princeton,  N.  J. 
S      Samuels,  Danny  Marc 

Paragould,  Ark. 
L      Samuels,  Edward  Barry 

Paragould,  Ark. 
S      Sanger,  Alexander  Campbell 

Mt.  Kisco,  N.  Y. 
S      Sargent,  David  Cutler 

Aurora,  Ohio 
L      Saunders,  Wade  Hampton 

Bethesda  14,  Md. 


L     Roby,  Thornton  Bigelow 

Saddle  River,  N.  J. 
L     Rockwell,  Charles  Embree,  Jr. 

New  Canaan,  Conn. 
U     Rockwell,  David  Hadley 

Fairfield,  Conn. 
S      Roe,  David  Benson 

San  Francisco  18,  Calif. 
J      Rogers,  James  Slocum 

Scarsdale,  N.  Y. 
S      Rogge,  Scott  DeBow 

Brigantine,  N.  J. 
L      Rooney,  Mark  Brigham 

Pelham,  N.  Y. 
S      Rorimer,  Louis 

New  York  28,  N.  Y. 
U     Ross,  Donald  Ogden 

Hamden,  Conn. 
U     Ross,  James  O'Neill 

North  Bergen,  N.  J. 
U     Ross,  James  Ottice 

Lawrence,  Mass. 
L      Roth,  Dennis  Levin 

Sidney,  Ohio 
L     Runyon,  Mefford  Ross,  II 

Fairfield,  Conn. 
S      Russell,  Thomas  Wright,  III 

Westmount,  Que.,  Canada 
U     Ryder,  Jeff  Wreden 

Miami  45,  Fla. 

s 

U     Sawyer,  Charles  Horner 

Buffalo  22,  N.  Y. 
S      Scanlan,  Craig  Lawrence 

Fair  Haven,  N.  J. 
U     Scharf,  Gilbert  Dale 

Sands  Point,  N.  Y. 
L      Scheft,  Thomas  Winden 

West  Newton  65,  Mass. 
S      Scheinmann,  Michel  Robert 

South  Dartmouth,  Mass. 
U     Schepps,  Joseph  William 

Dallas  29,  Tex. 
L      Schiavoni,  Thomas  Francis 

Bradford,  Mass. 
U     Schlesinger,  Andrew  Bancroft 

Washington,  D.  C. 
S      Schneider,  Franz,  Jr. 

Oyster  Bay,  L.  I.,  N.  Y. 
U     Schneiderman,  Matthew  Marks 

Montreal  6,  Que.,  Canada 
L      Schroeder,  Dean  Howard 

Burlington,  Wis. 
L      Scofield,  Arthur  Bly 

Brookline  46,  Mass. 


STUDENTS 


113 


U     Scott,  William  Andrew 

New  York  21,  N.  Y. 
U     Seamans,  Joseph 

Washington  7,  D.  C. 
L     Sears,  John  Russell,  Jr. 

Dallas,  Tex. 
U    Seccombe,  Stephen  Dana 

Pittsburgh  27,  Pa. 
S     Seeche,  Steven  Jay 

North  Andover,  Mass. 
J      Segarra,  Juan  Enrique 

San  Juan,  Puerto  Rico 
J     Selander,  Robert  William 

Southborough,  Mass. 
L     Selden,  Thomas  Randolph 

Houston  24,  Tex. 
U     Sessions,  Stuart  Lunsford 

Ladue,  Mo. 
L     Shannon,  Peter  Douglas 

Laconia,  N.  H. 
S     Sharpies,  Richard  James 

Mattapoisett,  Mass. 
L     Shea,  John  Richard,  III 

Baltimore  12,  Md. 
S     Shedd,  Steven  Alexander 

Newport  Beach,  Calif. 
S     Sheldon,  Charles,  II 

Amherst,  Mass. 
S      Sheldrick,  Malcolm  Bristol,  Jr. 

Hopewell,  N.  J. 
S     Shepard,  Donald  Sloane 

Tenafly,  N.  J. 
J      Sherman,  Scott  Merritt 

Andover,  Mass. 
U    Short,  John  Gerdes 

Cohasset,  Mass. 
S     Shuey,  James  Francis 

Grinnell,  Iowa 
L     Sieburth,  Richard  Raymond 

Denver,  Colo. 
L     Sinclair,  Thomas  Graham,  Jr. 

Maracaibo,  Venezuela 
U     Smith,  Bradley  Youle 

Princeton,  N.  J. 
L     Smith,  David  Emerson 

North  Pownal,  Vt. 
L     Smith,  Robert  Pease,  Jr. 

Burlington,  Vt. 
U    Smith,  Roger  Hampton 

Dayton  59,  Ohio 
T     Smith,  Sumner  Merrill 

Cohasset,  Mass. 
J     Smith,  Thomas  Dickson 

Wellesley  Hills,  Mass. 
S     Snavely,  Henry  Jackson 

Lancaster,  Pa. 
S     Snyder,  Colby  Hopewell 
Lancaster,  Pa. 


S      Solomon,  Christopher  Tonkin 

Cambridge  3  8,  Mass. 
J      Spalding,  Richard  Coxe 

Greenwich,  Conn. 
S      Spears,  Drew  Sharpless 

Riegelsville,  Pa. 
U     Sperry,  Robert  James 

Hillsdale,  N.  Y. 
U     Spiegel,  John  Willson 

Berkeley  8,  Calif. 
U     Spinden,  Joseph  Gilmour 

Carmel,  N.  Y. 
J      Spindler,  James  Andrew 

Morgantown,  W.  Va. 
U     Spooner,  Jonathan  Farr 

Douglas,  Mass. 
J      Staley,  Andrew,  Jr. 

Providence  6,  R.  I. 
S      Stanback,  Howard  Jan 

Durham,  N.  C. 
U     Stanley,  Bruce  McLaren 

Fort  Myers  Beach,  Fla. 
U     Stapleton,  Jonathan  Carroll 

Little  Compton,  R.  I. 
U     Steele,  William  Lawrence,  Jr. 

Gloucester,  Mass. 
U     Stein,  Geoffrey  Richard 

Newton  Centre  59,  Mass. 
U     Stelle,  Kellogg  Sheffield 

Washington,  D.  C. 
L     Stern,  Peter  Wright 

Old  Westbury,  L.  I.,  N.  Y. 
S      Sterner,  John  Parvin 

Rochester  18,  N.  Y. 
U     Stevens,  Jonathan  Buell 

Easthampton,  Mass. 
I      Stevenson,  Richard  Dill,  III 

Lake  Bluff,  111. 
U     Stewart,  Richard  Lawrence 

Reading,  Mass. 
S      Stewart,  Robert  Morrison,  Jr. 

Andover,  Mass. 
L      Stokely,  Dykeman  Cole 

Newport,  Tenn. 
J      Stokely,  James  Rorex,  III 

Newport,  Tenn. 
L     Stott,  Frederic  Sanderson 

Andover,  Mass. 
U     Strausz,  David  Alexander,  Jr. 

Seattle  5  5,  Wash. 
S      Strong,  George  Gordon,  Jr. 

Canton  9,  Ohio 
J      Stulgis,  Jonathan  William 

Andover,  Mass. 
L      Stuyck,  Jan-Pieter  Joslyn 

Cos  Cob,  Conn. 
S      Swanson,  Ralph  John,  III 

Red  Oak,  Iowa 


114 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


L.     Swartz,  John  Hay,  Jr. 
Gladwyne,  Pa. 


U     Takvorian,  Ronald  Wayne 

Lawrence,  Mass. 
U      Tan,  Ronald  Long 

Bangkok,  Thailand 
S       Tanner,  Robert  Luke 

Garden  Grove,  Calif. 
L     Taylor,  Lawrence  Jay 

Blue  Point,  L.  I.,  N.  Y. 
S      Thomas,  John  Christopher 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
S      Thomas,  Terry  James 

Rosedale  22,  N.  Y. 
U     Thomas,  Willys  James 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
L      Thompson,  Anthony 

Lexington,  Mass. 
J      Thompson,  Douglas  Crawford 

Sao  Paulo,  Brazil,  S.  A. 
S      Thompson,  Elliott  Church 

South  Lincoln,  Mass. 
S      Thompson,  Jeffrey  Bartlett 

New  York  28,  N.  Y. 
U     Thomson,  James  Barry 

Kingston  8,  Jamaica 
S      Thurber,  Peter  Lockwood 

Greenwich,  Conn. 
S       Thurmond,  Perry  Kelly 

Columbia,  S.  C. 
U     Tolman,  Charles  Edward 

Concord,  Mass. 
I      Tomassi,  John 

Westport,  Conn. 
U     Tompkins,  Vinton  Douglas 

Hudson,  Que.,  Canada 


U     Underwood,  Cary  Sutton 
Portville,  N.  Y. 


S      Valkenburgh,  Roger  Ransom,  Jr. 

Wilton,  Conn. 
1       Valpey,  Philip  Dalrymple 

North  Andover,  Mass. 
S      Vanderwarker,  Peter  Dean 

New  Canaan,  Conn. 
L      Van  Wyck,  David  Bicknell 

Cave  Creek,  Ariz. 


L     Sweezy,  James  Weldon 
Charlotte  8,  N.  C. 

T 

L      Torvik,  Stephen  Paul 

Decorah,  Iowa 
U     Tottenham,  Dennis  Edward 

Fort  Worth  7,  Tex. 
S      Tottenham,  Stephen  Leakey 

Fort  Worth  7,  Tex. 
L     Townend,  Stephen  Coughlin 

Dallas,  Pa. 
L     Tracy,  Wayne  Francis 

Rumford,  R.  I. 
L     Trafton,  Richard  Lewis 

Auburn,  Me. 
U     Tresemer,  David  Ward 

Fort  Lauderdale,  Fla. 
L     Tresemer,  Michael  William 

Fort  Lauderdale,  Fla. 
L     Truelove,  Frederick  Charles,  III 

Norwell,  Mass. 
J      Truitt,  Bruce  Evin 

Houston,  Tex. 
L     Tucker,  John  Lathrop 

Cambridge  3  8,  Mass. 
U     Tung,  Barry  Ko-Young 

Tokyo,  Japan 
S      Turbeville,  Daniel  Jackson 

Westfield,  N.  J. 
S      Turnbull,  Lowell  David 

Weston  93,  Mass. 
U     Turner,  Prescott  Kingsbury,  Jr. 

Fairfield,  Conn. 
L     Tuttle,  Robert  Carl 

Avon,  Mass. 
S      Twineham,  John  Cecil 

Annandale,  Va. 

u 

S      Utley,  Frederick  Brown,  III 
Bernardsville,  N.  J. 

V 

U     Vaughan,  Russell  Stone 

Groveland,  Mass. 
U     Verger,  Donald  Barry 

Great  Neck,  N.  Y. 
L     Vincent,  Jonathan  Sanborn 

Norwell,  Mass. 
S      Vinick,  Charles  William 

Farmington,  Conn. 


STUDENTS 


115 


s 

TVT     1                                   *  1L  t- 

Wabaunsee,  Albert  John 

J 

Wheaton,  Scott  Rodgers,  Jr. 

Ann  Arbor,  Mich. 

lJougnkeepsie,  N.  i. 

u 

Walcott,  Joseph  Pratt 

J 

W7L  '       1-     f  ^  1  *  '  1  nr*  I  1 

Whipple,  Christopher  iodd 

Wooster,  Ohio 

North  Grafton,  Mass. 

u 

Walden,  Robert  otewart 

\V7  L ."  „  _  »      T„l  W/--J 

wnisnant,  John  Ward 

Rye,  N.  Y. 

Charlotte,  N.  C. 

u 

Wales,  Carl  Alzen 

■  T 

u 

Wmte,  rniiip  Howell 

Borrego  Springs,  Calif. 

Lakeville,  Conn. 

s 

TOT   11                        rf             if  1 

walker,  Geoffrey  Kenly 

J 

Whitehead,  Howard  Judson 

Columbia,  b.  C. 

Melrose  76,  Mass. 

L 

walker,  Walton  Harris,  11 

T 

L 

W7L  1 .-                \V/1  1  1.  TTT 

Whitney,  Wheelock,  111 

XT            T7"  ~    1         XT  "V 

New  York,  N.  Y. 

Wayzata,  Minn. 

T 

L 

Wallace,  Robert  jbruce 

Wicks,  Uamel  Howard 

Doylestown,  Pa. 

Northport,  Ala. 

L 

TOT    11               T               1               T  T'    ^_ _ 

Waller,  Jonathan  Hiett 

L 

"TOT  *  1           J             X  <"          L             T  T 

Wikander,  Matthew  Hays 

Katonah,  N.  Y. 

Northampton,  Mass. 

T  T 

u 

Walton,  nruce  Hunter 

T  T 
U 

Wilbur,  cnnstopner  Hayes 

Montclair,  N.  J. 

Portland,  Conn. 

T 

L 

Wanning,  Thomas  Ashton 

Wilbur,  Robert  Carleton 

Saugerties,  N.  Y. 

Babylon,  N.  Y. 

L 

Waring,  Jeffrey  Harrison 

u 

TOT'11-*.        T?  1       _     _      At  TTT 

wiilets,  Elmore  Abram,  III 

Brewer,  Me. 

oewickley,  Fa. 

J 

Warren,  Caleb  Thomas 

s 

TVT'11*                     T     1_          T"\  1 

Williams,  John  Derek 

Princeton,  N.  J. 

Durham,  N.  C. 

S 

Warren,  Daniel 

u 

TVT  *  t  1  *                    TT                 TUT  11 

Williams,  Peter  Welles 

Princeton,  N.  J. 

Springfield  8,  Mass. 

J 

TOT                     T\  >  ,\                -r\  1 

Warren,  D  Arcy  Paul 

L 

TVT'11'                            TUT'll  •               T|             Ml  TT 

Williamson,  William  Burnll,  II 

Chappaqua,  N.  Y. 

Augusta,  Me. 

L 

TOT    a.               TJ      1_        .      T  •  1 

Waters,  Robert  Lincoln 

J 

TVT'        1_  *           "Kf*     1-        1     T>  iV 

Winship,  Michael  Bancroft 

\T  ^..,.1  J  J  J      XT  T 

JNortnneld,  IN.  J. 

North  sandwich,  N.  H. 

J 

TOT    *-\*               WT7  *  1 1  '               W7T    *     1_  - 

Wathng,  William  Wright 

u 

Winter,  C.  Larrabee 

Santa  Barbara,  Calif. 

Tucson,  Ariz. 

S 

TVT          J       T\         •   1     T>  1 

Waud,  David  Butler 

u 

TVT'                     1       •                1               T*       1  1 

Wise,  Christopher  Todd 

Lake  Forest,  111. 

Katonah,  N.  Y. 

L 

X\rr    *1      if       1      11  a1 

Weil,  Mitchell  Alan 

u 

Wise,  Erich  Paul 

Chicago,  111. 

San  Pedro,  Calif. 

U 

TO7    '1       HP  1                       T^l  *  T 

Weil,  Thomas  Eliot,  Jr. 

L 

Wise,  Michael  Todd 

Washington  8,  D.  C. 

Katonah,  N.  Y. 

L 

TOT    *      1                     T*  •     1  IT* 

Weinberg,  Richard  Barry 

S 

Witherspoon,  Thomas  Winfrey,  Jr 

O  1     1           -KT  -\r 

bcarsdale,  N.  Y. 

Litchfield,  Conn. 

U 

Weiss,  James  Woodrow 

L 

Wohlfeil,  Steven  Christopher 

Norwich,  Vt. 

Florence,  S.  C. 

T 
J 

Weiss,  Thomas  Lynn 

J 

Wolf,  Stewart  George,  III 

T            1          11  T»l 

rort  Lauderdale,  Fla. 

Oklahoma  City,  Okla. 

T 

L 

Welch,  John  Bernard,  III 

s 

Wood,  Michael  Melville 

W T     11         1                TT'11            ■»  r 

Wellesley  Hills,  Mass. 

Flint  3,  Mich. 

L 

Welch,  Thomas  Kneeland 

Woodlock,  Douglas  Preston 

Pelham  Manor,  N.  Y. 

La  Grange,  111. 

S 

Wells,  Lloyd  Allan 

J 

Woolsey,  John  Munro,  3d 

Cumberland,  R.  I. 

Cambridge  3  8,  Mass. 

L 

Wengert,  David  Allen 

L 

Works,  John  Vickery 

Lebanon,  Pa. 

Dallas  9,  Tex. 

L 

Wertimer,  Peter 

J 

Wright,  Clifford  Ramsey,  III 

Clinton,  N.  Y. 

Santa  Barbara,  Calif. 

U 

West,  Peter  Martin 

U 

Wright,  Marcus  Wayne 

New  York  17,  N.  Y. 

Charlotte  5,  N.  C. 

116 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Wulsin,  Frederick  Roelker,  II 
Cambridge  3  8,  Mass. 


Wyper,  James,  III 

West  Hartford  7,  Conn. 


Yankopolus,  Konstantine  Konstantine 

New  Bedford,  Mass. 
Ycttcn,  Peter  Michael 

Waltham,  Mass. 
Young,  John  Hendricks,  Jr. 

Whitchouse  Station,  N.  J. 
Young,  Philip  Renwick 

Pittsfield,  Mass. 


Young,  Robert  Vaughan, 

Venice,  Fla. 
Youngquist,  Jeffrey  Ives 

Lancaster,  Pa. 
Yu,  Allen 

New  York  21,  N.  Y. 


Jr. 


INDEX 


Administrative  Departments  and  Oificers    —  17 

Admission  Deposit     —    „    —  44 

Admission,  General  Policy    -  _  —  41 

Admissions  Interview    _  „    _42,  92 

Admission  Procedure   ..  _  —  -  —  42 

Admission  Requirements  for  Each  Class  ~~  _    46 

Admission  Tests,  Charges  and  Schedule  .„  —  43 

Aims  of  Phillips  Academy      _  —  4 

Alumni  Representatives  _         92 

Application  Blank      „  _.  „  facing  118 

Applying,  Procedure  in   „.    „    42 

Archaeology  Building        24 

Art  Gallery   -  „  —  23 

Athletics  and  Physical  Education   „  —  30 

Breakage  Deposit      „    „  .„  36 

Calendars      „  _  _  -  —  2,  3 

Classification  of  Students    -  -  —  »_  -  -  48,  99 

Class  Officers      „  —  48 

Clothing  „  ,     _  ~   34 

College  Admissions — Class  of  1964        ..    3  5 

College  Board  Examinations       _.._44,  47 

Constitution  of  Phillips  Academy  „  _  —  6 

Counselors      20 

Course  of  Study      „    48 

Courses,  Description  of      „  ....  _    52 

Cultural  Opportunities      ..  „   .   22 

Curriculum    „  „  „      5  0 

Daily  Schedule      _  -   32 

Dances      _    29 

Day  Excuses     _  ...  „  _  „    34 

Day  Students      „    ..  _    36 

Dental  Work  at  School  ..  _  _  ..  32 

Deposit,  Admissions      .„  _  45 

Deposit,  Breakage    „  „    „    38 

Diploma  Requirements   ...„  _  _  _  „  „   49 

Discipline   ..    _  _  .„  3  3 

Dormitory  Residence,  Plan  of  .„  „  20 

Eating,  Plan  of    _  _„  _   20 

Entrance  Examinations   _  _  _  _.  _   43 

Entrance,  Requirements  for   _  -    41,  46 

Expenses    _      _  3  5-39 

Extra-Curricular  Activities    „  „  „  _  26 

"Extras"      _  _  37 

Faculty      _  _  „  ,  „  m  10 

Financial  Aid  for  Students    _  _  „  „   38 

Founders  of  Phillips  Academy  „  „    _  „  „   5 

Four- Year  Program   ™      „  „  „    49 

Furniture  (Room  Equipment)    „   34 

General   Information      m  20 

Grades  and  Reports    „  „   3  3 

Headmasters      >  „.  ..„  _  j 

Health  Supervision            _  _  31 

Historical  Sketch    „    _  _  6 


117 


1  1  8  PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


1  1  ■  •  u  icmsf t crs  

  20 

Interview  for  Admission  ~  — .-  

 42,  92 

 _  22 

Map  of  the  School     -  -  ~  

1 

Mcdicsl  Care  at  School  „  

 _  31 

il  iiimranrp 

 „  37 

 „29,  70 

<  )•»!■•■■  1  lours                   ^   ,„„  

 „.  17 

(  )nr    \  .■  >r  »\riirl/>nr€ 

 A2,  47 

l'.i>  merits  .________-™._»«_«_»_..^.  

 _    3  6 

 _  30 

Placement  Examinations,  Preparation  for   „  

 „  _  46 

Plan  of  Residence  and  Eating    

 20 

Postgraduate  Students     _  

 42,  47 

Prizes  and  Winners    _  

 _  _  76 

Procedure  in  Applying    

  42 

Purpose  of  Phillips  Academy   

  4 

Regulations,  General     «  

 „  33 

Religion,  School  Policy    

 „    2 1 

Reports  _      

 _    3  3 

Representation,  Geographical   

99 

Residence,  Plan  of    

20 

Room  Equipment    _  _  

 _    34 

Scholarships,  Award  of  _  

3  g 

Scholarship  Funds  _.   

.„  m    g  j 

Scholarship  Aptitude  Tests   _  

 44}  49 

Schoolboys  Abroad  „  

 ~   40 

Secondary  School  Admission  Tests   

  43 

Self  Help  .._„  „  

  38 

Smoking  „   

 33,  34 

Spending  Money  ....  

 -   38 

Student  Activities    

  26 

Student  Aid      m  

  38 

Students,  Names  of — 1964-1965 

OQ 

Study  Hours      _  

Summer  Session      _  

X  Q 

Trustees       

Tuition  Charges      

 -  36 

Vacations  (see  Calendar)    '..ZZZZZ 

Weekend  Excuses    

••  ..  34 

Work  Program     

 -   32 

CATALOGUE 

PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 

Andover,  Massachusetts 


19  6  7 


ONE  HUNDRED  EIGHTY-NINTH  YEAR 


Published  by  Phillips  Academy,  Andover,  Massachusetts 


(^biroficlies  to 

vhillips  Academy 

^intforcr,  {Mass. 


FROM  BOSTON  23  Ml  US 

RTFS  l-ZS  FROM  CHARLES  RIVER  DAM 

LEFT  ON  RTF,  16  IN  MEDFORD 

tt  ON  INTERSTATE  93  HORTH 

RT  ON  RTF.  IZ5 

LEFT  NORTH  ON  RTF.  Z$ 

FROM  LOGAN  AIRPORT  Z5  MILES 

RT.  ON  RTE.  C-L  BECOMES  RTE.  I 
WEST  ON  RTE.  JJ+ 

IFFT  ON  ELM  ST  AT  MERRIMACK  COLLEGE 
LEFT  ON  MAIN  ST.,  ANDOVFR  ROUTE  2$ 

FfTOM  POINTS  WEST,  SOUTHWEST,  AND  NK 
RTF.  495  NORTH 
RT.  ON  RTE.  Z8 

FROM  POINTS  NORTHEAST 

RTE.  +95  SOUTH  TO  RTE.  23 
OR  RTE.  J 33  TO  125 
RZ  OH  ELM  ST. 
LETT  ON  MAIN  ST.,  AN  DOVER  I 


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jrem Jt 


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CATALOGUE 

PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 

Andover,  Massachusetts 


1967 


ONE    HUNDRED    EIGHTY-NINTH  YEAR 


Published     by     Phillips     Academy,     Andover,  Massachusetts 


1966 

1967 

1968 

SEPTEMBER 

MAY 

JANUARY 

S  M   T  W  T   F  S 

  12  3 

4     5     6    7    8     9  10 
11   12  13   14  15  16  17 
18  19  20  21  22  23  24 
25  26  27  28  29  30 

S  M  T  W  T   F  S 
1     2    3    4     5  6 
7    8    9  10  11  12  13 
14  15  16  17  18  19  20 
21  22  23  24  25  26  27 
28  29  30  31  —  ...... 

a    M    T    w    T    F  S 
1     2     3     4     5  6 

7     8     9  10  11   12  13 
14  15  16  17  18  19  20 
21  22  23  24  25  26  27 
28  29  30  31   

OCTOBER 

JUNE 

FEBRUARY 

 1 

2  3  4  5  6  7  8 
9  10  11   12  13  14  15 

16  17  18  19  20  21  22 

23  24  25  26  27  28  29 

30  3  1 

  »    12  3 

4     ?     6     7     P.     g  in 
11  12  13  14  15  16  17 
18  19  20  21  22  23  24 
25  26  27  28  29  30  _ 

~           —  —     12  3 

4      S      6     7      8      9  10 
11   12   13   14  15   16  17 
18   19  20  21   22  23  24 
25  26  27  28  29   

NOVEMBER 

JULY 

MARCH 

  1     2    3    4  ? 

6     7     8     91011  1Z 
13  14  15  16  17  18  19 

20  21  22  23  24  25  26 
27  28  29  30   

">      X      A      f      <      7  fi 

9  10  11   12  13  14  15 
16  17  18  19  20  21  22 
23  24  25  26  27  28  29 
30  31  

—  —          „  „     1  2 

\      4      \"      £      7      fi  Q 

j     t     >      o     /      o  y 

10  11   12  13   14  15  16 
17  18  19  20  21   22  23 
24  25  26  27  28  29  30 

31    „  _ 

LI  r.  v__-  c.  M 15  £  Iv. 

AITHTTnT 

AUUUj  I 

APRIL 

—  —  —  —     1      2  3 
4     5     6    7    8     9  10 
11   12  13  14  15  16  17 
18  19  20  21  22  23  24 
25  26  27  28  29  30  31 

1       7       X       A  K 

~—  ......     i     l     y     *t  > 

6    7    8     9  10  11  12 
13  14  15  16  17  18  19 
20  21  22  23  24  25  26 
27  28  29  30  31   

1       7      X      A      \  f. 

7     8     9  10  11   12  13 
14  15   16  17  18  19  20 
21  22  23  24  25  26  27 

28  29  30  „_  

SEPTFMBFR 

MAY 

1     2     3    4     5     6  7 
8     9  10  11  12  13  14 
15  16  17  18  19  20  21 
22  23  24  25  26  27  28 

29  3  0  31  ......  

    j  2 

3    4    5    6    7    8  9 
10  11  12  13  14  15  16 
17  18  19  20  21  22  23 
24  25  26  27  28  29  30 

12    3  4 
5     6    7    8     9  10  11 
12  13   14  15   16  17  18 
19  20  21  22  23  24  25 
26  27  28  29  30  31   

FEBRUARY 

OCTOBER 

JUNE 

  12    3  4 

5     6     7     8     9  1  fl  1 1 
12  13  14  15  16  17  18 
19  20  21  22  23  24  25 

26  27  28    „ 

1     2    3    4     5     6  7 
8     9   10   11    19   ix  ii 

15  16  17  18  19  20  21 
22  23  24  25  26  27  28 
29  30  31     

9  10  11   12  13   14  15 
16  17  18  19  20  21  22 
23  24  25  26  27  28  29 
30    ......  

MARCH 

M  O  VF  A  K  U  V  TJ 

INUVtMBtK 

TT  TT  V 
JUL! 

      12    3  4 

*     *     7     8     9  10  11 
12  13   14  15  16  17  18 
19  20  21  22  23  24  25 
26  27  28  29  30  31  . 

. —  —  —    12     3  4 
f     6    7     8     9  10  11 
12  13  14  15  16  17  18 
19  20  21  22  23  24  25 

26  27  28  29  30  _  .„.„ 

  1     2     3     4     5  6 

7     8     9  10  11   12  13 
14  15  16  17  18  19  20 
21  22  23  24  25  26  27 
28  29  30  31  .„  

APRIL 

DECEMBER 

AUGUST 

2     3     4    5     6    7  8 
9  10  11  12  13   14  15 
16  17  18  19  20  21  22 
23  24  25  26  27  28  29 

30  

—         — « •  —            1  2 

3    4     5     6    7     8  9 
10  11  12  13   14  15  16 
17  18  19  20  21  22  23 
24  25  26  27  28  29  30 
31   

 „..  >•)■..            1      i  3 

4     5     6    7    8     9  10 
11  12  13  14  15  16  17 
18  19  20  21  22  23  24 
25  26  27  28  29  30  31 

CALENDAR 


SCHOOL  YEAR  1966-1967 

Fall  term  begins    -  

Mid-term  Rating  ..   

Long  Thanksgiving  weekend   


Fall  term  ends 


  -Friday,  September  16,  1966 

   Wednesday,  November  2 

 Wednesday,  November  23,  to 

5:00  p.m.  on  Sunday,  November  27 

  Thursday,  December  15 


Winter  term  begins 

Long  weekend  »_  

Winter  term  ends 


Christmas  Recess — 20  days 


.8:00  p.m.,  Wednesday,  January  4,  1967 
.Friday-Sunday,  February  10-12 
.Thursday,  March  16 


Spring  term  begins 
Long  weekend 
Examinations  end  . 
Commencement  


Spring  Recess — 19  days 

 —  8:00  p.m.,  Tuesday,  April  4 

_     Friday-Sunday,  May  12-14 

  Thursday,  June  8 

 Friday,  June  9 


Summer  session  begins 
Summer  session  ends  ^« 


Summer  Session — 1967 


.Wednesday,  June  28 
.Thursday,  August  10 


Fall  term  begins 
Fall  term  ends  .... 


SCHOOL  YEAR— 1967-1968 


.Friday,  September  15,  1967 
.Thursday,  December  14 


Winter  term  begins 
Winter  term  ends  . 


Christmas  Recess — 20  days 


— 8:00  p.m.,  Wednesday,  January  3,  1968 
— Thursday,  March  14 


Spring  term  begins 
Examinations  end  . 
Commencement   


Spring  Recess — 19  days 


.8:00  p.m.,  Tuesday,  April  2 
.Thursday,  June  6 
.Friday,  June  7 


Summer  session  begins 
Summer  session  ends  .... 


Summer  Session — 1968 


.Wednesday,  June  26 
.Thursday,  August  8 


3 


PURPOSE  OF  PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


The  purpose  of  Phillips  Academy  is  to  teach  "the  great  end  and 
real  business  of  living."  According  to  its  Constitution,  signed  in 
1778,  "It  is  expected  that  the  Master's  attention  to  the  disposition 
of  the  minds  and  morals  of  the  youth  under  his  charge  will  exceed 
every  other  care;  well  considering  that,  though  goodness  without 
knowledge  (as  it  respects  others)  is  both  weak  and  feeble,  yet 
knowledge  without  goodness  is  dangerous,  and  that  both  united 
form  the  noblest  character  and  lay  the  surest  foundation  of  use- 
fulness to  mankind."  Adapted  to  conditions  of  modern  life,  the 
aim  of  the  Academy  remains  the  same :  so  to  intensify  and  broaden 
the  capacities  of  its  students  that  they  may  enter  the  larger  world 
with  trained  minds  and  with  a  deepened  sense  of  their  responsibility 
to  society. 

Phillips  Academy  is  dedicated  to  sound  scholarship.  It  endeavors 
first  of  all  to  stimulate  in  its  students  curiosity  about  things  of 
the  mind,  to  induce  in  them  a  desire  to  educate  themselves.  It  at- 
tempts to  foster  the  development  of  discriminating  judgment  and 
independence  of  thought.  It  tries  to  cultivate  the  imagination  and 
emotions  of  its  boys. 

By  long  tradition  Andover  believes  in  education  that  makes 
boys  resourceful  and  independent.  Andover  believes  in  the  value 
of  student  representation  from  all  parts  of  the  country  and  of 
the  world,  and  from  all  walks  of  life.  To  its  boys  it  offers  an  in- 
tellectual and  moral  discipline,  as  well  as  friendly  encouragement 
and  sympathy,  the  best  incentives  to  accomplishment. 

Phillips  Academy  is  a  liberal,  modern  school  with  an  ancient 
tradition.  It  values  the  benefits  passed  on  to  it  by  many  generations. 
It  has  contributed  directly  to  the  development  of  thousands  of 
men,  and  indirectly  to  numberless  aspects  of  our  national  life. 
Thankful  for  its  history,  Andover  focuses  on  the  present  and  on 
the  future.  In  training  American  boys  for  service  and  leadership 
it  seeks  to  preserve  a  flexible  spirit  that  will  test  and  try  the  new 
while  treasuring  the  riches  of  the  past. 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 

Founded  in  1778  by 
Samuel  Phillips  John  Phillips,  LL.D. 

Samuel  Phillips,  Jr. 


Constitution  and  deed  of  trust  signed 

School  opened 

Act  of  incorporation 


April  21,  1778 
April  30,  1778 
October  4,  1780 


HEADMASTERS 


ELIPHALET  PEARSON,  LL.D. 

EBENEZER  PEMBERTON,  LL.D. 

MARK  NEWMAN,  A.M. 

JOHN  ADAMS,  LL.D. 

OSGOOD  JOHNSON,  A.M. 

SAMUEL  H.  TAYLOR,  LL.D. 

FREDERIC  W.  TILTON,  A.M. 

CECIL  F.  P.  BANCROFT,  Ph.D.,  L.H.D.,  LL.D. 

ALFRED  E.  STEARNS,  Litt.D.,  L.H.D.,  LL.D. 

CLAUDE  M.  FUESS,  Ph.D.,  L.H.D.,  LL.D. 

JOHN  M.  KEMPER,  L.H.D.,  Litt.D.,  LL.D. 


1778-1786 
1786-1793 
1794-1809 
1810-1833 
1833-1837 
1837-1871 
1871-1873 
1873-1901 
1903-1933 
1933-1948 
1948- 


5 


HISTORICAL  SKETCH 


Phillips  academy  is  situated  at  Andover,  in  the  County  of 
Essex,  Massachusetts.  The  Constitution  and  original  deed  of 
gift  of  the  Academy  was  signed  April  21,  1778,  by  Esquire  Samuel 
Phillips,  of  the  north  parish  of  Andover,  and  his  brother,  John  Phil- 
lips, LL.D.,  of  Exeter,  New  Hampshire,  in  the  presence,  and  largely 
at  the  instance,  of  Samuel  Phillips,  Jr.  (then  but  twenty-six  years 
old),  afterward  judge  of  the  Court  of  Common  Pleas  for  Essex 
County,  president  of  the  Massachusetts  Senate,  and  lieutenant 
governor  of  the  Commonwealth.  By  this  act  the  Trustees  of 
Phillips  Academy  became  owners  of  the  land  in  the  south  parish 
of  Andover  on  which  the  chief  buildings  of  the  school  now  stand 
together  with  other  endowment  comprising  further  lands  and  the 
sum  of  one  thousand  six  hundred  and  fourteen  pounds.  Two 
years  later,  on  October  4,  1780,  the  school  was  incorporated  by 
the  Act  of  Incorporation  passed  by  the  General  Court  of  Massachu 
setts,  signed  by  John  Hancock. 

The  Constitution  was  written  by  Samuel  Phillips,  Jr.,  with  the 
advice  and  aid  of  his  friend,  Eliphalet  Pearson,  who  became  first 
Master.  The  following  passages  are  characteristic: 

A  serious  consideration  of  the  premises,  and  an  observation  of 
the  growing  neglect  of  youth,  have  excited  in  us  a  painful 
anxiety  for  the  event,  and  determined  us  to  make,  in  the  follow- 
ing Conveyance,  a  humble  dedication  to  our  Heavenly  Benefac- 
tor of  the  ability,  wherewith  he  hath  blessed  us,  to  lay  the 
foundation  of  a  public  free  School  or  Academy  for  the  purpose 
of  instructing  Youth,  not  only  in  English  and  Latin  Grammar, 
Writing,  Arithmetic,  and  those  Sciences,  wherein  they  are 
commonly  taught,  but  more  especially  to  learn  them  the  great 
end  and  real  business  of  living. 

The  Master  is  to  give  special  attention  to  the  health  of  the 
scholars,  and  ever  to  urge  the  importance  of  a  habit  of  industry. 

But  above  all,  it  is  expected  that  the  Master's  attention  to  the 
disposition  of  the  minds  and  morals  of  the  youth  under  his  charge 
will  exceed  every  other  care;  well  considering  that,  though  good- 
ness without  knowledge  (as  it  respects  others)  is  weak  and 
eeble,  yet  knowledge  without  goodness  is  dangerous,  and  that 
both  united  form  the  noblest  character,  and  lay  the  surest  foun- 
dation of  usefulness  to  mankind. 


6 


HISTORICAL  SKETCH 


7 


This  Seminary  shall  be  ever  equally  open  to  youth  of  requisite 
qualifications  from  every  quarter. 

And,  in  order  to  prevent  the  smallest  perversion  of  true  intent 
of  this  Foundation,  it  is  again  declared,  that  the  first  and  princi- 
pal object  of  this  Institution  is  the  promotion  of  true  Piety  and 
Virtue;  the  second,  instruction  in  the  English,  Latin,  and  Greek 
languages,  together  with  Writing,  Arithmetic,  Music,  and  the 
Art  of  Speaking;  the  third,  practical  Geometry,  Logic,  and 
Geography;  and  the  fourth,  such  other  of  the  Liberal  Arts  and 
Sciences  or  Languages  as  opportunity  and  ability  may  hereafter 
admit,  and  as  the  Trustees  shall  direct. 

Phillips  Academy  was  opened  for  instruction  April  30,  1778, 
in  a  building  which  had  earlier  been  used  as  a  carpenter's  shop. 
The  first  preceptor  was  Eliphalet  Pearson  (1778-1786),  a  stimu- 
lating teacher  and  stern  disciplinarian,  who  established  high  stan- 
dards of  instruction.  Shortly  before  he  resigned  to  become  professor 
at  Harvard  College,  a  new  and  larger  schoolhouse  was  built.  On 
November  5,  1789,  George  Washington,  President  of  the  United 
States,  visited  Andover  and  addressed  the  students  assembled  on 
the  Old  Training  Field. 

The  fourth  principal,  John  Adams,  raised  the  repute  of  the 
school,  increased  the  attendance,  and  enlarged  the  number  of 
teachers.  During  his  term  as  principal,  the  second  schoolhouse  was 
burned,  on  January  28,  1818,  and  a  new  brick  Academy  designed 
by  the  famous  architect  Charles  Bulfinch  was  erected  within  a 
year.  This  "classic  hall,"  described  in  Oliver  Wendell  Holmes's 
centennial  poem,  "The  School-Boy,"  is  still  in  use. 

The  modern  period  of  the  school's  history  commenced  in  1873 
with  the  election  of  Cecil  F.  P.  Bancroft,  a  man  of  foresight  and 
clear  vision,  patience  and  shrewd  discrimination,  who  was  prin- 
cipal until  his  death  in  1901.  Under  Dr.  Bancroft's  administra- 
tion, attendance  increased  from  262  to  over  400  pupils  and  since 
then  has  never  dropped  below  that  figure. 

Dr.  Bancroft  was  succeeded  in  1902  by  Alfred  E.  Stearns.  The 
purchase  in  1908  of  the  lands  and  buildings  of  the  Andover  Theo- 
logical Seminary  greatly  increased  the  resources  of  the  Academy 
and  made  possible  new  development.  In  the  late  1920's  and  in  the 
1930's  the  school  took  its  present  form  under  a  building  and 
landscaping  program  made  possible  by  the  generosity  of  Thomas 
Cochran,  other  alumni,  and  friends  of  the  school. 


B 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Under  the  administration  of  Claude  M.  Fuess,  Headmaster  from 
1933  to  1948,  the  faculty  was  greatly  enlarged  and  strengthened, 
the  curriculum  was  revised,  a  number  of  buildings  were  added, 
and  the  Andover  Summer  Session  (1942)  and  the  Andover  Eve- 
ning Study  Program  (1935)  began.  In  World  War  II,  Andover 
men  served  in  each  of  the  services,  and  143  gave  their  lives.  Dur- 
ing much  of  the  war,  Henry  L.  Stimson  served  as  president  of  the 
Trustees  as  well  as  Secretary  of  War. 

John  M.  Kemper  was  elected  Headmaster  in  1948.  Since  then, 
substantial  advances  have  been  made  in  three  areas:  curriculum, 
admissions  policy,  and  the  physical  plant  and  resources. 

The  curriculum  has  been  revised  to  provide  increased  flexibility. 
In  1952-1953,  under  Andover  leadership  and  with  a  grant  from 
the  Ford  Foundation,  the  important  study,  General  Education  in 
School  and  College,  was  completed.  It  has  resulted  in  the  introduc- 
tion into  the  Andover  curriculum  of  new,  advanced,  college-level 
courses.  In  1955,  in  response  to  the  national  teacher  shortage,  the 
school  inaugurated  the  Andover  Teaching  Fellow  Program  to  re- 
cruit and  train  young  men  for  teaching. 

Concerning  admissions,  the  decision  was  made  in  the  late  fifties 
to  admit  each  year  the  best  250  candidates  regardless  of  their 
ability  to  pay  tuition.  The  effect  of  this  decision  has  been  to  broaden 
still  further  the  school's  basic  policy,  in  the  words  of  its  Consti- 
tution, "to  be  ever  equally  open  to  youth  of  requisite  qualifications 
from  every  quarter.'' 

In  the  third  area,  physical  plant  and  resources,  several  changes 
are  notable.  The  endowment  has  grown  from  eleven  to  twenty- 
nine  million  dollars.  Meantime  the  enrollment  has  increased  from 
725  to  863. 

During  the  years  1959-61  The  Andover  Program,  a  major  capital 
gift  drive  carried  out  by  alumni  and  parents,  succeeded  in  raising 
$6,750,000  for  new  facilities.  With  these  funds  the  Academy  has 
built  four  new  dormitories,  two  new  faculty  houses,  a  new  science 
building,  an  Arts  and  Communications  Center  with  extensive 
audio-visual  equipment  and  studio  space,  an  enlargement  of  the 
auditorium  stage  and  an  experimental  drama  lab,  a  wing  on  the 
Library,  several  new  athletic  fields,  a  roof  for  the  hockey  rink, 
and  other  athletic  facilities;  existing  buildings  have  been  remodeled 
for  more  classrooms  and  for  sudent  and  faculty  housing. 


TRUSTEES 


JOHN  PETERS  STEVENS,  JR.  '15,  A.B.,  President 

South  Plainneld,  N.  J. 

Elected  iy4-o,  Elected  ^resident  ivoo 

JOHN  MASON  KEMPER,  A.M.,  L.H.D.,  Litt.D.,  LL.D.,  Clerk 

Andover 

Elected  ly4o 

CHARLES  STAFFORD  GAGE  '21,  A.M. 

New  Haven,  Conn. 

Elected  iy?£. 

BROMWELL  AULT  '18,  S.B. 

New  York,  N.  Y. 

Elected  ijii 

FREDERICK  GOODRICH  CRANE  '15,  A.B. 

Dalton 

elected  i  y  y / 

DONALD  HOLMAN  McLEAN,  JR.  '28,  LL.B. 

Brookline 

~C] n     4 n  A      IOC  ff 

elected  i7)6 

JOHN  USHER  MONRO  '30,  A.B. 

Cambridge 

Elected  1958 

THOMAS  LEE  PERKINS  '24,  LL.B. 

Rye,  N.  Y. 

Elected  7  959 

ROBERT  LIVINGSTON  IRELAND  III  '38,  A.B. 

New  York,  N.  Y. 

Elected  1960 

WILBUR  JOSEPH  BENDER  '37HF,  A.M.,  LL.D. 

Cambridge 

Elected  196} 

STEPHEN  YOUNG  HORD  '17,  A.B. 

Lake  Forest,  111. 

Elected  1963 

Alumni  Trustees 

FRANK  PRAY  FOSTER  '25,  M.D. 

West  Newton 

Elected  1964  for  three  years 

LOUIS  FREDERICK  POLK,  JR.  '49,  M.B.A. 

Wayzata,  Minn. 

Elected  1965  for  three  years 

PHILIP  KIRKHAM  ALLEN  '29,  A.B. 

Andover 

Elected  1966  for  three  years 

JAMES  PHINNEY  BAXTER,  4th  '37,  A.B. 

St.  Charles,  I1L 

Ex  Officio  for  one  year  as  President  of  the  Alumni  Association 

Trustees  Emeriti 

CHAUNCEY  BREWSTER  GARVER  '04,  LL.B. 

New  York,  N.  Y. 

J947-J960 

SUMNER  SMITH  '08,  A.B. 

Lincoln 

I956-J960 

HENRY  WISE  HOBSON  '10,  D.D.,  LL.D. 

Cincinnati,  Ohio 

1937-1966  (President  1947-1966) 

JAMES  PHINNEY  BAXTER,  3rd  '10,  Ph.D.,  Litt.D.,  L.H.D.,  D.Sc,  LL.D. 

1942-1966  Williamstown 


9 


FACULTY 


John  Mason  Kemper,  L.H.D.,  Litt.D.,  LL.D. 

Headmaster  Elected  1948 


George  Franklin  French,  A.M. 

Andover 

Instructor  in  French,  Emeritus 

1907-1944 

Lester  Edward  Lynde,  A.M. 

Andover 

Dean,  Emeritus 

1901-1944 

Oswald  Tower,  A.B. 

Andover 

Dean  and  Instructor  in  Mathematics,  Emeritus 

1910-1949 

Alice  Thacher  Whitney 

Andover 

Recorder,  Emerita 

1902-1950 

Lester  Charles  Newton,  A.M. 

Andover 

Instructor  in  French  and  German,  Emeritus 

1918-1952 

Henry  Preston  Kelley,  A.M. 

Pepperell 

Instructor  in  Spanish,  Emeritus 

1918-28,  1935-52 

Montville  Ellsworth  Peck 

North  Bridgton,  Me. 

Instructor  in  Physical  Education,  Emeritus 

1916-1955 

Guy  Johnson  Forbush,  A.B. 

Andover 

Instructor  in  French,  Emeritus 

1917-1920,  1924-1955 

Arthur  Burr  Darling,  Ph.D. 

Washington,  D.  C. 

Instructor  in  History,  Emeritus 

1917-1918, 1933-1958 

Douglas  Mansor  Dunbar,  A.M. 

Andover 

Instructor  in  Mathematics,  German,  and  Bible,  Emeritus 

1942-1958 

M.  Lawrence  Shields,  A.B. 

Marblehead 

Instructor  in  Biology  and  Secretary  of  the  Academy,  Emeritus 

1923-1960 

Roscoe  Edwin  Everett  Dake,  S.B. 

Andover 

Instructor  in  Chemistry,  Emeritus 

1921-1961 

John  Kingsbury  Colby,  A.M. 

North  Andover 

Instructor  in  Latin,  Emeritus 

1940-1962 

Miles  Sturdivant  Malone,  Ph.D. 

Daytona  Beach,  Fla. 

Instructor  in  History,  Emeritus 

1937-1962 

Elizabeth  Eades,  A.B. 

Amherst 

Director  of  the  Library,  Emerita 

1929-1963 

Roger  Wolcott  Higgins,  A.M. 

Andover 

Instructor  in  English,  Emeritus 

1933-1963 

Emory  Shelby  Basford,  A.B. 

Rome,  Italy 

Instructor  in  English,  Emeritus 

1929-1964 

Floyd  Thurston  Humphries,  A.B. 

Naples,  Fla. 

Instructor  in  French,  Emeritus 

1937-1964 

John  Sedgwick  Barss,  A.M. 

Andover 

Instructor  in  Physics,  Emeritus 

1923-1965 

Donald  Miller  Clark,  M.D. 

Williamson,  W.  Va. 

Medical  Director,  Emeritus 

1954-1965 

Elbert  Cook  Weaver,  A.M. 

Madison,  Conn. 

Instructor  in  Chemistry,  Emeritus 

1943-1965 

10 


FACULTY 


11 


Alan  Rogers  Blackmer,  L.H.D.  1925 
Dean  of  the  Faculty 

Kenneth  Smith  Minard,  A.M.  1928 
Assistant  Dean  of  Students 

*George  Knight  Sanborn,  S.B.  1928 
Instructor  in  Biology  on  the  Ammi  Wright  Lancashire  Foundation 
Warden  of  the  Moncrieff  Cochran  Sanctuary 

*  Alfred  Graham  Baldwin,  D.D.  1930 
Instructor  in  Religion 

Robert  Edward  Maynard,  S.B.  1931 
Instructor  in  Mathematics  on  the  Jenathan  French  Foundation 

Leonard  Frank  James,  A.M.  1932 
Instructor  in  History  on  the  Cecil  F.  P.  Bancroft  Foundation 
Chairman  of  the  History  Department 

George  Grenville  Benedict,  A.M.  1930-1932,  1933 

Dean  of  Students 

Douglas  Swain  Byers,  A.M.  1933 

Instructor  in  Anthropology 

Chairman  of  the  Archaeology  Department 
Bartlett  Harding  Hayes,  Jr.,  A.B.  193  3 

Instructor  in  Art 

Chairman  of  the  Art  Department 
James  Ruthven  Adriance,  A.B.  1934 

Assistant  to  the  Headmaster 
Alston  Hurd  Chase,  Ph.D.  1934 

Instructor  in  Greek  and  Latin  on  the  Independence  Foundation  Teaching 
Endowment 

Chairman  of  the  Classics  Department 
Norwood  Penrose  Hallowell,  Jr.,  A.B.  1934 

Instructor  in  English  and  Public  Speaking  on  the  Alfred  Lawrence  Ripley 
Foundation 

Frank  Frederick  DiClemente,  S.B.  1935 

Instructor  in  Physical  Education 
James  Hooper  Grew,  D.  is  L.  19*5 

Instructor  in  French  on  the  Elizabeth  Milbank  Anderson  Foundation 

Chairman  of  the  French  Department 
Frederic  Scouller  Allis,  Jr.,  L.H.D.  1936 

Instructor  in  History  on  the  Martha  Cochran  Foundation 

Director  of  Financial  Aid 
Chester  Archibald  Cochran,  A.M.  1936 

Instructor  in  French 

Frederick  Johnson,  Sc.D.  1936 

Instructor  in  Archaeology 
Stephen  Stanley  Sorota,  S.B.  1936 

Instructor  in  Physical  Education 
Stephen  Whitney,  A.M.  1936 

Instructor  in  French 

Hart  Day  Leavitt,  A.B.  1937 
Instructor  in  English 

William  Hayes  Brown,  A.M.  1938 
Instructor  in  English  on  the  Emilie  Belden  Cochran  Foundation 
Chairman  of  the  English  Department 

*  On  leave  of  absence. 


12 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


•Richard  Sawyer  Pieters,  A.M. 

Instructor  in  Mathematics  on  the  Alfred  Ernest  Stearns  Foundation 
Chairman  of  the  Mathematics  Department 

Robert  Whittemore  Sides,  A.B. 

Instructor  in  Mathematics 

Director  of  Admissions 
John  Bromham  Hawes,  Ed.M.  1933-1936, 

Instructor  in  English 

Harper  Follansbee,  Ed.M. 

Instructor  in  Biology  on  the  Samuel  Harvey  Taylor  Foundation 
Chairman  of  the  Biology  Department 

W  alter  Gierasch,  A.B. 
Instructor  in  English 

Dudley  Fitts,  A.B. 

Instructor  in  English  on  the  Independence  Foundation  Teaching  Endowment 

Francis  Bertrand  McCarthy,  A.B. 

Instructor  in  English  and  Philosophy 

Cornelius  Gordon  Schuyler  Banta,  S.B. 
Instructor  in  Mathematics 

*  Joseph  Rittenhouse  Weir  Dodge,  A.M. 
Instructor  in  English 

Alexander  Dunnett  Gibson,  A.M. 
Instructor  in  French 

Frederick  Almond  Peterson,  A.M. 
Instructor  in  English 
Director  of  the  Summer  Session 

Allan  George  Gillingham,  Ph.D. 

Instructor  in  Latin  and  Greek  on  the  John  Charles  Phillips  Foundation 

Peter  Quackenbush  McKee,  Ed.M. 
Instructor  in  Physics  and  Chemistry 
Chairman  of  the  Physics  Department 
Scheduling  Officer 

Gordon  Gilmore  Bensley,  A.B. 

Instructor  in  Art 

Director,  Audio-Visual  Center 
John  Richard  Lux,  M.S.Ed. 

Instructor  in  Mathematics 

William  Louis  Schneider,  Mus.Ed.B. 
Instructor  in  Music 

William  Russell  Bennett,  Jr.,  A.B. 
Associate  Dean  of  Students 

William  John  Buehner,  A.M. 
Instructor  in  Latin 

Simeon  Hyde,  Jr.,  A.M. 
Instructor  in  English 

Henry  Waring  Schereschewsky,  A.B. 
Comptroller 

Frederic  Anness  Stott,  A.B. 
Alumni  Secretary 
Director  of  Development 

*  On  leave  of  absence. 


1938 

1938 

1939 
1940 

1941 
1941 
1941 
1944 

1944 
1944 
1946 

1947 
1947 

1949 

1949 
1949 
1950 
1950 
1950 
1951 
1951 


FACULTY  1 3 

Philip  Brownlie  Weld,  M.S.  19  J 1 

Instructor  in  Chemistry  and  Physics  on  the  George  Peabody  Foundation 
Chairman  of  the  Chemistry  Department 

William  Franklin  Graham,  B.S.  1952 
Instructor  in  Mathematics 
Excusing  Officer 

Fred  Harold  Harrison,  A.M.  1952 
Instructor  in  History  and  Physical  Education 
Chairman  of  the  Athletic  Department 

John  Claiborne  McClement,  Ed.M.  1952 
Instructor  in  Mathematics 

*Joshua  Lewis  Miner,  III,  A.B.  1952 
Instructor  in  Science 
President,  Outward  Bound,  Incorporated 

James  Harold  Couch,  A.M.  1953 
Instructor  in  Spanish 
Chairman  of  the  Spanish  Department 

Sherman  Frederick  Drake,  Ed.M.  1953 
Instructor  in  Mathematics,  Schoolboys  Abroad,  Barcelona,  Spain 

Edmond  Emerson  Hammond,  Jr.,  Sc.M.  1953 
Instructor  in  Mathematics,  Physics,  and  Chemistry 

Louis  John  Hoitsma,  Jr.,  Ed.M.  1953 
Instructor  in  Mathematics 

Robert  Penniman  Hulburd,  A.M.  1953 
Instructor  in  German 
Director  of  College  Placement 

Dalton  Hunter  McBee,  A.B.  1953 
Instructor  in  English 
Admissions  Officer 

*  Albert  Karl  Roehrig,  Ed.M.  1954 
School  Psychologist 

*Robert  Edwin  Lane,  A.M.  195  5 

Instructor  in  Latin  and  Russian 

Chairman  of  the  Russian  Department 
Thomas  Michael  Mikula,  A.M.  195  5 

Instructor  in  Mathematics 
Harold  Holmes  Owen,  Jr.,  A.M.  195  5 

Instructor  in  English 

Thomas  Joseph  Regan,  A.M.  1955 
Instructor  in  English 

William  Biggs  Clift,  Jr.,  Mus.Ed.B  1956 

Instructor  in  Music 

Chairman  of  the  Music  Department 
* 'Frank  McCord  Eccles,  A.M.  1956 

Instructor  in  Mathematics 
Richard  Valentine  Healy,  P.E.  1956 

Director  of  Physical  Plant 
John  Ward  Kimball,  A.B.  1956 

Instructor  in  Biology 

Harrison  Schuyler  Royce,  Jr.,  M.I. A.  1956 
Instructor  in  History 


*  On  leave  of  absence. 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 

14 


1958 


1959 


1957 

Gerald  Shertzer,  M.F.A. 

Instructor  in  Art  19Jg 

George  William  Best,  A.M. 

Instructor  in  Mathematics  l9jg 

Clement  Morell,  A.M. 

Instructor  in  Mathematics  i9jg 

Frederic  Arnold  Pease,  Jr.,  B.D. 

Instructor  m  Religion  19J9 
Philip  Mason  DuBois,  Ph.D. 

Instructor  in  Physics 

John  Richards,  II,  M.A.T. 

Instructor  in  History 
W'ii  1 1 a m  Abbot  Munroe,  A.B. 

Bursar 

John  Patten  Chivers,  A.M. 
Instructor  in  German 
Chairman  of  the  German  Department 

Carl  Edward  Krumpe,  Jr.,  A.M. 

Instructor  in  Classics 
William  Lawrence  Markey,  A.M. 

Instructor  in  French 

Thomas  Rees,  Ph.D. 

Instructor  in  Chemistry 

Frank  DeWitt  Thornton,  B.M.Ed. 
Instructor  in  Music 

George  Howard  Edmonds,  Ed.M. 
Instructor  in  English 

Edward  Moseley  Harris,  S.B. 
Instructor  in  Spanish 
Administrator,  Schoolboys  Abroad 

*Guy  D'Oyly  Hughes,  A.M. 
Instructor  in  English 

Crayton  Ward  Bedford,  A.M. 
Instructor  in  Mathematics 

Alfred  James  Coulthard,  S.B. 

Instructor  in  Physical  Education 

Wayne  Andrew  Frederick,  Ph.M. 
Instructor  in  History 

Robert  Andrew  Lloyd,  Arch.B. 
Instructor  in  Art 

Charles  Waldo  Smith,  A.B. 

Executive  Director,  The  Alumni  Fund 

Alanson  Perley  Stevens,  III,  A.M. 
Instructor  in  German  and  Russian 


1960 
1960 

1954-1957,  1960 
1960 
1960 
1961 
1961 

1961 
1962 
1962 
1962 
1962 
1962 
1962 
1963 


Thomas  Tolman  Lyons,  M.A.T. 
Instructor  in  History 

Barbara  McDonnell,  A.B.,  S.B.  1963 
Director  of  the  Library 


PAfTIT  TY 

1 5 

Robert  Rennie  McQuilkin,  A.M. 

1963 

Instructor  in  English 

Chairman  of  the  Andover  Evening  Study  Program 

Meredith  Price,  M.A.T. 

1  Q£X 

Instructor  in  English 

Alexander  Zabriskie  Warren,  A.B. 

lyb) 

Instructor  in  Mathematics 

Christopher  Capen  Cook,  M.F.A. 

1  764 

Instructor  in  Art 

William  Sherman  Jardine,  M.A.T. 

1  Q6A 

1-nttrurtnT  irt  Pn-vsir*  /in A  Cht>i*ii*ir/\> 

Charles  Bartlett  Packard,  M.A.T. 

1  a£A 

ly64 

Instructor  in  Classics 

Vincent  Pascucci,  A.M. 

1964 

Instructor  in  Classics 

Daniel  Dretzka  Olivier,  A.M. 

1964 

Instructor  in  French 

Clark  Alvord  V  a  ugh  an,  A.M. 

1964 

Instructor  in  Spanish                                              .  . 

Tiir prior    ^rhnnlhn^t  Ahmni    Rarrrln+i/t  Kh/iin 

August  Thayer  Jaccaci,  Jr.,  M.F.A. 

1965 

J yt  t  f  rif    / f'«f    A  4*  / 
ITHlTUi.  HJT  Jn  Jr\Tf 

Julian  Stevens  Kaiser,  M.D. 

1965 

Medical  Director 

Ronn  Nels  Minne,  Ph.D. 

1965 

Instructor  in  Chemistry 

Director,  Bureau  of  Self -Help 

James  Arthur  Quitslund,  A.B. 

1965 

I ttttYM rinr  in  (~* p-r-m /iti 

Angel  Rubio  y  Maroto,  A.M. 

1965 

Nathaniel  Baldwin  Smith,  A.M. 

1965 

oALE  OTURGES,  11,  A.M. 

1965 

Instructor  in  French 

Jacques  Georges  Tallot,  Professeur  agrege 

1958-60,  1965 

Instructor  in  French 

John  Harvey  Beebe,  A.M.,  M.A.T. 

1966 

Instructor  in  Mathematics 

Timothy  Cooley  Callard,  A.M. 

1966 

Instructor  in  Religion 

Thomas  Edward  Cone,  III,  S.B. 

1966 

Instructor  in  Biology 

Pierre  LaTour,  Jr.,  A.B. 

1966 

Instructor  in  Biology  and  Science 

Daniel  Maxwell  Logan,  M.A.T. 

1966 

Instructor  in  History 

Gordon  Anthony  Marlow,  M.A.T. 

1966 

Instructor  in  English 

Michael  Edward  Mosca,  M.B.A. 

1966 

Director  of  Accounting 

16 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


James  Johnston  Pates,  Jr.,  A.B.  1966 
Admissions  and  Scholarship  Officer 

David  Albert  Penner,  A.M.  1966 
Instructor  in  Mathematics 

Elisabeth  McClure  Thomas,  Ed.M.  1966 
Director  of  Admissions,  the  Andover  Summer  Session 

John  Gibson  Tomlinson,  S.B.  1966 
Instructor  in  Spanish 

James  Rae  Whyte,  S.T.M.  1966 
Instructor  in  Religion 
Chairman  of  the  Religion  Department 

Kenneth  Kelly  Wise,  A.M.  1966 
Instructor  in  English 

Gene  Pyle,  A.B.  1966 
Wingate  Paine  Fellow  in  Photography 

George  Edward  Andrews,  A.B.  1966 

Teaching  Fellow  in  Religion 

Michael  MacKay  Austin,  A.B.  l96»' 

Teaching  Fellow  in  German 

David  Paul  Barton,  A.B.  l966' 
Teaching  Fellow  in  French 

Peter  Charles  Johnson,  A.B.  1966i 
Teaching  Fellow  in  English 

James  Harry  Mays,  B.S.E.  196<l( 
Teaching  Fellow  in  Mathematics  and  Science 


The  Headmaster  and  Mrs.  Kemper 


'ding 


Dormitories — Old  and  New 


ADMINISTRATIVE  DEPARTMENTS 


Correspondence  with  administrative  officers  should  be  addressed  to  them  at  George 
Washington  Hall.  Office  hours:  week  days,  9:00  a.m.  to  12:00  and  (except  Saturday) 
2:00  p.m.  to  5:00  p.m.  Offices  are  closed  on  Saturday  during  the  summer.  Appointments 
should  be  made  in  advance,  if  possible.  For  information,  call  or  see  Miss  Meredith  Thiras, 
Receptionist  (telephone  617 — 475-3400),  during  office  hours. 

HEADMASTER'S  OFFICE 

John  Mason  Kemper,  L.H.D.,  Litt.D.,  LL.D.,  Headmaster 
Mrs.  Amy  R.  Robinson,  Secretary  to  the  Headmaster 

OFFICE  OF  THE  ASSISTANT  TO  THE  HEADMASTER 

James  Ruthven  Adrjance,  A.B.,  Assistant  to  the  Headmaster 
Virginia  W.  Eastman,  Secretary  to  the  Assistant  to  the  Headmaster 

ADMISSIONS  OFFICE 

Robert  Whittemore  Sides,  A.B.,  Director  of  Admissions 

Dalton  Hunter  McBee,  A.B.,  Admissions  Officer 

Frederick  Scoulier  Allis,  Jr.,  L.H.D.,  Director  of  Fhiancial  Aid 

James  Johnston  Pates,  Jr.,  A.B.,  Admissions  and  Scholarship  Officer 

Harper  Follansbee,  Ed.M.,  John  Richards,  II,  M.A.T.,  Albert  Karl  Roehrig, 

Ed.M.,  Harrison  Schuyler  Royce,  Jr.,  M.I.A.,  Stephen  Whitney,  A.M., 

Interviewing  Officers 
Mrs.  Vivian  A.  O'Donnell,  Secretary  to  the  Director  of  Admissions 

OFFICE  OF  THE  DEAN  OF  THE  FACULTY 
Alan  Rogers  Blackmer,  L.H.D.,  Dean  of  the  Faculty 

OFFICE  OF  THE  DEAN  OF  STUDENTS 

George  Grenville  Benedict,  A.M.,  Dean  of  Students 

William  Russell  Bennett,  Jr.,  A.B.,  Associate  Dean  of  Students 

Kenneth  Smith  Minard,  A.M.,  Assistant  Dean  of  Students 

Robert  Penniman  Hulburd,  A.M.,  Director  of  College  Placement 

William  Franklin  Graham,  S.B.,  Excusing  Officer 

Peter  Quackenbush  McKee,  Ed.M.,  Scheduling  Officer 

Mrs.  Ruth  L.  Ermer,  Recorder 

Mary  Elise  Waddington,  Secretary  to  the  Director  of  College  Placement 

SUMMER  SESSION 

Frederick  Almond  Peterson,  A.M.,  Director 

Elisabeth  McClure  Thomas,  Ed.M.,  Director  of  Admissions 

Mrs.  Edith  Jako,  Office  Manager 

TREASURER'S  OFFICE 

Henry  Waring  Schereschewsky,  A.B.,  Comptroller 

William  Abbot  Munroe,  A.B.,  Bursar 

Michael  Edward  Mosca,  M.B.A.,  Director  of  Accounting 

Richard  Valentine  Healy,  P.E.,  Director  of  Physical  Plant 

Marion  E.  Hill,  Assistant  Bursar 

Evelyn  H.  Gordon,  Director  of  Student  Accounts 

Mrs.  Barbara  L.  Morrison,  Secretary  to  the  Comptroller 


17 


j  g  PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 

ALUMNI  AND  DEVELOPMENT  OFFICE 

Frederic  Anness  Stott,  A.B.,  Alumni  Secretary  and  Director  of  Development 
'  w  ™  Sm.th   AB    Executive  Director,  The  Alumni  Fund 

SriS.™ Tb^W-STS  *  lector  ™e  Alunni  Fund 

Mrs.  Ruth  P.  Ellison,  Scrr^ry  A>  /A.  Doctor  o/  Df»fo^ 

OLIVER  WENDELL  HOLMES  LIBRARY 
Barbara  McDonnell,  A.B.,  S.B.,  Director  of  the  Library 
Mrs.  Harriet  F.  Burkhard,  A.B.,  S.M.,  Assistant 
Mrs.  Margaret  B.  Towne,  S.B.,  Assistant  in  the  Library 
Irfne  Wilkinson,  A.B.,  S.M.,  Cataloguer 
Vivian  Miles,  S.B.,  S.M.,  Reference  Librarian 

DEPARTMENT  OF  HEALTH 

Jui  ian  S.  Kaiser,  M.D.,  Medical  Director 
Richard  O'Hara,  M.D.,  Assistant  Medical  Director 
ALBERT  K.  Rg-ehrig,  Ed.M.,  Chief,  Counseling  Services 
ft  SCHUYLER  Royce,  Assistant  in  Counseling  Services 
Miss  Eileen  Hall,  Administrative  Assistant 

Active  Medical  Staff 

Fred  G.  Arragg,  M.D.,  Otolaryngologist 

C.  Paul  Bonin,  D.M.D.,  Orthodontist 

William  Caverly,  M.D.,  Obstetrics  and  Gynecology 

Jerome  Crampton,  M.D.,  Opthalmologist 

HERMAN  De  Wilde,  M.D.,  D.M.D.,  Associate  Dentist 

Douglas  Malcolm  Dunbar,  D.D.S.,  Senior  Dentist 

Michael  A.  Gravallese,  M.D.,  Internal  Medicine 

John  Paul  Holihan,  M.D.,  Anesthesiologist 

Milton  Howard,  M.D.,  Pathologist 

Robert  J.  Joplin,  Orthopedist 

Richard  O'Hara,  M.D.,  Surgeon 

Nicholas  D.  Rizzo,  M.D.,  Psychiatrist 

Charles  E.  Rounds,  D.M.D.,  Associate  Dentist 

John  Webster,  M.D.,  Obstetrics  and  Gynecology 

George  V.  West,  M.D.,  Radiologist 

Associate  Staff 

Charles  Ellis,  Jr.,  M.D.,  Internal  Medicine 
Richard  Katz,  M.D.  Pediatrician 
KENNETH  McKusick,  M.D.,  Internal  Medicine 
Edmund  Melucci,  M.D.,  General  Medicine 
Robert  Ramsdell,  M.D.,  General  Medicine 

Consultants 

John  B.  McKittrick,  M.D.,  Surgeon 

Daniel  Ellis,  M.D.,  Internist 

[OHN  F.  Bronk,  Physical  Therapist 

fOHN  F.  Murphy,  B.A.,  Speech  Therapist 

John  F.  Nastasi,  Optometrist 

Joan  Walsh,  Dental  Hygienist 

I  nns  J.  Zuppardi,  Radiology  Technician 


BUREAU  OF  SELF-HELP 


Ronn  Nf.ls  Minne,  Ph.D.,  Director  of  the  Bureau  of  Self-Help 


ADMINISTRATIVE  DEPARTMENTS 


DEPARTMENT  OF  PHYSICAL  EDUCATION  AND  ATHLETICS 

Fred  Harold  Harrison,  A.M.,  Director  of  Physical  Education  and  Athletics 
John  Frank  Bronk,  Instructor  in  Physical  Education  and  Physiotherapist 
Alfred  James  Coulthard,  S.B.,  Instructor  in  Physical  VAucation 
Frank  Frederick  DiClemente,  S.B.,  Instructor  in  Physical  Education 
Stephen  Stanley  Sorota,  S.B.,  Instructor  in  Physical  Education 


CHAIRMEN  OF  ACADEMIC  DEPARTMENTS 


Archaeology 

Douglas  Swain  Byers,  A.M. 

Art 

Bartlett  Harding  Hayes,  Jr.,  A.B. 

Athletics 

Fred  Harold  Harrison,  A.M. 

Biology 

Harper  Follansbee,  Ed.M. 

Chemistry 

Philip  Brownlie  Weld,  M.S. 

Classics 

Alston  Hurd  Chase,  Ph.D. 

English 

William  Hayes  Brown,  A.M. 

French 

James  Hooper  Grew,  D.  es  L. 

German 

John  Patten  Chivers,  A.M. 

History 

Leonard  Frank  James,  A.M. 

Mathematics 

Richard  Sawyer  Pieters,  A.M. 

Music 

William  Biggs  Clift,  Jr.,  Mus.Ed.B. 

Physics 

Peter  Quackenbush  McKee,  Ed.M. 

Religion 

James  Rae  Whyte,  S.T.M. 

Russian 

Robert  Edwin  Lane,  A.M. 

Spanish 

James  Harold  Couch,  A.M. 

GENERAL  INFORMATION 


A \ i>over  students,  for  the  most  part,  live  together  by  classes 
in  the  Academy  dormitories  and  houses.  Each  building  is  under 
the  supervision  of  the  resident  faculty  housemaster.  All  boys  eat 
in  i heir  own  class  dining  rooms  in  the  Commons. 

Juniors  live  in  Williams  Hall  and  Rockwell  House,  or  in  neigh- 
boring  houses  and  cottages.  Williams  Hall,  with  its  annexes,  Junior 
I  louse  and  Stott  Cottage,  has  rooms  and  recreation  facilities  for 
fifty-six  Juniors,  who  occupy  single  or  double  rooms.  Rockwell 
I  louse  has  single  rooms  and  recreation  facilities  for  forty  Juniors. 
Juniors  are  subject  to  the  special  regulations  and  the  particularly 
close  supervision  found  helpful  to  boys  of  this  age  in  making  a 
successful  transition  from  home  to  boarding  school  life.  Carefully 
selected  Senior  proctors  play  an  important  part  in  the  activities  of 
the  various  Junior  units. 

Lower  Middlers  live  in  three  of  the  double-entry  brick  dormi- 
tories and  in  a  number  of  smaller  houses  and  cottages,  where  they 
receive  careful  guidance  but  also  enjoy  a  degree  of  independence 
suited  to  their  increased  maturity.  Senior  proctors  are  in  residence 
in  most  of  the  Lower  Middle  units. 

Upper  Middlers  and  Seniors,  having  learned  to  profit  from  rela- 
tively great  independence  and  freedom,  are  housed,  with  a  few 
exceptions,  in  large  brick  dormitories  by  classes,  where  they  are 
permitted  considerable  latitude  in  the  exercise  of  their  daily  affairs. 
In  the  five  newest  dormitories,  the  resident  groups  are  made  up  of 
an  approximately  equal  number  of  Upper  Middlers  and  Seniors, 
who  live  in  the  same  dormitory  for  their  last  two  years. 

FACULTY  COUNSELORS  (housemasters) 
Each  Andover  student  is  under  the  direct  charge  of  a  Faculty 
Counselor,  who,  for  boarding  students,  is  his  housemaster.  He 
knows  the  background,  the  character,  and  the  standing  of  each  of 
his  boys  and  acts  as  his  advisor  in  all  that  concerns  his  welfare  and 
his  happiness.  The  Counselor  is  usually  the  member  of  the  Faculty 
most  intimately  in  touch  with  the  student  and  his  parents.  From 
time  to  time,  he  will  write  the  parents  to  keep  them  informed  oi 
their  son's  progress.  Parents  should  feel  free  to  write  their  son': 


20 


GENERAL  INFORMATION 


21 


counselor  if  they  have  any  reason  for  concern  about  their  boy's 
progress.  They  are  encouraged  to  report  to  the  counselor  any  facts 
that  may  affect  the  boy's  work  or  behavior. 

RELIGION 

Phillips  Academy  is  an  inter- denominational  school  whose  ori- 
gin and  traditions  rest  firmly  upon  a  Christian  faith  and  system 
of  values. 

Chapel  services  are  an  essential  part  of  the  Phillips  Academy 
program  and  are  conducted  by  the  Headmaster,  the  School  Minis- 
ters, students,  and  members  of  the  faculty.  Among  the  visiting 
speakers  are  leaders  of  many  denominations.  A  number  of  college 
chaplains  are  invited  to  speak  each  year. 

Attendance  at  chapel  services  is  required,  although  on  Sundays 
boys  may  choose  to  attend  services  at  other  Protestant  or  Roman 
Catholic  churches  in  Andover.  Students  of  Jewish  faith  may  attend 
services  in  the  Sylvia  Pratt  Kemper  Chapel.  Mass  for  Roman  Catho- 
lic students  is  celebrated  there  each  Sunday  at  8:15  a.m. 

This  arrangement  emphasizes  two  sets  of  values:  a  close  con- 
nection of  each  boy  with  his  own  denomination,  and  a  program 
of  worship  within  the  life  of  the  school  built  upon  the  common 
elements  of  our  religious  heritage. 

In  a  school  composed  of  students  from  diverse  backgrounds,  it 
is  not  possible  fully  to  satisfy  all  the  special  requirements  of  dif- 
ferent sects  and  denominations.  Therefore  no  boy  should  apply  for 
admission  to  the  Academy  who  feels  that  the  ritualistic  practices 
of  his  own  faith  must  be  literally  followed  in  all  circumstances. 

In  daily  chapel  the  effort  is  to  develop  a  service  that  strengthens 
the  best  aspirations  and  insights  of  students,  while  denying  to  no 
one  the  right  to  hold  fast  to  his  own  faith.  The  school  tries  to  devel- 
op devotion  to  God  and  reliance  upon  faith  as  a  source  of  inspiration 
and  strength,  to  confirm  a  boy's  support  of  the  highest  values 
that  our  civilization  has  nurtured,  and  to  increase  his  respect  for 
and  understanding  of  the  beliefs  of  others. 

CULTURAL  OPPORTUNITIES 

Andover,  while  demanding  a  high  standard  of  accomplishment 
in  the  prescribed  course  of  study,  has  always  believed  that  a  boy's 


22 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


interest  should  be  widened  as  far  as  possible  beyond  the  limits  of 
the  curriculum.  Through  the  Oliver  Wendell  Holmes  Library,  the 
Robert  S.  Peabody  Foundation  for  Archaeology,  the  Addison  Gal- 
lery of  American  Art,  the  Department  of  Music,  and  the  Moncrieff 
Cochran  Sanctuary,  boys  are  given  a  chance  to  investigate  subjects 
which  may  in  later  life  become  major  pursuits  or  pleasant  hobbies. 

In  addition,  a  number  of  distinguished  men  and  women  are  in- 
vited to  the  Academy  each  year  as  lecturers  and  performing  artists. 
In  1965-1966,  Milton  Katz,  Henry  L.  Stimson  Professor  of  Law  in 
Harvard  University,  delivered  the  Stearns  Lecture;  Vincent  Brod- 
erick,  former  Commissioner  of  Police  of  the  City  of  New  York, 
was  the  Hosch  Lecturer;  and  Dr.  Benjamin  Spock  came  as  the 
eighth  annual  Lana  Lobell  Fellow.  These  visitors  addressed  the 
school  Assembly  in  the  Meeting  Room  of  George  Washington  Hall 
and  later  took  part  in  informal  conferences  with  student  and 
faculty  groups.  Among  other  guests  who  addressed  the  school  at 
Wednesday  morning  Assembly  were  Roger  Hilsman,  former  As- 
sistant Secretary  of  State  for  Far  Eastern  Affairs;  Dr.  Richard  H. 
Overholt,  of  the  Overholt  Thoracic  Clinic,  Boston;  Georges  May, 
Dean  of  Yale  College;  and  David  Wheeler,  Director  of  the  Boston 
Theatre  Company. 

Smaller  groups  interested  in  particular  subjects  met  for  discus- 
sion with  Louis  Lyons,  Curator  Emeritus  of  the  Nieman  Fellow- 
ships, Harvard  University;  John  Frederick  Nims,  poet  and  trans- 
lator, Professor  of  English  in  the  University  of  Illinois  at  Chicago; 
Jean  Valentine,  poet;  Charles  Chu,  authority  on  Chinese  painting, 
Professor  of  Chinese  Studies  at  Connecticut  College  for  Women; 
Tom  Cole,  novelist,  winner  of  the  1966  Rosenthal  Award  for  fic- 
tion; Alfred  Kazin,  critic  and  historian  of  American  literature; 
Russell  Johnson,  Peace  Education  Secretary  of  the  American 
Friends  Service  Committee;  Minor  White,  photographer,  Massa- 
chusetts Institute  of  Technology;  Robert  Stuart  Fitzgerald,  poet 
and  Hellenist,  Boylston  Professor  of  Rhetoric  and  Oratory  in  Har- 
vard University;  and  Richard  Wilbur,  poet,  Professor  of  English 
at  Wesleyan  University. 

Among  the  guest  artists  to  appear  on  campus  were  folksinger 
Theodore  Bikel,  the  viola  and  piano  duo  of  Paul  Doktor  and  Yaltah 
Menuhin,  and  the  noted  actress  and  director  Margaret  Webster. 
The  thirty-eighth  Sawyer  Concert  was  given  jointly  by  the  Fine 


GENERAL  INFORMATION 


23 


Arts  Woodwind  Quintet  and  the  Herb  Pomeroy  Jazz  Quintet. 

A  Shakespearean  play,  last  year  Henry  IV  (Part  I),  is  produced 
annually  by  the  Dramatic  Club.  A  musical  is  produced  each 
spring,  by  the  school  Chorus,  Orchestra,  and  Dramatic  Club; 
Carousel  was  the  1966  choice,  with  a  combined  cast  and  orchestra 
of  over  175. 

THE  OLIVER  WENDELL  HOLMES  LIBRARY 

The  Oliver  Wendell  Holmes  Library  (1929)  was  given  by 
William  Cochran,  class  of  1895;  Moncrieff  M.  Cochran,  class  of 
1900;  and  Louise  Cochran  Savage.  It  was  named  in  honor  of  the 
poet  and  physician,  a  member  of  the  class  of  1825. 

The  Copley  Wing,  gift  of  James  S.  Copley,  P. A.,  193  5,  designed 
to  seat  125  at  small  tables  and  carrels,  is  used  as  an  American  His- 
tory Reserve  Book  Room. 

The  book  collection,  over  85,000  volumes  in  the  liberal  arts, 
supports  and  supplements  the  curriculum  and  provides  many  areas 
for  independent  reading.  A  trained  staff  member  is  on  duty  at  all 
times  to  help  in  the  use  of  the  Library  and  advise  in  choice  of 
reading. 

Particular  treasures  of  the  Library  are  an  original  elephant  folio 
of  Audubon's  Birds  of  America,  given  by  Thomas  Cochran  of  the 
class  of  1890;  papers  and  books  of  the  poet  Oliver  Wendell  Holmes; 
part  of  the  library  of  Guy  Lowell,  architect  of  many  of  the 
Academy's  buildings;  a  notable  collection  of  259  volumes  on  Eng- 
lish Public  Schools;  the  Mercer  Collection  on  sports;  publications 
by  graduates  and  memorabilia  of  the  Academy;  classics  given  in 
memory  of  Allen  R.  Benner;  Early  Americana  given  by  Nelson  S. 
Taylor,  of  the  class  of  1900;  and  historical  map  of  the  Academy  by 
Stuart  Travis,  in  the  Freeman  Room.  Rare  Vergiliana,  gathered 
by  Charles  H.  Forbes,  and  a  handsomely  bound  collection  of 
French  literature,  selected  by  Charles  A.  Parmelee,  are  kept  in 
separate  rooms  open  to  all  who  may  be  interested. 

Housed  in  the  Library  building  are  the  Archives  Department 
and  a  music  record  listening  room. 

THE  ADDISON  GALLERY  OF  AMERICAN  ART 
The  Addison  Gallery  of  American  Art  (1930)  was  established 
in  memory  of  Mrs.  Keturah  Addison  Cobb,  "to  enrich  perma- 


24 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


oently  the  lives  of  the  students  of  Phillips  Academy,  by  helping  to 
cultivate  and  foster  in  them  a  love  for  the  beautiful."  The  original 
gift  included  important  objects  of  American  art  with  endowment 
£bl  the  maintenance  and  operation  of  the  building,  and  a  small 
fund  for  additional  purchases. 

It  is  the  aim  of  the  Addison  Gallery  to  serve  as  a  cultural  center 
for  Phillips  Academy  students  and  outside  visitors.  To  this  end, 
frequent  loan  exhibitions  are  held  throughout  the  year.  Some  are 
directly  related  to  the  courses  in  the  school  curriculum;  others  are 
of  general  interest. 

In  addition  to  its  activities  as  a  part  of  Phillips  Academy,  the 
Addison  Gallery  is  always  open  to  the  general  public  and  offers 
educational  opportunities  to  schools  and  organizations  in  neigh- 
boring communities. 

The  nucleus  of  the  present  collection  of  American  paintings  was 
presented  to  Phillips  Academy  in  1928  by  several  friends  of  the 
school.  The  collection,  now  including  nearly  two  thousand  items, 
is  recognized  as  one  of  the  outstanding  specialized  collections  in 
the  country.  Allston,  Copley,  Morse,  Stuart,  West,  and  others 
represent  the  Colonial  period.  Of  especial  importance  among  the 
many  paintings  of  the  nineteenth  century  are  examples  by  Cole, 
Doughty,  Eakins,  Homer,  Inness,  LaFarge,  Ryder,  Twachtman, 
and  Whistler.  The  early  part  of  the  present  century  is  shown  in 
the  work  of  such  men  as  Bellows,  Davies,  Demuth,  Hassam,  Hop- 
per, Luks,  Marin,  Prendergast,  and  Sloan.  Recent  acquisitions  of 
contemporary  paintings,  sculpture,  prints,  drawings  and  photo- 
graphs complete  an  exceptionally  well-balanced  collection.  Work 
by  Calder,  Lippold,  Moholy-Nagy,  Hofmann,  Marin,  O'Keeffe, 
Pollock,  Shahn,  and  Wyeth  is  included  in  this  latter  group. 

Models  of  American  sailing  ships,  built  to  uniform  scale,  are  also 
installed  in  the  Addison  Gallery.  In  addition  to  a  collection  of  18th 
Century  American  silver,  that  of  the  James  B.  Neale  bequest, 
received  in  1946,  selections  of  furniture,  glass,  and  textiles  of  the 
Colonial  period  are  on  permanent  exhibition. 

Among  recent  publications  of  the  Addison  Gallery  are  three 
books:  "Layman's  Guide  to  Modern  Art,"  1949-54;  "The  Naked 
Truth  and  Personal  Vision,"  1955,  and  "The  American  Line," 
1959,  all  based  upon  special  exhibits  arranged  in  connection  with 
the  Upper  Middle  course  in  Art.  Another  book,  "Models  of  Amer- 


GENERAL  INFORMATION  2  5 

ican  Sailing  Ships,"  serves  as  a  catalogue  of  the  Marine  Collec- 
tion. All  are  simply  written,  and  intended  for  adult  as  well  as  for 
student  readers. 

An  Art  Film  Library  of  some  three  dozen  titles  was  established 
in  1954  to  serve  schools  and  colleges  in  New  England,  as  well  as 
the  Academy  community. 

THE  ROBERT  S.  PEABODY  FOUNDATION  FOR 
ARCHAEOLOGY 

The  Robert  S.  Peabody  Foundation  for  Archaeology,  established 
in  1901  by  Robert  Singleton  Peabody,  Class  of  1857,  supports  re- 
search in  American  archaeology,  publishes  its  findings,  and  main- 
tains a  museum  in  which  collections  gathered  through  extensive 
programs  of  field  research  in  Mexico,  the  Southwest,  the  south- 
eastern states,  New  England,  and  the  Maritime  Provinces  are  dis- 
played. 

Now  in  preparation  is  a  series  of  six  volumes  reporting  findings 
of  research  into  origins  of  native  American  agriculture  and  civiliza- 
tion in  Mexico  made  possible  by  grants  from  the  National  Science 
Foundation  and  Rockefeller  Foundation.  Manuscripts  prepared 
with  NSF  assistance  will  be  published  for  the  Foundation  by  Uni- 
versity of  Texas  Press.  Also  under  way  is  the  preparation  of  fine- 
ings  of  research  into  the  earliest  occupation  of  Nova  Scotia  and 
contemporary  geologic  and  climatic  conditions.  This  program, 
carried  out  with  the  National  Museum  of  Canada  and  the  Nova 
Scotia  Museum,  was  assisted  by  the  National  Science  Foundation. 
A  third  project  will  complete  a  study  of  the  pre-ceramic  occupa- 
tions of  Cape  Cod.  A  fourth  will  summarize  a  long  program  of 
research  into  the  archaeology  of  coastal  Maine. 

A  decorative  map  of  North  America  by  the  late  Stuart  Travis 
'  is  mounted  on  the  stairway.  A  model  of  an  Indian  village  of  early 
Andover,  and  a  model  of  a  portion  of  the  pueblo  of  Pecos,  New 
Mexico,  are  also  on  display.  A  library,  open  to  all,  offers  an  oppor- 
tunity for  reading  and  research  in  the  varied  phases  of  aboriginal 
American  life. 

The  Foundation  offers  a  two-hour  elective  course  dealing  with 
the  life  of  the  Indians  and  the  pre-history  of  North  America. 


2b 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


THE  MONCRIEFF  COCHRAN  SANCTUARY 

The  Moncrieff  Cochran  Sanctuary  is  a  sixty-five- acre  tract  of 
rare  beauty  and  of  great  educational  value,  located  so  close  to  the 
center  of  school  activity  that  it  is  in  fact  an  extension  of  the 
campus.  Landscaped  areas  planted  with  dogwood,  azalea,  rhodo- 
dendron and  laurel  provide  a  succession  of  bloom  that  draws  many 
visitors  from  late  April  to  mid-June.  A  brook  and  two  ponds 
attract  nesting  ducks  and  geese,  and  extensive  natural  wild  areas, 
varied  in  terrain  and  plant  life,  draw  many  species  of  small  land 
birds  and  provide  nesting  places  for  grouse  and  pheasant.  Other 
areas  are  set  aside  for  student  projects  such  as  demonstration  of 
bird  feeders;  experimental  plantings  for  attracting  birds;  soil 
studies;  and  raising  and  liberating  duck,  quail,  and  pheasant. 
Special  paths  are  designed  and  planted  to  show  local  ferns,  wild- 
flowers,  and  trees  in  their  natural  habitats.  The  Log  Cabin,  a 
rustic  building  with  a  large  stone  fireplace,  kitchen,  flagstone  ter- 
race and  broad  lawns,  provides  an  attractive  setting  for  a  wide 
variety  of  social  events  at  all  seasons.  The  Cochran  Sanctuary  is 
unusual  in  its  ideal  location  and  in  its  varied  facilities  for  conser- 
vation, education,  and  enjoyment. 

STUDENT  ACTIVITIES 
Student  organizations  and  voluntary  enterprises  of  various  kinds 
are  an  important  part  of  life  at  Phillips  Academy.  They  may 
change  from  year  to  year  in  scope  and  intent,  depending  upon 
student  interest.  Among  others,  there  are  literary,  musical,  forensic, 
and  scientific  activities.  Each  group  is  under  student  leadership 
and  is  advised  by  a  member  of  the  faculty.  The  list  that  follows 
is  intended  to  be  representative  rather  than  complete. 

The  Phillipian,  founded  in  1878,  is  the  school  newspaper.  It  is 
published  every  Wednesday  of  the  school  year.  Students  on  the  edi- 
torial and  the  business  boards  gain  experience  in  writing  and  in 
business  practice. 

The  Mirror,  founded  in  1854,  is  the  undergraduate  literary  maga- 
zine, which  appears  several  times  each  year.  Positions  on  the  literary, 
business,  and  photographic  boards  offer  the  profitable  and  interest- 
ing experience  of  working  toward  the  publication  of  a  magazine 
devoted  to  encouraging  literary  talent. 


GENERAL  INFORMATION 


27 


The  Pot  Pourri  is  the  Academy  yearbook,  published  after  the  end 
of  each  year.  It  contains  pictures  and  personal  information  con- 
cerning all  Seniors  and  non-returning  Upper  Middlers,  group  pic- 
tures of  all  school  organizations,  and  many  special  features.  The 
three  boards,  editorial,  business,  and  art,  offer  excellent  opportun- 
ities for  the  development  of  literary,  business,  or  artistic  talent. 
This  book  is  the  chief  permanent  record  to  which  alumni  turn  for 
the  account  of  their  years  at  Andover. 

The  Dramatic  Society  is  an  organization  of  all  students  interested 
in  acting,  directing,  stage  design,  scenery  construction,  lighting, 
and  business  managing.  The  major  production  each  year  is  a  Shake- 
speare play.  A  considerable  number  of  modern  plays,  both  drama- 
tic and  musical,  are  also  presented. 

One  of  the  most  important  groups  within  the  Dramatic  Society 
is  the  Stage  Crew.  Carpenters,  painters,  shifters,  electricians,  and 
special-effects  men  work  under  a  stage  manager  and  a  chief  elec- 
trician. Their  job  is  to  build  the  sets  and  operate  the  staging  for 
all  the  plays. 

Another  branch  of  the  Society  is  the  Drama  Workshop,  whose 
intent  is  to  offer  further  opportunities  for  students  to  participate 
in  play  readings,  and  the  production  of  both  conventional  and  ex- 
perimental drama,  student  directed  in  the  Drama  Lab.  The  organi- 
zation welcomes  lower  classmen  as  well  as  Uppers  and  Seniors. 

The  language  departments  frequently  produce  plays  in  French, 
German,  Latin,  or  Spanish.  The  language  plays  are  projects  of 
language-interest  clubs  that  sponsor,  in  addition,  illustrated  lec- 
tures, motion  pictures  from  the  countries  of  their  choice,  and  dis- 
cussions of  history  and  culture.  Occasionally  there  are  language 
tables  in  the  Commons. 

Debating  and  school  forums  are  held  by  Philo,  properly  the  Philo- 
mathean  Society,  founded  in  1825.  Regular  meetings,  held  bi- 
monthly in  the  faculty  room,  normally  open  to  members  only, 
provide  forums  for  the  discussion  of  local,  national,  and  interna- 
tional issues.  From  time  to  time  there  are  debates  against  visiting 
teams,  which  all  students  may  attend.  Each  year  Philo  sponsors  a 
prize  debating  contest.  The  organization  has  also  sponsored  visiting 
lecturers  and  discussion  leaders  to  stimulate  interest  in  economic, 


28 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


wcial,  and  political  problems.  Some  instruction  in  debating  tech- 
nique' in  public  speaking,  and  in  parliamentary  procedure  is 

offered. 

Students  interested  in  art  may  work  in  the  studio  of  the  Addison 
Gallery  with  the  Design  Club. 

The  Camera  Club  has  a  dark  room  in  the  new  Arts  Center,  where 
students  may  develop,  enlarge,  and  print  their  own  photographs. 
In  response  to  interest,  groups  meet  for  the  discussion  of  fine 
points  in  the  art  of  photography. 

The  Radio  Club  has  a  room  in  the  basement  of  Evans  Hall,  where 
radio  sets  may  be  constructed  and  repaired.  It  also  has  facilities 
for  transmitting  and  receiving  amateur  broadcasts.  Code  and 
theory  classes  are  held  in  response  to  need. 

WPAA-FM  is  a  10-watt  educational  FM  station  licensed  by  the 
FCC  to  operate  at  a  frequency  of  91.7  mcs.  It  provides  25  hours 
per  week  of  news,  music,  sports  and  educational  programs  to  an 
area  with  a  population  of  about  200,000.  Its  studio  is  in  the  base- 
ment of  Evans  Hall,  and  its  transmitter  is  on  the  roof  of  the  same 
building.  It  is  completely  student  operated  and  with  its  staff  of 
over  100  is  one  of  the  largest  extra-curricular  activities. 

Students  who  wish  to  construct  furniture,  models,  or  other  articles 
enjoy  the  Woodworking  Shop,  which  is  well  supplied  with  hand 
and  power  tools. 

The  Rifle  Club,  a  large  and  active  organization,  gives  boys  who 
are  interested  in  indoor  rifle  shooting,  particularly  upper-classmen, 
an  opportunity  to  shoot  for  pleasure,  for  National  Rifle  Association 
awards,  and  in  interscholastic  competition.  The  range  is  in  the  base- 
ment of  Pearson  Hall. 

Model  Railroaders  may  meet  in  the  basement  of  Paul  Revere 
Hall,  where  a  layout  has  been  constructed. 

The  laboratories  are  open,  on  schedule  and  under  supervision, 
to  experimenters  in  chemistry  or  physics  (Science  Club).  Astron- 
omers will  find  both  a  reflecting  and  a  refracting  telescope  on  the 
campus.  One  of  them  is  housed  in  an  observatory  (Astronomy 
Club).  A  group  interested  in  tapes  and  records  makes  recording 
of  school  events  (Audio  Club). 


GENERAL  INFORMATION 


29 


Modest  lapidary  equipment  is  on  hand  for  those  boys  who  are  in- 
terested in  gems  and  minerals  (Minerals  Club).  Identification  of 
minerals  is  another  interest  of  the  club. 

Outings  in  search  of  Maine  lobsters,  the  best  ski  trails,  or  another 
mountain  to  climb  are  the  principal  activity  of  the  Outing  Club. 
Canoeing,  fishing,  and  rock  climbing  are  also  popular  with  the 
group. 

The  Stamp  Club  meets  in  the  tower  room  of  the  Chapel.  The 
club's  program  includes  an  annual  prize  exhibition.  Philatelists  are 
urged  to  bring  their  duplicate  stamps  and  covers  for  trading. 

The  Natural  History  Club  works  in  close  cooperation  with  the 
Biology  Department  and  the  Cochran  Bird  Sanctuary.  There  are 
widely  varied  opportunities  to  study  the  animal  and  plant  life  of 
the  region,  both  in  the  laboratory  and  in  the  field.  Trips  are  taken 
to  nearby  points  of  interest.  The  club  is  licensed  to  carry  on  a 
bird-banding  program. 

The  Asia  Society  has  as  its  aim  the  furthering  of  knowledge  and 
understanding  about  the  peoples  and  nations  of  the  East.  The 
members  meet  for  discussions,  lectures,  and  films. 

The  Phillips  Society  seeks  to  see  more  clearly  the  needs  and  prob- 
lems of  people  and  to  help  meet  those  needs.  Membership  in  the 
Phillips  Society  is  open  to  any  boy  who  wishes  to  participate  in  its 
program  and  activities. 

The  Phillips  Society's  interests  are  suggested  by  a  list  of  some  of 
its  activities: 

Receptions  for  new  boys  and  for  foreign  students 

The  raising  of  money  for  Red  Cross,  United  Fund,  the  Salva- 
tion Army,  the  Grenfell  Association,  national  health  agencies, 
and  other  organizations  and  projects 

Conducting  a  program  of  forums,  conferences,  chapel  talks,  and 
discussion  groups 

Collection  of  old  clothes,  books,  and  other  articles  for  distribu- 
tion to  schools  and  hospitals 

Field  trips  to  hospitals,  factories,  and  recreation  centers 


3  0 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Sunday  School  teaching  and  deputation  work  in  the  churches  in 
Andover  and  vicinity. 

Among  the  extracurricular  activities  in  the  field  of  music  are  the 
Marching  Band,  the  String  Orchestra,  the  C oncert  Band,  and  the 
Chorus  (combining  both  choir  and  glee  club),  which  take  part  in 
many  concerts  as  well  as  in  an  annual  musical  show.  Other  musical 
organizations  are  various  dance  bands,  and  the  Eight  V  One 
Octet.  A  well-stocked  record  library  is  located  in  the  Record 
Room,  where  recorded  concerts  are  given  from  time  to  time. 

Dances  of  different  kinds  are  sponsored  by  various  student  groups. 
Student  initiative  and  interest  determine  in  large  part  their  nature 
and  frequency.  Dormitories  often  arrange  informal  dances  with 
girls  from  nearby  schools.  Once  or  twice  a  term  a  club  or  a  class 
sponsors  a  tea  dance  open  to  the  whole  school.  Following  Saturday 
afternoon  athletic  contests,  the  Student  Congress  occasionally 
opens  Graham  House  for  informal  dancing  and  refreshments.  The 
two-day  Spring  Prom  in  May  is  the  climax  of  the  social  season. 

ATHLETICS  AND  PHYSICAL  EDUCATION 

Athletics  and  physical  education  are  important  at  Andover. 
The  physical  education,  intramural,  and  interscholastic  programs 
involve  every  student;  participation  is  required.  The  objective  is 
development  by  each  boy  of  his  physical  capabilities  and  of  such 
qualities  as  courage,  self-confidence,  self-discipline,  and  self- 
control. 

Each  new  boy  must  take  a  swimming  test;  non-swimmers  must 
take  special  instruction  until  they  meet  minimum  standards  of 
proficiency.  During  his  Lower  Middle  year,  every  boy  takes  two 
hours  a  week  of  physical  education  in  addition  to  his  regular  after- 
noon program  of  athletics.  The  morning  program  of  swimming, 
track,  and  gymnastics  attempts  to  develop  early  in  the  boy's  career 
the  self-confidence  and  physical  skills  essential  for  successful 
participation  in  the  more  advanced  phases  of  the  program.  Stan- 
dards of  performance  are  based  on  the  individual's  own  physical 
capacity. 

The  intramural  and  interscholastic  programs  provide  compe- 
tition at  all  levels  in  seasonal  sports.  Outside  games  are  scheduled 
with  neighboring  high  schools,  preparatory  schools,  and  college 


GENERAL  INFORMATION 


31 


freshmen.  During  the  fall,  the  sports  offered  are  football,  soccer, 
rowing,  cross  country,  and  tennis;  in  the  winter,  basketball, 
swimming,  hockey,  wrestling,  squash,  track,  and  skiing;  in  the 
spring,  baseball,  tennis,  golf,  track,  rowing,  lacrosse,  and  life- 
saving. 

The  Medical  Director  and  the  Athletic  Department  strongly 
advise  parents  to  provide  boys  who  wear  glasses  with  shatter-proof 
lenses,  not  only  to  minimize  danger  of  injury  in  athletics  but  also 
to  avoid  loss  of  study  and  reading  time. 

See  page  34  regarding  athletic  equipment. 

HEALTH  SUPERVISION 

Under  the  supervision  of  the  Medical  Director,  every  effort  is 
made  to  improve  each  student's  health,  to  prevent  disease,  and  to 
diagnose  and  treat  illnesses  and  injuries.  Before  school  opens,  every 
student  is  asked  to  have  a  general  physical  examination  by  his 
family  physician,  as  well  as  certain  screening  laboratory  proce- 
dures and  routine  vaccinations  against  smallpox,  poliomyelitis, 
tetanus,  typhoid,  and  measles.  His  family  is  asked  to  answer  ques- 
tions on  a  confidential  sheet  that  may  reveal  significant  symptoms 
or  illnesses.  These  clinical  details  are  under  the  exclusive  control  of 
the  Medical  Director. 

Immediately  after  the  student's  arrival  at  the  Academy,  a  review 
of  the  physical  examination  is  carried  out  by  the  Medical  Director 
with  each  student.  With  new  students,  complete  dental  x-rays  and 
x-rays  of  the  chest  are  taken.  Special  examinations  of  the  eye  and 
ear  and  tests  for  speech  defects,  reading  speed,  and  language  dis- 
ability are  carried  out  whenever  they  are  indicated.  The  full  time 
Medical  Director  and  his  colleagues  on  the  Isham  Infirmary-Hos- 
pital medical  staff  correlate  all  clinical  information,  with  a  view 
toward  establishing  an  accurate  estimate  of  each  student's  physical 
status  and  needs. 

The  Isham  Infirmary-Hospital  is  accredited  by  the  Joint  Com- 
mission on  the  Accreditation  of  Hospitals  under  the  auspices  of 
the  American  Medical  Association  and  the  American  Hospital 
Association.  It  has  50  active  beds,  as  well  as  room  for  expansion 
during  epidemics.  The  hospital  has  a  modern  x-ray  department 
and  clinical  laboratory,  with  a  full-time  technician.  A  well  equipped 
physiotherapy  unit  is  under  the  direction  of  a  qualified  full  time 


32 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


physiotherapist.  Graduate  nurses  are  on  duty  24  hours  daily,  and 
additional  graduate  nurses  manage  the  Outpatient  Services  from 
8:00  a.m.  to  6:00  p.m.  Although  serious  and  critical  medical  and 
surgical  emergencies  are  usually  referred  to  general  hospitals  in  the 
area,  or  in  Boston,  the  Isham  Infirmary-Hospital  is  equipped  to 
care  for  the  most  serious  emergencies. 

All  major  illnesses  and  injuries  are  reported  to  parents  by  tele- 
phone, telegram,  or  letter.  Minor  illnesses  and  injuries  are  not  re- 
ported unless  there  is  some  unusual  complication. 

The  financial  responsibility  of  families  for  the  medical  care  of 
students  is  detailed  on  page  37. 


DAILY  SCHEDULE 

Chapel  7:50  a.m. 

Recitation  hours  8:12  a.m.  to  1 2 : 5  0  P.M. 

t Athletics  2:00  P.M.  to  4:00  P.M. 

-  Recitation  hours  4:13  p.m.  to  6:00  P.M. 

Evening  study  hours  begin  8:00  P.M. 

Sunday  chapel  service  11:00  a.m. 

t  The  time  for  athletics  varies  with  the  team,  the  sport,  and  the  season. 
*  Wednesday  and  Saturday  afternoons  are  half-holidays. 


WORK  PROGRAM 

The  Phillips  Academy  work  program,  in  which  every  boy  takes 
part,  has  two  objectives:  to  train  boys  to  do  useful  work  well  and 
to  reduce  the  operating  costs  of  the  Academy.  Under  the  super- 
vision of  members  of  the  faculty,  the  work  program  has  become 
an  essential  part  of  the  democratic  life  of  the  Academy. 

The  work  program  has  three  phases:  (a)  the  daily  care  of 
dormitory  rooms  and  corridors,  under  the  direction  of  house- 
masters, (b)  work  in  The  Commons,  to  which  all  boarding  stu- 
dents are  assigned  for  two  (non-consecutive)  weeks  during  the 
year,  and  (c)  supervised  work  on  the  grounds  or  in  the 
buildings  of  the  school  at  the  end  of  the  fall  term  and  at  the 
beginning  of  the  spring  term. 


GENERAL  INFORMATION 


3  3 


GRADES  AND  REPORTS 

Reports  of  the  student's  grades  are  sent  to  the  parents  or  guard- 
ian at  the  Fall  Mid-Term  rating  and  at  the  end  of  each  term. 
Grades  are  based  on  results  of  both  daily  work  and  examinations. 
They  are  recorded  on  a  scale  of  100,  in  which  60  is  the  passing 
mark  and  80  or  over  is  an  honor  grade. 

Counselor's  reports  are  sent  to  parents  at  least  twice  a  year. 

DISCIPLINE 

Phillips  Academy  seeks  to  help  boys  develop  desirable  attitudes 
and  habits  so  that  they  will  be  sound  and  healthy  individuals 
and  good  citizens  of  their  community.  The  Academy  bases  its 
disciplinary  policy  on  the  assumption  that  each  boy  will,  at 
all  times  and  places,  conduct  himself  as  a  gentleman.  The  Academy 
tries  to  inculcate  in  a  boy  personal  integrity,  responsibility  for  his 
behavior,  self-control,  and  a  sense  of  individual  purpose.  It  be- 
lieves that  discipline  should  foster  clear,  independent  thinking, 
good  judgment,  and  sound  scholastic  achievement.  In  each  boy, 
from  the  beginning  of  his  career  in  Andover,  the  Academy  aims 
to  cultivate  a  sense  of  just  pride  in  his  school  and  of  responsibility 
to  an  orderly  society.  The  school  has  made  its  rules  in  accordance 
with  these  principles. 

The  school  expects  boys  to  occupy  themselves  with  their  studies 
and  other  school  work  during  all  study  hours.  A  student  is  ex- 
pected to  meet  all  fixed  appointments,  such  as  recitations,  daily 
chapel  or  assembly,  Sunday  chapel,  required  athletics,  and  study 
hours.  All  appointments  immediately  preceding  and  following 
vacations  and  holidays  the  school  considers  especially  important. 
Six  unexcused  absences  in  a  term  render  a  boy  liable  to  discipline, 
as  does  an  accumulation  of  demerits. 

A  student  renders  himself  liable  to  dismissal  if  he  is  guilty  of 
dishonesty,  of  gambling,  of  possessing  or  drinking  alcoholic  bever- 
ages, if  without  permission  he  is  absent  from  school  bounds  or 
from  his  dormitory  between  10  p.m.  and  5  a.m.,  or  if  he  is  any- 
where or  at  any  time  guilty  of  conduct  unbecoming  a  gentleman. 

Students  may  not  possess,  rent,  or  drive  any  motor  vehicle  with- 
in bounds,  nor  may  they  possess  or  use  firearms  or  explosives  of 
any  sort,  except  as  authorized  under  the  rules  of  the  Academy 


34 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Rifle  Club.  Smoking  is  forbidden,  except  that  Seniors  may  smoke 
pipes  in  their  dormitories.  Only  day  students  may  use  bicycles. 

OUT-OF-TOWN  EXCUSES 

Students  whose  scholastic  standing  is  satisfactory  may  with  per- 
mission take  two  out-of-town  excuses  a  term.  Seniors  are  allowed 
five  if  they  are  passing  all  courses. 

ROOM  EQUIPMENT  AND  CLOTHING 

The  Academy  provides  each  student  with  bed,  mattress,  pillow, 
bed  linen,  chest  and  mirror,  desk,  desk-chair,  and  easy  chair.  In 
double  rooms  they  are  provided  for  each  occupant. 

All  boys  are  required  to  wear  coats  and  neckties  to  recitations 
meals,  chapel,  and  assembly.  Various  sport  combinations,  includ- 
ing clean  khaki  trousers,  are  permitted;  but  a  suit  with  a  white 
shirt  and  appropriate  socks  and  shoes  is  required  for  Sunday  church 
and  other  formal  occasions.  All  wearing  apparel  and  personal 
effects  should  be  plainly  marked  with  the  student's  name. 

Protective  athletic  equipment  is  furnished  by  the  Academy.  Each  | 
student  is  urged  to  bring  along  whatever  other  equipment  he 
already  possesses,  but  not  to  buy  new  equipment,  since  substantial  1 
savings  can  be  made  on  purchases  through  the  Athletic  Depart- 
ment. All  scholarship  boys  will  be  able  to  buy  athletic  shoes  at  half 
price.  Every  student  is  required  to  own  a  pair  of  high  quarter 
sneakers. 

The  Academy  does  not  issue  a  detailed  list  of  necessary  equip- 
ment, but  in  addition  to  the  above,  the  following  are  suggested: 
Two  or  three  blankets  or  the  equivalent 
Warm  overcoat  or  jacket  for  the  winter  months 
Overshoes  and  rubbers  for  the  winter  months. 

The  Academy  is  not  responsible  for  the  loss  of  student's  cloth- 
ing or  personal  effects,  either  during  term  time  or  when  stored 
over  vacation,  unless  deposited  in  the  student  storage  center. 


GENERAL  INFORMATION 


35 


COLLEGE  MATRICULATION  OF  THE  CLASS  OF  1965 


No.  of  No.  of 

College                                   Students         College  Students 

Amherst  3         M.I.T.  4 

Arizona  1  Michigan  State  1 

Boston  University  1          Michigan  1 

Bowdoin  1  New  York  University  1 

Brown  4  North  Carolina  15 

California  Northwester  1 

at  Berkeley  1  Oberlin  1 

at  Irvine  1  Occidental  1 

at  Los  Angeles  1  Pacific  1 

at  Santa  Barbara  1  Pennsylvania  5 

Carleton  1  Princeton  14 

Centre  1  Rhode  Island  1 

Chicago  3  Rice  2 

Clarkson  1  Rochester  4 

Colby  2  Rollins  1 

Colgate  1  Rutgers  1 

Colorado  College  1  St.  Olaf  1 

Columbia  J  Stanford  13 

Cornell  9  Swarthmore  1 

Dartmouth  8  Texas  2 

Dayton  1  Trinity  3 

Denison  1  Vanderbilt  1 

Duke  2  Vermont  1 

Florida  1  Virginia  1 

Florida  Southern  1  Wake  Forest  1 

Harvard  36  Wesleyan  3 

Haverford  1  Western  Reserve  6 

Hiram  1  Whitman  1 

'       Kansas  2  Williams  2 

Knox  2  Wisconsin  4 

Lafayette  1  Wooster  1 

Lawrence  3  Yale  42 

Lehi«h  2                Total  "237 


FINANCIAL 

A  large  part  of  the  Academy's  operating  income  is  from  the 
investment  of  its  endowment  funds.  These  funds  have  made  it 
possible  for  many  years  to  charge  an  inclusive  fee  lower  than  the 
cost  of  a  student's  education  and  maintenance  and,  in  addition, 
to  make  scholarships  in  varying  amounts  available  to  worthy  and 
qualified  students.  Thus  it  can  be  said  that  all  students,  regardless 
of  the  fee  paid  or  the  scholarship  earned,  have  benefited  by  the 
endowment  funds.  The  total  annual  cost  to  the  Academy  for  each 
student  is  currently  in  the  neighborhood  of  $4,000.  Of  this  figure, 
$2,100  is  met  by  the  inclusive  fee,  leaving  a  considerable  balance 
to  be  met  by  the  income  from  invested  funds,  by  gifts  from  alumni, 
parents,  and  from  other  sources. 


36 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Tuition  Charges 

The  tuition  for  boarding  students  is  $2,100;  for  day  students 
(who  must  live  in  the  Greater  Lawrence  area)  $1,300:  one  half 
payable  on  October  1  for  Fall  Term,  one  fourth  on  January  1  for 
Winter  Term,  and  one  fourth  on  April  1  for  Spring  Term.  Ad- 
justed bills  for  scholarship  students  are  payable  on  the  same  basis. 
An  alternative  to  the  above  method  of  payment  is  that  tuition 
may  be  paid  in  ten  equal  monthly  installments  starting  Septem- 
ber 1  and  ending  June  1.  A  service  charge  of  ten  dollars  is 
made  for  this  accommodation.  Each  student,  when  assured  of  ad- 
mission, is  required  to  make  a  deposit  of  $50,  which  is  credited  on 
his  first  bill. 

The  tuition  charge  of  $2,100  covers  instruction,  board,  room 
(including  furniture  and  bed  linen),  physical  training  and  athletic 
privileges,  medical  insurance,  use  of  laboratory  equipment  and 
material,  admission  to  all  authorized  athletic  contests  and  the  au- 
thorized entertainments  at  George  Washington  Hall,  including  the 
Saturday  evening  motion  pictures.  It  does  not  include  charges  for 
tutoring,  Language  Training,  special  instruction  in  music  or  ath- 
letics, dental  care,  special  medical  expenses,  personal  laundry,  text- 
books, dues  to  school  organizations,  or  breakage  and  damage  to 
school  property. 

Bills  for  items  not  included  in  the  regular  school  charge  may  be 
rendered  at  any  time  during  the  school  year.  Any  alteration  in  the 
terms  of  payment  made  necessary  by  the  needs  of  parents  must  be 
arranged  in  advance  with  the  Comptroller.  No  rebate  for  the  term 
in  which  he  leaves  will  be  made  to  a  student  who  for  any  reason  is 
dismissed  or  withdrawn.  A  student  otherwise  eligible  for  return 
in  a  given  school  year  will  not  be  allowed  to  register  if  his  school 
account  for  the  preceding  year  has  not  been  paid  in  full.  The 
diploma  of  the  Academy  will  not  be  awarded  to  a  student  whose 
school  account  is  not  paid  in  full  by  the  date  of  graduation. 

Breakage  Deposit 

Each  student  is  required  to  make  a  deposit  of  $25  to  cover 
breakage  and  other  incidental  obligations  that  may  be  incurred 
during  the  school  year.  The  deposit  is  payable  on  October  1 
when  billed.  The  balance  remaining  after  charges  for  breakag< 
have  been  deducted  will  be  refunded  after  the  close  of  the  flsca 


GENERAL  INFORMATION 


37 


year,  June  30,  or  credited  on  the  first  bill  for  the  following  year. 
Medical  Expenses  and  Medical  Insurance 

All  minor  illnesses  and  injuries  are  treated  at  the  Isham  Infirm- 
ary-Hospital by  the  Medical  Director  and  his  staff  without  charge, 
including,  if  required,  routine  laboratory  tests  and  three  days  of 
hospitalization  for  each  disability.  Parents  are  responsible  for  the 
cost  of  out-patient  surgery,  medical  consultations,  dental  care,  x- 
rays,  special  laboratory  tests,  orthopedic  appliances,  and  hospital- 
ization at  the  Isham  Infirmary-Hospital  as  detailed  below. 

For  illnesses  or  injuries  requiring  hospitalization  at  the  Isham 
Infirmary-Hospital  beyond  three  days,  a  charge  will  be  made, 
retroactive  to  the  first  day  of  the  hospital  confinement.  A  charge 
will  be  made  for  the  treatment  of  all  surgical  cases  at  the  Isham 
Infirmary-Hospital,  and,  if  hospitalization  is  required,  a  charge 
will  be  made  commencing  with  the  first  day.  A  charge  will  be 
made,  commencing  with  the  first  day,  for  students  returned  to 
the  Isham  Infirmary-Hospital  for  post-operative  care  or  conva- 
lescence after  surgical  or  medical  treatment  at  an  outside  hospital. 

A  personal  family  medical  insurance  policy  will  meet  most 
costs  of  such  Isham  Infirmary-Hospital  care.  The  school  strongly 
recommends  that  each  student  be  provided  with  such  coverage. 

Phillips  Academy  Student  Medical  Insurance  for  every  student 
is  included  in  the  tuition  charge.  Coverage  for  old  students  com- 
mences on  September  1,  1966,  and  for  new  students  when  they 
arrive  on  the  campus  for  the  fall  term.  The  school  medical  in- 
surance applies  only  to  medical  expenses  for  treatment  of  students 
by  physicians  or  hospital  admission  outside  the  Isham  Infirmary- 
Hospital.  It  reimburses  parents  up  to  $650  for  each  accident  or 
illness  requiring  treatment  outside  the  school  during  the  twelve 
months  of  the  year,  on  campus  and  off.  Reimbursement  under 
this  plan  is  paid  in  addition  to  any  benefits  to  which  a  student 
may  be  entitled  under  any  personal  policy.  Not  infrequently  the 
coverage  from  both  kinds  of  policies  is  necessary  to  meet  the 
total  expenses  on  a  protracted  or  involved  illness. 

Extras 

As  a  rough  guide  to  parents  in  budgeting  for  the  total  expected 
expenses  of  each  academic  year,  the  following  low-average  ap- 
proximations of  extras  are  given. 


38 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Laundry  (if  done  locally)  $25.00  to  95.00 

Pressing  and  cleaning  15.00 
Books  and  supplies  40.00 
Dues,  publications,  and  charitable  contributions  20.00 
Breakage  deposit  (refundable)  0  to  25.00 

Miscellaneous,  including  spending  money  110.00 


$210.00  to  305.00 

Spending  Money 

Parents  or  students  may  open  an  account  at  the  Treasurer's 
Office  for  personal  expenses  during  the  school  year.  Students  are 
urged  not  to  keep  large  amounts  of  cash  in  their  possession  or  in 
their  rooms. 

Financial  Aid  (See  page  42  for  basic  policy) 

Scholarships  vary  in  amount  according  to  the  applicant's  need, 
ranging  from  $500  to  the  full  amount  of  $2100.  In  addition  to  the 
scholarship  award,  part  of  the  cost  of  travel  (within  the  con- 
tinental limits  of  the  United  States)  is  borne  by  the  school  when 
a  scholarship  student  lives  more  than  about  400  miles  from  An- 
dover.  The  travel  allowance  amounts  to  the  cost  of  three  round- 
trip  railroad  coach  tickets,  less  $25  a  trip.  For  trips  beyond  the 
Mississippi  River,  air-coach  fares  may  be  used  as  the  basis.  It  is 
paid  to  the  parent  upon  request  after  each  trip. 

Families  whose  need  is  not  great  but  who,  in  the  judgment  of 
the  Admissions  and  Scholarship  Committee,  are  entitled  to  some 
financial  assistance,  will  receive  aid  in  the  form  of  a  loan.  Such 
loans  will  not  bear  interest  while  the  boy  is  at  Andover,  but  interest 
at  the  rate  of  3  %  per  annum  will  be  charged  from  the  time  of  his 
graduation.  Under  normal  circumstances  repayment  of  the  loan 
starts  four  years  after  the  boy's  graduation  from  Andover,  at  a 
time  when,  presumably,  he  has  finished  college.  Normally,  all 
awards  of  $500  or  less  will  be  made  as  loans.  In  some  special  cases 
loans  for  larger  amounts  may  be  arranged;  in  others,  the  award 
may  occasionally  be  part  outright  grant  and  part  loan. 

The  Committee  requires  the  parents  of  all  boys  applying  for  fi- 
nancial aid  to  submit  a  complete  report  of  their  financial  condition, 
which  is  kept  confidential.  All  boys  on  the  Scholarship  List  are 
expected  to  maintain  academic  records  compatible  with  their  abili- 


GENERAL  INFORMATION 


39 


:y  and  to  show  by  their  general  record  at  Andover  that  they  are 
aware  of,  and  deserve,  the  opportunities  that  they  enjoy. 

Every  scholarship  boy  is  expected  to  perform  some  useful  ser- 
vice for  the  school  in  partial  return  for  the  aid  he  has  received. 
Accordingly,  the  Bureau  of  Self-Help  exercises  control  over  all 
student  employment,  such  as  campus  concessions  and  work  in  the 
various  departments  of  the  school.  The  revenue  anticipated  from 
such  work  is  included  in  the  overall  scholarship  budget.  Although 
the  boy  can,  in  addition,  find  odd  jobs  about  the  school  that  will 
help  him  with  his  pocket  money,  he  should  not  expect  to  earn  any 
significant  sum. 

THE  ANDOVER  SUMMER  SESSION 

Dating  from  1942,  the  Andover  Summer  Session  (six  weeks), 
now  co-educational,  is  an  integral  part  of  Phillips  Academy.  In 
1966  its  enrollment  was  468  boys  and  girls;  the  faculty  numbered 
107.  The  ideal  of  the  Summer  Session  is  to  be  a  national  public 
summer  school.  Ranging  in  age  from  thirteen  to  eighteen  and  com- 
ing from  most  of  the  fifty  states  and  from  many  foreign  countries, 
the  students  have  widely  diverse  geographical,  economic,  and  social 
background.  The  great  majority  of  the  students,  many  already 
admitted  to  college,  come  to  the  Andover  Summer  Session  from 
public  high  schools  to  combine  the  experience  of  boarding- 
school  life  with  the  opportunity  for  serious  study  in  a  field  of 
special  interest.  Scholarship  and  travel  grants  are  made  on  the 
basis  of  need. 

The  purpose  of  the  Andover  Summer  Session  is  to  provide  an 
opportunity  for  serious  study  to  able  and  qualified  secondary- 
school  students.  Some  courses,  such  as  beginning  language  courses, 
concentrate  on  the  acquisition  of  basic  skills  in  a  conventional 
manner.  Most  courses,  however,  wholly  unlike  those  offered  in  the 
regular  secondary- school  curriculum,  offer  an  academic  experi- 
ence in  depth  that  cannot  be  obtained  otherwise.  A  special  feature 
of  the  Summer  Session  is  that  no  academic  credit  is  offered  for 
any  course,  and  little  emphasis  is  placed  on  grades.  A  student 
normally  takes  18  course  hours  a  week:  a  major  course  meeting 
twelve  hours  a  week,  and  a  minor  course  in  English  composition 
meeting  six  hours  a  week.  In  addition,  a  particularly  able  student 
may  elect  an  optional  six-hour  minor  course. 


40 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


1  be  twenty-sixth  annual  Andover  Summer  Session  will  open 
on  W  ednesday,  June  28,  1967,  and  will  close  on  Thursday,  August 
10.  I  he  Summer  Session  publishes  its  own  catalogue,  which  may  be 
obtained  by  writing  to  the  Director  of  the  Summer  Session, 
Phillips  Academy,  Andover,  Massachusetts  01810. 

SCHOOLBOYS  ABROAD 

Schoolboys  Abroad,  a  program  conducted  during  the  school 
year  in  Barcelona,  Spain,  forms  an  integral  part  of  the  curriculum 
of  Phillips  Academy,  Andover,  and  of  the  Phillips  Exeter  Academy, 
Exeter,  N.  H.,  and  as  such  is  a  joint  educational  venture  of  the  two 
academies.  Its  purpose  is  to  provide  for  qualified  secondary  school 
Upper  Middlers  (11th  graders)  a  year  of  intensive  study  of  the 
Spanish  language  and  culture,  and  at  the  same  time  the  ordinary, 
full  academic  program.  The  program  is  open  to  boys  from  any 
accredited  secondary  school.  If  the  student  satisfactorily  completes 
the  course,  it  is  expected  that  he  will  return  to  complete  his  Senior 
\ear  at  the  school  he  was  previously  attending.  Those  students,  , 
however,  who  complete  the  year  abroad  successfully  are  eligible 
for  continuation  in  the  12th  grade  at  Andover  or  Exeter,  pro-  ] 
vided  that  they  announce  such  intention  at  the  time  of  original 
a  pplication. 

Candidates  must  have  completed  a  minimum  of  two  years  of 
study  of  secondary  school  Spanish.  The  curriculum  of  the  program 
parallels  that  normally  available  in  college  preparatory  schools  in  r  I 
the  United  States  (with  the  omission  of  laboratory  science).  The 
courses  in  European  History,  Spanish  language,  and  Modern  Span- 
ish Literature  are  taught  entirely  in  Spanish  by  three  outstanding 
native  teachers.  The  remaining  courses  are  taught  in  English  by 
two  experienced  members  of  the  faculty  of  Phillips  Academy, 
Andover,  and/or  of  The  Phillips  Exeter  Academy.  One  of  the 
chief  objectives  of  the  Spanish  courses  in  particular,  and  of  the 
program  as  a  whole,  is  thorough  preparation  for  honors  work  in  the 
Senior  year.  Such  preparation  is  ideally  suited  for  those  boys  whose 
interest  in  Spanish  is  such  that  they  may  seek  Advanced  Placement 
in  that  subject. 

Courses  are  conducted  in  facilities  of  the  Instituto  de  Estudios 
Norteamericanos,  Via  Augusta,  123,  Barcelona,  Spain.  The  boys 
hve  individually  in  Spanish  homes  throughout  the  city. 


GENERAL  INFORMATION 


41 


Schoolboys  Abroad  publishes  its  own  catalogue,  which  can  be 
obtained  by  writing  the  Administrator,  Schoolboys  Abroad,  16 
School  Street,  Andover,  Massachusetts  01810. 

A  similar  program  for  study  of  the  French  language  and  cul- 
ture will  be  established  in  France  to  open  in  the  Fall  of  1967.  It 
will  also  be  described  in  a  separate  catalogue  to  become  available 
in  the  Fall  of  1966,  which  can  be  obtained  by  writing  to  the 
same  address. 


ADMISSIONS 


GENERAL  POLICY 

T)hillips  Academy  assumes  that  no  boy  will  be  deterred  from 
applying  for  admission  because  his  family  is  unable  to  pay  the 
full  cost  of  an  Andover  education.  The  Constitution  of  the  Acad- 
emy states,  "This  Seminary  shall  be  ever  equally  open  to  youth 
of  requisite  qualifications  from  every  quarter."  With  this  prin- 
ciple in  mind,  the  Admissions  and  Scholarship  Committee  selects 
each  year  from  approximately  seventeen  hundred  candidates  the 
two  hundred  and  eighty-five  most  promising  and  deserving  boys, 
even  though  many  of  them  are  unable  to  pay  the  full  $2100  all- 
inclusive  fee.  The  academy  calls  its  "M.  Q."  or  "Most  Qualified" 
program.  Thanks  to  the  generosity  of  a  large  number  of  alumni 
and  other  friends,  over  $350,000  is  available  in  1967  to  provide  fi- 
nancial assistance  for  those  who  are  judged  eligible  strictly  on  the 
basis  of  need. 

The  basic  requirements  for  admission  to  Phillips  Academy  arc 
evidence  of  sound  character  and  a  strong  school  record.  Othei 
considerations  are  personality,  breadth  of  interest,  geographies 
distribution,  date  of  application,  and  performance  on  the  Second- 
ary School  Admission  Tests  (see  page  46).  Of  considerable  im- 
portance also  is  the  candidate's  relative  physical,  social,  and  emo 
tional  maturity.  Because  the  Academy  receives  applications  fron 
many  more  qualified  boys  than  it  can  admit,  it  must  make  selection 
on  a  competitive  basis,  with  emphasis  on  character,  personal  quali 
fications,  and  promise. 

The  closing  date  for  receiving  applications  (except  for  post 
graduate  candidates)  varies  from  year  to  year,  usually  in  earl- 
January.  Strong  priority  is  given  to  those  candidates  who  com 
plete  the  full  admissions  procedure  by  January  1 5.  It  is  particularl 
important  to  take  the  December  10,  1966  administration  of  th 
Secondary  School  Admission  Tests. 

Boys  are  admitted  annually  to  each  of  the  four  classes  in  approxi 
mately  the  following  numbers:  ninth  grade  (Junior),  110;  tent 
grade  (Lower  Middle),  100;  eleventh  grade  (Upper  Middle),  5C 
twelfth  grade   (Senior),  2  5    (including  postgraduates).  Unlik 


42 


ADMISSIONS  43 

Dme  schools,  the  Academy  does  not  consider  attendance  for  the 
ull  four  years  essential.  As  the  figures  indicate,  a  large  number  of 
oys  enter  the  tenth  grade;  the  Academy  encourages  that  plan. 
Because  maturity  is  important  in  achieving  success  at  Andover, 
boy  younger  than  fourteen  at  the  time  of  contemplated  entrance 
often  at  a  disadvantage  physically,  socially  or  emotionally,  even 
lough  he  may  be  well  qualified  academically.  It  is  often  better 
>r  such  a  boy  to  remain  at  his  present  school  through  the  ninth 
*ade  and  then  attend  the  Academy  for  four  years.  Although  a 
ember  of  the  Junior  Class  (ninth  grade),  he  can  generally  move 
lead  academically  in  one  or  more  subjects,  benefiting  at  the  same 
me  from  the  social  and  physical  advantage  of  living  with  his  con- 
mporaries. 

The  limited  number  of  postgraduates  admitted  each  year  are 
sated  in  all  ways  as  full-fledged  members  of  the  Senior  Class. 

nancial  Aid 

The  policy  is  described  above.  See  page  38  for  details. 
PROCEDURE  IN  APPLYING 


Every  applicant  must  complete  the  seven  steps  below.  The 
order  may  vary,  but  the  one  given  is  recommended. 

Candidates  who  complete  the  required  steps  on  time  will 
be  given  priority.  Except  for  postgraduates,  candidates  must 
normally  make  application  before  January  1  of  the  year  of 
intended  entrance. 

 i  

fcp  1:  Submit  the  Preliminary  Application  and  Fee. 

ben?    When  the  decision  to  apply  is  made. 

The  Preliminary  Application  (and  Geographical  Card)  will 
be  found  at  the  back  of  the  catalogue.  A  check  or  money 
order  for  $10,  payable  to  the  Trustees  of  Phillips  Academy, 
should  accompany  the  preliminary  application  when  it  is 
filed.  The  non-returnable  application  fee  is  required  unless 
specifically  waived  by  the  Admissions  Office. 


44 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Su  p  2:  Have  a  personal  interview. 

When?  Not  later  than  January  15  of  the  year  of  proposed  ad- 
mission,  preferably  well  before  December  1  5  of  the  preceding  year. 

An  interview  is  required  of  all  students.  A  visit  to  the 
Academy  is  highly  desirable,  but  if  a  candidate  cannot 
arrange  such  a  visit  he  or  his  family  should  make  an  ap- 
pointment with  a  nearby  Alumni  Representative  (see  list- 
ing on  pages  95-101.  Appointments  with  an  alumnus 
should  be  made  directly  with  the  man  himself,  not  through 
the  Academy  office. 

All  appointments  should  be  made  in  advance,  preferably 
by  telephone  if  the  distance  is  not  great.  Calls  to  arrange 
appointments  at  the  Academy  should  be  made  to  the  sec- 
retary in  the  Admissions  Office,  and  not  to  the  Director  of 
Admissions.  Tel.:  617-475-3400.  Office  hours:  9:00-5:00 
Mondays  through  Fridays;  9:00-12:00  on  Saturday.  The 
Admissions  Office  does  not  usually  schedule  interviews 
from  January  15  to  March  1. 


Step  3:  Submit  the  Final  Application  and  School  Record  Form. 
When?  Within  two  weeks  of  receipt. 

This  form  and  those  referred  to  in  Steps  4,  5,  and  6  are 
normally  mailed  on  October  1  to  all  candidates  who  have 
filed  preliminary  applications  for  admission  in  the  follow- 
ing September. 

(a)  The  parent  or  guardian  should  fill  in  the  first  page. 

(b)  It  is  then  to  be  completed  by  the  candidate's  pres- 
ent principal  or  guidance  counselor.  If  the  candi- 
date has  attended  two  schools  within  the  past 
twelve  months,  his  application  should  be  completed 
by  the  school  at  which  he  is  better  known. 

(c)  The  parent  or  guardian  should  make  sure  the  school 
returns  the  completed  form  promptly  in  the  en- 
velope provided. 


ADMISSIONS 


45 


Step  4:  Submit  the  three  Confidential  Recommendation  Forms. 

When?  Within  two  weeks  of  receipt. 

The  blue  form  should  be  completed  by  the  candidate's  En- 
glish teacher  and  the  yellow  form  by  his  mathematics  or 
science  teacher.  The  teachers  selected  should  be  those  who 
have  taught  him  within  the  past  twelve  months  and  know 
him  best. 

The  white  form  should  be  completed  by  the  person 
who  has  supervised  him  closely  in  a  non- academic  activity 
or  job. 

All  three  forms  should  be  returned  by  the  writers  direct- 
ly to  the  Admissions  Office  in  stamped,  addressed  envelopes 
supplied  by  the  candidate.  Additional  reference  letters 
from  any  source  are  welcome  but  not  required. 

Step  5:  Return  the  Student  Questionnaire. 

When?  Within  two  weeks  of  receipt. 

Each  applicant  is  asked  to  complete  a  questionnaire  sup- 
plied with  the  final  application  form.  He  will  be  given 
the  opportunity  to  enumerate  the  group  and  individual 
activities  in  which  he  has  taken  part.  Among  other  things, 
he  may  be  asked  to  write  an  essay  on  an  assigned  topic.  He 
should  not  receive  any  help  in  meeting  this  requirement. 
The  questionnaire  should  be  sent  promptly  to  the  Admis- 
sions Office,  but  separately  from  the  final  application  form. 

Step  6:  Submit  the  Current  Fall  Record  Form. 
When?  By  January  15. 

Candidates  whose  Final  Application  and  School  Record 
Forms  include  grades  through  the  first  quarter  of  the  cur- 
rent academic  year  need  not  complete  this  step.  All  other 
applicants  should  see  that  the  principal  or  guidance  coun- 
selor of  their  present  school  completes  and  returns  the 
Current  Fall  Record  Form. 


46 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Step  7:  Take  the  Secondary  School  Admission  Tests  (See  below 
for  Senior  Class  candidates) . 

When?  On  December  10,  1966 

The  Secondary  School  Admission  Tests  are  required  by 
all  but  candidates  for  the  Senior  Class.  It  is  particularly 
important  to  take  the  December  10  administration  of  the 
tests  even  though  the  candidate  has  taken  them  previously. 
They  will  be  given  on  that  day  by  the  Educational  Testing 
Service  at  centers  throughout  the  United  States  and  many 
foreign  countries.  The  tests  will  be  given  also  on  February 
4  and  April  1,  1967,  but  the  Academy  can  hold  out  little 
hope  of  providing  room  for  boys  who  take  them  in  Feb- 
ruary, and  no  hope  at  all  for  those  who  wait  until  April. 
The  February  and  April  dates  can  be  used  to  provide  a 
trial  run  for  1968  candidates. 

Each  applicant  must  complete  a  special  form  (supplied  with 
the  Bulletin  of  Information  for  Candidates)  and  be  sure  that  it 
reaches  the  Educational  Testing  Service  by  the  deadline  dates  listed 
in  the  Bulletin.  The  cost  is  $7.00  ($10.00  for  candidates  at  foreign 
centers),  payable  to  the  Educational  Testing  Service.  A  Bulletin 
of  Information  for  Candidates  will  be  sent  to  all  1967  candidates 
who  have  filed  the  Preliminary  Application  Form.  Others  may 
obtain  copies  by  writing  to  Secondary  School  Admission  Tests, 
Educational  Testing  Service,  Princeton,  N.  J.  08540. 

Special  preparation  or  tutoring  for  the  admission  tests  is  neither 
necessary  nor  advisable,  but  a  regular  program  of  general  reading, 
perhaps  a  book  a  week  beyond  school  requirements,  may  improve 
performance  on  the  verbal  sections.  Though  sample  tests  are  not 
available,  the  Bulletin  of  Information  for  Candidates  contains  a 
few  typical  questions. 

Candidates  for  the  Senior  Class  must  take,  instead,  the  College 
Board  Scholastic  Aptitude  Test,  preferably  the  current  December 
or  January  series  (or  the  Preliminary  Scholastic  Aptitude  Test  if  an 
eleventh  grader),  and  request  the  College  Board  in  writing  after 
the  test  date  to  send  Phillips  Academy  the  results  of  all  Board  tests 
rAcn.  A  check  or  money  order  for  $1.00  should  accompany  the 
request. 


ADMISSIONS  47 

Acceptance  Dates 

By  agreement  with  a  number  of  schools,  candidates  will  not  re- 
ceive official  notice  of  admission  earlier  than  February  15,  and 
parents  will  not  be  required  to  confirm  the  admission,  by  deposit 
or  otherwise,  before  March  15.  However,  as  soon  as  a  boy  hears 
favorably  from  his  first-choice  school,  he  is  strongly  requested  to 
notify  immediately  that  school  and  all  others  to  which  he  has  ap- 
plied. This  action  will  enable  schools  to  release  more  letters  of  ad- 
mission to  waiting  candidates. 

Phillips  Academy  candidates  for  1967  may  expect  notification 
of  action  as  soon  as  possible  after  February  15,  and  certainly  by 
March  15,  on  all  fully  completed  applications.  Successful  candidates 
who  decide  to  accept  their  admission  are  required  to  pay  a  non- 
returnable  deposit  of  $50.00  (to  be  credited  on  the  first  school 
bill). 

It  should  be  understood  that  admission  is  contingent  upon 
maintenance  of  a  thoroughly  satisfactory  academic  and  general 
record. 

Placement  Examinations  and  Preparation  for  Them 

Applicants  who  have  been  admitted  to  the  Academy,  and  who 
have  thereafter  paid  the  required  deposit,  will  normally  be  expected 
to  write  subject-matter  placement  examinations  on  or  about  Friday, 
May  12.  The  Admissions  Office  may  exempt  boys  with  outstanding 
records  and  Secondary  School  Admission  Test  results  from  all  or 
part  of  this  requirement.  Those  who  do  not  live  within  commuting 
distance  of  Andover  may  write  the  examinations  at  their  local 
schools.  While  no  special  preparation  for  the  admission  tests  is  ex- 
pected, outside  study  or  tutorial  assistance  in  anticipation  of  the 
placement  examinations  will  usually  be  helpful.  Sample  placement 
examinations  are  supplied  without  charge  by  the  Admissions  Office 
upon  receipt  of  the  $50.00  deposit  confirming  acceptance  of  admis- 
sion. Each  sample  examination  lists  the  topics  to  be  covered  in 
preparation  for  the  examination. 

As  a  further  aid  to  candidates  for  placement  in  the  two  lower 
classes,  and  to  those  upper  class  candidates  who  are  currently 
studying  the  first  year  of  Latin,  French,  Spanish,  or  Russian,  the 


4S 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


National  Association  of  Independent  Schools,  4  Liberty  Square, 
Boston,  Massachusetts  02109,  publishes  each  year,  for  $2.00  post- 
paid, a  pamphlet  entitled  "Definition  of  the  Requirements  for 
;y  The  pamphlet  contains  detailed  subject-matter  require- 
ments in  English,  Mathematics,  Latin,  French,  Spanish,  and  Rus- 
sian for  use  in  grades  six  through  nine.  The  standards  parallel 
closely  those  of  Andover.  The  previous  year's  examinations  in  each 
subject  at  each  level  are  included. 

The  proper  use  of  the  National  Association  of  Independent 
Schools  pamphlet  should  enable  parents  to  determine  well  in  ad- 
vance whether  their  boys  are  receiving  adequate  preparation  for  the 
Academy.  Please  note  that  Phillips  Academy  encourages  but  does 
not  require  the  study  of  a  foreign  language  in  grades  six  through 
eight. 

Room  Assignment  and  Matriculation  Notices 

Rooms  are  assigned  to  incoming  students  in  early  August,  in  the 
order  in  which  their  admission  applications  are  filed.  A  notice 
regarding  the  opening  appointments  of  the  school  year,  together 
with  various  required  forms,  is  sent  in  August  to  the  parents  or 
guardians  of  all  successful  applicants. 

PLACEMENT  REQUIREMENTS  FOR  EACH  CLASS 

The  examinations  ordinarily  required  for  entrance  to  the  four 
classes  are  specified  below.  Each  candidate  should  take  the  exami- 
nations for  which  his  previous  work  fits  him,  irrespective  of  the 
class  groups  in  which  the  subjects  are  listed. 

Junior  Class 

Boys  of  good  scholastic  ability  and  achievement  should  be  able 
to  enter  the  Academy  when  they  have  completed  the  work  of  the 
eighth  grade  and  have  reached  the  age  of  fourteen.  Normally,  they 
will  be  asked  to  write  a  placement  examination  in  mathematics 
which  will  cover  arithmetic  and  some  elementary  algebra,  but  a 
boy  whose  eighth-grade  course  is  a  standard  first-year,  high-school 
nlgebra  course  should  write  instead  the  paper  for  entrance  to 
Mathematics  2.  Boys  who  are  currently  studying  a  foreign  lan- 
guage should  write  the  appropriate  placement  examination. 


ADMISSIONS 


49 


Lower  Middle  Class 

For  entrance  to  the  regular  work  of  the  Lower  Middle  year, 
placement  examinations  are  required  in  algebra,  and  in  foreign 
languages  currently  being  studied.  The  work  is  described  on  pages 
54-78.  In  most  instances  the  courses  offered  at  Phillips  Academy  in 
the  Junior  year  (ninth  grade)  cover  considerably  more  ground 
than  those  given  elsewhere  at  the  same  level.  For  this  reason  appli- 
cants are  advised  to  note  carefully  the  description  of  the  Academy's 
Junior  courses,  and  the  sample  examinations  for  entrance  to  Mathe- 
matics 2  and  the  second  year  of  the  appropriate  foreign  language, 
which  will  be  sent  upon  request  without  charge.  Extra  preparation 
may  be  advisable.  Credit  for  the  English,  History,  and  Science  of 
the  Junior  year  may  be  granted  on  the  school  record  without  ex- 
amination. 

Upper  Middle  and  Senior  Classes 

Successful  candidates  for  the  Upper  Middle  and  Senior  Classes 
will  write  the  Academy's  placement  examination  for  entrance  to 
the  second-  and  third-year  levels  of  a  foreign  language  they  are 
planning  to  continue  at  the  Academy.  Examinations  in  other  sub- 
jects may  be  required,  depending  on  the  courses  taken  and  the 
quality  of  the  applicant's  record.  Candidates  must  secure  credits, 
by  examination  or  certification,  that  cover  the  work  of  the  Acad- 
emy's lower  years.  Candidates  who  have  taken  College  Boards 
should  request  the  Board  in  writing  after  the  test  date  to  send  the 
results  to  the  Phillips  Academy  Admissions  Office.  A  check  or 
money  order  for  $1.00  should  accompany  the  request. 

Postgraduate  Students 

A  limited  number  of  well  qualified  secondary-school  gradu- 
ates are  admitted  each  year.  They  must  take  the  College  Board 
Scholastic  Aptitude  Test,  normally  the  current  December  or 
January  series,  or  the  Preliminary  Scholastic  Aptitude  Test,  and 
request  the  College  Board  in  writing  after  the  test  date  to  send 
Phillips  Academy  the  results  of  all  Board  tests  taken.  A  check  or 
money  order  for  $1.00  should  accompany  the  request. 


COURSE  OF  STUDY 


Tin  curriculum  of  Phillips  Academy  combines  a  required  core 
of  studies  believed  to  be  fundamental  to  a  liberal  education  and 
elective  courses  designed  to  fit  the  special  needs  and  interests  of 
the  individual  student.  The  total  program  normally  includes  four 
years  of  English,  three  years  of  mathematics,  three  years  of  one 
foreign  language,  a  year  of  American  history,  a  year  of  a  labora- 
tory science,  one  course  in  art  or  music,  one  course  in  the  Bible, 
and  four  or  five  additional  courses.  Instruction  is  given  in  all 
subjects  required  for  entrance  to  higher  institutions,  whether 
liberal  arts  or  technical. 

Classroom  groups  are  small  enough  to  permit  individual  atten- 
tion, and  students  are  placed  in  sections  fitted  to  their  attainment. 
Honors  and  advanced  courses  offer  particularly  able  and  well 
prepared  students  opportunity  to  progress  at  a  rate  commensurate 
with  their  ability  and  ambition.  Most  departments  offer  courses 
beyond  the  level  of  preparation  for  college. 

For  full  membership  in  a  given  class,  students  should  have 
credit  for  the  work  of  the  lower  classes  or  its  equivalent.  Boys  are 
rated  as  members  of  a  given  class,  however,  if  their  deficiencies 
for  full  membership  in  it  do  not  exceed  one  major  course. 

Every  boy  is  assigned  to  a  Class  Officer,  who  advises  in  the 
selection  of  courses  designed  to  meet  Andover's  diploma  require- 
ments, college  entrance  requirements,  and  the  student's  particular 
interests.  The  Class  Officer  also  recommends  such  subsequent 
changes  as  are  necessary  or  advantageous.  It  is  highly  desirable 
that,  before  conference  with  the  Class  Officer,  students  and  parent; 
acquaint  themselves  as  fully  as  possible  with  the  Academy's  basic 
requirements  and  with  the  possibilities  of  its  flexible  program 
Also,  all  applicants,  and  especially  those  for  the  Upper  Middle  an< 
Senior  classes,  should  familiarize  themselves  at  the  earliest  possibl 
date  with  the  entrance  requirements  of  the  colleges  which  the; 
may  wish  to  enter. 

Two  additional  descriptions  of  the  Andover  curriculum,  namel) 
"Planning  a  Program  of  Studies  at  Andover"  and  "The  Andove 
Honors  Program,"  are  available  upon  request. 
See  pages  54-78  for  descriptions  of  all  courses. 


50 


COURSE  OF  STUDY 


51 


DIPLOMA  REQUIREMENTS 
The  diploma  requirements  for  students  entering  Phillips  Acade- 
my for  the  full  four  years  are  indicated  below.  Certain  modifica- 
tions are  permitted  for  boys  entering  after  the  Junior  year  (9th 
grade).  The  Admissions  Office  will  welcome  inquiries  concerning 
specific  requirements  for  such  boys. 

4  units  of  English 

3  units  of  mathematics 

3  units  of  one  foreign  language,  either  ancient  or  modern 
1  unit  of  history,  normally  American 
1  unit  of  laboratory  science 

*  l/2  unit  of  ancient  history  in  the  Junior  year 

*  y2  unit  of  elementary  science  in  the  Junior  year 
3  units  of  elective  courses 

Bible  in  the  Lower  Middle  year 

Art  or  Music  in  the  Upper  Middle  year 

An  elective  minor  in  the  Senior  year 

In  addition,  candidates  must  pass  all  courses  in  their  Senior 
year  even  though  they  may  be  ahead  in  units. 

THE  NORMAL  FOUR-YEAR  PROGRAM 

Junior  Year  (9th  grade)  Periods  a  week 

English  1  5 

Mathematics  1  5 

Foreign  Language  1  5 

History  1  3 

(or  a  second  foreign  language  replacing  History  and  Elementary  Science) 

Elementary  Science  3 

Total  21 

Lower  Middle  Year  (10th  grade) 

English  2  4 
Mathematics  2  4 
Foreign  Language  2  5 

"Elective  (major)  4  or  $ 
Bible  1  2 


Total  19-20 

*  Qualified  boys  may  take  a  second  foreign  language  in  place  of  these  two  minor 
courses. 

*  One  elective  major  in  three  upper  years  must  be  a  laboratory  science.  If  a  second 
foreign  language  was  begun  in  the  Junior  Year,  the  elective  in  the  Lower  Middle  Year 
must  be  the  second  year  of  that  language. 


52 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Upper  Middle  Year  (11th  grade) 

English  3 
Mathematics  3 
Foreign  Language  3 
♦Elective  (major) 
Art  or  Music 

Total 

Senior  Year  (12th  grade) 

English  4 

I  listory  4  (American) 
*  Elective  (major) 
"Elective  (major) 
Elective  (minor) 

Total 


Periods  a  week 

4 
5 
4 

4  or  5 
2 


19-20 


4 

5 

4  or  5 
4  or  5 
2 

19-21 


Elective  Majors 

English  5  American  Literature  Biology 

English  5  Comedy  |Chemistry 

English  5  Comparative  Humanities  fPhysics 

English  5  Honors  Science  Honors 

English  5  Literature  and  Composition  fMathematics  4,  4c,  5,  6 

Greek  1,  2,  3,  4  fArt  Major 

I  atin  1,  2,  3,  4,  5  fMusic  Major 

French  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  6  f  Religion 

German  1,  2,  3,  4,  5  ^History  2 

Spanish  1,  2,  3,  4,  5  tHistory  3 

Russian  1,  2,  3,  4  tHistory  6-7 

Chinese  1,  2 

No  credit  is  given  for  less  than  a  two-year  sequence  in  any  foreign 
language. 

Special  Courses 

Special  courses  designed  to  cover  the  work  of  two  years  in  one 
are  open  to  properly  qualified  Juniors  in  mathematics,  French,  and 
Latin;  and  to  Seniors  in  German,  French,  Greek,  Russian,  and 
Spanish. 

*  One  elective  major  in  three  upper  years  must  be  a  laboratory  science.  If  a  seconc 
fomgn  language  was  begun  in  the  Junior  Year,  the  elective  in  the  Lower  Middle  Yea: 
must  be  the  second  year  of  that  language. 

t  Normally  for  Upper  Middlers  and  Seniors  only. 

t  Not  permitted  after  the  Lower  Middle  year. 


COURSE  OF  STUDY 


53 


Honors  Courses  and  Advanced  Placement 

The  Andover  curriculum  offers  honors  courses  in  most  depart- 
ments. It  also  provides  special  programs  in  mathematics,  Latin,  and 
the  modern  foreign  languages,  designed  to  cover  four  years'  work 
in  three  or  five  years'  work  in  four;  and  a  two-year  honors  se- 
quence in  the  physical  sciences.  The  honors  programs  are  open,  on 
invitation  of  the  departments,  to  especially  able  and  ambitious 
students. 

A  large  number  of  Andover  students  take  College  Board  Ad- 
vanced Placement  Tests  in  May  to  establish  advanced  placement 
in  college  courses  or  credit  towards  the  college  degree. 

Independent  Projects  for  Seniors 

With  the  approval  of  a  faculty  committee,  a  Senior  may  under- 
take a  special  project  of  independent  work  under  the  supervision 
of  a  member  of  the  faculty  in  one  of  three  ways:  (1)  for  the 
Winter  or  Spring  Term,  in  place  of  required  athletics,  (2)  for  the 
Spring  Term,  in  place  of  the  Senior  elective  minor,  or  (3)  for  the 
whole  year,  in  place  of  the  Senior  elective  minor. 

Elective  Minors  (Mainly  for  Seniors) 

English  5  Composition 
English  5  Literature 
Public  Speaking 
Studio  Art 
Advanced  Studio 
Chorus 

Concert  Band 
Instrumental  Lessons 
Harmony 

Introduction  to  Music 
Orchestra 

Politics  of  International  Relations 
Introduction  to  East  Asia 
Introduction  to  South  Asia 


Ethics 
Philosophy 
Mathematics  L 
Mathematics  C 
Mechanical  Drawing 
Navigation 

Biology  S 
Chemistry  S 
Anthropology 
Physics  S 

Latin  S 
Latin  H 
Greek  T 
German  S 
Spanish  M 


DESCRIPTION    OF  COURSES 


ART 

The  courses  in  Art  are  organized  to  develop  the  visual  perceptions  of 
ali  students.  The  basic  course,  Studio  Art,  is  normally  taken  by  a  boy  in 
his  Upper  Middle  year.  He  will  have  the  opportunity  in  his  Senior  year  to 
pursue  his  interests  in  an  elective  course.  Occasional  reading  assignments, 
illustrated  lectures,  and  original  works  of  art  displayed  in  the  Addison 
Gallery  complement  the  experience  of  class  and  studio. 

Studio  Art.  Two  hours.  In  its  emphasis  on  observation,  interpretation, 
and  organization,  the  course  is  designed  to  supply  the  basis  for  a  critical 
understanding  of  contemporary  surroundings.  Four  hours  of  class  work 
count  for  two  hours  credit,  with  no  outside  preparation  required.  Along 
with  drawing  exercises  and  a  brief  historical  survey,  the  student  receives 
experience  in  photography  and  three-dimensional  construction.  Previous 
experience  in  art  is  not  required. 

Art  Major.  Four  hours.  The  course  includes  the  Advanced  Studio 
course  and,  in  addition,  two  hours  of  seminar  discussion.  It  allows  a 
student  to  combine  an  interest  in  the  practice  of  art  with  an  interest  in 
thinking  and  talking  about  culture  in  modern  society.  The  year  concludes 
with  a  brief  experience  in  motion  picture  structure,  exploring  its  creative 
and  communicative  possibilities. 

Advanced  Studio.  Two  hours.  Meeting  four  hours  a  week  in  the 
studio,  the  course  gives  the  student  a  chance  to  pursue  interests  he  may 
have  developed  in  Studio  Art  or  elsewhere.  Such  interests  may  fall  into 
the  categories  (more  fully  described  below)  of  painting  or  drawing,  sculp- 
ture, photography,  architecture,  or  furniture  design  and  construction. 
The  student  has  the  option  of  studying  each  art  form  for  a  minimum  of 
one  term,  although  most  students  prefer  to  stay  with  one  discipline  for 
the  entire  year.  Studio  Art  is  a  prerequisite. 

Painting.  The  student  may  develop  expression  in  any  medium  of  two 
dimensional  design,  such  as  oils,  watercolor,  collage,  drawing.  In  addition, 
he  is  required  to  perform  occasional  exercises  in  an  assigned  medium  {e.g.. 
tempera  and  gold-leaf).  He  receives  constructive  criticism  from  a  prac- 
ticing painter. 

Graphics.  As  an  adjunct  to  the  Painting  course,  the  Print  Workshop 
encourages  exploration  of  traditional  as  well  as  experimental  technique  ir 
etching,  drypoint,  aquatint  and  woodcut. 

Architecture.  A  design  course  based  on  the  previous  year's  work  ii 
Studio  Art,  which  involves  the  further  exploration  and  application  o 
concepts  of  human  function  and  material  structure  on  an  architectura 


54 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES 


55 


scale.  People,  considered  singly  and  socially,  and  materials,  considered 
structurally  and  aesthetically,  become  central  to  the  design  process. 

Furniture  Design.  A  course  in  the  design  of  the  useful  "thing,"  the 
implement  of  specific  human  purpose.  Work  in  the  shop  necessitates  con- 
sideration of  materials,  methods  and  machines  to  transform  design  ideas 
into  concrete  form. 

Sculpture.  Offers  an  opportunity  to  work  in  materials  available  to 
the  sculptor  today,  such  as  wood,  stone,  metal,  plastics,  plaster.  It  is, 
therefore,  possible  for  the  student  to  develop  into  sculpture  concepts 
already  begun  in  Studio  Art,  as  well  as  ideas  drawn  from  his  own  ex- 
perience. Individual  criticism  is  stressed.  A  collaborative  project  with  the 
architectural  students  is  sometimes  arranged  in  the  Winter  Term. 

Photography  uses  techniques  learned  in  Studio  Art  to  continue  work 
on  individual  projects,  such  as  the  photographic  essay,  development  of 
one  subject  idea,  study  of  lighting,  presentation,  or  still-life  material. 

THE  CLASSICS 

The  courses  in  Greek  and  Latin  are  arranged  to  provide  a  four-year 
course  in  Greek  and  a  five-year  course  in  Latin.  The  Department  hopes 
that  a  number  of  boys  with  Classical  interests  will  elect  four  years  of  one 
language  and  three  of  the  other.  However,  the  pressure  of  modern  times 
must  make  it  advisable  for  most  boys  to  take  one  ancient  and  one  modern 
language.  Such  boys  may  elect  either  Greek  or  Latin  in  their  first  year. 
Those  planning  on  a  general  education,  on  the  advanced  study  of  Romance 
languages,  or  on  entering  the  Law,  will  naturally  prefer  Latin;  but  boys 
interested  in  literature,  archaeology,  philosophy,  or  medicine  might  well 
choose  Greek  as  their  ancient  language.  It  is  no  more  difficult  than  Latin 
as  a  first  language. 

Greek 

Greek  1.  Five  hours.  The  course  is  devoted  mainly  to  forms  and  the 
most  essential  principles  of  syntax.  Chase  and  Phillips'  A  New  Introduc- 
tion to  Greek  (Harvard  University  Press)  is  used.  To  aid  the  memorizing 
of  inflections  and  vocabularies  there  are  daily  exercises,  both  oral  and 
written,  enforced  by  incessant  drill.  During  the  second  and  third  terms, 
work  in  the  grammar  is  supplemented  by  lessons  either  from  a  very  simple 
Greek  reader,  or  from  the  initial  chapters  of  Xenophon's  Anabasis. 

Greek  1-2.  Five  hours.  The  course  is  open  to  properly  qualified 
Seniors  and  Upper  Middlers.  It  covers  in  one  year  the  essential  material 
of  Greek  1  and  Greek  2.  The  texts  are  Chase  and  Phillips'  A  New  Intro- 
duction to  Greek;  Xenophon's  Anabasis,  ed.  Mather  and  Hewitt  (Uni- 
versity of  Oklahoma  Press) ;  and  Xenophon's  Hellenica,  Books  I  and  II, 
ed.  Edwards  (Cambridge  University  Press). 


56 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


GREEK  2.  Five  hours.  The  second  year  is  occupied  with  selections  from 
Xenophon's  works  and  with  some  easy  dialogue  of  Plato.  Prose  composi- 
tion  in  Attic  Greek  is  studied,  the  grammar  is  reviewed,  and  there  is  much 
work  in  sight  translation.  The  texts  are  Xenophon's  Anabasis  (ed.  Mather 
and  1  lewitt)  and  Plato's  Apology  and  Crito,  ed.  Dyer  and  Seymour,  (Ginn 
&  Co.). 

Greek  3.  Four  hours.  The  third  year  is  spent  mainly  in  reading  select- 
ed books  of  the  Iliad  and  the  Odyssey.  After  the  dialect  is  mastered,  more 
attention  is  given  to  the  literary  side  of  the  poems  and  to  the  translation 
of  ]  tomer  at  sight.  When  the  ability  of  the  class  warrants,  the  Alcestis 
of  Euripides  is  read.  The  texts  are  Benner's  Selections  from  Homer's 
"Iliad"  (Appleton)  and  Hadley's  Euripides'  "Alcestis"  (Cambridge  Uni- 
versity Press) . 

Greek  4.  Four  hours.  The  fall  term  is  devoted  to  selections  from 
Herodotus,  Hippocrates,  and  Plato;  the  winter  to  a  play  of  Sophocles;  the 
spring  to  selections  from  the  Greek  lyric  poets. 

Greek  T.  Two  hours.  A  Senior  elective  that  studies  the  Greek  Old 
and  New  Testaments. 

Greek  Composition.  See  notice  under  Latin  Composition. 
Latin 

Latin  1.  Five  hours.  The  year  is  spent  in  learning  the  basic  forms  and 
syntax  of  the  language  and  a  fundamental  vocabulary.  There  is  constant 
practice  in  sight  reading  and  in  prose  composition  of  simple  sentences. 
The  purpose  of  the  course  is  to  prepare  boys  for  general  reading  in  Latin 
prose,  not  solely  in  Caesar.  The  text  is  A  New  Introduction  to  Latin,  by 
Alston  H.  Chase. 

Latin  1-2.  Five  hours.  Boys  who  are  not  ready  for  Latin  2,  but  who 
make  a  high  grade  on  the  Advanced  Latin  I  Entrance  Examination,  may 
be  placed  in  Latin  1-2  and  thus  given  opportunity  to  complete  two  years 
of  work  in  one.  Those  who  pass  the  course  successfully  are  given  credit 
for  two  years  of  Latin.  The  course  is  reserved  for  boys  who  give  evidence 
of  high  ability.  Texts  as  for  Latin  1  and  2. 

Latin  2.  Five  hours.  During  the  first  term,  the  course  gives  a  thor- 
ough review  of  the  fundamentals  of  Latin  grammar  and  begins  the  read- 
ing of  Caesar.  In  the  last  two  terms,  more  Caesar  is  read,  but  the  reading 
is  varied  by  selections  from  other  Latin  prose  authors  and  from  simple 
poetry.  There  is  practice  in  sight  translation  and  in  prose  composition. 
The  texts  are  An  Intermediate  Latin  Reader,  by  William  J.  Buehner,  and 
John  Colby's  Review  Latin  Grammar. 

Latin  3.  Four  hours.  The  course  has  a  threefold  purpose.  Linguisti- 
cally, it  teaches  students  to  read  Latin  prose  with  increasing  ease.  His- 
torically, it  presents  a  picture  of  Cicero's  life  and  times  and  compares  his 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES 


57 


period  with  our  own.  Culturally,  it  assesses  the  literary  importance  of 
Cicero  as  the  creator  of  a  prose  style  which  influenced  the  literature  of 
Europe  for  centuries.  Representative  selections  are  read  from  the  writings 
of  Cicero  as  well  as  passages  from  other  prose  authors.  There  is  constant 
practice  in  sight  translation.  Selections  from  Vergil  and  one  of  the 
Comedies  are  read.  The  text  is  Gillingham  and  Barrett's  Latin:  Our  Living 
Heritage,  Book  III  (Charles  E.  Merrill  Books). 

Students  who  have  done  high  honor  work  in  Latin  2  and  who  intend 
to  take  only  three  years  of  the  subject  are  allowed  to  choose  either  Cicero 
or  Vergil  for  their  third-year  Latin. 

Latin  4.  Four  hours.  By  a  study  of  selections  from  the  Aeneid  and 
from  other  Latin  poetry,  the  course  attempts  to  introduce  students  to 
both  the  forms  and  the  content  of  classical  poetry  and  to  make  plain  its 
influence  upon  the  poetry  of  the  modern  languages.  The  student  is  given 
constant  practice  in  reading  Latin  verse  aloud.  The  poems  are  studied  as 
literature  and  not  merely  as  exercises  in  translation. 

Latin  H.  Two  hours.  Reading  and  discussion  of  the  Odes  of  Horace 
and  poems  of  Catullus,  with  special  attention  to  the  literary  artistry  of  the 
poems,  to  their  sources  in  the  Greek  Lyrics,  and  to  their  influence  upon 
modern  poetry.  Open  to  properly  qualified  students  who  have  passed 
Latin  3. 

Latin  S.  Two  hours.  This  course,  less  demanding  than  Latin  H,  is 
designed  for  boys  who  have  completed  Latin  3  and  desire  to  keep  in  con- 
tact with  the  language  through  a  minor  course.  The  reading  will  be  drawn 
mainly  from  the  poetry  of  Ovid.  The  basic  text  is  Dunmore's  Selections 
from  Ovid  (McKay  Co.). 

Latin  5.  Five  hours.  Open  to  students  who  have  passed  Latin  4  or 
who  otherwise  satisfy  the  Chairman  of  the  Department  of  their  fitness. 
The  course  is  the  equivalent  of  the  customary  Freshman  Latin  course  in 
most  colleges.  In  the  first  term,  selections  from  Livy's  Histories  are  read 
and  the  reading  of  Horace's  Odes  is  begun,  to  be  carried  on  through  the 
second  term.  In  the  winter,  two  Roman  comedies  are  read;  and,  in  the 
spring,  Catullus'  poems  and  selections  from  Tacitus'  Annals. 

Accelerated  Courses.  At  the  end  of  the  first  term  of  Latin  1,  stu- 
dents of  high  ability  are  offered  the  opportunity  to  join  an  accelerated  sec- 
tion, Latin  IX.  They  will  continue  in  Latin  2X,  and  proceed  in  their  third 
year  into  Latin  4,  thus  gaining  credit  for  four  years  of  Latin  in  three  years. 
Boys  who  drop  out  at  the  conclusion  of  Latin  2X  will  obtain  credit  for 
only  two  years  of  Latin. 

Latin  Composition.  No  regular  course  is  given,  but  special  arrange- 
ments can  be  made  for  any  student  desiring  work  in  advanced  composi- 
tion in  either  Latin  or  Greek. 


58 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


ENGLISH 

The  courses  in  English  aim  to  teach  students  to  think  logically,  to  speak 
and  write  clearly,  to  read  with  comprehension  and  appreciation,  and  to 
develop  discrimination  and  taste  in  the  judgment  of  books. 

Courses  at  all  levels  include  frequent  practice  in  speaking  and  writing, 
close  reading,  sustained  attention  to  problems  of  syntax  and  rhetoric,  the 
Study  and  discussion  in  class  of  the  principal  literary  types,  and  wide 
collateral  reading.  Classroom  teaching  is  supplemented  by  conferences. 
Sections  vary  in  size  from  ten  to  fifteen.  After  the  Junior  year,  particular- 
ly able  boys  may  enter  honors  sections  and  are  encouraged  to  develop 
their  special  literary  aptitudes. 

In  addition  to  assigned  reading,  students  do  collateral  reading,  guided 
by  the  English  teacher.  In  all  courses  the  Department  encourages  the 
writing  of  story,  poem,  and  essay,  and  sponsors  a  series  of  prize  competi- 
tions to  stimulate  interest  in  original  writing. 

English  5  major  courses  are  open  only  to  those  who  have  credit  for 
four  years  of  secondary  English,  who  have  completed  English  3X,  or  who 
are  concurrently  taking  English  4. 

English  1.  Five  hours.  The  work  of  the  course,  both  in  literature  and 
composition,  concentrates  on  narration  and  description.  It  does  not  in- 
clude a  study  of  formal  grammar,  though  it  treats  practical  matters  of 
form  and  usage  as  necessary.  A  study  of  the  growth  of  language,  word 
formation,  and  etymology  is  part  of  the  course.  Whenever  possible,  the 
writing  of  non-expository  themes  corresponds  with  the  literature  under 
study,  for  example,  the  writing  of  fables  along  with  the  study  of  Aesop, 

Representative  texts:  A  Book  of  Short  Stories,  The  Tempest,  Huckle- 
berry  Finn,  Animal  Farm,  Lord  of  the  Flies,  Aesop's  Fables,  Narrative 
Poems. 

English  2.  Four  hours.  The  course  concentrates  on  expository  writing 
and  on  the  acquisition  of  a  critical  and  analytical  vocabulary  to  be  used 
in  the  study  of  the  novel,  short  story,  drama,  poetry  and  the  essay.  All 
sections  study  generative  and  transformational  grammar. 

Representative  texts:  Composition  of  the  Essay,  by  Hyde  &  Brown, 
Great  Short  Stories,  ed.  Schramm,  Henry  IV  (Part  I),  The  Oxbow  Inci- 
dent, The  Red  Badge  of  Courage,  Sound  and  Sense,  by  Perrine. 

English  3.  Four  hours.  English  3  and  English  4  form  a  two-year 
sequence  studying  a  group  of  major  English  and  American  literary  works. 
A  student  who  completes  the  two  courses  should  have  both  a  sense  of  the 
chronology  of  English  and  American  literature  and  a  sound  reading  back- 
ground. Both  courses  place  equal  stress  upon  the  study  of  literature  and 
upon  composition,  both  analytical  and  non-expository. 

Read  intensively  by  all  students:  The  Odyssey,  Macbeth,  Gulliver's 
Travels,  Milton,  Pope,  Wordsworth,  Keats,  Hardy.  Other  authors  often 
studied:  Fielding,  Sheridan,  Coleridge,  Dickens,  Thackeray,  Melville, 
Tennyson,  Browning,  Arnold,  Ibsen,  Shaw,  Arthur  Miller. 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES 


59 


English  3X.  Four  hours.  A  course  for  particularly  able  students  who 
wish  to  do  the  required  work  of  English  3  and  4  in  one  year  and  thus 
qualify  for  specialized  work  in  English  in  their  senior  year.  Students  who 
complete  English  3X  must  take  another  major  English  course. 

English  4.  Four  hours.  The  course  continues  and  completes  the  se- 
quence begun  in  English  3,  requiring  greater  maturity  and  a  higher  level 
of  sophistication  than  English  3. 

Read  intensively  by  all  students:  The  Oedipus  Cycle,  Hamlet,  the  meta- 
physical poets,  Eliot,  Hemingway,  Fitzgerald.  Other  authors  often 
studied:  Chaucer,  Jonson,  Hawthorne,  Twain,  Conrad,  Joyce,  Faulkner, 
Yeats,  Frost,  O'Neill. 

English  5  American  Literature:  Four  hours.  A  course  in  Ameri- 
can Literature.  The  anthology  for  class  use  is  A  College  Book  of  American 
Dterature,  edited  by  Ellis,  Pound,  Spohn,  and  Hoffman. 

English  5  Comedy.  Four  hours.  The  course  explores  the  assumptions 
that  comedy  and  tragedy  are  akin  and  that  comedy  illuminates  the  human 
situation  in  ways  that  tragedy  does  not.  An  examination  of  the  nature 
and  importance  of  the  comic  spirit  in  the  dramatic  comedy  of  classical 
Greece,  Rome,  The  Middle  Ages,  the  Renaissance,  The  Restoration,  the 
eighteenth,  nineteenth  and  twentieth  centuries.  Essentially  a  reading 
course,  but  the  student  will  write  occasional  papers  and  see  on  the  stage 
as  much  comedy  as  opportunity  and  the  metropolitan  Boston  stage  will 
allow. 

English  5  Comparative  Humanities.  Four  hours.  The  course  ex- 
plores some  of  the  basic  principles  of  artistic  expression  in  literature, 
music,  photography,  cartoons,  and  painting.  The  aim  is  to  give  students 
a  chance  to  try  a  new  kind  of  thinking.  Some  of  the  areas  of  comparison 
and  contrast  are  metaphor,  artistic  purpose,  objectivity,  quality  of  humor, 
literal  technique,  and  theme-and-variations.  Examples  include  Heming- 
way in  relation  to  Mondrian,  Conrad  to  DeChrico,  Faulkner  to  Robert 
Frank,  and  Thurber  to  Klee.  Plays  are  studied  in  relation  to  their  film 
versions  and  stage  performances.  Poetry  is  read  in  relation  to  painting 
and  music. 

English  5  Honors.  Four  hours.  The  course  is  designed  as  an  investi- 
gation of  contemporary  trends  in  prose  fiction  and  poetry,  with  corrobora- 
tion in  the  field  of  drama.  The  emphasis  is  chiefly  technical  and  critical: 
how  to  approach  a  text,  how  to  read  it,  how  to  evaluate  it,  how  to  see  it 
in  its  proper  context.  The  course  concentrates  upon  a  few  typical  works, 
with  extensive  collateral  reading. 

English  5  Composition.  Two  hours.  An  elective  course  in  which  the 
students  write  at  least  once  a  week  and  submit  at  least  one  finished  work 
at  the  end  of  each  term.  Class  hours  are  spent  chiefly  in  the  analysis  and 
discussion  of  work  submitted  by  members  of  the  class. 


60 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


English  5  Literature.  Two  hours.  An  elective  course  devoted  to 
reading,  discussing,  and  occasional  writing  about  contemporary  literature, 
chiefly  fiction.  Representative  authors:  Agee,  Albee,  Baldwin,  Bellow, 
Camus,  Cheever,  Cummings,  Ellison,  Greene,  Kafka,  Katzanzakis,  Lowell, 
Updike,  E.  B.  White.  May  be  taken  with  English  5  Composition  to  form 
a  major  course. 

ETHICS 

Ethics — Personal  and  Social.  Two  hours.  An  elective  course  for 
Upper  Middlers  and  Seniors.  Readings  are  from  ancient  and  modern  sys- 
tems of  ethical  thought.  Consideration  of  attitudes,  values,  and  codes  of 
conduct  bearing  on  such  subjects  as  individual  freedom,  property  rights, 
the  home,  the  family,  the  community,  individual  integrity,  and  social 
responsibility. 

HISTORY 

The  courses  in  history  have  two  purposes.  They  are  arranged  to  provide 
information  in  company  with  other  subjects;  they  are  developed  consecu- 
tively to  give  increasing  experience  in  precision  of  thinking  and  to  train 
students  in  the  logical  expression  of  what  they  know.  The  system  of 
courses  is  scaled  during  the  first  year  to  the  potentialities  of  the  younger 
students,  stressing  the  topical  approach;  it  becomes  increasingly  mature  . 
and  analytical  during  the  succeeding  years. 

History  1.  Ideas  in  Motion.  Three  hours.  The  course  is  designed 
to  provide  Juniors  with  a  series  of  stimulating  examples  of  man's  develop- 
ment and  culture,  The  focal  point  is  man's  experiences  and  ability  to 
adapt  circumstances  to  his  needs,  to  work  with  others  for  common  pur- 
poses. With  this  objective,  the  course  shows  man  in  several  environments: 
Man  and  the  Land — Geography;  Man's  Entrance  into  History — the  River 
Civilizations;  Man  Makes  a  Living — Economics;  Man  Organizes  with 
Others — Government;  Man  Tries  to  Understand  the  Unknown — Religion; 
Man  Resorts  to  Force — War;  Man  Utilizes  Nature — Science. 

The  contribution  of  ancient  civilizations  is  usually  the  starting  point 
of  each  topic,  which  is  carried  through  to  modern  times.  By  this  tech- 
nique the  boy  is  able  to  relate  his  work  to  some  degree  to  his  own  experi- 
ences. Lectures  on  aspects  of  specific  topics  are  occasionally  given  to 
prepare  the  boy  for  later  work  in  this  method. 

Each  topic  is  approached  through  textual  and  supplementary  readings, 
class  discussions,  and  training  in  essay  writing.  Illustrative  material — 
films,  slides,  displays — is  used  wherever  possible.  Students  are  encouraged 
to  pursue  their  own  special  historical  interests  through  reports,  papers,  and 
projects. 

Text:  Wallbank  and  Taylor,  Civilization  Past  and  Present  (Scott  Fores- 
man).  Supplementary  books:  Smythe  and  Brown,  Elements  of  Geography 
(Macmillan);  the  editors  of  Life,  The  Epic  of  Man  (Time);  Davis,  A 
Day  in  Old  Athens  (Allyn  &  Bacon) ;  Burlingame,  Machines  that  Built 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES 


61 


America  (Signet  Key) ;  Bradley,  A  Guide  to  the  World's  Religions  (Pren- 
tice-Hall) ;  Butterfield  et  al,  A  Short  History  of  Science  (Doubleday  Dol- 
phin); Pratt,  Battles  that  Changed  History  (Doubleday  Anchor). 

History  2.  Men  and  Great  Issues  of  History.  Four  hours.  For 
Lower  Middlers,  the  course  is  a  study  of  outstanding  people  and  significant 
events  in  the  history  of  Europe. 

The  course  introduces  the  student  to  historical  concepts,  relations,  and 
problems.  The  student  learns  the  disciplines  of  outlining,  note  taking,  map 
reading,  defining,  analyzing,  and  organizing  evidence  to  prove  generaliza- 
tions. The  textbook  is  used  as  background  material,  usually  in  conjunction 
with  a  weekly  assignment  of  a  biography  or  a  description  of  an  important 
historical  event.  The  course  examines  the  interplay  of  the  influence  of  peo- 
ple upon  their  times  and  the  influence  of  events  upon  a  country  or  a  period 
of  history.  Representative  topics:  Medieval  people  in  Western  Europe; 
Thomas  Becket  and  the  struggle  between  state  and  Church;  Michelangelo 
and  the  Renaissance;  Martin  Luther  and  the  Reformation;  Christopher 
Columbus  and  the  Age  of  Exploration;  Elizabeth  I  and  the  rise  of  the 
national  state;  Richelieu  and  absolute  monarchy;  Louis  XIV  and  the 
Golden  Age;  Peter  the  Great  and  the  emergence  of  Russia;  Robespierre 
and  the  French  Revolution;  Gladstone  and  British  reform. 

Films  and  slide  tapes  are  often  shown.  Members  of  other  departments 
lecture  in  their  special  fields. 

Text:  Brinton,  Christopher  &  Wolff,  A  History  of  Civilization,  (Pren- 
tice-Hall). Supplementary  books:  E.  Power,  Medieval  People  (University 
Paperbacks) ;  J.  Anouilh,  Becket  (Coward-McCann) ;  R.  Bainton,  Here  1 
Stand,  A  Life  of  Martin  Luther  (Mentor) ;  M.  Waldman,  Queen  Elizabeth 
(Collier  Books) ;  S.  Morison,  Christopher  Columbus,  Mariner  (Mentor 
Books) ;  C.  V.  Wedgwood,  Richelieu  and  the  French  Monarchy  (Collier 
Books) ;  W.  H.  Lewis,  The  Splendid  Century  (Anchor) ;  I.  Stone,  The 
Agony  and  the  Ecstacy  (Signet  Books) ;  B.  H.  Sumner,  Peter  the  Great 
and  the  Emergence  of  Russia  (Collier  Books);  J.  M.  Thompson,  Robes- 
pierre and  the  French  Revolution  (Collier  Books) ;  F.  Birrell,  Gladstone 
(Collier  Books). 

History  3.  Modern  Europe.  Four  hours.  For  Upper  Middlers,  the 
course  is  a  background  survey  from  the  15  th  century  to  the  end  of  the 
18  th  century,  and  an  intensive  study  of  events  and  periods  from  the 
French  Revolution  to  the  present  day.  The  course  is  chronological  and 
deals  with  significant  issues.  The  Development  of  Absolutism;  Constitu- 
tionalism; Problems  of  the  Balance  of  Power;  the  French  Revolution  and 
the  Napoleonic  Empire;  Rise  of  the  Middle  Class;  the  Challenge  of  Social- 
ism; Imperialism  of  the  19th  Century;  the  Germany  of  Bismarck;  the 
Diplomacy  of  World  War  I  and  the  Peace  Settlement;  the  Russian  Revolu- 
tion and  the  Soviet  Union;  the  Dictatorship  and  Politics  of  Fascist  Italy 
and  Nazi  Germany;  World  War  II  and  the  Search  for  Security;  the  Cold 
War;  Issues  of  Foreign  Policy  of  the  United  States  and  the  Soviet  Union. 

The  course  prepares  for  the  Advanced  Placement  examination  in  Eu- 
ropean History. 


62 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Texts:  Palmer  &  Colton,  A  History  of  the  Modem  World  (Knopf); 
Goldwin  Smith,  A  History  of  England  (Scribner) ;  Hall  &  Davis,  The 
Course  of  Europe  Since  Waterloo  (Appleton-Century) ;  Black  &  Heim- 
reich,  Twentieth  Century  Europe  (Knopf);  David  Thomson,  Europe 
Since  Napoleon  (Knopf);  H.  S.  Hughes,  Contemporary  Europe:  A  His- 
to\  v  (Prentice-Hall).  Supplementary  readings:  L.  B.  Packard,  The  Age  of 
Louis  XIV,  (Holt);  J.  H.  Plumb,  England  in  The  Eighteenth  Century 
(Pelican);  G.  LeFebvre,  The  Coming  of  The  French  Revolution  (Vin- 
I  ige) ;  R.  L.  Heilbroner,  The  Worldly  Philosophers  (Simon  and  Schuster); 
I  [.  1  Iolborn,  The  Political  Collapse  of  Europe;  E.  H.  Harbison,  The  Age 
of  Reformation  (Cornell) ;  Voltaire,  Candide  (Bantam) ;  R.  L.  Heilbroner, 
The  future  as  History  (Prentice-Hall).  Readings  and  documents  in 
F.uropean  History  are  edited  and  supplied  to  the  students  by  members  of 
the  department. 

History  4.  The  United  States.  Five  hours.  For  Seniors,  the  course 
opens  with  the  American  Revolution  and  proceeds  through  the  transition 
from  Confederation  into  Federal  Union,  from  conflict  and  division  to  re- 
union, and  the  growth  of  the  United  States  as  a  world  power.  It  closes 
with  events  of  the  present  time.  It  surveys  the  westward  movement,  the 
plantation  system,  the  development  of  industry,  the  labor  movement,  and 
the  foreign  policy  of  the  American  government. 

Although  public  affairs  are  the  central  theme,  stress  is  placed  upon 
geographical,  economic,  social,  and  governmental  problems;  the  careers 
of  eminent  men  are  examined  in  relation  to  these  problems.  Much  atten- 
tion is  given  to  historical  decisions  of  the  Supreme  Court.  Matters  of 
literary,  intellectual,  religious,  and  philosophical  import  are  indicated  but 
not  stressed.  Students  with  a  satisfactory  average  may  with  permission 
elect  to  write  a  paper  in  lieu  of  the  final  examination. 

Texts  and  reference  works: 

General:  Morison  and  Commager,  The  Growth  of  the  American  Re- 
public; Randall,  The  Civil  War  and  Reconstruction;  Hacker  and  Kend- 
rick,  The  United  States  Since  1865;  Mitchell  and  Mitchell,  American 
Economic  History;  Malone  and  Rauch,  Empire  for  Liberty;  Blum,  The 
National  Experience. 

Source  Books:  Commager,  Documents  of  American  History;  MacDon- 
ald,  Documentary  Source  Book  of  American  History;  Evans,  Cases  on 
American  Constitutional  Law  (Fenwick  .edition);  Bartlett,  The  Record 
of  American  Diplomacy. 

Special  Histories  cited  frequently:  Bailey,  A  Diplomatic  History  of  the 
American  People;  Bemis,  A  Diplomatic  History  of  the  United.  States; 
Kelly  and  Harbison,  The  Amercian  Constitution;  Swisher,  American  Con- 
stitutional Development;  Pratt,  History  of  United  States  Foreign  Policy; 
Xcttels,  The  Roots  of  American  Civilization;  Agar,  The  Price  of  Power; 
A Ihs,  Government  Through  Opposition;  Brogan,  Era  of  Franklin  D. 
Roosevelt;  Faulkner,  From  Versailles  to  the  New  Deal;  Frederick,  Slavery 
and  the  Breakdown  of  the  American  Consensus;  Ganley,  The  Progressive 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES 


63 


Movement;  James,  The  Supreme  Court  in  American  Life;  Lippmann,  U.  S. 
foreign  Policy;  Lyons,  Idealism  &  Realism  in  Wilson's  Peace  Program, 
^residential  Power  in  the  New  Deal;  Van  Deusen,  The  Jacksonian  Era; 
Winks,  The  Cold  War;  Deglar,  Out  of  our  Past. 

Special  historical  works  cited  at  appropriate  places  in  the  Syllabus:  The 
kssett,  Turner,  McDonald  and  Dunning  volumes  of  the  older  American 
Nation  Series;  Miller,  The  Origins  of  the  American  Revolution;  Corwin, 
'ohn  Marshall  and  the  Constitution;  Nevins,  Ordeals  of  Union  (2  vols.) ; 
Kevins,  Emergence  of  Lincoln  (2  vols.);  Pringle,  Theodore  Roosevelt; 
\llen,  Lords  of  Creation;  Corwin,  The  Constitution  and  What  It  Means 
Today;  Mason  &  Leach,  In  Quest  of  Freedom;  R.  Hofstadter,  American 
Political  Tradition. 

History  5.  Politics  of  International  Relations.  Two  hours.  An 
dective  course  for  Seniors.  The  emphasis  is  upon  the  politics  ot  20th- 
;entury  nations  and  their  effects  upon  United  States  foreign  policy  and 
nternational  relations.  The  course  is  organized  to  introduce  students  to 
:he  many  factors  affecting  Great  Power  politics,  and  to  demonstrate  the 
:ausal  relationships  in  modern  international  events:  the  Fundamentals  of 
[nternational  Relations;  Power  Politics;  National  Interests  and  Objectives; 
Geography  and  World  Politics;  Economics  and  World  Politics;  Significant 
Nations  and  Areas;  Modern  Europe;  the  Soviet  Union;  China;  Emerging 
Africa;  Latin  America;  United  States  foreign  policy,  its  making  and 
execution,  development  since  1945,  the  factors  influencing  it. 

Readings  will  be  selected  from  Overstreet,  What  We  Must  Know  About 
Communism;  Crossman,  The  God  That  Failed;  Benton,  The  Voice  of  Latin 
America;  White,  Thunder  Out  of  China;  Shepherd,  Politics  of  African 
Nationalism;  Osgood,  Alternative  to  War  or  Surrender;  Fulbright,  Pros- 
pects for  the  West;  Fulbright,  New  Myths  and  Old  Realities;  Essays,  The 
Conservative  Papers;  Herzog,  The  War-Peace  Establishment. 

History  6.  Introduction  to  East  Asia.  Two  hours.  Open  to  Upper 
Middlers  and  Seniors.  It  is  the  purpose  of  the  course  to  introduce  Ameri- 
can students  to  Asia  through  study  and  critical  examination  of  the  his- 
tories of  China  and  Japan.  While  the  approach  is  essentially  historical, 
considerable  emphasis  is  placed  upon  East  Asia's  anthropology,  philosophy, 
religion,  literature  and  art.Topics  covered  include  East  Asia:  The  Setting 
and  Geographical  Beginnings,  Thought  and  Religion,  The  Social  Fabric, 
The  Political  Tradition,  The  Alien  Impact,  China  in  Revolution:  First 
Phase,  The  Modernization  of  Japan,  China  in  Revolution:  Second  Phase, 
New  Order  in  Eastern  Asia,  China  in  Revolution:  Third  Phase. 

The  course  consists  of  readings,  lectures,  audio-visual  materials,  map 
exercises,  and  work  projects.  Textual  and  supplementary  readings  are 
taken  from  such  works  as  Fairbank,  J.  K.,  The  United  States  and  China, 
Reischauer,  E.  O.,  Japans  Past  and  Present,  Michael  and  Taylor,  A  His- 
tory of  the  Far  East  in  Modern  Times,  M.  C.  Yang,  Chinese  Village, 
Tsao,  Bream  of  the  Red  Chamber,  Snow,  Red  Star  Over  China. 


64 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


History  7.  Introduction  to  South  Asia.  Two  hours.  Open  to  Upper 
Middlers  and  Seniors.  The  purpose  of  the  course  is  to  introduce  American 
st  u Joins  to  Asia,  through  study  and  critical  examination  of  the  histories 
idia  and  Pakistan.  The  approach  is  essentially  historical,  but  con- 
siderable emphasis  is  placed  upon  the  area's  anthropology,  philosophy,  re- 
ligion, literature  and  art.  Topics  covered  include  India  and  Pakistan: 
Setting  and  Early  Culture,  Thought  and  Religion  Prior  to  the  Coming  of 
[slam,  the  Nature  of  Indian  Society,  Patterns  of  Pre-Mughal  History,  The 
Mughal  Empire,  The  British  in  India,  Modern  India  and  Pakistan. 

The  course  consists  of  readings,  lectures,  audio-visual  materials,  map 
exercises  and  work  projects.  Textual  and  supplementary  readings  are 
taken  from  such  works  as  Spear,  P.,  India:  A  Modern  History,  Brown, 
\\  .  N.,  The  United  States  and  India  and  Pakistan,  Nehru,  J.,  The  Dis- 
covery of  India,  Forster,  E.  M.,  A  Passage  to  India,  deBary,  W.  T.,  et  al, 
Sources  of  the  Indian  Tradition,  Markandaya,  K.,  Nectar  in  a  Sieve. 

History  6-7.  Introduction  to  Asian  Civilizations.  Four  hours.  History 
6  and  History  7  may  be  combined  to  form  a  major  course. 

MATHEMATICS 

The  courses  in  mathematics  have  two  purposes.  The  first  is  to  give  the 
student  at  each  level  an  appreciation  of  the  mathematical  structure  and 
thus  of  the  essential  aesthetic  quality  of  the  mathematical  field  in  which 
he  is  working.  The  second  but  equally  important  purpose  is  to  assure  a  boy 
a  command  of  the  appropriate  technical  skills  without  which  he  cannot  go 
on  in  higher  courses  in  school  or  college.  Each  year  constant  and  consistent 
problem  work  helps  to  make  concrete  the  abstract  ideas  of  mathematics. 
Each  year  an  attempt  is  made  to  give  the  student  an  idea  of  the  way  in 
which  mathematical  ideas  grow  by  repeated  abstraction  and  generalization 
from  the  physical  phenomena  with  which  he  is  familiar. 

Thus  the  study  of  algebra  begins  with  the  properties  of  the  natural 
numbers  of  arithmetic  and  progresses  to  the  study  of  the  integers,  the 
rational  numbers,  the  irrational  numbers  and  an  introduction  to  the  real 
and  complex  numbers.  An  introduction  to  the  concept  of  proof  in  simple 
algebraic  and  geometric  situations  is  made  early  in  the  first  two  years, 
l  ater  these  ideas  are  sharpened  and  extended  in  both  fields.  A  basic  con- 
cern with  relations  and  functions  of  numbers  paves  the  way  for  a  system- 
atic study  in  the  last  two  years  of  a  variety  of  continuous  and  discretx 
functions. 

Resides  its  regular  sequence  of  courses  the  Department  provides  ac- 
celerated and  advanced  courses  for  those  boys  able  and  willing  to  mov< 
faster  than  normal. 

Mathematics  1.  First  Year  Algebra.  Five  hours.  The  course  pro 
vides  an  intensive  study  of  the  procedures  of  elementary  algebra  througl 
the  solution  of  quadratic  equations.  Texts:  Johnson,  Lendsey  and  Slesnick' 
Modern  Algebra,  First  Course  ( Addison- Wesley ) . 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES 


65 


Mathematics  1A.  Five  hours.  A  course  for  boys  who  have  had 
pproximately  a  half  year  of  algebra  in  the  eighth  grade.  At  the  end  of 
he  fall  term,  qualified  boys  are  invited  into  the  newly  formed  sections  of 
/lathematics  IX.  Texts  are  the  same  as  those  in  Mathematics  1. 

Mathematics  IX.  Five  hours.  A  course  for  very  able  students  who 
vish  to  begin  an  accelerated  program  in  mathematics.  It  is  formed  at  the 
nd  of  the  fall  term  of  boys  in  Mathematics  1A.  If  followed  by  Mathe- 
natics  2X,  it  enables  a  student  to  enter  Mathematics  4  in  his  third  year. 
V  major  portion  of  geometry  will  be  covered.  Texts  are  the  same  as  those 
n  Mathematics  1  and  2. 

Mathematics  2  Special.  Five  hours.  A  course  designed  for  Juniors 
nd  those  entering  Lower  Middlers  who  have  had  a  full  year  of  algebra  but 
lave  not  covered  well  enough  such  topics  as  inequalities,  the  postulates 
nd  elementary  structure  of  algebra,  number  systems,  etc.,  to  be  fully 
eady  for  Mathematics  2.  After  special  review  in  such  phases  of  algebra, 
he  course  undertakes  the  regular  work  of  Mathematics  2,  completing  it 
by  the  end  of  the  year.  Texts  used  will  be  the  same  as  those  in  Mathematics 

and  2. 

Mathematics  2.  Geometry.  Four  hours.  This  course  covers  a  pro- 
;ram  of  plane  geometry  using  both  synthetic  and  analytic  methods. 
)uring  the  work  with  plane  geometry,  the  natural  extensions  to  solid 
;eometry  are  made.  At  the  end  of  the  year  the  student  will  have  a  knowl- 
edge of  methods  of  proof  and  of  geometrical  facts  and  concepts  in  both 
wo  and  three  dimensions.  Text:  Moise,  Down's  Geometry  ( Addison -Wes- 
ey). 

Mathematics  2XA.  Five  hours.  The  prerequisite  for  the  course  is 
vlathematics  IX.  Work  in  geometry  is  continued  and  that  of  Mathematics 
J  is  undertaken.  Students  who  finish  the  course  satisfactorily  are  in  gen- 
•ral  required  to  take  one  more  year  of  mathematics  (usually  Mathematics 
I,  in  rare  cases  Mathematics  4C)  to  fulfill  the  school's  diploma  require- 
ment. Texts  used  are  those  of  Mathematics  2  and  3. 

Mathematics  2XB.  Five  hours.  An  accelerated  course  enabling  a 
ooy  starting  in  Mathematics  1  to  have  an  opportunity  to  take  the  calculus 
without  sacrificing  the  work  in  Probability  and  Linear  Algebra  of  Mathe- 
matics 4.  With  Mathematics  4X  it  provides  a  sequence  that  by  the  end 
of  the  Upper  Middle  Year  completes  Mathematics  2,  3,  and  4.  Mathe- 
matics 2XB  is  also  open  to  selected  students  entering  the  school  as  Lower 
Middlers.  Students  who  successfully  complete  both  Mathematics  2XB 
and  Mathematics  4X  are  prepared  to  take  Mathematics  5  or  some  other 
elective  in  their  Senior  Year.  The  texts  are  those  of  Mathematics  2  and  3. 

Mathematics  3.  Five  hours.  Algebraic  analysis  and  elementary  trigo- 
nometry. The  course  continues  the  work  in  the  algebra  of  real  numbers 
begun  in  Mathematics  1.  It  extends  and  develops  the  ideas  of  mathe- 
matical structure  and  methods  of  proof  met  in  Mathematics  2.  It  empha- 


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PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


sizes  the  study  of  the  elementary  functions:  algebraic,  exponential,  loga- 
rithmic  and  trigonometric.  It  also  covers  the  elements  of  analytic  trigo- 
nometry. Texts:  Vance's  Modern  Algebra  and  Trigonometry  (Addison- 
Weslcy). 

Mathematics  3G.  Five  hours.  A  course  in  geometry  for  entering 
students  who  have  had  two  years  of  algebra.  The  course  strengthens  the 
student's  background  in  algebraic  analysis  and  in  trigonometry  to  cor- 
respond to  the  work  done  in  Mathematics  3.  The  texts  are  those  of 
Mathematics  2  and  3. 

Mathematics  4.  Five  hours.  The  regular  senior  course  in  Mathe- 
matics. It  will  consist  of  work  in  elementary  probability  and  statis- 
tics, linear  algebra,  and  limits  of  simple  series  and  sequences.  Besides  open- 
ing up  fields  of  mathematics  increasingly  important  for  industrialists  and 
social  scientists,  the  course  will  increase  a  boy's  mathematical  maturity 
and  will  lay  a  strong  foundation  for  study  of  the  calculus  in  college  or  in 
Mathematics  5.  Entering  students  who  have  not  had  trigonometry  will 
be  placed  in  a  special  section.  Texts:  Mosteller,  Rourke  and  Thomas'  Prob- 
ability (Addison- Wesley) ;  Kelley's  Algebra:  A  Modern  Introduction 
(Van  Nostrand). 

Mathematics  4C.  Five  hours.  A  course  in  analytic  geometry  and 
the  calculus  open  to  selected  students  who  have  finished  Mathematics 
3  or  3G  and  for  whom  an  early  start  in  calculus  is  justified  by  their 
need  for  it  in  their  study  of  physics  and  chemistry.  The  course  will  move 
somewhat  more  slowly  than  Mathematics  5  because  of  the  lower  mathe- 
matical background  of  its  students,  but  by  the  end  of  the  year,  most  of 
the  boys  should  be  ready  for  the  Advanced  Placement  Examination  in 
the  Calculus.  Text:  Protter,  Morrey's  Calculus  and  Analytic  Geometry 
(Addison-Wesley). 

Mathematics  4X.  For  details  of  the  course  see  the  description  of 
Mathematics  2XB  above.  Completion  of  Mathematics  4X  meets  the  college 
requirements  for  four  units  of  mathematics. 

Mathematics  5.  Calculus  With  Analytic  Geometry.  Four  hours. 
The  course  corresponds  to  the  introductory  course  in  calculus  given  in 
many  colleges  and  universities.  It  is  open  to  those  who  have  completed 
the  regular  four-unit  sequence  in  secondary  school  mathematics.  Com- 
pletion of  the  course  offers  a  student  the  opportunity  to  qualify  for  ad- 
vanced placement  in  college  mathematics.  Text:  Thomas*  Calculus  and 
Analytic  Geometry  (Addison-Wesley). 

Mathematics  6.  Introduction  to  Algebraic  Structures  and  Ele- 
mintary  Analysis.  Four  hours.  A  course  for  boys  who  have  completed 
a  year  of  calculus.  It  is  designed  to  give  students  a  deeper  understanding  oi 
the  basic  concepts  of  elementary  calculus,  an  introduction  to  moderr 
algebra,  and  a  background  in  those  topics  of  linear  algebra  useful  in  ad- 
vanced calculus.  Texts:  McCoy's  Introduction  to  Modern  Algebra  (Allyr 
and  Bacon),  Goldberg's  Methods  of  Real  Analysis  (Blaisdell). 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES 


67 


Mathematics  L.  An  Introduction  to  Modern  Algebra.  Two 
ours.  An  elective  course  open  to  Seniors  who  have  finished  at  least  three 
sars  of  mathematics.  It  may  be  taken  simultaneously  with  either  Mathe- 
latics  4,  4C  or  5,  since  it  does  not  duplicate,  but  supplements,  the  work 
one  in  those  courses.  The  purpose  of  the  course  is  to  provide  an  introduc- 
on  to  systematic  development  of  algebraic  structures  that  include  groups, 
ngs,  fields,  and  vector  spaces;  and  to  study  those  topics  most  useful  in 
le  applications  of  Modern  Algebra  to  other  branches  of  mathematics, 
ext:  McCoy's  Introduction  to  Modern  Algebra  (Allyn  and  Bacon). 

Mathematics  C.  Programming  and  Use  of  a  Computer.  Two  hours, 
n  introduction  to  the  use  of  computers  in  mathematics,  science,  engi- 
eering,  medicine,  business,  and  other  fields.  A  study  of  what  the  computer 
in  and  cannot  do.  The  course  is  both  theoretical  and  practical.  Programs 
ritten  by  the  student  may  be  tried  on  a  large-scale  computer  available  at 
1  times  through  a  teletype  machine  located  in  the  classroom.  The  course 
ill  also  consider  elementary  machine  language  and  simple  compiling 
nguages. 

MECHANICAL  DRAWING 

Two  hours.  A  technical  drawing  course,  which  includes  the  use  of 
rawing  instruments  and  the  study  of  geometric  constructions,  ortho- 
raphic  projection,  descriptive  geometry,  spacial  relations,  isometric  and 
blique  pictorial  projections,  developments,  assembly  and  detail  engi- 
eering  drawings.  Special  stress  is  placed  on  a  thorough  mastery  of  funda- 
lental  concepts  and  skills.  Students  of  special  ability  are  given  an  oppor- 
anity  to  do  more  advanced  work  in  a  related  field  of  their  choice.  The 
;xt  is  French  and  Vierck's  Graphic  Science,  supplemented  by  motion 
ictures. 

MODERN  FOREIGN  LANGUAGES 

All  foreign  languages  offered  by  Phillips  Academy  are  acceptable  for 
dmission  to  college.  For  graduate  study,  and  particularly  for  the  Ph.D. 
egree,  French  and  German  are  frequently  required. 

Ihinese 

Chinese  1A.  Four  hours.  Open  to  Upper  Middlers  who  will  be  ex- 
acted to  continue  with  Chinese  2A  in  the  Senior  year.  The  program 
ioes  not  require  summer  study  (see  Chinese  2  below),  but  such  study 
nay  be  encouraged,  particularly  following  the  Senior  year.  The  combined 
Chinese  1A  and  2 A,  devoted  to  both  the  oral  and  the  written  language, 
Prepare  for  advanced  work  at  the  college  level. 

Chinese  2.  Four  hours.  Open  to  Seniors  who  have  successfully  com- 
pleted Chinese  1A  or  the  eight-week  summer  course  of  Chinese  Language 
!  Chinese  1)  at  the  Institute  of  Asian  Studies  for  College  Preparatory  Stu- 
lents.  The  Institute,  of  which  Phillips  Academy  is  an  Associated  Member, 


68 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


holdfl  its  summer  session  at  Thayer  Academy,  Braintree,  Massachuset 
Chinese  2  works  toward  increased  mastery  of  the  written  and  oral  language 
in  preparation  for  advanced  work  at  the  college  level. 

French 

The  French  Department  offers  a  six-year  course  of  study.  The  first 
four  are  devoted  to  teaching  the  students  to  understand  and  to  speak  the 
language  as  well  as  to  read  and  write  it.  The  methods  employed  parallel 
as  closely  as  possible  the  natural  order  of  language  learning:  hear  it  first 
then  say  what  you  have  heard,  next  read  and,  finally,  write.  Pronunciation 
articulation,  rhythm  and  fluency  receive  constant  emphasis  throughout 
each  year.  At  no  time  does  the  Department  teach  the  art  of  translation 
French  is  used  exclusively  in  the  classroom,  at  all  times  and  under  al 
circumstances,  and  from  the  very  first  day.  In  the  fifth  year,  students  tak< 
a  Freshman-level  course,  a  survey  of  French  literature  and  the  study  o 
key  writings  from  French  classical  authors,  in  preparation  for  the  Ad 
vanced  Placement  examination. 

Students  who  demonstrate  unusual  aptitude  for  and  interest  in  th 
language  during  their  first  term  of  study  are  invited  to  enter  special  "X 
sections  which  move  ahead  more  rapidly  without  demanding  more  time 
Those  who  successfully  complete  this  accelerated  course  of  study  re 
ceive  four  units  of  credit  after  three  years  of  study.  There  is  also  a  specie 
fourth-year  class  for  gifted  students  which  prepares  for  Advanced  Place 
ment.  Thus  certain  students  are  able  to  do  college-level  work  after  on! 
three,  and  sometimes  only  two,  years  of  study. 

French  1 .  Seven  hours.  For  the  first  half  year,  the  course  has  no  book 
Then,  Robin  &  Bergeaud,  Le  Francais  par  la  methode  directe  is  uset 
Classes,  limited  to  15,  meet  seven  times  a  week,  with  two  different  ii 
structors,  and  are  expected  to  spend  two  hours  a  week  working  wit 
records  and  tapes.  The  goal  is  to  acquire  listening  comprehension  and  tl 
basic  patterns  of  French  speech.  The  method  is  the  adaptation  of  FLI 
methods  to  older  students. 

French  1-2.  Five  hours.  For  new  boys  who  do  not  qualify  f 
French  2,  yet  who  have  too  much  French  to  start  again  at  the  beginnin 
At  the  end  of  the  first  term,  those  who  find  the  pace  too  swift  drop  ba( 
to  French  1A.  Those  who  successfully  complete  the  course  enter  Fren< 
3  the  following  year.  Texts:  Mauger,  Cours  de  langue  et  de  civilisath 
francaises,  Book  I,  and  the  Anthologie,  a  collection  of  French  stories,  bo 
past  and  contemporary,  which  has  been  compiled  by  the  members  of  t 
Department. 

French  1-2  S.  Six  hours.  Restricted  to  Seniors  who  have  not  previous 
studied  the  language.  The  course  covers  the  work  of  the  first  two  years 
the  normal  sequence. 

French  1A.  Five  hours.  For  new  boys  whose  knowledge  of  Fren 
is  too  slight  to  qualify  for  admission  to  French  1-2,  yet  who  have  had  t 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES 


69 


auch  to  start  over  again.  The  course  emphasizes  development  of  the 
ural-oral  skills  and  prepares  for  French  2A  the  next  year. 

French  2.  Five  hours.  While  continuing  to  develop  the  audio-lingual 
kills,  the  aim  in  the  second  year  is  to  teach  reading,  to  develop  the  ability 
o  understand  non-technical  French  prose  without  recourse  to  translation, 
iesides  the  X  sections  for  the  most  able,  there  are  regular  sections  for 
hose  who  have  begun  their  French  at  Andover;  "A"  sections  for  those 
/ho  come  from  other  schools  but  have  been  taught  by  audio-lingual 
echniques,  and  also  for  those  who  have  completed  French  1A;  and 
B"  sections  for  new  students  who  have  had  enough  French  to  qualify  for 

second-year  course,  but  who  have  been  taught  by  grammatical-transla- 
ion  methods.  Texts:  Couture,  Le  Frangais  Vivant,  Book  II;  Anthologie. 

French  3.  Four  hours.  Continuing  to  develop  the  three  skills  of 
stening  comprehension,  speaking  and  reading,  the  third-year  course  also 
:resses  writing  and  the  beginnings  of  reading  for  critical  analysis.  Texts: 
angellier,  Precis  de  Grammaire;  Pagnol,  Topaze;  Aveline,  La  Double - 
lort  de  Frederic  Belot;  Gide,  La  Symphonie  pastorale. 

French  4.  Four  hours.  Primarily  a  course  in  language,  French  4  intro- 
uces  the  student,  through  readings  in  Book  IV  of  Mauger  and  complete 
iitions  of  standard  French  authors,  to  contemporary  French  culture  as 
rell  as  to  its  literature  from  La  Chanson  de  Roland  to  Sartre. 

French  5.  Five  hours.  The  course  prepares  for  Advanced  Placement, 
'here  are  two-hour  minor  courses  in  French  for  those  whose  study  pro- 
rams  do  not  permit  a  major  course:  French  3 -Minor  for  those  with  two 
nits  of  credit;  French  4-Minor  for  those  with  three;  and  French  5- 
Iinor  for  those  with  four.  There  is  also  a  seminar  course,  both  four-  and 
wo-hours,  French  6,  for  those  who  have  successfully  completed  the  Ad- 
anced  Placement  courses  (French  4H  or  5-Major).  Those  who  are  in  it 
rrange  a  special  tutorial  program  with  a  member  of  the  Department. 

Senior  French  Project.  Seniors  taking  an  advanced  French  course 
lay  do  apprentice  teaching  during  either  the  Winter  or  Spring  term.  They 
tudy  the  techniques  and  methods  of  modern  language  instruction;  and 
ractice,  under  careful  supervision,  in  beginners'  classes. 

German 

The  German  Department  offers  a  five-year  course  with  the  purpose  of 
leveloping  the  ability  to  understand  spoken  German,  facility  in  speaking, 
eading  fluency,  the  ability  to  write  German  correctly.  The  more  advanced 
ourses  also  give  an  introduction  to  German  literature  since  the  eighteenth 
entury. 

From  the  first  meeting,  all  classes  are  conducted  in  German.  English  is 
lever  used  as  the  classroom  language. 

The  Department  offers  an  accelerated  course  for  students  who  show 
musual  ability  in  German  1.  After  completion  of  German  2X,  these 


70 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


students  enter  German  4  and  receive  four  units  of  credit  after  three  years 
of  study. 

GERMAN  1.  Five  hours.  The  beginning  course  seeks  to  develop  aural 
comprehension  and  oral  expression.  The  basic  patterns  of  the  language 
are  practiced  by  repetition  and  variation.  Texts:  Schulz-Griesbach, 
Deutsche  Sprachlehre  fur  Auslander  (Grundstufe) ;  Schulz-Griesbach, 
Lesebeft  fur  Auslander. 

German  1-2.  Six  hours.  The  course  is  designed  for  qualified  Seniors 
and  Upper  Middlers  who  wish  to  complete  in  one  year  the  material  covered 
in  German  1  and  2.  It  follows  approximately  the  outline  of  those  two 

courses. 

German  2.  Five  hours.  The  systematic  study  of  basic  patterns  is 
continued  with  Schulz-Griesbach,  Deutsche  Sprachlehre  fiir  Auslander. 
Both  close  and  comprehensive  reading  of  modern  German  prose  is  prac- 
ticed extensively.  Elementary  writing  is  introduced  at  this  level,  mostly 
in  the  form  of  summaries  of  the  reading  material.  Some  of  the  books  read 
include  Kessler,  Kurze  Geschichten;  House  and  Malthaner,  Helles  und 
Dunkles;  Schnitzler,  Der  blinde  Geronimo. 

German  2X.  Five  hours.  An  accelerated  course  for  qualified  stu- 
dents, covering  material  of  both  German  2  and  German  3.  Successful 
completion  enables  a  student  to  enter  German  4,  but  gives  only  the  same 
unit  credit  as  German  2. 

German  3.  Four  hours.  Throughout  the  year  grammar  is  reviewed 
in  Schulz-Sundermeyer,  Deutsche  Sprachlehre  fiir  Auslander.  The  follow- 
ing texts  are  read:  Durrenmatt,  Der  Richter  und  sein  Henker;  Aichinger, 
Der  Gefesselte;  Borchert,  Draussen  vor  der  Tiir  und  Ausgewahlte  Erzah- 
lungen.  Emphasis  is  placed  on  comprehension,  vocabulary  building,  and 
written  work. 

German  4.  Five  hours.  Introduction  to  German  literature.  Through 
detailed  stylistic  analysis  of  a  number  of  outstanding  works,  the  students 
gam  an  acquaintance  with  some  of  the  major  authors  and  most  significant 
trends  in  German  literature  since  1750.  The  works  read  include  Lessing, 
Nathan  der  Weise;  Goethe,  Werther,  Urfaust  and  Iphigenie;  Schiller, 
Maria  Stuart;  Eichendorff,  Aus  dem  Leben  eines  Taugenichts;  Heine, 
Ausgewahlte  Gedichte;  Keller,  Kleider  Machen  Leute;  Rilke,  Ausgewahlte 
Gedichte;  Mann,  Tonio  Kroger;  Kafka,  Das  Urteil  and  Vor  dem  Gesetz. 
Qualified  students  take  the  Advanced  Placement  Examination  at  the  end 
of  the  course. 

German  5.  Four  hours.  Contents  vary  according  to  the  needs  and 
interests  of  the  students.  Probable  texts:  Steinhauer,  Deutsche  Kultur; 
Neuse,  Deutscher  Sprachgebrauch. 

German  S.  Two  hours.  For  Seniors  who  wish  to  continue  German  as 
a  minor  subject.  Contents  vary  according  to  the  needs  of  the  students. 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES 


71 


Russian 

The  courses  in  Russian  develop  skill  in  speaking,  aural  comprehension, 
reading,  and  writing.  The  structure  of  the  language  is  explained  system- 
atically. 

Russian  1.  Five  hours.  An  elementary  course  in  speaking,  reading,  and 
writing  Russian.  Texts:  von  Gronicka,  Essentials  of  Russian,  Fourth  edi- 
tion (Prentice-Hall) ;  Dawson  et  al.,  Modern  Russian  1  (Harcourt) ; 
Graded  Russian  Readers  (Heath).  Coordinated  drill  with  tapes  in  the 
language  laboratory.  Open  to  Juniors,  Lower  Middlers,  and  Upper 
Middlers. 

Russian  1-2.  Six  hours.  An  accelerated  elementary  course,  presenting 
the  principal  features  of  Russian  in  one  year,  with  intensive  practice  in 
speaking,  reading,  and  writing.  Texts:  von  Gronicka,  Essentials  of  Russian, 
Fourth  edition  (Prentice-Hall);  Graded  Russian  Readers  (Heath).  Co- 
ordinated drill  in  the  language  laboratory.  Open  to  Seniors  and,  with  the 
approval  of  Class  Officers,  to  Upper  Middlers  with  a  satisfactory  record 
in  another  foreign  language. 

Russian  2.  Five  hours.  Completion  of  the  elementary  course,  with  con- 
tinued emphasis  on  active  use.  Texts:  von  Gronicka,  Essentials  of  Russian, 
Fourth  edition  (Prentice-Hall) ;  Dawson  et  al.,  Modern  Russian  11  (Har- 
court) ;  Katzner,  A  Russian  Review  Text  (Random  House) ;  Graded  Rus- 
sian Readers  (Heath). 

Russian  3.  Four  hours.  Reading,  conversation,  and  writing,  based  on  a 
variety  of  authors.  The  texts  include:  ALM  Russian,  Level  Four  (Har- 
court) ;  Ballad  of  a  Soldier  (Harcourt) ;  Katzner,  A  Russian  Review  Text 
(Random  House) ;  and  selected  literary  editions. 

Russian  4.  Four  hours.  Advanced  reading,  conversation,  and  composi- 
tion. The  texts  include  Turkevich,  Masterpieces  of  Russian  Literature 
(Van  Nostrand). 

Spanish 

The  Department  of  Spanish  offers  a  regular  sequence,  normally  of  four 
years,  but  able  students,  by  accelerating,  may  take  five  courses.  The  aim  is 
to  teach  the  students  to  understand  the  language  and  to  speak  it  fluently. 
Spanish  is  used  constantly  in  the  classroom.  The  students  are  also  taught 
to  read  and  write  the  language  with  ease,  and  are  given  a  comprehensive 
introduction  to  the  literature  of  Spain  and  South  America. 

Spanish  1.  Five  hours.  In  keeping  with  the  new  audio-lingual 
approach,  this  course  stresses  understanding  and  speaking  the  Spanish 
language,  with  a  minimum  of  English  used  in  the  classroom.  The  Holt 
series,  beginning  with  Entender  y  Hablar,  by  LaGrone,  McHenry  and 
O'Connor,  provides  the  basic  texts.  They  are  supplemented  by  language 


72 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


laboratory  practice  and  other  audio-visual  materials.  Reading  and  writing 
are  introduced  after  the  student  has  acquired  considerable  oral  fluency. 

SPANISH  1-2.  Six  hours.  Designed  for  qualified  seniors  who  wish  to 
complete  in  one  year  the  material  covered  in  Spanish  1  and  2.  Texts: 
Entender  y  Hablar  and  Hablar  y  Leer,  both  by  LaGrone,  McHenry  and 
O'Connor  (Holt,  Rinehart  and  Winston),  and  El  Gesticulador  by  Usigli 
( Appleton-Century-Crof  ts) . 

Spanish  2.  Five  hours.  A  continuation  course  that  emphasizes  speak- 
ing, reading,  simple  theme  writing  and  vocabulary  building,  including  the 
use  of  synonyms  and  antonyms.  Oral  fluency  is  stressed,  in  accordance 
with  the  principles  of  the  audio-lingual  method.  The  basic  text  is  the 
second  book  of  the  Holt  Series,  Hablar  y  Leer,  by  LaGrone,  McHenry  and 
O'Connor.  Ample  language  laboratory  practice  and  audio-visual  materials 
reinforce  classroom  procedures. 

Spanish  2X.  Five  hours.  Open  to  students  who  have  completed  Spanish 
1  with  honors.  It  covers  the  equivalent  of  the  material  of  Spanish  2  and 
Spanish  3.  Successful  completion  enables  a  student  to  enter  Spanish  4  but 
gives  only  the  same  unit  credit  as  Spanish  2.  Texts,  supplemented  by  addi- 
tional reading,  include:  Espaiia  y  su  Civilization,  by  Ugarte  (Odyssey); 
PcHsativa,  by  Goytortua  ( Appleton-Century-Crof  ts) ;  and  Pepita 
Jimenez,  by  Valera  (Macmillan). 

Spanish  3.  Four  hours.  An  advanced  course,  which  continues  to  de- 
velop oral  and  aural  skills  as  well  as  facility  in  written  composition.  Texts 
(supplemented  by  additional  reading)  Gramdtica  Espanola  de  Repaso,  by 
Ugarte  (Odyssey);  Pensativa,  by  Goytortua  ( Appleton-Century-Crofts) ; 
Sombrero  de  Tres  Picos,  by  Alarcon  (Macmillan) ;  and  Leer,  Hablar  y 
Escribir,  by  Keese,  LaGrone  and  O'Connor  (Holt,  Rinehart  and  Winston). 

Spanish  4.  Four  hours.  The  course  aims  to  develop  an  appreciation 
of  Spanish  culture  through  the  centuries  in  the  entire  Hispanic  world. 
It  presupposes  a  rather  extensive  knowledge  of  grammar  and  vocabulary 
and  a  fairly  fluent  conversational  ability.  Constant  use  of  the  Spanish 
language  in  the  classroom  discussions  and  written  assignments  is  required. 
Frequent  reference  is  made  to  all  available  types  of  illustrative  material 
or  "reaha."  The  basic  texts  are  Ugarte's  Panorama  de  la  Civilizacion 
Espanola  (Odyssey)  and  del  Rio's  Del  Solar  Hispdnico  (Dryden)  for  cul- 
tural and  historical  background,  as  well  as  grammatical  review.  Among 
the  literary  works  read  in  the  course  are  La  Barraca,  by  Blasco  Ibanez 
(Macmillan)  and  Las  Lanzas  Coloradas,  by  Uslar  Pietri  (Norton),  as  well 
as  novels,  plays  and  essays  found  in  such  collections  as  Biblioteca  Cldsica 
Ebro.  The  study  of  poetry  is  introduced  through  the  reading  and  discus- 
sion of  selections  from  Poesia  Espanola,  by  Marin  (Las  Americas  Publish- 
ing Company). 

Spanish  5.  Five  hours.  A  course  for  students  who  have  had  four  yean 
of  Spanish  or  its  equivalent.  The  course,  conducted  entirely  in  Spanish 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES 


73 


concentrates  upon  various  periods  and  genres  of  Spanish  and  Spanish 
American  Literature,  such  as  Las  novelas  ejemplares  by  Cervantes,  the 
Golden  Age  Drama,  the  Novel,  Contemporary  Drama,  etc.  Outside  read- 
ing and  written  and  oral  reports  are  required.  Texts  include  Poesia  Espan- 
ola,  by  Marin  (Las  Americas  Publishing  Company) ;  Plays  by  Calderon, 
Lope  de  Vega,  Tirso  de  Molina;  Dona  Per  feet  a,  by  Goldos  (The  Laurel 
Language  Library) ;  La  familia  de  Pasctial  Duarte,  by  Camilo  Jose  Cela, 
edited  by  Boudreau  and  Kronit  (Appleton,  Century,  Crofts). 

Spanish  M.  Two  hours.  A  minor  course  open  chiefly  to  seniors  who 
have  had  three  years  of  Spanish.  It  is  designed  to  keep  them  in  contact 
with  the  language  before  they  continue  its  study  in  college,  and  is  con- 
ducted entirely  in  Spanish.  The  basic  texts  are  Ugarte's  Gra-mdtica 
Espanola  de  Repaso  (Odyssey) ;  and  El  Sombrero  de  Tres  Picos,  by  Alar- 
con  (Macmillan). 

MUSIC 

The  aims  of  the  Music  Department  are  to  provide  every  student  with 
a  valuable  experience  in  music  and  to  give  him  an  understanding  of 
ihe  art.  Its  aims  are  achieved  by  the  study  of  theory  and  by  active  par- 
ticipation in  music  making:  individual  lessons,  recitals,  group  rehearsals, 
formal  and  informal  concerts,  and  one  operetta  or  musical  comedy  pre- 
sented each  year. 

Chorus,  Concert  Band,  Orchestra.  Each  of  these  is  a  minor  course 
not  requiring  outside  preparation  but  counting  for  two  hours  of  aca- 
demic credit.  Each  course  meets  four  periods  a  week:  two  afternoons  at 
4:13  and  two  evenings  between  6:45  and  7:45.  Upper  Middlers  may  take 
any  one  of  these  courses  in  fulfillment  of  the  diploma  requirement  in 
Music  or  Art.  Volunteers,  not  enrolled  in  the  courses  for  credit,  may  join 
the  sessions  of  such  courses  as  an  extracurricular  activity. 

Introduction  to  Music.  Two  hours.  The  purpose  of  the  course  is 
to  help  students  gain  understanding  and  enjoyment  of  various  forms  of 
music.  It  presents  aspects  of  the  development  of  musical  thought,  in- 
cluding examples  of  folk  music  and  the  music  of  the  baroque,  romantic, 
classical,  and  modern  schools,  including  jazz.  The  subject  matter  is  il- 
lustrated with  recordings  and  live  demonstrations. 

Harmony.  Two  hours.  The  course  equips  the  student  with  a  knowl- 
edge of  basic  harmonic  structure,  and  enables  him  to  harmonize  a  melodic 
line  in  traditional  four-part  fashion.  An  ability  to  read  music  is  a  prereq- 
uisite for  the  course.  Open  to  Seniors  only. 

Private  Instrumental  and  Vocal  Lessons.  Two  hours.  Weekly 
instruction  in  keyboard,  orchestral,  and  band  instruments,  or  in  voice, 
may  be  counted  as  a  two-hour  course.  One  half  hour  of  instruction  is 
to  be  supplemented  by  four  hours  of  practicing.  For  advanced  students 
arrangements  can  be  made  for  a  pupil  to  study  in  Boston  with  a  pri- 


74 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


v  iic  instructor.  For  piano  and  organ  students  there  is  a  separate  charge 
of  $140  a  year  for  weekly  half-hour  lessons,  and  $225  for  weekly  hour 
lessons,  plus  a  nominal  fee  for  the  use  of  practice  pianos  and  organs.  The 
charge  for  voice  lessons  is  $105  a  year  for  weekly  half -hour  lessons.  Lessons 
.uc  offered  on  all  band  and  orchestral  instruments  at  $105  a  year.  Active 
members  of  the  Band  and  Orchestra  receive  instruction  at  a  reduced  rate. 

Music  Major.  Four  hours,  which  may  be  gained  by  the  combination 
of  any  two  music  courses,  except  that  the  Orchestra,  Chorus,  and  Con- 
cert Band  courses  may  not  be  so  combined. 

Beginner's  Band.  Any  student  who  wishes  to  learn  to  play  a  brass, 
woodwind,  or  percussion  instrument  will  be  lent  an  instrument  and 
may  receive  group  instruction  in  the  Beginners'  Band,  at  no  expense  to 
the  student.  It  is  assumed  that  members  of  this  group  are  interested  in 
eventually  joining  the  advanced  Band  groups. 

NAVIGATION 

Two  hours.  The  course  consists  of  a  term's  work  in  each  of  the  fields 
of  piloting,  nautical  astronomy,  and  celestial  navigation.  Emphasis  is 
placed  on  the  practical  application  to  surface  navigation.  Considerable 
plotting  and  tabular  work  is  done  in  determining  a  ship's  position  both 
within  sight  of  land  and  on  the  open  sea.  During  the  latter  part  of  thei 
year  the  opportunity  to  cruise  may  be  offered  to  members  of  the  class.  The! 
textbook  used  is  Dutton's  Navigation  and  Nautical  Astronomy,  supple- 
mented by  Navy  and  Coast  Guard  films. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Two  hours.  The  course  offers  a  study  of  a  few  central  problems  of 
metaphysics.  The  interdependence  of  metaphysical  views  and  ethical  and 
political  attitudes  is  stressed,  though  the  study  of  ethics  and  politics  h 
not  pursued  so  intensively  as  that  of  metaphysics.  Much  of  the  reading 
of  the  fall  term  is  in  Plato;  thereafter,  the  chief  text  is  Joad's  Guide  t( 
Philosophy  and  Metaphysics.  During  the  latter  part  of  the  spring  tern 
it  is  customary  to  study  all,  or  part,  of  a  book  by  a  recent  or  contemporarj 
philosopher:  for  example,  Santayana,  Whitehead,  Langer.  The  final  as 
signment  is  a  paper  requiring  the  student  to  attempt  a  synthesis  of  hi 
views  on  some  of  the  chief  problems  explored  in  the  course,  throughou 
which  the  fundamentals  of  logic  are  strongly  emphasized. 

PHYSICS  (See  Science) 
POLITICS  OF  INTERNATIONAL  RELATIONS  (See  History 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES 


75 


PUBLIC  SPEAKING 

Two  hours.  An  elective  course  for  Seniors  and  (occasionally)  for 
Upper  Middlers.  It  provides  training  in  voice  production,  articulation,  and 
speech  making.  Impromptu  and  prepared  speeches  help  the  student  to 
develop  poise,  fluency,  and  force.  Two  texts  are  used  for  reference: 
Turner's  Voice  and  Speech  in  the  Theatre  (Sir  Isaac  Pitman  &  Sons,  Ltd., 
London)  and  Sarret  and  Foster's  Basic  Principles  of  Speech  (Houghton 
Mifflin). 

RELIGION 

The  study  of  religion  at  Phillips  Academy  is  intended  to  help  students 
gain  an  understanding  of  the  Judaeo-Christian  heritage,  and  to  develop 
the  capacity  to  relate  man's  religious  insights  to  the  problems  of  everyday 
living.  A  knowledge  of  how  to  read  the  Bible  is  valuable  in  its  own  right, 
and  familiarity  with  its  contents  is  indispensable  for  appreciation  of  much 
of  art,  music,  history,  and  literature.  Acquaintance  with  the  basic  con- 
cepts of  other  religions  adds  perspective  to  the  understanding  of  one's 
own  and  deepens  the  sense  of  the  importance  of  beliefs,  attitudes,  and 
values  in  various  aspects  of  one's  personal  and  social  life. 

Bible.  Two  hours.  Required  of  all  members  of  the  Lower  Middle 
class,  the  course  traces  the  development  of  the  basic  religious  concepts  of 
the  Old  and  New  Testaments.  It  acquaints  students  with  many  of  the 
finest  passages  of  the  Bible,  with  its  outstanding  personalities,  with  the 
individual  books  and  their  messages,  and  with  a  sense  of  the  progressive 
discovery  and  revelation  of  religious  truth. 

Senior  Religion.  Four  hours.  An  elective  course  for  Seniors.  It  in- 
cludes a  term's  study  of  some  of  the  living  religions  of  the  world  and 
their  sacred  writings.  A  second  term's  work  involves  the  study  and  dis- 
cussion of  certain  basic  religious  problems  and  of  various  attitudes  toward 
the  meaning  of  life  as  they  are  reflected  in  a  number  of  contemporary 
plays  and  novels.  A  third  term  is  devoted  to  an  investigation  of  Christian 
teaching,  through  New  Testament  writings  and  the  work  of  a  number  of 
contemporary  philosophers  and  theologians. 

SCIENCE 

Beginning  with  Elementary  Science,  a  student  may  pursue  a  four-year 
sequence  of  courses  in  science.  The  departments  aim  to  provide  the  stu- 
dent with  an  understanding  of  science  and  of  scientific  methods  and  think- 
ing as  a  necessary  part  of  his  general  education.  At  the  same  time,  the 
subjects  are  covered  with  sufficient  thoroughness  to  test  his  capacity  and 
interest  and  to  provide  a  sound  foundation  for  later  work  in  college, 
should  his  experience  indicate  the  desirability  of  such  work. 

Courses  designated  by  the  letter  X  are  more  difficult  than  the  regular 
ones,  and  admission  is  granted  only  to  selected  students.  These  courses 


76 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


meet  for  one  additional  class  each  week  and  use  texts  of  the  college  fresh- 
man level.  They  thereby  prepare  in  one  year  for  the  advanced  placement 
examinations,  and  consequently  for  advanced  standing  in  college.  Science 
1  lonors  provides  a  two-year  integrated  course  for  those  capable  of  ad- 
vanced work,  in  both  physics  and  chemistry.  Able  students  who  have 
taken  the  regular  courses  before  their  Senior  year  may  also  prepare  for 
the  advanced  placement  examinations  by  taking  the  minor  courses  indi- 
cated as  S  courses.  In  addition,  the  S  courses  provide  uninterrupted  prog- 
ress tor  the  student  who  plans  further  study  in  a  particular  field. 

In  general,  students  are  encouraged  to  take  a  variety  of  courses  and 
to  acquire  a  broad  background  of  knowledge  in  the  different  sciences, 
rather  than  to  specialize  in  any  subject.  Hence  no  second-year-level  courses 
are  offered.  For  the  student  with  special  interests  in  any  one  area,  in- 
dividual projects  are  encouraged  to  the  extent  that  they  are  consistent 
with  safety,  the  equipment  available,  and  the  capacity  of  the  student. 

Elementary  Science.  Three  hours.  The  course  is  designed  to  form 
an  approach  to  the  laboratory  sciences  that  follow  in  the  later  years,  and 
to  acquaint  the  student  with  information  important  to  any  educated  per- 
son. It  is  based  on  a  study  of  the  earth,  considered  from  the  points  of 
view  of  the  geologist,  the  physicist,  the  chemist,  the  biologist,  and  the 
astronomer.  Laboratory  work  is  an  important  part  of  the  course.  The  text 
materials  are  those  developed  by  the  Earth  Science  Curriculum  Project. 

Anthropology.  Two  hours.  An  elective  offered  by  the  Robert  S. 
Pea  body  Foundation  for  Archaeology,  the  course  is  intended  to  present  a 
brief  consideration  of  the  prehistory  of  North  America.  It  is  composed  of 
lectures  and  reading  on  a  variety  of  subjects  bearing  on  man's  life  in  the 
New  World,  touching  on  geology,  climatic  change  and  attendant  changes 
in  flora  and  fauna,  methods  of  dating  the  past,  as  well  as  archaeology. 
Some  discussion  and  reading  on  aboriginal  societies  brings  the  course  down 
to  the  beginning  of  written  history. 

Biology 

Biology.  Four  hours.  The  course  stresses  the  unity  of  life — rather  than 
the  diversity — by  emphasizing  the  functions  common  to  all  living  things. 
It  covers,  in  plants,  animals,  and  microorganisms,  the  fundamental  prin- 
ciples of  metabolism  including  nutrition,  gas  exchange,  transport,  ex- 
cretion and  homeostasis;  responsiveness  and  coordination;  reproduction, 
genetics  and  development;  the  principles  and  history  of  evolution;  and  the 
principles  of  ecology. 

The  class  meets  four  times  a  week,  three  times  for  discussion  and  once 
for  a  laboratory  period.  The  laboratory  work  includes  training  in  the  use 
of  the  compound  and  stereoscopic  microscopes  and  other  laboratory  equip- 
ment. It  requires  careful  observation,  mastery  of  techniques,  and  accurate 
recording  of  results.  Several  laboratory  periods  are  set  aside  for  field  trips 
featuring  Ecology  and  Conservation,  and  for  work  on  individual  projects. 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES 


77 


Biology  X.  Five  hours.  An  honors  course,  open  upon  invitation  of 
the  Department,  to  a  limited  number  of  able  Upper  Middlers  and  Seniors. 
In  addition  to  the  material  of  the  regular  Biology  course,  Biology  X  offers 
extra  work  in  the  field  of  physiology  in  preparation  for  the  Advanced 
Placement  Examination  of  the  College  Entrance  Examination  Board,  suc- 
cess in  which  leads  to  advanced  placement  in  college  and,  in  some  cir- 
cumstances, to  credit  towards  the  college  degree.  Will  not  be  offered  in 
1967-68. 

Biology  S.  Two  hours.  Open  to  Seniors  who  have  completed  the 
standard  course  with  high  grades.  In  addition  to  a  review  of  basic  biology, 
new  material  will  be  presented  as  the  course  progresses.  The  combination 
of  review  and  new  work  prepares  students  for  the  Advanced  Placement 
Examination  of  the  College  Entrance  Examination  Board. 

Chemistry 

Chemistry.  Four  hours.  A  college  preparatory  course  that  includes  the 
systematic  study  of  matter  and  of  the  changes  that  it  undergoes.  Special 
attention  is  given  to  modern  theory.  Emphasis  is  placed  upon  reasoning 
and  general  concepts  rather  than  upon  memorization  of  facts.  The  class 
meets  three  times  weekly  for  lectures,  demonstrations,  or  discussion,  and 
once  for  a  double  period  of  laboratory  work.  Text:  Chemistry,  An  Ex- 
perimental Science,  prepared  by  the  Chemical  Education  Material  Study. 

Chemistry  X.  Five  hours.  The  course  is  open  to  a  limited  number  of 
able  students  who  have  strong  scholastic  records  in  mathematics  and 
physics.  It  is  essentially  the  equivalent  of  a  first-year  college  course,  and 
prepares  qualified  students  for  the  Advanced  Placement  Examination. 
Text:  General  Chemistry,  by  Slabaugh  and  Parsons. 

Chemistry  S.  Two  hours.  One  period  a  week  is  for  recitation  and  dis- 
cussion of  review  and  advanced  topics;  the  other  is  a  double  period  for 
laboratory  work.  The  course  is  for  students  who  have  completed  a  regular 
course  with  good  grades.  Qualified  students  are  prepared  to  take  the  Ad- 
vanced Placement  Examination. 

Physics 

Physics.  Four  hours.  The  course  completes  the  requirements  for  en- 
trance to  college  and  prepares  the  student  for  further  work  in  this  or  in 
related  fields.  By  means  of  lectures,  recitations,  experimental  demonstra- 
tions, and  the  solution  of  numerical  problems,  the  student  is  taught  not 
only  the  fundamental  principles  of  physics,  but  also  the  elements  of 
scientific  method.  Reference  is  made  where  possible  to  the  implications 
and  effect  on  current  thought  of  recent  advances.  The  laboratory  experi- 
ments are  chosen  not  merely  to  afford  training  in  manipulative  techniques 
and  to  illustrate  portions  of  the  text  material,  but  also  to  exemplify  proper 
scientific  practice.  The  use  of  the  slide  rule  is  taught  and  required. 


78 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


PHYSICS  S.  Two  hours.  Open  to  Seniors  who  have  completed  a  year 
of  physics,  and  who  have  taken,  or  will  take  concurrently,  a  course  in 
calculus.  The  course  reviews  the  essential  material  of  elementary  physics, 
but  at  the  greater  depth  and  with  the  sophistication  made  possible  by  the 
calculus.  The  course  includes  a  number  of  advanced  laboratory  experi- 
ments. Students  undertake  individual  study  or  laboratory  projects  in  the 
spring.  Physics  S  will  prepare  the  better  students  for  the  Advanced  Place- 
ment Examination  in  Physics. 

Honors  Sequence 

Science  Honors  1  and  2.  Five  hours  each  year.  A  two-year  sequence, 
open,  upon  invitation  of  the  instructor,  to  a  small  group  of  Upper  Mid- 
Jlers  who  will  complete  a  year  of  analytic  geometry  and  the  calculus  be- 
fore graduation  and  who  show  promise  of  unusual  capacity  in  science  and 
mathematics.  The  subject  matter  includes  chemistry  and  physics,  both  of 
them  carried  well  beyond  the  elementary  level  in  text  and  laboratory 
work.  It  is  expected  that  the  ablest  students  in  the  sequence  will  be  pre- 
pared to  pass  both  the  physics  and  chemistry  Advanced  Placement  Exam- 
inations of  the  College  Entrance  Examination  Board. 

Science  Honors  1  will  fulfill  the  diploma  requirement  in  laboratory 
science  for  students  who  find  it  inadvisable  for  any  reason  to  continue  to 
Science  Honors  2. 


PRIZES 


Listed  below  are  prizes  open  for  competition  in  each  academic  year. 
Unless  otherwise  stated,  awards  may  be  made  in  cash,  or  in  the  value  of 
:he  amounts  listed. 

ENGLISH 

Draper  Prizes.  For  declamation.  Open  to  members  of  English  3,  4,  and  5.  $25,  $20, 
md  $15.  First  awarded  1867.  Funded  1878  by  Warren  F.  Draper,  Class  of  1843.  Awarded 
966  to  (1)  Matthew  Marks  Schneiderman,  (2)  James  Stidger  Pickering,  (3)  Nicholas 
Arthur  Deutsch. 

Means  Prizes.  For  declamation  of  original  essays.  Open  to  members  of  English  3, 
I,  and  5.  $25,  $20,  and  $15.  First  awarded  1868.  Funded  1879  by  William  G.  Means, 
if  Andover.  Awarded  1966  to  (1)  Christopher  Lee  Moore,  (2)  Elwyn  Cornelius  Lee, 
;3)  William  Wylie  Robinson. 

Robinson  Prizes.  For  debating  between  a  team  of  the  Philomathean  Society  and  one 
:hosen  from  the  rest  of  the  school,  or  between  two  teams  chosen  by  the  Philomathean 
iociety.  $75  to  the  winning  team.  First  awarded  1896.  Funded  1910  by  Henry  S.  Robin- 
on  of  Andover.  Awarded  1966  to  (1)  Francis  Charles  Klein,  (2)  David  William 
-laviland,  (3)  Bradley  Youle  Smith.  ($75  to  be  divided  equally.) 

Schweppe  Prizes.  For  an  examination  on  a  literary  subject.  Open  to  Senior  and 
Jpper  Middle  Class.  $30  and  $20.  First  awarded  1912.  Sustained  since  1941  by  John  S. 
ichweppe  in  memory  of  his  father,  Charles  M.  Schweppe,  Class  of  1898.  Awarded  1966 
o  (1)  Peter  Jay  Buchin,  (2)  No  award  this  year. 

Goodhue  Prizes.  For  an  examination  in  English  literature  and  composition,  including 
he  more  practical  topics  of  elementary  rhetoric.  Open  to  Senior  and  Upper  Middle 
classes.  $70  and  $50  First  awarded  1961.  Funded  1936  by  the  family  of  Francis  A. 
}oodhue,  of  Andover,  in  memory  of  his  devotion  to  Phillips  Academy.  Awarded  1966 
o  (1)  David  William  Haviland,  (2)  Alfred  Charles  Basile;  Honorable  Mention,  Timothy 
5ence  McKibben. 

Clough  Prize.  For  an  essay  by  a  Senior  on  an  assigned  literary  subject.  $40.  First 
iwarded  1923.  Funded  1923  by  friends  of  Charles  C.  Clough,  Class  of  1906,  in  memory 
)f  his  interest  in  literary  studies  and  his  devotion  to  Phillips  Academy.  No  award  this 
fear. 

Langley  Prize.  For  an  essay  on  Charles  Dickens.  Open  to  members  of  the  Lower 
Middle  and  Junior  Classes.  $15.  First  awarded  1929.  Funded  1927  by  Stephen  S.  Lang- 
ey,  Class  of  1863.  Awarded  1966  to  Sean  Konecky. 

Leonard  Prizes.  For  declamation  of  original  essays.  Open  only  to  Juniors  and  Lower 
Middlers.  Three  prizes  of  books.  First  awarded  1942.  Funded  1957  by  The  Pbillipian  in 
memory  of  Arthur  W.  Leonard,  Instructor  in  English  1907-1941.  Awarded  1966  to 
(1)  Irve  Lewis  Libby,  Jr.,  (2)  Neal  James  Rendleman,  (3)  John  Munro  Woolsey,  3d. 

Carr  Prizes.  For  skill  in  oral  English.  Open  only  to  Juniors  and  Lower  Middlers. 
$16,  $12,  $8,  and  $4.  First  awarded  1943.  Sustained  by  Donald  Eaton  Carr,  Class  of 
1922.  Awarded  1966  to  (1)  Philip  Leslie  Clinton,  (2)  Charles  Christopher  Smith,  (3) 
Rip  Cohen,  (4)  Charles  Faulkner  Bennett. 

Burns  Prizes.  For  an  original  poem.  Awarded  to  one  student  in  each  of  the  Senior 
and  Upper  Middle  Classes,  and  to  one  student  of  either  the  Lower  Middle  or  Junior  Class, 
$20  each.  First  awarded  1945.  Funded  1944  by  Mrs.  John  P.  O'Rourke  in  memory  of 
her  son,  2nd  Lt.  Charles  Snow  Burns,  USAAF,  Class  of  1941.  Awarded  1966  to  Senior, 
Richard  Cedric  Noble;  Upper,  Nicholas  Arthur  Deutsch;  Lower,  no  prize  this  year. 

Sumner  R.  Kates  Prize.  For  an  essay  in  American  literature.  $125  in  cash.  First 
awarded  1950.  Funded  1949  by  Summer  R.  Kates,  Class  of  193  8.  Awarded  1966  to 
Timothy  Pence  McKibben. 


79 


80 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


JOHN  Horne  Burns  Prize.  For  an  original  short  story.  Open  to  all  students.  $35  in 
Cash   Funded  in  1961  by  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Joseph  Lawrence  Burns  in  memory  of  their  son, 

John  Home  Burns,  Class  of  193  3.  Awarded  1966  to  Douglas  Christopher  Crichton. 

CLASSICAL  LANGUAGES 
Cook  Prizes.  In  Greek.  For  an  examination  in  Homer,  including  translation  at  sight 
•nd  questions  on  grammar  and  antiquities  suggested  by  the  passage  set.  $30,  $15,  and  $10. 
Pint  awarded  1879.  Funded  1878  by  Joseph  Cook,  LL.D.,  Class  of  1857.  Awarded  1966 
to  (1)  Anthony  Thomas  Grafton,  (2)  Stephen  Joseph  McCarthy,  (3)  David  Emerson 
Smith. 

Dove  Prizes.  In  Latin.  For  an  examination  in  the  translation  and  interpretation  oi 
Virgil.  Open  to  Seniors  or  members  of  Latin  4.  $30,  $20,  and  $10.  First  awarded  1880 
Sustained  since  1915  from  the  George  W.  W.  Dove  Fund.  Awarded  1966  to  (1)  Anthony 
Thomas  Grafton,  (2)  John  Bidwell,  Jr.,  (3)  Joseph  John  DeChellis. 

Valpey  Prizes.  For  Latin  composition  and  Greek  composition.  Open  to  the  Uppei 
Middle  Class.  $20  each.  First  awarded  1896.  Funded  1891  from  a  bequest  of  Rev.  Thoma 
( , .  Valpey,  Class  of  1854.  Awarded  1966  to  John  Grier  Buchanan,  III — Latin.  No  aware 
this  year — Greek. 

Johnson  Prize.  For  Greek  composition.  $10.  First  awarded  1924.  Funded  1932  b; 
Alfred  Johnson,  Class  of  1890,  in  memory  of  the  Rev.  Alfred  Johnson,  a  graduate  o 
Dartmouth  College.  Awarded  1966  to  Matthew  Cartwright  Mole.  Honorable  Mention 

Christopher  Hayes  Wilbur. 

Weir  Prize.  In  Greek.  For  an  examination  in  the  translation  of  New  Testament  Greet 
$70.  First  awarded  1928.  Funded  1927  from  a  bequest  of  The  Rev.  William  N.  Wei) 

Class  of  1895.  Awarded  1966  to  Anthony  Thomas  Grafton. 

Benner  Prize.  For  excellence  in  first-year  Greek.  $25.  First  awarded  1939.  Funde 
1  95  0  by  the  Rogers  Associates,  Inc.,  in  honor  of  Allen  Rogers  Benner,  Class  of  1888,  fc 

forty-six  years  Instructor  in  Greek  in  Phillips  Academy.  Awarded  1966  to  Robes 
Granger  Benson,  III  and  Richard  Woodson  Rutherford.  ($25  to  be  divided  equally).  . 

Department  Prizes.  For  excellence  in  Latin  translation  and  composition,  $10  an 
$5;  for  recitation  from  memory  of  poetry  or  prose,  $10.  First  awarded  1940.  Sustaine 
since  1947  from  Winthrop  Fund.  Awarded  1966  to  (1)  John  Grier  Buchanan,  III,  (2 
John  McMurray  Butte  for  Latin  3  Translation  and  Composition.  Awarded  1966  to  (1 
Philip  Martin  Pfeil  Buttenfield,  (2)  Davis  Burton  Everett  for  Latin  2  Translation  ar 
Composition.  Awarded  1966  to  Christopher  Lee  Apitz.  Honorable  Mention,  Rip  Coh< 
for  Latin  3  Recitation.  Awarded  1966  to  Vernon  Judson  Harward,  III.  Honorable  Mei 
tion,  Charles  Faulkner  Bennett  for  Latin  2  Recitation.  Awarded  1966  to  Andreas  Ale 
ander  Nowara  for  Latin  1  Recitation. 

Catlin  Prize.  To  be  awarded  regardless  of  need,  to  a  member  of  the  Upper  Midc 
Class  of  outstanding  scholarship  and  deportment,  who,  on  completion  of  Greek  2 
Latin  3  at  Phillips  Academy,  shall  include  in  his  Senior  program  a  major  course  in  Gre 
or  Latin.  $1,000.  First  awarded  1945.  Funded  1944  from  a  bequest  of  George  H.  Catli 
of  1  863.  Awarded  1966  to  Matthew  Cartwright  Mole  and  Woody  Norman  Petersc 
($1,000  to  be  divided  equally.) 

GERMAN 

Stevenson  Prize.    For  excellence  in  German  composition,  oral  and  written.  Op 
to  the  Senior  and  Upper  Middle  Classes.  $15.  First  awarded  1904.  Funded  1904 
Robert  Stevenson,  Jr.,  Class  of  1896,  in  memory  of  his  father.  Awarded  1966  to  Hayi 
Richardson  Mahoney.  Honorable  Mention  to  Marcus  Wayne  Wright. 

FRENCH 

Taylor  Prize.  For  excellence  in  French  conversation  and  composition.  A  selecti 
ot  French  books.  First  awarded  1909.  Funded  in  part  1908  by  a  member  of  the  Cl 
or  1  868  in  memory  of  Frederick  Holkins  Taylor  of  that  class,  son  of  Professor  Jc 


PRIZES 


81 


Taylor,  Treasurer  of  Phillips  Academy  1852-1868.  Awarded  1966  to  Jonathan  Morse, 
onorable  Mention  to  Andrew  Maine  Hemenway. 

Department  Prizes.  For  aural  ability.  To  those  students  in  their  first  and  second 
:ar  of  French  who  receive  the  highest  marks  on  a  special  examination  to  test  aural 
.mprehension.  First  and  second  prizes  in  books.  First  awarded  1946.  Sustained  by  an 
;onymous  donor.  Awarded  1966  in  French  1  to  (1)  Charles  Stephen  Donovan,  (2) 
avid  Burnham  Ensor;  French  2  to  (1)  John  Michael  Hosken,  (2)  Roderick  Marshall 
cNealey. 

Anthony  D.  Graves  Prize.  For  improvement  during  the  first  year  of  the  study  of 
ench.  To  the  student  whose  application  and  effort  result  in  the  greatest  over-all  im- 
ovement.  $2  5.  First  awarded  19  54.  Funded  1954  by  Mrs.  Charles  F.  Pease  in  memory 
her  father.  Awarded  1966  to  Michael  Charles  Liberman. 

Forbush  Prize.  For  excellence  in  French  3.  A  book  or  books.  First  awarded  1956. 
inded  195  5  by  students  and  friends  of  Guy  Johnson  Forbush,  Instructor  in  French  at 
lillips  Academy  1917-1920,  1924-195  5.  Awarded  1966  to  Alberto  Miguel  Raurell. 

SPANISH 

Howard  P.  Hayden  Prize.  For  excellence  in  oral  Spanish.  To  a  member  of  the  first- 
ar  Spanish  course  who,  in  the  opinion  of  the  faculty,  has  made  the  greatest  progress  in 
.al  Spanish.  $35.  First  awarded  1945.  Funded  1945  by  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Howard  P.  Hayden, 
Santiago,  Chile.  Awarded  1966  to  (1)  Andre  Mark  Spears,  $25,  (2)  Neil  Eric  Oner- 
im,  $10.  Honorable  Mention  to  Howard  Judson  Whitehead. 

Donald  E.  Merriam  Memorial  Prize.  Awarded  annually  to  the  student  in  the  second 
ar  of  Spanish  who,  in  the  opinion  of  the  Spanish  Department,  has  best  combined  the 
ulities  of  proficiency,  interest  and  enthusiasm  in  the  study  of  that  language.  A  book 
d  name  on  plaque.  First  awarded  1965.  Given  by  the  students  of  Spanish  at  Phillips 
:ademy.  Awarded  1966  to  Derek  Dexter  Rainey. 

HISTORY 

Lauder  Prizes.  For  an  examination  in  Modern  European  History.  $30,  $20,  and  books 
rst  awarded  1913.  Funded  1916  by  George  Lauder  in  memory  of  his  son,  George  Lauder, 
.,  Class  of  1897.  Awarded  1966  to  (1)  Douglas  Christopher  Crichton,  (2)  William 
larles  Lucas. 

Haymond  Prizes.  In  American  History.  To  undergraduates  taking  the  course  in 
istory  of  the  United  States,  for  an  essay  on  the  Constitution  of  the  United  States. 
F0,  $25,  $10,  and  books.  First  awarded  1943.  Sustained  by  the  Honorable  Frank  C. 
aymond,  in  honor  of  his  sons,  William  Stanley  Haymond,  2d,  Class  of  1942,  and 
h.omas  Arnette  Haymond,  Class  of  1943.  Awarded  1966  to  (1)  Jonathan  Carroll  Stap- 
con,  Paper  Money  Against  the  Constitution,  (2)  Arthur  Maxwell  Field,  III,  Virginia 
cession  Convention,  (3)  John  Fontana  Cooney,  Baker  v.  Carr. 

Grace  Prizes.  In  American  History.  For  an  essay  on  the  Bill  of  Rights  or  other 
storical  topic  related  to  our  heritage  of  human  liberty.  $70,  $45,  $3  5,  and  books.  First 
rarded  195  3.  Funded  1951  by  Oliver  R.  Grace,  Class  of  1926,  in  memory  of  his 
ther,  Morgan  H.  Grace.  Awarded  1966  to  (1)  Barry  Ko  Yueng  Tung,  Okinawa: 
nited  States  Imperialism,  (2)  Robert  Stewart  Walden,  Evolution  of  the  Social  Security 
k/j  (3)  Roger  Hampton  Smith,  Clement  L.  Vallandigham. 

Marshall  S.  Kates  Prizes.  In  American  History.  To  undergraduates  taking  the 
mrse  in  History  of  the  United  States  for  an  essay  on  a  topic  in  the  field  of  American 
istory.  $50,  $30,  $20,  and  books.  First  awarded  1953.  Funded  1952  by  Marshall  S- 
ates,  Class  of  1939.  Awarded  1966  to  (1)  William  Michael  Davis,  Ford  the  Dearborn  In- 
pendent,  and  the  Post-War  Period,  1919-1920,  (2)  David  Alan  Goldin,  North  Har- 
iird  Street  &  the  Great  Society,  (3)  Peter  Jay  Buchin,  New  York  City  Mayoralty  Elcc- 
on  of  19)3,  (4)  Vi  nton  Douglas  Tomkins,  The  Transatlantic  Review:  A  Voice  of  A 
ovement. 


82 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


WEBSTER  Prizes.  For  excellence  in  Ancient  History,  European  History,  or  Contem- 
porary Affairs.  Open  to  all  students  taking  the  courses,  on  the  basis  of  competitive 
examinations  or  proficiency  in  current  work,  at  the  discretion  of  the  department.  $125 
in  money  and  books.  First  awarded  1956.  Funded  1956  by  Dean  Kingman  Webster,  Jr., 
Class  of  1915.  Awarded  1966  to  (1)  Blake  Lawrence  Crawford,  (2)  Bruce  Owen  Glenn 
in  History  1;  to  (1)  Theodore  David  Dunbar,  (2)  Ira  Stuart  Outerbridge,  III  in  His- 
tory 2. 

MATHEMATICS 

Convers  Prizes.  In  Plane  Geometry.  Awarded  on  the  basis  of  an  examination  in 
Plane  Geometry  covering  analysis  on  the  originals,  numericals,  loci,  and  constructions. 
$100,  $75,  $50,  $25,  $10,  and  books.  First  awarded  1898.  Funded  1898  by  E.  B.  Con- 
vers, Class  of  1857,  and  extended  in  1951  by  the  former  prize  men.  Awarded  1966  to 
(1)  Frederick  Herman  Greene  Wright,  II,  (2)  Richard  Mansfield  Soule,  (3)  James 
Rorex  Stokley,  III,  (4)  Edward  King  Chapin,  (5)  Andrew  Staley,  Jr. 

Eaton  Prize.  For  excellence  in  Algebra.  To  a  member  of  the  Junior  Class  outstand- 
ing for  proficiency  in  first-year  Algebra.  $20.  First  awarded  1938.  Funded  1957  by 
bequest  of  Thaxter  Eaton,  Class  of  1904,  in  memory  of  his  father,  George  T.  Eaton, 
Class  of  1873,  for  fifty  years  instructor  in  Mathematics  at  Phillips  Academy.  Awarded 
1966  to  George  Arthur  Pugh,  II  and  Daniel  Leonard  Kent.  $20  to  be  divided  equally. 

McCurdy  Prizes.  For  excellence  in  Senior  Mathematics.  For  Seniors  in  the  regular 
fourth-year  Mathematics  program.  Awarded  on  the  basis  of  classroom  work  and  ar 
examination.  $3  5  and  $25.  First  awarded  1941.  Funded  1940  by  the  family  of  the  latt 
Matthew  S.  McCurdy,  in  memory  of  his  connection  with  Phillips  Academy  as  Instructoi 
in  Mathematics  1873-1921.  Awarded  1966  to  (1)  Barry  Ko- Young  Tung,  (2)  Dougla 
I.ee  Myers. 

Bailey  Prize.  In  Upper  Middle  Mathematics.  On  the  basis  of  an  examination  a 
the  close  of  the  year.  $3  5.  First  awarded  1946.  Funded  1946  by  Edward  Bailey  Crichton 
Class  of  1946,  in  memory  of  his  grandfather,  Edward  Bailey,  Class  of  1878.  Awards 
1966  to  Bruce  Reider.  Honorable  Mention  to  Robert  Pease  Smith,  Jr. 

Watt  Prizes.  In  Elementary  and  Intermediate  Algebra,  Plane  and  Solid  Geometry 
Plane  Trigonometry  and  Advanced  Algebra.  For  Seniors.  Awarded  on  the  basis  of 
comprehensive  examination  covering  the  analytical  work  of  secondary  school  Mathematic 
$125,  $75,  $25,  and  books.  First  awarded  1954.  Funded  1953  by  J.  Lester  Parsons  wit 
the  cooperation  of  William  C.  Ridgway,  Jr.,  Class  of  1925,  and  William  C.  Ridgway,  3< 
Class  of  1953,  in  memory  of  Frederick  Ellsworth  Watt,  Instructor  at  Phillips  Acadetr 
1  933-195  1.  Awarded  1966  to  (1)  Peter  Cushing  Perdue,  (2)  Kellogg  Sheffield  Stelle,  (3 
Prescott  Kingsbury  Turner,  Jr. 

Tower  Prize.    For  excellence  in  Analytic  Geometry  and  the  Calculus.  A  special 
bound  book  in  the  field  of  Mathematics.  First  awarded  1954.  Sustained  by  John  \ 
Dixon,  Class  of  1924,  in  recognition  of  Oswald  Tower,  Instructor  in  Mathematics 
Phillips  Academy  1910-1949.  Awarded  1966  to  Richard  Kenneth  Dawson. 

Winfield  M.  Sides  Prize.  For  excellence  in  Mechanical  Drawing.  Awarded  on  t 
basis  of  proficiency  in  classroom  work.  $100  in  cash  and/or  drawing  equipment.  Fund 
in  1966  by  Donald  A.  Raymond,  Jr.,  Class  of  1932,  in  memory  of  Winfield  M.  Sid 
Instructor  in  Mathematics  at  Phillips  Academy  1919-1958.  First  awarded  1960.  Award 
1966  to  Byron  Wendell  Powell. 

Joseph  Award.    For  excellence  in  the  area  of  Mathematics.  To  a  member  of  the  Sen 
Class.  A  gold  medal  and  a  book.  First  awarded  1960.  Sustained  by  David  Joseph, 
New  York  City,  in  memory  of  his  father,  Bernard  Joseph.  Awarded  1966  to  Kellc 
bhemeld  Stelle. 

Scoville  Prize.    (See  Sciences.) 

SCIENCES 

Scoville  PrIZE.  In  the  Physical  Sciences  or  Mathematics.  To  a  student  or  stude 
tor  an  original  paper  or  project  exhibiting  creative  thinking  or  ingenuity  in  the  Physi 
sciences  or  Mathematics,  preferably  not  in  assigned  course  work.  $50.  First  awar 


PRIZES  83 

59  by  Anthony  Church  Scoville,  Class  of  195  8,  in  memory  of  his  grandfather,  Herbert 
oville.  Awarded  1966  to  Victor  Maksymenko  and  Stephen  Dana  Seccombe.  $50  to  be 
Aded  equally. 

Wadsworth  Prize.  For  excellence  in  Physics.  To  the  student  holding  the  highest 
ik  in  Physics  for  the  year.  $30.  First  awarded  1900.  Funded  1952  by  William  S.  Wads- 
>rth,  M.D.,  Class  of  1887.  Awarded  1966  to  Frederick  Hermon  Greene  Wright,  II. 

Dalton  Prize.  For  excellence  in  Chemistry.  To  the  student  holding  the  highest  rank 
Chemistry  for  the  year.  $65.  First  awarded  1915.  Funded  1915  by  Frederick  Goodrich 
ane,  of  Dalton,  Massachusetts,  Class  of  1884.  Trustee  of  Phillips  Academy,  1912-1923. 
varded  1966  to  James  Russell  Priestley. 

Marsh  Prize.  For  excellence  in  Biology.  To  a  student  who  has  been  outstanding  in 
erest  and  attainment  in  the  Biological  Sciences.  $2  5.  First  awarded  1936.  Sustained 
ce  1950  by  an  anonymous  donor  in  memory  of  Othniel  C.  Marsh,  Class  of  1851,  one 
the  great  paleontologists  of  his  day.  Awarded  1966  to  Jonathan  Williams  Eaton  and 
bn  David  Malick.  $25  to  each. 

Graham  Prize.  For  excellence  in  Science.  To  that  member  of  the  graduating  class 
aining  the  highest  average  grade  in  ten  hours  of  the  natural  sciences  studied  while 
Phillips  Academy.  $1,000.  First  awarded  1946.  Funded  1945  from  a  bequest  of  James 
Ghaham,  Instructor  in  Science  at  Phillips  Academy,  1892-1937.  Awarded  1966  to 
Hogg  Sheffield  Stelle  and  Prescott  Kingsbury  Turner,  Jr.  $1,000  to  be  divided  equally. 

Wadsworth  Prize.  For  excellence  in  Biology.  To  the  student  holding  the  highest  rank 
Biology  for  the  year.  $30.  First  awarded  195  3.  Funded  1952  by  William  S.  Wads- 
rth,  M.D.,  Class  of  1887.  Awarded  1966  to  Edward  King  Chapin. 

Department  Prize.  For  excellence  in  Physics.  To  that  student  taking  elementary 
ysics  who  receives  the  highest  grade  on  a  prize  examination.  Books.  First  awarded 
56.  Sustained  by  the  Physics  Department.  Awarded  1966  to  David  Werblin  Nieren- 
•g- 

Department  Prize.  For  excellence  in  Biology.  To  a  student  who  has  demonstrated 
:eptional  interest  and  accomplishment  with  particular  reference  to  laboratory  investi- 
cion.  $25.  First  awarded  1964.  Sustained  by  an  anonymous  donor.  Awarded  1966  to 
larles  Bradford  Barber. 

MUSIC 

Cutter  Prize.  For  proficiency  in  orchestral,  especially  stringed  instruments.  $5  5. 
rst  awarded  1924.  Funded  1925  by  The  Rev.  C.  F.  Cutter,  Class  of  1871,  in  memory 
his  father,  Charles  Cutter,  Class  of  1840.  Awarded  1966  to  Leland  Stanford  Edwards. 

Poynter  Prize.  To  that  member  of  the  Phillips  Academy  Choir  who,  in  the  judg- 
;nt  of  the  Choirmaster,  has  been  the  most  useful  member  of  that  organization.  $30. 
rst  awarded  1945.  Funded  1943  by  Horace  Martin  Poynter,  Class  of  1896,  and  Mrs. 
ynter,  formerly  of  Andover,  in  memory  of  their  son,  Edward  Pitkin  Poynter,  Class 
1940,  who  gave  his  life  for  his  country  in  the  aviation  service  in  July,  1943.  Awarded 
66  to  Ronald  Wayne  Takvorian. 

Jones  Prize.  To  that  member  of  Phillips  Academy  Orchestra  who,  in  the  judgment 
the  Director  of  Music,  has  been  the  most  useful  member  of  that  organization.  $25. 

rst  awarded  1946.  Established  in  1945  by  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Edward  T.  Jones,  in  memory 
their  son,  Ainsworth  B.  Jones,  Class  of  1939,  who  gave  his  life  for  his  country  in 

e  aviation  service  in  July,  1943.  Awarded  1966  to  Leland  Stanford  Edwards. 

Collier  Prizes.  For  proficiency  in  the  playing  of  the  piano.  $25.  First  awarded  1947. 
inded  1946  by  Mrs.  Milton  Collier  and  I.  Alfred  Levy,  in  memory  of  Milton  Collier, 
warded  1966  to  Ronald  Wayne  Takvorian. 

Fuller  Music  Prize.  To  a  musical  student  who,  irrespective  of  need,  has  demonstrated 
gh  character  and  special  musical  aptitude.  The  recipient  will  assume  responsibility  for 
aying  the  carillon  in  the  Memorial  Tower.  $3  50.  First  awarded  19  51.  Funded  19  59 
7  Samuel  Lester  Fuller,  Class  of  1894.  Awarded  1966  to  John  Baker  Moore. 


84 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Kihru  K  Prize.  To  that  member  of  the  Phillips  Academy  Band  who,  in  the  judgment 
of  the  Director  of  Music,  has  been  the  most  useful  member  of  that  organization.  $50. 
Pint  awarded  1  95  3.  Sustained  in  memory  of  Herbert  V.  Kibrick,  Class  of  1934,  by  his 
wife.  Awarded  1966  to  Joseph  Michael  Latvis  $30  and  James  Francis  Grillo  $20. 

ART 

Morse  Prize.  To  the  student  who  best  combines  native  creative  ability  with  crafts- 
manship, as  evidenced  in  a  developed  personal  style.  $25.  First  awarded  1932.  Funded 
1942  by  Winslow  Ames,  Class  of  1925,  in  honor  of  Samuel  Finley  Breese  Morse,  Class  oi 
1  805.  Awarded  1966  to  Joseph  Seamans. 

Thompson  Prize.  For  improvement  in  drawing  and  painting.  $25.  First  awardec 
1  932.  Funded  195  5  by  Mrs.  Frances  Thompson  Heely,  in  memory  of  her  brother 
Augustus  Porter  Thompson,  3d,  Class  of  1928.  Awarded  1966  to  Selden  Thayer  Kirk. 

Addison  Gallery  Associates  Prize.  To  a  student  who  has  distinguished  himself  ii 
art  as  well  as  in  other  activities.  $25.  First  awarded  1941.  Sustained  by  the  Addisoi 
Cillery  Associates.  Awarded  1966  to  Eric  Redman. 

John  Esther  Gallery  Prize.  To  the  student  who  has  shown  through  his  wor 
the  clearest  understanding  of  art.  $25.  First  awarded  1943.  Awarded  1966  to  Christophe 
Todd  Wise. 

Photography  Fellowship  Prize.  To  the  student  demonstrating  the  greatest  exce 
lence  in  Photography.  $2  5  and  one  week  as  an  apprentice  in  the  photographic  studio  ( 
\\"  innate  Paine.  First  awarded  1964.  Sustained  by  Wingate  H.  Paine,  Class  of  193 
Awarded  1966  to  Joseph  Seamans. 

ATHLETICS 

Faculty  Golf  Cup.  To  the  winner  of  the  Varsity  Golf  Squad  competition.  Winnej 
name  inscribed  on  Cup.  Presented  1927  by  the  Faculty  of  Phillips  Academy.  Fir 
awarded  1927.  Awarded  1966  to  William  Lockhart  Dawson,  Jr. 

Kilpatrick  Trophy.    To  the  winner  of  the  Andover  versus  Exeter  track  meet,  i 
bowl.  Winner's  name  inscribed  on  bowl,  to  be  held  for  one  year  by  the  winning  Acaderr 
Replica  to  the  captain  or  co-captains  of  the  winning  team.  Trophy  presented  193  8 
John  Reed  Kilpatrick,  Class  of  1907.  First  awarded  193  8.  Awarded  1966  to  the  Philli 
Exeter  Academy. 

Schubert  Award.  To  a  member  of  the  Senior  Class  who  has  excelled  in  vars 
athletics  and  who  has  best  exemplified  the  qualities  of  sound  character,  cheerfulnc 
and  good  sportsmanship  on  the  athletic  field.  A  gold  medal,  and  winner's  name  inscril 
on  a  plaque.  Funded  1951  by  the  Eta  Delta  Phi  Society,  in  memory  of  Edmund  Jo 
Schubert  of  the  Physical  Education  Department.  First  awarded  1944.  Awarded  1966 
Gordon  Leslie  Freeman,  Jr. 

Banta  Trophy.  To  be  awarded  annually  to  that  member  of  the  Varsity  Tennis  Te 
who  shows  the  best  sportsmanship,  leadership,  and  character  throughout  the  seas 
Established  1  953  by  the  Tennis  Team  of  Phillips  Academy,  in  honor  of  their  coa 
Cornelius  Gordon  Schuyler  Banta.  Awarded  1966  to  Erich  Paul  Wise. 

Cross  Country  Cup.    To  the  member  of  the  Cross  Country  Team  who  during 
season  has  displayed  outstanding  sportsmanship,  performance,  and  team  spirit.  Winn  i 
name  inscribed  on  Cup.  Presented  19  52  by  the  members  of  the  cross  country  squad  i 
honor  of  their  coach,  Norwood  Penrose  Hallowell.  First  awarded  1953.  Awarded  1966) 
Richard  Cedric  Noble. 

Basketball  Trophy.  To  the  club  basketball  player  who  has  contributed  most  ) 
club  basketball.  Winner's  name  inscribed  on  trophy.  Presented  1953  by  the  meml  |j 
of  the  Varsity  Basketball  Team.  First  awarded  1953.  Awarded  1966  to  Winthrop  r  - 

brook  Newcomb. 

Facan  Squash  Racquets  Trophy.    To  the  winner  of  the  Fagan  Trophy  Tournam 
U  mner's  name  inscribed  on  Trophy.  Presented  in  1954  by  Charles  Aloysius  Fagan,  , 
Class  of  19  54,  in  honor  of  his  father,  Charles  Aloysius  Fagan,  Jr.  First  awarded  V.K 

Awarded  1966  to  Guy  Farlow  Blakeslee. 


I 


PRIZES 


S5 


Reagh  Wetmore  Swimming  Award.  Awarded  annually  to  a  senior  member  of  the 
'arsity  Swimming  Team  excluding  the  Captain  who  has  best  exemplified  the  spirit  of 
vndover  swimming.  Winner's  name  inscribed  on  plaque.  Established  by  the  1964  swim- 
ling  team.  Awarded  1966  to  Lee  Chickering  Eddy. 

Lacrosse  Trophy.  To  the  lacrosse  player,  excluding  the  captain,  who  through 
ithusiasm  and  love  for  the  sport  has  inspired  his  teammates  with  the  will  to  win. 
Zinner's  name  inscribed  on  trophy.  Presented  in  1954  by  the  members  of  the  lacrosse 
quad  in  honor  of  their  coach,  John  Richard  Lux.  First  awarded  1954.  Awarded  1966 
->  David  Ellsworth  Ludden. 

Smith  Hockey  Cup.  To  a  member  of  the  hockey  team,  exclusive  of  the  captain, 
ho  is  in  good  scholastic  standing  and  who  during  his  association  with  hockey  has 
Dntributed  most  to  the  sport  and  to  the  school  by  representing  its  ideals  through 
wrtsmanship,  endeavor,  and  ability.  A  silver  cup.  Funded  1954  by  Sumner  Smith,  Class 
f  1908.  First  awarded  1954.  Awarded  1966  to  Christopher  Jude  Gurry. 

Crew  Cup.  To  the  student  who  has  contributed  most  in  the  way  of  team  spirit  and 
>ortsmanship  to  the  crew.  Winner's  name  inscribed  on  cup.  Presented  195  5  by  the 
lembers  of  the  rowing  squad,  in  honor  of  their  coach,  William  Hayes  Brown,  Class  of 
934.  First  awarded  195  5.  Awarded  1966  to  Carl  Alzen  Wales. 

Track  Trophy.  To  the  member  of  the  winter  and  spring  varsity  track  squad  who 
chibits  outstanding  character  and  will  to  win.  Winner's  name  inscribed  on  trophy, 
resented  by  the  members  of  the  195  5  winter  and  spring  track  squads  in  honor  of  their 
)ach,  Stephen  Stanley  Sorota.  First  awarded  195  5.  Awarded  1966  to  James  Parnham 
abiani  and  Cary  Sutton  Underwood. 

Press  Club  Trophy.  To  the  student  who  has  proved  through  his  performance  on 
le  athletic  fields  to  be  the  most  capable  athlete  of  the  whole  year.  Winner's  name 
iscribed  on  trophy  and  winner  receives  replica  of  trophy.  Trophy  presented  1956  by 
le  members  of  the  Press  Club  of  Phillips  Academy  and  replicas  sustained  by  the  club, 
irst  awarded  1956.  Awarded  1966  to  John  Harvey  Turco. 

Sheridan  Medal.  To  the  student  who  has  contributed  most  to  the  intramural  ath- 
tic  program.  A  gold  medal.  Funded  1956  by  bequest  of  Fannie  J.  Sheridan,  in  memory 
f  her  grandson,  Harold  Joseph  Sheridan,  Jr.,  Class  of  1943,  who  gave  his  life  for  his 
Duntry  as  a  member  of  the  United  States  Marine  Corps  in  September  1944.  First 
warded  1957.  Awarded  1966  to  William  Henderson  Morrill. 

Football  Trophy.  To  the  member  of  the  Junior  Varsity  1  Team  who  con- 
ributed  most  to  Andover  football  below  the  Varsity  level.  Presented  in  195  5  by  the 
lembers  of  the  Junior  Varsity  1  Football  team.  Awarded  1966  to  Richard  Guild  Hin- 
un. 

Richard  S.  Pieters  Varsity  Wrestling  Award.  To  that  member  of  the  Varsity 
earn,  excluding  the  Captain,  who  demonstrates  throughout  the  season  outstanding  ability 
nd  enthusiasm  for  the  sport.  Winner's  name  inscribed  on  plaque.  Awarded  1966  to 
.obert  Thomas  Conlin. 

Peter  Q.  McKee  Ski  Bowl.  Awarded  annually  to  a  member  of  the  Varsity  Ski 
'earn  who  has  contributed  the  most  to  the  team  and  to  the  sport  of  skiing.  Winner's 
ame  inscribed  on  bowl.  Awarded  1966  to  Charles  Robert  Hogen,  Jr. 

Raymond  T.  Tippett  Memorial  Award.  Awarded  annually  to  a  senior  member 
f  the  varsity  football  or  baseball  team  whose  loyalty,  courage  and  modesty  exemplify 
he  character  of  Ray  Tippett  and  the  best  traditions  of  Andover  athletics.  Established 
p  1962  by  members  of  the  class  of  1945  for  a  prize  in  memory  of  their  classmate, 
Uymond  T.  Tippett.  Winner's  name  inscribed  on  plaque.  Awarded  1966  to  James  Parn- 
tam  Fabiani. 

Soccer  Cup.  To  be  awarded  annually  to  a  member  of  the  Soccer  Team,  exclusive  of 
he  captain,  who  has  contributed  most  to  the  team  through  his  sportsmanship,  effort, 
nd  ability.  Trophy  presented  in  1965  by  Stanley  C.  Smoyer.  First  awarded  in  1966  to 
Andrew  Delano  Abbott. 


86 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


OTHER  PRIZES 

Aurelian  Honor  Society  Prize.  To  a  member  of  the  graduating  class  who,  in  thi 
opinion  of  the  Faculty  and  his  classmates,  is  outstanding  in  sterling  character,  higl 
icholarship,  and  forceful  leadership.  Books.  First  awarded  1936.  Sustained  by  tb. 
Aurelian  Honor  Society.  Awarded  1966  to  Vinton  Douglas  Tompkins. 

Avars  Prize.  To  a  member  of  the  Senior  Class  who,  through  work,  perseveranc 
and  seeking  after  excellence,  has  created  for  himself  a  position  of  respect  and  admiratioi 
m  the  school  community.  $50.  First  awarded  1956.  Funded  1957  by  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jame 
S.  Avars,  in  memory  of  their  son,  James  Sterling  Ayars,  Jr.,  Class  of  1949.  Awarde. 
1966  to  Sclden  Thayer  Kirk. 

BlB&EB  Prize.  To  a  student  who  is  outstanding  in  character  and  personality.  $25 
First  awarded  1944.  Sustained  by  Eugene  S.  Bierer,  Class  of  1943.  Awarded  1966  to  Rob 
ert  Mallory  Browne. 

Faculty  Prize.  To  that  member  of  the  graduating  class  who  during  his  Senior  yea 
attained  the  highest  academic  average.  $100.  First  awarded  1912.  Funded  1923  by  Sanfor 
I  L  E.  Freund,  Class  of  1897,  and  increased  in  195  5  by  his  sister,  Miss  Camille  E.  Freunc 
Awarded  1966  to  Matthew  Cartwright  Mole. 

Federation  of  Harvard  Clubs  Prize.  To  an  outstanding  member  of  the  Upp< 
MiJdle  Class  who  combines  excellence  in  scholarship  with  achievement  in  other  field 
A  book.  First  awarded  in  1911.  Sustained  by  the  Harvard  Club  of  Andover.  Awarde 
1966  to  Jeffrey  Stephen  Melamed. 

Fuller  Prize.  To  a  member  of  the  Senior  Class  who,  having  been  at  Andover  n< 
less  than  two  years,  has  best  exemplified  and  upheld  in  his  life  and  work  at  Andover  tl 
ideals  and  traditions  of  the  school.  A  gold  medal.  First  awarded  1912.  Funded  1959  t 
Samuel  Lester  Fuller,  Class  of  1894.  Awarded  1966  to  James  Parnham  Fabiani. 

Hopper  Prize.  To  a  student  worker  in  the  Commons  who  is  outstanding  in  industr 
cooperation,  and  unselfishness.  $100.  First  awarded  1954.  Funded  195  3  by  friends  i 
Henry  Hopper  who,  for  thirty-eight  years,  served  Phillips  Academy  with  industr 

cooperation,  and  unselfishness.  Awarded  1966  to  Robert  Alan  Hutchison. 

Improvement  Prize.    To  a  member  of  the  Senior  Class  who  has  been  a  student 
Andover  for  at  least  two  years  and  who  has  shown  the  greatest  development  of  charact 
and  scholarship.  $100.  First  awarded  1941.  Sustained  by  a  member  of  the  Class  of  191 

Awarded  1966  to  Christopher  Jude  Gurry. 

Ki  yes  Prize.  To  a  boy,  who  in  his  Lower  Middle  year  shows  outstanding  qualit 
of  character,  leadership,  scholarship  and  athletic  ability.  $50.  Funded  195  8  by  Langl 
C.  Reyes,  Class  of  1920.  First  awarded  1959.  Awarded  1966  to  Davis  Burton  Everett. 

Kingsbury  Prize.  To  a  student  of  outstanding  character,  who,  in  the  judgment 
the  headmaster  is  especially  distinguished  for  perseverance  and  resolution.  $100.  Fii 
awarded  1943.  Funded  1945  by  Dr.  and  Mrs.  John  A.  Kingsbury,  in  memory  of  th< 
son,  John  Adams  Kingsbury,  Jr.,  Class  of  1934.  Awarded  1966  to  James  Francis  Gril 
Library  Prizes.  For  the  best  student  libraries  collected.  $30,  $15,  and  $10.  Sustain 
by  the  Friends  of  Oliver  Wendell  Holmes  Library  since  1956.  Awarded  1966  to  ( 
Norman  Yeh,  (2)  Donald  Montgomery  Neill,  (3)  Martin  Alan  Geiger. 

Lord  Prize.  To  a  Senior  who  during  his  residence  at  Phillips  Academy  has  display 
in  his  daily  actions  and  personal  contacts  a  genuinely  fine  character.  A  selection  of  boo 
First  awarded  1947.  Sustained  by  Mrs.  Mason  Faulconer  Lord,  in  memory  of  her  husba 
Mason  F.  Lord,  Class  of  1944.  Awarded  1966  to  Christopher  May  Keppelman. 

Phillipian  Prize.  For  outstanding  service  rendered  to  the  Phillipian.  $50.  Fi 
awarded  1931.  Funded  1931  by  James  Q.  Newton,  Class  of  1929,  and  Business  Manaj 
of  the  Pbilhpian  during  his  Senior  year.  Awarded  1966  to  James  Simon  Kunen. 

Sc  hweppe  (Richard  Jewett)  Prize.  To  a  member  of  the  Senior  Class  in  recognit 
of  an  unusual  spirit  of  cooperation  and  friendliness.  $100.  First  awarded  1947.  Func 
194<  by  Mrs.  Richard  J.  Schweppe,  in  memory  of  her  husband,  Richard  Jewett  Schwep 
Mi    of  1896.  Awarded  1966  to  Leslie  Hugh  Powell. 


PRIZES 


87 


Stearns  Prize.  In  honor  of  Dr.  Alfred  E.  Stearns,  Class  of  1890.  Headmaster  of 
Phillips  Academy  1903-1933,  to  a  student  who,  through  conscientious  effort,  high  ambi- 
;ion  and  courage,  outstanding  character  and  excellent  deportment,  has  made  Phillips 
\cademy  a  better  and  more  friendly  place  in  which  to  live.  $100.  First  awarded  19  51. 
mpportcd,  beginning  in  1959,  by  the  Roger  C.  Sullivan  Fund,  established  in  1921  by 
Joetius  H.  Sullivan,  Class  of  1905.  Awarded  1966  to  Vinton  Douglas  Tompkins. 

Abbot  Stevens  Prize.  To  a  member  of  the  Senior  Class,  upon  recommendation  of 
he  faculty,  who  through  his  character  and  leadership  has  made  a  significant  contribu- 
ion  to  the  Academy  and  to  his  classmates.  $100.  Funded  1959  by  Mrs.  Abbot  Stevens, 
n  memory  of  her  husband,  Abbott  Stevens,  Class  of  1907.  Awarded  1966  to  Jonathan 
iuell  Stevens. 

Stiles  Prize.  To  the  member  of  the  Upper  Middle  Class  whose  judgment  and  loyalty 
o  the  school  have  been  exemplary.  $50.  First  awarded  1960.  Funded  1960  by  Mrs. 
lussell  Stiles,  in  memory  of  her  husband,  Class  of  1908,  and  his  father,  Sumner  Burritt 
idles,  Class  of  1872.  Fund  increased  1960  by  her  son,  William  S.  Stiles,  Class  of  1942, 
nd  David  Stiles,  Class  of  1936.  Awarded  1966  to  Walton  Harris  Walker,  II. 

Sullivan  Prizes.  To  those  members  of  the  Senior,  Upper  Middle,  Lower  Middle,  and 
unior  Class  who  made  the  greatest  improvement  in  scholarship  during  the  previous 
chool  year.  Four  prizes  of  $200  each,  awarded  in  the  fall.  First  awarded  1921.  Funded 
921  by  Boetius  H.  Sullivan,  Class  of  1905,  in  memory  of  his  father,  Roger  C.  Sullivan. 
Vwarded  1966  to  Senior,  Christopher  John  Hallett,  Upper,  William  Henry  Barringer, 
.ower,  Robert  Hall  Arnold,  Junior,  John  Richard  Hawkins. 

Van  Duzer  Prizes.  Two  prizes  of  $3  50  each,  awarded  as  outlined  below,  (a)  Andover- 
iARVARD.  "The  income  is  awarded  annually  on  the  basis  of  high  scholarship  to  a  mem- 
er  of  the  incoming  Senior  Class  who  is  preparing  for  Harvard,  the  award  to  be  announced 
t  the  close  of  the  student's  Upper  Middle  year  on  the  basis  of  his  record  up  to  that  time." 
W/arded  1965  to  Marcus  Wayne  Wright,  (b)  Harvard-Andover.  "The  income  is  avail- 
ble  for  a  graduate  of  Phillips  Academy  during  his  Freshman  year  in  Harvard  College, 
he  award  based  on  high  scholarship,  to  be  announced  at  the  close  of  the  recipient's 
>enior  year  in  the  school."  Awarded  1965  to  James  Brian  Haley.  First  awarded  1912. 
;unded  1928  from  a  bequent  of  Henry  S.  Van  Duzer,  Class  of  1871. 

Warren  Prize.  To  a  member  of  the  Senior  Class  preparing  to  enter  Amherst  College 
vrho,  on  the  basis  of  character  and  scholarship,  is  deemed  most  deserving  of  the  award 
>y  the  faculty.  $50.  First  awarded  1926.  Funded  1925  by  Frank  Dale  Warren,  Jr.,  Class 
»f  1915,  in  memory  of  his  father,  Class  of  1879.  Awarded  1966  to  Stuart  Lunsford 
Sessions. 

Wells  Prize.  To  a  member  of  the  Junior  Class  who  has  displayed  the  outstanding 
lualities  of  loyalty,  perseverance,  and  sterling  character  which  characterized  the  boy 
n  whose  memory  the  prize  is  given.  $50.  First  awarded  195  3.  Sustained  by  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
.  Brent  Wells,  in  memory  of  their  son,  Anthony  Peters  Wells,  admitted  to  the  Class  of 
956.  Awarded  1966  to  David  Allen  Tibbetts. 

Jack  Williams  Prize.  To  that  member  of  the  Junior  Class,  residing  in  Williams 
■fall,  who  in  the  minds  of  the  proctors  and  housemaster  has  made  an  outstanding  con- 
ribution  to  dormitory  life  during  the  school  year.  Funded  in  1965  in  memory  of  John 

Williams  '61  by  his  family  and  friends.  Awarded  1966  to  Benjamin  Aaron  Gruber. 

Yale  Bowl.  To  that  member  of  the  Senior  Class  who  has  attained  the  highest  pro- 
iciency  in  scholarship  and  athletics.  First  awarded  1902.  Sustained  by  the  Yale  Club 
)f  Boston.  Awarded  1966  to  John  Harvey  Turco. 


SCHOLARSHIP  FUNDS 

Scholarships  are  provided  by  the  Trustees  from  the  income  of  the  fol- 
lowing funds: 

♦Hon.  William  Phillips  (179,5;  1804).  Begun  with  a  gift  from  Hon.  Wil- 
liam Phillips  and  increased  by  his  bequest  of  $4,000  _  „       $  4,63  3.33 

♦Students'  Educational  Fund  (1854).  Begun  with  a  gift  of  one  hundred 
dollars  from  the  Senior  Class  of  1854.  Since  then  increased  by  the  accu- 
mulation of  income  and  by  other  gifts,  including  one  of  $1,000  from 

Edward  Taylor,  Treasurer  of  Phillips  Academy,  1868-1889    7,762.64 

♦SAMUEL  Farrar  (  1  865  ).  Bequest  of  Samuel  Farrar,  1803,  Treasurer  of 
Phillips  Academy,  1808-1840.  (A  part  of  this  fund  is  for  other  pur- 
poses)       -    — •    22,000.00 

♦Jane  Aiken  Clarke  (1870).  James  G.  Clarke,  Class  of  1839,  in  memory 

of  his  mother    —      -   1,200.00 

■("Peter  Smith  Byers  (1878).  John  Byers,  Class  of  1848,  in  memory  of  his 

brother,  Class  of  1847     ......     500.00 

♦Class  of  1878  (1878).  Senior  Classical  class   „     1,200.00 

t Jonathan  Taylor  (1878).  Edward  Taylor,  Treasurer  of  Phillips  Acad- 
emy, 1868-1889,  in  memory  of  his  father     1,000.0C 

♦Hiram  W.  French  (1879),  Class  of  1839     1.000.0C 

♦Caroline  Parker  Taylor  (1880).  Mrs.  Alpheus  Hardy,  in  memory  of 
the  wife  of  Dr.  Samuel  H.  Taylor,  Principal  of  Phillips  Academy,  1  83  8- 

1871   _         1,000.01 

♦Gerard  Sumner  Wiggin   (1882).  Bequest  of  Lady  Elizabeth  Sumner 

Buckley-Mathew  Fleming,  in  memory  of  her  son,  Class  of  1875    1 ,000.0' 

♦Stone  Educational  Fund  (1882).  Mrs.  Valeria  G.  Stone  of  Maiden    26,400.0' 

♦Richards  (1889).  Mrs.  Mary  A.  Richards,  of  Andover,  in  memory  of  her 
sons,  Charles  Thomas  Richards,  assistant  in  the  Treasurer's  Office  of 

Phillips  Academy,  and  Edward  Stanley  Richards,  Class  of  1875    1,450.1 

♦Warren  F.  Draper  (1890),  Class  of  1843  ..  -   1,000.0 

^Charles  L.  Flint  (1890).  Bequest  of  Charles  L.  Flint,  Class  of  1845   5,000.0 

♦Henry  P.  Haven  (1890).  Trustees  of  Henry  P.  Haven  estate,  of  New 

London,  Conn.            „   1,000.0 

♦Emma  Lane  Smyth  (1890).  Gov.  Frederick  Smyth,  of  New  Hampshire, 

Class  of  1839,  in  memory  of  his  wife  .„   l,O00.C 

♦James  and  Persis  Taylor   (1890).  Mrs.  Mary  E.  Fairbanks,  sister  of 

Dr.  Samuel  H.  Taylor,  in  memory  of  her  father  and  mother    1,000.1 

♦Joseph  Dowe  (1892).  Bequest  of  Joseph  Dowe,  Class  of  1817    3,097.5 

Uohn  Cornell  (1894).  Bequest  of  John  Cornell.  Recommended  by  the 

School  Committee  of  Andover   „  _   5,000.( 

Awarded  1965-1966  to  Alan  Douglas  Dawson. 
♦James  Calvin  Taylor  (1895).  Mrs.  Mary  E.  Fairbanks,  in  memory  of 

her  brother,  Class  of  1840    1,000.< 

♦Mary  W.  Holbrook  (1900)   JOOJ 

♦  For  general  scholarship  purposes. 

tFor  general  scholarship  aid  for  boys  from  Andover. 
tFor  general  scholarship  aid;  preference  to  boys  from  Middleton. 


88 


SCHOLARSHIP  FUNDS 


89 


Carter  (1906).  Mrs.  Ruby  A.  Carter,  of  Andover,  in  memory  of  her 
husband  and  daughter   „.._  -    1, J 00.00 

German  Verhoeff  Hartwell  (1907;  1926).  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Frank  N. 
Hartwell,  in  memory  of  their  son,  Class  of  1908  _  -     5,000.00 

Seorge  Ripley  (1908).  Bequest  of  George  Ripley    ........   2,500.00 

I\  Augustus  Holt  (1909).  Bequest  of  T.  Augustus  Holt   „   26,003.24 

James  Huntington  (1910;  1931).  The  widow  and  daughter  of  James 
Huntington,  Class  of  1848      ^    2,000.00 

Allan  Morse  Penfield  (1913).  Bequest  of  Allan  Morse  Penfield,  Class 
of  1904        -       1,000.00 

jEorge  B.  Knapp  (1914).  Katharine  Knapp  estate,  in  memory  of  her 
brother,  Trustee  of  Phillips  Academy,  1899-1910  „    „   5,000.00 

Thomas  A.  Emerson  (1917).  Rev.  Thomas  A.  Emerson,  Class  of  18  59, 
and  Mrs.  Emerson  „      „  „     2,000.00 

obert  Henry  Coleman  (1919).  Mrs.  John  Coleman,  in  memory  of  her 
son,  Class  of  1912,  who  died  in  the  military  service  of  the  United 

States,  1918  .....  _  „    _    _  „  6,000.00 

"The  income  is  awarded  annually  at  the  end  of  his  Junior  year  to  a  stu- 
dent of  limited  means,  who,  in  the  judgment  of  the  Headmaster,  has 
displayed  the  most  promise  of  maintaining  the  highest  standard  of  worth, 
measured  by  character,  scholarship,  and  general  influence  in  the  school." 
Awarded  1965-1966  to  Michael  Bancroft  Winship. 

eorge  Xavier  McLanahan  (1919).  His  mother  and  sister,  in  memory  of 

George  Xavier  McLanahan,  Class  of  1892   .....    „  _  10,000.00 

"The  income  is  used  annually  for  the  assistance  of  a  worthy  student  or 
students  of  limited  means." 

Awarded  1965-1966  to  Cary  Sutton  Underwood. 

ordon  Ferguson  Allen  (1920;  1957).  James  F.  Allen,  of  Meriden,  Conn., 
and  his  sons,  Parker  B.  Allen,  Class  of  1914,  and  Theodore  F.  Allen, 
Class  of  1915,  in  memory  of  Gordon  Ferguson  Allen.  Increaed  in  1957 

by  Theodore  F.  Allen  ...    „  „  „  _   10,000.00 

"The  income  is  awarded  annually  to  a  deserving  student  of  character 

and  promise  and  of  limited  means." 

Awarded  1965-1966  to  David  Stanley  Goldstein. 

Rev.  William  Henry  and  Ellen  Cary  Haskell  (1920;  1936).  Rev. 
William  Henry  Haskell,  Class  of  1856,  and  his  five  sons,  Classes  of  1  8  83, 
1888,  1890,  and  1895         3,000.00 

Harriet  L.  Erving  (1922).  Bequest  of  Miss  Harriet  L.  Erving,  of  Andover, 

for  thirty  years  assistant  in  the  Treasurer's  Office   „     1,500.00 

Samuel  M.  Evans  (1922).  Class  of  1887.  (A  part  of  the  fund  is  for 
other  purposes)      „      2,000.00 

Charles  C.  Clough  (1923).  Princeton  University  classmates  and  friends 

of  Charles  C.  Clough,  Class  of  1906       5,000.00 

"The  income  is  awarded  annually  on  recommendation  of  the  Senior  Class 
to  that  member  of  the  Upper  Middle  Class  who  is  of  limited  means, 
and  who  most  embodies  those  qualities  of  manliness,  loyalty,  cheerfulness, 
high  purpose,  and  clean  living  which  were  conspicuous  in  the  character 
of  him  in  whose  memory  this  scholarship  was  established." 
Awarded  1965-1966  to  Walton  Harris  Walker.  II. 
Frank  Butler  Walker  (1923).  Bequest  of  Mrs.  Mary  C.  B.  Walker,  in 
memory  of  her  son,  Class  of  1889         1,425.00 

*  For  general  scholarship  purposes. 

tFor  general  scholarship  aid  for  boys  from  Andover. 


90 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


♦Abraham  B.  Coffin  (1924).  Bequest  of  Abraham  B.  Coffin,  Class  of  1852  2.000.0C 

\iiKin  Howlltt  Durston  (1926).  Marshall  H.  Durston,  Class  of  1900, 

in  memory  of  his  brother,  Class  of  1897    ..   5.000.0C 

'The  income  is  awarded  annually  to  a  student  of  limited  means  who, 
in  the  judgment  of  the  Headmaster,  embodies  the  best  ideals  of  student 
life,  scholarship,  character,  and  influence." 
Awarded  1965-1966  to  James  Francis  Grille 

SlilTH  Lewis  Multer,  Jr.  (1926).  Smith  Lewis  Multer,  in  memory  of  his 

son,  Class  of  1923  _      —  ~   5,000.01 

"The  income  is  awarded  annually  at  the  close  of  his  Upper  Middle  year 
to  a  worthy  student  of  limited  means  who,  in  the  judgment  of  the 
Headmaster,  has  exhibited  promise  in  scholarship  and  qualities  of  leader- 
ship and  wholesome  influence  in  the  general  activities  of  the  school." 
Awarded  1965-1966  to  James  Francis  Grille 

•Amasa  J.  Whiting  (1927;  1955).  Bequest  of  Mrs.  May  C.  W.  Speare,  in 

memory  of  her  father    —   5,159.5 

•James  H.  Haste  (1930;  1933-34;  1944).  Bequest  of  James  H.  Haste,  Class 

of  1894      ~~   241,074.1 

William  Thompson  Reed  Memorial  (1930;  1957).  His  father  and  mother 
and  members  of  his  family,  in  memory  of  William  Thompson  Reed, 

Class  of  1929      ......    ~   12,565.3 

"The  income  is  awarded  annually  to  a  student  of  character  and  promise 

at  the  beginning  of  his  Senior  year." 

Awarded  1965-1966  to  Ronald  Wayne  Takvorian. 

•Henry  Waldo  Greenough   (1931;   1937).  Bequest  of  Henry  Waldo 

Greenough,  Class  of  1889       2,000.( 

♦Moncrieff  M.  Cochran  (1932).  Bequest  of  Moncrieff  M.  Cochran,  Class 

•Bancroft  (1933).  Bequest  of  Cecil  K.  Bancroft,  Class  of  1887,  Registrar 

of  Phillips  Academy  1906-1932,  in  memory  of  his  father,  Dr.  Cecil  F.  P. 

Bancroft,  eighth  Principal  of  Phillips  Academy  „   2,000.1 

Schuyler  Bussing  Serviss  Memorial  (1936).  Mrs.  Charlotte  B.  Serviss, 

in  memory  of  her  son,  Class  of  1898  „     5,000.' 

Awarded  1965-1966  to  Robert  Paul  Reid,  III. 
•Osgood  Johnson  (1937).  Bequest  of  Helen  O.  Sprague,  in  memory  of  her 

grandfather,  Principal  1833-37,  and  her  father,  Class  of  1848.  For  New 

England-born  students  „.  „.    „   500. 

IDavid  and  Lucy  Hayward  Shaw  (1939).  Bequest  of  Lucy  Hayward 

Shaw  (Mrs.  David)    _    _   10,000. 

Augustus  Porter  Thompson   (1942).  Mrs.  Augustus  P.  Thompson,  of 

Andover,  in  memory  of  her  husband,  Class  of  1892    5,000. 

"The  income  is  awarded  annually  to  a  boy  who,  in  the  judgment  of 

the  Headmaster,  is  outstanding  in  intelligence  and  character." 

Awarded  1965-1966  to  James  Robert  Volker 
•Sumner  Smith  (1943),  Class  of  1908.  Balance  of  income  after  the  Smith 

Hockey  Cup       15142 

Julia  E.  Drinkwater  Memorial  (1944-56).  Arthur  Drinkwater,  Class  of 

1896,  and  William  Drinkwater,  Class  of  1900,  in  memory  of  their  mother  10,443 
"The  income  is  awarded  annually  to  deserving  students  of  character  and 
promise  and  limited  means." 

Income  from  the  William  Drinkwater  Fund  currently  added  to  that  of 
this  fund. 

Awarded  1965-1966  to  John  Harvey  Turco  and  Alberto  Miguel  Raurell,  Jr. 
*  For  general  scholarship  purposes. 
tFor  general  scholarship  aid  for  boys  from  Andover. 


SCHOLARSHIP  FUNDS 


91 


Charles  W.  Carl  (1944-46;  1950-53;  1955-56),  Class  of  1910    25,000.00 

"Income  to  be  used  during  his  Senior  year  by  an  outstanding  student 
who  is  a  member  of  an  Academy  athletic  team,  and  who,  in  a  previous 
year,  has  received  other  scholarship  aid  from  the  Academy  and  has  in- 
dicated his  intention  to  enter  Yale  University." 

Awarded  1965-1966  to  Jonathan  Buell  Stevens  and  James  Farand  Flowers. 

♦Louis  S.  Owsley  (1944-1946;  1948-1949).  Bequest  of  Louis  S.  Owsley, 
Class  of  1890.  Income  partially  subject  to  an  annuity;  balance  for  scholar- 
ships and  special  education  purposes   _      39  5,746.85 

Richard  Strong  Foxwell  (1945).  Mrs.  Gilbert  M.  Foxwell,  in  memory 

of  her  son,  Class  of  1922    _   —   2,500.00 

"Income  to  be  awarded  annually  to  a  deserving  student  of  limited  means 
to  meet  the  regular  expenses  of  the  school." 
Awarded  1965-1966  to  Albert  George  Mulley,  Jr. 

♦Arthur  L.  Kerrigan  (1945),  Class  of  1915    2,5  00.00 

♦Abbott  Stevens  (1945-46),  Class  of  1907.  Trustee  1935-58;  Treasurer 

1949-58     —  „.   20,000.00 

Herbert  E.  Stilwell  (1945;  1954).  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Charles  E.  Stilwell,  of 
Cleveland,  Ohio,  in  memory  of  their  son,  Class  of  1941,  who  was  lost 

in  the  English  Channel  on  a  mission  during  the  war     26,421.52 

"Income  to  be  awarded  annually  to  a  student  of  limited  means  who,  in 
the  judgment  of  the  Headmaster,  gives  evidence  of  those  qualities  of 
character,  initiative,  leadership  and  loyalty  which  contribute  to  real 
American  citizenship." 

Awarded  1965-1966  to  Howard  Gustave  Borgstrom. 
♦Cecil  K.  Bancroft  (1946).  Bequest  of  Mary  E.  Bancroft,  in  memory 
of  her  brother,  Class  of  1887,  Registrar  and  Instructor  at  Phillips 

Academy,  1906-1932     .    3,000.00 

♦Leonard  A.  Hockstader  (1946),  Class  of  1896     2,500.00 

Moses  Austin   Cartland   Shackford    (1946).   Professor  Martha  Hale 

Shackford,  of  Wellesley,  Mass.,  in  memory  of  her  brother,  Class  of  1891  5,000.00 
"Income  to  be  awarded  annually  to  a  boy  of  good  character  and  of 
limited  means,  preferably  from  New  Hampshire  and  preferably  pursuing 
a  classical  course." 

Awarded  1965-1966  to  Michael  Anthony  Fletcher. 
Macintyre  (1946-47;  1951).  John  Livingston  Macintyre,  of  the  Class  of 
1942,  Mrs.  John  L.  Macintyre,  and  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Mackenzie  Macintyre, 

of  Aurora,  111.,  in  memory  of  Mackenzie  Macintyre's  parents     12,100.34 

"Net  income  is  awarded  annually  to  a  worthy  student  of  limited  means 
who,  in  the  judgment  of  the  Headmaster,  has  exhibited  promise  in 
scholarship,  qualities  of  leadership  and  wholesome  influence  in  the  gen- 
eral activities  of  the  school." 
Awarded  1965-1966  to  David  Melville  Engvall. 

♦Robert  D.  Mills  (1947).  Bequest  of  Robert  D.  Mills,  Class  cf  1893    500.00 

fGEORGE  F.  Roberts  (1948).  Bequest  of  Mary  A.  Roberts     2,000.00 

Ray  A.  Shepard  (1949-1950;  1953;  1960-61).  Friends  of  Ray  A.  Shepard, 

Athletic  Director  of  Phillips  Academy,  1919-1949    „   2,630.3  5 

"The  income  is  awarded  annually  to  a  boy  of  limited  means  who  has 
shown  evidence  of  excellent  character  and  marked  ambition." 
Awarded  1965-1966  to  William  Joseph  Corcoran,  Jr. 
Suisman  Foundation   (1949-50;  1953  ;  1955-56).  The  Suisman  Founda- 
tion, Inc.,  Edward  A.  Suisman,  John  R.  Suisman,  Class  of  195  5,  Michael 
Suisman,  Class  of  1947,  and  Richard  Suisman,  Class  of  1950  >   15,000.00 

*  For  general  scholarship  purposes, 
t  For  general  scholarship  aid  for  boys  from  Andover. 


92 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


"Income  is  to  be  awarded  annually  to  a  student  selected  by  the  Scholar- 
ship Committee." 

Awarded  1965-1966  to  Michael  Paul  Currier. 

NbwTON-HinmaN  (1950).  Ahlers  Association,  in  honor  of  Frederick  E. 
Newton,  Class  of  1893,  and  George  W.  Hinman,  Class  of  1894,  former 
instructors  at  Phillips  Academy  and  faculty  guardians  of  the  PBX 
Society   _.      -    

SOCIETY  Scholarships.  The  following  funds  for  scholarship  purposes  were 
established  through  the  generosity  of  the  Secret  Societies  at  the  time  of 
their  dissolution. 

*AGC  Society  (1950).  The  Rogers  Associates,  Inc  

Balance  of  income  after  the  Benner  Prize 

*AUV  Society  (1950).  AUV  Corporation  

♦EDP  (  1950).  The  Eta  Delta  Phi  Society    ... 

Balance  of  income  after  Schubert  Award 

*FLD  Society  (1950;  1956).  The  Davison  Associates,  Inc  

*KOA  Society  (1950).  The  Blodgett  Association  

*PAE  Society  (1950).  The  Cooley  Association  

*PBX  Society  (1950).  (See  Newton-Hinman,  above)  

*PLS  Society  (1950).  Phi  Lambda  Sigma  Association   .....  

♦Anonymous  (1951)    -  —  —  

Richard  Jewett  Schweppe  Memorial  (1951-53;  1957-58).  Mrs.  Richard 

J.  Schweppe,  in  memory  of  her  husband,  Class  of  1896   

"Income  for  a  scholarship  (s)  to  be  awarded  annually  to  a  student  who 

shows  promise  of  leadership,  responsibility  and  enthusiasm,"  and  for  a 

prize. 

Awarded  1965-1966  to  Robert  James  Sperry  and  George  Booker  Nevius. 

*  Isabel  C.  McKenzie  (1952).  Bequest  of  Mrs.  Isabel  C.  McKenzie   

*AUV  Society- James  C.  Graham  Memorial  (1955).  AUV  Corporation, 
in  memory  of  James  C.  Graham,  instructor  at  Phillips  Academy,  1893- 

1937    _  _    „  „  

Chauncey  O'Neil   (1955-1959).  Edward  OTSfeil,  II,  Class  of  1927,  in 

memory  of  his  father,  Class  of  1899  „.  „  *a  

"The  income  to  be  awarded  annually  to  a  boy  or  boys  from  Western 
Pennsylvania." 

Awarded  1965-1966  to  John  Albert  Parker,  Jr. 

Horace  Martin  Poynter  (195  5-59).  His  wife,  Elsie  P.  Poynter,  and  his 
sisters,  Juliet  J.  Poynter  and  Harriet  R.  Poynter,  in  memory  of  Horace 
Martin  Poynter,  Class  of  1896,  instructor  at  Phillips  Academy  1902-1945. 

Income  partially  subject  to  an  annuity     

Awarded  1965-1966  to  Joseph  John  O'Hern  and  John  Ponton  Cuthbertson. 

*G.  Louise  and  Nelson  Robinson  (1955  ;  1957).  Bequest  of  Mrs.  G.  Louise 
Rob  inson  de  Dombrowski;  and  in  memory  of  her  uncle,  Nelson  Robinson 

Walter  Brooks  Memorial  (19J6).  The  Walter  Brooks  Foundation,  in 
memory  of  Walter  Brooks      

Hamilton  (1956-1964).  John  D.  Hamilton,  Class  of  1913,  in  memory  of 

his   father,  J.   D.   Hamilton  „  

"The  income  is  to  be  used  to  assist  a  boy  or  boys  who  may  be  in  need 
of  financial  aid  and  who  reside  in  the  United  States  west  of  the  Mississippi 
River." 

Awarded  1965-1966  to  John  Joseph  Leone. 

Evert  W.  Freeman  (1956-58).  Bequest  of  Evert  W.  Freeman,  Class  of 
1917    


22,243.17 


24,461.94 

3  5,000.00 
5,000.00 

18,115.14 
35,176.17 
35,000.00 

17,000.00 
1,000.00 

3  8,000.00 


25,000.00 

10,500.00 
27,000.00 


*  For  general  scholarship  purposes. 


23,481.25 

891,480.25 
30,000.00 
22,295.76 


29,380.23 


SCHOLARSHIP  FUNDS  93 

"The  income  to  be  awarded  annually  to  a  student  who  shows  promise 
of  substantial  accomplishment,  but  who  for  the  time  being  is  in  financial 
need." 

Awarded  1965-1966  to  Leslie  Hugh  Powell. 

oseph  Kaplan  (1956-59;  1962).  Joseph  Kaplan  and  other  donors   -   19,765.00 

"The  income  is  awarded  annually  at  the  end  of  the  Senior  year  to  a 
student,  or  students,  of  limited  means  for  use  in  the  freshman  year  at 
college,  the  award  to  be  made  with  due  regard  to  fine  character  and 
promise  of  adult  usefulness." 
Awarded  1965-1966  to  Miklos  Jako. 

Louis  N.  Bennett  Memorial  (1957-58).  Bequest  of  Mrs.  Josephine  C.  S. 

Blaisdell,  in  memory  of  her  brother,  Class  of  1893  ~      1,000.00 

Alexander  Angus  McDonell,  Jr.  (1957-58;  1964).  Mrs.  Alexander  Angus 
McDonell,  in  memory  of  her  son,  Class  of  193  5,  who  gave  his  life  for 
his  country  as  a  member  of  the  United  States  Air  Force  on  June  20, 

1944   .   _  _   23,721.85 

Awarded  1965-1966  to  William  Lawrence  Steele,  Jr. 

Putney  (1957).  R.  Emerson  Putney,  Class  of  1928  „   5,067.82 

Edmund  B.  Cabot  (1957-61).  Thomas  D.  Cabot     „....„   9,230.93 

William  Drinkwater  (195  8).  Bequest  of  William  Drinkwater,  Class  of 
1900.  Unrestricted.  Income  currently  added  to  that  of  the  Julia  E. 
Drinkwater  Memorial  fund         2  5,111.11 

ndiana  (195  8-59).  Bequest  of  James  C.  Thornton,  Class  of  1904.  Prefer- 
ence to  boys  from  Indiana.  Income  added  to  fund        11,218.11 

Alfred  O.  Hitchcock,  Jr.  (1959).  Bequest  of  Alfred  O.  Hitchcock,  Jr., 
Class  of  1895    ....    600.00 

Helen  Davis  Hood  (1959-60).  Bequest  of  Helen  Davis  Hood  (Mrs.  Gil- 
bert H).  Increased  in  1960  by  Gilbert  H.  Hood  Memorial  Fund  _  ...  6,000.00 

Aay  T.  Morrison  (1959).  May  T.  Morrison  Estate   „     10,000.00 

Awarded  1965-1966  to  Richard  Francis  Delaney. 

Henry  Mann  Silver  (1959).  Bequest  of  Henry  Mann  Silver,  Class  of 

1868         4,206.46 

William  Madison  Wood  (1959-60).  Cornelius  A.  Wood,  Jr.,  Class  of  19  37, 

in  memory  of  his  grandfather.  Income  added  to  fund   _  _   3,327.61 

Horace  D.  Bellis   (1960).  Bequest  of  Horace  D.  Bellis,  director  of 

gymnasium  1901-02        „   108,080.05 

Iarvey  Dann  (1960-61;  1963).  Income  added  to  fund  ..„  „   1,015.38 

Francis  F.  Patton  (1962).  Bequest  of  Francis  F.  Patton,  Class  of  1908  5,000.00 
Jack  Moon   (1963).  Mrs.  Wayne  Hayward  in  memory  of  her  father, 

Sumner  Gilbert  Moon,  Class  of  1895    „  13,427.95 

4enry  T.  Mudd,  Jr.  (1963-1964).  Henry  T.  Mudd  Jr.,  Class  of  1960    17,152.11 

Awarded  1965-1966  to  Preston  Robert  Black. 

Idward  A.  and  Samuel  C.  Suisman  (1963-65).  Edward  A.  and  Samuel  C. 

Suisman        „     5,921.30 

Awarded  1965-1966  to  Michael  Paul  Currier. 

Ralph  B.  Carter,  III  (1964).  Bequest  of  Ralph  B.  Carter,  III,  Class  of 

1941     .   „   14,261.66 

Awarded  1965-1966  to  James  Farrand  Flowers. 

John  W.  Weber  (1964).  Bequest  of  Ralph  B.  Carter,  III,  Class  of  1941   14,261.65 

Awarded  1965-1966  to  Arthur  Maxwell  Field,  III. 

*  For  general  scholarship  purposes. 


94  PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 

San  ford  H.  E.  Freund  (1964).  Bequest  of  Sanford  H.  E.  Freund,  Class  of 

1897   -   60,920.40 

Awarded  1965-1966  to  Peter  David  Constantineau,  John  William  Dineen 
and  Charles  William  Vinick. 

FRANCIS  F.  O'Donnell  (1964).  Bequest  of  Francis  F.  O'Donnell,  Class  of 

1921        -   100,000.0( 

Awarded  1965-1966  to  Alexander  James  Belida,  Jr.  and  John  Thomas 
O'Rourke. 

Charles  H.  Sullivan  (1964).  Bequest  of  Joseph  C.  Sullivan,  Class  of  1913      10, 000. Of 

Awarded  1965-1966  to  James  Stidger  Pickering. 
Mary  E.  Sullivan  (1964).  Bequest  of  Joseph  C.  Sullivan,  Class  of  1913   10,000.01 

Awarded  1965-1966  to  Dennis  Edward  Tottenham. 

*  Charles  F.  Oberhauser   (1965).  Bequest  of  Charles  F.  Oberhauser  of 

Somerville,  Mass.    ..  _     1,039.6 

*Gi:orge  Tait  Hall  (1965).  Mrs.  George  Tait  Hall  and  others  in  memory 

of  George  Tait  Hall,  Class  of  1933   2,508.5 

*  Chester  N.  Whitney  (1966).  Mrs.  Mary  E.  Whitney  in  memory  of  her 

husband,  Chester  N.  Whitney,  Class  of  1902   2,000.0 

ANNUAL  GIFT  SCHOLARSHIPS 

Philip  B.  Stewart  Scholarship (s).  $2,500.  To  be  used  for  not  more  than  tw 
scholarships  in  the  Senior  class.  Sustained  (since  1959)  by  the  Sarah  Frances  Hutchinsc 
Cowles  Fund,  Inc.,  in  memory  of  Phillip  B.  Stewart,  Class  of  1882. 

Awarded  1965-1966  to  Warren  von  Credo  Baker  and  Gary  Andrew  Ahrens. 

*  For  general  scholarship  purposes. 


ALUMNI  REPRESENTATIVES 

(Arranged  alphabetically  by  state.  Foreign  countries  at  end  of  listing) 

A  personal  interview  is  required  of  all  candidates.  Whenever  possible,  it  is  highly 
lesirable  that  candidates  come  to  Andover  for  a  personal  interview  with  the  Director  of 
Ydmissions,  the  Admissions  Officer,  or  one  of  the  Interviewing  Officers.  Candidates  unable 
o  visit  Andover  may  themselves  arrange  an  interview  at  a  mutually  convenient  time 
vith  one  of  the  Alumni  Representatives  listed  below.  A  definite  appointment  for  an 
nterview,  whether  in  Andover  or  elsewhere,  should  be  arranged  in  advance.  Candidates 
vho  would  find  it  a  real  hardship  to  get  to  any  of  the  centers  listed  should  communicate 
vith  the  Admissions  Office  about  the  possibility  of  seeing  a  representative  not  listed 
>clow. 


ALABAMA 

Birmingham 

Robert  B.  Donworth,  Jr.,  '42 
1500  Brown  Marx  Bldg. 
Mobile 

Frank  M.  Hicks,  Jr.,  '41 

P.  O.  Box  78 
Montgomery 
Peter  C.  Mohr,  '54 

2739  Colonial  Dr. 

ALASKA 

Anchorage 
John  V.  Munroe,  Jr.,  '48 
1814  Scenic  Way 
Juneau 

Cadmus  Z.  Gordon,  Jr.,  '16 
Box  2571 

\RIZONA 
Phoenix 

Howard  K.  Brown,  Jr.,  '31 
P.  O.  Box  190 
Sahuarita 

Keith  S.  Brown,  '31 

Box  8,  Santa  Rita  Ranch 
Tucson 
John  S.  Greenway,  '42 
1634  North  Olsen  Ave. 

ARKANSAS 
little  Rock 
Mose  Smith,  III,  M.D.,  '48 
7  Cantrell  Rd. 

CALIFORNIA 
Davis 

Donald  M.  Reynolds,  '3  8 
Department  of  Bacteriology 
University  of  California 
La  Jolla 

William  T.  Adams,  '28 
5911  Waverly  Ave. 


Los  Angeles 

Otis  Chandler,  '46 

Los  Angeles  Times 

Times-Mirror  Square 
Walter  L.  Farley,  Jr.,  '28 

12300  1st  Helena  Dr. 
Richard  A.  Moore,  '32 

6290  Sunset  Blvd. 
H.  Burt  Reiter,  '2  5 

The  Prudential  Insurance  Co. 

5757  Wilshire  Blvd. 
Marysville 

Harold  S.  Edwards,  '28 

770  Rameriz  Rd. 
Pacific  Palisades 

Benjamin  H.  Dorman,  '2  5 

1515  San  Remo  Dr. 
San  Diego 

George  E.  Mumby,  '24 

5001  College  Ave. 
San  Francisco 

John  P.  Austin,  '32 

Equitable  Life  Bldg. 

120  Montgomery  St. 
Hamilton  W.  Budge,  '46 

Brobeck.  Phleger  &  Harrison 

111  Sutter  St. 
Sherman  Chickering,  '29 

111  Sutter  St. 
William  S.  Creighton,  '39 

2939  Divisadero  St. 
Charles  A.  O'Brien,  '44 

Department  of  Justice 

6000  State  Bldg. 
Santa  Barbara 

Mancel  T.  Clark,  Jr.,  '28 

605  San  Ysidro  Rd. 

COLORADO 

Colorado  Springs 

Capt.  Frank  Zagorski,  '44 
Quarters  4510-E 
U.  S.  Air  Force  Academy 


95 


96 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Denver 

Richard  M.  Davis,  '29 

860  Gaylord  St. 
John  F.  Malo,  '40 

245  5  South  Jackson  St. 
John  C  Mitchell,  2nd,  '34 

2601  South  Sheridan  Blvd. 
David  C.  Wilhelm,  '3  8 

1408  East  47th  Ave. 

DELAWARE 

Wilmington 

Hon.  Caleb  R.  Layton,  III,  '26 

P.  O.  Box  46 
Edward  R.  McLean,  '34 

E.  L  duPont  deNemours  &  Co.,  Inc. 

International  Dept. 

DISTRICT  OF  COLUMBIA 

Washington 

George  W.  Beatty,  '50 
Lee,  Toomey  &  Kent 
1200  Eighteenth  St.,  N.W. 

Lawrence  C.  Dalley,  Jr.,  '45 
888  17th  St.,  N.W. 

FLORIDA 

Clear  uater 

William  H.  Fenn,  '48 

5  8  North  Pine  Circle,  Belleair 
Jacksonville 
Laurence  F.  Lee,  Jr.,  '40 
Peninsular  life  Insurance  Co. 
M/'tfwii 

D.  Pierre  G.  Cameron,  '21 

Ransom  School 

3  575  Main  Highway 

Coconut  Grove 
David  J.  Williams,  II,  '3  8 

1  395  5  S.W.  82nd  Ave. 
Vonte  Vedra  Beach 

Arthur  W.  Milam,  '45 

P.  O.  Box  632 
Sarasota 

Parker  C.  Banzhaf,  '3  8 

343  5  Sea  Grape  Dr. 

GEORGIA 
Atlanta 

Herbert  R.  Elsas,  '28 

3  510  Paces  Ferry  Rd.,  N.W. 
Frank  F.  Ford,  '32 
Bus. — P.O.  Box  19652 
Home— 2817  Habersham  Rd.,  N.W. 
Columbus 

M.  C.  Jennings,  '36 
Box  2121 


HAWAII 

Honolulu 

Nathan  F.  Banfield,  3d,  '36 
P.  O.  Box  3200 
First  National  Bank  of  Hawaii 

IDAHO 

Leiviston 

George  F.  Jewett,  Jr.,  '45 
320  21st  Ave. 

ILLINOIS 

Chicago 

Gardner  Brown,  '24 
White,  Weld  &  Co. 
30  West  Monroe  St. 
David  A.  Dudley,  '28 
Director  of  Admissions 
Illinois  Institute  of  Technology 
3300  South  Federal  St. 
Lake  Forest 

Barry  C.  Phelps,  '49 
1699  Riverwoods  Rd. 
Nortbfield 

W.  Newton  Burdick,  Jr.,  '3  5 
217  Dickens  Rd. 
Rock  Island 

George  T.  French,  '29 
1230  36th  Ave. 
Skokie 

R.   Neison   Harris,  '32 
9444  Skokie  Blvd. 
Peoria 

Charles  H.  Kellogg,  '3  5 
908  Stratford  Dr. 

INDIANA 

Evansville 

Reginald  B.  Collier,  '45 
7300  Newburgh  Rd. 
Indianapolis 

David  Moxley,  '42 
Kiefer-Stewart  Co. 
1515  North  Senate  Ave. 
C.  Perry  Griffith,  '45 
499  Forest  Blvd. 

IOWA 

Davenport 

Alan  S.  Howard,  '27 
118  Ridgewood  St. 

KENTUCKY 

Anchorage 

Samuel  S.  Caldwell,  Jr.,  '29 
Lincoln  Ln. 


ALUMNI  REPRESENTATIVES 


97 


Louisville 
William  H.  Abell,  '28 

Commonwealth  Life  Insurance  Co. 
4th  and  Broadway 

OUISIANA 
New  Orleans 
C.  Horton  Smith,  II,  '28 

108  Duplessis  St. 
Marshall  L.  Posey,  Jr.,  '5  5 
Bus. — c/o  Kern  Co.  Land  Co., 
500  Saratoga  Bldg. 
Home — 1511  Robert  St. 
Shreveport 

Donald  A.  Raymond,  Jr.,  '32 
1132  Erie  St. 

1ARYLAND 
Annapolis 
H.  Richard  Duden,  '43 
Perry  Farms 
Baltimore 

Leonard  M.  Gaines,  Jr.,  M.D.,  '45 

213  South  Tyrone  Rd. 
Bethesda 

William  C.  Hart,  '40 

7504  Hampden  Lane 

(ICHIGAN 
Ann  Arbor 
Charles  H.  Sawyer,  '24 
2  Highland  Ln. 
Birmingham 
Frederick  G.  Bahr,  '47 

540  Berwyn  St. 
Donald  H.  Parsons,  '48 
Emery,  Parsons  &  Bahr 
1100  North  Woodward 
Detroit 

William  G.  Butler,  '30 

2500  Detroit  Bank  &  Trust  Bldg. 
George  H.  Hunt,  Jr.,  '37 

223  8  Buhl  Bldg. 
Russell  H.  Lucas,  '12 

83  3  Penobscot  Bldg. 
Grand  Rapids 

Paul  F.  Steketee,  Jr.,  '26 

2700  Reeds  Lake  Blvd. 
Grosse  Pointe  Farms 
Carlton  M.  Higbie,  Jr.,  '3  5 

93  Kenwood  Rd. 
David  W.  Kendall,  '20 

75  Lake  Shore  Dr. 

V1INNESOTA 
Minneapolis 
Louis  Polk,  Jr.,  '49 
General  Mills,  Inc. 
9200  Wayzata  Blvd. 


A.  Lachlan  Reed,  '3  5 

Minneapolis-Honeywell  Regulator 
Co. 

275  3  4th  Ave.,  S. 
Arne  L.  Schoeller,  '48 

1924  James  Ave.,  S. 
J.  Kimball  Whitney,  '46 

Whitney  Land  Co. 

907  First  National  Bank  Bldg. 
Wheelock  Whitney,  Jr.,  '44 

Box  50,  Route  5,  Wayzata 

MISSISSIPPI 
Jackson 

Donald  K.  Cameron,  Jr.,  '48 

936  Briarwood  Dr. 
William  D.  Lynch,  '3  8 

134  Chippewa  Circle 

MISSOURI 
Clayton 

Eugene  F.  Williams,  '42 
21  St.  Andrews  Dr. 
Columbia 

George  C.  Miller,  '3  5 
600  South  Greenwood 
Joplin 

Lawrence  S.  Crispell,  M.D.,  '3  8 

Sixth  and  Pearl  Ave. 
Kansas  City 

Stephen  W.  Harris,  '3  8 

4700  Belleview 
St.  Joseph 

Robert  A.  Brown,  Jr.,  '49 

Brown,  Douglas  and  Brown 

Tootle-Enright  National  Bank  Bldg. 
F.  Gregg  Thompson,  Jr.,  M.D.,  '47 

902  Edmond  St. 
St.  Louis 

Peter  B.  Hubbell,  '50 

5154  Westminster  PI. 
John  Shepley,  '42 

503  Locust  St. 

MONTANA 
Missoula 

Meridan  H.  Bennett,  '45 
340  Keith  Ave. 
Philipsburg 

F.  William  Vietor,  '37 
Rocking  Chair  Ranch 

NEBRASKA 
Omaha 

James  A.  C.  Kennedy,  Jr.,  '3  3 
1  502  City  National  Bank 

NEVADA 
Deeth 

William  B.  Wright,  Jr.,  '50 
Mary's  River  Ranch 


98 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Reno 

Robert  S.  Kimball,  3d,  '51 
P.  O.  Box  3117 

NEW  MEXICO 
Albuquerque 

Gregory  H.  Illanes,  Jr.,  '38 
Quinn  &  Co. 
200  2nd  St. 
John  P.  Eastham,  '45 

Rodey,  Dickason,  Sloan,  Akin  & 
Robb 

First  National  Bank  Bldg. — West 
Santa  Fe 

Leslie  M.  Redman,  M.D. 
Route  1,  Box  177 

NEW  YORK 
Amsterdam 

Leon  H.  Young,  '20 
22  Summit  Ave. 
Buffalo 

Walter  F.  Stafford,  Jr.,  M.D.,  '3  8 

24  Tudor  PI. 
John  N.  Walsh,  Jr.,  '39 
8  5  Highland  Ave. 
Cazenovia 

Robert  B.  Simonton,  '50 
West  Lake  Rd. 
Ithaca 

Andrew  Schultz,  Jr.,  '32 

631  Highland  Rd. 
Mamaroneck 

Bernard  L.  Boyle,  Jr.,  '27 

1120  Cove  Rd. 
New  York  City 

Bromwell  Ault,  '18 

50  East  77th  St. 
Prescott  S.  Bush,  Jr.,  '40 

Johnson  &  Higgins 

63  Wall  St. 
Nathaniel  M.  Cartmell,  Jr.,  '42 

McGraw-Hill  Publishing  Co. 

3  30  West  42nd  St. 
Joseph  C.  Fox,  '34 

Kidder,  Peabody  &  Co. 

17  Wall  St. 
William  D.  Hart,  '36 

Parker,  Duryee,  Benjamin  Zunino 
&  Malone 

1  East  44th  St. 
Richard  D.  Lombard,  '49 

Lombard,  Vitalis  &  Paganucci,  Inc. 

1 1 1  Broadway 
John  D.  Lynch,  '46 

T.  &  W.  Seligman  &  Co. 

6  5  Broadway 
J.  Quigg  Newton,  Jr.,  '29 

I  East  75th  St. 


Lovett  C.  Peters,  '32 

16  Sutton  Place 
William  C.  Ridgway,  Jr.,  '25 

Crum  &  Forster 

110  William  St. 
Rochester 

Bruce  B.  Bates,  '49 

87  Grosvenor  Rd. 
John  H.  Castle,  Jr.,  '34 

Ritter  Co.,  Inc. 

400  West  Ave. 
Samuel  P.  Connor,  Jr.,  '24 

Amsden-Connor -Mitchell,  Inc. 

146  Broad  St. 
Martin  H.  Donahoe,  Jr.,  '31 

343  State  St. 
Gordon  P.  Small,  '42 

1237  Midtown  Tower 
Syracuse 

William  O.  Airman,  M.D.,  '42 
1117  East  Genesee  St. 

David  H.  Northrup,  '32 
205  DeWitt  St. 

NORTH  CAROLINA 

Charlotte 

E.  Osborne  Ayscue,  '51 

800  North  Carolina  Nat'l  Bank 
Bldg. 
Durham 

Peregrine  White,  '29 

39  Kimberly  Dr. 

NORTH  DAKOTA 
Fargo 

Thomas  L.  Powers,  '20 
1617  Seventh  St.,  S. 

OHIO 

Akron 

Wayne  F.  Anderson,  '37 

504  Delaware  Ave. 
Cincinnati 

William  Hausberg,  2d,  '32 

2600  Willowbrook  Dr. 
Rt.  Rev.  Henry  W.  Hobson,  '1C 

40  5  Albion  St.,  Glendale 
Fletcher  E.  Nyce,  '26 

The  Central  Trust  Co. 

WlLFORD  L.  ROMNEY,  '19 

7  Sylvan  Ln.,  Wyoming 
David  M.  Watt 

3322   Mowbray  Ln. 
Cleveland 

Edw.  T.  Bartlett,  II 

31700  Fairmount  Blvd. 
Thomas  J.  Keefe,  '50 

3  290  Glencairn  Rd. 


ALUMNI  REPRESENTATIVES  99 


James  C.  Miller,  II,  '50 

2347  Tudor  Dr. 
James  R.  Stewart,  '27 

1144  Union  Commerce  Bldg. 
Cleveland  Heights 
Edward  D.  Yost,  '47 
3137  Fairfax  Rd. 
Dayton 

Vernon  E.  Midgley,  '42 
Martin  Company 
131   North  Ludlow  St. 
Gates  Mills 
George  Oliva,  Jr.,  '39 
West  Hill  Dr. 
Granville 
George  W.  Chessman,  '37 
Briarwood  Rd. 

KLAHOMA 

Bartlesville 

Carl  M.  Elkan,  '3  5 
3  501    Woodlawn  Rd. 
Oklahoma  City 
John  H.  Edwards,  '22 

2205  Liberty  Bank  Bldg. 
Dr.  Stewart  G.  Wolf,  Jr.,  '31 
644  N.E.  14th  St. 
Tulsa 

James  M.  Bird,  '3  5 
Box  1590 

c/o  Seismograph  Service  Corp. 
Henry  C.  Williams,  '3  8 
5159  East  31st  St. 

•REGON 

Portland 
Broughton  H.  Bishop,  '45 

Pendleton  Woolen  Mills 

218  S.W.  Jefferson  St. 
Edmund  Hayes,  Jr.,  '44 

4256  S.W.  Patrick  PI. 
Frederick  J.  Kingery,  M.D.,  '45 

2250  N.W.  Flanders  St. 

ENNSYLVANIA 

All  en  town 
Charles  D.  Snelling,  '49 
2949  Greenleaf  St. 
Chambersburg 
John  M.  Sharpe,  Jr.,  '46 
630  Philadelphia  Ave. 
Indiana 
Joseph  N.  Mack,  '44 
Farmers  Bank  Bldg. 
Narberth 

Tolbert  N.  Richardson,  Jr.,  '27 
50  Righters  Mill  Rd. 


Philadelphia 

Henry  R.  Hallowell,  '39 

12  South  12  th  St. 

c/o  Gray  &  Rogers 
James  M.  Mead,  '47 

31  East  Springfield  Ave. 
Amory  M.  Sommaripa,  M.D.,  '48 

203  Chestnut  Hill  Ave. 
Pittsburgh 

Robert  S.  Kimball,  Jr.,  '27 

136  Beech  St. 
Edward  O'Neil,  '27 

P.  O.  Box  1692 
John  M.  Phillips,  Jr.,  '30 

Phillips  Corp. 

700  Clairton  Blvd. 
Scran  ton 

W.  Lawson  Chamberlin,  '34 

Chamberlin  &  Clarke 

Northeastern  National  Bank  Bldg. 
Waverly 

Thomas  M.  Rodes,  '54 

Beech  St. 

P.  O.  Box  231 
James  W.  Vipond,  '30 

Waverly  Dalton  Rd. 
Wayne 

Robert  Schafer,  '29 

730  Mancill  Rd. 

SOUTH  CAROLINA 
Charleston 

McColl  Pringle,  '33 
E.  H.  Pringle  &  Co. 
Columbia 

John  R.  Craft,  '29 

Columbia  Museum  of  Art 
Senate  and  Bull  Sts. 
Orangeburg 

Benner  C.  Turner,  '23 
South  Carolina  State  College 

SOUTH  DAKOTA 
Keystone 

James  E.  Liles,  '5  5 

Mount  Rushmore  National  Memo- 
rial 
Porcupine 

Rev.  George  P.  Pierce,  '49 
Pine  Ridge  Indian  Reservation 
Sioux  Falls 

Hiram  G.  Ross,  '21 
Box  423 

TENNESSEE 
Knoxville 

John  Muldowny,  '44 
University  of  Tennessee 
Department  of  History 


100 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Memphis 

Henry  Loeb,  III,  '39 
J65  Colonial  Rd. 
Nashville 

Robert  L.  Gwinn,  '29 
1719  West  End  Dr. 
Brush,  Hutchinson  &  Gwinn 

TEXAS 

Amarillo 

Edward  L.  Roberts,  '06 
2211  Harrison  St. 
Dallas 

N.  Bruce  Calder,  '41 

921 1  Guernsey  Ln. 
William  F.  Neale,  Jr.,  '44 

1010  Hartford  Bldg. 
John  R.  Sears,  '36 

Republic  National  Bank  of  Dallas 

El  Paso 

John  D.  Mason,  Jr.,  '42 
4208  North  Stanton  St. 
lort  Worth 

Edwin  S.  Ryan,  '49 
1700  Catalina  Dr. 
Houston 

George  H.  W.  Bush,  '42 

1740  Houston  Club  Bldg. 
David  M.  Underwood,  '54 
Home — 3  506  Del  Monte 
Bus. — 724  Travis  St. 
San  Antonio 

John  M.  Bennett,  Jr.,  '27 
National  Bank  of  Commerce 

UTAH 

Ogden 

Roderick  H.  Browning,  '44 

2641  Washington  Blvd. 
Salt  Lake  City 

Lincoln  D.  Clark,  M.D.,  '42 

156  Westminster  Ave. 
C.  Chauncey  Hall,  M.D.,  '41 

2652  East  6200  South 

VIRGINIA 

Charlottesville 

Gardner  W.  Smith,  M.D.,  '49 
University   of  Virginia  Hospital 
108  Woodstock  Dr. 
Norfolk 

Jere  A.  Klotz,  M.D.,  '41 
5  5  34  Lakewood  Dr. 
Richmond 

Thomas  Walker,  M.D.,  '28 
Richmond  Memorial  Hospital 
1300  Westwood  Ave. 


WASHINGTON 

Bellevue 

Walter  S.  Kimball,  M.D.,  '30 
3407  76th  Ave.,  N.E. 
Evergreen  Point 
Seattle 

Lucius  H.  Biglow,  Jr.,  '42 

1900  Washington  Bldg. 
Pendleton  Miller,  '28 

711  Central  Bldg. 
Holt  W.  Webster,  '39 
2000  12th  Ave.,  E. 
Snoqualmie  falls 

Frederick  W.  Hayes 
P.  O.  Box  97 
Spokane 

Samuel  L.  Galland,  '25 
West  1612  Marc  Dr. 
Tacoma 

Howard  S.  Reed,  '45 
7502  North  St.,  S.W. 

WEST  VIRGINIA 

Charleston 

William  A.  Pugh,  '39 
15  Grosscup  Rd. 
Wheeling 

Marshall  T.  Gleason,  Jr.,  '33 
Shawnee  Hills 

WISCONSIN 
Madison 

Professor  Williams  L.  Sachse, 
1105  Waban  Hill 
Milwaukee 

Robert  A.  Uihlein,  Jr.,  '34 
23  5  West  Galena  St. 
Racine 

John  H.  Batten,  3d,  '31 
Twin  Disc  Clutch  Co. 
1328  Racine  St. 

WYOMING 

Casper 

J.  A.  Padon,  Jr.,  '39 
P.  O.  Box  153 

Story 

Maurice  Leon,  Jr.,  '42 
Box  6 

BERMUDA 
Hamilton 


Hugh  C.  Masters, 
Box  139 


'40 


ALUMNI  REPRESENTATIVES 


101 


BRAZIL 

Sao  Paulo 

John  R.  Thompson,  '41 
Industria  de  Pneumaticos 
Firestone  S.  A. 
Caixa  Postal  8177 

BRITISH  CROWN  COLONY 

Hong  Kong 

Kenneth  K.  Chun,  '44 

4/4  A  Des  Voex  Rd.,  Central 
Malayan  Insurance  Co. 

CANAL  ZONE 
Balboa 

Robert  J.  Boyd,  Jr.,  '48 
Box  2013 

COLOMBIA 
Bogota 

William  Adams,  III,  '44 

First  Nat'l  City  Bank  of  New  York 
Apartado  Aereo  No.  4134 

ENGLAND 
London 

Laurence  W.  M.  Viney,  '3  8 
44  Great  Queen  St.,  W.C.  2 

FRANCE 
Paris 

Charles  C.  de  Limur,  '40 
Bankers  Trust  Co. 
16  Place  Vendome 
Seine  et  Oise 

Patrick  G.  Nollet,  '51 
28  Rue  des  Sablons 
La  Celle  Saint  Cloud 

GERMANY 

Duesseldorf 
Arthur  L.  Kelly,  '5  5 
Cecilien  Allee  80 

GUATEMALA 

Guatemala  City 

John  L.  Whitbeck,  '40 
Apartado  Postal   15 -A 


ITALY 
Rome 

Emory  Basford 

via  Metro  Paola  Rubens  21 

MEXICO 
Mexico  City 

Samuel  C.  Dysart,  Jr.,  '46 
Goldsmith  27-8 

PHILIPPINES 
Manila 

C.  Parsons,  '41 
Box  886 

PUERTO  RICO 
Bayamon 

Guillermo  E.  Gonzalez,  Jr.,  '50 
Hastings  BA-9,  Extension 
Garden  Hills 
San  Juan 

Ricardo  A.  Gonzales,  '5  3 
Box  2272 

SOUTH  AFRICA 
Selby,  Johannesburg 

C.  Andrew  Kaiser,  '45 
General  Electric  Bldg. 

THAILAND 
Bangkok 

Piya  Chakkaphak 
572/1  Phasuk  Lane 

VENEZUELA 
Caracas 

Alberto  J.  Vollmer,  '42 
Edf.  Polar-piso  13 
Plaza  Venezuela 

VIRGIN  ISLANDS 
St.  Croix 

Frank  L.  Luce,  '27 
54  King  St. 
Christiansted 
St.  Thomas 

George  A.  Ball,  '49 
Quick-Pics,  Inc. 
30  Main  St. 


STUDENTS —  1965-1966 


GEOGRAPHICAL  REPRESENTATION 


Alabama 

7 

Nebraska 

3 

Bahamas 

Arizona 

4 

New  Mexico 

1 

Bermuda 

Arkansas 

2 

New  Hampshire 

6 

Brazil 

California 

30 

New  Jersey 

48 

Canada 

Colorado 

7 

New  York 

117 

Colombia 

Connecticut 

82 

North  Carolina 

1 5 

El  Salvador 

Delaware 

4 

North  Dakota 

2 

Germany 

District  of  Columbia 

9 

Ohio 

29 

India 

Florida 

18 

Oklahoma 

2 

Iran 

Georgia 

3 

Oregon 

2 

Italy 

Hawaii 

1 

Pennsylvania 

29 

Japan 

Illinois 

17 

Rhode  Island 

1 1 

Korea 

Indiana 

4 

South  Carolina 

Mexico 

Iowa 

15 

Tennessee 

Pakistan 

Kentucky 

2 

Texas 

18 

Puerto  Rico 

Louisiana 

3 

Utah 

Spain 

Maine 

19 

Vermont 

Sweden 

Maryland 

13 

Virginia 

12 

Thailand 

Massachusetts 

214 

Washington 

Turkey 

Michigan 

West  Virginia 

Venezuela 

Minnesota 

12 

Wisconsin 

Virgin  Islands 

Mississippi 

3 

Wyoming 

West  Indies 

Missouri 

6 

Africa 

2 

Montana 

2 

Australia 

1 

Total 

CLASSIFICATION 

257  Seniors 
245  Upper  Middlers 
229  Lower  Middlers 
132  Juniors 

794  Boarding  Students 
69  Day  Students 

863  Total  Students 

A 

S      Ahrens,  Gary  Andrew 

Boone,  Iowa 
S      Alden,  John  Malcolm,  Jr. 

Atherton,  Calif. 
U     Allan,  Peter  Neal 

Pascagoula,  Miss. 
L      Allen,  Ernest  Marvin,  III 

Chapel  Hill,  N.  C. 
S      Allen,  Frederick  Lewis,  III 

Bronxville,  N.  Y. 
U     Allen,  Henry  Randall 
Watertown,  Conn. 

102 


S      Abbott,  Andrew  Delano 

Sherborn,  Mass. 
L     Abbott,  Ernest  Bennett 

Medford,  Mass. 
S      Abernethy,  John  Lloyd,  Jr. 

Charlotte,  N.  C. 
L     Adams,  Michael  Frank 

Camden  3,  N.  J. 
U     Adams,  Milton  Bernard,  Jr. 

Shaw  AFB,  S.  C. 
S      Adler,  Edward  Andrew  Koeppel 

Kings  Point,  L.  I.,  N.  Y. 


STUDENTS 


Allen,  Hoyt  Eaves,  Jr. 

Westport,  Conn. 
Allen,  Mark  Batchelor 

Mill  Valley,  Calif. 
Allen,  Thomas  Cleaveland 

Beverly,  Mass. 
Almquist,  Eric  Lucien 

Valentine,  Neb. 
J  Alofsin,  Anthony  Michael 

Memphis,  Tenn. 
J    Alsina,  John  Charles 

Rochester,  N.  Y. 
Anderson,  Brandt  Charles 

Hyannis  Port,  Mass. 
J    Anderson,  David  Groves 

Akron,  Ohio 
J     Anderson,  Peter  Gunard 

Naugatuck,  Conn. 
Anderson,  Robert  Gardner,  Jr. 

Chicago,  111. 
Andrews,  Duncan  Trumbull 

Alexandria,  Va. 


J    Bacalao,  Enrique 

Caracas,  Venezuela 
J    Backman,  Daniel  Gustav 

North  Reading,  Mass. 
Bacon,  Carter  Smith,  Jr. 

Hyannis  Port,  Mass. 
i     Badman,  Lawrence  Scott 

Riverside,  Conn, 
f     Bagan,  Kenneth  Jay 

Chicago,  111. 
Baird,  Gordon  Prentiss 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
J    Baird,  Jonathan  Raymond 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
5     Bakalar,  John  Stephen 

Swampscott,  Mass. 
5     Baker,  Warren  von  Credo 

Princeton,  N.  J. 
L     Banfield,  Michael  Judd 

Kailua,  Oahu,  Hawaii 
L     Barber,  Charles  Bradford 

Greenwich,  Conn. 
L     Barclay,  John  Whitney 

New  Haven,  Conn. 
S     Barringer,  William  Henry 

Washington,  D.  C. 
S     Basile,  Alfred  Charles 

Haverhill,  Mass. 
U    Bassett,  John  Bruce 

Cos  Cob,  Conn. 
U    Beardsley,  Jeffry  Sumner 

Elkhart,  Ind. 
I     Beck,  Gordon  Morison 

Canton,  Mass. 


U     Angelosante,  Michael 

Old  Orchard  Beach,  Me. 
U     Apitz,  Christopher  Lee 

Morris,  Minn. 
S      Arabie,  Clay  Phipps 

Kingsport,  Tenn. 
L      Armstrong,  Rex  Edwin 

Portland,  Ore. 
U     Arnold,  David  Bullard,  III 

Concord,  Mass. 
U     Arnold,  Robert  Hall 

Arlington,  Va. 
U     Asher,  James  Michael 

Leominster,  Mass. 
J      Ashley,  Craig  Stanley 

Syracuse,  N.  Y. 
U     Atkinson,  Edward  Page 

Boston,  Mass. 
J      Ause,  John  Marshall 

Harmony,  Minn. 

B 

S      Becker,  Joseph  Michael 

Borger,  Tex. 
S      Belida,  Alexander  James,  Jr. 

North  Tewksbury,  Mass. 
U     Belzner,  William  Duane 

Provo,  Utah 
J      Bennett,  Charles  Faulkner 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
S      Bennett,  Daniel  Gates 

Menlo  Park,  Calif. 
J      Benson,  Robert  Granger,  III 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
U     Berg,  Brian  Gunder 

Cavalier,  N.  D. 
S      Berg,  Edward  Henry,  Jr. 

Newark,  Del. 
U     Berlow,  Bruce  Alfred 

Bethesda,  Md. 
J      Bernardin,  Richard  Louis 

Lawrence,  Mass. 
S      Best,  Eric  Prentice 

Dunstable,  Mass. 
U     Bidwell,  John,  Jr. 

Greenville,  S.  C. 
U     Bigelow,  Franklin  Thomas,  Ji 

Carpinteria,  Calif. 
L      Billings,  George  Harrington 

Falmouth,  Mass. 
S      Billings,  Roger  Frank 

Falmouth,  Mass. 
U     Bird,  James  Raymond,  Jr. 

Plainfield,  N.  J. 
L      Blacher.  Steven  Mark 

Stamford,  Conn. 


104 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


u 

nl  ■   1     pMitim  Robert 

J 

Scranton,  Pa. 

r 

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J 

Murrysville,  Pa. 

■  t 
U 

ul  iL,>J,.,i    r^nv  Farlow 

ji  \M  Kt-SICC,    Vjuy  xaiivFw 

L 

P-ilm  Rp-irh  Fla 

1 

MaLmIm   Steven  Walton 

U 

P*1tn   Rnrh  Fla 

I  41111      171*11.11)       X  *•»• 

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u 

U 

nlrtrtt^     FVivirl  AllPn 
jJlOOtll,    J-^JVIU  .TWICII 

u 

Lawrence,  iviaoo. 

u 

Dluvui DCrgll|  junii  JA« 

s 

rxOCKpoiL,  ivia^b. 

J 

i)iunm,  jcrtrny  otun 

u 

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u 

Fill  T?  iT7Pr  A/fac^ 

Fail    IYIVCIj  JVidia. 

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RArrrctrrtm      T-Tmirar/1    1*  1 1  ct"  <1  VP 

L 

AlvAdllUl  Idi     v  a. 

L 

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lJL/>j<iIly,     ivVJU'tl  L  J^Jllll 

s 

TT 

U 

j>osi inn,    w  iiiiarn  juiiiiic 

TT 

U 

Richmond,  Va. 

s 

Rnf  toni  rt     K  ennpf  n  Iniflpc 

IllHU/IIJI  1,     J\v.HllvlIl     \_/lldL  ICS 

u 

Pit  tennron 

s 

Bowler    Daniel  Richards 

L 

Annapolis,  ^4d. 

L 

xjuyic,  junn  LcnnuA 

c 

J 

L 

Duyntun,  v_»arLcr  xvciu 

TT 

Stockbridge,  Mass. 

U 

Bradley,  Michael  Allen 

u 

Blackstone,  Mass. 

J 

Brainerd,  Samuel  Thompson 

L 

Billerica,  Mass. 

S 

Brand,  Peter  Schuyler 

U 

Washington,  D.  C. 

s 

Brewster,  Walter  Rice,  Jr. 

New  York,  N.  Y. 

C 

T 

J 

r  A             C       L        t  1 

Cadogan,  otephen  John 

S 

North  Andover,  Ms,ss. 

s 

v_>aurey,  Augustine  josepn,  ill 

TT 
U 

Andover,  Mass. 

T 

J 

v^dKan,  i\n.naru  j^ennis 

L 

Florence,  S.  C. 

L 

v^amuai,  j^^cnnis  riayQen 

L 

Waltham,  Mass. 

u 

Cameron,  Dennis  Scott 

L 

Charlotte,  N.  C. 

s 

Campbell,  Robert  Johnson 

L 

Andover,  Mass. 

L 

Carr.  John  Henry,  Jr. 

S 

Salem,  Mass. 

s 

Casey,  Richard  Andrew,  Jr. 

U 

North  Andover,  Mass. 

Bro,  Per  Bjarne 

Andover,  Mass. 
Brockie,  Edward  Simmons,  III 

Englewood,  N.  J. 
Brown,  Paul  Brooks 

Andover,  Mass. 
Brown,  Paul  Cameron 

North  Kingstown,  R.  I. 
Brown,  Stephen  Dennis 

Wellesley  Hills,  Mass. 
Brown,  Stephen  Gardner 

Sahuarita,  Ariz. 
Browne,  Robert  Mallory 

Louisville,  Ky. 
Bruce,  Greg 

Sheridan,  Wyo. 
Brush,  Bartlett  Marks 

Oneonta,  N.  Y. 
Buchanan,  John  Grier,  III 

Sewickley,  Pa. 
Buchin,  Peter  Jay 

Forest  Hills,  N.  Y. 
Buhler,  Roman  Paltenghe 

Harrison,  N.  Y. 
Burdick,  Winfield  Newton,  III 

Northfield,  111. 
Burke,  Christopher  James 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
Burke,  Stephen  Johnson 

Far  Hills,  N.  J. 
Burns,  Richard  Randolph 

Marblehead,  Mass. 
Butte,  John  McMurray 

Austin,  Tex. 
Buttenfleld,  Philip  Martin  Pfeil 

Pittsburgh,  Pa. 
Byers,  Robert  Kern,  Jr. 

Gilroy,  Calif. 


Cassel,  Douglass  Watts,  Jr. 

Timonium,  Md. 
Chamberlin,  Fletcher  Coleman, 

Sherborn,  Mass. 
Chang,  Patrick  St.  Clair 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
Chang,  Rowland  Waton 

Youngstown,  Ohio 
Chapin,  Edward  King 

Manchester,  Conn. 
Chapman,  Donald  Redding 

New  Canaan,  Conn. 
Cheng,  Chosen  Tien-chung 

Marietta,  Ohio 
Cheng,  DeWitt  Tien-wei 

Marietta,  Ohio 


STUDENTS 


105 


L     Chickering,  John  Cowee 

Wilmington,  Del. 
S     Chimento,  George  Louis 

Westerly,  R.  I. 
J     Chofnas,  Eric  Steven 

Oteen,  N.  C 
U    Clapp,  John  Thayer 

Seoul,  Korea 
L     Clark,  Allan  Douglas  Parker 

Chelmsford,  Mass. 
S     Clift,  William  Biggs,  III 

Andover,  Mass. 
J     Cline,  William  Whittenburg 

Amarillo,  Tex. 
L     Clinton,  Philip  Leslie 

Andover,  Mass. 
U    Coburn,  Stephen  Campbell 

Bedford,  N.  Y. 
U    Cohan,  Robert  David 

Worcester,  Mass. 
L     Cohen,  Rip 

Millburn,  N.  J. 
U    Cohen,  Todd 

Millburn,  N.  J. 
U    Coit,  Daniel  Grosvenor 

Washington,  Conn. 
S     Colby,  Alexander  MacGregor 

West  Boxford,  Mass. 
J     Colby,  Seth  Bartholomew 

Oyster  Bay,  L.  I.,  N.  Y. 
U    Coleman,  Edward  Francis 

Andover,  Mass. 
S     Coleman,  John  Michael 

Memphis,  Tenn. 
U    Collier,  Charles  Whitney 

Wellesley,  Mass. 
U    Combs,  Craig  Skidmore 

Eatontown,  N.  J. 
L     Comstock,  Lyndon  Brent 

North  Muskegon,  Mich. 
S     Conant,  Jonathan  Brewster 

West  Newton,  Mass. 
S     Conlin,  Robert  Thomas 

Whittier,  Calif. 
L     Conway,  John  Patrick,  Jr. 

Whitehaven,  Tenn. 
L     Coon,  William  Putnam 

Washington,  D.  C. 
S     Cooney,  John  Fontana 

Nashville,  Tenn. 


U    Dailey,  William  Jonathan 

Leonia,  N.  J. 
L     Daly,  Martin  William,  Jr. 

Andover,  Mass. 
U    Davis,  Andre  Maurice 

Baltimore,  Md. 


J      Copeland,  Craig  Scott 

Kensington,  Md. 
L      Copley,  Michael  Clifton 

La  Jolla,  Calif. 
J      Corcoran,  Robert  Patrick 

Cambridge,  Mass. 
S      Corcoran,  William  Joseph,  Jr. 

Cambridge,  Mass. 
S     Cotton,  John  Maurice 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
S      Cowan,  Spencer  Morris,  Jr. 

Concord,  Mass. 
L     Craft,  Samuel  Colvin,  III 

Menomonee  Falls,  Wis. 
J      Crawford,  Blake  Lawrence 

Wilmington,  Del. 
S      Crichton,  Douglas  Christopher 

New  Canaan,  Conn. 
L    Crock,  Stanley  Miles 

New  Bedford,  Mass. 
J      Cronin,  Anthony  Guthrie 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
U     Cross,  Norman  Campbell,  Jr. 

Lunenburg,  Mass. 
L      Crowley,  Roland  Vincent 

Lowell,  Mass. 
U     Cunningham,   Andrew  Francis 

Kensington,  Md. 
U     Cunningham,  Daniel  Paul 

Cincinnati,  Ohio 
J      Cunningham,  James  Archibald 

Kensington,  Md. 
S      Cunningham,  Stephen  Robert 

Cincinnati,  Ohio 
J      Cunningham,  Thomas  Allen 

Portland,  Ore. 
S      Curran,  Bruce  Hammill 

Scottsdale,  Ariz. 
S      Currier,  Michael  Paul 

Fort  Kent,  Me. 
L     Currier,  Scott  Huntington 

Andover,  Mass. 
S      Curtiss,  William  Hanford,  III 

Woodside,  Calif. 
U     Cuthbertson,  John  Ponton 

Boxford,  Mass. 
L     Czarnecki,  John  Jacob 

Reading,  Pa. 


D 

U     Davis,  Churchward,  Jr. 

Pittsfield,  Mass. 
S      Davis,  Geoffrey  Barker 

Providence,  R.  I. 
S     Davis,  William  Michael 

Northville,  Mich. 


106 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


J      Davison,  Edward  Benson 

Flint,  Mich. 
|      Dawson,  Alan  Douglas 

Lawrence,  Mass. 
S      Dawson,  Richard  Kenneth 

Lawrence,  Mass. 
S      Dawson,  William  Lockhart,  Jr. 

Arlington,  Va. 
U     DeAngelis,  Paul  Thomas 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
S      DcChcllis,  Joseph  John 

Mattapan,  Mass. 
S      Deck,  Raymond  Henry,  Jr. 

Andover,  Mass. 
L     DcFelice,  Harold  Louis,  Jr. 

New  Haven,  Conn. 
S      Delaney,  Richard  Francis 

Walpole,  Mass. 
U     Dembski,  Stephen  Michael 

Reading,  Mass. 
L      Deming,  Ellsworth  Huntington 

Hamden,  Conn. 
L     Denger,  Timothy  Eugene 

Xenia,  Ohio 
L     Des  Roches,  Daniel  Scott 

Andover,  Mass. 
U     Deutsch,  Nicholas  Arthur 

Cambridge,  Mass. 
L     Devereux,  Edward  Rickert,  Jr. 

Ponte  Vedra  Beach,  Fla. 
S      Diamond,  Norman  George 

"Waterloo,  Iowa 
J      Dickson,  Daniel  Hugh 

Miami  Shores,  Fla. 


S      Eakland,  William  Lyon 

Rye,  N.  Y. 
L      Eaton,  Jonathan  Williams 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
U     Eaton,  Theodore  Hambleton 

Grosse  Pointe,  Mich. 
J      Ebner,  Michael  Joseph 

Providence,  R.  I. 
U     Eckhardt,  Robert  Campbell 

Gibsonia,  Pa. 
S      Eddy,  Lee  Chickering 

Wheaton,  111. 
L      Edmundson,  Stephen  Taylor 

Darien,  Conn. 
S      Edwards,  Leland  Stanford 

Seattle,  Wash. 
S      Ehrhart,  Robert  Henry 

Orleans,  Mass. 
1      Ehrlich,  Frank  Chapman 

Kansas  City,  Mo. 
S      Eichleay,  George  Frederick 

Pittsburgh,  Pa. 


E 


L 

Dodd,  Douglas  Van  Everen 

Andover,  Mass. 

L 

Doe,  Lawrence  Conant 

Harvard,  Mass. 

J 

Donahue,  Douglas  Aidan,  Jr. 

Norwell,  Mass. 

J 

Donovan,  Charles  Stephen 

Wakefield,  Mass. 

U 

Doran,  John  Joseph 

Wellesley,  Mass. 

U 

Dorn,  William  Leary 

Houston,  Tex. 

L 

Douglas,  Eric  Frost 

Glendora,  Calif. 

S 

Duffy,  Robert  Franklin 

New  York,  N.  Y. 

L 

DuMez,  Richard  Alan,  Jr. 

Schenectady,  N.  Y. 

L 

Dunbar,  Theodore  David 

Syracuse,  N.  Y. 

U 

Duncan,  Robert  Ames 

Baltimore,  Md. 

U 

Dunham,  Carroll,  Jr. 

Old  Lyme,  Conn. 

L 

Dupont,  Jules  St.  Martin,  Jr. 

Houma,  La. 

L 

Durant,  Peter  Montgomery 

Hanover,  N.  H. 

T  T 
U 

jLyyer,  \_.nanes  neroert 

Haverhill,  Mass. 

T  T 
U 

Dyer,  John  Brent 

Bangor,  Me. 

J 

Elder,  William  Scott,  III 

Fairfield,  Conn. 

L 

Eller,  Gary  Steven 

Charlotte,  N.  C. 

U 

Ellis,  Alexander,  III 

Concord,  Mass. 

S 

Ellison,  Jonathan  David 

Falls  Village,  Conn. 

U 

Engvall,  David  Melville 

Dublin,  N.  H. 

J 

Ensor,  David  Burnham 

Washington,  D.  C. 

L 

Ermer,  Curtis  Arthur 

Andover,  Mass. 

S 

Erskine,  John  Emerson,  Jr. 

Racine,  Wis. 

U 

Escoruela,  Andres  Joseph 

Forest  Hills  Gardens,  L.  I.,  IS 

L 

Evans,  Peter  Seelye 

Demarest,  N.  J. 

L 

Everett,  Davis  Burton 

Excelsior,  Minn. 

STUDENTS 


107 


Fabiani,  James  Parnham 

Westport,  Conn. 
Fairbairn,  J.  Randall 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
Farley,  David  Wells 

Harvard,  Mass. 
Farnam,  James  Berwick 

Wallingford,  Conn. 
Farrah,  Albert  Louis,  Jr. 

Methuen,  Mass. 
Farrell,  Michael  O. 

Salisbury,  Mass. 
Feldman,  James  Samuel 

Waban,  Mass. 
Feldman,  Theodore  Sherman 

Waban,  Mass. 
Fessenden,  James  Southwick 

Brigham  City,  Utah 
Field,  Arthur  Maxwell,  III 

Richmond,  Va. 
Fine,  Valentine  Bliss 

Ciarks  Summit,  Pa. 
Fink,  James  Allan 

Jackson,  Minn. 
Fishman,  Kenneth  Harris 

St.  Thomas,  Virgin  Islands 
Flad,  Ward  Beecher 

Youngstown,  Ohio 


L      Fleming,  David  Andrew 

Chatham,  N.  J. 
S      Fletcher,  Michael  Anthony 

West  Windham,  N.  H. 
U     Florenz,  Paul  Andrew 

Methuen,  Mass. 
S      Flowers,  James  Farrand 

Houston,  Tex. 
L     Forsyth,  Scott  Allen 

Webster,  N.  Y. 
U     Fraker,  Ford  McKinstry 

Princeton,  N.  J. 
L      Francesco,  Steven  Anthony 

Beverly  Farms,  Mass. 
S      Franchot,  Peter  Van  Rensselaer 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
L     Freedman,  Robert  Morris 

Natick,  Mass. 
U     Freeman,  Douglas  Southall,  II 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
S      Freeman,  Gordon  Leslie,  Jr. 

North  Andover,  Mass. 
U     Friedman,  Michael  Alan 

Charleston,  Mo. 
J      Funkhouser,  David  Kristen 

Concord,  Mass. 

Greenwich,  Conn. 
U     Funston,  George  Keith,  Jr. 


Gadsden,  James  Philip 

Pelham.  N.  Y. 
Gadsden,  Thomas  Parker 

Short  Hills,  N.  J. 
Gatfny,  John  Joseph,  III 

North  Andover,  Mass. 
Gage,  Robert  Bruce 

Closter,  N.  J. 
Galpin,  Amos 

New  Haven,  Conn. 
Ganem,  Donald  Emil 

Methuen,  Mass. 
Gardner,  Ellis  Benjamin,  III 

Darien,  Conn. 
Gardner,  Kevin  Owen 

Hopkinton,  N.  H. 
Gardner,  Robert  Abbe,  III 

Lake  Forest,  111. 
Gardner,  Steven  Hedden 

Weston,  Mass. 
Garner,  Will  iam  Vaughan 

Richmond,  Va. 
Garten,  Allan  Michael 

Tampa,  Fla. 


G 

L     Gaskins,  George  Decker 

Belem,  Para,  Brazil,  S.  A. 
L     Gates,  Donald  Robert 

Des  Moines,  Iowa 
U     Gates,  Frederick  Taylor,  III 

Nassau,  Bahamas 
L     Gegenheimer,  Peter  Albert 

Tucson,  Ariz. 
S      Geiger,  Martin  Alan 

Harrison,  N.  Y. 
J      Gelb,  Lawrence  Nason 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
S      Gerber,  David  Frederick,  II 

Middletown,  Ohio 
S      Gibbs,  George  Geoffrey 

Billings,  Mont. 
U     Giles,  James  David 

Oklahoma  City,  Okla. 
J      Glenn,  Bruce  Owen 

Arvada,  Colo. 
U     Glenn,  Carvel  Wayne 

Greenwich,  Conn. 
L     Goddard,  Daniel  Convers 

Westmount,  P.  Q.,  Canada 


108 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


S      Goldin,  David  Alan 

Grccnport,  L.  I.,  N.  Y. 
S      Goldman,  Daniel  Franko 

Katonah,  N.  Y. 
S      Goldstein,  David  Stanley 

Newark,  N.  J. 
L     Gonzalez,  Carlos  Alberto 

Santurce,  Puerto  Rico 
S      Gonzalez,  Fernando  Luis 

Guaynabo,  Puerto  Rico 
J      Gonzalez,  Roberto 

Santurce,  Puerto  Rico 
U     Goodspeed,  Norwick  Beauford  Houston 

Fairfield,  Conn. 
U     Gould,  Willard  Joseph,  III 

Branford,  Conn. 
U     Grafton,  Anthony  Thomas 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
L      Green,  Benjamin  Paul 

Rochester,  N.  Y. 


U     Haley,  Mark  Layton 

Andover,  Mass. 
L     Hall,  James  Gilbert,  II 

Short  Hills,  N.  J. 
L     Hall,  Oakley  Maxwell,  III 

Olympic  Valley,  Calif. 
L     Hall,  Russell  Bruce 

Fort  Hood,  Tex. 
L     Hament,  John  Maxwell 

Maxwell  Air  Force  Base,  Ala. 
U     Hammond,  William  Edward 

Greenwich,  Conn. 
U     Hand,  Clark  William 

Andover,  Mass. 
U     Hanley,  John  Weller,  Jr. 

Cincinnati,  Ohio 
L     Hansen,  Jeffrey  Bayard 

New  Canaan,  Conn. 
S      Hanson,  David  Taverner 

Billings,  Mont. 
L     Harman,  James  Langmuir 

Rowayton,  Conn. 
U     Harness,  Edward  Granville,  Jr. 

Cincinnati,  Ohio 
1      Harper,  Stephen  Henry 

Irvington,  N.  Y. 
U     Harris,  Alexander  Eisemann 

Atlanta,  Ga. 
S      Harris,  Arthur,  III 

Atlanta,  Ga. 
L     Harris,  Charles  Clements,  Jr. 

Sewell,  N.  J. 
S      Harris,  Gerald  David 

Charlottetown,  P.  E.  I.,  Canada 
U     Harrison,  Charles  Maxwell 

Santa  Fe,  N.  M. 


U     Griffith,  Cornelius  Lavern 

Evansville,  Ind. 
J      Griggs,  Douglas  Steven 

Melrose,  Mass. 
S      Grillo,  James  Francis 

Andover,  Mass. 
J    Grillo,  John  Michael 

Andover,  Mass. 
J      Gross,  Henry  Robert 

Palatine,  111. 
J      Gruber,  Benjamin  Aaron 

Salem,  N.  H. 
L      Gruner,  Robert  Barnet 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
L     Gudorf,  Scott  Norman 

Dayton,  Ohio 
S      Gurry,  Christopher  Jude 

Andover,  Mass. 


H 

L     Harrison,  Richard  Granville 

Darien,  Conn. 
L     Hart,  Henry  Ashton 

Bethesda,  Md. 
L     Hart,  Robert  Mayes,  Jr. 

New  Canaan,  Conn. 
L     Harward,  Vernon  Judson,  III 

Northampton,  Mass. 
U     Hausberg,  Mark 

Cincinnati,  Ohio 
S      Haviland,  David  William 

Montclair,  N.  J. 
L     Hawkins,  John  Richard,  III 

River  Edge,  N.  J. 
J      Hawkins,  Peter  Gregory 

River  Edge,  N.  J. 
S      Hayes,  James  Stoddard,  Jr. 

Lancaster,  Pa. 
S      Healey,  Raymond  Francis,  Jr. 

Upper  Montclair,  N.  J. 
L     Healey,  Todd  Stephen 

Upper  Montclair,  N.  J. 
L     Hearey,  Bruce  Gerard 

Oaklyn,  N.  J. 
J      Hearty,  James  Bowe 

Marblehead,  Mass. 
U     Heber,  Justin  Garland 

Green  Lake,  Me. 
L     Heifetz,  Irvin  Neil 

Andover,  Mass. 
S      Hemenway,  Andrew  Maine 

Northford,  Conn. 
J      Henning,  Cameron  Hunt 

New  Haven,  Conn. 
J      Henningsen,  Victor  William,  III 

Pelham  Manor,  N.  Y. 


STUDENTS 


109 


Hertz,  Paul  Richard 

Springfield,  Ohio 
Hibbard,  Foster  Leonard,  Jr. 

San  Francisco,  Calif. 
Higby,  Lawrence  Harris,  Jr. 

Lander,  Wyo. 
Hildebrandt,  Andrew  Wayne 

Lawrence,  Mass. 
Hilley,  John  Lee 

Bedford,  Mass. 
Hilsman,  Hoyt  Roger 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
Hinman,  Richard  Guild 

Andover,  Mass. 
Hodge,  Ian  Gordon,  Jr. 

Lancaster,  Pa. 
Hogen,  Charles  Robert,  Jr. 

Chappaqua,  N.  Y. 
Holkins,  John  McGarry 

Howell,  Mich. 


Ide,  George  Everett 
Vestal,  N.  Y. 
1     Ireland,  Thomas  Ellis 
New  York,  N.  Y. 


Jackson,  Clifton  Edward,  Jr. 

Lynnfield,  Mass. 
Jackson,  Gary  Beggs 
Hot  Springs,  Ark. 
Jackson,  Thomas  Humphrey 

Kalamazoo,  Mich. 
Jacobson,  John  Frederick,  Jr. 

Saddle  River,  N.  J. 
Jensen,  Frode,  III 

Riverdale,  N.  Y. 
Johanson,  David  Owen 

Wellesley,  Mass. 
Johnson,  David  Clayton,  III 

Brooklyn,  N.  Y. 
Johnson,  Gary  Russell 
Andover,  Mass. 
[     Johnson,  John  William,  III 
Langdale,  Ala. 


J    Kahn,  Joseph  Plaut 

Scarborough,  N.  Y. 
L     Kaiser,  Julian  Stevens,  Jr. 

Andover,  Mass. 
5     Kapur,  Dilip 

Pondichery-2,  South  India 
U    Kaufman,  Mark  Leslie 

Lawrence,  Mass. 


U 

nouano,  Baxter  day 

Greenwich,  Conn. 

T 

J 

Hooker,  Jonathan  Bakewell 

vjuniora,  conn. 

T 
L 

Hopkins,  Brian  James 

TJ                 XT  V 

Kome,  iN .  I . 

T 

J 

Hosken,  John  Michael 

Lexington,  Mass. 

c 

rluaaK,  Kaymona  Jonn 

Pittsburgh,  Pa. 

L 

Hughes,  Bruce  Allan 

Swampscott,  Mass. 

S 

Hughes,  David  Evan 

San  Salvador,  El  Salvador,  C.  A. 

u 

Huntington,  David  Champion 

Troy,  N.  Y. 

u 

Hutchison,  Robert  Alan 

Carlisle,  Iowa 

I 

L  Irwin,  Michael  James 
New  Virginia,  Iowa 

U  Ives,  Alexander  Frank 
New  York,  N.  Y. 


U     Johnson,  Mark  Peter 

Andover,  Mass. 
S      Johnson,  Maurice  Carl,  III 

Winnetka,  111. 
U     Johnston,  William  Elliott 

Jackson,  Miss. 
L     Jones,  Christopher  Bentley 

Andover,  Mass. 
S      Jones,  Eric  Wilkins 

Andover,  Mass. 
U     Jones,  Stephen  Brewster 

Brewster,  Mass. 
J      Jones,  William  Pickering,  Jr. 

Darien,  Conn. 
S      Jonnes,  Denis 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
L     Joseph,  Jean  Paul 

San  Salvador,  El  Salvador,  C.  A. 


L     Kefferston,  Robert  Dick,  II 

Andover,  Mass. 
J      Kelleher,  Hugh  Richard 

Bradford,  Mass. 
U     Keller,  Peter  Gardner 

Chestnut  Hill,  Mass. 
U     Kellogg,  Stephen  Brewster 

Weston,  Mass. 


110 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


u 

Kelsey,  Harvey  Marion,  III 

S 

Rye,  N.  Y. 

J 

J 

Kelsey,  James  Talcott 

Rye,  N.  Y 

L 

Kelsey,  John  Lufkin 

S 

Toledo,  Ohio 

J 

Kemper,  Kutus  \^rosDy,  111 

L 

Kansas  City,  Mo. 

u 

S 

Kendnck,  tdmuna  nopjunsuu,  ji. 

Wenham,  Mass. 

u 

Kendrick,  Melvin  Southworth 

L 

Wenham,  Mass. 

L 

Kcnney,  rardon  rvooert 

L 

Andover,  Mass. 

J 

Kent,  Daniel  Leonard 

L 

Andover,  Mass. 

S 

Kcppelman,  Christopher  May 

L 

Litchfield,  Conn. 

u 

Ketch,  Lawrence  Levant 

s 

Denver,  Colo. 

L 

Key,  Kichard  Kalpn 

s 

Chevy  Chase,  Md. 

u 

Kidd,  Lawrence  Graves 

T 

J 

Andover,  Mass. 

L 

Kidde,  Thomas  Sloan 

U 

Pasadena  Calif. 

S 

Kinsolving,  Thomas  Bruce 

s 

New  York,  N.  Y. 

s 

Kirk,  Selden  Thayer 

J 

Old  Greenwich,  Conn. 

L 

Kirkpatrick,  William  Alexander,  Jr. 

u 

Carnegie,  Pa. 

T 

Lr 

T 

J 

... 

.Landry,  Alan  ouliivan 

u 

Andover,  Mass 

U 

Langford,  Charles  Parmelee 

c 

T  '     J  _    1           .      y       x       XT  V 

Lindenhurst,  L.  I.,  N.  Y. 

T 

L 

T  _     •     _      Ti       1    T>       .   TTT 

Lanius,  Paul  Baxter,  III 

T 

J 

INew  York,  IN.  Y. 

T 

L 

Lasater,  Ike  Kampmann 

u 

ralfurnas,  Tex. 

c 

Latvis,  Joseph  Michael 

Lawrence,  Mass. 

T 

L 

Latvis,  Paul  Peter 

L 

Lawrence,  Mass. 

T 

L 

Laurier,  Robert  Carl 

S 

St.  Lambert,  P.  Q.,  Canada 

c 

Lawrence,  Guy  Bedell 

J 

Stamford,  Conn. 

u 

Lawrence,  Randolph  Thomas 

u 

Pound  Ridge,  N.  Y. 

J 

Layton,  Charles  Lewis 

S 

New  York,  N.  Y. 

J 

Leavitt,  David  Lobell 

L 

Hanover,  Pa. 

u 

Lee,  Elwyn  Cornelius 

L 

Houston,  Tex. 

Kitendaugh,  James  Glanville 

Greenwich,  Conn. 
Kittredge,  Charles  James,  III 

Boxford,  Mass. 
Klein,  Francis  Charles 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
Koch,  Daniel  S. 

Little  Neck,  N.  Y. 
Koch,  James  Paul 

Larchmont,  N.  Y. 
Kogut,  James  Henry 

Woonsocket,  R.  I. 
Kohler,  Ted  Raney 

Marion,  Ohio 
Konecky,  Sean 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
Krier,  Kenneth  Daniel 

Canton,  Ohio 
Krinsky,  Michael  Mayer 

New  London,  Conn. 
Kritzer,  Robert  Benjamin 

Brooklyn,  N.  Y. 
Kroescher,  Thomas  Ralph 

Salt  Lake  City,  Utah 
Kubie,  John  Latz 

Scarsdale,  N.  Y. 
Kunen,  James  Simon 

Marlboro,  Mass. 
Kunen,  Peter  Daniel 

Marlboro,  Mass. 
Kurz,  James  Steward 

Springfield,  Va. 


Lee,  James  Hammon 

Wichita  Falls,  Tex. 
Leete,  Kevin  John 

Andover,  Mass. 
LeGendre,  Stephen  Mark 

Andover,  Mass. 
Leinwand,  Ira  Jay 

Manhasset,  L.  I.,  N.  Y. 
Lemkin,  Jeffrey  David 

Lowell,  Mass. 
Lemkin,  Michael  Bruce 

Lowell,  Mass. 
Leone,  John  Joseph 

South  San  Gabriel,  Calif. 
Levin,  Fredric  Winstan 

Norwich,  Conn. 
Lewis,  Rodney  Eldon 

Gibbon,  Minn. 
Liang,  Li-Shiang 

Bogota,  Colombia,  S.  A. 
Libby,  Irve  Lewis,  Jr. 

Westport,  Conn. 
Liberman,  Michael  Charles 

Mansfield  Center,  Conn. 


STUDENTS 


)      Lightfoote,  Johnson  Benjamin 

Tuskegee,  Ala. 
S     Lincoln,  Loring  Bills,  Jr. 

Swampscott,  Mass. 
L     Lindley,  Charles  Robert  Denver 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
U    Lisberger,  Stephen  Gates 

Ithaca,  N.  Y. 
S     Littlefield,  William  Emery,  Jr. 

Upper  Montclair,  N.  J. 
S     Liu,  Thomas  Wang 

Dayton,  Ohio 
L     Logan,  Richard  Dougherty,  III 

Glendale,  Ohio 
U    Logsdon,  Mark  Joseph 

Savannah,  Ga. 
J     Louie,  Eric  Kuo-wei 

Chicago,  111. 
S     Lowe,  Frederick  William,  III 

Manchester,  Conn. 


J     McAvity,  Thomas  Malcolm 

Birmingham,  Ala. 
J     McBee,  Coles  Hunter 

Andover,  Mass. 
U    McCarthy,  Stephen  Joseph 

Marblehead,  Mass. 
S     McEvoy,  Earl  Edward,  Jr. 

Rye,  N.  Y. 
L     McGar,  Bruce  Schuyler 

West  Colesville,  N.  Y. 
U    McGUl,  John  Landell 

East  Providence,  R.  I. 
L     MacGuire,  Donald  Cameron 

Montgomery,  Ala. 
S    MacGuire,  Osborne  Rainer 

Montgomery,  Ala. 
S     McKibben,  Timothy  Pence 

Grinnell,  Iowa 
S     McLean,  John  Alan 

Brookline,  Mass. 
L     McLean,  Kevin  Dorrance 

Greenville,  Del. 
S     McMullen,  Kelly  Andre 

Somerset,  N.  J. 
L     McNealey,  Roderick  Marshall 

Chicago,  111. 
U    MacNelly,  James  Bruce 

Cedarhurst,  L.  I.,  N.  Y. 
S     McTernen,  Malcolm  Bodwell,  III 

Peoria,  111. 
J     McVicar,  Dwight  Morgan 

Bedford,  N.  Y. 
S     McWilliams,   Andrew   Alfred  Reeves 

Bloomfield,  N.  J. 
U    Mahoney,   Haynes   Richardson,  III 

Jacksonville,  Fla. 


S      Lowell,  Peter  Tappin 

Bridgton,  Me. 
S      Lowell,  Roger  Wells 

Bridgton,  Me. 
S      Lower,  John  Wilson 

Dobbs  Ferry,  N.  Y. 
U     Lucas,  John  Edward 

York,  Me. 
U     Lucas,  William  Charles 

Scarsdale,  N.  Y. 
S      Ludden,  David  Ellsworth 

Chappaqua,  N.  Y. 
J      Lux,  Richard  Alan 

Andover,  Mass. 
L      Lynch,  Dana  Hoyt 

Jackson,  Miss. 
S      Lynn,  Christopher  Gardiner 

Los  Gatos,  Calif. 
U     Lytle,  Jesse  Stewart 

Birmingham,  Ala 

M 

J      Mahoney,  Patrick  Jeremy 

White  Plains,  N.  Y. 
S      Major,  James  Williamson,  Jr. 

Willimantic,  Conn. 
S      Maksymenko,  Victor 

Jakobsberg,  Sweden 
U     Malick,  Daniel  Franklin 

Monroeville,  Pa. 
J      Malick,  John  David 

Monroeville,  Pa. 
S     Mar,  James  Christopher 

Lincoln,  Mass. 
S     Maranzana,  Louis 

Hollywood,  Fla. 
S      Marichal,  Carlos 

Cambridge,  Mass. 
U     Marichal,  Miguel 

Cambridge,  Mass. 
L      Markley,  Herbert  James 

North  Canton,  Ohio 
U     Marks,  Standish  Backus 

Grosse  Pointe  Shores,  Mich. 
L      Marshall,  Courtney  Allen 

Machias,  Me. 
J      Marshman,  David  McGill 

Darien,  Conn. 
S      Martin,  James  Stuart 

Burlington,  Vt. 
L      Martz,  Robert  Graham 

Boulder,  Colo. 
U     Masters,  James  Henry  Peniston 

Pembroke,  Bermuda 
U     Matthews,  Paul  Chandler,  III 

St.  James,  N.  Y. 
S      Maxon,  Earl  Halbert 

El  Paso,  Tex. 


112 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


u 

ivlears,    w  imam  oaisidui 

TJ 

Litchfield,  Conn. 

u 

Mclamed,  jenrey  atepiien 

TJ 

bingnamton,  in.  i. 

u 

Mcienuy,  rvuDcri  vjuiuuu,  ji« 

L 

New  Haven,  Conn. 

L 

Mellcr,  oary  t^nester 

T 
J 

ii.     f  :    ...     XT  Y 

Mt.  rusco,  In.  I. 

U 

Mcndennall,  jonn   laicoit,  jr. 

s 

Madison,  wis. 

U 

*  i          ,!     T  .tic  TTT 

Menocal,  J-ius,  in 

L 

Mexico,  L>.  r.,  Mexico 

s 

Miller,  Bryan  orimn 

s 

Andover,  Mass. 

u 

Miller,  Marshall  Burns,  jr. 

TT 

San  Antonio,  Tex. 

c 

Miller,  i  eter  i  aui,  m 

s 

Swarthmore,  Pa. 

c 

Miller,  KODert  ^raig,  jr. 

T 

J 

Charlotte,  k\.  v^. 

s 

Miller,  oamuei  ivay 

T 
\- 

Miami  Beach,  Fla. 

J 

Millar     W/lnlnr-lr  William 

Miller,  winiocK.  wimam 

L 

Seattle,  wasn. 

T  T 

u 

Miner,  Frank  Courtright,  Jr. 

T 

D               (  nrA  Til 

KocKtord,  in. 

U 

Mintkeski,  Walter  Cleverdon 

T  T 

u 

lUinliaespr    T     T     "N  Y 

c 
J 

Mitchell,  Charles  DeBeaux 

>> 

Liien  xviage,  in.  j. 

c 
5 

Mitchell,  raul  Alexander 

Stamford  Conn. 

s 

Mole,  Matthew  Cartwright 

J 

Summit,  N.  J. 

s 

Mook,  David  Parker 

s 

Tenafly,  N.  J. 

s 

Moore,  Christopher  Lee 

u 

North  Tarrytown,  N.  Y. 

u 

Moore,  James  Daniel,  Jr. 

New  York,  N.  Y. 

N 


L 

Nadel,  James  Oliver 

S 

Silver  Spring,  Md. 

U 

Neal,  Albert  Malone,  Jr. 

S 

Marion,  N.  C. 

s 

Neill,  Donald  Montgomery 

S 

Ogunquit,  Me. 

L 

Nelson,  Paul  Michael 

U 

Des  Moines,  Iowa 

LT 

Nelson,  Phillip  Lloyd 

u 

Grand  Marias,  Minn. 

u 

Nettleton,  John  Scott 

u 

Fort  Collins,  Colo. 

s 

Nevius,  George  Booker 

J 

Red  Bank,  N.  J. 

J 

Newburger,  Frank  Liberman,  III 

S 

Rydal,  Pa. 

Moore,  John  Baker 

Wheaton,  111. 
Moore,  Joseph  Fitzgerald 

Pasadena,  Calif. 
Moravec,  Francis  Joseph 

Tuxedo  Park,  N.  Y. 
Morey,  John  Hope,  Jr. 

Frostburg,  Md. 
Morgan,  Philip  Robinson 

Shrewsbury,  Mass. 
Moriarty,  John  James 

Andover,  Mass. 
Morrill,  William  Henderson 

Barrington,  R.  I. 
Morris,  Sidney  Brock 

Pittsburgh,  Pa. 
Morse,  Jonathan 

Bedford,  N.  Y. 
Morton,  Allen  Salisbury 

Casper,  Wyo. 
Moseley,  Thaddeus  Maury 

Jacksonville,  Fla. 
Motley,  Christopher  Preble 

Davis,  Calif. 
Moulin,  Albert  Edward,  III 

New  Orleans,  La. 
Muhs,  Peter  LeBreton 

Pebble  Beach,  Calif. 
Mulley,  Albert  George,  Jr. 

Wilmington,  Mass. 
Munroe,  James  Granger 

Andover,  Mass. 
Murphy,  James  B.,  II 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
Myers,  Douglas  Lee 

Greenwich,  Conn. 
Myers,  Gregory  Bruce 

Ottumwa,  Iowa 


Newbury,  William  Kellogg 

Concord,  Mass. 
Newcomb,  Winthrop  Holbrook 

Andover,  Mass. 
Newhall,  Will  iam  Price,  II 

Riverside,  Conn. 
Newmyer,  Arthur  Grover,  III 

Washington,  D.  C. 
Nierenberg,  David  Werblin 

Chappaqua,  N.  Y. 
Ninger,  Theodore  Constant 

Clifton  Springs,  N.  Y. 
Nixon,  Peter  Edward 

Kennebunk,  Me. 
Noble,  Richard  Cedric 

Jackson,  Mich. 


STUDENTS 


113 


i     Noll,  Jan  Gray 

Springfield,  111. 
Northrup,  David  Hays,  Jr. 

Syracuse,  N.  Y. 
|     Nowara,  Andreas  Alexander 

Canton,  Ohio 


>  Ogilvie,  Andrew  Jones 

Ridgefield,  Conn. 

>  O'Gorman,  Stephen  Vincent 

Beverly,  Mass. 
J    O'Hern,  Joseph  John 
Barnum,  Iowa 

>  Oliver,  Andrew  Arnold 

New  Orleans,  La. 
|     Oiler,  Arthur  Greenleaf 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
f     Olney,  Peter  Butler,  III 
Andover,  Mass. 
Olsen,  Dwight  E.  Stephen 

Bagley,  Minn. 
O'Meara,  Robert  Matthew 
Cedar  Rapids,  Iowa 


Paez-Aragon,  Alejandro 

Mexico  10,  D.  F.,  Mexico 
J    Paoletti,  James  Joseph 

Hartford,  Conn. 
Parcells,  Steven  Jay 

Grosse  Pointe,  Mich. 
J     Park,  Bradford  Stalker 

North  Reading,  Mass. 
Parker,  John  Albert,  Jr. 

Pittsburgh,  Pa. 
Parkes,  Jonathan  Walker 

Littleton,  Colo. 
J    Parry,  Thomas  Hugh 

Hamilton,  N.  Y. 
I     Patton,  Charles  Riley 

Asheville,  N.  C. 
Payne,  Douglas  Brian 

Cedar  Grove,  N.  J. 
i     Perdue,  Peter  Cushing 

Port  Washington,  N.  Y. 
J    Perkins,  Arthur  James 

Dale,  Ind. 
5     Perry,  Winthrop  Scott,  II 

Weston,  Mass. 
Pertnoy,  Sidney  Mark 

Miami  Beach,  Fla. 
J    Peterson,  Lee  Allen 

Old  Lyme,  Conn. 
]     Peterson,  Robert  Burnett 

Andover,  Mass. 
>     Peterson,  Woody  Norman 

Canton,  Ohio 


L     Nowell,  Frederick  Nichols,  III 

Andover,  Mass. 
J      Nuckolls,  Richard  James 

Chapel  Hill,  N.  C. 


o 

L     O'Neill,  Henry  Eaton 

Granville,  Ohio 
L     Onerheim,  Neil  Eric 

Ottumwa,  Iowa 
L      Oniskor,  Alan  Philip 

Flushing,  N.  Y. 
L     O'Rourke,  John  Thomas 

North  Tewksbury,  Mass. 
U     Qrr,  Robert  Bird 

St.  Joseph,  Mo. 
L     Outerbridge,  Ira  Stuart,  III 

Pembroke,  Bermuda 
L     Overton,  Timothy  Merwin,  Jr. 

Tenafly,  N.  J. 


P 

J      Pfeifle,  Harold  Franklin 

Kingfield,  Me. 
J      Pfeifle,  Louis  Charles 

Kingfield,  Me. 
S      Phelps,  Roger  David 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
S      Phillips,  Charles  Gorham,  Jr. 

Upper  Montclair,  N.  J. 
S      Pickering,  James  Stidger 

McKnightstown,  Pa. 
L     Pickett,  Russell  Ames 

Milton,  Mass. 
S      Pierpont,  Jonathan  Ladd 

Darien,  Conn. 
S      Pieters,  Richard  Sawyer,  Jr. 

Andover,  Mass. 
U     Pike,  Nathan  Howard 

Pipestone,  Minn. 
U     Platz,  James  Andrew 

Auburn,  Me. 
S      Plimpton,  Charles  Gilbert,  III 

South  Lincoln,  Mass. 
L     Ponti,  Joseph  Francis 

Andover,  Mass. 
S      Porter,  David  Hill 

Wellesley,  Mass. 
U     Post,  Michael  Adam 

Great  Neck,  N.  Y. 
S      Potter,  Barr  Blakeslee 

St.  Joseph,  Mo. 
S      Potter,  Thompson  Eldridge,  Jr. 

St.  Joseph,  Mo. 


1  14 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


S      Powell,  Byron  Wendell 

Houlton,  Me. 
L      Powell,  Daniel  Winston 

Houlton,  Me. 
S      Powell,  Leslie  Hugh 

LaCrossc,  Va. 
L     Pratt,  Robert  Tucker 

St.  John's  N.  F.,  Canada 
U     Prichard,  Edward  Allen 

Versailles,  Ky. 


U     Quarrier,  John  Vanderbilt 
New  Canaan,  Conn. 


S      Raffcrty,  Christopher  Lawrence 

Farmington,  Conn. 
U     Rainey,  Derek  Rexton 

Port  Huron,  Mich. 
U     Ramey,  Clayton,  Reginald 

Norfolk,  Va. 
J      Randazzo,  Richard  Lee 

North  Andover,  Mass. 
S      Raurell,  Alberto  Miguel,  Jr. 

Miami,  Fla. 
L      Rawson,  Christopher  Bennett 

Riverside,  Conn. 
L     Raymond,  Andrew  Joseph 

Trenton,  N.  J. 
J      Read,  Richard  Rollins,  Jr. 

Mt.  Kisco,  N.  Y. 
J      Reddersen,  Brad  Rawson 

Glenview,  111. 
S      Redman,  Eric 

Seattle,  Wash. 
S      Reed,  Elliott  Williamson,  III 

Southport,  Conn. 
S      Reed,  Mark  Honeywell 

Wayzata,  Minn. 
U     Reed,  Philip  Dunham,  III 

Westfield,  N.  J. 
U     Rees,  Thomas  Dynevor 

Andover,  Mass. 
S      Reid,  Robert  Paul,  III 

Griffiss  AFB,  Rome,  N.  Y. 
U     Reider,  Bruce 

Edison,  N.  J. 
S      Reisner,  Walter  Lewis 

Allegany,  N.  Y. 
U     Remsen,  James  Vanderbeek,  Jr. 

Lakewood,  Colo. 
L      Rendleman,  Neal  James 

Dysart,  Iowa 
L      Rice,  Robert  Blair 

Fitchburg,  Mass. 
J      Richardson,  Harold  Leonard,  III 

Scarborough-on  Hudson,  N.  Y. 


U     Priestley,  James  Russell 

Melrose,  Mass. 
L     Proctor,  Richard  David 

Greenwich,  Conn. 
S      Prophet,  Douglas  Wilson 

South  Norwalk,  Conn. 
J      Pugh,  George  Arthur,  II 

Youngstown,  Ohio 
L      Pullen,  Vincent  Paul 

New  Canaan,  Conn 

Q 

L     Quinlan,  Michael  Owen 
Andover,  Mass. 

R 

L     Richardson,  James  Powell 

Riverside,  Conn. 
L     Richmond,  Scott  Louis 

Maiden,  Mass. 
L     Riley,  Roger  Del 

Salinas,  Calif. 
L     Ristuccia,  Joel  Manuel 

Andover,  Mass. 
S      Rizzo,  William  Ober 

Cambridge,  Mass. 
U     Robinson,  Harold  Bernard 

Brooklyn,  N.  Y. 
U     Robinson,  William  Wylie 

Lancaster,  S.  C. 
U     Roby,  Thornton  Bigelow 

Saddle  River,  N.  J. 
U     Rockwell,  Charles  Embree,  Jr. 

Smithtown,  N.  Y. 
L     Rogers,  James  Slocum 

Scarsdale,  N.  Y. 
L     Rogers,  Walter  Irving 

Texas  College,  Tyler,  Tex. 
J      Romano,  Anthony,  II 

East  Orange,  N.  J. 
U     Rooney,  Mark  Brigham 

Pelham,  N.  Y. 
S      Ross,  Donald  Ogden 

Hamden,  Conn. 
L     Ross,  James  Barnet 

Providence,  R.  I. 
S      Ross,  James  O'Neill 

North  Bergen,  N.  J. 
U     Roth,  Dennis  Levin 

Sidney,  Ohio 
J      Rutherford,  Richard  Woodson 

New  Canaan,  Conn. 
J      Ryan,  Peter  Burton 

Wellesley  Hills,  Mass. 
S     Ryder,  Jeff  Wreden 

Miami,  Fla. 


STUDENTS 


115 


St.  John,  Harry  Mark,  III 

West  Hartford,  Conn. 
Sabl,  John  Jeral 

Los  Angeles,  Calif. 
Salk,  Jonathan  Daniel 

La  Jolla,  Calif. 
Samp,  Frederick  Sullivan 

Cambridge,  Mass. 
Samson,  Charles  Felix,  II 

Princeton,  N.  J. 
Samson,  Hugh  Willett 

Princeton,  N.  J. 
Samson,  Peter 

Princeton,  N.  J. 
Samuels,  Edward  Barry 

Paragould,  Ark. 
Saunders,  Wade  Hampton 

Bethesda,  Md. 
Sawyer,  Charles  Horner 

Buffalo,  N.  Y. 
Sawyer,  James  Kelsey 

Dalton,  Mass. 
Scheft,  Thomas  Winden 

West  Newton,  Mass. 
Schepps,  Joseph  William 

Dallas,  Tex. 
Schiavoni,  Thomas  Francis 

Bradford,  Mass. 
Schlesinger,  Andrew  Bancroft 

Washington,  D.  C. 
Schneiderman,  Matthew  Marks 

Montreal  6,  P.  Q.,  Canada 
Schroeder,  Dean  Howard 

Burlington,  Wis. 
Schumacher,  Thomas  Donn 

Grafton,  N.  D. 
Scofield,  Arthur  Bly 

Brookline,  Mass. 
Scott,  William  Andrew 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
Seamans,  Joseph 

Washington,  D.  C. 
Sears,  John  Russell,  Jr. 

Dallas,  Tex. 
Seccombe,  Stephen  Dana 

Pittsburgh,  Pa. 
Sedgwick,  David  Williams 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
Segarra,  Juan  Enrique 

San  Juan,  Puerto  Rico 
Sekulic,  Zoran  Ozren 

Tanzania,  East  Africa 
Selander,  Robert  William 

Southborough,  Mass. 
Selden,  Thomas  Randolph 

Houston,  Tex. 


s 

S      Sessions,  Stuart  Lunsford 

Ladue,  Mo. 
J      Shannon,  James  Michael 

Lawrence,  Mass. 
U     Shannon,  Peter  Douglas 

Laconia,  N.  H. 
U     Shea,  John  Richard,  in 

Baltimore,  Md. 
L     iheldon,  Albert  Millard,  III 

Wayzata,  Minn. 
L     Sherman,  Scott  Merritt 

Andover,  Mass. 
L     Shiner,  Christopher  Scott 

East  Haven,  Conn. 
S      Short,  John  Gerdes 

Cohasset,  Mass. 
L     Shu,  Steven  Wesley 

Charlotte,  N.  C. 
J      Shuler,  Craig  Lant 

Salt  Lake  City,  Utah 
L     Shuman,  John  Curtis 

Springfield,  Mass. 
U     Sieburth,  Richard  Raymond 

Denver,  Colo. 
U     Sinclair,  Thomas  Graham,  Jr. 

Maracaibo,  Venezuela 
L     Sinclaire,  Peter  Edgecomb 

Darien,  Conn. 
S      Sinton,  Douglas  Milton 

San  Francisco,  Calif. 
S      Smith,  Bradley  Youle 

Princeton,  N.  J. 
J      Smith,  Charles  Christopher 

Waban,  Mass. 
U     Smith,  David  Emerson 

North  Pownal,  Vt. 
U     Smith,  Robert  Pease,  Jr. 

Burlington,  Vt. 
S      Smith,  Roger  Hampton 

Dayton,  Ohio 
L      Smith,  Sumner  Merrill 

Cohasset,  Mass. 
L      Smith,  Thomas  Dickson 

Wellesley  Hills,  Mass. 
J      Snelling,  Mark  Hornor 

Shelburne,  Vt. 
L      Soule,  Richard  Mansfield 

Andover,  Mass. 
L      Spaeth,  Walter  MacNeille 

Elizabeth  City,  N.  C. 
L      Spalding,  Richard  Coxe 

Greenwich,  Conn. 
L      Spear,  Brian  Hartwell 

Worcester,  Mass. 
L      Spears,  Andre  Mark 

Riverdale,  N.  Y. 


116 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


U     Spencer,  John  Carlton 

Wiesbaden,  Germany 
J      Sperry,  Leonard  Thomas 

Port  Chester,  N.  Y. 
S      Sperry,  Robert  James 

Hillsdale,  N.  Y. 
S      Spiegel,  John  Willson 

Berkeley,  Calif. 
S      Spinden,  Joseph  Gilmour 

Carmel,  N.  Y. 
L     Spindler,  James  Andrew 

Morgantown,  W.  Va. 
S      Spooner,  Jonathan  Farr 

East  Douglas,  Mass. 
U     Squires,  Richard  Hopkins 

Alexandria,  Va. 
L     Staley,  Andrew,  Jr. 

Providence  R.  I. 
S      Stanley  Bruce  McLaren 

Ft.  Myers  Beach,  Fla. 
S      Stapleton,  Jonathan  Carroll 

Little  Compton,  R.  I. 
U     Starr,  Thomas  Melvin 

Albert  Lea,  Minn. 
S      Steele,  William  Lawrence,  Jr. 

Gloucester,  Mass. 
S      Stein,  Goeffrey  Richard 

Newton  Centre,  Mass. 
J      Steinert,  Roger  Francis 

Andover,  Mass. 
S      Stelle,  Kellogg  Sheffield 

Washington,  D.  C. 
L     Stevens,  Alanson  Paul 

Andover,  Mass. 
S      Stevens,  Jonathan  Buell 

Easthampton,  Mass. 


S      Takvorian,  Ronald  Wayne 

Lawrence,  Mass. 
S      Tallot,  Michel  Robert 

Andover,  Mass. 
1      Tammen,  John  George,  Jr. 

Newark,  Ohio 
S      Tan,  Ronald  Long 

Bangkok,  Thailand 
S      Tansey,  Michael  Merle 

San  Jose,  Calif. 
U     Taylor,  Lawrence  Jay 

North  Babylon,  L.  I.,  N.  Y. 
J      Taylor,  Stephen  Emlyn 

New  Haven,  Conn. 
L      Tellis,  Christopher  Alexis 

Sausalito,  Calif. 
U     Tellis,  Gregory  Alexis 

Sausalito,  Calif. 
1      Thomas,  Evan  Welling,  III 

Huntington,  N.  Y. 


J      Stevens,  Mark  Whitney 

Washington,  D.  C. 
L      Stevenson,  Richard  Dill,  Jr. 

Lake  Bluff,  111. 
S      Stewart,  Richard  Lawrence 

Reading,  Mass. 
J      Stewart,  Richard  Warren 

Maquoketa,  Iowa 
U     Stokely,  Dykeman,  Cole 

Newport,  Tenn. 
L     Stokely,  James  Rorex,  III 

Newport,  Tenn. 
U     Stott,  Frederic  Sanderson 

Andover,  Mass. 
S      Strausz,  David  Alexander,  Jr. 

Seattle,  Wash. 
J      Strebeigh,  Waring  Marshall 

South  Dartmouth,  Mass. 
L     Stulgis,  Jonathan  William 

Andover,  Mass. 
U     Stuyck,  Jan-Pieter  Joslyn 

Cos  Cob,  Conn. 
L     Suen,  Theodore  Michael 

New  Canaaa,  Conn. 
S      Sullivan,  Stephen  Francis 

Jenkintown,  Pa. 
U     Sumner,  Cyril  Jonathan 

Belmont,  Mass. 
U     Swartz,  John  Hay,  Jr. 

Gladwyne,  Pa. 
U     Sweezy,  James  Weldon 

Charlotte,  N.  C. 
L     Swope,  George  Steel,  Jr. 

Lake  Forest,  111. 

T 

S      Thomas,  Willys  James 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
U     Thompson,  Anthony 

Lexington,  Mass. 
L     Thompson,  Douglas  Crawford 

Sao  Paulo,  Brazil 
S      Thompson,  Eric  Charles 

Lynnfield,  Mass. 
U     Thompson,  Timothy  Lewis 

Wilton,  Conn. 
S      Thomson,  James  Barry 

Kingston,  Jamaica 
J      Tibbetts,  David  Allen 

Lawrence,  Mass. 
S      Tolman,  Charles  Edward 

Concord,  Mass. 
L     Tomassi,  John 

Westport,  Conn. 
S      Tompkins,  Vinton  Douglas 

Wayland,  Mass. 


STUDENTS 


117 


Torvik,  Stephen  Paul 

Decorah,  Iowa 
Tottenham,  Dennis  Edward 

Fort  Worth,  Tex. 
Townend,  Stephen  Coughlin 

Dallas,  Pa. 
Tracy,  Wayne  Francis 

Rumford,  R.  I. 
Trafton,  Richard  Lewis 

Auburn,  Me. 
Tresemer,  David  Ward 

Ft.  Lauderdale,  Fla. 
Tresemer,  Michael  William 

Ft.  Lauderdale,  Fla. 
Truelove,  Frederick  Charles,  III 

Norwell,  Mass. 
Truelove,  John  Martin 

Norwell,  Mass. 


Underwood,  Cary  Sutton 
Portville,  N.  Y. 


Van  Wyck,  David  Bicknell 
Cave  Creek,  Ariz. 

Vaughan,  Russell  Stone 
Groveland,  Mass. 

Verger,  Donald  Barry 
Great  Neck,  N.  Y. 


Wagner,  John,  Jr. 

East  Lansing,  Mich. 
Wagoner,  Bradford  Allan 

West  Hartford,  Conn. 
Walcott,  Joseph  Pratt 

Wooster,  Ohio 
Walden,  Robert  Stewart 

Rye,  N.  Y. 
Wales,  Carl  Alzen 

Borrego  Springs,  Calif. 
Walker,  Frederick  Burgess,  II 

Needham,  Mass. 
Walker,  Walton  Harris,  II 

Fayetteville,  N.  C. 
Wallace,  Robert  Bruce 

Doylestown,  Pa. 
Walton,  Bruce  Hunter 

Montclair,  N.  J. 
Waring,  Jeffrey  Harrison 

Brewer,  Me. 
Wamecke,  Rodger  Cushing 

San  Francisco,  Calif. 
Warren,  Caleb  Thomas 

Princeton,  N.  J. 
Warren,  D'Arcy  Paul 

Chappaqua,  N.  Y. 


u 

Tucker,  John  Lathrop 

Cambridge,  Mass. 

s 

Tung,  Alan  Ko-Jen 

Tokyo,  Japan 

s 

Tung,  Barry  Ko- Young 

Tokyo,  Japan 

s 

Turco,  John  Harvey 

Melrose,  Mass. 

L 

Turk,  Daniel 

Danbury,  Conn. 

s 

Turner,  Prescott  Kingsbury,  Jr. 

Fairfield,  Conn. 

J 

Tuttle,  Arthur  Farwell,  III 

Deland,  Fla. 

u 

Tuttle,  Robert  Carl  John 

Avon,  Mass. 

u 


V 

U     Vincent,  Jonathan  Sanborn 

Norwell,  Mass. 
J      Volker,  James  Robert 

Andover,  Mass. 


w 

U     Waters,  Robert  Lincoln 

Northfield,  N.  J. 
L      Watling,  William  Wright 

Santa  Barbara,  Calif. 
J      Watson,  Andrew  Blanchard 

San  Francisco,  Calif. 
J      Weaver,  George  Bellinger 

New  Haven,  Conn. 
U     Weil,  Mitchell  Alan 

Chicago,  HI. 
S      Weil,  Thomas  Eliot,  Jr. 

Washington,  D.  C. 
U     Weinberg,  Richard  Barry 

Scarsdale,  N.  Y. 
S      Weiss,  James  Woodrow 

Norwich,  Vt. 
L      Weiss,  Thomas  Lynn 

Ft.  Lauderdale,  Fla. 
U     Welch,  John  Bernard,  III 

Wellesley  Hills,  Mass. 
U     Wellington,  Peter  Lauck 

Harrington  Park,  N.  J. 
U     Wengert,  David  Allen 

Lebanon,  Pa. 
U     Wertimer,  Peter 

London,  N.  W.  3,  England 


1  1  g  PHILLIPS 

S      West,  Peter  Martin 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
I      Whcaton,  Scott  Rodgers,  Jr. 

Poughkeepsie,  N.  Y. 
I      Whipple,  Christopher  Todd 

North  Grafton,  Mass. 
L     White,  Augustus  Thorburn 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
S       White,  Philip  Howell 

Lakeville,  Conn. 
J      White,  Stephen  Eliot 

Chestnut  Hill,  Mass. 
L      Whitehead,  Howard  Judson 

Melrose,  Mass. 
U     Whitney,  Wheelock,  III 

Wayzata,  Minn. 
U     Wikander,  Matthew  Hays 

Northampton,  Mass. 
S      Wilbur,  Christopher  Hayes 

Portland,  Conn. 
S      Willets,  Elmore  Abram,  III 

Sewickley,  Pa. 
J      Williams,  Charles  Gallup,  II 

Fairfield,  Conn. 
U     Williams,  Daniel 

Miami,  Fla. 
U     Williams,  John  Peter 

Annisquam,  Mass. 
S      Williams,  Peter  Welles 

Springfield,  Mass. 
U     Williamson,  William  Burrill,  II 

Augusta,  Me. 
T      Willis,  Robert  Blair 

Manset,  Me. 
L     Wilson,  Andrew  Murray 

Fayetteville,  N.  Y. 


U     Yeh,  Norman 

Washington,  D.  C. 
L     Yetten,  Peter  Michael 

Waltham,  Mass. 
S      Youns,  John  Hendricks,  Jr. 

Whitehouse  Station,  N.  J. 


ACADEMY 

L     Wilson,  James  Milton,  Jr. 

Corpus  Christi,  Tex. 
L     Winship,  Michael  Bancroft 

Peshawar,  Pakistan 
J      Winship,  Nathaniel  Hayford 

Peshawar,  Pakistan 
S      Wise,  Christopher  Todd 

Katonah,  N.  Y. 
S      Wise,  Erich  Paul 

San  Pedro,  Calif. 
U     Wise,  Michael  Todd 

Katonah,  N.  Y. 
S      Wiske,  Paul  Brendan 

Evansville,  Ind. 
U     Wohlfeil,  Steven  Christopher 

Fort  Bel  voir,  Va. 
L     Wolf,  Stewart  George,  III 

Oklahoma  City,  Okla. 
U     Woodbury,  Charles  Putnam,  Jr. 

Coulee  Dam,  Wash. 
L     Woolsey,  John  Munro,  3d 

Cambridge,  Mass. 
U     Works,  John  Vickery 

Dallas,  Tex. 
L     Wright,  Clifford  Ramsey,  III 

Santa  Barbara,  Calif. 
S      Wright,  Edward  Murray 

Milton,  Mass. 
J      Wright,  Frederick  Herman  Greene, 

Buzzards  Bay,  Mass. 
S      Wright,  Marcus  Wayne 

Charlotte,  N.  C. 
S      Wyper,  James,  III 

West  Hartford,  Conn. 


X 
Y 

L     Young,  Peter  Franklin 
Northampton,  Mass. 

L      Young,  William  Johnson,  III 
Baltimore,  Md. 

S      Youngquist,  Jeffrey  Ives 
Lancaster,  Pa. 


U     Zimmern,  Samuel  Hyams 
Pensacola,  Fla. 


Z 

u 


Zimmers,  Craig  Lee 
Dayton,  Ohio 


INDEX 


\ddison  Gallery  _  -  -  23 

\dministrative  Departments  and  Officers     17 

\dmissions  Deposit   —  47 

\dmission,    General    Policy    42 

admissions  Interview    —  44 

admission  Procedure   _  —  43 

Admission  Requirements  for  Each  Class   —  48 

Admission  Tests,  Charges  and  Schedule   —  46 

Aims  of  Phillips  Academy   „    4 

Alumni  Representatives   —  95 

Application  Blank  —  facing  120 

Applying,  Procedure  in     43 

Archaeology  Building  —  „  —  25 

Let    -    -  -  -  -  -  -  -  —23,  54 

in  Gallery  ~  —  23 

uhletics  and  Physical  Education   -  .  „  _  —    30 

lird  Sanctuary  . —    _  .    26 

Ireakage  Deposit     .  —  _  _  -    36 

Calendars     «...  _    —    2,3 

Classification    of    Students  48,  102 

Class   Officers     -  ......    50 

Nothing  —      ~  -  —  34 

College  Admissions — Class  of  1965  ..  ...  3  5 

Allege  Board  Examinations    „  46,  49 

Constitution  of  Phillips  Academy   —  6 

Counselors         20 

Course  of  Study  ...  ..  .  —  50 

Courses,  Description  of   .  .  .....  _  -  _  54-78 

Cultural  Opportunities  _  „  —  21 

Curriculum    _    ...  50 

)aily    Schedule     „  _      _  .   32 

dances   _      ....  .....  „    3  0 

day  Excuses     _  ...  _    „  ..  34 

day  Students   _  _._  _    36 

Oental  Work  at  School  .   31 

deposit,  Admissions     „   47 

deposit,  Breakage      „  ._  „  36 

diploma    Requirements       _  _  51 

discipline    „    _  _  „    3  3 

dormitory  Residence,  Plan  of  .   _  _    20 

Cating,  Plan  of    _  __  20 

Entrance   Examinations   _  _  _  _    46 

-Cntrance,  Requirements  for     „    43 

expenses      .......    3  5-39 

:xtra-Curricular  Activities   26 

'Extras"       „  m    37 

Acuity    _  10 

financial  Aid  for  Students  _  _    38 

founders  of  Phillips  Academy  „   5 

-Cmir-Year    Program     „  _  _  _    51 

furniture    (Room   Equipment)     34 

jeneral  Information  „    20 

trades  and  Reports   _    33 

headmasters   „    f 


119 


120 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Health    Supervision  —  

Historical  Sketch   

Housemasters 


Interview  for  Admission  —  ~.~      -    —  44 

Library    -  —  -   — 

Map  of  the  School          -•  -   

Medical  Care  at  School  „  -  -       

Medical  Expenses   -        — 

Medical  Insurance  —   -      -     

Music        -    —    — "—-——-—"* 

Office  Hours      ••-         

One  Year  Students    ~  ~  -       42 

Payments        —      — 

Peabody  Foundation  for  Archaeology  .„      -    

Physical  Education 


Placement  Examinations,  Preparation  for 
Plan  of  Residence  and  Eating   


Postgraduate  Students  —      —    -   42 

Prizes  and  Winners          ~   

Procedure  in  Applying  —  —       

Purpose  of  Phillips  Academy   —        — 

Regulations,  General         

Religion,  School  Policy        

Representation,  Geographical        —  — 

Residence,  Plan  of  

Room  Equipment  

Scholarships,   Award  of 
Scholarship  Funds 


Scholarship  Aptitude  Tests         —   46, 

Schoolboys    Abroad        , —     


Secondary  School  Admission  Tests   

Self  Help 


Smoking        „    33, 

Spending  Money  _           

Student  Activities    „     .        

Student   Aid        _  „  „  „      J 


Students,  Names  of — 1965-1966 

Study  Hours   

Summer  Session    

Trustees    

Tuition  Charges    „  

Vacations  (see  Calendar)    

Weekend  Excuses   _  

Work  Program    _  


CATALOGUE 

PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 

Andover,  Massachusetts 


19  6  8 


HUNDRED     NINETIETH  YEAR 
   _____  _ 


Published  by  Phillips  Academy,  Andover,  Massachusetts 


^btroAclies  to 

vhillips  Academy 

JimfoYcr,  {Mass. 

FROM  BOSTON'  IS  MILES 

RTES.  l-ZS  FROM  CHARLES  RIVER  DAM 
LETT  OH  RTE.  16  IN  MEDFORD 
IT.  ON  INTERSTATE  93  NORTH 
RT.  ON  RTE.  IZ5 
LEFT  NORTH  ON  RTE.  ES 

FROM  LOGAN  AIRPORT  Z5  MILES 

RT  ON  RTE.  C't  BECOMES  RTE.  I 
WEST  ON  RTE.  7/4 

LEFT  ON  ELM  ST  AT  MERRIMACK  COLLEGE 
LEFT  ON  MAIN  ST.,  AN  DOVER  ROUTE  28 

F/TOM  POINTS  WEST,  SOUTHWEST,  AND  NW. 
RTF..  495  NORTH 
RT  ON  RTE,  Z8 

FROM  POINTS  NORTHEAST 

RTE.  +95  SOOTH  TO  RTE.  23 
OR  RTE.  133  TO  125 
RT  OH  ELM  ST. 
LEFT  ON  MAIN  ST.,  AN  DOM* 


RTE.ZS 


fxttll 


1$C1.  ttnti  f  tkn  Hse  fnt  It  # 10.  (V/T,  ^ 


tcvidtnee 


CATALOGUE 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 

Andover,  Massachusetts 


1968 


ONE   HUNDRED    NINETIETH  YEAR 


Published     by     Phillips     Academy,     Andover,  Massachusetts 


1967 

1968 

1969 

SEPTEMBER 

MAY 

JANUARY 

C    \f    T    w  fee 

 „     1  2 

3     4     5     6     7    8  9 
10  11   12  13   14  15  16 
17  18  19  20  21  22  23 
24  25  26  27  28  29  30 

S    \A    T    W    T    F  S 

  12     3  4 

5     6     7     8     9  10  11 
12  13   14  15   16  17  18 
19  20  21  22  23  24  25 
26  27  28  29  30  31   

S    M    T   W   T    F  S 

\J       1V1         X          W          X         X  sJ 

  12     3  4 

5     6     7     8     9  10  11 
12  13   14  15   16  17  18 
19  20  21  22  23  24  25 
26  27  28  29  30  31  ...... 

OCTOBER 

JUNE 

FEBRUARY 

i     i     i     a     *     a  i 
8     9   10   11    12   13  14 
15   16  17  18  19  20  21 
22  2?   24  25   26  27  28 
29  30  31   - 

I 

2     3     4     5     6     7  8 
9  10   11    12  13   14  15 
16  17  18  19  20  21  22 
23  24  25  26  27  28  29 

30   

2     3     4     5     6    7  8 
9   10   11   12  13   14  15 
16  17  18  19  20  21  22 

23  24  25   26  27  28  „... 

NOVEMBER 

JULY 

MARCH 

  1      Z      J  4 

5     6     7     8     9   10  11 
12  13   14  15  16  17  18 
19  20  21   22  23  24  25 
26  27  28  29  30   

  1        i-        J        t  JO 

7     8     9  10  11   12  13 
14   15   16   17  18  19  20 
21   22  23  24  25  26  27 

28  29  30  31   

2     3     4     5     6     7  8 
9  10  11   12   13   14  15 
16  17  18  19  20  21  22 
23  24  25  26  27  28  29 
30  3  1    ..... 

DECEMBER 

AUGUST 

APRIL 

1  2 

3     4     5     6     7     8  9 
10  11    12  13   14  15  16 
17    18   19  20  21   22  23 
24  25  26  27  28  29  30 
31    ..... 

12  3 
4     5     6     7     8     9  10 
11   12   13   14  15   16  17 
18  19  20  21  22  23  24 
25  26  27  28  29  30  31 

1     2     3    4  J 

6     7     8     9  10  11  12 
13   14  15   16  17  18  19 
20  21  22  23  24  25  26 
27  28  29  30   

JANUARY    •  1968 

SEPTEMBER 

MAY 

......    1     2    3    4     5  6 

7     8     9   10  11   12  13 
14  15   16  17  18  19  20 
21   22  2*   24  25   26  27 
28  29   30  31   

1     2     3     4     5     6  7 
8     9  10  11   12  13  14 
15   16  17  18  19  20  21 
22  23  24  25  26  27  28 

29  30   

  1     2  3 

4     5     6    7    8     9  10 
11  12  13  14  15  16  17 
18   19  20  21  22  23  24 
25  26  27  28  29  50  31 

FEBRUARY 

OCTOBER 

JUNE 

  1     2  3 

4     5     6    7     8     9  10 
11   12  13   14  15   16  17 
18   19  20  21  22  23  24 
25   26  27  28  29   

  1     2     3     4  5 

6     7     8     9  10  11  12 
13   14  15   16  17  18  19 
20  21   22  23  24  25  26 
27  28  29  30  31   

1     2     3     4     5     6  7 
8     9   10  11   12  13  14 
15   16  17  18  19  20  21 
22  23  24  25  26  27  28 

29  30   J 

MARCH 

NOVEMBER 

JULY 

i  f 

 »  ■•-         ......    i  / 

3     4     5     6     7     8  9 
10   11   12  13  14  15  16 
17  IS  19  20  21   22  23 
24  25  26  27  28  29  30 
31    „  

   1  2 

3     4     5     6     7     8  9 
10  11   12   13  14  15  16 
17  18  19  20  21  22  23 
24  25  26  27  28  29  30 

  1     2     3     4  5 

6     7     8     9  10  11  12 
13   14  15   16  17  18  19 
20  21  22  23  24  25  26 
27  28  29  30  31    — 

APRIL 

DECEMBER 

AUGUST 

......     1     2     3     4     5  6 

7     8     9  10   11    12  13 
14   H   16  17  18   19  20 
21   22  23  24  25  26  27 
28  29  30   _  ...... 

1     2     3     4     5     6  7 
8     9  10  11   12  13  14 
15   16  17  18   19  20  21 
22  23   24  25  26  27  28 
29  30  3  1   

  1  2 

3     4     5     6    7     8  9 
10   11   12  13   14  15  16 
17  18   19  20  21  22  23 
24  25  26  27  28  29  30 

•  CALENDAR 

SCHOOL  YEAR  1967-1968 

1  term  begins   — Friday,  September  15,  1967 

;  i-term  Rating  .   -  .Wednesday,  November  1 

ig  Thanksgiving  weekend   Wednesday,  November  22,  to 

5:00  p.m.  on  Sunday,  November  26 

M  term  ends  „  Thursday,  December  14 

Christmas  Recess — 20  days 

titer  term  begins  8:00  p.m.,  Wednesday,  January  3,  1968 

]  ig  weekend  -  Friday-Sunday,  February  9-11 

'  nter  term  ends   „  Thursday,  March  14 

Spring  Recess — 19  days 

;  ing  term  begins  _  8:00  p.m.,  Tuesday,  April  2 

!  ig  weekend  ~  ,  .Friday-Sunday,  May  10-12 

1  minations  end  „  „     Thursday,  June  6 

(  nmencement  .....     Friday,  June  7 

Summer  Session — 1968 

amer  session  begins  _   Wednesday,  June  26 

:  nmer  session  ends   ..   Thursday,  August  8 


1  term  begins 
1  term  ends  .... 


SCHOOL  YEAR— 1968-1969 


.Friday,  September  20,  1968 
.Thursday,  December  19 


Christmas  Recess — 19  days 

neer  term  begins   „  _8:00  p.m.,  Tuesday,  January  7,  1969 

nter  term  ends   „  „  „   Thursday,  March  13 


'ing  term  begins 
animations  end 
mmencement  »..„.. 


er  session  begins 
mmer  session  ends  .. 


Spring  Recess — 19  days 

   8:00  p.m.,  Tuesday,  April  1 

  Thursday,  June  12 

 ..   Friday,  June  13 

Summer  Session  1969 

  Wednesday,  July  2 

  Thursday,  August  14 


3 


PURPOSE  OF  PHILLIPS  ACADEM 


The  purpose  of  Phillips  Academy  is  to  teach  "the  great  end  a  i 
real  business  of  living."  According  to  its  Constitution,  signed  1 
1778,  "It  is  expected  that  the  Master's  attention  to  the  dispositi 
of  the  minds  and  morals  of  the  youth  under  his  charge  will  exoi 
every  other  care;  well  considering  that,  though  goodness  with<t 
knowledge  (as  it  respects  others)  is  both  weak  and  feeble,  t 
knowledge  without  goodness  is  dangerous,  and  that  both  unid 
form  the  noblest  character  and  lay  the  surest  foundation  of  it- 
fulness  to  mankind."  Adapted  to  conditions  of  modern  life,  ie 
aim  of  the  Academy  remains  the  same:  so  to  intensify  and  broan 
the  capacities  of  its  students  that  they  may  enter  the  larger  wed 
with  trained  minds  and  with  a  deepened  sense  of  their  responsibi  y 
to  society. 

Phillips  Academy  is  dedicated  to  sound  scholarship.  It  endears 
first  of  all  to  stimulate  in  its  students  curiosity  about  thing? )f 
the  mind,  to  induce  in  them  a  desire  to  educate  themselves.  It  t- 
tempts  to  foster  the  development  of  discriminating  judgment  id 
independence  of  thought.  It  tries  to  cultivate  the  imagination  id 
emotions  of  its  boys. 

By  long  tradition  Andover  believes  in  education  that  m  es 
boys  resourceful  and  independent.  Andover  believes  in  the  vue 
of  student  representation  from  all  parts  of  the  country  ancof 
the  world,  and  from  all  walks  of  life.  To  its  boys  it  offers  ann- 
tellectual  and  moral  discipline,  as  well  as  friendly  encouragen  nt 
and  sympathy,  the  best  incentives  to  accomplishment. 

Phillips  Academy  is  a  liberal,  modern  school  with  an  ancnt 
tradition.  It  values  the  benefits  passed  on  to  it  by  many  generates. 
It  has  contributed  directly  to  the  development  of  thousand  of 
men,  and  indirectly  to  numberless  aspects  of  our  national  fe. 
Thankful  for  its  history,  Andover  focuses  on  the  present  am  on 
the  future.  In  training  American  boys  for  service  and  leadeiiip 
it  seeks  to  preserve  a  flexible  spirit  that  will  test  and  try  the  ew 
while  treasuring  the  riches  of  the  past. 


4 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 

Founded  in  1778  by 
Samuel  Phillips  John  Phillips,  LL.D. 

Samuel  Phillips,  Jr. 


;  rsnTunoN  and  deed  of  trust  signed 
■ 

[iOOL  OPENED 

>     OF  INCORPORATION 


April  21,  1778 
April  30,  1778 
October  4,  1780 


HEADMASTERS 


LHALET  PEARSON,  LL.D. 

E  iEZER  PEMBERTON,  LL.D. 

I  K  NEWMAN,  A.M. 

:  >J  ADAMS,  LL.D. 

1  )OD  JOHNSON,  A.M. 

VJEL  H.  TAYLOR,  LL.D. 

R)ERIC  W.  TILTON,  A.M. 

I  L  F.  P.  BANCROFT,  Ph.D.,  L.H.D.,  LL.D. 

KED  E.  STEARNS,  Litt.D.,  L.H.D.,  LL.D. 

I  JDE  M.  FUESS,  Ph.D.,  L.H.D.,  LL.D. 

:  M  M.  KEMPER,  L.H.D.,  Litt.D.,  LL.D. 


1778-1786 
1786-1793 
1794-1809 
1810-1833 
1833-1837 
1837-1871 
1871-1873 
1873-1901 
1903-1933 
1933-1948 
1948- 


5 


HISTORICAL  SKETCH 


Phillips  academy  is  situated  at  Andover,  in  the  County  ( 
Essex,  Massachusetts.  The  Constitution  and  original  deed  of  gi: 
of  the  Academy  was  signed  April  21,  1778,  by  Esquire  Samu 
Phillips,  of  the  north  parish  of  Andover,  and  his  brother,  John  Phi 
Hps,  LL.D.,  of  Exeter,  New  Hampshire,  in  the  presence,  and  large 
at  the  instance,  of  Samuel  Phillips,  Jr.  (then  but  twenty-six  yea 
old),  afterward  judge  of  the  Court  of  Common  Pleas  for  Ess< 
County,  president  of  the  Massachusetts  Senate,  and  lieutena 
governor  of  the  Commonwealth.  By  this  act  the  Trustees 
Phillips  Academy  became  owners  of  the  land  in  the  south  pari 
of  Andover  on  which  the  chief  buildings  of  the  school  now  star, 
together  with  other  endowment  comprising  further  lands  and  t 
sum  of  one  thousand  six  hundred  and  fourteen  pounds.  T> 
years  later,  on  October  4,  1780,  the  school  was  incorporated 
the  Act  of  Incorporation  passed  by  the  General  Court  of  Massach- 
setts,  signed  by  John  Hancock. 

The  Constitution  was  written  by  Samuel  Phillips,  Jr.,  with  is 
advice  and  aid  of  his  friend,  Eliphalet  Pearson,  who  became  fit 
Master.  The  following  passages  are  characteristic: 

A  serious  consideration  of  the  premises,  and  an  observation  of 
the  growing  neglect  of  youth,  have  excited  in  us  a  painful 
anxiety  for  the  event,  and  determined  us  to  make,  in  the  follow- 
ing Conveyance,  a  humble  dedication  to  our  Heavenly  Benefac- 
tor of  the  ability,  wherewith  he  hath  blessed  us,  to  lay  the 
foundation  of  a  public  free  School  or  Academy  for  the  purpose 
of  instructing  Youth,  not  only  in  English  and  Latin  Grammar, 
Writing,  Arithmetic,  and  those  Sciences,  wherein  they  are 
commonly  taught,  but  more  especially  to  learn  them  the  great 
end  and  real  business  of  living. 

The  Master  is  to  give  special  attention  to  the  health  of  the 
scholars,  and  ever  to  urge  the  importance  of  a  habit  of  industry. 

But  above  all,  it  is  expected  that  the  Master's  attention  to  the 
disposition  of  the  minds  and  morals  of  the  youth  under  his  charge 
will  exceed  every  other  care;  well  considering  that,  though  good- 
ness without  knowledge  (as  it  respects  others)  is  weak  and 
feeble,  yet  knowledge  without  goodness  is  dangerous,  and  that 
both  united  form  the  noblest  character,  and  lay  the  surest  foun- 
dation of  usefulness  to  mankind. 


6 


HISTORICAL  SKETCH 


7 


This  Seminary  shall  be  ever  equally  open  to  youth  of  requisite 
qualifications  from  every  quarter. 

And,  in  order  to  prevent  the  smallest  perversion  of  true  intent 
of  this  Foundation,  it  is  again  declared,  that  the  first  and  princi- 
pal object  of  this  Institution  is  the  promotion  of  true  Piety  and 
Virtue;  the  second,  instruction  in  the  English,  Latin,  and  Greek 
languages,  together  with  Writing,  Arithmetic,  Music,  and  the 
Art  of  Speaking;  the  third,  practical  Geometry,  Logic,  and 
Geography;  and  the  fourth,  such  other  of  the  Liberal  Arts  and 
Sciences  or  Languages  as  opportunity  and  ability  may  hereafter 
admit,  and  as  the  Trustees  shall  direct. 

Phillips  Academy  was  opened  for  instruction  April  30,  1778, 
n  a  building  which  had  earlier  been  used  as  a  carpenter's  shop. 
The  first  preceptor  was  Eliphalet  Pearson  (1778-1786),  a  stimu- 
ating  teacher  and  stern  disciplinarian,  who  established  high  stan- 
lards  of  instruction.  Shortly  before  he  resigned  to  become  professor 
t  Harvard  College,  a  new  and  larger  schoolhouse  was  built.  On 
\Tovember  5,  1789,  George  Washington,  President  of  the  United 
itates,  visited  Andover  and  addressed  the  students  assembled  on 
he  Old  Training  Field. 

The  fourth  principal,  John  Adams,  raised  the  repute  of  the 
chool,  increased  the  attendance,  and  enlarged  the  number  of 
eachers.  During  his  term  as  principal,  the  second  schoolhouse  was 
)urned,  on  January  28,  1818,  and  a  new  brick  Academy  designed 
>y  the  famous  architect  Charles  Bulfinch  was  erected  within  a 
rear.  This  "classic  hall,"  described  in  Oliver  Wendell  Holmes's 
:entennial  poem,  "The  School-Boy,"  is  still  in  use. 

The  modern  period  of  the  school's  history  commenced  in  1873 
vith  the  election  of  Cecil  F.  P.  Bancroft,  a  man  of  foresight  and 
:lear  vision,  patience  and  shrewd  discrimination,  who  was  prin- 
:ipal  until  his  death  in  1901.  Under  Dr.  Bancroft's  administra- 
ion,  attendance  increased  from  262  to  over  400  pupils  and  since 
hen  has  never  dropped  below  that  figure. 

Dr.  Bancroft  was  succeeded  in  1902  by  Alfred  E.  Stearns.  The 
purchase  in  1908  of  the  lands  and  buildings  of  the  Andover  Theo- 
ogical  Seminary  greatly  increased  the  resources  of  the  Academy 
md  made  possible  new  development.  In  the  late  1920's  and  in  the 
L 93 0's  the  school  took  its  present  form  under  a  building  and 
andscaping  program  made  possible  by  the  generosity  of  Thomas 
-ochran,  other  alumni,  and  friends  of  the  school. 


8 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Under  the  administration  of  Claude  M.  Fuess,  Headmaster  from 
1933  to  1948,  the  faculty  was  greatly  enlarged  and  strengthened, 
the  curriculum  was  revised,  a  number  of  buildings  were  added, 
and  the  Andover  Summer  Session  (1942)  and  the  Andover  Eve- 
ning Study  Program  (1935)  began.  In  World  War  II,  Andover 
men  served  in  each  of  the  services,  and  143  gave  their  lives.  Dur- 
ing much  of  the  war,  Henry  L.  Stimson  served  as  president  of  the 
Trustees  as  well  as  Secretary  of  War. 

John  M.  Kemper  was  elected  Headmaster  in  1948.  Since  then, 
substantial  advances  have  been  made  in  three  areas:  curriculum, 
admissions  policy,  and  the  physical  plant  and  resources. 

The  curriculum  has  been  revised  to  provide  increased  flexibility. 
In  1952-1953,  under  Andover  leadership  and  with  a  grant  from 
the  Ford  Foundation,  the  important  study,  General  Education  in 
School  and  College,  was  completed.  It  has  resulted  in  the  introduc- 
tion into  the  Andover  curriculum  of  new,  advanced,  college-leve! 
courses.  In  195  5,  in  response  to  the  national  teacher  shortage,  the 
school  inaugurated  the  Andover  Teaching  Fellow  Program  to  re- 
cruit and  train  young  men  for  teaching. 

Concerning  admissions,  the  decision  was  made  in  the  late  fifties 
to  admit  each  year  the  best  250  candidates  regardless  of  their 
ability  to  pay  tuition.  The  effect  of  this  decision  has  been  to  broaden 
still  further  the  school's  basic  policy,  in  the  words  of  its  Consti- 
tution, "to  be  ever  equally  open  to  youth  of  requisite  qualifications 
from  every  quarter." 

In  the  third  area,  physical  plant  and  resources,  several  changes 
are  notable.  The  endowment  has  grown  from  eleven  to  thirty- 
one  million  dollars.  Meantime  the  enrollment  has  increased  from 
725  to  853. 

During  the  years  1959-61  The  Andover  Program,  a  major  capita! 
gift  drive  carried  out  by  alumni  and  parents,  succeeded  in  raising 
$6,750,000  for  new  facilities.  With  these  funds  the  Academy  ha: 
built  four  new  dormitories,  two  new  faculty  houses,  a  new  sciena 
building,  an  Arts  and  Communications  Center  with  extensiv< 
audio-visual  equipment  and  studio  space,  an  enlargement  of  th< 
auditorium  stage  and  an  experimental  drama  lab,  a  wing  on  th< 
Library,  several  new  athletic  fields,  a  roof  for  the  hockey  rink 
and  other  athletic  facilities;  existing  buildings  have  been  remodele< 
for  more  classrooms  and  for  student  and  faculty  housing. 


TRUSTEES 


TOHN  PFTERS  STEVENS   TR   '15   AB  President 

South  Plainfield,  N.J. 

Elected  1948,  Elected  President  1966 

TOHN  MASON  KFMPER   LHD    Litt  D    LL  D  Clerk 

1  VVX  11  ^1      IVlil  JV/1  ^1       IV  J— 1  VAX                     X_* .  X  i.tXS  •  j      XjI  1  1  .  X-^  .  j      X-  X^  .  X  ^  .  ,     \_>  *  tlfv 

Andover 

Elected  1948 

rHARTFS  STAFFORD  GAGF  '21   AM  Treasurer 

N^cw  Haven  Conn. 

Elected  1952,  Elected  Treasurer  1966 

RROMWELL  AIJLT  '18  SB 

UlW/lVl  W  1—iX-i  X_*     1  \  \J  X_>  X         X  Oy     <J .  XJ  . 

New  York,  N.Y. 

Elected  1953 

DON  AT  D  HOI  MAN  MrT  FAN    TR    '28  TLB 

l_y  V/ 1  i  i  i  L-  XV     1  Iv/J-iuilli     iVlLJLljilli  j      IXV*                   Ll^.  1  J. 

J\  ronlf  linp 

XJ  L  UVA1UJ  V 

Elected  195  8 

TOHN  TISHFR  MONRO  '?0    A  B 

C^n  m  nrirl  f»p 

Elected  1958 

THOMAS  T  FF  PFRKTNS  '24  TIB 

Rye,  N.Y. 

Elected  1959 

RORFRT  LIVINGSTON  IREI  AND  III  '3  8  AB 

lVvyUJ_.AV  1      i-il  T  111  VJ  <J  X  W 1  1      1XVX_i1_iXX1  1  X-/     XXI       /  O  j     11 i  XJ  a 

New  York   N  Y 

1  >  C  W      1  Ul  IV,    i^S  .  1  • 

Elected  1960 

W7TTRTTTJ    TflQFPH  7*T7"\ir>PR                    T  T  r» 
wI—xjUIn.  J^jilJrri  x5r,iNl-'£.rv    3/rlr,  L.L..LJ. 

Cambridge 

Elected  196} 

STEPHEN  YOUNG  HORD  '17,  A.B. 

Lake  Forest,  111. 

Elected  1963 

JOHN  HARVARD  CASTLE,  JR.  '34,  M.B.A. 

Rochester,  N.Y. 

Elected  1966 

MILTON  STEINBACH  '20,  S.B. 

New  York,  N.Y. 

Elected  1966 

GEORGE  HERBERT  WALKER  BUSH  '42,  A.B. 

Houston,  Tex. 

Elected  1967 

Alumni  Trustees 

LOUIS  FREDERICK  POLK,  JR.  '49,  M.B.A. 

Wayzata,  Minn. 

Elected  1965  for  three  years 

PHILIP  KIRKHAM  ALLEN  '29,  A.B. 

Andover 

Elected  1966  for  three  years 

GILBERT  DUTTON  KITTREDGE  '42,  B.E. 

Dalton 

Elected  1967  for  three  years 

HOWARD  SAYRE  WEAVER  '42 

New  Haven,  Conn. 

Ex  Officio  for  one  year  as  President  of  the  Alumni  Association 

Trustees  Emeriti 

CHAUNCEY  BREWSTER  GARVER  '04,  LL.B. 

Oyster  Bay,  N.Y. 

1947-1960 

SUMNER  SMITH  '08,  A.B. 

Lincoln 

1956-1960 

HENRY  WISE  HOBSON  '10,  D.D.,  LL.D. 

Cincinnati,  Ohio 

1937-1966  (President  1947-1966) 

JAMES  PHINNEY  BAXTER,  3rd  '10,  Ph.D.,  Litt.D.,  L.H.D., 

D.Sc,  LL.D. 

1942-1966 

Williamstown 

FREDERICK  GOODRICH  CRANE  '15,  A.B. 

Dalton 

1957-1967 

9 


FACULTY 


John  Mason  Kemper,  L.H.D.,  Litt.D.,  LL.D. 

Headmaster  Elected  1948 


George  Franklin  French,  A.M. 

Andover 

Instructor  in  French,  Emeritus 

1907-1944 

Oswald  Tower,  A.B. 

West  Caldwell,  N.J. 

Dean  and  Instructor  in  Mathematics,  Emeritus 

1910-1949 

Alice  Thacher  Whitney 

Andover 

Recorder,  Emerita 

1902-1950 

Lester  Charles  Newton,  A.M. 

Andover 

Instructor  in  French  and  German,  Emeritus 

1918-1952 

Henry  Preston  Kelley,  A.M. 

Pepperell 

Instructor  fn  Spanish,  Emeritus 

1918-28,  1935-52 

Montville  Ellsworth  Peck 

North  Bridgton,  Me. 

Instructor  in  Physical  Education,  Emeritus 

1916-1955 

Guy  Johnson  Forbush,  A.B. 

Andover 

Instructor  m  French,  Emeritus                                            1917-1920,  1924-195  5 

Arthur  Burr  Darling,  Ph.D. 

Washington,  D.C. 

Instructor  in  History,  Emeritus  1 

917-1918,  1933-1958 

Douglas  Mansor  Dunbar,  A.M. 

Andover 

Instructor  in  Mathematics,  German,  and  Bible,  Emeritus 

1942-1958 

M.  Lawrence  Shields,  A.B. 

Marblehead 

Instructor  in  Biology  and  Secretary  of  the  Academy,  Emeritus 

1923-1960 

Roscoe  Edwin  Everett  Dake,  S.B. 

Andover 

Instructor  in  Chemistry,  Emeritus 

1921-1961 

John  Kingsbury  Colby,  A.M. 

North  Andover 

Instructor  in  Latin,  Emeritus 

1940-1962 

Miles  Sturdivant  Malone,  Ph.D. 

Daytona  Beach,  Fla. 

Instructor  in  History,  Emeritus 

1937-1962 

Elizabeth  Eades,  A.B. 

Deerfield 

Director  of  the  Library,  Emerita 

1929-1963 

Roger  Wolcott  Higgins,  A.M. 

Andover 

Instructor  in  English,  Emeritus 

1933-1963 

Emory  Shelby  Basford,  A.B. 

Rome,  Italy 

Instructor  in  English,  Emeritus 

1929-1964 

Floyd  Thurston  Humphries,  A.B. 

Naples,  Fla. 

Instructor  in  French,  Emeritus 

1937-1964 

John  Sedgwick  Barss,  A.M. 

Andover 

Instructor  in  Physics,  Emeritus 

1923-1965 

Donald  Miller  Clark,  M.D. 

Reno,  Nev. 

Medical  Director,  Emeritus 

1954-1965 

Elbert  Cook  Weaver,  A.M. 

Madison,  Conn. 

Instructor  in  Chemistry,  Emeritus 

1943-1965 

10 


FACULTY 


11 


George  Grenville  Benedict,  A.M.  Providence,  R.I. 

Dean  of  Students,  Emeritus  1930-32,  1933-67 

Alexander  Dunnett  Gibson,  A.M.  Mclndoe  Falls,  Vt. 

Instructor  in  French,  Emeritus  1944-67 


Alan  Rogers  Blackmer,  L.H.D.  192  5 

Dean  of  the  Faculty 

Kenneth  Smith  Minard,  A.M.  1928 
Assistant  Dean  of  Students 

George  Knight  Sanborn,  S.B.  1928 
Instructor  in  Biology  on  the  Ammi  Wright  Lancashire  Foundation 
Warden  of  the  Moncrieff  Cochran  Sanctuary 

*  Alfred  Graham  Baldwin,  D.D.  1930 
Instructor  in  Religion 

Robert  Edward  Maynard,  S.B.  1931 
Instructor  in  Mathematics  on  the  Jonathan  French  Foundation 

Leonard  Frank  James,  A.M.  193  2 

Instructor  in  History  on  the  Cecil  F.  P.  Bancroft  Foundation 
Chairman  of  the  History  Department 

Douglas  Swain  Byers,  A.M.  193  3 

Instructor  in  Anthropology 

Chairman  of  the  Archaeology  Department 
Bartlett  Harding  Hayes,  Jr.,  A.B.  193  3 

Instructor  in  Art 

Chairman  of  the  Art  Department 
"James  Ruthven  Adriance,  A.B.  1934 

Assistant  to  the  Headmaster 
Alston  Hurd  Chase,  Ph.D.  1934 

Instructor  in  Greek  and  Latin  on  the  Independence  Foundation  Teaching 
Endowment 

Chairman  of  the  Classics  Department 
Norwood  Penrose  Hallowell,  Jr.,  A.B.  1934 

Instructor  in  English  and  Public  Speaking  on  the  Alfred  Lawrence  Ripley 
Foundation 

Frank  Frederick  DiClemente,  S.B.  193  5 

Instructor  in  Physical  Education 
James  Hooper  Grew,  D.  es  L.  193  5 

Instructor  in  French  on  the  Elizabeth  Milbank  Anderson  Foundation 

Chairman  of  the  French  Department 
Frederick  Scouller  Allis,  Jr.,  L.H.D.  193  6 

Instructor  in  History  on  the  Martha  Cochran  Foundation 

Director  of  Financial  Aid 
Chester  Archibald  Cochran,  A.M.  193  6 

Instructor  in  French 

Frederick  Johnson,  Sc.D.  193  6 

Instructor  in  Archaeology 
Stephen  Stanley  Sorota,  S.B.  1936 

Instructor  in  Physical  Education 

Stephen  Whitney,  A.M.  1936 
Instructor  in  French 

*Hart  Day  Leavitt,  A.B.  1937 
Instructor  in  English 

*  On  leave  of  absence. 


12 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Wiiliam  Hayes  Brown,  A.M.  193  8 

instructor  in  English  on  the  Emilie  Belden  Cochran  Foundation 
Chairman  of  the  English  Department 

Ruhard  Sawyer  Pieters,  A.M.  1938 
Instructor  in  Mathematics  on  the  Alfred  Ernest  Stearns  Foundation 
Chairman  of  the  Mathematics  Department 

Robert  Whittemore  Sides,  A.B.  1938 
Instructor  in  Mathematics 
Director  of  Admissions 

[OHN  Bromham  Ha wes,  Ed.M.  1933-1936,  1939 

Instructor  in  English 

Harper  Follansbee,  Ed.M.  1940 
Instructor  in  Biology  on  the  Samuel  Harvey  Taylor  Foundation 
Chairman  of  the  Biology  Department 

Walter  Gierasch,  A.B.  1941 
Instructor  in  English 

Dudley  Fitts,  A.B.  1941 
Instructor  in  English  on  the  Independence  Foundation  Teaching  Endowment 

i  r  incis  Bertrand  McCarthy,  A.B.  1941 
Instructor  in  English  and  Philosophy 

Cornelius  Gordon  Schuyxer  Banta,  S.B.  1944 
Instructor  in  Mathematics 

[osEPU  Rittenhouse  Weir  Dodge,  A.M.  1944 
Instructor  in  English 

Frederick  Almond  Peterson,  A.M.  1946 
Instructor  in  English 
Director  of  the  Summer  Session 

A i  i  an  George  Gillingham,  Ph.D.  1947 
instructor  in  Latin  and  Greek  on  the  John  Charles  Phillips  Foundation 

Peter  Quackenbush  McKee,  Ed.M.  1947 
Instructor  in  Physics  and  Chemistry 
Chairman  of  the  Physics  Department 
Scheduling  Officer 

Gordon  Gilmore  Bensley,  A.B.  1949 
instructor  in  Art 
Director,  Audio-Visual  Center 

John  Richard  Lux,  M.S.Ed.  1949 
Instructor  in  Mathematics 

William  Louis  Schneider,  Mus.Ed.B.  1949 
Instructor  in  Music 

William  Russell  Bennett,  Jr.,  A.B.  1950 
Associate  Dean  of  Students 

William  John  Buehner,  A.M. 
Instructor  in  Latin 

Simeon  Hyde,  Jr.,  A.M. 
Instructor  in  English 

Henry  Waring  Schereschewsky,  A.B.  1951 
Comptroller 

Frederic  Anness  Stott,  A.B.  1951 
Direc  tor  of  Development 


1950 
1950 


FACULTY  1 3 

Philip  Brownlie  Weld,  M.S.  1951 
Instructor  in  Chemistry  and  Physics  on  the  George  Peabody  Foundation 
Chairman  of  the  Chemistry  Department 

William  Franklin  Graham,  B.S.  19  52 

Instructor  in  Mathematics 
Excusing  Officer 

Fred  Harold  Harrison,  A.M.  195  2 

Instructor  in  History  and  Physical  Education 
Chairman  of  the  Athletic  Department 

John  Claiborne  McClement,  Ed.M.  195  2 

Instructor  in  Mathematics 

*  Joshua  Lewis  Miner,  III,  A.B.  19  52 

Instructor  in  Science 
President,  Outward  Bound,  Incorporated 

James  Harold  Couch,  A.M.  19  5  3 

Instructor  in  Spanish 
Chairman  of  the  Spanish  Department 

Sherman  Frederick  Drake,  Ed.M.  195  3 

Instructor  in  Mathematics 

Edmond  Emerson  Hammond,  Jr.,  Sc.M.  195  3 

Instructor  in  Mathematics,  Physics,  and  Chemistry 

Louis  John  Hoitsma,  Jr.,  Ed.M.  195  3 

Instructor  in  Mathematics 

Robert  Penniman  Hulburd,  A.M.  1953 
Director  of  College  Placement 

Dalton  Hunter  McBee,  A.B.  1953 
Instructor  in  English 
Admissions  Officer 

Albert  Karl  Roehrig,  Ed.M.  1954 
School  Psychologist 

Robert  Edwin  Lane,  A.M.  195  5 

Instructor  in  Latin  and  Russian 
Chairman  of  the  Russian  Department 

Harold  Holmes  Owen,  Jr.,  A.M.  195  5 

Instructor  in  English 

Thomas  Joseph  Regan,  A.M.  195  5 

Instructor  in  English 

William  Biggs  Clift,  Jr.,  Mus.Ed.B.  1956 
Instructor  in  Music 
Chairman  of  the  Music  Department 

Frank  McCord  Eccles,  A.M.  19  56 

Instructor  in  Mathematics 

Richard  Valentine  Healy,  P.E.  195  6 

Director  of  Physical  Plant 

*John  Ward  Kimball,  A.B.  19  56 

Instructor  in  Biology 

Harrison  Schuyler  Royce,  Jr.,  M.I. A.  1956 
Instructor  in  History 

Gerald  Shertzer,  M.F.A.  1957 
Instructor  in  Art 


On  leave  of  absence. 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


John  Frank  Bronk  .  1958 

Instructor  in  Physical  Education  and  Physiotherapist 

*  George  William  Best,  A.M.  19*8 
Instructor  in  Mathematics 

Clement  Morell,  A.M.  1958 
Instructor  in  Mathematics 

Frederic  Arnold  Pease,  Jr.,  B.D.  195  8 

Instructor  in  Religion 

Philip  Mason  DuBois,  Ph.D.  1959 
Instructor  in  Physics 

John  Richards,  II,  M.A.T.  1959 
Instructor  in  History 
Dean  of  Students 

William  Abbot  Munroe,  A.B.  I960 
Bursar 

John  Patten  Chivers,  A.M.  I960 
Instructor  in  German 
Chairman  of  the  German  Department 

Carl  Edward  Krumpe,  Jr.,  A.M.  I960 
Instructor  in  Classics 

W  illiam  Lawrence  Market,  A.M.  1954-1957,  1960 

Instructor  in  French 

Thomas  Rees,  Ph.D.  I960 
Instructor  in  Chemistry 

Frank  DeWitt  Thornton,  B.M.Ed.  1960 
Instructor  in  Music 

Giorge  Howard  Edmonds,  Ed.M.  1961 
Instructor  in  English 

Edward  Moseley  Harris,  S.B.  1961 
Instructor  in  Spanish 
Administrator,  Schoolboys  Abroad 

Guy  D'Oyly  Hughes,  A.M.  1961 
Instructor  in  English 

Crayton  Ward  Bedford,  A.M.  1962 
Instructor  in  Mathematics,  Schoolboys  Abroad,  Kennes,  France 

Alfred  James  Coulthard,  S.B.  1962 
Instructor  in  Physical  Education 

Wayne  Andrew  Frederick,  Ph.M.  1962 
Instructor  in  History 

Robert  Andrew  Lloyd,  Arch.B.  1962 
Instructor  in  Art 

Charles  Waldo  Smith,  A.B.  1962 
Alumni  Secretary 

Executive  Director,  The  Alumni  Fund 
Alanson  Perley  Stevens,  III,  A.M.  1962 

Instructor  in  German  and  Russian 
Thomas  Tolman  Lyons,  M.A.T.  1963 

Instructor  in  History 

Barbara  McDonnell,  A.B.,  S.B.  1963 
Director  of  the  Library 

*  On  leave  of  absence. 


FACULTY 


Robert  Rennie  McQuilkin,  A.M. 
Instructor  in  English 

Chairman  of  the  Andover  Evening  Study  Program 

Meredith  Price,  M.A.T. 
Instructor  in  English 

Alexander  Zabriskie  Warren,  A.B. 
Instructor  in  Mathematics 

Christopher  Capen  Cook,  M.F.A. 
Instructor  in  Art 

William  Sherman  Jardine,  M.A.T. 
Instructor  in  Physics  and  Chemistry 

Charles  Packard,  M.A.T. 
Instructor  in  Latin 

Vincent  Pascucci,  A.M. 
Instructor  in  Classics 

Daniel  Dretzka  Olivier,  A.M. 
Instructor  in  French 

Clark  Alvord  Vaughan,  A.M. 
Instructor  in  Spanish 

Director,  Schoolboys  Abroad,  Barcelona,  Spain 

August  Thayer  Jaccaci,  Jr.,  M.F.A. 
Instructor  in  Art 

Julian  Stevens  Kaiser,  M.D. 
Medical  Director 

Ronn  Nels  Minne,  Ph.D. 
Instructor  in  Chemistry 
Director,  Bureau  of  Self-Help 

Angel  Rubio  y  Maroto,  A.M. 
Instructor  in  Spanish 

Nathaniel  Baldwin  Smith,  A.M. 
Instructor  in  Mathematics 

Hale  Sturges,  II,  A.M. 
Instructor  in  French 

John  Harvey  Beebe,  A.M.,  M.A.T. 
Instructor  in  Mathematics 

Timothy  Cooley  Callard,  A.M. 
Instructor  in  Religion 

Thomas  Edward  Cone,  HI,  S.B. 
Instructor  in  Biology 

Pierre  LaTour,  Jr.,  A.B. 

Instructor  in  Biology  and  Science 
Gordon  Anthony  Marlow,  M.A.T. 

Instructor  in  English 
Michael  Edward  Mosca,  M.B.A. 

Director  of  Accounting 
James  Johnston  Pates,  Jr.,  A.B. 

Admissions  and  Scholarship  Officer 
David  Albert  Penner,  A.M. 

Instructor  in  Mathematics 
Elisabeth  McClure  Thomas,  Ed.M. 

Dean  and  Director  of  Admissions,  the  Andover  Summer  Session 


16 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


John  Gibson  Tomlinson,  S.B. 
Instructor  in  Spanish 


1966 


James  Rae  Whyte,  S.T.M. 
Instructor  in  Religion 
Chairman  of  the  Religion  Department 


1966 


Kenneth  Kelly  Wise,  A.M. 


1966 


Instructor  in  English 

George  Edward  Andrews,  A.B.  1967 
Instructor  in  Religion 

David  Paul  Barton,  A.B.  1967 
Instructor  in  French 

[ames  Leighton  Bunnell,  A.M.  1967 
Ins  true  tor  in  History 

John  Robert  Leslie  Dent,  A.B.  1967 
Instructor  in  History 

Robert  Timothy  Grant,  S.B.  1967 
Instructor  in  Mathematics,  Schoolboys  Abroad,  Barcelona,  Spain 

IT  MacAllister  Henkels,  Jr.,  A.M.  1967 
Instructor  in  French 

Joseph  Belleau  Wennik,  A.M.  1967 
Instructor  in  German 

[ames  Robert  Wilson,  Ph.D.  1967 
Instructor  in  Science 

Charles  Steinhacker,  A.B.  1967 
Wingate  Paine  Fellow  in  Photography 

Kenneth  Alan  Hovey,  A.B.  1967 
Teaching  Fellow  in  English 

Charles  Henry  MacFarland,  S.B.  1967 
Teaching  Fellow  in  Physics 


•.Jill 


eng 


{all,  the  English  Department  Building  (18 IS) 


*  J*! 


It  Wendell  Holmes  Library  (8  5,000  Volumes) 


ADMINISTRATIVE  DEPARTMENTS 


Correspondence  with  administrative  officers  should  be  addressed  to  them  at  George 
Washington  Hall.  Office  hours:  week  days,  9:00  a.m.  to  12:00  and  (except  Saturday) 
2:00  p.m.  to  5:00  p.m.  Offices  are  closed  on  Saturday  during  the  summer.  Appointments 
ihould  be  made  in  advance,  if  possible.  For  information,  call  or  see  Miss  Meredith  Thiras, 
Receptionist  (telephone  617 — 475-3400),  during  office  hours. 

HEADMASTER'S  OFFICE 

[ohn  Mason  Kemper,  L.H.D.,  Litt.D.,  LL.D.,  Headmaster 
VIrs.  Amy  R.  Robinson,  Secretary  to  the  Headmaster 

OFFICE  OF  THE  ASSISTANT  TO  THE  HEADMASTER 

[ames  Ruthven  Adriance,  A.B.,  Assistant  to  the  Headmaster 
/irginia  N.  Eastman,  Secretary  to  the  Assistant  to  the  Headmaster 

ADMISSIONS  OFFICE 

Iobert  Whittemore  Sides,  A.B.,  Director  of  Admissions 

)alton  Hunter  McBee,  A.B.,  Admissions  Officer 

'rederick  Scouller  Allis,  Jr.,  L.H.D.,  Director  of  Financial  Aid 

ames  Johnston  Pates,  Jr.,  A.B.,  Admissions  and  Scholarship  Officer 

Iarper  Follansbee,  Ed.M.,  Albert  Karl  Roehrig,  Ed.M.,  Harrison  Schuyler 

Royce,  Jr.,  M.I.A.,  Stephen  Whitney,  A.M.,  Interviewing  Officers 
/Irs.  Vivian  A.  O'Donnell,  Secretary  to  the  Director  of  Admissions 

OFFICE  OF  THE  DEAN  OF  THE  FACULTY 
^lan  Rogers  Blackmer,  L.H.D.,  Dean  of  the  Faculty 

OFFICE  OF  THE  DEAN  OF  STUDENTS 
ohn  Richards,  II,  M.A.T.,  Dean  of  Students 

William  Russell  Bennett,  Jr.,  A.B.,  Associate  Dean  of  Students 
Cenneth  Smith  Minard,  A.M.,  Assistant  Dean  of  Students 
JCilliam  Franklin  Graham,  S.B.,  Excusing  Officer 
'eter  Quackenbush  McKee,  Ed.M.,  Scheduling  Officer 
«1rs.  Jane  H.  Munroe,  Recorder 

Aks.  Ruth  L.  Ermer,  Secretary  to  the  Dean  of  Students 

vIrs.  Sylvia  T.  Breck,  Secretary  to  the  Associate  Dean  of  Students 

OFFICE  OF  COLLEGE  PLACEMENT 

Iobert  Penniman  Hulburd,  A.M.,  Director  of  College  Placement 

vIary  Elise  Waddington,  Secretary  to  the  Director  of  College  Placement 

SUMMER  SESSION 
Frederick  Almond  Peterson,  A.M.,  Director 

ilisabeth  McClure  Thomas,  Ed.M.,  Dean  and  Director  of  Admissions 
4rs.  Edith  Jako,  Office  Manager 

TREASURER'S  OFFICE 

-Ienry  Waring  Schereschewsky,  A.B.,  Comptroller 

William  Abbot  Munroe,  A.B.,  Bursar 

vIichael  Edward  Mosca,  M.B.A.,  Director  of  Accounting 

Evelyn  H.  Gordon,  Director  of  Student  Accounts 

vIrs.  Mary  B.  Clukey,  Office  Manager 

^rs.  Barbara  D.  Morrison,  Secretary  to  the  Comptroller 


17 


18 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


BUILDINGS  AND  GROUNDS 

Frbdbmc  Annlss  Stott,  A.B.,  Director  of  Development 

Ri<  hard  Valentine  Healy,  P.E.,  Director  of  Physical  Plant 

ALUMNI  AND  DEVELOPMENT  OFFICE 
FREDERIC  Annlss  Stott,  A.B.,  Director  of  Development 

Charles  Waldo  Smith,  A.B.,  Alumni  Director,  Executive  Director,  The  Alumni 
Mrs.  Helen  R.  Bronk,  Secretary  to  the  Executive  Director,  The  Alumni  Fund 
Mrs.  Betty  S.  Peterson,  Secretary  to  the  Director  of  Development 

OLIVER  WENDELL  HOLMES  LIBRARY 

Barbara  McDonni.il,  A.B.,  S.B.,  Director  of  the  Library 
Miss  Doris  R.  Ducharmi:,  A.B.,  S.M.,  Assistant  Cataloguer 
Mrs.  Margaret  B.  Towne,  S.B.,  Assistant  in  the  Library 
Irene  Wilkinson,  A.B.,  S.M.,  Cataloguer 
Vivian  Miles,  S.B.,  S.M.,  Reference  Librarian 

DEPARTMENT  OF  HEALTH 

Julian  S.  Kaiser,  M.D.,  Medical  Director 
Richard  S.  O'Hara,  M.D.,  Assistant  Medical  Director 
Albert  K.  Roehrig,  Ed.M.,  Chief  Counseling  Services 
H.  Schuyler  Royce,  Assistant  in  Counseling  Services 
Eileen  Hall,  Administrative  Assistant 

Active  Medical  Staff 
Feed  G.  Arragg,  M.D.,  Otolaryngologist 
G  Paul  Bonin,  D.M.D.,  Orthodontist 
William  Caverly,  M.D.,  Obstetrics  and  Gynecology 
H.  Jerome  Crampton,  M.D.,  Ophthalmologist 
Herman  DeWildf.  M.D.,  D.M.D.,  Associate  Dentist 
Douglas  Malcolm  Dunbar,  D.D.S.,  Senior  Dentist 
Kmil  J.  Ganem,  M.D.,  Urologist 

Michael  A.  Gravallese,  Jr.,  M.D.,  Internal  Medicine 

John  Paul  Holihan,  M.D.,  Anesthesiologist 

Milton  Howard,  M.D.,  Pathologist 

Robert  J.  Joplin,  M.D.,  Orthopedist 

Richard  Katz,  M.D.,  Pediatrician 

Alfred  S.  Lanes,  M.D.,  Dermatologist 

Richard  S.  O'Hara,  M.D.,  Surgeon 

Nicholas  D.  Rizzo,  M.D.,  Psychiatrist 

Charles  E.  Rounds,  D.M.D.,  Associate  Dentist 

George  V.  West,  M.D.,  Radiologist 

Associate  Staff 
Matthew  Cushing,  Jr.,  M.D.,  Internal  Medicine 
Charles  Ellis,  Jr.,  Internal  Medicine 
Kenneth  McKusick,  M.D.,  Internal  Medicine 
Edmund  Melucci,  M.D.,  General  Medicine 
Robert  Ramsdell,  M.D.,  General  Medicine 
John  Welster,  M.D.,  Obstetrics  and  Gynecology 

Consultants 

John  B.  McKittrick,  M.D.,  Surgeon 
Daniel  Ellis,  M.D.,  Internist 
John  F.  Bronk,  Physical  Therapist 
John  F.  Murphy,  B.A.,  Speech  Therapist 
John  F.  Nastasi,  Optometrist 


ADMINISTRATIVE  DEPARTMENTS 


rancis  G.  Soule,  Jr.,  M.D.,  Internist 

oan  C.  Walsh,  Dental  Hygienist 

ouis  J.  Zuppardi,  Radiology  Technician 

BUREAU  OF  SELF-HELP 
onn  Nels  Minne,  Ph.D.,  Director  of  the  Bureau  of  Self -Help 

DEPARTMENT  OF  PHYSICAL  EDUCATION  AND  ATHLETICS 

red  Harold  Harrison,  A.M.,  Director  of  Physical  Education  and  Athletics 
dhn  Frank  Bronk,  Instructor  in  Physical  Education  and  Physiotherapist 
lfred  James  Coulthard,  S.B.,  Instructor  in  Physical  Education 
rank  Frederick  DiClemente,  S.B.,  Instructor  in  Physical  Education 
tefhen  Stanley  Sorota,  S.B.,  Instructor  in  Physical  Education 


CHAIRMEN  OF  ACADEMIC  DEPARTMENTS 


rchaeology 

Douglas  Swain  Byers,  A.M. 

RT 

Bartlett  Harding  Hayes,  Jr.,  A.B. 

THLETICS 

Fred  Harold  Harrison,  A.M. 

OLOGY 

Harper  Follansbee,  Ed.M. 

HEMISTRY 

Philip  Brownlie  Weld,  M.S. 

LASSICS 

Alston  Hurd  Chase,  Ph.D. 

MGLISH 

William  Hayes  Brown,  A.M. 

tENCH 

James  Hooper  Grew,  D.  es  L. 

ERMAN 

John  Patten  Chivers,  A.M. 

ISTORY 

Leonard  Frank  James,  A.M. 

ATHEMATICS 

Richard  Sawyer  Pieters,  A.M. 

USIC 

William  Biggs  Clift,  Jr.,  Mus.Ed.B. 

1YSICS 

Peter  Quackenbush  McKee,  Ed.M. 

ELIGION 

James  Rae  Whyte,  S.T.M. 

USSIAN 

Robert  Edwin  Lane,  A.M. 

•ANISH 

James  Harold  Couch,  A.M. 

GENERAL  INFORMATION 


An dover  students,  for  the  most  part,  live  together  by  classes 
in  the  Academy  dormitories  and  houses.  Each  building  is  under 
the  supervision  of  the  resident  faculty  housemaster.  All  boys  eat 
in  their  own  class  dining  rooms  in  the  Commons. 

Juniors  live  in  Williams  Hall  and  Rockwell  House,  or  in  neigh- 
boring houses  and  cottages.  Williams  Hall,  with  its  annexes,  Junioi 
House  and  Stott  Cottage,  has  rooms  and  recreation  facilities  foi 
fifty-six  Juniors,  who  occupy  single  or  double  rooms.  Rockwel 
House  has  single  rooms  and  recreation  facilities  for  forty  Juniors 
Juniors  are  subject  to  the  special  regulations  and  the  particularly 
close  supervision  found  helpful  to  boys  of  this  age  in  making  i 
successful  transition  from  home  to  boarding  school  life.  Carefulb 
selected  Senior  proctors  play  an  important  part  in  the  activities  o 
the  various  Junior  units. 

Lower-Middlers  live  in  the  newly  renovated  brick  dormitories  o 
the  West  Quadrangle,  where  they  receive  careful  supervision  ann 
guidance,  at  the  same  time  enjoying  an  increased  degree  of  inde 
pendence  appropriate  to  their  greater  maturity.  Senior  Proctors  ar 
in  residence  in  these  dormitories. 

Upper-Middlers  are  housed  in  the  large  dormitories  of  the  mai 
Campus  and  a  few  smaller  Faculty  houses  nearby.  Here  they  ar 
permitted  still  greater  latitude  in  the  management  of  their  dail 
lives  and  expected  to  assume  correspondingly  greater  responsibility 
In  the  Fall  of  1967,  Seniors  will  live  in  the  five  new  dormitori< 
near  Rabbit  Pond  and  in  three  or  four  smaller  houses  adjacen 
They  will  be  free  of  restriction  to  a  degree  unusual  in  America 
boarding  schools  as  the  combination  of  a  deliberately  planne 
scheme  of  educating  boys  by  progressive  stages  to  accept  respons 
bility  for  their  own  conduct  and  to  learn  how  to  cope  wit 
freedom — freedom  to  act,  to  choose,  often  perhaps  to  err. 

FACULTY  COUNSELORS  (housemasters) 

Each  Andover  student  is  under  the  direct  charge  of  a  Faculi 
Counselor,  who,  for  boarding  students  is  his  housemaster.  I 
knows  the  background,  the  character,  and  the  standing  of  each  i 

20 


GENERAL  INFORMATION 


21 


lis  boys  and  acts  as  his  advisor  in  all  that  concerns  his  welfare  and 
lis  happiness.  The  Counselor  is  usually  the  member  of  the  Faculty 
most  intimately  in  touch  with  the  student  and  his  parents.  From 
:ime  to  time,  he  will  write  the  parents  to  keep  them  informed  of 
:heir  son's  progress.  Parents  should  feel  free  to  write  their  son's 
:ounselor  if  they  have  any  reason  for  concern  about  their  boy's 
progress.  They  are  encouraged  to  report  to  the  counselor  any  facts 
hat  may  affect  the  boy's  work  or  behavior. 

RELIGION 

Phillips  Academy  was  founded  as  a  Protestant  Christian  com- 
nunity  and  in  its  worship  and  ministry  remains  in  the  Protestant 
;radition.  The  Academy  requires  student  attendance  at  Wednesday 
md  Sunday  religious  services,  whose  purpose  is  to  strengthen  devo- 
ion  to  God  and  reliance  upon  faith  as  a  source  of  direction  and 
neaning  in  a  young  man's  life.  On  Sunday  mornings  in  the  Sylvia 
^ratt  Kemper  Chapel  a  rabbi  conducts  a  service  for  students  of  the 
fewish  faith  and  a  priest  celebrates  Mass  for  Roman  Catholics, 
kudents  may  also  worship  Sundays  in  churches  of  their  choice  in 
he  town  of  Andover,  though  the  Academy  encourages  all  students 

0  attend  the  school  services.  The  Sunday  services  for  the  school  as 

1  whole  are  conducted  by  the  School  Ministers,  the  Headmaster,  or 
)y  visiting  clergymen. 

A  school  composed  of  students  of  widely  diverse  religious  and 
:ultural  backgrounds  can  not  satisfy  all  requirements  of  religious 
ittitude  and  habit.  Therefore  no  boy  should  apply  for  admission 
o  the  Academy  who  is  unwilling  to  participate  in  interdenomina- 
ional  services,  or  who  believes  that  religious  worship  can  have  no 
^lace  in  his  life. 

CULTURAL  OPPORTUNITIES 

Andover,  while  demanding  a  high  standard  of  accomplishment 
n  the  prescribed  course  of  study,  has  always  believed  that  a  boy's 
nterest  should  be  widened  as  far  as  possible  beyond  the  limits  of 
:he  curriculum.  Through  the  Oliver  Wendell  Holmes  Library,  the 
Robert  S.  Peabody  Foundation  for  Archaeology,  the  Addison  Gal- 
ery  of  American  Art,  the  Department  of  Music,  and  the  Moncrieff 
-ochran  Sanctuary,  boys  are  given  a  chance  to  investigate  subjects 
vhich  may  in  later  life  become  major  pursuits  or  pleasant  hobbies. 


21 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


In  addition,  a  number  of  distinguished  men  and  women  are  in- 
vited to  the  Academy  each  year  as  lecturers  and  performing  artists. 

In  1966-1967,  George  Wald,  Professor  of  Biology  at  Harvard 
University,  delivered  the  Stearns  Lecture;  Edward  J.  Logue,  Direc- 
tor of  the  Boston  Redevelopment  Authority,  was  the  Hosch  Lec- 
turer; and  Professor  John  Kenneth  Galbraith  came  as  the  ninth 
annual  Lana  Lobell  Fellow.  These  visitors  addressed  the  school  in 
the  Meeting  Room  of  George  Washington  Hall  and  later  took  part 
in  informal  conferences  with  student  and  faculty  groups.  Among 
other  guests  who  addressed  the  school  at  Friday  morning  Assembly 
were:  Louis  F.  Fieser,  Sheldon  Emory  Professor  of  Organic  Chemis- 
try, Harvard  University;  Mr.  John  C.  Esty,  Jr.,  Headmaster,  Taft 
School;  Professor  John  K.  Fairbank,  Director,  East  Asian  Research 
Center,  Harvard  University;  Mr.  Erwin  Canham,  Editor,  Christian 
Science  Monitor,  and  Mr.  Ken  Hyman,  photographer  and  Wyn- 
gate  Paine  lecturer.  The  school  was  also  honored  by  Mr.  R.  Sargent 
Shriver,  Jr.  who  delivered  the  principal  address  on  the  occasion  of 
the  first  presentation  of  the  Claude  M.  Fuess  Award  to  Andover 
Alumni  who  have  served  in  the  Peace  Corps. 

Smaller  groups  interested  in  particular  subjects  met  for  discus- 
sion  one  or  more  times  over  the  last  two  years  with  Louis  Lyons 
Curator  Emeritus  of  the  Nieman  Fellowships,  Harvard  University: 
John  Frederick  Nims,  poet  and  translator,  Professor  of  English  ir 
the  University  of  Illinois  at  Chicago;  Jean  Valentine,  poet;  Charle: 
Chu,  authority  on  Chinese  painting,  Professor  of  Chinese  Studies  ai 
Connecticut  College  for  Women;  Tom  Cole,  novelist,  winner  o: 
the  1966  Rosenthal  Award  for  fiction;  Alfred  Kazin,  critic  anc 
historian  of  American  literature;  Russell  Johnson,  Peace  Educatioi 
Secretary  of  the  American  Friends  Service  Committee;  Mino 
White,  photographer.  Massachusetts  Institute  of  Technology;  Rob 
ert  Stuart  Fitzgerald,  poet  and  Hellenist,  Boylston  Professor  o 
Rhetoric  and  Oratory  in  Harvard  University;  Richard  Wilbui 
poet,  Professor  of  English  at  Wesley  an  University;  Peter  Davison 
Director,  Atlantic  Monthly  Press;  George  Starbuck,  poet;  an. 
Stanley  Burnshaw,  critic. 

Among  the  guest  artists  to  appear  on  campus  were  folksinge 
Judy  Collins,  the  members  of  the  Metropolitan  Opera  Studio  per 
forming  "Don  Pasquale,"  and  the  noted  actor  Bramwell  Fletche 
in  "The  Bernard  Shaw  Story."  The  thirty-ninth  Sawyer  Concei 


GENERAL  INFORMATION 


23 


was  given  by  the  Orchestra  Da  Camera,  an  Italian  chamber  orches- 
tra. The  Pacific  Trio,  the  Estival  Trio,  and  the  New  York  Camerata 
also  gave  concerts. 

A  Shakespearean  play,  last  year  Antony  and  Cleopatra,  is  pro- 
duced annually  by  the  Dramatic  Club.  A  musical  is  produced  each 
spring,  by  the  school  Chorus,  Orchestra,  and  Dramatic  Club; 
Camelot  was  the  1967  choice,  with  a  combined  cast  and  orchestra 
of  over  175. 

THE  OLIVER  WENDELL  HOLMES  LIBRARY 

The  Oliver  Wendell  Holmes  Library  (1929)  was  given  by 
William  Cochran,  class  of  1895;  Moncrieff  M.  Cochran,  class  of 
1900;  and  Louise  Cochran  Savage.  It  was  named  in  honor  of  the 
poet  and  physician,  a  member  of  the  class  of  1825. 

The  Copley  Wing,  gift  of  James  S.  Copley,  P. A.,  193  5,  designed 
to  seat  125  at  small  tables  and  carrels,  is  used  as  an  American  His- 
tory Reserve  Book  Room. 

The  book  collection,  over  85,000  volumes  in  the  liberal  arts, 
supports  and  supplements  the  curriculum  and  provides  many  areas 
for  independent  reading.  A  trained  staff  member  is  on  duty  at  all 
times  to  help  in  the  use  of  the  Library  and  advise  in  choice  of 
reading. 

Particular  treasures  of  the  Library  are  an  original  elephant  folio 
of  Audubon's  Birds  of  America,  given  by  Thomas  Cochran  of  the 
class  of  1890;  papers  and  books  of  the  poet  Oliver  Wendell  Hofmes; 
part  of  the  library  of  Guy  Lowell,  architect  of  many  of  the 
Academy's  buildings;  a  notable  collection  of  2  59  volumes  on  Eng- 
lish Public  Schools;  the  Mercer  Collection  on  sports;  publications 
by  graduates  and  memorabilia  of  the  Academy;  classics  given  in 
memory  of  Allen  R.  Benner;  Early  Americana  given  by  Nelson  S. 
Taylor,  of  the  class  of  1900;  and  historical  map  of  the  Academy  by 
Stuart  Travis,  in  the  Freeman  Room.  Rare  Vergiliana,  gathered 
by  Charles  H.  Forbes,  and  a  handsomely  bound  collection  of 
French  literature,  selected  by  Charles  A.  Parmelee,  are  kept  in 
separate  rooms  open  to  all  who  may  be  interested. 

Housed  in  the  Library  building  are  the  Archives  Department 
and  a  music  record  listening  room. 


24 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


THE  ADDISON  GALLERY  OF  AMERICAN  ART 

The  Addison  Gallery  of  American  Art  (1930)  was  established 
in  memory  of  Mrs.  Keturah  Addison  Cobb,  "to  enrich  perma- 
nently the  lives  of  the  students  of  Phillips  Academy,  by  helping  to 
cultivate  and  foster  in  them  a  love  for  the  beautiful.,,  The  original 
gift  included  important  objects  of  American  art  with  endowment 
for  the  maintenance  and  operation  of  the  building,  and  a  small 
fund  for  additional  purchases. 

It  is  the  aim  of  the  Addison  Gallery  to  serve  as  a  cultural  center 
for  Phillips  Academy  students  and  outside  visitors.  To  this  end, 
frequent  loan  exhibitions  are  held  throughout  the  year.  Some  are 
directly  related  to  the  courses  in  the  school  curriculum;  others  are 
of  general  interest. 

In  addition  to  its  activities  as  a  part  of  Phillips  Academy,  the 
Addison  Gallery  is  always  open  to  the  general  public  and  offers 
educational  opportunities  to  schools  and  organizations  in  neigh- 
boring communities. 

The  nucleus  of  the  present  collection  of  American  paintings  was 
presented  to  Phillips  Academy  in  1928  by  several  friends  of  the 
school.  The  collection,  now  including  nearly  two  thousand  items, 
is  recognized  as  one  of  the  outstanding  specialized  collections  in 
the  country.  Allston,  Copley,  Morse,  Stuart,  West,  and  others 
represent  the  Colonial  period.  Of  especial  importance  among  the 
many  paintings  of  the  nineteenth  century  are  examples  by  Cole, 
Doughty,  Eakins,  Homer,  Inness,  LaFarge,  Ryder,  Twachtman, 
and  Whistler.  The  early  part  of  the  present  century  is  shown  in 
the  work  of  such  men  as  Bellows,  Davies,  Demuth,  Hassam,  Hop- 
per, Luks,  Marin,  Prendergast,  and  Sloan.  Recent  acquisitions  of 
contemporary  paintings,  sculpture,  prints,  drawings,  and  photo- 
graphs complete  an  exceptionally  well-balanced  collection.  Work 
by  Calder,  Lippold,  Moholy-Nagy,  Hofmann,  Marin,  0'Keeffe: 
Pollock,  Shahn,  and  Wyeth  is  included  in  this  latter  group. 

Models  of  American  sailing  ships,  built  to  uniform  scale,  are  alsc 
installed  in  the  Addison  Gallery.  In  addition  to  a  collection  of  18tl 
Century  American  silver,  that  of  the  James  B.  Neale  bequest 
received  in  1946,  selections  of  furniture,  glass,  and  textiles  of  th< 
Colonial  period  are  on  permanent  exhibition. 

Among  recent  publications  of  the  Addison  Gallery  are  thre< 
books:  "Layman's  Guide  to  Modern  Art,"  1949-54;  "The  Nakec 


GENERAL  INFORM  A  HON 


2S 


Truth  and  Personal  Vision,"  195  5,  and  "The  American  Line," 
1959,  all  based  upon  special  exhibits  arranged  in  connection  with 
the  Upper  Middle  course  in  Art.  Another  book,  "Models  of  Amer- 
ican Sailing  Ships,"  serves  as  a  catalogue  of  the  Marine  Collec- 
tion. All  are  simply  written,  and  intended  for  adult  as  well  as  for 
student  readers. 

An  Art  Film  Library  of  some  three  dozen  titles  was  established 
in  1954  to  serve  schools  and  colleges  in  New  England,  as  well  as 
the  Academy  community. 

ARTS  AND  COMMUNICATIONS  CENTER 

The  Arts  and  Communications  Center,  connecting  The  Addison 
Gallery  to  the  stage  of  the  Meeting  Room  in  George  Washington 
Hall,  provides  modern  facilities  for  stage  set  design  and  construc- 
tion, painting,  drawing,  architecture,  photography,  sculpture,  ce- 
ramics, and  woodworking;  an  audio- visual  department  of  unusual 
scope,  with  audio-visual  projection  facilities  ranging  from  small 
rooms  with  a  capacity  of  five  to  an  auditorium  seating  250.  The 
Underwood  Room  and  Court,  a  part  of  the  Arts  and  Communica- 
tions complex,  offer  pleasant  indoor  and  outdoor  areas  for  recep- 
tions, concerts,  dances,  and  informal  gatherings. 

THE  ROBERT  S.  PEABODY  FOUNDATION  FOR 
ARCHAEOLOGY 

The  Robert  S.  Peabody  Foundation  for  Archaeology,  established 
in  1901  by  Robert  Singleton  Peabody,  Class  of  1857,  supports  re- 
search in  American  archaeology,  publishes  its  findings,  and  main- 
tains a  museum  in  which  collections  gathered  through  extensive 
programs  of  field  research  in  Mexico,  the  Southwest,  the  south- 
eastern states,  New  England,  and  the  Maritime  Provinces  are  dis- 
played. 

Now  in  preparation  is  a  series  of  six  volumes  reporting  findings 
of  research  into  origins  of  native  American  agriculture  and  civiliza- 
tion in  Mexico  made  possible  by  grants  from  the  National  Science 
Foundation  and  Rockefeller  Foundation.  Manuscripts  prepared 
with  NSF  assistance  will  be  published  for  the  Foundation  by  Uni- 
versity of  Texas  Press.  Also  under  way  is  the  preparation  of  find- 
ings of  research  into  the  earliest  occupation  of  Nova  Scotia  and 
contemporary  geologic  and  climatic  conditions.  This  program, 


26 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


carried  out  with  the  National  Museum  of  Canada  and  the  Nova 
Scotia  Museum,  was  assisted  by  the  National  Science  Foundation. 
A  third  project  will  complete  a  study  of  the  pre-ceramic  occupa- 
tions of  Cape  Cod.  A  fourth  will  summarize  a  long  program  of 
research  into  the  archaeology  of  coastal  Maine. 

A  decorative  map  of  North  America  by  the  late  Stuart  Travis 
is  mounted  on  the  stairway.  A  model  of  an  Indian  village  of  early 
Andover,  and  a  model  of  a  portion  of  the  pueblo  of  Pecos,  New 
Mexico,  are  also  on  display.  A  library,  open  to  all,  offers  an  oppor- 
tunity for  reading  and  research  in  the  varied  phases  of  aboriginal 
American  life. 

The  Foundation  offers  a  two-hour  elective  course  dealing  with 
the  life  of  the  Indians  and  the  pre-history  of  North  America. 

THE  MONCRIEFF  COCHRAN  SANCTUARY 

The  Moncrieff  Cochran  Sanctuary  is  a  sixty-five -acre  tract  of 
rare  beauty  and  of  great  educational  value,  located  so  close  to  the 
center  of  school  activity  that  it  is  in  fact  an  extension  of  the 
campus.  Landscaped  areas  planted  with  dogwood,  azalea,  rhodo- 
dendron and  laurel  provide  a  succession  of  bloom  that  draws  many 
visitors  from  late  April  to  mid-June.  A  brook  and  two  ponds 
attract  nesting  ducks  and  geese,  and  extensive  natural  wild  areas, 
varied  in  terrain  and  plant  life,  draw  many  species  of  small  land 
birds  and  provide  nesting  places  for  grouse  and  pheasant.  Other 
areas  are  set  aside  for  student  projects  such  as  demonstration  of 
bird  feeders;  experimental  plantings  for  attracting  birds;  soil 
studies;  and  raising  and  liberating  duck,  quail,  and  pheasant. 
Special  paths  are  designed  and  planted  to  show  local  ferns,  wild- 
flowers,  and  trees  in  their  natural  habitats.  The  Log  Cabin,  a 
rustic  building  with  a  large  stone  fireplace,  kitchen,  flagstone  ter- 
race and  broad  lawns,  provides  an  attractive  setting  for  a  wide 
variety  of  social  events  at  all  seasons.  The  Cochran  Sanctuary  is 
unusual  in  its  ideal  location  and  in  its  varied  facilities  for  conser- 
vation, education,  and  enjoyment. 

STUDENT  ACTIVITIES 
Student  organizations  and  voluntary  enterprises  of  various  kinds 
are  an  important  part  of  life  at  Phillips  Academy.  They  may 
change  from  year  to  year  in  scope  and  intent,  depending  upon 


GENERAL  INFORMATION 


27 


student  interest.  Among  others,  there  are  literary,  musical,  forensic, 
and  scientific  activities.  Each  group  is  under  student  leadership 
and  is  advised  by  a  member  of  the  faculty.  The  list  that  follows 
is  intended  to  be  representative  rather  than  complete. 

The  Phillipian,  founded  in  1878,  is  the  school  newspaper.  It  is 
published  every  Wednesday  of  the  school  year.  Students  on  the  edi- 
torial and  the  business  boards  gain  experience  in  writing  and  in 
business  practice. 

The  Mirror, founded  in  1854,  is  the  undergraduate  literary  maga- 
zine, which  appears  several  times  each  year.  Positions  on  the  literary, 
business,  and  photographic  boards  offer  the  profitable  and  interest- 
ing experience  of  working  toward  the  publication  of  a  magazine 
devoted  to  encouraging  literary  talent. 

The  Pot  Pourri  is  the  Academy  yearbook,  published  after  the  end 
of  each  year.  It  contains  pictures  and  personal  information  con- 
cerning all  Seniors  and  non-returning  Upper  Middlers,  group  pic- 
tures of  all  school  organizations,  and  many  special  features.  The 
three  boards,  editorial,  business,  and  art,  offer  excellent  opportun- 
ities for  the  development  of  literary,  business,  or  artistic  talent. 
This  book  is  the  chief  permanent  record  to  which  alumni  turn  for 
the  account  of  their  years  at  Andover. 

The  Dramatic  Society  is  an  organization  of  all  students  interested 
in  acting,  directing,  stage  design,  scenery  construction,  lighting, 
and  business  managing.  The  major  production  each  year  is  a  Shake- 
speare play.  A  considerable  number  of  modern  plays,  both  drama- 
tic and  musical,  are  also  presented. 

One  of  the  most  important  groups  within  the  Dramatic  Society 
is  the  Stage  Crew.  Carpenters,  painters,  shifters,  electricians,  and 
special-effects  men  work  under  a  stage  manager  and  a  chief  elec- 
trician. Their  job  is  to  build  the  sets  and  operate  the  staging  for 
all  the  plays. 

Another  branch  of  the  Society  is  the  Drama  W orkshop,  whose 
intent  is  to  offer  further  opportunities  for  students  to  participate 
in  play  readings,  and  the  production  of  both  conventional  and  ex- 
perimental drama,  student  directed  in  the  Drama  Lab.  The  organi- 
zation welcomes  lower  classmen  as  well  as  Uppers  and  Seniors. 


j  g  PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 

The  language  departments  frequently  produce  plays  in  French, 
German,  Latin,  or  Spanish.  The  language  plays  are  projects  of 
language-interest  clubs  that  sponsor,  in  addition,  illustrated  lec- 
hanguage-lnterest  Clubs  that  sponsor,  in  addition,  illustrated  lec- 
tures, motion  pictures  from  the  countries  of  their  choice,  and  dis- 
cussions of  history  and  culture.  Occasionally  there  are  language 
tables  in  the  Commons. 

Debating  and  school  forums  are  held  by  Philo,  properly  the  Philo- 
mathean  Society,  founded  in  1825.  Regular  meetings,  held  bi- 
monthly in  the  faculty  room,  normally  open  to  members  only, 
provide  forums  for  the  discussion  of  local,  national,  and  interna- 
tional issues.  From  time  to  time  there  are  debates  against  visiting 
uams,  which  all  students  may  attend.  Each  year  Philo  sponsors  a 
prize  debating  contest.  The  organization  has  also  sponsored  visiting 
lecturers  and  discussion  leaders  to  stimulate  interest  in  economic, 
social,  and  political  problems.  Some  instruction  in  debating  tech- 
nique, in  public  speaking,  and  in  parliamentary  procedure  is 
offered. 

Students  interested  in  art  may  work  in  the  studio  of  the  Addison 
Gallery  with  the  Design  Club, 

The  Camera  Club  has  a  dark  room  in  the  new  Arts  Center,  where 
students  may  develop,  enlarge,  and  print  their  own  photographs. 
In  response  to  interest,  groups  meet  for  the  discussion  of  fine 
points  in  the  art  of  photography. 

'The  Radio  Club  has  a  room  in  the  basement  of  Evans  Hall,  where 
radio  sets  may  be  constructed  and  repaired.  It  also  has  facilities 
for  transmitting  and  receiving  amateur  broadcasts.  Code  and 
theory  classes  are  held  in  response  to  need. 

WPAA-FM  is  a  10-watt  educational  FM  station  licensed  by  the 
FCC  to  operate  at  a  frequency  of  91.7  mcs.  It  provides  25  hours 
per  week  of  news,  music,  sports  and  educational  programs  to  an 
area  with  a  population  of  about  200,000.  Its  studio  is  in  the  base- 
ment of  Evans  Hall,  and  its  transmitter  is  on  the  roof  of  the  same 
building.  It  is  completely  student  operated  and  with  its  staff  of 
over  100  is  one  of  the  largest  extra-curricular  activities. 


GENERAL  INFORMATION 


29 


Students  who  wish  to  construct  furniture,  models,  or  other  articles 
enjoy  the  Woodworking  Shop,  which  is  well  supplied  with  hand 
and  power  tools. 

The  Rifle  Club,  a  large  and  active  organization,  gives  boys  who 
are  interested  in  indoor  rifle  shooting,  particularly  upper-classmen, 
an  opportunity  to  shoot  for  pleasure,  for  National  Rifle  Association 
awards,  and  in  interscholastic  competition.  The  range  is  in  the  base- 
ment of  Pearson  Hall. 

The  laboratories  are  open,  on  schedule  and  under  supervision, 
to  experimenters  in  chemistry  or  physics  {Science  Club).  Astron- 
omers will  find  both  a  reflecting  and  a  refracting  telescope  on  the 
campus.  One  of  them  is  housed  in  an  observatory  {Astronomy 
Club).  A  group  interested  in  tapes  and  records  makes  recordings 
of  school  events  {Audio  Club). 

Modest  lapidary  equipment  is  on  hand  for  those  boys  who  are  in- 
terested in  gems  and  minerals  {Minerals  Club).  Identification  of 
minerals  is  another  interest  of  the  club. 

Outings  in  search  of  Maine  lobsters,  the  best  ski  trails,  or  another 
mountain  to  climb  are  the  principal  activity  of  the  Outing  Club. 
Canoeing,  fishing,  and  rock  climbing  are  also  popular  with  the 
group. 

The  Stamp  Club  meets  in  the  tower  room  of  the  Chapel.  The 
clubs's  program  includes  an  annual  prize  exhibition.  Philatelists  are 
urged  to  bring  their  duplicate  stamps  and  covers  for  trading. 

The  Natural  History  Club1  works  in  close  cooperation  with  the 
Biology  Department  and  the  Cochran  Bird  Sanctuary.  There  are 
widely  varied  opportunities  to  study  the  animal  and  plant  life  of 
the  region,  both  in  the  laboratory  and  in  the  field.  Trips  are  taken 
to  nearby  points  of  interest.  The  club  is  licensed  to  carry  on  a 
bird-banding  program. 

The  Asia  Society  has  as  its  aim  the  furthering  of  knowledge  and 
understanding  about  the  peoples  and  nations  of  the  East.  The 
members  meet  for  discussions,  lectures,  and  films. 

The  Phillips  Society,  a  student  service  organization,  evolved  from 
the  Society  of  Inquiry,  founded  in  1833,  and  Circle  A,  organized 


30 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


in  1930.  Its  purpose  is  to  serve  the  school  and  the  larger  com- 
munity in  a  variety  of  ways,  broadening  the  outlook  of  students 
by  stimulating  in  them  a  greater  awareness  of  social  problems  and 
tasks  that  need  doing,  and  by  giving  them  opportunities  for  prac- 
tical application  of  religious  and  humanitarian  principles  in  serv- 
ing others.  The  Phillips  Society  is  composed  of  a  number  of  work- 
ing committees.  Among  the  different  activities:  receptions  for  new 
boys  and  visitors;  hospitality  to  visiting  teams;  holding  Sunday 
coffee-hours;  supervising  special  recreational  use  of  the  gym;  help- 
ing boys  in  the  infirmary;  conducting  old  clothes  drives  and  book 
drives;  conducting  the  annual  Charities  Drive.  Membership  in  the 
Phillips  Society  is  open  to  any  student  who  wishes  to  participate  in 
the  activities  of  any  of  the  committees. 

Among  the  extracurricular  activities  in  the  field  of  music  are  the 
Marching  Band,  the  String  Orchestra,  the  Concert  Band,  and  the 
Chorus  (combining  both  choir  and  glee  club),  which  take  part  in 
many  concerts  as  well  as  in  an  annual  musical  show.  Other  musical 
organizations  are  various  dance  bands,  and  the  Eight  V  One 
Octet.  A  well-stocked  record  library  is  located  in  the  Record 
Room,  where  recorded  concerts  are  given  from  time  to  time. 

Dances  of  different  kinds  are  sponsored  by  various  student  groups. 
Student  initiative  and  interest  determine  in  large  part  their  nature 
and  frequency.  Dormitories  often  arrange  informal  dances  with 
girls  from  nearby  schools.  Once  or  twice  a  term  a  club  or  a  class 
sponsors  a  tea  dance  open  to  the  whole  school.  Following  Saturday 
afternoon  athletic  contests,  the  Student  Congress  occasionally 
opens  Graham  House  for  informal  dancing  and  refreshments.  The 
two-day  Spring  Prom  in  May  is  the  climax  of  the  social  season. 

ATHLETICS  AND  PHYSICAL  EDUCATION 

Athletics  and  physical  education  are  important  at  Andover. 
The  physical  education,  intramural,  and  interscholastic  programs 
involve  every  student;  participation  is  required.  The  objective  is 
development  by  each  boy  of  his  physical  capabilities  and  of  such 
qualities  as  courage,  self-confidence,  self-discipline,  and  self- 
control. 

Each  new  boy  must  take  a  swimming  test;  non-swimmers  must 
take  special  instruction  until  they  meet  minimum  standards  of 


GENERAL  INFORMATION 


31 


>roficiency.  During  his  Lower  Middle  year,  every  boy  takes  two 
lours  a  week  of  physical  education  in  addition  to  his  regular  aftcr- 
loon  program  of  athletics.  The  morning  program  of  swimming, 
tnd  gymnastics  attempts  to  develop  early  in  the  boy's  career 
he  self-confidence  and  physical  skills  essential  for  successful 
)articipation  in  the  more  advanced  phases  of  the  program.  Stan- 
iards  of  performance  are  based  on  the  individual's  own  physical 
:apacity. 

The  intramural  and  interscholastic  programs  provide  compe- 
ition  at  all  levels  in  seasonal  sports.  Outside  games  are  scheduled 
vith  neighboring  high  schools,  preparatory  schools,  and  college 
reshmen.  During  the  fall,  the  sports  offered  are  football,  soccer, 
owing,  cross  country,  and  tennis;  in  the  winter,  basketball, 
wimming,  hockey,  wrestling,  squash,  track,  and  skiing;  in  the 
pring,  baseball,  tennis,  golf,  track,  rowing,  lacrosse,  and  life- 
aving. 

The  Medical  Director  and  the  Athletic  Department  strongly 
dvise  parents  to  provide  boys  who  wear  glasses  with  shatter-proof 
>r  contact  lenses,  not  only  to  minimize  danger  of  injury  in  athletics 
)ut  also  to  avoid  loss  of  study  and  reading  time. 

See  page  34  regarding  athletic  equipment. 

HEALTH  SUPERVISION 

Under  the  supervision  of  the  Medical  Director,  every  effort  is 
nade  to  improve  each  student's  health,  to  prevent  disease,  and  to 
liagnose  and  treat  illnesses  and  injuries.  Before  school  opens,  every 
itudent  is  asked  to  have  a  general  physical  examination  by  his 
amily  physician,  as  well  as  certain  screening  laboratory  procc- 
lures  and  routine  vaccinations  against  smallpox,  poliomyelitis, 
:etanus,  typhoid,  and  measles.  His  family  is  asked  to  answer  ques- 
:ions  on  a  confidential  sheet  that  may  reveal  significant  symptoms 
)r  illnesses.  These  clinical  details  are  under  the  exclusive  control  of 
:he  Medical  Director. 

Immediately  after  the  student's  arrival  at  the  Academy,  a  review 
}f  the  physical  examination  is  carried  out  by  the  Medical  Director 
with  each  student.  With  new  students,  complete  dental  x-rays  and 
x-rays  of  the  chest  are  taken.  Special  examinations  of  the  eye  and 
ear  and  tests  for  speech  defects,  reading  speed,  and  language  dis- 
ability are  carried  out  whenever  they  are  indicated.  The  full  time 


32 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Medical  Director  and  his  colleagues  on  the  Isham  Infirmary-Hos- 
pital medical  staff  correlate  all  clinical  information,  with  a  view 
toward  establishing  an  accurate  estimate  of  each  student's  physical 
status  and  needs. 

The  Isham  Infirmary-Hospital  is  accredited  by  the  Joint  Com- 
mission on  the  Accreditation  of  Hospitals  under  the  auspices  of 
the  American  Medical  Association  and  the  American  Hospital 
Association.  It  has  50  active  beds,  as  well  as  room  for  expansion 
during  epidemics.  The  hospital  has  a  modern  x-ray  department 
and  clinical  laboratory,  with  a  full-time  technician.  A  well  equipped 
physiotherapy  unit  is  under  the  direction  of  a  qualified  full  time 
physiotherapist.  Graduate  nurses  are  on  duty  24  hours  daily,  and 
additional  graduate  nurses  manage  the  Outpatient  Services  from 
8:00  a.m.  to  6:00  p.m.  Although  serious  and  critical  medical  and 
surgical  emergencies  are  usually  referred  to  general  hospitals  in  the 
area,  or  in  Boston,  the  Isham  Infirmary-Hospital  is  equipped  to 
care  for  the  most  serious  emergencies. 

All  major  illnesses  and  injuries  are  reported  to  parents  by  tele- 
phone, telegram,  or  letter.  Minor  illnesses  and  injuries  are  not  re-r 
ported  unless  there  is  some  unusual  complication. 

The  financial  responsibility  of  families  for  the  medical  care  of 
students  is  detailed  on  page  36. 

WORK  PROGRAM 

The  Phillips  Academy  work  program,  in  which  every  boy  takes 
part,  has  two  objectives:  to  train  boys  to  do  useful  work  well  and 
to  reduce  the  operating  costs  of  the  Academy.  Under  the  super- 
vision of  members  of  the  faculty,  the  work  program  has  become 
an  essential  part  of  the  democratic  life  of  the  Academy. 

The  work  program  has  three  phases:  (a)  the  daily  care  of 
dormitory  rooms  and  corridors,  under  the  direction  of  house- 
masters, (b)  work  in  The  Commons,  to  which  all  boarding  stu- 
dents are  assigned  for  two  (non-consecutive)  weeks  during  the 
year,  and  (c)  supervised  work  on  the  grounds  or  in  th< 
buildings  of  the  school  at  the  end  of  the  fall  term  and  at  th< 
beginning  of  the  spring  term. 


GENERAL  INFORMATION 


33 


GRADES  AND  REPORTS 
Reports  of  the  student's  grades  are  sent  to  the  parents  or  guard- 
tan  at  the  Fall  Mid-Term  rating  and  at  the  end  of  each  term. 
Grades  are  based  on  results  of  both  daily  work  and  examinations. 
They  are  recorded  on  a  scale  of  100,  in  which  60  is  the  passing 
mark  and  80  or  over  is  an  honor  grade. 

REGULATIONS  AND  DISCIPLINE 

Phillips  Academy  seeks  to  help  boys  develop  desirable  attitudes 
ind  habits  so  that  they  will  be  sound  and  healthy  individuals  and 
*ood  citizens  of  their  community.  The  Academy  believes  that 
disciplinary  measures  are  among  the  instruments  of  education;  they 
ire  a  means  of  teaching  the  young  both  self-discipline  and  an  under- 
;tanding  that  the  goal  of  freedom  for  the  individual  can  be  achieved 
mly  within  a  social  order.  To  this  end,  the  Academy  tries  to  incul- 
:ate  in  a  boy  personal  integrity,  responsibility  for  his  behaviour, 
«lf-control,  and  a  sense  of  individual  purpose.  It  believes  that 
discipline  should  lead  a  boy  to  experience  the  consequences  of  ac- 
:ions  detrimental  to  himself  and  others,  help  him  to  strengthen 
limself  where  he  is  weak,  and  teach  him  to  accommodate  himself  to 
:he  requirements  of  the  school.  The  Academy  has  developed  its 
•egulations  in  accordance  with  these  principles. 

Offenses  involving  a  boy's  integrity,  social  offenses  that  threaten 
:he  well  being  of  the  school  community,  and  continued  infractions 
ndicating  an  unwillingness  to  come  to  terms  with  the  demands 
)f  the  school  all  render  a  boy  liable  to  dismissal.  Examples  are  dis- 
lonesty,  the  possession  or  consumption  of  alcoholic  beverages  or 
irugs,  gambling,  unauthorized  absence  from  school  bounds. 

Students  may  not  possess,  rent,  or  drive  any  motor  vehicle  within 
school  bounds,  nor  may  they  possess  firearms  or  explosives.  Smoking 
s  forbidden  to  all  students  with  the  exception  that  seniors  may 
>moke  pipes  in  their  dormitories. 

The  Academy  expects  all  boys  to  apply  themselves  conscientious- 
y  to  their  studies  and  to  discharge  their  obligations  to  the  school, 
[t  expects  a  greater  degree  of  self -discipline  and  initiative  as  the 
student  matures,  and  to  that  end  creates  a  less  regulated  existence 
for  Seniors  than  for  underclassmen.  All  students,  however,  are 
expected  to  meet  all  their  required  appointments,  especially  those 
immediately  preceding  and  following  vacations  and  holidays. 


M 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


OUT-OF-TOWN  EXCUSES 

A  student  whose  scholastic  standing  is  satisfactory  may  with 
permission  take  two  out-of-town  excuses  a  term.  A  Senior  passing 
all  courses  may  with  his  housemaster's  permission  take  additional 
excuses. 

ROOM  EQUIPMENT,  CLOTHING  AND  ATHLETIC  EQUIPMENT 

The  Academy  provides  each  student  with  bed,  mattress,  pillow, 
bed  linen,  chest  and  mirror,  desk,  desk-chair,  and  easy  chair.  In 
double  rooms  they  are  provided  for  each  occupant.  Bed  linen  is 
provided  and  laundered  by  the  school.  Students  furnish  their  own 
blankets,  bedspreads,  towels  and  desk  lamps. 

All  boys  are  required  to  wear  coats  and  neckties  to  recitations, 
meals,  chapel,  and  assembly.  Various  sport  combinations,  includ- 
ing clean  khaki  trousers,  are  permitted;  but  a  suit  with  a  white 
shirt  and  appropriate  socks  and  shoes  is  required  for  Sunday  church 
and  other  formal  occasions.  All  wearing  apparel  and  personal 
effects  should  be  plainly  marked  with  the  student's  name. 

Protective  athletic  equipment  is  furnished  by  the  Academy.  Each 
student  is  urged  to  bring  along  whatever  other  equipment  he 
already  possesses,  but  not  to  buy  new  equipment,  since  substantial 
savings  can  be  made  on  purchases  through  the  Athletic  Depart- 
ment. All  scholarship  boys  will  be  able  to  buy  athletic  shoes  at  half 
price.  Every  student  is  required  to  own  a  pair  of  high  quarter 
sneakers. 

The  Academy  does  not  issue  a  detailed  list  of  necessary  equip- 
ment, but  in  addition  to  the  above,  the  following  are  suggested: 
Two  or  three  blankets  or  the  equivalent 
Warm  overcoat  or  jacket  for  the  winter  months 
Overshoes  and  rubbers  for  the  winter  months. 

The  Academy  is  not  responsible  for  the  loss  of  student's  cloth- 
ing or  personal  effects,  either  during  term  time  or  when  storec 
over  vacation,  unless  deposited  in  the  student  storage  center. 

FINANCIAL 

A  large  part  of  the  Academy's  operating  income  is  from  th 
investment  of  its  endowment  funds.  These  funds  have  made  i 
possible  for  many  years  to  charge  an  inclusive  fee  lower  than  th 


L 


GENERAL  INFORMATION  3  5 

cost  of  a  student's  education  and  maintenance  and,  in  addition, 
to  make  scholarships  in  varying  amounts  available  to  worthy  and 
qualified  students.  Thus  it  can  be  said  that  all  students,  regardless 
of  the  fee  paid  or  the  scholarship  earned,  have  benefited  by  the 
endowment  funds.  The  total  annual  cost  to  the  Academy  for  each 
student  is  currently  in  the  neighborhood  of  $4,400.  Of  this  figure, 
$2,100  is  met  by  the  inclusive  fee,  leaving  a  considerable  balance 
to  be  met  by  the  income  from  invested  funds,  by  gifts  from  alumni, 
parents,  and  from  other  sources. 

Tuition  Charges 

The  tuition  for  boarding  students  is  $2,100;  for  day  students 
(who  must  live  in  the  Greater  Lawrence  area)  $1,300:  one  half 
payable  on  October  1  for  Fall  Term,  one  fourth  on  January  1  for 
Winter  Term,  and  one  fourth  on  April  1  for  Spring  Term.  Ad- 
justed bills  for  scholarship  students  are  payable  on  the  same  basis. 
An  alternative  to  the  above  method  of  payment  is  that  tuition 
may  be  paid  in  ten  equal  monthly  installments  starting  Septem- 
ber 1  and  ending  June  1.  A  service  charge  of  ten  dollars  is  made  for 
this  accommodation.  Each  student,  when  assured  of  admission,  is 
required  to  make  a  deposit  of  $50,  which  is  credited  on  his  first  bill. 

The  tuition  charge  of  $2,100  covers  instruction,  board,  room 
(including  furniture  and  bed  linen),  physical  training  and  athletic 
privileges,  use  of  laboratory  equipment  and  material,  admission  to 
all  authorized  athletic  contests  and  the  authorized  entertainments 
at  George  Washington  Hall,  including  the  Saturday  evening  mo- 
tion pictures.  It  does  not  include  charges  for  tutoring,  Language 
Training,  special  instruction  in  music  or  athletics,  medical  insur- 
ance, dental  care,  special  medical  expenses,  personal  laundry,  text- 
books, dues  to  school  organizations,  or  breakage  and  damage  to 
school  property. 

Bills  for  items  not  included  in  the  regular  school  charge  may  be 
rendered  at  any  time  during  the  school  year.  Any  alteration  in  the 
terms  of  payment  made  necessary  by  the  needs  of  parents  must  be 
arranged  in  advance  with  the  Comptroller.  No  rebate  for  the  term 
in  which  he  leaves  will  be  made  to  a  student  who  for  any  reason  is 
dismissed  or  withdrawn.  A  student  otherwise  eligible  for  return 
in  a  given  school  year  will  not  be  allowed  to  register  if  his  school 
account  for  the  preceding  year  has  not  been  paid  in  full.  The 


>6 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


diploma  of  the  Academy  will  not  be  awarded  to  a  student  whose 
school  account  is  not  paid  in  full  by  the  date  of  graduation. 

Breakage  Deposit 

Each  student  is  required  to  make  a  deposit  of  $25  to  cover 
breakage  and  other  incidental  obligations  that  may  be  incurred 
during  the  school  year.  The  deposit  is  payable  on  October  1, 
when  billed.  The  balance  remaining  after  charges  for  breakage 
have  been  deducted  will  be  refunded  after  the  close  of  the  fiscal 
year,  June  30,  or  credited  on  the  first  bill  for  the  following  year. 

Medical  Expenses  and  Medical  Insurance 

All  minor  illnesses  and  injuries  are  treated  at  the  Isham  Infirm- 
ary-Hospital by  the  Medical  Director  and  his  staff  without  charge, 
including,  if  required,  routine  laboratory  tests  and  two  days  of 
hospitalization  for  each  disability.  Parents  are  responsible  for  the 
cost  of  out-patient  surgery,  medical  consultations,  dental  care,  x- 
rays,  special  laboratory  tests,  orthopedic  appliances,  and  hospital 
ization  at  the  Isham  Infirmary-Hospital  as  detailed  below. 

For  illnesses  or  injuries  requiring  hospitalization  at  the  Isham 
Infirmary-Hospital  beyond  two  days,  a  charge  will  be  made, 
retroactive  to  the  first  day  of  the  hospital  confinement.  A  charge 
will  be  made  for  the  treatment  of  all  surgical  cases  at  the  Isham 
Infirmary-Hospital,  and,  if  hospitalization  is  required,  a  charge 
will  be  made  commencing  with  the  first  day.  A  charge  will  be 
made,  commencing  with  the  first  day,  for  students  returned  to 
the  Isham  Infirmary-Hospital  for  post-operative  care  or  conva- 
lescence after  surgical  or  medical  treatment  at  an  outside  hospital. 

A  personal  family  medical  insurance  policy  will  meet  most  costs 
of  such  Isham  Infirmary-Hospital  care.  The  school  strongly  recom- 
mends that  each  student  be  provided  with  such  coverage, 

A  student  medical  insurance  plan  is  available  to  parents.  Cov- 
erage for  old  students  commences  on  September  1,  for  new  stu- 
dents when  they  arrive  on  the  campus  for  the  fall  term.  The  school 
medical  insurance  applies  only  to  medical  expenses  for  treatment 
of  students  by  physicians  or  hospital  admission  outside  the  Isham 
Infirmary-Hospital.  It  reimburses  parents  up  to  $650  for  eacli 
accident  or  illness  requiring  treatment  outside  the  school  during 
the  twelve  months  of  the  year,  on  campus  and  off.  Reimbursement 
under  this  plan  is  paid  in  addition  to  any  benefits  to  which  a  stu- 

II 


GENERAL  INFORMATION 


37 


dent  may  be  entitled  under  any  personal  policy.  Not  infrequently 
the  coverage  from  both  kinds  of  policies  is  necessary  to  meet  the 
total  expenses  on  a  protracted  or  involved  illness. 

Medical  insurance  coverage  for  each  student  is  included  in  the 
1967-68  tuition  charge.  Beginning  in  1968-1969,  the  Academy 
will  no  longer  include  the  cost  of  insurance  in  the  tuition  charge, 
but  will  offer  the  same  coverage  on  an  optional,  extra-fee  basis. 

Extras 

As  a  rough  guide  to  parents  in  budgeting  for  the  total  expected 
expenses  of  each  academic  year,  the  following  low-average  ap- 
proximations of  extras  are  given. 

Laundry  (if  done  locally)                  $25.00  to  95.00 

Pressing  and  cleaning  15.00 

Medical  Insurance  (optional)                   15.00  to  20.00 

Books  and  supplies  40.00 

Dues,  publications,  and  charitable  contributions  20.00 

Breakage  deposit  (refundable)                     0  to  25.00 

Miscellaneous,  including  spending  money  110.00 


$250.00  to  325.00 

Spending  Money 

Parents  or  students  may  open  an  account  at  the  Treasurer's 
Office  for  personal  expenses  during  the  school  year.  Students  are 
urged  not  to  keep  large  amounts  of  cash  in  their  possession  or  in 
their  rooms. 

Financial  Aid  {see  page  42  for  basic  policy) 

Scholarships  vary  in  amount  according  to  the  applicant's  need, 
ranging  from  $500  to  the  full  amount  of  $2,100.  In  addition  to 
the  scholarship  award,  part  of  the  cost  of  travel  (within  the  conti- 
nental limits  of  the  United  States)  is  borne  by  the  school  when  a 
scholarship  student  lives  more  than  about  400  miles  from  Andover. 
The  travel  allowance  varies  in  amount  from  $25  to  $175  for  each 
round-trip,  depending  on  the  distance  of  the  student's  home  from 
Andover. 

Families  whose  need  is  not  great  but  who,  in  the  judgment  of 
t  the  Admissions  and  Scholarship  Committee,  are  entitled  to  some 
financial  assistance,  will  receive  aid  in  the  form  of  a  loan.  Such 


38 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


loans  will  not  bear  interest  while  the  boy  is  at  Andover,  but  interest 
at  the  rate  of  3  %  per  annum  will  be  charged  from  the  time  of  his 
graduation.  Under  normal  circumstances  repayment  of  the  loan 
starts  four  years  after  the  boy's  graduation  from  Andover,  at  a 
time  when,  presumably,  he  has  finished  college.  Normally,  all 
awards  of  $500  or  less  will  be  made  as  loans.  In  some  special  cases 
loans  for  larger  amounts  may  be  arranged;  in  others,  the  award 
may  occasionally  be  part  outright  grant  and  part  loan. 

The  Committee  requires  the  parents  of  all  boys  applying  for  fi- 
nancial aid  to  submit  a  complete  report  of  their  financial  condition, 
which  is  kept  confidential.  All  boys  on  the  Scholarship  List  are 
expected  to  maintain  academic  records  compatible  with  their  abili- 
ty and  to  show  by  their  general  record  at  Andover  that  they  are 
aware  of,  and  deserve,  the  opportunities  that  they  enjoy. 

Every  scholarship  boy  is  expected  to  perform  some  useful  ser- 
vice for  the  school  in  partial  return  for  the  aid  he  has  received. 
Accordingly,  the  Bureau  of  Self-Help  exercises  control  over  all 
student  employment,  such  as  campus  concessions  and  work  in  the  i 
various  departments  of  the  school.  The  revenue  anticipated  from 
such  work  is  included  in  the  overall  scholarship  budget.  Although 
the  boy  can,  in  addition,  find  odd  jobs  about  the  school  that  will 
help  him  with  his  pocket  money,  he  should  not  expect  to  earn  any 
significant  sum. 

THE  ANDOVER  SUMMER  SESSION 

Now  in  its  twenty-seventh  year,  the  six-week  Andover  Summer 
Session  complements  the  winter  program  of  Phillips  Academy  by 
offering  the  same  high  standards  of  teaching  and  learning  to  a 
different  student  body.  Its  purpose  is  to  provide  for  able  boys  and 
girls  of  high  school  age  a  summer  experience  that  will  deepen  and 
extend  their  intellectual,  aesthetic,  and  moral  interests.  The  ideal 
of  the  Summer  Session  is  to  be  a  national  public  summer  school, 
open  to  all  who  are  well  qualified.  In  1967,  the  Summer  Session 
enrolled  506  boys  and  girls  from  forty-eight  states  and  six  foreign 
countries,  and,  because  of  the  scholarship  program,  from  widely 
differing  economic  and  social  backgrounds. 

The  Summer  Session  offers  no  academic  credit  for  any  course 
and  places  little  emphasis  on  grades.  It  is  not  a  place  to  make  up 
work  or  to  strengthen  weak  academic  backgrounds.  Students  have 


II 


1 

GENERAL  INFORMATION  39 

the  opportunity  to  learn  for  the  sake  of  learning,  free  from  the 
pressure  of  grades,  credits,  and  rank  in  class. 

Because  the  student  takes  only  one  major  course,  in  a  field  in 
which  he  has  already  demonstrated  special  interest  and  ability,  the 
Summer  Session  offers  an  academic  experience  in  depth  that  can 
rarely  be  obtained  elsewhere.  Language  courses  offer  a  concentrated 
opportunity  to  learn  new  skills;  other  courses  offer  subject  matter 
or  approaches  rarely  available  in  secondary  schools,  (e.g.,  writing, 
architecture,  anthropology,  probability  and  statistics,  Asian  studies, 
invention).  All  students  also  work  in  English  composition.  Most 
take  18  hours  of  class  each  week;  the  particularly  able  may  elect  an 
additional  6-hour  minor  course. 

The  1968  Andover  Summer  Session  will  open  on  Wednesday, 
June  26,  and  will  close  on  Thursday,  August  8.  The  Summer  Ses- 
sion publishes  its  own  catalogue,  which  may  be  obtained  by  writing 
to  the  Director  of  the  Summer  Session,  Phillips  Academy,  Andover, 
Massachusetts  01810. 

SCHOOLBOYS  ABROAD 

Schoolboys  Abroad,  two  programs  conducted  during  the 
school  year  in  Barcelona,  Spain  and  Rennes,  France  form  an  integral 
part  of  the  curriculum  of  Phillips  Academy,  Andover,  and  of  the 
Phillips  Exeter  Academy,  Exeter,  N.  H.,  and  as  such  is  a  joint  edu- 
cational venture  of  the  two  academies.  Its  purpose  is  to  provide  for 
qualified  secondary  school  Upper  Middlers  (11th  graders)  a  year 
of  intensive  study  of  the  Spanish  or  French  language  and  culture, 
and  at  the  same  time  the  ordinary,  full  academic  program.  The 
programs  are  open  to  boys  from  any  accredited  secondary  school. 
If  the  student  satisfactorily  completes  the  course,  it  is  expected 
that  he  will  return  to  complete  his  Senior  year  at  the  school  he  was 
previously  attending.  Those  students,  however,  who  complete  the 
year  abroad  successfully  are  eligible  for  continuation  in  the  12  th 
grade  at  Andover  or  Exeter,  provided  that  they  announce  such 
intention  at  the  time  of  original  application. 

Candidates  must  have  completed  a  minimum  of  two  years  of 
study  of  secondary  school  Spanish  or  French  by  the  date  of  sailing 
for  Europe.  The  curriculum  of  the  program  parallels  that  normally 
available  in  college  preparatory  schools  in  the  United  States  (with 
the  omission  of  laboratory  science).  The  courses  in  European  His- 


40 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


tory,  Language  and  Culture,  and  Modern  Literature  are  taught 
entirely  in  the  language  of  the  country  by  outstanding  native 
teachers.  The  remaining  courses  are  taught  in  English  by  two  ex- 
perienced members  of  the  faculty  of  Phillips  Academy,  Andover, 
and/or  of  The  Phillips  Exeter  Academy.  One  of  the  chief  objec- 
tives of  the  language  courses  in  particular,  and  of  the  program  as  a 
whole,  is  thorough  preparation  for  honors  work  in  the  Senior  year. 
Such  preparation  is  ideally  suited  for  those  boys  whose  interest  in 
Spanish  or  French  is  such  that  they  may  seek  Advanced  Placement 
in  that  subject. 

Courses  of  the  Spanish  program  are  conducted  in  facilities  of 
the  Instituto  de  Estudios  Norteamericanos,  Via  Augusta,  123, 
Barcelona,  Spain.  Those  of  the  French  program  are  conducted  in 
the  building  of  the  Institut  Franco- Americain,  7,  Quai  Chateau- 
briand, Rennes,  France.  Boys  participating  in  either  course  live 
individually  in  native  homes  throughout  each  city. 

Schoolboys  Abroad  publishes  its  own  catalogues  (one  for  each 
program)  which  can  be  obtained  by  writing  the  Administrator, 
Schoolboys  Abroad,  George  Washington  Hall,  Andover,  Massa-  | 
chusetts  01810. 


COLLEGE  ADMISSIONS 


Decause  of  the  increasing  pressures  for  admission  to  the  most 
selective  colleges  and  universities,  most  Andover  seniors  have 
found  it  advisable  to  make  several  applications  to  institutions  of 
varying  degrees  of  renown.  In  recent  years  approximately  62  per- 
cent of  the  Senior  Class  have  been  admitted  to  the  college  of  their 
first  choice.  While  the  school  makes  every  effort  to  see  to  it  that  a 
boy  is  admitted  to  a  college  appropriate  to  his  needs  and  abilities, 
it  does  not  and  cannot  guarantee  him  admission  to  the  so-called 
prestige  colleges. 


College  1Y1 (itviculutioYi 

of  the 

Class  of  1966 

\  College 

Students 

College 

Amherst 

o 

Memo 

Boston  University 

2 

Michigan 

Brandeis 

1 

Middlebury 

Brown 

5 

Montana  State 

Case 

2 

Naval  Academy 

Centre 

1 

New  Hampshire 

3 

imw    i  ui ii.  umvcrMiy 

Clark 

1 

North  Carolina 

Colby 

3 

Northwestern 

Colgate 

1 

Oberlin 

Columbia 

8 

Penn 

Connecticut 

Princeton 

Cornell 

2 

Reed 

Dartmouth 

8 

Rice 

Delaware 

1 

Rochester 

Dickinson 

2 

Stanford 

Drew 

2 

Stetson 

Duke 

4 

Syracuse 

Georgetown 

3 

Texas 

Hamilton 

Trinity 

Hartwick 

Tufts 

Harvard 

47 

Tulane 

Holy  Cross 

1 

Univ.  of  Washington 

Illinois 

1 

Washington  University 

Knox 

1 

Wesleyan 

Lafayette 

1 

Western  Reserve 

Lake  Forest 

West  Point 

Lawrence 

Williams 

McGill 

1 

William  &  Mary 

Maine 

1 

Wisconsin 

Marlboro 

1 

Wooster 

M.I.T. 

5 

Yale 

StuJeii/s 
2 


2 
1 

22 


41 


ADMISSIONS 


GENERAL  POLICY 

Phillips  Academy  assumes  that  no  boy  will  be  deterred  from 
applying  for  admission  because  his  family  is  unable  to  pay  the 
full  cost  of  an  Andover  education.  The  Constitution  of  the  Acad- 
emy states,  "This  Seminary  shall  be  ever  equally  open  to  youth 
of  requisite  qualifications  from  every  quarter."  With  this  prin- 
ciple in  mind,  the  Admissions  and  Scholarship  Committee  selects 
each  year  from  approximately  seventeen  hundred  candidates  the 
two  hundred  and  eighty-five  most  promising  and  deserving  boys, 
even  though  many  of  them  are  unable  to  pay  the  full  $2,100  all- 
inclusive  fee.  Among  the  entire  student  body,  over  two  hundred 
and  sixty  boys  receive  awards  averaging  above  $1,400.  Thanks  to 
the  generosity  of  a  large  number  of  alumni  and  other  friends,  over 
$390,000  is  available  in  1968  to  provide  financial  assistance  for 
those  who  are  judged  eligible  strictly  on  the  basis  of  need.  Of  this 
amount  over  $130,000  is  ear-marked  for  new  boys. 

The  basic  requirements  for  admission  to  Phillips  Academy  are 
evidence  of  sound  character  and  a  strong  school  record.  Other 
considerations  are  personality,  breadth  of  interest,  geographical 
distribution,  date  of  application,  and  performance  on  the  Second- 
ary School  Admission  Test  (see  page  45).  Of  considerable  im- 
portance  also  is  the  candidate's  relative  physical,  social,  and  emo- 
tional maturity.  Because  the  Academy  receives  applications  from 
many  more  qualified  boys  than  it  can  admit,  it  must  make  selections 
on  a  competitive  basis,  with  emphasis  on  character,  personal  quali- 
fications, and  promise. 

The  closing  date  for  receiving  applications  is  normally  January  1 
except  for  postgraduates.  Strong  priority  is  given  to  those  candidates 
who  complete  the  full  admissions  procedure  by  January  15.  It  is 
particularly  important  to  take  the  December  9,  1967  administration 
of  the  Secondary  School  Admission  Test. 

Boys  are  admitted  annually  to  each  of  the  four  classes  in  approxi- 
mately the  following  numbers:  ninth  grade  (Junior),  110;  tentl 
grade  (Lower  Middle),  100;  eleventh  grade  (Upper  Middle),  50; 
twelfth  grade  (Senior  and  Postgraduate),  25.  Unlike  some  schools 


42 


ADMISSIONS 


43 


the  Academy  does  not  consider  attendance  for  the  full  four  years 
essential.  In  fact,  as  the  figures  indicate,  the  Academy  encourages 
tenth  grade  admission. 

Because  maturity  is  important  in  achieving  success  at  Andover, 
a  boy  younger  than  fourteen  at  the  time  of  entrance  is  often  at 
a  disadvantage  physically,  socially,  or  emotionally  even  though  he 
may  be  well  qualified  academically.  It  is  often,  not  always,  better 
for  such  a  boy  to  remain  at  his  present  school  through  the  ninth 
grade  and  then  attend  the  Academy  for  four  years.  Although  a 
member  of  the  Junior  Class  (ninth  grade),  he  can  generally  move 
ahead  academically  in  one  or  more  subjects,  benefiting  at  the  same 
time  from  the  social  and  physical  advantages  of  living  with  his 
contemporaries. 

The  limited  number  of  postgraduates  admitted  each  year  are 
treated  in  all  ways  as  full-fledged  members  of  the  Senior  Class. 

Financial  Aid 

The  policy  is  described  on  page  42.  See  page  37  for  details. 
PROCEDURE  IN  APPLYING 

Each  applicant  must  complete  these  four  steps: 
I.   Submit  the  Preliminary  Application  and  fee. 
II.  Have  a  personal  interview. 

III.  Return  the  Final  Application  forms. 

IV.  Take  the  Secondary  School  Admission  Test. 
(See  below  for  Senior  Class  candidates.) 

Candidates  who  complete  the  four  steps  on  time  will  be 
given  priority.  Except  for  postgraduates,  candidates  must 
normally  make  application  before  January  1  of  the  year  of 
intended  entrance. 


Step  I.  Submit  the  Preliminary  Application  and  ten  dollar  fee. 
Time:       When  the  decision  to  apply  is  made. 

Use  the  Preliminary  Application  (and  Geographical 
Card)  at  the  back  of  the  catalogue.  The  non-returnable 


44 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


ten  dollar  fee,  payable  to  the  Trustees  of  Phillips  Acade- 1 
my,  is  required  unless  specifically  waived  by  the  Admis- 
sions Office. 

Step   II.  Have  a  personal  interview. 

Time:  Preferably  well  before  January  15  of  the  year  of  pro- 
posed admission. 

An  interview  is  required  of  all  applicants.  A  visit  to 
the  Academy  is  highly  desirable  as  it  gives  the  candidate 
a  chance  to  have  his  questions  answered  and  to  see  the 
school  for  himself.  Student  guides  and  admissions  officers 
will  do  all  they  can  to  make  the  visit  a  pleasant  and  in- 
formative experience. 

If  a  candidate  cannot  arrange  such  a  visit,  he  or  his 
family  should  make  an  appointment  with  a  nearby 
Alumni  Representative  (see  listing  on  pages  95-101). 
Appointments  with  an  alumnus  should  be  made  directly 
with  the  man  himself,  not  through  the  Academy  office. 

All  appointments  should  be  made  in  advance,  prefer- 
ably by  telephone  if  the  distance  is  not  great.  Calls  to 
arrange  appointments  at  the  Academy  should  be  made 
to  the  secretary  in  the  Admissions  Office,  and  not  to  the 
Director  of  Admissions.  Tel.:  617-475-3400.  Office 
hours:  9:00-5:00  Mondays  through  Fridays;  9:00-12:OC 
on  Saturdays.  The  Admissions  Office  does  not  usuall) 
schedule  interviews  from  January  15  to  March  1. 

Step  III.   Return  the  Final  Application  Forms  described  below. 

They  are  normally  mailed  in  mid-October  to  candidate: 
who  have  completed  Step  I  for  admission  the  following 
fa... 

Time:  Within  one  month  of  their  receipt.  (Late  postgraduate 
applicants  should  see  that  they  are  returned  immedi 
ately.) 

A.  The  Student  Questionnaire:  This  form  should  be  re 
turned  separately  from  the  others. 


ADMISSIONS 


45 


B.  The  Confidential  Recommendation  Forms: 

1)  The  blue  form  should  be  completed  by  the 
candidate's  English  teacher. 

2)  The  yellow  form  should  be  completed  by  his 
mathematics  or  science  teacher. 

The  teachers  selected  should  be  those  who  have 
taught  the  candidate  within  the  past  twelve  months 
and  know  him  best. 

3)  The  white  form  should  be  completed  by  a 
person  who  has  supervised  him  closely  in  a  non-aca- 
demic activity  or  job. 

All  three  forms  should  be  returned  by  the  writers  di- 
rectly to  the  Admissions  Office  in  stamped,  addressed  en- 
velopes supplied  by  the  candidate.  Additional  reference 
letters  from  any  source  are  welcome  but  not  required. 

C.  Final  Application  and  School  Record  Form: 

After  the  parent  or  guardian  has  filled  in  the  first 
page,  the  form  should  then  be  completed  by  the 
candidate's  principal  or  guidance  counselor.  If  the 
applicant  has  attended  two  schools  within  the  past 
twelve  months,  the  desired  information  should  be 
supplied  by  the  school  at  which  he  is  better  known. 

All  forms  are  to  be  returned  directly  by  those  who 
complete  them.  The  candidate  himself  is  responsible  for 
determining  that  the  forms  are  completed  and  returned 
on  time.  As  an  aid,  the  Admissions  Office  will  send  a 
notice  to  each  candidate  whose  folder  is  incomplete  as  of 
January  1st. 

Step  IV.  Take  the  Secondary  School  Admission  Test. 
(See  below  for  Senior  Class  candidates) 

Time:       December  9,  1967. 

The  Secondary  School  Admission  Test  is  required  by 
all  but  candidates  for  the  Senior  Class.  It  is  particularly 
important  to  take  the  December  9  administration  of  the 
test  even  though  the  candidate  has  taken  it  previously. 
It  will  be  given  on  that  day  by  the  Educational  Testing 


4h 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Service  at  centers  throughout  the  United  States  and  many 
foreign  countries.  The  test  will  be  given  also  on  February 
3  and  April  6,  1968,  but  the  Academy  can  hold  out  little 
hope  of  providing  room  for  boys  who  take  it  in  Feb- 
ruary, and  no  hope  at  all  for  those  who  wait  until  April. 
The  February  and  April  dates  can  be  used  to  provide  a 
trial  run  for  1969  candidates. 

Each  applicant  must  complete  a  special  form  (supplied  with 
the  Bulletin  of  Information  for  Candidates)  and  be  sure  that  it 
reaches  the  Educational  Testing  Service  by  the  deadline  dates  listed 
in  the  Bulletin.  The  cost  is  $7.00  ($10.00  for  candidates  at  foreign 
centers),  payable  to  the  Educational  Testing  Service.  A  Bulletin 
of  Information  for  Candidates  will  be  sent  to  all  1968  candidates 
who  have  filed  the  Preliminary  Application  Form.  Others  may 
obtain  copies  by  writing  to  Secondary  School  Admission  Test, 
Educational  Testing  Service,  Princeton,  N.  J.  08  540. 

Special  preparation  or  tutoring  for  the  admission  test  is  neither 
necessary  nor  advisable,  but  a  regular  program  of  general  reading, 
perhaps  a  book  a  week  beyond  school  requirements,  may  improve 
performance  on  the  verbal  sections.  Though  sample  tests  are  not 
available,  the  Bulletin  of  Information  for  Candidates  contains  a 
few  typical  questions. 

Candidates  for  the  Senior  Class  must  take,  instead,  the  College 
Board  Scholastic  Aptitude  Test,  preferably  the  current  December 
or  January  series  (or  the  Preliminary  Scholastic  Aptitude  Test  if  an 
eleventh  grader),  and  request  the  College  Board  in  writing  after 
the  test  date  to  send  Phillips  Academy  the  results  of  all  Board  tests 
taken.  A  check  or  money  order  for  $1.00  should  accompany  the 
request. 

Acceptance  Dates 

By  agreement  with  a  number  of  schools,  official  notice  of  admis- 
sion will  not  be  mailed  before  February  15,  and  parents  will  not  be 
required  to  confirm  the  admission,  by  deposit  or  otherwise,  before 
March  15.  However,  as  soon  as  a  boy  hears  favorably  from  his  first- 
choice  school,  he  is  expected  to  notify  that  school  immediately  and 
all  others  to  which  he  has  applied.  This  action  will  enable  schools 
to  release  more  letters  of  admission  to  waiting  candidates. 


ADMISSIONS 


47 


Phillips  Academy  candidates  for  1968  may  expect  notification 
Df  action  as  soon  as  possible  after  February  15,  and  certainly  by 
March  15,  on  all  fully  completed  applications.  Successful  candidates 
who  decide  to  accept  their  admission  are  required  to  pay  a  non- 
returnable  deposit  of  $50.00  (to  be  credited  on  the  first  school 
bill). 

It  should  be  understood  that  admission  is  contingent  upon 
maintenance  of  a  thoroughly  satisfactory  academic  and  general 
record. 

Placement  Examinations  and  Preparation  for  Them 

Applicants  who  have  been  admitted  to  the  Academy,  and  who 
have  thereafter  paid  the  required  deposit,  will  normally  be  expected 
to  write  subject-matter  placement  examinations  on  or  about  Friday, 
May  10.  The  Admissions  Office  may  exempt  boys  with  outstanding 
records  and  Secondary  School  Admission  Test  results  from  all  or 
part  of  this  requirement.  Those  who  do  not  live  within  commuting 
distance  of  Andover  may  write  the  examinations  at  their  local 
schools.  While  no  special  preparation  for  the  admission  test  is  ex- 
pected, outside  study  or  tutorial  assistance  in  anticipation  of  the 
placement  examinations  will  usually  be  helpful.  Sample  placement 
examinations  are  supplied  without  charge  by  the  Admissions  Office 
upon  receipt  of  the  $50.00  deposit  confirming  acceptance  of  admis- 
sion. Each  sample  examination  lists  the  topics  to  be  covered  in 
preparation  for  the  examination. 

As  a  further  aid  to  candidates  for  placement  in  the  two  lower 
classes,  and  to  those  upper  class  candidates  who  are  currently 
studying  the  first  year  of  Latin,  French,  Spanish,  or  Russian,  the 
National  Association  of  Independent  Schools,  4  Liberty  Square, 
Boston,  Massachusetts  02109,  publishes  each  year,  for  $2.00  post- 
paid, a  pamphlet  entitled  "Definition  of  the  Requirements  for 
19 — The  pamphlet  contains  detailed  subject-matter  require- 
ments in  English,  Mathematics,  Latin,  French,  Spanish,  and  Rus- 
sian for  use  in  grades  six  through  nine.  The  standards  parallel 
closely  those  of  Andover.  The  previous  year's  examinations  in  each 
subject  at  each  level  are  included. 

The  proper  use  of  the  National  Association  of  Independent 
Schools  pamphlet  should  enable  parents  to  determine  well  in  ad- 
vance whether  their  boys  are  receiving  adequate  preparation  for  the 


48 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Academy.  Please  note  that  Phillips  Academy  encourages  but  does 
not  require  the  study  of  a  foreign  language  in  grades  six  through 

eight. 

Room  Assignment  and  Matriculation  Notices 

Rooms  are  assigned  to  incoming  students  in  early  August,  in  the 
order  in  which  their  admission  applications  are  filed.  A  notice 
regarding  the  opening  appointments  of  the  school  year,  together 
with  various  required  forms,  is  sent  in  August  to  the  parents  or 
guardians  of  all  successful  applicants. 

PLACEMENT  REQUIREMENTS  FOR  EACH  CLASS 

The  examinations  ordinarily  required  for  entrance  to  the  four 
classes  are  specified  below.  Each  candidate  should  take  the  exami- 
nations for  which  his  previous  work  fits  him,  irrespective  of  the 
class  groups  in  which  the  subjects  are  listed. 

Junior  Class 

Boys  of  good  scholastic  ability  and  achievement  should  be  able 
to  enter  the  Academy  when  they  have  completed  the  work  of  the 
eighth  grade  and  have,  in  most  cases,  reached  the  age  of  fourteen 
by  the  September  of  matriculation.  Normally,  they  will  be  asked 
to  write  a  placement  examination  in  mathematics  which  will  covet 
arithmetic  and  some  elementary  algebra,  but  a  boy  whose  eighth- 
grade  course  is  a  standard  first-year,  high-school  algebra  courst 
should  write  instead  the  paper  for  entrance  to  Mathematics  2.  Boy: 
who  are  currently  studying  a  foreign  language  should  write  th( 
appropriate  placement  examination. 

Lower  Middle  Class 

For  entrance  to  the  regular  work  of  the  Lower  Middle  year 
placement  examinations  are  required  in  algebra,  and  in  foreigr 
languages  currently  being  studied.  The  work  is  described  on  page 
54-78.  In  most  instances  the  courses  offered  at  Phillips  Academy  ii 
the  Junior  year  (ninth  grade)  cover  considerably  more  groum 
than  those  given  elsewhere  at  the  same  level.  For  this  reason  appli 
cants  are  advised  to  note  carefully  the  description  of  the  Academy' 
Junior  courses,  and  the  sample  examinations  for  entrance  to  Mathe 
matics  2  and  the  second  year  of  the  appropriate  foreign  language 
which  will  be  sent  upon  request  without  charge.  Extra  preparatioi 


L 


ADMISSIONS 


49 


may  be  advisable.  Credit  for  the  English,  History,  and  Science  of 
the  Junior  year  may  be  granted  on  the  school  record  without  ex- 
amination. 

Upper  Middle  and  Senior  Classes 

Successful  candidates  for  the  Upper  Middle  and  Senior  Classes 
will  write  the  Academy's  placement  examination  for  entrance  to 
the  second-  and  third-year  levels  of  a  foreign  language  they  are 
planning  to  continue  at  the  Academy.  Examinations  in  other  sub- 
jects may  be  required,  depending  on  the  courses  taken  and  the 
quality  of  the  applicant's  record.  Candidates  must  secure  credits, 
by  examination  or  certification,  that  cover  the  work  of  the  Acad- 
emy's lower  years.  Candidates  who  have  taken  College  Boards 
should  request  the  Board  in  writing  after  the  test  date  to  send  the 
results  to  the  Phillips  Academy  Admissions  Office.  A  check  or 
money  order  for  $1.00  should  accompany  the  request. 

Postgraduate  Students 

A  limited  number  of  well  qualified  secondary-school  gradu- 
ates are  admitted  each  year.  They  must  take  the  College  Board 
Scholastic  Aptitude  Test,  normally  the  current  December  or 
January  series,  or  the  Preliminary  Scholastic  Aptitude  Test,  and 
request  the  College  Board  in  writing  after  the  test  date  to  send 
Phillips  Academy  the  results  of  all  Board  tests  taken.  A  check  or 
money  order  for  $1.00  should  accompany  the  request. 


COURSE  OF  STUDY 


Thl  curriculum  of  Phillips  Academy  combines  a  required  core 
of  studies  believed  to  be  fundamental  to  a  liberal  education  and 
elective  courses  designed  to  fit  the  special  needs  and  interests  of 
the  individual  student.  The  total  program  normally  includes  four 
years  of  English,  three  years  of  mathematics,  three  years  of  one 
foreign  language,  a  year  of  American  history,  a  year  of  a  labora- 
tory science,  one  course  in  art  or  music,  one  course  in  the  Bible, 
and  four  or  five  additional  courses.  Instruction  is  given  in  all 
subjects  required  for  entrance  to  higher  institutions,  whether 
liberal  arts  or  technical. 

Classroom  groups  are  small  enough  to  permit  individual  atten- 
tion, and  students  are  placed  m  sections  fitted  to  their  attainment. 
Honors  and  advanced  courses  offer  particularly  able  and  well  pre- 
pared students  opportunity  to  progress  at  a  rate  commensurate  with 
their  ability  and  ambition.  Most  departments  offer  courses  beyond 
the  level  of  preparation  for  college. 

For  full  membership  in  a  given  class,  students  should  have  credit 
for  the  work  of  the  lower  classes  or  its  equivalent.  Boys  are  rated 
as  members  of  a  given  class,  however,  if  their  deficiencies  for  full 
membership  in  it  do  not  exceed  one  major  course. 

Every  boy  is  assigned  to  a  Class  Officer,  who  advises  in  the 
selection  of  courses  designed  to  meet  Andover's  diploma  require- 
ments, college  entrance  requirements,  and  the  student's  particular 
interests.  The  Class  Officer  also  recommends  such  subsequent 
changes  as  are  necessary  or  advantageous.  It  is  highly  desirable  that, 
before  conference  with  the  Class  Officer,  students  and  parents 
acquaint  themselves  as  fully  as  possible  with  the  Academy's  basic 
requirements  and  with  the  possibilities  of  its  flexible  program. 
Also,  all  applicants,  and  especially  those  for  the  Upper  Middle  and 
Senior  classes,  should  familiarize  themselves  at  the  earliest  possible 
date  with  the  entrance  requirements  of  the  colleges  which  the) 
may  wish  to  enter. 

Two  additional  descriptions  of  the  Andover  curriculum,  namely 
"Planning  a  Program  of  Studies  at  Andover"  and  "The  Andovej 
Honors  Program,"  are  available  upon  request. 
See  pages  54-78  for  descriptions  of  all  courses. 


50 


COURSE  OF  STUDY 


DIPLOMA  REQUIREMENTS 

The  diploma  requirements  for  students  entering  Phillips  Acade- 
my for  the  full  four  years  are  indicated  below.  Certain  modifica- 
tions are  permitted  for  boys  entering  after  the  Junior  year  (9th 
grade).  The  Admissions  Office  will  welcome  inquiries  concerning 
specific  requirements  for  such  boys. 

4  units  of  English 

3  units  of  mathematics 

3  units  of  one  foreign  language,  either  ancient  or  modern 
1  unit  of  history,  normally  American 
1  unit  of  laboratory  science 

*  x/z  unit  of  ancient  history  in  the  Junior  year 

*  Yz  unit  of  elementary  science  in  the  Junior  year 
3  units  of  elective  courses 

Bible  in  the  Lower  Middle  year 

Art  or  Music  in  the  Upper  Middle  year 

An  elective  minor  in  the  Senior  year 

In  addition,  candidates  must  pass  all  courses  in  their  Senior 
year  even  though  they  may  be  ahead  in  units. 

*  Qualified  boys  may  take  a  second  foreign  language  in  place  of  these  two  minor 
courses. 


THE  NORMAL  FOUR-YEAR  PROGRAM 

Junior  Year  (9th  grade)  Periods  a  week 

English  1  5 

Mathematics  1  5 

Foreign  Language  1  5 

History  1  3 

(or  a  second  foreign  language  replacing  History  and  Elementary  Science) 

Elementary  Science  3 

Total  21 

Lower  Middle  Year  {10th  grade) 

English  2  4 

Mathematics  2  4 

Foreign  Language  2  5 

^Elective  (major)  4  or  5 

Bible  1  2 


Total  19-20 

*  One  elective  major  in  one  of  the  three  upper  years  must  be  a  laboratory  science. 
If  a  second  foreign  language  was  begun  in  the  Junior  Year,  the  elective  in  the  Lower 
Middle  Year  must  be  the  second  year  of  that  language. 


52 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Upper  Middle  Year  (11th  grade)  Periods  a  week 

English  3  4 

Mathematics  3  * 

Foreign  Language  3  4 

-  Elective  (major)  4  or  5 

Art  or  Music  2 

Total  19-20 

Senior  Year  (12th  grade) 

English  4  4 

History  4  (American)  5 

^Elective  (major)  4  or  5 

^Elective  (major)  4  or  5 

Elective  (minor)  2 

Total  19-21 

Elective  Majors 

English  4S  American  Literature  Biology 

English  4S  Comedy  Basic  Concepts  of  Science 

English  4S  Novel  and  Drama  tChemistry 

English  4S  Prose  and  Poetry  tPnvsics 
English  4S  Literature  and  Composition    f  Science  Honors 

English  and  Art  4S  Contemporary  fMathematics  4,  4c,  5,  6 

Communication  fArt  Major 

Greek  1,  2,  3,  4  fMusic  Major 

Latin  1,  2,  3,  4,  5  fReligion 

French  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  6  ^History  2 

German  1,  2,  3,  4,  5  fHistory  3 

Spanish  1,  2,  3,  4,  5  fHistory  6-7 
Russian  1,  2,  3,  4 
Chinese  1,  2 

No  credit  is  given  for  less  than  a  two-year  sequence  in  any  foreig 
language. 

Special  Courses 

Special  courses  designed  to  cover  the  work  of  two  years  in  or 
are  open  to  properly  qualified  Juniors  in  mathematics,  French,  an 


English  4S  Literature  and  Composition    f  Science  Honors 

English  and  Art  4S  Contemporary  fMathematics  4, 

Communication  fArt  Major 

Greek  1,  2,  3,  4  fMusic  Major 

Latin  1,  2,  3,  4,  5  fReligion 

French  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  6  ^History  2 

German  1,  2,  3,  4,  5  fHistory  3 

Spanish  1,  2,  3,  4,  5  fHistory  6-7 
Russian  1,  2,  3,  4 
Chinese  1,  2 

No  credit  is  given  for  less  than  a  two-year  sequence 
language. 

Special  Courses 

Special  courses  designed  to  cover  the  work  of  tw< 
are  open  to  properly  qualified  Juniors  in  mathematic 

*  One  elective  major  in  three  upper  years  must  be  a  laboratory  s< 
foreign  language  was  begun  in  the  Junior  Year,  the  elective  in  the  I 
must  be  the  second  year  of  that  language. 

t  Normally  for  Upper  Middlers  and  Seniors  only. 

t  Not  permitted  after  the  Lower  Middle  year. 


COURSE  OF  STUDY 


53 


Latin;  and  to  Seniors  in  German,  French,  Greek,  Russian,  and 


Honors  Courses  and  Advanced  Placement 

The  Andover  curriculum  offers  honors  courses  in  most  depart- 
ments. It  also  provides  special  programs  in  mathematics,  Latin,  and 
the  modern  foreign  languages,  designed  to  cover  four  years'  work 
in  three  or  five  years'  work  in  four;  and  a  two-year  honors  se- 
quence in  the  physical  sciences.  The  honors  programs  are  open,  on 
invitation  of  the  departments,  to  especially  able  and  ambitious 
students. 

A  large  number  of  Andover  students  take  College  Board  Ad- 
vanced Placement  Tests  in  May  to  establish  advanced  placement 
in  college  courses  or  credit  towards  the  college  degree. 

Independent  Projects  for  Seniors 

With  the  approval  of  a  faculty  committee,  a  Senior  may  under- 
take a  special  project  of  independent  work  under  the  supervision 
of  a  member  of  the  faculty  in  one  of  three  ways:  (1)  for  the 
Winter  or  Spring  Term,  in  place  of  required  athletics,  (2)  for  the 
Spring  Term,  in  place  of  the  Senior  elective  minor,  or  ( 3 )  for  the 
whole  year,  in  place  of  the  Senior  elective  minor. 


Spanish. 


Elective  Minors  {Mainly  for  Seniors) 


Spanish  M 


DESCRIPTION    OF  COURSES 


ART 

The  courses  in  Art  are  organized  to  develop  the  visual  perceptions  of 
all  students.  The  basic  course,  Studio  Art,  is  normally  taken  by  a  boy  in 
his  Upper  Middle  year.  He  will  have  the  opportunity  in  his  Senior  year  to 
pursue  his  interests  in  an  elective  course.  Occasional  reading  assignments, 
illustrated  lectures,  and  original  works  of  art  displayed  in  the  Addison 
Gallery  complement  the  experience  of  class  and  studio. 

Studio  Art.  Two  hours.  In  its  emphasis  on  observation,  interpretation, 
and  organization,  the  course  is  designed  to  supply  the  basis  for  a  critical 
understanding  of  contemporary  surroundings.  Four  hours  of  class  work 
count  for  two  hours  credit,  with  no  outside  preparation  required.  Along 
with  drawing  exercises  and  a  brief  historical  survey,  the  student  receives 
experience  in  photography  and  three-dimensional  construction.  Previous 
experience  in  art  is  not  required. 

Art  Major.  Four  hours.  The  course  includes  the  Advanced  Studio 
course  and,  in  addition,  two  hours  of  seminar  discussion.  It  allows  a 
student  to  combine  an  interest  in  the  practice  of  art  with  an  interest  in 
thinking  and  talking  about  culture  in  modern  society.  The  year  concludes 
with  a  brief  experience  in  motion  picture  structure,  exploring  its  creative 
and  communicative  possibilities. 

Advanced  Studio.  Two  hours.  Meeting  four  hours  a  week  in  the 
studio,  the  course  gives  the  student  a  chance  to  pursue  interests  he  may 
have  developed  in  Studio  Art  or  elsewhere.  Such  interests  may  fall  into 
the  categories  (more  fully  described  below)  of  painting  or  drawing,  sculp- 
ture, photography,  architecture,  furniture  design,  or  film  making.  The 
student  has  the  option  of  studying  each  art  form  for  a  minimum  of  one 
term,  although  most  students  prefer  to  stay  with  one  discipline  for  the 
entire  year.  Studio  Art  is  a  prerequisite. 

Painting.  The  student  may  develop  expression  in  any  medium  of  two 
dimensional  design,  such  as  oil,  watercolor,  collage,  drawing.  In  addi- 
tion, he  is  required  to  perform  occasional  exercises  in  an  assigned  me- 
dium (e.g.,  tempera  and  gold-leaf).  He  receives  constructive  criticism 
from  a  practicing  painter. 

Graphics.  As  an  adjunct  to  the  Painting  course,  the  Print  Workshop 
encourages  exploration  of  traditional  as  well  as  experimental  technique 
in  etching,  drypoint,  aquatint  and  woodcut. 

Architecture.  A  design  course  based  on  the  previous  year's  work  in 
Studio  Art,  which  involves  the  further  exploration  and  application  of 
concepts  of  human  function  and  material  structure  on  an  architectural 


54 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES 


55 


scale.  People,  considered  singly  and  socially,  and  materials,  considered 
structurally  and  aesthetically,  become  central  to  the  design  process. 

Furniture  Design.  A  course  in  the  design  of  the  useful  "thing,"  the 
implement  of  specific  human  purpose.  Work  in  the  shop  necessitates 
consideration  of  materials,  methods  and  machines  to  transform  design 
ideas  into  concrete  form. 

Sculpture.  Offers  an  opportunity  to  work  in  materials  available  to 
the  sculptor  today,  such  as  wood,  stone,  metal,  plastics,  plaster.  It  is, 
therefore,  possible  for  the  student  to  develop  into  sculpture  concepts 
already  begun  in  Studio  Art,  as  well  as  ideas  drawn  from  his  own  ex- 
perience. Individual  criticism  is  stressed. 

Advanced  Photography  uses  techniques  learned  in  Studio  Art  to  con- 
tinue work  on  individual  projects,  such  as  the  photographic  essay,  de- 
velopment of  one  subject  idea,  study  of  lighting,  presentation,  or  still- 
life  material. 

Filmmaking.  An  introduction  to  movie-making  stressing  an  under- 
standing of  film  structure.  Work  will  be  done  in  editing,  writing  and 
shooting.  In  addition,  a  survey  of  important  films  of  all  kinds  will  be 
viewed  and  critically  analyzed  to  assist  the  student  in  developing  his 
own  work. 

Art  4S.  Contemporary  Communication.  Eight  Hours.  A  com- 
bined English  major  and  art  major  designed  to  explore  the  relationships 
of  visual  and  verbal  media  as  a  means  of  communication.  Student  reading 
in  recent  language,  communications,  and  information  theory  is  combined 
with  writing  within  a  wide  range  of  stories,  poems,  plays,  and  essays  as 
well  as  advanced  studio  work  in  painting,  sculpture,  photography,  or 
architecture.  Individual  and  group  projects. 

Eligible  for  the  course  in  1967-68  are:  (1)  those  who  have  had  Studio 
Art  and  have  completed  English  3X  or  4;  (2)  those  who  elect  an  Art 
Major  and  obtain  permission  of  the  Chairman  of  the  English  Department 
to  substitute  Contemporary  Communication  for  English  4. 

THE  CLASSICS 

The  courses  in  Greek  and  Latin  are  arranged  to  provide  a  four-year 
course  in  Greek  and  a  five-year  course  in  Latin.  The  Department  hopes 
that  a  number  of  boys  with  Classical  interests  will  elect  four  years  of  one 
language  and  three  of  the  other.  However,  the  pressure  of  modern  times 
must  make  it  advisable  for  most  boys  to  take  one  ancient  and  one  modern 
language.  Such  boys  may  elect  either  Greek  or  Latin  in  their  first  year. 
Those  planning  on  a  general  education,  on  the  advanced  study  of  Romance 
languages,  or  on  entering  the  Law,  will  naturally  prefer  Latin;  but  boys 
interested  in  literature,  archaeology,  philosophy,  or  medicine  might  well 
choose  Greek  as  their  ancient  language.  It  is  no  more  difficult  than  Latin 
as  a  first  language. 


S6 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Greek 

Greek  1.  Five  hours.  The  course  is  devoted  mainly  to  forms  and  the 
most  essential  principles  of  syntax.  Chase  and  Phillips'  A  New  Introduc- 
tion to  Greek  (Harvard  University  Press)  is  used.  To  aid  the  memorizing 
of  inflections  and  vocabularies  there  are  daily  exercises,  both  oral  and 
written,  enforced  by  incessant  drill.  During  the  second  and  third  terms, 
work  in  the  grammar  is  supplemented  by  lessons  either  from  a  very  simple 
Greek  reader,  or  from  the  initial  chapters  of  Xenophon's  Anabasis. 

Greek  1-2.  Five  hours.  The  course  is  open  to  properly  qualified  Seniors 
and  Upper  Middlers.  It  covers  in  one  year  the  essential  material  of  Greek 
1  and  Greek  2.  The  texts  are  Chase  and  Phillips'  A  New  Introduction 
to  Greek;  Xenophon's  Anabasis,  ed.  Mather  and  Hewitt  (University  of 
Oklahoma  Press). 

Greek  2.  Five  hours.  The  second  year  is  occupied  with  selections  from 
Xenophon's  works  and  with  some  easy  dialogue  of  Plato.  Prose  composi- 
tion in  Attic  Greek  is  studied,  the  grammar  is  reviewed,  and  there  is  much 
work  in  sight  translation.  The  texts  are  Xenophon's  Anabasis  (ed.  Mather 
and  Hewitt)  and  Plato's  Apology  and  Crito,  ed.  Dyer  and  Seymour  (Ginn 
&  Co.). 

Greek  3.  Four  hours.  The  third  year  is  spent  mainly  in  reading  select- 
ed books  of  the  Iliad  and  the  Odyssey.  After  the  dialect  is  mastered,  more 
attention  is  given  to  the  literary  side  of  the  poems  and  to  the  translation 
of  Homer  at  sight.  When  the  ability  of  the  class  warrants,  the  Alcestis 
of  Euripides  is  read.  The  texts  are  Benner's  Selections  from  Homer's 
"Iliad"  (Appleton)  and  Hadley's  Euripides'  "Alcestis"  (Cambridge  Uni- 
versity Press). 

Greek  4.  Four  Hours.  The  fall  term  is  devoted  to  selections  from 
Herodotus,  Hippocrates,  Thucydides,  and  Plato;  the  winter  to  a  play  of 
Sophocles;  the  spring  to  selections  from  the  Greek  lyric  poets. 

Greek  T.  Two  hours.  A  Senior  elective  that  studies  the  Greek  Old 
and  New  Testaments. 

Greek  Composition.  See  notice  under  Latin  Composition. 
Latin 

Latin  1.  Five  hours.  The  year  is  spent  in  learning  the  basic  forms  and 
syntax  of  the  language  and  a  fundamental  vocabulary.  There  is  constant 
practice  in  sight  reading  and  in  prose  composition  of  simple  sentences. 
The  purpose  of  the  course  is  to  prepare  boys  for  general  reading  in  Latin 
prose,  not  solely  in  Caesar.  The  text  is  A  New  Introduction  to  Latin,  by 
Alston  H.  Chase. 

Latin  1-2.  Five  hours.  Boys  who  are  not  ready  for  Latin  2,  but  whc 
make  a  high  grade  on  the  Advanced  Latin  I  Entrance  Examination,  ma) 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES  5  7 

be  placed  in  Latin  1-2  and  thus  given  opportunity  to  complete  two  years 
of  work  in  one.  Those  who  pass  the  course  successfully  are  given  credit 
for  two  years  of  Latin.  The  course  is  reserved  for  boys  who  give  evidence 
of  high  ability.  Texts  as  for  Latin  1  and  2. 

Latin  2.  Five  hours.  During  the  first  term,  the  course  gives  a  thor- 
ough review  of  the  fundamentals  of  Latin  grammar  and  begins  the  read- 
ing of  Caesar.  In  the  last  two  terms,  more  Caesar  is  read,  but  the  reading 
is  varied  by  selections  from  other  Latin  prose  authors  and  from  simple 
poetry.  There  is  practice  in  sight  translation  and  in  prose  composition. 
The  texts  are  An  Intermediate  Latin  Reader,  by  William  J.  Buehner,  and 
John  Colby's  Review  Latin  Grammar. 

Latin  3.  Four  hours.  The  course  has  a  threefold  purpose.  Linguisti- 
cally, it  teaches  students  to  read  Latin  prose  with  increasing  ease.  His- 
torically, it  presents  a  picture  of  Cicero's  life  and  times  and  compares  his 
period  with  our  own.  Culturally,  it  assesses  the  literary  importance  of 
Cicero  as  the  creator  of  a  prose  style  which  influenced  the  literature  of 
Europe  for  centuries.  Representative  selections  are  read  from  the  writings 
of  Cicero  as  well  as  passages  from  other  prose  authors.  There  is  constant 
practice  in  sight  translation.  Selections  from  Vergil  and  one  of  the 
Comedies  are  read.  The  text  is  Gillingham  and  Barrett's  Latin:  Our  Living 
Heritage,  Book  III  (Charles  E.  Merrill  Books). 

Students  who  have  done  high  honor  work  in  Latin  2  and  who  intend 
to  take  only  three  years  of  the  subject  are  allowed  to  choose  either  Cicero 
or  Vergil  for  their  third-year  Latin. 

Latin  4.  Four  hours.  By  a  study  of  selections  from  the  Aeneid  and 
from  other  Latin  poetry,  the  course  attempts  to  introduce  students  to 
both  the  forms  and  the  content  of  classical  poetry  and  to  make  plain  its 
influence  upon  the  poetry  of  the  modern  languages.  The  student  is  given 
constant  practice  in  reading  Latin  verse  aloud.  The  poems  are  studied  as 
literature  and  not  merely  as  exercises  in  translation. 

Latin  H.  Two  hours.  Reading  and  discussion  of  the  Odes  of  Horace 
and  poems  of  Catullus,  with  special  attention  to  the  literary  artistry  of  the 
poems,  to  their  sources  in  the  Greek  Lyrics,  and  to  their  influence  upon 
modern  poetry.  Open  to  properly  qualified  students  who  have  passed 
Latin  3. 

Latin  S.  Two  hours.  This  course,  less  demanding  than  Latin  H,  is 
designed  for  boys  who  have  completed  Latin  3  and  desire  to  keep  in  con- 
tact with  the  language  through  a  minor  course.  The  reading  will  be  drawn 
mainly  from  the  poetry  of  Ovid.  The  basic  text  is  Dunmore's  Selections 
from  Ovid  (McKay  Co.). 

Latin  5.  Five  hours.  Open  to  students  who  have  passed  Latin  4  or 
who  otherwise  satisfy  the  Chairman  of  the  Department  of  their  fitness. 
The  course  is  the  equivalent  of  the  customary  Freshman  Latin  course  in 
most  colleges.  In  the  first  term,  selections  from  Livy's  Histories  are  read 


5  g  PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 

and  the  reading  of  Horace's  Odes  is  begun,  to  be  carried  on  through  the 
second  term.  In  the  winter,  two  Roman  comedies  are  read;  and,  in  the 
spring,  Catullus'  poems  and  selections  from  Tacitus'  Annals. 

Accelerated  Courses.  At  the  end  of  the  first  term  of  Latin  1,  stu- 
dents of  high  ability  are  offered  the  opportunity  to  join  an  accelerated  sec- 
tion, Latin  IX.  They  will  continue  in  Latin  2X,  and  proceed  in  their  third 
year  into  Latin  4,  thus  gaining  credit  for  four  years  of  Latin  in  three  years. 
Boys  who  drop  out  at  the  conclusion  of  Latin  2X  will  obtain  credit  for 
only  two  years  of  Latin. 

Latin  Composition.  No  regular  course  is  given,  but  special  arrange- 
ments can  be  made  for  any  student  desiring  work  in  advanced  composi- 
tion in  either  Latin  or  Greek. 

ENGLISH 

The  courses  in  English  aim  to  teach  students  to  think  logically,  to 
speak  and  write  clearly,  to  read  with  comprehension  and  appreciation, 
and  to  develop  discrimination  and  taste  in  the  judgment  of  books. 

Courses  at  all  levels  include  frequent  practice  in  speaking  and  writing, 
close  reading,  sustained  attention  to  problems  of  syntax  and  rhetoric, 
the  study  and  discussion  in  class  of  the  principal  literary  types,  and  wide 
collateral  reading.  Classroom  teaching  is  supplemented  by  conferences. 
Sections  vary  in  size  from  ten  to  fifteen.  After  the  Junior  year,  particu- 
larly able  boys  may  enter  honors  sections  and  are  encouraged  to  develop 
their  special  literary  aptitudes. 

In  addition  to  assigned  reading,  students  do  collateral  reading,  guided 
by  the  English  teacher.  In  all  courses  the  Department  encourages  the 
writing  of  story,  poem,  and  essay,  and  sponsors  a  series  of  prize  competi- 
tions to  stimulate  interest  in  original  writing. 

English  1.  Five  hours.  The  work  of  the  course,  both  in  literature  and 
composition,  concentrates  on  narration  and  description.  It  does  not  in- 
clude a  study  of  formal  grammar,  though  it  treats  practical  matters  of 
form  and  usage  as  necessary.  A  study  of  the  growth  of  language,  word 
formation,  and  etymology  is  part  of  the  course.  Whenever  possible,  the 
writing  of  non-expository  themes  corresponds  with  the  literature  under 
study,  for  example,  the  writing  of  fables  along  with  the  study  of  Aesop. 

Representative  texts:  A  Book  of  Short  Stories,  The  Tempest,  Huckle- 
berry Finn,  Animal  Farm,  Lord  of  the  Flies,  Aesop's  Fables,  Narrative 
Poems. 

English  2.  Four  hours.  The  course  concentrates  on  expository  writing 
and  on  the  acquisition  of  a  critical  and  analytical  vocabulary  to  be  used 
in  the  study  of  the  novel,  short  story,  drama,  poetry  and  the  essay.  All 
sections  study  generative  and  transformational  grammar. 

Representative  texts:  Composition  of  the  Essay,  by  Hyde  &  Brown, 
Great  Short  Stories,  ed.  Schramm,  Henry  JV  (Part  I) ,  Richard  II,  The 
Face  of  a  Hero. 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES 


59 


English  3.  Four  hours.  English  3  divides  into  two  courses,  English  3R 
nd  English  3L.  English  3R  is  the  normal  course,  a  study  of  relatively 
nodern  works  in  the  usual  genres  of  drama,  novel,  poetry,  and  essay. 
Ul  sections  read  The  Odyssey,  Macbeth,  and  a  novel  by  Melville,  Haw- 
horne  or  Hardy.  Every  section  studies  other  works  chosen  by  the  teachcr 

0  enlarge  experience  in  reading  and  writing.  English  3L  undertakes  a 
nore  formal  study  of  literature  in  an  historical  context.  Texts  and 
uthors  studied  are  The  Odyssey,  Oedipus  the  King,  Macbeth,  Hamlet, 
vletaphysical  Poetry,  Milton,  The  Rape  of  the  Lock,  Gulliver's  Travels, 
Wordsworth,  Keats,  a  novel  of  Melville,  Hawthorne,  or  Hardy,  and  a 
nodern  drama.  These  represent  roughly  half  the  study  of  literature  in  the 
:ourse.  The  other  half  is  of  the  individual  teacher's  choosing. 

English  4.  Four  hours.  Those  who  have  completed  English  3R  take 
English  4  or  English  4  Honors,  which  have  as  their  core  the  texts  and 
mthors  listed  under  English  3L  except  for  The  Odyssey,  Macbeth,  and 

1  novel  by  Melville,  Hawthorne,  or  Hardy.  Those  who  have  completed 
English  3L  may  take  any  one  of  a  number  of  specialized  courses,  called 
English  4S,  which  will  vary  from  year  to  year.  Those  offered  in  1967-68 
ire  described  below. 

English  4S.  Prose  and  Poetry.  Four  hours.  This  honors  course  is 
designed  as  an  investigation  of  contemporary  trends  in  prose  fiction  and 
poetry,  with  corroboration  in  the  field  of  drama.  The  emphasis  is  chiefly 
technical  and  critical:  how  to  approach  a  text,  how  to  read  it,  how  to 
evaluate  it,  how  to  see  it  in  its  proper  context.  The  course  concentrates 
upon  a  few  typical  works,  with  extensive  collateral  reading. 

English  4S.  American  Literature.  Four  hours.  A  course  in  Amer- 
ican Literature.  The  anthology  for  class  use  is  A  College  Book  of  American 
Literature,  edited  by  Ellis,  Pound,  Sophn,  and  Hoffman. 

English  4S.  Comedy.  Four  hours.  The  course  explores  the  assumptions 
that  comedy  and  tragedy  are  akin  and  that  comedy  illuminates  the  human 
situation  in  ways  that  tragedy  does  not.  An  examination  of  the  nature 
and  importance  of  the  comic  spirit  in  the  dramatic  comedy  of  classical 
Greece,  Rome,  the  Middle  Ages,  the  Renaissance,  the  Restoration,  the 
eighteenth,  nineteenth  and  twentieth  centuries.  It  is  essentially  a  reading 
course,  but  the  student  will  write  occasional  papers  and  see  on  the  stage 
as  much  comedy  as  opportunity  and  the  metropolitan  Boston  stage  will 
allow. 

English  4S.  Novel  and  Drama  Seminar.  Four  hours.  Most  of  the 
readings  of  this  course  are  major  works  of  modern  literature,  principally 
the  works  of  Lawrence,  Faulkner,  Camus,  Updike,  O'Neill,  Eliot,  Brecht, 
and  Albee.  The  student  has  the  opportunity  to  study  the  "world"  of  each 
writer  and  to  compare  it  with  that  o  fthe  others.  In  order  that  he  may 
have  a  basis  for  comparison  with  the  writing  of  the  past,  he  also  studies 
Dostoyevsky's  The  Brothers  Karamazov  and  Shakespeare's  King  Lear. 


60 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


English  4S.  Composition.  Two  hours.  A  course  in  which  the  stu- 
dents write  at  least  once  a  week  and  submit  at  least  one  finished  work 
at  the  end  of  each  term.  Class  hours  are  spent  chiefly  in  the  analysis  and 
discussion  of  work  submitted  by  members  of  the  class. 

English  4S.  Literature.  Two  hours.  A  course  in  which  students  read 
the  works  of  a  number  of  modern  authors,  American  and  foreign.  Each 
student  pursues  a  program  of  reading  designed  specially  for  him  in  con- 
ferences with  the  instructor.  Classes  are  devoted  in  part  to  conferences 
and  in  part  to  reports  on  reading,  either  prepared  or  spontaneous. 

Note:  English  4S  Composition  and  English  4S  Literature  may  be  taken 
together  to  constitute  a  major  course  of  four  hours. 

English  4S.  Contemporary  Communication.  Eight  Hours.  A  com- 
bined English  major  and  art  major  designed  to  explore  the  relationship* 
of  visual  and  verbal  media  as  a  means  of  communication.  Student  reading 
in  recent  language,  communications,  and  information  theory  is  combined 
with  writing  within  a  wide  range  of  stories,  poems,  plays,  and  essays  as 
well  as  advanced  studio  work  in  painting,  sculpture,  photography,  or 
architecture.  Individual  and  group  projects. 

Eligible  for  the  course  in  1967-68  are:  (1)  those  who  have  had  Studio 
Art  and  have  completed  English  3X  or  4;  (2)  those  who  elect  an  Art 
Major  and  obtain  permission  of  the  Chairman  of  the  English  Department 
to  substitute  Contemporary  Communication  for  English  4. 

HISTORY 

The  courses  in  history  have  two  purposes.  They  are  arranged  to  provide 
information  in  company  with  other  subjects;  they  are  developed  consecu- 
tively to  give  increasing  experience  in  precision  of  thinking  and  to  train 
students  in  the  logical  expression  of  what  they  know.  The  system  of 
courses  is  scaled  during  the  first  year  to  the  potentialities  of  the  younger 
students,  stressing  the  topical  approach;  it  becomes  increasingly  mature 
and  analytical  during  the  succeeding  years. 

History  1.  Ideas  in  Motion.  Three  hours.  The  course  is  designed  to 
provide  Juniors  with  a  series  of  stimulating  examples  of  man's  develop- 
ment and  culture.  The  focal  point  is  man's  experiences  and  ability  to 
adapt  circumstances  to  his  needs,  to  work  with  others  for  common  pur- 
poses. With  this  objective,  the  course  shows  man  in  several  environments: 
Man  and  the  Land — Geography;  Man's  Entrance  into  History — the  River 
Civilizations;  Man  Makes  a  Living — Economics;  Man  Organizes  with 
Others — Government;  Man  Tries  to  Understand  the  Unknown — Religion; 
Man  Resorts  to  Force— War;  Man  Utilizes  Nature — Science. 

The  contribution  of  ancient  civilizations  is  usually  the  starting  point 
of  each  topic,  which  is  carried  through  to  modern  times.  By  this  tech- 
nique the  boy  is  able  to  relate  his  work  to  some  degree  to  his  own  experi- 
ences. Lectures  on  aspects  of  specific  topics  are  occasionally  given  to 
prepare  the  boy  for  later  work  in  this  method. 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES 


61 


Each  topic  is  approached  through  textual  and  supplementary  readings, 
class  discussions,  and  training  in  essay  writing.  Illustrative  material — 
films,  slides,  displays — is  used  wherever  possible.  Students  are  encouraged 
to  pursue  their  own  special  historical  interests  through  reports,  papers,  and 
projects. 

Text:  Wallbank  and  Taylor,  Civilization  Past  and  Present  (Scott  Fores- 
man).  Supplementary  books:  Smythe  and  Brown,  Elements  of  Geography 
(Macmillan) ;  the  editors  of  Life,  The  Epic  of  Man  (Time) ;  Davis,  A 
Day  in  Old  Athens  (Allyn  &  Bacon) ;  Burlingame,  Machines  that  Built 
America  (Signet  Key) ;  Bradley,  A  Guide  to  the  World's  Religions  (Pren- 
tice-Hall) ;  Butterfield  et  al,  A  Short  History  of  Science  (Doubleday  Dol- 
phin);  Pratt,  Battles  that  Changed  History  (Doubleday  Anchor). 

History  2.  Great  Men  and  Their  Ages  in  Western  History.  Four 
hours.  For  Lower  Middlers.  The  course  is  a  study  of  outstanding  people 
the  significant  ages  in  the  history  of  Europe  and  America. 

The  course  surveys  the  general  characteristics  of  a  given  historical 
period,  examines  selected  areas  for  particular  aspects,  and  focuses  on  the 
significant  contributions  of  outstanding  people.  First,  the  course  views 
the  Renaissance-Reformation  from  1450  to  1550  centered  on  the  Italian 
and  German  states  while  emphasizing  Michelangelo,  Luther,  and  Machia- 
velli.  Next,  the  Age  of  Reason  during  the  17th  Century  is  surveyed 
through  a  study  of  French  political,  economic  and  cultural  patterns  as 
these  were  influenced  by  Richelieu  and  Louis  XIV.  A  third  age  for  study 
is  the  18  th  Century  Enlightenment  in  England.  These  three  ages  are  tied 
together  through  a  study  of  the  exploration  and  colonization  of  America 
beginning  with  the  Columbus  discoveries,  moving  to  La  Salle's  grand 
design  and  ending  with  the  American,  Benjamin  Franklin. 

The  student  learns  the  disciplines  of  outlining,  notetaking,  map  read- 
ing, denning,  identifying,  analyzing  and  organizing  evidence  to  prove 
generalizations.  He  is  introduced  to  historical  relationships  such  as  time- 
place,  means-ends,  cause-effect  and  coincidental.  In  his  expression  he  is 
instructed  how  to  distinguish  between  relevant  and  irrelevant  data,  to 
use  sufficient  and  accurate  evidence  for  proof  and  to  make  effective,  con- 
cise generalizations. 

The  course  uses  films,  slide-tapes  and  maps.  Lectures  are  presented  by 
specialists. 

Texts:  Brinton,  Christopher  and  Wolff,  A  History  of  Civilization 
(Prentice-Hall) ;  Age  of  Exploration,  Renaissance,  Reformation,  En- 
lightenment (Time-Life  Books).  Supplementary  books:  S.  Morison,  Chris- 
topher Columbus,  Mariner  (Mentor  Books) ;  R.  Coughlan  and  Editors  of 
Time-Life  Books,  The  World  of  Michelangelo  (Time  Inc.);  R.  Bainton, 
Here  1  Stand,  A  life  of  Martin  Luther  (Mentor  Books) ;  Machiavelli,  The 
Prince  (Mentor  Books);  C.  V.  Wedgwood,  Richelieu  and  The  French 
Monarchy  (Collier  Books) ;  F.  Parkman,  La  Salle  and  the  Discovery  of 
the  Great  West  (Signet  Classics) ;  W.  H.  Lewis,  The  Splendid  Century 
(Anchor  Books) ;  C.  G.  Robertson,  Chatham  and  the  British  Empire  (Col- 


(,  j  PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 

tier  Books) ;  L.  Kronenberger,  Kings  and  Desperate  Men  (Vintage) ;  V.  V. 
Crane,  Benjamin  Franklin  and  a  Rising  People  (Little,  Brown). 

History  3.  Modern  Europe.  Four  hours.  For  Upper  Middlers.  The 
course  is  a  background  survey  from  the  15th  century  to  the  end  of  the 
18  th  century,  and  an  intensive  study  of  events  and  periods  from  the 
French  Revolution  to  the  present  day.  The  course  is  chronological  and 
deals  with  significant  issues.  The  Development  of  Absolutism;  Constitu- 
tionalism; Problems  of  the  Balance  of  Power;  the  French  Revolution  and 
the  Napoleonic  Empire;  Rise  of  the  Middle  Class;  the  Challenge  of  Social- 
ism; Imperialism  of  the  19th  Century;  the  Germany  of  Bismarck;  the 
Diplomacy  of  World  War  I  and  the  Peace  Settlement;  the  Russian  Revo- 
lution and  the  Soviet  Union;  the  Dictatorship  and  Politics  of  Fascist  Italy 
and  Nazi  Germany;  World  War  II  and  the  Search  for  Security;  the  Cold 
War;  Issues  of  Foreign  Policy  of  the  United  States  and  the  Soviet  Union. 

The  course  prepares  for  the  Advanced  Placement  examination  in  Eu- 
ropean History. 

Texts:  Palmer  &  Colton,  A  History  of  the  Modern  World  (Knopf); 
Goldwin  Smith,  A  History  of  England  (Scribncr);  Hall  &  Davis,  The 
Course  of  Europe  Since  Waterloo  (Appleton-Century) ;  Black  &  Helm- 
rcich,  Twentieth  Century  Europe  (Knopf);  David  Thomson,  Europe 
Since  Napoleon  (Knopf);  H.  S.  Hughes,  Contemporary  Europe:  A  His- 
tory (Prentice-Hall).  Supplementary  readings:  L.  B.  Packard,  The  Age  of 
Louis  XIV  (Holt) ;  J.  H.  Plumb,  England  in  The  Eighteenth  Century 
(Pelican) ;  G.  LeFebvre,  The  Coming  of  The  French  Revolution  (Vin- 
tage);  R.  L.  Heilbroner,  The  Worldly  Philosophers  (Simon  and  Schuster) ; 
H.  Holborn,  The  Political  Collapse  of  Europe;  E.  H.  Harbison,  The  Agi 
of  Reformation  (Cornell) ;  Voltaire,  Candide  (Bantam) ;  R.  L.  Heilbroner 
The  Future  as  History  (Prentice-Hall).  Readings  and  documents  ir 
European  History  are  edited  and  supplied  to  the  students  by  members  o' 
the  department. 

History  4.  The  United  States.  Five  hours.  For  Seniors.  The  cours« 
opens  with  the  American  Revolution  and  proceeds  through  the  transitior 
from  Confederation  into  Federal  Union,  from  conflict  and  division  to  re 
union,  and  the  growth  of  the  United  States  as  a  world  power.  It  close 
with  events  of  the  present  time.  It  surveys  the  westward  movement,  th< 
plantation  system,  the  development  of  industry,  the  labor  movement,  an< 
the  foreign  policy  of  the  American  government. 

Although  public  affairs  are  the  central  theme,  stress  is  placed  upoi 
geographical,  economic,  social,  and  governmental  problems;  the  career 
of  eminent  men  are  examined  in  relation  to  these  problems.  Much  atten 
tion  is  given  to  historical  decisions  of  the  Supreme  Court.  Matters  o 
literary,  intellectual,  religious,  and  philosophical  import  are  indicated  bu 
not  stressed.  Students  with  a  satisfactory  average  may  with  permissio 
elect  to  write  a  paper  in  lieu  of  the  final  examination. 

Texts  and  reference  works: 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES 


General:  Morison  and  Commager,  The  Growth  of  the  American  Re- 
public; Randall,  The  Civil  War  and  Reconstruction;  Hacker  and  Kend- 
rick,  The  United  States  Since  1865;  Mitchell  and  Mitchell,  American 
Economic  History;  Malone  and  Rauch,  Empire  for  Liberty;  Blum,  The 
National  Experience. 

Source  Books:  Commager,  Documents  of  American  History;  Bartlett, 
The  Record  of  American  Diplomacy. 

Special  Histories  cited  frequently:  Bailey,  A  Diplomatic  History  of  the 
American  People;  Bemis,  A  Diplomatic  History  of  the  United  States; 
Kelly  and  Harbison,  The  American  Constitution;  Swisher,  American  Con- 
stitutional Development;  Pratt,  History  of  United  States  Foreign  Policy; 
Mettels,  The  Roots  of  American  Civilization;  Agar,  The  Price  of  Power; 
Allis,  Government  Through  Opposition;  Brogan,  Era  of  Franklin  D. 
Roosevelt;  Faulkner,  From  Versailles  to  the  New  Deal;  Frederick,  Slavery 
md  the  Breakdotvn  of  the  American  Consensus;  Ganley,  The  Progressive 
Movement,  James,  The  Supreme  Court  in  American  Life;  Lippmann,  U.  S. 
Foreign  Policy;  Lyons,  Idealism  &  Realism  in  Wilson's  Peace  Program, 
Presidential  Power  in  the  New  Deal;  Van  Deusen,  The  Jacksonian  Era; 
Winks,  The  Cold  War;  Deglar,  Out  of  the  Past. 

Special  historical  works  cited  at  appropriate  places  in  the  Syllabus:  The 
Turner  and  Dunning  volumes  of  the  older  American  Nation  Series;  Miller, 
The  Origins  of  the  American  Revolution;  Corwin,  John  Marshall  and 
the  Constitution;  Nevins,  Ordeals  of  Union  (2  vols.) ;  Nevins,  Emergence 
of  Lincoln  (2  vols.) ;  Pringle,  Theodore  Roosevelt;  Allen,  Lords  of  Crea- 
tion; Corwin,  The  Constitution  and  What  It  Means  Today;  Mason  & 
Leach,  In  Quest  of  Freedom;  R.  Hofstadter,  American  Political  Tradition. 

History  5.  Politics  of  International  Relations.  Two  hours.  An 
elective  course  for  Seniors.  The  emphasis  is  upon  the  politics  of  20th- 
century  nations  and  their  effects  upon  United  States  foreign  policy  and 
international  relations.  The  course  is  organized  to  introduce  students  to 
the  many  factors  affecting  Great  Power  politics,  and  to  demonstrate  the 
causal  relationships  in  modern  international  events:  the  Fundamentals  of 
International  Relations;  Power  Politics;  National  Interests  and  Objectives; 
Geography  and  World  Politics;  Economics  and  World  Politics;  Significant 
Nations  and  Areas;  Modern  Europe;  the  Soviet  Union;  China;  Emerging 
Africa;  Latin  America;  United  States  foreign  policy,  its  making  and 
execution,  development  since  1945,  the  factors  influencing  it. 

Readings  will  be  selected  from  Overstreet,  What  We  Must  Know  About 
Communism;  Crossman,  The  God  That  Failed;  Benton,  The  Voice  of  Latin 
America;  White,  Thunder  Out  of  China;  Shepherd,  Politics  of  African 
Nationalism;  Fulbright,  Prospects  for  the  West;  Fulbright,  Neiv  Myths 
and  Old  Realities;  W.  Nielson,  Africa;  Harrison  Salisbury,  Russia;  Tad 
Szulc,  Latin  America;  Tannenbaum,  Ten  Keys  to  Latin  America;  Durdin, 
Southeast  Asia. 

History  6.  Introduction  to  East  Asia.  Two  hours.  Open  to  Upper 
Middlers  and  Seniors.  It  is  the  purpose  of  the  course  to  introduce  Ameri- 


64 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


can  students  to  Asia  through  study  and  critical  examination  of  the  his- 
tories of  China  and  Japan.  While  the  approach  is  essentially  historical, 
considerable  emphasis  is  placed  upon  East  Asia's  anthropology,  philosophy, 
religion,  literature  and  art.  Topics  covered  include  East  Asia:  The  Setting 
and  Geographical  Beginnings,  Thought  and  Religion,  The  Social  Fabric, 
The  Political  Tradition,  The  Alien  Impact,  China  in  Revolution:  First 
Phase,  The  Modernization  of  Japan,  China  in  Revolution:  Second  Phase, 
New  Order  in  Eastern  Asia,  China  in  Revolution:  Third  Phase. 

The  course  consists  of  readings,  lectures,  audio-visual  materials,  map 
exercises,  and  work  projects.  Textual  and  supplementary  readings  are 
taken  from  such  works  as  Fairbank,  J.  K.,  The  United  States  and  China; 
Reischauer,  E.  O.,  Japan's  Vast  and  Present;  Michael  and  Taylor,  A  His- 
tory of  the  Far  East  in  Modern  Times;  M.  C.  Yang,  Chinese  Village; 
Tsao,  Dream  of  the  Red  Chamber;  Snow,  Red  Star  Over  China. 

I  Iistory  7.  Introduction  to  South  Asia.  Two  hours.  Open  to  Upper 
Middlers  and  Seniors.  The  purpose  of  the  course  is  to  introduce  American 
students  to  Asia,  through  study  and  critical  examination  of  the  histories 
of  India  and  Pakistan.  The  approach  is  essentially  historical,  but  con- 
siderable emphasis  is  placed  upon  the  area's  anthropology,  philosophy,  re- 
ligion, literature  and  art.  Topics  covered  include  India  and  Pakistan: 
Setting  and  Early  Culture,  Thought  and  Religion  Prior  to  the  Coming  of 
Islam,  the  Nature  of  Indian  Society,  Patterns  of  Pre-Mughal  History,  Thf 
Mughal  Empire,  The  British  in  India,  Modern  India  and  Pakistan. 

The  course  consists  of  readings,  lectures,  audio-visual  materials,  map 
exercises  and  work  projects.  Textual  and  supplementary  readings  an 
taken  from  such  works  as  Spear,  P.,  India:  A  Modern  History;  Brown. 
W.  N.,  The  United  States  and  India  and  Pakistan;  Nehru,  J.,  The  Dis 
covery  of  India;  Forster,  E.  M.,  A  Passage  to  India;  deBary,  W.  T.,  et  al 
Sources  of  the  Indian  Tradition;  Markandaya,  K.,  Nectar  in  a  Sieve. 

History  6-7.  Introduction  to  Asian  Civilizations.  Four  hours.  His 
tory  6  and  History  7  may  be  combined  to  form  a  major  course. 

MATHEMATICS 

The  courses  in  mathematics  have  two  purposes.  The  first  is  to  give  th 
student  at  each  level  an  appreciation  of  the  mathematical  structure  am 
thus  of  the  essential  aesthetic  quality  of  the  mathematical  field  in  whic! 
he  is  working.  The  second  but  equally  important  purpose  is  to  assure  a  bo 
a  command  of  the  appropriate  technical  skills  without  which  he  cannot  g 
on  in  higher  courses  in  school  or  college.  Each  year  constant  and  consisten 
problem  work  helps  to  make  concrete  the  abstract  ideas  of  mathematic: 
Each  year  an  attempt  is  made  to  give  the  student  an  idea  of  the  way  i 
which  mathematical  ideas  grow  repeated  abstraction  and  generalizatio 
from  the  physical  phenomena  with  which  he  is  familiar. 

Thus  the  study  of  algebra  begins  with  the  properties  of  the  natur; 
numbers  of  arithmetic  and  progresses  to  the  study  of  the  integers,  tr 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES 


65 


rational  numbers,  the  irrational  numbers  and  an  introduction  to  the  real 
and  complex  numbers.  An  introduction  to  the  concept  of  proof  in  simple 
algebraic  and  geometric  situations  is  made  early  in  the  first  two  years. 
Later  these  ideas  are  sharpened  and  extended  in  both  fields.  A  basic  con- 
cern with  relations  and  functions  of  numbers  paves  the  way  for  a  system- 
atic study  in  the  last  two  years  of  a  variety  of  continuous  and  discrete 
functions. 

Besides  its  regular  sequence  of  courses  the  Department  provides  ac- 
celerated and  advanced  courses  for  those  boys  able  and  willing  to  move 
faster  than  normal. 

Mathematics  1.  First  Year  Algebra.  Five  hours.  The  course  pro- 
vides an  intensive  study  of  the  procedures  of  elementary  algebra  through 
the  solution  of  quadratic  equations.  Texts:  Johnson,  Lendsey  and  Slesnick's 
Algebra  ( Addison- Wesley ) . 

Mathematics  1A.  Five  hours.  A  course  for  boys  who  have  had 
approximately  a  half  year  of  algebra  in  the  eighth  grade.  At  the  end  of 
the  fall  term,  qualified  boys  are  invited  into  the  newly  formed  sections  of 
Mathematics  IX.  Texts  are  the  same  as  those  in  Mathematics  1. 

Mathematics  IX.  Five  hours.  A  course  for  very  able  students  who 
wish  to  begin  an  accelerated  program  in  mathematics.  It  is  formed  at  the 
end  of  the  fall  term  of  boys  in  Mathematics  1A.  If  followed  by  Mathe- 
matics 2X,  it  enable  a  student  to  enter  Mathematics  4  in  his  third  year. 
A  major  portion  of  geometry  will  be  covered.  Texts  are  the  same  as  those 
in  Mathematics  1  and  2. 

Mathematics  2  Special.  Five  hours.  A  course  designed  for  Juniors 
and  those  entering  Lower  Middlers  who  have  had  a  full  year  of  algebra  but 
have  not  covered  well  enough  such  topics  as  inequalities,  the  postulates 
and  elementary  structure  of  algebra,  number  systems,  etc.,  to  be  fully 
ready  for  Mathematics  2.  After  special  review  in  such  phases  of  algebra, 
the  course  undertakes  the  regular  work  of  Mathematics  2,  completing  it 
by  the  end  of  the  year.  Texts  used  will  be  the  same  as  those  in  Mathematics 
1  and  2. 

Mathematics  2.  Geometry.  Four  hours.  This  course  covers  a  pro- 
gram of  plane  geometry  using  both  synthetic  and  analytic  methods.  Dur- 
ing the  work  with  plane  geometry,  the  natural  extensions  to  solid  geom- 
etry are  made.  At  the  end  of  the  year  the  student  will  have  a  knowledge 
of  methods  of  proof  and  of  geometrical  facts  and  concepts  in  both  two 
and  three  dimensions.  Text:  Moise,  Down's  Geometry  (Addison-Wesley) . 

Mathematics  2XA.  Five  hours.  The  prerequisite  for  the  course  is 
Mathematics  IX.  Work  in  geometry  is  continued  and  that  of  Mathematics 
3  is  undertaken.  Students  who  finish  the  course  satisfactorily  are  in  gen- 
eral required  to  take  one  more  year  of  mathematics  (usually  Mathematics 
4,  in  rare  cases  Mathematics  4C)  to  fulfill  the  school's  diploma  require- 
ment. Texts  used  are  those  of  Mathematics  2  and  3. 


66 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


MATHEMATICS  2XB.  Five  hours.  An  accelerated  course  enabling  a  boy 
i  .u  ting  in  Mathematics  1  to  have  an  opportunity  to  take  the  calculus 
without  sacrificing  the  work  in  Probability  and  Linear  Algebra  of  Mathe- 
matics 4.  With  Mathematics  4X  it  provides  a  sequence  that  by  the  end 
of  the  Upper  Middle  Year  completes  Mathematics  2,  3,  and  4.  Mathe- 
matics 2XB  is  also  open  to  selected  students  entering  the  school  as  Lower 
Middlers.  Students  who  successfully  complete  both  Mathematics  2XB 
and  Mathematics  4X  are  prepared  to  take  Mathematics  5  or  some  other 
elective  in  their  Senior  Year.  The  texts  are  those  of  Mathematics  2  and  3. 

Mathematics  3.  Five  hours.  Algebraic  analysis  and  elementary  trigo- 
nometry. The  course  continues  the  work  in  the  algebra  of  real  numbers 
begun  in  Mathematics  1.  It  extends  and  develops  the  ideas  of  mathe- 
matical structure  and  methods  of  proof  met  in  Mathematics  2.  It  empha- 
sizes the  study  of  the  elementary  functions:  algebraic,  exponential,  loga- 
rithmic and  trigonometric.  It  also  covers  the  elements  of  analytic  trigo- 
nometry. Texts:  Notes  on  Fields  and  Functions  (Phillips  Academy); 
Fisher  &  Ziebur's  Integrated  Algebra  and  Trigonometry  (Prentice-Hall). 

Mathematics  3G.  Five  hours.  A  course  in  geometry  for  entering 
students  who  have  had  two  years  of  algebra.  The  course  strengthens  the 
student's  background  in  algebraic  analysis  and  in  trigonometry  to  cor- 
respond to  the  work  done  in  Mathematics  3.  The  texts  are  those  of 

Mathematics  2  and  3. 

Mathematics  4.  Five  hours.  The  regular  senior  course  in  Mathemat- 
ics. It  will  consist  of  work  in  elementary  probability  and  statistics,  linear 
algebra,  and  limits  of  simple  series  and  sequences.  Besides  opening  up 
fields  of  mathematics  increasingly  important  for  industrialists  and  so- 
cial scientists,  the  course  will  increase  a  boy's  mathematical  maturity 
.ind  will  lay  a  strong  foundation  for  study  of  the  calculus  in  college  or  in 
Mathematics  5.  Entering  students  who  have  not  had  trigonometry  will 
be  placed  in  a  special  section.  Texts:  Mosteller,  Rourke  and  Thomas'  Prob- 
ability (Addison-Wesley) ;  Murdock's  Analytic  Geometry  (John  Wiley 
&  Sons). 

Mathematics  4C.  Five  hours.  A  course  in  analytic  geometry  and 
the  calculus  open  to  selected  students  who  have  finished  Mathematics 
3  or  3G  and  for  whom  an  early  start  in  calculus  is  justified  by  their 
need  for  it  in  their  study  of  physics  and  chemistry.  The  course  will  move 
somewhat  more  slowly  than  Mathematics  5  because  of  the  lower  mathe- 
matical background  of  its  students,  but  by  the  end  of  the  year,  most  of 
the  boys  should  be  ready  for  the  Advanced  Placement  Examination  in 
the  Calculus.  Text:  Protter,  Morrey's  Calculus  and  Analytic  Geometry 
(Addison-Wesley). 

Mathematics  4X.  For  details  of  the  course  see  the  description  of 
Mathematics  2XB  above.  Completion  of  Mathematics  4X  meets  the  college 
requirements  for  four  units  of  mathematics. 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES 


67 


Mathematics  5.  Calculus  With  Analytic  Geometry.  Four  hours, 
he  course  corresponds  to  the  introductory  course  in  calculus  given  in 
any  colleges  and  universities.  It  is  open  to  those  who  have  completed 
ie  regular  four-unit  sequence  in  secondary  school  mathematics.  Com- 
etion  of  the  course  offers  a  student  the  opportunity  to  qualify  for 
Ivanced  placement  in  college  mathematics.  Text:  Moise's  Calculus,  Part  I 
\ddison- Wesley) . 

Mathematics  6.  Advanced  Mathematics.  Four  hours.  A  course  de- 
nned to  meet  the  needs  of  students  who  have  completed  a  course  in 
alytic  geometry  and  calculus  and  who  have  demonstrated  a  strong  in- 
rest  in  the  further  study  of  mathematics.  The  course  aims  at  exploring 
w  ideas,  fundamentally  unanticipated  in  lower  courses,  while  keeping 
<i  ideas  alive  as  much  as  possible  through  maximum  use  of  the  calculus 
d  of  function  ideas.  The  course  is  augmented  by  frequent  use  of  the 
mputer.  Text:  Kemeny,  Mirkil,  Snell  and  Thompson,  Finite  Mat  he- 
ctical Structures  (Prentice-Hall,  1959). 

Mathematics  L.  An  Introduction  to  Modern  Algebra.  Two 
I  urs.  An  elective  course  open  to  Seniors  who  have  finished  at  least  three 
;  irs  of  mathematics.  It  may  be  taken  simultaneously  with  either  Mathe- 

itics  4,  4C  or  5,  since  it  does  not  duplicate,  but  supplements,  the  work 
<  ne  in  those  courses.  The  purpose  of  the  course  is  to  provide  an  introduc- 
1  n  to  systematic  development  of  algebraic  structures  that  include  groups, 
Jigs,  fields,  and  vector  spaces;  and  to  study  those  topics  most  useful  in 
i;  applications  of  Modern  Algebra  to  other  branches  of  mathematics, 
'xt:  McCoy's  Introduction  to  Modern  Algebra  (Allyn  and  Bacon). 

Mathematics  C.  Programming  and  Use  of  a  Computer.  Two 
lurs.  An  introduction  to  the  use  of  computers  in  mathematics,  science, 
tgineering,  medicine,  business,  and  other  fields.  A  study  of  what  the 
i  mputer  can  and  cannot  do.  The  course  is  both  theoretical  and  practical. 
jOgrams  written  by  the  student  may  be  tried  on  a  large-scale  computer 
nilable  at  all  times  through  a  teletype  machine  located  in  the  classroom. 

ie  course  will  also  consider  elementary  machine  language  and  simple 
mpiling  languages. 

MECHANICAL  DRAWING 

Two  hours.  A  technical  drawing  course,  which  includes  the  use  of 
awing  instruments  and  the  study  of  geometric  constructions,  ortho- 
iphic  projection,  descriptive  geometry,  spacial  relations,  isometric  and 
ique  pictorial  projections,  developments,  assembly  and  detail  engineer- 
;  drawings.  Special  stress  is  placed  on  a  thorough  mastery  of  funda- 
ntal  concepts  and  skills.  Students  of  special  ability  are  given  an  oppor- 
lity  to  do  more  advanced  work  in  a  related  field  of  their  choice.  The 
is  French  and  Vierck's  Graphc  Science,  supplemented  by  motion 
tures. 


68 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


MODERN  FOREIGN  LANGUAGES 

All  foreign  languages  offered  by  Phillips  Academy  are  acceptable  for 
admission  to  college.  For  graduate  study,  and  particularly  for  the  Ph.D. 
degree,  French  and  German  are  frequently  required. 

Chinese 

Chinese  1.  Four  hours.  Open  to  Upper  Middlers  who  will  be  expected 
to  continue  with  Chinese  2  in  the  Senior  year.  The  course,  using  essen- 
tially the  Yale  method  of  instruction,  puts  emphasis  upon  both  the  oral 
and  the  written  language. 

Chinese  2.  Four  hours.  Open  to  Seniors  who  have  sucessfully  complet- 
ed Chinese  1.  Chinese  2  works  toward  increased  mastery  of  the  written 
and  oral  language  in  preparation  for  advanced  work  at  the  college  level. 

French 

The  French  Department  offers  a  six-year  course  of  study.  The  first 
four  are  devoted  to  teaching  the  students  to  understand  and  to  speak  the 
language  as  well  as  to  read  and  write  it.  The  methods  employed  parallel 
as  closely  as  possible  the  natural  order  of  language  learning:  hear  it  first, 
then  say  what  you  have  heard,  next  read  and,  finally,  write.  Pronuncia- 
tion, articulation,  rhythm  and  fluency  receive  constant  emphasis  through- 
out each  year.  At  no  time  does  the  Department  teach  the  art  of  translation, 
French  is  used  exclusively  in  the  classroom,  at  all  times  and  under  all 
circumstances,  and  from  the  very  first  day.  In  the  fifth  year,  students  take 
a  Freshman-level  course,  a  survey  of  French  literature  and  the  study  of 
key  writings  from  French  classical  authors,  in  preparation  for  th( 
Advanced  Placement  examination. 

Students  who  demonstrate  unusual  aptitude  for  and  interest  in  th< 
language  during  their  first  term  of  study  are  invited  to  enter  special  "X' 
sections  which  move  ahead  more  rapidly  without  demanding  more  time 
Those  who  successfully  complete  this  accelerated  course  of  study  re 
ceive  four  units  of  credit  after  three  years  of  study.  There  is  also  a  specia 
fourth-year  class  for  gifted  students  which  prepares  for  Advanced  Place 
ment.  Thus  certain  students  are  able  to  do  college-level  work  after  onl; 
three,  and  sometimes  only  two,  years  of  study. 

French  1.  Seven  hours.  For  the  first  half  year,  the  course  has  no  book 
Then,  Robin  &  Bergeaud,  Le  Fran  fats  par  la  methode  directe  is  usee 
Classes,  limited  to  15,  meet  seven  times  a  week,  with  two  different  in 
structors,  and  are  expected  to  spend  two  hours  a  week  working  wit 
records  and  tapes.  The  goal  is  to  develop  listening  comprehension  and  tr. 
basic  patterns  of  French  speech.  The  method  is  the  adaptation  of  FLE 
techniques  to  older  students. 

French  1-2.  Five  hours.  For  new  boys  who  do  not  qualify  fc 
French  2,  yet  who  have  too  much  French  to  start  again  at  the  beginning 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES  69 

U  the  end  of  the  first  term,  those  who  find  the  pace  too  swift  drop  back 
o  French  1A.  Those  who  successfully  complete  the  course  enter  French 
.  the  following  year.  Texts:  Mauger,  Cours  de  langue  et  de  civilisation 
rancaises,  Book  I,  and  the  Anthologie,  a  collection  of  French  stories,  both 
>ast  and  contemporary,  which  has  been  compiled  by  the  members  of  the 
)epartment. 

French  1-2  S.  Six  hours.  Restricted  to  Seniors  who  have  not  previously 
tudied  the  language.  The  course  covers  the  work  of  the  first  two  years  of 
he  normal  sequence. 

French  1A.  Five  hours.  For  new  boys  whose  knowledge  of  French 
5  too  slight  to  qualify  for  admission  to  French  1-2,  yet  who  have  had  too 
nuch  to  start  over  again.  The  course  emphasizes  development  of  the 
ural-oral  skills  and  prepares  for  French  2 A  the  next  year. 

French  2.  Five  hours.  While  continuing  to  develop  the  audio-lingual 
kills,  the  aim  in  the  second  year  is  to  teach  reading,  to  develop  the  ability 
o  understand  non-technical  French  prose  without  recourse  to  translation, 
iesides  the  X  sections  for  the  most  able,  there  are  regular  sections  for 
hose  who  have  begun  their  French  at  Andover;  "A"  sections  for  those 
fho  come  from  other  schools  and  have  been  taught  by  audio-lingual 
echniques,  and  also  for  those  who  have  completed  French  1A;  and 
B"  sections  for  new  students  who  have  had  enough  French  to  qualify  for 

second-year  course,  but  who  have  been  taught  by  grammatical-transla- 
ion  methods.  Texts:  Couture,  Le  Francais  Vivant,  Book  II;  Anthologie. 

French  3.  Four  hours.  Continuing  to  develop  the  three  skills  of 
stening  comprehension,  speaking  and  reading,  the  third-year  course  also 
rresses  writing  and  the  beginnings  of  reading  for  critical  analysis.  Texts: 
angellier,  Precis  de  Grammaire;  Pagnol,  Topaze;  Aveline,  La  Double- 
iort  de  Frederic  Belot;  Gide,  La  Symphonie  pastorale. 

French  4.  Four  hours.  Primarily  a  course  in  language,  French  4  intro- 
uces  the  student,  through  readings  in  Book  IV  of  Mauger  and  complete 
ditions  of  standard  French  authors,  to  contemporary  French  culture  as 
fell  as  to  its  literature  from  La  Chanson  de  Roland  to  Sartre. 

French  5.  Five  hours.  The  course  prepares  for  Advanced  Placement, 
here  are  two-hour  minor  courses  in  French  for  those  whose  study  pro- 
rams  do  not  permit  a  major  course:  French  3 -Minor  for  those  with  two 
nits  of  credit;  French  4-Minor  for  those  with  three;  and  French  5- 
■Iinor  for  those  with  four.  There  is  also  a  seminar  course,  both  four-  and 
wo-hours,  French  6,  for  those  who  have  successfully  completed  the 
advanced  Placement  courses  (French  4H  or  5 -Major) .  Those  who  are  in  it 
rrange  a  special  tutorial  program  with  a  member  of  the  Department. 

Senior  French  Project.  Seniors  taking  an  advanced  French  course 
lay  do  apprentice  teaching  during  either  the  Winter  or  Spring  term.  They 
tudy  the  techniques  and  methods  of  modern  language  instruction;  and 
ractice,  under  careful  supervision,  in  beginners'  classes. 


70 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


German 

The  German  Department  offers  a  five-year  course  with  the  purpose  o: 
developing  the  ability  to  understand  spoken  German,  facility  in  speaking 
reading  fluency,  the  ability  to  write  German  correctly.  The  more  advancet 
courses  also  give  an  introduction  to  German  literature  since  the  eighteentl 

century. 

From  the  first  meeting,  all  classes  are  conducted  in  German.  English  i 
never  used  as  the  classroom  language. 

The  Department  offers  an  accelerated  course  for  students  who  sho\ 
unusual  ability  in  German  1.  After  completion  of  German  2X,  thes 
students  enter  German  4  and  receive  four  units  of  credit  after  three  year 
of  study. 

German  1.  Five  hours.  The  beginning  course  seeks  to  develop  aun 
comprehension  and  oral  expression.  The  basic  patterns  of  the  languag 
are  practiced  by  repetition  and   variation.   Texts:  Schulz-Griesbacl 

Deutsche  Sprachlehre  fiir  Auslander  {Grundstufe,  Erster  Teil) ;  Schuh 
Griesbach,  Leseheft  fiir  Auslander. 

German  1-2.  Six  hours.  The  course  is  designed  for  qualified  Senio] 
and  Upper  Middlers  who  wish  to  complete  in  one  year  the  material  coverc 
in  German  1  and  2.  It  follows  approximately  the  outline  of  those  t\* 

courses. 

German  2.  Five  hours.  The  systematic  study  of  basic  patterns 
continued  with  Schulz-Griesbach,  Deutsche  Sprachlehre  fiir  Ausldnd 
(Gmndstufe,  Zweiter  Teil).  Both  close  and  comprehensive  reading  < 
modern  German  prose  is  practiced  extensively.  Elementary  writing 
introduced  at  this  level,  mostly  in  the  form  of  summaries  of  the  readii 
material.  Some  of  the  books  read  include  Kessler,  Kurze  Geschichte 
House  and  Malthaner,  Helles  und  Dunkles;  Schnitzler,  Der  blim 
Geronimo;  Durrenmatt,  Der  Kichter  und  sein  Henker. 

German  2X.  Five  hours.  An  accelerated  course  for  qualified  st 
dents,  covering  material  of  both  German  2  and  German  3.  Successf 
completion  enables  a  student  to  enter  German  4,  but  gives  only  the  sar 

unit  credit  as  German  2. 

German  3.  Four  hours.  Throughout  the  year  grammar  and  writing 
reviewed  in  Lederer-Neuse,  Kleines  Aufsatzbuch.  Some  of  the  books  re 
include  Fleissner  &  Fleissner,  Deutsche  Liter aturlesebuch;  Aichinger,  I 
Gefesselte  ttnd  andere  Kurzgeschichten;  Zuckmayer,  Das  Kalte  Lici 
Emphasis  is  placed  on  reading,  comprehension,  vocabulary  building,  a 
written  work. 

German  4.  Five  hours.  Introduction  to  German  Literature.  Throu 
detailed  stylistic  analysis  of  a  number  of  outstanding  works,  the  studei 
gain  an  acquaintance  with  some  of  the  major  authors  and  most  signifies 
trends  in  German  literature  since  1750.  The  works  read  include  Lessij 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES 


71 


Nathan  de  Weise;  Goethe,  Werther,  Urfaust  and  Iphigenie;  Schiller, 
Maria  Stuart;  Eichendorff,  Aus  dem  Leben  eines  Taugenichts;  Heine, 
Ausgewahlte  Gedichte;  Keller,  Kleider  Machen  Leute;  Rilke,  Ausgewahlte 
Gedichte;  Mann,  Tonio  Kroger;  Kafka,  Das  Urteil  and  Vor  dem  Gesetz. 
Qualified  students  take  the  Advanced  Placement  Examination  at  the  end 
of  the  course. 

German  4M.  Two  hours.  For  Seniors  who  wish  to  continue  German  as 
a  minor  subject.  Contents  vary  according  to  the  needs  of  the  students. 

German  5.  Four  hours.  Contents  vary  according  to  the  needs  and 
interests  of  the  students.  Probable  texts:  Steinhauer,  Deutsche  Kultur; 
Neuse,  Deutscher  Sprachgebrauch. 

Russian 

The  courses  in  Russian  develop  skill  in  speaking,  aural  comprehension, 
reading,  and  writing.  The  structure  of  the  language  is  explained  system- 
atically. 

Russian  1.  Five  hours.  An  elementary  course  in  speaking,  reading,  and 
writing  Russian.  Texts:  von  Gronicka,  Essentials  of  Russian,  Fourth  edi- 
tion (Prentice-Hall) ;  Dawson,  et  al,  Modern  Russian  I  (Harcourt) ; 
Graded  Russian  Readers  (Heath).  Coordinated  drill  with  tapes  in  the 
language  laboratory.  Open  to  Juniors,  Lower  Middlers,  and  Upper  Mid- 
dlers. 

Russian  1-2.  Six  hours.  An  accelerated  elementary  course,  presenting 
the  principal  features  of  Russian  in  one  year,  with  intensive  practice  in 
speaking,  reading,  and  writing.  Texts:  von  Gronicka,  Essentials  of  Rus- 
sian, Fourth  edition  (Prentice-Hall);  Graded  Russian  Readers  (Heath). 
Coordinated  drill  in  the  language  laboratory.  Open  to  Seniors  and,  with 
the  approval  of  Class  Officers,  to  Upper  Middlers  with  a  satisfactory  record 
in  another  foreign  language. 

Russian  2.  Five  hours.  Completion  of  the  elementary  course,  with  con- 
tinued emphasis  on  active  use.  Texts:  von  Gronicka,  Essentials  of  Russian, 
Fourth  edition  (Prentice-Hall) ;  Dawson,  et  al,  Modern  Russian  II  (Har- 
court) ;  Katzner,  A  Russian  Review  Text  (Random  House) ;  Graded  Rus- 
sian Readers  (Heath). 

Russian  3.  Four  hours.  Reading,  conversation,  and  writing,  based  on  a 
variety  of  authors.  The  texts  include:  ALM  Russian,  Level  Four  (Har- 
court) ;  Ballad  of  a  Soldier  (Harcourt) ;  Katzner,  A  Russian  Review  Text 
(Random  House) ;  and  selected  literary  editions. 

Russian  4.  Four  hours.  Advanced  reading,  conversation,  and  composi- 
tion. The  texts  include  Turkevich,  Masterpieces  of  Russian  Literature 
(Van  Nostrand). 

Russian  4M.  Two  hours.  For  Seniors  who  have  completed  Russian  3. 
Contents  vary  according  to  the  needs  of  the  students. 


72 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Spanish 

The  Department  of  Spanish  offers  a  regular  sequence,  normally  of  four 
years,  but  able  students,  by  accelerating,  may  take  five  courses.  The  aim  is 
to  teach  students  to  understand  the  language  and  to  speak  it  fluently. 
Spanish  is  used  constantly  in  the  classroom.  The  students  are  also  taught 
to  read  and  write  the  language  with  ease,  and  are  given  a  comprehensive 
introduction  to  the  literature  of  Spain  and  South  America. 

Spanish  1.  Five  hours.  In  keeping  with  the  new  audio- lingual  ap- 
proach, this  course  stresses  understanding  and  speaking  the  Spanish  I 
language,  with  a  minimum  of  English  used  in  the  classroom.  The  Holt 
series,  beginning  with  Entender  y  Hablar,  by  LaGrone,  McHenry  and 
O'Connor,  provides  the  basic  texts.  They  are  supplemented  by  language 
laboratory  practice  and  other  audio-visual  materials.  Reading  and  writing 
are  introduced  after  the  student  has  acquired  considerable  oral  fluency. 

Spanish  1-2.  Six  hours.  Designed  for  qualified  seniors  who  wish  to 
complete  in  one  year  the  material  covered  in  Spanish  1  and  2.  Texts: 
Entender  y  Hablar  and  Hablar  y  Leer,  both  by  LaGrone,  McHenry  and 
O'Connor  (Holt,  Rinehart  and  Winston),  and  El  Gesticulador  by  Usigli 
( Appleton-Century-Crofts) . 

Spanish  2.  Five  hours.  A  continuation  course  that  emphasizes  speak- 
ing, reading,  simple  theme  writing  and  vocabulary  building,  including  the 
use  of  synonyms  and  antonyms.  Oral  fluency  is  stressed,  in  accordance 
with  the  principles  of  the  audio-lingual  method.  The  basic  text  is  the 
second  book  of  the  Holt  Series,  Hablar  y  Leer,  by  LaGrone,  McHenry  andi 
O'Connor.  Ample  language  laboratory  practice  and  audio-visual  materials 
reinforce  classroom  procedures. 

Spanish  2X.  Five  hours.  Open  to  students  who  have  completed  Spanish 
1  with  honors.  It  covers  the  equivalent  of  the  material  of  Spanish  2  and 
Spanish  3.  Successful  completion  enables  a  student  to  enter  Spanish  4  but 
gives  only  the  same  unit  credit  as  Spanish  2.  Texts,  supplemented  by  addi- 
tional reading,  include:  Espana  y  su  Civilization,  by  Ugarte  (Odyssey) : 
Pensativa,  by  Goytortua  (Appleton-Century-Crofts) ;  and  El  Sombrerc 
de  tres  picos,  by  Alarcon  (Macmillan). 

Spanish  3.  Four  hours.  An  advanced  course,  which  continues  to  de- 
velop oral  and  aural  skills  as  well  as  facility  in  written  composition.  Text: 
(supplemented  by  additional  reading)  Grama tic  a  Espanola  de  Repaso,  b) 
Ugarte  (Odyssey) ;  Pensativa,  by  Goytortua  (Appleton-Century-Crofts) 
Sombrero  de  Tres  Picos,  by  Alarcon  (Macmillan);  and  Leer,  Hablar  ; 
Escribir,  by  Keese,  LaGrone  and  O'Connor  (Holt,  Rinehart  and  Winston) 

Spanish  4.  Four  hours.  The  course  aims  to  develop  an  appreciatioi 
of  Spanish  culture  through  the  centuries  in  the  entire  Hispanic  world 
It  presupposes  a  rather  extensive  knowledge  of  grammar  and  vocabular 
and  a  fairly  fluent  conversational  ability.  Constant  use  of  the  Spanisl 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES 


75 


language  in  the  classroom  discussions  and  written  assignments  is  required. 
Frequent  reference  is  made  to  all  available  types  of  illustrative  material 
or  "realia."  The  basic  texts  are  Poesta  Espanola,  by  Marin  (Las  Americas 
Publishing  Company) ;  Dona  Per  fee  la,  by  Galdos  (The  Laurel  Language 
Library) ;  and  La  Barraea,  by  Blasco  Ibanez  (Macmillan)'.  Novels,  plays 
and  essays  found  in  such  collections  as  Biblioteea  Cldsiea  Ebro  and  Cldsicas 
Castellanas  will  also  be  read. 

Spanish  5.  Five  hours.  A  course  for  students  who  have  had  four  years 
of  Spanish  or  its  equivalent.  The  course,  conducted  entirely  in  Spanish, 
concentrates  upon  various  periods  and  genres  of  Spanish  and  Spanish 
American  Literature,  such  as  Las  novelas  ejemplar es,  by  Cervantes,  the 
Golden  Age  Drama,  the  Novel,  Contemporary  Drama,  etc.  Outside  read- 
ing and  written  and  oral  reports  are  required.  Texts  include  Poesta  Espan- 
ola, by  Marin  (Las  Americas  Publishing  Company) ;  Plays  by  Calderon, 
Lope  de  Vega,  Tirso  de  Molina;  La  familia  de  Pascual  Duarte,  by  Camilo 
Jose  Cela,  edited  by  Boudreau  and  Kronit  (Appleton-Century-Crofts) . 

Spanish  4M.  Two  hours.  A  minor  course  open  chiefly  to  Seniors  who 
have  had  three  years  of  Spanish.  It  is  designed  to  keep  them  in  contact 
with  the  language  before  they  continue  its  study  in  college,  and  is  con- 
ducted entirely  in  Spanish.  The  basic  texts  are  Del  solar  hispanico,  by 
del  Rio  (Dryden) ;  and  Los  de  Abajo,  by  Azuela  (Fondo  de  Cultura 
Economica) . 

MUSIC 

The  aims  of  the  Music  Department  are  to  provide  every  student  with 
a  valuable  experience  in  music  and  to  give  him  an  understanding  of  the 
art.  Its  aims  are  achieved  by  the  study  of  theory  and  by  active  participa- 
tion in  music  making:  individual  lessons,  recitals,  group  rehearsals,  formal 
and  informal  concerts,  and  one  operetta  or  musical  comedy  presented 
each  year. 

Beginning  Instruments  (Not  for  credit).  Students  who  wish  to 
learn  to  play  a  band  or  orchestral  instrument  may  take  private  lessons 
without  academic  credit.  They  cost  the  same  as  the  lessons  given  for 
credit.  A  student  may  borrow  a  school  instrument  at  no  cost  to  the 
student,  if  one  is  available;  or  he  may  rent  one,  for  a  nominal  fee,  from 
a  recommended  music  company. 

Chorus,  Concert  Band,  Orchestra.  Each  of  these  is  a  minor  course 
not  requiring  outside  preparation  but  counting  for  two  hours  of  aca- 
demic credit.  Each  course  meets  four  periods  a  week:  two  afternoons  at 
4:13  and  two  evenings  between  6:45  and  7:3  5.  Upper  Middlers  may  take 
any  one  of  these  courses  in  fulfillment  of  the  diploma  requirements  in 
Music  or  Art.  Volunteers,  not  enrolled  in  the  courses  for  credit,  may  join 
the  sessions  of  such  courses  as  an  extracurricular  activity. 


74  PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 

Introduction  to  Music.  Two  hours.  The  purpose  of  the  course  u 
to  help  students  gain  understanding  and  enjoyment  of  various  forms  oi 
music.  It  presents  aspects  of  the  development  of  musical  thought,  in- 
cluding examples  of  folk  music  and  the  music  of  the  baroque,  romantic 
classical,  and  modern  schools,  including  jazz.  The  subject  matter  is  illus- 
trated with  recordings  and  live  demonstrations.  Open  to  Upper  Middler; 
and  Seniors  only. 

Harmony.  Two  hours.  The  course  equips  the  student  with  a  knowl 
edge  of  basic  harmonic  structure,  and  enables  him  to  harmonize  a  melodic 
line  in  traditional  four-part  fashion.  An  ability  to  read  music  is  a  pre- 
requisite for  the  course.  Open  to  Seniors  only. 

Private  Instrumental  and  Vocal  Lessons.  Two  hours.  Weekl) 
instruction  in  keyboard,  orchestral,  and  band  instruments,  or  in  voice 
may  be  counted  as  a  two-hour  course.  One  half  hour  of  instruction  i 
to  be  supplemented  by  four  hours  of  practicing.  For  piano  and  organ  stu 
dents  there  is  a  separate  charge  of  $140  a  year  for  weekly  half-houi 
lessons,  and  $22  5  for  weekly  hour  lessons,  plus  a  nominal  fee  for  the  usi 
of  practice  pianos  and  organs.  The  charge  for  voice  lessons  is  $105  a  yeai 
for  weekly  half-hour  lessons.  Lessons  are  offered  on  all  band  and  orches 
tral  instruments  at  $105  a  year.  Active  members  of  the  Band  and  Or 
chestra  receive  instruction  at  a  reduced  rate.  It  is  sometimes  possible  t< 
make  arrangements  for  students  to  study  with  members  of  the  Bostoi 
Symphony  Orchestra.  Such  lessons  are  at  a  higher  fee  and  require  tha 
the  student  pay  transportation  costs  to  Boston. 

Music  Major.  Four  hours,  which  may  be  gained  by  the  combination 
of  any  two  music  courses,  except  that  the  Orchestra,  Chorus,  and  Con 
cert  Band  courses  may  not  be  so  combined. 

NAVIGATION 

Two  hours.  The  course  consists  of  a  term's  work  in  each  of  the  field 
of  piloting,  nautical  astronomy,  and  celestial  navigation.  Emphasis  i 
placed  on  the  practical  application  to  surface  navigation.  Considerabl 
plotting  and  tabular  work  is  done  in  determining  a  ship's  position  botl 
within  sight  of  land  and  on  the  open  sea.  During  the  latter  part  of  th 
year  the  opportunity  to  cruise  may  be  offered  to  members  of  the  class.  Th 
textbook  used  is  Dutton's  Navigation  and  Nautical  Astronomy,  supple 
merited  by  Navy  and  Coast  Guard  films. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Two  hours.  The  course  offers  a  study  of  the  central  problems  of  meta 
physics.  The  interdependence  of  metaphysical  views  and  ethical  an 
political  attitudes  is  stressed,  though  the  study  of  ethics  and  politics  : 
not  pursued  so  intensively  as  that  of  metaphysics.  Much  of  the  readin 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES 


75 


of  the  fall  term  is  in  Plato;  thereafter,  the  chief  text  is  Joad's  Guide  to 
Philosophy  and  Metaphysics.  During  the  latter  part  of  the  spring  term 
it  is  customary  to  study  all,  or  part,  of  a  book  by  a  recent  or  contempo- 
rary philosopher:  for  example,  Santayana,  Whitehead,  Langer.  The  final 
assignment  is  a  paper  requiring  the  student  to  attempt  a  synthesis  of  his 
views  on  some  of  the  chief  problems  explored  in  the  course,  throughout 
which  the  fundamentals  of  logic  are  strongly  emphasized. 

PHYSICS  (See  Science) 
POLITICS  OF  INTERNATIONAL  RELATIONS  (See  History) 

PUBLIC  SPEAKING 

Two  hours.  An  elective  course  for  Seniors  and  (occasionally)  for 
Upper  Middlers.  It  provides  training  in  voice  production,  articulation,  and 
speech  making.  Impromptu  and  prepared  speeches  help  the  student  to 
develop  poise,  fluency,  and  force.  Two  texts  are  used  for  reference: 
Turner's  Voice  and  Speech  in  the  Theatre  (Sir  Isaac  Pitman  &  Sons,  Ltd., 
London)  and  Sarret  and  Foster's  Basic  Principles  of  Speech  (Houghton 
Mifflin). 

RELIGION 

The  courses  in  Bible,  ethics  and  religion  are  intended  to  help  students 
gain  some  knowledge  and  understanding  of  the  Judaeo-Christian  heritage, 
and  to  develop  the  capacity  to  relate  religious  experience  and  insight  to 
the  problems  of  everyday  living.  Every  man  should  know  how  to  read 
the  Bible  and  be  familiar  with  its  history  and  contents.  Acquaintance  with 
the  basic  concepts  of  other  religions  adds  perspective  to  the  understand- 
ing of  one's  own  and  makes  one  aware  of  the  importance  of  beliefs,  atti- 
tudes, and  values. 

Bible.  Two  hours.  Required  of  all  members  of  the  Lower  Middle  class. 
The  course  traces  the  history  and  experience  of  the  people  of  the  Bible 
and  deals  with  the  basic  religious  ideas  of  our  tradition.  It  acquaints  stu- 
dents with  many  of  the  finest  passages  of  the  Old  and  New  Testaments, 
with  outstanding  personaltities  of  the  Bible,  and  with  many  of  the  indi- 
vidual books. 

Ethics.  Two  hours.  An  elective  course  for  Seniors  and  Upper  Middlers. 
The  course  introduces  the  students  to  something  of  the  variety  of  ethical 
theories,  examining  various  criteria  men  may  employ  in  making  decisions. 
The  course  examines  various  ethical  problems,  both  personal  and  social, 
through  reading  and  class  discussion. 

Senior  Religion.  Four  hours.  An  elective  course  for  Seniors.  It  in- 
cludes the  study  of  some  of  the  living  religions  of  the  world  and  the  study 
and  discussion  of  certain  basic  human  problems  and  of  various  attitudes 


76 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


toward  the  meaning  of  life  as  they  are  reflected  in  a  number  of  contempo- 
rary novels  and  plays.  Throughout  the  course  and  particularly  at  the  end 
of  the  year  the  universal  aspects  of  the  human  experience  and  various 
particular  expressions  or  explanations  of  it  are  related  to  the  Christian 
proclamation  both  traditional  and  contemporary. 


SCIENCE 


Beginning  with  Elementary  Science,  a  student  may  pursue  a  four- 
year  sequence  of  courses  in  science,  designed  to  provide  an  understanding 
of  science  and  of  scientific  methods  and  thinking  as  part  of  a  general 
education.  At  the  same  time,  they  give  a  sound  foundation  for  later  work 
in  college  should  the  student's  experience  indicate  the  desirability  of  such 
work.  Courses  designated  by  the  letter  X  are  more  difficult  than  the  regu- 
lar ones,  and  admission  is  granted  only  to  selected  students.  These  courses 
meet  for  one  additional  class  each  week  and  use  texts  of  the  college  fresh- 
man level.  They  thereby  prepare  in  one  year  for  the  advanced  placement 
examinations,  and  consequently  for  advanced  standing  in  college.  Science 
Honors  provides  a  two-year  integrated  course  for  those  capable  of  ad- 
vanced work,  in  both  physics  and  chemistry.  Able  students  who  have 
taken  the  regular  courses  before  their  Senior  year  may  also  prepare  for. 
the  advanced  placement  examinations  by  taking  the  minor  courses  indi- 
cated as  S  courses.  In  addition,  the  S  courses  provide  uninterrupted  prog- 
ress for  the  student  who  plans  further  study  in  a  particular  field. 

In  general,  students  are  encouraged  to  take  a  variety  of  courses  and 
to  acquire  a  broad  background  of  knowledge  in  the  different  sciences, 
rather  than  to  specialize  in  any  subject.  Hence  no  second-year-level  courses 
are  offered.  For  the  student  with  special  interests  in  any  one  area,  in- 
dividual projects  are  encouraged  to  the  extent  that  they  are  consistent 
with  safety,  the  equipment  available,  and  the  capacity  of  the  student. 

Elementary  Science.  Three  hours.  The  course  is  designed  to  form 
an  approach  to  the  laboratory  sciences  that  follow  in  the  later  years,  and 
to  acquaint  the  student  with  information  important  to  any  educated  per- 
son. It  is  based  on  a  study  of  the  earth,  considered  from  the  points  of 
view  of  the  geologist,  the  physicist,  the  chemist,  the  biologist,  and  the 
astronomer.  Laboratory  work  is  an  important  part  of  the  course.  The  text 
materials  are  those  developed  by  the  Earth  Science  Curriculum  Project. 

Anthropology.  Two  hours.  An  elective  offered  by  the  Robert  S 
Peabody  Foundation  for  Archaeology,  the  course  is  intended  to  present  s 
brief  consideration  of  the  prehistory  of  North  America.  It  is  composed  oi 
lectures  and  reading  on  a  variety  of  subjects  bearing  on  man's  life  in  tht 
New  World,  touching  on  geology,  climatic  change  and  attendant  change; 
in  flora  and  fauna,  methods  of  dating  the  past,  as  well  as  archaeology 
Some  discussion  and  reading  on  aboriginal  societies  brings  the  course  dowr 
to  the  beginning  of  written  history. 


DESCRIPTION  OF  COURSES 


77 


Basic  Concepts  of  Science.  Five  hours.  The  course  presents  an  inte- 
grated coverage  of  the  basic  concepts  of  physics,  chemistry,  and  biology 
that  are  an  essential  part  of  the  layman's  understanding  of  science  today. 
Basic  Concepts  of  Science  is  designed  for  the  student  who  plans  to  take 
only  one  laboratory  science  while  at  Phillips  Academy.  Open  to  Seniors 
and  Upper  Middlers  not  already  credited  with  a  laboratory  science. 

Biology 

Biology.  Four  hours.  The  course  stresses  the  unity  of  life — rather  than 
the  diversity — by  emphasizing  the  functions  common  to  all  living  things. 
It  covers,  in  plants,  animals,  and  microorganisms,  the  fundamental  prin- 
ciples of  metabolism  including  nutrition,  gas  exchange,  transport,  ex- 
cretion and  homeostasis;  responsiveness  and  coordination;  reproduction, 
genetics  and  development;  the  principles  and  history  of  evolution;  and  the 
principles  of  ecology. 

The  class  meets  four  times  a  week,  three  times  for  discussion  and  once 
for  a  laboratory  period.  The  laboratory  work  includes  training  in  the  use 
of  the  compound  and  stereoscopic  microscopes  and  other  laboratory  equip- 
ment. It  requires  careful  observation,  mastery  of  techniques,  and  accurate 
recording  of  results.  Several  laboratory  periods  are  set  aside  for  field  trips 
featuring  Ecology  and  Conservation,  and  for  work  on  individual  projects. 

Biology  S.  Two  hours.  Open  to  Seniors  who  have  completed  the 
standard  course  with  high  grades.  In  addition  to  a  review  of  basic  biology, 
new  material  will  be  presented  as  the  course  progresses.  The  combination 
of  review  and  new  work  prepares  students  for  the  Advanced  Placement 
Examination  of  the  College  Entrance  Examination  Board. 

Chemistry 

Chemistry.  Four  hours.  A  college  preparatory  course  that  includes  the 
systematic  study  of  matter  and  of  the  changes  that  it  undergoes.  Empha- 
sis is  placed  on  the  reasoning  involved  in  logical  use  of  modern  theory 
and  general  concepts  rather  than  upon  memorization  of  facts.  The  class 
meets  three  times  weekly  for  lectures,  demonstrations,  or  discussion,  and 
once  for  a  double  period  of  laboratory  work.  Text:  Chemistry,  An  Experi- 
mental Science,  prepared  by  the  Chemical  Education  Material  Study. 

Chemistry  X.  Five  hours.  The  course  is  open  to  a  limited  number  of 
able  students  who  have  strong  scholastic  records  in  mathematics  and 
physics.  It  is  essentially  the  equivalent  of  a  first-year  college  course,  and 
prepares  students  for  the  Advanced  Placement  Examination. 

Chemistry  S.  Two  hours.  One  period  a  week  is  for  recitation  and 
discussion  of  review  and  advanced  topics;  the  other  is  a  double  period 
for  laboratory  work.  The  course  is  for  students  who  have  completed  a 
regular  course  with  good  grades.  The  abler  students  are  prepared  to  take 
the  Advanced  Placement  Examination.  The  text  is  Chemistry,  A  Con- 
ceptual Approach,  by  C.  E.  Mortimer. 


78 


TH1LLIPS  ACADEMY 


Physics 

Physics.  Four  hours.  The  course  completes  the  requirements  for  en- 
trance to  college  and  prepares  the  student  for  further  work  in  this  or  in 
related  fields.  By  means  of  lectures,  recitations,  experimental  demonstra- 
tions, and  the  solution  of  numerical  problems,  the  student  is  taught  not 
only  the  fundamental  principles  of  physics,  but  also  the  elements  of 
scientific  method.  Reference  is  made  where  possible  to  the  implications 
and  effect  on  current  thought  of  recent  advances.  The  laboratory  experi- 
ments are  chosen  not  merely  to  afford  training  in  manipulative  techniques 
and  to  illustrate  portions  of  the  text  material,  but  also  to  exemplify  proper 
scientific  practice.  The  use  of  the  slide  rule  is  taught  and  required. 

Physics  X.  Five  hours.  An  honors  course  open,  upon  invitation  of  the 
department,  to  a  small  group  of  Seniors  who  are  concurrently  taking 
Mathematics  5  or  Mathematics  4C  and  who  have  not  previously  studied 
elementary  physics.  A  previous  course  in  chemistry,  though  not  required, 
is  advisable.  Lectures,  recitations,  and  laboratory  work  will  be  planned 
to  prepare  students  to  pass  the  Advanced  Placement  Examination  in 
Physics  of  the  College  Entrance  Examination  Board. 

Physics  S.  Two  hours.  Open  to  Seniors  who  have  completed  a  year 
of  physics,  and  who  have  taken,  or  will  take  concurrently,  a  course  in 
calculus.  The  course  reviews  the  essential  material  of  elementary  physics, 
but  at  the  greater  depth  and  with  the  sophistication  made  possible  by  the 
calculus.  The  course  includes  a  number  of  advanced  laboratory  experi- 
ments. Students  undertake  individual  study  or  laboratory  projects  in  the 
spring.  Physics  S  will  prepare  the  better  students  for  the  Advanced  Place- 
ment Examination  in  Physics. 

Honors  Sequence 

Science  Honors  1  and  2.  Five  hours  each  year.  A  two-year  sequence, 
open,  upon  invitation  of  the  instructor,  to  a  small  group  of  Upper  Mid- 
dlers  who  will  complete  a  year  of  analytic  geometry  and  the  calculus  be- 
fore graduation  and  who  show  promise  of  unusual  capacity  in  science  and 
mathematics.  The  subject  matter  includes  chemistry  and  physics,  both  of 
them  carried  well  beyond  the  elementary  level  in  text  and  laboratory 
work.  It  is  expected  that  the  ablest  students  in  the  sequence  will  be  pre- 
pared to  pass  both  the  physics  and  chemistry  Advanced  Placement  Exam- 
inations of  the  College  Entrance  Examination  Board. 

Science  Honors  1  fills  the  diploma  requirement  in  laboratory  science 
for  students  who  find  it  inadvisable  for  any  reason  to  continue  to  Science 
Honors  2. 


PRIZES 


Listed  below  are  prizes  open  for  competition  in  each  academic  year, 
nless  otherwise  stated,  awards  may  be  made  in  cash,  or  in  the  value  of 
ie  amounts  listed. 


Draper  Prizes.  For  declamation.  Open  to  members  of  English  3,  4,  and  5.  $25,  $20, 
d  $15.  First  awarded  1867.  Funded  1878  by  Warren  F.  Draper,  Class  of  1843.  No 
'ard  this  year. 

Means  Prizes.  For  declamation  of  original  essays.  Open  to  members  of  English  3, 
and  5.  $25,  $20,  and  $15.  First  awarded  1868.  Funded  1879  by  William  G.  Means, 
Andover.  Awarded  1967  to  (1)  Edward  Page  Atkinson,  (2)  Elwyn  Cornelius  Lee, 
)  John  Carlton  Spencer. 

Robinson  Prizes.  For  debating  between  a  team  of  the  Philomathean  Society  and  one 
iosen  from  the  rest  of  the  school,  or  between  two  teams  chosen  by  the  Philomathean 
ciety.  $75  to  the  winning  team.  First  awarded  1896.  Funded  1910  by  Henry  S.  Robin- 
n  of  Andover.  Awarded  1967  to  (1)  Randolph  Thomas  Lawrence,  (2)  Charles  Herbert 
yer,  (3)  Edward  Barry  Samuels. 

Schweppe  Prizes.    For  an  examination  on  a  literary  subject.  Open  to  Senior  and 
pper  Middle  Class.  $30  and  $20.  First  awarded  1912.  Sustained  since  1941  by  John  S. 
hweppe  in  memory  of  his  father,  Charles  M.  Schweppe,  Class  of  1898.  Awarded  1967 
(1)  Edward  Barry  Samuels,  (2)  Robert  Ames  Duncan. 

Goodhue  Prizes  For  an  examination  in  English  literature  and  composition,  including 
ie  more  practical  topics  of  elementary  rhetoric.  Open  to  Senior  and  Upper  Middle 
lasses.  $70  and  $50.  First  awarded  1961.  Funded  1936  by  the  family  of  Francis  A. 
oodhue,  of  Andover,  in  memory  of  his  devotion  to  Phillips  Academy.  Awarded  1967  to 
I)  Wade  Hampton  Saunders,  (2)  Charles  Maxwell  Harrison;  Honorable  Mention, 
obert  Ames  Duncan. 

Clough  Prize.  For  an  essay  by  a  Senior  on  an  assigned  literary  subject.  $40.  First 
varded  1923.  Funded  1923  by  friends  of  Charles  C.  Clough,  Class  of  1906,  in  memory 
:  his  interest  in  literary  studies  and  his  devotion  to  Phillips  Academy.  No  award  this 
;ar. 

Leonard  Prizes.  For  declamation  of  original  essays.  Open  only  to  Juniors  and  Lower 
[iddlers.  Three  prizes  of  books.  First  awarded  1942.  Funded  1957  by  The  Phillipian  in 
lemory  of  Arthur  W.  Leonard,  Instructor  in  English  1907-1941.  Awarded  1967  to 
1)  James  Joseph  Coghlan,  (2)  Stephen  Vine,  (3)  David  Henry  Dieterich. 

Carr  Prizes.  For  skill  in  oral  English.  Open  only  to  Juniors  and  Lower  Middlers. 
16,  $12,  $8,  and  $4.  First  awarded  1943.  Sustained  by  Donald  Eaton  Carr,  Class  of 
922.  Awarded  1967  to  (1)  Anthony  Guthrie  Cronin,  (2)  Nathaniel  Hayford  Winship, 
3)  Charles  Faulkner  Bennett,  (4)  Kenelm  Edward  Winslow. 


Burns  Prizes.  For  an  original  poem.  Awarded  to  one  student  in  each  of  the  Senior 
nd  Upper  Middle  Classes,  and  to  one  student  of  either  the  Lower  Middle  or  Junior  Class, 
20  each.  First  awarded  1945.  Funded  1944  by  Mrs.  John  P.  O'Rourke  in  memory  of 
er  son,  2nd  Lt.  Charles  Snow  Burns,  USAAF,  Class  of  1941.  Awarded  1967  to  Senior, 
>nthony  Thomas  Grafton;  Upper,  Gary  Chester  Meller;  Lower,  no  award  this  year. 

Sumner  R.  Kates  Prize.  For  an  essay  in  American  literature.  $125  in  cash.  First 
warded  1950.  Funded  1949  by  Sumner  R.  Kates,  Class  of  1938.  No  award  this  year. 

John  Horne  Burns  Prize.  For  an  original  short  story.  Open  to  all  students.  $3  5  in 
ash.  Funded  in  1961  by  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Joseph  Lawrence  Burns  in  memory  of  their  son, 
ohn  Horne  Burns,  Class  of  1933.  No  award  this  year. 


ENGLISH 


79 


80 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


CLASSICAL  LANGUAGES 

Cook  Prizes.  In  Greek.  For  an  examination  in  Homer,  including  translation  at  sight 
and  questions  on  grammar  and  antiquities  suggested  by  the  passage  set.  $30,  $15,  and  $10. 
First  awarded  1879.  Funded  1878  by  Joseph  Cook,  LL.D.,  Class  of  1857.  Awarded  1967 
to  (1)  Robert  Benjamin  Kritzer,  (2)  James  Slocum  Rogers,  (3)  Michael  Todd  Wise. 

Dove  Prizes.  In  Latin.  For  an  examination  in  the  translation  and  interpretation  of 
Virgil.  Open  to  Seniors  or  members  of  Latin  4.  $30,  $20,  and  $10.  First  awarded  1880. 
Sustained  since  1915  from  the  George  W.  W.  Dove  Fund.  Awarded  1967  to  (1)  Philip 
Kingsley  Chamberlain,  (2)  Robert  Weldon  Wallace,  (3)  John  Grier  Buchanan,  III. 

Valpey  Prizes.  For  Latin  composition  and  Greek  composition.  Open  to  the  Uppei 
Middle  Class.  $20  each.  First  awarded  1896.  Funded  1891  from  a  bequest  of  Rev.  Thomas 
G.  Valpey,  Class  of  1854.  Awarded  to  Howard  Judson  Whitehead,  Latin.  Williair 
Alexander  Kirkpatrick,  Jr.,  Greek. 

Johnson  Prize.  For  Greek  composition.  $10.  First  awarded  1924.  Funded  1932  bj 
Alfred  Johnson,  Class  of  1890,  in  memory  of  the  Rev.  Alfred  Johnson,  a  graduate  o] 
Dartmouth  College.  Awarded  1967  to  William  Alexander  Kirkpatrick,  Jr. 

Weir  Prize.  In  Greek.  For  an  examination  in  the  translation  of  New  Testament  Greek 
$70.  First  awarded  1928.  Funded  1927  from  a  bequest  of  The  Rev.  William  N.  Weir 
Class  of  1895.  Awarded  1967  to  Donald  Francis  Jamieson. 

Benner  Prize.    For  excellence  in  first-year  Greek.  $25.  First  awarded  1939.  Funde< 

1  950  by  the  Rogers  Associates,  Inc.,  in  honor  of  Allen  Rogers  Benner,  Class  of  1888,  fo; 
forty-six  years  Instructor  in  Greek  in  Phillips  Academy.  Awarded  1967  to  Robert  Cush 
man  Barber  and  David  Henry  Dieterich.  (2  5  to  be  divided  equally). 

Department  Prizes.  For  excellence  in  Latin  translation  and  composition,  $10  an< 
$5;  for  recitation  from  memory  of  poetry  or  prose,  $10.  First  awarded  1940.  Sustained 
since  1947  from  Wintrop  Fund.  Awarded  1967  to  John  Ford  Latin  1  Recitation,  Stephei 
Michael  Vine  Latin  2  Recitation,  Honorable  Mention:  William  Lawrence  Hudson  Latii 

2  Recitation,  Irvin  Neil  Heifetz  Latin  3  Recitation.  Awarded  1967  to  (1)  David  Alio 
Tibbetts,  (2)  Stephen  Bennett  Blum  Latin  2  Translation  and  Composition.  Awards 
1967  to  Howard  Judson  Whitehead  (2)  Karl  Landis  Gores  Latin  3  Translation  an. 
Composition. 

Catlin  Prize.  To  be  awarded  regardless  of  need,  to  a  member  of  the  Upper  Middle 
Class  of  outstanding  scholarship  and  deportment,  who,  on  completion  of  Greek  2  o 
Latin  3  at  Phillips  Academy,  shall  include  in  his  Senior  program  a  major  course  in  Gree 
or  Latin.  $1,000.  First  awarded  1945.  Funded  1944  from  a  bequest  of  George  H.  Catlir 
Class  of  1863.  Awarded  1967  to  Anthony  Thomas  Grafton. 

GERMAN 

Stevenson  Prize.  For  excellence  in  German  composition,  oral  and  written.  Ope 
to  the  Senior  and  Upper  Middle  Classes.  $15.  First  awarded  1904.  Funded  1904  b 
Robert  Stevenson,  Jr.,  Class  of  1896,  in  memory  of  his  father.  Awarded  1967  to  Micha< 
Adam  Post. 

FRENCH 

Taylor  Prize.  For  excellence  in  French  conversation  and  composition.  A  selectic 
of  French  books.  First  awarded  1909.  Funded  in  part  1908  by  a  member  of  the  Cla 
of  1868  in  memory  of  Frederick  Holkins  Taylor  of  that  class,  son  of  Professor  Joh 
L.  Taylor,  Treasurer  of  Phillips  Academy  1852-1868.  Awarded  1967  to  William  Alexand. 
Kirkpatrick,  Jr. 

Department  Prizes.  For  aural  ability.  To  those  students  in  their  first  and  secon 
year  of  French  who  receive  the  highest  marks  on  a  special  examination  to  test  aur 
comprehension.  First  and  second  prizes  in  books.  First  awarded  1946.  Sustained  by  a 
anonymous  donor.  Awarded  1967  in  French  1  to  (1)  Christopher  Holmes,  (2)  Jol 
Woodruff  Sibal;  French  2  to  (1)  Lawrence  Nason  Gelb,  (2)  Paul  Henry  Daniel  Kapla 
(3)  Vincent  Joseph  Panetta;  Honorable  Mention:  Peyton  Howard  Moss,  Jr.,  and  Steph< 
Michael  Vine. 


PRIZES 


81 


Anthony  D.  Graves  Prize.  For  improvement  during  the  first  year  of  the  study  of 
French.  To  the  student  whose  application  and  effort  result  in  the  greatest  over-all  im- 
provement. $25.  First  Awarded  1954.  Funded  1954  by  Mrs.  Charles  F.  Pease  in  memory 
of  her  father.  Awarded  1967  to  David  Allen  Tibbetts. 

Forbush  Prize.  For  excellence  in  French  3.  A  book  or  books.  First  awarded  1956. 
Funded  195  5  by  students  and  friends  of  Guy  Johnson  Forbush,  Instructor  in  French  at 
Phillips  Academy  1917-1920,  1924-195  5.  Awarded  1967  to  Daniel  Leonard  Kent. 

SPANISH 

Howard  P.  Hayden  Prize.  For  excellence  in  oral  Spanish.  To  a  member  of  the  first- 
year  Spanish  course  who,  in  the  opinion  of  the  faculty,  has  made  the  greatest  progress  in 
oral  Spanish.  $3  5.  First  awarded  1945.  Funded  1945  by  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Howard  P.  Hayden, 
of  Santiago,  Chile.  Awarded  1967  to  (1)  James  William  McGinnis,  Jr.,  (2)  Warren 
Francis  Motte,  Jr.  Honorable  Mention  to  Frederick  Warburg  Peters. 

Donald  E.  Merriam  Memorial  Prize.  Awarded  annually  to  the  student  in  the  second 
year  of  Spanish  who,  in  the  opinion  of  the  Spanish  Department,  has  best  combined  the 
qualities  of  proficiency,  interest  and  enthusiasm  in  the  study  of  that  language.  A  book 
and  name  on  plaque.  First  awarded  1965.  Given  by  the  students  of  Spanish  at  Phillips 
Academy.  Awarded  1967  to  Nicholas  Andrew  Cotton  Pauley. 

HISTORY 

Lauder  Prizes.  For  an  examination  in  Modern  European  History.  $30,  $20,  and  books. 
First  awarded  1913.  Funded  1916  by  George  Lauder  in  memory  of  his  son,  George  Lauder, 
Jr.,  Class  of  1897.  Awarded  1967  to  (1)  Steven  Mark  Blacher,  (2)  Richard  Coxe  Spald- 
ing. 

Haymond  Prizes.  In  American  History.  To  undergraduates  taking  the  course  in 
History  of  the  United  States,  for  an  essay  on  the  Constitution  of  the  United  States. 
$50,  $25,  $10,  and  books.  First  awarded  1943.  Sustained  by  the  Honorable  Frank  C. 
Haymond,  in  honor  of  his  sons,  William  Stanley  Haymond,  2d,  Class  of  1942,  and 
Thomas  Arnette  Haymond,  Class  of  1943.  Awarded  1967  to  (1)  Timothy  Lewis  Thomp- 
son, Conscientious  Objection  and  the  Supreme  Court,  (2)  David  Allen  Bloom,  Escobedo 
and  Miranda:  A  fair  Chance,  (3)  Edward  Barry  Samuels,  The  Dred  Scott  Case:  A  Study 
in  Misunderstanding. 

Grace  Prizes.  In  American  History.  For  an  essay  on  the  Bill  of  Rights  or  other 
historical  topic  related  to  our  heritage  of  human  liberty.  $70,  $45,  $3  5,  and  books.  First 
awarded  1953.  Funded  1951  by  Oliver  R.  Grace,  Class  of  1926,  in  memory  of  his  father, 
Morgan  H.  Grace.  Awarded  1967  to  (1)  Arthur  Grover  Newmeyer,  III,  The  Free  D.  C. 
Movement,  (2)  John  Lathrop  Tucker,  McCarthy:  Another  Look  at  the  Record,  (3) 
Robert  Alan  Hutchison,  The  Amish  v.  Iowa. 

Marshall  S.  Kates  Prizes.  In  American  History.  To  undergraduates  taking  the 
course  in  History  of  the  United  States  for  an  essay  on  a  topic  in  the  field  of  American 
History.  $50,  $30,  $20,  and  books.  First  awarded  1953.  Funded  1952  by  Marshall  S. 
Kates,  Class  of  1939.  Awarded  1967  to  (1)  Stephen  Coughlin  Townend,  Troop  Train 
Tragedy,  (2)  Charles  Herbert  Dyer,  Daniel  Harrison  Spofford:  Doctor  of  Christian 
Science,  (3)  William  Wylie  Robinson,  The  Hale-Perry  Area  Coordinating  Committee 
for  Economic  Opportunity. 

Webster  Prizes.  For  excellence  in  Ancient  History,  European  History,  or  Contem- 
porary Affairs.  Open  to  all  students  taking  the  courses,  on  the  basis  of  competitive 
examinations  or  proficiency  in  current  work,  at  the  discretion  of  the  department.  $125 
in  money  and  books.  First  awarded  1956.  Funded  1956  by  Dean  Kingman  Webster,  Jr., 
Class  of  1915.  Awarded  1967  to  (1)  Peter  Clark  McCallum,  (2)  Matthew  Paul 
Ristuccia  in  History  1;  to  (1)  Paul  Henry  Daniel  Kaplan,  (2)  Jere  Schenck  Meserole, 
Jr.  in  History  2. 

MATHEMATICS 

Convers  Prizes.  In  Plane  Geometry.  Awarded  on  the  basis  of  an  examination  in 
Plane  Geometry  covering  analysis  on  the  originals,  numericals,  loci,  and  constructions. 


82 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


$100,  $75,  $50,  $25,  $10,  and  books.  First  awarded  1898.  Funded  1898  by  E.  B.  Con- 
vers,  Class  of  1857,  and  extended  in  1951  by  the  former  prize  men.  Awarded  1967  to 
(1)  Charles  David  Wyman,  (2)  Thomas  Cleaveland  Allen,  (3)  Richard  Warren  Stewart, 
(4)  Marc  Raymond  Poirier,  (5)  John  George  Tammen,  Jr. 

Eaton  Prize.  For  excellence  in  Algebra.  To  a  member  of  the  Junior  Class  outstand- 
ing for  proficiency  in  first-year  Algebra.  $20.  First  awarded  193  8.  Funded  1957  by 
bequest  of  Thaxter  Eaton,  Class  of  1904,  in  memory  of  his  father,  George  T.  Eaton, 
Class  of  1873,  for  fifty  years  instructor  in  Mathematics  at  Phillips  Academy.  Awarded 
1967  to  William  Reynolds  Monach. 

McCurdy  Prizes.  For  excellence  in  Senior  Mathematics.  For  Seniors  in  the  regular 
fourth-year  Mathematics  program.  Awarded  on  the  basis  of  classroom  work  and  an 
examination.  $3  5  and  $25.  First  awarded  1941.  Funded  1940  by  the  family  of  the  late 
Matthew  S.  McCurdy,  in  memory  of  his  connection  with  Phillips  Academy  as  Instructor 
in  Mathematics  1873-1921.  Awarded  1967  to  (1)  Richard  James  Balfour,  (2)  Robert 
Campbell  Eckhardt. 

Bailey  Prize.  In  Upper  Middle  Mathematics.  On  the  basis  of  an  examination  at 
the  close  of  the  year.  $3  5.  First  awarded  1946.  Funded  1946  by  Edward  Bailey  Crichton, 
Class  of  1946,  in  memory  of  his  grandfather,  Edward  Bailey,  Class  of  1878.  Awarded 
1967  to  Roger  Francis  Steinert. 

Watt  Prizes.  In  Elementary  and  Intermediate  Algebra,  Plane  and  Solid  Geometry, 
Plane  Trigonometry  and  Advanced  Algebra.  For  Seniors.  Awarded  on  the  basis  of  a 
comprehensive  examination  covering  the  analytical  work  of  secondary  school  Mathematics. 
$125,  $75,  $25,  and  books.  First  awarded  1954.  Funded  1953  by  J.  Lester  Parsons  with 
the  cooperation  of  William  C.  Ridgway,  Jr.,  Class  of  1925,  and  William  C.  Ridgway,  3d, 
Class  of  1953,  in  memory  of  Frederick  Ellsworth  Watt,  Instructor  at  Phillips  Academy 
1  933-1951.  Awarded  1967  to  (1)  Robert  Ames  Duncan,  (2)  John  Richard  Shea,  III. 
(3)  Philip  Kingsley  Chamberlain. 

Tower  Prize.  For  excellence  in  Analytic  Geometry  and  the  Calculus.  A  specially 
bound  book  in  the  field  of  Mathematics.  First  awarded  1954.  Sustained  by  John  W 
Dixon,  Class  of  1924,  in  recognition  of  Oswald  Tower,  Instructor  in  Mathematics  ai 
Phillips  Academy  1910-1949.  Awarded  1967  to  Michael  Bancroft  Winship. 

Win  field  M.  Sides  Prize.  For  excellence  in  Mechanical  Drawing.  Awarded  on  tlx 
tasis  of  proficiency  in  classroom  work.  $100  in  cash  and/or  drawing  equipment.  Fundec 
in  1966  by  Donald  A.  Raymond,  Jr.,  Class  of  1932,  in  memory  of  Winfield  M.  Sides 
Instructor  in  Mathematics  at  Phillips  Academy  1919-1958.  First  awarded  1960.  Awarde. 
in  1967  to  Andres  Joseph  Escoruela. 

Joseph  Award.  For  excellence  in  the  area  of  Mathematics.  To  a  member  of  the  Senio 
Class.  A  gold  medal  and  a  book.  First  awarded  1960.  Sustained  by  David  Joseph,  o 
New  York  City,  in  memory  of  his  father,  Bernard  Joseph.  Awarded  1967  to  Joh; 
Richard  Shea,  in. 

Scovtlle  Prize  (See  Sciences). 

SCIENCES 

Scoville  Prize.  In  the  Physical  Sciences  or  Mathematics.  To  a  student  or  studem 
for  an  original  paper  or  project  exhibiting  creative  thinking  or  ingenuity  in  the  Physic: 
Sciences  or  Mathematics,  preferably  not  in  assigned  course  work.  $50.  First  awarde 
1959  by  Anthony  Church  Scoville,  Class  of  1958,  in  memory  of  his  grandfather,  Herbei 
Scoville.  No  award  this  year. 

Wadsworth  Prize.  For  excellence  in  Physics.  To  the  student  holding  the  highe 
rank  in  Physics  for  the  year.  $30.  First  awarded  1900.  Funded  1952  by  William  S.  Wad 
worth,  M.D.,  Class  of  1887.  Awarded  1967  to  Michael  Bancroft  Winship. 

Dalton  Prize.  For  excellence  in  Chemistry.  To  the  student  holding  the  highest  rar 
m  Chemistry  for  the  year.  $65.  First  awarded  1915.  Funded  by  Frederick  Goodrk 
Crane,  of  Dalton,  Massachusetts,  Class  of  1884.  Trustee  of  Phillips  Academy,  1912-192 
Awarded  1967  to  Frederick  Taylor  Gates,  in. 


PRIZES 


85 


Marsh  Prize.  For  excellence  in  Biology.  To  a  student  who  has  been  outstanding  in 
interest  and  attainment  in  the  Biological  Sciences.  $25.  First  awarded  1936.  Sustained 
since  19 JO  by  an  anonymous  donor  in  memory  of  Othniel  C.  Marsh,  Class  of  1851,  one 
of  the  great  paleontologists  of  his  day.  Awarded  1967  to  Robert  Allan  Mass. 

Graham  Prize.  For  excellence  in  Science.  To  that  member  of  the  graduating  class 
attaining  the  highest  average  grade  in  ten  hours  of  the  natural  sciences  studied  while 
at  Phillips  Academy.  $1,000.  First  awarded  1946.  Funded  1945  from  a  bequest  of  James 
C.  Graham,  Instructor  in  Science  at  Phillips  Academy,  1892-1937.  Awarded  1967  to 
John  Richard  Shea,  III. 

Wadsworth  Prize.  For  excellence  in  Biology.  To  the  student  holding  the  highest  rank 
in  Biology  for  the  year.  $30.  First  awarded  195  3.  Funded  1952  by  William  S.  Wadsworth, 
M.D.,  Class  of  1887.  Awarded  1967  to  Eric  Kuo-wei  Louie. 

Department  Prize.  For  excellence  in  Physics.  To  that  student  taking  elementary 
physics  who  receives  the  highest  grade  on  a  prize  examination.  Books.  First  awarded 
1956.  Sustained  by  the  Physics  Department.  Awarded  1967  to  Michael  Bancroft  Winship. 

Department  Prize.  For  excellence  in  Biology.  To  a  student  who  has  demonstrated 
exceptional  interest  and  accomplishment  with  particular  reference  to  laboratory  investi- 
gation. $25.  First  awarded  1964.  Sustained  by  an  anonymous  donor.  Awarded  1967  to 
Manuel  Enrique  Tavares,  Jr. 

MUSIC 

Cutter  Prize.  For  proficiency  in  orchestral,  especially  stringed  instruments.  $5  5. 
First  awarded  1924.  Funded  1925  by  The  Rev.  C.  F.  Cutter,  Class  of  1871,  in  memory 
of  his  father,  Charles  Cutter,  Class  of  1840.  Awarded  1967  to  Timothy  Lewis  Thompson. 

Poynter  Prize.  To  that  member  of  the  Phillips  Academy  Choir  who,  in  the  judg- 
ment of  the  Choirmaster  has  been  the  most  useful  member  of  that  organization.  $30. 
First  awarded  1945.  Funded  1943  by  Horace  Martin  Poynter,  Class  of  1896,  and  Mrs. 
Poynter,  formerly  of  Andover,  in  memory  of  their  son,  Edward  Pitkin  Poynter,  Class 
of  1940,  who  gave  his  life  for  his  country  in  the  aviation  service  in  July,  1943.  Awarded 
1967  to  Robert  Alan  Hutchison. 

Jones  Prize.  To  that  member  of  Phillips  Academy  Orchestra  who,  in  the  judgment 
of  the  Director  of  Music,  has  been  the  most  useful  member  of  that  organization.  $25. 
First  awarded  1946.  Established  in  1945  by  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Edward  T.  Jones  in  memory 
of  their  son,  Ainsworth  B.  Jones,  Class  of  1939,  who  gave  his  life  for  his  country  in 
the  aviation  service  in  July,  1943.  Awarded  1967  to  David  Werblin  Nierenberg  and 
Timothy  Lewis  Thompson.  $25  to  be  divided  equally. 

Collier  Prizes.  For  proficiency  in  the  playing  of  the  piano.  $25.  First  awarded  1947. 
Funded  1946  by  Mrs.  Milton  Collier  and  I.  Alfred  Levy,  in  memory  of  Milton  Collier. 
Awarded  1967  to  Vincent  Joseph  Panetta,  Jr. 

Fuller  Music  Prize.  To  a  musical  student  who,  irrespective  of  need,  has  demonstrated 
high  character  and  special  musical  aptitude.  The  recipient  will  assume  responsibility  for 
playing  the  carillon  in  the  Memorial  Tower.  $3  50.  First  awarded  1951.  Funded  1959 
by  Samuel  Lester  Fuller,  Class  of  1894.  Awarded  1967  to  Gary  Russell  Johnson. 

Kibrick  Prize.  To  that  member  of  the  Phillips  Academy  Band  who,  in  the  judgment 
of  the  Director  of  Music,  has  been  the  most  useful  member  of  that  organization.  $50. 
First  awarded  195  3.  Sustained  in  memory  of  Herbert  V.  Kibrick,  Class  of  1934,  by  his 
wife.  Awarded  1967  to  Rodney  Eldon  Lewis. 

ART 

Morse  Prize.  To  the  student  who  best  combines  native  creative  ability  with  crafts- 
manship, as  evidenced  in  a  developed  personal  style.  $2  5.  First  awarded  1932.  Funded 
1942  by  Winslow  Ames,  Class  of  1925,  in  honor  of  Samuel  Finley  Breese  Morse,  Class  of 
1805.  Awarded  1967  to  Robert  Gordon  Melendy,  Jr.  and  Robert  Kern  Byers,  Jr. 

Thompson  Prize.  For  improvement  in  drawing  and  painting.  $25.  First  awarded 
1932.  Funded  195  5  by  Mrs.  Frances  Thompson  Heely,  in  memory  of  her  brother, 
Augustus  Porter  Thompson,  3d,  Class  of  1928.  Awarded  1967  to  William  Leary  Dorn. 


84 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Addison  Gallery  Associates  Prize.  To  a  student  who  has  distinguished  himself  in 
art  as  well  as  in  other  activities.  $25.  First  awarded  1941.  Sustained  by  the  Addison 
Gallery  Associates.  Awarded  1967  to  Wade  Hampton  Saunders. 

foHN  Esther  Gallery  Prize.  To  the  student  who  has  shown  through  his  work  the 
clearest  understanding  of  art.  $25.  First  awarded  1943.  No  award  in  1967. 

Photography  Fellowship  Prize.  To  the  student  demonstrating  the  greatest  excel- 
lence in  Photography.  $25  and  one  week  as  an  apprentice  in  the  photographic  studio  of 
YC'ingate  Paine.  First  awarded  1964.  Sustained  by  Wingate  H.  Paine,  Class  of  1932. 
Awarded  1967  to  Carroll  Dunham,  Jr. 

ATHLETICS 

Fa<  lli  v  Goli-  Cur.  To  the  winner  of  the  Varsity  Golf  Squad  competition.  Winner's 
name  inscribed  on  Cup.  Presented  1927  by  the  Faculty  of  Phillips  Academy.  First 
awarded  1927.  Awarded  1967  to  Craig  Skidmore  Combs. 

Kilpatrick  Trophy.  To  the  winner  of  the  Andover  versus  Exeter  track  meet.  A 
bowl.  Winner's  name  inscribed  on  bowl,  to  be  held  for  one  year  by  the  winning  Academy. 
Replica  to  the  captain  or  co-captains  of  the  winning  team.  Trophy  presented  193  8  by 
John  Reed  Kilpatrick,  Class  of  1907.  First  awarded  193  8.  Awarded  1967  to  the  Phillips 
Exeter  Academy. 

Schubert  Award.  To  a  member  of  the  Senior  Class  who  has  excelled  in  varsity 
athletics  and  who  has  best  exemplified  the  qualities  of  sound  character,  cheerfulness, 
and  good  sportsmanship  on  the  athletic  field.  A  gold  medal,  and  winner's  name  inscribed 
on  a  plaque.  Funded  1951  by  the  Eta  Delta  Phi  Society,  in  memory  of  Edmund  John 
Schubert  of  the  Physical  Education  Department.  First  awarded  1944.  Awarded  1967  to 
Ford  McKinstry  Fraker. 

Banta  Trophy.  To  be  awarded  annually  to  that  member  of  the  Varsity  Tennis  Team 
who  shows  the  best  sportsmanship,  leadership,  and  character  throughout  the  season. 
I  stablished  1953  by  the  Tennis  Team  of  Phillips  Academy,  in  honor  of  their  coach, 
Cornelius  Gordon  Schuyler  Banta.  Awarded  1967  to  Joseph  Vincent  Cavanagh,  Jr. 

Cross  Country  Cup.  To  the  member  of  the  Cross  Country  Team  who  during  the 
season  has  displayed  outstanding  sportsmanship,  performance,  and  team  spirit.  Winner's 
name  inscribed  on  Cup.  Presented  1952  by  the  members  of  the  cross  country  squad  in 
honor  of  their  coach,  Norwood  Penrose  Hallowell.  First  awarded  1953.  Awarded  1967  to 

Henry  Ashton  Hart. 

Basketball  Trophy.  To  the  club  basketball  player  who  has  contributed  most  to 
club  basketball.  Winner's  name  inscribed  on  trophy.  Presented  1953  by  the  members 
of  the  Varsity  Basketball  Team.  First  awarded  1953.  Awarded  1967  to  Preston  Robert 

Black. 

Fagan  Squash  Racquets  Trophy.  To  the  winner  of  the  Fagan  Trophy  Tournament. 
Winner's  name  inscribed  on  Trophy.  Presented  in  1954  by  Charles  Aloysius  Fagan,  III, 
Class  of  19  54,  in  honor  of  his  father,  Charles  Aloysius  Fagan,  Jr.  First  awarded  1954. 
No  award  this  year. 

Lacrosse  Trophy.  To  the  lacrosse  player,  excluding  the  captain,  who  through 
enthusiasm  and  love  for  the  sport  has  inspired  his  teammates  with  the  will  to  win. 
Winner's  name  inscribed  on  trophy.  Presented  in  1954  by  the  members  of  the  lacrosse 
squad  in  honor  of  their  coach,  John  Richard  Lux.  First  awarded  1954.  Awarded  1967 

to  Walton  Harris  Walker,  II. 

Smith  Hockey  Cup.  To  a  member  of  the  hockey  team,  exclusive  of  the  captain, 
who  is  in  good  scholastic  standing  and  who  during  his  association  with  hockey  has 
contributed  most  to  the  sport  and  to  the  school  by  representing  its  ideals  through 
sportsmanship,  endeavor,  and  ability.  A  silver  cup.  Funded  1954  by  Sumner  Smith,  Class 
of  1908.  First  awarded  1954.  Awarded  1967  to  Joseph  Vincent  Cavanagh,  Jr. 

Crew  Cup.  To  the  student  who  has  contributed  most  in  the  way  of  team  spirit  and 
sportsmanship  to  the  crew.  Winner's  name  inscribed  on  cup.  Presented  195  5  by  th< 


PRIZES 


85 


members  of  the  rowing  squad,  in  honor  of  their  coach,  William  Hayes  Brown,  Class  of 
1934.  First  awarded  195  5.  Awarded  1967  to  Phillip  Lloyd  Nelson. 

Track  Trophy.  To  the  member  of  the  winter  and  spring  varsity  track  squad  who 
exhibits  outstanding  character  and  will  to  win.  Winner's  name  inscribed  on  trophy. 
Presented  by  the  members  of  the  195  5  winter  and  spring  track  squads  in  honor  of  their 
coach,  Stephen  Stanley  Sorota.  First  awarded  19  5  5.  Awarded  1967  to  Dennis  Hayden 
Cambal  and  Harvey  Marion  Kelsey,  III. 

Press  Club  Trophy.  To  the  student  who  has  proved  through  his  performance  on 
the  athletic  fields  to  be  the  most  capable  athlete  of  the  whole  year.  Winner's  name 
nscribed  on  trophy  and  winner  receives  replica  of  trophy.  Trophy  presented  195  6  by 
:he  members  of  the  Press  Club  of  Phillips  Academy  and  replicas  sustained  by  the  club. 
First  awarded  1956.  Awarded  1967  to  Walton  Harris  Walker,  II. 

Sheridan  Medal.  To  the  student  who  has  contributed  most  to  the  intramural  ath- 
etic  program.  A  gold  medal.  Funded  1956  by  bequest  of  Fannie  J.  Sheridan,  in  memory 
)f  her  grandson,  Harold  Joseph  Sheridan,  Jr.,  Class  of  1943,  who  gave  his  life  for  his 
;ountry  as  a  member  of  the  United  States  Marine  Corps  in  September  1944.  First 
iwarded  1957.  Awarded  1967  to  Edward  Allen  Prichard. 

Football  Trophy.     To  the  member  of  the  Junior  Varsity   1   Team   who  con- 

ributed  most  to  Andover  football  below  the  Varsity  level.  Presented  in  195  5  by  the 

nembers  of  the  Junior  Varsity  1  Football  team.  Awarded  1967  to  John  Vickery  Works 
ind  Charles  Lowell  Wright. 

Richard  S.  Pieters  Varsity  Wrestling  Award.  To  that  member  of  the  Varsity 
Team,  excluding  the  Captain,  who  demonstrates  throughout  the  season  outstanding  ability 
:nd  enthusiasm  for  the  sport.  Winner's  name  inscribed  on  plaque.  Awarded  1967  to 
lobert  Lincoln  Waters. 

Peter  Q.  McKee  Ski  Bowl.  Awarded  annually  to  a  member  of  the  Varsity  Ski 
Team  who  has  contributed  the  most  to  the  team  and  to  the  sport  of  skiing.  Winner's 
lame  inscribed  on  bowl.  Awarded  1967  to  Richard  Lewis  Trafton. 

Raymond  T.  Tippett  Memorial  Award.  Awarded  annually  to  a  senior  member 
)f  the  varsity  football  or  baseball  team  whose  loyalty,  courage  and  modesty  exemplify 
he  character  of  Ray  Tippett  and  the  best  traditions  of  Andover  athletics.  Established 
:n  1962  by  members  of  the  class  of  1945  for  a  prize  in  memory  of  their  classmate, 
laymond  T.  Tippett.  Winner's  name  inscribed  on  plaque.  Awarded  1967  to  Joseph 
ohn  O'Hern. 

Soccer  Cup.  To  be  awarded  annually  to  a  member  of  the  Soccer  Team,  exclusive  of 
he  captain,  who  has  contributed  most  to  the  team  through  his  sportsmanship,  effort, 
md  ability.  Trophy  presented  in  1965  by  Stanley  C.  Smoyer.  Awarded  1967  to  Peter 
W  ertimer. 

Swimming  Trophy.  To  the  member  of  the  varsity  swimming  team  who,  in  the  judg- 
nent  of  the  coach,  has  contributed  most  to  the  sport  by  demonstrated  qualities  of  sports- 
nanship,  endeavor,  and  ability.  Established  by  the  1964  swimming  team  and  funded  in 

966  by  John  Noll,  captain  of  the  1966  team.  Awarded  1967  to  William  Jolliffe  Bostian. 

OTHER  PRIZES 

Aurelian  Honor  Society  Prize.  To  a  member  of  the  graduating  class  who,  in  the 
>pinion  of  the  Faculty  and  his  classmates,  is  outstanding  in  sterling  character,  high 
cholarship,  and  forceful  leadership.  Books.  First  awarded  1936.  Sustained  by  the 
\urelian  Honor  Society.  Awarded  1967  to  Ford  McKinstry  Fraker. 

Ayars  Prize.  To  a  member  of  the  Senior  Class  who,  through  work,  perseverance 
md  seeking  after  excellence  has  created  for  himself  a  position  of  respect  and  admiration 
n  the  school  community.  $50.  First  awarded  1956.  Funded  1957  by  Mr.  and  Mrs.  James 
>.  Ayars,  in  memory  of  their  son,  James  Sterling  Ayars,  Jr.,  Class  of  1949.  Awarded 

967  to  Phillip  Lloyd  Nelson. 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


BlERER  Prize.  To  a  student  who  is  outstanding  in  character  and  personality.  $25. 
!  irst  awarded  1944.  Sustained  by  Eugene  S.  Bierer,  Class  of  1943.  Awarded  1967  to 
James  Robert  Hurley,  Jr. 

Faculty  Prize.  To  that  member  of  the  graduating  class  who  during  his  Senior  year 
led  the  highest  academic  average.  $100.  First  awarded  1912.  Funded  1923  by  Sanford 
H.  E.  Frcund,  Class  of  1897,  and  increased  in  195  5  by  his  sister,  Miss  Camille  E.  Freund. 
Awarded  1967  to  Donald  Francis  Jamieson. 

Federation  of  Harvard  Clubs  Prize.  To  an  outstanding  member  of  the  Upper 
Middle  Class  who  combines  excellence  in  scholarship  with  achievement  in  other  fields. 
A  book.  First  awarded  in  1911.  Sustained  by  the  Harvard  Club  of  Andover.  Awarded 
1967  to  Davis  Burton  Everett. 

FULLER  Prize.  To  a  member  of  the  Senior  Class  who,  having  been  at  Andover  not 
lcs  than  two  years,  has  best  exemplified  and  upheld  in  his  life  and  work  at  Andover  the 
ideals  and  traditions  of  the  school.  A  gold  medal.  First  awarded  1912.  Funded  1959  by 
Samuel  Lester  Fuller,  Class  of  1894.  Awarded  1967  to  John  McGarry  Holkins. 

!  [oppi  R  Prize.  To  a  student  worker  in  the  Commons  who  is  outstanding  in  industry, 
cooperation,  and  unselfishness.  $100.  First  awarded  1954.  Funded  1953  by  friends  of 
Henry  Hopper  who,  for  thirty-eight  years,  served  Phillips  Academy  with  industry, 
cooperation,  and  unselfishness.  Awarded  1967  to  Steven  Christopher  Wohlfeil. 

Improvement  Prize.  To  a  member  of  the  Senior  Class  who  has  been  a  student  at 
Andover  for  at  least  two  years  and  who  has  shown  the  greatest  development  of  character 
and  scholarship.  $100.  First  awarded  1941.  Sustained  by  a  member  of  the  Class  of  1916. 

Awarded  1967  to  Andres  Joseph  Escoruela. 

Keyes  Prize.  To  a  boy,  who  in  his  Lower  Middle  year  shows  outstanding  qualities 
of  character,  leadership  scholarship  and  athletic  ability.  $50.  Funded  195  8  by  Langley 
C.  Keyes,  Class  of  1920.  First  awarded  1959.  Awarded  1967  to  Edward  Benson  Davison. 

Kingsbury  Prize.  To  a  student  of  outstanding  character,  who,  in  the  judgment  of 
the  headmaster  is  especially  distinguished  for  perseverance  and  resolution.  $100.  First 
awarded  1943.  Funded  1945  by  Dr.  and  Mrs.  John  A.  Kingsbury,  in  memory  of  their 
son,  John  Adams  Kingsbury,  Jr.,  Class  of  1934.  Awarded  1967  to  Joseph  John  O'Hern. 

Library  Prizes.  For  the  best  student  libraries  collected.  $30,  $15,  and  $10.  Sustained 
by  the  Friends  of  Oliver  Wendell  Holmes  Library  since  195  6.  Awarded  1967  to  (1) 
Michael  Bancroft  Winship;  no  second  and  third  awards. 

Lord  Prize.  To  a  Senior  who  during  his  residence  at  Phillips  Academy  has  displayed 
in  his  daily  actions  and  personal  contacts  a  genuinely  fine  character.  A  selection  of  books. 
First  awarded  1947.  Sustained  by  Mrs.  Mason  Faulconer  Lord,  in  memory  of  her  husband 
Mason  F.  Lord,  Class  of  1944.  Awarded  1967  to  Anthony  Michael  Alofsin. 

Phillipian  Prize.  For  outstanding  service  rendered  to  the  Phillipian.  $50.  First 
awarded  1931.  Funded  1931  by  James  Q.  Newton,  Class  of  1929,  and  Business  Manager 
of  the  Phillipian  during  his  Senior  year.  Alofsin  and  Stephen  Joseph  McCarthy.  $25  to 

be  divided  equally. 

Schweppe  (Richard  Jewett)  Prize.  To  a  member  of  the  Senior  Class  in  recognition 
of  an  unusual  spirit  of  cooperation  and  friendliness.  $100.  First  awarded  1947.  Funded 
1946  by  Mrs.  Richard  J.  Schweppe,  in  memory  of  her  husband,  Richard  Jewett  Schweppe, 

Class  of  1896.  Awarded  1967  to  Dennis  Scott  Cameron. 

Stearns  Prize.  In  honor  of  Dr.  Alfred  E.  Stearns,  Class  of  1890.  Headmaster  of 
Phillips  Academy  1903-193  3,  to  a  student  who,  through  conscientious  effort,  high  ambi- 
tion and  courage,  outstanding  character  and  excellent  deportment,  has  made  Phillips 
Academy  a  better  and  more  friendly  place  in  which  to  live.  $100.  First  awarded  1951. 
Supported,  beginning  in  1959,  by  the  Roger  C.  Sullivan  Fund,  established  in  1921  by 
Boetius  H.  Sulhvan,  Class  of  1905.  Awarded  1967  to  Walton  Harris  Walker,  II. 

Abbot  Stevens  Prize.  To  a  member  of  the  Senior  Class,  upon  recommendation  of 
the  faculty,  who  through  his  character  and  leadership  has  made  a  significant  contribution 


PRIZES 


87 


to  the  Academy  and  to  his  classmates.  $100.  Funded  1959  by  Mrs.  Abbot  Stevens,  in 
memory  of  her  husband,  Abbott  Stevens,  Class  of  1907.  Awarded  1967  to  Mark  Joseph 
Logsdon. 

Stiles  Prize.  To  the  member  of  the  Upper  Middle  Class  whose  judgment  and  loyalty 
to  the  school  have  been  exemplary.  $50.  First  awarded  1960.  Funded  1960  by  Mrs. 
Russell  Stiles,  in  memory  of  her  husband,  Class  of  1908,  and  his  father  Sumner  Burritt 
Stiles,  Class  of  1872.  Fund  increased  1960  by  her  son,  William  S.  Stiles,  Class  of  1942, 
and  David  Stiles,  Class  of  1936.  Awarded  1967  to  Thomas  Sloan  Kidde. 

Sullivan  Prizes.  To  those  members  of  the  Senior,  Upper  Middle,  Lower  Middle,  and 
Junior  Class  who  made  the  greatest  improvement  in  scholarship  during  the  previous 
school  year.  Four  prizes  of  $200  each,  awarded  in  the  fall.  First  awarded  1921.  Funded 
1921  by  Boetius  H.  Sullivan,  Class  of  1905,  in  memory  of  his  father,  Roger  C.  Sullivan. 
Awarded  1967  to  Settlor,  James  Stuart  Martin,  Upper,  Zoran  Ozren  Sekulic,  Lower,  Scott 
Norman  Gudorf,  Junior,  John  David  Malick. 

Van  Duzer  Prizes.  Two  prizes  of  $3  5  0  each,  awarded  as  outlined  below,  (a)  Anp- 
over-Harvard.  "The  income  is  awarded  annually  on  the  basis  of  high  scholarship  to  a 
member  of  the  incoming  Senior  Class  who  is  preparing  for  Harvard,  the  award  to  be 
announced  at  the  close  of  the  student's  Upper  Middle  year  on  the  basis  of  his  record  up 
to  that  time."  Awarded  1966  to  David  Werblin  Nierenberg.  (b)  Harvard-Andover. 
"The  income  is  available  for  a  graduate  of  Phillips  Academy  during  his  Freshman  year 
in  Harvard  College,  the  award  based  on  high  scholarship,  to  be  announced  at  the  close  of 
the  recipient's  Senior  year  in  the  school."  Awarded  1966  to  Matthew  Cartwright  Mole. 
First  awarded  1912.  Funded  1928  from  a  bequest  of  Henry  S.  Van  Duzer,  Class  of  1871. 

Warren  Prize.  To  a  member  of  the  Senior  Class  preparing  to  enter  Amherst  College 
who,  on  the  basis  of  character  and  scholarship,  is  deemed  most  deserving  of  the  award 
by  the  faculty.  $50.  First  awarded  1926.  Funded  192  5  by  Frank  Dale  Warren,  Jr.,  Class 
of  1915,  in  memory  of  his  father,  Class  of  1879.  Awarded  1967  to  Michael  Allen  Bradley. 

Wells  Prize.  To  a  member  of  the  Junior  Class  who  has  displayed  the  outstanding 
qualities  of  loyalty,  perseverance,  and  sterling  character  which  characterized  the  boy  in 
whose  memory  the  prize  is  given.  $50.  First  awarded  195  3.  Sustained  by  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
J.  Brent  Wells,  in  memory  of  their  son,  Anthony  Peters  Wells,  admitted  to  the  Class  of 
195  6.  Awarded  1967  to  James  Lindsay  Shea. 

Jack  Williams  Prize.  To  that  member  of  the  Junior  Class,  residing  in  Williams 
Hall,  who  in  the  minds  of  the  proctors  and  housemaster  has  made  an  outstanding  con- 
tribution to  dormitory  life  during  the  school  year.  Funded  in  1965  in  memory  of  John 
L.  Williams  '61  by  his  family  and  friends.  Awarded  1967  to  Donald  William  Celotto,  Jr. 

Yale  Bowl.  To  that  member  of  the  Senior  Class  who  has  attained  the  highest  pro- 
ficiency in  scholarship  and  athletics.  First  awarded  1902.  Sustained  by  the  Yale  Club 
of  Boston.  Awarded  1967  to  Ford  McKinstry  Fraker. 


SCHOLARSHIP  FUNDS 


Scholarships  are  provided  by  the  Trustees  from  the  income  of  the  fol- 
lowing funds: 

♦Hon.  William  Phillips  (1795;  1804).  Begun  with  a  gift  from  Hon.  Wil- 
liam Phillips  and  increased  by  his  bequest  of  $4,000                                 $  4,633.33 

♦Students'  Educational  Fund  (1854).  Begun  with  a  gift  of  one  hundred 
dollars  from  the  Senior  Class  of  1854.  Since  then  increased  by  the  accu- 
mulation of  income  and  by  other  gifts,  including  one  of  $1,000  from 

Edward  Taylor,  Treasurer  of  Phillips  Academy,  1868-1889    7,762.64 

*  Samuel  Farrar  (1865).  Bequest  of  Samuel  Farrar,  1803,  Treasurer  of 
Phillips  Academy,  1808-1840.  (A  part  of  this  fund  is  for  other  pur- 
poses)   -  22,000.00 

♦Jane  Aiken  Clarke  (1870).  James  G.  Clarke,  Class  of  1839,  in  memory 

of  his  mother  .      ~    1,200.00 

|Peter  Smith  Byers  (1878).  John  Byers,  Class  of  1848,  in  memory  of  his 

brother,  Class  of  1847        500.00 

♦Class  of  1878  (1878).  Senior  Classical  class     1,200.00 

t Jonathan  Taylor  (1878).  Edward  Taylor,  Treasurer  of  Phillips  Acad- 
emy, 1868-1889,  in  memory  of  his  father   .   1,000.00 

♦Hiram  W.  French  (1879),  Class  of  1839    .     1,000.00 

♦Caroline  Parker  Taylor  (1880).  Mrs.  Alpheus  Hardy,  in  memory  of 
the  wife  of  Dr.  Samuel  H.  Taylor,  Principal  of  Phillips  Academy,  1838- 

1871      1,000.00 

♦Gerard  Sumner  Wiggin   (1882).  Bequest  of  Lady  Elizabeth  Sumner 

Buckley-Mathew  Fleming,  in  memory  of  her  son,  Class  of  1875    1,000.00 

♦Stone  Educational  Fund  (1882).  Mrs.  Valeria  G.  Stone  of  Maiden   26,400.00 

♦Richards  (1889).  Mrs.  Mary  A.  Richards,  of  Andover,  in  memory  of  her 
sons,  Charles  Thomas  Richards,  assistant  in  the  Treasurer's  Office  of 

Phillips  Academy,  and  Edward  Stanley  Richards,  Class  of  1875     1,450.14 

♦Warren  F.  Draper  (1890),  Class  of  1843       1,000.00 

^Charles  L.  Flint  (1890).  Bequest  of  Charles  L.  Flint,  Class  of  1845   _   5,000.00 

♦Henry  P.  Haven  (1890).  Trustees  of  Henry  P.  Haven  estate,  of  New 

London,  Conn.     1,000.00 

♦Emma  Lane  Smyth  (1890).  Gov.  Frederick  Smyth,  of  New  Hampshire, 

Class  of  1839,  in  memory  of  his  wife     1,000.00 

♦James  and  Persis  Taylor  (1890).  Mrs.  Mary  E.  Fairbanks,  sister  of 

Dr.  Samuel  H.  Taylor,  in  memory  of  her  father  and  mother   1,000.00 

♦Joseph  Dowe  (1892).  Bequest  of  Joseph  Dowe,  Class  of  1817     3,097.98 

tJoHN  Cornell  (1894).  Bequest  of  John  Cornell.  Recommended  by  the 

School  Committee  of  Andover      „     5,000.00 

Awarded  1966-67  to  Alan  Douglas  Dawson. 
♦James  Calvin  Taylor  (1895).  Mrs.  Mary  E.  Fairbanks,  in  memory  of 

her  brother,  Class  of  1840         1,000.00 

♦  For  general  scholarship  purposes. 

t  For  general  scholarship  aid  for  boys  from  Andover. 

t  For  general  scholarship  aid;  preference  to  boys  from  Middleton. 

88 


SCHOLARSHIP  FUNDS 


S9 


VIary  W.  Holbrook  (1900)    .      500.00 

Carter  (1906).  Mrs.  Ruby  A.  Carter,  of  Andover,  in  memory  of  her 

husband  and  daughter     1,500.00 

Herman  Verhoeff  Hartwell  (1907;  1926).  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Frank  N. 

Hartwell,  in  memory  of  their  son,  Class  of  1908  ~    5,000.00 

jeorge  Ripley  (1908).  Bequest  of  George  Ripley      2,500.00 

T.  Augustus  Holt  (1909).  Bequest  of  T.  Augustus  Holt   „  „  „  26,003.24 

James  Huntington  (1909;  1931).  The  widow  and  daughter  of  James 
Huntington,  Class  of  1848      2,000.00 

Allan  Morse  Penfield  (1913).  Bequest  of  Allan  Morse  Penfield,  Class 
of  1904   .  1,000.00 

George  B.  Knapp  (1914).  Katharine  Knapp  estate,  in  memory  of  her 
brother,  Trustee  of  Phillips  Academy,  1899-1910.      5,000.00 

Thomas  A.  Emerson  (1917).  Rev.  Thomas  A.  Emerson,  Class  of  1859, 
and  Mrs.  Emerson    .   2,000.00 

obert  Henry  Coleman  (1919).  Mrs.  John  Coleman,  in  memory  of  her 
son,  Class  of  1912,  who  died  in  the  military  service  of  the  United 

States,  1918    6,000.00 

"The  income  is  awarded  annually  at  the  end  of  his  Junior  year  to  a  stu- 
dent of  limited  means,  who,  in  the  judgment  of  the  Headmaster,  has 
displayed  the  most  promise  of  maintaining  the  highest  standard  of  worth, 
measured  by  character,  scholarship,  and  general  influence  in  the  school." 
Awarded  1966-67  to  Nathaniel  Hayford  Winship. 

ieorge  Xavier  McLanahan  (1919).  His  mother  and  sister,  in  memory  of 

George  Xavier  McLanahan,  Class  of  1892  „   ..  10,000.00 

"The  income  is  used  annually  for  the  assistance  of  a  worthy  student  or 
students  of  limited  means." 

Awarded  1966-67  to  Frank  Courtright  Miner,  Jr. 

ioRDON  Ferguson  Allen  (1920;  1957).  James  F.  Allen,  of  Meriden,  Conn., 
and  his  sons,  Parker  B.  Allen,  Class  of  1914,  and  Theodore  F.  Allen, 
Class  of  1915,  in  memory  of  Gordon  Ferguson  Allen.  Increased  in  1957 

by  Theodore  F.  Alien  ,   _   10,000.00 

"The  income  is  awarded  annually  to  a  deserving  student  of  character 
and  promise  and  of  limited  means." 
Awarded  1966-67  to  James  David  Giles. 

Rev.  William  Henry  and  Ellen  Cary  Haskell  (1920;  1936).  Rev. 
William  Henry  Haskell,  Class  of  1856,  and  his  five  sons,  Classes  of  1883, 
1888,  1890,  and  1895   -    3,000.00 

Harriet  L.  Erving  (1922).  Bequest  of  Miss  Harriet  L.  Erving,  of  Andover, 
for  thirty  years  assistant  in  the  Treasurer's  Office    1,500.00 

Samuel  M.  Evans  (1922).  Class  of  1887.  (A  part  of  the  fund  is  for 
other  purposes)     2,000.00 

3harles  C.  Clough  (1923).  Princeton  University  classmates  and  friends 

of  Charles  C.  Clough,  Class  of  1906   5,000.00 

"The  income  is  awarded  annually  on  recommendation  of  the  Senior  Class 
to  that  member  of  the  Upper  Middle  Class  who  is  of  limited  means, 
and  who  most  embodies  those  qualities  of  manliness,  loyalty,  cheerfulness, 
high  purpose,  and  clean  living  which  were  conspicuous  in  the  character 
of  him  in  whose  memory  this  scholarship  was  established." 
Awarded  1966-67  to  Samuel  Colvin  Craft,  ILL 

'Frank  Butler  Walker  (1923).  Bequest  of  Mrs.  Mary  C.  B.  Walker,  in 

memory  of  her  son,  Class  of  1889    1,425.00 

*  For  general  scholarship  purposes. 

t  For  general  scholarship  aid  for  boys  from  Andover. 


90 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


*  Abraham  B.  Coffin  (1924).  Bequest  of  Abraham  B.  Coffin,  Class  of  1852  2,000.00 
Alfred  Howlett  Durston  (1926).  Marshall  H.  Durston,  Class  of  1900, 

in  memory  of  his  brother,  Class  of  1897   ..  ~     5,000.00 

"The  income  is  awarded  annually  to  a  student  of  limited  means  who, 
in  the  judgment  of  the  Headmaster,  embodies  the  best  ideals  of  student 
life,  scholarship,  character,  and  influence." 
Awarded  1966-67  to  Daniel  Gustav  Backman. 

Smith  Lewis  Multer,  Jr.  (1926).  Smith  Lewis  Multer,  in  memory  of  his 

son,  Class  of  1923  ....  -     5,000.00 

"The  income  is  awarded  annually  at  the  close  of  his  Upper  Middle  year 
to  a  worthy  student  of  limited  means  who,  in  the  judgment  of  the 
Headmaster,  has  exhibited  promise  in  scholarship  and  qualities  of  leader- 
ship and  wholesome  influence  in  the  general  activities  of  the  school." 
Awarded  1966-67  to  Stephen  Michael  Dembski. 

*Amasa  J.  Whiting  (1927;  195  5  ).  Bequest  of  Mrs.  May  C.  W.  Speare,  in 

memory  of  her  father  —  —     5,159.50 

■James  H.  Haste  (1930;  1933-34;  1944).  Bequest  of  James  H.  Haste,  Class 

of  1894  ..  -  ~    -  ~   241,074.18 

William  Thompson  Reed  Memorial  (1930;  1957).  His  father  and  mother 
and  members  of  his  family,  in  memory  of  William  Thompson  Reed, 

Class  of  1929  „  —  -  -    -   12,565.34 

"The  income  is  awarded  annually  to  a  student  of  character  and  promise 
at  the  beginning  of  his  Senior  year." 
Awarded  1966-67  to  Paul  Andrew  Florenz. 

*  Henry  Waldo  Greenough   (1931;   1937).  Bequest  of  Henry  Waldo 

Greenough,  Class  of  1889   ..  ..    2.000.0C 

*Moncrieff  M.  Cochran  (1932).  Bequest  of  Moncrieff  M.  Cochran,  Class 

of  1900   „..„  _   2,500.00 

'Bancroft  (1933).  Bequest  of  Cecil  K.  Bancroft,  Class  of  1887,  Registrar 

of  Phillips  Academy  1906-1932,  in  memory  of  his  father,  Dr.  Cecil  F.  P. 

Bancroft,  eighth  Principal  of  Phillips  Academy   ....  ..   2,000.00 

Schuyler  Bussing  Serviss  Memorial  (1936).  Mrs.  Charlotte  B.  Serviss, 

in  memory  of  her  son,  Class  of  1898   „  „   5,000.0C 

Awarded  1966-67  to  Thomas  Melvin  Starr. 
■Osgood  Johnson  (1937).  Bequest  of  Helen  O.  Sprague,  in  memory  of  her 

grandfather,  Principal  1833-37,  and  her  father,  Class  of  1848.  For  New 

England-born  students  „  m  „   „   500.0C 

•(•David  and  Lucy  Hayward  Shaw  (1939).  Bequest  of  Lucy  Hay  ward 

Shaw  (Mrs.  David)   _„  ,   10,000.00 

Augustus  Porter  Thompson   (1942).  Mrs.  Augustus  P.  Thompson,  of 

Andover,  in  memory  of  her  husband,  Class  of  1892    5, 000. Of 

"The  income  is  awarded  annually  to  a  boy  who,  in  the  judgment  of 

the  Headmaster,  is  outstanding  in  intelligence  and  character." 

Awarded  1966-67  to  Andre  Maurice  Davis. 
*Sumner  Smith  (1943),  Class  of  1908.  Balance  of  income  after  the  Smith 

Hockey  Cup  „  „   1,142.3! 

Julia  E.  Drinkwater  Memorial  (1944-56).  Arthur  Drinkwater,  Class  of 

1896,  and  William  Drinkwater,  Class  of  1900,  in  memory  of  their  mother  10,443.K 

"The  income  is  awarded  annually  to  deserving  students  of  character  and 

promise  and  limited  means." 

Income  from  the  William  Drinkwater  Fund  currently  added  to  that  of 
this  fund. 

Awarded  1966-67  to  Cornelius  Lavern  Griffith  and  Wayne  Francis  Tracy. 
*  For  general  scholarship  purposes. 

t  For  general  scholarship  aid  for  boys  from  Andover. 


SCHOLARSHIP  FUNDS 


91 


harles  W.  Carl  (1944-46;  1950-53;  1955-56),  Class  of  1910  ......   25,000.00 

"Income  to  be  used  during  his  Senior  year  by  an  outstanding  student 
who  is  a  member  of  an  Academy  athletic  team,  and  who,  in  a  previous 
year,  has  received  other  scholarship  aid  from  the  Academy  and  has  in- 
dicated his  intention  to  enter  Yale  University." 

Awarded  1966-67  to  Elwyn  Cornelius  Lee  and  John  Ponton  Cuthbertson. 
Louis  S.  Owsley  (1944-1946;  1948-1949).  Bequest  of  Louis  S.  Owsley, 
Class  of  1890.  Income  partially  subject  to  an  annuity;  balance  for  scholar- 
ships and  special  education  purposes     395,746.8  5 

ichard  Strong  Foxwell  (1945).  Mrs.  Gilbert  M.  Foxwell,  in  memory 

of  her  son,  Class  of  1922    „    -  ..   2,500.00 

"Income  to  be  awarded  annually  to  a  deserving  student  of  limited  means 
to  meet  the  regular  expenses  of  the  school." 
Awarded  1966-67  to  James  Daniel  Moore,  Jr. 

Arthur  L.  Kerrigan  (1945),  Class  of  1915    2,500.00 

Abbott  Stevens  (1945-46),  Class  of  1907.  Trustee  193  5-5  8;  Treasurer 

1949-58    _  ..  20,000.00 

Ierbert  E.  Stilwell  (1945;  1954).  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Charles  E.  Stilwell,  of 
Cleveland,  Ohio,  in  memory  of  their  son,  Class  of  1941,  who  was  lost 

in  the  English  Channel  on  a  mission  during  the  war    26,421.52 

"Income  to  be  awarded  annually  to  a  student  of  limited  means  who,  in 
the  judgment  of  the  Headmaster,  gives  evidence  of  those  qualities  of 
character,  initiative,  leadership  and  loyalty  which  contribute  to  real 
American  citizenship." 

Awarded  1966-67  to  Stephen  Brewster  Jones. 
Cecil  K.  Bancroft  (1946).  Bequest  of  Mary  E.  Bancroft,  in  memory 
of  her  brother,  Class  of   1887,  Registrar  and  Instructor  at  Phillips 

Academy,   1906-1932  ~  ..       3,000.00 

Leonard  A.  Hockstader  (1946),  Class  of  1896   ..   2,500.00 

Ioses  Austin   Cartland   Shackford    (1946).   Professor  Martha  Hale 

Shackford,  of  Wellesley,  Mass.,  in  memory  of  her  brother,  Class  of  1891  5,000.00 
"Income  to  be  awarded  annually  to  a  boy  of  good  character  and  of 
limited  means,  preferably  from  New  Hampshire  and  preferably  pursuing 
a  classical  course." 

Awarded  1966-67  to  Lawrence  Graves  Kidd. 
vIacintyre  (1946-47;  1951).  John  Livingston  Macintyre,  of  the  Class  of 
1942,  Mrs.  John  L.  Macintyre,  and  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Mackenzie  Macintyre, 

of  Aurora,  111.,  in  memory  of  Mackenzie  Macintyre's  parents    12,100.34 

"Net  income  is  awarded  annually  to  a  worthy  student  of  limited  means 
who,  in  the  judgment  of  the  Headmaster,  has  exhibited  promise  in 
scholarship,  qualities  of  leadership  and  wholesome  influence  in  the  gen- 
eral activities  of  the  school." 
Awarded  1966-67  to  Walton  Harris  Walker,  EL 

'Robert  D.  Mills  (1947).  Bequest  of  Robert  D.  Mills,  Class  of  1893    500.00 

[George  F.  Roberts  (1948).  Bequest  of  Mary  A.  Roberts   „  2,000.00 

Ray  A.  Shepard  (1949-1950;  1953;  1960-61).  Friends  of  Ray  A.  Shepard, 

Athletic  Director  of  Phillips  Academy,  1919-1949   2,630.3  5 

"The  income  is  awarded  annually  to  a  boy  of  limited  means  who  has 
shown  evidence  of  excellent  character  and  marked  ambition." 
Awarded  1966-67  to  Ernest  Bennett  Abbott. 
Suisman  Foundation  (1949-50;  1953;  1955-56).  The  Suisman  Founda- 
tion, Inc.,  Edward  A.  Suisman,  John  R.  Suisman,  Class  of  195  5,  Michael 
Suisman,  Class  of  1947,  and  Richard  Suisman,  Class  of  1950    1  5-000.00 

*  For  general  scholarship  purposes. 

t  For  general  scholarship  aid  for  boys  from  Andover. 


92  PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 

"Income  is  to  be  awarded  annually  to  a  student  selected  by  the  Scholar- 
ship Committee." 

Awarded  1966-67  to  Dennis  Scott  Cameron. 
*Newton-Hinman  (1950).  Ahlers  Association,  in  honor  of  Frederick  E. 
Newton,  Class  of  1893,  and  George  W.  Hinman,  Class  of  1894,  former 
instructors  at  Phillips  Academy  and  faculty  guardians  of  the  PBX 
Society     22,243.17 

*  Society  Scholarships.  The  following  funds  for  scholarship  purposes  were 

established  through  the  generosity  of  the  Secret  Societies  at  the  time  of 
their  dissolution. 

*AGC  Society  (1950).  The  Rogers  Associates,  Inc.  _  -   24,461.94 

Balance  of  income  after  the  Benner  Prize 

*AUV  Society  (1950).  AUV  Corporation   -  „   3  5,000.00 

EDP  (1950).  The  Eta  Delta  Phi  Society  „..._  „.„  ~   5,000.00 

Balance  of  income  after  Schubert  Award 

*FLD  Society  (1950;  1956).  The  Davison  Associates,  Inc.  „     18,115.14 

'  KOA  Society  (1950).  The  Blodgett  Association  ...„    3  5,175.17 

*PAE  Society  (1950).  The  Cooley  Association   „     35,000.00 

*PBX  Society  (1950).  (See  Newton-Hinman,  above)        

*PLS  Society  (1950).  Phi  Lambda  Sigma  Association  .„„  „  .....  17,000.00 

*  Anonymous  (1951)   „  —  ..  —  —    -  1,000.00 

Richard  Jewett  Schweppe  Memorial  (1951-53;  1957-58).  Mrs.  Richard 

J.  Schweppe,  in  memory  of  her  husband,  Class  of  1896      3  8,000.00 

"Income  for  a  scholarship  (s)  to  be  awarded  annually  to  a  student  who 
shows  promise  of  leadership,  responsibility  and  enthusiasm,"  and  for  a 
prize. 

Awarded  1966-67  to  Mark  Joseph  Logsdon  and  Gregory  Bruce  Myers. 

"Isabel  C.  McKenzie  (1952).  Bequest  of  Mrs.  Isabel  C.  McKenzie     2  5,000.00 

*AUV  Society- James  C.  Graham  Memorial  (1955).  AUV  Corporation, 
in  memory  of  James  C.  Graham,  instructor  at  Phillips  Academy,  1893- 

Chauncey  O'Neil  (1955-1959).  Edward  O'Neil,  II,  Class  of  1927,  in 

memory  of  his  father,  Class  of  1899         27,000.00 

"The  income  to  be  awarded  annually  to  a  boy  or  boys  from  Western 
Pennsylvania." 

Awarded  1966-67  to  Philip  Martin  P.  Buttenfield,  Michael  Scot  Curran 
and  John  Albert  Parker,  Jr. 

Horace  Martin  Poynter  (195  5-59).  His  wife,  Elsie  P.  Poynter,  and  his 
sisters,  Juliet  J.  Poynter  and  Harriet  R.  Poynter,  in  memory  of  Horace 
Martin  Poynter,  Class  of  1896,  instructor  at  Phillips  Academy  1902-1945. 

Income  partially  subject  to  an  annuity   „   2  3,481.25 

Awarded  1966-67  to  Mark  Peter  Johnson. 

"G.  Louise  and  Nelson  Robinson  (1955;  1957).  Bequest  of  Mrs.  G.  Louise 

Robinson  de  Dombrowski;  and  in  memory  of  her  uncle,  Nelson  Robinson  892,066.37 

Walter  Brooks  Memorial  (1956).  The  Walter  Brooks  Foundation,  in 

memory  of  Walter  Brooks  _  „     30,000.00 

Hamilton  (1956-1964).  John  D.  Hamilton,  Class  of  1913,  in  memory  of 

his  father,  J.  D.  Hamilton      m  „   23,026.61 

"The  income  is  to  be  used  to  assist  a  boy  or  boys  who  may  be  in  need 
of  financial  aid  and  who  reside  in  the  United  States  west  of  the  Mississippi 
River." 

Awarded  1966-67  to  Christopher  Lee  Apitz. 
*  For  general  scholarship  purposes. 


SCHOLARSHIP  FUND5 


93 


<vert  W.  Freeman  (1956-5  8).  Bequest  of  Evert  W.  Freeman,  Class  of 

1917        29,380.23 

"The  income  to  be  awarded  annually  to  a  student  who  shows  promise 
of  substantial  accomplishment,  but  who  for  the  time  being  is  in  financial 
need." 

Awarded  1966-67  to  Joseph  John  O'Hern. 

oseph  Kaplan  (1956-59;  1962).  Joseph  Kaplan  and  other  donors    19,765.00 

"The  income  is  awarded  annually  at  the  end  of  the  Senior  year  to  a 
student,  or  students,  of  limited  means  for  use  in  the  freshman  year  at 
college,  the  award  to  be  made  with  due  regard  to  fine  character  and 
promise  of  adult  usefulness." 
Awarded  1966-67  to  Robert  Craig  Miller,  Jr. 

Louis  N.  Bennett  Memorial  (1957-58).  Bequest  of  Mrs.  Josephine  C.  S. 
Blaisdell,  in  memory  of  her  brother,  Class  of  1893  ..   1,000.00 

Alexander  Angus  McDonell,  Jr.  (1957-58;  1964).  Mrs.  Alexander  Angus 
McDonell,  in  memory  of  her  son,  Class  of  193  5,  who  gave  his  life  for 
his  country  as  a  member  of  the  United  States  Air  Force  on  June  20, 

1944     26,563.41 

Awarded  1966-67  to  Cyril  Jonathan  Sumner. 

'Putney  (1957).  R.  Emerson  Putney,  Class  of  1928    5,067.82 

♦Edmund  B.  Cabot  (1957-61).  Thomas  D.  Cabot    9,230.93 

William  Drinkwater  (1958).  Bequest  of  William  Drinkwater,  Class  of 
1900.  Unrestricted.  Income  currently  added  to  that  of  the  Julia  E. 
Drinkwater  Memorial  fund  ~   „  „  —   25,111.11 

Indiana  (195  8-59).  Bequest  of  James  C.  Thornton,  Class  of  1904.  Prefer- 
ence to  boys  from  Indiana.  Income  added  to  fund   _    12,258.22 

*  Alfred  O.  Hitchcock,  Jr.  (1959).  Bequest  of  Alfred  O.  Hitchcock,  Jr., 

Class  of  1895      600.00 

*  Helen  Davis  Hood  (1959-60).  Bequest  of  Helen  Davis  Hood  (Mrs.  Gil- 

bert H.).  Increased  in  1960  by  Gilbert  H.  Hood  Memorial  Fund    6,000.00 

May  T.  Morrison  (1959).  May  T.  Morrison  Estate    10,000.00 

Awarded  1966-67  to  DeWitt  Tien-wei  Cheng. 

*  Henry  Mann  Silver  (1959).  Bequest  of  Henry  Mann  Silver,  Class  of 

1868         4,206.46 

William  Madison  Wood  (1959-60).  Cornelius  A.  Wood,  Jr.,  Class  of  1937, 

in  memory  of  his  grandfather.  Income  added  to  fund  _     3,628.86 

*  Horace  D.  Bellis   (1960).  Bequest  of  Horace  D.  Bellis,  director  of 

gymnasium  1901-02        108,080.05 

Harvey  Dann  (1960-61;  1963).  Income  added  to  fund   .....  „   1,057.83 

*Francis  F.  Patton  (1962).  Bequest  of  Francis  F.  Patton,  Class  of  1908  5,000.00 
*Jack  Moon   (1963).  Mrs.  Wayne  Hayward  in  memory  of  her  father, 

Sumner  Gilbert  Moon,  Class  of  1895       13,427.95 

Henry  T.  Mudd,  Jr.  (1963-1964;  1965;  1967).  Henry  T.  Mudd,  Jr.,  Class 

of  1960      _   22,406.30 

Awarded  1966-67  to  Preston  Robert  Black. 
Edward  A.  and  Samuel  C.  Suisman  (1963-65).  Edward  A.  and  Samuel  C. 

Suisman    „  „   5,930.98 

Awarded  1966-67  to  Dennis  Scott  Cameron. 
Ralph  B.  Carter,  III  (1964).  Bequest  of  Ralph  B.  Carter,  III,  Class  of 

1941      m   14,261.66 

Awarded  1966-67  to  James  R.  Hurley,  Jr. 

*  For  general  scholarship  purposes. 


94 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


John  W.  Weber  (1964).  Bequest  of  Ralph  B.  Carter,  III,  Class  of  1941......  14,261.65 

Awarded  1966-67  to  Charles  Putnam  Woodbury,  Jr. 
Sanford  H.  E.  Freund  (1964).  Bequest  of  Sanford  H.  E.  Freund,  Class  of 

1897   -~  -  -  -   60,920.40 

No  award  in  1966-67. 
Francis  F.  O'Donnell  (1964).  Bequest  of  Francis  F.  O'Donnell,  Class  of 

1921   -  -     100,000.00 

Awarded  1966-67  to  Brian  Gibbons  O'Dea  and  Elmer  Paul  Rynne,  Jr. 

Charles  H.  Sullivan  (1964).  Bequest  of  Joseph  C.  Sullivan,  Class  of  1913  10,000.00 
Awarded  1966-67  to  Charles  Putnam  Woodbury,  Jr. 

Mary  E.  Sullivan  (1964).  Bequest  of  Joseph  C.  Sullivan,  Class  of  1913   10,000.00 

Awarded  1966-67  to  Charles  Putnam  Woodbury,  Jr. 

'Charles  F.  Oberhauser  (1965).  Bequest  of  Charles  F.  Oberhauser  of 

Somerville,  Mass  ..  -       1,039.61 

*George  Tait  Hall  (1965).  Mrs.  George  Tait  Hall  and  others  in  memory 

of  George  Tait  Hall,  Class  of  1933   2,508.50 

*  Chester  N.  Whitney  (1966).  Mrs.  Mary  E.  Whitney  in  memory  of  her 

husband,  Chester  N.  Whitney,  Class  of  1902   „  ..   2,000.00 

Charles  Hayden  Foundation  (1967).  For  boys  from  the  metropolitan 

areas  of  New  York  and  Boston   „    20,000.00 

Charles  C.  Stelle  Scholarship.  $400.  In  memory  of  Ambassador  Charles 
C.  Stelle,  Class  of  1927,  acting  chief  United  States  delegate  at  the  Geneva 
Disarmament  Conferences  and  signatory  for  the  United  States  on  the 
Moscow-Washington  "hot  line"  agreement.  Awarded  by  the  American 
Foreign  Service  Association  to  a  deserving  son  of  a  Foreign  Service 
officer  who  has  been  at  Phillips  Academy  for  at  least  one  year. 


*  For  general  scholarship  purposes. 


ALUMNI  REPRESENTATIVES 

(Arranged  alphabetically  by  state.  Foreign  countries  at  end  of  listing) 


A  personal  interview  is  required  of  all  candidates.  Whenever  possible,  it  is  highly 
:sirable  that  candidates  come  to  Andover  for  a  personal  interview  with  the  Director  of 
dmissions,  the  Admissions  Officer,  or  one  of  the  Interviewing  Officers.  Candidates  unable 
i  visit  Andover  may  themselves  arrange  an  interview  at  a  mutually  convenient  time 
ith  one  of  the  Alumni  Representatives  listed  below.  A  definite  appointment  for  an 
terview,  whether  in  Andover  or  elsewhere,  should  be  arranged  in  advance.  Candidates 
ho  would  find  it  a  real  hardship  to  get  to  any  of  the  centers  listed  should  communicate 
ith  the  Admissions  Office  about  the  possibility  of  seeing  a  representative  not  listed 
:low. 


LAB  AM  A 
Birmingham 

Robert  B.  Donworth,  Jr.,  '42 
1500  Brown  Marx  Bldg. 
Mobile 

Frank  M.  Hicks,  Jr.,  '41 
P.O.  Box  78 
Montgomery 

Peter  C.  Mohr,  '54 
2739  Colonial  Dr. 

LASKA 
Anchorage 
John  V.  Munroe,  Jr.,  '48 
1814  Scenic  Way 
Juneau 

Cadmus  Z.  Gordon,  Jr.,  '16 
Box  2571 

vRIZONA 
Phoenix 

Howard  K.  Brown,  Jr.,  '3  1 
P.O.  Box  190 
Tucson 
Keith  S.  Brown,  '31 

3200  North  Swan  Rd. 
John  S.  Greenway,  '42 
1634  North  Olsen  Ave. 

\RRANSAS 
Little  Rock 
Mose  Smith,  III,  M.D.,  '48 
7  Cantrell  Rd. 

CALIFORNIA 
Davis 

Donald  M.  Reynolds,  '3  8 
Department  of  Bacteriology 
University  of  California 
La  Jolla 

William  T.  Adams,  '28 
5911  Waverly  Ave. 


'28 


Los  Angeles 

Otis  Chandler,  '46 

Los  Angeles  Times 

Times-Mirror  Square 
Walter  L.  Farley,  Jr.. 

12300  1st  Helena  Dr. 
Richard  A.  Moore,  '3  2 

6290  Sunset  Blvd. 
H.  Burt  Reiter,  '25 

The  Prudential  Insurance  Co. 

5757  Wilshire  Blvd. 
Marysville 

Harold  S.  Edwards,  '28 

770  Rameriz  Rd. 
Pacific  Palisades 

Benjamin  H.  Dorman,  '2  5 

1515  San  Remo  Dr. 

Ross 

H.  Leonard  Richardson 

The  Katherine  Branson  School 
San  Diego 

George  E.  Mumby,  '24 

5001  College  Ave. 
San  Francisco 

John  P.  Austin,  '32 

Equitable  Life  Bldg. 

120  Montgomery  St. 
Hamilton  W.  Budge,  '46 

Brobeck,  Phleger  &  Harrison 

1 1 1  Sutter  St. 
Sherman  Checkering,  '29 

1 1 1  Sutter  St. 
William  S.  Creighton, 

2939  Divisadero  St. 
Charles  A.  O'Brien,  '4- 

Department  of  Justice 

6000  State  Bldg. 
Santa  Barbara 

Mancel  T.  Clark,  Jr., 

605  San  Ysidro  Rd. 


'39 


'28 


95 


96 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


COLORADO 

Colorado  Springs 

Capt.  Frank  Zagorsri,  '44 

Quarters  4510-E 

U.S.  Air  Force  Academy 
Denver 

Richard  M.  Davis,  '29 

860  Gaylord  St. 
John  F.  Malo,  '40 

245  5  South  Jackson  St. 
John  C.  Mitchell,  2nd,  '34 

2601  South  Sheridan  Blvd. 
David  C.  Wilhelm,  '38 

1408  East  47th  Ave. 

DELAWARE 

Wilmington 

Hon.  Caleb  R.  Layton,  III,  '26 

P.O.  Box  46 
Edward  R.  McLean,  '34 

E.  I.  duPont  deNemours  &  Co.,  Inc. 
International  Dept. 

DISTRICT  OF  COLUMBIA 

Washington 

George  W.  Beatty,  '5  0 

Lee,  Toomey  &  Kent 

1200  Eighteenth  St.,  N.W. 
Hon.  Geo.  H.  W.  Bush,  '42 

U.S.  House  of  Representatives 
Lawrence  C.  D alley,  Jr.,  '45 

888  17th  St.,  N.W. 

FLORIDA 

Jacksonville 

Laurence  F.  Lee,  Jr.,  '40 
Peninsular  Life  Insurance  Co. 
Miami 

D.  Pierre  G.  Cameron,  '21 

Ransom  School 

3  575  Main  Highway 

Coconut  Grove 
David  J.  Williams,  II,  '3  8 

1395  5  S.W.  82nd  Ave. 
Ponte  Verde  Beach 

Arthur  W.  Milam,  '45 

P.O.  Box  632 
Sarasota 

Parker  C.  Banzhaf,  '3  8 

343  5  Sea  Grape  Dr. 
Winter  Haven 

Richard  C  Cheney,  '48 

American  International  Bank 
Andrew  P.  Ireland,  '48 

American  International  Bank 


GEORGIA 
Atlanta 

Herbert  R.  Elsas,  '28 

3  510  Paces  Ferry  Rd.,  N.W. 
Frank  F.  Ford,  '32 
Bus. — P.O.  Box  19652 
Home— 2817  Habersham  Rd.,  N. 
Jeremy  T.  Johnstone,  '48 
5215  Vernon  Springs,  N.W. 
Columbus 
M.  C.  Jennings,  '36 
Box  2121 


HAWAII 
Honolulu 

William  Reeves,  Jr., 
Iolani  School 


52 


ILLINOIS 
Chicago 

Gardner  Brown,  '24 
White,  Weld  &  Co. 
30  West  Monroe  St. 
David  A.  Dudley,  '28 
Director  of  Admissions 
Illinois  Institute  of  Technology 
3300  South  Federal  St. 
Lake  Forest 

Barry  C.  Phelps,  '49 
1699  Riverwoods  Rd. 
Northfield 

W.  Newton  Burdick,  Jr.,  '3  5 
217  Dickens  Rd. 
Rock  Island 

George  T.  French,  '29 
1230  36th  Ave. 
Skokie 

R.  Neison  Harris,  '32 
9444  Skokie  Blvd. 
Peoria 

Charles  H.  Kellogg,  '3  5 
908  Stratford  Dr. 

INDIANA 
Evansville 

Reginald  B.  Collier,  '45 
7300  Newburgh  Rd. 
Indianapolis 

David  Moxley,  '42 
Kiefer-Stewart  Co. 
1515  North  Senate  Ave. 
C.  Perrry  Griffith,  '45 
499  Forest  Blvd. 

IOWA 
Davenport 

Alan  S.  Howard,  '27 
118  Ridgewood  St. 


ALUMNI  REPRESENTATIVES 


97 


KENTUCKY 

Anchorage 

Samuel  S.  Caldwell,  Jr.,  '29 
Lincoln  Ln. 
Louisville 

William  H.  Abell,  '28 

Commonwealth  Life  Insurance  Co. 
4th  and  Broadway 

.OUISIANA 

New  Orleans 
C.  Horton  Smith,  II,  '28 

108  Duplessis  St. 
Marshall  L.  Posey,  Jr.,  '5  5 
Bus. — c/o  Kern  Co.  Land  Co. 

500  Saratoga  Bldg. 
Home— 1511  Robert  St. 
Sbreveport 

Donald  A.  Raymond,  Jr.,  '32 
1132  Erie  St. 

MARYLAND 

Annapolis 
H.  Richard  Duden,  '43 
Perry  Farms 
Baltimore 

Leonard  M.  Gaines,  Jr.,  M.D.,  '45 
213  South  Tyrone  Rd. 
Bethesda 

William  C.  Hart,  '40 
7504  Hampden  Ln. 

MICHIGAN 
Ann  Arbor 

Charles  H.  Sawyer,  '24 
2  Highland  Ln. 
Birmingham 

Frederick  G.  Bahr,  '47 

540  Berwyn  St. 
Donald  H.  Parsons,  '48 
Emery,  Parsons  &  Bahr 
1100  North  Woodward 
Detroit 

William  G.  Butler,  '30 

2500  Detroit  Bank  &  Trust  Bldg. 
George  H.  Hunt,  Jr.,  '37 

223  8  Buhl  Bldg. 
Russell  H.  Lucas,  '12 
83  3  Penobscot  Bldg. 
Grand  Rapids 
Paul  F.  Steketee,  Jr.,  '26 
2700  Reeds  Lake  Blvd. 
Grosse  Pointe  Farms 

Carlton  M.  Higbie,  Jr.,  '3  5 

93  Kenwood  Rd. 
David  W.  Kendall,  '20 
75  Lake  Shore  Dr. 


MINNESOTA 
Minneapolis 

Louis  Polk,  Jr.,  '49 
General  Mills,  Inc. 
9200  Wayzata  Blvd. 
A.  Lachlan  Reed,  '3  5 

Minneapolis-Honeywell  Regulator 
Co. 

275  3  4th  Ave.,  S. 
Arne  L.  Schoeller,  '48 

1924  James  Ave.,  S. 
j.  Kimball  Whitney,  '46 

Whitney  Land  Co. 

907  First  National  Bank  Bldg. 
Rochester 

Dr.  Douglas  B.  McGill,  '47 

200  First  St. 
Wayzata 

Thomas  M.  Crosby,  Jr.,  '5  6 

Route  5,  Box  656 

MISSISSIPPI 
Jackson 

Donald  K.  Cameron,  Jr.,  '48 

936  Briarwood  Dr. 
William  D.  Lynch,  '38 

134  Chippewa  Circle 

MISSOURI 

Clayton 

Eugene  F.  Williams,  '42 
21  St.  Andrews  Dr. 
Columbia 

George  C.  Miller,  '3  5 
600  South  Greenwood 
Joplin 

Lawrence  S.  Crispell,  M.D.,  '3  8 

Sixth  and  Pearl  Ave. 
Kansas  City 

Stephen  W.  Harris,  '38 

4700  Belleview 
St.  Joseph 

Robert  A.  Brown,  Jr.,  '49 

Brown,  Douglas  and  Brown 

Tootle-Enright  National  Bank  Bldg. 
F.  Gregg  Thompson,  Jr.,  M.D.,  '47 

902  Edmond  St. 
St.  Louis 

Peter  B.  Hubbell,  '50 

5154  Westminster  PI. 
John  Shepley,  '42 

503  Locust  St. 

MONTANA 

Missoula 

Meridan  H.  Bennett,  '4 J 
3 1  5  Keith  Ave. 


98 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


Philipsburg 

F.  William  Viktor,  '37 
Rocking  Chair  Ranch 

NEBRASKA 
Omaha 

James  A.  C.  Kennedy,  Jr.,  '3  3 
1502  City  National  Bank 

NEVADA 
Deeth 

William  B.  Wright,  Jr.,  '5  0 
Mary's  River  Ranch 
Reno 

Robert  S.  Kimball,  3d,  '51 
P.O.  Box  3117 

NEW  MEXICO 
Albuquerque 
Gregory  H.  Illanes,  Jr.,  '3  8 
Quinn  &  Co. 
200  2nd  St. 
John  P.  Eastham,  '45 

Rodey,  Dickason,  Sloan,  Akin  & 
Robb 

First  National  Bank  Bldg. — West 
Santa  Fe 

Leslie  M.  Redman,  M.D. 
Route  1,  Box  177 

NEW  YORK 
Amsterdam 

Leon  H.  Young,  '20 
22  Summit  Ave. 
Buffalo 

Walter  F.  Stafford,  Jr.,  M.D.,  '3  8 

24  Tudor  Pi. 
John  N.  Walsh,  Jr.,  '39 
8  5  Highland  Ave. 
Cazenovia 

Robert  B.  Simonton,  '50 
West  Lake  Rd. 
Ithaca 

Andrew  Schultz,  Jr.,  '32 

631  Highland  Rd. 
Neu>  York  City 

Bromwell  Ault,  '18 

50  East  77th  St. 
Prescott  S.  Bush,  Jr.,  '40 

Johnson  &  Higgins 

63  Wall  St. 
Peter  M.  Capra,  '5  3 

118  East  93rd  St. 
Nathaniel  M.  Cartmell,  Jr.,  '42 

McGraw-Hill  Publishing  Co. 

3  30  West  42nd  St. 
Joseph  C  Fox,  '34 

Kidder,  Peabody  &  Co. 

17  Wall  St. 


William  D.  Hart,  '36 

Parker,  Duryee,  Benjamin  Zunino 
&  Malone 

1  East  44th  St. 
David  D.  Jones,  '37 

3 1 5  West  End  Ave. 
Richard  D.  Lombard,  '49 

Lombard,  Vitalis  &  Paganucci,  Inc. 

Ill  Broadway 
John  D.  Lynch,  '46 

J.  &  W.  Seligman  &  Co. 

6  J  Broadway 
J.  Quigg  Newton,  Jr.,  '29 

1  East  75  th  St. 

William  C.  Ridgway,  Jr.,  '25 

Crum  &  Forster 

110  William  St. 
Rochester 

Bruce  B.  Bates,  '49 

87  Grosvenor  Rd. 
John  H.  Castle,  Jr.,  '34 

Ritter  Co.,  Inc. 

400  West  Ave. 
Samuel  P.  O'Connor,  Jr.,  '24 

Amsden-Connor-Mitchell,  Inc. 

146  Broad  St. 
Martin  H.  Donahoe,  Jr.,  '31 

343  State  St. 
Gordon  P.  Small,  '42 

1237  Midtown  Tower 
Scar sd ale 

Bernard  L.  Boyle,  '27 

2  Normandy  Ln. 
Syracuse 

William  O.  Airman,  M.D.,  '42 

1117  East  Genesee  St. 
David  H.  Northrup,  '32 

205  DeWitt  St. 

NORTH  CAROLINA 

Charlotte 

E.  Osborne  Ayscue,  '51 

800  North  Carolina  Nat'l  Bank 
Bldg. 
Durham 

Peregrine  White,  '29 

3  9  Kimberly  Dr. 

NORTH  DAKOTA 
Fargo 

Thomas  L.  Powers,  '20 
1617  Seventh  St.,  S. 

OHIO 
Akron 

Wayne  F.  Anderson,  '37 
5  04  Delaware  Ave. 


ALUMNI  REPRESENTATIVES 


99 


Cincinnati 

William  Hausberg,  2d,  '32 

2600  Willowbrook  Dr. 
Rt.  Rev.  Henry  W.  Hobson,  '10 

405  Albion  St.,  Glendale 
Fletcher  E.  Nyce,  '26 

The  Central  Trust  Co. 

WlLFORD  L.  ROMNEY,  '19 

7  Sylvan  Ln.,  Wyoming 
David  M.  Watt 

3322  Mowbray  Ln. 
Cleveland 

Edw.  T.  Bartlett,  II 

31700  Fairmount  Blvd. 
Thomas  J.  Keefe,  '50 
3290  Glencairn  Rd. 
James  C.  Miller,  II,  '50 

2347  Tudor  Dr. 
James  R.  Stewart,  '27 

1144  Union  Commerce  Bldg. 
Cleveland  Heights 
Edward  D.  Yost,  '47 

3137  Fairfax  Rd. 
Dayton 

Vernon  E.  Midgley,  '42 

Martin  Company 

1 3 1  North  Ludlow  St. 
Gates  Mills 

George  Oliva,  Jr.,  '3  9 

West  Hill  Dr. 
Granville 

George  W.  Chessman,  '37 

Briarwood  Rd. 

OKLAHOMA 
Barilesville 

Carl  M.  Elkan,  '3  5 
3  501  Woodlawn  Rd. 
Oklahoma  City 
John  H.  Edwards,  '22 

2205  Liberty  Bank  Bldg. 
Dr.  Stewart  G.  Wolf,  Jr.,  '3 1 
644  N.E.  14th  St. 
Tulsa 
James  M.  Bird,  '3  5 
Box  1590 

c/o  Seismograph  Service  Corp. 
Henry  C.  Williams,  '3  8 
5159  East  31st  St. 

OREGON 
Portland 

Broughton  H.  Bishop,  '45 
Pendleton  Woolen  Mills 
218  S.W.  Jefferson  St. 
Edmund  Hayes,  Jr.,  '44 
4256  S.W.  Patrick  PI. 
Frederick  J.  Kingery,  M.D.,  '45 
2250  N.W.  Flanders  St. 


PENNSYLVANIA 

Allentown 

Charles  D.  Snelling,  '49 
2949  Greenleaf  St. 
Chambersburg 

John  M.  Sharpe,  Jr.,  '46 
630  Philadelphia  Ave. 
Indiana 

Joseph  N.  Mack,  '44 
Farmers  Bank  Bldg. 
Narberth 

Tolbert  N.  Richardson,  Jr.,  '27 
50  Righters  Mill  Rd. 
Philadelphia 

Henry  R.  Hallowell,  '39 
12  South  12th  St. 
c/o  Gray  &  Rogers 
James  M.  Mead,  '47 

3 1  East  Springfield  Ave. 
Amory  M.  Sommaripa,  M.D.,  '48 
203  Chestnut  Hill  Ave. 
Pittsburgh 

Robert  S.  Kimball,  Jr.,  '27 

136  Beech  St. 
Edward  O'Neil,  '27 

P.O.  Box  1692 
John  M.  Phillips,  Jr.,  '3  0 
Phillips  Corp. 
700  Clairton  Blvd. 
Rydal 

John  P.  Stevens,  III,  '44 

1143  Kingsley  Rd. 
Scranton 

W.  Larson  Chamberlin,  '34 

Chamberiin  &  Clarke 

Northeastern  National  Bank  Bldg. 
Waverly 

Thomas  M.  Rodes,  '54 

Beech  St. 

P.O.  Box  231 
James  W.  Vipond,  '30 

Waverly  Dalton  Rd. 
Wayne 

Robert  Schafer,  '29 

730  Mancill  Rd. 

SOUTH  CAROLINA 

Charleston 

McColl  Pringle,  '3  3 
E.  H.  Pringle  &  Co. 
Columbia 

John  R.  Craft,  '29 

Columbia  Museum  of  Art 
Senate  and  Bull  Sts. 
Orangeburg 

Benner  C.  Turner,  '23 

South  Carolina  State  College 


100 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


SOUTH  DAKOTA 
Keystone 
James  E.  Liles,  '5  5 

Mount  Rushmore  National  Memorial 
Sioux  Falls 

Hiram  G.  Ross,  '2 1 
Box  423 

TENNESSEE 

Knoxville 

John  Muldowny,  '44 
Univeristy  of  Tennessee 
Department  of  History 
Memphis 

Henry  Loeb,  III,  '39 
365  Colonial  Rd. 
Nashville 

Robert  L.  Gwinn,  '29 
1719  West  End  Dr. 
Brush,  Hutchinson  &  Gwinn 

TEXAS 

Anwrillo 

Edward  L.  Roberts,  '06 
221 1  Harrison  St. 
Dallas 

N.  Bruce  Calder,  '41 

9211  Guernsey  Ln. 
William  F.  Neale,  Jr.,  '44 

1010  Hartford  Bldg. 
John  R.  Sears,  '36 

Republic  National  Bank  of  Dallas 
El  Paso 

John  D.  Mason,  Jr.,  '42 
4208  North  Stanton  St. 
Fort  Worth 

Edwin  S.  Ryan,  '49 
1700  Catalina  Dr. 
Houston 

Hon.  George  H.  W.  Bush,  '42 

Federal  Bldg.,  515  Rusk 
David  M.  Underwood,  '54 

Home— 3  506  Del  Monte 

Bus.— 724  Travis  St. 
San  Antonio 

John  M.  Bennett,  Jr.,  '27 

National  Bank  of  Commerce 

UTAH 

Ogden 

Roderick  H.  Browning,  '44 

2641  Washington  Blvd. 
Salt  Lake  City 

Lincoln  D.  Clarke,  M.D.,  '42 

156  Westminster  Ave. 
C.  Chauncey  Hall,  M.D.,  '41 

2652  East  6200  South 


VIRGINIA 
Charlottesville 

Gardner  W.  Smith,  M.D.,  '49 
University  of  Virginia  Hospital 
108  Woodstock  Dr. 
Norfolk 

Jere  A.  Klotz,  M.D.,  '41 
5  534  Lakewood  Dr. 
Richmond 

Thomas  Walker,  M.D.,  '28 
Richmond  Memorial  Hospital 
1300  West  wood  Ave. 

WASHINGTON 
Bellevue 

Walter  S.  Kimball,  M.D.,  '30 
3407  76th  Ave.,  N.E. 
Evergreen  Point 
Seattle 

Lucius  H.  Biglow,  Jr.,  '42 

1900  Washington  Bldg. 
Pendleton  Miller,  '28 

711  Central  Bldg. 
Holt  W.  Webster,  '39 
2000  12th  Ave.,  E. 
Snoqualmie  Falls 

Frederick  W.  Hayes 
P.O.  Box  97 
Spokane 

Samuel  L.  Galland,  '25 
West  1612  Marc  Dr. 
Tacoma 

Howard  S.  Reed,  '45 
7502  North  St.,  S.W. 

WEST  VIRGINIA 
Charleston 
William  A.  Pugh,  '39 
15  Grosscup  Rd. 
Wheeling 

Marshall  T.  Gleason,  Jr.,  '3  3 
Shawnee  Hills 

WISCONSIN 
Madison 

Professor  Williams  L.  Sachse,  '30 
1105  Waban  Hill 
Milwaukee 

Robert  A.  Uihlein,  Jr.,  '34 
23  5  West  Galena  St. 
Racine 

John  H.  Batten,  3d,  '31 
Twin  Disc  Clutch  Co. 
1328  Racine  St. 

WYOMING 
Casper 

J.  A.  Padon,  Jr.,  '39 
P.O.  Box  153 


ALUMNI  REPRESENTATIVES 


101 


Story 

Maurice  Leon,  Jr.,  '42 
Box  6 

ERMUDA 
Hamilton 
Hugh  C.  Masters,  '40 
Box  139 

-RAZIL 
Sao  Paulo 

John  R.  Thompson,  '41 
Industria  de  Pneumaticos 

Firestone,  S.A. 
Caixa  Postal  8177 

.RITISH  CROWN  COLONY 
Hong  Kong 
Kenneth  K.  Chun,  '44 
4/4  A  Des  Voex  Rd. 
Central  Malayan  Insurance  Co. 

:anal  ZONE 

Balboa 

Robert  J.  Boyd,  Jr.,  '48 
Box  2013 

:OLOMBIA 
Bogota 

William  Adams,  III,  '44 

First  Nat'l  City  Bank  of  New  York 
Apartado  Aereo  No.  4134 

ENGLAND 
Land on 

Laurence  W.  M.  Viney,  '38 
44  Great  Queen  St.,  W.C.  2 

GERMANY 
Duesseldorf 
Arthur  L.  Kelly,  '5  5 
Cecilien  Allee  80 

GUATEMALA 
Guatemala  City 
John  L.  Whitbeck,  '40 
Apartado  Postal  15-A 

ITALY 
Rome 
Emory  Basford 

via  Metro  Paola  Rubens  21 

JAPAN 
Tokyo 

Patrick  G.  Nollet,  '51 
c/o  French  Embassy 


KUWAIT 

Sharq  Dasman  Area 

Thomas  W.  H.  Phelps 

International  School  of  Kuwait 
10th  &  18th  Dasman  St. 

MEXICO 
Mexico  City 

Samuel  C.  Dysart,  Jr.,  '46 
Fray  Garcia  Guerra  #207 
Lomas  Virreyes 

PHILIPPINES 
Manila 

C.  Parsons,  '41 
Box  886 

PUERTO  RICO 

Bayamon 

Guillermo  E.  Gonzalez,  Jr.,  '50 
Hastings  BA-9,  Extension 
Garden  Hills 
San  Juan 

Ricardo  A.  Gonzales,  '5  3 
G.P.O.  Box  2129 

SOUTH  AFRICA 
Selby,  Johannesburg 

C.  Andrew  Kaiser,  '45 
General  Electric  Bldg. 

THAILAND 
Bangkok 

Piya  Chakkaphak 
572/1  Phasuk  Lane 

VENEZUELA 
Caracas 

Alberto  J.  Vollmer,  '42 
Edf.  Polar-piso  13 
Plaza  Venezuela 

VIRGIN  ISLANDS 

St.  Croix 

Frank  L.  Luce,  '27 

54  King  St.,  Christiansted 
St.  Thomas 

George  A.  Ball,  '49 
Quick-Pics,  Inc. 
30  Main  St. 


STUDENTS— 1966-1967 


GEOGRAPHICAL  REPRESENTATION 


Alabama 

9 

XT  J 

Nevada 

1 

Bahamas 

Arizona 

7 

New  Hampshire 

7 

Bermuda 

Arkansas 

I 

New  Jersey 

36 

Brazil 

California 

28 

New  Mexico 

2 

Canada 

Colorado 

6 

New  York 

122 

Republic  or  China 

Connecticut 

75 

North  Carolina 

27 

Dominican  Republic 

Delaware 

3 

North  Dakota 

2 

T7 1     C  -  1  1  

hi  Salvador 

District  of  Columbia 

5 

Ohio 

29 

England 

Florida 

17 

/^i,  1,,l1~_-1., 
UKlanoma 

2 

Germany 

Georgia 

8 

Oregon 

3 

Italy 

Illinois 

15 

Pennsylvania 

38 

Korea 

Indiana 

4 

Rhode  Island 

10 

Mexico 

Iowa 

16 

South  Carolina 

7 

Pakistan 

Kentucky 

2 

Tennessee 

5 

Puerto  Rico 

Louisiana 

2 

Texas 

13 

Scotland 

Maine 

16 

Utah 

4 

Spain 

Maryland 

14 

Vermont 

7 

Syria 

Massachusetts 

197 

Virginia 

14 

Venezuela 

Michigan 

15 

Washington 

3 

Viet  Nam 

Minnesota 

12 

West  Virginia 

3 

Virgin  Islands 

Mississippi 

4 

Wisconsin 

4 

Missouri 

6 

Wyoming 

2 

Total 

Nebraska 

1 

Africa 

4 

CLASSIFICATION 

250  Seniors 
259  Upper  Middlers 
217  Lower  Middlers 
128  Juniors 

854  Total  Students 

789  Boarding  Students 
65  Day  Students 

8  54  Total  Students 


U     Abbott,  Ernest  Bennett 

Medford,  Mass. 
J      Aberizk,  William  Joseph,  Jr. 

Lawrence,  Mass. 
L     Adair,  Fred  Lawrence,  Jr. 

Durham,  N.  C. 
S      Adams,  Milton  Bernard,  Jr. 

Alexandria,  Va. 
L     Adelberg,  Arthur  William 

New  Haven,  Conn. 


Adler,  Douglas  Ochs 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
Allan,  Peter  Neal 

Pascagoula,  Miss. 
Allen,  Ernest  Marvin, 

Chapel  Hill,  N.  C. 
Allen,  Henry  Randall 

Watertown,  Conn. 
Allen,  Mark  Batchelor 

Mill  Valley,  Calif. 


Ill 


102 


STUDENTS 


Allen,  Thomas  Cleaveland 

Beverly,  Mass. 
Alofsin,  Anthony  Michael 

Memphis,  Tenn. 
Alsina,  John  Charles 

New  Haven,  Conn. 
Amstutz,  Jay  Thatcher 

Lancaster,  Pa. 
Anderson,  Brandt  Charles 

Hyannis  Port,  Mass. 
Anderson,  David  Groves 

Akron,  Ohio 
Anderson,  Robert  Gardner,  Jr. 

Chicago,  111. 
Anderson,  Steven  William 

Waynesville,  N.  C. 
Anderson,  Walter  Howard 

Franklin,  Ohio 


Bacaiao,  Enrique 

Caracas,  Venezuela 
Backman,  Daniel  Gustav 

North  Reading,  Mass. 
Bacon,  Carter  Smith,  Jr. 

Hyannis  Port,  Mass. 
Bagan,  Kenneth  Jay 

Chicago,  111. 
Baird,  Gordon  Prentiss 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
Baird,  Jonathan  Raymond 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
Balfour,  Richard  James 

Montreal,  Que.,  Canada 
Barber,  Charles  Bradford 

Greenwich,  Conn. 
Barber,  Robert  Cushman 

Charleston,  S.  C. 
Barclay,  John  Whitney 

New  Haven,  Conn. 
Barr,  Mark  Sydney 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
Bassett,  John  Bruce 

Cos  Cob,  Conn. 
Bates,  Barry  Kendall 

Birmingham,  Mich. 
Baxter,  Peter  Carpenter 

Simsbury,  Conn. 
Beardsley,  Jeffry  Sumner 

Elkhart,  Ind. 
Beaulieu,  Edgar  Mark 

Methuen,  Mass. 
Beck,  Gordon  Morison 

Canton,  Mass. 
Bedell,  Wallace  Canaday,  Jr. 

Poughkeepsie,  N.  Y. 
Belzner,  William  Duane 

Provo,  Utah 


u 

Andrews,  Duncan  Trumbull 

Alexandria,  Va. 

s 

Apitz,  Christopher  Lee 

Morris,  Minn. 

u 

Armstrong,  Rex  Edwin  Hamilton 

Portland,  Ore. 

s 

Arnold,  David  Bullard,  III 

Concord,  Mass. 

s 

Arnold,  Robert  Hall 

Arlington,  Va. 

s 

Asher,  James  Michael 

Leominister,  Mass. 

L 

Ashley,  Craig  Stanley 

Syracuse,  N.  Y. 

s 

Atkinson,  Edward  Page 

Boston,  Mass. 

B 

L     Bennett,  Charles  Faulkner 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
S      Bennett,  John  Mirza,  IV 

San  Antonio,  Tex. 
L     Benson,  Robert  Granger,  III 

Essex,  Conn. 
J      Bentley,  Edward  Salisbury,  III 

Las  Vegas,  Nev. 
S      Berg,  Brian  Gunder 

Cavalier,  N.  D. 
S      Berlow,  Bruce  Alfred 

Bethesda,  Md. 
S      Berman,  Robert  Michael 

Dorval,  Que.,  Canada 
L     Bernardin,  Richard  Louis 

Andover,  Mass. 
S      Bidwell,  John,  Jr. 

Greenville,  S.  C. 
S      Bigelow,  Franklin  Thomas,  Jr. 

Carpinteria,  Calif. 
U     Billings,  George  Harrington 

Falmouth,  Mass. 
S      Billings,  Roger  Frank 

Falmouth,  Mass. 
S      Bird,  James  Raymond,  Jr. 

Plainfield,  N.  J. 
J      Bishop,  Clarence  Morton,  III 

Portland,  Ore. 
U     Blacher,  Steven  Mark 

Stamford,  Conn. 
S      Black,  Preston  Robert 

Scranton,  Pa. 
U     Blake,  Kenneth  Braden,  Jr. 

Murrysville,  Pa. 
S      Blakeslee,  Guy  Farlow 

Palm  Beach,  Fla. 
L     Blakeslee,  Steven  Walton 

Palm  Beach,  Fla. 


104 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


I  T 

u 

lM  ill     I-inipc  frflrnfln 

L 

Bro,  Per  Bjarne 

l-'t  i.-  Pi 

Andover,  Mass. 

c 

nlnnm    Oavifl  Allen 

IJlUOMl,    JLX.JV11X  iiiivu 

L 

Brockie,  Edward  Simmons,  III 

Lawrence,  Miss. 

Englewood,  N.  J. 

c 

Ul/->/->tviKprc?Vi     Tnhn  HolllS.  Tr. 
IjlOOmucI  gllj    JVilili   iiumoj  JA» 

J 

Brown,  Melville  Stewart 

Rockport,  Mass. 

New  York,  N.  Y. 

T 

JL 

TllnVim    Tprpmv  Scntt 

u 

Brown,  Paul  Brooks 

Andover,  Mass. 

r 
J 

Blum  Stephen  Bennett 

S 

Brown,  Paul  Cameron 

New  York,  N.  Y. 

North  Kingstown,  R.  I. 

T 
J 

Boone,  Sam  Wood,  Jr. 

s 

Brown,  Stephen  Dennis 

Maitland  Fla. 

Wellesley  Hills,  Mass. 

TT 

Rntcan v    R ohert  Tohn 

s 

Brown,  Stephen  Gardner 

Chetek,  Wis. 

Sahuarita,  Ariz. 

s 

Bostian,  William  Jolliffe 

s 

Bruce,  Greg 

Richmond,  Va. 

Sheridan,  Wyo. 

T 
J 

Bostwick  Mark  Allen 

s 

Brush,  Bartlett  Marks 

Kalamazoo,  Mich. 

Oneonta,  N.  Y. 

T 

J 

Boyden,  Christopher  Wayne 

u 

Brush,  William  Edward 

Parsippany-Troy  Hills,  N.  J. 

Omaha,  Neb. 

(J 

Boyle,  John  Lennox 

L 

Bryant,  Monroe  David,  Jr. 

Concord  Mass. 

Denison,  Tex. 

u 

Boynton,  Carter  Reid 

u 

Buchanan,  John  Grier,  III 

Stockbridge,  Mass. 

Sewickley,  Pa. 

T 

J 

Boynton,  Charles  Irving,  3rd 

s 

Buhler,  Roman  Paltenghe 

North  Easton,  Mass. 

Harrison,  N.  Y. 

s 

Bradley,  Michael  Allen 

s 

Burdick,  Winfield  Newton,  III 

Blackstone  Mass. 

Northfield,  111. 

L 

Brainerd,  Samuel  Thompson 

u 

Burke,  Christopher  James 

Billerica,  Mass. 

New  York,  N.  Y. 

J 

Bralley,  James  Alexander,  III 

s 

Burns,  Richard  Randolph 

Decatur,  111. 

Marblehead,  Mass. 

L 

Bralski,  Alex  Peter 

s 

Butte,  John  McMurray 

Cleveland,  Ohio 

Austin,  Tex. 

U 

Brande,  Scott 

u 

Buttenfield,  Philip  Martin  Pfeil 

Altoona,  Pa. 

Pittsburgh,  Pa. 

L 

Braunlin,  Daniel  Edward 

s 

Byers,  Robert  Kern,  Jr. 

Dayton,  Ohio 

Gilroy,  Calif. 

c 


L 

Cadogan,  Stephen  John 

U 

Carr,  John  Henry,  Jr. 

North  Andover,  Mass. 

Salem,  Mass. 

L 

Cagan,  Richard  Dennis 

J 

Carroll,  Anthony  John 

Florence,  S.  C. 

Old  Brookville,  N.  Y. 

J 

Cahill,  James  Dalton,  III 

L 

Cartmell,  Nathaniel  Madison,  III 

North  Hampton,  N.  H. 

Pelham,  N.  Y. 

J 

Cahill,  Peter  duPont 

L 

Castle,  Richard  DeWindt,  Jr. 

Needham,  Mass. 

Rochester,  N.  Y. 

L 

Calihan,  Robert  Barnes 

S 

Cavanagh,  Joseph  Vincent,  Jr. 

Rochester,  N.  Y. 

Cranston,  R.  I. 

U 

Callahan,  Leslie  Griffin,  III 

J 

Celotto,  Donald  William,  Jr. 

Fort  Monmouth,  N.  J. 

New  Haven,  Conn. 

U 

Cambal,  Dennis  Hayden 

S 

Chamberlain,  Philip  Kingsley 

Waltham,  Mass. 

Fort  Rucker,  Ala. 

s 

Cameron,  Dennis  Scott 

s 

Chamberlin,  Fletcher  Coleman,  Jr 

Charlotte,  N.  C. 

Sherborn,  Mass. 

J     Chang,  Patrick  St.  Clair 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
J    Chang,  Rowland  Waton 

Pittsburgh,  Pa. 
J     Chapin,  Edward  King 

Manchester,  Conn. 
J     Chapman,  Donald  Redding 
Kentfield,  Calif. 
Chapman,  James  Westbrook 

Farmington,  Conn. 
Cheng,  DeWitt  Tien-wei 
Marietta,  Ohio 
J     Checkering,  John  Cowee 
Woodstock,  Vt. 
Chofnas,  Eric  Steven 

Orange,  Conn. 
Church,  Thomas  Norton 

Bethlehem,  Pa. 
Clapp,  John  Thayer 

APO  San  Francisco,  Calif. 
Clark,  John  Gilman 
Providence,  R.  I. 
J    Cleary,  Neil  Augustine 
Ipswich,  Mass. 
Cleveland,  Michael  Lambert 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
Cline,  William  Whittenburg 
Amarillo,  Tex. 
i     Coburn,  Stephen  Campbell 
Bedford,  N.  Y. 
Coghlan,  James  Joseph,  III 

West  Point,  N.  Y. 
Cohan,  Robert  David 
Worcester,  Mass. 
J    Cohen,  Rip 

Millburn,  N.  J. 
'<     Cohen,  Todd 

Millburn,  N.  J. 
Coit,  Daniel  Grosvenor 

Washington,  Conn. 
Colby,  Seth  Bartholomew 
New  York,  N.  Y. 
■     Coleman,  Edward  Francis 

Andover,  Mass. 
!     Collier,  Charles  Whitney 

Wellesley,  Mass. 
J    Collins,  Ernest  James,  Jr. 

Trenton,  N.  J. 
i     Combs,  Craig  Skidmore 

Eatontown,  N.  J. 
T    Comstock,  Lyndon  Brent 
North  Muskegon,  Mich. 
Conway,  John  Patrick,  Jr. 

Whitehaven,  Tenn. 
Copeland,  Craig  Scott 
Kensington,  Md. 


STUDENTS  105 

U     Copley,  Michael  Clifton 

La  Jolla,  Calif. 
L      Corcoran,  Francis  Gerald 

Philadelphia,  Pa. 
L      Corcoran,  Robert  Patrick 

Cambridge,  Mass. 
S      Cossermelli,  Carlos  Eduardo 

Sao  Paulo,  Brazil 
U     Craft,  Samuel  Colvin,  III 
Menomonee  Falls,  Wis. 
J      Craig,  Daniel 

Belmont,  Mass. 
L      Crawford,  Blake  Lawrence 

Wilmington,  Del. 
U     Crock,  Stanley  Miles 

New  Bedford,  Mass. 
L      Cronin,  Anthony  Guthrie 

Laguna  Beach,  Calif. 
J      Crosby,  Gerrit  Lansing 

Woodbridge,  Conn. 
S      Cross,  Norman  Campbell,  Jr. 

Lunenburg,  Mass. 
L     Crouch,  Hubert  Adair,  III 

Tullahoma,  Tenn. 
J      Crouch,  Luis  Arturo 

Santiago,  Dominican  Republic 
J      Crowley,  Frank  Esmond 

Hamilton,  Mass. 
U     Crowley,  Roland  Vincent 

Lowell,  Mass. 
S      Cunningham,  Andrew  Francis 

Quebec,  Que.,  Canada 
S      Cunningham,  Daniel  Paul 

Cincinnati,  Ohio 
L      Cunningham,  James  Archibald 

Quebec,  Que.,  Canada 
L      Cunningham,  Thomas  Allen 

Portland,  Ore. 
J      Curley,  John  Walton 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
J      Curran,  Michael  Scot 

Pittsburgh,  Pa. 
U     Currie,  Francis  Sparre 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
U     Currier,  Scott  Huntington 

Andover,  Mass. 
U     Currin,  Henry  Randolph,  Jr. 

Durham,  N.  C. 
S      Cuthbertson,  John  Ponton 

Boxford,  Mass. 
Cutler,  Lloyd  Norton,  Jr. 

Chevy  Chase,  Md. 
U     Czarnecki,  John  Jacob 

Reading,  Pa. 


106 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


S     Dailey,  William  Jonathan 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
U     Daly,  Martin  William,  Jr. 

Andover,  Mass. 
U     Danforth,  David  Newlon 

Wellesley  Hills,  Mass. 
U     Danforth,  William  Henry,  III 

Belmont,  Mass. 
S     Davis,  Andre  Maurice 

Baltimore,  Md. 
S      Davis,  Churchward,  Jr. 

Pittsfield,  Mass. 
J      Davis,  Robert  Andrew 

Fort  Defiance,  Ariz. 
L     Davison,  Edward  Benson 

Flint,  Mich. 
L     Dawson,  Alan  Douglas 

Lawrence,  Mass. 
S      DeAngelis,  Paul  Thomas 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
U     Deck,  Michael  Clemens 

West  Hartford,  Conn. 
U     DeFelice,  Harold  Louis,  Jr. 

Hamden,  Conn. 
S     Dembski,  Stephen  Michael 

Reading,  Mass. 
U     Deming,  Ellsworth  Huntington 

Hamden,  Conn. 
J      Deming,  John  Nelson,  Jr. 

Hamden,  Conn. 
J     Dempsey,  Guy  Cary,  Jr. 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
U     Denger,  Timothy  Eugene 

Xenia,  Ohio 
J      DcRocco,  Paul  David 

Bridgewater,  Mass  . 
S     deSola,  Carlos 

San  Salvador,  El  Salvador,  C.A. 
U     DesRoches,  Daniel  Scott 

Andover,  Mass. 
S      Deutsch,  Nicholas  Arthur 

Cambridge,  Mass. 
U     Devereux,  Edward  Rickert,  Jr. 

Ponte  Vedra  Beach,  Fla. 
L     Dibble,  Philo  Louis 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
L     Dickson,  Daniel  Hugh 

Miami  Shores,  Fla. 


S      Earle,  John  Michael 

London,  England 
U     Eaton,  Jonathan  Williams 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
U     Eaton,  Theodore  Hambleton 

Grosse  Point,  Mich. 


D 


T 

Li 

Dieterich,  David  Henry 

Winchester,  Mass. 

L 

jjiiouj  vjeorge  niiioit 

New  Canaan,  Conn. 

T 

L 

Dobson,  James  Jaimet 

jvimoru,  ivei. 

I  1 

u 

Dodd,  Douglas  Van  Everen 

Andover,  Mass. 

(J 

JLvuc,  Lawrciitc  vunani 

1  Xal  VdiU)  iviodo. 

T 

Lt 

Donahue,  Douglas  Aidan,  Jr. 

Norwell,  Mass. 

C 
3 

Donahue,  John  Christopher 

jrittsourgn,  i  a. 

T 
J 

Donner,  Alexander  Brokaw 

iNew  i  orK,  in.  i. 

T 

J_, 

Donovan,  Charles  Stephen 

w  aKeneiu,  Mass. 

C 

o 

Doran,  John  Joseph 

wenesiey,  Mass. 

Q 

-J 

Dorn,  William  Leary 

Houston,  Tex. 

T  T 
U 

Douglas,  Eric  Frost 

vjienaora,  v_.aui. 

T 
J 

Doyle,  Kevin  Lawrence  Thomas 

Mpg,  Yr»rlr    "NT  Y 

ixcw  lorn,  rN.  i. 

tt 
U 

uraKe,  rreaencK  liiis,  hi 

natn,  Me. 

T 
.1 

nMU     Uirrv    \i!7i1k„r  Mill 

uraKe,  riarry  wnour  run 

xvocnesier,  im.  i. 

TT 

Drake,  Jay  Davis 

Gardner,  Mass. 

I  T 

u 

DuMez,  Richard  Alan,  Jr. 

ocnenectady,  IN.  i. 

I  T 

JL/UuD3r}    X  HCUllUiC  X-/3V1U 

Syracuse,  N^.  Y. 

S 

Duncan,  Robert  Ames 

Baltimore,  Md. 

S 

Dunham,  Carroll,  Jr. 

Old  Lyme,  Conn. 

u 

Dupont,  Jules  St.  Martin,  Jr. 

Houma,  La. 

s 

Dyer,  Charles  Herbert 

Haverhill,  Mass. 

s 

Dyer,  John  Brent 

Bangor,  Me. 

E 

L     Ebner,  Michael  Joseph 

Providence,  R.  I. 
S      Eckhardt,  Robert  Campbell 

Gibsonia,  Pa. 
L     Eddy,  Edward  Danforth,  III 

Pittsburgh,  Pa. 


STUDENTS 


107 


J    Edmundson,  Stephen  Taylor 

Darien,  Conn. 
J    Ehrlich,  Frank  Chapman 

Kansas  City,  Mo. 
.    Elder,  William  Scott,  III 

Fairfield,  Conn. 
>     Ellis,  Alexander,  III 

Concord,  Mass. 
J       Engvall,  David  Melville 

Dublin,  N.  H. 
Ensor,  David  Burnham 

London,  England 


J     Fairley,  Alan  Hewitt 

Riverhead,  N.  Y. 
Farnam,  James  Berwick 

Wallingford,  Conn. 
J    Farrell,  Michael  O. 

Salisbury,  Mass. 
f      Fawcett,  Alan  Blackwood 

Oakville,  Ont.,  Canada 
J     Feldman,  James  Samuel 

Waban,  Mass. 
L     Fessenden,  James  Southwick 

Ogden,  Utah 
f     Fine,  Valentine  Bliss 

Clarks  Summit,  Pa. 
J    Fink,  James  Allan 

Jackson,  Minn. 
U    Fishman,  Kenneth  Harris 

St.  Thomas,  Virgin  Islands 
U    Flad,  Ward  Beecher 

Youngstown,  Ohio 
(J    Fleischer,  Cornell  Hugh 

Pasadena,  Calif. 
U    Fleming,  David  Andrew 

Chatham,  N.  J. 


S     Gadsden,  James  Philip 

Pelham,  N.  Y. 
S     Gadsden,  Thomas  Parker 

Short  Hills,  N.  J. 
S     Gaffny,  John  Joseph,  III 

North  Andover,  Mass. 
L     Gailliard,  Robert  Lee 

Charleston  Heights,  S.  C. 
J     Galbraith,  James  Kenneth 

Cambridge,  Mass. 
U    Ganem,  Donald  Emil 

Methuen,  Mass. 
J     Ganley,  Richard  Edward 

Lawrence,  Mass. 
L     Gardner,  Kevin  Owen 

Hopkinton,  N.  H. 


U     Ermer,  Curtis  Arthur 

Andover,  Mass. 
S      Escoruela,  Andres  Joseph 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
U     Esteves,  Vernon  Xavier 

San  Juan,  P.  R. 
J      Eubanks,  Fenn  Bailey 

Chapel  Hill,  N.  C. 
U     Evans,  Peter  Seelye 

Demarest,  N.  J. 
U     Everett,  Davis  Burton 

Excelsior,  Minn. 

F 

S      Florenz,  Paul  Andrew 

Methuen,  Mass. 
J      Ford,  John 

Bronx,  N.  Y. 
U     Forsyth,  Scott  Allen 

Webster,  N.  Y. 
S      Fraker,  Ford  McKinstry 

Princeton,  N.  J. 
S      Francesco,  Steven  Anthony 

Beverly  Farms,  Mass. 
U     Freedman,  Robert  Morris 

Natick,  Mass. 
S      Freeman,  Douglas  Southall,  II 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
U     Friedlander,  David  Samuel 

Pittsburgh,  Pa. 
S      Friedman,  Michael  Alan 

Charleston,  Mo. 
L      Funkhouser,  David  Kristen 

Concord,  Mass. 
S      Funston,  George  Keith,  Jr. 

Greenwich,  Conn. 
J      Fury,  Conail  Steven 

Snoqualmie,  Wash. 


L     Gardner,  Robert  Abbe,  III 

Lake  Forest,  111. 
S      Gardner,  Steven  Hedden 

Weston,  Mass. 
U     Garten,  Allan  Michael 

Tampa,  Fla. 
U     Gates,  Donald  Robert 

Des  Moines,  Iowa 
S      Gates,  Frederick  Taylor,  III 

Nassau,  Bahamas 
J      Gearing,  Milton  LeRoy,  2nd 

Wallingford,  Conn. 
L      Gelb,  Lawrence  Nason 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
J      Gibbons,  Edmund  Graham,  III 

Tuckers  Town,  Bermuda 


1  us 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


s 

Giles,  James  David 

S 

Grafton,  Anthony  Thomas 

Oklahoma  City,  Okla. 

New  York,  N.  Y. 

L 

Ginsburg,  Jonathan 

u 

Green,  Benjamin  Paul 

Washington,  D.  C. 

Rochester,  N.  Y. 

L 

Glenn,  Bruce  Owen 

J 

Green,  Lewis  Stephen 

Arvada,  Colo. 

Lawrence,  Mass. 

S 

Glenn,  Carvel  Wayne 

s 

Griffith,  Cornelius  Lavcrn 

Greenwich,  Conn. 

Evansville,  Ind. 

L 

Glenn,  Lawrence  Edward 

L 

Griggs,  Douglas  Steven 

Greenwich,  Conn. 

Melrose,  Mass. 

U 

(ioddard,  Daniel  Convers 

L 

Grillo,  John  Michael 

Montrcal,  Que.,  Canada 

Andover,  Mass. 

U 

Gonzalez,  Carlos  Alberto 

U 

Grinberg,  Harold  David 

Santurce,  Puerto  Rico 

Pittsburgh,  Pa. 

L 

Gonzalez,  Roberto 

L 

Gross,  Henry  Robert 

Santurce,  Puerto  Rico 

Palatine,  111. 

S 

( inodspecd,  Norwick  Beauford  Houston 

L 

G  ruber,  Benjamin  Aaron 

Fairfield,  Conn. 

Salem,  N.  H. 

U 

Gordon,  John  William 

U 

Gruner,  Robert  Barnct 

Cheshire,  Conn. 

New  York,  N.  Y. 

L 

Gores,  Karl  Landis 

u 

Gudorf,  Scott  Norman 

New  Canaan,  Conn. 

Dayton,  Ohio 

S 

Gould,  Willard  Joseph,  III 

u 

Gura,  Philip  Francis 

Branford,  Conn. 

Ware,  Mass. 

]  I 


u 

Hagel,  John,  III 

L 

Harper,  Stephen  Henry 

Caparra  Heights  Station,  Puerto  Rico 

Irvington,  N.  Y. 

s 

Haley,  Mark  Layton 

L 

Harris,  Albert  William,  III 

Andover,  Mass. 

Sewell,  N.  J. 

u 

Hall,  Oakley  Maxwell,  III 

S 

Harris,  Alexander  Eisemann 

Olympic  Valley,  Calif. 

Atlanta,  Ga. 

u 

Hall,  Russell  Bruce 

U 

Harris,  Charles  Clements,  Jr. 

Springfield,  Va. 

Sewell,  N.  J. 

u 

Hament,  John  Maxwell 

J 

Harris,  Nicholas  Bennett 

Maxwell  Air  Force  Base,  Ala. 

New  York,  N.  Y. 

s 

Hammond,  William  Edward 

s 

Harrison,  Charles  Maxwell 

Greenwich,  Conn. 

Santa  Fe,  N.  M. 

S 

Hance,  William,  II 

u 

Harrison,  Richard  Granville 

Atlanta,  Ga. 

Darien,  Conn. 

J 

Hancock,  Sean  Jerome 

u 

Hart,  Henry  Ashton 

Pengilly,  Minn. 

Bethesda,  Md. 

S 

Hand,  Clark  William 

u 

Hart,  Kevin  Edward 

Andover,  Mass. 

St.  Mary's,  Pa. 

s 

Hanley,  John  Wcller,  Jr. 

u 

Hartzell,  James  Jerome 

Cincinnati,  Ohio 

Gettysburg,  Pa. 

u 

Hansen,  Jeffrey  Bayard 

L 

Hartzell,  Richard  William 

New  Canaan,  Conn. 

Kettering,  Ohio 

L 

Hansen,  John  Mark 

U 

Harward,  Vernon  Judson,  III 

u 

Parkers  Prairie,  Minn. 

Northampton,  Mass. 

Hardegree,  Gary  Michael 

s 

Hausberg,  Mark 

Smyrna,  Ga. 

Cincinnati,  Ohio 

L 

Hardy,  Christopher  Bartlett 

u 

Hawkins,  John  Richard,  III 

u 

New  York,  N.  Y. 

River  Edge,  N.  J. 

Harman,  James  Langmuir 

L 

Hawkins,  Peter  Gregory 

Rowayton,  Conn. 

River  Edge,  N.  J. 

S 

Harness,  Edward  Granville,  Jr. 

L 

Hayden,  Jonathan  Brewster 

Cincinnati,  Ohio 

Yarmouth,  Me. 

STUDENTS 


109 


U    Healey,  Todd  Stephen 

Upper  Montclair,  N.  J. 
U    Hearey,  Bruce  Gerard 

Oaklyn,  N.  J. 
L     Hearty,  James  Bowe 

Marblehead,  Mass. 
J     Hearty,  Owen  Eugene 

Marblehead,  Mass. 
U    Heatley,  John  Eldridge 

Fort  Lauderdale,  Fla. 
S     Heber,  Justin  Garland 

Green  Lake,  Me. 
L     Hecht,  Alan  Harvey 

Cape  Girardeau,  Mo. 
U    Heifetz,  Irvin  Neil 

Andover,  Mass. 
L     Henning,  Cameron  Hunt 

New  Haven,  Conn. 
L     Henningsen,  Victor  William,  III 

Pelham  Manor,  N.  Y. 
S     Hertz,  Paul  Richard 

Springfield,  Ohio 
L     Hibbard,  Foster  Leonard,  Jr. 

San  Francisco,  Calif. 
J     Higbie,  Carlton  Milo 

Grosse  Pointe  Farms,  Mich. 
L     Higby,  Lawrence  Harris,  Jr. 

Lander,  Wyo. 
U    Hildebrandt,  Andrew  Wayne 

Lawrence,  Mass. 
J     Hinkle,  Tobin  Hufstader 

Santee,  Calif. 
U    Hodge,  Ian  Gordon,  Jr. 

Lancaster,  Pa. 


L     Ide,  George  Everett 

Vestal,  N.  Y. 
S     Ingram,  Alfred  Christopher 

Chicago,  111. 
S     Ireland,  Thomas  Ellis 

New  York,  N.  Y. 


L     Jacobson,  John  Frederick,  Jr. 

Saddle  River,  N.  J. 
S     Jamieson,  Donald  Francis 

Edinburgh,  Scotland 
L     Jardis,  Charles  Edward 

Andover,  Mass. 
U    Jensen,  Frode,  III 

Riverdale,  N.  Y. 
U    Jenssen,  Thomas  Arthur 

Wmdham,  N.  H. 
U     Johanson,  David  Owen 

Wellesley,  Mass. 
L     Johns,  Glover  Steiner,  III 

New  York,  N.  Y. 


U     Hogen,  John  Elliott  Greene 

Chappaqua,  N.  Y. 
S      Holkins,  John  McGarry 

Howell,  Mich. 
S      Holland,  Baxter  Clay 

Greenwich,  Conn. 
L     Holland,  William  Welsh 

Greenwich,  Conn. 
L     Hollinger,  Peter  Lewis  Bond 

Monrovia,  Liberia 
U     Holman,  Jonathan  Harrison 

Larchmont,  N.  Y. 
J      Holmes,  Christopher 

New  Paltz,  N.  Y. 
L      Hooker,  Jonathan  Bakewell 

Guilford,  Conn. 
U     Hopkins,  Brian  James 

Rome,  N.  Y. 
L    Hosken,  John  Michael 

Lexington,  Mass. 
J      Howes,  David  Graham 

New  York,  N.  Y. 
J      Hudson,  William  Lawrence 

Concord,  Mass. 
U     Hughes,  Bruce  Allan 

Swampscott,  Mass. 
J      Humphries,  Joel  Marrin 

Long  Beach,  Calif. 
S      Huntington,  David  Champion 

Troy,  N.  Y. 
S      Hurley,  James  Robert,  Jr. 

Atlanta,  Ga. 
S      Hutchison,  Robert  Alan 

Carlisle,  Iowa 

I 

U     Irwin,  Michael  James 
New  Virginia,  Iowa 

U     Ivey,  Willie  McCoy,  Jr. 
Newport  News,  Va. 

J 

S      Johnson,  Barry  William 

Neptune,  N.  J. 
L      Johnson  Gary  Russell 

Andover,  Mass. 
L      Johnson,  John  William,  III 

Langdale,  Ala. 
S      Johnson,  Mark  Peter 

Andover,  Mass. 
S      Johnston,  William  Elliott 

Jackson,  Miss. 
L      Jones,  Christopher  Bentley 

Andover,  Mass. 
S      Jones,  Stephen  Brewster 

Brewster,  Mass. 


110 


PHILLIPS  ACADEMY 


L     Jones,  William  Pickering,  Jr.  U     Juer,  Frederick  George 

Darien,  Conn.  Dolgeville,  N.  Y. 

U     Joseph,  Jean  Paul 

San  Salvador,  El  Salvador,  C.  A. 

K 


S      Kahn,  Joseph  Plaut 

Scarborough,  N.  Y. 
U     Kaiser,  Julian  Stevens,  Jr. 

Andover,  Mass. 
U     Kaneb,  Thomas  Abraham 

Cornwall,  Ont.,  Canada 
L     Kaplan,  James  Ellis 

Nanuet,  N.  Y. 
J      Kaplan,  Paul  Henry  Daniel 

Northampton,  Mass. 
S      Kaufman,  Mark  Leslie 

Lawrence,  Mass. 
U     Kefferstan,  Robert  Dick,  II 

Andover,  Mass. 
L     Kelleher,  Hugh  Richard 

Bradford,  Mass. 
S      Keller,  Peter  Gardner 

Chestnut  Hill,  Mass. 
S      Kellogg,  Stephen  Brewster 

Weston,  Mass. 
J      Kelly,  Mark  Carroll 

Rye,  N.  Y. 
S      Kelsey,  Harvey  Marion,  III 

Rye,  N.  Y. 
L     Kelsey,  James  Talcott 

Rye,  N.  Y. 
U     Kelsey,  John  Lufkin 

Toledo,  Ohio 
L     Kemp,  Kenneth  William 

Tipton,  Iowa 
L     Kemper,  Rufus  Crosby,  3rd 

Kansas  City,  Mo. 
J      Kendall,  Richard  Becker 

Princeton,  N.  J. 
S      Kendrick,  Melvin  Southworth 

Wenham,  Mass. 
J      Kenna,  Michael  Earl 

Beverly  Farms,  Mass. 
U     Kenney,  Pardon  Robert 

Andover,  Mass. 
L     Kent,  Daniel  Leonard 

Andover,  Mass. 
S      Ketch,  Lawrence  Levant 

Denver,  Colo. 
U     Key,  Richard  Ralph 

Chevy  Chase,  Md. 
L     Kiarsis,  Victor,  Jr. 

South  Dartmouth,  Mass. 

L      Landry,  Al