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CATALOGUE, OF 

The Dundee Nursery 

D . HILL, E/vergreen Specialist 

telephone no. 6 Dundee, Illinois 


INDE.X 


Page. 

Description of Evergreens . 22 to 24 

Evergreens—Transplanted, Prices, etc. 3 to i 

Evergreens, Seedlings . 7 to S 

Evergreens and Ornamental Hedge Plants. 6 

Forest and Ornamental Tree Seedlings. 10 to 12 

Forest and Ornamental Trees, Transplanted . 8 to 10 

Fruit Trees . 12 to 14 

How and When to Plant Evergreens. 2 

Reasons Why You Should Plant Trees . 20 to 22 

Roses • • •. 19 to 20 

Small Fruits—Grape Vines, Strawberries, Raspberries, etc. 15 to 17 

Shrubs, Climbing Vines, etc. 17 to 19 

Terms and Conditions..... 1 

Weeping Trees . 1* 


OFFICE OF THE ILLINOIS STATE ENTOMOLOGIST. 

Urbana, Ill., August 28, 1902.—This is to Certify that the growing nursery 
stock and premises of the Dundee Nursery (D. Hill), situated at Dundee, Illi¬ 
nois, have been inspected according to the provisions of an “Act to prevent 
the introduction and spread in Illinois of the San Jose scale and other dan¬ 
gerous insects and contagious diseases of fruits,” approved and in force April 
11, 1899, and that no indications have been found of the presence of the San 
Jose scale or other dangerous insect or plant disease. 

This certificate is invalid after June 1, 1903. 

S. A. FORBES, State Entomologist. 


Mr. D. Hill, Dundee, Ill.: Calmar, Iowa, 1902. 

Dear Sir:—I received the evergreens ordered of you all O. K. Am very 
much pleased with them. Packing was excellent. A. G. HOLTHANS. 

Mr. D. Hill, Dundee, Ill.: Wichita. Kans., 1902. 

Dear Sir:—Please accept my thanks for the 25 Red Cedar. Trees are all 
doing fine. Will lose nothing to speak of except a few of the large ones. Out 
of 50 Black Hill Spruce 48 are doing well. Out of 50 Douglas Spruce 49 are 
making a good growth. Out of 50 Red Cedar 40 are in an excellent condition. 
Scotch and Austrian Pine not quite so good, but 40 out of 50 are showing up 
nicely. w. ,T ROOF 



























DUNDEE NURSERY. 


I 


Terms and Conditions 


In presenting this Catalogue and Price List for the fall of 1902 and the 
spring of 1903 I desire to thank my customers who have so liberally patronized 
me the past season and by honest dealing and strict attention to business, I 
hope to enjoy a continuance of the same. 

The growing of Evergreens from seed is my specialty. While my prices 
will be found lower than most reliable establishments, I am quite confident my 
trees will be equal to the best and superior to most. 

Terms of pajunent must invariably be cash, or satisfactory note or draft. 
Orders to be sent C. O. D. must be accompanied by one-fourth cash. Money 
can be sent as follows, at my risk: Draft on Chicago, Postoffice Order, Regis¬ 
tered Letter, or Express Order. Do not send money in an ordinary letter. 

Trees furnished as follows: 6 at dozen rates; 50 at 100 rates; 500 at 
1,000 rates, etc. 

All goods delivered at freight depot or express office free of charge, after 
which our responsibility ceases. 

Be particular in all cases to put the order in a distinct, definite form, with 
name, postoffice, county, and state plainly written, and give full directions as 
to route and manner in which stock is to be shipped—freight or express. 

I guarantee all my stock to be first-class in every respect and true to label, 
and to replace at one-half price, upon proper proof of good care, all stock that 
dies the first year, purchaser paying express or freight, but it is mutually 
agreed between the purchaser and myself that I am not liable for any suns 
greater than that originally paid for said stock. 

Letters of inquiry solicited and will be carefully and cheerfully answered. 
These Nurseries have been established for forty years. 

Write at once and take your choice from millions of trees—the largest 
Evergreen Nurseries in the United States. Also a general line of all kinds of 
Fruit Trees, Small Fruits, Forest Trees, Ornamentals, Roses, Shrubs, Bulbs, 
etc. Special attention is given to packing for long as well as short distance 
shipments, for which I make no charge. 

On receiving trees from a nursery the boxes or packages should be imme¬ 
diately unpacked and the roots dipped in a puddle made of fresh, mellow soil, 
about the thickness of paint ready for use, and be careful not to let the roots 
get dry before planting. Place them in a cool, shady place until ready to plant, 
and if not immediately ready, heel them in the ground by placing the roots 
in a trench, covering well up with mellow soil, and well firming with the foot; 
if the ground is dry, give some water at planting. Set the trees a little deeper 
than they stood in the nursery, treading the earth firmly about the roots when 
planting. This is one of the essentials of success. 

By permission I refer my friends and patrons to the following firms: 
Elgin National Bank; Express Agent, Dundee, Illinois; Hon. H. B. Willis, 
Judge of Kane County Circuit Court, Elgin, Illinois, and any reliable nursery 
firm, hank or commercial agency, and thousands of pleased customers through¬ 
put the United States. Yours truly, 

D. HILL, Evergreen Specialist 





2 


DUNDEE NURSERY. 


How and When to Plant Evergreens 


On pages 7 and 8 will be found the prices of the leading and most reliable 
evergreen seedlings for general planting. It is important that our patrons 
know how and when to plant. The best possible time to plant evergreens is in 
the spring when the ground has become warm and mellow, usually about corn 

Great care should be taken to have 
the ground in proper condition for 
planting, and mellow soil that has 
been cultivated to some hoed crop will 
do. Spade it deep, rake it fine and 
level, lay out the beds four feet wide 
lay a board across the end of the bed, 
and cut a trench, as shown in Fig. 2. 

Place the plants in the trench, fill¬ 
ing in moist soil, and tramp firm, as 
shown in said figure. 

Lay the board down and proceed to cut the next trench, as shown in Fig. 3. 

Put in the next row the same as Fig. 2 , and proceed with the planting, 
and after shading the bed will appear as in Fig. 6. 

If one, two or three year seedlings are planted they should be shaded as 
shown in Fig. 6, 

While hoeing and weeding the plants the shade may either be removed 
from the bed or raised. 

One, two and three year evergreen seedlings should be planted two to six 
Inches apart in the row, according to age and size. In planting it is well to us© 
b board from 6 to 10 inches wide. 




Keep them free from weeds and ground mellow, and the growth they will 
make will be surprising. After they have had two years’ growth, plant wheft) 
- ou want your shelter; have the soil in good, mellow condition, just as you 
would to plant corn; cultivate as you would corn, hoe them thoroughly, and 
don’t let a weed grow near them. The frames for shade are made of strips 
1x2 inches, and lath nailed to them one inch apart. If transplanted plants are 
Msed, the shading is not needed, although a little straw or hay should bs 
sprinkled over the tops to shade them for a few days. 

























































DUNDEE NURSERY 


3 



Medals for Best Exhibit of Hardy Evergreens. 
World’s Columbian Exposition, Chicago, 1893. 


Transplanted Evergreens 


From one to three times transplanted—stocky and well rooted. 


PSCEA PUNGENS—Blue Spruce of Colorado. 

Each. 12 


100 1,000 


Blue Spruce, selected 

blue, 5 feet ............. 

.$7 00 

$75 

00 

$... 


a 

66 

6 6 

“ 4 feet . 

. 6 00 

65 

00 



a 

6 6 

6 6 

3 feet . 

. 5 00 

55 

00 



u 

66 

66 

2 to 2 y 2 feet ...... 

. 4 50 

45 

00 



■6 6 

6 6 

extra fine 

blue iy 2 to 2 feet . 

. 3 00 

32 

00 



46 

6 6 

selected blue, 15 to 18 inch ........ 

. 2 00 

20 

00 

200 

00 

4 6 

6 ( 

green specimens, 6 feet . . . 

. 5 00 





4 6 

6 6 

6 6 

“ 5 feet ..... 

. 4 50 

45 

00 



46 

6 6 

6 6 

“ 4 feet .. 

. 4 00 

40 

00 



46 

6 6 

6 6 

“ 3 feet . 

. 3 00 

30 

00 






As they run in Nursery- 

—from 





Bright 

blue 

to green, 

4 feet ....... 

. 3 00 

30 

00 

250 

00 

6 6 

66 

66 

3 feet . 

. 2 00 

20 

00 

175 

00 

6 6 

66 

6 6 

2 feet . .. 

. .1 50 

16 

00 

125 

00 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

15 to 18 inch . ... . . 

75 

8 

00 

70 

00 

66 

66 

6 6 

12 to 15 inch . 

50 

5 

00 

iO 

00 

Where 

considerable quantity of these beautiful trees are 

wanted 


■snce ought to be given the unselected trees as they run in nursery row*. 
Many of these will develope into most beautiful colored trees. Above price* 
included digging with balls and sewing them up in burlap—well boxed and om 
cars. Sizes smaller than 2 feet will not be dug with balls unless otherwise 
agreed. The above method of digging and packing insures their living beyond 
a doubt. 















































































4 


DUNDEE NURSERY. 


ABIES EXCELSA. 


Norway Spruce 15 feet 


6 feet . 

3 to 4 feet. 

2 to 3 feet. 

18 to 24 inches 
12 to 18 inch, good . 
10 to 12 inch, good 


ABIES CANADENSIS. 


Hamlock Spruce, 


feet . 

feet . 

feet . 

18 to 24 inch . 
12 to 18 inch . 
10 to 12 inch 
6 to 10 inch 


ABIES ALBA. 


15 to 18 inch 
12 to 15 inch 
10 to 12 inch 


6 feet . 

2 to 3 feet . . 
18 to 24 inch 
12 to 18 inch 
10 to 12 inch 


Sach. 

12 


100 

1,000 

$10 

00 

100 

00 

$.. 


$... 

. 0 » 

6 

00 

60 

00 




• e w 

5 

00 

50 

00 




« O t> 

3 

00 

30 

00 




• «. n- 


75 

7 

00 

60 

00 


• & «> 


50 

5 

00 

30 

00 


♦ «. <» 


30 

3 

00 

20 

00 

175 

00 


20 

2 

00 

12 

00 

100 

@0 



1 

25 

6 

00 

50 

0§ 

Each. 

12 

100 

1,000 

$2 

00 

$20 

00 

$.. 


$... 


1 

50 

15 

00 



• • • 



75 

8 

00 

65 

00 




50 

4 

00 

30 

00 

• • • 

0 t v 


30 

2 

50 

25 

00 




30 

1 

50 

12 

00 

100 

00' 


. c 

1 

00 

9 

00 

80 

00 



1 

00 

7 

00 

60 

00 


25 

$12 

00 

$90 

00 

$... 


1 

00 

10 

00 

75 

00 




40 

3 

00 

15 

00 

125 

m 


25 

2 

00 

10 

00 

90 

m 


15 

1 

00 

7 

00 

50 

00 

do 

Seed. 






$7 

50 

$70 

00 

$... 


$... 


5 

00 

50 

00 





3 

50 

35 

00 






75 

7 

00 

50 

00 




50 

4 

00 

35 

00 




30 

1 

75 

15 

00 

100 

0.0 


20 

1 

50 

10 

00 

90 

00 


inis valuable evergreen deserves more extensive planting. It is perfectly 
fcftrdy, a rapid grower, and a long lived tree. 6, 8 and 10 feet sizes dug 
Ml and burlaped. 

ENGELMANII—Of Colorado. 

Ungelman Spruce, 6 feet ..$6 00 $..... $. 

5 feet. 5 00 50 00 ... 

3 to 4 feet ... 4 00 40 00 . 

12 to 15 inch ... 50 3 50 

ABIES CONCOLOR—From Colorado Seed. 

Concolor, selected, very fine, 6 feet .. 


30 00 


5 

4 

3 


feet 

feet 

feet 


2 feet 


12 to 15 inch.. 75 

All sizes 2 foot and over dug with balls and sewed in burlap. 


?7 50 $ 

6 50 ..... 

5 00 50 00 
4 00 40 00 
3 00 30 00 

5 50 50 00 



















































































DUNDEE NURSERY 


5 


ABiES ALBA- 


•Slack Hilis Variety. 

Each. 


12 


100 


1,000 


Black Hill 

Spruce, 12 to 18 inch .$ 

40 

$ 3 

50 

$15 00 

$... 

* • • 

a 

it 

“ 10 to 12 

inch .. 

30 

2 

00 

10 

00 



it 

i€ 

“ 6 to 10 

inch... 

25 

1 

50 

8 

00 





ABIES BAL3AMEA. 








Balsam 

Fir 

5 feet ... 

. . . $1 

50 $15 

00 

$. . 

• • 

1... 

« C 0 

a 

a 

4 feet . 

. 1 

00 

10 

00 





u 

ct 

3 feet . 


70 

5 

00 

30 

00 

• 9k 

• • 1 

a 

<t 

2 feet . 


50 

4 

00 

25 

00 

• • • 

• • • 

i c 

a 

18 to 24 inch .. 


40 

3 

00 

12 

00 

• • * 

« V » 

»< 

a 

12 to 18 inch .. 


25 

2 

00 

10 

00 

90 

m 

ti 

a 

10 to 12 inch .. 


15 

1 

00 

7 

00 

60 

o@ 




PiNUS SYLVES7R1S. 








Scotch 

Pine, 3 to 4 feet ... 

. $ 

50 

$5 

00 

$40 

00 

$... 

• 9 • 

it 

a 

2 to 3 feet ... 


30 

3 

00 

25 

00 

200 

00 

ct 

it 

18 to 24 inch . 


25 

2 

50 

15 

00 

100 

00 


tt 

12 to 18 inch . 


20 

2 

00 

10 

00 

90 

00 




PINUS AUSTRICA. 








Austrian Pine, 4 to 5 feet . 

. $ 

60 

$5 

00 

$40 

00 

$. . • 

* * 

a 


“ 3 to 4 feet . 


50 

4 

00 

30 

00 

150 

00 

a 


“ 12 to 15 inch. 

20 

1 

00 

7 

00 

60 

08 


PiNUS STROBUS. 


W ill 

a 

riuu, u . 

“ 4 feet . 

. 75 

7 

00 

-p. . 




a 

“ 3 feet . 

. 60 

6 

00 

50 

00 



ct 

“ 2 feet . 

. 50 

5 

00 

40 

00 



tt 

“ 18 to 24 inch. 

. 40 

4 

00 

25 

00 



a 

“ 12 to 18 inch .. 

. 25 

2 

50 

10 

00 


96 08 

<t 

41 10 to 12 inch... 


1 

00 

7 

00 


60 m 


PINUS PONDEROSA- 

—From Colorado. 






Finns 

Ponderosa, 5 feet. 


$7 

00 



$. 


Si 

“ 3 to 4 feet . 

. 50 

5 

00 

40 

00 

• 

• <a • • « 

it 

“ 2 to 3 feet . 

. 40 

4 

00 

25 

00 



tt 

“ 12 to 15 inch. 

. 25 

2 

00 

12 

00 

• 

• * • • * 


PINUS FLEXILIS— 

-Colorado Seed. 






Pin us 

Flexilis, 3 feet . 

.$1 50 

$15 

00 



1. 


it 

“ 2 feet . 

. 1 00 

10 

00 





a 

“ 18 to 24 inch . 

........ 75 

7 

00 

65 

00 


• 990* 


A most beautiful evergreen, like nearly all the Rocky Mountain Conifera* 
Finns Flexilis has a blue coloring. Its needles are soft like White Pine, but 
heavier—a hardy, handsome tree. Dug with ball and sewed in burlap. 

JUNiPERUS VI RGIN AN A. 


Red 

Cedar, 

5 feet . 

.$1 


$15 00 


.. $,..... 

tt 

t c 

4 feet .. 

. 1 

00 

10 00 



4f 


12 to 18 inch .. 


35 

3 50 

18 

00 . 

<f4 

it 

10 to 12 inch . 


25 

2 50 

12 

00 __ 


a 

'Q to 10 inch __ 


20 

1 00 

9 

00 . 

































































6 


DUNDEE NURSERY. 


IRISH JUNIPER. 


Each. 12 


100 1 , 00 # 


2 to 2 y 2 feet ... 1 

12 to 15 inch. 

10 to 12 inch ... 

THUYA OCCI DENTAL!S. 


2 to 3 feet, nice 
10 to 12 inch 


THUYA HOVEYI. 

Hovey’s Golden Arborvitae, 12 to 18 inch. 

Siberian Arborvitae, 10 to 12 inch. 


4 feet, very fine *.. 1 

2 to 3 feet . 

18 to 24 inch .. 

10 to 12 inch . 

6 to 10 inch.. 

THUYA PRYAMIDALIS. 

Pyramidal Arborvitae, 6 feet, nice .$2 50 $ 


25 

$12 

00 

$... 


$ 



00 

10 

00 

70 

00 




35 

3 

00 

20 

00 




25 

2 

00 

15 

00 




25 

$10 

00 

$70 

00 

$ 



00 

8 

00 

65 

00 




35 

3 

00 

25 

00 




25 

2 

50 

15 

00 

125 

§§ 

15 

1 

50 

8 

00 


75 

Of 


1 

00 

5 

00 


40 

m 

50 

$.., 


$... 


$ 



50 

15 

00 






25 

12 

00 






75 

6 

00 

50 

00 




35 

2 

50 

20 

00 




35 

$3 

00 

$20 

00 

$ 



25 

2 

50 

15 

00 



‘ r * 


Evergreen Hedge Plants 


American Arborvitae, 10 to 12 inch . 

“ “ 6 to 10 inch. 

Hemlock Spruce, 2 to 3 feet ... 

“ “ 11/ 2 to 2 feet . 

" “ 10 to 12 inch. 

Norway Spruce, 12 to 18 inch . 

“ “ 10 to 12 inch. 

White Spruce, 10 to 12 inch. 

For large sized Arborvitae see page 5. 


100 

1,00# 

. .$5 

00 

$45 0# 

. . 4 

00 

35 m 

. .30 

00 


. .20 

00 

175 00 

. . 6 

00 

50 00 

. . 8 

00 

75 00 

.. 6 

00 

55 0§ 

. . 6 

00 

55 00 


Deciduous Hedge Plants 

The following shrubs are well adapted to hedge planting. 


Barberry, common, 18 to 24 inch.$12 00 $100 00 

" “ 12 to 18 inch 10 00 90 0# 

“ “ 10 to 12 inch, seedlings . 5 00 45 00 

©sage Orange, 2 years old .. 1 50 9 0§ 

w “1 year old ... 1 00 6 00 

Locust, 12 to 15 inch. 1 00 7 00 

Bisssian Mulberry, 18 to 24 inch . 2 00 12 00 

“ “ 12 to 18 inch 1 50 10 00 

Privet, California, 12 to 18 inch . 6 00 50 00 































































DUNDEE NURSERY. 


Evergreen Seedlings 


Nursery Grown, Thrifty, Fine Plants, Well Rooted. 


PICEA PUNGENS—Of Colorado. 


12 100 

Blue Spruce, 6 to 8 inch. $ 40 $4 00 

" “ 4 to 6 inch . 30 3 00 

“ “ 3 to 4 inch . 2 00 

PICEA CONCOLOR—Of Colorado. 

Concolor, choice 12 to 15 inch ..$1 00 $8 00 

“ “ 8 to 10 inch . 75 5 00 

“ “ 6 to 8 inch . 50 4 00 

“ “ 4 to 6 inch . 40 3 00 

ABIES ALBA. 

White American Spruce, 8 to 10 inch.$ 50 $2 50 

“ “ “ 6 to 8 inch . 40 2 00 

“ “ “ 4 to 6 inch. 30 1 75 

ABIES EXCELSA. 

Norway Spruce, 12 to 15 inch, fine ..$ 50 $4 00 

“ “ 10 to 12 inch, fine. 40 3 00 

“ “ 8 to 10 inch, fine. 2 00 

“ “ 6 to 8 inch. 1 50 

“ “ 4 to 6 inch. 1 00 

ABIES NIGRA. 

American Black Spruce, fine, 10 to 15 inch .$ 50 $3 00 

“ “ “ “ 6 to 10 inch. 40 2 00 

ABIES DOUGLASSI—Colorado Seed. 

Douglas Spruce, 12 to 15 inch .$1 00 $5 00 

“ “ 10 to 12 inch . 50 4 00 

“ “ 6 to 8 inch. 3 00 

“ “ 4 to 6 inch. 2 00 

ABIES CANADENSIS. 

Hemlock Spruce, 6 to 8 inch .$ 75 $3 50 

“ “ 4 to 6 inch. 50 2 00 

BLACK HILL SPRUCE. 

Black Hill Spruce, seed collected in South Dakota 

3 to 5 inch.$ 75 $3 00 


PINUS STROBUS. 


1,000 


10,00# 

$30 

00 

$ 


20 

00 



15 

00 



$70 

00 

? 


40 

00 



35 

00 



25 

00 



$20 

00 

$ 


15 

00 



10 

00 



$30 

00 

$ 


25 

00 



15 

00 



12 

00 



8 

00 



$25 

00 

$ 


15 

00 



$45 

00 

$ 


35 

00 



20 

00 



15 

00 


• ••*»< 

$30 

00 

$ 

• • * f * • 

18 

00 




$25 00 $ 


White Pine, 12 to 15 inch .See 

“ “ 10 to 12 inch . “ 

“ “ 8 to 10 inch •. “ 

“ “ 6 to 8 inch .$ 

“ “ 4 to 6 inch ... 


Transplanted Evergreens 

a a 


$2 50 $18 00 $ 
2 00 12 00 


This is the most valuable of ail the Pines. Is being extensively planted 
for forest culture. Stock is limited. Orders should be sent early. 




















































8 


DUNDEE NURSERY. 


PINUS SYLVESTRIS. 


Scotch Pine, nice, 12 to 15 inch .$ 

“ “ “ 10 to 12 inch . 

8 to 10 inch . 

“ “ “ 6 to 8 inch . 

“ “ “ 4 to 6 inch . 

PINUS AUSTRICA. 


12 100 1,000 10,000 

. . $4 00 $30 00 $.. 

3 00 20 00 ...... 

2 00 15 00 . 

1 50 12 00 .. 

1 00 8 00 ...... 


Austrian Pine, 10 to 12 .inch.$ .. 

“ “ 8 to 10 inch. 

“ “ 6 to 8 inch. 

“ “ 4 to 6 inch ... 

PINUS MONTANA. 

Dwarf Mountain or Hugo Pine, stocky, 6 to 10 

inch ..... .$1 00 

Dwarf Mountain or Mugo Pine, stocky, 4 to 6 

inch..... 

JUNIPERUS VIRGINIA. 

Red Cedar—See transplanted trees. 


50 

$25 

00 $... 


00 

20 

00 . . . 


50 

12 

00 ... 


00 

8 

00 ... 



$3 50 $25 00 $ 
2 00 15 00 


THUYA OCCIDENTAL!S. 

Arborvitae, American, selects, 10 to 12 inch.$ 50 $3 00 $25 00 $ 

“ 8 to 10 inch... 2 00 20 00 

“ “ 4 to 6 inch .. 1 50 10 00 

' CHINESE PYRAMIDALIS. 

Pyramidal, Chinese, 10 to 12 inch, fine.. S3 00 $20 00 f 

6 to 10 inch .... .. 2 00 15 00 

“ “ 3 to 4 inch ... .. l 50 10 00 

CHINESE COMPACTA. 

Comp&cta, Chinese, 10 to 12 inch .. 3 00 20 00 

“ “ 6 to 10 inch . 2 00 15 00 

" “ 3 to 4 inch... 1 50 10 00 

CHINESE GOLDEN. 

Golden, Chinese, 8 to 10 inch. $3 00 $25 00 

3 to 4 inch. 1 75 12 00 


Note.—These beautiful Chinese Arborvitaes are especially recommended 
for Southern States, Pacific States, Southeastern States, and south half of Illi¬ 
nois, Nebraska, and Kansas. 


Most of above varieties of evergreen seedlings can be supplied in lots of 
1@@,0Q0 and over. Write for prices on large lots. 


Transplanted Shade and 
Ornamental Trees 


EUROPEAN LARCH. 


12 ioo i,o®e 

$1 00 $6 00 $... 


European Larch, 18 to 24 inch 
See Larch Seedlings. 


Each. 


• * e 




















































BUNMK NURSERY. 


9 


AMERICAN LINDEN. 


Each. 12 

Linden, American, nice, 5 inch diam.$4 00 $40 00 

“ “ “ 4 inch diam. ......... 3 00 30 00 

“ “ “ 3 inch diam. . 2 25 20 00 

“ “ “ 2 to 2V Z inch diam. ... 1 50 15 00 

“ extra nice, 8 to 10 feet, 1 y 2 

to 2 inch diam..... 1 00 10 00 

Linden, American, extra nice, 6 to 7 feet, 1 to 

1 y 2 inch diam.... 50 5 00 

Linden, American, extra nice, 4 to 5 feet.. 30 3 00 


AMERICAN WHITE ELM. 


Elm, American White, 4 inch diam. ..$4 00 $40 00 

“ “ “ 3 inch diam. .. 3 00 30 00 

“ “ 44 2 inch diam. 2 00 18 00 

" “ 44 8 to 10 feet. 1 00 9 00 

“ 44 44 6 to 8 feet. 50 5 00 

“ “ “ 4 to 0 feet. 40 4 00 

“ 44 “ 3 to 4 feet .. 20 2 00 


AMERICAN WHITE ASH. 


100 


$...«•« | 


85 00 

35 00 
20 00 


$375 00 $ 
200 00 
100 00 
50 00 
35 00 
25 00 
15 00 


Ash, 

White American, 4 inch diam. ...... 

......$3 50 $35 00 $ 



ii 

“ “ 3 inch diam.. 

. 2 50 

25 00 



ii 

44 “ 2 inch diam. ..... 

...... 1 50 

15 00 

75 

00 

it 

“ 44 10 to 12 feet ...... 

. 1 00 

9 00 

60 

00 

a 

44 44 6 to 8 feet ........ 

.. 50 

5 00 

35 

00 

a 

44 44 4 to 6 feet .. 

...... 40 

4 00 

25 

00 


EUROPEAN MOUNTAIN ASH. 

Mountain Ash, European, 10 to 12 feet, fine-$2 00 $20 00 $. $ 

“ 44 “ 6 to 8 feet . 1 00 9 00 60 00 

“ 44 Oak leaved, fine specimen, iy 2 to 

2 inch diam. .... 1 50 12 00 . 

Mountain Ash, Oak leaved, 4 to 6 feet. 1 00 10 00 . 

CATALPA SPECIOSA. 


Catalpa, fine, 4 inch diam..$ 2 00 

44 44 3 inch diam. . 1 50 

44 “ 2 inch diam. 1 50 

“ “ 8 to 9 feet . 75 

“ “ 4 to 6 feet ...... 40 


$20 00 $. $ 

15 00 . 

1200 8500.. 

7 00 40 00 

3 00 20 00 


CAROLINA POPLARS. 


Poplars, Carolina, 6 inch diam,. fine 
“ 44 5 inch diam., fine 

“ “ 4 inch diam. 

“ “ 3 inch diam. ... 

“ “ 2 inch diam. 

" 44 8 to 10 feet. 

“ 44 6 to 8 feet ..... 


$5 

00 

$50 

00 J 

L.. 


4 

00 

40 

00 



3 

00 

30 

00 



2 

50 

24 

00 



1 

50 

12 

00 

75 

00 

1 

00 

9 

00 

50 

00 


50 

5 

00 

35 

00 


SOFT OR SILVER MAPLE. 


Maple, Soft, 3 inch diam. 
“ 44 10 to 12 


$2 oo m 00 $.$ 

1 00 i 00 10 00 


1,000 




































































































IO 


DUNDEE NURSERY, 


Maple, Soft, 8 to 10 feet 
“ “ 6 to 8 feet 

“ “ 4 to 6 feet 


Each. 

12 

100 

1,000 

75 

7 50 

40 00 


50 

5 00 

30 00 


25 

2 50 

15 00 



HARD OR SUGAR MAPLE. 


Maple, Sugar, 2 .inch diam.$1 75 $15 00 

“ “ iy 2 to 2 inch diam. 1 25 12 00 

“ “ 6 to 7 feet. 75 6 00 

“ “ 4 to 6 feet ..'. 30 3 00 

NORWAY MAPLE. 

Maple, Norway, 3 inch diam., fine .$3 00 $30 00 

“ “ 2 inch diam., fine . 2 00 20 00 

“ “ iy 2 to 2 inch diam., fine . 1 50 15 00 

“ “ 4 to 6 feet. 40 4 00 

“ “ 2 to 3 feet. 20 2 00 



40 00 
25 00 



30 00 
7 00 


WEIRS CUT LEAF MAPLE. 


Maple, Cut Leaf, 6 to 8 feet..$1 50 $15 00 $. 

“ “ “ 4 to 6 feet.. 75 7 00 40 00 

OAKS. 

Oak, Red, 8 to 10 feet....$1 50 $15 00 $. 

“ “ 6 to 8 feet . 1 25 12 00 . 

“ “ iy 2 to 2 feet . 10 1 00 6 00 

BOX ELDER. 

Box Elder, 4 inch diam...|3 00 |. f. 

“ 3 inch diam... 2 00 20 00 ...... 

“ “ 8 to 10 feet ... 1 00 9 00 50 00 

“ “ 6 to 8 feet. 50 5 00 35 00 

“ “ 4 to 6 feet. 30 3 00 15 00 

HORSE CHESTNUT. 

Chestnut, Horse, 3 inch diam..$3 50 $35 00 $. 

“ “ 2 inch diam., 8 to 10 feet. 2 50 20 00 . 

" “ 4 to 6 feet. 1 00 9 00 65 00 

SWEET CHESTNUT. 

Chestnut, American, Sweet, 6 to 8 feet ..$ 75 $6 00 $. 

“ “ “ 4 to 6 feet. 50 4 50 




$ 


¥ 


¥ 


$ 


M • *! 1 


Shade and Ornamental Tree Seedlings 


EUROPEAN LARCH. 


ioo 1,000 io,ooa 

Larch, European, 10 to 15 inch ...$2 50 $20 00 $.. 

“ “ 10 to 12 inch .. 2 00 15 00 . 













































































DUNDEE NURSERY 


I I 


AMERICAN LINDEN. 


... , , , 100 1,000 

Linden, American, 18 to 24 inch ..$4 50 $40 00 

“ “ 15 to 18 inch .. 3 50 30 00 

10 to 15 inch .. 2 50 20 00 

“ “ 6 to 10 inch ... 2 00 15 00 

AMERICAN ASH. 

Ash, American, 2 to 3 feet...$2 50 $20 00 

“ “ 2 years, 12 to 18 inch. 1 00 6 00 

“ “ 10 to 12 inch. 75 4 00 

AMERICAN WHITE ELM. 

Elm, American White, 2 years, 12 to 18 inch.$1 00 $7 00 

“ “ “ 1 year, 10 to 12 inch. 75 4 00 

MAPLES. 

Maple, Soft, 2 years, 18 to 24 inch .$1 00 $7 50 

“ 1 year, 12 to 18 inch . 75 5 00 

Hard or Sugar, 10 to 12 inch ... 2 00 15 00 

“ “ “ 6 to 10 inch . 1 50 10 00 

“ Norway, 15 to 18 inch .. 3 00 25 00 

“ “ 12 to 15 inch... 2 50 20 00 

“ “ 10 to 12 inch... 2 00 15 00 

BOX ELDER. 

Box Elder, 3 to 4 feet. $6 00 $50 00 

“ “ 2 to 3 feet .. 4 00 30 00 

“ “ iy 2 to 2 feet. 2 00 10 00 

“ “ 12 to 18 inch . 1 00 5 00 

“ “ 10 to 12 inch... 75 3 00 

CATALPA SPECIOSA. 

Catalpa, Hardy, 18 to 24 inch.$1 50 $8 00 

“ “ 1 year, 12 to 18 inch .. 1 00 5 00 

RUSSIAN MULBERRY. 

Mulberry, Russian, 2 to 3 feet...$3 00 $20 00 

“ “ 2 years, 18 to 24 inch . 2 00 15 00 

“ “ 2 years, 12 to 18 inch . 1 50 10 00 

“ “ 1 year, 10 to 12 inch . 75 7 00 

“ “ 1 year, 6 to 10 inch . 50 3 00 

BLACK WALNUT. 

Walnut, Black, 1 year, 18 to 24 inch .$2 50 $20 00 

“ “ 1 year, 12 to 18 inch. 1 50 12 00 

“ English, 6 to 10 inch .10 00 . 

Pecans, 6 to 10 inch..... 6 00 . 

YELLOW LOCUST. 

Locust, Yellow, 12 to 15 inch .$2 00 $10 00 

“ “ 10 to 12 inch . 1 50 7 00 

OAKS. 

Oak, Red, 10 to 12 inch.$5 00 $. 

“ White, 10 to 12 inch . 5 00 40 00 

“ Pin, 15 to 18 inch.:.6 50 . 


10,000 

$ .. 


100 00 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 




$ 


















































































12 


DUNDEE NURIIHY. 


COTTONWOOD. 


Cottonwood, 2 years 
1 year 


100 1,000 10,000 

$1 00 $5 00 $. 

75 4 00 . 


Tlie above forest and ornamental tree seedlings are all nursery grown, 
therefore must not be compared with wild trees pulled up in the woods and 


along river bottoms. 


BARBERRY. 

Barberry, Thumbergia, very pretty, 12 to 15 inch.$6 00 $55 00 $ 

10 to 12 inch... 5 00 45 00 

Barberry, Purple Leaf, transplanted, iy 2 to 2 feet.12 00 100 00 

Purple Leaf, transplanted, 12 to 18 inch. 8 00 75 00 

Common, seedlings, 12 to 15 inch. 5 00 40 00 

“ “ “ 10 to 12 inch . 3 50 30 00 


WEEPING TREES. 


Each. 10 100 

Cut Leaf Weeping Birch, 4 to 6 feet. $2 00 $18 00 $. 

Weeping Willow, Kilmarnock, 2 year heads ... 1 50 12 00 

Wisconsin, Weeping Willow, 6 feet... 1 00 8 00 

Weeping Elm, Camperdown, 2 year heads .. 2 00 17 00 

Weeping Mulberry, 2 year heads, 6 feet stems.... 2 50 . 

2 year heads, 5 y 2 feet stems . 2 25 20 00 . 

“ “ 2 year heads, 5 feet stems. 2 00 17 00 . 


TEAS' WEEPING MULBERRY. 



Another season’s growth fully sustains what we have 
heretofore claimed for this remarkable tree—unequaled 
in gracefulness and beauty, combined with the strongest 
vigor, health and hardiness. And the unsolicited testi¬ 
mony of many having them growing in various parts of 
the country, from Wisconsin and Canada to Florida, from 
the bleak hills of New England, the sunny vales of Cali¬ 
fornia and the arid plains of Texas, all confirm our claim 
that it is the best Hardy Weeping Tree ever produced. 



Fruit Department 

W© have many varieties of fruit which can be supplied on application, but 
name below only those which have proven hardy and valuable in the north and 
western states. 


APPLES AND CRABS. 


Apples, 5 to 6 feet . 

“ 3 to 5 feet . 

Cherries, 5 to 6 feet. No. 1 

" 3 to 4 feet . 

Plums, 5 to 6 feet.. 

3 to 4 feet . 

Pears, 6 to 6 feet. 

“ 4 to 5 feet.. 

Peaches, 4 to 6 feet.. 

Apricots, 4 to 6 feet ...... 


Each. 

Doz. 

100 

.$ 30 $3 00 $25 00 


2 50 

17 60 


7 50 

60 00 


4 50 

40 00 


6 00 

40 00 


4 50 

35 00 


6 00 

50 00 


4 10 

40 00 


4 50 

35 00 


4 50 

35 00 






















































©UNDgg NimsgPtY, 


13 


SUMMER VARIETIES. 

Tetofsky.-—A Russian apple; medium size with a yellow ground, handsomely 
striped with red, and covered with a whitish bloom; flesh juicy, sprightly, 
acid and agreeable. Tree a moderate stocky grower; very hardy and pro¬ 
ductive. July and August. 

Red Astrachan.—Large, roundish, nearly covered with deep crimson, over¬ 
spread with a thick bloom; very handsome; juicy, good. The tree is very 
hardy, a free grower, and a good bearer. 

Yellow Transparent.-—A Russian apple; medium size, roundish, oblate, slightly 
conical; skin pale yellow when fully matured; flesh tender, juicy, 
sprightly, sub-acid; good; a free grower. August. 

FALL VARIETIES. 

Mameuse (Snow Apple).—Medium size; deep crimson; flesh snowy white, ten¬ 
der, melting and delicious. Tree vigorous, with dark wood; one of the 
finest dessert fruits, and valuable for market; succeeds particularly well 
in the north. November to January. 

Haas (Fall Queen, Horse).—Large, flat, ribbed or quartered skin, yellowish 
green, streaked and nearly covered with a dull brownish red; flesh white, 
tender, juicy, sub-acid, good. Tree very hardy and vigorous. 

Oldenburg (Duchess of Oldenburg).—A large, beautiful Russian apple; round¬ 
ish; streaked red and yellow; tender, juicy and pleasant. A kitchen apple 
of best quality, and esteemed by many for dessert. Tree a vigorous, 
fine grower, and a young and abundant bearer. Very hardy. Succeeds well 
in the Northwest, where most varieties fail. August and September. 

Wealthy.—Originated near St. Paul, Minn. Fruit large, roundish; skin 
smooth, oily, mostly covered with dark red; flesh white, fine, juicy, sub¬ 
acid, very good. Tree very hardy, a free grower and productive. A variety 
of much value, on account of its great hardiness and good quality. 

WINTER VARIETIES. 

Ben Davis.—A large, handsome, striped apple, of good quality. Tree very 
hardy, vigorous and productive; a late keeper; highly esteemed in the 
West and Southwest. 

Grimes' Golden.—Medium to large size; skin golden yellow, sprinkled with gray 
dots; flesh crisp, tender, juicy, sprightly, very good to best. Tree hardy, 
vigorous, productive; grown in the South and Southwest. 

Jonathan.—Medium size; red and yellow; flesh tender, juicy and rich; a mod¬ 
erate grower; shoots light-colored, slender and spreading; very produc¬ 
tive. One of the best varieties either for table or market. 

Tolman's Sweet.—Medium size; pale, whitish yellow, slightly tinged with red; 
flesh firm, rich and very sweet; excellent for cooking. Tree a free grower, 
upright, and very productive. 


CRABS. 

Whitney.—Large; skin smooth, glossy green, striped, flashed with carmine; 
flesh firm, juicy, and flavor very pleasant. Tree very hardy. 

Hyslop.—Large, red; very productive. One of the standard sorts. 

Martha.—One of the best. Hardy and very productive; excellent for canning 
and cooking. 






14 


DUNDEE NURSERY. 


CHERRIES. 

Early Richmond.—An early red, acid cherry; very valuable for cooking early in 
the season. Ripens through June. Tree a free grower, hardy and prolific; 
very healthy. 

Montmorency.—Fruit large, and one of the finest flavored in this class; tree a 
free grower; hardy and prolific. 

English Mocello.—Large; dark red, nearly black; tender, juicy, acid, rich. 

PLUMS. 

Lombard.—Medium size; oval; violet red; flesh yellow, juicy and pleasant. 
Tree very vigorous, a great bearer, and peculiarly well adapted to light 
soils. Very hardy. 

De Sota.—One of the best of our native varieties. Probably more extensively 
planted throughout the Northwest than any other kind. Fruit medium in 
size, with yellow ground, overlaid with a delicate crimson when ripe. Of 
excellent quality. Tree hardy, and an early and productive bearer. 

Forest Garden.—An early ,dark red plum of good quality. Tree hardy and pro¬ 
ductive. Ripens just before De Sota. 

Hawkeye. In our opinion the best late plum for market grown in the west. 
Fruit large; round, reddish purple, covered with blue bloom when ripe. 
Tree a strong grower, with fruit evenly distributed over the branches. Can 
be shipped for long distances and arrive in good condition. For commer¬ 
cial purposes or for a family orchard the varieties named above cannot be 
excelled. 

PEACHES. 

Alexander.—Medium to large size; skin greenish white, nearly covered with 
deep, rich red; flesh melting, juicy, sweet. Tree vigorous and productive; 
one of the largest and best of the extra early varieties. 

Hill’s Chili.—Medium size; oval; skin yellow, shaded with dark red; flesh 
half melting, sweet. Esteemed on account of hardiness and productive¬ 
ness. 

Champion. A new, early peach; large, handsome, creamy white with red 
cheek; sweet, rich, juicy, free stone. Hardy and productive. 

Elbeita. Originated in Georgia a few years ago, and has proved to be one of 
the most valuable of the newer varieties. The fruit is large, handsome, 
with golden yellow skin, covered with a bright crimson blush. Flesh yel¬ 
low, juicy, quality good. It bears transportation well, and is a variety of 
promise. 

PEARS. 

Bartlett. One of the most popular pears; large, buttery and melting, with a 
rich, musky flavor. A vigorous, erect grower; bears young and abund¬ 
antly. 

^ lemish Beauty, A large, beautiful, melting, sweet pear. Tree very hardy, 
vigorous and fruitful. 

Keiffer.—Large; skin rich golden yellow, sprinkled thickly with small dots and 
often tinted with red on one side; flesh slightly coarse, juicy, melting, 
with a pronounced quince flavor. Tree very vigorous, and an early and 
great yielder. 

Beurre d Anjou. A large, handsome pear, buttery and melting, with sprightly 
vinous flavoi, keeps into mid-winter. Tree a vigorous grower and good 
bearer. Fruit commands very high prices in the market. 






DUNDEE NURSERY. 


15 


Grapes 

I offer only the hardiest and best varieties. 

MOORE’S EARLY—Bunch large; berry large, round, with heavy blue bloom; 
vine exceedingly hardy, entirely exempt from mildew or disease: Its 
earliness makes it desirable for an early market; its hardiness particu¬ 
larly adapted it to Canada and northern parts of the United States. Suc¬ 
ceeds admirably in the south. 

WORDEN.—A splendid large grape cf the Concord type, but earlier, larger in 
bunch and berry, and of decidedly better quality; vine hardier than the 
old stand-by, and every way as healthy. 

Each. Doz. 100 

Moore’s Early and Worden, 2 years ....$ 25 $2 50 $15 00 

Concord, 2 years . 15 1 50 10 00 

Bunch very large, berries black, sweet, and the best all-around grape for 
family use. Hardiest and most productive vines. 

Niagara, 2 years... 25 2 50 15 00 

Bunch medium; berry large and greenish white; good for family use and 
market. A late keeper. Vines hardy and productive. 

Poeklington, 2 years . 25 2 50 15 00 

Bunch medium; berry large; golden yellow; fair quality, good for des¬ 
serts and market; late. Vines fairly hardy and productive. 

Agawam, 2 years. 25 2 50 15 00 

Bunch large; berries large and red; musk flavor; late keeping. Vines 
very vigorous and productive. 

Cottage, 2 years. 25 2 50 15 00 

Bunch small; berries small and black; very early; good for family use 
and market. Vine hardy and productive. 

Salem, 2 years . 25 2 50 15 00 

Bunch large; berry large; coppery red; one of the best to use when half 
ripe for pies, jelies, etc. Late. Vines hardy and productive. 

Brighton, 2 years. 25 2 50 15 00 

Bunch large; berry large; red; excellent quality; late. Vines hardy and 
productive. 

Moyer, 2 years . 25 2 50 15 00 

Very much like the Delaware, except lighter colored and more productive. 

Diamond, 2 years. 25 2 50 15 00 

Bunch large, berries medium; greenish white; fine quality. Vines hardy 
and productive. 

Early Ohio. 25 2 50 15 00 

Introduced by C. S. Curtice, N. Y., and said to be fine and two weeks 
earlier than Moore’s Early. 


Gooseberries 


Plant three to four feet apart each way, manure well, and after fruit is gath¬ 
ered, prune out all old wood. 

ENGLISH VARIETIES. 


INDUSTRY.— The best English gooseberry yet introduced; of vigorous up¬ 
right growth and a greater cropper than any other known variety, berries 
of the largest size, one and one-half inches in diameter and of most 
excellent flavor, both pleasant and rich; color, when fully ripe, dark red. 

% years ......... _____ / .50c each; $5.00 per dozen; $30.00 per 100 
















16 


DUNDEE NURSERY. 


AMERICAN VARIETIES. 

Downing.—Very large, handsome, pale green and of excellent quality for both 
cooking and table use; bush a vigorous grower and free from mildew. 

Houghton Seedling.—Small' to medium, roundish, oval, pale red; sweet, tender, 
very good; plants spreading, shoots slender; very productive. 

Smith’s Improved.—Large, pale greenish yellow; skin thin; of excellent qual¬ 
ity, being unsurpassed by any other variety for table use or cooking; bush 
moderately vigorous and excessively productive. 

2 years.20c each; $2.00 per doz.; $12.00 per 100 

Red Jacket.—A new red gooseberry of the American type. Large, hardy and 
very productive; far superior to the common varieties in cultivation. 

2 years ....50c each; $5.00 per dozen 


Currants 

Set four feet apart in rich ground, cultivate well or mulch heavily; prune out 
old wood, so that each remaining shoot will have room to grow. If the currant 
worm appears, dust with hellebore; manure freely. 

Lee’s Prolific (Black).—A new English variety. The fruit is large and of 
superior quality; the bush is a vigorous grower and productive. 

Cherry (Red).—Berry sometimes more than half an inch in diameter; bunches 
short; the plant is very vigorous and productive when grown on good soil 
and well cultivated. 

Red Dutch.—An old variety, excellent and well known. 

Victoria.—Large, bright red, with very long bunches; late, good bearer. 

White Grape.—Very large, yellowish white, sweet or very mild acid; excellent 
quality and valuable. 

2 years...20c each; $2.00 per dozen; $12.00 per 100 

North Star.—New, hardy; a northern variety.30c each; $3.00 per dozen. 

Pomona.—New, said to be the sweetest, best quality and the most productive 
.. .....50c each. 


Raspberries 

Black varieties, strong roots.10c each; $1.00 per dozen; $6.00 per 100 

Tyler, or Souhegan.™Large, early, hardy and productive. 

Gregg.—Large, late, very productive. 

Older .20c each; $1.00 per dozen; $6.00 per 100 

Large, medium, early, best quality, hardy and productive; best all-round 
berry for table or market. 

Red Varieties.10e each; 50c per dozen; $5.00 per 100 

Turner.—Well-known, large, productive, early. 

Cuthbert.—Well-known, large, productive, late. 

Loudon ... 20c each; $2.00 per dozen. 

Said to be a seedling of the Turner crossed with Cuthbert. It has the 
hardiness and quality of the former, with the size and productiveness of 
the latter. Large, broadly conical; beautiful red. Acknowledged by all 
leading horticulturist! to h© the best red raspberry in cultivation. 













DUNDEE NURSERY. 


l 7 


Blackberries 

Snyder.—Large, fine flavored, hardy and productive. The only variety we rec¬ 
ommend for general planting in the West. 

One year plants, strong.15c each; 75c per dozen; $5.00 per 100 

Ancient Briton.—Best for northern climate, because easily wintered by cover¬ 
ing. One year plants, strong .. ,20c each; $1.50 per dozen; $10.00 per 1/M 

Junefoerries 

Dwarf, 1 to 2 feet.25c each; $2:50 per dozen; $15.00 per 100 

Grows in bush form. Its fruit is good for pies, sauce, etc., and its beautiful 
white flowers make it a desirable shrub. 

Garden Roots 

Rhubarb.—Strong roots .20c each; $1.50 per dozen; $10.00 per 100 

Asparagus.—Conover’s Colossal, 2 years. 10c each; 75c per dozen; $5.00 per 100 

Strawberries 

Can furnish many varieties, but the following are the best. 

Prices: 25, 50c; 100, $1.50. 

Bederwood (s).—Medium; early; good quality, vigorous and productive. A 
Good fertilizer. 

Warfield (p).—Medium; dark red; good quality, hardy and productive. 
Crescent (p).—Well known everywhere. Very good. 

Captain Jack (s).-—Medium; firm; a good fertilizer. 

Bubach (p).—Large; soft; one of the best for home market; strong. 

Price .25, 75c; 100, $2.00. 

Jessie (s).—Large; best quality, fair bearer; good fertilizer for Bubach. 

Price ....25, 75c; 100, $2.00. 

Parker Earl (s).—Large; fruit stems strong, bearing large clusters; late; 
plant stocky, forming new plants slowly; very hardy and productive. 

Price .... .25, $1.00; 100, $3.00. 


Hardy Ornamental Flowering Shrubs 


Each. Dos. 

Spires Van Houetti (see description next page) .$ 50 $4 00 

Althea, double, white, red and purple, 3 to 4 feet. 50 3 50 

Upright and climbing Honeysuckle, 3 to 4 feet . 50 3 50 

Lilacs, purple and white, 3 to 4 feet. 50 3 50 

Barberry, purple leaf, 2 to 3 feet . 50 3 50 

Japan Quince, 2 to 3 feet . 50 3 50 

Deutzia, double white and pink. Snowballs and Dogwood, Purple 

Fringe, Snowberry, Syringas, two varieties, 3 to 4 feet. 50 3 50 


Weigelas—Weigela Rosea.—This is one of the most charming shrubs in culti¬ 
vation. It cannot be too highly recommended. The flowers are large and 
of a deep rosy color. They are borne in such profusion that the whoi« 
plant appears a mass of lovely blooms. 

Large plants. 

Pure white, large plants 


Each, 50c: dozen, $4.00. 
Each, 50c; dozen, $4.00. 






















1 8 


DUNDEE NURSERY. 


HYDRANGEA GRANDiFLORA. 

The Hydrangea Grandiflora continues to be one of the best and most hand¬ 
some ornamental shrubs ever grown. It blooms finely the first year and gets 
better and grows large with age. It grows 3 to 4 feet high, is perfectly hardy 
in all parts of the country, needs no protection, blooms in July and August 
when other flowers are scarce, and remains in bloom two or three months. 
The flowers are pure white, afterwards changing to pink and rich coppery 
red, and are borne in immense pyramidal tresses more than a foot long and 
nearly as much in diameter. Large 2 year old plants, cut back, ready for plant¬ 
ing. Each, 50c; dozen, $4.00. 


SPIREA VAN HOUTTEh 

Van Houttei—Spires, 
The grandest of all 
Spireas. It is a beauti¬ 
ful ornament for the 
lawn at any season, but 
when in flower it is a 
complete fountain of 
white blooms, the fol¬ 
iage hardly showing. 
Clusters of twenty or 
thirty fiat white florets 
make up the raceme, 
and these clusters are 
set close along the droop¬ 
ing stem. Perfectly 
hardy and an early 
bloomer. Strong plants. 
2 y 2 to 3 feet, 5 to 10 
hems. 

Each, 50c. Dozen, $4.00., 


Climbing Shrubs and Vines 

Each. Dos.. 


Clematis.—By all odds the most popular of all hardy climbers, 
of easy growth, needs but slight protection and rewards the 
grower with innumerable blossoms. Large three-year-old 

roots .......$1 00 $. ... 

Snowflakes.—Very fine white variety, blooming freely. A three- 

year-old plant bearing hundreds of blossoms .. 1 00 

Jackmannii.—Large purple. Well known, very hardy, the finest 

of them all. Large three-year-old roots. 1 00 

Coccinia.—Immensely popular, growing fully twelve feet high, 
covering the wall with numerous bright coral scarlet fiow^ers. 

Large three-year-old roots ... 1 00 .... 

Madame.—Edw. Andre. Grand new crimson velvet clematis, 

very fioriferous and fine . 1 00 

Paniculata.—Desirable, strong grower, very sweet scented flow¬ 
ers, pure white. Strong plants. See descriptions below. 1 00 ... „ 

















DUNDEE NURSERY. 


Ampelosis Veitchii.—Out doors grown, three years. 75 6 01 

Honeysuckle.—Hall’s Japan, monthly; fragrant, strong plants. .. 50 4 00 

Each. Doz„ 

Trumpet Vine.—Strong plants. 50 4 00 

Wistaria.—Chinese White .... 1 00 8 00 

Wistaria.—Chinese purple, strong plants . 50 4 00 

CLEMATIS PANICULATA. 


This wonderful .flower blooms in July and lasts until September. It is one 
o£ the finest of hardy climbers, with handsome foliage, of very vigorous and 
rapid growth, and produces in late summer dense sheets of medium sized, pure 
white flowers of the most pleasing fragrance. Each branch let is thickly set 
with these showy flowers, and altogether produce a most gorgeous sight. This 
is a new Japanese plant, perfectly hardy, and finely adapted to use for any 
covering purpose. 

Extra large three-year-old vines for immediate bloom... .Each, $1.00; six, $4.5© 


Hybrid Perpetual Roses 


This class of roses is admirably suit¬ 
ed for garden culture, for the forma¬ 
tion of rose beds, hedges, and perma¬ 
nent plantations where hardy varieties 
of roses are desired They are of easy 
culture and luxuriate in a deep rich 
soil. They are benefitted by mulching 
with leaves or strawy manure placed 
around the roots in the fall of the 
year. Prune according to the habit of 
growth, cutting back close all weak 
shoots and shortening the long canes 
to a convenient length. 

My roses are grown in open ground, 
are strong, heavy rooted plants, two to 
years old; will give an abundance of bloom the first year. Only the best. 


varieties are offered. Each. 

Gen. Jacqueminot. —Brilliant crimson, very large, globular and excellent; 
a free bloomer unsurpassed in its clear, rich crimson scarlet color. 

Large plants ....... 50c 

Anna DeDiesbach.—Bright rose color, very large and showy; particularly 
fine in bud; flower lightly cupped; a vigorous grower; one of the 

best. Large plants .. 50c 

Pierre Notting.—Blackish red, shaded with violet; very large and full; 

form globular; habit good; one of the best dark roses. 50c 

Prince Camille DeRohan.—Deep, velvet crimson; large; moderately full. 50c 
Paul Neyron.—Flowers very large, often measuring five inches in diam¬ 
eter; perfect in shape; color deep shining rose, very fresh and 
pretty, It is a very strong grower and remarkably free bloomer. 

Large plants . 50c 

Marshall P. Wilder.—Lovely light red, very fragrant, popular and one of 

the best for bedding. 50c 

John Hopper.—Bright rose; large and full; fragrant and profuse 

bloomer. 50c 

Gen. Washington.—Bright red with crimson shading; very full and free 

bloomer; fragrant . 50c 



















20 


DUNDEE NURSERY. 


Each. 


Coquette des Alps.—White, slightly pink center; flowers on long stem; 

medium size; strong grower .. 50c 

American Beauty.—Large; deep pink; delicious odor; half-hardy out 

doors......... 50c 

ftugosa Rubra.—Single; bright red, succeeded by large, red berries or 

pods, a great acquisition . 50,* 

ftugosa Alba.—Single; pure white; very hardy and like Rubra has a 

very beautiful leaf .. .... 50c 

Madam G. Bruant.—A Hybrid Rugosa; semi-double, fragrant; pure 

white; hardy. ..... 50c 


Moss Roses.—Salet, Perpetual white, crested moss... .Each, 50c; dozen, $4.50 

Collection Hardy Climbing Roses 

Prairie Queen.—Clear, bright pink, sometimes with white stripes; large, 


compact and globular, very double and full; blooms in clusters; one 

of the finest ...... 50c 

Baltimore Belle.—Pale plush variegated, carmine, rose and white; very 
double; flowers in beautiful clusters, the whole plant appearing a 
perfect mass of bloom; one of the very best climbing roses...._ 50c 


Some Reasons for Planting 

1.—It pays in the in¬ 
creased value imparted to 
land, as measured by their 
cost. Certain beautiful, 
stately trees possess great 
value. Shade and fruit trees 
are called to mind, which 
cost their owners not three 
dollars apiece all told, 
but which today would 
not be spared for $300, $500 
or $1,000 apiece. Rail¬ 
roads taking planted lands 
often pay from $30 to $300 
each for trees occupying 
the same. The writer 
knows of $600 apiece hav¬ 
ing been awarded in solid 
cash to the owner for trees 
that stood on some land 
that was needed for a cer¬ 
tain town park. 

The planting of these 
trees paid enormously, for 
besides the money realized 
in the sales alluded to, the 
priceless delight in shade, 
trees had previously given 
shelter and beauty for 
many years. The cost was 
as nothing. Such returns 
not unfrequently follow 
judicious planting. 


















DUNDEE NURSERY. 


2 I 


2.—IT PAYS FROM THE BETTER LIVING AND INCREASED COMFORTS 
THAT SPRING FROM PLANTED GROUND. 

The free use not only of fruits, but also of garden vegetables, should be 
enjoyed by every family in the land daily the year round. The children 
especially should be treated to all the luscious fruits, fresh and preserved, that 
they may desire to eat—none should be deprived of the light and excellent 
food to be found in the choice fruits and vegetables so easily grown. 

Many troublesome diseases are unknown to the free users of a largely 
vegetable diet. A convincing argument for the value of fruit is this. Settlers 
in a new country improve in health as their orchards begin to yield freely. 
Sailors in the frigid zone succumb to severe, sometimes fatal diseases, very 
soon after their supplies of fruits and vegetables give out. 

Statisticans prove beyond any doubt that people on an average live longer 
now than in past centuries. This fact should in a large part be ascribed to the 
rapidly increasing use of fruits and vegetables in recent years in all civilized 
lands. 

The presence of trees about a place contributes greatly to the comfort of 
man and beast. A dense belt of trees, especially evergreens, to the windward 
of a home will save the consumption of many an additional ton of coal in keep¬ 
ing the residence at an agreeable temperature. A similar gain comes in the 
saving of feed and the increased thrift of live stock in stables that are welt 
sheltered from wintery storms. The summer life of man and beast is made 
more pleasant for the presence of an abundance of shade trees. Increase the 
trees of the land, and we not only add to the attractiveness of our country, but 
that is provided which modifies the conditions of freshets, of drouth, and of 
sweeping gales and cold. 

8—IT PAYS IN THE PROFITS THAT MAY BE DERIVED FROM THE SALE 

OF SURPLUS PRODUCTS. 

Our population living in towns and villages become ready buyers from 
those who have a surplus. On this account the judicious culture of fruits and 
vegetables is among the most profitable branches of land culture. Tens of 
thousands of gardeners and fruit growers all over our land derive larger in 
comes from their small plats of perhaps less than ten acres each, devoted to 
these crops than does the average farmer from his many acres given to farm 
crops. 

A neighbor of the writer, from a Bartlett pear orchard of less than two 
acres, clears upward of $1,000 year after year on his crop. The sales from an 
acre of strawberries in the vicinity of thriving towns and villages is seldom 
less than $300, and often reaches $400 to $800 a year. 


JLvergreens 

These are a class of indispensable trees and shrubs for parks, private an«l 
public grounds and farm wind breaks, and possessing varied characteristics of 
habit, growth, form and coloring of foliage, and adapted to a variety of soils. 

Several of this class are exceedingly useful for reclaiming waste lands, 
and many more are of the highest value for the formation of belts for land 
scape effects, and also for shelter, to allow the use of more tender kind of trees 
and plants in localities which otherwise would be too much exposed to climate, 
sun, and wind. 








22 


DUNDEE NURSERY. 


Soil.—Conifers will grow in all soils, except those of a wet nature, and 
even in such there are a few that will thrive. The firs being of a shallow 
rooted nature will make vigorous growth in many localities where the good soil 
may be very thin. Several of the pines and firs will grow well on the bleakest 
side hills, exposed to the most trying gales, and on the coast and prairies they 
are especially valuable to form belts for the protection of animals and vegeta¬ 
ble life. In planting the choice Conifers for ornamental effect, it is well to 
have the soil of good quality, and the same planting directions apply to these 
as to other trees, but no fresh manure should be used directly on the roots, 
and its most advisable use is as a mulch, placed on top of the ground in the 
fall and raked away in early summer, after the spring rains. 

Pruning.—Except for hedges, the best time to prune Conifers is previous 
to their growing season, and careful use of the pruning knife will often revive 
a tree which otherwise may be on the decline. 

Roots.—It is very important that Conifers should have an abundance of 
fine, fibrous roots. Our soil is particularly adapted to their growth, and our 
stock first-class in every respect. 

We exercise the greatest care to have our trees frequently transplanted 
or root pruned, to insure such roots. Use blankets or pails of water when 
planting so as to allow the least possible exposure to the roots of Conifers, and 
see that the trees do not 'wilt. 

PICEA PUNGENS—Blue Spruce—See First Cover Page. 

This is the King of Spruces, clothed in royal robes of silver and sap¬ 
phire, a very Kohinoor among the gems of the Rockies. It is a child of the 
storm king, growing at an altitude of from 8,000 to 10,000 feet above the level 
of the sea. It is generally found even there in deep gorges or on the north of 
the ranges. We would naturally suppose that it could not endure a sudden 
change or thrive in a hot climate. There are some specimens growing in 
Washington; also in North Carolina. The question arises, while the tree 
endures such a diversity of climate, why is it never found on the lower alti¬ 
tudes, or among the foot hills? The answer is, it could not possibly grow 
there. The Douglas, the Ponderosa and Concolor have larger seeds and send 
out a strong plant, and therefore they are found lower down. Pungens seed is 
small, about 110,000 to the pound. In higher altitudes are frequent showers 
and often moss in the woods, and the ground is seldom dry. It is not hot 
enough to kill the plants, and so, on high altitudes, nature has provided for 
their propagation. The cone on the Pungens is about one-half the size of that 
of the Norway. The needles are short and sharp—pungent—hence the name. 
They are polished like glass. 


THE CONCOLOR. 

I take this description from an article in the Boston Congregationalism 
The tree with that bright foliage is the Concolor. Riding with a friend in 
Massachusetts last winter, far off on a hill, we saw a row of evergreens. 
There, said I, is a tree from the Rockies, which proved to be true. As the 
name indicates, it is even colored, the same the year around. But you say: 
What a marvlous beauty this has—ermine and emerald blended. Such a 
sheen! A tree dressed in glory \ What is it? It is a robe of matchless 
beauty the great horticulturist has given these Conifers, making them the most 
attractive of anything on earth. They are held in reserve for these later days, 
when nature and art unite to make home, lawn and landscape so attractive 
to the eye of taste. Note the contrast of this rare color with the deep green 
of the pines. There are one or two of these on the princely estate of Mr. Hun- 
neweil at Wellesly. They are true to their nature—some trees put on wondrus 






DUNDEE NURSERY. 


23 


beauty while young, but these retain their attractiveness down to old age, 
and wear their brightness, as a Christian does his joy, to the very last. 

But in order to see these trees in all their glory, you should see them 
while bearing their cones. Here is a grove of them. All are dressed in their 
marvelous attire of silver and green. On one tree the blossoms are of a deep 
ridh purple. What a contrast to the other hues! But this other tree has blos¬ 
soms and cones of the brightest green—another contrast. The cones grow 
erect at the top of the tree. They are perfect in form and about the size of an 
ear of sweet corn. As they mature in their perfect symmetry, these colors 
seem to deepen, and then from the cone that clear gum exudes; the sun 
shines, and it sparkles like crystals. Take this grove, then, with the sun 
shining brightly upon it, with its green and silver, its purple and crystal, and 
it seems almost too beautiful for earth.” From the small plantings of this tree 
m the east one has no conception of its coming symmetry and grace, its 
beauty of mingled tints; and yet at the east I note that these trees do as well 
as in their own habitat, and you will soon have these mountain treasures 
there, that will hold the stranger spellbound by their unique beauty. I have 
tried selecting seeds from the rarest specimens, and find that among the 
thousands now coming up, most of them fairly sparkle with silver. 

DOUGLAS SPRUCE.—Seudotsuga Dougiassi. 

This is emphatically the tree for the million. While on a visit to the east¬ 
ern nurseries, 1 noted in almost every instance that it was the most rapid 
grower of all the conifers. Sometimes the complaint is made that it grows 
too fast, and is riot compact enough for the lawn tree, yet on my grounds they 
seem to have the perfection of form. The foliage is soft and somewhat re¬ 
sembles the hemlock, hence the name (resembling the hemlock.) In the 
mountains it is a grand tree. It reaches from the Rockies to the Pacific slope, 
and our Chief of Forestry, B. E. Fernow, tells us that he never on earth saw 
such a burden of lumber to the acre as that produced by this tree in the west. 
We are of the mind that the seeds gathered from the Conifers on the Pacific 
slope are tender, while those gathered in Colorado produce hardy trees, which 
endure both drought and cold. 

The lumber of this tree is very strong, and is invaluable for timber, posts, 
and scantlings, and makes good lumber for finishing, though like the hemlock, 
it is easily split. In color it is like the Red Wood of the Pacific coast. 

I want to call your attention to one feature of this tree. In the deep 
gorges and on the north side of the mountains, as you reach the high altitudes 
you will find them of the deep blue type—literally sparkling with silver. Seen 
at a distance they are often taken for Pungens. These trees should be sought 
out and cultivated, for in addition to their rich coloring, they have more flex¬ 
ible grace than the rigid Pungens. 

NORWAY SPRUCE.—Abies Excelsa. 

A very popular variety from Europe. It has been more extensively planted 
in this country than has any other evergreen. In fact, it is so well known as 
being one of the best evergreens for ornamental purposes, that it is only nec¬ 
essary to say that it is the most valuable for wind breaks, screens and hedges. 

AMERICAN WHITE SPRUCE.—Picea Alba. 

Pyramidal tree of dense growth, with light, silvery green foliage. A more 
compact tree in all respects than the Norway Spruce. Fine for lawn planting 
or use near the sea shore. One of the best for general use. 

BLACK HILL SPRUCE. 

This is the Picea Alba, or the White Spruce, but with this difference: 
That while the Norway and the Black and White Spruce will not endure the 
winter droughts of the western plains, this tree seems well adapted for all the 






2 4 


DUNDEE NURSERY. 


regions from which, the others are excluded. Growing in a dry climate and 
often richly colored, it seems to meet the requirements of a vast field. While 
the air of the plains has but about 50 degrees of moisture to 90 degrees in the 
eastern states, it is necessary to have something which will endure the bright 
sun and drying winds of winter. We have not the experience with this tree 
we have with the Rocky Mountain Conifers, yet having a few thousand grow¬ 
ing, we have great faith in them for the west, and see no reason why they 
should not do well in the east also. 

HEMLOCK SPRUCE.—Abies Canadensis, Sometimes Called Weeping Spruce* 

This is a well known evergreen of high northern latitudes. It is one of th«- 
most graceful spruces, with light and spreading spray, frequently branching; 
almost to the ground. It is a beauty for the lawn and makes a highly orna¬ 
mental hedge. 

BALSAM FIR.—-Picea Balsamea. 

A well known, popular tree, very handsome while young, assuming th® 
upright, conical form; leaves dark green above, silvery underneath; retains 
its color throughout the severest winter weather; grows quite rapidly when 
established; desirable in every w r ay. 

WHITE PINE.—Ptnus Strobus. 

It is the most ornamental of all our native pines. Foliage light, delicate 
silvery green. Flourishes in the dryest, poorest soil; easily transplanted. 

SCOTCH PINE.—Pinus Sylvestris. 

A rapid growing, hardy variety, with stout, erect shoots, and silvery green 
foliage. Valuable for shelter and makes a good lawn tree, and being one of 
the hardiest of the evergreen family, it readily adapts itself to the trying cli¬ 
mate of Minnesota, the Dakotas and Montana. It also thrives vrell on the dry 
plains of Kansas, and is perfectly at home in Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska, and 
other States. 

AUSTRIAN PINE; or BLACK PINE.—P. Austriaea.. Nigricans. 

A remarkably robust, hardy, spreading tree, leaves long, stiff and dark 
green; rapid grower; valuable for this country. 

PINUS PON DEROSA, OF COLORADO. 

Heavy wooded pine, a rapid grower, forming a tree of great size. Bark 
reddish and foliage longer and coarser than the Red or Norway Pine. A val¬ 
uable tree for the west and northwest. 

DWARF MOUNTAIN PINE.—Pinus Montana. 

It is a beautiful little tree or bush, foliage very dense and of a rich, dark 
green; very valuable for ornamental purposes. It is perfectly hardy in th# 
most exposed situations. 

JUNIPER VIRGIN I AN A. 

Red Cedar.-—A well known American tree. It varies much in habit and 
color of foliage. It succeeds well on the plains of Nebraska and Kansas, where 
other evergreens fail. It is very desirable for ornamental purposes; also for 
wind breaks, shelter belts and hedges. 

AMERICAN ARBORVITAE.—Thuya Occidentals. 

A handsome tree of regular and symmetrical habits. Growth thick and 
buShy; one of the best and most useful evergreens; excellent for screens and 
hedges. 




PYRAMIDAL ARBORVITAE. 

A superb, new and hardy sort, of very compact habit; much better than 
the Irish Juniper, and growing in a perfect column; rare and beautiful. 
Largely planted in cemeteries, owing to the small amount of space it occupies. 
This is, perhaps, the most valuable Arborvitae in cultivation. 

THE EUROPEAN LARCH. 

Is the greatest timber tree in Europe, combining rapid growth with great 
durability, extreme hardiness, adaptability to any variety of soil not too wet, 
and remarkably free from disease. It is also very desirable as an ornamental 
tree, its conical shape, regular, delicate branches, and soft, light, green leaves 
making a striking contrast to the different varieties of European and orna 
mental trees. Thrives well in Minnesota and the Dakota*. 


Useful PLules 

To Get the Number of Trees or Plants Required for an Acre. 

Divide the number of square feet in an acre (43,560) by the number of 
square feet each plant occupies. This is obtained by multiplying the distance 
between the rows by the distance between the plants. For example: Apple 
trees planted 33x16% feet gives each tree 544% square feet, or eighty trees to 

the acre. 

NUMBER TO THE ACRE. 


3 feet apart each way 



16%x33 feet apart each way 


4,840 
2,722 
1,210 
680 
170 
. 108 
80 


Washburn, Minn., April 9, 1901. 

Dear Sir: Spruces received the 5th inst. in good condition. They are a 
aic* lot. Thanks for your promptness. Yours truly, A. C. Kruger. 

Bridgeton, Mo., April 10, 1901. 

Dear Sir: I received the evergreens today and they are splendid. They 
were in good condition, and I am well pleased with them. 

Yours truly, H. Meyer. 

Mr. D. Hill, Dundee, Ill.: Corning. Kans.. 1902. 

Dear Sir:—The package of evergreens arrived in good condition today I 
have them planted in good shape and feel sure they will all grow. 1 desire to 
tender my thanks for your liberality. F. P. HAWTHORNE. 

Mr. D. Hill, Dundee, Ill.: Mendota, Ill., 1902. 

Dear Sir:—I received the evergreens in good condition today. Advise me 
how long it will be safe to plant evergreens. I want to order some more later 
this spring. E. ANSCHICKS. 

Mr. D. Hill, Dundee, Ill.: Glenco, Okla.. 1902. 

Dear Sir:—The Norway Pine was received in the best of condition. Pack¬ 
ing was very carefully and skillfully done, for which please accept my thanks. 

J. H. CANFIELD. 

Mr. D. Hill, Dundee, Ill.: West Camden, N. Y., 1902. 

Dear Sir:—Evergreens came today—the finest lot I ever received. Thank 
you very much. You will hear from me in the future. A. D. H. KELSEY 












[Copyright Applied For.] 


Picea Pungen, Blue Spruce 

The above is take a from a photograph of a beautiful specimen now stand¬ 
ing on the lawn in front of proprietor’s residence, Dundee, Ill. The picture 
does not do the tree justice. It is the admiration of all who see it, and the 
owner has several times been offered large sums of money for same. Its 
beautiful color attracts the attention of every passer-by.