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Full text of "The Edinburgh musical miscellany: a collection of the most approved Scotch, English, and Irish songs, set to music. Selected by D. Sime, Edinburgh. Vol. II"

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THE GLEN COLLECTION 
OF SCOTTISH MUSIC 
Presented by Lady Dorothea Ruggles- 
Brise to the National Library of Scotland, 
in memory of her brother. Major Lord 
George Stewart Murray, Black Watch, 
killed in action in France m 1914. 
2m. Januani 1927. 



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V^ 



EDINBURGH 

MUSICAL MISCELLANY 

A 

COLLECTION 

OF THE MOST APPROVED 

SCOTCH, ENGLISH, AND IRISH 

SONGS, 

^T TO MUSIC. 



Selected by D. SIME^ Edinburgh, 



VOL. IL 




f rj^igd for Jolin Eider, T« Brown, and C. El 
!,f^' and Vv Coke, Z«'j/'j. 



24,SC«!,XCiTr, 






TO THE PUBLIC, 



Xhe favourable reception wliick 
the firfi; volume of tHe Edinburgh 
Mufical " Mifcellany met with^ has 
induced the Editors to bring for- 
ward a fecond Volume, conducl- 
ed upon a fmiilar plan^ felecced^ 
they hope, v/ith equal judgment 
and tafte, and v/hich they flatter 
themfelves will merit a degree of 
public approbation equal to the 
former. 

A great variety of admireti 
Scots and Irifli airs are here in-^ 
Vol II a 



TO THE PUBLIC. i^ 

troduced, which the nature of our 
plan prevented us from inferting 
in the former work ; and^ to ren- 
der this volume a lit fequel to the 
firft, it is alfo enriched with the 
lateft and mofl admired fongs of 
Dibdin, Hook^ and other cele- 
brated Compofers. 



CONTENTS. 



• . Page, 

A fcarlet coat and white cockade 46 

Anacreon, they fay, was a jolly old blade 76 

At the peaceful midnight hour 84 

As down on Banna's banks I ilray'd 131 

As Jamie Gay gaed blithe his way 340 

At Beauty's fl-irine I long have bow'd 184 

A failor's life 's a life of woe i8(> 

Affift me, ye lads 2iB^ 

Aik if yon damafk rofe be fweet -24 a 

An gin ye meet a bonny laflie 27 £ 

Ah i v/hy mufl words my flame reveal 274 
Adieu ye groves 

Adieu, adieu my only life 32: 

At Polwart on the green 3?, 

As I came by Loch Eroch fida 3 c 

B 

EIcw, blow thou winter's v/irxd 'i; 
By moonlight on the green 

Bufi: ye, builc ye, my bonny bride ic 

By Finkie houfe : ;; 
Behold the man that is unlucky 
By a murmuring ilream 
Bk-ft as th' immortal i>ods is he 
a 2 



o 



Fa. 51 
By fraoolli winding Tciy ^ 00.3 

Ikity early gone a iiiaying 



1* 



a3 



Ccme UTK? round my favourite tree 24 

Cliioe, by that borrowed kifs 6g 

Come now, al] ye focml powers ' 2^6 

Come, roufe from your trances 244 

Come roufe, brother fportfmau 253 

Cotchelia fat all alone ■-> 18 

l> 

De.ir is my little native vale 60 

llown --he burn, and through the mead . 11; 8 

Dunbarton's duums beat bonny, O 20^]. 

.De;^r Roger, if your Jenny geek 273= 

.Oicgen's, furly and proud 294 

Dear image of the maid I love " 3^1 

E 

jl:;c 9.aQnt bnrd replete uith ■v.h 79t 

.ii^iiCoinpaiy'd in angefs frame ii2 



:liou regal purple (IrsazTi 17 

.deiiiefs form'd, ^ a.^. 



OKTENT&. v''ll' 

Falrefl of thxC virgin trala^ i lo 

For ever Fortune 534 

From the eaft breaks the morn 2'2?^ 

From the chace in the mountain 297. 

H 

Here, a flissr hulk', lies poor Tom Bowling - 36 

How bleft has niy time been Sz 

How bled the maid ^-^> 

Had I a heart for fainaood FramM 130- 

How (lands the gbi^i around 202 

How fweetly fniells the fnnmer green 22:4 

Here awa, there awa 33'-^ 

Hark, Phillis, hark 36;.) 



I;fing the Britifn foldler's praife 5^ 

John met with Peg the other day r6 

I loo'd ne'er ii laddie but an^ ' ";' 

Llaird from the Downs - S' '■ 

In winter when the rain ran'd cauid 1 5 a 

1:. that once was a ploughman ^90 

I winna marry cny man - >'' 

In wine there is all in this life "S-^^ 

I made love to Kate ^S'' 

I've found out a gift for my fair 26'X 

If to force me to (ing 20 u 

In former times we France did rout. 3'--^ 

Jack, Ratlin was the abieQ; feamaa S.-''^ 

In this iadand fiknt gloom 3O© 
a 3 



viu ■ 



COl^TErM'^. 



Let bards -elate^ of Sue ?.nd Kate 

Let gay ones and great 

Love's goddefs, in a myrtle grove 



I^ifc's like a ihip 



1 .^y^-vi where my dear Hamilia fmiles 



;r inore (hall give me pain 



i6i 

27B 
299, 

344 



M 



Tv dn^-5 have been to vi-ondVous Iree- 
'■V i ;c-dlc is g;ine far away o'er the plain 
^uifb peace and plfeamre's. melting ftrain 

'-.' Icldng is on the cold ground 
■T; ddoie is a cankei'd carle 
v,> Celiii leaves fair London town; 



33 

116. 

220 



N 

* 

'N'lver till now I knew loveks fniart 
i-''o'''/3 the time for mirth and gjee 
Kcw phcebus flnketli in the wed . 



250 



O 



Our trade to wor-k in cl-iy began 

Oa ilurdy ilout Dobbin 

C thou lovVi countr/ • 

CU-e ix.orc I'll tune the vocal Oid 




96 

iC2 

20 4, 



CON rE\T?. Jv? 

Pa- 



T 



> ) 



O'er inoorlaads unci incuntains. 

O why fliouia okl :.ge 206 

Old care begone 247 

O wa]y, waly, up yon bank 3:8 

O Logic o' Biirhaii ' 364 



Psin"d with her flighting J-.imie's love ^T-^ 



3^ 



See, fee the jolly god appears 

Soft Zephyr^;, in thy bahiiy wincr 

Sweet ditties would my P<itty uag 

Shepherds, I have loll rr.y love j 

Sfcill the lark finds repcfe I 

Sv/eet doth bkifh the rofy morning 

Say, have you in the village i^^ii 

Sweet Annie frae the iea-heash came 3 

Some talk of Alexander 

Says Plato, why ihould man be vain 

S-ays Colin ^0 me 260 

Saw ye nae my ^tg'^y 



173 

17" 

21 I 

2 'i(y 



340 



Though Bacchus may boafb 19 

^Twas Saturday's nignt 2-1 

The -.::.- - - :: A cheaifd 23 



^^ CONTENTS. 

^ Pags 

The liardy fallor braves the ocean 29 

The wind was hufli'd 40 

Thy fatal drafts unerring move 58 

To the winds, to the waves 70 

Thus, thus, my boys, our anchor's weighM 72 

Thou'rfc gone. awa, thour't gone awa 120 

The heavy hours are ahuoit pad 122 

The fummer v^^as over 124 

The morn v/as.£iir L26 

'Tv/as fu'nmer, and (oddj 148 
Tii^ht lads have I fali'd with r 190 

There was a jolly miliar 009 

The e''hc>5ii^!j horn 214 

Th.e (jjI'Is ■^vqv'^ .2;.. "en 216 

There wwe a little man 266 

'i: ..• ^^uH^y DJ^ht 283 
To cdfe his heart, and owm his flame ^ 26g 

'Tvv-./s within a mile of Edinburgh- 306 

Tlie fieids were gay • 313 

J.".) B.;tclie]or's hall 315 

There's nought but care on ev'ry han' 352 

Tho' .Uftant far from Jelly's charms 356 

The fpring time returns 370 

W 

Wer^ I obligM to beg my bread 43 

Whiiil h.^ppy in mv native land 48 

We bipcdc^ i-nadt up of frail clay 44 

i/hv_iunie5 my love •' 54, 



CONTENrS- ■ Xi 

Why? don't you know me by my fears ? 64 

When innocent p;i(l:me 8,8' 

YV' h e n f u m n i e f c ir^ e 3- M 2 

Wlieiie'er I think on that dear fpot J 60 

When I thuik on this world's pelf ^64 

Whtn Phoebus fir a falutes the eaft Jp^ 

When airy dreams ^^^ 

When merry hearts were gay 1.7^ 

W^illie was a wanton wag 179- 

When morn her fweets ., ^82 

Won't you hail the leap year 193 

When Cupid holds the myrtle crown 200 

With an honeft old hien.d 225 

When fragrant bloom of yellow broom 23a 

Vv^hen laHe I wander'd 234, 

Why hangs that cloud upon thy brow^ 280 

When Orpheus went down 29a 

While here Anacrecn's chofen fons 3c i 

WhiUt foLiie for picufure pawn their health 326 

W he n I was at ho ni e _ 3 4 ^' 

Will ye gang o'er the lee-iig 34'^ 

What numbers lliall the mufe repeat 350 



Ye mortal's whom fancies 2.-.tZ 

Ye gales that gently wave tlie fea 26$. 

You're welcome to PaxLon 304 

Young Feggy blcams our bonnied hX^ ' " 3 5'^ 



I 



THE 

EDINBURGH 

MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



SONG L 

THO' BACCHUS MAY BOAST OF HIS CARE-KILLING 

BOWL, 



8UNG BY MR BOWDEN, 



~§iii:E=: 



Tho* Bacchus may boaft of his care-killing 






-^ — W- — 'P- 



'-¥■ 



bowl, And Folly in thought-drov/ning revels 



-±ff^-kz^T- 



F?£— si 



*^lp^ai=p§ii 



de-light. Such worfliip a - las ! hath no charms 



lipi^ipip 



M^ "" 



for the foul, When fofter devotions the ferifes 

V6l. ir. A 



1-4 



THE EDINBURGH 



rsrb: 



zJrtJ&E^i: 



-vll 



in-vlte : "When fofter devotions the fen - fes 

tr. 



^ip^yipiippEp 



invite. To the arrow of fate,- or the canker 



^iiz:^: 



of care, His potions oblivious a balm may be- 



^^m^^ 



flow : But to Fancy, that feeds on the charms 




liiSEiimii^E 



of the fair, The death of reflection 's the birth 






!a££|5pSESi 



ii 



of all woe : The death of refleftion 's the birth 






?:E3 



of all woe. 



MUSICAL MISCELLANt I5 

What foul that's poflefl of a dream fo divine, 
With riot would bid the fweet vifiqn begone ? 

For the tear that bedews Senfibility's ihrine 

Is a drop of more worth than all Bacchus's tun. - 






Is a drop of more worth than all Bacchus's tun. 

The tender excefs which enamours the heart, 
To few is imparted, to millions deny'd ^ 

*Tis the brain of the victim that tempers the dart. 
And fools jeil at that for which fages have died. 
And fools, &c. 

Each change and excefs hath through life been m 
doom. 
And well can I fpeak of its joy and its Urifc ; 
The bottle affords us a glimpfe tliro' the gloom, 
But love's the true funfhine that gladdens om life 
But love's, &c. 

Come then, rofy Venus, and fpread o'er my fight 
The magie illufions that ravilh the foul : 

Awake in my bread the foft dream of delight. 
And drop from thy myrtle one leaf in my bowj., 
And drop, &c. 

A 2.. 



■16 



THE EDINBURGH 



EpEp5Efp|||£!H 



Then deep will I drink of the ne6lar divine, 
Nor e'er, jolly God, from thy banquet remove, 

JSut each tube of my heart ever thirft for the vi^ine, 
That's mellovi^'d by friendfliip, and fvi^eeten'd by 
love^ 



"~ zrm^r- 



^^£ l£R'^ ~ 






That's mellow'd by friendfliip, and fvi^eeten'd by love. 



C^ The above Notes are trifling deviations from the 
original melody ^ to fuit the exprejjion of the different 
Jlanzas* 



MtTSICAL MISCELLANY. 



57 



SONG II. 

FLOW THOU REGAL PURPLE STREAM. 
Flow thou regal purple ftream, Tingled by 



the folar beam j In my goblet fparkling rife, 



'iz±±zf-^-^-'^ 



Cheer my heart, and glad my eyes : Flow thou 



fe^F 



5d 






.^^j 



re - gal purple ftream, Tin£led by the fo- 

:liizxzrzzr:i:mTzp3q3zii^zz1u:x:~: 



lar beam j In my gobr^ let fpark-llng rife, 

±z-. 



m^^^m 



Cheer my heart and glad my eyes ; lu my 
A3 



3^^^- 



THE Em^EURGH" 






fparkling goblet rife. Cheer my heart and glad: 




my eyes, Cheer my heai^t, and glad my eyes. 



My brain afcend on Fancy's wing, 'Noint me- 



i^l;|iii 




wine, a jovial king : My brain afcend on Fan- 



cy's v/Ing, *Noint mc, wine, a jo - vial king 






Etz|i:^PEpr&|5|EEiEE 



My brain afeend on Fancy's wing, 'Noint me, 

lllgiii^gii 

wine, a .pviai -kmg, 'Noint me^ wine, a jo- 



MUSICAL TvlI^CELLANY. 



1.9- 



siiSi^sii^^ 



vial king, a jo 






— _, — I J, 



s|riizgl|J^P5J;ir^ 



Pk 



- vial king, a jovial king, a jovial king. 



js±—z: 






a:::£rf 



-k-t- 



While I live, FU lave m\y clay ; When I'm dead 



|^r jEjppi |p: ^^ gg 




and gone away, Let my thirfty fubje£l;s fay, A 



iiii^gi^^- 



month he reign'd, and that was May : While 

-hr-T — n- 



i*gsiaif^^iEg 



I live, I'll lave my clay j When I'm dead^ and. 



•'20 THE EDINBORGH 



gone away, Let my thirily fubjefts fay, A month 



:z^xi=rziz±=ipzzp:±:rzz!5t:ttir_M 

he reign'd, but that was May : Let my thirily 



fubje^ts fay, A month he reign'd, but that was 



cfc: 



r-fe-->-? 



.^ZW-i-WA- 



fc 



Mrsni 



E 



May : Let my thirily fubje6ls fay, A month he 
rcign'd, but that was May, but that was May, 



-T 



biftt that was May. 



M^SICJiL MISCELIAN"3ftk 



23 



SONG III. 

SATURDAY NIGHT AT SEA. 



'Twas Saturday night, die twinkling ftarS 

.u ffl—^ — ~J — ^ — ! M. M.^ 



:i=iz2:i~ 



£ 



Shone on the rippling fea ; No duty call'd the 



igiipfcli 



^M 



jo -vial tars. The helm was laih'd a -'lee, 
The helm was lafh'd a - -lee. The am- pie 



can adorn'd the board, Frepar'd to fee it 



out, Each, gave the iafs that he a dor'd 



THE EmNBURGH 






And pulliM the grog a - bout, And puili'd 



— 1 



the grog a - - bout. 

Cried honeft Tom, my Feg I'll toad, 

A frigate neat and trim, 
All jolly Portfmouth's favourite bo^ft t 

I'd venture life and limb, 
Sail feven long years, and ne'er fee land, 

With dauntkfs heart and flout, 
So tight a vefTel to command i 

Then pufh the grog about. 

I'll give, cried little Jack, my Poll, 

Sailing in comely flate, 
Top ga'nt-fails fct fhe is fo tall, 

She looks like a firfl-rate. 
Ah ! would fhe take her Jack in low> 

A voyage for life throughout, 
No better birth I'd with to know : 

Then pufh the grog about* 

I'll give, cried I, my charming Nan, 
Trim, handfome, neat, and tigliSo. 

What joy, fo neat a fhip to man 1 
Oh ! fne's- m.y heart's delight- 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY* 1^ 

So well Die bears the ftorms of life, 

I'd fail the world throughout. 
Brave every toil for fuch a wife ; 

Then pu(h the grog about. 

Thus to defcribe Poll-, Peg, or Nan, 

Each his beft manner tried. 
Till fummon'd by the empty can, 

They to their hammocks hied : 
Yet ftill did they their vigils keep, 

Tliough the huge can was out 5 
For in foft vifions gentle lleep 

Still pulh'd the grog about. 



24 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG IV. 

COME SING ROUND MY FAVOURITE TREE, 



± 



:S; 



^ 



<- 



t=^.m.^t=^-m. 



£Evjt-P:^i 



::?:Tri^==^ 



ii^ 



Come, fmg round my fa-vou-rite tree. Ye 



'i-^k 






:^zrb3i::r:g: 



3^ 



^zw:: 



'm 



fongfters that vifit the grove j 'Twas the haunt 



■^»-=zz-~ 






c_tt_=::r::B±: 



of my fhephsrd and me, And the bark is a 



iiiiisiiSE^I 



re - cord of love. Sing round my fa~vou-rite 



* 



»-s- 



tree : Come, ye fongfters that vifit the grove, 




Ui l^ Ui Urt Urf K^ 



^^.^W^ 



'Twas the haunt of my ihepherd and me, "Tvtias 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



»5 



^t-^ 



the haunt of my fliepherd and me, And the 




s;|:&=k-t 



bark is a reeoi-d of love, And the bark is a re- 



cord of love. Rechn'd on the turf by my fide. 



He ten - der-iy pleaded his caufe^ I only with 



:n±i::Es 



blufhes reply'dj I on-ly with blulhes reply'd. 



And the nightingale iili'd up the paufe^, The 




;£E31e: 



nightingale fiii'd up the paufe. Come iiwg. D. C, 
VoL= II. B 



26 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG V* 

FOR TENDERNESS FORM'd. 






Si?=|S33|3=lBS 



_i^_-u — _ — Mzi^j: 

For tendernefs form'd in life's early day, 



A parent's foft forrows to mine led the way, 




A parent's foft forrows to mine led the wav 



The leiTon of pi - ty was caught from 



■" '"^ !«• " ted " '0~' 

her eye, And ere words were my own I 



— I- — 1*. — ai-fi-- J J 



fpoke with a figh.. 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 1^. 

The nightingale plunder'df the mate M^Idow'd dove, 
'I'lic warhled complaint of the fuffering grove. 
To youth as it ripcn'd gave fentimcnt new, 
The objed ftill changing, the fympathy true. 

Soft embers of paffion, yet reft in the glov^^, 

A warmth of more pain may this breaft never know ! 

Or, if too indulgent the blefting I claim. 

Let the fpark drop from reafon that wukens the 
llame. 



B2 



28 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG VI. 

THE LASSES OF DUBLIN, 






■-—-©' 



1 it: ■ FP^=i^^EE^"?^^ 

The meadows look cheerful, the birds fweet- 

iiiiiiirii^ 

Iv fingj So gayly they carrol the praifes of 

■i 






fpring ! Tho"' Na-ture rejoices, poor No - rah 



^^^^^^m 



fhall mourn, Until her dear Patrick again ftiail 



0-A 






IBfeEElil 



return. Tho' 



:f" 

gain ill all return. 



Ye Lafses of Dublin, ah, hide your gay charms, 
Nor lure her dear Patrick frorn Norah's fond arms 
Tho' fattins, and ribbons, and laces are line. 
They hide r.ot a heart with fuch feeling as mine. 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



2p 



SONG VII. 

THE HARDY SAILOR. 



:S: 



iipiiiiig'pi 



The hardy failor braves the ocean, Fearlefs 



L-fc: 



ism^iP 



of the roaring wind j Yet his heart, with 



lliiili^iii 



foft e - mo - tion, Throbs to leave his love be- 



idzQl-: 



— •# 



L^. 



^f-^ 



:i: 



:^^.p^:i 



+—: 



p-^- 



hind : Throbs, throbs, throbs, throbs : 




-tJ^k^' — ttifziij^jz: 



Yet his heart, with foft e - - mo->tion, throbs 



fcii 



M. 



:i= 



51=1^5:-^=^ 



p: 



P-s— — 



tczE: 



To leave his love be - hind - » » To leave his 



3^ 






THE EDINBURGH 




m 



§ii 



love be - hind ■ . --To 



^±::pzz±ii:Fzz4^Tqzir:5T:^zz3JZ, 



leave, to leave his love behind. To 
dread of foreign foes a ilranger, Tho' the 



ii^iiiliiiiiiiii 



youth can dauntlefs roam. Alarming fears paint 

±:r.:! 



^^——S—)^ — .p_'j^| — y^— [Z_^X|ZZ!^ — ._Z-l gX 

ev' -ry danger, In a rival left at home: A- 

larming fears paint ev'ry danger In a ri- 
val left at home - The. D .C. 



^ 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY, 



3^ 



SONS VIII. 

PRECIOUS GOBLET, 



.^igii^iiHiii 



See the jol-lyjol-- ly god appears. In - 




"£:: 



-'-^^■ 



feESEES 



his hand the bowl he rears, QuafFmg let 



ll^i^pii 



me drown my cares, And all thy no 



ble fpirit fhaife Pre - - cious gob-let, cup 



,^. 



:| 



n^yr^ X ti^EtZL EEti-2_l 




ZT 



tzi 



divine, Let me, let me quaff thy rofy wine * 



5E|EtEi||fe:p|i?|^^! 



Pre — cious gob - - let, cup divine, Let me 



^% THE EDINBURGH 




ili^lHHiiEE 



let me quaff thy ro - fy wine. 

Let my hoary honours grow, 
Wrinkles trefpafs on my brow ^ 
Let them come, prepar'd I ftand. 
And grafp my goblet in my hand. 
Precious goblet, &c. 

Cupid, in my youthful hour. 
Led me captive of his pow'r, 
Now, with branches from the vine^ 
I guard me from his dart divine. 
Precious goblet, &c. 

Bacchus ! jolly God, appear I 
None but choiceft fouls are here, 
Pierce thy oldeft, deepeft caf% 
And let us drain the frequent flafk* 
Precious goblet, &€. 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



33 



SONG IX. 

MY DAYS HAVE BEfeN SO WOND^ROUS FREE, 



My days have been fo wond'rous free, The 



^:iE3E: 



:p: 






=i; 



little birds that fly. With carelefs cafe, from 



iHi^il 



tree to tree, Were but as bled as I. Afk 



tipisr^i* 



mm 



m 



fL _A^ 



glid - ing wa - ters, if a tear Of mine encreas'd 



See 



rEp^iE 



azm. 



their ftream ; Or afk the pafling gales, if e'er 






I knt a figh to them : Or alk the paffing 



THE EDINBURGH 



Slow, 



iSiiSiiii 



gales. If e'er I lent a figh to them 

tr. 

: b. 



But now 



yfe 

^^■ 




:^: 



gZM 






my former days retire. And I'm by beauty 






caught : The tender chains of foft defire are 



^^liii^^ 



fixM upon my thought : An ea-ger hope, with- 



s 



®._^_ 



iKit^^sr 



in my breall. Does every doubt controul. 




i=; 



:^tfi 



;ts±; 



£ 



And love-ly Bet-fy ftands confefl the fav'rite 



ssgia== 



of my foul 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. %^ 

Ye nightingales, ye twilling pines, 

Ye fwains that haunt the grove. 
Ye gentle echoes, breezy winds. 

Ye clofe retreats of love. 
With all of nature, all of art, 

AfFift the dear defign. 
O teach a young unpra6lis'd heart 

To make her ever mine. 

The very thought of change I hate, 

As much as of defpair ! 
And hardly covet to be great, 

Unlefs it be for her. 
'Tis true, the paffion of my mind 

Is mixt with foft diflrefs j 
Yet while the fair I love is kind, 

I cannot wifli it iefs. 

But if (lie treats me with difdain, 

And flights my well-meant love. 
Or looks with pleafure on my paio^ 

A pain Ihe wont remove ; 
Farewell, ye birds, and lonely pines, 

Adieu to groans and fighs. 
I'll leave my pailion to the winds. 

Love unreturn'd foon dies. 

N. B. The Second and Third Stanzas mujt he fiwg U 
the laft Air^ and the Fourth Stanza to the Fvrmer, 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG X. 

POOR TOM, OR THE sailor's EPITAPH. 






iipEE^l 



Here, a ilieer hulk, liea poor Tom Bow- 



^^^^ 







ling, The darling of our crew ; No more 
he*ll hear the ttmpeft: howling. For death ^ 



has broach'd him to. His f 
the manlieft beauty, His b 



^ of 

- kind and 




_flL_J _J —is;-;-- r^_— i^— _^-_ 



foftj Faithful bdow he did his du-ty, 



■MOMCAI. MISCELLAKV. 



tt 




e^ 



g»^ 



And now he's gone a - ^ - loft, And now 

^i. t. 



gi^a 



he*s gone a - ^ loft. 

Tom never from his word depatte(^. 

His virtues were fo rare, 
His friends were many, and true-hearted^ 

His Poll was kind and fsir : 
A.nd then he'd fing fo blithe and jolIjr> 

Ah many's the time and oft I 
But mirth is turn'd t© melancholy. 

For Tom is gone aloft. 

Yet (hall Poor Tom find pleafant wca£hc3i^ 

When he who all commands, 
Shall give, to call life's crew together, 

The word to pipe all hands. 
Thus death, who kiffgsand tars difpatchci;^ 

In vain Tom's life has doff 'd ; 
For, tho' his body's under hatciieSj 
His foul is gone aloft. 



tpl> 11; 



as 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG XL 

BLOW, BLOW, THOU WINTER'S WINB. 



fei^pfeii^i 



Blow, blow, thou winter's wind, Thou ar^ 
tF-^-S-TJ-.-:^ T -— — T^#-J 



^^^^m 



not fo unkind, thou art not fo unkind,. As 



^^iijllfelsE&E 



S?=^ 



men^s in - gra - ti-tude : Thy tQoth is not fa 



::s±t 






-; 



')~TT-T-3rz: — 



keen, Becaufe thou art not feen 5 Thy tooth 



is not fo keen, Becaufe thou art not feen 4 
Altho' thy breath be rude, Altho' thy breath 



MtfSlCAL MISCELLANT. 



-0 




be rude, Al - tho' thy breath be rude. 



Freeze, freeze, thou bitter ficy, 
Thou doft not bite fo nigh 

As benefit forgot : 
Tho' thou the waters warp, 
Thy fting is not fo fharp 

As friend remember'd ndt. 



Ga- 



THE EOrNBUReS 

SONG XIL 

SUXOM NAN. 



E^^EB^iSEiS 



±i 



£ 




P 



■^^ 



-znzzzm 



The wind was hufliM, the ftorm was over. 




uti 






t± 



zwcit:c 



Unfmi'd was e • * very flowing fail. From toil 



P^^|g||5^^^ 



rclcas'd, wheti^Dick of Dover Went with hit 
ir-sgrrrr-ra-rh- -XT-ar— -nP 



fcfl 



t 



i: 



t 



P-r—^- 



mefsmates to re * gale. All danger*s o*er, cried 



^1^^ 



f±^t^ 



he, my neathearts. Drown care, then, in the 



■^' 



"-^^^^^ 



fkiiling can : Come, bear a hand, let's toaft 



UisstcKh iii5€i:Li:AN#. 



•^*si-f%* 






OUT fweethearts, And firft I'll give 

(7\ 



IpiiiiirSilg 



my buxom Nan : Gome, bear » hand, let's toafb 



I^Niii^^ 



our fweethearts, And firft I'll give my buxoiT:?i 



■^-y jiL-p. j-C- " rrfiis-T - 



Nan, Firft Fll give my buxom Nan. 

She's none of they that's always gigging^ 
And ftem- and ftern made up of art j; 

One knows a velTel by her rigging. 
Such ever flight a conftant heart. 

With ftraw-hal, and pink-ftreamers Sowing 
How oft to meet me has (lie ran ; 

While for dear life would I be rowing. 
To meet with fmiles my buxom Na»> 

Jack Jollyboat went to the Indies, 
Xe^fee liim Hare when b& came hm%^ 



^* f R-E ET5TKBXTRGW 

THe girls were foall off the hinges. 
His Poll was quite unknown to JacL 

Tant mafted all, to fee who's talleft, 

Breaft works, top-ga'nt fails, and a fan 51 

MelTmate, cried T, more fail than ballad^ 
Ah Hill give me my buxom Nan. 

None on life's fea can fail more quickerj 
To {hew her love, or ferve a friend : 

But hold, Vm preaching o'er my liquor, 
This one word more, and there's an endi. 

Of all the wenches whatfomever, 
I fay, then, fir^d me out who can,,. 

€)ne half fo true, fo kind, fo clever, 
Swest^ tiiaTij, ana neat^^ as. buxom Narsi^ 



MCSICAL MISCELLANf, 



44 



SONG XIL 

SOMEBODY. 



:s:^^:z:""ii"r!":^" 



&tmi^^ 



Were I oblig'd to beg my bread. And had 






not where to lay my head, I'd creep where yon- 






der herds are fed. And (teal a look at fomebodys 








My own dear fomebody, my conftant fomebody,. 



lli 



±=t 



m^ 



m^m 



I'd creep where yonder herds are fed^ and fteal. 






& look at fome-bo-dy. 



When Vm laid low, and am at reff. 
And; maybe number'd with the ble%" 
Oh ! may thy artlefs feeling bread 
Throb with regard for — Somebody : 
Ah I will you drop the pitying teaij. 
And figh for the loft- — Somebody ? 

But fhould I ever live to fee 
That form fo much ador'd by me,- 
Then thou'it reward ray conftancy,. 
And I'll be bleft with— Somebody r 
Then fhall my tears be dried by thee,; 
And I'll be bleft with— Somebody. 



SONG XIIL 

WHILST HAPPY IN MY NATIVE LAND; 




Whilft happy in my native land, I boaft. 



to SBSte^ 



my country's eharter, Hlnever bafely Itnd my 



jpfgaggig^g 



j-Herlibcme^ to bar-ter^ The jio-bl^ 



IrttMlCAL MISCELLANY. 



« 






mind is not at all By poverty degraded, 'Tis 



Pi 



i 



i 



jzzir 



guilt alone can make us fall, And well' I ani 




^^^glg 



perfuaded, Each free-born Briton's fong fhould 



^ 



SeS^ 



e 



Be, Or give me death or liberty, or give me 



s 



^^ 



^^- 



mzzMT 



death or liberty, or give me death or liberty,. 



^^^m 



or give me death or liberty. 

The' fmali the pow*r which fortune granti, 
j\:nd few the gifts flie fends us, . 

The iordly hireling often wants 
Thai freedom which, defends ixs^ 



A^ 



THE EDiNBtTRCH 



By law fecur'd from lawlefs ftrifc. 

Our houfe is our caftellum ; 
Thub blefs'd with all that's dear in life, 
For lucre fliaU we fell them ? 

No: — ev'ry Briton's fong fhould be. 
Or give me death or liberty, &c. 



SONG XIV. 

THE VOLUNTEER. 






A fcarlet coat, and fmart cockade. Are paf- 




ports to the fair ; For Verms felf was kind, 'tij 
faid, To Mars the God of war. Then, nnce my 



country calls to arms,, Lov€*s livery witi I w 



MUSICAL MISCfeLtAtlT. 



!»• 



m mM mmmm 



Nor feek reward fave Nanny's charms, But go 






a volunteer, but go a volunteer, but go a vo- 



^l^M^l^ 






lunteer •, Nor feek reward fave Nanny's charmip 
But 20 a volunteer, Nor feek reward fave Nan- 




ny's charms, but go a volunteer. 

Should fortune fmils, and grant me famq, 

The laurel will be thine, 
The flowers of love I only claim. 
Ah ! let their fweets entwine. 

Then fince my country calls to arms. 

Love's llv'ry will I wear, 
Nor feek reward fave Nanny's charna'. 
But go a volunteer. 



All hardfhips feem as light as art*, 
While Britifh maids we guard, 
Each foldier has one darling care, ■ 
Her fmiles his beft rewar-d. 

Then fince my country calls to arms, 

Love*s liv'ry will I wear. 
Nor feek reward fave Nanny'^j charmt^ 
But ^o a volunteer. 



SONG XV. 

50UND ARGUMENT, 



We bipeds made up of frail clay, Alas are 



E^^ 



A 



the children of forrow ; And tho' hrifk and 



zit: 



merry to-day, We all maybe wretched to- 



^-S^i 



^^Ei=Pi#pi 



jnorrow: For funihine's fucceeded by r^iT> 



MUStCAT" MI^.CELLANY. ' ^^ 

vi'f wCwtutrj Leii plea- 



^::i:z0E±^ 



¥- 



.::r.|3n.fc::i^ 



;,i^.__^.. 



■#■- 






furc fhoaid only bring pain : Let us all be uii- 






happy together^ let us all be unhappy together, 

Li,_Ui_ H-hs-^l — — -" — —^ — — 



let us all be unhappy together, For funPiTine's 
— ®. j-j __.^_#.„^. — . 



'■00 — 'ii^ — 1^--^^ ~[— _ 8 .. _- 



^J0^ — --^...<^ 
fuccesded by rain. Then, fearful of life's flor- 



>-R^ -— ^ -&^-t*~-h — ^—-U^-— j— 



my weather, Left pleafare ihould on-ly bnng 



Eiz 



pain, Let us all be unhappy together. 
Vol. IL D 



;$# YHE EDINBURGH 

I grant, tlie befl bleffing we know 

Is a friend — for true friend (hip's a treafii^-e i 
And yet, left your friend prove a f*?e. 

Oh tafte not the dangerous pleafure. 
'Thus friendftiip's a flimfy affair ; 

Thus riches and heahh are a bubble % 
'Thus there's nothing delightful but care, 

Nor any thing pleafmg but trouble. 

If a mortal would point out that life, 

That on earth could be neareft to heaven, 
Let him, thanking his ftars, choofe a wife. 

To whom truth and honour are given : 
But honour and truth are fo rare. 

And horns, when they're cutting, fo tingle, 
That with all my refpecSt for the fair, 

I'd advife him to figh and live fmgle. 

it appears from thefe premifes plain. 

That wifdom is nothing but folly. 
That pleafure's a term that means pain, 

And that joy is your true melancholy. 
That all thofe who laugh ought to cry, 

That 'tis fine frifk and fun to be grieving | 
And that, fmce we muft all of us die, 

P^e. Ihould all be unhappy v/hile living. 



i 



M0SICAL MISCELLANY. 

SONG x\aL 

THE NEGLECTED SOLDIER. 
I-K ANSWER TO THE NEGLECTED TAR, 






'<*^— ■ 



■t 



1 fing the Britifh foldier's praife, A theme 



siiiS-iS^; 



rei 


lown 


d 


n 


ftory, It well deferves more poHfli'd 

, tr. 


' €^ 








n ~r ^ 


«ft T 


'!rv "" 








J (^ ,^. 


i?r 


j-_ -^ _ - -- - -- 


# . ^ ?l , 


Q)— € 


-=t-^ 


— 


Lii 


^ ^ ,. P . 


-{" 


._ 


P t 


•^ 




~~"^ 




^l- — 


IsJ- 




f---— -5-^ 



lays, Oh 'tis your boall and glo - ry. Wheii 



^Eit^s^l 



thundering Mars fpreads war around, By ^theni 

tr. 8ve. 



SppgpgjgjfgS 



you are prot^ded ; But when in peace the na- 

:S: Cho. 



-5-^=}—^ 



ESElgfeiS 



tion's found, Poor fouls they are neglected. But 
D 



5^ THE EDINBURGH- 



oh I i'tretch forth your aiding hand, in to-ken 
of their merit, Then boldly they'll march o'er 
the land, And fhew a grateful fpirit. 



For you the mu&et iirfi he takes>, 

1 hat you may red in quiet, 
His wife and children he forfakes. 

To ftiift for cloaths and diet' 
He'sfudden cali'd, he knows notv/herc>. 

Nor knows he fliall return 
To thofe he left in deep dcfpair, 

Yv^hofe hearts for him yet burn. 
But oh ! liretch forth your bounteous handj 

In juftice to their merit, 
Then cheerful they'll march through the land^i 
And (liew a grateful fpirit. 

Tor you through many a tedious road 
He goes without complaining, 

From fcorcliing heat he feeks abode^, 
Sometimes without obtaining : 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 5 

Bf tKlrft and hunger oft he's preft. 

Yet fcorns to droOp his head, 
Ambition from within his breall 
He fubftitutes as breaft. 
Then oh ! ftretch forth your friendly hand. 

In juftice to his merit, 
How cheerful he'll march through the land. 
And blefs your gen'rous fpirit 1 

For you through fields of blocd they'll feek 

Your foes of ev'ry nation *, 
'Tis there bold adions loudly fpeak 

Their worth in ev'ry ftation. 
Firm as a flinty wall they'll (land, 

Obferving ftricl decorum, 
Until their leader gives command 
To beat down ail before 'em. 
Then oh ! ilretch forth th' affifting hand^ 

In juftice to their merit, 
When they return unto their land, 
They'll blefs your noble fpirit. 

Well, now they've threlliM the foe, we'll fay^^ 

Did all within their power, 
But little more than blows have they, 

Aud one farthing an hour. 
Little within the Frenchman's fob. 

To recompenfe their labours ; 
Why then it proves a forry job. 

Little better than their neighbours^- 



Si. 



THE EDINBURGH 



Then oh ! ftretch forth the lib'ral hand. 

In juilice to their merit, 
So (hail they blefs their happy land^^ 

The land of godlike fpirit. 



SONG xviir. 

THE PIDGEON, 



-5r-^^ 



i^iUl^l^i 



Why tarries my love ? Ak ! where does 



ppplgg^ 



he rove ? My love is long abfent from me 



-rs-^^- 






Come hither, my dove, I'il write to my love,. 




iililEii 



I 



/:E.l krd. h*.m a kt - - ter by tliee *' - And 



MUWCAL MtSCELLANT, 



M 



^^l^W^M 



fend him a let - ter by thee. 

To find him fwift %, 

The letter I'll tye 
Stcure to thy leg with a ftring * 

Ah ! not to my leg, 

Fair lady I beg, 
But faften it under my: wing. 

Her dove Oie did deck, 

She drew o'er his neck 
A bell and a collar fo gay 5 

She tyM to his wing 

The fcroll with a firing, 
Then kifs'd him and fent him away. 

It blew and it raln'd. 

The pidgeon difdain'd 
Ta feek ihelter, undaunted he flew j 

'Till wet was his wing, 

And painful the firing, 
So iieiH'y the letter it grew. 

He flew all .around, 

Till Colin he found. 
Then percli'd on his hand y/ith the prise 5 

Whofe heart while he reads, 

With tendernefs bleeds 
For the pigeen,-'^tbat fl-dtters,— and d),«s ! 



s-^ 



THE EDINBURGH* 



SONG XIX. 

LOVE AND TIME, 



g^ig^fei^ 



ohn met with Peg the other day, As fhe 



-?== 
i^*=i 



3:e5E= 



^^m 



to church was walking ; And as he had a 



— &T— *— 



=a=E=i:teii5i 



deal to fay, He ftraight began a - talking, a- 



±i!^rzz:^x:p:ii:~:^Tz=iNzz:|ziiqd3T 



iftpzp: 



^^^ 



^^^f^± 



talking, a - - talking, He ftraight be - gan 



-_Sl _Z Ipil.pl:; S__ ^ _! 

^%fc&:3:bt:Ezzbzt=zF: 



-1^— b- 



,|W^E::z:pz' 



talking. He afk'd her if her heart was free, 



Or if flie him ap - - prov'd - - And all the 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 57 




while cquld plainly fee Her fnowy bofom movMg 

Her fnowy bo - fom mov'd. 

His heart v/as yet 'tween hope and fear. 

And drove his thoughts to fmother 3 
Unlefs thofe heavings of his dear 

Perchance were for fome other. 
A while fhe blufh'd, and now (lie fmird^. 

Cry'd, pr'ythee be not fimple ; 
When love the more his heart beguil'dj, 

And fported in each dimple. 

She thought he talk'd too foon of love--- 

'Twas time enough for wooing : 
He told her time would fwiftly move, 

A-iid time was love's undoing. 
Peg then replied : If that's the cafe, 

'Tis time that we were moving j 
And faid, with fadnefs in her face, 

He fuie won't kill for loving. 

Why then, cried John, let's haft Ac churchy. 
And all our fears deliver j 



5^ 



THE EDINBURGH 



Old time iliall linger in the lurch. 
And love fhall live fer ever. 

Avi^ay they went, made mod of time. 
In fpite of all his flurry ; 

Love faw they both u^ere in their prime. 
And join'd them in a hurry. 



SONG XX. 

THY FATAL SHAFTS UNERRING MOVE. 






Thy fatal fliafts un - err - ing move, I bow 






before thine al - tar, Love : I /eel tlie foft 



re - filVIefs flame Glide fwift through all rtiy 






vi - tal. frame. 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. |9 

For while I gaze my bofom glows. 
My bleod in tides impetuous flows 5 
Hope, fear, and joy, alternate roll, 
And floods of tranfport whelm my foul. 

My fault'ring tongue attempts In vain, 
in foothing numbers to complain ; 
My tongue ibme fecret magic ties, 
My murmurs fmk in broken flgha. 

Condemned to nurfe eternal care. 
And ever drop this filent tear ; 
Unheard I mourn, unknown I figh^ 
Unfriended live, unpitied die. 



THE EDINBURGH 

SONG XX. 

DEAR IS MY LITTLE NATIVE VALE, 

|— :dz±!=:|^r~^T5:rj===:=:i:Tr:=jr 



De^r is my little native vale, The ring- 



E 



m^ 



dove builds and warbles there, Clofc by my 



§— —^^ — ,_ j._ — j J ^ 



cote {he tells her tale To every pafling vil- 




■=t-r 



i^ggiiiii 



la - ger : The fquirrel leaps from tree to tree* 






And fhells his nuts at |Iiberty. 



In orange groves, and myrtle bowers. 
That breathe a gale of frag'rance round, 
I charm the fairy footed hours, 
With my lov*d lute's romantic found. 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. ^t 

Ot crowns of living laurel weave 
For thofe that win the race at eve. 

The (liepherds horn, at break of day^ 
The ballet danc'd at twilight glade. 
The canzonet, and roundelay, 
Sung in the filent greenwood fhade : 
Thefe fimple joys, that never fail. 
Shall bind me to my native vale. 



Vol. IL E 



4z 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG XXI. 

JOCKEY. 



-5^— - 



|-x-i£-d — t-E±~ti 



::Ez 



-m 



My lad-die is gang'd far a - - way o'er the 






plain , Where in for - row behind I'm forc'd 



iipHiilip 






to remain; Tho' blue - bells and vi' — lets the 



t:5i:Ei:EE^i=:! 



hedges adorn j Tho' trees are in bloflom, and 



.^_jg^ — - — zzzdzzzi^' 



m-M^- 



±—i- 



fweet blows the thorn. No pleafure they give 



-^ 



ii|ili=lE|pipi 



pi€f in vain they look gay, There's nothing can 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



«? 



iii^li 




pleafe now, my Jockey's away, Forlorn I fit 



-7^-^ "- 






zz^t=ti:^^ 



■w — -#■ 

fmgmg, and this is my drain : Hai'te, hails my 



-?r^ 



deareil Jockey, hails, hade my deareft Jockey, 



Hafle, hade, my deared Jockey, to me back 



a-- gam. 

When the lads and their lafTes are on the green metj, 
They dance and they fmg, they laugh and they chat 5 
Contented and happy, their hearts full of glee, 
I can't without envy their merriment fee : 
Thofe padimes offend me, my Shepherd's not there^ 
No pleafure I relidi that Jockey don't fnare ; 
It makes mc to figh, I from tears fcarce refraifij; 
I wifh mv dear Jockey return'd back again» 
Ez 



€4 



THE EDINBURGH 



But hope fliall fuaain me, nor will I defpair j 
He promis'd he would in a fortnight be here j 
On fond expectation my wifnes I'll feaft, 
For Love my dear Jockey to Jenny will hafte. 
Then farewell, each care, and adieu each vain figh, 
"Who'll then be fo bleft or fo happy as I : 
ril fmg on tlie meadows, and alter my ftraln^ 
'\¥hen Jockey returns to my arms back again. 



SONG XXIL 

SOLDIER DICK. 



?ie;sl; 



iE£ 



iHi 



^'hy, don't you know me by my fears ? 



(«^_*t^— |3ES J™ JH^mj. 



— -"^^-j-i 



H — i — » 



I'm fol-dier Dick come from the wars, Where 



many a head with - out a hat Crowd honour's 



"pr^-j-z:- — — r 



bed : but what of that ? Crowd honours bed- 



MU'SiCAL MISCELLANY". 



<5J 



■* 



Sri 



_n_T_r_!, ' ^ — x^u \ — 4 — — ■■ 

_QZX__! — p_p — ^ — .-L-K ^ i — ■^■ 

but what of that ? Beat drums, play fifes,- 'tis 



,^!5HJ- 



gg=^|ii3E3g:: 



g!o-ry calls, What ar-gufies who ftands or 

■* ^T-f-s — £ — ^"•bffii: — zzn; — 

.=-£=iEfcz==:£i=:r--r:i^^_^=: 



:ijir~i:i:ti:pz™_p_' — LpipLip: — ^— 



OT^ 



fails ! Lord 1 what feould one be for-ry for ? 



.@.JL_^_t_. 



Life's but the fortune of the war : Then rich or 
poor, or v/ell or fick. Still Iziugh and fmg {hall 



TT-^Zl- 



-zxz-izz:-zzi!zz 



3~ 



fcldier Dick, Stiil laugh and fing iliall fol- 



g|=q=:qri33 



P^ 



dier Dick, 



E. 



66 THE EDTNEUUGf-I 

I ufed to look two ways at once, 
A bullet hit me on the fconce, 
And doufh'd my eye — d'ye think I'd wince 
Why, Lord I I've never fquinted fince. 
Beat drums, &c. 

Some diftant keep from war's alarms, 
Toy fear of wooden legs and arms -, 
While others die fafe in their beds, 
W^ho all their lives had wooden heads. 
Beat drums, &c. 

Thus gout or fever, fword or fliot, 
Or fomething fends us all to pot : 
That we're to die, then, do not grieve^ 
But let's be merry while we live. 
Beat drums, &c. 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



^7 



SONG XXIII. 

I lo'ed ne'er a laddie but ane. 



■noB — ^>^ 



I lo'ed ne'er a laddie but ane, He lo'ed 



iig^iSiiisi 



ne'er a laffie but me -, He is willing to mak' me 



wmm^ ^ m 



his ain, And his aih I am willing to be. 



;|=|=fcEfc^|^£; 



He has coft me a rocklay o' blue. And a pair 



^-33-- 



ZZlll 



ijrrfz fej^j:; 



o' mit - tins o' green : The price was a kifs 



^grg^i^ 



o' my mou' And I paid him the debt yeftreei^b 



THE EDINBURGff 

Let ithers brag weel o' their gear. 

Their land, and their lordly degree- 
I carena for ought but my dear, 

For he's ilka thing lordly to me : 
His words mair than fugar are fweet,, 

His fcnfe drives ilk fear far awa' ; 
I lifien, poor fool ! and I greet, 

Yet, oh ! how fweet are the tears as they faT 

^' Dear lafTie," he cries wi' a jeer, 

" Ne'er heed what the auld anes will fay ;-. 
^^ Tho' we've little to brag o', ne'er fear, 

" What's gowd to a heart that is wae ? 
*' Our laird has baith honours and wealth, 

*•' Yet fee ' how he's d wining wi' care j- 
" Now we^ tho' we've naithing but health,, 

^^ Are cantie and leii evermair.. 

*^ O Menie ! the heart that Is true, 

'' Has fomething mair coftly than gear,. 
" Ilk e'en it has has naithing to rue, 

" Ilk morn it has naithing to fear. , 

" Ye wardiings I gae hoard up your flore, 

" And tremble for fear ought ye tyne : 
** Guard your treafures wV lock, bar, and door,' 

" Y/hiie thus in mv arms I lock mine." 



He ends wi' a kifs and a fmile, 
Waei rpe ! can I take it amifsj,. 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



69 



When a lad, fae unpraftisM in guile, 
Smiles faftly, and ends wi' a kifs 1 

Ye lafles, wha lo'e to torment 

Your lemans wi' faufe fcorn and ftrife, 

Play your pranks,— for I've gi'en my confent^ 
And this night I'll take Jamie for life. 



SONG XXIVo 

CHLOE, BY THAT BORROWED KISS. 



Chlo-e, by that borrow'd kifs, I a -las am 



quite undone ! 'Twas fo fweetj fo fraught with 

/- — N i^ W'^ _fe— ^ I- 




biifs, Thoufands will not pay that one ! 






Thou - - fands will not pay that one ! 

Left the debt fhould break your hearty 
(Roguifn Chloe, fmiling, cries) 

Come, a thoufand, then, in part^^. 
For the prefent Oiall fufiice. 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG XXV. 

AH WELLADAY ! MY POOR HEART t 



To the winds, ro the waves, to the woods I 



-5»~ 



tjidE: 






-t;0-^3^-^-'^- 



.j 



complain, Ah welladay ! my poor heart ! They 



rliiiiiii^pilii 



hear not my fighs^ and they heed not my 









e=::f:: 



:—Cz: 



pain: Ah wel-Ja-day! my poor heart ! Ah 



welJaday ! my poor heart I 

The name of my goddefs I grave on each tree, 

Ah well-a-day my poor heart I 
^Tis I wound the bark, but Love's arrows M^ound me ; 

Ah wdl-a-day my poor heart ! 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 71 

The Keavens I view, and their azure-bright Ikies ; 

Ah well-a-day my poor heart ! 
My heaven exills in her Hill brighter eyes ; 

Ah well-a-day my poor heart !, 

To the Sun's morning fplendor the poor Indinn bowsj 

Ah well a-day my poor heart ! 
But I dare not worfhip where I pay my vows ; 

Ah weli-a-day my poor heart ! 

His God each morn rifes, and he can adore ; 

Ah well-a-day my poor heart ! 
But my goddefs to me mud foon never rife more ; 

Ah \yell- a-day my poor heart ! 



7^ 



.THE EDINBURGH 



SONG XXVI. 



THE SOVEREIGN OF THE SEAS. 



^; 



V 



- [ — 1__. 



Thus, thus my boys, our anchor's M^eigh'd, 



The glorious Britiih flag's difplay'd, Unfurl'd the 



:^it i if f f Ef f f E^f f t b^fzi: i^^ 



fweliing fail : Sound, found, found your ihells-, 



£ 



:rt 



■M± 



:zjs. 



3^i:S|fb 



ye Tritons, found, Let ev'-ry heart with joy 

J. — -IW— 






^ 



f-f— 



rebound. We feud before the gale ; Let e - v'ry 



:— 1_. 



■p 



— -~^-L^- ^zEz? 



heart with joy rebound, We feud be - fore the 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



73 



^-f^f^- 



e£Et-ESi£E£EE33 



PtEsrsr-s:: 



hilif 




gale. For Neptune quits his wa - try car, De- 
pos'd by Jove's de - cree, Who hails a free-born 



P — -z-p- 



:e 



Britifh tar the Sovereign of the feas : Who hails 






a triie-born Britifh tar the fov'reign of the 



ZMl 



gililgii^ 



feas, The fov'reign of the feas The fov'- 



:\±z.M: 



reign of the feas. 

A fail a headj our decks we clear, 
Our canvas crowd, the chace we near, 

In vain the Frenchman flies : 

Vol. IL F 



74 



THE EDINBURGH 



A broadfide pour'd through clouds of fmoke. 
Our Captain roars, my hearts of Oak, 
Now draw and board your Prize. 
For Neptune, &c. 



SONG xxvri. 

THE TARTAN PLAIDJI. 



#: 






By moonlight on tbe green. Where lads 

!:zgrg=gzE:=:^zi:±zt=Jr:J; 

and lalTes flray, How fvveet the bloiTom'd bean I 



S 



|lpfe|: 



:zz4:zizzzizi 






^: 



;fe 



How fweet the new made hay ! But not to me 



>^- 



:^z: 






lb fweet The blofibmo on the thorn, As when 

-^— T— P— '-^~ 



-^--p-- fr"#C-f 



h-q-=tib-=fe:- — -fe.-— &- 



:£=??E:FEEEE 



niv 



lad I meet. More frefh than llx\ day 



MUSICAL MISCELLANT. 






morn : Give me the i^d fo blithe and gay, Give 









;±-t 



E'iEEE^E 



I^S — l^—I^g. I®._ 



>^-:&3:S: 



me the Tartan plaidic ; For, fpite of all th( 






":H: 



c: — u^—^ — ^g~f-. 






wife can fay, FU wed my Highland laddie : My 
bonny Highland laddie. My bonny Highland 






lad - die. My bonny, bonny, bonny, bonny^ 



bonny Highland lad - die. 

His fksn is white as fnow, 
His e'en are bonny blue, 

ILike rofe-bud fwett his mou* 
When wet wi' morning dtw* 



THE EDINBURGH 

Young Will is rich and great, 
And fain wou'd ca' me his ; 

But what is pride or flate, 
Without love's fmiiing Bllfs ? 
Give me the lad, &c. 

When fira he talked of love, 

He look'd fae blithe and gay, 
His flame I did approve, 

And cou'd na fay him nay. 
Then to the kirk Til hafte, 

There prove my love and truth 
!Reward a love fae chafte, 

And wed the conftant Youth, 
Give me the lad, &c 



SONG XXVIIL 

NEW ANACREONTIC SONG. 






■^-\^'i 



— I— h 



iz±:§ 



i^lg 



Anacreon they fay was a jol - ly old blade 



gp^-^- 



igii§iii 



A Gr eci^n ghoice fpirit, and po - et by tgrade. A- 



M17SICAL MISCELLANY. 



77 



T^tf.: 



nacreon, they fay, was a jol - - ly old blade, A 



; -g — |- 



3; 



Grecian choice fpirit, and poet by trade. To 



:^± 



'^^- 



1^3333= 






Venus and Bacchus he tunM up his lays ; For 



Love and a bumper he fung all his days : To 
Venus and Bacchus he tun'd up his lays, For 



love and a bumper, For love and a bumper he 



A^n| all his days. 



F3 



^S THE EDINBTJRGH . 

He laugh'd as he quafF'd ftill the juice of the vine^ 
And tho' he was human was look'd on divine, 
At the feafh of good humour he always was there,. 
And his fancy and fonnets ftill banilh'd dull care,. 

Good wine, boys, fays he, is the liquor of Jove, 
n?is our comfort below and their ne£tar above ; 
Then whi^e round the table the bumper we pafs. 
Let the, toaft be to Venus and each fmiling lafs. 

Apollo may torment his catgut or wire. 
Yet Bacchus and Beauty the theme muft infpire. 
Or elfe all his humming and ftrumming is vain. 
The true joys of heaven he*d never obtain. 

To love and be lov'd how tranfporting the blifs. 
While the heart-cheering glafs gives a zeft to each 

kifs y 
With Bacchus and Venus I'll ever combine. 
For drinking and kifting are pleafurcs divine, 

As fons of Anacreon then let us be gay, 
With drinking and love pafs the moments away ; 
V^ith wine and with beauty let's fill up the fparr, 
For that's the beft method, deny it who can. 



MtfSICAL MIS'CELLANT, 



19 



SONG XXIX.. 

HEDSOR DALE. 



Each fluent bard, replete with wit, In 

e -- qual numbers ilimes, And fmoathly fiows 

Zl jUIj. _Zl-l -^-^^ 



:DHj^f33~d! 



fome fan - cied name To grace his po - lifh'd 



pil|ii^5g|pii 



lines : He calls the Mu - - fes to his aid. 



In verfe he tells his am'rous tale Be thou 



t:pzzz:E::±fzz;zi±zztzzife±tlut: 



my mufe, thou much lov'd maid, The fair -ell 



to. 



TKE EDrNBUR<?M; 



^ilSifii^l 



flow'r of Hed - - - for dale, Of Hed - for dale, 



£p:::33:iS:3:n: 



!3!5 



±:-±z±±^i^z±^ 



m 



Of Hed - - for dale. Of Hed - - for dale. Be 



piiiseES 



-yi> bal 



thou my mufe, thou much lov'd maid, The 
fair--eil flow'r of Hedfor dale. 






I feel theVarm, the pleafmg fire 

Within my bofom roll, 
And pureft love and chafte defire 

Steal foftly on my foul : 
In vain I wou'd the flame conceal, 

And hide tlicfe cares my heart aiTaii 5 
My talk and looks and fighs prevail, 

I love die flow'r of HedforDale! 



Mt3%'lCAL MISCELLAnY. I?' 

What pity— -that a nymph fo fair, 

"With winning 0)'ipe and face, 
Should be devoted to fome clcy/n, 

Or ruftic's rude embrace ! 
That form demands a better fate ; 

Sweet hope, perhaps I can prevail 5 
V}\ try before it is too late, 

To cull the flow'r of Hedfor Dak* ; 



tz 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG XXX. 

HOW BLEST HAS MY TIME BEEN. 






■^ 



IS= 



Hwv bleft has my time been, what joys 






5 



:± 



S7- 



have I known, Since wedlock's foft bondage 
made Jef - - - fy my own : So joyful my 



E&:*±^=±bt£5gEEEEEEEE^£ 



heart is, fo ea - fy my chain, That freedom 

iSiiclEiiiSill 



is taftelefs, and rov - - ing a pain. 

Tliro* walks grov/n M'ith woodbines as often we flray. 
Around us gut boys and girls frolic and play : 
How pleafmg their fport is ! the wanton ones fee^. 
And borrow their looks from mj JeiTy and me. 



MUSICAL MiSCELLANr. .g|p. 

To try her fweet temper, oft times am I feen. 
In revels all day with the nymphs on the green ' 
Tho' painful my abfence, my doubts fhe beguiles, 
And meets me at night with complacence and fmiles. 

What tho' on her cheeks the rofe lofes its hue, 
Her wit and good humour blooms all the year thro' > 
Time (till, as he flies, adds increafe to her truth, 
jAnd gives to her mind what he fteals from her youth. 

Te fhepherds fo gay, who make love to enfnare^ 
And cheat with falfe vows the too credulous fair^ 
Jn fearch of true plcafure how vainly you roaw^^ 
Xo hold it for life you muft find it at homo 



S4 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG XXXI. 

THE WOLFo 



Siciliano. 






a^-"4-5zj=i 



l^g^^ 



At the peaceful midnight hour, Every fenfe I 



_±5±^:i±_zz§zz±dzzzi2S^=:l:t=:5Z 



and e-ve-ry power^ Fetter'd Hes in downy 



^^l|fiiip^pi 



;^ 



fleep : Then our careful watch we keep, Then 



^ I J /^""^ Andante col' efpreflione„ ' 



our careful watch we keep. While the wolf 



y^iliiElEiii: 




in nightly prowl, Bays the moon with hideous 







^-^ 







howl, - <--^- - Y/'hile the wolf, in nightly 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



»J 






'^^^&^^-^ 



"=il^ 



prowl, Bays the moon with hideous howl : 









-^— t:=nq!3:i=: 



While the w^olf in nightly prowl. Bays 



liiiiiiiii^ 



Ads 



I 



the moon 

Allegro con fpu-ito. 

|:b,|3::iji:^:ij:±i:?^=, 



£|1: 



■^--^ ^^ i~^ 



with hideous howl. 



Gates are barr'd, a 



tpZIFT 



i^ii 






-^- 



vain refiftance ; Females ihriek, but no ailift' 



ISZnZ_j I_i^I_i^ Ll_I IH;_i.l!I 



ance : Silence, fiieiice, or you meet your 






gigiillili 






fate ; Silence, or you meet your fate 
Vol. 11. G 



g6 



TflE EDINSURGK 






Your keys^ your jewel s^ caOi 



and plate ! Your keys, your jewels, your 



gEgiife?^ 



jewels, cafli and plate, your jewels, cafli and 
_, _, ^ r^ _^_ 



^m=:n±i:. 



4^-- H- 



'.wixinzzzx: 
d- 



rsrij- 



plate, your jewels, cafli and plate- Locks, 

Ipigzppafpli^E 



bolts, and bars, foon Sy afunder : Locks, bolts, 



and bars, foon fly afund;r. Then to rifle, rob. 



^nd plunder : Then tAifle, rob^ and plunder 



MOSICAL MISCELLiiN-Y. 



8t 



„.- ^- Locks, bolts, r.nd bars, 

foon lly afunder, llien to ri - - 



fiimmmmmii 



j^x: 



^4 J 



Mzf^^~l 






lie, robj and plunder, To rifie, rob, and 



pliiiiderj To rifle, rob, and pbmder. 



G :i 



€S 



THE EDINEUKGH 



SONG XXXII. 

JEMMY AND NANNY, 






When innocent paftime our pleafure did 



crown, Upon a green meadow, or under a tree | 







E'er Nanny became a fine lady in town. How 



:s:t 



t^z 



■^4- 



y^—'^- 




mzi 



Z5J — m — nrT~»^ — n;" 



lovely and loving and bonny was ilie ! R.ouze up 



thy reafon, my beautiful Nanny, Let no new 



:FiE=::E=?=fZteEE±EE- 

whim take thy fan - cy from me : Oh • as thou 



'MZKZZ: 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



H 







— b*»- 



EEt^- 




art bonny, be faithful as o-ny, Fayour thy 

:iS:4^:::fe:::^z=cpfP:ri:r.=.E:p: 

Jemmy, favour thy Jemmyj favour thy Jemmy 

!5 





who doats upon thee. 



Does the death of a Kntwhite give Annie the fpleen ? 

Can tyning of trifles be uneafy to thee ? 
Can lap-dogs, or monkies, draw ^ears from thefe een ? 

That look with indiff'rence on poor dying me 1 
RoLvfe up thy reafon, my beautiful Annie, 

And dinna prefer a paroquet to me : 
O ! as thou art bonny, be prudent Tmd canny. 

And think upon Jamie wha doats upon thee. 

Ah ! fliould a new mantua, or Flanders-lace head. 

Or yet a wee cotty, tho' never fae fine, 
Gar thee grow forgetful, or let his heart bleed, 



That anes had fome hope of purcl 



1.0^ 



ms 



Lhine ? 



Roufe up thy reafon, my beautiful Annie, 
And dinua prefer your fieegaries to ms j 

G3 



^C -rKE EDINBUS.GH 

O ! as tliou art bonny, be folid and canny, 
And tent a true lover that doats upon thee.. 

Shall a Paris-edition of new-fangled Sawny, 

Tho' gilt o'er wi' laces and fringes he be, 
By adorning himfelf be admir'd by fair Annie, 

And aim at thofe bennifons- promif'd to me ; 
Roufe up thy reafon, my beautiful Annie, 

And never prefer a light dancer to me : . 
O ! as thou art bonny, be conftant and canny^ 

Love only thy Jamie v,dia doats upon thee. 

O tliink, my dear charmer, on ilka fweet hour, 

That ilade awa' faftly between- thee and me^,. 
'Ere fqdirrels* or beaux, or fopp'ry had powV^^, 

To rival my love, or impofe upon thee. 
'Roufe up thy reafon,- my beautiful Annie, 

And let thy defires be a' center'd in me : 
© I as thou art bonny, be faithfu' and canny, 

And, lov.e hloi wha's' hinging to center in. the? 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY, 



5^1 



SONG XXXIV. 

TH£ TAR FOR ALL WEATHERS. 



^4|zp|"j~E£=^=|; 



ZBzXz: 



1 raii'd from the Downs in the Nancy, my 







£5- 
jibb how fhe fmack'd thro' the breeze ! She's a 



vefTel quite rigg'd to my fancy, As i?'er faii'd 






on the fait feas : Then adieu to the white ch^s 



'^h 



of Britain, Our girls, and our dear native fliorCj 



*^3:i=r: 






I 



E'er if tome hard rock, we ihould fplit on, Wt 



9'X 



THE EDINBURGH 






^ _]^ . 



ne'er fhould fee tliem a - ny more* But fail- 



— t? — 



iina:: 






ors are boon for all weathersj Great guns, let 



it blow hijh, blow low 1 Our duty keeps us 
to our tethers, And where the gak drives we 



fcz; 



S'^fcp 



iTfijjzzrz 



niuit go. 



When we enter'd the gut of Gibralter, 

I verily thought fhe'd have funk. 
For the wind fo began for to alter ; 

She yauFd juft as tho' (he was drunk. 
The fi|uall tore the mainfail to fhivers, 

Heim-a-weather the hoarfe botfwain cries ;. 
Set the forefail a-thwart fea fhe quivers, 

As through the rough tempeft fhe Hies* 
But faiiors; 6c c 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY* J^^ 

Tlie llorm came on thicker and fafler, 

As black then as pitch v/as the fky j 
But then what a dreadful difaller, 

Befel three poor feamen and I. 
Ben Buntlen, Sam Shroud and Dick Handfailj 

By a gale that came furious and hard ; 
And as we were furling the mainfail, 

We were every foul fwept from the yard» 
But failors, &c. 

Poor Ben, Sam and Dick cried piecavi^ 

When I at the riik of my neck, 
While in peace they funk down to old Davyj 

Caught a rope and fo landed on deck. 
Well, what would you have, we were {lranded> 

And out of a fine jolly crew, 
Of three hundred, that fail'd, never landed^ 

But I, and I think, twenty two. 
But failors, &c. 

At lad then at fea having mifcarrledj 

Another guefs way fet the wind ; 
To England I came and got married. 

To a lafs that was comely and kind. 
But whether for joy or vexation, 

We know not for what we were born | 
Perhaps we may find a kind ftation. 

Perhaps we may touch at Cape Horn. 
But failors, &fi 



THE EDINBURGH- 



SONG XXXV. 
OUR TP.ADE TO WORK IN CLAY BEGAN. 

Our trade to work in clay began, Ere the 



firft man was made j For out of clay was made 






3:: 



3 



:z=q- 



qrs:; 



E^mE 



this man, And thus' began our trade. Since man 






is but an earthen jug, The jug then let us fill ; 

zr^--t:±Y~~z=:jz=-li--ZM:z 



^3- . 

For this to empty t'other mug good iiquor s 

dz 






aaW — ' BBt — ^ h — r— 1 ' ' 

welcome liuL In earth, my boys, let's work oiix- 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



95 



>X-i— r— 



way,. And when we're dry, and when we're 






dry, we'll wet the clay. 



it^. 



See here a noble chrifl'ning bo\vl, 

But fill It to the brim ; 
So large, the baby (pretty foul) 

May like young Indians fwim : 
The Covent Garden fweli at jupps, 

In this may take his go, 
For Afh ley's punch houfe here are cups. 

Pro bono publico. 

And when we're dry, &c. 

And why abroad our money fling, 

To pleafe our fickle fair, 
No more from Chinaj China bring, 

Here's Englilli China ware. 
Then, friends, put round the foaming mug, 

And .take it v.'itli good will, 
Since man is but an earthen jug, 

This jug then let lis fin. 

And when we're drv, &c. 



96 



THE EDINBURGH 

SONG XXXVI. 

THE TWADDLE. 



iSpii^iii^g 



On fturdy flout Dobbin I mounted my fad- 
die, And canter'd to town, where they call'd 



me the Twaddle ; 'Till I met with a friend by 




=T- 



Ht 



w.'-^^: 



._3 — 

:zp— t: 



1^3= 



mere dint of good luck, Who taught me the 



E--|r= p=| j=JiJJE-i:-^ =r3 



Tippee, And now I'm a buck ! To fwallow fix 

-^ — 



— ^ — ti-_i: — ^-_.u,_ 



bottles I now dare engage, Then to knock down 



MUSICAL MISCFXIANY. §'f 



■y-p- ' ] — -- 






-— - — b- 

thole watchmen bent double with age, And i£ 



---:i=^3 






.i^_ 



fpent with fatigue to St James's I waddie. To 
Hiew the beau monde I'm no longer the twaddle. 



3T5~* 



No longer the twaddle, No longer tlie twaddle, 
_ p^ p 

^=±i::h=±=-i=E=r!=rjittrE=t— 

To fnew the beau monde I'm no longer the 



twaddle. 



Having now learnt to r?-;\d why I take in the papers. 
And draining a bumper to bmiili the vapaiirs, 
I fcan the freili quarrels 'twhit nevz-married fpoufes. 
To match the debates in both Parliament h^ulLS. 
Vol. II. M 



©3 ' THE EDINBURGH 

Where patriots and placemen keep wrangling for 

fame, 
The outs are all faultlefs, the ins are to blame ; 
Tho' the outs are the Tippee, their brains are all 

addle, 
Yet v/hen they get in you foon find'em the Twaddle. 

When Briton's bafe foes dare prefume to unite, 
Old Elhot's the Tippee, becaufe he dare fight. 
And to poets, who live on the lioor next the fky, 
Road beef is a Tippee they fsldom come nigh. 
The lawyer and do6lor both flridlly agree 
That all is the Twaddle— except 'tis their fee. 
And when you from Dover to Calais would Itraddle, 
A balloon is the Tippee, a packet's the Twaddle. 

Dick Twilling is now ciiite the Twaddle for tea, 
Tho' he once was the Tippee for Green and Bohea ; 
But then we'd no tax to turn day into night. 
No dire Commutation to bl-ock up our light. 
*' Lead faid's fooneft mended," I hope I'm not wrong, 
If I am, pray excufe, and I'll hence hold my tongue : 
Perhaps you may tliink me a mere llddlc faddle. 
Yet if not quite the Tippee^ don't Liv I'm the 
Twaddle. 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



9^ 



SGNG XXXVIL 
THE MANSION OF P.EACE1 



And^int^ 



Soft zephyr, on thy bahny wing, Thy gen- 









tied breezes hither brmg ; Her {lumbers guard 






w. 



w—3: 



HZLZZ' — 

— £ — t 



fo me hand divine, Ah! Vv^atch her with a care 

Affetuofo. 

nzz:|^ZTpzd::|:±zi|bzz:T^d:^^^^^^ 



^- 



— -^--(a 



like mine. A rofe ! a rofe ! from her bofom has 






C^I 'l:. 



ttW-^Bt-. 



:idz±±frfe?f± 

ftray'd ; I'll feek to replace it, To replace it v/itli 

:: ::i::^:;i:zz 






iii^zzc: 



art, A. Art. But no, no^ no, 'Twill 
Ha 



3 00 



' 



.---1^. 



THE E-DINBURGH 



her fiumbera invade, I'll wear it, fond youth ! 

fr. I 2 

next mj heart. But. heart; A -lay! fil-'ly 



grggl^^^lll 



.-i. 



rofr,. fiUly rcfc, hadpt thou known, Twas.' 
Daphne that gave thee, that gave thee that 



phce. A place. Thou ne'er^ no ne'er from 



r^ 



ill/ ftatioa jiadT; i]own_, Her boiom's the m:^n- 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



I or 



H • X « 



fiDn of pcace% Thou peace. 



H3 



3-- THE EDINBURGH 

SONG XXXVIII. 

QUEEN MAPvY's FAREWELL TO FRANCE. 

:s:b3::i::fr1:i]ii^^:T=!~ 



misimmi 



SP 



O ! thou lovM country, where my youth was 



-_-[_x__-pi_s^r: 



fpent, Dear golden days, All pail in fweet con- 






■ isass 



;ggi 



tent, Where the fair morning of my clouded day 

:a:ii:t:: 



iliig^iliilllEl 

Shone mildly bright, and temperately gay. Dear 



fe:kp:p33T2:5Fr:rT z^zmzz ix3~::;|3i:x:^z^: 



France, adieu, a long and fad farewel ! No thoughtj 

5:te:t:^rsT:sr=r3z^!^:T:=ri:-T-=j;=|r 



-cr- 



can image, and no tongue can tell, The pangs. 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



10 : 




I feel at that drear word — farewell! 



The iliip that wafts me from thy friendly {horcj 
Conveys my body, but conveys no more. 

My foul is thine, that fpaik of heav'niy flame. 
That better portion of my mingled frame. 

Is wholy thine, that part 1 give to thee, 
That in the temple of thy memory, 

The other ever may enOirined be. 



i«4 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG XXXIX.. 
ONCE MORE I'll tune. 



»rlWj_p. T^_r:^~ 



^m^. 



Once more I'll tune the vo - eal fhell, To 




hills and dales my paf - fion tell^ A flame which 
time can ne ver quell, That burns for , 









lovely Peggy- Ye greater bards the lyre fliould ' 



hit, For fay what fubjt£t is more fit, Than 



Jigpgpgpppg; 



to re -QQrd the fpark-iing wir^ and bloom q£ 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. loi 



J^ J. 



^ 



love-ly Peg -gyp 

ThxC fun firft rifing in tlie mom. 
That paints the dew-befpangled thcrn. 
Does not fo much the day adonij 

Ao does my lovely Peggy,. 
And when in Thetis lap to reil. 
He ilreaks with gold the ruddy well, 
He's not fo beauteous, as undrefs'd 

Appears my lovely Peggy. 

Were fhe array'd in rullic weed. 
With her the bleating flocks Fd feed. 
And pipe upon mine oaten reed, 

To pleafe my lovely Peggy. 
With her a cottage would delight, 
All's happy when fhe's in my fight, 
But when {he's gone it's endiefs nighty 

All's dark without my Peggy. 

The zephyr's air the violet blows. 
Or breathe upon the damafk rofc, 
He does not half the fweets difclofe^ 

That does my lovely Peggy. 
I ilcle a kifs the other day, 



iO^ THE EDINBURGH 

And trufl me, nought but truth I fay, 
The fragrant breath of bloommg May, 
Was not fa fwegt m I^eggy. 

While bees from flow*r to flow'r fliall rove-, 
And linnets warble thro' the grove, 
Gr ftntely fwans the waters love, 

So long will I love Peggy, 
And when Death with his pointed dart,. 
Shall (trike the blow that rives my heart,. 
My word fliall be when I depart, 

Adieu ! my lovely Peggy. 



^vIUSICAL MISCELL^ls^Y. 

SONG XL. 

Oscar's ghost. 



Jot 



^^"^^^^^J^^ ^-T 



O fee that form that faintly gleams ! 'Tis 
Ofcar come to cheer my dreams : On wings of 






wind he flies away, O ftay, my lovely Ofcar,>itay ! 

Wake OfTian, laft of Fingal's line, 
And mix thy tears and fighs with mine. 
Awake the Harp to doleful lays, 
And foothe my foul with Ofcar's praife. 
The Shdl is ceas'd in Ofcar's Hall, 
Since gloomy Kerbar wrought the fall : 
The Roe on Morven lightly bounds, 
Nor hears the cry of Ofcar's hounds. 



30 f 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG XLI* 

BUSK YE, EUSK- YZ. 






Bulk ye, bufk ye, my bon-ny bride, Builc 



^ M.SZ ^ 



ye, buflc ye, my winfome marrow, Bvifk: ye, 
bufK ye, my boniiv bride, And let us to the 

y.:^ . 2Z^s 

^ — A-4-.iM H-*-- £S — !,^-'> — '■■ L^-- £ 

braes of Yarrow. There will we foort and 
gather dew. Dancing while lav'rocks fing in' 

^^^^^^^^^^ 

1^ H— te'B.' ' *-— La: ki#^ — ii^^— b.kskfcM^^^£l 

the morning , There learn frae turtles to prove 



Mt?SICAL MISCELLANY. 



IG() 






true, O Bell ne'er vex me with 'thy fcorniiig 

To weflilin breezes Flora yields, 

And when the beams are kindly warming, 
Blythnefs appears o'er all the fields, 

And nature looks mair freOi and charming. 
Learn frae the burns that trace the mead, 

Tho' on their banks the rofes bloilom, 
Yet haftily they flow to Tweed, 

And pour their fweetnefs in his bolc"m« 

Hafi-e ye, hade ye, my bonny Bell, 

Hade to my arms, and there Fil guard thee. 
With free confent m.y fears repel, 

I'll v/ith my love and care reward thee. 
Thus fang I faftly to tny fair, 

Wha rais'd my hopes with kind relenting, 
O ! Queen of Smiles, I afk nae mair, 

Since now my bonny Bell's confeniing. 



Vol. IL 



ila THE EDINBURGH 

SONG XLII. 

THE FAIRY. 
A MIDNIGHT MADRIGAL. 



j^pppE^IJEp! 



-^\ 



Faired of the virgin train, That trip it o'er 




fc^— t J^ 



the ma - gic plain : Come and dance and fing 



ipEigsSiii 



with me, Under yonder aged tree : Come, and 



SiiiiSr^l 



dance and fmg with me, under yonder aged tree. 

There I'll tell you many a tale, 
Of mountain, rock, of hill and dale, 
Which will make you laugh with me, 

Under yonder aged tree. 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. tit 

See the moon all filver bright, 
Shining with a tenfold light, 
To try to fee my Qu^sen with me. 
Thro' the boughs of yonder tree. 

Who is that which I efpy, 
Juft defcended from thy fky ? 
E'en faith 'tis Cupid, come to fee* 
My fair beneath yon aged tree. 

A little rogue ! but he fliall fmart— 
Til take away his bow and dart, 
And give them, 'fore his face, to thee^ 
Under yonder aged tree. 

Then we'll play, and dance, and fingj 
Celebrating Pan our king, 
And I'll always live with thee, 
Under yonder aged tree 



la 



,n^a 



THE EDINBURGH 



SCNi 



.IIL 



ANNA S URN. 



Encompafs'd m an- angel's frame, An angel's 



r"^ 






virtues lay : Too foon did heaven aflert its 

3- 3 



ifizztexb^ttt 



claim, And call'd its own away, and calFd its own 

tr. 



av/ay. My An-na's worth, my Anna's charms 
Can never more return, Can never more re- 






"^-i9-®j-4-F-F"~-F~i=^- 

— ":.^„^^t ±:p _| — I ; 

{hall fill thefe widow'd arms 



turn ! What then fhall fill thefe vv^idow'd arms ? 



Ah »,----. - ^le I Ah me ! All iTie,. J m y 



MUSICAL MiSCELLAKt. II3 



Can I forget that blifs refin'd, 

Which, bled with her, I knew ? 
Gur hearts, in facred bonds entwin'd. 

Were bound by love too true. 
That rural train, which once were uf'd 

In feiiive dance to turn, 
So pleafd, when Anna they amufed^ 

Now weeping deck her Urn. 

The foul efcaplng from its chain, 

She clafp'd me to her bread, 
" To part with thee is all my pain 1" 

She cried ! then funk to reft 1 
While mem'ry (hall her feat retain. 

From beauteous Anna torn. 
My heart Ihall •breathe its ceafelefs ftralii 

Of forrow oe'r her Urn* 

There with the earlieft dawn, a dove 

Laments her murder'd mate : 
There Philornela, loft to love, 

Tells the pale moon her fate. 
With yew, and ivy round me fpread^ 

My Anna there I'll mourn ; 
For ail my foul, now fhe is dead^ 

Concentres in her Uru. 

13 



TH-E" EDIT>rBtlS:GHi 



SONG XLW. 

BLUE-EYED PATTY '. 
TII£ ORIGIN OF "THE PATTEN. 



-^-^-. 



liiiEipiigsili 



Sweet ditties would my Patty fmg, Old Chevy 






Chace, God fave the king, Fair Rofemy and Sawny 



~^^-^- 



Scot, Lil-li-bul-le-ro, and what not : All thefe 
would fing my blue-ey'd Pat- ty, As with her pail< 



Sii 



:^z± ^^ 



i^i^# 



fhe trudg'd along : While il41i the burden of her 

~' -^ ^ N J!!J -A. BW 



fongj My hammer beat to blue-ey'd PattVj 



'-1^ 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



If 5 



While fiill the bur - den of her fong, My hammer 



^,^^ 



beat to blue-ey'd Patty, My hammer beat to 



i^gipigil 



blue-eyM Pat - ty, My hammer beat to blue- 



^BiE 



ey'd Pat - - ty. 

But nipping frofts and chilling rain, 
Too foon alas ! choak-'d every drain, 
Too foon alas ! the miry way 
Her wet (hod feet did fore difmay ; 

And hoarfe was heard my blue ey'd Patty 
While I, for very mad did cry,. 
Ah ! cou'd I but again, faid I, 

Hear the fweet voice of blut-ey'd Patty. 



Love taught me how : I work'd I fung,. 
My Jinvil glow'd, my hammer rung. 



n5' 



THE EDINBURGH 



Till Ihad form'd, from out the fire, . 
To bear her feet above the mire, 

All engine for my blue-ey'd Patty. 
Again was heard each tuneful clofe, 
My fair one on the Patten rofe. 

Which takes its name from blue-ey'd Pattj. 



SONG XLV. 

FOR FREEDOM AND HIS NATIVE LAND, 



Andantino, 



/TN r^ 



Eiiiiii^ig 



Muft peace and pleafure's melting ftrain For 



t 

e ver in this 'circle reign? A while the 



--^-^^m-i^'-^ 



:£E:t 



mufe with ardour glows. To pay the debt that 




Britain ov/es. To pay the debt that Bri - taiis^- 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



Vivace. 



117' 



^ili=iiiifeii 



' ov/es. O wave a while your foft delights 1 To 
praife each valiant Ton that fights, And braves ^-^ 



feE^^sSiiSz^ 



broad each hof - tile band, And braves abroad 



i^siii^ps 



each hoilile band, For freedom, freedom, For 




freedom and his native land 



For free 



Si 



SEE 



'^■. 



dom and his native land, For. 



Il8 THE EDINBURGH 



freedom, freedom, freedom, and his native land. 

The foldier feeks a diftant plain, 
The failor ploughs the boift'rous main i 
Their toil domeilic eafe fecures, 
The labour theirs, the pleafure yours^: 
Then change a while your foft delights^?- 
To praife each valiant fon that fights. 
And braves abroad each hoftile band. 
For freedom and his native land. 

Ye wealthy, who domeftic fweets. 
Enjoy within your gay retreats, 
Think, think, on thofe who guard the Ihorc^ 
While unmolefted fprings your ftore : 
And change a while your foft delights, 
To praife each valiant fon that fights, 
And braves abroad each hoftile band> 
For freedom and his native land. 

Ye fv/ains who haunt the (hady grove. 
And tranquil breathe your vows of lovCj 
Who hear not Vv'ar's tremendous voice. 
But in the arms of peace rejoice : 
Change, change a while your foft delights. 
To praife each valiant fon that fights, 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. II^ 

And braves abroad each hoflile band. 
For freedom and his native land. 

And ye, who in this frolic train, 
infpfr'd with mufic's fprightly ftrain, 
And wild with pleafure's airy round, 
Bid flowing bowls with love be crown'd : 
Amid your focial dear delights, 
Remember him who boldly fights. 
And braves abroad each hoflile band, 
For freedom and his native land. 



1 29 



THE EDrNBtTRCa 



SONG XLVI. 

THOU ART GONE AWA FROM ME, MARY-. 



iipiiiLiiSip 



a=t 



Thou art gone awa, thou art gone awa, thou 



:fgli 



N:| 






art gone awa from me. Ma - ry ; Nor friends 

x: 



— j 



^■fe-d^-3-i 



^^m^^mm 



nor I couid make thee Hay, Thou haft cheated 

tr. 






fef« '^ 



them and me, Ma - ry. Until this hour I ne - ver 






f^giEil 



-k 



-i-- 



pii:^^— 



thought tliat ought could alter thee, Mary : Thour't 



^^^^^ 



ftill the miilrefs of my heart, Think what you 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



121 




"^^IeI 



will of me Ma - - ry. 

What e'er he faid or might pretend, 

That dole that heart of thine, T'.Iary \ 
True love Fm fure was ne'er his end, 

Or nae fuch love as mine, Mary. 
I fpoke fincere nor flatter'd much, 

Had no unworthy thoughts, Mary ; 
Ambition, wealth, nor naething fuch, 

No — I lov'd only thee, Mary. 

Tho' you've been falfe, yet while I live. 

No other maid Fli woo, Mary ; 
Till friends forget, and I forgive 

Thy wrongs t'o them and me, Mary. 
So then farewell : of this be fure, 

Since you've been falfe tp me, Mary \ 
For all the world Fd not endure. 

Half what Fve done for thee, Mary. 



Vol. XL 



Hi 






THE EDINBURGH 



SONG XLVII. 

THE HEAVY HOURS, 



Largo andante 



^:S~ggS 



h—w-1 



Z-MTZZtZ 



:n:: 



The heavy hours are almofi pail That part 






:±: 



my love and me ; My longing eyes may hope at 



r.^^- 




lafl their only v/ifh to fee. But how, my De- 

lia, will you meet The man you've loft fo long ? 



Win love in all your pulfes beat, And tremble 
on your tongue ? Will love in all your pulfes 



MUSICAL MISCSLLANY. 12^ 






^M^MliMi 



\ — ^^^ 

beatj And tremble on your tongue ? 

Will you in ev'ry look declare 

Your heart is ftUl the fame ? 
And heal each idly anxious care. 

Our fears in abfenee frame ? 
Thus, Delia, thus I paint the fcenej 

When we (hall ihortly meet ; 
And try what yet remains between, 

Of loit'ring time to cheat ! 

But if the dream that foothes my miad^ 

Shall falfe and groundlefs prove j 
If I am doom'd at length to iind 

You have forgot to love i 
All I of Venus afk is thi% 

No more to let us join ; 
But grant me here the flatt'ring bUr:>,, 

To die and think you minsc 



I 



K ?:, 



124 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG XLVIII. 

THE SUMMER WAS OVER. 



\z±:. 



m 



F=# 



•-1 — I- 



-u«»- 



The fummer was o-ver, my flocks were all 

m 



s^si^-p— — 



gpi^^pp 



Hiorn, My meadows were mowM, And Fd houf'd 









mm 



all my corn, Fair Phillida's cottage was jull ii 



my view, A- wooing I Swent I had nought elfe to 



do. On Flora's foft fopha together we fat, And 
pent feme long hours in amorous chat. I told 
her I lov'd, and I hop'd flie lov'd too. Then kjfs'd 



M-SrSICAi: MISCELLA^NY,.- 



1-25 



i^ipgi^^i 



her fweet lips, I had nought elfe to do, I had 




I — &— U- 



nought elfe to do, Thenkifs'd her fweet lips, I had 



nought elfe to do. 

She hung down her head and with bluOies reply'd, 

ril love you, but lirft you muft make me your bride.- 

Without hefitation, I make her a vow, 

To make her my wife — I had nought elfe to do. 

To the village in quell of a prieil did we roam, 

By fortune's decree, the grave. Don was at homej, 

I gave him a fee to make one of us two. 

Me married us then— he had nought elfe to dc. 

E'er fmce we've been happy with peace and conteni. 
Nor tailed the forrov/s of thofe who repent, 
Our neighbours all round us we love, and 'tis tiue^ 
Each other befide ! — ^when we've nought elfe to do,, 
A¥ith Phoebus the toil of the day we begin, 
1' fliepherd my floek, vvhileitie (its down to fpin, 
Our cares thus domeflic we'll arduous purfue, 
And ever, will love— when we've nought elfetto do,- 
E:3. 



^1 :d 



THE EDIHB.Gr-RGH-. 



SONG XLIX. ■ 

LEADED HAU CHS AND YARROW. 

The morn was fair, faft was the air, All Na- 
lure's fv/eets were fprlnging : The buds did bow 



'-i^T~~- 



^-S-^ — — -^ WisiSt— H — ^ii— 3- 



v/ith filver dew, Ten thoui^md birds v/ere fing- 



^^5 



^^ 



ing, "Vv^ien on the bent, witK blyth content: 









young Jamie fang his marrow, Nae bonnier lafs e'er 



trode the grafs on Leader-haughs and Yarrow.- 



How fweet her face, where every grace 
In heavenly beauty's plante^I 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. I 27 

Her fmiling e'en and comely mein. 

That nae perfe6lion wanted. 
I'll never fret, nor ban my fate. 

But blefs my bonny marrow : 
if her dear fmile my doubts beguile. 

My mind; fnall ken nae forrow. 

Yet tho' (he's fair, and has full fliare ( 

Of ev'ry charm inchantin^, 
Each good turns ill, and foon will kill 

Poor me, if love be wanting. 
O bonny iafs ! have but the grace 

To think ere ye gae further. 
Your joys maun flit, if you commit 

The crying fin of muider. 

My wand'ring ghaifl will ne'er get refl:, 

And day and night affright ye ; 
But if ye're kind, and joyful mind, 

I'll ftudy to delight ye. 
Our years around with love thus crown'd, 

Fr-om all things joy fliall borrow : 
Thus none fnall be more bleft than we^ 

On leader-haughs and Yarrow. 

O fweetefl Sue ! 'tis only you 

Can make life worth my wifhes> 
If equal love your. mind can move 

To grant this bed of bliiies. 
Thou art my fun, and thy leaft frown 

Would blaft me in the bioffom : 
But if thou (lilne, and make me thine, 

I'll flou-viili in thy bofom. 



I2l 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG L. 

HOW BLEST THE MAID. 




Hov/ bleil the maid whofe bofom No headftrong; 



/"^ 









Effr 



izt 






palTion knov/s, Her days in joys (lie paf-fes, Her- 



>-- s^i — U--^ 
— I**- 






-j«n| 






nights in calm repofe. Where'er her fan^cy leads 
her, No paiiij no fear invades her, But pleafure 



p-v. 



without meaiure froin evv.^ry obje£t-fIov/3. No pain, 




no 



fear» Where'er (lie goes, How blcil tKe maid. 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



'Ezi^-'-z^z^xz 






129 



|i&< 



whofe bofom no headftrong paf-fion knows, Her 



f^> 



I — ^-^^■ 



— 2s-a-T-(8>- 



ges 



^days in joys {lie paiTes, Her nights in calm repofc. 



i|Silfe|fellEi!p 



Where'er her fancy leads, No pain no fear in- 



■^r 



m 



-ades, No fear invades, no fear invades% 



130 



THE EDINEUPXH 



SONG LI. 

HAD I A HEART. 



Had I a heart for falfehood framM, I ne'er 



^iiip 



izEzzS^zE 



^--> 



could injure you j For tho' your tongue no pro- 




^^^ 



mife claim'd, your charms would make me true. 



V 



Fjp-=: 



To you no foul fhali bear deceit, No ftranger 



i 



3:i^Zi:z~zr; 



OiFer wrong ; But friends in all the agM you'll 



I 



^lilii^ 



meet; And lovers ia the young. 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 1 3 

But when they learn that you have bleft 

Another with your heart, 
They'll bid afpiring paffion reft. 

And a6l a brother's part. 
Then, lady, dread not here deceit, 

Nor fear to fuiFer wrong, 
For friends in all the ag'd you'll meet. 

And brothers in the young. 



SONG LII. 

13RAMACHREE MOLLY. 

ro rHE FOREGOING TUNE. 

As down on Banna's banks I ftray'd^ 

One evening in May, 
The little birds, in blytheft notes, 

Made vocal ev'ry fpray : 
They fung their little tales of love 

They fung them o'er and o'er; 
Ah Gramachree, ma Colleenouge, 

Ma Molly Afhtore ! 

The daify pled, and all the fweets 
The dawn of nature yields j 

The primrofc pale, the vi'let bluCj, 
Lay fcatter'd o'er the fields : 



132 THE EDINBURGH 

Such fragrance in the bofom lies 
Of her whom I adore. 

Ah Gramachree, &c. 

I laid me down upon a bank. 

Bewailing my fad fate, 
That doomVi me thus the flave of love, 

And cruel Molly's hate : 
How can fhe break the honell heart 

1 hat wears her in its core ? 

Ah Gramachree, &c. 

You faid you lov'd me, Molly dear ! 

Ah ! why did I believe ? 
Yet, who could think fuch tender words 

Were meant but to deceive^? 
That love was all I alk'd on earth, 

Nay, heav'n could give no more. 

Ah Gramachree, &c. 

Oh had I all the flocks that graze 

On youder yellow hill, 
Or low'd for me the num'rous herds 

That yon green pafcure fill ; 
With her I love I'd gladly fliare 

My kine and fleecy ftore. 

Ah Gramachree, occ. 

Two turtle doves above my head 
Sat courting on a bough ; 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 

I envied not their Iiappinefs, 

To fee them bill and coo : 
Such fondnefs once for me flie iliewM ; 

But now, alas ! 'tis o'er. 

Ah Gramachree, &c. 

Then fare thee well, my Molly dear. 
Thy lofs I e'er fhall mourn ; 

WhilH life remains in Strephon's heart, 
'Twill beat for thee alone : 

Tho' thou art falfe, may heaven on thee 
Jts choiceft blefTmgs pour. 

Ah Gramachrecj &t:. 



¥0L. H. 



^j4 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG LIII. 

FOR EVER FORTUNE. 



For ever, Fortune, wilt thou prove An un- 



-3^-^ *~^iii 

re - lenting foe to love ? And when we meet a , 



©._<%_?_ 



EiESE^|EliliE|El±rr?i!§ 



mutual heart, Come in between and bid us part ? 

lEIIZ^ 









Bid us figh on, from day to day, And wifh and ^ 



^^-i-= 



lEEEiiiSi^iiHlgiE 



wifh our fouls away, Till youth and genial years 'i 



%-s~ 



^ ' "^-^'*^ ."11. i___j;:i3_ .-».v- 



:Eiie.liteE#!ll 



are 'flown, And all the life of life is gone 



I 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. t^S 

But bufy, bufy (lill art thou 

To bind the lovelefs, joylefs vow j 

The heart from pleafure to delude, 
To bind the gentle with the rude. 

For once, O Fomme, hear my pray'f^ ' 

And I abfolve thy future cztt , 
All other bJcfiings I refign, 

Make but the dear Amanda minSi 



La 



■ :n 



^3^ ^HE EDINBURGH 

SONG LIV. 

THE BANKS QF BANKA* 



Shepherds, I have loft my love, Havt you 

feen my Anna, Pride of ev'ry ftiady grove, Up- 
pon tlie banks of Banna. I for her my home 






nmm 



for- fook Near yon miily mountain,. Left my 






'—^MZZiLE.f'.^, 






Hock, my pipe, my crook, greenwood fliade^ 






did fountain. 



I 



MUMCAL MISCELLANY. |^, 

Never {hall I fee them more, 

Until her returning •, 
AH the joy§ of life are o'er, 

From gladnefs chang'd to mourning. ? 

Whither is my charmer flown. 

Shepherds tell me whither, 
Ah ! woe for me, perhaps (he's gone 

For ever, and for eveir 



^■3 



kS 



THE EDINBUKGB 



SONG LV. 

PINKY HOUSE. 



si^^ 



-^ . 



±3?-| 



^By Piii--kie houfe oft let me walk, 

*'^^irf 3!^ — zl§" — T" ~ rrs^ 

While GIF - - cled in my arms, I hear my Nel- ,| 







ly fwee-tly taik,**And gaze o'er all her charms '! 



-m --r 



iigi^se 



O let me e - ver fond behold thofe gra 









t: 



I&:pzP^:±S: 



:i|^:igz: 



•~^- 



ces void of art, Thofe chearful fmiles that 



fweet-iy hold in will - ing chains my heart, ■ 



I 



MUSrCAL MISCELLANY. 1^9 

O come, my love, and bring anew 

That gentle turn of mind ; 
That gracefulnefs of air, in you, 

By nature's hand defign'd : 
That beauty like the bluflnng rofcj 

Flril lighted up this flame ! 
Which, like the fun, for ever glowS- 

Vv^iciiin my bread the fame. 

Ye light coquets ' ye airy things ! 

How vain is all your art ! 
How feldom it a lover brings ! 

How rarely keeps a heart ! 
O gather from my Nelly's charms> 

That fweet, that graceful eafe -, 
That bluOiiag modelly that warms j 

That native art to pleafe I 

Come then, my love , O ! come along-, 

And feed me with thy charms ; 
Come, fair infpirer of my fong^ 

O fill my longing arms ! 
A flame like mine can never die, 

"While charms, fo bright as thingj 
So heav'nly fair, both pleafe the eye-j 

And fill the foul divine* 



%4^i 



THE EDINBU"RC:ar 



SONG LVL 

JAMIE GAy» 



i?e: 



Mi^: 



Se^ 



m 



^±:±-3t 



E 



As Ja - mk Gay gaed blithe his way Along 






the banks of Tweed, A bonny lafs as e- 

. ir. 



^^^^^m 






ver was came tripping o'er the mead,. The 

_^EK_ ^"ff ■ 

hear - ty fwaiii, im - taught to feign, The 






^^333^' 



.=& 






Sjig5^g-ffi^^3E 



buxom nymph furvey'dj And full of glee, As ladi 
could be^ Befpoke the blooming maido 






IVIUSICAL MISCELLANY. 14* 

©ear laffie, tell, why by thyfell 

Thou lonely wander'ft here ? 
My ewes, (he cry*d., are ilraying wide ? 

Canft tell me, laddie, where ? 
To town I hie, he made reply. 

Some pleaGng fport to fee : 
But thou'rt fo neat, fo trim, fo fwect, 

I'll leek thy ewes with thee. 

She gav>^. her hand, nor made a fland 5 

But Uk'd the youth's intent : 
O'er hili and dale, o'er plain and valcy, 

Right merrily they went. 
The birds fang fweet, the pair to greet. 

And flow' rets blccm'd around i 
And as they walk'd, of love they talk' d. 

And lovers joys when crownM. 

And now the fun had rofe to noon, 

The zenith of liispow'r, 
When to the (hade their lleps they mads. 

To pafs the mid-day hour. 
The bonny lad rov/d in his plaid 

The lafs, who fcorn'd to frown : 
She foon forgot tli^ ewes (lie fougliij>. 

And he to gang to town. 



'$4^ 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG LVII. 

THE BROOM ON COWDENKNOWS, 



^:g|giJS^g£j||! 




±~ 



When fummer comes, the fwains on Tweed 

"i7zl u ~^E:3''3^3*3"]3"'^ - 3T^ — -^w^ 

— ^r— »— — — ^^r-— —--^ — ir~3 — ^^^^ — "fe' — 

fing their fuc - cefs - ful loves •, A -round the 

'- -#r&-^ b-H-fer- ' — '[- — b**tbB'— -W-U-r-^-h-" 



ewes and lambkins feed. And mufic fills the 




groves : But my lov'd foiig is then the broom 



m^m 



tt3 



I (Si n^r^L i 



1 



H^h 



fo fair on Cowdenknows 5 For fure fo foft fo 



-77-*»~ 



i^fifp 




fweet a bloom Elfewhere there ne --ver growsi 



MySICAL MISCELLANY. 



143 



iil^llliiiiil 



Oh the broom, the bonny bonny broom, the 
broom on Cowdenknowo -, For fure fo foft, fo 







,fweet a bloom Elfewhere there ne - ver grows. 



There Colin tunM his oaten reed, 

And won my yielding heart ; 
No fliepherd e'er that dwelt on Tweed 

Could play with half fuch art. 
He fling of Tay, of Forth, and Clyde 

The hills and dales all round ; 
Of Leader haughs and Leader fide, 

Oh ! how I blelT'd the found. 
Oh ! the broom, &c. 

Not Tiviot braes, fo green and gay. 
May with its broom compare ; 

Not Yarrow banks, in flow'ry May, 
Nor the Buih aboon Traquair. 



144 



THE EDINBURGH 



More pleafmg far are Cowdenknowj, 
Mj peaceful happy home, 

Where I was wont to milk my ewes 
At eve among the broom* 
Oh ! the broom, &c. 



SONG LVIII. 

STILL THE LARK FINDS REPOSE. 

Andante. 




i^:^:: 
^ 



giiigis; 



Still the lark finds re - - pofe in the full 






G 



■i-' 



^fifeU^ 



ving corn, Or the bee on the rofe, tho* fur- 



^^^1^11 



rounded with thorn. Never robb'd of their 



Eiii 




tt 



-^-^4 



mk, .they are thoughtlefs and free : But m 




MUSICAL MISCGLLANY. 
- ~J^- 



14- 



i^>^ . — ^ . ^ — 4J ^___ y . 1 



more gentle peace fhall ecr harbour with msr. 



(^ 



e'er harbour with me. Still the lark hads re- 



^l — 1_ — . — J j 



5— 



T~-~ 



^ 

(M^ 



pofe, in the full waving corn, Or the bee on 



ig^ii: 



the rofe, tho' furrounded with thorn : Still in 



-5:r-^^ ^~rl 



^iiiii^gi 



-^~' 



fearch of delight, every pleafure they prove. Ne'er 







:c 



B^'" 



torment-ed by pride, nor the ilights of fond 




^E^|l 3 Eq|^ E^p!£i 



'"W^ 



love, the llights of fond love^j^He flights of fond 
Vol. II. M 



I4.& 



TKE EDINBURGH 






:-^- 



"T- 



'^-^-fe-,-*.- 



T^ 



--^::^z:i.zzp: 



love. Still the lark finds repofe in the full 



''m.z,3. 




waving corn, Or the bee on the rcfe, tho' fiir- 



:qd^:cis:t^-. 



rounded with thorn. 



SONG LIX. 

MY LODGING IS ON THE COLD GROUND. 




K^ 



My lodging is on the cold grourid. And 
ve- ry hard is my (are; But that which grieves 



MUSICAL MiSCHLLANY, 



s^} ,b< _ SS;T_ 



^X— ;'^K~f— -^— -^t-5-"-^£"i-'--^^'--^T-^■ '- 






me more, love, Is the coklnefs of my dear - - 
Yet ftill he cry'd, fani love^ I pr.iy thee, lov 



,|5._~'?~ 






^' 




iP 



tiirn to me \ For tl 



art t:ie on - ly g.xl, 



love, that is ado -red by me. 



Wi'-h a gn.rhind of draw PlI crown thee, love, 
I'll marry thee whh a rufh ring y 

Thy frozen heart fhall melt with love. 
So merrily I fliall img. 
Yet Rili, &c. 



But if you Will harden your heart, love. 
And be deaf to my pitiful moan : 

Qh ! I muil endure the fmart, love^,. 
And tunible in ftraw all alone. 

Yet (lih, &c. 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG LX. 

THJi: BANKS OF THE DEE, 



■m- 






^S^ 



'Twas fummer, and foftly the breezes v/ere 






blowing, And fweetly the nightingale fung from 



the tree 5 At the foot of a rock where the river 



was flowing, I fat myfelfdown on the banks. 



'-1: 



of the D€e. Flow on, lovely Dee, flow on thou 



spippi 




fweet river. Thy banks, pureft flreamj Ihall be 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



149 



i^iiiplii^^ 



dear to me ever : For there I firfl gained the 



'*- 




feEiE^^I 



:^+*~d- 



aiFedion and favour Of Ja - mie the glory and 



^^i§ 



pride of the Dee» 

But now he^s gone from me, and left me thus mourn- 

To quell the proud rebels — for valiant is he ; 
And ah ! there's no hopes of his fpeedy returningp 
To w^ander again on the Banks of the Dee. 
He's gone, haplefs youth, o'er the loud-roaring bil- 
lows, 
The kindeft and fweeteil of all the gay fellows, 
And left me to ftray 'mongll the once loved willows^, 
The lonlieft maid on the Banks of the Dee^ 

But time and my prayers may perhaps yet rertore 
him, 
Bleft peace may reflore nfy dear ihepherd to me ^ 
And when he returnrj, with fueh care I'll v/atch 
o'er him, 

M 3 



15 0- THE EDINBUPvGlT 

He never fliali leave tae fweet JBanks of tlie Dee. 
The' Dee. then fliall flow, all its beauties difplaying; 
The lambs on its banks fliall again be feen playing *, 
While I, \vitli my Jamie, am carelefsly ftrayiiig,^ 
And tailing; again all the fweets of the Dee. 



ADDiriG.NS ST A LADT. 

Thus fung the fair maid on the banks of tl'ie .liter^ 
And fweetly re-cho'd each neighbouring tree ; 
But now all thefe hopes muft evanifii for ever, 
Since Jamie ihall ne'er fee the Banks of the Dee. 
On a foreign fnore the fweet youth lay dying. 
In a foreign grave his body's nov/ lying ; 
'While friends and acquaintaince in Scotland are 

crying 
'.For Jan":ie the glory and pride of the Dee.. 

Mis-li-T ^^ ^^^^ hand by whom he v/as v/ounded *? 
IMis-hap on the wars that call'd him av/ay (ed, 

From a circle of friends by v/hich he was furround- 
Who mourn for dear Jamie the tedious day. 
Oh ! poor haplefs maid, wlio mourns difcontentedj 
The iofs of a lover fo juflly lamented ; 
By time, only time, can her grief be contented, ' 
And all her dull hours become chearfui and gav,. 

'Tv/as honour ?M brav'ry made him leave hct 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY- I5I 

From unjuft rebellion his country to free 5 
I He left her in hopes of a fpeedy returning, 

To wander again on the Banks of the Dee. 

For this he defpifed all dangers and perils ; 
li 'Twas thus he efpoufed Britannia's quarrels, 
' That when he came home he might crown Iicr with 
laurels, 

3:'h^;^xppieft maid on the Banks of the Dee. 

But fate had determin'd his fall to be glorious, 
Tho' dreadful the thought muft be unto me ; 
He fell, like brave Wolfe, when the troops were 

vi6lorious j 
Sure each tender heart muft bev/all the decree : 
Yet, tho' he is gone, the once faithful lover. 
And all our fine fchemes of true happinefs overj. 
No doubt he implored his pity and favour 
For me he had left on the Banks of the Dee. 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG LXI. 

tak' your auld cloak about ye. 



ii^^^^i 



In winter when the rain lainM cauld, And 



^fe^iipil|:|^ 



frofl and fnaw on il ka hill, And Boreas wi' 



iippisip^ii 



his blafts fae bauld, was threat'ning a' our ky 



epif 






r^^-- bz 



to kill j Tlien Bell my wife, who loe's nae 



±=i 



^^^ii%:^l| 



Jlrife, She faid to me right haf ^ ti -ly, Get up. 



sflpNii 




gudeman, (avc Crummy's life, And tak' your 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 1 53 




i:lPi^ 



auld cloak a -bout ye. 



My Crummy is a ufeful cow. 

And fhe is come of a guid kine ; 
Aft has fhe wet the bairns mou'. 

And I am laith that flie fhould tyne : 
Get up, gudeman, it is fu' time, 

The fun ihines in the lift fae hie ; 
Sloth never made a gracious end, 

Gae tak' your auld cloak about ye. 

My cloak was anes a guid gray cloakj 

When it was fitting for my wear; 
But now its fcantly worth a groat, 

For I have worn't this thirty year. 
Let's fpend the gear that we have won. 

We little ken the day we'll die ; 
Then FU be proud, fmce I have fwom 

To have a new cloak about me. 

In days when our king Robert rang. 

His trews they colt but half a crown j 
He faid they were a groat o'er dear. 

And ca'd the taylor thief and lown. 
He was the king that wore a crown. 

And thou the man of laigh degree^ 
/Tis pride puts a' the country down, 

Sae tak' thy auld cloak about ye. 



154 THE EDINBURGH 

Every land has its alii laugh, 

Ilk kind of corn it has its hool ; 
I think the warld is a' run wrang, 

When ilka wife her man wad rule. 
Do ye 'not fee Rob, Jock, and Hab, 

As they are girded gallantly ? 
While I fit hurklen in the afe— 

I'll have a ncv.' cloak about me. 



Gudeman, I wat 'tis thirty years 

Since \¥e did ane anither ken ; 
And we have had between us twa 

Of lads and bonny laiTes ten : 
Now they are women grovv^n and men, 

I wiC^ and pray well may they be 
And if you prove a good hufband. 

E'en tak' your auld cloak about ye. 

Bell my wife fne lo'es nai flrife ; 

But ihe wad guide me if (he can : 
And, to maintain an eafy life, 

I aft maun yield, though I'm p^udeman. 
Nought's to be won at woman's hand,- 

Unlcfs ye give her a' the plea : 
Then I'll leave afi v/here I began. 



knd tak' niy uuld cloak about 



mc. 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



is: 



SONG LXII. 

CONTENT. 



'4iSi 



--h— 



:::sz: 



=:=iz=:±:KF=:^~s:::lfe: 



,rs::t:zirz^xii::^r;3izxx~ 



O'er moorlands and mountains, rude, bar- 



5:;!ir^::^T:rii::^jT:f5qs— ; 



:d!; 



ren, and bare, As wearied and wilder'd I roara, 

|Kw±^iirfr^?|Ep¥s 

A gentle young fhepherdefs fees my defpair, 

SS:$EESS]-feiiHEi=J5:F?i 



And leads me o'er lawns to her home. Yellow 









ilieaves from rich Ce ~ res her cottage had crown'd, 
Green raOics were ftrew'd on the floor : Her 



iS6 



THE EDINBURGH 



cafement fweet woodbines crept wanton— ly round, 




And deckt the fod-feats at the door. 

We fat ourfelves down to a cooling rep aft, 

Frefh fruits, and (he cull'd me the beft ; 
Whilft thrown from my guard by fome glances 
(he caft, 

Love flily ilole into my breaft. 
I told my foft wifties, fhe fweetly reply'd, 

(Ye virgins, her voice was divine !) 
*' I've rich ones rejected, and great ones deny'd, 

" Yet take me, fond (liepherd, I'm thine." 



Her air was fo modeft, her afpe6i: fo meek. 

So fimple— tho' fweet— were her charms ; 
I kifs'd the ripe rofes that glow'd on her cheek, 

And lock'd the dear maid in my arms. 
Now jocund together we tend a few fheep. 

And if on the banks by the dream, 
Reclin'd on her bofom, I Gnk into fleep, 

Her image ftill foftens my dream. 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 157 

l^ogether we range o'er the flow rifing hills, 
I Delighted with paftoral views *, 
:Or reft on the rock whence the ftreamlet diftils/ 

And mark out new themes for my mufe. 
To pomp or proud titles (he ne'er did afpire, 

The damfel's of humble defcent ; 
The cottager Peace is well known for her fire, 

The fliepherds have nam'd her Content. 



Vol. II. N 



fss 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG LXV. V 

Johnny AND mary. 






5=5=i[rzftF; 



Dov/n the burn and thro' the mead^ His gol- 



mm 



--^— X RISERS. 



I — 4--^. 



^'i^ 



m. 



den locks wavM o'er his brow, Johnny lilt- 






ing tun'd his reed, And Ma - ry wip'd her bon- 




:*-s 






iiy mou'. Dear fiie lo'ed the well-known fong, 
While her John-ny, blyth -nid boi>ny, Sung her 



kt 






.-fiBi;. 






azdtrE 



.- X — ^ 1 ^[ 



praiie Uic whole day long. Down the burn and 



« 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



159 






thro' the mead his gol-den locks wav'd o'er hi^ 






brow ; John- ny lilt- ing tun'd his reed, And 




Ma - ry wip'd her bon - - ny mou'. 



Coftly claiths ihe had but few •, 
Of rings and jewels nae great (lore; 
Her face was fair, her love was true. 
And Johnny wifely wifli'd nae more : 
Love's the pearl the iliepherds prize ; 
O'er the mountain— near the fountain,. 
Love delights the fhepherd's eyes, 
Down the burn, &c. 

Gold and titles give not health. 
And Johnny cou'd nae thefe impart ^ 
Youthfu' Mary's greateft wealth 
Was ftill her faithfu* Johnny's heart : 
Sweet tlie joy's the lovers find, 
Great the treafure,- -fweet the pleafure. 
Where the heart is always kind. 

Tiovirn the burn^ &c. 



Tt6Q 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG LX\a. 

THE ROYAL COTTAGER, 




ii3Sigi^ 



.When- e'er I think on that dear fpot, On 






I fix'd my ru-ralcot; Then while 

-HS^-r^NrH^— h-j— . .«__, 

fi:W^f^rE=ztlzfc=:3E£S 






v.^^ 



my rofe hang on my arm, All free from guile 



piP^ipiiiipi 



and free from harm, My days they glid-ed 



en with glee. And all things then were well 
r7> 



-m—~^ 



■^ 



iHM . ......._ 



with me : My days tiiey glided on with glee^ 




MUSICAL MISCEL'LANto 



161 




And all things then were v/ell with n^e». 



But v/hen once drawn away by fate 
Unto a more exalted ftate, 
By fmiling Fortune promif d fair 
Until (he brought her train of care i 
*Twas then I firft began to fee 
That happinefs had fled from me. 



- The noife of cities, glare of courts, 
Y»^here gay diffimulation fports, 
Where envy fain wou d blight my Rofe. 
Becaufe her cheek fo purely glows i 
Let fortune take her ft ores again, 
Give me my cot, and rural plain. - 

And while I tread the ocean's fide, 
The greateil pleafure, greateft pride. 
Shall' be each day with Rofe to v/alk^. 
In focial inofFenfive talk ; 
And when each blifsful day fliall clofg3 . 
The waves fnall lull- us to repof?. 



i6z 



rn-E EDiNBURG'ES 



SCNG LXVII. 

PEGGY PERKINS. 



■b^-- 



=S±±:e-:E=t=ti=f 



Let bards ehite of Sue and Kate, And Mog- 
gy take their liil, O y And pleas'd rehearfe in 



jingling verfe. The Lafs of Richmond hill, 0> i 



The lafs of Richmond hill, O. A lafs mors ^ 

_ — I [^±^^j^ — ^ — zi,^.^ — r — gn: 



bright my am'rous flight, Impell'd by Love's fond 
workings^ Shall fondly fmg, like a-ny thing, 'Tis 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



t^^ ^-b 



1 6' 



"^- 






charming Peggy Perkins, Peggy Perkins, Peggy 
Perkins, Peggy Perkins, Peggy Perkins. Shall 



loudly fing, like a - - ny thing, 'Tis charming 



I 



"blt^'a""^^. '"1" 

Peg - gy Perkins. 

Some men compare the fav'rite fair 

To every thing in nature j 
Pier eyes divine are funs that fiiine. 

And fo on with each feature. 
jLeave, leave ye fools, thefe hackneyed ruIeS|, 

And all fuch fubtile quirkings ; 
3un, moon, and ftars, are all a faree, 

Compar'd to Peggy Perkins. 

Each twanging dart that through my heart 
From Cupid's bow has morric'd. 

Were it a tree — why I fhould be 
J'or all the world a foireft I 



1^4 



THE EDINBURGH 



Five lumdred fops, with fiirugs and hops^ 
And leers, and fmiles, and fmirkings, 

Moft v/llling fhe would leave for me — 
Oh what a Peggy Perkins ! 



SONG LXVIII. 

THE BLATHRIE o't. 



'^^^^m^ 



When I think on this warld's pelf, And 



w 

the little wi' fhare I ha'e o't to n?yfc]fj And how 
the lafs that wants it is by the lads forgot. 






May the {l:iame fa' the gear and the bla-thrie 



■^ 



'1? 



— ~^4 



Q't. 



1 



MUSICAL MISCL^LANY. 1 65 

Jockie was the hddie that held the pleiigh, 
But now he's got gowd and gear eneugh ; 
i He thhiks nae mair of me that wears the plaiden 
coat j 

I May the 'ftame, &c. ^; 

Jenny was the laffie th?.t mucked the byre, 
But now file is clad in her filken attire, 
And Jockie (Iiys he loes her, and fwears he's me 
forgot J 

May the fliamc, '&c. 

But all this fliall never danton me, 
Sue lang as I keep my fancy free : 
For the lad that's fae inconftant, he is not worth a 
groat J 

May the fliame, kc> 



j66 



THE EDINBURGft 



SONG LXIX. 

JENNY MAY. 



When Phoehus firft falutes the esft. And 



■i&~f~f^ 



dew-drops deck each thorn, When ploughmen 



iggrg^g^ 



:=^=s:zziT 



t 



?^F^ 



lliake ofF downy reft. And hunters wind the horn : 



~K 



Then light as air I feek the fliade Where glides 



ii^o^pEife; 



the filver Tay, And tune my pipe to that fweet 

r^ ^_rj* ^ ■ 

izz±"tir:rzi:„z:±si: 



maid Whofe jiame is J^nny May. 



^.lUSiCAL MISCELLANY. 167 

At noon, when fultry fol is found 

To fcorch the verdant plain ; 
When nimbling flocks are panting round, 

And feem to live in pain •, 
Then, fhelter'd in the llraw thatch'd cot, 

I pafs the time away ; 
The higheft folks I envy not, 

Give me but Jenny May. 

When, riding down the diftant well, 

The god of light declines. 
By many varied Pcreaks confeft, 

Delightfully he fliines : 
With nymphs and fliepherds on the plain., 

I ftili am blithe and gay j 
But yet myfofteft, fweeteft ftrain 

Mufl flow to Jenny May. 

In fpring, in fummer, autumn too. 

In winter's furieft rage, 
Days, hours, and months I'll ftill purfu^ 

My fancy to engage : 
For ev'ry moment, ev'ry hour. 

And ev'ry pafiing day 
Shall, while kind nature gives me powV^ 

Be true to Jenny May . 



y 



l6% 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG LXX. 

IN AIRY DREAMS. 



Affetuofo. 



In ai - ry dreams foft fan - - cy flies My 




ab fent love to fee, And with the ear. 




^iiii^^s 



-ly dawn I rife, Dear youth to think onl 





W- 




thee. How fwiftly flew the ro fy 



Eii^lgg^; 



hours, While love and hope were new ; Sweet 



fKTi— i|!S-±iz 



St1lgSi*§ 



■ti3 



d=d 




as - - the breatli of op' - - ning ilow'rs, But 



I 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



i6$ 




The moments now move flowly on. 

Until thy wiih'd return ; 
I count them oft, as all alone - 

The penfive fhadcs I mourn. 
Return, return my love, and charm 

Each anxious care to reft ; 
Thy fmiles fhall every care difarm. 

And foothe my foul to reft. 



^' OL. II. 



iTO 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG LXXT. 

THE EGYPTIAN LOVE-SONG. 

fllOM FOriPHAR'S WIFE TO YOUNG JOSEPH. 

TrafiJIated from an Oriental FJpiy en Chajiiiy. 



?^^_S:i 



L z. 1 ^ ^ * ^ y ^1 ^ 



Sweet doth blufh the ro-fy morn-ing, Sweet :l 



@i-^ ^ — M.in e_xjS._^ z X 

doth beam the giill'ning dew ; Sweeter ilill the 

day a --dorn - ing, Thy dear iinlles tranljiort^t 









" my view. Mid [I the bioiTjms, fragrance 






^ov^"- ing, Why delights th^e hon"-icd bee, '■ 



MbSICAL MiSCElLANY. 



171 






-f— ^ .z=-- ^^^^ ^^^ j^^^ .^_ ^ 

fweetef breutlis thy - fsslf b«; - ilow - ing ? One 
kind kifs on me ! on me ! One kind kif$-: 



:zz.:a: 



ESlifeEE:^"""^ 



on me^ 



()■?, 



17^ 



THE EDINBURGH- 



SONG Lxxir. 

AELEN BROOKE OF WYNDERMEER. 

Say, have you in the village feen, A 
loveiy youth of pen - - five mien ? If fuch a- 

one hath paiT>^d by, with me-lan-cho-Iy 



in his eye, Where is he gone ? Ah ! tell 



-Q- 



me where ?— 'Tis Allen Brooke of Wyn-der- 
.__ -___ ^^. 



T--3— J— i^t-^-- 



meer : Where is he gon-^ ? Ah ! tell me whereB 



■1^ 



MCrSlCAl. MISCELLANTf* 




iiilp^i 



'Tis Allen Brooke----- of Wyndermeer. 



Laft night he fighing took his leave. 
Which caus'd me all the night to grieve j- 
And many maids I know there be, 
"Who try to wean his love from me. 
But Heaven knows my heart's fmcere 
To Alien Brooke of Wyndermeer. 

My throbbing heart is full of woe, 
To think that he fhould leave me fo :• 
But if my love fliould anger'd be, 
And try to hide himfelf from me, 
Then Death fnall bear me on a bier 
To Allen Brooke of Wyndermeer»^ 



0-3 



TKE. EDINBURGH-: 



SONG LXXI!I.. 
svvEET AN-NIE. 



Sweet Annie frae the fea-beach came, Where- 
jDckey Ipeel'd the veflel's (idcj Ah ! \^'ha caiib 

_rX-Xi_^,S ^? 1 I .;,;. _ _.__'„?-,._ „j !-,, I ! _'! ;«„ __i(& 



i!5 



keep thtlr heart at hame, When Jockey's toft- 



a-boon the tide. Far aff to dif-tant 









fzrp; 



?:ba; 



realms he gangs. Yet VW prove true as he 
lias been J And v/heix ilk. lafs a-'bout.hiin 



MXTsrCAL MISCELLANY. 



175 






ZZI^^IXZDZ 



I .LJ . -_^J_®tf_^. 



^s>»^ 



tlirangs. He'll think on Annie^ Kis faithful 



.ziizlH 



ane. 



I met our v/eakhy laird yefereen, 

Wi' gou'd in hand he tempted mCj 
He praif d my browj my roiling een. 

And made a hrag of what he'd gi'e»- 
What tho' my Jockey's faraway, 

Toft up and down the anfome mamj- 
I'll keep my heart anither day, 

Since Jockey may return again, 

Nae mair, falfe Jamie, fing n?>,e m.airg. 

And fairly call: your pipe away ; 
My Jocky wad be troubled fair, 

To fee his friend his lo^'e betray :" 
For a' your fongs and verfe arc vain^ 

While Jockey's notes do faithful How;; 
My heart to him fhall true remaini- 

Til keep it for m.y conftant jo. ' 

Blaw Miy ye gales, round Jocky's head,. 

And gar your waves be calm and fliil ^ 
:|Iis hameward fail with breezes fpeed^ 

And. diniia a' my pisafure fpill. 



Ip 



THE EDINBURGH 



What tho* my Jockey's far away. 
Yet he will braw in filler fhine ; 

Fll keep my heart anither day, 
Since Jockey may again be mine. 



SONG LIV. 

DONNEL AND FLORA, 



-^- 



ee: 



■p 



ii=s; 



4.- 



ir=cx: 



When mer - ry hearts were gay, Carelefs of 







ought but play, Poor Flo-ra flipt away., Sadning 
■m- 



ligiEiEli^^lliE 



to Mora : Loofe flow'd her coal-black hair, quick 



p3=:g±E^ 



±\z3^I±±Z^'SZ 



-Q- 



heav'd her bofom bare, And thus to the troub- 

f:s-5r::rrilz~-ii^ 



'■gi— ~- a—il 

kd air She vented her forrow.- 






MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 177 

" Loud howls the northern blaft, 
*' Bleak is the dreary wrxde ; — - 
« Hafte then, O Donnel hafte, 

" Hade to thy Flora. 
** Twice twelve long months are o'er^ 
** Since in a foreign ihore 
** You promif'd to fight no more^ 

" But meet me in Mora, 

'' Where now is Donnel dear ?" 
" Maids cry with taunting fneer,. 
" Say, is he ftill fincere 

" To his lov'd Flora ?" 
*^ Parents upbraid by moari, 
** Each heart is turn'd to ftone— 
^' Ah Flora 1 thou'rt now alone^^ 

" Friendlefs in Mora ! 

•• Come, then, O come away, 
** Donnel no longer ftay j 
" Where can my rover ftray 

" From his dear Flora. 
" Ah fure he ne'er could be 
*^ Falfe to his vows to me«— 
*^ O heaven ! is not yonder he 

" Bounding in Mora ? 

" Never, O wretched fair, 
(Sigh'd the fad mefienger) 
" Never fnall Donnel mair 
" Meet his lov'd Flora.. 



178 THE EDINBURGH 

<* Cold, cold beyond the main 
** Donnel thy love lies llain 5 
" He fent me to foothe thy pain 
** Weeping in Mora. 

it "^T^ii fought our gallant men, 
** Headed by brave Burgoyne ; 
" Our heroes were thrice led oa 

** To Britifh glory, 
** But ah; tho' our foes did flee, 
" Sad vi^as the lofs to thee, 
^^ While every frefh vi£lory 

** Drown'd us in forrow/* 

" Here, take this trufty biade,^^ 
(Donnel expiring, faid) 
*' Give it to yon dear maid 

" Weeping in Mora. 
" Tell her, Q Alkn, tell, 
** Donnel thus bravely fell, 
" And that in his lall farewell,. 

** He thought on his Fiora^''' 

Mute flood the trembling fair, 
Speechlefo with wild defpair. 
Then ftriking her bcfom bare^ . 

Sigh'd out poor Flora ! 
«* Oh Donnel ! O weMaday !" 
Was all the fond heart could fay |- 
At length the found died away^ 

Feebly in' Mora. 



T^USICAL MISCELLANT. 



I7$r 



SONG LXXV. 

WILLY WAS A WANTON WAG. 



Willy was a wanton wag, The biytheft lad 



that e'er I faw, At bridals iliil he bore the brag 

Pz#|-_E;?:|zE:|:t:i±^ibrE=-^ 

And carried ay the gree awa'. His doublet was 
of Zetland (ha^, And vov/ but Willy he was braw j 






At his ilioulder hang a tag, That pleas'd the 

ad Verfe. 



laiTes bed of a% He was a man 



1^0 THE EDINBURGH 

He was a man without a clag, 

His heart was frank without a flaw |. 
And ay whatever Willy faid, 

It was ftill hadden as a law. 
His boots they were made of the jag, 

When he v/ent to the weapon-fhaw 
Upon the green nane duril him brag, 

The fiend a ane amang them a'. 

And was not V/illy well worth gowd. 

He wan the love of great and fma' 5 
For after he the bride had kiff'd, 

He kiff'd the laffes hale-fale a' ? 
Sae merrily round the ring they rowM, 

When by the hand he led them a\ 
And fmack on fmack on them beftow'd^ 

By virtue of a flanding law. 

And was na Willy a great lown, 

As fhyre a lick as e'er was feen ? 
When he dancM with the laffes round, 

The bridegroom fpeer'd where he had been ^, , 
-Quoth Willy, IVe been at the ring, 

With bobbing, faith, my fhanks are fair. 
Gae ca' your bride and maidens in, 

For Willy he dow do na mair 

Then reft ye, Willy, I'll gae out. 
And fpr a wee fill up the ring,.; 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. l8l 

But fhame light on his fouple fnout. 
He wanted Willy's wanton fling : 

Then ftraight he to the bride did fare, 
Says, welFs me on your bonny face ; 

With bobbing, Willy's fhanks are fair, 
And Fm come out to fill his place. 

iBrldgroom, fhe fays, you'll fpoil the dance. 

And at the ring you'll ay be lag, 
Unlefs, like Willy, ye advance ; 

( O ! Willy has a wanton wag :) 
For wi't he learns us a to fteer. 

And foremoft ay bears up the ring 5 
We will find nae fick dancing here, 

if we want Willy's wanton fling. 



ToL. IL 



XS2 



THE EDINBURGM 



SONG LXXVI. 

WHEN MORN HER SWEETS. 



iinzl 







3teF 




When morn her fweets fhall firfl unfold, And 

■0^ 



'rA^zw-z 



-Mz 



i 



gie 



paint the flee - cy clouds with gold. On tuft- ed I 




green O let me play. And welcome up , 








the jo-cund day. Wak'd by the gen -tie voice 



'0m\:^ 



HT-:sr3 



±[iiS±ti^i:i 



of love, A— rife, my fair, a— rife and prove The 



ElBiii 



dear delights fond lovers know, The belt of bieflings 






MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 

3 




here below, The bed of bleflings here below- 

To fome clear river's verdant fide, 
Do thou my happy footfteps guide 5 
In concert wich the purling ftream 
We'll fm^, and love fh?al be the theme : 
E'er night ailuxiies her gloomy reign, 
When fhadows lengthen o*er the plain ; 
We'll to the myrtle grove repair, 
For peace and pleafure wait us there. 

The laughing god there keeps his court* 
And little loves inceffant fport ; 
Around the winning graces wait. 
And calm contentment guards the feat. 
There loft in extafies of joy. 
While tendereft fcenes our thoughts employ. 
We'll blefs the hour our loves begun. 
The happy moment made us one . 



Pz 



THE EDINSURGEf 



SONG LXXVIL 

TAIR ELIZA. 




At Beau - ty's fhrine I long have bow'd, ,' 



"5^" ag8gaar*~m^ar~~>Bi iaB - ' ■ ' ' , i. - i».,i » i^ 



At each new face my heart has glow'd With 




is^tsii 



fomething like a paflion. But dull in - fi - pid 



joys L found, The biifs no genuine rap - tures 







crow'nd, The fair Ic^re but from fa fhion. The 



fair love but from fadiiou. 



TVItJSICAL MISCELLANY* 1$^ 

Inconftant I of couirfe became. 
No care kept up the lambent flame. 

Which thus unheeded died : 
To whim was facrificed each grace. 
To vanity each pleafing face, 

And love too oft to pride. 

At length I fair Eliza faw, 

Whofe beauties fire— whofe virtues awe 5 

I gaz'd, admir'd, and lov'd. 
Her fweet attention foothes each care. 
Nought can our mutual blifs impair, 

Time has our flame improv'd' 



»3 



m 



i8<5 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG LXXVIIL 

THE FLOWING CAN. 



:£gEgi|E;lii 



A f;iiior's life's a life of woe, He works 



-T^r^-h 



:mzw:Tlzj::Mzz±::\ 



iEH^ 



now late now early j Now up and down, now 



ii^l^r^Pigi 



to and fro, What then ? he tates it cheerly" 
-*-&-i — I fen-, — B- 






Bleft with a fmillng can of grog, If duty call 

— i^^ — t — .^ — jz:z^j:m ^, 



r5ffi 



ftand, rife, or fall, To fates laft verge he'll jog^ 



i^l^^i^ 




The cadge to weigh, the fheets belay, lie does. 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY, 



i8T 



iEBEE|=e5£?§=:±=fe&ez 



'—4-W 



ep^^f^ 



it with a wifli, To heave the lead, or to cat 



'MX~: 



cat 



fez 



head the pond'rous anchor 'h^a : For while the 



■m- 



giSlSii^iES-: 



grog goes rcundj All fenfe of danger's drowii'd^ 



We defpife it to a man. We fing a little, and 



— . — .. — -,-p_— — ^-^~fe — ^-i^-i — fk" 

—4- d-^S — S~-^ — I ' — -' — L__™M — 



laugh a little, And work a little, And fwear a 

little : We rmg a little, And laugh a littU, And 

^ — ! — >_i,*_i^-i^-J -^^-^-^ 

work a little, And fwear a little : And fiddle a 



-n-^^^-T-jBZiWJzqf: 









little, And foot it a little, And fwig the llowmg 



rSS- 



THE EDINBURGH 




can, And fiddle a little, And foot it a little. 



iii^^i^i^ 



And fwig the flowing. can. And fwig the flow- 



igUP^iai 



ing can, An^ fwig the flowing can. 

If howling winds and roaring feaa 

Give proof of coming danger, 
We view the florm, our hearts at eafe^ 

For Jack's to fear a ftranger. 
Bleft with the fmiling grog, we fly 

Where now below 

We headlong go. 
Now rife on mountains high i 

Spight of the gale. 

We hand the fail. 
Or take the needful reef; 

Or man the deck, 

To clear fome wreck. 
To give the fhip relief. 
Though perils threat around. 
Ail f^nfe of danger's drcwn'da 



I 



MUSICAL MISCLELANY. 3 ^^ 

We defpife it to a man. 

Wefinga little, &c. ' 

But yet think not our cafe is hard. 

Though ftorms at fea thus treat us^ 
For coming home— a fweet reward, 

With fmiles our fv/eathearts greet us. 
Now too the friendly grog we c^n3.ffy 
Our am'rous toafl. 
Her we love moll, 
And gayly fing and laugh,,. 
The fails we furl, 
Then for each girl,. 
The petticoat difplay. 

The deck wc clear, 
Then three times cheery 
As v/e their charms furvey. 
And then the grog goes round. 
All fenfe of danger's drown'd. 
We defpife it to a man. 

We fing a little, &c. 



19© 



THE EDINBURGH 

[SONG LXXIX. 

BILL BOBSTAY. 










Tight lads have I faiFd with, but none e'erl 
fo fightly. As honed Bill Bobftay, fo kind and 




"""^M 



fo true : He'd fing like a mermaid, and foo^ 



fl^F 



hSrJSi^xiFzS: 



— 4- 




it To lightly. The forecaftle's pride, the delight 

of the crew : But poor as a beggar, and of- 

ten in tat - - ters He v/ent^ tho* Iiis fortune was- 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



191 



>^^Pp[ 



ZZ^K 



Sbk! — — 

kind without end. For money, cried Bill, and 



K.-L. 



. 1^- 




them there fort of mat - - ters, For money, cried 



M' 



iHii^^^i^fc 



®3- 

Bill, and them there fort of matters, What's 



the good on't d'ye fee, but to fuccour a friend ? 

There's Nipcheefe, the purfer, by grinding and 

faueezingj 
Firft plund'ring, then leaving the fliip like a rat ; 
The eddy of fortune (lands on a ftiff breeze in, 
And mounts, fierce as fire, a dog-vane in his hat. 

My bark, though hard dorms on life's ocean fhould 

rock her, 
Tho' fhe roll in misfortune, and pitch end for end. 
No, never fhali Bill keep a lliot m the locker. 
When by handing it out he can fuccour a friend. 



192 THE EDINBURGH ^ \ \ 

Let them throw out their wipes, and cry, fpight of \ 

the crofTes, 
And forgetful of toil that fo hard'ly they bore, 
That " Sailors at fea earn their money like horfes, 
** To fquander it idly like afles afhore." 

Such lubbers their av/ would coil up, could they 

meafure. 
By their feeling, the gen'rous delight without end, 
That gives birth in us tars to that trueft of pleafure. 
The handing our rhino to fuccour a -friend. 

Why, what's all this nonfenfe they talks of and pother 
All about rights of meny what a plague are they at ? 
If they means that each man to his meffmate's 

a brother, 
Why, the lubberly fwabs ! ev'ry fool can tell that. 

The rights of us Britons we knows to be loyal, 
In our country's defence our laft moments to fpend : 
To fight up to the ears to protea the blood royal. 
To be true to our wives— and to fuccour a friends 



SONG LXXX. 

LEAP YEAR-, 



■zMz:z^=^zzm:ht:fi:zi 



^zSzi=ip:]::^|zze:ir^z=r:zL:TT:zp- 

WoiVt you hail the kap year, by that am'rous 



±± 



rogue Janus, Once in ev'ry four times confe- 



5=: 



crated to Venus ? Oli the fine lovely feafon for 
frolic and fportiag, When the men are made love 



to, and girls go a-courting : Then come round 



!^ 




— ^. 




H-'^ 



m^ 



me dear creatures, and frolic and frifii it, And 
Vol. II. Q^ 



1 



Jp4 



THE EDIi^EUP.GH 



5: 



E- ^— Sg— 1-i* ^af \~ — h"- 



■^: 



dance it and whiik itj and dance it and whill it : 



fe-li:±;£feEe-±}:t:E£ 



(Ti 



^ ^_^_ ^'T^g^-^ — --■ — 

Sing fmalliow, ba-thefliin, all anow pat : (*ro 



^' 



be fure dere v/ont be forae fine fun. goino- for- 
.^ ^_ ^. 



:Si- 



i*g_-i-.. 



^ — itzij-rj^rxl 



yp 



ward) Faith and confcience and you may fay 






: Ji- 



dat. 



Mider Vanus come put en a mafculine air, 
Throw yourfelf on your knees, Curfe your ftars, lie 

and fwear ; 
.PerfeGicn, fays you, to ycur beauty's a quiz, 
Cries Mils Mars, do you love me, I do, dam'me, whiz ! 

1\hen come round ms, &c. 
(To be f-r:- c: --^ -;-cii't oe line fighing and dving and 

Fait and ccafcicncv^- and you may fay dat. 

* To be Tin-. , J //;,■;,.;.. ' ■■ 



I 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. I95, 

Rich young ladies of fixty r^ew born to love's joys. 
Shall hobbk and mumble their courtiliip to boys 5 
Girls ill-all court from the fliiaers of old men 

afiiftance, 
With uieir eye on a haiidfome tight lad in the dif- 

tance, 

Then come round 'iriCj Szc. 
(To be fare they won't make the befr ufe of theii' 
: time ! ) 

_Fait and confcience and you may fay dat. 

Mifs Maypole diall ftoop to the arms of an imp, 
And the tall lady Gauky iliall court my Lori Shrimp, 
Mifs Pigmy (hall climb round the neck of a tail manj. 
And the rich widow Mite court a big Irlfli Jollmaii ! 

Then come round me, &c. 
(To be fure dere won'^t be fnie fimpering and ogling 

and leering !) 
Fait and confcience and you may fay dat. 

Mifs Charnpaiifys whofe monky has fo many charm.Sj. 
Of a fiiie powder'd coxcomb fliall rufli to the arms'-, 
To court Mliler Sciatic Mifs Spafm fhall hop, 
And Mifs Cheveux de frize (hall addrefs Mr Crop I 

Then come round me, &c. 
(To be fure de bold little devils won't put the men 

in a fine ilufteration!) 
Fait and confcience and you may fay dat ; 

Thus you've nothing to do JoUmen all but fit ftill. 

And fait ev'ry Jack wiil loon find cut a Jill, j 



i>(^6 



THE EDINBURGH 



Come on J ye bold devils, fwear, lie, amd make 

fpeeches, 
Tjs leap-year, and-the petticoats govern the breeches t 

Then come round me, &c. 
CAh the dear creatures ! to be fare they wont cut a.: 
comical figure when they are drefs'd in their in- 
expreilibles I) 
'i?-\it TiXid CQukknct and' you muj % iu-^ 



SONG LXXXL 

THE LUCKY ESCAP£, 



&iI2±iS3riiE= SS? 



I that once was a ploughman, a failor am 



now. No lark that aloft in the fky, E-ver flut- 



sia: 



ter'd his wings to give fpeed to the plough Was^ 



£o. gay and fo car^ekfs as I, Was. fo gay and 






M'UJICAL MISCELLANY. 



W 



rzr:ii:s:tz«tz£r 



-■5-^- 



fo carelefs as I ; But my friend was a car-'. 



findo a-board a king's feip, A!id he ax'd me to 



:**. 






..^ Z| . _X_^_-p^ 



gojiift to fea for a trip; And he taik'd of fudv 

things as if fuilors v/ere kings, And fo teazing did: 
.-L| — 



^1 



:ef 



iiE±±EE?i' 



keep, and fo teazing did keep, That I left my poor' 



■^ 



plough to go ploughing the deep. No long-er the 



hGrncali'dme up in the morn, No longer th^' 
' Q>3 



I^S- 



THE EDINBURGH 






P—^C 1 —i — 5^- 

liorn call'd me up in the moni, I trufted the- 

-c^-^-b-t^ ^"^-fe ^ — —- ^ -"- 

carfindc and the inconPcant wind, That made m.e 



for to go and leave my dear be - hind. 



I did not much like for to be aboard a fldp, 

'\Vheii in danger there is no doer to creep out , 

I liked the jolly tars. I liked bumbo and flip, 
But I did net hke rocking about ; 

'By and by came a hurricane, I did not like thatj, 
Ne::t a L..t:le that many a Ihilor laid flat y 

..k:i ' cried I, who would roam, 

-■Vtk';e m.k.dahome; 

^■■.k:,;2. I.. ib-.7 a:-.drd reap, 
Ere I iei!: my poor plougi::, to go ploughing the deepj 

Vr - . :tly tiie horn 

Cc .: ^p in th'.:: mcrn, 

Ere I triilced'the Carhndo and the inconflant wind,. 
That made me fcr to 7.0 and leave my dear behind.. ^ 






MUSICAL MISCELLANY. '^p^ 

At laft fiife I landed, and in a whole ikin, 

Nor did I make any long flay, 
Ere I found by a friend who I ax'd for my klnj , 

Father dead, and my wife ran away ! 
Ah who but thyfelf, faid I, haft thou to blame? 
Wives loofing their hufbands oft lofe their goodname»» 

Ah why did I roam 

When fo happy at home: 

I could fow and could reap, 
Ere I left my poor plough to go ploughing the deep : 

Whi^Ti fo fweetly the horn 

Cail'd me up in the morn, 
Curfe light upon the Carfindo and inconilant wind. 
That made me for to go and leave my dear behind* 

Why if that be the cafe, fliid this very fame friend^ 

And you ben't no more minded to roam, 
Gi'e'^ a iiiake by the hfr, all your care's at an end,, 

Dad's alive and your wife's fafe at home. 
Siark flaring with joy, I leapt out of my ikln, 
BulFd my wife, m.other, filler, and all of my kin : 
Now, cried I, let them roam, 
Who want a good home, 
I am well, fo Til keep, 
Nor again leave my plough to go ploughing the. 
deep ^ 
Once more fliall the horn 
Call me up in the morn, 
Nor flvail any damn'd Carinido, uor the inconflant 

~ wind 
E'er tempt me for to go and leave my dear behind,. 



ZQ^. 



THE EDlKBURGBf 



SONG LXXXir. 

WHEN CUPID HOLDS THE MYRTLE CROWN, 



-TT^-^ 



•2r-H^-f-^-; 



I 



Hift^ 



-^- 



When Cupid holdb the rayr - tie crown, I'll 



-^.^-^ — 




■^ 



^i' 



§¥l 




not the gift de - ny, But gb.dly feize the pro- 



fer'd boon Which now compleats my joy, which- 
now compleats. my joy. Yet not am-bi-tion 
prompts me on l"o rule the wide Defmene, I'd 
mign a. king nviove alone That thou might-W.. 



p: 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 201 

Siilliiiiiir 

my queen, Vd reign a king in love alone That* 



thou might bs^ my queen, 



Or fhould the goddefs, bright and fair> 
Stoop from the Paphian ifle, 

And ftrewing rofy chaplets here. 
On tliee prefer to fmile : 

ril ne'er repine at this decree,,, 

Nor other bleffing crave *, 
Sole monarch thou in love flialt be> 

And I thy captive Have. 



202 



THE EDINBURGH 



' SONG Lxxxin.. 

HOvV STANDS THE GLASS AROUN&. 



s&3Er-'- 



How ftaiids the gL;fs around ? For Pxianie ye 



take no care, my bovs, Hov/ Hands the glafs a- 



,^- 



no care, my boys, Hov/ ilai 

r:-=T:Hz:^=q!]::^^i zm' 



round ? Let mirth and wine a - bound. The trum- 



-d-? 









pets found, the colours they are flying, boys, To 



s:ii: 



Ptzu^. 



— j_: 1-.—. 1■^^-', 1 : — r—]—' 



fight, kill, or wound, May we ftill be found Content 



-r—S— r-^-^F ^ 






^EEE±^ESES±l5:is!5i 

with our hard fate, my boys, On the cold ground. 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 202 

Vv^hy, foldiers, why, 
Should we be melancholy, boys ? 

Why^ ioldiers, why ? 

Whofe byfinefs 'tis to die ! 

What, fighing ? fie ! 
Don't fear, drink on, be jolly, boys ! 

''Tis he, you, or I ! 

Cold, hot, wet, or dry, 
Vf e're always hound to follow, boys, 

And fcorn to fiy ' 

'Tib but in vain^ — ' 
I mean not to upbraid you, boys, — ■ 

'Tis but in vain, 

For foldiers to complain : 

Should next campaign 
Send us to hini who mad<d! us^ boys, 

We're free from pain ! 

But if we remain, 
A bottle and a kind landlady- 
Cure all again. 



294 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG LXXXIV. 

Dumbarton's drums. 



mmm^ 



Dumbarton's drums beat bon-ny O, When 



they mind me of my dear Johnny O, How hap- 
py am I when my foldler is by, While he kif- 







,^^_^;:_i 







fes and blelTcs his Annie O, 'Tis a foldier a- 




1 i^i — — ^1 — ri — P~ r~"*"bl — r" 
t- Wj" — I — »3irx ~"^t — ^ — ^l!Z!K 



l4l.^b±Z! 



lone can delight me O For his graceful looks do 




invite me O : Whiifl j^uarded in his arms, I'll 




MUSICAL MISCELLANY 



205 






fear no war's alarms, Neither clanger nor death 




fliall e'er fright me, O. 



My love is a handfome laddie, O, 
Genteel, but ne'er foppifh nor gaudy, O : 

Tho' commiffions are dear, 

Yet I'll buy him one this year, 
For he fhall ferve no longer a cadie, O. 
A foldier has honour and bravery, O, 
Unacquainted vi'ith rogues and their knavery, O ; 

He minds no other thinp-, 

But the ladies or the King ; 
For every other care is but fiavexy O. 

Then I'll be the Captain's lady, O, 
Farev/ell all my friends and my daddy, O -, 

I'll wait no more at home, 

But ril follow with t!ie drum, 
And whene'er that beats, I'll be ready, O. 
Dumbarton's Drum, found bonny, O ; 
They are fprightly, like my dear Johnny, O, 

Plow happy fliall I be, 

When on my foldier's knee, 
And he kliles and bliiPis lis Annie, O, 
Vol. IL R 



:-2>-q6 the EDINBURGH 

SONG LXXXV. 

THE OLD man's SONG. 
21? the foregoing Tune. 

O WHY fliould old age lo much wound us, O ? 
There is nothing in't at all to confound us, J 

For how happy now am I, 

With my old wife fitting by. 
And our bairns and our oyes all around us, O. 

For how happy now am I, &c. 

We began in this world with naething, O, 
-^n^ we've jogg'd on and toild for the aething, O \ 
We made ufe of what v/e had. 
And our thankful hearts were glad, 

When we got the bit meat and the claithing, O. 
We made ufe of what we had, &c. 

W^hen we had any thing we never vaunted, O, 
Nor did we hing our heads when we wanted, O | 

We always gave a ihare 

Of the little we could fpare, 
When it pleas'd the Almighty to grant it, O. 

We always gave a (hare, &c. 

We have liv'd all our lifetime contented, O, 
Since the day we became Hrft acquainted, O: 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY.' 20^ 

It's true we have been poor, 
And we are fo to this hour. 
Yet we never repin'd nor lamented, O. 
It's true we have been poor, &c. 

We never laid a plot to be wealthy, O, 
By ways that were cunning or ftealthy, O^ 
But we always had the blifs, 
(And what further could we wis ' ?) 
To be pleas'd v/ith ourfelves and be healthy, O. 
But wc always had the blifs, &c.J 

But tho' we cannot boafh of our guineas^ O, 
We have plenty of Jockies and Jeanmes, O \ 

And thcfe I'm certain are 

More defireabie by far 
Than a bag full of poor yellow Jianics, O. 

And thefe I'm certain are, &c. 

We have feen many wonder and fairly, O, 
At changes that have almoll been yearly, O, 

Of rich folks up and down. 

Both in country and in town. 
That now live but fcrimply and fparely, O. 

Of rich folks up and down, &c. 

Then why fliould people brag of profperlty, O, 
Since a ftraiten'd life wc fee is no rarity, O ? 

Indeed we've been in want, 

And our living's been but fcant^ 
R 2 



208 THE EDINBURGH 

Yet we never were reduc'd to feek charity, Q. 
Indeed we've been in want, &c. 

In this houfe we firft came together, O, 
Where we've long been a father and mother, O, 

And tho' not of ftone and lime, 

It will ferve us all our time, 
And I hope we (hall never need another, O. 

And tho' not of ftone and lime, &c. 

And when we leave this habitation, O 
We'll depart with a good commendation, O, 

Weil go hand in hand I wis* 

To a better place than this. 
And make room for the next generation, O, 

We'll go hand in hand I wis', &c. 

Then why fhould old age fo much wound us, O ? 
There is nothing in't at all to confound us, O, 

For how happy now am I, 

With my old wife fitting by. 
And our bairns and our oyes all around us, O. 

For how happy now am I, &. 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



^^■09: 



SONG LXXXVI. 

THERE WAS A JOLLY MILLER, 



Td::^z±:p:g:- _ 



There was a jol-ly miller once Liv'd on the 



ri - ver Dee, He danc'd and he fung from morn 



I 



•^— ^ 



till night, No lark fo blithe as he. And this the 



burden of his fong for e- ver us'd t© be : I 



«-^ 






— ^7»#^^ 



care for nobody, no, not I, If no-bo-dy cares 



kdJ«: 
^_-± ji:m — 



£0 



r me. 



S.3., 



210 THE EDINBURGH 

I li,vc by my mill, God blefs her! Ihe's kindred,, 

child and wife ; 
I would not change my ilation for any other in life,. 
No iawyer, fyr^eon^ or doftor, e^er had a groat from 

me. 
I care for nobody, no, not I^. if nobody cares for me. 

When fpring begins its merry career, oh ! how his. 

heart grows gay ! 
No fummer's drouth alarms his fears, nor winter's 

fad decay ; 
No foreiight mars the miller's joy, who's wont to 

fmg and fay^ 
Let others toil from vear to vear, I live from day to 

1 

Thus, like the miller, bold and free, let us rejoice^ 

and fmg : 
The days of youth are made for glee, and time is^fff?' ' 

the wing. 
This fong ili all pafs from me to thee, along thi& 

jovial ring : 
Let heart and voice and all agree^ to fay,— long live 



the King ! 

o 



/ 



I 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



21 



SONG LXXXVII. 

BRITISH GRENADIERS,. 



SiHgiil^l 



Some talk of Alexander^, and fome of Her- 

-p. 



ilifS^^^ 



cu— les, Of Conon and Lyfander, and fome MIL 



wm&n 



I 



3=^ 



Mzzzz: 



ti - a - des ', But of all the world's brave heroes 



mz: 



t 



zs.^ 



pria 



;;gEi 




there's none that can compare With a tow, rowj 



i^iiiliiSi 



row, row, row, to the Britifli grenadiers- But 



-ft- -0-^ -p- -»• -»■ -© -®- ^ ^ 



>f aII the world's brave heroes there's none tha-£ 



212 



THE EDINEURGKP 



$wmm 



-'^'J^f^-J^H'=f=ir^- 



:c: 



\ can compare with a tow, row, row, row, row, 



^Jjfe ilgg|g jj==:=zi= 



to the Britifh gre-na-<iiers^ 

None of thofe ancient heroes e'er faw a cannon ball, 5 
Or knew the force of powder to flay their foes^ 

withal ; 
But our brave boys do know it, and banifh all their 

fears. 
With a tow, row, row, row, row, the Britifh Gre-,,^ 

nadiers. 
But our brave boys, &c 

Whene'er we are commanded to florm the Palilade^ : 

Our leaders march w^ith fufees, and we with hand 
Granades, 

We throw them from the glacis about our enemies,! 
ears. 

With a tow, row, row, row, row, the Britiflii Gre- 
nadiers, 
We throw them, &c. 



The god of war v/as pleafed, and great Bellona fmiles,; 
To fee thefe noble heroes of our Britidi liles > 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 213 

And ail the gods celeftial, defcended from their 

fpheres, 
Beheld with admiration the Britilh Grenadiers. 
And all the gods celeftial, &c. 

Then let us crown a bumper, and drink a health to 
thofe 

Who carry caps and pouches that wear the looped 
clothes. 

May they and their commanders live happy ail their 
years, 

"With a tow, row, row, row, row, the Britifn Gre- 
nadiers. 
May they and their commandcrSj 6cc. 



214 



THE EDINBURGH 



A/^ 




SONG LXXXVIII. 

THE ECHOING HORN. 



.-X ^^. 



The echoing horn calls the fportfmen abroad 



To horfe, my brave boys, and away. The morn- 




iipPiii 



ing is up, and the cry of the hounds Upbraids 



our too tecktus delay. What pleafure we feel in 






:^e=g:ps^ 



purfuing the fox ! O'er hill and o'er valley he 



— — -^ — p. »■T-r-r^ — r- 



flies : Then follovr, we'll foon overtake him : huz- 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



21 



-P-^ftpt] 



za ! The traitor Is feizM on and dies. Ht dies - - 




The traitor is feiz'd on 



Chorus. 



and dies. Then follow, we 11 foon overtake him, 

huzza ! The traitor is feiz'd on, and dies. 

Triumphant returning at night with the fpoil. 

Like BaGchanals, fliouting and gay ; 
How fweet with a bottle and lafs t:o refreOi, 

And drown the fatigues of the day ' 
With fport, love, and M^ne, fickle fortune defy -, 

Dull wifdom all happinefs fours. 
Since life n no more than, a pallage at beft. 

Let's flrew the way over with flow'rs. 

With flow 'r-s 5 lets drew/ .&c. 



2l6 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG LXXXIX. 

HE STOLE MY TENDER HEART AWAY, 



||ggggEgEgilg 



tzztzztlzc 



— — p - '^ ' ' ■! " — t- 



The fields were green, the hills were gay, And 



±- 



^=: 



—m- — g- 

zzt~f ' 



EEeEB 



birds were iinging on each fpray, When Colin 



met me m the grove, And told me tender 



xnzns: 



— j^__ 









tales of love. V\''a3 ever fwain fo blithe as he ? 

^±:&£zt=35L-:eEEiE§£E:= 

. So kind, i'o f.iithfn], and fo free ? In fpite of 



-@— 



ill my friends could fi^y, Young Colin itolc my 




MUSICAL MISCELLANY. "2 L? 

heart away. In fpite of all my frisnds could 



fay, Young Colin Hole my heart away. 



Whene'er he trips the meads along, 
He fweetly joins the wood! ark's fong ; 
And when he dances on the green, 
There's none (o blithe as Colin feen. 
If he's but by I nothing fear ; 
■ For I alone am all his care : 
Then, fpite of all my friends can fay, 
He's ftole my tender heart away. 

My mother chides whene'er I roam, 
And feemsTurpris'd I quit my home : 
But fhe'd not wonder that I rove. 
Did flie but feel how much I love. 
Full well I know the gen'rous fwain 
Will never give my bofom pain : 
Then, fpite of all my friends can fayj 
He's Hole my tender heart away. 

A^OL. II. . , S 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG XC. 

ONE BOTTLE MORE. 
-JS N ._ 




AiTift me, ye lads, who have hearts void of 







:x^^z| 




guile, To fing in the praifes of old Ireland's ifle. 



Where true ho-fpi-ta-li-ty o- -pens the door, 

f S-jK , *^> J I tog* i HT^ l ^r 1 jgl @^j ^* 

. And friendfiiip detains us for one bottle more, 






one bot-tle more, ar-ra, one l?ot-tle more, And 









riendmip detains us for oi)e bottle more. 



MUSlCx^L MISCELLANt. 21^ 

Old England, your taunts on our country forbear ; 
With our bulls, and our brogues, wq are true and 

fincere, 
JTor if but one bottle remain'd in our ftore, 
We have generous hearts to give that bottle more. 

In Candy's, in Church-ftreet, Fll fing of a fet 
Of fix Irilli blades who together had met i 
Four bottles a-piece made us call for our fcore, 
And nothing remained but one bottle more. 

Our bill being paid, we were loath to depart, 

For friendfliip had grappled each man by the heart ^ 

Where the lead touch you know makes an IriHiman 

. roar, 
And the whack from Tnileila brought fix bottles more. 

Slow Phoebus had fhone thro' our window fo bright^ 
Quite happy to view his blell children of light. 
So we parted with hearts neither forry nor fore, 
Eefolving next night to diink twelve bottles more. 



3% 



aiQ 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG XCI. 

BONNY CHRISTY. 



4X-. 






i^as5E^Ea;S:±5E3 



.J. 



r_ ^ 

How fweetly imdls the fimmer green ! Svv'eet 
tciiles the peach and cherry : Painting and or-der 



pleafe our een, And claret makes us mer-ry : But, 



icz'2x:!!sh::Etz&i 



.± 




-±^u. 



fin-eft colours, fruits, and ilowers, and wine, tho* 

^feEzpTprj^±qf3T=l:ij^zz=z=jqr.Tr^^^ 
gz^ibgjdjjj^^^^ 

I be thir - (ly, Lofe a' their charms and weak- 

^feEK||g3i9Jiffl:B 

er powers, Compar'd withthofe of Chrif-ty. 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 22! 

When wand'ring o'er the flow'ry park, 

No natural beauty wanting, 
How lightfome is't to hear the lark. 

And birds in concert chanting I 
But if my Chrifty tunes her voice, 

I'm rapt in admiration -, 
My thoughts with ecftafies rejoice. 

And drap the haill creation. 

Whene'er flje fmiles a kindly glancej> 

I take the happy omen, 
And aften mint to make advance. 

Hoping {he'll prove a woman : 
But dubious of my ain defert, 

My fentiments I fmother ; 
With fecret fighs I vex my heart. 

For fear {he loves another. 

Thus fang blate Edie by a burn, 

His Chri{ly did o'er-hear him ; 
She doughtna let her lover mourn. 

But e'er he wift drew near him. 
She fpake her favour with a look. 

Which left nae room to doubt her \ 
He wifely this white minute took. 

And flang his arms about her. 

My Chrifcy ! — — -witnefs, bonny ftream,. 
Sic joy frae tears arifing, 

S3 



212 



T»E liDiNBU'E.Ge 



I wiili tills mayna be a dream ; 

O love the maid furprlhrig I 
Time was too precious now for talk ^. 

This point of a'' his wiihes 
He wadna with fet fpeeches bauk,. 

But war'd it a' on kiiTes. 



SONG XCII. 

FROM THE EAST BREAKS THE MORN.. 

IpiiiiiirEii 



From the eail, breaks the morn, See the fun- 



|||ilpgl^|E||s 



beams a-dorn The wild heath and the mountains- 







io high--. The wild heath and tiie moun- 



taius fo liigh. o Shrilly oges the itaunch bound> 



> 



MUSICAL MISCCtLANt:. 



2^ 







The fteed neighs to the found, And the iloods- 

^ K ^ __^ N , 

— —j— r— Jk. — ^. — X — |- ^biJBagtKkali^ — I 1^ Se_^-l-. — h- -~ 

— ® -^ ■' — jE!L— "-bssiwiWwiMwr — r »^— ■' ■ ^— 

and the vallies re ply. And the floods 



EtiEEEEEEES 



b=:_=:5=fe:=:£H: 



and the vai -lies re - -ply. 



Our forefathers, fa gOQd, 
Prov'd their greatnefs of blood 

By encount'ring the pard and the boar;= 
Ruddy health bioom'd the face, 
Age and youth urg'd the chace, 

And taught woodlands and forefts to r.oai 

Hence of noble defcent, 
Hills and wilds we frequent^ 

Where the bofom of nature's reveal'd j 
Tho' in life's bufy day 
Man of man make a prey, 

Still let ours be the prey of the field. 

With the chace in full fight, 
Gods ! how great the delight h 
Mow our mutual fenfations refine 1 



2:24 THE EDINBURGH 

Where is care ? Where is fear ? 
Like the winds in the rear, 
And the man's loft in fomething divine. 

Now to horfe, my brave boys : 
Lo ! each pants for the joys 

That anon fliall enliven the whole : 
Then at eve we'll difmount, 
Toils and pleafures recount, 

And renew the chace over the bowl. 



SONG XCIII. 

LET GAY ONES AND GREAT. 

To the foregoing tune* 

Let gay ones and great 

Make the mod of their fate j 
From pleafure to pleafure they run ^ 

Weil, who cares a jot ? 

I envy them not 
While I have my dog and my gun. 

For exercifcj air^ 

To the field I repair. 
With fpirits unclouded and light x. 

The bliffes I find. 

No flings leave behind. 
But health and diverfion unite. 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



225 



SONG XCIV. 

WITH AN HONEST OLD FRIEND. 
With an honed old friend and a merry old fong> 

~=i:^:i|=5i:i:— :±idifri|!:i£;a:|rp] 



-^^■- 



'r±±dn~:x. 



All J a ilaik of old port, let me (it the n;ght long : And 



laugh at the malice of thofe who repine. That they 

^T^ 

KEF±S^ESE±SEtEEF£|iiJ-zz 



mud fwig porter, While 1 can drink wine. 

I envy no mortal, though ever fo great. 
Nor fcorn I a wretch for his lowly eftate ^ 
But what I abhor, "and efteem as a curfe, 
.Is poorneis of fpirit not poornefs in purfe. 

Then dare to be generous, dauntlefs, and gay 5 
Let's merrily pafs life's remainder away : 
Upheld by our frlenns, Vv e our foes may dcfpife *, 
For the more we are envied the higher we rife. 



2z6 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG XCV. 

PLATO'S ADVICE. 



Says Via - to, why fl^iould man be vain ? Since 






^ 



bounteous heaven has made him great : Why 



looketh he with infolent difdain On thofe un- 



deck'd with weahh or ftate ? Can fplendid robes. 



or beds of down, Or coftly gems that deck 
the fair , Can all the glo — - - - 



MUSICAL MI3CELLANT. 



il? 



^iiisiiiip 



ries of a crown> 



gEir^iiiis^ 



Give health, or eafe the brovt of care ? 

The fcepter'd king, the burthen'd flave, 
The humble, and the haughty, die ; 
The rich, the poor, the bafe, the brave, 

In duft, without diftin£lron, Ue. 
Go fearch the tombs where monarchs ref^ 
■ Who once the greateft titles bore : 
The wealth and glory they poiTeff'd, 
And all their honours, are no more. 

So glides the meteor thro* the Iky, 

And fpreads along a gilded train ; 
But when its fhort-Iiv'd beauties die, 

DiiTolves to common air again. 
So 'tis with us, my jovial fouls ! — 

Let fricndftiip reign while here we ftay; 
Let'^ crown our joys with flowing bowls, — ^ 

Vfhen Jove us calls we mull away. 



22S , THE EDINBURGH 

SGNG XCVI. 

LOW DOWN IN THE BROOM. 



IViy daddy is a canker'd carle, He'll nae twia 




h-^'-^-W- 



±G«:1^=: 



zfc^: 



:^— fc 



wi' his gear j My minny fhe's a fcolding wife. 



■Iteer : But let them fay, or 



iP 



let them do, It's a' ane to me *, For he's low 



Ef-tr-s!-— i^-l-^- 



|4i 



down, he's in the broom. That's waiting on 

<7» 



-m: 



--^ 



'■==£Ei±S^:^I=: 



me. Waiting on me, my love, he's waiting on 



MUSICAL MISCELLAJr/. 



229 






^m 



me ; For he's low down, he's in the broom 



iii 



•Mi: 



zzr-z^j: 



That's waiting on me. 

My aunty Kate fits at her wheel. 

And fan- Tiie lightlies me i 
But weel ken I it's a* envy ; 

For ne'er a jo has fhe. 

But let them fay, &c. 

My coufin Kate was fair beguil'd 

Wi' Johnny i' the glen •, 
And ay fince-fyne flie cries, beware 

Of falfe deluding men. 
But let her fay, &e. 

Glee'd Sandy he came weft ae night. 
And fpeer'd v^^hen I faw Pate ; 

And ay fince fyne the neighbours round 
They jeer me air and late. 
But let them fay, &c. 



Vol. II. 



^3^ 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG xcvir. 

WILLY. 



"When fragrant bloom of yellow broom De- 



:i:ii 



m 



~^— F — ^^- 

lights our lads and lalTes, O'er yellow broom in 






-&; 



F=f^ 



w 



w. 






beauty's bloom My Will all lads furpaifes. Wi' 



gfe^zrE!- 









Willy, then, Fli o'er the braes, I'll o'er the braes 
wi^ Willy, Wi' Willy, then, Til o'er the braes,' 

iiEi^ppil .„, 

Fil o'er the braes wi' Willy. From morn to eve-^ 



i 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



i^yiipiSi^ 



I'll fing the praife of buxom bonny Willy. Wil- 



mt 



^z^m^i-i-^±z 



ly, Willy, Willy, Willy : From mom to eve 



ipy^ispiig^ 




I'll fing the praife of buxom bonny Willy, Wil- 

ly, Willy. 

Reclin'd by Tay at noon-tide day,l 

We'll pu' the daify pretty ; 
The live long day we'll kifs and plaj, 

Or fmg fome loving ditty. 
Wi' Willy then, &c. 

Now blithe and gay at fetting day, 

My mither dinna hinder, 
I'll fing and play wi' Willy gayj^j 
For we twa ne'er fhall finder*. 
Wi' Willy then, &c. 

T2L 



2^2 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG xcviir. 
he's ay a kissing me.. 



1 winna. marry ony man but Sandy o'er the 



iecj I winna marry ony man butSandy o'er the 






lee : I winna ha'e the dom.inee for guid he 



cannar be. Bat I will hae my Sandy lad, my 
Sandy o'er the lee. For he's ay a-kifling, kif- 



_^xj c?__:__Ctfiiz . '°^ ~ 






fuig, ay a - kiihng me, He's ay a - kifiing, 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



ns 




I • > 

kiffing, ay a-klfling me. 

I will not have the minifter for all his godly looks, 
Nor yet will I the lawyer have, for all hi^ wily crooks 2 
I will not have the plowman lad, nor yet will I the 

miller, 
But I will have my Sandy lad without one penny 

filler. 

For he's aye a-kiffing, kiffing, &c. 

I will not have the foldier lad for he gangs to the war, 
1 will not have the failor lad becaufehe fmells of tar, 
I will not have the lord nor laird for all their mickle 

gear, 
But 1 will have my Sandy lad, my Sandy o'er the-- 

muir. 

For he's ay a-kiffing, kiffmg, &c» 



T3 






THE EDINBURGH 

SONG XCIX> 

WHEN LATE I WANDER'd. 



iiiSil^^l 



When late I wander'd o'er the phiin, From 



iiiiS^lEgi 



nymph to nymph I ftrove in vain, My wild defires 



-g^« T:f-B-:£jN::rir5:ri^-:J*i~i-P^T 






to rally, to rally, My wild defires to ral-ly 

< i — I — — j™^— 

:3:IJ=E3S3 



'§^M 



4-^ztzT: 



^: 



—- -^ 



But now they're of themfelves come home, And 

tr. tr. ^ 



^giiiisiiii 



itrange I no longer Vv^iih to roam, They centre all 



-T=-S^ 











ife 



in. Sally, in Sally, they cen - tre all in Sal^- 



I 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 235, 



glE^^fe: 



ly- 



Yet flie, unkind one, damps my joy. 
And cries, I court but to dellroy. 

Can love with ruin tally ? 
By thofe dear lips, thofe eyes, I fwear,, 
I wou'd all deaths, all torments bear, 

Rather than injure Sally. 

Gome then, Oh come, thou fweeter far 
Than violets and rofes are, 

Or lillies of the valley ; 
O follow love, and quit your fear. 
He'll guide you to thefe arms my dear^ 

And make me bleil in Sally. 



2^6 



TFIE EDINBURGH; 



SONG C. 

COME NOW ALL YE SOCIAL POW'rS, 



!5Se; 



'=.S*z-rf: 



^m 






Come now all ye fecial pow'rs, Shed your in- 



:m.z 




ii^^iiliii 



fluence o'er us, Crown with joy the prefent hours, 



-^-h 

S 



m- 






-W=z^- 






En-li-ven thofe before us, Brin^ the flaik, the 



^l,g-^-^r^T- —^inpzE ^TEzJ:rl:^I|f£ 



mufic bring, joy ihali quickly find us^ Drink 



wt 



W^^^^^^"^^^ 




and dance, and laugh and fing, And call dul^. 

Chorus |. 



care behind ii§. Brin? the llaik, the mufio- 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



23.7 



~9- 



bring, Joy fhall quickly find us, Drink and dance, 




V-^ 



md laugh and nng, and call dull care behind us. 

Friendiliip, with thy pow'r divine, 

Brighten all our features j 
What but friendOiip, love, and winCj, 

Can make us happy creatures ? 
Bring the flafic, &c. 

Love, thy Godhead we adore, 

Source of generous palTion j. 
Nor will we ever baw before 

Thofe idols, wealth and fafhioa. 
Bring the flafk, &c, 

Why iliould we be dull or fad, 

Since on earth we moulder ? 
The grave, the gay, the good, the bad^ 

They every day grow older. 
Bring the tlafk, &c. 

Then fmce time will (leal away, 

'Spite of all our forrow ; 
Heighten every joy to day, 

And never mind to morrowo. 
Bring the flails, &c. 



238 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG CI. 

MY COLIN LEAVES FAIR LONDON TOWN. 



_^^ — -P>_P J ^:^_ ^ 



My Co -lin leaves fair Lon-don town. 



:H:*t-fe,p;rTC-ii^r=:r-:i:T:f--_rffr 



Its pomp, and pride, and noife ; With eager 



:k 









hade he hies him down To tufte of ru- 



ral joys, To tafte of rii-- -ral joys. Soon 
as the blythfome fwain's in fight. My heart 

J. 



-^ijEgiaf^s 



g::x:; 






-i.,^; J- — 1 — i,*_j. — gji — k,i — 

is mad with glee, I ne - vcr know 



Musical miscellany. 



239 




fuch true delight As when he comes to 

I 



^m^i^m 



me, As when he comes to me. 

How fv/eet with him all day to rove, 

And range the meadows wide ; 
Nor yet lefs fweet the moon-light grove. 

All by the river's fide : 
The gaudy feafons pafs away, 

How fwift when Colin's by ! 
How quickly glides the flow'ry May ! 

How fail the Summers fly ! 

When Colin comes to grace the plains, 

An humble crook he bears, 
He tends the flock like other fwains, 

A fliepherd quite appears. 
All in the verdant month of May, 

A ruilic rake his pride, 
He helps to make the new mown hay 

With Moggy by his fide. 



'Gainfl yellow Autumn's milder reign, 
His fickle he prepares, 



24© 



THE EDINBURGH 



He reaps the harveft on the plain, 
All pleaf'd with rural cares : 

With jocund da?^:ce the night is crown'd, 
When all the toil is o'er. 

With h^;'-i L trip it on the ground, 
With bi-isinr i\^-^ins a fcore. 



W^ !■ "'3 gloomy months prevail,- i 

li „ -.r. < .red here, 
His joviv^i '■.::■ :h -"iwl merry tale 

For me are nKikle cheer. 
The folks who choofe in towns to dwell. 

Are from my envy free, 
For Moggy loves the plains too well. 

And Colin's ail to me. 



"W 



SONG CII. 

ASK IF YON DAMASK ROSE BE SWEET. 



:fe 






3^ 



Aik if yon damafk rofe be fweet, Thatfcents 



iSiiiiiifey=i 



the ambient air j Then aik each (hepherd that 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



2-4 I 



iiigisiliiiii 

you meet If dear Sufanna's fair, If dear, dear 



Suf^mnah's fair, If dear Sufannah's fair. Afk 

^'"T~;;;r 









li yon damafk: rofe be fweet, That fcents the 






± 



ambient air, Then ail each (liepherd that you 




nah's fair. 



Say, will the vulture leave his prey, 
And Vv^arble thro' the grove ? 

Bid wanton Hnnets quit the fpray, 
Then doubt thy Ihepherd's love* 
Vol. II. . U 



242 



THE EDINEUR€:H 



The fpoils of war let heroes fhare^ 
Let pride in fplendour fhine ; 

Ye bards unenvy'd laurels wear, 
Be fair Sufannah mine. 






SONG cm. 

YE MORTALS WHOM FANCIES. 



■^ 




-f.: 



r: 



I^MW. 



Ye mortals whom fancies and troubles per- 
rH— I 



-^— 



-^- 



W.ZZ.I 



gEgiga 



plex. Whom folly mifguides, and infirmities vex,<| 



sm 



Whofe lives hardly know what it is tabe bleft, 



Who rife without jov, and lie down without reft, 



Obey the glad fummons, to Lethe repair. Drink l! 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



243 



i-iEi-iE-il 



deep of the flream, and forget all your care, Drink 
deep of the dream, and forget all your care, Drink 



deep of the flream, and forget all yotir care. 

Old maids (hall forget what they wlih for In valnj 
And young ones the rover they cannot regain ; 
The rake fhall forget how laft night he was cloy'd, 
A:nd Cliloe again be with paffion enjoy'd : 
Obey then the fummons, to Lethe repair, 
And drink an Oblivion to trouble and care. 

The wife at one draught may forget all her want.^j 
Or drench her fond fool, to forget her gallants ; 
The troubled in mind fhall go chearful away, 
And yefterday's wretch be quite happy to day|: 
Obey then the fummons to Lethe repair, 
Drink deep of the flream and forget all your care; 



XJ 



244 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG CIV. 

COME ROUSE FROM YOUR TRANCES. 



Come roufe from your trancesj the fly morn 
■m-^-©-^ r !- 



— — # 1 



:tzt±: 



:^ziz:g:=:: 



^-Ff^. 



^: 



advances, To catch fluggifli mortals in bed : Let 

r±xrt:qz:JZL"p~ipi:i:T:|^ 

the horn's jocund note In the wind fwcetly float, 



ziczm 



-±ff: 

While the fox from the brake lifts his head : Now 



^i:cr:t:: 



iiE^it 



:e^ 



creeping, now peeping, Now peeping, now creep- 



,:g.y-ffp— f--- p— F— F^- 






C 



i 



:t 



ir-F^ 



--IS 



ing, The fox from the brake lifts his head. Each 



Sli§5~! 



W.ZZK: 



zzx: 



m^. 



away to his deed, Your goddefs flialllead,. Coms 



MUJICAL MISCELLANY. 



245^ 






follow, my worfhippers, follow, follow, follow, 






follow, follow. For the chace all prepare, See 



the hounds fnufF the air, Hark, hark to the 



i^=Elii=lliiEii: 



huntfman's fweet hollow, hollow ; Hark to the 



'H^iHiiii; 



huntfman's fweet hollow, hollow, hollow, hol- 



;ifeSi!i; 



low, hollow, 



Hark Jovvder, hark E-Over^ 
See Reynard breaks cover, 
The hunters fly over the ground • 

U3 



24^ 



'I*HE EDINBURGH 



i 



Now they fklm o'er the plain. 

Now they dart down the lane, 
And the hills, woods, and valiies refound. 

With fplafhing and dafliing, 

With fplafhing and dafhing, 
The hills, woods, and valiies refound^ 

Then away with full fpeed. 

Your goddefs fhall lead. 
Come follow, my worfhippers, follow, follow, fol- 
low, follow, follow, 

For the chace all prepare, 

See the Hounds fnufF the air, 
Hark, hark, to the huntfman's fweet hollow, hollow 
Hark to the huntfman's fweet hollow, hollow, hoi- 
low, hollow, hollow^ 



,y^ 



MUSICAL MISCE-LLANY. 



247 



SONG CV. 

OLD CARE BEGONE. 



Maellofo; 



Old care begone, thou churlifh gueft. Who 



li^ilMp 



=i=*:i 



lov'It not flowing bowls ! Thou art the mifer's 



Sri^jfsr^t:; 







god a --lone; Hence, hence, we've none but 






fouls, We've none but fouls, Hence, hence, we've 

Allegro. 






none but fouls. Ana-cre-on bids thee quit the 



m- 




:i3ill|-3§ 






{brine, nor dare approach his fchool : For wine 




THE EDINBURGH 




infpires the foul of man, Then who would drink 

_^J . ... _1 J 

by ru ---le. For 

iiiiiiiiii 

wine inipires the foul of man, Then who would 

drink by rule ?. 

No turbid thoughts perplex the brain, . 

We cynic rules decline ; 
Give me your joyous drinking blades, - 

And cellars ftor'd with wine. 
With grapes my temples wreathe around, 

A hogthead ftriding o'er, 
A rummer fill'd with generous wine, 

Ye gods, 1 aik no more. 

In triumph then, O ! how I'll quaff, 

Amidll each toping fon j 
I wou'd like Bacchus' felf appear, 

Adride the jolly tun. 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY 249 

Let learned pedants rave and rail, 

Their maxims we defpife ; 
If fliunning wine is wifdom caird^ 

Oh ! let me ne'er be wife. 

The difPrence view 'twixt fons of care, 

And la'ls of rofy hue, 
Their fober joys are dill the fame, 

Our drinking's ever new. 
Let them go on, dream Hfe away, 

Great i3acchus we'll adore, 
And free as air we'll dunk and fing, 

Till time AkiU be no niore. 



25.0 



THE EDINBURGH- 



SONG CVI. 

N£V£R TILL NOW I KNEW LOVe's SMART, 
Never till now J knew love's fmart, Guefs who 



■m— 



m-^^- 



il^i 



it was that ftole away rny heart ? 'Twas cn-ly 



you, if you'll believe me, 'Twas only you, if 






you'll believe me. 

Since that I've felt love's fatal pow'r. 
Heavy has palTM each anxious hour. 
If not with you, if you'll believe me. 

If not with you, &c. 
Honour and wealth no joys can bring. 
Nor I be happy tho' a king. 
If not with you, if you'll believe me^ij 

If not with you^ &c. 



TviUSICAL MISCELLANY. 

When from this world I'm call'd away, 
¥or you alone I'd wifh to flay, 
JFor you alone, if you'll believe me. 

For you alone, &c. 
"Grave on my'tomb, where'er I'm laid. 
Here lies one who lov'd but one maid, 
That's only you, if you'll believe me. 

That's only you, &c. 



25 >i 



SONG cvn. 

A LAUGHING SONG. 



tr. 



iii=ipfe^iiEis 



Now's the time for mirth and glee, Laugh and 



|q=i::Ti:z=^~:F:pr^.=f=^::Trz=: 
'z:i==ti::p=t::=4==i:-=t=t=f::±zp= 



love and fmg with me \ Cupid is my theme 



of (lory, 'Tis his godfhip's fame and glory, 'Tis 



his godiliip's fan:ie and glory : Ever bending to 



THE EDINBURGH 



9:rFFT^^==i^q^H' 



tr. 



iiSiliiifei 



his law, Haj ha, ha, ha, ha, ha ; Ever, bend- 

— IBM Iffia IffiB ■^ 



?-Ei:t:frh:i:^i:|JSS±i:EEi£ 



ing to his law, ha, ha, ha, ha, ha, ha, ha, ha, 

ha, ha, ha, ha, ha, ha, ha, ha, ha, ha, ha. , 

O'er the grave, and o'er the gay, 

Cupid takes his fhare of play, •' 

He makes heroes quite their glory, 

He's the god mofl fam'd in flory, 

Bending then unto his law, 

Haj ha ha 

Sly the urchin deals in darts, 
"Without pity piercing hearts, 
Cupid triumphs over paffions, 
Not regarding modes nor fafnions, 
Firmly fix'd is Cupids law. 
Ha, ha ha 



i 



You may doubt thcfe things are true ; 
But they're facls 'iwixt nie and you^ 



[USICAL MISCELLANY. 



253 



Then young men and maids be wary, 
How ye meet before ye marry, 
Cupid's will is folely law. 
Ha ha- - - ha. 



SONG cvnr. 

COME ROUSE BROTHER SPORTSMAN. 

iiiiliiiiliiliilil 

- Come roufe, brothet fportiman, The hunters 



all cry, We've got a ilrong fcent, and a fa-vor- 

i'iiiiiiiiii-lii 

ing fKy, We\'e got a flrong fcei'nt, we've got 



a ilrong fcent, we've got a ftrong fcent and 

a favouring fey. The horns fprightly notes 

Vol. IL X 



-^ 



feE^ 



J 



254 



THE EDINBURGH 






And the lark's early fong, Will chide the dull 






r^i^:^ 



"I^ticz 






E^ 




fportfman for ileepirig fo long, Will chi 






SSES 



f^i^^f 



r^e 



de. Will chide the dull 



i^:iiiiiiiiiii 



fportfman for fleeping fo long, Will chide the 



dull fportfman for lleeping fo long. 



Bright Ph(£bu3 has (hewn us the glimpfe of his face. 
Peep'd iri at our v/iiidows and calFd to the chac€j| 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. ^55 

He foon v/ill be up, for his dawn wears away» 
And makes the fields blufh with the beams of his ray« 
Sweet Molly may teize you perhaps to lie down, 
And if you refufe her, perhaps fne may frown -, 
But tell her fweet love mud to hunting give place, 
For as weH as her charms, there are charms in the 
chace. 

Look yonder, look yonder, old Reynard I fpy, 
At his bruih nimbly follows briik Chanter and Fly t 
They feize on their prey, fee his eye balls they roll. 
We're, in at the death, now go home to the bowl. 
There we'll fill up our glafles and toafb to the king, 
From a bumper frefh loyalty ever will fpring, 
To George, peace and glory may heavens difpenfe, 
And fox-hunters flourifli a thoufand years hence. 



X2 



2 c6 



THE EDINBURGH 

SONG CiX. 

TRE FKIEPfDS-. 



li5±:E=rh:KE=SrE±:=E£rE=E 



fzt-rA& 



In wine there is all in this life we can name. 



iiiipiiiiiS^i 

It ilrengthens our friendfhip and love lights the 

Deft but 

m 



flame : Tho* life is but fhort, and at beft but a 
-m — 



zzarr^zini 






fpun, Let's live all our days, and may this be the 



— # "^ "3 "- - r- p—. 




plan : To drink, my dear boys, and to drive a- 






v/ay forrow ; Let cafh but hold out, and M^e'U 






sie'er aik to borrow j Tho' paupers to night, we'll 



ivnjsrCAi: Misc£LLANyi 



357 




Eii^i^^^ 



be rich rogues to-morrow, be rich rogues to- 



'^m^ 



i 



i=t: 



£ 






e 



:i=L.= 



morrow, be rich rogues to morrow ; Tho'pau- 



PI 



— -r--¥ — ^- 



§=Eiis 



pers- to-night, we'll be rich rogues to-morrow> 

In a neat country village ', yet not far from town, 
A clean bed for a friend whene'er he comes down. 
With a choice pack of hounds us to wake in the; 

morn, 
A hunter for each to fet off with the horn. 
Then drink, &c. 



Our diflies well chofen, and nice in their forf, 
Gur cellars well (lor'd with good claret and port^- 
A bumper to hail, to hail the all glorious, 
Our grandfires did fo, and our fathers before us. 
Then drink, &c. 

A jolly briik chaplain that can well grace the table^ 
Who will drink like a man as long as he's able^^ 

X3 



258 



THE EDINBURGH 



Who'll drink till his face port and claret makes red,. |*( 
Then ftagger enlightened quite happy to bed. jl 

Then drink, &c. 

May each man have a lafs, that he wifhes would prove 
To hib honour moft true, and fin cere to his love. 
With beauty, with wit, to change never prone, 
And the bandage good-nature to bind us their own.. 

Then drink, &c. 

And juft as we've liv'd may we clofe the lad: fcene, 
Oiiite free from all trouble, qu^te free from all pain,. 
The young they may wonder, the old they may ftare. 
And lift up their hands, fay whatfriendlliip ^vas there? 
Then drink^ &c. 



SONG ex. 

I MADE LOVE TO KATE, 



Siiiiiiiiilpi 

I made love to Kate, long I figh'd for Ihe, 







Till I heard of late, flie'd a mind to me. me. 



I 



IVrUSlCAL MISCELLA 



259 



I met her on the green, in her bed array, So 



3jT:ii:_izzzr:: 



pretty ^v.q did feera, (he ilole my heart away : 



iiiiiiiiii^^ 



Oh then we kiCs'd and preft, were we much to 
blame ? Had yoa been in my place^ \vhy you 



!=zt=tz:i:z 



rz^JJzi: 



had done the fame. Oh ! fame. 



As I fonder grew, (lie began to prate. 
Quoth ilie, I'll marry you, and you will marry Kate, 
But then I laugh'd and fwore, 

I lov'd her more than fo, 
Ty'd each to a rope'^ end. 
Is tugging to and fro. 



26o ~ 



THE EDINBURGEl 



•| 



Again we klfs'd and preft, were we much to blame ? 
Had you been in ray place, why you had dont the 
fame. 

Then (he fighM, and faid, fhe was wond'rous fick j 
Dicky Katy led, Katy (he led Dick 5. 
Long we toy'd and play'd 

Under yonder oak^ > 

Katy loft the game, ^ 

Tho' (lie play'd in Joke, 
For there we did, alas ! what I dare not name. 
Had you been in my place, why you had done the-~ 
fame. 



SONG CXI. 

AS SURE AS A GUN. 






1 — --_. 



fcji 



-^-'^ 



tz^l 



Says Colin to me, I've a thought in my 



he?d, I know a young damfej Fin dying to wed. 






I know a young danxfel I'm dying to wed : So 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



l6l 



-^5- 



pleafe you, quotli I, and whene'er it is done. 
You'll quarrel and you'll part again, as fure as 



:s±±x:t:±:T-^-jz:rj.:z-Z-: 




^m 



w~ 



¥^ 



f3^;±tt:p:p±±a=p±pttFtp: 

a gun, As fure as, a gun, As fure as a gun 



iips^i^lii 



You'll quarrel and you'll part again, as fare as 



s±: 



ililli 



a gun. 



And f(3 M'Tien you're married (poor amoious wight ! ) 
You'll bill it and coo it from morning till night ; j 
But truft me, good Colin, you'll find it bad fun- — 
inflead of which you'll fight and fcratch — as fure as 

a gun ! 
But fliou'd fhe prove fond of her nown deareft love^ 
And you^be as fouple, and foft as her glove j 



262 



THE EDINBURGH 



Yet be flie a faint, and as cliafte as a nun — 

You're faftcn'd to her apron-ftrings — as fure as a r 

gun ! 
Suppofe it was you, then, faid he with a leer ; 
You wou'd not ferve me fo, I'm certain, my dear : 
In troth I replied, I will anfwcr for none— 
But do as other women do — as fure as a gun-! 



SONG CXIf. 

THE bird's nest. 



tr. 



Sp 



-pW-- 



:=p=:=^^^tttc 



t 



— B^- 



I've found out a gift for ray fair, I've found 







where the wood-pigeons breed, But let me that 



plunder forbear, She'll fay it's a bar - ba -rous 
deed j But let me that plunder forbear, She'U 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



233 




fay its a bar barous deed. 



For he ne'er can be true, (lie averr'd. 
Who can rob a poor bird of its young ; 
And I lov'd her the more, when I heard 
Such tendernefs fall from her tongue. 

I've heard her with fweetnefs unfold, 
How that pity was due to a Dove : 
That it ever attended the bold, 
And file cali'd it the fdler of LovCo 



2(54 THE EDINBURGH 

SONG CXIII. 

^^0W PHOEBUS SINKETH IN THE V/EST. 






|grF=pz^gg^|^d:|zgt:E:E 



Now Phoebus fmketh in the weft, Welcome 



H=5ra-lzM-^-^- 



:S:rM^zs.zi:ssfi' 



igj^|t^i=|;* 



* 



fong and welcome jcil, Midnight (hout and re-f 







velry, Tipfy dance and jollity, Midnight {liout^t 

and revelry, Tipfy dance and joiiity. Now f 

— ^ ' I 

Phcsbus (inkcth in the weft, Welcome fong and 



welcome jeft^ Midnight ftiout and revelry, 



MUSI-CAL MISCELLANY. 



25s 



-^t-C-p-F-» 



»-f-i- 



ir- — ' 







Tipfy dance and jollity. Braid your locks, v/itli 
rofy twine, dropping odours, dropping wine. 



-pi- 
Braid Your lo 



cks with ro-fy 



:!6:^ 



-»■ 



twine, dropping odours, dropping wine* dropping 

±=„::f:i!z±: 



odours, dropping wine, droppin:^ odours, dropping 

g&aE"S|:Ii5a:E5z:E?±:E 

|^zi:^:±„izlE?±z:D::|iir^r3f:x:t:z:^: 

wine. Rigour now is gone to bed, And ad- 



::i:;^ ::~-:r :]:z;3:::3:=i=- 



-^—3= 



ik: 



vice witli fcraa'lous Kead, StilSt ygc and four 
Vol.11. T 



266 



THE EDINEUIIGH 



feveri-ty, With their grave faws in fiumber Ijy 



|=fe=5=EE=t3fer|a3EE= 

With their grave faws in fiumber iy» D^' Cr?/;?. ;^ 



SONG CXIV. I 

THE LITTLE MAN AND LITTLE MAID. 1 



There was a little man, and he wo'ed a lit_ 

^q-xqrzg— :j3=dpi:iH:==l-:rj:T:=:- 

tie maid, And he faid, little maid, u'lli you wed, 

*=^3E=EeEEz^;^Eti=£|;^Et4 

wed, wed. 1 have little more to fay. Than, 

s::b:z:zijzi:zzd::]:i:i;zz:'z^xi::^z~zz':i| izz: 
Pz:(z=_zz:izi:±tizzpzi=lp:tzf:ztcrsiJ 

^vill you, ay or jiay ^ For_ little f?ud is fooncft 



BU3IGAL MISCELLAt^T. ' ^6'] 

meud - tA ^ tA. 

Then rc^'y'a the liule mM, lUtk fir^ yo^^Ve little Mdl 

To iaavics a litrla maUu to wed^ wed, wed, 
Yoii mud hj a lictle a^ore, ana in\uivic<i 8 little dow% 
. Ere I m;\ke a little print in your bed, bed, bed. 

Then the ;i^tle man repli'-d, u you'll hzm'j littkbrU® 

rU mils m^ love a Uttie h'gh^r \ 
-THq' I ludeiova to prat^, my liuk he^rt Is gre^t, 
\ ' ' With die littb.god of love ail on fire. 



Then the little maid replied, flaould I be your little 
bride, 
Pray v.dint fnziH we do for to eat, eat, eat ? 
Will the flame that you're fo rich in ferve for fire m 
the kitchen ? 
Or the little god of love turn the fpit, fpit, fpit ? 

Then the little man he hgh'd, fome fay a little crledj^ 
For his little bread Vv-as big with forrow „ 

I am your little flave, if the little that I have 
is too little, little dear, 1 will borrow. 

So the little man fo gent, made the little maid relent^ 

And fet her little heart a thinking, 
Tho' his ofKers were but fmall, fl-ie took his little all 

Ar].d could have of a cat but her (kin,- , 



i^^g 



THE Em'NBURGH 



SONG CXV, 

KOBODY. 






If to force me to fing it be your intention, 



Some one I will hint at, yet nobody mention* 



tJ 



Nobody you'll cry, ipfh^Wy that muft be ftuff'' 






At iinglng I'm no-bo-dy, that's the firO: proofj 

Ko, no-bo-dy, no, no-bo-dy, no-bo-dy, 
nobodyj. no-bo-dy, no. 



MC3ICAL ivnSCEtLAllY-, 1<^-^ 

l^obody'o a name every body wiU own, 

When fomething they ought to be alhaPxi'd of have- 
done ; 

'Tis a name well applied to old maids and young; 
beaus, 

What they were intended for nobody knows. 
No, nobody, &c. 

If negligent feivants fliould china-plate crack. 
The fault is ftill laid on. poor nobody's back *, 
IF accid'ents happen at home or abroad, 
When nobody's blam'd for it, is not that odd ? 
No, nobody, &c. 

Nobody can tell you the tricks that are play'd,. 
Y/hen nobody's by, betwixt mailer and maid ;' 
She gently crys out, fir, there'll fome body hear usv^- 

He foftly replies, my dear, nobody's near us. 
No, nobody, &c. 

But big with child proving, Tne's quickly difcarded;,-. 
When favours are granted, nobody's rewarded j 
And when (he's examined, crys, mortals, forbid it,. 
If Fm got with child, it was nobody did it. 
No, nobody, &c. 

¥^hcn by Health, the gallant, the wanton wife leaves^- 
The hufband's aifrighten'd, and thinks it -is thieves '^ 



270 THE EDINBURGH 

He roufes himfelf, and crys loudly who's there ? 
The wife pats his cheek, and fays, nobody, dear. 
No, nobody, &c. 

Enough now of nobody fure has been fung, 
Since nobody's mentioned, nor nobody's wrong'd 
I hope f( t free fpeaking I may not be blam'd,, 
Since nobody's injur'd, nor nobody's nam'd^^. 
No, nobody, Sic. 



MUSICAL MISCEtLANY. 



zri 



SONG CXVI. 

FY GAR RUB HER OE*R Wl' STRAE, 



S=?S§lpSilfsi^ 



And gin ye meet a bonny lafTie, Gie'er a 



:ri:3=3tff:i^i:3zri±?i:±::S:=±f: 



kifs, and let her gae ; But if ye meet a dir - ty 



^^^^^ 



huffy, Fy gar rub her o'er wi' ftrae. Be fure 




ye dinna quit the grip Of ilka jay v/hen ye are 



i^im^ii^ 



young. Before auld age your vi - tals nipj And 



^SSi 



lay you twafauld o'er a rung. 



27^ THE EDINBURGH 

Sweet youth's ii blithe and heartfome tline 

Then lads and laflesj while 'tis May, 
Gae pu' the gowan in. it's prime 

Before it wither and decay. 
Watch the faft minutes of delyte, 

Vs^hen Jenny fpeaks beneath her breathy 
And kiiTis, laying a' the wyte 

On you if (lie kepp ony Ikaith. 

Haith ye're ill-bred, ihe'li fmiling iiiy, 

Ye'll vv^orry me, ye greedy rook : 
Syne frae your arms flie'U rin away, 

And hide herfclf in fome dark nook,. 
Her laugh will lead you to the place 

Where lies the happinefs ye want, 
And plainly tell you to your face 

Nineteen na-fays are ha'f a grant.^. 

Now to her heaving bofom cling 

And fweetly toolie for a kifs : 
Upon her finger whoop a ring, 

As taiken of a future biifs- 
Thefe bennifons, I'm very fure, 

Are of the gods indulgent grant : 
Then, furly cads, whiiht, forbear 

To plague us witb your whining c:mU~ 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 273 

'SONG CXVIT. 
Tq the foregoing 'Tune, 

Dear Roger, if your Jenny geek 

And aafwer kindnefs wi' a flight, 
Seem unconcern'd at her negle£l j 

For women in a man delight ; 
But them defpife who're foon defeat, 

And wi' a fimple face give way : 
To arepulfe then be not blate •, 

Pufh bauldly on and win the day^ 

When maidens, innocently young,. 

Say aften what they never mean, 
Ne'er mind their pretty lying tongue,. 

But tent the language of their een : 
If thefe agree, and fhe perfift 

To anfwer a' your love v/ith hate, 
Seek elfewhcre to be better bleft, 

And let her figh whea its too late* 



THE EDINBURGH 

SONG CXVIU. 
AH WHY MUST WOilSg. 






Ah why uiuil wouU my ilanu revea! ? Y/hat , ; 
needs my Damon bid my tell What all my a:-; 

tions prove? What all my atbions prove.. 



;£±:br:b; 



-^|z_g,ul : ;— ^|~ — 



A bluih ^A'hens'er I meet his eye, When-y; 



ferexsEsEitzei-e-sriei-trifi 



^'=t=s;:b"tP±S'r4-F:tz:t-t±=±::rF 

e'er I hear his name A iigh betrays ray k^ 



mwmwwsmm 

ret iove^ - « be - - trays my fecret Iove<^ 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 27^ 

In all tliclr fports upon the plain 
My eyes (lill iix'd on him remain, 

And him alone approve ; 
The rePc unheeded, dance or play. 
He deals from all ray praife away, 

And can he doubt my love ? 

Whene'er we meet, my looks confefs 
The pleafures which my foul poiTefs, 

And all it's cares remove. 
Still, ftili too fliort appears his flay, 
I frame excufes for delay, 

Can this be ought but love ? 

Does any fpealc in Damon's praife, 
How pleas'd am I with all he fays, 

And every word approve •, 
Is he defam'd, tho' but in jefl', 
I feel refentment fire my bread, 

Alas ! hecaufe I love. 

But O ! what tortures tear my heart, 
When I fufped his looks impart 

The lead defire to rove. 
I hate the maid who gives me pain. 
Yet him 1 ftrive to hate in vain. 

For ah ! that hate is k)ve. 

Then all^ not words, but read my eyes. 
Believe my bluihes, truft my fighs. 



^',6 



THE EDINBURGH 



All tliefe my paiTion prove : 
"Words may deceive, may fpring from art^ 
But the true language of my heart 

To Damon rauft be love. 



SONG CXIX. 

WINTER. 



tEi^:tit:E:Ei3z33±tiEir:zi • 



A dieu, ye groves, adieu ye plains, All na- 






^y~. rsj- — ::2.;.^ — _a_ — je — sx.~ — j IflZ^ 

ture mourning lies. 8ee gloomy clouds, and 



fcerrstt 





3:-b 



thick'ning rains Obfcure the lab'ring ikies 

a 

fa- -T — 35r J>-d=rPci- - ■ 



L4-:*E|;iiz£te^.^;f|r±&-i 






See^ kc, from a-far, th'im pend ing ftorm VYilh 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 277 




fuJlen hafte ap - - pear. See win-ter comes, A 

drea - ry form, to rule the falling year. 

No more tlie lambs with gamefome bound. 

Rejoice t!ie gladden'd fight : 
No more the gay enamelFd ground. 

Or fylvan fcenes delight. 
Thus, lovely Nancy, much lov'd maid. 

Thy early charms muft fail ; 
Thy rofe muft droop, the iilly fade. 

And winter foon prevail. 

Again the lark, fweet bird of day. 

May rife on adlive wirigs, 
Again the fportive herds may play, 

And hail reviving fpring. 
But youth, my fair, fees no return. 

The pleafmg bubble's o'er. 
In vain it's fleeting joys you mourn. 

They fall to bloom no more. 

Hafte, then, dear girl, the time improvej 

Which art can ne'er regain. 
In bdfsfuU fcenes of mutual love. 
With fome diiiinguifti'd fwain$ 
ToL. U. Z 



278 



THE EDINBURGH 



So fhall life's fprlng, like jocund May, 

Pafs fmiiing and ferene ; 
Thus fummer, autumn, glide away. 

And winter foon prevail. 



SONG CXX. 

BONNY JEAN. 






-^cr- 



ma 



^'-^~— - w3^rr'Tj-:3r ■^^— ^' 



^^ --1— "^ f -!- "l-J — #-- h5~ 



3??- 




'Mz: 



Love's goddefs m a myr-tle grove, Said, 

^^ — J 1,_-, , . 

Cupid, btiid thy bow with fpetd, Nor let thy 

's^s-i — ^ — £--F-v — -^-.^—^^1—3 

fhaft at random rove. For Jen--ny's haughty 
heart muft bled. The imiling boy with di — 



f 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



27$> 



vine art, From Paphos ihot an ar - row kceii^ 

-:3;i±-t:a«?:±3!:idr:3~lr:tir--? 



:iri- 



V/hlch flew un - erring to the heart, And kill'd 




the pride of bon - ny Jean. 

No more the nymph, with haughty air^ 
Refufes Willy's kind addrefs ; 
Her yielding bluflies fliow no care, 
But too much fondnefs to fupprefs. 
No more the youth is fullen now. 
But looks the gayell on the green, 
Whilft every day he fpies fome new 
Surprizing charms in bonny Jean. 

A thoufand tranfports crowd his breajlj 
He moves as light as il 'Acting wind ; 
HivS former forrows feem a jefl:, 
Now when his Jenny is turn'd kind. 
Riches he looks on with difdain, 
The glorious fields of war look mean | 



aSo 



THE EDINBURGH 



The chearfu] hound and horn gives pain *, 
If ^bfent from his bonny Jean. 

The day he ipends in am'rous gaze, 
Which ev'n in fummer ihort'ned feems ; 
When funk in downs, with glad amaze, 
He wonders at her in his dreams. 
All charms difcloa'd, fhe looks more bright 
Than Troy's prize, the Spartan Queen. 
With breaking day, he lifts his fight, 
And pants to be with bonny Jean. 



SONG CXXI. 

WHY HANGS THAT CLOUD. 



-5^* j 






Why hangs that cloud u - pon thy brow ? 



-TT-^-r- 



sni^^s 



^:tg=^ig 



That beauteous heaven erewhile ferene : Whence 






m. 



do thefe ftorms and tempefts flow ? Or wha 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY, 



2U 




m- 



v.^ 



^m 



iHgi^ 



this gall 'of paiTion mean ? And muft then 



WtWi 









mankind lofe that light, Which in thine eyes 



iili^^Sl^il 



was wont to fhine ? And ly obfcur'd in 



iSiliteiiiii 



end-lefs night, For each poor fil - ly fpeech 




il^E 



Qt mine r 



Dear child, how can I wrong thy namCj - 

Since 'ti& acknowledged at all hands. 
That could ill tongues abufe thy fame. 

Thy beauty can make large amends ; 
Or if I duril profanely try 

Thy beaisty's pow'rful charms t' upbraid 
Thy virtue well might give the lie, 

Nov. CB-li thy beauty to it's aid. 



2^2 THE EDINBURGH 

For Venus every heart f enfnare, 

With all her charms has deck'd thy face>. 
And Pallas with unufual care. 

Bids wifdom heighten every grace. 
Who can the double pain endure ! 

Or who muft not refign the field 
To thee, celeftial maid, fecurc 

With C upid's bow, and Pallas fhield ? 

If then to thee fuch pow'r is given, 

Let not a wretch in torment live, 
But fmile, and learn to copy heaven, 

Since we muft fin ere it forgive. 
Yet pitying heaven not only does 

Forgive th' offender and th' offence^ 
But even itfelf appeas'd beftows^ 

As the reward of penitence^ 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



28j 



SONG CXXIL 

THE DUSKY NIGHT, 



iii^iiil^il 



The duiky night rides down the r^y, And 



ufhers in the morn ; The hounds all join in jo- 



irteltfEEEi: 



&5?L^_« 

vial cry. The hounds all join in jovial cry, The 
huntfman winds his horn, The huntfman winds 



IK. 



' -^ 



^^:^^^^^^^^M^^ 



his horn. And a hunting we will go, A hunt- 



liiilliiiligilS 



ing we will go, A hunting we will go - - 
■^Z^TZJ-j^-IJ-I^T 3^Tll~i-Zl"I&T 



A hunting vv^e will go. And a huntiDg we will 



s€4 



THE EDINBURGH 



SSi^SiiiS 



go, A hunting we will go, And hunting we 



:i|^-l|?:£ g| Tq l P 



will go A hunting we will go. 

The wifs around her hufhand throws - 
Her arms to make him ftay : 

My dear, it rains, it hails, it blowSj , 
You cannot hunt to-day. 
Yet a hunting. Sec* 

Sly Reynard now like light'ning flies, . 

And fweeps acrofs the vale ; 
But when the hounds too near he fpiesj 

He drops his bufhy tail. 
Then a hunting, &s. ■• 

Fond echo feems to like the fport, 

And join the jovial cry ; 
The woods and hills the found retort^' 

And mufic fills the Iky, 
When a hunting, &c. 

At lail his flrength to faiatnefs worn^ 
Poor Reynard ceafes flight 5 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 2S5 

Then hungry homeward we return 
To feaft away the night. 
And a drmkhig, &c. 

Ye jovial hunters in the morn 

Prepare then for the chace ; 
Rife at the founding of the horn. 

And health with fport embrace, 
When a hunting, &c. 



286 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG CXXIIL 

THE EONNY SCOTMAN. 



:m 



Til 



zqzngHViqzqzzqrq-Tifr: 



:s_» _L_-^. 



^ 



Ye gales that gently wave the fsa, And pleafe 



tr. 




the canny boatman^ Bear me frae hence, or. 



:xE;!i:rf:E:=5:±=:zzr|=faiii^r^=: 

bring to me. My biyth, my bonny ScotmaHj 

iiiiiiiEiiiiiti 

Bear me frae hence, or bring to me, My biyth 

tr. 

my bonny Scotman, my biyth my bonny Scot- 



•m — ! 



:55; 



^yZZWZlIZM. 



--i- 



zwx:t 






g 






man. in holy bands we join'd our hands^ Yet 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 287 

may nor chat difcover, While parents rate a 
large eilate before a faith - fu !o-ver In 






holy bands we join'd our hands. Yet may not 



that difcover, While parents rate a large eilate 



lltoiiSiii 



be-fore a faithful lo - ver, before a faithful lo- 






N:1^, 



lii 



:€:9 



ver, before a faith-ful lo-ver j While parents 

tr. tr. 






-rate a large eftate be-fore a faithful lover. 



288 THE EDINBURGH 

But I wouM chufe in Highland glens, 

To herd the kid and goat man j 
E'er I.cou'd for fuch little ends, 

Refufe my bonny Scotman. 
Wr.e worth the man who firft began^ 

The bafe ungen'rous faOiion ; 
From greedy views, love's art to ufe, 

Whiiil flranger to it's pailion. 

Frae foreign fields my lovely youth, 

tlafle to chy longing laffie ; 
Who pants to kifs thy balmy mouth, 

A nd in her bofom prefs thee : 
Love gives the word, then hafle on board, 

Fair M'ind ynd gentle boatman, 
Waft o'er, w^ft o'er, from yonder fhore. 

IMy blyth my bonny Scotman. 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



23^ 



■SONG CXXIV. ^- 

THE SPINNING WHEEL. 



— .!- 



Xl^^ ^.i_ZlJ MlH u- 

To eafe his heart, and own his flame, Young 

tr. 



Jockey to my cottage came : But tho' I lik'd 

^ I j_ ^ ^^ 

him paiTmg well, I carelefs turn'd my fpinning 
wheel. My milk-white hand he did extolj And 

prr.is'd my fin - gers long and fmall, Un-uf— ual 



J:%^:tt:t^zze:i-^zzt^ 

fJ^U.]JZlJZ — i__p — i^_x pZ_JjL^J., 

joy my heart did feel, But ftiil I turn'd my 
ToL. II A a 



^GO 



THE EDINBURGH 



fpinning wheel. Then round about my flender 

iSifipisiiS^lii 



waift He clafp'd his arms, and me embrae'd, 



-rrh 






5-E?i3-: 



To kifs my hand he down did kneel, But yet 



h- >— 



-i 



_4S„N^ 



■m- 



:T=1= 



S;£ardri]3 



I turn'd my fpin-ning wheeL With gentle voice 



r=±±_i:tf:ii:-5r±:?~=r::f3E333 



I bid him rife -, He blefs'd my neck, my lips 



I, 



4.- 






a±i3S5;:EESiEE^~l 



and eyes ; My fondnefs I could fcarce conceal, 



I 



;EpEEE^^|±E| 



.p. — j ^. 



Yet flili I tuvn'd my fpinning wheel, TiM 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



2QI 



Lr 



iplii^=ii5 



bolder grown, fo clofe he preft, His wanton- 

I — t— 

thoughts I quickly guefs'd, Then pufn'd hlai 






iiiliiii 



^iSis^i 



from my rock and reel, And angry turn'd 









my fpin-ning wheel. At laft, when I be- 



■•^•*H^-r— - 



-0--^~- ^-]-^-# — - 



-m 






gan to chide. He fwore he meant me for his 



:-|~.— :K:irz!'!'ird!5:r^:^aTf;p.t;gJr-=: 
>~:^=ziz±-^i:35:B::Ebx-t-t~t: 

bride : 'Twas then my love I did re, — veal, 









And flung a- way my fpinning wdieeL 

A a 2 



2€>2 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG CXXV. 

THE POWER OF MUSIC. 



^_^:^rirt-rpzrp:rz2x:±:f:l:rz::^z_r: 

When Orpheus went down to the regions be- ', 



:z:r:r:i:^::j-p;rpr 
5S:4::e::i 






ta:q-: 



low, Which men are forbidden to fee ; He tun'd 
_ /*> /-^ 

:!r-t-t~:fe~:h: 

up Ilis lyre, as oJd hifto-ries fiiew. To fet his 






fci±^±i=-i[:t|-;.g*.t:t:lii,l±y: 

■ Eurydice free, To fet his Eury-dice free. All 
heli was aftonirifd a perfon fo wife Should rafh- 






t-. 



:?:z 



ly emiiin^er his life, And vcnlure fo fai'j But 



I 



MUSICAL MISCELLA'NY. 



^9: 



iz: 



h»\r vafl their furprife ! When they heard that 
he came for his v/ife ! How vail their furprife ! 



:^-z^zi:H~T-z:. 



- F-|~#- — Wd - H -1 - 






i 



When they heard that he came for his wife ! 

To find out a punifliment due to his fault, 

Old Pluto long puzzled his brain •, 
But hell had not torments fufficient, he thought ; 

So he gave him his wife back again. 
But pity fucceeding found place in his heart j 

And, pleas'd with his playing fo well, 
lie took her again in reward of his art j .. 

Such merit had mufic in hell ! 



A^a 3 



:_94 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG CXXVI. 

DIOGENES SURLY AND PROUD. 
Di-o-ge-nes furly and proud, Who fnarl'd at 



wzz^ 



Z^M 



?=?-■■ 



the Macedon youth^ Dehghted in wine that was 






:zx 



good, Becaufe In good wine there is truth ; But 






^Ei=E^|=illE^^^ 



growing as poor as a Job, And un-a-ble to pur- 






:zwBMfzf 



chafe a fla&, He chofe for his manfion a tub. 



And Ijy'd by the fceiit of his ca 



I 



"MUSICAL MISCELLANY. Spj; 
— .^■'■^Bac^__ ^ 1 ;<*». ^- j-— . 



{k, And liv'd by the fcent 



of his cafk. 

Heraclitus would never deny 

A bumper to cherifh his heart ; 
And, when he was maudhn, would cry ; 

Becaufe he had empty'd his quart : 
Though fome v/ere fo foolifh to think 

He wept at men's folly and vice, 
When 'twas only his cuftom to drink 

'Till the liquor ran out at his eyes. 

Democritus always was glad 

To tipple and cherifli his foul ; 
Would laugh like a man that was mad, 

When over a jolly full bowl : 
While his cellar with v/ine was well ftor'd^ 

His liquor he'd merrily quaff; 
And, when he was drunk as a lord, 

At thofe that were fober he'd laugh, 

Copernicus, too, like the reft, 

Believ'd there was wifdom in wine : 

And knew that a cup of the beft 
Made reafon the brighter to lliine : 



'.g6 THE EDINBURGH 

With wine lie replenifli'd his veins. 
And made his philofophy reel : 

Then fancy'd the world, as his brain s, 
Turn'd round like a chariot v.'heeL 

Ariftotle, that mailer of art?, 

^ Had been but a dunce without wine i. 
For what we afcribe to his parts. 

Is due to the juice of the vine j 
His belly, fome authors agree, 

Was as big as a watering-trough :. 
He therefore ieap'd into the fea, 

Eecapfe he'd have liquor enough.. 

When Pyrrho had taken a glafs, 

He faw that no object appear'd 
Exactly the fame as it was 

Before he had liquor'd his beard ; 
For things running round in his drink^ 

Which fober he motionlefs found, 
Occafion'd the fceptic to think 

There was nothing of truth to be found. 

Old Plato was reckon'd divine. 

Who ^vifely to virtue was prone ; 
But, had it not been for good wine, 

His merit had never been known : 
By wine we are generous made ; 

It furniflies fancy with wings *, 
Without it we ne'er fhould have had 

Philofophers, poets, or kings. 



i 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY* 

SONG CXXVII. 

MCGREGOR ARUARO< 



297 



—- N- 






From the chace in the mountain as I was re- 



turning, By the ficle of a fountain Malrina fat 



x:t' 



mourninp- f To the winds tluit loud vvhiiird fhe 
told her fad ftory ; And die vallies re-echo&d.Mac- 



Gregor A - rauro. 



ed ngli::';^-V:" ^'"'' - - ^ ..ihcame 
Macara, 
More fleet than the roe-buck on the lofty Beinn-lara. 



29^' THE EDiNEURGfr 

0h where Is McGregor ? fay, where does he hover ? 
You foil of bold Calmar, why tarries my lover ? 

Then the voice of foft forrow,- from his bofom thu-s 

founded, 
Lov^^lies your McGregor, pale, mangl'd and vi^oundedi 
Overcome with deep ilumber^ to the rock I convey'd 

Him, (tray'd hhn. 

Whei^e the fons of black malice to his foes have be- 
As the blafl from the mountain foon nips the frefh 

bloiTom, 
So died the fair bud of fond hope in her bofom -, 
McGregor ! McGregor ! loud echoes refounded ; 
And the hills rung in pity, M'Gregor is wounded.! 

Near the brook in the valley the green turf did hide 
ber ; (her 5 

And they laid down McGregor found ileeping belide 
Secure is their dwelling from foes and black llander s 
Near the loud roaring waters their Ipirits oft wander^-j 



IVIUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



29f 



SONG CXXVIIL 



THE SAILOR S ALLEGORY 



iiipiiiii 



Life's like a iliip, in conflant motion, fome- 



^—Td—-^ 



z=z:z:i:;J=zfii:trh±: 



times high and fometimes low ; where ev'ry one 



^^z^z^^pmj^ 



mud brave the ocean, What-fo-e-ver wind may 

H— i — j—zi: 



IK' 



EaEiE|gBE3tiS 



,^xz._ 



'r- 



blow : If, unafTail'd by fquall or fnow - cr. Waft- 






ed by the gentle gales *, Let's not lofe the fav'- 



ring hoi5r^ ¥/hile fuccefs attends our fails^ 



3^® THE EDINBURGH 

Or, if tlie wayward wijids (Iiould bluders 
Let us not give way to fear ; ' - 

■But let us all our Patience mufter, 

And leani, by Reaibn, how to fteer : 

Let Judgmen: keep you ever fteady, 
'Tib a b.iilait never fails ; 

Should dangers rife, be ever ready, 
. To manage well the, fwelling fails. 

Truil; not too much your ov/n opinion, 

"While jour veiTel's under v/ay j 
Let good example bear dominion. 

That's a compafs will not ftray : 
When.thund^ing tempefts make you fhudder^ 

Or Boreas en the furface rails ; 
Let good Difcretion guide the rudder, 

And Providence attend the .fails. 

Tlien, when vcu're fafe from danger, ridir.f? 

In fome welcome port or bay ; 
Hope be the anchor you confide in, 

And Care, awhile, enflumber'a lay : 
Or, when each cann, with liquor flowing, 

And good fellovv'^rnip prevails ; 
Let each tiue heart, with rapture glcwingj 

Drink ^' iuccefs unto our falb-" 



MUSICAL MlSCtLtANY. 



3^' 



SONG CXXIX. 

THE LIQUOR OF LIFE. 



•Ueclt. 



i?B2 



iM^. 



ifcE=t 



'•^-w — ^- ^ 



~t? — ^- 
While here Anacreon's chofen fons combine, 

""""igiplpips 



Like him to tafte the joys of mirth and wiiiie ; 



-^ 



While the full bowl is with the goblet crown'd. 



igiiiHiiiiffi: 



Harmonic let the joyful fong te found : To 



A^ ! 



33=r=±= 



baniflijife's troubles the Grecian old fage Prefs'd 



-m- 



SPS^^ip 



the juice of the vintage oft into the bowl, Prefs'd 






the juice oC the vintage oft into the bowl : h 
Vol. II. Bb 



3^2 



*mE EDINBURGjEf 



made him forget all the cares of old age, It 



9—0- 



Sz^t£tz§:zz 
— ■^ i_i„_^ — J — __» 



bloom'd in his face, and made happy his foul. 
It bloom'd in his ftce and made happy his foulj 



mB^m^tm 




0- 



It bloomM in his face and made hap-pyhis foul' 



Quick 



While here, then, we're found, pufh the bottle 




around, While here, then, we're found, puOi tht 

n :S: 

■--i-s--. — -t:w: 



ii^ii:^!p 



pottle aroundp 'Tis the liquor pf life, Tis the ]i^ 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY, 



3^-3 



.:^^. 
^ 



-« 5s._R^ ,-n 



^^zfe^i^E 



feS 



^ 



quor of life, 'tis the liquor of life, No care can 

• IT 






E=iE^H 



contrcul. 

This jovial philofopher taught that the fun 

Vv^as thirfly, and oft took a fwig from the main | 

The planets would tipple as faft as they run ; 

The earthy too, was dry, and would fuck up the rain. 

While here then we're found, 

Pufh the bottle around, — 
'Tis the liquor of life, pr^y wKo can refrain? 



Bb t 



, 3^4 



THE EDI'NEUR«3a 



SONG CXXX. 

ROBfN ADAiK< 



isrrb-n-n-^T'-T — 



You're v/elcome to Pax -ton, Robin Adair: 

'z:i!:pzz:|rz5z:pl:cr:£:z:^:l£ri:zE F-H 

How does Johnny Mackrill do ? Aye, and Luke 



Gard'ner too ? ¥/hy did they no come with you, 

Robin Adair ? Come, and fit down by me,,. 
Robin Adair •, And welcome you ihall be To 



jQ,_in^i,© --^^ -^ 



.^-^ 



-i^~W— tl 






* ^—^i- — 

every thing that you fee: Why did they not 



MtJSrCAL M'ISCEltA'Nr. 



s<^ 



slplillH^ii 



come with you, Robin Adair ? 

I. will drink wine with you, Robin Adair, 
I will drink wine with you, Robin Adair ; 
Rum-punch, aye, or brandy to, 
By my foul I'll get drunk with you -, 
Why did they not come with you, Robin Adair i' 

Then let us drink about, Robin Adair, 
Then let us drink about, Robin Adair, 

Till we've drank a Hogfhead out. 

Then we'll be fow nae doubt ; 
Why did they not come with you, Robin Adair? 



l^b^g^ 



■M^ 



THE EDmi^WRGH 



SONG CXXXI. 

WITHIN A MILE OF EDINBURGH, 



.^^. 



cop 




-£'pJS]S=^-N--=- 



-i__^- — atJTj^ii 



'Twas with- In a mile of Edinburgh town. 



tr. 



■4: 



In. the ro- fy tune of the year, fwcct 



flow - er-s blooin'd, and the grafs was down^ 



^ai — r ~i ar— 



And each ihepherd;woed his dear : Bonny Jock^• 



-^^■ 




ZZfSZ 






-^-^-v x_; 



cy, blyth and gay, Elfs'd fweet Jenny making 






hay: Ths lafTie bluOi'dj and frowiiiagcry'd, No^ 



MtSTCAL MlSC^tLitNY. 



s^r 







no, it will not do ; I cannot, cannot, won- 




ii^i 



not, wonnot, maniiot buckle too. 



Jockey wa* a W2ig that never would wed, 

Tho' long lie Ead foliow'd t1.\e lafs, 
Contented fhe earn'd and eat her brown breads- 
And merrily turn'd up- the graft : 
Bonny Jockey, blyth and free, 
Won her heart right merily. 
Yet flill (he bluih'd, and frowning cry'd, no, nn, ig 

will not do, 
I cannot cannot, wonnot wonnot, mannot buckle toOb 

But when he vow'd he wou'd make her his bride^ 

Tho' his fioeks and herds were not few. 
She gave him her hand, and a kifs befide, 

- And vow'd ihe'd for ever be true ; 

Bonny Jockey, blyth and free, 
Won her heart right merrily. 
At church {he no more frowning cry'd, nOj no, it 

- will not do, 

I cannot cannotj wonnot woniiot, niannot buckle too. 



joS 



THE EDrNEURGH^ 



SONG XXXII. 

IN FORMTER TIMES WE FRANCE DID ROUT, 



In former times we France did rout, 'Caufe 
then our princes drank old ftout j But now, even- 






-^ 



S=-"5i 



men of low degree,. Drink what thofe drank whom- 



Si5iE-&5T5: 




:^j:TJ25JJji:£-£ 



we made flee. I'll bctmy befl mi-li.tia gun, Who 
drinks like them, like them will run : For fure no 






_bn_^:fe: 



iiiil^=H5? •- 



^=F 



knight was ever born Com|5ar'd to Sir John Biir». 



MUSrCAL MISCTLLAl^T. 



3^9 



ley.corn. With a hey gse, wo gee, up gee wo> 

And a iinglc gin^-lc, ringk glngle, glngle, gin- 

gle, creakiag, breakings ddfhing, fplafhing, creak- 

ing, breaking, dafiiing, fpla(:iing, u'hacK, whack, 



!E^55*ifi?g-£Efe^^£t3E5 



whack : Then while that the team goes flow thro 
the vale, ,So merri-ly) merri-ly, merrily, merri-ly>. 

|EgS:e:bzi=te:t=:^F:S 

memi-ly let us wet a lip, For Joan (he loves a- 



310 



THE EDINBURGH 



fmack of the wliipj and the fmack of nut-brown 





I ne'er want bolus, draught, or pill. 
For 'tis outlandifh liquors kill ; 
I keep to ale, and ale keeps me 
From ev'ry ail, but hiccups, free 5 
Nay, on my beaft, the fame I try. 
So Dobbin is as flout as- 1, 
For fure no Doctor e'er was born, 
Compar'd to Sir John Barley-corn. 
With a hey gee wo, &c 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



31^ 



SONG XXXIII. 

DEAR IMAGE OF THE MAID I LOVE. 



£3f 

— 4f 








1^ 



-J- — -«-— 



Dear i - mage of the maid I love, Whofe 

iEppiilillp 

charms yoii bring to view ; In ab-fence fome de- 






!BBB3Btsta!~" 




light 1 feel, By gazing ftill on you ; De- 







barr'd her fight, by tyrant power, How wretched 






wretched fhould I be. But that I chear each 



'^^- 



^■^-■^z-^lt: 



^-a-~3r »■- - 



^^S 



WIiWZ 



-zw: 



lonely hour, by gazing ftill on thee, by gazing 



312 



THE EDINBURGH 



l'^'*)^ 









ilill on thee, by gaz-iag ftill on thee.. 

Oh ! cou'd I call this fair one mine, 

What rapture fliou'd I feel ; 
Oh 1 cou'd I prefs that lorm divine, 

Each hour my blefs wou'd feal : 

But ah ! deprived of all her charms. 

My foul can find no reil : 
J^nd fhou'd fhe blefs another's arms* 

Defpair wou'd fill my breaft. 



MUSICAL MlSCEdLLANY. 



313 



SONG CXXXIV. 

POOR SILLY FAN. 



±> 




e=; 




i 



zb^ 



f 



The fields were gay, and fweet the hay. Our 






gypfies fat upon the grafs ; Both lad and lafs 



by you were fed, 'Twas all to cheat poor fil- 



Igpli^i: 



E3EE 



rfcrzeirk 



ly Fan. The fields were gay, and fweet the 






gz£ 



hay, Our gypfies fat upon the grafs, upon the 



i-:ET-^-i-:^■ 



F I ^"^^^ F " ^P~F — ^ -•- j~ 



grafs : Both lad and lafs by you were fed, by 
Vol. II. C c 



31^4 



THE EDINBURGH 



i^P^jfeHi 



you were fed, 'Tv/as all to cheat poor fil - - ly 



S 



Whene'er we meet, with kliTes fweet ; 

With fpeeches foft you won my heart ; 
The hawthorn buih fliou'd make you blufh, 

'Twas there you did betray my heart. 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



115 



SONG CXXXV. 

BATCHELORS HALL. 






!fi: 



,rcr:e 



-fe 






To Batchelors hall we good fellows invite, ^ 



iiipi^p 



To partake of the chace, that makes up our de- 







light : We have fpirits like fire, and of health fuch 






a flock, That our pulfe flrikes the feconds as 



true as a clock : Did you fee us you'd fwear, as 



we mount with a grace •, Did you fee us you'd- 

CC2. 



2l6 



THE EDINBURGH 



mm 



i=tesi 




fwear, As we mount with a grace, That Di-a-na 



m 



^^^^ 



^^ 



had dubb'd fome new gods of the chace, That 



iiiplipii^ 



Dl-a-na had dubb'd fome new gods of the chace. 



—a- 



m^ 



Hark a -way, hark away, All nature looks gay. 



ppil^ii 



And Aurora with fmiles ufh-ers in the bright day, 

Dick Thickfet came mounted'upon a fme black, 
A better fleet gelding ne'er hunter did back: 
Tom Trig rode a bay, full of mettle and bone. 
And gayly Bob Buxon rode proud on a roan ; 
But the horfe of all horfes that rivall'd the day, 
Was the Squire's Neck-or-nothing, and that was a 
grey. 



r 



MUSICAL MISCELLANT, 



Hark away, hark away, 

While our fpirits are gay, 

Let us drink to the joys of the next coming day. 

Then for hounds there was Nimble, fo well that 

climbs rocks. 
And Cocknofe, a good one at fcenting a Fox, 
Little Plunge, like a mole, who with ferret and fearch. 
And beetle-browed Hawks-eye, lo dead at a lurch: 
Young Sly-looks, that fcents the ftrong breeze from 

the South, 
And mufical Echo-well, with his deep mouth. 
Hark away, &c. 

Our horfes, thus all of the very bed blood, 

'Tis not likely you'll eafily find fuch a ilud ; 

And for hounds our opinions with thoufands we'ij" 

back, (pack . 

That all England throughout can't produce fuch a 
Thus having defcribed you dogs, horfes, and crew^ 
Away we fet off, for the Fox is in view. 

Hark away, &c. 

Sly Reynard's brought home, while the horns found 

a call, 
And now you're all welcome to Bachelor's hall 
The favory Sir-loin grateful fmoaks on the board, 
And Bacchus pours wine from his favourite hoard 5 
Come on then, do honour to this jovial place, (chace. 
And enjoy the fweet pleafures that fpring .from the 
Hark away; &:q.. 



318 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG CXXXVI. 

COTCHELIN SAT ALL ALONE. 



Cotchelm fat all alone, Not a foul beflde her. 





^ 




N— F- 



While from Teddy, who was gone. Oceans did 



w---^ 



^lilsi^ llgp 



divide her. His pipes which ihe'd been us'd to 
hear, Carelefs left behind him : She thought fhe'd 



p 




try her wOes to chear, Till once again (he'd find 



m^ 



m 



I 



sgEgi 



z—zzieziEgzze: 



him. 'Twill not do, you loodle loo, Arrah, now 




^^^^^^- 



fee ca-fy ! Ted was born with grief to make Cot- 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 319 



li^gg^s 



chelin run cra-zy. 

She "takes them up and lays them down/ 

And now her bofom's panting ; 
And now (he'd figh, and now (he'd frowOj 

For Teddy ftill was wanting ; 
And now fhe plays her pipes again, 

The pipes of her dear Teddy, 
And makes them tune his fav'rite ftrainj 

Arrah, be eafy Paddy ! 
Ah ! 'twill not do you loodle loo, 

Arrah ! now be eafy, 
Ted was born with grief to makcj 

Cotchelin run crazy. 

Teddy from behind a bufh, 

Where he'd long been lift'ning 1 
Now like light'ning forth did rufh. 

His eyes with pleafure gliitningj 
Snatching up the pipes he playM, 

Pouring out his pleafure, 
Whilft half delighted, half afraid, 

Kate the time did meafure, 
Ah that will do, my loodle loo^ 

Arrah ! now Pm eafy, 
Ted was born with joy to make 

Cotchelin rua crazy. 



32^ 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG CXXXVII. 

JAACK RATLIN" WAS THE ABLEST SEAMAN. 






siinsi 



Jack Ratlin was the ableft feaman, None like 



_» — ij j — {—:—] : — > — 

^^^^ — ^ — ^. 

him could hand, reef, and fleer : No dang'rous 



:dl: 



xzz-:p_^zs: 



-i — 



toil but he'd encounter, With Iklll and in 






contempt of fear. In nght a lion : the bat- 

""' Q — y — r E" 



±3T:jq5:d:zzzz2:fZZT=5=Ezz-:: 
:rt§zzfezzc 



feii* 



-k- — ^ 



tie end - ed^ Meek as the bleating lamb he'd 

liiipp^lpgEpig 

prove : Thus Jack had nianners, courage, me- 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



321 



MB 



— ^ 






rit, Yet did he figli, and all for love. 



The fong, the jeft, the flowing liquor, 

For none of thele had Jack regard : 
He, while his mefsmates were caroufing, _ 

High fitting on the pendant yard. 
Would think upon his fair one's beauties, 

Swore never from fuch charms to rove 5 
That truly he'd adore them living, 

And dying figh — to end his love. 

The fame exprefs the crev/ commanded 

Once more to view their native land, 
Amongft the reft, brought Jack fome tidings, 

Wou'd it had been his love's fair hand ! 
Oh fate ! her death defac'd the letter j 

Inftant his pulfe forgot to move ; 
With quiv'ring lips, and eyes uplifted. 

He heav'd a figh— and dy'd for love' 



322 THE EDINBURGH 

SONG CXXXVIII. 

Tune—" Jack Ratlm -was the ahlefl Sean^un.'' 

Behold the man that is unlucky, 

Not thro' negle6i:, by fate worn poor ; 
Tho' gen'rous, kind v/hen he was wealthy. 

His friends to him are friends no more ! 
He finds in each the fame like fellow. 

By trying thofe he had relieved ; 
Tho* men fhake hands, ^h-ink health's, gzt mellow,, 

Yet men by men are thus deceiv'd. 

Where can he find a fellow creature 

To comfort him in his diftrefs ? 
His old acquaintcince proves a ftranger^ 

That us'd his friendiliip to profefs. 
Altho' a tear drop from his feeling, 

His felfifn heart cannot be mov'd ; 
Then what avails his goodly preaching, 

Since gen'rous deeds cannot be prov'd. 

But fo it is in life among us, 

And give mankind their judly due, 
'Tis hard to fmd one truly gen'rous, 

We all, at times, find this too true j 
But if your friend he feels your forrow^ 

His tender heart's glad to relieve ; 
And when he thinks on you to-morrow, 

He's happy he had that to givCo 



MU31CAL MISCELLANY. 



32: 



SONG CXXXIX. 

ADIEU, ADIEU, MY ONLY LIFE. 

A-dieu, adieu, my on-ly life, My horiour 
calls me from thee : Remember thou'rt a fol- 



iiiyiisiiiiiii 



dier's wife, Thofe tears but ill be - come thee, 

±:=:iij=4!:!Zijzil:x:^r^zriJzzz,?!ETzP:z- 



What tho' by du - ty I am call'd Where thun- 

zfc:z:zz=i-M:±zzz±T^z:izi]lzz-T 

^ii2:p±^i-fT:^:3:EZzfzx^z-EzJ^ztS:: 

dring cannons rattle •, Where valour's felf might 

::ii::^r:z~z:zzzz::f:i::zz:z43-:i"Zi:izg:z 



ftaud appail'd, Where valour's felf might ftand 



3^4 



TH« EDINBURGH 



.— -.^,- 




appall'd ; When on the wings of thy dear love> 



M: 



'±±. 



— —_ ^ — .— .-Sf — « _«— I 



V.^ 



To heaven a-bove thy fervent orifons are flown; 



siiiiEii^^ti 



The tender pray'r thou put'ft up there Shall call 



— b ^ — — — I-.-— _>L.i__-». — ._i 1^. 



a guardian angel down, Shall call a guardian 






fr JjJI j^SJdblijalJ 



an - gel down, To watch me in the battle. 



My fafety thy fair truth fhall be. 
As fword and buckler ferving, 

My life ftiall be more dear to me> 
Fecaufe of thy preferving. 



MUSCAL MISCELLANY. 3^. 

'Let peril come, let horror threat, 

Let thundr'ihig cannons rattle, 
I fearkfs feek the conflia's heat, 

AiTur 'd when on the wings of love. 
To heaven above, &c. 

Enough,— with that benignant fmile 

Some kindred god infpirVi thee, 
"Who faw thy boibm void of- guile, 

Who wonder'd and admlr'd thee : 
I go, aflur'd,— my life 1 adieu, 

Tho' thund'ring cannons rattle, 
Tho' murd'ring carnage ftalk in view^ 

When on the wings of thy true love, 
To heaven above, &c« 



Vol. n. B d 



32^ 



THE Epns'BURGH 



SONG CXL. 

MY NANNY, O, 



ilifiiEpgi^ 



-H- 



l5 



While fome for pleafure pawn their heajth. 



'Twixt Lais and the Bagnio, I'll fave my- 
felf, and without flealth, Blefs and ca-refs my 



An - ny, O. She bids more fair t'engage a 



'>J^ -i ^1 — ^--1 y-ka^ms^ ' kasai 1 --»- 



Jove, Than Le - da did, or Da - nae, O : Were 

r-ti]:^;ij^:q;':T:qzzijzpzir:^:Tz;^~zz:z 

tH^±:z£#5±:^=z-2-bz=d;zlt£t|^^ 

I to paiiit the Qn_een of Love^ None dfc VnoM 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 3^7 

fit but Nan --ny, O. 

HoM^ joyfully my fpirlts rife, 

When dancing fiie moves fmely— -O^ 
I guefs what heav'n is by her eyes, 

Which fparkle fo divinely— 0« , 

Attend my vow, ye gods, while I 

Breathe in the bled Britannia, 
None's happinefs I fhall envy, 

As long's ye grant me Nanny— O. 

My bonny, bonny Nanny— O, 
My lovely charming Nanny— -O ; 
I care not tho' the whole v/orld know 
How dearly I love'NaDny—O. 



s^a 



THE EDINBURGM 



SONG CXLT. 

WALY, WALY. 
O waly, waly up yon bank, And waly, 









waly, down yon brae, And waly by yon river 



'^-rzpizi 



-I ^ 

fide, Where I and my love vi^ont to gae. O 



waly, waly, love is bonny A little while when 

?^:b!z:^:zzbiz£z£ztizH^^ 

it is new. But when its auld, It waxes cauld. 



w 



zz::f_7Z3T:T 
tSzSi 



'^' 



"^j""! — i~i ";7^" 



And wears awa' like morning dew 



* 



MUSrCAL MISCELLANt. 22^ 

I lent my back unto an aik,- 

I thought it was a trufl)r tree : 
But firil it bow'd and the» it brake. 

And fae did my faufe love to me. 
When cockle-lhells turn filver bells. 

And muffels grow or cv'. y tree , 
When Froft and Snaw fliall warm us a". 

Then fhall ray love prove true to me. 

Now Arthur's feat fhall be my bed. 

The Oicets iliall ne'er be fyl'd by me 4 
St. Anton's well fhall be my drink, 

Since my true love's lorfaken me. 
O Mart'mas wind, when wilt thou blow. 

And fliake the green leaves off the tree ? 
O gentle death, when wilt thou come. 

And take a life that wearies me ? 

'Tis not the froil that freezes fell. 

Nor blawing fnaw's inclemency ; 
'Tis not fic cauld that makes me cry. 

But my love's heart grown cauld to m§» 
When we came in by Glafgow town, 

We were a comely fight to fee. 
My love was cled in velvet black. 

And I myfell in cramafie. 

But had I wift before I kift. 

That love had been fae ill to win ^ 
D d 3 , 



33^ 



THE^ E©rNBUR®fS 



I'd lock'd my heart in cafe of gold, 
And pin'd it with a filver pin. 

Oh 1 Oh ! if my young babe were borni. 
And fet upon th.Q nurfe's knee, 

And I myfel' were dead and gane. 
For maid again I'ii never be ! 



&ONG CXLII. 

HERE AWA, THERE AWAo 






p35E=~:^3:i:i 



aijif::^- 



Here a - wa, there awa, here awa, Willie, 
Here awa, there awa, here awa hame. Lang 



lave I fought thee,, dear have I bought thee. 



ii5l:f?rf 






g^P54±ff:=g3^:^^i=Ei-33?:~ 



Now I I'a'egottea.my "VYillle agaia».. 



MUSICAL MISCELLANYi 35I 

THrougK the lang mulr I have followed my Willie^ 
Through the lang muir I have foilow^ed him hame : 
Whatever betide us, nought (hall divide us j 
Love now rewards all my forrow and pain. 

Here awa, there awa, here a wa Willie, 
Here awa, there awa, here awa hame ; 
Come Love, believe me, nothing can grieve ftiej:- 
Ika. thing pleafes while Willy's at hame.j 



3^2 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG CXLIII. 

LOVE IS THE CAUSE OF MT MOURNING, 



tg:p§i?z^i^ 



pE^EE 



:zg: 



Z3 




By a murmuring ftream a fair fhepherdefs 



^m 




m 



lay, Be fo kind, O ye nymphs, I oft heard her 



N-r— 



iSi 



m 



m 



^izjumxtnj 



fay. Tell Strephon I die, if he paf - fes this 



fega^iipiisg: 



way, And love is the caufe of my mourn - ing^ 



..^-S^- 




gi^giiss= 



S'alfe ihepherds that tell me of beauty and charms, 




^m 




Deceive me, for Strephon's eold heart ne-ver 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



333 



warms : Yet bring me this Strephon, I'll die 

SF~tJpB"t""T^=5zizfe:iBz:E:3:] 



in his arms, O Strephon ! the caufe cf my 



3s 






^-- 



m^ourn - ing But iirft, faid fhe, let me go, Down 



:H 



-WtBa 



to the lliades below, Ere ye let Strephon know 



That I have lov'd him fo. Then on my pale 






che«?ks no bluihes will ihew That love is the caufe 



— ;^-^ 



of my mourn.-- ing. 



334 



THE EDINBURGH 



Her eyes were fcarce cIosM ivii^a.Streplion came hi. 
He thought flie^lbeen fleeplng, and foftly drew nigh : 
But finding her breathlefs. Oh heavens ! did he cry, 

Ah Chloris ! the caufe of my mourning ! 
Reftore me my Chloris^ ye nymphs ufe your art. 
They fighing replfd, Twas yourfelf (hot the dart, 
Thaft wounded the tender young Oiepherdefs' heart. 
And kiil'd the poor Chloris with mourning. 
Ah ! then is Chloris dead'! 
Wounded by me ! he faid, 
I'll follow thee, chafte maid, 
Down ro the fiient fhade ! 
Then on her cold fnowy breaft leaning his head, 
Expii'd the poor Strephon with mourning ! 



SONG CXLIV. 

AT POL WART ON THE GREEN. 





lie 



At Polwart on the green, If you'll meet me 




'^^m^m 



the morni Where laffes do gonvene, To dance 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



335 



about the thorn. A kindly welcome'you Ihail 




meet Frae her wha likes t» view A lover and a 




ligiglSi 



lad compleat, The lad and io - vsr you. 

Let dorty dames fay na, 
As lang as e'er they pleafe, 
Seem caulder than the fnaw, 
While inwardly they bleeze : 
But I will frankly (haw my mind. 

And yield my heart to thee 3 
Be ever to the captive kind, 

That langs nae to be free. 

At Polwart on the green,- 
Amang the new mawn hay, 
With fangs and dancing keen, 
We'll pafs the heartfome day : 
At night, ifheds be o'er thrang laid. 

And thou be twin'd of thine. 
Thou flialt be welcome, my dear lad, 

To take a part of mine. 



33^ 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG CXLV. 

BLEST AS THE IMMORTAL GODS IS lIEe 




slfe^spS^ 



Bleft as th' immortal gods is he, The youth 



iffiE 



.XL ---A-— -_ — ^ I ®.z.._4 »^ , 

;fe 0-'^^--9-^-i-4~f-fi'P—f~f-f~^— 



who fondly fits by thee, and hears and fees thee 






all the while, So foft - ly fpeak, and fweetly 



siggiSiiiii 

fmile. 'Twas this bereav'd my foul of reft, 

:hz-z-^T:wztzpr-Z~JW~~f;Z^ 

And rais'd fuch tumults in my breaft ; For while 



pligllEil 



illl 



1 gaz'd, in tranfport tollj My breath was gone 



1 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 337 



My voice was loft. 

My bofom glow'd, the fubtile flame 
Ran quick thro' all my vital frame : 
O'er my dim eyes a darknefs hung, 
My ears vi^ith hollow murmurs rung. 

In dewy damps my limbs were chiUM, 
My blood with gentle horrors thrill' d. 
My feeble pulfe forgot to play, 
I fainted, funk, and d'y'd away ! 



YoL. n. F f 



33' 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG CXLVI. 

JOHN HAlf's L-ONNY LASSIE. 






tr. 



By fmooth winding^Tay a Twain Vas reclining, 
Aft cry'd he, Oh hey ! maun I flili live pining 



tr. 



S3i3z3r5:;:rirtoip:t±ljZ3=z=.fdte 



Myfell thus a ---.way, And darena dif- cover 

ir. 






To my bon - ny lafs that I am her lover. 






N'aemair it wilihid^f, the flame waxes friongerj 

ir. 



EE^__J^_ J ^ 



If file's -not my bride, my days are nae longer 



MtTSICAL MISCELLANY.. 
ir. ^—^ \ fr. 



339 




Then I'll tak' a heart, and try at a yen- 

fr. 



turcj Maybe, e'er v/e part, my vows may con- 






tent her. 

She's fredi as the fprltig, and fweet as Aurora, 
When birds mount and fmg, bidding day a good 

morrow : 
The fv/ard on the meadj ennamell'd with daiOes, 
Lock wiLher'd and dead, when twin'd of her graces. 

But if flie appear v/here verdure invite her, 

The fountains run clear, and the iiov/ers fmell the 

fweeter.- 
' Tis heaven to be by, when her wit is a flowing, 
Her fmiles and bright eye fet my fpirits a-glowing. 

The mair that I gaze, the deeper I'm wounded ; 
Struck dumb v/ith amaze, my mind is confounded ^ 
I'm all in a lire, dear maid, to carefs ye, 
For a' my defite is Hay's bonny Lailie.. 



34© 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG CXLVIT. 

THE BONNIEST LASS IN a' THE WARLB, 







f^Sif^ 



Look where my dear Hamllia fmiles, Hami* 



^^^^^M 



ii-a heav'nly charmer ; See how with all their 



tr. 



tfs^irfr 









arts and wiles the loves and gra - ces arm 

her. A blufh dwells glowing on her cheek, 

-^ — 



1 



Fair feat of youthful pleafure, There love in 



-^- 



-^- 



j_ 



fmil - ing language fpeaks, There fpreads the 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



^r 



^ M± ttm- 



iiiiliil^ 



ro--fy trea-fure, 

O faireft maid, I own thy power, 

I gaze, I figh, I languifli. 
Yet ever, ever will adore, 

And triumph in my anguifli. 
But eafe, O charmer, eafe my care, 

And let my torments move thee y 
As thou art faired of the fair, 

fSo 1 the deareft love thee. 



"Eey, 



34^ 



•f EFE EDli^BURGB 



SONG CXLVIIL 

COPORAL CASEY. 



When I was at home, I was merry and frif- 
.-h^__-A,— ^ K— ^^ ^. N 



ffe^£|^|=|;^jz||^S 



ky, My dad kept a pig, and my mother fold 

4-. 



;i=i 




i=l^|ElEliii 



whifkv : My uncle was rich, but would never 



beea-fy, Till I was inlifted by Corporal Ca. 



{cy. Oh ! rub a dub, row de dow, Corporal 



m^^^m 



Cafey, rub a dub, row de dow, Corporal C^fey 



I^USKiAL MISCELLANY. 



p^^-ii^pp 



My dear little Sheelah, I thought would run 

— U — ~ — — ^"^ "" " 

crazy, Oh ! When I trudg'd away with tough 




Corporal Cafey. 

I march'd from Kilkenny,, and as I was thinking 
On Sheelah, my heart in my bofom was finking 5 
But foon I was forc'd to look frelh as a daifey, 
For fear of a drubbing from Corporal Cafey. 
Och ! rub a dub, row de dow, Corporal Cafey f 
The devil go with him ! I ne'er could be lazy, 
He ftuck in my Ikirts fo, ould Corporal Cafey, 

"We went into battle, I took the blows fairly 
That fell on my pate, but they bother'd me rarely 5 
And who fhould the firll be that dropt^r— why, an't 

pleafe ye, 
It was my good friend, honeft Corporal Cafey : 
Och ! rub a dub, row de dow. Corporal Cafey. 
Thinks I you are quiet, and I fhall be eafy, 
So eight years I fought without Corporal Cafey> 



44 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG CXLIX. 

MY DEARY IF THOU DIE. 

.^ <ES¥g.j — ! rzr— 1 -;: — ' ^ — 1"^ 



rjf:iq:H-m^ 









'd--^~-+-^ 



c« 



Love never more iliall give me pain, My fan- 

ir. tr. 



cy's fixt on thee j Nor ever maid my heart fhall 
gain, My Peg - gy if thou die. Thy beau- 






ty doth fuch pleafure give, Thy love fo true 
to m.e, .Without thee I can ne -ver live, My 



ili|iil|ifeE=EE 

dea - ry if thou die. 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 345 

If fate fhall tear thee from my bread, 

How (hall I lonely ftray ? 
In dreary dreams the night I'll wafle, 

In fighs the filent day. 
I ne'er can fo much virtue find, 

Nor fuch perfe£l:ion fee : 
Then I'll renounce all woman-kind, 

My Peggy, after thee. 

No new-blown beauty fires my hearts 

With Cupid's raving rage, 
But thine which can fuch fweats impart, 

Mud all the world engage. 
'Twas this, that like the morning fun, 

Gave joy and life to me ; 
And when it's deftin'd day is done, 

With Peggy let me die. 

Ye powers that f mile on virtuous love, 

And in fuch pleafure fliare ; 
You whp it's faithful flames approve, 

With pity view the fair. 
Reftore my Peggy's wonted charms, 

Thofe charms fo dear to me 5 
Oh ! never rob them from thefc arms : 

I'm lofl, if Peggy die. 



346 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG CL. 

SAV/ YE NAE MY PEGGY, 



-^=:i^fel3E 



.-. - ^ ^^p-.j-j.-.-j-.- 

't- i — — Kiff^i — ~~r"" 

baw ye nae my Peg ^j^/, ;^.;.. yo nae my 
•^^o"g75 ^■>aw ye nae my Peggy coming o'er 

_I1 J._IIX_~ ._..-^3"".1^ 






-n — r 






tLe lf.t ? Sure a frner creature Ne'er was 









compleat etich feature, 






u 



So divine is fr.e. O how Peg - gy charms 

_, ^'■^ " -f ■ { '— - ij""^ 'a . I __, _„_^i_ 

n ~ ' zz 



.e^ c\'rY Jcuk i.ul x'i, uiiio ...^^ Lv'iy th ""^K. 



Musical miscellany. ' 347 



alarms \n e, Left fce love not me. Peg - gy 

ilo.ii dif- CO -verj Nought but cliarnis all over, 
.'c 1-idG me love her, that's a law 



i? 

^ 




W^. 


d.: 




Na - 


• I ^iCt _- 


An 




tr. 






-rr 






-™ 



to me. 

V/ho would leave a lover, 
To become a rover ? 
'No, I'll ne'er give over. 

Till I happy be. 
For unce love inlpires me, 
As her beauty hres me. 
And her abfence tires me. 

Nought can pleafe but flie. 
When I hope to gain her, 
Fate feems to detain hej, 
Could I but obtain her, 

Happy would I be - 
I'll ly down before her, 
Blefs, figh, and adore' her, 
With faint looks imiplore her, ' 

Till fne pity me,. 



34S 



THE EDINBURGH 



SONG CLI. 

MY AIN KIND DEARY, O, 



Will ye gang o'er the lee-rigg, My ain 
kind dea - ry O, And cuddle there fae^kind- 



-^~e~ ^ :z^. 



ly, Wi' me, my kind deary O- At thor - nie 



:®z:xr: 



dike, and bir - ken tree, We'll dafF, and ne'er 



, b JS-T— — b 



be vvea - ry, O ; They'll fcug ill een frae you 



^. 



g^feapE 



2nd me. Mine ain kind deary Or 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 349 

Nae iiei*ds \vi' kent, or colly there, 

Shall ever come to fear ye, O ; 
But lavVor^ks, whiftling in the aii?j 

Shall woo^ like me, their deary, O \ 

While others htrd their lambs and ewesj 

And toil for warld's gear, my jo. 
Upon the lee my pleafure grows, 

Wi' you, my kind deary, O. 



Vol. II. G ^ 



\<0 



THE EDINBURGM 



SONG CUL 

ALLAN VVAT£R. 



iliisi^Eiii^Ell 



"What numbers fhaii the mufe repeat ! What 



iliiiiPJiiil 



verfe be found to praife my Annie ? On her 
ten thoufand gra - ces wait, Each fwain admires 



T,nd owns (lie's bon - nv. Since firft (lie trode 



lii 



iPpa^SlEfiq 



E0E?^3aE: 



3e33=i= 



af3i??f?; 



>^-/ 



the hap - py plain, She fet each youthful heart 

g|||ili|||||;|Ep 

on fire : Eich nyitiph dc?s to her fwain com- 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. , ^^l 



plain That Annie kindlts new d? - - Tire. 

This lovely darling, cfeareft care, 

This new delight, this charming Annicg 
Like fummer's dawn {he's frefh and fai^r. 

When Flora's fragrant breezes fan ye. 
All day the am'rous youths convene. 

Joyous they fport and play before her 5 
All night, when fhe no more is {eeuy 

In blifsful dreams they ftiil adore her. 

Among the crowd Amyntor came, 

He look'd, he lov'd, he bow'd to Annie 5 
His rifmg fighs exprefs his flame, 

His words were few, his wifhes many. 
With fmiles the lovely paid reply'd, 

Kind ihepherd, why (hould I deceive you ? 
Alas ! your love mufl be dtny'd. 

This deilin'd breafk can ne'er relieve you., 

Young Damon came with Cupid*s art, 

His wiles, his fmiles, his charms beguiling;^ 
He ilole away my virgin heart— 

Ceafe, poor Amyntor ! ceafe be\vaiUng ; 
Some brighter beauty you may find -, 

On yonder plain the nymphs r^re many , 
Then chufe fome heart that's unconiin'd^ 

And leave to Damon his own Annie. 
G g z 



r;t2 



THE EDINBURGH- 



SONG CLIII. 

GREEN GROW THE RASHES, 



>iHS 



There's nought but care on ev'ry haa' In evVy, 



j|9 j^ ipP ^ 

hour that p'lfT^s^ O : V/hat irgniiies the life o' 

-Fi^S:£EE|:|5$3^-531rfe 

man, An' twere not for the laffbs, O ? Green 



rt=- 



grow the rallies, O j Green grow the rafhes, O^ 
The fweetefth ours that e'er I fpenJ Are fpent 



— l^-S^-- K 



— g-- ■ — 1-« 



a - mcng the kilTes, O, 



MtJSCAL MISCELLANt. 3^2 

The warl'y race may riches chace, 
And riches ftill may flee them O 'f 

An' tho' at laft they catch them faft,. 
Their hearts can ne'er enjoy them, O. 
Green grow, &c. 

But gi'e me a canny .hour at e'en, 

My arms about my dearie, O : 
An' warl'y cares, an' warl'y men 

May a' gae tapfailteerie, O I , \_ 

Green grow, &c. 

For you fae doufe ye fneer at this, 
Ye're nought but fenfelefs affes, O ; 

The wifeft man the warl' faw, 
He dearly lov'd the lalTes, O. 
Green grow, &c. 

Auld Nature fwears the lovely dears 

Her nobleft work fhe claffes, O : 
Her prentice han' (he try'd on man,. 

And then fhe made the lalTes, O, 
Green grow, &c. 



^gd- 



354 



'Tl^E- EDiNBUKGH' 



SONG CLIV. 

%'HER'E^S-MY- THUMB i'lL" NE'eR BEGUILF- 
THEE. 



-^- 



j zd5i"'*5'^'^~3iEi"z~^"'& J"' 



Bet--ty ear-]y gone a may - in|]^, JMet 
her lover Willie ilraying, Drift or chance no 

"" . ^ /^ "^z ^ 

matter whithcrjThls we know he reafon'd with- 

^»-£J^-i1-'r — 0— F---H--F-^--y-^f 

her: Mark, dear maid^ the turtles coo - iugj, 
Fondly bil - ling, kind - - ly woo - ing See, how 



¥m 



«v''-ry buili di£-covers happy gajjs of feathei'd 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 35 



±nr:r±:jir=:-zzz: 



JO -vers. 

See, the op'ning blulli of rofes 

All their fecret eharms difclofes ; 

Sweet's the time, ah ' fhort's the meafure y 

Q their fleeting haily pleafure ! 

Q^iickly we muft ihatch the favour, 

Of their foft and fragrant, flavour ; 

They bloom to-day, and fade to-morrow^ 

Droop their headsj and die in forrow. 

Time, my Befs, will leave no traces 
0f thofe beauties, of thofe graces •, 
Youth and love forbid our ftaying 5 
Love and youth abhor delaying •, 
Beared maid, nay, do not fly me |: 
Let your pride no more deny me i 
Never doubt" your faithful Willie : 
There's nty. thumb I'll ne'er beguile thee. 



r,4 



THE EDIN;BURGH 



SONG CLV. 

HER ABSENCE WILL NOT ALTER ME. 



Though diitant far from Jef- fy's charms, I 



iSliglplili 



ftretch in vain my longing arm», Though part. 




m 



ed by the depths of fea, Her abfence fhall not 



ipiaiipiill 



al - ter me. Tho' beauteous nymphs I fee a- 



[—- — Ci 1**-* U r- — 



round, A Chloris, Flo - ra, might be found, Or 






Fhyl-lis with her rov -ing eye ; ijer absence- 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 357 



Txiall not al - ' ter me. 

A fairer face, a fweeter fmile, 

feconftant lovers may beguile, 

But to my lals Fll conPtant be, 

Nor {hull her abfence alter me. 

'i hough laid on India's burning coafl^ 

Or on the wide Atlantic toft, 

My mind from love no pow'r could free^. 

Nor could her abfence alter me, '1 

See how the tlow'r that courts the fan] 
Purfues him till his race is run ! 
See how the needle feeks the Pole, 
Nor diftance can its pow'r controul f 
Shall liielefs flov/'rs the fiin pu'ffue, 
The needle to the Pole prove true j 
Like them (liall I not faithful be, 
Or fliall her abfence alter me ? 

Aik, v/ho has feen the turtle dove- 
Unfinthful to its marrow prove ? 
Or who the bleating ewe has ktn 
Defert her lambkin on the green ;'- 
Shall beads and birds, inferior far 
To us, difphy their love and care ?' 



358 THE EDI^-BURGH 

Shall tliey in union fweet agree, 
And (hall her abfence alter nie ? 

For conqu'ring love is flrong as deaths 
Like vehemnt flames his pow'rful breath, 
Thro' floods unmov'd his courfe he keeps:, 
Ev'n fhro' the fea's devouring deeps : 
His vehement flames my bofom burn, 
Unchang'd they blaze till thy return j 
My faithful Jeily then fhall fee, 
Her abfence has not aker'd m<:. 



SONG GLVr. 

LOCH-EROCH SIDE. 



As I came by Loch Eroch fide, The lofty 
hills furveying, The v/ater clear, the heather 

ir. 



blooms Their fragrance fweet conveying. I 



MUSIrCAL MISCELLANY. 



3S> 




-^ — 1^ — Kr - -i,^- 

met unfought, my lovely maid, I found her like 



May-morning ; With graces fweet and charms (o 




rare, her perfon all adorning. Perfon all adorning. 

How kind her looks, how bleft was I, 

When in my arms I pref&'d her ! 
And (he her wifhes fcarce conceal'd. 

As fondly 1 carefs'd her. 
She faid, if that your heart be true, 

If conftantly you'll love me, 
I heed not caies, nor fortune's frowns. 

Nor ought but death fhall move me. 

But faithful, loving, true, and kind, 

Forever you fliall find me, 
And of our meeting here fo fweet, 

Loch Eroch fide will mind me. 
Enraptui'd then, " My lovely lafs I 

I cry'd, no more we'll tarry, 
We'll leave the fair Loch Eroch fide, 

fox lovers fooa fhould marry." 



3t5p TME EDINEURGM 



SONG CLVil. 

YOUNG PEGGY. 

Tu NIL— Loch Eroch Sick. 

Young Peggy blooms our bonnieft lafs., 

Her blufh is like the moTiiing, 
The rofy dawn, the fpringing grafg, 

With early gems adorning : 
Her eyes outihine the radiant beams 

That gild the pafiing fliower^ 
And glitter o'er the chryftal ftreams. 

And chear each freih'ning tlowetc 

Her lips more than the -cherries bright^ 

A richer dye has grac'd them. 
They charm th' adminng gazer's fight 

And fweetly tempt to tafte them : 
iler foiile is as the ev'ning mild, 

When feath'red pairs are courting, 
And little lambkins wanton wild, 

In playful bands difpoiting. 

Were fortune lovely Peggjy's foe, 
Such fweetnefs would relent her. 

As blooming fprlng unbends the brow 
Of furly, favage winter. 

D<itra£lion'3 eye no aim can gain :^ 
Her winning pow'rs to ieflen : 



MOfflCAL MISCELLANY. . 36 1 

And fretfu! envy grins in vain, 
The poifon'd tooth to fallen. 

Ye pow'rs of Honour, Love, and Truth, 

From ev'ry ill defend her ; 
Infpire the highly favoured youth 

The diftinies intend her 5 
Still fan the fweet connubial 'flame 

Refponfive in each bofom ; 
And blefs the dear parental name 

Wiih many a filial blofTom. 



Vol. II. H k 



i 



"^62 



THE LDINCURGH 



SONG CLVIII. 

THE LASS OF LIVING-TON. 



Paiii'd witli her flighting Jamie's love, Bell 



dropt a ,tearj Bell dropt a tear-; The gods de- 

::xri:zi:: 






rjisiE+Ef; 



fcended from a - bove. Well pleas'd to hear, wel^ 






V_^ 



SE|ESfe|EEE£E|B|te 

pleas'd to hear : They heard the praifes of the 



youth, From her ov/n tongue, From her own 






tongue, Who now coiiVerted was to truth, And 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 3^3 



thus ilie' fung, and thus rnQ iunr. 

BlefsM days v/hen our ingenuous fex, 

More frank and kind— more frank and kind. 
Did not their lovM adorers vex. 

But ipoke their mind— rut -poke i;a;>ri)-::i.: , 
Repenting now, flie promib'd fair, 

WouM he return— woii'd he return^ 
She ne'er again wou'd give him care, 

Or caufe him mourn — -or caufe him mourn. 

Why lov'd I the deferving fwain, 

Yet ftill thought fhame— yet ilili thought lliamej. 
When he my yielding heart did gain, 

To own my flame — to own my flame ? 
V/hy took I pleafure to torment, 

And feem too coy— and feem too coy. 
Which makes me now, alas ! lament 

My flighted joy— my flighted joy ? 

Ye Fair, while beauty's in its fprlng, 

Own your defire — own yonr delire, 
While love's young pow'r wltii his foft v.'ing; 

Fans up the fire'--— fans up the iire ! 
O do not v/itli a filly pride. 

Or, low defign— or lowdefign, 
Refufe to be a happy bride, 

But anfwer plain — but anfwer plaiii-. 



3^4 



THE EDINBURGH 



Thus the fair mourner wail'd her crime 
With flowing eyes, — with flowing eyes, 
Giad Jamie heard her all the time/ 
With fweet fiirprize,— with fweet furprife. 
Some god had led him to the grove. 
His mind unchanged, — his mind unchang'd^ 
Flew to her arms, and cryM, my love, 
I am reven^'dj— I arn reveng'd. 



SONG CLIX. 

LOGIE OF BUCHAN. 






'^4-p 



3 



O Lo - gie vcf Buchan, O Loglethe Laird, 



Eii±:r±„|::bi:: 









They lia'e ta'en awa' Jamie that delv'd in the 



'MZ 



HE 



^-izwzt-r 



MZR'3:f:^c:izfizc^^ 

yard ! Who playM on the pipe, wi the viol fae 

^ \^ S^-JL — ._ Li \. — L-J \^.^ 



foia', They ha'e taen awa Jamie the flow'r q* 



MUSICAL M13CELLANT. 



i<?r 



Cnerus. 



Ei_^±ii±x„±:]:„X:^ , 

them a\ He faid, think na lang, Isfiie, iho' I 

^|: i1z:±T:=]r:t_b=Tr3=z Ni: 
p:^zi:±Jr±rJr±:-j-=Jz: 



'^i 



gang a - wa ; He faid, Think na lang laiTie, tho 



„4 



P: 



■pzi- 



I gang awa' : For the fimmer is comingj cauld 



:|:irr:-T5rzaE;Lp.zp:z=g 



winters awa, And 1 11 come and fee thee, in 



Si; 






fpite o' them a' 



Sandy has oiifen, has gear, and has l>'ye'; 
A hoiife, and a hadden,, and filler forby : , 
But I'd tak' mine ain Jad, wl' iis ;t. ifF in hi^j hanj,. 
Before Vd ha'e him, wi' his houfes and land. 
He faid, think na lang Iaflie_, &c. 

My daddy looks fiilky, my miniiy looks four v 
They frown upon Jamie, becaufe he is pGor:- 
- H h Q 



366 



THE EDINEUKGH 



Tho' I lo'e tKem as well as a daughter (liould doj 
They are nae half fae dear to me, Jamie, as you. 
He faid, think na lang iaiTiej &c. 

I fit on nij creepie, and fpin at my wh^eel. 
And think on the laddie that lo'ed me fo weel j 
H^ lir.d but ae faxpence, he brak it in twa, 
And he gied me the ha'f o't when he gaed av/a. 

Then hafte ye back, Jamie, and bid^ na awa. 
Then hade ye back, Jamie, and bide na awa. 
Simmer is coming, cauld winter's awa, 
And ye'li come and fee me, in fpite o' them a- 



(jOr-ti G CIjX, . 
THE nun's complaint. 



«™..JL^. 






In this fad and filent gloom loft Leu - i - f a 



-- ,^ ^ ^ ..^ K-i^^T 



■^^ 



pines unknown J Shrouded in a living tomb> 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY 



.-)'■' / 



:r-3n^-: 3 -^«besi — :^ 




Doom'd to pine a — ion.j. Midft the 






:^|^±5^P 



is^_^_^ , 



id=dd- 






s^^azzag; 



■™i^' 



t 



fi - lent {liades of woe, Tears of fond re - 



^r^-^—^--^ 




d% 






%i^ 



gret fhall flow, Tears cf fond re-gret--- 






l^ 



'. -et (liail -».»-.-- ilow, . Tell, foft 




lute,, ill plaintive tone, Sad Lou - - i - - fa's h?.p 



s:±-qgz 



3^_. 



kfs moan, Midfl the fi - lent fhades of woe^ 



3^8 THE EDINBURGH 

Still the tears mud fiovv. 



Ye dark clouds, who fail along, 
Hide me. in your fliade profound i- 
V/hifp'ring; breezes bear rny fong;, 

To the -woods around. 
Should forae pen five lover's feet, 
¥/ander near this fad retreat,, 
Telij foft lute, &c. 

Tell her, love's celefcial tale 
Yiekis no biifs. no joy ii.ipires^. 
Gold religion's icy veil 
Darkens ?dl his fires. 
No foft ray adorns the gloom. 
Round the hapiefs veftars tomb. 
Tell, foft iute, &c. 

Fancy'^ flame within my breaPc,. 
Faintly glo.7S with vital heat *, 
Tei'^d-r paniocs fink to reft — 

8:v\ my pulies beat ! 
Soon ■ le Ian_^uid eyes fiiall dole, 
Dcatii"- -old d...r fhall ftfal my woes I 
Tell, foft lute^, &c. 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY. 



3^9 



SONG CLXI. 

THE KNITTING GIRL. 



r^\ 



in~'^zi!iJZ:xiiiZi:iiziiriiir!J:x"":"~=i ^f:ziEZiL 



Hark, Phiiiis, hark, thro' yon - der groves 



•=^*fS@SzzS 



-P""t^-^z~ 



Refponfive Nature fmgs i Love feeks the deep 



embowerd alcove, and lends uvift Fancy wings. 



i^:zz?zz:ziz5: :3zEzE: 'int 






Phillis heard, but Phillis fat, filent knitting, 

tr. 

S^Ez^iptipZLliii^ 

filent knitting at her cottage gate : Phillis heard 
but fat filent knitting at her cottage gate. 



7© 



'HE EDINBURGH 



Enthron'd, he's-^feated in thine eye. 
Where he, tho' blind, can fee 

Himfelf reile£led in each iigh. 
He bids me breathe for thee. 
Phillis heard, <Scc. 

Lo ! towards the bow'r he beckons now, 

O rife, and come away ! 
From ill to ward thee is his vow, 
To guard J and not betray. 
PhilUs heard, but Phillip fit 
No longer knitting at her cottage gate. 



SONG CLXII. 

ALLOA HOUSE* 



iZT'^z: 



„_,SS^_j. 



The fpring time return Sj and cloaths the 



green plains, And Ailoa fhines more chearful 
and gay j The iark tunes his tliroat, and tho- 



MUSICAL MISCELLANY.. 



37^ 



:zr]3:=z: 






neighbouririg fwains (ing merrily round me v/here- 
e - ver I ftray j But San - dy no more re - 
turns to my view i No fpring time me chears, 
no mu - fic can charm. He's gone, and I fear 

me for e - ver a-dieu! Adieu, ev'ry pleafufe 



.-^izj-I]^ — i"^T -H- 



this bo - fom can warm ! 

O Alloa houfe ! hovt^ much art thou chang'd ! 
How filent, how dull to me is each grove ! 
Alone I here wander where once we both rang'd, 
Alas ! where to pleafe me my Sandy once ilrove I 



3/-^ 



THE EDINBURCKj 



Here Sandy I heard the tales tli^tyou told j 

Here liitened too fond, whenever you fang ; 

A.m 1 erow!5 lefs fair, then, 'that you are turn'd cold ? 

Or fooliili, believ'd a falie, iiattering tongue ; 

So fpoke the fair jr.aid •, when forrow's keen pain, . 
And (hame, her iaft fault' ring aee^nts fuppreft : 
For fate at that moment brought back her dear 

iw'-ain, 
Who heard, and, with rapture, his Neily addrell : 
My Nelly ! my fair, I come ; O my Love, 
No power ill all thee tear again from my arm. 
And, Nelly ! no more thy fond ihepherd reprove, 
Wlio ]:nows thy fair wortli, and adores all thy 

charms. 

She heard •, and nev/ joy (liot thro' her foft frame, 
And will you, my love ' be true ? (he replyVu 
And live I to meet my fond ihepherd the hmie ? 
Oi dream 1 that Sandy will make me his bride ? 
O NcUy ! I Hve to find thee (tiil I ind ; . ' 
Still true to thy fwain, and lovely as true •, 
Then adieu I to all forrow : what foul is fo blind 
As not to live happy for ever with you ? 



AT £ 

An. 



DJNEURGH : ") 

■ GRAN r b'' AIQIR, > 
nno 1793. 3 



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