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GREEK-ENGLISH    LEXICON 


WW 

A 


GREEK-ENGLISH    LEXICON 


COMPILED     BY 


HENRY    GEORGE    LIDDELL,    D.D. 

LATE    DEAN    OF    CHRIST    CHURCH, 


AND 


ROBERT    SCOTT,    D.D. 


LATE  DEAN  OF  ROCHESTER,  ANTi  MASTER  OF  BALLIOL  COLLEGE. 


EIGHTH    EDITION,   REVISED   THROUGHOUT. 


ll>Ti-  (3 


<« 


AMERICAN    BOOK    COMPANY 
NEW  YORK,    CHICAGO,  CINCINNATI. 


PR 

ESL.6 

iqo 


Entered  according  to  Act  of  Congress,  in  the  year  1882,  by 

HARPER    &    BROTHERS, 

In   the   Office   of  the   Librarian   of  Congress,   at   Washington. 


All  rights  reserved. 


C.  P.    2. 


PREFACE   TO   THE   SEVENTH    EDITION. 


THE  First  Edition  of  this  Lexicon  appeared  in  1843,  and  was  stated  to  be  'based  on  the 
German  work  of  Francis  Passow.'  In  the  Preface  to  our  Fourth  Edition  (1855)  it  was 
said  that  'we  had  omitted  the  name  of  Passow  from  our  Title-page, — assuredly  not  from 
any  wish  to  disown  or  conceal  our  obligations  to  that  Scholar,  without  whose  Lexicon,  as  a 
base  to  work  upon,  our  own  would  never  have  been  compiled, — but  because  our  own  was 
now  derived  from  so  many  and  various  sources,  that  we  could  no  longer  fairly  place  any 
one  name  in  that  position  *.'  This  argument  applied  with  still  greater  cogency  to  the  Fifth 
Edition  (1861),  which  was  very  much  augmented  and  improved,  not  only  by  continued 
reference  to  the  great  Paris  Thesaurus  (then  drawing  near  to  completion),  but  also  to  the 
Greek-German  Lexicon  of  Rost  and  Palm,  and  to  various  other  sources.  The  Sixth  Edition 
(1869)  was  revised  throughout;  and  though  brevity  was  studied,  the  number  of  pages  was 
increased  by  one  eighth.  Much  of  this  increase  was  due  to  the  length  at  which  the  forms 
of  Verbs  were  treated ;  and  here,  in  particular,  we  must  express  our  obligation  to  the 
excellent  and  exhaustive  Greek  Verbs  Irregular  and  Defective,  by  Dr.  Veitch.  We  referred 
in  some  cases  especially  to  this  work,  and  have  to  thank  him  for  the  great  assistance  we 
have  constantly  derived  from  his  labours. 

In  this,  the  Seventh  Edition,  the  last  that  we  can  hope  to  see  published,  the  whole  work  has 
been  thoroughly  revised,  and  large  additions  made.  But  by  compression,  and  a  slight  enlarge- 
ment of  the  page,  the  bulk  of  the  volume  has  been  reduced  by  ninety  pages.  The  additions 
consist  mainly  of  fuller  references  to  the  classical  authors,  and  a  free  use  of  the  Indices  to 
the  Berlin  Aristotle  and  to  the  Corpus  Inscriptionum  Graecarum. 

We  have  gratefully  to  acknowledge  the  assistance  rendered  us  by  many  scholars.  More 
particularly  must  we  mention  the  names  of  Professors  Drisler,  of  New  York  ;  Goodwin,  of 
Cambridge,  Massachusetts ;  and  Gildersleeve,  of  Baltimore.  Professors  Goodwin  and  Gilder- 
sleeve  have  rewritten  several  important  Articles,  which  their  well-known  Grammatical  learning 
makes  peculiarly  valuable  ;  we  may  specify  the  Articles  on  av,  «,  f-nti,  Hare,  Iva,  O7r<os,  ore,  oirorf, 
ov,  \ir\.  and  irpiv:  the  former  has  also  supplied  some  excellent  additions  to  Attic  law-terms, 
such  as  ypannaT(vs,  Trapaypai/iij,  crvvhiKos,  vfipis,  vTT(op.otria.  Professor  Drisler  has  gone  carefully 
over  the  whole  Book,  and  there  is  hardly  a  page  which  does  not  bear  some  trace  of  his 
accurate  observation. 

« 
In  the  Arratiganent  of  the  work,  it  will  be  found  that  in  Verbs,  the  Grammatical  forms 

come  first ;    then  Etymological  remarks,  inclosed  in  curved  brackets  (  ) ;    then  notices  of  the 

Prosody,  inclosed  in  square  brackets  [  ]  ;  then  the  Interpretation  of  the  word,  with  examples, 

etc.     In  Nouns,  the  Etymological  remarks  have  been  generally  left  at  the  end  of  the  word. 

The  Tenses  of  Compound  Verbs  will  be  found  under  the  Simple  forms,  except  when  the 
Compound  Verb  itself  has  anything  peculiar. 

Adverbs  must  be  sought  at  the  end  of  their  Adjectives. 

The  science  of  Comparative  Philology  has  made  such  rapid  progress  since  the  publica- 
tion of  our  First  Edition  (1843), — in  which  we  had  adopted  for  our  textbook  the  valuable 
litymologisclic  Forschungen  of  Professor  A.  F.  Pott, — that  it  was  necessary  entirely  to  recast 
this  portion  of  our  work.  And  in  doing  so  we  availed  ourselves  of  the  Grundzugc  de>- 
griechischen  Iiiymologie  of  Georg  Curtius,  an  excellent  summary  of  the  most  approved  results 

*   Passow  himself,  after  three  Editions,  omitted  the  name  of  Schneider  from  his  Title-page. 

b 


A 


vi  PREFACE. 

of  modern  inquiry  into  the  relations  of  the  Greek  language  to  Sanskrit  *,  Latin,  Gothic,  Old 
High  German,  Lithuanian,  the  Ecclesiastical  Slavonic,  and  other  cognate  languages.  We 
inserted  these  results  in  a  compendious  form,  and  have  now,  to  save  space,  omitted  special 
references  to  Curtius'  book  :  this  work  has  copious  Indices,  and  the  English  translation  by 
Messrs.  Wilkins  and  England  (Murray,  1N75)  renders  it  easily  accessible  to  all  Students. 

We  have  been  urged  to  incorporate  all  Proper  Names  in  the  Lexicon.  But  this  would  have 
added  so  much  to  the  bulk  of  a  Book,  already  bulky  enough,  that  we  have  been  obliged  to  put 
the  suggestion  aside.  Many  Proper  Names,  however,  appear  in  their  places.  Under  some 
words,  as  'A-o'AAwr,  Ztvs,  etc,  a  short  account  of  their  mythological  bearings  has  been  retained, 
as  important  for  the  young  Student  in  reading  Homer.  Others  are  given  which  have  in 
themselves  some  force  and  significance,  or  present  something  remarkable  in  their  grammatical 
forms,  e.g.  'Ayafitniw,  'HpaxAi/y,  '0&v<t<t(vs.  It  may  be  observed  that  the  proper  names  of 
the  mythological  and  heroic  times  contain  elements  of  the  language  which  sometimes  cannot 
be  traced  elsewhere :   cf.  Zeus,  Stlpios,  etc. 

In  all  these  cases  it  is  difficult  to  draw  a  line  between  what  is  essential  to  general  Lexico- 
graphy and  what  is  not.  We  have  done  this  to  the  best  of  our  judgment ;  and  if  the  line 
waves  more  or  less,  we  must  shelter  ourselves  under  the  plea  that  it  could  hardly  be  otherwise. 
We  subjoin  an  Alphabetical  Catalogue  of  Authors  quoted,  with  a  note  of  the  Edition  used, 
when  the  reference  is  made  by  pages.  The  date  of  each  author's  '  floruit '  is  added  in  the 
margin ;  and,  by  comparing  this  with  the  short  summary  of  the  chief  Epochs  of  Greek  Litera- 
ture prefixed  to  the  Catalogue,  it  will  be  easy  to  determine  the  time  of  a  word's  first  use, 
and  of  its  subsequent  changes  of  signification.  It  will  be  understood,  however,  that  the  age 
of  a  word  does  not  wholly  depend  on  that  of  its  Author.  For,  first,  many  Greek  books  have  been 
lost ;  secondly,  a  word  of  Attic  stamp,  first  occurring  in  Lucian,  Alciphron,  or  later  imitators  of 
Attic  Greek,  may  be  considered  as  virtually  older  than  those  found  in  the  vernacular  writers 
of  the  Alexandrian  age.  Further,  the  Language  changed  differently  in  different  places  at 
the  same  time ;  as  in  the  cases  of  Demosthenes  and  Aristotle,  whom  we  have  been  compelled 
to  place  in  different  Epochs.  And  even  at  the  same  place,  as  at  Athens,  there  were  naturally 
two  parties,  one  clinging  to  old  usages,  the  other  fond  of  what  was  new.  The  Greek  of  Thucy- 
dides  and  Lysias  may  be  compared  in  illustration  of  this  remark.  We  may  add  that,  though  the 
term  '  flourished '  is  vague,  it  is  yet  the  only  one  available,  if  we  wish  to  observe  the  influence  of 
any  particular  Writer  on  Language  and  Literature.  The  dates  have  generally  been  assigned 
with  reference  to  some  notable  event  in  the  life  of  the  Writer :  and  this  is  specified  in  the  case 
of  the  most  eminent  persons.  In  many,  however,  no  specific  note  of  time  can  be  found ;  and 
here  a  date  has  been  taken,  as  nearly  as  it  could  be  fixed,  so  as  to  give  the  age  of  30  or  35.  We 
have  in  these  matters  been  chiefly  guided  by  Mr.  Fynes  Clinton's  Fasti  Hellenici,  and 
Dr.  Smith's  Biographical  Dictionary. 

*  Sanskrit  words  have  been  written  in  English  cha-  ference  to  ch  and/;  the  object  being  to  suggest  to  the 

racters  according  to  the  system  adopted  in  Professor  eye  of  the  reader  the  real  affinity  which  exists  between 

M.  Williams'  Sanskrit  Grammar  /—except  that  U  and  g  cR  and  ^  f  as  in  kirk  and  church),  T  and  tT  (as  in  get  and 

have  been  used  as  the  equivalents  of  ^  and  ",  in  pre-  gem),  notwithstanding  their  difference  to  the  ear. 

Oxford,  October,  1882. 


In  this  Eighth  Edition,  all  corrections  and  additions  that  could  be  made  without  altering 
the  pagination  have  been  inserted  in  the  text.     The  rest  appear  in  the  Addenda. 

H.  G.  L. 
Ascot,  June,  1897. 


I.     SUMMARY  OF  THE  PRINCIPAL  ERAS  IN  GREEK  LITERATURE. 


I. 
11. 

III. 

IV. 


VI. 


VII. 


VIII. 


IX. 


The  Early  Epic  Period,  comprising  the  Iliad  and  Odyssey,  the  Homeric  Hymns,  and  the  Poems  of  Hesiod. 

From  about  800  to  530  A  C,  in  which  Literature  flourished  chiefly  in  Asia  Minor  and  the  Islands :  the  Period  of  the  early 
Lyric,  Elegiac,  and  Iambic  Poets. 

From  530  to  510  A.  C,  the  Age  of  Peisistratus,  etc. ;  the  beginning  of  Tragedy  at  Athens  :  early  Historians. 

From  510  to  470  A.  C,  the  Age  of  ret  Ufpaixa,  in  which  the  Greek  Tragic  Poets  began  to  exhibit,  and  Simonides  and  Pindar 
brought  Lyric  Poetry  to  perfecticn. 

From  470  to  431  A.C.,  the  Age  of  Athenian  Supremacy:  perfeclion  of  Tragedy:  regular  Prose,  Ionic  of  Herodotus  and 
Hippocrates,  Attic  (probably)  of  Antipho. 

From  431  to  403  A. C,  the  Age  of  the  Peloponnesian  War:  perfection  of  the  Old  Comedy:  old  Attic  Prose  in  Pericles' 
Speeches,  Thucydides,  £tc. 

From  403  to  about  336  A.  C,  the  Age  of  Spartan  and  Theban  Supremacy,  and  of  Philip:  Middle  Comedy:  Attic  Prose  of 
Lysias,  Plato,  and  Xenophon :  perfection  of  Oratory,  Demosthenes,  etc. 

From  about  336  A.  C.  to  the  Roman  Times:  (1)  Macedonian  Age:  Prose  of  Aristotle  and  Theophrastus :  New  Comedy. 
(2)  Alexandrian  Age:  later  Epic  and  Elegiac  writers,  Callimachus,  Theocritus,  Apollonius  Rhodius,  etc.,  learned 
Poets,  Critics,  etc. 

Roman  Age :  Epigrammatic  Poets,  Hellenic  Prose  of  Polybius,  etc. :  Alexandrian  Prose  of  Philo,  etc. :  Grammarians.  Then 
the  revived  Atticism  of  Lucian,  the  Sophists,  etc. 


II.    LIST  OF  AUTHORS,  WITH  THE  EDITIONS  REFERRED  TO. 


Achaeus  Eretrieus,  Tragicus    (Aged  40) 

Achilles  Tatius,  Scriptor  Eroticus  (an  imitator  of  Heliodorus)    

Achmes,  Oneirocritica.     Ed.  Kigalt 

Actuarius,  Joannes,  Medicus.     In  Ideler's  Physici  Gr.  Minores      

Acusilaiis,  koyoypa(t>os.     In  Muller's  Fragm.  Historicorum 

Adamantius,  Medicus 

Aelianus,  Rhetor, 


fHist.  Xaturalis  1 
(Varia  Historia  J 


Aelianus.  Tacticus 

Aelius  Dionysius,  Rhetor  et  Grammaticus 

Aeneas  Tacticus  or  Poliorcetes  (At  battle  of  Mantineia) 

Aeschines,  Orator.     In  Oratt.  Attici:  quoted  by  the  pages  of  H.  Stephens (Speech  against  Timarchus, 

at  the  age  of  44) 

Aeschylus.  Tragicus.     Ed.  Dindorf.    (His  first  prize,  at  the  age  of  41) 

Aesopus,  Fabularura  scriptor,  circ.  570  A.  C. :  but  the  present  collections  of  his  Fables  are  spurious 

Aetius,  Medicus 

Agatharchides,  Grammaticus,  etc 

Agathemerus,  Medicus 

Agathias,  Hist.  Byzant 

Agatho,  Tragicus (Gains  the  prize) 

Agesianax,  Epicus.     (Fragm.  in  Plutarch) 

Alcaeus  Messenius,  Elegiacus.     In  the  Anthologia     (Epigram  on  battle  of  Cynoscephalae) 

Alcaeus  Mytilenaeus,  Lyricus.     In  Bergk's  Lyrici  Gr (At  the  war  about  Sigeium) 

Alcaeus,  Comicus  (Vet.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  824 (Contends  with  Aristophanes) 

Alcidamas.  Rhetor.     Ed.  Reisk (At  Athens) 

Alciphro,  Scriptor  Eroticus  

Alcman,  Lyricus.     In  Bergk's  Lyrici  Gr 

Alexander  Actolus,  Elegiacus.     In  the  Anthologia (At  the  court  of  Ptolemy  Philadelphus) 

Alexander  Aphrodisiensis,  Philosophus  

Alexander,  Comicus  (Incert.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  553   , 

Alexander  Trallianus,  Medicus    

A'.i-xis,  Comicus  (Med.).    In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  3.  p.  382 

Amipsias,  Comicus  (Vet.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  701  (The  Ktu/iaoTai  gains  the  prize) 

Ammonius,  Grammaticus  (At  Constantinople) 

Ammonius,  Hermeae  fil.,  Philosophus    

A  mmonius  Saccas,  Philosophus 

Amphilochius,  Ecclesiasticus.     Ed.  Combelis    

Amphis,  Comicus  (Med.)     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  3.  p.  301  

Anacreon  of  Teos,  Lyricus.  |"is  true  £"«»«•}»  collector!  by  Bergkj    (Migrates  to  Abdera) 

'  (Spurious  Poems,  Anacrtonlica  s     " 

Ananius,  Iambographus.     In  Bergk's  Lyrici  Gr 

Anaxajjoras,  Philosophus.     Ed.  Schaubach (Leaves  Athens,  aged  50) 

Anaxandrides,  Comicus  (Med.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  3.  p.  161     (Begins  to  exhibit) 

Anaxilas,  Comicus  (Med.).    In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  3.  p   341 

Anaximander.  Philosophus (30  years  old) 

Anaximenes,  Philosophus 

Anaxippus,  Comicus  (Nov.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  459 

Andocides.  Orator.     In  Oratt.  Attici:  quoted  like  Aeschines    (Imprisoned,  at  the  age  of  52) 

Andromachus,  Medicus 

Andronicus  Rhodius,  Philosophus      (Chief  of  the  Peripatetics  at  Rome) 

b  2 


Floruit  circa 

A.  C. 

P.  C. 

444 

— 

— 

500? 

— 

1300 

575? 

— 

— 

4'5 

— 

'30 

— 

120 

— 

117 

362 

345  . 
484 

=    J 

— 

500 

117? 

— 

— 

50 

416 

57o 

'97 
6c6 

— ■ 

388 

— 

432 

— 

— 

200? 

050 
280 

— 

— 

220 

35°? 

— 

356 

S7<» 

423 

— 

— 

390 

— 

470 

— 

220 

375 

350 

— 

54° 

— 

54° 

— 

45° 
376 

— , 

34° 
580 

— 

544 

— 

303 

— ■ 

4'5 

— 

58 


68 


vm 


LIST   OF  AUTHORS, 


Anna  Comncna,  Hist.  Byzant (27  years  0,d) 

Anthemius,  Mathematicus  (brother  of  Alexander  Trallianus) 

Antidotus,  Comicus  (Med.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  3.  p.  328 

Antigonus  Carystius 

Antimaehus,  Epicus  et  Elegiacus.     Ed.  Schellenberg 

Antipater  Sidonius.     In  the  Anthologia     

Antipater  Thessalonicensis      In  the  Anthologia 

Antiphanes.  Comicus  (Med.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  3.  p.  3    (Begins  to  exhibit) 

Antipho,  Orator.     In  Oratt.  Attici :  quoted  like  Aeschines  (Aged  39) 

Antoninus,  M.  Aurelius,  Philosophus    (Emperor) 

Antoninus  Liberalis  

Aphthonius,  Rhetor  

Apion.  Grammaticus  (Embassy  to  Caligula) 

Apollodorus  (tres,  Comici  Nov.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  pp.  438,  440,  450 


Apollodorus,  M  y thologus     

Apollonius,  Archebuli  til.,  Grammaticus.     Lexicon  Homericum    • 

Apollonius  Dyscolus,  Grammaticus.     (De  Construction,  by  Sylburg's  pages.     De  Conjunct,  et  Adverb.,  in 

Bekker's  Anecdota,  vol.  2.     De  Pronom.,  in  Wolfs  Museum  Antiquitatis.     Historiae  Commentiticu,  Ed. 

Meursius)    

Apollonius  Pergaeus,  Mathematicus  

Apollonius  Rhodius.  Epicus    (At  the  court  of  Egypt) 

Apollophanes,  Comicus  (Vet.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  879 

Appianus.  1  listoricus     

Aquila,  Judaeus (Translator  of  O.T.  into  Greek) 

Araros,  Comicus  (Med.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  3.  p.  273  (First  exhibits) 

Aratus,  Poeta  Physicus.     Ed.  Bekker  (in  which  the  Atooriptta  and  tnra/ura  form  one  continuous  poem) 

Arcadius,  Grammaticus.    Ed.  Barker     

Aichedicus,  Comicus  (Nov.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  435 

Archilochus  Parius,  Iambographus.     In  Bergk's  Lyrici  Gr (Migrates  to  Thasos) 

Archimedes.  Mathematicus.     From  the  Bale  ed (About  37  years  of  age) 

Archippus,  Comicus  (Vet.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  715   (First  prize) 

Archy tas  Tarentinus,  Philosophus  

Aretaeus,  Mcdicus 

Arethas,  Ecclesiasticus 

Aristaenetus,  Script  or  Eroticus     

Aiistagoras,  Comicus  (Vet.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  761     

Aristarchus,  Grammaticus     (At  the  court  of  Ptolemy  Philopalor) 

Aristarchus  Samius,  Astronomus     , 

Aristeas,  de  LXX  (in  Gallandii  Patrum  Bibl.  lorn,  ii.) 

Aristias.  Tragicus 

Aristides,  Rhetor.     Ed.  Jebb     (Hears  Herodes  Atticus) 

Aristides  Quintilianus,  Musicus.     In  the  Antiquae  Musicae  Auctt.  of  Meibomius   

Aristomenes,  Comicus  (Vet.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  730    

Aristonymus,  Comicus  (.Vet.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  698   

Aristophanes,  Comicus  (Vet.).     Ed.  Dindorf.     (The  AairaAtrs,  his  first  play) 

Aristophanes,  Grammaticus 

Aristopho,  Comicus  (Med.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  J.  p.  356  

Aristoteles,  Philosophus.     Ed.  Bekker,  Oxon (Departs  from  Athens,  at  the  age  of  3  7) 

Arrianus,  Historicus  (his  Periplus  cited  by  Hudson's  pages)   (Introduced  to  Hadrian  in  Greece) 

Artemidorus  (Oneirocritica).     Edd.  Rigalt.  and  Reiff.    

Asius,  Elegiacus.     In  Bergk's  Lyrici  Gr 

Astrampsychus  (Oneirocritica).     In  Rigalt.'s  Artemidorus 

Astydamas.  Tragicus  (First  exhibits) 

Athanasius,  Ecclesiasticus (Archbishop  of  Alexandria,  at  the  age  of  about  30) 

Athenaeus.  Grammaticus.     By  Casaubon's  pages  (Mentions  death  of  Ulpian) 

Athenaeus,  Mathematicus  {De  Machinis) 

Athenio,  Comicus  (Incert.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  557 

Autocrates,  Comicus  (Vet.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  891   

Axionicus,  Comicus  (Med.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  3.  p.  530 

Babrius,  Fabularum  Scriptor    

Bacchylides,  Lyricus.     In  Bergk's  Lyrici  Gr (At  the  court  of  Hiero) 

Basilius  Magnus,  Ecclesiasticus    (Bishop  of  Caesarea,  at  the  age  of  59) 

Bato,  Comicus  (Nov.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  499    

Bion,  Poela  Bucolicus  

Bito,  Mechanicus.     In  Mathematici  Veteres;    ed.  Paris  1693     

Caelius  Aurelianus,  Medicus    

Caesarius.  Ecclesiasticus (Brother  of  Gregory  Nazianz. ;  at  the  court  of  Constantius) 

Callias,  Comicus  (Vet.  "I.    In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  735 

Callicrates,  Comicus  (Med.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  3.  p.  536 

Callicratidas,  Pythagoreus.     Fragments  in  Stobaeus    

Callimachus.  Epicus (Librarian  at  Alexandria) 

Callinus  Ephesius,  Elegiacus.     Ed.  Bach 

(allippus,  Astronomus 

Callippus,  Comicus  (Incert.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  561 

Callistratus,  Sophista.     In  Olearius'  Philostratus,  pp.  890  sqq 

Callixenus,  H  istoricus  , 

Cantharus,  Comicus  (Vet.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  835    

Cassius  Iatrosophista.     In  Ideler's  Physici  Gr.  Minores  

Cebes,  Philosophus  (Present  at  the  death  of  Socrates) 

(  ephisodorus,  Comicus  (Vet.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  883 

Cercidas  of  Megalopolis   

Chaeremon,  Tragicus    

Chalcidius,  Philosophus    

Chariclides,  Comicus  (Incert.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  556 

Charito,  Scriptor  Eroticus    

1  haron,  Historicus.     In  Midler's  Fragm.  H  istoricorum _ 

Chio  (Epistolae  xiii,  but  prob.  spurious,  in  Orelli's  Memnon)     


Florui 

circa 

K.C. 

P.C. 

— 

1110 

— 

57° 

35°? 

— 

250? 

— 

4°5 

— ■ 

106 

— 

— 

10 

387 

— 

440 

— 

— 

161 

— 

147? 

— 

315 

— 

38 

33o 

■ — 

260 

— 

140 


138 


220 

— 

200 

— 

407 

— 

— 

140 

— 

'3° 

375 

— 

270 

— 

— 

200? 

302 

— 

700 

— 

250 

— 

415 

— 

400? 

— 

— 

70? 

— 

54°? 

— 

450? 

410 

— 

210 

— 

280 

— 

270 

— 

45° 

— 

— 

160 

— 

100? 

425 

— 

420 

— 

427 

— 

200 

— 

35°? 

— 

347 

— 

— 

124 

— 

160 

700? 

— 

— 

...? 

398 

— 

— 

326 

— 

228 

210? 

— 

35o? 

— 

39° 

— 

340 

— 

50? 

— 

470 

— 

— 

37° 

260 

280 

— 

150? 

— 

35° 

424 

— 

35°  •' 

— 

9 



260 

— . 

73°? 

— 

35° 

— 

•> 



160? 

— 

270 

— 

420 

— 

— 

100? 

399 

— 

402 

— • 

320 

— 

380 

— 

j 

500? 

...? 

5°4 

— 

353 

— 

WITH  THE   EDITIONS   REFERRED   TO. 


Chionides,  Comicus  (Vet.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  5    

Choerilus  Atticus,  Tragicus (His  first  exhibition) 

Choerilus  Samiu-,  Epicus.     Ed.  Nike (Aged  30) 

Choeroboscus,  Grammaticus.     Ed.  Gaisford    

Christodorus,  Poeta.     In  the  Anthologia 

Chrvsippus,  Philosophus   (At  the  age  of  40" 

Chrvsippus  Tyaneus  (ap.  Athenaeum)    

Clean thes,  Stoicus 

Clearchus,  Comicus  (Incert.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  562    

Clemens  Alexandrinus,  Ecclesiasticus.     Ed.  Potter 

Clemens  Romanus,  Ecclesiasticus     (Bishop  of  Rome) 

Cleomedes,  Mathematicus.     Ed.  Bake   

Clitodemus  (or  Clidemus),  Historicus    

Coluthus,  Epicus  

Corinna,  Lyrica.     In  Bergk's  Lyr.  Gr 

Comutus  (De  Natura  Deorum,  publ.  by  Aldus  under  the  name  of  Phurnutus)  (Banished  by  Nero) 

Cosmas  Indicopleustes.     In  Nova  Collectio  Patrum  (Paris  1706) 

Crates,  Comicus  (Vet.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  233 

Crates,  Grammaticus   (Contemporary  with  Aristarchus) 

Cratinus  Major,  Comicus  (Vet.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  15    

Cratinus  Minor,  Comicus  (Med.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  3.  p.  374 

Critias.  Elegiacus  et  Tragicus.     Ed.  Bach (Promotes  recall  of  Alcibiades) 

Crito,  Comicus  (Nov.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  537  

Crobylus,  Comicus  (Incert.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  565 

Ctesias,  Historicus (Physician  to  Artaxerxes) 

Cyrillus,  Ecclesiasticus (Archbishop  of  Alexandria) 

Damascenus,  v.  Joannes,  and  Nicolaus  

Damascius,  Philosophus.     Ed.  Kopp (Schools  at  Athens  closed  by  Justinian) 

Damocrates,  Medicus    

Damoxenus„Comicus  (Nov.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  5:9  

Demades,  Orator.     In  Oratt.  Attici ;  quoted  like  Aeschines (Leads  opposition  to  Demosthenes) 

Demetrius  (duo  Comici).     In  Meineke's  Com  Fragm.  'Wjtq./n  '  *!   ,iQ " 

Demet  rius  Phalereus,  Rhetor.     In  Walz's  Rhetores  Graeci    (Governor  of  Athens) 

Democrates,  Pythagoreus.     Sententiae  gnomicae  in  Gale   

Democritus,  Philosophus     (Aged  30) 

Demon,  Historicus.     Ed.  Siebelis  

Deraonicus,  Comicus  (Incert.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  570  

Demosthenes,  Orator.     In  Oratt.  Attici;  by  Reiske's  pages (First  public  speech,  at  the  age  of  27) 

Dexicrates,  Comicus  (Incert.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  571  _ 

Dicaearchus,  Geographus.     In  Hudson's  Geographi  Giaeci  Minores    

Didymus,  Grammaticus    

Dinarchus.  Orator.     In  Oratt.  Attici:  quoted  like  Aeschines      (At  the  age  of  26) 

Dinolochus,  Comicus  D01  icus 

Dio  Cassius,  Historicus    (Senator  at  the  age  of  25) 

Dio  Chrysostomus,  Rhetor:  quoted  by  Morell's  pages  (Lutetiae  1604) 

Diodes,  Comicus  (Vet.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  838   

Diodorus,  Comicus  (Med.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  3.  p.  543   

Diodorus  Siculus,  Historicus.     Ed.  Wesseling    (His  History  finished) 

Diogenes  Laertius 

Diogenianus.     In  the  Paroemiographi  

Dionysius  Areopagita  

Dionysius.  Comicus  (Med.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  3.  p.  547  

Dionysius  Halicarnassensis.  Historicus,  et  Criticus       Ed.  Reisk.       (The  treatise  De  Compositione  Vtrbomm 

sometimes  by  Upton's  pages  in  the  margin  of  Schafer's  Ed.)     (Contemp.  with  Strabo) 

Dionysius  Periegetes     

Diophantus,  Comicus  (Vet.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  1.  p.  492     

Dioscorides.  Physicus.     Ed.  Sprengel     

Dioxippus.  Comicus  (Nov.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  541  

Diphilus,  Comicus  (Nov.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  37J     

Dosilheus,  Grammaticus  

Doxopater  or  Doxipater,  Rhetor.     In  Walz's  Rhetores  Graeci  

Draco  Stratonicensis,  Grammaticus.     Ed.  Hermann    

Dromo,  Comicus  (Med.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  3.  p.  540  

Ecphantides,  Comicus  (Vet.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  12 

Empedocles.  Poeta  philosophicus.     Ed.  Stun 

Ephippus,  Comicus  (Med.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  3.  p.  322   

Ephorus,  Historicus.     In  Midler's  Fragm.  Historicorum     

Epicharmus.  Comicus  Syracusanus.     In  Ahrens  de  Dialeclo  Doiica (In  the  reign  of  Hiero) 

Epicrates,  Comicus  (Med.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  3.  p.  365 

Epictetus,  Philosophus.     Ed.  Schweighauser    (Expelled  from  Rome  by  Domitian) 

Epicurus,  Philosophus (Establishes  School  at  Athens,  at  the  age  of  35) 

K|ii^enes,  Comicus  (Med.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  3.  p.  537    

In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  887 

In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  505     

By  the  pages  of  Petavius,  in  margin  of  Dindorfs  ed (Bishop  of  Constantia 

in  Cyprus) 

Kra>istratus,  Medicus (At  the  court  of  Seleucus  Nicator) 

Eratosthenes,  Mathematicus.     Ed.  Bemhaidy     (Librarian  at  Alexandria  about) 

Erinna.  Lvrica.     In  Bergk's  Lyrici  Gr 

Eriphus,  Comicus  (Med.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  3.  p.  556 

Erotianus,  Medicus.     Glossary  of  Hippocrates     

Etymologicum  Magnum,  quoted  by  the  pages  of  Sylburg's  Ed 

Euangelus,  Comicus  (Incert.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  572    

Eubulides.  Comicus  (Med.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  3.  p.  559 

Eubulus  Comicus  (Med.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  3.  p.  203     

Kuclides,  Mathematicus     (At  Alexandria) 

Eudocia,  Bvzantina   


Epilycus.  Comical  (Vet.). 
Epinicus,  Comicus  (Nov.). 
Epiphanius,  Ecclesiasticus. 


Floruit  circa 
A.C. 
487 

523 
440 


240 

270 

...t 


IX 


400? 
5°0 


4+9 
210 

454 
350 
411 

...? 

3^4 

401 


345? 
349 
4C0 
299 

317 
...? 
430 
280 
...? 
355 
...? 
320 
to 
336 
487 


47o 

354 
8 


35° 

3° 

...? 

...? 
3  20 


35°? 
460 

444 
368 

35° 
376 

306 
378 
394 
217 


294 
240 
610? 

350? 


...? 

35°? 

375 

350? 


60 

1030? 


43° 


LIST   OF  AUTHORS, 


Eudoxus,  Astronomus,  etc 

Eudoxus,  Comicus  (Nov.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  508 

Eumathius,  or  Eustathius,  Macrcmbolita,  Scriptor  Eroticus    

Eunapius,  Sophista.     Ed.  Boissonade     

Eunicus,  Comicus  (Vet.).     In  Mcineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  856  •  ■ ■■•■■■ 

Euphorio,  Poeta  et  Grammaticus.     Ed.  Meineke (Librarian  at  Antioch.  at  the  age  ol  55) 

Euphro,  Comicus  (Nov.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  486  •; ■••■•  ••••■ 

Eupoiis,  Comicus  (Vet.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  426 (Exhibits) 

Euripides,  Tragicus.     Ed.  Dindorf.     (His  first  prize,  at  the  age  of  39) 

Eusebius,  Ecclesiasticus.     The  Demonstratio  Evangelica  by  the  pages  of  the  Ed.  1628,  the  Praeparatio  fcv.  by 

those  ofViger,  in  Gaisford's  margin (Bishop  of  Caesarea) 

Eustathius,  Grammaticus.     Ed.  Romana:— Opuscula,  Ed.  Tafel  

Eust ratius,  Philosophus    

Euthycles,  Comicus  (Vet.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  890   

Evagrius  of  Antioch,  Ecclesiasticus    

Evagrius,  Historicus  Eccl ■ 

Evenus,  Elegiacus.     In  Gaisford's  Poe'tae  Minores  Gr,  and  the  Anthologies 

Galenus.  Medicus.     Ed.  Kuhn  (Visits  Rome,  at  the  age  of  34) 

Gaza  (Theodoras)  Byzant (Escapes  to  Italy) 

Gcminus,  Mathematicus  

Gemistus,  v.  Pletho  "• 

Genesius,  Byzant.     By  the  pages  of  the  Venice  Ed.,  in  the  margin  of  the  Bonn  Ed 

Geoponica.     Ed.  Niclas  

Georgius  Acropolita,  Byzant 

Georgius  Cedrenus,  Byzant 

Georgius  Pachymeres,  Byzant 

Georgius  Pisida,  Byzant 

Georgius  Svncellus,  Byzant ■■■■ 

Gorgias,  Sophista     (Embassy  to  Athens,  at  the  age  of  60) 

Gregoi  ius  Corinthius,  Grammaticus.     Ed.  Koen.  et  Schafer  

Gregorius  N'azianzenus  (o  BioXuyos) (Ordained  Presbyter,  at  the  age  of  32) 

Gregorius  Nyssenus,  Ecclesiasticus     (Brother  of  St.  Basil ;   bishop  of  Nyssa) 

Harpocratio,  Lexicographus    

Hecataeus  Abderita.     Ed.  Zorn,  Altonae  1730   (Follows  Alexander  into  Syria) 

Hecataeus  Milesius,  Historicus.     In  Muller's  Fragm.  Historicorum     .•■.■■•• 

Hegemon,  Comicus  (Vet.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  743   (Exhibits) 

Hegesippus,  Comicus  (Nov.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  469    

Heliodorus,  Scriptor  Eroticus 

Helladius,  Grammaticus  

Hellanicus,  Historicus.     In  Muller's  Fragm.  Historicorum    (30  years  of  age) 

Heniochus,  Comicus  (Med.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  3.  p.  560 

Hephaestio,  Grammaticus.     Ed.  Gaisford     (Preceptor  of  L.  Verus) 

Heraclides,  Comicus  (Med.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  3.  p.  565 

Heraclides  Ponticus,  Allegoriae  Homeri  and  Politicae   

Heraclitus,  Philosophus   

Hermesianax.  Elegiacus.     Ed.  Bach 

Hermippus,  Comicus  (Vet.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  380 

Hermogenes,  Rhetor.     In  \Yalzs  Rhetores  Graeci  .... 

Hero  Alexandrinus.  (BiXoiwi'iita,  Spiritalia,  etc.)     In  Mathematici  Vett.,  Paris  1693     

Hero  Junior  (De  Machinis,  etc.).     Ibid 

Herodes  Atticus,  Rhetor    (Consul) 

Herodianus,  Historicus     

Herodianus,  Aelius,  Gramm.:  mpl  fnovrfpom  \f((ws  in  Dindorf 's  Gramm.  Graeci ;  impfptoftot,  ed.  Barker  

Herodotus,  Historicus  (At  Thurii,  aged  41) 

Hesiodus,  Epicus  

Hesychius,  Lexicographus    

Hierocles,  Philosophus : 

Hieronymus  Rhodius,  Philosophus 

H  imerius,  Sophista   

Hipparchus,  Astronomus 

Hipparchus,  Comicus  (Nov.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  431    

Hippocrates,  Medicus.     By  the  pages  of  Foesius    (Aged  30) 

Hipponax,  Iambographus.     In  Bergk's  Lyrici  Gr 

Homerus,  Epicus   

Horapollo  or  Horus,  Grammaticus     

Hyperides,  Orator     (Funeral  Oration  in  Lamian  War,  at  the  age  of  70) 

Iamblichus,  Philosophus 

Ibycus,  Lyricus.     In  Bergk's  Lyrici  Gr 

J  oannes  Alexandrinus  (roviva  TrapayyikfiaTa) .     Ed.  Dindorf 

Joannes  Chrysostomus,  Ecclesiasticus (Archbishop  of  Constantinople,  at  the  age  of  50) 

J  oannes  Cinnamus,  Byzant 

J  oannes  Damascenus,  Ecclesiasticus    

J  oannes  Gazaeus    

Joannes  Laurentius  Lydus,  Byzant 

Joannes  Malalas,  or  Malelas,  Byzant 

Joannes  Philoponus,  Grammaticus 

Ion  Chius,  Tragicus  

Josephus,  Historicus (At  the  age  of  34:  faU  of  Jerusalem) 

Isaeus,  Orator.     In  Oratt.  Attici :  cited  like  Aeschines    

Isidorus  Pelusiota,  Ecclesiasticus     

1  socrates.  Orator.     In  Oratt.  Attici :  cited  like  Aeschines (Panegyric;  at  the  age  of  56) 

ister,  Historicus.     In  Muller's  Fragm.  Historicorum 

Julianus,  Imperator.     Ed.  Spanhem (Emperor,  at  the  age  of  30) 

Justinus  Martyr,  Ecclesiasticus   

I.amprocles,  Dithyrambicus.     In  Bergk's  Lyrici  Graeci  

Laon,  Comicus  (Incert.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  574   

Lasus.  Dithyrambicus.    In  Bergk's  Lyrici  Graeci (Preceptor  of  Pindar) 

Leo,  Diaconus,  Byzant 


Floruit  circa 


A.C. 
366 


394 
221 
280 
429 
441 


400? 
450 

77 


427 


332 
520 

4'3 

300 


466 
35°  ■' 

348 
39° 
5'3 
34° 
432 

250 


508 


P.C. 


1100? 
380 


3i5 
1160 
1 100 

388 
560 

163 
1430 


95° 

920? 

1250 

1100? 

1270 

620 

Soo 

1150 

361 

372 

350? 


39° 
43° 


150 


170 


— 

620 

— 

»43 

— 

238 

— 

160 

443 

— 

800? 

— 

— 

...? 

— 

4c° 

300 

— 

— 

35° 

150? 

— 

320 

— 

<3° 

— 

546 

— 

900? 

— 

— 

400? 

323. 

— 

— 

300 

560 

— 

— 

— 

— 

397 

— 

1160 

— 

730 

— 

500? 

— 

520 

— 

580? 

— 

620 

45i 

— 

— 

70 

380 

— 

400 

3S0 

— 

236 

— 

— 

361 

— 

!5° 

joo? 
j 

— 

9S0 


WITH   THE   EDITIONS   REFERRED   TO. 


Leo,  Grammaticus,  Byzant 

Leo,  Philosophus  or  Tacticus,  Byzant (Emperor  at  the  age  of  21) 

Leonidas  Alexandrinus.      In  the  Amhologia 

Leo.iidas  Tarentinus.     In  the  Anthologia 

Leontius,  Ecclesiast icus 

Leontius,  Mechanicus  Jn  Buhle's  Aratus,  vol.  i) 

Lesbonax,  Sophista      In  Oratt.  Attici :  cited  like  Aeschines 

Leuco,  Comicus  (Vet.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  749 

Libanius,  Sophista.     Ed.  Keisk 

Licymnius,  Dithyrambicus.     In  Bergk's  Lyrici  Graeci    

Longinus,  Rhetor  1 

Longus,  Scriptor  Eroticus     

Lucianus    

Lycophro,  Iambographus _ (At  the  court  of  Ptolemy  Philadelphus) 

Lycurgus,  Orator.     In  Oratt.  Attici :  cited  like  Aeschines     (Speech  against  Leocrates) 

Lynceus,  Comicus  (Nov.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  433 

I.ysias,  Orator.     In  Oratt.  Attici     (Returns  from  Thurii  to  Athens,  at  the  age  of  47) 

Lysippus,  Comicus  (.Vet.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  744 

L\x,  i.e.  the  Septuagint  Version  of  the  Old  Testament  

Macarius  Aegyptius,  and  Macarius  Alexandrinus,  Ecclesiastic;  

Macho,  Comicus  (Nov.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  496    

Magnes,  Comicus  (Vet.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  9   

Malalas,  v.  Joannes  

Manasses,  Historicus  Byzant 

Manetho,  Poeta     

Manuel  Bryennius,  Musicus  Byzant.    . .  „ 

Marcellus  Sidetes,  Poeta  Medicus.     In  Fabric.  Bibl.  Gr.  vol.  I.  p.  14,  ed.  3     

Marcianus  Capella     

Marcus  Asceta  or  Eremita  (A  disciple  of  St.  Chrysostom) 

Marinu ■>,  Rhetor.    Ed.  Boissonade , 

M  auricius,  Byzant 

Maximus  Epirota  {wipi  Karafx">v)  (Preceptor  of  Julian) 

Maximus  Planudes.  Byzant.     (Compiler  of  the  latest  Anthology) 

Maximus  Tyrius,  Philosophus 

M elampus,  Physiognomicus     

Melanippides,  Dithyrambicus.     In  Bergk's  Lyrici  Gr 

Meleager,  Elegiacus.     In  the  Anthologia 

Melinno,  Lyrica 

Mtlissus,  Philosophus   

Memnon,  Historicus.     Ed.  Orelli   

Menandcr,  Comicus  (Nov.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  pp.  99  sqq (Begins  to  exhibit,  aged  20) 

Menander.  Historicus  Byzant 

Menander,  Rhetor.    In  Walz's  Rhetores  Graeci     

Metagenes,  Comicus  (Vet.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  751    

Methodius,  Ecclesiasticus.     Ed.  Combens 

M  ichael  Psellus,  Byzant 

Mimnermus,  Elegiacus.     In  Gaisford's  Poetae  Minores  Gr.,  or  Bergk's  Lyrici  Gr 

Mmsimachus,  Comicus  (Med  ).    In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  3.  p.  567 

Moeris.  Grammaticus.     Ed.  Pierson   

Moschio,  Medicus 

Moschopulus,  Grammaticus  Byzant 

Moschus,  Poeta  Bucolicus 

Musacus,  Grammaticus     

Musonius  Kufus.  Philosophus     (Banished  by  Nero) 

Myrtilus,  Comicus  (Vet.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  418  

Nausicrates,  Comicus  (Med.  ?).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  575 

Nemesius,  Philosophus 

Nicander,  Poeta  Physicus 

Nicephorus  Bryennius,  Byzant 

Nicephorus  Patriarcha,  Byzant.    (At  the  second  Council  of  Nicaea) 

Nicetas  Choniates,  Byzant.     Annates,  cited  by  the  pages  of  the  1st  Ed.,  in  the  margin  of  the  Bonn.  Ed 

Nicetas  Eugenianus,  Poeta  Eroticus  (Byzant.) 

Nicetas  Paphalo,  Ecclesiasticus 

Nicochares,  Comicus  (Vet).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  842  

Nicolaus,  Comicus  (Incert.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  579 

Nicolaiis  Damascenus,  Historicus     (At  the  Court  of  Augustus) 

Nicolaus  Myrepsus,  Medicus    

Nicolaus  Smyrnaeus,  Arithmeticus.     In  Schneider's  Eclogae  Physicae  J.  p.  477  

Nicomachus,  Comicus  (Nov.?).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p. 583,  (cf.  I.  p.  77)  

Nicomachus  Gerasenus,  Arithmeticus.     Ed.  Ast.  Lips.  1817  

Nicopho,  Comicus  (Vet.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  848  

Nicostratus,  Comicus  (Med.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  3.  p.  278,  (cf.  1.  p.  77) 

Nilus,  Ecclesiasticus 

Nonnus.  Epicus 

Nymphodorus.  Historicus  (</<•  Moribus  Asiat  stve  Barbaricis)    

Ocellus  Lucanus,  Philosophus     

Occumenius.  Ecclesiasticus    

Oenomaiis,  Philosophus,  (apud  Eusebium) 

Olympiodorus.  Historicus.     In  Photius'  Bibliotheca     

«  Myinpiodorus.  Philosophus  Neo-Platonicus   

Olympiodorus,  Philosophus  Aristotelicus  

Onosander.  Tacticus  ...  

Ophtlio,  Comicus  (Med.).    In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  3.  p.  380 

Oppianus,  Poeta  Physicus 

( Iracula  Sibyllina (At  various  dates,  i     ™ 

<  >ribasius,  Medicus     by  pp.  of  Edd.  Matthaei  et  Maii  (in  Daremberg's  margin).  (Accompanies  Julian  to  Gaul) 
Origents,  Ecclesiasticus (Ordained  Presbyter  at  about  44  years  of  age) 


Floruit  circa 


XI 


A.C. 


280 


422 


270 

33° 
300 
411 

434 
274? 

280 
460 


300 


250? 
450? 
60 

444 

322 


410 
630 


200 
•? 


43° 
350? 

160? 


400 
"4 


388 
35° 


400? 


380 
170 


B.C. 

950? 
886 
60 

600 

580? 
10 

350 

250 

400? 
160? 


33° 


1150 

1300 

13° 

500? 

400 

45° 
600 

340 

1320 
ISO 


100? 

50? 

30? 


270 

1050 


-00? 
110? 

1300? 


66 


400? 

ii  00 

787 

1200 

"75? 

880 


1300? 
t 


50 


420 

500? 


95°? 
150? 

45° 

5'5 
575 
55 

180? 

2, so 
355 
230 


XII 


LIST  OF  AUTHORS, 


Orion  Thebanus.  Grammaticus 

Orphica.     Ed.  Hermann  

Paiaephatus,  Mythologus 

Palladius,  Ecclesiasticus,  (Historia  Lausiaca)  

Palladius,  Medicus.     Author  of  a  treatise  de  Febribus  in  Ideler's  Physici  Gr.  Minores • 

Painphilus,  Ecclesiasticus 

Pamphilus,  Grammaticus  et  Medicus  

Panyasis,  Epicus.     In  Gaisford's  Poetae  Minores  Gr 

Pappus,  Mathematicus 

Parmenides,  Poeta  Philosophicus    

Parthenius,  Scriptor  Erot icus   

Paulus  Alexandrinus,  Astrologus,  (Apo/elesmatica)  

Paulus  Silentiarius,  Poeta  Byzant.,  (Ecplirases  in  the  Corpus  Histt.  Byzant.)    

Pausanias.  Archaeologus  

Phalaris  (Spurious  Epistles) 

Phanias,  Philosophus    

Phanocles,  Elegiacus.     Ed.  Bach 

Phanodemus,  Archaeologus •■•• 

Pherecrates,  Comicus  (Vet.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  252   (His  first  prize) 

Pherecydes,  Historicus.     In  Midler's  Fragm.  Historicorum     

Pherecydes  (of  Syros),  Philosophus     

Philemon,  Comicus  (Nov.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  3 (Begins  to  exhibit) 

Philemon  Minor,  Comicus  (Nov.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  68  

Philemon,  Grammaticus.     Lexicon  Ed.  Osann 

Philes  (Manuel),  Poeta  Byzant 

Philetaerus,  Comicus  (Med.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  3.  p.  292 , 

Philetas,  Elegiacus.     Ed.  Bach 

Philippides,  Comicus  (Nov.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  467 

Philiscus,  Comicus  (Med.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  3,  p.  579 

Philistus,  Historicus.     In  Midler's  Fragm.  Historicorum  Supports  Dionysius) 

Philo,  Academicus     

Philo  Judaeus.     By  Mangey's  pagts (Embassy  to  Rome) 

Philo  Byzantinas,  Mechanicus.     (BfKotrouxa,  De  vii  Mirabilibus) 

Philochorus,  Archaeologus.     In  Midler's  Fragm.  Historicorum    

Philodemus,  Epicureus.     In  Gomperz  Herkul.  Studien   

Philonides,  Comicus  (Vet.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  421   

Philoponus,  v.  Joannes 

Philostephanus,  Comicus  (Incert.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  589   

Phi lostorgius,  Historicus  Eccles 

Philostralus,  Sophista.     By  the  pages  of  Olearius  .    (Lives  of  Sophists  written  about) 

Philostratus,  Junior  

Philoxenus,  Dithyrambicus,  v.  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  3.  pp.635  s(¥i-i  an<^  Bergk's  Lyr.  Gr 

Philyllius  Comicus  (Vet.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  857 

Phlegon  (de  Miraculis) 

Phocylides,  Elegiacus.     In  Gaisford's  Poetae  Minores  Gr 

Phoebammon,  Rhetor.     In  Walz's  Rhetores  Graeci 

Photius.  Ecclesiasticus,  Lexicographus,  etc.     Lexicon,  ed.  Porson ;    Bibliotheca,  ed.  Bekker ;    Epistolae,  ed. 

Montague    

Phrynichus,  Comicus  (Vet.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  580 (Exhibits) 

Phrynichus,  Tragicus (Prize) 

Phrynichus,  Grammaticus.     By  Lobeck's  pages    l 

Phurnutus,  v.  Cornutus 

Phylarchus,  Historicus.     In  Miiller's  Fragm.  Historicorum    

Pindarus,  Lyricus.     Quoted  by  Heyne's  lines,  in  the  right  margin  of  Bockh,  Dissen,  etc. ;    the  Fragments  by 

Bockh's  Edition  (At  the  age  of  32) 

Pisander  Larandius,  Poeta    

Pisander  Rhodius,  Poeta 

Pisida,  v.  Georgius    

Planudes,  v.  Maximus  

Plato,  Comicus  (Vet.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.615    (Begins  to  exhibit) 

Plato,  Philosophus:  quoted  by  the  pages  of  H.  Stephens (At  the  age  of  30;  death  of  Socrates) 

Pletho,  (Georgius  Gemistus),  Byzant 

Plotinus,  Philosophus (Accompanies  Goidian  to  the  East,  at  the  age  of  38) 

Plutarchus,  Philosophus.     The  Lives  by  Chapters;  the  Moralia  by  Xylander's  pages    

Poeta  de  Viribus  Herbarum,  in  Fabricius'  Bibl.  Graeca,  2.  p.  692  ed.  3 

Polemo,  Physiognomicus.     In  Franz's  Scriptt.  Fhysicgnomiae  Veteres 

Polemo,  Sophista 

Poliochus,  Comicus  (Incert.)     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  589 

Pol  lux,  Archaeologus    

Polyaenus  (Strategemata)  (Dedicates  his  work  to  M.  Aurelius) 

Polybius,  Historicus   (Date  of  exile) 

Polycarpus,  Ecclesiasticus    

Polyidus,  Dithyrambicus.     In  Bergk's  Lyrici  Gr 

Polyzelus,  Comicus  (Vet.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  867 

Porphyrius,  Philosophus (Becomes  pupil  of  Plotinus,  at  the  age  of  30) 

Posidippus,  Comicus  (Nov.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  513 

Posidonius,  Philosophus   

Pratinas,  Tragicus  et  Lyricus.     In  Bergk's  Lyrici  Gr 

Praxilla,  Lyrica.     In  Bergk's  Lyrici  Gr 

Proclus,  Philosophus.     Paraphr.  of  Ptolemy,  Ed.  Leo  AUatius (Comment,  on  fimaeus,  at  the  age  of  28) 

Procopius,  Hist.  Byzant (Secretary  to  Belisarius) 

Psellus,  v.  Michael     ; 

Ptolemaeus,  Mathematicus  et  Geographus     

Pythagoras,  Philosophus 

Quintus  Smyrnaeus  (or  Calaber),  Epicus  

Rhianus,  Elegiacus.     In  Gaisford's  Poetae  Minores  Gr 

Rufinus,  Ecclesiasticus 

Rufus  Ephesius,  Medicus 


Floruit 

circa 

i.e. 

P.C. 

...? 

45° 

z 

420 

489 


307 
30? 

380 


503 

— 

30? 

— 

— 

.'75 

— 

53° 

— 

180 

322 

330? 

— 

100? 

— 

438 

— 

480 

— 

544 

— 

33° 

— 

321 

— 

650 

— 

I3°3 

35° 

— 

300 

— 

323 

— 

380 

— 

404 

— 

100 

— 

— ■ 

39 

•53 

— 

280 

— 

5° 

— 

43° 

— 

...'/ 

400 

— 

237 

— 

250? 

398 

— 

3'J2 

— 

— 

130 

54° 

— 

— 

420 

— 

850 

429 

— 

475 

— 

180 

219 

— 

490 

— 

— 

230 

647 

— 

427 

— 

399 

— 

— 

1400 

— 

242 

— 

80 

— 

150? 

...? 

'33 

180 

— 

163 

167 

— 

104 

400 

— 

402 

— 

— 

263 

289 

— 

100 

— 

499 

— 

450 

— 

— 

440 

— 

527 

— 

139 

531 

— 

— 

39°? 

222? 



— 

380 

— 

100 

WITH  THE  EDITIONS  REFERRED  TO. 


Sanchuniatho,  translated  into  Greek  by  Philo  Byblius 

Sa:i:.yrio.  Comicus  (Vet.)-     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  872  

Sappho,  Lyrica.     In  Bergk's  Lyrici  Gr 

Satyrus,  HUtoricus 

Scvlax,  Geographus.     In  Hudson's  Geographi  Graeci  Minores 

Scymnus,  Poeta  Geographicus      In  the  Geographi  Graeci  Minores  

Secundus,  Sophista     

Scmus,  Grammaticus     

Severus,  Medicus 

Severus,  Rhetor.     In  Walz's  Khetores  Graeci     (Consul) 

Sextus  Empiricus,  Medicus  et  Philosophus    

Sidetes,  v.  Marcellus 

Simonides  Amorginus,  lambographus.     In  Bergk's  Lyrici  Gr 

Simonides  Ceius,  Lyricus.     In  Bergk's  Lyrici  Gr (At  the  age  of  31) 

Simplicius.  Philosophus    

Solinus,  Grammaticus  

Solon,  Elegiacus.     In  Bergk's  Lyrici  Gr (Archonship) 

Sopater,  Rhetor.     In  Walz's  Rhetores  Graeci   

Sophilus,  Comicus  (Med.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  3.  p.  581 

Sophocles.  Tragicus.     Ed.  Dindorf.    (His  first  prize,  at  the  age  of  27) 

Sophron,  Mimographus.     In  the  Museum  Criticum,  and  Ahrens  de  Dialecto  Dorica 

Soranus,  Medicus.     Ed.  Dielz     

Sosibius,  Grammaticus 

Sosicrates,  Comicus  (Incert.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  591     

Sosipater,  Comicus  (Nov.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  482    

Sotades,  Comicus  (Med.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  3.  p.  585  

Sozomenus,  Hist.  Eccles 

Speusippus,  Philosophus (President  of  the  Academy) 

Stephanus  Byzantinus,  Geographus 

Stephanus,  Comicus  (Nov.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  544  

Stesichorus,  Lyricus.     In  Bergk's  Lyrici  Gr 

f  Florilegium :  quoted  by  Gesner's  pages      1 

Stobaeus,  jjrdoga,..  by  Heeren's  pages J 

Strabo,  Geographus:  quoted  by  Casaubon's  pages     (With  Aelius  Gallus  in  Egypt,  at  the  age  of  37) 

Strattis,  Comicus  (Vet.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  763    

Suidas,  Lexicographus 

Susario,  Comicus  (Vet.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  3     

Synesius,  Ecclesiasticus  et  Philosophus:  quoted  by  the  pages  of  Petavius (Bishop  of  Ptolemais) 

Teleclides,  Comicus  (Vet.).     In  Meineke  s  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  361    

Telesilla,  Lyrica.     In  Bergk's  Lyrici  Gr 

Telestes,  Dithyrambicus.     In  Bergk's  Lyrici  Gr (Gains  prize) 

Thalassius,  Ecclesiasticus    

Tlieages,  Py thagoreus  

Themistius,  Khelor:  quoted  by  Harduin's  pages  in  the  margin  of  Dindorf  s  Ed (Senator) 

Theocritus,  Poeta  Bucolicus     

Theodoretus.  Ecclesiasticus (Bishop  of  Cyrus) 

Theodoras  Hyrtacenus,  Byzant 

Theodoras  Metochila,  Ecclesiasticus  

Theodoras  Prodromus,  Poeta  Byzant 

Theodoras  Studita,  Ecclesiasticus (Banished  by  Constantine  VI) 

Theodosius.  Grammaticus 

Theognetus,  Comicus  (Nov.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  549     

Theognis,  Elegiacus.     In  Bergk's  Lyrici  Gr 

Theognostus,  Grammaticus.     In  Cramer's  Anecdota  Oxon.,  vol.  2    

Theon  Smymaeu».  .Mathematical     

Theophanes,  Byzant 

Theophanes  Nonnus,  Medicus 

Theophilus  An tiochenus,  Ecclesiasticus 

Theophilus,  Comicus  (Med.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  3.  p.  626 

Theophilus  Protospatharius.  Medicus 

Theophrastus,  {  ^f  ^"c^I^"  }  I*""*  Arisl°<le  -  P™d«"  of  the  L^m> 

Theophylactus,  Ecclesiasticus 

Theophylact us  Simocatta.  Byzant 

Theopompus,  Comicus  (Vet.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  2.  p.  792  

Theopompus.  Historicus.     In  Miiller's  Fragm.  Historicoram  (At  the  age  of  45) 

Thomas  Magister,  Grammaticus.     Ed.  Oudendorp  

Thucydides,  Historicus (Date  of  exile,  at  the  age  of  48) 

Thugenides,  Comicus  ^Incert.) .     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  593  

Timaeus,  Historicus.     In  Miiller's  Fragm.  Historicoram (Termination  of  his  History) 

Timaeus,  Sophista.     Lexicon  Platon..  ed.  Ruhnkenius 

Timo,  Sillographus    

Timocles,  Comicus  (Med.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  3.  p.  590    

Timocreon,  Lyricus  

Timostralus,  Comicus  (Incert.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p.  595 

Timotheus,  Comicus  (Med.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  3.  p.  589 

Timotheus,  Dithyrambicus.     In  Bergk's  Lyrici  Gr 

Tryphiodorus,  Epicus    

Tyrtaeus,  Elegiacus.     In  Bergk's  Lyrici  Gr 

T/.etzes,  Grammaticus  

Xanthus,  Historicus.     In  Miiller's  Fragm.  Historicoram     

Xenarchus.  Comicus  (Med.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  3.  p.  614  

Xeno,  Comicus  (Incert.).     In  Meineke's  Com.  Fragm.  4.  p. 596     

Xenocrates  Chalcedonius,  Philosophus ' (President  of  the  Academy,  at  the  age  of  57) 

Xenocrates,  Medicus.     In  Ideler's  Physici  Gr.  Minores   

X  enophanes,  Poeta  Philosophicus  

Xenophon,  Historicus     (Anabasis,  at  about  43  years  of  age) 

Xtnophon  Ephesius,  Scriptor  Eroticus  


XIII 

Floruit 

circa 

A.C. 

P.C. 

— 

7s 

407 

— 

611 

— 

200 

— 

350? 

— 

90? 

— 

— 

130? 

■) 

•> 

— 

600? 

— 

470 

— 

225? 

693 

— 

525 

— 



500 

— 

240? 

594 

— 

— 

53°? 

35°  •' 

— 

468 

— 

45° 

— 

— 

120 

250 

— 

...? 

— 

290? 

— 

...? 

— 

— 

45° 

347 

— 

— 

500? 

332 

— 

611 

— 

— 

500? 

n 

— 

407 

— 

— 

1100? 

57° 

— 

— 

410 

440 

— 

5'o 

— 

401 

— 

280 


662 


355 


— 

420 

— 

1300 

— 

1300 

— 

1 125 

— 

795 

— 

320? 

...? 

— 

544. 

— 

— 

8i5 

— 

"3° 

— 

880 

— 

93° 

— 

180 

33° 

— 

— 

800? 

322 

— 

— 

1070 

— 

610 

39° 

— 

333 

— 

— 

1310 

423 

— 

...? 

— 

264 

— 

— 

250? 

279 

— 

35° 

— 

500 

— 

...? 

— 

35o? 

— 

39* 

— 

— 

400? 

650 

— 

— 

1150 

463  V 

— 

35° 

— 

...? 

— 

339 

— 

— 

5° 

53» 

— 

401 

— 

— 

...  1 

LIST  OF  AUTHORS,  &c. 


Xiphilinus,  Byzant > 

Zeno  Eleaticus,  Philosophus    

Zeno  Citiensis,  Philosophus     

Zenobius.     In  the  Paroemiographi 

Zenodotus,  Grammaticus     (First  Librarian  at  Alexandria) 

Zonaras,  Historicus  et  Lexicographus      (Retires  to  Mt.  Athos) 

Zosimus.  H istoricus  


Floruit  circa 

AC. 

P.C. 

— 

'°75 

464 

2  90 

— 

— 

1  jo 

280 

— 

1118 

— 

410 

III.     LIST   OF   ABBREVIATIONS. 

N. B. —  The  names  of  those  Authors  only  are  here  given  which  are  liable  to  be  mistaken:    the  rest 
will  be  easily  made  out  from  the  foregoing  list. 


A.  B.  =  Anecdota  Bekkeri 

A.  S.  =  Anglo-Saxon 

absol.  =  absolute,  absolutely 

ace. —  accusative 

ace.  to  =  according  to 

act..  Act.  =  active 

Acusil.  =  Acusilau; 

Adj.  =  adjective 

Adv.  =  adverb 

Ael. -Aelianus 

Aeol.  =  Aeolice 

Aesch.  =  Aeschylus 

Ae-chin.  —  Aeschines 

Ahrens  D.  Dor. -de  Dialecto 
Dorica 

Ahrens  D.  Aeol.=de  Dialecto 
Aeolica 

al.  ■  alibi 

Alex.  —  Alexis 

Alexandr.or  Alex.  =  Alexandrian 

Amips.  —  Amipsias 

Amnion.  =  Ammonius 

An.  Ox.  or  Anecd.  Ox. -=  Cra- 
mer's Anecdota  Oxoniensia 

Anacr.  =  Anacreon's  true  Frag- 
ments 

Anacreont.  =  Anacreontica  (spu- 
rious) 

Anan.  ■  Ananius 

Anth.  P.  =  Anthologia  Palatina 

Anth.  Plan.  =  Anthologia  Planu- 
dea  (at  the  end  of  Anth.  Pala- 
tina) 

Antig.  =  Antigonus 

Ant  im.  =  Antimachus 

Antiph.  =  Antiphanes 

M.  Anton.  =  Marcus  Antoninus 

aor.  —  aoristus 

ap.  =  apud  (quoted  in) 

Apoll.  Dysc.  —  Apollonius  Dy- 
scolus 

Apoll.  Lex.  Horn.  —  Apollonii 
Lexicon  Homericum 

Ap.  Rh.  =  Apollonius  Rhodius 

Apollod.  —  Apollodorus 

App.  =  Appianus 

Ar.  =  Aristophanes 

Arat.- Aratus 

Arcad.  =  Arcadius 

Archil.  —  Archilochus 

Aretae.  —  Aretaeu^ 

Arist.  =  Aristoteles 

Aristaen.  =  Aristaenetus 

Aristid.  =  Aristides 

Arr.  =  Arrianus 

Arr.  Epict. -  Epicteti  Disserta- 
tiones  ab  Arriano  digestae 

A-:yd.  -  Astydamas 

Ath.  -  Athenaeus 

Att.- Attice.  in  Attic  Greek 

Att.  Process  «=  Attischer  Process, 
by  Meier  and  Schdmann(Halle 
1824) 

augm.  =  augment 

Kabr.  =  Babrius 

Bast.  Ep.  Cr. -Bast's  Epistola 
Critica 

Batr.  —  Batrachomyomachia 

Bekk.-Bekker 


Bentl.  Phal.  =  Bentley  on  Phalaris 

Bgk.  =  Bergk 

Blomf.  =  Blomfield 

Bockh    P.    E.  =  B6ckh's    Public 

Economy  of  Athens 
Boeot.  =  Boeotice 
Boisson.An.  —  Boissonade'sAnec- 

dota 
Br.  =  Brunck 
Buttm.    Ausf.    Gr.  =  Buttmann's 

Ausfuhrliche  Griechische 

Sprachlehre 
Buttm.  Catal.  =  Buttmann's  Cata- 
logue of  irregular  verbs 
Buttm.    Dem.    Mid.  =  Buttmann 

on  Demosthenes'  Midias 
Buttm.  Lexil.  =  Buttmann's  Lexi- 

logus 
Byz.  or  Byzant.  —  Byzantine 
c.  gen.  pers.,  etc.  =  cum  genitivo 

personae.  etc. 
C.    I.  —  Corpus    Inscriptionum 

(Bbckhii) 
Call.  —  Callimachus 
Callix.  =  Callixenus 
cf.  —  confer,  conferatur 
Clem.     Al.  -  Clemens     Alexan- 

drinus 
collat.  —  collateral 
Com.  =  Comic,  in  the  language 

of  the  Comic  writers 
Comp.  =  Comparative 
compd.  =  compound 
compos.  —  composition 
conj.  =  conjunctive ;  ar,  sometimes 

conjecture 
Conjunct.  =  Conjunction 
contr.  =  contracted,  contraction 
copul.  =  copulative 
Ctes.  —  Ctesias 
Curt.  -  Curtius 
Cynosoph.  —  Cynosophica 
Cyrill.  =  Cyril  of  Alexandria 
dat.  —  dative 
Dem.  —  Demosthenes 
Dem.  Phal.  =  Demetrius  Phale- 

reus 
Demad.  =  Demades 
Dep.  =  Deponent  Verb 
deriv.  •>  derived,   derivation,    de- 
rivative 
Desiderat.  -  Desiderative 
Diet,  of  Antiqq.  —  Dictionary  of 

Antiquities  (Dr.  Smith's) 
Dim. —  Diminutive 
Dind.  -  Dindorf  (W.  and  L.) 
Dio  C.  =  Dio  Cassius 
Diod.  =  Diodorus  Siculus 
Diog.  L.  —  Diogenes  Laertius 
Dion.  H.  =  Dionysius  Halicamas- 

sensis 
Dion.  P.  =  Dionysius  Periegetes 
Diosc  =  Dioscorides 
Diphil.  =  Diphilus  (Comicus) 
Diph.Siphn.  =  Diphilus  Siphnius 
disyll.  -  disyllabic 
Doderl.  =  Doderlein 
Donalds.  N.  Crat.  =  Donaldson's 

New  Cratylus 


Dor.  =  Dorice 

downwds.  =  downwards 

dub.,    dub.    1.  =  dubious,    dubia 

lectio 
e.g.  —  exempli  gratia 
E.  Gud.  =  Etymologicum  Gudia- 

num 
E.  M.  —  Etymologicum  Magnum 
Eccl.  =  Ecclesiastical 
Ecphant.  =  Ecphantides 
Elmsl.  —  Elmsley 
elsewh.  =  elsewhere 
enclit. —enclitic 

Ep.  =  Epice,  in  the  Epic  dialect 
Ep.    Ad.   or  Adesp.  —  Epigram- 

mata   Adespota   (in   Brunck's 

Anal.) 
Ep.    Horn.  =  Epigrammala    IIo- 

merica 
Epich.  =  Epicharmus 
Epigr.Gr.  =  EpigrammataGraeca 

(Kaibel,  Berl.  1878) 
epith.  =  epithet 
equiv.  =  equivalent 
Erf.  -  Erfurdt 
csp.  =  especially 
euphon.  =  euphonic 
etc.  =  et  caetera 
Eur.  —  Euripides 
Eust.  —  Eustathius 
exclam.  =  exclamation 
f.  or  fut.  —future 
f.  1.  ==  falsa  lectio 
fern.  —  feminine 
fin. —  sub  tine 
foreg.  —  foregoing 
Kr.  =  Fragment 
freq.  =  frequent,  frequently 
Frequent.  =  Frequentative  Verb 
I  fut. —  future 
Gaisf.  =  Gaisford 
Galen. »  Galenus 
1  gen.  or  genit.  =  genitive 
(Jeop.  —  Geoponica 
Gloss.  =  Glossaria    H.    Stephani 

(Paris  1573) 
Goth.  =  Gothic 
Gottl.  -  Gottling 
Gr.  Gr.  —  Greek  Grammar 
Greg.    Cor.  —  Greporius    Corin- 

thius 
h.  Horn.  —  hymni  Homerici 
Harp.  =  Harpocratio 
Hdn.  —  Herodianus 
Hdt.  =  Herodotus 
Hecat.  -  Hecataeus 
Heind.  =  Heindorf 
Heliod.  —  Heliodorus 
Hemst.  =  Hemsterhuis   (on    Lu- 
cia-   and  Aristophanis    Plu- 

tus) 
Herkul.      Stud.  —  Herkulanische 

Studien    (Gomperz),    Leipzig, 

Herm.  =  Ht  rmann,  Godfrey 
Herm.  Pol.  )\nt.  =  Hermann's  (C. 

F.)  Political  Antiquities 
Hermes.,  Hf  rmesian.  —  Hermesi- 


Hephaest.  «■  Hephaestio 
Hes.  —  Hesiodus 
Hesych.  =  Hesychius 
heterocl.  =  heteroclite 
heterog.  =  heterogeneous 
Hieracosoph.  =  Hieracosophica 
Hipp.  —  Hippocrates ;    but  Eur. 

Hipp.  —  Euripidis    Hippolytus 
Hippiatr.  —  Hippiatrica 
Hippon.  =  Hipponax 
Horn.  —  Homerus 
Homer.  =  Homeric 
Horn,  et  Hes.  Cert.  —  Homeri  et 

Hesiodi  Certamen,  ed.  H.  Ste- 

phanus 
Hu^sey,  W.  and    M.  =  Hussey's 

Ancient    Weights    and    Mea- 
sures 
i.e. —  id  est 
Iambi.  —  Iamblichus 
ib.  or  Ibid.  =  Ibidem 
Ibyc.  —  Ibycus 
ICt.  —  Jurisconsulti 
Id.  —  Idem 
II. -Iliad 

imperat.  =  imperative 
imperf.  or  impf.  =  imperfect 
impers.  —  impersonal 
ind.  or  indie.  —  indicative 
indecl.  =indeclinabilis 
indef.  —  indefinite 
inf.  —  infinitive 
Inscr.  -  Inscription 
insep.  —  inseparable 
Interpp.  =  Interpretes 
intr.  or  intrans.  —  intransitive 
Ion.  =  Ionic 
irreg.  -  irregular 
Isae. = Isaeus 
Isocr.  =  Isocrates 
Jac.  A.  P. —Jacobs  (F.)  on  the 

Anthologia  Palatina 
Jac.     Anth.  —Jacobs     (F.)     on 

Brunck's  Anthologia 
Jac.  Ach.  Tat. —Jacobs  (F.)  on 

Achilles  Tatius,  etc.      m 
Joseph.  =  Josephus 
l.  —  lege 
1.  c,  11.  c,  ad  1.  =  loco  citato,  locis 

citatis,  ad  locum 
Laced.  =  Lacedaemonian 
Lat.  —  Latin 
leg.  —  legendum 
lengthd.  —  lengthened 
Leon.    Al.  =  Leonidas   Alexan- 

drinus 
Leon.    Tar.  =  Leonidas    Taren- 

tinus 
Lith.  —  Lithuanian 
Lob.  Aj. -Lobeck  on  Sophoclis 

Ajax 
Lob.  Phryn. —Lobeck  on  Phry- 

nichus 
Lob.  Paral.  ■  Lobeck's  Paralipo- 

mena  Grammatica 
Long.  —  Longus 
I.ongin.  =  Loogfaiai 
Luc.  —  Lucianus 
Lxx  =  The  Septuagint 


XVI 


LIST  OF  ABBREVIATIONS. 


Lye.  =  Lycophron 

l.ys.  =  Lysias.     (But  Ar.  Lys.- 

Aristophanis  Lysistrata) 
masc.  =  masculine 
Math.  Vett. ™ Mathematics   Vc- 

teres  (ed.  Paris.  1693) 
Med.  =  medium,  middle 
Medic,  —in  medical  writers 
Mel.  =  Meleager.      (But    Schar. 

Mel.  —  Schafer's     Mcletemata 

Critica) 
Menand.  =  Menander 
metaph.  =  metaphorice 
inetaplast.  =  metaplastice 
metath.  =  metathesis 
metri  grat.  =  metri  gratia 
Moer.  =  Moeris 
Mosch.  =  Moschus 
Miill.  Archaol.  d.  Kunst  =Mul 

ler's  (K.  O.)  Archaologie  der 

Kunst 
Miill.   Proleg.    z.    Myth.  =  Mul- 

ler's   Prolegomenen    zu   einer 

wissenschaftlichen     Mytholo- 

gie 
Mus.  Crit.  =  Museum  Criticum 
Mus.  Vett.  =  Musici  Vcteres  (ed. 

Meibomius) 
n.  pr.  =  nomen  proprium 
N.  T.  =  New  Testament 
negat.  =  negativum 
neut.  =  neuter 
Nic.  =Nicander 
Nicucli.  =-  Xicochares 
Nicoph.  =  Nicopho 
nom.  m  nominative 
Od  -Odyssey 
Oenom      ap.     Eus.  =  Oenomaiis 

apud  Eusebium 
oft.  -  often 
O.  H.  G.,  orO.  H.  Germ.  =  Old 

High  German 
Opp.  =  Oppianus 
opp.  to  =  opposed  to 
opt.  or  optat.  =  optative 
Opusc  =Opuscula 
Or.  Sib.  =  Oracula  Sibyllina 
orat.  obliq.  =  oratio  obliqua 
Oratt.  =  Oratores  Attici 
orig.  =  originally 
Orneosoph.  =  Orneosophica 


Orph.  =  Orphica 

oxyt.  =  oxytone 

Paroem.  =  Paroemiographi     (ed. 

Gaisford) 
parox.  —  paroxytonc 
part.  =  participle 
pass.  =  passive 
Paus.  =  Pausanias 
pecul.  =  peculiar 
perf.  or  pf.  =  perfect 
perh.  =  perhaps 
perispom.  =  perispomenon 
Philo  Bel.  =  Philo  BfXoTrou/rd 
Phryn.  =  Phrynichus 
Piers.  Moer.  -  Pierson  on  Moeris 
pi.  or  plur.  =  plural 
Plat.  «=  Plato  (Philosophus) 
Plat.  Com.  =  Plato  (Comicus) 
plqpf.  =  plusquamperfectum 
plur.  =  plural 
Plut.  =  Plutarchus 
poet.  =  poetice 
Poet,  de  Herb.  =  Poeta  de  Viri- 

bus  Herbarum.  (In  Fabricius' 

Bibliotheca  Graeca,  ii.  p.  630, 

ed.  pr.) 
Poll.  =  Pollux 
Polyb.  --  Polybius 
Pors.  =  Porson 
post-Horn.  =  post-Homeric 
Pott.  Et.  Forsch.  =  Pott's  Etymo- 

lqgische  Forschungen 
pr.  11.  =  proper  name 
Prep.  =  Preposition 
pres.  =  present 
prob.  =  probably 
proparox.  m  proparoxytone 
properisp.  —  properispomenon 
Q.  Sm.  =  Quintus  Smyrnaeus 
q.  v.  =  quod  vide 
radic.  =  radical 
regul.  =  regular,  regularly 
Rhet.  =  Rhetorical ;      Rhett.  = 

Rhetores 
Ruhnk.    Ep.     Cr.  =  Ruhnkenii 

Epistola  Critica,  appended  to 

his  Ed.  of  the  Homeric  hymn 

to  Ceres 
Ruhnk.    Tim.  =Ruhnkenius    ad 

Timaei      Lexicon      Platoni- 


Salmas.  in  Solin  =Salmasius  in 

Solinum.  (Ed.  16S9) 
Skt.  =  Sanskrit 
I  sc.  =  scilicet 
Schaf.  Dion.  Comp.  =  Schafer  on 

Dionysius  de  Compositione 
Schaf.  Greg.,  v.  Greg.  Cor. 
Schaf.    Mel.  =  Schafer's    Melete- 

mata  Critica,  appended  to  the 

former  work 
Schneid.  =  Schneider 
Schol.  =  Scholium,  Scholiastes 
Schweigh.    or  Schw.  =  Schweig- 

hauser 
Scol.    Gr.  =  Scolia    Graeca    (by 

llgen) 
shortd.  =  shortened 
signf.  =  signification 
Simon.— -Simonides  (of  Ceos) 
Simon.  Iamb.  =  Simo.iides  (Iam- 

bographus) 
sing.  —  singular 
Slav.  =  Slavonic 
Sopat.  —  Sopater 
Soph.  =  Sophocles 
sq.    or    sqq.  =sequens,    sequen- 

tia 
Stallb.     Plat.  =  Stallbaum     on 

Plato 
Steph.   Byz.  =--  Stephanus    Byzan- 

tinus 
Steph.  Thes.  =  Stephani  Thesau- 
rus (edited  by  Hase  and  Din- 

dorf) 
Stesich.  =  Stesichorus 
Stob.  =  Stobaei  Florilegium 
Stob.  Ecl.  =  Stobaei  Eclogae 
strengthd.  =  strengthened 
sub.  =subaudi 
subj.  =  subjunctive 
Subst.  =  Substantive 
Suid.  —  Suidas 
Sup.  =  Superlative 
susp.,   susp.   1=  suspected,   sus- 

pecta  lectio 
s.  v.  =  sub  voce 
syll.  =  syllable 
synon.  =  synonymous 
Telecl.  =  Teleclides 
Th   M.  =  Thomas  Magister 
Theol.  Arithm.  =  Theologumena 


Arithmetica,  Ed.  As'..  Lips. 
1817 

Theoph.  Cont.  =  Theophanes 
Continuatus  (in  Byz.  Histo- 
rians) 

Theopomp.  Com.  or  Hist.  = 
Theopompus  (Comicus)  or 
(Historicus) 

Thirlw.  Hist.  Gr.  =  Bp.  Thirl- 
wall's  History  of  Greece 

Thuc.  =  Thucydides 

Tim.  =  Timaeus 

Trag.  =  Tragic 

trans.  =  transitive 

Tryph.  =  Tryphiodorus 

trisyll.  =  trisyllable 

Tyrt.  =  Tyrtaeus 

v.  =  vide :  also  voce  or  vocem 

v.  1.  =  varia  lectio 

Valck.  Adon.  =  Valcknaer  on 
Theocritus'  Adoniazusae 

Valck.  Diatr.  =  Valcknaer's  Dia- 
tribe, appended  to  his  Hip- 
polytus 

Valck.  Hipp.  =  Valcknaer  on  Eu- 
ripidis  Hippolytus 

Valck.  Phoen.  =  Valcknaer  on 
Euripidis  Phoenissae 

verb.  adj.  ~  verbal  adjective 

voc.  —  voce,  vocem 

vocat.  =  vocative 

Vol.  Here.  Ox  =Volumina  Her- 
culanensia,  Oxoniae 

usu.  =  usually 

Welcker  Syll.  Ep.  =  Welckei  s 
Sylloge  Epigrammatum 

Wess.  or  Wessel.  =  Wesseling 

Wolf  Anal.  =  Wolfs  Analekten 
(Berlin  1 816— 1820) 

Wolf  Mus.  =  WolPs  Museum 

Wytt.  (orWyttenb.)  Ep.  Cr.  = 
Wytlenbach's  Epistola  Cri- 
tica, appended  to  his  Notes 
on  Juliani  Laus  Constantiui 
(ed.  Schafer) 

Wytt.  (or  Wyttenb.)  Plut.  = 
Wyttenbach  on  Plutarch 

Xen.  =  Xenophon 

Xen.  Eph.  =  Xenophon  Ephesius 

Zd.  =  Zend 

Zonar.  =  Zonaras 


ADDITIONAL  LIST  OF  ABBREVIATIONS. 


Amer.  Inst.  -  American  Institute  of  Hellenic  Anti- 
quities 

Arist.  Resp.  Ath.  -  Aristotle  on  the  Constitution  of 
Athens  (Kenyon,  London) 

C.  1.  A.  =  Corpus  Inscriptionum  Atticarnm  (Berlin) 

Fr.  Here.  =  Fragmenta  Herculanensia  (Scott,  Ox- 
ford) 


Hell.  J.  =  Hellenic  Journal  (Macmillans) 
Heracl.  F"r.  =  Heracliti  Ephesii  Reliquiae  (Bvwater, 

Oxford) 
Hicks  —  Manual  of  Greek  Historical   Inscriptions 

(Oxford) 
Inscr.  Co.  » Inscriptions  of  Cos  i,Paton  and  Hicks, 

Oxford) 


IV.     SIGNS,  Etc. 

*,  to  denote  words  not  actually  extant. 

=  ,  equal  or  equivalent  to,  the  same  as. 

(, )  Between  these  brackets  stand  the  Etymological  remarks. 

[  ]  Between  these  brackets  stand  the  Prosodial  remarks. 

Where  the  Root  of  a  word  is  quite  obvious,  it  has  often  been  omitted,  to  save  space. 

e.  ace.  cognato  is  applied  where  the  accusative  is  of  the  sar.e  or  cognate  signification  with  the  Verb,  as  v0piv  vfyifav,  iivat  Mir,  etc. 

When  Compound  words  can  easily  be  divided  by  a  hy  en  (as  Moo-fros)  we  have  written  them  so.  And  in  Compounds  so  common 
as  to .admit  of  no  mistake,  we  have  even  omitte'  the  hyphen.  This  applies  to  words  regularly  compounded  with  prepositions, 
or  with  ova-,  «u-,  cpt-,  fa-,  ^/u-,  $<0-,  koko-,  ko.  o-,  iiiyaKo-,  puxpo-,  pnoo-,  novo-,  vio-,  oivo-,  ukiyo-,  ipo-,  -nan-,  vav-  rrayro-, 
Ttvra-,  irtvre-,  vo\v-,  rtrpa-,  Tpi-,  rpia-,  Qik-,  p,\o-,  xa*-*-,  xa^*°-.  XPva~<  XP"""-,  t<v8-,  ^tvSo-. 


A. 


A  a,  dAdwi,  to,  indecl.,  first  letter  of  the  Gr.  alphabet :  hence  as  Nu- 
meral, a'  ^tis  and  vpurros,  but  a-  iooo. 
Changes  of  d :  1.  Aeol.,  a  for  f,  in  some  Advs.  of  time  and 

place,  oAAoto  for  -rt,  ivtpOa  for  -6t,  Ahrens  D.  Aeol.  p.  74.  b.  for 

o,  vwa-5tfipvpaK(i\  Sapph.  2.  10,  cf.  Alcae.  7  Ahrens : — but  o  more  fre- 
quently represents  d,  v.  sub  o.  2.  Dor.,  4  for  t,  as  in  Aeol., 
akkotca  for  -t«,  dpcrfa  for  -0t  or  -0«i',  -ya  for  yt.  b.  so  in  the 
body  of  words,  'Aprafiis  for  ¥  Apr  t  pus,  drtpos  for  tripos,  tapos  for  iepoj, 
rpd<pw,  arpdtpaj,  rpa\o),  for  Tpitpat,  arpiipat,  rptxot,  tppaoi  for  tppcrl.  etc., 
Ahrens  D.  Dor.  p.  1 1 3  sq.  o.  for  0,  titan  (f  ft/cart)  for  tinooi ; 
but  more  often  o  for  a,  v.  sub  o,  Ahr.  p.  1 19.  3.  Ion.,  d  for  t, 
as  uiyaBos  for  fiiyt9os  :— reversely  <  for  d,  v.  sub  t.  b.  d  some- 
times becomes  ij,  in  the  num.  forms,  ot-nXiioios,  »oAAa»A.r/<7ios  for  SiirAd- 
aios,  voXXavXdatos,  etc.  c.  in  some  words,  a  represents  rj,  as 
XiXafipai  for  XiXntifiat,  Ad£o/Mu  for  Af/£o/iat,  fLtoap&pin  for  utanu0pia, 
dfupiu-0dria,  -tSaaii)  for  dpupta-^rrriat,  -firrrnats,  Dind.  de  dial.  Hdt. 
p.  xxxiv.  d.  d  for  0,  as  dppojoiw  for  uppwbiaj,  Hdt.  II. 
changes  of  a :  1.  a  appears  constantly  in  Aeol.  and  Dor.  (as  also 
in  Lat.)  for  Ion.  17,  whereas  Att.  agrees  sometimes  with  Ion.,  sometimes 
with  the  older  dialects  ;  for  there  is  little  doubt  that  the  forms  in  d  are 
the  most  ancient.  It  may  be  laid  down  as  a  gen.  rule  that  17  Ion. 
becomes  d  Aeol.  and  Dor.  in  the  term,  of  the  1st  decl.,  as  irvAa,  Arpt't- 
8as,  etc.,  for  wvXn,  'Arptions,  etc. ;  and  wherever  n  represents  a  in  the 
Root  or  primary  form,  as  Syaaxai  for  9vi)OKai  (*/  8av),  fivdfta  (*/  fiva), 
tv-dvaip  (dvqp),  dXxdtis  (d\xd),  etc. :  but  when  n  represents  <  or  «,  then 
it  is  retained  in  Aeol.  and  Dor.,  as  ypxoftav  (ipxofiai).  but  dpxopiav 
(dpxoimi),  parrip  (*/  p.artp),  etc. :  many  exceptions  however  occur ; 
see  on  the  whole  question,  Ahrens  D.  Aeol.  pp.  84  88,  D.  Dor.  pp. 
1 J  7  -153.  b.  reversely,  in  Dor.,  at  and  att  in  the  inflexions  of 
Verbs  in  dot  are  contr.  not  into  d  but  into  17,  as  iviitn  for  -d.  uprjs  for 
-^s,  Ahr.  D.  Dor.  p.  195  ;  so  017,  as  o»x'  °p3  for  Sroi'  opdn,  Epich.  10 
Ahr. : — also  in  crasis,  as  ry/id  for  Td  ipsa,  ici/ywv  for  xai  iyatv,  etc.,  Ahr. 
p.  MI.  c.  in  Dor.,  ao  and  att  are  contracted  not  into  a>,  but  into 
d,  v.  sub  af.  d.  in  Aeol.,  at  sometimes  stands  for  Dor.  d,  as  6vai- 
itkoi  for  SydoKU  {9vj)OKai),  Ahr.  D.  Aeol.  p.  96  : — Locr.  for  a,  as  diidpa  for 
Tjpipa,  tpdpat  for  ipipat.  Hicks,  Inter.  63  : — v.  also  d«i,  dtrds.  2.  in 
Ion.,  17  for  d  is  as  characteristic  as  d  for  17  in  Aeol.  and  Dor.  :  so  in  1st  decl. 
aotpii],  -17s,  -n,  -tjv,  'Apiaraydpns,  (-tat),  -n,  -nv ;  but  when  the  nom. 
ends  in  d,  the  change  only  takes  place  in  gen.  and  dat.,  dXT)9tia.  -17s,  -17, 
-av:  also  in  many  inflexions  and  terminations,  as  9wpn(.  -17x0s,  Zwapriq- 
rns,  dvtnpus,  XdSpn,  Xinv,  etc. ;  and  in  many  words,  of  which  a  list  (as 
used  by  Hdt.)  is  given  by  Dind.  de  dial.  Hdt.  p.  vii  sq. 
a  -,  as  insep.  Prefix  in  compos. :  I.  a  artprrriKuv,  alpha  priva- 
tiviim,  expressing  want  or  absence,  like  Lat.  in-,  Engl.  -un,  as  aoipis 
wise,  Offo^oi  i,nwise :  (for  the  Root,  v.  sub  dv-,  iva-.)  Sometimes  it 
implies  blame,  as  dflovXia,  =  ovo&ovXla,  ■//-counsel,  dup&aarwos  ill-heed, 
ug'y- — ,nis  oc'D&  strictly  a  hyperbole,  counsel  thai  is  no  counsel,  i.  e.  bad, 
a  face  no  better  than  none,  i.  e.  ugly,  cf.  abaipos .  This  a  rarely  precedes 
a  vowel,  as  in  d-aoTot,  d-aror,  017017s,  ookvos,  dofos,  dorros  ;  more  often 
before  the  spir.  asper,  as  datrros,  dfoanros,  dowXos.  ddparos,  ddptoros, 
diibpos,  dwpos ;  other  cases  are  not  in  point  as  a  f  has  been  lost,  as 
dtittXos,  dttorjs,  dionXos,  diopis,  dioros,  diicajv,  dtXwros,  dtpyos,  ooikos : 
sometimes  a  coalesces  with  the  foil,  vowel,  as  ajcaiv,  dpyds  (dtpyos) :  but 
before  a  vowel  dy-  is  more  common.  It  answers  to  the  Adv.  &vtv,  so 
that  Adjs.  formed  with  it  often  take  a  gen.,  as  dXapnrit  ijAi'ot;,  iyaros 
KOKwy,  =  ds-cu  kdiuftan  $kiov,  dvtv  arns  kokuiv,  esp.  in  Trag.,  Sch»f. 
Mel.  p.  137.  Only  found  in  compos,  with  nouns;  for  verbs  into  which 
it  enters  are  always  derivatives,  Scaliger  ap.  Lob.  Phryn.  266;  cf. 
dffovkiat,  dyyoio),  dvifbopat,  drifa.  II.  a  d0poiOTtKov, 
alpha  copulativum,  a-  or  d-,  expressing  union,  participation,  likeness, 
properly  with  spir.  asper,  as  in  aSpoos,  dwas,  but  commonly  with  spir. 
lenis,  dxoirir,  dAoxor,  dotXipis,  drdXayrot,  dxvkovOos,  cf.  Plat.  Crat. 
405  C.  It  answers  to  the  Skt.  sa-,  sam-  (aim),  being  prob.  akin  to  the 
Adv.  dfia  (q.  v.),  and  sometimes  appears  in  the  form  6  .  as  in  ostarpos, 
uydorptos,  u{v(  :  Curt.  no.  598.  III.  a  iwiraTiKoy,  alpha  in- 
tensivum,  strengthening  the  force  of  compds.,  and  said  to  answer  to  the 
Adv.  dyav,  very.  The  use  of  this  a  has  been  most  unduly  extended  by 
the  old  Gramm. :  many  words  cited  as  examples  seem  to  be  inventions 
of  their  own,  as  dyovot,  dyvpvaarot  for  wokvyovos,  vokvyvfivaaros, 
V'alck.  Adon.  p.  314;  some  words  have  been  referred  to  this  a  which 


belong  to  a  privative,  as  dbaxpvros,  d9to<paros,  dfvXos  (v.  sub  vocc.)s 
and  in  those  which  remain,  as  daxios,  artyr/v,  doirtpxts,  daietkis,  etc., 
it  may  be  asked  whether  the  a  be  any  more  than  a  modification  of 
a  copulat.  IV.  a  euphonicum,  in  a  few  words,  esp.  Ion.  and 

Att.,  is  used  merely  for  phonetic  purposes,  mostly  before  two  consonants, 
as  dffkr/xpds,  dawaipai,  daraipis,  dartpoirfi  for  0\nxpm,  awaipai,  <rra(pis, 
OTtpoTrri,  but  also  before  one,  as  d/itipofiat  for  fitipopai,  and  ukovoi  cf. 
Koiai ;  in  some  cases  also  before  vowels,  v.  dtidat,  dtipw,  dt£at.  [d  in 
all  these  cases,  except  by  position.  Yet  Adjs.  which  begin  with  three 
short  syllables  have  d  in  dactylic  metres,  as,  dSd/iaros,  dBipuros,  dxa- 
uarot,  dvdXaftos,  dvapd^ivOos  (v.  sub  voce).  One  Adj.,  dOdvaros,  with 
its  derivs.,  has  d  in  all  metres,  so  that  to  make  it  short  would  be  faulty, 
Pors.  Med.  139,  Elmsl.  Ar.  Ach.  47.] 

4.  exclamation  used  to  express  various  emotions,  like  Lat.  and  Engl. 
ah!  in  Horn,  always  0  SttKi,  a  Sttka,  a.  SciAoi,  II.  II,  441,  45a.,  17. 
443,  Od.  20. 351,  al. ;  also  in  Trag.,  Aesch.Ag.  1087,  etc. ;  <i.  /jrjSafiwi . . 
Soph.  Ph.  1300.  cf.  O.  T.  1 147  j  d  iidxap  C.  1. 401  ;  sometimes  doubled. 
4  i  Aesch.  Pr.  114,  566,  etc.;  rare  in  Prose,  Plat.  Hipp.  Ma.  295  A. 

fi  5  or  i  i.  to  express  laughter,  like  our  ha  ha,  Eur.  Cycl.  157,  Ar., 
etc. ;  a  &  baaw9lv  ytkwra  817W  Hesych.  and  Phot. ;  cf.  Meineke  Plat. 
Com.  rpvw.  2. 

4,  Dor.  for  Artie.  ^.  II.  4,  Dor.  for  relat.  Pron.  fj.  III.  cj, 

Dor.  for  J,  dat.  of  3s. 

adaros,  ov,  (dda;)  in  II.  with  penult,  long,  not  to  be  injured  or  violated, 
inviolable,  vvv  fioi  ofiooooy  ddarov  Xrvyos  vbatp,  because  the  gods  swore 
their  most  binding  oaths  thereby,   IA.  271.  II.  in  Od.  with 

penult,  short,  fiyijarjjptaoty  dtOkov  dadrov  21.  91  ;  dt$kos  dddrot  inrt- 
riXtarai  12. 5,  where  it  is  commonly  rendered  by  hurtful,  dangerous ;  but 
here  also  Buttm.,  Lcxil.,  attempts  to  retain  a  kindred  sense,  not  to  be  hurt, 
not  to  be  treated  lightly  or  slighted.  III.  in  Ap.  Rh.  2.  77,  Kapros 

dadrov  invincible  strength.  (Originally  dd faros,  which  is  implied  in  the 
Lacon.  form  ddfiaicros  cited  by  Hesych. ;  cf.  daw,  drn.) 

advT)S,  is,  unbroken,  not  to  be  broken,  hard,  strong,  Od.  II.  575, 
Theocr.  24.  121,  etc.  (Originally  dfayr)s;  cf.  dyvv/u.)  [The  first  a 
short  in  Od.  and  Theocr.,  but  long  in  Ap.  Rh.  3.  1251,  Q^Sm.  6.  596.] 

Aa£u,  f.  oa>,  to  breathe  through  the  mouth,  breathe  out,  Arist.  Probl.  34. 
7.     (For  the  Root,  v.  sub  dnpt.) 

davda,  1},  a  kind  of  earring,  Alcman  113,  Ar.  Fr.  567,  Hesych. 

AdirXfrof,  ov,  lengthd.  Ep.  for  dirA«Tos,  Q^Sm.  I.  675. 

&-aTrrot,  ov,  (airro/iai)  not  to  be  touched,  resistless,  invincible,  xf'Pf* 
dawroi  Horn,  (mostly  in  U.,  as  1.567),  Hes.  Op.  147;  ktjtos  dairrcv 
Opp.  H.  5.  629. 

dds.  tomorrow  or  the  day  after  tomorrow,  genit.  of  da,  =  1701s,  as  Zenod. 
read  for  ijous  in  II.  8. 470  (v.  Schol.  Ven.)  ;  used  in  Boeot.  as  Adv.,  Hesych. 

aao-id^poawi),  daai^puv,  in  Gramm.  for  dtattpp-. 

&a<ru.ds,  i,  (ddfon)  a  breathing  out,  Arist.  Probl.  34.  7. 

oao-Tf«TOS,  aao~xcTos,  v.  sub  d<rir€Tos,  d<rx«Tos. 

oarat,  Ep.  for  dtrai,  from  dot,  satio,  Hes.  Sc.  IOI. 

4-OTOS,  contr.  4ros,  ov,  (dat,  doai)  insatiate,  c.  gen.,  daros  iroKtftoto 
Hes.  Th.  714;  "Aprjs  dVos  lroXifiow  II.  5.  388;  naxt*  druv  ittp  iuvra 
22.  218:  cf.  Buttm.  Lexil.  s.  v.: — absol.,  daros  Wpis  Ap.  Rh.  I.  459. 
[The  first  syll.  in  daros  is  short  in  Hes.,  but  long  in  Ap.  Rh.] 

daros.  ov,  in  Oj.  Sm.  I.  21 7, *=Arrros,  q.  v. 

aau,  old  Ep.  Verb,  used  by  Horn,  in  aor.  act.  dd<ra  contr.  aaa,  med. 
d&adftnv  contr.  dffduijv,  and  pass.  ddaBnv  :  the  pres.  occurs  only  in  3  sing, 
of  Med.  ddrai  II.  Properly  to  hurt,  damage,  but  always  used  in 

reference  to  the  mind,  to  mislead,  infatuate,  of  the  effects  of  wine,  sleep, 
divine  judgments,  etc.,  daadv  u'  trapoi  rt  icaKot  irpos  rotoi  rt  vitvos 
Od.  10.  68;  aa«  at  oaiftovos  aXaa  Kaxi)  xai . .  oTvos  II.  61;  (pplvas 
iaat  oiiKy  21.  296;  inf.  offai  Aesch.  Fr.  428;  part,  aaas  Soph.  Fr. 
554: — so  in  Med.,'Ar7j  tf -navras  ddrai  II.  19.  91,  129: — Pass.,  daaSnv 
Hes.  Op.  281.  II.  the  aor.  med.  has  an  intr.  sense,  to  act  recklessly 

or  foolishly,  daodfinv  I  was  infatuated,  U.  9.  1 1 6,  1 19,  etc. ;  ddaaro  Si 
ptya  8vpu>  lb.  537.,  II.  340;  koX  ydp  St/  vv  irort  Ztvs  daaro  (as  Aris- 
tarch.,  whereas  others  read  Zi}v'  daaro  sc.  "AT17),  19.  95,  v.  Schol.  Ven.  ; 
«t  ri  srtp  daadpnv  Ap.  Rh.  I.  1333;  daaditnv .  .drnv  2.  623;  so  also 
aor.  pass.,  uiy  ddo8n  II.  16.  685. — Cf.  Buttm.  Lexil.  s.  v.  ddffai.  (Hence 
d-daror,  0T77,  draros.  Originally  it  had  the  digamma,  dfdat,  v.  sub  arn 
and  ddoros.  Hesych.  also  cites  dyardaOai  (i.e.  dfaraa9ai)  =  0XdwTt- 
o»at,  an  dydrnpai  (i.e.  dfdrnnat)  = /3«'/3Aau/<ai.)  [The  usual  quantity 
*  B 


. 


a/3a  —  a/3oXo9. 


is  a&aev  aiiaafiTjv,  part,  a&aas ;  but  aaffai'  Od.  io.  68;  aacraTO  and 
aaoOnv  II.  11.  c. ;  but  aaoaro  II.  340,  aao&n  h.  Horn.  Cer.  24".] 

a/3a,  ij,  Dor.  tor  iyjQi?. 

apd$T)S.  is,  {&d0os)  not  deep,  Arr.  Tact.  5.  6 ;  iirupdvtia  up.  without 
depth,  Sext.  Emp.  p.  475.  5  Bekk. 

d-paOpos,  ov,  without  foundation,  Georg.  Pisid. 

opaicfw,  (d&a/erjs)  to  be  speechless,  Ep.  Verb,  only  used  in  aor.,  ol  0' 
ufidtcyaav  iravrts  said  nothing,  took  no  heed,  Od.  4.  249. 

d|3aKT)S.  is,  (&a£oj)  speechless,  Lat.  infans :  hence  childlike,  innocent, 
<pprjy  Sappho  77  (where  E.  M.  has  ace.  afiatcrjv).  Adv.  -itiajs  E.  M. — 
Hesych.  has  also  dpaKT|jtuv  ;  and  dpo|  is  cited  by  Eust.  1494.  64. 

dpaKi$ou.ai,  Dep.,  ■  dpa/ciai,  Anacr.  74. 

dptuciov,  to,  v.  sub  a/3a£. 

d/3uKio-Kos,  o,  Dim.  of  d£a£,  a  s?nall  stone  for  inlaying,  in  mosaic 
work,  Lat.  tessera,  tessella,  Moschio  ap.  Ath.  207  D. 

d(3aico-«t,BT|$,  is.  like  an  afSa£,  Schol.  Theocr.  4.  61. 

d-paicx«VTOs,  ov,  uninitiated  in  the  Bacchic  orgies,  Eur.  Bacch.  472  ; 
generally,  joyless,  Id.  Or.  319;  v.  Luc.  Lap.  3. 

dpdXc  [50]*  properly  d  /JaX«,  expressing  a  wish,  0  that . . .'  Lat.  utinam, 
c.  indie,  Callim.  Fr.  455  ;   c.  inf.,  Anth.  P.  7.  699.     Cf.  £dXe. 

d-Sdvavo-os,  ov,  liberal :   in  Adv.  -ws,  Clem.  Rom.  I.  44. 

dpa|  [a],  &tcos,  0,  Lat.  abacus  : — a  slab  or  board:  1.  a  reckoning- 

board  or  board  for  geometrical  figures,  Iambi.  V.  Pyth.  5,  Sext.  Emp. 
447.  4  Bekk. ;  and  in  dim.  form  dpdiciov,  Lys.  ap.  Poll.  10.  105,  Alex. 
'Avcyk.  I.  3.  2.   a  draught-board,  Caryst.  ap.  Ath.  435  D;  Dim. 

dfiatciov  Poll.  IO.  150.  3.  a  sideboard,  Amnion.  4.  a  trencher, 

plate,  Cratin.  K\«o/3.    2.  II.    a  place  on  the  stage,   in  Dim. 

d&diciov,  Suid.  III.  cf.  a&atcio-icos. 

apdimcrr-os,  ov,  (Qairrtfa)  not  to  be  dipped,  that  will  not  sink,  Lat. 
immersabilis,  d/3.  dX/ias  of  a  net,  Pind.  P.  2.  146 ;  d/3.  Tpviravov  a  trepan 
with  a  guard,  to  stop  it  from  going  too  deep,  Galen.  II.  not 

drenched  with  liquor,  Plut.  2.  686  B.  III.  not  baptized,  Eccl. 

dpa-nros,  ov,  (ftdirraj)  of  iron,  not  tempered  by  dipping  in  cold  water, 
Suid.*  Hesych. ;  v.  sub  0a<prf  I. 

dpappapiorcos,  ivithout  barbarisms,  E.  M. :  -urri,  Boiss.  An.  3.  160. 

dpappapos.  ov,  not  barbarous :   but  in  Soph.  Fr.  336,  Blomf.  d&opfiopov. 

d)3apr)s,  «'*,  {$dpos)  without  weight,  Arist.  Cael.  I.  8,  16,  Plut.,  etc. ; 
otpvyfxjs  d/3.  a  light  pulse,  Galen.  II.  not  burdensome,  of  per- 

sons, afiapTJ  iavrov  rrjpuv  2  Ep,  Cor.  II.  9;  d/3.  eavrov  irapiX(lv 
C.  I.  5361.  15  :— Adv.  -pais,  lightly,  without  offence,  SimpHc. 

d-pao-dvioTOS,  ov,  not  examined  by  torture  or  question,  untortured,  un- 
questioned, Antipho  112.  46;  d/3.  Ovrjaxetv  Joseph.  B.  J.  I.  32,  3;  d£. 
Hkiituv  {sc.  tov  tjkiov),  without  pain,  of  hawks,  Ael.  N.A.  IO.  14.  2. 

of  things,  untested,  unexamined,  d/3.  irapaktinftv  rt  Plut.  2.  59  C.  3. 

Adv.  -tojs,  without  question  or  search,  Thuc.  I.  20,  Plut.  2.  28  C. 

d-paaCXcvros,  ov,  without  a  king,  not  ruled  by  a  king,  Thuc.  2.  80, 
Xen.  Hell.  5.  2,  17. 

dpdoxdvos,  ov,  (f3aa/catvoj)  free  from  envy,  Teles  ap.  Stob.  575,  fin. 
Adv.  -vojs,  M.  Auton.  1.  16. 

dpdcrtcovTOS,  ov,  not  subject  to  enchantment,  C.  I.  5053,  51 19:  Subst., 
a$a<7KavTov ,  to,  a  charm,  amulet,  cited  from  Diosc.  Adv.  -tojs,  Anth.  P. 
II.  267. 

dp  a  or  a  k  to  s,  ov,  (paaTa(oj)  not  to  be  borne  or  carried,  Plut.  Auton.  16. 
Adv.  -tojs,  Hesych. 

d{3&Tas,  o,  Dor.  for  fjpijrrjs,  Call.  L.  P.  109. 

dparoojiai,  Pass,  to  be  made  desert,  Lxx  (Jerem.  29.  20). 

d-J3aTOS,  ovt  also  rj,  ov,  Pind.  N.  3.  36  : — untrodden,  impassable,  inacces- 
sible, of  mountains,  Hdt.  4.  25.,  7. 176,  Soph.  O.T.  719,  etc. ;  of  a  river, 
not  fordable,  Xen.  An.  5.  6,  9 :  metaph.  in  Com.,  oUtai  d/3.  tois  ixovat 
pt-qhX  (V  inaccessible  to  the  poor,  Aristopho  'larp.  2  ;  d/3.  ttokTv  rds 
rpairifas  Anaxtpp.  Ktpavv.  5.  2.  of  holy  places,  not  to  be  trodden, 

like  a&iKTos,  Soph.  O.  C.  167,  675  ;  tpirti  wkovros  .  .  ts  rd$ara  teat 
trpoi  fii&rjka  Id.  Fr.  109  ;  ditarwraros  6  roiros  [sc.  ol  Taxpot]  Arist. 
Probl.  20.  12  :  metaph.  pure,  chaste,  faxy  Plat.  Phaedr.  245  A.  b. 

as  Subst.,  afiarov,  to,   adytum,  Theopomp.  Hist.  272.  3.    of  a 

horse,  not  ridden,  Luc.  Zeux.  6  ;  of  female  animals,  Id.  Philops.  7,  cf. 
Lexiph.  19.  II.  act.,  d0.  iruvos,  a  plague  that  hinders  walking, 

u  e.  gout,  Luc.  Ocyp.  36. 

d-P&<f>T]s,  is,  —  afSairros,  v.  sub  avaty-qs. 

'Appd,  Hebr.  word,  father,  Ev.  Marc.  14.  36. 

dj3pds,  d,  v,  an  abbot,  Justinian. 

dpStXuKTos,  ov,  (@b,€\vo'OQj)  not  to  be  abominated,  Aesch.  Fr.  130. 

'ApStipiTris  [f],  ov,  6,  a  man  of  Abdera  in  Thrace,  the  Gothamite  of 
antiquity,  proverb,  of  simpletons,  Dem.  218.  10: — Adj.  'Ap&rjpLTucos,  rj, 
ov,  like  an  Abderite,  i.e.  stupid,  Luc.  Hist.  Conscr.  2  :  'ApSTjpo-XoYos, 
ov,  Tatian,  Cic.  Att.  7.  7,  4. 

dpS-qs,  6,  said  by  Hesych.  to  mean  a  scourge  in  Hippon.  88. 

d-P<paios,  ov,  uncertain,  of  remedies,  Hipp.  Aph.  1245  ;  dPcfiatoTaTov 
5jv  KftcTTjfieOa  (sc.  irkovros)  Alex.  Incert.  27,  cf.  Menand.  Avok.  2.  1  ; 
6<p$a\fj.os  a/3,  unsteady,  Arist.  H.  A.  I.  10,  3;  metaph.,  djS.  <pt\ia  Id. 
Eth.  E.  7.  2,  15  ;  ry  dfiifiatov  =  d^t^atuTijs,  Luc.  Char.  18  ;  «£  d&€0aiov 
from  an  insecure  position,  Arr.  An.  I.  1 5,  2.  2.  of  persons,  unstable, 

uncertain,  fickle,  Dem.  134I,  fin.,  Arist.  Eth.  N.  9.  12,  3.  Adv.  -oj?, 
Menand.  Ttajpy.  I. 

d-P«paioTns,  rjros,  1),  unsteadiness,  instability,  Polyb.  Fr.  Gram.  6. 
d-(3«f3T|\os,  ov,  like  d/3aros,  sacred,  inviolable,  Plut.  Brut.  20. 

dfJcXios,  i.  e.  dfiKtos,  Cretan  for  yiKios,  tjKios,  Hesych. 

dp€XT«p«io$,  a,  ov,  lengthd.  for  dfiiXrtpos,  as  ^fj-tripftos  for  y'Urtpos, 
Eust.  1930.  32,  E.  M.  429;  restored  by  Dind.  in  Anaxandr.  'E\cv.  1,  for 
dfiikTtpiov, 


d^cXTcpia,  ^,  silliness,  stupidity,  fatuity,  Plat.  Theaet.  174  C,  SyiBp, 
198  D,  etc.  (The  false  form  d0(Xrr)pia,  common  in  late  Ms.S.,  is  left 
uncorrected  by  Bekk.  in  Arist.  Pol.  5. 11,  26.) 

dpeXTepo-KOKicvf,  vyos,  o,  rt  silly  fellow,  Plat.  Com.  Adi'.  1. 

d{3cXT€po$,  a,  ov  (Plat.  Phil.  48  C),  good  for  nothing,  silly,  stupid, 
fatuous,  Ar.  Nub.  1201,  Antiph.,  etc. ;  irpos  rt  Anaxandr.  Kavij<p.  1  ;  u£. 
rt  naOftv  Dem.  449.  26; — Sup.  -ojtcltos,  Ar.  Ran.  989;  of  Margitts, 
Hyperid.  Lye.  6.     Adv.  -pats,  Plut.  2.  531  C. 

o.|3t)5wv,  i.  e.  dfijb'ujv,  for  drjSwv,  prob.  Lacon.,  Hesych. 

df3*f)p,  i.  e.  dfrjp,  Lacon.  word  for  oitcijpa  arods  txovi  Hesych.;  cf.  alrjp. 

dpCao-ros,  ov,  (pid^ojiat)  unforced,  without  force  or  violence,  Plat.  Tim. 
61  A:  unstrained,  unaffected,  Dion.  H.  de  Demosth.  28.  Adv.  -T<rs 
Arist.  Mot.  An.  10.  4. 

d-pLpX^s.  ov,  v,  a  man  ivithout  books,  Tzetz.  Hist.  6.  407,  475. 

d-ptos,  ov,  —  dfiiojTos,  ^cuijs  dfiiov  Emped.  38;  ap.  0'ios  Anth.  P.  7. 
715.  2.  not  to  be  survived,  atvxvvi]  Plat.  Legg.  873  C.  II. 

without  a  living,  starving,  Luc.  D.  Mort.  15.  3;  arttcvos  xal  djS.  teal 
■npowXys,  an  imprecatory  form  in  C.  I.  3915.  46.  III.  d&tot  in 

II.  13.  6,  as  cpith.  of  the  'IvTnjfioXyoi,  simple  in  life  and  manners,  'linn)- 
fxoKywv  y\aKTo<pdyojv  dfiicuv  tc  :  but  prob.  'A&iojv,  as  a  pr.  n.,  is  the  true 
reading  ;  it  certainly  was  so  used  in  the  time  of  Alexander,  v.  Schol.  Ven. 

d-pCoTos,  ov,  =  sq.,  Kara/tovd  d0'toros  &iov,  d&iorcs  fiiov  rvxa  ^ur- 
Hipp.  821,  867,  ubi  olim  d&iarros. 

dpicoTOiroios,  ov,  making  life  insupportable,  Schol.  Eur.  Hipp.  8^3. 

upicoTOs,  ov,  (^(ooj)  not  to  be  lived,  insupportable,  d/3.  Trtiro't7)K€  rov 
fStov  Ar.  PI.  969  ;  d/3.  foV**'  &'i0V  Philem.  Incert.  8.  7,  cf.  5.  7  ;  dpiwrov 
Xpvvov  @toT€vaai  Eur.  Ale.  241  ;  d&iajTov  aier  to'to'dat  rov  fiiov  avriv 
Dem.  557.  fin. : — dfiiojTov  [iaTi]  life  is  intolerable,  Plat.  Rep.  407  A ; 
also,  dpiarrov  ^qv  Id.  Legg.  926  B  ;  d&iojrov  17/uv  Eur.  Ion  670.  Adv., 
dfitwTois  (X*IV  P'ut*  ^^°  ^  >  a-iffXP&>i  xal  d/3.  biaTtOfjvai  Id.  Sol.  7.  Cf. 
d&ios,  dfiioTos,  fitarrds. 

dpXdpcia,  i),  freedom  from  harm,  Lat.  incolumitas,  Plut.  2,  1090  "B; 
for  Aesch.  Ag.  1024    v.  sub  tuXd/Sfta.  II.  act.  hartnletsuess, 

Lat.  innocentia,  Cic.  Tusc.  3.  8. 

d-pXu.pTjs,  If,  without  harm,  i.  e.,  I.  pass,  unharmed,  unhurt, 

Pind.  O.  13,  37,  P.  8.  77,  Aesch.  Th.  68,  etc.;  (uxrav  d&\ap€t  &la* 
Soph.  El.  650,  cf.  649.  II.    act.    not    harming,    harmie>>, 

innocent,  £vvovoia  Aesch.  Eum.  285;  Tjoovat  Plat.  Rep.  357  B,  etc.; 
d/3X.  airaapioi  doing  no  serious  injury,  Hipp.  Epid.  1.  944.  2.  evert- 

ing or  preventing  harm,  vo~ojp  Theocr.  24.  96: — in  Plat.  Legg.  953  A, 
we  have  the  act.  and  pass,  senses  conjoined,  d@\.  rov  Spdaai  t«  koI 
■naduv: — Adv.  dftka&ws,  Ep.  -ievs,  h.  Horn.  Merc.  83.  3.  in  Att. 

tormularies,  dfika&ivs  airovoais  i^ivuv,  coupled  with  hiKaiais  and  dho- 
Xws,  seems  to  exclude  open  violence  as  well  as  fraud,  Thuc.  5.18  and  47 ; 
so  the  airovhai  themselves  are  entitled  dSoXox  teal  d/3X.  Id.  4.  118.,  5.  iS  ; 
and  we  have  £vfi(iaxot  TuaTOt . .  /cat  d/3X.  in  C.  I.  74*  !4« 

dpXupia,  i),  poet,  for  d/3xdy3eia,  d&ka&iTjai  vooto  h.  Horn.  Merc.  39^. 

dpXairros,  ov,  =  d&ka@r}s,  Nic.  Th.  488.     Adv.  -tojs,  Orph.  H.  63.  10. 

dpXaoT€a>,  not  to  bud,  to  bud  imperfectly,  Theophr.  C.  P.  1.  20,  5. 

d-pXaoTOS,  ov,  (pkaardvoj)  not  budding,  budding  imperfectly,  barren, 
Theophr.  H.  P.  1.  2,  5  : — also,  d-pXcurrfis,  it,  Id.  H.  P.  2.  2,  8  ;  and 
d-pXdo"rrjTOS,  ov,  v.  1.  C.  P.  I.  3,  2. 

dpXcurtfnfjp.'nTos,  ov,  not  blasphemed,  Socr.  H.  E.  5.  19. 

apXavros,  ov,  (jSXatm;)  unslippered,  Opp.  C.  4.  369. 

dpXeu/qs,  is,  (&k€fx(atvaj)  feeble,  Lat.  impotens,  Nic.  Al.  82: — Adv., 
d/3\€/i€OJS  tt'ivojv  drinking  intemperately,  Panyas.  6.  8. 

dpX«WT)S,  Is,  (fikivva)  without  mucus  (pttuita),  Ath.  355  F. 

dpX€iTT€a>,  (d/SXejTT^s  Hesych.)  not  to  see,  to  overlook,  disregard,  ri 
wpiirov  Polyb.  30.  6,  4,  often  in  Euseb. 

dpX«imrjp,a,  to,  a  mistake,  oversight,  ==  irapopana,  Polyb.  Fr.  I. 

d-pX<4>upos,  ov,  without  eyelids,  Anth.  P.  11.  66. 

d-pXtiJaa,  17,  blindness,  Eccl. 

dpXtjpa,  i.e.  dfk-npa,  for  avkrjpa,  tvkrjpa  (q.  v.),  Hesych.: — 'A&kijpos 
as  prop,  name,  II.  6.  32. 

dpX'qs,  rjros,  6,  ij,  ($dkk<u)  not  thrown  or  shot,  lov  d/SX^Ta  an  arrow 
not  yet  used,  II.  4.  117,  cf.  Ap.  Rh.  3.  279. 

d-8XT|Tos,  ov,  not  hit  (by  darts),  opp,  to  uvovraros,  II.  4.  540. 

dpX"T|XT|S,  is,  (fikriXT})  without  bleatings,  tvavkiov  Antip.  Sid.  95. 

dpXt]xp*|S*  *'s'  8en*  *os*  rare  ^orm  of  d@kr]xp6s,  Nic.  Th.  885. 

dpX"rjxp°S*  d,  iv,  (a  euphon.,  fikijxpus,  v.  sub  fiakaxos) : — weak,  feeble, 
of  a  woman's  hand,  II.  5.  337;  of  defenceless  walls,  II.  8.  178;  d£X. 
Odvaros,  an  easy  death  in  ripe  old  age,  opp.  to  a  violent  one,  Od.  II. 
135.,  23.  282  ;  KWfjLa  d^X.  Lat.  langiddus  sopor,  Ap.  Rh.  2.  205. 

dpX-rjxpwBTis.  «s,  =  d&krjxpds,  of  sheep,  Babr.  93.  5  (Suid.  fJkijxwoTjs). 

dpouTL,  -aTOS,  Dor.  for  dfHorrrt,  -tjtos. 

d-PoTfjOTjo-ia,  i],  helplessness,  Lxx  (Sir.  51.  10). 

d-Po-f]0TjTOS,  ov,  admitting  of  no  help,  without  remedy,  incurable,  of 
wounds,  Ephor.  58,  Polyb.  I.  81,  5,  etc.;  dp.  fXflv  TVV  imicovpiav,  un- 
serviceable, useless,  Diod.  20.  42  ;  vv£  d/3.  Galen. : — Adv.  -tojs,  Diosc. 
Ther.  12.  II.  of  persons,  helpless,  Plut.  Arat.  2,  etc. 

dpoT|Ti,  Dor.  -fixt,  Adv.  (podoj)  without  sjmimons,  Pind.  N.  8.  15. 

dpoTjTOS,  Dor.  -dTOS,  ov,  (fHodaS)  not  loudly  lamented,  Anth.  P.  append. 
200.         2.  noised  abroad,  tckios  ovk  d/3.  Epigr.  Gr.  40.  II.  voice- 

less, Nonn.  Jo.  12.  v.  42. 

dpoXfw,  f.  r\aoj,  late  Ep.  for  avriPokioi,  to  meet,  Ap.  Rh.  3.  1145  ;  Ep. 
aor.  dpokrjaav  Id.  2.  770,  Call.  Fr.  455. 

dpoXTjTUS,  vos,  "fy,  a  meeting.  Ion.  word  in  A.  B.  322.  E.  M.  3. 

dpoX*qT«p,  epos,  o,  one  who  meets,  Antim.  ap.  E.  M.  4.  8. 

dpoXXa,  17,  the  Lat.  abolla,  a  thick  woollen  cloak,  Arr.Peripl.  M.  Rubri,  p.  1 3. 

upoXos,  ov,  (Pokrj)  that  has  not  shed  his  foal -teeth,  of  a  young  horse. 


afiopfiopos  —  wyaBls. 


Soph.  Fr.  363,  Plat.  Legg.  834  C.  Strattis  Xpva.  2  :  also  of  an  old  horse, 

that  no  longer  shetis  them,  A.  B.  322.  2.  d0o\a  an  nnlncky  throw 

ol*  the  dice,  Poll.  7.  204.  II.   as  Subst.,  dBo\os,  17,  a  horseman's 

cloak,  Lat.  abolla,  Ait.  Peripl.  M.  Rubri,  p.  4  :  (in  this  sense.  Curt,  re- 
gards the  u-  as  a  relic  of  dpip-  or  dptpi-,  thrown  around ;  cf.  dYpoKTOs-.) 

d-S6p^opos.  ov.  without  mire,  v.  sub  d0dpBapos. 

u(3dv  Dor.  for  t)/3us. 

dBo<rKT|S.  <5,  {Boo/cai)  unfed,  fasting,  Nic.  Th.  1 24. 

d-p6<TKT|Tos,  ov,  pastureless,  dpi)  Babr.  45.  10,  cf.  Eust.  307.  27. 

d-pdriivos,  ov,  without  plants  or  vegetation,  Jo.  Chrys. 

uBotos.  oi',  {Bookw)  without  pasture,  Hesych. 

dSoDKoX-nros,  ov,  (BovKoXiw)  untended :  metaph.  unheeded,  ufi.  tout' 
ipw  ippovrifiari  Aesch.  Supp.  929. 

dfiovXci,  Adv.,  inconsiderately,  Suid.,  etc. 

dpovXcvros,  ov,  ill-advised,  inconsiderate,  Hippol.  c.  Noiit.  10.  Adv. 
-tois,  Lxx  (I  Mace.  j.  67). 

dfiovXcu.  to  be  unwilling.  Plat.  Rep.  437  C ;  c.  inf.,  Ep.  Plat.  347  A : 
— also  c.  ace.  to  dislike,  object  to,  Dio  C.  55.  9.  (dBovXiw  seems  to  be 
an  exception  to  the  rule  that  o  privat.  cannot  be  comp.  directly  with 
Verbs :  but  Plat.,  in  a  manner  not  unusual  with  him,  may  have  taken 
dBovKos  in  the  sense  of  unwilling  for  the  purpose  of  forming  this  Verb  ; 
cf.  the  curious  analogy  of  im-probus,  improbare.) 

dSovAijTos,  ov,  {BovXopai)  unwilling,  involuntary,  Plat.  Legg.  733 
D.  II.  not  according  to  one's  wish  or  will,  disagreeable,  Dion. 

H.  ;.  74.     Adv.  -tok,  Sext.  Emp.  P.  I.  19,  M.  8.  316. 

dBouAta.  17,  ill-advisedness,  want  of  advice,  thoughtlessness,  Hdt.  7.  210, 
Antipho  1 26.  30,  etc. ;  iwapOivres  d&ovKiy  Hdt.  7.  9,  3  ;  i(  dflovKms 
■nfotiv,  d0ov\ia  Wfafiv  Soph.  El.  398,  429:  also  in  pi.,  Hdt.  8.  57, 
Pind.,  etc. 

uBovAos.  ov,  (0ovKti)  inconsiderate,  ill-advised.  Soph.  Ant.  1026,  etc.; 
riicvotoi  TJnv  dBovXov  taking  no  thought  for  them,  Id.  Tr.  140:  Comp. 

urtpoi  Thuc.   I.   120,    7.  2.  =  KaKo0ov\os,  Soph.  El.  546. — 

Adv.  -an,  Hdt.  3.  71  ;  oiix  dfi.  Pherecr.  Tup.  1.6;  Sup.  d0ov\oTara, 
Hdt.  7.  9,  2. 

<iBod-rT)s.  ov,  o,  {&ovs)  without  oxen,  i.  e.  poor,  Hes.  Op.  449. 

of3pa,  r),  a  favourite  slave,  Lat.  delicata.  Menand.  "Aithtt.  I ,  Xik.  3, 
VfvS.  3,  Lxx  (Gen.  24.  61,  Ex.  2.  5,  al.).  (Commonly  referred  to 
dBpds :  but  some  old  Granim.  call  the  word  foreign,  and  write  it  dBpa, 
cf.  A.  B.  322.) 

dBpap.Q>iov.  to.  Dim.  of  sq.,  Xenocr.  36. 

dBpap.is.  ibos,  r),  a  rish  found  in  the  sea  and  the  Nile,  Opp.  H.  I.  244. 

dPpcitTos,  ov.  =  dBpoxos,  Plut.  2.  381  C,  Mosch.  ap.  Niike  Opusc.  179. 

uppifouxu.  Med.  or  Pass.  =  dBpvvopai,  Hesych. 

d-PptSris.  is,  of  no  weight,  Bdpos  piv  ovx  dBpiBis  Eur.  Supp.  1 1 25. 

ufipiKTos,  ov,  (Bpifa)  wakeful,  Hesych.,  Suid. :  4Bpi£,  Adv.,  Hesych. 

dBpo-Bd-rt]*,  ov,  d,  softly  or  delicately  stepping,  Aesch.  Pers.  1072. 

dBpo-Bios,  ov,  living  delicately,  effeminate,  Plut.  Demetr.  2,  etc. 

uPpo-Bdo-Tpvxos,  ov,  =  dBpox6prjs,  Tzctz. 

dBpd-YOos.  of,  wailing  womanishly,  Aesch.  Pers.  54I. 

dflpd-Sais.  0,  r),  luxurious,  d&pooatrt  TpoWfr/  Archcstr.  ap.  Ath.  4  E. 

a8po-8tcuTa,  r),  luxurious  living,  a  faulty  compd.  (v.  Lob.  Phryn.  603) 
in  A.  B.  322,  Suid.,  Ael.  V.  H.  12.  24  in  lemmate. 

dflpo-oiaiTos.  ov,  living  delicately,  dBpohiatTW  Avowv  dx^-os  Aesch. 
Pers.  41,  cf.  Anth.  P.  append.  59:  to  dBp.  effeminacy,  Thuc.  1.  6,  Ath. 
513  C.     Adv.  -rats,  Philo  1.  324. 

dBpo-<iu.jiv,  ov,  (f'pa)  softly  clad.  Com.  Anon,  in  Mein.  4.  p.  621. 

djBpd-Kapirot,  ok,  bearing  delicate  fruits,  ap.  Hesych. 

dBpo-icdp.i]s.  ov,  d,  with  delicate  or  luxuriant  leaves,  <poivt£  Eur.  Ion 
920.  I.  T.  1099,  cf.  Anth.  P.  12.  256: — dBpoKou,os.  ov.  Or.  Sib.  14.  67. 

d  Bpduxos,  ov,  without  Bacchus,  Anth.  P.  6.  291. 

dBpopiTp-ns .  ov,  d,  with  bright  girdle,  Hesych. 

clppopos,  ov,  either,  1.  (a  copul.)  noisy,  boisterous,  or,  2.  (a  priv.) 
noiseless ;  of  the  Trojans,  v.  sub  aiiaxos :  Ap.  Rh.  uses  it  in  the  latter 
sense,  dBp.  tcvpa  4.  153. 

dSpo-irf'StXot.  ov,  soft-sandalled,  'rZp&s  Mel.  in  Anth.  P.  12.  158. 

dBpoir«vflr|f,  is,  v.  sub  dxpowtv$i]s. 

dppdmqvos,  ov,  (irrpt;)  0/  delicate  texture.  Lye.  863  ;  whence  it  was 
introduced  by  Salinas,  into  Aesch.  Ag.  690,  for  the  vulg.  dBporipwv. 

a8pd-irAovro«,  ov,  richly  luxuriant,  x^'ty  Eur.  I.  T.  1 1 48. 

dBpds.  d,  ov,  poet,  also  or,  dv  : — graceful,  beauteous,  pretty,  rait,  "Epoiy 
Anacr.  16.  64;  dBpai  Xdptrts  (with  Aeol.  ace.)  Sapph.  65;  esp.  of  the 
body,  ampul,  rods,  etc.,  Pind.  O.  6.  90,  Eur.,  etc. :  of  things,  splendid, 
ariipavos,  xioos,  irXovroretc.  Pind.  I.  8.  144,  etc. — Very  early,  however, 
the  word  took  the  notion  of  soft,  delicate,  dainty,  luxurious,  like  rpv- 
tptpds ;  hence,  dBpd  wa0tiv  to  live  delicately,  Solon  15.  4,  Theogn.  474  ; 
and,  from  Hdt.  downwards  (1.  71,  and  in  Sup.  -drarot,  4.  104)  it  became 
a  common  epithet  of  Asiatics  ;  'lurvwv  dBpds  . .  dx^os  Antiph.  Aa&  1  ; 
cf.  ffavAos. — Still  the  Poets  continued  to  use  it  in  good  sense,  esp.  of 
women,  delicate,  gentle,  e.g.  Aesch.  Fr.  32J,  Soph.  Tr.  523;  and  of 
anything  delicate  or  pretty,  Valck.  Call.  p.  233 ;  iBpiv  d&vppa,  of  a 
pet  dog,  Epigr.  Or.  626  ;  neut.  pi.  dBpd  rraprjlbos  =  aBpdv  napniba  (cf. 
danpos  in.  1),  Eur.  Phoen.  I486.  Adv.  ABpais,  Anacr.  16;  ABpan  and 
dBpdr  Balvnv  to  step  delicately,  Eur.  Med.  831,  1 164  ;  so  neut.  pi.,  dBpd 
7«Adv  Anacreont.  44.  3.,  45.  5;  iBporipa/s  »x*'v  Heliod.  I.  17. — The 
word  is  chiefly  poet.,  though  never  found  in  old  Ep. ;  and  is  rare  in  Att. 
Prose,  Xen.  Synip.  4,  44.  Cf.  dBpa.  (Perh.  from  same  Root  as  fj&Tj : 
Curt,  regards  the  root  as  unknown,  p.  490.)  [4  by  nature,  v.  Eur.  Med. 
1  104,  'I'm.  Hjo.] 

d|JpooTaYT|V  it,  (uTafoi)  dropping  rich  unguents,  ytiramov  Anon.  ap. 
Suid.  t.  v.  dflpit. 


oBpocruvT],  i7,  =  a^pcTT/s,  Sappho  43,  Eur.  Or.  340,  Xenophan.  3    1 

oBpoToJu,  to  miss,  c.  gen.,  Ep.  Verb  only  used  in  aor.  1  subj.,  ufaus 
aBporaioixtv  ^p.  tor  -a>p.<v)  dAAr/XoiiV  II.  10.  65.  A  Subst.,  dppdra|is, 
(cut,  1),  error,  is  cited  in  Hesych.,  Eust.  789.  52  ;  and  an  Adj.,  dBpoTTi- 
(icov,  ov,  erring,  in  Hesych.,  A.  B.  322.  (From  the  same  Root  with 
dfiBpor-uv,  dp.apr-tlv,  p.  being  rejected  as  in  dp-Bporos  dBporos,  d/«r\a- 
Kttv  dirkaxuv,  cf.  Buttm.  Lexil.  s.  v.  dpBpoatos  7.) 

dBpoTr|S,  rrros,  rj,  splendour,  luxury,  bdp.ovs  dBporaros  houses  of  luxury 
i.  e.  luxurious,  Pind.  P.  1 1 .  5 1  ;  ti,  M17W  WToXp  icai  dBpoTr/rt  Xen.  Cyr. 
8.  8,  15,  cf.  Plat.  Ale.  1.  122  C,  Eur.  Bacch."  968;  ovk  iv  dBpdrnr\ 
Kfiaai  thou  art  not  in  a  position  ro  be  fastidious,  Id.  I.  T.  1343  ;  also, 
d/SpdroTos  in  in  tender  youth,  Pind.  P.  8.  127. 

dSpo-Ttpos.  ov,  delicate  and  costly,  v.  sub  dBpdwnvos. 

d/}poTivT|,  r),  =  dpaprakr),  Hesych. ;  cf.  iBporafyu. 

ajSpOTOvuvos.  r;,  ov,  made  of  djipdrovov ,  Diosc.  I.  60. 

dPpoToviTT|S,  oiVos,  d,  wine  prepared  with  dfipdrovov,  Diosc.  5.  62. 

oppoTovov,  to,  an  aromatic  plant,  prob.  southernwood,  Artemisia  abro- 
tonum,  Theophr.  H.  P.  6.  7,  3,  etc. ;  v.  Schneider  in  Indice. 

o-PpoTos.  ov,  also  17,  ov,=dpiBporos,  immortal,  divine,  sent  from  or 
sacred  to  the  gods,  holy,  in  Horn,  only  once,  vii(  dfiport]  II.  14.  78,  either 
holy  Night,  as  a  divinity,  (like  vi>(  apBporos,  dpBpoair),  baipovii],  iipuv 
xviipas,  iipuv  Ijpap),  or  never  failing  (like  d<p0iTos  r/cis)  ;  iirn  dBpora 
holy  hymns,  Soph.  Ant.  1 1 34,  ubi  v.  Musgr. — Cf.  dpBporos,  dpfipooia, 
and  Buttm.  Lexil.  s.  v.  H.  without  men,  deserted  of  men,  dfipo- 

rov  us  ipr/puav  Aesch.  Pr.  2,  where  the  MS.  reading  dfiarov  has  been 
corrected  from  Schol.  Ven.  II.  14.  78. 

&Ppo-<t>vr|S,  is,  tender  of  nature,  prob.  1.  Anth.  P.  9.  412  ;  v.  dippo<pvi)s. 

dPpo-xavrr|S,  ov,  d,  =■  dBpoxdpnjs,  Anacreont.  44.  8. 

dppoxia,  r),  (dBpoxos)  want  of  rain,  drought,  Menand.  ap.  Joseph.  A.  J. 
8.  13,  2,  Or.  Sib.  3.  540;  cf.  Lob.  Phryn.  291. 

aPpo-x(Tuv  [rj,  <wos,  d,  r),  i'k  soft  tunic,  softly  clad,  Anth.  P.  9.  538 ; 
— (iivds  dBpoxiroivas  beds  with  soft  coverings,  Aesch.  Pers.  543. 

ippoxos,  ov,  (Bpix")  like  dBpucros,  ununited,  unmoistened,  Aeschin. 
31.  5,  Nic.  Th.  339;  xard.  wovtov  dBpoxos  diaaus  Mosch.  2.  139: 
wanting  rain,  waterless,  vebia  Eur.  Hel.  1484  ;  'ApxaSlij  Call.  Jov.  19. 

SPpuva.  rd.  mulberries,  =avxdpuva,  Parthen.  ap.  Ath.  51  F,  cf.  A.  B. 
224  ; — Hesych.  writes  afipwa. 

4PpwTt|S,  ov,  o,  a  coxcomb,  fop,  Adam.  Physiogn.  2.  20. 

iPpuvu.  (dtjpos)  to  nuike  delicate,  treat  delicately,  /»ij  yvvaixos  iv  rpd- 
»o«s  iiBpwi  pi  Aesch.  Ag.  919 :  to  deck  or  trick  out,  (U  7a/uov  dBpival 
rata  Anth.  P.  6.  281  : — Med.  or  Pass,  to  live  delicately,  and  so,  much 
like  0ptnrrop.at.  to  wax  wanton,  give  oneself  airs,  dBpvvtrai  yap  irds  tis- 
«I  rrpdo-o-iw  jrA«'ov  Aesch.  Ag.  I205,  cf.  Soph.  O.  C.  1339;  iicaWvvopirjr 
re  Koi  i/Bpwdpriv  dv  Plat.  Apol.  20  C  ;  c.  dat.  rei,  to  pride  or  plume 
oneself  on  a  thing,  ovx  dBpvvopat  rwb'  Eur.  I.  A.  858  ;  ^Bpvvtro  to) 
Bpabiais  btawpdrrav  Xen.  Ages.  9.  2  :  cf.  Xapurpvvai,  atpvvvw. 

dPputui,  to,  a  woman's  garment,  Hesych. 

u-ppu>p.os,  ov,  free  from  smell,  Diph.  Siphn.  ap.  Ath.  355  B. 

"Appwv,  ajvos,  d,  Abron,  an  Argive,  proverbial  for  luxurious  living, 
' KBpatvos  Bios  Suid. 

d-pput,  dVrot,  d,  ^,  -  vijoris,  Paul.  Sil.  66  ;  restored  by  Cobet  for  dBpo- 
ros in  Soph.  Fr.  796. 

d-Bpwo-ia,  1),  want  of  food,  fasting.  Poll.  6.  39. 

dppuiTOS.  ov,  {BiBpdiaxai)  not  fit  to  be  eaten,  not  good  for  food,  Ctes. 
in  Phot.  Bibl.  49.  7,  Arist.  H.  A.  9.  28,  I,  al. ;  drrrd  Menand.  Avon.  3  : — 
of  wood,  not  eaten  by  worms,  Theophr.  H.  P.  5.  r,  2.  II.  of 

persons,  without  eating,  dBp.,  dworos  Charito  6.  3  tin. ;  cf.  d0pws. 

'ApoSot,  r),  Abydos,  the  town  on  the  Asiatic  side  of  the  Hellespont : — 
*Apo5d9«v,  Adv.  from  Abydos,  II.  4.  _s°o ;  'ApvSdfk.  at  Abydos,  17. 
584: — Adj.  *Apuotjvds,  r),  ov,  of  or  from  Abydos,  Ath.  572  E,  etc.: 
proverb.,  'AB.  iwifpdprjpa  a  dessert  of  Abydos,  i.  e.  something  unpleasant, 
variously  expl.  in  Paroemiogr. : — hence  "Apu8r|VOKdu.T|».  or  'APv8o- 
Kop-ns.  ov,  d,  =  d  *irt  toi  oviewpavruv  xopwv.  At.  Fr.  568,  ubi  v.  Dind.  1.  c. 

d-PuOos.  ov,  =  dBvaaos,  tis  Tiva  dBvSov  ipXvapiav  Plat.  Parm.  130  D  ; 
but  prob.  the  true  reading  is  tis  rtva  BvOov  tpKvapias. 

dpvpo-«VTOs,  ov,  (BvpcTfvat)  untaniud,  Schol.  II.  2.  527. 

dpvpTaicn  [dx],  17,  a  sour  sauce  of  leeks,  cresses,  Pherecr.  Incert.  89, 
Theopomp.  Com.  8ijff.  I.  Alex.  Mavbp.  I.  13,  etc. 

dpupTuKo-iroids.  dv,  making  dBvprdxtj,  Demetr.  'Aptov.  I. 

dpvo-cros.  ov,  bottotnless,  unfathomed,  Hdt.  2.  28 ;  ott^s-  dBvaaov 
viKayos  Aesch.  Supp.  470 :  generally,  unfathomable,  boundless,  enormous, 
like  BaBvs,  dB.  vKoirros  Aesch.  Th.  950 ;  dpyvpiov  At.  Lys.  1 74  ;  <ppiva 
Ai'av  Kadopdv,  fyiv  dBvaaov  Aesch.  Supp).  1059.  ^-  ^  d0voaost 

the  great  deep,  the  sea,  Lxx  (Isai.  44.  27):  the  abyss,  bottomless  pit,  Ev. 
Luc.  8.  31,  Apoc.  9.  I,  etc.     (For  the  Root,  v.  BaOvs.) 

-iPuiXoKoiros.  ov,  not  hoed.  Poll.  I.  246. 

dpwp,  i.e.  dfup,  Lacon.  for  ifws,  and  dRm  —  irpwi,  Hesych. 

iy,  apoc.  form  of  dvd  before  *,  7,  x>  v-  &**  'n''- 

&y&.  Dot.  for  dyij. 

dyda.<r9ai.  dydao-fe,  Ep.  forms  from  ayapai,  Od. 

ttYdfopai.  port,  collat.  form  of  dyapai,  from  which  we  have  part. 
honouring,  adoring,  XotBaiaiv  dya£6fUvot  npurav  6taiv  Pind.  N.  II.  7; 
impf.  r/7<if«To  Orph.  Arg.  63  : — for  the  Homeric  fut.  dydooopat,  etc., 
v.  sub  dyapai.  II.  the  Act.  is  used  in  same  sense  by  Aesch. 

Supp.  1062,  rd  0fS/v  pr/Siv  dydfav ;  but  dyd(us  is  cited  from  Soph,  in 
A.  B.  (Fr.  797)  as  =  ^apovv«is. 

dydfaot,  Dor.  for  1)7-,  Pind. 

dyaOtStov,  to.  Dim.  of  070*15,  Hesych.  s.  v.  toXviti;. 

oYdOit,  180s  [f  Draco  23],  r),  <t  ball  of  thread,  Pherecyd.  106  ;  070*101' 
dyaOibts,  proverb.,  quantities  of  goods,  Com.  ap.  A.  B.  9,  Poll.  7.  31. 
xV  B  2 


aya9of3pv<Tta  —  ayu\\a>. 


dyado-ppuTia.  7j,  good  produce,  C.  I.  9262. 

dyifcoBai^ovio-rai  or  -taoTaC.  01,  guests  who  drink  to  the  dyaBbs 
tiaipojv  (cf.  sq.) :  hence,  guests  who  drink  but  little.  Arist.  Eth.  E.  3.  6, 
3  : — d-Ya8oSatjj.ovia.tr Tai,  name  of  a  sort  of  club,  Ross  Inscrr.  ined, 
1-Sa  ;  at  Rhodes,  Hell.  J.  2.  p.  357- 

dyat)o-Saip.u)v,  01*0?,  b,  the  good  Genius,  to  whom  a  cup  of  pure  wine 
wtfl  Jrunk  at  the  end  of  dinner,  the  toast  being  given  in  the  words  dya- 
Bov 5aip.ovos :  and  in  good  Greek  it  was  always  written  divisim.  II. 
an  Egyptian  serpent.  Wessel.  Diod.  3.  50. 

dyaOoSoo-ia,  r).  (boots)  the  giving  0/  good,  Schol.  Arist. 

dyaOo-Sorns,  ov.  b,  the  Giver  0/  good,  Diotog.  ap.  Stob.  332.  19:  fern. 
-Sorts,  ibos,  17,  Dionys.  Ar.  440.  34. 

dyaOo-ciB-qs,  h,  like  good,  seeming  good,  opp.  to  dyaBbs,  Plat.  Rep. 
509  A.  Iambi.,  etc.     Adv.  -oars. 

dyaOocpytu.  to  do  good  or  well,  I  Ep.  Tim.  6.  18:  contr.  -ovpycw, 
Act.  Ap.  14.  17  (vul^.  dyafloiroiaij'). 

dyaOocpyia,  Ion.  -itj,  contr.  -ovpyia,  17,  a  good  deed,  service  rendered, 
Lat.  beneficium,  Hdt.  3.  154,  160.  II.  well-doing,  Eccl. 

dyado-cpyos.  contr.  oupyos.  ov,  (*tpya>)  doing  good,  Damascius  ap. 
Suid.  s.  v.  dyaBotpyia  : — 01  'AyaBotpyoi,  at  Sparta,  the  five  oldest  and 
most  approved  knights,  who  went  on  foreign  missions  for  the  state,  Hdt. 

1.  67 ;  v.  Biihr  ad  1..  Ruhnk.  Tim.  s.  v.,  Grote  Hist.  Gr.  2.  478,  602. 
dyaOodcXeia.  r),  desire  0/  good,  Anon.  ap.  Suid. 

dyaOoiroiccd,  to  do  good,  Sext.  Emp.  M,  II,  70,  Ev.  Marc.  3.  4.  2. 

07.  Ttvd  to  do  good  to,  Ev.  Luc.  6.  33  ;  c.  dupl.  ace,  Lxx  (Num.  10. 
32).  II.  to  do  well,  act  rightly,  1  Ep.  Petr.  2.  15. 

dyaOoTTOiTjo-is.  r),  well-doing.  Hernias: — also  -troua,  17,  I  Pet.  4.  19. 

dyaOo-TTOLOs,  bv,  doing  good,  beneficent,  Plut.  2.  368  B,  Lxx,  etc,  II. 
as  astrolog.  term,  giving  a  good  sign,  Artem.  4.  59,  Eus.  P.  E.  275  D. 

dyaGo-Trpf-Trqs.  c's.  becoming  the  good,  Eccl.     Adv.  -irws. 

dyaOoppvTOS.  ov,  (fiiw)  streaming  with  good,  Synes.  H.  I.  128. 

dyaOos  [&y],  t).  ov,  Lacon.  dyao-os  Ar.  Lys.  1301  :  (v.  sub  fin.)  : — good, 
Lat.  bonus:  I.  of  persons,  1.  in  early  times,  good,  gentle, 

noble,  in  reference  to  birth  and  rank,  the  Nobles  and  well-born  being 
termed  good  men.  prud'kommes,  as  opp.  to  tca/coi,  SciAoi  (lewd  people, 
churls,  etc.),  ofa  rt  tois  dya&otvt  trapaSpuwat  X*PVfS  Od.  15.  324,  cf. 
It.  1.  275  ;  dtyvtibs  r  dyaBbs  tc  U.  13.  664,  cf.  Od.  18.  276;  waTpbs  5' 
ftp:'  dyaOoto,  Bed  5c  p-t  yetvaro  fiTjrijp  II.  2 1.  109,  cf.  Od.  4.  611  ;  so  in 
later  writers,  xaxos  i£  dyaBov  Theogn.  190,  cf.  57  scb >  vPavs  darols, 
ov  <pBovioiv  dyaBots  Pind.  P.  3.  125,  cf.  2.  1 75-.  4-  506;  ris  6\v  tviraTpts 
w5c  $\do'Tot ;  ou5cis  twv  dya&tuv  /crk.  Soph.  El.  1082  ;  01  f  070^01 
irp-jf  rwv  dy*v5iv  KaravtKwvrat  Id.  Fr.  105  ;  rovs  tvytvtts  yap  tcdya- 
Bovs  .  .  <f>ikti  ""Apjyy  iva'tpttv  lb.  649 ;  and  so  to  tvytvis  is  made  the 
attribute  of  ol  dya&oi,  Eur.  Ale.  600  sq.,  cf.  I.  A.  625,  Andr.  766,  Tro. 
1254;  070^01  Kal  c£  dyaBwv  Lat.  bom  bonis  prognati,  Plat.  Phaedr. 
274  A: — with  this  early  sense  was  often  associated  that  of  wealth  and 
political  power,  just  as  in  the  phrases  boni  and  mali  elves,  optimus  quis- 
que  in  Sallust  and  Cicero ;  esp.  in  the  phrase  Kakol  Kaya&o't  (v.  sub 
KakoKayaBbs) : — on  this  sense  v.  Kortum  Hellen.  Staatsverf.  p.  14, 
Welcker  praef.  Theogn.  §  10-15,  22  sq.,  and  cf.  toBkbs,  xPV°"r^*  dfiti- 
vojv,  dptGTOS,  fokrioav,  £cAt(o*tos\  nanus,  x«*Va"'»  X(P€*0JV>  fbytvTjs.  2. 
good,  brave,  since  these  qualities  were  attributes  of  the  Chiefs  and 
Nobles,  so  that  this  sense  runs  into  the  former,  II.  I.  131.,  10.  559  ;  rip 
k  dyaBbs  ptiv  €ire<pv',  dyaBov  5c  Ktv  i£tvapi£tv  21.  280;  cf.  Hdt.  5. 
109,  etc.  3.  good,  in  reference  to  ability  or  office,  07.  0aatktvs 

1'-  3*  J79'  Lrtrh?  2*  732  J  Btpdirwv  16.  165.,  17.  388;  often  with 
qualifying  words,  dyaBbs  Iv  vapivri  13.  314;  fioty  070,00?  2.  408,  563, 
etc. :  vv£  3.  237,  Od.  II.  300 ;  0'trjv  II.  6.  478  ;  so  in  Att.,  yvwfxrjv  (I7. 
Soph.  O.  T.  687  ;  irdaav  dptTtjv  Plat.  Leeg.  899  B,  cf.  Ale.  1.  124  E  ; 
T€\vrjv  Id.  Prot.  323  B;  rd  iroktpua,  ra  noKtritcd  Hdt.  9.  1 22,  Plat. 
Gorg.  516  B,  etc.; — more  rarely  c.  dat.,  dy.  irokip.<p  Xen.  Oec.  4. 
15  ; — also  witha  Prep.,  07.  irepi  to  7rA7)0os  Lys.  130.2  ;  ci's  rt  Plat.  Ale.  I. 
125  A  ;  trpos  t*  Id.  Rep.  407  E  : — also  c.  inf.,  07.  paxtcrBat  Hdt.  1. 136  ; 
ImrtveaBai  1.  79  ;  dy.  iardvat  good  at  weighing,  Plat.  Prot.  356  B.  4. 

good,  in  moral  sense,  first  perhaps  in  Theogn.  438,  but  not  frcq.  till  the 
philos.  writers,  as  Plat. ;  often  joined  with  other  Adjs.,  o  marbs  Kay.  Soph. 
Tr.  541  ;  aotpbs  Kay.  Id.  Ph.  119  ;  BiKattuv  Kay.  lb.  1050,  cf.  Ant.  671, 
etc.  5.  at  'yaOe,  my  good  friend,  as  a  term  of  gentle  remonstrance, 

Plat.  Prot.  311  A,  314  D,  etc.  6.  0.70^00  Saifiovos,  as  a  toast,  'to 

the  good  Genius,*  /f^ScVorc  irtotft'  aKpdroVj  puoBbv  dyaBov  Saiuovos 
Ar.  Vesp.  525;  cf.  dyaOohaipuuv,  rvxV  JI-  3  :  b  07.  haifiojv  became  a 
title  of  the  Rom.  Emperor,  as  of  Nero,  C.  I.  4699,  cf.  3886  (add.) :  j) 
0tbt  uyaBrj,  the  Rom.  bona  dea,  Plut.  Caes.  9,  Cic.  19.  II.  of 

things,  1.  good,  serviceable,  'IBokt}  . .  ayaBi)  Kovporp6<pos  Od.  9. 

27.  etc.;  dy.  tois  roxtvat,  ttj  iruAct  Xen.  Cyn.  13,  17;  c.  gen.,  tt  rt 
o'5a  TTt-pcToC  07.  good/or  it,  Id.  Mem.  3.  8,  3.  2.  of  outward  cir- 

cumstances, aiSa/  5'  ovk  dyaB-qv  (f>Tj(r'  (upwai  dvb"pt  irpoi'KTrf  Od.  1 7.  352  ; 
tiwttv  ciy  070^01'  to  good  purpose,  II.  9.  102  ;  o  5£  irciVcTat  tt$  dy.  irtp 
for  any  good  end,  II.  789  ;  uvdur  th  070^0  23.  305  : — ayaBvv  [cctt*],  c. 
inf.,  it  is  good  to  do  so  and  so,  II.  7.  282.,  24. 130,  Od.  3.  196,  Att.  3. 

dyaBov,  ru,  a  good,  a  blessing,  benefit,  of  persons,  3)  ptya  dy.  ov  tois 
<pi\ots  Xen.  Cyr.  5,  3,  20;  *pi\ov,  b  akyiarov  dy.  uvai  <paffi  Id.  Mem. 

2.  4.  2,  cf.  Hier.  7,  9,  Ar.  Ran.  74,  etc.;  ctt*  dyaBQ  twos  for  one's  good, 
Thuc.  5.  27,  Xen. ;  «V  dyaBai  tois  irokirats  Ar.  Ran.  1487  : — to  dyaBov 
or  rdyaBov.  the  good,  Cicero's  summum  bonum.  Plat.  Rep.  506  B,  508  E, 
534  C.  a). : — also  in  pi.,  070^0,  Ta,  the  goods  of  fortune,  goods,  wealth, 
Hdt.  2.  172,  Lys.  138.  32,  Xen.,  etc.;  dyaBd  irdo*xeit/>  etc-  •'  Dut  a'so» 
good  things,  dainties,  Theogn.  1000,  Ar.  Ach.  873,  982,  etc.:  also  good 
qualities,  rots  dy.,  oh  txopLtv  iv  ttj  ipvxy  Isocr.  165  D :  d  T&Wa  iravra 
dy.  tx01-'  KaKovovs  5'  ftrj,  ofa  horse,  Xen.  Eq.  1,  2,  etc.  III. 


the  word  has  no  regular  degrees  of  Comparison  ;  but  many  forms  are 
used  instead;  viz.  Comp.  dp.tivoiv,  dpctW,  $e\Tiojv,  Kptiaaajv  (xappaiv), 
Xoj'totv  (X<ptvv).  Ep.  &(\Ttpos,  Xwirfpos,  <p€pT(pos  i — Sup.  dpiO'TOS,  /3c'A.- 
TiffTos,  KpariOTos,  XuA'aros  (K^/o'tos),  Ep.  &i\Taros,  KapTiaros,  <f>$p- 
raros,  <pipto~Tos.  The  reg.  Comp.  dyaBwrtpos  occurs  in  Lxx  (Jud.  11. 
25.,  15.  2)  and  Eccl.;  the  Sup.  a7a0o/raToy  in  Diod.  16.  85.  Heliod.  5. 

15,  Eus.,  etc.  IV.  Adv.  usually,  <5:  but  070^0*?  occurs  in  Hipp. 
OrHc.  742,  Arist.  Rhet.  3.11,1,  Lxx.  (The  relation  of  d-yaB-os  to  the 
Tent,  forms  got,  gut,  good,  cannot  be  maintained :  for  Gk.  g  ought  to 
be  represented  by  Teut.  k.) 

dyaOoTTjs,  tjtos,  t)t  goodness,  Lxx   ^Sap.  1.  1),  Philo  I.  55,  Eccl. 

dyaOovpyco).  -ovpyto,  contr.  from  dya&ocpy-. 

dyaOovpyiKos.  17,  bv,  beneficent,  Eccl. 

dyaOovpyos,  bv,  contr.  from  dyaBotpybs,  Plut.  2.  1015  E. 

dya9o-4>avris,  is,  appearing  good,  Democrat.  Sent.  p.  629  Gale. 

dyaflo-^tXtis,  ts,  loving  good,  Dion.  Ar. 

dya96$po>v,  ov,  b,  i),  (<Ppf)v)  well-disposed,  Procl.  paraphr.  Ptol.  p.  229. 

dya0o-<t>uT|S,  ts,  of  good  abilities,  Nicet.  Paphl.  in  Notices  des  Mss. 
9.  2,  p.  193,  Dion.  Areop.  Div.  Nom.  21. 

dyadoca,  a  verb  first  found  in  Lxx,  to  do  good  to  one,  Ttvd  or  rtvi  Lxx 
(I  Regg.  2?.  |I,  Sir.  49.  10). 

dyadvvu,  like  dyaBboj,  first  and  chiefly  in  Lxx :  I.  trans,  to 

honour,  magnify,  exalt  (3  Regg.  I.  47,  Ps.  50.  18):  to  adorn,  rrjv 
K((f*akrjv  (4  Regg.  9.  30)  : — Pass,  to  be  of  good  cheer,  to  rejoice  greatly, 
2  Regg.  13.  28,  Dan.  6.  23,  al.  II.  intr.  to  do  good,  do  well,  Ps. 

35.  3  ;  Tivi  to  one,  (but  with  v.  1.  Te^a),  lb.  124.  4. 

dyaOwowrj,  1),  goodness,  kindness,  Ep.  Rom.  15.  14,  Eph.  5.  9. 

(iya.Lou.cu.  Ep.  and  Ion.  for  dyaptat,  but  only  used  in  pres.,  and  always 
in  bad  sense  (cf.  dyrj  11),  1.  c.  ace.  rei,  to  be  indignant  at,  uyai- 

ofiivov  nana  tpya  Od.  20.  16:  to  look  on  with  jealousy  or  envy,  ovS' 
dyatofiat  Betvv  tpya  Archil.  21,  cf.  Opp.  H.  4.  1 38.  2.  c.  dat.  pen-. 

to  be  wroth  or  indignant  with,  rep  .  .  Zeus  avrbs  dyaifTai  Hes.  Op.  331  ; 
uyaibfifvoi  tc  xat  (pBovtovrts  ovt/j  Hdt.  8.  69,  I.  3.  absol.,  Ap. 

Rh.  1.  899. 

dyaios,  a,  ov,  enviable,  admirable,  Hesych.,  A.  B.  334,  E.  M.  Suid. 

uya-KXeTis,  ts,  voc.  -Kktis  Horn.:  Ep.  gen.  dyankijos  II.  16.  738,  nom. 
pi.  dyaKkrjtis  Manetho  3.  324,  (and  in  very  late  writers,  as  Apollinar.,  a 
sing.  nom.  dyaKkrjtis)  : — shortened  ace.  sing.  a7a*Xc'a  Pind.  P.  9.  187., 
I.  1.  49  ;  dat.  u7a*Ac(  Anth.  Plan.  377  :  pi.  dyaKk4ds  Antim.  Fr.  36  ;  cf. 
tVKktrjs.  Very  glorious,  famous,  Lat.  inclytus,  in  II.  always  of  men,  as 

16.  738.,  23.  529;  in  Pind.,  dy.  ala,  etc. — Ep.  and  Lyr.  word  (not  in 
Od.),  except  in  Adv.  uyaKktu/s,  Hipp.  28.  1 3. 

dya-KXetTos,  17,  bv,  =  foreg.,  Horn.,  and  Hes.,  mostly  of  men.  2.  of 

things,  dyanktiT^  tKaTbu^rj  Od.  3.  59  ;  dy.  irdBos  Soph.  Tr.  854  (in  lyr.) : 
cf.  dyaKkvTos. 

dyaKXvu.cvrj,  a  poet.  fern.  =  sq.,  Antim.  Fr.  25  :  cf.  dyaKTtplvq. 

dyo-icXvTOS.  ov,  =  dyaKktT}s,  -Kktirbs,  Lat.  inclytus,  Horn,  (chiefly  in 
Od.),  and  Hes.,  mostly  of  men.  2.  of  things,  0.7.  Sahara  Od.  ^. 

388.,  7.  3,  46. 

dyaKTlp-cvrj,  poet.  fern.  =  tvKTiulvq,  well-built  or  placed,  nbkts  Pind. 
P.  5.  108  ;  cf.  dyaKkvp.tvn. 

dyaXaKTia,  77,  want  of  milk,  Autocrit.  Incert.  I,  Poll.  3.  50. 

dydXaKTos  [7a],  ov,  (a  privat.,  7aAa)  without  milk,  giving  none.  Hipp. 
247.  9,  cf.  Call.  Apoll.  52.  2.  getting  no  milk,  i.e.  taken  from  the 

mother's  breast,  Horace's  jam  lacte  depnlsus,  Aesch.  Ag.  718.  3.  never 
having  sucked,  Nonn.  Jo.  9.  v.  20.  4.  vouai  dydkaKTot  pastures 

bad  for  milch  cattle,  Galen.  II.  (a  copul.)  =  bpoydkaKTos,  ap. 

Hesych.,  who  also  quotes  dyaXaicTocnjvT]  =  avyyivtia. 

dydXa£,  axros,  v,  17,  =foreg.  (signf.  I),  found  only  in  pi.  dydkanrti. 
Call.  Apoll.  52.  II.  =  foreg.  II,  Hesych.,  Suid. 

dyaAXia.u,a,  to,  a  transport  of  joy,  Lxx. 

dyaXX£do*ts,  cw?,  if,  great  joy,  exultation,  Ev.  Luc.  1.  14.  44,  etc. 

dyaXXidu,  late  form  of  dydkkofxai,  to  rejoice  exceedingly,  Apocal.  19. 
7  (v.  1.  dyakktajpitBa)  ;  rjyakkiao~a  Ev.  Luc.  1.  47  : — more  common  as 
Dep.  a7aAAmo/zai  or  ~d£ouai,  Lxx  :  fut.  -do"o/xai  lb. :  aor,  ■tjyakktao'dfirji' 
Psalm.  15.  9,  Ev.  Jo.  8.  56  ;  also,  i)yakktdaBr]v  Ev.  Jo.  5.  35. — But  this 
family  of  words  seems  also  to  have  been  used  in  malam  partem.  dyaX- 
Xid£ci  ■  AoiSopciYeu,  dya.Xp.6s  *  koihopia,  dydXXios  '  AoiSopo.?,  Hesvch.. 
cf.  E.  M.  7.  8, 

dyaXXCs.  ifos,  %,  a  bulbous  plant  of  the  genus  vaKtv&os,  the  iris,  ox  flag, 
h.  Horn.  Cer.  7,  426 ;  cf.  Alb.  Hesych.  1.  p.  30. 

dydXXoxov,  T(J,  Lat.  agallochum,  the  bitter  aloe,  Diosc.  I,  21,  ubi  v. 
Sprengel ;  from  Aetius*  time  called  fvkakbr). 

dyd\Xo>  [d],  Pind.,  Att.:  fut.  dyakw  Ar.  Pax  399,  Theopomp.  Com. 
Tlijvtk.  I  :  aor.  rjyrjka  Dio  C,  etc.,  subj.  dyrjkw  Hermipp.  'ApT.  1,  inf. 
CI777ACU  Eur.  Med.  1027  : — Pass.,  only  used  in  pres.  and  impf.  by  correct 
writers:  aor.  I  inf.  070X^^01  Dio  C.  51.  20:  cf.  cira/YoAAo/jai.  To 
make  glorious,  glorify,  exalt,  Pind.  O.  I.  139,  N.  5.  79:  esp.  to  pay 
honour  to  a  god,  dyakkt  &o?0ov  Ar.  Thesm.  1 28,  cf.  Plat.  Legg.  931  A  ; 
U7.  Ttvd  Bvaiatat  Ar.  Pax  1.  c. ;  <p4pt  vvv,  dyffkai  tovs  Btovs  Hermipp. 
1,  c. : — to  adorn,  deck,  yafirjkiovs  tvvds  Eur.  1.  c. : — Pass,  to  glory,  take 
delight,  rejoice  or  exult  in  a  thing,  be  proud  of  it,  c.  part..  Ttvxta  5' 
"E/rrwp  . .  tx&v  wptotatv  a7aAAcTai  II.  17.  473,  cf.  18.  132  ;  i§j>  tKaOTos 
Trarp'tSa  *xqjv  •  *  °T-  Thuc.  4.  95  ;  but  mostly  c.  dat.,  tmroto'tv  Kal 
bxtatptv  dyakkbpttvos  II.  12.  II4;  opvtBts  dydkkovrat  Trrtpvytaai  2. 
462;  vrjts  .  .  dy.  Ato s  ovpep  Od.  5.  176;  Moutrat . .  07.  birl  Kaki)  Hes. 
Th.  C8  ;  dan'tdt  Archil.  5  ;  toprats  Eur.  Tro.  452  ;  so  in  Prose,  to;  ovvb- 
pan  ijydkkovro  Hdt.  1.  143,  cf.  Thuc.  2.  44,  Plat.  Theaet.  176  B: 
dkkoTpiots  irrtpots  dy.  to  strut  in  borrowed  plumes,  Luc.  Apol.  4;  also, 
a7d\A.c<r0a£  tni  rtvt  Thuc.  3.  82,  15,  Xen.  Cyr.  8.  4,  II  ;  later  also  Sid 


uya\fj.a  —  ayairaCw. 

ti  Dio  C.  66.  2  ;  and  even  c.  ace.  Anth.  P.  7.  378 :  absol.,  Hdt.  4.  64., 
«>.  109,  Hipp.  Art.  S02,  Kur.  Bacch.  1197. — -Cf.  dyaXpa  throughout 


uyaXua.  arcs',  tu,  ace.  to   Hesych.   nav  ftp'  at  tis-  ayaWcrai,  a  glory, 

delight,  honour.  II.  4.   144.  etc. ;  so  Alcae.  Fr.  15,  speaks  of  kuipot  as 

KttpaKaimr  dvbpd/v  dydXpara  ;  and  Pind.  calls  his  ode  \wpas  dyaXpa, 

V  3.  21.  cf.  8.  27  :  often  of  children,  riicvov  bupwv  dya\pa  Aesch.  Ag. 

207  ;  f  vKKtiai  Ttfcvois  dy.  a  crown  of  glory  to  them  (cf.  tvK\tia),  Soph. 
Ant.  704;  Kabptias  dy.  Nvpipas.  addressed  to  Bacchus,  lb.  1 1 16; 
paripus  dy.  ipoviov.  said  of  slain  sons,  Eur.  Supp.  37 I,  ubi  v.  Markl. : 
dydXpar'  dyopds  mere  ornaments  of  the  agora  (cf.  dyopatos  II.  3),  Eur. 
EL  38S,  cf.  Metagen.  "Op.  1.  2.  a  pleasing  gift,  esp.  for  the  gods, 

dy.  Oewv  Od.  8.  509,  cf.  3.  438,  where  a  bull  adorned  for  sacrifice  is 
called  an  dyaXpa ;  of  a  tripod,  Hdt.  5.  60,  61,  158,  and  generally,  = 
dvd&rjpa,  Inscrr.  Vet.  in  C.  I.  8  (v.  Bockh),  24,  150,  al. ;  dvOtjKfv  dy. 
Simon.  158 ;  Xdprjs  upt  . . ,  dy.  tw  '  AvoWarvt  Inscr.  at  Branchidae,  Newton 
p.  779  :  so,  'Exdrrfs  dyaKpa  . .  Kvatv,  because  sacred  to  her,  Eur.  Fr.  959, 
cf.  Ar.  Fr.  635.  3.  a  statue  in  honour  of  a  god,  Hdt.  I.  131.,  2.  42, 

46,  Lys.  104.  35  ;  as  an  object  of  worship,  Aesch.  Th.  258,  Euni.  55, 
Soph.  O.  T.  1379,  Plat.  Phaedr.  251  A  :  sculpture,  prrredy.  prrrt  ypatprj 
Arist.  Pol.  7.  17,  10  ; — but  iy.  'Alia,  in  Pind.  N.  10.  125,  is  the  head- 
stone of  a  grave,  called  OTTfkrj  in  the  parallel  passage  of  Theocr.,  22. 
207.  4.  then  generally,  =  dvbpids,  any  statue,  Plato  Meno  97  D  : 

or  a  portrait,  picture,  i(a\tt<pO(io'  in  dyakpa  Eur.  Hel.  262  ;  cf.  A.  8. 
82.  324.  334.  5.  lastly  any  image,  expressed  by  painting  or  words, 

Plat.  Tim.  529  C,  Symp.  216  E. — On  the  word  v.  Ruhnk.  Tim.  s.  v. 

dyaAfuvrias,  of,  d,  like  a  statue,  beautiful  as  one,  Philostr.  612. 

dyaXud-nov,  t«.  Dim.  of  dyaXpa,  Theopomp.  Com.  Xlrp/tK.  1,  etc. 

dyaAuaTtTn«,  0,  =  KiOoKoKXa,  Hesych. 

dyaXua.TO-yXud>o$,  d,  a  carver  of  statues,  Theodoret. 

dyaAu.a,To-Troids,  u,  a  maker  of  statues,  a  sculptor,  statuary,  Hdt.  2. 
46,  Plat.  Prot.  311  C,  etc.;  ypatptis  r)  117.  Arist.  Pol.  8.  5,  21: — 
dyaXuaTOTroww,  to  make  statues.  Poll.  7.  108 : — dyaAua,ToiroiT|TiKds. 
r/,  uv,  of  or  for  a  statuary :  1),  -*ij  (sc.  rixvij),  ap.  Poll.  I.  13  : — dyoA- 
luvroiroiia,  r),  the  statuary's  an,  Porph.  Abst.  2.  49,  A.  B.  335,  Poll. 

dyaXftaTOvpyia,  1),  =  dyaXpaTOiroiia,  Max.  Tyr.  1.  p.  438  :  and  dyoA- 
uaTovpyucds,  r),  dv,  =  dya\paTowoirrriit6s,  Id.  2.  p.  1 39,  Clem.  Al.  41. 

dyaXp-aTOupyos,  uv,  (*ipyai)  —- iyaXparowoios,  Poll.  I.  12. 

uyaAuaTodiopcw.  to  carry  an  image  in  one's  mind,  bear  impressed  upon 
M*i  mind,  Philo  1.  16,  412.,  2.  403,  etc. ;  and  Pass.,  2.  1 36. 

dyaXpo.To-$6pos,  ov,  carrying  an  image  in  one's  heart,  Hesych. 

dyaXfiaTow,  f.  oktw,  to  make  into  an  image,  Lye.  845. 

dyaXu,o-tioTis.  is,  beautiful  as  a  statue,  "Epan  Pocta  ap.  Jo.  Lvd.  p.  117. 
18,  Bekk. 

dyaAuo-Tvirot  [0],  ov,  forming  a  statue,  vaKtiprjntv  iyaXporvwots 
M:uietho  4.  $69. 

dydfuu  [4],  2  pi.  iyaa$e  (vulg.  uyio$t,  from  iydopat)  Od.  f,  129, 
Bp.  dydaaSt  lb.  1 19;  Ep.  inf.  dyda<T0ai  16.  203:  impf.  irydpr/v  Plat. 
Rep.  367  E,  Xen.,  Ep.  2  pi.  frydaaff  Od.  5.  122  : — fut.  Ep.  dydaaofuu 
Od.  4.  181,  (v.  1.  1.  389),  later,  dyaa$ijaopat  Themist. : — aor.  yyaadprjv 
Ho:n.,  Dem.  296.  4,  Plut.,  etc.;  Ep.  1rydaaa.ro  or  uydaaaro  II.  3.  181, 
.  j-4  :  but  after  Horn,  the  pass,  ifydaO-nv  prevails,  Hes.  Fr.  206,  Solon  32, 
Pind.,  Att.  '  (From  same  Root  as  dyrj  wonder,  iydfapai,  iyaiopai : 
cf.  Kuttm.  Lexil.  s.  v.  drrros  4.)  [dyiuat,  but  irydaoit  by  the  re- 
quirement of  Ep.  metre,  Od.  L  c.]  I.  absol.  to  wonder,  be 
ii-t',nished,  pvrjarrjpes  8*  .  .  vwtptfnaXws  iydaavro  Od.  18.  71,  etc.; 
c.  part.,  dyapai  loam  II.  3.  224;  cf.  dydopai.  2.  more  often  c. 
ace,  to  admire  a  person  or  thing,  rov  tV  u  yipaiv  irydaaaro  II.  3.  181  ; 
ius  at,  yuvcu,  dyapai  Od.  6.  168  ;  pvBuv  dy.  II.  8.  29  ;  ru  vpoopdv  Ay. 
otv  Hdt.  9.  79,  cf.  8.  1 44  ;  so  in  Att.,  raura  dyaaitit  Xen.  Cyr.  2.  3, 
]<j.  cf.  7.  1,  41,  etc.;  c.  ace.  pers.  et  gen.  rei,  to  admire  one  for  a  thing, 
Plat.  Rep.  426  D,  Xen.  Cyr.  2.  3,  21.  8.  c.  gen.  rei  only,  often  in 
Com.,  to  winder  al,  dyapat  bi  Xuyam  At.  Av.  1 744,  cf.  Plat.  Euthyd. 
276  D,  Xen.,  etc. :  dyapai  Ktpapian  Eupol.  Incert.  90  ;  dy.  oov  aroua- 
tos,  cut . .  Phryn.  Com.  KpoV.  5.  4.  c.  ace.  rei  et  gen.  pers..  ovk  dyauai 
rairr'  ivbpii  apiarian  Eur.  I.  A.  28.  5.  c.  gen.  pers.,  foil,  by  a  part., 
to  wonder  at  one's  doing,  dy.  'Kpaalvov  ou  irpo&iooKros  Hdt.  6.  76,  2  ;  dy. 
avrov  tiwui-Toi  Plat.  Rep.  329  D,  etc. ;  so,  iy.  rtvot  on  . . ,  or  Stiri . . , 
Id.  Hipp.  Ma.  291  E,  Xen.  Mem.  4.  2,  9,  etc.  6.  also  like 
va/pai,  ijbtifiai,  c.  dat.  to  be  delighted  with  a  person  or  thing,  Hdt.  4.  75, 
Kur.  H.  F.  845,  Plat.  Symp.  179  D,  Xen.  Cyr.  2.  4,  9;  and  later  l*i 
tiki.  Ath.  594  C,  cf.  Ruhnk.  Tim.  II.  in  bad  sense,  to  feel  envy, 
bear  a  grudge,  c.  dat.  pers.,  tl  /»r;  of  dydtroaTO  *oifios  'ArroAAiuc  II.  17. 
7 1  ;  dyaooaiuvot  {jiot]  wtpi  rUtn  23.  639 ;  with  an  inf.  added,  to  be 
jealous  of  one  that  .  .  ,  axifKioi  lent,  ttoi,  .  .  dirt  ttais  dydaaOt  nap' 
dvbpaaiv  tvvditaiat  Od.  s,.  119,  cf.  122,  129.,  23.  211  ;  foil,  by  a  relat., 
itpaoKt  Hoanbdojv'  dydaaa$ai  rjptv.  ovvtKa  .  .  8.  565.  2.  c.  ace. 
to  be  jealous  of,  angry  at  a  thing,  dyatrirdiKt-oi  «a«d  «pya  2.  67  ;  ri. 
Iiiv  rtov  siiKKtv  dyaaataBai  $tit  4.  181  ;  $0ptv  dyaaadfuroi  23.  64. 
Cf.  dyaiofiat. 

Ayofu'iivuv.  oi-os,  o,  (dyav,  fupnuy  (from  pivot),  the  very  resolute  or 
steadfast,  cf.  Mipvuv)  : — Agamemnon,  king  of  Mycenae,  leader  of  the 
Greeks  against  Troy,  Horn. :  Adj.  'Ay&iuu.vdv«ot,  ia,  tov,  Horn.,  also 

6v«ioi,  «i'a,  fioc,  and  ovio*.  fa,  iok,  Pind.,  Aesch. :  Patron.  -oviS-rrf ,  ou, 
o.  Agamemnon's  son,  Orestes.  Od.  I.  30,  Soph.  El.  182. 

dyu|u'vut.  Adv.  part.  pre*,  of  dyaitai.  with  admiration  or  applause,  dy. 
\iyuv  Arist.  Rhet.  3.  7,  3  ;  dy.  Toy  \uyov  iwebifaro  with  respect  or  de- 
ference, lltind.  Plat.  Phaedo  89  A. 

dydfirrrot ,  ov,  rarer  form  for  dyipos,  Comici  ap.  Poll.  3.  47  :  a  form 
dyd|uro5  is  cited  from  Soph.  (Fr.  798)  in  A.  B. :  v.  Lob.  Phryn.  514. 

dyaiiia.  r),  'ingle  estate,  celibacy,  Plut.  2.  491  E: — dyafuou  Ji'kij,  1),  an 


t 


action  against  a  bachelor  for  not  marrying,  Plut.  Lys.  30,  v.  Poll.  3. 
48. 

a-y.iu.os.  ov,  unmarried,  single,  properly  applied  to  the  man,  whether  a 
bachelor  or  widower,  dvavbpos  being  used  of  the  woman,  II.  3.  40,  and 
in  Prose  ;  so,  £a>  5^  Tipwvos  fiiov,  dyapov,  dbovXov  Phryn.  Com.  Moi'orp. 
I  : — however  dya^os  is  used  of  the  woman  in  Aesch.  Supp.  143,  Soph. 
O.  T.  1502,  Ant.  867,  and  Eur.  II.  ydpos  dyapos,  a  marriage 

that  is  no  marriage,  a  fatal  marriage,  Soph.  O.  T.  1 2 14,  Eur.  Hel.  6yo  ; 
like  0ioy  d&Los,  etc. 

ttyav.  Adv.  very,  much,  very  much,  Theogn.,  Pind.  and  Alt.,  the  word 
Kirjv  being  the  usual  equiv.  in  Ep.  and  Ion.  (but  see  Hdt.  2.  173),  strongly 
afhrmat.  like  Lat.  prorsus,  too  surely,  Aesch.  Th.  81 1  ;  and  so  in  compos, 
it  always  strengthens  or  enforces.  The  bad  sense  roo,  foo  much,  like  Lat. 
nimis,  occurs  only  in  peculiar  phrases,  as  in  the  famous  pr/Siv  dyav,  ne 
quid  nimis,  not  too  much  of  any  thing,  first  in  Theogn.  335,  Pind.  Fr. 
235  ;  attributed  to  Chilo  by  Arist.  Rhet.  2.  12,  14;  so,  dyav  ti  iroi<=i"V 
Plat.  Rep.  563  E,  etc.  It  may  stand  alone  with  the  Verb,  dyae  i"  i\tv- 
Sfpooroptis  Aesch.  Pr.  180,  etc.;  but  it  is  not  seldom  joined  with  an 
Adj.,  which  may  either  go  before  or  follow,  dyav  fiapvs  Id.  Pers.  515  ; 
m$avos  dyav  Ag.  483  ;  even  with  Sup.,  dyav  dypiwrdrovs  far  the  most 
savage,  Ael.  H.  A.  I.  38,  cf.  8.  13  ;  also  with  an  Adv.,  vnepSvpais  a.  Aesch. 
Kum.  824  ;  dyav  ovrai  Soph,  Ph.  598  ;  wputs  dyav  Xen.  Vect.  5,6;  with  a- 
Subst.,  r)  dyoc  criyij  Soph.  Ant.  1251  ;  r)  dyav  iXtvOepia  Plat.  Rep.  564 
A  ;  without  the  Article,  th  dyav  Sovktiav  lb.  (The  t/KT  appears  in 
uy-T/t-tvp :  Curt,  refers  it  to  dytu :  in  sense  it  seems  rather  to  belong  to 
dyaiiai,  dyrj.)  [aydV  properly,  Orac.  ap.  Hdt.  4.  157,  etc.;  but  dydi' 
in  Anth.  P.  5.  216.,  10.  51.] 

dyuvoKTtw,  f.  ^crcu,  properly  in  physical  sense,  to  feel  a  violent  irrita- 
tion (cf.  sq.),  of  the  effects  of  cold  on  the  body,  Hipp.  426.  6 ;  fef  Tt= 
<rai  dyoKO«r«r,  of  the  soul,  Plat.  Phaedr.  251  C;  of  wine,  to  ferment, 
Plut.  2.  734  E.  II.  metaph.  to  be  grieved,  displeased,  vexed, 

annoyed,  angry,  or  discontented,  pr)S  dyavaxrei  Ar.  Vesp.  287 ;  esp.  to 
shew  outward  signs  of  grief,  kKAuv  Kal  dy.  Plat.  Phaedo  117  D,  etc. : — 
foil,  by  a  relat.,  dy.  otc  .  .  ,  Antipho  1 26.  5,  Lys.  96.  30 ;  dy.  (I  .  .  ,  or 
lay  . . ,  Andoc.  18.  16,  Plat.  Lach.  194  A.  2.  c.  dat.  rei,  to  be  vexed 

al  a  thing,  e.  g.  Bavdrqi  Plat.  Phaedo  63  B  ;  also  c.  ace.  rei,  Heind.  Phaedo 
64  A  ;  dy.  TaCra,  oti  .  .  ,  Plat.  Euthyphro  4  D  ;  also,  dy.  «iri  tivi  Lys. 
91.  5,  Isocr.  357  A,  etc.;  inrip  rivos  Plat.  Euthyd.  283  D,  etc.;  ir«pt 
tivos  Id.  Ep.  349  D  ;  bta  ti  Id.  Phaedo  63  C ;  rrpds  ti  Epict.  Enchir.  4  ; 
and  sometimes  c.  gen.  rei,  A.  B.  334.  8.  to  be  vexed  at  or  with  a 

person,  tiw  Xen.  Hell.  5.  3,  1 1  ;  irpot  tico  Plut.  Cam.  28 ;  Kara  Ttvos 
Luc.  Tim.  18; — also  c.  part,  to  be  angry  at,  dy.  dwoOvrjCTKOVTas  Plat. 
Phaedo  62  E,  cf.  67  D  ;  dy.  iv0vpovptvos  . .  Andoc.  31.  24.  III. 

in  Luc.  Somn.  4  and  Aristid.,  uyai'a/cT«fo'0ai  as  a  Dep. — Cf.  8*-,  aw-, 
inrtp-ay aval-rial.  (The  signf.  shows  that  dyav  forms  the  first  part  of 
the  Verb.  The  latter  part  is  referred  by  Schneid.  to  dya»,  as  -tiniu)  in 
irAfOK«icT«o;,  TtpiTjpacTfat  to  Jx**-) 

dyavaKT-na-is,  tan,  ij,  properly  physical  pain  and  irritation,  dy.  irtpi  rd 
ovXa,  of  the  irritation  caused  by  teething.  Plat.  Phaedr.  25 1  C.  II. 

vexation,  annoyance,  dyavaxrijaiv  «x«*  the  thing  gives  just  grounds  for 
displeasure,  Thuc.  2.  41,  cf.  2  Cor.  7.  II,  Hesych. 

dyavaK-rrrnicdt,  ij,  iv,  apt  to  be  vexed,  easily  vexed,  irritable,  peevish, 
Plat.  Rep.  604  E,  605  A  (Bekk.) ;  vulg.  dyaraxrixov. 

dyavaxTTrrdt,  4,  uv,  verb.  Adj.  vexatious.  Plat.  Gorg.  51 1  B. 

dyovoKTiKosi,  i),  uv,  =  dyaKo/tTirrHrds  (q.  v.),  Luc,  Pise.  14.  Adv. 
-kois,  M.  Anton.  II.  13. 

dydv-vl4>os,  ov,  much  snowed  on,  snow-capt^OKvpvos  II.  1.  420. 

dyuvo-pXtc^apot,  ov,  mild-eyed,  Ibyc.  4,  Anth.  P.  9.  604. 

dyuvdpcios,  dyavopia,  Dor.  for  dyrjv-. 

dyuvos,  rj,  iv,  poet.  Adj.  mild,  gentle,  kindly,  of  persons  or  their 
words  and  acts,  dy.  xal  r)irios  iorai  tr/rr/irToCxos  ftaaikevs  Od.  2.  230., 
5.  8;  dy.  tnitooiv  II.  2.  164,  180,  etc.;  pvSots  iy.  Od.  15.  53; 
ti'Xaikfis  II.  9.  499,  Od.  13.  3J7  ;  bwpoirn  II.  9.  113  ;  so  in  Pind.,  dy. 
Xdyoit  P.  4.  179;  dy.  iuppvi  lb.  9.  65;  Trag.  only  in  Aesch.  Ag.  101  ; 
avAdip  uyavai  tpatvai  Mnesim.  *Imr.  1.  56.  2.  in  Horn,  also  of  the 

shafts  of  Apollo  and  Artemis,  as  bringing  an  easy  death,  dXX*  ot« 
yrjpdaieato'i  .  .  ,  'AiroAAcuv  'Apripibt  (ifv  oi's  uyavoU  fieKieooiv  i-noi- 
X&ptvos  KariwKpvtv  Od.  15.  41 1,  cf.  3.  280,  II.  24.  759,  etc.: — Sup. 
dyavdVaTov,  Hes.  Th.  408.  Adv.  -van,  Aiucr.  49.  I,  Eur.  I.  A.  602  ; 
Comp.,  dyavarrepov  tSkimiv  Ar.  Lys.  886.  (The  Root  is  perh.  the 
same  as  that  o(  ydvvpat.  with  a  euphon.) 

dyavot,  ov,  (dyvvpi)  broken,  (vkov  dy.  sticks  broken  for  firewood, 
A-  B-  335.  Eust-  i0°.  3. 

dyavod>po<rvvi),  ^,  gentleness  of  mood,  kindliness,  II.  24. 772,  Od.  1 1. 202. 

dyovd-4pwv,  ov,  gen.  ovos,  (ippyv)  poet.  Adj.  gentle  of  mood,  II.  20. 
467,  Cratin.  Xeip.  1  ;  'Hovxia  At.  Av.  1 32 1. 

dyav-iiTrn.  180s,  1).  (uif)  mild-looking,  mild-eyed,  Marcell.  Sid.  80 ;  dy. 
waptid  ap.  Hesych. 

dydvup,  Dor.  for  dyr)vatp,  Pind. 

dydvwrot,  ov,  (y&vuoj)  not  glazed  over.  Posidon.  ap.  Paul.  Aeg. 

dydo|KU,  Ep.  collat.  form  of  dyapai,  only  found  in  part,  dywpevos, 
admiring,  Hes.  Th.  619  ;  for  in  Od.  5.  1 29,  dyaaSe  is  restored  for 
Qydcrtff  ;  dydacfl*.  j'rydaad*.  dydaoOai  also  belong  to  dyapai. 

uyawdju.  Ep.  and  Lyr.  form  of  dyandai  Horn. ;  Dor.  3  pi.  -ovrt 
Pind.  I.  f .  69 ;  Ep.  impf.  dyd»afop  Ap.  Rh. ; — also  in  Med.,  Hoin. ; 
Dor.  impf.  'dyairdfoFTo  Pind.  P.  4.  428  : — only  used  in  pres.  and  impt., 
except  aor.  act.  dyairdfai  in  Callicrat.  ap,  Stob.  487.  16.  _  To  treat 
with  affection,  receive  with  outward  signs  of  love,  to  love,  in^Si  irartip 
tv  waiba  .  .  dyandfti,  »A0oVt"  «£  diri'r/s  yaiV  btKarai  iviavrfi  Od.  16. 
17;    vtpfoorrrov  bi  mv  ur)  dSdvarov  Otiv   u/bt   ffporois  dyana(iptv 


6  ayairaTOS  —  ayyeXtcapopos 

dvrrjv  II.  24.  464  : — Med.  in  absol.  sense,  to  show  signs  of  love,  caress. 


xvvtov  dyava^ufitvot  teapak-qv  rt  teat  utpovs  Od.  21.  224  ;  ou5'  dya 
wa^ufitvot  iptkiova'  (cf.  <ptkiat  I.  2)  7.  33  ;  but  c.  ace.,  like  Act.,  Pind.  P. 
1.  c.  2.  Tipat  teakkivtteov  x^PM*  dyaird^ovrt  welcome,  receive  grate- 

fully, Pind.  1. 1.  c. ;  cf.  dpupayaird^at. — Used  once  in  Trag.,  v.  dyairaai  1. 1. 

dyawdTos,  oV,  Dor.  for  dyamjros,  Pind. 

dyuirdw.  f.  rja<»:  pf.  rrydwntca  Isocr.  Antid.  §  158  :  Ep.  aor.  Aydmura 
Od.  23.  214: — cf.  btrtp-ayaitdai.  (The  Root  is  uncertain.)  I.  of 

persons,  to  treat  with  affection,  receive  with  outward  signs  of  love,  to 
love,  be  fond  of,  like  the  Ep.  dyawdfa,  used  by  Horn,  once  in  this  sense, 
Od.  I.e.;  rare  also  in  Trag.,  and  only  in  the  sense  of  shelving  affection 
to  the  dead,  or  i/ydtra  vacpovs  Eur.  Supp.  764  (so  vitevv  iratb'us  u*ya- 
ird£atv  ifiov  Id.  Phoen.  1327);  but  freq.  in  Plat.,  etc.,  both  of  persons 
and  things,  annrtp  .  .  oi  votrp-ai  rd  avrutv  irotrjfiara  teat  oi  iraripts 
roxts  iratdas  dyatrwo't  Plat.  Rep.  330  C,  cf.  Legg.  928  A  ;  dts  kvtcot 
dpv  dyatrwo'  Porta  ap.  Phaedr.  24I  D  ;  dy.  rovs  iiratviras  lb.  257  E  ; 
iwtarrffiijv,  to  btxatov,  rd  xpVftaTa-  etc-*  Id.  Phileb.  62  D,  Rep.  359  A, 
al. ;  rovrovs  dyaira  teal  vtpl  avruv  i\u  Dem.  23.  23: — Pass.,  ^7. 
teal  oitettv  tvhatfxdvws  Plat.  Polit.  301  D  ;  i»iro  rutv  $ea,v  rjyanTJoOat  Dezn. 
1404.  4;  and  of  things,  ktSiSta  ravra  rd  rryairnpiva  Plat.  Phaedo  no 
D.  2.  to  desire,  Plat.  Lys.  215  A,  B.  3.  in  N.  T.  and  Christian 

writers,  to  regard  with  brotherly  love,  v.  dydwrj : — the  word  comes  near 
this  sense  in  two  passages  of  Menand.,  o  fiiytorov  dyairwv  Bt  ikdxto'r 
dpyi^rat   Incert.  113,  cf.  215.  4.  dyairdat  differs  from  <ptkia),  as 

implying  regard  or  affection  rather  than  passion,  cf.  Lat.  diligo,  amo, 
but  sometimes  can  hardly  be  distinguished,  v.  Xen.  Mem.  2.  7,  9,  and  12  ; 
tptkti<j$ai  =  dyairdaOat  avrdv  5*'  avruv  Arist.  Rhet.  1.  n,  17.  5. 

improperly  of  sexual  love,  like  kpdat,  Arist.  Fr.  66,  Luc.  Jup.  Trag.  2; 
in  Plat.  Symp.  180  B,  Phaedr.  253  A,  this  sense  is  not  necessary;  and  in 
Xefc.  Mem.  I.  5,  4,  vopvas  a7airdV  is  not  =  «pdV,  but  simply  to  be  fond 
of  devoted  to  them;    so,  dy.  iraipav  Anaxil.  Neott.  1.  II.  in 

relation  to  things,  to  be  well  pleased,  contented,  used  once  by  Horn,  also 
in  this  sense,  ovtc  dyairqs  o  tterjkos  . .  fif$'  iffiiv  Saivvaat  Od.  21.  289;  but 
this  sense  is  freq.  in  Att.,  dyatrdv  on  . . ,  Thuc.  6.  36,  4  ;  more  commonly 
07.  (I  .  .  to  be  well  content  if  .  .  ,  Plat.  Rep.  450  A.  al. ;  tdv  . .  lb. 
330  B,  al. ;  ty  . . ,  &v  . .  ,  Ar.  Vesp.  684,  Plat.  Gorg.  483  C,  al.  2. 

c.  part.,  dy.  npwfxfvos  Plat.  Rep.  475  B,  cf.  Isocr.  234  C,  Antiph. 
Neott.  2  ;   c.  inf.,  Hdn.  2.  15,  Alciphro  3.  61,  Luc,  etc.  3.  c.  dat. 

rei.  to  be  contented  or  pleased  at  or  with  a  thing,  like  aripyat,  daird^opat, 
dy.  rots  xrtrdpxovGiv  dyaOots  Lys.  192.  26  ;  rots  irrn pay -pivots  Dem. 
13.  II.  4.  like  aripyat,  c.  ace.  rei,   prjKirt   r^v  (ktvdcpiav  dy. 

Isocr.  69  D  ;  rd  -napuvra  Dem.  70.  20 ;  cf.  Arist.  Rhet.  1.  2,  23.  5. 
rarely  c  gen.,  ira  .  .  rijs  dfias  dyatrwatv  may  be  content  with  the 
proper  price,  Alex.  Ac'0.  3.  *J.  6.  absol.  to  be  content,  dyairr)oavres 

Lycurg.  157.  5,  cf.  Luc.  Nee.  17.  7.  c.  inf.  to  be  fond  of  doing, 

wont  to  do,  like  (ptkiat,  rovs  Avtciovs  dyairutvras  rpixwp-0-  <p*pew  Arist. 
Oec.  2.14;  and  so  in  Lxx. 

dydin],  7),  love,  dy.  teal  ptaos  Lxx  (Eccl.  9.  I,  al.)  :  esp.  brotherly 
love,  charity,  1  Ep.  Cor.  1 3.  1  sq.,  al. :  the  love  of  God  for  man  and  of 
man  for  God,  Philo  I.  283,  Rom.  5.  8,  2  Cor.  5.  14,  Ev.  Luc.  II.  42, 
al.  II.  a  beloved  object,  one's  love,  Lxx  (Cant.  2.  7).  III. 

in  pi.  a  love-feast,  2  Ep.  Petr.  2.  13,  Ep.  Jud.  12.  The  Noun  first  occurs 
in  Lxx,  and  Biblical  writers,  though  dyairdfa,  dyairdat,  and  derivs.  are 
freq.  in  Classical  authors. 

dyd-irnu-a,  rd,  Lat.  deliciae,  a  darling,  of  a  person,  Anth.  P.  10.  104, 
C.  I.  5039;  of  a  dainty  dish,  ktxwv  dvdpwv  dy.  Axionic.  <Ptk.  1.  6. 

dyair-T|vwp,  opos,  6,  =  i)vopirjv  dyairwv,  loving  manliness,  manly,  epith. 
of  heroes,  II.  8.  114,  etc.:  also  as  a  prop,  n.,  II. 

dydirrjcris,  tats,  r),  affection,  choice,  Arist.  Metaph.  I,  I,  I,  Def.  Plat. 
413  B,  Plut.  Pericl.  24;  cf.  Lob.  Phryn.  352. 

d-yaTTTjo-jios.  o,  rarer  form  for  foreg.,  Menand.  1.vvap.  3. 

dya-rrnTtos,  a,  ov,  verb.  Adj.  to  be  loved,  desired,  Plat.  Rep.  358  A. 

dyairnTtKos,  17,  6v,  affectionate,  Plut.  Sol.  7,  Clem.  Al.  123,  etc.  Adv. 
-tcuts.  Id.  102,  etc. 

dyuTrrjTos,  17,  dv,  Dor.  -otos,  a,  uv,  verb.  Adj.  beloved,  povvos  kdv 
dyairnrus  the  only  dearly  beloved  son,  Od.  2.  365  ;  more  commonly 
without  povvos,  of  an  only  son,  'E/cropidnv  dyairnrov  II.  6.  401,  cf.  Od. 
4.  817  ;  so  in  Att.,  Ar.  Thesm.  761  ;  Nt/efjparos  . .  6  rov  Httciov  dy.  irats 
Dem.  567.  24,  cf.  Arist.  Rhet.  1.  7,  41.  *L§  Comically,  Saw'tStov  $v  dy. 
Hipparch.  'Avaa.  I.  II.   of  things,  worthy  of  love,  loveable, 

desirable,  dear,  Plat.  Ale.  I.  131  E,  etc.;  Sup.  -draros  Id.  Phil.  61  E; 
to  dyairnrov  an  object  of  desire,  Arist.  Rhet.  1.  7»  41.  al.  2.  to  be 

acquiesced  in  (as  the  least  in  a  choice  of  evils),  Andoc.  26.  15  : — hence, 
dyairnrov  [iart]  one  must  be  content,  ci  . . ,  (dv , . ,  Plat.  Prot.  328  A, 
Xen.  Oec.  8.  16,  Dem.  302.  1,  Arist.,  etc.;  c.  inf.,  Eth.  N.  9.  10, 
6.  III.  Adv.  -rws,   readily,  gladly,  contentedly,   Plat.  Legg. 

735  D,  Dem.  409.  7,  etc.  2.  to  one's  heart's  content,  Diphil.  Incert. 

4.  3.  just  enough  to  content  one,  only  just,  barely,  scarcely,  =  pokts, 

Plat.  Lys.  218  C;  dyatrnrws  aotBrjvat  Lys.  107.  16;  so  also,  dyairnruv 
Menand.  Mt'0r/  1. 

dyaTrwyTtus,  late  form  for  dyainjrSis,  Eus.  P.  E.  14.  5,  4,  Stob.  297.  41. 

dyaplicdv,  to,  Lat.  agaricum,  a  sort  of  tree-fungus,  boletus  igniarius, 
used  for  tinder,  Diosc.  3.  1.  [#y-  ;  but  07  nietri  grat.  in  the  hexam.  of 
Androm.  in  Gal.  Antid.  894  B,  895  D.] 

d-yappis.  r),  (dytipw)  a  meeting,  Inscr.  Neap,  in  C.  I.  5785.  12,  Hesych. 

d-ydppoos,  ov,  contr.  ppovs.  ovv,  (dyav.  ftiw)  strong-flowing,  Homeric 
epithet  of  the  Hellespont,  II.  2.  845.,  12.  30. 

dyo<r9«vT|S,  is,  (aOivos)  very  strong,  Opp.  C.  2.  3,  Epigr,  Gr.  1052  ; — 
in  II.  only  as  prop,  n. ' KyaaOivns  (paroxyt.). 

dyaaryKa,  rd,  (dyapat)  an  object  of  adoration,  Soph.  Er.  799. 


d-yd-o-Tuxus*  v,  very  rich  in  corn,  yi)  Greg.  Naz.  2.  112  I>. 

aYa-<rTovos,  ov,  much  groaning,  howling,  of  the  hollow  roaring  of  the 
waves,  Od.  12.  97,  h.  Ap.  94:  loud-ivailing,  Aesch.  Th.  97. 

dyaoTOS,  1).  ov,  (dyapat)  deserving  admiration,  later  form  of  the  Horn. 
dyrjros,  admirable,  Aesch.  Fr.  265  ;  ovtcirt  fiot  fiios  dy.  Eur.  Hec.  169; 
(kmvo  S£  tcpiva)  rov  dvhpos  dy.  Xen.  Hell.  2.  3,  56,  cf.  An.  I.  9,  24,  Oec. 
11,  19,  Eq.  11,  9;  often  in  Plut.: — Adv.  -rats,  Xen.  Ages.  I,  24. — In 
other  Att.  writers,  Bavpaards  is  the  word  preferred. 

dydo^rup,  opos,  (a  copul.,  ytMrrrjp,  cf.  d8tk<p6s)  from  the  same  womb: 
pi.  twins,  Hesych. :  generally,  a  near  kinsman,  Lye.  264. 

dyaa-vkkis.  iSos,  r),  a  plant,  heracleum  gummiferum,  Diosc.  3.  98. 

dydcrvpTos,  o,  an  obscure  epith.  given  to  Pittacus  by  Alcae.  (38),  which 
Diog.  L.  I.  81  explains  by  imo-to-vpfjtivos  teat  pvirapos. 

dyuoxos,  Lacon.  ace.  pi.  of  dyaOds,  Ar.  Lys.  1301. 

dyuTos,  17,  ov,  poet,  for  d7a<rTos  (cf.  Oavparus,  dSdfxaros,  etc.),  h.  Horn. 
Ap.  515  ;  v.  Ruhnk.  Ep.  Cr.  p.  26. 

dyavos,  17,  ov,  in  Horn,  almost  always  of  kings  or  heroes,  illustrious, 
noble,  high-born,  dy.  K^pvK€S  II.  3.  268  ;  pvTjarrjpcs,  *ai'r/«€sOd.;  dyavi/ 
Xltpaftyweta  Od.  II.  213;  tro/iirr;<s  dyavoi  noble  guides,  Od.  1 3.  71: 
also  in  Pind.  P.  4.  127,  and  once  in  Trag.,  Hipaais  dyavots  Aesch.  Pers. 
986  (lyr.)  : — Sup.  -otcitos  Od.  IX.  229.  2.  as  prop,  names,*  Ayavos, 

'Ayavrj,  II.,  Hes. ;  not  "Ayavos,  'AyatSr;,  v.  Arcad.  45  and  103,  Lehrs  dc 
Stud.  Aristarch.  p.  293.     (For  the  Root,  v.  yaiat.) 

dyatipiup-a,  to,  insolence,  Lxx  (Bar.  4.  34),  Hesych.,  A.  B.  325. 

dyavpos,  a,  uv,  ^yavpos  with  a  euphon.,  stately,  proud,  ravpos  Hes. 
Th.  832,  cf.  Wess.  Hdt.  7.  57,  2,  where  the  superl.  Adv.  dyavpdrara  is 
used  of  Xerxes. 

dyd(|>0cyKTO5,  ov,  (<p$iyyofxat)  loud-sounding,  dotda't  Pind.  O.  6.  155. 

dydw,  =  dyafo/ta(,  Alcman  1 19. 

dyydpa,  rd,  the  daily  stages  of  the  dyyapot,  E.  M. 

dyydpcCa,  r),  impressment  for  the  public  service,  C.  I.  4956  A.  21,  cf. 
Arr.  Epict.  4.  1,  79. 

dyyup€vrf|S,  ov,  o,  one  who  employs  an  dyyapos,  Hesych. 

dyyupcvu,  to  press  one  to  serve  as  an  dyyapos,  or  generally,  to  press 
into  service,  late  Lat.  angariare,  Ev.  Matth.  5.  41.,  27.  32,  C.  I.  4956  A. 
24  : — Pass,  to  be  pressed  into  service,  Menand.  XiKvatv.  4. 

dyyaprjios,  o,  Ion.  form  oi  dyyapos,  Hdt.  3.  126.  II.  as  Subst., 

dy  yapTjtov,  to,  post-riding,  the  Persian  system  cf  mounted  couriers,  Id.  8. 98. 

dyydpos,  o,  Persian  word,  a  mounted  courier,  such  as  were  kept  ready 
at  regular  stages  throughout  Persia  (with  power  of  impressment)  for  car- 
rying the  royal  despatches,  Auct.  ap.  Suid.  s.  v.,  cf.  dyyap^tos  II,  and  v. 
Xen.  Cyr.  8.  6,  17.  II.  as  Adj.,  Aesch.  Ag.  282  dyyapov  irvp  the 

courier  flame,  said  of  beacon  fires  used  for  telegraphing ;  cf.  tropirds  fin. 

dyyapo<|>opco>,  to  bear  as  an  dyyapos,  Procop.  3.  163,  1 8. 

dyyciSiov,  to,  Dim.  of  077**01',  Damocr.  in  Galen.  Antid.  S94  F,  Poll. 

10.  30. 

dyycio-\oy€(i>,  to  take  up  a  vein  and  operate  upon  it,  Paul.  Aeg.  6.  5* 
p.  177  : — hence  Subst.  -Xoyta,  ij,  Id. 

dyyetov,  Ion.  -T|iov,  to,  (017709)  a  vessel  of  any  kind  for  holding  liquid 
or  dry  substances  (tovto  .  .  {rjpots  teat  vypots  .  .  ipyaaOiv,  dyyttov  o  Sr) 
/ucj  tekr)o~€t  vpoa<p$€yy6fX€$a  Plat.  Polit.  287  E)  ;  of  metal,  dpyvpta  dyy. 
silvcr^'ars  or  vases  for  water,  Hdt.  1.  188  ;  dpyvpd  teat  xa^Ka  dyy.  Plut. 
2.  695  ;  iv  dyy.  xa^KH>  a  mortar,  Theophr.  Lap.  60 ; — (vktva  dyy. 
large  tubs  or  vats  of  wood,  Hdt.  4.  2  ; — vessels  for  holding  money,  in  a 
treasury,  Id.  2. 1 2 1,  2;  for  masons'  use,  Thuc.  4.  4; — barpdtetva  dyy. 
of  earthenware,  Hipp.  668.  31,  Lxx  (Lament.  4.  2); — pails  or  buckets 
used  by  firemen,  Plut.  Rom.  20 ; — also,  buckets  or  sacks  of  leather, 
OvkaKot  teal  dkka  dyy.  Xen.  An.  6.  4,  23  ;  rds  pa<pds  rwv  dyy.  Plut. 
Lys.  16;  for  corn,  Lxx  (Gen.  42.  25);  for  wine,  Lxx  (1  Regg.  25. 
18).  2.  generally,  a  receptacle,  reservoir,  Xen.  Oec.  9,  2,  Plat.  Criti. 

Ill  A,  Legg.  845  E.  3.  a  coffin  or  urn  for  the  dead,  C.  I.  4300 f, 

al.  II.  of  the  human  body,  a  vessel,  cell,  Arist.  H.  A.  3.  20,  I  ; 

of  the  veins,  lb.  2,  al. ;  of  the  stomach,  Id.  P.  A.  4.  5,  39  ;  the  lungs. 
Id.  G.  A,  5.  7,  14  ;  the  female  breast,  Id.  P.  A.  4.  11,  19;  of  plants,  a 
capsule,  Theophr.  H.  P.  1.  11,  1 : — in  Eccl.  the  body  itself,  like  otetvos. 

dyy€io-o-«\lvov,  to,  pot-parsley,  Anacr.  37  Bgk. 

dyycio-or-ircpLxos,  ov,  v.  s.  (vayyaoavipparos. 

dyyciuS-qs,  ts,  (uSos)  like  a  vessel,  holloiv,  Arist.  P.  A.  3.  8,  5. 

dyytXta,  Ion.  and  Ep.  -it],  1),  (0776X05)  a  message,  tidings,  news,  cs 
well  the  substance,  as  the  conveyance  thereof,  II.  18.  17,  Od.  2.  30,  Att.; 
dyycktT]  kiyovaa  rdfa  Hdt.  2. 1 14  ;  d77«A*i7i'  ipdvat,  dwoepdvat,  dwtnntv 

11.  18.  17,  etc. ;  tpipav,  dTrorftipav  Horn.,  Hdt.,  etc. ;  irifittttv  Hdt. ;  ray 
dyycktas  ia<pipuv  (cf.  dyytkta<f>6pos)  Hdt.  1.  114.,  3.  77: — dyy€kin 
ifiTj  a  report  of  me,  concerning  me,  II.  19.  336;  077.  rtvos  a  message 
about  a  person  or  thing,  dyytki-nv  warpos  *pipa  ipxopivoto  news  of  thv 
father's  coming,  Od.  I.  408;  so,  dvb'pljs  at&ovos  dyy.  Soph.  Aj.  221  ; 
077.  rrjs  Xiov  d<pttev(irat  Thuc.  8.  1 5  ;  077.  fjkOov  tie  rwv  vokcpiajv 
Xen.  Cyr.  6.  2,  14:  with  Verbs  of  motion,  dyytkinv  ik&uv,  like  Lat. 
legationem  obire,  II.  II.  140,  cf.  Od.  21.  20,  and  v.  sub  e^aia; — so  also 
Ep.  in  gen.,  rtv  dyytktrjs  .  .  Tjkv$€s  II.  13.  252;  c^yT^Afys  oixvmk* 
15.  640;  TjkvOe  atv  tvete'  dyyekiijs  (i.  e.  oVy^ycXfyy  oov  who)  3.  206 ; 
dyytki-ns  iratkttrat  Hes.  Th.  781 ; — in  all  which  places  it  is  gen.  causae, 
and  may  be  rendered  on  account  of  a  message  ;  for  the  old  Interpp. 
(Schol.  II.  11.  c,  Apoll.  Lex.)  are  wrong  in  assuming  a  masc.  Subst.  £7- 
ytkiris.  2.  an  announcement,  proclamation,  Pind.  P.  2.  7  (4)  :  a 
command,  order,  h.  Horn.  Cer.  448,  Pind.  O.  3.  50,  cf.  Od.  5.  150.,  7. 
263.                  II.  a  messenger,  v.  1.  Hes.  Th.  781. 

dyy€X(-apxos,  o.  =d^x"77e^0*'  Anth.  P.  1.  34, 
dyy«Xia4>op«a>,  f.  rjaat,  to  bear  tnessages,  Schol.  Aesch.  Pr.  966. 
dyyeAva-^opos,  Ion.  dyycXti)^  1  ov>  bearing  a  message,  a  messenger, 


ay  yeXieta 

Hdt.  1 .  1 20,  Arist.  Mund.  6,  1 1 ,  Luc,  etc. :  csp.  the  Persian  minister  who 

introduced  people  to  an  audience  with  the  king,  Hdt.  3.  118. 
ayytXitiM,  t),  a  female  messenger,  Orph.  H.  78.  3  ;  but  v.  ayye\.T-fip. 
ayytkii)*.  o,  v.  sub  dyytkia. 
oyy«A111-4«P0S»  ov,  Ion.  for  ayytkiatpopos. 

dyytAucos,  »7,  dv,  of  or  for  a  messenger,  f>r\ais  A.  B.  26.  2.  nw- 

gelic.  orparia  Just.  M.  Apol.  1.  52  ;  ipvxh  C.  I.  8654.  II.  07- 

yt\t/CT)  opx'nats  a  Sicilian  kind  of  pantomimic  dance  at  a  banquet,  Ath. 
629  E,  cf.  Anth.  Plan.  289 : — Adv.  -teas,  Procl.  Plat.  Tim.  298  ;  perh. 
from  "AyytKot  a  name  of  Hecate,  cf.  Ath.  1.  c,  Poll.  4.  103,  Hesych. 

oYY€Auin)s,  ov,  o,  a  messenger,  h.  Horn.  Merc.  296 :  fern.  dYY«Auans, 
1  Jos,  Call.  Del.  216. 

oyy'AAw,  (d-y-yeXos):  Ep.  and  Ion.  fut.  d77«\€a>  II.  9.  617,  Hdt.,  Att. 
dyytkw.  Dor.  -1S1  Tab.  Heracl.  in  C.  I.  5774.  70:  aor.  1  ^yya\a  Horn., 
Att.:  pi".  ijyyt\Ka  Polyb.  35,  4,  2,  (tar-)  Lys.  174.  28,  (da-)  Lycurg. 
147.  43,  (»«(»-)  Dem.  515.  19 : — Med.  (v.  infra)  :  aor.  yyytikaur)v  (€»-) 
Hdt.  6.  35,  Plat. : — Pass.,  fut.  iyyikOrjaofiat  (dv-)  Dem.  445.  IO, 
later  ay-ayytXriaonai  Lxx :  aor.  rryyikOTpf  Hdt.,  Att. :  pf.  jjyytKpiat 
Aesch.  Cho.  774,  Thuc.  8.  97,  etc. — An  aor.  2  pass.  rfyyi^-V  >s  treor  '" 
later  Greek,  as  Dion.  H.  IO.  20,  Plut.  Anton.  68,  Galb.  25,  etc.,  and  was 
introduced  by  the  copyists  into  correct  writers,  as  Eur.  I.  T.  932  (where 
now  rryyiXfhi  is  restored) :  the  aor.  2  act.  fryytkov  seldom  occurs  even 
in  late  writers  (as  Dion.  H.  I.  c,  App.  Civ.  I.  121)  without  the  impf.  as  a 
v.  1.,  though  in  Anth.  P.  7.  614,  ayytXi-rnv  is  required  by  the  metre; 
and  the  aor.  2  med.  rYfytkium  is  equally  dub. :  v.  Veitch  Gr.  Verbs 
$,  v.  To  bear  a  message,  wpro  bi  "*Ipis  .  .  uyytXtowra  II.  8.  409, 

cf.  9.  617,  al. ;  Tivi  to  a  person,  Od.  4.  24.,  15.  458  ;  with  an  inf.  added, 
oi'  Kt .  .xtivots  dyytikajai  ..olxdvbt  vita$ai  may  bring  them  word  to  return 
home,  16.  350,  ci.  E.  M.  s.  v.  ayyiiXat ;  also  c.  ace.  et  inf.,  xripvxa  b'. . 
dyytkXdvrwv  . .  yipovras  \i(ao6at  make  proclamation  that  they  should 
lie  down,  II.  8.  517.  2.  c.  ace.  rei,  to  announce,  report,  ia$Ka  II.  10. 

448  ;  tpaos  i)ovs  Od.  13.  94  ;  with  dat.  added,  'Ax<Xi)i  xaxiv  tiros  II.  1 7. 
701  ;  noanbawvi  rdbt  rrdvra  15.  159; — so  in  Prose,  ptr)  ti  vtwrtpov 
dyyiWtis  Plat.  Prot.  310  B;  ravra  fiiv  r)pSv  rjyytiXi  tis-  Id.  Phaedo 
f8  A,  cf.  57  B;  077.  wukepiov  to  proclaim  war,  Id.  Phaedr.  242  B; — 
with  a  Prep,  added,  dyyiXktafitv  is  viXiv  rdbt  Eur.  Or.  1539  ;  *pis  tip' 
d77efXai  p.t  \ph  X0701/S;  Id.  Supp.  399.  3.  c.  ace.  pers.  to  bring 

news  of. . ,  tt  *«'  puv  dyytikaipu  Od.  14.  120,  cf.  123  ;  later,  077.  irepi 
Tiros  Soph.  El.  1 1 1 1  : — dependent  clauses  are  added  with  a  Conj., 
fryytiktv  otti  fid  oi  »d<ris  iitTodi  pti/ivtt  II.  2  2.  439,  cf.  Simon.  95  ;  077. 
its  . .  Eur.  I.  T.  704  ;  udovvtxa  . .  Soph.  El.  47  ; — also  in  the  part.,  ij 
mat  0avuvra  rryyttKav ;  did  they  bring  word  that  he  was  dead  ?  lb. 
1443,  I452;  Kvpov  intarpartiovra  . .  ijyyfi\ty  Xen.  An.  2.  3,  19,  cf. 
Cyr.  6.  2,  15;  with  ws  inserted,  wart  pa  tvv  ouv  dyytXdiv  its  ovxir 
Srra  Soph.  O.  T.  955  ;  »j77«Xas  is  T«*Vtixora  Id.  El.  1 341.  II. 

Med.,  perh.  only  in  pres.,  Ttvicpq*  dyytWoptai  tlvat  <pi\os  I  an- 
MOttnce  myself  to  him   as  a  friend.  Id.  Aj.  1376.  III.  Pass. 

to  be  reported  of,  inl  to  rrXtiov  Thuc.  6.  34  ;  also  c.  part.,  (Sir  r)  Saviiv 
iyyi\Xtrat  Soph.Tr.  73,  cf.  Eur.  Hec.  591,  Thuc.  3. 16,  Xen.  Hell.  4. 
3,  13  ;  c.  inf.,  fjyytXTai  77  p^Xl  lo\vpd  ytyovivcu  Plat.  Charm.  153  B, 
cf.  Xen.  Cyr.  5.  3,  30 ;  also,  t)yyik0n . . ,  Sti  <ptvyouv  news  was  brought. 
that ...  Id.  Hell.  I.  I,  27  : — rd  TJyyiKptiva  the  reports,  M  rots  J777, 
Thuc.  8.  97. 

dyy-iX^a,  to,  a  message,  tidings,  news,  Eur.  Or.  876,  Thuc.  7.  74,  etc. 

aY7«Ao«iOT|f,  is,  like  an  angel,  Jo.  Chrys. 

dyytkos,  0,  t),  a  messenger,  envoy,  Horn.,  Hdt. ;  &'  dyyikav  i/uXitiv 
tivi  Hdt.  5.  92,  6,  cf.  I.  99.  2.  generally,  one  that  announces  or 

tills,  e.  g.  of  birds  of  augury,  II.  24.  292,  296  ;  Movawv  d77<>.os•,  of  a 
poet,  Theogn.  769  ;  opi'is  . .  Aios  dyy.,  of  the  nightingale.  Soph.  El. 
149:  c.  gen.  rei,  077.  kokuiv  ipwv  Id.  Ant.  277  ;  d77fXoi'  yXaiaaav 
Kuyaiv  Eur.  Supp.  203.  3.  an  angel,  Lxx,  N.  T.  II.  like 

Lat.  nuntius,  the  message,  or  tidings  brought,  Polyb.  I.  72,  4.  (Perh. 
akin  to  dyyapos  and  Skt.  angiras,  as  wokvs  to  Skt.  purus.) 

oyy«Attip,  ^poi,  o,  =  foreg..  Or.  Sib.  2.  214,  243:  fern.  dy7«XTpio.  lb. 
8.  117  ;  also,  dyY<ATupa  as  restored  by  Dind.  in  Orph.  H.  7S.  3. 

ayyfX-nMos,  17,  to,  of  or  for  a  messenger,  Justin.  M.  Apol.  I.  21. 

oY7T|iov,  to,  Ion.  for  d77«foK,  Hdt. 

dYYO-frqKI,  1),  a  receptacle  for  vessels,  Ath.  210  C. 

aYY°f>  <°?<  Tu>  a  vessel  of  various  kinds,  a  jar  to  hold  wine,  Od.  16. 
13.  cf.  2.  289  ;  milk,  II.  16.  643 :  a  vat  for  the  vintage,  Hes.  Op.  611  ; 
a  water-pot,  urn,  pitcher,  such  as  women  carried  on  the  head,  Hdt.  5.  12, 
cf.  Aei.  V.  H.  7.  12,  Eur.  El.  55  :  a  bucket,  pail,  Hdt.  4.  62  ;  a  bowl 
or  cup  (jur  wine,  Ear,  I.  T.  953,  960.  II.  also  for  dry  substances, 

a  coffer  or  ark,  in  which  children  were  laid,  Hdt.  1.  113,  Eur.  Ion  32, 
1337  :  a  chest  for  clothes,  Soph.  Tr.  622  :  a  cinerary  urn,  Id.  El.  Ill8, 
1205;    a  coffin,  C.  I.  3573.  III.  the  womb,  Hipp.  Epid.  5. 

p.  1 185.  v.  Galen,  ad  1.  IV.  the  shell  of  the  napakos.  Opp.  H. 

2.  406.  V.  the  cell  of  a  honey-comb,  Anth.  P.  9.  226. — Cf.  d77cfbi'. 

QYYovpiov,  to,  a  water-melon,  Byz. ;  v.  Ducang. 

aYYpd^x*),  shortd.  for  dvayodipw. 

dyYwv.  wos,  o,  a  Frankish  javelin,  Agath.  2.  5,  p.  40  D. 

aYOT|v.  Adv.  (iyai)  by  carrying,  aybijv  avpuv  Luc.  Lexiph.  10. 

07*.  aY«T«,  properly  impcr.it.  of  £70;,  but  used  as  Adv.  like  <t>ipt,  come  ! 
come  on  !  well !  Lat.  age  !  Horn.,  who  mostly  strengthens  it,  «I  !'  dyt, 
vvv  5'  dyt,  dyt  or),  dK\'  dyt.  immo  age  !  in  Att.  also  dyt  viv  Ar.  Eq. 
101 1  :  also  like  ipipt  before  I  and  2  pers.  pi.,  07*  M)  rpairtiofuv  II.  3. 
441  ;  dyt  bii  <niaifuv  II.  348  ;  dyt  TaprtTt  Od.  3.  332  ;  dAA'  dyt, 
Xlipaai.  Bvwptffa  Aesch.  Pers.  140  ;  dyt  it),  xai  x°P°v  aipapev  Id.  Eum. 
307.  cf.  Supp.  625 ;  rarely  before  1st  sing.,  dyt  Si) . .  ipi9ffqaa>  Od.  13.  215, 
if.  Eur. Cycl.  590  ;  even  before  3  pi.,  dW'dyt.xripvKts  . .  Xaov  . .  dyupiv- 


—  ayeXt].  7 

toiv  II.  2.  437  ;  in  Prose,  a7e  Sj;  . .  axoirupitv  Xen.  Cyr.  5.  5,  15  : — also, 
dytrt,  . .  KvaaaOt  Aesch.  Cho.  803  ;  d7«T€  is  also  used  with  1  pi.,  in  II. 

2.  139,  Od.  1.  76,  Ar.  Lys.  665  ;  with  I  sing.,  Od.  22.  139. 
dytiot,  ov,  (777)  landless,  a  corrupt  word  in  Aesch.  Supp.  858. 
dY«ipa.TOS,  ov,  poet,  for  dyipaaros,  E.  M. 

aytLpa:  impf.  f/ytipov  Hdt.  I.  61,  6:  aor.  1  frytipa  Ep.  dytipa  Od. 
14.  285  :  pf.  dyrrytpxa  (aw-)  Theod.  Prodr.  p.  181  : — Med.,  fut.  u7«- 
povpai  (in  pass,  sense)  Or.  Sib.  I.  346  :  aor.  I  ■qyttpdpm'  (trans.)  Ap. 
Rh.  4.  1335,  (aw-)  Horn.: — Pass.,  aor.  1  fiyipSr/v  Horn. :  pf.  dyrrytpfiai 
App.  Civ.  2.  134:  plqpf.  dyr/ytpro  Id.  Mithr.  108,  Ep.  3  pi.  dynyiparo 
II.  4.  211,  App. — We  also  find  in  Horn,  a  shortd.  aor.  2  of  med.  form, 
but  pass,  sense,  dyipovro  II.  18.  245,  inf.  d7€pe'<r9a<  Od.  2.  385  (not 
dyipioSat,  v.  Pors.  ad  1.),  part.  o7po^€>'os  II.  2.  481,  etc.  (whence  later 
Poets  formed  a  pres.  dyipou.ai,  e.  g.  C.  I.  6280.  35).  To  bring  together, 
gather  together,  Xaov  dytipwv  II.  4.  377,  etc. ;  \aiv  dytipovraiv  Kara 
vrjas  let  them  gather  . .  2.  438  ;  ivOdo*  utro . .  iro\iW  rjyttpa  tKaarov 
17.  222  ;  so  in  Att.,  TtV  is  &rj0riv  ot6\ov  Soph.  O.  C.  1306,  Thuc.  I.  9; 
tj  'EXkdSos  OTpaTtvpa,  Soph.  El.  695  ;  (TTpaTidv  Xen.  An.  3.  2,  13; 
■fa  fuav  oiicnaiv  dy.  icotvaivovs  Plat.  Rep.  369  C,  cf.  App.  Mithr.  84 ; 
(jiaxmi  ijyftpas  II.  13.  778  rather  belongs  to  iytipw,  as  also  iro\tfiov 
Trytipav  Plat.  Legg.  685  C,  v.  Spitzn.  II.  5.  510)  : — Pass,  to  come  together, 
gather,  assemble,  II.  2.  52,  Od.  2.  8,  etc.;  dypopttvot  avts  herded  swine, 
Od.  16.  3  ;  0vf*us  ivl  arrjOtaaiv  dyipBrj,  is  <ppiva  Bvfius  dyipBi}  II.  4. 
152,  etc.  (v.  sub  iytipoj.)  II.  of  things,  to  get  together,  collect, 

gather,  bijpx>$tv  dKiptra  . .  xal  ai&owa  otvov  dytipas  Od.  19.  197 ;  tfo\vv 
&10TOV  xal  xpvaov  dytipaiv  3.  301  ;  7roAXd  5'  dytipa  xp^aTa  14.  285  ; 
— so  in  Med.,  dyttpdpitvot  Kara  dijuov  13.  14.  2.  to  collect  by 

begging,  stipem  colligere,  dis  dv  nvpva  Kara  pLvrjffTrjpas  dytipoi  17.  362, 
cf.  Hdt.  I.  61  ;  d<p'  wv  dytiptt  xal  vpoaanti  Dem.  96.  17  : — absol.  to 
collect  money  for  the  gods  and  their  temples,  Nv/upais  07.  Aesch.  Fr.  1 70, 
cf.  Hdt.  4.  35,  Plat.  Rep.  381  D  ;  esp.  for  Cybele,  Luc.  Pseudom.  13,  cf. 
prjTpayvpTTjs  : — absol.  to  go  about  begging,  Philostr.  225,  Max.  Tyr.  19. 

3.  3.  to  put  things  together,  accumulate  arguments,  as  in  a  speech, 
Aesch.  Cho.  638.  4.  txppvas  tls  Iv  dy.  to  frown,  Anth.  P.  7.  300. 
Rare  in  good  Prose. 

d-Y«iTwv,  ov,  gen.  oyoy,  without  a  neighbour,  neighbourless.  lrdyos  Aesch. 
Pr.270;  oIkos  <pi\atv  07.  Eur.  El.  1 1 30 ;  d<pi\os  /tat  1I7.  Plut.  2.  423  D. 

dY'XdSov.  Dor.  for  dytkr/Siiv,  Theocr.  16.  92. 

aY<Ad{ouai,  Pass,  to  go  in  flocks,  be  gregarious,  Arist.  H.  A.  8.  12,  9., 
9.  2,  I  : — Hesych.  cites  the  Act.,  uytKaaaf  KOfiioat. 

aYcAoto-KouxKos,  1),  dv,  (iconioj)  =*  dyt\atorpo<piKvs  ;  ij  uytXatoKoptKTj 
(sc.  Tix*1!)  '**  <""'  of  breeding  and  keeping  cattle,  Plat.  Polit.  275  E,  sq„ 
299  D ; — dytKvtcopiKT)  in  Clem.  Al.  338. 

aY<Aaios.  a,  ov,  (dyi\rj)  belonging  to  a  herd,  feeding  at  large,  because 
the  herds  stayed  out  at  grass  all  the  summer,  in  Horn,  always  with  (3ui>i, 
U.  II.  729,  Od.  IO.  410,  al. ;  so,  0ovs  dy.  Soph.  Aj.  175  ;  &oaicr)p.aTa 
Eur.  Bacch.  677 ;  al  dy.  toiv  inrajv,  i.  e.  brood-mares,  Xen.  Eq.  5,  8.  II. 
in  herds  or  shoals,  gregarious,  i'x9>«s  Hdt.  2.  93  ;  d7«\ofa,  rd,  gre- 
garious animals.  Plat.  Polit.  264  D  ;  opp.  to  povattxd,  Arist.  H.  A.  I. 
I,  23,  sq. ;  to  inropaSiJcd,  Id.  Pol.  I.  8,  5  ;  »oA.it<*o>'  i  dv$pamos  £<vov 
Trdans  pxXtTTijs  /cat  wavrds  dytKaiov  CT'oo  puiWov  lb.  I.  2,  10.  2.  of 
the  herd  or  multitude,  i.e.  common,  dy.  dvBpaxwoi,  opp.  to  dpxovTts.  Plat. 
Polit.  268  A  ;  d7.  laxdbts  Eupol.  Incert.  74  ;  dproi  Plat.  Com.  Mtv.  3  ; 
ffoipiffTai  Isocr.  236  D :  (in  this  sense  the  Gramm.  make  it  proparox. 
dyikaios,  Hemst.  Thorn.  M.  p.  7.) 

dyiXaiorpo^ia.  1),  the  keeping  of  herds.  Plat.  Polit.  261  E. 

dY«XaiOTpod)iK6s.  r/,  dv,  of  or  fit  for  uytXatorpotpia  :  ij  -kt),  =  foreg.. 
Plat.  Polit.  267  B,  etc. ;  cf.  dytKatoicopiKus. 

dY<X<ua-Tpo^ot,  ov,  keeping  herds.  Max.  Tyr.  2,5.  6  ;  in  Poll.  dytKorp-. 

aYiXouiv,  wvos,  o,  a  place  for  herds  (Td  dytkaia),  pasture,  Suid. 

dY<Xopx<u,  to  lead  a  herd  or  company,  c.  gen.,  Plut.  Galb.  1 7. 

dY«X-dpxi*.  ov,  o,  (dpxco)  the  leader  of  a  company,  a  captain,  Plut. 
Rom.  6 ;  0:7.  Tavpos  Luc.  Amor.  2  2  :  -opx°»,  o,  Philo  2.  144. 

dY«XcuruA,  aros,  to,  a  gathering,  crowd,  vovaaiv  Procl.  h.  Minerv.  44. 

dY«Xao-r«i>,  to  be  uyiKaOTos,  cited  from  Heracl.  Epist. 

oY«Xo<rri,  Adv.  without  laughter,  Plat.  Euthyd.  278  E,  Plut.  2.  727  A. 

dYcXao-nicos,  77.  ov,  disposed  to  herd  together,  social,  Philo  2.  202 , 
etc. 

d-Y«Xao*TO«,  ov,  (ytkdai)  not  laughing,  grave,  gloomy,  h.  Horn.  Cer. 
200 ;  dy.  vpuijanra  0ia£ufitvoi  Aesch.  Ag.  794 »  cpith.  of  Crassus, 
Lucil.  ap.  Cic.  Fin.  5.  30: — metaph.  d7«'Xoo-Ta  <p6iyyta$ai  Heracl.  ap. 
Plut.  2.  397  A;  07.  <ppt)v  Aesch.  Fr.  418;  0ios  Phryn.  Com.  ttovurp. 
I.  II.  pass,  not  to  be  laughed  at,  not  light  or  trifling,  (vfupopai 

Aesch.  Cho.  30 ;  also  as  v.  I.  Od.  8.  307. 

QY«XdTns,  oi»,  o,  v.  sub  dyikn  II.  [o] 

dY«X«iT|.  r),  Ep.  epith.  of  Athena,  =  krjtTis,  dyovaa  Ktiav,  the  driver  of 
spoil,  the  forager,  II.  6.  269,  etc.,  and  Hes. 

dY«X7|,  >>,  (d7<«)  a  herd,  of  horses,  U.  19.  281  ;  elsewhere  in  Horn, 
always  of  oxen  and  kine,  II.  II.  678,  etc.,  cf.  fioivopios: — also,  any  herd 
or  company,  Lat.  grex,  avuiv  dy.  Hes.  Sc.  168,  d7.  vapOivaiv  Pind.  Fr. 
78 ;  mtviv  dyi\ai  Soph.  Aj.  168,  Eur.  Ion  106;  metaph.,  iroiw  ayiKai 
Eur.  H.  F.  1276;  a  shoal  of  fish,  Opp.  H.  3.  639;— also  in  Plat.  Rep. 
451  C,  Arist.  H.  A.  9.  2,  2,  etc.,  but  not  freq.  in  good  Prose.  II.  at 

Crete  d7«'Aai  were  the  bands  or  classes  in  which  the  youth  were  trained 
from  the  age  ot  seventeen  until  marriage ;  while  at  Sparta  the  boys  were 
removed  from  their  parents'  home  and  put  into  the  dyi\at  (there  called 
0ovat)  at  the  age  of  seven  ;  Ephor.  ap.  Strabo  480,  Plut.  Lye.  16,  Heraclid. 
Polit.  3  ;  the  chief  of  an  dyiy-n  was  d7<XaTi7S,  Heraclid.  1.  c. ;  and  the 
youths  were  dyiKaarot,  Hesych.;  cf.  Miiller  Dor.  4.  5,  1,  sq.,  and  v, 
eova  :  also,  viuv  dy.  at  Miletus,  C.  I.  2892  ;  ditW  at  Smyrna,  3326. 


ayeXqSov  —  ayt)(Ti\aoi. 


8 

dY«Xif8dv,  Adv.  (d7«A.i;)  in  herds  or  companies,  II.  16.  160,  Hdt.  2.  93, 
2,  etc. ;  also  dytXiiSd.  Arat.  965,  1079. 

dY«'XT)0tv.  Adv.  (dyiKn)  from  a  herd;  Ap.  Rh.  I.  356,  406. 

uY«Xt)ts,  180s,  17,  pecul.  fern,  of  ayt\aios,  Numen.  ap.  Ath.  320 
1).  II.  =  ayt\tii],  Cornut.  N.  D.  20. 

uy«\i]-k6u.os,  ov,  keeping  herds,  Nonn.  D.  47.  218. 

dY«XTfn)S.  ov,  d,  belonging  to  a  herd,  0ovs  ap.  Suid.  cf.  dyeXdrTjs. 

dY<Xi)4>i,  Ep.  dat.  of  dyi\n,  II.  2.  480. 

d-Y^Xotos,  Of,  not  matter  of  laughter,  oix  dyiKowv  no  bad  joke, 
Henioch.  Tpox-  6* 

dytXc-KojaLxos.    Tpddios.  v.  sub  uytXato-. 

ayipfv,  Ep.  inf.  of  dyai. 

aYcpovcvpa,  dy€p.ovtvuj.  aYcp/jav,  Dor.  for  ijytp-. 

dytv,  Ep.  for  idyrjaav,  v.  sub  dyvvpa,  11.  4.  214. 

d-Y€v«uX6Yn,TOS,  °f»  of  unrecorded  descent,  Ep.  Hebr.  7.  3. 

aY«v«ia.  17,  (dyevrjs)  low  birth,  Arist.  Pol.  6.  2,  7  ;  cf.  dyivvtia. 

QY«v6ios.  ov,  (yivttov)  beardless,  Pind.,  etc.  (v.  infra)  ;  dyivuiv  ti 
tiprfxivai  to  speak  lite  a  boy,  Luc.  Jup.  Trag.  29  ;  tA  dyivtiov,  absence 
or  want  of  beard.  Id.  Eun.  9  : — Adv.,  dyfvtiais  ixtiv  Philostr.  489.  II. 

the  dyivttoi  were  boys  within  the  age  to  enter  the  lists  for  certain  prizes 
at  the  games,  Pind.  O.  8.  71.,  9.  135,  cf.  Ar.  Eq.  1373,  Lys.  162.  4,  Plat. 

L"SS-  833  c>  c-  *•  236.  al-  Paus-  6-  6-  3- 

aY«vT|s,  is,  (ytviaBai)  unborn,  uncreated,  Plat.  Tim.  27  C.  II. 

of  no  family,  ignoble,  mean,  cowardly,  vile,  opp.  to  dyaOvs,  Soph.  Fr.  105 
(the  metre  warrants  the  form  in  this  sense,  though  the  correct  word  was 
dytvviis,  Stallb.  Plat.  Prot.  319  D)  ;  of  things,  oix  dytvtis  oti'xoi  Schol. 
Od.  11.  568  ;  cf.  A.  B.  336,  Steph.  Byz.  s.  v.  'Avaxroptia.  III. 

with  no  family,  i.e.  childless,  Isae.  ap.  Harpocr. 

QY«virTOS,  ov,  (ytviaOai)  unborn,  uncreated,  unoriginated,  dpxv  Plat. 
Phaedr.  245  D,  cf.  Arist.  Cael.  1.  II,  I.,  12,  II.  II.  of  things, 

not  done,  not  having  happened,  to  yap  tpaviiv  ris  &v  Siivatr  dv  dyivrrrov 
ttoitiv ;  infectum  reddere,  Soph.  Tr.  743  ;  dYtVijra  ■xoitiv,  dao'  b\v  17 
ltiKpaypAva  Agatho  ap.  Arist.  Eth.  N.  6.  2,6;  atrial  ay.  groundless 
charges,  Aeschin.  86.  I  ;  StafioXai  Alciphro  3.  58  ;  wv  ovStv  . .  dy.  can 
be  undone,  Isocr.  397  A.     Cf.  dyivvrjros. 

uyiwtia  (in  Mss.  often  dyivtia  or  dytvvia),  ^,  meanness,  baseness, 
Arist.  de  Virt.  et  Vit.  7.  4,  Polyb.,  etc. 

qy«wt|S,  is,  (yivva)  =  dytvfis  II  (q.  v.),  of  low  family,  Hdt.  I.  134  (in 
Comp.),  Plat.  Prot.  319  D,  etc.  II.  low-minded,  base,  Hdt.  5.  6, 

Ar.  Pax  748,  Plat.  Prot.  319  D,  al. ;  01  dytvvtis,  opp.  to  01  ycvvaiurepoi, 
01  ytvvaioi,  Arist.  Pol.  3.  13,  2.,  4.  12,  2  ;  of  a  cock,  Plat.  Theaet.  164 
C,  Menand.  ©«o<p.  2.   13.  2.  of  things,  much  like  pdvavoos, 

illiberal,  sordid,  Plat.  Gorg.  465  B,  513  D,  al. ;  oibiv  dytvvis  Dem.  563, 
tin.  Adv.  -wis,  Eur.  I.  A.  1458,  Plat.  Com.  Zttis  I.  6. — In  Plat,  mostly 
with  a  negat.  oix  dytvvws,  Charm.  158  C,  etc.  In  Mss.  sometimes 
confused  with  drfvrjs,  Ruhnk.  Tim.  46. 

dY€WT)0-io,  17,  the  state  of  one  not  begotten,  Greg.  Naz.  Or.  25.  16,  al. 

dY«wi)TOY«v-f|s,  is,  born  from  the  unbegotten,  Arius  ap.  Epiphan., 
Theodorct.  H.  E.  I.  5. 

dyiwiyros,  ov,  (ytvvdw)  like  dyivnros,  unbegotten,  unborn,  dy.  tot  77 
Soph.  O.  C.  973 :  unoriginated,  Id.  Fr.  739,  Plat.  Tim.  52  A;  of  the 
elements,  Emped.  ap.  Hesych. : — Adv.,  dvaiTioK  xal  dy.  Plut.  2.  1015 
A.  II.  like  dytvvqs,  low-born,  mean.  Soph.  Tr.  61.  III. 

act.  not  productive,  Theophr.  C.  P.  6.  10,  I. 

dyevvia,  v.  sub  dyivvtia. 

dY«w({u,  to  act  like  an  dytvvtjs,  Teles,  ap.  Stob.  68.  6. 

dyiopai.  Dor.  for  f/yiofuii,  Pind. :  rd  dynp-iva,  customs,  prescription, 
Orac.  ap.  Dem.  1072.  27.     This  form  also  occurs  in  Mss.  of  Hdt.,  as 

2.  69,  72,  115,  etc.,  but  is  corrected  by  Edd. 

dytpno-Tos,  ov,  (yipas)  without  a  gift  of  honour,  unrecompensed,  unre- 
warded, II.  1.  119,  Hes.  Th.  395;  dy.  tvjjlPos,  ovopa  Eur.  Hec.  117, 
Bacch.  1378  ;  dirtKBttv  dy.  Luc.  Tyrannic.  3  ;  c.  gen.,  ivioiv  dy.  Ap.  Rh. 

3.  65  : — a  poet,  form  dytipdros  is  cited  in  E.  M. 
AytpiBa,  v.  sub  riytpiSopai. 

d/ycpOev,  Dor.  and  Ep.  3  pi.  aor.  1  pass,  of  dyt'ipai. 

aY<pp.6s,  0,  a  collecting  of  money  for  the  service  of  the  gods  (cf.  dytiptu  2), 
C.  I.  2656.  28,  Dion.  H.  2.  19,  Ath.  360  D,  Poll.  3.  in.  II.  in 

Arist.  Poet.  8,  3,  prob.  (like  dytpats)  the  gathering  of  the  Greeks  against 
Troy.  III.  generally  a  collection,  as  of  wisdom  and  experience, 

Ael.  V.  H.  4.  20. — The  form  dyvp/ios  is  condemned  in  E.  M. 

dY«pp-oo-wr|,  i),  =  dytpais,  Opp.  C.  4.  251. 

dYcpou.ai,  late  poet,  form  of  dytipofiai  (q.  v.),  Ap.  Rh.  3.  895. 

aY<ppu>.  Aeol.  for  dyeipw. 

dY«po"t-KvpT|Xis  [p],  d,  a  begging  sacrificer  or  priest,  Cratin.  Apair.  1 1, 
ubi  v.  Meineke.     (From  xvpr}\ts  II,  not  Kv&ib.rj.) 

dytpms,  tins,  1),  a  gathering,  mustering,  OTpaTirjs  Hdt.  7-  5>  48. 

dY«pTT|S,  Dor.,  -Tas,  d,  a  collector  of  dues,  C.  I.  5640.  I.  35. 

uY«piJX'a'  "7.  arrogance,  Lxx  (Sap.  2.  9),  Polyb.  10.  35,  8,  etc. 

aY«pwxos  [&],  ov,  poet.  Adj.  (used  also  in  late  Prose),  in  Horn,  always 
in  good  sense,  high-minded,  lordly,  honoured,  epith.  of  warlike  tribes, 
mostly  of  the  Trojans,  U.  3.  36,  etc. ;  the  Rhodians,  2.  654  ;  the  Mysians, 
10.  430,  cf.  Batr.  145  ;  once  of  a  single  man,  viz.  Periclymenus,  Od.  II. 
286,  and  so  Hes.  Fr.  2  2  Gaisf. ;  in  Pind.  of  noble  actions,  d7.  'ipy/iara 
N.  6.  56 ;  wfi;  O.  10  (1 1).  95  ;  wkovrov  artipdvaji  dy.  lordly  crown  of 
wealth,  P.  1.  96.  II.  later  in  bad  sense,  haughty,  arrogant,  insolent, 

Archil.  154,  Alcae.  119;  so  also  3  Mace.  1.  25;  dy.  ovos  Luc.  Asin.  40: — 
so  Adv.  -x«"S.  Anth.  P.  9.  745,  Polyb.  2.8,  7;  Comp. -oTf pop  Id.  18. 17,  3. 

'AY«o"iXaos,  'AY«o-tXas,  v.  sub  'A7r;oiAaos. 

dYi'-o-rparos,  !>,  17,  host-leading,  '  A9r]vn  Hes.  Th.  925  ;  od\iriy£,  airXo's 
Nonn.  D.  26.  ij.,  28.  28. 


QYfrns.  aYCTis,  Dor.  for  J77-. 

aY€vo-ria,  rj,  fasting,  Schol.  Ar.  Nub.  621. 

ttY«\M7TOS.  ov,  (ytvofiai)  act.  not  tasting,  without  taste  of ,  fasting  from, 
vKaKovi'Tos  Plat.  Com.  II01.  1  ;  ixBvaiv  Luc.  Saturn.  28  :  metaph.,  ofoi 
xa«wv  dyevoros  aiwv  Soph.  Ant.  583  ;  (XevOepias  dy.  Plat.  Rep.  576  A  ; 
rail'  Ttpnvuiv  Xen.  Mem.  2.  I,  23  ;  toC  xaXov  Arist.  Eth.  N.  10.  10  (9), 
4: — absol.  without  eating,  diroroi  xai  dy.  Luc.  Tim.  18.  II.  pass. 

without  taste,  Arist.  de  An.  2.  10,  3.  2.  unlasted,  Plut.  2.  731  D, 

etc. 

d-Y»>p.tTpT)TOS,  ov.  of  persons,  ignorant  of  geometry,  Arist.  An.  Post. 
I.  12,  3;  firjbels  dy.  daiTO),  Inscr.  on  Plato's  door,  Tzetz.  Chil.  8. 
973.  2.  of  problems,  not  geometrical,  Arist.  ut  supr.  4. 

aY«wpYll0"^a'  ^'  oad  husbandry,  Theophr.  C.  P.  2.  20,  I. 

d-Y«d>pYr|TOS,  OJ'»  uncultivated,  C.  I.  (add.)  2561  b.  77,  Theophr.  C.  P. 
1.  16,  2. 

d-Y<wpYiov  bixij,  17,  an  action  for  neglect  of  agriculture,  prob.  against 
careless  tenants,  A.  B.  20  and  336. 

dyr|,  Dor.  aYd  [dy],  17,  (v.  sub  dyaiiai)  wonder,  awe,  horror,  amaze- 
ment, Horn,  only  in  phrase  0717  p  ixtt  "■  21.  221,  Od.  3.  227.,  16. 
243  : — Hesych.  interprets  it  by  Tiu-fj,  aefiaopLus,  citing  also  pi.  d/yais 
(  =  £r]\wO(Oiv)  from  Aesch.  Fr.  81  ;  in  Soph.  Ant.  4,  Coraes  reads  ovb<v 
. .  dyrjs  drep  pro  vulg.  dVr/s.  II.  envy,  malice,  ipOovai  xal  dyn 

XP*dfpifvos  Rdt.  6.  61 :  and  of  the  gods,  jealousy,  firj  tis  dya  BeuBev 
xv((pdoy  Aesch.  Ag.  131.— The  two  senses  are  also  found  in  the  Verb 
dyaftat,  while  the  latter  alone  belongs  to  dyaiopai. 

oyt),  Dor.  aYd  [67],  r),  (v.  sub  ayvvfii)  breakage:  1.  a  fragment, 

piece,  splinter,  dyaiat  xanrdiv  Aesch.  Pers.  425  ;  npus  dpftdrtuv  t  dyaiat 
Eur.  Supp.  693.  2.  Kvp-aros  dyrj  the  place  where  the  wave  breaks, 

the  beach,  Ap.  Rh.  I.  554.,  4.  941.  3.  a  curve,  bending,  6<piosdyri 

Arat.  688  : — hence  Bockh  reads  dydv  (for  dyav)  in  Pind.  P.  2.  151  (82), 
in  the  sense  of  crooked  arts,  deceit.  4.  a  wound,  Hesych. 

ayn,  Ep.  for  idyn,  v.  sub  dyvvpx. 

^YTY'PaT0>  v-  su^  dyeipoi. 

dY^dTtoj,  to  drive  out  one  accursed  or  polluted  (dyos),  Lat.  piaadum 
exigere,  esp.  one  guilty  of  sacrilege  and  murder,  Hdt.  5.  72,  Soph.  O.  T. 
402,  v.  Schiif.  Greg.  p.  546;  cf.  dvbp-qXaTiai. 

dYTjXdTOS,  ov,  {dyos,  iKavvoj)  driving  out  a  curse,  dy.  u.daTi[,  i.  e. 
lightning  which  consumes  and  so  purifies,  Lye.  436. 

dYT)pa,  tu,  (from  dyai,  or  perh.  Dor.  for  ijyvfxa)  anything  led,  a  division 
of  an  army,  of  the  Lacedaemonians,  Xen.  Lac.  II.  9.,  13.  6:  but,  in  the 
Macedonian  army,  the  Guard,  Polyb.  5.  65,  2,  Arr.  An.  I.  I  ;  rdv  iirniwv 
to  ay.  Id.  4.  24,  1 ;  rav  tti^wv  to  ay.  2.  8,  3 ;  raiv  iKetpdvruv  Ath.  539  E. 

dYT|v6pcios,  Dor.  aYavdp-,  a,  ov ,  =  dyrjvajp,  Aesch.  Pers.  1026. 

dynvoptwv,  a  participial  form  =  dyrjvwp,  Nonn.  D.  12.  206. 

aYrjvopia  [a],  17,  manliness,  manhood,  courage,  of  men,  11.  22.  457  : 
haughtiness,  in  pi.,  9.  700  ;  of  a  lion,  1 2.  46. 

dYT|va>p  [a],  Dor.  aYavaip,  opos,  o,  17 :  (dyav,  dvqp) :  poet.  Adj., 
manly,  heroic, BvposU.  2.  276.,  12.  300;  xpabirj  xai  Sviiiis  dy.  9.  635,  al. ; 
Piri  xal  dyqvopt  Ovfia  ti(as,  of  a  lion,  24.  42  :  often  with  collat.  notion 
of  headstrong,  arrogant,  of  Achilles,  9.  699;  of  Thersites,  2.  276;  of 
the  suitors,  Od.  I.  106,  144,  al. ;  of  the  Titans,  Hes.  Th.  641,  cf.  Op. 
7  ;  of  commanders  of  an  army,  Aesch.  Th.  1 24  (lyr.).  2.  in  Pind. 

of  animals  and  things,  stately,  splendid,  magnificent,  Xmros  O.  9.  35  ; 
ir\oCros  P.  10.  27  ;  xopmos  I.  I.  60. 

uY-rjoxa.  pf.  of  d'7<u  ;  also  a7i77oxa,  v.  sub  dyai. 

d-YT|pavTos,  ov,  =  sq.,  Simon.  95,  Eur.  ap.  Ath.  61  B. 

d-YT|paos,  ov,  Att.  contr.  dYT|p!os,  aiv  (of  which  Horn,  uses  nom.  dual 
dy-qpai  (v.  infr.),  nom.  sing,  and  ace.  pi.  dy-qpais  Od.  5.  218,  etc.)  ;  ace. 
sing,  dyfipaiv  h.  Horn.  Cer.  242,  for  which  Hes.  Th.  949  has  a7^o<u ; 
nom.  pi.  dyripa)  Hes.  Th.  277,  dat.  071700*5  Ar.  Av.  689.  Not  waxing 

old,  undecaying,  Horn.,  and  Hes.,  who  use  it  of  persons  in  conjunction 
with  dSdvaros;  dSdvaros  xal  dyfipaos  fjuara  itdvra  II.  8.  539,  cf.  Od. 
5.  136,  etc. ;  av  S  d0.  xai  dyr/pais  Od.  5.  218  ;  071^01  t'  dBavdrai  re  II. 
12.  323.,  17.  444;  so  Hes.  Th.  949;  also,  dm^on-os  xal  dy.  lb.  955; 
so,  dyrjpais  XP"VV  Swdaras  Soph.  Ant.  608  (lyr.).  2.  of  things, 

once  in  Horn.,  of  the  Aegis,  U.  2.  447  ;  then,  07.  *rD5os  Pind.  P.  2.  96 ; 
Xapiv  t  dyripwv  (tofuv  Eur.  Supp.  1 1 78  ;  and  in  Prose,  To*  dyqpwv 
ivatvov  Thuc.  2.  43;  07.  xal  dSdvarov  iratfos  Plat.  Phil.  15  D,  etc. 

uYTipao-ia.  rf,  eternal  youth,  Schol.  II.  II.  1 . 

dYT|pa.Tov,  to,  an  aromatic  plant,  perhaps  yarrow  or  milfoil,  Achillea 
ageratum,  Diosc.  4.  59. 

d-Y-qpdTos,  ov,  =  dyfipaos,  xkios  Eur.  I.  A.  565  (lyr.),  C.  I.  6269; — 

also  in  Prose,  Lys.  198.  8,  Xen.  Mem.  4.  3,  13,  Plat.  Ax.  370  D,  Arist. 

de  Cael.  I.  3,  9. 

dYT|po.Tos,  o,  a  stone  used  by  shoemakers  to  polish  women's  shoes,  Galen. 

dyi]ptai,  <uv,  v.  sub  uyT/paos. 

dY'qs  [«]>  ts,  (dyos)  guilty,  accursed,  Hippon.  6  (4).  II.  also  in 

good  sense,  =  thayns  C,  bright,  pure,  dyia  xvxXov  Emped.  ap.  A.  B.  337, 

cf.  Nake  Choer.  179,  sq. ;  or  perh.  it  is  =  irtpirryr/s,  round. 
'AYi|O-"av8p0si  6,  epith.  of  Pluto,  =  'Ayi)<ri\aos,  Hesych. 
dyno-f-Xaos  [Sty],  ov,  6,  leader  of  the  people,  conductor  of  mankind, 

epith.  of  Hades  (Pluto),  Aesch.  Fr.  319;    Jiyr]oi\fws  Anth.  P.  7.  54J  ; 

Ep.  ^yeoi'Xaos,  Nic.  ap.  Ath.  684  D  ;  poet,  also  a7€0-i'Xas,  a,  Call.  Lav. 

Pall.  130,  Anth.  P.  append.  235; — the  form  07*01X005,  cited  in  E.  M., 

Zonar.',  etc.,  is  doubtful.  II.  as  pr.  11.,  esp.  of  the  well-known 

Spartan  king,  ' hyrjaiKaos  Xen.  Hell.  3.  3,  4,  etc. ;  but  'HynaiXews  Id. 

Vect.  3,  7,  Dem.  434.  14,  as  in  Hdt.  7.  204.,  8.  131,  2  ;  'At^o/Xos,  a, 

Paus.  8.  18,  8;    poet.  'A7fffiXos  Critias  ap.  Plut.  Cim.  10,  C.  I.  2599; 

'A.ytiai\as.  Inscr.  Boeot.  in  Leake's  Northern  Gr.,  no.  37 ;  cf.  Ahr.  D. 

Aeol.  p.  182,  sq. 


ay r)(Tf)(opo<i  - 

afn<ri-xopo%,  ov,  (dyiopat.  Dor.  for  J77-)  leading  the  chorus  or  dance, 

npootfua  Pind.  P.  I.  6. 
ayirrf|p,  ijpos,  o,  Dor.  for  ^T^ri/p. 
ayr]r6i,  17,  iv,  (dyajiat)  Ep.  form   of  the   later  ayaarus,  admirable, 

wonderful,  iptn)v  xat  C1005  dyrrrov "Exropos  II.  22.  370;   elsewh.  in  Horn. 

of  persons,  c.  ace.  rei,  otpas  xat  efoos  dynris  admirable  in  .  .  ,  24.  376, 

cf.  Od.  14.  1 77  ;  tjoos  dyrrroi  wonderful  in  form  only,  as  a  reproach,  II. 

5.  T87.,  8.  228;  «<oos  0717717  h.  Horn.  Ap.  198;  later  c.  dat.  rei,  dy. 

Xprjfiaat  Solon  4.  3. 
&Y'Trwp.  opos,  v.  Dor.  for  ifyfrroip. 
ofiajw.   later  form   for  dyifa,   Anth.  P.  append.    339,    Lxx,    N.  T., 

Eccl. ; — in  Dion.  H.  7.   72,  prob.  ayvt£ofievaiu  should   be  restored,   cf. 

mptayviaavrts  just  above. 
ayvurpa,  aros,  to,  =  aytaar-qptov,  Lxx  (Amos  7.  15,  al.).  II. 

holiness,  lb.  (Ps.  92.  5).  III.  the  consecrated  host,  Eccl. 

dyiao'tLos.  ov,  o,  consecration,  sanctification,  Lxx,  N.  T.,  Eccl. 
dyuio-TTjptov,  to,  a  holy  place,  sanctuary,  Lxx  (Lev.  12.  4,  al.). 
d-yiao-Tucos,  ^,  ov,  of  01 for  consecration,  ikatov,  etc.,  Eccl. 
dywi-^opos,  ov,  =  ifpatpipos,  C.  I.  481. 

d-ytYapTOs.  ov,  of  grapes,  etc.,  without  seed  or  stone,  Theophr.C.P.  5.5, 1. 
dyi£ci>,  f.  Att.  Tat,  (07*05)  to  hallow,  make  sacred,  Lat.  dedicare,  esp.  by 

burning  a  sacrifice,  6t$  0ov6vrov  ioriav  dyi£wv  Soph.  O.  C.  1495  (ryr.)  > 
wivava  ijytfcv  is  odxrav,  a  joke  irap*  imivotav  for  is  &a>fu>v,  Ar.  PI. 
681  : — Pass.,  Batfiot  varpi  dytoOivres  Pind.  O.  3.  34  ;  ayurOtis  C.  I.  353. 

18.     Cf.  iv-,  xa$-ayi£a/. 

dytvcw,  lengthd.  Ep.  and  Ion.  form  of  07*;,  used  by  Horn,  and  Hdt. 
only  in  pres.  and  impf.  (impf.  with  or  without  augm.  in  Horn.,  but  with- 
out always  in  Hdt.) ;  inf.  pres.  dytvitttvat  Od.  20.  213,  Ion.  impf.  dyi- 
vtoxov  Od.  1 7.  294  (in  Arat.  Ill,  ifyivtoxov),  cf.  xakioxero,  vukioxero: 
f.  dytvqov  h.  Horn.  Ap.  57,   249,  etc.  To  lead,  bring,  carry, 

vvpupas  . .  Tjyivtov  Kara,  dorv  II.  18.  493  ;  fxrjkov  dytvtt  Od.  14.  105  ; 
dyivus  atyas  tivno-n)peaot  22.  198  ;  dy'tvtov  dairtrov  vkrjv  II.  24.  784 ; 
owpa  dy'tvtov  Hdt.  3.  89,  cf.  93,  97,  etc.,  cf.  dvaytvlat ;  so,  vkoirrov  dy. 
tls  uptrqv  Anth.  P.  append.  47;  Xr/idoas  dy.  lead  captive,  Ap.  Rh.  I. 
613: — Med.  to  cause  to  be  brought,  ywatxas  is  to  Ipov  dytviifitvos 
Hdt.  7.  i^.     [1'iyivtov  II.  18.  493,  is  a  trisyll.] 

dyvdypa^Ki  (sc.  Bt0kia).  to,  the  Sacred  Boots,  i.e.  the  Poetic  Books,  | 
which,  with  the  Law  and  the  Prophets,  made  up  the  Old  Testament, 
Eccl. ;  so,  07.  Sikrot  Dion.  Areop. :  v.  Suicer. 

dyi-oiroLttu,  to  sanctify,  Phot. ;  from  d-yto-irotds,  ov,  sanctifying,  Eccl. 

dyio-irptirTH,  is,  befitting  the  holy.  Adv.  -irw*.  Subst.    irp«ir«ui.  Eccl. 

07101  £4],  a,  ov,  (ayos  or  dyos)  devoted  to  the  gods,  Lat.  sacer,  and 
to,  I.  in  good  sense,  sacred,  holy:  1.  of  things,  esp. 

temples,  'KtppootTns  Ipov  aytov  Hdt.  2.  41  ;  Ipiv  'Hpaxkios  dytov  lb. 
44,  cf.  Plat.  Criti.  1 16  C,  Xen.  Hell.  3.  2,  19 ; — in  these  places  the  gen. 
h  sometimes  taken  as  dependent  on  Symr,  sacred  to  Aphrodite,  etc.,  but 
prob.  wrongly  ;  it  must  be  so,  however,  in  Luc.  Syr.  D.  13  (vijuv  iwi  t<£ 
X&anaTi  "Hpi/i  d-yioi"  ioTrjoaro)  : — generally,  (hrniai.  (vpBikaia  Isocr. 
218  D,  Plat. ;  finrpis .  .  tart  irarpcs  iyiwrtpov  Id.  Crito  51  A  ;  opicos 
07.  Arist.  Mir.  57.  I  :  to  ayiov,  the  Temple,  Lxx,  etc.;  rd  0710  ram 
dyian/  the  Holy  of  Holies,  lb.,  cf.  Ep.  Hebr.  9.  3.  2.  of  persons, 

holy,  pious,  pure,  Ar.  Av.  522  (anap.)  : — Adv.,  dyian  xat  atpvas  «x*"' 
Isocr.  226  C  :    freq.  in  Lxx,  N.  T..  etc.  II.  in  bad  sense,  ac- 

cursed, execrable,  as  Lat.  sacer,  Cratin.  Incert.  3;,  Antiph.  At!*.  7,  Eust. 
'35^'  59- — The  word  never  occurs  in  Horn,  or  Hes.,  and  is  rare  in  Att.  (v. 
supr.) ;  nor  is  it  ever  found  in  Trag.,  who  use  iyvis  instead,  Pors.  Med.  752. 

dyidrris,  irros,  17,  m  dytaiovvn,  2  Mace.  15.  2,  Ep.  Hebr.  12.  10. 

dyio-^dpas.  ov,  abounding  in  holiness,  Ignat.  Eph.  9,  Smyrn.  in  tit. 

b.yio-p.6*,  ov,  o,  =  ivaytotws.  an  offering  to  the  dead,  Diod.  4.  39. 

&Yio~r<ta,  17,  mostly  in  pi.  holy  rites,  temple-worship  or  service,  Isocr. 
227  A,  Plat.  Ax.  371  D,  Arist.  de  Caelo  I.  I,  3.  II.  holiness, 

Strabo  417. 

dy«rr«Ui).  to  perform  sacred  rites,  Plat.  Legg.  759  D  : — Pass.,  Soa 
£kka  dytOTfvtTai  all  other  sacred  rites,  Philo  2.  231.  2.  to  be 

holy,  live  piously  or  chastely.  Sorts  . .  Btordv  ^7.  xal  Btaatvtrat  \^v\nr 
whoever  is  pure  in  life  and  religious  in  soul,  Eur.  Bacch.  74 :  to  be  sacred, 
Paus.  6.  20,  2,  cf.  8.  13,  1.  II.  act.  to  purify,  tpvvov  xt'Pa,from 

Wood,  Orac.  ap.  Paus.  10.  6,  7.  2.  to  deem  holy :  Pass.,  of  places, 

Strabo  417,  Dion.  H.  1.  40. 

dytuSwi.  Adv.  in  sacred  manner.  Sup.  -«<rraTO  Philo  I.  675. 

&Yi«>o-vinr|,  ^,  holiness,  sanctity,  Lxx  (j  Mace.  3.  1 2),  Ep.  Rom.  I.  4.  etc. 

A71C -,  poet.  (esp.  Ep.)  abbrev.  for  dvcut-  in  compds.  of  dvd  with  words 
beginning  with  *,  as  dyxtiaBat  for  dvantioBat ;  cf.  dyxaStv  11. 

ayK&£o\Lax,  (dyicAt)  Epic  Dep.  to  lift  up  in  the  arms,  vexpiv  dir'. 
X*oi-us  d7*dfo>To  II.  17.  722  ;  aor.  tiytcdaaaro  Nonn.  D.  7.  318. 

tyxitn,  Adv.  like  d7*dr,  in  the  arms,  iyx.  kaptiv  ti  Aesch.  Eum. 
80.  II.  contr.  for  dvixaStv,  =  ivuOtv,  on  the  top,  Aesch.  Ag. 

3  (v.  Schol.  ad  I.  c,  Hesych.,  A.  B.  337.  25)  ;  in  this  place  Herm.  inter- 
prets it  cubito  presso,  with  bent  arm,  resting  on  Ike  arm,  since  in  all  other 
cases  d7«-  stands  for  dvait  ,  never  for  dvtic-  ;  but  v.  Schneidew.  Philol. 
3.  p.  1 17  sq. : — in  Eum.  369,  dvixaStv  is  required  by  the  metre. 

dyicdXti  [d],  s),  the  bent  arm,  Hdt.,  etc.;  iv  dyxaXait  Aesch.  Ag.  723. 
Supp.  481,  Eur.;  proverb.,  iv  rats  dyic.  *tpt<pip*tv  rtva  Xen.  Cyr.  7. 
f .  JO ;  also  without  iv,  dytedkats  lx*tv,  tttpttftipttv  Eur.  I.  T.  289,  Or. 
464  ;  also,  It'  dyxakas  kaBttv  Id.  Ion  761;  is  dyie.  lb.  1 598;  wpot 
dynakats  ntaiiv  lb.  t)ft2  ;  irw'  dyndkats  araBtis  Id.  Amir.  747  ; — rarely 
in  sing.,  tpipetv  iv  rn  dyndkij  Hdt.  6.  61,  cf.  Timocl.  in  Com.  Fr.  3.  p. 
•A  II.  metaph.  anything  closely  enfolding,  ntrpaia  dyiedkn 

Aesch.  Pr.  1019  :  wivrtat  dyxdkat  bights,  arms  of  the  sea.  Id.  Cho.  587, 
cf.  Eur.  Or.  1378  ;    wikayiots  iv  dyxdkais  Nausicr.  Nat/*.  1  ;  Kvpdraiv 


-  uyKvXoSous.  <j 

iv  dyxdkais  Ar.  Ran.  704  ;  even  of  the  air,  yijv  . .  (XovS'  vypats  iv  dyx 
Eur.  Fr.  93;  ;  cf.  d7*oi>'n.     (For  the  Root,  v.  dyxos.) 
ayxuXlS-ayayia,  to  carry  a  bundle,  Paus.  ap.  Eust.  1283.  42. 
dYKuAtS-uywYos,  ov,  carrying  an  armful  or  bundle:  of  beasts  of  burden, 
dyxakibri<popos,  -<popia>  being  used  of  men,  Poll.  7.  109,  Eust.  1283.  4-. 
a YKuAi{o(iat.    Dep.,  =  dyxaifltiai,  to  embrace,  Sorts  Kaiebv  dy/cak't^trat 
Simon.  Iamb.  7.  77  ;  aor.  med.,  t'ts  Tpvtptpds  T)yicak'ioao6t  x«Vas  Mel.  in 
Anth.  P.  12.  122,  cf.  Manetho  I.  45;  pf.  xtpoiv  uooikov  yynaktopivos 
Lye.  142,  cf.  imayicakifa : — but  dyxakt&iievos  in  pass,  sense,  Aesor 
366  (Hahn.l  ' ' 

dYKiiXis.  17,  in  pl.  =  d7*dAa(,  arms,  Ep.  dat.  pi.  dyitakiSeooiv  II.  18. 
S56*  22-  5°3  >  *»'  a7*a*1'<">'  C.  I.  (add.)  1907  bb.  2.  an  armful,  Ni- 

costr.   2wp.  3,  Plut.  Rom.  8.  II.  =  Spiiravov,  Macedon.  word, 

Hesych.,  Joseph.  A.  J.  5.  I,  2. 

uYKdXuru.a,  aros,  to,  that  which  is  embraced  or  taken  in  the  anr.s, 
Luc.  Amor.  14;  cf.  inrayKaktOfia.  II.  an  embrace,  Lye.  308. 

aYKaAos,  o,  an  armful,  buti'.Ue,  h.  Horn.  Merc.  82. 
aY*ds  [fis].  Adv.  into  or  in  the  arms,  ixl  °  dyitds  ajcotrtv  II.  14.  31^, 
cf.  Theocr.  8.  55,  Ap.  Rh.  1.  276;  117*05  (papim  II.  14.  346;  dyicds 
ikd£tTo  Ovyaripa  fjv  J.  371  ;  rporrtv  dyitds  ikwv  veos  Od.  7.  252; 
07*05  8'  akkT/ktuv  ka&iTqv  (of  wrestlers)  II.  23.  711:  cf.  ayicatttv. 
(Prob.  for  a7*d£«,  from  07*17  =  07*0X1;.) 

itpc\,   j),  =  07*0X17    (cf.    *<57xv  =  *07xtiA.i;),    Coraijs    Heliod.   2.    113, 
372  : — a  metapl.  dat.  pi.  dyxdotv  occurs  in  Opp.  H.  2.  315. 
dyxiov.  tv.  Dim.  of  07*05-,  prob.  1.  for  d77^l'olS•  Arist.  H.  A.  8.  16,  2. 
dYKio-rptia.  j),  angling.  Plat.  Legg.  823  D. 

dYKurrpcunKos,  f),  ov,  of  ot  for  angling  :  to  -«oy,  angling,  like  07*1- 
arp€ta,  Plat.  Soph.  220  D. 

dYKurrpcva,  f.  tvaai,  (dyxtOTpov)  to  angle  for,  entice,  Aristaen.  1 .  5  : — 
so  also  Med.,  Philo  2.  265,  316,  etc. 
dyKio-Tpiov.  to,  Dim.  of  dyxtorpov,  Theocr.  21.  57. 
dYKtorpo-OfTos.  ov,  with  a  hook  bound  to  it,  bvva(  Anth.  P.  6.  27. 
dY«OTpo-«iSTiS,  is.  or    liS-ns.  «s,  hoolt-shaped,  barbed,  Polyb.  34.  3.  5, 
Diod.  5.  34,  Strabo  24,  al. ;  bid  twv  dyx.  dorpajv  (drufiwv  Heeren)  Stob. 
Ed  Phys.  1.  22. 

OYKKTTpov,  to.  (117*05)  a  fish-hook,  Od.  4.  369,  Hdt.  2.  70,  etc. :  the 
hook  of  a  spindle,  Plat.  Rep.  616  C. 

aYKto-Tpdouat,  Pass,  to  be  furnished  with  barbs,  Plut.  Crass.  25.         II. 
to  be  caught  by  a  hook,  Synes.  Ep,  4 ;  i)yxtaTpwptivos  rn'Siv  Lye.  67. 
dYKUTTpo-iru>XT|S,  ov,  o,  a  seller  offish-hooks.  Poll.  7.  198. 
dYKio~rpo-<t>dYOS,  ov,  (ip&ytiv)  biting  the  hook,  Arist.  H.  A.  9.  37,  13. 
dYKio-Tpu>OT|S.  «5,  v.  sub  dyxtOTpotibt)s. 
dYKio-TpuiTos.  tJ,  iv,  verb.  Adj.  barbed,  Polyb.  6.  23,  10. 
dyxXapiov,  to,  seems  to  be  Dor.  for  dpaKXr/pioy,  an  apportionment  (?), 
C.  I.  2^62.  13. 
qykXivcd.  aiul  uYKXipo.  to,  poet,  for  dvaxk-. 

dyKoivi\,  ft,  (07*05)  poet,  for  d7*dXi7,  dyxuv,  the  bent  arm,  used 
only  in  pi.,  TLnvos  .  .  iv  dyxoivnotv  lavtts  II.  14.  213,  Od.  II.  261, 
etc.  II.  metaph.  anything  closely  enfolding,  iv  xOovus  dyxoivats  .  . 

Iirrrptdotv  Anth.  P.  9.  398,  Opp.  H.  3.  34. 
uykoviu.  v.  1.  for  iyx  -,  Ar.  Lys.  I311,  as  if  from  dvaxovtu  =  iyxoviat. 
uykos,  (us,  to,  properly  a  bend  or  hollow :    hence  a  mountain  glen, 
dell,  valley,  II.  20.  490,  Od.  4.  337,  Hes.  Op.  387,  Hdt.  6.  74,  etc.; 
in  Trag.  only  in  F;ur.  Bacch.  1051.      (From  a/ZsTK  come  also  d7«^, 
07*0X17,  dyxuv,  dyxoivr).  dyxvkij,  dyxvkos,  dyxtorpov,  dyxvpa,  07*05 ; 
cf.  Skt.  ax,  ailkdmi  (curvo),  ankas  (sinus)  ;    Lat.  ancus,  uncus,  anguho, 
ungulus  ;  Goth,  hals-agga  (neck)  ;  O.  H.  G.  angul,  etc.) 
aYKpcpdvwpL.  aYKptcris.  dyKporitti,  aYKpovottat,  poet,  for  dvaxp-. 
aYKTT)p.  ^pos,  o,  (dyxoi)  an  instrument  for  closing  wounds,  Lat.  fibula, 
Plut.  2.  468  C,  Galen. — Hence  dYKTnpid{n>  or  -lju,  to  bind  with  an 
dyxrjp,  and  dYKTT|piao-pct,  o,  Galen. 

uYK{iXfotuu,  Dep.  to  hurl  like  a  javelin,  Lat.  torquere  jaculum,  "Eou/s- 
xipavvov  iryxvknuivus  ap.  Ath.  534  E ; — in  Poll.,  QYKvXtJopai. 

aYKuXt)  [0],  ij,  (dyxos)  properly,  like  d7*aXi7,  the  bend  of  the  arm  or 
wrist,  dn'  dyxvkt)s  tivat,  u  phrase  descriptive  of  the  way  in  which  the 
cottabus  was  thrown,  Bacchyl.  Fr.  24  ;  dir'  d7*uXi7S  "iijot  kdrayas  Cratin. 
Incert.  ifi,  ubi  v.  Meineke  (hence  came  the  sense  of  a  cup,  given  by  Ath. 
007  C  and  Eust.).  2.  a  join',  bent  and  stiffened  by  disease,  Paul.  Aeg., 

etc.,  v.  Poll.  4.  196 : — also  d7*t'Xi7,  dyxvkat.  II.  a  loop  or  noose  in  a 

cord,  »X«*rds  d7*i)Xos  F^ur.  I.  T.  1408  ;  in  the  leash  of  a  hound,  Xen.Cyn. 
6,  I,  cf.  Poll.  5.  54,  56.  2.  the  thong  of  a  javelin,  by  which  it  was 

hurled,  Lat.  amentum,  Strabo  196  :  hence  the  javelin  itself,  Eur.  Or.  I476, 
cf.  C.  I.  2099  °»  Plut.  Philop.  6,  and  v.  dyxvklofjtat,  dyxvknrds.  3. 

a  bow-string,  dyx.  xpvodarpoipot  Soph.  O.  T.  203.  4.  d7*i!Xn 

t^s  ififidoos,  a  saudal-Monij',  Alex.  'Ax-  2.  5.  the  looped  handle  of 

a  vase,  cited  from  Hipp. 

uyk0Xi)t6»,  1),  iv,  verb.  Adj.  of  dyxvkiopat,  thrown  from  the  bent  arm, 
of  the  cottabus,  Aesch.  F"r.  1 78  (as  emended  by  Dobree)  ;  cf.  dyxvkrj  1. 
1.  II.  as  Subst.,  dyxvkrrriv,  to,  a  javelin.  Id.  Fr.  14. 

uykoXiowtos.  iv,  having  a  loop  for  a  handle  (dyxvkrj  III),  Galen. 
oykuXiov.  to,  Dim.  of  07*0X17,  a  ring  of  a  chain,  A.  B.  329,  Suid.     II. 
Td  d7«vXia,  the  Roman  ancilia,  Plut.  Num.  13. 
dyKiiki*.  iSos,  1),  a  hook,  barb,  Opp.  C.  I.  155. 

uYtt/Xo-pXf'4>apo?.  o,  also  -ov,  ri,  a  cohesion  of  the  eyelids,  Paul.  Aeg. 
(>.  if: — as  Adj.  in  Ccls.  7.  7' 
i'iYkCXo-PouXos.  ov,  crafty,  Tzetz.  Horn.  144,  Posth.  84,  630. 
uykvXoyXujo-o-ov  tto^o5.  ri,  contraction  of  the  tongue,  Aet.  6.  29- 
oYtOXo-YXtixiv,  tvos,  of  a  cock,  with  hooked  spurs,  Babr.  17.  3- 
aYKCXd-octpos,  ov,  crook-necked,  Opp.  H.  4.  630. 
d YKt-X-ooovs .  ovros,  o,  ^,  crook-toothed,  of  a  scimitar,  Q^  Sm.  6.  218; 


10  ayirvXoeff  —  ayXaocpoprog 

dyK.  \a\tvoi,  of  anchors,  Nonn.  D.  J.  =;o.  II.  barbed,  Auth.  P. 

6.  176. 

aYKvXocis,  fatra,  tv,  poet,  for  aytevkos.  Noun.  D.  6.  2f. 

dYKvXoKoir«(i>.  ro  hamstring.  Jo.  Aegaeates  in  Rev.  Arclu-ol.  (1S73). 
26.  403  ;  v.  Casaub.  ad  Ar.  Eq.  262. 

dy kvXo-kvkKos.  ov,  curved  in  spires,  of  a  dragon's  tail.  Noun.  P.  35.  217. 

ayicuXo-KwXos.  oc,  crook-limbed,  Archestr.  ap.  Ath.  320  A. 

QYKiiXo-jjLTjXij.  Jf,  a  curved  probe,  Erot.,  Galen. 

ay*ciiXo-p,TjTTjs.  ov,  6,  jj,  (ui/tis)  crooked  of  counsel,  regular  epith.  of 
Kpdvos,  II.  2.  205,  Od.  21.  415,  al.,  Hes.  Th.  19;  of  Prometheus,  lb. 
?/>.  Op.  48. 

aYKvX6-^iT)Tis.  105,  o,  %,  =  foreg.,  Nonn.,  v.  1.  in  Horn,  and  Hes. 

d-yKvXo-Trovs.  u,  1),  -row,  to,  gen.  iroSos,  with  bent  legs,  dyK.  di<ppos, 
the  Rom.  sella  curulis,  Plut.  Mar.  5. 

dyicuXo-ptvos,  ov,  hook-nosed,  Mala!.  106.  7. 

dyKvXos  [y],  17,  ov,  (07*05)  crooked,  curved,  rounded,  ro£a  II.  5.  209, 
Od.  2 1 .  264,  etc. ;  dpfta  II.  6.  39  ;  of  the  eagle,  dyttvXov  ndpa  his  beaked 
head,  Pind.  P.  1.  15  ;  of  greedy  fingers,  hooked,  Ar.  Eq.  205  ;  of  the  move- 
ment of  a  snake,  d.  fpirwv  Dion.  P.  123.  II.  metaph.,  1. 
of  style,  crooked,  intricate,  Luc.  Bis  Ace.  2 1  ;  ipiffTiKos  Kat  dyK.  ttjv 
ykwo-oav  catchy,  Alciphro  3.  64 :  but  in  good  sense,  terse,  periodic,  like 
arpoyyvkos,  Dion.  H.  de  Thuc.  25  ; — so  Adv.  -Xa/5,  lb.  31.  2.  of 
character,  wily,  crafty,  Lye.  344. 

dyKvXd-To|os,  ov,  with  crookedbow,  II.  2.  848.,  10.  428,  Pind.  P.  I.  151. 

dycuXo-f^puv,  v,  y,=  dyKvko  (xyTys,  Nicet.  Eug.  8.  1 94. 

d-yKOXo-x^iXils,  ov,  6,  (x**X°ff)  with  hooked  beak,  aUros  Od.  19.  538  ; 
aiyitwioi  II.  16.  428,  Hes.  Sc.  405,  v.  sq. 

oYKi»Xo-XT|XTjS,  ov,  6,  (xV^v)  with  crooked  claws,  Batr.  295  ;  in  Ar.  Eq. 
197  Cleon  is  called  fivpoaitTos  dyKvkoxftkys ',  but  the  interpr.  of  the 
Schol.,  u  iwiKafxtrfts  rds  x€?Pa*  *X<UV>  shews  that  he  read  -X17X.J7S. 

dyKuXdu,  f.  dxraj,  to  crook,  hook,  bend,  rf)v  x€*Pa>  as  m  throwing  the 
cottabus,  Plat.  Com.  Zeos  1,  cf.  Meineke  5.  p.  44: — Pass.,  6Vt/xas 
yyKv\ajfi(vos  with  crooked  claws,  Ar.  Av.  1 1 80. 

dY*vXu>vv£,  i>x°*i  °>  ^i  with  crooked  claws,  Nic.  Eug.  5.  214. 

aYKuXu<rts,  r),  as  medic,  term,  anchylosis,  a  stiffening  of  the  joints,  Paul, 
Aeg.  4.  55:  adhesion  of  the  eyelids,  Galen.  14.  772. 

dyKuXwros,  17,  6v,  verb.  Adj.,  of  javelins,  furnished  with  an  dyKvky 
(signf.  II.  2),  aToxdffuaTO  Eur.  Bacch.  1205. 

dyKvpa,  y,  Lat.  ancora,  an  anchor,  first  in  Alcae.  1 8.  9,  Theogn.  459, 
for  in  Horn,  we  hear  only  of  tvvai ;  dyKvpav  (Sdkkia&at,  KaOUvat, 
ptcSttvat,  dtpUvat  to  cast  anchor,  Pind.  I.  5.  18,  Hdt.  7.  36,  Aesch.  Cho. 
662,  Xen.  An.  3.  5,  10;  dyK.  atptiv,  atpeaOat  to  weigh  anchor,  Plut. 
Pomp.  50,  80;  dvatpuoBai  Anth.  P.  10.  I  ;  fir  dyKvpfwv  tx€lv  T<*$ 
Was  Hdt.  6.  12;  opfitfctv  Thuc.  7-  59!  *7r*  dyKVpas  oppaioOat,  awo- 
traktvuv  to  ride  at  anchor,  Hdt.  7.  188,  Dem.  1213.  24,  cf.  Eur.  Hel. 
107 1  ; — proverb.,  dyadal  irtkovT  . .  ov  ayKvpai  'tis  good  to  have  '  two 
strings  to  your  bow,'  Pind.  O.  6.  173  ;  so,  im  8vo<V  dyKvpaiv  opfiftv 
avrovs  idrt  Dem.  1295,  fin. ;  dyKvpa  &  y  ftov  ras  rvxas  ^Xet  povij  Eur. 
Hel.  277,  cf.  i>x*oj  I.  1  ;  inl  TJ75  outtjs  (sc.  dyKVpas)  dpfitttv  rots  irokkois, 
i.e.  *to  be  in  the  same  boat '  with  the  many,  Dem.  319.  8  ;  fiat  firjrpl 


vatSfs  ay xvpat  0iov  Soph.  Fr.  612  ;  oikcov  dyKvpa,  of  a  son,  Eur.  Hec. 
80;  for  If  pa  dyK.,  of  one's  last  hope,  v.  Upos  IV.  1.  II.  gener- 

ally, any  hook,  for  pruning,  Theophr.  C.  P.  3.  2,  2.  III.  —  aiboiov, 

Epich.  ap.  Hesych.     (For  the  Root,  v.  0:7*05.) 

d-yKdpTipoXtov,  to,  v.  s.  dyKvpo&~. 

dyKvpiiia,  f.  Att.  iw,  (ayxvpa)  in  Ar.  Eq.  262,  StoA.ajSd-i'  yyKvptaas 
having  taken  him  by  the  waist  you  threw  him  by  the  hook-trick,  i.e.  by 
hooking  your  leg  behind  his  knee ;  so,  dyKvpioas  fppy^fv  Eupol.  Ta£.  6  ; 
something  like  it  is  described  in  the  wrestling-match,  II.  23.  731: — hence 
dyKvpurpa,  to,  Schol.  Ar.  1.  c,  Hesych. 

dyKupLov,  to,  Dim.  of  dy/cvpa,  Luc.  Catapl.  1.  II.  dyKvpia  (sc. 

WfifffiaTa),  rd,  anchor-cables,  Diod.  14.  73. 

aYKvpopoXcu,  to  secure  by  throwing  an  anchor :  generally,  to  hook  fast 
in,  fasten  securely,  yy  Kvpo06kyTai  Hipp.  279.  53. 

dyKvpo-poXiov,  to,  an  anchorage,  Strabo  159,  Democr.  ap.  Plut.  2. 
317  A,  with  v.  1.  dyKVprj$-. 

dyKupo-ciS-fis,  4t§  anchor-shaped,  Diosc.  3.  166,  Galen. 

aYK0po-p,T|\T),  y,  a  kind  of  probe,  Hipp.  ap.  Phavor. 

dyKupouxia,  ^,  (tx0*)  a  holding  by  the  anchor,  kv  dyKvpovx}o,ts  when 
at  anchor,  Aesch.  Suppl.  766. 

dyKVpuTos,  y,  ov,  verb.  Adj.  as  if  from  ayKVpoco,  bent  like  an  anchor, 
Philo  in  Math.  Vett.  85  D.  II.  secured  as  by  en  anchor,  Epiphan. 

dyKwv,  wvos,  o,  the  bend  of  the  arm,  and  so,  like  Att.  ujXtvij,  the  elbow, 
opBojOfh  0'  (ir  dyKwvos  U.  10.  80;  17,  Kal  iir'  dyKwvos  we^aX^c  cx^Btv 
Od.  14.494;  dyKu/va  tvx^v  fitoov  (the  man  had  turned  his  back  before 
he  was  hit),  II.  5.  582,  cf.  20.  479  J  dyKajvt  vvrrttv  to  nudge,  Od,  14. 
485,  cf.  Plat.  Amat.  132  B;  xporuv  Tofy  dyKu/atv  rds  irXevpds  Dem. 
1259.  22:  proverb.,  dyKwvi  diropi\>TT€0~9ai  Bion.  ap.  Diog.  L.  4.  46; 
in  uyKwvos  dttirvfiv  cnbito  nixus,  of  the  attitude  at  meals,  Luc.  Lexiph. 
6.  2.  generally  the  arm,  like  dyKaXrj,  dyKolvrj,  vinas  tv  dyKwvfoat 

mrvctv  Pind.  N.  5.  76  ;  i s  5*  vypov  dyKwva  .  .  TrpoairrvoafTat  Soph.  Ant. 
1237,  etc.  3.  the  bend  in  animals'  legs,  Xen.  Cvn.  4,  1.  II. 

any  nook  or  bend,  as  the  jutting  angle  of  a  wall,  dytcwv  rdxtos 
II.  16.  702,  cf.  Hdt.  1.  180 ;  the  bend  or  reach  of  a  river,  Id.  2.  99  ;  the 
tffirtpoi  dyKQ}vt<:  in  Soph.  Aj.  805,  seem  to  be  the  western  angle  of  the 
bay  of  Rhoeteium  near  the  mouth  of  the  Simois ;  also  the  jutting  land  which 
forms  a  bay,  Strab.  580;  ay kS>v*s  KtOdpas  the  ribs  which  support  the 
horns  of  the  cithara,  Ath.  637  C,  Hesych.  III.  the  proverb  y\v«vs 

dyKwv  is  used  nar  avrltppaaiv  of  a  difficulty,  Plat.  Phaedr.  257  D,  Ath. 
516  A;    said  to   be  derived   from  a  long  bend  or  reach  in  the  Nile, 


Paroemiogr.,  Interpp.  ad  11.  c. ;  in  Plat.  Com.  *d.  4,  however  yKvKvs 
dynwv  seems  to  be=irapa7*aA.(0'^a,  a  thing  to  be  embraced,  treasure. 
(For  the  Root,  v.  cry/cos-.) 

dyKwvLo-Kos.  o,  Dim.  of  dyKwv,  Hero  Spir.   228,  Lxx  ;    -Comov,  to, 
Hero  Spir.  229. 
uykwvlo-j-ios.  ov,  6,  a  bending,  reach,  of  an  estuary,  Eust.  1 71 2.  29. 
dyKcovo-cioris,  «y,  curve-shaped,  curved,  Bito  Mech.  no. 
uYXo-«8€tpos,  ov,  bright-haired,  h.  Horn.  18.  5. 

dyXata,  Ion.  -vf\,  1),  (07X005)  splendour,  beauty,  adornment,  of  any- 
thing splendid  or  showy,  as  opp.  to  what  is  useful,  «G5oy  t«  Kal  dy\. 
Kat  vvetap  Od.  15.  78;  dyka'i'Tj<pt  irarotOws  (Ep.  dat.)  II.  6.  510;  of 
Penelope's  personal  appearance,  Od.  1 8.  180:  in  bad  sense,  pomp,  show, 
vanity,  dyka'i'j)?  ivtKtv  Ko/ieetv  Kvvas  1 7.  310;  and  in  pi.  vanities,  17. 
244,  Eur.  El.  175.  2.  festive  joy,  triumph,  glory,  Pind.  O.  1 3.  18, 

etc.;  ftr/5*  wot  dykaias  d-nova'taro  Soph.  El.  211  :  in  pi.,  festivities, 
merriment,  Hes.  Sc.  272,  285. — The  word  is  poet.,  and  in  Trag.  only 
found  in  lyr.  passages,  but  occurs  in  Xen.  Eq.  5,  8,  Ael.  N.  A.  10.  13,  etc. 

d-yXai£b>,  Hipp.  666.  45,  Ael.  :  f.  Att.  dykaiu  («ir-)  Ar.  Eccl.  575: 
aor.  i?7Adi'o-a  Theocr.  Ep.  I.  4,  Anth.,  etc.,  («»•-)  Ar.  Fr.  548  : — Pass., 
v.   infr.   (dykaos).  To  make  bright  or  splendid,  glorify,  honour, 

dOavdrats  ijykdi'o-fv  xaPlfflv  Epitaph,  in  C.  I.  2439,  cf.  Plut.  2.  965  C, 
Ael.  N.  A.  8.  28.  2.  to  give  as  an  ornament  or  honour,  oot,  Bd*x«' 

ravSc  povaav  dykat(o^v  Carm.  Pop.  8  (in  Bgk.  Lyr.  Gr.),  cf.  Theocr. 
1.  c. — But  II.  earlier  only  in  Med.  and  Pass,  to  adorn  oneself 

or  be  adorned  with  a  thing,  take  delight  in,  ok  <t>rjpt  diafiirtph  dykai- 
ua&ai  (sc.  nnrois)  II.  10.  33 1  (this  fut.  is  the  only  form  in  Horn.,  even 
of  compds.)  ;  qotis  tolovtols  0vfj.ov  dykai^fTat  Simon.  Iamb.  7,  70  ; 
dykaifcaOat  novoixas  iv  awTat  Pind.  O.  I.  22  ;  comically,  ikaioj  fid- 
(pavos  yy kaio-fievT]  Ephipp.  Typ.  2.  III.  in  Antiph.  Incert-37, 

Pors.  restored  krryykai'^r  for  yykatfcv  (intr.)  ;  but  Hesych.  cites 
d7Xa'/^€t*  Bdkku. — Never  used  in  Trag.  or  good  Att.  Prose. 

dyXduTiia,  to,  an  ornament,  honour,  Aesch.  Ag.  131 2  ;  to  fiyTpus  dyk. 
Eur.  Hel.  1 1,  cf.  282  ;  of  the  hair  of  Orestes  placed  as  an  offering  on  his 
father's   tomb,   Aesch.  Cho.  193,  Soph.  El.  908,  cf.  Eur.  EI.  325  ;    of 
a  sarcophagus,  Epigr.  Gr.  325. — Poet,  word,  used  in  late  Prose,  as  07.^ 
(}>vt(vv,  of  the  rose,  Ach.  Tat.  2.1. 
d*yXaio-u.6s.  o,  an  adorning,  an  ornament.  pypaTw  Plat.  Ax.  369  D. 
d^Xa'Co-Tos,  y,  ov,  also  6s,  ov,  verb.  Adj.  of  dykat^w,  adorned,  Hesvch.; 
d7Xato"Tos  x^Pa  J°-  Chr.  7-  3I3* 
dyXao-poTpvs,  v,  gen.  vos,  with  splendid  bunches,  Nonn.  D.  18.  4. 
dyXao-YUios,  ov,  beautiful-limbed,  "H0a  Pind.  N.  7.  6. 
aYXao-SevBpos,  ov,  with  beautiful  trees,  Pind.  O.  9.  32. 
d-yXao-Stopos.  ov,  with  or  bestowing  splendid  gifts,  Ay/iyryp  \i.  Hom. 
Cer.  54,  192,  492. 
aYXao-epyos,  ov,  (Zpyov)  ennobled  by  works,  Maxim,  ir.  Kar.  68. 
d^Xao-Opovos,  ov,  with  splendid  throne,  bright-throned,  Moioai  Pind. 
O.  13.  136 ;  also  in  N.  10.  I,  with  v.  1.  d^Xao-OoiKos. 
dyXaodii|ios,  ov,  noble-hearted,  Anth.  P.  15.  40,  25. 
dyXao-Kapiros,    ov,   bearing  beautiful   or  goodly  fruit,   of  fruit-trees, 
fiykeai  dyk.  Od.  7.  115.,  II.  589;  dyk.  StKtkia  Pind.  Fr.  73. — And  so 
in  h.  Horn.  Cer.  4,  23,  where  it  is  an  epith.  of  Demeter  and  the  Nymphs, 
as  givers  of  the  fruits  of  the  earth;  and  in  Pind.  N.  3.  97,  of  Thetis,  as 
blessing  the  fruit  of  woman  s  womb,  v.  Bockh  ad  I.  (56). 
dyXao-icovpos,  ov,  rich  in  fair  youths,  KvptvOos  Pind.  O.  13.  5. 
dyXao-Kcapos,  ov,  giving  splendour  to  the  feast,  <paivy  Pind.  O.  3.  10. 
dYXao-p.€iS-f|S,   is,  brightly  smiling,  "Epcuy  Poeta  Lyr.  ap.  Jo.  Lyd.  de 
Ostent.  p.  282  ;— restored  by  Meineke  for  the  vulg.  dyakpiottb'ys. 
dyXad-jiTiTis,  tos,  6,  y1,  of  rare  wisdom,  Tryph.  183. 
dyXa6-u.op4>os.  ov,  of  beauteous  form,  Inscr.  Vet.  in  C.  I.  38,  cf.  Anth* 
P;9.  524,  al. 
dyXao-Trois,  o,  jj,  rich  in  fair  children,  Opp.  H.  2.  41,  Epigr.  Gr.  896. 
dYXad-TTcirXos,  ov,  beautifully  veiled,  Q^Sm.  11.  240. 
dYXao-irrixvs,  v,  gen.  *os,  with  beautiful  arms,  Nonn.  D.  32.  80. 
dYXao-moros,  ov,  splendidly  faithful,  Hesych. 
dyXao-TTOiiw,  to  make  famous,  Hermap.  ap.  Ammian. 
aYXad-irvpYos,  ov,  with  stately  towers,  Tzetz.  Horn.  417. 
dyXaos.  77,  6v,  also  6s,  6v  Theogn.  985,  Eur.  Andr.  135  : — splendid, 
shining,  bright,  often  as  epith.  of  beautiful  objects,  dyk.  vdup  II.  2.  307, 
etc. ;  yvta  19.  385  ;   fxypta  Hes.  Op.  335  ;  t/j3t/s*  07X001'  dv$os  Tyrt.  10. 
28,  cf.  Theogn.  I.  c. ;   of  the  sun,  Emped.  172  :  then  generally,  splendid, 
beautiful,  dwotva  II.    1.   23;    Swpa  lb.  213,  etc.;    «fp7a   Od.   10.   223; 
dX^oy  II.  2.  506  ;  so  also  in  Pind.,  etc.  II.  of  men,  either  beau- 

tiful ox  famous,  noble,  II.  2.  736,  826,  etc. ;  c.  dat.  rei,  famous  for  a 
thing,  Kfpa  07X005  sarcastically,  II.  11.  385. — It  is  an  old  Ep.  and  Lyr. 
word,  being  only  found  twice  in  Trag.,  in  lyr.  passages,  07X005  Qifias 
Soph.  O.  T.  152  ;  Hypyihos  07X00^  idpav  Eur.  I.  c.j  but  it  occurs  in  late 
poetry,  e.  g.  Theocr.  28,  3,  and  the  Adv.  07X0015  in  Ar.  Lys.  640  :  cf. 
the  derivs.  07X0^0;,  dykdiofia,  dykaujif/.  (Akin  perhaps  to  d7aXXeo.) 
[07X005,  and  so  in  compds.] 

dYXao-TtVKTOS,  ov,  splendidly  built,  Or.  Sib.  14.  1 25. 
aYXao-Ttjios,  ov,  splendidly  honoured,  often  in  Orph. 
'AYXao-TpIaivns,  ov,  6,  he  of  the  bright  trident,  a  name  of  Poseidon, 
Pind.  O.  1.  64,  in  ace.  *A7XaoTp/aiJ'ar,  cf.  Bockh.  praef.  p.  39. 
dYXao-$avf|S,  it,  of  bright  appearance,  Eccl. 
aYXao-<^dpT)S,  e's,  in  splendid  robe,  Or.  Sib.  3.  454. 

OYXao-^eYTHS,   *'?,  splendidly  shining,    Maxim,  ir.  kot.  189,  Or.  Sib. 
II  (13).  65. 
dYXad-^p-os,  ov,  of  splendid  fame,  Orph.  H.  30.  4. 
aYXa6-<J>oiTos,  ov,  one  who  '  walks  in  beauty,*  Maxim,  ir,  «ot.  402. 
u-YAao-4>opTos.  ov.  proud  of  one's  burden,  Nonn.  D.  7.  253. 


(iy\ao(pvTevTOs  —  ayvvfj.1. 


dYXao-t^uT€VTOs.  or.  beautifully  planted,  dKaos  Manass.  Chron.  4260. 
dyXao-dwovos,  ov,  with  a  splendid  voice,  Procl.  h.  Mus.  2. 
<ryAao-$wTvs,  (60s,  $,  the  peony,  =  yKvxvaibrj,  Ael.  N.  A.  14.  24. 

uyXavpos.  ov,  =  07X00?,  Nic.  Th.  62,  441.  II.  "AyKavpos,  17,  a 

daughter  of  Cecrops,  worshipped  on  the  Acropolis  at  Athens,  Hdt.  8.  53,  2. 

d-"yAa4>vpus,  Adv.  without  polish,  inelegantly,  Ath.  431  D. 

dyAd-wif-  onros,  o,  fj,  bright-eyed,  beaming,  vtvicn  Soph.  O.  T.  214  (lyr.). 

dyX<vKT|S,  is,  {y\tvieos)  not  sweet,  sour,  harsh.  Xen.  ap.  Suid..  whence 
Zeune  has  received  it  (in  comp.)  for  d*yAwr^j  in  Hier.  I,  21,  and  restored 
it  for  artpirti  and  dxKfiaraTov  in  Oec.  8,  3  and  4  ;  opp.  to  yXvxvs 
Arist.  Probl.  4.  12,  I  ;  oivos  Luc.  Lexiph.  6  ;  cf.  Lob.  Phryn.  536  : — 
metaph.  of  the  style  of  Thucyd.  harsh,  crabbed,  Hermog. — In  Nic.  Al. 
171,  dykfvKij  Bakaooav  should  prob.  be  read  for  dyXtvicnv. 

d-yXtjvos,  ov,  without  yKrjvi}.  i.  e.  blind,  Nonn.  Jo.  9.  v.  6. 

dyXts,  gen.  ayhWos,  not  so  well  ^7X1605  (Dind.  Ar.  Ach.  763),  ^  : — 
only  used  in  pi.,  a  head  of  garlic,  which  is  made  up  of  several  cloves, 
Ar.  1.  c,  Vesp.  680 :  cf.  yikyis. 

d-yXurxpos,  ov,  not  sticky,  Hipp.  77  D.  Theophr.  C.  P.  6.  II,  16. 

d--yXCKT|s,  is,  =  dykfvKrjs,  q.  v.,  Theophr.  C.  P.  6.  16,  2. 

d-yX6<)>os.  ov,  unhewn,  Schol.  Soph.  O.  C.  IOI. 

dyAciMroria,  Att.  -TTia,  ^,  want  of  eloquence,  Eur.  Fr.  57. 

0-7X010-0-05,  Att.  -ttos,  ov,  without  tongue,  of  the  crocodile,  Arist.  Part. 
An.  4.  II,  2  ;  of  a  flute  (cf.  yXaiaaa  III.  1),  Poll.  2.  108  : — Adv.  -this  Id. 
6.  145.  II.  tongueless,  ineloquent,  Lat.  elinguis,  Pind.  N.  8.  41, 

Ar.  Fr.  570,  Anth.,  etc.  2,  =  $dp0apos  ;  ov$f  'EWds  (="EK\ip>) 

ovr  dyXaxtoos  Soph.  Tr.  1060. 

&Y|ia,  to,  (dyvvfu,  taya)  a  fragment,  Plut.  Philop.  6. 

uyu.ov  d,  (dyvvfu)  a  breakage,  fracture  of  a  bone,  irf  pi  dy/iwv  title  of 
a  treatise  by  Hipp.  II.  a  broken  cliff,  crag,  Eur.  I.  T.  263  ;  in 

pi..  Id.  Bacch.  1094,  Nic.  Al.  391. 

d-Yva|iTrTos,  ov,  unbending,  inflexible,  Orph.  Lith.  27  ,*  to  vpus  ^bovdi 
. .  dyvaftwTov  Plut.  Cato  Mi.  II,  cf.  Anth.  Plan.  4.  278  : — in  Aesch.  Pr. 
163,  the  metre  requires  a  short  penult. ;  Dind.  suggests  dyvatpov,  citing 
Hesych.  dxavOov  (1.  dyvatpov)'  dyvapvrov. 

d-yvairTOS,  ov,  of  cloth,  not  fulled  or  carded,  and  so,  new,  Plut.  2. 
691  D.  II.  not  cleansed,  unwashen,  lb.  169  C. 

dyvad>os.  ov,  (yvdirrtu)  =  foreg.,  Ev.  Matth.  9.  16,  Marc.  2.  21. 

4yv«io.  1),  (dyvtvai)  purity,  chastity.  Soph.  O.  T.  864  (lyr.),  Anth.  P. 
append.  99,  N.  T. ;   rwv  Otwv  Antipho  116.  II.  II.  strict  ob- 

servance of  religious  duties.  Plat.  Legg.  909  E,  etc. : — in  pi.  purifications, 
Isocr.  225  D,  Pseudo-Phoc.  215,  Joseph.  B.  J.  prooein.  10. 

dyv«v|ia,  to,  {dyvtvot}  chaste  conduct,  chastity,  Eur.  Tro.  got, 

4yv«vrT|piov.  to.  a  place  of  purification,  A.  B.  267.  9,  Eccl. 

ayvcvTucot,  17.  ov,  preserving  chastity,  opp.  to  dtppolkatavTttcdi  Arist. 
H.  A.  I.  I,  30.  II.   act.  purificatory,   to  d-yv.   a   sin-offering, 

Philo  2.  206. 

4yv«vrpia,  17,  a  female  purifier.  Gloss. 

4yv<ijw,  f.  tvatu  :  pf.  ijyvevxa  Dem.  I.  citand.  To  consider  as  part 

fjf  purity,  make  it  a  point  of  religion,  c.  inf.,  dyvevovoi  ipapvxov  uijSiv 
KTttvtiv  Hdt.  I.  140:  absol.  to  be  pure,  dpviBos  dpvts  irws  dv  Ayvtvoi 
<paywv;  Aesch.  Supp.  226,  cf.  Plat.  Legg.  837  C;  c.  ace.  rci,  X*'Pai 
dyvtvtt  Ear.  I.  T.  1227;  dyvtvwv  8i*iv  Lys.  107.  39:  d^cwis  in 
Alex.    'K-wtyK,   1.   6:    to   keep   oneself   pure   from,    nvds   Dem.   618, 

10.  II.  act.  »  dyvifa,  to  purify,  Lat.  lustrare,  Antipho  1 19.  II. 
dyvtuv.  wvos.  A,  a  place  of  purity,  per  antiphr.  for  a  brothel,  Clearch. 

ap.  Ath.  515  F.   _ 

4yv((u,  f.  Att.  tu> :  (ayvis  .  To  wa-h  off,  cleame  away.  eip.  by  water 
(to  irup  Koda'ipti . . ,  to  vowpdyvi^u  Plut.  2.  263  K),  \vpa9'  dyvlaas  *pa 
Soph.  Aj.  0M,  2.  to  cleanse,  purify,  x«po5  °"<*s  iyviaas  utda- 

fuxrot  Eur.  H.  F.  1324  ;  freq.  in  Lxx,  N.  T. : — late  also  in  Med.,  but  cf. 
wpayvifa.  II.  0-)*.  w  Oavuvra  to  hallow  the  dead  by  fire,  so 

that  he  may  be  received  with  favour  by  the  gods  below.  Soph.  Ant.  545. 
cf.  Diphil.  Incert.  3.  I  : — Pass.,  awptaS'  iryvia&n  irvpi  Eur.  Supp.  1  -•  1 1  : 
hence  2.  to  burn  up.  destroy.  Soph.  Fr.  119. 

d^vio*,  a,  ok,  made  ofayvos  or  withy,  Plut.  2.  693  F. 

dyvwrjia,  to,  a  purification,  expiation,  iiarpwnv  dyv.  tpdvov,  of  Orestes, 
Aesch.  Eum.  325  (lyr.) ;  also  in  Lxx. 

a,yvur)k6%,  d,  purification,  expiation,  dyv.  wottia$at  Dion.  H.  3.  2  2  ; 
Tois  d7>>.  Tofs  wpo  rwv  Qfopapopiaiv  C.  I.  \\(>i  ;  d-VF.  Ttp  vooti  Lxx 
(Num.  6.  3). 

o-yvurriot.  a,  ov.  verb.  Adj.  to  be  purified.  Eur.  I.  T.  1 199. 

dyvwrrripiov,  to.  a  means  of  purifying  (cf.  wptppavrripiov).  Hero  219. 

«YVUJ"rn*'  ou'  u'  a  purifier,  like  iyvirtjs.  Gloss. 

dyvio-TtKov  17.  dv,  (dyvifa)  m  dyv tvTucos  11,  Bust.  43.  (t. 

dyviTi)*  [f],  ov,  o,  (dyrlfa)  a  purifier,  8toi  dyvirai  PolL  I. 
24.  II.  one  who   requires   purification,    like    ixirns,    Hesvch., 

A.  B.  338  (ubi  dyi-rni). 

dyvora,  Ep.  dyvoitu,  3  sing.  subj.  Ayvoiijai  Od.  24.  218:  impf. 
^tooi/v  Isocr.,  etc. :  fiit.  dyroriaai  Bacchyl.  31.  Isocr.  285  C,  Dem.  885. 
2.,  1266.  19  :  aor.  iiyvirnaa  Aesch.  Eum.  134.  Time,  etc.,  Ep.  Jj-fyoir/aa 

11.  2.  807,  Hes.  Th.,  also  Ep.  contr.  3  sing,  dyvwaaaxt  Od.  23.  95  :  pf. 
Iryvd^xa  Plat.  Soph.  221  D.  Alex.  'AiroKorr.  1  : — Pass.,  fut.  (of  med. 
formi  d-yvo^iro^ai.  v.  iufr. ;  dyvarftnaouat  v.  I.  Luc.  J.  Trag.  5:  aor. 
iryvi:ri0Tpy,  v.  infr.  :  pf.  ifyvdriiiai  Isocr.  Antid.  §  182,  Plat.  (This  Verb 
implies  a  form  a-yvoos  ^ayvan  II ;  for  it  cannot  be  compd.  of  o-  priv., 
rottu.  cf.  a-  1.  fin.  For  the  Root,  v.  sub  yiyvdta wa».)  Not  to  perceive 
or  know,  Lat.  ignorare;  Horn.,  almost  always  in  Ep.  aor.,  dvip'  dyvotijaao' 
v\dtc  from  urrf  recognising  him.  Od.  20.  15.  cf.  Thuc.  2.  49.  Plat.  Phaedr. 
2.'-»  A  :  but  in  -stly  with  negat.,  ovx  ifyvo'.-naw  he  perceived  or  knew 
veil  (v.  supr.)  ;    unliv  dyviti   learn  nil,  Eur.  Andr.  899. — Construct., 


11 

mostly  c.  ace.  to  be  ignorant  of,  Hdt.  4.  156,  Soph.  Tr.  78,  Plat.;  taurous 
dyv.  to  forget  their  former  selves.  Dem.  151.  7  ;  t^v  nd\tv  utv.  not  to 
discern  public  opinion,  Id.  413.  11,  etc. ;  also  rapi  tivos  Plat.  Phaedr. 
277  D;  also  c.  gen.  pers.  added,  d7>/ooSi'Tes  dWrikuv  o  ti  \iyop\ev 
Plat.  Gorg.  5 1 7  C  :— dependent  clauses  are  added  in  part.,  ti's  . .  d7voef 
Tor  (KttOtv  woke/iov  Stvpo  ff(ovTa  ;  Dem.  13.  17;  or  with  a  Conjunct.. 
oiSth  ayvoti  on  . . ,  Id.  565.  8,  etc. ;  dyvoaiv  ti . .  Xen.  An.  6.  c„  12  :— 
Pass,  not  to  be  known.  Plat.  Euthyphro  4  A,  Hipp.  Ma.  294  D,  etc. ; 
dyvoovutva  5Vij  .  .  dya0d  io~ri  Id.  Rep.  506  A ;  7/yvoTJo9ai  (vuwaacv 
oti  .  .  Id.  Legg.  797  A  ;  imtXdu&avov  dyvor)0(o8ai  they  expected  that 
they  should  escape  notice,  Dem.  310.  7  ;  xaipov  ov  wapeOivra  oib'  dy- 
vorfiivra  Id.  326.  25,  cf.  Isocr.  Antid.  1.  c.  ;  to  ijyvor]uiva  unknown 
parts,  Arr.  An.  7.  I,  4.  II.  absol.  to  go  wrong,  make  a  false 

step,  first  in  Antipho  134.  30,  Isocr.  167  C  ;  part.  d"y>'o«i'  ignorantly,  by 
mistake,  Andoc.  29.  28,  Xen.  An.  7.  3,  38,  Arist. :  in  moral  sense,  to  be 
ignorant  of  what  is  right,  to  act  amiss,  Polyb.  5.  II,  5,  cf.  Ep.  Hebr.  5.  2. 

ttyvoTju^i,  to,  a  fault  of  ignorance,  oversight,  dyv.  trtpov  wpoaayvodv 
Theophr.  H.  P.  9.  4,  8,  cf.  Lxx,  N.  T. 

dyvoTrMov,  verb.  Adj.,  with  negat.,  oix  dyv.  one  must  not  fail  to  remark, 
Diosc.  prooem.  1,  Philo. 

d-yvcTrmcos,  77,  ov,  mistaken,  rd  d.  irpdrTttv  Arist.  Eth.  E.  7.  13,  3. 

dyvotu,  ij,  (v.  sub  ytyvdiaxoi)  -want  of  perception,  ignorance,  dyvo'ia 
Aesch.  Ag.  1596  ;  dyvoias  viro  Supp.  499  ;  ijv  vrr'  dyvoias  ipqs  whom 
seeing  you  pretend  not  to  know,  Soph.  Tr.  419;  dyvoia  ifauaprdvav 
Xen.  Cyr.  3.  I,  38,  cf.  Thuc.  8.  92,  II,  Ar.  Av.  577,  Dem.: — in  logic, 
7  tou  iXiyxov  dyv.,  ignoratio  elenchi,  ignorance  of  the  conditions  of  a 
valid  proof,  Arist.  Soph.  Elench.  4,  10,  cf.  5,  5-6.  lX.  =  dyv6riiia, 

a  mistake,  Dem.  271.  15.,  1472.  5.  [In  Poets  sometimes  dyvoia,  Soph. 
Tr.  350,  Ph.  1 29  ;  and  this  is  old  Att.,  ace.  to  Ael.  Dion.  ap.  Eust. 
1579.  29,  cf.  Moer.  191,  Lob.  Phryn.  494.     Cf.  dyoia.] 

dyvoicw,  Ep.  for  dyvoia). 

dyvoowTws,  Adv.  of  dyvoia),  ignorantly,  Arist.  Top.  2.  9,  4. 

o.yyo-7roLo%,  dv,  making  pure,  Eccl. 

dyvo-iroXos,  or,  (wokfai)  pure,  ArjftTiTTjp  Orph.  H.  18.  12.  II. 

act.  making  pure,  Id.  Arg.  38. 

4-yv6-pi>TO»,  ov,  pure-flowing,  itoto^oj  Aesch.  Pr.  435  (lyr.):  poet.  form. 

d-yvoi,  rf,  dv,  (dyos)  full  of  dyos  or  religious  awe,  Horn,  (only  in  Od.), 
etc, :  I.  of  places  and  things  dedicated  to  gods,  hallowed,  holy, 

sacred,  ioprrj  Od.  21.  259  ;  of  frankincense,  dyv^  dbpiij  Xenophan.  I.  7 
Bgk. ;  iXaos  h.  Horn.  Merc.  187,  Pind. ;  riufros  Id.  P.  4.  363  ;  vbajp  Id. 
I.  6.  109  ;  wvpds  dyvvrarat  vayal  Id.  P.  I.  41  ;  aldrjp  Aesch.  Pr.  281  ; 
ipdos.  Kovrpdv  Soph.  El.  86,  Ant.  1 201  ;  $vuara  Id.  Tr.  287  ;  XPI"^- 
pta  Eur.  Ion  243,  etc. ;  x^'Pov  °^X  d'yeoi'  irareiv  a  spot  not  holy  to 
tread  on.  Soph.  O.  C.  37.  2.  of  divine  persons,  chaste,  pure,  Horn., 

mostly  of  Artemis,  xpWT^Povos  *^-  a-f^V  Gd.  5.  123,  cf.  18.  202,  al. ; 
also,  d.  Tl(pa«pdvfia  1 1,  386,  cf.  h.  Cer.  337,  439  ;  of  Demeter,  h.  Cer. 
203  ;  dyvai  Dial,  of  Demeter  and  Persephone,  C.  I.  5431,  5643  ;  of 
other  gods,  as  Apollo,  Pind.  P.  9.  112  ;  Zeus,  Aesch.  Supp.  652  ; — also 
of  the  attributes  of  gods,  BtSiv  ai&as  Soph.  O.  T.  830,  cf.  Ph. 
1 289.  II.  after  Horn.,  of  persons,  undefiled,  chaste,  pure,  of 

maidens,  Pind.  P.  4.  183,  Aesch.  Ag.  244,  Fr.  238  ;  so  of  Hippolytus, 
Eur.  Hipp.  102  ;  and  c.  gen.,  Xixpvs  ayvov  bipias  lb.  1003  ;  70^011'  dyvoi 
Plat.  Legg.  840  D;  £71^  dir'  dvbpus  avvovaias  Jusj.  ap.  Dem.  1371. 
23.  2.  pure  from  blood,  guiltless,  innocent,  dyvol  Toini  Trjvbf  ttjv 

xdprjv  Soph.  Ant.  889:  dyvds  x*ipas  Eur.  Or.  1604;  pnrrpoKTovo?  . , , 
Toff"  dTKoi  wv  Id.  El.  1607,  cf.  I.  A.  940 ;  of  dyvds  Jjv,  says  Her- 
cules, when  I  had  been  purified  from  blood.  Soph.  Tr.  258:  c.  gen., 
dyvu^  aipaTos  Eur.  Hipp.  316;    <pdvov  Plat.  Legg.  759  C.  3. 

generally,  in  moral  sense,  d.  xpiots  pure,  upright,  Pind.  O.  3.  37  ;  tfvxvs 
*pikia  d.  Xen.  Symp.  8,  15,  etc.  4.  A&uarpos  d*rdy  oifias  dyvbv 

ioxav  to  keep  the  body  pure  (torn  food,  abstain  from  .  . ,  Eur.  Hipp. 
138.  5.  iv  dyvii)  i£to-0at  on  pure,  holy  ground,   Aesch.  Supp. 

233.  III.  Adv.,  d7Vttis  xal  xaOapwi  h.  Horn.  Ap.  121,  Hes. 

Op.  339  ;  d.  ix(tv  Xen.  Mem.  3.  8,  10. — Cf.  017*05  fin. 

dyvos.  J),  Att.  o  (Heind.  Plat.  Phaedr.  230  B),  =  Xu7or,  a  willow-like 
tree,  the  branches  of  which  were  strewed  by  matrons  on  their  beds  at  the 
Thesmophoria,  vitex  agnus  castus  (still  called  iyvtia),  h.  Horn.  Merc. 
410,  Chionid. "Hp.  2,  ubi  v.  Meineke,  cf.  Arist.  H.  A.  9.  40,  49.  (It  was 
associated  with  the  notion  of  chastity  from  the  likeness  of  its  name  to 
dyvds,  ii.dv.)  II.  dyvos,  0,  name  of  a  fish,  Ath.  356  A.  III. 

a  kind  of  bird,  Suid. 

dYvc-o-Tou.os,  ov,  with  pure  mouth,  Tzetz.  Chil.  6.  36. 

4yv<>-T«XT|»,  is,  worshipped  in  holy  rites,  Qifus  Orph.  Arg.  55 1. 

4yv6ti)»,  J7TOS,  1},  (dTvot)  purity,  chastity,  C.  I.  1 133.  2  Ep.  Cor.  2.  2. 

dyvvtos.  an>,  al,  stones  hung  to  the  threads  of  the  warp  to  keep  them 
straight,  Plut.  2.  156  B;  cf.  Poll.  7.  36,  and  v.  sub  Aaiai,  navuv. 

dyvvp.1,  3  dual  iyvvrov  Horn.  (v.  infr.)  :  fut.  i(a>  (kot-)  II.  8.  403 : 
aor.  I  «afo  Horn.  (*ot-  Plat.),  ij(a  II.  23.  392  ;  imper.  a(ov  6.  306  ; 
part,  dfos  16.  371,  Eur.  Hel.  1598  (but  in  Lys.  IOO.  5  (xaT-)(d(avTts, 
perh.  to  distinguish  it  from  the  I  aor.  of  ayai)  ;  inf.  of  01  Ap.  Rh. : — 
Pass., pre*,  (v. infr.):  aor.  2  ^07171' Horn., etc. ;  Ep.  3 sing. dyij II. :  pf.act. 
(in  pass,  sense)  iSya,  Ion.  iiya  (but  only  in  comp.  jrar-)  Hes.,  Hdt.,  Att. : 
a  pf.  pass.  Kar-iayuai  Luc.  Tim.  10.  (dyvvfu  orig.  had  the  digamma, 
which  remained  in  the  form  xavdfas  (v.  xardyvviu),  and  in  the  Aeol. 
fiaye,  Ahrens  D.  Aeol.  32  ;  so  that  the  Root  was  f cry,  whence  dyq  [S], 
0-07171,  vav-ayds,  dy puis,  perh.  A/CT17;  cf.  Skt.  bhamj,  bhanaijmi  (frango), 
bhangas  (Jracturd).)  [a  by  nature,  as  appears  from  the  pf.  wya,  Ion. 

irfya  ;  in  aor.  pass.  €07171'  Horn,  and  later  Ep.  commonly  shorten  the 
penult.,  (whereas  in  Att.  xar-*aym>  is  always  found)  ;  so  in  the  un- 
augm.  form  a  is  short,  v.  supr.;  even  Horn,  however  has  407171',  U.  II. 


12  ay  udotjf  — 

559.]  To  break*  f-hiver,  tiotv  5'  affnib"  «a£«  II.  ".  270;  ?j(t  Btd 

Viryoi*  23.  392  ;  apfiara  .  .  a£avT  (i.  e.  a^a^rc,  agreeing  with  i'mroi)  iv 
vparry  pvfuy  II.  16.  371 ;  i/7/ds. .  «a£  ar  tfvjtara  Od.  3.  298;  but,  irpo  t« 
iru/iar'  €a^«v  broke  the  waves.  Od.  5.  385  ;  dyvvrov  vkijv  crashed  through 
it,  of  wild  boars,  II.  12.  I4S;  dyvvat  Ktpavvov  Anth.  Plan.  250. — Pass., 
with  pi.  taya,  to  be  broken  or  skivered,  «V  x*lP(<J<Jtv  °77  £*V*°S  H*  3» 
367,  cf.  16.  801  ;  I*  *avAa)  ('071;  to\ix*>v  Sopv  13.  162  ;  vdrayos  .  .  a7i>u- 
/icvaarv  (sc.  of  the  trees),  16.  769  ;  vrjwv  $'  dp.a  dyvvpuvawv  (cf.  vavd- 
yiov)  Od.  10.  123  ;  tov  5*  i£t\Kou.ivoto  ndkiv  dyiv  o£f(?  oytcot  as  the 
arrow  was  drawn  back  out  of  the  wound  the  barbs  broke  (where  others 
join  vdXtv  dy*v,  were  bent  back  and  broken),  II.  4.  214;  in  Hdt.  I.  185, 
7,  woTapus  wept  Kaunas  voXkds  dyvvp&vos  is  merely  a  river  with  a  broken* 
i.e.  winding,  course: — metaph.,  dyvvro  yx<*>  the  sound  spread  around, 
Hes.  Sc.  279,  348  ;  so,  KtKabos  dyvvp:tvos  hid  aTop.aTos,  of  the  notes 
of  song,  Pind.  (?)  Fr.  238.  The  Act.  never  appears  in  Prose,  and  the 
Pass,  once,  in  Hdt. ;  the  compd.  Kardyw/u  being  in  far  more  general 
nse,  v.  sub  voc.     Later  forms  are  {KaT)daaw,  {Kar)ayvvoj. 

oyvwStjs,  ts,  («*5os)  like  a  willow,  Theophr.  H.  P.  3.  18,  4. 

dyvwu-ovta).  to  be  dyvwpuvv,  to  act  without  right  feeling,  act  unfairly, 
Xen.  Hell.  I.  7,  33  ;  dyv.  us  or  irpos  rtva  to  act  unfeelingly  or  unfairly 
towards  one,  Dem.  257.  14  (in  pf.),  309.  25,  Apollod.  Ad/c.  1 ;  with  a  neut. 
Adj.,  p.ii  vvv  rd  Bvrjrd  Bvnrbs  wv  dyvajp-ovu  Trag.  ap.  Clem.  Al.  52 1  ; 
dyv.  vtpi  nva,  trtpi  n  Plut.  Cam.  28,  Alcib.  19 : — Pass,  to  be  unfairly 
treated.  Id.  2.  484  A ;  dyvrjiiovrjBus  Id.  Cam.  18,  etc. 

dyvu|io<rwT|,  j),  wan!  of  acquaintance  with  a  thing,  want  of  knowledge, 
Plat.  Theaet.  199  D.  2.  want  of  sense,  folly,  Theogn.  896  :  sense- 

less  pride,  arrogance,  obstinacy,  Hdt.  2.  1 72,  Eur.  Bacch.  885  (lyr.)  ; 
vpus  dyv.  TpaweaBat  Hdt.  4.  93  ;  dyvkvpoovvn  xp°-a^at  Id.  5.  83  ;  vtf 
uyvcufioavvrjs  Id.  9.  3.  3.  want  of  feeling,  unkhidness,  unfairness, 

Soph.  Tr.  1266  (1.  susp.),  Dem.  311.  7  ;  dyv.  tvx*!**  ^at*  iniquitas  for- 
tunae.  Id.  297.  7.  4.  in  pi.  misunderstandings,  Xen.  An.  2.  5,  6. 

ayvfetfudv,  ov,  gen.  ovos,  (yvwprj)  ill-judging,  senseless,  Theogn.  1260 
(si  vera  I.),  Pind.  O.  8.  79,  Plat.  Phaedr.  275  B  ;  opp.  to  purd  Xoytap-ov 
wpdrruv  Meuand.  Incert.  267  ;  inconsiderate,  Hipp.  Aer.  290 : — Adv. 
-ovats,  senselessly,  Xen.  Hell.  6.  3,  11,  etc. ;  dyv.  *xuv  Dem.  25.  18.  2. 
headstrong,  reckless,  arrogant,  (in  Comp.  -ovicrcpos)  Hdt.  9.  41  ;  in 
Sup.,  Xen.  Mem.  I.  2,  26.  3.  unfeeling,  unkind,  hard-hearted, 

4>o(/3a>  t«  teapot  /it)  ytvrjaB'  dyvwptovts  Soph.  O.  C.  86 ;  of  judges,  Xen. 
Mem.  2.  8,  5  ;  joined  with  dxdptaTos,  Id.  Cyr.  8.  3,  49,  cf.  Mem.  2. 10, 
3  ;  of  Midias,  Dem.  546.  3  ;  r)  dyvwfiwv,  i.  e.  fortune,  Isocr.  Epist.  10.  3  : 
— esp.  ignoring  one's  debts,  Ulp.  ad  Dem.  25.  19  ;  dyv.  wtpl  rets-  0.77080- 
aus  Luc.  Hermot.  10.  4.  unknowing,  in  ignorance,  dyv.  nKavdaBai 

Hipp.  343.  20.  II.  of  things,  senseless,  brute,  Aeschin.  88.  37  ;  also, 

tppovovaav  Bvjjrd  kovk  dyvwp.ova  (neut.  pi.)  Soph.  Tr.  473.  2. 

pass,  ill-judged  of,  unforeseen,  Parthen.  III.  of  horses,  without  the 

teeth  that  tell  the  age  (yvwpovts)  Poll.  I.  182  ;  cf.  Arroyvwiuuv,  [&yv-, 
only  in  Manetho  5.  338.] 

d-Yvwpurros,  ov,  unascertained,  Theophr.  H.  P.  1.  2,  3. 

dyvus,  wtos,  v,  7),  (ytyvtoOKa},  yvwvat,  cf.  Lob.  de  Adject.  Immobil. 
4,  7)  *•  -^ •  pass,  unknown,  mostly  of  persons,  dyvwTCS  dWrjkots 

Od.  5.  79 ;  dyvws  npus  dyvwr  ttv€  Aesch.  Cho.  677,  cf.  Supp.  993, 
Soph.  Ph.  iooS  ;  dyvws  irarpi  clam  patre,  Eur.  Ion  14  ;  so  in  Prose, 
dyv.  tois  (V  ttJ  vijt  Thuc.  1. 137,  cf.  Plat.  Rep.  375  E,  al.  b.  of  things, 
dark,  obscure,  unintelligible,  tpaivrj,  tp&oyyos  Aesch.  Ag.  105 1,  Soph.  Ant. 
IOOI  ;  dyv.  botcrjo-is,  a  dark,  vague  suspicion,  Id.  O.  T.  681.  2. 

not  known,  obscure,  ignoble,  dyv.,  d/c\*y$  Eur.  I.  A.  19  ;  ovk  dyvSiTa 
v'tKav  a  victory  not  unknown  to  fame,  Pind.  I.  2.  19.  II.  act.  not 

knowing,  ignorant.  Soph.  O.  T.  1133;  oov  p.iv  tvx&v  dyvaiTos  unable 
to  appreciate  me,  lb.  677;  dyvws,  ri  ovvarat . .  Xen.  Oec.  20,13.  III. 
c.  gen.,  where  the  sense  fluctuates  between  pass,  and  act.,  x^wv  OVK  °riv- 
eijpwv  Pind.  P.  9.  103,  cf.  I.  2.  44;  dyva/rcs  dkkrjkwv  Thuc.  3.  53;  o 
d-yc.  twv  koyaiv  Arist.  Soph.  Elench.  22,  4. 

dyvwo-ta.  »),  a  not  knowing,  ignorance,  Hipp.  Vet.  Med.  II ;  cvpupopds 
dyv.  Eur.  Med.  1 204 ;  bid  tt)v  dXX^Ktuv  dyv.  from  not  knowing  one 
another,  Thuc.  8.  66  :  absol.,  opp.  to  yvwats,  Plat.  Soph.  267  B.  II. 
a  being  unknown,  obscurity,  Plat.  Menex.  238  D. 

dYvaxraw,  =  dyvoioj,  a  pres.  only  used  in  late  Poets,  as  Musae.  249, 
Dion.  P.  173,  Coluth.  8,  Norm.,  etc.,  as  also  in  Luc.  Ep.  Sat.  25  (with 
v.  1.  dyvofts),  prob.  formed  backward  from  the  Horn,  form  dyvwaaoKt 
(v.  sub  dyvoiu)  on  the  analogy  of  Xipwaaw,  etc.,  cf.  Lob.  Phryn.  607  sq. 

d-yvtao-TOS,  ov,  unknown,  rati  Od.  2.  175  (or,  perh.,  unexpected): 
unheard  of,  forgotten,  like  dtbrj\os,  Mimnerm.  5.  7  ;  v.  sub  otarrrr},  I. 
I  ;  dyv.  h  yfjv  Eur.  I.  T.  94 : — so  also  in  the  form  dyvwros,  yvwrd 
kovk  dyvorrd  fiot  Soph.  O.  T.  58  ;  dyvwra  rots  0ttvpL€vots  Ar.  Ran. 
926.  2.  not  to  be  known,  dyvwardv  rtva  T(\>xtiV  Od*  J3*  J9X  ! 

-rravTtoai  lb.  397;  dyvojJTorarot  yXwaaav  most  unintelligible  in  tongue, 
Thuc.  3.  94.  3.  in  Plat,  and  Arist.  not  a  subject  of  knowledge, 

unknowable,  d\oya  Kai  dyv.  Plat.  Theaet.  202  B,  cf.  Arist.  Metaph.  6.  10, 
iH  ;  in  Comp.  harder  to  know,  lb.  I  (min.).  3,  I.  4.  as  the  name  of 

a  divinity  at  Athens,  vij  rov" Kyvojarov  Luc.  Philop.  9,  cf.  Act.  Ap.  17.  23; 
in  pi.  &a/i/  .  .  livopux^op.ivoiv  dyvwarojv  Paus.  I.  I,  4.  II.  act. 

not  knowing,  ignorant  of,  xf/tvhiwv  Pind.  O.  6.  1 1 3,  cf.  Luc.  Hale.  3. — 
Adv.  -ran,  Clem.  Al.  881. 

dy^tipaivw,  poet,  for  dvafrjpaivat,  II.  21.  347. 

<W£l*»  #»  (^7XW)  a  throttling,  like  dyxovn,  E.  M.  194,  50. 

dyoyytoria,  r),  (yoyyvfa)  abstinence  from  murmuring,  patience,  Eccl. 

d-yoyyvorro%,  ov,  not  murmuring,  Eccl. 

d--yo'f|T€VTO«,  ov,  not  to  be  bewitched  or  beguiled,  Synes.  135  B.  II. 

act.  without  guile:  Adv.  -rats,  Cic.  Att.  12.  3,  I. 

d-ydp$ios,  ov,  without  grinders,  dy.  alwv  toothless  age,  Diocles  Incert.  1. 


ayopaZw. 

Q-*y6p.4>wTOs,  ov,  not  nailed,  unfastened,  Jo.  Chrys. 

aYovuros,  ov,  (701/v)  without  a  knee,  Arist.  lncess.  An.  9,  4.  2. 

metaph.   not  bending  the  knee,  inflexible,  Socr.  H.  E.  6.  15.  II.  of 

plants,  without  knots  ov  joints,  Theophr.  H.  P.  4.  8,  7. 

dvov*ti>,  to  be  dyovos  or  unfruitful,  Theophr.  H.  P.  9,  1 8.  3,  al. 

d-yovia,  »),  unfruitfulness,  Plut.  Rom,  24. 

dyovos.  ov,  (70V17) :  I.  pass,  unborn,  II.  3.  40  (which  Augustus 

translated  childless,  Suet.  Oct.  65).  2.  unborn,  not  yet  born,  Eur. 

Phoen.  1597.  II*  act-  not  producing,  unfruitful,  impotent,  barren, 

of  animals  both  male  and  female,  Hipp.  Aph.  1255,  Art.  807,  Arist. 
G.  A.  I.  7,  2  (in  Comp.),  etc. ;  tokoktiv  dyvvots  travail  without  issue, 
bringing  no  children  to  the  birth,  Soph.  O.  T.  27,  cf.  Hes.  Op.  242, 
Hdt.   6.   139.  b.  of  plants,  Theophr.  H.  P.  1.  13,  4,  al. ;  of  sandy 

soil,  Justin.  M.  348  B.  c.  metaph.,  07.  ijptpa  a  day  utducky  for 

begetting  children,  Hipp.  1053  D  ;  ay.  itoitjt^s,  opp.  to  yovtfxos,  Plut. 

2.  348  B : — in  the  Pythag.  language  7  was  an  dyovos  opiOpius,  not  being 
divisible  by  any  number,  nor  a  factor  of  any  number  under  1 2  (cf.  du- 
irapOtvos),  Clem.  Al.  811.  2.  c.  gen.  not  productive  of ,  barren  of  or 
in,  ffoibias  Plat.  Theaet.  150C,  cf.  157  C;  dijpiwv  Menex.  237  D;  KaKwv 
dy.  &tos  Id.  Ax.  370  D.  III.  childless,  yivos  Eur.  H.  F.  887, 
v.  supr. 

d-yoos,  01/,  unmounted,  Aesch.  Th.  1063  (lyr.). 

d-yopd   [dy],   as,  Ion.  dyopT|,  jjs,  77:    {dyupw).       Any  assembly,  esp. 
an  Assembly  of  the  People,  opp.  to  the  Council  of  Chiefs  {&ov\-q,  Bwkos) 

11.  2.  51,  93,  sq.,  Od.  2.  26,  etc.;  the  absence  of  dyopat  @ovkn<p6poi 
among  the  Cyclopes  (Od.  9.  112)  is  a  mark  of  barbarism.  In  the  d7opd, 
sitting  was  the  proper  posture,  II.  2.  96,  cf.  99  ;  standing  denoted  tumult 
or  terror,  18.  246;  dyopal  Tlvkariofs,  of  the  Amphictyonic  Council  at 
Pylae,  Soph.  Tr.  638,  cf.  Ion  1,3;  in  Pind.,  even  of  the  gods,  uaKapwv 
dy.  I.  8.  59,  cf.  A.  B.  210. — Phrases,  some  of  which  may  belong  to 
signf.  II.  I,  KaBi^uv  dyoprfv  to  hold  an  assembly,  opp.  to  Ai!«i'  dy.  to 
dissolve  it,  Od.  2.  69,  cf.  II.  I.  305  ;  dyop^vbf  xakttiv,  Krjpvaottv  11.  I. 
54.,  2.  51  ;  dyopty  irottiaBat  or  TtBtaBat,  us  ri)vdy.  tiottvai,  dydpfaBat, 
dyoprjvb'f  KaBtfyoBai  Horn.,  etc. — This  sense  is  more  freq.  in  Ep.  than 
Att.,  but  we  have  d7opdv  avvdyuv  and  avWtyuv  Xen.  An.  5.  7,  3  ; 
irouiv  Aeschin.  57.  37: — in  late  Prose,  £7.  diKuv  irpo&etvat,  Karaarri- 
aaoBat,   to  express  the  Rom.  conventus   ageret   Luc.  Bis   Ace.  4  and 

12.  2.  generally,  a  tribe,  people,  Pind.  N.  3.  23.  II.  the  place  of 
Assembly,  Rom.  forum,  toLs  8'  tvp  tlv  dyoprj  II.  7.  382  ;  tva  a<f>  dy.  t« 
Bip\ts  T€  II.  807,  cf.  2.  788.,  7.  345,  Od.  6.  266.,  8.  5,  sq. ;  also  in  pi., 
Od.  8.  16.  2.  as  in  Horn,  the  dyopd  was  used  not  only  for  meet- 
ings, trials  at  law  and  other  public  purposes,  it  is  likely  that  it  was  also 
used  as  a  market-place,  like  the  Roman  Forum,  but  the  rirst  passage  in 
which  this  distinctly  appears  seems  to  be  in  Epigr.  Horn.  14.  5,  iroAAd 
p\v  elv  dyoprj  TTw\€vp€va,  TroAXd  5'  dyvtais  ;  but  it  is  freq.  in  all  later 
authors  (though  signfs.  II.  I  and  II.  2  are  often  blended),  npvpivois 
dyopds  tin  Pind.  P.  5.  125  ;  Otol . .  dyopds  imaKO-noi  Aesch.  Th.  272  ; 
fx(<nj  Ipaxtv'twv  dy.  Soph.  Tr.  424 ;  ovt€  dyopa  ovrt  darn.  fix*oOai 
Thuc.  6.  44;  in  Theogn.  268  ovk  . .  us  dy.  tpx^Tai  is  a  sign  of  poverty; 
but  to  frequent  or  lounge  in  the  market  was  held  to  be  disreputable,  dkiyaKts 
. .  dyopds  xPaiV(tlv  ^vkKov  Eur.  Or.  919  ;  !£  dyopds  tt  Ar.  Eq.  181,  etc.; 
cf.  a7opafos'  H  ;  us  dy.  ip.(5d\kuv  to  go  into  the  forum,  i.e.  be  a  citizen, 
Lycurg.  148.  23;  iv  ttJ  dy.  ipydfaoBai  to  trade  in  the  market,  Dem. 
1308.  9;  us  r^v  dy.  TTKarruv  rt  to  make  it  for  the  market,  Id.  47. 
14.  III.  the  business  of  the  dyopd  :  1.  public  speaking,  gift  of  speak- 
ing, mostly  in  pi.,  tax'  dyopdwv  withheld  him  from  speaking,  II.  2.  275  ; 
oi  b'  dyopds  dyoptvov  lb.  788,  cf,  Od.  4.  818  ;  tpbty  dvr  dyopds  Bipuvos 
Solon  1 .  2.  things  sold  in  the  dyopd,  the  market,  provisions,  Lat.  annona ; 
dyopdv  7rapaaK€vd£uv,  Lat.  commeatum  offerre,  to  hold  a  market  for  any 
one,  Thuc.  7. 40,  Xen.  Hell.  3.  4,  11;  d7.  iraptxiiv  Thuc.  6.  50,  Xen.,  etc. ; 
dyuv  Xen.  An.  5.  7,  33,  etc. ;  opp.  to  dyopa  xPVa^ai*  to  nave  supplies, 
Xen.  An.  7.  6,  24;  ttJs  £7.  upyurBai  to  be  baired  from  it,  Thuc.  1. 
67,  Plut.  Pericl.  29  ;  dyopds  irepiKuirTuv  to  stop  the  market  Dion.  H. 
10.  43  ;  dy.  tXivBipa,  i.  e.  Ka&apd  tu/v  tvviwv  iravTatv,  Arist.  Pol.  7.  12, 

3,  cf.  Xen.  Cyr.  I.  2,  3  ;  opp.  to  dy.  dvayKaia  Arist.  Pol.  7.  12,  7  ;  °* 
(K  ttjs  dy.  market  people,  Xen.  An.  I.  2,  18,  cf.  Ar.  Eq.  181.  b.  market, 
sale,  dy.  twv  @t&Xiwv,  rd/v  irapBivuv  Luc.  Indoct.  19,  Ael.  V.  H.  4.  I  ; 
cf.  Nicoch.  Ktvr.  2,  et  ibi  Meineke.  IV.  as  a  mark  of  time,  a7opd 
irAT70ovo*a  the  forenoon,  when  the  market-place  was  full,  and  the  ordinary 
business  was  going  on,  a7op?7S  vXrjBvovarjs  Hdt.  4.  181  ;  a7opds  ttAt/- 
Oovo-tjs  Xen.  Mem.  I.  1,  10;  irtpl  or  dpupl  dyopdv  tTKrfOovoav  Id.  An. 
2.  I,  7.,  i.  8,  I  ;  iv  dyopa  irXrJBovor}  Plat.  Gorg.  469  D;  also  called 
dyoprjs  iTK-qBujpt},  Hdt.  2.  173.,  7.  223;  poet.,  iv  dyopd  vh-qBovros  ox^ov 
Pind.  P.  4.  151  ;  TTplv  dyopdv  irerrKrj&tvai  Pherecr.  Avto/i.  9; — opp.  to 
a7op77$  5td\vats  the  time  just  after  mid-day,  when  they  went  home 
from  market,  Hdt.  3.  104,  cf.  Xen.  Oec.  12,  I. 

dyopd£a>  [dy],  fut.  daw  Ar.  Lys.  633,  dyopw  Lxx  (Neh.  10.  31):  aor. 
t)y6paffa  Xen.  Hell.  7.  2,  18,  Dem.,  etc.;  pf.  7j7opa«a  Arist.  Oec.  2.  34, 

5,  Polyb. : — Med.,  aor.  'qyopaadfi-nv  Dem.  1223.  20:  pf.  7j7opaa^at 
(v.  infr.): — Pass.,  aor.  y\yopdaBr\v  Id.  1360.  19:  pf.  tfyopaapai  Isae.  71. 
22,  Menand.  Incert.  214.  To  be  in  the  dyopd,  frequent  it,  at 
yvvatK€s  dy.  Kal  KamjKfvovat,  m  Egypt,  Hdt.  2.  35.,  4.  164,  cf.  Arist. 
Phys.  2.  4,  2  :  to  occupy  the  market-place,  of  troops,  Thuc.  6.  51.  2. 
to  buy  in  the  market,  buy,  purchase,  ttwKuv,  dyopd^uv  Ar.  Ach.  625, 
cf.  PI.  984;  tmTTjdua  ay.  Xen.  An.  I.  5,  10;  and  this  became  the  com- 
mon sense: — Med.  to  buy  for  oneself,  Xen.  An.  I.  3,  14,  Dem.  1215.  2; 
pf.  pass,  in  med.  sense,  dvrl  tov  ifyopdaBat  airrots  to>  ofvoi'  Dem.  929. 

6.  3.  as  a  mark  of  idle  fellows,  to  haunt  the  dyopd,  lounge  there. 
Corinna  and  Pind.  ap.  Schol.  Ar.  Ach.  720 ;  u7opdo"d7«V€ios  (a  crasis  for 
d7opdo*fi  dytvuos)  ovotts  nor  shall  any  one  lounge  in  the  dyopd  till  he  has 


ayooaio?  - 

got  a  beard,  Dind.  Ar.  Eq.  1373:  ayopaftiv  tts  wuKtv,  stroll  in,  Thuc.6.  5 1  ; 
cf.  sq.  II.  2.  [d7-  properly  ;   but  ay-  in  Com.  Anon.  4.  p.  620.] 

dyopalos  [07],  ov,  fern,  also  dyopaia  (as  epith.  of  Artemis  and  Athena, 
Paus.  R.  15,  4.,  3.  II|  9.  etc.).  In,  of.  or  belonging  to  the  dyopd,  Ztvs 

*A7#  as  guardian  of  popular  assemblies.  Hdt.  5.  46,  Aesch.  Eum.  973 
(lyr.),  Eur.  Heracl.  70;  'Epurjs  "A7.  as  patron  of  traffick,  Ar.  Eq.  297, 
cf.  C.  I.  2078,  2156,  Paus.  I.  15,  1;  and  generally,  Btol  dy.  Aesch. 
Ag.  90;    c(.  Th.  272.  2.  of  things,  rd  ay.  details  of  market- 

business.  Plat.  Rep.  425  C:  dpros  dy.,  a  particular  kind  of  good  bread, 
Ath.  109  D.  II.  frequenting  the  market,  o  Cy.  6\Kos,  OTJfios 

Xen.  Hell.  6.  2,  23,  Arist.  Pol.  4.  3,  2..  6.  4,  14,  etc.;  to  ay.  wXrjdos  .  . 
to  wtpi  rds  wpdotis  /cat  tcls  wvds  *a*  ras  ipwoptas  /cat  rd?  KainjKtias 
otarpt&ov  lb.  4.  4,  10; — dyopatot  (with  or  without  avOpwwoi),  olt  those 
who  frequen'ed  the  dyopd,  loungers  in  the  market,  Lat.  circumforanei, 
subrostrani,  Hdt.  I.  93.,  2.  41  ;  opp.  to  tfiwopot,  Xen.  Vect.  3,  13: — 
hence  generally,  the  common  sort,  low  fellows  (cf.  d7opd  11.  2,  dyopdfa 
3),  Ar.  Ran.  1015,  Plat.  Prot.  347  C,  Theophr.  Char.  6.  Act.  Ap.  17.  5  ; 
and,  in  Comp..  the  baser  sort,  Ptolem.  ap.  Ath.  438  F: — hence  Adv., 
dyopaton  kiyttv  Dion.  H.  de  Rhet.   10.   II.  2.  of  things,  low, 

mean,  vulgar,  common,  ffxa/u/xara  Ar.  Pax  750  ;  tovs  vovs  uyopaiow 
tyrrov . .  votw  Id.  Fr.  397  ;  ay.  <pt\ia  Arist.  Eth.  N.  8.  13,  6,  cf.  lb.  6, 
4.  III.  generally,  proper  to  the  dyopd,  skilled  in,  suited  to  foremic 

speaking,  Plut.  Pericl.  II  : — dyopatos  (sc.  if  pi  pa),  a  court-day,  rds  dy. 
woitta$at  Strabo  629  :  also,  67c  if  tvv  dyopatov  Joseph.  A.  J.  14.  10,  21, 
cf.  dyopd  II.  I,  fin.,  Act.  Ap.  19.  38  ;  (in  this  sense  some  Gramm.  write 
proparox.  dyupatos,  as  in  most  Edd.  of  N.  T.) : — Adv.  -«?,  in  forensic 
style,  Plut.  C.  Gracch.  4,  Anton.  24. 

dyopdvopita.  to  be  dyopavopos,  Alex.  *o*o\  1,  Dion.  H.  10.  48,  C.  I. 
2483.  20;   pf.  -rjxa  Dio  C.  52.  32. 

dyopdvo|xia.  r),  the  office  of  dyopavofws,  Arist.  Pol.  7.  12,  7,  C.  I. 
1 104.  al. 

dyopuvouLitos,  17.  ov,  of  or  for  the  dyopavuuos  or  his  office,  dy. 
drra  Plat.  Rep.  425  D;  vvut/xa  Arist.  Pol.  2.  5,  21;  ri/uu  C.  I. 
1 716.  II.  for  Lat.  aedilicius,  Dion.  H.  6.95.  Plut.  Pomp.  53. 

dyopdvouaov,  to,  the  court  of  the  dyopavdftos.  Plat.  Legg.  91 7  E,  C.  I. 
2374  e.  44  (add.),  2483.  25. 

aYopa.v6p.os,  ov,  of  or  in  the  forum,  wtpiwaros  C.  I.  3545. 

dyop5.-vop.ov  6,  a  clerk  of  the  market,  who  regulated  buying  and  selling 
there,  Ar.  Ach.  723,  al.,  Lys.  165.  34,  freq.  in  C.  L,  v.  Ind.  iv ;  cf. 
Bockh  P.  E.  I.  67,  Diet,  of  Antiqq.  II.  to  translate  the  Lat. 

Aedilis,  ait  officer  who  had  similar  duties,  Dion.  H.  6.  90,  Plut.  2.  658  D. 

dyopdou.ai,  almost  wholly  used  in  the  Ep.  forms,  pres.  dyopdaaOt, 
inipf.  i/yopdaaBt,  t)yop6ajvTo,  aor.  I  only  in  3  sing.  dyopTjaaro  (v.  infr.)  : 
but  2  sing,  impf,  "fjyopot  occurs  in  Soph. ;  inf.  dyopdoBai  in  Theogu. 
159:  aor.  1  tvayopTjSiis  (v.  tvrjyopio))  Pind.  I.  1.  73:  in  Hdt.  6.  II  the 
Mss.  give  the  Ep.  form  ^yopdortro:  Dep.  To  meet  in  assembly, 

tit  in  debate,  oi  oi  Otol  rap  Zrjvl  xaBrffitvot  i/yopoarvro  II.  4.  1  :  also, 
like  dyopfvw,  to  speak  in  the  assembly,  harangue,  o  atfnv  litypoviwv 
dyoprfaaro  II.  1.  73.,  9.  95,  cf.  Od.  7.  185  ;  watalv  iouttms  dyopdaaOt, 
II.  2.  337 : — to  speak,  utter,  tv\a}\ai  .  .  .  as  .  .  Ktv«av\ifi  i/yopdaaBt 
8.  230: — to  speak  or  talk  with,  tots  ov  .  .  ijyopw  fivats  Soph.  Tr. 
601.  [57~  H-  2.  337,  metri  grat. ;  otherwise  07-.] 

dyopio'Su).  Dor.  for  dyopdfa,  Theocr.  15.  16. 

dyopC*.o-*Lui,  Desid.  of  dyopdfa,  to  wish  to  buy.  Lat.  empturio,  Schol.  Ar. 
Ran.  1 1 00. 

dyopuo-ta.  r),  a  buying,  purchase,  Teleclid.  Incert.  27,  Diog.  L.,  etc. 

dyopuoas,  tan,  r),  =  foreg..  Plat.  Soph.  219  D,  in  pi. 

dyopacrp-a.  to,  that  which  is  bough'  or  sold :  mostly  in  pi.  goods,  wares, 
merchandise,  Aeschin.  85.  37,  Dem.  909.  27,  etc.,  cf.  Alex.  ILryifp.  I. 

dyopao'p.os,  o,  a  purchasing,  Phintys  ap.  Stob.  445.  19.  Or.  Sib.  2. 
-*,2<).  II.  purchase,  Lxx  (Gen.  42.  19,  al.),  C.  I.  4957.  20;   in 

pi.,  Epigr.  Gr.  714. 

dyopaarrip,  ov,  o,  the  slave  who  had  to  buy  provisions  for  the  house,  the 
purveyor,  Xen.  Mem.  1.  5,  2  :  in  later  authors  tyajvaraip,  Lat.  obsonator, 
Ath.  171  A: — generally,  a  buyer,  fiirpiot  dy.  Menand.  ♦dV.  2. 

dyopao-rvicos.  17,  ov,  of  or  for  traffick  or  trade,  commercial.  Plat.  Crat. 
408  A :  if  -KTf  (sc.  rixvy)  traffick,  trade,  commerce.  Id.  Soph.  223  C. 

dYopa,<TTov  -if,  ov,  verb.  Adj.  to  be  bought  or  sold.  Gloss. 

dyopaTpos,  o,  =  wvKayvpas,  Delph.  Inscr.  in  C.  I.  1689  b. 

dyopaxos,  r),  some  kind  of  female  official  in  Pelop.  cities,  C.I.  1 446, 1 45 1. 

dyop€VTT|piov,  to,  a  place  for  speaking,  C.  I.  5789. 

dyop«vr6s.  t],  «r,  utterable,  to  be  spoken  of.  Just.  M.  221  D. 

dyopvwM  (dyopd),  with  impf.  ifropfvov  Ep.  dyoptvov  U.  1.  385: — 
fut.  -tvaoj  often  in  Horn.,  (wpoa-)  Plat.  Theaet.  147  E: — aor.  1/70- 
ptvaa,  Ep.  dy-,  Horn.,  (d*-)  Plat.  Theaet.  200  D,  Dem.  1021. 18.,  1273. 
2:  (tar-)  Ar.  Pax  107.  (irpotf-)  Xen.  Mem.  3.  2,  I,  Dem.  1006.  7; 
(aw-)  Id.  397.  7:  pf.  ify'iptvKa  (wpo-)  Id.  157.  20: — Med.,  aor.  1/70- 
ptvadftnv  (v.  infr.): — Pass.,  fut.  (of  med.  form)  uyoptvaopat  (wpo-)  Xen. 
Hipparch.  2.  7  (where  however  the  sense  requires  wpoa7op«iJ<Tat) : — 
aor.  iiyoptvBnv  (wpoa-)  Aesch.  Pr.  834,  Anaxil.  NVott.  2,  Philem.  Incert. 
16: — pf.  vydpcv/MU,  (wap-)  Hdt.  7.  13,  (wpo-)  Xen.  Mem.  I.  2,  35. — 
But  in  correct  Att.  writers,  this  Verb  (and  still  more  its  compds.)  is 
for  the  most  part  confined  to  the  pres.  and  impf. ;  the  fut.,  pf.  and  aor. 
being  borrowed  (sc.  ipat,  ttprjtea,  ttwov,  and  their  compds.),  v.  sub  tTwov  ; 
and  recent  Editors  have  endeavoured  to  alter  the  passages  which 
contravene  this  rule,  cf.  Cobet  V.  LL.  p.  36  ;  but  see  Veitch  Gr.  Verbs 
s.  v. — Cf.  dv-,  Ayr-,  dw-,  |f-(  xar-,  wpo-,  wpoa-,  ow-ayoptvw.  To 

speak  in  the  assembly,  harangue,  to  speak,  twta  wrtpCtvra,  dyopds 
dy.  Horn.,  who  constantly  uses  the  word,  as  do  Hes.  and  Hdt. ;  ws 
*E*rjup  dyjptvt  II.  8.  542  ;   sVy.  tw(  II.  1.571.  al. ;   rtvi  n  Hdt.  6.  97  ; 


9 


-  aypav\o$.  j  3 

rt  irpoy  riva  II.  24.  142  ;  wttoifav  dy.  Od.  iS.  380;  tcatcov  n  dy.  rtvd 
to  speak  ill  of  one,  lb.  15  ;  also,  Ka/cws  dy.  rtvd  Arist.  Fr.  378  :  in  Att.. 
of  the  crier's   proclamation   in   the   Ecclesia,   ris  dyoptvtiv  &ov\cTat  ■ 

who  wishes  to  address  the  house?  Ar.  Ach.  45,  Dem.  285.  6,  etc. : also 

07.  dry;  .11.  1.  109,  Hdt.  3.  156  ;  on..  Ar.  PI.  102  :— "c.  inf.,  w  Tt  <pol 
fiovb"  dyoptvt  counsel  me  not  to  flight,  II.  5.  252  ;  £7.  fir)  arpartvicBai 
Hdt.  7.  10.  2.  to  tell  of  mention,  Tt  Od.  2.  318.,  16.  263,  al. ;  also, 

vwip  rtvos  dy.  of. . ,  Plat.  Legg.  776  E.  3.  to  proclaim,  declare,  II! 

I.  385,  Plat.  Legg.  917D;  and  so  in  aor.  med.,  dyoptvaaaBai  w?  ..  to  have 
it  proclaimed  that . . ,  Hdt.  9.  26: — so  in  Att.  phrase,  d  vopos  dyoptvti 
the  law  declares,  says,  Antipho  123.  16,  Lys.  115.  6,  Arist.  Rhet.  1. 
I,  5;  dy.  fir)  wottiv  Ar.  Ran.  628;  ovvofia  . .  jjb'  dy.  0-T17A7  C.  I. 
1412: — simply  to  say,  speak.  Soph.  O.  C.  838,  Eur.:  metaph.,  oippa 
Brjpos  dy.  \ctpwv  tpyov  tells  a  tale  of. .  ,  Theocr.  25,  1 75.  4.  Pass., 

of  a  speech,  to  be  spoken,  iirl  tois  . .  Oawropivots  Thuc.  2.  35. 

dyopTj.  Ep.  and  Ion.  for  dyopd. 

dyopf|0«v,  Adv.  from  the  assembly  or  market,  II.  2.  264,  al. 

dyopT|vS«,  Adv.  to  the  assembly  or  market,  II.  I.  54. 

dyop^TTis.  ov,  o,  (dyopdofiat)  a  speaker,  Ep.  word,  chiefly  used  of  Nes- 
tor, AtT^y  XlvXlaiv  dyoprrrf)?  II.  I.  248,  al.,  cf.  Ar.  Nub.  1057.  II. 
in  C.  I.  4474.  dyopTfTi)?  seems  to  be  =  dyopavopos. 

dyopip-us,  vos,  ij,  the  gift  of  speaking,  eloquence,  Od.  8.  168  :  Ep.  word. 

dyopf)4>t.  Adv.  in  the  assembly,  Hes.  Th.  89. 

dyopos,  o,  =  dyopd,  only  found  in  lyrical  passages  of  Eur.,  and  always 
in  pi.  (I.  T.  1096,  El.  723,  Andr.  1037),  except  in  H.  F.  412,  ayopov 
dXtaa?  tftiKcw. 

dyos  [&],  ov,  6,  (dyou)  a  leader,  chief,  often  in  II.,  c.  gen.,  e.  g.  4.  265; 
also  in  Pind.  N.  I.  77,  Aesch.  Supp.  248,904,  Eur.  Rhes.  29  (lyr.),  Anth. 
P.  9.  219. 

dyos  or  oyos  [d],  cor,  to,  any  matter  of  religious  awe:  hence,  like 
Lat.  piaculum,  1.  that  which  requires  expiation,  a  curse,  pollution, 

guilt,  iv  t£  dyti  ivixfoBat  Hdt.  6.  56, 1 ;  ayos  tK$vaaa$at  6.  91 ;  0:70s  . . 
*«*r^o*«Tai  deary  Aesch.  Th.  I017;  070?  aiftdrajv  Id.  Eum.  168;  070,- 
<J>v\d<7<7t(J&ai  Id.  Supp.  375  ;  <f>tvyttv  Soph.  Ant.  256 ;  o&ev  to  070s 
avvi&n  rots  'S.v&apiTaxs  Arist.  Pol.  5.  3,  II  ;  070s  dtf>oaiwaaa$at  Plut. 
Cam.  18,  cf.  Anth.  P.  7.  268  : — also  in  concrete  sense,  the  person  or  thing 
accursed,  an  abomination,  Soph.  O.  T.  1426;  070?  ikavvttv  —  dynKarttv, 
Thuc.   I.   126.  2.  an  expiation,  Soph.  Ant.   775,  Fr.  613;    cf. 

Herm.  Aesch.  Cho.  149.  II.  in  good  sense,  =  at&as,  awe,  fiiya 

ydp  ti  Otwv  dyos  la\dvti  avor)v  h.  Horn.  Cer.  479 ;  in  Hesych.  also  we 
find  dyta'  rtfiivta,  and  dyitaar  rtfiivtat ;  and  in  A.  B.  212.  33,  ayrj- 
rd  fivar^pia. — Cf.  Ruhuk.  Tim.  s.  v.  (Curt,  seeks  to  distinguish 

the  two  senses  as  belonging  to  diff.  Roots:  (1)  ^AT,  dyos,  expiation, 
sacrifice,  whence  ayios,  dyvus,  a£of*at,  cf.  Skt.  yag,  yagdtni  (sacrifico, 
colo),  yagus,  yag  nam  (sacrificium)  ;  and  (2)  ^AI\  070s  in  bad  sense, 
curse,  pollution,  whence  dyns  or  0717s,  iv-ayf)s,  cf.  Skt.  a  gas  (offiensa).) 

dyooT-As,  o,  the  flat  of  the  hand,  in  Horn,  only  in  II.,  in  the  phrase  o  6* 
iv  Kov'tno'i  wtauv  tXt  yaiav  dyoarip  II.  425,  etc. ;  dy.  \ttpos  Ap.  Rh. 
3.  120.  II.  the  arm,  =  dyKdXrj,  Theocr.  17.  129,  Anth.  P.  7. 

464:  metaph.,  'A/taonptias  . .  iv  dyoar$  Simon.  (?)  ib.  6.  144.  (Akin 
to  07*0?,  47*0X17,  etc.) 

dyovpos,  d,  a  youth,  Bvz. 

aypa.  Ion.  dyp-q,  ^,  (dyai)  a  catching,  hunting,  the  chase,  (never  in  II.), 
dypav  i<f>twtiv  to  follow  the  chase,  Od.  1 2.  330 ;  xa*P°V(Tl  °*  T'  ^vipfi 
dypjj  22.  306;  dypati  wpoaicttaBai  Soph.  Ai.  407;  isrdypas  iivat  Eur. 
Supp.  885,  cf.  Plat.  Legg.  823  E;  cxw  dvwvovs  dypas,  of  fishermen, 
Soph.  Aj.  880.  2.  a  way  of  catching,  Hes.  Th.  442,  Pind.  N.  3. 

143,  Hdt.  2.  70,  I.  II.  that  which  is  taken  in  hunting,  the 

quarry,  prey, Hes.Th.  442;  dypav  wKtaa  Aesch.  Eum.  I48(lyr.);  ivtctpaii 
d.  Soph.  Aj.  64,  cf.  297  ;  M«Xt'o7p«,  ptkiav  ydp  wot  dypevtis  dypav 
Eur.  Fr.  521  :  game,  Hdt.  I.  73,  5,  etc.;  of  fish,  a  draught,  take,  Ev. 
Luc.  5.9: — metaph.,  topot  dypa  Aesch.  Th.  322  (lyr.).  III. 

'Aypa,  if,  a  name  of  Artemis,  like  'Ayporipa,  'Aypaia,  Plat.  Phaedr. 
229  C.  cf.  Ruhnk.  Tim.  186. 

dypu8«.  Adv.,  poet,  form  of  dypovot.  Call.  Fr.  26. 

dypaios,  a,  ov,  (aypa)  of  the  chase,  as  epith.  of  Apollo,  Paus.  I.  41,  6 ; 
and  of  Artemis,  Eust.  361.  36  ;  baipovts  Opp.  H.  3.  27  :  cf.  'Ayporipa. 

dypau.u.uTia.  r),  want  of  learning,  Ael.  V.  H.  8.  6. 

d-ypap^tuTOf,  ov,  without  learning  (ypdpfiaTa),  unlettered,  Lat.  illite- 
rate, Damox.  'S.vvrp.  12,  Xen.  Mem.  4.  2,  20,  Anth.  P.  II.  154,  cf. 
Sext.  Emp.  M.  1.  99:  unable  to  read  or  write,  Plat.  Tim.  23  A: — Adv. 
-tois,  ArT.  Epict.  2.  9,  10.  II.  =d7pairroy,  07^.  tOrj  Plat.  Polit. 

295  A.  III.  of  animals,  unable  to  utter  articulate  sounds,  Arist. 

H.  A.  I.  I,  29:  of  sounds,  inarticulate.  Id.  Interpr.  2,  2,  Diog.  L.  3.  107. 

d-ypau.p.os,  ov,  not  on  the  line,  dypafifia  dfpttrat,  of  a  throw  o(  the 
dice,  counting  nothing,  Hesych. 

dypdv&is,  =  d7poVof,  Dor.  Adv.  in  Theognost.  Can.  163.  33. 

d-ypoiTTOS,  ov,  unwritten,  dyp.  Otwv  vofttua  Soph.  Ant.  454 :  cf.  dypa- 
<pos.  II.  d7p.  5**17  an  action  cancelled  m  consequence  of  a  demurrer. 

Poll.  8.  5J\ 

dypavX«fa>,  to  be  an  aypavXos,  and  so,  To  live  in  the  open  fields, 

live  out  of  doors,  Arist.  Mirab.  IX,  Plut.  Num.  4,  Strabo  197  ;  of  shep- 
herds, Ev.  Luc.  2.  8. 

dypavXriS,  e's,  in  the  fields,  out  of  doors,  koittj  Nic.  Th.  78. 

dypavXta,  r),  the  state  of  an  dypavXos: — in  Dion,  H.  6.  44,  Diod.,  etc., 
military  service  in  the  field. 

dypav\iJou,ai,  Dep.  =  dypauXc'tw,  Theoph.  Sim.  179*  4* 

dypavXos.  ov,  (dypds,  ai/\^)  dwelling  in  the  field,  living  out  of  doorsr 
of  shepherds,  II.  18.  162,  Hes.  Th.  26,  Ap.  Rh.  4.  317;  so  epith.  ot 
Pan,  Anth.  P.  6.  179;  but,  dyp.  dvf)p  a  boor,  Ib.  11.  60.  2.  a 


14 

uvular  epith.  of  oxen,  0oos  dypavkoto  II.  10.  155.,  I"*  521'  ^d.  ' 2- 
253  I  &*IP  Soph.  Ant.  349  (lyr.),  Eur.  Bacch.  1 187,  etc.  3.  of  things, 
rural,  rustic,  wiiA.au  Id.  El.  342. 

dypu^iov  ypcuprj,  1),  an  action  against  state-debtors,  who  had  got  their 
debts  cancelled  without  paying,  Deni.  1338.  19.  Poll.  8.  54. 

u-YP^4»°*'  ov,  unwritten,,  ^vrjfiij  Thuc.  2.  43;  dyp.  otaBrj/cat  verbal 
wills.  Plut.  Cor.  9,  cf.  dyp.  tekrjpovunoi  Luc.  Tox.  23  ;  dypatpa  Xiyttv  to 
speak  without  book,  Plut.  Demosth.  S  : — Adv.  -<pws,  Clem.  AI.  771.  II. 
dypatpoi  voftot,  unwritten  laws,  which  are  1.  the  laws  of  nature, 

moral  law  (cf.  dypamros),  rots  dyp.  voptots  feat  rots  dvBpatirivots  tBtot  Dem. 
317.  23:  to  hUatov  tori  Slttov,  to  fiiv  dyp.,  to  5J  Hard  vofiov  Arist. 
Eth.  N.  8.  13,  5.  2.  laws  of  custom,  common  law,  Thuc.  2.  37  ; 

dyp.  vufufta  Plat.  Legg.  793  A,  cf.  omnino  Arist.  Rhet.  1.  10,  3  and 
'  3»  2  ;  dyp.  dbiKrjfxa  a  crime  not  recognised  by  law  as  suck,  Hesych.  3. 
religious  traditions,  as  of  the  Eumolpidae,  Lys.  104.  8.  III. 

no!  registered  or  recorded,  dyp.  woXtts  cities  whose  names  do  not  stand 
in  a  treaty,  Thuc.  1.  40.  2.  dyp.  fitraXXa  mines  which  had  not 

been  registered,  but  were  wrought  clandestinely,  to  evade  the  tax  of  ■£%, 
Suid.  s.  v. ;  cf.  dtroypeupoj  in,  dvair6ypa<f>os.  IV.  without  in- 

scription, C.  I.  155.  41. — Prose  word. 

uypei.  v.  sub  dyptot  II. 

dypcLOs,  a,  ov,  (dypus)  of  the  field  or  country,  trXaravos  Anth.  P.  6. 
35.  2.  clownish,  boorish,  like  dypot/cos,  Ar.  Nub.  655,  Thesm. 

160. 

dypeioowii,  jy\  clownishness :  or  a  rude,  vagrant  life,  Anth.  P.  6.  51  ; 
cf.  Jacobs  Del.  Epigr.  I.  6. 

OYp«i4>vav»  v-  su^  dypitfnj. 

d-yp<p.io$,  ov,  taken  in  hunting:  to  dyp.=dypa  II,  Anth.  P.  6.  224. 

QYp«|A'iv,  vvos,  0,  a  catcher,  hunter,  Artem.  2.  17*  E.  M.  13: — for 
Aesch.  Fr.  138,  v.  Dind.  Lex.  Aesch. 

OYp€<ria,  Ion.  -(ij,  4»  =dypa  I,  Anth.  P.  6.  13,  Call.  Fr.  22.  2. 

dypin\s,  ov,  o,  (dy€tptu)  a  Lacedaemonian  magistrate,  ace.  to  Hesych. 
=  ^yfpiwv,  whence  it  is  restored  by  Toup  for  dypdrai  in  Aesch.  Pers. 
1002  (lyr.),  and  by  Bergk  in  Alcm.  16.  1,  8:  a  Verb  dYp«T€vo>,  to  be  an 
dypiras,  occurs  in  a  Pelop.  Inscr.  in  C.  I.  1395  ;  cf.  also  twir-ayptTtjs. 

aYp«up.a,  to,  (dyptvta)  that  which  is  taken  in  hunting,  booty,  prey, 
Eur.  Bacch.  1241  : — metaph.,  Xen.  Mem.  3.  11,  7;  dyp.  dvBioiv  Eur. 
Fr.  754  ;  cf.  d^pa  II.  II.  a  means  of  catching,  dyp.  Brjpus  Aesch. 

Cho.  998  ;  ivTJS  . .  popoipjuv  dyp.,  of  the  net  thrown  over  Agamemnon, 
Id.  Ag.  1048,  cf.  Eum.  460. 

dYp«vs,  4ojs,  v,  (dyp€v<u)  a  hunter,  as  epith.  of  Aristaeus,  Pind.  P.  9.  115; 
of  Apollo,  Aesch.  Fr.  205  (cf.  dyptvrrjs)  ;  of  Bacchus,  Eur,  Bacch.  1192 
(Ivr.)  ;    of  Pan,  Poseidon,  etc.,  Dorvill.  Charit.  77.  II.  of  an 

arrow,  Anth.  P.  6.  75.  III.  a  kind  of  fish,  Ael.  N.  A.  8.  24. 

dypcO J-1U.0S.  jj,  ov,  easy  to  catch,  Schol.  Soph.  Ph.  863. 

dypivo\%,  tws,  i],  a  catching,  Hesych.,  Achm.  Onir.  1 78. 

dYp«vTT|p,  rjpos,  6,  =sq.,  Theocr.  21.  6,  Call.  Dian.  218,  Anth.  P. 
7.  578.  II.  as  Adj.,  dyp.  Kvves  Opp.  C.  3.  456 ;  dypevrijpt  \'tva>, 

i.e.  with  fishing  net,  Manetho  5.  279. 

dYp«VTT|S,  ov,  o,  a  hunter,  like  dypevs,  epith.  of  Apollo  as  slayer  of 
Python,  Soph.  O.  C.  1091  (lyr.).  II.  as  Adj.,  dyp.  Kvves,  hounds,  Solon 

23.  2  ;  dyp.  xdXafiot  a  hunter  s  trap  of  reeds,  Anth.  P.  7.  171,  cf.  6. 
109. 

dypevTiKos.  17,  ov,  of  or  skilled  in  hunting,  dypevrtKov  [tort]  useful  for 
ensnaring  an  enemy,  Xen.  Hipparch.  4.  12.     Adv.  -kws.  Poll.  5.  9. 

dYptvTis,  tbos,  1),  fern,  of  dypfvrrjs,  prob.  1.  in  Schol.  Ar.  Vesp.  367. 

aYptvTos,  &*%  caught,  Opp.  H.  3.  541. 

dYpcuu,  f.  tvooi  Call.  Dian.  84:  aor.  tfypcvaa  Eur.  Bacch.  1 204: — 
lied.,  v.  infr. : — Pass.,  aor.  i)y  ptvB-nv  Anth. :    (dypa).  To  take  by 

hunting  or  fishing,  catch,  take,  i\Bvs  Hdt.  2.  95,  cf.  Xen.  Cyn.  1 2,  6  ; 
dypav  rjyptvKUTfs  Eur.  Bacch.  434  ;  of  war,  <pi\ci . .  dvdpas  . .  dypevav 
viovs  Soph.  Fr.  498 : — also  in  Med.,  Bvpar  yyp€v<rao'(f  ye  caught  or 
chose  your  victim,  Eur.  I.  T.  1 163  ;  also,  ri  ftot  £i<pos  itc  x*Poy  yjyptvo'oj; 
why  didst  thou  snatch  . .  ?  Id.  Andr.  841 : — Pass,  to  be  hunted,  taken  in  the 
chase,  Xen.  An.  5.  3,  8  ;  dyptvBeis  u'  TJyptvae  Anth.  P.  9.  94.  2. 

metaph.  to  hunt  after,  thirst  for,  aJfia  Eur.  Bacch.  138;  dpfrds  hvvapnv 
Arist.  in  Bgk.  Lyr.  p.  664  ;  virvov  Anth.  P.  7.  196,  cf.  12.  125  ;  but, 
dypevftv  rtvd  Xoy<p  to  catch  by  his  words,  Ev.  Marc.  12.  13. 

aYp«w.  poet,  form  of  foreg.,  used  only  in  pres.,  but  seldom  in  lit.  sense, 
dypa  5*  olvov  ipvBpuv  search  for,  Archil.  5.  3  ;  rpupos  irdoav  dypei 
seizes,  Sapph.  2.  14,  cf.  Theogn.  294;  dypu  iruktv  capture*,  Aesch.  Ag. 
126   (lyr.);    of  fishing,  dyptts  Anth.  P.  6.  304.  II.  in  Horn, 

only  in  imperat.  dypu,=dyt,  come!  come  on!  dypu  ftdv  oi  titopaov 
'A0T}vairjv  II.  5.  765  ;  so,  dypttrc  Od.  20.  149.    Cf.  Buttm.  Lexil.  s.  v. 

dypr\,  17,  Ion.  for  dypa. 

dyprfiw,  Adv.  from  the  chase,  Ap.  Rh.  2.  938. 

dypi\vov,  to,  a  net,  Hesych. : — also  a  net-like  woollen  robe  worn  by 
Bacchanals  and  soothsayers,  Id.,  Poll.  4.  116. 

dypiaivut,  fut.  avw  Plat.  Rep.  501  E  :  aor.  r/yptava  Dio  C.  44.  47, 
Ael.: — Pass.,  Dion.  H.  12.  3,  Plut.:  fut.  dypiavBrjo-ofiai  Lxx  (Dan. 
11.  II)  :  aor.  J/yptdvOijv  Diod.  24.  I. — In  Att.  the  Pass,  was  supplied  by 
uypioai  (cf.  Lob.  Phryn.  p.  757),  which  was  rare  in  Act.;  but  the  compd. 
Pass.  f£ayptaivofiat  occurs  in  Plat.,  and  the  Act.  ifaypiocu  in  Hdt.,  Eur., 
Plat.  1.  infer,   to  be  or  become  dyptos,   to  be  angered,  provoked, 

angry.  Plat.  Rep.  493  B,  etc.;  rtvi  with  one,  Id.  Symp.  173  D;  of 
animals,  to  be  wild,  Arist.  H.  A.  9.  I,  1 1  ;  of  rivers  and  the  like,  to  chafe, 
-rrpos  tt)>  irkrjupvpav  .  .  dyptaivtuv  6  Trorafxos  Plut.  Caes.  38  : — of  sores, 
to  be  angry  or  inflamed,  Aretae.  Caus.  M.  Diut.  2.  11,  etc.  II. 

Causa),  to  make  angry,  provoke,  anger,  Dio  C.  44.  47  ;  of  love,  to 
irritate,  Ach.  Tat.  2.  7  :— Pass,  to  be  angered,  Plut.  Anton.  58. 


aypa(ptov  —  uypto<pait/$. 


aYpids,  ados,  rj,~dypia,  pecul.  fern,  of  dypios,  wild,  rough,  Ap.  Rh. 
I.  28,  Arat.,  etc.;  dpmtXov  dypidha  Anth.  P.  9.  561. 

dYpi-dco,  to  be  savage,  Opp.  C.  2.  49,  in  Ep,  form  dyptuwvra. 

dYpi&iov,  to,  Dim.  of  dypos,  Lat.  agellus,  Arr.  Epict.  1 .  1,  10. ,  2.  2,  1 7. 

dYpi-cXaia,  i},  a  wild  olive,  olive-wilding,  hit.  oleaster,  Diosc.  1.  125. 

aYpt-«\<uos,  ov,  of  a  ivild  olive,  Anth.  P.  9.  237.  II.  as  Subst., 

=  dypt(\aia,  Theocr.  7.  18,  Theophr.  H.  P.  2.  3,  5,  Ep.  Rom.  II.  17. 
— On  late  forms  like  this,  dypio-fidKavos,  etc.,  v.  Lob.  Phryn.  382. 

dYpi-Tjvds,  17,  ov,  —dypios,  wild,  Or.  Sib.  7.  79- 

aYpt-p-atos,  a,  ov,  wild,  opp.  to  ijfitpos  :  rd  dypifxata  the  flesh  of  wild 
animals,  game,  Ptolem.  ap.  Ath.  549  F. 

dYpi-pcXurcra,  i£,  a  wild  bee,  metaph.  of  Hegesias,  Hesych. 

OYpto-omSiov,  to,  wild  pear,  Geop.  8.  37. 

dYpio-pdXavos,  ^,  wild  @d\avo$,  cited  from  LXX. 

aYpio-pdppapo«,  ov,  savagely  barbarous,  Manass.  Chron.  4350. 

dYpi6-pov\o$,  ov,  wild  of  purpose,  Polem.  Physiogu. 

dYpio-8aiTT|$,  ov,  6,  eating  wild  fruits,  Orac.  ap.  Paus.  8.  42,  6. 

uyptoeis,  tffaa,  tv,=dypios,  Nic.  Al.  30.  617. 

aYpLo-Oujxos.  ov,  wild  of  temper,  Orph.  H.  II.  4. 

uYpv-o-Kawupis.  1),  wild  hemp,  Diosc. 

uYpto-Ka.pBap.ov.  to,  wild  xapSafiov,  Galen. 

aYpLo-KapSLOs,  ov,  of  savage  heart,  Manass.  Chron.  3763. 

aYpid-Kevrpos,  ov,  with  cruel  thorn,  Manass.  Chron.  4634. 

dYpto-KoKKV^LTj\a,  ojv,  wild  KOKKVfinka,  Diosc.  I.  174- 

uYpio-Kpopu-vov.  to.  wild  onion,  Schol.  Ar.  PI.  283. 

aYpto-KiiuiLvov,  to,  wild  cummin,  Schol.  Nic.  Th.  7°9- 

uypt-o-XaxLtva.  tuv,  to.,  wild  \dxava,  Schol.  Theocr.  4.  52,  Eccl. 

dYpio-X€ixT|v,  o,=dypws  kttxyv  (3),  Hesych. 

dYpLo-u.uXdxT],  1J,  wild  mallow,  Schol.  Nic.  Th.  89. 

uYpLo-fA7)Xa.  ojv,  rd,  wild  apples,  Diosc.  I.  164. 

uYpLo-p.op4>os.  ov,  wild,  savage  of  form,  Orph.  Arg.  977. 

uYpio-p.tipiKTj  [f],  ^,  wild  fivpitcT},  Lxx  (Jer.  17.  6). 

aYpt-d-fiupos,  ov,  desperately  foolish,  Eccl. 

dYpto-ir€T«tvdXiov,  and  -ircT€i.vov,  to,  the  hoopoe,  Ducang.  Gl. 

dYpto-Trf|Yavov»  T(^'  wild  rue,  Hesych. 

dYpto-injYOS,  o,  (iTTjyvvfAi)  —  dfia£ovpyos,  dypiwv  £v\cav  kpydrrfi,  Schol. 
Ar.  Eq.  462. 

aYpid-irvoos,  ovf  contr.  -irvous,   ovv,  fiercely  blowing,  Manass.  Chron. 

4;83, 3776. 

dypLo-TTOLeu),  to  make  wild,  Schol.  Aesch.  Pers.  613. 

dYpto-irot6s,  ov,  drawing  wild  characters,  writing  wild  poetry,  as  epith. 
of  Aeschylus  in  Ar.  Ran.  837. 

uYpi-opLYdvos,  o,  wild  upiyavos,  Diosc.  3.  34. 

uYpt-6pvL$€S,  ojv,  at,  wildfowl,  Byz. 

dYpios,  a.  ov*  Od.  9.  119;  also  os,  ov,  II.  19.  88,  Plat.  Legg.  824  A: 
Comp.  -drrfpos  Thuc.  6.  60;  Sup.  -wtcztos  Plat.  Rep.  564  A  ;  (d-ypos) : 
living  in  the  fields,  wild,  savage,  Lat.  agrestis :    hence  I.  of 

animals,  opp.  to  rtBaoot  or  jjftfpos,  wild,  savage,  fidkKetv  dypta  iravra 
wild  animals  of  all  kinds,  II.  5.  $2  ;  di£,  ovs  3.  24.,  9.  539  ;  'imrot,  ovot, 
etc.,  Hdt.  7.  86,  etc.;  of  men,  living  in  a  wild  state,  Id.  4.  191  ;  of  a 
countryman,  as  opp.  to  a  citizen,  Mosch.  5.  15.  2.  of  trees,  opp.  to 

ijfxcpos,  wild,  Pind.  Fr.  21,  Hdt.  4.  21,  etc.;  firrrpus  ilypias  diro  ttotov 
made  from  the  wild  vine,  Aesch.  Pers.  614,  cf.  Arist.  Probl.  20.  12,  4; 
dyp.  tkatov  Soph.  Tr.  1 197  ;  vkrj  Id.  O.  T.  476,  etc.  3.  of  coun- 

tries, wild,  uncultivated,  Lat.  horridus,  Plat.  Phaedo  113  B,  Legg.  905 
B  : — but,  II.  mostly  of  men,  beasts,  etc.,  as  having  qualities 

incident  to   a  wild  state :  1.  in  moral  sense,  savage,  fierce,  Lat. 

ferus,  ferox,  U.  8.  96,  Od.  I.  199,  etc.,  cf.  Ar.  Nub.  349,  567,  Aeschin. 
8.  10;  rvpavvos,  dfo-rruTT)?  Plat.  Gorg.  510  B,  Rep.  329  C;  dyptt  irat 
leal  oTvyvi  Theocr.  23.  19,  cf.  2.  54  ;  dyp.  kv&(vtt]s  a  passionate  gambler, 
Menand.  Incert.  335.  2.  of  passion,  temper,  disposition,  wild,  savage, 

fierce,  coarse,  boorish,  Bvftos,  x^*-0^  I'-  9-  629.,  4.  23  ;  Ktoov  8  w$,  dypta 
otofv  24.  41  ;  dyp.  Trrokfftos,  ^aiXos  17.  737,  398  ;  dyptos  drrj  19.  88  ; 
dyp.  oboi  savage  ways  or  counsels.  Soph.  Ant.  1274;  vpyh  O.  T.  344; 
uyptwTaTa  ijOea  Hdt.  4.106;  tparr€s  Plat.  Phaedo  81  A;  tptkia  Id. 
Legg.  837  B,  cf.  Rep.  572  B,  etc.: — to  dyptov  savageness,  Id.  Crat. 
394  E  ;  is  to  aypiurrepov  to  harsher  measures,  Thuc.  6.  60.  3.  of 

things,  circumstances,  etc.,  cruel,  harsh,  Offffxd  Aesch.  Pr.  1 76 ;  Ttpas 
Eur.  Hipp.  1 214;  vv£  dyptorrtp-q  wild,  stormy,  Hdt.  8.  13  ;  hovXtia, 
b"ovkajo*is  Plat.  Rep.  564  A,  al.;  £vo-Taot$  dyp.  a  violent  strain,  Id. 
Phil.  46  D  ;  dyp.  fidpos,  of  strong,  hot  wine,  Ar.  Fr.  130.  b.  dyp.  vuoos, 
prob.,  like  TcB-qptoifxivos,  in  the  Medic,  sense,  malignant,  cancerous. 
Soph.  Ph.  173,  265  ;  dyp.  «A.kos-  Bion  1.  16;  v.  dyptaivat,  dyptooi,  and 
cf.   Cels.  5.    28,  16.  III.   Adv.  -iws,   savagely,   Aesch.    Eum. 

972,  Ar.  Vesp.  705  :  also  dypta  as  neut.  pi.,  Hes.  Sc.  236,  Mosch. 
I.  II.  [The  first  syll.  is  always  used  long  by  Horn.;  Aesch.  and  Soph, 
have  it  long  in  iambics,  but  short  in  lyr.;  Eur.  long  or  short  indif- 
ferently:— Horn,  has  r,  when  the  ult.  is  long,  II.  22.  313.] 

aYpt-o-o-tXlvov,  to,  wild  parsley,  Diosc.  3.  78. 

dYpio-a-Tu<t>is,  ifios,  i),  wild  grapes,  Orneosoph.,  etc. ;  so  in  Gramm., 
dYpto-o-ra4>vXT|,  -o-Ta<|>vXtvov,  -o-Ta^uXis. 

aYpto-o-vK-f),  i),  the  wildfig,  Horapoll. ;  -ctvkiov,  to,  the  fruit,  A.  B.  1097. 

dYpvoTns,  tjtos,  i/,  savageness,  wildness,  of  animals,  opp.  to  rffitporns, 
Xen.  Mem.  2.  2,  7,  Isocr.  267  B;  and  plants,  Theophr.  H.  P.  3.  2,  4; 
of  untitled  ground,  dyp.  yfjs  Geop.  7.  1  : — of  diet,  Hipp.  Vet.  Med.  13, 
Aer.  294.  II.  of  men,  in  moral  sense,  savageness,  fierceness,  cruelty, 

Plat.  Symp.  197  D,  al.,  Arist.  H.  A.  8.  1,  2 ;  in  pi.,  Dem.  808.  15. 

dYpLo~4>dY0t,  01,  men  who  eat  raw  food,  Salmas.  Solin.  214  F. 

dYpi6-4>a.Ypos,  o,  the  wild  <pdypos,  Opp.  H.  1.  140. 

aYpio-<j>avfi$,  is,  appearing  wild,  Cornut.  27, 


ay  pi6(p6a\fxo$  —    ayvtdrtj^. 


uypi.-64>0aA|AOs.  ov,  with  wild  eyes,  Vit.  Nil!  Jun. 
u.Ypto<f>puv,  ovos,  o,  %,  (<Pp^v)  savage  of  mind,  Eccl. 
d-ypto-^vXXov,  to,  a  name  for  the  irtvKtOavos,  Dtosc.  3.  92. 
dYpi.6-<f>wvos,  ov,  with  wild  rough  voice  or  tongue,  like  0ap@ap6il>ojvos, 

Od.  8.  294. 

aYpio-XTlv^P^ov-  Tt>>  'A«  ti'/Vrf  goose,  Byz. 

dypto-xotpos.  o,  a  t«7rf  swine,  Ar.  PI.  304. 

aYpt-oi^upia.  1),  (if/wpa)  inveterate  itch,  Hesych. 

aYpidw.  aor.  -frypiwaa  Eur.  Or.  616,  the  act.  tenses  being  mostly  sup- 
plied by  ayptaivai :  (ayptos).  To  make  wild  or  savage,  provoke,  r)  ry 
Tt kovct}  <j    ■jjypiajffe   against  thy  mother,  Eur.  1.  c.  II.  mostly 

in  Pass.  (c{.  dypiaivcu),  uypwvuat  Hipp.  Aer.  282  :  impf.  rjypiovpirjv 
Eur.  El.  103 1  :  aor.  TJyptwOTjv  Plut.,  (dir-)  Plat.  Polit.  274  B  :  pf.  ijypitu- 
fiai  Soph.,  Eur.,  Xen. : — to  grow  wild,  and  in  pf.  to  be  wild,  properly 
of  plants,  countries,  etc.,  vrjoos  vAt/  rrypiarrai  Theophr.  C.  P.  5.  3,  6 ; 
of  men,  to  be  wild  or  savage  in  appearance,  w;  i/ypttuaat  Sid  fiatcpas 
dAova/as  Eur.  Or.  226,  cf.  387.  2.  in  moral  sense,  of  men,  to  be 

savage, fierce,  cruel,  r'/ypioxxat  Soph.  Ph.  1321,  cf.  Eur.  El.  I.e.,  etc.: — 
yKwatra  .  .  fryp'iaxrai,  of  Aeschylus,  Ar.  Ran.  898  ;  metaph.,  yypiaifxtvov 
wtkayos  an  angry  sea,   Plut.   Pyrin.  15.  3.  t\K(a  uyptovrcu    (cf. 

aypws  II.  4)  Hipp.  I.  c. 

a-Ypiirrros,  6,  Lac  on.  name  for  the  wild  olive,  Suid.,  etc. ;  proverb., 
aKapTToTtpos  dypiwirov  Zenob.  Cent.  1.  60: — in  Hesych.  dypn^os. 

dYpiTrjs,  ov,  o,  a  countryman,  Steph.  Byz.  s.  v.  dypos. 

o.ypi^i\  [t],  </),  a  harrow,  rake,  Arcad.  1 15,  E.  M.  1 5.  44,  Hesych.  The 
Doric  dypt<pav  is  restored  by  Dind.  for  dyptfyvav  in  Anth.  P.  6.  297. 

d-ypuoS-rjs.  «s,  ((lHos)  of  wild  nature,  Strabo  155. 

'Aypiwvios,  o,  epith.  of  Bacchus,  transferred  to  Antony,  Plut.  Anton.  24 : 
—  A"ypui>vui,  rd.  a  festival  in  honour  of  Bacchus,  Id.  2.  291  A.  299F,etc. 

aYpi-urrrds,  6v,  wild-looking,  ofiua,  Eur.  H.  F.  990,  cf.  Bacch.  541  ;  to 
ay ptojwuv  tov  wpoaanrov  Plut.  Mar.  14. 

dYpo-pd-rrjs.  ov,  6,  haunting  the  country,  v.  1.  in  Eur.  for  dypo&oTTjs. 

aYpo-pdas,  6,  rudely  shouting,  Cratin.  Incert.  36. 

uYpo-poTTjs,  ov,  Dor.  -as,  a,  o,  feeding  in  the  field,  dwelling  in  the 
cuntry,  like  aypovoftos,  Soph.  Ph.  214  (lyr.),  Eur.  Cycl.  54  (lyr.). 

aypo-ytlrav,  ovos,  0,  a  country  neighbour,  Plut.  Cato  Ma.  25  ;  dyp. 
IMS  having  afield  adjoining  his,  Joseph.  A.  J.  8.  13,  8. 

dypo-ytvvp.  «s,  country-born.  Gloss. 

dYpo-SioiTOS,  ov,  living  in  the  country,  Synes.  27  B. 

dYpo66n)s,  ov,  o,  (diYpa)  a  giver  of  booty,  game,  etc.,  Anth.  P.  6.  27. 

aYpdOtv,  Adv.  from  the  country,  Od.  13.  268.,  15.  428,  Eur.,  etc. 

dypdft.  Adv.  in  the  country.  Call.  Cer.  136,  Poll.  9.  12. 

dYpOMccvouai,  Dep.  to  be  dypoucos,  E.  M. 

dYpoucTjpos.  d,  of,  boorish,  dyp.  <pvots  ap.  Steph.  Byz.  s.  v.  dypui. 

dYpoiKia.  jf,  rusticity,  boorishness,  coarseness.  Plat.  Gorg.  46 1  C,  Rep. 
560  D,  al.  ;  cf.  Arist.  Eth.  N.  2.  7,  13.  II.  tke  country,  Lat.  rta, 

Plut.  2.  519  A;  pi.,  lb.  311  B.        III.  in  pi.  country-houses,  Diod.  20.8. 

dYpotKi£ou4u,  Dep.  to  be  rude  and  boorish.  Plat.  Theact.  I46  A,  Plut. 
Sull.  6:  aor.  yypotKtcdpirjv  Aristid.  I.  491 :  pf.,  •irypotKio-fitvos  Synes. 

dYpouciKos,  Tf,  ov,  boorish,  Ath.  477  A.     Adv.  -kws,  Philostr.  198,  etc. 

dYpoiKo-Trvppuvciot,  v,  a  rude,  coarse  Pyrrhonlst,  Galen. 

aYp-oiKos,  ov,  of  ox  in  the  country,  dyp.  fiiot  Ar.  Nub.  43,  etc.  2. 

Op.  of  men,  dwelling  in  the  country,  a  countryman,  rustic,  lb.  47: — 
mostly  with  the  collat.  sense  of  clownish,  boorish,  rude,  rough,  coarse, 
lb.  628,  646,  etc.  ;  fiiXos  dypoiKortpov  Id.  Ach.  674  ;  dyp.  ootpia,  Lat. 
crassa  Minerva,  Plat.  Phaedr.  229  E,  cf.  Isocr.  98  D,  Arist.  Eth.  N.  7.  9, 
fortune,  Apollod.  Car.  Tpafif*.  5,  14  : — the  character  of  the  a-ypo*- 
*ov  is  described  by  Theophr.  Char.  4  ;  Dinarchus  is  called  o  ayp.  Arjfio- 
o~$fvrjs  by  Dion.  H.  de  Din.  8.  II.  Adv.  -ttws,  Ar.  Vcsp.  1320; 

Camp,  -oWpa/9,  Plat.  Rep.  361  E,  Xen.  Mem.  3.  13, 1 J  but  -ortpov.  Plat. 
Phaedr.  260  D.  2.  of  fruits,  grown  in  the  country,  common,  opp. 

SO  ytwaiot.   Plat.   Legg.  844  D,  845  B.  3.  of  land,  rough,  uncul- 

tivated, like  dyptos  1.  3,  opos  Thuc.  3.  106. — (Not  found  in  good  Ep. 
or  in  Trag.) 

dyponco-crcx^os,  or,  coarsely  wise,  with  rude  mother-wit,  Lat.  abnormis 
sapiens,  Philo  1.  448. 

dYpoiKk>&T)S,  «s,  ufclriwui-h  kind,  rude,  Schol.  II.  23. 474,  Mus.  Vett.  p.  67. 

dYpoiwrns,  ov,  o,  —  dyporns  I,  Horn.,  who  always  uses  nom.  pi.,  drepes 
dypoiUrrai  II.  1 1.  549;  pouicoKot  dyp.  Od.  II.  293  ;  Aaot  dyp.  II.  11.676; 
without  a  Subst.,  vqwiot  dyp.  Od.  2 1.  85  ;  $o,  voifiivas  dypotdrras  Hes. 
Sc.  39 ;  sing,  in  Ar.  Thesni.  58  :  fern.  dYpouins,  j),  Sapph.  70.  II. 

as  Adj.  rustic.  Anth.  P.  6.  22.,  7.  41 1  :  wild,  Numen.  ap.  Ath.  371  C. 

dYpOHcrpTtov,  to,  afield  kept  like  a  garden,  Strabo  545. 

dypo-Kop.os.  o,  a  Utnd-steward,  Joseph.  A.  J.  5.  9,  2. 

aYp-o\«T«ipa.  ^,  a  waster  of  land,  Hesych. ;  rfApTf/m  dyp.  ap.  Suid. 

uYpo-p.«vT|s,  «,  dwelling  in  the  country,  Hesych. 

dYpop.*vo5,  syncop.  part.  aor.  pass,  of  dyupaj. 

dYpovSc,  Adv.  (d7poj)  to  the  country,  Od.  15.  370:  cf.  aypa^t. 

dypovo^ios  or  v 6(1  os,  ov,  (vtfiopat)  haunting  the  country,  rural,  wild, 
'Nvfupou  Od.  6.  106  ;  $rjp4S  Aesch.  Ag.  I42  (lyr.)  ;  of  a  song,  dyp.  fiovaa, 
Virgil's  agrcstis  musa,  Anth.  P.  7.  196  (Cod.  Pal.  dypovopav).  2. 

of  places,  tXdtcts,  av\ai  Soph.  O.  T.  1103,  Ant.  785  (both  lyr.)  ;  V\rj 
Opp.  H.  1.  27.  II.  as  Subst.,  dypov6p.ov  6,  (vi^ioj)  a  magistrate 

at  Athens,  overseer  of  the  public  lands,  freq.  in  Plat.  Legg.,  e.  g.  760  B  ; 
cf.  Arist.  Pol.  6.  8,  6  ;  v.  sub  vAarpor. 

oyoo\,  o9,  o,  a  field,  mostly  in  pi.  fields,  lands,  II.  23.  832,  Od. 
4-  797*  Pi«d.  I*-  4.  265,  Plat.,  etc.:  in  sing,  a  farm,  an  estate,  Od. 
24.  205.  2.  the  country,   opp.  to  the  town,  Od.  17.  182,  al.; 

dyp'jv  rdv  tr6\tv  wotttt  Epich.  162,  cf.  Eur.  Supp.  884  ;  dypai  in  the 
country,  Od.  II.  188  ;    lir   dypov  in   the  country,   1.  lyo.,    22.  47;    iir 


15 

aypov  vvafit  noXrjos   I.  185  ;    in  pi.,  Kara  tttuKiv  i)i  tear  u^povs   iy. 

18  ;  iv  oikuis  A  'v  u-ypois  Soph.  O.  T.  112  ;  in  uypwv  lb.  1049;    a-ypoiai 

Id.  El.  313  ;  tov  e(  dypwv  Id.  O.  T.  1051  ;  so,  ra  i£  aypaitr  Thuc.  2.  13, 
cf.  14;  xar'  aypovs  Cratin.  Incert.  178,  Plat.  Legg.  881  C;  oixttv  iv 
aypw  Ar.  Fr.  344.  2  ;  to  iv  dypw  yiyvopiva,  fruits,  Xen.  Mem.  2.  9, 
4,  cf.  An.  5.  3,  9  : — proverb.,  oiSty  i(  uypov  Xiyfis,  dypov  n\tws,  i.  e. 
boorish  (cf.  aypotxos),  Suid.,  Hesych.  (With  ^ATV,  whence  also 

ayptos,  etc.,  cf.  Skt.  agras  (aeqitor),  Lat.  ager,  Goth,  akrs,  O.  Norse  altr, 
A.  S.  acer,  Engl,  acre.)  [&  by  nature,  but  often  used  long,  except  in 
Com.,  who  always  have  it  short,  except  Ar.  Av.  579,  Philem.  Incert.  21  ; 
dypuBtv  in  Alcae.  Ka>/*$>o.  1  is  a  parody  on  Eur.] 

crypoTfpos,  a,  ov,  poet,  for  dypws,  in  Horn,  always  of  wild  animals, 
J)/uovoi,  <riits,  iKaipot,  aly<s  ;  so  Hes.  and  Pind. ;  also,  dyportpot  or  -pa, 
alone,  Theocr.  8.  58.  2.  of  countrymen,   Anth.  P.  9.  244,  Plan. 

235.  3.  of  plants,  wild,  Anth.  P.  9.  384,  cf.  Coluth.  108.  II. 

(ay pa)  fond  0/ the  chase,  huntress,  of  the  nymph  Cyrene  (cf.  £7^1^175), 
Pind.  P.  9.  10;  metaph.,  jiipipaia  dyp.  Id.  O.  2.  100.  2.  as  prop.  11. 

'Ayporipa,  Artemis  tke  huntress,  like  'Aypaia  (cf.  dypfvs,  dyptvT-qs),  II. 
21.  471  (vers,  dub.),  Xen.  Cyn.  6,  13;  worshipped  at  Sparta,  Id.  HelL 
4.2,  20;  in  other  places,  C.  1.2117,5173,  Paus.  1. 19,6, al.;  Stol  dyportpoi 
lnscr.  in  Hell.  J.  10.  p.  55  ;  cf.  Iuterpp.  ad  Ar.  Eq.  660,  and  v.  sub  x'Va'P"- 

dYpoTT|p  [a],  ijpos,  u,  =  dyp6ri]s,  Eur.  El.  463  (lyr.)  : — fern.  dypoTcipa, 
as  Adj.,  rustic,  lb.  168  (lyr.). 

dYpoTr|S,  ov,  o,  (drypos)  pot'-t.  word,  a  country-man,  rustic,  dyp.  dvi]p 
Eur.  Or.  1 2  70;  ndpotvos  dyp.,  of  something  out  of  place,  Anth.  P. 
append.  311.  II.  (dypa)  =^dyptvrrjs,  a  hunter,  oltuvoi  .  . ,  oloi 

rt  Ttfcva  uypdrat  i£ti\ovTo  Od.  16.  218  ;  a-ypoVa  Hdv,  to  whom  Siierva 
dw'  dyp(o-t7)s  are  offered,  Anth.  P.  6.  13  : — in  fern,  form,  vv/upr]  aYpons, 
the  same  as  dypoptva  in  Pind.,  Ap.  Rh.  2.  509 ;  d-yp.  xovpa,  i.  e.  Artemis, 
Anth.  P.  6.  1 1 1  ;  dyp.  aiyaveri  lb.  57  : — in  Od.  1.  c,  etc.,  some  retain  the 
sense  of  countryman ;  but  Apollon.  Lex.  and  Hesych.  interpret  it  by 
9-qptvrai ;  and  this  usage  in  the  later  Poets  cited  seems  unquestion- 
able. III.  for  Aesch.  Pets.  1002,  v.  dypirris. 

dypoTiKos.  17,  ov,  rustic,  Eust.  Opusc.  261.  24,  etc.  II.  fond 

of  the  chase,  Tzetz.  ad  Lye.  400,  ubi  Mss.  dyptvrai. 

d-Ypo-<pvAo£  [0],  0,  a  watcher  of  the  country,  Anth.  Plan.  243. 

uypvKTOS,  ov,  (a  privat.,  ypv)  not  to  be  spoken  of,  aypvxra  vaBtiv 
Pherecr.  Incert.  20  . — hence  dypv£ia,  1),  dead  silence,  Pind.  Fr.  253. 

dypvirv«<i),  to  be  aypinrvos,  lie  awale,  be  wakeful,  Theogn.  471,  Hipp. 
Progn.  37,  Plat.,  al.  ;  opp.  to  Ka0tvS<u,  Xen.  Cyr.  8.  3,  42  ;  dypwvttv 
rqv  vu/CTa  to  pass  a  sleepless  night,  Id.  Hell.  7.  2, 19,  Menand.  At;/*,  i,  cf. 
Incert.  40  : — to  suffer  from  sleepless/uss,  Diosc.  4.  65.  2.  metaph. 

to  be  watchful,  Lxx  (Sap.  6.  15),  Ev.  Marc.  13.  33,  Ep.  Eph.  6.  18. 

dYpuim]T«ov,  verb.  Adj.  one  must  watch,  Eust.  168.  16. 

dypvirv-ryrTip,  ijpos-,  d,  a  watcher,  Manetho  I.  81  ;  in  Gl.,  dypvirvrrr-qs. 

d-ypVTrv-riTiKds,  17,  oV,  wakeful,  Diod.  Excerpt.  32,  Plut.  Cam.  27. 

ttYpvirvta,  Ion.  -11).  *}.  sleeplessness,  waking,  watching,  Hipp.  Aph. 
1244,  al..  Plat.  Crito  43  B  ;  also  in  pi.,  uyptnrviriaiv  efx«T0  Hdt.  3.  129, 
cf.  Ar.  Lys.  27.  II.  a  time  of  watching,  Pseudo-Plat.  Ax.  368  B. 

[1  in  Opp.  Cyn.  3.  J 1 1.] 

dYp-virvos,  ov,  (dyptai)  seeking  after  sleep,  sleepless,  wakeful,  watchful, 
Hipp.  Epid.  1.  954,  Plat.  Rep.  404  A,  Arist.  Pol.  5.  II,  24:  metaph., 
Zrjvi/s  dyp.  fiiXof  Aesch.  Pr.  358  ;  yivvts  Anth.  P.  7.  278  : — to  dypvirvov 
=  dypvwvia.  Plat.  Rep.  460  D  : — Adv.  -van,  C.  I.  4717.  23.  II. 

act.  banishing  sleep,  keeping  awake,  vvi/afts  Arist.  Probl.  1.8.  7,4;  p-tpipvat 
Anth.  Plan.  21 1,    [aymhrvos  Eur.  Rhes.  2  (lyr.),a7p5irvoi  Theocr.  24. 104.] 

dYpvirvwoi)*,  es,  («(2os)  making  sleepless,  Hipp.  68  A. 

dypwo-o-u).  F'p.  for  dyptvw,  only  used  in  pres.,  to  catch,  dypuaaoiv  lx6i>s 
Od.  j.  53  ;  often  in  Opp.,  H.  3.  339,  543,  etc.  ;  so  Call.  Ap.  60,  Lye, 
etc. : — absol.  to  go  hunting,  Opp.  C.  1 .  129 : — Pass,  to  be  caught,  Opp. 
H.  3.  415..  4.  565. 

dypiuo-T-ns.  ov,  i,  «=  tlYpoTTjf ,  subst.  and  adj.,  Lat.  agrestis.  Soph.  Fr. 
S3.  Eur.  H.  F.  377,  Rhes.  266  ;  whence  Meineke  reads  dypotarwv  ytpa- 
pdfraTos  in  Theocr.  25.  48.  II.  a  hunter,  (dypioi)  Ap.  Rh.  4. 

1 75  :  (em.  dYpuams,  180s,  as  epith.  of  a  hound,  Simon.  130  (e  conj. 
Schneid.  for  dypuaaa,  cf.  A.  B.  213,  332,  where  dypwarai  are  expl.  by 
KWijyirai).  2.  a  kind  of  spider,  Nic.  Th.  734. 

uYpuKTTivos.  Syracus.  for  dypotKos,  name  of  a  play  by  Epich. ;  dypat- 
arivat '  vvfitpat  vpttoi,  Hesych. 

u.ypia<mt,  ibos  Theophr.  H.  P.  I.  6,  10,  and  «vs,  >},  a  grass  that  mules 
fed  on,  dyp,  pxkirfirfs,  Od.  6.  90;  ti\irfv^s  dyp.  Theocr.  13.  42  : — it  is 
triticum  repens,  ace.  to  Interpp.  ad  Theophr.  H.  P.  I.  6,  7,  etc.  II. 

for  dypuoTis,  v.  sub  dypwoTrp  II. 

dYpuxrrwp,  opoy,  0,  =  aYpd«TTi;s,  Nic.  Al.  473. 
aYpwrrip,  d,  fern.  aYpun-fipa,  =d7pdTi;s,  Steph.  Byz.  s.  v.  dypos. 
uYpdn-ns.  ov,  o,  =  dypvrijs,  v.  1.  for  dporptvs  in  Theocr.  25.  51.  2. 

as  Adj.  of  the  field,  wild,  0ypti  Eur.  Bacch.  562  (lyr.)  :  rustic,  0ovk6\oi, 
Anth.  P.  6.  37. 

dY»td.  1),  a  street,  highway,  II.  5.  642,  Od.  2.  388,  etc. ;  ^7.  arivri 
Xen.  Cyr.  2.  4,  3: — mostly  in  pl„  o-kioWto  Si  iraaai  dyvtai,  in  describing 
the  passage  of  Telemachus  from  city  to  city,  Od.  3.  487,  cf.  15. 185;  and 
even  of  a  passage  over  sea,  II.  12;  dyviatat  in  the  streets,  Epigr.  Horn. 
15.  g;  so  in  Pind.  P.  2.  107,  Soph.  O.  C.  715,  Ant.  1 136,  Eur.  Bacch.  87 
(all  lyr.),  Ar. ;  rare  in  Prose,  Xen.  Cyr.  2.  4,  3.  2.  a  collection  of 

streets,  a  city,  Pind.  O.  9.  52,  N.  7.  136 ;  jroXi/m/pos  07.  Epigr.  Gr.  1028. 
2,v.  sub  tvpvxopos,  xviadoi.   (A  quasi-participial  form  from  ayai,  cf.  apm/ta, 
ipyvia.)      \&yvia,  except  in  II.  20.  254,  where  it  is  written  proparox. 
071118:  on  this,  v.  Roche  Horn.  Text-kritik,  p.  177  sq.] 
dYVtaios,  a,  ov,  of  streets  or  highways,  777  Soph.  Fr.  211. 
dYUtdTT(t,  ov,  i,  =  'Ayvi(vt,  Aesch.  Ag.  1081,  in  voc.  'A7waTa. 


16 


uyuMTis 


dywdns,  tbos,  r),  fem.  from  foreg.,  like  Ktvfirjrts,  a  neighbour,  Pind.  P. 
II.  J.  II.  as  Adj.,  dyvtartbts  Ofpamtat  the  worship  of  Apollo 

Agyieus,  Eur.  Ion  1 86  (lyr.). 

'Ayvteiis,  iats,  u,  a  name  of  Apollo,  as  guardian  of  the  streets  and 
highways,  Eur.  Phocn.  631,  ap.  Dem.  531.  9,  fawn  Att.  in  C.  I. 
4M4  5.  2.  a  pointed  pillar,  set  up  as  his  statue  or  altar  at  the 

street  door,  Ar.  Vesp.  875,  v.  Miiller  Dor.  2.  6,  5  ;  similarly,  'Ayvtevs 
tiaifios  in  Soph.  Fr.  340 : — cf.  Kviaato. 

dyvtairXacrTiw,  {vXaaaw)  to  build  in  streets  or  rows.  Lye.  601. 

d-yvvos,  ov,  without  limbs,  weak  in  limb,  Hipp.  600.  49. 

d-yvp.v&cria,  7),  want  of  exercise  or  training,  Ar.  Ran.  1088,  Arist.  Eth. 
N.  3.  5,  15. 

dyvjivao-TOS,  ov,  (yvfivafa)  unexercised,  untrained,  Virirot  Xen.  Cyr.  8. 
1.  38,  cf.  Arist.  Probl.  8.  10;    a*y.  t#  <rd/ftan  Plut.  Arat.  47.  2. 

unpractised,  twos  in  a  thing,  Eur.  Bacch.  491,  Xen.  Cyr.  1.  6,  29,  Plat., 
etc. ;  also  cfc  or  wpus  Tt  Plat.  Legg.  731  A,  816  A  ;  irtpt  rt  Plut.  2. 
802  D.  3.  unharassed,  Soph.  Tr.  1083  ;  ovo3  dyvpvaffTov  rrXdvots 

Eur.  Hel.  533  ;  ovk  dyvjivaoros  vvvots  <ppivas  Id.  Fr.  335.  II. 

Adv.,  ayvfivcurran  *X(iV  VP^  Tt  Xen.  Mem.  2.  1,  6. 

dyvvai|,  6,  (yvt^rj)  wifeless,  Soph.  Fr.  5  :  another  nom.  dyuvaiKos  oc- 
curs in  Phryn.  Com.  Mov.  13  ;  dywaios  in  Dio  C,  Porphyr.  Abst.  4.  17, 
Manetho  1. 173;  dyvvrjs  in  Poll.  3.  48  ;  dywos  in  Ar.  Fr.  571. 

d-yCpis  [#],  tos,  J),  Aeol.  form  of  dyopd,  a  gathering,  crowd,  dvopwv 
ayvptv  Od.  3.  31  ;  lv  vckvojv  dyvptt  II.  16.  661  ;  iv  vrjwv  07.  24.  141  ; 
also  in  Eur.  I.  A.  753  (lyr.).  (Hence  ojirjyvpts,  Travrjyvpts;  cf.  dyvprrjs,  etc.) 

dyvppA,  aros,  to,  anything  collected,  A.  B.  327. 

dyvpu,6s.  6,  =  dyvpis,  Babr.  102.  5,  A.  B.  331:  cf.  avvayvpptos,  and 
v.  sub  dytpfws. 

d-yvpTafw,  (dyvprrjs)  to  collect  by  begging,  xpVPiara  Od.  *9-  284. 

dyvpTeta,  r),  begging ;  and  dyupT«ij*i>,  to  be  an  dyvprrjs,  Suid. 

dyupT€VTT|S,  ov,  6,  =  dyvprrjs,  Tzetz. 

dytjpTT|p,  rjpos,  6,  =  sq.,  Manetho  4.  218. 

dyilprns,  ov,  6,  (dytiptu)  properly  a  collector,  esp.  a  begging  priest  of 
Cybele,  Mrjrpjs  dy.  (cf.  ixrjTpayvprrjs)  Anth.  P.  6.  218;  rdXAoiS-  dy. 
Babr.  2  : — then,  2.  as  the  character  of  these  persons  was  bad,  a 

beggar,  vagabond,  impostor,  juggler,  Eur.  Rhes.  503,  715.  cf.  Lysipp. 
Bd*x«  6;  applied  to  Teiresias  in  Soph.  O.  T.  388  ;  associated  with  jidv- 
T€is  generally,  Plat.  Rep.  364  B.  II.  a  throw  of  the  dice,  Eubul. 

Kv&.  2. — On  the  accent,  v.  E.  M.  436.  3. 

dyvpnicos,  rj,  ov,  Jit  for  an  ayvprrjs,  vagabond,  dy.  jxdvris  Plut.  Lye. 
9  '  JuSSl*n&*  """'awes,  Id.  Comp.  Aristid.  c.  Cat.  3 ;  to  dy.  yivos  Id.  2. 
407  C  :  tu  ay.  as  Subst,  jugglery,  Strabo  474.     Adv.  -kws,  Hierocl. 

dyvpTts,  /So?,  fem.  of  ayvprrjs,  Tzetz. 

d-yupTos,  17,  ov,  verb.  Adj.  of  dydpco,  got  by  begging,  Hesych. 

dyiiprpia,  1^,  fem.  of  dyvprrjp,  Aesch.  Ag.  1 273  ;  cf.  dyvprrjs. 

dyvpTwS-ns,  *?.  (ftbos)  like  an  ayvprrjs,  Eccl. 

dyx~,  poet,  abbrev.  for  dvax~  in  compds.  of  dvd  with  words  beginning 
with  x- 

dyxd£«,  poet,  for  dvaxd^ofxat,  to  retire,  Soph.  Fr.  800. 

dyx-aupos,  ov,  near  the  morning,  dyx.  vvfc  the  end  of  night,  Ap.  Rh. 
4. 1 1 1,    {-avpos  seems  to  be  connected  with  avptov,  Aur-ora,  v.  sub  ijws.) 

dyxe-p-dxos,  °v,  fighting  hand  to  hand,  II.  13.  5,  Hes.  Sc.  25  ;  rd  dyx- 
airXa  tcaXovjitva  arms  for  close  fight,  Xen.  Cyr.  I.  2,  13  ;  rtvx^tv  <*7X- 
Anth.  Plan.  173.  Adv.  -x<vs,  ap.  Lob.  Phryn.  685.  .  (With  017x1,  &yx*~ 
ftaxos,  cf.  u\pi,  tnpi-fiaBrjs,  etc.) 

dyx«-irdXos,  ov,  at  close  quarters,  Or.  Sib.  IO  (12).  IOO  ;  cf.  &7X*VaXoy- 

dyx-^pTjs,  ts,  close-fitted,  neighbouring,  near,  Soph.  Fr.  6,  Orph.  Arg.  108 1 . 

dyxTjorivos,  v.  1.  for  dyxtcr-. 

**7X^t  *=  «77»Js,  poet.  Adv.  of  Place,  near,  nigh,  close  by,  II.  5.  185,  Od. 
3.  449,  etc. : — oft.  c.  gen.,  which  precedes,  "Etcropos  dyx^  U.  8.  117, 
cf.  Od.  4.  37°  I  but  sometimes  follows,  017x1  vtwv  II.  10.  161,  etc.; 
Comp.  dyxtov,  dacov.  Sup.  dyx^xra  (v.  daaov,  dyx^ros) :— so  in  Trag. 
a7X(  TtXayias  dXos  Aesch.  Pers.  467  ;  dyxt  irvivjxbvwv  Id.  Cho.  639 ; 
dyxi  T^y  Soph.  O.  C.  399 : — when  dyxi  appears  to  be  used  with  dat., 
the  dat.  should  be  taken  as  dependent  on  the  Verb,  as  in  II.  ft,  570.,  6. 
405.,  11.  362.,  23.  447  ;  or  is  dat.  commodi,  20.  283.  2.  in  Od. 

19.  301  it  is  commonly  taken  of  time,  next,  soon,  but  needlessly.  II. 

like  dyxtara,  of  near  resemblance,  c.  dat.,  Pind.  N.  6.  16.  (For  the  Root, 
v.  a7xa> ;  cf.  Lat.  pressus,  squeezed  close,  close,  Ital.  presso,  French pris.) 

dyxi-uAos,  ov,  also  rj,  ov,  h.  Horn.  Ap.  32,  Andromach.  171  :  (d\s) : — 
poet,  word,  near  the  sea,  of  cities,  II.  2.  640;  of  islands,  sea-girt,  as  of 
Peparethos,  h.  Horn.  1.  c. ;  of  Lemnos,  etc.,  rds  dyxtaXovs  ..  jxtoaKrovs 
Aesch.  Pers.  887  (lyr.)  ;  of  Salamis,  Soph.  Aj.  135  (lyr.),  Anth.  P.  9.  28S  ; 
of  the  fountain  Arethusa,  o/yx.  vbara  Eur.  I.  A.  169  (lyr.),  cf.  Ap.  Rh.  2. 
160. 

dyxt-pu-&T|S,  is,  deep  to  the  very  edge  or  shore,  OaKaaoa  Od.  5.  413  ; 
cf.  Plat.  Criti.  in  A;  — so  rd'uyxt&a6TJ  deep  places,  Arist.  Probl.23.  31, 
cf.  Plut.  2.  667  C.  2.  generally,  deep,  high,  aKTai  Arist.  h/a.'  5. 

16,  8  ;  Xtfxrjv  Strabo  222,  792. 

dyxiP4T€o>,  to  stand  by,  Hesych.  II.  in  Ion.  for  dfxtlna^Tjrfco, 

Suid.,  who  quotes  dyxtpa<K7]  for  ujupKj^rjrrjais  from  Heraclit.  (Fr.  9). 

eWxi~P<*T1lS,  ov,  o,  one  that  comes  near,  Hesych. 

oYX^Y^H-05'  ov>  "ear  marriage,  Parthen.  Fr.  24,  Noun.  D.  5.  572. 

«YXl-Y"TWV.  ov*  gen-  ovos>  neighbouring,  Aesch.  Pers.  886  (lyr.). 

<tyX^-YCo*>  °".  (yvVs)  neighbouring,  Ap.  Rh.  1.  1222,  Dion.  P. 
215.  II.  near  land,  Nonn.  D.  3.  44. 

dyxt-OaXao-<ros,  Att.  -ttos,  ov,  near  the  sea,  Poll.  9.  17. 

dyxi-Ouvfjs,  4s,  near  dying,  cited  from  Nonn. 

dyxi-0«os,  ov,  near  the  gods,  i.  c.  like  them  in  happiness  and  power,  or 
living  with  them,  Od.  5.  35:  as  Subst.  a  demigod,  C.  1. 911,  Luc.  S.Dea  31. 


OYx£-8povos,  ov,  sitting  near,  Nonn.  Jo.  7.  v.  39. 

dyxidvpcu,  to  be  at  the  door,  be  close  at  hand,  Eust.  1133.  61,  Manass. 
Chron.  5227. 

dyxt-G^pos,  ov,  next  door,  yurovts  Theogn.  302,  Anth.  P.  append. 
50.  3  ;  a7X-  vaiotaa  Theocr.  2.  71.  2.  near  the  door,  of  the 

position  of  a  statue,  C.  I.  2592. 

dyxL-KtXevOos.  ov,  near  the  way,  Nonn.  D.  40.  328. 

dyxL-KpT}p.vos,  ov,  near  the  cliff's  or  coast,  AiyvTrros  Pind.  Fr,  50. 

dyxt-Xo>4'.  ojwos,  o,  a  sore  at  the  inner  corner  of  the  eye,  Galen. 

<*YXl'lJL'iX1Tri1s'  °"»  o,  =  dyxit*axos,  only  in  pi.,  II.  2.  604,  etc. 

dyxL-u-dx°s.  ov,  later  form  of  dyx^axos,  Lob.  Phryn.  685. 

dyx"-p-o\«o),  to  come  nigh,  Nonn.  D.  25.  426. 

dyxip-oXos,  ov,  (fitoXtiv)  coming  near ;  Ep.  word,  mostly  used  in  neut. 
as  Adv.  near,  close  at  hand,  dyxipoXov  5*  oi  ?jX$t  II.  4.  529,  cf.  Od.  8. 
300,  etc.,  Hes.  Sc.  325  ;  *£  dyxty-oXoio  i<ppdaaro  he  perceived  from  nigh 
at  hand,  II.  24.  352  ;  dyxiri0^ov  °^  M€T'  avrov  close  behind  him,  Od. 
17.  336  (where  it  need  not  be  taken  of  time),  c.  gen.  e$ev  dyxipoKot 
Theocr.  25.  203  ;  in  Hes.  Sc.  325  the  dat.  prob.  belongs  to  the  Verb,  v. 
a7x*  I-     A  form  dyxipXws  {fiXwoita))  is  found  in  E.  M. 

dyx4*-os,  oyt  (ayxt)  —ir*<Va''0S  ^ur-  Fr.  859. 

°,YXl"V€<t>'Hs'  *'?'  near  the  clouds,  GKorrtXos  Anth.  P.  6.  219,  14,  Nonn. 

dyxivoia,  fj,  {voiat)  readiness  of  mind,  ready  wit,  sagacity,  shrewdness. 
Plat.  Charm.  160  A,  Arist.  Eth.  N.  6.  9,  3,  Rhet.  1.  6,  15  : — as  a  title,  tt? 
arj  dyxtw'o^Eus.  H.E.  9.  I,  5. 

dyxt-voos,  ov,  contr.  -vovs,  ovv,  ready  of  wit,  sagacious,  shrewd,  Od. 
13.  332,  Plat.  Legg.  747  ^>  etc* »  vp^  ^d  avfi&aivovra  Arist.  H.  A.  7. 
IO,  I  : — Comp.  and  Sup.,  Sext.  Emp.  P.  2.  41,  42  : — Adv.  dyxivtus,  Arist. 
Virt.  et  Vit.  4,  1. 

dyxt-TrXoos,  ov,  contr.  -irAovs,  ovv,  near  by  sea,  dyx.  trvpos  a  short 
voyage,  Eur.  I.  T.  1325. 

dyxi-iropos,  ov,  passing  near,  always  near,  KuXaxts  Anth.  P.  10.  64  ; 
c.  gen.,  Nonn.  Jo.  4.  47.,  6.  9. 

cVYXt"'n"0'us»  0,  7),  -now,  to,  near  with  the  foot,  near,  Lye.  318. 

dyxt-iTToXis,  €iw$,  o,  r),  poet,  for  d7x<VoX(S',  near  the  city,  dwelling  hard 
by,  IlaXXds  Aesch.  Th.  501 ;  *Aprjs  Soph.  Ant.  970  (lyr.)  :   cf.  dirorrTokis. 

dyxtp-poos,  ov>  contr.  -povs,  ovv,  flowing  near,  Ap.  Rh.  2.  367. 

dyxi-o~iropos,  ov,  near  of  kin,  oi  Otwv  ay xicnopot,  oi  Zrjvos  «77Vf  Aesch. 
Fr.  155  ;  <pvo"iv  al&cpos  ovaav  dyx-  Philo  2.  374. 

dyxioT€ia,  t),  (d7xtorT€ua;)  nearness  of  kin,  r)  tov  yivovs  uyx.  Plat. 
Legg.  924  D  ;  d7X-  vitdpx*1  TIV^  nP^  Ttra  Arist.  Rhet.  2.  6,  25.  2. 

rights  of  kin,  right  of  inheritance,  Ar.  Av.  1661 ;  it port pots  rots  dppecri  ruiv 
BrjXdutv  ttJv  a7X-  ircnoirjKt  Isae.  65.  26;  vo9(p  ftrjoi  voOrj  dyx.  tlvai  Id.  61. 
6,  Lex.  ap.  Dem.  1067.  13  ;  rats  dyx-  irpurtpot  ovrts  rtvos  Isae.  68.  6. 

dyxwrreta,  rd,  =  foreg.,  yivovs  tear  dyxto'Tfta  Soph.  Ant.  174. 

dyxio*T€VS,  itus,  6,  mostly  in  pi.  dyxtonts,  the  next  of  kin,  closely 
akin,  of  nations,  Hdt.  5.  80,  3:  in  law,  the  next  of  kin,  heir-at-law, 
Lxx  (Ruth.  3  sq.),  Suid.,  etc.;  ovyyfvrjs  dyx~  Luc.  Tim.  51:  cf. 
dyxtcrrtia. 

dyxtcrrcuw,  f.  f  vo*o),  to  be  next  or  near,  77/  uyxtortvovaa  .  .  irovrqt  Eur. 
Tro.  224  (lyr.).  II.  to  be  next  of  kin,  to  be  heir-at-law,  rtvi  Isae.  84. 
28  : — metaph.,  d7x.  rtvos  to  have  to  do  with  a  thing,  Hipp.  27.  44*  2. 
in  Lxx,  d7x.  rtvd  to  do  a  kinsman's  office  to  a  woman,  i.e.  marry 
her,  Ruth.  3.  13.,  4.  4  ;  also,  KXrjpovojiiav  dyx.  to  enter  upon  . . ,  Num. 
36.  8  : — in  2  Esdr.  2.  62,  Nehem.  7.  64  ijyxiortvBrjaav  drro  rijs  Upareias 
means,  they  were  excluded  from  the  priesthood  because  their  descent  was 
not  proved.  (Signf.  I,  as  also  dyxtarrjp,  dyxiortvos  imply  nearness  only, 
so  that  a  deriv.  from  the  Sup.  ayxtoros  might  be  questioned  :  but  Lat. 
proximitas,  proximity  are  also  derived  from  a  Sup.) 

dyxto*TT|p,  rjpos,  6,  one  who  brings  near,  only  in  Soph.  Tr.  256,  ^7X- 
tov  ird$ovs  immediate  author  of  the  suffering. 

dyxifTtKOS,  17,  ov,  belonging  to  the  dyxwre'ta,  Ammon. 

dyxio-TivST|V,  Adv.  according  to  nearness  of  kin,  dyx.  ya/xetv  Poll.  6. 
175,  cf.  Solon,  ap.  Hesych. 

dyxicrTtvos,  rj,  ov,  Ep.  Adj.  (v.  a7x<orT*t;a>),  close,  crowded,  in  heaps, 
at  fj.4v  r  dyxtGrivat  ktr  uXXTjknoi  Ktxvvrat  II.  5.  I41  ;  rot  h'  dyxi- 
arivot  imirTov  vttepoi  17.  361,  cf.  Od.  22.  118  :  on  the  v.  1.  dyxno-rtvot, 
cf.  Spitzn.  ad  II.  5.  141. 

dyxto-TOS,  ov,  Sup.  of  0:7x1,  nearest :  as  Adj.  first  in  Pind.  and  Tragg. ; 
nearest  in  place,  Aesch.  Ag.  256  (lyr.),  Soph.  O.  T.  919;  yivet  dyx^aros 
warpus  nearest  of  kin,  Eur.  Tro.  48  ;  tov  dyxtcrov,  without  ytvtt. 
Soph.  El.  1 105  :  nearest  and  dearest,  Pind.  P.  9.  114.  II.  Horn. 

has  only  neut.  as  Adv.,  ayxtffrov  nearest,  Od.  5.  280  ;  or  more  com- 
monly d7X(0"Ta,  in  the  phrases,  dyxto'ra  iyictt  was  most  nearly  like,  II. 
2.  58.,  14.  474;  °?7x.  eowvs  Od.  13.  80;  dyx.  i'i'CKOi  6.  152,  cf.  Pind. 
I.  2. 16  :  often  c.  gen.,  Atos  dyx-  next  to  Zeus,  Aesch.  Supp.  1036  (lyr.)  ; 
dyx-  tov  Pqjjxov  Hdt.  9.  81  ;  ofyx*  oIkuv  rtvos  Id.  1.  134,  al. : — in 
Hipp.  Art.  805,  nearest  to  what  is  right : — ol  dyx-  those  next  of  kin, 
with  a  play  on  the  other  sense  the  nearest  neighbours,  Hdt.  5.  79  !  <*7X' 
r)v  avrw  yivovs  Luc.  Catapl.  1 7.  III.  of  Time,  most  lately,  but 

now,  iruXffios . .  dyxwra  bibrjev  II.  20.  18 ;  o  dyx-  diroBavwv  he  who  died 
last,  Hdt.  2.  143  ;  rd  dyx-  most  recently,  Antipho  115.  25. 

dyxi-o*Tpo<J>os,  ov,  turning  near  or  closely,  quick-wheeling,  itcrtvos 
Theogn.  1 261.  2.  quick-changing,  changeable,  dyx^rpO(f)a  0ov- 

XfVfcOat  to  change  one's  mind  suddenly,  Hdt.  7-  '3!  **7X-  rlfTa^0^l 
sudden  change,  Thuc.  2.  53 : — often  in  Rhet.  writers,  introducing  words 
or  thoughts  suddenly,  tu  dyx.  rapidity  of  transition,  Toup  Longin.  27. 
Schaf.  Dion.  H.  de  Comp.  p.  300: — Adv.  -<f>ojs,  Longin.  22.  I. 

dyxt-TeXecrros,  ov,  near  ending,  xpwo*  Nonn.  Jo.  16.  25. 

dyxt-TtXTjs,  «?,  near  an  end,  v~e\r)vrj  Nonn.  D.  40.  314. 

dyxi-T€pp.wv,  ov,  gen,  ovos,  (ripfta)  near  the  borders,  neighbouring. 


ay)(iTOK0{  —  ayw 

Soph.  Fr.  349 ;  rivi  Eur.  Rhes.  426  ;  rtvos  Lye.  1 130 : — Mostly  poet, 
(and  ace.  to  Poll.  6.  113  dithyrambic),  but  also  in  Xen.  Hier.  10,  J. 

ayXi-Toicos,  ov,  near  the  birth,  d-yx-  uiStves  the  pangs  of  child-birth, 
Pind.  Fr.  58.  5 ;  of  a  woman,  in  the  pangs  of  child-birth,  Anth.  P.  7.  462. 

dyx1'^**!5-  *'s'  appearing  near,  Nonn.  D.  29.  29. 

dYx'"4,UTOS'  ov,  planted  near,  Nonn.  D.  3.  152.,  12.  279. 

dyx'o"'  '""i  gen'  ovos,  nearer,  Comp.  of  07x1,  E.  M.  14.  47. 

oyxooStiv,  Adv.  poet,  form  of  dvax~  (x*0/10*)  gushing  UP*  Hesych. 

ayxoSfv,  Adv.  (d7xo5)/rom  nigh  at  hand,  Hdt. 4.  31,  Luc.  Syr.  D.  28: 
opp.  to  voppojOev. 

dyxoSi.  Adv.  =  dyxov,  ayx',  near,  c.  gen.,  II.  14.  412,  Od.  13.  103  ; 
absol.,  Theocr.  2  2.  40,  Anth. 

dyxovdw,  (dyxovjj)  to  strangle,  Manetho  I.  317,  Suid. 

dyxovi),  1),  (afX0')  °  throttling,  strangling,  hanging,  Trag.,  etc.  ; 
ayx<Jvris  . .  ripaara  Aesch.  Eum.  746 ;  (pya  xpeiaaov  dyxovqs  deeds 
beyond  (i.e.  too  bad  for)  hanging,  Soph.  O.  T.  1374;  rati'  dyxovns 
ire'Aas  'tis  nigh  as  bad  as  hanging,  Eur.  Heracl.  246  ;  ravr  o&xl  . . 
ayxovys  iird(ta  ;  Id.  Bacch.  246  ;  ravra  . .  ovk  dyxovjj ;  Ar.  Ach.  125; 
rare  in  Prose,  dyxovrj  xal  \vwr/  Aeschin.  33.  18  : — in  pi.,  iv  dyxovais 
SavaTov  \a&uv  Eur.  Hel.  200,  cf.  lb.  299,  H.  F.  154 ;  of  dyx-  paKiara 
Tofs  viots  Arist.  Probl.  30.  I,  26.  II.  a  cord  for  hanging,  halter, 

Simon.  Iamb.  I.  18  ;  0p6x°*  dyxovjjs  in  Eur.  Hipp.  802. 

dyxovt£u.  r°  strangle,  Schol.  Eur.  Hipp.  780. 

dYXOvi|iaios.  a,  ov,  aopos,  death  by  strangling,  ap.  Eus.  P.  E.  277  O. 

dyxovio*,  a,  ov,  {iyx")  fit  for  strangling,  0poxos  Eur.  Hel.  686  (re- 
stored by  Elmsl.  for  dyxuvuos)  ;  beapas  Nonn.  O.  21.  31.,  34.  229. 

dyxopfvai,  poet,  for  dvaxoptvta,  Anacreont.  14.  30,  ace.  to  Coraes. 

ayxoo-t.  Adv.  coming  near,  Apoll.  de  Adv.  607.  23. 

dYX°™T<">.  Adv.,  Sup.  of  07x01),  ''ke  dyxiora,  nearest,  next,  c.  gen., 
h.  Horn.  Ap.  18,  Hdt.  2.  169,  Eur.  Fr.  623  ;  dyx.  tikos  very  near,  i.  e. 
very  like,  some  one,  Hdt.  7.  73,  80,  al. ;  also  Tivi  7.  91,  I  : — of  07x0- 
totoi  TpoaTjKovrts  the  nearest  of  kin,  4.  73 : — so  too  AyxoWara  ;  dyx- 
*XfiV  twos  to  be  most  Hie  . . ,  7.  64. 

i.y%oTtpot,  a,  ov,  Comp.  of  d7xov,  nearer,  c.  gen.,  Hdt.  7-  175- 

aYx°Vi  =  <*7X'»  near,  Lat.  prope,  freq.  in  Horn.,  mostly  absol.,  and  at 
the  beginning  of  a  line,  dyxov  S  inrapivj]  II.  2.  172,  cf.  4.  92,  203,  al. ; 
absol.  also  in  Soph.  Tr.  962,  Fr.  69  ;  twice  c.  gen.,  II.  24.  709,  Od.  6.  5  ; 
elsewh.  in  Horn,  always  dyxov  larautvos  or  -pUvr),  except  in  Od.  17. 
526.,  19.  271 ;  also  c.  dat.,  Pind.  N.  9.  95,  Hdt.  3.  85  ;  but  cf.  07x1 ; — 
never  in  Att.  Prose,  v.  Luc.  Ner.  9.  Later  forms  are  dyxoripos,  07x0- 
totoi,  qq.  v.     (V.  sub  £7x01.) 

dYX°vpo»,  ov,  Ion.  for  ayxopos,  neighbouring  (Hesych.),  Anth.  P.  9.  235: 
bordering  on,  Tivi  Orph.  Arg.  1 22  ;  twos  Lye.  418. 

OYXowa,  v.  sub  lyxovaa. 

dYX°v°"i{opai,  Med.  to  use  rouge,  Hesych. 

dyx".  f-  ay(",  Ar.  Eccl.  638,  Luc. :  aor.  ^yfo  C.  I.  3588,  Joseph., 
(ow-)  Ar.  Pax  796 : — Med.  and  Pass.  (v.  infr.)  only  in  pres. :  cf.  d»d-y- 
X«.  (From  ^AX.,  y'ATX  come  «x(V  dxfvai,  dxvvuoi  ;  d7x<>>"7, 

as  also  dyxt  (q.  v.),  dyxov,  evayxos,  lyyvs  ;  dxos,  ax^opat,  ^X^°*t  aIl<* 
perh.  dxqv,  dxyvia  (Lat.  egeo)  ;  cf.  Skt.  anhus,  anhas  (Lat.  angustus, 
angor),  agham  {evil)  ;  Lat.  ango,  angina,  anxius ;  Goth,  aggvya,  (ango), 
aggvus  (angustus) ;  O.  H.  G.  angust  (angst,  anguish)  ; — the  common 
notion  being  of  close  pressure  or  constriction.)  To  press  tight,  esp.  the 
throat,  d7x<  f"  'V"'  v*o  bufrtjv  II.  3.  371  :  to  strangle,  throttle,  toiis 
raTfpat  Jjyxov  vvicrup  Ar.  Vesp.  1039,  cf.  Eccl.  638,  640  ;  t&v  KipPt- 
pov  dinjfar  dyxajv  Id.  Ran.  468,  cf.  Av.  1575  ;  xav  Tavpov  dyxots  Id. 
Lys.  81,  cf.  Deni.  1157.  6.,  1263.  7,  Theocr.  5.  106,  Anth.  Plan.  90;  Iv 
XaAiryrds  aiayvvasd.  Lxx  (Psalm.  31.9):  metaph.,  of  pressing  creditors, 
Ar.  Eq.  775,  Luc.  Conv.  32,  cf.  Ev.  Matt.  18.  28 ;  v.  ad  Thorn.  M.  p.  8 ; 
of  a  guilty  conscience,  twto  . .  07x«i,  aicuirdv  woui  Dem.  406.  5  : — Med. 
to  strangle  oneself,  Hipp.  563.  7  : — Pass.,  Pind.  N.  I.  69,  Dem.  1157.  6. 
Not  found  in  Trag. 

ayx^p.O.\ot,  ov,  (uuaXus)  nearly  equal,  dyxiipaXot  Iv  x*'porovia  Thuc. 
3.  49,  cf.  Dion.  H.  5.  14 ;  dyx.  pax7!  »  doubtful  battle,  Thuc.  4.  1 34  ; 
vi«rij  Plut.  Otho  13;  oil*  dyx-  to  »At/#oi  Id.  Caes.  42: — neut.  pi.  as 
Adv.,  dyxwpiaXa  vavuaxuv,  Lat.  aequo  Marie  pugnare,  Thuc.  7.  71  ; 
dTXcu/MtXo  otptoi  iyivero  Luc.  Herm.  1 2.  Adv.  -aXan  Luc.  Ver.  Hist.  2, 37. 

dyia  [&),  Dor.  3  pi.  d70KTt  Pind.  P.  7.  13  :  impf.  fyyov,  Ep.  O70r  11.  7. 
312,  3  dual  dyi-rnv  Od.  3.  439,  Dor.  370K  Pind.  P.  9.  217,  Ion.  dytonov 
Hdt.  I.  148,  Ap.  Rh. : — fut.  df«  II.  1.  139,  Soph.,  Plat.;  but  df«T«  is 
used  as  aor.  imperat.  by  Horn.,  II.  3.  105.,  24.  778,  Od.  14.  414 ;  so  inf. 
dfipuvai,  -i/uv  II.  23.  50,  III;  and  med.  iftait  8.  J05  : — aor.  2 
fjyayov  Horn,  and  Att.: — also  aor.  I  ijfo  Hes.  Op.  432,  438,  Batr.  1 1 5, 

119  ;  but  aor.  I  is  very  rare  in  Att.,  dfa<  Antipho  134.  42,  wpoo-i)(av 
Thuc.  2.  97  ;  (in  other  places  it  has  been  corrected,  partly  from  Mss., 
partly  from  the  context,  v.  sub  dwatoato,  upotfaloou,  avwdaaai,  cf.  L. 
Dind.  Xen.  Hell.  2.  2,  20,  Veitch  Gk.  Verbs  s.  v.) :— pf.  r)Xa  Polyb.  3. 

111,3,  (*po-)  Dem.  346.  24.,  772.  5,  (<rw-)  Xen.  Mem.  4.  2,  8  ;  later 
dyrjoxa,  Joseph.,  etc.,  which  is  allowed  by  the  Atticists  only  in  compds., 

ii'<7a7jp>x"Ta»  Philipp.  ap.  Dem.  238.  28;  Karay^oxtv  (v.  sub  Kariyai); 
owayqoxa  Arist.  Oec.  2.  I,  10;  a  form  dT^yoxo  twice  in  Inscr.  Aeg. 
in  C.  I.  2.  p.  1013,  ow-<i7d7oxa  Inscr.  Ther.  in  C.  I.  2448.  III.  12, 
b-ay*i>X*a  lb.  (»dd.)  4897  d:  plqpf.  dT^x"  Polyb.  30.  4,  17,  cf.  C. 

I.  (add.)  4897  d  :— Med.,  fut.  Sfopitu  Horn.,  Hdt.,  Trag. :  aor.  2  1^7070- 

*hj*  Horn.,  etc. :  also  aor.  I  unaugm.  dfAnnv  («<r-)  Hdt.  5.  34,  cf.  I.  190., 

8.  20,  I,  never  in  Att.: — Pass.,  fut.  dx#r/<ro/uu  Plat.  Hipp.  Ma.  292  A, 

(■wpoa-)  Thuc.  4.  87,  etc.,  but  also  dfopiai  in  pass,  sense,  Aesch.   Ag. 

1632,  Plat.  Rep.  458  D,  (wpoa-)  Thuc.  4.  115,  etc.:  aor.  1  fafyr  Xen 


17 


An. 6.  3, 10,  Ion.  Slx^W  Hdt.  6.  30,  I:  pf.  Ifyiua  Id.  2. 158,  2,  Dem.  170. 
19  :  plqpf.  r/7/Mroi  %aa*  Thuc.  6.  loo ;  also,  in  med.  sense,  v.  infr.  B.  2  : 


—Verb.  Adj.  axrtov,  q.  v.  (From  ^AT  come  also  dyivia,  d7<is- 

aicraip,  ifr«o/u»i,  fyefiwv,  etc. ;  also  dypa,  dyptvai,  etc. ;  07011/  (v.  signf 
IV.  2)  ;  Sy/ws,  and  perh.  the  Adv.  ayav  :  cf.  Skt.  ag,  agami  (ago),  agal 
(a/crap)  ;  agmas  (oypos),  agis  (dy&v)  ;  Zd.  az  (ago),  azra  (dypa).) 

I.  to  lead,  carry,  convey,  bring,  mostly  with  living  creatures  as  the 
object,  <p^pai  being  used  of  things,  owki  8'  dye  iv  irdpoiat . .  yvvatxa,  xal 
rphoba  .  .ipipuv  II.  23.  512  ;  fiovv  8'  dyirqv  xepaaiv  by  the  horns,  Od. 
3-  439  i  ay.tis  or  irpos  t&itov,  but  poet,  also  c.  ace.  loci,  vootoi  S  ix 
nokipwv  dnivovs  (sc.  dvSpas)  . .  Jjyov  oikoui  Aesch.  Pers.  862  ;  "AiBas 
"7ei  'Axipovros  d«Tdr  Soph.  Ant.  811  ;  ay.  rivd  m  to  lead  one  to 
another,  Od.  14.  386  ;  ijnrous  v<p'  dppar  dy.  3.  476,  Aesch.  Pr.  465  : 
from  the  common  phrases  dyeiv  orpdrevp-a,  arparov,  etc.,  comes  the  use 
of  dyuv  intr.  of  the  soldiers  themselves,  Tairrr/ . .  df  u  o  \6xos  Xen.  An. 
4.  8^12,  cf.  Hell.  4.  2,  19,  and  perh.  Thuc.  5.  54:  more  generally,  inl 
to  dxpov  d7a70VTa)V  ixarepuv  tending  to  the  extreme,  Plat.  Legg. 
701  E :  dyaiutv  let  us  go,  often  in  N.  T. ;  cf.  dicriov.  b.  part.  07011' 

is  used  in  gen.  sense,  talcing,  arrfae  8"  07011'  II.  2.  558,  cf.  Od.  1.  130, 
where  we  should  use  two  Verbs,  took  and  placed ;  and  v.  ix<"  A.  I.  6, 
(pipta  A.  X.  2.  2.  to  take  with  one,  iraipovs  Od.  10.  405  ;  ti  II. 

XS-  S31-  3-  ,0  carry  off  is  captives  or  booty,  II.  I.  367.,  9.  594, 

Aesch.  Th.  340,  etc. ;  dxOy  dyouivos  wapd  fSa<ri\ia  had  been  seized  and 
taken  to..,  Hdt.  6.  30;  d7o^«i'os,  i.e.  oov\os,  Archil.  155,  cf.  Eur.  Tro. 
140,  Plat.  Legg.  914  E  ;  so,  Aiktjv  dyeiv  to  lead  Justice  forcibly  away, 
Hes.  Op.  218  : — o(  a  fowler,  tpvKov  opviOuv  dpKpi&a\wv  dytt  Soph.  Ant. 
343  : — mostly  in  phrase  07*11'  Kal  tpepetv  to  sweep  a  country  of  all  its 
plunder  (where  strictly  <pipeiv  refers  to  things,  ayav  to  men  and  cattle), 
tirst  in  II.  5.  484  ofei'  k  r/€  tpipottv  'A^aioi  fj  K(v  ayoiiv,  cf.  23.  512 
sq. ;  then  often  in  Hdt.  and  Att.  Prose  ;  more  rarely  reversed,  tpepovai  tc 
xal  dyovai  Hdt.  I.  88,  I  ;  itpept  Kal  f/yt  iravras  Id.  3.  39,  4;  also  c. 
ace.  loci,  tpipwv  xal  dyuv  tt)v  BtOvviba  Xen.  Hell.  3.  2,  2  ;  just  like 
Lat.  agere  et  ferre,  Liv.  22.  3,  etc.  : — but  cpipuv  xal  dyuv  sometimes 
means  simply  to  bear  and  carry,  bring  together,  Heind.  Plat.  Phaedr. 
279  C  ;  tJ]v  voi-naiv  q>iptiv  rt  xal  dyuv  i.  e.  bring  it  into  the  state, 
Id.  Legg.  817  A,  cf.  Xen.  Cyr.  3.  3,  2  ;  like  portari  atque  agi  in  Caes. 
B.  C.  2.  25:  in  Pass.,  dyiatOa,  <p<pvu(0a  Eur.  Tro.  1 310,  cf.  Ar.  Nub. 
241  : — Xen.  Hell.  3.  2,  5,  has  also  dyuv  xal  xaifiv  ;  cf.  <pipoi  A.  VI. 
2.  4.  07*11'  tiy  bixijv  or  8i*aar^pioi',  07.  circ  tovs  btxaards  to 

carry  one  before  a  court  of  justice,  Lat.  rapere  in  jus,  often  in  Att. 
Prose ;  so,  irpos  Tr)v  bixijv  dy.  Eur.  Fr.  1036 ;  also  simply  07*11',  Plat. 
Legg.  914  E,  Gorg.  527  A,  etc. :  esp.  in  the  phrase  €iri  Oavdr<p  dy.  Xen. 
An.  1 .  6,  10,  etc. :  so,  <p6vov  dytaOai  to  be  accused  of  murder,  Plut.  2. 
309  E.  5.  to  fetch,  d£c0'  vaiv  rov  aptarov  Od.  14.  414:  hence 

also  of  things,  to  bring  to,  or  in,  import,  olvov  vrjts  dyovoi  II.  9.  72, 
etc.;  cf.  Hdt.  I.  70;  ivo  ol  crvi'  <poprov  dyoipu  (i.e.  avv  of)  Od.  14. 
296.  6.  to  draw  on,  bring  on,  vrjua  too'  ijyayov  Ovpaviaives  II. 

24.  547  ;  'IA101  <p9opav  Aesch.  Ag.  406  ;  repuiav  dfitpav  Soph.  Ant. 
I330;  Cirvov  Id.  Ph.  638;  xaPav  Eur.  Fr.  1 74;  bdxpv  Id.  Ale. 
108 1.  7.  to  bear  up,  tpt\\o\  8*  eys,  dyovai  bixrvov  Aesch.  Cho. 

506.  II.  to  lead  towards  a   point,  lead  on,  tov  8'  dye  aoipa 

xaxi)  Savdroio  riX.oaoe  II.  13.  602,  and  absol.,  2.  834  ;  ol  p!  aTtpias 
dyeit  Soph.  El.  1035  ;  also,  c.  inf.,  07*1  Savuv  leads  to  death,  Eur. 
Hec.  43 : — c.  ace.  cogn.,  dyopat  Tdv  nvparav  obov  (but  the  metre  re- 
quires epxopai)  Soph.  Ant.  877  ;  to  orpaTtvpa  J(y*  t^v  liil  Miyapa  (sc. 
ibov)  Xen.  Hell.  4.  4,  1 3  ;  also,  ibos  ayu  the  road  leads,  tls  or  iirl  towov. 
Soph.  O.  T.  734,  Plat,  and  Xen.  2.  metaph.  to  lead,  as  a  general, 

II.  IO.  79  ;  &s  dye  vetxos  'Ktrqyij  II.  721  ;  07.  o'TpaTtdi',  vavs,  etc.,  Thuc. 
7.  12.,  8.  59,  etc.:  to  guide,  as  the  gods,  etc.,  Pind.,  Hdt.,  etc. ;  8id 
wovtav  dyttv  Tivd  Eur.  I.  T.  988 ;  d7«  Tijv  iroKiTfiav  to  conduct  the 
government,  Thuc.  I.  127;  <"8f  rfjv  aoqnav  dyovai  thus  they  treat 
philosophy,  Plat.  Theaet.  172  B  ;  t^v  avr^v  aipeatv  dy.  tivi  to  hold  the 
same  views  as  .  . ,  Polyb.  27.  13,  14  : — Pass,  to  be  led,  guided,  Koyiopip 
Plat.  Rep.  431  C.  3.  to  bring  up,  train,  educate,  dp$ws,  xaKws  or 
xaxws  dxfvai  Plat.  Legg.  782  D,  etc.  III.  to  draw  out  in 
length,  Tttxos  dyuv  to  draw  a  line  of  wall,  Thuc.  6.  99 ;  so,  pUXaBpov 
•Is  ipwpovt  dy.  Anth.  P.  9.  649  ;  uypov  dyuv  Theocr.  10.  2,  cf.  Thuc. 

6.  100 : — 07.  ypapuds  to  draw  lines,  Arist.  Top.  1.  1,  6,  cf.  An.  Pr.  1. 
24,  2,  etc. : — Pass.,  t}*toi  t)  biuipv(  Hdt.  2.  158  ;  x6\irov  dyopivov 
Tf/r  Ttjs  i.e.  when  the  land  runs  round  into  a  bay,  Id.  4.  99 ;  cf.  iKavvai 

III.  2.  IV.  to  keep  in  memory,  xai  fttv  xkios  fjyov  'Axaioi  Od.  5. 
311.  2.  like  agere,  to  hold,  celebrate,  topriiv,  to  'OXvuiria,  etc.,  Hdt. 
1.147,183;  though  this  is  more  freq.  in  Att.  (for  Hdt.  mostly  uses  di^tiy), 

07.  Svaiav  Isocr.  386  C,  etc. ;  xpeovpyiv  juap  ebSvutos  dyuv  Aesch. 
Ag.  1392  ;  but  in  II.  I.  99,  Hes.  Sc.  480,  dy.  ixanpH^v  is  literal,  to  convey 
the  hecatomb.  3.  also  to  hold,  keep,  observe,  ipBav  dytts  iipripoavvav 
Pind.  P.  6.  20  ;  <nroi'8ds  07.  irpos  tikos  Thuc.  6.  7  ;  tlpi)vnv  Plat.  Rep. 
465  B,  etc. :  often  c.  ace,  as  a  periphrasis  for  a  neut.  Verb  (cf.  «fx<»  A.  I.  8), 
vukos  dyuv  =  vttxfiv,  Pind.  P.  9.  54,  cf.  dpfrfjv  dy.  Id.  I.  7.  31 ;  axo^v 
dyuv  —  axo\i(eiv,  Eur.  Med.  1238,  Plat.  Rep.  376  D;  i)<ri>x'a"  ay.  =  ^ov- 
Xa^fii'  Xen.  An.  3.  I,  14 ;  07.  diraariai'  Ar.  Nub.  621 ;  so,  yt\arr'  dyuv 
to  keep  laughing,  Soph.  Aj.  382 ;  07.  nrrwoi'  Eur.  Or.  182.  4.  to  keep, 
maintain,  iKivBipav  fae  tj}k  'EAAdSa  Dem.  1 20.  17.  8.  of  Time,  to 
pass,  dirfipavrov  dyuv  0'iorov  Pind.  O.  8.  115;  iroias  fipipas  boxus  p 
dyuv  ;  Soph.  El.  266 ;  0  (3i'os  oi/181  iowipav  ayu  Alexis  Tit0.  3  ;  bixarov 
trot  dy.,  etc.,  decimum  annum  agere,  Galen.  V.  like  Jryeouai. 
Lat.  ducere,  to  hold,  account,  reckon,  Iv  Tipr/  dyuv  or  dyeoQai,  iv  oi- 
beptfj  po'tpr)  07.,  irfpi  hXuotov  dyuv  Hdt.  I.  134.,  2.  172.,  9.  7.  I.  etc. ; 
Beovs  dyuv  to  believe  in,  Aesch.  Supp.  924  ;  81'  afSovs,  Sid  Tipqs  dy. 
Tied,  etc.,  Eus.  H.  E.  7.  24,  4,  Luc.  Prom.  4,  etc. ;  rdu'  bXo>\o(f  tvpiaxatv 
dyoi  Aesch.  Supp.  918  ;  Td  vpdyp'  dyuv  . .  d>?  irap'  ovblv  Soph.  Ant.  34  ; 
rf/v  ' A<t>pobtTTp>  Ttpoaff  dyuv  tov  Bokx1'01'  Eur.  Bacch.  225  ;  Tipuurrtpov 

'  C 


18  dyw — 

ay.  nva  Thuc.  8.  8 1  : — also  with  Adverbs.  ovotpiipws  dy.  to  think  in- 
sufferable. Soph.  0.  T.  784  ;  so.  ivrifuis  dyuv  Plat.  Rep.  528  C,  etc. : — 
Pass.,  Jryoptjv  o'  dvijp  dorwv  ptfytaros  Soph.  O.  T.  775,  cf.  Lob.  Phryn. 
418.  VI.  to  weigh  so  much,  dyetv  ftvdv,  Tptattoaiovs  oapuKOvs, 

etc.,  to  weigh  a  mina,  300  darics,  etc.,  Dem.  617.  21.,  741.  7.  cf- 
Philippid.  'Apy.  'A<p.  7,  etc. ;  aytiv  irXiov  Arist.  Probl.  23.  3,  2  :  where 
the  ace.  is  the  weight  which  the  thing  weighs  or  draws  down :  also,  ay. 
araOfiov  Plut.  2.  96  C;  cf.  i'A/coi  A.  II.  9,  and  v.  sub  avTippoiros.  VII. 

on  dyt,  dyer*,  v.  s.  voce. 

B.  Med.  ayofiat,  to  carry  away  for  oneself,  take  to  oneself,  xp"""" 
tc  Atai  dpyvpov  o'txaS  dyiaBat  Od.  10.  35 :  to  lake  with  one,  6.  58  ; 
often  in  Att.  2.  dyeoBat  Twaf/to,  Lat.  uxorem  ducere,  to  take  to 

oneself  a  wife,  Od.  14.  211,  Hes. ;  in  full,  07.  yvvatxa  h  ra  o'txia  Hdt. 
I.  59,  etc. ;  and  simply  dyiaBat,  to  marry,  II.  2.  659,  Hdt.  2.  47,  I,  etc., 
and  in  Att.,  cf.  Elmsl.  Heracl.  808  ;  pf.  pass.  y)yptat  is  used  in  this  med. 
sense,  Joseph.  A.J.  14.  12,  I,  cf.  irpoayai  I.  6;  (Aesch.  Pr.  560  has  the 
Act.  dyitv  in  same  sense)  :  also  of  the  father,  to  bring  home  a  wife  for  his 
son,  Od.  4.  10,  Valck.  Hdt.  I.  34;  of  the  brother  who  brings  a  wife 
to  his  brother,  Od.  15.  238  ;  and  of  the  friends  of  the  bridegroom  and 
bride,  Od.  6.  28,  Hes.  Sc.  274.  3.  bwpov  dytoBat  to  take  to  oneself* 

gift,  Valck.  Theocr.  I.  1 1  ;  Std  aripta  dyiaBat  ptvBov  to  let  pass  through 
the  mouth,  i.  e.  to  utter,  II.  14.  91 ;  dyeaOai  ti  is  xt'Pas  t0  ta^e  a  thing  into 
one's  hands,  and  so  to  take  upon  oneself,  undertake,  Hdt.  I.  126.,  4.  79. 

hyii  [d],  crasis  for  a  iyii.  Soph.  El.  259. 

oryuYaios,  ov,  (dyaryr))  fit  for  leading  by,  of  a  dog's  collar  or  leash, 
Anth.  P.  6.  35. 

dyayiiov,  to,  a  pander's  house,  Poll.  9.  48. 

dY^Y^vs,  iws,  b,  one  that  draws  or  drags,  Hdt.  2.  175,  3>  2.  an 

accuser  (v.  dya)  I.  4),  Suid.  TL.  —  p'vrTjp,  a  leading-rein,  leash, 

Soph.  Fr.  801,  Strattis  Xpva.  2,  Xen.  Eq.  6,  5. 

aY«YT|'  ^'  ("7W)  a  carrying  away,  Hdt.  6.  85,  etc. ;  freight,  carriage, 
npus  rds  dywyds  . .  xpyaBat  vno^vyiots  Plat.  Rep.  370  E,  cf.  C.  I.  1838. 

1.  b.  intr.,  ti)v  dy.  did  Ta\ovs  irrotuTO  pursued  his  voyage,  Thuc.  4. 
29  :  movement,  tov  itoS6s  Plat.  Rep.  400  C,  cf.  604  B  ;  dy.  iiri  ti  ten- 
dency towards  . . ,  Hipp.  Epid.  I.  938.  2.  a  bringing  to  or  in, 
vpwv  r)  is  tovs  oXiyovs  dy.  your  bringing  us  before  the  council,  Thuc.  5. 
85.  3.  a  carrying  off",  abduction,  Aesch.  Ag.  1263,  Soph.  O.  C. 
662.  4.  vbaros  dyaiyai  aqueducts,  C.  I.  2338.  52.  II.  a 
leading  towards  a  point,  conducting,  guiding,  timov  Xen.  Eq.  6,  4  ;  7) 
tov  voptov,  tov  Xoytapiov  dy.  guidance  by . . ,  Plat.  Legg.  645  A,  cf. 
Polit.  274  A  : — intr.  the  course,  tenour,  tendency  of  a  thing.  2.  the 
leading  of  an  army,  Plat.  Legg.  746  D  ;  r)  dywyrj  toV  irpaypaTwv 
the  administration  of  public  affairs,  Polyb.  3.  8,  5.  3.  a  lead- 
ing, conducting,  directing,  training,  watbeia  ptiv  iaB'  jy  lraidivv  uXktj 
Te  Kal  dy.  irpds  tov  biro  tov  voptov  Xoyov  bpBbv  etp-npiivov  Plat.  Legg. 
659  D,  cf.  819  A  ;  dy.  opOrjs  rvxitv  np6s  dptT-rjv  Arist.  Eth.  N.  10.  9,  8  ; 
Std  to  i)6os  nal  tt)c  dy.  Id.  Pol.  4.  5,  3  ;  esp.  of  the  public  education  of 
the  Spartan  youth,  Aarcwvifcr)  dy.  Polyb.  1.  32,  I  ;  'AyrjoiXaos  tjx&V  t^v 
Xtyoptivrfv  070177)1/  iv  AaKfbaifiovt  Plut.  Ages.  I  ;  cf.  Miiller  Dor.  4.  5, 
I  : — also  of  plants,  culture,  Theophr.  H.  P.  1.  3,  2  ;  of  diseases,  treatment, 
Galen.  4.  generally,  a  method,  way,  construction  (of  a  law),  Arist. 
Rhet.  1.  15, 10:  style,  Dion.  H.  de  Isocr.  20,  al. ;  r/  dy.  twv  btaX*KTwv 
Strabo648.  5.  a  school  of  philosophers,  Sext.  Emp.  P.  I.  145.  III. 
a  rhythmical  movement,  in  beating  time.Plat.Rep.  400C,  cf.  Plut.  2. 1 141 C. 

u ytoYLU-os .  ov,  easy  to  be  led,  capable  of  being  carried,  rptaawv  dpu\£wv 
.  .  dy.  0dpos  enough  to  load  three  wains,  Eur.  Cycl.  385  ;  to.  dywyipta 
things  portable,  wares,  Plat.  Prot.  313  C,  Xen.  An.  5.  1,  16,  etc. ;  dXXo 
oi  firjbkv  dywytpov  dyeaOai  iv  tw  irXoiw  Dem.  929.  17.  II.  of 

persons,  to  be  outlawed,  Schneid.  Xen.  Hell.  7.  3,  1 1  :  to  be  delivered  into 
bondage,  Dem.  624.  12,  Plut.  Sol.  13: — so  of  things,  liable  to  seizure, 
Dion.  H.  5.  69.  2.  easily  led,  complaisant,  Plut.  Ale.  6. 

Aywyiov,  t°,  in  Xen.  Cyr.  6.  I,  54,  the  load  of  a  wagon  or  carriage. 

<1y<dy°s,  &">  ("7<u)  leading,  guiding,  and  as  Subst.  a  guide,  Hdt.  3.  26 ; 
dywyoi  an  escort,  Thuc.  2.  12  ;  dy.  vbaTos  an  aquedwc/,  Hdn.  7.  12,  C.  I. 
1040,  I.  17  :  c.  gen.,  Svvapus  dvBpwirwv  dywyus  power  of  leading,  Plut. 
Lye.  5.  II.  leading  towards  a  point,  irpus  or  Iiri  ti  Plat.  Rep. 

525  A  ;  fls  . .  Plut.  Pericl.  I.  III.  drawing,  attracting,  Ttvos, 

of  the  magnet,  Diosc.  5.  148.  2.  drawing  forth,  eliciting,  xoai 

vexpwv  dywyoi  Eur.  Hec.  536;  Saxpvwv  dy.  Id.  Tro.  1131.  •  3. 
absol.  attractive,  Plut.  Crass.  7  ;  to  dywyvv  attractiveness,  Id.  2.  25  B. 

&YUV  [a],  crasis  for  b  dywv. 

&yu>v  [&],  wvos,  o,  Aeol.  also  ciycovos.  ov,  v,  Alcae.  120:  (dyw).  A 

gathering,  assembly,  like  dyopd;  t(avev  dpiiv  dyuiva  II.  23.  258  ;  XCto 
0'  dywv  24.  1,  cf.  Od.  8.  200 ;  iv  dywvi  vtuiv  II.  16.  239,  cf.  Eust.  1335. 
57:  esp.  an  assembly  met  to  see  games,  often  in  II.  23;  'Tirtp0opiwv 
dywv  Pind.  P.  10.  47  ;  koii/ous  dywvas  BivTes  Aesch.  Ag.  845,  cf.  Ar. 
Fr.  572-  2.  a  place  of  contest,  the  arena,  &t}Tt]v  is  fieaaov  dywva 

II.  23.  685,  cf.  531,  Od.  8.  260,  Hes.  Sc.  312,  Pind.  P.  9.  202,  cf.  esp. 
Thuc.  5.  50:  proverb.,  e(w  dywvos  out  of  the  lists  or  course,  i.e.  beside 
the   mark,   Pind.-  P.  1.  84,   Luc.  Gymn.  21  ;   cf.  i£aywvtos,   opofios  II. 

2.  II.  an  assembly  of  the  Greeks  al  their  great  national  games, 

0  iv  'OXvumri  iywv  Hdt.  6.  127  ;  'OXv/mias  d.  Pind.  O.  I.  1 1  ;  0  'OXvp- 
■niKos  dywv  Ar.  PI.  583  ;  'EXXidos  .  .  dywvos  Soph.  El.  682,  cf.  699  : 
— hence  the  contest  for  a  prize  at  the  games,  dywv  i?nri«(5s,  yv/ivticos 
Hdt.  2.  91,  Plat.  Legg.  658  A,  al. ;  liovatxis  Ar.  PI.  1163,  Thuc.  3.  104  ; 

01  dy.  oi  ivl  XafiirdSt  Arist.  Fr.  385  ;  07011'  tow  dvSpwv  a  contest  in 
which  the  chorus  was  composed  of  men,  opp.  to  twv  iraiEwv,  Dem.  520. 
27  ' — d.7.  OT«pavn<p6pos  or  o~T«pav'iT7]s  a  contest  where  the  prize  is  a 
crown,  Hdt.  5.  102,  Arist.  Rhet.  I.  2,  13;  dy.  xaAxtos,  where  it  is  a 
shield  of  brass,  Pind.  N.  10.  41,  ubi  v.  Dissen : — hence  many  phrases, 


aywvios. 

dywva  dyeiv,  KaBiordvai,  TiBivai,  npoTtBevai,  irotetv,  etc.,  to  hold  or 
propose  a  contest ;  dywva  npoayopeveiv  tivi,  els  dywva  npoKaXfiaOai 
Ttva,  etc.  ;  dywva  or  iv  dywvi  vitcdv,  to  win  one  or  at  one,  etc. ;  dywv 
rrpos  Tiva  Dem.  247.  10  ;  us  07.  Xoywv  dtpiKto-Bai  Tivi  Plat.  Prot.  335  A. 
— V.  Interprr.  ad  Ar.  PI.  1 163.  III.  generally,  any  struggle, 

trial  or  danger,  noXXoiis  dywvas  i£twv,  of  Hercules,  Soph.  Tr.  159  ;  07. 
£i(pn(p6pos  Aesch.  Cho.  584 ;  elf  dywva  Twbe  avp.ireawv  pax7}*  Soph.  Tr. 
20,  etc. ;  dywv  irpoidtTai,  c.  inf.,  it  is  hard  or  dangerous  to  . . ,  Hdt.  7. 
II  ;  dywv  dnopos  Lys.  108.  25  ;  fieyiaTos  Eur.  Med.  235  ;  onXwv  t/cftT* 
dywv  nipt  Soph.  Aj.  936;  and  without  trepi,  dywv  twv  'Axi^fiwv 
ottXwv  lb.  1 240 : — so  also,  dywv  irepl  Ti}y  ifivxijs,  nepl  fnyio'Twv,  etc.,  a 
struggle  for  life  and  death,  for  one's  highest  interests,  Eur.  Or.  847, 
Phoen.  1330;  iroAXous  dywvas  opaixiovrat  trepl  atpiwv  airaiv  Hdt. 8. 102  ; 
Xoywv  yap  ov  . .  dywv,  dAAd  arjs  if/vxys  vipi  Soph.  El.  1492  ;  v.  sub 
opop.os.  2.  a  battle,  action,  Thuc.  2.  89,  etc.  3.  an  action  at 

law,  trial,  Antipho  143.  44,  etc.,  cf.  Aesch.  Eum.  677,  744 ;  fls  dywvas 
KaBiardvai  dvOpwvovs  Plat.  Apol.  24  C,  Rep.  494  E  ;  irepl  ^vx^'  «<* 
dywva  ttaTatTTTjaai  Ttva  Xen.  Lac.  8,  4.  4.  metaph.,  oil  Ao^-cuf 

e$'  dywv  now  is  not  the  time  for  speaking,  etc.,  Eur.  Phoen.  588  ;  oi»x 
ebpas  dy.  'tis  no  time  for  sitting  still,  Id.  Or.  1291,  cf.  Thuc.  3.  44; 
dywv  npotpaaiv  ov  b~ixfTal  tne  crisis  admits  no  dallying,  Ar.  Fr.  318,  cf. 
Plat.  Crat.  421  D,  Legg.  751  D;  irotiuv  1)  Tradeetv  Trpuntnai  dywv  the 
issue  proposed  is  to  do  or  die,  Hdt.  7,  H,  cf.  209;  /4«7a?  6  dywv  .  .  to  XPV' 
gtov  fj  Katcuv  yeveaBat  the  issue  is  great . .  ,  Plat.  Rep.  608  B;  cf.  d/tftr]. 

aYUtv&Xcis,  01,  the  Lat.  Agonales,  Dion.  H.  2.  70* 

dYwv-dpxTjs,  ov,  u,  judge  of  a  contest,  Soph.  Aj.  572  ;  cf.  dywvoBtT-ns. 

aYUVta,  1),  a  contest,  struggle  for  victory,  dywv  aid  ndans  dywvirjs 
(Xwv  Hdt.  2.  91  ;  iroXefuwv  dy.  Eur.  Hec.  314,  cf.  Tro.  1003;  v.  sub 
dvopottfiris  ;  esp.  in  the  games,  Pind.  O.  2.  94,  P.  5.  150;  also  in' Prose, 
iv  o^oTi/tp  dy.  Xen.  Cyr.  2.  3, 15 ;  dtraaav  dy.  ivreivat  Dem.  1398.  20, 
etc.  2.  gymnastic  exercise,  wrestling,  and  the  like,  Hipp.  Art.  787, 

Plat.  Meno  94  B,  Legg.  765  C,  etc. :  generally,  exercise,  Id.  Gorg.  456  D 
sq.,  Rep.  618  B.  3.  of  the  mind,  agony,  anguish,  iv  tpofiw  /rat 

iroXXrj  dywviq.  Dem.  236.  19,  cf.  Menand.  Incert.  5,  Arist.  Probl.  2.  26, 
2  ;  iv  toTs  TTjs  ipvxrjs  tpitfiois,  iXniatv,  dywviais  Id.  de  Spir.  4,  6. 

dYwvidrrjs  [dr],  ov,  o,  a  nervous  person,  Diog.  L.  2.  131,  Suid. 

dyuvidio,  inf.  -idV  Plat.  Prot.  333  E,  part,  -iwv  Id.  Charm.  162  C,  Isocr., 
(indie,  first  in  Luc.)  :  impf.  rrywviwv  Polyb.,  etc. :  fut.  do"ai  [d]  Porph. 
Abst.  I.  54:  aor.  -qywviaoa  Timocl.  MapaB.  I,  Diod. :  pf.  ijywviaKa 
(virep-)  Dem.  1410.  5.  Like  dywvi£opiat,  to  contend  eagerly,  struggle, 

Dem.  534.  II  ;  irpds  dXXrjXovs  Isocr.  59  B.  II.  to  be  distressed 

or  anxious,  be  in  an  agony,  TerpaxvvBat  t«  Kat  dy.  Plat.  Prot.  333  E  ; 
d7o>i/ia'i'Ta  teal  TtOopvpvpiivov  Id.  Lysis  210  E,  cf.  Arist.  Probl.  2. 
26,  2;  irep'i  Ttvos  Id.  Rhet.  I.  9,  21;  c,  ace,  Polyb.  I.  20,  6,  al. ; 
M  Tivi  Plut.  Caes.  46  ;  dy.  p.i\  . . ,  Polyb.  3.  9,  2,  etc. 

dYcovi£o|i.ai,  fut.  Xovfiat  Eur.  Heracl.  992,  Thuc,  etc.,  (in  pass,  sense, 
v.  infr.  B) }  -iaoptat  only  in  late  writers,  as  Joseph. ;  -toBrjao/xat  Aristid. 
I.  504:  aor.  Tjywvtadpiijv  Eur.,  etc.:  pf.  rjywvianai  (in  act.  sense)  Eur. 
Ion  939,  Ar.  Vesp.  993,  Isocr.,  (in  pass.,  v.  infr.  B)  :  aor.  ^ywviaBrjv 
in  pass,  sense,  infr.  B  :  an  act.  form  dywviaas  in  C.  I.  1 108  (bis)  : — -(dywv). 

A.  as  Dep.,  to  contend  for  a  prize,  esp.  in  the  public  games, 
Hdt.  2.  160,  al. ;  rrpos  Ttva  Plat.  Rep.  579  C,  al. ;  Tivi  Id.  Ion  J30  A  ; 
■ntpi  Ttvos  about  a  thing,  Hdt.  8.  26,  Thuc.  6.  16  ;  *OAu/i7rm<Tii'  Plat. 
Hipp.  Mi.  364  A;  nepl  irpwriiwv  Dem.  247.  5;  virtp  ttjs  iXevOfpias 
Id.  287.  17  :  often  c.  ace.  cogn.,  d7<  aTabtov  Hdt.  5.  22  ;  toV  d7dVa>i', 
ovs  irepl  ttjs  ipvxys  T)ywvi£(<r8e  Dem.  314.  15  ;  a7aVa  .  .  Toro'  f)ywvio~w 
thou  didst  provoke  this  contest,  Eur.  Supp.  427,  cf.  Ion  939,  Heracl. 
795.  2.  to  fight,  Hdt.  I.  76,  82,  al.,  Thuc.  8.  27,  al. ;  irepl  tot 
dirdvTwv  dy.  Id.  6.  16;  rrpos  Ttva  Id.  I.  36;  c.  ace.  cogn.,  t)v  [ptdxyv]  .  . 
dywvifrcrBc  Eur.  Supp.  636.  3.  to  contend  for  the  prize  on  the 
stage,  both  of  the  poet,  Hdt.  5.  67,  Ar.  Ach.  140,  419,  Arist.  Poet. 
7,  II  ;  and  of  the  actor,  Dem.  418.  5  :  generally  to  contend  for  victory, 
xaXius  . .  itywvtoat  Plat.  Symp.  194  A,  cf.  Menex.  235  D.  4.  to 
argue  sophistically,  like  ipi$w,  opp.  to  otaXiyofiat,  Plat.  Theaet.  167  E, 
cf.  Rep.  454  A,  Phileb.  17  A  :  but,  5.  generally  of  public  speaking, 
Xen.  Mem.  3.  7,  4;  d7.  rrpos  dv6Stt(tv  Arist.  Fr.  I.  23.  II.  to 
contend  or  struggle  against,  as  law-term,  Antipho  130.  7  >  c-  acc- 
cogn.,  07.  o'iki]v,  ypa<pr)v  to  fight  a  cause  to  the  last,  Lys.  98.  14, 
Dem.  653,  26:  hence  also,  dy.  ipfvbofiaprvptwv  (sc.  ypatpijv)  Dem. 
741.  20;    dy.  dywva  Andoc.  4.  I,  Lys.  III.  36:    also,  07.  (pivov  to 

fight  against  a  charge  of  murder,  Eur.  Andr.  336 ;  07.  t£  Trpaynart  to 
grapple  with  the  matter,  Plat.  Hipp.  Mi.  369  C,  cf.  Arist.  Rhet.  3.  I, 
5.  III.  generally,  to  struggle,  to  exert  oneself,  c.  inf.,  Thuc.  4.  87  ; 

ev  dy.  Lys.  160.  6;  c.  ace.  cogn.,  d  p\v  rrywviow  Dem.  420.  4;  Kav 
dfieivw  dywviaw/iat  Id.  536.  5. 

B.  as  Pass.,  to  be  won  by  a  hard  contest,  to  be  brought  to  issue, 
mostly  in  pf.,  iroAAoi  dywv(s  dywvioaTat  (Ion.)  Hdt.  9.  26 ;  to  i/ywvta- 
peva  the  contested  points,  points  at  issue,  Eur.  Supp.  465,  Dem.  745. 
21  ; — rarely  in  pres.,  6  dywvt^optvos  voptos  the  law  noiv  under  debate, 
Dem.  7°9-  7  t  or  aor.,  beivos  . .  Ktvbvvos  vrrep  rrjs  .  .  iXtvOepias  riywvioBr) 
Lys.  194.  5  ;  r)ywvif7&7j  Xafinpws  (impers.)  Plut.  Sert.  21  ; — fut.  med.  in 
pass,  sense,  dywvtttTat  Kat  tcpiB-r)afTat  to  irpdypta  it  shall  be  brought  to 
issue  and  determined,  Dem.  516.  18. 

dYiivtos,  oi',  (07011')  0/  or  belonging  to  the  contest,  deBXos  07.  its  prize, 
Pind.  I.  5  (4).  9 ;  «5x0J  Id.  O.  10  (11).  75  ;  trovs  Simon.  29 : — epith.  of 
Hermes,  as  president  of  games,  Pind.  I.  1 .  85  ;  also  of  Zeus  as  decider  of 
the  contest,  Soph.  Tr.  26;  of  Hermes,  Inscr.  Lac.  in  C.  I.  1421  ; — the 
dywvtot  Btoi,  in  Aesch.  Ag.  513,  Supp.  189,  242,  332,  355,  are  held  by 
some  to  be  all  the  12  greater  gods  as  Protectors  in  danger ;  by  others 
the  gods  who  presided  over  the  great  games  (Zeus,  Poseidon,  Apollo, 


aywvioi  - 

and  Hermes),  or,  ace.  to  Eust.,  those  worshipped  on  a  common  altar 
(xoivo0<uiua),  as  in  an  dyuiv  or  assembly;  cf.  Plat.  Legg.  "83  A.  2. 

dyaviw  <rx<>Xa  m  Soph.  Aj.  195,  is  prob.  an  oxymoron  (as  the  Schol. 
takes  it),  quasi  axoXrj  aaxoXa,  a  rest  /""  °f  conflict  and  anxiety, 
anxious  idleness. 

a-yiivios.  ov,  without  angle,  or/.  <rxWa  "  kvkXos  Arist.  Metaph.  4.  14,  I, 
ci.  Theophr.  H.  P.  3.  42,  2. 

dyumois.  r),  (aYawifojuu)  a  contending  for  a  prize,  Thuc.  5.  50. 

dyuvLO-fia,  to,  a  contest,  conflict,  in  pi.  <j«rfs  done  in  battle,  brave 
deeds,  Hdt.  8.  76  ;•  /«!«  of  horsemanship,  Xen.  Hipparch.  3,  5  ;  oVy. 
Kara  ra  &$Xa  C.  I.  2741  ;  dyaviafiara  wottiv  to  enter  into  competition, 
of  dramatic  poets,  Arist.  Poet.  9,  II.  2.  in  sing.,  d-y.  twos-  a  feat 

for  him  to  be  proud  of,  a  feather  in  his  cap,  Thuc.  8.  12,  cf.  17.,  7-  5^. 
59,  86 ;  (wiatais  dy.  a  fine  stroke  of  wit,  Id.  3.  82  ;  dpds  dy.  the  issue 
of  the  curse,  Eur.  Phoen.  1355.  II.  ay.  mtftoSai  ti  to  make  it 

an  object  to  strive  for,  Hdt.  I.  140,  cf.  Eur.  Phoen.  1355  ;  oi  puxpov  to 
dywviaua   TrpoaraTTtis   Luc.    Imag.  12.  III.   that  with  which 

one  contends,  a  prize-essay,  declamation,  dy.  is  to  vapaxpvtJLa  Thuc. 
I.  22.  IV.   the  ground  or  plea  on  which  a  cause  is  founded, 

Antipho  133.  34,  Lys.  137.  8. 

a.yo>viay.6s,  0,  rivalry,  Thuc.  7.  70. 

OYuvio-Ttov,  verb.  Adj.  one  must  contend,  Xen.  Cyr.  1 .  6,  9,  Dem.  1 29.  6. 

dyuvwrrTiptos,  a,  ov,  also  05,  ov  (Poll.  4.  89),  =  d*yaJvi<7Ti*os,  but  sensu 
dubio  in  Anaxipp.   Ki$.  I.  II.  dyuvioTTipiov,  to,  a  place  of 

assembly,  Aristid.  1.  108. 

dJYo>vio-TTJs,  ov,  o,  a  combatant,  competitor,  esp.  at  the  games,  Hdt.  2. 160., 
5.  22,  Isocr.  17  C,  etc.: — as  Adj.,  dy.  Xirwot  ra«-horses,  Plut.  Them. 
25.  2.  a  pleader,  parly-spealter,  debater,  opponent.  Plat.  Phaedr. 

269  D,  Theaet.  164  C,  cf.  Thuc.  3.  37.  3.  an  actor,  Arist.  Probl. 

19.  15  ;  Otatpois  (It  dyaxviorais  Achae.  ap.  Ath.  417  F;  dy.  rpayixuv 
ira&wv  Timae.  119.  II.  a  master  in  any  art  or  science,  Isocr.  Antid. 

201,  204;  ixpos  dy.  \rr)s  yttaiUTpias"]  Dem.  1414.  20.  III. 

c.  gen.  one  who  struggles  for  a  thing,  dy.  rrjs  dptrijs,  rr}s  dXrfitias, 
a  champion  of  virtue,  of  truth,  Aeschin.  79.  31,  Plut.  2.  16  C. 

d-yuvto-TiKos,  j),  iv,  fit  for  contest,  esp.  in  the  games,  bvvapus  dy. 
Arist.  Rhet.  I.  5,  6;  dy.  trwfiaros  dptrr)  lb.  14;  i)  dyojvtOTixrj  the  art 
of  combat  or  contest.  Plat.  Soph.  225  A,  sq. ;  so,  to  dyajvioTixdv  lb. 
219C,  D.  2.  fit  for  contest  in  speaking,  07.  \t(is  style  of  debate, 

Arist.  Rhet.  3.  12,  1  ;  dy.  X6701  contentions,  much  like  iptarticoi,  Id. 
Soph.  Elench.  2,  fin.,  al.  ;  dy.  btarpiflai  Id.  Top.  8.  II,  2.  3.  able 

to  win,  masterly,  bold,  striking,  dy.  ytpopp^fiara  Hipp.  Art.  825  ;  dy. 
ti   ixovaa.   having   in    it   something  glorious,  lb.  832.  II.   of 

persons,  contentious,  eager  for  applause.  Plat.  Meno  75  C.  III. 

Adv.  -xiin,  contentiously,  Arist.  Top.  8.  14,  fin. ;  dy.  ix""  to  be  dis- 
posed to  fight,  Plut.  Sulla  16.  2.  in  masterly  style,  Arist.  Probl.  19. 
15  :  boldly,  decisively,  in  late  Medic. 

dyimoTpia,  i),  fem.  of  dytxivtOTi)s,  Eus.  H.  E.  5.  I. 

dyuvo-Biirns,  ov,  0,  a  judge  of  the  contest,  Hesych. 

dYuvo8«o-ia,  i),  the  office  of  dytavcQi-rns,  direction  or  exhibition  of  games, 
Plut.  Ages.  21,  C.  I.  2785  al..  Poll.  3.  140. 

d-ywvo8«T«i>,  f.  i)ao>,  (dycaroSirns)  to  direct  the  games,  exhibit  them, 
Thuc.  3.  38,  oft.  in  Insert.;  d-y.  XlvSta,  'OXii/ma  Anth.  P.  12.  255; 
nipots  dy.  Plut.  2.  621  C.  2.  c.  ace,  d7.  Ttvds  to  embroil  them, 

Polyb.  9.  34,  3  ;  dy.  araatv,  wiXt/ior,  etc.,  to  stir  up  war,  etc.,  Plut. 
Cato  Mi.  45,  Joseph.  A.  J.  17.  3,  I.  H.  to  preside  al  the  games, 

Dem.  no.  13,  cf.  Plat.  Symp.  184  A. 

ayuwo-9fri\p,  rjpos,  i,  =  sq.,  Inscr.  metr.  in  C.  I.  5727. 

OYwvo-flmis,  on,  o,  (tIBtjiu)  judge  of  the  contests,  president  or  director 
of  the  games,  or  (later)  an  exhibitor  of  games,  Hdt.  6.  1 27,  3,  Andoc. 
32.  31,  Decret.  ap.  Dem.  253,  fin.,  oft.  in  Inscrr.  2.  generally,  a 

judge,  Xen.  An.  3.  1,  21,  Aeschin.  79.  30. 

dyuvofcTucov  T/,  inr,  of  or  for  the  direction  of  the  games,  Xf>^/«Ta  C.  I. 
1378,  cf.  2742  : — of  a  person,  lb.  6824. 

qy<iwo8«th,  iJot,  fem.  of  dyavoSirns,  C.  I.  1444,  S415,  al. 

di<i>vo-8T|irn.  t),  =  dywvoOtoia,  Soph,  ft.  802,  as  restored  by  W.  Dind. 
The  form  is  irreg.,  as  Poll.  3.  141  remarks,  but  introduced  metri  grat. ; 
cf.  vofw0i)icT]. 

dyuvoXo-yia,  i),  (\iyai)  laborious  discussion,  Galen. 

d-ywvos,  ov,  like  dyiwios,  without  angle,  Theophr.  H.  P.  7.  6,  2. 

qyuvov  o,  Aeol.  for  dywv.  q.  v. 

doaYrids,  i,  v.  sub  obayiws,  Hesych.  has  dbaxrw  =  Kvrflofuu. 

dSaoot ,  ov,  (bats,  Sit)  without  resin,  Theophr.  H.  P.  5.  I,  5. 

dSa8ovpxi]To»,  ov,  (babovxtoi)  not  lighted  by  torches ;  of  marriage,  clan- 
destine, Apion  ap.  Eust. 

dSdi)u.ovia,  r),  ignorance,  unskilfulness  in  doing,  c.  inf.,  Od.  24.  244, 
where  Buttm.  (I.cxil.  s.  v.  ibtjaat  13)  prefers  the  v.  1.  dSa-qu-oo-wn. 

d-6aT)pjjv,  ov,  unknowing,  ignorant,  c.  gen.,  fiaxys  dbarffwvt  tpwri  II. 
5.  f>34  ;  xaxaiv  dbatjftovts,  ignari  malorum  (Aen.  I.  1 98),  Od.  12.  208  : 
absol.,  Pseudo-Phocyl.  81. — Ep.  word,  used  by  Hdt.  8.  65  db.  toiv  Ipwv 
rwv  iv  'KXtvatvt. 

dodrp.  is,  (*bdai,  Ja^voi)  =  foreg.,  c.  gen.  pers.,  Hdt.  9.  46  ;  c.  gen.  rei, 
t^s  ffvair/s,  tSiv  xWI"**  Id.  2. 49.,  5.  90  ;  vnv  obvvas  dbar)s  Soph.  Ph. 
827  (lyr.) :  also  c.  inf.,  unknowing  how  to  ..  ,  dbar/s  !'  «?x*"/  t">t>*ov  &x^m 

(sc.  icrip)  lb.  1 167  (lyr.):  absol.,  Xen.  Cyr.  1.6,  43  ;  oix  db.  Anth.  Plan. 

84: — Adv.  dbar/ori,  Suid.,  Zonar.  II.  dark,  Parmen.  12 J. 

d8d-r|TO«,  ov,  (baT/vat)  unknown,  Hes.  Th.  655,  Epigr.  Gr.  1028.  67. 

d-SaioaXTos.  ov.  unembroidered,  plain,  Orph.  Arg.  405. 

dSat<T0i.  ov,  (baiai)  undivided,  Ap.  Rh.  3.  1033. 

d-odiKTOS.  ov,  undestroyed,  Q^  Sm.  I.  196.,  11.  165. 

dodiot,  ov.  Dor.  for  dbi]ios. 


aSe 


19 


dSatos,  ov,  (aSrjv)  abundant,  Sophron  ap.  Hesych. 

dSaiTos,  ov,  (Saivvuai)  of  which  none  might  eat,  Ovoia  Aesch    Ac 

'5£-,  ,  ' 

d8aiTp«xrros,  ov,  (8aiTp«i;w)  =  sq.,  Nonn.  D.  17.  51. 

dSaiTpos,  ov,  (baioj  B)  undivided,  Hesych. 

d-oaKpus,  v,  gen.  nor,  =  dbcucpirros  I,  Pind.  O.  2.  120,  Eur.  Ale.  1047  ; 
biro  rpwpip  abaKpvs,  of  a  healthy  child,  Theocr.  24.  31.  II.  = 

dbdxpvros  II,  Eur.  Med.  861 :  costing  no  tears,  iroXf/tos,  vixn  Diod  ic  72 
Plut.  2.  318  B.  ' 

dSaicpvTi,  Adv.  tearlessly,  without  tears,  Isocr.  305  E,  Plut.  Caes.  7,  etc. 

d-Sdicpfrros,    ov,  without  tears,  i.e.:  I.  act.  tearless,  db.  ical 

dirqpMV  II.  1.  415,  cf.  Od.  24.  61  ;  dSaxpiroi  ixfv  oaoe  Od.  4.  186; 
drrrivaKTO!  KdSaxpvros  Soph.  Tr.  1 200 : — (bvdfav  dbaupvTaiv  f}k«pdpcvv 
iruffov  to  lull  the  desire  of  her  eyes  so  that  they  weep  no  more,  lb.  106  ; 
on  this  proleptic  usage,  v.  Lob.  Aj.  515,  Ellendt  Lex.  Soph.  s.  v.,  and  cf. 
dSfpKTOs.  2.  c.  gen.  not  weeping  for,   tivos  Epigr.  Gr.  (add.) 

241  a.  13.  II.  pass,  unwept,  unmourned,  Soph.  Ant.  881.  2. 

costing  no  tears,  rpoirata  Plut.  Timol.  37. 

dSaX-qs.  «'r,  Dor.  form,  =  dbrfXT/ros,  Hesych. 

dSaudvTlvos,  77,  ov,  adamantine,  of  steel,  Pind.  P.  4.  398,  Aesch.  Pr.  6, 
64,  Soph.  Fr.  604,  Aeschin.  65.  33.  2.  metaph.  hard  as  adamant, 

adamantine,  ovbfis  &v  ytvoiro . .  ovtcvs  db.,  09  av  . .  Plat.  Rep.  360  B  ; 
otbrjpois  xaX  db.  Xoyots  Id.  Gorg.  509  A ;  ovk  db.  tvri,  of  a  girl,  Theocr. 
3.  39.     Adv.  -vais.  Plat.  Rep.  618  E. 

doau.dvrtos,  6,  =  foreg.,  as  a  name  of  Origen,  Eus.  H.  E.  6.  14,  10. 

d5&u.avT6-8«TOS,  ov,  iron-bound,  db.  Xvpxu  Aesch.  Pr.  148,  426  (lyr.). 

doauavTO-ir&TAos,  ov,  on  a  base  of  adamant,  k'iwv  Pind.  Fr.  58. 

dSdjias,  avros,  o,  (bafidat)  : — first  in  Hes.  (in  Horn,  only  as  prop,  n.), 
properly  the  unconquerable  :  I.  as  Subst.  adamant,  i.  e.  the  hard- 

est metal,  prob.  steel,  Hes.  Op.  146  ;  hence  the  epithets  xXoupoV,  jtoXios 
Id.  Sc.  231,  Th.  161:  metaph.  of  any  thing  fixed,  unalterable,  «ttos 
ipiaj  dbdfxavTi  itfXdaoas  having  fixed  it  firm  as  adamant,  Orac.  ap.  Hdt. 
7.  141  ;  dbdfxavros  8t}o~cv  aXots,  fixed  them  with  nails  of  adamant,  i.e. 
inevitably,   Pind.  P.  4.   125,  cf.  Anth.  Plan.  167.  2.  a  hard  metal 

resembling  gold,  xpv<ro"  °C0S  •  •  "*'•  IkXj)0t)  Plat.  Tim.  59  B,  cf.  Plin. 
37.  15  ;  so  perh.  in  Plat.  Polit.  303  E.  3.  the  diamond,  Theophr.  Lap. 
19.  II.  as  Adj.  not  to  be  broken,  dvaxrirns  Orph.  Lap.  192  : 

metaph.  the  inflexible  one,  i.e.  love,  Alex.  Qatbp.  I.  13;  of  Hades, 
Theocr.  2.  34. 

d-5uu.ao-Ti.  Adv.  unconquerably,  Suid. 

dSdu-aoros.  ov,  (ba^dot)  epith.  of  Hades,  inflexible,  U.  9.  158  :  later  in 
the  proper  sense,  untamed,  unbroken,  tmros  Xen.  Eq.  1,  1. 

d-odu&TOV  ov,  =  djd/iaoros,  unconqvered,  Aesch.  Cho.  54,  Th.  233, 
Supp.,  etc.,  Soph.  O.  T.  205  :  of  females,  unwedded.  Soph.  Aj.  450 :  of 
beasts,  untamed,  v.  sub  irionpa. — dbdfiavros  is  the  form  preferred  in 
Med.  Ms.  of  Aesch.,  and  dbapiaarot  in  Laur.  of  Soph. ;  but  the  metre 
in  several  passages  requires  dbdfiaros,  never  -aoTos  or  -aiTos ;  whence 
Elmsl.  (Soph.  O.  T.  196)  inferred  that  dbd/taros  was  the  only  form  used 
by  Trag.,  who  have  the  word  only  in  lyr.  passages.  [abSfi&Tai  in 

Theocr.  15.  4,  unless  we  read  dX(fidrct),  v.  sub  ^AV/xaTOS.] 

d-oau,vt|»,  is,  and  £8au,vos.  ov,  =  doa/rao-Tos,  Hesych. 

d-Sau.os,  ov,  =  dda/iaoTor,  Ion  9. 

dSdv.  Aeol.  for  dbrjv,  Alcman  76. 

dSa£du  or  -iw,  dbaffjaat,  dbdfofiai,  v.  sub  ooafar. 

doairdvT|TOS,  ov,  (ba-rr&vdot)  inexhaustible,  Eccl. 

d-oair&vos,  ov,  without  expense,  costing  nothing,  ykvxia  xdbdirava  Ar. 
Pax  593,  cf.  Teles,  ap.  Stob.  69.  19 ;  dS.  T(9t<r8o/  ti  C.  I.  3065,  cf. 
3066  : — Adv.,  dbavdvojs  riptfai  tppiva  Eur.  Or.  1 1 76.  II.  of 

persons,  not  spending,  db.  xPVfaran'  th  to  biov  Arist.  Virt.  et  Vit.  7,  3. 

d5dpKT|,  7),  or  dodpKT|v  0,  a  salt  efflorescence  on  the  herbage  of  marshes, 
Diosc.  5.  137 :  also  &SapKos,  6,  Damocr.  ap.  Galtn. ;  Dim.  dSdpKiov,  to, 
Galen.  '  Cf.  Salmas.  Solin.  918. 

aSapTOt.  of,  (oipa)  unflayed :  not  cudgelled,  Hesych. 

§8<ii  or"Ai8as,  Dor.  for  a"Sr)s,  "AiSiyr,  Soph. 

d-Seurpot,  ok,  tribute-free,  Aesch.  Fr.  59. 

dSao-Tos,  or,  (bdaaoBai)  undivided.  Soph.  Aj.  54. 

dSax<u.  to  scratch,  Ar.  Fr.  360 :  cf.  bbifofiat. 

dSS««s,  v.  sub  dbtr)s. 

do6r|KoT«,  d86r)v.  dS&n<|>aY<u,  v.  sub  dbia),  ibr)v,  donipayiui. 

do8ii,  Ixos,  r),  a  measure  of  four  xotvlKt^t  Ar.  Fr.  573. 

ao«.  doctv,  v.  sub  dvbdvot. 

d8«a.  Dor.  for  r/bua,  and  also  for  r)bvv :  v.  sub  r)bvt. 

d5«T)s.  Ep.  d5«iT|s.  t's:  Ep.  voc.  dbbeis:  (bios).  Fearless,  «  irep  d?«if)s 
t  iari,  of  Hector,  II.  7.  1 1 7  ;  kvov  dbbeis  8.  423,  cf.  Od.  19.  91.  2. 

fearless,  secure  (v.  sub  dX«;s),  to  dbtis,  security,  Thuc.  3.  37 ;  dbtrjs 
Savdrov  Plat.  Rep.  386  B ;  wtpi  to>  «oXdi'  Sdvarov  Arist.  Eth.  N. 
3.  6,  10  ;  iv  voaois  lb.  1 1 :— dbtte  bios  btbiivat  to  fear  where  no  fear  is. 
Plat.  Symp.  198  A.  II.  causing  no  fear,  not  formidable,  irpdr  ix- 

Bpovs  Thuc.  1.  36;  and  so  in  6.  87,  pr)  dbtfts  tivat  mvbwtvtiv  to  chance 
to  be  not  without  fear  (i.e.  formidable)  to  him  (where  however  Dobree 
suggests  dbds,  as  in  Dem.  207.  23  obx  dbtis  not  without  cause  for 
fear).  III.  most  common  in  Adv.  dbtws,  without  fear  or  scruple, 

confidently,  Hdt.  3.  65.,  9.  1 09 ;  db.  iroXiTtvtoOai  Lys.  1 70.  32  ;  db.  Xt- 
ytiv  Arist.  Fr.  394;    <p$iyyta0ai  Epigr.  Gr.  502.  7.  2.  freely, 

largely,  without' stint,  Thuc.  2.  40,  Cic.  Att.  13.  52. 

dSrfp,  ^5,  (biofuu)  not  in  want.  Max.  Tyr.  5.  I  (c.  gen.),  etc. 

d8«T|Toj,  ov,  (biopai)  not  wanting  a  thing,  Antipho  ap.  Suid. ;  cf. 
dbtvrrros. 

o8«ia,  i),  (dbtr)s)  freedom  from  fear,  Lat.  securitas,  esp.  of  the  person, 
dbfim  btbovai  to  grant  o  safe  conduct,  amnesty,  indemnity,  Hdt.  2.  131, 
)  C  2 


20 

6;  rots  dWots  dSftav  5e5dVare  oi/cttv  rqv  otptripav  Antipho  13S.  24; 
iv  <lS«i'p  tlvai  Hdt.  8.  120 ;  oix  iv  dS.  TtoiuaSai  to  \iyctv  to  hold  it  not 
safe,  Id.  9.  42  ;  to  aSifia  tivos  fte  dSfiav  naBiaravai  Lys.  192.  4;  toiv 
ffaifiaTwv  doaav  votuv  Thuc.  3.  58 ;  also,  dtittav  ^rj<pi^ea$at  ntpi  rtvos 
Lys.  1 66.  7  ;  a5.  tivi  irapaoicevdfriv,  irapix^v  Dem.  I/1-  7>  etc*  >  °PP- 
to  dStiav  (vpiaxtaSai  to  get  an  amnesty  or  indemnity,  Andoc.  3.  14; 
XaptSdvav  Dem.  321.  10 ;  d8«'as  Tvyxdveiv  Id.  58.  16  ;  tov  /if)  rraffx*"' 
dittav  rjyert  Id.  387.  17;  ^«rd  irdtrr/s  dSti'as  Id.  327.  9;  p.*T  dS«ias 
601.  13: — also,  yTJs  SS.  a  secure  dwelling-place,  Soph.  O.  C.  447: — in 
certain  cases,  at  Athens,  accusers  were  obliged  to  obtain  aStta  or  indem- 
nity,free  licence  to  speak,  Dem.  715.  14,  Plut.  Per.  31  ;  cf.  Diet,  of  Antt. 

dStidJu,  ro  6*  at  ease,  Eust.  Opusc.  251.  6. 

dSci-ydvcs,  01,  a  name  of  certain  Seleucian  magistrates  in  Polyb.  5.  54, 
IO ; — prob.  an  Eastern  word. 

dociT|s,  is,  Ep.  for  adcrjs. 

dStiKTOS,  ov,  (d(invvpu)  not  shewn,  unknown,  v.  1.  Pseudo-Phocyl.  124  ; 
of  the  Deity,  Philo  1.  197,  618. 

dS<iXia,  r),  fearlessness,  Pallad.  Hist.  Laus.  896  B. 

a-SctXos,  ov,  fearless,  Adam.  Physiogn. 

dScifiavTos.  ov,  (Sei/xaivai)  fearless,  dauntless,  Find.  N.  10,  30,  etc. ;  c. 
gen.,  dJ.  t/iaurf/s  without  fear  for  myself,  Aesch.  Pers.  162  : — Adv.  -rais, 
Id.  Cho.  771.  2.  where  nofear  is,  voidoffear,  olxia  Luc.  Philops.  31. 

dScipos,  ov,  (Supa)  fearless,  Hesych.,  Suid. 

dSctv,  Aeol.  o6eiv,  v.  sub  dvhdvw. 

d'-Sciirvos,  ov,  without  the  evening  meal,  supperless,  Hipp.  Aph.  1254, 
Xen.  An.  4.  5,  21,  etc. 

d-Sei.o-i8aip.ovia.  r),  freedom  from  superstition,  Hipp.  23.  37. 

d-S<io-tSaip.ov,  ov,  without  superstition,  Clem.  Al.  302.  Adv.  -fiuvus, 
Diod.  Excerpt.  614.  56. 

d-5<uri6cos,  ov,  impious,  Xoyiafioi  Orac.  ap.  Jul.  297  D. 

d&€Ko<7TOS,  ov,  (5e/cd£cu)  unbribed,  impartial,  Arist.  Eth.  N.  2.  9,  6, 
Dion.  H.,  etc. : — Comp.  Adv.  -oripov  Luc.  Hist.  Conscr.  47. 

d-Sacd-rcvTOS,  ov,  no!  tithed,  tithe-free,  Ar.  Eq.  301,  C.  I.  3137-  101. 

docKTOS,  ov,  (5i\op-at)  not  received,  incredible,  v.  1.  Lxx  (3  Mace.  4. 
2).  II.  act.  not  capable  of,  rijs  (idaifiovias  Hippod.  ap.  Stob. 

553.  19;  Kanov  Plut.  2.  881  B. 

docX^cd,  -c-f|,  d5c\4>c6$,  -cios,  v.  sub  dtit\<pfi,  ddeXtpos. 

d8«\d>€o-KTovos,  ov,  Ion.  for  dbtXipoKTuvos. 

dScAdVfj,  t),  fern,  of  dSfX<p6s,  a  sister,  Trag.,  etc. ;  Ion.  dScXqScrj,  Hdt. 
2.  56,  al. ;  Ep.  dSeXdieiT),  Qj.  Sm.  I.  30,  Anth. ;  Dor.  dSe\d>«d,  Pind.  N. 
7.  5,  and  in  lyr.  passages  of  Trag.,  Soph.  O.  T.  160,  O.  C.  535.  2. 

a  sister  (as  a  fellow  Christian),  Ep.  Rom.  16.  I. 

dScAdnScos,  contr.  -ovs,  6,  a  nephew,  generally  a  brother's  son,  Hdt.  I. 
65.,  6.  94,  al.,  Thuc.  2.  IOI,  etc. ;  also  a  sisters  son,  Hdt.  4.  147,  Thuc. 
2.  101,  etc.: — also,   d5cX<pi5us,   a  brother,  a  dear  one,   Lxx  (Cant.  2. 

dS<A<t>i&TJ,  1J,  Att.  contr.  for  dbeXtptbin,  a  brothers  or  sister  s  daughter, 
a  niece,  Ar.  Nub.  47,  Lysias  97.  2,  etc. 

dScX4>i8iov,  to.  Dim.  of  dStA^ds,  Ar.  Ran.  60,  Call.  Incert.  7  (prob.  I.). 

dS€\<$>££b>,  f.  Att.  tw,  to  adopt  as  a  brother,  call  brother,  Hecatae.  354, 
Apolloph.  'I<p.  2,  Isocr.  390  C : — Pass,  to  be  very  like,  Hipp.  Acut.  384, 
etc. ;  rod  Id.  Fract.  772. 

d5cA4>uc6s,  17,  ov,  brotherly  or  sisterly,  Arist.  Eth.  N.  8.  10,  6.  Adv. 
— kus,  Joseph.  Mace.  13.  9. 

d8c\4>i£i$,  $,  brotherhood,  close  connexion,  Hipp.  Art.  S23. 

dSeXt^o-KTOvos,  ov,  murdering  a  brother  or  sister,  Hdt.  3.  65  (in  Ion. 
form  dh(\(ptoicT~),  Plut.  2. 256  F : — hence  dScX^OKTCvcw,  to  be  murderer 
of  a  brother  or  sister,  Joseph.  B.J.  2.  11,  4;  and  d8cX<j>oKTOv(a,  i), 
murder  of  a  brother  or  sister,  lb.  1.  31,  2. 

d5e\4>o-£cuia,  j),  a  living  as  brothers,  Pallad.  Vit.  Chrys. 

d5c\4>o-p.i|ia,  1),  marriage  of  brother  and  sister,  Tzetz. 

dSeA^o-irats,  iratoos,  6,  -f),  a  brother's  or  sister  s  child,  Dion, H. 4. 64  (ex 
Cod.  Vat.),  and  restored  by  Dind.  in  Joseph.  A.  J.  4. 6, 1 2  for  dScA^ot)  ireuoos. 

dSeX^o-wotds,  ov,  adopting  as  a  brother,  E.  M.:  hence  dSeX^o-Troieu), 
Jo.  Chrys. ;  Subst.  dScX^o-iroiTjo'is,  -iroita,  -fy,  -iroiirjTOS,  ov,  Eccl. 

dSeA^oTTpcTT-ws,  Adv.,  as  befits  a  brother,  Lxx  (4  Mace.  10.  1 2). 

dScX<f>6s  [d],  (a  copul.,  bcX<f>vs,  Arist.  H.  A.  3.  I,  21  ;  cf.  d-yaOTOjp, 
and  Skt.  sa-garbhyas,  co-uterinus),  so  that  db(X<poi  are  properly  sons  of 
the  same  mother:  I.  as  Subst.,  dbtX<pos,  o,  voc.  d'5tA</>t  (not 

-<f>i),  Ion.  doeA'/;€uj,  Ep.  -ctos  (one  of  which  two  forms  Horn,  always 
uses,  Hdt.  and  Pind.  the  former,  which  also  occurs  in  a  lyr.  passage  of 
Aesch.,  Th.  974) : — o  brother,  or  generally,  a  near  kinsman ;  dS«X0oi 
brother  and  sister,  like  Lat.  fr aires,  Eur.  El.  536;  d5«A</>eoi  d?r'  ajxipo- 
rtpew,  i.  e.  not  half-brothers,  Hdt.  7.  97 :  proverb.,  xa^€ir°i  w<JX«/ioi 
do(\(p&v  Eur.  Fr.  965  : — cf.  atitK<p7}.  2.  a  brother  (as  a  fellow 

Christian),  Ev.  Matth.  12.  50,  Act.  Ap.  9.  30,  al.  II.  Adj., 

dd(\<pos,  rj,  ov,  brotherly  or  sisterly,  Trag.,  as  Aesch.  Th.  811  ;  <pvaiv 
dot,\<piiv  txovrts,  of  Hephaistos  and  Athena,  Plat.  Criti.  109  C.  2. 

generally,  like  Lat.  geminus,  gemellus,  of  anything  double,  twin,  in  pairs, 
Xen.  Mem.  2.  3, 19  : — also  like  twins,  just  like,  cognate,  dd.  v6pois  Plat. 
Legg.  683  A,  etc.:  mostly  c.  gen.,  dd(K<f>d  raivot  Soph.  Ant.  192  ;  1)  bi 
fiwpia  ptdXtOT  dd.  rrjs  irovrjpias  t<pv  Id.  Fr.  663  ;  very  often  in  Plat., 
as  Phaedo  108  B,  Crat.  418  E,  etc.;  but  also  c.  dat.,  dZt\<pa  rovrotot 
Soph.  O.C.  1262,. cf.  Plat.  Symp.  210  B. 

d5«X$ds,  crasis  for  o  dotX<pos,  Ar.  Pax  808,  Plat.  Prot.  310  C. 

dScX^oo-vvrj,  J),  ^dfcktyuTJjs,  Eccl. 

dScX^oxqs,  ttos,  i),  brotherly  affection,  Lxx  (1  Mace.  12. 10  and  17): 
relation  of  brothers  and  sisters,  Schol.  Eur.  Or.  1045.  II.  the 

brotherhood,  1  Petr.  2.  17.,  5.9. 

d-8fLi.vi.os,  ov,  vnwedded  to  any  one,  tivos  Opp.  C.  3.  358. 


aoeia^w  —  aotjfxoveto. 


d-8«vSpo$,  ov,  without  trees,  Polyb.  3.  55,  9,  Dion.  H.  1.  37: — poet. 
dScvSpcos,  Opp.  C.  4.  337. 

d8cvocL$T|S,  it,  (doos)  tike  an  dbyv,  glandular,  Galen. : — contr.,  uStvajSn 
ipitfiara  Plut.  2.  664  F. 

d-Sc£io$,  ov,  left-Handed,  awkward,  Luc.  Merc.  Cond.  14,  Saturn.  4. 

d-5«pKT]s.  is,  unseen,  invisible,  Anth.  P.  11.  372. 

aScpKTOS,  ov,  (otpKopat)  not  seeing,  dhipKruv  ofiyLarcuv  TTjrwfifvos  (a 
prolepsis)  reft  of  thine  eyes  so  that  they  see  not.  Soph.  O.  C.  1200  ;  cf. 
dhdicpvTOs  I.     Adv.  -reus,  without  looking,  lb.  1 30. 

d-5t'pLLa.TOs.  ov,  without  skin,  Schol.  Pind.  P.  4.  398. 

d-8cpu.os,  oi',  =  foreg.,  Hesych.  s.  v.  dSonros'. 

d-8co-u,ios,  ov,  =  s<\.,  Nonn.  D.  15.  138. 

u-Sco-lios,  ov,  unfettered,  unbound,  do.  <pv\aKTi,  Lat.  libera  custodia,  our 
'parole,'  Thuc.  3.  34,  Dion.  H.  I.  83,  etc. ;  {SaXXdvria  d8.  open  purses, 
Plut.  2.  503  D;  Sffffitov  dStfffiov  <pv\kdb*os,  i.e.  the  suppliant  wreaths 
which  were  hung  around  her,  Herm.  Eur.  Supp.  32., 

d-ScViroTos,  ov,  without  master  or  owner,  of  property,  Plat.  Rep.  617  E  : 
of  freedmen,  Myro  ap.  Ath.  271  F,  Arist.  Eth.  N.  8.  10,  6  ;  d5.  koX 
avTotcpartis,  of  the  gods,  Plut.  2.  426  C.  II.  of  reports  or  writings. 

without  an  owner,  anonymous,  Dion.  H.  11.  50,  Plut.  Cic.  15,  etc. : — Adv. 
-tojs,  Schol.  Ar.  Ran.  1447. 

d8«Tos,  ov,  (5«'tw)  unbound,  loose,  Hipp.  Art.  808  ;  d5.  ttKokos  Christod. 
Ecphr.  73.  2.  free,  Dem.  753.  1  :  unmarried,  Eccl.  3.  un- 

shod, like  dvvwodrjros,  Philostr.  921. 

d8«vT|TOS,  ov,  Ep.  form  of  dbi-nros,  Hesych.  (vulg.  d'Sfuros),  E.  M.  17.  4. 

d5euKT]s,  4$,  a  word  used  by  Horn,  only  in  Od.,  oXiBptp  dZevKti  4.  489  ; 
dofv/cca  ttot^iov  10.  245;  <f>rjfuv  dSfvxea  6.  273;  so  also  in  Ap.  Rh.. 
etc.  It  is  commonly  explained  not  sweet,  bitter,  cruel  (5€v/cos  yap  to 
y\vKV  says  Schol.  Ap.  Rh.  2.  267,  cf.  Schol.  Od.  4.  489,  etc.),  and  Nic. 
Al.  328  used  otvicii  otvty  =  y\vK€i.  But  the  Scholiasts  almost  always 
add  another  sense,  viz.  direoitcws,  dirpoabo/enros,  dirpoopaTos,  dvfi(cao~TO$, 
i.  e.  unexpected,  unforeseen,  sudden,  and  this  is  the  only  sense  recognised 
by  Apollon.  Lex.  Horn.  Curt,  also  makes  it  prob.,  on  etymol.  grounds, 
that  the  latter  is  the  true  Homeric  sense,  holding  that  -ocvic-fjs  belongs  to 
the  same  Root  as  hoK-loj ;  cf.  iv-ovfetajs,  HoKv-dfv/cijs. 

d8«U/TjT0s,  ov,  (Screen)  untanned,  of  a  raw  hide,  Od.  20.  2,  142,  Anth. 
P.  6.  298. 

d8cu,  (dw  satio)  to  be  sated  (only  found  in  two  Homeric  forms,  aor.  I 
opt.  and  pf.  part.,  the  other  tenses  being  supplied  by  dew),  fiij  £ttvo$ . . 
deiirvcp  dh-qoti*  lest  he  should  be  sated  with  the  repast,  feel  loathing  at  it, 
Od.  1.  134  (cf.  d-qbioS)  ;  Kapidr^  dt-nicoTts  ^Se  teal  virvtp  sated  with  toil 
and  sleep,  II.  10.  98,  cf.  312,  399,  471,  Od.  12.  281. — In  both  these 
forms  the  first  syll.  is  long,  as  in  dboXtcrxys,  and  the  best  Mss.  and 
authorities  agree  in  writing  them  with  a  single  5 ;  whereas  in  ddrjv  or 
ddrjv  the  a  is  short,  except  in  one  phrase,  and  here  the  same  authorities 
write  tdfifvai  aoorjv  (II.  5.  203).  Heyne  and  Buttm.  consider  the  a  to 
be  long  by  nature,  but  fail  to  explain  the  fact  that  do-nv  as  a  rule  has  a. 
(For  the  Root,  v.  ddrjv.) 

a8-[),  v.  sub  dvbdvoj. 

doTjios,  contr.  dSfjos.  Dot.  dSd'ios,  ov,  unassaited,  vnravaged,  dZyov  . . 
ffirapTu/v  an  dvopwv  Soph.  O.  C,  1533  :  of  persons,  not  hostile,  Ap.  Rh. 
4.^647. 

d8i]KTOS,  ov,  (batcvoi)  imbitten,  not  gnawed  or  worm-eaten,  Hes.  Op. 
418  (in  Sup.  dbijKTOTaTij),  Diosc.  2.  64,  al. : — Adv.  -tojs,  Plut.  Pomp. 
2.  2.  metaph.  unmolested,  not  carped  at,  Plut.  2.  864  C  : — Adv. 

-tojs,  lb.  448  A.  II.  act.  not  biting  or  pungent,  Hipp.  596.  4, 

Diosc.  I.  29,  cf.  Schiif.  Eur.  Hec.  1117. 

dS-nXecj,  (dorjKos)  be  in  the  dark  about  a  thing,  understand  not,  otcoirbs 
irpo&rjKfts  Sjv  dbrjkovfxfv  tppdaat  Soph.  O.  C.  35  : — Pass,  to  be  obscure, 
Sext.  Emp.  M.  II.  233,  cf.  7.  393  :  to  fail,  not  to  appear,  Hipp.  590.  17. 

dS-f|XT|TOS,  ov,  (dr}\4ofiat)  unhurt,  Ap.  Rh.  2.  709. 

dS-nXCa,  #,  —  dSi/Ao-n/s,  Anth.  P.  10.  96,  Agath.  Hist.  p.  180.  18. 

dS-nXo-Troieco,  to  make  unseen,  Symm.  Job.  9.  5. 

dB^Xo-TTOios,  6v,  making  unseen,  Schol.  II.  2.  455,  al. 

d-8TjXos,  ov,  not  seen  or  known  :  hence,  unknown,  obscure,  ignoble,  Hes. 
Op.  6  (cf.  dpifaXos) ;  tov  d8.  dvopa  . .  Ixvevuv  Soph.  O.  T.  475  ;  tdv  5t 
. .  do.  6  KTfivas  77  Plat.  Legg.  874  A  ;  -notuv  kavrov  d5.  Arist.  H.  A.  9. 
37,  5.  II.  mostly  of  things,  db.  Odvarot  death  by  an  unknown 

hand,  Soph.  O.  T.  496  ;  d'5.  ix^Pa  secr£t  enmity,  Thuc.  8.  108  ;  pti  nav 
dbrjKov  melts  all  to  nothing,  Soph.  Tr.  698  ;  d5.  tivi  unseen  by  one,  un- 
observed by  him,  Xen.  Cyr.  6.  3,  13;  dS.  tivi  ct  .  . ,  Plat.  Phaedr. 
232  E.  b.  neut.,  dbr)\6v  [eori]  <i . . ,  oti  . . ,  it  is  uncertain  whether 

, . ,  unknown  that , . ,  often  in  Att.  Prose  ;  so,  dbtjKov  firj . . ,  Plat.  Phaedo 
91  D: — absol.,  ddrjXov  ov  it  being  uncertain,  Thuc.  I.  2  ;  so  also,  ev 
db-qXcp  ttvai  Antipho  130.  4;  iv  dtyXoTtpo)  tlvai  Xen.  Hell.  7-  5»  8  ; 
<£  dbrjXov  €px*Ta*  [aeKrjvrj']  Soph.  Fr.  713  ;  us  t^  d5.,  opp.  to  iv  to! 
</>ai'6pa).  Xen.  Eq.  Mag.  5,  7  ; — but  also,  c.  abrjXos  agreeing  with 

the  subject  (like  Stnatos  clpu),  iraibts  ddnXoi  6iroT€pojv  =  dbTj\ov  dnoTf- 
oojv  Traibts  tlaiv  Lys.  95.  I  ;  dbrjXots  . .  oitojs  diro07jo~€Tat  =d  dbrj\d  tart 
onojs  air.,  Arist.  Eth.  N.  3.  3,  10,  cf.  Xen.  Mem.  I.  I,  6.  d.  in  Eur. 

Or.  1318  it  has  a  half  act.  sense,  XP°r  ^-b-qXtp  tojv  dfbpapifvojv  nipt  giving 
no  sign  of  what  had  been  done.  III.  Adv.  -Aw?,  secretly,  Thuc. 

I.  92,  etc. ;  Sup.  -oVara,  Id.  7.  50. 

dB^Xo-nis^TOStfifUncertainty,  Prot.  ap.  Diog.L.9.  51, Polyb.  5.  2, 3, etc. 

dS-nXd-^Xcpos,  ov,  with  invisible  veins,  Arist.  G.  A.  1.19,  15,  P.  A.  3.4,  fin. 

dorjXdcd,  to  make  dbrjXos ;  Pass,  to  be  obliterated,  C.  I.  5774-  57* 

d-8irjLiioupYT|TOs,  ov,  not  wrought  by  workmen,  rou^A,Diod.  3. 26.  2. 

uncreate,  Eccl. : — Adv.  -ojs,  lb. 

dSrjLj.oKpdrnTOs,  ov,  not  democratical,  Dio  C.  43.  45. 

uOT]LLov(a>,  aor.  inf.  dbjjfiovqcat,  to  be  sorely  troubled  or  dismayed,  be  in 


aStjuovla  —  aSia(pdopta. 


anguish,  Hipp.  563.  5  ;  dlnixovwv  rt  kcu  dwopwv  Plat.  Theaet.  175  D,  cf. 
Dem.  402.  24 ;  donptovrjoai  tos  f  t^ds  Xen.  Hell.  4.  4,  3  ;  c.  dat.  rei, 
dSrjUOVu  TT)  aroma  too  irdfloire  Plat.  Phaedr.  251  D  ;  km  rivt  Dion.  H. 

3.  70.  (Eust.,  833.  15,  derives  it  from  d8ij/uuv,  a  word  which  is  nowhere 
found,  unless  it  is  rightly  restored  by  Littre  in  Hipp.  Epid.  1  ;  besides, 
the  origin  of  db-qiiwv  is  equally  unknown.)  £fi8-,  Nic.  ap.  Ath.  282  F, 
cf.  Anth.  P.  12.  226.] 

dSi)u,ovia,  ij,  trouble,  distress,  Anth.  P.  12.  226,  Plut.  Num.  4:  (v.  foreg.) 

d-5iip.os.  ov,  =  diroSrjfxos,  Soph.  Fr.  566. 

d-8-r|u,oo-i«VTOs,  ov,  not  divulged,  secret,  Eccl. 

doTmoo-wn,  r),  rarer  form  for  aorjfwvia,  Democr.Fr.  91,  Xen.  ap.A.B.8o. 

45t|u,uv,  ov,  gen.  oyos,  sore-troubled,  v.  sub  donpLovioj. 

5&nv,  Ion.  aS-nv,  Adv.,  Lat.  satis,  to  one's  Jill,  (S/itvai  dobnv 
to  eat  their  Jill,  II.  5.  203,  al. ;  inm-nkapuvoi  oirwv  aSrjv  Plat.  Polit. 
272  C.  2.  c.  gen.,  01  fuv  dbnv  tXooxjt . .  wo\ipcoio  may  drive  him  to 

satiety  of  war,  II.  13.  315  ;  Tpwas  dbnv  i\aaai  iroktfwto  19.  423  ;  in  puv 
<t>rjfu  dbnv  cXdav  xaKornros  Od.  5.  290 ;  so  in  Att.,  dbnv  eXfif  ev  alfiaros 
licked  his  Jill  of  blood,  Aesch.  Ag.  828  ;  so  in  Plat.,  not  rovraiv  liiv 
dbnv  Euthyphro  J I  E,  cf.  Rep.  341  C,  etc. ;  aonv  i%liv  nvit  to  have 
enough  of  i.  thing,  be  weary  of  it.  Id.  Charm.  153  D  ;  toD  (payttv  Arist. 
Probl.  28.  7  ;  also,  doijv  ixovotv  oi  \6yoi  Plat.  Rep.  541  B  ;  and  c.  part., 
dbnv  uxov  KTfivovrts  Hdt.  9.  39.  (The  Root  is  "AA,  cf.  the  Lat.  satis, 
satur,  satio ;  hence  aSiai,  alos,  also  ion,  dadofiai :  a  shorter  form  d  ap- 
pears in  <fa>,  satio,  whence  daros.)  [&,  except  in  the  phrase  ibjitvai  aonv  ; 
v.  sub  dbiu.~) 

o8t,v  or  &8t|v,  ivos,  6,  also  r),  a  gland,  Hipp.  Art.  788,  etc. 

d8r)vr|s.  is,  (orjvos)  ignorant,  inexperienced,  Simon.  Iamb.  7.  53  (e  conj.)  : 
— Adv.  -tare  A.  B.  341.     Hence  dorprcut,  1),  ignorance,  Hesych, 

dSrjos,  ov,  contr.  for  doiji'or. 

d-67]pis.  10s,  0,  jj,  without  strife,  Anth.  P.  7.  440. 

dS-rjpiTos,  ov,  (bnptopuxt)  without  strife  or  battle,  II.  17.  42,  ubi  v. 
Spitzn.  2.  uncontested,  undisputed,  Orph.  Arg.  849,  Polyb.  I.  2,  3: 

— so  Adv.  -ran.  Id.  3.  93,  I.  II.  not  to  be  striven  against,  un- 

conquerable, dvdyxns  aOivos  Aesch.  Pr.  105. 

"Aiotjs  or  a*&r)S,  ov,  o,  Att. ;  but  also  'Atorjs,  ao,  and  tw,  the  older  and 
more  Homeric  form ;  Dor.  'Atbas,  a,  in  lyr.  and  anap.  verses  of  Trag.  : 
there  is  also  a  gen.  'Ai'805,  dat.  'AUt  (as  if  from  *Ai's),  Horn.,  Trag. ;  v. 
infr. :  (from  a  privat.  and  <</f\&  (ibtiv),  whence  Herm.  renders  it  by 
Nelucus)  : — in  Horn,  only  as  pr.  n.  Hades  or  Pluto  (cf.  nXotiraiv),  the 
god  of  the  nether  world,  son  of  Kronos  and  Rhea,  brother  to  Zeus,  Zf  ire 
xat  iyw,  rpiraros  8'  'Aiovs  11.  15.  188,  cf.  Hes.  Th.  455  ;  also  called 
Zfire  KaraxOuvios  II.  9.  457;  ira(  ivipwv  20.  61,  etc.: — tlv,  tis 
'Atbao  (sc.  bopiots,  bupiovs),  in,  into  the  nether  world,  Horn. ;  also,  tlv 
'Alios  II.  24.  593  ;  in  Att.  Com.  and  Prose  iv  "Aioov,  is  "Aibov  (sc. 
oUtf,  oIkov)  ;  A'iboabt  Adv.  to  the  nether  world,  II.  7.  330,  etc. ;  Soph. 
El.  463,  Tr.  4,  etc.  ;  trap'  'Attn,  tap'  'Aionv  O.  T.  972,  O.  C.  1552  ; 
cf.  wvXiy  1 : — hence,  2.  the  word  came  to  denote  a  place,  of  which 

the  first  trace  appears  in  II.  23.  244  chrd/HV  alrros  ,  .  'Ai'81  xtvOai^at : 
then,  i-rt  rov  9817V  Luc.  Catapl.  14;  «lr  dibnv  Anth.  P.  II.  23;  iv  t$ 
983  Ev.  Luc.  16.  23.  II.  after  Horn,  as  appdlat.  the  grave, 

death,  dtbnv  Xayxdvuv,  Si(ao9ai  Pind.  P.  5.  130,  I.  6  (5).  21 ;  98175 
itovtioj  death  by  sea,  Aesch.  Ag.  667,  cf.  Eur.  Ale.  13,  Hipp.  1047.  Cf. 
Aiouvfvs.  [tUtns  in  Horn.,  Att.  981;? ;  but  in  Trag.  also  alias,  Soph.  O.  C. 
1690  (lyr.);  and  018175  in  Simon.  Iamb.  I.  14: — gen.  Blttto  as  an  anapaest 
in  Horn.,  later  also  SXtiai,  Pors.  Hec.  1018,  Jac.  A.  P.  p.  374  ;  gen.  iXbao 
Horn. ;  gen.  ajSos  before  a  vowel,  II.  6.  284.,  20.  336.  J 

dST)C(ii,  v.  sub  dvbdvaj. 

uOT]4>aY«V  to  be  greedy,  Hermipp.  Incert.  16,  Isocr.  127  C. 

dSi)<|>&Yta,  *l,  gluttony.  Call.  Dianl  160;  pi.,  Arist.  Fr.  1 72,  Opp.  H.  2. 218. 

dSn-i^dyo*,  ov,  (aonv)  eating  one's  Jill  and  more,  gluttonous,  greedy, 
u8.  dv4)p,  of  an  athlete,  Theocr.  22.  115  ;  tt)v  d8.  vdaov  Soph.  Ph.  313  ; 
at.  \vxvos,  of  a  lamp  that  burns  much  oil,  Alcae.  Com.  K<u>i.  2.  2. 

metaph.  devouring  much  money,  costly,  rpiqpns  Lys.  ap.  Harp.,  cf.  Philist. 
58 ;  so  of  racehorses,  Pherecr.  Incert.  36. 

d-8j|»TOi,  ov,  not  ravaged,  Xen.  Hell.  3.  I,  5. 

d-5io0dToj,  ov,  not  to  be  passed,  vorafrfs,  vdwos  Xen.  An.  3. 1,  II,  Hell. 
;■  4.  44.  II.  act.  not  striding,  closed,  axiXn  A.  B.  343. 

d-SiapVf&uuTOf,  ov,  unconfirmed,  Ptolem.  Geogr.  2.  I. 

d-5iap;/3ao-ros,  ov,  as  Gramm.  term,  intransitive. 

d-SidpXnTot,  ov,  not  listening  to  slanderous  accusations,  i)  tuv  dya- 
6wv  (pikia  08.  «<7Ti  Arist.  Eth.  N.  8.  4,  3,  cf.  8.  6,  7 ;  iyvvoirros  *oJ  dl. 
Plut.  Brut.  8.     Adv.  -rut,  Clem.  Al.  536. 

u-SittfJoXos,  ov,  =. foreg.,  Stob.  Eel.  2.  240. 

d-£id|3poxos,  ov,  not  wetted  through,  Paraphr.  Opp.  Ix.  2.  I. 

d-SutyXvirroi,  ov,  not  to  be  cut  through,  A.  B.  344. 

d-oidYvwoTot,  ov,  undistinguishable,  Diod.  I.  30:  hard  to  distinguish 
or  understand,  dvofiara  Arist.  Quint.  9.  14. 

d-Sidyuyos,  ov,  impossible  to  live  with,  Philo  I.  1 18. 

d-StdScKTos.  and  d-8id6oxos,  ov,  without  successor,  perpetual,  Eccl. 

d-SidSpaorof ,  ov,  not  escaping ;  secure,  ipvXdTTttv  dS,  Clem.  Al. 
323.  2.  inevitable,  Aristocles  ap.  Eus.  P.  E.  15.  14,  Id.  H.  E.  6.  9,  8. 

d-Sid{<vKTOf,  ov,  not  disjoined,  inseparable,  Comut.  N.  D.  14,  Iambi. 

d-8id8«TOV  ov,  not  disposed  or  set  in  order,  Schol.  Ar.  Nub.  1370,  etc. ; 
cti'xoi  dS.  Schol.  II.  22.  487.  2.  having  made  no  will,  intestate, 

Plut.  Cato  Ma.  9,  Dio  Chr.  2.  281 : — Adv.  -ww,  Achm.  Onir.  97. 

d-tuuprrot,  ov,  undivided,  Arist.  Pol.  2.  6,  II,  aL  2.  indivisible,  like 
apuprit.  Id.  Phys.  6.  1,1,  Metaph.  9. 1,  al. ;  Comp.  less  divisible,  lb.  Adv. 
-run,  Phryn.  443,  C.  I.  8962.  II.  c.  gen.,  inseparable  from,  Eccl. 

d-SuucAfio-ros,  ov,  not  shut  out,  Joseph.  B.  J.  J.  5,  4. 

d-8iaK6vT)TOs,  ov,  not  executed,  Joseph.  A.  J.  19.  i,  1. 


21 

d-8ioKovn.oTos,  ov,  which  no  arrow  can  pierce,  restored  by  Passow  in 
Ael.  V.  H.  13.  15,  for  d8ia*dviffTO!,  which  Hesych.  explains  dvaiVflr/Toj, 
drparros. 

d-Sidicoiros,  ov,  not  cut  asunder,  unbroken,  uninterrupted,  X070S  Philo 
I.  81,  Porph.     Adv.  -ireos,  Ulp.  ad  Dem. 

d-Suucdo-p-nros,  ov,  unarranged,  Dion.  H.  3.  10. 

d-Siaxpio-ia,  j),  want  of  discernment,  Suid.,  Eccl. 

d-BidKptTOS,  ov,  not  to  be  parted,  undistinguishable,  mixed,  Hipp.  Coac. 
213;  atpa  Arist.  Somn.  3,  29: — Adv.  -Tore,  without  distinction,  in  com- 
mon, Lat.  temere,  Eccl.  2.  unintelligible,  Polyb.  15.  12,  9.  3, 
undecided,  Luc.  Jup.  Trag.  25,  C.  I.  2741.  8. 

d-SidAtiiTTOs,  ov,  unintermitting,  incessant,  Tim.  Locr.  98  E,  Ep.  Rom, 
9.  2.,  2  Tim.  I.  3.     Adv.  -rare,  Polyb.  9.  3,  8,  Ep.  Rom.  I.  9,  etc. 

d-SidX<KTOs,  ov,  without  conversation,  dS.  fiios  a  solitary  life,  Phryn. 
Com.  Mov.  I. 

d-5idXnirTos,  ov,  unseparated,  undistinguishable,  Epiphan.  I.  1071. 
Adv.  -Tore,  Philodem.  s.  v.  ttttXnpnivws.  The  Subst.  doioAndna  in  Vol. 
Hercul.  Ox.  2.  p.  23. 

d-SidXXaKTOs.  ov,  irreconcilable,  ra  wpis  ifids  doidWaxTa  virdpxti  my 
relation  to  you  admits  no  reconciliation,  Dem.  I472.  23.  Adv.,  dSiaX- 
Ad/rrare  ix*"'  vpos  nva  Dion.  H.  6.  56,  cf.  Plut.  Brut.  45. 

dSiaAo-yurros.  ov,  unreasoning,  thoughtless,  Eccl. 

d-8idX*Tos,  ov,  undissolved :  indissoluble,  Plat.  Phaedo  80  B.  II. 

irreconcilable,  as  in  Adv.,  dSmAirrore  (Xuv  "7><re  Tiva  Polyb.  18.  20,  4. 

doiaXupTnTOS,  ov,  unblamed,  Cyrill.  adv.  Nest.  2.  4,  Hesych. 

d-8iav«'u.T|Tos,  ov,  not  to  be  divided,  Longin.  22.  3. 

dSiavonrcvoiuu,  Dep.  to  speak  unintelligibly,  Schol.  Ar.  Av.  1377. 

d-SiavoTfros,  ov,  incomprehensible.  Plat.  Soph.  238  C.  II.  act. 

not  understanding,  silly,  Arist.  Fr.  77: — Adv.  -tods,  Plat.  Hipp.  Ma.  301  C. 

d&idvoiKTos,  ov,  unopened,  atppayib'ts  Eccl. 

d-SiavTos,  ovjunwetted,  vapuais  dSidvroiat  Simon.  44  (50),  3 :  not  bathed 
in  sweat,  oOivos  Pind.  N.  7.  107  ;  cf.  dvibparri,  d/coviTt.  II.  as 

Subst.  d8iavTos-,  a  plant,  maiden-hair,  Orph.  Arg.  918  :  also  dSiavrov,  to, 
Theocr.  13.  41,  Theophr.  H.  P.  7. 10,  5. 

d-oidvth-os,  ov,  not  to  be  accomplished.  Gloss. 

d-8id|to-Tos,  ov,  unpolished,  Galen.  4.  p.  574. 

d-Sidiravo-Tos,  ov,  not  to  be  stilled,  incessant,  violent,  Polyb.  4.  39,  10. 
Adv.  -Tare,  Id.  1.  57,  I. 

d-SidirXao-ros.  ov,  as  yet  unformed.  Plat.  Tim.  91  D,  cf.  Suid.  v.  4>pCvos. 

dotairvcvoTKi),  not  to  perspire,  Galen.  10.  p.  528. 

d8uMrv€VOT{a,  r),  want  of  perspiration,  Galen.  10.  p.  257* 

d8idirv«wTO$,  ov,  {oianviaj)  not  blown  through,  Galen.  10.  p.  251  ;  not 
evaporated  or  volatilized,  Theophr.  Odor.  39.  II.  act.  without 

drawing  breath,  uninterrupted.  Iambi,  v.  Pyth.  188. 

d-8iairdvT|T0*,  ov,  not  worked  out,  undigested,  Ath.  402  D. 

d-8idirraurros,  ov,  «or  stumbling.  Iambi.  Protrept.  360. 

dSuLTTTwo'ia,  r),  infallibility,  Hipp.  1282.  56. 

d-StdiTTwTos,  ov,  not  liable  to  error,  infallible,  Hipp.  1283.  21,  Sext. 
Emp.  M.  7.  no: — Adv.  -Tare,  Polyb.  6.  26,  4:  unerringly,  of  archers, 
Heliod.  9.  18.  2.  faultless,  of  writers,  Longin.  33.  5  :  to  d8id7rra>- 

tov  perfection  of  style,  Id.  36.  4. 

d-8iop8pos,  ov,  a  faulty  form  for  sq.,  Theophr.  H.  P.  3.  10,  5  ;  Lob. 
Paral.  p.  39. 

d-8idp8p<oTOf,  ov,  not  jointed  or  articulated,  Arist.  H.  A.  2.  I,  5, 
al.  II.  of  the  voice,  inarticulate,  Plut.  2.  378  C,  Adv.  -Tare, 

without  distinction,  Galen.  16.  p.  240. 

d-StdppnKTOt,  ov,  not  torn  in  pieces,  Jo.  Chrys. 

d-8idppoia.  17.  constipation,  Hipp.  ap.  Erotian. 

d-8ido*iwrros,  ov,  not  shaken  about,  Galen. 

d-8iao*K«jTrrws,  Adv.  inconsiderately,  Eccl. 

d-8tdo*K«vof ,  ov,  unequipt,  tmros  Anon.  ap.  Suid. 

d-Sido-KoiTos,  ov,  not  perspicuous,  Schol.  Aesch.  Cho.  815. 

d-8ido-rraoTot,  ov,  not  torn  asunder,  uninterrupted,  unbroken,  Xen. 
Ages.  I.  4,  Polyb.  I.  34,  5,  Greg.  Nyss.     Adv.  -Tare,  Hesych.,  Eccl. 

a-oido-TaXTO*,  ov,  not  clearly  unfolded,  v.  1.  Schol.  Od.  19.  560. 

d8iao-Tao-ta,  1),  continuousness.  Iambi,  in  Nicom.  Arithm.  81. 

d-otdordToi,  ov,  without  intervals,  continuous,  Antipho  ap.  Suid.,  Cy- 
rill.: — Adv.  -Tare,  without  intermission,  Philo  I.  342,  501,  etc.  2. 
without  difference  : — Adv.  -Tare,  without  dispute,  Eust.  Opusc.  228.  50, 
etc.          II.  (Si/ffTW/u)  without  dimensions,  Plut.  2.  601  C,  926  B. 

d-8ido-Turroj,  ov,  undistinguished,  unvarying,  Philo  2.  297. 

d-8idorro\o»,  ov,  not  separated,  confused,  A.  B.  809.  II.  =  dnap- 

ipjparos,  Gramm.     Adv.  -Xare. 

d-8taoTp«irrtoi ,  Adv.  without  turning,  continuously,  Hipp.  Fract.  765* 

d-Sido-Tpo<t>o*,  ov,  incapable  of  turning,  of  the  eyes  of  certain  animals, 
Arist.  Probl.  31.  7  ;  dS.  t$  irpoauirai  irittv  Clem.  Al.  185  :  metaph.  un- 
perverted,  xp'tais  Dion.  H.  de  Thuc.  2 : — Adv.  -<pois,  Sext.  Emp.  M.  2.  77. 

d-8ido-xioTos,  ov,  not  cloven,  Arist.  H.  A.  7.  4,  12. 

d-8idTaKTOS,  ov,  unarranged,  Dion.  H.  3.  10. 

d-8idTtiT]Tos,  ov,  not  cut  in  pieces,  indivisible,  Eccl. 

dBiaTpdvurTos,  ov,  not  made  clear,  unintelligible,  Athan. 

d-8tdTp€TTTOS,  ov,  immoveable,  headstrong,  Lxx,  etc.     Adv.  -Tare,  Lxx. 

d-SuLTpcd/ia,  ij,  obstinacy,  Caligula  ap.  Suet.  Calig.  29. 

d-8iaTwuTOS,  ov,  unshapen,  Diod.  1.  10. 

d-8iavAos,  ov,  with  no  way  back,  without  return,  of  the  nether  world,  Eur. 
Fr.  860 ;  ^tpacpovas  diiavKov  imo  .  .  Sopiov  Epigr.  Gr.  244.  9. 

d-8tddi9apTos.  ov,  =  dSid^opos  I ,  Plat.  Apol.  34  B,  Legg.  95 1  C.  II. 
=  dSidip$opos  II,  Galen.  2.  p.  27. 

d-8ui<t>8opia,  f/,  incorruption :  uprightness,  Ep.  Tit.  2.  7  (but  Lachm. 
and  Tisch.  dtptopiav). 


22 

d-Sid$0opos.  ov,  uncorrupted,  pure,  chaste.  Plat.  Phaedr.  252  D  ;  air 
opirjs  .  .  xai  dbiaipSupov  tt}s  <f<vXls  Dem.  325.  15  ;  cf,  Menand.  Incert. 
357,  Diod.  I.  59,  Plut. : — Adv.  -pare  ipaaBat  Aeschin.  19.  20.  2. 

of  judges,  incorruptible.  Plat.  Legg.  768  B;  of  witnesses.  Arist.  Rhet. 
I.  15,  17;  of  magistrates.  Id.  Pol.  3,  15,  9:  Sup.  Adv.  -wrara,  Plat. 

1.  c.  II.  imperishable.  Plat.  Phaedo  106  D,  E. 

dSiad>op«i>.  to  be  dbidipopos  or  indifferent,  Kara  n  Sext.  Emp.  P.  I. 
191  ;  wpos  Tt  M.  Anton.  11.  16:  dota<popfi  c.  inf.,  Lat.  nihil  re/ert, 
Apoll.  de  Pron.  57.         II.  db.  tivos  not  to  differ  from,  Philo  I.  414. 

doia<^6pTjO-vs.  ta'v.  r),  =  dbtatpopia,  Eccl. 

dSia4>opT|TiK6s,  ij,  6v,  like  indifference  :  to  dS.—uSia<popia,  Arr.  Epict. 

2.  I,  I4. 

dSia<t>6pT|Tos,  ov,  not  evaporating  or  perspiring,  Medic. 

dSia4>opia,  r),  indifference,  Cic.  Acad.  Pr.  2.  42,  Sext.  Emp.  P.  I.  152  ; 
cf.  sq.  II.  equivalence  of  signification,  Gramm. 

d-oid<t>opos,  ov,  not  different,  Arist.  Rhet.  I.  12,  35  ;  rofs  iuoiois  xal 
do".  Id.  Gael.  4.  3,  4.  2.  in  his  Logic,  dbidtpopa  are  individual  objects, 
as  having  no  logical  differentia,  dbidtpopa  wv  dbiaiptTov  to  elbos 
Metaph.  4.  6,  15  ;  d8.  t#  eibu  lb.  14;  xard  to  tlbos  Id.  Top.  I.  7-  *• 
cf.  An.  Post.  2.  13,  7,  etc.  II.  indifferent;  in  Stoic  philosophy,  t<x 

dStdipopa,  res  mediae  or  indifferentes,  are  things  neither  good  nor  bad, 
Cic.  d»  Fin.  3.  16,  Epict.  Enchir.  32;  cf.  Sext.  Emp.  P.  3. 177,  sq.  III. 
in  metre,  common,  Lat.  anceps,  Gramm.  IV.  Adv.  -pas,  without 

distinction,  promiscuously,  Dion.  H.  de  Demosth.  56. 

d-Sid(f>paKTos.  ov,  with  no  divisions  or  joints,  opp.  to  yovaTworji, 
Theophr.  H.  P.  I.  5,  3.,  8.  5,  2.     Adv.  -Tare,  lb.  6.  5,  3. 

dotdxvTos,  ov,  (biaxial)  not  softened  by  cooking,  opp.  to  (vbidx-, 
Theophr.  C.  P.  4.  1 2,  2.  II.  not  diffuse  or  extravagant,  of  per- 

sons, Hipp.  22.  45  ;  of  style,  Longin.  34.  3. 

d-oiax<*>pio-Tos,  ov,  unseparated,  Nicet.  Eug.  6.  46,  Suid. 

d-Sidd/cvo-Tos,  ov,  not  deceitful,  Diod.  5.  37,  Ath.  Adv.  -Tare,  Sext. 
Emp.  M.  7.  191. 

d-oiSaKTOS,  ov,  untaught,  ignorant,  Pseudo-Phocyl.  83  ;  c.  gen.,  ad. 
ipirraiv  Anth.  P.  5.  122,  cf.  Hipp.  382.  34.  2.  unpractised,  un- 

trained, of  a  chorus,  Dem.  520.  13.  II.  of  things,  untaught,  like 

airrobioaicTos,  dtp'  iavrov  xal  do.  Plut.  2.  968  C,  cf.  Luc.  de  Hist. 
Conscr.  34.  2.  db.  bpa.ua  not  yet  acted  (v.  btbdoxaj  III)  Ath.  270 

A.  III.  Adv.  -Tare,  without  teaching,  Plut.  2.  673  F,  al. 

d-8i«K8vTos,  ov,  not  to  be  escaped,  Apoll.  Lex.  s.  v.  vfjbvuos.  Adv. 
-Tare,  Ulp.  in  Pand. 

d-oic£«pYao-Tos,  ov,  not  wrought  out,  Isocr.  104  C  ;  v.  1.  dbtipyaoros. 

d-Sw|«TOOTOs,  ov,  that  will  not  stand  inquiry,  Lxx. 

d8i«|iTr|TOS,  ov,  (bii(uui)  that  cannot  be  gone  through,  Arist.  Phys.  3. 7, 5- 

d-Sie£6S«VTOS,  ov,  having  no  outlet,  \a$vpiv6os  Eust.  1688.  37. 

d-Sic£oSo$,  ov,  that  cannot  be  gone  through,  to  airupov  Arist.  Phys. 
3.  5,  2.  2.  having  no  outlet,  of  places,  App.  Mithr.  100.  II. 

act.  unable  to  get  out,  Anth.  P.  II.  395,  cf.  Plut.  2.  679  B. 

d-8upY<xo~Tos,  ov,  not  wrought  out,  unfinished,  Isocr.  289  B  (cf. 
dbit(ipyaoTos),  Poll.  6.  144,  who  also  cites  the  Adv.  -Tare. 

d-8upcuvT)TOS,  ov,  inscrutable,  Plat.  Tim.  25  D.  2.  uninvestigated, 

Philo  I.  470,  etc.  II.  of  persons,  unquestioned,  Plut.  Dio  19. 

d-Sicutcpiirr)TOs,  ov,  indistinct,  Eust.  213.  23. 

d-SiTiynT0*.  ov,  indescribable,  Xen.  Cyr.  8.  7,  22,  Dem.  219,  fin.  II. 
not  related,  Heliod. 

d-8iT|9nTos,  ov,  not  filtered  or  strained,  wTioavn  dS.  gruel  with  the  meal 
in  it,  Hipp.  Acut.  384. 

d-8txaLapxos.  ov,  =  dbtxos  dpxoiv,  in  Cic.  Att.  2.  12,  a  pun  on  the 
name  of  the  historian  Dicaearchus,  as  dtpos  on  'Ipos,  etc. 

d-SiKaioSuri)Tos,  ov,  where  no  justice  can  be  got,  SixeKia,  Diod. 
Excerpt.  616.  65. 

d-SiKao-ros,  ov,  without  judgment  given,  Plat.  Tim.  51  C:  undecided, 
Luc.  Bis  Ace.  23.     Adv.  -Tare,  Aesop. 

dSUcipi.  Boeot.  for  doixiai :  part.  pass,  dbtxuuivos  (or  -ovuevos  (in  pf. 
sense)  Ar.  Ach.  914  ;  cf.  dJWai  sub  fin.,  and  v.  Ahrens  D.  Aeol.  p.  210. 

dSiKcuots.  fare,  17,  a  doing  wrong,  Stoic  word,  Stob.  Eel.  2.  1 00. 

dStKtV  Solon  3.  22,  Att.:  Ion.  impf.  r)bixtov  or  -evv  Hdt.  I.  121: 
— Pass.,  fut.,  in  med.  form  dbixr)oouai  Eur.  I.  A.  1437,  Thuc.  5.  56, 
Plat.,  etc. ;  pass,  dbucrfi-qoouai  Apollod.  1.  9,  23,  v.  1.  Dem.  507.  16, 
etc.  To  be  doixos,  do  wrong  (defined  by  Arist.,  Rhet.  I.  10,  3,  to 

BXdirrtiv  ixovra  napa  rbv  vouov,  cf.  dbixrjua),  first  in  h.  Horn.  Cer. 
368,  where  it  means  to  do  wrong  before  the  gods,  to  sin ;  then  in  Hdt. 
and  Att. ;  rdbixeiv  wrong-doing,  Soph.  Ant.  1059  ;  to  udbtxuv  righteous 
dealing,  Aesch.  Eum.  85.  749  ;  but,  oxhou  T"  adbixttv  will  restrain 
wrong-doing,  lb.  694 : — in  legal  phrase,  to  do  wrong  in  the  eye  of  the  law, 
the  particular  case  of  wrong  being  added  in  participle,  as  XaiKpdrrjs  dbixei 
. .  voiuiv  .  .  xai  bibaoxwv  Plat.  Apol.  19  B,  cf.  Xen.  Mem.  init. : — if  an 
ace.  rei  be  added,  it  must  either  be  the  cognate  dbixiav,  doixr/uaTa,  and 
the  like,  Plat.  Rep.  344  C,  409  A  ;  or  some  Adj.  implying  the  latter, 
as  dS.  oibiv  d(iov  Stouoi  Hdt.  3.  145  ;  dSixuv  >ro\Ad,  uiyaXa,  etc., 
Plat.  Symp.  188  B,  al. ;  oibiv,  uriblv  dS.  lb.  A,  al. : — also,  do.  irepi  to1 
uvoTj/pia  Dem.  571.  15;  dS.  tis  Ttva,  cf.  Bast.  Ep.  Cr.  p.  15. — The 
pres.  often  takes  a  pf.  sense,  /  have  done  wrong,  I  am  in  the  wrong,  (the 
pf.  being  mostly,  though  not  always,  used  in  trans,  sense),  as  c!  ur)  dbtxai, 
(I  ur)  dbixa  yt  if  /  am  not  wrong,  implying  certainty  of  being  right, 
Heind.  Plat.  Charm.  156  A;  v.  H.  I,  fin.  II.  trans,  c.  ace.  pers. 

to  do  one  wrong,  to  wrong,  injure,  first  in  Hdt.  I.  112,  121,  al.  and  Att. : 
— c.  dupl.  ace.  to  wrong  one  in  a  thing,  Ar.  PI.  460  ;  d  iroWoiis  i/uaiv 
i)oixijX(v  Dem.  556.  27  ;  t<1  uiyiora,  loxara  db.  rivd  Wolf  Leptin. 
494.  20  ;  but  also,  dS.  rivd  irtpi  nva  Plat.  Legg.  854  E;  dS.  Tivd  fit 
v0ptv  Arist.  Rhet.  2.  12,  15  : — Pass,  to  be  wronged  or  injured,  ur)  oijr 


aStdtpdopof  —  aSiopdooroi. 


dbtxrfiui  Soph.  O.  C.  1 74 ;  do.  iff  ti  Eur.  Med.  265;  ueyaXa  AS. 
Aeschin.  65.  35  ;  out'  dbtxet  out'  dbixurat  Plat.  Symp.  196  B,  etc. ;  the 
pres.  doixfirai,  -ovutvos  is  used  for  the  pf.  j'lbixTjTat,  -r/uivos  (v.  supr.  I), 
Antipho  1 29.  6,  Plat.  Rep.  359  A,  etc.,  cf.  dbixeipi.  2.  little  more  than 
PKairrav  or  xaxuis  iroiftv;  dS.  yijv  Thuc.  2.  71,  etc.;  tirtrov  Xen.  Eq.  6,  3. 

dSiKi),  ■//,  a  nettle,  Diosc.  Noth.  4.  94. 

d8iKT|u.a,  aros,  tu,  (dSixtai)  a  wrong  done,  a  wrong,  Lat.  injuria, 
Hdt.  1.  2,  100,  al.,  and  Att.:  properly,  a  deliberate  wrong,  opp.  to 
duaprnfa  and  qtuxW,  Arist.  Eth.  N.  5.  8,  7,  sq.,  Rhet.  1.  13,  16; 
d5.  oiwpiOTai  tw  txovo'up  Id.  Eth.  N.  5.  8,  2  :  cf.  dbixtta  sub  init. : — c. 
gen.  a  wrong  done  to  one,  dS.  tuiv  vopaiv  Dem.  586.  II  :  also,  do.  irpos 
Ttva  Arist.  Rhet.  1.  13,  3  ;  dd.  us  Tt  Dem.  983.  15  ;  wept  ti  Plut.  2. 
569  C : — iv  doixrjuaTt  $4o$ai  to  consider  as  a  wrong,  Thuc.  I.  35  ;  also, 
dbtxrjua  Bttva't  Tt  Dem.  188.  19;  ifiippi^eaOai  ti  iv  dbiKT/uaTt  tivai 
Hyperid.  Euxen.  36.  II.  that  which  is  got  by  wrong,  ill-gotten 

goods,  Plat.  Rep.  365  E,  Legg.  906  D. 

dSiK-ncris,  eare,  17,  a  doing  wrong,  Oly mpiod.  in  Job.  1 76. 

dSiKT)T«ov,  verb.  Adj.  of  dotxiw,  one  ought  to  do  wrong.  Plat.  Rep. 
365  E ;  tpauiv  fx6vras  db.  uvai  Id.  Crito  49  A. 

dSiKi)TT|s,  (5,  a  wronger,  injurer,  Eust.,  Jo.  Chrys. 

dSiKT)TVKos,  Tj,  ov,  (doiKe'a/)  disposed  to  do  wrong,  injurious,  Plut.  2. 
562  D.     Adv.  -xws,  Stob.  Eel.  2.  228. 

d8iKT|u,  Aeol.  for  doixiai,  Sappho  I.  20,  cf.  Gaisf.  Hephaest.  p.  65. 

dSlicia,  Ion.  -Ct|,  t),  wrong-doing,  injustice,  offence,  dbi.xi.-ns  dpxuv 
Hdt.  1.  130,  cf.  4.  I,  Eur.  Or.  28,  Plat.  Gorg.  477  C,  al.;  tux!7  udWov  fj 
dbixiq.  Antipho  141.  21.  II.  like  dbixrjua,  a  wrong,  offence,  Hdt.  6. 

136;  dd.  xarayvwvai  tiv os  Andoc.  1 .  15; — in  pi..  Plat.  Phaedo  82  A, etc. 

dStxidu  or  doiKiu,  Dor.  for  dbixea.  Tab.  Heracl.  in  C.  I.  5774.  138,  al, 

dSiKiov  ypatpri,  an  action  against  public  wrong-doers  (v.  Att.  Proc. 
p.  345  sq.),  of  the  suit  against  Pericles,  Plut.  Pericl.  32  ;  mentioned  by 
Harpocr.,  Hesych.,  E.  M.  II.  in  Hdt.  5.  89,  of  a  hostile  invasion, 

and  too  AiyivrjTiWV  dbixtov. 

dSr.Ko-So£eu,  {56(a)  to  seek  fame  by  unworthy  means,  Diod.  31.  1. 

dSiKo6o£ta,  if,  an  unfair  plan,  evil  design,  Polyb.  23.  16,  7. 

dSucopaxcu,  to  fight  unfairly,  esp.  in  the  law-courts,  Alciphro  3.  29  ; 
dub.  in  Poll.  3.  154. 

dSiKo-p.dx(a,  ri,  an  unfair  way  of  fighting,  Arist.  Soph.  Elench.  1,  10. 

uOLKop-axos.  ov,  of  horses,  obstinate,  Xen.  in  A.  B.  344,  6. 

d8iKO-p.T)xdvos,  ov,  plotting  injustice,  Ar.  Fr.  560. 

d5lKo--mf]u.u)v.  ov,  unjustly  harming,  A.  B.  343. 

d5tK0TrpaY«i>,=dSt«fa;,  to  act  wrongly,  Plut.  2.  501  A,  Philo  2.  329. 

d8iKo-TTpd"yT]U.a.  to,  a  wrong  action,  Stob.  Eel.  2.  194. 

d8Iico-iTpaYT|S,  is,  acting  wrongly,  Perict.  ap.  Stob.  487.  47,  in  Ion. 
form  -Trprryrjs. 

dStKos,  ov,  {bixn)  of  persons,  wrong-doing,  unrighteous,  unjust :  first 
in  Hes.  Op.  258,  332  ;  d8t/«uTfpos  lb.  270;  then  in  Hdt.  2.  119,  al., 
and  very  freq.  in  Att. ;  Sixav  i£  dbixaiv  d-rratTU)  Aesch.  Cho.  398,  cf. 
Supp.  404,  etc.;  dStKturaToi  Soph.  Tr.  1011: — ad.  tis  ti  unjust  in  a 
thing,  is  Tiva  towards  a  person,  Hdt.  1.  c. ;  irtpi  Ttva  Xen.  Cyr.  8.  8,  6 
and  27  ;  c.  inf.  so  unjust  as  to  . . ,  Ep.  Hebr.  6.  10.  2.  db.  iWot 

obstinate,  unmanageable,  Xen.  Cyr.  2.  2,  26 ;  so,  db.  yvdBos  is  the  hard 
mouth  of  a  horse,  Id.  Eq.  3,  5  ;  cf.  dbixoua\os.  II.  of  things, 

wrongly  done,  wrong,  unjust,  ipyuara  Theogn.  3S0,  Solon  13.33; 
dbixa  (ppoviuv  Theogn.  395  ;  tpya  Hdt.  I.  5  ;  do.  Aoyos  freq.  in  Ar. 
Nub. ;  dbixaiv  x(iPwv  apx(l"  to  begin  offensive  operations,  Antipho  126. 
6,  Xen.  Cyr.  1.  5,  13  ;  to  bixatov  xal  tu  db.,  rd  bixaia  xal  dbixa  right 
and  wrong,  Plat.  Gorg.  460  E,  etc. ;  db.  rrXovros  ill-gotten,  unrighteous, 
Isocr.  10  D  ;  r)  dbixos  .  .  (vvaycoyi)  dvbpijs  xal  yvvaixus  the  unrighteous 
union,  Plat.  Theaet.  150  A,  cf.  Herm.  Opusc.  1.  77.  III.  dS. 

flliipa,  i.  e.  dvev  bixwv,  a  day  on  which  the  courts  were  shut,  Lat.  dies 
nefastus,  Luc.  Lexiph.  6,  cf.  Archipp.  Incert.  4.  IV.  Adv.  -xws, 

Solon  12.  7,  Aesch.  Ag.  1546;  tous  db.  6vr)axovTas  Soph.  El.  113; 
tin  wv  br)  btxaitus  are  d5.  jure  an  injuria,  Hdt.  6.  137  ;  btxaiats  xal 
db.  Plat.  Legg.  743  Br  oix  db.  not  without  reason,  h.  Horn.  Merc.  316, 
Simon.  92,  Lysias  96.  5,  Plat.  Phaedo  72  A. 

d5fico-TpoiTOS,  ov,  of  unjust  disposition,  Crates  Incert.  7- 

d8lK0-x«p,  X€'P0S>  °i  ^i  W"A  unrighteous  hand,  Soph.  Fr.  803. 

d8tKO-xpT)U.cLTOS,  ov,  with  ill-gotten  wealth.  Crates  Incert.  J. 

dStvos,  17,  6v  [a] ,  radic.  sense  close,  thick,  v.  Buttm.  Lexil.  s.  v. :  hence 
in  Horn.,  1.  crowded,  thronging,  dbivov  xr)p,  like  irvxival  <ppives, 

in  physical  sense,  II.  16.  481,  Od.  19.  516;  so  too  of  bees,  flies,  sheep, 
II.  2.  87,  469,  Od.  1.  92.  2.  vehement,  loud,  of  sounds,  db.  yios 

II.  18.  316;  2(ipr)vcs  dStvai  the  loud-voiced  Sirens,  Od.  23.  326: — but 
more  often  as  Adv.,  frequently,  or  loudly,  vehemently,  dbivi/s  dvcvitxaro 
II.  19.  314;  also  dbivov  and  dbivd  as  Adv.,  dbtvuv  7odi\  xKaiuv,  piv- 
xao6ai,  OTOvaxijoai  Horn.:  Comp.  dStrdVrepoi'  Od.  16.  216. — The  word 
continued  in  use,  though  rare  in  Att.  Poets,  d5.  bdxos  a  deep  bite,  Pind. 
P.  2.  98  ;  dS.  Sdxpva  thick-falling  tears,  Soph.  Tr.  848  (lyr.)  ;  and  freq. 
in  Ap.  Rh.,  as  db.  vttvos,  xiuua  abundant,  refreshing  sleep,  3.  616,  747  ; 
db.  (bvi)  frequent  wedded  joys,  3.  1206.  (Some  Gramm.  wrote  it  with 
the  aspirate,  Scholl.  ad  II.  2.  87,  which  would  confirm  its  prob.  relation 
to  dbpos  ;  v.  sub  dbpus.) 

d-8i68«UTOS,  ov,  not  to  be  travelled  through,  Themist.  206  D,  Charito  7.  3. 

d-8i0LKi)T0S,  ov,  nnarranged,  Dem.  709.  5. 

d-SioTros,  ov,  without  commander,  of  a  ship,  Aesch.  Fr.  261. 

d-SiopdTOS,  ov,  not  to  be  seen  through.  Poll.  £.  150. 

d8iopYfivio-T0s,  ov,  not  organised  or  formed,  Byz. 

d-Siopvdvbrros,  ov,  having  bad  organs,  Iambi.  V.  Pyth.  1 7. 

d-Sioptfutos,  ov,  not  corrected,  not  set  right,  Dem.  50.  18  : — of  books, 
unrevised,   Cic.  Att.   13.  21  ;    cf.  SiopOarrqs.  II.   incorrigible, 


aSiopurrta  - 

irremediable.  bovktia  App.  Civ.  3.  90,  cf.  Diog.  L.  5.  66  ;  d5iop6Vra 
uSunfv  Dion.  H.  6.  20: — Adv.  -Tare,  Diod.  29.  25. 

dSiopuTTta.  t),  indefiniteness,  Nicom.  Geras. 

d-Siopio-TOS,  ov,  undefined,  Arist.  An.  Pr.  1.  1,  2,  al. :  indefinite, 
dbnkov  nal  d!.  Id.  P.  A.  I.  I,  5,  al.     Adv.  -rare,  Id.  Phys.  1.  1,  3,  al. 

d-oVirXao-iaoTos,  ov,  not  doubled,  and  Adv.  -Tare,  Eust. 

d-oiirXao-TOS,  and  d-SiirXoiTos,  ov,  =  foreg.,  Eust. 

d-810-ra.KTOS,  ov,  undoubted,  Ptolem.  Geogr.  I.  4.  II.  act.  un- 

doubting,  Eccl. : — Adv.  -Tare,  Anth.  P.  12.  151. 

dSiuXto-TOS,  ov,  (btvkifa)  not  strained  ov  filtered,  Galen. 

dBixacTTOs,  ov,  (Sf^d^oj)  not  to  be  cut  in  two,  Nicom.  Geras. 

dSidiccii.  to  be  free  from  thirst,  Hipp.  Coac.  218. 

dStdVnTOS.  tmthirsting,  not  lacking  moisture,  Or.  Sib.  I.  132, 185.,  3.403. 

d-Sidtos,  ov,  not  thirsty,  not  suffering  from  thirst,  Hipp.  180  B,  Eur. 
Cycl.  574,  Arist.  P.  A.  3.  6,  8.  II.  act.  quenching  thirst,  Hipp. 

Acut.  385,  394  : — Adv.  -^are.  Id.  Epid.  3.  1089. 

d-5ui»iCTOS,  ov,  unpursued.  Syncs,  ap.  Fabr.  B.  Gr.  8.  240  (ed.  I7I7)- 

d-Suip-oros,  ov,  not  put  upon  oath,  Lat.  injur atus,  Procop.  Anecd.  18  B. 

dSp/qs,  firos,  6,  r),  poet,  for  dba/xaros,  Horn,  only  in  Od.  of  maidens, 
unwedded,   itapOivos  dbu.r)s   6.   109,   228  ;    so,  dburjras  a&eXtpas  Soph. 

0.  C.  1056.  2.  like  aburrros,  of  cattle,  once  in  Od.,  t)piovoi . .  db/tfj- 
T(9  4.  637.            3.  c.  gen.,  dbtidrts  vovowv  unsubdued  by  . . ,  Bacchyl.  34. 

dSp.TJTv5,  ibos,  t/,  v.  1.  for  dburfrn  in  II.  23.  655. 

d5p.T)TOS,  rj,  ov,  poet,  for  dbaparos,  in  Horn,  only  in  fern,  and  of  cattle. 
unbroken,  flovv  r}vtv  .  .  dbiiJjTnv,  fyf  ov  wtu  vvo  faybv  rryaytv  dirjp 
II.  10.  293,  Od.  3.  383  ;  tnrov  .  .  i(ir(  dbiirrrnv,  0pt<pos  .  .  xviovaav 
II.  23.  266  :  r/fuovnv  .  .  i£tT(  diurirnv,  rj  t  dkyiarn  bafmaaaOat  lb. 
6m.  2.   like  dbfiT/s,  unwedded,  of  maidens,  -napOivw  dbu^rri   h. 

Horn.  Ven.  82,  cf.  1 33,  Aesch.  Supp.  149  ;  of  Artemis,  rdv  aiiv  dbarrrav 
Soph.  El.  1239;  of  Atalanta,  tt/s irp6o9iv  dSur/Tijs  Id.  O.  C.  1321.  II. 
"Ao/xt/tos,  d,  as  pr.  n.,  Horn.,  etc. 

d5u,oXir|,  r),  uncertainly.  Call.  Fr.  338  :  also  dopuXrj  in  Hesych.  and 
Arcad. :  also  a  Verb  dopuXw  and  Adv.  dopuXti,  in  Suid. 

dSituvcs  or  dopoMs,  ol,  a  kind  of  sea-fish,  Opp.  H.  3.  371. 

dSvds,  ace.  to  Hesych.,  Cret.  for  07*01. 

'AtSo-f}aTT|S,  ov,  6,  one  who  has  gone  to  the  nether  world,  restored  by 
Passow  in  Aesch.  Pers.  924  (lyr.)  for  ' Ayoa&aTai. 

dSdfifv,  Adv.  from  the  nether  world,  Hermesian.  5.  3- 

aSoidorus,  (ooid£a»)  without  doubt,  Anacr.  96  (68).     [otl.c.] 

aootpx,  v.  sub  dvbavev. 

d-SoicnTos,  ov,  unexpected,  Hes.  (r.  infr.)  ;  rdv  db.  x"P'v  Soph.  O.  C. 
249  ;  used  by  Eur.  in  the  concluding  moral  reflections  of  the  chorus,  rd 
boxijOivr  ovk  irtkioBrj,  rwv  o"  dboxirrw  wdpov  tvpt  $*6s  Med.  1417, 
Ale.  1161,  Bacch.  1300,  Andr.  1286,  Hel.  1690  ;  (vtupopa  do.  Thuc. 
7.  29,  etc. :  to  do.  the  unexpectedness,  surprise.  Id.  4.  36,  al.  II. 

in  Pind.  N.  7.  45  dboKrrrov  xal  boxiovra  may  be  either  the  inglorious 
and  glorious,  or  the  unexpecting  and  the  expectant.  III.  Adv. 

-ran,  Thuc.  4.  17  ;  also  dooxirra,  as  Adv.,  Hes.  Fr.  31,  Eur.  Phoen.  318; 
so,  dwo  too  dboxfyrov  Thuc.  6.  47  ;  Ix  rov  db.  Dion.  H.  3.  64. 

d-SoKipoo-TOf ,  ov,  untried,  unproved,  esp.  in  regard  to  civic  rights,  I.vs. 
140.  J4.,  175.  45,  Aeschin.  56.  3,  etc.;  cf.  Harpocr.     Adv.  -Tare. 

d-5diclp.o5,  ov,  not  standing  the  test,  spurious,  base,  properly  of  coin. 
Plat.  Legg.  742  A.  II.  metaph.  disreputable,  ignoble,  mean, 

Xaxiauar  dooxiit  dkfiints  «xfiV  r-ur-  Tro.  497 ;  u-ovaa  Plat.  Legg. 
829  D,  cf.  Dem.  781.  3  : — Adv.  -ujus.  Poll.  5.  160.  2.  of  persons, 

Plat.  Rep.  618  B  :  rejected  as  false,  reprobate,  Xen.  Lac.  3,  3,  Ep.  Rom. 

1.  28,  2  Tim.  3.  8,  etc. 

dSoX«rx«i>  [a],  i, 1)001,  to  tall  idly,  to  prate,  Eupol.  Incert.  II,  Plat. 
Phaedo  70  C,  Xen.  Oec.  II,  3,  etc.: — Verb.  Adj.  -ifriov,  Clem.  Al.  203. 

d8o-XiO*XT|i,  ov,  o,  a  prating,  garrulous  fellow,  idle  talker,  esp.  of 
reputed  sophists ;  Xojxpdnjv,  rov  wratxov  db.  Eupol.  Incert.  10,  cf. 
Ar.  Nub.  I485  ;  t)  IlpobiKos,  t)  tSiv  db.  tU  y{  ti»  Id.  Fr.  418  ;  it.  Tts 
oolptOTT)*  Plat.  Polit.  299  B,  cf.  Theaet.  195  B,  Rep.  488  E.  II. 

in  good  sense,  11  keen,  subtle  reasoner.  Plat.  Crat.  401  B,  cf.  dboktaxia  II. 
(Prob.  from  ibnv,  kio^o,  talking  to  satiety :  the  a  is  long  (as  in  dbn- 
K'.Tit,  v.  dbioi),  Eupol.  and  Ar.  II.  c. ;  and  in  Mss.  it  sometimes  has  1 
subscr.  aooA<o'x<<V,  as  in  Paris  Ms.  of  Dem.  1462.  12.) 

dSoX<o-xia  [d],  i),  prating,  garrulity,  idle  talk,  Ar.  Nub.  I480,  Isocr. 
292  D,  Plat.  Theaet.  195  C;  a  foible  of  old  persons,  Arist.  Rhet.  2. 
13,  12  ;  Theophr.  wrote  wtpl  dboktax^as.  Char.  3.  II.  keenness, 

subtlety.  Plat.  Phaedr.  269  E,  Parmen.  135  D. 

dSoX<o-xuc6t  [d],  t),  ov,  prating,  to  -xov  garrulity.  Plat.  Soph.  225  D. 

doo-XfO~xot  [d],  ov,=dbo\sax1ltf  Monost.  in  Com.  Fr.  4.  p.  347, 
Anth.  P.  app.  236. 

d-ooXos,  ov,  guileless,  without  fraud,  honest,  aotpia  Pind.  O.  7.  98  ;  in 
Art.  esp.  of  treaties,  db.  tlpr)vTj  Ar.  Lys.  168  ;  awovbai  db.  xai  d0Ka0us 
Thuc.  J.  18: — Adv.,  often  in  the  phrase  dboKsat  xal  Sixaian  without 
fraud  or  covin,  Lat.  sine  dolo  malo,  Thuc.  5.  23  ;  cf.  Polyb.  22.  15,  2, 
with  Liv.  38.  1 1,  and  v.  sub  ooAor  ;  so,  »Aoor«iV  dbikoK  Scol.  8  Bergk  ; 
dboXarripov  \iyta9ai,  opp.  to  wiarius,  Antipho  122.  42.  II.  of 

liquids,  unadulterated,  genuine,  Aesch.  Ag.  95 ;  OTvpaf  Diosc.  1.79;  dp- 
yvptov  Poll.  3.  86;  metaph.,  aipait  dl6\ots  <f>vxas  pure,  Eur.  Supp.  1029. 

afiov,  Ep.  for  tabov,  aor.  2  of  dvbdvar. 

aSovrjTos.  ov,  (boviai)  unshaken,  Anth.  P.  5.  268. 

doovit,  1).  poet,  for  dr/SoWs,  Mosch.3.47,  Meineke  Theocr.  Ep.  4. 1 1,  [d] 

d-6o£ao-ro«,  ov,  unexpected.  Soph.  Fr.  215  b.  2.  not  matter  of 

opinion,  i.  e.  certain.  Plat.  Phaedo  84  A.  II.  act.  not  supposing, 

i.e.  knowing  with  certainty,  Diog.  L.  7.  162  : — forming  no  rash  opin- 
ion, Plut.  2.  105SB:  cf.  Jdfo: — Adv.  -Tare,  opp.  to  SoyiiaTiKuis.  Sext. 
Emp.  P.  I.  15,  etc. 


—  dSpo/x.ep>'jf.  23 

dSo£€co,  to  be  dbo£os,  to  be  held  in  no  esteem,  to  stand  in  ill  repute, 
dbo(ovvT(s,  opp.  to  01  SoKOvvTts,  Eur.  Hec.  294,  cf.  Dem.  374.  7  ;  opp.  to 
fiSnKtufiv,  Arist.  Rhet.  1.  12.  16.  II.  trans,  to  hold  in  no  esteem, 

in  contempt,  nvd  Plut.  Lucull.  1 4 : — hence  in  Pass.,ai  ffavavoixal  [Tt'xvai] 
. .  dbo£oivTcu  irpds  tuiv  woktwv  Xen.  Oec.  4,  2. 

dSd£T||ia,  aToj,  to,  disgrace,  Plut.  2.  977  E. 

dSo|ia,  r),  the  state  of  an  dbo(os,  ill-repute,  disgrace,  Hipp.  Lex  2,  Thuc. 
I.  76,  Plat.  Phaedo  82  C,  Dem.,  etc.;  obscurity,  Plut.  Agis  2.  II. 

contempt,  App.  Syr.  41. 

d-8o£oiTOtT|TOS,  ov,  not  led  by  opinion,  unreasoning,  Polyb.  6.  5,  8. 

dSo|os,  ov,  without  S6(a,  inglorious,  jroktuot  Dem.  58. 6  :  disreputable, 
Tfxvn  Xen.  Symp.  4,  56.  2.  of  persons,  obscure,  ignoble,  Isocr.  286  A ; 
dvwvvfwt  ical  db.  Dem.  106.  7,  cf.  Arist.  Rhet.  2.  6,  24;  of  eunuchs, 
despised,  Xen.  Cyr.  7.  5,  61 :— Adv.  -(as,  Plut.  Thes.  35.  II.  = 

vapdSo(os,  unexpected,  Soph.  Fr.  71  ;  improbable,  opp.  to  ivba[os,  Arist. 
Top.  8.  6,  I,  etc. ;  to  dSoforaTa  kiyuv  lb.  9.  4. 

dSopos,  ov,  (otpaf)  =  dvt*5apro5,  Suid.  II.  as  Subst.,  abopos, 

o,  =  KwpvKos,  a  skin,  Antimach.,  cf.  Schellenb.  ad  Fr.  56. 

d-Soprros,  ov,  without  food,  fasting.  Lye.  638. 

d-Sopud>6pi)Tos,  ov,  without  body-guard,  Arist.  Pol.  5.  12,  4. 

doos,  cos,  to,  satiety,  loathing,  only  in  II.  II.  88  rdfivaiv  bivbpea 
paxpd,  doos  tc  pnv  ixtro  Ovuov,  where  Heyne  proposes  uaxp',  35di  ri 
tuv  ikcto  :  v.  sub  abijv. 

d8os,  to,  a  decree,  Inscr.  Hal.  reprinted  from  Newton  in  Cauer's  Delect. 
Inscrr.  131.  20;  cf.  Hesych.  dOTjiia,  dSos'  <p-q<piaiia,  boyfsa,  with 
Schmidt's  note,  p.  44.  84,  and  addend.: — and  Eust.  172 1.  61  cites  a 
Verb  d5«G>  from  Hipponax,  dbnKt  Povkq,  rjyovv  Tjpfaxe  to  fiovktv/xa,  so 
that  db«v.  dbos  seem  to  be  from  ^AA,  dvbavco,  taba. 

0.80s,  dSoo-vvT],  Dor.  for  r}8os,  r/boovvr). 

o-Sotos,  ov,  without  gifts,  h.  Horn.  Merc.  573. 

d-SovXcvTos,  ov,  one  who  has  never  been  a  slave,  Isae.  ap.  Poll.  3.  80, 
Arr.  Epict.  2.  10,  I. 

dSovXia.  17,  a  being  without  slaves :  poverty,  Arist.  Pol.  6.  8,  23. 

d-SovXos,  ov,  unattended  or  unmatched  by  slaves,  dbovka  bufiaO'  tCTtas 
Eur.  Andr.  593 ;  c.  gen.,  tcov  toiovtuv  dbovkos  unattended  by  .  . ,  Ael. 
N.  A.  6.  10.  2.  having  no  slaves,  too  poor  to  keep  a  slave,  Phryn. 

Com.  Moxoto.  1  ;  cf.  Ruhnk.  Veil.  Paterc.  2.  19,  4,  Madvig  Advers.  I. 
580.  II.  impatient  of  slavery,  doouAorcpos-  tu/v  kfovraiv  Philo 

3-  45  *  • 

d-SovXuros,  ov,  utumslaved,  unsubdued,  Diod.  1.  53,  Or.  Sib.  5.  l8,  cf. 
10.  2  2  (where  dbovktvros  seems  to  be  an  error)  ;  dbovkairot  i)bovy  Crates 
eij/3.  Cf. 

d-oovn-nro*,  ok,  noiseless,  Anth.  P.  5.  294. 

d-Sovrros,  ov, «=  foreg..  Epiphan.  1.  262. 

'Ai8o-d>oiTT|S,  ov,  6.  —' AiboBaTTji,  Ar.  Fr.  198.  4. 

dSpaia,  Macedon.  for  alOpia,  Hesych. 

dSpuKT)s,  is,=db*pxt)s,  Hesych. 

dSpav<r|$,  fs,  =>  dbpavt)s,  restored  by  Dind.  in  Anth.  P.  9.  135,  for 
dbpavtn. 

d-opdv«a,  r),  listlessness,  weakness,  Hdn.  2.  IO,  17:  Ep.  dSpaviT|,  Ap. 
Rh.  2.  200,  etc.     [Jpd] 

dSpuvtu.  to  be  dbpavr/s,  Opp.  H.  I.  296,  Nonn.  32.  280. 

dSpdvrp ,  «'t,  (bpaivw)  inactive,  powerless,  feeble,  Babr.  25.  3,  Anth.  P. 
9.  359,  Plut.  2.  373  D,  etc. ;  of  nations,  Arr.  Epict.  3.  7,  13 ;  of  plants, 
Comp,  -ioTtpos,  Diosc.  3.  1 24 :  Sup.  -jffTOTos,  Lxx  (Sap.  13. 19).  2. 
intractable,  of  iron.  Plut.  Lycurg.  9,  Lysand.  17.  II.  act.  ener- 

vating, Plut.  2.  987  E. 

dSpuviT|,  if,  poet,  for  dbpdvtta. 

'ASpdo-Ttia.  Ion.  'A8pT)o-T*ia,  r),  a  name  of  Nemesis,  from  an  altar 
erected,  to  her  by  Adrastus,  first  in  Aesch.  Pr.  936,  v.  Blomf.  Gloss.,  and 
cf.  wpoaxwiu.  (From  d,  btbpdffica),  =  dvawobpaOTOs  atria,  ace.  to  Arist. 
Mund.  7,  5  :  for  other  derivs.  v.  Schol.  Plat.  Rep.  45 1  A.) 

dopocrros,  Ion.  dop-no-ros,  ov,  (btbpdoicai)  not  running  away,  not  in- 
clined to  do  so,  of  slaves,  Hdt.  4.142  : — in  II.  only  as  prop.  n.  II. 
pass,  not  to  be  escaped,  Dio  Chr.,  cf.  'Aopdo"r<ia. 

dSpao-rov  and  dopdTos.  ov,  (opdai)  not  done,  Hesych.,  A.  B.  7. 

d&pdd>a|vs  or  dSpdd>a|us,  r),  v.  drpaipa(vs. 

d8pdxvT|,  r),  a  kind  of  tree,  often  confounded  with  dvbpaxvTj,  Theophr. 
H.  P.  1.5,  2,  Plin.  N.  H.  13.  22. 

d-opciruvot.  ov,  untouched  by  sickle,  Soph.  Fr.  804. 

d8p-cirT|^oXof,  ov,  (dbpus)  attaining  great  things,  Longin.  8.  I. 

d-6p«irro»,  ok,  unplucked,  Aesch.  Supp.  663  (lyr.). 

dopcvoi,  poet,  for  dpbtvai,  i/bptvoas  Or.  Sib.  9.  310. 

dSpi'u,  to  be  dbpos  or  grown  up,  f/bpriKus  Diosc.  2.  107  : — pass,  forms 
dbpuTo,  dbpwutvov  (-ovuevov)  in  Hesych. 

d£pT|o-TOS,  Ion.  for  dopooros,  ov,  Hdt. ;  so  too  ' KbprjOTos,  etc. 

ASpiaf,  ov.  Ion.  'ASp^ns,  tai,  u,  the  Adriatic,  Hdt.  5.  9,  etc.: — Adj. 
ASpiavos.  17,  iv,  (cf.  dA.«*Topis),  but  in  earlier  Att.  'A8piT|v6$,  Adriatic, 
xv)ia  tos  'Abpirjvds  auras  Eur.  Hipp.  736  (lyr.)  ;  so,  in  Aesch.  Fr.  67, 
Herm.  restores  'Abptnvai  re  ywaixts  : — also  'ABpusvutos,  r),  6v,  v.  1. 
Arist.  H.  A.  6.  I,  3,  al. ;  'ASpidTiicos,  Ath.  285  D  ;  'ASpiuKos  du<pi- 
•poptvs  i.e.  a  cask  of  Italian  wine,  called  Adriatic  because  imported 
through  Curcyra,  Anth.  P.  6.  257,  Arist.  Mirab.  104,  Hesych. :  pecul. 
fern.  'ASpids .  dbos,  Dion.  P.  92. 

d-8pipvs,  v,  not  tart  or  pungent,  Luc.  Trag.  323. 

dSpd-fJuXot,  ov,  in  large  pieces  or  masses,  of  bdellium,  Diosc.  I.  80,  cf. 
Plin.  12.  19. 

i8po-K«<t>aXos.  ov,  with  large  head,  Paul.  Aeg.  6.  94. 

aSpo-p.<pt|S,  4s,  of  coarse,  large  grains,  opp.  to  ktvToptpt)s,  Diod.  5. 
26  :  coarse,  of  wine,  lb.  IO.     Adv.  -Sis,  Galen. 


24  dSpofxiado? 

d8po-|uo-4os.  ov,  getting  or  asking  high  pay,  Scymn.  352. 

aSpoojiai,  Pass.  (dSpos)  to  come  to  one's  full  strength,  Plat.  Rep. 
498  B  :  to  be  stout,  Myro  ap.  Ath.  657  D. 

dSpos.  a,  ov,  in  the  primary  sense  it  seems,  like  dSivos  (to  which  it  is  re- 
lated as  xvSpos  to  tcvSvos),  to  mean  thick,  stout,  bulky :  I.  of  things, 
\tova  dSpr)v  viirrovaav  ISdv  falling  thick,  Hdt.  4.  31  ;  rwv  dvOpd/cwv  ol 
dSpoTaroi  the  most  solid,  Hipp.  648.  55;  /doves  dS.  large,  Diod.  3.  47  ; 
tous  dopordrottt  t£x  kiji&ccv  Id.  so.  85  : — strong,  great  in  any  way, 
dSpos  »dA.f/ios  Ar.  Ran.  1099  ;  frtiuaTa  full,  swollen,  Arist.  Probl.  28. 
I,  3;  of  rain,  violent,  Id.  Mund.  4,  6;  of  fire,  Plut.  Solon  I  ;  877^*" 
Diod.  I.  35  ;  Saiptds  Tt  leal  ti/ios  nSpas  Sovvat  in  abundance,  Id.  19.  86 ; 
— of  style,  grandiose,  Longin.  40,  4  ;  to  dS.,  Lat.  ubertas,  grandilo- 
quentia,  opp.  to  to  ia\vov,  Schiif.  Dion.  H.  de  Comp.  p.  65  : — Adv. 
Comp.,  dbpOTfpws  Statrdv  to  live  more  freely,  Hipp.  Aph.  1 243;  dSp. 
ipapfiajcivdv  lb. ;  also  neut.  as  Adv.,  dSpov  ytKdaai  to  laugh  loud, 
Antiph.  Atj^v.  2.  8,  cf.  Poll.  4.  9  ;  dSpvrtpov  mdv  to  drink  more  deeply, 
Diphil.  Aip.  I .  II.  of  persons,  large,  fine,  well-grown,  kirtdv 
to  vaib'tov  dSpov  ytVTjrat  Hdt.  4.  180;  t£  vatbi,  iir7)v  abpus  ty  Hipp. 
232.  42;  toiv  walSajv  oaot  dSpoi  Plat.  Rep.  466  E;  ol  abportpot  the 
best-grown,  the  stronger,  Isocr.  255  C ;  in  Lxx,  of  dSpoi  are  the  chiefs, 
princes,  4  Regg.  10.  6.  2.  so  of  animals,  xoi~pos  ^en-  ®ec-  J7> I0; 
Kvkos  Fabr.  101  ;  and  in  later  Com.,  often  of  flesh,  fish,  etc.,  Antiph. 
'Ajtiarp.  I,  'AKttvfi.  1.  21,  Alex.  Tlafitp.  I,  etc.  3.  of  fruit  or  corn, 
full-grown,  ripe,  okcus  tin  xapwis  AS.  Hdt.  1. 17,  cf.  Arist.  Metaph.  4.  7, 
8.  4.  of  an  egg,  ready  to  be  hatched.  Id.  H.  A.  6.  2,  7. — The  word 
first  occurs  in  Hdt.,  never  in  Trag.,  and  is  rare  in  the  best  Att.  writers  ; 
but  the  derivs.  dSpoTrts,  dbpoffvvn,  dSpvvoj  occur  in  Horn.,  Hes.,  Soph.,  al. 

dSpoo-ia,  7),  (Spoaos)  want  of  dew,  Joseph.  A.  J.  2.  2,  5. 

dSpoown,  7),  {dSpos)  =  dbpoTTjs,  of  ears  of  corn,  Hes.  Op.  471. 

dSpd-o'dtaipot,  ov,  with  or  in  large  balls  or  globules,  of  the  /mA.d- 
0a$pov,  Arr.  Peripl.  M.  Rubri,  p.  38. 

d8pOTT|s,  Tyros,  7),  thickness,  ripeness,  vigour,  strength,  esp.  of  body,  II. 
16.  857.,  22.  363.,  24.  6  (ubi  vulg.  dpSporrtTa)  ;  of  plants,  Theophr.  H.  P. 

7.  4, 1 1 :  metaph.  of  sound,  loudness,  Amarant.  ap.  Ath.  415  A.  II. 
abundance,  2  Ep.  Cor.  8.  20. 

dSpou,  v.  dSpuopai. 

dSpva,  rd,  —  dxpoSpva,  said  to  be  a  Sicilian  word,  Ath.  83  A,  Hesych. 

dSpvds,  dbos,  r),  (a  copul.,  Spvs)='Auabpvds,  Anth.  P.  9.  664. 

dSpwoxs,  «us, t), a  coming  to  maturity,  Arist.  Metaph.  1 0.9, 3,  Phys.  3.1,6. 

dSpuv-riKos,  17,  ov,  ripening,  strengthening,  Epiphan.  I.  945. 

dSpvvw,  (dSpos)  to  make  ripe,  ripen,  dSpvvat  Soph.  Fr.  805  ;  dSpvvoiv 
Xen.  Mem.  4.  3,  8  : — Pass,  to  grow  ripe,  ripen,  come  to  maturity,  of 
fruit  or  corn,  Hdt.  I.  193,  Arist.  Phys.  5.  6,  6  ;  of  the  embrya  or  young 
animals,  Id.  H.  A.  6.  10,  14.,  9.  34,  3: — v.  dSpew,  dbpoouat. 

dSpuirTos,  ov,  (SpinrToi)  not  scratching  or  tearing,  Nonn.  D.  II.  137. 

d-Spud>aKTOS,  ov,  unfenced,  drdxtOTOs,  d<pv\aKTos,  dvtv  SucaOTripiov, 
Hesych. : — metaph.,  dirovos  Kal  draKaiTrwpos,  A.  B.  345. 

dSu-{3das,  -yXoxro-os,  -«irr|s,  -Xdyos,  -|mXt|S,  Dor.  for  t)Sv-. 

dSwau,«i>,  to  want  power,  be  incapable,  Lxx  (Sirach.  in  prologo). 

d8vv&p.la,  Ion.  -It|,  7),  want  of  strength  or  power,  bodily  inability  or 
exhaustion,  Hipp.  Vet.  Med.  12.  2.  generally,  inability,  incapacity, 

Hdt.  8.  Ill,  Antipho  129.  33,  Plat.  Legg.  646  C,  etc.;  Si  dSvvapiiav 
Arist.  G.  A.  I.  18,  55,  etc. ;  c.  gen.,  dS.  tov  dSiKtiv  for  wrong-doing,  Plat. 
Rep.  359  B;  rwv  Trpayudruv  for  business,  Arist.  Pol.  5.  II.  16;  c.  inf., 
Plat.  Rep.  532  B.  3.  poverty,  Xen.  Oec.  20,   22,    Dem.  399. 

20.  4.  an  impossibility,  Arist.  Poet.  25,  6. 

d-50vup.os,  ov,  —  dbvvaTos,  Diosc.  5.  13. 

dSiivuo'ia,  r),  ~ dSwapiia,  Hdt.  3.  79.,  7.  172,  Thuc.  8.  8  ;  c.  gen.,  d8. 
too  Ktytiv  Id.  7.  8. — The  forms  dSuvacrrta,  Dion.  H.  de  Dem.  26, 
dBuvaria.  Dinol.  in  A.  B.  345,  are  prob.  errors,  Lob.  Phryn.  508. 

ASivaoTtvTos,  ov,  not  subject  to  a  Swaarf);,  Synes.  19  C. 

dSvvaaTi,  Adv.  impotently,  Suid. 

dSvv&T«i>,  of  persons,  to  be  dSvvaros,  to  want  strength,  Epich.  147  Ahr., 
Arist.  de  Somn.  1 ,  8  :  c.  inf.  to  be  unable  to  do,  Plat.  Rep.  366  D,  Xen. 
Mem.  1.2,  23,  Arist.  Eth.  N.  10. 4, 10,  Pol.  3.  16, 10.  II.  of  things, 

to  be  impossible,  Ev.  Matth.  17.  20,  Ev.  Luc.  I.  37,  cf.  Lxx  (Gen.  18.  14). 

d-SvvttTos  [o],  ov,  I.  of  persons,  unable  to  do  a  thing,  c.  inf., 

Hdt.  3.  138,  Epich.  130  Ahr.,  Eur.  H.  F.  56,  etc.;  dovvaros  dirdv 
Arist.  Rhet.  2.  2,  7: — Comp.,  tov  Swarivrtpov  tov  dbwararrtpov 
[nKiov   f  x<"/]   plat-  Gorg.  483  D :    Sup.,  -curaros  Xiytiv  Eupol.  Ar/u. 

8.  2.  absol.  without  strength,  powerless,  weakly,  Hdt.  5.  9,  Eur. 
Ion  596,  Andr.  746 ;  of  dSvvaroi  men  disabled  for  service,  incapable, 
whether  as  invalids  or  paupers,  cf.  Lys.  irrrip  toO  dSwdrov,  Arist.  Fr. 
430,  Bockh  P.  E.  I.  323,  sqq. ;  iv  rots  dSwdrois  fuaSoipopdv  Aeschin. 
14.  40;  dS.  aiip-ari  Lys.  197.  26;  dS.  xpnpnoi  poor,  Thuc.  7.  28;  ffl 
ti  Plat.  Hipp.  Mi.  366  B  :— so  of  things,  disabled,  vits  Hdt.  6.  16  : — to 
dS.  want  of  strength,  Plat.  Hipp.  Ma.  296  A  ;  Td  dS.  disabilities,  Dem. 
262.  24.  II.  of  things,  Mar  cannot  be  done,  impossible,  Eur.  Or. 
665    " 


5,  Hel.  1043,  Plat.,  etc. ;  dSvvara  (iovkouai  Lync.  K«vt.  1 2  : — dSv- 
varov  [«o-ti]  c.  inf.,  Hdt.  I.  32,  al. ;  or  dbvvard  [«o"ti],  Id.  I.  91.,  6. 
106,  Thuc. ;  dS.  ran  uiort .  . ,  Plat.  Prot.  338  C :  to  dd.  impossibility, 
Hdt.  9.  60,  Att.;  to  db.  Kaprtpuv  Eur.  I.  A.  1370;  toXuolv  dbvvara 
Id.  Hel.  811  ;  dSwdraiv  ipdv  Id.  H.  F.  318: — Comp.,  uSwaTtlurtpov 
tTt ..,  it  oUv  Tt .  .  Plat.  Theaet.  192  B,  cf.  Parm.  138  D  :  Sup.,  6  Sr)  rrdv- 
tuv  dSwarvraTov  Id.  Phileb.  15  B.  III.  Adv.  -tois,  without 

power  or  skill,  feebly,  Ki-itodat  Antipho  1 2  2.  42  ;  dfivvtaSai  Id.  127.  26  : 
— dS.  ixfiv  to  be  unwell,  Plat.  Ax.  364  B ;  to  be  unable,  c.  inf.,  Arist. 
Rhet.  ad  Al.  25,  3. — Little  used  in  Poets,  and  of  the  Trag.  only  by  Eur. 

dSv-oivos,  dSii-rrvoos,  d&v-iroXis,  Dor.  for  r)Sv-. 

dSvs,  Dor.  for  r)Svs. 


d-5v<ruirr|T0$,  ov,  not  to  be  put  out  of  countenance,  shameless,  inexorable, 
Plut.  2.  64  F,  etc.     Adv.  -t<us,  lb.  534  B. 

dSinros,  ov,  (Siitu)  nor  to  be  entered,  Pind.  P.  II.  7  ;  aS.  ioriv  u  tokos 
Strabo  650.  II.  mostly  as  Subst.  the  innermost  sanctuary  or 

shrine,  Lat.  adytum,  II.  5.  448,  512,  Pind.  O.  7.  59  (where  however  the 
gender  is  not  determined) ;  it  is  dSvTov,  to,  in  Hdt.  5,  72,  Eur.  Ion  938  ; 
oSvtos,  6,  in  h.  Horn.  Merc.  247  : — metaph.,  in  tov  dS.  Tr}s  liillKuv 
Plat.  Theaet.  162  A  ;  dS.  tt)s  0a\daarjs  Opp.  H.  I.  49. 

a8u,  Att.  contr.  for  ddStu,  q.  v. 

o.5iou.t]tos,  ov,  (oat/idcu)  unbuilt,  Nonn.  D.  17.  40. 

d5wv  [a],  ovos,  7),  Dot.  for  dr/dwv,  Mosch.  3.  9  ;  cf.  dbovts. 

'ASiov  [&],  aivos,  o,  ="A5aim,  Anth.P.6. 275;  v.  Burm.  Propert. 2.10,  53. 

'ASuvaia,  7),  epith.  of  Aphrodite,  Orph.  Arg.  30  :  cf.  'Aoan'ids. 

'ASwvctos,  a,  ov,  of  Adonis,  Suid. 

'ASuvta,  Td,  the  mourning  for  Adonis,  celebrated  yearly  by  Greek 
matrons,  Cratin.  Bovk.  2,  cf.  'Abatvis : — hence  'Abcvvid^ovaai  (as  if  from 
'ASumd£o>,  to  keep  the  Adonia)  as  title  of  the  15th  Id.  of  Theocr. 

'ASuvlqkos.  17,  6v,  of  ot  for  Adonis,  Arr.  Epict.  4.  8,  36. 

'A8iimds,  d5os,  7),  =  'Abaivaia,  Nonn.  D.  33.  25. 

'A8<i)viao-p.6s,  ov,  6,  the  mourning  for  Adonis,  At.  Lys.  390. 

'A&wvios,  o,  rare  form  of  "ASWty,  Meineke  Com.  Fr.  2,  p.  188,  Plut.  2, 
756  C.  II.  as  Adj.  os,  ov,  of  Adonis  :  hence,  1.  'Abwviov, 

Td,  a  statue  of  him  borne  in  the  Adonia,  Suid.  2.  (sub.  jtirpov)  a 

kind  of  verse,  consisting  of  a  dactyl  and  spondee,  Herm.  El.  Metr.  715, 

"A8uvis  [d],  i5os  (also  ios,  Pherecr.  Incert.  21),  6,  Adonis,  son  of 
Cinyras  and  Myrrha,  favourite  of  Aphrodite,  ai  tov  "ASojviv  Sappho  63  ; 
'Abuvt  dyofitv  xal  tov  'A8.  fcXdoutv  Pherecr.  Incert.  84  ;  tabavLS,  i.  e.  o 
'AS.,  Theocr.  3.  47  : — hence,  generally,  an  Adonis,  a  favourite,  darling, 
bfx  'Abwvtbas  avroi/s  daovtiv  Luc.  Merc.  Cond.  35,  cf.  Alciphr.  1.  39, 
Anth.  P.  5.  113.  2.  'Abwvtbos  ktittoi,  cresses  and  suchlike  quick- 

growing  herbs  grown  in  pots  for  the  Adonia,  Plat.  Phaedr.  276  B, 
cf.  Theocr.  15.  113:  proverb.,  of  any  short-lived  pleasure,  v.  Interpp. 
Plat.  1.  c.  II.  a  kind  of  flying-fish,  elsewh.  i[wKotTos,  Clearch. 

ap.  Ath.  332  C,  Opp.  H.  1. 157,  etc. 

d-SwpijTOS,  ov,=db(upos,  h.  Horn.  Merc.  168;  jrpos  Ttvos  Eur.  Hec. 
42.  II.  =  dotti/>os  II,  Eus.  P.  E.  782  C, 

d-Swpta,  7),  incorruptibility.  Poll.  8.  II. 

d-8upoSoKT)TOS,  ov,  =  dSaipoboKos,  Aeschin.  65.21,  etc.  Adv.  -tws,  Dem. 
310.  22.,  342.  18. 

u8ci)po8oKta,  7),  =  dSajpia,  Dio  C.  Fr.  37. 

d-Supo&oKos,  ov,  incorruptible,  Anth.  P.  9.  779,  Nonn. 

d-8b>p6X-nirTO$,  ov,  =  foreg.,  Hesych.,  Schol.  Thuc.  2.  65. 

d-8copos,  ov,  without  gifts,  taking  none,  incorruptible,  c.  gen.,  doaipo- 
Taros  xPV/iaTUV  Thuc.  2.  65  ; — Adv.  -<ws,  Poll.  8.  II.  2.  unpaid, 

TrpioPtvois  C.  I.  1625.  25.  II.  giving  no  gifts,  c.  gen.,  dd.  tivos 

not  giving  it.  Plat.  Symp.  197  D ;  dbwpois  k\atpri/3o\iais  by  hunting 
from  which  no  gifts  were  offered,  Soph.  Aj.  178.  III.  dbtupa 

baipa  gifts  that  are  no  gifts,  like  /3/or  dpiwros,  lb.  665  ;  cf.  SvaSwpos. 

d-8to>TT)S,  ov,  o,  one  who  gives  nothing,  Hes.  Op.  353. 

a,i  [4],  Dor.  for  dei,  Pind.  P.  9. 154  (si  vera  1.),  cf.  Cramer  An.  Par.  3.  321. 

d-eBvos,  ov,  undowered,  Hesych.,  who  also  expl.  it  by  iroKiupepvos. 

dtBvwTOS,  ov,  (eSvoai)  =  foreg. :  unafftanced,  Lye.  549. 

dc6Xcuo>,  dc0Xevp.a,  dcSXeu,  -T)TT|p,  -T)f(|S,  etc.,  Ep.  and  Ion.  for  dBK-. 

dtflXiov,  Ep.  and  Ion.  for  a9Kov,  the  prize  of  contest,  II.  9.  124,  Od.  8. 
108.  II.  for  d$\os,  the  contest,  Od.  24.  169  and  later  Ep. 

dcOXios,  ov,  also  a,  ov,  gaining  the  prize,  or  running  for  it,  Vttttos  «a\f) 
Kal  deBKirj  a  rnce-horse,  Theogn.  257;  dtOKios  i'mros-  Call.  Del.  113; 
ufjKov  d{$\.  the  apple  of  discord,  Anth.  P.  9.  637.  The  contr.  form 
d0A*os  is  used  in  a  restricted  sense. 

de6Xov,  to,  dedXos,  o,  Ep.  and  Ion.  for  a$\ov,  d6kos. 

d<6Xo-viKia,  7),  victory  in  the  games,  Pind.  N.  3.  II. 

dtOXocrwrj,  7),  a  contest,  a  struggle,  Anth.  P.  5.  294. 

dcOXodtdpos,  ov,  Ep.  and  Ion.  for  d$\o<p6pos. 

dti  [ofj,  Ep.  aid,  aiiv  (v.  sub  fin.),  Adv.  ever,  always,  for  ever,  for  aye, 
Horn.,  etc. ;  often  with  other  specifications  of  time,  as  biapntpis  aid, 
avvex**  aid,  iuufvts  aid,  Horn. ;  dd  Ka$'  7}ulpav,  Ka$'  Tjpitpav  dd,  dd 
Kal  Ka6'  7)fiipav,  dd  nor  iviavrov,  dd  Sid  @iov,  etc.,  Heind.  Plat. 
Phaedo  75  D,  Schiif.  Greg.  169  and  Appar.  ad  Dem.  3.  265,  Pors.  Phoen. 
I422;  Stop'  dd  until  now,  Pors.  Or.  1679 ;  also  ds  dd,  daad,  ioad, 
v.  daad. — With  the  Artie,  o  dd  xpovos  eternity,  Hdt.  I.  54,  Plat. 
Phaedo  103  E,  etc.;  ot  del  ovtcs  the  immortals,  Xen.  Cyr.  I.  6,  46, 
etc.: — but,  6  aid  f$aci\tvaiv  the  king  for  the  time  being,  Hdt.  9.  116  ; 
ol  dd  8tKa£ovT€s  Dem.  585.  24  ;  o  dfi  ivTos  ytyvouevos  every  one  as  he 
got  inside,  Thuc.  4.  68  ;  tui/  dd  npoarvx^vTa  Dem.  557.  20  ;  Toro*i 
tovtojv  aid  ticyovoiffi  to  their  descendants  for  ever,  Hdt.  I.  105,  cf.  3. 
83,  etc. ;  in  Aesch.  Pr.  937,  Bonrrt  tw  KparovvT  dd,  the  position  of  dd  is 
due  to  the  requirement  of  the  metre. — Of  this  word  14  forms  are  enume- 
rated, Ahrens  D.  Dor.  378  sq. : — We  here  notice  the  following  :  1. 
aUC,  Ep.  and  Ion.,  and  in  all  Poets  except  the  Att. :  Horn,  uses  dd  three 
times,  when  his  metre  required  the  1st  syll.  to  be  short.  2.  aUv, 
used  by  Horn,  when  the  ult,  was  required  to  be  short ;  occasionally  also 
in  Trag.,  for  the  same  purpose,  e.g.  Aesch.  Pr.  428,  Ag.  891,  Soph.  Aj. 
682,  cf.  aiivvirvos.  3.  ad,  the  only  correct  Att.  form,  the  1st  syll. 
being  long  or  short,  as  the  metre  required :  when  this  syll.  was  long,  the 
Copyists  often  substituted  the  Ion.  aid,  and  introduced  this  form  even 
into  Att.  Prose ;  but  in  the  best  Mss.  the  true  Att.  form  is  often  pre- 
served even  where  a  is  long,  as  in  the  Laur.  of  Soph.,  and  the  Rav.  of 
Ar. ;  cf.  dfTos,  daad,  Kaico,  tcKalcu.  4.  aits.  Dor.,  Ar.  Lys.  1267, 
Bion  1 1 .  I ,  Tab.  Heracl.  in  C.  I.  5  7  74.  1 34.  5.  at,  Pind.  P.  9.  1 54 ; 
cf.  dc'-voos,             6.  T|t,  Boeot.,  and              7.  Aeol.  uu  or  -iv,  ai  or  -iv, 


aei/3Aa<TT!/f  —  aeipw. 


25 


Ahr.  D.  Aeol.  p.  156;  it-  !s  freq.  in  Inscrr.,  as  dtatros,  etc.  (The 

^AI^  occurs  in  at  f  ft,  C.  I.  I :  with  alfiiv,  dfiSios,  cf.  Skt.  aiva  (Ved.), 
ivas  {vitae  ratio),  Lat.  aevum,  aetas  (aevitas),  aeternus  (aeviternus),  Goth. 
aivs  (ataiv),  aiveins  (aiwvtos),  aiv  =  Germ.  ewig  =  ever.) 

N.  B.  Some  compds.  of  ad,  which  are  in  no  way  altered  by  compos., 
are  left  out :  for  they  are  written  divisim  in  the  best  Edd.,  and  they  can 
always  be  found  under  the  simple  form. 

d«.-flXao-rf|S,  is.  ever-budding,  Theophr.  C.  P.  I.  II,  6. 

d«ipXdo~rno-vs,  tars,  r),  a  perpetual  budding,  Theophr.  Ibid. 

d«t-flAao-Tos.  ov.  =  dftfSKaaTtjs,  Manass.  Chron.  189. 

uctfioXos.  ov,  (&d\\aj)  continually  thrown,  Anth.  P.  6.  282. 

d«i-ppvr)s.  is,  (fjpvar)  ever-sprouting,  Nic.  Th.  846. 

ati-yevto'ia,  r),  perpetual  generation.  Iambi,  ap.  Stob.  Eel.  I.  900. 

d«i-Y€V€TT|p,  ijpos,  b,  ever-generating,  Orph.  H.  7.  5. 

d€i-Y«v«nr|S,  only  in  Ep.  form  aUiYcv€TT|S,  ov,  6,  (ytvioOat)  epith.  of  the 
gods,  like  aiiv  turret,  everlasting,  immortal,  used  by  Horn,  only  at  the  end 
of  a  line,  Qtwv  aittytvtTdarv  II.  2.  400,  al. ;  Btots  aitiytvirriaiv  3.  296,  al. 

d*i-,y€VTis, is,  everlasting,  Flit.  Legg.  773  E,Symp.  206  E,  Xen.  Symp.8, 1. 

a€iY«WT]TT|S,  ov,  o,  (ytwdw)  perpetual  producer,  epith.  of  Apollo  (to! 
tov  airrov  del  yiyvtaOat  wat  dtt  ytvvdv),  ap.  Macrob.  Sat.  I.  17. 

d«i-YvrjTO«,  ov,  =  detye virrjs,  Orph.  Arg.  15. 

d-itSfXios.  ov,  =sq.,  E.  M.  21.  33. 

d-«i5«Xov  ov,  (*  ftiSoi)  unseen,  dark,  Hes.  Fr.  61  :  obscure,  Opp.  H.  I. 
86,  etc.  II.  not  to  be  looked  on,  and  so,  dazzling,  Nic.  Th. 

20.  (For  dtbrjKos,  as  dtotos  for  dtibtos,  dwtptiatos  for  dvttpiatos,  Buttm. 
Lexil.  s.  v.  AfDijXos  7.) 

d-<i&T|S,  is,  (ttbos)  incorporeal,  immaterial,  opp.  to  o-aiuaroftbris, 
often  in    Plat.,   as   Phaedo   79  A.  II.   (fibivai)  un- 

known,  obscure.  Id.    Ax.    365  C.  III.    oWtiSf/s,  un- 

"ghtly,  Philetaer.  Kvv.  1  : — Adv.  AttSSrs,  dub.  1.  Theophr.  C.  P.  a. 
4.  11. 

dciSia.  r),  (det&Tif  III)  deformity,  Joseph.  B.  J.  7.  5,  5. 

dct-oivrrros  [f],  ov,  ever-revolving,  Anth.  P.  6.  289. 

d<CSio$,  ov,  Adj.  from  dti,  as  sempiternus  from  semper,  everlasting, 
Hesych.,  Orac.  ap.  Didym.  de  Trin.  2.  17,  I. 

d«-8ovX«ta  and  d«-SovXia,  r),  perpetual  slavery.  Poll.  3.  80. 

dei-£pou,os.  ov,  ever-running,  Greg.  Naz.  168  B. 

d<iSu,  Ion.  and  poet,  form  (cf.  dttpai)  used  by  Horn.,  Pind.,  and  some- 
times by  Att.  Poets  (even  in  trim.,  Aesch.  Ag.  16,  Eur.  Fr.  188,  Cratin. 
Incert.  142),  also  in  Ion.  Prose;  Att.  contr.  q&u  (also  in  Anacr.  45, 
Theocr.),  Trag.,  Plat.,  etc. : — impf.  rJciJov  Od.,  also  itttov  II.,  etc. ;  Att. 
ybov  Eur.  Ale.  761,  Thuc. : — fut.  deiaouat  Od.  22.  352,  Theogn.,  but 
iaouat  h.  Horn.  5.  2.,  32.  19,  and  always  in  Att.  (for  in  Ar.  Pax  1297 
aatt  is  now  admitted  ;  and  in  Plat.  Legg.  666  D  Pors.  restored  woiav  Si 
jjaowrtv  .  .<pajvt)v  :)  :  rarely  in  act.  form  dtinar  Sapph.  II,  Theogn.  4,  Ar. 
Lys.  1243  (Lacon.),  and  late  Poets  (in  Eur.  H.  F.  681  dtibai  is  restored 
by  Elmsl.)  ;  still  more  rarely  dVei  (v-  *<•!"'■)  Babr.  12.  13;  Dor.  aatiipuit 
Theocr.  3.  38,  tfoiii  Id.  1.  145: — aor.  ijttoa  Call.  Ep.  22.  4,  Opp.,  Ep. 
atiaa  [A]  Od.  21.  411,  and  late  Ep.,  Aftaov  Eur.  Tro.  513,  Ar. ;  ]Joo 
Ar.  Nub.  1371,  Plat.  Tim.  21  B. — Pus.,  dt'tboftat  Pind.,  Hdt.:  poet, 
impf.  dtibero  Pind. :  aor.  fiobtjv,  v.  infr.  II.  I  :  pf.  ^ffftat  Plat.  Com. 
Aaxarv.  I.  II. — An  imper.  aor.  med.  dtiato  occurs  in  h.  Horn.  16.  I, 
unless  dtibto  be  read. — Cf.  St-afibw,  iw-,  wpoa-,  aw-qbai.  (From 

^^EIA  with  a  prefixed,  as  in  dtipw,  di(aj,  come  dttbar  (dftibar),  Aoibos, 
drfiwv:  cf.  Skt.  vad,  vadiimi  (loquor),  viuias  (sermo);  \.\\\t.vadini(voco); 
cf.  also  the  later  Gr.  words  55a;.  uJijs.  )  [A :  but  A  in  arsi  Od.  1 7. 

519,  h.  Horn.  27.  I,  Theogn.  4,  Theocr.  7.  41,  etc.]  To  sing,  II. 

1.  604,  etc. :  hence  all  kinds  of  vocal  sounds,  to  crow,  as  cocks, 
twitter  as  swallows,  hoot  as  owls,  croak  as  frogs,  etc.,  Arist.  Mirab.  70, 
Theophr.  de  Sign.  3.  5,  etc. : — also  of  other  sounds,  /o  twang,  of  the 
bowstring,  Od.  21.  411  ;  to  whistle,  of  the  wind  through  a  tree,  Mosch. 
5.8;  ro  ring,  of  a  stone  when  struck,  Theocr.  7.  26 : — rptv  vtvircnxivat 
4S»tv  to  crow  too  soon.  Plat.  Theaet.  164  A. — Construction  : — dtit.  rivi 
to  sing  to  one,  Od.  22.  346 ;  but  also  to  vie  with  one  in  singing,  Theocr. 
8.  6 ;  4°-  wpd*  aikiv  1)  kvpav  to  ting  to  . . ,  Arist.  Ptobl.  19.  9 ;  far' 
aikov  Plut.  2.  41  C  ; — dtiaas . .  xaipttv  ArjpLoitXia,  poet,  for  dirts,  C.  I. 
3256.  7.  II.  trans.,  1.  c.  ace.  rei,  to  sing,  chant,  psijvtv 

ante  rer\.  II.  I.  1  ;  rratrjova  I.  473;  re\ia  dvbpaiv,  viarov,  etc.,  9.  189, 
Od.  1.  326;  top  Botarrtov  vopov  Soph.  Fr.  8j8 : — also  absol.,  a.  Afitpi 
rtvos  to  sing  in  one's  praise,  Od.  8.  267  ;  eh  tivo  Ar.  Lys.  1 243 :  later 
simply  =  xaXtiv,  Ael.  N.  A.  2.  28  :— Pass.,  of  songs,  to  be  sim^.Hdt.  4. 
35  '<  T<*  **X9ivra  *<d  4°9ivra  Plat.  Lys.  205  E ;  ^oym  Kakan  ao-Qiv, 
opp.  to  X070J  tcakws  finStis,  Xen.  Cyr.  3.  3,  55.  2.  c.  ace.  pers. 

to  sing,  praise,  as  Lat.  canere,  Pind.  P.  5.  32,  and  Att. ;  hence  in  Pass., 
dti&erai  Opiifato'  ijpaxis  is  celebrated  as  the  nurse  of  heroes,  Pind.  P. 
8.  35-  '•  'n  Pass,  also,  to  resound  with  song,  duiero  vav  rifuvos 

.  .  OaXiatt  Pind.  O.  10  (II).  92. 

d<i-«rru,  i),  eternal  being,  Antipho  ap.  Harp. ;  cf.  titarii,  dnfOTut. 

d«i{u)ia.  -h,  eternal  life.  Feci. 

dci-{uos.  ov,  Att.  contr.  d«t(ui.  tw,  ever-living,  everlasting,  wvp  dti^aov 
Heraclitus  20;  dti£an>  wiav.det^wov  irons,  both  in  Aesch.  Fr.  31  ;  dtifas 
ytvta  Soph.  Fr.  806  ;  Atifav  jAjror  lb.  807  ;  iei(an  Beit  C.  I.  4598  ; 
u\tt(uov  ^ux«!  Melanipp.  6,  cf.  C.  I.  6199 :  metaph.,  d'x*o»  Ati(an>  Aesch. 
Supp.  988.  II.  dfifanr,  t6,  an  evergreen  plant,  prob.  houseleek, 

Lat.  sempervivum,  Theophr.  H.  P.  I.  10,  4,  Plut.,  etc. 

QH{U0TT|5.    TfTOS,   T>,  -  dt lfo>fa,   Isid.  PelUS. 

d«i.-{uro«,  ov,  ever  girded,  aye  ready,  ¥..  M.  2  2.  20. 

d«-{iiuv.  ovaa,  ov,  ever-living,  dtt^iiovra  .  .  Upa  Call.  Del.  314  ; 
ytvtrrjpos  det{wovTot  Nonn.  Jo.  1.  34;  dti^wovaav  <pvr\nv  Anth.  P. 
I-  10,  35. 


d«i-8oXT|S,  h,  ever-green,  Anth.  P.  7.  195.,  12.  256:  metaph.  ever- 
blooming,  XaptTfs  Orph.  H.  60.  5 : — to  da0a\is  toV  tpvWav  Diosc.  4. 88. 

dci-6dvf|S,  is,  ever-dying,  ever  fearing  death,  Manetho  I.  166. 

dci9cpT|s,  is,  {iipai)  always  warming,  Eratosth.  p.  144  Bernh. 

dci-Oovpos,  ov,  ever-warlike,  Opp.  C.  2.  189. 

dfi-flpuXriTos.  ov,  ever  talked  of ,  celebrated,  lo.  Lyd.  de  Magistr.  3.  51. 

dci-Kapiros,  ov,  ever  fruit-bearing,  Theophr.  C.  P.  I.  22,  4. 

d-«.K(Xios,  a,  ov,  Od.  4.  244,  but  also  os,  ov  19.  341  ;  collat.  poet,  form 
of  d<i«f}r,  Od.  13.  402,  II.  14.  84,  and  Hdt.;  contr.  oXkcXios  Theogn. 
1344,  Eur.  Andr.  131  (lyr.)  : — of  things,  words,  and  actions;  more  rarely 
of  persons,  Od.  6.  242.     Adv.  -iais,  Od.  8.  231.,  16.  109. 

d-«iicf|s,  «r,  unseemly,  insulting,  shameful,  dttitia  Xotyov  dptvvttv  II.  1. 
456,  al. ;  detxia  [«/*aTa]  'ioaat  Od.  24.  250 ;  Sea/ids  Aesch.  Pr.  97,  cf. 
525  ;  duKtt  avv  aro\fi  Soph.  El.  191  ;  dtiKiarepa  ewea  Hdt.  7.  13; 
ovSiv  deiKts  itapix*o~Qat  to  cause  no  inconvenience,  Id.  3.  24 ;  dtttcia 
pttaOov  mean,  scanty,  U.  12.  435;  so,  oil . .  dtiicia  . .  airoiva  24.  594. 
Adv.  dtiKtos,  Hesych. ;  Ion.  -itus,  Simon.  13;  dtitcis  as  Adv.,  Od.  17. 
216.  2.  ovSiv  det/cis  iffn,  c.  inf.,  it  is  nothing  strange  that . . , 

Hdt.  3.  33.,  6.  98,  Aesch.  Pr.  1043. — Cf.  the  Att.  form  ai/cr/s. 

dciKia.  Ion.  -11)  [1,  whence  in  the  Mss.  often  written  -«n],  f),  outrage, 
injury,  iraaav  dtiKiTjv  direx*  XP°'  (from  Hector's  body)  II.  24.  19 ;  pi., 
ptrf  tis  ftoi  dtiKtas  ivt  otttat  tpatviro)  Od.  20.  308  ;  detKiri  ireptiiretv  rtvd 
Hdt.  1.  73,  115  ;  diroflf)s  tt/j  d.  Id.  3.  160. — Cf.  the  Att.  form  alula. 

dciKi£u.  fut.  id)  II.  (v.  infr.),  Ep.  also  attic'tooa  Q^  Sm.  10.  401  :  Ep. 
aor.  duictaea  II.  16.  545: — Med.,  Ep.  aor.  dttKtaadnijv  lb.  559.,  22. 
404:— Pass.,  Ep.  aor.  inf.,  dtiKio6-qp<vai   Od.  18.    222.  To  treat 

unseemly,  injure,  abuse,  Horn. ;  ov  yap  iyu  ct'  tKttayKov  detKiar  I  will  do 
thee  no  great  dishonour,  II.  22.  256,  cf.  24.  22  and  54,  etc.: — Med.  in 
act.  sense,  II.  11.  c. — Cf.  the  Att.  form  atKifa. 

d«.-Ktvnf)o-(a,  r),  perpetual  motion,  C.  I.  3546.  35,  Galen. 

dci-K^VTjTos,  ov,  ever-moving,  in  perpetual  motion,  Plat.  Phaedr.  245  C. 
Adv.  -Tfttf,  Arist.  Mund.  6,  37. 

dci-Kuuos,  ov,  continually  revelling,  Manetho  4.  301. 

dei-XdXos,  ov,  ever-babbling,  Anth.  P.  5.  178. 

dei-Xau/rrfu,  is,  ever-shining,  Stob.  Eel.  I.  494. 

d«iXtpif|»,  is,  (Keifiot)  ever-flowing,  Nonn.  Jo.  3.  v.  34. 

d«i-Xi\vos,  ov,  ever-eager,  Philo  1.  348. 

dciXo-ytw,  to  be  always  talking  about,  rt  Eccl. 

dciXoyta,  r),  a  continual  talking : — as  Att.  law-term,  ri)v  d.  wporeivf- 
oBat  or  wapix**v,  to  court  continual  inquiry  into  one's  conduct,  Dem. 
341.  16.,  1306;.  27. 

dciXos,  ov,  («IXr/)  unsunned,  Aesch.  Fr.  419. 

d<i-)iapYOf,  ov,  ever-greedy,  Opp.  H.  2.  213. 

d<i-p.vr)p.dvtVTOf,  ok,  ever-remembered,  Joseph.  A.  J.  17.  6",  J. 

d«i-u>VT}puov,  ov,  gen.  ovos,  ever-remembering,  of  good  memory,  Arist. 
Physiogn.  3,  14. 

d«t-u.v-no-Tos.  ov,  had  in  everlasting  remembrance,  ever  to  be  remem- 
bered, tpyov  Aesch.  Pers.  760;  rd<pos  Soph.  Aj.  1 166,  Eur.,  etc.;  p-er 
iitipv.  ptaprvpiov  Thuc.  I.  33;  rpowata  Lys.  192.  24;  airaot  deipiv.  r) 
dfiapria  Antipho  138.  34.     Adv.  -this,  Aeschin.  52.  22. 

d«-v&TJs,  is,  —  so.,  Nic.  ap.  Ath.  61  A,  in  r^p.  dat.  pi.  dttvaieaai. 

d«{-vaot,  ov,  —divaos,  q.  v. 

d«i-vavT<u,  Siv,  of,  a  Milesian  magistracy,  which  held  its  sittings  o« 
ship-board,  Plut.  2.  298  C. 

d«i-vn<T-n«,  10s,  o,  r),  ever-fasting,  Anth.  P.  9.  409.     . 

d«tv<us.  <w,  Att.  contr.  for  dciVaot,  v.  divaos. 

d*i-rro.9T|S,  is,  ever-suffering,  liable  to  be  perpetually  acted  on,  tpvats 
Crito  ap.  Stob.  43.  42,  cf.  Philolaiis  in  Stob.  Eel.  I.  420. 

d<lirais,  ira<5os,  o,  r),  ever-maiden,  of  the  Virgin,  Eccl. 

ddrrdpOcvos,  r),  ever  a  virgin,  Sapph.  96  (in  Aeol.  form  diV.,  cf.  Cramer 
An.  Par.  3.  321),  Eus.  Laus  Const.  17  ;  of  the  Vestals,  ai  iiptiat  at  dun. 
Dio  C.  56.  5,  cf.  59.  3.  2.  in  Pythag.  language  of  the  number  7, 

Philo  I.  46,  497  ;  cf.  Syovot  II.  1. 

dcf-irXuvos,  ov,  ever-wandering,  Epigr.  ap.  Suid. 

dfi-poos,  ov,  contr.  -povt,  ow,  =sq.,  Aristeas,  etc. 

dt{.-pvro%,  ov,  ever-flowing,  icprjvij  Soph.  O.  C.  469. 

d«ipu.  Ion.  and  poet.  Verb  (cf.  dcioat),  used  by  Hdt.,  and  also  in  Aesch. 
Th.  759,  Pers.  660  (both  lyr.)  ;  but  the  Att.  form  is  oipw  (q.  v.),  Aeol. 
df'ppu  (q.  v.) :  impf.  ifttpov  (ow-)  II.  10.  499,  Hdt.,  Ep.  aetpov  11. : — 
fut.  aput  [a],  contr.  from  dtpdi  (which  never  occurs),  Aesch.  Pers.  795. 
Eur.  Heracl.  322,  Tro.  1148  (cf.  t(fwaipu) : — aor.  I  ijetpa  (aw-)  II.  24. 
590,  Ep.  detpa  23.  730.  part,  dt'tpas  Soph.  Ant.  418  (in  the  speech  of 
the  <pi\at): — Med.,  Horn.,  and  in  Soph.  Tr.  216  (lyr.):  fut.  dpoi/^ai 
(v.  sub  atpai) : — aor.,  imper.  ddpao  Ap.  Rh.,  inf.  ddpaoOat  (dvr-)  Hdt. 
7.  212,  part,  -apuvos  Horn.: — Pass.,  aor.  fyp&nv  Ap.  Rh.,  (irap-)  II.  16. 
34I,  Ep.  dipS-nv  Od..  3  pi.  htoBtv  II.  8.  74,  subj.  dtpBai  Eur.  Andr.  848, 
part.  depOtis  Horn..  Pind.,  Hdt.,  Aesch.  Ag.  1525:  pf.  fitpfat  Ap.  Rh. 
2.  171:  Ep.  plqpf.  3  sing.  Saipro  II.,  Theocr.,  Ion.  dopro  (q.  v.)  for 
TJopro. — The  form  dtiptu,  being  Ion.,  is  generally  used  by  Hdt.  and  Hipp., 
as  by  Horn.,  except  in  II.  17.  724;  also  in  Pind.  and  a  few  Lyric  places 
of  Trag.,  never  in  Att.  Prose.  Horn,  however  prefers  the  aor.  2  dpioBai 
to  dupaaSat :  cf.  aipai. — V.  dv-,  dir-,  eltr-,  iv-,  irap-,  aw-aeipai.  (The 
Root  appears,  by  comparison  of  the  Skt.and  Lat.,  to  have  been  ZEP  or  EP, 
with  a  prefixed  as  in  dtibai,  di(ai. — From  ^2EP  we  have  attpd,  cf.  Skt. 
sarat,  sarit  (linum),  Lat.  swo  (serui),  sera;  from  y'EP,  oppos  (morale), 
opuaSdt,  Sppud ;  also  tipai,  d-eipai,  itppUvos.  The  sense  of  junction,  union, 
lost  in  dtipai,  appears  in  the  derivatives  ovvatipto,  rraprjopos,  ownopos, 
awaipis,  and  to  some  extent  in  the  words  cited  below,  III.  2.)  [#, 

when  unaugmented  ;  but  o  in  arsi  in  late  F:p.,  as  Opp.,  cf.  C.  I.  177, 
347.]  To  lift,  heave,  raise  up,  tyoo'  dt'tpas  eijntv  [rcwiriv,  etc.]  II.  10. 


26  iet'?- 

465 ;  Iffria  . .  o-rttkav  dtlpavrts  furled  the  sails  by  broiling  them  up,Od.  3. 
II  : — esp.  to  lift  for  the  purpose  0/  bringing  or  carrying,  to  bear,  carry, 
tie  0tk4<vv  2apwr)56va  5tov  deipas  II.  10.678  ;  voffiptv  dttpcuxas  24.  583  ; 
axOos  dtiptiv,  of  ships  of  burden,  Od.  3.  31 2  ;  ftTJka  -yap  «£  'IBa/ajs  . . 
attpav  vrjvai  carried  them  off,  21.  18;  firj  pot  oTvov  dupe  offer  me  not 
wine,  II.  6.  264 :  often  in  participle  with  Verbs  of  motion,  irrl  GT&pa- 
vqv  KHpakijtpiv  at  1  pas  BrjKaro  10.  30;  vivaxas  iraptBrjxtv  at i pas  Od. 

I.  141  ;  tvfiaptv  dtipojv  Aesch.  Pers.  660.  2.  to  raise,  levy,  ktxrbv 
dpovfMv  arokov  lb.  795.  II.  Med.  to  lift  tip  for  oneself, 
i.e.  bear  off,  win,  take,  freq.  c.  ace.  rei,  irdvras  dttpdfitvos  irtktxtas 

II.  23.  856,  etc. :  but  also  just  like  Act.,  [irtrrkajv~\  iv  dtipap.4vr}  II. 
6.  293  :  cf.  alpoj.  2.  to  raise  or  stir  up,  vttxos  dttpdpitvos  Theogn. 
90;  d(ipaa$ai  woktfiov  to  undertake  a  long  war,  Hdt.  7.  132,  156; 
flapvs  d.  slow  to  undertake  anything,  Id.  4.  150.  3.  dtipaaBai  rd 
Iffria  to  hoist  sail,  Id.  8.  56,  94;  also  without  torta,  1.  27  :  so  Ap.  Rh. 
has  dtipttv  iaria  in  Act.,  2.  1229.  III.  Pass,  to  be  lifted  or 
carried  up,  is  aWipa  Stav  dtpBrj  Od.  19.  540,  cf.  II.  8.  74;  vxf/uo-' 
dtpBtls  . .  ix^H-W  Od.  I2-  432  '»  dtiptaBat  tis . .  to  rise  up  and  go  to  a 
place,  Hdt.  1.  170;  dtpBtvrts  tic  . . ,  lb.  165; — mostly  of  seamen,  but 
also  of  land-journeys,  as  dtpB^vat  9.  52:  —  atpOtis,  like  Lat.  elatus, 
rising  above  or  exceeding  due  limits,  Pind.  N.  7.  in.  2.  to  be 
suspended,  hang,  [jiaxatpa.']  trap  £t<ptos  p.tya  xovktbv  aliv  dojpro 
II.  3.  272.,  19.  253 ;  cf.  -^tptBofxai,  alcaptopat,  fitrtcupos,  dop, 
doprrjp.              3.  metaph.  to  be  lifted  up,  excited,  Soph.  Tr.  216. 

<ms,  part,  of  dijfu. 

ati-0-ifia.oros,  ov,  ever-august,  title  of  late  Emperors,  C.  I.  5187,  al. 

deC-o-iTOS,  ov,  always  fed:  esp.  of  those  who  lived  at  the  public  expense 
in  the  Prytaneum,  C.  I.  115.  41.,  184-197 : — in  Epich.  18,  Ahr.  restores 
aivti  airov. 

deL-o-Kuuj/,  a  kind  of  owl  (axuflf),  so  called  from  not  being  migratory, 
strix  aluco,  Arist.  H.  A.  9.  28,  1. 

dtio-|j.a,  to,  poet,  and  Ion.  for  aafia,  as  dtiocu  for  a5a>,  Hdt.  2.  79,  Call. 
Ep.  28  ;  also  in  Eupol.  EiXarr.  3.  ' 

dci-crdos,  ov,  ever-safe,  Noun. 

dei-o-T«va,KT0S,  ov,  ever-sighing,  Nicet.  Eugen.  5.  119. 

dei-o-rpe^-rjs.  ts,  ever-turning,  Greg.  Naz. 

dfL-o-Tpo4>os.  ov,  =  foreg.,  Eust.  Opusc.  109.  92,  Tzetz. 

utL-o-0(j.4>opos.  ov,  ever-useful,  Cleanth.  ap.  Eus.  P.  E.  679  C. 

dtt-o-upos,  ov,  f.  1.  for  drjavpos. 

dciTas,  a,  6,  Boeot.  for  dtrds,  Lye.  461.  II.  v.  sub  diras. 

dci-TtX-qs,  €$,  ever-perfect,  Btos  Alcin.  Intr.  477- 

d€i-Tp€irros,  ov,  ever-turning,  ever-changing,  Pisid. 

d€L-<^4vT)s,  4s,  ever-shining,  of  stars,  Arr.  Ind.  25 .  6.  2.  always 

visible,  of  the  pole,  Stob.  Eel.  1.  900. 

a€i<t>uTos,  ov,  {<f>ijfii)  ever-famed,  Or.  Sib.  3.  415. 

dct-^Xcyns,  4s,  ever-burning,  Greg.  Naz.,  cf.  Anth.  P.  11.  409. 

dei.-<|>poiJpTjTos,  ov,  =  sq.,  Norm. 

d«i-$poupos,  ov,  ever-watching,  i.e.  ever-lasting,  Hesych.,  as  emended 
by.Pors.  Ar.  Nub.  518  (for  dtt<p6pos);  r<pd.  fitkikurry  Cratin.  MaX0.  1.7* 
oixrjats  dd<pp.,  of  the  grave,  Soph.  Ant.  892  ;  vovot  Opp.  H.  4.  189. 

d«i-$iryia,  j),  exile  for  life,  (ptvytroj  dtttpvyiav  Plat.  Legg.  877  C,  C.  I. 
158  B.  26  ;   dtt<pvyia  fafiiovv  nvd  Dem.  528.  *j. 

deicftuXXCa,  if,  a  being  evergreen,  Theophr.  C.  P.  2.  17,  2. 

dc{-4>u\Xos,  ov,  evergreen,  Arist.  G.  A.  5.  3,  25,  Theophr.  C.  P.  1.  10,  7. 

dei^KOTOS,  ov,  (<pu>s)  ever-light,  Tjktos  Dion.  Areop.  188  C. 

d€ix€^H,ao"ros'  ot/'  (X^'Z^C*1)  ever-stormy,  troubled,  Joann.  Clim. 

d€i-xX«pos,  ov,  evergreen,  Euphor.  Fr.  64. 

d«i-xp6vtos,  ov,  everlasting,  Anth.  P.  12.  229. 

d€Ka£6|i.cvos,  rj,  ov,  particip.  form  —  dtx<uv,  Od.  18.  135;  ttoXX  dexa£6- 
fttvos  (Virgil's  multa  reluctans),  13.  277* 

dcKT|Xi,os,  ov,  for  dtix4ktos,  II.  18.  77  ;  cf.  dtlStkos. 

d-«KT|Tt  or  d«KT|Ti,  Epic  Adv.  against  one's  will,  often  in  Horn.;  c.  gen., 
atv  dffcrjTt,  dtxnrt  atdtv,  Lat.  te  invito,  Od.  16.  94.,  3.  213;  Btwv 
df/crjTt,  dtxijTt  Btwv,  Lat.  Diis  non  propitiis,  II.  1 2.  8,  Od.  4.  504. 

d-CKovo-tos,  ov,  also  a,  ov  Luc.  Syr.  D.  18  ;  Att.  contr.  aKovo-ios,  ov  [a], 
but  the  uncontr.  form  is  used  in  anapaest,  by  Soph.  Tr.  1 263.  Against 

the  will,  constrained,  forced,  of  acts  or  their  consequences,  touto  . .  oinc 
d(K.  avrw  ZyivfTo  Hdt.  2.  162  ;  TXrjffoftat .  .  dtKovata  irokkd  Theogn. 
1343  ;  $pdo~os  dttovatov  (as  Canter  emended  (Kovffiov,  but  Ahrens  better 
ifc  OvGtwv),  Aesch.  Ag.  803  ;  is  d/covaiovs  dvdyxas  iriirreiv  Thuc.  3.  82 ; 
often  in  Att.  of  involuntary  offences,  d«.  <p6vos  Antipho  121.  36; 
dtcovoiotv  irpaKTopts  lb.  39,  cf.  Plat.  Legg.  733  D,  864  A,  Arist.  Eth.  N. 
3.  I  ;  rd  p.(v  dtcovaia  [p\d&rf\  dirkr},  rd  5%  (novata  Sinkr}  C.  I. 
71  b.  II.  like  dtKOJv,  of  persons,  but  only  in  Adv.  d/covcricos, 

involuntarily,  Thuc.  2.  8,  Plat.  Tim.  62  C ;  d*.  diroOavttv,  opp.  to 
(Kovaiuts  dwoKTflvetv,  Antipho  1 1 2.  10;  dtcowriojs  rtvl  dipixBat  to  have 
come  as  an  unwelcome  guest,  Thuc.  3.  31    (Madvig  dicovai(p). 

dcKuv,  Att.  contr.  clkuv  [a],  ovaa,  ov,  but  the  uncontr.  form  used  in 
anapaest,  by  Aesch.  Supp.  40:  (ixwv,  v.  sub  t/crjKos).  Involuntary, 
constrained,  of  persons,  dixovros  kfieto  II.  I.  310  ;  iKwv  detcovri  ye  6vfJ.a> 
4.43;  strengthd.,  iroW'  de/caiv  (Virgil's  multa  reluctans),  IX.  557: — 
Horn,  uses  the  contr.  form  only  in  phrase  tw  5'  ovk  a/tovre  tt(t€0'Otjv 
(where  however  the  metre  would  admit  detcovre)  II.  5.  366,  Od.  3.  484  ; 
otherwise  it  first  occurs  in  h.  Horn.  Cer.  413,  Hdt.  2.  131,  al.,  and  then 
is  common  in  all  Att.  writers  (cf.  deKovfftos)  ;  a/covros  Ai6s,  invito  Jove, 
Aesch.  Pr.  771  ;  often  repeated,  dfcovrd  a  aicwv  Trpoairaaffakeuffai  lb.  19, 
cf.  671  ;  so,  dncov  dtcovttv  ovs  eic&v  tt-rrtv  kvyovs  Soph.  Fr.  668,  cf.  Ant. 
276;  p.nS(va  p.f]T  dknovra  ptveiv  /caTtpvtcf  Pherecr.  X<t'p.  2  (mock 
heroic)  : — Adv.  dxuvTOJs,  unwillingly,  vptokoyuv  Plat.  Prot.  333  B,  cf. 
Hipp.   Mi.  374  D  ;   ovk  uk.,   dkkd   irpoBvfiws  liruoB-qo'av  Xen.  Hell.  4. 


8,  5.  II.  in  Poets,  but  rarely,  like  aKOvatos,  of  acts  or  their 

consequences,  involuntary,  Ka/td  t/tuvra  kovk  d/c.  Soph.  O.  T.  1230; 
ipyoiv  dx.  Id.  O.  C.  240,  cf.  977. 

dcXioi,  oi,  brothers-in-law,  whose  wives  are  sisters :  Hesych.  writes  al- 
ktoi,  but  wrongly,  v.  Eust.  648.  45,  E.  M.  31.  24.  (M.  Muller,  Oxf. 
Essays  (1856),  p.  21,  compares  Skt.  syalas  {uxoris  frater)  ;  in  which 
case  d  must  be  taken  as  euphon.,  d-ektot.) 

dtAios.  o,  Dor.  for  -fjiktos,  tfktos,  [a,  but  made  short  in  Soph.  Tr.  835, 
Eur.  Med.  1252,  Ion  122.] 

atXXa,  Ep.  dcXX-r],  t;s,  ^,  a  stormy  wind,  a  whirlwind,  often  in  Horn., 
not  rare  also  in  pi.;  dpyakiwv  dvtfxwv  .  .  dtkkrj  II.  13.  795;  d«XXat 
iravTOtojv  dvipwv  Od.  5.  292,  304;  vjf/t  5'  dfkkr}  anibvar  (i.e.  the 
dust),  II.  16.  374.  2.  metaph.  of  any  whirling  motion,  wxvhpofiots 

d.,  of  an  animal,  Eur.  Bacch.  873  ;  cuttoojv  vit'  dlkkaiai  Id.  Hel.  1498. 
Used  by  Soph,  also  in  derivs.  and  compds.  (v.  infr.),  but  the  word  is 
mostly  Ep.     (For  the  Root,  v.  sub  ukw.) 

deXXcuos,  a,  ov,  storm-swift,  irtkctds  Soph.  O.  C.  108 1. 

dcXXds,  dSos,  ^,  =  foreg.,  'iirnot  Soph.  O.  T.  467  ;  tptuvai  Id.  Fr.  614. 

deXX*r|€is,  €(T(ra,  tv,  =  deAXafos,  Nonn.  D.  5,  322,  etc. 

dcXX^s  Koviaakos,  6,  in  II.  3. 13,  eddying  dust,  i.  e.  an  eddy  of  dust,  not 
found  elsewh. :  Buttm.,  Ausf.  Gr.  §  41  Ann.  15  n.,  would  write  dcXX^s, 
contr.  from  dekkr/tts;  cf.  Spit/11,  ad  1.     (For  the  Root,  v.  sub  ukat.) 

ueXXo-8p6p.os.  ov,  storm-swift,  irwkos  Bacchyl.  6. 

a€XX6-$pi£,  rptxos,  6,  7),  with  hair  floating  in  the  wind,  Soph.  Fr.  273. 

deXXo-u-dxos.  ov,  struggling  with  the  storm,  Anth.  P.  7.  586. 

deXXo-TTOs,  7ro8oy,  u,  ij,  for  dcXXoirot/s  (like  dprtTros,  Olhirros,  etc.)  : — ■ 
storm-footed,  storm-swift,  II.  8.  409,  etc.  (never  in  Od.)  :  dat.  pi.  d«X- 
koTTuo'to'O'iv  h.  Horn.  Ven.  218;  pi.  d<XXoTro5«y,  -iroftoiv,  Simon.  7,  Pind. 
N.  1.  6,  etc. ;  once  only  in  Trag.,  viz.  Eur.  Hel.  1314. — Later  deXXo-rroB-ns, 
ov,  Opp.  C.  1.  413. 

utXXos,  6,  a  bird,  perh.  the  stormy  petrel,  Hesych. 

'AcXXu,  00s,  contr.  ovs,  %,  {aekka)  Storm-swift,  name  of  a  Harpy,  HftS. 
Th.  267  ;  also  of  a  hound,  Ovid.  Metam.  3.  219. 

dcXXuS-ns,  «y,  («?5os)  storm-like,  stormy,  Schol.  II.  3. 13. 

dtXirrw,  to  be  dtkirros,  have  no  hope,  despair,  only  found  m  part.,  deX- 
ttt4ovt€s  aoov  itvat  II.  7.  310;  d.  tovs  "Ekkijvas  vntpfiakUoBai.  Hdt.  7. 
168: — the  forms  dtkirito,  dtkirrjs  are  defended  by  Lob.  Phryn.  569. 

d-€XirTT|s,  4s,  unhoped  for,  unlooked  for,  unexpected,  yaiav  dtkirria 
baifcfv  I54a&at  Od.  5.  408  ;  ubi  olim  d(kti4a,  v.  foreg. 

d-eX-TTTia,  ^,  an  unlooked  for  event,  i£  dtk-rrrirjs,  Lat.  ex  insperato,  un- 
expectedly, Archil.  54.  II.  despair,  Pind.  P.  12.  55  [where  I]. 

deX-nros,  ov,  ((kTropiai)  =  dfkiTTTis,  h.  Horn.  Cer.  219;  i£  diktrrov  be- 
yond  hope,  unexpectedly,  Hdt.  I.  Ill  ;  so  «£  dtkvTwv  seems  to  be  used 
in  Soph,  Aj.  715,  cf.  Aesch.  Supp.  357  ;  trijfL  d.,  d.  /caicov  Id.  Pers.  265, 
1005  ;  ttirtp  oifiofiat  rdv  dekirrov  dp4pav  Eur.  Supp.  785  ;  dik-nra  yap 
k4y(is   Id.    Hel.  585.  2.   beyond  hope,   despaired  of,   Archil.   74, 

Solon  35,  Hipp.  Art.  808.  II.  act.  hopeless,  desperate,  h.  Horn. 

Ap.  91,   Aesch.   Supp.  907.  III.  Adv.  -tojs,   beyond  all  hope, 

Lat.  insperato,  Aesch.  Pers.  261,  Soph.  El.  1263  ;  and  in  bad  sense,  Aesch. 
Supp.  987:  also  neut.  pi.  as  Adv.,  Eur.  Phoen.  311. 

dtp.p.0.,  rd,  Ep.  for  ap.p.a,  a  bowstring  or  bow,  Call.  Dian.  10,  Apoll.  33. 

de-vuos  [a-],  ov  (vdeo  A),  also  dcC-vaos  Hdt.,  contr.  dcivus  Ar.  Ran. 
146,  (never  d4vvaos,  which,  though  often  introduced  by  the  Copyists. 
Herm.,  Eur.  Ion  117,  has  shewn  to  be  against  analogy,  cf.  dti  5);  used 
by  Trag.  only  in  lyr.  passages.  Ever-flowing,  fcp-qvqs  r  dtvdov  Kai 
dnoppVTOv  Hes.  Op.  593;  dtivaos  kt/ivrj,  iroTafx6s  Hdt.  I.  93,  145,  cf. 
Simon.  1 20;  rrorafiovs  dtvdovs  Aesch.  Supp.  554;  fdv  devaov  ira*ydp 
Eur.  Ion  118,  cf.  1083,  Or.  1299  ;  dtvdov  wvpos  Pind.  P.  1.  9  ;  &6pf$opov 
Kal  OKwp  dtivojv  Ar.  1.  c. ;  dtvaoi  ve<p4kat  Id.  Nub.  275: — generally, 
everlasting,  dptrds  .  .  Koafiov  dtvadv  tc  kkkos  Simon.  4  ;  dtvdois  iv 
TpaTr4£ais,  of  the  dinners  in  the  Prytaneum,  Pind.  N.  II.  9; — also  in 
Prose,  d4v.  Tpo<p-q  Xen.  Ages.  I,  20;  dtvawrtpov  .  .  rbv  ok&ov  irapixiLV 
Id.  Cyr.  4.  2,  44;  dtvaov  ovaiav  iropio-ai  Plat.  Legg.  966  E;  Trorafwl 
dtvaot  Arist.  Meteor.  1.  13,  6.    Adv.  dtvdws  Id.  Oec.  2.  4,  I. 

devdeov,  ovaa,  ov,  —  foreg.,  Od.  13.  109,  Hes.  Op.  548. 

d-€woT|TOs,  ov,  never  thought  of,  Schol.  Soph.  Tr.  1057. 

dt^Lpios,  ov,  increasing  while  one  lives  (?),  irtvBos  Epigr.  Gr.  562. 

dcfi-yvtos,  ov,  strengthening  the  limbs,  dtBka  Pind.  N.  4.  120. 

dc£i-KaKOs,  ov,  multiplying  evil,  Nonn.  D.  20.  84. 

de£i-K€po)s,  wv,  gen.  a;,  making  horns  grow,  C.  I.  6272. 

de£i-voos,  ov,  contr.  -vovs,  ovv,  strengthening  the  tnind,  Procl.h.  Mus.  16. 

dc|i-TOKOs,  ov,  nourishing  the  fruit  of  the  womb,  Nonn.  D.  5.  614,  etc. 

a€|i-Tpo<f>os,  ov,  fostering  growth,  Orph.  H.  51.  17. 

de£i~4>vXXos,  ov,  flourishing  leaves,  leafy,  Aesch.  Ag.  697. 

a€|i-<j>vTos,  ov,  nourishing  plants,  'Hats  Mel.  in  Anth.  P.  9.  363,  5. 

dc£u>,  old  poet,  form  of  av£oj  {av£dv<v),  found  once  in  Hdt.,  twice  in 
Trag.  (in  lyr.  passages)  ;  used  by  correct  writers  only  in  pres.  and  impt, 
without  augm. :  later  Poets  formed  a  fut.  dtf-qaoj  (Nonn.  D.  12.  24), 
aor.  rj4£r}aa  (lb.  8.  104,  Anth.  append.  299),  fut.  med.  d^rjaofiat  (Ap. 
Rh.  3.  837),  aor.  pass.  dtfrjOnv  (Anth.  P.  9.  631),  plqpf.  (dv-)rj4£rjTo 
(Nonn.  D.  4.  427).  (Prob.  from  ^fES,,  with  a  prefixed  (cf.  deibai, 
dtipoj),  whence  also  avfcai,  etc. ;  cf.  Skt.  vakshdmi  (cresco) ;  Goth. 
vahstus  (av£-no-ts)  ;  O.  Norse  vaxa,  to  wax;  O.  H.  G.  wachsa  (wachsen)  : 
the  Lat.  augeo  is  referred  by  Curt,  to  a  dirY.  Root  ;  v.  sub  vyi^s.)  To 
increase,  enlarge,  foster,  strengthen,  dvhpl  5<  k€K^tjwti  ptvos  fitya 
otvos  d«£ft  II.  6.  261  ;  Bvfibv  d4£*iv  II.  17.  226;  v4vBos  d.  to  cherish 
woe,  Od.  1 7.  489 ;  vibv  d.  to  rear  him  to  mans  estate,  1 3.  360 ;  epyov 
dtiovai  . .  Btoi  they  bless  the  work,  15.  372.  2.  to  exalt  by  one's  deeds, 

to  glorify,  magnify,  avrovs  r  d4£oi  teal  rroktv  Pind.  O.  8,  fin. ;  t<j 
ttX^oj  dtffiv  Hdt.  3.  80:  to  magnify,  exaggerate,   [dyytkiav]  pvBos 


ueTTTOi  —  afy\of. 


27 


de'ffi  Soph.  Aj.  226.  3.  ai£uv  frovrav  tporor  Eur.  Hipp.  537  ;  cf. 

ai£dra>  I.  4.  II.   Pass,  to  increase,  grow,  Tr/kiuaxos  SI  viov 

/iiv  di((TO  was  waxing  tall,  Od.  22.  426  ;  oil  .  .  wot  &i[(to  xvpa  7'  «v 
avr§  no  wave  ros*  fo'g'A  thereon,  10.  93  ;  x^Xos  •  ■  drSpwr  ir  arrjOtaatr 
d.  r)vrt  Kavvos  rises  high,  II.  18.  no;  Ttlo€  ipyor  d.  it  prospers,  Od. 
14.  66  ;  dtf«TO  icpoi'  r)/mp  u-as  getting  on  to  noon,  II.  8.  66,  etc. ;  so, 
firjrts  ai{*Tat  Emped.  375  ;  xipbos  antral  Aesch.  Cho.  825,  cf.  Supp. 
856.  III.   in  Soph.   Ant.  353   Dind.  has  received  Deiderlein's 

doubtful  conj.  di£trai  (for  a£trai)  as  a  med.  form,  exalts,  adorns; 
better  (with  Schone)  6xi*a£tTai,  v.  Schneidew.  ad  I.  IV.  intr.  = 

Pass.,  Q^Sm.  I.  1 16. 

eUirros,  or,  epith.  of  young  animals,  as  the  Schol.  read  in  Aesch.  Ag. 
141,  explaining  it  by  rots  tvtffOat  rots  yortvat  ur)  Svrafiirois :  the  Med. 
Ms.  gives  d(\wrois :  but  the  word  is  no  doubt  corrupt. 

d-«py)Xds.  r),  or,  =  dip-fos,  Ap.  Rh.  4.1186,  etc.;  o-€pyf|S,  is,  Nic.  Fr.4. 

d-cp-yia.  Ion.  -£i]  [i],  r),  a  not  working,  idleness,  Od.  24.  251,  Hes.  Op. 
309,  Bion  6.  6  (ubi  vulg.  dtpytiij).  2.  of  a  field,  a  lying  fallow 

or  waste,  Orac.  ap.  Aeschin.  69.  I. — Cf.  the  Att.  form  dpy'ia. 

d-tp-yds.  or,  like  dtpyr)s,  dtpyrjXos,  not-working,  idle,  11.  9.  320,  Od. 
19.  27,  Hes.  Op.  301,  etc.  ; — d.  bouoi  idle  houses,  i.e.  where  people  are 
idle,  Theocr.  28.  15  :  c.  gen.  not  working  out,  not  doing,  ipytav  alaxpwr 
dra<rr)s  xal  d.  Theogn.  1 177.  II.  act.  making  idle,  Nic.  Th. 

381. — Cf.  the  Att.  form  dpyos. 

dcpoijv,  Adv.  (dtipa)  lifting  up,  Aesch.  Ag.  235. — Cf.  the  Att.  form 
dpSr/r. 

d€p«0op4it,  see  under  Ion.  form  f)tp-. 

dfpStv,  v.  sub  deipai. 

Aepia,  as,  Ion.  'H<pii|,  175,  r),  old  name  of  Egypt,  prob.  from  drip,  the 
dark  land  (v.  Xrjfua  ,  Aesch.  Supp.  75,  cf.  Ap.  Rh.  4.  267;  also  of  Crete, 
Plin.  H.  N.  4.  20. 

d<pi{u,  (dr/p)  to  be  like  air;  and  so,  1.  ro  be  thin  as  air,  Diosc. 

1.  83.  2.   to  be  sky-blue,  Id.  5.  100. 

dcpixov,  to,  name  of  a  tax  by  Justinian,  Georg^Cedr.  742  C. 

diplvos,  77,  ov,  aerial,  like  air,  Arist.  Metaphrs.  7,  5.  3.  sky-blue, 

icr»f)s  Poll.  4.  119.  ' 

d<pt-oucot,  or,  dwelling  in  air,  Eubul.  Incert.  16  (mock  heroic). 

df'pios  [d],  or,  also  a,  or:  Ion.  T|cptos,  rj,  ov  (q.  v.) :  {drip).  In 
the  mist  or  thick  air  of  morning,  Eur.  Phoen.  1534.  II.  in  the 

air,  high  in  air,  Eur.  Tro.  546  :  of  the  air,  aerial,  opp.  to  x^ofios,  Id- 
Fr.  27;  ipiian  Arist.  Mund.  3,  4  ;  f£a  lb.  6,  Luc.  Prom.  6;  diptov  yivos 
Plat.  Epin.  984  D  : — Adv.  -ait.  Iambi,  de  Myst.  III.  wide  as  air, 

infinite,  Diod.  1.  33,  etc. 

d<piTis,  r),  pec.  fern,  of  dc'ptot,  Diosc.  2.  209. 

dcpKTos,  or,  (ipyw,  ttpyu)  unfenced,  open,  Lys.  1 10.  42. 

d<po{3du.uv  [d],  ov,  travelling  the  air,  of  birds,  cf.  Lob.  Phryn.  p.  431. 

d«po(3dT«'u,  to  walk  the  air,  of  Socrates,  in  pres.,  Ar.  Nub.  225,  1 503. 
Plat.  Apol.  19  C:  aor.  part.  d(po&aTr)aai  Luc.  Philopatr.  U> 

d«po-pdTns.  ov,  o,  one  who  walks  the  air,  Plut.  2.  952  F. 

d«po-5lvi'|s.  is.  Ion.  T|«p  ,  wheeling  in  air,  euros  Anth.  P.  9.  223. 

d<po-S6vT]TOt,  or,  air-tossed,  soaring.  At.  A  v.  1 385  ;  cf.  vt<pilio\os. 

d<poopop.<u,  f.  r)ati,  to  traverse  the  air,  Luc.  V.  H.  I.  10. 

d<po-Spdu,os.  or,  traversing  the  air,  d.  Map,  of  an  aqueduct,  C.  I.  4535 
(add.),  cf.  Eust.  1503.  10,  Manass.  Chron.  143,  410. 

d<po-«ioT|f  [a],  Ep.  and  Ion.  T|<po«iST|s,  is.  Like  the  sky  or  air. 
Plat.  Tim.  78  C,  Arist.  Gen.  et  Corr.  2.  3,  5  : — sky-coloured.  Id.  Color.  3, 
8  :  cf.  dtpwans. — For  the  Homeric  usage  of  the  word,  v.  r)tpottSr)>. 

dipojis,  Hesych.,  but  elsewh.  only  in  Ion.  form  r)tpons.  q.  v. 

ucpoOcv,  Adv.  out  of  the  air,  from  on  high,  cited  from  Eust. 

dfpo-Kopa£,  d*os.  It,  an  air-raven,  Luc.  V.  H.  I.  16. 

d<po-Kuvud/,  anus,  an  air-gnat.  Ibid. 

d«po-Af'o-xT|*.  ov,  A,  a  man  of  big  empty  words,  Hesych. 

<Upo-p&x">.  '),  an  air-battle.  Luc.  V.  H.  I.  18. 

d<pd-u.<Ai,  iTot,  to,  honey-dew,  Virgil's  atrium  met  (some  say  manna), 
Ath.  500  D  ;  also  vov  uiki. 

d<po-p.«Tp<u.  to  measure  the  air ;  hence  to  lose  oneself  in  vague  specu- 
lation, in  pres.  inf.,  Xen.  Oec.  II,  3  ;  cf.  d(po0ariai. 

d<po-p.iYT|S,  is,  compounded  of  air,  Diog.  L.  7.  145,  etc. 

dtpofivOia,  —  /uTfaipoKo-fitti,  rrtpl  aiXijrns  Philo  1.457: — from  dtpd- 
livOot,  Id.  2.  268. 

atpo-YT\x,'l%,it,  (vr)xouai)  floating  in  air,  of  the  clouds,  Ar.  Nub.  337. 

d<po-vou.<u,  to  move  in  air,  Heliod.  10.  30 ;  cf.  x('P°vi'uiai. 

dtpdoiuu.  Pass,  to  become  air,  Heraclid.  Allcg.  22. 

Mpo-wrfp,  is,  (rrirrrai)  fallen  from  the  sky,  Sanchun.  ap.  Eus.  P.  E.  38  C. 

d«po-ir«rns,  es,  (niroiuu)  flying  in  air,  Horapollo  2.  124. 

dfpd-TrXdvot,  or,  wandering  in  air,  Hesych.  s.  v.  i/epwpoirts. 

dcpoirop«u,  to  traverse  the  air,  Philo  2.  116,  300. 

d«po-iropos.  or,  traversing  the  air.  Plat.  Tim.  40  A,  Philo. 

a«po-<TKoTua.  r),  divination  by  observing  the  heavens,  Schol.  II.  I.62,Tzetz. 

d«poropos,  or,  (riftvai)  cleaving  the  air,  seems  to  have  been  coined  by 
way  of  derivation  for  'Kprtsus,  Clem.  Al.  668. 

d«po-Tovov  or,  stretched  or  driven  by  air,  Philo  in  Math.  Vett.  77. 

d<po-4>d(3os.  or,  afraid  of  the  air,  Cael.  Aurel.  M.  A.  3.  12. 

d«po-4>oiTO*.  or,  roaming  in  air,  Aesch.  ap.  Ar.  Ran.  1 291. 

dfpo-d>6pT)TOf .  oc,  upborne  by  air,  Eubul.  2r«p.  2.  2  (Meineke  suggests 
iffpo-). 

dspd-xpoo* ,  -out,  sky-coloured,  Diosc.  5.  85,  v.  1.  Orph.  Lith.  264. 

df'potu.  Ion.  T|<'poib.  oiros,  o,  Boeot.  name  for  the  bird  uipoif  (q.  v.), 
Schol.  Ar.  Av.  1354. 

d<ppu,  Aeol.  for  deipai,  Sappho  91,  Alcae.  78;  an  aor.  I  subj.  dipon 
Panyas.  6.  13  Diibner. 


dfpo-i-KdpT|Vos,  or,  carrying  the  high  head,  Paul.  Sil.  Ecphr.  397. 

d€po-i-Aod>os,  or,  high-crested,  Ap.  Rh.  2.  1061,  Nonn. 

depo-i-voos,  or,  contr.  -vo«s,  ovr,  haughty,  Nonn.  Jo.  8.  v.  44.  II. 
act.  cheering,  olvos,  prob.  1.  Ion  9 ;  also,  dep.  Bdxxov  ap.  Tzetz.  Schol! 
ad  Hes.  p.  18,  Gaisf. 

d«po-t-Tf«Tr|S,  «s,  (WTO^oi)=d(p<riironjs,  Qi  Sm.  3.  211. 

depo-i-TrdoTvs,  ov,  6,  =  d(ptrinovs,  Nonn.  D.  10.  401. 

dtpo-t-rropos,  ov,  going  on  high,  Nonn.  D.  I.  285. 

d«po-t-Tf6TT|S,ou,d,  (Trordo^iai)  high-soaring,  Hes.  Sc.  316,  Anth. P.  5. 299. 

dcpo-l-TroTTVTOS,  or,  =  foreg.,  Hes.  Op.  775. 

dcpo-i-irovs,  i,  t),  vow,  to,  lifting  up  the  feet,  brisk-trotting,  irrwoi 
dipaiiroSts  II.  18.  532  ;  contr.  dpaiiroits  h.  Horn.  Ven.  211. 

depTaJu,  lengthd.  Ep.  form  of  deipeu,  to  lift  up,  Ap.  Rh.  1.  73S,  Call. 
Fr.  19,  etc.;  impf.  r)ipra(ov  Anth.  P.  9.  12,  Ap.  Rh.,  etc.,  Ep.  aor. 
dtpraoofte  Nonn.  D.  43.  99: — besides  these  forms,  we  have  (from 
*dfprd<u)  slot.  I  yiprnaf  Anth.  P.  6.  223;  pf.  pass.  t)iprriTai,  lb.  5.  230, 
Opp.  C.  2.  99. 

dtpu&rjs.  es,  (f'oos)  like  air,  Arist.  Mund.  4,  18:  light  of  texture,  Schol. 
Eur.  Or.  1431.  2.  like  dipofibjjs,  t^k  xpoav  Diosc.  5.  170.  3. 

as  subst.,  to  dfpwSts  the  airy  nature,  Emped.  ap.  Plut.  2.  888  B.  II. 
full  of  air,  Arist.  P.  A.  3.  6,  8.     Cf.  dfpo(iSt)s. 

d*s,  Dor.  for  dci. 

dco-a,  diaau-ev,  contr.  daa/iev,  ataav,  inf.  dioai,  an  aor.  1  (with  no 
other  tense  in  use)  to  sleep,  Od.  19.  342.,  3.  151,  490.,  15.  40,  never  in 
II.  (Akin  to  anfu,  aa>,  cf.  miovra  .  .  vwvtp  Aesch.  Cho.  622,  and  Virg. 
proflare  somnum  ;  cf.  Lob.  Rhemat.  p.  144.)  [d  in  arsis  or  by  contrac- 
tion, d  in  thesis.] 

dcox4>poovvr|,  r), silliness,  folly,  dtauppoovvat  Od.  15.  470,  Hes.  Th.502. 

dco-i-dtpuv,  ov,  gen.  ovos,  =  tpptaiv  daoOtis,  damaged  in  mind,  witless, 
silly,  II.  20.  183,  Od.  21.  302,  Hes.  Op.  333; — and  therefore  for  daai- 
<ppwr  (from  ddej,  <ppr)v),  Buttm.  Lexil.  s.  v.  ddtrai. 

d<T«os  [d],  ov,  (citrus)  of  the  eagle,  Suid. ;  cf.  ■limn 

d«TT|s,  is,  v.  sub  aitTiJs. 

dcTtocvs  [a],  ius,  6,  an  eaglet,  Ael.  N.  A.  7-  47- 

dwvrjff  [t]  \i9os,  o,  the  eagle-stone,  said  to  be  found  in  the  eagle's 
nest,  Ael.  N.  A.  I.  35. 

dcTos,  Ep.  and  Ion.  olcros  (v.  sub  fin.),  oO,  o,  an  eagle,  as  a  generic 
name,  II.  8.  247  ;  its  epithets  in  Horn,  are  dyxvkox(i\ris,  vxfitirtrqs, 
v^cntrr)tts,  aidwv,  fii\as,  xapriaros  xal  uikiotos  vfTfrjrair,  u^vraros 
bipxioBat,  and  in  respect  to  omens,  TfAfioTaTos,  II.  8.  247,  cf.  12.  201, 
Od.  2.  I46;  it  was  the  favourite  of  Zeus,  otrrc  aoi  avT§  tpikraros 
oituvotv  II.  24.  310;  so  in  Trag.,  Atuv  .  .  vttjvus  xvair,  Satpotros  d. 
Aesch.  Pr.  1022,  cf.  Ag.  136  ;  d  axrnrrpo^du.a>r  a.,  xvair  Aws  Soph.  Fr. 
766  : — proverb.,  aicTos  ir  worarois  Pind.  N.  3.  138  ;  dcTus  ir  r«pi\aiai, 
of  a  thing  quite  out  of  reach,  Ar.  Eq.  1013  ;  dtror  xdr$apos  fiaitvaouai 
(v.  sub  fiaitvou-at) ; — the  dill",  kinds  are  distinguished  by  specific  names, 
d.  yvr)atos  seems  to  be  the  golden  eagle,  xpvodfros,  Arist.  H.  A.  9.  32, 
6,  sq.:  in  this  chapt.  he  enumerates  the  other  kinds,  mrya^ds,  1X07705  or 
yirrTotpovos,  u*\avd*ros,  ntpxrvnrtpos  or  vrdros  (twit-),  dAid«Tos.  2. 
an  eagle  as  a  standard,  of  the  Persians,  Xen.  Cyr.  7.  I,  4;  of  the 
Romans,  Plut.  Mar.  23,  etc.  II.  a  kind  of  ray,  of  the  class 

ai\axos,  Arist.  H.  A.  5.  5,  3.  III.  in  architecture,  like  diraiua, 

the  gable  of  a  house,  the  pediment  of  a  temple,  Lat.  fastigium,  Ar.  Av. 
1 1 10,  ubi  v.  Schol.,  C.  I.  160  II.  So:  said  to  be  invented  by  the 
Corinthians,  Pind.  O.  13.  29: — also  called  rvuvaror  and  o«Ato.  Cf. 
Valck.  Diatr.  p.  214  (Eur.  Fr.  764).  (The  Ion.  form  oifTos  is  constantly 
used  by  the  Ep.  and  Lyr.  Poets ;  but  the  only  correct  Att.  form  is  dtros, 
though  altros  has  often  been  introduced  by  the  Copyists  into  Trag.,  etc., 
cf.  df  1.— Another  form,  alrrros,  is  now  read  in  Pind.  P.  4.  6,  v.  Bergk  Aiucr. 
99,  Arat.  522,  691.  The  dial,  form  al&trus,  i.e.  aiftrvs.  cited  in 
Hesych.,  confirms  the  belief  that  the  Root  is  Af ,  v.  sub  dial  (A).)  [d, 
Piers.  Moer.  231,  and  in  all  derivs.  and  compds.J 

dfTodidpos,  i,  a  standard-bearer,  Lat.  aouilifer,  Plut.  Caes.  52.  CC 
dr/roipdpor. 

d«TujSrjs  [d],  cf,  (cToos)  eagle-like,  Luc.  Icarom.  14. 

diVuiia  [d],  t<5,  =dfTd?  Ill,  a  gable,  Lat.  fastigium,  oixov  Hipp.  Art. 
808,  cf.  Timae.  50,  Joseph.  A.  J.  3.  6,  4 :  aiTwsia  in  C.  I.  481.  5. 

dtTuxns  [d],  tats,  r),  the  forming  of  a  gable,  Lat.  fastigatio,  Athen.  de 
Mach.  p.  4. 

Ha.  r),  (v.  dfoo)  heat,  r)«Aioi/  Opp.  C.  I.  134,  cf.  3.  324: — dryness,  of 
the  skin,  XP°6*  Nic.  Th.  304,  ubi  Schneid.  aT?;:— but  in  Od.  22.  184  an 
old  shield  is  said  to  be  ireiraAtry/ifi'o!'  dfy  coated  with  dirt  or  mould : — 
oi  dry  sediment,  Schol.  Theocr.  5.  109. 

dtoivu.  (df<v)  to  dry,  parch  up,  aor.  subj.  dfijyjj,  -r)rTiai  Nic.  Th.  205, 
368  (Schneid.  reads  also  aiatr.  after  Cod.  II):  Pass.,  d^airtrat  (Schneid. 
avaivtrai)  lb.  339.     Cf.  d£dra>,  xara^airat. 

dJuA«o*.  a,  or,  dry,  parched,  oipos  11.  20.  491  ;  uXi;  Od.  9.  234,  etc.  ; 
Bav  di^aXirjv  dry  bull's-hide,  II.  7.  239;  u%.  yrjpas  withered,  sapless, 
Epit.  in  C.  1. 6280.  1 2,  Plut.  2.  789  B.  2.  metaph.  dry,  harsh,  cruel, 

like  dTf7«Tos,  Anth.  P.  5.  238,  v.  Lob.  Aj.  648.  II.  act.  parch- 

ing, scorching,  Xtipios  Hes.  Sc.  153,  cf.  Ap.  Rh.  4.  679  ;  of  love,  fiariai 
Ibyc.  I. — Poet.  word. 

'A(avia,  4,  land  of  Zdr  or  Z«us,  i.  e.  Arcadia,  Steph.  Byz. 

ii&ya,  =  dfairu,  h.  Horn.  Vcn.  271,  in  Pass. 

d-tcvKTOf,  or,  unyoked,  Dion.  H.  2.  31,  etc. ;  df.  70^01;  Schol.  Ar.  Lys. 
217:  also  without  yduov,  e.g.  irap6ivos,  Schol.  Ap.  Rh.  4.  897. 

dfrnXCo.  r),  freedom  from  jealousy,  Clem.  Al.  1 71.  II.  simplicity, 

Plut.  Lye.  21. 

d-fnXov  ov.  like  atfkarros,  unenvied,  unenviable,  dreary,  yrjpas  Simon. 
Iamb.  1.  n  ;  (ppovpi  Aesch.  Pr.  143;  Pios,  ipyov  Soph.  Tr.  284,  745  ; 


28 

9ia  El.  I455  ;  in  Orac.  ap.  Hdt.  *.  140,  d'fijXa  jrt'Xci  all  are  /'«  ill  flight. 
Lob.  Aglaoph.  1353  corrects  dtonXa.  2.  generally,  sorry,  incon- 

siderable, Plut.  Lye.  10.  II.  act.  nor  envious,  Ath.  594  C. 

d-jT)XoTvirr|TOS,  ov,  not  exposed  to  jealousy,  Plut.  2.  7S7  D. 

d-j-nXdrim-os,  ov,  free  from  envy,  Plut.  Conip.  Lye.  c.  Num.  3. 

d-£r|XwTos,  ov,  not  to  be  envied.  Plat.  Gorg.  469  B. 

d-$T|u.ios,  ov,  free  from  further  payment,  Hdt.  6.  92.  2.  without 

loss,  scot-free,  Lat.  immunis,  antSi  d(.  Id.  I.  212  ;  in  legal  usage,  d^\a^rj 
teal  atfijuov  waptxirai  Plat.  Legg.  865  C:  unpunished,  Eur.  Med. 
1050,  Ar.  Ran.  407,  Antipho  123.  37,  etc. ;  6ird  tivos  Plat.  Rep.  366  A  : 
not  deserving  punishment.  Soph.  El.  1 102:  c.  gen.,  dacflr]imTwv  a(. 
Polyb.  2.  60,  5.  Adv.  -iws,  with  impunity,  Philem.  Incert.  10:  also 
without  fraud,  honestly,  Joseph.  A.  J.  15.  4,  4.  II.  act.  not 

amounting  to  punishment,  harmless,  of  sour  looks,  Thuc.  2.  37  ;  ov*  d£. 
Joseph.  A.  J.  15.  5,  I. 

'AJt|o-ia,  ij,  a  name  of  Demeter,  prob.  corrupt  for  AJf  ijffi'a,  Soph.  Fr.  809. 

d-fTfrnTos,  ov,  unexamined,  Aeschin.  57.  3.  Adv.,  d^rp-rjTais  ix*'"  Ttvds 
Philo  I.  96. 

d{T|XT|S,  is,  unceasing,  excessive,  oStivij  II.  15.  25  ;  ipvfiayoos  17.  741 : 
neut.  as  Adv.,  dfijx^s  <payip(v  Kal  mi/iev  Od.  18.  3  ;  [oi'es]  d£.  fitua- 
xviai  II.  4.  435.  II.  hard,  rough,  Kopvvr)  Ap.  Rh.  2.  99  ;  Svfios 

v.  1.  II.  15.  25,  cf.  Lob.  Aj.  648.  (Ep.  word,  perhaps  an  old  dialectic 
form  for  d&«x^s  (a  copulat.),  v.  sub  £a-.) 

u£op.ai.  Dep.,  used  only  in  pres.  and  impf. ;   act.  only  in  Soph.  O.  C. 


afyXoTLnrtjTos  —  a^T^y. 


134,  part.  a£ovra. 
parents,  d^opitvoi 


To  stand  in  awe  of,  dread,  respect,  gods  and  one's 
'AiroWtuva  II.  I.  21  ;  ftr/T*  ovv  ptnrip'  (aty  a$tv  Od. 
17.  401 ;  followed  by  inf.,  xfP^  b*  dvl-motatv  Ail  Xetfieiv  .  .  d^opLCU  II.  6. 
267  ;  (dvovs  oix  afro  •  •  iaOifUvai  Od.  9.  478  ;  d£.  \xr\  11.  14.  261  ; — so 
in  Theogn.,  t/s  5f}  Ktv  . .  dfotT  dOavarovs  748 ;  and  in  Trag.,  rh  ovv 
Tab"  oix  antral  Aesch.Eum.  389;  IlaAAdSos-  S'  vtto  irrcpofs  oVras afarai 
war-rip  (sc.  Zeus)  respects  .  .  ,  lb.  1002  ;  a^ovrai  yap  dpLcu/xovs  Id.  Supp. 
651  ;  ir\oKauov  ouSdp.'  afrrat  lb.  884  (all  lyr.)  ;  oix  a£o/iai  Savftv  I 
fear  not  to  die .  .  ,  Eur.  Or.  1 1 1 6  (vulg.  oi  xa{opai,  cf.  Elmsl.  Heracl.  600, 
Monk  Alcest.  336).  2.  absol.  in  part,  awe-struck,  Od.  9.  200  ;  afup't 

001  a£6utvos  Soph.  O.  T.  155.  (From  •y'AT  v.  0170s,  d/yos,  ayvos,  0710s.) 

djos,  d,  contr.  from  dofos,  a  servant,  Clitarch.  ap.  Ath.  267  C. 

d-Jvy-qs,  is,  =dfu£,  Clem.  Al.  106. 

u-Jvyos,  ov,  =  d£v(,  unwedded,  noirn  Luc.  Amor.  44.  2.  in  pi.  not 

a  pair,  oavbdXta  Strabo  259. 

u-{vu.os,  ov,  without  process  of  fermentation.  Plat.  Tim.  74  D: — of 
bread,  unleavened,  dpros  Ath.  109  B,  dprous  df.,  d(vua  \dyava  Lxx 
(Exod.  29.  21,  Levit.  2.  4):  absol.,  dfupia,  rd,  Exod.  12.  15;  but  rd 
d^vfia  the  feast  of  unleavened  bread,  Ev.  Marc.  14.  I,  =  7  foprrf  twv 
dC.vp.wv  Ev.  Luc.  2  2.  I. 

d£vu,oi>a-yia,  the  eating  of  unleavened  bread.  Just.  Mart.  231  D  (in  pi.). 

"5«J,i70i,  d,  1),  to, (frvyvvfu)  unyoked,  unpaired,  Archil.  146  (13s);  and 
$0  unmarried,  Eur.  Bacch.  694  ;  of  Pallas  the  virgin  goddess,  Id.  Tro.  536  : 
with  a  gen.  added,  d£v(  KixTpiov,  yduwv,  dvijs,  Lat.  nuptiarum  expers, 
Id.  Hipp.  546, 1.  A.  805,  Med.  673.  II.  solitary,  Arist.  Pol.  I.  2, 10. 

a£u,  v.  sub  d^oficu. 

d{u  (A),  to  dry  up,  parch,  {mint  xP"a  Sfiptos  af«  Hcs.  Sc.  397,  cf. 
Op-  585,  Alcae.  39 : — Pass.,  [ai7«pos]  d^ouivrj  xurai  lies  drying,  II.  4. 
487.  (From  -y^AZ  come  also  d£a,  dfaivco,  -dvtu:  avta,  aiaivaj  come 
from  a  diff.  Root.) 

ufo  (B),  to  cry  a  (as  aid£<u  to  cry  alai),  to  groan,  sigh,  Soph.  Fr.  808 ; — 
and  perh.  this  is  the  sense  of  the  Med.,  ti  tis  . .  d^ip-at  Kpabirjv  dKax"r)u(vos 
Hes.  Th.  99.         2.  to  breathe  hard,  Nicoch.  Incert.  2  ;  cf.  atd£o>  2,  £a(u. 

u£uta,  f/,  (dftvos)  lifelessness,  Porph.  ap.  Stob.  Eel.  I.  820. 

dJuviKos,  7,  ov,  =sq.,  Psell.  1.  c. 

d-£wvos,  ov,  confined  to  no  zone  or  region,  opp.  to  local  deities,  Serv. 
Virg.  Aen.  12.  118,  Psell.  Exp.  Dogm.  Chald.  114. 

u-£u>os,  ov,  ((tat)}  lifeless,  Porphyr.  II.  (fipov)  without  worms 

in  it,  of  wood,  Theophr.  C.  P.  4.  15,  3. 

u-Jwo-tos,  ov,  tfuivvv/u)  ungirt,  from  hurry,  Hes.  Op.  343 ;  generally, 
not  girded,  Plat.  Legg.  954  A. 

d-J&>TOS,  ov,  =  foreg.,  E.  M.  22.  20. 

d-nSw,  to  feel  disgust  at,  Sfiirvtp  dnbrjaacv  as  the  Vienn.  Ms.  in  Od.  I . 
134,  ubi  nunc  dbrjo'ttfv  (v.  dbiai). 

aT)8T|s,  is,  (fjoos)  unpleasant  to  the  taste,  distasteful,  nauseous,  of  food, 
drugs,  etc.,  Hipp.  Aph.  1246,  Plat.  Legg.  660  A.  2.  generally  of 

all  things  unpleasant,  as  oibiv  ol  dijbioTtpov  taioBat  Hdt.  7.  101, 
Plat.  Legg.  893  A,  al. :  in  Plat.  freq.  of  narration  dr/bts  or  ovk  drjdis 
ion,  Apol.  33  C,  41  B,  Phaedo  84  D :— Comp.  drfiiarepos,  Hdt.  1.  c. : 
Sup.  dijJtoraros,  Plat.  Legg.  663  C,  Phaedr.  240  B.  II.  of  per- 

sons, unpleasant,  disagreeable,  odious,  dnoynpds  d.  yiyvtrai  Alex.  Incert. 
15,  cf.  Dem.  1147.  12,  Arist.  Eth.  N.  2.  7,  13,  al. ;  rivi  to  one,  Plat. 
Phaedo  91  B.  III.  Adv.   -bus,   unpleasantly,   (i)v  Id.  Prot. 

351  B,  cf.  Phaedo  88  C,  al. ;  dr/Stus  (X"v  rivi  to  be  on  bad  terms  with 
one,  Dem.  500.  15;  so,  drjduis  biaxeiaOai,  dnbws  5iaT(0TJvai,  trpos  riva, 
Lys.  145.  36,  Isocr.  237  A.  2.  without  pleasure  to  oneself,  un- 

willingly, oix  d.  Plat.  Prot.  335  C,  al. 

aT|Sia,  ij,  a  being  disagreeable,  nauseousness,  of  drugs,  Hipp.  Acut. 
387.  II.  mostly  of  persons,  unpleasantness,  odiousness,  Dem.  564. 

1 2,  Aeschin.  64.  3,  Theophr.  Char.  20  ;  t))v  of)c  d.  your  odious  presence, 
Aeschin.  77.  12.  2.  a  being  ill-pleased,  disgust,  dislike,  Plat.  Phaedr. 

240  D,  Legg.  802  D,  etc. ;  pi.,  d.  *ai  fiapirnTts  ruiv  d\\wv  Isocr. 
239  B- 

i1t|Si{(i>,  ro  disgust,  rijv  yivo'tv  Sext.  Emp.  P.  1.  92  : — Pass,  to  be  dis- 
gusted with,  Eccl. 

dT)Sicru.6s,  d,  disgust,  opp.  to  ijbovt),  Sext.  Emp.  P.  I.  87. 


d-rjSoveios.  ov,  =  dr/oowos,  vnvos  drjo.  proverb,  of  the  least  winh  of  sleep, 
Nicoch.  Incert.  3,  cf.  Nonn.  D.  5.  411. 

d-i)Sovia,  r),  loss  of  pleasure,  Diog.  L.  2.  89,  90. 

aT]8ovi8€us,  tajs,  6,  a  young  nightingale,  Theocr.  15.  121,  in  poet.  pi. 
drj5ovibr}fS,  cf.  Valck.  ad  1.  (p.  401  B).     Cf.  drjoovttos. 

d-r|86vios,  ov,  of  a  nightingale,  700s,  vofios  d.  the  nightingale's  dirge, 
Aesch.  Fr.  420,  Ar.  Ran.  684 ;  cf.  dnbovetos. 

d-rjSovis,  i'5os,  fi,  =  dijowv,  a  nightingale,  Eur.  Rhes.  550,  Call.  Lav.  Pall. 
94,  Theocr.  8.  38  ;  t/lovadcuv  dijbovts,  of  a  poet,  Anth.  P.  7.  414 ;  of  a 
girl,  Epigr.  Gr.  551.  6. — Dim.  only  in  form. 

aT|8u,  =  a7]Swv,  of  which  we  have  gen.  d?;8oCs  Soph.  Aj.  628  (the  Schol. 
says  it  is  a  Mytil.  form),  vocat.  dj;5or  Ar.  Av.  679. 

dT)8wv,  ovos,  %,  (dtiSai)  the  songstress,  i.  e.  the  nightingale,  Hes.  Op. 
201  ;  in  Horn,  of  the  daughter  of  Pandareiis,  who  was  changed  into  a 
nightingale,  Od.  19.  518,  where  the  description  (ij  rt  6aud  rpojirwaa  x<<* 
no\vr/xta  (poivijv)  plainly  indicates  the  nightingale,  though  the  epiths. 
X^-aipnis  (Od.  1.  c),  x^-aPa''XV''  (Simon.  73),  hardly  suit  its  colour ;  cf. 
also  £ov6us,  TfOiKi\65upos ;  it  is  called  Ktytia,  ktyvcpwvos,  etc.,  in  reference 
to  its  voice: — Movawv  dtjbovis,  periphr.  for  poets,  Valck.  Phoen.  321 ;  Ttai 
d-noovss  thy  strains,  Call.  Ep.  47  ;  £<oovaas  €Aiires  ydp  d-nbvvas  songs, 
Epigr.  Gr.  618  a.  9.  II.  the  month-piece  of  a  flute,  Eur.  Fr.  560  : 

so  for  the  flute  itself,  lb.  923. — The  masc.  is  known  only  from  Anth.  P.  7. 
44,  Eust.  376.  24  ('Am/rds  dvi)p  tov  aiya  \4yct  iua-nep  xat  tov  drjbova). 

d-rjOcia,  Ion.  aTjOirj  [t],  ^,  (d^r/s)  nnaccustomedness,  novelty  of  a  situa- 
tion, Batr.  72  ;  d-r)6,  tivos  inexperience  of  a  thing,  Thuc.  4.  55  ;  uird  uij- 
$tias  from  inexperience.  Plat.  Theaet.  175  D.     Cf.  dr^i'a. 

dT|0€o-o-(o,  poet,  for  dr/Sia),  to  be  unaccustomed,  c.  gen.,  drjBfoaov  'in 
racpwv  II.  10.  493  (the  only  Homeric  passage  where  it  occurs) ;  so, 
drfliaaovaa  bir\s  Ap.  Rh.  4.  38  ;  drfliaoovns  Nic.  Al.  378  : — inAp.Rh. 
I.  1171  d-qQeaov  appears  to  be  used  metri  grat.  for  d-qBeoaov, 

uT|(rr)s,  €i,  (rjflos)  unwonted,  unusual,  strange,  ctyis  Aesch.  Supp.  568 ; 
els  drjOij  bwuara  Soph.  Fr.  517:— Adv.  -6as,  unexpectedly,  Thuc.  4. 
17.  II.  of  persons,  unused  to  a  thing,  c.  gen.,  /'dx'js  Thuc.  4. 

34,  cf.  Plat.  Theaet.  146  B,  al. ;  d7]6(ts  tov  xaraxovtiv,  tov  npoirnKaKt- 
£fcr$at  Dem.  15.  28.,  538.  2  : — in  Soph.  Tr.  869,  Wunder  Q17S77S.  2. 

without  ^0os  or  character,  rpayaibia  Arist.  Poet.  6,  15,  cf.  24,  14. 

d-rjOia,  rj,  =  di}6tta,  Eur.  Hel.  418. 

dT)8ifou.ai,  Dep.  to  be  unaccustomed  to  a  thing,  Strabo  198. 

uT)u.a,  to,  a  blast,  wind,  Aesch.  Ag.  1 41 8,  Eum.  905  ;  ouvwv  a.  vvtv- 
fULTaiv  (Lob.  \eiuiv)  Soph.  Aj.  674. 

ut|U.i,  3  sing,  drjai  Hes.  Op.  514,  3  dual  dryrov  (not  dnov)  \\.  9.  5,  3  pi. 
aei&i  Hes.  Th.  875  ;  imper.  3  sing.  dr/Tai  Ap.  Rh.  4.  768 ;  inf.  df/vai  Od. 
3.  183,  Ep.  dt)n(vat  lb.  176;  part,  dtis,  dtvros  II.  5.  526:  impf.  3  sing,  an 
Od.  12.  325.,  14.  458  (cf.  Sidij/u),  3  pi.  atoav  Ap.  Rh. : — Pass.,  3  sing. 
drjTai,  impf.  drrro,  part.  dt//x€Cos,  v.  infr.  (From  ^Af  (for  fA)  come 
also  doi,  drjTTjs,  avpa  (i.  e.  dfpa),  dr/p  (Aeol.  airjp  or  df-f)p),  aval,  lava:, 
dfoa  (dot),  dd£ai,  d£a>  B,  dial  (dnux),  dtff$at:  cf.  Skt.  vti,  vnmi  (spiro), 
vdtas,  vityus  (ventus)  ;  Lat.  ventus;  Goth,  vaia  (irvioj),  vinds  (dvtfios); 
O.  Norse  vinbr;  etc.)  Ep.  Verb,  to  breathe  hard,  blow,  of  the  winds, 
rdi  t«  &pTJfcrj8fv  dnrov  II.  9.  5,  cf.  Od.  3.  176,  183,  etc. ;  oi'  re  vitpta  .  . 
biaatctb'vdaiv  dtvTts  II.  5.  526;  dviatuv  . .  fiivos  vypuv  divTOjv  Od.  19. 
440,  cf.  Hes.  Th.  871  sq. : — the  pass,  forms  are  used  sometimes  in  strictly 
pass,  sense  to  be  beaten  by  the  wind,  vofievos  Kal  djjficvos  Od.  6.  131  ; 
but  more  commonly  absol.  to  toss  or  wave  about,  as  if  by  the  wind,  &'xa 
0vpos  drjTO  their  mind  waved  to  and  fro,  i.  e.  was  in  doubt  ox  fear,  U.  21. 
386  ;  dvpus  drjrat  rrcpi  -naiSajv  Ap.  Rh.  3.  688  ;  but,  fiaprvpta  drp-ai  ttr 
dvOpwirovs  they  are  wafted  to  and  fro  among  men,  one  knows  not  how, 
Pind.  I.  4.  15  ;  irepi  T  dutpi  Tt  KaXKos  drjro  beauty  breathed  all  around 
her,  Ruhnk.  h.  Horn.  Cer.  276;  so,  Tofoi'  dijro  dno  Kprfitv  Hes.  Sc.  8. 

dt)p,  depos,  in  Horn,  drjp,  r/fpos,  while  Hipp.  (Aiir.  282,  290)  has  the 
nom.  i)rjp  ;  Aeol.  auT|f>,  Dor.  dpT]p  (i.  e.  df-rjp),  Ahrens  D.  Aeol.  39,  Dor. 
491 : — fern,  in  Horn,  and  Hes.  (except  in  Op.  547)  ;  from  Hdt.  downwds. 
masc.,  (II.  5.  776.,  8.  50,  h.  Cer.  383,  cannot  be  quoted  for  the  masc. 
usage,  since  there  rrovXvs  and  &a$vs  need  not  be  masc.)  ;  so  aer  was  fern, 
in  Enn.,  Gell.  13.  20.  In  Horn,  and  Hes.,  the  lower  air  or  atmosphere, 
the  thick  air  or  haze  that  surrounds  the  earth,  opp.  to  a\6-r)p  the  pure 
upper  air  (v.  esp.  II.  14.  288,  where  a  tall  pine  iiaKporaTi}  napvvia  hi 
rjtpos  aiOep  'ifcavfv,  and  cf.  Ar.  Nub.  264  sq.)  ;  hence  misty  darkness, 
mist,  gloom,  Trepib' ijipa  irovXiv  txcvev  II.  5.  776, cf.  3.  381.,  8.  50;  rjc'pa 
piv  oicibaae  Kal  dnuioev  vfiix^rjv  17.  649  ;  rph  5'  yepa  Tvipt  0a9ftav  20. 
446 ;  so  sometimes  in  Prose,  Hipp.  11.  c. ;  cf.  yeptos,  Jitpotibr)? : — but 
later,  2.  generally,  air,  Soph.  El.  87,  Ar.  Av.  694,  Eur.,  Plat., 

etc. ;  irpds  tov  dfpa  oiaTplQttv  in  the  open  air,  Ar.  Nub.  198  ;  tuv  dtpa 
'i\Kiiv  KaOapov  Philyll.  Incert.  I,  cf.  Philem.  Incert.  27  a;  tairacas  tuv 
d.  tov  koivuv  Meuand.  Incert.  2.  7  ;  dipa  bipttv  (cf.  Virg.  verberat  auras), 
I  Ep.  Cor.  9.  26 :— in  pi.,  Plat.  Phaedo  98  C,  D  ;  of  mephitic  vapours, 
Strabo  244.  8.  personified,  'Ar}p,  ov  av  Tts  vvoudaut  Kal  Aia, 

as  in  Lat.  Jupiter  for  air,  Philem.  Incert.  2.  4,  cf.  Diphil.  Incert.  3. — Cf. 
Buttm.  Lexil.  s.  v.  II.  the  open  space  in  baths,  Galen.        [a,  ex- 

cept in  Arist.  Epigr.  ap.  Eust.  17.  37,  Pseudo-Phocyl.  108.  In  Soph. 
El.  87,  for  Si .  .  777s  lo-6fioipos  d-r)p,  Pors.  restored  ladfiotp .] 

d-no-is,  tajs,  1),  (d'jy/it)  «=  d-npa,  a  bloiving,  Eur.  Rhes.  417* 

uTjcro-nTOS,  Att.  d"f|rn]Tos,  ov,  unconquered,  not  beaten,  Thuc.  6.  70, 
Lys.  914,  fin.,  Dem.  309.  17.  2.  unconquerable,  Plat.  Rep.  375  B. 

dT|o-«Xos,  for  aiavXos,  wicked,  II.  5.  876. 

d-qcrvpos,  ov,  (dcu,  anpu)  light  as  air,  hence  little,  Aesch.  Pr.  452,  ubi  v. 
Blomf. :  aloft,  Ap.  Rh.  2.  1101. 

d-nT<ou.ai,  Dep.  (d^r^s)  to  fly*  read  in  Arat.  523. 

d-f|Tr|,  r),  —  drjTTjs,  Hes.  Op.  643,  673. 

dTjnjs,  ov,  d,  (da),  d'r/ui)  a  blast,  gale,  dviptow,  Ztcpvpoio,  dvtpojv  d^Tai 


atjToppoo? 

II.  15.  626,  Od.  4.  567,  Hes.  Op.  619:  absol.  a  wind,  Theocr.  2.  38: — 
poet,  word,  01  woitjtcu  to.  irvtvfxara  drjTat  KaXovai  Plat.  Crat.  410  B. 

dTiTop-poos.  ov,  contr.  -povs,  ovv,  creating  df/Tai,  a  word  coined  by 
Plat.  Crat.  410  B. 

diiTOS,  ov,  an  old  word,  only  found  in  phrase,  Bdpaos  drrrov  II.  21.  395 
(written  Sapaos  aarov  in  Q.  Sm.  1.  217);  but  quoted  also  from  Aesch. 
(Fr.  2)  by  Hesych.,  drjrovs-  pcydkas  : — prob.  from  d-npu,  in  the  sense  of 
stormy,  furious,  terrible,  like  afirros- :  but  cf.  Butt  in .  Lexil.  s.  v. 

d-nro-tpopos,  ov,  eagle-bearing,  keyeaivts  Or.  Sib.  8.  78  ;  v.  deTos  sub  fin. 

d-TjTT-nTos,  ov,  later  Att.  for  drujairrof. 

d-TjXos,  ov,  without  sound,  (pa/vrj  Aretae.  Caus.  M.  Diut.  I.  II. 

d9uXdu,evros,  ov,  unwedded,  ^Kikitj  Epigr.  Gr.  372.  33. 

d9uXdo-orevTOs,  Att.  -TTtvros,  ov,  =  aBaKaooarros,  Poll.  I.  121. 

dfloAao-o-ia,  Att.  ->rr£a,  r),  ignorance  of  the  sea,  Secund.  in  Galei  Opusc. 
p.  639. 

d-9dXao-o-os,  Att.  -tto$,  ov,  without  sea,  far  from  it,  inland,  Menand. 
Tpwp.  1.  9.  II.  not  mixed  with  sea-water,  oivos  Damocr.  ap. 

Galen.,  Horace's  vinum  maris  expers. 

d0iXdo-o-wros,  Att.  -ttwtos,  ov,  (fiaXaaadtu)  unused  to  the  sea,  a  land- 
lubber, Ar.  Ran.  204,  Agath.  Hist.  p.  8.  8. 

d-9&A-f|s  or  d-8oXATi$,  e's,  of  the  laurel,  not  verdant,  withered,  Plut. 
Pomp.  31,  Orac.  ap.  Ath.  524  B. 

d6aXirr|s,  is,  (BdXvos)  without  warmth,  Nonn.  D.  37.  151.,  40.  286, 
Paul.  Sil.,  etc.     Adv.  -wiojt,  Hipp.  Acut.  388. 

d-9ap.pVf|s,  e's,  fearless,  Ibyc.  I ,  Phryn.  Trag.  ap.  Hesych. ;  bkotov  Plut. 
Lye.  16. 

dflap43ta.  Ion.  -£t|,  1},  imperturbability,  Democr.  ap.  Cic.  Fin.  5.  29. 

d-9ap43os.  ov,  imperturbable,  Democr.  ap.  Stob.  38.  39. 

'Afldva,  'A8dvcu,  'AOdvaia,  Dor.  for  'A9nv-,  v.  'ABTjvn. 

dSuvuo-ia,  r),  immortality.  Plat.  Phaedr.  246  A,  al. ;  i  Si  Xi/ids  ioriv 
dOavaaias  tpdpfiaicov  Antiph.  AtirX.  2.  [penult,  made  long  in  Or.  Sib.  2. 

4'.  «*>]■ 

d9<ivuTt£cii,  to  make  immortal,  Arist.  Fr.  601 : — Pass,  to  become  or  be 
immortal,  Polyb.  6.  54,  2.  II.  to  hold  oneself  immortal,  Virai 

oi  ddavartfavTis  Hdt.  4.  93,  sq.,  cf.  94  ;  i<p'  doov  ivoix^rat  d0.  to  put 
off"  the  mortal,  Arist.  Eth.  N.  10.  7,  8  ;  cf.  dvaBavarifa. 

d9dva-n.<T(i6*,  0,  the  gift  of  or  belief  in  immortality,  Diod.  I.  I. 

d-ddvaros,  ov,  also  17,  ov  (as  always  in  Horn.,  rare  in  Trag.,  Elsm.  Med. 
807).  Undying,  immortal,  opp.  to  Bvrrrds  and  fipords,  Horn.,  Hes., 
etc. : — hence  dBdvarot,  ol,  the  Immortals,  Horn.,  etc. ;  dBdvarat  d\tat. 
i.  e.  the  sea  goddesses,  Od.  24.  47 :  Comp.  -d/rtpos.  Plat.  Phaedo 
99  C.  2.  of  immortal  fame,  Tyrtae.  12.  32.  II.  of  things, 

etc.,  everlasting,  d$.  xaxdv  Od.  12.  1 18;  xal"s  Hdt.  7.  178;  aperr), 
dpxv  Soph.  Ph.  1420,  O.  T.  905  ;  dO.  avKotpdtrrnt  Hyperid.  Lye.  3 ;  so, 
dO.  K\ios,  nvfipn,  bo(a,  6pyrf,  etc. ;  d$.  d  Bdvaros  death  is  a  never-ending 
state,  like  Tennyson's  *  death  that  cannot  die,'  Amphis  VvvaiKoxp.  1 .  2. 

d$.  Bpi(  on  which  life  depended,  Aesch.  Cho.  620.  III.  oi  dBdvarot 

the  immortals,  a  body  of  Persian  troops  in  which  every  vacancy  was  filled 
up  by  successors  appointed  beforehand,  Hdt.  7.  83,  2 1 1  ;  so,  &8.  dvr)p  one 
whose  successor  in  case  of  death  is  appointed,  (as  we  say,  the  king  never 
dies,)  lb.  31.  IV.  Adv.,  dBavdrms  fvStiv  Anth.  P.  9.  570.  [at»- 

always  in  the  Adj.  and  all  derivs.,  v.  sub  A   a,  fin.] 

d-SuvuTou,  to  male  immortal,  Tzetz.  Hist.  6.  740. 

tt9a.vaTO-irot.6s,  ov,  making  immortal,  Eos.  V.  Const.  4.  62. 

d-flavqv  is,  undying,  tfvxv  Max.  Tyr.  38.  2. 

d-OanTos,  ov,  unburied,  II.  22.  386,  Trag.,  etc.;  dSairrov  iiOttv,  0d\- 
Kuv,  iav  Tiri  Soph.  Aj.  1307,  1333.  Ant.  205.  II.  unworthy 

of  burial,  Anth.  P.  9.  498. 

d9dpr|  (not  dSdpa  Piers.  Moer.  184),  t),  groats  or  meal,  a  porridge 
thereof,  Hellanic.  179,  Ar.  PI.  673,  Pherecr.  MctoXA.  I.  3,  Crates  'Up.  2, 
Nicoph.  Xap.  2,  Anaxandr.  TIpaiT.  I.  42.  (An  Egypt,  word,  ace.  to  Plin. 
22.  25;    but  v.  sub  avBos.)  [i$dpn,  II.  c. :    written  dtfijpr;  in  Eust. 

1675.  60,  Epiphan.J 

d-0apo-qs,  is,  discouraged,  downhearted,  Plut.  Cic.  35  :  to  dBapais 
want  of  courage.  Id.  Nic.  4.     Adv.  -oSis,  Id.  Pomp.  50. 

d9ttp<iST|i,  ts,  (tious)  lite  ABdpn,  Ruf.  Ephes.,  Gramm. 

d9avp.ao-Tia,  r),  the  character  of  an  dBavfiaaros,  Horace's  nil  admirari, 
Strabo  61.     The  form  dBavu-aoia  is  dub.,  Lob.  Phryn.  509. 

d-8aviLao-Tos,  ov,  not  wondering  at  anything  (cf.  foreg.),  irpds  Ti  Zeno 
ap.  Ath.  233  B,  M.  Anton.  I.  15:— Adv.  -ran.  Soph.  Fr.  810;  also 
ddavpaari,  Suid.  II.  not  wondered  at  or  admired,  Luc.  Amor.  13. 

d-dtdujuv  [4],  ok,  gen.  ovos,  not  beholding,  rivis  Synes.  147  D.  Adv. 
-dvais,  i.  q.  dvewiarvftdvais,  dwuptus.  Poll.  4.  10,  who  also  quotes  the 
Subst.  dOiaiLoo-wri,  lb.  8. 

d-9fdTot,  ov,  unseen,  invisible,  Luc.  Mar.  14.  2,  Plut.  2.  7.  2.  that  may 
not  be  seen,  secret,  Pseudo-Phocyl.  100,  Plut.  Num.  9,  etc.  II. 

act.  not  seeing,  blind  to,  nros  Xen.  Mem.  2.  I,  31,  Arist.  Mund.  I,  5. 

d0cno-iT|.  ij.  Ion.  Noun,  want  of  sight,  blindness,  Aretae.  Cur.  M.  Ac.  1 . 4. 

dOeei,  Adv.  (fids)  without  the  aid  of  God,  mostly  with  a  negat.,  obit 
dBtti,  Horace's  non  sine  Dis,  Od.  18.  353,  I'hilostr.,  Norm.,  etc. 

d-Oeia,  r>,  —  dBturns,  Eccl. 

d-9«iao-ros,  ov,  uninspired,  oi*  d$.  Plut.  Cor.  33. 

d9eipr|S,  it,  Ep.  for  dOtpr/s :  v.  sub  dSepi^ai. 

d6«'XpV  to  filter,  HesyeV : — Pass,  (written  dBikbdpai  in  A.  B.  350), 
Diocl.  McAiTT.  I. 

d-fJeX-yris,  is,  unappeased,  Nonn.  D.  33.  200. 

d8«X-yu,  =  dpiik-fw,  Hesych. : — Pass.,  d$i\ytTat  is  drawn  off  or  pressed 
out,  Hipp.  47.  22,  (expl.  by  Galen.  itnBtiTai,  onx\vtTai)  ;  so  l(a$i\yo- 
iiai,  Hipp.  Art.  744. — For  £8tX£if,  v.  ak9t(is. 

d9«\«o»,  ov,  (9iKai)  «.  sq.,  dub.  1.  Aesch.  Supp.  862. 


—  aBereu 


29 


-ovp-yos,  and 


V 


d-9«Xr|TOS, ov, unwilling,  Hesych., Eccl.  Adv.  -rare,  Aspas.ap.  Ath.  2 19D. 

o-9«Xktos,  ov.  implacable,  Aesch.  Supp.  1056,  Lye.  1335. 

d-9eXJivoos,  ov,  not  beguiling  or  seductive,  Movaai  Auson.  Epist.  12.  26. 

d9cp.eUi.os,  ov,  without  foundation,  an  Ep.  word  concealed  in  two  glosses 
of  Hesych. :  d9cu.T|Xos'  oiSvv  oi/K  txovoa  oiSi  Bf/iiMov, — dOcpiXios' 
d/fpoo"<^aXr/y,  xptvo'Tns. 

d-e<u,cXiii>ros,  ov,  =  foreg.,  Hesych.;  a$.  oUia,  of  a  ship,  Secund  p  6xa 
Gale.  F     i9 

d-8<)us,  itos,  o,  1),  lawless,  Pind.  P.  3.  56.,  4.  193,  Eur.  Ion  1093  :— 
Comp.  -iortpos,  Opp.  H.  1.  736:  Sup.  -lora-ros,  Or.  Sib.  I.  169. 

d9*uio-Tfu,  to  do  lawless  deeds,  Hesych. 

d9€u.io-Tia,  7),  lawlessness,  App.  Civ.  2.  77. 

d-6ep.io-n.cn,  ov,  lawless,  godless,  dtrqp  Od.  18.  141  ;  mostly  in  phrase 
d$e/uo-Tta  (ibws,  versed  in  wickedness,  9.  428,  etc. 

d-OepaoTos  or  ddcjiiTos,  ov,  (the  first  form  being  required  in  Poetry,  the 
latter  prob.  more  correct  in  Prose).  Lawless,  without  law  or  govern- 
ment, godless,  Lat.  nefarius,  U.  9.  63  ;  of  the  Cyclopes,  Od.  9.  106 ; 
dBtpuaToTtpoi  Xen.  Cyr.  8.  8,  5  : — Adv.  -this,  Phaennis  ap.  Paus.  10. 
15-  3'  II-  of  things,  lawless,  unlawful,  dOi/iira  ipbetv  Hdt.  7.  33., 

8.  I43  ;  rroifiv  Xen.  Mem.  I.  I,  9  ;  tvxfaOai  Id.  Cyr.  I.  6,  6  ;  dSi/uara 
opav  Soph.  Fr.  811  ;  xtivots  !*  ovx  dBipiarov  Epit.  in  C.  I.  1046.  88. 

d0ep.iTOYap.fw,  to  form  an  unlawful  marriage,  Eus.  P.  E.  275  C:^ 
-vaiiio,  r>,  Eccl.: — so  d9euiTopi|ia,  t),  Tzetz.  Lye.  1 143. 

a-9e'p.lTOS,  ov,  =  dOifttaros,  q.v.     Adv.  -thus-,  App.  Pun.  53. 

dSepxToupyeu,  (*(pyu)  to  do  lawless  deeds,  with  the  Adj.  -ovp-yos 
Subst.  -ovpyta,  freq.  in  Eccl. 

d0ep.iTo<t>a'Ycu,  to  eat  unlawful  meats,  Eus.  P.  E.  6.  10,  8. 

d9cp.iT0-<j>dYos,  ov,  feeding  on  unhallowed  food,  Ptolem. 

d-9eos.  ov,  without  God,  denying  the  gods,  esp.  those  recognised  by  the 
state,  Plat.  Apol.  26  C,  etc. :  hence  several  philosophers  were  named 
dfleoi,  Cic.  N.  D.  I.  23  : — to  dSfov,  opp.  to  to  6etov,  Plat.  Theaet.  176 
E.  2.  generally,  godless,  ungodly,  Pind.  P.  4.  288,  Aesch.  Eum. 

151,  Soph.  Tr.  1036  :— Comp.  -irrepos  Lys.  106.  6  ;  Sup.  -inaros  Xen. 
An.  2.  5,  39.  3.  abandoned  of  the  gods,  Soph.  O.  T.  661.  4. 

not  derived  from  God,  Ath.  448  E.  II.  Adv.  -<us,  impiously, 

Soph.  O.  T.  254,  El.  1 181;    Sup.  -dirara,  in  most  unholy  wise,  lb. 

"1. 
d0coTT)S,   r/ros,   r),   ungodliness.   Plat.  Polit.  308  E ;    in  pi.,  Id.  Legg. 

967  C,  Plut.,  etc.  II.  atheism,  Philo  I.  360,  368,  etc. 

d-9cpa-ireta,  t),  =  sq.,  neglect  of  medical  care,  Antipho  127.  38. 

d9epd-rrevcaa,  r),  want  of  attendance,  c.  gen.  neglect  of  a  thing,  Otwv 
ddtpavtvaiai  Plat.  Rep.  443  A ;  tou  adi/iaros-  Theophr.  Char.  19. 

d-0epdireuTos,  ov,  not  attended,  uncared  for,  of  animals,  Xen.  Mem.  2. 
4,  3 ;  of  persons,  Dion.  H.  3.  2  2:  to  dB .  negligence  of  one's  pertonal 
appearance,  Luc.  Pise.  12.  II.  unhealed,  incurable,  Luc.  Ocyp. 

27  :  to  d$.  impossibility  of  being  cured,  Achm.  Onir.  236: — Adv.  -this, 
Philo  2.  404.  III.  not  prepared  or  cured,  ariap  Diosc.  2.  93. 

d9cpT|is,  loot,  r),  having  dBipts  or  spikes,  Nic.  Th.  848. 

d0«pi{w.  Horn.:  acr.  1  dOipt(a  Ap.  Rh.  4.  477,  Orph.  Lith.  675,  Ma- 
netho,  and  prob.  1.  for  dBiptaaa  Ap.  Rh.  4.  488  ;  but  med.  dOfptaaaro 
Dion.  P.  997.  To  slight,  make  light  of,  Lat.  nihil  curare,  c.  ace.  pers., 

ovwori  ft  oiy  u6ipt£vv  II.  I.  261  ;  ov  .  .  Ttv  dvaivofiat  ovS  d$.  Od.  8. 
212  ;  absol.,  23.  174;  also  c.  gen.,  like  dpuKiai,  Ap.  Rh.  2.  477.  (In 
Hesych.  is  the  gloss  dOepis '  dvorrrov,  dvoctov ;  and  Bgk.  restores  d&fiprjs 
(in  this  sense)  in  Theogn.  733.  The  Root  is  prob.  the  same  as  Opdoi,  to 
set,  support.) 

d0cpivT)  [i],  1},  a  kind  of  smelt,  Arist.  H.  A.  6.  17,  6,  Call.  Fr.  38. 

d9epivos,  o,^dS(pivn,  Arist.  H.  A.  9.  3,  I. 

dOcpuTTos,  ov,  unheeded,  Zouar.  2.  act.,  xtXto?  d$.,  i.  e.  d  d$f- 

pi{<uv  koX  oiStvlt  ix""1  X070K,  Aesch.  Fr.  127  c.  II.  (fitpifa) 

not  reaped,  Theophr.  H.  P.  8.  II,  4. 

d-9«'pu.avros.  ov,  not  heated:  in  Aesch.  Cho.  629  d$.  carta,  prob.  a 
household  not  heated  by  strife  or  passion. 

d-0epuos,  ov,  without  warmth :  to  aBtppov  Plat.  Phaedo  106  A. 

dSjpoXoyiov,  to,  a  surgical  instrument  for  extracting  splinters,  Oribas. 

d9epu&ns,  es,  (dOrjp,  ethos)  bearded  like  ears  of  corn,  Theophr.  H.  P.  7. 
II,  2.  2.—  dOapwins,  Galen. 

d9tpu>pA,  To,  v.  s.  dJB-np-. 

d-9«o-ta,  t),  faithlessness,  fickleness,  Polyb.  3.  78,  2,  etc. 

d9*o-p.ia.,  t),  lawlessness,  Eccl. 

d9c'o*u.Los,  ov,  unlawful,  lawless,  Nonn.  Jo.  19.  v.  6. 

d9co-Li6-ptos,  ov,  living  a  lawless  life,  lawless,  Hipp.  1282.  32, 

d9eo-p6-X«KTpos.  ov,  joined  in  lawless  love,  Lye.  1 143. 

d9eo-p.o-TrpdYta,  r),  lawless  conduct,  Manass.  Chron.  4418. 

c-9eo-iios,  ov,  m  dSiofitos,  Philo 2. 165,  Plut.  Caes.  10.  Adv.  -pais,  Hesych. 

d0eo'rio-dtd'YOt,  ov,  eating  lawless  meals,  Manetho  4.  564. 

d9eoTOS,  ov,  (BiooaaOat)  not  to  be  intreated,  inexorable,  of  the  Erinyes, 
cf.  Meineke  Com.  Gr.  3.  p.  8. 

d-0e'o-4>uTos,  ov,  beyond  even  a  god's  power  to  express  :  inexpressible, 
unutterable,  ineffable,  marvellous,  of  horrible  or  awful  things,  onffpot, 
Bdkaaaa,  vi(  II.  3.  4,  Od.  7.  273.,  1 1.  373:  but  also  simply  of  vast  quan- 
tities or  size,  d$.  divot,  atros  Od.  11.  61.,  13.  244;  &hs  20.  211 ;  of 
great  beauty,  vfivos  Hes.  Op.  660 : — only  once  in  Trag.,  d$.  Bia  Eur.  I.  A. 
232  (lyr.).    Cf.  Buttm.  Lexil.  s.  v.  Bioxtkos  7. 

d0eTew,  f.  rjerai,  (dflfTos)  to  set  aside,  disregard  a  treaty,  oath,  promise, 
law,  C.  I.  (add.)  2374  e.  19,  Polyb.  8.  2,  5,  al. ;  d6.  nva  to  deny  one, 
refuse  his  request,  Ev.  Marc.  6.  26.  2.  c.  dat.  to  refuse  one's  assent 

to  a  thing,  Polyb.  13. 14,  6.  II.  in  Gramm.,  to  reject  as  spurious, 

=  i0<\i(ai.  Dion.  H.  de  Dinarch.  9,  Diog.  L.  7.  34,  etc.  III.  to 

rebel,  revolt,  Lxx  (2  Regg.  13.  3,  al.). 


•  uQeDifta  —  ad\oi. 


30 

d8«TT)(ia.  to,  a  breach  of  faith,  transgression,  Dion.  H.  4.  27,  Lxx. 

d8€Ti]o%s.  17-  "  setting  aside,  abolition,  Sext.  Emp.  M.  8.  142.  II. 

rejection  (of  a  spurious  passage),  Diog.  L.  3.  66,  cf.  Cic.  ad  Att.  6.  9. 

d8(T-r|T«ov.  verb.  Adj.  one  must  set  aside,  Polyb.  3.  29,  2. 

d9«T-r|T-r|S.  ov,  o,  a  violator,  tov  vopov  Eccl. 

ci8«tos.  ov,  (tiOtjiu)  without  position  or  place  as  a  unit  (jiovds)  is  called, 
in  opp.  to  a  point  (any/itf)  which  is  9eTos,  Arist.  Metaph.  4.  6,  25  ;  7) 
poms  OTiyfii)  aO.  eoTi  lb.  12.  8,  27;  cf.  An.  Post.  I.  27.  2.  not 

in  its  place,  i.  e.  lying  about,  w\iv9os,  Ai'flos  C.  I.  160.  I.  10,  22.  II. 
set  aside,  invalid,  Polyb.  17.  9,  10:  hence  useless,  unfit,  Diod.  II.  15  : — 
Adv.  -tcos.  =  d9iafia>s,  lawlessly,  despotically,  Aesch.  Pr.  150. 

afcttiprpria.  r),  want  of  observation,  Diod.  I.  37. 

dStupTfrC,  Adv.  inconsiderately,  Autipho  ap.  Harp. 

u-9€wpT|Tos,  ov,  not  seen,  not  to  be  seen,  Arist.  Mund.  6,  26  :  to  d0. 
invisibility,  M.  Anton.  I.  9.  II.  act.  not  having  observed,  not 

conversant withjT&r  imapx&vTaiv  Arist. Gen. etCorr.  1,2, 10;  d9.iv\6yois 
Plut.  2.  405  A: — Adv.  -rare,  Plut.  Num.  18. 

d8rrr|Tos.  ov.  Ion.  for  ddcaro;,  Noun.  D.  2.  6. 

dOifX-ris,  es,  (Oqk-h)  not  having  suckled,  fia^os  Tryph.  34. 

dOrjXos,  ov,  ($T}\y)  unsuckled,  Ar.  Lys.  881 :  just  weaned,  Horace's  jam 
lacte  depulsus,  Simon.  Iamb.  5.  II.  a  eunuch,  Cyrill.  ap.  Suid. 

d-0t)AwTOS,  ov,  not  womanish,  Clem.  Al.  790,  Ptolem. 

d-OrjXvs,  v,  no!  womanish,  Plut.  2.  285  C.  II.  unfeminine,  Id. 

Comp.  Lye.  c.  Num.  3. 

'A9i]vd,  Att.  for  'A0T)vair),  'A(tf)vn. 

'A0-rjvcu,  Dor.  'A0dvai,  wv,  al,  the  city  of  Athens,  used  in  pi.,  because 
it  consisted  of  several  parts  (cf.  Qijliai,  Mvfcrjvai),  Horn.,  etc. ;  the  sing. 
form  (like  0J?3r/)  occurs  in  Od.  7.  80: — 'AOrjvat  generally  —  'Attikt),  of 
the  whole  country,  Hdt.  9.  17.  II.  Adverbs,  'AW|vaJ«,  to  Athens, 

Inscrr.  Att.  (Berl.)  38  g.  II.,  43,  Thuc.  4.  46,  Xen.  Rep.  Ath.  I.  16: — 
A6t|vt|9€v,  from  Athens,  Lys.  132.  7,  etc. ;  poet.  'A9^vo9ev,  Anth.  P.  7. 
369 : — 'A0T|VT)<rvv,  at  Athens,  Inscrr.  Att.  (Berl.)  26,  28,  29,  Dem.  247. 
I ,  etc. : — these  forms  were  more  Att.  than  els  'AO-qvas,  !£  'AGtjvuiv,  ev 
'ASijvais,  Greg.  Cor.  p.  165,  Heind.  Plat.  Hipp.  Ma.  281  A. 

'A9r|vaia,  rd,  older  name  of  the  Tlava&Tjvata,  Paus.  8.  2,  I. 

'A0Tjvat£a>,  to  be  an  Athenian,  Just.  M.  II.  to  be  wise  as  Athena, 

Eust.  1742.  2. 

'A0T)vaiov,  to,  (AOijva)  the  temple  of  Athena,  Hdt.  5.  95. 

'A9r|va!os,  a,  ov,  Athenian,  of  or  from  Athens,  II.  2.  551,  etc. 

'A8t|vt|,  ti,  Athene,  in  Horn,  the  goddess  of  mental  power  and  wisdom, 
of  warlike  prowess,  and  of  skill  in  the  arts  of  life,  often  called  IlaMdy 
'A9t)vo  (v.  IlaXXds) :  she  is  also  called  'A9r)vaCT|  or  TlaWds  'ABrjvair). — 
The  latter  name  (in  Att.  'A&rjvaia,  Aesch.  Eum.  288,  Ar.  Eq.  763,  Pax 
271,  Av.  828,  Xen.  An.  7.  3,  39,  and  freq.  in  Inscrr.)  was  afterwards 
contr.  into  'AOrjvd,  Athena,  and  became  (after  the  archonship  of  Euclides, 
B.C.  403)  her  common  name  at  Athens,  the  city  under  her  special  protec- 
tion, C.  I.  87.,  99.  6,  al. :  Dor.  'A9dva,  which  is  the  form  always  used 
by  Trag.,  though  they  wrote  'A0i]vaia  even  in  lyrics,  Pors.  Or.  26 ; 
'ABavaia  Theocr.  15.  80:  Aeol.  \A0avda  [yX],  Alcae.  9,  Theocr.  28.  I, 
and  also  in  Att.,  C.  I.  150.  I.,  154.  She  was  believed  to  have  founded 
the  court  of  Areopagus,  and  to  have  given  her  casting  vote  in  favour  of 
Orestes,  whence  the  proverb  'AflTpds  iprjtpos,  cf.  Aesch.  Eum.  753.  2. 

—  'A9t)vu,  in  Od.  7.  80  'A9t)vt]  . .  Ikcto  «  . .  'A0f)v7]v.  (On  the  Root, 
v.  sub  dV0os.) 

'A9r|viA(i>,  to  long  to  be  at  Athens,  Luc.  Pseudol.  24. 

d9"f(p,  epos,  6,  the  beard  or  spike  of  an  ear  of  corn,  an  ear  of  corn 
itself,  Lat.  spica,  Hes.  Fr.  2.  2,  Arist.  H.  A.  8.  8,  I: — husks,  chaff,  Luc. 
Anach.  31.  II.  the  point  of  a  weapon,  Aesch.  Fr.  153,  Hipp. 

496.  54.,  1 1 53  H,  Plut.  Cat.  Mi.  70.     (On  the  Root,  v.  sub  avbos.) 

d-8T|paTOS,  ov,  not  caught,  or  nor  to  be  caught,  Opp.  C.  I.  514,  Ael. 
N.  A.  I.  4. 

d-9r|ptvTOS,  ov,  not  hunted,  Xen.  Cyr.  I.  4,  16. 

d9r|pT|,  7),  =aSapr),  Diosc. 

d0T|pT|-Xoi'y6s,  0,  (a6r)p)  consumer  of  ears  of  corn,  epith.  of  a  winnowing- 
fan  {irrvov),  Od.  11.  128.,  23.  275  :  cf.  a&npoBparros. 

d-9qpio,  7),  want  of  game,  Ael.  N.  A.  7.  2. 

d9r]piuTos,  ov,  not  made  savage,  Eust.  Opusc.  304.  II. 

dfrqpo-fjpuiTOs,  ov,  {d9i)p)  devouring  ears  of  corn,  d0.  opyavov,  i.  e.  a 
winnowing-fan,  Soph.  Fr.  404 ;  cf.  dOTjpr/Xoiyos. 

d-0T|pos,  ov,  without  wild  beasts  or  game,  x^PV  Hdt.  4.  1 85  :  to  d$rjpov 
ivtOTi  Tafs  Ki/ivats,  —  d0ripia,  Plut.  2.  981  C: — &9.  r/ptpa  a  blank  day, 
Aesch.  Fr.  239.  II.  repelling  noxious  animals,  K\aSos  Geop. 

IO.  32,  etc. 

d9T|p(iST]S,  ft,  (ett)os)=d0(pai$ijs,  Basil,  ap.  Ruhnk.  Tim.  124. 

d0T|pup.a,  aTos,  to,  a  tumour  full  of  gruel-like  matter  (d6f)prj),  Galen. 

d-0T|o-avpio-Tos,  ov,  not  hoarded,  not  fit  for  hoarding,  Plat.  Legg. 
844  D :  of  food,  Theophr.  H.  P.  6.  4,  II. 

d-9tyr|S,  it,  (fiiyeiv)  untouched,  Theopomp.  Hist.  79  :  of  a  virgin,  Anth. 
P.  append.  248.  2.  intangible,  Sext.  Emp.  M.  9.  281. 

d-9tKTos,  ov,  untouched :  mostly  c.  gen.  untouched  by  a  thing,  oktivos 
d6.  Soph.  Tr.  686;  00.  r)ynTr)pos  Id.  O.  C.  1521,  etc.;  icepbwv  aOttcTov 
f}ov\(vrr)ptov  untouched  by  gain,  i.  e.  incorruptible,  Aesch.  Eum.  704,  cf. 
Plut.  Cim.  10;  also  c.  dat.,  viaois  d9.  Aesch.  Supp.  561  ;  d9.  bird  toC 
Xp6vov  Plut.  Pericl.  13.  2.  chaste,  virgin,  Araros  Tlav.  2  ;  cf.  &B. 

dufiaTa  TtapBfvi-qs  Epigr.  Gr.  248.  8.  3.  not  to  be  touched,  holy, 

sacred,  tov  dS.  yds  ofupaKov,  of  Delphi,  Soph.  O.  T.  899 ;  &B.  oiS  oIkjj- 
tos  [0  x"Por]  Id-  O.  C.  39 ;  &6tKTa  holy  things,  Aesch.  Ag.  371,  Soph.  O.  T. 
891.  II.  act.  not  touching,  c.  gen.,  Call.  Dian.  201. 

d-9Xao-Tos,  ov,  not  crushed,  Arist.  Meteor.  4.  8,  J.,  4.  9,  10. 

dSXcvu,  Ep.  and  Ion.  d«0X«vu ;  f.  daw  Aesch.  Pr.  95  (lyr.),  Q^  Sm., 


Nonn.:  (dSXos,  dOkov).  To  contend  for  a  prize,  combat,  wrestle,  absol., 
deOKevetv  npoica\t£tTO  II.  4.  389  ;  (I  .  .  de9\evoifiev  23.  274;  otppa  .  . 
de9\evataiv  lb.  737»  cr"-  Hes-  Th.  435  ;  once  in  Horn,  in  contr.  form, 
d9Xevatv  npb  dva/cros  struggling  or  suffering  for  him,  II.  24.  734  ;  once 
in  Hdt.,  de9Keveiv  5.  22  ;  and  once  in  Plat.,  ev  dya/vt  dOX.  Legg.  873  E  ; 
but  the  Trag.  always  used  dO\ea,  except  Aesch.  1.  c. 

d9Xcu,  Ion.  impf.  di$\fov  Hdt.  1.  67.,  7.  212:  fut.  -t)oo>  Or.  Sib.  2. 
43 :  aor.  ij0\rjoa  (v.  infr.)  :  pf.  TjOX-qna  Plut.  Demetr.  5  : — Med.,  aor.. 
iv-r)9Ki]cidifnv  Anth.  P.  7-  II 7  : — Pass.,  pf.  KaTi)9\rniai  Suid.  :  (d9\os, 
d9kov).  Commoner  form  of  dOkevcv,  used  by  Horn,  only  in  aor.  part., 
AaoptbovTt  . .  d9\f)aavT(s  having  contended  with  him,  II.  7.  453  ;  7ro\Ad 
■ntp  d9\rjaavTa  having  gone  through  many  struggles,  15.  30  :  to  contend 
in  battle,  Hdt.  7.  212  ;  irpds  Tiva  I.  67  ;  d9\tiv  dO\ovs,  d9\.  Kara  tt)v 
ayajviav  Plat.  Tim.  19  C  and  B,  cf.  Legg.  830  A  ;  Tj9\7j(ra  KtvbvvevfiaT 
have  engaged  in  perilous  struggles,  Soph.  O.  C.  564  ;  (pavhov  d6\f)aas 
trovov  Eur.  Supp.  317  ;  dSAtiv  Tip  (Tw/joti  Aeschin.  47.  37.  II. 

to  be  an  athlete,  contend  for  the  prize,  in  games,  Simon.  149,  C.  I.  (add.) 
28106,  2811  6. 

d9Xr|p.a,  to,  (d9kia)  a  contest,  struggle.  Plat.  Legg.  833  C,  etc.  II. 

an  implement  of  labour,  Theocr.  21.9. 

d9Xt)o-is,  t),  a  contest,  combat,  esp.  of  athletes,  Polyb.  5.  64,  6,  C.  I. 
5913.  36.  2.  generally,  a  struggle,  hard  trial,  d9K.  imopiivuv  Ep. 

Hebr.  10.  32  ;  of  martyrdom,  Mart.  S.  Ignat.  4. 

d9Xir)TT|p,  rjpos,  0,  older  form  of  d9\-nrr}S,  Od.  8.  164,  Epigr.  Gr.  969. 

d9XTrW|s,  contr.  from  dt9\r)Ti)s,  ov,  0 :  (d$K(ai).  A  combatant,  cham- 
pion; esp.  a  prize-fighter,  Lat.  athleta,  Pind.  in  both  forms,  N.  5.  90., 
10.  95,  oft.  in  C.  I.  2.  as  Adj.,  d9\.  'iirnos  a  race-horse,  Lys.  157. 

39,  Plat.  Parm.  137  A.  II.  c.  gen.  rei,  practised  in,  master  of, 

nokepov  Plat.  Rep.  543  B  ;  tuiv  Ka\wv  epyaiv  Dem.  799.  16  ;  t&v  epywv 
(sc.  toV  TToXefiiKuiv)  Arist.  Pol.  6.  7,  3;  t^s-  dXTjOtvrjs  ke^ecus  Schaf.  Dion. 
Comp.  p.  415  ;  irda-ns  dptTrjs  Diod.  Excerpt,  p.  551  ;  d9K.  yrjs  a  skilful 
farmer,  Philostr. ;  etc. 

d9XT|TiK6s,  17,  ov,  of  or  for  an  athlete,  athletic,  ?fis  Arist.  Pol.  8.  4,  1  ; 
dyuivts  d9\.  Plut.  2.  724  F.     Adv.  -kois,  Id.  2.  192  C. 

d-8XtpTjs,  is,  not  pressed  or  hurt,  Nonn.  D.  9.  31.  II.  act.  not 

pressing,  Id.  37.  220. 

d9Xi6irais,  rraibos,  6,  f/,  wretched  in  one's  offspring,  Eumath.  213. 

d9Xios,  a,  ov,  also  os,  ov  Eur.  Ale.  1038,  etc.,  Att.  contr.  from  diBKios : 
(d(9\ov,  a9kov).  Winning  the  prize  or  running  for  it  (this  sense  only 
in  Ep.  form  dt$\ios,  q.  v.).  II.  metaph.  struggling,  unhappy, 

wretched,  miserable  (this  sense  only  in  Att.  form  d9\tos),  of  persons  freq. 
from  Aesch.  downwds. ;  Comp.  -tarrepoy  Soph.  O.  T.  815,  1204:  Sup. 
-iwtotos  Eur.  Phoen.  1679  : — sometimes  also  of  states  of  life,  dOk.  ydpoi 
Aesch.  Th.  779,  Eur.;  Pios,  tvxV  Eur-  Heracl.  878,  Hec.  425: — also  of 
that  which  causes  wretchedness,  dp'  d9\iov  Toijveibos  Soph.  O.  C.  753*  cf- 
EI.  1 140  ;  irpoaoTftis  Eur.  Or.  952  : — Adv.,  toj>  d9kiojs  Oavuvra  Soph.  Ant. 
26,  cf.  Eur.  H.  F.  707,  etc.  2.  in  moral  sense,  pitiful,  wretched,  Dem. 

I42.  18  ;  tis  ovt<us  oj9\ios  ware  . .  ;  who  such  a  wretch,  as  to  .  .  ?  Id. 
536.  7;    Kat  yap  &v  d9\tos  t)v,   el..  576.  18.  3.  without  any 

moral  sense,  wretched,  sorry,  Brjpalv  d9\tav  0opdv  Eur.  Phoen.  1603  ; 
d9X.  (wypd<pos  Plut.  2.  6  F  :— Adv.,  dBKlais  Kat  imituis  with  wretched 
success,  Dem.  276.  2  ;   £i)v  d9Kiais  Philem.  Incert.  109. 

d9Xi6-rrjS,  i]Tos,  7),  suffering,  wretchedness,  Plat.  Rep.  545  A,  etc. 

d9XiTTTOS,  ov,  (9\l0w)  =  dBM&Tjs,  Galen. 

d9Xo-9€0-£a  or  -0€Tta,  7),  the  office  of  dOKoOertjs,  Ar.  Fr.  585,  ubi  v. 
Dind.,  cf.  Lob.  Phryn.  510. 

d9Xo9€T«»>,  (t'i9t]hi)  to  propose  a  prize,  offer  rewards,  4  Mace.  17.  12  ; 
Ttvi  Ath.  539  B.  II.  to  manage,  direct,  Heliod.  7.  12. 

d9Xo-9eTT|p,  fipos,  o,  =  sq.,  C.  I.  1397,  6250. 

d9Xo-9e-rT)S,  ov,  6,  one  who  awards  the  prize,  the  judge  or  steward  in 
the  games,  Plat.  Legg.  764  D,  Arist.  Eth.  N.  I.  4,  5,  C.  I.  144.  6.,  147. 
5,  al. ;  cf.  dycovoBeTTjs,  @pa@evs. 

&9Xov,  to,  Att.  contr.  from  Ep.  and  Ion.  d«9Xov  (which  alone  is  used 
by  Horn,  and  Hdt.,  mostly  also  by  Pind.,  and  once  by  Soph.  (Tr.  506)  in  a 
lyr.  passage).  The  prize  of  contest,  a  prize,  II.  23.  413,  620,  etc.,  often 
in  Pind.  (though  the  gender  can  seldom  be  determined),  Eur.  Hel.  43  ; 
also  in  Prose,  d9\a  dperys  Thuc.  2.  46;  dfjiapTTjfxdTaiv  Lys.  96.  8. 
Phrases :  a*0Aa  iceiTat  or  npoKeirai  prizes  are  proposed,  Hdt.  8.  26.,  9. 
IOI ;  &9\a  7rpo<palvetv ,  irpori9evai,  Ti9evat  to  propose  prizes,  Xen.  Cyr. 
2.  I,  23.,  I.  2, 12,  etc. ;  a9\a  Kappdvetv  or  <pipeo9ai  to  win  prizes,  Plat. 
Rep.  613  C,  Ion  530  A,  etc.,  cf.  Thuc.  6.  80 ;  aBKov  vIkjjs  Ka/i&dvttv  as 
the  prize,  Arist.  Pol.  4.  II,  17;  a9.  7toieio9ai  Td  Koivd  Thuc.  3.  82  ;  to 
aflAa  ir7T(p  S)v  eanv  6  ir6\efios  Dem.  26.  II  ;  d9\a  irokefiov  Id.  41.  25  ; 
ttjs  dpeTTJs  Id.  489.  21  ;  a.  TrpoKtiTai  17  e\tv9epia  Arist.  Pol.  7.  10, 
14.  II.  =  d9\os,  a  contest,  £wvvvvTai  Te  veoi  teal  etrevTvvovTai 

de9\a  Od.  24.  89,  cf.  Xenophan.  2.  5,  Pind.  O.  I.  5,  and  v.  d$poi£w : — 
metaph.  a  conflict,  struggle,  arvyepbv  to5'  a9\ov  Aesch.  Supp.  1034,  cf. 
Pr.  634 ;  iroWuiv  eKt£ev  SvaoioTwv  ttuvoiv  S9\'  Soph.  Ph.  508 ; 
de9\'  dywvwv  Id.  Tr.  506  : — this  usage  is  censured  by  Luc.  Soloec.  2, 
cf.  Coraes  Isocr.  Paneg.  37.  III.  in  pi.  the  place  of  combat, 

Lat.  arena.  Plat.  Legg.  868  A,  935  B.     (For  the  Root,  v.  sub  d9Xos.) 

d9Xo-viKi)s,  ov,  6,  a  victor  in  the  games,  Eust.  Opusc.  1 73.  25. 

d9Xo-viKia,  j),  victory  in  the  games,  Pind.  N.  3.  II. 

aOXos.  o,  contr.  from  Ep.  and  Ion.  dtOXos.  which  alone  is  used  by  Horn, 
(except  in  Od.  8. 160),  and  mostly  by  Hdt.  and  Pind.  A  contest  either 
in  war  or  sport,  esp.  contest  for  a  prize,  toil,  trouble,  like  irovos,  Lat. 
labor,  Horn.;  vixdv  TOiwh'  eir  de0K<u  (for  the  arms  of  Achilles),  Od.  11. 
548  ;  ae9\os  TtpuxeiTai  a  task  is  set  one,  Hdt.  I.  126  ;  ae$\ov  nporiBevai 
to  set  it,  Id.  7.  197;  aSXoi  Ae\<ptxoi,  T!vBinoi  Soph.  El.  49,  682  ;  often 
in  Pind. : — metaph.  a  conflict,  struggle,  Trag.,  as  Aesch.  Pr.  702,  752, 


aOXocrvvr]  —  advpw. 


Soph.  Ant.  856.  —  On  the  proper  difference  of  dSKov  and  a$Xos,  v. 
aBKoy  II.  (The  proper  form  of  the  word  seems  to  be  dfe8-Xos,  df(6- 
Aoi>,  from  ^fES  with  a  prefixed  ;  cf.  Lat.  vas  (vadis)  ;  Goth,  vadi 
(pignus)  ;  O.  Norse  vebja  (to  wager)  ;  O.  H.  G.  wetti  (Germ,  welte).) 

d8Xoo-vvT],  ij,  =  aO\os,  Anth.  P.  6.  54. 

d8Xo-$dpos,  ov,  bearing  away  the  prize,  victorious,  'iinros  II.  9.  1 24 : 
dvtpes  Pind.  O.  7.  13,  etc.;  in  Ion.  form  dc0X-,  II.  22.  22,  Hdt.  I. 
31.  II.  prize-giving,  dydtvts  C.  I.  1582. 

d-OoAov  ov,  not  turbid,  clear,  Luc.  de  Hist.  Conscr.  51. 

d-86X<i>ros,  ov,  untroubled,  of  water,  Hes.  Op.  593  ;  of  pure  air,  Luc. 
Trag.  62. 

uOopos,  ov,  (9opeiv)  of  male  animals,  veneris  expers.  Ant.  Lib.  1 3. 

d-Oopipp-nros,  ov,  undisturbed:  to  ad.  tranquillity  of  mind,  Xen.  Ages.  6,  7. 

d-86pt>(3os.  ov,  without  uproar,  undisturbed,  tranquil,  Plat.  Legg.  640  C. 
Adv.  -/3cut,  Eur.  Or.  630. 

d8os,  Dor.  for  })0os. 

dBpaytvi],  1},  a  tree  0/ which  tinder  was  made,  Theophr.  H.  P.  5.  9,  6. 

d8paKTOS,  ov,  (Bpdaaw)  =  drdpaKTOs,  Soph.  Fr.  812. 

d-8pavcvTOS,  ov,  expl.  bv  aarpanos,  prob.  uncushioned,  Eur.  Fr.  573, 
A.  B.  352. 

d-8pawrros,  ov,  unbroken,  undestroyed,  unhurt,  sound,  Eur.  Hec.  17, 
etc. :  not  to  be  broken,  Arist.  Meteor.  4.  8,  5,  etc. 

d8p«iTTOS.  f.  1.  for  drpenros,  Anth.  P.  5.  178. 

d8pcu>  or  &8p(<a  :  fut.  i\aai  (v.  Elmsl.  Med.  519)  :  aor.  opt.  d9pr\aut,  inf. 
dSprjaat  Horn.,  Soph. :  aor.  med.  dffprfaatrBat  Timo  6 :  Ep.  part,  d&ptto- 
ptivov  Manetho  6.  60.  (The  Root  appears  to  be  ©EP,  with  a  prefixed  ; 
cf.  Spaa.)  To  look  earnestly  at,  gaze  at,  observe,  perceive,  "tva  pcq  tis 

'AX<umv  P^Vr""0"  a9piaii(  II.  12.  391,  cf.  14.  334;  oiii  rn  dSpfjaat 
bvvdpnv  (sc.  2Kv\Xm>)  Od.  I  2.  232,  cf.  19.  478,  Eur.  Hec.  679,  El.  827  ; 
[oi  fitBvovTfs]  aQptiv  rd  vuppco  ov  ovvavrai  Arist.  Probl.  3.  9.  2. 

absol.  or  with  a  Prep,  to  loot  earnestly,  gaze,  or  h  wtiiov  to  tpay'ixov 
uBpfiatifv  II.  10.  II  ;  SBptt  observe,  watch,  Aesch.  Fr.  225  ;  ievp'  aBpnaov 
lonk  hither,  Eur.  Hipp.  300 ;  Xtvaaer,  dSprjaart  Id.  Andr.  1228;  oi  -yelp 
foots  iv  iSpwv  by  observing,  Soph.  O.  C.  252.  II.  later,  of  the 

mind,  to  look  at  or  into  a  thing,  to  observe,  consider,  rt  Pind.  P.  2.  1 29  ; 
iroAAd  mi9ia9at,  jroXAd  8'  d9pi)aat  Soph,  O.  T.  1 305,  cf.  O.  C.  1032  ; 
dBpijaov  airro  Eur.  Bacch.  1282,  cf.  1327,  etc.: — foil,  by  an  interrog.  or 
rel.  clause,  ical  ravr'  dBprjaov,  tl .  .  consider  this  also,  whether  .  . ,  Soph. 
Ant.  1077.  cf.  1216;  T<J8f  Toivw  aBpu  wortpov  . .  Plat.  Rep.  394  E  ; 
aSptt  ptr)  oi  .  .  Id.  Phaedo  104  B,  Gorg.  495  B  ;  aSpti  on  .  .  Id.  Rep. 
583  B ;  and  Plat,  generally  uses  this  imper.  form,  but  d$pw  Parni. 
144  D,  d$pwv  Tim.  91  E.  2.  absol.  d9pnaov,  consider,  Eur.  I.  A. 

1416.  III.  to  perceive,  ovaatv  iSp.  Nic.  Th.  164. 

d8pT]u.aTa,  rd,  =  om-npta,  Hesych. 

d-0p-r)vt]TOS,  ov,  unlatnented,  to  expl.  vuvvptvos,  Eust.  928.  63. 

d8p*nyi.  Adv.  (9prjvos)  without  mourning,  Suid. 

dSpTfWov,  verb.  Adj.  of  dOpiu,  one  must  consider,  Eur.  Hipp.  379,  Xen. 
Symp.  8,  39. 

d-6pidp.)3«uTos.  ov,  uncelebrated,  Eust.  Opusc.  237.  =,-. 

d-Qpiyytaros,  ov,  without  coping,  E.  M. 

d-8pt|,  TpTyot,  6,  i>,  without  hair,  Matro  ap.  Ath.  656  F  :  cf.  oOpt( . 

d$pi-irr)0€0~roi,  ov,  not  worm-eaten,  Theophr.  H.  P.  5.  I,  2,  where  the 
MM.  dBptrnoiaTaTov  :  cf.  fipnnj$«7T0S-. 

d8po<i,  Adv.  ataBpoos,  Philes  5.  149. 

d8poi(u  or  d9poi£u  (Elmsl.  Heracl.  122):  fut.  am:  aor.  f]Bpotaa  Eur., 
etc. : — Pass.,  aor.  ijBpo'w&nv  :  pf.  ijtpotapMt :  plqpf.  ffipotaro  Aesch. 
Pers.  414: — the  quadrisyll.  form  adpoifa  is  used  by  Archil.  104,  Anth. 
Plan.  308  :  restored  by  Dind.  in  Pseudo-Eur.  I.  A.  267,  Ar.  Av.  253  : 
(dBpdos  or  dBpdos).  To  gather  together,  collect,  esp.  to  muster  forces, 

A$p.  Xadv,  arpdrtvpta,  bvvapuv,  etc..  Soph.  O.  T.  144,  Xen.  An.  I.  3,  I, 
etc.;  Tpoiav  aBp,  to  gather  the  Trojans  together,  Eur.  Hec.  1 1 39; 
*v*vpta  dBpotaov  collect  breath,  Id.  Phoen.  851,  cf.  Arist.  G.  A.  2.  4,  5  ; 
TtpurKottds  \dyan>  AOpoiaas  having  strung  together,  Eur.  Phoen.  495  :-*- 
absol.  to  collect  or  hoard  treasure,  Arist.  Pol.  5.  II,  20: — Med.  to  gather 
for  oneself,  collect  round  one,  Eur.  Heracl.  1.  c,  Xen.  Cyr.  3.  I,  19  ; — 
Pass,  to  be  gathered  or  crowded  together,  «vre  rpos  dtOXa  brjptos  rfDpoi- 
(tro  Archil.  1.  c,  cf.  60;  is  ri/v  dyopfiv  iSp.  Hdt.  5.  101  ;  A9poto9ivrfs 
having  rallied,  Thuc.  I.  50 ;  ro  ol .  .  (vptwav  Jj6poio(h)  ScryiAioi  but  the 
whole  amounted  collectively  to  . .  ,  Id.  5.6;  ivravBa  Jj0poi£ovro  they 
mustered  in  force  there.  Id.  6.  44,  etc. :  to  form  a  society.  Plat.  Prot. 
322  B;  dBpoiotivTts  having  formed  a  party,  Arist.  Pol.  5.  5,  3; — of 
things,  mpl  woXXuiv  d9pota9ivron>  taken  in  the  aggregate  (cf.  dBpot- 
apta  2),  Plat.  Theaet.  157  B.  2.  in  Pass,  also  of  the  mind,  iBpoi^ta9ai 

th  iavrvv  to  collect  oneself,  Plat.  Phaedo  83  A,  cf.  67  C  ;  tpiffot  ffipoi- 
arat  fear  has  gathered  strength,  arisen,  Xen.  Cyr.  5.  2,  34. 

d8po{o-iu.os  T)p.fpa,  a  day  of  assembling,  Eccl. 

d8poio-is,  iais,  ij,  a  gathering,  collecting,  mustering,  trrparov  Eur.  Hec. 
314;  \pnptaTajv  Thuc.  6.  26  ;  a!  raw  vupwv  d.  Arist.  Meteor.  I.  3,  16. 

d8poio-pa.  to,  that  which  is  gathered,  a  gathering,  Aaou  Ear.  Or. 
•K74-  2.  a  process  of  aggregation,  Plat.  Theaet.  157  B.  II. 

in  Epicur.  philos.,  the  concourse  of  atoms,  Diog.  L.  8.  66. 

d8pou7p.6s,  o,  ^iBpotais,  Theophr.  C.  P.  1. 10, 7:  condensation,  lb.  5.2, 1. 

d8poio~r«ov,  verb.  Adj.  one  must  colled,  Xen.  Lac.  7.  4. 

d8poto-TT]piov.  to,  a  muster-place,  Eust.  (?) 

dBpouTTiKos.  17.  ov,  of  or  for  collecting,  like  d9poiatv.os,  Eccl.  II. 

in  Gramm.  collective,  ovdfiara:  copulative,  avvfcopuM. 

d9pdo$,a,oy,  (m,ov  Dcm.  412.  14,  Arist.  P.  A.  3.  14,  22,  etc.),  or  better 

adpoot  as  Aristarch.  wrote  it  (Schol.  Ven.  II.  14.  38),  Att.  oSpous,  ow, 

dat.  pi.  A0potaiv  Epigr.  Or.  1034.  26: — but  in  later  writers  the 

spir.  lenis  prevailed:  (o  copulat.,  9pdos).       In  crowds,  heaps  or  masses. 


31 

crowded  together,  often  in  Horn,  but  only  in  pi.,  as  II.  2.  439;  irdcres 
d9pioi  Od.  3.  34,  etc. ;  the  sing,  first  in  Pind.  P.  2.  65  ;  dBp&oi,  of 
soldiers,  in  close  order,  Lat.  conferto  agmine,  Hdt.  6.  113,  Xen.  An.  1. 
10,  13,  etc. ;  opp.  to  dairraKToi,  Id.  Cyr.  8.  I,  46  ;  in  column,  lb.  5!  1, 
36 ;  also,  voWal  Ktv/xat  d9p.  close  together.  Id.  An.  7.  3,  9.  ix' 

brought  together,  in  a  body,  d9poa  ttovt  dirinaiv  he  paid  for  all  at 
once,  Od.  1.  43  ;  d9pva  iroAis  the  citizens  as  a  whole,  opp.  to  fVaoToi, 
Thuc.  2.  60;  so,  d9p.  Suva/us  Id.  2.  39,  cf.  1.  141  ;  d9p.  ?jv  aiiry  to 
arpdrevpia  was  assembled,  Xen.  Cyr.  3.  3,  22  ;  to  d9p6ov  their  assembled 
force,  lb.  4.  2,  20,  cf.  An.  5.  2,  1  ;  d$poa  (TTo/taTi  with  one  voice,  Eur. 
Bacch.  725  ;  dBpvovs  Kpivttv  to  condemn  all  by  a  single  vote,  Plat.  Apol. 
32  B;  iroAAoiis  d9poow  vftaiv  Dem.  557.  27  ;  dflpous  a«p9n  was  seen  with 
all  his  forces,  Plut.  Themist.  12,  cf.  Id.  Syll.  12  ;  dSpoov  \c-y6111vov  used 
in  a  collective  or  general  sense,  opp.  to  /tcrrd  pipos,  Plat.  Theaet.  182  A  ; 
i)  utrdtiaots  dBpoa  yivtrai  takes  place  at  once,  Arist.  Pol.  5.  8,  3,  opp. 
to  ix  wpoaayaryrjs  lb.  1 2  ;  KOTT\pnttv  d9p.  he  fell  all  at  once,  Theocr.  1 3. 
49,  cf.  25.  252  ;  d9pdai  irivrt  vvierts  five  whole  nights,  Pind.  P.  4.  231  ; 
Kardoraois  dBpoa  xal  aia9rjTt)  Arist.  Rhet.  I.  11,  1  ;  xdBapots  d.,  opp. 
to  KO.T  dKiyov,  Id.  H.  A.  7.  2,  2  ;  Karameiv  dSpovs  Ttv.ax'ras  at  a 
gulp,  Eubul.  'Avaow{.  1,  cf.  Plut.  2.  650  B,  etc.  ;  d9p6ov  fKKayxa(ftv 
to  burst  out  laughing,  Arist.  Eth.  N.  7.  7,  6,  cf.  Hipp.  1281.  III. 

multitudinous,  or  continuous,  incessant,  u9p.  KaxoTrjs  Pind.  P.  2.  65  ; 
odxpv  Eur.  H.  F.  489 ;  A070S  Plat.  Rep.  344  D,  Arist.  Meteor.  2.  8, 
20,  etc.  IV.  Adv.  dSpoov,  all  at  once,  v.  supr.  II : — also  in 

regul.  Adv.  dBpvais  Arist.  H.  A.  4.  8,  II,  etc. ;  d.  Kiyuv  to  speak  gene- 
rally, Rhet.  V.  Comp.  dBpourtpos  Thuc.  6.  34,  etc. ;  later 
d9pov<XTfpos  Plut.  Caes.  20,  Ath.  79  B,  etc.  ;  cf.  Lob.  Phryn.  143. 

d-Opoos,  ov,  noiseless,  only  in  Gramm. 

dOpoorns,  i;tos,  1^,  (dflpoos)  a  being  massed  together,  Diog.  L.  10.  106. 

dOpos,  a,  ov,  for  dSpoy,  Inscr.  Aeg.  in  C.  I.  4710. 

d-8pvA'nTos,  ov,  not  much  spoken  of,  Jo.  Chrys. 

d8puirros,  ov,  (9p\nrni)  unbroken,  imperishable,  Plut.  2. 1055  A.  II. 

not  enervated,  Pythag.  Carm.  Aur.  35,  and  often  in  Plut. ;  d9pvirros  tis 
7«A<ura  never  breaking  into  laughter,  Plut.  Pericl.  I.  Adv.  -ran,  Id.  Fab.  3. 

dSpvdaa,  ^,  a  simple  way  of  life,  Plut.  2.  609  C. 

d(H)p.<<i>,  f.  4<rai,  to  be  &9vv.os,  be  disheartened,  lose  heart,  despond,  it 
viaov  me&rv  dBvpnis  Aesch.  Pr.  474  ;  otfi  ws  uOvpa  Soph.  Aj.  587  ;  ufl. 
tivi  at  or  for  a  thing,  Id.  El.  769,  etc.  ;  in  rm  Isocr.  41  B  ;  th  ti  Plat. 
Soph.  264  B;  irpos  ti  Thuc.  2.  88  ;  ti  Id.  5.  91  ;  ivtitd  rivos  Xen.  An. 
5.  4,  19  : — also  foil,  by  a  relat.  word,  to  be  sore  afraid,  dBvvMi  5'  ct  tpavi)- 
aoitat  Soph.  Tr.666  ;  ottvuis  d$vpw  pt^  0\iiraiv  6  pLavrisij  Id.  O.  T.  747. 

d8uu,T)T«'ov,  verb.  Adj.  one  must  lose  heart,  Xen.  An.  3.  2,  23 ;  toi's  irap- 
ovai  vpdyptaaiv  oin  d9.  Dem.  40.  II. 

ddvuia.  Ion.  -(ij,  1),  want  of  heart,  faintheartedness,  despondency,  Hdt. 
I.  37,  Soph.  Ant.  237,  Eur.  H.  F.  551  ;  cl>  d9.  Ka9iaTavat  or  ipsfidWav 
rtvd  Plat.  Legg.  731  A,  Aeschin.  79.  12  ;  d9.  napix*tv  rtvl  Xen.  Cyr.  4. 
I,  8  ;  tU  A0.  KaTaarr)vai  Lys.  120.  23  ;  iv  u9.  tTvat  Xen.  Hell.  6.  2,  24  ; 
dBvpiiav  ixf'y  Soph.  1.  c,  Xen.  ;  &9.  ipnrimtt  riv'i  Xen.  Mem.  3.  1 2,  6  : 
— pi.,  68.  «oi  <pi$ot  Arist.  Probl.  30.  I. 

d-SvpidTos.  ov,  not  exhaling,  Arist.  Meteor.  4.  8,  5. 

d-flOp.os,  ov,  without  heart,  fainthearted,  spiritless,  once  in  Horn.,  uont- 
Kies  xal  66.  Od.  10.  463  ;  xaxos  xal  6S.  Hdt.  7.  1 1  ;  oi  rots  dS.  ^  rvxn 
(vWapi0dvet  Soph.  Fr.  666,  cf.  O.  T.  319  ;  of  nations,  opp.  to  iv9vpios, 
Arist.  Pol.  7.  7,  2  ;  60.  tlvat  irpos  rt  to  have  mo  heart  for  it,  Xen.  An.  I. 
4,  9  ;  so,  dBvpws  *x(iV  WP°^  Tt  Id.  Hell.  4.  5,  4  ;  dffvpais  btdyttv  Id. 
Cyr.  3.  I,  24 ;  dBvptais  vovtiv  to  work  without  heart  or  spirit.  Id. 
Oec.  21,  5.  2.  without  anger  or  passion.  Plat.  Rep.  411  B,  Legg. 

888  A.  II.  act.  unpleasing,  oboi  Aesch.  Eum.  770  (if  the  line 

be  genuine). 

dScpiSoiTOS.  ov,  (9vpis)  without  door  or  window,  Jo.  Chr. 

d0vppa,  to,  (dOvptv)  a  plaything,  toy,  like  lraiyvtov,  II.  15.  363,  Od.  18. 
323,  h.  Horn.  Merc.  40 :  like  ayaXuta,  a  delight,  joy,  ' r\iro\\wvtov  d9., 
of  the  Pythian  games,  Pind.  P.  5.  29  ;  uBvppara  Movadv,  i.  e.  songs, 
Bacchyl.  48  ;  AJSpiv  d9.,  of  a  pet  dog,  Epigr.  Gr.  626,  cf.  272.  10.,  810. 
4: — rare  in  Att.,  Eur.  Fr.  274,  Cratin.  'OJuiro-.  16,  Com.  Anon,  in  Mein. 
4.  p.  663,  Alcidamas  ap.  Arist.  Rhet.  3.  3,  2  and  4. 

dfluppd-nov,  to.  Dim.  of  foreg.,  Eupol.  in  Com.  Fr.  5.  p.  40,  Philox.  3. 
24 :  a  pet,  Luc.  D.  Mar.  1.  5. 

d8<5poYA(i>TT«i>,  to  be  d0vp6y\arrros,  v.  Suicer  s.  v. 

dfrupoYAwrria,  jj,  impudent  loquacity,  Polyb.  8.  12,  I. 

d8t>po-YX(i)TTOs.  ov,  one  that  cannot  keep  his  mouth  shut  ($  yXwoari  9v- 
pat  oiic  inKuvrat  Theogn.  421),  a  ceaseless  babbler,  Eur.  Or.  903. 

dBvpo-vopos,  ov,  making  game  of  the  laws,  Hesych. 

dStpos.  ov,  (Ovpa)  without  door,  Plut.  2.  503  C,  Hdn.,  etc.  II. 

metaph.  open,  unchecked,  yKarrra  Philo  I.  678,  Clem.  Al.  165;  oropa 
Physiogn. 

uBvpoo-Topfii).  =  dBvpoyXturrtoj,  Eccl. 

dSOpooTOpia,  ^,  =  dBvpoykarrrta,  Anth.  P.  5.  352. 

dSCpd-aropos,  ov,  =  dBvpoyKairros,  dS.  dx&i  ever-babbling  Echo,  Soph. 
Ph.  188  ;  cf.  dBvpot  II,  A.  B.  352. 

d-8upo-os.  ov,  without  thyrsus,  Eur.  Or.  1492. 

d8vpw  [D],  Ep.  word,  used  only  in  pres.  and  impf.,  rare  in  Att.  (v. 
infr.).  To  play,  sport,  of  children,  Alt  ort  . .  wait . .  ,  oar  iwtl  voti\an 
uBvppara  vnmi-natv,  dip  avrts  awixtvf  Troatv  Kal  x(P°~iv  d9vpwv  U.  15. 
364  ;  vios  ptiv  ovv  .  .  fiXdr  d9vpwv  Eur.  Ion  53  ;  Tax'  av  irpos  dynd\atot 
.  .  Trr/bwr  d9vpot  Id.  Fr.  325  ;  TiW  with  a  thing,  Ap.  Rh.  4.  950  ;  of 
dancing,  Plat.  Legg.  796  B  ;  playing  on  an  instrument,  /ford  rrr)inioaiv 
Anacreont.  41.  10 ;  c.  ace.  cogn.,  ptovaav  d9vpwv  singing  sportive  songs, 
h.  Horn.  19. 15  : — Med.,  simply,  to  sing,  h.  Horn.  Merc.  485.  II. 

c.  ace,  Trofs  i'uv  d9vp(  pnydXa  ipya  (of  Achilles)  when  yet  a  child  he 


32  aQvpwros 

sported  with  great  deeds,  did  them  in  play,  i.  e.  great  deeds  were  the 
sports  of  his  childhood,  Pind.  N.  3.  78  ;  tpya  <patrwv  dO.  to  play  the 
deeds  of  men,  of  an  actor,  Anth.  P.  9.  505.  2.  to  sing,  sing  of, 

dptrdv  dfvpttv  Pind.  I.  4.  67  (3,  57).     Cf.  iroi'yu. 

d-0upwros  [v],  ov,  =a^upoy,  trro^a  Ar.  Ran.  838,  Phryn.  Com.  Incert. 
15. 

o-9votos,  ov,  =  sq.,  tpd  Simon.  Iamb.  7.  $6. 

Q-0t>TOs,  ov,  not  offered,  i.  e.  omitted,  neglected,  Upd  Lys.  175, 
34.  2.  no/  successfully  offered,  Upd  dO.,  Lat.  sacra  inauspicata,  not  ac- 
cepted, Aeschin.  75.  12.,  72.  16,  cf.  Soph.  Ant.  1006  (ix  Sv/idraiv  "Htpat- 
otos  ovk  (kafivfv)  and  v.  dwvpos,  dvitpos : — metaph.,  dOvra  ira\kaxwv 
cntpfxara,  of  illegitimate  children,  Plat.  Legg.  841  D,  cf.  Suid.  s.  v.  d&v- 
rot  yd/iot.  II.  act.  not  offering,  without  sacrificing,  dBvrov 

dni\$iiv  Xen.  Hell.  3.  2,  33. 

dOwos.  ov,  (Oorrj)  : — unpunished,  scot-free,  Eur.  and  Oratt. ;  dOqjovs  xa&i- 
trrdvat  rtvds  to  secure  their  immunity,  Dem.  31.  17  »  d&aiov  dtpUvai  ap. 
Dem.  549.  27  ;  d$$os  c.Tra\Kdrr(tv  or  -toOat  to  get  off  scot-free,  Plat. 
Soph.  254  E,  Lys.  103.  28  ;  diripx*oOai  Archipp.  'PiV.  1  ;  Statpvyttv 
Menand.  AiW.  4.  2.  c.  gen.  free  from  a  thing,  trX-nyStv  Ar.  Nub. 

1413;  but,  dO.  dbticr^fidroiv  unpunished  for  offences,  Lycurg.  157.  38,  cf. 
Diod.  14.  76.  3.  unharmed  by,  d8qios  rr)s  &t\iinrov  . .  dwaoreias 

Dem.  316.18.  II.  not  deserving  punishment,  guiltless,  without 

fault,  (yu  ptv  d0$o$  dwaot  Dem.  269.  4.  III.  act.  causing  no 

harm,  harmless,  Dem.(?)  1437.  9.  (The  form  and  accent  ddoios  is  main- 
tained by  Elms!.  Med.  1267.) 

"Atopos  or  'A9uos  (as  Choerob.  wrote  it  to  distinguish  it  from  dBoios), 
i},  ov,  of  mount  Athos,  Aesch.  Ag.  285,  ubi  v.  Blomf. 

dOcuou,  (dSwos)  to  hold  guiltless,  dOqiov  dOtpovv  nvd  Lxx  (Nah.  I.  3)  : 
— fut.  pass.  d$oiai0r]tTopai  (Prov.). 

d-OunrcvTos,  ov,  unflattered,  without  flattery,  ttjs  lp.r)s  y\wffans  from 
my  tongue,  Eur.  Andr.  460.  II.  act.  not  flattering,  Teles  ap. 

Stob.  524,  fin.:  hence  rough,  rude,  harsh,  Anth.  P.  6.  168. 

d-8upd,KioTOs  [5k]  ,  ov,  without  breastplate  or  body-armour,  Xen.  Cyr. 

4;  2.  3'- 

&-6(ipT)KTOS,  ov,  =  foreg.,  Nonn.  D.  35.  102.  II.  not  drunken 

(v.  9o)pr)aaat  II),  Hipp.  263.  3. 

*A9ws  [a],  a>,  6,  ace.  "Aflai  Aeschin.  72.  25,  Theocr.  7.  77,  etc.,  but  in 
earlier  writers  'ABoiv,  Hdt.  6.  44.,  7.  21,  Thuc.  5.  3: — Ep.  nom.  'A66o>s, 
<5<u,  11.  14.  229:  later  nom.  *A9o)v,  aivos,  Strabo  330: — mount  Athos, 
'A&yy  axtd£ti  vwra  A-npvias  0oas  Soph.  Fr.  348. 

dfluiuKns,  r),  (dSaibw)  acquittal,  Ctes.  Pers.  61. 

al,  Dor.  for  (I,  if,  Epich.  44,  94,  Ahr.,  al. : — in  Horn,  only  ai  K(  or  xtv, 
if  only,  so  that,  Lat.  dummodo,  always  with  subj.,  except  in  orat.  obliq., 
as  in  II.  7.  387;  (in  II.  5.  279  Wolf  writes  at  xf  tvxo>/u  for  Tvxotpu  ; 
and  in  Od.  24.  217  imyvajri  should  be  written  for  iwiyvo'cn,  cf.  Spitzn. 
II.  24.  688) ;  so  Dor.  aixd,  Epich.  19,  11,  Theocr.  I.  4,  al.  II. 

al  yap  (with  accent),  Ep.  for  ei  yap  (v.  ti  VII.  2.  b),  to  express  a  wish, 
Othat!  would  thatl  Lat.  utinam !  Horn.;  always  with  optat. ;  for  in 
Od.  7.  311  at  yap  .  .  irafia  t  ipLT)v  hxipev  xal  i/xus  ya/i&pos  xaKitoBat, 
some  word  like  i$f\ois  must  be  supplied ;  so  Hdt.  1.27;  so  also  ai  alone, 
in  Aeol.  and  Dor.  writers.     Cf.  aide. 

ai,  exclam.  of  astonishment  or  indignation,  ha !  Hdn.  ap.  Arcad.  183.  20, 
Joann.  top.  irapayy.  32.  25,  who  quotes  a!  rdAas,  as  in  Ar.  PI. 
706.  II.  at  (perispom.)  exclam.  of  grief,  ah!  Lat.  vae,  only  used 

in  the  disyll.  alat  (as  we  learn  from  Hdn.  it.  fiov.  \i(.  27.  13),  not  al  a! 
or  ai  at  (as  in  the  Mss.).  It  is  freq.  in  Trag.,  aiaf  ToA/xas  Eur.  Hipp. 
814;  and  repeated,  aiai  alat  fie\€o>v  epyoiv  Aesch.  Cho.  1007,  cf.  Pers. 
1039 :  often  placed  extra  versum  with  an  hiatus,  at'af  ixvovpat  Soph.  El. 
136,  cf.  Tr.  969  : — later  c.  ace,  aiaf  rdv  Kviepuav  Bion.  I.  28,  etc. ; 
alat  irhpov  ixftvov  Anth.  P.  7.  554,  cf.  9.  424. — In  Ar.  Ach.  I083  the 
alat  of  Lamachus  is  mockingly  repeated  by  Dicaeopolis. 

at,  Aeol.  for  itt:  Maced.  in  Hicks  Inscrr.  138.  34. 

aia,  ^,  Ep.  form  used  for  *yafa  metri  grat.,  Horn. ;  also  by  Trag., 
chiefly  in  lyr.  passages :  never  in  pi.  II.  A?a,  r),  orig.  name  of 

Colchis,  Soph.  Fr.  774:  also  part  of  Thessaly,  lb. 

aiaypa.  to,  a  wail,  Eur.  Ale.  873,  etc. :  alayuds,  ov,  b,  Eust. 

aedfu).  Trag. :  fut.  d(ai  Eur.  H.  F.  1054  (restored  by  Herm.  for  ald£(Tt)  : 
aor.  part.  aldfas  Anth.  P.  append.  127.  To  cry  aiai  or  ah !  to  wail, 
Trag. ;  and  c.  ace.  to  bewail,  Aesch.  Pers.  922,  Eur.  2.  like  ddfeu, 

dfa>  (B),  to  breathe  hard,  al.  xat  ixrtviiv  Arist.  H.  A.  4.  9,  20,  cf. 
G.  A.  5.  7,  34. 

aiai,  v.  sub  al. 

AiaKtios,  a,  ov,  of  Aeacus,  Soph.  Fr.  434. 

AiaKiS-ns,  ov,  6,  son  of  Aeacus,  II.  9.  191,  etc. 

ataKTos,  f),  bv,  verb.  Adj.  of  alafa,  bewailed,  lamentable,  Trr)/j.aTa 
Aesch.  Th.  846,  cf.  Ar.  Ach.  1 195:  lamented,  Bvydrnp  Epigr.  Gr. 
205.  II.  wailing,  miserable,  Aesch.  Pers.  931,  1069. 

aidvTjs,  Ion.  air|VT)S,  es,  an  old  poet,  word,  first  in  Archil.  38  Searvov 
aiijvis;  next  in  Pind.,  aiai^s  /copos,  Ktvrpov,  Xiftoi  P.  1.  161.,  4.  420, 
I.3.4; — trien  in  Aesch.  and  Soph.,  vvktSs  aiavrj  TfKva  Eum.  416  ; 
vvktos  alavfis  kvkKos  Soph.  Aj.  672  ;  alavijs  voaos  Aesch.  Eum.  479, 
942  ;  aiapj;  fldy/iara  Id.  Pers.  635  ;  atari;  irdj/Si/proi'  aiSdv  lb.  940  ; 
TltXonos  . .  iTriTtia,  ws  ffwkfs  alavrjs  rp5«  -yp  Soph.  El.  506 :  of  time, 
fis  tuv  aiavrj  xp^vov  Aesch.  Eum.  572,  Epigr.  Gr.  263;  and  so  in  Adv. 
alavwsfor  ever,  Aesch.  Eum.  672. — The  form  aiavos,  which  occurs  as  a 
v.  1.  in  Eum.  416,  479,  Soph.  Aj.  672,  El.  506  is  prob.  corrupt,  v.  Nauck 
Melanges   Greco-Komains,  1862,   2.  p.  441.  (The   prob.   deriv.   is 

from  aUi,  everlasting,  for  ever,  (as  it  must  be  with  xpwos,  and  in  Adv. 
aiavws),  whence  might  come  the  notion  of  never-ending,  wearisome,  as 
with  vv( ;  and  then  that  of  dreary,  dismal,  direful,  horrible,  as  in  the 


other  places  cited,  though  this  sense  is  commonly  thought  to  connect  the 
word  with  alvos.) 

Aiavrtios,  a,  ov,  of  Ajax  :  to  Aiavrttov  his  tomb,  Philostr. ;  to  Ami'Teia 
(sc.  Upd)  festivals  in  his  honour,  Hesych. :  Ai.  yekais  of  insane  laughter, 
Paroemiogr.,  v.  Lob.  Aj.  301  : — a  poet,  form  AidvTcos  in  Pind.  O.  9.  166  ; 
Nic.  ap.  Ath.  683  E. 

AiavTt8i)s,  ov,  6,  son  of  Ajax,  patron. :  hence,  one  of  the  tribe  Aiavrit 
in  Attica,  Dem.  1399.  2. 

Aids,  airos,  o,  Ajax,  masc.  pr.  n.,  borne  by  two  heroes,  the  Greater, 
son  of  Telamon,  the  Less,  son  of  Oileus,  Horn.  A  nom.  A?dy  occurs  in 
Alcman  55;  ace.  A?av,  Pind.  Fr.  179;  voc.  Alav  (postulante  metro)  Soph. 
Aj.  482,  elsewh.  in  Trag.  Aias ;  pi.  Aiavrts,  proverb,  of  deep  tragedies, 
Arist.  Poet.  18,  6.     (Soph,  derives  it  fancifully  from  aiai",  Aj.  430.) 

aiptTos,  i.  e.  alftros,  6,  dial,  form  of  dtTos,  Hesych. 

atfloi,  bah!  exclam.  of  disgust  or  astonishment:  but  aiffoi,  0ot,  of  laughter, 
Ar.  Pax  1066. 

aiY-a-ypos,  u  and  r),  the  wild  goat,  capra  aegagros  (cf.  ai£),  Babr.  102. 8, 
Opp.  Cyn.  I.  71. 

Ai-ya8tv,  Dor.  for  Alyr)6ev,  Adv.,  from  Alyai  (an  island  off  Euboea), 
Pind.  N.  5.  68. 

Aiyatos,  a,  ov,  Aegaean,  TrtA^os  Aesch.  Ag.  659  ;  opo?  A17.  mount 
Ida,  Hes.  Th.  484.  v.  Gaisf.  ad  1.  II.  Ai7afos  (sc.  jtoVtos),  d, 

the  Aegaean,  Plat.  Eleg.  9.  I,  Arist.  Meteor.  2.  I,  10,  etc. 

Aiyaiuv,  O1C0S,  6,  Aegaeon,  the  name  given  by  men  to  the  hundred- 
armed  son  of  Uranus  and  Gaia,  called  by  gods  Bptaptan  (q.  v.),  II.  1.  404, 
Hes.  Th.  714,  817.     (Prob.  akin  to  di<«ra>.)  II.  the  Aegaean 

sea,  Ttbvrwv  t  Aiyaiav'  Eur.  Ale.  595,  cf.  Salmas.  Solin.  1.  125  F ;  where 
however  others  take  it  as  Adj.  agreeing  with  the  following  word  dtcrdv. 

atyavrri,  r),  a  hunting-spear,  javelin,  II.  2.  774,  Od.  4.  626,  Anth.  P. 
6.  57.     (Perh.  from  ai(,  a  goat-spear,  cf.  Od.  9.  156.) 

diYOT|v,  Adv.  (diWai)  rushing  swiftly,  impetuously,  Ap.  Rh.  2.  826. 

al-yfa,  r),  v.  sub  diyttos. 

aiytios,  a,  Ion.  17,  ov,  Ep.  lengthd.  for  aiyeos,  which  is  used  by  Horn, 
only  once,  v.  infr. :  (aif).  Of  a  goat  or  goats,  Lat.  caprinus,  alyttov 
kvt}  Tvpiv  goats-milk  cheese,  II.  11.  639;  00x01  iv  alyeiw  in  a  goat's 
skin,  3.  247  ;  af-yeoi'  daxov  txov  Od.  9.  196  ;  aiydrj  xvvi-q  a  helmet  of 
goatskin,  24.  231  ;  bt<p9ipr)atv  alyi-notv  Hdt.  5.  58  ;  70X0  aiyuov  Arist. 
H.  A.  3.  20,  12.  II.  as  Subst.  ai7e'i;  (sc.  Sopd),  7),  a  goat's  skin, 

Hdt.  4.  189;  rr)v  alyiav  Joseph.  A.J.  1. 18,  6;  and  contr.  0171}  Arcad. 
»}.  2. 

Afy«ios,  a,  ov,  of  Aegeus,  Aesch.  Eum.  682,  ace.  to  Well,  and  Herm. : 
— Alytiov,  to,  (properisp.),  his  temple,  Dinarch.  ap.  A.  B.  354. 

aiycipos,  r),  the  black  poplar  (cf.  Ktixrj),  /laxedvi),  /iaxpr)  Od.  7.  106., 
10.  510,  cf.  Soph.  Fr.  24 ;  017.  vbaTorpttpits  Od.  17.  208,  cf.  9.  140.,  5. 
64,  70,  Eur.  Hipp.  211  (lyr.)  ;  with  smooth  bark  and  foliage  chiefly  at 
top,  II.  4. 482  ;  with  trembling  leaves,  Od.  7. 106  :  Arist.  was  aware  that 
the  tree  was  dioecious,  aty.  dxapvos  (Mund.  6,  37,  cf.  G.  A.  I.  18,  60), 
and  xapvotyopos  (Mirab.  69):  as  a  tree  of  the  nether  world,  Od.  10.  510. 

aiycipuv,  wvos,  6,  a  black  poplar  grove,  Strabo  774. 

aiY-£\aTT)S  [a],  ov,  6,  (iKavvai)  a  goatherd,  Plut.  Pomp.  4,  Anth. 
Plan.  229. 

aiycos,  a,  ov,  =  aiye tos,  q.  v. 

ai'vepos.  t),  =  atyttpos,  Com.  Anon,  in  Mein.  4.  p.  62 1. 

ai*yia£w,  to  talk  of  goats,  Eupol.  Ai7.  9. 

aiyidXcios,  a,  ov,  of  or  on  the  shore,  Aetius:  —  so  aiyuxAevs,  t)os,  b, 
Nic.  Th.  786: — aiYiuXiTr|S,  ov,  b,  fem.-tns,  i5os,  Strabo  182,  Anth.  P. 
10.  10. 

ai-yuiXos,  b,  the  sea-shore,  beach,  II.  4.  422,  Od.  22.  385,  Hdt.,  and  some- 
times in  Att.  Prose,  as  Thuc.  I.  7,  Xen.  An.  6.  4,  4  ;  distinguished  from 
d«Ti7,  Arist.  H.  A.  5.  15,  6  ; — also  in  lyr.  passages  of  Eur.,  I.  T.  425, 
I.  A.  210;  aiytaXbv  fvSov  rpetpti,  i.  e.  he  has  a  whole  sea-beach  (i.  e. 
quantities  of  voting-pebbles,  ifir}<pot)  in  his  house,  Ar.  Vesp.  no: — 
proverb.,  alytakw  KaXeis,  of  deaf  persons,  Suid.  (Not  from  dyvvfu,  d\s, 
that  on  which  the  sea  breaks,  like  oktij  ;  but  from  diaaoi,  d\s,  that  over 
which  the  sea  rushes  (cf.  atjf  IV,  ai7(?  II,  alyi^at).) 

aiyiuXcoS^s,  €S,  (tlbos)  frequenting  the  shore,  (^a  Arist.  H.  A.  I.  I,  15. 

aiyias,  dSo?,  i),  a  white  spot  on  the  eye,  Hipp.  Coac.  218. 

atyi-pdTT|S  [a],  ov,  b,  goat-mounting,  epith.  of  he-goats,  etc.,  Pind.  Fr. 
215  ;  of  Pan,  Theocr.  Ep.  5,  Anth.  P.  6.  31. 

alyi-Pocis,  €ws,  r),  a  goat-pasture,  Anth.  P.  9.  318. 

alyi-PoTrjs,  ov,  b,  feeding  goats,  browsed  by  goats,  Anth.  P.  6.  334. 

aiyt-PoTOS,  ov,  browsed  by  goats,  'Wdxrj  Od.  4.  606  ;  so  in  Od.  13.  246, 
7afa  must  be  supplied  from  v.  238. 

aiyiSiov,  to.  Dim.  of  at£ ,  a  kid,  Pherecr.  Avro^i.  *}. 

aiyi^u,  (alyW)  to  rend  asunder,  Aesch.  Fr.  60. 

aiyi6a\Xos  or  aiyiOaXos,  b,  the  tit,  titmouse,  Lat.  parus,  Ar.  Av.  887, 
Alcae.  Com.  Tav.  2,  cf.  Arist.  H.  A.  8.  3,  4.,  9.  15,  2.  In  the  Mss.  often 
written  oxyt.,  but  v.  Arcad.  55,  A.  B.  360. 

atyidos,  also  alyioOos,  o,  the  hedge-sparrow  or  perh.  the  bunting,  Arist. 
H.  A.  9.  I,  18.,  9.  15,3. 

aiyC-Kvr|Uos,  ov,  goat-shanked,  Anth.  P.  6.  167. 

aiyi-Kopets,  taw,  of,  goatherds ;  name  of  one  of  the  four  old  Attic 
Tribes,  Hdt.  5.  66  (who  derives  it  from  Alytxbp-ns  a  son  of  Ion),  Eur. 
Ion  1581,  Plut.  Sol.  23: — there  were  four  Tribes  at  Cyzicus  with  the 
same  names,  C.  I.  3665. — On  the  question  whether  these  Tribes  were 
Castes,  v.  Thirlw.  Hist,  of  Gr.  2.  p.  4  sq.,  Grote  a.  p.  69,  Clint.  Fasti  I. 
p.  53,  Herm.  Pol.  Ant.  §  94.  (If  from  aff,  xopevvvfu,  the  literal  sense 
would  be  goat-feeders.  But  Curt,  takes  the  p  to  represent  an  older  A,  so  that 
the  Root  would  be  the  same  as  that  of  0ov-xo\os,  at-TroKos,  Lat.  coio.) 

aiyCXid/  [711,  iirot,  o,  r),  (perh.  from  a't(,  K(irra>)  destitute  even  of  goats, 


aiytXog atd^/J.wv. 


33 


hence  steep,  sheer,  rerpn  II.  9.  15,  al.  (not  in  Od.)  ;  also  in  Aesch.  Supp. 

794  ('."•)•  ,   , 

olylXos,  ^.  a"  *""°  of  which  goats  are  fond,  perh.  the  same  as  0171X01^, 
Theocr.  5.  I 28,  Babr.  3.  4. 

aiytXwmov,  to,  —  aXylkcu^i  II,  Diosc.  3.  144. 

aiytX<»K|i  P]  1  ""os,  poet,  oiros,  Nic.  Th.  857,  o,  a  kind  of  oats,  wild 
oats,  Lat.  arena  sterilis,  Theophr.  C.  P.  5.  15,  15.  II.  a  kind  of 

oak  with  sweet  fruit,  v.  I.  Theophr.  H.  P.  3.  8,  2.  III.  an  ulcer  in 

the  eye,  lachrymal  fistula,  Diosc.  4.  71. 

Aiylvo,  17$,  17,  Aegina,  II.,  etc.;  also  Aiyivaii]  (sc.  vrjaos)  Hdt.  5. 
$6: — hence,  Aiyivrtnis,  ov,  A,  fem.  -tjtis,  lios,  an  Aeginetan,  Id., 
etc. 

Aiyivalos,  a,  of,  Aeginetan,  Cratin.  IIXoCt.  2,  al. ;  d/3oXds  Ai'y., 
bpaxph  Aiy.,  etc.,  Thuc.  5.  47,  etc.,  v.  Diet,  of  Antiqq.  p.  81 1  ; — also 
AiyivT]TVK6s,  17,  ov,  Luc.  Tim.  57,  Paus.,  etc. 

aiyT-vou.evs.  iws,  A,  a  goatherd,  Anth.  P.  9.  318. 

aiytvdu.os,  ov,  (yipa)  feeding  goats :  as  Subst.  a  goatherd,  Anth.  P.  6. 
221,  cf.  9.  744.  II.  aiyivoiws  (proparox.),  pass,  browsed  by  goats, 

porayij  Anth.  P.  9.  217. 

aiytoOos,  0,  v.  sub  aiyt&os. 

<uy(-oxo$,  ov.  Aegis-bearing,  epith.  of  Zeus,  Horn.;  later  also  of  Athena. 

Aiyi-irdv,  dvos,  v,  goat-Pan,  goat-footed  Pan,  the  Rom.  Silvanus, 
Plut.  2.  311  B. 

aiyt-irXayitTOS,  ov,  wandered  over  by  goats : — hence  opos  Alyiwkaytcrov 
Mount  Aegiplanct,  near  Megara,  Aesch.  Ag.  303. 

aiyt-'ir66T|S,  ov,  A,  goat-footed,  h.  Horn.  18.  2,  37. 

alyt-Trovs,  iroJos,  d,  17,  vow,  t6,  =  foreg.,  Hdt.  4.  25. 

aiyl-irvpos,  d,  a  plant  with  a  red  flower,  of  which  goats  were  fond, 
perh.  buckwheat,  Theophr.  H.  P.  2.  8,  3,  Theocr.  4.  25  ;  alyimipov,  to, 
in  Anth.  P.  append.  120. 

aiyis.  ibos,  7,  I.  the  aegis  or  shield  of  Zeus,  flashing  forth  terror 

and  amazement,  as  described  at  length  in  II.  5.  738  sqq. ;  and  so  prob. 
from  the  same  root  as  itaaai,  to  move  violently. — In  works  of  Art  the 
aegis  appears  on  the  statues  of  Athena,  not  as  a  shield,  but  as  a  sort  of 
short  cloak,  covered  with  scales,  set  with  the  Gorgon's  head,  and  fringed 
with  snakes  {Owraavutaaa)  ;  hence  xokwos  alyibos  Aesch.  Kurn.  404. 
The  artists  no  doubt  took  the  word  to  come  from  ai( ,  and  to  mean  a 
goatskin,  v.  Hdt.  4.  189,  Diet,  of  Antiqq.  s.  v.  2.  simply  a  goat- 

skin  coat,   Eur.   Cycl.  360.  II.   a  rushing  storm,   hurricane, 

terrible  as  the  shaken  aegis,  Aesch.  Cho.  592  ;  cf.  alyifai,  iweuyi(oi, 
Karcuyii.  III.  a  yellow  kernel  in  the  pith  of  the  pine,  Theophr. 

H.  P.  3.  9,  3.  IV.  a  speck  in  the  eye,  Hipp.  Coac.  153. 

oiyio-icos,  0,  Dim.  of  a<£,  Lxz. 

aiyXdns,  contr.  aiyXat,  Dor.  for  alyk^fti. 

aiyXdlu,  to  beam  brightly,  Manetho  4.  264. 

ovyXti,  4>  properly  the  light  of  the  sun,  radiance,  Od.  4.  45,  etc.: — then 
simply  daylight,  ktvxi)  017X17  Od.  6.  45  ;  th  atykav  poktiv,  i.  e.  to  be 
born,  Pind.  N.  1.55;  'OKvuvov  p>app.apAtaaav  atykav  Soph.  Ant.  6x0 
(lyr.)  : — for  Soph.  Ph.  831  (lyr.)  v.  sub  d»-T<x«i  I.  2.  any  dazzling 

light,  aiykr)  xokxoi  the  gleam  of  brass,  II.  2.  458  ;  T<lr  wvptpopovs 
'Aprifubos  aiykas  the  gleam  of  her  torches.  Soph.  O.  T.  208  (lyr.)  ; 
uikatvav  aiykav,  of  dying  embers,  Eur.  Tro.  549;  cf.  Virgil's  atro 
lumine  taedas  Aen.  7. 456.  8.  metaph.  splendour,  glory,  0.17X17  woowv, 

of  swiftness,  Pind.  O.  13.  49  ;  ItiaSorot  aiyka  Id.  P.  8. 136.  II. 

it  is  cited  by  Hesych.  from  Soph.  (Fr.  524),  u  —  xkibav,  a  bracelet,  and 
from  Epich.  as  =  WSrj,  a  band;  cf.  A.  B.  354,  where  other  singular  uses  of 
the  word  are  cited. 

aiyXTriij.  toaa,  tv,  dazzling,  radiant,  beaming,  in  Horn,  always  aiyX^- 
evros  'Okvpwov  II.  I.  532,  Od.  20.  103  ;  so,  Kkapos  alyk-qtoaa  h.  Horn. 
Ap.  40;  iriXot  alyk.  h.  Horn.  32.  9  ;  neut.  as  Adv.,  lb.  31.  Ii  : — Dor. 
oiyXdtif.  contr.  aiyXdt.  xwas  alykbUv  .  .  Svodrai  Pind.  P.  4.  411  ;  ei- 
7XaKra  niaiiov  lb.  2.  19  ;  a^XaVra  awftara  Eur.  Andr.  286  (lyr.). 

oiYXT|TT]S,  ov,  A,  the  radiant  one,  epith.  of  Apollo,  Ap.  Rh.  4.  1716. 

aiyXo-PoXiw,  to  cast  beams  of  light,  Manetho  4.  188. 

olyXo-dKivf|»,  is,  radiant,  Anth.  P.  12.  5. 

aiyo-|5dTn»,  ov,  d,  =  the  older  alyi0anjs,  Anth.  P.  12.  41. 

aiyoSopos,  ov,  (bopa)  of  goatskin,  Opp.  H.  5.  356. 

oiyo-^nXo*,  °v,  o,  the  goatsucker,  nightjar  or  fern-owl,  eaprimulgus 
Europaeus,  Arist.  H.  A.  9.  30,  2,  Ael.  N.  A.  3.  39. 

oiyoufpas,  aTor,  to,  fenugreek,  foenum  Graecum,  Galen. 

aiyo-K<p<vi,  tut.  Ion.  i)ot,  A,  =  sq.  II,  Arat.  386. 

aiyi-Ktpwt,  gen.  -ittpoi,  dat.  -mepv  Manetho  I.  106,  ace.  -Ktpaiv  Plut., 
Luc.:  later  gen.  -Ktparrot  Julian.,  cf.  Thom.  M.  193:  (xtpat).  Goat- 
horned,  Anth.  Plan.  4.  234.  II.  as  masc.  Subst.  Capricorn  in 
the  Zodiac,  C.  I.  6179,  Arat.  286,  Plut.  2.  908  C,  Luc.  Astr.  7. 

oiyo-KadMiXos,  d,  perh.  the  horned  owl,  strix  otus,  Arist.  H.  A.  2.  15,  7. 

oiy-dX«8poi,  A,  goat's-bane,  prob.  azalea  pontica,  a  poisonous  herb, 
Antig.  Car.  p.  30,  Plin.  H.  N.  21.  13. 

oIyo-(mXt|»,  is,  goat-limbed,  Orph.  H.  10.  5. 

aiyo-vop.<vs,  tan,  Ion.  1705,  A,  —  aiyivofitvs,  a  goatherd,  Nic.  Al.  39. 

oiyo-vdiuov,  to,  a  herd  of  goats,  Hesych.  s.  v.  cdyovCktov,  etc. 

aiYO-v6|iO*,  ov,  =  alyiviuos,  Anth.  P.  7.  397. 

aiy-ovv{.  v\os,  A,  i),  =  aiywvv(,  Anth.  Plan.  4.  258. 

oiyo-mOiiicot,  0,  a  goat-ape,  Philostorg.  H.  E.  3.  II  ; — a  goal-bearded 
species,  ace.  to  Cuvier. 

aiyd-irXao-ros,  or,  goat-shaped,  Emped.  Sphaer.  139. 

aiyo-irdoiis,  oh,  A,  =  alytwutys,  Anth.  Plan.  I.  15. 

aiyo-Trpoo-(imo%,  ov,  goat-faced,  Hdt.  2.  46. 

cuyo-o-ihXt|1,  is,  goat-shanked,  llav  Philostorg.  H.  E.  3.  II. 

oiYo-Tplx«o),  to  have  goat's  hair,  Strabo  822. 


oiYorpub,  r/3or,  A,  J/,  (rpt0a>)  trodden  by  goats,  Dion.  H.  19.  12. 

aiYO-<j>aY0S,  ov,  goat-eating,  epith.  of  Hera  at  Sparta,  Paus.  3.  15,  7, 

aly-odjiSaAp-os,  6,  goat's-eye,  a  precious  stone,  Plin.  37.  72. 

aiYCmos,  d,  a  vulture,  often  in  Poets  from  Horn,  downwards,  017.  yau- 
if/wwxes,  dyxvkoxfika'  II.  16.  428,  cf.  Od.  16.  217,  Hdt.  3.  76,  Arist. 
H.  A.  9.  I,  20  and  25  : — aiyxnrtos  and  yfy  differ  (ai'7ii7rioi  707r«'s  rt  Nic. 
Th.  406),  the  former  being  the  711^  alywv  (yviratros  or  oiratTos),  the 
Lammer-geier,  Vultur  barbatus  L.,  which  preys  on  live  animals  (cf.  II.  17. 
460,  Od.  2  2. 302,  Soph.  Aj.  169) ;  the  latter  the  carrion-vulture,  V.  cinereus. 

AiYvimoJw,  to  be  like  an  Egyptian,  to  follow  the  Egyptians,  i.  e.  to 
be  sly  and  crafty,  Cratin.  Incert.  32,  cf.  Ar.  Thesm.  922,  Valck.  Adon. 
p.  357  ;  A17.  t<?  boyiian,  of  Plato,  Eus.  P.  E.  698  D,  cf.  D.  E.  20 
C.  2.  to  speak  Egyptian,  Luc.  Philops.  31.  II.  to  be  like 

Egypt,  i.  e.  be  under  water,  Philostr.  831. 

AlYVjmaieos,  V>  °V.  of  or  for  the  Egyptians,  Plut.,  etc.    Adv.  -kois,  Eccl. 

AiYVirTiao-u.6s,  A,  imitation  of  the  Egyptians,  Eust.  ad  Dion.  P. 

AtYwrnaoTt,  =  AlyvTTi&ri  (as  Dind.  reads),  Joseph,  c.  Apion.  1.  14. 

AiYvirn.os,  a,  ov,  Egyptian,  Horn.,  etc.  [In  Horn.  AiyvTrrir/,  Aituit- 
Ti'tw,  etc.,  are  necessarily  a  trisyll.,  Od.  4.  83,  127,  229.,  17.  432:  in 
Aesch.  Supp.  817  Herm.  restores  Ai'7virT«ioi',  metri  grat.] 

AiYVimow,  to  make  like  an  Egyptian,  i.  e.  swarthy,  xpo°-v  Comic. 
Anon.  95  B  (ubi  v.  Meineke),  Hesych.  s.  v. 

AtYvirrurri,  Adv.  (as  if  from  *Ai7V7m'£<u),  in  the  Egyptian  tongue, 
Hdt.  2.  46.  II.  in  Egyptian  fashion,  i.e.  craftily,  Theocr.  15. 

«!•. 

AiYVim-<i8i)S.  fs,  Egyptian-like,  Cratin.  Min.  Ti7.  2,  ubi  v.  Meineke. 
Aiyvttto-y«vtjs,  <?,  of  Egyptian  race,  Aesch.  Pers.  35. 
AryvTrros,  A,  the  river  Nile,  Od.  4.  477.  aL  >  though  even  Hes.  calls 
it  NfrXos.  2.  King  Aegyptus,  Aesch.  Supp.  10,  etc.  II. 

4.  Egypt-  Od.  17.  448,  etc. ;  AiTUirrdi'Sf  to  Egypt,  Od.  17.  426. 
cuyuXios  or  aiyuXios,  A, .a  small  kind  of  oi<7,  Arist.  H.  A.  8.  3,  3., 

9.  17,  2  ;  written  aiTaiXios  in  6.  6,  3. 

atyuvv^,  iix«?,  d,  17,  (6vv£)  goal-hoofed,  Anth.  P.  6.  35. 

aiy-wvvxov,  to,  goat's  hoof,  a  plant,  the  same  as  ktOoairtpnov,  Diosc. 

aiy-<"ros,  ov,  goal-eyed,  of  persons,  Arist.  G.  A.  5.  I,  17:  also  like 
those  of  a  goat,  of  eyes,  lb.,  cf.  H.  A.  I.  10,  I. 

dtS&Xof ,  ov,  Dor.  for  dt&nkos. 

'AtSas,  Dor.  for  'Atons,  "Atbijs,  freq.  in  lyr.  passages  of  Trag. 

aiSioiuu,  II.,  etc.,  Ep.  imper.  aibtio  II.  24.  503,  Od.  9.  269 :  poet, 
also  cuSopai,  Horn.,  part,  aioofifvos  Aesch.  Supp.  362,  Eum.  549,  Eur. 
Phoen.  1489  (all  lyr.) ;  imper.  afSco  II.  21.  74: — impf.,  ybovvro  Aesch. 
Pers.  810,  etc.,  al&tovro  Pind.,  poet,  aiotro  II.  21.  468: — fut.  otStVo/iai 
22.  124,  Att.,  Ep.  aitioaofiat  Od.  14.  388;  late  a\bto9iia op.ai  Dio  C. 
45.  44,  Galen.,  (itr-)  Eur.  I.  A.  900: — aor.  med.  rj$taan7)V  Od.  21.  28, 
Att.  (v.  sub  fin.),  Ep.  imper.  aiotaaai  II.  9.  640 : — aor.  pass.  pJtVSi/i' 
Horn.,  etc.,  and  in  Prose,  Ep.  3  pl.  aibtoScv  II.  7.  93 :  pf.  pot 0710:1  (v. 
sub  fin.) :   the  act.  form  is  found  only  in  nar-aiMa),  q.  v. :  Dep.  To 

be  ashamed,  to  feel  ashamed,  c.  inf.,  aiStoSfv  ftiv  av-qvaaiai  otiaav  f 
vitooe\Oat  II.  7.  93  ;  aiMopat  Si  pioytaB'  dOavaroiai  24.  90 ;  alb",  yap 
yvitvovoOat  Od.  o.  221  :  rarely  c.  part.,  aibtoai  ftiv  naripa  wpoktivaiv 
feel  ashamed  of  deserting  him,  Soph.  Aj.  506  : — absol.,  a'tbioitis  from  a 
sense  of  shame,  II.  I".  95.  2.  mostly  c.  ace.  pers.  to  stand  in  awe 

of,  fear,  but  in  moral  sense,  to  fear  his  bad  opinion,  aibtio  Otovs  II.  24. 
503,  Od.  9.  269;  alb.  Tpwas  II.  6.  442,  cf.  22.  124,  Od.  2.  65,  etc.; 
dXA^Xovs-  albtiaOt  shew  a  sense  of  shame  or  honour  one  for  another,  II. 

5.  530 ;  so,  oibi  Otwv  orrtv  jfbiaaf/  neither  regarded  he  .  .  Od.  21.  28  ; 
and  of  things,  atbtaacu  fiikaOpov  respect  the  house,  II.  9.  640 ;  t\9put' 
Stb*  atbti  viicvv  ;  Soph.  Aj.  1356  ;  tovS*  opttov  aibtoBtis  Id.  O.  T.  647,  cf. 
1426: — in  Pind.  P.  4.  308  albtaOevrts  akxav  prob.  means  shewing  a 
sense  of  shame  in  their  strength,  i.  e.  using  it  moderately : — also  in  Prose, 
Am  aibto$ivTts  Hdt.  9.  7,  I,  cf.  7.  141  ;  tpofiovpai  yt . .  tovs  fiox&fj- 
povs  (ov  yap  or/wort  tivoip.'  dv  &s  ye  albovuai)  Plat.  Legg.  886  A,  cf. 
Euthyphro  1 2  B,  Phaedr.  254  E ;  later  also,  alt.  iirl  rtw  Dion.  H.  6. 
92  ;  inrip  tivos  Plut.  Cim.  2.  II.  to  respect  another's  misfortunes, 
feel  regard  for  him,  /1170c  ti  /i*  cubofitvos  . . ,  fiijb'  ektaipajv  Od.  3.  96 ; 
alb.  t^v  Tory  ftijbiv  abiKovvraiv  evotfiuav  Antipho  120.  25.  III. 
as  Att.  law-term,  to  forgive  or  be  reconciled  to  a  person,  said  of  a  kins- 
man who  allows  a  homicide  to  return  from  exile  (cf.  diro'iawrifoi),  dv 
tkuiv  tw  axovaiov  tpovov  .  .  albiairrai  xal  d<py  Dem.  983.  19,  cf.  991. 
5.,  1069.  2  ;  lb.  644.  I,  tov  dAoKra  cV  dKovoitp  <pov<p  .  .  tptvytiv,  <ais 
civ  albiarrrai  rtva  ruv  iv  yivtt  TrtirovOurav,  it  seems  necessary  to  read 
tis,  cf.  635.  22;  so  albovfitvos  Plat.  Legg.  877  A ;  ybtafitvos  Dem. 
645,  fin. :  cf.  ivaibtia  II. 

alSio-viiOS,  ov,  exciting  shame  or  respect,  venerable,  Luc.  Nigr.  26: 
holy,  Paus.  3.  5,  6.     Adv.  -pan,  reverently,  Ael.  N.  A.  2.  25. 

aiScoat,  ^,  respect,  compassion,  albtatats  icai  (pikavBpwirias  Dem.  528.  8. 

aio«OT«ov,  verb.  Adj.  one  must  reverence,  Eust.  1434.  35. 

ai5«o-rds.  17,  ov,  verb.  Adj.  revered,  venerable,  Plut.  2.  67  B. 

dtSriXot  p].  Dor.  dtSdXos.  ov,  (a  priv.,  fibtiv)  making  unseen,  anni- 
hilating, destroying  (cf.  Aipavifa)  :  so  always  in  Horn.,  as  epith.  of  Ares, 
Athena,  etc.,  II.  5.  897  ;  but  mostly  of  fire,  2.  455,  etc. ;  later,  Tiixo 
C.  I.  3328.  5  ;  dVi7  Opp.  H.  2.  487  ;  irdr/ios  lb.  I.  150;  dfJaXot  ti/x<« 
Anth.  P.  append.  200: — Adv.  -X015,  =  oktSpiais,  II.  21.  220.  II. 

pass,  unseen,  unknown,  obscure,  Hes.  Op.  754,  Parmenid.  135  :  as  epith. 
of  Hades,  either  in  the  Homeric  sense,  or  dark,  gloomy,  Soph.  Aj.  608 
(lyr.).     Poet,  word,  on  which  v.  Buttm.  Lexil.  s.  v. ;  cf.  dfj^Xos-. 

oiStip-oo-wt),  4,  modesty,  Zeno  ap.  Stob.  Eel.  2.  p.  106,  C.  I.  6236. 

aior|UA>v,  ov,  gen.  ovos,  bashful,  modest,  Xen.  Lac.  2,  10,  Arist.  Eth.  N. 
2.  7,  14,  al. :  Sup.  albnuovia-raTos,  Xen.  An.  I.  9,  5.  Adv.  -pCvaK, 
Id.  Symp.  4,  58. 


3-1  ai'Sfc- 

d'Corp,  is,  (o  priv.  fibtiv)  unseen,  annihilated,  Hes.  Sc.  477.  II. 

act.  not  seeing,  Bacchyl.  46. 

'Ai8t)S,  o,  poet.  for'AiJiys  ;  v.  sub  91817$. 

ai$T|<rip.os,  ov,  poet,  for  albiaiftos,  Orph.  Arg.  1346. 

di'Sios  [SIS'],  ov,  also  if,  or  Orph.  H.  9.  II,  etc.  (aei).  Everlasting, 
eternal,  for  dci'Sios,  h.  Horn.  29.  3,  Hes.  Sc.  310;  often  in  Prose,  dtb. 
Xpivos  Antipho  113.  36;  ix^pa  Thuc.  4.  20;  d.  oixtjois,  of  a  tomb, 
Xen.  Ages.  II,  16  ;  1)  d.  oiaia  eternity.  Plat.  Tim.  37  E ;  d.  OTpaTr/yia, 
"Wi.  QaoiXtia,  vavapxia  perpetual . .  ,  Arist.  Pol.  3.  14,  4.,  4.  I5>  J  ! 
so,  d.  liaatXtis,  yipovrts  lb.  3.  13,  25.,  5.  6,  II  ;  rd  d.,  opp.  to  rd 
7tvi;Td  and  <p0aprd.  Id.  Metaph.  8.  8,  15,  Eth.  N.  6.  3,  2,  al. : — is  dtbtov 
for  ever,  Thuc.  4.  63  ;  also  ad  infinitum,  Arist.  P.  A.  I.  I,  14. 

d'iSiorns,  ifros,  1},  eternity,  Arist.  Cael.  2.  I,  7,  Phys.  8.  I,  21,  al. 

uiSvos,  ij,  oV,  (a  priv.,  fibtiv)  poet,  word,  =  di'Siji,  unseen,  obscure, 
dark,  Hes.  Th.  860 : — later,  dV8vr|eis,  taaa,  tv,  Euphor.  60 ;  and  di.°8vif|S, 
it,  Poeta  ap.  Plut.  Thes.  1,  Opp.  H.  4.  245. 

aiSotT),  r),  =  alSws,  Or.  Sib.  8.  184. 

alSouKos,  71,  iv,  of  or  belonging  to  the  aiSota,  Oribas.  p.  184  Mai., 
Paul.  Aeg.,  Aet. 

cuSoiov,  to,  often  in  pi.  aiSom,  rd,  the  privy  parts,  pudenda,  both  of 
men  and  women,  II.  13.  568,  Hes.  Op.  731,  Hipp.  Aph.  1253,  Plat.,  etc. ; 
also  in  sing.,  Hdt.  2.  30,  48,  and  mostly  so  in  Arist.  II.  alSoiov 

SaXaaatov,  a  sea  animal,  perh.  pennatula,  Nic.  ap.  Ath.  105  C,  cf.  Arist. 
H.  A.  4.  7,  14. 

atSoios,  a,  ov,  (aiSo/xoi)  regarded  with  awe  or  reverence,  august,  vener- 
able, in  Horn,  and  Hes.  only  of  persons,  as  superiors  or  elders,  persons 
under  divine  protection,  esp.  of  the  wife  or  mistress  of  the  house ;  then 
generally  of  women,  deserving  respect,  tender,  wapffivos  alSolr]  II.  2.  514  ; 
rarely  of  the  gods,  18.  394,  425,  Hes.  Th.  44  ;  of  guests  and  suppliants, 
often  joined  with  (piXos  and  bttvos  in  Horn. ;  also  atoofos  absol.  for  Ixi- 
rns,  Od.  15.  373,  ubi  v.  Schol.  2.  later  of  things,  deserving  rever- 

ence, yipas  Pind.  P.  5.  22  ;  atSoit'cn-aTos  xrtdvav  xPvtr&s  Id.  O-  3- 
76.  II.  act.  bashful,  shamefaced,  Od.  17.  578,  Plat.  Legg.  943 

E: — Adv.  -us,  reverently,  Od.  19.  243.  2.  of  things,  shewing 

reverence,  reverent,  x<*Pts  Pind.  0.  7.  164;  alb.  nvevfia,  Xoyoi  a  spirit, 
words  of  reverence  or  respect,  Aesch.  Supp.  29,  455.  III.  Comp. 

alSoiurtpos,  Od.  II.  360,  -iortpos,  Dion.  P.  172;  Sup.  alboiiOTaros, 
Pind.  O.  3.  76. — A  poet,  word ;  for  the  few  places  in  which  Plato  uses 
it  are  from  Poets. 

ot8ouiSi)S,  ts,  (tUos)  like  the  alboia,  Arist.  H.  A.  5.  6,  3. 

cuSoncu,  poet,  for  albioftat. 

vA'C5os,  Ep.  gen.  of  an  obsol.  nom.^Ais,  v.  sub  "AiS^y,  abijs. 

(u8oo-uvt|,  i},  late  and  incorrect  form  of  aiSriftoavvr],  C.  I.  (add.)  4316  h. 

cuSd-dtpuv,  ov,  gen.  ovos,  (<ppi)v)  regardful  of  mind,  compassionate, 
Soph.  0.  C.  237  (lyr.)  :  respectful,  irpos  Ttva  Eur.  Ale.  659. 

cu5p€i-n  or  -itj  [117],  r},  want  of  knowledge,  ignorance,  Od.  12.  41  ;  also 
in  pi.,  Od.  10.  231.,  11.  272  : — Ep.  word,  used  by  Hdt.  6.  69  in  Ion.  form 
uibp7jtTj  or  rather  dibpir). 

&-'£5pT)tis,  toaa,  tv,  later  collat.  form  of  sq.,  Nic.  Al.  415. 

d-l'5pis,  1,  gen.  10s  and  tos,  poet.  Adj.  unknowing,  ignorant,  II.  3.  219, 
Pind.  P.  2.  68  ;  often  c.  gen.,  Od.  10.  282,  Hes.  Sc.  410,  Aesch.  Ag. 
1 105,  etc.      [The  penult,  is  short  by  nature,  long  by  position  in  Aesch. 

I.  c,  Soph.  Aj.  213  (lyr.).] 

uiSpo-Siicns  [Si],  ov.  Dor.  -SiKas,  a,  (5,  unknowing  of  right  or  law, 
lawless,  Pind.  N.  I.  96. 

d-tSpvros  or  dv-l8pvros,  ov,  unsettled,  vagabond,  like  dviarios,  airoXis, 
of  Timon  the  misanthrope,  Ar.  Lys.  809,  cf.  Dem.  786.  10 ;  bpop.ots  dv. 
in  vagabond  courses,  Eur.  I.  T.  971  ;  dibp.  xaxuv  Cratin.  2fpi'c/>.  3,  expl. 
by  E.  M.  o  owe  av  tis  ai/rcp  ibpvaairo : — metaph.  unsettled  or  unstable 
in  mind,  Philo  2.  112.  2.  of  a  floating  island,  Dion.  H.  I.  15, 

cf.  Plut.  2.  925  F.  Adv.  -Ttos,  Theod.  Metoch. — The  better  form  seems 
to  be  dibpvros,  though  the  other  is  freq.  in  Mss.,  v.  Lob.  Phryn.  730. 

'A'CSuveus,  ias  (in  Anth.  P.  7.  480,  los),  d,  lengthd.  poet,  form  of 
'A1875,  Horn.,  Aesch.  Pers.  650.  Later  authors,  as  Mosch.,  used  the 
obi.  cases  'AiSofijos,  r)'i,  r)a,  with  the  first  syll,  long,  metri  grat. :  trisyll. 
nom.  Albavtvs  in  Soph.  O.  C.  1560.  In  Hesych.,  the  form  'Aibavt  is 
corrected  by  Bentl.  into  'Ai'Baix^i  from  II.  5.  190. 

atSus.  60s,  contr.  ois,  t/,  as  a  moral  feeling,  a  sense  of  shame,  shame, 
modesty,  II.  24.  45;  o  5' . .  d7opci;«  cuSof  fiakixh  Od.  8.  1 72,  etc. : 
a  sense  of  shame,  feeling  of  honour,  self-respect,  alba  Biaff  ivl  Bvp.ij> 
cherish  a  sense  of  shame  within  you,  II.  15.  561 ;  tax*  yetp  albas  xal 
bios  shame  and  fear  held  them  back,  lb.  657  (v.  sub  bios)  ;  alboi  tixav 
10.  238  ;  so,  dXAd  p.t  xaXvti  albas  Alcae.  55  ;  dfia  xiQavi  ixbvopivu 
avvtxbvtrai  nal  rrjv  alba  yvvq  Hdt.  1.8;  albas  rfe  p.'  «x€1  P'at-  Soph. 
217  D  ;  albas  xal  81*17  Id.  Prot.  322  C  ;  aiSoSs  tp.mirXaa$ai  Xen.,  etc. : 
— personif.,  Zrjvl  avvBaxos  Bpdvav  Albas  Soph.  O.  C.  1268.  2. 

regard  for  others,  respect,  reverence,  alSoOs  obbtpur)s  I tvxov  Theogn. 
1266,  cf.  Eur.  Heracl.  461  ;  albas  roxiwv  respect  for  them,  Pind.  P. 
4.  388  ;  rijv  epir)v  alba  respect  for  me,  Aesch.  Pers.  699 ;  alba  \a0uv 
Im  Tivt  Soph.  Aj.  345  ;  baxpvuv  irivOipov  alba  tears  of  sorrow  and  pity, 
Aesch.  Supp.  577  ;  rd  7dp  Tpa<prjvai  /ii)  xaxuis  alba  <ptpei  Eur.  Supp. 
911.  3.  mercy,  pardon,  Antipho  114.  16,  Plat.  Legg.  867  E.  II. 
that  which  causes  shame  or  respect,  and  so,  1.  a  shame,  scandal, 

albas,  'Apyttot,  Kan'  i\iyx*a  I  II.  5.  787,  etc. ;  albiis,  a  Avxwf  it6oi 
iptvytrt ;  16.  422  ;  albas  fiev  vvv  r)bt .  .  17.  336.  2.  =rd  albota, 

II.  2.  262.  3.  dignity,  majesty,  albdis  xai  x°Pts  h-  Horn.  Cer.  214. 
(On  the  Homeric  notion  of  the  word,  v.  Gladstone,  Horn.  2.  431  sqq.) 

aUt,  Ion.  and  poet,  for  dei,  q.  v. 

<uti-Y«V€Ti)i,  6,  poet,  for  duytvirris,  II.  2.  400,  Od.  2.  432,  al.  (For 
compds.  of  aid  here  omitted,  v.  sub  dti-.) 


llBvp. 


aUi--y€v(|S,  is,  =  foreg.,  Opp.  C.  2.  397. 

aicXioi,  v.  sub  deKioi. 

aUXovpos,  v.  sub  aiKovpos. 

aiiv,  v.  sub  dti. 

at«v-virvos,  ov,  lulling  in  eternal  sleep,  epith.  of  Death,  Soph.  O.C.  1578. 

ails,  Dor.  for  aliv,  aid. 

aitTTjSov,  Adv.  like  an  eagle,  Apollon.  Lex.  Horn.  68,  Schol.  II.  18. 
410. 

aUriatos,  a,  ov,  (dtrus  III)  belonging  to  or  placed  in  the  pediment, 
C.  I.  160.  col.  2.  73. 

aic-nos,  ov,  =d«T6(0s:  proverb.,  alenov  x°-Piv  *KTiau,  of  those  who 
repay  benefits  quickly,  Apost.  Cent.  I.  78. 

aieToeis,  £<7<ja,  iv,  of  eagle-kind,  Opp.  C.  3.  117. 

ai€Tos,  6,  v.  sub  dcros". 

aij-qeis,  taaa,  tv,  late  form  of  alfros,  Theopomp.  Coloph.  ap.  Ath.  183  B. 

atj-fjios,  o,  lengthd.  form  of  alfois  II.  1 7.  520,  Od.  12.  83,  Hes.  Sc.  408. 

dtfnXos,  ov,  =  dibr)\os,  unseen,  riv  piv  di(rj\ov  $rjxtv  0(6s  II.  2.  318, 
as  restored  (for  dpi£r]\ov)  by  Buttm.  and  others  from  the  Scholiasts, 
Hesych.,  and  Apollon.  Lex.  Horn. — On  the  change  of  S  and  f,  cf.  dpibrj- 
Kos,  dpifyXos,  Zf  H.  2,  and  v.  Curt.  Gr.  Et.  p.  605. 

aifnos,  lengthd.  aij-qios,  o,  in  full  bodily  strength,  active,  vigor- 
ous, in  Horn,  of  kings  and  warriors  generally  ;  of  the  brother  of  Hecuba, 
II.  16.  716  :  of  a  stout,  lusty  slave,  reaaepaxovratTns  alfous  Hes.  Op. 
439,  cf.  Th.  863 : — as  Subst.  a  warrior,  Cratin.  Aax.  I  ;  simply  a  man, 
Ap.  Rh.  4.  268.  These  passages  shew  that  the  common  transl.  of 
youthful,  youth,  is  inappropriate,  except  in  the  latitude  allowed  to  the 
Lat.  juvenis,  junior,  v.  Gladstone,  Horn.  3.  41  sqq.  (The  deriv.  is  as 
yet  not  made  out,  v.  Curt.  Gr.  Et.  p.  615.) 

aii)vT|s,  Ion.  for  ala.vr)s,  Archil.  38. 

aiTjTOS,  in  U.  18.  410  Vulcan  is  called  ireXap  aiTjrov,  prob.  =  drjrov, 
mighty  monster,  Buttm.  Lexil.  s.  v.  4. 

cu-nTos,  6,  Dor.  for  deros,  aUr6s. 

a!9aXeos,  a,  ov,  (ai'SdAif)  smoky,  Ap.  Rh.  4.  777.  II.  of  ants,= 

alOaXoas  II.  2,  Nic.  Th.  750. 

ai6dX*q,  i),  (ai6a)  =  at$a\os,  esp.  soot,  Luc.  D.  Deor.  15.  1  ;  cf.  Lob. 
Phryn.  p.  114. 

d'C9uXT|S  [ar-],  is,  =  dtt8a\r)s,  Orph.  H.  8.  13. 

ai6aXCwv,  avos,  epith.  of  the  rirri^,  prob.  =  aWaXueis  II.  2,  Theocr. 

7\138-, 
aiOuXocis,  ueaaa,  6ev,  contr.  aiOaXovs,  ovoaa,  ovv:  (atOaXos).       Poet. 

Adj.  smoky,  sooty,  fiiXaBpov  II.  2.  415,  cf.  Theocr.  13.  13;  xovis  aid. 
black  ashes  that  are  burnt  out,  U.  18.  23,  Od.  24.  316.  II.  burning, 
blazing,  xepavvos  Hes.  Th.  72  ;  (pXo£  Aesch.  Pr.  992.  2.  burnt- 

coloured,  i.  e.  red  or  reddish-brown,  Nic.  Th.  566. 

ai9aXoKop.iria,  i),  empty,  boasting,  that  is  nothing  but  smoke,  Schol. 
Ar.  Eq.  696. 

aiG&Xos,  6,  like  Xiyvvs,  a  smoky  flame,  the  thick  smoke  of  fire,  soot, 
Hipp.  634.  23,  Eur.  Hec.  91 1 :  also  alOaXrj.  II.  as  Adj.  aiBaXos, 

ov,  =  nWaXtms  II.  2,  Nic.  Th.  659. 

alBuXou,  to  soil  with  soot  or  smoke,  Eur.  EI.  1 140: — Pass,  to  burn  to 
soot,  Diosc.  I.  79  ;  poet,  to  be  laid  waste  by  fire,  Lye.  141. 

aiOaXwSijs,  €?,  {elbos)  sooty,  black,  Arist.  Mund.  4,  20. 

ald&Xuo-is,  fa*?,  r),  a  raising  of  vapor,  Max.  Tyr.  41.  1. 

aiOaXcoTos,  17,  ov,  verb.  Adj.  burnt  to  ashes.  Lye.  338. 

al'flc,  Ep.  for  t!St,  as  oX  for  ei,  in  Horn.  ai6'  oipeXes,  II.  I.  415,  al. 

dtOcos,  Dor.  for  -qiBeos.  . 

tu0ep-eu.(3aT(ii>,  to  walk  in  ether,  Anth.  Plan.  328. 

aiOcpios,  a,  ov,  also  os,  ov  Eur.  Fr.  836.  Of  al$r)p  or  the  upper  air, 
and  so,  1.  high  in  air,  on  high,  Aesch.  Pr.  157,  Th.  81,  Soph.  O.  C. 
1082,  etc.;  aWepia  uvinTa  flew  up  into  the  air,  Eur.  Med.  440,  cf.  Andr. 
830.  2.  ethereal,  heavenly,  yovr)  Eur.  Fr.  1.  c.  Adv.  -lat,  Iambi.  Myst. 
I.  9.    In  Trag.  used  only  in  lyric  passages;  also  in  Arist.  Mund.  2, 10.,  7,  2. 

ai6epiu&i]S,  e s,  («*Sos)  =  aWepabys,  Galen. 

cu0epo-J3du,<i>v  [o/»],  ovos,  b,  %,  walking  in  air,  Eust.  Opusc.  183.  21,  etc. 

aidcpo-pdTcu,  —  aWepffiParia,  Luc.  Philops.  25. 

<u6epo-fS6o-Kas,  ov,  6,  living  in  ether,  Cercid.  ap.  Diog.  L.  6.  76. 

aiOcpoSpoLtcci},  to  skim  the  ether,  Welck.  Syll.  Ep.  32. 

<u0cpo-8pou,os,  ov,  ether-skimming,  Cines.  ap.  Ar.  Av.  1 393,  Anth. 
Plan.  384,  C.  I.  1907. 

al6epo-«t8T|S,  is,  =  aWfpab7)s,  Plut.  2.  430  E. 

aiOcpo-XapTrqs,  is,  shining  in  ether,  ovpavds  Manetho  4.  29. 

alScpo-Xo-yos,  ov,  talking  of  ether  and  the  like,  of  Thales,  Anaximen. 
ap.  Diog.  L.  2.  4  ;  hence  alOcpoXo'yeu,  lb.  2.  5,  cf.  8.  50. 

aiOepovcpos.  ov,  (viuoptat)  =  aWfpo&oaxas,  Hesych. 

atOc-po-vwudu).  to  rule  the  sky,  Manetho  4.  25. 

at©ep6-irXaYKT0S,  ov,  roaming  in  ether,  Orph.  H.  5.  I. 

a:.8epw8i]S,  (s,  (tlbos)  like  ether,  Plut.  2.  432  F. 

Af9i),  4,  name  of  a  horse  of  Agamemnon,jfery,  i.e.  bright  bay,  II.  23.  295. 

aiOTjcts,  taaa,  tv,  (at6a)  =  aWaXotts  II.  2,  Nic.  Al.  394. 

al6r|p,  ipos,  in  Horn,  always  1) ;  in  Hes.  and  Att.  Prose  always  6  ;  in 
Pind.  and  Trag.  mostly  6  as  always  in  Aesch.,  but  r)  in  Soph.  O.  T.  867, 
and  often  in  Eur. :  (ai6a).  Ether,  the  upper,  purer  air,  opp.  to  ui)p 
(v.  sub  voc,  and  cf.  Arist.  Cael.  1.  3,  13,  Meteor.  I.  3,  8):  hence 
ether,  as  the  abode  of  the  gods,  II.  15.  192  ;  Z(iis  alSipi  vaiav  2.  412; 
and  in  later  philosophy  equiv.  with  the  Deity,  Ztvs  tanv  016170  Aesch. 
Fr.  65  a,  cf.  Virg.  G.  2.  325: — also  the  blue  sky,  sky,  ore  r  iirXtTO 
vr)vtp.os  al$r)p  II.  8.  556 ;  but  in  16.  365  a  cloud  is  said  to  come  aWipos 
tx  0117s,  cf.  ai8p-nytvr)s,  and  v.  Spitzn.  ad  I. :  later  it  is  used  where  dr)p 
might  stand  equally  well,  Aesch.  Pr.  1044,  1088,  Pers.  365,  Eur.  Bacch. 
150;  al$r)p  fyiptpus,  dxXvuus  Ap.  Rh.  3. 1 264.,  4.  927  ;  and  Eur.,  Cycl. 


al6>is  — 

II.  in 


■  cuXij/oy. 


35 


410,  even  his  it  for  the  fume  from  the  Cyclops'  mouth. 
Eur.  Ale.  594,  a  clime,  region. 

<u(K|S,  is,  burning :  aiBi)s  WirAot  the  robe  of  Hercules,  hence  proverb, 
of  a  demagogue,  Paroemiogr.,  cf.  Meineke  Cratin.  K\eoB.  4. 

aTOivos,  n,  ov,  burning,  Hesych.,  E.  M. 

Ai8toiri£«,  to  speak  or  be  like  an  Ethiop,  Heliod.  10.  39. 

Ai0iot|r,  oiros,  o,  fern.  Ai8iottis.  tbos,  1),  more  rarely  AlBioip  as  fern., 
Lob.  Aj.  323  :  irr.  pi.  AiSioirijts  II.  1.  433, — whence  Call.  (Del.  208) 
formed  a  itom.  AiOtoiKvs,  t}os  :  (alBai,  uif).  Properly  Burnt-face,  i.  e. 
an  Ethiop,  negro,  Horn.,  etc. : — proverb.,  AlBioira  <r/if)xf'v  '  *°  w»sh  a 
blackamoor  white,'  Paroemiogr.  II.  Adj.  Ethiopian,  Aiflioiris 

yktaooa,  Hdt.  3.  19;  -fi  Aesch.  Fr.  304,  Eur.  Fr.  230: — a  form  Ai8i- 
6-m.os,  a,  ov,  is  found  in  Eur.  Fr.  351  :  Aidto-mxos,  r),  ov  Hdt.,  etc.:  and 
as  Subst.  Alfcoma,  i),  Hdt.,  etc.  2.  in  the  literal  sense,  like  attof, 

sun-burnt,  Anth.  P.  7.  196. 

ai86Xi£,  ikos,  r),  a  pustule,  pimple,  Hipp.  427.  4. 

cuOos,  i,  a  burning  heat,  fire^  Ear.  Supp.  208,  Rhes.  990.— later  also 
aiBos,  €0?,  to,  Ap.  Rh.  3.  1304. 

0.186s,  r),  iv,  burnt,  Ar.  Thesm.  246.  II.  fiery,  Pind.  P.  8.  65  : 

of  a  red-brown  colour,  Bacchyl.  13. 

ai8ouo-a  (sc.  tsroa),  1),  in  the  Homeric  house,  the  corridor  or  cloister 
of  the  avX-q,  open  in  front  like  a  verandah,  on  each  side  of  the  wpvBvpov 
looking  E.  or  S.  to  catch  the  sun,  whence  the  name  (for  it  was  originally 
partic.  of  aiOw),  bv^iov  .  .  CtorTJs  aiBovayai  Tcrvyfiivov  II.  6.  243,  cf. 
20.  11.  Horn,  makes  it  the  sleeping-place  of  travellers  who  wish  to 
start  early,  Od.  3.  399 :  in  Od.  4.  302  he  says  the  same  of  the  vpobofios, 
prob.  as  including  the  aiOovaa. 

otSoU/,  oiros,  (aiBos,  o>p)  fiery-looking,  in  Horn,  as  epith.  of  metal,  flash- 
ing, aiBovi  xaXjcqi  H-  4-  495.  etc-  J  and  of  wine,  sparkling  (not  fiery- 
hot  or  strong,  as  others)  alBona  oTvov  4.  259,  etc. ;  once  of  smoke, 
Od.  10.  152,  where  it  prob.  means  red  smoke,  smoke  mixed  with  flame, 
like  aiOakoi ;  later  alSoif  <p\.o-ip6s,  Aa^iras  Eur.  Supp.  1019,  Bacch. 
594.  2.  swart,  black,  Opp.  H.  1.  133,  etc. ;  affair*  Kiooip  Anth. 

P.  append.  69.  H.  metaph.  y?«-y,  hot,  keen,  Lat.  ardens,  \tfi6s 

Hes.  Op.  361 ;  Baaxavin  Anth.  P.  5.  21S  :  fiery,  furious,  dvqp  Soph.  Aj. 
224  ;  v.  sub  aiBajv. 

aCSpi),  fj,  in  Att.  as  well  as  Horn.:  later  oXOpa,  Piers.  Moer.  p.  184: 
(related  to  cuBf/p,  as  ydtrrpa  to  yaaT-qp).  Clear  sky,  fair  weather, 
Lat.  sudum,  sroirjaov  S  titprpi  II.  17.  646 ;  dAAd  p.a\'  aiBprj  viwraraL 
dvi<pt\os  Od.  6.  44:  rare  in  Att.  Poets,  as  Eur.  Fr.  781.  50,  Ar.  Av. 
778.     Poet,  word,  cf.  alBpia. 

oI8pY]Y«vT|»,  h,  (yviaBcu)  epith.  of  Boreas  in  Jl.  15.  171,  born  in  ether, 
sprung  from  ether,  (not  act.  making  a  clear  cold  sky,  Spitzn.  11.  1.  c.) ; 
so  a!6pi)-ytv«TT)*,  Od.  5.  296,  cf.  Soph.  O.  T.  867. 

ai8pi)<is,  taoa,  tv,  =  aXBpios,  Pherenic.  ap.  Schol.  Pind.  O.  3.  28,  Opp. 

C-  4-  73- 

atSpla,  Ion.  -lij,  ^,  prose  form  for  aiBprj,  first  used  however  by  Solon, 
13.  22;  i(  alSpirjs  xal  vrjvtiiirjs  Hdt.  7.  188;  i(  alBpias  darpd^a 
Cratin.  Apaw.  4,  cf.  Hdt.  3.  86,  Xen.  Hell.  7.  1,  31  ;  alBpias  oiar/t  in 
clear  weather,  per  purum,  opp.  to  orav  lwivi<peKov  ;J,  Arist.  Meteor.  2. 
9,  II,  al.;  so  alBplrjs  or  -its  alone,  Hdt.  7.  37,  Ar.  Nub.  371  ;  ttjj 
alBpias  Arist.  Probl.  25.  18.  H.  the  open  sky,  vrb  Tps  alBpias 

in  the  open  air,  Lat.  sub  dio,  Xen.  An.  4.  4,  14.  2.  esp.  cf  the 

clear  cold  air  of  night,  Hdt.  2.  68 ;  and  so  prob.  in  Hipp.  Aer.  285. 
[r  in  penult,  except  in  dactylics  and  anapacstics,  Solon  1.  c,  Ar.  Nub. 
371 ;  cf.  Meineke  Com.  Fr.  2.  p.  34.] 

QiSpioiu,  to  clear  the  sky,  dipa  Arist.  Probl.  26.  8 : — but  Hesych.,  Suid., 
etc.,  quote  alBpti  in  the  sense  of  xfifia£ft,  i.  e.  to  be  chill,  cf.  sq. 

aiSpiou,  to  expose  to  the  air,  to  cool,  aiBpujaas  Hipp.  497,  fin. ;  but 
just  below  T/Opiaa/ifva  (from  aiepiafa).  II.  intr.  to  be  clear,  of 

the  sky,  is  6  ntpiSot  Babr.  45.  9  (Meineke  jfl/Koft). 

aiSpivos,  17,  ov,  =  wpwivus,  Hesych. 

ai8pio-KotT<u,  to  sleep  in  the  open  air,  Theocr.  8.  78. 

alBpiov  ov,  clear,  bright,  fair,  of  weather,  h.  Horn.  Ap.  433  ;  aiBpiov 
iuvros  tow  typos  Hdt.  2.  25.  2.  also  as  epith.  of  Z«i!s,  Theocr.  4. 

43,  Arist.  Mund.  7,  2,  Thcophr.  C.  P.  5.  12,  2 :  of  winds  which  cause 
a  clear  sky,  Arist.  Meteor.  2.  6,  18  ;  esp.  of  the  North  winds,  lb.  2.  6, 
22.  II.  in  the  open  air,  kept  there,  Cratin.  AijA.  5.  2. 

cold,  chill,  iro7o«  tpavivros  aiBpiov  Soph.  Fr.  162  ;  for  Id.  Ant.  357, 
v.  sub  irwaitptos.  III.  aiBpiov,  To,  an  adaptation  of  the  Lat. 

atrium  to  a  Greek  sense,  Joseph.  A.  J.  3.  6,  2,  Luc.  Anarch.  2. 

ai8puiiSr|S,  ts,  (tltos)  like  the  clear  sky,  Heracl.  AUeg.  36. 

aiSpc-pA-njV  ov,  i,  walking  through  ether,  of  Abaris,  Iambi.  V.  Pyth. 
I.  28.  II.  a  rope-dancer,  Manetho  4.  278. 

at8po-{3oX<u,  to  dart  rays  at,  shine  on,  c.  ace.,  Manetho  4.  224. 

alflpo-Sovrrros,  ov,  whirling  through  ether,  Manetho  4.  298. 

<u0po-irXuvr|S,  is,  wandering  in  ether,  Manetho  4.  586. 

ai8po-rroX<uu,  to  roam  through  air,  Manetho  2.  383  ;  also  -t'u. 

o."9pos,  0,  the  clear  chill  air  of  morn,  Od.  14.  318  ;  cf.  aiBprj,  alBpia. 

at8p6-roicot,  ov,  generated  in  air,  Manetho  4.  339. 

aiOpunros,  ov,  —  atBptos,  Manetho  4.  166,  with  v.  I.  aiBama. 

oitKryiia,  aTor,  to,  (alBiao-ai)  a  spark :  metaph.,  a'B.  tivoias,  bo(7js 
Polyb.  4.  35,  7.,  20.  5,  4,  cf.  Plut.  2.  966  B. 

aidvia,  fj,  a  sea-bird,  prob.  a  kind  of  gull,  Larus  marinus,  Od.  5.  337,  cf. 
Arist.  H.  A.  5.  9,  I  ;  tit.  IxtvBokoi  Anth.  P.  6.  23 : — epith.  of  Athena, 
as  protecting  ships,  Paus.  I.  5,  3.  II.  metaph.  a  ship.  Lye.  230. 

at9vio-8p«'trTai,  ov,  feeding  with  gulls.  Lye.  237. 

ai6vKTT|p,  9)pos,  6,  that  which  darts  through  the  air,  of  wild  animals, 
arrows,  etc.,  Opp.  C.  2.  332,  Anth. 

aiCvo-o-u  (cf.  iv-,  It-,  *ot-,  irap-aiBvtov):  aor.  vap-aitv(a  Pind. 


(akin  to  alBw).  To  put  in  rapid  motion,  stir  up,  kindle,  Soph.  Fr. 

486  : — Pass,  to  move  rapidly,  quiver,  of  leaves,  Sappho  4.  II, 

intr.,  Arat.  1033. 
aCSui,  only  found  in  pres.  and  impf.,  to  light  up,  kindle,  aiBuv  nip  Hdt. 

4.  145,  Aesch.  Ag.  1435  ;  fitofs  fpa  Soph.  Ph.  1033  ;  \anrrdbas  Eur. 
Rhes.  95,  Theocr.,  etc.  (whence  perh.  m)p  aiSnv  should  be  read  for 
TrvpaiBav,  Eur.  Rhes.  41,  78,  823)  : — metaph.,  ai\as  6pp.aotv  aiBti  Anth. 
P.  12.  93  ;  xo*oj<  aiB.  lb.  5.  300.  2.  rarely  intr.  ro  burn  or  blaze, 
Pind.  O.  7.  87  ;  Xauirrripfs  ou/ctV  pflov  Soph.  Aj.  286.  3.  in  this 
sense  the  Pass.  cu8op.ai  is  used  by  Horn,  always  in  part.,  rrvpus  /uVos- 
alBojiivoto  11.  6.  182,  cf.  8.563,  etc.;  aiB.  5a\6s  13.  320;  aiB.  babts 
Od.  7.  101 ;  so,  Pind.  O.  I.  2,  Eur.  Hipp.  1279,  etc.;  so,  after  Horn., 
aiBtrat  KaXXtara  [to.  o<rT€a]  Hdt.  4.  61  ;  aXBiaBta  b\  ttvp  Eur.  I.  A. 
1471  ;  ZwpaT  aiBtoBai  Sokoiv  Id.  Bacch.  624,  cf.  Xen.  An.  6.  3,  19; 
metaph.  like  Lat.  uri,  tparn  aiBeaBai  Xen.  Cyr.  5.  I,  15,  cf.  Anth. 
P.  12.  83;  also,  ai0«T  (pais  (Ep.  impf.)  burnt  fiercely,  Ap.  Rh.  3. 
296.  (From  ^AI©  come  also  aiflos,  0.180s,  atBwv,  prob.  also  aiBrjp, 
aiBprj ;  cf.  Skt.  indh,  indhe  (accendo),  iddhas  (bright),  edhas  (firewood)  ; 
Lat.  aestus,  aestas,  aedes;  A.  S.  ad  (a  pile) ;  O.  H.  G.  eit  (fire) ;  M.  H.  G. 
eiten  (to  glow).) 

at8uv,  wvos,  i,  i}.  v>  sub  fin. :  (aiBw).  Fiery,  burning,  blazing,  of 
lightning,  etc.,  Pind.  O.  10.  98  ;  also  of  fiery  smoke,  Pind.  P.  1.  44: — 
cf.  aiBcnfr.  II.  of  burnished  metal,  like  a'tSoip,  flashing,  glittering, 

aibripos  II.  4.  485,  Od.  I.  184,  Soph. ;  atBavfs  KiBrfrfs,  Tpiirobcs  II.  9. 
123.,  24.  233.  III.  of  various  animals,  as  in  Horn,  of  the  horse, 

lion,  bull,  eagle,  and  in  Pind.  O.  11.  20,  of  the  fox: — some  take  it  to  be 
fiery,  fierce;  others  of  the  colour,  like  Lit.  fulvus,  rufus  ;  others  of  their 
bright,  fiery  eyes;  aiBavts  Brjpts  Plat.  Rep.  559  D.  2.  metaph.  of 

men,  ablaze,  fiery,  like  Virgil's  igneus.  Soph.  Aj.  222,  1088,  Hermipp. 
Moip.  1  ;  alBouv  Kfjfia  fiery  in  spirit,  Aesch.  Th.  448  ;  Ai/zos  aiBajv  Epigr. 
ap.  Aeschin.  80.  II  (Anth.  P.  append.  205),  Call.  Cer.  68. —  [The  penult. 
of  the  oblique  cases  is  sometimes  shortd.  in  Poets,  metri  grat.  Thus 
dvbpos  aiBovos  is  restored  by  W.  Dind.  (for  aiBonos)  in  Soph.  Aj.  222 
from  the  Laur.  Ms.;  atBova  Kifwv  (for  alBoira)  by  Bgk.  in  Hes.  Op.  361 ; 
so  vj)<poti  dat.  pi.  from  vfypatv,  in  Theogn. ;  and  aiBova  (wrongly  altered 
by  Musurus  into  aiBuva)  is  cited  by  Hesych.] 

auca  [*a],  Dor.  for  eif  «,  iav,  e  conj.  Valck.  Theocr.  I.  10. 

abcdAAu,  only  used  in  pres.  and  impf.:  (cu'koAos).  To  flatter,  wheedle, 
fondle,  properly  of  dogs  (v.  ad  fin.,  and  A.  B.  21),  c.  ace,  Soph.  O.  T. 
J97  (Mss.  (KKakovat),  Eur.  Andr.  630 ;  rdv  bfOTTornv  ijicaWt  Ar.  Eq. 
48;  rd  fiiv  Xuyt  atKoWfi  fit  flatter,  please  me,  lb.  211  ;  atKaWtt 
aapbiav  inqv  it  cheers  my  heart,  Id.  Thesm.  869  : — of  a  dog,  like  taivat, 
to  wag  the  tail  fawningly,  Babr.  50.  14. 

aiKaXos,  6,  a  flatterer,  Hesych.     (Perh.  from  the  same  Root  as  d/cTjV, 

djctojV,  V.  *OK7l  11.) 

aiK«,  aiK€v.  poet,  and  Dor.  for  iav, 

aiKcia,  v.  sub  alxi'a. 

aiic<Xios.  ov,  poet,  for  <Uijk'Aio?,  Theogn.  1344,  Eur.  Andr.  131. 

ducrj  [Si],  r),  (itaoai)  rapid  motion,  flight,  Lat.  impetus,  rit^aiv  d'inai 
II.  15.  709  ;  IptTpwv  Opp.  H.  4.  651.     Cf.  fiiirrj. 

dJLirqt  [t],  is,  poet,  for  dtixij;,  Adv.  dixais  II.  22.  336:  in  Trag.  also 
aiKTjs,  is  (cf.  alxia),  alxis  srfj/jia  Aesch.  Pr.  472  ;  Bavdrovs  altcds  Soph. 
El.  206.  Adv.  alxas.  Soph.  El.  102  (Mss.  dbixas),  216,  Plat.  Com. 
Incert.  60. 

aixia.  1),  Att.  for  the  Ion.  dtiKtin  (q.  v.),  injurious,  insulting  treatment, 
an  affront,  outrage,  esp.  of  blows,  stripes,  etc.,  Aesch.  Pr.  177,  Soph.  El. 
514,  O.  C.  748  ;  in  pi.,  Aesch.  Pr.  93,  Soph.  El.  486,  511.  2.  in 

Prose  mostly  as  law-phrase,  aiKtas  bixn  a  private  action  for  assault,  less 
serious  than  that  for  SBp's  (which  was  a  ypa<pJi),  Plat.  Rep.  425  D, 
464  E,  and  often  in  Oratt. ;  r)v  6  ttJs-  0\dBrjs  vuiv  vopos  irdXat,  r/r  <« 
tt}s  alnias,  rjv  i  ttjs  vBpos  Dem.  525.  14,  cf.  Lys.  Fr.  27,  Bdckh  P.  E. 
2.  p.  102.  3.  generally,  suffering,  disgrace,  Thuc.  7.  75.     [ai*ia, 

wherefore  Dawes,  Pors.,  Elms!.,  would  write  aiKtia,  cf.  danein :  but  v. 
Ellendt,  Lex.  Soph.] 

<UKi£fi>,  Act.  used  only  in  pres.,  to  treat  injuriously,  to  plague,  torment, 
nvd  Soph.  Aj.  403,  Tr.839;  of  a  storm,  naoav  aixifav  (poBnv  v\ns  Id.  Ant. 
419  : — Pass,  to  be  tormented,  pres.  in  Aesch.  Pr.  168  ;  irpos  kvvuiv  ibtorov 
alKicrBivr'  Soph.  Ant.  206 ;  els  to  oaifia  alKtotijvat  srXnyais  Arist.  Pol. 

5.  10,  19.  II.  more  commonly  as  Dep.  aiic({o}uu,  Aesch.  Pr. 
195,  Isocr. :  fut.  aliciaofiai  Anth.,  Att.  -lot/jim  (tear-)  Eur.  Andr.  829: 
aor.  ■QKiadfOfv  Soph.  Aj.  Ill,  O.  T.  1 1 53,  Xen.,  but  also  rjxioBnv  Andoc. 
18. 11,  Lys.  105.  32,  Isocr.  73  A,  Xen.  (for  its  pass,  sense,  v.  toft.) :  so,  pf. 
/JKiapuu  Eur.  Med.  1 1 30,  plqpf.  fjntoTO  Plut.  Caes.  29: — in  same  sense  as 
Act.,  c.  ace,  11.  c. :  and  even  Tel  \eupia  aix.  Dem.  1075.  II ;  c.  dupl.  ace. 
pers.  et  rei,  aUifatai  Tiva  Ttt  iaxara  Xen.  An.  3.  I,  18;  cf.  Ep.  dftxifa. 

<iiKio-(ia,  aTor,  To,  an  outrage,  torture,  Aesch.  Pr.  989,  Lys.  105.  29: — 
in  pi.  mutilated  corpses,  Eur.  Phoen.  1529. 

aiKio-u.65.  o,  —  foreg.,  Dem.  102.  20,  and  often  in  later  writers. 

aiKio-nicoS!.  17,  iv,  prone  to  outrage,  known  from  Adv.  -kws,  Schol.  Ven. 
B.  22.  336,  Poll.  8.  75,  and  other  Gramm. : — fern.  aUurrpia,  1),  (as  if 
from  a  masc.  almffTifc),  Suid.     Adv.  -kuk,  Schol.  Ven.  B.  II.  22.  336. 

atxAov  or  dutAov,  To,  the  evening  meal  at  Sparta,  Epich.  20  Ahr.,  Alcman 
58  (26),  cf.  Ath.  139  B  :  another  form  aucvov  is  quoted  by  Hesych.,  Suid., 
Eust. : — cf.  okoXos,  iiraucXov. 

ducTTJp  [o],  ripos,  0,  (dtooai)  the  swift-rushing,  Opp.  H.  I.  171. 

aiKTos,  ov,  (Uviouat)  unapproachable,  Hesych. ;  restored  by  Herm.  ill 
h.  Horn.  Merc.  346,  for  88*  iicrds. 

aiKuis,  aUwf,  Adv.  of  6ukt)s,  ainr)s. 

aiXivos.  it,  a  plaintive  dirge,  repeated,  aiXtvov  aikivov  tliri  Aesch.  Ag. 

121  (lyr.),  cf.  Soph.  Aj.  627  (lyr.),  Eur.  Or.  1395 ;  (said  to  be  from  al 

<J>  D  2  I 


36 

AiVoe,  ah  me  for  Linos !  Paus.  9.  29,  8  ;  v.  sub  AiVos).  2.  Adj.  ai- 

\ivos,  ov,  mournful,  plaintive,  alxlvois  Kaicois  Eur.  Hel.  171 ;  Bpiipos  ai\. 
unhappy,  C.  I.  6351  : — neut.  pi.  aiKtva,  as  Adv.,  Call.  Ap.  20,  Mosch. 

3/- 

aLXovpios.  A,  cat-mint,  E.  M.  34.  9. 

aCXoupos,  Arist.  H.  A.  5.  2,  7.,  6.  35,  3,  or  aUXovpos.  !>,  ij,  Hdt.  and 
Coniici  11.  c.  A  cat./elis  domesticus,  Hdt.  2.  66,  Ar.  Ach.  879,  Anax- 
andr.  IIoX.  I.  II,  Timocl.  Kiyitrr.  I.  II.  later,  a  weasel,  v. 

Moschop.  v.  a\(o.  148.  (Ace.  to  Buttm.,  Lexil.  s.  v.  aioXos  5,  from 
atuKos  and  ovpd,  as  expressive  of  the  wavy  motion  of  the  tail  peculiar  to 
the  cat  kind.) 

aiua.  otos,  to,  blood,  Horn.,  who  often  joins  <poVos  ri  koX  aipa,  etc. ; 
'f'VXV'  dicparov  aipa  Soph.  El.  786  ;  also  in  pi.  streams  of  blood,  Aesch. 
Ag.  1 293,  Soph.  Ant.  1 20,  Eur.  El.  1 1 76,  Ale.  496.  2.  of  anything  like 
blood,  aipa  OTa<pv)i.7Js  Lxs  (Sir.  39.  26),  cf.  Anth.  P.  append.  69.  3. 

with  collat.  meaning  of  spirit,  courage,  oix  txw  aipa  pale,  spiritless, 
Aeschin.  76.  28;  cf.  Arist.  de  An.  I.  2,  21  atpa  ipdaxovai  rives  rrjv 
tyvxhv-  II.  bloodshed,  murder,  Aesch.  Cho.  520,  Soph.  O.  T. 

IOI,  cf.  Elmsl.  Bacch.  139  ;  opaipov  atpa  yiyvtrai  a  kinsman's  murder 
is  done,  Aesch.  Supp.  449 ;  (ipyaorat  prrrpipov  aipa  Eur.  Or.  284,  cf. 
406  ;  atpa  irp&TTetv  lb.  1 1 39  ;  and  even  aipa  Kravtlv,  as  if  atpa  were 
a  cognate  ace,  Soph.  Fr.  153  : — e<p'  atpari  tptiytiv  to  avoid  trial  for 
murder  by  going  into  exile,  Dem.  548,  fin.;  which  in  Eur.  Supp.  148  is 
atpa  iptvytiv,  v.  Miiller  Eumen.  §  50  sq. — The  pi.  is  used  in  this  sense 
by  Aesch.  Ag.  1302,  Cho.  64,  650,  often  by  Eur.,  never  by  Soph.;  alpara 
avyyova  brothers'  corpses,  Eur.  Phoen.  1503. — The  words  of  Soph. 
El.  1394  led  Hesych.  and  others  to  interpr.  atpa  as  — /idxaipa,  but  v. 
vtaicovrrros.  III.  like  Lat.  sanguis,  blood,  blood-relationship, 

kin,  atpa  re  xal  yivos  Od.  8.  583  ;  alfiards  (U  dya&oio  4.  611  ;  0$  aijs 
i£  diparis  tloi  ytviOKns  II.  19.  Ill  ;  to  atpa  nvos  his  blood  or  origin, 
Lat.  stirps,  Pind.  N.  II.  44;  atp'  ipipvKiov  Soph.  O.  T.  1406;  0  irpos 
aiparos  one  of  the  blood  or  race.  Id.  Aj.  1305,  cf.  Arist.  Pol.  2.  3,  7  ; 
prrrpos  rrjs  ipijs  iv  aipari  akin  to  her  by  blood,  Aesch.  Eum.  606,  cf. 
Th.  141 ;  dtp'  aiparos  from  the  race.  Soph.  O.  C.  245.  2.  concrete 

of  a  person,  w  Aids  . .  atfia,  Epigr.  Gr.  831.  I  ;  atpa  aiv  lb.  722.  8  ;  cf. 
1046.  4,  al.     (The  Root  of  the  word  is  uncertain.) 

aiu,-aY«Yos,  6v,  {dytv)  drawing  off"  blood,  Diosc.  3.  137. 

aludicopiai  or  aipaKoupiai,  av,  al,  (xopivvvpi)  offerings  of  blood  made 
upon  the  grave  to  appease  the  manes,  Pind.  O.  I.  146,  v.  Dissen.  (90) :  — 
the  sing,  in  Plut.  Aristid.  21. — Dor.  and  Boeot.  word. 

aiu.aKTi.K6s.  4],  iv,  mailing  bloody,  Schol.  Soph.  Ant.  1003. 

aiu.aKTOS,  7),  ov,  verb.  Adj.  of  alpdaaa,  mingled  with  blood,  of  blood, 
Eur.  I.  T.  644. 

atpaXcos,  a,  ov,  bloody,  blood-red,  Anth.  P.  6.  129,  Tryph.,  Nonn.,  etc. 

aluaXums,  i5os,  1),  a  clot  of  blood,  Diosc.  2.  95. 

aiuaXutu,  aiiros,  6,  (alpakios)  a  mass  of  blood :  a  bloodshot  place,  Hipp. 
207  C,  240.  II,  etc.  II.  as  Adj.  looking  like  clotted  blood,  x"^os 

Aretae.  Caus.  M.  Diut.  2.  I. 

aipa£is.  «vs,  ij,  a  letting  of  blood,  Aretae.  Cur.  M.  Ac.  I.  6. 

alp-ds,  aSos,  ij,  a  gush  or  stream  of  blood,  Soph.  Ph.  697  (lyr.) ;  =  a'ipa- 
tos  pvais,  as  the  Schol.  has  it. 

atpdo-id.,  1),  a  wall  of  dry  stones,  Lat.  maceria,  alpaaias  re  \iytiv  to 
build  walls  (v.  \iytv  B.  1.  1,  alpaaioXoyioj),  Od.  18.  359  ;  alp.  \i£ovns 
24.  224;  in  Hdt.  I.  180,  191,  of  the  walls  of  Babylon  ;  of  walls  as  the 
haunts  of  lizards,  Id.  2.  69  ;  alp.  iyyeykvppivn  rviroiai,  of  a  wall  round 
an  Egyptian  temple,  lb.  1 38 ;  of  a  defensible  wall,  Thuc.  4.43;  alp. 
o'mobopfiv  Dem.  1274,  fin.;  and  in  Theocr.  I.  47,  etc.,  a  boy  is  sitting 
ftp'  alpafflrjaiv.  (The  sense  of  wall  therefore  is  quite  certain  ;  that  of 
thorn-hedge  seems  to  rest  on  the  supposed  deriv.  from  alpus.  Cf.  Buttm. 
Lexil.  s.  v.  Kiytiv  8.) 

aluan-io-Xoyt'iD,  ro  build  walls,  Theopomp.  Com.  Incert.  II. 

alu,do-iu8i)s,  is,  (fiSos)  like  an  alpaoid.  Plat.  Legg.  681  A. 

alp-dcrcra).  Att.  -tt«  :  fut.  -a£to :  aor.  rjpa(a  (v.  infr.) : — Pass.,  aor.  xipdx~ 
$rn>  Eur.  El.  574,  but  alpdxBnv  Soph.  Aj.  909  ;  part.  Aesch.  Pers.  595  :— 
poet.  Verb  (but  cf.  ([-,  na6-aipaao<»).  To  make  bloody,  stain  with 

blood,  irioiov  Pind.  I.  8  (7).  1 10,  cf.  Aesch.  Ag.  1589 ;  (arias  Btuiv  Id.  Th. 
275  ;  x"Pat  alpcu-ai  BoroTs  to  stain  them  in  the  blood  o/beasts,  Soph. 
Aj.  453,  cf.  a'txpafc  II : — hence  to  wound,  smite  so  as  to  make  bloody, 
Kpar  ipiv  rio'  avrUa  ttirpa  . .  alpaca  vtawv  shall  dash  my  head 
against  the  rock,  Soph.  Ph.  1002  ;  trirepos  dpa  troripov  alpd£ti ;  shall 
bring  to  a  bloody  end,  Eur.  Phoen.  1288  ;  so,  irlaia  Sdi'a  .  .  alpd£erov 
lb.  1299  ;  alpcu-fis  .  .  rds  KaWiipBuyyovs  cpdds  Id.  Ion  168  ;  absol.,  rois 
ftiv  oix  Vfiacaev  /3t'Xos  their  weapons  wounded  none,  drew  no  blood. 
Id.  Bacch.  761  : — Med.,  ■Qixa^avro  Ppax'ovas  Anth.  P.  7.  10 : — Pass. 
to  welter  in  blood,  be  slain.  Soph.  Ant.  1 1 75.  2.  as  medic,  term,  to 

draw  blood,  as  by  cupping,  Aretae.  Cur.  M.  Ac.  I.  4.  II.  intr. 

to  be  bloody,  blood-red,  Nic.  Al.  480,  Opp.  H.  2.  618. 

aip.aT&u>,  to  be  bloodthirsty,  cf.  tpovdw,  prob.  1.  Alcman  55  (52). 

alu.aT-tiexvo-{a,  ^,  shedding  of  blood,  Ep.  Hebr.  9.  22,  Eccl. 

alu,uTT)p6s,  a,  ov,  in  Eur.  Or.  962  also  is,  iv.  Bloody,  bloodstained, 
blood-boltered,  chiefly  used  by  Trag. ;  ai/i.  x« tpts,  (i<pos,  etc  ;  <p\ii£  alpia- 
rnpd  Kawii .  ,  Spvis,  i.e.  dip'  aluaros  nal  opvis,  fed  by  the  blood  of  the 
victim  and  the  wood,  Soph.  Tr.  766 :  esp.  bloody,  murderous,  Trvevpia 
Aesch.  Eum.  137  ;  rtvxos  alp.  the  fatal  urn,  Id.  Ag.  815  ;  alp.  /3\d/3ai 
Id.  Eum.  859  ;  oppdraiv  Sia<p0opai  Soph.  O.  C.  552  ;  arivos  alp.  caused 
by  the  blood-reeking  wound,  Id.  Ph.  695  ;  cf.  $nyavn.  II,  of 

blood,  consisting  thereof,  pivos  Aesch.  Ag.  1065  ;  arayivt s  alp.  gouts 
of  blood,  Eur.  Phoen.  1415  ;  alp.  povs  a  bloody  flux,  discharge  0/  blood, 
Hipp.  Coac.  201. 

aip.uTT)-(t>6pos,  ov,  bringing  blood:  bloody,  pipos  Aesch.  Th.  419. 


aiXoupios  —  ai/moppavTos. 


olp-iTia,  17,  blood-broth,  the  Spartan  black  broth  made  with  blood,  Poll. 
6.  57  ;  cf.  Manso'Sparta  I.  2,  p.  192. 

aifiuTtJa).  to  stain  with  blood,  aor.  aipariaat  ntSov  yas  Aesch.  Supp. 
662.  II.  to  draw  blood,  sting,  Arist.  H.  A.  4.  7,  6. 

alp.uTi.Kos,  17.  or,  of  the  blood,  Oipporns  Arist.  P.  A.  4.  13,  27  ;  iiypirrjs 
Id.  G.  A.  4.  8,  13  ;  rpcxpi),  vKrj  Id.  P.  A.  2.  6,  8.,  3.  4,  3.  II. 

=  tvaipos,  of  animals  which  have  blood,  opp.  to  dvaipos,  Id.  H.  A.  I.  4, 
2,  P.  A.  2.  I,  21,  etc. 

aluaTtvos,  i],  ov,  of  blood,  bloody,  ariyp-q  Arist.  H.  A.  6.  3,  2  ;  baKpva 
Schol.  Eur.  Hec.  238. 

atu,aTiov,  to,  Dim.  of  atpa,  a  little  blood,  M.  Anton.  5.  4. 

aluuTts,  i'Sos,  17,  a  blood-red  cloak,  Arist.  Color.  5. 

aiu&TiTT]S  [it],  ov,  6,  blood-like,  \i0os  alp.  hematite,  a  red  iron-ore, 
Theophr.  Lap.  37,  Diosc.  5.  143  ;  liXfbs  alp.  a  disease,  Lat.  convolvulus 
sanguineus,  Hipp.  557.  12: — fern.,  alpartris  ipkty  a  vein  as  conductor 
of  blood,  Id.  1286.  42  ;  alp.  xopSi?  a  black  pudding,  Sophil.  *uX.  2. 

alu,&TO-86x°s,  ov,  holding  blood,  Schol.  Od.  3.  444. 

alu.uTO-ciS'TJs,  it,  like  blood,  blood-red,  Diod.  17.  10. 

aiuuTOCis,  itaaa,  in,  contr.  alua/rous,  ovaaa  (restored  by  Pors.  in 
O.  T.  1279  x°-XaC^  0'  alparovaa'  for  xa^Cvs  atparos),  ovv,=alpa- 
rrjpis,  II.  5.  82.  2.  blood-red,  or  of  blood,  $ia&es,  apwdi[  16.  459., 

2.  267  ;  alparoev  piSos  aloxvvii  spreads  the  blood-red  blush  of  shame, 
Soph.  Ant.  529;  (so,  ipoivix,  IpiBnpa  npoawwov  in  Eur.  Phoen. 
1488).  3.  bloody,  murderous,  iroKtpos,  etc.,  II.  9.  650  ;  tpis  Aesch. 

Ag.  699  ;  0kaXai  Id.  Th.  348. 

alpuTO-Xoixos,  ov,  (Xti'xw)  licking  blood,  ipais  alp.  thirst  for  blood, 
Aesch.  Ag.  1478  (lyr.). 

alpuTO-iroicu,  to  make  into  blood :  Pass,  to  become  blood,  Medic. 

alu-aToiroiiio-is,  feus,  1),  a  making  of  blood,  Theophil.  Med. 

alu,uTO'TroiT|Tiic6s,  17,  ov,  calculated  for  making  into  blood,  Galen. 

aluuTO-iroo-Ca  or  atpo-Troo-Ca,  ij,  a  drinking  of  blood,  Porphyr.  ap.  Stob. 
Eel.  I.  1024. 

atp.&TO-TroT«i>,  (irivai,  rroriv)  to  drink  blood,  Schol.  Ar.  Eq.  198. 

otu,aTO-ira>rr|S,  ov,  d,  a  blood-drinker,  blood-sucker,  Ar.  Eq.  198  :  in 
fern.  — trwTis,  i5os,  Manetho  4.  616. 

a'niaTOppofyos, ov,(jloip(w)  blood-drinking,  Aesch.Eum.I93,Soph.Fr.8l3. 

alu&ToppvTOS,  ov,  (dta>)  blood-streaming,  alp.  fiavibts  a  shower  of 
blood,  Eur.  I.  A.  1515. 

alpaTOo-Tayris,  is,  (ordjjiu)  blood-dripping,  reeking  with  blood,  Aesch. 
Pers.  816,  Th.  836,  Eur.  Supp.  812,  Ar.  Ran.  471  : — in  Aesch.  Eum.  365 
the  word  is  against  the  metre :  on  Cho.  842,  cf.  Sdparoarayfis. 

atpuTO-d^vpTos,  ov,  blood-stained,  fieKn  Anth.  P.  5.  180. 

alp.uTO-xupT|s,  is,  delighting  in  blood,  Suid. 

atpuTO-xapu-ns,  ov,  =  foreg.,  Anth.  P.  15.  28. 

aluuTOW,  f.  wffcu,  to  make  bloody,  stain  with  blood,  alpdrov  0(ds  Baipuv 
Eur.  Andr.  260;  did  wapijoos  6wxa  ■  •  alparovn  Id.  Supp.  77  : — Pass., 
pnoiv  alparuiptBa  Aesch.  Ag.  1656  ;  xpdras  alparovpevot  Eur.  Phoen. 
1 149;  -gparaipkvr)  x«rpas  Id.  Bacch.  1135  ;  cf.  Ar.  Ran.  476,  Thuc.  7. 
84,  Xen.  Cyr.  I.  4,  10.  2.  to  slay,  aor.  alparwaai  Soph.  Fr. 

814.  II.  to  make  into  blood,  Medic. 

aluaTu>8i)s,  is,  (uSos)  looking  like  blood,  blood-red,  Thuc.  2.  49,  Arist. 
Meteor.  I.  5,  1,  al.  2.  of  the  nature  of  blood,  Arist.  G.  A.  I.  19, 

9,  P.  A.  4.  3,4,  al. 

atp-uT-toiros,  ov,  bloody  to  behold,  blood-stained,  alp.  Kopai,  of  the  Furies, 
Eur.  Or.  256;  alp.  otpypdraiv  biaipOopai  Id.  Phoen.  870. 

aluaTwo-is,  eais,  17,  {alparitu)  a  changing  into  blood,  Galen. 

alu-aT-wtp.  wttos,  6,  fi,=alparonros,  Eur.  H.  F.  933,  e  conj.  Pors. 

alp.Tj-TroTTjs,  d,  Ion.  for  alponorrjs,  Apollon.  in  A.  B.  602. 

aip/npds,  a,  iv,  =  alparTjpos,  Manetho  1 .  338,  of  women ;  cf.  Steph. 
Byz.  s;  v.  'Eiri'Sat/pos. 

atpviov,  to,  a  basin  for  blood,  v.  1.  Od.  3.  444,  for  dpviov. 

alp.o-p?dpT|S,  es,  heavy  with  blood,  Opp.  H.  2.  603. 

atuo-£id(J>T]s.  bathed  in  blood.  Soph.  Aj.  219,  Nonn. 

aluo-p^oXiov,  ro,  a  word  of  dub.  sense  in  C.  I.  8558. 

atp.o-f36pos,  ov,  blood-sucking,  of  certain  insects,  Arist.  H.  A.  8. 1 1 , 1 ;  700*- 
ripas  alp.,  of  serpents,  greedy  of blood,  Theocr.  24.  18;  txitiva  C.  L1152. 

aluo-SaiTCGj,  to  revel  in  blood,  Theophr.  ap.  Porph. 

alpo-cad/os,  ov,  bloodthirsty,  Luc.  Ocyp.  97. 

atao-Soxos.  ov,  =  ai^aTOooxos,  E.  M.,  Suid. 

alp.o-€LS-f|S,  is,  =  alparoeibys,  Philo  2.  244. 

aipo-Kepxvov,  to,  a  slight  cough  with  blood-spitting,  Hipp.  ap.  Erot. 

olp.o-XairTts,  17.  blood-sucking,  BSiWa  Greg.  Naz.  2.  221. 

o.Iuo-u,iktt]S,  6,  an  incestuous  person ;  alp.ou.igia,  17,  incest,  Pandect. 

atpo-tr6Ti)S,  =  aiparoirwrrjs,  Or.  Sib.  8.  94; — for  atp-oirooxa,  ij,  v.  Stob. 
Eel.  Phys.  p.  1024. 

alpo-Trn/ucos,  y,  iv,  spitting  blood,  Androm.  ap.  Galen.  13.  78,  sq. 

alpo-irtoTTjS,  ov,  o,  —  alparan6jrns.  Lye.  1 403. 

aipo-poos.  ov,  poet,  for  alpippoos,  Nic.  Th.  318. 

aipoppdycu,  to  have  a  hemorrhage,  bleed  violently,  (K  ptvwv  Hipp. 
Acut.  395  ;  alpoppaytt  irkijBos  there  is  a  violent  hemorrhage,  Id.  Aph. 
1250: — also  impers.  alpoppayetlb.  1252  ;  alp.  riv'i  Id.  Epid.  I.  938. 

alpop-pd-yr|s,  is,  bleeding  violently,  Hipp.  1029  F,  Soph.  Ph.  825. 

alpoppdyia,  1},  hemorrhage,  Hipp.  Aph.  1259,  etc.:  a  bloody  flux,  or  any 
violent  bleeding  (esp.,  says  Galen,  from  the  nose),  Hipp.  Aph.  1 253,  etc. 

aipoppd-yiKos,  17,  iv,  liable  to  alpoppayia,  Hipp.  79  B,  etc.  Adv.  -kws, 
Galen. 

alpoppa-yuS^s,  (s,  (itSos)  =  foreg.,  onpua  alp.  symptoms  of  hemor- 
rhage, Hipp.  78  H. 

aluoppavros,  ov,  (paivw)  blood-sprinkled,  blood-boltered,  Bvaiai  Eur. 
Ale.  135 ;  £tivoi  Id.  I.  T.  225. 


aLfjLOppoew 

a'i(ioppoiu).  to  lose  blood,  Hipp.  129  H,  133  A,  etc. :  to  have  a  aipop- 
poia,  Ev.  Matth.  9.  20. 

aifioppoia,  17,  a  discharge  of  blood,  bloody  flux,  Hipp.  167  A,  168  B, 
etc.;  alu.  ire  p\viwv  Id.  Aer.  282. 

atu.oppo'i8o-icavio-n)S,  ov,  i,  an  instrument  for  stopping  hemorrhage, 
Paul.  Aeg.  6.  79. 

aluoppoocos,  17,  ov,  belonging  to  aiuoppota,  indicating  or  caiising  it, 
Hipp.  Aph.  1254,  cf.  168  B,  etc. 

alu.oppois,  toot,  1),  mostly  in  pi.  aipoppoio(s  (sc.  <pktfi(s)  veins  liable  to 
discharge  blood,  esp.  hemorrhoids,  piles,  Hipp.  Aph.  1248,  etc.  II. 

a  kind  of  shell-flsh,  Arist.  H.  A.  4.  4,  34  (v.  1.  diroppaifa*?).  III. 

=  aip6ppoos  II,  Plin.  N.  H.  20.  81. 

alu.6p-poos,  ov,  contr.  -povs,  ow,  flowing  with  blood,  Tpwpara  Hipp. 
Art.  831 ;  aifi.  (p\ifi(s  veins  so  large  as  to  cause  a  hemorrhage  if  wounded, 
Id.  Fract.  759,  ubi  v.  Galen. ;  suffering  from  hemorrhage,  Id.  II. 

as  Subst.,  a  serpent,  whose  bite  makes  blood  flow  from  all  parts  of  the 
bodv,  Diosc.  Io0.  30,  Nic.  Th.  282  ;  cf.  aipoppoh  III. 

aiu.oppou>8ns,  (s,  ( fiSos)  =  ai poppayat-q s,  Hipp.  Coac.  168. 

atp.op-pvTjs,  is,  =  aiu6ppvros,  A.  B.  16. 

aiu.6p-pvoas,  ((us,  q,- aiuoppota.  Poll.  4.  186. 

alu.6p-pvros,  ov,  (fiiu)  blood-streaming,  Aesch.  Fr.  230 : — poot.  alp.6- 
pVTOS,  Anth.  P.  append.  384. 

ai^opvYX^'J*.  (fivyx0*)  t0  have  a  bloody  snout,  Hermipp.  Incert.  3. 

aluos,  6,  =  tpvpLos,  cf.  Aesch.  Fr.  8. 

aijioo-i-rns.  o,  a  Samian  stone  used  in  burnishing  gold,  Diosc.  5.  173, 
ubi  v.  Sprengel. 

alp.o-<rriYT|s,  is, —  aipaTooTayris,  Eur.  Fr.  388. 

aluo-o-Taois,  (as,  i>,  a  means  of  stopping  blood,  Galen. :  a  plant  used 
as  a  styptic,  Diosc.  4.  82. 

alu,o-4>6fios,  ov,  afraid  of  blood,  i.  e.  of  bleeding,  Galen. 

alp.odt6puKTOs,  ov,  ((popvaaw)  defiled  with  blood,  Kpia  Od.  20.  348. 

alp.6-d>upTOS.  ov,  =  aiparixpvpTOS,  Polyb.  15.  14,  2. 

aijio-x  apf|S,  is,  =  aipaToxapqs,  Or.  Sib.  3. 30,  cf.  Schol.  Hec.  24,  Or.  1563. 

alfio-xpoos,  oov,  contr.  -xpovs,  ow,  blood-red,  Joann.  Euch.  in  Mustox. 
Anecd.  p,  2. 

atuo-xpouSns.  fs,  ((T&os)  =  foreg.,  Hipp.  1 1 39.  I. 

aljiou,  =  aluaruco,  from  which  we  have  Ion.  part.  pass,  al/uvpura  in 
Hipp.  1 138  C  ;  and  Dind.  restores  alptovaa  for  aiudaaovaa  in  Eur.  I.  T. 
226.     Hesych.  expl.  alpuOq  by  ripiaTwOq. 

alu-vXCa,  j),  (af/xvAos)  winning,  wily  manners,  Plut.  Num.  8. 

aluvXtos,  of,  =  aluvXos,  Od.  1 .  56,  h.  Horn.  Merc.  3 1 7,  Hes..  Theogn.  704. 

aluvXo-u.T|TT|«,  ov,  o,  0/  winning  wiles,  Lat.  blonde  decipiens,  h.  Horn. 
Merc.  13,  where  Ruhnk.  conj.  aipvXopvSos. 

qIu.*Xo-ttX6kos,  ov,  weaving  wiles,  Cratin.  Incert.  39 ;  cf.  8oAoirAo«os. 

alu-vXos  [0],  1;,  ov,  also  os,  ov  Anth.  P.  7. 643.  Flattering,  glozing, 

wheedling,  wily,  mostly  of  words,  Hes.  Op.  372,  Pind.  N.  8.  56 ;  so, 
alptvKat  fir/xavai  wily  arts,  Aesch.  Pr.  206  ;  of  persons,  t&v  alp.vXurraTov 
Soph.  Ai.  389  (lyr.),  Plat.,  etc. ;  of  foxes,  Ar.  Lys.  1 269. 

alp.vX6-d>p.ov,  ov,  gen.  ovos,  (<t>pifv)  wily-minded,  Cratin.  Incert.  39. 

alu.uS<u.  f.  qoai,  to  be  alpwoqs,  Suid.,  A.  B.  10.  2.  to  have  the 

teeth  benumbed  or  set  on  edge,  Hipp.  49.  30 :  to  suffer  from  scorbutic 
gums,  Orion  Theb.  617.  30. 

olu.<i8t)».  «,  («i8os)  bloody,  blood-red,  Luc.  D.  Syr.  8.  II. 

scorbutic,  Galen. 

aiuuSia,  ■/),  a  scorbutic  affection  of  the  gums,  Arist.  Probl.  1.  38. 

atu.u5iao-p.os,  o,  =  foreg.,  Hesych.  s.  v.  yopufxaapus. 

atuuoiau,  to  have  the  teeth  set  on  edge,  Arist.  Probl.  7.  5,  I  : — metaph. 
of  one  whose  mouth  waters,  qpaibia  Timocl.  'Ewixaip.  •■  II.  trans., 

alp.  to'vs  dtdvras  to  set  the  teeth  on  edge,  Hipp.  534.  33. 

aiu-wv,  ovos,  0,  =  baluaiv  B,  taquwv,  skilful,  2/capdvtpiov  a'iuova  Orjpqs 
II.  5.  49 ;  v.  Herm.  Aesch.  Ag.  1450.  II.  (at/ia)  bloody,  Aesch. 

Supp.  847,  Eur.  Hec.  90. 

a'tpuivios,  ov,  blood-red,  auxa  Ath.  76  B. 

alu.-onrot,  ov,  —  alpuiTunis,  Anth.  P.  6.  35,  Sext.  Emp.  P.  I.  44. 

aiv-ttp«rr|i,  ov,  i,  (alvus)  terribly  brave,  II.  16.  31  : — so,  alvaptros 
Odvaroi  Epigr.  Gr.  425. 

Atvftas.  ov,  6,  Aeneas,  Ep.  gen.  Alvci'do,  but  in  II.  5.  534  Alvtiai : 
Att.  also  AEvcas,  Soph.  Fr.  342. 

aiv«ns,  tan,  i>,  (aM<v)  praise,  Lxx,  N.  T. ;  in  Philo  2.  24;.  amjois. 

aiv«T«ov,  verb.  Adj.  one  must  praise,  Synes.,  Medic. ;  cf.  iwatvtrioy. 

aivrrn*,  ov,  u,  one  that  praises,  Hipp.  5.  48. 

aiv«T6s.  q,  ov,  verb.  \a\.  praiseworthy,  Arist.  Rhet.  2.25,7,  Anth.P.  7. 429. 

atvfw,  cf.  aivqpu,  alvifofiat  :  impf.  fivtov,  $vow  Eur.,  Ion.  atvtov  Hdt. 
3.  73,  etc. :  fat.  aivqaa  Od.  16.  380,  Theogn.  1080,  Pind.  N.  I,  fin. ; 
In  Att.  Poets  always  aiviaai,  as  in  Pind.  N.  7.  92,  Simon.  Amorg.  7.  1 1  2 : 
aor.  qvqoa  Horn.,  opt.  alv^aeit  Simon.  57  ;  Dor.  aivqaa  Pind.  P.  3.  25 ; 
in  Att.  always  yvfaa.  Ion.  aivma  Hdt.  5. 1 13:  pf.  fvtxa  («»■-)  Isocr.  276 
B: — Med.,  fut.  alvkooutu  (only  in  compds.  It-,  wap-): — Pans.,  aor. 
part.  alvt$tis  Hdt.  5. 102 :  pf.  jvTjpuu  (/»-)  Hipp.  Acut.  392.  34,  Isocr.  281 
C.  Poet,  and  Ion.  Verb,  very  rare  in  good  Att.  Prose  (Plat.  Rep.  404  D. 
Legg-  95*  C),  inaiviw  being  used  instead;  cf.  also  hot  ,  irap-,  aw-, 
owe*-,  bwtptv-aiviaj.  Properly,  to  tell  or  speak  o/(cf.  oTkos),  Aesch.  Ag. 
98, 1482,  Cho.  192,  Soph.  Ph.  1380.  II.  commonly,  like  the  Att. 

iwaivia),  to  speak  in  praise  of,  praise,  approve,  Lat.  laudo,  c.  ace,  Horn. 
and  Hdt. : — Pass,  to  be  praised,  bw6  'Stpwvibtw  aivt$ti,  Hdt.  5.  102  ; 
iti  nvifor  a  thing,  Theocr.  16.  15.  2.  to  allow,  recommend,  Od. 

16.  380,  403  :  c.  inf.  to  recommend  to  do  a  thing,  euphem.  for  Kt\eva>, 
Aesch.  Cho.  JJJ,  715  (as  itraivi  is  used  lb.  581);  also  c.  part.,  alvtiv 
lovra  to  commend  one's  going.  Id.  Pers.  642.  3.  like  d7airri<u.  to 

be  content,  acquiesce,  Pind.  N.  1.  102;    k&v  puv  6l\aia(V  aiV«Vai  Eur. 


■a(Voc.  37 

Supp.  388  : — c.  ace.  rei,  to  be  content  with,  acquiesce  in,  accept,  yapov  Pind. 
p-  3-  25. cf-  Aesch.  Eum.  469,  Supp.  902, 1071;  Eur.  Med.  1 157;  etjaaav 
Tpawcfav  alvio-cu  Id.  Ale.  2.  4.  to  decline  courteously,  Hes.  Op.  641 

(cf.  Plut.  2.  2  2,  fin.),  Soph. Fr. 96;  like  laudare  in  Virg.G.  2.412.  III. 
to  promise  or  vow,  Tivi  ti  or  rivl  iroietv  ti,  Soph.  Ph.  1 398,  Eur.  Ale.  1 2. 

atvT),  ij,  =anvos,  praise,  fame,  iv  aivri  iwv  Hdt.  3.  74.,  8. 112,  cf.Alcm.  I. 

aivrjui,  Aeol.  for  alviw,  Hes.  Op.  681  ;  cf.  inaivrjpu. 

aivr|o-is,  v.  sub  atveois. 

atvT)Tos.  17,  ov,  verb.  Adj.,  =  alveris,  Pind.  N.  8.  66;  alvrfrov  navreaatv 
imxBovlots  Arist.  (?)  Epigr.  14  (8)  Bgk. ;  TtapaKoiT(S  C.  I.  6203.  6; 
arep.p.a  Epigr.  Gr.  247,  al. 

atviYUA,  aros,  to,  (alviaaopat)  a  dark  saying,  riddle,  like  aiviyuiis, 
Pind.  Fr.  165,  Aesch.  Pr.  610,  etc.,  cf.  SuoToTraoTos :  often  in  pi.,  i( 
alviypLOToiv  in  riddles,  darkly,  Aesch.  Ag.  1113,  1183;  ti  aivtyfiaraiv 
Aeschin.  70.  34  (cf.  alvtyuos)  ;  atv.  irpo&aWttv,  (vvrtdivai,  irXixuv  to 
make  a  riddle,  Plat.  Charm.  162  B,  Apol.  27  A,  Plut.  2.  671  E;  opp.  to 
aiviypta  taiireiv,  fltevat,  Xvuv,  tbpiaKav  to  solve  it,  Soph.  O.  T.  393, 
1525,  etc.  II.  a  taunt,  Aristaen.  I.  27. 

aiviyu.aTias,  ov,  o,  =  alv(yp.aT(ar-qs,  Diod.  5.  31. 

atWY|«iTto-Tfjs,  ov,  o,  one  who  speaks  riddles,  Lxx. 

aivtyuaTO-iroios,  6v,  proposing  riddles,  Eust.  1074.  6°- 

aivryp*iTWOT|S,  ts,  (ettos)  riddling,  dark,  Aesch.  Supp.  464;  alv.  fopa- 
TiVma,  of  the  Heracliteans,  Plat.  Theaet.  180  A.     Adv.  -tws,  Diog.  L.  9.  3. 

aivryp.os,  o,  a  riddle,  mostly  like  aiv(yp.a  in  pi.,  ti  aiviypwv  ipdv, 
Ar.  Ran.  61,  cf.  Plat.  Tim.  72  E;  iv  alviypujtat  orjpLaivfiv  ti  Eur.  Rhes. 
754  ;  (v  alv.  \a\(tv  Anaxil.  NfOTT.  23. 

aivi£op.ai.  Dep.  only  used  in  pres.,  —  alvtot,  II.  13.  374,  Od.  8.  487:— 
Act.  aivifw  in  Anth.  P.  11.  341. 

aivvK-rr|p,  ijpos,  6,  one  who  speaks  darkly,  alv.  0eo(pa.Ta)v  Soph.  Fr.  707. 

aiviKTT|pios.  ov,  known  from  the  Adv.  -iais,  in  riddles,  Aesch.  Pr.  949. 

aivucTTjS,  ou,  d,  =  alviKTrjp,  of  Heraclitus,  Timo  ap.  Diog.  L.  9.  6. 

aiviKTos.  17,  ov,  expressed  in  riddles,  riddling,  Soph.  O.  T.  439. 

aivto-o-ouxii,  Att.  -TTop.ai :  f.  i£npai :  aor.  rjvi£du7]v  : — Dep.,  but  also 
as  Pass.,  v.  infr.  II :  (cuvos).  To  speak  darkly  or  in  riddles,  Pind.  P.  8. 
56;  pwv  ^vt(dp:rfv  ;  Soph.  Aj.  1 158;  Atfyoiai  Kpwrrotat  alv.  Eur.  Ion 
430 ;  yvtupipiws  alvi£opai  so  as  to  be  understood,  Id.  El.  946 ;  alvia- 
otaSat  (W(a  to  speak  riddling  verses,  Hdt.  5.  56  :■ — c.  ace.  rei,  to  hint  a 
thing,  intimate,  shadow  forth,  Plat.  Apol.  21  B,  Theaet.  152  C,  etc.; — 
also,  alv.  «/s  . .  to  refer  as  in  a  riddle  to,  to  hint  at,  els  KXttwa  tovt 
atviTTfTai  Ar.  Pax  47  ;  ri)V  KvWijvijv  .  .  <is  rty  \(ip'  hpBws  rfvi^aro 
used  the  riddling  word  Cyllene  (cf.  KvWos)  ,.  ,  Id.  Eq.  1085  ;  so, 
Tjvi£a$'  6  Bdtcis  rovro  vpos  rbv  aJpa  Id.  Av.  970 ;  aiviTr6pLtvos  (is  (fi( 
Aeschin.  42.  19  ;  alv.  dts  . .  Arist.  Fr.  66  ; — alv.  t&v  wK(avov  to  form 
guesses  about  it,  Id.  Meteor.  I.  9,  5.  II.  also  as  Pass.,  to  be 

spoken  darkly,  to  be  wrapt  up  in  riddles,  but  perh.  in  good  Greek  only 
in  aor.  yvixQy"  Plit.  Gorg.  495  B ;  pf.  jjviyp:a(,  Theogn.  681,  Ar.  Eq. 
196,  Arist.  Rhet.  3.  2,  12. 

aivo-PaKxcvTOS.  ov,  raging  direfully,  Lye.  792. 

aivo-fjias.  Ion.  -fiiifl,  ov,  6,  dreadfully  strong,  Anth.  P.  7.  226. 

aivo-Yiinos.  of,  fatally  wedded,  Eur.  Hel.  1 1 20,  Orph.  Arg.  875  ;  cf. 
aivoXacrpos. 

aivc-Y<v«8Xo»,  ov,  born  to  ill  luck,  Manetho  I.  145. 

aivo-ytvcios,  ov,  with  dreadful  jaws,  Call.  Del.  92. 

aho-yCY01*'  avros,  o,  a  terrible  giant,  Nonn.  D.  4.  447. 

aiv6-YOO»,  ov,  terribly  lamented,  C.  I.  1653,  Keil  Inscr.  p.  129. 

atvo-8pvd>T|»,  (s,  sadly  torn,  in  sign  of  mourning,  Poeta  ap.  Apoll.  de 
Pron.  356  C. 

alvc6cv,  Adv.  from  aivos,  only  found  in  the  phrase  aivoO(v  alvws,  from 
horror  to  horror,  right  horribly,  II.  7.  97 ;  cf.  ol60(v,  ofos. 

a!vo-9pVTrro»,  ov,  sadly  enervated,  lazy,  Theocr.  15.  27. 

aivo-Xau.irf|S,  {s,  horrid-gleaming,  Aesch.  Ag.  389. 

alvo-X«Tpoi,  ov,  fatally  wedded,  Aesch.  Ag.  713  ;  cf.  aivoAfxfa,  aiVo- 
yauos.  II.  Mi  a  frightful  bed,  of  the  cave  of  Echidna,  Lye.  1354. 

aiv-oXt'rns,  ov,  o,  a  dire  destroyer,  Orph.  Arg.  424. 

aivo-Xjx11!*!  is,  =  alvoK( terpos,  Orph.  Arg.  876. 

atvo-Xfwv,  ovtos,  o,  a  dreadful  lion,  Theocr.  25.  168. 

a'v6-Xlva»,  ov,  unfortunate  in  life's  thread,  in  allusion  to  the  Parcae, 
Anth.  P.  7.  527. 

aivo-XCxos,  0,  a  horrible  wolf,  Anth.  P.  7.  550. 

aivo-p.avT|t,  ^s-,  raving  horribly,  Nonn.  D.  20.  152,  etc. 

aiv6-u.opos.  ov,  doomed  to  a  sad  end,  II.  2  2.  48 1 ,  Od.  9.  5 3 ;  come  to  a 
dreadful  end,  Aesch.  Th.  904. 

aivo-Tru(rrjS,  is,  suffering  dire  ills,  Od.  18.  201,  Anth.,  etc. 

Aivo-Trdpis.  loos,  o,  like  Avffirapis,  unlucky  Paris,  Paris  the  author  of 
ill,  Alcman  24  (50),  Eur.  Hec.  944. 

atvo-TfuTqp,  (pos,  (i,  unhappy  father,  Aesch.  Cho.  315. 

aivo-ir(Xupos,  ov,  fearfully  portentous,  Opp.  H.  5.  303. 

aivo-irX^|{,  7705,  6,  1),  with  dire  sting,  Nic.  Th.  517. 

aivo-iroT|iot,  ov,  =  aiv6uopos,  Orph.  Arg.  1 01 4. 

aivos,  o,  an  old  poet,  and  Ion.  word  (cf.  alviu),  used,  I.  =  pvOos, 

a  tale,  story,  Od.  14.  508,  Archil.  86.  89;  alvuv  alvov  to  tell  a  tale, 
Aesch.  Ag.  1482,  Soph.  Ph.  1380:  hence  a  fable,  like  Aesop's,  Hes. 
Op.  200:  generally,  a  saying,  proverb,  Eur.  Fr.  511,  Theocr.  14. 
43.  XX. •  Att.  iiraivos,  praise,  II.  23.  652,  Od.  21.  no,  Pind. 

and  Trag. :  imrvpSittos  dlvos  Aesch.  Ag.  1547,  cf.  780,  Soph.  O.  C. 
707,  C.  I.  380.  17;  d£ios  afvov  pieyaXov  Hdt.  7.  107.  (Buttm.,  Lexil. 
s.  v..  compares  Lat.  aio.) 

aivos.  17,  6v,  Ep.  and  Ion.  word  =  oticer,  used  also  by  Pind.  P.  II.  85, 
Soph.  Aj.  706  (lyr.).  Dread,  dire,  grim,  horrible,  often  in  Horn.,  of  feel- 
ings, axos,  xoA<«.  Tpoaos,  nafuiTos,  oi'f  v s ;  of  states  and  actions,  as  bniorlis, 


38 


au'oy  —  aipeats. 


iroKe/ios,  nvpos,  etc. :  of  persons,  dread,  terrible,  esp.  of  Zeus,  alvorare 
Kpovidi)  II.  4.  25,  etc. ;  of  Pallas,  8.  423.  II.  Adv.  -van,  terribly, 

i.  e.  strangely,  exceedingly,  II.  10.  38;  (once  rivi  3.  158,01!.  1.  208; 
</nXt'e<T«  1.  264;  ivl  fovv  KcirAtrat  Aesch.  Pers.  930  (lyr.) ;  cptvytiv 
Tt  Hdt.  4.  76  ;  also  with  an  Adj.,  aivaj,  Kaxos  terribly  bad,  Od.  17.  24; 
ai.  irtupas  Hdt.  4.  52;  tt}s  2kv$iktjs  aivws  d£v\ov  iovo-qs  lb.  61; — 
also  alva  as  Adv.,  II.  1.  414;  Sup.  -orarov  13.  52. 

d'uvos  [f],  ov,  (U)  without  vessels  or  fibres,  Theophr.  H.  P.  I.  5,  3. 

olvo-TaXus,  avos,  6,  most  miserable,  Antim.  in  A.  B.  1422. 

aiv&n|S,  irros,  r),  (alvis)  =  5t ivorns,  Hdn.  v.  fiov.  \i(.  33.  27. 

aivo-TOKCia,  t),  unhappy  in  being  a  mother,  Mosch.  4.  27. 

alvo-TOKOs,  ov,  unhappy  in  being  a  parent,  Opp.  H.  5.  526,  C.  I.  6259. 

aivo-Tiipavvos,  o,  a  dreadful  tyrant,  Anth.  Plan.  5.  350. 

aivupai..  poet.  Dep.,  used  only  in  pres.  and  in  impf.  without  augm. ;  cf. 
diraivvficu.  To  take,  aivvro  Ttvx*  dir'  w^iwv  I!.  11.  580.,  13.  55°  • 

dird  vaaaaXov  aivvro  to£ov  Od.  21.  53;  x('Pas  alvifitvai  taking  hold  of 
them,  22.  500;  c.  gen.  partit.,  rvpwv  aivvuivovs  taking  of  the  cheeses, 
9.  225  :  metaph.,  dAAd  \i  'Obvarjos  iri9os  aivvrai  a  longing  seizes  me 
for  him,  14.  144,  Hes.  Sc.  41  ;  also  to  enjoy,  feed  on,  xapirov  Simon.  5.  17. 

aivu,  =  wriaaoi,  to  sift,  winnow,  Pherecr.  Incert.  18  (ap.  Eust.  II.  801. 
56) ;  fioKyuv  aXvtiv,  proverb,  of  any  impossibility,  v.  Bgk.  ap.  Meineke 
Com.  Fr.  2.  pp.  988,  1066,  sq.,  Dind.  Ar.  Fr.  p.  504. 

a!|,  al-yos,  i,  r) :  dat.  pi.  alyttjiv  II.  10.  486.  A  goat,  Lat.  caper, 

capra,  in  Horn,  mostly  fern.,  but  masc.  in  Od.  14.  106,  530  (cf.  77)0705); 
its  bleating  is  described  by  fiijxdofiai,  firjKas ;  the  kid  being  ipitpos : 
flocks  of  goats  were  common  in  Homer's  time,  cf.  aliroKiOV,  a'iiroKos  ; 
— once  in  Trag.,  Soph.  Fr.  962  (lyr).  2.  at(  dyptos  the  wild  goat, 

lovBas  (bearded)  Od.  14.  50;  !(a\os  (bounding)  II.  4.  105;  with 
horns  six  spans  long,  lb.  109,  is  no  doubt  the  ibex;  the  atyes  uptatctpoi 
of  Od.  9.  155,  aypurtpai  of  17.  294,  and  the  o?7a7/)os  (q.  v.)  may  belong 
to  diff.  species : — proverb.,  at(  ovpavta  in  Com.  as  a  source  of  mysterious 
and  suspected  wealth,  in  allusion  to  the  horn  of  Amalthea,  Cratin.  (X«tp. 
21)  ap.  Zenob.  I.  26;  ovpdviov  alya  ir\ovro<p6pov  Com.  Anon. 
281.  3.  the  constellation  so  called,  Arat.  157.  II.  a  water- 

bird,  apparently  of  the  goose  kind,  Arist.  H.  A.  8.  3,  16.  III. 

a  fiery  meteor,  Arist.  Meteor.  I.  4,  6.  IV.  atyts,  high  waves, 

Artemid.  2.  12;  cf.  alyta\6s.  (From  ^Air  prob.  =  dyi,  as  appears 

from  Skt.  ago.  (goat),  agas  (buck):  the  deriv.  from  aioou  must  give  way, 
for  its  root  is  due :  see  Curt.  no.  1 20.) 

dif.  aXxos  [I],  r),  (diWo;)  =  di/rr),  dvt/iav  aXxts  Ap.  Rh.  4.  820.  (The 
word  occurs  earlier  in  the  compds.  iro\vcu( ,  Kopv$di{,  cf.  aiyis,  alyifa.) 

dt£ao-Ke,  Ion.  and  Ep.  aor.  of  aiaow.  II. 

ai|uveuou.ai.  Dep.  to  be  foul-mouthed,  slanderous,  like  the  people  of 
Aexone,  v.  Menand.  Kavncp.  5. 

a.ioXdop.o.1,  Pass.  (aloKos)  to  shift  about,  be  restless,  Hipp.  664.  8. 

AioXcus,  iais,  0,  an  Aeolian;  pi.  AloXies,  Hdt.  I.  28,  Att.  Alo\its  or 
-t}s,  Thuc.  7.  57  : — hence  Adj.  AioXikos,  17,  ov,  of  or  like  the  Aeolians, 
Theocr.  1.56,  etc.; — fern.  AioXis,  180s,  Hes.  Op.  638,  Hdt.,  etc.;  poet, 
fern.  AioX-rjis,  Pind.  O.  I.  164  : — Adv.  AloXixuis,  Gramm. 

aio\tu, =iroiKi\\aj,  Plat.  Crat.  409  A  :  on  «oA.«,  IuXtjto,  v.  sub  voce. 

at6XT|<Tis,  las,  r),  a  rapid  motion,  Schol.  Pind.  P.  4.  414. 

aioXias,  ov,  6,  a  speckled  fish,  Epich.  Fr.  52  Ahr.,  Plat.  Com.  *a.  1, 
ubi  v.  Meineke  ;  as  Adj..  alokiijv  Kopaxtvov  Numen.  ap.  Ath.  308  E. 

aloXi£u,  f.  iaw,  —  aioAAa; :  metaph.,  like  irotxiWoi,  to  trick  out  with 
false  words,  p-nb'  aiuAt^e  ravra  Soph.  Fr.  815.  II.  (AioAtvs) 

to  imitate  the  Aeolians,  aio\.  tw  piKa  Pratin.  Fr.  5  :  to  speak  Aeolian, 
Strabo  333,  Plut.  Cim.  I. 

AloXwrrt,  (AtoXifoj)  in  the  Aeolic  dialect,  Strabo  333. 

aioXXu,  only  used  in  pres.,  to  shift  rapidly  to  and  fro,  dis  8'  ore  yaorip 
dvijp  . .  aliWr/  Od.  20.  27  ;  (for  Pind.  P.  4.  414,  v.  sub  iu\et).  II. 

to  variegate,  Nic.  Th.  155  : — Pass,  to  shift  colour,  ofiupaKts  aloKKovrat 
the  grapes  begin  to  turn,  Hes.  Sc.  399 ;  cf.  Buttm.  Lexil.  s.  v.  aiuKos  10. 

aloX6-(3ovXos,  ov,  wily,  Opp.  C.  3.  449. 

atoXo-(3p6vTt)S,  ov,  o,  wielder  of  forked  lightning,  Ztvs  ai.  Pind.  O.  9.  64. 

atoXo-SeLKTT|S,  ov,  6,  shewing  himself  in  various  forms,  of  Phoebus ; 
voc.  alo\6btiKTa,  restored  by  Herm.  in  Orph.  H.  7.  12  for  -beixre. 

uioXo-Seipos.  ov,  with  changeful  neck,  Ibyc.  8  ;  cf.  iroixi\65(ipos. 

aioX6-5tpp.o5.oj'.  xw'/Ai/aWe^a/erfsWn.Pseudo-Theocr.  in  Boiss.Buc.  268. 

aloX6-8upos,  ov,  bestowing  various  gifts,  Epimen.  ap.  Schol.  Soph. 
O.  C.  42. 

aioXo-9wpT)|.  ijxos,  0,  with  glancing  breastplate  or  moving  easily  in 
one's  breastplate  (v.  aloKos),  II.  4.  489. 

aloX6-p.T|Ti.s,  ws,  i,  tJ,  full  of  various  wiles,  like  alo\60ov\os,  Hes.  Th. 
511,  Aesch.  Supp.  1037  ;  also  aioXo-p.T|TT|S,  ov,  6,  Hes.  Fr.  28. 

aioXo-p.iTpT|S,  ov,  6,  with  glancing  or  glittering  girdle  (for  it  was  plated 
with  metal,  II.  4.  216),  or  moving  easily  in  one's  girdle  (v.  aioAos),  II.  5. 
707.  II.  with  variegated  mitre  or  turban,  Tllpaai  Theocr.  17. 19. 

aioX6-p.oXTros,  ov,  of  varied  strain,  ovpiy£  Nonn.  D.  40.  223. 

aioX6-popd>os,  ov,  of  changeful  form,  Orph.  H.  3.  7,  etc. 

atoXo-vuTos,  ov,  with  speckled  back,  Opp.  H.  1.  125. 

aloXo-TrerrXos,  ov,  with  spangled  robe,  Nonn.  D.  7.  173, 

aioXc-TrTepv£,  vyos,  o,  7),  quick-fluttering,  Telest.  I. 

atoXo-rrwXos,  ov,  with  quick-moving  steeds,  II.  3.  185,  Theocr.  2  2.  34. 

aioXos,  rj,  ov,  quick-moving,  nimble,  rapid,  Lat.  agilis,  irobas  alokos 
trnroy  II.  19.  404;  atoAai  tuAat  wriggling  worms,  22.  509;  acpiJKfS 
fitaov  alokoi  12.  167;  aloXov  ixpiv  lb.  208;  aidXos-  otarpos  Od.  22. 
300.  2.  elsewh.  in  Horn,  as  epith.  of  armour,  Tcvxta  II.  5.  295  ; 

oaxos  7.  222.,  16.  107  (cf.  Soph.  Aj.  1025),  where  most  Critics  interpret 
it  in  signf.  II,  but  Buttm.  (Lexil.  s.  v.)  moving  with  the  body,  easily 
moved,  manageable,  Lat.  habilis  ; — in  this  case  the  Homeric  sense  is  con-  I  for  taking  a  place,  Thuc.  2.  75 


fined  to  that  of  quick-moving,  cf.  a'oXXai ;  though  it  must  be  confessed 
that  this  sense  passes  easily  into  that  of  quick-glancing,  gleaming  (cf. 
dp7<Js  I) :  the  same  ambiguity  prevails  in  the  compds.  aloko-6wp7)£, 
-lUTptjs.  II.  after  Horn.,  certainly,  changeful  of  hue,  gleaming, 

glancing,  sheeny,  (like  shot  silk),  Spaxoiv  Soph.  Tr.  1 2.  2.  variegated, 
dappled,  aloKa  vi(  star-spangled  night  (cf.  Cic.  caelum  astris  distinctum). 
lb.  94,  cf.  aiokoxpais ;  Aesch.,  Th.  494,  calls  smoke  flushed  by  fire-light 
aioA!7  mipds  Kaais;  kvoiv  ai.  speckled.  Call.  Dian.  91,  etc.;  aii\a  oap£  dis- 
coloured from  disease,  Soph.  Ph.  1157.  III.  metaph.,  1.  change- 
ful, shifting,  varied,  alvX'  avBpamwv  nana  Aesch.  Supp.  327  ;  of  sounds, 
JdXij  Eur.  Ion  499,  cf.  Ar.  Ran.  248 ;  aitiAoi  ^ut'pai  changeable  days,  Arist. 
Probl.  26.  13,  I  (the  only  place  where  it  is  known  to  occur  in  Att.  Prose, 
or  to  have  the  fern,  in  oy) ;  cf.  aloko-fiTrrts,  -oto/xos,  etc.  2.  shifty, 
wily,  slippery,  twos  Sol.  11  ;  if/tvbos  Pind.  N.  8.  43;  nrjxavqiia.  Poeta 
ap.  Plut.  2.  16  D. — Cf.  Troinikos,  which  is  used  in  a  similar  variety  of 
sense,  and  also  takes  a  peculiar  accent. 

B.  as  prop,  n.,  proparox.  A10X05,  ov,  o,  the  lord  of  the  winds,  properly 
the  Rapid  or  the  Changeable,  Od.,  al.  [The  penult,  is  lengthd.  in  the 
gen.  AloKov  fxeyaK-rjTopos,  metri  grat.,  Od.  10.  36.] 

aioX6-OTop.os,  ov,  shifting  in  speech,  of  an  oracle,  Aesch.  Pr.  661, 

atoX6-(pvXos,  ov,  of  divers  kinds,  Opp.  H.  1.  617. 

aloX6-d>uvos,  ov,  with  changeful  notes,  anbwv  Opp.  H.  I.  728, 

aloXo-xaiTT|S,  ov,  A,  with  wavy  hair,  Eust.  1645.  5. 

aioXo-xpws,  orros,  6,  1),  spangled,  vv£  Eur.  Fr.  596. 

aiovda), tomoisteii.foment, Hipp. 424. 5, etc. ;  aor.  1  jjoyr/ca  Aesch. Fr. 366. 

aiovT|U,a,  O.T0S,  to,  a  fomentation,  Dio  C.  55.  17,  E.  M.  348.  27. 

alovrjo-is,  «ajy,  7),  a  fomenting,  Hipp.  424.  37. 

aiimvos,  t),  ov,  (alirvs)  poet.  Adj.  high,  lofty,  of  cities  on  heights,  Horn., 
cf.  Aesch.  Fr.  99  b,  Soph.  Tr.  858,  Ph.  1000:  of  mountain-tops,  II.  2.  869, 
Od.  6.  123.  II.  metaph.,  1.  alntivol  A0701  precipitate, 

hasty,  wicked  words,  Pind.  N.  5.  59,  ubi  v.  Dissen.  2.  hard  to 

win,  aotpiai  ixiv  a'nrtivai  Id.  O.  9.  161  ;  aiir.  fiavrtia  difficult,  Eur.  Ion 

739- 

aiTTcp,  Dor.  for  ei'irep,  Theocr. 

atTrf|eis,  «o-<ra,  iv,  =  aliriivus,  II.  21.  87. 

aiTroXcu,  only  used  in  pres.  and  impf.,  to  tend  goals,  Eupol.  Ary.  9, 
Theocr.  8.  85  ;  r/7rd\ei  rafs-  at£lv  Lys.  Fr.  13  : — Pass.,  dvev  [Sorripos  aino- 
kovfievai  a  flock  tended  by  no  herdsman,  Aesch.  Eum.  196. 

ai-rroXiKos.  17,  ov,  of  or  for  goatherds,  Anth.  P.  12.  128,  cf.  9.  217. 

atTroXiov,  to,  a  herd  of  goats,  alwokt  alywv  II.  11.  679,  al. ;  also  in  Hdt. 
I.  126,  Soph.  Aj.  375  (lyr.).  II.  a  goat-pasture,  Anth.  P.  9.  101. 

atiroXos,  6,  a  goatherd,  altroKos  aiyaiv  Od.  20.  173,  cf.  Plat.  Legg. 
639  A  :  in  Hdt.  2.  46  for  ol  airroXot  Schiifer  restored  01  koXoi,  cf.  Theocr. 
8.  51.  (ai-ird\os  is  evidently  for  ai70-TroXoj,  cf.  OaKafirjitoKos,  OtmroKos, 
ftovao-ndkos ;  from  ^IIEA,  ^IIOA,  which  appear  in  ireKopai,  iroXiai, 
TToXevat,  avairo\evw,  dfitpiiroXos,  and  agree  in  sense  with  the  Lat.  versari, 
colere.  It  is  prob.  that  ^IIOA  and  ^KOA  are  merely  diff.  in  form,  cf. 
nrr.  II,  so  that  0ovk6\os  =  PovttuXos,  alir6\os  =ai«oXos.) 

atTTOs,  fos,  to,  (alirvs)  a  height,  a  steep,  Aesch.  Ag.  285,  309,  etc. ;  cf. 
dnorofios: — rrpos-  a?7ros  uvai,  oboiiropsiv  to  toil  up  hill,  Hipp.  479.  17  and 
44.,  485.  51  ;  rrpos  dtiros  tpxrrat,  metaph.  of  a  difficult  task,  Eur.  Ale. 
500 ;  and  in  Phoen.  851  a?7ro?  tK0akwv  ubov  (the  weariness  of  the 
journey)  is  the  prob.  reading,  for  Hesych.  has  a  gloss  oittoj  ■  KapaTos,  cf. 
Eust.  381.  iy  (where  however  dnos  stands  in  the  text). 

atTros,  t},  ov,  Ep.  for  alirvs,  high,  lofty,  of  cities,  II.  13.  625,  al. ;  atrrd 
fiitBpa  streams  falling  sheer  down,  II.  8.  369.,  21.  9. 

aiTruSpT|Tos,  ov,  (befiaj)  high-built,  Coluth.  235,  Nonn.  D.  4.  13. 

atTrv-SoXa>TT|S,  ov,  6,  an  arch  knave,  Timon  ap.  Sext.  Emp.  M.  II.  171. 

aLTrv-K€pMs,  cuv,  gen.  Q},  =  \nptKtpws,  E.  M.  37.  38,  Suid. 

avrru-Xotpos,  ov,  high-crested,  Nonn.  D.  2.  379,  etc. 

aiTrv-p/r|TT|S,  ov,  6.  with  high  thoughts,  0t/it5os  airrv/xf/Ta  rrar  Aesch.Pr.18, 

almj-voos,  ov,  =  foreg.,  of  Osiris,  Epigr.  Gr.  1028.  19. 

atiru-ViiiTOs,  ov,  (vuitov)  high-backed,  on  a  high  mountain-ridge,  of 
Dodona,  Aesch.  Pr.  830. 

aiTrv-TrX&vTis,  is,  high-roaming,  Manetho  4.  249. 

aiTrus,  ua,  v,  Ep.  Adj.,  used  also  by  Pind.,  but  very  rare  in  Trag.,  high 
and  steep,  in  Horn,  mostly  of  cities  on  rocky  heights,  esp.  of  Troy,  Od. 
3.  485,  al. ;  of  hills,  II.  2.  603,  al. ;  in  Soph.  Aj.  845  also  rbv  alirvv 
oipavuv : — [ipoxos  alu.  a  noose  hanging  straight  down,  Od.  II. 
278.  2.  metaph.  sheer,  utter,  alirvs  o\(8pos  freq.  in  Horn.,  death 

being  regarded  as  the  plunge  over  a  precipice  (cf.  diroWofios)  ;  so,  qwvos 
alirvs  Od.  4.  843  ;  Odvaros  alirvs  Pind.  O.  10  (11).  50:  also  of  passions, 
alirvs  xoXos  towering  wrath,  II.  15.  223;  SoAos  airriJs  h.  Horn.  Merc.  66, 
Hes.  Th.  589.  3.  metaph.  also,  arduous,  irdvos  II.  II.  601.,  16. 

651  ;  alirv  01  eaaeirai  'twill  be  hard  work  for  him,  13.  317.  II- 

after  Horn,  deep,  atccWos  Pind.  Fr.  252  ;  alirtia  larq  a  deep  sound,  Hes. 
Th.  682  ;  aiirvTarn  oorpi-n  Anth.  P.  11.  354. 

aipa.  r),  a  hammer,  alpdcvv  ipya  smith's  work,  Call.  Fr.  129.  II, 

a  weed  in  wheat,  darnel,  Lat.  lolium,  Theophr.  H.  P.  I.  5,  2  ;  in  pi., 
Ar.  Fr.  364,  Pherecr.  Incert.  17 ; — ace.  to  Arist.  Somn.  3,  9  it  was  iirvw- 
tik6s,  so  that  it  is  prob.  the  lolium  temulentum  L. 

aipdpiov,  to",  the  Lat.  aerarium,  treasury,  C.  I.  4033,  al. 

alpeo-i-dpxTjS,  ou»  °,  'he  leader  of  a  school,  Sext.  Emp.  P.  3.  245  ;  esp. 
of  a  medical  school,  C.  I.  6607,  Galen.  II.  the  chief  of  a  sect  or 

heresy,  an  heresiarch,  Eus.  H.  E.  6.  13,  5  ;  whence  alpeo-iapx«o,  Eccl. 

a'.pco-ip.os.  ov,  (aipiai)  that  can  be  taken,  Xen.  Cyr.  5.  2,  2. 

alpeo-io-pdxos,  ov,  fighting  for  a  sect,  Philo  2.  84. 

aiptcas,  (uis,  r),  (alptui)  a  taking,  esp.  of  a  town,  Hdt.  4.  I,  etc.;  r) 
Paai\ijos  dip.  the  taking  by  the  king,  Hdt.  9.  3.  2.  a  plan  or  means 


aipe&iaiTtjS 

B.  (dtpiopai)  a  choosing,  choice,  diptalv  vt  ftoi  SiSov  Aesch.  Pr. 
779  ;  Twvbt . .  diptaiv  vapSibaipx  Pind.  N.  10.  154 ;  foil,  by  a  relat.,  atp. 
oiSuvat  owortpov  . . ,  ei . . ,  etc.,  Hdt.  I.  1 1.,  9.  26  ;  also,  diptaiv  vpori- 
Oivat,  vpo0dkktiv  Plat.  Theaet.  196  C,  Soph.  24;  B  ;  ci  vipot  tis  diptaiv 
Soph.  Aj.  265  ;  diptaiv  kapfidvtiv  to  have  choice  given,  Dem.  947-  18  ; 
aip.  yiyvtrai  Tivt  a  choice  is  allowed  one,  Thuc.  2.  61  ;  oix  «xf'  diptaiv 
it  admits  no  choice,  Plut.  2.  708  B.  2.  choice  or  election  of  magis- 

trates, Thuc.  8.  89;  dip.  *oitio6ai  Isocr.  143  C,  cf.  Arist.  Pol.  3.  II, 
15.,  4.  6,  3,  etc.  3.  a  striving  after,  dip.  ovvaptai;,  Lat.  affectatio 

imperii.  Plat.  Gorg.  513  A:  inclination,  choice,  attachment,  vpos  Tiva 
Philipp.  ap.  Dem.  283.  12,  Polyb.  2.  61,  9,  etc.  II.  a  choice, 

plan,  purpose,  course  of  action  or  thought,  like  vpoaiptats.  Plat.  Phaedr. 
256  C  ;  r)  dip.  ttjs  vpta&tias  Aeschin.  29.  30  ;  dip.  'Ekkvvixri  the  study 
of  Greek  literature,  Polyb.  40.  6,  3.  2.  a  philosophic  principle  or  set 

of  principles,  or  those  who  profess  such  principles,  a  sect,  school,  Sext. 
Emp.  P.  1.  16,  Dion.  H.  de  Dem.  et  Arist.  7,  etc.,  cf.  Cic.  ad  Fam.  15. 
16,  3:  esp.  a  religious  party  or  sect,  such  as  the  Essenes,  Joseph.  B.  J. 


aipw. 


39 


2.  8,  1  ;    the  Sadducees  and  Pharisees,  Act.  Ap.  , 


IS-  5-  *6-  5  ; 


by  them  used  of  the  Christians,  lb.  24.  5,  14.,  28.  22  ;  and  by  orthodox 
Christians  of  those  who  dissented,  Eccl. :  also  of  their  doctrine,  heresy, 
Eccl.  3.  a  proposed  condition,  proposal,  Dion.  H.  3.  10.  4. 

a  commission,  r)  cirl  tovs  vtovs  at.  Plat.  Ax.  367  A.  5.  in  Lxx 

(e.g.  Lev.  22.  18)  a  freewill  offering,  opp.  to  a  vow. 

alpco-ui-rns,  ov,  6,  Eus.  H.  E.  6.  2,  13,  fern,  -wns,  (805,  a  heretic,  Eccl. 

alpcTfos,  a,  ov,  verb.  Adj.  to  be  taken,  desirable,  Xen.  Mem.  I.  I,  7, 
al.  II.  atptriov,  one  must  choose.  Plat.  Gorg.  499  E,  a!. 

alp ctCJoi,  =  aipia,  to  choose,  select,  Hipp.  1282.  20,  Babr.  61.  5,  Epigr. 
Gr.  252,  Lxx,  N.  T. :— as  Dep.,  Ctes.  Pers.  9.  II.  to  belong  to 

a  sect,  Eccl. 

cupcTvxos,  ti,  ov,  (aipia)  able  to  choose,  Def.  Plat.  41 2  A  : — Adv.  -kws, 
Diog.  L.  7.  126.  2.  heretical,  Ep.  Tit.  3.  10,  Eccl. 

alpc-ns,  180;,  r),  one  who  chooses,  Lxx  (Sap.  8.  4). 

alpcTwrrqs,  ov,  d,  a  partisan,  rav  Tpovav  tivos  Philem.  Incert.  43  ;  also 
in  Polyb.  1 .  79,  9,  etc. :  a  sectarian,  in  philosophy,  Diog.  L.  9.  6. 

atpcTos,  17,  ov,  verb.  Adj.  that  may  be  talten  or  conquered,  boka  Hdt.  4. 
201  :  to  be  understood.  Plat.  Phaedo  81  B.  II.  (aipiopai)  to  be 

chosen,  eligible,  desirable,  opp.  to  ^tturrds.  Plat.  Phil.  21  D,  sq.,  Arist. 
Eth.  N.  I.  7,  4,  al. ;  often  in  Comp.  or  Sup.,  Hdt.  I.  126,  156,  al. ; 
{otjs  vovijpds  Odvaros  aiptTwrtpos  Menand.  Monost.  193  (Aesch.  Fr. 
395),  etc.  2.  chosen,  elected,  Sixaaral  alp.,  opp.  to  xknparoi. 

Plat.  Legg.  759  B,  cf.  915  C,  Aeschin.  58.  6 ;  alp.  ffaatktis  Plat.  Menex. 
238  D  ;  alprri)  apx*!  an  elective  magistracy,  Isocr.  265  A,  Arist.  Pol.  2. 
12,  2;  cf.  xuPorovVT^ '• — aipcToi  avopts  commissioners,  Plut.  Lye.  26; 
ol  aiptroi  Xen.  An.  I.  3,  21  ;  also  the  optiones  or  accensi  in  the  Roman 
army,  Jo.  Lyd.  de  Mag.  1 .  46. 

oipcu:  impf.  ijpcoK  II.,  Ion.  aipiov  Hdt.,  but  contr.  jipci  even  in  II.  17. 
463 :  fut.  afpijToj  II.,  Att. :  aor.  rjpnoa  late  (dv-)  Q±  Sm.  4.  40,  etc. : 
pf.  rjpnua  Aesch.  Ag.  267,  Thuc,  etc..  Ion.  apaipnua  or  dipnxa  (dv-) 
Hdt.  4.  66.,  5,  102  :  plqpf.  dpatpr\xtt  3.  39: — Med.,  fut.  aipqaopuu  II., 
Att. :  aor.  ypTjaap-m  Polyb.,  etc.  (cf.  cfaipcoi) :  pf.  in  med.  sense  rjprjpai 
Ar.  Av.  1577,  Xen.  An.  5.  6,  12,  Dem.  22.  21,  etc.:  3  pi.  plqpf.  jpnvro 
Thuc.  I.  62  : — Pass.,  fut.  alpt9r)aopai  Hdt.  2.  13,  Plat. ;  rarely  rip-qaopat 
Plat.  Prot.  338  C:  aor.  ypifrnv  and  pf.  jjpjjpat  v.  infr.  C,  al. :  plqpf. 
jpr/n-o  Xen.  An.  3.  2,  I,  dpoipirro  Hdt.  I.  191,  etc. — From  ^EA  come 
the  following:  fut.  iku  only  late  (81-)  Inscr.  Ther.  in  C.  I.  2448  vi.  19, 
(tiv-)  Dion.  H.  II.  18,  Diod.,  (xa0-)  Anth.  Plan.  334:  aor.  I  tlka  (dv-) 
Act.  Ap.  2.  23,  (iv-)  C.  I.  3272.  24 ;  elsewhere  aor.  2  ttkov  Horn.,  etc.. 
Ion.  tktaxt  II.  24.  752 : — Med.,  fut.  IkoCpai  Dion.  H.  4.  75,  Or.  Sib.  8. 
184,  (dtp-)  Timostr.'+tAoScffir.  I,  Anth.,  (&-)  Dion.  H.,  (i(-)  Alciphro: 
aor.  1  tlkapnv  Anth.  P.  app.  257.  5,  (dtp-)  Ath.  546  A,  (&-)  Anth.  P. 
9.  56 ;  elsewh.  aor.  2  tlkopnjv  Horn.,  etc. — Cf.  dv-,  dtp-,  it-,  i(-,  xa$-, 
vap-,  vtpt-,  wpo-,  vpoa-,  aw-,  txp-atpia.  (Curt,  believes  that  the 

Roots  alp  (api),  IX.  may  be  closely  related :  cf.  also  Akiaxopuu,  which 
often  serves  as  a  Pass,  to  aipia.) 

A.  Act.  to  take  with  the  hand,  grasp,  seize,  alp.  rt  iv  xtpolv,  ptrd 
Xtpaiv  to  take  a  thing  in  hand,  Od.  4.  66.,  8.  372  ;  alp.  Tivd  x'lP''i  '» 
take  one  by  the  hand,  II.  1.  323;  xoprji  nva  lb.  197;  ft  ikwv  iwl  pa- 
araxa  x*f'iV  °a-  23-  76 ;  also,  alp.  xcpoi  bipv,  etc. : — the  part.  Ikwv  is 
sometimes  used  as  Adv.,  like  kaBiiv,  by  force.  Soph.  Ant.  497  ;  but,  Iv- 
8tv   Ikwv   having  taken  up   [the  song],  Od.  8.  500.  2.  to  take 

away,  ti  &w6  tivos  Horn. ;  but  also  Ttva  ti,  like  dtpatptiaOat,  II.  16. 
805.  II.  to  take,  get  into  one's  power,  vavs  II.  13.  42  ;  esp.  to 

take  a  city,  2.  37,  Soph.  Ph.  347,  etc.,  cf.  ajcpa  3:  to  overpower,  kill, 
Horn.,  etc. : — often  of  passions,  etc.,  to  come  upon,  seize,  as  x<S*°s  II.  18. 
322  ;  iptpos  3.  446  ;  Srvos  io.  39  ;  kifOn  2.  33,  etc. ;  of  disease.  Plat. 
Theaet.  142  B  : — simply  to  conquer  (in  a  race),  oix  lot?  os  xi  a'  tknoi 
ptrakpAVos  II.  23.  345  :— the  Med.  is  sometimes  used  in  this  sense,  nana 
vtv  ikoiro  poipa  Soph.  O.  T.  887,  cf.  Aj.  396.  2.  ro  catch,  take, 

(aiov  Iktiv  II.  21.  102  :  to  take  in  hunting,  Horn.,  etc. :  also  to  catch, 
win,  seduce,  entrap.  Soph.  O.  C.  764,  etc. ;  and  in  good  sense  to  win 
over,  Xen.  Mem.  2.  3,  16,  cf.  3.  II,  II,  Plat.  Lys.  205  E,  etc.  b.  c. 
part,  to  catch  or  detect  one  doing  a  thing,  Soph.  Ant.  385,  655  ;  Iv'  airro- 
•pwfxp  Ikfiv  to  catch  in  the  very  act,  Eur.  Ion  1 2 1 4  ;  #£pa  M  *Aoirp 
Ikiiv  Plat.  Legg.  874  B.  8.  generally,  to  win,  gain,  «S8oi  II.  17. 

321  ;  aT«pdvovs  Pind.,  etc. ;  esp.  of  the  public  games,  'Iirfl/iia  Iktiv,  etc., 
Simon.  158  : — Pass.,  07011'  yplih)  the  game  was  won,  Soph.  O.  C.  1 1 48  ; 
cf.  KaBaipiu  IV.  b.  generally,  to  obtain,  gain,  opp.  to  ixiptvyai.  Plat. 

^eP'  359  A,  cf.  Tim.  64  B,  etc.  4.  as  Att.  law-term,  to  convict  a 

person  of  a  thing,  nva  tivos  Ar.  Nub.  591  ;  tiki  a'  1)  AiVij  Eur.  Heracl. 
636  :  also  c.  part.,  aip»V  nva  *A«'irTC»'Ta  to  convict  of  theft,  Ar.  Eq. 


829,  Plat.  Legg.  941  D  ;  so,  rjprjo-0ai  xkowtvs  (sc.  wv)  Soph.  Ant.  493, 
cf.  406.  b.  alptiv  Slxnv  or  ypatpr/v  to  get  a  verdict  for  conviction, 

Antipho  115.  24,  etc.  ;  but  also,  oiktjv  iktiv  Ttva  to  convict  one  on  trial 
Isae.  64.  19 ;  iktiv  to.  SiapapTvpijOivTa  to  convict  the  evidence  of  false- 
hood, Isocr.  374  B.  0.  absol.  to  get  a  conviction,  ol  ik6vrts,  opp.  to 
ol  iakaiKoTts,  Dem.  518. 16  ;  Kuirpis  tTkt  koyots  alokois  (sic  Musgr.  pro 
Soklots)  Aphrodite  won  her  cause  .  . ,  Id.  Andr.  290,  cf.  Supp.  608,  Plat. 
Legg.  762  B,  etc.  d.  of  a  thing  or  circumstances  which  convict, 
tout'  tOTiv  o  ipl  aip-qan  Id.  Apol.  28  A.  5.  o  koyos  aipia,  Lat. 
ratio  evincit,  reason  or  the  reason  of  the  thing  proves,  Hdt.  2.  33;  also 
c.  ace.  pers.,  reason  persuades  one,  Id.  1.  132.,  7.  41  ;  d/s  ipi)  yvuun 
aiptti  Hdt.  2.  43  ;  oirr)  o  kuyos  aipti  ttikTiara  ixtiv  Plat.  Rep.  604  C, 
cf.  607  B ;  c.  inf.,  lb.  440  B.  III.  to  grasp  with  the  mind,  take 
in,  understand.  Plat.  Phileb.  17  E,  20  D,  Polit.  282  D. 

B.  Med.,  with  pf.  ypTipai  (v.  supr.),  to  take  for  oneself,  iyxos  ikt- 
a$ai  to  take  one's  spear,  II.  16.  140,  etc.;  Sopmv,  ottirvov  to  take  one's 
supper,  7.  370.,  2.  399 ;  irtitiv  b'  oiiK  ttxtv  iktaOat  Od.  11.  584 ;  Tpaialv 
.  .  opxov  ik.  to  accept  it  from  . . ,  II.  22.  119  ;  and  so  in  most  senses  of 
the  Act.,  with  the  reflexive  force  added.  II.  to  take  to  oneself, 
choose,  II.  10.  235,  Od.  16.  149 :  hence  to  take  in  preference,  prefer  one 
thing  to  another,  Tt  irpo  tivos  Hdt.  I.  87  ;  ti  dvri  tivos  Xen.  An.  1.  7, 
3,  Dem.  22.  21  ;  also,  ti  twos  Soph.  Ph.  1100;  ti  pakkov  t)  . . ,  or 
pakkuv  tivos,  freq.  in  Att. ;  and  sometimes,  like  0ovkto$at,  aiptiaOai 
^..,  without  fiakkov,  Pind.  N.  10.  IIO,  Theocr.  II.  49,  and  even  in 
Att.  Prose,  Lys.  196.  23.  b.  c.  inf.  to  prefer  to  do,  Hdt.  I.  1 1,  al.,  and 
Att. ;  also,  fiakkov  aipttaOat,  c.  inf.,  like  Cicero's  potius  malle.  Plat.  Apol. 
38  E,  etc.  c.  aiptiaOai  ti  . .  ,  to  be  content  if..,  Anth.  P.  12. 
68.  2.  aiptfirflai  Ta  tivos  or  Ttva  to  take  another's  part,  join 
his  party,  Hdt.  I.  108,  etc.;  aip.  yvwpinv  to  adopt  an  opinion,  Id.  4. 
137.  3.  to  choose  by  vote,  elect  to  an  office,  aiptiaOai  Tiva  apxovra, 
OTparnyiv,  etc.,  freq.  in  Att.;  also,  alp.  Ttva  eir'  apxv"  Plat.  Meno  90  B; 
alp.  Ttva  apxtiv  Id.  Apol.  28  E,  cf.  II.  2.  127.  4.  v.  supr.  A.  II.  I. 

C.  Pass,  to  be  taken,  Hdt.  I.  185,  191.,  9.  102  ;  but  in  this  sense, 
akioxofiat  is  more  used  in  Att.  as  Pass.  2.  v.  supr.  A.  II. 
3.  II.  as  Pass,  to  the  med.  sense,  to  be  chosen,  in  pf.  rtpTjuai 
(which  is  also  med.),  Aesch.  Ag.  1209,  etc.;  Ion.  dpaiprjuat  Hdt.  7. 
1 18,  172,  173,  al. ;  aTparnyuv  ypnpivos  Xen.  Mem.  3.  2,  2  ;  «rr'  apxvs 
ijpfja$at  lb.  3.  3,  2  ;  iv  dpxv"  "va  Plat.  Legg.  809  A  ; — the  aor.  pp«- 
Orjv  is  always  so  used,  Aesch.  Th.  505,  Ar.  A  v.  799,  Thuc,  etc. ;  the  pres. 
rarely,  alpouvrai  vptafititrai,  are  chosen,  Arist.  Pol.  4.  15.  3. 

aIpT|<Ti-T<ixTjs,  ovs,  u,  taker  of  cities,  name  of  a  play  by  Diphilus. 

oipucos,  ^,  iv,  Diosc.  2.  137,  or  aipivos,  n,  ov,  Aretae.  Cur.  M.  Ac.  2. 
6  :— o/or  made  of  darnel  (aipa). 

otpo-mvov,  to,  a  sieve  (iv  y  m/pot  arfOovrat  Inrip  too  tcLs  dipas  tiitk- 
Otiv),  Ar.  Fr.  404  ;  v.  Phryn.  in  A.  B.  22,  Hesych.,  Suid. 

d-'ipot  p],  i,  Od.  18.  73lpos  (ti'uuv.  Irus  unhappy  Irus, — a  play  upon 
his  name,  like  bwpa  abojpa  :  cf.  Alvunapis,  Autnrapis,  xaxotkios. 

aipu  (lengthd.  Ep.  and  poet,  dctpoi  q.  v.) :  f.  dpiu  [d]  (which  hardly 
occurs  in  the  act.  form,  v.  infr.) ;  from  it  must  be  distinguished  apui  [a], 
contr.  from  d<pai,  fut.  of  atipa) : — aor.  ^pa  Hdt.  9.  59,  Aesch.  Ag.  47, 
Thuc,  with  d  through  all  moods,  imper.  dpov,  subj.  dpps,  opt.  dpcias, 
part,  dpat  [d],  Aesch.,  Soph.,  inf.  apat  Call.  Cer.  35  : — pf.  ijp*a  Dem. 
786.  4,  (d»-)  Thuc  8.  100:— plqpf.  1\pxtaav  (d*-)  Dem.  387.  28: — 
Med.,  Eur.  El.  360,  Thuc  4.  60 :  impf.  ypvpnv  Soph.  Ant.  907  :  fut. 
dpovpuu  [a]  Id.  O.  C.  460,  Aj.  75  (where  dpti  seems  to.be  the  true  read- 
ing). Plat.  Legg.  969  A;  dpiopai  Pind.  P.  I.  146;  (for  dpovpai  [a]  v. 
d«ip«u)  : — aor.  I  i\pdp.m>  II.  14.  510,  Eur.,  Plat.,  with  a  through  all 
moods,  subj.  dtpr/,  opt.  dpaifirjv,  inf.  dpaaOai,  part,  dpdptvos.  Soph.,  Eur., 
and  in  Prose  : — in  Ep.  poets  also  aor.  2  dpd/xijv  [4]  II.  II.  625.,  23.  592  ; 
Ep.  subj.  dpmu  Hes.  Op.  632,  dpr/rat  II.  1 2.  435  ;  opt.  dpoipa)v  II.,  Trag. ; 
inf.  dpioOai  Horn.,  Soph.  Aj.  245  ;  part,  dpofitvos  Aesch.  Eum.  168 : — 
pf.  (in  med.  sense)  fjptiat  Soph.  El.  54 : — Pass.,  fut.  dpOr)ootxai  Ar.  Ach. 
565  :  aor.  f)p9ny  Aesch.,  Thuc,  etc.,  and  iir-ap$tis,  etc.,  even  in  Hdt.  I. 
90,  etc  :  perf.  rjppat  Eur.  Fr.  1027,  Thuc,  but  in  med.  sense,  Soph.  El.  54. 
— Cf.  dv-,  dvr-,  dw-,  8t-,  tla-,  i(-,  iv-,  xar-,  yitT-,  vpoa-,  aw-,  imtp- 
aipoi.  (For  the  Root,  v.  deipai:  Curt,  thinks  that  the  tenses  with  a,  viz.  fut. 
dptiaOai,  aor.  2  dpiaOat,  cannot  belong  to  the  same  Root  with  those 
which  have  &,  fut.  dpd»  (v.  sub  dctpoi),  aor.  I  Spat,  dpaaOai :  no  doubt 
the  fut.  cited  belongs  to  dctpoi;  but  the  aor.  forms  may  have  arisen 
from  atpoi,  independently  of  dctpoi,  just  as  ipatVai,  fut.  tpavw,  has  i<pr]va  for 
its  aor.  1.) 

A.  Act.  to  take  up,  raise,  lift  up,  vixvv  II.  17.  724  (the  only  in- 
stance in  Horn,  of  afpoi  for  dctpoi)  ;  so,  ipntvovs  dpOfis  Antipho  116.  7  '• 
to  raise  up,  support,  nvd  Soph.  Ph.  879 ;  dvo  yijs  aip.  Plat.  Tim.  90  A  ; 
often  in  part.,  dpas  ivatat  he  raised  [them]  and  struck,  Soph.  O.  T. 
1270: — to  take  up  to  carry,  and  so  to  carry,  bring,  Ttvi  ti  Ar.  Ran. 
1339. — Phrases,  a'pttv  tSrjpa  to  step,  walk,  Eur.  Tro.  342  ;  ai"p.  axikrj, 
of  a  horse,  Xen.  Eq.  10, 15  ;  cf.  Arist.  Incess.  11,3  : — opSov  aiptiv  to  x&pa 
Aesch.  Cho.  496 ;  otpOakpov  Spas  Soph.  Tr.  795  ;  dpaaa  pv[as,  of  a 
deer.  Id.  Fr.  no: — dtp.  tci"xos  iKavoV  Thuc.  I.  90,  cf.  2.  75;  afp.  an- 
pxiov  to  make  signal,  Xen.  Cyr.  7.  I,  23  ;  afp.  pnxavf)V  to  make  a  coup 
or  unexpected  scene  in  the  theatre,  Antiph.  Tloino.  1 .  1 5  ;  dtp.  itovs  to 
call  up  the  gods,  Plat.  Crat.  425  D : — Pass,  to  mount  up,  ascend,  Xen. 
Hell.  5.  2,  5  ;  dvoi  dpffijvai  to  be  high  in  heaven,  of  the  sun,  Hipp.  Aer. 
283;  (so  intr.  in  Act.,  ws  av  .  .  ^Xios  atpn  Soph.  Ph.  1331)  :— to  be 
seized,  snatched  up,  sublimis  rapt,  Ar.  Ach.  565,  cf.  571.  ^  2.  often 
of  armies  and  ships,  afp.  Tds  vavs  to  get  the  fleet  under  sail,  Thuc.  1.52: 
— also  intr.  to  get  under  way,  start,  set  out,  Spat  t£  OTpaTcp  Id.  2.  12  ; 
so  absol.,  lb.  23 :  Hdt.  has  the  Pass,  dcpfijjvai  in  this  sense,  cf.  dctpoi ; 
also  in  Med.,  Soph.  Tr.  1 255.  II.  to  bear,  sustain,  pipov  Aesch. 


40 


iipwSiis  ■ 


vnip  Aids  alaav  17.  321,  cf. 
rtav  kclt    alaav  by  thy  ordi- 


Pers.  547;    S8\ov  Soph.  Tr.  80.  III.  to  raise  up,  exalt,  dnb 

apuxpov  b"  &v  apdas  ftiyav  Aesch.  Cho.  262,  cf.  791 ;  6\0ov  ov  Aapuos 
r)p(V  Id.  Pers.  164 : — esp.  of  pride  and  passion,  to  exalt,  excite,  vipoii 
aipttv  0v(i6v  to  grow  excited.  Soph.  O.  T.  914  ;  alptiv  Bdpaos  to  pluck 
up  courage,  Eur.,  etc. ;  cf.  infr.  B : — Pass,  to  be  raised,  increased,  17  5u- 
va/iis  rjptTo  Thuc.  I.  118;  rjpfTO  to  vtpos  toO  t(Ixovs  p-iya  Id.  2.  75  ; 
ijpOrj  piyas  rose  to  greatness,  Dem.  20.  9  ;  ovk  rjp&rj  vovv  is  draaBa- 
\irjr  Simon,  in  ;  dpBr)vai  </>ci/9y,  Srifiaoi  Aesch.  Theb.  196,  Eur.  Hec. 
68;   absol.  to  be  excited.  Soph.  Ant.  ill.  2.  to  raise  by  words, 

and  so  to  praise,  extol,  Eur.  Heracl.  322,  etc. ;  aipeiv  \6ytp  to  exagge- 
rate, Dem.  537.  13.  IV.  to  lift  and  take  away,  to  remove,  dnu 
p.(  Ttfiav  rjpav  Aesch.  Eum.  880;  Ttvd  ix  m\fa>s  Plat.  Rep.  578  E; 
generally,  to  take  away,  put  an  end  to,  rcL  Katcd  Eur.  El.  942  ;  alp.  rpa- 
nifas  to  end  dinner,  Menand.  Ktup.  2  ;  dpBivros  tov  aiTtov  Arist.  Probl. 
19.  36.  2.  to  take  away  from  a  thing,  c.  gen.,  Aesch.  Eum. 
846.  3.  later  to  take  off,  Mil,  Ev.  Matt.  24.  39,  Luc.  23.  18,  etc. 
B.  Med.,  with  pf.  pass,  rjppat  (v.  supr.),  to  take  up  for  oneself  or 
what  is  one's  own :  to  carry  off,  win,  gain,  x\ios  iaBXbv  dpotro  II.  5.  3, 
cf.  Plat.  Legg.  969  A;  diBkta  noaatv  dpovro  (of  horses)  II.  9.  1 24; 
Kvbos  apioOai  9.  303,  Od.  22.  253: — hence  simply  to  receive,  (\kos 
dpioBat  II.  14.  130;  rvKfiav  Find.  N.  7-  87: — so  also  in  Att.,  bdkiav 
dp(T  (so  Schneidew.  for  dp(is)  wilt  incur  .  . ,  Soph.  Aj.  75  ;  oyxov  dp.  to 
be  puffed  up,  lb.  129,  cf.  Plat.  Polit.  277  B.  II.  to  take  upon 
oneself,  undergo,  carry,  oi/S'  b\v  vrjvs  .  .  dxBos  apono  II.  20.  247  ;  dyos 
Aesch.  Eum.  167  ;  ndvov  Soph.  Ant.  907  ;  fidpos  Eur.  Cycl.  473.  2. 
to  undertake,  begin,  no\(ptov  Aesch.  Supp.  341,  Thuc.  4.  60,  Dem.  58. 
7;  xivSvvov  Antipho  136.  44;  V(txos,  ixBpav,  etc.,  Eur.  Heracl.  986, 
991 : — also  tpvyr)v  dpioBat  fugam  capere,  Aesch.  Pers.  481,  Eur.  Rhes. 
54;  so,  iro8o<V  xkondv  Soph.  Aj.  247.  III.  to  raise  up,  aanrjpd 
tiki  Soph.  O.  C.  460 :  of  sound,  aiptaOat  (paivrjv,  to  raise,  lift  up  one's 
voice,  Ar.  Eq.  546  ;  nivBos  Soph.  O.  T.  1225.  IV.  like  Act.  to 
take  away,  Eur.  I.  T.  1 201. 

aipwSns.  (s,  ((ISos)  =  aipixos,  Theophr.  H.  P.  8.  4,  6. 

**Ai's,  obsol.  nominat.,  v.  sub'AiSijs  or  0817s. 

Aura,  r),  like  Mofpa,  the  divinity  who  dispenses  to  every  one  his  lot  or 
destiny,  Lat.  Parca,  daaa  oi  Alaa  ytyvoptivtp  inivno(  II.  20.  127,  cf.  Od. 

7.  197.  II.  as  Appellat.,  1.  the  decree,  dispensation  of  a 
god,  T(Ttp.r)aBai  Aids  atari  II.  9.  608  ; 
487;  Saipiovos  alaa  xaxr)  Od.  n.  61 
nance,  Pind.  N.  3.  25  ;  0iov  alaa  Eur.  Andr.  1 203  (lyr.)  :— kot'  alaav 

fitly,  duly,  like  xard  /totpav,  II.  10.  445,  etc. ;  xar  alaav,  oiS'  birtp 
alaav  II.  6.  333  ;  iv  ataa  Aesch.  Supp.  547  ;  opp.  to  nap'  alaav,  Pind.  P. 

8.  16.  2.  one's  lot,  destiny,  like  ptotpa,  ov  yap  ol  rrjS'  alaa  .  .  6\e- 
aBat,  d\K'  «ti  of  ftotp'  iari  .  .  Od.  5.  113,  114;  c.  inf.,  tri  yap  vv  ptot 
aiVa  fiiavai  14.  359,  cf.  13.  306,  al. ;  Kaxrj  atari .  .  ikopcnv  by  ill  luck, 
II.  5.  209 ;  tov  ala'  dnkaros  Jax(t  Soph.  Aj.  256  (lyr.),  cf.  Anth.  P.  7. 
624.  3.  generally,  a  share  in  a  thing,  \rjiZos,  iknibos  ataa  Od.  5. 
40.,  19.  84  ;  x^ovfe  Pind.  P.  9.  99  ;  for  the  proverb  iv  xapbs  a'tarj,  v.  s. 
xdp. — On  the  Homeric  ataa,  as  compared  with  ptotpa,  v.  Gladstone, 
Horn.  2.  286,  sq. — The  word  was  much  used  by  Pind.,  not  seldom  by 
Aesch.,  twice  each  by  Soph,  and  Eur.,  but  only  in  lyr.  passages. 

auraicos,  o,  a  branch  of  myrtle  or  laurel,  handed  by  one  to  another  at 
table  as  a  challenge  to  sing,  Plut.  2.  615  B,  Hesych. 

alcdXuv,  aivos,  0,  a  kind  of  hawk,  prob.  the  merlin,  Falco  aesalon, 
Arist.  H.  A.  9.  36,  I. 

aicrfldvouai  (cf.  aiaBoptat),  Ion.  3  pi.  opt.  a'toBavoiaro  used  by  Ar.  Pax 
209 :  impf.  r)o8av6p.r)v :  fut.  a'ia6r)aopiai,  Att.,  (in  Lxx  aio$av8r)aop.ai 
and  a'taBr)Br)aonat)  :  aor.  2  r)oB6p,m>  Hdt.  and  Att. ;  pf.  ijoBnpiai ;  later, 
aor.  I  f,aBr)adptr\v  Schol.  Arat.  418,  and  in  Lxx  r)aBr)Bnv:  Dep. :  (dta). 
(The  4/ AXE  seems  to  be  a  lengthd.  form  of  AI,  di'cu,  q.  v.)  Att.  Verb 
(used  also  by  Hdt.),  to  perceive,  apprehend  or  notice  by  the  senses,  Hdt. 
3.  87  ;  a'taB.  tt)  &kotj,  tj  bapy  Thuc.  6. 1 7,  Xen.  Mem.  3. 1 1, 8  :  to  see, 
Soph.  Ph.  75,  etc. :  to  hear,  0of)v  Id.  Aj.  1318,  cf.  Ph.  252  ;  ovk  (tSov, 
rjaBoiiTjv  S'  ir  ovTa  vtv  lb.  445  ;  rjaB.  rtvis  vTroaTcvoiarjs  Id.  El.  79, 
cf.  Eur.  Hipp.  603,  etc.  2.  of  mental  perception,  to  perceive, 

understand,  also  to  hear,  learn,  often  in  Att. :  absol.,  a'toBavu,  Lat. 
tenes,  you  are  right,  Eur.  Or.  752.  II.  Construct,  in  both  senses, 

c.  gen.  to  take  notice  of,  have  perception  of,  raiv  xanaiv  Eur.  Tro.  633, 
etc. ;  rarely  mpi  tivos  Thuc.  I.  70;  a'taB.  imo  rtvos  to  learn  from  one, 
Id.  5.  2  ;  !«1  tivos  by  means  of  some  one,  often  in  Plat. ;  also  c.  ace, 
Soph.  El.  89,  Ph.  252,  Eur.  Hel.  653,  764,  etc. : — dependent  clauses  are 
mostly  added  in  part,  agreeing  with  subject,  aiaBdvojuat  xa/ivaiv  Thuc.  2. 
51  ;  aiaBavdfuBa  yikotot  oms  Plat.  Theag.  122  C;  or  agreeing  with 
object,  Tvpavvovs  ixweaovras  r]aB6iajv  Aesch.  Pr.  957,  cf.  Thuc.  I.  47, 
etc. :  more  rarely  c.  ace.  et  inf.,  Id.  6.  59 ;  also,  -jjoBero  to  arpa- 
Tivpa  on  r)v  .  .  Xen.  An.  I.  2,  21  ;  a'taB.  ws  .  .  lb.  3.  I,  40;  etc. ; 
ovi^Ka  .  .  Soph.  El.  1477: — a'taBavoptevos  rrj  r)\iKtqi  absol.  having  full 
possession  of  my  faculties  by  reason  of  (or  notwithstanding)  my  age, 
Thuc.  5.  26 ;  v.  Poppo  ad  1. — The  Pass,  is  supplied  by  aiaBrjatv  irapixai, 
cf.  aiaBijats. 

afa0T)|io,  aros,  To,  the  thing  perceived  by  the  senses,  or  the  sensation  of 
any  object,  Arist.  An.  Post.  2.  19,  3,  Metaph.  3.  5,  29,  etc.  II. 

sense  or  perception  of  'a  thing,  KaxSiv  Eur.  I.  A.  1243. 

aur(ri)(ris,  ecus,  r),  perception  by  the  senses,  esp.  by  feeling,  but  also  by 
seeing,  hearing,  etc.,  sensation,  a'taB.  irnudrcov  perception,  sense  of . . , 
Eur.  El.  290 :  also  of  the  mind,  perception,  knowledge  of  a  thing,  Plut. 
Lucull.  11,  etc. — The  phrase  ataBr/atv  lxtiv  's  usea  !•  of  persons, 

ataB.  ixttv  Tiv6s,  =  alo6av(aBat  Ttvos  or  ti,  to  have  a  perception  of  a 
thing,  perceive  it,  Plat.  Apol.  40  C,  Theaet.  192  B  ;  also,  aiaB-natv 
a'taBaveaSat  Phaedr.  240  C  ;  Xaptflavftv  Isocr.  12  C.  2.  of  things, 


-  a/cTToy. 

to  give  a  perception,  i.  e.  be  perceived,  become  perceptible,  and  so  serving 
as  a  Pass,  to  aiaBdvofiat,  Thuc.  2.  61  ;  more  freq.  aiaBrjatv  -napixttv. 
Id.  3.  22,  Xen.  An.  4.  6,  13,  etc.;  ataBr/atv  rrotetv  Ttv6s  Antipho  134. 
29,  Dem.  133.  14;  aiaBrjatv  rrapix'tv  rtvus  to  give  the  means  of  observing 
a  thing,  furnish  an  instance,  Thuc.  2.  50.  II.  one  of  the  senses, 

17  tou  tipdv  ataB.  Plat.  Rep.  507  E  ;  dir'  otf,«vs  fj  Ttvos  dWrjs  a'taB.  Id. 
Phileb.  39  B,  etc. :  and  in  pi.  the  senses.  Id.  Theaet.  156  B,  etc.  III. 

in  object,  sense,  =  ataBri/ia,  a  sensation  or  perception,  Arist.  Metaph.  I . 
I,  14,  Poet.  15,  fin. ;  so,  aiaBrjatts  Btwv  visions  of  the  gods,  Plat.  Phaedo 
III  B.  2.  in  hunting,  the  scent,  track,  slot,  Xen.  Cyn.  3,  5. — Only 

in  Att.  Prose,  except  Eur.  1.  c,  Antiph.  Zairip.  I.  5. 

aio-9t]TT|pi.ov,  to,  an  organ  of  sense,  Hipp.  375.  44,  Arist.  de  An.  2.  9, 
12.,  2.  10,  4  ;  irrdv  rj  xaSapd  TCfa8rjTr)pta  Macho  'Ettio't.  I.  5  ;  Td  a'taB. 
the  faculties,  Lxx,  Ep.  Hebr.  5.  14. 

a'io-frr|Tr|s,  ou,  o,  one  who  perceives.  Plat.  Theaet.  160  D. 

aurO-q-riKos,  r),  ov,  of  or  for  sensation  or  perception  by  the  senses,  sensi- 
tive, perceptive,  Plat.  Tim.  67  A;  feu^  ataBrrrncr)  Arist.  Eth.  N.  I.  7, 
1 2  : — generally,  quick,  sharp,  ypavs  Alex,  (is  to  fypiap  I  : — Adv.,  aiaB-n- 
TtKtxis  (X€IV  t0  De  quick  of  perception,  Arist.  Eth.  E.  3.  2,  8  ;  ataB.  ixuv 
iavTOv,  c.  part.,  to  be  conscious  of  myself  doing,  Ael.  V.  H.  14.  23.  2. 

pass.,  ubvvrj  ataBrjTtKf)  a  keen,  sharp  pang,  Galen.  II.  of  things, 

perceptible,  Plut.  2.  90  B. 

aurtrnros,  f),  6v,  and  6s,  ov  Plat.  Meno  76  D  : — verb.  Adj.  sensible,  per- 
ceptible by  the  senses,  opp.  to  vorrros,  Id.  Polit.  285  E,  etc. ;  to  aiaBrjruv 
an  object  of  sensation  or  perception,  Id.  Tim.  37  B,  etc.  Adv. -tws,  Arist. 
Color.  3,  13,  Plut.  2.  953  C. 

atoOofiai,  a  late  form  for  alaBa.voy.at,  Clem.  Al.  519,  882,  Origen.,  etc.; 
introduced  here  and  there  by  the  Copyists  into  the  early  writers' (but  prob. 
incorrectly),  as  Thuc.  5.  26,  Isocr.  27  D,  Plat.  Rep.  608  A. 

dto*9oi,  (arjptt)  Ep.  verb,  to  breathe  out,  like  diroirWai,  Bvfibv  ataBt  he  was 
giving  up  the  ghost,  II.  20.  403  ;  Bv/iov  diaBuv  16.  468.     Cf.  aia  =  an  pa. 

aio-L^Lia.  17,  happiness,  a'tatfiiats  ttKovtov  Aesch.  Eum.  996. 

aicafios,  ov,  also  IJ,  ov,  Od.  23.  14:  (alaa) : — Ep.  Adj.,  like  Lat. 
fatalis,  appointed  by  the  will  of  the  gods,  destined,  aXatptov  r)p.ap  the  fatal 
day,  day  of  death,  II.  8.  72,  Bacis  ap.  Hdt.  9.  43,  etc. ;  atatp.6v  «<m  'tis 
fated,  II.  21.  291.  II.  agreeable  to  the  decree  of  fate,  meet, 

right,  fitting,  alatfia  (irretv  Od.  22.  46  ;  atatpta  eibws,  opp.  to  atavXa 
{tifav,  2.  231;  ataiyrj  tppivas  right-minded,  well-disposed,  23.  14; 
atatpta  rrivetv  to  drink  in  decent  measure,  21.  294. 

cuo-i.6ou.cu,  Med.  to  take  as  a  good  omen,  think  lucky,  Plut.  2.  774  C,  etc. 

Qtcrtos,  ov,  also  a,  ov,  Pind.  N.  9.  43,  Eur.  Ion  421 :  (alaa) : — poet. 
Adj.  boding  well,  auspicious,  coming  at  a  good  time,  lucky,  opportune, 
oSoiTropos  II.  24.  376,  cf.  Aesch.  Ag.  104  (lyr.),  Soph.  O.  C.  34;  l)ptipa 
Eur.  1.  c. ;  afcrtos-  iv  (piXorrrrt  Epigr.  Gr.  615: — most  freq.  of  omens, 
aicri'a  opvts  Pind.  1.  a,  Soph.  O.  T.  52;  cf.  dtros  Xen.  Cyr.  2.  4, 19,  etc.: 
v.  sub  0810s: — Adv.  -icos,  Eur.  Ion  410.  II.  meet,  right,  a'iatos 

6\kt),  Lat.  justum  pondus,  Nic.  Th.  93. 

d-icos,  ov,  =  dvtaos,  unlike,  unequal,  Pind.  I.  7-  60. 

duro-co,  Horn.,  Hdt. ;  in  Pind.  and  Trag.  contr.  ao-cra  ;  in  other  Att. 
writers  cjttco,  or  dmu  (without  1  subscr.)  in  Mss.  of  Plat.,  etc. ;  impf. 
r\taaov  II.  18.  506,  Ion.  ataaeaxov  Ap.  Rh.,  Att.  yoaov  Aesch.  Pr.  676, 
Eur. : — fut.  at(ai,  (vw-)  II.  21.  126,  Att.  q^a>  Eur.,  Ar. : — aor.  r)t(a  Horn., 
(81-)  Hdt. ;  Att.  rj(a  Aesch.  Pr.  837,  Soph.  O.  C.  890,  etc.,  part.  a(as 
Isae.  47.  21,  Ion.  di(aaxov  II.  23.  369: — Med.,  aor.  di(aa8at  II.  22. 
195  : — Pass.,  Horn. :  aor.  r)'txBri,  dtxBnv  II.  (v.  infr.). — The  Trag.  use 
the  uncontr.  forms  in  lyr.  passages,  Soph.  O.  C.  1497,  Tr.  843,  Eur.  Tro. 
156,  1086,  Supp.  962  ;  sometimes  also  in  trim.,  as  maintained  by  Pors. 
Hec.  31,  Elmsl.  Bacch.  147  ;  whereas  Piers,  and  other  scholars  would 
emend  all  such  passages : — in  later  times  the  Verb  lost  the  1  subscript.,  v. 
Stataaai.  It  is  a  poiit.,  chiefly  Ep.,  Verb,  rarely  found  in  good  Prose,  as 
also  the  compds.  dv— ,  dir-,  St-,  ela-,  i£— ,  irr-,  kot-,  /x«t-,  nap-,  rrpoa—, 
vrr-aiaaa.  (From  .^AIK,  cf.  at(,  atxptr).)  [a-  in  Horn.,  save  in 

the  compd.  irrctt(u  II.  21.  126:  cf.  Nic.  Th.  455.]  To  move  with 

a  quick  shooting  motion,  to  shoot,  dart,  glance,  as  light,  aiyr)  II.  18.  212, 
etc. ;  so,  vdos  II.  15.  80;  of  shooting  pain,  Eur.  Hipp.  1352  : — hence  of 
any  rapid  motion,  as  of  one  darting  upon  his  enemy,  diaauv  iyx", 
tpaaydvty,  'imrots,  Lat.  ruere,  impetu  ferri,  II.  II.  484.,  5.  81.,  17.  460, 
etc. ;  c.  dat.  pers.,  18.  506  ;  of  the  rapid  flight  of  birds,  23.  868,  etc. ; 
also,  r)t(ev  rrerioBat  (cf.  0ij  8°  ifVoi)  21.  247;  of  ghosts  gliding  about, 
Od.  10.  495  ;  of  darts,  II.  5.  657  ;  of  a  tree,  to  shoot  up,  Pind.  N.  8.  69 ; 
so  also  once  in  aor.  Med.,  a^Tioc  di(aaBat  II.  22.  195  :  c.  ace.  cogn., 
diaauv  Sp6fir/p.a  Eur.  Phoen.  1394;  Tr)v  .  .  ni\ivBov  rj(as  Aesch.  Pr. 
837  ;  so  also  in  Pass.,  [<?7X0!]  Siaev  . .  irdiatov  dt'xBrjvat  II.  5.  854 ;  is 
ovpavbv  di\Br}Trjv  24.  97  ;  ix  xflP^v  $lv'ia  r)ixBrjaav  slipped  from  his 
hands,  16.  404 ;  dpttpl  Si  xa'Tat  tiptots  diaaovrat  tossed  about  his 
shoulders,  6.  510;  xopen  Si'  avpas  . .  qaairat  floats  on  the  breeze, 
Soph.  O.  C.  1261 : — so  in  Act.  to  be  driven,  nvevpMraiv  imo  Svaxipw 
divaai  Eur.  Supp.  962.  2.  later,  to  turn  eagerly  to  a  thing,  be  eager 

after,  (is  ti  Eur.  Ion  328  ;  also  c.  inf.  to  be  eager  to  do,  Plat.  Legg.  709 
A  ;  and  freq.  in  later  Prose.  II.  in  a  trans,  sense,  avpav  .  .  dta- 

aaiv  putting  the  air  in  motion  (with  a  fan),  Eur.  Or.  1429  (ubi  v.  Pors.)  ; 
but  j)£tc  xtya-  Soph.  Aj.  40,  rather  resembles  the  phrase  0aiv(tv  rruSa, 
etc.,  where  the  ace.  is  the  instrum.  of  motion : — but  later  really  trans,  to 
drive,  force.  Or.  Sib.  5.  27. 

aicrri.  Adv.  of  sq.,  Suid. 

d-'io-Tos,  ov,  contr.  ctaros  Aesch. :  (ISetv,  cf.  di*8^s,  diSrj\os)  : — poet. 
Adj.  unseen,  xai  xi  p.'  aiarov  an  atBipos  ep.$aX(  nbvrcv  II.  14.  258; 
x(tvov  p.iv  dtarov  inoirjaav  n(pt  ndvTaiv  Od.  I.  235;  <px(T  aiaros, 
drrvaros  lb.  242  ;  w\(T  dxXavTos,  qaros  Aesch.  Eum.  565  ;  $aiptot  5* 
d'iOTOt   Id.  Pers.  811;    iv  dtOTOts  T(K(6wv  Id.  Ag.  465;    dnoTpi-ifKKV 


aiarov  v0pm  (prolept.  lor  wort  ftvat  diarov)  Id.  Supp.  881,  cf.  Pr.  910: 
— late  Adv.,  dttrrais  $vfwv  oKeaaav  obscurely,  ingloriously,  Manetho  3. 
363.  II.  act.  unconscious  of,  dVas  (fids  aJiarot  Eur.  Tro.  1313, 

cf.  1 3*1.  2.  in  Stesich.  Fr.  97  (Kleine)  dub.  as  epith.  of  Athena, 

v.  Dind.  ad  Schol.  Ar.  Nub.  964,  Bgk.  ad  Lampr.  I. 

d'urrou  contr.  dVrdu  :  fut.  axrta :  aor.  rttaraxja,  contr.  J70-T-  (v.  infr.): — 
poet.  Verb,  not  in  11.,  used  by  Hdt.,  and  once  in  Plat.,  to  make  unseen, 
to  annihilate,  make  away  with,  destroy,  like  dtpavifa,  wt  ip.'  dtaTwauav 
Od.  20.  79  ;  irOp .  .  dtaToxrev  v\av  Pind.  P.  3.  67  ;  aioTwoat  yivot  to 
xdv  Aesch.  Pr.  232  ;  rtarpiS  rjaTooat  Jojxi  Soph.  Aj.  515  ;  Knpbv  qar&i- 
aat  irvpi  Id.  Fr.  481  a  ;  to"  vplv  bi  nt\wpta  .  .  cuffroi  Aesch.  Pr.  151  ; 
so,  aiorwoti  fitv  Hdt.  3.  69  ;  bvo  Tjfiew  Tjiarajae  lb.  127  : — Pass.,  oi  b' 
ap  diaTwOijaav  aoWiis  Od.  10.  259  ;  ravra  ifinxavaro  .  .  ,  /xij  ti  7cVos 
■aiaToiOui)  Plat.  Prot.  321  A. 

d-urrwp,  opos,  v,  r),  unknowing,  unconscious,  dioTOjp  wv  avrot  Plat. 
Legg.  845  B  ;  Ttvot  of  01  in  a  thing,  Eur.  Andr.  683. 

Qurr(i>TTipios,  ov,  {otoTOoj)  destructive,  Lye.  71. 

dioTtixris,  ews,  r),  annihilation,  C.  I.  127.  5  (?). 

awrvrjTT|p,  ijpos,  o,  a  word  found  in  many  of  the  M8S.  of  II.  24.  347,  as 
epith.  of  Kovpos,  explained  by  some  Gramm.,  happy,  wealthy  (from  at- 
atot)  ;  by  some  as  =  vopuvt,  a  shepherd : — Heyne  and  Spitzn.  follow 
Aristarch.  in  restoring  Kovpw  aiavfivijTTJpt,  princely  youth :  yet  the  Ms. 
.reading  derives  support  from  the  prop.  n.  Aiavrrrnt  in  II. 

oia-uAo-tp-yos,  ov,  —  atavKa  ii(<ov,  ill-doing,  Poeta  ap.  Clem.  Al.  28.  18, 
Maxim,  ir.  xarapx-  368  ;  read  by  Aristarch.  in  II.  5. 403  for  oppiLtoepyot. 

ata-CAos.  ov,  unseemly,  evil,  godless,  opp.  to  atatptot,  aiavKa  pU£arv  II. 
-.  403  ;  pv0Tjoao8at  20.  202  ;  olbtv  h.  Horn.  Merc.  164,  cf.  Anth.  P.  7- 
624.     (Pott.,  Et.  Forsch.  1.  272,  thinks  it  is  for  dtovXos  —  dtoot.) 

aio-vfivdw.  to  rule  over,  aiavpva  xQ°v0*  Eur.  Med.  19,  cf.  Dor.  Inscr. 
in  American  Inst.  3.  p.  317,  aiavuvirrnt  II,  aiavpvrrrtia. 

aio-VfivTfma,  17,  =  aipfTr)  rvpavvit,  an  elective  monarchy,  Arist.  Pol.  3. 
14.  14,  Diog.  L.  I.  100. 

<u<ru(iVT|TT(p,  ripot,  6,  =  sq. ;  v.  sub  atavrrriip. 

aurvp.vT(TrjS,  ov,  o,  a  regulator  of  games,  chosen  by  the  people,  a  judge 
or  umpire,  like  0pa0fvs,  Od.  8.  258 :  generally  a  president,  manager, 
Theocr.  25.  48.  II.  a  ruler  chosen  by  the  people,  an  elective 

prince  (alpfTot  rvpavvot),  dictator,  Arist.  Pol.  3.  14,  8  and  9.,  4.  10,  3 ;  r. 
C.  I.  no.  3044,  Argum.  Soph.  O.  T.,  Diet,  of  Antiqq.  2.  used  to 

express  the  Rom.  dictator,  Dion.  H.  5.  73. — Fem.  aio-vu.vfJTis,  1805,  Suid. 
(Ace.  to  E.  M.  from  atant  uvr)oaa0at,  and  Curtins  favours  this  deriv.) 

aurx<OK<pS'qs,  it,  =  aiaxpoKfpbr)t,  Manetho  4.  314  ;  aio-x«6pv8os.  ov, 
and  aio-x<od>r|p.os,  ov,  talking  shameful  things,  lb.  57,  592. 

oia-XTIUKv.  ov,  v.  aiaxpi)puiv. 

ato-xiuv,  aiTXUrro«,  used  as  Comp.  and  Sup.  of  aiaxpit,  q.  v. 

aixTxot,  tot,  t<S,  shame,  disgrace,  Horn,  (who  often  has  it  in  pi.,  as  II. 
3.  242),  Hes.  Op.  til,  Solon  3,  Aesch.  Supp.  1008,  etc.  2.  in  pi.  also 

disgraceful  deeds,  Od.  I.  229.  II.  ugliness  or  deformity,  whether 

of  mind  or  body.  Plat.  Symp.  201  A,  Xen.  Cyr.  3.  3,  39,  etc. ;  atax0*  trtpl 
Tr)v  xdrn(,v  Hipp.  Art.  790;  ahxot  bviparot  Arist.  Rhet.  3.  3,  13. 

aurxou,  censured  by  Hdn.  w.  pwv.  \i(.  36,  as  a  faulty  form  for  ataxvvai : 
he  cites  jjVxouv  from  the  EtKarrtt  of  Eupol. ;  cf.  Kaibel  Epigr.  Gr.  336. 

<uo-xpri(io>v,  or,  gen.  OK05,  {aiaxpit)  shameful,  base,  Anth.  Plan.  I.  15*, 
ubi  al.  aloxvp-w  (as  in  a  recent  Schol.  ad  Soph.  Aj.  1046  ed.  Erf.)  ;  Pors. 
Phocn.  1622  reads  daxvp-fv. 

aio-xpo-Biov  ov,  filthy-living.  Or.  Sib.  3.  1 89. 

aiorxp6-Y«A<DS,  ottos,  o,  f),  shamefully  ridiculous,  Manetho  4.  283. 

ourxpo-StSAiCTTK,  o«>,  b,  teacher  of  shameful  things,  Manetho  4.  307. 

alo-xpo-«ir«i>,  (twot)  to  use  foul  language,  Ephipp.  +<A.  3. 

aio-xpo«pY<u,  (*ipyai)  v.  sub  alaxpovpyiai. 

aurxpoiu'pSua.  r),  sordid  love  of  gain,  base  covetousness.  Soph.  Ant. 
J 056,  Lys.  121.  43,  Plat.  Legg.  754  E,  etc.;  but  the  analogous  form  is 
alaxpoatpbia,  as  in  Diphil.  Incert.  13. 

aXo-xpoKcpSf <■>,  to  be  aioxpoittpbr)t,  Hyperid.  ap.  Poll.  3.  113. 

aIo-xpo-Kfp8rrs.  it,  sordidly  greedy  of  gain,  Plautus'  turpi-lucri-cupidus, 
first  in  Hdt.  1.  187,  then  Eur.  Andr.  451,  Plat.  Rep.  408  C,  etc.;  v. 
Arist.  Eth.  N.  4.  I,  43.     Adv.  -ban,  I  Ep.  Pet.  5.  2. 

aio-xpoK<pS(a.  17.  v.  sub  aloxpoitipbtia. 

aio-xpoAoY<u,  =  aioxpotviu,  Plat.  Rep.  395  E,  Bryson  ap.  Arist.  Rhet. 
3-  3.  '3- 

oio-xpoXoYia,  i),  foul  language,  Xen.  Lac.  5,  6 :  abuse,  Polyb.  8.  13,  8. 

aiaxpo-Xbyot,  ov,  foul-mouthed ;  and  Adv. -7011,  Poll.  6.  133.,  8.  80,  81. 

a"J,XP*-H-1TTl*i  ""■  °.  f),  fostering  or forming  base  designs,  Aesch.  Ag.  3  3  2. 

aXo-xpo-p.v6<u,  ■  alaxpotwiai,  of  a  delirious  woman,  Hipp.  Epid.  3. 1 109. 

aio-xpo-TTaOrn,  is,  submitting  to  foul  usage,  Philo  3.  368. 

aio-xpoiroUu,  to  act  filthily,  Ath.  343  C.  II.  trans,  to  degrade, 

dishonour,  rat  rixvas  Hipp.  3.  41. 

ourxpoirotta,  i),  euphem.  (or  fellatio,  Schol.  Ar.  Nub.  395. 

ato-xpo-iroios,  ov,  doing  foully,  Eur.  Med.  1346:  euphem.  for  fellator, 
Macho  ap.  Ath.  583  D. 

ai.o~xpo-itpa.yiaj,  =  aiaxpowenito,  Arist.  Eth.  N.  4.  I,  8,  Cyrill. 

aio-xpoirpdYia,  ^,  =  alaxpowotta,  Nilus. 

aio-xpo-irpa.Yp.oo~uvT|,  ^,  =  foreg..  Phot.  Bibl.  33.  36. 

aurxpo-irpcTTTis,  it,  of  hideous  appearance,  Schol.  Eur.  Hipp.  74,  Suid. 
s.  v.   Apxi'Aoyos. 

aurxpo-  Trpoo-uTros.  ov,  of  hideous  countenance,  Suid.  s.  v.  <pt\oK\tjt. 

ato-xpoppT|u.ov<<j>.  =  alaxpotwiu,  Incert.  ap.  Stob.  391.  13. 

oio-xpopp-npoo-uvT),  ^,  =  aioxpoXoyia,  Dem.  Epist.  1489.  8. 

a!o-xpop-pT|pi>v,  ov,  -'olaxpokiyot,  and  Adv.  -fiivaK,  Poll.  8.  81. 

aio-xpos,  a,  ov,  also  os,  vv  Anth.  Plan.  Mil  (ar<7xoj).  In  Horn. 

causing  shame,  dishonouring,  reproachful,  viimoatv  . .  ahxpott  iwitaaiv 


-  altryyvco.  41 

II.  6.  325,  etc. ;  so  in  Adv.,  alaxoait  tviviowt  23.  473.  II.  =  Lat. 

turpis,  opp.  to  xaKu s :  1.  of  outward  appearance,  ugly,  ill-favoured 

of  Thersites,  II.  2.  216,  cf.  h.  Horn.  Ap.  197,  Hdt.  I.  196,  etc.;  de- 
formed, Hipp.  Art.  790;  ataxpws  xo'Aos  with  an  ugly  lameness,  lb. 
829 :  but  commonly  2.  in  moral  sense,  shameful,  disgraceful, 

base,  infamous,  Hdt.  3.  155,  Aesch.  Th.  685,  etc. ;  aloxpott  yap  aicxpd 
lrpayfiar  itcbtbaa/ceTai  Soph.  El.  621  ;  aiaxpov  [«<m],  c,  inf.,  II.  2. 
298,  Soph.  Aj.  473,  1159,  Plat.,  etc.;  iv  aiaxpv  iiadai  ti  Eur.  Hec. 
806  ;  iw  ataxpoit  on  the  ground  of  base  actions,  Soph.  Fr.  196,  Eur. 
Hipp.  511 : — tw  aiaxpov,  as  Subst.,  dishonour,  disgrace,  Soph.  Ph.  476 ; 
to  ifiov  aiaxpov  my  disgrace,  Andoc.  21.  1  ;  the  Socratics  and  Stoics 
spoke  of  to  xa\ov  xal  to  aiaxpov,  Lat.  honestum  et  turpe,  virtue  and 
vice,  cf.  Arist.  Rhet.  I.  9,  I : — Adv.  shamefully,  Trag.,  Plat.,  etc.;  Sup. 
aiffX'oTa  Aesch.  Pr.  959,  Soph.  O.  T.  367.  3.  ill-suited,  aiaxpdt 

6  icaipos  Dem.  287.  35  ;  aiaxpos  vpot  ti  awkward  at  it,  Xen.  Mem.  3. 
8,  7-  III.  instead  of  the  regul.  Comp.  and  Sup.  aio"xpoTfpos, 

-oraTos,  the  forms  alaxi&v,  atax'aTOt  (formed  from  a  Root  ato-xo)  are 
used  by  Horn.,  Hdt.,  and  in  Att. 

aio-xpoTT|S,  rrrot,  r),  ugliness,  deformity,  Lat.  turpitudo,  Plat.  Gorg. 
525  A.  II.  obscenity,  euphem.  {or  fellatio,  Schol.  Ar.  Ran.  1308. 

— In  Tzetz.,  aio"xpoo*vvT),  t). 

aio-xpovpYt'w.  contr.  for  alaxpotpyiaj,  to  act  obscenely,  masturbare, 
Sext.  Emp.  P.  3.  206 : — Pass.,  to.  aiaxpovpyoiuiva  Diog.  L.  prooem.  5. 

oio~xpoupYia,  r),  contr.  for  aiaxpoepyia,  shameless  conduct,  Eur. 
Bacch.  1060;  pi.,  Eus.  H.E.  8. 14, 12.  II.  obscenity,  Aeschin.  41.  13. 

alo-xpovpYOS,  oV,  contr.  for  aiaxpoepyos,  obscene,  Galen.  9.  274. 

Aio-xuAsios,  a,  ov,  of  or  like  Aeschylus,  Schol.  II.  19.  87. 

aio-xwrj  [0],  lj,  (ataxot)  shame  done  one,  disgrace,  dishonour,  «$- 
ataxvvVv  ^**P€(  lt  leads  to  disgrace,  Hdt.  I.  10,  cf.  3.  133  ;  so,  aiaxvvtjv 
<pip(t,  *x(l  ll  b"0!?5'  involves  dishonour,  Soph.  Tr.  66,  Eur.  Andr.  244, 
etc. ;  af^x.  trfpiiaTarai  p.f,  avftfiaivet  /toi  Dem.  30.  24.,  254.  3 ; 
alaxvvn  m-rruv  Soph.  Tr.  597 ;  irepitriirTfiv  Xen.  Hell.  7*  3i  9 » 
alaxvvVv  it*pia*Tttv  tivi  Plat.  Apol.  35  A  ;  aiffx-  trpoa&aSAeiv  Ttvi 
Id.  Legg.  878  C;  iv  aiax-  trotay  Ttva  Dem.  272.  18: — of  a  person, 
aiaxvvrj  vdrpa  Aesch.  Pers.  774»  a^°"X*  TiJ,^s  dishonour  from  .  .  ,  Dem. 
17.  6.  2.  aiax-  ywaiKwv  a  dishonouring  of  women,  Lat.  stupratio, 

Isocr.  64  D,  287  B ;  also,  ypa<pto6at  Ttva  yivovt  aloxvirns  for  dishonour 
done  to  his  race.  Plat.  Legg.  919  E.  II.  shame  for  an  ill  deed, 

Lat.  pudor,  personified  m  Aesch.  Theb.  40*9  ;  Aiaxvvrjv  ov  vopxaaaa 
6(6v  Anth.  P.  7.  450.  2.  generally,  like  aibwt,  shame,  the  sense  of 

shame,  honour,  trdaav  aiax-  dtpett  Soph.  Ph.  120;^  ydp  aiaxvvrj  vdpot 
tov  £r/e  .  .  vofufcrai  Eur.  Heracl.  200 ;  &'  alaxvyy*  *X-iV  to  be  ashamed, 
Id.  1.  T.  683  ;  also,  alaxvynv  ix(iv  Ttvotfor  a  thing,  Soph.  El.  616  ;  or 
aio-xui";  Tivos  ix(l  f  I°'  J°!  a'°"X-  -w'  Ttvl  P'at-  Symp.  178  D; 
vwip  Ttvot  Dem.  43.  6 ;  joined  with  biot  Soph.  Aj.  1079  »  with  «Acos 
and  aibwt,  Antipho  1 14.  22: — rare  in  pi.,  urr/o-o-ovo-ay  aiaxvvatatv 
Soph.  Fr.  588 ;  iv  aiaxvvait  ix<»  I  hold  it  a  shameful  thing,  Eur.  Supp. 
164.  IU.   in  late  authors,  as  Orig.  Philoc.  c.  2,  Schol.  Ar. 

Eq.  364,  =  albotov ;  cf.  tt)v  tow  acu/iaToj  aiax,  AJcid.  ap.  Arist.  Rhet. 

3-  3.  3- 

olaxOvop.«vt),  i),  a  kind  of  Mimosa,  Plin.  24.  17. 
aio~xvvou,^vus,  Adv.  from  aiaxvvoi,  with  shame,  Dion.  H.  7.  50. 
aXaywriov,  verb.  Adj.  of  alaxvvo/iat,  one  must  be  ashamed,  Xen.  Cyr. 

4-  2.  4°-     ■' 

awrxwrqAia,  7),  bashfulness,  Plut.  2.  66  C. 

aiCTx«vnjA6»,  1),  6v,  bashful,  modest.  Plat.  Charm.  166  E,  Arist.  Eth.  N. 
4-  9.  3;  to  aiax-  modesty.  Plat.  Charm.  158  C: — Adv.  -Aais,  Id.  Legg. 
665  E.  II.  of  things,  causing  shame,  shameful,  Arist.  Rhet.  3.  6,  31. 

alo-xwTT|p,  rjpot,  6,  a  dishonourer,  of  Aegisthus,  Aesch.. Cho.  990;  so 
KaTaiaxwrftp,  Id.  Ag.  1 363  : — otherwise  aloxvvTi)p  occurs  only  in  a 
late  Inscr.  in  C.  I.  8664. 

alo-xwrnpot,  "fj,  6v,  =  aiaxwTTj\6t,  in  Comp.,  Plat.  Gorg.  487  B.  (It 
is  disputed  which  is  the  more  Att.  form.  Piers.  Moer.  p.  38.) 

ato-xwTuc6s,  t),  ov,  shameful,  Arist.  Rhet.  3.  6,  13. 

alo-xuvf  6»,  ^,  bv,  shameful,  Pseudo-Phocyl.  1 76,  ubi  Bgk.  aio-xwrr/pofs. 

aurxvvw  [i]  :  Ion.  impf.  alaxvveaKf  (far-)  Q^  Sm.  14.  531 :  fut. 
-vrS)  Eur.  Hipp.  719,  Ion.  -vviai  Hdt.  9.  53  :  aor.  ^irxvva.  II.,  Att. :  pf. 
fiaxvytta  Dio  C.  58.  16,  poxO/ra  Draco  13: — Pass.,  fut.  alo-x0>/ot7»'1' 
Aesah.  Ag.  856,  Ar.  Fr.  31,  Plat.,  rarely  aiaxw9i)aonai  v.  sub  fin. :  aor. 
rjoxvvOrtv  Hdt.  and  Att.,  poet.  inf.  aiaxvv$r)fifv  Pind.  N.  9.  64 :  pf. 
rjoXvpLfat  (v.  infr.  B.  1)  : — cf.  d»-,  irr-aio-xi!''o/uu,  *aT-aio'xv''«'.  To 

make  ugly,  disfigure,  mar,  vpboomov,  KOpujv  II.  18.  34,  37  ;  aiax-  T"v 
"vrwov  to  give  the  horse  a  bad  form,  Xen.  Eq.  1,13.  2.  mostly  in 

moral  sense,  to  dishonour,  tarnish,  /jijSJ  yivot  itaTipwv  aioxwip.(v  11. 
6.  309,  cf.  23.  371 ;  tt)v  Zvdprnv  Hdt.  9.  53  ;  freq.  in  Att.,  as  aiax- 
(tviav  Tpave{av  Aesch.  Ag.  401  ;  Tour  irpos  aiuarot  Soph.  Aj.  I3°5! 
Tour  waripat  Plat.  Menex.  246  D.  b.  esp.  to  dishonour  a  woman, 

Eur.  El.  44,  etc.;  olffx-  tivi)v  Aesch.  Ag.  1626;  — for  Soph.  Ant.  528, 
v.  sub  ai/MiTd«is.  3.  to  dishonour,  disdain,  imx&pia  Pind.  P.  3.  38. 

B.  Pass,  ro  be  dishonoured,  Lat.  contumelia  affici,  vtKVt  rjaxvf 
iiivot,  of  Patroclus,  II.  18.  180;  tit  to  aaipui  aiax-  Arist.  Pol.  5.  10, 
17.  II.  to  be  ashamed,  feel  shame,  absol.,  Od.  7.  305.,  18.  13, 

Hdt.  I.  10,  Eur.  Hipp.  1291.  2.  more  commonly  to  be  ashamed 

at  a  thing,  c.  ace.  rci,  aloxwofitvot  tpdrtv  Avbpwv  Od.  21.  323'  T^lv 
bvayivuav  rilv  i^v  aiax-  Soph.  O.  T.  1079  ;  also  c.  dat.  rei,  Ar.  Nub. 
992,  Lys.  97.  12,  etc. ;  and  with  Preps.,  aiax-  •'"'  r,vi  X-n-  Mem.  2.  3, 
8  ;  Sv  Tiyi  Thuc.  3.  43  ;  imip  Ttvot  Lys.  143.  24,  Dem.,  etc.  b. 

c.  part,  to  be  ashamed  at  doing  a  thing  (which  however  one  does), 
Aesch.  Pr.  643,  Soph.  Ant.  540,  Ar.  Fr.   21,  Plat.,  etc.;  but  o. 

c.  inf.  ro  be  ashamed  to  do  a  thing  (and  therefore  not  to  do  it),  Hdt.  I. 


42 


82,  Aesch.  Ag.  856,  Cho.  917,  Plat.  Rep.  4I4  E,  Phaedr.  257  D,  etc. ; 
though  this  condition  must  not  be  pressed  absolutely,  v.  Apol.  2  2  B.  d. 
foil,  by  a  relat.  clause,  aiaxyvtoSai  tl  or  1)v  .  . ,  to  be  ashamed  that  .  .  , 
Soph.  El.  254,  Andoc.  34.  31,  Plat.,  etc.;  ala\-  M  •  • »  P'at-  Theaet. 
183  E.  8.  c.  ace.  pers.  to  feel  shame  before  one,  Eur.  Ion  933, 

1074,  Pherecr.  Airr.  I.  6,  Plat.  Symp.  216  B;  toV  ye  firjSiv  door' 
alaxvyBriaeTcu  Philem.  Incert.  51  D;  c.  ace.  et  inf.,  Eur.  Hel.  415; 
■gaxvvdnfiiv  Btovs  . .  npoSovvat  airov  Xen.  An.  2.  3,  22  : — also,  aio"x. 
npos  Tira  Arist.  Rhet.  2.  6,  I.  b.  to  reverence,  Aeschin.  25.  36. 

ato-xvvupa,  otos,  ri>,  —  to  aiboiov,  Lxx. 

Aio-uiro-TTOiTjTos,  ov,  made  by  Aesop,  Quintil.  Inst.  5.  II. 

di-ras  [«],  o,  Dor.  word  for  a  beloved  youth,  answering  to  elanvi)Kas  or 
eionvnkos  (the  lover),  Ar.  Fr.  576,  Theocr.  12. 14  (where  it  is  said  to  be 
a  Thessalian  word),  23.63:  also  generally  a  lover,  Xpvaas  (sc.  'Awards) 
8   dt-rns  Anth.  P.   15.   26: — a    fern,   d'tris    (-">$),   occurs    in    Alcman 

125.  Cf.  Miiller  Dor.  4.  4,  6.  (Either  from  atw,  a  hearer;  or  from 
du,  dnpi.  cf.  elonvrjKas.) 

aiTf,  Dor.  for  fire . 

aiTfw,  cf.  airnut :  Ion.  impf.  aireor,  Hdt. :  fut.  alrifaa :  aor.  yrTjo'a : 
pf.  ynjKa  Aristid. ;    pf.  pass.  •Q-rnp.ai,  etc.  To  ask,  beg,  absol.  in 

Od.  18.  49,  Aesch.  Supp.  340.  2.  mostly  c.  ace.  rei,  to  ash  for, 

crave,  demand,  II.  5.  358,  Od.  17.  365,  Att. ;  obov  air.  to  beg  one's 
departure,  i.  e.  ash  leave  to  depart,  Od.  10.  17;  air.  rivi  ti  to  ash 
something/or  one,  JO.  74,  Hdt.  5.  17: — c.  ace.  pers.  et  rei,  ro  ash  a 
person  for  a  thing,  II.  22.  295,  Od.  2.  387,  Hdt.  3.  I,  al.,  and  often  in 
Att. ;  Slxas  ah.  Tied  <povov  to  demand  satisfaction  from  one  for  . .  , 
Hdt.  8.  114;  also,  air.  n  irods  Tiros  Theogn.  556 ;  Tropd  Tiros  Xen.  An. 
1.  3,  16.  3.  c.  ace.  pers.  et  inf.  to  ash  one  to  do,  Od.  3.  173,  Soph. 

O.  C.  1334,  Ant.  65,  etc.;  also,  air.  napd  Tiros  Sovvai  Plat.  Eryx. 
398  E.  4.  in  Logic,  to  postulate,  assume,  Arist.  An.  Pr.  I.  24,  2,  Top. 
8.  13,  2,  etc.  II.  Med.  to  ash  for  oneself,  for  one's  own  use  or 

purpose,  to  claim,  Aesch.  Cho.  480;  often  almost  =  the  Act.,  and  with 
the  same  construct.,  first  in  Hdt.  I.  90.,  9.  34,  Aesch.  Pr.  822,  etc. ; 
alrtiaOai  riva  onas  ..  Antipho  112.  41  ;  often  absol.  in  part.,  airovuiva 
plot  b6s  Aesch.  Cho.  480,  cf.  2,  Theb.  260,  Soph.  Ph.  63  ;  alrovuivn  irov 
rtv(erai  Id.  Ant.  778  ;  alrtjaapitvos  ixprioa.ro  Lys.  154.  24  ;  oil  nip  ydp 
airuv,  obSi  XondS'  airovnevos  Menand.  "T/ir.  5 ;  alreiaBai  imip  Tiros  to 
beg  for  one,  Lys.  141.  35.  III.  Pass,  of  persons,  to  have  a  thing 

begged  of  one,  alrrfitls  ti  Hdt.  8.  Ill,  Thuc.  2.97;  airfv/ifvos  Theocr. 
14.  63  :  also  c.  inf.  to  be  ashed  to  do  a  thing,  Pind.  I.  8  (7).  10.  2. 

of  things,  to  be  ashed,  ro  alrtopifvov  Hdt.  8.  112  ;  fir7roi  rjrrjuivoi  bor- 
rowed horses,  Lys.  1 69.  1 7. 

airrjpa,  otos,  to,  a  request,  demand,  Plat.  Rep.  566  B,  N.  T.  II. 

in  Logic,  a  postulate,  assumption,  Arist.  An.  Post.  I.  10,  7. 

aLrn|AaTLK6s.  17,  ov,  disposed  to  ash,  Artemid.  4.  2. 

atrr|U,aTu8T|S,  is,  (ethos)  like  a  postulate,  Plut.  2.  694  F. 

aLTT|U,i,  Aeol.  for  airia,  Pind.  Fr.  127. 

aiTrjoxs,  tax,  ii,  a  request,  demand,  Hdt.  7.  32,  Antipho  1 29.  40.  II. 
in  Logic,  assumption,  rrfs  dnoKpiatas  Arist.  Interpr.  II,  3. 

euTHTtov,  verb.  Adj.  one  must  ash,  Xen.  Eq.  Mag.  5,  11. 

oitt|tt|S.  ov,  o,  one  that  ash,  a  petitioner,  Dio  C.  Excerpt,  p.  67. 39  Reim. 

aiTTiTtKos.  ti,  ov,  fond  of  ashing,  tivos  Arist.  Eth.  N.  4.  I,  16.  Adv., 
airrrriKu/s  (Xfiv  WP^S  riva  Diog.  L.  6.  31. 

oit>)t6s,  oV,  verb.  Adj.  ashed  for,  dpxf)v  bapryrov,  oiie  airnruv  freely 
given,  not  ashed  for,  Soph.  O.  T.  384. 

aiTia.iJ,  (alri a)  a  charge,  accusation,  imputation,  blame,  Lat.  crimen,  and 
so  the  guilt  ox  fault  implied  in  such  accusation,  first  in  Pind.  O.  1.  55  and 
Hdt.  (but  Horn,  uses  amos,  dramos,  and  alndouai  in  this  sense)  : — 
Phrases:  amor  <?xe"'>  Lat.  crimen  habere,  to  have  the  imputation,  be 
accused,  Tiro's  of  a  thing,  Hdt.  5.  70,  Aesch.  Eum.  579  ;  also  c.  inf.,  Ar. 
Vesp.  506  ;  foil,  by  its  .  .  Plat.  Apol.  38  C  ;  c.  part.,  Id.  Phaedr.  249  E  ; 
imo  Tiros  by  some  one,  Aesch.  Eum.  99,  Plat.  Rep.  565  B ; — reversely, 
oiVia  «x€1  V*  Hdt.  5.  70,  71  ! — also,  airiav  «x€"/  tivos  from  a  person, 
Soph.  Ant.  1 31 2  ;  aiT.  (pevyeiv  tivos  Id.  Ph.  1404;  iv  atria  iivat  or 
yiyveaBat  Hipp.  Art.  830,  Xen.  Cyr.  5.  3,  18  ;  airiav  bnixeiv  to  "e 
under  a  charge,  Plat.  Apol.  33  B,  Xen.  Cyr.  6.  3,  16;  vnopiiveiv 
Aeschin.  73.  24 ;  ipiptaBai  Thuc.  2.  60  ;  \a0fiv  dn-o  Tiros  lb.  18  ;  so, 
alriats  ivixeoBai  Plat.  Crito  52  A;  alrlais  neptniirreiv  Lys.  108. 
21;  els  airiav  ipininrtiv  Plat.  Theaet.  150  A;  airias  rvyxdveiv 
Dem.  1467.  17;  euros  alrias  Kvpeiv  Aesch.  Pr.  330: — opp.  to  these 
are  iv  airia  txfl"  *°  hold  one  guilty,  accuse,  Hdt.  5.  106  ;  Si'  airias 
tX11"  Thuc.  I.  35,  etc.;  iv  arria  0dWeiv  Soph.  O.  T.  655;  tt)v 
airiav  inupipeiv  Ttvi  to  impute  the  fault  to  one,  Hdt.  I.  26;  airiav 
vt/itiv  rivi  Soph.  Aj.  28 ;  iirayeiv  Dem.  320.  9 ;  npoo&dWuv  Tin 
Antipho  121.  32;  dvartBivai,  npoanBivai,  etc.,  Att.;  dnoKveiv  Tipd 
T17S  airias  to  acquit  of  guilt,  Oratt.  2.  in  good  sense,  fi..tv 

Trpd£aiu(v,  airia  Beov  the  credit  is  his,  Aesch.  Theb.  4  ;  57  ovriva  airiav 
ixovatv  'ABnvatoi  fif\Ttovs  yiyovivai  are  reputed  to  have  become 
better,  Plat.  Gorg.  503  B,  cf.  Ale.  1.  119  A;  &v..vipt  airiav  tx(ls 
btatpipttv  in  which  you  are  reputed  to  excel,  Id.  Theaet.  169  A ;  of  .  . 
ixovoi  Tavr-qv  t^v  airiav  who  have  this  as  their  characteristic,  Id.  Rep.  435 
E,  cf.  Legg.  init.,  Arist.  Metaph.  I.  3,  17: — cf.  airtaouai,  icaTr/yopi- 
ofiai.  3.  expostulation,  admonition,  fir)  in  €X^P?  T0  v^iov  r)  airia 

Thuc.  I.  69.  II.  in  Plat,  and  the  philosophic  writers,  a  cause, 

Lat.  causa,  Tim.  68  E,  Phaedo  97  A  sq.,  etc. ;  on  the  four  causes  of 
Arist.,  v.  Phys.  2.  3,  Metaph.  I.  3  : — aiVi'a  toC  yevtoBat  or  yeyovivai 
Plat.  Phaedo  97  A  ;  rov  myiarov  dyaBov  rrf  iroKet  airia  fj  Koivwvia 
Id.  Rep.  464  B : — dat.  airia,  like  Lat.  causa,  for  the  sake  of,  kolvov 
tivos  dyaBov  Thuc.  4.  87,  cf.  Dion.  H.  8.  29 : — the  first  traces  of  this  sense 
are  in  Hdt.  prooem.  oi'  -r)v  airinv  irro\iriTio'av ; — amor  (ncut.  of  amos) 


— a;- 


tTvaiof. 

is  used  just  like  arria  in  the  sense  of  cause,  but  not  in  that  of  accusa- 
tion. III.  an  occasion,  opportunity,  airiav  poaiai  Moiodv 
ivi&aXt  gave  them  an  occasion,  argument,  theme  for  song,  Pind.  N.  7. 16  ; 
airiav  irapixw  Luc.  Tyrannic.  13.  IV.  the  head  or  category 
under  which  a  thing  comes,  Dem.  645.  II.  (The  word  cannot  but  be 
from  the  same  Root  as  airia,  though  the  connexion  of  sense  is  obscure.) 
aiTtd£ou.ai,  Pass,  to  be  accused,  ■/)  no\is  aiVidf«Tai  Xen.  Hell.  I.  6,  5,  cf. 

I2_;  jjrta$eTO  Tiro's  o/a  thing,  Dio  C.  38.  10.    The  Act.  is  not  found. 
aiTiap-a.  otos,  to,  a  charge,  guilt  imputed,  \a0uv  W  airiafiari  riva 
Aesch.  Pr.  194;  TOiofffSe  bi)Of  Zivs  in  airiapiaaiv  aUi'£«Tai  lb.  255  ;  cf. 
Thuc.  5.  72. 

amdop.ai,  used  by  Horn,  only  in  Ep.  forms,  3  pi.  aiTidairrai,  opt. 
aiTioyo,  -aro,  inf.  aiTida<r9ai,  impf.  ijTidairfl*,  -oWto  : — fut.  -daopiai 
Ar.  Nub.  1433,  Plat.:  aor.  ^naaafinv  Eur.,  Thuc,  etc.,  Ion.  part,  oi'ti- 
■nadp.o'os  Hdt. :  pf.  j/Tia/iai  Dem.  408.  7,  Ion.  -117^01  Hipp,  (also  in  pass, 
sense,  and  aor.  yriaBnv  always  so,  v.  infr.  11) :  cf.  in-,  /caT-aiTido/iai : 
(ama).  To  charge,  accuse,  censure,  blame,  c.  ace.  pers.,  Taxa  xev 
*ai  dvainov  airwaro  II.  II.  654,  cf.  78  ;  dvairtov  airidaaBat  13.  775, 
cf.  Od.  20.  135  ;  Beoiis  Pporol  alrioavrat  Od.  I.  32  ;  xai  pC  yridaoBe 
'ixaoros  II.  16.  202  ;  so  also  Soph.  O.  T.  608,  Ph.  685,  etc. ;'  olr.  <Jis 
aiapois  Plat.  Rep.  562  D  ;  air.  riva  Tiros  to  accuse  of  a  thing,  Hdt. 
5.  27,  Plat.  Rep.  619  C,  Dem.  548.  21,  etc. ;— c.  inf.,  ah.  riva  noieiv 
ti  to  accuse  one  of  doing,  Hdt.  5.  27,  Plat.  Criti.  120  C ;  air.  riva  ius  . . 
or  oti  . . ,  Thuc.  I.  120,  Xen.  An.  3.  1,  7  ;  air.  riva  ntpi  tivos  Xen. 
Hell.  1.  7,  6;  c.  ace.  cogn.,  air.  airiav  Kara  Tiros  to  bring  a  charge 
against  one,  Antipho  144.  32  : — in  this  sense,  certain  tenses  are  used  as 
Pass,  to  be  accused,  aor.  1  TJTidBnv  (always)  Thuc.  6.  53.;  8.  68,  Xen. 
Hell.  2.  1,  32  ;  pf.  TJTia/iai  Thuc.  3.  61,  Plat.  Criti.  120  C  ;  fut.  oitio- 
8-nao/iai  Dio  C.  37.  56.  b.  in  good  sense,  to  give  one  the  credit  of 

being,  suppose,  ai  ris  airidrai  vouoBirrjv  dyaBov  yeyovivai ;  Plat.  Rep. 
599  E>  cf-  3°9  0.  Crat.  396  D  ;  and  v.  airia  n.  2.  2.  c.  ace.  rei, 

to  lay  to  one's  charge,  impute,  tovto  air.  Xen.  Cyr.  3.  1,  29;  TaSra 
Dem.  408.  7  ;  c.  dupl.  ace,  ti  ravra  roiis  Aaxavas  ainwpitBa  ;  Ar. 
Ach.  514.  II.  to  allege  as  the  cause,  air.  riva  ainov  Plat.  Phileb. 

22  D,  Gorg.  518  D  ;  oi  to  amor  am  not  to  allege  the  real  cause.  Id. 
Rep.  329  B;  Ti'ra  «xels  airiaaaaBai  .  .  rovrov  Kvpiov ;  lb.  508  A  ;  cpaivas 
t«  .  .  Kai  aXKa  fivpia  air.  Id.  Phaedo  98  D  ;  TararTia  Id.  Tim.  88  A  ; 
av  ri]v  ntviav  airiaaair  dv  ris  Dem.  314.  20;  T^r  5i'r>;r  Arist.  Cael. 
2-  J3.  23  !    Tu  airipiarov  Id.  Phys.  2.  4,  5.  2.  c.  inf.  to  allege 

that,  rov  \6yov  air.  Svox'PV  fivat  Plat.  Prot.  333  D,  cf.  Meno  93  D  ; 
Ikiyyovs  ix  tpiKoootpias  iyyiyveaBai  to  allege  by  way  of  accusation 
that .  .  ,  Id.  Rep.  407  C ;  t^s  i«ods  x^Pas  iridro  tivai  he  alleged  that 
it  was  part  of .  .  ,  Dem.  277.  11. 

amuo-is,  eas,  ■fi,acomplaint,  accusation,  Antipho  132.25,  Arist. Poet  .18.3. 

aiTidT«ov,  verb.  Adj.  one  must  accuse,  Xen.  Cyr.  7.  I,  II.  II. 

one  must  allege  as  the  cause.  Plat.  Rep.  379  C,  Tim.  57  C,  87  B. 

aiTtuTiKos,  17,  o'r,  causal,  Schol.  II.  23.  627.  II.  ij  aiTiaTim} 

(sc.  nraats)  casus  accusativus  ;  Adv.  -kcus,  in  the  accusative,  Gramm. 

amaTOS,  17,  ov,  verb.  Adj.  produced  by  a  cause,  effected,  Arist.  An.  Post. 
I.  9,  4  ;  to  aiViaTor  the  effect,  opp.  to  to  ainov  the  cause,  lb.  2.  16,  I. 

aiT(£u,  Ep.  form  of  alrta  (not  in  II.,  used  once  by  Ar.)  ;  only  found  in 
pres.  (except  aor.  part,  airiaaas  in  Anth.  P.  10.  66)  to  ash,  beg,  c.  ace. 
rei,  error  .  .  airi^av  Hard  brjuov  Od.  17.  558,  cf.  222  ;  fjviit  dv  alri^rrr' 
dprov  Ar.  Pax  1 20.  2.  c.  ace.  pers.  to  beg  of,  airi^uv  .  .  vdvras 

inoixop-fvov  tivrjorijpas  Od.  17.  346.  3.  absol.,  airi( av  Poonuv 

r)v  yaaripa  by  begging,  lb.  228,  cf.  4.  651. 

aLTto-Xoytw,  to  inquire  into  the  causes  of 'a  thing,  account  for,  Plut.  2. 
689  B  ;  rb  £nrovfiivov  Sext.  Emp.  P.  1. 181:  also  as  Dep.  ainoKoyiopai, 
Apoll.  de  Conj.  507. 

at-noAoynT€ov,  verb.  Adj.  one  must  investigate  causes,  Diog.  L.  10.  So. 

amoXo-yia,  fj,  a  giving  the  cause  of  a  thing,  Archyt.  ap.  Stob.  Eel.  I . 
724,  Sext.  Emp.  P.  1.  181. 

aiTioAoyiKos,  17,  or,  ready  at  giving  the  cause,  inquiring  into  causes, 
airioXoyixararos,  of  Aristotle,  Diog.  L.  5.  32  : — as  Subst.  to  -kov  or 
^  -tcq  (sc.  rixvrf),  investigation  of  causes,  Strabo  104,  Galen.  2. 

aivSeapiot  air.  causal  conjunctions,  Gramm.,  cf.  Schol.  Ar.  PI.  40. 

amos,  a,  ov,  more  rarely  os,  ov  Ar.  PI.  547 :  (v.  ama).  To  blame, 

blame^worthy,  culpable,  inei  ov  ri pioi  airioi  eloiv  II.  I.  153,  cf.  3.  164,  Hdt. 
7.  214:  Comp.  alnwrepos,  more  culpable,  Thuc.  4.  70  ;  Sup.  tovs  aiTiaj- 
totods  the  most  guilty,  Hdt.  6.  50  ;  am  Tiros  most  to  blame  for  a  thing, 
Id.  3.  52.  2.  as  Subst.,  amos,  0,  the  accused,  the  culprit,  Lat.  reus, 

Aesch.  Cho.  68,  etc. ;  ot  amoi  too  narpos  they  who  have  sinned  against 
my  father,  lb.  273; — c.  gen.  rei,  01  am  tou  ipovov  Aesch.  Cho.  117,  cf. 
Soph.  Ph.  590,  Hdt.  4.  200.  II.  being  the  cause,  responsible  for, 

c.  gen.  rei,  Hdt.  I.  I,  etc ;  amos  Tiros  Tin  being  the  cause  of  a  thing  to 
a  person,  Lys.  135.  10,  Isocr.  179  C  ;  c.  inf.  with  and  without  the  Art., 
amos  tou  7roi€fr  Hdt.  2.  26.,  3.  12,  etc.;  amos  Baveiv  Soph.  Ant. 
1 1 73;  air.  nf/MpBr)vai  dyytKov  Antipho  132.  14: — Comp.,  toC  . .  iktv- 
Bipav  livai  .  .  ainartpov  Dem.  701.  II,  cf.  1234.  8;  Sup.,  amiuTOTos 
iv  ra  orevqi  vavpiaxQOat  mainly  instrumental  in  causing  the  sea-fight, 
Thuc.  I.  74,  cf.  Hdt.  3.  52;  o!t.  toS  ptf)  dnoBavtiv  Dem.  469. 
25.  2.  ainov,  r6,  a  cause,  often  in  Plat.,  etc. ;  Ti  itot'  our  «ffTi 

to  aiVior  toO  .  .  pnjbiva  tlireiv  ;  what  is  the  cause  that . .  ?  Dem.  103.  17, 
ubi  v.  Dind. ;  toOto  amor  oti  . .  Plat.  Phaedo  1 10  E,  etc. : — it  is  used 
like  aiTia  II,  v.  Indices  Plat,  et  Arist. 

amuSr]S,  <s,  («?5os)  causal,  Schol.  Eur.  Or.  439 :  to  alriaSes,  formal, 
as  opp.  to  to  iAiKor,  M.  Anton.  4.  21,  etc.:  Adv.  -bas,  formally,  Clem. 
Al.  930.  II.  o/or  respecting  the  cause,  dyvoia  Id.  449. 

aiTVUvvu.os,  or,  (oro/ja)  named  from  a  fault,  Schol.  Soph.  Aj.  205. 

AiTvaios,  a,  or,  o/or  belonging  to  Etna  (Airvn),  Pind.  P.  3.  1 21,  O.  6. 


curpia  —  'A.Kadi'/fJi.eia 

161,  Aesch.  Pr.  365,  etc.  2.  metapli.  huge,  enormous,  Eur.  Cycl. 

395  :  and  so  some  explain  it  when  used  of  horses,  but  better  Etnean, 
Sicilian  (for  the  Sicilian  horses  and  mules  were  famous),  Soph.  O.  C.  312  ; 
jestingly  applied  to  the  beetle,  Ar.  Pax  73 ;  v.  Schol.  ad  1.  et  ad  Ar.  Ach. 
347;  cf.  Phot.  s.  v.  oxo!  'Axearatos,  Plaut.  Mil.  Glor.  4.  2,  73.  II. 

arrvafot,  6,  a  sea-fish,  Opp.  H.  I.  512. 

aiTpCo.  for  at$pta,  barbarism  in  Ar.  Thesm.  1001. 

cutwAios,  v.  sub  at-ywktos. 

cu4>vt)S.  Adv.,  =  daVoi,  i(ai<pvqs,  on  a  sudden,  Pseudo-Eur.  I.  A.  1581 
and  other  late  writers: — the  forms  alqWnSis,  -86v,  are  cited  in  Hdn. 
Epim.  27,  A.  B.  1310,  etc. 

oidwiSios,  ok,  (or  rather  d<j>vi8ios  (cf.  dipvw)  as  Elmsl.).  Unfore- 

seen, sudden,  quid,  Aesch.  Pr.  680,  Thuc.  2.  61,  Arist.  Eth.  N.  3.  8,  15. 
Adv.  -iais,  Thuc.  2.  53  ;  also  -tov,  Plut.  Num.  15. 

alxp.deis.  aixpa-rds,  Dor.  for  alxMytts,  alx^^V3- 

aixu.d{u,  fut.  daw,  to  throw  the  aixpfi  or  spear,  ai'x/*at  a'txputfav  II. 
4.  324;  fvbov  alxfidfav  to  play  the  warrior  at  home,  Aesch.  Pers.  756 ; 
aixfaaat  rait  to  perform  these  feats  of  arms,  Soph.  Tr.  355.  II. 

to  arm  with  the  spear,  trpos  'Arptibatotv  j;x/*a<ros  X^f1  (Dut  Musgrave 
jf/ia£as),  Soph.  Aj.  97. 

aixp-aXuxria.  f/,  (dXawis)  a  being  prisoner  of  war,  captivity,  Diod.  20. 
61.  II.  a  body  of  captives.  Id.  17.  70,  LxX,  N.  T. 

alxp-dAuT<vci>,  =  sq.,  1.  X  X ,  Ep.  Eph.  4.  8. 

<uxh-&Aut{(<i>,  fut.  ioo>,  to  make  prisoner  of  war,  take  prisoner,  Diod.  14. 
37 : — Dep.  alxtiakwri^ppiat,  in  same  sense,  Joseph.  B.  J.  4.  8,  I :  fut. 
-iaoftcu  lb.  2,  4:  aor.  i;'x/'aAam<ra/ii7i'  Id.  I.  22,  I,  Diod.  13,  24:  pf. 
jx/JaAdViff/iai  Joseph.  B.  J.  4.  9,  8  : — pf.  also  in  pass,  sense,  C.  I.  3668. 

aixp-dXuTUcds,  i\,  6v,  of  or  for  a  prisoner,  Eur.  Tro.  871. 

aixjiiX<»Ti5.  loot,  i/,  a  captive.  Soph.  Aj.  1228,  Eur.  Tro.  28.  2. 

Adj.  fern,  of  aix^dAftrc'ot,  Tat  atxptaXwribas  x^Pas  Soph.  Aj.  71- 

aixna-Xwruns,  «ws,  ^,  —  ai x/iaAawrt a ,  Hesych.  s.  v.  dpramj :  so,  aixp-ct- 
XuTurjids,  6,  Schol.  Ar.  Nub.  186. 

aixji-aXwTOS,  ov,  taken  by  the  spear,  captive  to  one's  spear,  taken 
prisoner,  Hdt.  6.  79,  1 34  ;  esp.  of  women,  as  of  Cassandra  and  Iole, 
Aesch.  Ag.  1440,  Soph.  Tr.  417  ;  cf.  boptaXarros  : — aixpa\orrot  prisoners 
of  war,  Andoc.  32.  7,  Thuc.  3.  70;  alxfaXwrov  XauDdvttv,  dyuv  to 
take  prisoner,  Xen.  Cyr.  3.  I,  37.,  4.  4,  I ;  ai'x^.  yiyvtaOat  to  be  taken, 
lb.  3.  I,  7»  of  things,  alxpt.  xpVhiaTa  Aesch.  Eum.  400,  cf.  Ag.  334, 
Dem.  384.  13;  via  Xen.  Hell.  2.  3,  8  ;  Td  atxfdXwra  booty,  lb.  4.  I, 
26,  An.  5.  9,  4.  II.  -aixpaXuTiKoi,  bovKoavvri  aixpt.  such  as 

awaits  a  captive,  Hdt.  9.  76 ;  tirfi  Aesch.  Th.  364. 

aixjiT|.  1},  (v.  fin.)  the  point  of  a  spear,  Lat.  cuspis,  mpoiSt  H  Xauwtro 
bovpis  ai'xM  Xa*Jct,7l  "•  6.  319 ;  so,  alxM^I  «TX<ot  '6-  3'5  ;  the  shaft 
being  (varov,  Hdt.  I.  52.  2.  the  point  of  anything,  iyxiarpov, 

xtpdrwv  Opp.  H.  I.  216,  C.  1.  451.  II.  a  spear,  II.,  Hdt., 

and  Trag. ;  upas  t))v  aJxM"  irpawfro  took  to  his  spear,  Hdt.  3.  78  ; 
a'XMU  <"X*  ""'*  '**  spear,  i.  e.  in  war  (v.  infr.  3),  Id.  5.  94 ;  To£ouA*dt 
olx/xi7,  of  an  arrow,  Aesch.  Pers.  239 ;  v.  infr.  3  ;  rare  in  Att.  Prose, 
Xen.  Cyr.  4.  6,  4.  b.  perh.  in  the  sense  of  a  sceptre,  Aesch.  Pr.  405, 

925,  v.  infr.  lit.  2.  a  body  of  spear-bearers,  like  bonis,  Pind.  O. 

7.  35,  P.  8.  58,  Ear.  Heracl.  276;  cf.  itnrit  I.  2.  3.  war,  battle, 

xaxws  1)  aixj'rj  iarijKK  the  war  went  ill,  Hdt.  7.  152  ;  0j)pwv  with  wild 
beasts,  Eur.  H.  F.  158: — esp.  in  compds.,  as  alxftdXwros,  /KTai'x/uot, 
vfiatx/ua  :  cf.  bopv.  4.  metaph.  of  plague,  pestilence,  and  thi  like, 

Aesch.  Eum.  803.  III.  warlike    spirit,   mettle,  ai'x^d 

viwv  iiXXu  Terpand.  6 ;  9pfyt  V  alxfiav  '  Aiuptrpvwvm  Pind.  N. 
10.  23 ;  so,  in  Aesch.  Ag.  483,  Cho.  625,  ywcuxbt  or  ywaixtia 
ai'x/«i  seems  to  be  a  woman's  spirit;  but  Herm.  interprets  it  imperium, 
sway,  rule,  v.  supr.  H.  I.  (Perh.  related  to  dtaaw,  as  bpaxnn  to 

bpdaaouat,  Donalds.  N.  Crat.  p.  224:  Curt,  takes  it  to  be  for  axi/ifi, 
from  djr^,  axis.) 

•"Xt"!"*.  Dor-  -£«M,  taaa,  tv,  armed  with  the  spear,  Aesch.  Pers.  136, 
Opp-  C.  3.  321. 

oiXui)Td  [d],  i,  Ep.  collat.  form  of  aJx/«rrijt,  II.  5.  197. 

aixi"lTT!p,  ripm.  A,  =  aix/«rrfc,  Opp.  C.  3.  211. 

<uxsiT)TT)pto«,  o,  ov,  warlike,  Lye.  454. 

oiXK-TrT'i  ov.  Dor.  -drd*.  o,  d,  (alxjtri)  poet.  Noun,  a  spearman, 
warrior,  esp.  as  opp.  to  archers,  II.  2.  543,  Od.  2.  19,  al. ;  cf.  alx- 
pirra.  II.  In  Pind.  as  Adj.,  1.  pointed,  alxpards  xipav- 

vbs  P.  1.8.  2.  warlike,  alxii.  0vpt6s,  N.  9.  87. — Fern,  aixp-ij-rit 

(sic),  E.  M.  535.  39. 

aix|id-S«TOt,  of,  (biw)  bound  in  war,  =  atx/iaXwros,  Soph.  Fr.  41,  cf. 


E.  M. 


4'-  3- 


atx|io-d>dpot,  ov,  one  who  traits  a  pike,  a  spearman,  Hdt.  I.  103, 
215.  2.  esp.  like  lopxxpipos,  of  body-guards.  Id.  I.  8.,  7.  40. 

otd/a,  Adv.  quick,  with  speed,  forthwith,  on  a  sudden,  often  in  Horn, 
(who  also  joins  a7^o  pui\a,  atya  b"  iwura  II.  4.  70,  Od.  15.  193, 
straight  thereupon)  ;  so  also  Theogn.  663,  Solon  2,  Pind.  P.  4.  237, 
Aesch.  Supp.  48 1  (in  dialogue) ;  rare  in  other  Poets,  and  never  in  Prose. 
(Hence  al^npos,  Katifrrjpvs,  q.  v.) 

auJrnpo-KiXcyOof,  ov,  swift-speeding,  epith.  of  Boreas,  Hes.  Th.  379. 

aldrnpdt ,  a,  ov,  (al\(/a)  quick,  speedy,  sudden,  al\frnpbs  Si  xvpos  xpvipoio 
70010  satiety  in  grief  cobks  soon,  Od.  4.  103 ;  ACo-ck  b'  iyopi/v  aty-qpiiv 
he  dismissed  the  assembly  so  that  it  quickly  broke  up,  i.  e.  in  haste,  II.  19. 
276,  Od.  2.  257 ;  like  0o^t>  dX«7w«T«  Jofro  Od.  8.  38.— Not  used  in 
Att. :  cf.  \attfijp6s. 

*"*  [*]i  Ep.word,  often  used  by  Trag.  in  lyrics  (and  so  Hermipp.  Mm/>.  2); 
once  only  in  dialogue  (Soph.  O.  C.  304)  ;  found  only  in  pres.  and  inipf. : 
but  cf.  iwata:  (v.  sub  fin.).  To  perceive  by  the  ear.  to  hear,  c.  ace. 

rei,  ouk  attts  a  ri  <f>rjai  ■  II.  ij.  130,  cf.  248  ;  Wioraip  bi  lrpSrrot  ktvuov 


43 

&ie  10.  532,  cf.  21.  388,  Aesch.  Ag.  ;j,  Supp.  59,  Eur.  Med.  14s,  etc.; 
c.  gen.  rei,  Soph.  O.  C.  304,  Ph.  1410 ;  c.  gen.  pers.,  diet  pov  . .  0a<rik( t's- 
Aesch.  Pers.  633,  cf.  874: — also  to  perceive  by  the  eye,  to  see,  Od.  18. 
1 1 ,  Soph.  O.  C.  181 : — generally,  to  perceive,  ovx  dUt  s  ws  Tpuxs  .  .  tiarai 
dyx1  veaiv ;  II.  10.  160.  2.  to  listen  to,  give  ear  to,  bixys  Hes.  Op. 

211  :  to  obey,  Aesch.  Pers.  874,  Ar.  Nub.  1166  ;  cf.  iiratai.  (From 

^Af  comes  also  dtras ;  cf.  Skt.  av,  avami  (tueri,favere),  avas  (gratia), 
Zd.  av  (tueri),  Lat.  au-dio,  and  perh.  au-ris :  Curt,  would  also  recognise 
alaO-avofiat  as  belonging  to  this  Root :    cf.  also  aeros.)  [Horn, 

uses  &  always  in  pres.,  ajai;  so  also  Aesch.  Pers.  .633,  Soph.  Ph.  1410; 
but  dTfis,  SXwv  Soph.  O.  C.  181,  304,  cf.  Iirofai:  in  impf.  ate  II.  10.  532., 
21.  388  (as  always  in  Trag.),  but  Stfv  II.  II.  463,  SXov  18.  222  : — 1  is 
always  short,  except  Sl(  in  Hes.  Op.  211,  Aesch.  Eum.  844,  878,  and 
perh.  dXdvrtaoi  in  Od.  1.  352.] 

did)  [a],  —  dijfu,  to  breathe,  found  only  once  in  the  impf.,  iitfi  <pi\ov 
aXov  rjrop  when  /  was  breathing  out  my  life,  II.  15.  252  ;  like  flu/ior 
dioSi  (cf.  dtoSai). 

d'iuv  [a],  Dor.  for  ifiuiv. 

auiv,  dVor,  d,  but  in  Ion.  and  Ep.  also  fj,  as  also  in  Pind.  P.  4.  331,  Eur. 
Phoen.  1484 :  apocop.  ace.  ai'cD,  like  Tlootibai,  restored  by  Ahrens  (from 
A.  B.  363)  in  Aesch.  Cho.  350:  (properly  aifwv,  aevuin,  v.  sub 
ai«).  A  period  of  existence  (rd  TtAoj  to  irtpiixov  rov  rrfs  txdarov 
£wrj$  XP°'V0V  •  •  aldiv  ixdarov  xtKXijrat  Arist.  Cael.  I.  9,  15)  :  I. 

one's  lifetime,  life,  Horn.,  who  joins  ^kvx^  xat  alwv ;  ix  tf  aluv  Ttitparat 
II.  19.  27;  (pOivft  Od.  5.  160;  Xcimi  Ttvd  II.  5.  685;  dir'  aidVo?  »"«os 
cuAeo  (Zenod.  viov)  24.  725  ;  TtKtvrdv  rov  alwva  Hdt.  I.  32,  etc. ; 
aiaivos  artpttv  Ttvd  Aesch.  Pr.  862  ;  alwva  tkoixvfiv  Id.  Eum.  315  ; 
awtiarpiflftv  Cratin.  'Apx-  1  I  aiojv  Alaxtbdv,  periphr.  for  the  Aeacidae 
(but  Bgk.  reads  Siotv),  Soph.  Aj.  645  : — diriirvfvofv  aiiuva  Eur.  Fr.  798  ; 
ipiov  xar  aiuiv a  Aesch.  Th.  219: — this  is  the  common  sense  in  Poets.  2. 
an  age,  generation,  Aesch.  Th.  744 ;  d  /liKKaiv  alwv  posterity,  Deni. 
295.  2,  cf.  Plat.  Ax.  370  C.  3.  one's  lot  in  life,  TiV  ald^'  els  to 

Aoiirdi'  i(fts;  Eur.  Andr.  I2IJ.  II.  a  long  space  of  time,  an  age, 

Lat.  actum,  alwv  yiyviTat  'tis  an  age,  Menand.  Incert.  7  ;  esp.  with 
Preps.,  dir'  atwvos  of  old,  for  ages,  Hes.  Th.  609,  N.  T. ;  oV  atwvos  uaxpov, 
dvavOTov  Aesch.  Supp.  582,  574  J  rdv  Si'  atwvos  xp°vov  for  ever.  Id. 
Ag.  554,  cf.  Cho.  26,  Eum.  563,  Soph.,  etc. ;  rdv  alwva  for  ever.  Plat. 
Tim.  37  D;  tox  avavra  al.  Arist.  Cael.  1.  19,  14,  Lycurg.  155.  42  ;  th 
dttavra  rdv  al.  Id.  162.  24;  th  rov  al.  Diod.,  Luc,  etc. ;  irr'  at.  Philo 
2.  608.  2.  a  space  of  time  clearly  defined  and  marked  out,  an  era, 

epoch,  age,  period  of  a  dispensation,  0  alwv  ovros  this  present  world, 
opp.  to  o  fjttkXwv,  Ev.  Matth.  13.  22,  Luc.  l6.  8: — hence  its  usage  in 
pi.,  «ts  tous  aluivas  Ep.  Rom.  I.  25,  etc. ;  (It  Tout  of.  rwv  aicurcui'  Ep. 
Phil.  4.  20,  etc. ;  dird  rwv  al.,  ltpo  rwv  al.  Ep.  Eph.  3.  9.,  1  Cor.  2.7; 
Td  r(Krj  rwv  aluvav  lb.  10.  II.  3.  on  alwv  and  xpovos,  v.  Philo 

I.  496,  619. 

B.  the  spinal  marrow,  h.  Horn.  Merc.  42,  1 19,  Pind.  Fr.  77,  Hesych., 
E.  M. ;  cf.  Ruhnk.  Ep.  Cr.  29. 

aluviju,  to  be  eternal,  Thcod.  Metoch.  355,  Suid.,  etc. 

atuvios,  ov,  also  a,  ov  Plat.  Tim.  38  B,  N.  T.  Lasting  for  an  age 

(alwv  11),  perpetual,  niSrj  Plat.  Rep.  363  D,  etc.  2.  like  diSiot, 

ever-lasting,  eternal,  dvwktBpov  .  .  ,  dkk'  oix  a'twvtov  Id.  Legg.  904  A  ■ 
$tov  r&v  at.  Tim.  Locr.  96  C  ;  ov  xp°v'lrl  povvov  . .  ,  &.KK'  atwvti]  Aretae. 
Cur.  M.  Ac.  1.  5. 

aUmoTTjs,  fjros,  ff,  eternity,  Eccl. 

aiuvi-plot,  ov,  immortal,  Inscr.  Rosett.  in  C.  I.  4697.  '4. 

aluvo-irijp(iov,  Td,  the  place  of  everlasting  fire,  C.  I.  9065  b. 

aiwvo-TOKOS,  ov,  parent  of  eternity,  Synes.  322  A,  etc. 

aiuvo-xapTp,  ^s,  rejoicing  in  eternity,  Hymn,  in  Clem.  Al.  115. 

alwpa,  ij,  (dttpw)  a  machine  for  suspending  bodies,  a  swing,  hammock, 

Millingen 


chariot  on  springs,  Plat.  Legg.  789  D,  Plut.  2.  793  B,  etc. 
Uned.  Monum.  I.  77»  pi*  3°-  2.  a  noose  for  hanging,  a  halter. 

Soph.  O.  T.  1264  (in  the  form  iwpa).  II.  n  being  suspended  cr 

hovering  in  the  air,  oscillation.  Plat.  Phaedo  II I  E,  Dion.  H.  3.  47,  etc. 

aiupKi).  fut.  Tjrrtv :  fut.  pass,  -ifi^aoptat  Dio  C.  41.  I,  but  -T\ao}iat  Aristid. 
p.479:  aor.  TF»prflr\v  (v .  infr.):  pf.  pdipij^mOpp.  H.  3.  532:  (d(i'par).  To 
lift  up,  raise,  vypiv  vwrov  alwptt,  of  the  eagle  raising  his  back  and 
feathers,  Pind.  P.  1.  17:  to  swing  as  in  a  hammock,  a'twp.  [yvvaixa] 
(tti  «AiM7t  <ptpouivr\v  Hipp.  617,  cf.  Aretae.  Cur.  M.  Ac.  I.  4;  Tout 
utptts  .  .  {mip  rijs  x«paKrjs  alwpwv  Dem.  313.  26: — cf.  iwpiw.  2. 

to  hang,  rtvi  ix  rov  drpdxrov  Luc.  J.  Confut.  4,  cf.  Plut.  Brut.  37 : — 
metaph.,  ywptt  . .  i\nh,  ort  riv  xdpaxa  alpTioovot  excited  them  to  think 
that  . .  ,  App.  Civ.  2.  81  : — never  in  good  Att.  II.  more  freq. 

in  Pass,  to  be  hung,  hang,  bipptara  irtpt  rovs  w/iovs  alwpfvpttva  Hdt. 
7.  92,  cf.  xaratwptouat  to  hang  in  a  bandage  or  sling,  Hipp.  Fract.  757  » 
alwpovaivwv  rwv  barwv  being  raised,  lifted.  Plat.  Phaedo  98  D  ;  atua 
ywptiro  spouted  up,  Bion  I.  25.  2.  to  hang  suspended,  float  in  air. 
Plat.  Lach.  184  A,  Arist.  Mirab.  79:  to  hover,  of  a  dream,  Soph.  El. 
1390:  to  vibrate,  oscillate.  Plat.  Phaedo  112  B.  3.  metaph.  to  be 

in  suspense,  Lat.  suspensus  esse,  iv  xtvbvvw,  to  hang  in  doubt  and  danger, 
Thuc.  7.  77  ;  alwp.  iv  ak\ois  to  depend  upon  .  . ,  Lat.  pendere  ab  aliquo. 
Plat.  Menex.  248  A  ;  alwpijOtts  i/irip  utydXwv  playing  for  a  high  stake, 
Hdt.  8.  100 ;  alwp.  rffv  tkvxvv  Xen.  Cyn.  4,  4. 

aiup-r]u.a.  aTot,  to,  that  which  is  hung  up  or  hovers,  Lye.  1080.  2. 

n  hanging  cord,  halter,  Eur.  Hel.  353 :  of  hanging  slings  or  chains,  Id. 
Or.  984  ;  v.  sub  xov<pi(a  II.  I. 

alwpijo-ts,  (ait,  1),  a  hovering :  suspense.  Plat.  Tim.  89  A. 

aiupTjTos.  6v,  hanging,  hovering,  Anth.  P.  5.  204. 

dica.  Dor.  Adv.  =djr^i',  softly,  gently,  Pind.  P.  4.  277. 

'Ak4Stj|x(ui  or    (a  [f],  1}.  the  Academy,  a  gymnasium  in  the  suburbs  of 


'AicaSrineucos  —  cucavdoftoXos. 


44 

Athens  (so  named  from  the  hero  Academus,  Iv  Spofiototv  'Axabr/fiov  fleou 
Eupol.  'harp.  3),  where  Plato  taught :  hence  the  Platonic  school  of 
philosophers  were  called  Academics : — proverb.,  'Aica8T|p.iT]8€v  fjxus  of 
a  philosopher,  Apostol.  Cent.  2.  I.  (Commonly  written  in  the  Mss. 
'AxaSrjftia.  But  the  form  'AxaSruuid,  acknowledged  by  Steph.  Byz. 
s.  v.  'KnaSrifteia.  is  here  and  there  preserved  in  the  oldest  Mss.  (as  the 
Bod!,  of  Plato  and  the  Ven.  of  Athenaeus) ;  and  that  the  penult,  is  long 
appears  from  several  poet,  passages,  Ar.  Nub.  1002,  Epicr.  Incert.  370, 
Alex.  'Aaarr.  I.  2,  'Imr.  I.) 

'Aicu8iip.eiicos,  >?, dV,.<4caefem<V,C.I.(add.)58i4:  -Canos,  Plut.2.i02D. 

aKdSatpCTOS,  ov,  (xaBcupiu)  not  to  be  put  down,  Philo  2.  1 66. 

dpcuflapo-ta,  r),  uncleanness,  foulness  of  a  wound  or  sore,  Hipp.  Fract. 
7T-,  Plat.  Tim.  72  C.  2.  moral  foulness,  impurity ,  foul  depravity, 

Dem.  553.  13. 

axaSopTOS,  ov,  (xaBaipai)  uncleansed,  impure,  foul,  ar/p  Hipp.  Aer. 
283;  of  the  body,  Arist.  Probl.  5.  27;  of  a  woman,  quae  menstrua  non 
kabet,  Luc.  Lexiph.  19.  b.   unpurified,  Plat.  Legg.  866  A,  868  A  ; 

dxiSapre  thou  beast!  Bato  Svpff.  I.  2.  2.  morally  unclean,  im- 

pure, Plat.  Phaedo  81  B,  etc. ;  also  like  /iavtwSns,  Achae.  ap.  Hesych. : — 
Adv.,  &Ka8apTws  «x«"/  P'at-  Tim.  92  A.  3.  of  things,  not  purged 

away,  unpurged.  Soph.  O.  T.  256,  Plat.  Legg.  854  B.  II.  act. 

not  jit  for  cleansing,  [cpdpfiaxa]  ekxtav  dxaBaprbrepa  Aretae.  Cur.  M. 
Diut.  1.  8. 

dKa9«KT€OH<u,  Pass,  to  be  left  void,  Sext.  Emp.  M.  10.  3. 

dxaScKTOS,  ov,  ungovernable,  Pseudo-Phocyl.  180,  Plut.  Nic.  8. 

d-KuOoo-iuTOS,  ov,  unpurified,  Epiphan.  I.  495  C. 

dxaiva,  ijs,  1),  {dxrj,  axis)  a  thorn,  prick,  goad,  Lat.  stimulus,  Ap.  Rh. 
3.  1323,  Anth.  P.  6.  41.  II.  a  ten-foot  rod,  used  in  land-survey- 

ing, Lat.  acnua,  acna,  Schneid.  Ind.  Script.  R.  R. ;  cf.  Call.  Fr.  2 14. 

d-KaivoT6(iT|Tos,  ov,  not  altered.  Phot. 

aKaipcvo|&ai,  Dep.  to  behave  unseasonably,  Philo  2.  166,  280. 

dicaipcu,  ro  be  without  an  opportunity,  opp.  to  (vxaiptai,  Diod.  Excerpt. 
Vat.  p.  30: —  Med.,  impf.  ijxatptioBe,  in  Ep.  Phil.  4.  10,  —  exwXveoBe 
xaipbv  ovx  txOVTfS'  acc-  t0  Phot. 

dicaipia,  fj,  unfitness  of  times,  opp.  to  tvxatpia,  Plat.  Phaedr.  272  A; 
to  iyxatpia,  Id.  Polit.  305  D.  2.  of  bad  seasons,  unseasonable/less, 

iviavrwv  woXXwv  dx.  Id.  Legg.  709  A  ;  twv  nvevfidrajv  Arist.  Probl.  26. 
13,  I.  3.  opp.  to  xatpbs,  want  of  opportunity,  r^v  dxaipiav  ttjv 

ixttvov  xaipbv  vpUrepov  voyXaavres  Dem.  16.  4:  also  want  of  time, 
Plut.  2.  130  E.  II.  of  persons,  the  character  of  an  dxatpos,  wan! 

of  tact,  importunity,  Plat.  Symp.  182  A,  Theophr.  Char.  12. 

dicaipi|ios,  n,  ov,  ill-timed : — proverb.,  o  ti  xiv  hit'  uKaiplpav  yXuocrav 
t^Orj,  quicquid  in  buccatyi  venerit,  Schiif.  Dion.  Comp.  p.  8. 

uKaipios,  ov,  poet,  for  axaipos,  cue.  ijxeis,  of  untimely  death,  C.  I.  6203. 

utcaipo-p6as,  ov,  6,  an  unseasonable  brawler,  Eccl. 

aKaipoXoytu),  to  prate  unseasonably,  Schol.Thesm.  39 ;  -XcyCa,  7,  Phot. 

aKaipo-Xoyos,  ov,  an  unseasonable  prater,  Philo  2.  268,  Eust.  208.  38. 

dxaipo-pvOia,  ij,  unseasonable  talk,  Lex.  Havn. 

dKaipo-irappr|o-Ca,  %,  ill-timed  freedom  of  speech,  Eust.  Opusc.  225.  50, 
ah,  and  -irapp7|criaa-TT|S,  ov,  b.  Id.  1857.  2, 

dKa'.po-Tr«piTrdTT|Tos,  ov,  walking  at  unseasonable  times,  Eccl. 

dKaipop-pT)ixcov,  ov,  —  dxatpoXbyos,  Origen. 

d-Kaipos,  ov,  ill-timed,  unseasonable,  inopportune,  is  dxatpa  irovetv,  Lat. 
operant  perdere,  Theogn.  919 ;  ovk  dxatpa  Xeyuv  Aesch.  Pr.  1036  ;  dx. 
TtpoBvpXa  Thuc.  5.  65  ;  IXivBipia  Plat.  Rep.  569  C  ;  eiratvos  Id.  Phaedr. 
240  E  ;  paOv/ua  Dem.  241.  8  ;  7c'Xois  Menand.  Monost.  88  : — Adv.  -pax, 
Aesch.  Ag.  808,  Cho.  624,  Hipp.  Vet.  Med.  11,  Acut.  386:  Comp.  -orepais, 
Id.  955  ;  neut.  pi.  as  Adv.,  dxcup'  dirwXXvro  Eur.  Hel.  1081.  II. 

of  persons,  importunate,  troublesome,  Lat.  molestus,  ineptus,  Theophr. 
Char.  12  ;  ax.  Kal  XaXos  Alciphro  3.  62.  2.  c.  inf.  ill-suited  to  do 

a  thing,  Xen.  Hipparch.  7,  6,  in  Compar. 

dKcucaXis,  iSos,  ^,  the  white  tamarisk,  Diosc.  I.  1 18. 

d-KaKcp.<)>aTOS,  ov,  in  no  ill  repute,  Hesych.,  Method.  Conv.  Virg.  3.  20. 

d-Kaions,  Dor.  dicdxas  [SjcSjc],  b,  poiit.  form  of  axaxos,  Aesch.  Pers. 
855  (lyr.)  ;  epith.  of  Hades,  C.  I.  1067  ;  cf.  dxdxnra. 

dicuKT|ooos,  b,  epith.  of  Hermes  in  Arcadia,  =  sq.,  Call.  Dian.  143. 

dicdicrjT&  [a/caV],  Ep.  form,  =  axaxos,  guileless,  gracious,  epith.  of  Her- 
mes, II.  16.  185,  Od.  24. 10  (cf.  iptovvios)  ;  of  Prometheus,  Hes.  Th.  614. 

dicaKia  (A),  f/,  (d*f))  an  Egyptian  tree,  the  acacia,  Diosc.  1 .  133. 

dicuKia  (B),  ij,  (ana/cos)  guilelessness,  Dem.  1372.  23,  Arist.  Rhet.  2. 
12,  1,5,  Lxx,  etc. 

d-KdicoT|<rr|s,  es,  guileless,  Eus.,  Phot. :  Adv.  -Bus,  Iambi.  Protr.  p. 
350  Kiessl. : — in  Eust.  404.  8,  d-KaKOT|8«UTOS,  ov. 

dicuicoiraScu,  to  be  free  from  suffering,  E.  M.  86.  12  : — Adv.  dxaKOTra- 
6t)tus,  Apoll.  Mirab.  35. 

dtciiKOTroios,  ov,  doing  no  evil,  Jo.  Chtys. 

d-KuKos,  ov,  unknowing  of  ill,  guileless,  benignant,  Aesch.  Pers.  664, 
Plat.  Tim.  91  D.  2.  innocent,  simple,  much  like  evrjBns  or  djrXoCs, 

Dem.  1153.  II.,  1164. 13  ;  ax.  dvBpunrwv  rpbwos  Anaxil.  Incert.  I.  Adv. 
-xais,  Dem.  1 154.  18. 

d-KuKOTjpyT|TOS,  ov,  uncorrupled,  Harpocr.,  E.  M.     Adv.  -rare,  Epiphan. 

d-KuKoupyus,  Adv.,  used  to  expl.  evnBuis,  Schol.  Dem.  393.  22. 

d-KaKWTOS  [«a],  ov,  =sq.,  Hierocl.  Carm.  Aur.     Adv.  -rare,  Id. 

dxaKuros  [«a],  ov,  unharmed,  Dio  C.  77.  15;  Ax.  eixn  Epigr.  Gr. 
618.  39.  II.  unsubdued,  M.  Anton.  5.  18. 

aKaXavlXs.  iSos,  ij,  =  dxavBis,  Ar.  Av.  872,  cf.  Pax  1076. 

dicaXappCLTT)S,  ov,  b,  (dxaXbs,  pia)  soft-flowing,  epith.  of  Ocean,  II.  7. 
422,  Od.  19.  434: — in  Orph.  Arg.  1185,  dic&Xdp-poos,  ov. 

ukSXt)<j>t|.  1),  a  nettle,  Lat.  urtica,  Ar.  Lys.  549,  etc. :  metaph.,  dwb  rijs 
bpyfjs  rijv  dx.  d(p(\{a9at  Id.  Vesp.  884.  II.  a  kind  of  mollusc 


which  stings  like  a  nettle,  urtica  marina,  of  the  actinia  kind,  Arist.  H.  A. 
4.  6,  6.,  8.  1,  7,  al. 

d-KaXX-f]s.  4s,  without  charms,  ouifta  Luc.  Hist.  Conscr.  48  ;  79  aixnipd 
«al  dx.  (v.  1.  dxafirjs),  Id.  Prom.  14. 

d-KaXXicpT)Tos,  ov,  not  accepted  by  the  gods,  ill-omened,  itpa  Aeschin, 
72.  16.,  75.  12  ;  /juf/ireis  Eus.  H.E.  9.  3. 

d-KaXX(imo-TOS,  ov,  unadorned,  Heraclit.  12  Byw.,  Luc.  Pise.  12. 

dxaXos,  r),  ov,  like  ijxaXos,  peaceful,  still,  Hesych.,  Eust.  1009.  30,  E.  M. 
44.  29.     Adv.  -Xws,  Eust.,  E.  M. 

d-KdXuTrros,  ov,  uncovered,  unveiled,  Soph.  O.  T.  I427,  Arist.  H.  A.  I. 
5,2;  iv  dxaXxmra) .  .  0ioj,  of  one  who  has  no  house  over  his  head, 
Menand.  IIAok.  4 : — Adv.  -rtus,  3  Mace.  4.  6. 

d-K&Xv<|>^|s,  e's,  =  dxaXvirros,  Soph.  Ph.  1327,  Arist.  de  An.  2.  9,  13; 
and  dicaXv<{>os,  ov,  Diog.  L.  8.  72. 

dKap.avTO-X6-yxT|S,  ov,  b,  unwearied  at  the  spear,  Pind.  I.  7  (6).  13. 

dicap.avTO-p.dxT|S,  ow>  "•  unwearied  in  fight,  Pind.  P.  4.  304. 

dKap.avTO-Trovs,  b,  f/,  -now,  to,  gen.  ttoSos,  untiring  of  foot,  "i-rnros  Pind. 
O.  3.  5  ;  also,  dx.  ppovrfj,  dirrjvrj  lb.  4.  2.,  5.  6. 

dK3p.avTO-xdpp.as,  a,  b,  unwearied  in  fight,  Pind.  Fr.  179,  in  voc.  dxa- 
Itavroxappav  Alav, — (/caTa  ovvfxbpoiiTjv  tov  Atav,  as  Choerob.  observes, 
106,  128  Gaisf.). 

dKap.as  [axcr],  avros,  b,  (xdfiva>)  untiring,  unresting,  f)i\ios,  ^nipxabs, 
etc.,  II.  18.  239.,  16.  176,  al.  (not  in  Od.)  ;  'iimoi  Pind.  O.  I.  140; 
Notos,  Bopeas  Soph.  Tr.  112  (lyr.);  XP"'",S  Eur-  ^r-  597;  °*'  f&voi 
unceasing,  Arist.  Fr.  596. 

d-Kdp.aTos  [«tt],  ov,  also  n,  ov,  Hes.  Th.  747,  Soph.  Ant.  339.  Without 
sense  of  toil,  hence,  1.  like  forcg.,  untiring,  unresting,  in  Horn, 

always  epith.  of  fire,  II.  5.  4,  Od.  20.  123,  al. ;  dvefiot  Emped.  464; 
ff$tvos  Aesch.  Pers.  901 ;  dx.  yr\  earth  that  never  rests  from  tillage,  or 
inexhaustible.  Soph.  1.  c. : — neut.  dxafiara,  as  Adv.,  Id.  El.  164.  2. 

not  tired  or  weary,  Hipp.  752  D.  II.  act.  not  tiring,  Aretae. 

Cur.  M.  Diut.  2.  13.  Adv.  -tois  or  -ti,  Gramm.  [Sjeifiiros,  Soph. 
El.  164;  but  first  syll.  long  in  dactylic  verses;  v.  A  a  sub  fin.] 

d-Kdu.p.vcrros,  ov,  without  winking,  Hesych.  s.  v.  daxapbdpivxros. 

d-Kap.Trf|s,  (S,  =  dxafiirTos,  Theophr.  H.  P.  3.  10,  4,  etc. 

aKap.ir(a,  f),=dxaix\fiia,  Hipp.  Art.  822  :  aKap.iriov,  C.  I.  A.  2.  2,  p.  384. 

dKap-TTTO-Trous,  b,  j),  with  unbending  foot,  iKetpavrts  Nonn.  D.  15.  148. 

d-KapviTTOS,  ov,  unbent,  that  will  not  bend,  rigid,  Hipp.  Fract.  751, 
Plat.  Tim.  74  B  (in  Comp.),  etc. ;  dx.  x^pos  ivipaiv,  Virgil's  irremeabilis, 
Anth.  P.  7.  467  ;  tls  dx.  tpxo^v  rpifiov  Epigr.  Gr.  193  ;  rb  dx.  the  part 
that  will  not  bend,  Arist.  H.  A.  I.  15,  3.  2.  metaph.  unbending,  un- 

flinching, 0ov\ai  Pind.  P.  4.  128  ;  ipvxdv  dxafitrros  Id.  I.  4.  89  (3.  71); 
dxdjiTTTui  p.(Vfi  Aesch.  Cho.  455  ;  to  irpbs  tovs  wbvovs,  to  npbs  tmtixttav 
dxaiiTTTOv  Plut.  Lye.  II,  Cat.  Mi.  4. 

oKap-UHa,  ij,  inflexibility,  Arist.  P.  A.  2.  8,  9. 

aKav,  avos,  c»,  =  sq.,  only  in  Lxx  (2  Regg.  14.  9). 

dicavOa  [ok],  rjs,  17,  (d«ij)  a  thorn,  prickle,  Arist.  P.  A.  2.  9,  2,  Theocr. 
7.  140,  etc. :  hence  1.  a  prickly  plant,  of  the  thistle  or  cardoon  kind, 
xvvapos  dx.  Soph.  Fr.  643,  cf.  746  :  in  pi.  thistle-down  Od.  5.  328  ;  cf. 
axavSos;  —  used  also  in  Lxx  (Isai.  5.  4,  where  E.  V.  has  wild  grapes), 
cf.  Ev.  Matt,  7.  16: — proverb.,  ov  fdp  dxavOat  no  thistles,  i.e.  nothing 
useless,  Ar.  Fr.  407.  2.  of  the  prickles  or  spines  of  the  porcupine 

and  of  certain  fish.  Ion  ap.  Ath.  91  E,  Arist.  H.  A.  4.  5,  2  :  —  also  the 
thorns  of  certain  plants,  Arist.  Plant.  I.  5,  etc.  3.  the  backbone  or 

spine  of  fish,  Aesch.  Fr.  270,  Ar.  Vesp.  969,  Alex.  Kpartv,  I.  II,  al. ;  of 
serpents,  Hdt.  2.  75,  Theocr.  24.  32  : — also  of  men,  Hdt.  4.  72,  Hipp. 
Art.  791,  Eur.  El.  492,  Arist.  P.  A.  2.  8,  9,  etc. ;  but  improperly  used  of 
mammalia,  ace.  to  Arist.  An.  Post.  2.  14,  4  : — technically,  ace.  to  Galen. 
2.  451,  of  one  of  the  spinous  processes  of  the  vertebrae.  4.  metaph., 

dxavBai  (^nrho(wv),  Cicero's  spinae  disserendi,  thorny  questions,  Luc. 
Disp.  c.  Hes.  5,  Ath.  97  D ;  cf.  dxav6o-0aTr}s,  -\6yos,  dxavOubrjs.  II. 

a  thorny  tree,  prob.  a  kind  of  acacia,  found  in  Egypt,  the  Mimosa 
Nilotica  (whence  gum  arabic  is  obtained),  Hdt.  2.  96  (cf.  d*d>'0ij'os)  : 
several  kinds  are  mentioned  by  Theophr. 

dtcavdcwv,  Sjvos,  b,  a  thorny  brake,  Lat.  dumetum,  Greg.  Naz.,  Eust.,  etc. 

dKav8r|€is,  tooa,  ev,  thorny,  prickly,  Nic.  Th.  638. 

aKavCrnpos,  a,  bv,  with  spines,  of  certain  fish,  Arist.  H.  A.  9.  37,  16. 

dicav9T|-<£6pos,  ov,=dxav6otpbpos,  cited  from  Hdn.  Epim. 

uKavfKas.  ov,  b,  a  prickly  thing,  and  so,  1.  a  kind  of  shark,  prob. 

squalus  acanthias  L.,  Arist.  H.  A.  6.  10,  sq.,  9.  37.  2.  a  kind  of 

grasshopper,  Ael.  N.  A.  10.  44.  3.  a  prickly  asparagus,  Theophr. 

H.  P.  6.  I,  3,  Poll. 

dKavfiixos,  17,  bv,  thorny,  Theophr.  H.  P.  6.  4,  6. 

aKdv9ivos,  n,  ov,  ofthorns,  ore  tpavos  Ev.  Marc.  15.  17,  Jo.  19.  5.  2. 

metaph.  thorny,   iv  dx.   drap-nois   Anacreont.    53.    12.  II.  cf 

acantha-wood,  iorbs  Hdt.  2.  96;  Td  dx.  cloths  made  of  its  inner  bark, 
Strabo  1 75. 

dicdv8iov,  to,  Dim.  of  dxavBa  2,  Arist.  H.  A.  3.  7,  II.  2.  a  kind 

of  thistle,  onopordum  acanthium,  Diosc.  3.18. 

dicav8is,  i'Sos,  4,  »  bird,  the  goldfinch,  fringilla  carduelis,  or  the  linnet, 
fr.  linaria,  Arist.  H.  A.  9.  17,  2,  Theocr.  7.  141.  II.  a  name 

for  the  plant  senecio,  Call.  ap.  Plin.  H.  N.  25.  106.  III.  as  fern. 

Adj.,  prickly,  Anth.  P.  6.  304. 

aKav8iwv,  ovos,  b,  a  hedgehog,  porcupine,  Galen. 

dKav8o-|3dTT]S,  ov,  b,  walking  among  tkorns,  nickname  of  grammarians, 
Anth.  P.  II.  322,  cf.  dxavBa  I.  4 : — fern.  aKav8o-pdTts,  i5os,  Anth.  P.  7. 
198. 

dicav6of36Xos,  ov,  (0dWai)  shooting  thorns,  pricking,  p'oSov  Nic.  Th. 
542.  II.  b  dx.  a  surgical  instrument  for  extracting  bones,  Paul. 

Aeg.  6.  32. 


ciKav66\oyos  —  aKdTao-TaTect) . 


dKavflo-Xoyos,  ov,  gathering  thorns,  nickname  of  quibbling  arguers, 
Anth.  P.  II.  20  and  347  ;  cf.  dxav$a  I.  4. 

aKav66-vciiTOS,  ov,  prickle-backed,  Hesych. 

dicavtidofiai.  Pass.  {axavOa)  to  become  prickly,  Theophr.  H.  P.  7.  6,  2. 

dKav6o-ir\T|J,  rjyos,  o,  r/,  wounded  by  the  prickle  of  a  fish,  'Obvootvs 
dx.  name  of  a  play  of  Sophocles. 

axavOos.  6,  Lat.  acanthus,  brank-ursine,  a  plant  imitated  in  Corinthian 
capitals,  vypbs  ax.,  Lat.  mollis,  Theocr.  I.  55,  cf.  Diosc.  3.  19;  cf. 
dxavSa  I.  II.    a  prickly  Egyptian  tree,  prob.  the  same  as 

aicavda  II,  Voss  Virg.  G.  2.  119. 

dtcav$o-o~r«<f>T|S,  is,  of  a  fish,  prickle-backed,  Arist.  Fr.  279. 

duavOo-cpdyos  [S],  ov,  eating  thorns,  Arist.  H.  A.  8.  3,  6. 

aKavOo^opcu,  to  bear  thorns,  Greg.  Nyss. 

dicav9o-4>6pos.  ov,  prickly,  bristling,  ixivos  Nonn.  D.  13.  421.  2. 

bearing  thorns  or  thistles,  Greg.  Naz. 

dtcav6o-a)vfti>,  to  bear  thorns  or  thistles,  Diosc.  3.  21. 

aKavdo-xoipos,  o,  a  porcupine  or  a  hedgehog,  Hesych.  s.  v.  ixivos,  Gramm. 

ditavSiiXXis,  ioos,  s).  Dim.  of  dxavOis  (in  form),  aegithalus  pendulinus, 
the  pendulous  titmouse,  Eubul.  Incert.  14,  Arist.  H.  A.  8.  3,  9.,  9.  13,  5. 

dxavSuS-ns,  (s,  (etbos)  full  of  thorns,  thorny,  x'upos  Hdt.  *•  ' 2^  '•  T" 
JH&ov  Arist.  Probl.  12.  8,  etc.  2.  prickly,  yXairra  Arist.  H.  A. 

2.  10,  2;  rpixts  lb.  I.  6,  6;  of  the  vertebrae,  spinous,  lb.  3.  7,  II, 
al.  3.  metaph.,  X0701  cue.  thorny  arguments,  Luc.  D.  Mort.  10.  8  ; 
dx.  0ios  Paroemiogr. ;  cf.  dxavSa  I.  4. 

dxavOuv,  uvos,  u,  =  dxavOtwv,  Gloss. 

dic&vi{u,  (axavos)  to  bear  or  be  like  dxavot,  Theophr.  H.  P.  6.  4,  8. 

dxavueof,  T),  ov,  like  the  axavos,  Theophr.  H.  P.  4.  6,  10. 

dicdviov,  t(S,  Dim.  of  axavos,  Hesych. 

&uv«,  u,  (d/n/,  axis)  a  kind  of  thistle,  and  the  prickly  head  of  some 
fruits,  like  the  pine-apple,  v.  Theophr.  H.  P.  I.  10,  6,  al.,  and  Schneid. 
Ind. ;  v.  also  Schleuin.  Thes.  Vet.  Test. 

dtcuvudrfs,  *s,  like  the  axavos,  Theophr.  H.  P.  6.  4,  3. 

d-K&iri|XcvTOf,  ov,  free  from  tricks  of  trade,  sincere,  Synes.  187  D. 

d-KaTrnXos,  ov,  =  foreg. :  0ios  ax.  a  life  without  tricks,  Strabo  513. 

d-icdirvwjTOS,  ov,  unsmoked,  piiKi  dx.  honey  taken  without  smoking  the 
bees,  Strabo  400. 

d-Kcnrvos,  ov,  without  smoke,  free  from  it,  aximn  Hipp.  Acut.  395:  not 
smoking,  making  no  smoke,  irvp  Theophr.  Ign.  71  ;  0wria  axam/os  an 
offering  but  no  burnt  offering,  Luc.  Amor.  4 ;  so  a  poem  is  called  KaX- 
Xtowns  ax.  Ovoi  Anth.  P.  6.  321  : — but,  dxawva  yap  aliv  dotbol  Ovouiv 
we  sacrifice  without  a  fire  of  our  own,  i.e.  live  at  others'  expense,  Poeta 
ap.  Ath.  8  E.  II.  =  foreg.,  Plin.  H.  N.  II.  16. 

d-icAitvwTO*,  ov,  free  from  vapour,  Eur.  Fr.  78 1.  50. 

d-KapdSdicnTOS,  ov,  unexpected,  Eust.  11 27.  62. 

d-tcdpSiot,  ov,  wanting  the  heart,  Plut.  Caes.  63 :  metapn.  heartless, 
weak,  Lat.  excors,  Lxx,  Galen.  II.  of  wood,  without  heart  or 

pith,  solid,  Theophr.  H.  P.  3.  12,  I. 

d-icdpirvov  ov,  headless,  Anth.  Plan.  116,  C.  I.  4746. 

dxOpTp,  is,  (xupai)  properly  of  hair,  too  short  to  be  cut,  hence  generally, 
short,  small,  tiny,  dxaprj  riva  ivOvfiTjfiaTa  Dion.  H.  de  Isocr.  20.  II. 

metaph.  within  a  hairs  breadth  of,  all  but,  dxapis  wttptkiirwioaxrai 
you  have  become  all  but  as  thin  as  Philippides  (v.  Meineke  Com.  Fr. 
4.  p.  100),  Alex.  Mavbp.  5;  ax.  vapa-rokajXas  Menand.  Incert.  226; 
xariwtaov  ax.  Tip  Siti  Id.  Com.  Anon.  3.  III.  mostly  in  neut. 

dxapis,  1.  of  Time,  a  moment,  iv  ixaptt  \p6vou  Ar.  PI.  244, 

Alciphro  3.  56,  Luc.  Tim.  3  (not  iv  ax.  rov  xpoVov,  as  written  lb. 
23)  ;  iv  dxapei  alone.  Id.  Asin.  37,  etc. ;  dxapTJ  ata\tvwv  (sc.  XP^V0V) 
having  waited  a  moment,  Ar.  Nub.  496 ;  also,  dxapis  upas  in  a  moment, 
Plut.  Anton.  28  ;  juipas  fuds  dx.  Id.  2.  938  A  ;  ir  dxapis  Aretae.  Caus. 
M.  Diut.  2.  2.  2.  dxapi)  is  also  used  adverbially  without  reference 

to  Time,  mostly  with  a  negat.,  oix  dvoKavtis  rov  t  (piptis  dxaprj  not  a 
bit,  not  at  all,  Ar.  Vesp.  701  ;  oif  dxapij  lb.  541,  Dem.  1223.  28; 
dxapi)  vavTiXiis  (v.  I.  dxapti  or  -pfi)  Xenarch.  Xlop<p.  I.  15  ;  so,  irap' 
dxapi)  within  a  hair's  breadth.  Plat.  Ax.  366  C.  IV.  rd  dxapis, 

a  ring  on  the  little  finger.  Poll.  5.  100,  Hesych. 

dxapi,  to,  a  kind  of  mite,  bred  in  wax,  Arist.  H.  A.  5.  32,  1. 

dxapuuos.  a,  or,  (dxap-qs)  momentary,  brief,  wKois  Dem.  1 292.  2; 
cf.  Arist.  H.  A.  8.  2,  11,  Dion.  H.  8.  70.  Adv.  -as,  Alciphio  1.  39 
(Meineke). 

dxapva,  ns,  i),  a  kind  of  thistle,  Theophr.  H.  P.  6.  4,  6. 

dicaptrjw,  to  be  dxapwos  or  barren,  Theophr.  H.  P.  3.  3,  4. 

dxapma,  v),  unfruitfulnest,  barrenness,  Aesch.  Eum.  801,  Hipp.  378. 
491,  Arist.  Mirab.  III.  2.       [dxapwln.  Or.  Sib.  4.  73.] 

d-Kapirurroi,  ov,  =  dxdpwarros,  where  nothing  is  to  be  reaped,  unfruit- 
ful, of  the  sea,  like  drpiryfTos,  Eur.  Phoen.  210 ;  v.  ntplppvros  2. 

d-Kao-n<vi,  ov,  without  fruit,  barren,  Eur.  Fr.  890.  8,  Plat.  Tim.  91  C  ; 
c.  gen.,  \iuvT)  a.  IxOvojv  Paus.  5.  7,  3.  2.  metaph.  fruitless,  un- 

profitable, vdvos  Bacchyl.  19;  X0701  Plat.  Phaedr.  277  A  ;  rd  out.  Arist. 
Eth.  N.4.  3,  33:— Adv. -iron,  Soph.  O.  T.  254;  cf.  xapiris  (A)  III.  II. 
act.  in  Aesch.  Eum.  942,  making  barren,  blasting. 

d-icdpiTWTov  ov,  not  made  fruitful ,  without  fruit,  Theophr.  C.  P.  3.  13, 

3.  2.  metaph.,  xffaos  £*■  J"  unfulfilled  oracle,  Aesch.  Eum. 
714  ;  vixas  dxdpwvrov  xaPv  because  of  some  victory  which  yielded  her 
no  fruit.  Soph.  Aj.  176  :  —  cf.  xapwis  (A)  III. 

d-KopT«'pT]Toj,  ov,  insupportable,  Plut.  2.  733  B,  Galen.  II.  im- 

patient, Niceph.  Blemm. 
oucoproi,  ov,  (xiipw)  unshorn,  uncut,  Ath.  211  E. 
ajtapo>Tp,  If,  (xaptpai)  not  dried  or  withered,  Nic.  ap.  Ath.  133  D. 
(ucao-Kd,  (*dxii  II)  Adv.  gently,  ax.  npoBwi'Tts  Cratin.  N^.  5. 
dKocncaioi,  o,  ok,  (*d*r/  ii)  gentle,  dyaA^a  tKqvtov  Aesch.  Ag.  741. 


45 

dKdTO,  a  corrupt  word  in  Aesch.  Ag.  985  ;  Ahrens'  emend.  Qpafi/xts 
dxrd  for  ifiaufuds  dxdra)  would  suit  the  metre. 

d-KaTa|3iaarTos,  ov,  unforced,  unenslaved,  Cyrill. 

d-KaTdp\T|TOS,  ov,  irrefragable,  Koyos  Ar.  Nub.  1229. 

d-KaTdyYtXTOs,  ov,  unproclaimed,  nohtpos  Dion.  H.  1.  58,  App.  Bell. 
Hisp.  434.  19. 

d-KaTd-yvwoTos,  ov,  not  to  be  condemned,  2  Mace.  4.  47,  Ep.  Tit.  2.  8, 
C.  I.  197 1  b,  Epigr.  Gr.  728.     Adv.  -tojs,  Eccl. 

d-KaTayunao-Tos,  ov,  unconquerable,  Diod.  17.  26. 

d-KaTaScKacTTOS,  ov,  unbribed,  Eccl. 

d-KardSexTOS,  ov,  not  accepted,  Eccl. 

d-KaTa8iKaaTOS,  ov,  not  condemned,  Eccl. 

d-KCLTa8ovAf vtos,  ov,  =  sq.,  Theod.  Prodr. 

d-KaTa&ovXuTOS,  ov,  not  enslaved,  Schol.  Eur.  Hec.  417,  737. 

d-KaTa{TiTf|T<i>s,  Adv.  without  examination,  Epiphan. 

d-KaTa6vp.ios,  ov,  disagreeable,  Artemid.  2.  48,  Eust.  149.  28,  etc. 

d-Ka-raiffxuvTos,  ov,  not  to  be  ashamed  of,  Eccl. 

d-KaTaiTiaToj,  ov,  not  to  be  accused,  Joseph.  B.  J.  I.  24,  8,  Cyrill.,  etc. 

d-KaTaKaXvuTos,  ov,  uncovered,  Lxx,  Polyb.  15.  27,  2, 1  Cor.  11.5, 13. 

d-K<vrdKau.irTOS,  ov,  not  to  be  bent,  Eust.  Opusc.  220.  78. 

d-KaTaKauo-TOS,  ov,  not  burnt,  Apollon.  Mirab.  36. 

d-KaTOKXao-Tos,  ov,  not  to  be  broken,  stubborn,  Schol.  Od.  10.  329,  Eust. 

d-KaraicXvorTOS,  ov,  not  open  to  the  waves,  Greg.  Nyss. 

d-KaTaKo-rrros,  ov,  unwearied,  Gramm. 

d-KaTouc6crp.T|TOS,  ov,  unarranged,  Plut.  2.  424  A. 

d-KaTGucpdTT)TOS,  ov,  not  to  be  subdued:  rd  -tov  Eust.  Opusc.  151.  22. 

d-KaTOKpiTos,  ov,  uncondemnned.  Act.  Ap.  16.  37.,  22.  25.  Adv.  -tow, 
Eust.,  etc. 

d-icdTaKTO$,  ov,  not  to  be  broken,  Arist.  Meteor.  4.  8,  5. 

d-Ka.TaXT|KTos.  ov,  incessant,  Arr.  Epict.  I.  17,  3,  etc. : — Adv.  -tojj, 
lb.  2.  23,  46  (where  wrongly  dxaTaknxTixws) .  II.  acatalectic, 

in  prosody,  Hephaest. 

QKaTaX-nTfTtiD,  not  to  understand,  Sext.  Emp.  P.  1.  201. 

d-Ka.TaXT|TrTos,  ov,  that  cannot  be  reached  or  touched,  Arist.  Probl.  19. 
42  :  not  held  fast,  M.  Anton.  7.  54  : — Adv.  -rait,  Schol.  II.  17.  75.  II. 

not  to  be  conquered,  Joseph.  B.  J.  3.  7,  7.  2.  metaph.  incompre- 

hensible, a  word  of  the  Sceptical  philosophers,  Sext.  Emp.  P.  2.  22,  Plut. 
2.  1056  F,  Cic.  Acad.  2.  9,  18  : — hence,  dKaTaXi)<|>ta,  1),  the  incompre- 
hensibleness  of  things,  Sext.  Emp.  P.  I.  1,  Cic.  ad  Att.  13.  19,  3. 

d-KaTaXXaKTos,  ov,  irreconcilable,  Zaleuc.  ap.  Stob.  280.  12,  Diod. 
12.  20.       Adv.  -raw,  dx.  -noKtutiv  Dem.  153.  17. 

d-Ka.TaXXT|Xos,  ov,  not  fitting  together,  heterogeneous,  Arist.  Mund. 
6,  6,  Dion.  H.  de  Dem.  27,  etc.:  Adv.  -01s,  Diog.  L.  7.  59: — Subst. 
dKaTaXAT|XoTTjS,  ijTor,  )},  or  dxaTaXXi)Xia,  t),  Apoll.  de  Constr.  194 
and  199. 

d-KaTdXCros,  ov,  indissoluble,  Dion.  H.  10.  31,  Ep.  Hebr.  7.  16. 

d-icaTau.d(rnTos,  ov,  not  learnt  or  known,  Hipp.  Acut.  384. 

d-KO/rduaKTOs,  ov,  not  softened  by  kneading,  Schol.  Ar.  Lys.  656. 

d-icaTau.dxT|TOi,  ov,  unconquerable,  Pseudo-Luc.  Philopatr.  8,  M.  Ant. 

8.  78. 

d-KdTdfuaxos,  ov,  — foreg.,  Eus.  D.  E.  424  D. 

d-KaTau,cTpirrot,  ov,  unmeasured,  Strabo  77,  Nicom.  Geras.  I.  77. 

d-KHTavdyKao-Toj,  ov,  not  compulsory,  Eus.  P.  E.  196  D,  199  A. 

d-KaravCiCTrros,  ov,  invincible,  Athanas. 

d-KaTav6irros,  ov,  inconceivable,  Pseudo-Luc.  Philopatr.  1 3,  and  Gramm. 

d-KaTdvucTos,  ov,  without  compunction,  Eccl. 

d-KaTdfto-ro*,  ov,  not  hewn,  C.  I.  160.  col.  1.  60,  68,  al.,  Eust. 

d-KaTairdXaicTTOf,  ov,  unconquerable  in  wrestling,  Schol.  Pind.  N.  4. 

d-KaTdirauo-TO«,  ov,  not  to  be  set  al  rest,  incessant,  Polyb.  4.  17,  4, 
etc. :  that  cannot  cease  from,  Tivor  2  Ep.  Petr.  2.  14.  Adv.  -rare,  Schol. 
Ap.  Kh.  I.  1002. 

d-Ko.TdirXr|KTos.  ov,  undaunted,  Dion.  H.  1.  81,  Eus.  H.  E.  8.  7,  4. 
Adv.  -to;s,  Dion.  H.  1.  57. 

dicaTairXTjgia,  r),  undauntedness,  Clem.  Al.  498  (restored  for /fardirX^iv). 

d-KaTairovT|Tos,  ov,  not  to  be  worn  out,  xoap.os  Philolaiis  in  Stob.  Eel. 
I.  420. 

d-KOTdiTOTO*,  ov,  not  to  be  swallowed,  Lxx  (Job  20.  18). 

d-Ka-ra-irpdvvTOt,  ov,  unappeasable,  Schol.  Soph.  Tr.  999. 

d-KOTaTrroTjTO*,  ov,  not  to  be  scared,  Schol.  II.  3.  63. 

d-KaTd-irrwTOt,  ov,  not  liable  to  fall,  Eust.  Opusc.  187,  fin. 

d-KaTapynros,  ov,  never-ceasing,  unwearied,  vovs  Epiphan. 

Q-Ko.TdpS«vTO«,  ov,  not  watered,  Cyrill. 

d-KQTdoP«o-Tos,  ov,  unquenchable,  Galen. 

d-Komio-tuTTO*,  ov,  not  to  be  shaken,  Hesych.,  Eust.     Adv.  -thus,  Cyrill. 

d-KaTaorrjjiavTos.  ov,  unsealed,  unwritten,  dx.  ivrakua  a  commission 
by  word  of  mouth,  Hdn.  3.  II,  19. 

d-icaTcuriuirrof ,  ov,  inconsiderate,  Eccl. 

d-KOLTaanctwurTOi,  ov,  unwrought,  rough,  inartificial,  Theophr.  H.  P. 

9.  16,  6,  et  ibi  Schneid.,  Lxx  (Gen.  I.  2):— Adv.  -tois,  Dion.  H.  de 
Isaeo  I  J.  II.  not  admitting  of  high  finish,  Vit.  Horn.  218. 

d-Ka,TOATK*\>o%,  ov,  without  preparation,  inartificial,  v.  1.  Aeschin.  7"-3> 
Dion.  H.  de  Thuc.  27,  Philostr.  249  : — Adv.  -as,  Polyb.  6.  4,  7.  II. 

without  regular  establishment,  without  a  dwelling,  /Sios  Diod.  5.  39. 

d-KaTao-KOTrnTos,  ov,  not  to  be  gazed  upon,  abyi)  Greg.  Naz. 

d-KciTdo-KamTov  not  liable  to  derision,  Cyrill. 

d-KaTOO-ddjiaros.  ov,  not  to  be  put  down  by  fallacies,  Apoll.  Tyan.  44. 

d-Ka-nurTdkria,  r/,  instability,  anarchy,  confusion,  Lxx  (Prov.  26.  28), 
Polyb.  I.  70, 1,  Dion.  H.  6. 31,  etc.  II.  unsteadiness,  Polyb.  7. 4,  8. 

aKaracnllTia,  lobe  unstable,  Arr. Epict.  2.1,12 : — Pass.,  LxX(Tob.  1. 15). 


46  aKardaraTOi  ■ 

cucaTaariTOS,  ov,  (KatHoTnui)  unstable,  unsettled,  Hipp.  Aph.  1247  ; 
uk.  irvivua  Dem.  383.  7,  cf.  Arist.  Probl.  26.  13  ;  lroXirtia  Dion.  H.  6. 
74: — of  men,  fickle ,  Polyb.  7.  4,  6  ;  of  fevers,  irregular,  Hipp.  399.  47  : 
— Adv.  -row,  dx.  (\uv  Isocr.  401  B.  II.  not  making  any  deposit, 

thick,  ovpov  Hipp.  69  F,  149  F. 

&-KaTaor6p€aTOS,  ov,  not  to  be  laid  low,  kvuutu  Ann.  Comn. 

tt-KaTao-ToXttcrros,  not  to  be  conjectured,  Suid. 

d-KaTdo-Tp«irTOS,  ov,  not  to  be  overthrown,  Schol.  Find.  O.  2.  146. 

d-KaTdaTpod)OS,  ov,  never-ending,  ap.  Stob.  374.  22  :  of  style,  not 
rounded,  Dion.  H.  de  Comp.  p.  168  Schiif. 

dicaTao*x€0-ia,  7),  ungovernableness,  Ptol.,  etc. 

dKaTaox«TOS,  ov,  («aW x<u)  not  to  be  checked,  Pseudo-Phocyl.  90,  Diod. 
17.  38,  etc.     Adv.  -tow,  Plut.  Cam.  37. 

d-KardTCLKTOS,  ov,  not  to  be  placed  under  subjection,  Dion.  Areop. 

dKaTaTpTjTOS,  ov,  (xaTUTtrpnivw)  not  pierced,  Oalen. 

d-KardTptiTTOS,  ov,  not  to  be  used  up,  Polyb.  3.  89,  9. 

d-Kard4>X€KTOS,  ov,  not  burnt  up,  Eccl. 

d-KaTd<j>pao"TOS,  ov,  inexpressible,  Eccl. 

d-KOTa<j>povr)TOS,  ov,  not  to  be  despised,  important,  Lat.  hand  spernendus, 
Xen.  Ages.  6,  8,  Plut.,  etc. 

d-KaTaxpTjo-TOS,  ov,  unused,  Eust.  812.  52. 

d-KaTaxwpicrTOS,  ov,  undigested,  vKrj  Arist.  Probl.  28.  3. 

d-xaTaJ/€KTOS,  ov,  (\peyuj)  blameless,  Eccl.     Adv.  -Tare  Cyrill. 

d-KaTad/€VCTTOS,  not  fabulous,  Bnptu  Hdt.  4.  191 :  xaru^/tvo'TU  is  a  mere 
conjecture. 

d-xaT«pYao-TOS,  ov,  not  worked  up,  unshapen,  Longin.  15.  5.  II. 

undigested,  rpoip-q  Arist.  P.  A.  2.  3,  9:  indigestible,  Galen.  6.  484. 

d-KaT€vvao~TOS,  ov,  not  put  to  bed,  waking,  Hesych. 

d-tcartvoSos,  ov,  not  easy  to  travel,  dbos  Achmes  Onir.  1 70. 

d-KOTTCY6pT|TOS,  ov,  blameless,  Diod.  II.  46. 

d-KaTtlXTT05!  ov*  noi  encompassed  by  sound,  Suid.  II.  unin- 

structed  in  the  rudiments  of  the  Faith,  Eccl. 

dxaTiov  [uxH],  t<S,  Dim.  of  uxutos,  a  light  boat,  used  by  pirates,  Lat. 
actuaria,  Thuc.  I.  29.,  4.  67,  Polyb.,  etc.  II.  a  kind  of  sail, 

either  used  separately  from  the  large  square  sail  (uifa  lariov,  bSovrj),  or 
added  to  it  in  a  fair  wind  ;  perh.  a  stay-sail,  cf.  boXcov:  in  Xen.  Hell. 
6.  2,  27,  Iphicrates  leaves  his  ueydXu  lariu  behind,  ws  enl  vavuaxiav 
■nXtwv,  and  makes  little  use  even  of  his  dxuria, — so  that  here  they 
plainly  were  used  separately;  but  in  Epicur.  ap.  Plut.  2.  15  D,  a  person 
desiring  to  increase  his  speed,  dxaTiov  dpuuevos  (ptvyet,  cf.  1094  D, 
— so  that  here  they  must  have  been  used  in  addition  to  the  ordinary 
square  sail;  and  in  Luc.  Jup.  Trag.  46,  6  uvtuos  iuiriirrojv  ttj  b&ovn 
xul  iuirnrXds  rd  uxutiu,  the  two  are  mentioned  as  both  set  together,  cf. 
Hist.  Conscr.  45  : — in  Epicr.  Incert.  2,  there  is  a  play  on  the  double  sense  of 
dtcdnov  {sail  and  cup,  v.  uxaros  11),  kutuPuXXc  tukutlu  Kal  kvXixiu  (?) 
aipov  to  /iei(a>  down  with  your  stay-sail  cups  and  up  with  your  main 
goblets.  III.  a  sort  of  woman's  shoe,  Poll.  7.  93,  Hesych.  IV. 

a  little  man,  dwarf,  Phryn.  in  A.  B.  19, — robs  utKpovs  rd  cujuutu 
ukutiu  Xeyovffiv. 

d-Ka.Toiio]TOS,  ov,  uninhabited,  Theophyl. 

d-Ko/rovopao-TOS,  ov,  unnamed,  jiameless,  Epicur.  ap.  Plut.  2.  S98  D:  uk. 
XovSpos  the  cricoid  cartilage  of  the  larynx,  Greenhill  Theophil.  p.  no. 

d-KaTOTTTOS,  ov,  unobserved,  Heliod.  6.  14. 

d-KaTop9wTOS,  ov,  incorrigible,  Cyrill.,  etc. 

ukutos  [put],  7),  (rarely  6,  as  in  Hdt.  7.  186).  A  light  vessel,  boat, 
Lat.  actuaria,  Theogn.  458,  Find.  P.  II.  60,  Hdt.  1.  c,  Thuc,  etc.; 
cf.  dfcdnov  : — generally,  a  ship,  Eur.  Hec.  446,  Or.  342.  II.  a 

boat-shaped  cup,  Theopomp.  Com.  'A\9.  2  (  =  Telest.  6),  Antiph.  'Ayp. 
5  ;  cf.  ukutiov  II,  fin.,  Pors.  Med.  139. 

d-xaTOuXwTOS,  ov,  not  scarred  over,  Oribas.,  Paul.  Aeg. 

d-icdTTVTOS,  ov,  unshod,  Teles,  ap.  Stob.  523.  49. 

u-KavXos,  ov,  without  stalk,  Diosc.  2.  212.  II.  of  a  feather, 

without  shaft  or  stalk,  Arist.  P.  A.  4.  12,  3. 

dxauo-TOS,  ov,  (xaiai)  unburn!,  Xen.  An.  3.  5,  13.  2.  incombustible, 
Arist.  Meteor.  4.  9,  24. 

d-Kaurripiao-TOs,  ov,not  branded,  of  horses,  Strabo  215:  v.  KuvTTjpidfa. 

d-Kavxi]o-ia,  7),  humility,  Eccl. 

aKaxeiaTO,  dicdxT)p.ai,  dKax^^Oa,  aKaXTlp-evos  (on  the  accent,  v. 
Arcad.  170,  I77)»  dtcaxT|cro),  aKaxT|cra :  v.  sub  dx^oJ. 

dicaxijw  [3k],  (dx«'a>,  UKUXt'v)  only  used  in  pres.  to  trouble,  grieve, 
Tivd  Od.  16.  432  : — Med.,  ui) .  .  Xinv  dxaxifyo  Ovuw  be  not  troubled, 
II.  6.  486  :  c.  part.,  ut)ti  Buvwv  aKaxtfrv  be  not  grieved  at  death,  Od. 
II.  486. 

dxaxpcvos,  17,  ov,  an  Homeric  part,  (as  if  from  a  Verb  *uko>,  v.  sub 
uxt)  1),  sharpened,  sharp-edged,  dxaxfifvov  o£i'i  xaXKui  B.  1 5-  482,  Od. 
I.  99,  al. ;  TrtKfKW  .  .  dfi(pOTfp(ti$(v  uk.  Od.  5.  235  ;  tpuoyuvov  22.  80. 

dxcuvos,  o,  a  kind  of  herb,  Pherecr.  Incert.  17. 

dxtaaros,  ov,  (K(d£ai)  not  to  be  split  or  parted,  Greg.  Naz. 

uKeiop.evos,  v.  sub  dxiouui. 

dxcipc-Kop.T|S,  Dor.  -os,  o,  =  dxtpafKou7]9,  of  Apollo,  Pind.  P.  3.  26, 
I.  1.  8;  of  Asclepius  (Aesculapius),  C.  I.  (add.)  511;  of  Scythians, 
Anth.  Plan.  72. 

u-kc\£u6os,  ov,  pathless,  Hesych. 

d-KfXtiKrros,  ov,  unbidden,  Aesch.  Ag.  731,  Soph.  Aj.  1 284,  Eur.  El. 
71,  Plat.  Legg.  953  D.     Adv.  -tow,  Suid. 

d-K('Atid>os.  ov,  withotd  husk  or  capsule,  of  fruits,  Theophr.  C.  P.  1.  17, 8. 

d-Kcv6oo£os,  ov,  without  vainconceit,  M.Anton.  1. 16:  -8o£Ca,  7),  Zonar. 

d-xtvos,  ov,  without  a  vacuum,  Diog.  L.  10.  89. 

d-K€v6</irov5os,  ov,  shunning  vain  pursuits,  Cic.  Fam.  15.  17,  4,  M. 
Anton.  I.  6. 


—  a/ceo-T'/coy. 

d-K€vrr|TOS,  ov,  needing  no  goad  or  spur,  Pind.  O.  I.  33. 

d-KevTpos,  ov,  stingless,  K7fp7)v(s  Plat.  Rep.  552  C,  564  B  :  without 
spur,  of  a  cock,  Clytus  ap.  Ath.  655  E :  without  thorns,  0dros  Philo  1. 
91.  2.    without  force  or  energy,  Lat.  aculei  expers,  Longin. 

21.  II.  «or  central,  Manetho  5.  108. 

dxcvuTOS,  ov,  (K(voai)  unemptied,  Eccl. 

axt'opai  [a],  Ion.  imper.  ukio  (for  d/te'co)  Hdt.  3.  40  ;  Ep.  part,  dxeti- 
utvos  II.  16.  29,  Od.  14.  383,  also  in  Pind.  P.  9.  180:  fut.  uxianuai 
Dio  C.  38.  19,  Ep.  dKfffaouai  Musae.  199,  Att.  dxoiuut  Plat.  Rep. 
364  C :  aor.  fyfodum>,  Ep.  imper.  axtaaut,  etc. :  v.  sub  fin. : 
Dep. :  I.  trans,  to  heal,  cure,  c.  ace.  of  the  thing  healed,  Jf'Akos 

&K(ooat  heal  it,  II.  16.  523  ;  'i\Kt  dxtioutvot  16.  29  ;  i//cupt]v  ditiaaoBat 
Hdt.  4.  90 ;  or  of  part  healed,  &\(<papov  UKtaaio  rinp\6v  Eur.  Hec. 
1067  ;  also  of  the  person,  iiri  ..  tpdpuaKa  itdaaojv  TJKfffaT'  healed  him  of 
his  wound,  II.  5.  402,  901,  cf.  448  ;  c.  gen.  morbi,  vovaov  ..  \i  &Ktoa> 
PapvaXyios  Epigr.  Gr.  803,  cf.  Paus.  8.  18,  8.  2.  to  stanch,  quench, 

iriov  t  aKfovro  re  Siif/av  II.  22.2,  cf.  Pind.  P.  9. 180.  3.  generally,  to 

mend,  repair,  vijas  ixaoufvos  Od.  14.  383  ;  often  applied  to  a  tailor  or 
cobbler,  like  Lat.  resarcire,  Luc.  Fugit.  33,  Necyom.  17  ;  to  a  spider 
mending  its  web,  Arist.  H.  A.  9.  39,  4 ;  cf.  dKtorrjS,  aKiCTtKos.  4. 

metaph.,  uk.  dfiaprdba  Hdt.  1.  167  ;  rd  tnHptpoucva  Id.  3.  16  ;  kukuv, 
&xos  Soph.  Ant.  1027,  Tr.  1035,  cf.  Eur.  Med.  199  ;  ui\viy.a  Antipho 
128.  4  ;  dbiKijua  Plat.  Rep.  364  C  ;  diropias  Xen.  Mem.  2.  7, 1.  II. 

intr.  or  absol.  to  apply  a  remedy,  make  amends,  d\\'  &Kcwfi(8a  Bdooov 
aKiGTai  roi  *pp4vfs  lff6\SiV  II.  13.  1 15;  d\\'  aKtoaaBt,  <piXoi  Od.  10. 
69,  cf.  Hdt.  3.  40,  Plat.  Phileb.  30  B.  III.  the  Act.  dicta  occurs 

in  Pseudo-Hipp.  412.  34,  C.  I.  511.  18;  cf.  i£aitiouai  ;  and  dKitrat  in 
pass,  sense,  Aretae.  Cur.  M.  Ac.  1.  1;  UKtoutvov  rov  KaKov  Id.  Caus.  M. 
Diut.  I.  6  ;  aor.  dKCffBijvat  Paus.  2.  27,  3. 

dK«pai6ou,ai,  Pass,  to  be  dicipann.  Eust.  277.  16. 

d-Kcpaios,  ov,  Prose  word  (used  by  Eur.)  for  the  poet.  aKTjpaTos,  un- 
mixed, vbtup  Arist.  H.  A.  8.  24,  fin.,  cf.  6.  21,  4.  2.  of  a  person, 
pure  in  blood,  Eur.  Phoen.  943.  II.  entire,  unharmed,  unravaged, 
uk.  diro\au{3dv(iv  rijv  ttoXiv  Hdt.  3.  146;  7J7  Thuc.  2.  18  (perh.  with 
allusion  to  Ktpai^a})  ;  uk.  bvvauis,  of  an  army,  in  full  force,  fresh.  Id. 
3.  3 ;  idv  Ti  daivh  kui  uk.  C.  I.  989  b,  991  6.  2.  in  many  rela- 
tions, uKfputov  wy  outffaiui  MtviXecp  Xex0*  inviolate,  Eur.  Hel.  48 ; 
[t€'x>"7]  i0XaPip  Kal  ax.  Plat.  Rep.  342  B  ;  tpvXuKts  T7js  o'tKtius  dKt- 
palov  [xwpas]  Dem.  17.  13;  ovoiu  uk.  Id.  1087.  24;  iX-nibes,  upurj 
Polyb.  6.  9,  3.,  I.  45,  2,  etc.: — i(  uKtpuiov  anew,  Lat.  de  integro,  Id. 
24.  4, 10;  or,  in  afresh,  entire  state,  Lat.  re  adhuc  Integra,  Id.  6.  24,  9 ; 
Iv  dxepaiqi  luv  to  leave  alone,  Id.  2.  2,  10: — Adv.  -<vs,  Cic.  ad  Att.  15. 
21.  3.  of  persons,  uncontaminated,  guileless,  Eur.  Or.  922  :  c.  gen., 
d«.  KUKuiv  7]6wv  uncontaminated  by  . .  ,  Plat.  Rep.  409  A. 

dK€paioo~uvr|,  it,  guilelesstiess,  innocence,  Ep.  Barnab.,  Suid. 

aKepaioTris,  tjtos,  fj,  integrity :  freshness,  Polyb.  3.  73,  6. 

d-Kcpaaros,  ov,  unmixed,  pure,  tivos  from  a  thing,  Plat.  Polit.  310 
D.  II.  that  cannot  be  mixed  or  confounded,  Dion.  H.  de  Comp.  22. 

dxc'pdTOs,  ov,  (Kepas)  without  horns,  Plat.  Polit.  265  C,  sq.,  Arist.  H.  A. 
2.  I,  51,  al. 

d-K<pauvos,  ov,  =  sq.,  of  Capaneus,  Aesch.  Fr.  15. 

d-KcpawccTOS,  ov,  not  stmck  by  lightning,  Luc.  J.  Trag.  25. 

dxcpScia,  17,  want  of  gain,  loss,  Pind.  O.  I.  84. 

d-Kcp8T|S,  4$,  without  gain,  bringing  loss.  Soph.  O.  C.  1484,  Plat.  Crat. 
417  D,  etc.: — bringing  no  gain,  Dion.  H.  6.  9: — Adv.  -bios,  without 
profit,  gratis,  Arist.  Pol.  5.  8,  19,  Plut.  2.  27  D.  II.  not  greedy 

of  gain,  Plut.  Arist.  I. 

dutpKurros,  ov,  {KepKi^ai)  unwoven,  Anth.  P.  "J.  472. 

u-Kcpxos,  ov,  without  a  tail,  Arist.  P.  A.  4.  10,  52. 

uK€pu,aTia,  7),  (jctpua)  want  of  money,  Ar.  Fr.  119. 

d-Kcpos,  ov,  =  UK(pais,  Arist.  H.  A.  2.  I,  31. 

dK€po*€K6p.7]S,  ov,  o,  (Kfipco,  KouTj)  with  unshorn  hair,  ever-young  (for 
the  Greek  youths  wore  their  hair  long  till  they  reached  manhood),  epith. 
of  Phoebus,  II.  20.  39,  h.  Horn.  Ap.  134,  Pind.  P.  3.  26  and  late  Poets: 
cf.  aKetpeKoutjs : — Nonn.  has  a  dat.  pi.  dKipotKouotoiv,  D.  14.  232. 

d-Kepxvos,  ov,  without  hoarseness,  Aretae.  Cur.  M.Ac.  I.  10.  II. 

act.  curing  hoarseness,  Id.  Cur.  M.  Diut.  I.  8. 

d-K<pus,  av,  gen.  a,  =  uKtpuros,  Plat.  Polit.  265  B,  cf.  ojcepos. 

diccpwros,  ov,  (Kepus)  not  horned,  Anth.  P.  6.  258. 

dxco-Ca,  i),=uKtois,  Hipp.  6.  33. 

dKccipPpo-TOS  [#],  ov,  healing  mortals,  of  Aesculapius,  Orph.  L.  8. 

dxco-ipos,  ov,  {dxeouai)  wholesome,  healing,  Plut.  2.  956  F. 

dxco-ios,  ov,  healing,  epith.  of  Apollo,  Lat.  opifer,  Paus.  6.  24,  6. 

dxeois,  fore,  i),  a  healing,  cure,  Hdt.  4.  90,  109  ;  rov  tiipduevov  iravcri- 
trovovs  dxtofis  C.  I.  434.  II.  name  of  a  salve  or  plaster,  Galen. 

dxecpa,  to,  a  remedy,  cure,  Pind.  P.  5.  86,  Aesch.  Pr.  482,  Anth. 

dxeo-pos,  <5,=d«<ns,  and  dic<o-p.ios,  ov,  curable,  Hesych.  (nisi  leg. 
uKtaiuos). 

dKeo-o-i-voo-os,  ov,  poet.  Adj.  healing  disease,  Anth.  P.  9.  516  (e  conj. 
Schneid.). 

cuceo-o-i-irovos,  ov,  poet.  Adj.,  assuaging  pain  or  toil,  Nonn.  D.  7.  86. 

diceo-nf|p,  ijpos,  o,  a  healer :  as  Adj.,  uk.  xa*-lv"s  tne  re'n  '*"'  tames 
the  steed,  Soph.  O.  C.  714. 

dK€(TTT|piov,  to,  a  tailor  s  shop,  Liban. 

dK«o-rf|S,  ov,  o,  "dKtarnp,  Lye.  1052,  Alciphro  3.  27  ; — in  the  Phrygian 
dialect  ace.  to  Schol.  II.  22.  2,' Eust.  1254.  2,  E.  M.  51.  7.  2.  u/re- 

otuI  luariav  fiuyhrwv  menders  of  torn  clothes,  Xen.  Cyr.  1 .  6,  16  (with 
v.  1.  iprnrai,  cf.  Phryn.  p.  91  (Lob.)),  v.  sub  dxeo/iui  1.  3. 

di«o-Tiic6s,  17,  ov,  fitted  for  healing  or  repairing :  iy  -ktj  (sc.  tc'x>";) 
clothes-mending,  Plat.  Polit.  281  B. 


aKe<TTOpta  ■ 

aKccrropia,  17,  Me  healing  art,  Ap.  Rh.  2.  512,  Anth.  P.  9.  349,  al.,  etc. 
dKto-Topis,  180s,  r),  fern,  of  dxiaraip,  Hipp.  295.  48. 

dxto-ros,  17,  &v,  curable,  Hipp.  Art.  825  ;  irpd-yuo  Antipho  140.  15  : — 
metaph.,  dxajral  <ppiv(s  (oOXant  the  spirit  of  the  noble  is  easily  revived, 
11.  13.  115. 

aKtoTpa,  r),  a  darning-needle,  Luc.  D.  Mort.  4.  I. 

diccoTpia,  7),  =  sq. :  a  sempstress,  Luc.  Rhet.  Praec.  24. 

dicccrTpis,  ibos,  7),  feni.  of  dx(arrip,  a  midwife,  Hipp.  254.  50. 

aKearpov,  to,  a  remedy.  Soph.  Fr.  427. 

aK(7Tup,  opos,  d,  a  healer,  saviour,  Qoi&os  Eur.  Andr.  900. 

aKc<r4>opia.  r),  healing,  salvation,  Maxim,  xarapx-  167. 

dicco--d>6pos,  ov,  bringing  a  cure,  healing,  c.  gen.  rei,  Eur.  Ion  1005, 
Astydam.  ap.  Ath.  40  B. 

dic€o--w8uvos.  ov,  allaying  pain,  Paetus  in  Hipp.  1279.  2,  Anth.  P.  9. 
815,  C.  I.  5973  c. 

d-K«'4>dXos,  ov,  without  head:  ol  dxitpaKoi,  fabulous  creatures  in  Libya, 
Hdt.  4.  191,  cf.   Plin.  5.  8.  2.  without  beginning,  Ad-yos,  pvSos 

Plat.  Phaedr.  264  C,  Legg.  752  A;  <rTi'x<x  d*.,  hexameters  which  begin 
with  a  short  syllable,  Ath.  632  D,  Gaisf.  Hephaest.  p.  181.  8. 

aipfffts  die.  a  sect  with  no  known  head,  Suid.,  etc. ;  dxicpaXot,  schismatics, 
Eccl.  II.  =arifios,  Horace's  capitis  minor,  Artemid.  I.  35. 

dK«u,  v.  dxiou.ai  sub  fin.  II.  v.  sq. 

ukkhv,  ovaa,  (v.  sub  axi\  II)  a  participial  form,  used  by  Horn,  as  Adv. 
like  0*131',  stilly,  softly,  silently,  II.  1.  34,  Od.  9.  427,  etc. ;  used  in  sing. 
even  with  pi.  verb,  dximv  oaivvvOf  21.  89,  h.  Horn.  Ap.  404;  but  dual 
dxiovr(  Od.  14.  195  ;  never  in  pi. — Though  dxiovaa  occurs  II.  I.  565, 
Od.  11.  141,  yet  axiom  stands  also  with  fern.,  'ABijvain  anion1  fjv  II.  4. 
2  2. — Ap.  Rh.  1.  765  has  an  opt.  Anion,  as  if  a  Verb  dxioi,  to  be  silent, 
really  existed.     Cf.  Buttm.  Lexil.  s.  v. 

ditT|,  r),  a  Subst.  cited  by  Gramm.  (Hesych.,  Suid.,  Eust.,  E.  M.)  in  three 
senses,  I.  a  point,  (cf.  axis,  dxojv,  dxatva,  dxavos,  dxovrj,  dxpos, 

dixvs,  the  term,  -^itrfs,  the  part,  axaxfiivos,  also  0*0**17,  and  perh.  dxp:-q, 
alxfV  '•  Skt.  aean  (dart),  Apis  (swift)  ;  Zd.  alcu  (a  point) ;  Lat.  acus, 
acuo,  acer,  ocior,  and  perh.  acies;  O.  H.  Germ,  egg-ja  (actio).)  II. 

silence,  (cf.  dxi)v,  dxitw,  4*5,  dxaaxa,  dxaoxatos,  fj*a,  fjxtora,  77*0- 
Xor).  III.  healing  (whence  dxiopiai,  and  perh.  afxdXor,  alxaXXu) 

Hipp.  853  C,  866  B. — Curt,  suspects  that  H  and  in  belong  to  one  and 
the  same  root ;  the  common  notion  being  that  of  soothing,  gentleness. 

ditT|S«ui,  r),  (0x170775)  carelessness,  indifference,  in  pi.,  Emped.  441,  Ap. 
Rh.  3.  298. 

diCT|o«p.6v«VTOs,  ov,  (kt)8€)iwv)  neglected,  slighted,  Eccl. 

d-tcT|8€OTO«,  ov,  uncared  for,  unburied,  II.  6.  60 :  so  in  Adv.,  -toot, 
without  due  rites  of  burial,  or  (perh.)  without  care  for  others,  recklessly, 
remorselessly,  II.  22.  465.,  24.  417,  cf.  Anth.  P.  9.  375. 

o-kt|8«vtoi,  ov,  unburied,  Plut.  Pericl.  28,  Joseph. 

d>CT|8«'«,  fut.  770-01,  Qi  Sm.  10.  16.,  12.  376,  but  aor.  dx^itoa  II.  14. 
427  :  (0*170775).  To  take  no  care  for,  no  heed  of  c.  gen.,  od  tis  eu 
dxr\o«j(v  II.  I.  c. ;  oi  uiv  u(v  (uovrot  ajeifttis,  dAAd  tavivros  23.  70 ; 
oavTOv  0'  0*170(1  ovo-ruxowrros  (imperat.)  Aesch.  Pr.  508,  cf.  Mosch. 
4.  81  : — cf.  difxMai. 

d-icr)8T|»,  is,  I.  pass,  uncared  for,  unheeded,  unburied,  &<ppa  uiv 

"Zxrwp  *«ira<  d*.  II.  24.  554  ;  t)  airrait  xurat  d*.  Od.  20.  1 30;  aiiuar 
uicnoia  /curat  Od.  24.  187,  cf.  6.  26.,  19.  18.  II.  act.  without 

care  or  sorrow,  Lat.  securus,  alu!  dwoKiXfi^aovrai  Axijoits  II.  21.  123, 
cf.  24.  526,  Hes.  Th.  489,  Anth.  P.  II.  42.  2.  careless,  heedless, 

Tuv  Si  ywaiKts  drntift  oi  xouiovaiv  Od.  17.  319;  taking  no  care  of, 
vaiocuv  Plat.  Legg.  913  C. 

dxT)8ia,  Ion. -(t),  1),  =  d*ij8€io  :  indifference,  torpor,  from  grief  or  ex- 
haustion, Hipp.  272.  39,  Cic.  ad  Att.  12.  45,  Aretae.,  etc. 

dicnSidu.  to  be  careless  or  reckless,  Basil.,  Io.  Chrys.  2.  to  be 

torpid,  exhausted,  weary,  Lxx  (Ps.  60.  2.,  I42.  4,  etc.). 

d-KT|XT)Tos,  ov,  to  be  won  by  no  charms,  proof  against  enchantment.  Plat. 
Phaedr.  259  B : — hence  unconquerable,  inexorable,  in  Horn,  only  once, 
d*7jAfiTov  voos,  Od.  10.  329  (a  line  susp.  even  by  old  Gramm.)  ;  uavia 
dx.  Soph.  Tr.  999  (lyr.),  also  of  persons,  Theocr.  22.  169. 

d-K7|Xi8uTOt  ft],  ov,  spotless,  pure,  Lxx. 

OKTuia,  to,  =  axf aua,  a  cure,  relief,  iowaaiv  II.  1  j.  394. 

d-Ktuiaro*,  of.  unmuzzled,  Eccl. 

dx-qv,  (v.  sub  ixri  II)  an  accus.  form  used  as  Adv.  stilly,  softly,  silently, 
Horn,  mostly  in  phrase,  d/rijK  <-y«Voi'TO  cianrp  II.  3.  95,  al. ;  also,  oi  8" 
dXAoi  dxrjv  iffav  4.  429. 

d-KTfir€VTO»,  ov,  not  in  a  garden,  wild,  Posidon.  ap.  Ath.  369  D. 

d-KTprov  ov,  without  a  garden,  xtrtos  dxrptm  Greg.  Naz. 

d-K-qpacria.  1),  purity,  Hesych.  (dxnptoia  in  Ms.),  Apollin.  Psalm. 

d-K-qpdo-ios,  ov,  Ep.  form  of  uxtjootos,  unmixed,  oivos  Od.  9.  205.  II. 
untouched,  Lat.  integer,  dx.  Ad/iim  meadows  not  yet  grazed  or  mown, 
h.  Horn.  Merc.  72  ;  SvOot  dx.  pure,  fresh,  Anth.  P.  12.  93 ;  axfjirrpa  dx. 
powerful,  C.  I.  4158. 

dinjpdTOj.  ov,  (xtpavw/u)  like  dxipaws,  unmixed,  uncontaminaled,  un- 
defiled,  pure,  properly  of  liquids,  vtoip  II.  24.  303  ;  morov  Aesch.  Pers. 
614 ;  x'"ua-  ipflpo*  Soph.  O.  C.  471,  690 ;  dx.  xpwd's  pure  gold,  Hdt. 
7.  10,  1,  Simon.  64,  cf.  Plat.  Rep.  503  A,  Polit.  303  E.  II. 

metaph.,  1.  of  things,  untouched,  unhurt,  undamaged,  Lat.  integer, 

o7*or  xal  xKrjpos,  *t7Juoto  II.  15.  498,  Od.  17.  532  ;  cr*d<por  Aesch.  Ag. 
661  ;  dw'01  strong  reins,  Pind.  P.  5.  43  ;  dx.  xuun  unshorn  hair,  Eur.  Ion 
1 266  ;  dx.  Xuuwv  an  unmown  meadow,  Id.  Hipp.  73  ;  dx.  cfitKia,  xiauos 
Xen.  Hier.  3,  4,  Cyr.  8.  7,  22  ;  iwurrfifiti,  ffit)  Plat.  Phaedr.  247  D,  Legg. 
735  C ;  d*.  <pdpu.axa  spells  that  have  all  their  power,  Ap.  Rh.  4.  157 : — 
in  Hdt.  4.  I  j  2,  to  ifiwifnov  rotrro  fjv  dx.  rovrov  tov  xpovov,  it  may  be 
taken  for  either  untouched,  unvisited  (like  dx.  d\yto-i  supr.),  or  in  full 


■  CtKlVtrTOt. 


47 

force  and  freshness.  2.  of  persons,  Lat.  integer,  TrapOivos  dx.  an 

undefiled  virgin,  Eur.  Tro.  670;  so,  d*.  \ixos  Eur.  Or.  575  ;  and  c.  dat., 
dxiJpoTos  d\yeai,  rvxats  untouched  by  woes,  etc.,  Eur.  Hipp.  1 1 13,  H.  f! 

1314 :  mostly  c.  gen.,  d*.  xaxuiv  without  taint  of  ill,  lb.  949  ;  dx.  fduaiv 
Plat.  Legg.  840  D  ;  d*.  woivoiv  free  from  throes  of  child-birth,  Ap.  Rh. 

1.974,  etc.     Cf.  dxipatos,  dxnpdoios,  dxpaupvrjs. 

d-KT|pu>s  (A),  ov,  unharmed  by  the  KtJjws,  generally  unharmed,  Horn, 
(never  in  II.),  Od.  12.  98.,  23.  328  ;  $vxal  dxijpiot,  =  dfldi/OToi,  free  from 
the  power  of  the  Fates,  Pseudo-Phocyl.  99.  II.  act.  unharming, 

harmless,  pdgoos  h.  Horn.  Merc.  530;  f/nipa  Hes.  Op.  821. 

d-K-qptos  (B),  ov,  (xijp)  without  heart,  i.  e.,  I.  lifeless,  Horn. 

(never  in  Od.),  dxrjptov  atya  Ti0nat  II.  11.  392,  cf.  21.  466.  II. 

heartless,  spiritless,  Lat.  vecors,  oi  irov  oios  tax*1  dx7]ptov  5.812;  Tjutvoi 
avQl  (KaOTOl  axr/piot  7.  I0O. 

aK-qpdraTOS,  a  poet.  Sup.  of  dxriparos,  Anth.  P.  12.  249. 

d-icqpvKTct  and  -r£,  Adv.  without  needing  a  flag  of  truce,  Thuc.  2.  I : 
but  in  Dio  C.  50.  7,  without  admitting  one ;  cf.  sq. 

d-KT|puKTOs,  ov,  unannounced,  unproclaimed,  dx.  iroAc uo;  a  sudden  war, 
Hdt.  5.  81  ;  but  also  a  war  in  which  no  herald  was  admitted,  truceless, 
implacable,  Xen.  An.  3.  3,  5,  Plat.  Legg.  626  A  ;  fjv  ydp  aoirovbos  xal 
dxTjpvxros  vuiv  irpos  Tour  Oiards  iroAf/jos  Dem.  314.  16  (cf.  doTrovSos)  ; 
dx.  ixOpa.  Plut.  Pericl.  30.  2.  without  herald,  to  dx.  rrjt  080O 

the  fact  that  the  journey  was  unprepared  by  heralds,  App.  Mithr. 
104: — Adv.  -rais,  without  needing  a  flag  of  truce,  Thuc.  I.  146;  cf. 
foreg.  II.  not  proclaimed  victor  by  heralds,  inglorious,  unknown, 

Eur.  Heracl.  89,  Aeschin.  86.  37.  III.  with  no  tidings,  not 

heard  of.  Soph.  Tr.  45. 

QKTipwTos,  ov,  (xnpiai)  unwaxed,  Luc.  Icarom.  3,  Polyaen. 

OK-qx<8aTai,  aKT|x<V€vos>  v-  SUD  ^X^u- 

dm)x<Suv,  ovos,  0,  =  dxos,  Hesych. 

d-KiP8T|X«VT0S,  ov,  =  sq.,  Philo  I.  565,  etc. 

d-Ki^SqXos,  ov,  unadulterated,  genuine,  Plat.  Legg.  916  D  ;  boxtfxa 
xal  dx.  Luc.  Hermot.  68.  2.  metaph.  of  men,  guileless,  honest, 

Hdt.  9.  7,  1,  Phryn.  in  A.  B.  371.     Adv.  -Xare,  Isocr.  3  C. 

dxiSvot  [4],  17,  ov,  weak,  feeble,  faint,  Horn.  Od.,  always  in  the  Comp., 
«'8os  dxiovorfpos  8.  169,  cf.  5.  217.,  18.  130  ;  insipid,  iota/ia  Archestr. 
ap.  Ath.  117  A. — Ep.  word,  found  also  in  the  Prose  of  Hipp.,  27.  43,  etc. 

okISuStk,  er,  (d*is,  tT&os)  pointed,  Theophr.  H.  P.  4.  12,  2. 

dxlSuTos,  ry,  6v,  —  foreg..  Poll.  1. 97.,  10. 1 33,  A.  B.  331,  Hesych.  II. 
to  dx.,  a  plant,  =  TroT77p<oi'  II,  Diosc.  3.  15. 

d-KiOdpts,  f,  gen.  tor,  without  the  harp,  Aesch.  Supp.  681. 

d-Kticu»,  vos,  i,  r),  powerless,  feeble,  Od.  9.  515.,  21.  131.  II. 

weakening,  vovaos  Orph.  Lith.  22. — Ep.  word,  used  by  Aesch.  Pr.  548 
(lyr.),  and  in  the  Ion.  Prose  of  Hipp.  504.  5. 

QKivaYu-a  [drf],  to,  -7116$,  o,  =  Tifo-y/ia,  -yu.6s,  Poeta  ap.  E.  M.  48.  39. 

dxivdicTis,  i,  Lat.  acinaces  (Hor.  Od.  I.  27,  5),  Persian  word,  a  short 
straight  sword,  often  in  Hdt.,  who  declines  it  -«os,  -«i\  -ea,  3.  118, 
128.,  4.  62.,  9.  107 ;  but  in  7.  54.,  9.  80,  almost  all  the  Mss.  give  ace. 
dxn-dxr/v,  dxtvdxas  (as  in  Xen.  An.  I.  2,  27,  al.)  for  -fa,  -(as ;  dx. 
imxpvaos,  (prob.)  a  Persian  sword  kept  in  the  Parthenon,  C.  I.  139.  16, 
ubi  v.  Bockh. ;  also,  1/1)  rbv  dxivajcnv,  a  Scythian  oath,  Luc.  Tox.  38  ;  v. 
Diet,  of  Antiqq.  s.  v.      [f  in  Horace.] 

dmvSOvi,  Adv.  of  sq.,  without  danger,  Suid. 

d-nivSvvos,  ov,  without  danger,  free  from  danger,  Simon.  51.,  107, 
Eur.  LA.  17,  Thuc.  I.  124;  vvptToi  Hipp.  Aph.  1260;  dp«Ta!  dxivo. 
virtues  that  court  no  danger,  i.e.  cheap,  easy  virtues,  Pind.  O.  6.  14,  cf. 
Thuc.  3.  40 ;  dx.  flvai  tiki  tuv  dyaiva  Hyperid.  Lye.  7  ;  dx.  yipas,  of 
silence,  C.  I.  6308.  II.  Adv.  -van,   Eur.  Rhes.  584,  Anti- 

pho 1 20.  3,  etc. ;  7)  dx.  tovktla  Thuc.  6.  80 ;  to  dx.  dir(\6tiv  airois 
their  departure  without  danger  to  us.  Id.  7.  68  :  Comp.  dxtvovvortpov 
with  less  danger.  Plat.  Phaedo  85  D ;  Sup.  dmi'SwoTO/rci  {771'  Xen. 
Mem.  2.  8,  6. 

d*tv80vdTijs,  »ttos,  o,  freedom  from  danger,  Galen. 

d-KivSvvuSrvi,  m,  (fTJos)  of  no  dangerous  appearance,  Hipp.  829  H. 

d-Kivr|«is,  taaa,  ev,  =  dxivrrros,  Nic.  Al.  436. 

dxlvncrCa,  7),  quiescence,  rest,  Arist.  H.  A.  5.  17,  II  :  also  aKi\rnax%,  (OK, 
7),  Theod.  Mctoch.  798. 

dKiVT)T«i),  to  be  dxivrrros,  Hipp.  596.  30,  Sext.  Emp.  M.  7.  188;  of 
bones,  as  opp.  to  joints,  Galen.  19.  460. 

dicIVT|Ti,  or  -rti.  Adv.  immovably.  Poll.  3.  89.,  9.  IIj. 

dnlvT|Ti{w,  =  dxtvryrioi,  Arist.  H.  A.  4.  IO,  12,  etc. 

djcivTfTivSd,  Adv.,  dx.  srai(ttv  to  play  a  game  of  standing  stock-still. 
Poll.  9.  1 10 ;  so  (SaaiXlvSa,  etc. 

d-KivT|TO«,  ov,  also  17,  ov  Pind.  O.  9.  51,  Anth.  P.  append.  50.  14: — 
unmoved,  not  moving,  motionless,  of  Delos,  Orac.  ap.  Hdt.  6.  98  ;  then 
in  Pind.,  etc. ;  i(  dxtvrjrov  iroovs  without  stirring  a  step,  Soph.  Tr.  875  ; 
Tdr  Kivrujfts  dxivrrros  Plat.  Tim.  40  B ;  iarpa  dx.  fixed  stars,  Poll.  4. 
156.  2.  idle,  sluggish,  iir'  dxtvirrotoi  xaSifav  to  sit  in  idleness, 

Hes.  Op.  748  (where  others,  to  sit  on  graves,  v.  infr.  II.  2)  ;  d*.  (ppivts 
a  sluggish  soul,  Ar.  Ran.  899  J  of  the  Boeotians,  Alex.  Tpoip.  I  ;  X"'Pa 
dx.  untitled,  Plut.  2.  1054  A.  3.  unmoved,  unaltered,  dx.  vliuipa. 

Thuc.  I.  71,  etc.;  tows'  vipums  eav  dxivhrow  Arist.  Pol.  2.  8,  21,  cf. 
Plat.  Legg.  736  D;    dx.  iiapiivfiv  Xen.  Lac.  14,  I.  II.  im- 

movable, hard  to  move.  Plat.  Soph.  249  A,  Luc.  Imag.  1  (in  Comp.) : — 
Adv.,  dxivi/Tan  ix*'v  Isocr.  293  C,  Plat.,  etc.  2.  not  to  be  stirred 

or  touched,  inviolate,  Lat.  non  movendus,  rdipos  Hdt.  I.  187:  esp.  proverb, 
of  sacred  things,  Kivtiv  rd  dxivrrra  Id.  6.  134,  cf.  Soph.  O.  C.^  1526,  Plat. 
Theaet.  181  A  : — hence  that  must  be  kept  secret,  rdxivrrr  tirn  Soph. 
O.  C.  624;   rdxivrrra  ippdaai  Id.  Ant.  1060.  3.  of  persons,  not 

to  be  shaken,  steadfast,  stubborn,  lb.  1027;  dxivnros  11(1601  Plat.  Tim. 


48  aKivioi  ■ 

51  E;  d*.  Inrb  <p60ov  Def.  Plat.  412  A;  trpus  to  Buov  Plut.  2.  165 
B.  III.  Adv.  -reus,  v.  supr.  II.  I. 

dxivios,  d,  a  chaplet  ofdxivos,  Ath.  680  D. 

okIvos,  d,  basil-thyme,  Diosc.  3.  50. 

oklos.  ov,  (xis)  not  worm-eaten.  Sup.  dxiwraros  Hes.  Op.  433. 

dicipos,  uv  (al.  dxlpos,  a,  ov),  Theocr.  28.  15,  v.  1.  Hes.  Op.  433,  a 
word  of  dub.  signf.,  prob.  =  dxtbvos. 

okis,  ibos,  17,  (v.  sub  ajcii  I)  a  point,  Hipp.  554.  44 ;  a  splinter.  Id. 
1 153  E  :  the  beak  of  a  ship,  Diod.  13.  99.  2.  the  barb  of  an  arrow 

or  hook,  Lat.  cuspis,  0t\ovs  Plut.  Demetr.  20 ;  dyxiarpov  Anth.  P.  6. 
5: — an  arrow,  dart,  Ar.  Pax  443,  Mnesim.  *iA.  1,  Opp.  H.  5. 
151.  3.  metaph.,  ipvs  .  .  17  ippevwv  axis  Timoth.  A18.  5  ;  iroBaiv 

dxibts  the  stings  of  desire,  Anth.  P.  12.  76:  also  shooting  pains,  Aretae. 
l".uis.  M.  Diut.  2.  4.  II.  a  surgical  bandage,  Galen. 

o-kixitos  [1],  ov,  not  to  be  reached,  unattainable,  djcixnra  Siwxav  II. 
J  7-  75  :  tUTaBtiv  Ael.  N.  A.  4.  52.  II.  of  persons,  nor  to  be 

reached  by  prayer,  inexorable,  Aesch.  Pr.  184. 

d-Kiuv,  oros,  o,  i),  not  supported  by  pillars,  Hesych. 

ditici{ou.ai,  Dep.  (dxxw)  to  affect  indifference,  properly  of  prudish  girls, 
rd  piv  ovv  yivaia  .  .  ijk*i£«to  Philippid.  'Avav.  I,  cf.  A.  B.  364,  Suid. 
and  v.  dxxiopui.  2.  generally,  to  affect  ignorance,  dissemble,  olaBa, 

dXX'  nxxi&i  Plat.  Gorg.  497  A,  Cic.  ad  Att.  2.  19,  5:  cf.  Ruhnk.  Tim. 
s.  v. — Act.  atactica  in  Ael.  Epist.  9. 

dKKiirr|o-Los,  d,  Lat.  acipenser,  the  sturgeon,  Ath.  294  F. 

dicKuxu.a,  (jtos,  to,  =  sq.,  Nicet.  Eug.  6.  404. 

dmao-pos,  d,  affectation  of  indifference,  prudery,  Philem.  'ASeAiji.  1. 14: 

cf.  OKKlfapXU. 

okkuttlkos,  17,  ov,  disposed  to  be  coy,  Eust.  1727-  28. 

aKKop,  Lacon.  for  daxos,  Hesych. 

ukku,  17,  like  aKipiTw,  poppa,  a  bugbear,  that  nurses  used  to  frighten 
children  with:  ace.  to  others,  a  vain  woman,  Zenob.  I.  53,  ubi  v. 
Leutsch. 

d»\aY7i,  Adv.  (xKayyrj)  without  clang  or  noise,  Longus  1.5:  in  Aesch. 
Pr.  803,  Dind.  reads  autKayyti!. 

d-K.\.d8evTos.  ov,  unpruned,  Eccl. :  Aeol.  fern.  dxXds,  dSos,  Hesych. 

dxXdpuros,  Dor.  for  dxkrjp-,  Pind. 

d-KAao~ros,  ov,  unbroken,  Theophr.  C.  P.  I.  15,  17,  Anth.  P.  9.  322  : 
metaph.  of  an  unbroken  line,  17  xvxXcp  tpopa  dx\.  Arist.  Cael.  2.  6,  3. 

dicXavo-TCi  or  -ti,  dicXavTet  or  -ti,  (*Aauu)  Adv.  of  sq.,  without  weep- 
ing, Call.  Dian.  267. 

d-xXavTos  or  d-KXovorros,  ov, — the  former  being  the  only  form  used 
by  Horn.,  and  prob.  also  by  the  Trag. :  (x\aiaj) :  I.  pass,  un- 

wept, esp.  without  funeral  lamentation,  II.  22.  386,  Od.  11.  54,  Solon 
21 ;  uiKer  dx\avros,  qaros  Aesch.  Eum.  565  :  c.  gen.,  <pi\a>v  d/cAauToy 
Soph.  Ant.  847  : — in  Eur.  Andr.  1235  Thetis  says,  iyw  yap,  fjv  dxKavr 
*XPVy  tiktciv  rixva  .  .  ,  i.  e.  children  not  liable  to  death.  II. 

act.  unweeping,  tearless,  oiSi  at  tprjpt  br)v  axKavrov  eatoBai  Od.  4.  494, 
cf.  Aesch.  Th.  696,  Eur.  Ale.  173: — in  Soph.  El.  912  =  xal7>a"'>  «"''* 
impunity. 

dKXcf|S,  ey :  gen.  toy:  ace.  d/eXcd,  Ion.  dxkcrj,  Ep.  dxXcd  Od.  4.  728: 
— Ep.  axXci-qs,  Ap.  Rh.  3.  932,  Poeta  ap.  Plut.  2.  38  F,  Nonn. ;  pi. 
dxAetefy  or  dx\neis,  II.  12.  318,  Spitzn.  Exc.  22:  («A«oy).  Without 

fame,  inglorious,  unsung,  Horn.,  Pind.  O.  12.  22,  Hdt.  prooem.,  Eur.,  etc. 
Adv.  dxKtuis,  Hdt.  5.  77,  Antipho  113.  38,  Ep.  d/cAetd}y,  II.  22.  304: 
also  neut.  as  Adv.,  dx\.tls  aureus  II.  7.  100. — Cf.  Buttm.  Lexil.  s.  v. 
iiriT'no'ts  I.  3. 

d-icXeta,  Ion.  -tr),  ij,  ingloriousness,  Anth.  P.  9.  80. 

d-i<A€iT]s.  is,  Ep.  for  d«X«ijs. 

d-KXcuTTOS,  ov.  Ion.  aKXriioTOS  Call.  Fr.  41,  Att.  contr.  cucXtjo-tos 
Eur.  Andr.  593,  Thuc.  2.  93  :  (*X«i'<u)  : — not  closed  or  fastened,  11.  c., 
Xen.  Cyr.  7.  5,  25. 

d-KXt-irros,  ov,  not  stealing,  not  deceiving,  Soph.  Fr.  615. 

dKXt|T|S,  is,  v.  sub  axXdis. 

oxXtiiotos,   ov,   v.  sub  dx\ftiXTOS.  II.  (kA«i£o))   nameless, 

Greg.  Naz. 

d-KX-qu-ciTOs,  ov,  (xXijpa)  not  from  the  vine,  ydvvapa  Greg.  Naz. 

axX-npcu,  to  be  ax\-npos,  be  unfortunate,  Polyb.  I.  7,  4,  etc. 

aKXr]pT)(ia,  otos,  to,  a  loss,  mishap,  Diod.  13.  31. 

dicXrjpia,  ij,  misfortune.  Soph.  Fr.  816,  Antiph.  'AScuv.  1,  Polyb.,  etc. 

d-KXi]pov6p.T|TOS,  ov,  without  inheritance,  Eccl.  II.  without  heirs, 

Eust.  533.  32,  Gramm.,  Eccl. 

d-kXi)pos,  ov,  without  lot  or  portion,  poor,  needy,  Od.  II.  490,  Xen. 
An.  3.  2,  26,  etc. :  c.  gen.  without  lot  or  share  in,  Aesch.  Eum.  353 ; 
Isae.  41.  15,  etc.: — Adv.  axKrjpd,  Zonar.  II.  unallotted,  with- 

out an  owner,  h.  Horn.  Ven.  123,  Eur.  Tro.  32. 

dicXT|poviXT|TOS,  ov,  not  having  received  a  lot,  C.  I.  3137.  102. 

d-KX-ripwTn  or  -I,  Adv.  without  casting  lots,  Lys.  147.  19,  C.  I.  2880. 

d-KXr|pwTOS,  ov,  without  lot  or  portion  in  a  thing,  c.  gen.,  x^pos 
dxXdparros  Pind.  O.  7.  Io8.  2.  without  casting  lots,  Dio  C.  Fr. 

62.  II.  not  distributed  in  lots,  Plut.  2.  231  E. 

dicX-go-ros,  v.  sub  dxKtiaros. 

d-KXir|Ti,  Adv.  uncalled,  unbidden,  Zenob.  2.  46  [where  ¥]. 

d-KX-qTOS,  ov,  uncalled,  unbidden,  Asius  I,  Aesch.  Pr.  1024,  Cho.  838, 
Soph.  Aj.  289,  Thuc.  1.  118,  Plat.,  etc. 

u-kXCvt|S,  is,  bending  to  neither  side,  unwavering,  unswerving,  Plat. 
Phaedo  109  A  :  regular,  axXtviuv  xa\dpa>v  Anth.  P.  10.  II,  etc. : — Adv. 
-vius,  Philo  2.  669;  Ion.  -viws,  Anth.  P.  5.  55.  2.  metaph.  stead- 

fast, steady,  Anth.  P.  12.  158,  Ep.  Hebr.  10.  23,  Luc,  etc.: — unmoved, 
tranquil,  Nonn.  D.  35.  11,  etc. 

d-KAtoria,  17,  indeclinableness,  Apoll.  in  A.  B.  551,  552. 


—  UK/Mltf. 

o-kXItos,  ov,  undeclined,  indeclinable,  Gramm. ;  Ael.  Dion,  wrote  irtpi 
axkiTuv  fandraiv.     Adv.,  okXitcus  tx""  Eust.  162.  32. 

d-KX6vi)TOS,  ov,  unshaken,  unmoved,  Synes.,  Suid.,  C.  I.  8672.  Adv. 
-twj,  Cyrill. : — in  Galen.  9.  205,  ukXovos,  ov. 

u.  kXottos.  ov,  not  stolen,  Greg.  Naz.  II.  not  liable  to  seduction, 

Id.  III.  not  furtively  concealed,  dyxtarpov  Opp.  H.  3.  532. 

d-KXC8<ivio-T0S,  ov,  not  lashed  by  waves  :  generally,  shelteredfrom,  hi/xfiv 
dx\.  tw  irvivfidrtuv  Polyb.  10.  10,  4. 

d-KXvo-TOS,  ov,  =  foreg.,  Lye.  736,  Plut.  Marius  15,  Nonn.,  etc.;  Xi/ii/v 
dxK.  Diod.  3.  44  ;  fern.,  AjAij/  dxKvarav  Eur.  I.  A.  121. 

d-KXfrros,  ov,  (x\va)  unheard,  Epigr.  Gr.  1046.  91  : — the  sense  is  dub. 
in  Plut.  2.  722  E. 

u-kXwv.  i,  j),  without  twig  or  branch,  Theophr.  H.  P.  6.  6,  2. 

dteXworos,  ov,  (xKwOoj)  unspun,  ffTTjpovfs  Plat.  Com.  Incert.  53. 

oKjidJu,  rut.  daw,  (d*/uj)  to  be  in  full  bloom,  be  at  the  prime, 
flourish:  I.  of  persons,  Hdt.  2.  134,  Plat.  Prot.  335  E;  dxpxi^fiv 

ai/fiari,  pu>fir>,  Xen.  Mem.  4.  4,  23,  Plat.  Polit.  310  D,  etc. ;  so  of  cities 
and  states,  Hdt.  3.  57.,  5.  28  ;  dxp.  to  auifta  diro  tSiv  A'  Itqiv  fitXP' 
toS  t  Koi  n'  Arist.  Rhet.  2.  14,  4.  2.  to  flourish  or  abound  in  a 

thing,  vKovtv  Hdt.  I.  29;  irapaoxevrj  wdori  Thuc.  I.  I  ;  V(6ttjti  Id.  2. 
20 ;  iv  rivi  Aeschin.  46.  23.  3.  c.  inf.  to  be  strong  enough  to  do, 

Xen.  An.  3.  I,  25.  II.  of  things,  d/c/id£ci  o  iroAt/jos,  1)  voaos 

is  at  its  height,  Hipp.  Aph.  1245,  Thuc.  3.  3.,  2.  49;  dx/id(ov  Bipos 
mirf-summer,  Id.  2.  19;  of  corn,  to  be  just  ripe,  Ibid.  2.  so  also, 

jjvixa  .  .  dxfidfat  [o  6vp6s~\  when  passion  was  at  its  height.  Plat.  Tim.  70 
D;  dx^id^ovoa  f&fVf  Antipho  127.  25;  dxfidfct  irdvia  imp.t\tias  ttd- 
puva  require  the  utmost  care,  Xen.  Cyr.  4.  2,  40.  '3.  impers.,  c. 

inf.,  dxpAfai  fSptrioiv  ix((J®at  't*s  ilme  to  . . ,  Aesch.  (lyr.)  Th.  96 ;  vvv 
ydp  dx/x.  IlctOw  . .  £vyxaTa&rjvat  now  'tis  time  (or  her  to  . . ,  Id.  Cho.  726. 

aKUAios,  a,  ov,  in  full  bloom,  at  the  prime,  bloo?ning,  flourishing, 
vigorous,  nwXot  Aesch.  Eum.  405  ;  rj£n  Id.  Th.  1 1  ;  dxp.atos  <piaiv  in 
the  prime  of  strength,  Id.  Pers.  441;  d«/x.  rty  opyrjv  Luc.  Tim.  3; 
xdWei  dxfiaid Epigr.  Gr.  127;  to axfiaiorarov  Dion.  H.  5.22  : — dxft.irpus 
ipana,  Lat.  nubilis,  Anth.  P.  7.  221,  cf.  Luc.  D.  Deor.  8.  2,  Ael.  N.  A. 
15.  10: — so  in  Adv.,  dxnaias  «x(l"  *<"■<&  tv)"  ^Kixiav  Polyb.  32.  15,  7: 
— of  things,  at  the  height,  d  dx/iaioraTOi  xatpbs  ttjs  rjfiipas,  i.  e.  noon, 
Polyb.  3. 102,  I ;  to  dxfiatov  tou  xelliavos  Arr.  An.  4.  7, 1,  etc.  II. 

in  time,  in  season,  Lat.  opportunus,  ws  dxpaios  .  .  fio\oi  (Wakef.  dxfiai' 
dv).  Soph.  Aj.  921  ;  dxfi.  yuepai  the  seasonable  days,  Ath.  180  C,  cf. 
Anth.  P.  10.  2. 

dicu.ao"rv|S,  oO,  d,  =  foreg.,  Hdn.  I.  17,  24. 

aKp-ao-TiKos,  r\,  6v,  =  dxp.aios,  dxfi.  trvperds  Galen.  10.  615,  of  a  kind 
of  continuous  fever,  when  the  amount  of  heat  is  kept  up  steadily  through- 
out ;  also  dfioTOVos.     Adv.  -xais,  Theod.  Metoch.  59. 

dxp-f],  ii,  (v.  sub  dxri  l)  a  point,  edge :  proverb.,  iirl  £vpov  dxpijs  on 
the  razor's  edge  (v.  sub  £vp6v)  ;  dx/iff  tpaaydvov,  (ityovs,  obovrwv,  Pind., 
etc.;  xtpxibav  dx/iai  Soph.  Ant.  976;  \6yxV*  dxpj\  Eur.  Supp.  318; 
dfupiSf^ioi  dxp.at  both  hands,  Soph.  O.  T.  1243  ;  TroSoiV  dxptai  the  feet, 
lb.  1034  '  Trvp0*  dxpai,  ip-irvpot  dxfiai,  v.  sub  fifjiis.  II.  the 

highest  or  culminating  point  of  anything,  the  bloom,  flower,  prime,  zenith, 
esp.  of  man's  age,  Lat.  flos  aetatis,  dxp.ij  ijp-ns  Soph.  O.  T.  741  ;  iv  TpSe 
tov  xdk\ovs  d«/xij  Cratin.  IIut.  1 3  ;  awpiaros  re  xat  tppovijaeus  Plat. 
Rep.  461  A  ;  ftirpws  XP"V0S  dxiiijs  Id.  Rep.  460  E  ;  dxfir)  0iov  Xen. 
Cyr.  7.  2,  20,  etc. ;  cis  dxp^v  i\0djv  Eur.  H.  F.  532  ;  iv  dxpy  etvat  — 
dxpAfctv  Plat.  Phaedr.  230  B  ;  iv  avrats  rats  dxpiaXs  Isocr.  147  A  ; 
dxfiTjv  ixtiv,  OI"  com,  to  be  ripe,  Thuc.  4.  2  ;  roaovrov  rijs  dxfirjs 
varepuiv  Isocr.  418  D  ;  tt)s  dxpfjs  \-rjyeiv  to  begin  to  decline,  Plat. 
Symp.  219  A: — then  in  various  relations,  as  d.  f/pos  the  spring-^nme, 
like  Milton's  '  the  point  of  dawn,'  Pind.  P.  4.  114;  d.  Bipovs  mirf-summer, 
Xen.  Hell.  5.  3,  19;  d.  irXjiptvpiaTOs  the  highest  condition,  prime 
of  a  crew,  Thuc.  7-  14  ;  d.  tou  vavrixov  the  flower  of  their  navy,  Id.  8. 
46  ;  d.  ttjs  do^rjs  Id.  2.  42  : — al  dxfiai  the  crisis  of  a  disease,  Hipp.  Aph. 
1245  : — generally,  strength,  vigour,  iv  x*P"s  dxpa  Pind.  O.  2.  113,  cf. 
Aesch.  Pers.  1060 ;  d.  ttooujv  swiftness,  Pind.  I.  8  (7).  83,  cf.  Aesch. 
Eum.  370  ;  <pptvwv  Pind.  N.  3.  68  ;  Papiis  dx^a  terrible  in  strength,  Id. 
I.  4.  86  (3.  81) :— periphr.  like  0ia,  dxp\ii  Orjaiibdv  Soph.  O.  C. 
1066.  III.  of  Time,  like  xatpos,  the  time,  i.  e.  the  best,  most 

fitting  time,  often  in  Trag.,  i)vix'  dv  Si)  npos  ydfuov  ijxijr'  dxp.ds  Soph. 
O.  T.  1492  ;  ipywv,  Kdyuv,  edpas  dxfirj  the  time  for  doing,  speaking, 
sitting  still,  Id.  Ph.  12,  El.  22,  Aj.  811  ;  c.  inf.,  xobxir  ijv  piKXtiv  d. 
Aesch.  Pers.  407,  cf.  Ag.  1353;  duTjXXdx^ai  S  d.  Soph.  El.  1338;  iir 
dxpLTJs  uvai,  c.  inf.,  to  be  on  the  point  of  doing,  Eur.  Hel.  897,  cf.  Ar.  PI. 
256 ;  aol  p.\v  dxpL^i  (pt\oao(p(Tv  Isocr.  I  C  : — iv  ai/TTjv  ijxti  r^v  dxprfv 
'tis  come  to  the  critical  time,  Dem.  52.  7  ;  dxp:ijv  XapL&dveiv  to  seize 
the  right  moment,  Isocr.  (Epist.)  404,  Plut.  ;  rijv  b^vrdrnv  d.  naptivai 
to  let  it  pass,  Plat.  Rep.  460  E.     Cf.  also  sq. 

aKp.T)v.  accus.  of  dxprj,  used  as  Adv.,  much  like  in,  as  yet,  still,  very 
rare  in  Att.,  rd  oxevocpopa  .  .  dxpty  oii$aive  were  just  crossing  the 
river,  Xen.  An.  4.  3,  26 ;  (Isocr.  I  C  is  now  corrected,  v.  dxp.ii  III)  ; 
often  in  Polyb.,  as  I.  13,  12.,  3.  17,  5,  al. ;  also  Theocr.  4.  60,  Anth. 
P.  7.  141,  Ev.  Matth.  15.16,  etc. ;  dxpty  vios  wv  C.  I.  6864 ;  strengthd., 
dxprjv  in  Polyb.  14.  4,  9.,  15.  6,  6. 

dKu.T)vds,  17,  ov,  (dxpi))  full-grown,  Bdpvos  iXaiip  Od.  23.  191  ;  vvp\- 
(pu/v  ds  dxpnvds  xaKovaiv  Paus.  5.  15,  6. 

dKu.T)vos,  ov,  (not  dxfirjvos,  Spitzn.  II.  19.  163)  : — fasting  from  food, 
dxprjvos  oiToio  II.  1.  c. ;  ipbv  xijp  dxp.-nvov  noaios  xal  iorjrvos  lb.  320 : 
absol.,  V7i<TTtas,  dxpLTjvovs  lb.  207  ;  dxp.rjvos  xai  dnao'TOS  lb.  346.  (dxpri 
is  said  to  have  been  Aeol.  =  vrjareia  :  others  from  xaptiv.) 

aKU.T|S,  jjtos,  d,  il,  also  as  neut.,  Paus.  6.  15,  5  ;  C.  I.  428  :  (xdpvai); 
=  dxdfias,  untiring,  unwearied,  II.  II.  802.,   15.  697,  Aesch.  Fr.  330, 


a/cfuirei 

Soph.  Ant.  353;  irv'Xat  a*/j.  Anth.  P.  9.  526:— also  in  late  Prose,  as  I 
Dion.  H.  q.  14  (ubi  male  dxprnriv),  Paus.  1.  c,  Plut.  Cim.  13. 

o-K(it|T€i  and  -ti,  Adv.  without  toil,  easily,  Joseph.  B.  J.  I.  16,  2. 

djcu/qTOS,  ov,  (xdfivtu)  =  dxfxrjs ,  unwearied,  noaiv  h.  Horn.  Ap.  520.  II. 
mot  causing  pain,  Nic.  Th.  737. 

dK(io-8«TT)S,  ov,  6,  =  sq.,  Poll.  10.  I47. 

oicu.o-0«tov,  to,  (ti'Aij/u)  the  anvil-bloch,  stithy,  II.  l8.  410,  Od.  8.  274. 

djcudviov,  to,  Dim.  of  sq.,  Aesop. 

okuaiv,  ovos,  o,  orig.  prob.  a  meteoric  stone,  thunderbolt  (v.  sub  fin.), 
xdA«os  dxpaiv  oipaviStv  xartwv  Hes.  Th.  722,  cf.  724.  II.  an 

anvil,  II.  18.  476,  Od.  8.  274,  Hdt.  I.  68:  metaph.,  irpds  dxytovt  x^~ 
xtvt  ykwaoav  Pind.  P.  I.  167  ;  \6yxi*  ajc/iovfs  very  anvils  to  bear 
blows  (as  the  Schol.  takes  it),  Aesch.  Pers.  51  ;  so,  inroftiveiv  irXirydj 
dxutvv  Aristopho  'IaTp.  I  ;  TtpvvQtos  ajcpajv,  i.  e.  Hercules,  Call.  Dian. 
146.       2.  a  pestle,  a  Cyprian  usage  ace.  to  Hesych.  III.  -  ovpavos, 

and  axfioviSat  =  oipaviSat,  Hesych.,  cf.  Alcman  III  (ubi  v.  Bgk.).  IV. 
3.  kind  of  eagle,  Hesych.  V.  a  kind  of  wolf,  Opp.  C.  3.  326.  (With 
the  above-cited  senses,  cf.  Skt.  aema  (a  stone,  meteoric-stone),  acmaras 
(lapideus)  ;  O.  Norse  hamarr ;  O.  H.  G.  hamar  (hammer)  ;  Lith.  alimu 
(a  stone).) 

afcvau/irros,  aKvairros,  aKvud»os,  =  dyv— . 

ukvt|U,o$,  ov,  (xvrjpirj)  without  calf  of  the  leg,  Plut.  2.  520  C. 

uHcv^cru.of ,  ov,  without  irritation  or  itching,  Hipp.  Offic.  747. 

dKVT)0-ns,  ioj,  ■)),  (dxavos)  the  spine  or  backbone  of  animals,  Od.  10. 
161.  II.  a  plant,  Nic.  Th.  52. 

dicvlo-os,  ov,  (xvtaa)  without  the  fat  of  sacrifices,  (Saifids  Anth.  P.  10.  7; 
so  Cobet  restores  fioiiiotai  nap'  axviaotat  in  Luc.  J.  Trag.  6.  2. 

meagre,  spare,  of  persons,  Theophr.  C.  P.  2.  4,  6;  of  food,  Plut.  2.  123  B. 

dicvio-wros  [i],  ov,  without  the  steam  of  sacrifice,  Aesch.  Fr.  422. 

dxoT|,  )),  Ep.  okovt|  (the  stem  being  dxof,  as  in  dxoiia)  =  dxufw)  : — a 
hearing,  the  sound  heard,  txaOiv  Si  rt  y'tyvtr  axi/vy  II.  16.  634.  2. 

the  thing  heard,  news,  tidings,  furd  irarp&s  &xow)v  ixiaSat,  (Ifjvai  to  go 
in  quest  of  tidings  of  his  father,  Od.  2.  308.,  4.  701,  cf.  Anth.  P.  7. 
220;  xard  r^v  2oAo/ros  dxorjv  according  to  Solon's  story.  Plat.  Tim. 
21  A,  cf.  22  B.  3.  the  thing  heard,  a  hearing,  report,  saying, 

fame,  Pind.  P.  1.  162,  174  ;  dxod  aotpots  a  thing  for  wise  men  to  listen 
to,  lb.  9.  1 35  ;  d/rojj  laropitv,  wapa\a$(tv  rt,  etc.,  to  know  by  hearsay, 
Hdt.  2.  29,  148,  etc. ;  iiriaraa$at  Antipho  137.  17,  Thuc.  4.  126;  so, 
i£  dxoi)S  Xiyuv  Plat.  Phaedo  61  D  ;  Tdr  dxods  rwv  wpoytyevijptivoiv 
traditions,  Thuc.  I.  20 ;  dxoal  .  ,  kuyaiv  Id.  I.  73 ;  dx<n)v  naprvpttv  to 
give  evidence  on  hearsay,  Dem.  1300.  16  ;  dxm)v  wpoadyuv  to  bring 
hearsay  evidence,  lb.  14;  0apvv  .  .  dxoijs  ifidtpov  Anth.  P.  6.  220.  II. 

the  sense  of  hearing,  Hdt.  I.  38,  etc.;  joined  with  Sif/ts,  Plat.  Phaedo 
65  B,  etc. ;  ots  una  ftiv  iartv.  A/coal  Si  oix  ivuatv  Philo  1.  474.  2. 
the  act  of  hearing,  hearing,  is  dxudv  ip.i\v  to  my  hearing,  my  ear, 
Aesch.  Pr.  690;  ydpw  dpapttv  dxoatat  Simon.  41 ;  u( tiav  Ako^v  .  .  Ao- 
yots  StSovs  Soph.  £1.  30;  &xo%  xXvttv  Id.  Ph.  1412  ;  dxoats  Six^a$at, 
ii!  dmai  .  .  f)mi  Eur.  I.  T.  1 496,  Phoen.  1 480;  St  dxoijs  aioBdvt- 
oHai  Plat.  Legg.  900  A  ;  oiiStvis  dxorjv  vwttwwv  Eur.  H.  F.  962  (perh. 
in  allusion  to  the  herald's  cry,  dxovtrt  AfoJ) ;  ToiV  dxpodfxaat  rds 
dxods  dvari&ivat  Polyb.  24.  5,  9.  3.  the  ear,  omdrtaot  S'  oiSiv 

opijn',  iwtt3pdptttat  S'  dxovai  Sapph.  2.  12;  dntaditt  fiov  rr)v  dx.  Her- 
mipp.  Srpar.  7,  cf.  Pherecr.  Incert.  24 ;  tvalr  dxoats  xpivttv  with  two 
ears,  Arist.  Pol.  3.  16,  12.  III.  a  hearing,  listening  to,  dxoijs  dfios 

worth  hearing.  Plat.  Theaet.  142  D ;  tis  dxoi)v  <pavr)s  within  hearing 
of  the  voice,  Diod.  19.  41. 

d-KoiXios,  ov,  without  hollows,  Hipp.  409.  fin.,  Eust.  Opusc.  194. 
53.  2.  without  stomach,  Galen.  5.  384. 

d-KoiAos,  ox,  nor  hollow,  Arist.  H.  A.  3.  5,  I. 

d->coi(iT)TO»,  of,  sleepless,  unresting,  of  the  sea,  Aesch.  Pr.  139,  cf. 
Theocr.  13.  44,  Diod.,  Plut.,  etc.;  die.  baxpwn  C.  I.  1778;  of  the 
Emperor,  Epigr.  Gr.  1064.  9; — the  form  d-Koiuxo-ros.  ok,  is  dub.  in 
Diod.  Excerpt.  6f6.  48. 

d-KOivos,  ov,  not  common,  Themist.  Or.  142  A. 

dicoivuvT|0-(a,  ^,  the  non-existence  of  community  of  property,  Arist.  Pol. 
J.  5,  12.  II.  unsociableness,  Stob.  Ed.  2.  320.  III.  ex- 

communication, Eccl. 

a-KoivuvrjTOf ,  ov,  not  shared  with,  ydftott  dxotvunrnrov  tiivdv  a  bed  not 
thared  in  common  with  other  wives,  Eur.  Andr.  470.  2.  not  to  be 

communicated,  ovofta  Lxx  (Sap.  14.  21).  II.  act.  having  no  share 

of  or  in,  c.  gen.,  vopjav  Plat.  Legg.  914  C :  also  c.  dat.,  dx.  to<V  xaxois 
Arist.  Top.  3.  2,  8:  absol.  unsocial,  Plat.  Legg.  774  A:  inhuman  Cic.  Att. 
('  ?!■  7  : — •"  '"  Adv.  -ran,  lb.  6. 1,  7.  III.  excommunicated,  Eccl. 

dxoivuvia,  f),  unsociableness,  Ep.  Plat.  318  E. 

dKoi-nrfls.  ov,  6,  (a  copul.,  KoiTt],  cf.  d\o\os)  a  bedfellow,  spouse,  hus- 
band, II.  15.  91,  Od.  5.  120,  Pind.  N.  5.  51,  Soph.  Tr.  525,  Eur. ; — fern. 
okoitii,  (or,  1),  a  spouse,  wife,  II.  3.  138,  Pind.,  Aesch.  Pers.  684,  Soph., 
Eur.— Poet,  words,  cf.  Plat.  Crat.  405  C. 

d-KoXdnfUTOV  ov,  not  to  be  won  by  flattery.  Plat.  Legg.  729  A.  II. 

act.  not  flattering.  Teles  ap.  Stob.  524,  fin. : — so  in  Adv.  -ran,  Cic.  Att. 
>.}   Rl.  I. 

d-KoX&Kot,  ov,  not  flattering,  Diog.  L.  2.  141. 

dicoXdo-ia,  ^,  licentiousness,  intemperance,  excess,  opp.  to  omppoovvrj, 
Hecatae.  144,  Antipho  125.  35,  Thuc.  3.  37,  Plat.,  etc.,  cf.  Arist.  Eth. 
N.  2.  7,  3 ;  in  pi.,  Lys.  146.  34,  Plat.  Legg.  884. 

dtcoXoo-Toivw,  fut.  avw  Ar.  Av.  1226,  to  be  licentious,  intemperate,  At. 
I.  c,  Mnesim.  'lirrorp.  I.  19,  Plat.  Rep.  555  D,  al. 

dKoXdTTocuA,  r6,  (as  if  from  *d«oAao"Td^<w)  =  diroXdffTi;^a.  restored 
by  Dobree  in  Ar.  Lys.  399,  for  d*oAa<7T'  qaftara  ;  and  Meineke  suggests 
A«oXao-Tao>aTa  for  -ctfiara  in  Anaxandr.  Incert.  24,  cf.  Alciphr.  1.  38. 


-aKovtj.  4.9 

dKoXdo-TT|U.a,  otos,  to,  an  act  of  dxo\aola,  Plut.  Crass.  32,  M  Anton 
11.  20,  Orig. 

dKoXao-n)T«ov,  verb.  Adj.  (as  if  from  *d/coAa<rT€<u),  one  must  behave 
licentiously,  Clem.  Al.  2.  28. 

aKoXao-Tia.  17,  probl.  1.  for  dxoXaaia,  Alex.  TaX.  1.  6  ;  v.  Meineke. 

d-icdXao-Tos,  ov,  Lat.  non  castigatus,  unchastised,  undisciplined,  un- 
bridled, o  Sijfios  Hdt.  3.  81  ;  oxXos  Eur.  Hec.  607  ;  arpdrfv/ui  Xen.  An. 
2.  6,  9;  so  Plat.  etc.  2.  commonly,  unbridled  in  sensual  pleasures, 

licentious,  intemperate,  opp.  to  auKppaiv,  Soph.  Fr.  817,  Plat.  Gorg.  507 
C,  Arist.  Eth.  N.  2.2,7;  «f»  "  Id.  H.  A.  6.  18,  8  ;  irpos  ti  (v.  fin.)  : 
— so  in  Adv.,  dxohdorais  ixcv  Plat.  Gorg.  493  C ;  Comp.  -ortpais  ex«" 
vpos  ri  to  be  too  intemperate  in  a  thing,  Xen.  Mem.  2.  1,  1. 

aKoXXTpri,  Adv.  of  sq.,  Herm.  ap.  Stob.  Eel.  I.  1078. 

d-KoXXi)T0s,  ov,  not  glued  or  adhering  to  a  thing,  nv'i  Galen.  2. 

not  to  be  so  fastened,  incompatible,  Dion.  H.  de  Comp.  p.  42. 

d-KoXXos,  ov,  without  glue,  not  adhesive,  Theophr.  C.  P.  6.  10,  3. 

dKoXXv6urro$,  ov,  v.  sub  «oAAu/3or  II. 

d-KoX6p<i)TOS,  ov,  not  curtailed,  Eust.  727.  39. 

dxoXos,  ov,  fi,  a  bit,  morsel,  like  tf-wftos,  Od.  17.  222,  Anth.  P.  9.  563, 
cf.  6.  1 76  :  Boeot.  for  fvStots,  Strattis  *oiV.  3.7.  (Curtius  suggests 

that  d*oXos  and  alxKov  may  perh.  be  akin  to  the  Skt.  ^af  (to  eat).) 

aKoXovdcu,  fut.  rjaaj,  to  be  an  dx6\ov6os,  to  follow  one,  go  after  or  with 
him,  esp.  of  soldiers  and  slaves : — Construct,  mostly  c.  dat.  pers.,  Ar.  PI. 
19,  etc. ;  dx.  r$  jjyov/iivai  Plat.  Rep.  474  C  ;  also  with  Preps.,  dx. 
fLtrd  tivos  Plat.  Lach.  187  E,  Lysias  103.  18,  etc;  Tofs  o"tu/iao~i  \ur 
(Kfivaiv  IixoXovQow,  rats  5'  fvvoiats  peff  rj^wv  %aav  Isocr.  299  C  ;  dx. 
avv  rtvt  Xen.  An.  7.  5,  3  ;  xar6ntv  rtvos  Ar.  PI.  13  ;  very  rarely  c.  ace, 
as  Menand.  Incert.  32,  cf.  Lob.  Phryn.  354: — absol.,  often  in  Plat.,  etc. ; 
dx.  i<p'  dpirayfjs,  of  soldiers,  Thuc.  2.  98  ;  dxo\ov0wv,  o,  as  Subst.,= 
dxoKovSos  I,  Menand.  K<iA.  3.  II.  metaph.  to  follow  one  in  a 

thing,  let  oneself  be  led  by  him,  Tjj  yvwfrn  rtvos  Thuc.  3.  38  ;  Tofs 
npdyiutatv,  rots  xatpots  to  follow  circumstances,  etc.,  Dem.  51.  14.,  730. 
18  :  to  obey,  rots  vofiots  Andoc.  31.  35.  2.  to  follow  the  thread  of 

a  discourse,  Plat.  Phaedo  107  B,  etc.  3.  also  of  things,  to  follow 

upon,  to  be  consequent  upon,  in  conformity  with,  dxo\ov0uv  rots  elprj- 
liivots  Plat.  Rep.  332  D ;  tiKoyia  .  .  tiirflt'ta  dx.  lb.  400  E,  cf.  398  D : 
to  follow  the  analogy  of,  to  be  lite,  Arist.  H.  A.  2.  I,  3,  al.  4. 

absol.  dxoXovift,  it  follows,  Lat.  sequitur,  Id.  Categ.  12.  2. — Only  in 
Att.  Comedy  and  Prose :  cf.  ukoAov0ov. 

dKoXou0r|O-i$,  (tut,  4,  a  following,  sequence,  Arist.  Rhet.  3.  9,  7.  2. 

a  consequence,  conclusion,  Id.  An.  Pr.  I.  46, 17.  II.  obedience, 

Def.  Plat.  412  B. 

dKoXou6t|T«ov,  verb.  Adj.  one  must  follow,  absol.,  Xen.  Oec.  21,7;  rS> 
Xoyai  Plat.  Rep.  400  D. 

dKoXov0T|TUc6s,  17,  ov,  disposed  to  follow,  rats  imOvjiiats,  rots  irdBtot 
Arist.  Rhet.  2.  12,  3,  Eth.  N.  1.  3,  6. 

dxoXovdia.  1),  a  following,  attendance,  train,  Soph.  Fr.  818,  Plat.  Ale. 
1. 122  C.  2.  a  series,  sequence,  succession,  Clem.  Al.,  etc.;  xar  dxo- 

\ov$iavin  regular  succession,  Hdn.  8.  7.  II.  a  following  upon,  con- 

formity with,  rots  irpdyfiaat  Plat.  Crat.  437  C:  a  grammatical  agreement, 
right  construction  (cf.  dvaxoKovO'ta),  Dion.  H.  de  Comp.  p.  178.  2. 

obedience,  M.  Anton.  3.  9.  III.  a  consequence,  Philo  2.  497. 

dKoXovrOto-Kos,  <i,  Dim.  of  dxoKovOos,  afoot-boy,  Ptol.  ap.  Ath.  550  A. 

duoXouflos,  ov,  (a  copul.,  xiXtvSos,  Plat.  Crat.  405  C)  : — -following,  at- 
tending on ;  mostly  as  Subst.  a  follower,  attendant,  footman,  Lat.  pedi- 
sequus,  Ar.  Av.  73  ;  otoio'i  iro<"s  dx.  iartv  who  keep  a  lacquey,  Eupol. 
KoX.  1.  3;  often  in  Att.  Prose,  Antipho  115.  19,  Thuc.  6.  28.,  7.  75, 
Plat.  Symp.  203  C,  etc. ;  ol  dxoKovSot  the  camp-followers,  Xen.  Cyr.  5. 
2,  36:  also  fem.,  Plut.  Caes.  10.  2.  following  after,  c.  gen.,  itXdra 

.  .  Nijprjbaiv  dx.  Soph.  O.  C.  719  (lyr.).  3.  following  or  consequent 

upon,  in  conformity  with,  c.  gen.,  rixoKov$a  riuv  faxuiv  Ar.  Ach.  438, 
cf.  Plat.  Phaedo  11 1  C:  but  mostly  c.  dat.,  Id.  Legg.  716  C,  Tim.  88 
D ;  dxiKovSa  toiJtois  rpdrrftv  Dem.  312.  25  ;  dx.  rots  (tpifnivots  iart 
to  Stypfjadat  Arist.  Pol.  6.  8,  I  ; — absol.  correspondent,  Lys.  162.  26 ; 
agreeing  with  one  another,  Xen.  An.  2.  4,  19,  Hyperid.  Euxen.  36 : — 
Adv.  -0a>s,  in  accordance  with,  rots  vuftots  Dem.  I  loo.  14,  cf.  Diod.  4. 
17:  absol.  consistently,  ttxorais  xal  dx.  Aristid.  2.  142. — Used  once  by 
Soph.  1.  c. ;  otherwise  only  in  Com.  and  Prose. 

dicoXovTtu,  for  dxoXovOiai,  barbarism  in  Ar.  Thesm.  1 1 98. 

d-KoXirot,  ov,  without  bay  or  gulf,  Ael.  N.  A.  15.  16. 

d-ic6Xvp23ot,  ov,  unable  to  swim,  Batr.  157,  Strabo,  Plut. 

dKouio-Ka,  Ep.  — ttj  [r],  ^,  want  offending  or  care,  Od.  21.  284,  Themist. 

d-KOfiurros,  ov,  untemled,  Diog.  L.  5.  5,  Nonn. 

d-K6u.u,uTOi,  ov,  unpointed,  Themist.  218  B. 

aKou.oj,  ov,  (xdiirf)  without  hair,  bald,  Luc.  V.  H.  1.  23 :  of  trees,  leaf- 
less. Poll.  I.  236. 

d-Koii-rracrross  and  d-icou.iros ,  ov,  unboastful,  Aesch.  Theb.  538,  lb.  554. 

d-Kou.i|/f vtos,  ov,  inartificial,  Dion.  H.  de  Comp.  1 78,  200. 

d-Kou.v|>os.  ov,  unadorned,  boorish.  Archil.  158  ;  iyu  !'  dxoftifos  'rude 
I  am  in  speech,1  Eur.  Hipp.  986  ;  dx.  xat  <pav\os  A.  B.  369,  cf.  Diog. 
L.  3.  63.     Adv.  -^ois,  Plut.  2.  4  F. 

dxovdu,  fut.  170-ai,  (dxivn)  to  sharpen,  whet,  ftaxaipas  Ar.  Fr.  551 ; 
\6yxV  ^en-  Cyr.  6.  2,  33: — Med.,  dxovaaSat  ftaxaipas  to  sharpen  their 
swords,  Id.  Hell.  7.  J,  20.  2.  metaph.  like  01)701,  6(vva>,  ttapaxo- 

vdaj,  Lat.  actio,  to  provoke,  inflame,  yXwaaav  Tixovnptvos  Poeta  ap.  Plut. 
Comp.  Lys.  c.  Syll.  4,  cf.  Xen.  Oec.  21,3;  $vftdv  in'  i\iri8t  rtvos  dxovdv 
Demad.  180.  30. 

d-KovSuXos,  ov,  without  inuciles: — without  blows,  Luc.  Char.  2. 

dKovT)  [4],  r),  (v.  sub  dm}  I)  a  whetstone,  hone,  Lat.  cos,  \t9iv-q  Chilo  I, 
Hermipp.  Mofp.  I,  etc. ;  dx.  Nafio  (the  best  were  from  Naxos)  Pind.  I. 

E 


50  ttKOVrjais  — 

6  (5)-  fin.  2.  metaph.,  bo£av  tx<"  dxovas  Xtyvpas  iirt  yKwooq,  I 

have  the  feeling  of  a  whetstone  on  my  tongue,  i.e.  am  roused  to  song,  Pind. 

0.  6.  141 :  esp.  of  persons,  like  Horace's  fungar  vice  cotis,  of  'Epais, 
Amh.  P.  12.  18,  cf.  Plut.  2.  838  E,  Greg.  Naz.  ap.  Suid.  s.  v.  'Clpiyivijs. 

dicov-qo-is,  «us,  »),  a  sharpening,  Hesych.,  E.  M.  s.  v.  Ppvyfibs. 

dxovias,  ov,  b,  a  kind  offlsh,  Numen.  ap.  Ath.  326  A. 

QKovittTos.  ov,  (xovtdiu)  nnplastered,  not  whitewashed,  Theophr.  H.  P. 
8.  11,  1. 

duoviov.  to,  in  medicine,  a  specific  for  the  eyes,  prob.  powdered  by  rub- 
bing on  an  dxovij,  Diosc.  I.  129. 

d-KoviopTos,  or,  without  dust,  opp.  to  xovioprwSns,  Theophr.  H.  P.  8. 1 1 , 1 . 

okoviti  [ti].  Adv.  of  dxivnos,  without  the  dust  of  the  arena,  i.  e.  with- 
out a  struggle,  without  effort,  Lat.  sine  pulvere,  of  the  conqueror,  Thuc. 
4.  73-  ^e"-  Ages.  6,  3 ;  but,  d  ravra  wpouro  okoviti  Dem.  295.  7- 

qkovitikos.  t),  6v,  made  of  dxbvtrov,  Xen.  Cyn.  II,  a. 

okovitov,  to,  =  sq.,  Lat.  aconitum,  a  poisonous  plant,  like  monkshood, 
growing  on  sharp  steep  rocks  (iv  dxovais),  or  in  a  place  called  'Axovai, 
Theophr.  H.  P.  9.  16,  4,  cf.  Sprengel  Diosc.  4.  76,  Theopomp.  Hist.  200: 
— also  okovItos,  77,  Schneid.  Nic.  Al.  42. 

dicdvtTOs,  ov,  (xoviw)  without  dust,  combat  or  struggle,  Q^  Sm.  4. 
3'9*  II.  =  dWd/ciCTO?  Diosc.  1.  6: — Adv.  -rats,  Id. 

okovti  [r],  Adv.  of  cuauv,  for  dtxovrt,  Plut.  Fab.  5,  etc. ;  but  not  in 
good  Att.  (Lob.  Phryn.  5). 

dxovTias,  ou,  o,  (dxaiv)  a  quid-darting  serpent,  Lat.  jaculus,  Nic.  Th. 
491,  Galen.,  Luc.  II.  a  meteor,  mostly  in  pi.,  Plin.  H.  N.  2.  23. 

aKovTi{u,  fut.  Att.  11S,  (dxaiv)  to  hurl  a  javelin,  or  absol.  to  throw,  dart, 
Ttvos  at  one  (cf.  oroxdfo/xat),  Atavros  .  .  dxovTioe  tpaibtfios  Exrwp  II. 
14.  402,  cf.  8.  118;  also,  Afar  .  .  i<p'  "Ektoik  .  .  Ut  dxovTiaoat  16. 
359;  oik.  is  or  xa$'  SpuKov  Od.  22.  263,  II.  4.  490: — the  weapon  is 
mostly  put  in  dat.,  tj  kclI  dxbvrioi  bovpi  darted  with  his  spear,  II.  5.  533; 
uk.  Sovpi  (pativa  lb.  611,  al. ;  also  in  ace,  ajc&VTioav  b£ia  bovpa  darted 
their  spears,  Od.  22.  265  ;  aKovri^ovat  Bapads  alxpds  iic  xfiPav  H.  12. 
44,  cf.  14.  422,  Pind.  I.  I.  33  :  to  use  the  javelin,  To£titiv  koX  dx.  Hdt. 
4.  114 ;  ait.  dirb  Tail-  'iimwv  bpSos  Plat.  Meno93  D.  2.  after  Horn., 

c.  ace.  pers.  to  hit  or  strike  with  a  javelin,  or  simply  to  aim  at,  Lat. 
petere,  cue.  rbv  ovv  Hdt.  I.  43,  etc.;  hence  in  Pass,  to  be  so  hit  or 
wounded,   Eur.    Bacch.   1098,  Antipho  120,  ult.,  Xen.  3.  dx. 

(auras  im  worapov  to  hurl  themselves,  Eus.  H.  E.  8.  12,  4.  4.   to 

shoot  forth  rays,  of  the  moon,  Eur.  Ion  1 155  ;  in  Med.  to  flash,  Arist. 
Mund.  2,  II.  II.  intr.  to  dart  or  pierce,  liou  777s  Eur.  Or.  1241. 

dtcovTtov,  t6,  Dim.  of  dxaiv,  a  dart,  javelin,  h.  Horn.  Merc.  460,  Hdt. 

1.  34,  al.  2.  in  pi.  the  javelin-exercise,  Plat.  Legg.  794  C. 
dKovTto-ts,  (tus,  77,  the  throwing  a  javelin,  Xen.  An.  1.  9,  5. 
dxovTurtia,  aTos,  t6,  the  distance  thrown  with  a  javelin,  Ivrbs  uxovrta- 

fiaros  within  a  dart's  throw,  Xen.  Hell.  4.  4,  16.  II.  the  thing 

thrown,  a  dart,  javelin,  Strab.  576,  Plut.  Alex.  43,  etc.  III.  in 

pl.=the  concrete  d/foi/Tio-Tat,  Id.  Pyrrh.  21. 

aKovTto'p.os,  v,  =  ok6vti0is,  Xen.  Eq.  Mag.  3,  6,  Arr.  An.  1.  2,  6;  as 
a  game,  C.  I.  2360.  24:  a  darting  out  of  liquids,  Galen.,  Eust.,  etc.  2. 
dxovriouol  daripajv,  of  shooting  stars,  Procl.  paraphr.  Ptol.  147. 

dicovTurTT|p,  ypos,  b,  =  sq.,  Eur.  Phoen.  142.  II.  as  Adj.  darting, 

hurtling,  Tpiaiva  Opp.  H.  5.  535  : — metaph.,  tau&oi  Christod.  Ecphr.  359. 

dKOVTUTTT|s,  ov,  6,  a  darter,  javelin-man,  II.  16.  328,  Od.  18.  262, 
Hdt.  8.  90,  Aesch.  Pers.  52,  Thuc.  3.  97,  etc. 

dxovTio-TiKos,  17,  bv,  skilled  in  throwing  the  dart,  Xen.  Cyr.  7.  5,  63  ; 
Sup.,  lb.  6.  2,  4 ;  Td  aKovriOTtKO,  the  art  of  throwing  the  dart,  Plat. 
Theag.  126  B. 

dKovruTTVS,  voi,  77,  Ion.  for  dxbvTiffts,  the  game  of  the  dart  (like  the 
Eastern  jerid),  dxovrtorvv  (iabvatai  II.  23.  622. 

dKOVTO-p6Xos,  ov,  spear-throwing,  Ap.  Rh.  2.  1000. 

dtcovTO-Soicos,  ov,  receiving  (i.  e.  hit  by)  the  dart,  or  watching  (i.  e. 
shunning)  the  dart,  Simon.  106. 

dxovTO-dtopos,  ov,  carrying  a  dart,  Nonn.  D.  20.  148. 

okovtus,  Adv.  oidxwv,  v.  sub  dixoiv. 

dicods,  bv,  =  dKowTTi/co?,  Plat.  Com.  Incert.  61. 

djcoin|Ti,  Adv.  of  dxovos,  Liban. 

aKoma,  7),  (dxovos)  freedom  from  fatigue,  Cic.  Fam.  16.  18. 

dxOTfiao-TOS,  ov,  (xontdw)  not  wearying,  b&bs  Arist.  Mund.  I,  2.  II. 

untiring,  unwearied,  Stob.  Eel.  1.  952  : — Adv.  -darais  Schol.  Soph.  Aj. 
852  ;  also  -aari,  Socr.  H.  E.  6.  II, 

d-Koiros,   ov,   without  weariness,   and    so,  I.  untired,  xara- 

xivftaffat  Plat.  Legg.  789  D.  2.  free  from  trouble,  Amips.  Incert. 

14.  II.  act.  not  wearying,  bxrjois  Plat.  Tim.  89  A;  of  a  horse, 

easy,  Xen.  Eq.  1,6;  rots  T«Tpd7rocn»'  dxonov  rb  lardvai  Arist.  P.  A.  4. 
10,  55.  2.  removing  weariness,   refreshing,  Hipp.  Aph.   1246, 

Acut.  395,  Plat.  Phaedr.  227  A: — clkottov  (sc.  tpdpuaxov),  to,  a  restora- 
tive, Galen.,  etc. ;  cue.  fidXayua  Diosc.  1.  93 ;  in  Galen,  also  dxoiros,  77 : 
— Adv.  -irois,  Theophr.  C.  P.  4.  16,  2.  III.  (from  xbirrai) 

not  worm-eaten,  Arist.  Probl.  14.  2.  2.  not  broken  or  ground, 

whole,  Alex.  Aphr. 

dtcoirpio-TOS,  ov,  (xoirpifa)  not  manured,  Theophr.  C.  P.  4.  12,  3. 

d-Koirpos,  ov,  with  little  excrement  in  the  bowels,  Hipp.  Acut.  394.  II. 

=foreg.,  Theophr.  H.  P.  8.  6,  4. 

d-KoirpuSi)t,  «s,  producing  little  excrement,  of  food,  Hipp.  Acut.  393. 

dicdpcoTOS,  ov,  (Koptvvvfu)  Att.  for  dxup-nros,  insatiate,  Trag.,  in  lyr. 
passages  (v.  dxbptros)  ;  c.  gen.,  alxpds  dxbptaros  Aesch.  Pers.  999 : 
— in  Soph.  O.  C.  120  (A  lrdvrwv  dxopicTaros),  the  word  is  either  sync,  for 
dKoptarbraroi  (cf.  fiiooaros,  vtarot),  or  is  the  Sup.  of  dxopT|S  (a  word 
cited  by  Hesych.,  the  MS.  gives  dyicopts),  and  used  by  Themist.  Or. 
90  D :  cf.  81a-,  vara-,  irpca-,  vwtp-Koprjs.  2.  of  things,  unceasing. 


UKOVtrTtKOi. 

Lat.  improbus,  oi^'us  Aesch.  Ag.  756  ;  oip:wyd  Soph.  El.  123  ;  vtUrj  Eur. 
Med.  638  ;  7001s  dxopfOTots  (as  Prien  for  -tototois)  Aesch.  Pers. 
545-  H-  act-  not  satiating,  Aesch.  Ag.  1331.  2.  nut 

liable  to  surfeit,  iptKia  Xen.  Symp.  8,  15. 

dKop«TOS,  ov,  used  in  Trag.  (metri  grat.)  for  aKupiOTOs,  Aesch.  Ag. 
1114,  1143,  Soph.  El.  122. 

dicopT|s,  «y,  v.  sub  dicbpiOTos. 

dKopTjTos,  ov,  (Kopivvv)u)  insatiate,  unsated,  c.  gen.,  iroKe/iov,  ua\is, 
dTT(i\aav  II.  12.  335.,  20.  2.,  14.  479  (never  in  Od.),  cf.  Hes.  Sc.  346; 
TrpoxdSaiv  h.  Horn.  Veil.  71:  cf.  dicbpiOTos.  II.  (xopiai)  unswept, 

untrimmed,  Ar.  Nub.  44. 

dicopia,  1),  {axopoi)  in  Hipp.  1180  F,  a  not  eating  to  satiety,  moderation 
in  eating; — but  in  Aretae.  Cur.  M.  Ac.  2.  2,  d«.  itotoS,  prob.  an  insa- 
tiable desire  of  drinking. 

aKopiTns  [t]  otVos,  d,  wine  flavoured  with  aicopos,  Diosc.  5.  73. 

dKopva.  j),  a  prickly  plant,  Theophr.  H.  P.  I.  10,  6  and  13,  3. 

aKopos,  ov,  —  dxvpfOTOs :  untiring,  ceaseless,  Lat.  improbus,  elptaia 
Pind.  P.  4.  360. 

aKopos.  77,  the  sweet  flag,  acorns  calamus  (Sprengel  iris  pseudacorus),  its 
root  being  dicopov,  to,  Diosc.  1.  2. 

dKopC<t>os,  ov,  (xopvipri)  without  top,  without  beginning,  Dion.  H.  de 
Comp.  198.  II.  =  sq.,  Hesych. 

d-KopvdiuTOS,  ov,  not  to  be  summed  up,  Hesych.  s.  v.  ajcpira. 

dxos,  (0%,  to,  (dxtouai)  a  cure,  relief,  remedy,  resource,  c.  gen.  rei  quae 
avertitur,  Kaicwv  Od.  22.  481,  cf.  II.  9.  250,  etc.;  vvfifptKwv  ibuXiojv 
Aesch.  Cho.  71  ;  tevfiovs  .  .  ,  Ttpnvbv  dpyias  atcos  Soph.  Fr.  380;  tcaicuv 
teaxw  SiSoiij  dxos  Id.  Aj.  363  : — absol.,  duos  (vpeiv  II.  9.  250 ;  Si'^oSai, 
l£tvpfi~v,  (K-novtiv,  KaPuv,  irottioSai,  Hdt.  1.  94.,  4.  187,  Aesch.  Supp. 
367,  Eur.  Bacch.  327,  Plat.,  etc.: — in  literal  medical  sense,  Hipp.  Acut. 
383  ;  and  (by  a  medical  metaph.),  dxos  ivripvuv,  riavitv,  Aesch.  Ag. 
17  (cf.  Cho.  539),  Eur.  Andr.  121: — dxos  [«<tt(],  c.  inf.,  dxos  yap  ovbiv 
rovSt  Bp-qvfToBai  it  boots  not  to  .  .  ,  Aesch.  Pr.  43.  2.  a  means  of 

obtaining  a  thing,  c.  gen.  rei   quae  expetitur,  oarrjptas  Eur.  Hel.  1055. 

aKoo-ftcu,  fut.  Tjoto,  to  be  disorderly  or  unmannerly,  to  offend,  01  dxoa- 
uovvtis  Soph.  Ant.  730,  Ph.  387,  Lys.  140.  42,  Dem.  729.  7  ;  dx.  nepi 
ti  to  offend  in  a  point,  Plat.  Legg.  764  B. 

cikoo-u.t]€is.  eaaa,  tv,—dKoapos,  Nic.  Al.  175. 

dicdo-u.T|TOS,  ov,  (xoafiico)  unarranged,  unorganised,  Plat.  Gorg.  506 
E,  Prot.  321  C: — Adv.  -reus,  Id.  Legg.  781  B.  2.  of  style,  un- 

adorned, Dion.  H.  de  Thuc.  23,  etc.    •  ■  3.    unfurnished  with,  rivi 

Xen.  Oec.  II,  9. 

aKoo-p.ia,  77,  disorder,  Plat.  Gorg.  508  A :  extravagance,  excess,  Xuywv 
Eur.  I.  A.  317: — 'n  moral  sense,  disorderliness,  disorderly  conduct,  Soph. 
Fr.  726;  in  pi.,  Plat.  Symp.  188  B.  II.  an  interregnum  (v. 

xbofios  III),  Arist.  Pol.  2.  10,  14. 

d-KCo-p-os,  ov,  without  order,  disorderly,  tpvyfi  Aesch.  Pers.  470 ;  dx. 
xal  Tapax&bijs  vavpaxta  Plut.  Mar.  10 : — in  Horn,  once,  in  moral  sense, 
disorderly,  unruly,  of  Thersites'  words,  II.  2.  213: — Adv.  -puus,  Hdt. 
7.  2  20,  Aesch.,  etc.  II.  xbfffios  dxoopos,  a  world  that  is  no 

world,  Anth.  P.  7.  561,  but  in  9.  323  of  an  inappropriate  ornament. 

duoo-Taw  or  -«w,  (dxoOTT))  only  used  in  aor.  part.,  iViros*  axoo-rijaas 
tjri  tpdrv-n  a  horse  well-fed  at  rack  and  manger,  a  stalled  horse,  II.  6.  506., 
15.  263: — cf.  xpiOdw,  Buttm.  Lexil.  s.  v.  dxoo~TT\0as. 

dK0o-TT|,  77,  barley,  Nic.  Al.  106.  (Said  to  be  a  Cyprian  word,  cf. 
Buttm.  Lexil.  ubi  supr.) 

d-Koros,  ov,  without  grudge,  Hesych. 

dicovd£op.ai  [d*],  Dep.  =  dxovw,  to  hear,  hearken,  or  listen  to,  c.  gen., 
doibov  Od.  9.  7,  cf.  1 3.  9  ♦  oatTos  dxovd^fffOov  ye  are  bidden  to  the 
feast,  like  Ka\tia6ai,  Lat.  vocari,  II.  4.  343  : — absol.  to  listen,  Hipp. 
483.  1*0. — In  h.  Merc.  423,  also  dicovd£(i>. 

aKOUT),  fj,  Ep.  for  OK017  (q.  v.). 

dKO-upt-UTos,  ov,  (xovptvai)  unshaven,  unshorn,  Hesych.,  Suid.,  etc. 

aKovpos.  ov,  (xovpos  for  xopos)  childless,  without  male  heir,  Od.  7. 
64.  II.  (xovpd)  unshaven,  unshorn,  Ar.  Vesp.  477,  Lye.  976,  Strabo. 

dicovo-ciw,  Desiderat.  of  dxovw,  to  long  to  hear,  Soph.  Fr.  820;  and  in 
Hesych.,  the  series  of  words  requires  dxovaeiwv  for  dxovaTtwv. 

aKovo-La  [ax],  j),  involuntary  action,  Soph.  Fr.  822. 

uKo-uo-iaJopcu  [a*],  in  aor.  I  Pass,  to  do  a  thing  unwillingly,  Lxx 
(Num.  15.  28). 

aKovo-i-6cos  [a],  ov,  heard  of  God,  Anth.  P.  6.  249. 

dKo-uo-iuos  [d],  17,  ov,  audible,  Soph.  Fr.  823. 

dtcovenos,  ov,  Att.  contr.  for  dtxovatos. 

dKOvo-ioT-ns  [d/f],  77T0?,  7),  =  dxovaia,  Hesych.  s.  v.  dfxijri,  etc. 

aKovo-is  [d],  tcos,  77,  a  hearing,  Arist.  de  An.  3.  2,  5. 

aKouo-u.a  [dx],  aros,  to,  a  thing  heard,  such  as  music,  tjSkttoi'  dx. 
the  sweetest  strain  the  ear  takes  in,  Xen.  Mem.  2.  I,  31,  cf.  Arist.  Eth. 
N.  10.  4,  7,  Menand.  Incert.  115;  dx.  xal  opd/tara  Arist.  Pol.  7.  17, 
7.  2.  a  rumour,  report,  tale,  Soph.  0.  C.  517  (lyr.). 

aKowp-aTiKos.  77,  ov,  willing  or  eager  to  hear : — ol  axovcfiaTixoi  the 
probationers  in  the  school  of  Pythagoras,  Clem.  Al.  246. 

uKo-uo-u-aTtov,  to,  Dim.  of  axovafia,  Pseudo-Luc.  Philopatr.  18. 

dtcouo-Ttov,  verb.  Adj.  of  dxovw,  one  must  hear  or  hearken  to,  c.  gen. 
pers.,  Hdt.  3.  61,  Eur.  I.  A.  1010,  Xen.,  etc. ;  c.  ace.  rei,  Plat.  Rep.  386 
A  :  absol.,  Soph.  O.  T.  II 70.  2.  dxovorios,  a,  ov,  to  be  hearkened 

to,  to3v  xparovvToiv  iori  irdvr  dxowTrea  Id.  El.  340. — Cf.  cucovca  IV. 

dKouo"rf|S  [d],  ov,  b,  a  hearer,  listener,  Menand.  Incert;  403.  2. 

an  auditor,  disciple,  Agathem.  Geogr.  1.  I,  Dion.  H.,  etc. 

aKowTiicds  [d],  77,  ov,  of  or  for  the  sense  of  hearing,  aujOrfais  dx. 
Plut.  2.  37  F ;  7rdpos  dx.  the  orifice  of  the  ear,  Galen. :  to  dx.  the 
faculty  of  hearing,  Arist.  de  An.  3.  2,  5.  2.  =  axovcruarixos, 


01KOW7TO?  — 

c.  gen..  A.ist.  Eth.  N.  I.  13,  19,  Arc.  Epict.  3.  I,  13: — Adv.  -kws,  Sext. 
Emp.  ML  7.  355.  II.  =  d*oiwT<!s,  Schol.  Eur.  Or.  12S1. 

okovotos,  r),  ov,  verb.  Adj.  ot  dxovu,  heard,  audible,  h.  Horn.  Merc.  512, 
Plat.,  etc. ;  opp.  to  Bt ards,  Isocr.  42  C.  II.  that  should  be  heard, 

Soph.  O.  T.  1312  ;  axovaai  5"  ovk  ixovob"  optus  $i\u  Eur.  Andr.  1084. 

cucoimfw  [a],  fut.  iota,  Att.  iu,  to  make  to  hear,  Ttvi  ri  or  Ttvos  Lxx  : 
ia  Pass.,  to  hear,  Byz. 

aKOvu  [a]:  Ep.  inipf.  dxovov  II.  12.  442:  fut.  dxovooftat  (the  Act. 
Ebm  ixovaai  first  occurs  in  Alexandr.  Greek,  as  Lye.  378*  686,  Lxx, 
Dion.  H.,  etc.,  cf.  Winer's  Gramm.  of  N.  T.  p.  99,  Veitch's  Irreg.  Gr. 
Verbs  s.  v.):  aor.  fjxovaa,  Ep.  axovaa  II.  24.  223:  pf.  ixr)xoa,  Lacon. 
dxovxa  Plut.  Lye.  20,  Ages.  21  :  later  f/xovxa:  plqpf.  ixr]x6fiv  Hdt.  2. 
52.,  7. 2o8,Lycurg.  15;  rjxnxotiv  Xen.  Oec.  15,5 ;  old  Att.  i)kt]k6t]  Ar.  Vesp. 
Soo,  Pax  616  (ubi  v.  Schol.)  ;  d*nxdn  Plat.  Crat.  384  B. — Rare  in  Med., 
pres.  (v.  infr.  II.  2)  :  Ep.  inipf.  ixovtro  II.  4.  331 :  aor.  r)xovadu7jv  Mosch. 
3.  120. — Pass.,  fut.  ixovaBrjao^at  Plat.  Rep.507D:  aor. iixovaBnv Thuc. 
3.  38,  Luc:  pf.  rjxovofiat  Dion.  H.  Rhet.  II.  10,  Pseudo-Luc.  Philopatr. 
4  :  a.KTjKov<Tfiai  in  Luc.  de  Hist.  Conscr.  49  is  now  corrected.  (The 

Root  seems  to  be  KOT,  i.  e.  KOf.  with  o  prefixed ;  cf.  xoiu,  ixof).) 

To  hear,  Horn.,  etc. :  xXvttv,  ixovaai  (Aesch.  Cho.  j)  is  ridiculed 
as  tautology  by  Ar.  (Ran.  1 1 73,  sq.),  but  cf.  II.  3. — Construct.,  properly, 
c.  ace.  of  thing  heard,  gen.  of  person  from  whom  it  is  heard, — as 
ravra  KaXwf-ovs  fjxovaa  Od.  12.  389,  cf.  Soph.  O.  T.  43,  etc. ;  the 
gen.  pers.  being  often  omitted,  vavr  dxr)xoas  Xuyov  Id.  Aj.  480,  etc.; 
<>r  the  ace.  rei,  dxovt  too  Oavvvros  Id.  El.  643,  cf.  644: — often  how- 
ever c,  gen.  rei,  <p$oyyfjs,  xtvvov  to  have  hearing  of  it,  hear  it,  Od. 
12.  198.,  21.  237  ;  Ao-ycw  Soph.  O.  C.  1187.  b.    c.  gen.  objecti, 

to  hear  of,  hear  tell  of,  ix.  warpus  Od.  4.  1 14;  to  this  a  panic,  is 
often  added,  an.  varpos  rtOvr/uros  I.  289.  etc.;  in  same  sense, 
c.  ace,  lb.  287  :  this  in  Prose  is  commonly  ax.  vtpi  tivos,  as  first  in 
Od.   19.   270,   cf.  Eur.   1.  T.  964.  0.   in  Prose   the   pers.  from 

whom  the  thing  is  heard  often  takes  a  Prep.,  ixovttv  ti  dwo.  ix,  irapa, 
irpos  Ttvos,  as  first  in  II.  6.  524,  cf.  Hdt.  3.  62,  Soph.  O.  T.  7,  95, 
Thuc.  I.  125;   c.  dat.  pers.,  as  II.   16.  515,  Soph.  El.  227.  d. 

not  often  c.  dupl.  gen.  pers.  et  rei,  to  hear  of  a  thing  from  a  person,  as 
Od.  17.  115,  Dem.  228.   12.  e.  the  act  or  state  of  the  person  or 

thing  is  added  in  part,  or  inf., — in  part,  when  the  hearing  amounts  to 
certain  knowledge,  otherwise  in  inf.,  as  tl  wrwaffovras  ixp'  "Yjcropt 
srdvras  ixovaai  should  he  hear  that  all  are  now  crouching  under  Hector, 
II.  7.  129,  cf.  Hdt.  7.  10,  8,  Xen.  Cyr.  2.  4,  12,  Dem.  31.  3;  but,  ix. 
airrov  SX&tov  tivai  to  hear  [generally]  that  he  is  happy,  II.  24.  543,  cf. 
Xen.  An.  2.  5,  13,  etc. :  —  this  is  often  changed  for  ixovttv  on  or  us 
with  finite  Verb,  as  Od.  3.  193,  Xen.  Mem.  4.  2,  33  ;  also,  an.  ovvtxa 
Soph.  O.  C.  33.  f.  c.  gen.  et  partic.  to  express  what  one  actually 

hears  from  a  person,  ravr  .  .  rjxovov  aatpus  'Obvaoian  Xiyovrcn  Soph. 
Ph.  £95  ;  ax.  Ttvos  Xtyovros,  btaXtyouivov,  Plat.  Prot.  320  B,  Xen. 
Mem.  2.  4,  I. — Horn,  once  uses  the  Med.  for  Act.,  ixovtro  Aadv  iOrrjs 
II.  4-  331.  2.  to  know  by  hearsay,  i(otb"  ixovuv  Soph.  O.  T. 

105  :  this  sense  sometimes  involves  an  apparent  use  of  the  pres.  like  a 
pf.,  vrjoos  TU  Zvpir)  xix\r)axtTai.  tl  wov  ixovtts  Od.  15.  403,  cf.  3.  193; 
and  so  in  Att.  Prose,  Plat.  Gorg.  503  C,  Rep.  407  A,  Luc.  Somn.  13.  3. 

absol.  to  hear,  hearken,  give  ear,  csp.  to  begin  a  proclamation,  ixovtrt 
kttp  hear,  v.  Aodt  I  sub  fin. :  for  Soph.  O.  T.  1387,  v.  sTrryr)  2.  4. 

n't  dxovovrts  readers  of  a  book,  Polyb.  I.  13,  6,  al.  II.  to  listen 

to,  give  ear  to,  c.  gen.,  II.  I.  381,  etc. ;  rarely  c.  dat.,  dxoittv  ivipt 
xnboptivy  to  give  ear  to  him,  11.  16.  515  ;  by  an  anacoluth.  with  gen. 
of  part,  after  a  dat.,  otti  oi  oik'  ijxovat  .  .  Btos  tv(auivoio  lb.  531 .  2. 

to  obey,  s3aai\rfos,  Btov  11.  19.  256,  Od.  7.  1 1  ;  so  in  Med.,  \taxpi\ov  5' 
ixovtrat  [wavra]  Archil.  69.  3.  to  hear  and  understand,  xKvovrts 

oix  ijxovov  Aesch.  Pr.  448.  III.  after  Horn.,  serving  as  Pass. 

to  tv  or  xaxws  Xiyttv  Ttvi,  to  hear  oneself  called,  be  called  so  and  so, 
like  Lat.  audire,  tiwtp  oaf  dxovtts.  Ztv  Soph.  O.  T.  903  (cf.  Aesch.  Ag. 
161) ;  xaxius  d*.  wro  rtvos  to  be  ill  spoken  of  by  one ;  ttpos  tipoj  Hdt. 
7.  16,  I  ;  ntpi  Ttvos  for  a  thing.  Id.  6.  86,  I  ;  tv,  xaxiis,  dptora  ax., 
Lat.  bene,  male  audire,  Hdt.  2.  1 73.,  8.  93,  Soph.  Ph.  1313,  Antipho 
138,  13,  etc.  2.   with  nom.  of  the  subject,  ixovttv  xaxvs,  xaXos, 

Soph.  O.  C.  988,  Plat.  Lys.  207  A  ;  viv  xokaxts  xaX  Btois  ixBpo't  .  . 
ixovovat  Dem.  241.  13,  etc.  3.  sometimes  c.  inf.,  rjxovov  tlvai 

npirroi  were  said  or  held  to  be  the  first,  Hdt.  3.  131 ;  so  also,  dxovaouai 
piv  us  itpvv  oixrov  wkiws  Soph.  Ph.  1074.  4.  c.  ace.  rei,  ix. 

i:axd,  to  have  evil  spoken  of  one,  Ar.  Thesm.  388,  cf.  Soph.  Ph.  607  ; 

1  too,  ix.  Ad-yov  iakuv  Pind.  I.  5.  17  ;  tp^suss  .  .  xaxis  fjxovotv  Eur. 
Htl.  615.  5.  otrrtus  ix.,  to  hear  it  so  said,  i.e.  at  first  hearing.  Wolf. 

Deni.  Lcpt.  235,  Schaf.  Mel.  80 ;  an  ovtu  7'  ixoxtaai  Plat.  Euthyphro 
3  B  ;  un  yt  ovrajoi  axovirai  Id.  Lys.  216  A.  IV.  in  Scholl.  to 

understand  so  and  so,  subaudirt,  Schol.  Eur.  Or.  333;  ti  iwi  Tiros  Schol. 
Hipp.  73  ;  so  ixovo-Ttov,  Schol.  Or.  1289,  Schol".  Ap.  Rh.  3.  86. 

dicpa,  Ion.  dxprj,  1),  (fern,  of  axprn)  like  axpov,  the  highest  or  furthest 
t^nt  •'  1.  a  headland,  foreland,  cape,  II.  4.  425.,  1 7.  264,  Od.  9. 

iSg,  Soph.  Tr.  78S,  Plat.  Criti.  1 1 1  A  ;  axpav  inrtpeitiv  (metaph.)  Aesch. 
tmt.  562;  xau-wrttv  Menand.  'AA.  9.  2.  a  mountain-top,  peak. 

Soph.  Fr.  265,  etc. ;  metaph.,  xvaaros  axpa  the  top  or  summit,  Eur. 
R  232.  3.  used  by  Horn,  only  in  the  phrase  xar'  axpijs  (though  this 
may  mean  xar  axpT/s  no\tws,  v.  infr.  3),  vvr  w\no  staaa  xar  axpr/s 
'IAios  aisrtivi)  from  top  to  bottom,  i.e.  utterly  (so  Virg.,  ruit  alto  a 
udmine  Troja,  sternitque  a  culmine  Trojam,  Aen.  2.  290,  603),  II.  13. 
772,  cf.  15.  557.,  24.  -28  ;  so,  itoAik  alpitiv  xar  axprn  Hdt.  6.  18,  cf. 
Plat.  Legg.  909  B  ;  (cf.  xar  axpav  sttpyifuuv  i\tiv  wiKiv  Eur.  Phoen. 
1 '  76) ;  also,  iXaotv  siiya  xvua  xar  axprfs  a  billow  struck  him  from 
above,  Od.  5.  313;    so    in    Att.,   yr}v    varptpav .  .  wpijaai    xar    axpas 


UKpUTlfTTOi.  51 

utterly,  Soph.  Ant.  201  :  and  metaph..  xar  axpas  us  Tiopiovu.t6a  )iow 
utterly  . .  ,  Aesch.  Cho.  691,  cf.  Soph.  O.  C.  1242,  Eur.  I.  A.  778,  Thuc. 
4.    112,    Plat.,    etc.: — cf.    xaTaxpr)$tv,    xpds.  4.  the  castle 

or  citadel  built  on  a  steep  rock  overhanging  a  town,  Lat.  arx,  Xen.  An. 
7.  I,  20,  etc. ;  cf.  Nieb.  R.  H.  3.  n.  311 :  this  is  called  axprj  iroAis  in 
Horn.,  and  in  later  times  axpostoKis.  5.  n«  end,  extremity,  Arist. 

H.  A.  3.  2,  8.,  3.  II,  J  J  nap'  axpas  (ace.  pi.)  at  the  ends,  Eur.  Or.  128. 

dicpdavTos  [xpa~],  ov,  {xpaiaivu)  -  axpavros,  without  result,  unfulfilled, 
fruitless,  Lat.  irritus,  II.  2.  138,  Od.  2.  202. 

aKpa-vT|s,  is,  (xpafa)  not  barking,  ixpaytis  xvvts,  of  the  gryphons  (like 
TrCp  av-ntpaiarov,  etc.),  Aesch.  Pr.  803.  Hesych.  expl.  ixpayis  by  hva\f pis, 
axhrjpov,  6(vxo\ov,  and  in  A.  B.  369  we  read  dxpayyts  (1.  ixpayis)- 
axpoxokov,  whence  Meineke  Com.  Er.  3.  p.  452  suspects  the  word  to 
be  a  compd.  of  dxpos,  dyos  ;  Herm.  of  dxpos,  dyn.     Cf.  ixXayyi. 

aKpdSavTos.  ov,  (xpaSaivouai)  unshaken,  Philo  2.  1 36,  etc.  Adv.  -rare, 
Nicom.  Harm.  p.  8. 

dKpaTjs,  tt,  (dxpos,  arjfu)  blowing  strongly,  fresh-blowing,  of  the  north 
and  west  wind,  Od.  14.  253.,  2.421,  Hes.  Op.  592;  si  dxpais  erit,  if  it  shall 
be  clear  weather,  Cic.  Att.  10.  17.  Adv.  dxpacl  7rAfiV  to  sail  with  a 
fresh  breeze,  Arr.  Ind.  24.  1. 

dxpatos,  a,  ov,  =  dxpos,  often  in  Hipp,  (as  Epid.  I.  954.,  3.  I066),  and 
Galen,  in  plur.  ri  ixpata,  the  extremities  (of  the  body) ;  in  the  Mss.  and 
Edd.  almost  always  written  axpta.  II.  dwelling  on  the  heights, 

epith.  of  Hera,  Eur.  Med.  1379;  of  Aphrodite,  Paus.  I.  I,  3.,  2.  32,  6; 
of  Artemis  and  Athena,  Hesych.  s.  v.  ixpla  (leg.  ixpaia)  ;  oi  tv  ixpo- 
iroA«  Btoi  ixpatoi  [«iVi],  *oi  iroKitis   Poll.  9.  40. 

d-KpaLrruAos,  ov,  without  nausea  from  drunkenness,  Arist.  Probl.  3. 
17-  2.  of  certain  wines,  not  producing  such  nausea,  Ath.  32 

D.  3.  of  certain  herbs,  counteracting  nausea,  Diosc.  I.  25. 

dxpai(t>vf|s,  is,  syncop.  form  of  ixtpaio-<j>avqs  (which  is  not  in  use),  = 
ixipaios,  unmixed,  pure,  xoprn  axp.  ataa  Eur.  Hec.  537  ;  SSup  Ar.  Fr. 
98:  metaph.,  vtvia  ixp.  sheer,  utter  poverty,  Anth.  P.  6.  191.  II. 

untouched,  unharmed,  entire,  Lat.  integer,  Eur.  Ale.  1052,  Thuc.  I.  19, 
5^.  2.  c.  gen.  untouched  by  .  .  ,  ixp.  twv  xaTrprttXrjfiivojv  Soph. 

0.  C.  1 147  ;  xopovs  ixpaitpvtis  nvppiyrjs  free  from  .  .  ,  Lysipp.  Incert.  3. 
d-Kpavros,  ov,  poet.  Adj.,  like  the  Homeric  ixpdavros,  unaccomplished, 

unfulfilled,  fruitless,  idle,  itrta,  (Airiocs  Pind.  O.  I.  137,  P.  3.  41  ;  Ti\vai 
Aesch.  Ag.  249: — neut.  pi.  as  Adv.,  in  vain,  Pind.  O.  2.  158  ;  axpavra 
0a£w  Aesch.  Cho.  882  ;  ouS*  dxpavO'  upurjaautv  Eur.  Bacch.  435  ; 
dxpavr  dovpti  Id.  Supp.  770. — For  Aesch.  Cho.  65,  v.  sub  dxparos  2. 

dxp-ofdviov,  to,  (dfoiv)  the  end  of  the  axle.  Poll.  I.  145. 

aKpdo'ia,  r),  (dxp&ros)  bad  mixture,  ill  temperature,  opp.  to  tvxpaaia, 
ixp.  iipos  an  unwholesome  climate,  Theophr.  C.  P.  3.  2,  5 ;  Sid  tt)v  ixprp- 
aitjv,  of  meats  (nisi  legend,  dxp&aitjv,  intemperance),  Hipp.  Vet.  Med.  10. 

dtcpdo-ia,  r).  m  ixpartia,  q.  v. 

dxpaTcui  [xpa],  i),  (ixpaTr)s)  want  of  power,  debility,  vtvpuv  Hipp. 
Aph.  1253.  II.  the  conduct  and  character  of  an  ixparjjs,  in- 

continence, want  of  self-control,  opp.  to  iyxpartia.  Plat.  Rep.  461  B, 
Legg.  734  B,  etc. ;  d*p.  r)iovuv  t«  «ai  itrtSvutuv  lb.  886  A,  etc. — The 
prevailing  form  in  later  writers  is  ixpaaia,  Arist.  Eth.  N.  7.  1-4,  Rhet. 

1.  12,  12,  Menand.  csaa.  4 ;  and  this  form  occurs  in  Mas.  of  Plat.  (Rep. 

1.  c,  Gorg.  525  A)  and  Xen.  (Mem.  4.  5,  6,  al.) ;  the  form  ixparia  also 
occurs  in  Mss.  of  Hipp.  Coac.  145,  Plat.,  etc.,  prob.  by  error: — v.  Lob. 
Phryn.  524  sq. 

dicpdrtvopuu,  Dep.  (ixparrjs)  to  be  incontinent,  Arist.  Eth.  N.  7.  2,  I., 
7.  3,  3,  etc. :  censured  by  Phryn.  p.  442,  who  quotes  however  Menand. 
Incert.  449. — The  Act.  occurs  in  Plut.  ap.  Stob.  8 1 .  40. 

dKp&TCVTiicdt,  17,  ov,  arising  from  incontinence,  ittKf)uara  Arist.  Rhet. 

2.  16,  4. 

dxpuTiu,  to  be  ixpartjs,  Hipp.  600.  35,  Poll.  2.  154. 

dicpa-rr|S.  is,  txpann)  powerless,  impotent,  yr}pas  Soph.  O.  C.  1 236  ; 
iraiSia  Hipp.  Aph.  1247  ;  of  paralysed  limbs,  Aretae.  Caus.  M.  Diut.  I. 
7.  II.  c.  gen.  rei,  not  having  power  or  command  over  a  thing, 

Lat.  impotens,  y\wa<rr)s  Aesch.  Pr.  884 ;  <f>uvr)s  Hipp.  447.  24  ;  l>pyr)s 
Thuc.  3.  84 ;  0v/4Ov  Plat.  Legg.  869  A  ;  dxp.  rwv  \tipwv,  of  persons 
with  their  hands  tied,  Dion.  H.  I.  38  : — also,  intemperate  in  the  use  cf  a 
thing,  dtppt>b\aiuv.  otvov  Xen.  Mem.  1 .  2,  2,  Oec.  12,11;  so,  ixp.  xipbovs, 
rififjs  intemperate  in  the  pursuit  of  them,  Arist.  Eth.  N.  7.  I,  7;  also 
with  Preps.,  ixp.  vpos  top  otvov  Arist.  H.  A.  8.  4,  2  ;  wtpl  ri  vvuara 
Id.  P.  A.  4.  II,  5;  and  c.  inf.,  ixp.  tlpytoOai  Ttvos  unable  to  refrain 
from  . .  ,  Plat.  Soph.  252  C.  2.  absol.  in  moral  sense,  without  com- 

mand over  oneself  or  one's  passions,  incontinent,  unbridled,  licentious,  Arist. 
F^th.  N.  7.  I,  sq. ;  ixp.  ariliua  Ar.  Ran.  838  ;  i^ovs  Aristias  ap.  Ath.  686 
A: — Adv.,  ixpaTun  i\ttv  npus  ti  Plat.  Legg.  710  A.  3.  also  of 

things,  uncontrolled,  immoderate,  oavavrj  Anth.  P.  9.  367  ;  ovpov  .  . 
ixparis  incontinence  of  urine,  Aretae.  Caus.  M.  Ac.  I.  6;  so  in  Adv., 
ixparl  rd  ovpa  ix\ittv  Id.  Caus.  M.  Diut.  1.  7. 

d-icpdrnTOt  [xpa],  ov,  uncontrolled,  Arist.  Meteor.  4.  7,  II:  iucontrol- 
lable,  iwt$vptia  Hdn.  I.  8.  II.  incomprehensible,  Fxcl. 

dxp&TCa,  t),  v.  sub  ixpartia. 

dicpaTiJopoi.  fut.  Toiuai :  Dep. :  (dxpdTos).  To  drink  pure  wine  (luc- 
rum) :  hence,  to  breakfast,  because  this  meal  consisted  of  bread  dipped 
in  wine  (Ath.  1 1  C,  sq.),  Ar.  PI.  295,  ubi  v.  Schol.,  Canthar.  Incert.  I  :— 
c.  ace,  ixp.  xoxxvur/Ka  to  breakfast  on  plums,  Ar.  F'r.  505  a  ;  utxp6v  Ari- 
stom.  Incert.  I : — metaph.,  c.  gen.,  iuiyovs  i/xpariau  aotpias  Philo  2.  166. 

aKfinayjx  [xpa],  aros,  to,  a  breakfast,  tan  ixpaTiauaTos  upas  Arist. 
H.  A.  6.  8,  3,  cf.  Ath.  1 1  D. 

dxpa-napos,  o,  breakfasting,  Ath.  1 1  D. 

dxpaTurros  [xp&],  ov,  the  Ms.  reading  in  Theocr.  I.  51,  vpiv  r)  dxpd- 
TiffTOP  in)  (rjpotot  xa8i(n, — defended  by  Herm.,  who  interprets  dxpaTta- 

E  2 


52 

TOV  iiri  (qpoioi,  having  made  a  dry  breakfast,  i.  e.  none  at  all.  One  Ms. 
gives  avaptarov,  dinnerless; — if  this  be  received,  iiti  (npotat  xa6i£-n  must 
be  joined,  leave  him  on  dry  ground,  i.  e.  bare  and  destitute  ; — so,  of  ships, 
we  have  lv  ovbt'i  xad'iaaai  h.  Horn.  Merc.  284 ;  cf.  Ovid's  in  sicca  destitui. 

oKpdTO-KuOuv,  euros,  0,  a  hard  toper,  Hyperid.  ap.  Prise.  18.  25. 

QKpaTOTTcwia.  Ion.  oKpTrroTroo'iT},  1),  a  drinking  of  sheer  wine,  Hdt.  6. 
84,  Hipp.  Aph.  1257  :  dKpdToiroT<<i>,  to  drink  sheer  wine,  Arist.  Probl. 
3.  5  :  dKpSTO-iroT-ns,  ov,  Ion.  dKpT|TOiron)S,  ea>,  6,  (nivtv)  a  drinker  of 
sheer  wine,  Hdt.  6.  84. 

uKp&Tos,  Ion.  dicpTVTOS,  ov  :  (x(pawvixi):  1.  of  liquids,  unmixed, 

pure,  sheer,  unadulterate,  esp.  of  wine,  Od.  24.  73  ;  dxprrroi  airovbai 
drink-offerings  of  pure  wine,  II.  2.  341. ,  4.  159;  otvos  rrdvv  dxp.  very 
strong  indeed,  Xen.  An.  4.  5,  27;  oivos  dxptrros  wine  without  water, 
Lat.  merum,  Hdt.  I.  207,  etc. ;  and  dxparos  (without  oTvos),  Ar.  Eq. 
105,  and  freq.  in  Com. ;  so,  dxparov,  to,  Arist.  Poet.  25,  16,  Ath.  441 
C  ;  also  of  milk,  Od.  9.  297  ;  of  blood,  Aesch.  Cho.  578,  etc. : — said  to 
mean  dark-coloured  in  Hipp.  Epid.  1 .  966 : — Adv.  -tois,  Id.  107  C.  2. 

of  any  objects,  dxp.  o~iip.ara  pure,  simple  bodies,  Plat.  Tim.  57  C  ;  dxp. 
liiKav  pure  black,  Theophr.  Color.  26  ;  dxparos  vv(  (sheer  night)  should 
perh.  be  read  with  Schiitz  in  Aesch.  Cho.  65  for  dxpavros,  cf.  dxparov 
oxotos  Plut.  Nic.  21  ;  wcp.  axid  Id.  2.932  B.  3.  of  qualities,  pure, 

absolute,  dxp.  vovs  Xen.  Cyr.  8.  7,  20 ;  iruis  . .  7}  dxp.  Sixaioavvrj  irpbs 
dSixiav  dxp.  <?x«  Plat.  Rep.  545  A,  cf.  491  E.  4.  of  conditions  or 

states,  pure,  untempered,  absolute,  i\(v0(pia,  -hbovri  Plat.  Rep.  562  D  ; 
o\iyapxta  Arist.  Pol.  2.  12,  2,  etc.  ;  dxp.  vop:os  absolute  law,  Plat. 
k*S8-  723  A ;  dxp.  \fxvbos  a  sheer  lie,  Id.  Rep.  382  C : — so  Adv.  dxpd- 
Tcof,  absolutely,  entirely,  dxp.  p(\as  or  Kfvxos  Ael.  N.  A.  16.  IX,  Luc. 
D.  Marin.  I.  3.  5.  of  persons,  hot,  intemperate,  excessive,  violent, 

dxparos  ipyqv  Aesch.  Pr.  678  ;  dxparos  i\0(  come  with  all  thy  power, 
Eur.  Cycl.  602.  6.  so  of  things  we  feel,  dxparos  dpyn  Alcid.  ap. 

Arist.  Rhet.  3.  3,  2  ;  XpKpos  Soph.  Fr.  678  ;  dxp.  Sidppoia  Thuc.  2.  49  ; 
dxp.  xaCfia  Anth.  P.  9.  71  ;   (polios  Joseph.,  etc.  II.  a  Comp. 

axpartOTtpos  (as  if  from  dxparrjs)  Hipp.  Vet.  Med.  10,  Hyperid.  ap.  Ath. 
424  D,  Arist.  Probl.  3.  3:  Sup.  dxpariararos  Plat.  Phil.  53  A:  but 
d/rparoTtpos  Plut.  2.  677  C  ; — cf.  Lob.  Phryn.  524. 

dKp&TO-o-TOnos,  ov,  unbridled  of  tongue,  Schol.  Eur.  Or.  891. 

aKpdTorifs,  rjros,  7),  an  unmixed  state,  otvov,  piXtros  Hipp.  Acut.  393. 

dicp&TO-tpopos,  6,  and  dicp&TO-<J)6pov,  to,  a  vessel  for  pure  wine,  elsewh. 
ipvxrijp,  Cic.  Fin.  3.  4,  15,  Poll.  6.  99.,  10.  70,  Joseph.  B.  J.  5.  13,  6. 

dicpdrup  [d],  opos,  6,  =  dxparos  I,  Soph.  Ph.  486.  TI.  =  dxpar-qs 

II,  dxp.  iavrov  Plat.  Rep.  579  C,  Criti.  121  A. 

dtcpaTus  [a],  Adv.  of  dxparos.  II.  dicpuTcos  of  dxparrjs:  v.  sub  voce. 

dKp&xoX<w,  to  be  passionate,  only  in  pres.  part.,  Plat.  Legg.  731  D. 

dicpdxoXia,  Ion.  dKpTjxoXt-r),  rj,  passionateness,  a  burst  of  passion,  Hipp. 
1212  H:  later  dicpoxoXia,  Sopat.  ap.  Stob.  313.  30,  Plut. 

dupd-xoAos  [d],  ov,  quick  or  sudden  to  anger,  passionate,  Ar.  Eq.  41  ; 
xvaiv  dxp.  an  ill-tempered  dog,  Id.  Fr.  535  ;  piiXiooa  Epinic.  Mvija.  I  ; 
dxcpSos  dxp.  a  wild  pear  that  pricks  on  the  least  touch,  Pherecr.  Incert. 
32 : — also  dxpoxoXos.  ov,  Arist.  Eth.  N.  4.  5,  9,  Philo,  Plut.,  etc.  II. 

generally,  in  passionate  distress,  Theocr.  24.  60.  (The  forms  dxpd- 

XoXos,  -xoKiw,  are  confirmed  by  all  the  poetic  passages,  as  also  by  the 
Ion.  form  dxprjxoKta  in  Hipp. ;  and  in  A.  B.  77  dxpdxoXos  is  cited  from 
Plat.  Rep.  (41 1  C),  where  the  bulk  of  the  Mss.  give  dxpoxoKoi,  whereas 
in  Legg.  731  D,  791  D  is  read  dxpdx- ;  cf.  Eust.  1243.  23.,  1735.  46. 
The  orig.  form  seems  to  have  been  dxpdxo\os,  and  this  prob.  was  short- 
ened from  dxpar6-xo\os,  v.  dxp7rr6-xo\os,  and  cf.  Lob.  Phryn.  664 ;  when 
this  sense  was  forgotten,  the  form  dxp6xo\os  was  gradually  introduced.) 

dicpea,  v.  sub  dxpaios. 

aKpcp.oviKos,  77,  ov,  like  an  dxpifiwv  or  twig,  Theophr.  H.  P.  4.  6,  8. 

dKpcp,aiv,  ovos,  ci,  or  better  dtcpcpcov,  ovos,  Arcad.  14.  2,  Suid. :  (axpos) : — 
properly  a  bough  or  branch,  which  ends  in  smaller  branches  and  twigs, 
Arist.  Plant.  2.  10,  3,  Theophr.  H.  P.  I.  I,  9:  but  also,  simply,  a  branch, 
twig,  spray,  Simon.  (?)  183,  Eur.  Cycl.  455,  Theocr.  16.  96. 

dicp-jcMrepos,  ov,  at  eventide  (cf.  dxpos  II),  Nic.  Th.  25,  Anth.  P.  7. 
633: — dxpto-irtpov  as  Adv.,  Hipp.  1216  B,  Theocr.  24.  75  »  for  which 
Arist.  ap.  Ath.  353  B  says  rfjv  dpx(air(pov  (nisi  legend,  dxp(air(pov). 

dKp-T|pV]S,  ov,  0,  a  youth  in  his  prime,  Anth.  P.  6.  JTI.,  12.  124. 

dKp-TjPos,  ov,  in  earliest  youth,  Theocr.  8.  93. 

d-KpT|Seu.vos,  ov,  without  head-band,  Opp.  C.  I.  497,  Christod.  Ecphr.  62. 

uKpTjTos.  aKpT|To-TrocrLT|,  — tt6tt)S,  v.  sub  dxpar-. 

cucpTjT6-xoXos,  ov,  caused  by  sheer  bile,  iruperos  Hipp.  Fract.  778, 

dKp-rjxoXia,  v.  sub  dxpax~. 

dxpia,  7),  v.  sub  dxpaios. 

dxpia,  rd,  —  dxpa,  dxpia  fnvds  Opp.  C.  2.  552. 

aKptf3d£co,  =dxpitS6a,  Lxx  ;  censured  by  Poll.  5.  152  :  dxpi{3acrp.a,  r6, 
aKpifBao-Lios,  o,  =  dxpi&viia,  -cuo~is,  Lxx  :  dxpif3ao-TT|s,  ov,  o,  a  close 
enquirer,  Lxx. 

dxpCpeia  [*7>r],  77,  exactness,  literal  or  ?ninute  accuracy,  precision,  Thuc. 
I.  22,  etc. ;  raiv  TrpaxBivTwv  Antipho  127.  12,  cf.  Lys.  148.  38  : — often 
with  Preps,  in  adv.  sense,  tV  dxpifitias,  =  dxpi&ivs,  with  minuteness  or 
precision,  Plat.  Theaet.  184  C,  Tim.  23  D,  etc.;  Sid  vdar\s  dxp.  Id.  Legg. 
876  C; — «i'stt)i'  dxp.  <pi\oooipfiv  Plat.  Gorg.  487  C; — (Is  dxpi0tiav  Arist. 
Pol.  711,9  ; — *pos  -riiv  dxpi0€iav  Plat.  Legg.  769  D  ;  irpis  dxp.  Arist.  de 
Resp.  16 : — J7  dxp.  rov  vavrtxov  its  fine  state,  exact  discipline,  Thuc.  7- 
13  ;  dxp.  vdpjav  strictness,  severity,  Isocr.  147  E,  cf.  Isae.  65.  7  : — pi. 
niceties,  Plat.  Rep.  504  E.  2.  niceness,  punctuality,  also  over-nice- 

ness, pedantic  precision,  Polyb.  32.  13,  II.  3.  parsimony,  frugality, 

Plut.  Pericl.  16  ;  vbaip  hi  dxpiBdas  tori  rifi  is  scarce,  Plat.  Legg.  844 
B. — Hardly  to  be  found  save  in  Att.  Prose. 

dKpi^cvu,  -dxpi&ow,  Schol.  Pind.  N.  4.  3:  in  Med.,  Sext.  Emp.  M.  I.  71. 


aKparoKwdcov  —  aicpiTOS. 


aKptp-qs,  h,  exact,  accurate,  precise,  made  or  done  to  a  nicety,  in  all  sorts 
of  relations,  Eur.  El.  367,  Thuc,  etc.;  Siatra  Hipp.  Aph.  1243;  dxp. 
trvptTos  returning  precisely  at  its  time,  Id.  Epid.  I.  943.  II.  of 

persons,  exact,  precise,  strict,  Sixaorris  Thuc.  3.  46 :  exact,  consummate, 
iarp6s  Plat.  Rep.  342  D :  painfully  exact,  over-nice,  precise,  curious,  Id. 
Legg.  762  D;  dxpi@-t)s  tois  !>p.p.aai  sAar/>-sighted,  Theocr.  22.  194: — • 
so  also  of  arguments,  Ar.  Nub.  130;  of  thoughts  and  notions,  Eur.,  etc., 
cf.  Tttpiaads  II.  3  : — to  dxpifiis  =  dxpi&tia,  Hipp.  Vet.  Med.  1 1 ,  Thuc. 
6.  18: — very  freq.  in  Adv.  -fiws,  to  a  nicety,  precisely,  dxpipws  ilbtvai, 
lmoTaa$ai,  xaBopdv,  fia$ctv,  etc.,  Hdt.  7.  32,  etc. ;  dxpi0ws  uiv  -ntpiaao- 
(ppaiv  Aesch.  Pr.  328  ;  opp.  to  ottXius,  Isocr.  91  D  ;  to  tvwoi  (in  outline, 
roughly),  Arist.  Eth.  N.  2.  2,  3  ;  dxpi$Sis  xal  piXis,  Lat.  vix  ac  ne  vix 
qiiidem,  with  the  greatest  difficulty,  Plut.  Alex.  16:  so,  oix  eis  dxpi0h 
■n\9(s  at  the  right  moment,  Eur.  Tro.  901  ;  irr'  dxpSis  Eus.  H.  E.  6.  31, 
2,  al.  2.  parsimonious,  frugal,  stingy,  dxp.  tovs  rpoirovs  Menand. 

ap.  Stob.  387.  45,  v.  Gaisf.  ad  1.;  dxpi/lws  oiatTaoBai  Andoc.  33.  19. — 
Rare  except  in  Att.,  and  mostly  in  Prose  :  the  Comp.  and  Sup.  -iartpos, 
-eOTaros,  freq.  in  Plato,  with  -iortpov,  -earara,  as  Adverbs.  (The 
sense  points  to  dxpos  as  the  first  part  of  the  word,  but  -ij3r/s  remains  dub.) 

ctKpiflC,  Adv.  exactly,  Theodos.  Gramm.  p.  74. 

aKpipo-SiKcuos,  ov,  severely  judging,  dxp.  itri  ro  x*ipov  extreme  to  mark 
what  is  amiss,  Arist.  Eth.  N.  5.  10,  8. 

dKpTp}6X€KTOS,  ov,  stated  with  precision,  Eccl. 

dKptj3oXo-ycou.cu,  Dep.  to  be  exact  or  precise  in  language,  investigation, 
etc.,  absol.,  Plat.  Rep.  340  E,  Crat.  415  A  ;  also  c.  ace.  rei,  to  weigh 
accurately.  Id.  Rep.  403  D,  and  Oratt. ;  raira  ndvra  tWep  rrjs  d\rj9tias 
dxpi&oKoyovfiai  Dem.  232.  5  ;  ep.ov  irepi  tovtojv  dxpi@o\oyovpifVov  Id. 
307.  9. — The  Act.  is  found  later,  as  in  Dion.  H.  de  Dem.  ult. 

dxpipoXo  yt|T€ov,  verb.  Adj.  one  must  weigh  accurately,  Arist.  Rhet.  3.1,10. 

aKptpoXo-yia,  fj,  exactness,  precision  in  speech,  investigation,  etc.,  Arist. 
Rhet.  I.  5,  15.  2.  parsimony,  stinginess,  Id.  Eth.  N.  4.  2,  7. 

dtcptpo-Xoyos,  ov,  precise  i?i  argument,  in  pi.,  Timo  ap.  Diog.  L.  2.  19. 

dtcptpow,  fut.  wool,  to  make  exact  or  accurate,  Eur.  Hipp.  469;  dxp.  rd5e 
to  be  perfect  in  bearing  these  hardships,  Xen.  Cyr.  2.  2,  13;  to  arrange 
precisely,  Ar.  Eccl.  274: — Pass,  to  be  exact  or  perfect,  Ar.  Ran.  1483; 
rtxpitSwa&ai  irpos  trdaav  dptTTjv  Arist.  Pol.  3.  7,  4. — The  Med.  is  later,  as 
Joseph.  A.  J.  17.  2,  3,  Eust.  1799.  33,  etc. ;  but  v.  Siaxpt&ooj.  2. 

to  investigate  accurately,  to  understand  thoroughly,  01  Tab'  7)xpi@Q>xoTcs 
Eur.  Hec.  1 192,  cf.  Xen.  Cyr.  2.  2,  9  ;  rovvopA  fiov  ov  dxpifiois ;  are 
you  sure  of .  .  ?  Plat.  Charm.  156  A.  3.  absol.  to  be  exact,  corre- 

spond exactly,  Arist.  Meteor.  2.  6,  9  ;  dxp.  wtpi  ri  Id.  G.  A.  5.  I,  36,  cf. 
4.  10,  10,  de  An.  2.  9,  2. — Cf.  di~,  ({-axpifioto. 

aKpifjcopa,  to,  exact  knowledge,  Epicur.  ap.  Diog.  L.  10.  36. 

dKpi{3coo-is,  7?,  exact  observance,  vop.ov  Joseph.  A.  J.  17.  2,  4. 

dKpij3uTeov,  verb.  Adj.  one  must  examine  accurately,  Philo  I.  357. 

dicpCSiov,  to,  Dim.  of  dxpis,  Diosc.  2.  116. 

dKp(So-0T|KT),  17,  a  locust-cage,  Theocr.  I.  52,  Longus  I.  10. 

dxplSo-did'yos,  ov,  a  locust-eater,  Diod.  3.  29,  cf.  Strabo  772. 

dicpC£to,  (dxpos)  to  go  on  tiptoe,  Eur.  Fr.  5  74 :  cf.  i£axpi£aj. 

dicpis,  10s,  i),  (dxpos)  Ep.  Noun,  a  hill-top,  mountain-peak,  Horn,  only 
in  Od.  and  always  in  pi.,  dxpifs  rjvtfioeooai  the  windy  mountain-tops, 
Od.  9.  400,  cf.  h.  Horn.  Cer.  383 :  generally,  a  hill-country  is  called 
dxpus  Od.  10.  281  ; — in  sing.,  Tlipyaitirjs  imip  dxpios  C.  I.  3538. 
18  : — cf.  ox  pis. 

dicpts,  iSos,  17,  a  locust,  Lat.  gryllus,  II.  21.  12,  Ar.  Ach.  1116,  al. 

dtcpicria,  77,  (dxptros)  want  of  distinctness  and  order,  confusion,  Xen. 
Hell.  7.  5,  27.  II.  want  of  judgment,  bad  judgment  or  choice, 

perversion,  Polyb.  2.  35,  3.  III.  the  undecided  character  of  a 

disease,  its  not  coming  to  a  crisis,  Hipp.  Epid.  I.  945. 

dicp-{crxiov,  to,  the  end  of  the  tax^°v  or  hip,  Medic. 

dicpiTt  [ti],  Adv.  of  dxpiTos,  Lys.  Fr.  56,  Gramm. 

dicplTO-povXos,  ov,  indiscreet  of  counsel,  Manetho  4.  530. 

aKpiToyvios,  ov,  perh.  with  confused,  unsteady  gait,  Emped.  317  (Sturz 
dxpiToxtipa). 

aKptro-SaKpus,  v,  shedding  floods  of  tears,  Anth.  P.  5.  236. 

aKptTO-€TrT|S,  is,=^dxpn6[iv0os,  Theod.  Metoch.  77* 

aKptTOu.56t<i),  to  babble,  Eust.  349.  17:  -p-COta,  rj,  babbling,  Id.  1878.  4. 

aKptT6-p.v6os,  ov,  recklessly  or  confusedly  babbling,  II.  2.  246;  cf.  dxpi- 
tos  I.  I.  II.  ovttpoi  dxp.  hard  of  interpretation,  Od.  19.  560. 

aKpiros,  ov,  (xp'ivai)  ^indistinguishable,  confused,  disorderly,  iwBos  II.  2. 
796 ;  dxpira  iroAA.'  dyopevtiv  Od.  8.  505  ;  ti//x/3os  dxp.  one  common  un- 
distinguished grave,  II.  7.  337  ;  dxp.  Trdyos  a  confused  mass,  Hipp.  ap. 
Galen. ;  cf.  Plat.  Gorg.  465  D.  2.  continual,  unceasing,  c?x«a  D,  3. 

412;  neut.  as  Adv.,  •ntvB'qp.ivai  dxpirov  alei  Od.  18.  I74-,  *9*  I20» 
Si)pbv  xal  dxpirov  h.  Horn.  Merc.  126  : — opos  dxp.  a  continuous  chain  of 
mountains,  Anth.  P.  6.  225.  3.  after  Horn,  in  Poets,  countless, 

dxp.  darpaiv  ox^os  Eur.  Fr.  596 ;  pvpia  ipiKa  xal  dxp.  Opp.  H.  1 .  80 ; 
dxpirov  irXridei  cited  from  Babr.,  etc.  II.  undecided,  doubtful, 

vfixfa.  dtSKos  II.  14.  205,  Hes.  Sc.  311  ;  dxp'iTuv  uvtwv  while  the  issue 
was  doubtful,  Thuc.  4.  20;  dxp.  (pis  xal  rapaxv  Dem.  231.  8:  un- 
certain as  to  time,  Arist.  Meteor.  2.  5,  4 ;  iwptTos  dxp.  a  fever  that  will 
not  come  to  a  crisis,  Hipp.  399.  22  ;  and  so  Adv.  -tois,  Id.  Epid.  I.  941; 
to  dxpirois  £vv(x*s  rrfs  dfiiWrjs  without  decisive  issue,  Thuc.  7.  71.  2. 
unjudged,  untried,  of  persons  and  things,  dxpirov  riva  xrdvav,  dvaip(tv, 
diroWiwcu  to  put  to  death  without  trial,  Lat.  indicia  causa,  Hdt.  3.  So, 
Thuc.  2.  67,  cf.  8.  48,  Dem.  212.  23;  dxp.  dnoBavdv  Antipho  135.  10, 
etc. : — npaypa  dxp.  a  cause  not  yet  tried,  Isocr.  385  A,  cf.  Plat.  Tim.  51 
C: — also  subject  to  ?io  judge,  npvravis,  Aesch.  Supp.  371: — Adv.,  dxplrus 
dwoxrdvdv  Dion.  H.  II.  43.  III.  act.  not  giving  a  judgment, 

Hdt.  8. 124:  710/  capable  of  judging,  rash,  headstrong,  Polyb.  3.  19,  9; 


dicpiTOipvWos  —  aicpovvyl. 


53 


so,  axptra  pT)\avui)itvoi  engaged  in  rash  attempts,  Eur.  Andr.  549.  2. 

not  exercising  judgment,  undistinguishing,  of  the  Fates,  Anth.  P.  7.  439, 

cf.  5.  284  ;  axpcTi  Saifiov,  of  death,  Epigr.  Gr.  204.  3. 
dxpiTo-^iuAAos,  ov,  of  undistinguishable,  i.  e.  closely  blending,  lea/age, 

opos  II.  2.  868. 
dicptTo-^vpTos.  ov,  undistinguishably  mixed,  Aesch.  Theb.  360. 
QKpiT6-<j>u>vos,  ov,  to  explain  fSapf}apo<pa>vos,  Apoll.  Lex.,  Hesych. 
dxpod^opoi,  =  anpoaop,ai,  Epich.  75  Ahr.,  Menand.  'E7X-  2  (si  vera  1.) 
dxpddpa,  otos,  to,  (axpoaofiai )  Lat.  acroama,  like  dxovaua,  anything 
heard,  esp.  with  pleasure,  anything  read,  recited,  played  or  sung,  as  a 
play,  musical  piece,  etc.,  Xen.  Symp.  2,  2,  Hier.  I,  14,  Arist.  Eth.  N.  10. 
3,  7,  and  freq.  from  Polyb.  downwds.  II.  in  pi.  for  the  concrete, 

lecturers,  singers,  or  players,  esp.  during  meals,  Polyb.  16.  21,  12,  al. 

dxpodu-aTucds.  r),  ov,  designed  for  hearing  only,  ai  dxp.  bibaoxaXiat 
the  esoteric  doctrines  of  philosophers,  delivered  orally,  Plut.  Alex.  7  ;  cf. 
dxpoartxvs,  ioarrepixos. 

aKpodopai,  2  sing.  impf.  r/xpoaao  Antiph.  'EmS.  2  :  fut.  -aoopat  [d] 
Plat.  Apol.  37  D,  etc.:  aor.  ^xpodadfivv  Ar.  Ran.  315,  Plat.,  etc.:  pf. 
^Kpodfjtai  Arist.  H.  A.  4.  10,  II  :  aor.  T/xpodihjv  (in  pass,  sense)  Joseph. 
A.  J.  17.  5,  2,  Aristid. :  Dep.  (Perh.  from  the  same  Root  as  xkvai, 

with  a  prefixed  :  cf.  A  A,  IV.)  To  hearken  to,  listen  to :  Construction 

as  with  CLKovai,  c.  gen.  pers.,  Antipho  1 29.  38,  Plat.  Euthyd.  304  D  ;  c. 
ace.  rei,  Thuc.  6.  17,  etc. ;  but  sometimes  also  c.  gen.  rei,  Thuc.  2.  31, 
Plat.  Hipp.  Ma.  285  D.  2.  absol.  to  listen,  Ar.  Lys.  504,  Pherecr. 

WtvS.  I  :  o  dxpouiptvos  a  hearer,  Eupol.  Arju,.  6  ;  esp.  of  those  who  hear 
lectures,  a  pupil,  disciple,  Plat.  Rep.  605  C,  Xen.  Symp.  3,  6;  hence  like  a 
Subst.  c.  gen.,  dvrjp  'AptaToriXovs  ^xpoap.ivos  Strabo  608,  cf.  Plut.  Caes.  3, 
and  v.  axpoafxa,  dxpoaT-rjs.  II.  to  attend  to,  obey.  rtv6s  Thuc. 

3.  27,  Lys.  158.  35,  Plat.  Gorg.  488  C:  absol.  to  submit,  Thuc.  6.  10. 

dtcpodcas,  fats,  ij,  a  hearing,  hearkening  or  listening  to,  Antipho  1 29. 
41,  Thuc.  I.  21,  22,  etc.  ;  dxp.  wotftoOat  Ttvos,  =  dxpodaSai,  Andoc.  2. 
21  ;  xXiirruv  rijv  dxpoaatv  vuuiv  to  cheat  you  into  hearing,  Aeschin. 
58.  37.  2.  obedience,  Ttvos  Thuc.  2.  37.  II.  the  thing 

listened  to,  a  recitation,  lecture,  Hipp.  28.  15,  Polyb.  32.  6,  5  : — ipvotKT) 
dxp.,  name  of  a  work  by  Arist.  III.  =  dxpoaT^pioi',  Plut.  2.  58  C. 

dxpoaT<ov,  verb.  Adj.  one  must  listen  to,  t&v  xpfirrovwv  Ar.  Av.  1228. 

aKpodTT|ptov,  to,  a  place  of  audience,  Lat.  auditorium.  Act.  Ap.  25.  23: 
a  lecture-room,  Plut.  2.  45  F.  II.  an  audience.  Id.  Cato  Ma.  22. 

dxpoaTrp,  ov,  o,  a  hearer,  Lat.  auditor,  of  persons  who  come  to  hear  a 
public  speaker,  Thuc.  3.  38,  Plat.,  etc. :  one  who  hears  a  teacher,  a  dis- 
ciple,  a  pupil,  Arist.  Pol.  2.  12,  7,  cf.  Eth.  N.  I.  3,  5.  II.  a  reader, 

lecturer,  Plut.  Thes.  I,  Lysand.  12. 

dxpoarucot,  17,  6v,  of  or  for  hearing,  dxp.  k&yot  esoteric  discourses 
(v.  dxpoafiaTixus),  Arist.  Fr.  612;  puaSbs  dxp.  a  lecturers  fee,  Lat. 
honorarium,  Luc.  Encom.  Dem.  25.  Adv.,  dxpoarixws  extiv  to  be  fond 
of  hearing,  Philo  1.  215,  etc. 

dxpopVifiovfu,  —  dxpofSariw,  Hippiatr.  p.  265. 

dicpopdfLuv,  ok,  (&alva>)  walking  on  tiptoe  or  erect,  Greg.  Naz. 

dicpoj3uT«i>,  to  walk  on  tiptoe,  skim  along,  of  ostriches,  Diod.  2.  50; 
of  haughty  people,  Philo  1.  640,  etc.:  v.  Lob.  Aj.  121 7.  II.  to 

climb  aloft,  Polyaen.  4.  3,  23. 

dxpofJaTiKos.  ij,  ov,  fit  for  mounting,  Lat.  scansorius,  Vitruv.  10.  I. 

dicpo-pHATOs,  ov,  =  dxpo&dfuw,  ixveaiv  dxpotidrototv  Nonn.  D.  47.  234. 

dicpo-0&4rf|$,  is,  tinged  at  the  point  or  slightly,  Anth.  P.  6.  66.  II. 

skimming  the  surface  of  the  water,  Nonn.  D.  I.  65. 

dicpo-P«AT|f ,  is,  with  a  point  at  the  end,  Anth.  P.  6.  62. 

uKpo-(3«Ais,  iSos,  4,  the  point  of  a  dart  or  spit,  Archipp.  'Hp.  3. 

dKpo-p>r]ujLT{£<!>,  =  dxpoParfai,  Hesych.,  Schol.  II.  13.  158. 

dicpd-8Aao-TOS,  ov,  budding  at  the  end,  Theophr.  H.  P.  I.  14,  2. 

dxpopoAcu,  to  be  an  dxpo&dKos,  to  sling,  Anth.  P.  6.  106. 

dxpoPoArp,  is,  —  dxpo0(Ar);,  Anth.  Plan.  2 1 3. 

unpofJoAia.  r),  a  slinging,  skirmishing,  App.  Civ.  I.  84,  etc. 

dKpof3oAl{o|uu. :  aor.  Jjxpo@oKiodur)v  Hdt.,  Thuc. :  Dep.  To  throw 

from  afar,  to  fight  with  missiles,  as  opp.  to  close  combat,  to  skirmish, 
■wpos  rtva  Thuc.  4.  34;  absol..  Id.  3.  73,  Xen.  Cyr.  8.  8,  22 : — metaph., 
dxp.  iwtai  Hdt.  8.  64. — The  Act.  only  in  Anth.  P.  7.  546,  and  Hesych. 

a>cpo(3dAuns,  (at,  i?i,  a  skirmishing,  Xen.  An.  3.  4,  18,  etc. 

aKpopdALo'p.a,  aTos,  to,  =  foreg.,  App.  Pun.  36. 

dicpoJ3oAuru,d$,  ov,  i,  =  dxpo06ktais,  Thuc.  7.  25,  Xen.  Hell.  1.  3, 14,  etc. 

ditpoPoAuTTTn.  ov,  o,  =  sq.,  Xen.  Cyr.  6.  I,  28. 

dxpd-floAos,  ov,  pass.,  struck  from  afar,  Aesch.  Theb.  158.  II. 

d«po(3oAos.  o,  one  who  throws  from  far,  a  skirmisher,  Hesych.,  Suid. 

aKpoPvo-Ttw,  to  be  uncircumcised,  Lxx. 

ditpoPuo-rCa,  1),  the  foreskin,  Lat.  praeputium,  Lxx,  Act.  Ap.  II. 
3.  II.  the  state  of  having  the  foreskin,  uncircumcision,  Ep.  Rom. 

2.  25,  etc.  2.  collect,  the  uncircumcision,  i.  e.  the  uncircumcised, 

lb.  2.  26.,  3.  30,  etc.  (The  dcriv.  from  dxpos,  ISvo  is  difficult  to 

understand.  Perh.  the  word  is  a  corruption  for  dxpowooOia  ;  in  which 
case  the  Adj.  dxpofJucTos,  ov,  occurring  as  v.  1.  in  Lxx  and  in  Feci. 
writers,  must  have  been  formed  from  the  Subst.) 

dxpo-Yfvuot,  ov,  with  prominent  chin,  Arist.  Physiogn.  6,  40. 

dxpoyuviaios,  a,  ov,  (yaivia)  at  the  extreme  angle,  dxp.  \i$os  the  corner 
foundation-stone,  Lxx  (Esai.  28.  16),  Ep.  Eph.  2.  20. 

uKpo-ocTOi,  ov,  bound  at  the  end  or  top,  Anth.  P.  6.  5. 

dKpo-oiKoios.  ov.  ^dxpipobixaios,  Clem.  Al.  413. 

dxpd-opwi,  to,  fruit-trees.  Plat.  Criti.  1 15  B,  Xen.  Oec.  19, 12.  II. 

fruits,  Arist.  H.  A.  8.  28,  8,  Probl.  22.  8; — ace.  to  Geop.  10.  74,  properly 
of  hard-shelled  fruits,  as  acoms,  chestnuts ;  so  Spvos  ixpa  in  Theocr.  15. 
1 1 2  : — the  sing,  occurs  in  Anth.  P.  9.  555,  Ath.  49  E. 

dxpo-jAucTOt,  ov,  twisted  at  the  end,  Paul.  Sil.  Ambo  1 78. 


dicp6£co-TOS,  ov,  (£«u)  boiled  or  heated  slightly,  Diosc.  2.  146. 

dKpo-gcuyui,  Td,*=£ivy\i),  Hesych.,  Poll.  1.  253. 

dxpo-Jupos,  ov,  slightly  leavened,  Galen. 

dicpo-SdAuirTOS,  ov,  burnt  ai  the  end,  Lat.  adustus,  Hesych. 

dxpdOcv,  Adv.  from  the  end  or  top,  Arist.  Physiogn.  6,  20,  Nic.  Th.  337. 

dxpo-Oeppos,  ov,  very  hot,  cited  from  Philes  de  Propr.  An. 

dxpdOi,  Adv.  at  the  beginning,  c.  gen.,  pvxtos  Aral.  308. 

dKpo-0l-yT|s,  is,  touching  on  the  surface,  touching  the  lips,  <pi\nua  Anth. 
P.  12.  68.  Adv.,  dxpo9iyws  ifipairrtiv  just  to  dip  in,  so  that  it  is  hardly 
wetted,  Diosc.  2.  105. 

dicpo6ivid£opai,  Dep.  to  take  the  dxpo$ivia,  take  of  the  best,  pick  out 
for  oneself,  Eur.  H.  F.  476. 

dicpo-6£viov  [W],  to,  Eur.  Phoen.  282,  Thuc.  I.  132,  Plat.  Legg.  946  B; 
but  mostly  in  pi.  dxpoOlvia,  in  Pind.  also  dxpoOlva :  (dxpos,  6ts).  The 
topmost  or  best  part  of  a  heap  ;  hence  the  choice  part,  firstfruits  of  the 
field,  of  booty,  etc.,  to  be  offered  to  the  gods,  like  drrapxai,  Simon.  109, 
Hdt.  I.  86,  90,  al.,  Find.,  and  Trag.;  dxpoOtva  woXifiov,  in  Pind.  O.  2.  7, 
the  Olympic  games,  as  being  founded  from  spoils  taken  in  war. — Properly 
a  neut.  Adj.,  as  in  Aesch.  Eum.  834  dxpoSivia  bSm  offerings  of  firstfruits. 
Post-hom.  word,  rare  in  Prose. 

dKpo6upo|,  axos,  o,  ij,  (OiupTiaaa  II)  slightly  drunk,  Arist.  Probl.  3.  2 ; 
irtTnixor'  rfit)  t  dxpoOupax'  oVra  Diphil.  Hp.  1  ;  Ion.  -8d)pi)£,  Hipp.  ap. 
Erotian.  p.  178. 

dicpd-Kapiros,  ov,  fruiting  at  the  top,  <poivi(  Theophr.  H.  P.  1.  14,  2. 

dxpo-KcAaividu,  only  used  in  Ep.  part,  dxpoxc Kaivioatv,  growing  black 
on  the  surface,  of  a  swollen  stream,  II.  21.  249 ;  cf.  Nonn.  D.  18.  156. 

dxpoKipcua,  to,  (xipas)  the  ends  of  sail-yards  (cf.  xipas  VIII),  Poll.  1 .  91 : 
also  dxpoKcpa.  Schol.  Ap.  Rh.  I.  566. 

QKpoKioviov,  to,  (xiaiv)  the  capital  of  a  pillar,  Philo  2.  147. 

dKpo-Kv<<t>aios,  ov,  at  the  beginning  of  night,  in  twilight,  Hes.  Op.  565: 
— so,  aKpo-KV€d>T)s,  is,  Luc.  Praec.  Rhet.  1 7,  Lexiph.  1 1 . 

dtcpoKopos,  ov,  {xdfirj)  with  hair  on  the  crown,  epith.  of  the  Thracians, 
who  either  tied  up  their  hair  in  a  top-knot,  or  shaved  all  their  head 
except  the  crown,  II.  4.  533:  with  hair  at  the  tip,  of  a  goat's  chin,  Polyb. 
ap.  Strabo  208: — in  Poll.  2.  28,  dicpoKop^s.  ov,  d.  II.  with  leaves 

at  the  top,  tufted  with  leaves,  Eur.  Phoen.  1516,  Theocr.  22.  41  ;  esp.  of 
the  palm,  Diod.  2.  53,  Dion.  P.  1010. 

'AKpc-Kopivdos,  o,  the  citadel  of  Corinth,  Eur.  Fr.  1069,  Xen.  Hell.  4.4,4. 

dxpoKvpaTOu).  {Kvfia)  to  float  on  the  topmost  waves,  a  bombastic  word 
ridiculed  by  Luc.  Lexiph.  15. 

dxpo-KuAiov,  to,  mostly  in  pi.  the  extremities  of  the  body,  esp.  of  ani- 
mals, the  snout,  ears,  trotters, pettitoes,  Lat.  truncidi,  Pherecr.  M«TaAA.  I. 
14,  Telecl.  Incert.  13,  Ar.  Fr.  109,  Archipp.  'Hp.  2,  Arist.  Probl.  23.  40, 1, 
etc. ; — the  sing,  in  Antiph.  KopivB.  1,  Alex.  Kv0.  I,  Eubul.  'Kua\6.  1. 

dxpo Actov,  to,  (Acta)  ■  dxpoOivtov,  Suid. 

dicp6-Al8os,  ov,  with  the  ends  made  of  stone  ;  [oavov  dxp.  a  statue  with 
the  head,  arms,  and  tegs  marble,  the  rest  wood,  Anth.  P.  12.  40;  cf. 
Miillcr  Archaol.  d.  Kunst,  §  84.  1. 

dxpo-Atwov  [Af],  to,  the  edge  of  a  net,  Xc-n.  Cyn.  2.  6.,  6.  9,  ubi  olim 
(ut  in  Poll.  5.  29)  dxpau\ivtov. 

dxpo-ACvos,  ov,  at  the  edge  of  the  net,  Opp.  C.  4.  383. 

dicpo-AiTrupos  [Ai-],  ov,fat  on  the  surface,  Alex.  Tlovrjp.  7. 

dxpo-Aoytu,  to  gather  at  top,  ardxvas  Anth.  P.  9.  89. 

dxpoAodiia.  4,  a  mountain  ridge,  hilly  country,  Polyb.  2.  27, 5,Strab.699. 

d»cpoAo<t>irr)S  [r],  ov,  d,  a  mountaineer,  Anth.  P.  6.  221. 

dicp6-Ao<t>os,  ov,  high-crested,  peaked,  itirpai  Opp.  ,C.  I.  418,  Anth. 
P.  12.  185  : — as  Subst.  a  mountain  crest,  Plut.  Poplic.  22. 

dxpo-Atirtu  iuivqv,  to  play  with  the  ends  of  the  belt,  as  if  untying  it, 
Anth.  P.  5.  253. 

dxpd-poAAos,  ov,  having  short  wool,  dub.  in  Strabo  196,  where  Coraes 
proposes  u-axpopaWos. 

dxpo-pavrp,  is,  on  the  verge  of  nmdness,  somewhat  mad  (cf.  dxpdxoAos, 
ixpo6wpa{),  06  <pptvi)pns  dxp.  re  Hdt.  5.  42. 

dicpo-p.«flOo-os.  ov,  =  dxpoOwpa{,  Schol.  Ar.  Ach.  1132,  Vesp.  II90. 

dxpo-poAiP&ot,  ov,  leaded  at  the  edge,  Xivov  Anth.  P.  6.  5. 

dxp-op4>dAu>v,  to,  the  middle  of  the  navel,  Poll.  2.  169. 

dxpov,  ov,  rd,  (neut.  of  dxpos)  like  dxpa,  the  highest  or  furthest 
point  :  1.  a  mountain-top,  peak,  summit,  Tdpyapov,  dxpov  ''lSrjs  II. 

14.  292  ;  dxpov  InrtpffaXinv  Od.  II.  597  ;  Td  dxpa  the  heights,  Hdt.  6. 
IOO,  Plat.,  etc.  2.  a  headland,  foreland,   cape,   Xovviov  dxpov 

'Athjvuiv  Od.  3.  278.  3.  an  end,  extremity,  TcL  a.  Tfjr  Sa\daans 

Plat.  Phaedo  109  D  ;  dxpa  yupwv  the  hands,  Luc.  Imag.  6  ;  i(  dxpaiv 
at  the  end,  Ar.  Fr.  94 ;  l(  dxpov  Com.  Anon,  in  Mein.  4.  p.  653  ;  cir 
dxpou  Plat.  Soph.  220  D  : — a  border,  frontier,  Polyb.  I.  42,  2.  II. 

metaph.  the  highest  pitch,  the  height,  vavbo(ias  axpov  Pind.  N.  I. 
14;  els  dxpov  ixioBau  to  the  highest  pitch,  Simon.  58;  tls  dxpov  doiis 
exceedingly,  Theocr.  14.  61  ;  tir  dxpov  d<pixia9ai,  iKietv  Plat.  Polit. 
268  E,  Tim.  20  A ;  irpos  dxpa;  yeviaBai  Id.  Phaedr.  247  B :  dxpa,  to, 
the  heights,  highest  point,  ovroi  -naff  di/«i  rSnr  dxpaiv  dviv  n6vov  Soph. 
Fr.  463  ;  to  dxpa  Tofs  dxpois  diro&Jdi'ai  the  highest  place  to  the  highest 
men,  Plat.  Rep.  478  E  ;  dxpa  <pipeo9ai  to  win  the  prize,  Theocr.  12. 
31.  2.  of  persons,  'Ap-ytos  dxpa  TleXaayoi  the  oldest  rulers  of 

Argos,  Theocr.  15.  142  ;  v.  Valck.  Adon.  p.  414.  III.  bpv6t 

dxpa,  v.  sub  dxpoopua.  IV.  in  the  Logic  of  Arist.  to  dxpa  are 

the  major  and  minor  terms  of  a  syllogism,  as  opp.  to  the  fiiaov  or  middle, 
cf.  fiiaos  III.  4. 

dxpovtryus ,  (vvaaat)  Adv.  touching  at  the  edge,  Galen. 

dxpd-vvKTOs,  ov,  —  dxpo-v v\os ,  Procl.  etc. ;  inManetho5.  1 77, -vuktios. 

dxpd-wf,  vvxtos,  ij,  =  dxpowx'a,  night-fall,  A.  B.  372,  Suid. 

dxp-ovtixi  [i],  Adv.  with  the  tip  of  the  nail,  for  dxpa*t;xi,  Anth.  P.  I  a. 


54 


uKpovvyiu 

but  cf.   avTovvxi). 


126  (Cod.  Pal.  uxpovvx'),   from    an  Adj.   -!fx>)s  '> 
Cf.  dxp-ovvxos. 

dxpoviixia,  77,  =  dxpovv(,  Suid.,  Tzetz.  Hes.  Op.  565. 

QKpo-vOxos,  ov,  at  night-fall,  at  even,  Arist.  Meteor.  2.  8,  28.  Theophr. 
{Sign.  Pluv.  1.  2,  Theocr.  31.  3,  Nic.  Th.  761: — neut.  as  Adv.,  Arist. 
Probi.  26.  18. 

dxp-ovuxos,  ov,  =  dxpwvvxos,  Anth.  P.  6.  103,  Q^  Sm.  8.  157. 

aKpo-TTuY"f|S,  is,  fastened  or  nailed  at  the  end,  Noun.  Io.  4.  23. 

dxpo-iraOos,  oc,  f.  1.  for  dtfpdirAoos,  q.  v. 

aKpoiraoros,  ov,  (ndaaw)  sprinkled  on  the  surface  :  slightly  salted, 
Sopat.  ap.  Ath.  119  A,  Xenocr.  Aquat.  5. 

OKpo-irdxT|S,  is,  thick  at  the  end,  Moer.  346. 

aKpo-7r«v9T|s,  €5,  exceeding  sad,  Aesch.  Pers.  135  (lyr.)  :  but  Paley 
dPponevSeis,  mourning  effeminately,  from  the  Schol.,  cf.  dQpoyoos. 

aKpo-irrjAos,  ov,  muddy  on  the  surface,  Polyb.  3.  55,  2. 

dxpoirts,  disabled,  ykarnoa  Hipp.  1259  H,  1221  G: — but  the  readings 
are  doubtful,  see  Littru  4.  p.  410. 

dxpo-irXoos,  ov,  contr.  -irXovs,  ovv,  swimming  at  the  top,  skimming 
the  surface,  Hipp.  451.  38  (v.  Galen.  Gloss,  p.  420),  Aretae.,  Plut. : — 
restored  for  dxponaOos  in  Hipp.  95.  263: — superficial.  Id.  Epist.  1286. 

aKpoiroSijTi  or  -it(  [ti].  Adv.  (iroire)  on  tiptoe,  stealthily,  Luc.  Prom. 

I,  etc. 

dxpo-iroXcvu,  to  traverse  the  top,  Mauctho  4.  79. 

dicpo-TroXis,  poet.  dicpo-irroXis,  fan,  77,  the  upper  or  higher  city,  hence 
the  citadel,  castle,  Lat.  arx,  is  dxponokiv  Od.  8.  494  (in  II.  only  divisim, 
axpn  nokis,  v.  dxpos  I),  Pind.  O.  7.  89,  Hdt.  I.  84,  etc. ;  ravS1  is  dxpu- 
nrokiv  Aesch.  Theb.  240,  cf.  Eur.  Or.  1094;  as  the  seat  of  a  tyranny  (in 
arce  tyrannus,  Juven.),  Philo  I.  401,  417.  2.  in  Att.  writers  the 

Acropolis  of  Athens,  Andoc.  10.  31  (cf.  Hdt.  1.  60.,  8.  51)  ;  which 
served  as  the  treasury,  Thuc.  2.  13  ;  as  a  record  office,  C.  I.  84,  85,  87, 
al. ;  y(ypdip$ai  iv  T77  dyfp07rdA.fi,  avtv(x^lval  €('s  dxponokiv  to  be 
entered  as  a  debtor  to  the  state,  Deni.  1337.  24.,  1327.  25  ;  (in  this 
sense  the  Art.  is  often  omitted).  II.  metaph.  of  men,  ajcpo-noXis 

Kal  nvpyos  iuv  orjficv  Theogn.  233  ;  d/cp.  'Ekkdvcuv,  of  Corinth,  Simon. 
137:  also  the  most  important  part,  chief  stronghold,  ttjs  ipvxys,  rod 
aaiparos  Plat.  Rep.  560  B,  Arist.  P.  A.  3.  7,  II,  cf.  Plat.  Tim.  70  A. 

aKpoirdXos,  ov,  (nokiai)  high-ranging,  lofty,  iv  dxponokoiaiv  opeaoiv 

II.  5.  523,  Od.  19.  205. 

dtcpo-irdpos,  ov,  boring  through,  piercing  with  the  point,  o(Stkoi  Od.  3. 
463.  2.  proparox.,  dxponopos,  ov,  pass,  with  an  opening  at  the  end, 

o~vpiy(  Nonn.  D.  2.  2.  II.  (irop«tio/uai)  going  on  high,  lb.  46.  136. 

aKpo-TrotrOia,  Ion.  -ill,  i$,  theforeskin,  Lat. praeputium, Hipp.  Aph.  1257, 
Arist.  H.  A.  1.  13,  3: — aKpoirocriHov,  to,  Poll.  2.  171.     (Cf.  dxpo&vOTia.) 

dKpo-TTOT-rjs,  17,  a  hard  drinker,  Nonn.  D.  14.  108. 

dicpoirous,  6,  the  extremity  of  the  leg,  i.e.  the  foot,  an  anomalous  word 
for  dxpos  novs  in  Hipp.  Fract.  285  ;  v.  Lob.  Phryn.  603,  cf.  dxpox*ip. 

dicp6-Trp<{>pov,  to,  the  end  of  a  ship's  prow,  Strabo  99,  101. 

aKpo-irrtpov,  to,  the  tip  of  the  wing,  Anth.  P.  6.  229;  dxponrtpa 
ipcuTwv,  the  men  in  the  wings  of  a  company,  Opp.  C.  4.  127. 

aKpo-irroXis,  ft,  poet,  for  d.Kp6no\is. 

uKpoppifos,  ov,  (p"i(a)  not  striking  deep  root,  Basil. 

aKpop-piviov,  to,  (fits)  the  tip  of  the  nose,  Poll.  2.  80. 

dxpop-pviuov,  to,  the  fore-end  of  the  pole,  Poll.  I.  146. 

aKpos,  a,  ov,  (on  the  Root,  v.  dxrj  i)  at  the  furthest  point  or  end,  and 
so  either  highest,  topmost,  Lat.  sum?jius,  or,  outermost,  Lat.  extre- 
mus :  1.  highest,  topmost,  dxpordTn  xopvipTJ  II.  1 .  499,  al. :    iv 

dnprf  ndkti  =  iv  dxponokei,  II.  6.  88;  «£  dxprjs  nukios  lb.  257;  dxpcu 
'Okvu.n<p  13.  523;  Tapydpto  dxpcv  14.  352  ;  kdipovres  .  .  p.ikav  vowp 
dtcpov  at  its  surface,  16.  162  ;  dxpijv  pivov  the  surface  of  the  skin,  Od. 
22.  278,  cf.  infr.  V ;  in  dxpcuv  opttov  on  the  mountain  tops,  Soph.  O.  T. 
1 106;  cf.  airorofiov ;  Sup.,  d/epoTaTois  op6<poiai  Orac.  ap.  Hdt.  7. 
140.  2.  outermost,  xar'  dicpas  omkdbos  on  the  edge  of .  .  ,  Soph. 

Tr.  678  ;  mliov  in  ditpov  Id.  Ant.  1 197  ;  esp.  of  the  extremities  of  the 
body,  dxprj  x*</>.  dxpoi  nooes,  dxpos  Sipos  the  end  of  the  hand,  ends  of 
the  feet,  tip  of  the  shoulder,  U.  5.  336.,  16.  640,  etc. ;  aKpos  nous,  x*tp 
the  foot,  hand  itself,  Hdt.  1.  119  and  (prob.)  Thuc.  2.  49,  cf.  dxpvxeip ; 
ykwaaav  dxpav  Soph.  Aj.  238  ;  dxpas  TTJy  xvu.tjs  by  the  ends  of  the 
foliage,  Cratin.  Incert.  138  : — in  dxpwv  [Saxrvkcuv]  on  tiptoe,  Soph.  Aj. 
1 230,  ubi  v.  Schol. ;  so,  comically,  in  dxpwv  nvyioiaiv  on  tip-tail,  Ar.  Ach. 
638,  cf.  Plat.  Tim.  76  E ;  dxpoTarots  x(&f(Xlv  Epigr-  Gr.  547.  8  : — ova 
dn  dxpas  (pptvus  not  from  the  outside  of  the  heart,  i.  e.  from  the  inmost 
heart,  Aesch.  Ag.  805,  cf.  Eur.  Hec.  242  ;  dxpos  pivekos  the  in?nost 
marrow,  Id.  Hipp.  255  ;  dxpoiai  kaiipovs  xpaaniSoismX'h  the  mere  edges 
of  the  sail,  i.  e.  under  close-reefed  sails,  so  as  to  escape  the  fury  of  the 
wind,  Id.  Med.  524  (where  the  Schol.  interprets  with  sails  full  set,  but 
v.  Ar.  Ran.  1000,  et  ibi  Schol.).  II.  of  Time,  dxpos  denotes 

completeness,  dxpa  avv  ionipa  when  eve  was  f idly  come,  Pind.  P.  II.  18; 
dxpov  Qipos  m/rf-summer,  Hipp.  Aph.  1 247  ;  dxpas  vvktos  at  dead  of 
night,  Soph.  Aj.  285  ;  cf.  dxpionepos :  though  in  some  later  compds. 
dxpos  signifies  that  the  time  is  only  just  come,  cf.  dxpd-vvxos,  -tpavijs, 
dxpoipia.  III.  of  Degree,  the  highest  in  its  kind,  prime,  exceed- 

ing good,  consummate,  excellent,  Lat.  capitalis,  1.  of  persons,  Hdt. 

5.  112.,  6.  122,  Aesch.  Ag.  628;  9ia<pdTwv  yvwucov  dxpos  lb.  1130; 
fi&VTis  Soph.  El.  1499;  01  ndvTn  dxpoi,  01  dxporarot  Plat.  Theaet.  148  C; 
tois  dxpots  rd  dxpa  d7ro5t5t>i/ai  Id.  Rep.  478  E :  then  of  any  extremes 
(opp.  to  fiiaos),  as  of  classes  in  a  state,  Arist.  Pol.  4.  12,  4:  of  moral 
conditions,  Id.  Eth.  N.  2.  7,  8,  cf.  lb.  8.  I  and  dxpov  111: — often  with 
an  ace.  modi  added,  ipvxhv  °vK  dxpos  not  strong  of  mind,  Hdt.  5.  1 24; 
dxpoi  rd  nokeuia  7.  in  ;  dxpos  bpyrjv  quick  to  anger,  passionate,  I.  73; 
Evpunn  dptrty  dxprj  7.  5  :  so  c.  gen.  modi,  01  dxpoi  tj/s  noirjaetus  Plat. 


—  aKpwfxia. 

Theaet.  1 52  E  ;  rrj;  ipikoaoipias  Clem.  Al.,  etc. ;  also,  dxpos  (is  ipikoao- 
<piav  Plat.  Rep.  499  C  ;  irtpi  onkopaxiav  Id.  Legg.  833  E  : — so  also  in 
Sup.,  highest,  most  excellent.  Id.  Theaet.  148  C,  al.  2.  of  things, 

highest,  extreme,  av/tipopa  Alex,  tapavr.  4  (as  amended) ;  vqortia  Diphil. 
\np.v.  1  :— Sup.,  Plat.  Phil.  4?  A.  IV.  as  Subst.,  v.  sub  dxpa, 

dxpov.  V.  neut.  as  Adv.  on  the  top  or  surface,  just,  dxpov  in 

dv$(pixav  eiov  II.  20.  227  ;  dxpov  inl  ^-v/iiVo?  lb.  229  ;  so,  dxpa  8  in 
auras  PaejiiSos  Anth.  P.  7.  428,  3.  b.  exceedingly,  oib'  dxpa 

Ti/X7jtaaa  Theocr.  27.  43;  dxpov  ipairaiv  iIootos,  dxpa  /jidxas  Anth.  P. 
7.  448 ;  dxpov  ixaiv  aoipins  Epigr.  Gr.  442 ;  dxpa  cpipova'  dpfrrjs  lb.  224; 
cf.  dxpov  11.  2.   also  in  the  reg.  Adv.,  dxpws  avfordkBai  to  be 

turned  up  at  the  point,   Hipp.  Mochl.  855.  b.   utterly,  completely, 

Plat.  Rep.  543  A,  Ath.  248  F ;  ^oi>oi  dxpas  Euphro  'AS.  1.  g. 

dKpo<r;iirT|s,  «!,  (o-fjnofiai)  rotten  at  the  end,  Hipp.  382.  41. 

dKpo-o-iST|pos,  ov,  pointed  or  shod  with  iron,  Anth.  P.  6.  OK. 

dxpo-ompia,  7),  a  hill-copse.  Tab.  Heracl.  in  C.  I.  5774.  65,  71 ;  cf.  axipes. 

dxpo-o-odjios,  ov,  high  in  wisdom,  Pind.  O.  11.  19,  Dicn.  H.  l'c 
Demosth.  51. 

d-Kpoo-cos,  ov,  without  tassels,  Athanas.  2.  116,  Geop.  20.  22. 

aKpo-o-T-fjOiov,  to,  the  chest,  Arist.  Physiogn.  6,  10. 

aKpo-o-Ttxts,  ibos,  i),  an  acrostic,  i.e.  a  thcrt  poem  in  which  the  fin: 

letters  of  the  verses  form  a  word,  Dion.  H.  4.  62,  Cic.  Divin.  2.  54: 

also,  -OTixiov,  to,  Or.  Sib.  8.  249.,  11.  17,  23. 

dpcpo-oToXiov,  t<5,  the  gunwale  of  a  ship,  Plut.  Demetr.  43,  Callix.  ap. 
Ath.  203  F.  II.  also  =  dipkacTov,  Diod.  18.  75,  Paus.  9.  16,  7. 

dicpo-orouiov,  tu,  the  edge  of  the  lips,  Dion.  H.  de  Comp.  p.  164.  ii 

=  dxpo<f>ioiov,  Eust.  II53.  38. 

aicpo-o-d>aLpia,  rd,  the  rounded  tips  of  the  fingers,  Ermerins  Anec! 
Med.  p.  15. 

dKpoo-<t>aX-f|S,  is,  (oipdkkai)  apt  to  trip,  unsteady,  Plut.  2.  713  B;  Lap 
npos  byUiav  precarious  in  health,  Plat.  Rep.  404  B: — so  in  Adv.,  dxpu- 
oipakws  (X(iV  p'ut-  2-  682  D.  II.  act.  apt  to  throw  down,  slip- 

pery, dangerous,  Polyb.  9.  19,  7. 

dxpo-o-ifivpa,  Td,  a  sort  of  woman's  shoes,  Hesvch. ;  aKpocrdn'pui  ap, 
Poll.  7.  94. 

aKpo-o-xtS-qs,  it,  cloven  at  the  end,  Theophr.  H.  P.  3.  11,  1. 

dKpo-TcXtvTiov,  tu,  the  fag-end  of  anything,  esp.  of  a  verse  or  poem, 
Thuc.  2.  1 7,  Phryn.  A.  B.  369:  hence  the  burden,  chorus,  cf.  Dio  C.  63.  10 

dicpo-T«VT|s,  is,  stretching  high,  Nonn.  D.  7.  310. 

dKpoTTjs,  i?to?,  j),  (dxpos)  an  extremity,  Hipp.  Vet.  Med.  17,  Arist.  Plan; 
2.  9,  12.  II.  an  extreme  (in  point  of  height),  opp.  to  ftfoorijs,  Id. 

Eth.  N.  2.  6,  17: — metaph.  excellence,  Dion.  H.  de  Demosth.  2,  etc. 

d-Kpo-rnTOS,  ov,  not  beaten  down,  Heliod.  9.  8.  II.  not  struck 

together  or  in  unison,  pikn  ndpavka  xdxpoTijra  xvp&aka  Com.  Anon,  ii: 
Meiueke  4.  p.  606. 

dKpoTop.«co,  to  lop  off,  Xen.  Oec.  1 8,  2. 

aKpoTO(xos,  ov,  (rifivoj)  cut  off  sharp,  abrupt,  of  a  precipice,  Polyb.  9. 
27,  4,  Philo  I.  82  ;  ^  dxp.  (sc.  nirpa),  Lxx  (Ps.  113.  8,  cf.  Job  28.  t , 
Deut.  8.  13) :  of  a  stone,  sharp,  Theodot.  Exod.  4.  25. 

dKpo-TOvos,  ov,  strained  to  the  utmost,  muscular,  Polemo  ap.  Ath.  55  2  D. 

u-KpoTOS,  ov,  unapplauded,  Hesych. 

dicp-ovXos,  ov,  curled  at  the  end,  Arist.  Physiogn.  6,  42. 

dxp-oupavia,  t),  heaven's  citadel,  Luc.  Lexiph.  15. 

dxpovxiw,  (dxpov,  ex1")  tu  haunt  the  heights,  Soph.  Fr.  290. 

aKpo-d>dT)S,  is,  —  dxpo<pavTjs,  Nonn.  D.  4.  130. 

dKpo-d>uXT)pidw,  to  shine  or  to  be  white  at  top,  only  in  Ep.  part,  dxpoipa  - 
krjptocovTa  Nonn.  D.  2.  460. 

dicpo-<J)uvT|s,  is,  juit  dawning  or  bright-shining,  often  in  Nonn. 

d.Kpo-d>vT]s.  is,  grown  at  the  tip  or  end  of  a  branch,  Theophr.  H.  P.  9. 
5,  I.  II.  high-bred,  Synes.  180  B  ;  dxp.  vovs  Id.  60  D. 

dKpo-d>\>Xa£,  &xos,  o,  governor  cf  a  citadel,  Polyb.  5.  50,  10. 

aKpo-<pvXXos,  ov,  with  leaves  at  top,  Theophr.  H.  P.  I.  14,  2. 

aKpod)tio-tov,  to,  (<pvaa)  the  snout  or  pipe  of  a  pair  of  bellows,  Soji'j 
Fr.  824,  Thuc.  4. 100;  prj^iara  .  .  inibtixvvvai  ndi'T  an'  dxpocpvaiav  fresh 
from  the  bellows  (or,  as  we  say,  from  the  anvil),  Ar.  p'r.  561.  II. 

a  comet's  tail,  Dio  C.  78.  30. 

dicpo-xdXi£,  o,  r),  =  dxpo6u>pa£,  Ap.  Rh.  4.  432. 

dicpo-xuvT|s,  it,  yawning  at  top,  oipfjia  Anth.  P.  6.  57. 

oKpo-x«ip,  Xf'P0S<  *!'  'ater  I°rm  f°r  "*Pa  Xf'P<  i-e'  the  hand,  whereas  x*'.f 
includes  the  arm,  Galen. ;  in  Ptol.  also  dicpoxeipov,  to.     Cf.  dxponovs. 

dKpo-xupi£b>,  to  seize  with  the  hands,  Aristaen.  I.  4.  II.  mor? 

usual  in  Med.  to  struggle  at  arm's  length,  of  a  kind  of  wrestling,  in  which 
they  grasped  one  another's  hands,  without  clasping  the  body  (the  latter 
being  called  avu-nkoxi]) ,  dxp.  rtvt  ot  npos  riva,  Plat.  Ale.  1. 107E,  Posido::. 
ap.  Ath.  1 54  B  ;  cf.  Ruhnk.  Tim. :  to  spar,  Arist.  Eth.  N.  3.  1 ,  1 7. 

dxpoxeipio-is,  eois,  7),  =  sq.,  Hipp.  374.  3 ;  and  to  be  restored  in  364.  1  j 
(for  dxpoxeipiQ,  372.  38  (for  -x«ipifi). 

dKpoxcipicrp.os,  o,  wrestling  with  the  hands,  Luc.  Lexiph.  5,  Galen. 

aKpox*ipio-TT|S,  ov,  o,  a  handwrestler,  Paus.  6.  4,  1. 

dicpo-xXidpos  [t],  ov,just  warm,  lukewarm,  Hipp.  Acut.  394. 

aKpoxoXccu,  -xoXia,  -xoXos,  v.  sub  dxpax~. 

dtcpoxopSuv,  ovos,  77,  (x°pbr])  a  wart  with  a  thin  neck,  Hipp.  Aph.  1 2  4S . 
Plut.  Fab.  1,  Galen.,  etc. ;  distinguished  from  p.vppLT]xia,  to,  Paul.  Aeg.  4. 
|k  : — dicpoxopoovu&ns,  es,  troubled  with  warts,  Dio  C.  Fr.  16. 

dicpo-d/iXos,  ov,  bare  or  bald  at  top,  Hipp.  1133  E. 

dtcpo-U/toXos,  ov,  ip tokos  at  the  end,  Schol.  Ar.  Eq.  960. 

d-KpuiTTOS,  ov,  unhidden.  Eur.  Andr.  836.     Adv.  -tojs,  A.  B.  8. 

d-KpwTaXXos,  ov,  free  from  ice,  1)  X^PV*  Hdt.  2.  22. 

aKp-uXtviov.  to.  the  point  of  the  elbow : — v.  sub  d«poA.iVioi'. 

aKp-a;p.La.  77.  the  point  of  the  shoulder,  acromion  process,  Hipp.  Art.  791 : 


in  a  horse,  the  withers,  Xen.  Eq.  I,  II,  cf.  Arist.  H.  A.  2.  I.  19: — 
so  dicp-wpAov,  to,  Hipp.  Art.  780,  Arist.  H.  A.  8.  =,,  4.  Cf.  Greenhill 
Theophil.  176.  13. 

aKpwv.  ovos,  o,  and  dicpwvdpiov,  to,  =  uxpoxw\iov,  Hippiatr.  p.  32,  etc.; 
like  aero  in  late  Latin. 

dtcpwvta,  ij,  in  Aesch.  £um.  188  is  taken  by  H.  Steph.  as  =  dxpajrvpiaa- 
pujs,  mutilation,  which  Herm.  (Opusc.  6.  2.  p.  41)  calls  impossible:  the 
Schol.  interprets  xaxov  dxpwvia  by  xaxwv  dOpotais,  the  height  of  woe, 
and  in  A.  B.  372  the  word  is  expl.  by  dOpoiapiaTa,  dxporns,  dxptrj : — but 
the  passage  is  prob.  corrupt,  v.  sub  \\ovvis. 

dKp<ovt>xta,.  1),  (oVvf)  the  tip  of  the  nail :  hence,  the  ridge  or  top  of  a 
mountain,  —  dxpwpcia,  Xen.  An.  3.  4,  37,  Hell.  4.  6,  7. 

dtcpuvvxos,  ov,  (ovv£)  with  nails,  claws,  hoofs,  etc.,  \(pos  dxpwvvxa, 
the  tips  of  the  ringers  or  toes,  Anth.  P.  12.82;  ixvos  dicp.  the  traces  of 
one  walking  on  his  toes,  Plut.  2.  31 7  E,  cf.  325  B: — dicpuvvf,  Suid. 

dxpupcia,  1),  (dpos)  a  mountain-ridge,  Xen.  Hell.  7.  2,  IO,  Theocr.  25. 
31,  etc. 

dicpupia,  fi,  {wpa)  daybreak,  Theophr.  Sign.  Pluv.  3.  5. 

dKpo>i~T]pid£u),  to  cut  off  the  dxpwrqpia,  of  ships,  Tas  irpapas  ijxpajTn- 
piaaav  cut  the  beaks  off"  the  prows.  Hdt.  3.  59  : — so  in  Med.,  Tas  Tpirjptis 
dxpaxrnptaadutvoi  Xen.  Hell.  6.  2,  36  ;  pf.  pass,  in  med.  sense,  i)xpvrTj- 
ptaaptivoi  rds  narpioas  having  foully  mutilated  their  countries,  Dem.  324. 
22.  2.  of  persons,  to  cut  off  the  hands  and  feet,  mutilate,  Polyb. 

5.  54,  IO,  etc. ;  fXTjbiv  dxpomjpiaa-ns  iv$a£t,  Inscr.  on  a  statue,  C.  I. 
6855.  II.  intr.  to  form  a  promontory,  to  jut  out  like  one,  Polyb.  4. 

43,  2,  Strabo  28. 

dxpu-nqpiao-p-a,  to,  mutilation,  Hesych.  v.  rouia.  Schol.  Ap.  Rh.  4.  478. 

aKptimrjpiao'p.ds,  d,  mutilation,  Diosc.  7.  1,  Poll.,  etc. 

dKpu/TTjpiov,  to,  (dxpos)  any  topmost  or  prominent  part,  dxp.  tov  ovpeos 
a  inountain-^ai,  Hdt.  7.  2 1 7,  cf.  Pind.  O.  9.  12.  2.  a  cape,  pro- 

montory, Hdt.  4.  43,  Pind.  O.  9.  12,  Thuc.  I.  30.  II.  the  end  or 

extremity  of  anything,  dxp.  vnos  a  ship's  beak,  Lat.  rostrum,  Hdt.  8. 121 ; 
dxparrfipia  wpvpLvns  h.  Horn.  33.  10.  2.  in  pi.  the  extremities  of  the 

body,  hands  and  feet,  fingers  and  toes,  Hipp.  Aph.  1258,  Acut.  390,  Thuc. 
2.  _fij ;  dxp.  dnoTftijOyafaffat  Lys.  105.  29;  Td  dxp.  rrjsNixns  her  wings, 
Dem.  738.  14,  cf.  C.  I.  150.  22.,  151.  10.  3.  in  pi.  the  angles  of  a 

pediment,  i.  e.  the  top  and  ends  of  base,  on  which  stood  statues,  Plat. 
C'riti.  116  D,  Plut.  Caes.  63,  etc. 

dKpurnipiu&r)S,  fs,  like  an  dxparrriptov,  Schol.  Aesch.  Pr.  726. 

dKpumfS,  ov,  v,  (dxpos)  a  chief,  v.  sub  dypirns. 

djcra,  rd,  the  Latin  acta,  C.  I.  2927,  al. 

aKT&i<i>,  fut.  aai,  {dxrfi  A)  to  banquet  on  the  shore,  to  enjoy  oneself,  Lat. 
in  actis  esse,  convivari,  Plut.  2.  668  B,  in  the  proverb.,  osipupov  dxrdotu- 
ptv. — -v.  Lob.  Aglaoph.  p.  102 1,  Hesych.  s.  v.  d*Tij.  II.—  dx- 

raivat,  E.  M. 

dxTata,  at, i),afine Persian  state  robe, Democr.ap.Ath. 525 D.  II.  a 

marble  ball,  Clearch.  ap.  Ath.  648  F ;  cf.  d*TiTijs.  III.  v.  sub  dxria. 

dicraivw,  to  lift  up,  raise,  dxraivuv  ardaiv  to  raise  myself  so  as  to 
stand,  to  get  011  my  legs,  stand  upright,  Aesch.  Eum.  36  (fidaiv  is  an 
emendation  written  over  ordo'ii'  in  the  Ms.)  : — so  also  in  the  form  ouc- 
Taivoii),  dxraivSjocu  Aiucr.  137;  orav  dxratvuxrr)  iavri  Plat.  Legg. 
672  C. — Both  forms  are  recognised  by  the  Gramm..  dxratvwaat  .  .to 
inkwaai  xal  i£upai  xal  pArtoipiaai'  (Plat.  Com.  4»a.  9),  . .  AhrxdAos  ov- 
Mtr  dlCTaiVfc)  iprprl  &apvTvvats,  oiov  ovxir  vpBovv  ovvapiai  iuavrov 
Phryn.  in  A.  B.  23.  7,  cf.  373.  1 8,  E.  M.  54.  34,  etc.  V.  Ruhuk.  Tim. 
;-.  v.,  cf  dxrd^ai  II,  diraKTaiVai,  inrtptXTaii'opai. 

uKTaios,  o,  of,  (drr^)  on  the  shore  or  coast,  as  epith.  of  Ionian  cities, 
Thuc.  4.  52  :  so,  'Axraia  (sc.  717),  ij,  an  old  name  of  Attica,  «=  dxr^  (A), 
I.  2,  Call.  Fr.  348,  cf.  Hicks  Inscrr.  no.  47  (o).  2.  dwelling  on  the 

coast,  belonging  thereto,  9toi  Orph.  Arg.  342  ;  fiarpaxot  Babr.  25.  6. 

dxTta,  contr.  aK-rij.  i),  the  elder-tree,  sambucus  nigra,  Hipp.  564.  I., 
609.  31,  Theophr.  H.  P.  1.  5,  4,  etc.  The  uncontr.  form  appears  in  Luc. 
Tragop.  74,  where  the  Mss.  give  the  faulty  form  Axraia.  Cf.  A.  B.  23, 
Lob.  Paral.  337. 

o-kt«uvo»,  ok,  without  property,  poor,  rivos  in  a  thing,  Anth.  P.  7.  353. 

d-KT«vurro»,  ov,  uncombed,  unkempt.  Soph.  O.  C.  1 26 1. 

dxTtov,  verb.  Adj.  of  d-vai,  one  must  lead.  Plat.  Rep.  467  E,  etc.;  upi)- 
vnv  dxriov  one  must  keep  peace,  Andoc.  28.  28,  Dem.  91.  11.  II. 

one  must  go  or  march,  Xen.  Hell.  6.  4,  5. 

d-KT«p«io-ro»,  ov,  unhallowed  by  funeral  rites,  Anth.  P.  7.  564. 

d-KT<pT|i,  is,  -  foreg..  Or.  Sib.  3.  481. 

d-KTipurros,  ov,  m  dxripiiaTos,  Soph.  Ant.  1 07 1  ;  cf.  woo-tos. 

dicrfj  (A),  4»  a  headland,  foreland,  promontory,  dxrrj  wpov\ovaa  Od. 
24.  82  ;  dxrai  *0o0Af/T<s  5.  405.,  IO.  89;  opp.  to  Xiurjw  II.  12.  284; 
otten  with  epithets  denoting  a  high  rugged  coast,  rprnxfta,  0^7/Ar/  Od.  5. 
4-'.;.  II.  2.  395;  rpaxia  Hdt.  7.  33;  aruttkos  Aesch.  Pers.  303;  dpvpi- 
xkvaros  Soph.  Tr.  752  ;  orivtp  tipipovm  J'  dvri*\i)yfs  dxrai  Id.  Ant. 
591  s— even  of  the  rugged  banks  or  strand  of  rivers,  dxrai  'EKwpov, 
VtiXov  Pind.  N.  9.  96,  I.  2.  62  ;  zXipUvjvs  Aesch.  Ag.  697  ;  ' kxipovros 
Soph.  Ant.  813. — Rare  in  Att.  Prose,  as  Xen.  An.  6.  2,  I.  Lycurg.  149 
•A-  2.    generally,  a    tract  of  land  running  out    into  the 

tea,  eoast-Iand,  dxrai  oupaaiat  of  the  North  and  South  coasts  of 
Asia  Minor,- Hdt.  4.  38;  of  Africa,  conceived  as  jutting  out  from  Asia, 
4.  41,  cf.  177  ;  of  Cape  Sepias  to  the  S.  of  Thessaly,  7.  183,  al. ;  of  Mt. 
Athos,  Thuc.  4.  109  ;  of  Italy,  Arist.  Pol.  7.  10,  3  ;  an  old  name  of 
Attica,  like  'Axraia,  Soph.  Fr.  19,  cf.  Suid.  s.  v.  II.  generally, 

any  edge  or  strand,  like  the  sea-coast,  Lat.  ora,  as  x<v/"ito*  djrrij  of  a 
sepulchral  mound,  Aesch.  Cho.  722,  cf.  Ag.  493  ;  \\apd  d.,  of  a  moun- 
tain. Soph.  Ant.  1 133  :  Miiuos  i.  of  an  altar,  Id.  O.  T.  183.  (Com- 
monjy  derived  from  dym/it,  as  frnfpiv  from  prryvvut,  the  land  against 


which  the  waves  break :  but  Curt,  remarks  that  the  Root  of  ayvvut  is 
fAr.  whereas  there  is  no  trace  of  the  f  in  d«r^.) 

dKTT|  (B),  -h,  an  old  poet,  word  for  corn  or  meal,  ArjprjTepos  dxrh  II. 
13.  322.,  21.  76,  cf.  Eur.  Hipp.  138,  Epin.  Kvrja.  9  ;  uv\r)<paTov  d\<piTov 
d.  Od.  2.  355,  cf.  14.  429,  II.  11.  630;— in  which  places  the  sense  of 
fine  meal  or  flour  seems  to  suit,  and  so  the  Scholl.  take  it,  deriving  the 
word  from  dyvvfu.  But,  as  in  d/tTi}  (A),  here  also,  there  is  no  trace 
of  the  f ;  and  in  Hes.  AijfiTjTfpos  d.  plainly  means  corn,  either  still 
in  the  fields,  or  not  yet  ground,  Sc.  290,  Op.  32,  464,  595,  803;  so 
that  in  this  word  also  the  deriv.  from  dyvvp*  becomes  dub. 

dicrfj,  contr.  for  dxria,  q.  v. 

aKTT)u.ovcu,  to  be  dxTripiaiv,  live  in  poverty,  Eust.  Opusc.  96. 83.,  220.17. 

aKTnp.oo-vvir|,  t),  poverty.  Poll.  3.  in.,  6.  197,  and  Eccl. 

d-KTt|u.ci>v,  ov,  gen.  ovos,  without  properly,  poor,  xpvaoio  in  gold,  II.  9. 
126 ;  absol.,  dxr.  jrtvia  Theocr.  16.  33  ;  cf.  Plut.  Sol.  14. 

d-KTT|V,  TJVOS,  =  dKTTJpLWV,  E.  M. 

d-KTT|oria,  5),  =  dxTijuoovvij,  Eccl. 

d-KTi)Tos,  ov,  not  worth  getting.  Plat.  Hipp.  Mi.  374  E. 

oKTtniSdv,  Adv.  like  a  ray,  Luc.  Salt.  18. 

dKTtvoffoAra,  to  send  forth  rays,  Philo  I.  638  : — Pass,  to  receive  the  rays 
of  the  sun,  Isid.  Char.  ap.  Ath.  94  A,  Eust.,  etc. 

oKTtvofioXia,  i),  the  shooting  of  rays,  Plut.  2.  781  A:  in  Manetho  1.  322, 
dxrivTjffo\irf. 

dxTtvo-'ypudiia,  j},  a  treatise  on  radiation  (by  Democritus),  Diog.  L.  9. 48. 

dKTtvo«ioT|S,  is,  —  dxrtvwSris,  Philo  2.  559. 

oktivo«.s,  fffffa,  tv,  =  dxrivarros.  Or.  Sib.  8.  191  [with  r,  incorrectly]. 

axrlvoi,  rj,  ov,  (dxrij)  of  elder-wood,  Theophr.  H.  P.  5.  3,  3  :  but  prob. 
dxT«Vos  should  be  restored,  Lob.  Paral.  337. 

dKTivo-diopos.  ov,  bearing  rays : — as  Subst.,  a  radiated  shell-fish,  Lat. 
pecten,  Xenocr.  Aquat.  p.  II. 

dKTivu&ns,  is,  like  rays,  Philostr.  133.     Adv.  -bws,  Galen. 

dicrtviDTos,  J),  iv,  furnished  with  rays,  Lat.  radiatus,  Philo  2.  560. 

dicTiov,  to,  -dxrri  (A),  Ael.  N.  A.  13.  28. 

dx-rvos,  ov,  (dxrq),  of  or  on  the  sea-beach,  epith.  of  Pan  as  god  of  the 
coast,  Theocr.  5. 1 4 ;  of  Apollo,  Ap.  Rh.  1 .  402 :  cf.  dkiirKayxros,  kintvlrns. 

dims  [f],  ivos,  t),  a  ray,  beam  :  used  by  Horn,  only  in  dat.  pi.,  dxriaiv 
Od.  5.  479.,  19. 441 ;  axrivfoo-iv  1 1. 16,  11. 10.547  '•  °*T'S  a'°ne,  Emped. 
225,  Soph.  Tr.  685,  Arist.  Meteor.  3.4,  17,  etc.;  drd  piiaaav  dxriva,  i.e. 
from  the  south.  Soph.  O.  C.  1247  ;  axrtvfs  TtKtvrwoai  sunset,  Eur.  Ion 
1 1 36: — also  of  lightning,  dxrtvfs  aTepoirds  dtroprryvvpuvat  Pind.  P.  4. 
352  ;  w  Atis  dxris,  vataov  Soph.  Tr.  1086  ;  of  the  eyes,  Pind.  Fr. 
88.  2.  metaph.  brightness,  splendour,  glory,  dxrls  dywvwv,  xa- 

kwv  ipyitdruv  Pind.  P.  II.  72,  I.  4.  72  (3.  60)  ;  dxrtvfs  5\fSov  splendid 
fortunes.  Id.  P.  4.  454.  II.  like  Lat.  radius,  the  spoke  of  a  wheel, 

Anth.  P.  9.  418.  Poet,  word,  but  used  by  Plat.  Tim.  78  D,  and  not 
seldom  by  Arist. 

d-KTwrros,  ov,  unbuilt :  uncreate,  Eccl. 

ditTiTr|S  [i],ou,o,  (dxrfi)  a  dweller  on  the  coast,  Anth.  P.  6. 304.  II. 

d*r.  Xi'tfos  stone  from  Attica  (cf.  curri)  (A)  I.  2),  i.  e.  Pentelic  marble, 
Soph.  Fr.  72,  Hyperid.  ap.  Harpocr.  s.  voc.  dxrr). 

d-KTlro*,  ov,  poet,  for  dxriaros,  unfilled,  h.  Horn.  Ven.  123. 

dicTos.  ij,  tiv,  brought,  (dub.  word,  v.  sub  vaxrds). 

d-KTfriros,  ov,  noiseless,  Eust.  964.  60 : — Adv.  d*rt/iri,  Polemo. 

dxTodpios,  i,  the  Lat.  actuarius,  C.  I.  4004. 

aKTwp,  opos,  6,  (dyaj)  a  leader,  Aesch.  Pers.  557,  Eum.  399  ;  as  prop, 
name,  II.,  etc.  II.  a  leash,  =dyuytvs,  Hesychi 

dxTuptu,  from  dirr-upds,  o,  a  guard  of  the  coast,  both  in  Hesych. 

d-KifJt'pvT|Tos.  ov,  without  a  steersman,  Plut.  Caes.  28,  Luc,  etc. 

d-icvf3«vTOS,  ov,  risking  nothing  upon  a  die :  cautious,  prudent,  M. 
Anton.  I.  8. 

d-nvTiTfipiOv  (sc.  tpdppaxov),  to,  a  drug  to  cause  abortion,  Hesych. 

d-Ku4ft)pos.  ov,  (KOfiijoi;)  like  d><a<ppd&Tos,  Lat.  invenustus,  without 
charms,  Cic.  Fam.  7.  32,  2,  Euuap.  10. 

dieOflov  ov,  (xvtu)  unfruitful.  Call.  h.  Apoll.  52  :  also  dxvros. 

d-KvxXios,  ov,  one  who  has  not  gone  the  round  of  studies,  opp.  to  iyxv- 
ttAtot,  Plat.  Com.  Incert.  62. 

d-iciJXio-TO»,  ov,  not  to  be  rolled  about :  metaph.,  xpaoirj  dx.  an  un- 
daunted heart,  Timon  ap.  Ath.  162  V.  II.  of  Protagoras,  oix 
dx.  not  without  volubility  or  versatility.  Id.  ap.  Sext.  Emp.  M.  9.  57. 

dicoXos.  1),  a  kind  of  acorn,  given  to  swine  with  the  /3&\avos,  Od.  10.  242, 
Arist.  H.  A.  8.  6,  4 :  the  fruit  of  the  ilex  (irpiVos),  Amphis  Incert.  6,  cf. 
Theophr.  H.  P.  3.  16,  3.     (Perh.  from  same  Root  as  Skt.  <if  (edere).) 

d-KvpAVTOt  [D],  ov,  not  washed  by  the  waves,  ipapidBois  iir  dxvudvrots  on 
sands  washed  by  no  waves,  i.  e.  oil  the  sands  of  the  stadium,  Eur.  Hipp. 
235,  cf.  229.  II.  waveless,  calm,  viKayos  dx.  Luc.  D.  Marin.  5.  1. 

d-Kvp.aTOS  [0],  ov,  =  foreg.  II,  Poeta  in  A.  B.  6. 

4-KOp.os,  ov,  —  dxvuavros,  Arist.  Probl.  23.  4,  Plut.,  etc.:  metaph.,  dx. 
eioros  Eur.  H.  F.  698. 

dxviuriv  [0],  or,  gen.  ovos,  (xipta)  =  dxvputvros,  Pind.  Fr.  259,  Aesch. 
Ag.  566 :  metaph.  calm,  fiios  Plut.  8  B,  etc.,  v.  Wyttenb.  ad  1. 

axuiuiiv  [v],  ov,  gen.  ovos,  (*v«<u)  without  fruit,  barren,  of  women, 
Eur.  Andr.  158;  of  the  earth,  Moschio  ap.  Stob.  Eel.  1.  242. 

d-icupT|S.  f's,  =  drvxhs  ;  hence  dxvpT|UA  and  dxvppa,  to,  Hesych.,  E.M. 

d-KOpta  \i£tais,  impropriety  of  language,  Hermog. 

d-KCpifVTOt,  ov,  not  ruled,  suffering  no  master,  Eust.  Opusc.  252.  31. 

dieupo-XficrnTos.  ov,  incorrectly  used,  Eust.  569.  6  (ubi  male  dxvpio-). 

dKvpoXfJia,  ij,  =  dxvpokoyia,  Enst.  1770,  tin.,  etc. 

dxvpoXoycu.  to  speak  incorrectly,  Philo  1.  216,  Gramm. 

aKvpoXoyia,  1),  an  improper  phrase,  Dion.  H.  de  Lys.  4. 

<S-K€pos,  ov.  without  authority,  opp.  to  xvptos,  and  so,  I-  of 


56  aicvpou)  —  aXa/X7n?y. 

laws,  sentences,  etc.,  of  no  validity,  unratified  or  obsolete,  t^ijipio- ua 
Andoc.  2.  II  ;  Sixrj  Plat.  Legg.  954  E ;  owflijKoi  Lys.  150.  35  ;  axvpov 
■ttoitiv,  xaraffTrjaai,  Lat.  irritumfacere,  to  set  aside,  like  dxvpovv,  Plat. 
Prot.  356  D,  Isae.,  etc.;  axvpov  yiyvtaOai,  ttvai,  to  become  or  be  0/ no 
force,  to  be  set  aside,  Plat.  Legg.  954  E,  etc. ;  vofiots  dxipots  xP°>pt>"l< 
i.  e.  having  laws,  but  not  enforcing  them,  Thuc.  3.  37.  II.  of 

persons,  having  no  right  or  power,  ax.  voiftv  rtvd  Xen.  Hell.  5.  3,  24 ; 
xa$toTavai  Lys.  115.  42;  tivSs  over  a  thing,  Plat.  Theaet.  169  E  ; 
axvpot  iravrav  .  .  ytVTjOia$(  Dem.  342.  2  ;  c.  inf.,  Plat.  Legg.  929 
E.  2.  so  too  of  things,  dxvporipa  xpiois  a  less  trustworthy  decision, 

Plat.  Theaet.  178  D;  dxvpos  djjL<pop€vs  the  voting  urn  into  which  the 
neutral  votes  are  said  to  have  been  thrown,  Schol.  Ar.  Eq.  1 1 50,  Poll.  8. 
123:  rddxvpa  the  unimportant  parts  of  the  body,  Galen.,  cf.  Arist.  G.  A. 
4.  4,  41.  III.  of  words  and  phrases,  used  in  an  improper  sense, 

Lat.  improprius,  Cic.  Fam.  16.  17,  I :— so  Adv.  -pais,  Eust.  457.  41,  etc. 

dxvpou,  fut.  wow,  to  cancel,  set  aside,  Dion.  H.  2.  72. 

dicvipwois,  ftos,  i),  a  cancelling,  Dion.  H.  8.  21. 

&KupuTf'ov,  verb.  Adj.  one  must  cancel,  Strab.  362,  Clem.  Al.  223. 

dicvpuTOS,  ov,  verb.  Adj.  unconfirmed,  Eur.  Ion  800. 

okvtos,  ov,  (xva>)  =  dxvSos,  Hesych. 

UKxaXC^op,  =  xpafitSaros,  Lacon.  word  in  Hesych. 

dicxos,  0,  =  uiuos,  Hesych.  (Curt,  takes  this  to  be  the  same  as  Lat.  ala 
(i.  e.  axla).  Dim.  axilla :  cf.  d£wv.) 

a-KoSuvurros,  ov,  not  tested,  Ar.  Lys.  485  ;  v.  xwoaiv. 

d.K<i)KT|  [a],  17,  (dmj  1)  a  point,  edge,  Lat.  acies,  oovp&s,  P(\ios,  <ryx€0s 
11.  10.  373.,  13.  251.,  22.  327,  cf.  Od.  19.  453,  Theocr.  22.  195  ;  also 
in  late  Prose,  Luc.  D.  Mort.  27.  4 ;  axis  being  the  usual  Att.  word. 

dicwAio-ros,  ov,  not  divided  into  clauses  (kui\o),  Dion.  H.  de  Comp.  23. 

u-kwXos.  ov,  without  limbs,  mutilated,  Paus.  1.  24,  3.  II.  ill- 

jointed,  and  so  moving  slowly,  Schol.  Od.  12.  89. 

d-Ku>XvTos,  ov,  unhindered,  Luc.  Tim.  18,  C.  I.  2321.  8,  etc.  Adv. 
-tojs,  Plat.  Crat.  415  D  ;  also  dxaiKvTt,  Democr.  in  Fabr.  Bibl.  4.  338. 

d-Kiupao*TOS,  ov,  without  revelry,  Liban. 

d-KwutaS-nTos.  ov,  not  ridiculed: — Adv.  -tojs,  Luc.  V.  H.  I.  2. 

dicuv  [a],  ovtos,  6  (dxrj  1)  a  javelin,  dart,  smaller  and  lighter  than  the 
«7X<",  II.  15.  709,  Od.  14.  531,  al.,  Pind.  P.  9.  37,  Eur.  Phoen.  1402,  etc. 

axon-  [a],  dxovaa,  dxov,  Att.  contr.  for  dixaiv. 

aKuvio-ros,  ov,  (xcovifa)  unpitched,  Diosc.  I.  6. 

d-Kuvos,  ov,  without  a  conical  top,  rri\os  Joseph.  A.  J.  3.  7,  3. 

d-KoiirnTOS,  ov,  not  having  oars :  unequipt,  A.  B.  373,  Hesych. 

d-Kumos,  ov,  without  oars,  Anth.  P.  9.  88. 

uXd(3a  or  dXdfjr],  17,  a  kind  of  ink,  Hesych. 

dX&Papx«",  to  be  dhafiapxqs,  Joseph.  A.  J.  18.  8,  I.,  20.  5,  2. 

dXafJdpxns.  v.  sub  'Apafidpxrjs. 

dXdpapx(a  [fix],  17,  the  office  of  d\a(idpxns,  Joseph.  A.  J.  20.  7,3;  e£ 
dXa/3apx«is  [']>  Anth.  P.  11.  383. 

dXapdornov,  to,  Dim.  of  d\d$aaros,  Eubul.  2T«p.  7. 

dXaj3ao-rCT!|s  (sub.  Xiflos),  ov,  6,  calcareous  alabaster,  Theophr.  Lap.  6 : 
also  dXafJao-TiTis,  iSos,  17,  Ath.  206  C ;  v.  sub  akdfiaOTpos. 

dAfipao-TO-(rr|icT|,  y,  a  case  for  alabaster  ornaments,  Dem.  415.  5  :  gene- 
rally, a  small  box  or  casket,  Ar.  Fr.  463  :  v.  dXd/3a<rrpos. 

dXdpao-ros  [3X3-],  6,  a  box  or  casket  of  alabaster  (cf.  dXa/3a<mTi7s), 
Hdt.  3.  20,  Ar.  Ach.  1053,  Crates  2.  6,  Alex.  E1V01*.  I,  MavSp.  4.  In 
the  places  cited  the  best  MsS.  preserve  the  form  in  dXd/3aoTos,  which  is 
recognised  as  the  old  and  correct  form  in  A.  B.  206,  Phot.  Lex.  s.  v. 
XrtxvBov.  The  other  form  dXdtJaorpos  occurs  in  the  common  dialect, 
as  Lxx,  N.  T.,  Plut.,  etc. :  Dor.  ace.  pi.  d\a0darpas  Call.  Lav.  Pall.  15. 
— A  neut.  dXifJacrTpov  in  C.  I.  A.  2.  p.  744,  N.  T.,  pi.  dkd&aOTpa  or 
-to  in  Theocr.  15.  114,  Anth.  P.  9.  153. 

dXdTjao-TO-<p6pos,  ov,  carrying  alabaster  vases,  Aesch.  Fr.  354. 

dXaf3ao-Tpo-EiSus,  Adv.  like  alabaster,  Diosc.  4.  77. 

dXdpaorpos,  v.  dXdfjaoros. 

dXdp-n,  v.  sub  dXdjSa. 

dXdfS-ns  or  dXXdp-ns.  ijtos,  17,  a  fish  of  the  Nile,  Strabo  823  ;  in  Plin. 
alabetes. 

5XoSe  [4X.],  Adv.  (d'Xs)  to  or  into  the  sea,  II.  I.  308,  etc.;  also,  cis 
a\aoc  Od.  10.  351.  II.  a\abi  fXvOTai,  name  of  the  second  day 

of  the  Eleusinian  mysteries,  the  16th  of  Boedromion,  Polyaen.  3.  II,  2. 

dXd-8pou.os  [*X],  6,  dithyrambic  word  in  Ar.  Av.  1395, — by  some 
derived  from  dXXo/iai,  the  bounding  race ;  by  others  from  dXr,  a  race 
over  the  sea. 

dXaJjoveia,  r),  the  character  of  an  dXa^wv,  false  pretension,  imposture, 
quackery,  Ar.  Eq.  903,  Plat.  Gorg.  525  A,  etc.;  described  by  Arist.  Eth. 
N.  4.  7,  Theophr.  Char.  23;  tm  d\a(ovfias  Ar.  Ran.  919;  in  pi.,  Id. 
Eq.  290,  Isocr.  237  B: — metaph.,  dX.  x°P^wv  their  over-readiness  to 
sound,  opp.  to  ((dpvruris.  Plat.  Rep.  531  B. — That  the  penult,  is  long 
appears  from  Ar.  II.  c,  Menand.  Incert.  195  ;  dXafoci'a  [t]  only  in  late 
Ep.,  Or.  Sib.  8.  32. 

dXa£6veuua,  otos,  to,  an  imposture,  piece  of  quackery,  Aeschin.  87.  41 : 
in  pi.  quackeries,  Ar.  Ach.  87,  Aeschin.  25.  23. 

dXa(ov<vo|iai,  fut.  tvaoftar.  Dep.:  (dXafdV).  To  make  false  preten- 
sions, Lys.  Fr.  42,  Plat.  Hipp.  Mi.  371  A ;  of  the  Sophists,  Xen.  Mem. 
1.  7»  5,  etc. ;  ir«pi  Tiros  Eupol.  KoX.  10,  Isocr.  293  B.  2.  c.  ace. 

to  feign,  pretend,  Arist.  Oec.  I.  4,  3. 

dXagovtas,  ov,  6,  a  boaster,  braggart,  Hdn.  Epim.  183. 

dXa£ovucds,  f),  ov,  disposed  to  make  false  pretensions,  boastful,  braggart, 
Hipp.  20. 14,  Xen.  Mem.  1.  2,  5,  Arist.     Adv.  -xws,  Plut.  Mar.  9. 

dXa£ovo-xawo-4>Xvdpos,  6,  a  swaggering  empty  babbler,  Archestr.  ap. 
Ath.  29  C. 

dXa£uv  [dX],  oVos,  o,  17,  (0X17)  properly  a  wanderer  about  the  country. 


vagabond,  the  Scottish  landlouper,  Alcae.  Com.  Incert.  5.  IL 

like  dyvprns,  a  false  pretender,  impostor,  quack,  esp.  of  Sophists,  Cratin. 
Incert.  41,  Ar.  Nub.  102,  Plat.  Phaedo  02  D,  al. ;  cf.  Xen.  Cyr.  2.  2,  12, 
Arist.  Eth.  N.  4.  7,  II,  and  v.  d\a£ovtta.  2.  as  Adj.  swaggering, 

boastful,  braggart,  Lat.  gloriosus,  Hdt.  6.  12  ;  dX.  X0701  Plat.  Rep. 
560  C: — Sup.,  r)dovr)  dXafono-TOTr/  (not  -tardrr),  v.  Eust.  1441.  27), 
most  shameless,  Plat.  Phil.  65  C. 

dXdOcia,  dXa$r|s,  Dor.  for  dXijfl-. 

dXddcCs,  v.  sub  d\dofiai. 

d-Adtrnros  [Xa],  ov, =d\i]OTos,  which  nothing  escapes,  Aesop.,  Eust., 
and  late  writers. 

dXoivu  [aX],  =  dXdo/^ai,  to  wander  about,  Aesch.  Ag.  82,  Eur.  Tro. 
1083,  El.  204,  589,  Cycl.  79;  dX.  ir<SSa  bvarrp'ov  (v.  ffaivw  A.  II.  4), 
Id.  Phoen.  1536;  always  in  lyrics,  except  Eur.  Or.  532. — Cf.  ^XoiVcu. 

dXaios,  ov,  f.  1.  for  dXeo? ;  cf.  17XE0?  II. 

dXaKara.  7),  Dor.  for  rjXaxdrn. 

dXaXd,  Dor.  for  dXaXj^,  q.  v. 

dXaXaY-q,  rj,  a  shouting,  Soph.  Tr.  206 ;  cf.  d\a\ri,  dXaXdfa). 

uXdXaypa,  otos,  t<5,  =  sq.,  Call.  Fr.  310,  Plut.  Mar.  45. 

uXaXa-ypos,  d,  =  0X0X0717,  Hdt.  8.  37.  II.  generally  a  loud 

noise,  rvintdvoiv,  aiiKov  Eur.  Cycl.  65,  Hel.  1352. 

dXaXd£u ;  fut.  -d£opiai  Eur.  Bacch.  593,  -d£a>  Lxx ;  aor.  7JKd\a£a 
Eur.,  Xen.,  etc.,  poet.  dXdXafa  Pind.  O.  7.  69  : — Med.,  Soph.  Fr.  479, 
Arr.  An.  5.  10;  (formed  from  the  cry  d\a\ai  or  0X0X17,  as  €XeXi£a>  (B), 
dXoXv^a)  from  similar  sounds :  cf.  dv-,  ew-,  ovv-a\a\d£a)).  To  raise 

the  war-cry,  tq~>  'Evva\iai  jj\d\a(av  (v.  1.  ^Xt'Xtfov)  Xen.  An.  5.  2,  14, 
cf.  6.  5,  27,  and  so  in  Med.,  Arr.  1.  c. ;  c.  ace.  cogn.,  vixwv  dXaXdfeiy 
to  shout  the  shout  of  victory,  Soph.  Ant.  133.  2.  generally,  to  cry 

or  shout  aloud,  Pind.  1.  c,  etc. ;  of  Bacchus  and  the  Bacchae,  Eur. 
Bacch.  593,  1 133,  etc.  3.  rarely  of  a  cry  of  pain,  ijXdAafc  SvoSvij- 

axov  <p6vq)  Eur.  El.  843  (where  Valck.  io(pdoa(c),  Ev.  Marc.  5.  38,  Plut. 
Luc.  28.  II.  rarely  also  of  other  sounds  than  the  voice,  to  sound 

loudly,  ipaK/ios  5*  dXaXd^t  Aesch.  Fr.  55  ;  xvfi$a^ov  d\akd£ov  I  Ep. 
Cor.  13.  I  :  cf.  dXaXo7/x<5s  II,  dXaX^Tds. — Poet,  word  used  by  Xen.  and 
in  late  Prose. 

dXaXai  [ax],  exclam.  of  joy,  in  the  formula  dXaXat  tr)  iranjwv  Ar.  Av. 
1763,  Lys.  1 291  ;  and  restored  in  Av.  953  for  dka\dv. 

dXaXa£ios,  0,  epith.  of  Ares,  Cornut.  N.  D.  21. 

dXaXaTos,  6,  Dor.  for  dKa\r)T6s. 

dXaX^j  [3X3],  Dor.  dXaXd,  ^,  (dXaXoi)  =  dXaXr/TcJs,  a  loud  cry,  pav'tai 
t  dXa\ai  t  bpivo^iivoiv  Pind.  Fr.  224 ;  dXaXat  alayfidrcuv  (v.  1. 
0X0X0701)  Eur.  Phoen.  337  : — esp.  the  cry  with  which  battle  was  begun, 
hence  the  war-cry,  battle-cry,  Pind.  N.  3.  109,  I.  7  (6).  15. — 'AXaXa 
personified  by  the  same  Poet,  x\O0',  'AXaXd,  TTokffiov  Ovyarep,  Id.  Fr. 
225,  cf.  Plut.  2.  349  C. 

dXdX-r)p.ot  [dxa],  pf.  of  d\dop:ai,  but  only  used  in  pres.  sense  (and  part. 
0X0X770(1/01  takes  the  accent  of  pres.,  Od.  14.  122),  to  wander  or  roam 
about,  like  a  beggar,  Horn,  mostly  in  Od.,  as  2.  370.,  15.  10,  etc. ;  of 
seamen,  fiaibiSias  d\d\t)o8(  3.  72,  cf.  313  ;  of  a  departed  spirit,  dX. 
dv'  (vpvTTv\es  "Aibos  5d>  II.  23.  74  ;  of  things,  fxvpia  \vypd  xar  dv- 
Qpumovs  dXdXr/rai  Hes.  Op.  100  : — once  in  Trag.,  Eur.  Andr.  307  (lyr.). 
Cf.  d\a\vxTT]ii.ai. 

d-XdXT|TOs,  ov,  unspeakable,  unutterable,  Anth.  P.  5.  4,  Ep.  Rom.  8.  26. 

dXoXT|Tos,  ov,  6,  (d\a\ai)  the  shout  of  victory,  II.  16.  78  :  the  war-cry, 
battle-shout,  Hes.  Th.  686,  Pind.  P.  I.  137.  2.  generally,  a  loud 

shouting,  II.  2.  149.  3.  rarely,  a  cry  of  woe  or  wailing,  21.  10  ; 

comically,  TdV  St  7rXaK0iW&>i'  .  .  ryr  dX.  Teleclid.  'A/*<p.  1.  13.  II.' 

rarely  of  other  sounds,  a  loud  noise,  av\u>v  Anth.  P.  6.  51. 

dXaXCa,  r),  =  Trovijpia,  dra£ia.  Soph.  Fr.  220. 

dXaXxe  [aXa],  3  sing.  aor.  2  (also  2  imperat.,  Theogn.  13)  Horn.,  Hes., 
Pind.  ;  subj.  (v.  infr.)  ;  opt.  dXdX«ois,  -koi,  -xotcv  Od.  13.  319,  II.  21. 
138.,  22.  196;  inf.  dKaXxiiifvai,  -kpiv  II.  17.  153.,  19.  30,  dXaXxiiv 
only  in  Anth. ;  part.  aKaKxiiv  II.  9.  605,  Anth.  To  ward  or  keep  off, 
Tt  nvi  something  from  a  person,  II.  19.  30,  etc.  ;  more  rarely  ri  twos 
21.  539  :  also,  dX.  Tt  nvi  xparos  Od.  10.  288. — No  other  tenses  are  in 
use  in  Horn.,  for  Wolf  rightly  altered  the  fut.  dXoXKr;«!  (Od.  10.  288) 
into  aor.  dXaXwr/o'i ;  but  Ap.  Rh.  2.  235  formed  a  fut.  d\a\K-qaovoiv, 
and  Q^  Sm.  7.  267  a  pres.  dXdX/covo'ti'.  (From  ^AAK  come  d\a\xt, 
d\xaOuv,  d\xfi,  dXxap,  dkxifxos,  dX/cTr/p,  dX«fai :  identical  with 
^APK  (v.  A  X.  IV),  whence  dpxito,  Lat.  arceo,  arx,  area  ;  cf.  Skt. 
raksh  ( =  arks),  rakshami  (defendo)  :  prob.  dprjyai  also  is  a  modification 
of  the  same  Root.) 

'AXaX>cop;€VT|ts,  toos,  epith.  of  Athena,  II.  4.  8.,  5.  908  :  ace.  to  Ari- 
starch.  from  the  Boeot.  town  Alalcomenae,  but  better  from  dka\xuv, 
the  Protectress.     A  masc.  'AXaXKOu.eveus,  i as,  of  Zeus,  E.  M. 

dAaXicou.cvios,  6,  a  Boeot.  month,  answering  to  the  Att.  piaifiaxrrjpiwv, 
C.  I.  no.  1569,  Plut.  Aristid.  21,  cf.  Muller  Orchom.  p.  213. 

dXaXKTT]piov,  to*,  (dXaX/ce),  a  remedy,  Phavorin.,  Zonar. 

d-XdXos,  ov,  speechless,  dumb,  Aesch.  Fr.  57,  Lxx  (Ps.  37  (38).  13), 
Ev.  Marc.  9.  17,  etc.  ;  Kfi/ieaSa  dX.  Epit.  in  C.  I.  6233.  8. 

dXdXvy£,  U770S,  fj,  =  \vyii6s,  a  gulping,  choking,  Nic.  Al.  18. 

dXaXvKTT||iai  [8X8],  a  pf.  formed  by  redupl.  from  dkvKr(a>  (like  0X0X17- 
fiai  from  d\dop\ai),  once  in  II.  (10.  94),  ovbt  fioi  i^Top  t^iirtbov,  dXX' 
dX.  am  in  anguish,  am  sore  distressed. 

dXdp.ircTos,  ov,  (Xd/iirai)  without  light,  darksome,  h.  Horn.  32.  5  ;  of 
the  nether  world,  Soph.  O.  C.  1662  (where  it  is  restored  from 
the  margin  of  the  Laur.  Ms.)  ;  dX.  "AiSiis  C.  I.  1930.  5  ;  dX.  ovZas 
"Ai8etu  lb.  2321,  cf.  3333  ;  axoros  Anth.  P.  9.  540. 

d-Xap.irT|S,  is,  =  foreg.,  of  eyes,  Hipp.  Progn.  37  ;  dX.  iJXi'ou  out  of  the 
sun's  light,  Soph.  Tr.  691  ;   dXauirtas  'AiSos  livds  Anth.  P.  append. 


aXafjurla  —  aXSofxai. 


57 


260.  2.  metaph.  obscure,  dpfrrjv  .  .  dptavpdv  xal  dXa/Mrij  Plut. 

Phoc.  1. 
dXap-ma,  9,  leant  of  light,  Theol.  Arith.  p.  6.  19,  Phot. 

dXaopai  [dA],  Ep.  3  pi.  aKoaivrat,  iniper.  dXoaj  (v.  infr.),  but  used  by 
Horn,  mostly  in  contr.  forms  a\ao0t,  dkuip-tvos,  impf.  f/Xui/ttji/,  Ep. 
dAaTo,  fut.  dk-qoopwu  (d»-)  Hes.  Sc.  409  (but  v.  1.  diroA^aaTo)  ■  Ep. 
aor.  0A17917J'  Od.  14.  120,  362,  Dor.  part.  dkaOeis  Aesch.  Supp.  870  :  cf. 
dkdXijfuu :  Pass. :  (oAr/).  To  wander,  stray  or  roam  about,  Horn.,  Hdt., 
and  Att.  (though  in  Prose  wXavaopai  was  the  commoner  form),  ofd  t€ 
\moTJjpts  .  .  ,  rot  t  dXuavTat  ^vxds  irapBifitvoi  Od.  3.  73  ;  tij  oii- 
ottjvos  dkutpuvos  iv&db1  iicdvti  6.  206  ;  piif  vdBoiuiv  ri  dkupuvoi  Hdt.  4. 
97  ;  aloxp&s  aXwpuu  Aesch.  Eum.  98  ;  aairos  yijX/irous  r  dA.  Soph. 
O.  C.  349:  esp.  to  wander  from  home,  be  banished,  like  iptvyftv,  lb.  444, 
Thuc.  2.  102,  Lys.  105.  41,  Dem.  440.  21  ;  Ik  aiOtv  by  thee,  Soph.  O.  C. 
1363  ; — often  with  a  Prep.,  dvd  arparov  0101  dkdaOe  II.  10.  141  ;  Ka-n- 
•wtbiov  .  .  010s  oXoto  6.  201  ;  iroXAti  fiporwv  iirl  dart  dkwptfvos  Od. 
15.  492  ;  777s  in  iaxdrois  Spots  Aesch.  Pr.  666  ;  inl  £ivns  x&pas  Soph. 
Tr.  3CO,  cf.  Isocr.  76  A  ;  ovru  vvv  .  .  dAoai  xard  novrov  Od.  5.  377,  cf. 
Aesch.  Supp.  870 ;  vopjdbtaai  ydp  iv  XxvOais  dXdrot  Ar.  Av.  942  :  also 
c.  ace.  loci,  dX.  yrjv  to  wander  through  or  over  the  land,  Soph.  O.  C. 
1686;  vopOfiovs  dA.  Eur.  Hel.  532  ;  uipta  Theocr.  13.  66  ;  cf.  irkavdai 
II.  2.  c.  gen.  to  wander  away  from,  miss  or  be  without  a  thing, 

twppoavvas  dXdrat  Pind.  O.  I.  94  ;  tyvxty  d\drat  rrjs  ndpoitf  evnpa^ias 
Eur.  Tro.  635.  II.   metaph.   to  wander  in   mind,  be  perplexed, 

Soph.  Aj.  23. 

dXads,  ov,  not  seeing,  blind,  Od.  8.  195,  etc.  (v.  fin.),  never  in 
II.,  and  used  by  Trag.  only  in  lyric  passages ;  to  iparruiv  dXauv 
yivos  Aesch.  Pr.  549 ;  dAaoi,  as  opp.  to  btbopx&rts,  the  dead, 
Id.  Eum.  322  ;  of  the  eyes,  Soph.  O.  C.  150,  243,  Eur.  Phoen. 
1531  ;  i\Kos  dXaov  a  blinding  wound,  i.e.  blindness.  Soph.  Ant. 
974.  II.    like    Lat.    caecus,    dark,    obscure,    vt<pos    Ap.    Rh.  2. 

259.  III.  invisible,  imperceptible,   <p0iais   dXai)  Hipp.  41 2.   24, 

restored  by  W.  Dind.  for  dXXi;,  or  (as  Galen.  Lex.)  dXa/a.  (If  it   be 

a  compd.  of  a  privat.  and  Ada)  video  (though  the  existence  of  this  Verb 
is  dub.,  y.  s.  roc.),  the  accent  is  exceptional,  and  is  so  taken  by  Arcad. 
38.)  [dAdos  Od.  1.  c,  etc.; — hence,  in  Od.   10.  493.,    12.  267,  for 

lidvTios  dAdoC,  the  best  Edd.  give  puivnjos  dAdoC  with  the  ult.  of 
fiavr-qos  lengthd.  in  arsi,  Herm.  El.  Metr.  p.  347.] 

dX&o-o-Komd,  Ion.  -cfj,  >),  a  blind,  i.  e.  useless,  careless  watch,  II.  10. 
515  (ubi  v.  Spitzn.),  13.  10,  Od.  8.  285,  Hes.  Th.  466. 

dAdo-T0Kos,  ov,  bringing  forth  young  blind,  Suid. 

dX&du,  to  blind,  uijtdaXfiov  dXadWat  to  blind  him  of  his  eye,  Od.  1 .  69., 
9.  516 ;  c.  ace,  Anth.  P.  7.  601. 

dXs-rraovds,  j),  ov,  (dAairdfuu)  easily  exhausted,  i.  e.  powerless,  feeble, 
<m'x«,  otiivos,  pv9m,  etc.,  II.  4.  330,  Od.  18.  373,  h.  Horn.  Merc. 
334,  al.,  cf.  Hes.  Op.  435 ;  Comp.,  dXairaoVdrfpoi  ydp  iotoSt  II. 
4.  305. — Ep.  word,  used  by  Aesch.  without  the  a  euphon.  (cf.  dXaird£<u), 
Svats  Xanabvov  being  restored  by  Musgr.  for  Ktvabvov  in  Eum.  562. 

dAdiraSvoowr),  ^,  feebleness,  Q±  Sm.  7.  12. 

aAdird£w  [dA],  Ep.  impf.  dXdirafoi'  11.  1 1 .  503  :  fut.  d(ai  2.  367,  Aesch. : 
Ep.  aor.  dxdirafa  11.  750,  Theogn.  951  : — Pass.,  II.  24.  245:  aor. 
dKandxSnv  (i£-)  Or.  Sib.  To  empty,  drain,  exhaust,  Od.  17.  424  ; 

dA.  woKiv  to  sack  or  plunder  it,  II.  2.  367 ;  and  of  men,  ro  over- 
power, destroy,  5.  166.,  II.  503,  al.  :  metaph.,  [oiVot]  Ik  xpabias 
dvias  dvbpaiv  dA.  Panyas.  ap.  Ath.  37  C.  Ep.  word  (cf.  i(a\awd(ai) 
used  by  Aesch.  without  the  a  euphon.  (cf.  dAairaoVds),  Kand(tiv  Sarv 
Kabptiwv  0ia  Theb.  47,  531 ;  and  Triclin.  gave  xriprn  .  .  Moipa  Xairdf  «i 
(for  Moip'  d\and(n)  in  Ag.  130.  (The  Root  appears  to  be  AAII 

with  a  prefixed,  cf.  kandaoa) :  but  Curt,  hesitates  to  connect  these  words 
with  Xdimu,  q.  v.) 

dAas,  dros,  to,  (dAf)  salt,  ace.  to  Suid.  only  used  in  the  proverb  dXaatv 
wi ;  but  the  nom.  occurs  in  Arist.  Mirab.  138,  and  often  in  late  Prose, 
as  Plut.  2.  668  F,  Ev.  Matt.  5.  13,  etc. 

dAao-rcuvu,  =  sq.,  Hesych. 

dAao-T«u,  (dAoirrot)  to  be  full  of  wrath,  jXdoTtov  8«  0toi  (as  trisyll.) 
II.  15.  21  ;  tffuvffv  .  .  ,  xal  dkaa-riioas  iwos  rjuba  12.  163,  cf.  Call.  Del. 
239,  etc.,  and  v.  ivaXaoriai. 

dAao-Topia,  r),  wickedness,  Jfseph.  A.  J.  17.  I,  I. 

dAdo-Topos,  ov,  under  the  influence  of  an  dXdoTvp,  Aesch.  Kr.  90  (in 
ace.  masc.  dAdffTopoi')  :  suffering  cruelly,  dXaaripoiaiv  ififiaTaiv  kvk- 
A015  Soph.  Ant.  974  (lyr.). 

dXao-ros,  ov,  Ion.  dXr|<rTot  Philo  :  (a  privat.,  XaStiv,  \rfiofiai).  Not 
to  be  forgotten,  insufferable,  unceasing,  nivOos,  dx<w  II.  24.  105,  Od.  4. 
108,  Hes.  Th.  467,  cf.  Aesch.  Pers.  990 ;  iva0ov  SXaara  Soph.  O.  C. 
538:  neut.  as  Adv.,  akaarov  iSvpo/tat  I  wail  incessant,  Od.  14. 
174.  2.  of  persons,  as  in  II.  22.  261,  where  Achilles  calls  Hector 

dXaart,  thou  whom  I  will  never  forget  nor  forgive ! — an  accursed 
wretch,  Soph.  O.  C.  1482  ;  so,  »arpor  .  .  dA.  alius  lb.  1672  :  cf.  dAd- 
arup.     Poet,  word,  used  by  Trag.  only  in  lyr.  passages. 

dAdoruip,  opos,  o,  the  Avenging  Deity,  destroying  angel,  Lat.  Deus 
Vindex,  with  or  without  iaifuuv,  often  in  Trag.,  as  Aesch.  Pers.  354, 
Ag.  1501,  1508  ;  dA.  ov/ios  Soph.  O.  C.  788  ;  i(  dkaaripav  voauv  "id. 
Tr.  1235;  dA.  n<Aoiri8dV,  proverb,  of  utter  ruin,  Xenarch.  Bovt.  1; 
generally,  BovkuKojv  dXdorwp  the  herdsmen's  plague,  of  the  Nemean 
lion.  Soph.  Tr.  1092  ;  as  fem.,  of  the  Sphinx,  Nicoch.  Incert.  4  ;  cf. 
pudara/p  II.  II.  pass,  he  who  suffers  from  such  vengeance,  a  pol- 

luted or  accursed  wretch,  Aesch.  Eum.  236,  Soph.  Aj.  374  ;  puapol  .  . 
*oJ  KoXaxis  koJ  dAa<rrop«s  Dem.  324.  21  ;  Sap0apiv  t*  .  .  xal  dAd- 
oropa  tok  ♦lAiTnroK  dnoicakwv  Id.   438.    28 ;    dvOparrr   dKdarwp  Bato 

Ay&p-  I.  5,  cf.  Meineke  3.  p.  186 :  cf.  dxderopos.        (The  2nd  signf.  of, 


aXao-ros  brings  it  into  close  connexion  with  dKdarwp.  But  Curt,  refers 
this  last  word  to  ^AA  in  dAi7,  dAdo^ai,  the  pursuer.) 

dAdxas,  aXd-reia,  Dor.  for  dKrjT-rjs,  dXrrrda. 

aXdixvos,  r),  ov,  (dAas)  made  of  salt,  \160s  Clem.  Al.  461. 

dAaTtov,  to,  Dim.  of  dAas,  Aesop. 

aAaro,  Dor.    3  sing.  aor.  I  of  dAAo/iai. 

d-\dTou,T|TOS,  ov,  not  hewn  square,  ap.  Clem.  Al.  452. 

dXdTO-TruXia,  ii,  the  trade  of  vending  salt,  Arist.  Oec.  2.  4,  2. 

d-Adxdvos,  ov,  without  herbs,  Greg.  Naz. 

dAa-uTfis,  i5os,  r),  pecul.  fem.  of  sq.,  Emped.  185. 

d\a-<im6s,  ov,  blind-eyed:  dark,  Lat.  caecus,  Nonn.  Jo.  9.  14. 

dXawrus,  uos,  7,  (dAaocu)  a  blinding,  cKpeaXptov  Od.  9.  503. 

d\a-wv|/,  wnos,  6,  •h,  —  dXaonr6s,  Synes.  Hymn.  3.  583. 

dApdpios,  o,  the  Lat.  albarius,  a  plasterer,  C.  I.  9863. 

oAy«iv6s,  -t),  ov,  (dXyos)  giving  pain,  painful,  grievous,  Aesch.  Pr.  197, 
238,  Soph.  O.  T.  1530,  Eur.  Med.  1037,  Thuc,  etc.: — Adv.  -vus. 
Soph.  Ant.  436,  Ph.  ion,  Plat.  Gorg.  476  C.  II.  rare  in  pass, 

sense,  feeling  pain,  grievously  suffering,  suffering,  Soph.  O.  C.  1664. — 
The  Comp.  and  Sup.  in  common  use  are  0X710^,  dA7iaror,  though 
Plat,  has  dWyfivorepos,  -ototos,  Gorg.  477  D,  Symp.  218  A;  so  Arist. 
Probl.  9.  8,  and  v.  1.  Isocr.  306  A.     The  Horn,  form  is  dkeytivos,  q.  v. 

dXyco-i-Supos,  ov,  bringing  pain,  Sappho  125,  Opp.  Hal.  2.  668. 

dAY«o-i-90|xos.  ov,  grieving  the  heart,  Orph.  H.  64. 

dAycui,  fut.  -r/aai,  (aKyos)  to  feel  bodily  pain,  suffer,  d\yfiaas  smarting 
with  pain,  II.  2.  269,  etc. ;  to  suffer,  be  ill,  Hdt.  4.  68  ;  more  fully, 
dA-vijffar  oowpffi  II.  12.  206:  the  suffering  part  in  ace,  as  aXytjaov 
fprap  Aesch.  Eum.  135  ;  Tds  yvdOovs  dKyqatTt  Ar.  Pax  237  ;  Toy 
hdxTvXov  Plat.  Rep.  462  D  ;   Td  opuara  lb.  515  E.  2.  to  suffer 

hardship,  t)  dAdr  f)  M  yijs  dkyriOfTf  Od.  12.  27.  II.  to  feel 

pain  of  mind,  to  grieve,  be  troubled  or  distressed,  d\yttv  \pvxr}v,  tppiva 
Hdt.  3.  43,  Eur.  Or.  608,  etc.  :  dXy.  tivi  to  be  pained  at  a  thing,  Hdt. 

3.  120,  Soph.  O.  C.  744,  etc. ;  M  tan  Id.  Aj.  377,  etc. ;  Sid  ti  Hdt. 

4.  68  ;  vtpi  ti  or  Ttvos  Thuc.  2.  65,  Eur.  Andr.  240  ;  but  also  c.  gen., 
dkyuv  XP^I  TiJxfs  iraAiyKorou  Aesch.   Ag.  371,  cf.  Eur.  Hec.   1256: 

c.  ace,  dXyai  piiv  ipya  Aesch.  Cho.  1016  ;  wpa(iv  ■/jv  ij\yjja'  iyw  Soph. 
Aj-  79°  (v-  SUD  A"'/*",  flboixai)  :  c.  part.,  fikyrjo'  dxovaas  Hdt.  3.  50, 
Aesch.  Pers.  844 ;  dXyai  k\vuv  Soph.  Ph.  86 ;  opivv  Eupol.  A^/x. 
15-  2-  III.  trans,  to  cause  pain,  rd  dXyovvra  (d\yvvovra  ?) 
Clem.  Al.  933. 

dAyriowv,  ovos,  1),  a  sense  of  pain,  pain,  suffering,  of  body,  Hdt.  5.  18, 
Eur.  Med.  24,  Plat.  Prot.  354  B  ;  iSvvr)  tis  t)  dA7_  Id.  Rep.  413  B, 
al.  II.  ofmind,/am,|T«/',Soph.O.C.2I5,Eur.Med.56,al.  (With 
the  termin.  -rjbwv  in  this  and  xatPV^wv^  c^-  Lat.  torpedo,  lib-ido,  cup-ido.) 

dAvT|UA,  to,  pain  felt  or  caused,  suffering.  Soph.  Ph.  340,  Hipp.  Vet. 
Med.  10,  Eur.,  etc. ;  ou*  iffrt  Xvmjs  dXy.  piu^ov  Menand.  Incert.  121. 

dAYn,pds,  d,  6v,  painful,  Lxx  (Ierem.  10.  19,  al.). 

dAyrjo-n,  jous,  ^,  sense  of  pain.  Soph.  Ph.  792,  Ar.  Thesm.  147. 

dAYlvocis,  taaa,  tv,  (0X705)  painful,  grievous,  Hes.  Th.  214,  226, 
Mimnerm.  1 1 ,  Xenophan.  2.  4. 

dXyitiiv,  ov,  aXvurros,  ij,  ov,  irreg.  Comp.  and  Sup.  of  dXyetvos,  formed 
from  Subst.  0X70?  (as  /raXAiW,  -taros  from  KaWos,  aiax^v,  -iotos 
from  aftrxos).  Afore  or  most  painful,  grievous  or  distressing.     Of  the 

Comp.,  Horn,  has  only  neut.  dXytov,  in  signf.  so  much  the  worse,  all  the 
harder,  t$  b"  d\ywv,  at  k  iSikyoiv . .  apfu  fidxeaOat  II.  18.  278,  cf. 
306,  Od.  4.  292  :  he  has  Sup.  only  in  II.  23.  655,  ifi  dkyiarri  hapd- 
oaaOai  (of  a  mule) : — but  both  are  common  in  Att.,  as  0X7101^  Aesch. 
Pr.  934,  Soph.  Ant.  64;  dA7«rTos  Id.  O.  T.  675,  etc.:  cf.  dXyttvos  fin. 
[In  Horn.  0X7101',  but  F  always  in  Att.] 

0X704,  foj,  to,  poet.  Noun,  pain  of  body,  II.  5.  394,  Soph.  Ph.  734, 
1379  ;  in  Horn,  mostly  in  pi.  pains,  sufferings,  0X7*0  t«vx<(  N-  *•  II0 » 

d.  irdaxw  2.  667,  al.  2.  pain  of  mind,  grief,  distress,  II.  I.  2.,  3. 
97,  Od.  2.  41,  etc.;  tt)v  5'  dpia  xa9lui  Ka^  akyos  «X«  *ppiva  19. 
471  ;  d.  duKt'Xtui'  14.  32;  dv/jKtOTov  II.  5.  394;  but  more  freq.  in 
pi.,  II.  2.  39,  al. ;  Td  Kvvrar  dXyn  teatewv  Eur.  Supp.  807  ;  vv  aXyovs 
from  pain,  Aesch.  Eum.  183;  ai<rxu>'os  I  pas  inr'  dkyimv  from  grief  for 
my  shame,  Eur.  Hel.  201.  II.  later,  anything  that  causes  pain, 
Bion  2.  II,  Anth.  P.  9.  390.  (Hence  dXtyttvos,  dXynvis,  dXyioi,  etc.: 
cf.  also  7XttVffoXTOt.) 

oAyuvu  [u],  Ion.  impf.  dX7w«o-Kf  (eir-)  Q^  Sm.  4.  416  :  fut.  Zvai  Soph. 
O.  T.  332,  etc. :  aor.  ^Kyvva  Soph.,  etc. : — Pass.,  with  fut.  med.  dX- 
ywovpat  (in  pass,  sense)  Id.  Ant.  230,  Eur.  Med.  622  :  aor.  riKyvv0r;v : 
— Trag.  Verb,  used  by  Eupol.  AffpL.  2,  Xen.  Apol.  8,  and  in  late  Prose, 
to  pain,  grieve,  distress,  rivd  Aesch.,  etc. : — Pass,  to  feel  or  suffer  pain, 
be  grieved  or  distressed  at  a  thing,  nn  Soph.  Ant.  468,  etc. ;  ini  rivt 
Eur.  Tro.  172  ;  Tt  Soph.  Ph.  102 1  :  c.  part.,  tloiboiod  r  rjKyvvBnv  Ktap 
Aesch.  Pr.  245. 

dXoaivii).  rare  poet.  Verb,  used  only  in  pres.  and  impf.,  except  Ep.  aor. 
3  sing.  (JXoaVf  Od.  II.  citand.  (not  elsewh.  in  Horn.),  and  dX&^ffoovM 
Orph.  Lith.  364,  cf.  iv-a\baiva  : — Causal  of  uXbrjaitai.  to  make  to  grow, 
nourish,  strengthen,  fU\t'  ij\bave  votpUvi  Kauiv  she  filled  out  his  limbs, 
Od.  18.  70.,  24.  368,  cf.  Aesch.  Th.  12  ;  6vpiiv  iXbaivovaav  iv  fi<ppo- 
avvais  Id.  Pr.  540  :  to  increase,  multiply,  bs  oi/K  idati  yka/aaav  . .  dX- 
oaivftv  xaxd  Id.  Th.  557.  (From  .y/AAA  come  also  dX8iJ<r«a>  and 
'AXSripios  (a  name  of  Zeus,  Method,  in  E.  M.  58.  20) :  diff.  from  AAQ 
in  dXOaivca.  etc. ;  though  both  prob.  come  from  the  older  Root  AA, 
v.  sub  dXaos.) 

dXSr|<is,  «7<ra,  tv,  waxing,  increasing,  Maxim,  it.  *ot.  533. 

dXoTjO-Kio,  ro  grow,  wax,  Kqiov  dKHjaKovros  II.  23.  599.  II. 

trans.  «■  dXoaiVoi,  Theocr.  17.  78,  Epigr.  Gr.  511. 

dXBop.01,  m  dKbrjOKu,  v.  sub  d\9alva,  and  cf.  ivakSaiva. 


08 

dAla  [dA],  (A),  Ion.  dAlri.  »>,  (dkr],  dAe'opai)  an  avoiding,  escaping, 
flight,  iyyvBi  pioi  Savaroi  . .  ,  oio'  dkin  11.  22.  301  (not  in  Od.):  c.  gen. 
shelter  from  a  thing,  vtrov  Hes.  Op.  543:  cf.  dktwpr).     Ep.  word. 

dAla  [dA],  (B),  Ion.  dAet),  r),  warmth,  heat,  of  fire,  Od.  17.  23  (not  in 
II.)  ;  but  more  commonly  of  the  sun,  iv  dkir)  ytvioBai  Hipp.  Vet.  Med. 

15  :  noiitoBai  ntpindrovs  iv  dA.  Id.  Apr.  285;  iv  dAla  xaTaxtiptvos 
Ar.  Eccl.  541  ;  dAla;  xat  tf/vxovs  in  heat  and  cold,  Plat.  Eryx.  401  D, 
el.  Arist.  Meteor.  2.  5,  17  ;  lrviyos  Kai  dkia  Id.  Metaph.  5.  2,  7  ;  in  pi., 
1J.  Probl.  j.  40,  etc.  :  in  late  Prose  animal  heat,  Plut.  2.  131  D,  658  C, 
etc.  (From  the  same  Root  seem  to  come  lir-dA7)s,  tlkr/  (q.  v.),  though 
the  breathing  makes  a  difficulty  in  this  word.) 

dX<d{u,  to  be  warm,  Arist.  Probl.  I.  39,  de  Resp.  4.  9;  cf.  Aedfoi. 

dXcaivu,  aor.  ava  Ael.  V.  H.  9.  30,  (dAla  (B))  to  warm,  make  warm, 
Hipp.  523  (ace.  to  Littre),  Arist.  Probl.  6.  3,  P.  A.  2.  10,  7.  II. 

iutr.  to  grow  warm,  be  warm,  Ar.  Eccl.  540 ;  dA.  Trpos  to  7rt/p  xaB-np-iv-n 
Menand.  Incert.  235. 

dAeavnicds,  17,  dv,  fit  for  warming,  Sext.  Emp.  P.  3.  179. 

dXlao-Qai.  dXlacrOe,  Ep.  aor.  I  forms  of  dkiop.ai. 

dAcycivos,  17,  6v,  Ep.  for  dkytivos,  painful,  grievous,  aixitr),  t^XV'  U* 
5.  658.,  18.  248;  tiptain  Od.  10.  78  ;  p-tpip-vapiaTa  Pind.  Fr.  245:  c. 
inf.  troublesome,  irrnot  dktytivol  baprjfitvai  U.  10.  402.  Adv.  -vws,  Q^ 
Sm.  3.  557. 

dAcyi^w,  Ep.  Verb,  onlv  used  in  pres.  and  inipf. :  (a\iya>).  To  trouble 
oneself  about  a  thing,  to  care  for,  mind,  heed,  in  Horn,  (only  in  II.)  always 
with  a  ncgat.,  c.  gen.,  twv  ovti  fitTarpinrj  oi/b"  dktyi^tts  II.  1.  160,  al. ; 
rwf  fiiv  dp'  oiiK  dkiyi^t  iraTTjp  II.  80,  cf.  Hes.  Th.  171  :  absol.,  d  8' 
cupfjfitvos  ovk  dktyi^ti  ovb'  oBtrai  II.  15.  106  ;  in  late  Ep.  c.  ace,  iyw 
Si  puv  oiiK  dktyifa  Q^Sm.  2.  428  ;  rarely  without  negat.,  8$  rpia.  pXv 
fierce,  bvo  ixkinti,  iv  5'  dktyi£ti  Musae.  ap.  Arist.  H.  A.  6.  6,  I  ; 
ijpwaiv  dk.  C.  I.  6280.  42  : — Pass.,  ovk  dktyi^dfitvos  Anth.  P.  5.  18. 

dAeywci).  Ep.  Verb,  used  by  Horn,  only  in  pres.  and  impf. :  aor.  uAl- 
yvva  Ap.  Rh.  1.  394,  med.  dAe-ydVaTO  Emped.  445  :    (dA*7<w).  To 

mind,  heed,  care  for,  Horn,  (only  in  Od.)  always  c.  ace.  datra  or  batras, 
cikkas  8'  dktyvvtrt  bairas  find  your  meals  elsewhere,  1.  374  ;  oatr'  dki- 
yvvov,  of  invited  guests,  13.  23  ;  but,  batras  itaas  .  .  dktyvvtiv  to  pre- 
pare a  meal  for  guests,  II.  186:  later,  Soko<ppoavvr]v  uktyvvaiv  h.  Horn. 
Merc.  361. 

dA<Yu<  Ep.  Verb,  used  also  by  Pind.  and  once  in  Aesch.  (lyr.),  only  in 
pres.,  to  trouble  oneself , have  a  care,  mind,  he ed, mostly  with  negat.:  1. 

absol.,  ovk  dk.  to  have  no  care,  heed  not,  Lat.  negligo,  II.  11.  389,  Od. 
17.  390  ;  xvvts  ovk  dkiyovaai  careless,  reckless  .  .  ,  Od.  19.  154  ;  but 
without  negat.,  Arrai  aXiyovai  xtovoai  walk  with  good  heed,  II.  9. 
504.  II.  with  a  case,  1.  c.  gen.  to  care  for,  ovb'  dkkrjkwv 

dkiyovaiv  Od.  9.  115  ;  ov  ydp  Kvxkuints  Aids  .  .  dXiyovo'tv  lb.  275,  cf. 
Simon.  37.  10;  tiwuwv  dXiyovrts  ovbiv  Aesch.  Supp.  752;  without 
negat.,  ifwxfjs  "A-  vntp  Ap.  Rh.  2.  634,  cf.  C.  I.  6280.  65.  2. 

rarely  c.  ace.  to  heed,  regard,  respect,  Btwv  drriv  ovk  dkiyovrts  II.  16. 
388.  Hes.  Op.  251  :  without  a  negat..  vr/wv  onka  . .  dkiyovaiv  take  care 
of,  Od.  6.  268,  cf.  Pind.  O.  11  (10).  15,  I.  8  (7).  103.  III.  Pass. 

dkiy€O0at  iv  Tiai,  to  be  regarded  or  counted  among,  Pind.  O.  2.  142. 
(Commonly  deriv.  from  a  copul.,  kiyai,  to  count  with,  and  Pind.  in  the  last 
passage  seems  to  have  taken  it  in  this  sense.  Hence  dktyifa,  dktyvvto : 
the  connexion  with  dktyttvos,  dkytivds,  etc..  is  more  than  doubtful.) 

dAetivds.  r),  6v,  (dAla  (B))  lying  open  to  the  sun,  warm,  hot,  x<W"7 
Hdt.  2.  25  ;  opp.  to  (Ioiy(iw)!,  Xen.  Cyn.  10,  6  ;  xiTWV  Id-  Symp.  4,  38  ; 
often  in  Arist.,  of  places,  climate,  air,  water,  etc. 

dXefivoj  [d],  Ep.  Verb,  used  only  in  pres.  and  impf.  (except  aor.  dke- 
tivai  Msnetho  6.  736) :  (dkia  (B),  dkr,).  Like  dkiopai,  to  avoid,  shun, 
mostly  c.  ace.  rei,  6vp.ov  dni^ofiai  r)b'  dkttivm  Od.  13.  148,  al. ;  d  81 
xtpboavvrj  dkittvt  evaded  [my  question],  4.  251  ;  more  rarely  c.  ace. 
pers.,  dkifive  5'  b(pop06v  16.  477,  cf.  h.  Horn.  Merc.  239  ;  c.  inf.,  urtivai 
p.iv  d'  dkitivt  II.  6. 167  ;  dkt(tfitvai  dkitivt  13.  356  : — also  in  Luc.  Dem. 
Encom.  23.  II.  intr.  to  shrink,  df  t  dkitivtv  Ap.  Rh.  3.  650. 

dAo],  v.  sub  dAla. 

dA(T|S,  is,  like  dkcitvds,  warm,  in  the  sun,  virvos  Soph.  Ph.  859  (lyr.) : 
— so  the  Mss.  read  and  so  the  Schol.  interprets ;  but  the  conj.  of  Reiske, 
uteris,  is  very  plausible. 

dXcta,  r),  (dA?;)  a  wandering  about,  A.  B.  376,  Hesych. 

dXtta.  r),  =  ikuia,  like  vytia  for  vyitia,  v.  1.  Arist.  Oec.  2.  4,  2,  Hdn. 
3.  I,  etc. ;  cf.  Lob.  Phryn.  493. 

dAeiavTOs,  ov,  (ktaivai)  umnasticated,  rpcxpr)  Arist.  P.  A.  3.  14,  9. 

dXciaTa,  rd,  (dkitu)  wheaten  flour,  Od.  20.  108  ;  cf.  dktvpov. 

d\eiu.|xa.  aros,  to,  (dkdipa)  anything  used  for  anointing,  unguent, fat, 
m7.  Plat.Tim.  50E,  Antiph.Mi7Tpa7. 1,  Arist.  Probl.  5.  38,  etc.;  cf.  xpiap,a. 

dAe1.u41dTi.ov,  t6,  Dim.  of  foreg.,  Diog.  L.  6.  52. 

d\«iu.p.a.Tu>8T|s,  ts,  (eiSos)  unctuous,  Hipp.  685.  16. 

dA€i/TTTT|p,  rjpos,  i,  =  dkfirrrris,  Manetho  4.  1 78. 

dAeiirnfipiov,  t6,  a  place  for  anointing  in  gymnastic  schools,  or  among 
the  Romans  at  the  baths,  used  also  as  a  sudatory,  Alex.  KatV.  1 ,  Theophr. 
Ign.  13,  C.  I.  2782.  25,  al. ;  v.  Schneid.  Vitruv.  5.  10,  5. 

dAetirrns,  ov,  6,  an  anointer  :  hence  (cf.  dkutpw  I),  the  trainer  and 
teacher  in  gymnastic  schools,  Lat.  aliptes,  lanista,  Arist.  Eth.  N.  2.  6,  7, 
Polyb.  27.  6,  1,  C.  I.  418,  al.  2.  metaph.  a  teacher,  twv  lrokiriKwv  Plut. 
Pericl.  4  ;  rrjs  xaxias  Sext.  Emp.  M.  1.  298  ;  cf.  Wyttenb.  Plut.  2.  133  B. 

dXetTTTiKos,  r),  ov,  of  or  for  the  dktirrTris,  trained  wider  hi?n,  Plut.  2. 
619  A: — r)  -kt)  (sc.  rixvrj),  the  art  of  training,  Tim.  Locr.  104  A. 
Adv.  -kws,  like  an  akfimns,  Schol.  Ar.  Eq.  492. 

dXenrrds,  ov,  verb.  Adj.  of  dktiipui,  anointed,  smeared,  Clem.  Al.  240. 

d-XetiTTOS,  ov,  (k(inai)  not  left  behind,  unconquered,  rrvKTns,  d0kr/rr)s 
C.  I.  5909,  5912-15,6883-4. 


ct\eu  —  uXetcTwp. 


dXtiirrpta,  7),  fern,  of  ikttmp,  Lvs.  ap.  Poll.  7.  3  ;  a  title  of  plays  b\- 
Amphis,  Antiphanes,  etc. 

dAti-nrpov,  f.  1.  for  {(akfinrpov,  q.  v. 

dXtis,  fiaa,  iv,  v.  sub  tlXou  III. 

dAeio-ov  [a],  to,  a  cup,  goblet,  =  5irras  (Ath.  783  A),  xP^etov  IL  11. 
774.  °d-  3-  5°.  a1-.  Call.  Fr.  109:  also  as  masc,  dAtio-os,  d,  Ar.  Fr. 
521.  II.  the  hip-socket,  Marsyas  ap.  Ath.  479  C  ;  cf.  xorvkr)  2. 

dAei/ma,  r),  (dAr;)  =  dklrr/pia,  Suid. 

dAeirns,  ov,  6,  (dkt))  one  who  leads  or  goes  astray,  a  sinner,  of  Paris 
and  the  suitors  of  Penelope,  II.  3.  28,  Od.  20.  121: — dAtiT>?s  tivos  a 
sinner  against  one.  Ap.  Rh.  1.  1338  : — cf.  dAiTpdr,  dAoiVrjs,  dAoiTos. 

dX«iTOUpYT|0-ta,  r),  exemption  from  ktirovpyiai,  a  late  word  for  the  Att. 
dTfAeia,  C.  I.  (add.)  4315  n  ;  censured  as  €VTfkis  by  Poll.  8.  156. 

d-X«iToOpyTjTos,  ov,  free  from  ktirovpyiai,  Lat.  immunis,  dk.  rtaadv 
Tav  kfiTovpyidv  Decret.  Byz.  ap.  Dem.  256.  10,  cf.  Dinarch.  ap.  Poll.  8. 
156;  dovfipokos  ko.1  dk.  C.  I.  2271.  45.,  2693 d.  10,  cf.  Epicur.  ap. 
Diog.  L.  10.  97. 

dAci<|>a,  to,  collat.  form  of  sq.,  Hes.  Th.  553  (Mss.  dktupap),  Hipp. 
620.  47,  Aesch.  Ag.  322,  Call.  Fr.  12,  Q^  Sm.  14.  265,  C.  I.  5953. 

uAti4>ap,  aTos,  to,  (dkeitpm)  unguent,  anointing-oil,  oil,  fat,  used  in 
funeral  sacrifices,  II.  23.  170,  Od.  3.  408,  etc. ;  dkeicpap  drro  xibpov,  and 
aikkixvwpiav  oil  of  cedar,  etc.,  Hdt.  2.  87,  94.  II.  generally, 

anything  for  smearing  with,  hence  in  Theocr.  7.  147,  pitch  or  resin,  to 
seal  wine-jars. — Cf.  foreg. 

dXtidiaTirns  dpTos,  d,  bread  baked  with  oil,  Epich.  ap.  Ath.  1 10  B. 

dXeid>6-pL0S,  ov,  one  that  lives  by  anointing,  contemptuous  word  for 
dAffirnis,  Ar.  Fr.  578.  2.  generally,  poor,  Philo  2.  537,  Hesych. 

dXeidtu,  Hdt.,  Att. :  fut.  -^cu  (If-)  Eur.  I.  A.  i486,  Plat. :  aor.  r)k(i\f,a 
Horn.,  Att.,  Ep.  ukfiila  Od.  12.  177:  pf.  dkr)kt<pa  (dir)  Dem.  1243, 
fin.,  («£-)  Aristid. : — Med.,  fut.  -ipofiai  Thuc.  4.  68 :  aor.  r)kii}pdp.riv 
Att.,  Ep.  dA-  II.  14.  171: — Pass.,  fut.  dk(i(p9r)ooiiai  (i£-)  Dem.  792. 
4 :  aor.  1  r)k(i<pBriv  Hipp.  514.  6,  Plat.  Lys.  217  C,  (If-)  Eur.,  etc. ;  but 
aor.  2  i(-r)kitpriv  is  read  from  Mss.  by  Bekk.  in  Plat.  Phaedr.  258  B, 
cf.  Joseph.  A.  J.  17.  12,  2,  Dio  C.  55.  13  :  pf.  dkr)kiix/iai  Thuc.  4.  68. 
(If-,  in-)  Dem.  791.  13,  Xen.  Oec.  10,  6. — The  pf.  forms  dkr)k(t<pa, 
dkrfkufx^ai,  r)kn<pa,  r)kftfipiat  occur  in  Mss.,  v.  Arist.  H.  A.  5.  19,  8., 
5.  23,  3,  Plut.  Marcell.  17,  Luc.  Pise.  24  and  36,  etc.  (From  .y'AIII 
with  a  prefixed,  v.  sub  Ai'ttos.)  To  anoint  with  oil,  oil  the  skin,  as  was 

done  after  bathing,  the  Act.  referring  to  another,  Med.  to  oneself,  kovaai 
xikfT  dfupi  r  dktixfiai  II.  24.  582  ;  but  Horn,  elsewhere  always  adds  kirra 
or  AtV  ikaitp  (v.  sub  A(tra),  rrdvra  koiaaaro  xat  kin  dkea^fv  Od.  6.  227; 
kotaoapiivco  xal  dk€iipap:ivto  kin'  ikaiq>  II.  10.  577,  cf.  14. 171.,  18.  350; 
applied  to  anointing  for  gymnastic  exercises,  ktna  picrd  tov  yvjivdfoBai 
rjkuipavTo  Thuc.  1.6;  kina  dkti<ptaBai  Id.  4.  68.  2.  to  supply  the  oil 

for  the  gymnasts,  dkiupovons  rrjs  nokttos  C.  I.  (add.)  1957 £,  cf.  2820  A. 
3616-17,  al. : — Pass.,  ol  dkfupdntvoi  the  youths  at  the  gymnastic  schools, 
those  who  were  in  training  for  the  games,  Ib.108  b,  256,  1183,  al.;  dA«i'- 
<pto-8ai  napd  tivi  to  attend  a  gymnastic  school,  Arr.  Epict.  I.  2,  26  ;  cf. 
dkfinTrjs  2.  3.  metaph.  to  prepare  as  if  for  gymnastics,  to  encou- 

rage, stimulate,  Demad.  180.  29,  Plat.  ap.  Diog.  L.  4.  6  ;  rjktuptv  [iav- 
rbv~\  ini  tov  Kkwbiov  App.  Civ.  2.  16,  cf.  Plut.  Themist.  3  :  cf.  dkcinT-ns 
2.  II.  like  inakti<pa>  in  Horn.,  generally  to  anoint,  daub,  plaster, 

besmear,  Lat.  linere,  ovara  dkfiipai  to  stop  up  the  ears,  Od.  12.  47,  177, 
200 ;  dk.  a'ipiaTi  Hdt.  3.  8  ;  iiikrw  Xen.  Oec.  10,  5  ;  ipifivBitp  Plat.  Lys. 
217  D.  III.  to  blot  out,  efface,  cf.  dkoitpr)  III. 

dXcid/is,  ecus,  r),  an  anointing,  Arist.  G.  A.  5.  5,  5,  al.  2.  a  method 
or  custom  of  anointing,  Hdt.  3.  22. 

dXtKTopeios,  ov,  (dkixTwp)  of  a  fowl,  wd  Synes.  167  D. 

dXcKTOpiScvs,  lews',  d,  a  chicken,  Ael.  N.  A.  7.  47. 

dAcKTOpis  [d] ,  ibos,  r),  fern,  of  akixrap  and  dktxrpvwv,  a  hen,  Epich. 
96  Ahr. ; — the  word  was  found  both  in  Trag.  and  Com.  (ace.  to  Phryn. 
p.  228,  ubi  v.  Lob.),  being  used  as  a  generic  name,  v.  Arist.  H.  A.  5.  13. 
2.,  9.  9,  3  ;  'ASpiaval  dk.,  a  small  kind,  lb.  6.  I,  3.  A  rare  form  dAeic- 
Tpvovis  occurs  in  Schol.  Ar.  Nub.  226,  where  however  Suid.  dktxTopis. 
cf.  Galen.  12.  285  ;  and  Ar.  introduced  a  form  dXeKTpuatvo,  by  analogy 
to  kiaiva,  Nub.  667. 

dXcKTOpio-Kos,  d,  Dim.  of  dkixrwp,  a  cockerel,  Babr.  5.  1.,  97.  9. 

dXcKTOpd-Xodios,  d,  cock's  comb,  a  plant,  Plin.  H.  N.  27.  23. 

dX€KTOpo-d><i>via,  r),  cock-crow,  i.  e.  the  third  watch  of  the  night,  Aesop. 
44  de  Furia,  Ev.  Marc.  13.  35,  and  Byz.  writers. 

d-X«KTOS,  ov,  not  to  be  told,  indescribable,  Pherecr.  Incert.  20,  Polyb. 
30.  13,  12,  etc. 

d-X«KTpos,  ov,  imbedded,  unwedded.  Soph.  Ant.  917,  etc.;  dkcxrp', 
dvvfiipa  ydpuuv  dfukkr)iiaTa,  much  like  ydptos  dyapios,  a  marriage  that 
is  no  marriage,  i.  e.  a  lawless,  unhallowed  marriage,  Id.  El.  492  ;  dA.  £6a 
Eur.  Tro.  254  (lyr.)  ;  dktxrpa  yrjpdaxetv,  as  Adv.,  Soph.  El.  962. 

dXeKTpvaiva,  r),  v.  sub  dktxropis. 

dX«KTpudv€ios,  ov,  of  a  fowl,  xpias  Hipp.  645  A. 

dXeKTpudvtov,  Td,  Dim.  of  dktKrpvwi',  Ephipp.  'O^fA.  1.  8. 

dAeKTpvovo-TrwXTjs,  ov,  6,  a  poulterer,  Poll.  7.  136. 

dX€KTpuovo-Tpod>os,  u,  a  cock-feeder,  Aeschin.  ap.  Poll.  7-  135- 

dX€KTpuovw8"r|S,  ts,  («8os)  like  fowls,  Eunap.  in  Phot.  Bibl.  24. 

dX€KTpvo-Trd»XT|S,  ov,  d,  =  dktxTpvovonuik-ns,  Lob.  Phryn.  669. 

dX«KTpvo-Tru»Xtov  or  -TrtuXTjTTjpiov,  to,  a  poultry-vutrket,  Phryn.  Com. 
ap.  Poll.  7.  135. 

dXeKTpvuv  [d],  ovos,  6,  a  cock,  gallus  gallinaceus,  Theogn.  864,  etc., 
cf.  Arist.  H.  A.  4.  9,  14,  etc. ;  d  dA.  abti  'tis  cock-crow,  Plat.  Symp. 
223  C.  II.  r),  *=  dkt xrpvaiva,  a  hen,  Ar.  Nub.  663,  Fr.  237,  Plat. 

Com.  AaiS.  I,  Theopomp.  Com.  E(p.  3,  etc.     Cf.  d\!*Taip,  dktxropis. 

dXlK-rup  [d]  (A),  opos,  i,  poet,  form  of  dktxTpvuv,  a  cock,  tail  iBur/atv 


dA.  Batr.  191,  cf.  Pind.  O.  12.  20,  Simon.  Si,  Aesch.  Ag.  1671,  Eum.  861; 
u!.o  in  later  Prose,  Arist.  Fr.  271,  C.  I.  523.  27.  II.  a  husband, 

consort,  Tzetz.  Lye.  1094,  and  so  perh.  in  Soph.  Fr.  730.  (Perh.,  like 
OKoiTTji,  aKo\os.  from  a  copul.,  Kfxrpov.) 

dAfKTup  (B).  opos,  7),  (a  privat.,  Af yaj)  —  aXtxrpos,  Ath.  98  B. 

dXtKcu  [al,  =  dA«fai,  to  ward  off,  a\ficois  vtviwv  Anth.  P.  6.  245,  ex 
coni.  Salinas,  pro  a\iyois : — for  the  fut.  &\(£<v,  etc.,  v.  sub  a\e£aj. 

dX-tXaiov,  to.  salted  oil,  Galea. 

dAfpaTos.  dXep-aTais,  Dor.  for  r}Af/i-. 

dXcv  and  dA«v.  v.  sub  fiXa)  in. 

dXf|-ai9pios,  ov,  screening  from  the  chill  air.  Soph.  Fr.  120. 

'AA«£avSpt£<iJ,  to  be  on  Alexander's  side,  Apolloph.  ap.  Ath.  251  D. 

'AAf£av8purTT|s,  ov,  6,  a  partisan  of  Alexander,  Plut.  Alex.  24. 

'AAefavSpo-KoAaf,  axos,  0,  a  flatterer  of  Alexander,  Ath.  538  F. 

dXf£-av8pos.  ov.  (dvqp)  defending  inert,  noXcpos  Inscr.  ap.  Diod.  II. 
14.  II.  the  usual  name  of  Paris  in  II.,  cf.  Aesch.  Ag.  61,  363. 

'AAf|av8pto>&ns,  ts,  (f78os)  Alexander-like,  Menand.  Incert.  39. 

dXe|avcu.ia.  r),  shelter  from  wind,  Polyb.  Mai.  2.  451. 

dXeJ-avep-os.  ov.  keeping  off  the  wind,  Od.  14.  529,  Philo   I.  666. 

dXc^T]u,a,  aros,  to,  (dAefa/)  a  defence,  guard,  help,  Aesch.  Pr.  479  ;  dA. 
TTpos  ti  a  defence  against  . . ,  Dion.  H.  7.  13. 

dA«J-T|vwp,  opos,  d,  aiding  man,  as  the  name  of  a  physician,  Paus.  2. 
1 1.  6,  in  Dor.  form  ~dva>p. 

dAc£-no~is,  tws,  r),  a  keeping  off,  defence,  vpbs  dX.  rpawiaOcu  Hdt. 
9.  18.  2.  a  helping,  assistance,  Hipp.  1279.  14. 

dAc{-f[Tcipa.  r),  Anth.  P.  9.  764,  Nonn. ;  fern,  from 

dXc^ijTTip.  rjpos,  d,  one  who  keeps  off,  Lat.  averrtincus,  dA.  pax*!*  stemmer 
of  battle,  II.  20.  396;  Xoi/wv  dA.  a  protector  from  plague,  Ap.  Rh.  2. 
519;  xaxwv  Epigr.  Gr.  831.  13; — rare  in  Prose,  tois  varpiatv  dXt£v- 
rrjpfs  uvat  Xen.  Oec.  4,  3.  II.  as  Adj.,  Svpos  dA.  Opp.  H.  4.  42. 

dX<|-r)TT|pios,  a.  ov,fit  or  able  to  keep  off,  defend  or  help,  esp.  as  epith. 
of  the  gods,  like  Lat.  Averrunci,  Z«is  dA.  Aesch.  Theb.  8 ;  (iXov  dA.  a  club 
for  defence,  Eur.  H.  F.  464.  2.  dXt(nri)piov  (sc.  (pap/xaxov),  to, 

a  remedy,  medicine,  Hipp.  Acut.  393 :  a  protection,  Xen.  Eq.  5,  6 ;  dA. 
Tr/j  Sr/Aijo-f  ok  a  charm  against  . . ,  Theophr.  H.  P.  7.  13,  4 ;  dA.  voioaiv 
C.  I.  1897. 

dXc|T]T^'p,  opos,  o,  =  dXt(nrfip,  Ztv  dAffrjrop,  Soph.  O.  C.  143. 

dXe|i  dpT)  [dp],  r),  (dpi)  she  that  keeps  off  a  curse,  or  (from  Apr/s)  she 
that  guards  from  death  and  ruin,  Hes.  Op.  462  ;  dA.  fidpvos  a  wand 
that  served  as  an  amulet,  Nic.  Th.  861. — The  masc.  dAcJtdpns  occurs 
in  Paus.  9.  25,  6,  cf.  Hesych. 

dAf£i-8fAtp.vo«.  ov,  keeping  off  darts,  Anth.  P.  6.  81. 

dAc£i-y&u,os.  ov,  shuumng  marriage,  Bd*xat  Nonn.  D.  40.  541. 

dXeJi-KdKOS,  ov,  keeping  off  ill  or  mischief,  prjvis  II.  10.  20,  cf.  Hes. 
Op.  123,  Paus.  8.  41,  8  :  c.  gen.,  titfrns  dA.  Anth.  P.  6.  170;  as  epith.  of 
Heracles,  Luc.  Alex.  4,  etc.,  cf.  Schol.  Ar.  Nub.  1375;  of  Hermes,  Ar. 
Vesp.  422. 

dXcJt-Xo-yos,  ov,  promoting  or  supporting  discourse,  ypdppara  Critias 
(Fr.I.  9)  ap.  Eust.  1 771.  44  (from  Ath.  28  ubi  Schweigh.  A«fi'A.),A.B.  382. 

dAe|i-u,J3pOTOV  ov,  protecting  mortals,  Xoyxt  Pind.  N.  8.  51  ;  dA.  wop- 
ita't  sacred  processions  to  shield  men  from  ill.  Id.  P.  5. 122. 

dAf  Ji-p-opos,  ov,  warding  off  death,  Tptoool  dA.,  i.  e.  Apollo,  Artemis, 
Athena,  Soph.  O.  T.  164. 

dAc£ipov.  t<S,  =  dAe£ nrfipiov,  Nic.  Th.  702  :  also  dAt'f  iov.  lb.  805,  Al.  4. 

uA«{is.  «vs,  7).  help,  E.  M.  59.  2  2.  II.  Kukm  aXt{iv  to>  'HpaxAf'a 

vopifovaiv  Aristid.  I.  60. 

&A<£i-$dpu4Kos.  keeping  off  poison,  acting  as  an  antidote,  flavins 
against  it,  Hipp.  1274.  19.  II.  dXf£i<pdppaxov,  to,  an  antidote, 

Lat.  remedium.  Plat.  Polit.  279  C,  Theophr.  H.  P.  9.  15,  7  ;  'A\f(t<pap- 
paxa,  title  of  a  poem  by  Nic.  2.  a  charm,   spell,   'Vjpiata  rots 

yapovaiv  .  .  Xiywv  dA.  Menand.  IIai8.  2.  3.  generally,  a  remedy, 

tivus  against  a  thing.  Plat.  Lcgg.  957  D. 

dAcfi-xopov  ov,  helping  or favouring  the  chorus,  'A0rjvat  C.  1. 5 1 1 .  III.  1 7. 

dAc£ci>  [d],  Ep.  inf.  uXftiptvat.  -  ipiv  Horn.;  tut.  dXi^rjoai  Id.:  aor. 
opt.  dA«£r)o-«it  Od.  3.  346: — Med.,  fut.  dAffr/ffo/uu  Hdt.  8.  81,  108. — 
Besides  these  tenses  (formed  as  if  from  dAff  f'oM,  we  find  others  formed 
from  dAcKu,  fut.  dXi(at,  aor.  r/Af£a  (v.  sub  dw-aA^ai)  : — Med.,  fut.dAf- 
(opai  Soph.  O.  T.  171,  539,  Xen.  An.  7.  7,  3:  aor.  dXi(ao$ai  II.,  Hdt., 
and  Xen.  An.  I.  3,  6.,  3.  4,  33.,  5.  5,  21.,  Cyr.  I.  5,  13  : — for  the  aor.  2 
dAaAxf ,  dXxaBtiv,  v.  sub  voce.     (For  ^AAK,  v.  sub  dAaAxc.)  To 

ward  or  keep  off.  turn  away  or  aside,  like  dpvvw,  and  constructed  like 
it ; — c.  ace.  rei,  Z«tij  to  7"  dXi( rjfffif  Od.  3.  346 ;  c.  ace.  rei  et  dat.  pers., 
Aavauioiv  d\i£i]fjuv  xaxuv  %pap  will  ward  it  off  from  them,  II.  9.  25 1, 
cf.  20.  315;  dAAT/Aois  .  .  dXt(ipfvat  <p6vov  alriv  17.  36$,  etc.: — then 
c.  dat.  pers.  only,  to  assist,  defend,  dXt(<ptv  dXX^Xoiotv  II.  3.  9,  cf.  I, 
779,  al.,  Xen.  Cyr.  4.  3,  2  ;  absol.  to  lend  aid,  II.  I.  590. —  Med.,  dAf- 
tao8ai  to  keep  off  from  oneself,  Lat.  defendere,  dXi(aaBat  .  .  xvvas  t;8f 
*ai  dvipas  II.  13.  475,  cf.  Hdt.  7.  207  :  also,  dXi(aa6at  wtpi  man  or  to-os- 
Ap.  Rh.  4.  551.  1488  :  absol.  to  defend  oneself,  II.  II.  348.,  15.  565, 
Archil.  66,  Hdt.  1.  211.,  2.  63,  al..  Soph.  O.T.539,  Xen.  Cyr.  1.5,  13; 
also  c.  dat.  instrum.,  ovo*  ivi  tppovrioos  «7X0S.  V  T(S  dA^crai  Soph. 
D«T.  171.  2.  in  Med.,  also,  to  recompense,  requite,  Tovt  tv  xat 

xaxan  wotovtrras  d\f(upuvos  Xen.  An.  1 .  9,  1 1. — Soph,  alone  of  the  Trag. 
has  the  word,  except  in  compd.  dir-  ;  and  Xen.  is  the  chief  authority  in 
Att.  Prose.  II.  =6Xiyai,  to  take  care  of,  protect,  only  in  the 

derivs.  a\*(is.  &Ae(l-p4ipoTos,  -x0P°s- 

.  dAcopxu  [dA],  contr.  dAiupeu  Theogu.  575,  also  dX<voiuu  Od.  24.  29, 
Hes.  Op.  533  :  part.  dA«o>«vos-  Simon.  Iamb.  7.  61  :  impf.  aXiovro  {i£   ) 

11.  iH.  586: — but  chiefly  used  by  Horn,  in  aor.,  v.  infr. :  inf.  AXiaa9ai, 
tiiadat  Hes.  Op.  732.  503  ;  part.  dAf  vapitvos  Od.  9.  277,  Theogu.  400. 


uXeKTwp  C1X.1;.  59 

(Prob.  from  same  Root  asd'A);,  dAdo/iai :  cf.  dAeoco,  akvanco,  vw-aK(vop.at, 

im-aKvatcai.)         Ep.  Dep.,  to  avoid,  shun,  c.  ace.  rei,  iyxfa  8'  dWrjKaiv 

d\eaj/i(8a  11.  6.  226;  i)\evaTO  xdA/ceov  «7xos  13.  184;  ip.bv  <7X0S  aKtvai 

;  dAetiaTO  xjjpa  p.iKaivav  3.  360  :   Aids  8'  aKcaiptBa  p.T)Vi.v  t,.  ■>, ; 

k^tos  .  .  dAe'aiTO  20.  147  ;   xaxov  .  .  ,  to  kiv  ovtis  .  .  diiatTo 


22.  285^ 

wppa  to  1 

Od.  20.  368  ;  pi$ovf  piiv  inripipiaAovs  dXiaaBe  4.  774 ;  rarely  c.  ace. 
pers.,  6iovs  ij  Sfi&ifMv  r)  dKiaoeai  9.  274 :— c.  inf.  to  avoid  doing,  KiBov 
S  d\earr6cu  iwavpetv  II.  23.  340  ;  dAcutTai  (Ep.  for  -nrat)  i)TTcpoirivfLV 
Od.  1 4.  400.  2.  absol.  to  flee  for  one's  life,  flee,  rbv  p.iv  dAeud- 

^fi-oi'  rbv  Si  xrapttvov  II.  5.  28  ;  oOe  .  .  ipvyiuv  Sivar  out'  dWtaoBat 
1 3.  436  ;  plt\  irtus  .  .  dAtT/Ttu  Od.  4.  396. 

dAeos.  uv,  =  dXfuvos,  Hesych.,  E.  M.  II.  v.  sub  ijAc<5s  11. 

dAcoTTjs,  17TOS,  7,  (dA^s)  an  assemblage,  like  dBpotois,  Galen. 

dA«6-<j>pu;v.  ov,  gen.  okos,  =  Homer's  (ppivai  r/Aeos-,  Hesych.,  E.  M.  59. 
45.     Cf.  ijAcos*. 

d-A«iri8a»Tos.  ov,  without  scales,  to  fftAdxr;  Arist.  P.  A.  4.  13,  23  ;  and 
so  Schneider,  for  the  faulty  form  d\eiros,  in  Ael.  N.  A.  12.  27. 

d-Xtirurros,  ov,  not  scaled,  unsealed,  Archestr.  ap.  Ath.  311  B.  II. 

unpeeled:  of  flax,  not  hackled,  Schol.  Ar.  Lys.  737. 

dXcots,  tens,  r),  (dAe'w)  a  grinding,  Geop.  2.  32,  cf. dAryo*iS":  also  dAeo-- 
p.6s,  o,  restored  from  Mss.  for  dAto'Tiui'  in  Joseph.  A.  J.  3.  10,  5. 

dA«cru.a.  aToy,  to,  meal,  Tzetz. 

dAwrreov,  verb.  Adj.  from  dAcar,  one  must  grind,  Diosc.  5.  103. 

dA«TTjs,  ov,  6,  a  grinder,  v.  sub  ovos-  VII.  2. 

dAcTOS,  o,  a  grinding,  Plut.  Anton.  45  ;  cf.  dArp-dy.  II.  the 

thing  ground,  meal,  Eust.  Opusc.  260.  35,  etc. 

dA€Tp«vu).  fut.  tvatu,  strengthd.  from  dXiai,  to  grind,  Od.  7.  104. 

dAe-TpCfJavos  [dA  . .  r],  d,  {rpi0a)  that  which  grinds  ov  pounds,  a  pestle, 
Ar.  Pax  259,  265,  269. 

dAerpis.  i'Sos",  r),  a  female  slave  who  grinds  corn,  Lat.  molitrix,  yvvr) 
dA«Tpi's  Od.  20.  105.  2.  at  Athens,  one  of  the  noble  maidens  who 

prepared  the  meal  for  the  offering-cakes,  Ar.  Lys.  643,  Eust.  1885.  9. 

dAcTpo-TrdSiov,  to,  the  constellation  Orion,  Petav.  Uranol.  p.  258. 

dX(Twv,  wvos,  0,  =  dXtTns,  dA.  oi'os,  the  upper  mill-stone,  v.  bvos  VII.  2  ; 
also  dAf  Ttii"  alone,  Dieuch.  ap.  Ath.  263  A,  Eust.,  etc. 

dXcv,  v.  sub  dAf  vup.ai. 

dAfvpirns  apros,  0,  bread  of  wheaten  flour  (dAfvpa),  Diph.  Siphn.  ap. 
Ath.  115  C. 

dA<upo-0T|KT|,  r),  a  flour-bin,  Hesych. 

dAfvpo-pavTfiov,  to,  divination  from  flour,  Oenom.  ap.  Eus.  P.  E.  219. 

dXfUpd-pavTis,  catt,  d,  one  that  divines  from  flour,  Clem.  Al.  10.  fin., 
Hesych.,  etc. ;  as  epith.  of  Apollo,  Lob.  Aglaoph.  2.  815:  cf.  dA<piTo^arri!. 

dAfupov  [d],  t6,  but  mostly  in  pi.  dAcvpa  (dA«'«i),  =  Homer's  dAfiara, 
wheaten  flour,  distinguished  from  d\<ptra,  Hdt.  7.  1 19;  ix  filv  twv 
xpt$wv  aAtptra  OKtva^ofuvoi,  ix  8<  rwv  mpwv  aktvpa  Plat.  Rep.  372  B, 
cf.  Legg.  849  C,  Xen.  An.  I.  5,  6,  Arist.  Probl.  I.  37 ; — in  sing.,  Ar.  Fr. 
141,  Sotad.   AAcvp.  I.  24,  Arist.  Probl.  21.  I.  2.  generally,  meal, 

dA.  xpiSivov  Diosc.  I.  94,  etc. 

dAfupo-rroifu,  to  make  into  flour,  E.  M.  62.  (4  :  -iroita,  r),  Eust. 

dA«vp6-TT|o-n,  fo»t,  r),  (aifiai) aflour-sieve.  Poll.  6.  74,  A.B.382.  II. 
the  flour  sifted,  fine  flour,  Suid. 

dX«vpw8i)S,  ts,  (f?8oy)  like  flour,  Galen. 

dXcuu,  used  rarely  by  Trag.  in  lyr.  passages  as  the  Act.  of  dXevofiai 
(v.  sub  dA<o/ia<),  to  remove,  keep  far  away,  Lat.  averruncor,  syncop. 
imp.  dXfv,  for  dAf uf,  Aesch.  Pr.  568  ;  fut.  dKtiioai  Soph.  Fr.  82J  ; 
aor.  imper.,  aAtvoov  dvbpwv  ijfSptv  Aesch.  Supp.  528,  cf:  Theb.  141;  iai 
Otiii  .  .  xaxbv  dXtvoare  lb.  87. 

dAni  [d] :  impf.  fjAowv  Pherecr.  'A7P.  1 :  aor.  f/Ktoa  Id.  Incert.  18,  Hipp., 
etc.,  Ep.  aXtaoa  («<"■-)  Od. :  pf.  dArjAcxa  Anth.  P.  II.  251  : — Pass.. 
pf.  dArjAcff/uu  Hdt.  7.  23,  Thuc.  4.  26  (where  however  Bekk.  dAr}Af/mc 
and  that  this  is  the  true  Att.  form  appears  from  the  metre,  if  rightly  given 
by  Meineke,  in  Amphis  Twaixopi.  I):  aor.  i)\io6i]v  Diosc.  I.  173.  To 
grind,  bruise,  pound,  xarci  irvpbv  dKeaoav  (which  properly  belongs  to 
xaraXia),  Od.  20.  109 ;  fjAow  Td  oiTi'a  Pherecr.  1.  c. :  $ios  dAijAf^tVos- 
a  civilised  life,  in  which  one  uses  ground  corn  and  not  raw  fruits,  v. 
Meineke  Amphis  I.  c. ;  dA«,  pii\n.  dA«  grind,  mill,  grind!  a  song  in 
Plut.  2.  157  E,  Bgk.  Carm.  Pop.  Lyr.  43.  (From  ^AA  come  also 

dXrjOv,  dxivw,  dAfiara,  dAfTos,  aAcupoi'  (but  not  oAtutoi'),  dAodaf,  aAais, 
dAtor; :  Buttm.  and  others  connect  this  Root  with  f  EA  in  «iA<u,  which 
view  is  supported  by  the  form  ouAaj  (barley-groats).  But  there  is  no 
trace  of  the  f  in  dXiai  and  its  derivs. ;  and  the  cognate  words  in  Lat. 
and  others  point  to  the  loss  of  an  initial  M,  so  that  the  orig.  Root  may 
have  been  MAA,  MOA,  Lat.  molo,  mola,  etc. ;  v.  sub  p-vKv.) 

*dAfu>.  only  used  in  Med.  d\iopat.  q.  v. 

dA«npT),  Att.  -pi,  7),  ■  dAt'ouHi !  avoidance,  escape,  II.  24.  216  ;  dA.  riva 
tiipiaBat  escape,  relief,  Hdt.  9.  6.  2.  c.  gen.  a  means  of  avoiding. 

a  defence  or  shelter  from,  or)tav  dvSpwv  dA.,  of  a  palisade,  II.  12.  57;  ot 
a  breastplate,  15.  533;  axtvtjv  fffXiaiv  dA.  (mock  heroic  verse),  Ar.  Vesp. 
613  ;  used  also  by  Arist.,  ri]v  mpl  to  owfia  dA.,  of  armour,  P.  A.  4.  10, 

23,  cf.  4.  5,  23,  H.  A.  I.  I,  31.,  9.  8,  1,  etc. 

dXfuKTOTW  :    V,    f',Af  f'..    II. 

dAi)  [d],  r),  wandering  or  roaming  without  home  or  hope  of  rest,  Od. 
10.  464,  al. :  fpx«Tat  8'  aKn  a  troop  rf  wandering  ghosts  (Hesych. 
nOpviapa).  Soph.  Fr.  693.  2.  wandering  of  mind,  distraction,  Lat. 

error  mentis,  Eur.  Med."  1 28?,  Plat.  Crat.  42 1  B.  II.  act.,  dAai 

Bporwv  ovaoppot,  of  storms  such  as  keep  men  wandering  without  haven 
and  rest,  Aesch.  Ag.  195.         (From  the  same  Root  seem  to  come  d\vai, 
dXvooat,  etc. ;  cf.  dAi«o.) 
dAt|  [a],  r>,  the  Lat.  ala,  a  mmdron  of  horse.  C.  I.  3991.  al 
dA-ri.  r),  only  used  in  pi.  dAai',  Lat.  salinae,  salt-works,  dAai  raw  bpvxTwv 


60 

akwr  Strabo  561  (as  restored  by  Meineke);  "AXus  .  .  wvufiaarai  awo  rwv 
aXwv  <&s  irapappu  (the  gend.  shows  it  is  not  from  a\s)  Id.  546  ;  so  d\ats 
is  restored  for  aAAat;,  Id.  831  ;  d\dsf  dAatV  for  d\kas,  dWats  in  Dion. 
H.  3.  41  ;  and  no  doubt  rwv  dkuiv  belongs  to  this  word,  not  to  d'Xs, 

oX-twos,  ov,  carrying  salt,  Plut.  2.  685  E. 

o-Xi)8dpYi)Tos,  op,  /r«  /rom  lethargy,  ever  wakeftd,  C.  I.  2804, 
Hesych.,  etc. 

aXT|8«ia  [dA],  ij,  Dor.  aXdOcia ;  Ep.  also  uAr|9eia.  but  the  forms  dXi;- 
flti'17,  -qtrj  111  Mss.  of  Hdt.  are  false,  v.  Dind.  de  Dial.  Hdt.  p.  xi :  (dAij- 
017$) :  I.  truth,  opp.  to  a  lie,  or  to  mere  appearance :  1. 

in  Horn.,  and  Pind.,  only  as  opp.  to  a  lie,  and  Horn,  mostly  has  it  in 
phrase  aXrfidrjv  naTaki(ai,  II.  24.  407,  al. ;  dA.  diroetireiV  23.  361  ; 
iratSds  naaav  dA.  fiv$€ia9ai  to  tell  the  whole  truth  about  the  lad,  Od. 
II.  507,  cf.  Pind.  N.  5.  31  ;  so  too  in  Hdt.  and  Att.,  dirAd  yap  ian  ti}s 
dA.  itrn  Aesch.  Fr.  173,  cf.  Eur.  Phoen.  472  ;  xpaoSai  tt)  dA.  Hdt.  1. 
116;  (hat  t^p  dA.  Id.  6.  69  ;  r)  dA.  irepi  tipos  Thuc.  4.  122,  Soph.  Tr.  9 1 ; 
dA.  fxf'v  to  be  true,  Arist.  Pol.  3.  II,  I :  also  in  pi.,  rats  dA.  xPVa^ai 
Isocr.  p.  190  A ;  rds  dA.  Xiyuv  Menand.  'A<pp.  3,  al. : — 'AAiJfleia  was 
the  title  of  a  work  by  Protag.,  Plat.  Theaet.  161  C,  162  A,  Crat. 
391  C.  2.  in  Att.  also  opp.  to  appearance,  truth,  reality,  ij  dA.  tcup 

npax^ivraiv  Antipho  119.  21  ;  raiv  ipywv  i)  dA.  Thuc.  2.  41  ;  fUftT/fiara 
aX-rfttias  Plat.  Polit.  300  D  : — in  adverb,  usages,  t>)  d\r)9uq  in  very 
truth,  Thuc.  4.  120,  etc. ;  so,  rats  dXrjBciaiaiv  Philem.  Incert.  40  a,  cf. 
Babr.  75.  20 ;  rarely  (without  the  Art.)  d\r)0(iq,  as  Plat.  Prot.  343  D  ; — 
also  with  Preps.,  in  d\r)9eias  in  truth  and  reality,  Dem.  323.  26;  €7ri 
rrjs  dXrj$fias  leal  tou  irpayiiaros  Id.  538.  4  ;  but,  eV  a\i]6eiafor  the  end 
or  sake  0/ truth,  Aesch.  Supp.  628,  Ar.  PI.  891  ;  also  according  to  truth 
and  nature,  Theocr.  7.  44; — /x«t'  dKrfidas  Xen.  Mem.  2.  I,  27,  Dem. 
19.  I  ; — xarct  ttiv  dA.  Isocr.  242  A,  etc. ;  nar'  d\T)9aav  Arist.  Pol.  3. 
6,  6,  etc. ; — fiiv  dkrfida.  Aesch.  Ag.  1567  ; — 7rpos  dA^fleiap  Diod.  5.  67, 
etc.  3.  in  Polyb.  real  war,  as  opp.  to  exercise  or  parade,  5.  63, 

13,  etc.  4.  the  true  event  or  realisation  of  a  dream  or  omen,  Hdt. 

3.  64,  Damon  ap.  Schol.  Ar.  PI.  1003;  cf.  dAijfl^s  I.  3.  II.  the 
character  of  the  d\r)07is,  truthfulness,  sincerity,  frankness,  candour,  Hdt. 
I.  55  ;  d\a9iiq  ipptvwv  Aesch.  Ag.  1550;   cf.  Arist.  Eth.  N.  2.  7,  12., 

4.  7.  III.  the  symbol  of  truth,  a  sapphire  ornament  worn  by 
the  Egyptian  high-priest,  Diod.  I.  48  and  75,  Ael.  V.  H.  14.  34:  so  of 
the  Thummim,  Lxx. 

&\T|9«tKn.s,  ecus,  7),  =  dAiJfeia  II,  Sext.  Emp.  M.  7.  394. 

dAi)0«UTT|S,  ov,  o.  a  truthful,  candid  man.  Max.  Tyr.  21.6. 

c1Xt|9«vtuc6s,  17,  op,  truthful,  frank,  candid,  Arist.  Eth.  N.  4.  7.  Adv. 
-kws,  Eust.  385.  6,  etc. 

dXii,9tiJcu,  fut.  fuffai  Xen.  Mem.  1.1,5,  a'-: — '°  *c  dXrjBrjs,  to  speak  truth, 
Aesch.  Theb.  562,  Hipp.  Progn.  42,  Plat.  Rep.  589  C  ;  trepi  Tt  Id.  Theaet. 
202  B  ;  and  with  neut.  Adj.,  dA.  trdvra  to  speak  truth  in  all  things,  Batr. 
14;  7roAAd  dA.  Xen.  An.  4.  4,  15  ;  so  also,  rds  Siica  r/uipas  7)\rjdevo€ 
he  rightly  foretold  .  .  ,  lb.  5.  6,  18 ;  dA.  tous  inaivovs  to  prove 
their  praises  true,  Luc.  Indoct.  20.  2.  of  things,  to  be  or  prove 

true,  Brjixeia  Hipp.  Progn.  46 : — Arist.  often  uses  the  word  ;  in  Act.  of 
reasoners,  to  arrive  at  the  truth,  Metaph.  3.  5,  2,  al. ;  in  Pass,  of  argu- 
ments, to  be  in  accordance  with  truth,  Top.  5.  4,  2  sq.,  al. ;  fut.  rued,  in 
same  sense,  Eth.  N.  I.  10,  7,  al. ;  d\rj9ev(a0ai  Kara  rivos  to  be  truly 
predicated  of .  .  ,  Id.  Metaph.  3.  6,  10 :— Med.  in  act.  sense,  to  speak 
truth,  Xen.  Cyr.  4.  6,  10  (unless  with  Schneid.  we  read  iirl  toutois  dA7)- 
9(vo/iivois  on  the  fulfilment  of  these  conditions). 

d\7]0T|s  [d],  Dor.  d\u0T)s.  e's,  (At/0cu,  =  Aapfldpcu ;  d\ij0is  to  /n)  XrjBov, 
said  Heraclit.)  : — unconcealed,  and  so  true,  real,  as  opp.  to  false,  or  to 
apparent :  I.  in  Horn.,  as  opp.  to  TptvS-qs,  in  phrases  dX-qBia 

Iiv$rjaaa6ai,  eiirefp,  dyopfvuv,  d\n6is  ivioireiv  II.  6.  382,  Od.  13.  254., 
3.  254,  247,  al.  ;  in  Hdt.,  and  Att.,  to  dkrj&ts,  by  Trag.  crasis  TclA^es, 
Ion.  TuiKrfiis  (Hdt.  6.  68,  69),  or  Ta  dXrfiT],  by  crasis  TaAijflij,  etc. ; 
d\rj9ii  Ao-ycv  xPVa&at  Hdt.  I.  14,  etc. ;  d^-nBeaTarrj  irp6(pa<ris  Thuc.  I. 
23.  2.  of  persons,  truthful,  frank,  honest,  in  Horn,  only  once, 

dAt;0j)s  yvvri  II.  12.  433  ;  so,  dA.  pdos  Pind.  O.  2.  167  ;  xarriyopos  Aesch. 
Theb.  439;  dA.  Kptrqs  Thuc.  3.  56;  olvos  dA.  effTt  '  in  vino  Veritas,*  Plat. 
Synvp.  217  E,  cf.  Arist.  Eth.  N.  4.  7 ;  d\rjBh  tlvcu  Sef  to  atpvov  Menand. 
Incert.  478.  3.  of  oracles,  true,  unerring,  Lat.  certus,  dKa6ia 

navriwv  Bwnov  Pind.  P.  II.  II,  cf.  Eur.  Ion  1537,  Soph.  Ph.  993;  of 
dreams,  Aesch.  Theb.  692  ;  cf.  d\r)9aa  I.  4.  II.  of  qualities  or 

events,  true,  real,  <pi\os  Eur.  Or.  414  ;  dA.  to  irpax9iv  Antipho  112. 
15.  2.  realising  itself,  coming  to  fulfilment,  dpd  Aesch.  Theb.  946, 

cf.  Eum.  796 ;  and  v.  dKrftivos.  III.  Adv.  dAn0cu$,  Ion.  -Bias, 

truly,  Simon.  5,  Hdt.  I.  II,  al.,  Aesch.  Supp.  310,  etc.  b.  really, 

actually,  in  reality,  yivos  TdSe  Xt)vos  ianv  dA.  lb.  585  ;  dA.,  ouSep 
((■nxaa/iiva  Id.  Ag.  1244;  so  Thuc.  1.  22,  etc. ;  rfjv  dXrjOu/s  /ioummje 
(sc.  oJffay)  Antiph.  TpiT.  I.  6; — also,  ws  dAi;8ais  Eur.  Or.  730,  Plat. 
Phaedr.  63  A,  etc. ;  ^  /i«v  yap  urs  d\-rj$uis  HVTrlP  Dem.  563.  3 ;  ws  5i) 
dAi70f'ais  as  if  really,  Hdt.  3.  155;  so  also,  oi  d\ifii'C  \6yqi  0aoi\ifS 
really,  Id.  I.  120.  2.  also  neut.  as  Adv.,  proparox.  aXrftes ;  itanel 

indeed?  really?  in  sooth?  ironically,  Soph.  O.  T.  350,  Ant.  758,  Eur. 
Cycl.  241,  Ar.  Ran.  840,  Av.  174 ;  cf.  4t«Ss  II :— but  to  d\r)$ls  in  very 
truth,  really  and  truly,  Lat.  revera,  Plat.  Phaedo  102  B,  etc. ;  so,  to 
dKrfiiararov  Thuc.  7.  67. 

dAT)0(£o[mi..  Dep.  =  d\r/0iva>,  Hdt.  1. 136.,  3.  72,  Alciphro  3.  39,  59  : — 
Act.  <!Xt]0i£(i>  only  in  Plut.  2.  230  B. 

dXT|8tvo-AoYia,  17,  a  speaking  truth,  Plat.  ap.  Poll.  2.  124,  Polyb. 

dArjOtvos,  17,  ov,  agreeable  to  truth :  1.  of  persons,  truthful,  trusty, 

Xen.  An.  1.9,  17,  Dem.  113.  27.  2.  of  things,  real  and  true,  genuine, 
opp.  to  apparent  or  sham,  Plat.  Rep.  499  C,  etc. ;  l\9vt  Amphis  AfUK. 


aXtiyos  —  aXde^ts. 


I ;  7T('Aa7os  Menand.  'App.  I :  Td  dA.  real  objects,  opp.  to  Td  yeypaiiytiva, 
Arist.  Pol.  3.  II,  4;  so  of  persons,  «s  dA.  dvSp'  diro$rjvai  to  turn  out  a 
genuine  man,  Theocr.  13.  15: — Adv.  -vws,  truly,  really,  Isocr.  HI  B, 
Plat.,  etc. ;  (rjv  dA.  to  be  really  alive,  Plat.  Tim.  19  B  ;  dA.  yiyd^xiv ; 
Antiph.  *iA.  1. 

dXT)9o-Yv<oo-ia,  fj,  (yvwvai)  knowledge  of  truth,  Dion.  Areop. 

dAT)8o-emf|S,  is,  speaking  truth,  Hesych. 

dX7)96-|uLVTis,  <5,  f),  prophet  of  truth,  Aesch.  Ag.  1341  ;  cf.  aa/tofiavTis. 

oAt|0ou,v6<u,  to  speak  truth,  Democr.  ap.  Stob.  140.  26. 

dXT|96-u.c8os,  ov,  speaking  truth,  Democr.  p.  627  ed.  Gal. 

dA-rj9o-iTot€w,  to  make  or  prove  true,  t»  Euthym. 

dXi)0-opK€u,  to  swear  truly,  Chrysipp.  ap.  Stob.  196.  58;  v.  imopitiui. 

dXr)9oawr|,  7),  poet,  for  d\7j6aa,  Theogn.  1226. 

d\r)9oTT)S,  yros,  1),  =  d\rj$(ia,  Sext.  Emp.  M.  8.  472. 

dA-r|9oupYT|S,  is,  (*ipya)  acting  truly,  Heracl.  Alleg.  Horn.  67. 

d\-r)9oi  [4],  later  form  of  the  Att.  dAe'cu,  only  used  in  pres.  (and  impf., 
Lxx),  Theophr.  C.  P.  4.  12,  13,  Diod.  3.  13,  Anth.  P.  II.  154.  V. 
Meineke  Com.  Gr.  2.  285. 

'AXt|iov  neSiov,  to,  (01A17),  lit.  the  land  of  wandering,  in  Lycia  or  Cilicia, 
icdrr  TTtdiov  to  AA^ioy  otos  dAaTO,  .  .  irdrov  dv&pumwv  dKttivatv  (where 
there  is  a  double  play  on  dAaTO,  dXttivav),  II.  6.  201,  cf.  Hdt.  6.  95. 

oXt|IOS,  ov,  (A1710C)  without  corn-la?tds  or  fields,  poor  in  lands,  opp.  to 
iroAuAiJios,  II.  9.  125,  267. 

dATjKio-ira>Xi)S,  ov,  0,  (Lat.  halec)  a  dealer  in  fish-pickle,  C.  I.  9185. 

oXt/ktos,  ov,  (\rjya>)  unceasing,  C.  I.  6303  (postulante  metro)  ;  cf. 
dWjj/cros. 

dX-f|X«Ka,  dXr)Xcu,ca  or  -to-p.ai,  v.  sub  dAc'ai,  to  grind. 

a\-i\\Xd*a,  dArjXiu,u.ai,  v.  sub  akfiifw. 

dXr)p.a  [dA],  aTos,  to,  (dAe'cu)  fine  meal :  used  metaph.  by  Soph,  of  a 
fine-witted,  wily  knave,  such  as  Ulysses  (like  7rai7rdAi7/io,  Tpipiu-a),  Aj. 
381,  390  (lyr)  : — cf.  AdAi7/ta. 

d\i']u.evcu,  dXfjvcu.  v.  sub  «lAcu  III. 

dXT)u,ocruvir),  i),  (01A77)  a  wandering  about,  Dion.  P.  716:  in  pi.,  Ap.  Rh. 
2.  1264. 

dXT|u,cov  [fi],  ovos,  6,  if,  (dAdo/*ai)  a  wanderer,  rover,  dXij^ioviS  dvSpts 
Od.  iq.  74;  of  planets,  Anth.  P.  9.  25;  and  absol.,  Od.  17.  376.    Ep.  word. 

oXt||,  rjKos,  o,  a  kind  of  pulse,  Alex.  Trail. 

d-X-nirros,  ov,  not  to  be  laid  hold  of,  hard  to  catch,  Plut.,  etc. ;  in  Comp., 
d\j]Trr6T€pos  less  amenable,  Thuc.  1.  37,  82,  143.  II.  incom- 

prehensible, Plut.  Nic.  11,  al.  III.  in  Stoic  philosophy  aKrjwra 

are  things  not  to  be  made  matter  of  choice,  opp.  to  Airirrd. 

dXrjs,  is.  Ion.  word  equiv.  to  Att.  dSpoos,  thronged,  crowded,  in  a  mass, 
Lat.  confertus,  Hdt.  and  Hipp. ;  either  in  pi.,  us  d\ies  tirjaav  oi  "EWrjves 
Hdt.  9.  15,  cf.  I.  196.,  3.  13,  al. ;  or  with  collective  nouns,  dAiJr  7fi>o- 
\iivT}  trdaa  ij  'EAAds-  7.  157;  dAi)?  Iwv  u  orparos  lb.  236;  dKiat  ixtv  . . , 
opp.  to  ivl  Si  i/cdaTcp  .  .  4.  184 ;  Kara  jiiv  'iva  .  .  ,  d\i(s  Si  . .  7.  104 ; 
Xpiovrat  inapoprifMaoi  .  .  ovk  dA«Vt  not  all  put  on  table  at  otice,  1.  133: 
— to  this  word  Gottl.  refers  Hes.  Op.  491,  dAea  KiaxV  tn£  crowded 
hall,  where  others  take  dA«a  =  dXtttvov.  Adv.  -iais,  Hipp.  604. 
49.  (From  ^'AA,  akin  to  /^EA  in  ei'Aoj,  cf.  aor.  2  pass.  idKrjv, 

dkrjvai :  hence  also  dcAAiJs,  doAAiJs,  d'Ais,  dAi'fai  [a],  dAi'a  [aA], 
^Aiata.)  [a,  as  appears  from  Hes.  1.  c,  if  rightly  referred  to  this  word, 

but  at  all  events  from  Call.  Fr.  86,  and  dAifcu.] 

oXtjo-is,  ecus,  ^,  (dAdo/iai),  =  dAi7,  of  the  course  of  the  sun,  Arat. 
319.  II.   (dAe'cu)  a  grinding,  Achmes  Onir.  194,  Geop.  9.  19, 

cf.  d\(ais. 

dXT)cru.6s,  0,  (dAe'cu)  a  grinding,  crushing,  Ignat.  Rom.  5. 

d-Xrfo-TtUTOS,  oi',  unpillaged,  Joseph.  A.  J.  18.  9,  4,  Arr.  Epict.  4.  I,  93. 

d-XTjo-Tos,  ov,  v.  sub  aKaoTos. 

dXr|T€ta,  Dor.  dXarcCa,  r},  a  wandering,  roaming;  Svankdvois  dAa- 
reiais  Aesch.  Pr.  900  (lyr.)  ;  dAaTeta  fitorov  raXat<ppwv  Eur.  Hel.  523, 

cf-  934-, 

dXTjTeixo,  fut.  aai  Eur.  Heracl.  515  : — to  be  an  d\rjTijs,  to  wander,  roam 
about,  mostly  of  beggars,  Od.  17.  501,  al. ;  but  also  of  hunters,  12.  330: 
of  exiles,  Eur.  1.  c,  Hipp.  1048,  etc. 

dX*r*|TT|3  [a],  ov,  Dor.  dXcvras,  a,  o;  voc.  dA^Ta  Soph.  O.  C.  1096,  Dor. 
dAaTa  lb.  165 :  (dAdo/iac).  A  wanderer,  stroller,  rover,  vagabond, 
Lat.  erro,  Horn,  only  in  Od.,  and  always  of  beggars  (17.  420,  al.) ; 
in  Trag.  also  of  exiles,  Aesch.  Ag.  1 282,  Cho.  1042,  Soph.  O.  C.  50,  746, 
Eur.  Heracl.  224,  Supp.  281  : — top  naitpav  ukdrav  -novaiv  one  who  has 
wandered  in  long  labour,  Soph.  Aj.  888.  2.  as  Adj.  vagrant,  roving, 

0ios  dA^T^s-  Hdt.  3.  52  : — so  also  fern.  dXfJTis,  180s,  as  the  name  of  a  song 
in  honour  of  Erigone,  Arist.  Fr.  472,  Poll.  4.  55,  Hesych.  s. v.;  cf.  iwpa  II. 

dXT|T0-«i8T|S,  es,  like  meal,  meal-coloured,  Hipp.  Coac.  217. 

dX-nTOv,  to,  meal,  flour,  (cf.  dXivpov),  Hipp.  Art.  802,  Rhinthon  ap. 
Ath.  500  F. 

dXi^TOS,  o,  poet,  for  dAeTciy,  (is  dA.  iirpdOn  was  sold  to  grind  in  the 
mill,  Babr.  29.  I. 

dXT|TVS,  vos,  ij,  Ion.  for  0X17,  Call.  Fr.  277. 

dXOata,  1),  wild  mallow,  marsh  mallow,  Theophr.  H.  P.  9.  15,  5  : — as 
prop,  name,  II.  9.  555. 

dX9aivco,  to  heal,  'Lye.  582  :  fut.  dXBijau  Nic.  Th.  587  :  aor.  7J\$Tjoa 
lb.  496,  Al.  112  : — Pass,  to  become  whole  and  sound,  pres.,  ini/v  t& 
e'A/cos  dX$aivnTat  Hipp.  472.  4  :  Ep.  impf.  or  aor.  dA9«To  x(iP  "• 
5.  417;  dXOopivn  Q^  Sm.  9.  475  (where  perh.  dA8o^eVi7  is  better, 
v.  Spitzn.)  :  fut.  dXSrjOO/iat  (drr-)  II.  8.  405  :  aor.  d\6(a$ijvai  (aw-) 
Hipp.  Art.  792  D  (cf.  dx^eo'f^i'ai  from  dxfo/iai) : — later  aor.  nied. 
i)\6riodiJ.-nv  Poeta  de  Herb.  44  :  cf.  aX6((is.  (With  ^AA©,  cf.  Skt. 
ardh  (to  thrive),  ardhukas  (thriving),  Zd.  ared  (to  grow).) 

dX9eJis,  tws,  i),  a  healing,  cure,  Hipp.  Fract.  758,  Art.  800  (where 


a\#ew  —  a\iv8>]<Tts. 


61 


Galen.  d$tX£it),  cf.  Aretae.  Cur.  M.  Ac.  2.   2  : — a  fut.  med.  dX6<(ou,ai 
(as  if  from  *iXBiaaoi)  =  dXb^aopMi,  occurs  in  Caus.  M.  Diut.  2.  8. 
dX0«vs,  ioit,  d,  a  healer,  physician,  Hesych. 

d\0Tj«ts,   fffffa,  tv,  healing,  wholesome,  Nic.  Th.  84,  645. 

dX0co"TT|pta,  to,  remedies,  Nic.  Th.  493. 

dXIrqo-icw  or  dX8io-Ktj.  =  dXOalvtu,  Hipp.  472.  31. 

dAdos,  tot,  to,  a  healing,  medicine,  E.  M.,  Hesych. 

4Xia,  Ion.  -£t|  [aX-,  v.  sub  dXijs],  1),  an  assembly  of  the  people,  in 
Dor.  states,  answering  to  the  Art.  (KKXijaia,  as  at  Sparta,  dA.  avXXiyttv 
Hdt.  7.  134 ;  at  Byzantium,  Decret.  ap.  Dem.  255.  21  ;  at  Corcyra, 
C.  I.  1841-5;  in  Sicily  and  Magna  Graecia,  Inscr.  Sicil.  ib.  5475-91, 
Tab.  Heracl.  ib.  5774.  1 18.,  5775.  10:  cf.  dXiaff/ia,  dXtaia,  doXXrjt, 
TjKiala.  II.   Hdt.    uses  the   word  generally,  dXinv  iroittaOai,  at 

Miletus,  5.  29;   at  Thebes,  Ib.  79;  of  the  Persians,  1.  125. 

dXia  [SX],  1),  (dAs)  a  mortar  for  pounding  salt,  a  salt-cellar,  Archipp. 
'HpaxK.  6,  Strattis  Ktvrjtr.  2  ;  dXiij-K  Tpxntdv  to  clear  out  the  salt-cellar, 
a  mark  of  extreme  poTerty,  (as  Persius,  digito  terebrare  salinum),  Apoll. 
Tyan.  Ep.  7,  ct  Call.  Ep.  50.  I. 

aXid8T|S,  ov,  d,  (dXs)  a  seaman,  Soph.  Aj.  880  (lyr.). 

dXi-a«TOS,  poet,  -aitros,  6,  the  sea-eagle,  prob.  the  osprey,  falco 
haliaetus  L.,  Eur.  Fr.  637,  Ar.  Av.  891,  Arist.  H.  A.  9.  32. 

iXi-drp.  it,  (dnpu)  blowing  seaward,  only  in  Od.  4.  361,  cf.  Nitzsch  ad  1. 

dXuua,  7],  —  dAi'a,  fjXiala.  at  Epidamnus  and  Tarentum,  Arist.  Pol. 
5.  1,9,  Hesych. 

dAuucds,  17,  oV,  Dor.  for  iJXiaxds. 

dXt-avfrqs,  is,  properly  sea-blooming,  hence  =  aXtwSfKpvpos,  bright  pur- 
ple, Anth.  P.  5.  228.,  7.  705. 

dXiapds,  ov,  (dAs)  salted,  Eust.  1 506.  61. 

AXids,  doot,  fi,  (dAs)  of  ox  belonging  to  the  sea :  dXtds  (sc.  Kvp&a),  ft,  a 
fishing-boat  or  bark,  Arist.  H.  A.  4. 8, 1 2 ,  Moschio  ap.  Ath.  208  F,  Diod.  3. 2 1 . 

dXias.  v.  dXis  sub  fin. 

dXtao-uA,  to,  (dXid)  a  decree,  liovXas  Inscr.  Sicil.  in  C.  I.  5475.  5,  cf. 

-76.  -9'; 

dAuurrfp,  Dor.  jJXiao-nJs. 

dXiao-ros,  ov,  (Aid£opat)  unbending,  unabating,  not  to  be  stayed  or 
turned,  f^XV'  opabot,  700?  II.  14.  57.,  12.  471.,  24.  760*  wdXtfwv  8* 
dkiaOTov  iytipt  20.  31  ;  dA.  dvit]  Hes.  Th.  611  ;  neut.  as  Adv.,  /njS" 
dxiaarov  ubvpto  nor  mourn  incessant,  II.  24.  549  ;  and  in  same  sense, 
$pf)v  dxiaorot  tppioott  Eur.  Hec.  85.  II.  of  persons,  undaunted, 

Eur.  Or.  1479. — Ep.  word,  used  twice  by  Eur.  in  lyric  passages. 

d-Xlp^dvurot  [&v] ,  ov,  not  honoured  with  incense.  Plat.  Com.  Tlotirr.  I . 

dXi-pV-irros,  of,  dipped  in  the  sea,  drowned  therein,  Nic.  Al.  618  [where 
SXI-  in  arsi]. 

dXiPas,  avros,  d.  a  dead  body,  corpse,  Hippon.  102  ;  tvtpot  Kal  dXi- 
Pavrtt  Plat.  Rep.  387  C ;    cf.  Schol.  Ar.  Ran.  188,  196.  2.  the 

dead  river,  i.  e.  the  Styx,  Soph.  Fr.  751,  cf.  831.  3.  dead  wine, 

i.  e.  vinegar,  i$n(av  otov  (v.  I.  olvov)  dXiffavra  trivovrtt  Call.  Fr.  88  ; 
r.  E.  M.  63.  52.  (Nothing  is  known  of  the  origin  of  the  word  ;  for  the 
notion  of  the  Gramm.  that  it  properly  means  dry,  withered  (a  privat.  and 
Ai/Jds)  is  refuted  by  the  fact  that  the  quantity  is  SXiffat.  Hesych.  cites  a 
Lacon.  word  dxxdXt$ap  =  xpd$0arot,  which  may  be  related.) 

dXipVroi,  ov.  Dor.  for  i>Xi/3aTos. 

&Ai-f3&4>T|t,  it,  =  dXi#airroj,  noXiSova  auiy-aS  &Xt0a<prj  restored  in 
Aesch.  Pers.  275  (lyr.),  for  dxibova  a.  woXv0cup^. 

dXifftvu  [0],  Aeol.  for  *dXiouar,  to  sink  or  submerge  in  the  sea,  vijai 
aXt0biovoi  Call.  Fr.  269:  to  hide,  aor.  dXt0bvaaaa  Lye.  351.  Peril,  it 
should  be  written  dXl  08-. 

dX£-Pp<KTos,  ov,  washed  by  the  sea,  Anth.  P.  7.  501,  Nonn. 

4Xi-f3pou.os,  ov,  murmuring  like  the  sea,  Nonn.  D.  43.  385. 

dXC-/3poxos,  ov,  =  dXi0ptxTot,  Ap.  Rh.  2.  731. 

4Xi-{3pwros,    ov,    swallowed   by   the  sea.    Lye.    760;    also  4A(-f3pus. 

AUTOS,    Id.    443. 

dXtySovirej,  ov,  poet,  for  dXi'ooviros,  Opp.  H.  5.  423,  Nonn. 

&Xi-y<ituv.  ok,  gen.  okos,  near  the  sea,  Ep.  Horn.  4. 

4Xi-Y«v-f(*.  it,  sea-born,  of  Aphrodite,  Plut.  2.  685  E. 

dAtyicioi  [d],  ov,  resembling,  like,  dX.  doript  nakcji  II.  6.  401  ;  dX. 
dSavaroiaiv  Od.  8.  174  ;  dX.  -bpinamv  C.  I.  6235.  3  ; — but  the  compd. 
ivaKiyntos  is  more  freq. — Ep.  word,  used  once  by  Emped.  138  and 
Aesch.  Pr.  440  ovtipdrajv  dXtyxioi  poppaiatv.  (Of  uncertain  deriv. : 
pern,  akin  to  f/Kif,  ijAi/rot.) 

d-Xiyu-YXoHTo-os,  ok,  with  no  clear-toned  voice,  not  voluble,  Timo  ap. 
Sext.  Emp.  M.  9.  57. 

&Ai-S!v-f|s,  it,  sea-tost,  Dion.  P.  908. 

4Ai-Sovoy  ov,  sea-tost,  v.  sub  dXiSacpr/t. 

4Ai-Soimos,  ok,  sea-resounding,  of  Poseidon,  Orph.  H.  1 7.  4  :  cf.  dX/78-. 

4Xi-Spou,os,  ok,  running  over  the  sea,  Nonn.  D.  43.  281. 

dXuta,  fi,  (dkitvs)  fishing,  Arist.  Pol.  1.  8,  7,  6ec.  2.  4,  2,  Strabo, 
etc.  ;  cf.  dXfi'a. 

'AXwio,  to,  Dor.  for  'HAnfa,  the  festival  of  the  Sun,  at  Rhodes,  Lysipp. 
(?)  Incert.  2  ;  v.  Meineke  5.  p.  52. 

&Xi-4iorp,  it,  sea-coloured,  Numen.  ap.  Ath.  305  C. 

4Xi-«pyth,  it,  working  in  the  sea,  fishing,  Opp.  H.  4.  635  :  also  4Ai- 
•PY«,  6v,  Nonn.  D.  40.  306.  II.  —  dXovpy/it,  purple,  E.  M. 

&Xi-tpKT|f ,  it,  sea-fenced,  sea-girl,  of  Aegina,  Pind.  O.  8.  34  ;  of  the 
Isthmus,  Id.  I.  I.  10  ;  dX.  6\$ai  Id.  P.  1.  34. 

dXi«uuA,  aTot,  to,  (dAutiai)  a  draught  offish,  Strabo  493. 

dXitus,  i  :  gen.  ioit.  Ion.  ^or,  and  contr.  dXiw;  Pherecr.  Incert.  27  ! 
ace.  pi.  dAi<at  Antiph.  XlKova.  1.17,  Alex.  'OS.  2  ;  gen.  dXu'atK  Id.  'EXX. 
1.5:  (&\t,  aKiot).         One  who  has  to  do  with  the  sea,  and  so,  1.  a 

fifher,   Od.    12.    251.,   22.  384,    Hdt.   3.    42,    Soph.    Fr.    118,    Plat.,  \. 


etc.  2.  a  seaman,  sailor,  Od.  24.  419  ;  iphat  d\iijat  rowers  on 

the  sea,  16.  349  ;  so,  aKitvs  arparot  Opp.  H.  5.  121,  v.  /SaTpavos  II. 

&X«vtt|s,  ov,  6,  =  foreg.  I,  Theodoret. 

dXtctmKos,  ■q,  ov,  of  or  for  fishing,  dX.  irXoiW  a  fishing-boit,  Xen.  An. 

7.  I,  20  ;  dX.  koXo/jos  a  fishing-rod,  Arist.  P.  A.  4.  12,  11  j  dX.  0ios  a 
fisher's  life,  Id.  Pol.  1.  8,  8  ; — ij  -*ij  (with  or  without  rixvn)  the  art  of 
fishing.  Plat.  Ion  538  D,  Soph.  220  B  ;  Td  'AXitort/cd  a  poem  by  Opp. 
on  this  subject.  II.  of  persons,  engaged  in  fishing,  Arist.  Pol.  4.  4,  21. 

dXicOu,  (dAs)  to  fish,  Ev.  Joann.  21.3:  to  be  a  fisher,  Plut.  Anton.  29  j 
Luc,  etc.;  dX.  t^k  Sd\aaaav  to  fish  it,  Basil. :  metaph.  of  an  avenger! 
d\tfvttv  Tivd  Lxx  (Jerem.  16.  16).  II.  only  the  Med.  occurs  in 

Att.,  Plat.  Com.  Eipinr.  2  ;  ' AXitvonirn  as  title  of  a  play  by  Antiph  • 
cf.  Ath.  544  C,  Thorn.  M.  36.  *^ ' 

oAJfco  (A):  aor.  ^xroo  Eur.  H.  F.  412,  (aw-)  Hdt.,  Xen.: — Pass., 
aor.  ^Xio-9ijk  Hdt.,  Xen. :  Ion.  part.  pf.  d\ia/iivot  (without  augm.)  Hdt. 
4.  118.,  7.  172  :  (dAijs).  To  gather  together,  assemble,  of  military 

forces,  Hdt.  1.  77,  80,  119,  etc. ;  dA.  tit  tv  Eur.  Heracl.  404: — Pass,  to 
meet  together,  Hdt.  1.  63,  79.,  7.  172:  to  be  massed  into  a  globe,  Emped. 
241. — Rare  in  Att.,  the  Act.  being  used  twice  by  Eur.,  once  by  Plat.  Crat. 
409  A  ;  the  Pass,  by  Xen.,  An.  2.  4,  3.,  6.  3,  3,  Arist.  Probl.  2.  28.,  24.  9: 
generally,  the  compd.  awaXifa  is  more  freq.    [a-,  Elmsl.  Heracl.  1.  c] 

aX((u  (B)  [a],  fut.  iaa,  (dAs)  to  salt,  and  Pass,  to  be  salted,  Arist.  H.  A. 
6.  15,  10,  Probl.  21.  5,  Lxx,  N.  T.  II.  ro  supply  with  salt  or  salt 

food,  Arist.  H.  A.  8. 10, 2,  al. :  Pass.,  of  sheep,  ro  be  supplied  with  salt,  Ib.  3. 

dAi-(uvos,  ov,  sea-girt,  Anth.  P.  7.  218. 

iXi-f  ciios.  ok,  living  on  orin  the  sea,  Anth.  P.  7. 654,  Pancrat.  ap.  Ath.  32 1 F. 

dAC-n,  if.  Ion.  for  dXia. 

iXvtyfhfi,  it,  (dyvvpu)  broken  on  by  the  sea,  nirpa  Opp.  H.  3.  460. 

4AiT|p'r|t,  (t,  (ipioaa!)  sweeping  the  sea,  kwvt)  Eur.  Hec.  455. 

dXiT|Tup,  opor,  i,  poet,  for  dAicu?  1,  Horn.  Ep.  16. 

4Xi-i)XTls.  it,  resom.ding  like  the  sea,  Musae.  26  :  cf.  d\i0popiot. 

dXiOios.  Dor.  for  rj\i$iot. 

d-Xi8os.  ok,  without  stones,  not  stony,  of  lands,  Xen.  An.  6.  4,  5.  II. 
without  a  stone  set  in  it,  of  a  ring,  Poll.  7.  1 79.  III.  free  from 

the  stone,  as  a  disease,  Aretae.  Cur.  M.  Diut.  2.  3. 

dXt-KaKopov.  t6,  a  plant,  prob.  physalis  Alkekengi,  Diosc.  4.  72. 

'AXucopvoo-o-ds,  Ion.  -vno-6s,  4.  a  Doric  city  of  Caria,  Hdt.,  etc. : 
'AXucapvoo-o-<vs,  iwt.  Ion.  -vno-«vs,  &>s,  6,  a  Halicarnassian,  Id. : — 
'AXucapvao-o-66cv,  Adv.  from  Halicarnassus,  Luc.  de  Dom.  20. — On  the 
forms  with  single  a,  v.  Buttm.  Ausf.  Gr.  2.  p.  387:  in  Newton's  Halic. 
(Inscr.  1)  a  gen.  pi.  ' AXiKapvarioiv  occurs. 

dXiKia,  ^,  Dor.  for  i)Ai/«'a. 

4Xi-kAwtos,  ok,  sea-washed,  sea-beaten,  of  a  coast,  Soph.  Aj.  1219 
(lyr.)  ;  dX.  nap  x*ok!  Hfipaiat  Epigr.  Gr.  113  ;  dA.  Si/xas  Anth.  P.  9. 
228.  2.  high-surging,  ttoktos  Orph.  Arg.  335. 

4Xi-ku,t)to*.  ok,  wearied  by  the  sea,  uiptpva  dX.  the  care  and  toil  of  a 
sea-life,  Paul.  Sil.  Ambo  198. 

&Ai-KVT)p.ts  Tbot,  A,  J),  difyrn  dX.  a  sea-borne  car,  Nonn.  D.  43.  199. 

dXiicov  a,  ok,  Dor.  for  4Xixo:. 

dXiicds,  4Xikctt|»,  worse  forms  for  dXvxds,  dkvKorns. 

4Xi-Kpds.  otos,  d,  4,  mixed  with  salt-water,  Eust.  1559.  50. 

4Xi-KpdTup  [St-],  opos,  i,  =  sq.,  Theod.  Prodr.  5.  422. 

4Xi-Kp<iuiv,  0KT05,  o,  lord  of  the  sea,  Eust.  57.  27. 

dXi-upT|irt»,  180s,  d,  )),  at  the  sea's  edge,  Nonn.  D.  1.  289. 

aXi-KpoKdXos,  ok,  shingly,  pebbly,  Orph.  Arg.  337. 

4X£hct6ito»,  ok,  groaning  at  sea,  in  bad  weather,  of  ships,  Soph.  Ant. 
953  CyO :  »ls°.  "X-  *«Ma  roaring  on  the  sea,  Eur.  Hipp.  754  (lyr.). 

4Xl-KViiwv  [0"],  ov,  surrounded  by  the  sea-waves,  Anth.  P.  9.  429. 

dXiKu>5r|S.  worse  form  for  dkvKutbrjt,  Theophr.  H.  P.  9.  11,  2. 

4Ai-rifoa>v,  oktos,  d,  =  wovTOfiibwv,  Ar.  Thesm.  323. 

dXipcvia.  4,  want  of  harbours,  Hyperid.  in  A.  B.  78,  Poll.  I.  IOI. 

d-X(u,<vo*  [t],  ok,  without  harbour,  harbourless,  Lat.  importuosus, 
Aesch.  Supp.  768,  Eur.  Hel.  1211,  Thuc.  4.  8,  etc.  2.  metaph. 

shelterless,  inhospitable,  opta,  avrXot  Eur.  Hel.  1132,  Hec.  1025; 
dktpevov  dipot  avXaxa  Ar.  Av.  1400  ;  xapoia  Eur.  Cycl.  349. 

dXip<vdfns,  i>,  =  dXi/ifKi'a,  Xen.  Hell.  4.  8,  J. 

4Xi-p.iKTos.  v.  sub  dXifffirjKTOt. 

dXtpos,  ov,  (dAs)  0/  or  belonging  to  the  sea,  Lat.  marinus,  Hesych.  ; 
Td  dXi/ia  the  sea-side,  Lxx  (Jerem.  17.  6).  II.  as  Subst.,  oAi/iok, 

Td,  a  shrubby  plant  growing  on  the  sea-shore,  perh.  salt-wort,  Antiph. 
Mk7/<.  1,  Theophr.  H.  P.  4.  16,  5  :  in  Diosc.  also  dA</ios,  i,  1.  120. 

d-Xipos.  ok,  banishing  hunger,  Plut.  2.  157  D. 

4XlpCpT|«s,  taaa,  tv  (jivpa>)  flowing  into  the  sea,  woto/ioi  II.  21.  190, 
Od.  5.  460 ;  cf.  Ap.  Rh.  2.  936  ;  cf.  sq. 

4A(-u,upTp,  it,  =  foreg.,  Orph.  Arg.  346,  etc,  II.  =oXios  (A),  Ap. 

Rh.  1.  013,  Phanocl.  I.  17,  Anth.  Plan.  180. 

dXivoMi  or  4X(vSu  [a],  (the  pres.  is  only  found  in  Pass.)  :  the  aor. 
^Xioo  and  pf.  17X1*0  only  found  in  comp.  with  i£  :  (the  formation  of 
these  tenses  with  I  exactly  resembles  the  form  ticvXIaa  from  nvXivbia  or 
KvXivboi)  : — to  make  to  roll.  II.  Pass.,  mostly  used  in  partici- 

ple, rolling  in  the  dust,  like  a  horse  (cf.  dXivUflpa),  dXivbovntvot  Plut. 
2.  396  E  ;  aXtviuutvoi  if,afid$oiot  Nic.  Th.  156  ;  dAiKO^fci?  Ib.  204  ; 
TiXtvlnpivos  rolled  over,  over-turned,  Dinarch.  ap.  Suid.  2.  generally, 

to  roam  about,  dXXrjv  i(  dXXns  tit  xfldV  dXivbdptvot  Anth.  P.  7.  73^  >" 
ot  wtpl  t))v  'Axabripuav  dXivbovvTCu  Alciphro  3.  14,  cf.  31 ;  i}X<kJi?/«kos 
iv  aiiXait  oaTpairtKait  having  grovelled,  Plut,  Agis  6. 

dXiv8r|flpa,  i),  a  place  for  horses  to  roll  in,  Lat.  volutabrum  (cf.  i(a- 
XtvSai)  :  metaph.,  dXivbriipai  iirwv,  i.e.  long  rolling  words,  Ar.  Ran.  904. 
dXtvSno-ij,  tait,  i>,  o  rolling  in  the  dust,  an  exercise  in  which  the 
wrestlers  rolled  on  the  ground,  Hipp.  364.  13.,  368,  26. 


G2 


aXlvSofxai 


tlXivScuai,  v.  sab  dXcSt'aj. 

aXtvT|KT<ipa,  ij,  (rijxaj)  lem.  as  if  from  *aKiV7jKT-/]p,  swimming  in  the 
sea,  Anth.  P.  6.  190  [with  1  in  arsi]. 

dXt-VT]X''|S,  is,  swimyiiing  in  the  sea,  Anth.  1'.  6.  29. 

aXlvos.  r/,  ov,  (dXs)  of  salt,  xuvtyoi  Hdt.  4.  185  ;  Tot\oi  lb. 

a-Xtvos.  ov,  (AiVov)  without  a  net,  without  hunting  toils,  d'A.  Grjpa  a 
chase  in  which  no  net  is  used,  Anth.  P.  9.  244. 

dXiva,  (dX«'o;)  ■  ktwrvvoj,  to  pound,  Soph.  (Fr.  826)  ap.  A.  B.  383. 1 1 : — 
but  Hesvch.  gives  dKivuv  (leg.  dAiWii')*  d\d>pfiv  ; — dXfvm'  hira\u\[>at. 

lXt{,  Dor.  for  ij"Xif . 

aXi|,  txos,  0,  =  xvvSpos.  Ath.  647  D. 

aXi-£avTOS,  ov,  worn  by  the  sea,  xolpabts  Anth.  P.  6.  89 ;  dX.  piupos 
death  by  being  dashed  on  the  beach,  lb.  7.  404. 

oAios,  d,  Dor.  for  ijKios. 

SAios  (A),  o,  ov,  also  01,  ov  Soph.  Aj.  357,  Eur.  Heracl.  82  :  (dXs)  : — 
0/  the  sea,  Lat.  marinus,  epith.  of  sea-gods,  nymphs,  etc.,  Horn.  etc. ; 
Ovydrnp  d\ioio  yipovros,  i.  e.  of  Nereus,  II.  I.  556,  Hes.  Th.  1003,  cf. 
Od.  4.  365,  al. ;  Otal  aXiai  sra-goddesses,  Nereids,  18.  432;  of  Apollo, 
Arist.  Mirab.  107,  cf.  d\iir\ayKTos ;  dX.  ^apaOoi  the  sea-sand,  Od.  3.  38; 
d'A.  irpaiv  Aesch.  (lyr.)  Pers.  131,  879;  Kvp\a  Id.  Supp.  15;  vavs,  v\dra, 
Trpvfivrj,  etc.,  Pind.  O.  9.  Ill,  Soph.  O.  C.  716,  etc.;  dXia  Spvs,  perh. 
the  same  as  dXitp\oios,  Eupol.  Aly.  1.4;  v.  Meineke  ad  1. 

dXios  (B),  a,  ov :  (dXi;,  ^XiOioj) : — like  furraios,  of  things,  fruitless, 
unprofitable,  idle,  erring,  tiros,  fivBos,  7rdi/os,  (Sikos,  opxiov,  etc.,  II. ;  in 
Od.  only  with  oSis,  2.  273,  318;  of  a  person,  II.  10.  324:  neut.  dAiov 
as  Adv.,  in  vain,  13.  505  ;  and  so  best  taken  in  4.  179  ;  so  also  Soph. 

0.  C.  1 469;  but  regul.  Adv.  -('are,  Id.  Ph.  840. — Ep.  word,  used  by 
Soph,  in  lyric  passages. 

aXto-Tpe<(>T|S,  is,  feeding  in  the  sea,  sea-reared,  <pu>nai  Od.  4.  442. 

aXiou,  Poet.  Verb,  only  used  in  fut.  aXiwaoi,  aor.  i)\ia>aa,  Ep.  akiaioa:  a 
fut.  med.  occurs  in  act.  sense,  Maxim,  it.  icarapx-  582,  in  pass.,  lb.  512: 
(oXior  B).  To  make  fruitless,  disappoint,  Aios  cool' . .  aKiuiaai  Od. 

5. 104  ;  oiS'  akiaiae  ffi\os  nor  did  he  hurl  the  spear  in  vain,  II.  16.  737  ; 
oix  ijAiWe  rovrros  spate  not  the  word  in  vain,  Soph.  Tr.  258.  2. 

=  di'<TT(ia;,  to  destroy,  to  fiiv  T(s  ov  . .  dXiwaet  Soph.  O.  C.  704- 

d-XiTrupT|S,  4s,  not  fit  for  a  suppliant,  dX.  $pi(  (perh.  with  a  play  on 
Xtirapus, — not  sleek  and  smooth),  Soph.  El.  451. 

dXi-iraoTOS,  ov,  sprinkled  with  salt,  Aristom.  Td^x.  2,  Eubul.  'Apia\0. 

1.  10,  Archestr.  ap.  Ath.  399  E. 

oX£-tt«8ov,  to,  a  plain  by  the  sea,  sandy  plain,  Thcophr.  H.  P.  7.  '5, 

2.  Lye.  681 ;  so  the  plain  in  Attica  near  Piraeeus  was  called,  Xen.  Hell.  2. 
4,  30;  but  Ar.  (Fr.  30)  wrote  iv  dXi-niSw  with  spir.  lenis,  says  Harp.  [dAi- 
in  arsi.  Lye.  1.  c,  which  prob.  explains  the  form  aKiaireHov  in  Poll.  1. 186.] 

dXttrfjs,  is,  (AiVos)  without  fat,  meagre,  poor,  Ath.  315  D:  without 
any  fatty  substance,  Strabo  195  :  in  Medic,  not  thick  and  fatty,  of  lotions 
as  opp.  to  salves,  Aretae.  Caus.  M.  Ac.  2.  7.  II.  (XciVaj,  XiTrefv) 

unfailing,  irpoxoai  Poeta  ap.  Porph. 

oXi-irXaYKTOS,  ov,  roaming  the  sea,  Si  Xldv,  Ildy  dXiirXa7KTf  . .  tfmvr/St 
prays  the  Chorus  of  Greek  seamen  at  Troy  (so,  below,  Apollo  is  sum- 
moned to  come  'luaplav  virip  niKayiaiv),  Soph.  Aj.  695  ;  of  Trito,  Anth. 
P.  6.  65  ;  ?x,s  °X.  Epigr.  Gr.  1033.  15  : — cf.  dXnrXr/KTOs. 

dXt-irXiiVTis,  is,  sea-wandering,  Anth.  P.  II .  390. 

dXi-irX&via,  1),  a  wandering  voyage,  Anth.  P.  6.  38. 

aXl-irXavos,  ov,—a\nr\aV7)s,  Opp.  C.  4.  258. 

aXi-ir\cup.uv,  ovos,  o,  =  TrXtvpunv  II,  Marcell.  Sid.  2  7  in  Fabr.  Bibl.  I .  p.  1 7. 

dXi-irXijKTOs,  Dor.  -trXaKros,  ov,  sea-beaten,  of  islands,  Pind.  P.  4.  24  ; 
6a\affff6w\ijKTOs  in  Aesch.,  whence  dAiTrAatfTos-  is  restored  in  Soph.  Aj. 
597  Oyr0  f°r  dXiVXa7«ros-. 

4Xi-wX'f|J,  T7os,  o,  4,  =foreg.,  Call.  Del.  11,  Anth.  P.  6. 193. 

a\i-TrXoos,  ov,  contr.  -irXovs,  ow,  covered  with  water,  Tfixta  II.  12. 
26.  II.  later  act.  sailing  on  the  sea,  vavs  Arion  17  (Bgk.  p. 

873)  :  as  Subst.  a  seaman,  fisher,  Ap.  Rh.  3.  1329,  Call.  Del.  15. 

dXi-irvoos,  ov,  redolent  of  the  sea,  Musae.  265. 

dXi-iropos,  ov,  through  which  the  seafloivs,  Siao<pa£  Luc.  Tragoed.  24. 

oXiirop<t>vpCs,  i'Soj,  r),  a  bird,  perh.  the  same  as  -noptpvpis,  Ibyc.  7  ;  cf. 
aXtiropcpvpos  opvis,  Alcman  12  (26). 

d\i-ir6p4>Opos,  ov,  of  sea-purple,  of  true  purple  dye,  TjKaxara,  ipdpta 
Od.  6.  53.,  13.  108;  olS/ia  Arion  18  (Bgk.  p.  873). 

aXi-iTTOiTrro«,  ov,  scared  by  the  roar  of  the  sea,  Nonn.  D.  8.  58. 

aXippdyfis.  is,  (fir/yvv/u)  breaking  the  waves :  or  rather  pass.,  against 
which  the  tide  breaks,  (T/rdn-cXos  Anth.  P.  7-  3°*3- 

d.Xip-paio-TT)s,  u,  (paiiu)  ravening  in  the  sea,  SpaKotw  Nic.  Th.  828. 

dXippavTos.  ov  (fiaivai)  sea-surging,  ttovtos  Anth.  P.  9.  333. 

aXtp-pr)KTO$,  ov,  =  aXippayqs,  iapabts  Anth.  P.  7.  278. 

dXip-p60ios,  0^,  also  a,  ov  Anth.  P.  7.  6,  624 : — sea-roaring,  sea-beat, 
Kovis,  vrfis  Anth.  11.  c.  II.  roaring,  Sahaoaa  Orph.  Arg.  1 296. 

dXip-podot,  ov,  =  foreg. ;  dX.  ir6poi  the  roaring  friths,  or  the  pathways 
of  the  roaring  sea,  Aesch.  Pers.  367,  cf.  Soph.  Aj.  41 2  (lyr.)  ;  also,  dX. 
&ktt)  Eur.  Hipp.  1205,  Mosch.  2.  128:  cf.  dXi'/tXi/ffTOs,  dAiKTinros. 

aXip-poi£os,  ov,  =  a\tpp66ios,  Nonn.  D.  13.  322,  etc. 

dXip-puTos,  ov,  washed  by  the  sea,  Anth.  P.  12.  55.  II.  dX. 

a\oos  the  surging  sea  itself,  Aesch.  Supp.  868  (lyr.). 

5Xit  [dXfr],  Adv.:  (v.  sub  0X175).  In  heaps,  crowds,  swarms,  in  abund- 
ance, in  plenty,  Lat.  affatim,  and  in  a  modified  sense,  sufficiently,  enough, 
Lat.  satis  :  1.  in  Horn,  mostly  joined  with  Verbs,  dXis  jreiroT^arat 

[/ie'Xi<r<rai]  II.  2.  90;  irtpl  Si  Tpifal  aAis  ijaav  3.  384;  Koirpos  aXis  ni- 
X^rro  Od.  17.  298  ;  okis  hi  ol  %aav  /Lpovpai  II.  14.  122  : — from  the  con- 
text it  sometimes  takes  the  sense  of  just  enough,  in  moderation,  (i  !'  dXis 
t\9oi  Kuirpis  Eur.  Med.  629  ;  «<p«pt  Kaieov  oiXis  Id.  Ale.  907.  2.  in 

Horn,  also  often  closely  attached  to  a  Noun,  xaXfdi'  rt  xpww  re  dXis 


-  aKtrrrpa. 

gold  and  silver  in  abundance,  gold  and  silver  enough,  Od.  16.  231,  cf.  II, 
22.  340  ;  vija  aXis  xPv<">v  "at  xa^K<>v  VT)r\aaaOai  II.  9.  137  ;  dAis  xi- 
paSos  (v.  sub  x«Pa*0S)  21.  319  ;  dXis  8'  fiwSfs  i\aiov  Od.  2.  339; — 
this  Homeric  usage  is  rare  in  Att.,  d'Xis  0iorov  tvpov  Eur.  Med.  1 107  ; 
Xdirat  d'Xis  «xa"/  (Elmsl.  Xii7n;s)  Id.  Hel.  589 : — rarely  with  an  Adj., 
dXis  r)a$'  avapoios  Aesch.  Ag.  511.  3.  dXis  (sc.  iari)  'tis  enough, 

ij  oix  a\is,  otti  .  .  ;  is't  not  enough,  that  . .  ?  II.  5.  349 ;  ff  oix  aXis, 
its  . . ;  17.  450,  Od.  2.  312  ;  so,  0A11,  iV  i(riK(is  Saupvwv  Soph.  O.  T. 
1515  ;  and  absoi.  dXis  enough!  Id.  Aj.  1402: — in  Att.  c.  ace.  et  inf., 
'Apytiotat  KaSpeiovs  aXis  is  xf'pas  i\0(iv  Aesch.  Theb.  679  ;  c.  dat.  et 
inf.,  dXis  Si  itXativ  roiuov  rjv  f^oi  xaxov  Eur.  Ale.  104I,  cf.  Soph.  O.  T. 
685.  4.  like  an  Adj.,  as  the  predicate,  a\ts  yap  7  Tiapovaa  ov[i(popd 

Eur.  Ale.  673,  cf.  I.  T.  983,  Soph.  Tr.  332.  5.  dXis  (sc.  tlfd)  with  a 

part,  added,  dXis  vooovo'  iyw  enough  that  I  suffer,  Id.  O.  T.  1061  ; 
akts  iyu  Sv&tvx&v  Trag.  ap.  Arist.  Eth.  N.  9.  11,5.  6.  in  Att..  like 

Lat.  satis,  c.  gen.  rei,  enough  of  a  thing,  aXts  ix(tv  TVS  Poprjs  Hdt.  1. 
119,  cf.  9.  27;  irritiovTJs  a\is  y'  inrapxti  Aesch.  Ag.  1656,  cf.  1659; 
dXis-  [«<rW]  XeKtyfiivaiv  Id.  Eum.  675  ;  dXty  \6ywv  Soph.  O.  C.  1016; 
d\is  d<pvrjs  ptoi  Ar.  Fr.  421  ;  to  conclude  an  argument,  *ai  tovtwv  uiv 
d'Xts-  Plat.  Polit.  287  A  ;  Kai  irepl  fiiv  tovtcov  a\is  Arist.  Eth.  N.  1.5,  6, 
etc.  II.  a  form  ciXias.  or  dXias.  in  Hippon.  101,  cf.  E.  M.  63. 

18,  Joann.  Al.  tov  napayy.  p.  38.  12  ;  and  read  by  Dind.  in  Eur.  Ion 
723  (lyr.),  dXias  dXias  o  irapos  dpxayos,  where  the  Mss.  dXiVos. 

dXis,  i'5os,  )},  (aXs)  =  aKfivpis,  Eust.  706.  56. 

dXCo-p-rj,  1),  =  dndrrj,  Hesych. 

dXio-ysiu,  to  pollute,  Lxx  (Dan.  I.  8,  al.)  :— dXio-ynpa.  aTos,  to,  a 
pollution,  Act.  Ap.  15.  20. 

aXio-Kopau  [dX],a  defect. Pass.,  the  Act.  being  supplied  by  alpioj (dXioKw 
only  in  proverb  (\t<pas  fivv  oix  akiaKtt,  Paroemiogr.) :  inipf.  fiKtaKOfiijv 
(never  ia\-)  Hdt.,  Att.:  fut.  a\waofiai  Hdt.,  Att.:  aor.  ijKwv  Od.  22. 
230,  always  in  Hdt.,  and  sometimes  in  Mss.  of  Att.  writers,  as  Plat.  Hipp. 
Ma.  286  A,  Xen.  An.  4.  4,  21,  but  the  common  Att.  form  was  iaXav  [a, 
Ar.  Vesp.  355,  but  S.  Anth.  P.  7.  114.,  II.  155  ;  &  in  all  other  moods, 
etc.,  except  in  part,  akvvn  II.  5.  487]  ;  subj.  a\w,  ais,  o)  Aesch.  Theb.  257. 
Eur.  Hipp.  420,  Ar.  Ach.  662,  Vesp.  898,  etc.,  Ion.  dXiuoi,  dAiirj  II.  II. 
405.,  14.  81,  Hdt.  4.  127  ;  opt.  akoirjv  Plat.,  Ep.  aKfav  Od.  14.  183.,  I£. 
300;  (the  subj.  dXd>7;  and  opt.  dXcprj  are  often  confounded,  v.  11.  11.  9. 
592.,  14.  81,  Hdt.  4.  127);  inf.  akavat  II.  21.  281,  Att.,  Ep.  a\uituvai 
lb.  495  ;  part.  dXoils  II.  2.  374,  Att.,  v.  supr. : — pf.  ijkaKa  Hdt.  1.  83, 
Antiph.  Xrpar,  I ,  Xenarch.  Tloptp.  1 ,  and  often  in  Dem. ;  but  commonly 
in  Att.  eaXaixa  [dX]  Aesch.  Ag.  30,  Thuc,  etc.  (and  in  Mss.  of  Hdt.,  1. 
191,  209)  :  plqpf.  f)\uiK(iv  Xen.  An.  5.  2,  12. — On  the  forms  r/Xaiv  idXwv, 
ijKaiKa  iaXuMca,  v.  Veitch  Gr.  Verbs  s.  v.- — Of  these  Tenses,  Horn,  uses 
only  the  aor.- — Cf.  irapa\iaKopLai.  (The  fact  that  dKiaxopiai,  with  its 
tenses,  serves  as  a  Pass,  to  aipiw,  aor.  2  tTkov,  ikfiv,  points  to  ^ AA  = 
fEA  (cf.  ifdXoiv),  in  the  sense  of  take,  v.  Lob.  Rhem.  163.  It  seems  to 
be  unconnected  with  dvakioicoj,  v.  sub  voc.)  To  be  taken,  conquered, 

fall  into  the  enemy's  hand,  of  persons  and  places,  II.  2.  374,  al.,  Hdt., 
Trag.,  etc. ;  dXdxrcrai  (sc.  o  Kpiav)  Soph.  O.  C.  1065  ;  dXiaittaSat  us 
iroXtpiiovs  to  fall  into  the  hands  of  the  enemy  and  be  taken  by  them, 
Plat.  Rep.  468  A  ;  iv  rotavrats  {vfiQopaTs  Id.  Crito  43  C.  2.  to 

be  caught,  seized,  of  persons  and  things,  Oavdrty  dKwvai  to  be  seized  by 
death,  die,  II.  21.  281,  Od.  5.  312  ;  also  without  Oavdrtp,  II.  12.  172,  Od. 
18.  265,  etc.;  dvSp  i«  Oavdrov  KopXaai  j\Sr\  dXajKora  [sc.  voaw~\  Pind. 
P.  3.  100  ;  idXaaav  (is  'AOrjvas  ypd^ifxara  letters  were  seized  and  taken 
to  Athens,  Xen.  Hell.  I.  I,  23  :— in  Ar.  Ach.  700  there  is  a  play  on  the 
law-phrase  (v.  infr.  II.  2) ;  rots  abrwv  irrepois  d\taKupito-9a,  of  an 
eagle,  i.e.  by  a  feathered  arrow,  Aesch.  Fr.  129,  v.  omnino  Pors.  Med. 
139  (viii) : — to  be  taken  or  caught  in  hunting,  II.  5.  487,  Xen.  An.  5.  3, 
IO  :^also,  dX.  vTtvtp  Aesch.  F)um.  67  ;  dirdrais,  ptavia  Soph.  El.  1 25,  Aj. 
216;  vir'  tporros  Plat.  Phaedr.  252  C,  etc.;  voaTjftart,  Stappoia,  etc., 
Arist.  Probl.  30.  1,  19,  etc: — absol.  to  be  overpowered,  Soph.  Aj.  649; 
dXovs  icpdvevaa,  Lat.  mente  captns,  Id.  O.  C.  547  (as  Herm.  for  dXXotfs-, 
but  v.  dvovs)  ;  piq  vikjj  dkiaKovrai  by  one  victory  they  are  ruined,  Thuc. 
I.  121.  3.  in  good  sense,  to  be  won,  achieved,  attained.  Soph.  O.  T. 

543,  Eur.  Ale.  786,  Xen.  Cyn.  12,  22.  II.  with  part,  to  be  caught 

or  detected  doing  a  thing,  ovrt  ov  dKwaeai  dStxio/v  Hdt.  1 .  112;  ini- 
0ov\fvojv  ipiol .  .  idXauet  lb.  209  ;  tap  dX^is  trt  tovto  irpdrTaiv  Plat. 
Apol.  29  C  ;  also  with  a  Subst.  or  Adj.,  the  part,  wv  being  omitted,  oi 
yap  8^  (povevs  dkwaopiaL  Soph.  O.  T.  576  ;  fwixos  yap  fjv  rvxV*  dXovs 
Ar.  Nub.  1079;  also,  dX.  iv  xanoiai  Soph.  Ant.  496.  2.  often  as 

Att.  law-term,  to  be  convicted  and  condemned,  in  full,  dXous  tt;  Sikjj  Plat. 
Legg.  937  C  ;  \nroTa£iov  ypacprfv  ijKvxivai  Dem.  549.  I,  cf.  Antipho 
117.  18.,  118.  26: — dX.  fua  4-ii<p<v  Andoc.  30.  10: — c.  gen.  criminis, 
dXoivat  lf-tvSopiapTvpiwv,  darpaTtias,  doefiuas,  etc.  (sc.  ypatpqv),  v.  sub 
voce;  dX.  Bavdrov  to  be  convicted  of  a  capital  crime,  Plut.  2.  552  D; 
also,  aXovaa  Siktj  a  conviction,  Plat.  Legg.  937  D  : — cf.  aipitu  II.  4. 

dXio-pa,  to,  a  water-plant,  AlismaParnassifolia  or  Plantago,  Diosc.  3. 1 69. 

dXi-o-pdpd-yos,  ov,  sea-resounding,  Nonn.  D.  39.  362. 

a\£-cu,T)KTOS,  ov,  washed  by  the  sea.  Lye.  994  :  Hesych.  has  dXtV/i^«Ta 
(Cod.  dXt<ri/xx*Ta)  •  ^Xiffpiiva,  and  Suid.  dXifUKTOV  vtiraau-ivov.      ^" 

dXio-n-apTOS,  ov,sownotsprinkledwithsalt, Eust. 182 7. 61, Hesych. ,E.  M. 

dXCo"ir«5ov,  to,  v.  dXiirfbov. 

dXu-«TT€<^avos,  ov,  sea-crowned,  sea-girt,  vrjaos  Alex.  ap.  Steph.  Byz. 
s.  v.  TairpofSdvr) : — so,  d  dXi-VT«d>T|S  ©diros  Epigr.  Gr.  208. 16,  cf.  Orph. 
Arg.  146. 

aXi-OTOvos,  ov,  sea-resounding,  pax'ai  Aesch.  Pr.  712-  H- 

groaning  on  the  sea,  of  fishers,  Opp.  H.  4.  149. 

aXio-ros  [d],  ij,  ov,  (dXi'foj)  salted,  pickled,  Anth.  P.  9.  377,  Strabo  197. 

iXio-Tpo.  r),  =  d\ivSt)9pa,  Poll.  I.  183. 


aXi-<TTp<TTTos,  or,  sea-tost,  vavs  Anth.  P.  9   84 

aAtTQivw  [fiA],  Kp.  Verb  (also  used  by  Aesch.  in  Ivr.  passages)  chiefly 
found  ...  aor.  2 :  ,«.  and  med.  .—Act.,  in  aor.  fAfrJ,  II.  The™,  I  70 
Aesch.  tun,.  ,69;  sub,.  «A/rp  Pseudo-Phoc.  208  ;  opt.  dA,Vo,t  Aesch' 
Pr  533  I  part.  dW  Aesch.  Eum.  3,6  (restored  by  lt.nl.  fordA \rZ)- 
later  ip  aor_  ,  aAix^a  Orph.  Arg.  642 -Med  ,  «A,Ta,Wa/(v  1 
«*.»*-)  Hes.  Op   328:  aor.  AXirovro,  dXir^a,,  dMriaBa,  Hon,  ■  part 

^fe^^V^-:  *A^L  isT™ 

c  ace   re.,  to  transgress,  A.os  J'  dA,Va,„a<  i*(TJs  II  777  £     - 
ottokM*  Ap.  Rh.  4   388,  Opp   H    s    c<£  T  4.  57°''  T""' 

**£»  d^of  4ph.  l.PcP:Hcr5cllh3Dian.  afi"  ^  Vt^' 

a^^Tm^  f0Und  in  »* form  <£M'T">  *  -    Ad-  -• 

/^'oTZds:'^;^"/^0^0"! '*  s'a^iod-  ?•  -*•  a  ** 

■Voce    Cic    At.  7?    ,,  r  ?  •  9  :  <""*"/""°  **■  »  walk  o«  „ /?„, 

fg^^v^rap piut- Them- i4:  °f  the  - 

oA.TT,Ha,  aroj,  To,  a  sin,  offence,  Anth.  P.  ,.278     ' 

TjTril   £1/      i  h  ?T"  Pr°  ^'"V""-").  cf.  E.  M.  428.  10. 
^At^oow,,  ^,  =  dA.V,/(a,  Orph.  Arg.  131=  4 

aAli-npuv,  ov,  gen.  0x05,  (dAir*  i»  =  so     II  2.  .  -t  7R6  f  ,11  tv 

ri;pios  fcAAaSos  Aeschm.  76.  7.  2    -ihiol    c,-,./..;   _   ■;,     1     '  , 

•*.  •*»*"■  ayirf,  guilty,  Lat.  /iomo 


Kas, 


63 


I ;  Tlparrayvpas  .  .  aMTr/ptot  (i.  e. 


i  aA.)  Eupol-  KoA.  10,  cf.  AW.  7,  Menand.  IrTccrt  38. 

dA  ™^r      /r""'  ACSCh'  Kum-  3«6'  b»«  Auratus  Stores  dAW 
a  t™»«,  rorw,  Od.  1   182-  a  fcn.     HaT,  i    I3-'595'   c"    "' mildCT «"»'. 

^.  *  5ja  ^twsrssr/a  ^  ■ 

4A.-Tpo<|K>«.  or.  /„rfv  *.  or  „,  /*»  Vrf  fi^  (Jpp   H   /'  7564' 

AmhT°Tr0,:940,''5",-i'0/"'-  "a-"»-  1*f~  Thcocr.  r.  45;    -^, 

ers.  94S  (|yr.) .  as  Sublt    fl  „amaMiyfsA,rma,    j,       ^         ^      '   rtescn- 

4^-TCpo,,  o,  a  mrt  of  udt-cheese,  Anth.  P.  o. \13  373' 

J^l"t^!^•-0  '*'>tt"'":*-  ="'d  mrt»Ph-  to  ruin,  Sophr.  ap.  E   M    776 

IkM^ll'T^  6+ar'°'U'  He$yCh-     Cf'  I'ob-  S-P--  Aj?  p  3,8  " 
tx    *AP       *'  afiatt'rat  *<>.  Mpweci,  Anth.  P.  o.  4,    P  3S 
"A^9opo.,wrf«/roy,«^o« /*,««,..  as  Subst.  «/.,><,/,,  Anth  P  7  6^ 

oAi^  ,,r  dAup,  .  «Tpa  in  Hesych.,  v.  sub  Warm  ^ 

*A«i(u.,  to  put  forth  strength  o,  prowess,  K.M..6m     66  IO  •     w,.h 
>A*as,,,vTo,)^oKTo,ap.  Hesych  5  '  W,I°— Med.. 


oAk^S,  v.  sub  dA*^«j. 

oAk.'o.,  *,  a  kind  of  wild  mallou;  Diosc.  ,   164 

aAKui,,  ,,  „  poisonous  plant ,  Orph.  Arg  02s 

word  (used  also  in  Hdt.,  and  1  fer  Prose rTTtaf'r  ^^  St,?ngth)'  Poiit- 
N.  3.  6,  12,  Pol.  8    ,    7   etc  finHnr     •        i ,m- L°«- 103  B,  Arist.  Eth. 

^vt,  11. ,:  2I2,  o3d'.  ;*i  .  eSD',- J'l mth. ae'^  ^  ¥*%, 

♦ffrfF  «>Vos  dA^,  20.  381 -'sto/af  oaS*  "r'"'"'0S  aA^";  »• 
dA*5  Pind.  O.  10  7n\  122-  a^n'     •     -^  9-    3I  :—later  als°.  X*po' 

6  3:-in  p..  /„,,  o/strengthXu  tel ^  ^d.VTT  g  RUf 
933-  II.  s/rm^-M  to  avert  danger,  a  safeguard  2k  , 

help,  succour,  aid,  A,o5  d^r,  11.  «.  4ci  cf  8  1%  T^i*7  '"'  a"d  5° 
12.  120.,  22.  30s  i  ttoC  T.f  Av^  •  A4?,h  b  I4°;,'"'««  tis-  dA*^  Od. 
Ph.  i.ji;  So^rEuTphoeT^s'L^i45^  *M/W„,  Soph. 
-«a.»tf  a  thing.  Hes.  Op.  *£,  Xj    n"*:   7*f»  ,T"?r  *>'«  or  <* 

^p--^*™«a«a?0TZ<l:?;0  give  „  j2So^hph60c  T- 2I8- cf- 

W  4 ™'.  fp  -ff  '2Archrcfheskt49v,569v876'  "d -^ 

^M  a/c„.  6.  H!tela'ho,  A^hy''  "*"*  ^  W°/"''^ 
aA^s,  .<rffa,  €y,  t,a/,an/,  war/,*,,  h.  Hon..  28,  Anth  P  6    2"  •  Pi,,  I 

aAK^aTT,,,  o«,  o,  a  kind  of/sA,  Opp.  H.  1.  1  70  ? 

r^   Diosc.  4.  23,  24Xe„!'.3   p  i454I~alSO  «"*«—-**•. 
Awh.1?^?^''  W'  *"*«>*"*«'  or  «  *>.rf*r,n  M^,,  of  Athena, 

Comp.  -<ir»pos  Hdt   1    -n   >«   ,„,    v     33.' •  2;"  etc-;  s0  ™ 

Eur  Pho«,    •«..  A        '9.'°3.  201,  Xen.,  Arist.,  etc.;    Sup.  -iraros 

H« ^  Th   k^'t^'fT""*  &Vtl^  a  l8-  I0°- Od.  f4.  ,3i[  so 
He,  Jh.  6a7,  where  the  dat.  depends  on  7«'„o,  Pi„d.  P.  3.TV      ' 

•S^iiv^-jra**!! a  ,hinsf  Ni1  Th- 528- 

o^with  o?wi,phogUt  **5&i2&,  ^^^^r;^; 

in  ^.^..ViUfN'  AT^r^  ,80;-alS0'  ,iA,"'^l"  *^ 
TdA««,  -  dA«f «, .  v.  ikKaSuv,  dAoA*..  '' 

ifX'^chuse  be  affirm  T  T"8  y  °PP<>Sed'  ^^  is  Reeded  by  ^ 
araf,  dAAd  »oAAd«s  Plat  Phaedr  ,,S  a        ■J!.'  '. '  4  ;  °"  /""'0" 

"'ProsV  after  2  '  ' '  £t  "  '  '  'J'  J5  "6"  ^  "  ™  '  » ^  ="  » 
D  Ttc  w  1/  •  • '  "AA°  •  ■ '  °r  .^  •  •  1"  Plilt-  Ph"d<>  9'  B,  Gorg.  470 
„f;  V:  U  r»TtXo«a,  .  . ,  dAA'  oi  .  .  .  Arist.  Pol.  3. 11,  12  ■_ Jess 
oft  n  after  ^njuiictions  of  Time,  as  .„,«*.  Od.  ,4.  ,51 .  ^  g^  O  C 

dAAd  rCv  dAAJ  -  -1""  ^  'S  sometim«  »»«hed  to  a  single  word, 
r^J      '  ,  ?•  XTr-  /a"rf""  ^uando:  but  in  fact  the  usage  is 

cll.pt,c,  and  may  be  explained  from  the  foreg.  head,  as  in  Soph.  El.  fu 


64 

Si  Beot  warpqioi,  avyyiveaBi  y  dXXd  vvv  (i.  e.  ci  ui)  wporepov,  dAAd  vvv 
ye),  cf.  Ant.  jj2,  O.  C.  1276:— this  usage  is  very  frcq.  in  Trag.,  v.  Elmsl. 
Eur.  Heracl.  565,  Med.  912  : — so,  idv  ovv  dkka  vvv  y  in,  i.  e.  iav  ovv 
[ur)  dAAoTt],  dAAd  vvv  yt  .  . ,  if  then  now  at  least  ye  still  .  .  ,  Dem.  37. 
19:  v.  infr.  II.  2.  3.  after  a  negative  dAAd  sometimes  =  dU'  f) 

(q.  v.),  except,  but,  ovn  uot  atnos  dAAos,  dkka  .  .  Totcrje  no  one  else, 
but  .  .  ,  Od.  8.  312  ;  oiibt  tis  dkkrj  <paivtro  yaidwv,  dAA'  oiipavbs  ?/8* 
Bdkaaaa  12.  404;  iwatotv  cutis  dAA'  iyw  Soph.  O.  T.  1331  ;  r)Sia  .  .  . 
oix  ianv  dAAd  tovtois  Arist.  Eth.  N.  10.  5,  10,  cf.  7. 12,  I :  cf.  the  re- 
verse process  in  our  word  but  =  be  out,  except : — so  also,  ra<pov,  oiiK  iv 
y  Kuvrat  udkkov,  dkk'  iv  <p  r)  Sofa  ktA.  not  more  that  in  which  they 
are  lying,  but  .  .  ,  Thuc.  2.  43  ;  ovx  owkwv  rb  wkiov,  akka  bawdvrjs  Id. 

I.  83.  4.  after  a  vocat.,  like  St  I.  5,  Plat.  Euthyphro  3  C.  II. 
to  oppose  whole  sentences,  but,  yet,  Lat.  at :  1.  often  in  quick  transi- 
tions from  one  subject  to  another,  as  in  II.  1. 134,  140,  etc.;  so  too  dAAd 
xal  Sis  I.  116;  dAA'  oiS'  ws  .  . ,  Od.  I.  6: — after  Horn,  also  in  quick 
answers  and  objections,  nay  but .  .  ,  well  but  .  . ,  mostly  in  negation,  Ar. 
Ach.  402,  etc. ;  but  not  always,  Plat.  Prot.  330  B,  Gorg.  449  A.  When 
a  number  of  objections  follow  in  quick  succession,  both  questions  and 
answers  are  introduced  by  dAAd,  as,  wortpov  t)tovv  oi  Ti  »  . ;  dAA'  awr\- 
toui'  ;  dAAd  wept  waibixuiv  uaxoutvos ;  dAAd  ut&vaiv  iwapcpvqaa  ;  Xen. 
An.  5.  8,  4 ;  (when  all  after  the  first  may  be  rendered  by  or)  ;  so,  akka 
fir)v  . . ,  answered  by  dkka,  Arist.  Pol.  3.  16,  4  sq. : — in  vehement  answers 
Plato  often  uses  vr)  tovs  Btoiis  dkka  ...  /id  Al"  dAAd  .  . ,  Gorg.  481  C, 
Phil.  36  A,  cf.  Ale.  I.  IIoB,  C,  al. : — Horn,  also  has  dAAd  at  the  beginning 
of  a  speech,  to  introduce  some  general  objection,  Od.  4.  472,  cf.  Xen. 
Symp.  init.  2.  dAAd  is  used,  esp.  by  Horn.,  with  imperat.  or  subj., 
to  remonstrate,  encourage,  persuade,  etc.,  like  Lat.  tandem,  dAA'  tBt,  dAA' 
dye,  dkka  ttoutv,  dAAd  wiBtoBt  Horn.;  so,  dAA'  ipwtB'  ws  Tax'CTa  Soph. 
O.  C.  1643,  cf.  Ant.  1029,  etc.:  the  vocat.  sometimes  goes  before  dAAd, 
as,  Si  *iVtis,  dAAd  £tv[ov  Pind.  O.  6.  37  :  v.  supr.  1.  2.  3.  often  to 
break  off  a  subject  abruptly,  dAAd  raCra  uiv  ti  Stt  kiyeiv  ;  Soph.  Ph. 

II,  cf.  756,  Tr.  467,  etc.  4.  a  number  of  Att.  phrases  may  be 
referred  to  this  head,  as  elliptic,  ov  ut)v  dAAd,  ov  uivrot  dkka  .  . ,  it  is 
not  [so],  but .  . ,  6  Vircros  wiwrtt  ical  uncpov  avrbv  i^trpaxv^totv  ov  ur)v 
f_tf tTpaxr)ktatv] ,  dAA'  iwiuttvtv  6  Kvpos  it  did  not  however  [throw  him], 
but  .  . ,  Xen.  Cyr.  I.  4,  8  ;  cf.  Plat.  Symp.  173  A: — so,  oi  yap  dAAd  Ar. 
Ran.  58, 498  : — even  after  St,  vueis  Si  a'  dAAd  watbl  ovatpovtvaart  Eur. 
Hec.  391.  III.  when  joined  with  other  Particles,  each  retains 
its  proper  force,  as,  1.  dAA'  dpa,  much  like  dAAd  in  quick  transi- 
tion, II.  6.  418.,  12.  320;  but  in  Att.  to  introduce  an  objection  founded 
on  something  foregone,  Plat.  Apol.  25  A;  also  in  questions  dAA'  Spa  .  . ; 
Id.  Rep.  381  B.  2.  dAA'  ovv,  but  then,  however,  Hdt.  3.  140,  Soph. 
Ant.  84,  etc.;  also  in  concession,  well  then,  Plat.  Prot.  310A;  and  in 
apodosi,  yet  at  any  rate,  dkk'  oZv  ye  Id.  Phaedo  91  B,  cf.  Aeschin.  66. 
5.  3.  dAAd  yap,  often  with  words  between,  Lat.  enimvero,  but  really, 
certainly,  as,  dAAd  ydp  Kpiovra  ktvaaai  .  .  ,  wavaaj  y6ovs,  but  this  is 
irregularly  placed  for  dAAd,  Kpiovra  ydp  ktvaaai,  waveev  yoovs,  Eur. 
Phoen.  1307;  and  so  we  find  the  collocation  in  Soph.  Ph.  81,  cf.  Elmsl. 
Heracl. 481,  Med.  1035 ;  but  the  Verb  accompanying  dAAd  is  often  omitted, 
Hdt.  8.  8,  Aesch.  Pr.  941 :  this  usage  in  the  negative  form  dAA'  oi  ydp  is 
earlier,  II.  7.  242,  Od.  14.  355,  al.,  Soph.  O.  T.  1409: — also,  dAAd  70^ 
S17,  dAAd  ydp  rot,  Soph.  Aj.  167,  Ph.  81;  v.  ov  yap  dAAd.  4.  dAA' 
ti  .  . ,  quid  si  .  .1  II.  16.  559.  5.  dAA'  t)  in  questions,  Lat.  an  vero  '! 
ergo?  Soph.  El.  879;  dAA'  r),  rb  keyouevov,  Karowiv  ioprijs  r/Houtv ; 
Plat.  Gorg.  447  A,  cf.  Prot.  309  C,  and  v.  dAA'  fj  (suo  loco).  6.  dAAd  is 
followed  by  many  words  that  merely  strengthen  it,  as  dAA'  ^toi  Horn. ; 
dAAd  Tot  Aesch.  Pers.  795,  etc. ;  dAAd  uivroi,  dkka  fify,  v.  sub  urjv  11.  3  ; 
dAAd  .  .  ye  concessive,  dAA'  iuotye  .  .  tpaiverai  nay  .  .  ,  Plat.  Theaet.  157 
D  ;  so,  dAAd  Sr),  mostly  with  words  between,  Soph.  Aj.  1 2 71,  O.  C.  586, 
etc.;  dAAd  uiv  8^  /cat  avr6s  Plat.  Theaet.  143  B. 

dAAd-ySTiv,  Adv.  alternately,  Theognost.  p.  161.  20. 

dXAayifi,  1),  (dAAd<r<rai)  a  change,  Aesch.  Ag.  482,  Plat.,  etc. ;  dAAa-yd 
B'tov  Soph.  O.  T.  1206  ;  ^  Kcrrd  tottov  d.  Arist.  de  Spir.  8.  II. 

exchange,  barter,  whether  buying  or  selling,  Plat.  Rep.  371  B,  Arist. 
Eth.  N.  5.  5,  io,  sq.,  Pol.  I.  8,  8  ;  so  in  pi.,  Sid  tos  dAA.  for  purposes 
0/ exchange,  lb.  3.  9,  6.  III.  in  late  Gr.,  a  change  of  horses, 

afresh  stage,  Eust.  531.  21 ;  v.  Ducang. 

dAAd-yi-q.  f/,  =  foreg.,  Or.  Sib.  2.  157. 

dAAayu-a.  cctos,  to,  that  which  is  given  or  talten  in  exchange,  Katvrjs 
StaiTTjs  Hipp.  Vet.  Med.  9.  2.  the  price  of  a  thing,  Anth.  P.  12. 

132,  Lxx  (Deut.  23.  18). 

d\\avu.6s,  <5,  =  foreg.,  Arcad.  58,  5,  Manetho  4.  189. 

dXAaKTtov,  verb.  Adj.  one  must  change,  Plut.  2.  53  A. 

dXAaKTLKos.  17,  iv,  of  or  for  exchange  :  fj  -ktj  or  to  -kov  the  business 
of  exchange.  Plat.  Soph.  223  C  ;  Kotvwvia  dkk.  Arist.  Eth.  N.  5.  5,  6. 

dAAdvnov,  to,  Dim.  of  dAAas,  Moer.,  Thorn.  M. 

dXXavTO-tiS"f|S,  h,  sausage-shaped,  dkk.  i/ur/v,  X'rwv  the  allanto'id  mem- 
brane of  the  foetus,  Soran.  p.  68  Dietz.,  v.  Greenh.  Theoph.  p.  332. 

dAAavTo-iroios,  o,  a  maker  of  dkkdvres,  Diog.  L.  2.  60. 

dXAavTO-n-wXtw,  to  deal  in  dkkavres,  Ar.  Eq.  1242. 

aXXavTO-TrtoX-ns,  ov,  6,  a  dealer  in  dAAdi/Tts,  Ar.  Eq.  143,  etc. 

dXXa|,  Adv.  =  tcaAAaf ,  C.  I.  4957  (prob.  1.). 

aXXa^is,  tcus,  f),  exchange,  barter,  Arist.  Magn.  M.  I.  34,  12. 

dXXds,  avros,  6,  forced-meat,  a  sausage  or  black-pudding,  Ar.  Eq.  161, 
Crates  &rjp.  3,  etc. 

dXXdo-o-u,  later  Att.  -ttg>  :  fut.  d(oi :  aor.  ^AAafa  :  pf.  fjAAax°-  (df-) 
Xen.  Mem.  3.  13,  6,  (Si-)  Dionys.  Com.  0ta>i.  1.  10: — Med.,  fut.  dAAd- 
(ouai  Luc.  Tyr.  7,  (dvr-)  Eur.:  aor.  TJkka£dur]v  Eur.,  Antipho  138.  35, 
Thuc,  etc.:  pf.  (in  med.  sense),  ijkkayuat  (iv-)  Soph.  Aj.  208: — Pass., 


aWaySt/v  —  aXXiiXeyyvot. 


fut.  akkax^riaouai  and  dAAa7ij<ro/iai,  the  former  always  in  Trag.,  the 
latter  in  Prose  ;  aor.  yk\dx&nv  and  rjkkdynv,  the  former  most  freq.  in 
Trag.,  the  latter  in  Prose  ;  v.  Veitch  Gr.  Verbs  :  pf.  ijkkayuai  Antiph. 
'O/iip.  1,  Anth.:  plqpf.  jj/AAa/cro  Hdt.  2.  26. — Freq.  in  compds.  dvr-, 
aw-,  dt~,  i£-akkdoo-cu,  etc.  To  make  other  than  it  is  ^from  dAAos),  to 

change,  alter,  rt  Emped.  67,  157  ;  XP°1<IV<  *?&os  Eur.  Med.  1 168,  Bacch. 
53  ;  to  iavrov  t*8os  tis  iroAAds  uoptpds  Plat.  Rep.  380  D  ;  x^?av  ^a- 
Parm.  139  A.  II.  dAA.  ti  tipos  to  exchange,  give  in  exchange 

for,  barter  one  thing  for  another,  t^s  ffijs  karptias  ttjv  iuty  Svff- 
wpafiav  .  .  ovk  dv  dkkd£atu'  iyw  Aesch.  Pr.  967  ;  ti  dvri  rtvos  Eur. 
Ale.  661  :  and  in  Med.,  rfjv  wapavrUa  ikwiba  .  .  ovbevds  av  r/kkd^avro 
Thuc.  8.  82  ;    cf.  dvTaAAdco'ft;,  infr.  III.  2.  to  repay,  requite, 

<povov  ipovevaiv  Eur.  El.  89.  3.  to  give  up,  leave,  quit,  ovpdvtov 

(puis  Soph.  Ant.  944,  cf.  Eur.  I.  T.  193;  v.  infr.  III.  2,  and  wapak- 
kdaaai.  4.  Med.,  txvos  i£cu  rpt&ov  akkdaatoOat  to  remove  one's 

position,   Eur.  El.  103.  III.  to  exchange,  take  one  thing  for 

another,  xdictov  rovaBkov  waptovros  Theogn.  21  ;  also,  wovcp  wuvov  dkk. 
io  exchange  one  suffering  with  another  (nisi  leg.  7roVoi»),  Soph.  Fr.  400 ; 
i)k\aTTou(a$'  av  bdxpva  8<Wes  xpvo'tov  should  take  in  exchange, 
Philem.  2apS.  1  : — dAA.  6vt)ruv  tfSos  to  assume  it,  Eur.  Bacch.  53,  cf. 
1332  : — more  freq.  in  Med.,  ti'  Tiros  one  thing  for  another,  tuSm/ini'ins 
Kaicooaiuovlav  Antipho  138.  34,  cf.  Plat.  Legg.  733  B;  to  oi'/rijia  Kaicd 
dkkd£ao0at  rotat  wk-qaiotot  to  exchange  them  with  them,  Hdt.  7.  152  ; 
hence,  to  buy,  rt  dvr  dpyvpiov  Plat.  Rep.  371  C ;  Si'  djvrjs  fj  icat 
wpaatas   akkdrreoBat    ri   rtvt    Id.    Legg.   915    D.  2.   to    take 

a  new  position,  i.  e.  go  to  a  place,  dAAd(T(7ti>'  "AiSa  Bakduovs  Eur.  Hec. 
483  (where  the  sense  of  '  having  escaped  death  only  to  fall'  into  slavery,' 
has  also  been  suggested)  ;  woktv  t«  TroAtois  Plat.  Polit.  289  E  ;  so,  mutare 
in  Hor.  Od.  1.  17,  2,  etc.  IV.  absol.  to  have  dealings,  whether 

as  buyer  or  seller,  in  Med.,  irpos  Ttva  Plat.  Legg.  915  E.  2.  to  al- 

ternate, aicTJwTp'  dkkdaaaiv  ixetv  to  enjoy  power  in  turn,  Eur.  Phoen. 
74,  cf.  Plat.  Tim.  42  C : — Pass.,  dperat  .  .  dkkaaaduivai  in  turns,  Pind. 
N.  II.  49,  cf.  Arist.  Probl.  25.  22. — Cf.  duei&ai  throughout. 

dXAaxij,  Adv.  (dAAos)  elsewhere,  in  another  place,  dkkos  dkkaxy  one 
here,  another  there,  Xen.  An.  7.  3,  47  ;  dAAoTt  dAAax*?  now  here,  now 
there,  Id.  Mem.  1.  4,  12. 

dXXaxoStv,  Adv.  from  another  place,  Antipho  124.  16: — dXXaxoBi, 
Adv.  elsewhere,  somewhere  else,  Xen.  Mem.  4.  3,  8  : — dXXaxoo-t.  Adv. 
elsewhither,  to  another  place,  Xen.  Cyr.  7.  4,  7,  Arist.  Fr.  381  : — 
dXXaxou,  Adv.  elsewhere,  somewhere  else,  Soph.  O.  C.  43,  Xen.  Hell.  2. 
3,  20. — These  forms  are  censured  by  Thorn.  M.  and  Moer.  as  being  less 
Att.  than  dXkoBev,  akkoBt,  dkkoae. 

dXXtyov,  dXXt£cu,  v.  sub  dpaAt'yaj. 

dXXt-iraXXT|Xia,  i/,  accumulation,  Eust.  12.  3. 

d\X-tTr-dAXT|Xos,  ov,  one  upon  another,  to  dAAtTr.  accumulation,  Paus. 
9.  39,  4,  Gramm. :  alternate,  Eccl. — But  in  most  passages,  except  in  late- 
authors,  Editors  write  divisim  dAA'  iw„  v.  Alciphro  Fr.  6.  11,  Heinichen 
Eus.  H.  E.  2.  6. 

dXX-rj,  Adv.,  properly  dat.  fern,  of  dAAos:  I.  of  Place,  1. 

in  another  place,  elsewhere,  II.  13.  49,  Soph.  Ph.  23,  Xen. ;  in  Hdt.  also 
Tp  dAAfl,  2.  36.,  4.  28  : — c.  gen.  loci,  dAAos  dkkrj  t^s  wokeais  one  in  one 
part  of  the  city,  one  in  another,  Thuc.  2.  4;  dAAoTt  dkkrf  (as  in 
dAAax^,  q.  v.),  Xen.  Hell.  I.  5,  20;  dAAp  teat  dkkrf  here  and  there,  prob. 

I.  Id.  An.  5.  2,  29;  dAATp  xal  dkkrjv  Plat.  Euthyd.  273  B.  2.  to 
another  place,  elsewhither,  II.  5.  187,  Od.  18.  288  ;  ipxtrat  dAAjj,  i.  e. 
is  lost,  II.  I.  120,  cf.  dAAore  II.  3  fin. ;  dAAoi  dkkri  Hdt.  1.  46,  cf.  7.  25  ; 
dAA?;  tovaat  Id.  4. 114.  II. of  Manner,  inanother  way,  somehow 
else,  otherwise,  II.  15.  51,  Hdt.,  etc.;  tj)  akk-n  wokkaxfj  Hdt.  6.  21 ; 
dkkri  yi  wr)  Plat.  Symp.  189  C  ;  dAAj)  was  Xen.  Cyr.  I.  1,  I,  etc. 

dAV  i],  =  dAAd  I.  3,  except,  but,  after  negat.  words,  esp.  ovStis  or 
urjoeis,  which  are  often  joined  with  dAAos  or  tTtpos,  as,  ouStis  dAA'  r) 
iKeivrj  no  one  except  she,  Hdt.  9.  109  ;  uqoiv  dkko  bomtv  elvat  dk-qBis 
dkk'  t)  to  ffw/iaTOfiSe's  Plat.  Phaedo  81  B,  cf.  83  A,  97  D,  Rep.  429  B, 
etc. ;  dpyvptov  ptiv  ovk  txw  dAA*  i)  ut/cp6v  ti  Xen.  An.  7-  7.  53  ;  so 
after  questions  implying  a  negat.,  Plat.  Phaedr.  258  E  : — in  Ar.  Ach. 
nil,  1112,  for  dAA*  77  .  .  ,  dAA*  r\  .  .  Kriiger's  emendation  dAA'  7)  .  .  , 
dAA'  r) . .  should  prob.  be  accepted.  (This  form  is  best  explained  as  — 
dAAo  r),  other  than,  except,  the  accent  of  dAAo  having  been  lost ;  indeed 
the  phrase  appears  in  full  in  Hdt.  I.  49.,  9.  8,  dAAo  yt  fj  0V1  .  .  except 
that  .  .  ,  cf.  dAAo  ti.) 

dXX'  t],  in  questions,  v.  dAAd  III.  5. 

dXX-i)Yopto>,  (dyop(vai)  to  speak  so  as  to  imply  something  other  than 
what  is  said,  to  interpret  allegorically,  allegorize,  "EAAqrts  Kpovov  dk- 
krjyopovat  tov  xf°vov  Plut.  2.  363  D,  cf.  996  B  : — -Pass,  to  be  spoken 
allegorically,  Ep.  Gal.  4.  24  ;  dAAjy-yopfirai  6  'Awokkaiv  tis  rbv "HAioi', 
Schol.  Soph.  Aj.  186. 

dXX-r)YopT|TT|s,  ov,  6,  an  allegorical  expounder,  Theodoret.,  Eust. : — 
dXXTjyopioTwv  Eus.  H.  E.  271  A,  ubi  Dind.  -tttuiv. 

dXAffyopCa,  t),  an  allegory,  i.  e.  description  of  one  thing  under  the  image 
of  another,  Longin.  9.  7,  Cic.  Att.  2.  20,  3,  in  pi. : — an  allegorical  expo- 
sition of  mythical  legends,  Dem.  Phal.  101,  Plut.  2.  19  E  ;  v.  sub  imovota 

II.  II.  metaphorical  language,  Cic.  Orat.  27. 
aXX-nyopiKos,  f),  ov,  allegorical,  Longin.  32,  etc.     Adv.  -kws,  Dem. 

Phal.  254. 

oXX-qYopiDS,  Adv.  allegorically,  Tzetz.  (?)  ap.  Schol.  Aesch.  Pr.  428. 

dXXT]KTOS,  ov,  poet,  for  dkrjKTOs,  unceasing,  ceaseless,  vdros  Od.  12. 
325  ;  obvvat  Soph.  Tr.  985  :  implacable,  Bvuds  II.  9.  636. — So  'AkkrjKTaj 
is  restored  for  'AAtjktiu  (the  Fury)  in  Luc.  Tragop.  6. 

dXXr)X-aiTioi,  ot,  one  the  cause  of  the  other,  Justin.  M. 

aXX-nX-tyyuov,  a,  bound  in  law  one  for  another,  mutual  sureties,  By  z. 


aWyXevSeToi 

dXXr)X-«v8«Toi,  a,  bound  one  into  the  other,  Byz. 

dXXi)Xi£u>,  to  lie  together,  sensu  obsc.,  A.  B.  383,  Clem.  Al.  222.  Two 
other  usages  are  noted  by  Hesych.,  dWrjkifetv  dAAofS"  real  dAAare  kiyttv, 
and  dWijkiitaOai  •  to  dAAi/Aotre  imx<tprjaat. 

dXX-nXo-pdpos,  ov,  in  pi.  devouring  one  another,  Hesych.  s.  v.  AAA17A0- 
Suootcu  (leg.  dAAi;A«offfT<ll). 

dXXijXo-Ypodiia,  j),  the  writing  of  amabaan  poems,  Eust.  55.  39. 

dXXT]Xo-oia86xwSt  Adv.  in  continuous  succession,  Eccl. 

aXXT|Xo-8pop.oi,  a,  running  from  one  to  another,  Nicet.  Eugen.  2.  314. 

dXX-nXoicTOvtai,  to  slay  each  other,  Hipp.  1282.  32,  Arist.  Fr.  268. 

uXXt]Xoktovio,  tj,  mutual  slaughter,  Dion.  H.  1.  87,  Philo  2.  567. 

oXXtjXo-ktovos,  ov,  of  things,  producing  mutual  slaughter,  SaiTts  Mo- 
schin  ap.  Stob.  Eel.  I.  242  ;   (^Aoj  Dion.  H.  2.  24. 

uXXi)Xou.dxia.  y,  a  mutual  fight,  Schol.  II.  3.  443. 

dXXi]Xo-jidxoi.  a,  fighting  one  with  another,  restored  by  conj.  in  Arist. 
H.  A.  9.  I,  26  for  dWijKoipdyoi. 

aXXTjXo-Tpo-iroi,  a,  exchanging  forms,  Linus  ap.  Stob.  Eel.  1.  282. 

dXXT)Xo-Tpo<£oi,  a,  feeding  one  another,  v.  d\\TjKo<fn\ot. 

dXXtiXo-rvma,  y,  mutual  striking  or  wounding,  Democrit.  ap.  Stob. 
Kcl.  1.  348. 

dXXi)Xovx<<D,  to  hold  together,  Eust.  Opusc.  316.  15  ;  Pass.,  lb.  308.  9. 

aXXijXovxia,  i},  a  holding  together,  Dion.  H.  de  Comp.  p.  202  Schaf. ; 
Krnbovojv  Diosc.  5.  144. 

oXXtjXovxoi,  a,(l x<»)  holding  together,  Epicur.  ap.  Diog.L.  10.99,  Hesych. 

dXA-nXo<J>a-Y«u>,  to  eat  one  another,  Arist.  H.  A.  8.  2,  25,  Fr.  299. 

dXA-r|Xo4>&YLa.  7),  an  eating  one  another,  Hdt.  3.  25,  Plat.  Epin.  975  A. 

dXXT|Xo-4>dYOi.  a,  eating  each  other,  Arist.  H.  A.  8.  3,  17,  Orac.  ap. 
Paus.  8.  42,  6 ;  1)  dAA.  dvofua  Sext.  Emp.  M.  2.  32  ;  AAA.  Sinai  Telecl. 
*A/i</>.  4  ;   cf.  dWrjXofu'^ft s. 

dXXi)Xo^9ovia,  r),  (<p$ivos)  mutual  envy,  Dion.  H.  4.  26. 

dXXT]Xo(j>flop«u),  to  destroy  one  another,  Euseb.  H.  E.  I.  2. 

dXXi)Xo^Oopia,  lj,*mutual  slaughter.  Plat.  Prot.  321  A. 

dXXTjXo-4>9dpos,  ov,  destroying  one  another.  Max.  Tyr. 

dXXT]Xd-4»Aoi,  a,  fond  of  each  other,  Geop.  20.  6  (v.  1.  -Tpitpa). 

dXXTjXo^ovta,  Dor.  AXXdXo-,  y,  mutual  slaughter,  Pind.  0.  2.  74. 

dXXi]Xo-4>dvoi,  a,  murdering  one  another,  Koyxal  Pind.  Fr.  137; 
\etpes,  fiaviai  Aesch.  Theb.  931  (in  Dor.  fomi  AAAaA-),  Ag.  1575; 
d3«A<pot'  Xen.  Hier.  3,  8. 

dXXi]Xo-^dvTH«.  ov,  o,  =  foreg.,  Justin.  M.  I  Apol.  39. 

dXX-nXo-4>vr|t,  it,  in  pi.,  grown  out  of  one  another,  Plut.  2.  908  E. 

dXXi)Xo-<^u)via,  17,  mutual  speech,  Eust.  Opusc.  261.  1. 

dXX-rjXuv.  gen.  pi.,  dual  a\Krf\oiv  (a  nom.  being  impossible) :  dat. 
AAA^Aoir,  air,  ois,  dual  d\\i}Kotv  :  ace.  dAAijAovs,  as,  a.  Redupl.  from 
dAAos,  of  one  another,  to  one  another,  one  another,  Lat.  alter  alterius,  alter 
alteri,  alter  alteram  ;  hence  mutually,  reciprocally,  used  of  all  the  three 
persons.  II.  4.  62,  Od.  1.  209,  etc.: — in  Od.  12.  102,  by  the  common 
punctuation,  dWrjKaiv  must  be  taken  for  tov  iripov  ;  but  if  the  stop  be 
put  after  vXyaiov  (v.  Schol.),  there  is  no  difficulty.  Of  the  dual,  Horn, 
uses  dat.  dAA^AoiiV  for  dWrjKotv.  peril,  also  as  gen.  II.  10.  65  ;  but, 
Tovrot  .  .  iv  aWyXaiai  Aesch.  Pers.  188 ;  in  Prose  the  dual  is  rare. 
Often  with  Preps.,  iv  dAAijAois,  among  one  another,  Pind.  P.  4.  397,  etc.; 
tit  AAA^Aotre,  vpot  dAAijAow  Aesch.  Pr.  491 ,  1087  ;  M  or  tpos  AAAijAoii 
Od.  2  2.  389,  Aesch.  Pers.  506,  Ag.  654  ;  i(  AAA^Aivr  Xen.  Mem.  4.  4, 
2%  Arist. :  nap*  d\Ar]\wv  Hdt.;  irap'  dAAjjAow,  -a.  Plat.  Gorg.  472  C, 
I'haedr.  264  B  ;  Ji'  dWr)\wv  Arist.  An.  Pr.  2.  5,  3,  etc. ;  /ut  dAAijAaw 
Id.  Probl.  30.  I  ;  vw'  dAAjjAan-  Aesch.  Theb.  821. 

uXXtjv.  ace.  fern,  of  dA  Aos ,  used  as  Adv.,  elsewhither,  to  another  place  I  bat, 
aWrjv  Kai  dAA  rjv  dvofJKiwttv  tis  riva  again  and  again.  Plat.  Euthvd.  273  B. 

dXXi{,  f*os,  fi,  Lat.  alicula,  a  man's  upper  garment,  Euphor.  Fr.  1 1 2,  Call. 
Fr.  149,  v.  Miiller  Archiiol.  d.  Kunst  i  337.  6  :  also  dAXi)(,  ijatoj,  i>,  E.  M. 

dXXurros,  ov,  Ep.  for  d-Aioro«,  (Kioaofiai)  inexorable,  "AiSrp  Emped. 
I'r.  go  (ubi  v.  Meineke),  Anth.  P.  7.  643. 

oXXitAwuto*,  Ep.  for  d-kiTavevTos,  inexorable,  Anth.  P.  7.  483. 

oXXo-y«vt|s.  it,  of  another  race,  a  stranger,  Lxx,  Ev.  Luc.  17.  18. 

aXXoyXuKro-ia.  y,  the  use  of  a  strange  tongue,  difference  of  tongue, 
Joseph.  A.  J.  I.  5,  I. 

oXXo-yXuxto-os,  ov,  using  a  strange  tongue,  Hdt.  1.  154,  C.  I.  5126. 

dXXoyvoM),  (7V0-,  yvin>ai)  Ion.  Verb,  to  take  one  for  another,  to  mis- 
Itnow,  not  know,  dXXoyvwcat  Kpolaov  (Ion.  for  dKKoyvofyjas)  Hdt.  I. 
h,  II.  to  be  deranged,  Galen.  Lex.  Hipp. 

dXXo--yvws,  utos,  o,  ij,  =*sq.,  Emped.  194,  in  dat. 

dXXo-yrwTOi.  ov,  nu^-known,  unknown,  strange,  iqfiot  Od.  2.  366. 

dXXoSairot,  ^,  iv,  (dAAos,  v.  sub  vo&awds).        Belonging  to  another 

people  or  land,  foreign,  strange,  II.  16.  550,  Od.  17.  485,  Piiid.  N.  I.  33, 

Aesch.  Theb.  1077.  Xen.  Cyr.  8.  7,  14,  etc. : — a  later  form  is  dXAoodirrp . 

«'»',  mentioned  in  E.  M.  68.   2,  and   found   in  a  few  passages  of  later 

:  cf.  Bast.  Greg.  p.  891. 

dXXo6i)(ua,  q,  =  dvoby/jua,  stay  in  a  foreign  land,  Hipp.  558.  45  ;  iv 
d\Xobi)iu<f  (for  iv  d\.\y  bypuv),  abroad.  Plat.  Legg.  954  E.  II. 

roncrete,  a  crowd  of  foreigners.  Poll.  9.  21^  who  also  uses  the  Adj. 
dXXo-cVnuov  ov,  foreign.  3.  54. 

dXXo-$iici|i.  ov,  d,  having  strange  notions  of  justice.  Or.  Sib.  3.  390, 
(and  c  conj.)  lb.  II.  2 16. 

dXXo8o£«j.  to  opine  that  one  thing  is  another,  mistake  one  thing  for 
another.  Plat.  Theaet.  1 89  D,  1 90  D :  and  dXXoSo(ia,  1),  a  mistake  of 
this  kind,  lb.  1 89  B,  1 90  E  :  cf.  dKXotppoviiu. 

dXXd-So£of ,  ov,  holding  a  strange  or  wrong  opinion,  Athanas. 

dXXo-«8vT|t.