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HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


January,  1922 


THE  Pilot  Superior  Pipeless  Furnace 

SEE  OUR  DISPLAY  AT  THE  HARDWARE  EXHIBITION 
AT  HAMILTON,  FEBRUARY  14  TO  17,  1922 

cold  air        warm  air       cold  aix 


Galvanized  Outer 
Casing 


Adjustable  Collar 
to  Adapt  Heater  for 
Various  Heights 


Warm  Air 
Ascending 


Direct  and  Indirect 
mper  Handle 


Correctly  Proper-  i 
tioned  Combustion  r 
Chamber 


Fire  Pot  in  Two 
Sections  to 
Allow  for 
Expansion  and 
Contraction 


Anti  Clinker  Four  Bar* 
Triangular  Grate 
( Simplest  and  Best 
Grate  Ever  Invented) 


Deep  Roomy  Ash  Pit         Cast  Iron  Ash  Pit  Bottom 


Dust  Damper 


This  remarkably  effective  furnace  supplies  you  with  an 
uiiu.ual  number  of  very  convincing  features  and  advan- 
tages to  point  out  to  your  prospects.  The  galvanized 
oute.-  casing;  correctly  proportioned  combustion  chamber; 
convenient  arrangement  for  hot  water  coils;  the  tin  and 
asbcitos  lined  galvanized  inner  casing;   fire  pot  in  two 


sections  to  allow  for  expansion  and  contraction ;  every  joint 
a  deep  wide  cuj)  joint;  large  watering  pan;  anti-clinker 
four-bar  triangular  grate — the  simplest  and  best  grate 
ever  invented;  the  deep  roomy  ash  pit;  the  hot  blast  to 
improve  combustion  and  many  other  useful  features 
convincing  to  the  prospective  purchaser. 


Write  now  for  our  agency  in  your  district 


Hall  Zry  d  Foundry  Co.^  Limited 

Western  Branch:  Post  Office  Box  687,  Winnipeg,  Man. 
Manufacturers  of  Pilot  Stoves,  Ranges  and  Furnaces 

HESPELLER,  ONT. 


January,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


3 


W.  Walker  &  Son  Limited  II^Me^tr.  10-16  Alcorn  Ave.,  Toronto 


-SERVICE- 

A  Much  Mis-used  Word 

But  we  take  no  chances — if  there's  one  thing  we  are  proud  of  even  to  the  boasting  point  it's  "Walker 
service."  To  many  this  announcement  will  come  as  real  news,  because  up  until  now  it  has  not  been 
possible  for  us  to  care  for  other  than  regular  customers.  Now  that  the  big  new  addition  to  our 
warehouse  is  completed,  we  are  out  for  more  busine^5S.  We  have  the  goods — new  stocks — represen- 
tative lines  from  the  best  manufacturers,  Canadian,  American  and  British — Dealers  tell  us  that  our 
serv-ice  is  all  that  could  be  desired — that  our  complete  and  varied  lines  make  our  travellers  always 
welcome  and  real  order  getters^ — and  that  our  live  wire  selling  helps  create  ready  sales  and  increased 
profits.  We  really  have  something  out  of  the  ordinary  to  offer  you — don't  wait  for  our  travellers — 
write  us  for  prices  on  any  lines — it  will  pay  you  to  do  so. 


WALKER  SERVICE-^THAT'S  DIFFERENT 


Partial  List  of  Walker's 
Quality  Products 

Aero  Shingle  Stain,  all  colors 

Aeio  High  Gloss  Enamel 

Aero  Paints,  one  gallon  cans  only 

6  saU  to  case.  White.  Green.  Brown,  Cray  and  Cream 

Aero  Orange  Shellac 

Aero  White  Shellac 

Aero  Barn  Red  Paint 

Aero  Spar  Varnish 

Aero  Japan  Dryers 

Aero  Putty  Aero  Floor  Wax 

Aero  White  Lead 
Owl  Brand  Roofing, — light  weight 
Owl  Brand  Roofing, — medium  weight 
Owl  Brand  Roofing  , — heavy  weight 
Owl  Brand  Slate  Surface  Roofing 

Red  and  Green 
Walker's  Wizard  Roll  Roofing 

Red  and  Green 
Walker's  Wizard  4  in  1  Shingles 


Walker  service  in  part  means  oraers 
shipped  same  day  as  received — Our 
modern  facilities  for  handling  orders  is  a 
revelation  to  all — We  carry  at  all  times 
complete  stocks  in  Builders'  Hardware 
—Aero  quality  products — Owl  Brand 
Roofing,  etc.  Link  up  with  the"Walker'* 
organization— we're  growing  fast,  so  why 
not  grow  with  us— a  postcard  to  us  now 
will  start  the  ball  a-rolling. 

Strictly  iVholesale 
Hardware  andiron  Merchants 


CfWt 


W.  WALKER  &  SON  LIMITED 

10-1 S  ALCORN  AVENUE,  TORONTO 


Canadian  Distributors  for  Ontario  Distributors 

May  &  Padraore,  Birmingham,  Eng.  Mitchell  Vacuum  Cleaner 

Toronto  and  District — Beaver  Hexacon  Shingles 


mm. 

RopJinfc 


4r 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


January,  1922 


CLOSE  UP  THE  WINDOWS  AND 
MAKE  MORE  MONEY 

Just  at  the  present  moment  there  is  a  campaign  on  against  the  robber.  Every- 
where owners  of  factories,  stores,  etc.,  are  putting  up  guards  to  keep  out  the  thief. 

nCNNISTEEl 

Made  in  Canada  ■■^ 

WIRE  WINDOW  GUARDS 

are  greatly  in  demand.  There  isn't  a  hardwareman  who  can't  take  an  order  for  us  for  these 
guards  for  buildings  in  his  district.      There  is  good  profit  for  you  if   you  act  as  our  agents. 

Write  for  particulars. 

WE  ALSO  MAKE 

Wire  Elevators,  Enclosures,  Machinery  Guards,  Steel  Lockers,  Steel  Cabinets, 
Steel  Shelving,  etc.  Commercial  Wirework  of  all  kinds.  General  Builders'  Iron- 
work, Ornamental  Iron  and  Bronze,  "Boca"  Solid  Steel  Sash,  Steel  Lavatory 

Compartments,  etc. 

Write  for  folders 

The  Dennis  Wire  and  Iron 
Works  Co.  Limited 
London 

Toronto 
Hamilton 
Wind»or 


Halifax 

Montreal 

Ottawa 


Winnipeg 
Calgary 
Vancouver 


"YANKEE" 

VISES 

FOUR  SIZES 

With  Detachable  Swivel  Base 


Dimensions 


1991 

1992 

1993 

1994 

1  15/16 

SVs 

4  in. 

5^ 

12M'' 

4H 

6 

8H 

3 

6 

14 

41  lbs 

.Your  Jobber 
ill  supply 
you 


Jaw  Opening 
Height  Over  All 
Length  Over  All 
Net  Weight 

This  vise  is  accurately  machined  on  the  bottom,  sides  and  end,  for  use  in  holding  work  in  several 
positions  on  drill  press,  shaper,  etc.,  allowing  it  to  pass  through  several  operations  before  necessary  to 
change  it  in  the  vise.  An  entirely  distinct  feature  in  vises  and  one  that  is  quickly  appreciated  by  Tool 
Makers,  Pattern  Makers  and  Machinists. 

NORTH  BROS.  MANUFACTURING  CO. 

PHILADELPHIA,  PA. 


January,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


S 


The  Frost 
Hold-Tight 
Lock 


the  economical  fence 


Frost  Fence  Saves  your  customers'  money,  not  only  in  erecting 
and  maintaining  the  fence,  but  in  many  extra  years  of  good  service. 
That  is  the  quality  standard  that  builds  up  fence  business  in  these 
times,  and  you  v^ant  all  tlie  particulars.  Let  us  tell  you  how^  we 
make  and  extra  heavily  galvanize  our  wire  in  our  own  factory. 
Let  us  explain  the  famous  Frost  Hold-tight  Lock.  Let  us  prove 
Frost  superiority  at  every  point.    Write  today. 


For  Your 

TIN  SHOP 

Britht,  galvanized 
and 
coppered  wire. 


Frost  Steel  and  Wire  Company  Limited,  Hamilton,  Canada 

Galvanized  and  Bright  Wire — Hay  Wire  and  Bale  Ties — Woven  Wire — Farm,  Factory 
and  Ornamental  Fences — Galvanized  Gates  Manufacturers'  Wire  Supplies. 


PISTONS  AND  PISTON  RINGS 

FOR  POPULAR  CARS 

Ford  Chevrolet  Dodge  Studebaker 
McLaughlin        Maxwell       Overland  and  others 


Regular  and  Oversizes  carried  in  stock. 

Pistons  made  from  high  grade  semi-steel.     Machined  to  Manufacturers'  limits. 
Material  and  Workmanship  guaranteed  in  every  detail. 

Special  Oil  Proof  Piston  Rings  and  Standard  Step-Cut  Rings  of  all  sizes. 

ORDER  FROM  YOUR  JOBBER  OR  DIRECT 

The  White  Machine  Works  Limited 


Windsor 


Ontario 


6 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


January,  1922 


TheK.T. 
COBBLER  SET 

(Guaranteed  Unbreakable) 

Weighs  1  4  Ibs.-Costs  you  $1 .00 
Sells  for  $1.50 

Recommend  It  To  Your  Customers, 


We  also  make 

Clothes  Line  Pulleys,  Clothes  Reels,  Coal  Chutes, 
Window  Weights,      Clean  Out  Doors,      Horse  Weights, 

Builders'  Castings. 

Ask  your  jobber  for  the  K-T  or  write  us  for  prices. 


GALT 


^^22^  O  N  T. 


SOLE  MANUFACTURERS  OF  THE  CELEBRATED 

"MAPLE  LEAF"  BRAND 

STITCHED  COTTON  DUCK  BELTING 

STRONG    DURABLE    ECONOMICAL    TRUE  RUNNING 

Mr.  Hardware  Merchant- Look  over  your  stock  and 
send  in  your  orders  Now,  to  secure  present  prices,  as  the 
cost  of  duck  has  been  steadily  advancing. 

MAPLE  LEAF  BELT  DRESSING 

The  Best  for  all  Kinds  of  Belts 
WRITE  FOR  SAMPLES  AND  PRICES 
Quebec  Branch:    51  Duluth  Building,  Montreal 

DOMINION  BELTING  CO.,  Limited 

HAMILTON  -  ONTARIO  -  CANADA 


Maple  Leaf 

'  ^^ltDressi 


'  'S  MOT  s^wtTCH  1-t  etiTs 

..■i  r,-e  anO  TBOuBie 
,*.!S  v*E/<l_AflO  riA^  

OMiNiON  Belting  Co.. 

HAMrLTON.  OnT. 


January,  1922 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


7 


What  does  your  customer 
think  about  your  deliveries 

Absolutely  no  room  for  improvement  in  your  product — what  impression  do  your  deliveries  make? 
By  your  deliveries  you  can  add  prestige  and  more  saleability  to  your  line — and  stir  up  more  business. 

Beath  Welded  Steel  Barrels  will  win  over  many  a  doubtful  sale.  Your  customer  likes  to  see  safe 
deliveries  of  liquids,  chemicals,  oils,  paints,  varnish,  enamels,  powders,  crystals,  tar— and  Beelh 
barrels  deliver  them  safely  without  loss. 

Beath  Welded  Steel  Barrels  are  best  quality  sheet  steel  with  every  seam  welded:  Self  draining 
outlet.  No  leaks.  Can  be  used  over  and  over  again  and  stored  inside  or  outside  in  all  weathers. 
The  Beath  barrel  is  the  barrel  for  economy.  We  make  barrels  in  any  special  design  when  required. 

Always  Order  Your  Own  Supplies  In  Beath  Barrels 

Wriim  u»  for  full  particulars  and  prices 

W.  D.  Beath  and  Son  Limited 


Toronto 


Ontario 


Beath 


WELDED  STEEL 


Barrels 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


January,  1922 


The  Truth  in 
Business 

By  Dr.  Frank  Crane 


LISTEN,  young  man !    The  cleverest  m  an  in  the  world  is  the  man  who  tells  the 
truth,  and  tells  it  all  the  time,  not  occasionally.    Sometimes  you  can  profit  by 
a  lie,  but  it  is  like  dodging  bullets;  you  never  know  when  you  are  going  to 
get  hurt. 

Lying  is  a  game.  Sometimes  it  is  a  very  exciting  game.  But  it  is  essentially 
gambling.    And  gambling,  any  sort  of  gambling,  is  not  business. 

The  fundamental  laws  of  business  are  just  as  accurate  and  as  well  established 
as  the  principles  of  geometry. 

It  is  hard  to  see  this,  for  our  visual  range  is  limited.  Most  of  us  can  see  the 
crooked  dollar  coming  today,  but  not  the  ten  straight  dollars  it  is  going  to  lose  us 
tomorrow. 

Real  business  success  is  cumulative.  It  grows  like  a  snowball.  And  the  one 
thing  that  makes  it  keep  on  growing,  even  while  we  sleep,  is  our  persistent  truthful- 
ness and  dependableness. 

If  you  put  an  advertisement  in  the  paper  announcing  goods  worth  five  dollars  for 
sale  at  two  dollars,  and  if  the  people  coine  and  buy,  and  find  out  the  stuff  is  not 
worth  ten  cents,  you  may  make  a  or>e  day's  gain,  but  you  have  alienated  a  lot  of 
indignant  customers  and  have  started  to  saw  away  the  posts  that  sustain  your  repu- 
tation. 

If  you  have  a  store  rented  for  a  week  only  and  purpose  to  conduct  a  sacrifice  sale 
of  goods  that  will  make  everybody  disgusted  who  buys  them,  then  perhaps  you  may 
lie  with  a  high  hand  and  a  stretched-out-  arm. 

But  if  you  are  in  business  to  stay,  and  want  regular,  returning,  increasing,  satis- 
fied ai  d  friendly  customers,  it  will  pay  you  to  stick  to  the  old-fashioned  truth. 

Exaggeration  is  lying.  It  does  not  take  long  for  the  people  to  get  the  habit  of 
discounting  twenty-five  per  cent,  of  all  you  say. 

If  you  continually  overstate  and  vociferate  you  must  keep  on  getting  louder,  until 
you  soon  become  incoherent. 

But  if  you  habitually  state  only  what  is  soberly,  honestly  true,  by  and  by  everv- 
thing  you  say  will  be  away  above  par. 

A  man's  repute  for  truthfulness  is  as  much  a  part  of  his  capital  as  are  his  store 
and  stock;  so  much  so  that  he  can  raise  money  on  it. 

As  civilization  progresses,  business  becomes  more  and  more  an  affair  of  credit, 
of  trust.  The  very  foundation  of  big  business  is  trustworthiness.  Therefore,  if 
you  are  ever  going  to  get  beyond  the  peanut-stand  and  push-cart  stage  of  merchan- 
dise you  must  establish  a  basis  of  dependableness. 

There  is  not  one  thing  in  this  world,  young  man,  that  can  be  of  as  much  value 
to  you  as  building  up  a  reputation  such  that  men  will  say,  "his  word  is  as  good 
as  his  bond." 

It  is  well  to  be  clever  and  keen  and  Johnnv-on4he-spot,  it  is  well  to  look  out  for 
number  one  and  to  know  a  good  bargain,  but  best  of  all  is  to  have  the  world  say 
of  you: 

"Whatever  that  man  says  can  absolutely  be  relied  upon." 


••••••••••••••• i 


•••••••••••• 


•^J^  ^w"*^  ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 


Copyright   1921  by  Dr.  Frank  Crane. 


January,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


9 


Including 
CANADIAN 
HARDWARE 
STOVE  AND 
PAINT 
JOURNAL 

Established 
1909 


Including 

CANADIAN 
TIRE  AND 
ACCESSORY 
JOURNAL 

Established 
1909 


Published  Monthly  by  Weston  Wrigley,  123  Bay  St.  Toronto. 

Subscription  Rates  fl.OO  per  year  in  Canada,  Great  Britain  and  Her  Dominions;  12.00  to  the  United  States. 


Volume  14 


TORONTO  JANUARY  1922 


Number  1 


BUSINESS  ON  THE  UPGRADE 
No  chicken  was  ever  hatched  out  of  a  fresh  egg,  says  the 
Herald  Press,  Montreal.    About  the  time  that  new  life  is 
ready  to  come  out  of  an  egg,  the  egg  is  rotten- 

The  same  is  true  of  business.  Things  have  been  so  rotten 
that  they  are  good.  We  bave  incubated  all  the  freshness 
out  of  the  world-egg  and  it  is  time  now  for  a  new  sort  of 
vitality  to  be  iborn  from  it.  Labor,  capital,  politics,  ethics, 
morals,  civilization  as  a  whole — all  have  worked  them- 
selves up  to  proportions  of  purulent  and  perfect  putrescen- 
ce. But  put  your  ear  down  to  the  shell  and  you  can  dis- 
tinguish the  first  faint  peeks  of  a  new  and  yet  unborn  life 
that  is  about  to  break  through  and  walk  out  among  us. 

Philosophers  and  moralists  have  always  known  that  every 
form  of  excitement  and  every  debauch  produces  its  own 
antidote  and  reaction-  And  civilization  has  too  much  vital- 
ity and  too  good  a  constitution  to  be  knocked  cold  by  even 
the  extraordinary  hard  bumps  it  has  taken  during  the  past 
seven  years. 

Old  Mother  Nature  has  been  patiently  sitting  on  her  eggs. 
At  this  time  they  are  no  good  for  a  cake  or  an  omelette, 
but  if  you  will  restrain  yourself  and  look  forward  with  a 
more  optimistic  vision  and  endeavor  to  work  toward  better 
conditions  they  are  sure  to  come. 


ATTEND  THE  CONVENTION 
The  doubling  of  membership  in  the  Ontario  Retail  Hard- 
ware Association  as  predicted  by  Hardware  and  Access- 
ories in  March  last,  makes  it  practically  certain  that  the 
attendance  of  retailers  at  the  Hardware  Convention  to  be 
held  at  Hamilton,  Feb.  14  to  17,  will  be  larger  than  at  any 
previous  gathering,  not  excepting  the  Ottawa  convention 
in  1914. 

With  the  membership  around  300,  the  previous  high 
mark,  an  attendance  of  150  to  200  retailers  was  considered 
satisfactory,  but  with  about  600  paid  up  members  to  draw 
from  it  is  reasonable  to  expect  300  or  more  to  attend  the 
1922  convention- 

Up  to  Dec.  31,  94  of  the  99  booths  in  the  convention  hall 
had  been  reserved  so  that  the  Hardware  Exhibition  is  an 
assured  success.  The  buying  card  plan  will  be  used  this 
year,  prizes  being  awarded  to  the  dealers  who  (1)  make 
the  largest  total  of  purchases  nd  (2)  to  those  who  make 
the  largest  number  of  individual  purchases  from  exhibitors. 

Two  banauets  are  planned,  one  under  the  auspices  of  the 
Retail  Hardware  Association,  and  one  tendered  by  the 
Hardware  Manufacturers  of  Hamilton.    It  has  also  been 


suggested  that  the  Exhibitors  be  allotted  one  evening  to 
put  on  some  selling  stunts  or  other  educational  features. 

Special  convention  fares  will  be  offered  by  the  railways, 
and  by  asking  for  a  convention  certificate  when  buying  a 
one-way  ticket  to  Hamilton,  return  ticket  will  be  obtained 
by  paying  25c  registration  fee.  With  the  help  of  the  travel- 
ing salesmen  the  necessary  300  is  easily  assured. 


AVERAGE  OVERHEAD  IS  21% 
Figures  compiled  by  the  Bureau  of  Business  Research  of 
Harvard  T diversity  indicate  that  in  the  majority  of  retail 
hardware  stores  the  overhead  appears  to  be  about  21  per 
cent,  of  salf  s.  The  lowest  figure  reported  was  11.42  per 
cent ,  and  tho  highest  36.3  per  cent.  The  average  selling 
expense  is  7  per  cent,  and  the  average  for  buying  and 
nia>Tagem.ent  is  4.4  per  cent. 

The  follov^^mg  figures  express  the  percentages  between 
the  various  expenses  and  the  total  sales: 

Lowest    Highest  Common 

Wa-;es  of  sales  force   2.57       15.80  6.2 

Other  seUing  expenses   0.03         4.12         0  7 

Total  selling  expense   3.02       15.8  7.0 

Delivery  expense   3.22  0.7 

Buying,   ir.anigement  and  office 

salaries   0.66         9.64  4.0 

Office  supplies,  postage  ?nd  other 

expense     1.15       10.6  4.4 

Rf-nt   0.38         6.09  1.7 

Heat,  ligl'.t  and  power   0.06         1.35  0.4 

Taxes,  (except  on  buildings,  in- 
come and  profits)...   0.04        1.14  0.5 

Insurance  '  e.vcept  on  buildings)  0.08  1.02  0.4 
Repairs  of  store  equipment....  0.01  1.11  0.1 
Depreciation  of  store  equipment  0.02         1.6  0.3 

Total  interest  "   0.95         8.95  3.3 

Total  fixed  charges  and  upkeep 

expense     3.07       12.68  7.0 

Miscellaneous  expense   0.01         3.86  0.9 

Losses  from  bad  debts   6.8  0.5 

To^al  exppri=e    11.42       36.30  31.0 

To  realize  a  net  profit  of  five  per  cent,  on  the  year's 
business,  the  hardware  retailer  must,  therefore,  add  an 
average  of  a  little  over  35.1  per  cent.  , 

In  comparison  with  these  figures,  the  Bureau  of  Busi- 
ness Research  points  out,  the  overhead  in  retail  drug  stores 
averages  27.6  per  cent.,  and  in  grocery  stores  14.6  per  cent. 


10 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


January,  1922 


THE  HARDWARE  ROUND  TABLE 

LITTLE  CHATS  ABOUT  SALESMANSHIP  AND  BUSINESS  ME  i  HODS 


THE  thing  we  call  business  is  you  and  me.  It  is 
hard  for  the  business  man  to  realize  that  his  goods, 
stocks  and  bonds;  his  factories  and  his  farms,  of 
themselves  are  not  business.  It  is  a  personal  matter. 
Health  and  mental  conditions  are  business  The  merchant 
makes  a  mistake  if  he  hesitates  to  correct  the  employee  on 
the  first  show  of  a  selfish  nature.  Such  a  person  can 
never  measure  up  to  the  best.  It  is  a  disease.  It  is  a 
cancer  on  the  future  possibilities  of  the  person. 

The  merohant  who  finds  himself  putting  all  his  thought 
on  the  money  he  can  ^ake,  centering  everything  on  the 
dollar,  giving  but  little  thought  to  the  interests  and  wel- 
fare of  others,  nees  to  take  himself  in  hand  and  adminis- 
ter a  big  dose  of  some  kind  of  remedy.  If  you  allow  this 
condition  to  grow  ,it  will  only  be  a  question  of  time  until 
you  will  l>e  so  wound  up  in  its  clutches  that  it  will  be  al- 
most impossible  to  throw  it  aS.    There  is  no  happiness, 

or  health  in  it.    Its  very  influence  is  for  the  bad. 
'  *    *  * 

Frank  E.  Mutton  general  manager  of  the  International 
Business  Machines,  Limited,  Toronto,  spent  many  years  on 
the  road  as  a  salesman  and  "doesn't  forget  that  he  was  once 
a  boy"  at  the  head  of  the  stairs  leading  to  his  office  this 
sigrn  erects  the  visitor: 


'  Salesmen  who  happen  to  be  in  this  vicinity  any  day 
about  3.40  p.m.  are  invited  to  have  a  cup  of  tea  with  us." 

"Our  office  staff,"  explained  Mr.  Mutton,  has  tea  served 
to  them  by  our  lunch  room  maid  every  afternoon,  the  ex- 
ecutives joining  with  me  in  a  daily  conference  which  may 
last  twenty  minutes  or  two  hours  if  something  of  particular 
interest  arisen.  The  girls  have  their  tea  in  the  general 
office  and  experience  has  shown  that  the  few  minutes  spent 
in  this  diversion  is  more  than  repaid  by  increased  efficiency 
in  all  of  us  for  the  rest  of  the  afternoon. 

"One  afternoon  recently  I  noticed  a  salesman  waiting 
near  the  switchboard  at  the  tea  hour  and  invited  him  to 
join  us  as  it  was  a  raw  day  outside  and  a  hot  cup  would  be 
appreciated  Since  then  we  have  had  the  invitation  on  a 
card  near  the  stairs  and  we  appreciate  the  opportunity  to 
entertain  visiting  salesmen  who  have  business  to  do 
with  us." 

Mr.  Mutton  says  that  his  factory  is  five  weeks  behind  in 
their  deliveries  of  the  special  Dayton  Scale  made  for  hard- 
waremen  and  the  outlook  for  1922  business  is  for  a  great- 
ly increased  volume  over  1921. 

#    *  * 

John  D.  Rockefeller  took  a  little  girl  in  Cleveland  to 
ride  in  his  car  and,  after  she  had  comfortably  seated  her- 
self, he  asked  her,  "Where  would  you  like  to  go?" 

"Oh,  I  don't  care,"  the  little  miss  replied.  "Where  do 
you  want  to  go?" 

"I,"  Mr  Rockefeller  replied  with  a  twinkle  in  his  eyes, 
"I  want  to  go  to  Heaven." 

"Oh,  Mr.  Rockefdler,"  the  girl  exclaimed,  "I  guess  you 
haven't  sol  gasoline  enough  to  take  you  there." — 


"Where  is- 


Nadonal  Hardtvare  Bullrtin. 


 now?  asked  Fred  Hatch,    of  the 

Canada  Steel  Goods  Co.,  Hamilton,  mentioning  a  Western 
Ontario  hardwareman  who  is  now  in  another  line  of  trade. 

"On  one  of  my  first  trips  on  the  road  I  called  on  some 
of  the  towns  west  of  London  and  being  a  widely  known 
merchant  I  was  told  to  call  on  this  dealer.  When  I  called 
the  dealer  said  he  was  busy  on  a  tinsmithing  job  but  would 
see  me  at  noon  so  while  I  was  waiting  during  the  morning 
I  found  another  hardware  store  and  secured  a  small  order 
from  him  7he  first  merchant,  however,  happened  to  see 
me  leaving  his  opposition's  store  and  when  I  entered  his 
store  at  noon  he  bawled  me  out  in  a  loud  voice,  telling  me 
that  I  couldn't  do  business  with  him  if  I  sold  my  line  of 
hin^?es,  etc.,  to  his  competitor.  When  I  returned  home  I 
was  told  not  to  call  on  the  dealer  with  a  big  voice  again  as 
our  company  could  do  business  without  him. 

"I'm  not  surprised  that  he's  out  of  the  hardware  busi- 
ness," added  Mr.  Hatch,  "as  if  a  merchant  wants  to  succeed 
lie  must  have  the  friendship  of  the  travelling  salesmen  and 
the  confidence  of  the  manufacturers  and  jobbers. 

Paint!  Paint!  Paint!  the  world  is  painting, 
Varnish  also  has  the  call. 

And  the  year  of  "Twentv-two" 

Marks  the  greatest  year  for  you, 
Paint  and  varnish — Save  the  Surface  and  save  all! 


January,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


11 


ine  name  ol  Uscar  Zryd,  of  t±ie  Hall  Z-ryd  l^oundry  Co, 
LlO.,  mespeler,  nappened  to  be  menuonea  in  a  lorouio 
manulaciuier  fi  oiiice  recently  ana  tne  loliowing  incident 
was  related: 

"I  was  on  my  hrsi  trip  as  a  salesman  and  was  irymg 
lO  maKe  at  least  one  sale  in  every  town  1  visited  in  order  lo 
?now  ine  lirrr.  talil  1  nao  been  mere.  VVlien  i  reacnea 
ijriinsoy  1  lound  one  customer  s  Siore  closed  and  no  otnef 
piospec!  ol  gelling  an  order.  1  saw  a  lounary  aown  tiic; 
street  and  as  a  last  resort  called  on  them.  Oscar  waS 
oooKKeeper  and  asking  him  to  looK  over  my  line  ne  qki 
but  could  lind  nothing  he  could  use  until  we  ioimd  babbit 
metal. 

"we  don  t  use  much  metal  and  we  won't  need  any  until 
the  spring  bul  you  caan  put  us  down  lor  2UU  pounds  lor 
delivery  April  jst. 

Ihe  order  wasn't  big  but  it  meant  much  to  me  and  I 
fully  appreciated  the  spirit  which  prompted  him  lo  give  a 
helping  hand  to  a  young  salesman,"  added  the  manufac- 
turer. 

*  *  # 

Mr.  Merchant,  if  a  man  came  into  your  s^ore  and  bought 
some  merchandise  and  tendered  a  $10  bill  in  payment,  and 
you  saw  on  the  reverse  side  of  the  bill  was  printed  the 
following,  "Ihis  bill  is  void  if  such  and  such  conditions 
are  not  complied  wjth,"  wouldn't  you  ask  that  customer  to 
wait  until  you  had  read  over  the  conditions  pretty  care- 
fully'.'' We  venture  to  say  that  you  would,  and  yet  have 
you  ever  read  over  the  conditions  on  the  $1000  or  $10,000 
bills  that  you  have  against  the  various  insurance  compan- 
ies with  whom  you  do  business? 

Read  your  insurance  policies  carefully,  and  before  plac- 
ing any  renewals  or  new  insurance  ask  Secretary  MacPher- 
son  of  the  Ontario  Retail  Hardware  Association  about  the 
soundness  of  the  Hardware  Alutual  Fire  Insurance  compan- 
ies and  the  savings  to  be  made  by  placing  business  with 
them  instead  of  the  old  line  companies. 

Many  of  the  biggest  retail  hardware  retailers  in  Ontario 
are  placing  hundreds  of  thousands  of  dollars  of  insurance 
with  the  Hardware  Mutuals  and  during  1922  dividends  of 
50  per  cent  on  the  premiums  on  several  millions  of  dollars 
worth  of  insurance  will  be  paid  to  hardware  dealers  in 
Ontario. 

Take  this  tip^ — insure  with  the  Hardware  Mutuals  if  you 
have  not  already  done  so. 

The  tip  IS  worth  several  years  subscription  to  Hardware 
and  Accessories  but  if  you  don't  want  to  send  Three  Dollars 
for  p,  Five  Years  Subscription  just  now  you  can  have  One 
Years  Subscription  for  One  Dollar. 

#  ^  # 

Miss  Hanslei';  of  Advertising  Service,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  in 
telling  of  an  experience  she  had  recently,  made  a  suggestion 
which  may  be  helpful  to  some  manufacturers  selling  elec- 
trical equipment,  auto  accessories  or  other  lines  to  hard- 
waremen. 

"A  friend  of  mine",  said  Miss  Hansler  "found  her  store 
overstocked  in  several  lines  recently.  I  had  advised  her 
to  order  some  popular  priced  goods  in  moderate  quantities 
but  ihc  salesman  induced  her  to  place  an  order  for  several 
dozen  of  a  high  priced  line.  We  put  on  a  sale  and  man- 
aged to  clear  the  stock  but  it  occurred  to  me  that  the  inan- 
ufant-Livers  and  jobbers  might  instruct  their  salesmen  to  do 
what  T  di.]  in  this  case — get  behind  any  dealers  who  are 
overstocked  end  help  them  to  unload. 

"Goods  are  not  sold  until  thev  reach  the  consumer  and 


whe.'i  business  is  quiet  and  salesmen  have  spare  time,  they 
might  be  used  to  help  dealers  move  their  overstock  either 
by  store  sales  or  by  canvassing  special  prospects  for  the 
particular  line  they  are  selling." 

What  is  one  of  the  big  contributing  factors  to  prices  in 
retail  stores  which  some  people  still  talk  of  as  "too  high?" 
Service.  If  stores  cut  out  their  service  of  course  they 
could  sell  cheaper,  but  does  the  public  want  this  service? 
Yes  indeed  they  want  it,  but  they  don't  want  to  pay  for  it. 
What  retailers  need  to  do  today  is  to  remind  the  public  of 
the  service  they  are  giving  and  put  the  casae  before  them 
frankly  that  if  lower  prices  are  wanted,  they  will  have  to 
get  along  witii  less  service? 

*    *  * 

Another  plan  to  swindle  retailers  has  been  exposed  by 
the  National  Retail  Hardware  Association  in  the  United 
States. 

Retail  ers  are  approached  by  electric  sign  salesmen  who 
claim  to  have  contracts  from  hardware  manufacturers  to 
exhibit  electric  flash  signs  in  retail  store  windows  adver- 
tising products  sold  by  the  dealer. 

The  retailer  is  asked  to  pay  $15  for  membership  and 
agrees  to  keep  one  of  the  signs  flashing  four  hours  each 
night  for  one  month,  the  flashing  sign  having  24  changes 
of  wording.  The  dealer  is  to  receive  $10  per  month  for 
each  additional  flash  sign  which  the  sign  concern  May 
send  him. 

The  fly-in-the-ointment  is  that  maybe  the  hardware  man- 
ufacturers will  not  want  ot  advertise  their  products  in  this 
manner.  Then  the  $10  more  or  less,  that  the  dealer 
thought  he  was  going  to  get  when  he  became  a  member 
will  vanish  into  the  thin,  thin  air. 

There  are  several  sign  "associations"  working  the  retail- 
ers on  this  game,  some  having  a  capitalization  of  a  million 
dollars. 

If  the  game  is  tried  on  Canadian  Hardwaremen  it  would 
be  wise  lo  demand  that  photographed  copies  of  the  signed 
orders  be  shown  before  agreeing  to  contribute.  The 
trade  papers  and  the  Secretary  of  the  Retail  Hardware 
Association  should  also  be  advised. 


12  HARDWARE    AND    ACCESSORIES  January,  1922 

CANADIAN  DEALERS  SHOULD  MAKE  1922 
THEIR  GREATEST  PAINT  AND  VARNISH  YEAR 

IIIIMINIIIIIMMIMIIIIMIIIIMIMHIIIMIMMUnHininilMIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIMIIMHIIIIllMIMIIIIMIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIMIMIMIMIMMMIIIIMIinMllinillll^ 

Mauufacturer's  publicity  has  paved  the  way  for  increased  business  for  the  retailer  —  Public 
appreciation  of  necessity  of  "saving  the  surface"  has  been  created  —  It's  up  to  the  dealer  to  cash  in 

1IIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII  nil  Mil  Illlllllll  Illlllllll  IIIIIMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIM   IIMIIIIIIII  Ill  IIIIIKIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIUIIHIIIIIIIIIMIIII 

By    GEORGE    HENDERSON     Chairman    Save    the    Surface  Campaign 

Committee 


1  am  pleased  to  note  that  with  the  inauguration  of  the 
increase  in  size  of  your  publication  in  January  next  you 
are  especially  emphasizing  the  value  of  the  Save  the  Surface 
Campaign  to  dealers  in  their  efforts  to  enlarge  their  paint 
business,  and  I  feel  sure  that  if  dealers  can  be  brought  to 
realize  the  facts  of  the  matrer  they  will  be  of  one  mind  in 
iheir  apjjrobation  of  your  action  in  this  regard. 

For  three  years  now  the  Save  the  Surface  Campaign, 
through  the  medium  of  the  daily  press  has  been  educating 
the  people  of  Canada,  from  one  end  of  the  country  to  the 
other,  to  the  truth  of  the  contention,  which  in  a  few  words 
is  that  no  matter  what  it  costs  to  paint  the  fact  remains 
that  it  costs  more  not  to  paint  than  to  paint. 

A  far-reaching  appreciation  of  this  fact  has  sprung  up 
and  the  one  thing  required  now  to  increase  the  dealer's 
paint  sales  tremendously  is  a  more  concentrated  effort  on 
his  I'Ort  tf  take  advantage  of  this  state  of  the  public  mind. 


GEOWGE  HENDERSON,  Montreal 
President   and    General    Manager   Brandram-Henderson,  Ltd. 
President  AlbiTta  Linseed  Oil  Co.,  Ltd.,  Medicine  Hat,  Alta.,  and 
President  Pacific  Vhite  Lead  Ce.,  Ltd.,  Vancouver,  B.C. 

Courtesy  International  Press  Ltd. 


As  .stated  on  numerous  occasions  the  campaign  was  start- 
ed tc  educvHte  the  public  on  the  necessity  for  the  use  of 
paints  and  varnishes.  To  a  very  remarkable  extent  this 
object  has  been  achieved.  Now,  having  accomplished  so 
much,  the  paint  dealer  should  realize  the  situation  and 
turn  it  to  his  personal  benefit  and  that  of  the  manufacturer 
whose  product  he  sells. 

There  arc  without  doubt  many  among  our  population 
who  do  not  require  to  be  urged  to  apply  surface  saving 
materials  to  their  property  for  the  very  good  reason  that 
the  practical  side  of  our  arguments  appeals  too  strongly  to 
tliem  to  permit  of  them  doing  otherwise. 

Oi'  the  other  hand  there  are  those,  and  large  numbers  of 
them,  who  know  and  feel  that  the  principle  of  surface  pro- 
tection is  sound  through  and  through,  but  who,  through 
lock  of  encouragement  on  the  part  of  the  dealer,  have  not 
put  this  knowledge  to  practical  use.  This  may  be  due  to 
pr  ocrastination,  carelessness,  indecision  or  other  reasons. 
But  right  here  the  progressive  dealer  can  take  a  hand.  He 
can  call  upon  such  people  and  if  he  discusses  the  question 
properly,  he  cannot  fail  to  crystallize  their  already  solvent 
idf  ^s  into  action ; — aqtion  which  will  mean  the  sale  of  more 
paint  and  varnish  and  the  consequent  increased  profits  to 
dealer  as  well  as  manufacturer — action  which  will  mean 
clean,  sanitary  condition  of  houses  and  communities  gen- 
erally— and  above  all,  action  which  will  prove  an  actual 
economy  to  all  property  owners. 

Every  paint  and  varnish  manufacturing  firm  provides 
its  dialers  with  extensive  advertising  equipment,  including 
sales  promotion  literature  etc.,  all  of  which  is  calculated 
to  assist  dealers  in  bringing  business  to  the  door,  and  in  the 
sale  of  their  own  particular  products. 

The  Save  the  Surface  Campaign  Committee  is  driving 
home  its  arguments  to  the  public  on  the  broader  subject  of 
painting  and  varnishing  for  economy's  sake  as  well  as  that 
of  beaut^f,  with  no  reference  whatever  to  any  particular 
description  or  brand  of  these  products. 

It  therefore  but  remains  for  the  dealer  to  conduct  a  vig- 
orous campaign  in  his  own  special  territory  to  reap  the 
combined  benefits  of  the  two  cjasses  of  advertising,  both  of 
v/hich  are  aimed  at  the  same  result, — though  one  is  individ- 
ual and  the  other  co-operative — viz.,  the  greatly  increa-ed 
sp.le  of  pc-.iiits  and  varnishes. 

The  busines.'  is  to  be  had  beyond  all  question.  As  to 
the  methods  to  be  applied  to  develope  it  so  far  as  the  in- 
dividual dealer  is  concerned,  I  do  not  think  it  necessary  to 
say  anything  in  this  letter.  Trade  papers  for  months 
past  have  been  full  of  suggestions  along  these  lines  and  the 
Save  the  Surface  Campaign  Committee  through  its  adver- 
tising merchandise  and  suggestions  for  dealers'  helps  has 
also  pointed  out  innumerable  methods  which  can  be  adopt- 


January,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


13 


ed.  The  Campaign  Committee  is  willing  and  anxious  at 
all  times  to  do  anything  in  its  power  to  give  assistance  to 
any  and  all  who  maya  require  it. 

While  of  course  this  statement  does  not  apply  to  all, 
generally  speaking  the  dealer  is  now  the  one  weak  link  in 
an  otherwise  strong  chain.  To  those  dealers  to  whom  this 
Statement  does  apply,  let  me  say  that  I  cannot  urge  upon 


them  too  strongly  the  desirability  of  taking  steps  along  the 
lines  indicated  and  thus  render  the  strength  of  the  chain 
uniform  and  enable  us  all  to  share  in  a  splendid  year's 
business  in  1922. 

I  look  forward  to  harty  co-operation  and  aggressiveness 
on  the  part  of  every  paint  dealer  in  the  country  commenc- 
ina  with  th.e  New  Year. 


DEAN  OF  CANADIAN  STOVE  TRADE  PASSES 

IIMIIIMIMIMIIMMIIMMIIIIIIIMIIIMIIIIIIIMIMIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIMMIIIIIIIIIHIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIMIIMMIIIIMIMIIIIIIMIIIMIIIIIIMIIIIII^  ''IIIMIIIMIIMIIINIIIIMIIMMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllllllllllllMIMIIhlllMIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 

John  McClary,  Pioneer  Canadian,  dies  aged  93  after  75  years  of  active  life  as  Tinsmith,  Salesman, 

Manufacturer  and  Captain  of  Industry. 

IJIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIMIMIIIMIIIMIMIMnMIMIIIMMIMMMIIIIIIMIIIMIHIIIIIIMIMIIMIMIMIIIIMMIIMIIIIIIMIMiMIIIMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMMIM   IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIII  mill  ml  Mimillll/ 


The  death  of  John  McClary,  President  of  the  McClary 
Mfg.,  Co,.  London,  Ont,  on  Dec.  11th.,  after  only  one  day's 
illness,  brings  to  an  end  an  honored  and  active  career 
such  as  few  have  the  good  fortune  to  experience. 

Nearly  two  centuries  ago  his  great-grandfather,  Andrew 
MrClary,  migrated  from  Scotland  to  America,  settling  in 
Pennsylvania  and  later  in  New  Hampshire,  from  which 
state  John  McClary,  senior,  removed  to  Nilestown,  near 
London,  Ontario,  in  1816.  Here  John  McClary,  the  future 
millionaire  stove  manufacturer,  was  born  Jan.  2,  1829,  the 
eleventh  of  a  family  of  twelve  children. 

In  1847  the  young  John  McClary  left  the  pioneer  home 
to  learn  tinsmithing,  and  two  years  later  joined  the  rush  of 
'49  gold  fields  of  far  off  California.  Going  via  New  York 
and  Panama  he  reached  San  Francisco  and  opened  a  shop. 
This  burning  in  a  great  conflagration,  and  failing  to  locate 
as  a  miner,  he  returned  to  London. 

From  1851  till  his  death  Mr.  McClary  was  engaged  in 
manufacturing  at  London,  first  as  partner  in  the  firm  of  J. 
&  O.  McClary,  and  later  as  head  of  the  McClary  Manufac- 
turing Company.  The  first  products,  plows  and  tinware, 
were  sold  to  pioneer  farmers  in  Western  Ontario,  Mr.  Mc- 
Clary and  other  salesmen  travelling  by  wagon  over  the 
entire  country  from  Brantford  to  Windsor,  selling  and  dis- 
tributing the  products  of  their  workshops,  and  taking  in 
exchange  commodities  which  the  farmers  bartered  for  the 
tinware  and  plows. 

The  building  of  the  old  Great  Western  Railway  to 
London  in  1853-4  made  possible  greater  developments  in 
the  manufacturing  industry.  Raw  materials  were  more 
easily  procured  and  distribution  became  possible  in  larger 
quantities.  The  making  of  plows  was  discontinued  and 
the  output  was  changed  to  stoves,  a  real  companion  indus- 
try to  kitchen  utensils,  enameled  wares  being  soon  added 
to  the  tinware  products. 

In  1871  the  McClary  Manufacturing  Company  was  in- 
corporated, in  1879  a  branch  was  opened  in  Toronto,  others 
following  within  a  year  in  Montreal  and  Winnipeg,  one  in 
Vancouver  in  1894,  and  more  recently  in  St.  John,  N.B., 
Hamilton,  Calgary,  Saskatoon  and  Edmonton. 

Up  to  the  incorporation  of  the  company  Oliver  McClary, 
an  elder  brother,  was  a  partner  but  for  nearly  half  a  cen- 
tury John  McClary  was  the  active  head  of  the  industry, 
aided  by  his  two  sons-in-law,  Lt.-Col.  Wm.  Gartshore.  Vice 
President  and  General  Manager,  who  joined  the  staff  in 
1876,  and  Mr.  W.  A.  Gunn,  formerly  secretary  of  the  com- 
pany, and  whose  sons  are  now  active  in  the  company's 
affairs. 

Mr.  McClary's  life,  so  actively  spent  in  building  up  one 
of  the  outstanding  industrial  enterprises  in  Canada,  said 


to  be  the  greatest  stove  foundry  in  the  British  Empire,  also 
found  time  for  public  service  as  an  active  backer  of  Sir 
Adam  Beck  in  his  public  ownership  and  Hvdro-Electric 
campaigns.  He  was  also  President  of  the  Ontario  Loan  & 
Debenture  Company,  a  Past  President  of  the  London  Life 
Insurance  Co.,  and  a  Director  of  the  London  &  Western 
Trust  Co.    He  was  formerly  a  Justice  of  the  Peace.  In 


The  Late  JOHN  McCLARY 

1911  he  was  given  a  public  dinner  by  the  London  Board  of 
Trade  in  recognition  of  his  services  as  one  of  the  pioneer 
business  men  of  the  district. 

The  new  officers  of  the  McClary  Manufacturing  Co.  are 
W.  M.  Gartshore,  president  and  general  manager;  A.  M. 
Smari,  vice  president  and  treasurer;  John  McClary  Gunn, 
vice  president  and  assistant  general  manager  (to  be  ap- 
pointed), with  the  following  additional  directors:  John 
McClary  Moore,  T.  G.  Meredith,  K.C.,  and  J.  K.  H.  Pope, 
Secretary. 


1922  will  be  a  Happy  New  Year  for  all  who  work 
to  make  it  so. 


A  merchant  without  a  January  inventory  is  a  busi- 
ness jitney  without  a  brake. 


14 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


January,  1922 


"GO  GET  IT"  IN  NINETEEN  TWENTY  TWO 

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There's  business  to  be  gotten  if  gone  after  and  the  farther  we  get  into  1922  the  better  it  will  be  — 

Confidence  can  change  Dull  Times  into  Good  Times. 

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There's  a  '"go  get  it"  spirit  evident  in  business  with  the 
start  of  nineteen-twenty-two  that  is  putting  heart  into  the 
manufacturers  and  business  men  who  found  he  latter  part 
of  1921  a  period  when  orders  were  hard  to  get,  and  who 
have  felt  that  with  a  poorer  harvest  than  expected  in  West- 
ern Canada,  the  outlook  for  1922  was  none  too  promising- 

A  year  ago,  it  will  be  remembered,  there  were  many  mis- 
givings and  it  was  felt  that  we  were  sitting  on  the  top  of 
a  volcano  in  the  business  world.  Some  crawled  into  the 
cellar  and  locked  the  door,  others  felt  it  better  to  buffet  the 
expected  storm  out  in  the  open.  But  the  truth  is  that  the 
explosion — cyclone — calamity — never  came.  We  had  dark 
davs  and  had  storms  but  they  only  served  to  clear  the  atmos- 
phere. Those  who  hid  away — called  in  Salesmen — stopped 
adv-'rtising — ceased  fig^hting — are  now  coming  out  of  the 
storm  cellars  and  blinking  their  eyes  to  find  that  the  storm 
clouds  have  passed  and  he  sun  is  beginning  to  shine. 

The  business  atmosphere  is  clearing  and  the  scene  is  all 
set  for  the  return  of  a  period  of  prosperity — not  a  boom, 
but  a  steady  grow'.h  in  the  volume  of  trade  month  after 
month  for  several  years. 

"Our  business  last  year  totalled  about  $250,000"  said  a 
retail  hardwareman  in  a  Wester-n  Ontario  city.  "In  July 
last  we  comm.enced  to  curtail  credit  sales  but  our  cash 
trade  has  kept  up  as  large  as  in  1920,  and  for  the  whole 
year  our  total  will  be  about  $225,000." 

"The  only  difference  between  "good  times  and  "dull 
times"  is  the  lack  of  confidence  during  inactive  periods, 
said  an  Ontario  wholesaler  to  Hardware  and  Accessories, 
"and  there  is  no  reason  for  lack  of  confidence  today.  Dur- 

1921  prices  of  hardware,  taken  on  the  whole,  declined  prob- 
ablv  30  per  cent,  yet  our  volume  of  sales,  measured  in 
dollars,  was  only  about  10  per  cent  lower  than  1920,  and 
our  tonnage  was  larger  than  last  year.  Moreover  our 
financial  man  has  just  showed  me  a  statement  indicating 
that  we  are  le?3  than  five  weeks  behind  in  collections  on 
our  total  volume  of  sales.  This  is  a  most  favorable  and  un- 
usual condition," 

This  jobber  has  for  over  a  year  followed  the  policv  of 
keeping  his  stocks  at  least  one  month  ahead  of  demand,  be- 
lieving that  it  is  better  to  lose  a  few  dollars  on  reduced 
prices  of  stocks  in  hand,  than  to  lose  trade  by  not  having  the 
goods  to  fill  orders  promptly. 

"Our  sales  have  shown  an  increase  every  month  since 
Julv,"  said  a  manufacturer  of  scre'fen  doors,  etc,  "and  our 
bookings  for  spring  are  well  up  to  the  average." 

"We  have  relied  on  Ontario  and  Quebec,"  said  a  manu- 
facturer of  hockv  sticks,  "j'.nd  our  factory  has  been  work- 
ing over  time  for  several  weeks  past." 

"The  sales  of  Ouebec  heaters  with  ovens  has  been  enor- 
mo!is  this  winter,"  said  a  Montreal  Stove  man,  "although 
.salos  of  higher  priced  ranges  has  not  been  as  large  as 
desired" 

Storks  in  jnosf  lines  are  low,  both  in  manufacturers'  and 
re'ailers'  hands,  a  mnch  different  conditic^n  to  that  which 
prevailed  a  vear  a"'o.  Retailers  who  did  business  in  1921 
on  carry  over  storks,  will  have  to  order  more    heavily  in 

1922  in  order  to  do  an  equal  volume  of   business.  This 


means  more  and  larger  orders  for  wholesalers  and  manu- 
facturers. 

Building  too,  has  a  more  favorable  outlook  than  a  year 
ago.  Materials  have  declined  at  least  25  per  cent,  and  wages, 
following  the  decreased  cost  of  living,  are  declining  in 
spite  of  efforts  of  union  organizers  to  maintain  the  high 
war-time  levels. 

The  views  of  some  representative  men  in  various  branch- 
es of  the  trade  are  given  below  and  the  almost  universal 
expression  is  that  1922  holds  out  great  promise  for  those 
who  have  the  aggressiveness  to  go  after  trade  this  year. 

LARGE  BOOKINGS  FOR  ACCESSORIES. 

A.  M.  Bottcher,  Manager  of  the  Accessory  Department 
(of  Hyslop  ros.,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  said:  "While  generally  speak- 
ing we  have  done  a  fair  amount  of  business  during  the 
year  considering  the  prevailing  trade  depression,  the  vol- 
ume was  of  course  considerably  below  the  pre-war  stand- 
ard. There  was  a  fairly  steady  inflow  of  business  but  at 
no  period  of  the  year  did  our  turn-over  run  up  to  any  high 
peak.  For  the  coming  year,  however,  I  see  at  least  one 
very  encouraging  sign.  One  year  ago  we  did  not  have  one 
five  cent  piece  in  orders  booked  up  for  spring  shipment. 
Today  our  orders  for  spring  delivery  are  as  large  as  they 
have  been  in  any  previous  season.  A  year  ago  stocks  were 
heavy  and  no  one  needed  to  buy  but  the  situation  is  entire- 
ly altered  now.  Stocks  generally  are  pretty  well  depleted 
and  automobile  accessory  dealers  find  themselves  forced  in- 
to the  market  to  buy  goods. 

It  was  inevitable,  that  bo'h  manufacturers  and  dealers 
had  to  pass  through  a  period  of  readjustment  during  the 
vear  and  with  many  of  the  automobile  firms  resuming 
operations  and  planning  expansion,  accessories  are  getting 
their  decks  cleared  ready  for  a  good  year's  business  in  1922. 
Many  dealers  are  now  placing  orders  for  March  or  April 
shipment  and  Ave  take  it  that  this  is  a  pretty  fair  indication 
of  returning  confidence  in  the  future  of  the  industry.  I 
see  no  reason  whv  1922  should  not  be  a  good  year  in  our 
line  of  business. ' 

LOOKS  FOR  GREATER  BUSINESS. 

W.  L.  Moncur,  of  Cutten  &  Foster,  accessory  dealers, 
Toronto,  talking  to  Hardware  and  Accessories,  said  that 
while  the  past  year  had  Shown  a  little  decrease  in  the  volume 
of  business,  the  success  of  the  industry  next  year  would  de- 
pend largely  on  several  factors.  One  of  these  had  refer- 
ence to  the  over-plus  of  garages  who  did  not  take  the  hand- 
line  of  accessories  seriously  enough,  thus  hampering  the 
ligitimale  dealers.  Certain  dealers,  he  said,  were  carrving 
goods  at  a  loss  just  in  order  to  serve  customers  and  as  an 
adjunct  to  their  automobile  selling. 

In  the  opinion  of  Mr.  Moncur  the  average  parage  man 
had  not  been  devoting  sufficient  attention  to  the  studv  of 
merchandising  of  his  goods,  a  fact  that  was  demonstrated 
bv  the  verv  fpw  window  displays  of  accessories  in  Toronto 
this  Christmas.  "The  garage  man  has  got  to  <ret  out  and 
make  the  accessories  department  carrv  his  business,"  de- 
clared Mr.  Moncur,  who.  is  the  President  of  the  Canadian 
Automotive  Equipment  Association. 


January,  1922  HARDWARE   AND   ACCESSORIES  15 


ADVISES  OPTIMISM  WITH  CARE 

W.  H.  Lament,  Financial  Manager  of  H.  S.  Howland 
Sons  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  who  has  his  finger  constantly  on 
the  pulse  of  the,  hardware  trade,  is  optimistic  concerning 
the  outlook  for  trade  in  1922. 

In  an  interview  accorded  Hardware  and  Accessories  Mr. 
Lamont,  in  discussing  the  future,  placed  special  emphasis 
on  the  value  of  an  optimistic  spirit  in  the  conduct  of  bus- 
iness during  the  coming  year  and  added  that  it  should  be 
accompanied  by  careful  and  well-thought  out  policies.  It 
was  his  opinion  that  optimism  with  care,  following  upon  a 
good  example  of  economy  in  administration  upon  the  part 
of  our  Governments  would  help  greatly  to  improve  business 
conditions  during  1922. 

"One  of  the  chief  difficulties  in  trading  during  the  past 
year,"  said  Mr.  Lamont,  "has  been  the  great  spread  be- 
tween the  price  of  the  products  of  the  soil  and  those  of  the 
factory.  Either  agricultural  products  must  advance  or  man- 
ufactured commodities  decline  until  a  fairer  proportion  is 
reached,  and  it  would  seem  that  this  readjustment  can  only 
be  accomplished  by  the  latter  taking  place.  One  of  the 
factors  tending  to  maintain  high  production  costs  is  the 
wages  paid  to  labor.  Labor  leaders,  I  maintain,  should  de- 
velope  a  broader  appreciation  of  the  general  conditions  pre- 
vailing and  guide  their  affairs  accordingly.  I  am  confident 
that  if  this  were  done  labor  would  not  be  holding  out  for 
a  few  cents  an  hour  in  wages  while  at  the  same  time  sacri- 
ficing continuous  employment." 

It  was  pointed  out  by  Mr.  Lamont  that  retailers,  as  well 
as  manufacturers  and  wholesalers,  should  carefully  scrutin- 
ize accounts  and  attend  vigorously  to  collections.  The 
farmer  and  consumers  generally  had  "enjoyed  several  good 
years  and  it  was  not  thought  unreasonable  that  they  pay 
their  honest  debts,  even  if  it  did  mean  the  consumption  of 
savings.  It  was  shown  that  the  retailer,  by  promptly 
collecting  outstanding  accounts,  helps  business  very  mater- 
iallv  by  enabling  the  wholesaler  to  place  orders  with  man- 
ufacturers, and  thereby  resulting  in  more  employment, 
which  subsequently  returns  to  the  advantage  of  the  retail- 
er by  increasing  buying  power. 

"The  possibilities  of  our  natural  resources  are  beyond 
comprehension,"  said  Mr.  Lamont.  "Our  huge  wheat 
fields,  the  extent  of  our  forests  and  mines  and  fisheries, 
together  with  the  developmnt  of  our  hydro-electric  power, 
must  result  in  prosperity,  if  we  will  only  all  get  together 
so  as  to  enable  intensified  production.  The  assistance  of 
our  Governments  in  directing  trade  to  flow  through  its 
natural  chanels,  unhampered  by  restrictions,  is  necessary. 
Reasonable  protection  of  manufacturers  is  no  doubt  re- 
quired, but  could  this  be  accomplished  by  placing  a 
definite  rate  of  duty  upon  imports,  and  not  by  varying 
regulations  which  create  uncertainty  regarding  costs  of 
goods,  and  in  this  manner  is  very  apt  to  curtail  trade." 

WORK  AHEAD,  FOR  SALESMEN. 

That  the  coming  year  is  not  going  to  be  an  easy  one  for 
the  seller  of  merchandise  was  stressed  by  the  manager  of 
the  National  Electric  Heating  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  in  a  state- 
ment to  Hardware  and  Accessories,  as  follows: 

"It  is  very  hard  to  prophesy  just  what  is  going  to  take 
place  during  the  coming  year,  never-the-less  certain  con- 
clusions can  be  arrived  at,  from  the  results  of  the  extra- 
ordinary conditions  during  1921.  1922  is  not  going  to  be 
■a  picnic  for  the  salesman.  Business  will  only  be  got  after 
going  for  it,  but  there  is  going  to  be  business  to  be  had.  In 
imost  lines,  dealer's  shelves  are  depleted,  they  have  been 
w'aiting  for  prices  to  stabilize.    Prices  have  about  touched 


bottom  on  all  commodities  and  there  is  a  sign  of  some  of 
the  basic  materials  stiffening  in  price.  We  have  particular 
reference  to  copper  and  brass,  and  there  is  no  doubt  that 
if  prices  stiffen  on  some  of  the  finished  products  that  buy- 
ing will  be  accelerated.  There  are  signs  of  some  building 
activity,  and  with  the  price  of  materials  and  labor  receding, 
this  should  stimulate  business  considerably.  In  conclus- 
ion, we  would  say  that  there  will  be  business  to  be  had,  but 
it  will  require  going  ofter  it.  If  we  all  put  our  shoulder 
to  the  wheel  and  get  out  after  business  and  not  wait  for  it 
to  come  to  us." 

PUBLICITY  HELPS  SELL  PAINT 

Mr.  H.  E-  Poole,  Stewart  &  Wood,  Ltd-,  Toronto,  outlined 
the  situation  in  the  paint  industry  which,  he  said,  has  had 
its  difficulties  during  the  past  year  but  he  had  sufficient 
confidence  in  the  future  to  believe  that  these  are  going  to 
be  minimized  in  1922. 

It  is  not,  generally  realized"  said  Mr.  Poole,  "that  prac- 
tically all  manufacturing  concerns  use  paint  and  finishes 
before  turning  out  their  finished  goods  and  the  fact  that 
quite  a  number  of  manufacturing  plants  were  closed  down 
during  part  of  the  present  year  naturally  affected  the  out- 
put of  paint.  A  very  large  percentage  of  the  demand  for 
paint  comes  from  the  industrial  plants.  Hardly  an  article 
is  sold  in  these  days  that  does  not  carry  with  it  its  painted 
covering  or  varnish.  Furniture  manufacturers  and  makers 
(of  automobile  bodies  have  been  quiet  and  they  are  all  big 
users  of  paint.  Also  there  was  a  comparitively  small 
amount  of  building  during  the  past  year. 

"One  circumstance,  however,  acted  in  our  favor  during 
1921  and  helped  a  good  deal  in  saving  the  situation.  The 
shutting  down  of  many  of  the  factories  threw  many  men  out 
of  work  and  the  thrifty  men  in  numerous  towns  and  small- 
er cities  put  in  a  good  deal  of  their  idle  time  in  painting 
their  own  houses.  We  conducted  an  investigation  along 
these  lines,  and  found  that  a  surprising  amount  of  paint 
was  used  this  way. 

"Another  feature  that  materially  helped  the  paint  indust- 
ry this  year  was  the  big  co-operative  advertising  campaign, 
with  its  slogan,  "Save  the  Surface"  carried  on  bv  paint 
manufacturers  in  Canada  and  the  United  States.  There  is 
no  doubt  that  this  wiil  continue  to  bear  fruit  next  year  as 
it  has  done  this  year.  As  regards  the  coming  year  I  be- 
lieve that  it  will  show  vastly  improved  conditions. 

"Considerable  building  activity  is  under  way  and  many 
factories  are  opening  up  again  after  a  period  of  non-pro- 
duction. The  prices  of  paint  are  now  down  to  rock  bottom 
and  in  many  lines  they  are  down  to  the  1914  level.  I  be- 
lieve that  a  reaction  will  take  place  soon  now  and  the 
price  pendulum  start  to  swing  the  other  way. 

"Paint  prices  were  reduced  several  times  durin-s;  the  year 
and  disturbed  m.arket  conditions  badlv.  I  believe  this 
period  is  now  over  and  we  can  look  forward  to  better 
things  durins  1922.  Stocks  generally  throushout  the 
coimtry  are  light  and  master  painters  and  dealers  have  a 
verv  little  on  hand  at  the  present  time.  Our  chief  hope 
for  better  business  in  1922  lies  in  the  reopening  of  the  man- 
ufacturing plants  which  is  now  taking  olace  and  which,  I 
believe  is  likelv  to  continue  until  manufacturing  is  back  to 
its  eld  basis,  or  close  to  it." 

BRUSH  OUTLOOK  ENCOURAGING. 

Asked  for  their  views  concerning  the  outlook  for  the 
coming  year  in  the  brush  industry,  the  Boeckh  Company, 
Ltd.,  Toronto,  maunfacturers  of  brushes  and  brooms 
authorized  the  following  statement: 


16 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


January,  1922 


"We  might  say  that  conditions  in  the  brush  industry 
were  exceedingly  good  in  the  early  part  of  this  year  but 
there  was  a  very  noticeable  slackening  in  the  demand 
during  the  summer  and  early  fall.  This  condition  was 
undoubtedly  due  to  the  general  depression  which  affected 
most  industries  as  early  as  the  fall  of  1920.  About  August 
1st.  New  prices  on  brushes  were  put  into  effect,  which 
showed  reductions  varying  from  10  to  25  per  cent.  The 
outlook  for  1922  is  very  incouraging.  Some  customers 
who  have  placed  orders  for  delivery  next  spring  are  now 
in  urgent  need  of  brushes  and,  therefore,  are  asking  to 
have  their  orders  sent  on  immediately.  This,  we  think,  is 
a  very  good  sign  showing  not  only  that  stocks  are  generally 
ally  low  but  that  a  demand  has  started  which  should  de- 
velope  to  large  proportions  within  the  next  few  months. 
The  inquiries  and  orders  received  from  factories  show  that 
manufacturing  conditions,  generally,  are  improving  and, 
therefore,  we  feel  sure  that  the  employment  situation  will 
show  a  verv  great  improvement  also.  We  do  not  anticipate 
that  prices  will  be  any  lower  in  1922,  as  many  lines  of  raw 
materials  are  stiffening  in  price  and  are  today  higher  than 
thev  were  some  months  ago  and  these  conditions  may  be 
accentuated  as  the  demand  becomes  heavier." 

GLASS  OUTLOOK  ENCOURAGING 

G.  C.  Book,  Sales  Manager  of  the  Toronto  branch  of  the 
Consolidated  Plate  Glass  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto  believes  that 
the  New  Year  holds  considerable  promise  of  good  business 
in  the  slass  industry  and  the  companv  is  shaping  its  oolicv 
accordinslv.  The  volume  of  trade,  however,  will  depend 
upon  construction,  which  is  the  big  feeder  for  the  glass 
trad'^,  and  in  the  opinion  of  Mr.  Book,  buildina:  construc- 
tion is  going  to  depend  largely  upon  the  attitude  of  the 
rank  and  file  encraged  in  it.  He  has,  however,  sufficient 
faith  in  the  sanitv  and  common  sense  of  the  workmen  to 
convince  him  that  a  sane  policv  will  prevail  in  labor  cir- 
cles during  the  present  year,  which  would  mean  befer  bus- 
iness all  round. 

In  conversation  with  Hardware  and  Accessories  Mr. 
Book  stated  that  the  past  vear  had  been  fairly  ffood  in  the 
volume  of  business  it  had  produced  when  considered  that 
the  trade  had  been  passing  through  a  period  of  reconstruc- 
tion in  common  with  other  lines  of  industry.  The  year 
had  started  with  a  feelin<r  of  uncertainty  and  doubt  as  to 


what  was  going  to  take  place  but  on  the  whole  it  had  turn- 
ed out  much  more  satisfactorily  than  had  been  anticipated. 
His  company  is  looking  for  a  good  year  in  building  con- 
struction and  with  stocks  in  the  hands  of  the  hardware 
firms  very  low  as  they  are  at  present  it  is  generally  believ- 
ed that  1922  will  yield  a  good  volume  of  business.  It 
was  pointed  out  that  last  year  dealers  were  afraid  to  buy 
owing  to  the  unsettled  condition  of  the  market  and  the 
doubt  as  to  where  prices  were  going  to  land.  This  con- 
dition appears  to  have  passed  and  the  trade  is  now  getting 
back  to  normal. 

The  Consolidated  Plate  Glass  Company,  Ltd.,  have  the 
lowest  stocks  they  have  had  in  the  past  ten  years,  but  are 
anticipating  fairly  liberal  supplies  from  the  Libbey  Owens 
Company  in  Hamilton,  which  will  place  the  Toronto  branch 
in  fairly  good  shape  within  the  next  two  or  three  months. 
■Hardware  dealers  are  in  the  same  Position  as  the  jobbers 
■as  far  as  light  stocks  are  concerned,  which  means  that  with 
any  kind  of  a  market  at  all  there  should  be  an  excellent 
years  business  from  February  on.  Speaking  of  the  out- 
look of  the  building  trade,  which  has  its  reflection  in  the 
glass  industry,  Mr.  Book  pointed  out  that  a  few  years  ago 
building  construction  used  to  be  held  up  about  the  first  of 
December  or  earlier,  but  now  the  big  companies  carry  on 
their  big  construction  programs  pretty  much  through  the 
v/inter  months.  This  applies  chiefly  to  the  cities  and  is 
carried  on  to  some  extent  in  the  smaller  towns  and  this 
continuous  program  of  building  naturally  reacts  favorably 
on  the  glass  industry. 

DOWNWARD  CURVE  NOW  ARRESTED. 

Messrs  Samuel  &  Benjamin,  Ltd.,  iron  steel  and  metals, 
Toronto,  make  the  following  statement:  "It  is  at  all 
times  difficult  to  forecast  the  future,  and  never  more  so 
than  at  the  present  time.  Fortunately,  in  Canada  the  nec- 
essities of  life  are  in  great  abundance,  but  there  is  a  hitch 
in  the  distribution:  broadly  speaking,  there  can  be  no  re- 
turn to  normal  trade  until  there  is  a  stabilization  of  for- 
eign Exchange.  In  the  meanfme  it  behooves  everyone  who 
is  in  business  to  endeavor  to  increase  his  liquid  assess,  for 
it  is  by  this  meaans  only  at  the  present  time  that  progress 
can  be  attained  and  maintained.  It  is  probable  that  the 
downward  curve  of  prices  has  been  arrested,  and  we  are 
approaching  an  era  of  less  violent  fluctuations. 


„„|„„„„„  nllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll  llllllllllllllllltllllllllliriMIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIMIIIII  Illlllllllll  Ill  IIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII  I  Illllllllllllll  Illlllllllllllllll 


ACCESSORIES  BUYING  INCREASES 


At  the  recent  gathering  of  the  Auto- 
motive Equipment  Association  in  Chi- 
cago, 900  manufacturers  and  distribu- 
tors from  all  parts  of  America  attended 
the  exhibition  and  convention,  nearly 
100  of  these  being  Canadians,  W.  L. 
Moncur,  of  Cuttcn  &  Foster,  Toronto, 
being  elected  president  of  the  Canadian 
Auxiliary  of  the  Association,  the  secre- 
taries being  James  Hardy  &  Son,  To- 
ronto. 

At  the  Exhibition  a  year  ago  buying 
was  at  zero  point,  but  jobbers  placed 
orders  at  this  exhibition  in  excess  of 
the  heavy  buying  of  two  years  ago. 
Buying  wa,s  heavy  not  because  it  is 
expected  that  the  automotive  retailer 
will  incline  to  overstock  any  more,  for 
a  eon.siderable  time  at  least,  but  because 
reports  from  all  parts  of  the  continent 
indicate  that  the  automotive  retailer's 
shelves  are  just  about  empty  of  goods. 

Naturally  the  bulk  of  new  equipment 
for  automobiles  is  introduced  at  the 
Chicago  shew  of  the  Automotive  Equip- 
ment Association,  but  a  notable  de- 


crease in  the  number  of  new  equipment 
devices   shown   was   noted   this  year. 

Two  lines  that  are  comparatively  new 
were  tackled  -eagerly  by  a  number  of 
manufacturers:  automatic  windshield 
cleaners  and  rear  automatic  signal 
lights.  The  latter  device  particularly 
seems  to  have  met  with  the  favor  of 
manufacturers,  and  there  were  about  a 
dozen  makes  of  the  automatic  "stop" 
light  on  exhibition.  Automatic  wind- 
shield cleaners  were  not  as  numerous'ly 
represented,  but  there  were  perhaps  ten 
makes  of  them  shown,  and  there  were 
also  a  few  newcomers  in  the  field  of 
the  old  hand-operated  windshield  wiper. 
Some  of  the  automatic  cleaners  work 
by  suction  through  a  rubber  tube  from 
the  engine  air  intake,  and  others  are 
operated  by  a  small  electric  motor 
working  off  the  car  battery.  Tn  either 
case  the  frequency  with  which  the 
driver's  field  of  vision  may  be  regu- 
cleaning  surface  swings  across  the 
lated.  It  is  anticipated  that  both  the 
automatic  signal  light  and  the  autoipa- 


tie  wind-shield  cleaner  will  meet  with 
a  good  reception  in  the  motoring  world, 
for  they  constitute  really  useful  equip- 
ment which  adds  to  the  simplicity  and 
safety  of  driving. 


NEW  LIQUID  WHITE  LEAD 

A  new  produdt,  "Champion  Liquid 
White  Lead, ' '  is  being  put  on  the  mar- 
ket by  iStewart  &  Wood,  84  York  street, 
Toronto,  who  offer  sample  tins  to  any 
dealer  on  request. 

The  well-known  preference  for  white 
lead  and  oil  by  master  painters  and 
others  is  met  by  the  new  producit,  a 
lead  having  been  found  of  thie  qualities 
necessary  to  allow  it  to  be  held  in  sus- 
pension in  oil  and  turpentine  for 
months,  besides  being  more  thoroughly- 
mixed  than  when  donei  by  hand. 

A  full  description  is  given  in  Stewart 
&  Wood's  announcement  in  this  issue, 
and  the  merit  of  the  product  -will  un- 
doubtedly be  tested  by  numerous  re- 
tailers who  obtain  the  sanupleis  offered 
for  dealers'  inspection. 


January,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


17 


THE  PRICING  OF  THIS  YEAR'S  INVENTORY 

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIMMMMIMIIIIIIIIIIUIIHIIIIIIIJIIIIIIIMIMiriirilllll  IIMIMIIIIJIIIIIMMMIMIIIIIMMIMMIIIIMMIIMIIIMIMIIMIIM'IIIIMIIIIIIIMMIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIMIIMIIIMIIIIIIIItlllllMIIIIIIMirMIJIMIMIIMIMMIMIIIIM 

Market  value  of  most  commodities  lower  than  actual  cost— Inventory  should  be  taken  at  market 

IIIIIIIIIIIMiniinininNIMINiniMIMIMIIMUIIIIIIIIiniMINIMIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIJMIIIIMJIUIMMMMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIII  IIMIMII  IIIIMIIII  IMIIIIMIMIIIMIIIMIIMMIMIMIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIMIIIIIIMIIIIIMIIIIIIIIMMIMIMMIUMMMIIIIMIUIMIIIinillMIIIMIIIIMIillllllllllllllMIIIIJI 

•  By  EDWARD  N.  HURLER  in  National  Hardware  Bulletin 


THE  proper  methods  for  pricing  inventories  is  a  sub- 
ject which  has  been  more  or  less  open  to  minor  dis- 
cussions but  during  the  last  several  years  the  question 
has  become  one  of  considerable  importance,  due  entirely 
of  course,  to  the  widely  varying  market  prices  of  com- 
modities. 

The  old  established  and  usually  accepted  rule  has  been 
to  price  an  inventory  at  either  actual  cost  or  market  values 
at  the  date  of  inventory,  whichever  may  be  lower. 

Prior  to  1917  this  rule,  if  followed  when  closing  the 
books  of  a  company,  would  cause  the  financial  statements 
to  reflect  the  profits  or  losses  of  an  organization  and  also 
show  a  financial  condition  at  the  close  of  a  financial  year 
in  a  manner  which  would  be  about  as  accurate  as  such 
statements  could  Possibly  be  made. 

EFFECT  OF  ADVANCING  MARKETS 

However,  as  the  rapidly  increasing  costs  of  materials 
pui  chased  subsequent  to  1917  had  a  very  material  effect 
on  both  the  profit  and  loss  account  and  the  balance  sheet, 
depending  entirely  as  to  whether  the  company  decided  to 
price  its  inventory  at  cost  or  at  market  value. 

If  cost  price  were  used  the  Profit  and  loss  account  would 
show  more  accurately  from  an  actual  trading  standpoint, 
but,  on  the  otJier  hand,  the  balance  sheet  would  not  indicate 
the  showing  of  the  company  in  as  favorable  a  light  as  if 
the  inventory  had  been  priced  at  market  value. 

At  the  close  of  the  year  1921,  however,  we  find  an  en- 
tirely different  condition  than  that  existing  during  the  per- 
iod of  rising  prices.  The  market  value  of  most  commodi 
ties  at  the  present  time  will  be  considerably  lower  than  the 
actual  cost  has  been  to  the  purchaser. 

This  fact,  however,  does  not  change  the  principle  that 
an  inventory  should  be  priced  and  carried  on  the  books  at 
cost  or  market,  whichever  may  be  lower. 

However,  in  determining  the  profits  for  the  year  1921 
and  preparing  the  balance  sheet  as  at  December  31,  1921, 
it  is  my  opinion  that  the  inventory  should  firstly  be  priced 
at  actual  cost  from  which  amount  the  profits  of  the  busi- 
ness from  an  actual  trading  standpoint  could  be  ascer- 
tained. 

The  inventory  should  then  be  re-priced  at  market  and 
the  difference  between  the  two  inventory  amounts  written 
off  to  a  special  "Inventory  Adjustment  Account"  which 
should  be  considered  as  a  special  deduction  from  income, 
or  in  other  words  a  deduction  from  the  actual  trade  profits 
as  ascertained  by  pricing  the  inventory  at  cost. 

You  will  note  that  after  writing  off  the  difference  be- 
tween the  two  inventory  amounts,  that  your  merchandise 
on  hand  will  appear  in  your  books  at  market  price. 

REASONS  FOR  PRICING  AT  MARKET 
In  preparing  the  balance  sheet,  the  item  appearinsr  as 
merchandise  on  hand  should  be  very  clearly  stated  as 
being  priced  at  market  of  December  31.    The  inclusion 
of  this  statement  or  comment  will  have  a  very  material 


effect  on  those  to  whom  you  present  your  financial  state- 
ments and  will  indicate  a  very  conservative  statement  of 
your  financial  condition  at  the  beginning  of  the  year  1922. 

There  are  two  important  reasons  for  carrying  the  inven- 
tory at  the  close  of  the  present  season  at  market,  even 
though  the  actual  cost  is  higher.  Firstly,  you  will  be  in  a 
position  for  the  coming  year  to  meet  competitors,  who  may 
he  buying  their  materials  in  December,  on  an  equal  basis, 
and,  secondly,  you  will  be  in.  a  position  to  include  the  loss 
between  the  cost  and  market  price  of  your  inventory  as  a 
deduction  from  income  when  preparing  your  income  tax 
returns  for  the  year  1921. 

Answering  the  question  as  to  the  pricing  of  such  goods 
as  oaints,  where  there  may  be  several  cost  prices  on  cans 
containing  the  same  color  or  qualitv,  I  have  found  that,  as 
is  usual  in  cost  account  problems,  there  are  several  ways 
in  which  the  inventory  could  be  priced  on  a  line  such  as 
paints  and  nails. 

If  a  stock  record  was  kept  of  such  individual  items  that 
you  handled,  the  oldest  purchase  should  always  be  con- 
sidered as  the  first  to  be  sold.  It  follows,  therefore,  that 
the  last  purchase  you  made  should  be  considered  as  being 
on  hand  at  the  time  of  taking  inventory  and  the  goods 
should  be  priced  accordingly. 


A  SIMPLE  COST  MARK 

A  southern  store  uses  an  extremely  simple  one,  and 
yet  it  has  not  been  figured  out  in  some  time,  perhaps 
because  of  its  simplicity. 

The  price  is  simply  written  backwards,  and  then  another 
figure  added  in  front  to  "make  it  harder  to  guess." 

For  example,  if  an  article  cost  $31.50,  the  cost  mark 
sim^ply  be  written  backwards,  0513  therj  any  figure,  =ay  6, 
added  in  front  of  that  making  it  60513. 

Of  course  when  this  known,  it  appears  as  if  most  any 
one  could  fieurt  it  out,  but  the  store  where  it  is  used  has 
had  unusually  good  success  with  it,  and  is  willing  to  pass 
it  along  for  the  benefit  of  any  other  merchants  who  may 
be  looking  for  something  of  this  kind  . 


CUSTOMERS  PAY  YOUR  SALARY 

You  who  are  selling,  day  af^er  day.  direct  to  the  public 
— do  you  really  know  who  your  employer  is? 

You  thing  you're  working  for  the  people  who  own  the 
stor-i  you're  selling:  in.      But  you're  not! 

Your  real  employer  is  the  customer  who  daily  enters 
the  store,  comes  up  to  your  counter  and  buys  the  goods 
vou  have  to  sell. 

Yes,  and  vour  boss  is  working;  for  the  customer,  too, 
just  as  much  as  you  are.  In  fact,  everybody  in  the  store 
— boss,  superintendents,  managers,  clerks,  cashiers,  and 
wrappers — are  all  working  together — in  the  service  of  the 
customer. 


18 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


January,  1922 


ACCESSORIES  CAN  BE  SOLD  DURING  WINTER 

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUMIIII  Mill  IIIIIIMIIIIIIIINIIII  IIIIIMIIIMIIIIIMIMiniliaMinilllllMI  III!  II  Hill  I  IIIIIIIIIMII  Hill  IIIIIIMIIIIHIIIIII  Illlllll  Illll  Illl  Ml  Illlllllll  Illllllllllllllllllll 

Rough  Roads  and  Bad  Weather  Create  a  Demand  for  Auto  Accessories  —  Many  Tools  Required 

in  Overhauling  Cars  Laid  Up  for  the  Winter 

UIIIIIMIIIIIIIIII  Illllllllllllllll  Illllllllll  IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH  I  I  Illllll  HII  Iinillllllll  linillllHIIIIIIIIIIH  I  Ill  I  HIHIHII  HIIHII  Illl  IIIIIIMIII  Illlllllllllllll  IIIIMI  Jl  IIIMIIIIIIU 


Too  many  hardware  and  garage 
dealers  selling  accessories  liave  in  the 
past  felt  that  the  touring  season  is 
over  when  the  first  snow  flies  and  re- 
moves their  tire  and  fiecessorv  displays 
from  their  windows,  and  forget  all 
about  them  until  the  birds  begin  to  fly 
northward  again. 

Pleasure  driving  does  not  cease  with 
the  first  cold  snap,  and  commercial  ve- 
hicles are  on  the  road  in  all  kinds  of 
weather.  Even  admitting  that  a  good 
many  cars  may  be  laid  up  for  the 
winter,  it  does  not  follow  that  their 
owners  forget  them.  Do  you  know  any 
automobile  owner  who  does  not  spend 
many  hours  from  November  until  April 
in  tinkering  with  his  car?  This  being 
the  case,  why  is  it  that  the  average 
dealer  does  not  feature  accessories  cal- 
culated to  arouse  the  interest  of  the 
motorist  ? 

Windows  should  display  tires  and 
tubes,  spotlights,  electric  ' '  stop ' '  sig- 
nals, motometers,  engine  hood  covers, 
motor  heaters,  chains  to  prevent  the 
car  from  skidding,  extra  sj^rings  to  re- 
place those  broken  in  bouncing  over  the 
ruts,  rubber  mats  to  keep  the  feet  from 
slipping  when  entering  the  car.  All 
these  and  more  are  to  be  found  in  this 
window,  and  they  all  suggest  them- 
selves to  the  uses  of  the  winter  drivers. 


Even  if  the  car  has  been  stored  away 
in  the  garage  until  spring,  there  are 
many  articles  the  dealer  can  sell  that 
can  be  used  in  overhauling  it.  You 
can 't  remove  a  wheel  unless  it  is  off 
the  ground,  and  in  order  to  raise  the 
car  you  must  use  a  jack.  You  can't 
overhaul  your  motor  with  your  bare 
fingers,  but  must  use  tools,  each  one  of 
which  is  adapted  to  a  certain  use.  If 
you  want  to  polish  the  car  you  will  have 
to  use  polish  of  some  kind.  A  car  can 
burn  as  easily  in  a  garage  as  upon  the 
road,  and  it  is  always  a  good  thing  to 
have  a  fire  extinguisher  at  hand. 

SALESMEN  HELPING  DEALERS 
Accessory  salesmen  are  setting  an  ex- 
ample to  travelers  in  other  lines  of 
goods  by  realizing  that  it  is  part  of 
their  job  to  see  that  goods  are 
' '  moved ' '  as  well  as  ' '  sold. ' ' 

Over  in  St.  Catherines  a  salesman 
found  a  dealer  who  had  on  his  shelves 
a  stock  of  Ford  engine  hood  covers 
bought  three  or  four  years'  ago  and 
waiting  for  buyers  to  ask  for  them. 
"Get  the  covers  down,  dust  them  and 
put  one  in  that  window  near  the  gaso- 
line pump,"  said  the  salesman.  The 
dealer  did  so  and  two  had  been  sold 
before  the  salesman  left  town,  as  a  re- 
sult of  suggestions  given  to  Ford  own- 
ers who  drove  up  for  gas  and  had  their 


attention  drawn  to  the  need  of  engine 
covers  and  the  ones  displayed  for  sale 
in  the  window. 

ADVERTISE  SEASONABLE 
ACCESSORIES 
Traffic  signals  are   fast  sellers  just 
now  aud  a  cut  with  some  wording  like 
that  below  should  help  sell  a  few: 
Those  rear  end  collisions  are 
entirely  preventable.    All  you 
need  is  an  effieiient  signal  that 
works   automatically,  warning 
equally  well  day  or  night.  Are 
visible  for  long  distance.  Why 
not  protect  your  car  and  also 
give     the     fellow    behind  a 
cliancef     Signals  complete, 
.$.5.50. 

ADVOCATES  EXTRA  TIRE 
William  Felderman,  647  Yonge  Street, 
Toronto,  advocates  the  carrying  of  an 
extra  tire,  and  in  a  window  display 
showed  a  convincing  representation  of 
a  limousine.  This  model  was  con- 
structed entirely  out  of  cardboard,  but 
was  provided  with  real  headlights, 
which  were  illuminated  aill  the  time. 
At  the  side  of  the  ear  were  the  two 
passengers,  a  man  and  a  woman,  both 
with  dejected  expressions  on  their  faces, 
and  looking  at  the  tire  that  had  failed 
them  many  miles  from  nowhere.  The 
scenic  background  was  that  of  a  de- 
serted country  road.  One  side  of  the 
window  was  devoted  to  the  small  model 
of  a  pillared  billboard,  which  bore  the 
following  inscription: 

Motto:.  "Always  Carrj'  a  Spare 
Tire. ' ' 

Another  effective  display  of  William 
Felderman 's  also  singled  out  motor  car 
tires  for  special  attention.  The  main 
exhibit  comprised  two  tire  car  wheels, 
with  tires  attached,  fastened  together 
with  a  cross  piece.  The  whole  was  sur- 
mounted with  the  cutout  of  a  man  in  a 
contented  mood.  Down  in  front  a  card 
announced  that: 

"The  Optimist — rides  to  Success 
on  Blank  Tires. ' ' 

Another  card  at  the  opposite  side  de- 
picted a  miserable  looking  man,  backed 
up  by  the  following  sentence: 

"The  Pessimist — rides  to  ruin  on 
his  own  thots. ' ' 

SOLD    TWELVE  MOTOMETERS 

The  Premier  Motor  Sales,  Toronto, 
featured  a  display  of  motometers  in 
their  window  just  before  Christmas, 
drawing  attention  to  their  usefulness 
and  their  suitability  as  holiday  gifts, 
a  dozen  l>eing  sold  as  a  result  of  the 
display. 

An  Eastern  Ontario  accessoiy  dealer 
also  moved  a  number  of  motometers  by 
having  one  handy  to  show  to  motorisits 
when  they  drove  up  for  a  supply  of  gas. 
Tlic  value  of  the  equipment  was  em- 
phasized to  the  motorist  and  in  addition 
to  making  some  sales  several  owners 
promised  to  return  to  buy  repairs  for 
broken  curtains,  lenses  for  headlights. 


Not  a  Dollar  Day  But  a  Dollar  Month 

See  What  You  Can  Buy  At  The  Sherman  Co., 
For  $1.00  During:  the  Month  of  November 

With  the  following  a.ssortments  you  can  make  your  home  look  like  a  new  place  in 
one  evening — make  the  old  stove  and  dingy  pipe  look  like  new — enamel  the  bedstead 
and  kitchen  table  white — touch  up  the  picture  frames — rgive  a  lasting  silver  finish  to 
tixl\ues,  water  boiler,  pipes,  etc. — refinish  an  o>d  chair  or  two,  and  touch  up  the 
flower  pots,  flower  boxes,  cupboards,  etc.  Next  morning  the  children  will  think  a 
fair;,  has  been  in  your  home. 


Assortment  No.  1 

1    can    Enamel  Underco.it 
1   can   White  Enamel 
1  Sheet  Sand  Paper 
1   Brush — 

All    for  $1.00 


Assortment  No.  2 

1  can  Aluminum  or  Bronze? 
Paint 

1  can  Stove  Pipe  Enamel 

1    can   Varnish  Stain 

1    Brush — all    for.... $1.00 


Assortment  No.  3 

3    pint   can  Linoleum  Var- 
nish 

1  can  Wall  Paper  Cleaner 
1  pkg  None-Such  Cleaner — 
All   for    ;  ¥1.00 


Monarch  100  per  cent.  Pure  House  Paint, 
per    quart  $1.00 

SfcMour's  100  per  cent.  Pure  Floor  Paint, 
per    quart  $1.00 

One  3  or  3% -in.  Rubber  Set  Brush.  $1.00 


New   Tone   Flat   Wall   Finish,   jier  quart 

 $1.00 

Granite  Floor  Varnish,  per  quart..  $1.00 
Elastic  Interior  Finish,  per  quart.  $1.00 


ATTENTION!  MR.  C.\R  OWNER 


Assortment  No.  4 

can  .lohnscn's  Auto  Wax 
can     .Johnson's  Carbon 
Remover,  or 
can    -Johnson's  Radiator 

Cement — 
All   for  $1.00 


One  can  Johnson's  Anti- 
I'>eeze,  regular  price 
$1.50,  this  month 
 $1.00 

One    gallon    Alcohol ..  $1.00 


can  Auto  Enamel 

any  color 
package    Lock-Tite  Tire 

Patch 
Brush — 
All    for..  .. 


.  $1.00 


THE  SHERMAN  COMPANY 


The  100;  Pure  Paint  Store 


January,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


19 


(ojeman  Quick-Fill 


HOSE 

CONNECTION 
PARALLEL 
WITH  BARREL 

7  


3  INCH  1 
BASE  I 


ACCESSIBLE 
CHECK  VALVE 


LARGE  SETTLING'CHAMBER 
PREVENTS  PUMPING  OIL  INTO  TIRE 


Nickel  Plated  Brass  Barrel 

Length  25  in.  over  all 
Hose  28  in.  long 
Shipping  weight  3  ^  lbs.  1  in  carton 


TIRE  PUMP 

MADE  IN  CANADA 

"More  Air  With 
Less  Strokes" 

No  air  kick  back 

No  oil  in  your  tires 

No  waste  of  compression 

No  screw  cap  to  come  loose 

No  more  backaches 

No  more  soft  tires 

This  Pump  can't  rust  out 

"A  Canadian  made  pump  that's 
right."  We  guarantee  them  to  give 
satisfaction. 


Coleman 

Quick-Fill 

Tire  Pumps 

are  sold 

onl\)  through 

jobbers 

(bleman 


and 

m_%  i  anterns 


YOUR  JOBBER  HAS  IT 

The  (bleman  |amg  Company  limited 

largest  Manufacturers  of  Gasoline  Lamps,  lanterns  and  li^hlin^  Plants  in  the  World 


Queen  Street  E.  and  Davies  Ave. 


Toronto,  Ontario 


20 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


January,  1922 


A  Useful  Sales  Helper 

This  attractive  counter  display,  of  Meakins  Special  Household  Assortment 
of  Paint  and  Varnish  Brushes,  is  illustrated  here  just  to  remind  you  of  the  de- 
finite, practical  helps  the  Meakins  organization  offers  its  customers. 

We  have  assortments  of  Cream  Separator  Brushes,  Specially  Boxed  Varnish 
Brushes  and  Display  Cards  mounted  w^ith  flat  Varnish  Brushes. 

Ask  about  these  little  *' sales-boosters." 

MEAKINS  &  SONS 

LIMITED 

HAMILTON,  ONTARIO 

WAREHOUSES: 

Winnipeg  London  Toronto  Montreal  Vancouver 

PILKINGTON  BROS.,  CALGARY,  ALTA. 


Jcinnary,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


21 


QUALITY- PROTECTIOH  ■  DURABILITY 


A  Chain 


JUST  because  different  surfaces  are 
subjected  to  different  kinds  of 
wear  there  must,  of  necessity,  be 
a  particular  varnish  to  meet 
each  particular  need. 

And  there  is  ^  in  the  Sherwin- 
Williams  "  Cover  the  Earth  " 
line.  MAR-NOT,  SCAR- 
NOT    and  REXPAR 
meet  the  three  distinct 
varnish  requirements 


about  tlie  home,  for 
floors,  for  furni- 
ture and  wood 
work,  and 
for  outside 
surfaces. 


JV6R 


Sherwin- 
Williams 
dealers  have, 
therefore,  a 
complete  chain  of 
varnishes  to  meet  every 
customer's  varnish  require- 
ments, each  product  exactly 
suited  to  the  purpose  for  which 
it  is  intended. 


"Save  the  surface  and 
you  save  all  ^^i^ 


THE  Sherwin-  Williams  Co, 

oF  Canada.,  Li  mi  bed 
MONTREAL. TORONTO.  WINNIPEG,  CALGARY,  VANCOUVER.  HALIF^AX,  N.S..  LONDON,  ENG.  ■ 


22 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


January,  1922 


Keep  these  Bustj 

and  well  All  Prosper 


DISPLAY  THIS  PAGE 

in  your  store  window  to 
help  relieve  unemployment 

Can^bu  give  him  work? 

4  million  like  him 
need  work  now 


You  owe  it  to  the  man  without 
a  job  to  find  one  for  him,  if  you 
have  work  that  needs  to  be  done. 

You  owe  it  to  the  man  without  a 
job,  to  buy — and  buy  now — mate- 
rials that  his  labor  can  supply,  if 
you  or  your  business  have  good  use 
for  these  materials. 

Every  extra  day's  work  you  cause  to 
be  done  now  takes  men  off  the  streets. 

Every  dollar  you  use  now  for  worth- 
while purposes  puts  money  into 
circulation. 

Every  dollar  you  put  into  circulation 
employs  men — checks  business  de- 
pression —  hastens  business  pros- 
perity. 

Relieve  Unemployment  by 
Maintaining  Your  Property 

Mr.  Herbert  Hoover,  Secretary  of 
Commerce  and  Chairman  of  the 
President's  Conference  on  Unem- 
ployment, has  rendered  a  report 
giving  the  recommendations  of  the 
conference.  Please  read  the  sixth 
clause  of  that  report: 

Private  houses,  hotels,  offices,  etc.,  can 
contribute  to  the  situation  by  making 
repairs  and  alterations  and  doing  clean- 
ing during  the  winter  instead  of  waiting 
until  spring,  when  employment  will  be 
more  plentiful. 

The  eleventh  clause,  which  deals 
with  the  construction  industry,  con- 
tains this: 

Considering  all  branches  of  the  construc- 
tion industry, more  than  2,000,000  people 
could  be  employed  if  construction  were 
resumed. 

The  findings  of  the  conference 
showed  clearly  that  acute  unem- 
ployment can  be  promptly  relieved, 
if  the  public  will  act. 


Property  maintenance  presents  a 
large  field  where  action  will  benefit 
equally  both  the  owners  and  the 
unemployed. 

You  have  an  interest  tn  or  own  some 
kind  of  property — your  home,  an 
automobile,  a  factory  or  store — 
perhaps  a  railroad. 
Neglect  of  your  property  means 
direct  loss  to  you  and  economic  loss 
to  the  whole  country. 
A  firmly  establishea  principle  that 
applies  to  the  maintenance  of  prac- 
tically every  kind  of  property  is 
surface  protection  by  means  of  paint 
or  varnish. 

Paint  and  Varnish  NOW! 

Winter  is  as  good  a  time  as  any  for  all 
kinds  of in  terio  rpa  mting  andva  mish  ing. 
Don't  wait  till  spring  to  have  it  done. 
Painting  and  varnishing  done  now 
will  relieve  unemployment,  when 
relief  is  most  needed,  and  will  save 
the  surface  of  valuable  property. 
The  paint  brush  is  our  greatest 
weapon  against  property  deteriora- 
tion and  its  by-products — dirt,  dis- 
ease, ugliness,  depression. 
The  painter's  brush  spreads  more 
than  paint  and  varnish.  With  every 
stroke  it  spreads  economic  mainten- 
ance, cleanliness,  health,  beauty, 
cheer — the  ingredients  of  prosper- 
ity. Put  the  paint  brush  to  work  now 
— this  winter— and  you  will  share  in 
a  public  service  to  meet  the  national 
emergency  of  unemployment. 


'T'ODAY  it  costs  less  to  paint  than  it  did.  The 
cost  of  materials  has  led  in  the  downward 
economic  trend  of  manufactured  products.  But 
no  matter  what  it  costs,  the  fact  remains  that  it 
always  costs  more  not  to  paint  than  to  paint. 
Rust  and  rot  go  on  till  you  check  them.  The 
logical  time  to  paint  and  varnish  is  NOW. 


nil 


SAVE  THE  SURFACE  CAMPAIGN,  507  The  Bourse,  Philadelphia. 
A  co-operative  movement  by  Paint,  Varnish  and  Allied  Interests  whose  products 
and  services  conserve,  protect  and  beautify  practically  every  kind  of  property. 


300  ©  Save  the  Surface  Campaign,  192 1 


January,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


23 


Telephone  Cpossarm  Treated  with  Solignum.  Dipped  and  Sawn  in  half  after  three  days 
Note  Penetration  at  points  where  needed. 


Solignum  is  supplied  in — 
Browns,  Reds,  Greens  and 
Greys — in  one,  five  and 
forty  gallon  packagss. 

HuiirEnliand '  Write  for  Agency  Plan 

Solignum  is  recommended  for:  all  EXTERIOR  WOODWORK 
such  as  SHINGLES,  half  tinber  work,  timbers  set  in  concrete,  bridge 
timbers,  telegraph  poles,  scows,  tables,  fences,  posts,  pig  pens,  ties,  etc. 

Solignum  Interior  Stain  is  a  new  line  and  splendid  seller  also. 

STURGEONS,  LIMITED,  66  Richmond  St.  East,  Toronto 


KEYSTONE  STEEL  MATS  and  MATTING 

The  Leading  Steel  Mat  Made 

ORDER  NOW  FOR  SPRING  DELIVERY 

FLEXIBLE        ^^^^^^^^^^^^       MADE  OF 
REVERSIBLE    ^^^^^^^^^^^5    RIBBON  STEEL 

Continuous  Crimp   ^^^^^^^^^^^^^S       No  Short  Pieces 

Matting  made  in  1 00  foot  rolls,  all  widths,  fiom  which 
Mats  any  length,  can  be  made 

THE  IDEAL  DOOR  MAT,  of  rigid  construction,  made  in 
three  sizes  1  6  x  24,  1 8  x  30,  and  22  x  33  inches,  is  the  lowest 

priced  Wire  Mat  made. 

Ask  us  for  information 


PORT  HOPE  MAT  &  MFG.  CO.,  PORT  HOPE,  ONT. 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


January,  1922 


BOECKH'S 
BRUSH  NEWS 


Seven  Brushes  for  A  Young  Man's  Kit 

The  following  is  an  extract  from  an  article  by  the 
Rev.  Byron  Stauffer: 

A  young  fellow  from  Orillia  asks  me  for  advice  on  what  he  calls  "minor  matters" 
.pertaining  to  success  in  the  big  city. 

'You  may  cut  out  the  usual  ministerial  dope  about  purity,  sobriety  and  honesty," 
he  writes,  "for  with  the  young  man  of  the  gospels  I  can  say,  'All  these  things  have 
I  kept  from  my  youth  up.'  What  I  want  is  to  save  valuable  time  by  securing  a 
few  tips  on  catching  the  eye  of  some  big  man  of  the  business  world  and  thus  get 
into  the  game  quick. 

He  re  goes  then. 

I  earnestly  advise  the  immediate  purchase  of  seven  brushes:  Tooth  Brush, 
Shaving  Brush,  Shoe  Brush,  Hair  Brush,  Clothes  Brush,  Flesh  Brush  and  Hand 
Brush.    By  the  faithful  use  of  these  seven  tools,  I  would  keep  neat. 

I  would  shave  every  morning  without  skipping  even  once  a  year.  Don't  make 
the  excuse  that  you  have  an  exceptionally  tender  face.  Keep  your  razor  sharp, 
rub  in  the  lather  well,  steam  the  face  with  a  hot  towel  and  shave  once  over. 
But  don't  you  ever  go  downtown  with  your  chin  looking  like  the  autumn 
stubble  fields  of  your  native  county  of  Simcoe. 

Go  and  have  your  nails  manicured  just  once.  Watch  the  procedure  carefully; 
then  buy  a  manicure  outfit  and  go  to  it. 

It  does  not  cost  much  to  keep  neat  after  these  few  initial  expenditures  and  the 
first  effort  of  establishing  the  habit. 

Cause  Miss  Nimble-Fingers  of  your  office  staff  to  remark  that  the  Orillia  chap 
always  looks  as  if  he  had  just  emerged  from  a  band  box. 

Young  fellow  from  Orillia.  I  salute  you!    From  your  very  questions,  I  know 
you'll  do." 

The  above  will  call  to  your  mind  the  many  possibilities  that  are  right  in  your 
midst  for  the  sale  of  Brushes. 

Seven  Brushes  for  the  young  man  means  an  equal  number  for  every  member  of 
the  family,  with  the  necessary  house-cleaning  and  Paint  Brushes  added.  This 
opportunity  for  increased  business  is  right  at  your  door  all  the  year  round — as 
Mr.  Stauffer  says;  "GO  TO  IT." 

The  Boeckh  Company,  Ltd. 

TORONTO  E.tabii,hed  18S6  CANADA 

Distributors 

Montreal— The  H.E.  Smith  Sales  Co.,  130  Craig  Street,  West 
Winnipeg — Mr.  J.  B.  Buckham,  664  Broadway 
Vancouver  and  Victoria— The  T.S.  Griffiths  Co.,  1080  Hamilton  St.,  Vancouver  B.  C. 


January,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


Save  the  surface  Section' 


Malie  1922  the  GreatesfoRunt  and  \^irnish  year 

as  the  first  step  toward  irdoublia^  the  industry  by  1926 


Feature  Brushes  With  Paint  Displays 

Women's  pride  in  having  an  attractive  home  can  be  catered  to 
by  live  hardwaremen  who  carry  a  well  assorted  stock  of  brushes 


The  demand  for  brushes  in  the  hard- 
ware store  conies  from  the  mechanic  or 
factory  worker,  and  from  the  house- 
wife, though  often  it  is  not  possible  to 
make  even  this  division.  Tlie  automo- 
bile, for  example,  calls  for  both  types. 

There  is  a  steady  and  profitable  de- 
mand for  brushes  which  are  used  in 
cleaning  machines,  arms  and  various 
mechanical  appliances.  The  workman 
is  a  good  customer  for  whatever  he 
buys.  The  right  brush  for  his  purposie 
will  go  far  toward  establishing  the 
valuable  trade  of  the  better  class  of 
workman.  Brushes  for  garage  and  car 
are  a  profitable  line,  both  the  specials 
and  the  ordinary  lines. 

A  little  item  in  this  connection,  but 
one  which  ' '  takes ' '  well,  is  the  display 
of  small  brushes  for  the  hands  set  forth 
beside  a  good  cleaning  compound. 

The  real  stronghold  of  special  designs 
in  brushes  is  the  home,  writes  Edith 
Holliek  Oliver,  for  with  the  develop- 
ment of  mechanical  household  time  and 
labor-saving  appliances  has   come  the 


awakening  and  development  of  a  more 
intelligent  use  both  of  working  hours 
and  leisure.  The  woman  who  had  to 
grub  among  the  ashes  and  break  her 
back  over  the  washtub  hadn't  the  ambi- 
tion left  to  keep  either  herself  or  her 
house  above  cleanliness.  The  woman 
who  cooks  in  the  modern  way  and 
washes  by  pressing  an  electric  button 
begins  where  the  other  left  off,  and 
adds  to  cleanliness  the  demand  for  the 
refinements  and  beauties  of  life,  and 
in  the  attainment  of  them  the  special 
brush  plays  an  important  part. 

The  idea  of  painting  inside  the  house 
is  fascinating  to  every  woman,  and  a 
good  display  of  paint,  varnish,  or  even 
whitewash  brushes  brings  up  visions  of 
all  sorts  of  possible  changes  and  im- 
provements that  few  can  resist.  Mere 
man,  perhaps,  cannot  understand  this, 
but  many  a  dealer  has  grasped  it  and 
reaped  dollars  therefrom. 

It  is  always  advisable  to  have  the 
brush  display  side  by  side  with  that  of 
paints,  etc.,  when  the  housewife  is  to 


be  considered,  and  also  whenever  pos- 
sible to  have  a  varied  selection  of  color 
and  finish  cards  in  plain  sight,  because 
the  woman,  for  example,  who  comes  in 
for  a  small  can  of  paint  to  renew  the 
worn  place  on  the  bathroom  door,  will 
immediately  see  visions  of  rejuvenated 
chairs  and  if  she  buys  some,  the  proper 
brush  will  follow  as  a  matter  of  course. 
A  regular  House  that  Jack  Built  of 
paints  and  varnishes  and  their  proper 
brushes  often  grows  out  of  a  very  small 
beginning. 

It  is  an  excellent  thing  to  have  a 
piece  of  furniture  half  painted  with 
enamel  and  with  the  fashionable  sten- 
cil or  hand  work  also  displayed  as  a 
finish.  Both  paiiit  and  fine  finish  lines 
call  for  their  special  brushes  if  the 
sale  is  to  be  lasting  and  satisfaetorv. 


An  Attractive  Display  of  Brushes  in  The  Paint  Department 


PAINT  AS  A  PEOTECTOE 
William  Jevons,  a  hardware  dealer 
in  Wakefield,  Kansas,  recently  sent  out 
a  letter  to  his  customers  and  prospective 
customers  which  talked  about  paint,  but 
did  it  in  such  an  unusual  and  out-of- 
the-ordinarjr  way  that  he  secured  the 
attention  of  those  to  whom  the  circular 
was  sent,  and  was  able  to  trace  many 
sales  to  the  letter. 

Jevons  began  his  letter  by  warning 
people  of  the  many  bank  robberies 
which  were  constantly  occurring  from 
time  to  time.  He  then  went  on  as  fol- 
lows: 

' '  Chicago  banks  announce  that  they 
will  build  underground  tunnels  to  se- 
cure safe  connection  with  the  Federal 
Eeserve  Bank.  This  is  necessary  to 
keep  bandits  from  holding  up  bank 
messengers  on  the  streets.  We  say, 
'At  what  an  expense  is  this  protection 
secured! ' 

"Stop!  Mr.  Property  Owner,  aren't 
you  being  robbed  every  day  yourself? 
Look  at  your  buildings.  Hasn't  the 
weather  cracked  and  beaten  them  until 
they  are  rapidly  decaying?  Or  are  you 
one  of  those  who  has  accepted  the  slo- 
gan, 'Save  the  Surface  and  You  Save 
AH?' 

''Fifteen  dollars  will  buy  enough 
paint  and  oil  for  the  average  house.  So 
why  allow  the  elements  to  pick  your 
pockets  continually? 

"It  is  not  necessary  for  you  to  dig  a 
tunnel  or  use  a  gun  for  protection  of 
your  property.  A  little  paint  and  oil 
properly  applied  will  keep  tiie  elements 
from  robbing  you,  and  make  the  build- 
ings warmer  as  well  as  helping  their 
appearance  tremendously.  Eemember 
we  have  plenty  of  paint,  any  color,  for 
inside  or  outside  use,  and  will  be  glad 
to  help  you  select  just  the  right  paint 
that  will  be  pleasing  and  give  lasting 
satisfaction. ' ' 


26 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


January,  1922 


New  Hardware  and  Accessory  Lines 

A  Monthly  Department  in  Which  Manufac- 
turers are  Given  an  Opportunity  to  Describe 
New  Products  Offered  to  Canadian  Dealers 


NEW  LUFKIX  LINE 
The  Lufkin  l?ule  Co.  of  Canada,  Ltd., 
Windsor,  is  introducing  an  improved 
try  and  mitre  square  marked  both  sides 
8ths  and  16ths,  with  figures  and  lines 
elear  and  distinct,  and  fitted  with  a 
moveable  head  which  can  be  securely 
clamped  at  any  point. 

The  makers  state  it  is  a  high-grade 
tool  in  every  respect,  being  known  as 
Lufkin  "L^niversal"  No.  (55,  and  made 
in  two  lens^ths — 9  and  12  inch  blade. 
As  the  blade  is  adjustable  in  length,  it 
can  also  be  used  as  a  marking  gauge, 
for  measuring  mortises;  with  head  set 
at  extreme  end,  as  a  heiglit  gauge  for 
woodworkers,  or  with  blade  removed  as 
a  separate  rule. 


BURCHALL  MAKING  CHAINS 
J.  Burchpll,  formerly  superintendent 
McKinnon  Columbus  Chain  Company 
and  McKinnon  Industries,  Limited,  has 
formed  a  new  company  known  as  the 
United  Chain  &  Manufac'turing  Com- 
pany at  114  Queenstou  8t.,  St.  Cath- 
arines, Out 

The  company  is  manufacturing  a 
number  of  automobile  ijarts,  but  spe- 
cializes in  ' '  Neverslij) ' '  Tire  Chains. 
The  "Neverslip"  is  put  on  unit  by 
unit,  fastening  to  patent  "T"  bolts 
which  are  supplied  to  take  the  place  of 
the  ordinary  rim  bolts  on  the  rear 
wheels  of  it  car.  These  bolts  when  in- 
stalled are  permanent  equipment. 
"Neverslip"  chains,  it  is  claimed,  can 
be  put  on  in  a  snow  bank  or  mud  hole 
as  easily  as  in  a  garage,  and  have  no 
loose  ends  to  rattle  on  mud  guards  or 
pavement. 


TIFFANY  PARKING  LAMP 
Every  driver  fully  realizes  the  dan- 
ger to  his  own  and  passing  cars  when 
he  parks  his  car  without  a  light  burn- 
ing, and  yet  he  continues  to  do  it,  risk- 
ing a  serious  accident  or  a  police  sum- 
mons rather  than  wear  down  the  bat- 
tery which  lias  so  many  services  to 
perform. 

The  Tiffany  Mfg.  Co.,  50  Spring  St., 
Newark,  N.J.,  are  marketing  a  small 
and  neat  Parking  Lamp  at  a  very  popu- 
lar price.  Instead  of  using  two  head- 
lights, a  taillight  and  a  dashlight,  rep- 
resenting twenty  eandlepower,  the 
Parking  Lamp  uses  a  two  eandlepower 
bulb  only.  The  lamp  fits  flush  with  the 
fender  and  has  the  appearance  of  being 
"built  into"  the  car.  It  is  not  an 
accessory,  but  a  part  of  the  car. 

An  especially  attractive  feature  in 
the  lamp  is  the  very  simple  operation 
necessary  to  replace  burned  out  bulbs. 
Istead  of  removing  the  two  small  lenses 
and  placing  the  bulb  through  the  small 
opening  in  the  usual  manner,  bulbs  are 
quickly  and  easily  replaced  in  the  Tif- 
fany Lamp  by  merely 'snapping  off  the 
cover  which  leaves  the  lamp  socket 
fully  exposed. 


NEW  LUGGAGE  CAEEIER 
Richardson  &  Bureau,  55  St.  Fran- 
cois Xavier  St.,  Montroyl,  Quebec,  are 
placing  on  the   market   an  adjustable 
running  board  luggage  carrier. 


NEW  PIPE  WRENCH 
The  Superior  Wrench  &  Tool  Co., 
Widmer  ard  Adelaide  Sts.,  Toronto, 
Ont.,  are  tow  manufacturing  "Light- 
ning Adjustment  Pipe  vVrenches"  in 
five  sizes,  langing  from  8  to  24  inches. 


NEW  CANUCK  WRENCH 
Tlie  Canuck  Tool  Co.,  1103  Temple 
Building,  Toronto,  is  mair^factiiring  the 
Canuck  wrench,  which  they  claim  is 
"seven  wrenches  in  one,"  because  they 
lock  almost  instantly  into  any  desired 
position. 


NEWELL  HACK  SAW  FRAME 
The  Newell  Manufacturing  Co.,  Pres- 
cott.  Out.,  are  now  manulacturing  hack 
saw  frames,  a  line  formerly  made  by 
the  National  Machinery  &  Supply  Co., 
Plamilton.  They  also  manufacture  cur- 
tain rots,  bathroom  fixtures  and  sundry 
supplies.  A  complete  line  of  frames 
will  be  made  from  extra  heavy  cold 
rolled  steel  beirg  heavily  nickei-plated, 
and  adjustable  from  8  to  12  inches. 
Any  size  saw  can  be  used,  the  blades 
being  set  by  m.'ans  of  the  screw  in  the 
handle. 


BRUSH  MANUFACTURER 
HONORED 
E.  C.  Boeckh,  president  of  the  Boeckli 
Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  was  before  Christ- 
mas presented  with  an  illuminated  ad- 
dress by  his  company's  employees,  as 
a  token  of  their  appreciation  of  the  in- 
terest Mr.  Boeckh  has  always  mani- 
fested in  their  welfare,  an  illustration 
of  which  was  the  recent  distribution  to 
them  of  disability  and  life  insurance 
policies. 

Mr.  Boeckh,  speaking  a  few  words  in 
reply,  alluded  feelingly  to  the  friendly 
relations  which  existed  between  the 
executives  and  the  staff  in  all  depart- 
ments and  expressed  the  hope  that  such 
good  relations  would  long  continue,  as 
he  felt  that  the  best  interest  of  all  were 
conserved  by  good-will  and  hearty  co- 
operation. 


BROCKVILLE  GETS  STOVE  PLxiNT 
Tlic  Beeby  Range  Company,  Ltd.,  has 
leased  a  portion  of  the  plant  of  Ma- 
chinery &  Foundries,  Ltd.,  at  Brock- 
ville,  and  proposes  to  manufacture 
cooking  appliances.  The  company  re- 
cently received  a  Dominion  charter  to 
carry  on  business  with  a  capital  of 
$500,000,  t'le  active  head  being  John 
H.  Beeby,  stove  manufacturer  and  effi- 
ciency engineer,  Ottawa. 


SITCO  RATCHET  WRENCH 
The  SiniT.lex  Iron  &  Tool  Co.,  Ltd., 
216  Adelaide  St.  West,  loronto,  are  in 
trodueing  a  ratchet  wrench  which  cai 
be  adjusted  to  almost  any  angle.  Thit 
ratchet  wrench  called  the  "Sitco,"  is 
claimed  to  be  a  necessity  in  automobile 
kits,  mechanic 's  tool  chests,  or  for 
workshop  use. 


NEW  DOWSWELL  CrVTALOGUE 
Dowswell-Lees  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hamilton, 
have  issued  Citalogue  No.  10,  describ- 
ing their  line    of    washing  machines, 
wringers,  etc.,  illustrate  1  in  colors. 


TO  MANUFACTURE  POULTRY 

SUPPLIES 
The  businesses  of  the  Collins  Manu- 
facturing Company,  Toronto,  and  the 
Never-Fail  Products,  Limited,  Hamil- 
ton, have  been  combined,  the  new  or- 
ganization to  be  known  as  Collins 
Never-Fail  Products,  Limited.  They 
will  occupy  a  modern  factory  at  1322 
Burlington  Street  East,  Hamilton,  C.  W. 
Collins  being  president  and  general 
manager. 

The  new  company  will  develop  to  a 
much  greater  degree  the  line  of  metal 
poultry  supplies  and  fittings  heretofore 
made  by'  the  Collins  Manufacturing 
Company.  ,  The  line  of  sprayers  and 
force  pumps  which  have  attained  wide- 
spread popularity  will  be  continued,  as 
well  as  other  novelties  made  at  present 
and  in  prospect.  Ample  factory  space 
is  now  available  to  mase  the  poultry 
supplies  of  sheet  metal  which  come  in 
such  a  variety  of  patterns  and  styles 
that  a  large  space  is  necessary  to  manu- 
facture them  in  quantity. 

The  Collins  Manufacturing  Company, 
Svmington  Avenue,  Toronto,  was  es- 
tablished in  1891  by  the  late  G.  M.  Col- 
lins and  has  been  carried  on  by  C.  W. 
Collins  and  G.  S.  Collins.  The  opera- 
tions were  somewhat  impeded  by  the 
war  activities  of  the  two  partners,  but 
since  the  return  of  peace  the  business 
liars  grown  to  such  an  extent  that  the 
factory  on  Symington  Avenue  was  not 
large  enough  for  the  increased  opera- 
tions. The  Collins  Metal  Hen,  an  incu- 
bator and  brooder  combined,  has  been 
selling  remarkably  well.  Part  of  this 
business  has  been  for  export.  The  com- 
pany is  now  busy  on  a  large  order  for 
English  use. 

The  Never-Fail  Products,  Limited, 
have  for  the  last  three  years  made  and 
sold  the  ' '  Never-Fail ' '  five-gallon  oil 
and  gasoline  cans  originally  made  by 
the  J.  A.  Harps  Company  of  Greenfield, 
Ohio.  Never-Fail  Products,  Limited, 
obtained  the  Canadian  rights  for  their 
manufacture  and  thousands  of  Never- 
Fail  cans  have  been  sold  in  Canada. 

The  Collins  Never-Fail  Products, 
Limited,  will  supply  many  lines  of 
goods  which  have  heretofore  been  im- 
ported from  the  United  States  and  the 
establishment  of  the  new  company 
therefore  means  a  distinct  addition  to 
Canada's  manufacturers. 

The  trade  will  receive  i'.»e  full  benefit 
of  the  reduced  prices  coming  into  ef- 
fect for  galvanized  sheets  and  other 
materials  used  in  manufacturing.  The 
new  company  has  no  excess  stocks  of 
supplies  or  of  manufactured  articles. 
They  are  therefore  able  to  quote  low 
prices  and  to  make  prompt  shipments' 
from  their  Hamilton  headquarters. 


Jariiary,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


27 


"The  finish  mendii^ 
w  t»n 
 t  X  TERIOR 

sliL^'"    Th<?f-r"".  OUTSIDE 


^  [MPEBIAlVARNISHiCoiORCa 
fcLZ""«    TORONTO  VANMOWKf. 


^^^^^r  The  Finish  That  Endut 


The  Seven 


flaze 


es  are 


Home  and  Farm  Finishes 
Auto  Finishes 

Art  Shades 
Velvet  Finishes 
Porch  and  Veranda  Floors 
Lac  Shades 
Exterior  Finishes 


"For  Exterior 

Surfaces" 

{The  can  with  the  black  and  blue  label) 


An  improvement  on  anything  in  the  Hne  of  oil 
pamt  for  exterior  work. 

Gives  a  better  and  higher  gloss. 

Brushes,  spreads  and  flows  better  than  anything 
yet  produced  for  outside  finishing. 

Dries  harder,  wears  longer,  and  gives  better 
protection. 

A  strictly  high  class  line  for  trade  that  requires 
something  unusual,  both  in  appearance  and  lasting 
qualities. 


Our  dealer's  booklet  "A  Guide  to  large  Profits" 
gives  detailed  description  of  Floglaze  "Exterior 
Surfaces"  and  six  other  Floglaze  lines.  Write 
for  a  copy. 


"Make  1922  Your  Greatest  Paint  and  Varnish  Year" 

ImperialVarnish  &  Color  Go. 

HEAD  OFFICE    TORONTO  CANADA^"'™ 

MONTREAL       WINNIPEG  VANCOUVER 

Sofe  Diatributors  for  Manitoba, 

Distributors  for  British  Columbia:  Saskatchewan  and  Alberta  Eastern  Distributors 

The  Callander  Shore  Co  ,  Limited  MIILERMORSE  HARDWARP  CO  PAINT  &  VARNISH 

vT„tu?e7^"  ni!STHEBlGWINNIPEGH"l!??i^^^  MONTREAL 

243  Beaver  Hall  Hill 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


January,  1922 


Trade  News  From  Coast  To  Coast 

A  Monthly  Summary  of  News  Among  Dealers, 
Jobbers,  Manufacturers  and  Allied  Interests 


BRITISH  COLUMBIA 
Nanaimo — A.  Sampson,   of  Sampson 

Hardware,  dead. 

Vernon — Okanagan    Hardware,  Ltd., 

lias    been    incorporated    with  $30,000 

capitaL 

Vancouver — The  Canadian  Oil  Burn- 
ers, Ltd.,  ha«  been  incorporated  with 
$50,000  capital  to  manufacture  oil 
burners  for  stoves,  etc. 

Vancouver — Rowlands  Hardware  & 
Paint  Co.  succeeds  Vancouver  Paint  & 
Hardware  Co 

Vancouver — The  Pacific  Wire  &  Sup- 
plj'  Co.  has  been  formed  by  A.  D'Arey, 
McBride  and  W.  Hunter. 

ALBERTA 

Alliance  —  J.  Nelson  oiiened  new 
store. 

Bellevue — C.  Emmersou  establishing 
hardware  business. 

Calgary — Thos.  Davidson  Mfg.  Co. 
opening  branch. 

Bentley — Thompson  &  Bratke  open- 
ing plumbing  and  tin  shop. 

Drumiheller — Wyman  &  Small  open- 
ing hardware  store. 

Radisson — Assmus  &  Powrie,  hard- 
ware merchants,  have  sold  their  garage 
business. 

Galahad — J.  Ledingham  entering 
hardware  business. 

High  River — V.  Maurice  &  Co.  open- 
ing hardware  store. 

Killam — G.  E.  Labrash  opened  new 
store. 

Strome — R.  S.  Woodruff,  hardware, 
moving  from  Chinook,  Alta. 

MANITOBA 

Bruxelles  —  Adams  &  Schumaker 
opening  garage. 

Winnipeg — Meakins  &  Sons  are  now 
located  in  the  Gait  Building,  corner 
Princess  and  Banntyne  Ave. 

Roblin — Swain  &  Roe  opening  hard- 
ware store. 

Winnipeg  —  Quality  Tool  Works, 
Montreal,  have  appointed  S.  H.  Whyte 
Mfg.  Co.,  Winnipeg,  as  their  Western 
agents. 

Winnipeg — C.  C.  Craig  Company  have 
moved  to  new  premises  in  the  Stobart 
Building,  281  McDermot  Ave. 

SASKATCHEWAN 

Elbow — L.  P.  Woodham  discontinued 
hardware  business. 

Elrose — Tackaberiy  &  Norris  hard- 
ware store  burned. 

Milestone — A.  J.  Sankey  opening 
garage. 

Odessa— W.  A.  Caswell  &  Co.,  Ltd., 
selling  out. 

Southey — Central  Hardware  &  Motor 
Oo.  have  taken  over  a  garage  business. 

Harris — Jefferson  &  Wilson  suffereil 
fire  loss. 

Regina — T.  W.  Peart,  Lti..  incovjio- 
rated. 

Vanseoy — R.  Williams  sell'.u.j  out. 

Vanguard— J.  A.  Stewart  sold  to  W. 
W.  Cooper,  Ltd.,  of  Swift  C\ir:(.\T. 
OxXTARIO 

Deseronto— The  E.  B.  Eddy  Co.,  Ltd., 
have  taken  over  the  Dominion  Match 
Co. 


Brantford — Karl  Bornliold  succeeds 
George  R-  Bucher,  hardware. 

Gait — Osborne  Hardware  Co.  have 
enlarged  premises. 

Grinisby — William  A.  Davies,  presi- 
dent of  the  Acme  White  Lead  &  Color 
Works,  died. 

Hamilton — Cyclone  Wire  Fence  Co., 
Waukegon,  111.,  announce  that  they  will 
postpone  establishing  their  Canadian 
plant  here  for  a  year. 

London — J.  Frank  White,  London 
Rolling  Mills  Co.,  elected  M.P.  for  Lon- 
don. 

Aylmer — The  Aylmer  Pump  &  Scale 
Co.  has  been  taken  ovor  by  W.  H. 
Heard  of  the  Spramotor  Co.,  London. 

Oshawa — Ontario  Potteries  Co.,  Ltd., 
are  establishing  a  $300,000  plant  here 
to  manufacture  tableware. 

Ottawa — A.  W.  Gayler  opening  hard- 
ware store. 

Toronto — ^Samuel  &  Benjamin,  Ltd., 
have  been  incorporated  with  $2,000,000 
capital  to  succeed  M.  &  L.  Samuel,  Ben- 
jamin &  Co.,  metal  merchants. 

Toronto — T.  W.  Rogers  has  been  ap- 
jiointed  Toronto  and  Western  Ontario 
representative  of  the  James  Smart 
plant  of  th^  Canada  Foundries  &  Forg- 
iiigs  Co.,  Ltd.,  Brockville. 

Toronto — E.  B.  Rvckman,  Dunlop 
Tire  &  Rubber  Co.,  elected  M.P.  for 
East  Toronto. 

Toronto — Waller  Bros.  beginning 
hardware  store  at  1293  St.  Clair  Ave. 

Toronto — Thomas  Craik  Irving,  vice- 
president  of  tlie  Indei>endent  Cordage 
Co.,  died. 

St.  Catharines— J.  D.  Chaplin,  Wel- 
land  Vale  Mfg.  Co.,  elected  M.P.  for 
Lincoln. 

Watford— W.  L.  McCrae  &  Co.  suc- 
ceeds Thos.  Dodds  &  Son,  hardware. 

Wingham — J.  J.  Cunningham,  presi- 
dent Western  Foundry  Co.,  died. 
QUEBEC 

Drummondville — N.  Pelletier  &  Fils 
building     new    store    and  apartment 

Montreal — H.  M.  Bolger,  sales  man- 
ager of  the  Montreal  Branch  of  the  Mc- 
Clary  M/g.  Co.,  died. 

Montreal — Col.  Robert  Starke,  of 
Starke,  Seybold  &  Co.,  was  elected 
president  of  the  Montreal  Metal  and 
Hardware  Association. 

Montreal — Fire  destroyed  the  factory 
of  the  Montreal  Hardware  Mfg.  Co., 
Hochelaga.  Tlie  damage  exceeds  $50,- 
000,  covered  by  insurance. 

Montreal — Adcock  &  Co.  succeed  Ad- 
cock  &  Brewer,  manufacturers'  agents. 

Montreal  —  Canadian  Wire  Bound 
Boxes,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  have  established 
a  branch  factoiy  at  17  Mill  St.,  Mont- 
real. 

Montreal — H.  J.  McAdic  has  resigned 
as  sales  manager  for  A.  Ramsay  &  Son, 
paint  manufacturers,  and  will  act  as 
manufacturers'  representative  for  paint 
products,  etc. 


TOM  WRIGHT'S  NEW  LINES 
Tom  Wright,  for  many  years  Toronto 
salesman   for  H.   S   Howland   Sons  & 
Co.,  later  a  retail  hardware  dealer  in 
Toronto,  and  for  the  past  year  Ontario 


representative  for  Canada  Foundries 
&  Forgings,  Ltd.,  Welland  and  Brock- 
ville, has  begun  1922  by  establishing 
himself  as  a  manufacturers'  agency. 

Mr.  Wright  will  repiesent  the  Rae 
Machine  &  Tool  Works,  Hamilton,  who 
have  taken  over  the  manufacture  of 
the  National  Machinery  k  Supply  Co.'s 
planes  and  vises,  and  in  addition  to 
' '  National ' '  planes  and  vises,  have  an 
extensive  line  of  pipe  vises,  etc. 

Other  lines  to  be  represented  include 
the  products  of  Machinery  &  Tool  Co., 
Ltd.,  Brockville;  the  Canadian  Tool 
Co.,  Bridgeburg,  and  W.  H.  Dunne 
Skates,  Toronto. 


ESTABLISHING  GERMAN  FACTORY 
The  Yale  &  Towne  Manufacturing 
Company,  which  has  a  Canadian  fac- 
tory at  St.  Catharines,  has  announced 
its  decision  to  manufacture  in  Ger- 
many. Hitherto  the  company's  export 
business  was  handled  from  the  Ameri- 
can factory.  The  Canadian  plant  got 
a  share  of  the  British  business  during 
the  period  when  import  restrictions 
were  applied  affecting  products  made 
outside  the  Empire.  In  making  the 
decision  to  produce  in  Germany,  the 
lock  company  is  influenced  by  the  lower 
cost  of  manufacturing  there.  Other- 
wise it  faced  exclusion  from  export 
markets  gained  at  some  cost,  which,  if 
once  lost,  could  not  be  regained  readily. 


BOECKH  COMPANY  EXTENDING 

On  December  1st  the  H.  E.  Smith 
Sales  Co.,  130  Craig  Street  West,  Mont- 
real, were  appointed  distributors  of 
Boeckh 's  brushes  for  the  Province  of 
Quebec.  This  arrangement  was  en- 
tered into  for  the  purpose  of  effecting 
still  better  service  for  the  many  deal- 
ers throughout  Quebec  Province  who 
handle  the  Boeckh  line. 

The  Boeckh  Company  have  also  ap- 
pointed J.  B.  Buckham  sales  agent  and 
distributor  of  their  brushes,  etc.,  with 
headquarters  and  warehouse  at  664 
Broadway,  Winnipeg,  also  representing 
Valentine  &  Co.'s  varnishes  and  col- 
ors. 

Mr.  Buckham  is  widely  known,  hav- 
ing been  salesman  for  the  J.  H.  Ash- 
down  Hardware  Company  and  the  Sher- 
win  Williams  Co.  for  several  years,  as 
well  as  being  in  busiuciss  at  Winnipeg 
under  the  name  of  the  Winnipeg  Trunk 
&  Bag  Co. 


HARDWARE  MANUFACTURER  IN 
CABINET 

Hon.  T.  A.  Low,  appointed  Minister 
without  portfolio  in  Hon.  Mackenzie 
King's  Cabinet,  has  been  in  political 
life  since  1908,  when  he  was  elected  to 
tlie  House  of  Commons  from  South  Ren- 
frew for  the  first  time.  He  was  again 
elected  in  1911,  but  retired  in  1912.  He 
carried  South  Renfrew  again  this  year 
by  a  sound  majority. 

Hon.  Mr.  Low  is  a  business  man  of 
long  standing  and  is  a  lumber  merchant 
and  manufacturer.  He  is  president  of 
the  Renfrew  Machineiy  Company,  Lim- 
ited; president  of  the  Renfrew  Flour 
Mills,  Limited;  president  of  the  Ren- 
frew Electiic  Manufacturing  Company, 
Limited;  president  of  the  Renfrew 
Manufacturing  Comjjany,  and  a  direc- 
tor of  the  Renfrew  Power  Company, 
Limited. 


January,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


29 


TORONTO  FIRM'S  RAPID 
EXPANSION 

W.  Walker  &  Sons,  Ltd.,  wholesale  hard- 
ware merchants,  Toronto,  announce 
that  they  have  disposed  of  their  retail 
hardware  business  at  1228  Yonge  street 
to  the  Northern  Plai'd-ware  Co.,  and  will 
in  furturei  coiifLne  their  efforts  solely  to 
the  wholesale  end  of  the  business,  they 
now  having  eight  salesmen  on  their 
staff. 

A.  W.  Walker,  vice-presiden't  and 
general  manager  of  the  eomfpany, 
showed  "Hardware  and  Accessories" 
representative  over  their  new  ware- 
house, a  large  addition  to  which  has 
just  been  completed,  giving  them  ap- 
proximately 32,600  square  feet  of  floor 
space  and  incorporating  some  new  and 
novel  features  in  the  stock  and  ship- 
ping deipartments,  'the  most  modern 
types  of  shelving  and  bin®  being  used 
for  storage,  wiliile  a  particularly  good 
feature  has  been  adapted  in  the  ship- 
ping department  by  placing  a  series  of 
separating  boards  on  ithe  assembling 
table  to  keep  each  shipment  distinct 
and  eliminate  possiblei  errors  in 
assembling  shipments  of  goods  to  their 
different  customers,  the  boards  sliding 
along  a  groove  in  the  table  and  are 
adjustable  to  accommodate  any  sized 
shipment.  A  parcel  chute  is  also  being 
installed  to  carry  packages  from  the 
shipping  floor  to  the  shipping  platform 
on  the  ground  floor.  Every  parcel 
fJiipped  bears  a  label  indicating  that 
the  shipment  was  made  on  the  date 
order  was  received,  four  large  motor 
trucks  being  used  daily  to  make  local 
deliveries,  while  eight  motor  cars  are 
in  use  by  the  travellers. 

The  construction  of  the  new  ware- 
house building  is  so  modern  and  satis- 
factory to  the  insurance  companies  that 
they  are  said  to  have  been  granted  the 
lowest  rate  per  itlhousand  ever  charged 
for  insurance  to  any  wholesale  hard- 
ware warehouse.  A  new  steam  boiler 
has  been  installed  underground  sepa- 
rated from  the  warehouse. 

The  Walker  organization  has  grown 
rapidly  from  a  small  beginning  in  a 
tin  shop,  which  developed  into  a  re- 
tail hardware  store,  the  outgrowth  of 
whieOi  has  been  the  present  wholesale 
organization,  which  requires  a  working 
staff  of  35,  recent  appointments  to 
which  have  been  W.  J.  Shaw,  as  assist- 
ant manager,  and  O.  C.  James,  formerly 
with  the  Miller-Morse  Hardware  Co., 
Winnipeg,  and  Eioe  Lewis  &  Son,  To- 
ronto, as  sales  manager. 

As  organized  now,  the  Walker  con- 
cern is  strictly  wholesale,  and  in  addi- 
tion to  their  well-stocked  lines  of 
builders'  hardware,  "Aero"  quality 
paints  and  "Owl"  brand  roofing,  they 
are  distributors  for  some  Canadian, 
American  and  BritiSli  manufacturers, 
representing  May  &  Padmiore,  Birming- 
ham, England,  east  of  Port  Arthur; 
Mitchell  "Vacuum  Cleaners  in  Ontario, 
and  being  sole  distributors  for  Beaver 
Hexagon  Shingles  in  Toronto  and  dis- 
trict. 

Unusual  advertising  methods  have 
featured  the  steady  growth  of  W. 
Walker  &  Son's  business,  it  being  their 
policy  to  back  up  their  advertising  by 
real  service  in  order  to  stimulate  _sales 
for  their  retail  customers. 

For  1922  a  comprehensive  campaign 
is  being  prepared  by  A.  H.  MacLauich- 
lan,  their  advertising  counsellor,  the 
plans  including  not  only  consistent  ad- 


verttiising  in  trade  papers,  but  also  a 
definite  advertising  campaign  to  con- 
sumers, in  which  products  sold  by  W. 
Walker  &  Son  will  be  given  wide  (pub- 
licity, inquiries  being,  directed  to  the 
retail  stores  wiliere  "Owl,"  "Aero," 
"Beaver,"  "Mitchelll"  and  other 
Walker  products  are  sold.  To  adver- 
tise in  such  an  unusual  manner  and 
submergei  their  own  personality  in  or- 
der to  give  the  retailers  greater  service 
is  out  of  the  ordinaiy,  and  in  these 
days,  when  aggressiveness  in  business- 
getting  is  necessary  to  obtain  volume 
of  turnover,  the  plan  is  certainly  de- 
serving of  success  and  should  be  a 
business  builder  for  W.  Walker  &  Son. 


COLEMAN  QUICK-FILL  PUMP 

The  Coleman  Lamp  Company,  of 
Toronto,  are  selling  through  jobbers  of 
accessories  the  tire  pump  illustrated. 
It  has  a  large  ebonized  handle  which 
cannot  come  off;  no  screw  caps  at  top 
of  barrel;  brass  barrel,  nickel  plated, 
rust-proof  and  not  subject  to  chipping 
like  an  enamelled  barrel;  no  waste  of 
compression  because  the  ' '  quick-fill ' ' 
plunger  seats  itself  directly  above  the 
check  valve  right  against  the  bottom 
of  the  barrel,  so  that  all  the  air  is 
forced  past  the  check  valve  into  the 
tire;  a  quickly  accessible  check  valve. 


the  whole  base  of  th6  pump  unscrew- 
ing from  (the  barrel  and  leaving  the 
check  valve  exposed  for  cleaning;  a 
new  style  base  which  makes  the  use  of 
the  pump  quite  practicable  in  sand  or 
in  soft  mud;  the  very  highest  grade  of 
red  rubber  hose  which  is  attached  par- 
allel to  the  pump  barrel  so  that  when 
the  pump  is  put  away  it  lies  parallel 
to  the  pump  barrel  without  having  to 
be  bent;  a  quick  fastening  hose  con- 
nection which  makes  a  perfect  joint  on 
the  tube  air  stem;  and  careful  and  ex- 
act- manufacture.  The  retail  price  is 
•$4.75  in  eastern  Canada  and  $5.00  in 
western  Canada. 


A.  W.  MeDOUGALL  ILL 
A.  W.  McDougall,  buyer  for  Wood, 
Vallance  &  James,  Hamilton,  who  has 
been  seriously  ill  for  several  weeks,  has 
improved  considerably. 

Mr.  McDougall  has  a  host  of  fricn  Is 
amongst  retail  hardwaremen  in  North- 
ern Ontario,  which  territory  he  cov- 
ered for  many  years  for  Eice  Lewis  <fc 
Son  and  Wood,  Vallance  &  Co. 


TORONTO  HARDWAREMEN  TO 
ORGANIZE 

Toronto  hardware  and  paint  dealers, 


at  a  meeting  held  under  the  auspices  of 
the  Paint,  Oil  and  Varnish  Club  of  To- 
ronto, on  Wednesday,  Jan.  3,  discussed 
the  need  for  closer  organization  and 
will  meet  again  January  25th  to  form 
an  association  for  social  and  business 
purposes.  One  of  the  objects  will  be  to 
promote  plans  for  closer  co-operation 
on  such  business-creating  campaigns  as 
the  "Save  the  Surface"  movement,  in 
which  the  manufacturers  of  paints  and 
kindred  lines  are  spending  large  sums 
in  advertising  with  which  dealers  feel 
they  should  back  up  more  aggressively. 


W.  P.  Buzzek,  formerly  associated 
with  the  Aluminum  Products  Co.  of  the 
United  States,  has  been  appointed  sales 
manager  of  Ideal  Aluminum  Products, 
Ltd.,  Toronto. 


MARKET  INFORMATION 


SOME  RECENT  PRICE  CHANGES 

Cut  Nails— Declined  50  cents  a  keg. 
Price  now  $4.35  f.o.b.  factory,  with  car- 
load freight  rate  allowed  for  Toronto. 

Crow  Bars — Down  50  cents  per  hun- 
dredweight.   Price  now  $8  per  100  lbs. 

Iron  Rivets  and  Burrs — Easier.  Dis- 
counts increased  from  50  to  52%%. 

Pick  and  Cutter  Mattocks — Lower  by 
$1.50  a  dozen.  New  quotation  is  at 
$10  a  dozen. 

Picks — Lower  quotations.  Clay  pick's 
are  at  $7.80  per  dozen  for  5  and  6 
pound  weights,  and  $8.50  for  6  to  7 
pound  weights.  Eock  picks  are  at  $9.25 
for  7  and  8  pound  weights,  and  $9.75 
for  8  pounders. 

J.  M.  T.  Gate  Valves — Eeduced  prices. 
Discounts  now  at  25  and  10%  from  list. 

Big  Ben  and  Baby  Ben  Alarm  Clocks 
— Declined.  New  quotation  is  now 
$3.43,  with  luminous  dials  at  $4.80. 

Portland  Cement — Eeduced  prices. 
Barrels  are  now  at  $3.70  and  bags  at 
$1.15  for  carload  lots. 

Wire — New  and  lower  prices.  Gal- 
vanized and  barb  are  now  at  a  base 
price  of  $4.10. 

Bolts  and  Nuts — New  discounts.  Car- 
riage bolts,  %  and  smaller,  are  at 
471/2%,  and  larger  at  40  off.  Machine 
bolts,  %  and  smaller,  are  at  55  off,  and 
larger  at  42%.  Sleigh  shoe  bolts  are 
at  30  off;  Coach  and  lag  screws,  55; 
Bolt  ends,  42%;  Square  head  blank 
bolts,  421/2;  Elevator  bolts,  30,  with 
corrugated  heads,  60;  Fancy  head  bolts, 
30;  Shaft  bolts,  30;  Step  bolts,  30; 
Whiflaetree  bolts,  30;  Tire  bolts,  521/2; 
Stove  bolts,  72%;  Nuts,  2  inch  and 
smaller,  square,  blank,  off  net  list, 
$1.25;  tapped,  25  cents;  hexagon  blank, 
75  cents  off  list;  tapped,  75  cents  off 
list. 

Radiators — Lower  by  about  12%. 

Boilers  for  Steam  or  Water — Declin- 
ed by  about  10%. 

Iver-Johnson  Revolvers — Lower;  now 
at  $11  for  safety  hammer  type  and  $12 
for  hammerless  type. 

Shot  Guns — Single-barrel  reduced  to 
$11.50  for  non-ejectors  and  $11.85  with 
ejectors. 

Metal  Base  Prices — Copper  ingots,  18 
cents;  tin,  39  cents  a  pound  for  ingot 
tin.  Lead,  6%  cents  for  pig  lead. 
Spelter,  7I/4  cents  a  pound.  Antimony, 
10  cents.    Aluminum,  27  cents. 


30 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


January,  1922 


The  quotations  below  are 
approximately  correct  for 
large  lots  in  Toronto  on  the 
dale  mentioned. 


CURRENT  PRICES 

TORONTO,  JANUARY  10,  1922 


They  may  not  be  the  same 
in  any  other  jobbing  centre 
owing  to  freight  and  other 
conditions. 


METALS  and  SHEETS 


Aluminum — Per  pound,  24c. 

Antimony — Per  pound,  8e. 

Brass — Sheets,  base,  23c;  rods,  base 
%  to  1  in.,  round,  21e.;  tubing,  seam- 
less, base,  2oe.    F.o.b.  Toronto. 

Copper — Casting  ingot,  base,  17%c; 
rods,  V2  to  2  in.,  28c;  soft  sheets,  plain, 
16  oz.  and  heavier,  lb.,  30c ;  plain  tin- 
ned, 16  oz.  and  heavier,  lb.,  37c;  pol- 
ished and  tinned,  16  oz.  and  heavier,  lb., 
42c;  tubing,  lb.,  2&c. 

Above  prices  are  full  sheets  and  bars. 
Cut  sheets  and  bars  arc  5e  per  lb. 
liigher. 

Coppers,  Soldering — Base,  4  to  8  lbs., 
35  cents  per  lb.;  3-lb.,  38c;  2%-lb.,  39c; 
2-lb.,  41c;  114-lb.,  44c;  1-lb.,  48c  per  lb. 
F.o.b.  Toronto.  Hamilton. 

Iron,  Tinued — Lion  and  Crown  Brand, 
Toronto  in  22,  24  and  26  gauge.  36  x 
96,  21c  per  lb.;  48  x  96,  21c  per  lb.  Loss 
than  case,  50c  per  100  lbs.  extra. 

Lead  (pig) — $6.75  per  hundred  lbs. 

Plates,  Canada — Box  of  60  sheets, 
$0. <;.■);  ordinary,  52  sheets,  $5.60. 

Plates,  Coke,  Tin  —  20x28x100  lb. 
basis,  $17.50  box;  20x28xIC,112s,  $18 
box;  20x28  IX,  112s,  $20  box;  20  x  28, 
IXX,  5(js,  $11.25  box;  20x28  IXXX,  56s, 
box,  $12. 

Plates,  Charcoal,  Tin — 

Terne  Plates— IX,  20x28,  56s,  $14; 
IXX,  20x28,  56s,  $16. 

Plates,  Teme — TC,  14x20,  112  sheets, 
$12.00. 

Spelter — Per  pound,  7M!C. 

Tin— Ingots  (100  lbs.),  per  lb.,  38y2e. 

Zinc — Sheets,  per  lb.,  12c. 


PLUMBERS  AND  TINNERS' 
SUPPLIES 


Boilers  (Range) — 30-gal.,  standard, 
$8.75  cash;  30-gal.,  extra  heavy,  $11.25. 

Fittings — Cast  iron  fittings,  25'/( ; 
malleable  bushings,  28%;  cast  bushings, 
289^  ;  unions  45%  ;  flanged  unions  25''/r  ; 
plugs,  cast  iron,  28%;  plugs,  solid, 
28% ;  plugs,  countersunk,  28% ;  coup- 
ling.s,  4  in.  and  under,  30%;  do.,  2V2 
ill.  and  larger,  10%. 

Nipples,  Wrought — Close  and  short,  4 
and  under,  50%;  41/2  and  larger, 
40'/'^;  long,  4  in.  and  under,  60%c  ;  4% 
in.  and  larger,  50%,;  running  thread,  4 
in.  and  under,  30%. 

Oakum — Special  No.  1,  $15;  plumb- 
ers', $7. 

Packing  —  Fine  jute,  17c  a  pound; 
coarse  jute,  18c;  hemp,  36c;  square 
braided  hemp,  38c;  No.  1  Italian,  44c; 
No.  2  Italian,  36e. 

Wrought  Pipe — Price  List  No.  54, 
Deo.  22,  1V21. 


Standard  Buttweld  Pipe  S-C  per  100 


Size. 

Blk. 

Galv. 

Blk. 

Galv. 

Steel 

Gen.Wrot.Iron 

Vs 

in. 

$  6.00 

$  8.00 

$  ... 

$  ... 

V-L 

in. 

3.84 

5.94 

7.20 

9.30 

% 

in. 

3.84 

5.94 

7.20 

9.30 

in. 

4.85 

6.46 

7.31 

8.93 

% 

in. 

.5.87 

7.71 

8.86 

10.70 

1 

in. 

8.J6 

11.05 

12.58 

15.30 

in. 

11.04 

14.95 

17.02 

20.70 

11/0 

in. 

13.20 

17.88 

20.35 

24.75 

2 

in. 

17.76 

24.05 

27.38 

33.30 

21/0 

in. 

28.08 

38.03 

3 

in. 

36.72 

49.73 

3% 

in. 

47.84 

63.48 

4 

in. 

56.68 

75.21 

Standard  Lapw 

eld  Pip 

e  S-C, 

per  100 

Size. 

Blk. 

Galv. 

Blk. 

Galv. 

Steel 

Gen.Wrot.Iron 

2 

in. 

21.46 

27.38 

31.08 

37.00 

21/2 

in. 

31.50 

40.05 

46.80 

56.16 

3 

in. 

41.31 

53.55 

61.20 

73.44 

31/2 

in. 

48.76 

65.32 

72.68 

89.24 

4 

in. 

57.77 

77.39 

86.11 

105.76 

4 1/2 

in. 

06.04 

86.36 

1.04 

1.24 

5 

in. 

76.96 

1 00.64 

1.21 

1.45 

6 

in. 

1.00 

1.31 

1.57 

1.88 

7 

in. 

1.33 

1.76 

2.02 

2.45 

8L 

in. 

1.40 

1.85 

2.13 

2.58 

8 

in. 

1.61 

2.13 

2.45 

2.97 

9 

in. 

1.97 

2.59 

2.97 

3.59 

lOL 

in. 

1.32 

2.40 

2.75 

3.33 

10 

in. 

2.35 

3.09 

3.54 

4.28 

Pipe  (Conductor),  plain,  in  10-foot 
lengths— 2  in.,  $18.40;  3  in.,  $22.30;  4 
in.,  $29.60;  5  in.,,  $40;  6  in.,  $49.  Less 
70  ])er  cent. 

■  Pipe  (soil) — Med.  and  extra  heavy — 
2  in.,  3  in.,  25%c;  4  in.,  30%  ;  5,  6  in., 
30%  ;  8  in.,  net. 

Soil  Pipe  Fittings — 2,  3,  4,  5,  6  in., 
40-10%  ;  8  in.,  net. 

Pipe  (stove) — Net  list. 

Registers — Warm  air,  jajjanned  and 
common  oxidized,  20%  from  standard 
list.    No.  3,  $10.75. 

Tinners'  Trimmings — Plain  50  and 
10,  retinned,  50%,. 

Trough  (Eave) — O.  G.  Square  bead 
and  half  round:  Per  100  ft.:  8  in., 
$15.90;  10  in.,  $17.70;  12  in.,  $21.20;  15 
in.,  $28.80;  18  in.,  $36.50.    Less  70%. 

Valves  Brass  (Penberthy)  —  Gate 
valves,  25%;  regrinding  valves,  20%©; 
smng  check  valves,  '  10%r  ;  compodisk 
valves,  20%. 

Valves,  Foot — 1%  in.,  blk.  70c,  galv. 
$1;  IV2  in.,  blk.  85c,  galv.  $1.30;  2  in., 
,  blk.  $1.20,  galv.  $2.10. 

Washers,  Wrought  —  Round,  plain. 
Sizes  given  arc  size  of  hole.  In  boxes 
of  50  lbs.  list  prices  per  100  lbs. — in., 
$28;  5/16  in.,  ,$34.40;  %  in.,  $22.80; 
7/10  in.,  $21;  %  in.,  $19.60;  9/16  in., 
$18.80;  •%  in.,  $18.00;  11/14  in.,  $18.40; 
%  in.,  $18.20;  13/16  in.,  $18;  1  1/16  in., 
1%  in.,  1%  in.,  1  5/16  in.,  $18.90;  1% 
in.,  1%  in.,  1%  in.,  $18.40;  1%  in.,  1% 
in.,  2  in.,  2%  in.,  $19.  Discount,  60%p 
f.o.b.  Montreal,  Hamilton,  Toronto, 
London  and  Halifax. 

Car  lots  allowance  to  following 
points:  Windsor,  Walkerville,  St.  John, 
Moncton,     Amherst,     New  Glasgow, 


Freight  allowance:  Fort  William  and 
West,  10c  per  100  lbs. 

Net  extras,  26  to  40  lbs.  of  a  size, 
$1;  25  lbs.  of  a  size  or  less,  $2  per  100 
lbs.  Package  allowances — if  taken  in 
kegs  about  175  lbs.  each,  allowance  10c 
per  100  lbs.;  if  taken  in  bags  about  100 
lbs.,  allowance  15c  per  100  lbs. 


HARDWARE 


Ammunition  (American) — Winchester 
and  Savage  advance  22i/2%  on  Ameri- 
can list.  Remington  Union  Metallic 
list  plus  22y2%c. 

Ammunition    (Dominion)  —  Discount 

30  and  20%c. 

Shot,  standard,  100  lbs.,  Toronto, 
$15;  Montreal,  $13.50;  net  extras,  as 
follows,  subject  to  cash  discounts  onlv: 
Chilled,  $1.50;  buck  and  seal,  90c;  No. 
28  ball,  $1.20  per  100  lbs.;  bags  less 
than  25  lbs.,  Vie  per  lb.;  f.o.b.  Mont- 
real, Toronto,  Hamilton,  London,  St. 
John  and  Halifax  freight  equalized. 

Animal  Ties — Cow  ties,  list  plus  SlVj 
per  cent.;  trace  chains,  list  plus  25  per 
cent.;  dog  chains,  list  plus  20  per  cent.; 
halter  chains,  net;  tie-out  chains,  net; 
stall  fixtures.  Dominion,  $2.80  per  doz.; 
heavy,  $2. 

Axes — Boys',  doz.,  $15.50;  Hunters', 
doz.,  $14.50;  single  bits,  doz.,  $19.50; 
double  bits,  doz.,  $24.  Bench  axes, 
45%c  off  list. 

On  weights  heavier  than  base  add  to 
list  as  follows:  Group  2,  50c;  group  3, 
$1;  group  4,  $1.50;  group  5,  $2;  group 
6,  $2.50;  group  7,  $3.50. 

Baskets  (Willow) — Delivery  (handl- 
ed), per  doz.,  $7.50  to  $11;  splint, 
clothes  or  meat,  per  doz.,  $2  to  $2.85; 
oblong  clothes,  per  doz.,  $10.50  to 
$14.75. 

Baskets  (Wire)— Vegetable  —  Half 
bushel,  each,  90c;  1  bushel,  each,  $1.30; 
11/2  bushel,  each,  $1.80. 

Belting  (Leather) — Discounts  apply 
to  revised  list  of  Nov.  4th,  1920.  Extra 
qualit.y,  15/10  per  cent.  Standard  qual- 
ity, 15/10/10  per  cent.  Side  lace  leath- 
er, lb.,  $1.60;  cut  lace  leather,  lb.,  $1.85. 

Belting  (Canvas) — 60   per   cent,  off 

Bits,  Auger — (Standard  list  prices 
per  dozen):  3-16,  $6;  4-16,  $5;  5-16, 
$5;  6-16,  $5;  7-16,  $5;  8-16,  $5;  9-16,  $6; 
10-16,  $6;  11-16,  $7;  12-16,  $7;  13-16, 
$8.25;  14-16,  $8.25;  15-16,  $9.50;  16-16, 
$9.50;  17-16,  $12;  18-16,  $12;  19-16,  $14; 
20-16,  $14;  21-16,  $16;  22-16,  $16;  23-16, 
$18;  24-16,  $18;  25-16,  $21;  26-16,  $21; 
27-16,  $24;  28-16,  $24;  29-16,  $27;  30- 
16,  $27;  31-16,  $30:  32-16,  $30. 

Discounts  from  Standard  list  prices: 
Ford  auger  bits,  add  15%;  Ford  car 
bits,  add  7V2%  ;  Beaver,  35%r;  Gilmour 
auger  bits,  10% ;  Gilmour  eye  augers, 
add  5%;  Irwin  auger  bits,  add  5%; 
Irwin  car  bits,  less  7^^% 

Boards  (Bake) —  •%  Rim.  %  Rim 
No.  0-16  X  22,  doz.  ...$  8.90  $12.50 
No.  1—18  X  24,  doz.  .  .  .  10.78  12.80 


January,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


31 


No.  2—18  X  29,  doz.  ...  12.10  14.75 
No.  3—20  X  30,  doz.  .  . .  13.86  17.75 

Boards  (Ironing) — No.  1,  Daisy,  $38 
per  doz.;  No.  10,  Daisy,  $43  per  doz.; 
No.  33,  21  per  doz.;  No.  35,  $38  per 
doz.;  No.  36,  $43  per  doz.;  Perfection, 
$48  per  doz. 

Boards  (Wash)— Baby  Globe,  $2.45 
per  doz.;  Beaver  (brass),  $8  per  doz.; 
Competition  Globe  (metal),  $5.90  per 
doz.;  Diamond  King  (glass),  $8  per 
doz.;  Enamel  Queen,  $9  per  doz.;  Glass 
Globe,  $8  per  doz.;  Improved  Globe, 
$5.25  per  doz.;  Jubilee,  $5.80  per  doz.; 
Neptune,  $5.25  per  doz.;  Newmarket 
King,  $5.80  per  doz.;  Pony,  $2.45  per 
doz.;  Eoyal  Globe  (zinc),  $5.25  per 
doz.;  Original  Globe,  solid  back,  $5.95 
per  doz.;  Standard  Globe,  $5.25  per 
doz.;  Supreme  (zinc),  $6.50  per  doz.; 
Western  King"  (Enamel),  $9  per  doz. 

Bolts  and  Nuts — Discounts  herewith 
apply  to  standard  list.  Carriage  bolts 
($1  list),  %  in.  diameter  and  smaller, 
6  in.  and  shorter,  40%.  Carriage  bolts 
($1  list),  %  in.  and  longer  lengths, 
30%.  Carriage  bolts  ($1  list),  7/16  in. 
and  larger,  25%.  Machine  bolts,  %  in. 
and  smaller,  4  in.  and  shorter,  50%. 
Machine  bolts,  %  in.  and  smaller,  longer 
lengths,  40%.  Machine  bolts,  7/16  in. 
and  larger,  40%.  Sleigh  sho|  bolts,  all 
sizes,  25%.  Coach  and  lag  screws, 
50%.  Bolt  ends,  40%.  Square  head 
blank  bolts,  40%.  Plow  bolts,  1,  2,  3 
head,  35%.  Plow  bolts,  others  35%  dis- 
count plus  20%.  Elevator  bolts,  large 
head,  25%.  Elevator  bolts,  corrugated 
heads,  55%.  Fancy  head  bolts,  25%. 
Shaft  bolts  ($3  list),  25%.  Step  bolts, 
large  head  ($3  list),  25%.  Whiffletree 
bolts,  25%.  Tire  bolts,  50%.  Stove 
bolts,  67%%.  Nuts,  2  in.  and  smaller, 
square.  Blank,  off  net  list,  50c.  Nuts, 
2  in.,  and  smaller,  square,  Tapped,  net 
list.  Nuts,  2  in.  and  smaller,  hexagon. 
Blank,  net  list.  Tapped,  add  to  list, 
50c.    !Nuts,  2  in.  and  smaller,  hexagon. 

Terms — Cash  in  30  days  from  date  of 
shipment,  less  2  per  cent. 

Borax — Lump  crystal  borax,  lOe  lb. 

Brooms — No.  5,  4  strings,  $6.65  per 
doz.;  No.  5,  standard,  $7.50  per  doz.; 
Little  Beauty,  $9.40  per  doz.;  Eoyal 
Blue,  $13.90  per  doz. 

Butts  —  (Wrought  Steel)— No.  840, 
less  5%;  No.  800,  net;  No.  838,  less 
5%;  No.  808,  add  10%;  No.  804,  less 
5%;  No.  802,  plus  5%;  No.  810,  add 
25%;  No.  814,  add  20%. 

Cans  (Milk)— At  list  plus  15%. 

Cement  (Portland) — ^^In  carload  lots, 
per  bbl.,  $3,770.  Less  than  car  lots:  Per 
bbl.,  f.o.b.  yard,  $4.75;  per  bbl.,  deliv- 
ered, $5.00.  Single  bags,  $1.15  each,  4 
bags  to  barrel.  Extra  charge  of  $1.50 
per  load  on  less  than  24  bag  lots.  Re- 
bate, 20  cents  for  empty  sacks. 

Choppers  (Food) — Universal — No.  0, 
$30  a  doz.;  No.  1,  $36  a  doz.;  No.  2,  $42 
a  doz.;  No.  3,  $58  a  doz.  F.o.b.  Mont- 
real and  Toronto. 

Chums  (Barrel) — No.  0,  each,  hand, 
$10.30;  power,  $15.50.  No.  1,  hand, 
$10.30;  power,  $15.50.  No.  2,.  hand, 
$10.90;  power,  $16.20.  No.  3,  hand, 
$11.75;  power,  $17.10.  No.  4,  hand, 
$13.60;  power,  $18.45.  No.  5,  hand, 
$15.10;  power,  $19.80.  Net  list  f.o.b. 
Montreal,  Ottawa,  Kingston,  Toronto, 
Hamilton,  Fergus,  London,  St.  Mary's. 

Clippers  (Horse) — New  market,  $3.50 
per  pair.  No.  1  B.B.  Stewart  Horse  Clip- 
per, $14  list,  less  25  per  cent. 

Clocks  (Alarm) — Big  Ben,  each, 
$3.43;     Good     Morning,     each,  $1.90; 


Lookout,  $2.05;  Sleepmeter,  $2.25. 

Clothes  Bars — No.  2,  $19  per  doz.; 
No.  3,  $14.40  per  doz.;  No.  4,  $11  per 
doz.;  No.  5,  $16  per  doz.;  No.  6,  $13  per 
doz. 

Clothes  Horses  (folding)  6  feet,  per 
doz.,  $16;  5  feet,  $13;  4  feet,  $11. 

Extension— 6  feet,  $32;  5  feet,  $26; 

4  feet,  $22. 

Clothes  Lines  (Galvanized) — No.  18, 
100  ft.  lengths,  $6.50  per  1,000  feet; 
50  ft.  lengths,  $7.10;  No.  19,  100  ft. 
lengths,  $5.50;  50  ft.  lengths,  $6.75. 

Clothes  Line  Reels — No.  3,  $17.50  per 
dozen;  No.  31/2,  $19.75;  No.  4,  $32.50. 

Cobbler  Sets — Common,  per  set,  $1.14. 

Combs,  Curry — No.  101,  $1.40  per 
dozen;  No.  Ill,  $1.60;  No.  121,  $1.70; 
No.  127,  $2.30. 

Combs,  Cattle — No.  98,  $2  per  dozen; 
No.  100,  $2.85. 

Cord  (Sash) — No.  6,  59c  a  pound; 
No.  7,  58c;  Nos.  8,  9,  10,  12,  57c. 

Crowbars — $8.00  per  100  lbs. 

Dampers — Cast,  Champion,  5  in.,  $1.42 
a  dozen;  6  in.,  $1.57;  7  in.,  $2.10. 

Doors,  Screen — Kasement,  No.  2,  oak 
stain,  varnished,  including  hardware 
sets:  2  ft.  6  in.,  $45  per  dozen;  2  ft. 
8  in.,  $45.60;  2  ft.  10  in.,  $46.70;  2  ft. 
7  in.,  $46.80. 

Drills — Standard  lists.  Blacksmiths ', 
%  in  X  2%  in.  shank,  each,  %,  45c; 
5/32,  45c;  3/16,  50c;  7/32,  55c;  %,  60c; 
9/32,  65c;  5/16,  70c;  11/32,  75c;  %, 
80c;  13/32,  85c;  19/32,  $1.20;  %,  $1.30; 
21/32,  $1.40;  11/16,  $1.50;  23/32,  $1.60; 
%,  $1.70;  25/32,  $1.80;  13/16,  $1.90; 
27/32,  $2;  Vs,  $2-10. 

Drills— 7/16,  90c;  15/32,  95c;  1/0,  $1; 
17/32,  $1.05;  9/16,  $1.10;  29/32,  $2.20; 
15/16,  $2.30;  31/32,  $2.40;  1,  $2.50.  In- 
termediate sizes  take  list  of  next  larger. 

Bit  Stock — List  per  doz.,  less  45%: 
3/32,  $2.70;  Vs,  $3;  5/32,  $3.50;  3/16, 
$4;  7/32,  $4.50;  %,  $5;  9/32,  $6;  5/16, 
$7;  %,  $8.50;  7/16,  $10.50;  1/2,  $13; 
9/16,  $15.50;  %,  $18;  11/16,  $21;  %, 
$24;  %,  $30.  Blacksmiths',  %  in. 
shank,  straight  shank,  wire,  taper 
shank,  50%  off. 

Files  and  Rasps — These  discounts  ap- 
ply to  list  of  Nov.  1,  1899:  Great  West- 
ern, Amer.,  50% ;  Kerney  Foot  Arcade, 
60/5%;  J.  Barton  Smith,  Eagle,  55%; 
P.  H.  and  Imperial,  60/5%;  Globe, 
60/5%;  Nicholson,  40%;  Black  Dia- 
mond, 40%;  Delta  Files,  20%;  Firth 
Files,  50%. 

Grindstones — Under  40  lbs.  weight — 
Smaller  than  2  in.  face,  $5.25  per  hun- 
dred pounds;  two  in.  and  over,  $4.50. 

40  to  80  lbs.  weight— Under  2  in. 
face,  $4.75  per  hundred  pounds;  2  ins. 
and  over,  $4.25;  Bi-Treadle,  each,  $9.75; 
Cycle  BB,  $8.75. 

Grindstone  Fixtures— No.  22,  $8.67 
per  dozen;  No.' 23,  $9.37;  No.  2^/2,  $10; 
No.  3,  $11.50. 

Halters,  Rope — Sisal,  7-16  in.,  $21  per 
gross;  9-16,  $33.  Jute,  7-16  in.,  $19; 
9-16  in.,  $28.50. 

Hame  Fasteners — (Dodson),  $4.60  per 
dozen. 

Hammers,  Nail — No.  21,  $12  per 
dozen;  No.  1,  $15.-t0;  Nos.  IV2,  611/2, 
$15.20. 

Hammers,  Sledge — (Canadian),  2-2% 
lbs.,  $22.50  per  cwt.;  3-41/2  lbs.,  $20.70; 

5  lbs.  and  over,  $14.40. 

Masons— 2-3%  lbs.,  $28.35  per  cwt.; 
3-4%  lbs.,  $25.50;  5  lbs.  and  over, 
$20.70.  , 

Hammers,  Striking — No.  38,  No.  46,  5 
lbs.  and  over,  $14.40  per  dozen. 


Hammers,  Machinist — No.  30,  1  lb., 

$10.20  per  dozen;  No.  30,  1%  lb.,  $11. 

Handles  (Wood) — All  hickory  han- 
dles, list  plus  20%;  all  oak,  ash  and 
maple  handles,  list  plus  10%;  hay  fork, 
hoe  rake,  shovel  and  manure  fork,  net 
list;  Whiffletrees,  double-trees  and  n&ck- 
yokes,  list  plus  20%;  wood  rakes,  list 
plus  10% ;  horse  pokes,  list  plus  10%. 
Terms,  all  goods  f.o.b.  factories,  2%  10 
days,  net  30  days.  0-Cedar  Mop  Han- 
dles, less  30%. 

Hangers,  Bam  and  Parlor — ^Storm 
King  No.  42,  list  less  20-10%;  Safety 
No.  20,  list  less  20-10%;  Eeliable  No.  1, 
list  less  20-10%;  Eound  Trolley  No. 
1917,  list  less  33  1-3-5%.  Atlas  No.  0, 
$13.35;  No.  1,  $13.80;  No.  2,  $15.85; 
Stearns,  4  in.,  $12.80;  5  in.,  $16.00.  Per- 
fect, No.  1,  $10.50;  Canada,  $13.25; 
Hatch,  $13.25;  National,  $12;  America, 
$19;  Great  West,  $30. 

Hatchets,  Shingling — No.  1,  $10.25 
per  dozen;  No.  2,  $11.25. 

Hatchets,  Lath— No.  3,  $10.25  per 
dozen;  No.  4,  $11.25. 

Hatchets,  BarreUing — Nos.  50  and  60, 
$15.75  per  dozen. 

Hatchets,  Claw — No.  7,  $12.25  per 
dozen;  No.  8,  $13. 

Hinges  (Blind)— Clark's  No.  1,  $2.22 
per  dozen  sets. 

Hinge,  (Spring)— No.  200  and  No.  20, 
$25  per  gross;  Ajax  Floor  No.  3111, 
$1.85  per  set. 

Reliance  Door  No.  270 — Light,  per 
doz.,  $3.15;  medium,  per  doz.,  $4.20; 
heavy,  per  doz.,  $6.40. 

Hinges — Heavy,  in  bulk.    Doz.  pairs: 

4  in.,  strap,  $3;  tee,  $2.55.  5  in.,  strap, 
$370;  tee,  $3.20.  6  in.,  strap,  $4;  tee, 
$3.60.  8  in.,  strap,  $5.40;  tee,  $4.10. 
10  in.,  strap,  $9.60;  tee,  $7.30.  12  in., 
strap,  $11.90;  tee,  $11.60.  14  in.,  strap, 
$13.60;  tee,  $11.80.    Discount,  35%. 

Light — Net  prices — 3  in.,  strap,  90c; 
tee,  90c.    4  in.,  strap,  $1.08;  tee,  $1. 

5  in.,  strap,  $1.26;  tee,  $1.17.  6  in., 
strap,  $1.53;  tee,  $1.35. 

Screw  Hook  and  Strap  Hinges — List 
prices,  per  dozen  pairs — 6  in.,  $4.30;  8 
in.,  $4.80;  10  in.,  $6.40;  12  in.,  $7;  15 
in.,  $7.50;  18  in.,  $11;  21  in.,  $12.40; 
24  in.,  $16;  27  in.,  $17.20;  30  in.,  $18.50; 
33  in.,  $21.50;  36  in.,  $24.50.  Discount, 
25%. 

Heaters,  Electric  —  Glower  Heater, 
$10;  Heatray  Heater,  $12.  Discount, 
25%-33%,  according  to  quantity. 

Majestic,  1  burner,  $11;  2  burner, 
$16.    Discount,  27%%. 

Universal,  $13.80.  Discount,  20  and 
5%. 

Hoes — Grub,  $9.25  per  dozen. 

Hooks  (Grass) — Canadian,  No.  2, 
$3.90  per  dozen;  No.  3,  $4;  No.  4,  $4.10; 
No.  5,  $4.30;  Little  Giant,  $6.50;  Bar- 
den  Pat.,  $6.50. 

English  Fox — No.  2,  $7.50  a  dozen; 
No.  3,  $8;  No.  4,  $8.50. 

Horseshoes —  Price  per  keg 

No.  2  No.  1 
Sizes  and  and 
made  smaller  larger 

Light  iron    0-7    $7.75  $8.00 

Long  heel  light  iron    3-7  7.75 

Medium  iron    1-8      7.75  8.00 

Heavy  iron    6-8  7.75 

Snow    1-6     8.00  8.25 

New  light  XL  steel.  1-6  8.20  8.45 
Featherweight 

XL  steel    0-4     9.60  all  siz. 

Special  countersunk.  0-4  10.10  all  siz. 
Toe  weight  (front 

only)    1-4    10.60  all  siz. 

Packing — Up  to  3  sizes  in  one  keg, 


32 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


January,  1922 


lOe  per  100  lbs.  extra.  More  than  3 
sizes,  25c  per  100  lbs.  extra.  F.o.b. 
Moutreal. 

Terms — Cash  in  thirtj^  days,  less  2% 
discount. 

Hose,  Lawn — Corrugated,  %  in.,  per 
hundred  feet;  %  in.,  $15.50;  %  in., 
$18.    Less  5%  for  full  reell,  500  ft. 

Irons  (Sad) — Mrs.  Potts,  polished, 
$1.90  per  set;  nickel  plated,  $1.95. 

Handles  for  above  japanned,  $20.75 
per  gross. 

Common,  Xo.  1  ,4  and  5  lbs.,  $20.60 
per  cwt.;  fi  lbs.  and  up,  cwt.,  $15. 

Irons,  Electric — Model  B,  $6.50  list. 
Classic,  $8  list.  Discount,  25%  to  33%, 
according  to  quantity. 

Knives,  Hay — Spear  Point,  $15  per 
dozen;  Lightning,  $14;  Heath's,  $14. 

Ladders  —  Step  Ladders — Standard, 
46c  a  foot;  Household,  35c;  Shelf  Lock, 
4  to  8  ft.  only,  32c;  Faultless,  4  to  8  ft. 
only,  46e;  Faultless,  10,  12  and  14  ft., 
50c. 

Single  and  Fruit  Picking — 10  ft.  to 
16  ft.,  28c  per  foot;  18  ft.  to  20  ft.,  29c. 

Eoped  and  Straight  Extension  Lad- 
ders— 20  to  32  ft.,  32c  a  foot;  36  to  44 
ft.,  35c;  over  44  ft.,  43c;  special  qual- 
ity, 20  to  40  ft.,  45e;  three  section  ex- 
tension, 45e. 

Fire  ladders  up  to  32  feet  are  twice 
the  price  of  ordinary  extensions.  Over 
32  ft.  are  supplied  with  supporting  legs 
at  three  times  the  price. 

Lantems-r-Short  or  long  globe,  plain, 
$12;  japanned,  $12.75;  Dash,  plain, 
$18.75;  japanned,  $19.25;  search  (round 
reflection),  $15.75;  Little  Bobs,  2  10-4 
20. 

Lantern  Globes — Cold  blast,  short  or 
long,  1  doz.  eases,  $1.35  doz.;  3  doz. 
cases,  $1.20  doz.;  6  doz.  cases,  $1.15 
doz.;  Cold  Blast  genuine  ruby,  $5.40 
doz.    F.o.b.  factory. 

Latches — Steel  Thumb,  No.  2,  $2  per 
dozen;  No.  3,  $2.50;  No.  4,  $3.75;  Bam 
Door,  No.  5,  $3.30;  No.  9,  $6.15. 

Machines  (Washing)  —  Dowswell, 
$12.75  each;  Noiseless,  $17.50;  Hamil- 
ton, $14;  Peerless,  $14.50;  Snowball, 
$19.50;  New  Century,  style  A,  $19.75; 
style  B,  $21.75;  electric,  "$160.00;  Play- 
time, engine  drive,  $27 ;  Ideal  Power, 
$30;  Seafoam,  electric,  style  A,  $105; 
engine  drive,  $50;  Sunshine,  $10.25; 
Popular,  $14.50;  Economic,  $16;  Puri- 
tan, $19.50;  New  Champion,  $21.50; 
Home,  $21.50;  Vacuum,  $28;  Home  Wa- 
ter, motor,  $28;  Whirlpool,  water  power, 
$31;  Hydro,  1  Tub,  engine  drive,  $57; 
electric,  $116.50;  Rotary  water  motor 
washer,  $29;  Connor  ball-bearing,  with 
rack,  $22.75;  Perfection,  engine  drive, 
$65;  electric,  $132;  Beaver,  $26;  power, 
$27;  Connor,  vacuum,  .$27.50;  Patriot, 
$21.50;  Jubilee,  $12.50;  Canada  First, 
$21.50.  These  prices  are  less  30%. 
Freight  equalized  with  Montreal,  Ot- 
tawa, Toronto,  Hamilton,  Kingston, 
London  and  St.  Mary's,  or  shipments  of 
quarter  dozen  and  upwards. 

Stands,  Washtub — Dowswell,  $44.10 
per  dozen. 

Mattocks — Cutter,  $11.50  per  dozen; 
Pick,  $11.50. 

Mixed  Bread — Canuck— No.  4,  $36.24 
dozen;  No.  8,  .$40.92. 

Universal — No.  $40,00  a  dozen;  No. 
8,  $52. 

Mops — Liquid  Veneer,  $16  per  dozen; 
O  Cedar,  less  handle,  $14;  O 'Cedar,  with 
handle,  $16;  S.  W.  Mops,  complete, 
.$4.35;  Mop  Sticks,  No.  8,  $2;  Cast  Head 
Mop,  $2;  Crescent,  No.  10,  $2.60;  Crank 
wringing,  $7.35;  Smarts',  $4. 


Mop  Wringers — White,  No.  1,  $16.40 

per  dozen;  white.  No.  2,  $16.80;  white, 
No.  3,  $24. 

Mowers,  Lawn — (List  of  Sept.  12, 
1921) — ^Adanac,  Woodyatt,  Empress, 
Mayflower,  Ontario  Daisy,  Star,  all  at 
20%  oi¥  list;  Whippet,  Thousand  Island, 
Red  Wing,  Blue  Bird  are  all  net. 

Nails— List  adopted  Sept.  10,  1920. 
Advance  over  base  on  common  wire 
nails  in  kegs:  1  in.,  $1.50;  1%  in., 
$1.40;  1%  in.,  $1.15;  1%  in.,  80c;  1% 
in.,  75c;  2  in.,  60c;  2%  in.,  55c;  2^4  in., 
30c;  2%  in.,  30c;  3  in.,  20c;  3%  in., 
15c;  3%  in.,  10c;  4  in.,  5e;  4^/^  in.,  5c; 
5  in.,  base;  5%  in.,  base;  6  in.,  base. 
6%  to  12  in.  2  ga.  and  heavier,  25e 
over  base. 

Standard  steel  wire  nails,  f.o.b.  Lon- 
don, Hamilton,  Mdlton,  Toronto,  Owen 
Sound,  Collingwood,  Montreal,  $4.25 
base.  Freight  equalized  on  above 
points.  7 

Windsor,  Walkerville,  Sandwich, 
f.o.b.  factory  prices,  carload  freight  al- 
lowed, $4.35. 

Sault  Ste.  Marie,  Port  Arthur,  Fort 
William,  $4.75  base,  f.o.b.  factory;  no 
freight  allowance. 

Moulding,  Flooring,  Slating,  Box, 
Fence,  Barrel  Nails,  25c  per  100  lbs. 
over  common  nail  prices.  Finishing 
nails,  50c  per  100  lbs.  advance  over  com- 
mon nail  price. 

Miscellaneous  wire  nails,  70%  off 
miscellaneous  list,  f.o.b.  Toronto,  Mont- 
real, Hamilton  and  London. 

Nails,  cut — $4.85.' 

Roofing  Nails — American,  large  head, 
keg,  $10.50.    Less  quantities,  $12.50. 

Nails  (Horse) — Cape  well  C  Brand — 
No.  5,  $6.75  per  25  lb.  box;  No.  6,  $6.50; 
No.  7,  $6.25;  No.  8,  $6;  No.  9,  $5.75. 
Discount,  10%. 

"M.R.M."  Brand— Net  price  list. 
No.  3,  5%  in.  long,  $20.25  per  25  lb. 
box;  No.  4,  1%  in.  long,  $10.25;  No.  5, 
1  15/16  in.  long,  $5.25;  No.  6,  21/8  in. 
long,  $5;  No.  7,  2  16/16  in.  long,  $4.75; 
No.  8,  2%  in.  long,  $4.75;  No.  9,  2  11/16 
in.  long,  $4.50;  No.  10,  2%  in.  long, 
$4.50;  No.  11,  3  1/16  in.  long,  $4.50;  No. 
12,  3%  in.  long,  $4.50. 

Setting,  Poultry — 2  in.  mesh  and  19 
gauge  wire — 12  in.,  $1.80  per  50-yard 
roll;  18  in.,  $2.65;  24  in.,  $3.40;  30  in., 
$4;  36  in.,  $4.75;  42  in.,  $5.50;  48  in., 
$6.20;  60  in.,  $7.70;  72  in.,  $9.20;  84  in., 
$10.50;  96  in.,  $12. 

1%  in.  mesh  and  19  gauge  wire — 12 
in.,  $3.50  per  50-vard  roll;  18  in.,  $5; 
24  in.,  $6.30;  30  iii.,  $7.75;  36  in.,  $9.90; 
42  in.,  $10.50;  48  in.,  $12;  60  in.,  $15; 
72  in.,  $18. 

1  in.  mesh  and  20  gauge  wire — 12  in., 
$4;  18  in.,  .$5.50;  24  in.,  $7;  30  in., 
$8.50;  42  in.,  $12;  48  in.,  $14;  60  in., 
$17;  72  in.,  $20 

%  in.  mesh  and  20  gauge  wire — -24 
in.,  $10.50;  30  in.,  $12.75;  36  in.,  $15. 

y>  in.  mesh  and  22  gauge  wire — 24 
in.,  $16.50;  30  in.,  $20;  36  in.,  $24. 

Discounts  at  present  quoted  apply 
only  to  land  2  in.  mesh  setting.  Other 
prices  have  been  withdrawn  and  are 
quoted  only  on  application. 

Toronto,  London,  Montreal,  Canadian 
netting,  2  in.  mesh,  12%%  off;  1  in. 
mesh,  12%%  off.  American  netting,  1 
in.  mesh,  12%%  off. 

Invincible— No.  1848,  80c  a  rod;  2060, 
88c.  Put  up  in  10,  20  and  30  rod  rolls. 
F.o.b.  Montreal. 

Blue  Ribbon— 24  in.,  $5.50  per  roll; 
36  in.,  $7.15;  48  in.,  $8.35;  60  in.,  $9.85; 
72  in.,  $11.25.    Put  up  in  10  rod  rolls. 


Paper  (Building) — Dry  fibre,  No.  1, 
Anchor,  $1.25  per  400  ft.  roll;  No.  2, 
Anchor,  60c;  No.  2,  Elephant,  70c. 

Tarred  Fibre,  No.  1 — Anchor,  $1.35; 
No.  2,  85c. 

Elephant  Brand,  tarred,  Nq.  2,  85e; 
Surprise  fibre,  80c;  Empress  Dry 
Sheathing,  $1.45;  Stag  Sheathing,  80c; 
Cyclone,  dry,  $1.25;  tarred,  $1.35.  Joli- 
ette  Sheathing,  70c;  tarred,  85c. 

Monarch  Sheathing,  white,  $5.75  per 
100  pounds;  grey,  $4.75;  Straw  Sheath- 
ing, heavy  dry,  .$3.15;  Red  Star  heavy 
tarred  straw,  $3.40;  Imp.  White  Sheath- 
ing, $0.75;  Imp.  Grey  Sheathing,  $4.75; 
Scythe  and  dry  straw,  $3.15;  Spruce 
Sheathing,  36  in.  and  72  in.  wide,  $7.25; 
Asbestos  Sheathing,  $10;  carpet  felt, 
$3.90;  tarred  felt,  7,  10  and  16  oz., 
$3.45. 

Paste  (Stick-Fast) — In  barrels,  250 
lbs.,  14c  a  pound.  Barrels  of  5  lbs., 
cotton  bags,  15c.  In  kegs,  125  lbs.,  16c ; 
in  50-lb.  boxes,  18c;  in  25-lb.  boxes, 
19c. 

Solpar,  barrels  (200  lbs.),  14c  a 
pound;  2  lb.  pkgs.,  case  lots,  lb.,  16c; 
1  lb.  pkgs.,  case  lots,  lb.,  17c. 

Picks — Clav,  5  to  6  lbs.,  $9  a  dozen; 
6  to  7  lbs.,  $10.25. 
Rock— 7  to  8  lbs.,  $11.25  dozen. 

Pins,  Clothes — 5  gross,  4  in.  (loose), 
$2.25  a  case;  4  gross  (cartons),  4  in., 
$2.25;  Spring,  2  gross  to  box,  $1.90. 

Pitch— Pine,  black,  per  bbl.,  $13.25; 
Navy  pitch,  per  bbl.,  $6.50;  Coal  tar 
pitch,  per  cwt.,  $1.55. 

Planters,  Corn— King  of  Field,  $13.20 
a  dozen;  Triumph,  $11. 

Polish  (0-Cedar) — 4  oz.  bottles,  per 
dozen,  net,  $2.40;  12-oz.  bottles,  $4.80; 

1  qt.  can,  $12;  %  gal.  cans,  $20;  1  gal. 
cans,  $28. 

Liquid  Veneer — 4  oz.  bottle,  per  doz., 
net,  $2.40;  12  oz.,  $4.80;  32  oz.,  $10;  64 
oz.,  each,  $1.34;  128  oz.,  each,  $2.34. 

PuUeys— Axle,  No.  1,  1%  in.,  80c  a 
dozen;  2  in.,  90c ;  2^/4  in.,  95c;  Palmer's, 
90c. 

Pulleys,  Clothes  Line — No.  58,  japan- 
ned, $4.35  per  dozen;  No.  158,  galvan- 
ized, $4.45;  No.  59,  japanned,  $4.45; 
No.  159,  galvanized,  $4.55. 

Pumps —  Pitcher  Closed 

Spout  Spout 

No,  2,  each    2.85  3.10 

No.  3,  each    3.15  3.40 

No.  4,  each    3.75  4.10 

No.  70,  each   6.00 

No.  80,  each   8.00 

Pumps,  Redwing — No.  0,  $6.85;  No.  1, 
$7.50;  No.  2,  $8.75;  No.  3,  $10.75;  No. 
4,  $12.75;  No.  5,  $15.25;  No.  6,  $18. 

Rivets  and  Burrs — Iron  rivets,  7-16 
inch  and  smaller,  blacked  and  tinned, 
50  per  cent.;  Iron  burrs,  50%  off  list 
on  200-lb.  kegs.  Extras,  add  Ic  to  list 
on  100-lb.  kegs;  3c  on  50-lb.  boxes;  4c 
on  25  lb.  boxes,  8c  on  1  lb.  pkgs. 

Copper  rivets,  usual  proportion  of 
burrs,  32%%-  off;  burrs,  add  10%.  Ex- 
tras on  copper  rivets,  %  lb.  pkgs.,  le 
per  lb.;  %  lb.  pkgs.,  2c  lb.  Coppered 
rivets,  net  extras,  3c  per  lb. 

Roofing — Samson,  1  ply,  $2.65  roll; 

2  ply,  roll,  $3.10;  3  ply,  roll,  $3.80. 
Red  Star,  2  ply,  $1.93  roll;  Red  Star, 

3  ply,  $2.30. 

Everlastic,  1  ply,  $2;  Everlastie,  2 
ply,  $2.40;  Everlastic,  3  ply,  $2.80. 

Panamoid,  1  ply,  $1.80;  Panamoid,  2 
ply,  $2.20;  Panamoid,  3  ply,  $2.60. 

Everlastic  Multi-Shingles  (4  shingles 
in  one),  per  square,  $6.25;  Everlastic 


January,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


Slate  Surface  Single  Shingle,  Tylike 
(red  or  green),  sq.,  $7.40. 

Everlastic  Liquid  Eoofing  cement — • 
Per  gal.,  in  bbls.,  70c;  5  and  10  gal. 
lots,  gal.,  80c;  1  gal.  cans,  gal.,  doz., 
$10.50. 

Coal  Tar  (refined),  per  barrel,  $10.50; 
coal  tar  (crude),  $9.25. 

Eoofix  Eoofing  Cement — In  bbla.,  per 
gallon,  60c;  in  %  bbls.,  per  gal.,  65c; 
in  5s  and  10c,  70c;  1  gal.  cans,  per  doz., 
$2. 

Rope — Pure  Manila  basis,  23c  a 
pound;  Beaver  Manila  basis,  19c;  New 
Zealand  hemp  basis,  19c;  Sisal  basis, 
17c.  These  quotations  are  basis  prices, 
%  in.  and  larger  diameter.  The  follow- 
ing advances  over  basis  are  made  for 
smaller  sizes:  %  in.,  %e;  9-16  to  7-16 
in.,  inclusive,  Ic;  %  in.,  l%c;  %  and 
5-16  in.,  2c;  3-16  in.,  2y2C  extra. 

Single  lathe  yam  basis,  17c;  double 
lathe  yarn,  17%e;  halyards,  50e;  Bea- 
ver Halyards,  white,  %  in.  basis,  35e. 

Hemp,  deep  sea  line  basis,  50c;  hemip, 
tarred  ratline  basis,  45c;  hemp,  tarred 
bolt  rope  basis,  45c;  marline  and  house- 
line,  45c.  Extra  charge  for  shorter 
lengths  than  half  coils,  2c  per  pound 
additional. 

Cotton,  %in.,  51c  a  pound;  5.32  in., 
50c;  3-16  in.,  47c;  %  in.  and  up,  45c. 

Sandpaper — ^B.  &  A.  sandpaper,  less 
5%;  Star  sandpaper,  less  5%;  B.  &  A. 
emery  cloth,  plus  25%  on  list. 

Scales — Champion,  including  stamp- 
ing, list  net:  4  lb.,  $6.60;  10  lb.,  $8.65; 
240  lb.,  $12.65;  600  lb.,  $35.80;  1,200 
lb.,  $43;  2,000  lb.,  $57.10;  2,000  lb.  drop 
lever,  $64.75. 

Scythes — ^Cast  steel,  $15  a  dozen; 
Golden  Clipper,  $16;  Little  Giant,  $17; 
Bush,  $16. 

Snaths — 1  loop,  $16.80  a  dozen;  2 
loops,  $15.80;  3  loops,  $14.70;  Bush, 
$18.20. 

Screws — Discounts  off  Standard  List 
—Wood,  F.H.,  bright.  82^/2%;  Wood, 
E.H.,  bright,  80%;  Wood,  O.H.,  bright, 
80%;  Wood,  F.H.,  brass,  771/2%;  Wood, 
E.H.,  brass,  75%);  Wood,  O.H.,  brass, 
75%,;  Wood,  E.E.,  bronze,  721/2%; 
Wood,  O.H.,  bronze,  70% ;  Squai-e  cap, 
40% ;  Hexagon  cap,  40% ;  Set  Screws, 
70%. 

Screws,  Iron  Bench,  No.  14 — 1  in., 
$11.25;  iVs  in.,  $13.50;  1%  in.,  $15.65. 

Spiders — Cast,  No.  7,  $1;  No.  8,  $1.05; 
No.  9,  $1.15. 

Cast— Nickel  Plated— No.  7,  $1.26; 
No.  8,  $1.35;  No.  9,  $1.50;  No.  10,  $1.75. 

Spades,-  Shovels  and  Scoops — Plain 
back  shovels  and  spades,  draining  tools, 
hollow  back  scoops,  sand  shovels,  hol- 
low back  shovels,  hollow  back  coal 
shovels,  riveted  back  scoops,  miners' 
spring  point  shovels.  1st.  2nd  and  4th 
grades,  all  55%.  These  discoimts  apply 
whether  goods  are  sold  in  carload  or 
less  than  carloads,  and  apply  only  to 
Black  List,  Black  List  prices  being  as 
follows: 

Plain  back  shovels  and  spades,  No.  2 
black- 1st,  $29;  2nd,  $28;  3rd,  $25. 

Draining  tools,  No.  2  black — 1st,  29; 
2nd,  $27.50. 

Hollow  back  scoops.  No.  2,  black — 
1st,  $34.50;  3rd,  $32. 

Coal    shovels,    hollow    back.  No.  2, 
black— 1st,  $32;  3rd,  $30. 
Sand  shovels.  No.  2,  black — lat,  $27.50; 
3rd,  $24. 

Hollow  back  shovels,  No.  2,  black — 
1st,  $27.50;  3rd,  $24. 

Eiveted  back  scoops.  No.  2,  black — 
1st,  $37.50;  2nd,  $35.50;  3rd,  $34. 


Miners '  spring  point  shovels.  No.  2 — 
1st,  $36.50. 

Net  Extras — For  each  size  larger  than 
No.  2,  add  35c  dozen  net.  Full  polished, 
add  $1  per  -dozen  net.  Half  polished, 
add  50c  per  dozen  net.  F.o.b.  London, 
Hamilton,  Toronto,  Gananoque,  Ottawa, 
Collingwood,  Sherbrooke,  Montreal, 
Quebec,  Halifax,  St.  John,  Moncton  and 
freight  may  be  equalized  thereon.  On 
shipments  less  than  5  dozen  f.o.b.  fac- 
tory only. 

Spikes,  Ship — Base,  %  in.  and  larger, 
$5  per  100  lbs.  M  and  5/16  in.,  $5.50 
per  cwt.  F.o.b.  Montreal,  Belleville, 
Toronto  and  Hamilton,  with  freight 
equalized  on  these  points. 

Spouts,  Sap — Eureka,  $15  per  thous. 

Staples  (Fence) — Bright,  $4.85  per 
100  lb.  keg;  galvanized,  $5.85. 

Stoves  (Oil  Burning  Cooking) — Per 
fection  No.  32,  2  burner,  $21.50  each; 
Perfection  No.  33,  3  burner,  $26;  Per- 
fection No.  34,  4  burner,  $34;  No.  22G 
oven  for  above  stoves,  $8.  Discount, 
30%  off  list. 

McClary  Glass  Front  Oven,  No.  170, 
each,  net,  $4.75.  Detroit  Glass  Front 
Oven,  No.  85,  each,  net;  Hot  Blast, 
plus  %. 

Oil  Burning  Heaters — No.  525,  $8.75 
each;  No.  530,  $9.75;  No.  630,  $12.50. 
Discount  30%  off  list  on  these  three 
numbers.  Hot  Blast,  plus  10%. 

Stretchers,  Wire  —  Hercules,  $3.60 
doz.  Stretchers,  curtain — Star,  No.  1, 
$27.60  doz.;  Star,  No.  2,  $30  doz.;  Sun, 
No.  1,  $20;  Sun,  No.  2,  $22. 

Swings — Ontario,  4-passenger,  $8.75. 

Tacks — Wire  tacks,  70/15%  from  re- 
vised hardware  tack  list  adopted  June, 
1921:  Double-pointed  tacks,  70/15%. 

Shoe  Findings — List  adopted  Novem- 
ber 21,  1921. 

Tapes,  Measuring  (Lufkin) — 263,  50 
ft..  Challenge,  steel,  $4.95  each;  103,  50 
ft.  Eeliable  Jr.,  steel,  $5.25  each;  243, 
50  ft.  Eival,  steel,  $4.40  each;  553,  50 
ft.  Steel,  $3.95  each;  1243,  50  ft.  Eival 
Jr.,  steel,  $4.06  ea-.;  603,  50  ft.  Metallic, 
$3.17  each;  604,  66  ft..  Metallic,  $3.54 
each;  403,  50  ft.  Linen,  $2.39  each; 
713,  50  ft.  Ass  Skin,  $6.15  doz.;  714,  66 
ft.  Ass  Skin,  $7.37  doz.;  143,  3  ft.  Steel 
Pocket,  $7.27  doz.;  145,  5  ft.  Steel 
Pocket,  $9.20  doz.;  175,  5  ft.  Linen 
Pocket,  $6.35  doz.;  165,  5  ft.  Cotton 
Pocket,  $1.55  doz. 

Toasters,  Electric — Universal,  $7.80; 
C.  G.,  $5.  Discount,  20  and  10%.  Can- 
adian Beauty,  $5.43;  Upright,  with 
rack,  $6.40. 

Tools,  Harvest — Waverley,  Welland- 
vale,  Bixford,  Maple  Leaf,  Bedford, 
60%  off  new  list. 

Track,  Bam  Door — Hatch  Trolley, 
l>er  ft.,  22%c;  brackets  for  this,  per 
doz.,  $2.20. 

National  Flat  Track,  1%  in.  per  100 
ft.,  $10.85.  Storm  King  Flat,  No.  60, 
list  less  20-10%.  Safety  Flat,  No.  60, 
list  less  20-10%.  Eeliable  No.  1  and  2, 
20e  per  ft.,  less  20-10%.  Bound  Trolley 
No.  1918,  20e  per  ft.,  less  20-107c. 

Traps  (Game) — Victor,  No.  1  Giant, 
$3.35  per  dozen;  Jump,  No.  1,  $3.50; 
Hawley  &  Norton,  No.  1,  $5;  Newhouse, 
No.  1,  $7.50.    All  these  include  chains. 

Tubs,  Wood — No.  0,  $26  per  dozen; 
No.  1,  $23.10;  No.  2,  $20.90;  No.  3, 
$17.60.    F.o.b.  Newmarket. 

Twine,  Binder— 500  ft.,  1714c  a  foot; 
550  ft.,  18%c;  600  ft.,  20i/4e;  650  ft., 
21 1/4 c.  Freight  prepaid  to  nearest  sta- 
tion in  lots  of  300  lbs.  and  over.  (This 
applies  to  Eastern  Canada  only.)  Ee- 
bate  of  i/s  cent  lb.  on  10,000  lbs.  and 
cent  lb.  on  20,000  lbs. 


Twine  (Cotton)— 5-lb.  sack,  3-ply,  lb., 
47 1/2 c;  4  ply,  lb.,  50c. 

Cones,  3  ply,  lb.,  44c ;  4  ply,  lb.,  47c. 
Tin  and  Enamelwares — 

Britannic,  list  plus  157^,. 
Scotch  Grev  Ware,  50  and  107o. 
Colonial,  40%. 
Imperial  ware,  40%.. 
Pearl,  40%,. 
Premier,  209^. 
Canada  ware,  20%. 
Crescent,  50  and  107o. 
White  ware,  50  and  10%. 
Japanned  ware,  net  list. 
Japanned  ware,  white,  list,  plus  10%. 
Plain  and  japanned  sprinklers,  list, 
10%. 

Stamped  ware,  plain,  50  and  10%. 

Stamped  ware,  retinned,  50%. 

Copper  bottoms,  plus  40%. 

Tinners'  trimmings,  plain  50/107c. 

Tinners'  trimmings,  retinned,  50%. 

Tinners'  trimmings,  general,  write 
for  prices. 

Factory  milk  cans,  list,  plus  15%. 

Milk  can  trimmings,  list,  plus  33i/^%. 

Cream  cans,  write  for  prices. 

Railroad  cans,  write  for  prices. 

Sheet  iron  ware,  list,  plus  10%,. 

Pieced  ware,  ordinary,  list,  plus  20%. 

Pieced  tinware,  C.  B.,  list,  plus  30%. 

Fry  pans,  Acme,  33i^%. 

Fry  pans.  Quick  Meal,  net  list. 

Spiders,  steel,  net  list. 

Fire  shovels,  japanned,  list,  plus, 10%. 

Fij-e  shovels,  japanned,  list,  plus  10%. 

Steel  sinks,  galvanized,  net  list. 

Steel  sinks,  painted,  net  list. 

Light  galv.  pails  and  tubs,  net  list. 

Heavy  galv.  pails  and  tubs,  net  list. 

Hollow  ware,  add  40  per  cent. 

Garbage  pails,  net  list. 

Jap.  coal  hods,  list  plus,  33 14%. 

Galv.  coal  hods,  list,  plus  331/3%. 

Paper'  lined  boards,  4:0%. 

Wood  lined  boards,  259c- 

Copper  boilers,  109^.  * 

Copper' tea  kettles,  10%. 

Copper  tea  and  coffee  pots,  lO^c 

Stove  and  other  pipe,  net  list. 

Stove  pipe  elbows,  black  and  galv., 
net  list. 

Stove  pipe  thimbles,  60%. 

Weights,  Sash — Sectional,  1  lb.  per 
100  lbs.,  $2.75;  sectional,  1/3  lb.,  per  100 
lbs.,  $2.85;  solid,  3  to  30  lbs.,  per  100 
lbs.,  $2.50. 

Wire  Products — Annealed  or  Bright — 
Advances  over  base  price  on  sizes  light- 
er than  No.  9.  No.  9  and  heavier,  60; 
No.  11,  12e;  No.  12,  20e;  No.  13,  30e; 
No.  14,  40c;  No.  15,  55c;  No.  16,  70c. 

Annealing,  no  extra.  Oiled  and  an- 
nealed extra,  15c.  Cappering  and  liquor 
finish  extra,  $1  to  $1.50.  Tinning  ex- 
tra, $2  to  $3. 

Bright  base,  $4.30.  Annealed  base, 
$4.30.    Galvanized  base,  $4.60. 

Barbed  wire,  $5.50.  Coiled  spring 
wire,  9  gauge,  $4.65. 

Extra  net,  per  100  lbs. — Oiled  wire, 
ISc;  bright,  soft  drawn,  25c-70c. 

Stovepipe  Wire— No.  18,  $8.75;  No. 
19,  $9.25. 

Wringers,  Clothes  —  Domestic,  No. 
531E,  $115;  Dom.  Bench,  No.  541EB, 
$174;  Favorite,  No.  511E,  $105;  Favor- 
ite, No.  512,  $112;  Eoyal  Canadian,  $94; 
Favorite,  No.  514,  $133;  Ottawa,  No. 
331E,  $105;  Ottawa  Bench,  No.  341EB, 
$162;  Challenge,  No.  311E,  $95;  War- 
ranty, $115;  Bicycle,  11  in.,  $105;  Eze, 
$102";  Rapid,  $92;  Eureka,  $64;  Blue 
Belle,  $115;  Blue  Belle,  Folding  B, 
164;  Eival,  $105;  Model,  $97;  Imperial, 
$102.    Discounts  fi'om  above  list  30%. 


34 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


January,  1922 


PAINTS  AND  OILS 


Alabastiiie — Colors  and  white  —  2^4  lb. 
packages.  $10.10  for  100  lbs.;  5  ib.  packages, 
$9.60  for  100  lbs.  F.o.b.  Paris  or  nearest 
jobbing  house. 

Beeswax — Small  quantities.  45c  per  pound; 
larger  quantiites,  40c. 

Blue  Stone — Per  lb.,  bbls.,  7c;  less  quan- 
tities, 10c. 

Bora.\ — Lump  crystal  or  powdered  borax. 
13c  pound. 

Bronzinir  Liquid — Bronzing  liquid.  No.  1, 
$2.25  a  gallon.     Banana  oil,  $4.25.  a  gallon. 

Bruslies — Floor  waxing — Acme,  15  pounds, 
$2.70  each;  20  pounds,  $3.25;  25  pounds, 
$3.80. 

Coating — Cement  coating,  P.  &  L.,  $5.40. 

Coal  Tar — In  quart  tins,  per  case  of  three 
dozen,  $3.75  per  dozen;  less  than  cases.  $3.95 
per  dozen. 

Colors   (Dry) — Per  pound — 

Raw  and  Burnt  Umber,  100  lb.  kegs.  No. 
1,   6-9%c;  less  quantities,  ll-15c. 

Raw  and  Burnt  Sieoina,  100  lb.  kegs, 
less   quantities,  12-15c. 

Imp.  green,  100  lb.  kegs,  15c. 

Chrome  green,  CP.,  40-45c. 

Chrome  yellow,  2o-35c. 

Brunswick  green.  100  lb.  keg,  ll-13c. 

Indian  red.  100  lb.  keg,  15-20c;  No.  1, 
100  lb.  keg.  Sc. 

Lamp  black,  in  bulk,  24c;  packages,  25- 
28c. 

Venetian  red,  best  bright,  6^4 -9c;  No.  1, 
3%i-5Hc. 

Drop  black,  pure  dry.  12-15c. 

Golden  Ochre.  100  lb.  kegs.  5c. 

White  ochre,  100  lb.  keg,  6c;  barrels,  5c. 

Yellow  ochre,  barrels,  3 -6c. 

French  ochre,  bbls.,  5-8c. 

Spruce  ochre,  100  lb.  keg,  5-8c. 

Can.  red  oxide,  bbls.,  3c. 

Super  magnetic  red,  5c. 

Vermillion,  Mexican,  75c. 

English  Vermillion,  $1.85. 

Colors  in  Oil — Pure,  in  1  lb.  tins: 

Venetian  red,  27c;  Indian  red.  — ;  Chrome 
yellow,  pure,  50c;  Golden  ochre,  pure,  34c; 
French  spruce  ochre,  pure,  29c;  Greens, 
pure.  35c;  Siennsis,  36c;  Umbers,  36c;  Ultra- 
marine blue,  70c;  Prussian  blue,  95c; 
Chinese  blue,  95c;  Drop  black,  42c;  Ivory 
black,  44c;  Signwriters'  black,  pure,  48c; 
Imperial   black,   25  lb.   irons,  39c. 

Colors — Mortar — Brown,  per  pound,  2^4c; 
red,  2>4c;  baack,  7c;  buff,  3c. 

Dryers — I.  V.  housepainters'  japan,  gal 
cans,  $3;  I.  V.  liquid  dryer,  $2  75.  Discount, 

50  per  cent,  on  both  these.  Housepainters', 
$1.15. 

Enamels  (White) — Per  gallon:  Dougall 
white  enamel,  $7.43;  Vitralite,  $7.77:  Dura- 
lite,  $6;  Old  Dutch,  $0.27;  B-H  "White" 
Enamel,  $6.50;  Martins,  white,  $7;  Satinette, 
$7.23;  C.  P.  Co.  Albagloss,  $6.30;  C.  D.  Mas- 
ter Painters.  $6.75;  Mooramel,  $7;  Lowe 
Bros..  Linduro,  $7;  Sunshine.  white,  $6; 
Kyanize,  $8;  Solpar,  $4.50;  Paripan,  $9; 
Jasperlac,  $4.25;  Invincible,  X6;  Hillcrest. 
$7;  Adelite,  A.  &  E..  $7.65;  Adeilite.  A.  & 
E..  $5.40;  Floglaze,  $4.50;  Ripolin,  $7.09. 

Glue — English,  sheet,  per  lb,  24  to  30c; 
White  pigsfoot,  50c;  Oake  bone,  112  lb.  (bags, 
24  to  30c;  Hides,  112  lb.  bags,  30  to  32c; 
Ground  glues.  112  lb.  bags — English,  per  lb., 
22  to  24c;  Canadian,  16  to  18c. 

Glass —  Star  or  Double 

Case  lots.  16  oz.  or  24-  oz. 

Up  to  25    $  5.50        $  9.05 

26  to  40    6.95  11.40 

41  to  50    7.65  12.55 

51  to  60    7.95  13.05 

61   to  70    8.35  13.65 

71  to  80    8.80  14.40 

81  to  84    10.30  17.70 

85   to  90    10.85  18.55 

91   to  95    20.80 

96  to  100    22.60 

Cut  size  sheet  glass,  75  per  cent,  off  No- 
vember. 1920,  list.   Montreal,  70  per  cent.  off. 

Glass  Plate — Montreal,  60  per  cent.  off. 

Glaziers'  Points — Zinc  coated,  8c  %  lb. 
package. 

Lead,  ^Vhite— (Ground  in  oil) — Prices  are 
per  100  lbs.  in  ton  lots.  Leiss  than  ton  lots 
are  35c  per  100  lbs.  higher  than  quoted  be- 
low. F.o.b.  Brantford,  50c;  London.  55c; 
Windsor,  60c  per  100  lbs.  F.o.b.  Toronto 
and  Hamilton,  45c  per  100  lbs.  F.o.b.  Fort 
William  and  Port  Arthur.  75c  per  100  lbs. 
Maritime  differential  50c  per  100  lbs.  over 
Montreal. 

Montreal.  Toronto 

Anchor,    pure    $12.75  $13.20 

Champion,  pure    12.75  13.20 

Crown  Diamond,  pure  ....     12.75  13.20 

Green  Seal  pure    12.75  13.20 

I.  V.  Perfection    12.75  13.20 

Ramsay's  pure    12.75  13.20 


Moore's  pure    12.75  13.20 

Tiger,    pure    12.75  13.20 

O.P.W..  Dec,  pure    12.75  13.20 

Elephant  Genuine    13.25  13.70 

BB  Genuine,  less  than  tons    14.10  14.55 

Lead  (Red  Dry) — Per  100  lbs. — Genuine, 
560  lb.  casks,  $10.25;  Genuine,  100  lb.  casks, 
$11.25;  less  quantity,  $12.75.  F.o.b.  Mont- 
real and  Toronto. 

Linseed  Oil — (Raw) — Per  gal.— 1  to  2 
bbls..  S4c.     Boiled — 1  to  2  bbls.,  87c. 

Litharge — Casks,  per  cwt.,  $9.25;  smaller 
quantities,  per  lb.,  10%c, 

Mnresco — Per  100   lbs.  White.  Tints. 

350   lb.   bbls   $7.15  $8.25 

200  lbs.,  half  bbls   8.00  9.10 

100  lbs.,  kegs    8.25  9.35 

Cases,  20  5-lb.  pkgs   8.80  9.90 

Paints,  Prepared — Price  per  gallon,  1  gal- 
lon can  basis — 

C.  P.  Co.  Elephant  white,  $3.85;  Sanitone, 
white,  $3.45:  Sanitone,  colors,  $3.35;  C.  P. 
Co.,  pure  white,  $3.95;  C.  P.  Co..  pure  colors, 
$3.60;  C.  P.  floor  paint,  $3.55;  Elephant  floor 
paint.  $3.30;  Victoria  floor  paint,  $2.90. 

B-H  English,  colors,  $3.60;  English,  white, 
$3.95;  Fresconette,  white,  $3.45;  Fresconette, 
colors,  $3.35;  floor.  $3.55;  porch  floor,  $3.60. 

Crown  Diamond,  white,  $3.70;  colors, 
$3.35;  floor,  $3.30;  porch,  $3.30;  flat  waJl 
tone,  white,  $3.45;  colors,  $3.35. 

Moore's  House  Colors,  white,  $4.35;  House 
Colors,  colors,  $4.10;  Preesrvo  Paint,  white, 
$2.95;  colors,  $2.85;  floor  paint,  $3.80;  Sani- 
Flat.  $3.80;  Porch  and  Deck  Paint,  $4.10. 

I.  V.  Blastica,  white,  $3.95;  Elastica,  col- 
ors. $3.70;  Flatine,  int.  wall,  white,  $3.85; 
Flatine,   int.   wall,   colors.  $3.75. 

Lowe  Bros.,  H.  S.  White,  No.  328,  $3.95; 
H.  S..  color,  $3.60;  H.  S.  floor,  hard  drying, 
$3.55;  H.  S.  Porch.  $3.60;  Mellotone,  flat 
wall,  white,  3.50;  color,  $3.35. 

Jamieson's  Crown  Anchor,  $3.45. 

O.P.W.  Canada  Brand,  white,  $3.95;  col- 
ors, $3.60;  floor,  $3.55;  Flat  WaJl,  white, 
$3.45;  color,  $3.35. 

Ramsay's  Pure,  white,  $3.80;  colors,  $3.45; 
floor,  $3.40;  porch,  $3.45. 

Glidden's  white.  $3.95;  colors,  $3.60. 

Martin-Senour.  100<%,  white.  $3.95;  col- 
ors, $3.60;  porch,  $3.60;  Neutone,  white, 
$3.45;  Neutone,  colors,  $3.35;  floor  paint, 
$3.35. 

Sherwin-Williams.  white,  $3.95;  colors, 
$3.60;  floor,  $3.60;  porch,  $3.60;  Flat  Tone, 
wihite,  $3.45;  colors,  $3.35. 

Maple  Leaf,  white,  $3.95;  colors,  $3.60; 
floor,  $3.55. 

Pearcy's  Prepared,  colors,  $3.05;  white, 
$3.40;  floor,  $3. 

Adelite,  white,  $3.95;  colors,  $3.60;  IndUiS- 
trial  white,  $3.50. 

Barrett's  Everjet  Elastic  Carbon  Faint — 
Barrels,  per  gal.,  80c;  haJf  barrels,  85c;  5s 
and  10s,  95c;  Is.  per  case,  doz.,  Montreal, 
$12;  Toronto.  $10.50. 

Everjet  Black  Enamel — Crates,  2  doz.,  8 
oz.,  $1.45;  crates  12  doz.,  8  oz.,  $1.40;  1  gal. 
cans,  g-al.,  $1.50;  5-10  gal.  cans,  gal.,  $1.35; 
barrels-half  bWs.,  gal.,  $1.25. 

Carbosota  Liquid  Creosote  Oil — Barrels, 
60c;  half  barrels.  65c;  5s  and  10s,  gal.,  95c; 
Is  (case  12  gals.),  Montretal,  $8.50;  Torom- 
to.  $9.50. 

H„  T.  &  A.  Co.'s  Creosote  Oil — Barrels, 
45c;  half -barrels,  50c;  5s  and  10s,  60c.  F.o.b. 
Montreal  and  Toronto. 

Paris  Green — 100  lb.  lots — %  lb.  paper 
cartons,  per  lb.,  52c;  1  lb.  paper  cartons, 
50c;  V2  Ih.  tins.  54c:  1  lb.  tins,  52c;  25  lb. 
tins,  48c;  50  and  100  lb.  drums,  46c;  250  lb. 
kegs.  44  %c;  100  lb.  barrels,  44c.  Terms: 
1  per  cent.  15.  or  30  days  net.  F.o.b.  Mont- 
real. Toronto,  Hamilton,  London,  Ottawa, 
Quebec,  Moncton,  St.  John's  and  Halifax. 
Yarmouth  and  P.  E.  I.  points  V4C  per  lb. 
extra. 

Polish  (O-Cedar) — 4  oz.  bottles,  doz., 
$2.10:  12  oz.  bottles.  $4.20;  1  qt.  can.  $10.50; 
%  gal.  cans,  $16.80;  1  gal.  cans.  $25.20. 

Putty  (Standard) — Less  than  tons — Bulk, 
bbls.  (800  lbs),  pier  cwt..  $5.90:  100  lb. 
drums,  $6.75;  25  lb.  drums,  $7;  12%  lb. 
irons.  $7.25;  Bladders  in  bbls.  (400  lbs.), 
$7.65:  in  cases  (100  lbs.),  $7.75.  Tons  35c 
lower.  Pure  linseed  putty.  $2  cwt.  advance 
on  above  prices.  Hamilton  prices  same  as 
Toronto:  Windsor  and  London  5c  advance 
on  above. 

Plaster  Paris — Single  barrels,  $4.  , 

Rosin — Barrel  lots,  per  100  lbs. — G.,  med- 
ium grade,  $5  to  $7.50:  water  white,  $7  to 
$9.50. 

Remover  (Paint  and  Varnish) — High  Stan- 
dard. $3:  Taxitf.  1  gal.  cans,  $3:  B-H  Van- 
isher.  S3;  Chalco,  $3;  Klensa,  $3.60:  Cumoff, 
$3:  Dougall  Lingerwett,  $3.25;  Takeoff,  $3: 
O.P.W.  Presto,  $2.60;  Solvo,  $3.60;  Varn-oft, 
$3:  Adelite.  $3. 

Shellac — Per  ,gal.  in  bbls— White,  $4.65: 
orange,  $4.15.  Gal.  jugs,  white,  $5:  orange, 
$4.50,     F.o.b.  Toronto,  London,  Montreal. 

Sulphur — In  lOO  lb.  bags,  per  T>ound.  4%c. 


Shingrle  Stains — 

Ordinary  Colors.  Greens 

Sherwin-Williams    $1.39  $1.60 

B-H  Anchor    1.40  1.60 

M.  L.  Creosote    1.40  1.60 

Soligum   -.   1.25  1.60 

Martin  Senours    1.40  1.60 

Elastica    1.40  1.60 

Hillcrest    1.40  1.60 

"CD."   Shingle   Stain    1.20  1.40 

Canada  Paint    1.75  2.00 

O.P.W.  Creolin    1.30  1.50 

Tar — Coal  tar,  refined,  $10.50;  crude,  $9.25. 
F.o.b.  Toronto,  Montreal,  25c  lower. 

Turpentine — Single  bbls.,  gal.,  $1.20:  2-4 
bbls.,  gal.,  $1.19;  6  gal.  lots,  per  gal.,  $1.35. 

Tarnishes — Per  gal.  cans— B-H  Floors, 
$4.08;  Maritime  Spax,  $5.13;  Hard  oil,  $2.76; 
Gold  Medal,  $3.42;  Elastilite,  $3.85;  Grani- 
tine  Floor  Finish,  $3.85;  Hydrox  Spar,  $3.95. 

C.  P.  C.  Sun  Varnish,  $4.30;  Sun  Aero 
Spar,  $4.50;  Sun  Waterproof  Floor,  $4.40. 

Glidden  Wearette,  $3.90;  floorette,  $3.90. 

L  V.  Elastica,  No.  1,  $4.89;  No.  2,  $4.48; 
Floor,  $4. 

Jasperite  Interior  and  Exterior.  $3.75;  In- 
destructo,  floor,  $3.75;  Pale  Hard  Oil,  $3.75. 
P.  &  L.,  No.  61,  $5.04. 
Jamieson's  Copaline,  $4. 

M-S  Marble-Ite  Floor,  $4.22;  Wood-Var, 
$4.06;  Durable  Spar,  $5.13;  Finest  Interior, 
$4.87. 

Moorlastic  Floor,  $4.25;  T.  45  Floor,  $3.50; 
Moorvar  Interior,  $3.25;  Moore's  Spar,  $5. 

S.  W.  Elastic  Interior,  $3.14;  Mar-not, 
$3.93;  Quick  Action  House,  $2.65;  Rexspar. 
$5.04;  Scar-Not,  $4.66. 

Lowe  Bros.,  durable   floor,  $4.50. 

Solpar.  Spar  Marine,  $6;  House  Spar,, 
$4.50;  Floor,   $4.50;  Interior,  $3.50. 

Kyanize  Spar.  $5.15;  Cabinet  Rubbing, 
$4.85;  Interior  and  Floor,  $4.85. 

Luxeberry  light,  $4.72;  Granite,  $4.90; 
Spar,  $5.62. 

Ramsay's  Universal,  $3.75;  Agate  Floor. 
$3.95;  400  Hard  Oil,  $3.25. 

"C.  D.  Big  4"  Exterior,  $5;  Interior,  $4.50; 
General  purpose.   $4.18;  Furniture,  $2.25. 

Dougall  Univerndsh,  clear,  $4.40;  Trans- 
parent, spar,  $4.90;  Transparent,  floor,  $4.40. 

Adelite,  No.  103,  Floor,  $3.90;  No.  105. 
Flat,  $3.90;  No.  100,  Spar,  $5.70.  F.o.b. 
Montreal  and  Toronto. 

Water  Paints — Per  100  lbs.  in  5  lb.  pack- 
ages— Frescota,  white,  $7.50;  Decotint,  white, 
$8.50;  Coralite,  white,  $9;  Perfecto,  white, 
$8.60;  Rockface,  bbls.,  250  lb..  5c;  Opallte, 
300  lb.  bbls.,  17V4c;  Opalite,  100  lb.  pkg., 
18  ^4c;  1  gal.  packages,  per  pkg.,  $1;  %  gal. 
package,  per  pkg.,  52i^c;  Ramsay's  "Ideal," 
310  lb.  bbls.,  40V4c;  Sturgeon's  Solpar,  40e. 

Waste — Cream,   polishing,  19  %c. 
Whiter — XXX,    lS%c;    xx,    16%c:    x,  15Hc; 
xc,    14Hc;     XXX   ex.,    17c;     xx  grad.,  16c; 
XLCR,  15c;  X  empire,  14c;  X  press,  13c. 

Colored — No.  1,  13%c;  No.  lA,  11  %c;  No. 
17,  12%c;  No.  IB.  10%c;  Fancy,  14c;  Lion, 
12'%c;  Standard,  lie;  Popular,  10c;  Keen,  9c. 
Discount  for  quantity. 

Wax — B-H  Wax,  45c;  Berry  Bros.,  70c; 
Imperial     Floor     Wax,    35c:     Anchor,  38c; 

0.  P.W.  Lion  Brand,  38c:  Old  English.  67c; 
Johnson's,  67c:  Jamieson's  liquid  wax,  gal., 
$3.50  ;Ramsay's.    45c;    Martin-Senours,  38c; 

1.  V.  Wax,  38c:  Sherwin-Williams,  60c;  Sol- 
par, $8.80  to  $9.90;  Crown  Diamond.  40c; 
Hillcrest,  45c;  Plymouth  Rock,  45c;  Cham- 
pion white,  50c;  Ad-el-ite  paste,  45c. 

Whiting — Plain,  in  bbls.,  $2.50;  Gildera, 
bolted  in  bbls,  $2.75. 

Wood  Alcohol — Per  gal. — In  five  gallons, 
$1.75;  Methylated  Spirits,  $1.90  to  $2.55. 

Wood  Filler  (Paste) — Kleartone — Forest 
green,  fumed  and  mahogany — 1  lb.  cans,  30c 
a  pound;  2  lb.,  35c:  5  and  10  lb.,  33c;  25  lb., 
31c.     Discount  50  per  cent. 

Wood  Filler  (Liquid) — Crown  Diamonid, 
per  gal.  in  qt.  tins,  $1.70. 


EAGLE  LAMP  BLACK 

MaJe  only  by 

THE  L.  MARTIN  COMPANY 

81  Fulton  Slreet,  NEW  YORK 

Agenfs  in 

Montreal,  Winnipeg  and  Toronto 


THE  PARMENTER  BULLOCK  CO. 

Limited 
GANANOQUE,  ONT. 
Iron  and  Copper  Rivets,  Iron  and  Copper 
Burrs,  Bifurcated  and  Tubular  Rivets, 
Wire  Nails.  Copper  and  Steel  Boat  and 
Canoe  Nails,  Escutcheon  Pins,  Leather 
Shoe  and  Overshoe  Buckles,  Fence  Plates. 


January,  1922 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


35 


Read  This  Page 


Genuine  White  Lead  in  Liquid 
form  ready  for  use. 


CEampion  ; 

•JURE  LIQUID? 
WHITE  LEAD^ 

Ready  for  use 


B 


 tunmnaDooaa  _^ 


B 


Sets  up  a  new  standard 
in  paint. 


Made  of 
Pure  Government  White 


Pigment 

figure  Ketined  Lmsee 
Liquid— I p^^j.g  Spirits  of  Tur 


Lead 


pentme. 


and  that  'a  all ! 


Champion  Pure  Liquid  White  Lead 

Easimst  paint  for  the  dealers  to  tell  because  it  is  made  of  the  materials  that  n.ost  people  really  wart  to  use — made  the 
way  they  want  to  use  it. 

It  will  satisfy  your  painters  trade — Notwithstanding  the  various  claims  for  prepared  paints,  the  painter 
stifl  continues  to  use  white  lead — the  paint  that  has  proven  best  for  centuries  past.  Champion  Liquid  White 
Lead  will  save  the  painter's  time  in  breaking  up  white  lead. 

Most  city  houseowners  and  farmers — insist  on  white  lead  for  their  painting.  They  will  be  glad  to  get 
Champion  Liquid  White  Lead  ready  for  use. 

Factories,  Mills,  Hotels,  Public  Buildings,  Steamships,  all  big  consumers — will  be  glad  to 
get  Champion  Liquid  White  Lead  and  save  the  labor  expense  of  the  old-time  hand  mixing, 
New  avenues  of  trade  for  profitable  paint  sales — will  be  opened  to  you  with  Champion  Liquid 
White  Lead,  with  the  home  owner,  the  farmer,  the  manufacturer,  the  painter,  the  institutional  buildings. 

Champion  Liquid  White  Lead,  ready  for  use,  is  a  white  lead  paint  of  absolute  purity,  extreme  covering 
power,  fine  texture,  superior  whiteness  and  excellent  spreading  properties.      It  is  made  direct  from 
pure  government  standard  white  lead,  with  addition  of  Pure  Refined  Linseed  Oil  and  Pure  Spirits  of 
Turpentine,  ground  and  mixed  through  powerful  machinery  in  scientifically  correct  proportions, 
which  are  always  the  same. 

It  stays  in  suspension — always  ready  for  use — No  breaking  up — Saves  time  material  and  waste. 
Show  the  formula  guarantee  on  the  label  and  your  sale  is  made. 


Use  coupon  or  write  us  for  sample  tin — charges  prepaid. 


4- 


\>  Vv*'  A*^ 


36 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


January,  1922 


RECOMMENDED  GOODS 

The  list  of  namss  published  is  a  convrenience  to  readers  and  not  a  part  of  any  advertiser's  contract. 


ALUMINUM  WARE 

Aluminum  Specialty  Co.,  Toronto. 
Aluminum  Ware  Mfg.  Co.,  Oakville. 
Duro  Aluminum,  Ltd.    Hamilton,  Ont. 
Veribest  Aluminum  Co.,  Toronto. 
Sheet  Metal  Products  Co.,  Toronto. 

ASH  SIFTERS 

Burrowes  Mfg.  Co.,  Toronto. 

AUTOMOTIVE  ACCESSORIES 

Ames,  Holden,  McCready,  Limited. 

Dunlop  Tire  and  Rubber  Goods  Co.,  Toronto. 

Henry  Disston  &  Sons,  Toronto. 

Hobbs  Manufacturing  Co.,  London. 

Richards  Wilcox  Canadian  Co.,  London. 

Samuel  Trees  &  Co.,  Toronto. 

S.  C.  Johnson  &  Son,  Brantford. 

White  Machine  Co.,  Windsor,  Ont. 

[Also  see  Wholesale  Hardware  Listings] 

BABBELS  (METAL) 

W.  X>.  Beath  &  Son,  Toronto. 

BRASS  GOODS 
James  Morrison  Brass  Mfg.  Co.,  Toronto. 

BARN-DOOR  HANGERS 

Richards  Wilcox  Canadian  Co.,  London. 
Taylor-Forbes  Co.,  Guelph. 

BASKETS 
Walter  Woods  &  Co.,  Hamilton. 

BATTERIES 
Samuel  Trees  &  Co.,  Toronto. 

BELTING 

Diulop  Tire  and  Rubber  Ooods  Co.,  Toronto. 

Dominion  Belting  Co.  Hamilton, 

BITTS  — AUGER 

E.  C.  Atkins  &  Co.,  Hamilton. 

North  Bros.  Mfg.  Co.,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 

BRUSHES  AND  BROOMS 
Brer-Ready  Safety  Razor  Co.,  Toronto. 
Meakins  &  Sons,  Hamilton. 
Rubberset  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 
Walter  Woods  &  Co.,  Hamilton. 

BUILDERS'  CASTINGS 
Katie  Foundry  Co.,  Gait. 

BUILDERS'  HARDWARE 

Richards  Wilcox  Canadian  Co.,  London. 
Taylor-Forbes  Co.,  Guelph. 

CHAIN 

B.  Greening  Wire  Co.,  Hamilton. 

CLEAN  OUT  DOORS 
Katie  Foundry  Co.,  Gait. 

CLOTHES  REELS  AND  PULLEYS 
Katie  Foundry  Co.,  Gait. 
Taylor  Forbes  Co.,  Guelph. 

COAL  SHUTES 

Katie  Foundry  Co.,  Gait. 

CONVEYORS  —  OVERHEAD 
Rlchards-Wllcoz  Canadian  Co.,  London. 

COBBLERS'  SETS 
Katie  Foundry  Co.,  Gait. 
Taylor-Forbes  Co.,  Guelph,  Ont. 

DRILLS 

North  Bros.  Mfg.  Co.,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 
Walker  Twist  Drill  &  Tool  Co..  Walkerville. 

DRY  COLORS 

Brandram  Henderson,  Ltd.,  Montreal. 
Martln-Senour  Co.,  Ltd.,  MontreaL 
McArthur-Irwln,  Ltd.,  Montreal. 
Sherwin-Wlliiams,  Ltd.,  Montreal. 
Stewart  &  Wood,  Toronto. 

EAVETROUGH 
Pedlar  People,  Ltd.,  Oshawa,  Ont. 

ENAMELED  WARE 
UcClary  Mfg.  Co.,  London. 
8be«t  MeUl  Products  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 


ELECTRIC  EQUIPMENT 

Hurley  Machine  Co.,  Toronto. 
Nineteen  Hundred  Washer  Co.,  Toronto 
W.  A.  Krlbs  &  Co..  Hespeler.  Ont. 

FENCING  AND  GATES 
Banwell-Hoxie,  Ltd.,  Hamilton. 
Frost  Wire  Fence  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hamilton. 

FILES 

G.  &  H.  Barnet  Co.,  Philadelphia. 
E.  C.  Atkins  &  Co.,  Hamilton. 
Henry  Disston  &  Sons,  Toronto. 


FIRE-DOOR  FITTINGS 

Richards  Wilcox  Canadian  Co.,  London. 
Taylor-Forbes  Co.,  Ltd.,  Guelph. 

FIRE  ESCAPES 

Canada  Wire  and  Iron  Goods  Co.,  Hamilton. 
Dennis  Wire  and  Iron  Works  Co.,  London. 

FLATWARE 

Canadian  Wm.  Rogers  Co.,  Ltd..  Toronto. 
FLOWER  POTS 

Fostei  Pottery  Co.,  Hamilton. 

FLOOR  WAX 

Stewart  &  Wood,  Toronto. 

Sturgeons,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

S.  C.  Johnson  &  Son,  Brantford. 

FURNACES 

Canadian  Stoves,  Limited,  Grimsby. 

Gait  Stove  and  Furnace  Co.,  Gait. 

Clare  Bros..  Ltd.,  Preston. 

Hamilton  Stove  &  Heater  Co.  Hamilton. 

Gurney  Foundry  Co.,  Toronto. 

Hall-Zryd  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hespeler,  Ont. 

McClary  Mfg.  Co.,  London. 

Pease  Foundry  Co.,  Toronto. 

GALVANIZED  WARE 

Sheet  Metal  Products  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

GARAGE  HARDWARE 

Richards-Wiicox  Canadian  Co.,  London. 

GLASS 

Consolidated  Plate  Glass  Co,.  Toronto. 
Hobbs  Manufacturing  Co.,  Ltd.,  London. 
Toronto  Plate  Glass  Importing  Co.,  Toronto. 

GLOVES  AND  MITTS 

Hamilton  Carhartt  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

GRINDERS 

Bichards-Wllcox  Canadian  Co.,  London. 
Taylor-Forbes  Co.,  Ltd.,  Guelph,  Ont. 

HACK  SAWS  AND  BLADES 

E.  C.  Atkins  &  Co.,  Hamilton. 
Henry  Disston  &  Sons,  Toronto. 

HANDLES  — CHEST  AND  DRAWER 

Taylor-Forbes  Co.,  Ltd.,  Guelph. 

HAND  PULLS 

North  Bros.  Mfg.  Co.,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 
Taylor  Forbes  Co.,  Guelph. 

HANGERS—  DOOR 

Beatty  Bros.,  Ltd.,  Fergus,  Ont. 
Richards-Wllcox  Canadian  Co.,  London. 
Taylor-Forbes  Co.,  Ltd.,  Guelph. 

HEATERS  —  GAS,  HOT  WATER 

Canadian  Stoves,  Limited,  Grimsby. 
James  Morrison  Brass  Mfg.  Co.,  Toronto. 

HINGES  — SPRING 
Taylor-Forbes  Co.,  Ltd.,  Guelph. 

HOCKEY  STICKS 

Hall-Zryd  Foundry  Co.,  Hespeler,  Ont. 

ICE  CREAM  FREEZERS 
North  Bros.  Mfg.  Co.,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 


INJECTORS 

James  Morrison  Brass  Mfg.  Co.,  Toronto. 

IRONS  — SAD 

Taylor-Forbes  Co.,  Ltd.,  Guelph,  Ont. 

IRONING  BOARDS 

Stratford  Mfg.  Co.,  Ltd.,  Stratford,  Ont. 

KITCHENWARE 

Sheet  Metal  Products  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

LADDERS 

Stratford  Mfg.  Co.,  Ltd.,  Stratford,  Ont. 

LAMPS 

Coleman  Lamp  Co.,  Toronto. 

LAMP  BLACK 

L.  Martin  Co.,  New  York. 

LANTERNS 

Coleman  Lamp  Co.,  Toronto. 

Sheet  Metal  Products  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

LAVATORY  COMPARTMENTS 

Dennis  Wire  and  Iron  Works,  London. 

LAWN  MOWERS 

Taylor-Forbes  Co.,  Ltd.,  Guelph.  Ont. 

LEVELS 

Henry  Disston  &  Sons,  Toronto. 

LINSEED  OIL 

Sherwin-Williams  Co.,  Ltd.,  MontreaL 
Stewart  &  Wood,  Toronto. 
Sturgeons,  Limited,  Toronto. 

MANGLES—  CLOTHES 

Taylor-Forbes  Co.,  Ltd.,  Guelph,  Ont. 

MATS  — WIRE,  DOOR 

Port  Hope  Mat  and  Mfg.  Co.,  Port  Hope,  Ont. 

METAL  CEILINGS  AND  WALLS 

Pedlar  People,  Ltd.,  Oshawa,  Ont. 

METAL  LATH  AND  SHINGLES 

Pedlar  People,  Ltd.,  Oshawa,  Ont. 

MILK  CANS 

Sheet  Metal  Products  Co.,  Toronto. 

MIRRORS 

Hobbs  Manufacturing  Co.,  London,  Ont. 
Toronto  Plate  Glass  Importing  Co.,  Toronto. 

MITRE  BOXES  AND  SAWS 

E.  C.  Atkins  &  Co.,  Hamilton. 

OIL  CAKE  AND  MEAL 

Canada  Paint  Co.,  Montreal. 
Sherwin-Williams  Co.,  Ltd.,  MontreaL 

OIL  STOVES 

Sheet  Metal  Products  Co.,  Toronto. 

ORNAMENTAL  IRON  WORK 

Canada  Wire  and  Iron  Goods  Co.,  Hamilton. 
Dennis  Wire  and  Iron  Works,  London. 

PAINTS  AND  VARNISHES 

Alabastine  Co.,  Paris,  Ont. 

Benjamin  Moore  &  Co.,  Toronto. 

Brandram-Henderson,  Ltd.,  MontreaL 

Canada  Paint  Co.,  MontreaL 

Dougall  Varnish  Co.,  Montreal. 

Imperial  Varnish  and  Color  Works,  Toronto. 

International  Varnish  Co.,  Ltd.,  MontreaL 

Lowe  Bros.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

McArthur-Irwin,  Ltd.,  MontreaL 

Martin-Senour,  Ltd.,  Montreal. 

Ottawa  Paint  Works,  Ltd.,  Ottawa,  Ont. 

Sherwin-Williams  Co.,  Ltd.,  MontreaL 

Stewart  &  Wood,  Toronto. 

Sturgeons,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

PAINT  BRUSHES 

Meakins  &  Sons,  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  Ont. 
Rubberset  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 


January,  ^922 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


37 


PAINTERS' SUPPLIES  (JOBBERS) 

Stewart  &  Wood,  Toronto. 
Sturgeons,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

PARIS  GREEN 

Canada  Paint  Co.,  Montreal. 
McArthur-Irwin,  Ltd.,  Montreal. 
Sherwin-Williams  Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal. 

PISTONS  AND  PISTON  RINGS 

White  Machine  Worlts,  Ltd.,  Windsor,  Ont. 

POST-HOLE  DIGGERS 

Kichards-Wilcox  Canadian  Co.,  London. 
Taylor-Forbes  Co.,  Ltd.,  Guelph. 

POTTERY 

Foster  Pottery  Co.,  Hamilton. 

PRISM  GLASS 
Hobbs  Manufacturing  Co.,  Ltd.,  London. 

PUNCHES 
North  Bros.  Mfg.  Co.,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 

RAZORS  — SAFETY 

AutoStrop  Safety  Razor  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

Ever-Ready  Safety  Razor  Co.,  Toronto. 

Gem  Safety  Razor  Co.,  Toronto. 

Gillette  Safety  Razor  Co.  of  Can.,  Ltd.,  Montreal 

REAMERS 

Walker  Twist  Drill  Co.  of  Canada,  Walker- 
ville. 

ROOFING 

H.  S.  Howland  Sons  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 
RULES 

Lufkln  Rule  Co.  of  Canada,  Windsor. 

SASH  AND  SCREEN  HANGERS 

Phenix   Mfg.   Go.    Milwaukee,  Wis. 

SAWS 

E.  C.  Atkins  &  Co.,  Hamilton. 
Henry  Disston  &  Sons,  Toronto. 

SCALES 

International  Business  Machines,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

SCREEN  DOORS  AND  WINDOWS 

Kasement  Skrene  Dore  Co.,  Toronto. 

SILVERWARE 

Canadian  Wm.  Rogers  Co.,  Toronto. 

SPOKE  SHAVES 
E.  C.  Atkins  &  Co.,  Hamiton. 

STEPLADDERS 

Stratford  Mfg.  Co.,  Ltd.,  Stratford, 


Ont. 


STORE  LADDERS 
Richards-Wilcox  Canadian  Co.,  London. 

SQUARES 

Henry  Disston  &  Sons,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

STEEL  LOCKERS  AND  SHELVING 

Dennis  Wire  and  Iron  Works  Co.,  London. 
STAINS 

[See  Paints  and  Varnishes]. 

STORE  FRONT  CONSTRUCTION 

Consolidated  Plate  Glass  Co.,  Toronto. 

STOVES  AND  HEATERS 

Canadian  Stoves,  Limited,  Grimsby. 
Gait  Stove  and  Furnace  Co.,  Gait. 
Gurney  Foundry  Co.,  Toronto. 
Hall-Zryd  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hespeler,  Ont. 
McClary  Mfg.  Co.,  London. 

TANKS  — STEEL  AND  WOOD 

W.  D.  Beath  &  Son,  Toronto. 

TAPES 

Lufkin  Rule  Co.  of  Canada,  Windsor. 

TAP  HOLDERS 

North  Bros.  Mfg.  Co.,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 

TINWARE 

Taylor  Forbes  Co.,  Guelph. 

Sheet  Metal  Products  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

TIRES  AND  ACCESSORIES 

Ames,  Holden,  McCready,  Limited. 

Dunlop  Tire  and  Rubber  Goods  Co.,  Toronto. 

Samuel  Trees  &  Co.,  Toronto. 

TIRE  PUMPS 

Coleman  Lamp  Co.  Toronto. 

TOYS 

A.  C.  Gilbert-Menzies  Co.,  Toronto. 

TROWELS 

E.  C.  Atkins  &  Co.,  Hamilton. 
Henry  Disston  &  Sons,  Toronto. 

VALVES 

James  Morrison  Brass  Mfg.  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

VARNISHES 

Benjamin  Moore  &  Co.,  Toronto. 
Brandram  Henderson,  Ltd.,  Montreal. 
Canada  Paint  Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal. 
Dougall  Varnish  Co.,  Montreal. 
Imperial  Varnish  and  Color  Works,  Toronto. 
International  Varnish  Co.,  Montreal. 
McArthur-Irwin,  Ltd.,  MontreaL 
Martin-Senour,  Ltd.,  Montreal. 


Ottawa  Paint  Works,  Ltd.,  Ottawa. 
Sherwin-Williams,  Ltd.,  Montreal. 
Stewart  &  Wood,  Toronto. 
Sturgeons,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

VACUUM  CLEANERS 
Clements  Mfg.  Co.,  Toronto. 

VISES 

North  Bros.  Mfg.  Co.,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 
Richards-Wilcox  Canadian  Co.,  London. 
Tnylor  Forbes  Co.,  Guelph. 
Superior  Vise  Co.,  London. 

WALL  SIZE  AND  GLUE 
Stewart  &  Wood,  Toronto. 

WASHING  MACHINES  AND  WRINGERS 
Bluebird  Corporation,  Brantford. 
W.  A.  Kribs,  Ltd.,  Hespeler,  Ont. 
1900  Washer  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 
Taylor  Forbes  Co.,  Guelph. 

WATER  WHEELS 
Katie  Foundry  Co.,  Gait. 

WINDSHIELD  GLASS 
Hobbs  Manufacturing  Co.,  Ltd.,  London. 

WINDOW  SCREENS 

Burrowes  Mfg.  Co.  Toronto. 
F.  W.  Lawson  Co.,  Toronto. 

WINDOW  WEIGHTS 

Katie  Foundry  Co.,  Gait. 

WOOD  STAINS 

Sturgeons,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

WHITE  LEAD 

Brandram-Henderson,  Ltd.,  MontreaL 
McArthur-Irwin,  Ltd.,  Montreal. 
Sherwin-Williams  Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal. 
Stewart  &  Wood,  Toronto. 
Sturgeons,  Limited,  Toronto. 

WHOLESALE  HARDWARE 

Hobbs  Hardware  Co.,  Ltd.,  London. 
H.  S.  Howland  Sons  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 
Kennedy  Hardware  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 
Rice  Lewis  &  Son,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 

WIRE  CLOTH 
Canada  Wire  and  Iron  Goods  Co.,  Hamilton. 
B.  Greening  Wire  Co.,  Hamilton. 
Kasement  Skrene  Dore  Co.,  Toronto. 

WIRE  FENCING 
Banwell-Hoxie,  Ltd.,  Hamilton. 
Frost  Wire  Fence  Co.,  Hamilton. 

WOODENWARE 

Stratford  Mfg.  Co.,  Stratford. 
Walter  Woods  &  Co.,  Hamilton. 


SOMETHING  NEW 

For  Your  Winter  Trade 

LUTHER 

POCKET  SKATE  SHARPENER 


A  cold  winter  means  more  skating  and  dull  skates 
mean  a  good,  healthv  demand  for  Pocket  Skate 
Sharpener.  It's  a  handy  little  device  that  keeps 
skates  sharp  and  hollow  ground.  Fitted  with  a 
genuine  Dimo-Grit  Stone,  the  hardest  and  fastest 
cutting  stone  known.  Size  and  price  both  fit  the 
pocket — the  Pocket  Skate  Sharpener  will  be  a  real 
money-maker  for  you  during  winter  months.  Sold 
only  in  dozen  lots — $4.50  per  dozen — and  an  at- 
tractive display  card  is  free  with  every  dozen. 
Your  jobber  should  be  aible  to  supply  you — if  he 
cannot,  we'll  see  that  you  are  supplied. 

LUTHER  GRINDER  MFG.  CO. 

Dept.  60,  285  So,  Wattr  St. 

MILWAUKEE,  WIS.  U.  S.  A. 


Black  Diamond  File  Works 


Established  1863 


Incorporated  1895 


Twelve  Medals 
of  Award  at 

INTERNATIONAL 
Expositions 


Special  Grand 
Prize 
GOLD  MEDAL 
Atlanta,  1895 


Copy  of  Catalogue  will  be  sent  free  to  any 
interested  File  User  upon  application. 

G.&H.BARNETT  COMPANY 

Philadelphia,  Pa. 

Owned  and  operated  by 
NICHOLSON  FILE  CO.,  PORT  HOPE,  ONT. 


38 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


January,  1922 


JI|IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIII''Mlhirillllll'lllli:illlllhil'|l|IIIIIIIIIMIIIIi:illlllll  IIIMIMIMMMIIIMMIIMIMIMIIMMIIIMMIIIMIIII.IIMIII|MIIIMnMIMIIiMMIIII|iMMMII'IIIIMIIIIMIIMMIIIIIIIhlMMIMnilMIMIIMIM^MIMinii:;iMIII{inil^ 

I  INDEX  TO  ADVERTISEMENTS 

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G.  &  H.  Barnet  Co   35 

W.  D.  Beath  &  Son   7 

Canadian  National  Carbon  Co  40 

Coleman  Lamp  Co  

Dennis  Wire  &  Iron  Works  Co   4 

Dominion  Belting  Co   6 

Frost  Wire  Fence  Co   5 

Hall-Zryd  Foundry  Co  cover  2 

Imperial  Varnish  &  Color  Co  27 


International  Varnish  Co  39 

Boeckh  Bros  24 

Port  Hope  Mat  Mfg  Co  23 

Katie  Foundry   6 

Lufkin  Rule  Co  38 

Luther  Grinder  Co  37 

L  Martin  Co  34 

Meakins  &  Son  20 

North  Bros.  Mfg.  Co   4 


Parmenter     Bullock   34 

Phenix  Mfg  Co   58 

Sherwin-Williams  Co.,  Ltd   21 

Stewart  &  Wood   35 

Sturgeons,  Ltd   23 

White  Machine  Works,  Ltd   5 

Save  the  Surface  Committee.  .22  &  cover  1 

W.  Walker  &  Son   3 


PHENIX  STORM  SASH  AND  SCREEN 
HANGERS  AND  FASTENERS 


Simple — easily  applied — rust-proof — non-rattle — and  practically  un- 
breakable. Positively  the  best  storm  sash  and  screen  hangers 
and  fasteners  you  can  buy.    Catalogue  and  discounts  sent  on 


request. 


Phenix  Manufacturing  Company 


048  Centre  Street 


MILWAUKEE,  WIS. 


TAPES  /UF/C/A/  RULES 


RELIABLE 


FAVOURABLY  KNOWN 
BY 

USERS  EVERYWHERE 


MADE  IN  CANADA 
STOCKED  BY  JOBBERS 


mE/uFKiNRuL£^a.  ofQanada^Itd. 

W/jvDso/tojvr. 


,1 


Tanuary,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


ENAMEL 

A  DISTINCTIVE  LEADER 

For  Your  Paint  &  Varnish  Department 


SATINETTE  ENAMEL  is  :n  demand  by  those  who  know  real  enamel 
value  for  all  high  class  finishinp:  whether  exterior  or  interior. 
This  already  large  demand  will  be  materially  increased  by  the  ex- 
tensive publicity  campaign  now  being  carried  on  among  master 
painters  and  consumers.  This  campaign  will  bring  forcibly  to  the 
attention  of  the  buying  public  the  superior  quality  of  Satinette. 


You  will  be  called  upon  to  furnish  Satinette  Enamel  to  your  cus- 
tomers.   No  substitute  will  bt  acceptable. 

The  Satinette  container  a&  reproduced  here  if  displayed  on  your 
shelves  or  counter  v/iU  jet  sales  making  attention  immediately. 

Satiiictio  I'inami'l  is  sii])i:iied  in  Gloss,  Stuii  Glus^s  or  Flat  White,  also 
in  ivy  or  grey  shadeb. 


Satinette  is  only  one  of  the  many  easy  selling  and  profitable  International  Var- 
nish Go's  products.  We  manufacture  a  full  and  complete  line  of  highest  quality 
Varnishes,  Stains,  Paints  and  Enamels. 


Order  your  supply  of  Satinette  now. 
particulars  on  our  complete  line. 


Write  us  for  prices  and  full 


MONTREAL 


WINNIPEG 


TORONTO 


HALIFAX 


VANCOUVER 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


January,  1922 


A  Big  Year  for 

COLUMBIA 


ALL  records  for  sales  of  Columbia 
^  Dry  Batteries  were  smashed  in 
1921.  The  demand  was  very  large 
—due  to  the  wide  use  of  gasoline 
engines  of  every  description  requir- 
ing dry  batteries  for  ignition,  and 
the  recognition  of  the  public  that 
Columbia  Dry  Batteries  have  the 
most  "pep"  and  longest  life. 

Dealers  should  order  their  stock 
early  through  their  Jobbers  to  make 
sure  of  securing  a  full  supply  of 
fresh,  powerful  Columbias. 


Columbia  Advertising 

/^NE  factor  in  the  success  of  Columbia 
Dry  Battery  sales  is  the  consistently 
good  advertising  which  has  made  Columbia 
stand  for  not  only  the  best  dry  battery  but 
the  one  battery  which  has  been  obtainable 
everywhere  in  uniformly  good  quality.  The 
advertising  plans  for  this  year  are  the  most 
comprehensive  ever  planned  by  the  Com- 
pany. 


Leading  newspapers,  farm  papers,  and 
magazines  will  be  used  extensively.  New 
window  and  store  display  material  is  being 
prepared.  1922  will  see  Columbia  more 
widely  advertised  than  any  previous  year — 
and  that  means  much  to  the  dealer. 


CANADIAN  NATIONAL  CARBON  CO.,  LIMITED 

Toronto  Montreal  Winnipeg  Vancouver 

Columbia 

Drv  Batteries 

theij  Last  Longer 


CTl 


February,  1922 


CANADIAN  HARDWARE  JOURNAL  and  the  CANADIAN  TIRE  &  ACCESSORY  JOURNAL 
Have  been  consolidated  into  HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


$1  Yearly 


Vol.  14,  No.  2 

OLD  SERIES 


Published  Monthly  by  WESTON  WRIGLEY 


123  BAY  STREET,  TORONTO 


Vol  3,  No.  2 

NEW  SERIES 


Established  1855 

SAMUEL  &  BENJAMIN,  LIMITED 

FORMERLY 

M.  &  L.  SAMUEL,  BENJAMIN  &  CO. 

We  carry  in  stock  all  the  standard  sizes  in— 

BLACK  AND  GALVANIZED  SHEETS 

TINNED  SHEETS 

TINPLATES 

CANADA  PLATES 

BLUE  POLISHED  SHEETS 

LONG  TERNE  SHEETS 

ZINC  SHEETS 

CANADIAN  SALES  AGENTS 

Goldstein  Mfg.  Co.  Limited,  Toronto  -  Seamless  Brass  and  Copper  Tubing 
Mond  Nickel  Co.  Limited,  London,  Eng.    -       Nickel  99  100% 

WRITE  FOR  OUR  MONTHLY  STOCK  LIST 


King  St.  and  Spadina  Ave. 


Toronto,  Ontario 


CANADA'S  ONLY  NATIONAL  HARDWARE  MONTHLY 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


February.  1922 


H  A  M  I  LTO  N 

HARDWARE   CONVENTION  NUMBER 


SEE  THE  "PILOT"  PIPELESS  FURNACE 
AT  THE  HARDWARE  EXHIBITION 

We'll  be  at  Booth  No.  5  in  the  Armouries. 


Galvanized  Outer 
Casing 


Adjustable  Collar 
to  Adapt  Heater  for 
Various  Heights 


Direct  and  Indirect 
Damper  Handle 

Direct  Connected 
Clean  Ou' 


Correctly  Propor- 
tioned Combustion 
Chamber 


Fire  Pot  in  Two 
Sections  to 
Allow  for 
Expansion  and 
Contraction 


Anti  Clinker  Four  Baf 
Triangular  Grate 
I  Simplest  and  Besi 
Grate  Ever  Invented) 


Deep  Roomy  Ash  Pit         Cast  Iron  Ash  Pit  Bottom 


Dust  Damper 


Mr.  J.  R.  Hambly, 

ex-president,  and  one  of 
the  founders  of  the 
Ontario  Retail  Hard- 
ware Association,  will 
be  glad  to  explain  the 
merits  of  the  "PILOT" 
PIPELESS  and  the 
wonderful  success  dealers 
have  had  with  it  in  all 
parts  of  Ontario. 

Besides  satisfied  custom- 
ers, the  "PILOT"  gives 
the  dealer  a  generous 
profit. 

Secure  the  agency  m 
your  district  now. 


Hall  Zryd  Foundry  Company,  Limited 

Western  Branch:  Post  Office  Box  687,  Winnipeg,  Man. 
Manufacturers  of  pilot  Stoves,  Ranges  and  Furnaces 

HESPELER,  ONTARIO 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


3 


If  you  are  keen  on  a 
live  selling  proposition, 
then  by  all  means 
write  us.  There's  no- 
thing quite  so  full  of 
"pep"  in  honest  to 
goodness  Hardware 
lines  as  "Aero"  qual- 
ity products. 


IBADE  MARK 


Aero  quality  products 
are  attractively  put  up 
— well  advertisee,  and 
easy  to  sell.  "Aero" 
dealers  are  always 
busy  because  we  co- 
operate with  them  in 
a  helpful  sales  pro- 
motion plan. 


EVERY  MAIL  BRINGS  ORDERS 


**OWL  BRAND'^  ROOFING  SETS  A  NEW  SALES  REGORD 


"Full  steam  ahead"  is  the  standing  order  to  the  manufacturers — Owl  Brand  Roofing 
is  blazing  its  own  trail— dealers  tell  us  that  with  Owl  Brand  Roofing  they  hope  to 
mount  up  sales  far  in  excess  of  previous  years— new  buildings  must  be  put  up,  repairs 
will  be  made,  and  the  dealer  that  carries  a  stock  of  Owl  Roofing  is  sure  of  a 
bountiful  harvest. 

Public  Demand  For  Owl  Brand  Roofing 

WHY  IGNORE  THE  OPPORTUNITY? 

Owl  Brand  Roofing  is  the  best  made — a  guarantee  goes  with 
every  roll — 108  sq.  ft.,  32  inches  wide,  nails,  cement  for 
seams  and  instructions  for  laying  are  included.  Owl  Brand 
labels  are  beautifully  colored  lithographs  which  make  a  very 
attracrive  display. 


FREE  SAMPLES  SENT  ON  REQUEST 


W.  WALKER  &  SON  LIMITED 

WHOLESALE  HARDWARE  AND  IRON  MERCHANTS 

10-15  ALCORN  AVENUE,  TORONTO 


WE  SELL  ONLY  TO  THE  WHOLESALE 


4r 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


February,  1922 


Ha  rdwa  remen  !  Act  as  our  Agents 

Every  day  in  your  district  there  is  a  need  for  some 
Dennis  or  Dennisteel  product.  A  live  hardwareman, 
with  his  eyes  on  building  activities  can  make  a  good 
profit  every  w^eek  in  the  year  from  us. 

Things  We  Make  That  You  Can  Sell 


Steel  House  and  Office  Safes 
Wire  Window  Guards 
Steel  Lockers  etc. 

We  al»o  make 

Steel  Lavatory  Compartments,  Steel  Chair*  and  Stools,  Steel  Shelving 
etc.  Ornamental  Iron  and  Bronze,  Commercial  Wirework  of  all  kinds. 
General  Builders'  Ironwork 


The  Dennis  Wire  and  Iron 
Works  Co.  Limited 
London 


Steel  Cabinets 
Wire  Stockroom  Enclosures 
"Boca"  Steel  Sash 


Halifax 

Montreal 

Ottawa 


Toronto 

Hamilton 

Windsor 


Winnipeg 

Calgary 

Vancou»er 


"YANKEE" 

QUICK  RETURN 


In  3  Sizes 


With  spring  in  the 
handle  to  drive  bit 
quickly. 


Holds  it  extended 
for  overhead  work. 


No.  130  —  For  all  gen- 
eral work.  Very  popular. 

No.  131  — Heavy  pattern  for  gen- 
eral house  carpentry  and  heavy  screw 
driving.    Becoming  very  popular. 

No.  135  —  Small  size,  for  smaller  screws,  electric 
work,  and  wherever  a  large  number  of  small  screws 
are  frequently  driven.    Your  Jobber  will  supply  you. 

NORTH  BROS.  MFG. 

Philadelphia,  Pa. 


February,  1922 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


HAMILTON 

HARDWARE   CONVENTION  NUMBER 


Profit  For  The  Poultry  Man 
Can  Mean  Profit  For  You 


You  can  share  in  the  profits  pouhry  raisers  are  making  by  having  ready 
a  Hne  of  poultry  supphes  that  will  meet  their  spring  requirements. 

The  Collins  Never-Fail  Poultry  Supplies  are  just  what  your  customeris  want. 
The  are  made  to  suit  Canadian  conditions.  Their  design  is  based  upon 
actual  experience  and  they  give  the  poultry  raiser  results. 

The  Collins  Never-Fail  Dependable  Sprayers  are  sure  to  give  your  custo- 
mers satisfaction.    They  are  built  for  easy  operation  and  to  stand  hard  use. 


COLLINS  NEVER-FAIL  PRODUCTS,  LIMITED 


HAMILTON 


CANADA 


Collins  Hen  Pecked 
Feeder.  Regulates 
the  feed  and  keeps  the 
hens  working.  It  has 
increased  egg  produc- 
tion 100  per  cent. 


Never-Fail  Potato 
Sprayer.  Easy  to  op- 
erate, nothing  to  get  out 
of  order  and  low  in 
price.  Three  features 
that  make  a  sure  seller. 


Collins  Brooder  Hatcher 


Collins  Brooder  Hatcher. 

A  complete  outfit  for  the  begin- 
ner. Chicks  are  hatched  and 
also  brooded  so  that  they  are 
taken  care  of  from  the  time 
they  are  hatched. 


Collins 
Hen  Pecked  Feeder 


Never-Fail 
Potato  Sprayer 


6 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


February,  1922 


For  your 

Tin 
Shop 

Bright, 
Galvanized 
and  copper 
wire 


Tros€Ft 


Of  course  you  have  noticed  how  keen  and  particu- 
lar your  farmer  customers  are  these  days. 

Thev  are  looking  to  you  for  fence  that  will  save 
them  money  and  that  is  just  exactly  what  Frost 
Fence  does  for  them. 

When  you  go  after  the  farmer  strong  to  buy 
Frost  Fence  this  year  you-  know  that  his  good  will 
is  safe  for  your  store — ^and  you  can  talk  price  to 
him. 


for  Big  Business  this  year 

Every  time  he  looks  at  his  tidy  looking  Frost 
fence  you  are  sure  he  will  feel  good  towards  you, 
for  it  will  stand  up  tight  and  tidy  years  after  ordin- 
ary fences  are  down. 

It  will  pay  you  to  remind  farmers  of  the  Frost 
Hold-tight  Lock  and  other  special  features — and 
close  sales  with  Frost  low  prices  which  compare 
favorably  with  those  of  any  other  fence  the  farmer 
can  buy. 


Frost  Steel  and  Wire  Company  Limited,  Hamilton,  Canada 

Galvanized  and  Bright  Wire — Hay  Wire  and  Bale  Ties — Woven  Wire — Farm,  Factory 
and  Ornamental  Fence* — Galvanized  Gates  Manufacturers'  Wire  Supplies. 


SOLE  MANUFACTURERS  OF  THE  CELEBRATED 

"MAPLE  LEAF"  BRAND 

STITCHED  COTTON  DUCK  BELTING 

STRONG    DURABLE    ECONOMICAL    TRUE  RUNNING 

Mr.  Hardware  Merchant- Look  over  your  stock  and 
send  in  your  orders  Now,  to  secure  present  prices,  as  the 
cost  of  duck  has  been  steadily  advancing. 

MAPLE  LEAF  BELT  DRESSING 

The  Best  for  all  Kinds  of  Belts 
WRITE  FOR  SAMPLES  AND  PRICES 
Quebec  Branch:    51  Duluth  Building,  Montreal 

DOMINION  BELTING  CO.,  Limited 


i  Maple  Leaf 


IH,  Dominion  Belting  Co.. 

Hamilton.  Ont, 


HAMILTON 


ONTARIO 


CANADA 


February,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


SANI-SPAlc\ 

INOOOn-OUTDOOR 

VARNISH 
STAIN 


A  Waterproof 
Varnish  Stain 

Here's  a  waterproof  Varnish  Stain  which  will  not  turn  white.  Gives 
wonderful  results  on  furniture,  floors,  woodwork  and  all  interior 
and  exterior  surfaces.  It  is  not  affected  by  ammonia,  alcohol,  steam, 
hot  water,  or  toilet  water,  perfume,  etc.  - 


JOHNSON'S  SaNI-SpAR 

Varnish  Stain 

For  refinishing  in  color  where  one  doesn't  care  to  go  to  thb  trouble  or  expense  of  re- 
moving the  old  finish.  Saves  time,  money,  labor  and  material.  One  coat  gives  the  color 
and  a  beautiful,hard,  durable  finish.  It  dries  dust-free  in  two  hours  and  hard  overnight. 

A  few  of  the  many  uses 
for  Sani-Spar 


Boats  of  all  kinds— automobiles— air  craft— interior  and 
exterior  of  buildings— outside  doors— screen  doors — floors 
—  linoleum — oil  cloth — bath  rooms — kitchens — stables — 
garages— dairies— furniture— school  desks— office  desks- 
counters — cafe  and  restaurant  tables — refrigerators — church 
and  opera  furniture— hospital  floors  and  furniture— etc., 
etc. 


ONLY  FOUR  SHADES 
to  Carry 

Hardware  dealers  can  put  in  a  complete  stock  of  Johnson's 
Sani-Spar  Varnish  Stain  with  a  small  investment  for  it 
comes  only  in  four  sizes  ( quarts,  pints,  half-pints  and 
quarter-pints)  and  in  Natural  and  four  shades  as  fol- 
lows: Light  Oak,  Dark  or  Golden  Oak,  Mahogany  and 
Walnut.  All  shades  may  be  lightened  by  adding  Natural 
Sani-Spar  Varnish. 


Johnson's  Sani-Spar  Varnish  Stain  is  tvell  canned — beautifully  labeled — will 
be  well  advertised  and  gives  you  a  good  margin  of  profit.  Write  us  for 
further  particulars. 

S.C.  JOHNSON  AND  SON,  LIMITED 


'The  Wood  Finishing  Authorities" 
BRANTFORD 

MADE  IN  CANADA— BY  CANADIANS 


Meet  us  at  Booth  57  in  the  Armouries  at  the  Hardware  Convention,  Hamilton 


10 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


February,  1922 


HAMILTON 

HARDWARE  CONVENTION  NUMBER 


Look  up  the  Exhibit 

when  you  visit  the  convention 


SEE  for  yourself  the  excellence  of 
Maxwell  products.  This  event  will 
provide  you  with  an  opportunity 
to  compare  the  virtues  of  the  goods 
you  recommend  to  your  customers. 
They  are  going  to  buy  carefully.  So 
must  you.  Maxwell  products  wilj 
stand  your  inspection. 


"MON-G-VAC" 
Electric  Vacuum  Washer 

Has  a  special  M  H.P.  adjustable  motor 
(below  tub — aids  stability)  and  capacity 
equalling  8  sheets.  Carefully  construc- 
ted; tub  of  cypress  wood  to  retain  heat. 

Maxwell's  "HOME"  Washer 

A  hand  washer  with  high  speed  balance 
wheel  and  ball  bearings  which  ensure 
smooth  and  gentle  running.  Capable  of 
washing  any  weight  or  texture  of  fabric. 


Maxwell's  H  &  P 
Washer 

Combines  all  the  good 
features  of  the  Home 
Washer  and  in  addi- 
tion is  adapted  to 
either  hand  or  power 
use. 


"MINIMAX" 

Doliy  Type  Electric  Washer 

"Wing"  design,  easily-operated,  noiseless 
and  with  gears  completely  enclosed. 
Wringer  is  adjustable  and  may  be  used 
independent  of  washer. 


J[y|AXWELL  Products  include  Washing  Ma- 
chinss.  Churns  Food  Choppers,  Pumps,  Lawn 
Mowers,  and  a  complete  line  of  Farm  Implements 


"IMPERIAL  Clothes  Wringer" 

One  of  Maxwell's  several  excellent  types. 
Has  covered  gears,  ball  bearings  and  im- 
proved clamp  to  fit  any  tub. 


jV/TAXWELL  Made-in-Can- 
ada  Products  stand  out 
against  a  background  of 
half  a  century  of  fine  work- 
manship and  reliability. 


MAXWELLS  LIMITED  ^ 

ST.  MARYS,  ONT. 

Representatives 
Bissett  &  Webb,  126  Lombard  Street 

Winnipes 
Jas.S.Parke8&  Co.,  290  St.Paul  St.W. 
Montreal 


February,  1922 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


11 


Including 
CANADIAN 
HARDWARE 
STOVE  AND 
PAINT 
JOURNAL 

Established 
1909 


Including 

CANADIAN 
TIRE  AND 
ACCESSORY 
JOURNAL 

Established 
1906 


Published  Monthly  by  Weston  Wrigley,  123  Bay  St.  Toronto. 

Subscription  Rates  $1.00  per  year  in  Canada,  |2.00  to  Great  Britain  awd  Her  Dominions-  and  the  United  Statt  e. 


Volume  14 


TORONTO  FEBRUARY  1922 


Number  2 


MUTUAL  FIRE  INSURANCE  IS  POPULAR 

A  dozen  years  ago  J.  Walton  Peart,  of  St.Marys  (now 
of  Regina),  then  vice-president  of  the  Ontario  Retail  Hard- 
ware Association,  assisted  by  Past  President  Brockelbank 
and  Secretary  Wrigley,  strove  hard  to  organize  a  Mutual 
Hardware  Insurance  Company  in  affiliation  with  the  0. 
R.  H.  A.,  and  to  arrange  with  the  Hardware  Mutuals  in  the 
United  State.';  for  re-insurance.  The  obstacles  were  too 
great  and  the  effort  had  to  be  albandoned. 

Two  years  ago,  however,  C.  L.  Clark,  representing  the 
Minnesota  and  Wisconsin  Hardware  Mutuals  and  the 
Minnesota  Implement  Mutual,  opened  a  Canadian  office 
at  Winnipeg  and  made  the  necessary  cash  deposits,  etc, 
with  the  Dominion  Government  to  enable  them  to  operate 
in  Canada,  commencing  business  with  Merchants  in  the 
Western  Province,  and,  when  their  proposition  met  with 
approval  at  the  0.  R.  H.  A.  convention  at  Hamilton  in 
February,  1921,  soughl  business  on  a  large  scale  in  Ontario. 

Mr.  Clark  will  be  one  of  the  speakers  at  the  hardware 
convention  at  HamUton,  F^b.  14  to  18,  and  the  report  of 
progress  for  the  past  years  work  will  be  heard  with  interest. 
It  will  not  be  surprising  to  hear  that  between  five  and  ten 
million  dollars  of  fire  insurance  has  been  placed  with  the 
Hardware  Mutuals  by  Ontario  Hardwaremen  during  their 
first  years  operation  in  this  Province. 

Already  some  Canadian  hardwaremen  have  received 
cheques  for  refunds  of  fifty  per  cent  of  their  insurance 
premiums  for  1921. 

While  fifty  per  cent  is  a  splendid  saving  to  make  some 
United  States  hardware  Mutuals  are  doing  even  better,  two, 
the  Illinois  and  the  Washington  Hardware  Mutuals,  pay- 
ing sixty  per  cent  rebates  to  hardware  association  members. 
The  three  Mutuals  represented  by  Mr.  Clark,  as  well  as  the 
National,  the  Pennsylvania  and  the  Iowa  Mutuals  all  pay 
fiftv  per  cent,  the  Ohio  Mutual  pays  forty  per  cent,  and 
the  Hardware  Mutual  Casualty  Co,  doing  business  in  plate 
glass  insurance,  pays  thirty  three  and  one  third  per  cent 
rebate  on  premiums. 

The  time  will  probably  never  come  when  the  insuring 
public  and  the  stock  fire  insurance  company  will  agree 
upon  the  cost  of  fire  insurance.  The  individual  policy 
holder  pays  out  his  money  for  premiums  year  after  year 
without  having  a  fire,  and  to  him  any  rate  seems  too  high. 
The  stock  insurance  company  experiences  a  constantly  in- 
creasing loss  ratio  and  to  it  no  rate  seems  more  than  ade- 


quate. Ever  since  the  days  of  the  sunny-faced  Lloyd  of 
coffee-house  fame  in  London,  where  fire  insurance  had  its 
birthplace,  the  difference  of  opinion,  more  or  less  bitter, 
has  existed. 

The  stock  fire  insurance  company  can  never  tell  just 
what  its  outstanding  policies  will  cost  it  by  way  of  loss 
claims.  It  must  accumulate  and  use  the  experience  of  a 
great  many  companies  and  make  its  rate  high  enough  to 
cover  all  its  accumulated  experience,  with  certain  contin- 
gencies added,  such  a?  coiiflagration  danger,  exposure  to 
o;her  risks,  etc.  It  would  not  be  a  safe  company  to  insure 
with  if  it  did  not  do  this,  for  the  reason  that  a  stock  com- 
pany cannot  compel  additional  payments  from  policy- 
holders. A  mutual  company  has  such  recourse,  which  is 
the  source  of  strength  and  avoids  the  necessity  of  accumu- 
lating cash  assets. 

Fire  insurance  is  a  commodity  of  such  prime  and  imper- 
ative necessity — our  whole  structure  of  credit  is  built  up- 
on it — that  it  must  be  carried.  It  is  a  tax  upon  commerce 
to  guarantee'  its  stability  by  throwing  upon  the  whole  body 
the  fire  losses  of  its  individual  members. 

There  are  many  who  believe  that  because  fire  insurance 
is  a  tax  and  a  necessary  one  it  should  be  laid  as  lightly  as 
possible  and  attended  with  the  least  possible  expense  and 
that  where  m  the  actual  experience  of  the  year  the  losses 
and  necessary  expenses  do  not  absorb  the  premium  tax  the 
excess  charged  should  be  returned  to  the  policy-holders, 
or  the  charges  levied  after  the  losses  and  expenses  become 
a  known  quantity. 

This  is  the  principle  of  the  mutual  company  and  years 
of  experience  have  prcven  its  soundness.  The  life  of 
Hardware  Mutuals  in  the  United  States  have  now  been  in 
successful  operation  for  nearly  a  quarter  of  a  century, 
their  percentage  of  failures  has  been  lower  and  their  record 
in  loss  settlement  better  than  those  of  any  other  form  of  fire 
insurance. 


"IF  YOU  want  to  work  in  the  kind  of  a  town 

Thai's  the  kind  of  a  town  you  like. 
You  needn't  slip  your  cloths  in  a  grip. 

And  start  on  a  long,  long  hike. 
"'You'll  find  elsewhere  what  you  left  behind., 

For  there's  nothing  that's  really  new. 
It's  a  knock  at  yourself  when  you  knock  your  town. 

It  isn't  your  town — it's  You." 


12 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


February,  1922 


m 


DiiioiiDiMraiicraiOfl 


How  to  Handle  Your 
Competitor 

Written  for  Hardware  and  Accessories  by  Dr.  Frank  Crane. 


IT  is  a  mistake  to  suppose  that  you  have  to  fight  your  competitors.  Nothing  was 
ever  permanently  gained  by  fighting.  For  fighting  of  any  kind  is  pure  destruc- 
tion. 

Your  competitor  does  not  have  to  be  your  enemy.    He  can  be  your  friend. 
Competition   does  not  kill   trade;   it  builds  trade,  stimulates  trade,  and  makes 
new  trade. 

This  is  based  on  the  natural  law  that  no  one  person  can  suit  everybody.  No  man 
can  get  all  possible  business  in  any  community.  His  personality  attracts  some 
and  repels  others.  Wherever  there  is  a  lot  of  business  for  one  man  there  is  busi- 
ness for  somebody  else. 

This  is  proved  by  the  fact  that  in  any  big  city  business  houses  in  the  same  line 
group  together.  We  find  most  of  the  piano  houses  in  one  part  of  the  town. 
Most  of  the  automobile  concerns  are  strung  along  a  certain  section  of  Broad- 
way, New  York.  The  silk  merchants,  the  hat  manufacturers,  and  so  on,  each  have 
their  district.  This  proves  that  in  the  practical  working  out  of  business  it  pays 
a  man  to  locate  in  the  neighborhood  of  his  competitors. 

It  is  not  true  that  there  is  just  so  much  business  to  be  had,  and  that  a  rival  cuts 
your  trade  in  half.  As  a  rule  the  more  tradesmen  the  more  trade.  A  good  lively 
competitor  will  increase  your  custom. 

Two  grocers  in  the  same  block  will  do  more  business  than  if  there  were  only  one, 
and  if  the  other  grocer  is  good  it  is  a  more  valuable  competitor  to  you  than  a  poor 
one. 

"Where  the  carrion  is  there  the  eagles  are  gathered  together." 

So  runs  the  proverb.    And  where  no  eagles  hover  there  is  slim  picking. 

Don't  hate  yoUr  competitor.  Hate  is  always  expensive.  Get  acquainted  with 
him.    You  may  learn  something. 

Don't  knock  your  competitor.  It  sounds  bad,  and  it  is  bad.  Be  a  good  sport. 
Play  the  game.    Keep  good  natured. 

Beat  your  competitor  if  you  can,  but  rei.  ember  that  the  surest  way  to  beat  him 
is  to  sell  better  goods,  give  prompter  service  and  have  more  courteous  work-people 
Don't  fight  by  cutting  prices.    Keep  your  margin  of  profit  fair. 

If  your  competitor  lies  about  you,  or  uses   underhand  methods  to  harm  you, 
don't  worry.    He  is  cutting  off  his  nose 
people  all  the  time.      Straight  business 
long  run. 

Your  competitor  will  do  you  a  deal  of 
keep  you  from  slumping.  He  will  make 
business,  and  altogether  will  be  a  good 


There  is  business  enough  for  both  of 


to  spite  his  face.  He  cannot  fool  all  the 
and  good  nature  win  out  always  in  the 

good  if  you  keep  your  eyes  open.  He  will 
you  energetic,  careful,  more  attentive  to 
tonic  for  you,  if  you  know  how  to  use  him. 
you.    Go  after  it. 


Copyright  by  Dr.  Frank  Crane 


February,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


13 


THE  HARDWARE  ROUND  TABLE 

LITTLE  CHATS  ABOUT  SALESMANSHIP  AND  BUSINESS  ME  i  HODS 


IT  WON'T  ALWAYS  RAIN 

At  a  certain  important  directors'  meeting  held  the  other 
dav,  one  large  stockholder  was  prophesying  dire  calamities 
for  the  business.  Conditions  were  bad,  he  avowed,  sales 
were  nil  and  profits  were  less  than  nothing.  Surely  busi- 
ness was  going  to  the  "demnition  bow-wows." 

Then,  smilingly,  another  executive  broke  into  the  mono- 
logue. "George,"  he  said,  turning  to  the  pessimistic  stock- 
holder, "how  far  can  a  dog  run  into  the  woods?" 

"Why,  damn  it  all.  Will,  I  suppose  a  dog  can  run  into  the 
woods  as  far  as  he  likes,"  responded  the  down-cast  director, 
a  bit  nettled  at  such  a  triviality. 

"You're  wrong,"  snapped  the  executive,  "after  a  dog 
runs  half  wav  INTO  the  woods  he  is  beginning  to  run 
OUT!" 


ORGANIZE— GET  TOGETHER— CO-OPERATE 

Associations  and  clubs  are  bringing  business  men  to- 
gether in  all  walks  of  life  and  phases  of  activity.  In  the 
cities  the  Rotary  and  Kiwanis  clubs  have  set  a  high  stand- 
ard for  public  and  social  service  and  have  broadened 
thousands  of  men  v/ho  otherwise  would  have  confined 
their  activities  to  their  store  or  office,  their  home  and, 
possibly,  on  Sunday  their  Church. 

Few  lines  of  business  are  now  without  a  trade  association, 
and  in  Ontario  many  towns  and  cities  now  have  local  hard- 
ware clubs  in  addition  to  their  provincial  Ontario  Retail 
Hardware  Association. 

Discussing  the  increasing  demands  of  organized  move- 
ments upon  the  time  and  attention  of  business  men,  Harvey 
Whipple,  in  Building  Materials,  recently  analyzed  the 
benefits  of  men  getting  together  in  trade  associations  as 
follows: 

The  average  man  goes  through  life  dividing  up  himself 
and  his  interests  into  three  parts — One  part  social  relations; 
One  part  work — ^which  in  itself  is  a  social  service;  One 
part  hobby — which  is  to  keep  him  mentally  and  physically 
fit  for  the  other  two. 

At  every  step  of  analysis  of  our  human  activities  we  are 
impressed  with  our  complete  dependence  upon  others. 

Alone  a  man  would  be  beating  out  his  own  trails  through 
a  wilderness — subsisting  on  roots  and  berries.  He  is  freed 
of  such  a  bondage  only  be  his  dependence  upon  organized 
effort. 

A  man  rears  himself  to  a  great  height  on  foundations  of 
the  co-ordinated  knowledge  of  others. 

Whatever  a  man's  special  calling  or  means  of  livelihood, 
his  wits  are  but  utilizing  the  data  that  have  been  assembled, 
analyzed  and  arranged  by  others.  It  has  been  said  that 
the  measure  of  a  man's  mental  balance  is  in  his  ability  to 
co-operate. 

It  seems  that  in  spite  of  our  impatience  with  the  some- 
times cumbersome  movements  of  organized  human  beings — 
that  organized  effort  does  get  farther  and  upon  surer 
ground;  that,  selfishly  as  a  man  may  think  he  can  best  go 
it  alone,  he  is  dependent,  consciously  or  not,  upon  the  pro- 
gress in  knowledge  which  others  make  for  him;  that  a  man 


who  does  not  assist  an  organized  movement  that  is  prepar- 
ing the  very  road  which  he  himself  must  travel,  is  not  only 
an  ingrate,  but  a  fool. 

Civilization  got  its  start  when  two  pre-historic  men  stop- 
ped hurling  rocks  at  each  other  and  got  their  heads  to- 
gether over  the  same  camp  fire. 

Co-operate.  If  you  have  a  good  idea,  share  it  with  some- 
body else. 


HARDWARE  CODE  OF  ETHICS 

Here  is  the  Code  of  Ethics  adopted  by  the  National  Re- 
tail Hardware  Association  in  the  United  States  as  a  set  of 
rules  to  govern  jobbers  and  retailers  in  their  relationship 
with  one  another. 

1.  It  is  not  within  the  wholesaler's  function  to  quote 
prices  to  consumers.  All  sales  to  consumers  should  be 
made  through  the  legitimate  retail  merchant. 

2.  Hardware  jobbers  should  not  sell  to  merchants  not 
engaged  in  the  retail  hardware  business  merchandise  not 
intended  for  regular  resale  purposes., 

3.  Price  reductions  by  manufacturers  should  be 
promptly  passed  to  the  retail  merchant,  and  by  him  to  the 
public. 

4.  Cash  discounts  should  be  taken  only  within  the 
specified  or  agreed  time. 

5.  Bills  should  be  paid  promptly  according  to  speci- 
fied terms.  In  no  case  is  the  retail  merchant  justified  in 
delaying  his  remittance  for  a  longer  period,  except  by 
special  arrangement,  in  which  case  he  should  be  willing 
to  pay  a  legitimate  interest  charge  for  the  accommodation. 

6.  Merchandise  shipped  on  regular  order  should  not 
be  returned  without  permission  from  the  seller.  Such  per- 
mission should  not  be  requested  after  the  lapse  of  a  reason- 
able period,  and  in  no  case  should  such  return  shipment 
be  made  "freight  collect." 

7.  The  retailer  should  accept  railroad  responsibility 
for  goods  delivered  by  the  shipper  to  the  railroad  in  good 
order. 

8.  Buyers  should  not  violate  the  confidence  of  pros- 
pective sellers  by  divulging  price  quotations. 


The  Armouries,  Hamilton,  Ontario. 


14  HARDWARE   AND   ACCESSORIES  February,  1922 


HAMILTON  CONVENTION  PROGRAM 

TUESDAY,  FEBKUAEY  14th 
Boyal  Connaught  Hotel 
8.30    A.M.    Secretary's   Office,    located   ou    Mezzanine   floor,    open  for 
registrir.Ioa   of   members   and   guests,   distribution   of  badges  and 
Seuar.'l  iiu'irmation. 
9.45  .i.M.    Convention  Hall  on  Mezzanine  floor,  Community  singing. 
10.00  A  M.   '..Vromptly).    Opening  session.  President  Nelson  Mills  pre- 
siding. 

Song — "God  Save  the  King." 

Imccation — Rev.  Dv.   \V.  H.   Sedgewick,   Minister  Central  Presby- 

t'Miau  C'Ir.uch,  Hamilton. 

-Annual  Address — President  Mills. 

Civic  V  cicorae — Mayor  of  Hamilton. 
10.30  A.  11.    Question  Box — Ed.  Wanless,   Chatham,  presiding.  Special 

toiuci  ftr  iho  day  questions  1  to  6  inclusive. 
11.00   A.M.     •  The   uiaintenancc   of   established   resale   prices   on  well 

advertised  products" — H.  J.  Haire,  The  Alabastine  Co.,  Paris. 
11.30   A.Vy.    How    Dealers   may    successfully   advertise — L.    R.  Green, 

Adverti&inp  Manager,  Tucketts  Limited,  Hamilton. 
12.00   A.M.     Appointment    cf   Convention    Committees   and  introduction 

01  new  business  by  luembers. 
12.30  P.M.  Adjourianent. 

I.  00   P.M.    Opening  of  Hardware   Kxhibition   at  the  Armouries,  John 

St.,  North.    Hours:     1  to  10  o'clock. 

During  the  afternoon,  only  merchants  and  ladies  accompanying 
tlieui  will  be  admitted  to  the  Kxhibition. 

'rh«se  holers  every  day  are  reserved  for  business  intercourse  between 
exhibitors  and  those  who  bviy  to  re-sell  or  use  the  products  ex- 
hibited. 

Members  and  their  ladies  require  no  admission  tickets,  their  badges 
sre  credentials  at  al!  hours. 

Xon  niembers  and  Other  buyers  will  be  provided  with  "Merchants' 
Tickets"  by  Exhibitors  or  by  Secretary  at  booth  No.  99  (to  the 
right  at  main  entrance)  on  entering  the  Exhibition. 

7.00  P.M.  Exhibition  open  to  thv  public.  Children  unaccompanied  by 
parents  not  admitted.  Prospective  buyers  will  have  an  excellent 
opportunity  to  witness  demonstrations  of  articles  which  they  pur- 
pos3  purchasing. 

10.00  P.M.    Closing  hour. 

WEDNESDAY,  FEBRUARY  15th 
8.30  A.M.    Secretary's  Office  open  on  Mezzanine  floor  of  Hotel. 
9.15  A..\I.     Community  singing. 

9.30  A.JI.  (promptly).  Convention  Hall.  Question  Box — George  E. 
May,  'J  oronto,  presiding.  Topics  for  the  day.  Questions  7  to  12 
inclusive. 

10.30  A.M.    Reports  ef  Officers  and  Committees. 
Treasurer's  Report. 
Secretary's  Report. 
Audito-'s  Report. 

II.  00  A.M.    The  Banker  and  the  Retailer — J.  P.  Bell,  General  Manager 

of  the  Bank  of  Hamilton. 
11.30  .\.M. — Hardware  Mutual  Fire  Insurance — C.  L.  Clarke,  Winnipeg, 

Canaaian  Manager,  Canadian  Hardware  &  Implement  Underwriters. 
12.00  A.M.  "Business  Disease" — T.  J.  Penberthy,  Lowe  Bros.  Toronto. 
12.30  P.M.  .\djr.urnment. 

I.  00  P.M.    Hardwarr?  Exhibition  at  the  Armouries. 

Afternoon    for   Buyers   and   Representatives    of   Business  Houses. 
Evening  open  to  the  public. 
7.700  P.M.    Association  Banquet  for  ladies  and  men.    Royal  Connaught 
Hotel.    Tickets,  f2.50  each. 

.Tohn  D.  Wells,  Managing  Editor  "Buffalo  Times."  will  speak  at 
the  Ban^iuet.    Subject:     "Whoa"  (full  of  wit  and  humor). 

THURSDAY,  FEBRUARY  16th 
9.15  A.M.     Convention  Hall.     Community  Singing. 

9. '.J  A.M.  (promptly).  Question  Box — H.  N.  Joy,  President  Hardware 
&  Paint  Dealers  Club  of  Toronto,  presiding.  Topics  for  the  day- 
Questions  13  to  12  inclusive. 

10.00  .\.M.  "Save  the  Surface"  Campaign  and  how  to  hook  up  with 
it.— H.  E.  Mihell,  Imperial  Varnish  &  Color  Co.,  Toronto,  Executive 
M'lnber  Save  tht   Surface  Campaign  Committee. 

10.30  -\.M.  "Econoinics  as  applied  to  every  day  business." — Professor 
W.  C.  Clark,  Director  of  courses  in  Commerce,  Queen's  University. 

II.  00  .V.M.     "Business  conditions   and  prospects — Our  joint  responsi- 

bility in  building  up  and  maintaining  Canadian  Prosperity." — J.  R. 

Sli(;W.  ^^P.,  Canadian  Manufacturers'  Association. 

Mr.  Tiios.  Birkett,  President  Wholesale  Hardware  Association. 
12.00  A.M.    The  Association  Price  Book,  introduced  by  Secretary. 

Open  discussion  by  members. 
12.30  P.?I.  Adjourrment. 

1.00  P.M.  to  6  P.M.  Hardware  Exhibition  at  .\rmouries  open  to  Buy- 
ers and  Dealers. 

6.30  p..\l.    Complimentary  Banquet   tendered  by  the  Hardware  Manu- 
facturers of  Hamilton. 
7.00  to  10.00  P.M.    Exhibition  open  to  the  Public. 

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i  Every  buyer;    will  be  furnished  with  a  Buyer's  Card.  | 

1  On  making  a  purchase  from  an  Exhibitor  he  will  present  | 

I  the  card  and  have  entered  on  it  the  name  of  exhibitor  | 

I  from  who"-))  he  buys  goods,  and  the  approximate  amount  | 

I  of  the  purchase,  (entries  to  be  made  by  salesman).    Have  | 

I  each  exiiibilor  from  whom  you  buy  do  the  same.  | 

I         Cash  and  other  awards  will  be  made  in  two  ways:    (a)  | 

I  several  graded  awards  to  buyers  of  the  largest  aggregate  1 

I  purcliases.  (b)  several  graded  awards  to  dealers  who  buy  | 

I  from  the  1  irgesl  number  of  exhibitors.  | 

I  At  the  close  of  the  Convention,  hand  or  mail  the  card  to  § 
1      the  Association  Secretary.  | 


FRIDAY,  FEBRUARY  17th 

9.15  A.M.     Convention  Hal..     Coinmunitv  Singing. 

9.30  A.M.     Question  Box. 

10.00  A.M.    Reports  of  Committees. 

Kesolutii;ns. 

Koiiiination  of  Officers. 

-Mection  of  Oflicers. 

Uj.fiuisiied  business. 
10.30  .V.M.    A  isit  new  factory  Libbey  Owens  Sheet  Glass  Co. 
1.00  P.M.    Visit  Hardware  Exhibition,  finish  buying,  and  file  buyer's 

cards  with  the  Secretary  at  booth  No.  99  or  mail  to  him  at  Pres- 

cott.  Out. 


CONVENTION  QUESTION  BOX 


1. 


How  closely  should  we  follow  declining  markets  in  adjusting  otuj 

selling;  prices? 

Are  the  Jobbers  as  prompt  as  they  should  be  in  meeting  the  de- 

(linii  s  nihrket! 

V.  hat  thali  we  dc  with  wage  question  as  the  high  living  costs  de- 
cline. 

Ho^v  can  the  cost  of  doing  business  be  cut,  and  maintain  service. 
What  new  lines  did  you  add  during  1921,  that  have  proved  profit- 

S  1)13. 

How  many  dealers  present  pay  a  bonus  on  sales  by  Clerks! 
Could   not   active  steps   be  taken  by  this  Association  to  prevent 
Vviioleaalers  from  doing  a  Retail  business? 

What  is  the  best  way  to  get  results  from  advertising  folders,  etc., 
as  iiirnif-:hed  by  manufacturers? 

IIov  much  should  a  dealer  pay  for  goods  he  takes  out  of  stock  for 

his  own  use  ? 

V'hiL  slionld  properly  be  included  in  over-head  Expenses? 
V.":.at    is    the    average   wage   paid    Clerks,    Tinsmiths,  Plumbers! 
Ha/' e  any  reduced  wages  ^-et  ' 

Has  any  one  definite  information  regarding  workshop  in  connection 

with  store  i     Does  it  pay? 

What  is  the  best  way  to  handle  slow  accounts  without  offending 

custoniei  ? 

14.     What  is  the  average  percentage  of  loss  on  credit  accounts? 

Have  any  members  successfully  turned  a  Credit  Business  into  a 
Casi'  Business?    How  was  it  done? 

In  changing  Credit  to  Cash  business  would  it  be  advisable  to  allow 
montl.ly  accounts  to  telephone  customers,  and  to  customers  who  are 
building  or  painting? 

How  do  you  proceed  to  collect  tough  accounts? 

What  e.\perienee  have  dealer.i  present  had  in  handling  Auto  Sup- 
plies, Tires,  etc.,  in  a  small  town?  Do  they  find  it  profitable,  or  is 
most  of  the  business  going  tc  garages.  If  hardware  dealers  get 
bulk  ol  lusiness,  how  do  they  do  it? 

What  are  the  advantages  or  disadvantages  of  marking  selling  prices 

pr-vate  code? 

Why  are  cheap  Platform  Scales  still  three  times  the  pre-war  price! 


2. 


3. 


10. 
11. 


12. 


13. 


15. 


16. 


17. 
18. 


19. 


20. 

iiniMIMIUIIlllMnMMinMMIIIIIIllMIIMJIIMIMIIIIIIMMIMIIMIMINJIIIIMirnilllMUIIIMIIIIlninnMIMUlnMIIIUIIIIIIIIMIIMIIUIUIIIJMIIM 

I  O.  R.  H.  A.  OFFICERS  1 92 1  •  2  | 

I  PRESIDENT  I 

I      Nelson  Mills  Hamilton  1 

i  VICE-PRESIDENT  1 


George  E.  May 


Toronto 


TREASURER 


John  Caslor 


Toronto 


PERMANENT  SECRETARY 


W.  F.  Macpherson 


F.  B.  Smith 
W.  J.  Bell 
R.  Hawkins 
E.  Wanless 


Geo.  Mathewson 
J.  W.  Peacock 


EXECUTIVE 


AUDITORS 


PAST  PRESIDENTS 


1906  A. 

1907  W 

1908  J. 

1909  D. 

1910  D. 

1911  R. 

1912  M. 

1913  H. 

1914  W 

1915  C. 

1916  W, 

1917  J. 

1918  D. 

1919  A. 

1920  E. 


W.  Humphries 
.  G.  Scott 
R.  Hambly 
Brocklebank 
Cinnamon 
C.  Chown 
S.  Madole 
Occomore 

F.  Macpherson 
W.  Conn 
J.  Carter 
N.  McGregor 
A.  Macnab 
J.  Wright 
Wanless 


Prescott 


BeHeville 
Beeton 

Smiths  Falls 
Chatham 


Toronto 
Toronto 


Parkhill 

Mount  Forest 

Barrie 

Arthur 

Lindsay 

Belleville 

Napanee 

Guelph 

Prescott 

Tillsonburg 

Picton 

Oakville 

Orillia 

Hamilton 

Chatham 


HONORARY  SECRETARY 


Weston  Wrigley 


Toronto 


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February,  Wl2 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


15 


CONVENTION  WILL  BE  LARGELY  ATTENDED 

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Splendid  program  and  entertainment  features  arranged — One  hundred  Displays  at  Exhibition  in 
Armouries— Single  fare  railway  rates  on  certificate  plan. 

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Hamilton  is  again  the  Mecca  toward  which  hardware 
men  from  all  parts  of  Ontario  will  turn  their  faces  during 
the  third  week  in  Feibruary. 

The  seventeenth  annual  convention  of  the  Ontario  Retail 
Hardware  Association  is  to  be  held  in  Hamilton  Feb.  14 
to  18  and  past  experience  has  shown  the  popularity  of  the 
"Hardware  "  City  as  a  convention  center. 

This  year  with  the  membership  in  the  Ontario  Associa- 
tion doubled  in  number,  the  prospects  indicate  that  the 
number  of  retail  buyers  attending  will  probably  be  larger 
than  at  any  previous  convention. 

One  hundred  exhibitors  will  also  help  swell  the  attend- 
ance and  endeavor  to  make  it  profitable  for  visiting  re- 
tailers to  attend  the  convention.  The  new  lines  of  goods 
to  be  shown  are  numerous  and  those  exhibitors  who  do  not 
exhibit  new  lines  will  have  new  selling  ideas  and  sugges- 
tions to  make  to  visitors  who  call  at  the  various  booths  and 
examine  the  lines  displayed. 

ONE  HUNDRED  EXHIBITS 
Every  afternoon  the  Hardware  Exhibition  in  the  Armour- 
ies will  be  open  to  retailers  and  their  wives  and  there  is 
little  enough  time  for  inspection  of  the  displays  which  will 
be  brought  together  at  a  cost  of  thousands  of  dollars. 
The  wise  retailer  will,  therefore,  allow  nothing  of  a  social 
nature  from  preventing  him  to  give  the  time  necessary 
for  a  thorough  and  systematic  study  of  the  exhibits. 

In  appreciation  of  the  heavy  expense  entailed  by  the 
exhibitors  ,the  O.R.H.A.  are  this  year  encouraging  dealers 
to  place  orders  at  the  Exhibition.  Every  member  and 
visiting  merchant  will  be  given  a  buying  card  and  have 
entered  on  ii  the  name  of  each  exhibitor  from  whom  he 
buys  goods  and  the  amount  of  the  purchase.  (Entries 
made  by  the  salesman.)  Cash  awards  to  buyers  will  be 
paid  in  two  ways  (a)  several  graded  awards  to  buyers  of 
the  largest  aggregate  purchases;  (b)  other  graded  awards 
to  dealers  who  buy  from  the  greatest  number  of  exhibitors. 
This  system  will  develop  spirited  buying  and  it  will  insure 
the-  filing  of  cards  because  the  cash  awards  will  total  sev- 
eral hundred  dollars. 

CONVENTION  MEETINGS 
All  the  convention  meetings  will  be  held  at  the  Royal 
Connaught  Hotel  in  the  mornings  and  evenings,  leaving  the 
afternoons  free  for  the  exhibition. 

The  program  for  each  morning  provides  for  many  inter- 
esting discussions  on  important  trade  problems  and  in 
such  a  period  as  the  hardware  trade  is  now  experiencing 
every  dealer  who  can  should  attend  each  session  as  it  is 
the  one  place  where  hardware  dealers  can  meet  with  open 
frankness  and  exchange  ideas. 

It  is  a  liberal  education  to  attend  a  state  convention 
None  are  so  successful,  or  so  keen,  or  so  perfect  hardware 
men  that  they  cannot  be  benefited  by  contact  with  friendly 
competitors.  They  are  broadened  by  this  contact,  glean 
new  views,  see  how  others  make  collections,  buy  their 
stock,  advertise  their  wares  and  run  their  stores.  They 
only  have  this  opportunity  at  conventions  and  this  oppor- 
tunity comes  only  once  each  year. 


The  finest  tonic  in  the  world  for  new  enthusiasm  in  your 
store  is  to  attend  the  hardware  convention.  You  listen  to 
talks  from  successful  men  on  business  problems.  You  dis- 
cuss with  other  hustling  hardware  dealers  what  they  are 
doing  and  the  ideas  you  pick  up  there,  when  apj^lied  to 
your  own  stores  lielp  to  rejuvenate  business. 

ENTERTAINMENT  FEATURES 

Banquets  are  billed  for  Wednesday  and  Thursday  even- 
ings, the  first  to  be  under  the  auspices  of  the  Ontario  Retail 
Hardware  Association  themselves.  In  previous  years  it  has 
been  customary  for  a  jobbing  house  to  act  as  host  but  this 
year  the  Association  is  host  and  it  is  a  Dutch  treat  affair, 
tickets  being  $2.50  each.  No  retailer  or  exhibitor  need 
stay  away  because  the  invitations  are  limited  or  the  guest 
is  not  a  customer  of  the  host. 

On  Thursday  evening  the  Hamilton  hardware  manufac- 
turers are  tendering  a  complimentary  dinner  to  all  mem- 
bers of  the  Retail  Hardware  Association. 

On  Friday  a  visit  to  the  new  glass  factory  of  the  Canad- 
ian Libby-Owens  Sheet  Glass  Co.,  is  on  the  program,  the 
process  of  glass  making  being  one  which  few  hardware 
dealers  have  had  an  opportunity  of  seeing. 

The'  railways  have  arranged  to  issue  certificates  to  all 
who  buy  one  way  tickets  to  Hamilton  for  the  convention. 
These  certificates  will  be  signed  at  Secretary  MacPherson's 
office  and  on  payment  of  25  cents  a  return  ticket  will  be 
issued  free  pro^dding  300  or  more  certificates  are  deposit- 
ed, which  is  easily  assured. 

dMriiiiriJiMiiiiirMiiiiiriiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiii  iiiiiiiiiiii  niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii  i  

1     PRESIDENT  MILLS  SAYS  "COME"  j 

i  Ti  Hardware  Merchants  of  Ontario:  | 

I  The  coming  Convention  in  February  at  Hamilton  prom-  | 

I  ises  to  be  the  most  important  ever  held  in  our  history.  | 

1  Men!    I  urge  you  to  lay  aside  your  business  cares  and  | 

I  join  us  there.  | 

I  The  Association  never  was  so  valuable  as  it  is  at  the  | 

I  present  time,  and  a  few  days  spent  at  the  Convention  will  | 

I  be  handsomely  repaid  in  learning  what  the  other  fellow  | 

I  has  to  say.    You  owe  it  to  yourself.    You  owe  jt  to  your  | 

I  business.    You  owe  it  to  the  Association.    Come  prepared  | 

I  to  dc  your  part  as  the  situation  may  require  in  the  many  | 

1  important  questions  and  topics  which  are  sure  to  be  pre-  | 

I  sented.    You  will  have  the  privilege  of  listening  to  talented  | 

I  speakers,  men  of  ability,  men  of  authority,  men  who  have  | 

I  pcoomplished  something  in  life  and  men  who  will  inspire  | 

I  ycu  with  higher  ideals;  the  kind  that  help  everybody  and  | 

I  hurt  nobody.  | 

I  The   foundation   and   structure   of   our   Association   is  | 

1  based  upon  increased  numerical  strength,  retaining  mem-  | 

I  bership  already  obtained,  having  members  grow  and  broad-  | 

I  en  through  mixing  v/ith  others  at  Convention,  and  rising  | 

1  with  the  experience  gained  in  their  daily  business.  | 

I  The  exhibition  this  year  will  absolutely  eclipse  any  ever  | 

I  held  in  former  years.    There  will  be  thirty  more  exhibitors.  | 

I  TJie  Retailers'  Banquet  and  entertainment  on  Wednesday  | 

I  evening  will  be  a  big  feature  of  the  Convention.  | 

I  I  am  sure  you  will  find  a  trip  to  Hamilton  this  year  | 

I  botli  pleasant  and  profitable,  and  I  take  pleasure  in  ex-  | 

I  lending  to  each  and  every  Hardware  man  in  Ontario  a  | 

I  sincere  and  cordial  invitation  to  "Come."  | 

I  Nelson  Mills  | 

I  President  O.R.H.A.  | 

jfllllllllMllllinilMMMIIMIIIMMIMIIIMIIIIIIIMIIMMMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIirlllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIMIIIMIMIIIMIMIMIIIIMIIIM 


16 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


February,  1922 


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LIST  OF  EXHIBITORS 

Booth  No.  Exhibitors  Address 

1  Muck  Furnace  Co   Chatham 

lA  .  .  .  .Hardware   &   Accessories   Toronto 

2  Coleman  Lamp  Co.,   Ltd  Toronto 

3  Bird  &  Son  Limited  Hamilton 

4  The  Alabastine   Co.,   Ltd  Paris 

5  Kali  Zryd  Foundry  Co  Hespeler 

6  &.  7.. The  Gurney  Foundry  Co.,  Ltd  Toronto 

8  &  9..  Sanderson  Pearcy  Co.,  Ltd  Toronto 

k  11.  Can.  Fdry.  &  Forgings  Co.,  Ltd  Brockville 

&  13.  Consumers  Cordage  Co.,  Ltd  Montreal 

 R.  McDougal  &  Co.,  Ltd  Gait 

 Xationai  Electric  Heating  Co.,  Ltd  Toronto 

 Aluminum  Specialty  Co  Toronto 

 SInde  Manfg.  Co.,  Ltd  Owen  Sound 

»  .  .  .  .  MeFarlane  Mfg.  Co  Toronto 

Canadian  National  Carbon  Co.,  Ltd  Toronto 

 Durham  Duplex  Co.,  Ltd  Toronto 

 j!iluator   Manfg.   Co  Hamilton 

 Stewart   &   Wood   Ltd  Toronto 

&  24.McClary  Manfg.  Co.,  Ltd  London 

 Standard  Paint  &  Varnish  Co  Windsor 

 Benjamin   Moore  Co.,   Ltd  Toronto 

 Xorman    Macdonald  Toronto 

 Hardware  &  Metal  Toronto 

 Kasemen;    Skrene   Dore  Co  Toronto 

 Louden  Machinery  Co  Guelph 

 Taylor  Bros.  Cutlery  Co  Hamilton 

&  33. Can.  Cycle  &  Motor  Co  Weston 

 Industrial  Varnish  Co  Hamilton 

 Aluminum  Ware  Mfg.  Co.,   Ltd  Oakville 

 N.  Slater  Co..   Ltd  Hamilton 

 Perfection  Stove  Co  Sarnia 

 Ideal  Aluminum  Products.  Ltd  Toronto 

 Brantford  Computing  Scales  Co  Brantford 

 The  Homo  Products  Co  Hamilton 

 Oneida  Community  Ltd  Niagara  Falls 

 Lowe  Brothers.   Ltd  Toronto 

 Auto  Strop   Safety  Razor  Co  Toronto 

 A.  R.  Lundy,  257  King  W  Toronto 

 International  Business   Machines   Co.,   Ltd.. Toronto 

 Rae  Machine  Tool  Works  Hamilton 

48.  Can.  Needle  &  Fish  Tac  Co  Toronto 

&  50.  Canadian  Weslinghouse  Co.,  Ltd  Hamilton 

&  52.Glidden  Varnish  Co  Toronto 

<i-  54.Hamiltoa  Stove  &  Heater  Co  Hamilton 

 Richards  Wilcox  Canadian  Co  London 

 Niwell  Manf^  Co  Prescott 

 S.  C.  Johnson  &  Sons  Brantford 

 Premier  Tire  Rubber  Co  Toronto 

 Toronto  Asphalt  Roofing  Mfg.  Co  Mount  Dennis 

 Geo.    Cooke  Company  Toronto 

 Richardson   &  Bureau  Montreal 

 Gendron   Manufacturing   Co.   Ltd  Toronto 

 Can.  Consolidated  Plate  Glass  Co  Toronto 

 Monitor   Stove   Co  Toronto 

 Thos.   Davidson   Mfg.   Co  Montreal 

 Doherty    Manfg.   Co  "..Sarnia 

 Meakins  &  Sons  Ltd  Hamilton 

 Pease  Foundry  Co.,  Ltd  Toronto 

 The  Boulton   Paint   Co  ,  ..Toronto 

 Canadian  Buffalo  Sled  Co  Preston 

 Duro  Aluminum-   Limited  Hamilton 

 D.   Moore  Co.,   Ltd  Hamilton 

 E.  C.  Atkins  &  Co  Hamilton 

 D.  G.  Moody,  Veribest  Aluminum  Toronto 

 The  Boerkh  Co.,  Ltd  Toronto 

*  77.Banwell  Hoxie  Co..  Ltd  Hamilton 

 Hoover   Suction   Sweeper   Co  Hamilton 

 Stratford   Manufacturing   Co.,    Ltd  Stratford 

k  81.  Steel  Co.  of  Canada  Hamilton 

&  81. Steel  Co.  of  Canada  Hamilton 

 Brantford   Roofing  Co.,   Ltd  Brantford 

 Frost  Steel  &  Wire  Co.,  Ltd  Hamilton 

 Cofiield  Washer  Co.,  Ltd  Hamilton 

"  Happy  Thought  Foundry  Co  Brantford 

 Hurley  Machine  Co.,   Ltd...  Toronto 

 1900  Washer  Co.,   Ltd  Toronto 

&  89.  Maxwells  Ltd  St.  Marys 

91,  92.Beatty  Bros  Fergus 

 Findlay  Bros.  Co..  Ltd  Carleton  Place 

 T.  Wright  &  Co.,  Ltd  Hamilton 

•.  Wentworth    Mfg.    Co  Hamilton 

 Canadian  Wire  &  Iron  Goods  Co  Hamilton 

 Tallman  Brass  &  Metal  Ltd  Hamilton 

 DowRwell  Lees  Co.,  Ltd   Hamilton 

 O.R.H.A.  Exhibition  Office  

 Hardware  Mutual  Insurance  Companies  


10 
12 
14 
15 
Itj 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 

23 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
.Tl 
32 
34 
35 

?e 

37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
49 
51 
53 
55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
02 
63 
04 
65 
66 
67 
68 
69 
70 
71 
72 
73 
74 
75 
76 
78 
79 
80 
81 
82 
83 
84 
85 
86 
87 

eg 
no, 

93 
94 
95 
96 
97 
98 
99 
99 


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KEEPS  A  NOTE  BOOK  HANDY 

"When  I  attend  a  hardware  convention,"  writes  a  hard- 
wareman  in  a  town  cast  of  Toronto,  "I  forget,  in  a  sense, 
that  I  am  in  business  and  am  out  for  pleasure  and  know- 
ledge. Any  little  point  that  appeals  to  me  in  noted  down 
and  forgotten  for  the  time  being.  Then  when  it  is  all  over 
and  I  am  back  on  the  job  we  make  a  survey  of  the  material 


at  hand  and  see  what  I  can  use  to  advantage. 

"I  always  examine  new  goods  and  novelties  and  if  inter- 
ested, buy.  We  have  found  in  some  instances  where  we 
could  make  better  connections,  either  in  prices,  delivery  or 
quality. 

"In  other  words  attending  the  convention  means  to  have 
a  good  time,  absorb  all  you  can,  buy  if  you  find  a  good 
thing  or  better  price,  go  home  refreshed  and  take  stock  of 
vourself." 


MILITAR.Y  naoMS 


ml 


Flan  ot  Exhibits  in  Armouries. 


February,  1922  HARDWARE  AND   ACCESSORIES  17 

yjlllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIII  IIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIMMIIMIMIIIHMMIIIIIIIIIIMIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIinillMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIMIMnilllliniMMMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIII 

I  HAMILTON  AS  A  HARDWARE  CENTRE  | 

I     Nearly  a  Hundred  Hardware  Manufacturers  and  Jobbers  Located  In  ambitious  City  | 


Nearly  a  hundred  Hardware  Manufacturers  and  Jobbers 
located  in  ambitious  city. 

One  of  the  reasons  whv  Hamilton  is  so  popular  as  a 
meeting  place  for  hardware  conventions  is  the  number  of 
industries  manufacturing  in  Hamilton  lines  which  are  sold 
bv  hardware  dealers  in  Canada  and  exported  to  all  parts 
of  the  world. 

Some  of  the  most  important  of  the  big  United  States  in- 
dustries which  have  chosen  Hamilton  as  their  Canadian 
headquarters  and  which  have  millions  of  dollars  invested 
in  this  city  are  the  International  Harvester  Company,  Chi- 
cago; Canadian  Westinghouse  Company,  Pittsburgh; 
Procter  and  Gamble,  Limited,  Cincinnati;  E.  C.  Atkins 
Company,  Indianapolis;  Meriden  Britannia  Company, 
Meriden,  Conn.;  Armour  and  Company,  Chicago;  Ameri- 
can Horseshoe  Company,  Erie,  Pa.;  American  Can  Com- 
pany; Pittsburgh  Perfect  Fence  Company;  Hoover  Suction 
Sweeper  Company,  North  Canton,  Ohio.  There  are  more 
than  fifty  Canadian  branches  of  large  American  industries 
now  located  in  Hamilton. 

Hamilton  has  the  cheapest  electric  power  in  the  world, 
and  that  fact,  more  than  anything  else,  has  made  this  city 
the  industrial  center  of  the  Dominian  of  Canada.  Geo- 
graphical location  is  largely  responsible  for  the  low  power 
rates  enjoyed  in  Hamilton,  but  a  great  contributing  factor 
is  that  in  this  city  there  is  keen  competition,  a  public  own- 
ed utility  competing  with  a  private  corporation. 

A  partial  list  of  the  manufacturers  and  wbolesalers  in 
Hamilton  selling  to  the  Canadian  hardware  trade  is  as 
follows: 

Ace  Chain  Co.  auto  chains. 

Adamson  Mfg.  Co,  auto  specialties. 

E.  C.  Atkins  &  Co,  saws  and  tools. 

Banwell  Hoxie  Wire  Fence  Co,  wire  fencing. 

Bird  &  Son,  roofing. 

Brown  Boggs  Co.,  Ltd.,  tinners  tools. 

Burlington  Products  Ltd..  fence  posts. 

Burrow,  Stewart  Ik  Milne,  stoves  furnaces  and  scales. 

Canada  Steel  Goods  Co.  Ltd.,  builders  hardware. 

Canada  Wire  &  Iron  Goods  Co.  Ltd.,  wire  specialties. 

Canadian  Hart  Products  Co.,  abrasives. 

Canadian  Horseshoe  Co.,  horseshoes. 

Canadian  Libby  Owens  Sheet  Glass  Co.  Ltd.,  glass. 

Canadian  Polishes  Ltd.,  polishes. 

Canadian  Shovel  &  Tool  Co.  Ltd.,  shovels. 

Canadian  Steel  &  Wire  Co.  Ltd.,  wire  fencing. 

Canadian  Westinghouse  Ltd.,  electrical  goods. 

Coffield  Washing  Machine  Co.  washers. 

Collins  Neverfail  Products,  Ltd.,  sprayers,  etc. 

Commercial  Oil  Co.  Ltd.,  belt  dressing. 

Climax  Baler  Co.  Ltd.,  balers. 

Dominion  Belting  Co.  Ltd.,  cotton  belting. 

Dominion  Sheet  Metal  Corporation,  sheets. 

Downswell,  Lees  Mfg  Co.  Ltd.,  washing  machines. 

Duro  Aluminum,  Ltd.,  aluminum  ware. 

Eagle  Mfg  Co.,  tool  cabinets. 


Electrical  Appliances,  Ltd.,  electrical  specialties. 
Equator  Mfg.  Co.,  Ltd.,  electrical  specialties. 
Firestone  Tire  Corporation,  tires. 
Ford  Smith  Machine  Tool  Co.,  accessories. 
Foster  Pottery  Co,  flower  pots. 
Frost  Steel  &  Wire  Co.  Ltd.,  fencing. 
Grasselli  Chemical  Co.,  Ltd.,  insecticides. 
B.  Greening  Wire  Co.  Ltd.,  screen  wire  cloth,  etc. 
Gurney  Scale  Co.  Ltd.,  scales. 
Hamilton  Aluminum  Co.  aluminum  ware. 
Hamilton  Cotton  Co.  sash  cord. 
Hamilton  Mirror  Plate  Co.  auto  lenses. 
Hamilton  Gass  Mantle  Co.  gas  mantels. 
Hamilton  Stove  .'i  Heater  Co.  stoves  furnaces,  builders 
hardware. 

Hamilton  Stamp  &  Stencil  Co.  Ltd.,  brass  tablets. 
Hamilton  Sewer  Pipe  Co.  Ltd.,  sewer  pipe. 
Hamilton  Whip  Co.  Ltd.,  whips. 
Home  Products  Co.,  polishes. 

Hoover  Suction  Cleaner  Co.  Ltd.,  vacuum  cleaners. 

Industrial  Varnish  Co.  Ltd.,  polishes. 

Robt.  Hassler,  Ltd.,  shock  absorbers. 

Kent,  Garvin  Co.,  wholesale  builders'  hardware. 

Lacoa  Polish  Co.,  auto  polishes. 

Laidlaw  Bale  Tie  Co.  Ltd.,  nails,  bale  ties,  etc. 

Meakins  &  Sons,  Ltd.,  brushes. 

Meriden  Brittania  Co.  Ltd.,'  silverware. 

D.  Moore  Co.  Ltd.,  stoves  and  furnaces. 
Nicholson  Sales  Co.  Ltd.,  wholesale  accessories. 
Ontario  Lantern  &  Lamp  Co.  Ltd.,  electric  lamps. 
Ontario  Plate  Glass  Co.  auto  lenses. 

Rea  Machine  Tool  Co.  Ltd.,  planes  and  vises. 
Schultz  Mfg  Co.  Ltd.,  lamp  burners. 
Servos  &  Bateman,  wire  fencing. 
N.  Slater,  Ltd.,  builders  hardware. 
Steel  Co.  of  Canada,  Ltd.,  nails,  tacks,  etc. 
Tallman  Brass  &  Metals,  Ltd.,    auto    pumps,  electric 
fixtures,  etc. 

Taylor-Brasco,  Ltd.,  metal  store  fronts. 
Taylor  Cutlery  Co.  Ltd..  cutlery- 
Wilkinson  &  Compass,  Ltd.,  wholesale  accessories. 
Wires  of  Canada,  Ltd.,  lawn  hose  couplings. 
Wallace  Barnes  Co.  Ltd.,  wire  springs. 
Walter  Woods,  Ltd.,  woodenware. 
Wood,  Alexander  &  James,  wholesale  hardware. 
Wentworth  Mfg  Co.  aluminum  ware. 

E.  T.  Wright  &  Co.  kitchenware. 
Wright  Tool  Co.  cement  tools. 
Zenoleum  Products,  Ltd.,  stock  foods. 


The  trouble  with  folks  who  keep  their  store  records 
in  their  heads  instead  of  in  books,  say  bankers,  is 
that  such  folks  usually  have  poor  heads. 


The  best  Nev7  Year 's  resolution  is  to  resolve  to  keen 
the  resolves  we  make. 


/ 


18 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


February,  1922 


TORONTO  HADWARE  DEALERS  ORGANIZE 

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Retail  Hardware  and  Paint  Dealers  Club  of  Toronto  formed  to  co-operate  in  matters  of  Educat- 
ion and  Trade  Expansion— About  60  retailers  enrolled. 

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At  a  banquet  tendered  by  the 
Paint,  Oil  and  Varnish  Club  of 
Toronto  to  the  hardware  and  paint 
retailers  of  Toronto  on  Jan.  25  at  the 
Carls-Rite  Hotel,  a  definite  organiza- 
tion was  formed  to  be  known  as  the 
Retail  Hardware  and  Paint  Dealers 
Club  of  Toronto. 

The  need  and  advantages  of  a 
local  organization  had  been  dis- 
cussed at  various  times  and  prelim- 
inary action  towards  organization 
had  been  taken  at  a  previous  gather- 
ing of  the  Paint,  Oil  and  Varnish 
Club,  as  well  as  at  a  meeting  at 
Mathewson's  hardware  store.  Con- 
sequently when  the  proposal  was 
made  and  the  plans  outlined  it  did 
not  take  long  to  perfect  an  organ- 
ization. 

The  meeting  was  opened  by  T.  F. 
Penberthy,  manager  of  Lowe  Bros. 
Ltd.  who  welcomed  the  retailers  as 
guests  of  the  Paint  Oil  aand  Var- 
nish Club,  stating  that  paint  job- 
bers and  manufacturers  had  often 
felt  the  need  of  a  local  association 
of  dealers  to  co-operate  with  in 
creating  increased  business  in  their 
own  and  other  lines,  and  if  the  deal- 
ers decided  to  organize  some  de- 
finite suggestions  would  be  made 
whereby  the  dealers  could  secure 
greater  sales  and  increased  volume 
of  business.  Mr.  Penberthy  turn- 
ed the  meeting  over  to  the  retail- 
ers and  asked  them  to  elect  a  chair- 
man. 

H.  N.  Joy  was  chosen  to  preside 
and  thanked  the  Paint,  Oil  and  Var- 
nish Club  for  the  splendid  dinner 
and  for  their  acting  as  god-fathers 
in  brinsing  the  dealers  together.  Mr. 
Jov  said  the  meeting  was  favored 
by  having  the  President  anad  Secre- 
tary of  the  Ontario  Retail  Hard- 
ware Association  present  as  well  as 
representatives  of  the  trade  press, 
who  had  consented  to  help  the  work 
of  organization. 

Nelson  Mills,  Hamilton,  President 
of  the  Ontario  Retail  Hardware  As- 
sociation, gave  the  suggested  or- 
ganization a  strong  boost  by  speak- 
in?  of  the  great  advantage  to  be 
gained  bv  local  dealers  getting  to- 
gether.   Hardware  and  Paint  retail- 


ers could  gain  much  by  getting  to- 
gether in  a  club  where  the  retailers 
their  salesmen  and  their  wives  could 
get  acquainted,  have  social  events, 
and  educational  talks  on  store  pro- 
blems. He  urged  against  setting 
prices,  discussing  competitors  and 
attacking  department  store  methods 
and  urged  constructive  work  such  as 
bringing  experts  to  address  the  clerks 
and  dealers  on  advertising,  salesman- 
ship and  trade  matters.  A  "clean 
up  and  paint  up"  campaign  could 
also  be  conducted  to  the  profit  of 
the  dealers  and  the  community. 


H.   N.  JOY,  WEST  TORONTO. 

W.  F.  MacPherson,  Prescott,  Per- 
manent Secretary  of  the  Ontario 
Retail  Hardware  Association,  ex- 
pressed and  told  of  the  great  success 
he  had  been  meeting  with  in  en- 
rolling members  in  the  Provincial 
Association.  In  many  towns  and 
cities  he  had  visited  in  Western 
Ontario  recently  all  the  local  hard- 
waremen  had  been  brought  together 
and  would  benefit  by  belonging  to 
the  Association  and  getting  together 
occasionally  to  co-operate  in  over- 
coming trade  abuses.  Mr.  Mac- 
Pherson told  of  one  town  where  dis- 
counts of  50,  60  ond  70  off  were  be- 
ing given  on  glass  by  different  re- 
tailers owing  to  misunderstanding 
of  costs.  Some  dealers  were  not  fair 
to  themselves  and  others  were  not 
fair  to  their  customers.    "You  like 


to  meet  the  men  you  know",  said 
Mr.  MacPherson,  "and  you  aren't 
interested  in  meeting  the  man  you 
don't  know."  Get  acquainted  with 
your  competitors,  therefore,  know 
them  and  you  will  find  you  will  want 
to  meet  them  at  trade  meetings,  and 
it  will  pay  both  of  you. 

H.  L.  Southall  spoke  for  G.  D. 
Davis  and  promised  to  do  all  he 
could  to  assist  the  work  of  orrgan- 
ization. 

Weston  Wrigley,  publisher  of 
Hardware  and  Accessories  said  he 
was  glad  to  be  in  at  the  birth  of  a 
local  club  at  Toronto,  and  hoped 
that  the  time  would  soon  arrive 
when  a  Dominion  wide  organization 
of  Provincial  and  local  hardware 
associations  and  clubs  would  be  or- 
ganized. Mr.  Wrigley  paid  tribute 
to  the  help  given  by  Mr.  Joy  in  the 
early  days  of  the  Ontario  Retail 
Hardware  association.  A.  W.  Hum- 
phries and  the  speaker  had  issued  a 
call  to  organize  an  Ontario  associa- 
tion and  about  fifty  had  enrolled 
when  Mr.  Joy  had  arrived  back  in 
Toronto  after  being  active  in  the  Re- 
tail Hardware  Association  in  North 
Dakota,  being  able  to  give  practical 
advise  and  assistance.  Here  again 
Seventeen  years  later  Mr.  Joy  and 
"Honest  John"  Caslor  were  again 
leading  in  the  work  of  organization. 
"After  ten  years  as  secretary,  Mr. 
MacPherson  succeeded  me,  "said  Mr. 
Wrigley.  "He  has  done  splendid 
work  and  doubled  the  Association's 
membership,  and  with  he  and  his 
able  executive  there  is  no  reason  why 
every  city  and  town  should  not  have 
a  local  club,  and  no  reason  why  the 
whole  Dominion  should  not  be  or- 
ganized." 

ORGANIZATION  RESOLUTION 
ADOPTED 

F.  R.  Jackson  was  the  nex*^  sneak- 
er and  said  all  present  should  now 
be  convinced  of  the  benefits  of  or- 
ganization and  he  moved,  second- 
ed bv  John  Caslor,  as  follows: 

"Be  it  resolved  that  the  retail 
hardware  and  paint  dealers  of 
Toronto  organize  a  club  to  be  known 
as  the  Hardware  &  Paint  Dealers' 


February,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


19 


Club  of  Toronto.  The  objects  of 
this  Club  to  be  the  cultivation  of 
friendly  relations  amongst  its  mem- 
bers; to  advance  the  interests  of  its 
membership  through  the  discussion 
of  matters  of  common  interest;  to 
co-operate  amongst  themselves  and 
with  other  Associations  and  trades 
that  may  have  objects  in  common 
with  this  Association  so  their  busi- 
ness and  interests  may  be  advanced; 
to  promote  honesty  in  competition, 
trading  and  advertising  and  to  cor- 
rect, in  a  lawful  and  proper  manner, 
any  such  evils  as  may  exist  or  arise 
in  their  business  in  every  reasonable 
and  lawful  and  proper  manner." 

The  resolution  was  discussed  and 
fully  twenty  local  dealers  expressed 
their  approval  before  the  motion 
was  put  and  carried. 

The  dues  were  set  at  $3  for  retail- 
ers and  $1  for  Associate  members. 

On  motion  of  C.  G.  Bailey  and 
Sam  Hobbs  the  election  of  officers 
pro  tem  was  then  proceeded  with, 
the  following  being  chosen  to  act 
until  the  work  of  organization  was 
completed  at  the  next  meeting: 
President,  H.  N.  Joy;  Vice-president, 
F.  R.  Jackson;  Secretary,  Geo. 
Mathewson;  Trrr?".rer,  A.  H.  Lake, 
608  Queen  St.,  West;  Executive  Com- 
mittee: W.  Piatt,  W.  V.  Pritchard, 
0.  Morrison,  H.  Dowe,  G.  Pearsall. 

President  Nelson  Mills  and  Secre- 
tary W.  F.  MacPherson  of  the 
O.R.H.A.  were  elected  Honorary 
Members,  while  Vice-president  Geo. 
May  had  the  honor  of  paying  the 
first  membership  fee  into  the  new 
association.  Honorary  Secretary 
Weston  Wrigley,  of  the  O.R.H.A., 
was  also  the  first  Associate  Member 
enrolled. 

A  vote  of  thanks  was  tendered  the 
Paint,  Oil  and  Varnish  Club  for  their 
hospitality  and  co-operation,  res- 
ponse being  made  by  F.  J.  Pen- 
ber^hy  and  by  T.  F.  Moneypenny,  of 
the  Imperial  Varnish  and  Color  Co., 
Ltd..  Toronto,  who  gave  practical 
words  of  advice  to  the  retailers. 

"The  paint  trade  throughout 
Canada  is  back  of  you,  and  the  man- 
ufacturers want  to  sell  you  not  paint 
alone,  but  service  that  will  enable 
you  to  sell  more  paint  and  make 
bigger  profits  in  your  business," 
said  Mr.  Moneypenny. 

Members  of  the  Paint,  Oil  and 
Varnish  Club  included:  T.  F. 
Moneypenny,  F.  P.  Penberthv,  J. 
Anthony,  S.  Armstrong,  J.  F.  Paton, 
J.  F.  Smith,  G.  Cooke,' H.  E.  Mihell, 
J.  Sturgeon,  J.  D.  Craig,  W.  M.  Bur- 


den, J.  R.  McKeown,  A.  S.  Boulton, 
R.  Pinchin  and  C.  E.  Paton;  while 
amongst  the  retailers  were:  G.  W. 
Garrett.  J.  Ritchie,  J.  Wickham,  V. 
Mathewson,  T.  H.  Boyd,  J.  W.  Jack- 
son, J.  Adams,  J.  Jolly,  J.  Peacock, 
W.  Fleming,  J.  E.  Hewitson,  H. 
Smith,  M.  Phillips,  R.  W.  Smith,  W. 
J.  Robinson,  J.  H.  Sinclair,  S.  Cap- 
Ian.  F.  Caplan,  R.  D.  Blackmore,  J. 
McFadden,  A.  R.  Hamilton,  B.  J. 
Hobbs,  A.  B.  Gowdy,  Hobbs  Hard- 


All  because  we  have  neglected  ti 
observe  the  economic  laws  that  govern 
business  has  caused  the  very  un- 
comfortable business  condition  that 
we  have  recently  gone  through.  By 
this  I  do  not  mean  only  manufactur- 
ers, wholesalers  and  retailers,  but 
the  entire  list  of  persons  and  organi- 
zations of  persons  who  work  for  a 
living,  whether  on  a  large  scale  or  a 
small  one,  with  or  without  capital. 

In  the  future  we  must  grasp  a  more 
complete  knowledge  of  these  econo- 
mic laws  that  control  business  condi- 
tions. They  are  many,  but  the  most 
important  one  is  the  law  of  supply 
and  demand,  because  if  the  stream  of 
consumable  goods  is  steady,  economic 
life  will  go  on  smoothly;  if  for  any 
reason  the  stream  is  interrupted,  more 
or  less  serious  consequences  will  re- 
sult. No  matter  what  form  economic 
life  may  assume,  it  is  a  unity,  and 
tJiat  one  element  cannot  be  affectf-d 
without  influencing  the  other  ele- 
ments. 

We  must  remember  that  there  are 
two  sets  of  people  in  business  deal- 
ings. Those  who  desire  to  buy  and 
those  who  desire  to  sell.  No  sensible 
person,  for  instance,  would  try  to 
sell  refrigerators  to  the  natives 
around  the  North  Pole.  There  is  no 
demand  there  for  such  things,  there- 
fore, the  business  would  fail,  not  foi 
a  lack  of  product,  but  because  the  law 
of  supply  and  demand  had  been 
violated. 

There  are  some  people  who  urgent- 
ly desire  some  particular  article. 
This  article  may  be  quite  necessary 
to  them,  and  their  income  being  ample 
they  are  prepared  to  pay  any  price 
which  is  demanded.  Then  again  there 
are  those  who  are  equally  urgent  sel- 
lers— they  are  prepared  to  sell  for 
any  price  which  may  be  offered.  If 
the  predominance  is  in  favor  of  the 
demand  side,  that  is  to  say.  if  there 
are  more  goods  of  a  particular  char- 
acter demanded  than  the  visible  sup- 
ply can  provide,  then  the  most  urgent 
buyers  will  exert  a  very  strong  in- 
fluence toward  raising  the  price.  The 
price  always  tends  to  approximate 
toward  that  price  which  can  be  paid 
by  the  most  urgent  buyers.  When 
the  supply  is  in  excess  of  the  demands, 
the  price  will  tend  to  approximate  to 
the  price  which  the  most  urgent  sel- 
lers will  accept. 

Changes  in  the  standard  of  living  is 
another  thing  that  exercises  a  very 


ware,  M.  Freek,  C.  McFarland,  G. 
Wallace,  J.  N.  Rush,  E.  McNichoI, 
J.  Harding,  A.  Staples,  G.  H.  Cutts, 
H.  E.  Groom,  Prince  &  Co.,  J.  M. 
Boyd,  G.  Pearsall,  N.  G.  Leslie,  W. 
J.  Merrill,  C.  G.  Bailey,  J.  Heideman, 
W.  E.  Piatt,  B.  Stainton,  R.  Edwards, 
W.  Kirkland,  W.  Kinnear,  R.  D. 
Ross,  J.  D.  Anderson,  S.  Hobbs,  A. 
Lake,  G.  D.  Mathewson,  John  Caslor, 
H.  N.  Joy,  G.  E.  May  and  F.  R. 
Jackson. 


important  influence  upon  demand,  es- 
pecially so  when  it  extends  to  the  mass 
of  the  people.  This  change  is  caused 
by  increased  wages  or  other  incomes, 
or  by  increased  supplies  of  certain 
commodities  in  diminished  prices. 
Take  for  instance  the  recent  wide- 
spread purchase  of  automobiles  and 
what  has  been  termed  the  'silk  shirt" 
epidemic.  The  margin  of  income  over 
actual  living  costs  made  possible  this 
higher  scale  of  living. 

In  the  early  days  of  automobiles, 
many  factories  started  up  without 
first  learning  about  this  economic  law 
of  business.  What  was  the  result? 
Cars  were  produced  readily,  but  could 
not  be  sold.  This  meant  failure.  Any 
person  or  company  that  starts  to 
make  a  product  without  knowing 
where  it  can  be  sold  and  how  much 
can  be  sold  is  violating  this  law  of 
business  and  courting  failure.  The 
same  thing  applies  to  the  workman. 
If  he  learns  a  trade  for  which  there 
is  no  demand  he  will  have  to  go  with- 
out pay  or  learn  another  one.  He 
cannot  force  people  to  hire  him;  he 
can  only  sell  his  services  where  there 
is  a  buyer  for  them. 

It  is  usually  the  buyer,  and  not  the 
seller,  who  sets  the  price.  A  seller 
can  hold  goods  at  a  certain  price,  but 
if  the  buyer  says  "no,"  he  can't  sell 
them,  and  he  must  bring  his  prices 
down  to  where  the  buyer  is  willing 
to  buy.  That  is  what  has  been  hap- 
pening during  the  past  year  and  will 
continue  to  happen  until  prices  are 
more  in  equilibrium.  The  buyer  had 
gone  on  "strike"  and  prices  were 
forced  down.  Ultimately  the  price 
of  an  article  bears  no  relation  to  its 
cost  but  is  determined  by  balancing 
the  total  number  of  buyers  against 
the  total  number  of  the  goods  to  be 
bought.  When  anything  is  plentiful 
it  is  cheap;  when  anything  that  is 
wanted  is  scarce,  it  is  dear. 


The  Claremont  Auto  Supply  Co., 
Montreal,  has  been  registered. 

O.  W.  Thompson,  Ltd.,  Kitchener, 
Ont.,  has  been  incorporated  to  deal  in 
automobiles,  bicycles  and  accessories. 
Capital,  $200,000. 

Consolidated  Steel  Corporation,  an 
American  concern,  has  obtained  a  Man- 
itoba license  and  has  appointed  E.  Vic- 
tor Vallance,  Confederation  Life  Bldg., 
Winnipeg,  as  its  agent. 


The  Law  Of  Supply  And  Demand 

By  Wilfred  G.  Astle  Canadian  Tools,  Limited.  Bridgeburg. 


20 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


February,  1922 


ELIMINATE  DUPLICATE   LINES  OF  STOCK 

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Reduction  of  Stock  should  not  be  done  by  Narrowing  the  Assortment  or  by  Curtailing  Buying 

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By  S.  R.  MILES,  Field  Manager,  National  Hardware  Association. 


RECENTLY  I  attended  a  series  of  group  meetings  of 
retailers  at  which  the  question  that  aroused  most 
interest  was  ''''What  is  the  best  way  to  reduce  stock?" 
Some  said,  "Sell  and  don't  replace."    This  was  not  con- 
sidered good  advice,  however,  if  applied  generally  and  sales 
are  to  be  kept  up. 

Other  said  they  had  quit  buying.  This  plan  did  not 
meet  with  favor.  Just  now  sales  and  profits  are  necessary. 
It  is  easily  possible  to  sell  a  great  many  goods  from  cat- 
alogs but  this  does  not  apply  to  staple  goods  that  should 
always  be  in  stock.  Every  body  agreed  that  staples  are 
most  in  demand  now. 

Listing  obsolete  or  slow-selling  articles  and  making  a 
special  effort  to  unload  was  a  plan  that  was  thought  good, 
but  would  not  mean  any  very  great  reduction  of  stock. 

Finally,  it  was  suggested  that  a  very  practical  and  ef- 
fective way  to  reduce  stock  is  to  eliminate  duplicate  lines. 

In  the  discussion  of  this  plan  it  was  found  that  many 
dealers  are  carrying  three  or  four  different  makes  of  mal- 
leable, enameled,  steel  and  cast  ranges,  with  a  difference 
of  only  three  or  four  dollars  in  the  cost  of  the  same  type 
of  r^njre. 

It  was  found  that  this  duplication  exists,  also,  with 
washinr;  machines,  oil  cook  stoves,  «ras  stoves,  implements 
land  many  other  lines.  Some  merchants  admitted  carry- 
ing two  and  even  three  lines  of  paint. 

Tlie  imj)OTtance  of  a  complete  assortment  of  the  lines 
nrried  was  emphasized.  It  was  also  decided  that  it  would 
be  mucli  bel^er — and  mean  much  less  investment — to  carrv 
a  complete  assortment  of  one  line  than  a  broken  assort- 
ment of  several  lines. 

Here  are  some  figijres  that  show  conclusively  just  what 
the  elimination  of  a  few  duplicate  lines  will  mean  in  dol- 


lirs  and  cent?: 

2  malleable  ranges.  S8.5  eac                                $  170 

2  enameled  ranges,  SJOO  ea   200 

2  cast  ranges  ranire?.  S60  ea   120 

4  wash,  mach.,  $37.50  ea   150 

4  oil  cook  stoves,        ea   60 

1  stock  paint,  minimum   300 


Total   $1,000 

These  fifiures  show  onlv  a  few  of  the  nossibilities  of  el- 
imination. There  is  not  a  den^rtment  that  does  not  have 
an  imnecessarv  duolicatioin  of  linps.  It  is  necessary 
if  all  rl.Tsses  of  customers  are  to  be  served  to  carrv  a 


line  of  pood  ai'd  a  line  of  less  exoensive  hand  saws  and 
hammers  and  the  same  thin<r  is  true  of  most  other  lines. 

It  is  safe  to  sav  that  th**  average  store  carrvinrr  a  sfocV 
of  $10,000  ran  pHminnte  dnnlif-ate  lines  to  the  amount  of 
at  least  $2,000  and  sfill  have  ^  comT>lete  stock — 
$2.nO0  that  rieed  "ot  be  used  to  renlacp  stocl^  nrxl  which 
would  afford  the  financial  relief  so  much  needed  bv  many 
mcrrhanls.    The  same  ratio  will  apply  to  larger  stocks. 

The  followirijT  figiires  on  turnover  are  interesting:    //  a 


dealer  buys  three  ranges  each  of  three  different  makes — 
all  costing  the  same — and  sells  nine  ranges  of  each  make 
during  the  year,  he  will  have  sold  twenty-seven  ranges,  turn- 
ing his  stock  three  times.  If  he  buys  three  ranges  at  ai 
time  of  only  one  make  and  sells  twenty-seven  ranges  h(f 
has  turned  his  stock  nine  times,  on  one-third  the  investment. 

If  the  ranges  cost  $90  each  buying  only  one  line  dur- 
ing the  year  releases  $1,620  for  other  purposes. 

These  figures  apply  to  but  one  item  out  of  a  stock  of 
perhaps  10,000  items.  Apply  to  all  lines  and  you  have 
some  conception  of  what  it  means  in  dollars  and  cents,  and 
as  a  practical,  common  sense  method  of  reducing  stock. 

Elimination  means  concentration,  which  in  turn  means 
more  sales  If  there  are  three  makes  of  ranges,  washing 
machines  or  cream  separators  on  the  floor  and  a  customer 
'A'ho  is  being  shown  the  goods  finally  in  his  confusion 
asks,  man  to  man,  which  is  best,  what  answer?  Carrying 
three  lines  is  in  itself  an  admission  that  the  merchant 
himself  does  no!  know  which  is  best.  How  can  the  mer- 
chant or  salesman  who  is  not  himself  convinced  hope  to 
convince  others? 

The  secret  of  the  tremendous  sale  of  Ford  cars  is  due 
more  to  sales  concentration  than  to  any  other  single  factor. 
Fold  agencies  are  not  permitted  to  sell  other  cars.  The  re- 
sult is  concentration.  Everv  Ford  salesman  is  thoroughly 
sold  on  the  Ford  car.  It  is  his  one  job  to  sell  Ford  cars 
and  he  sells  them;  every  car  sold  helps  to  sell  others.  Oth- 
er makes  have  tried  to  market  low-priced  cars  and  have 
failed,  laigely  from  the  lack  of  properly  organized  vetail 
sales  organizaation. 

It  is  the  paramount  duty  of  every  merchant  to  study  that 
he  may  know  the  needs  of  his  community,  that  he  may 
buy  the  kind  of  merchandise  best  suited  to  its  require- 
ments. He  should  be  thoroughly  sold  on  every  article 
of  r'erchanrlise  he  buys  if  he  expects  to  sell  it  to  others. 
It  is  his  further  duty  to  sell  that  merchandise  to  his  cus- 
tomers at  the  lowest  possible  price. 

Summing  up,  the  elimination  of  duplicate  or  unnecessary 
lines  means: 

Reduced  investment; 

A.  more  flexible  working  and  storage  space  for  the  lines 
retained : 

Increased  sales  as  a  result  of  better  display; 

Increased  sales  through  concentration: 

Increased  turnover; 

Less  help,  with  fewer  lines  to  handle; 

Reduced  overhead; 

Lower  prices  to  customers; 

Increased  buying  power,  as  a  result  of  fewer  buying 
connections ; 

Better  service,  by  always  having  aa  complete  stock  of 
the  lines  carried; 

Increased  prestige  by  better  service. 

Is  there  a  better  plan  to  reduce  stock  than  by  elimina- 
tion    duj'Iicaie  or  unnecessary  lines? 


February,  1922 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


21 


TURN  STOCK  OFTENER  WHEN  PRICES  FALL 

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Merchaat  raiist  spread  his  taraover  with  market  tending  downward  —  Smaller  profit  but  more  sales 

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIJIIJIIIIIIIIIIMirjIllrillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllMIIIJIIIIJIIIII  lllllllinilinilUIMIIIMIIIMMHIIIMMIIMMIIHMIIIIMIIMIIIIIIIIIIUnnillMIIIMIMIIIinillMIIIIIIIIUIinUMMIMMMIMIMlnMIMIUIIMnMlllltinn 

By  FRANK  FARRINGTON 


THE  strange  thing  about  it  is,  that  in  spite  of  all  that 
has  been  said  about  turnover,  there  are  merchants  on 
your  street  today  who  will  think,  when  you  talk 
ai)out  turnover  that  you  mean  some  kind  of  cake  or  pie. 
So  what  wonder  so  many  of  them  turn  under  instead  of 
over,  and  go  out  of  business  before  they  a^e  ready  to  quit? 

Consumers  don't  seem  to  be  very  keen  nowadays  about 
consuming,  portly  because  they  have  formed  the  opinion 
ihat  prices  are  too  high,  and  no  matter  how  much  they 
come  down  they  can't  get  rid  of  that  idea.  And  when  con- 
sumers don't  consume  it  is  harder  to  speed  up  the  turnover 
of  your  slock.  Then,  if  prices  are  slipping  downward, 
there  is  all  the  more  reason  for  you  to  turn  over  your  stock 
more  quickly  and  more  frequently.  That  doesn't  produce 
an  ideal  situation — greater  need  for  quick  turnover  and 
greater  difficulty  in  getting  it. 

And  yet,  if  a  merchant  is  to  make  money,  he  must  speed 
up  his  turnover.  Under  present  conditions  the  successful 
merchant  is  bound  to  be  the  one  who  keeps  his  stock  turn- 
ing rapidly,  who  fits  his  profit  to  the  public  temper  as  far 
as  he  can  and  sets  about  making  a  small  profit  often  in- 
stead of  a  large  profit  once  in  a  while. 

A  profit  of  SI 50  every  month  is  better  than  a  profit  of 
$300  every  ihree  months.  Twenty-one  sales  with  a  profit 
of  $1  each  net  you  a  bigger  return  than  seven  sales  with  a 
proht  of  $2  each.  Any  newsboy  can  tell  you  that  the  often- 
er  you  sell  out  your  stock  and  buy  new,  the  oftener  you 
make  a  profit  on  your  investment,  and  he  can  explain  why. 
You  can  figure  that  out  for  yourself. 

Of  course  the  larger  number  of  sales  means  more  selling 
expense,  but  not  in  proportion  to  the  increased  business. 
Larger  selling  expenses,  too,  are  pretty  much  offset  by  the 
inciease  ii  extra  sales  that  are  made  just  because  more  cus- 
tomers conip  1(1  and  see  what  you  have  for  sale. 

A  store  soon  gets  a  reputation  for  selling  close  if  it  does 
so  and  that  attracts  more  people  and  makes  it  easier  to 
pull  them  in  with  advertising.  Also  turning  over  the  stock 
rapidly  mean.s  new  goods  oftener  with  the  added  advantage 
of  freshness  of  stock  and  more  novelties  and  new  items. 

More  salesmen  may  be  needed  to  sell  more  goods,  after 
the  sales  increase  above  a  certain  per  cent.,  but  less  sales- 
manship is  required.  The  individual  sale  is  made  with  less 
selling  expense,  v/ith  less  expense  of  all  kinds.  The 
quicker  the  lurnover,  the  less  insurance,  rent,  depreciation, 
interest,  and  many  other  charges  put  upon  the  goods. 

Not  ever)  Merchant  knows  how  to  find  out  how  many 
times  be  t»rns  his  stock  in  the  course  of  a  year — and  everv 
merchant  ought  to  know  that  much  about  his  business. 
The  simplest  rule  is  to  divide  the  cost  of  the  goods  sold 
during  the  year  by  the  average  inventory. 

I  have  k)  own  merchants  to  divide  the  year's  gross  sales 
by  the  inventory  without  realizing  that  thev  were  dividing 
selling  firurcs  bv  cost  figures,  which  would  mean  i  dis- 
rrenancy  in  results.  In  making  your  business  figures  base 
them  on  cost  or  selling  Price,  as  you  prefer,  but  don't  mix 
up  the  two  sets  of  figures. 


In  order  to  find  out  what  the  goods  cost  that  '   

>ol(I  during  the  year,  forget  the  sales  figures.  Take  the 
total  purchases,  the  total  of  all  inventory — that  is,  the 
amount  the  inventory  of  the  end  of  the  year  is  below  that 
of  the  first  of  the  year.  If  there  is  an  increase  in  inventory, 
deduct  that  increase  from  the  total  of  goods  bought.  The 
result  is  the  cost  of  goods  sold.  Of  course  you  omit  from 
such  figures  anything  that  includes  fixtures  or  equipment  or 
anything  you  dj  not  sell  rerularly  as  part  of  the  stock 

With  prices  advancing,  quick  turnover  of  stock  was  less 
important  than  it  is  now.  You  made  a  paper  profit  by 
just  holding  onto  the  goods.  I'oday  holding  onto  the 
goods  means,  in  many  instances,  to  take  a  loss,  at  least  a 
reduced  [(rjlil. 

What  you  must  do  now  is  to  get  your  money  out  of  your 
stock  ju?t  as  soon  as  you  can,  turning  the  stock  as  quickly 
as  possible  taking  your  profit  before  it  may  be  wiped  out 
by  a  decrease  in  value. 

We  are  in  the  midst  of  times  when  brains  and  merchan- 
dising ability  are  at  a  premium  because  it  is  no  longer 
poa'ibl'  for  1  man  with  no  ability  to  open  a  store  and  stock 
it  with  goods  and  then  see  his  capital  investment  doubled 
without  any  effort  on  his  part.  To  make  money  now,  you 
must  sell  the  goods  and  sell  them  quickly. 

There  are  some  kinds  of  goods  that  suffered  less  advance 
in  price  than  others,  and  that  suffer  less  decrease.  There 
are  lines  that  have  been  better  stabilized  than  others,  per- 
haps by  reason  of  more  liberal  policy  on  the  part  of  the 
manufacturer,  perhaps  because  an  advertised  price  could 
not  bi  changed  without  a  great  deal  of  loss  and  inconven- 
ience. The  OKTchant  will  naturally,  in  a  declining  market, 
look  for  the  lines  that  are  least  susceptible  to  decline  and 
that  are  most  likely  to  remain  at  a  set  figure.  These  lines 
are  mainly  lines  that  bear  well  known  trade  names  and 
that  are  mot-t  likely  to  remain  at  a  set  figure.  These  lines 
these  arc  the  lines  that  move  off  fastest,  on  which  it  is 
ea^'jest  to  speed  up  the  turnover.  The  lines  your  customers 
know  nothing  about  are  hard  to  move. 

Better  times  are  on  their  way.  Their  influence  is  already 
i)eing  felt  in  many  spots,  but  a  merchant  is  a  fool  to  sit 
back  and  'vait  for  good  times  to  come,  doing  nothing  to 
help  bring  them,  nothing  to  quicken  his  sales  and  to  speed 
up  his  turnover  in  the  meantime.  The  merchant  who  just 
waits  is  going  to  find  that  somebody  else  will  get  the  jump 
on  him  while  he  waits.  There  are  live  men  in  all  lines  of 
trade  who  are  pushing  ahead  regardless  of  local  business 
conditions.  Those  are  the  men  who  will  be  found  to  have 
secured  the  bulk  of  the  trade  when  trade  comes  back  to 
normal.  So  get  busy  and  see  what  you  can  do  to  keep 
your  stock  turning  and  to  make  it  turn  faster.  Advertising, 
display,  salesmanship  have  not  lost  their  power. 


The  storekeeper  who  is  thinking  of  business  in 
terms  of  1919  is  walking  in  his  sleep. 


22 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


February,  1922 


HARDWARE  JOBBERS  PUSH  ACCESSORIES 

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N.  H.  Oliver  of  the  Metal  Specialties  Mfg.  Co.,  Chicago,  points  out  enormous  possibilities  in  an 
address  to  the  accessory  branch  of  the  National  Wholesale  Hardware  Association. 

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They  tell  us  that  there  are  between 
nine  and  ten  million  motor  cars  in  use 
in  the  United  States  and  Canada,  and 
without  doubt,  every  car  owner,  if 
properly  approached,  would  easily 
spend  ill  a  year's  time  $100  for  special 
equipment,  not  to  sepak  of  repairs  a:ul 
the  replacement  parts  that  are  bound 
to  be  used  during  the  year.  Every  ear 
owner  is  a  prospect  for  chains,  bumpers, 
an  extra  tire,  shock  absorbers,  a  spot- 
light, a  storm  and  glare  visor,  a  motor 
meter-meter  with  lock,  a  rear  stop  sig- 
nal and  a  windshield  cleaner.  These 
items  alone  will  run  into  about  $100, 
and  I  am  sure  that  if  the  owner  was 
approached  on  these  items,  and  their 
value  and  comfort  explained,  that  it 
would  be  an  easy  thing  to  sell  at  least 
one  of  these  items  each  month  to  him. 

Do  you  realize  what  the  business 
alone  on  these  items  would  amount  to 
if  properly  pushed  by  the  manufacturer, 
the  jobber  and  the  dealer?  The  figures 
will  almost  stagger  you.  One  hundred 
dollars  per  car  for  nine  or  ten  million 
cars — that  means  one  billion  dollars 
worth  of  business  in  the  very  essentials 
of  Automotive  Equipment. 

The  other  day  Eay  Sherman  address- 
ed one  hundred  automobile  dealers  on 
the  possibilities  of  Automotive  Equip- 
ment, and  before  the  meeting  was  over, 
one  of  the  dealers  proposed  a  resolution 
that  each  and  every  dealer  should  buy 
a  showcase  and  put  in  a  $100  stock  of 
accessories.  A  showcase  would  cost 
about  $100  and  with  a  $100  stock— $200 
to  each  dealer — $20,000  sales  started  in 
one  night  with  one  hundred  car  dealers. 

Do  you  realize  what  an  enormous 
field  there  is  in  the  Automotive  Equip- 
ment business,  and  do  you  hardware 
jobbers  realize  how  easy  it  is  for  you 
to  get  dealers  started  in  handling  ac- 
cessories? 

You  do  not  have  to  ask  a  hardware 
dealer  to  buy  a  showcase  and  spend  one- 
half  of  his  original  investment  in  store 
equipment;  he  already  has  this;  you  do 
not  have  to  ask  him  to  put  in  a  .  show 
window;  he  already  has  this.  You  do 
not  have  to  ask  him  to  celan  up  his 
place  of  business  and  put  on  present- 
able clothes,  as  is  the  case  with  the 
garage  man,  because  every  hardware 
dealer  knows  that  a  clean  store  and 
personal  appearance  count  a  great  deal 
in  his  line  of  business;  therefore,  the 
first  steps  in  merchandising  Automotive 
Equipment  are  already  taken  care  of, 
and  the  work  before  your  salesmen  is  to 
induce  the  dealer  to  put  in  automotive 
supplies. . 

E.  C.  Simmons,  founder  of  the  Sim- 
mons Hardware  Co.,  has  often  said 
that  "the  jobber's  first  duty  is  to  help 
his  customer  to  prosper."  What  better 
work  can  you  do  in  helping  him  to 
prosper  than  to  interest  him  in  one 
of  the  best  money  making  lines  he 
can  put  in  his  store? 

I  live  in  one  of  the  resident  suburbs 
of  Chicago,  and  in  our  town  of  forty- 


five  thousand  people  we  have  a  retail 
hardware  store  that  is  the  pride  of  the 
town,  and,  at  least,  once  every  sixty 
days  you  will  see  in  the  Nicholas  Hard- 
ware store  one  window  beautifully  dec- 
orated and  devoted  exclusively  to  Au- 
tomotive Equipment.  This  show  win- 
dow contains  only  the  articles  covered 
by  a  full  page  advertisement  in  tlie 
local  weekly  paper;  each  article  exhib- 
ited with  a  sign  bearing  the  price  of 
the  article,  as  priced  in  the  advertise- 
ment, and  as  you  pass  the  window  and 
picture  to  yourself  the  possibilities  of 
the  sale  of  Automotive  Equipment  to 
the  hardware  dealers,  you  wonder  why 
the  hardware  jobber  so  often  states 
that  they  must  go  outside  of  the  hard- 
ware trade  and  hire  specialty  salesmen 
to  call  upon  garages  and  accessory 
dealers;  in  other  words,  go  outside  of 
your  trade  to  get  a  volume  of  business. 

I  asked  a  prominent  manufacturer, 
tlie  other  day,  if  he  was  going  to  ex- 
hibit his  line  at  the  Hardware  Conven- 
tion, and  when  he  said  ' '  No, ' '  I  wanted 
to  find  out  why,  and  this  was  his  rea- 
son: 

"The  majority  of  buyers  of  acces- 
sories in  wholesale  hardware  houses 
haven't  been  educated  in  the  accessory 
field.  Their  whole  education,  as  a  rule, 
has  been  in  buying  sporting  goods  or 
hardware,  and  they  are,  as  a  rule,  still 
so  tied  up  in  purchasing  these  lines 
that  they  are  unable  to  devote  the 
necessary  time  to  tlie  study  of  Auto- 
motive Equipment.  They  do  not  have 
time  to  read  the  magazines  and  to  keep 
abreast  of  the  times  on  new  items  that 
come  up  and  are  being  iaitroduced. 
They  do  not  dare  take  a  chance  in  their 
judgment  on  a  new  article  and  the  pos- 
sibilities of  its  sale.  They  are  afraid 
to  buy,  because  they  do  not  believe 
their  hardware  salesmen  can  sell  any- 
thing excepting  where  the  demand  has 
been  created  and  the  sale  stabilized  by 
years  of  use.  They  have  little  conli- 
dence  in  their  salesmen's  ability  to 
sell  quality  merchandise  at  a  price,  and, 
therefore,  confine  their  purchases  to  the 
cheapest  substitutes  they  can  find  for 
nationally  advertised  goods,  for  which 
a  demand  has  been  created. ' ' 

I  know  this  is  a  great  shock  to  you, 
but  if  that  is  the  way  the  big  manu- 
facturer feels  regarding  the  members 
cf  the  National  Hardware  Associatiou, 
it's  time  that  some  of  you  gentlemen 
who  never  bring  your  purchasing 
agents  to  a  convention,  take  the  mes- 
sage home  to  them  and  find  out  what 
ia  wrong  with  your  Automotive  Equip 
ment  department,  from  sales  manager 
;ind  salesman,  through  to  the  purchas- 
ing department. 

Pardon  me  if  I  refer  again  to  Mr. 
Simmons,  the  man  who  built  up  one  of 
the  largest  wholesale  hardware  houses 
in  the  wor^ld.  He  often  said  "The  re- 
collection of  quality  remains  long  after 
the  price  is  forgotten."  What  did  he 
mean?     Doesn't   he    mean  nationally 


advertised  lines  of  quality  manufac- 
tured by  houses  that  have  been  in  busi- 
ness for  years?  Who  understand  how 
to  make  goods;  Who  stand  behind 
their  products?  Who  practically  guar- 
antee the  sale  of  their  goods?  Who 
create  a  demand  for  the  goods,  and  who 
help  you  to  sell  them  and  move  them 
off  the  dealer's  shelf?  Or  does  he  mean 
cheap  substitutes  manufactured  by 
"Fly-by-night"  firms,  who  do  not  know 
how  to  figure  the  cost  of  manufacture 
or  overhead;  who  have  no  respect  for 
motorists,  whose  lives  are  constantly  in 
danger  while  driving  a  car  equipped 
with  inferior  parts? 

If  some  of  these  hardware  jobbers 
who  are  sitting  in  this  room  who  have 
built  up  a  large  accessory  business,  who 
recognize  quality,  as  well  as  price,  and 
who  know  that  the  reason  they  have 
built  up  this  business  is  because  they 
recognize  the  value  of  national  adver- 
tising, and  the  necessity  of  having  a 
purchasing  department  that  has  made 
a  study  of  the  equipment  business, 
would  get  on  their  feet  and  tell  some 
of  you  how  they  have  done  it,  it  would 
go  a  long  way  towards  putting  the 
National  Hardware  Association  on  the 
map. 


HEARD  AT  THE  GAS  PUMP 

A  motorist  drove  up  with  a  new  car 
and  asked  for  five  gallons  of  gas. 
The  salesman  pumped  his  gas  and  be- 
fore handing  him  his  change  ran  his 
hand  over  the  top  of  his  radiator  which 
v,'as  pretty  hot  although  not  steaming. 

Owner:  "What's  the  matter?  Is 
she  boiling?" 

Salesman:  "No  but  she's  pretty  hot. 
Why  don't  you  put  a  motometer  on  so 
you  know  just  what  your  motor  is 
doing?" 

Owner:  "I've  had  a  couple  of  the 
tilings,  but  someone  always  steals 
them." 

Salesman:  "Why  don't  you  put  a 
lock  cap  on?" 

Owner:  "Never  saw  one.  What  are 
they?" 

Salesman:  (Still  holding  change  from 
the  sale  of  gas.)  "Just  a  minute  I'll 
show  you  one,"  and  in  a  minute  re- 
turns with  a  motometer  and  lock  cap, 
puts  it  on  machine  and  hands  owner 
the  keys. 

Owner:  "Can't  you  get  that  off  now 
without  the  keys?" 

Salesman:  "The  firm  that  make  these 
will  pay  one  hundred  dollars  to  any- 
one who  can  get  it  off  without  the 
key. ' ' 

Owner:    "How  much  is  it?" 

Salesman:    "Seventeen  fifty." 

The  car  owner  thought  it  was  a  lot 
of  money,  but  he  dug  deep  and  came 
across. 


Clement  &  Hepworth  have  incorpor- 
ated their  auto  acctssories  business  at 
Lacliine,  Que. 


February,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


23 


EVEREADY 
SPOTLIGHT 

-with  the  300-foot 
range 


Exclusive  Features  of 
the  Eveready  Spotlight 

1.  Focusing  device. 

2.  Special  Eveready  Mazda 
Lamp. 

3.  Parabolic  Reflector. 

4.  Shock  Absorber. 

5.  Chamber,  holds  2  extra 
Eveready  Mazda  Lamps. 

6.  End  cap  stamped  with 
battery  and  lamp  renewal 
numbers. 


Eveready  was  the 

first  Flashlight  made 

— it  established  the  industry 

FROM  the  beginning  the  Eveready  laboratories 
have  worked  patiently,  earnestly,  unceasingly, 
to  make  Flashlights  still  more  useful;  yielding  a 
still  more  powerful  light;  having  still  longer  life. 

All  this  has  involved  much  more  than  the  better- 
ment of  design  and  construction  in  the  Flashlight 
itself.  It  has  called  for  laborious  and  costly  research 
to  create  a  Flashlight  Battery  that  generates  more 
electricity  for  a  longer  time.  For,  after  all,  the  Bat- 
tery is  the  power  house  of  the  Flashlight. 

The  Eveready  Flashlights  in  use  today  flash  the 
story  of  our  success  in  every  quarter  of  the  globe. 
Eveready  Flashlights  are  the  acknowledged  stand- 
ard Flashlights  of  the  world.  Eveready  Flashlight 
Batteries  are  universally  demanded  as  the  best 
Batteries  for  every  type  of  Flashlight.  Every  im- 
provement ever  made  in  Flashlights  was  made  by 
Eveready.    The  latest  are — 

The  Eveready  Spotlight  with  the  300-foot 
range. 

The  Eveready  Unit  Cell  for  tubular  flash- 
lights. This  assures  fresher  and  longer- 
lived  batteries  for  the  flashlight  user,  be- 
cause the  dealer  can  fit  all  tubulars  with 
this  one  type  of  battery  and  he  therefore 
carries  a  minimum  of  stock. 

Eveready  advertising  throughout  the  year  will 
tell  the  story  of  Eveready  Flashlights  as  used  in  the 
Home,  in  the  Office,  in  the  Factory — the  thousands 
of  uses  wherever  safe,  portable  lights  are  needed  to 
serve  humanity. 

CANADIAN  NATIONAL  CARBON  CO.,  LIMITED 

Montreal      Toronto     Winnipeg  Vancouver 

EVEREADY 


FLASHLIGHTS 


ITE 


24 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


February,  1922 


Save  the  surface  Section/ 


MaW  1922  the  Greatesfot^nt  and  \^isli  year 

as  the  first  step  toward  i^dotiblmi^  the  industry  b)' 1926 


V. 


Paint  Trade  Good  In  Maritime 

Manager  of  St.  John,  N.  B.  store  tells  how 
"Save  the  Surface"  Campaign  helps 

"I  have  noticed  that  our  Paint  sales  have  been  very  satis- 
factory, and  have  kept  up  well  throughout  the  winter 
months".  These  are  the  words  of  Mr.  W.  H.  McBride,  man- 
ager of  the  paint  and  glass  department  of  W-  H.  Thorne  & 
Co.,  Ltd.,  wholesale  and  retail  Hardware  merchants,  St. 
John,  N.B.,  in  reply  to  our  representative's  question  re  the 
effectiveness  of  the  "Save  the  Surface  Campaign."  Mr.  Mc 
Bride  went  on  to  say  that  he  had  noticed  a  great  increase 
in  business  with  the  domestic  users,  people  who  had  been 
influenced  by  the  "Save  the  Surface"  propaganda.  Paint- 
ers have  had  a  busy  season,  and  some  of  them  are  busy  at 
the  present  time.  During  the  summer  months  it  was  al- 
most impossible  to  secure  the  services  of  a  painter,  with- 
out giving  three  or  four  weeks  notice.  As  there  have  been 
few  large  contract  painting  jobs  in  St.John  this  year,  it 
goes  to  show  that  the  public  have  been  doing  considerable 
house  painting.  This  may  be  due  to  the  lower  prices  of 
paint  and  linseed  oil,  but  there  is  no  doubt  that  the  adver- 
tising brought  them  into  the  store. 

"There  are  many  departments  in  our  storei,"  continued 
Mr.  McBride,  "and  each  one  receives  its  turn  in  local  news- 
paper advertising.  Our  advertising  manager  has  given  us 
as  much  publicity  in  the  paint  department  as  possible,  ind 
during  the  season  when  the  "Save  the  Surface  Publicity 
Committee"  were  advertising  nationally,  our  advertising 
department  also  used  large  space  at  the  same  time  as  their 
copy  appeared  in  our  St.John  newspapers.  It  would  not 
be  right  for  me  to  say  that  this  had  been  a  big  paint  year 
with  us,  but  the  sales  have  kept  up  wonderfully  well.  We 
are  doing  quite  a  business  with  lady  customers  who  buy  in 
small  quantities,  and  are  evidently  going  to  use  the  paint 
themselves.  These  customers  have  to  be  handled  very 
carefully,  and  by  salesmen  who  know  the  business,  for  in 
nearly  every  case  they  look  to  the  salesman  for  as  much 
information  as  they  can  possibly  get,  and  follow  his  in- 
structions to  the  letter,  and  woe  to  the  salesman  who  gives 
inaccurate  information.  Business  with  coach  painters  has 
been  pretty  good.  A  large  number  of  automobiles  and 
carriages  have  been  painted  up  this  year. 

We  get  a  good  deal  of  co-operation  from  the  manufactur- 
ers in  assisting  us  to  sell  coach  and  carriage  pain's.  Their 
representatives  make  it  a  point  to  call  upon  the  coach  paint- 
ers, at  the  same  time  as  they  call  upon  us.  We  find  that 
our  painter  customers  like  to  receive  a  visit  from  the  man 
fro.ni  the  factory,  and  are  glad  of  the  opportunity  of  giv- 
ing their  experiences  with  the  various  lines  of  paints  and 
varnishes  to  the  manufacturer  direct.    Business  was  poor 


with  the  boat  and  yacht  owners,  they  did  not  seem  to 
respond  to  the  "Save  the  Surface"  publicity  as  did  the 
householders.  This  may  be  due  to  the  fact  that  our  local 
Yacht  Club  has  not  yet  fully  recovered  to  its  pre-war  con- 
dition, and  many  of  the  members  stuck  more  closely  to 
business  during  1921,  and  denied  themselves  the  pleasure 
of  week  ends  on  the  river. 

The  sale  of  floor  paints  is  gradually  increasing.  The 
high  price  of  carpets  and  linoleums  induced  many  people 
to  ])uy  rugs  and  squares,  and  paint  around  the  edges.  In 
fact  this  method  of  floor  covering  has  become  very  popular 
in  St.John,  and  the  use  of  made-to-measure  carpets  is  dying 
out.  Floor  paints  are  so  easy  to  apply,  and  the  housewife 
can  do  the  job  herself,  and  make  a  good  job  of  it,  too.  I 
have  seen  floors  painted  by  ladies  that  were  a  credit  to  the 
house.  We  are  always  very  particular  to  impress  upon  the 
purchaser  of  floor  paint  the  necessity  of  absolute  cleanlin- 
ess, and  a  dry  floor  before  applying.  A  well  painted  floor 
brings  many  customers,  for  the  statement,  "I  did  it  myself," 
makes  many  others  attempt  to  do  likewise.  On  the  other 
hand,  if  the  floor  was  painted  dusty  or  wet,  and  a  poor 
job  results,  the  paint  gets  the  blame  every  time." 

The  Thorne  Paint  department  is  one  of  the  largest  in  the 
Maritime  Provinces,  and  the  foregoing  remarks  of  Mr.  Mc- 
Bride may  be  assumed  to  apply  to  conditions  throughout 
Eastern  Canada.  The  "Save  the  Surface  Campaign" 
has  been  the  means  of  keeping  the  paint  and  varnish  bus- 
iness alive,  and  has  brought  home  the  fact  to  every  house- 
holder that  it  is  cheaper  to  paint  than  to  replace. 


PAYS  TO  ATTEND  CONVENTION 

"By  attending  conventions  of  the  Ontario  Retail  Hard- 
ware Association  I  have  formed  an  acquaintance  that  is 
worth  all  the  cost  of  dues  and  expenses  of  attending  the 
conventions  "  writes^a  Western  Ontario  dealer.  "I  am  now 
acquainted  with  hundreds  of  hardware  men  with  whom  I 
would  not  have  been  had  it  not  been  for  the  conventions." 

There  is  no  place  where  a  retail  hardware  m^n  can  get 
the  benefit  of  seeing  so  many  exhibits  and  have  the  priv- 
ilege of  comparing  prices  and  qualities  as  at  the  hardware 
convention,  and  I  have  put  in  new  lines  of  goods  that  have 
made  me  enough  profit  to  pay  all  expenses  of  attending 
and  left  a  nice  margin  besides. 

"I  am  looking  forward  to  our  next  convention  and 
planning  on  receiving  much  benefit  from  the  exhibits  as 
well  as  the  many  good  talks  and  the  discussions  I  shall 
hear  from  different  ones  who  take  part  in  the  program. 

"It  is  impossible  for  me  to  associate  with  five  or  six 
hundred  hardware  men  for  three  or  four  days  and  not  re- 
ceive much  good. 


February,  1922 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


HOW  TO  PLAN  FOR  A  BIG  PAINT  CAMPAIGN 


Intense  selling  effort,  and  wise  mer- 
chandising, will  bring  record  business 
to  the  retailers  who  have  the  vision  to 
go  after  business  hard,  with  old-time 
confidence  and  renewed  courage.  In 
fact,  1922  should  be  a  record  year  for 
many  lines. 

Now  is  the  time  for  the  paint  dealer 
to  get  busy.  Eecent  price  declines  have 
brought  the  price  of  paint  within  the 
means  of  the  most  limited  pocketbook. 

The  wise  merchant  is  the  one  who 
will  put  a  sufficient  stock  on  his  shelves 
to  take  care  of  this  trade,  place  his 
stock  well  up  to  the  front  of  the  store, 
trim  his  windows,  use  his  mailing  list, 
get  out  and  see  the  paint  prospects  and 
go  after  business  in  an  aggressive  sort 
of  way.  There  has  been  so  mueli  build- 
ing put  off  because  people  thought 
paint  too  expensive  that  the  dealer  can 
start  a  big  paint  and  varnish  boom  at 
once  if  the  opportunity  is  realized. 
There  are  many  repaint  jobs  that  will 
be  done  next  spring  which  will  mean 
good  'business  to  the  merchant  who  is 
alive  to  the  situation. 

Some  of  the  most  favorable  influen- 
ces for  a  good  paint  business  might  be 
classed  as  follows: 

Lower  Prices 

Probably  the  biggesit  single  influence 
on  prices  to  stimulate  business  is  the 
price  decline.  Higher  priced  goods 
have  been  worked  off,  most  dealers  hav- 
ing eliminated  this  inventory  from 
their  shelves.  With  the  new  price 
schedule  in  effect  sufficient  stocks  can 
be  maintained  without  a  large  invest- 
ment. 

On  the  new  basis,  painting  materials 
for  a  house  that  would  cost  about  $3.5 
before  the  reduction  would  now  cost 
only  $24.50.  The  merchant  is  inter- 
ested chiefly  in  how  much  he  can  sell, 
not  how  much  he  can  buy,  and  with  the 
present  reduced  prices  he  is  benefitted 
bath  ways,  for  it  makes  it  easier  for 
him  to  sell  'the  goods — his  profit  is  the 
same,  and  his  investment  is  less.  Lower 
prices — bigger  sales — larger  profits, 
greater  opportunity. 

New  Building 

With  some  decline  in  practically  all 
building  commodities,  lower  wage  scale, 
and  lower  money  rate,  and  easier  build- 
ing loans  and  an  incompleted  building 
program,  new  building  should  be  re- 
sumed at  an  unusual  rate.  Architects 
who  have  been  holding  plans  and  speci- 
fications for  months  and  years  on  ac- 
count of  exhorbitant  construction  costs 
are  releasing  these  to  contractors  for 
completion.  This  includes  not  only 
large  buildings,  but  residences  and 
rhodest  homes  as  well.  New  building 
and  alterations  will  play  a  big  part  in 
the  painting  program  this  year. 

With  lumber  prices  lower  than  they 
have  been  ilor  the  last  decade,  lower, 
perhaps,  than  they  will  be  for  some 
time  to  come,  depreciated  prices  on 
steel,  painting  prices  back  to  normal, 
unusual  activity  in  the  building  field 
is  anticipated.  The  administration 's 
interest  in  the  building  situation  and 
housing    shortage,    and    the  immense 


By  C    M.  LEMPERLY 

amount  of  plans  incompleted  all  point 
to  a  year  of  unusual  opportunity. 

It  is  up  to  the  dealer  this  year  to 
look  over  his  lines,  carefully  selecting 
those  for  which  there  is  a  good  demand, 
to  feature  during  the  coming  season. 
In  some  industrial  centres  where  fac- 
tories have  laid  off  their  men  for  a 
week  or  so,  paint  dealers  have  capital- 
ized on  this  by  selling  lots  of  smaller 
specialties  when  these  men  had  the 
time  to  carry  out  the  work  themselves. 
There  is  an  active  demand  for  paint 
and  varnishes  for  farm  use,  vehicles, 
implements,  barns  and  outbuildings  to 
be  painted  and  a  score  of  other  surfaces 
that  require  the  protection  of  a  paint 
film.  Therefore,  with  prices  back  to 
where  they  were  in  1917,  a  demand  for 
paint  for  repainting  new  buildings  and 
having  the  best  season  for  painting 
coming  on,  the  merchant  should  select 
his  paint  line  to  push  energetically  to 
make  up  in  volume  for  some  of  thi. 
slow-moving  stocks  that  he  might  liave 
on  hand  and  that  miglit  not  sell  so 
re;idily. 

Therefore,  with   a    demand  assured, 


THERE  is  a  retail  hardware  dealer 
in  our  town  named  Sam  S.  Nave, 
who  has  done  a  nice  business  in 
paints  in  this  very  depressing  financial 
period  and  there  are  good  reasons  for 
it.  I  have  known  this  man  from  the 
time  he  was  a  small  boy.  In  fact,  I 
paid  him  the  first  money  he  ever  re- 
ceived for  rendering  a  service. 

Several  years  ago — nearly  twenty — 
he  came  into  possession  of  an  interest 
in  a  hardware  store  situated  in  the  last 
block  at  the  tag  end  of  the  main  busi- 
ness street  of  the  town.  The  room 
was  small  and  the  business  likewise — 
not  enough  for  two  partners. 

After  running  along  for  a  while  he 
bought  out  the  partner  and  with  the 
assistance  of  a  clerk  kept  store,  stinted 
and  accumulated  a  little  surplus  and 
increased  the  stock.  He  stuck,  made 
friends  and  increased  his  trade  because 
of  fair  prices  and  fair  dealing. 

His  stock  outgrew  the  small  single 
room  and  the  basement  was  fitted  up 
and  filled.  The  only  publicity  was  the 
satisfaetory  service  and  treatment 
given  his  trade.  But  he  grew  and — 
He  bought  the  building  of  which  his 
room  was  only  a  part  of  the  first  floor. 
The  purchase  gave  him  an  additional 
room  and  basement.  The  partition  be- 
tween the  two  rooms  was  removed,  the 
display  windows  were  greatly  enlarged 
and  made  the  most  attractive  of  any 
hardware  store  in  the  town  and  the 
equal  of  the  best  display  windows  of 
any  kind  in  the  town.    And  then  he 


lower  jjrices  in  effect  and  small  stocks 
on  the  shelves,  now  is  the  time  to  get 
the  paint  stock  back  to  normal  size 
again. 

Full,  clean,  weill-arranged  shelving 
properly  laid  out,  impress  the  customer 
with  the  fact  that  you  are  a  real  mer- 
chant and  believe  in  your  goods  to  the 
extent  of  a  genuine  investment  in  them. 

If  you  have  a  fair  investment  in 
your  paint  stock  you  are  going  to  pay 
more  attention  to  it.  You  are  going 
to  sell  more  and  consequently  you  are 
going  to  make  more  money  on  it. 

You  will  be  able  to  hold  your  custo- 
mers. Even  your  old  customers  will 
drift  away  if  you  cannot  furnish  them 
with  the  material  they  require.  You 
wiU  find  it  possible  to  sell  quantity  lots 
where  you  sold  onlj'  small  lots  before. 

You  will  make  satisfied  customers. 
If  a  man  buys  three  gallons  he  may 
decide  to  go  ahead  and  paint  the  en- 
tire house.  He  comes  back  and  wants 
the  same  color  to  match.  You  should 
carry  sufficient  stock  to  take  care  of 
this  and  other  repeat  customers. 


did  the  unusual  for  a  hardware  dealer — 

The  purchase  and  remodeling  were 
made  during  the  high  prices  of  material 
and  labor.  About  the  time  the  work 
was  completed  the  business  depression 
struck  the  country,  but  he  has  taken 
his  losses  by  reducing  prices  and  has 
gained  new  business,  and,  notwithstand- 
ing the  big  reduction  in  prices,  his  in- 
come from  sales  so  far  this  year  are 
considerably  ahead  of  the  same  period 
last  year.  With  the  exception  of  one 
month  he  has  made  a  decided  gain 
over  each  month  of  last  year. 

What  did  it"?  He  had  not  advertised 
through  the  local  press  until  1921. 

He  has  gone  further  than  this.  He 
ha,s  insisted  that  the  manufacturer  of 
the  goods  he  handles  do  some  general 
publicity  and  he  has  hitched  up  with  it. 

In  1921  he  urged  the  manufacturer 
of  the  paint  he  handles  to  use  space  in 
a  farm  paper,  and  to  quote  his  exact 
words:  "I  have  sold  a  pile  of  paint 
this  year.  Up  to  this  date  (October  7) 
I  have  sold  forty-two  barrels  of  linseed 
oil  and  the  mixed  paint  to  go  with  it." 

This  merchant  up  to  date  has  more 
than  doubled  his  paint  sales  of  last 
year  and  along  with  the  paint,  trade 
there  went  a  good  business  in  building 
material.  New  customera  were  made 
for  other  lines  of  hardware. 

What  this  man  has  done,  in  not  the 
best  business  location  in  town,  could 
have  been  more  than  duplicated  by 
hardware  merchants  elsewhere  with  the 
right  kind  of  push  and  piiblieily. 


I  Doubled  His  Sales  of  Paint  | 

I  Reprinted  from  Business  Chat  f 

^llinilllHi'lUHMIIIMIIiniUJMNIIIIIIIMIIIIIIMIIIIMMIIIMIIIinJMIUMJIMIMIJIMinMIIIIIIUilWIIMIIIMIiailMIIIIIMIIIMIilllMllllilllllMI^ 


26 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


February,  1922 


New  Hardware  and  Accessory  Lines 

A  Monthly  Department  in  Which  Manufac- 
turers are  Given  an  Opportunity  to  Describe 
New  Products  Offered  to  Canadian  Dealers 


XICW  ItECORDING  DOOR  LOCK 

The  International  Business  Ma- 
chines Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  are  now- 
manufacturing  an  International  Re- 
cording Lock  which  should  interest  all 
hardwai'e  dealers  who  desire  to  keep 
a  close  check  upon  their  store  prem- 
ises and  encourage  other  merchants 
to  do  likewise.  The  International 
Time  Recording  Lock  links  all  the 
features  of  the  International  Time 
Recorder  with  the  recording  lock,  re- 
cording the  time  the  store  or  his  office 
was  opened  in  the  morning;  the  time 
it  was  closed  at  night;  who  opened 
it  and  who  closed  it;  from  which  side 
of  the  door  the  key  was  inserted; 
whether  or  not  anyone  was  in  the 
place  of  business  outside  of  business 
hours,  and  if  so,  for  how  long.  The 
time  each  employee  arrives,  goes  to 
lunch;  retunis  from  lunch;  and  the 
time  each  leaves  at  the  close  of  busi- 
ness, thus  recording  exactly  how  much 
time  each  employee  spends  in  the 
store  or  office  each  day. 

The  illustration  shows  that  C.  B. 
Clarke,  the  clerk  carrying  key  number 


BIOL 

C. 
B21L 

A21U 
AlOU 


f  606 

k6o5 

f  605 
f  605 

?602 
S807 

^806 

E8o5 


3.  closed  the  door  number  2  from  the 
inside  at  6.05  p.m.,  and  door  number 
1  as  shown  on  the  lock  recorded  at 
fi.OG  p.m.,  from  the  outside.  Also 
that  R.  L.  Weston  and  S.  L.  Davidson 
departed  at  6.02  and  6.03  p.m.,  respec- 
tively. Also  that  key  "A"  opened  door 
number  1  from  the  outside  at  8.05 
a.m.,  and  that  R.  L.  Weston  held  the 
key,  and  that  at  8.07  he  opened  door 


number  2  from  the  inside. 

The  advantages  of  this  new  equip- 
ment will  be  recognized  at  once  by 
large  employers  who  appreciate  the 
advantage  of  keeping  full  control  over 
their  store  premises. 

The  new  lock  will  be  shown  for  the 
first  time  at  the  Hardware  Convention 
at  Hamilton,  February  14  to  18. 


KEYSTONE  AUTO  CREEPERS 

The  Port  Hope  Mat  &  Manufactur- 
ing Company,  Port  Hope,  Ont.,  are 
marketing  the  Keystone  Automobile 
Creeper,  which  sells  to  motorists  hav- 
ing a  private  garage  as  well  as  to 
garage  owners.  When  it  is  necessary 
to  get  under  a  car  to  make  inspections 
01  repairs  one  of  these  creepers,  made 
of  one  inch  hardwood  sticks  fitted 
with  strong  ball-bearing  casters,  is 
irdispensible. 


WIRE  GOODS  CATALOGUE 

An  interesting  catalogue  of  kitchen 
wire  goods,  bath  room  specialties, 
p.arment  hangers,  etc.,  has  been  issued 
by  the  Racine  Iron  and  Wire  Works, 
Racine,  Wisconsin.  Over  one  hundred 
wire  specialties  are  illustrated  in  the 
book. 


LUXEBERRY  ENAMEL 

Luxeberry  enamel,  made  in  six 
colors  and  white,  is  being  offered  by 
Berry  Bros.,  Inc.,  Detroit,  in  a  new 
type  of  package.  This  is  a  long  oil 
enamel  claimed  to  be  "as  good  out- 
doors as  it  is  in." 


NEW  PAINTERS'  TORCH 

A  painters,  torch  which  will  burn 
either  gasoline  or  kerosene,  and  hav- 
ing burners  fitted  with  double  needles, 
neither  of  them  sharp  points,  is  being 
offered  by  the  Clayton  &  Lambert 
Mfg.  Co., 'Detroit. 


SANI-SPAR  VARNISH  STAIN 

S.  C.  Johnson  &  Son,  Ltd.,  Brant- 
ford,  Ont.,  are  adding  a  new  line  to 
their  list  of  products  to  be  known  as 
"Sani-Spar  Varnish  Stain,"  and  they 
invite  dealers  to  write  for  particulars 
of  the  plan  of  co-operation  adopted 
to  aid  in  the  selling  of  this  new  pro- 
duct by  means  of  local  newspaper 
advertising,  etc.  In  describing  the 
new  line  the  manufacturers  say  that 
Johnson's  "Sani-Spar  Vamish  Stain" 
is  the  ideal  method  for  refinishing  in 
color,  furniture,  woodwork  and  floors 
where  you  do  not  care  to  go  to  the 
trouble  or  expense  of  removing  the  old 
finish.    This  product  is  made  in  four 


beautiful  shades:  Light  oak,  dark  or 
golden  oak,  mahogany  and  walnut, 
and  is  also  made  in  natural  and 
ground  color.  The  outstanding  fea- 
ture, however,  of  this  product  is  the 
fact  that  it  will  not  turn  white  and 
can  be  used  safely  for  out-of-door 
work  as  well  as  interior  work;  it  can 
be  applied  with  excellent  results  on 
window  sills,  porch  furniture,  etc., 
and  is  not  affected  by  ammonia,  alco- 
hol, hot  water,  or  any  other  toilet 
preparations;  it  is  waterproof  and 
weatherproof.  Johnson  "Sani-Spar 
Vamish  Stain"  is  very  easy  to  apply 
and  it  dries  dust-free  in  two  hours 
and  hard  over  night. 


REPEATER  FUSE  PLUGS 

A  new  manufacturing  concern.  The 
"Repeater  6"  Fuse  Plug  Co.  of  Can- 
ada, Ltd,  Burlington,  Ont.,  has  pur- 
chased the  Canadian  manufacturing 
and  selling  rights  of  the  "Repeater 
6"  Fuse  Plug  and  will  have  its  plant 
in  operation  by  February  1st.  Its 
CL'pacity  being  10,000  plugs  per  day. 

In  the  Repeater  6  there  are  six 
fuses;  when  one  blows  out,  by  simply 
turning  the  knob  to  the  right  contaci 
is  instantly  restored  leaving  five  more 
fuses  for  further  use. 

This  plug,  it  is  claimed,  thus  re- 
moves many  of  the  annoyances  caused 
by  the  sudden  blowing  out  of  ordinary 
fuse  plugs.  When  this  Company  gets 
nation  wide  distribution  an  adequate 
advertising  campaign  will  be  under- 
taken. The  retail  price  of  the  plug 
is  30c. 


MALLORY  FORD  TIMER 

The  mallory  Timer  for  Ford  cars 
will  be  distributed  in  Canada  through 
the  Ford  Smith  Machine  Company, 
Limited  Hamilton,  Ontario,  who  have 
obtained  the  selling  and  manufactur- 
ing rights  for  the  Dominion  and  the 
British  Empire. 

The  Mallory  Timer  can  be  installed 
without  changing  in  any  way  the 
original  wiring  plan.  Its  use  entirely 
eliminates  the  vibrating  points  on  the 
coils  and  makes  it  possible  to  throttle 
down  to  three  miles  an  hour  without 
slipping  the  clutch  or  racing  the  mo- 
tor. This  is  a  decided  advantage 
when  driving  in  traffic  and  saves 
gasoline  and  wear  and  tear  on  the 
motor. 

With  the  Mallory  all  four  coils  are 
handled  through  a  single  circuit 
maker  and  breaker  and  one  conductor 
aso  handles  all  four  coils.  The  vi- 
brating points  on  the  coils  can  also  be 
screwed  down.  This  permits  the  Mal- 
lory to  act  not  only  as  a  timer  but 
also  as  a  high  class  ignition  system. 

The  Canadian  organization  are  now 
appointing  representatives. 


WATERPROOF  SANDPAPER 

Waterproof  sandpaper  of  great  val- 
ue to  automobile  painters,  and  pos- 
sibly also  to  interior  decorators,  has 
been  perfected  and  is  now  being  put 
on  the  market  by  the  Minnesota  Min- 
ing &  Mfg.  Co.,  of  St.  Paul,  Minn. 


February,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


27 


Beath  Steel  Barrel 
Oil  Station 

T^he  cut  below  illustrates  the  application  of  our  C.  I.  3 
^   oil  pump  to  a  Beath  Steel  Barrel. 

It  shows  how  readily  a  Beath  Steel  Barrel  can  be  converted 
into  a  stationery  or  portable  "Oil  Station. 

When  empty  the  pump  is  easily  and  quickly  transferred 
to  another  full  barrel,  and  the  empty  barrel  may  be  return- 
ed for  credit  or  refilling. 

Type  of  open  top  drip  tray  shown  is  rarely 
supplied,  as  most  customers  prefer  our  dust 
proof  drip  tray. 

Either  caster  truck  shown  may  be  used,  or 
our  standard  barrel  truck. 

Why  not  v/rite  for  our  catalogue  No.  1  4, 
describing: 

Beath  Steel  Barrels 
Oil  and  Grease  Pumps 
Gasoline  Storage  Tanks 

"What  the  Shipper  puts  in  the  Customer  takes  out" 

Manufactured  By 

W.  D.  Beath  and  Son 

Toronto  Limited 
Ontario 


28 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


February,  1922 


Trade  News  From  Coast  To  Coast 

A  Monthly  Summary  of  News  Among  Dealers, 
Jobbers,  Manufacturers  and  Allied  Interests 


nought"  Shock  Absorbers  and  other 
auto  specialties  have  opened  a  branch 
office  at  309  St.  James  St.,  Montreal, 
E.  J.  Mitchell  being  in  charge. 


ALBERTA 

Forestberg — E.  S.  Woodruff  opening 
hardTTare  store. 

Stcttler — McElherne  &  Cullis  succeed 
Dunbar  &  Eagan,  hardware'  merchants. 
BEITISH  COLUMBIA 

Durks — Monte  Creek.  Trading  Co., 
general  merr-liants,  have  been  succeeded 
by  A.  E.  Tavlor. 

Fernie— J.  "d.  Quail,  hardware  mer- 
chant, dead. 

Prince  Eupert — Fred  Stork,  of  the 
Stork  Hardware  Co.,  Ltd.,  Prince  Eu- 
pert, B.C.,  was  elected  as  liberal  mem- 
ber of  parliament  for  the  Skeena  Eiver 
District,  British  Columbia,  in  the  recent 
Dominion  elections. 

MANITOBA 

Crystal  City — A.  G.  Smith  succeeds 
Smith  &  Hogarth. 

Treherue— J.  E.  Scott  succeeded  bv 
H.  A.  Adair. 

Winnipeg— C.  W.  Fillmore,  hardware 
merchant,  has  been  elected  president 
of  the  Xorth  Star  Oil  &  Eefining  Co. 

Winnipeg — Harry  Morris  has  opened 
a  hardware  store  at  523  Selkirk  Ave. 

Winnipeg — H.  H.  Harris,  1849  Port- 
age Ave.,  has  sold  his  hardware  busi- 
ness to  Buckingham  &  Pentland. 

Winnipeg— The    Canadian  Asbestos 
Co.,  opened  a  branch  of&ce  in  Winnipeg. 
MAEITIME  PEOVINCES 

Frederieton,  X.B.— Fire  caused  dam- 
age amounting  to  $20,000  to  the  foun- 
dry plant  of  McLean,  Holt  &  Co.  The 
damage  was  covered  hy  insurance. 
QUEBEC 

Hull— F.  E.  Tremblyn,  hardware  mer- 
chant, suffered  fire  loss. 

Montreal— John  A.  Fraser  has  sev- 
ered his  connection  with  Lewis  Bros  , 
Ltd.,  to  become  vice-president  of  H. 
E.  Wood  Company,  Bondbrokers. 
ONTAEIO 
Belmont— E.  J.  Grant  succeeds  Or- 
ville  Eeid  on  March  1. 

Grand  Valley — James  Duke,  hard- 
ware, sold  out. 

Gravenhurst— J.  E.  Clipsham  &  Sons 
suffered  fire  loss. 

Hamilton— The  Burlington  Steel 
Company  has  resumed  operations  and  is 
running  at  fifty  per  cent,  eapacitv. 

Kitchener — K.  E.  Bornhold  &  Co., 
have  taken  over  the  hardware  store  of 
Geo.  B.  Bucher  &  Son,  57  King  St.  E. 

London— The  store  and  stock  of  the 
Cowan  Hardware  Co.,  suffered  injurv 
to  the  extent  of  $250,000,  which  was 
covered  by  insurance.  The  store  is  be- 
ing rebuilt. 

Kingston— Wm.  B.  Dalton  of  Dalton 
&  Sons,  Ltd.,  wholesale  hardware  mer- 
^  chants  died  after  a  ten  days'  illness. 
Ottawa — J.  Le   Blanc  is  opening  a 
hardware  store  at  1109  W^ellihgton  St. 

Ottawa— The  Somerset  Hardware  Co., 
will  commence  business  about  March  1 
with  H.  Sparks  as  manager. 

Port  Elgin— John  Hepner,  of  Stevens 
Hepner,  Ltd.,  brush  manufacturers,  died 
recently  at  the  age  of  73. 

Toronto — Canada  Foundries  &  Forg- 
ings  have  opened  an  oflfice  at  186  Bay 
Street,  in  charge  of  Tim.  W.  Eogers. 


Toronto — F.  J.  Wolfe,  general  sales 
manager  of  the  Imperial  Oil  Co.,  has 
been  elected  a  director  of  the  company. 

Toronto — Kroch  Brothers,  Ltd.,  have 
been  incorporated  with  $40,000  to  man- 
ufacture hardware  and  leather  goods. 

Toronto — Beacon  Tire  &  Eubber  Co., 
Ltd.,  has  been  incorporated  at  $50,000 
to  manixfacture  general  rubber  goods. 

Wardsville — George  Faulds  opening 
hardware  store. 

Windsor — Canadian  Show  Case  & 
Mfg.  Co.,  incoi-porated  with  $40,000  to 
manufacture  show  cases  and  store 
equipment. 

SASBCATCHEWAN 

Dilke — R.  Frederickson  succeeds 
Peter  C.  Larsen. 

Elrose — Tackaberry  &  Morris,  hard- 
ware,  suffered  fire  loss. 

Hatton — Hewitt  Black,  Ltd.,  Medi- 
cine Hat,  have  opened  a  branch  store. 


APPOINTED  SALES  MANAGER 
The  Canadian  National  Carbon 
Company,  Limited,  and  Prest-O-Lite 
Company  of  Canada,  Limited,  To- 
ronto, have  appointed  Alexander  Mac- 
Kenzie,  General  Sales  Manager.  Mr. 
MacKenzie  joined  the  staff  of  the 
I  rest-O-Lite  Company  in  1917.  After 
some  months  in  the  Head  Office  in 
Toronto,  he  took  charge  of  the  Mont- 


real Office  and  Service  Station  of  the 
Prest-O-Lite  Company  and  built  up 
large  and  profitable  branch  business 
in  Quebec.  On  August  1st,  1920,  Mr. 
MacKenzie  was  made  Sales  Manager 
ol  the  Canadian  National  Carbon  Co., 
Limited,  and  now  his  work  for  this 
Company  has  earned  for  him  the  pro- 
n  otion  to  General  Sales  Manager  of 
both  Companies. 


IDEAL  ALUMINUM  OFFICERS 

The  Ideal  Aluminum  Products,  Ltd., 
Toronto,  announce  that  the  following 
officers  have  been  appointed:  George 
Cathcart,  Winnipeg,  president;  J.  Hunt- 
er, Winnipeg,  vice-president;  James  A. 
Richardson,  Winnipeg,  director;  R.  K. 
Gemmell,  secretary-treasurer;  F.  G. 
Davies,  acting  general  manager;  W.  P. 
Buzzek,  sales  manager,  and  F.  W.  Hud- 
son, late  of  Hudson  Bros.,  general  super- 
intendent. E.  Roderick  is  no  longer 
connected  with  the  company. 

The  Ideal  Aluminum  Products,  Ltd., 
have  been  running  their  plant  to  fuU 
capacity  recently  and  report  the  out- 
look for  business  to  be  exceedingly 
bright  for  the  coming  year.  The  large 
factory  at  2,480  Dundas  St.  W^est,  To- 
ronto, is  a  consolidation  of  the  Hudson 
Bros,  factory  in  Toronto  and  the  fac- 
tory of  the  Louis  McLean  Co.  at 
Winnipeg,  and  Mr.  Hudson,  general 
superintendent,  has  been  in  charge  of 
production  since  the  commencement  of 
the  industry. 


MERCHANT  WANTS  CATALOGUES 

Charles  McFarland,  HardwareMer- 
chant,  Stop  29,  Long  Branch,  Ont., 
desires  to  receive  catalogues  from 
manufacturers  and  jobbers  of  builders 
hardware  and  electrical  goods.  "If 
it  is  hardware,  we  have  it,"  is  Mr.' 
McFarland's  store  motto.  Mr.  Mc- 
farland  also  writes:  "I  have  been 
on  the  mailing  list  for  HARDWARE 
and  ACCESSORIES  since  your  first 
issue  and  would  not  be  without  your 
paper." 


APPOINTS  QUEBEC  REPRESENT- 
ATIVE 

The  Hamilton  Stove  &  Heater  Co., 
Hamilton,  have  appointed  J.  E.  Mar- 
anda,  St.  Hilaire,  Que.,  to  represent 
the  "Souvenier"  and  "New  Idea"  line 
of  ranges  and  furnaces  in  Quebec 
Province.  Mr.  Maranda  has  been  rep- 
resenting the  D.  Moore  Co.,  Hamilton, 
and  the  Fawcett  Mfg.  Co.,  Sackville, 
N.  B. 


ESTABLISHING  CANADIAN  PLANT 

The  Climax  Cleaner  Manufactur- 
ing Company,  Cleveland,  has  made  ar- 
rangements with  the  John  Bull  Com- 
pany, 119  Augusta  street,  Hamilton, 
for  the  manufacture  of  their  product 
in  Canada.  Previously  90  per  cent, 
of  the  cleaners  used  in  Canada  were 
made  in  the  United  States,  and  it  is 
now  proposed  to  manufacture  that  90 
per  cent,  in  Hamilton. 


OPENS  MONTREAL  BRANCH 
The    Auto    Specialties    Mfg.  Co., 
Windsor,  manufacturers  of  "Dread- 


ANOTHER  FACTORY  REOPENS 

The  Northern  Bolt,  Screw  &  Wire 
Co.,  which  has  been  idle  for  the  last 
several  months,  is  resuming  opera- 
tions. D.  W.  Armstrong,  Manager, 
announces  that  about  60  men  would 
be  employed  and  this  number  gradu- 
ally increased  until  the  whole  staff 
is  again  employed. 


February,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


29 


HAMILTON 

HARDWARE  CONVENTION  NUMBER 


Champion 
Pure  Liquid 
White  Lead 


Made  of 

Pigment — Pure  Government  Standard  White  Lead 
Liquid — /Pure  Refined  Linseed  Oil 
"^Pure  Spirits  of  Turpentine. 
and  that's  all! 


YOU  CAN  NOW  GET  THE  GOOD 
OLD-FASHIONED  WHITE  LEAD 

IN  LIQUID  FORM 

Champion  Pure  Liquid  White  Lead  is  a  white  lead  paint,  ready  for  immediate  use.  It  is  absolutely  pure,  made 
from  Government  standard  white  lead,  with  the  addition  of  pure  refined  linseed  oil  and  pure  spirits  of  turpentme,  ground 
and  mixed  in  scientifically  correct  proportions  which  are  always  the  same. 

It  stays  in  suspension.    No  breaking  up.    Use  it  from  the  tin.    Saves  time  and  waste. 

Painters  will  use  it  because  it  saves  time  and  gives  perfect  results. 

Every  customer,  whether  for  a  quart  or  a  barrel  will  buy  Champion  Liquid  White  Lead  in  preference  to  buying 
the  lead,  oil  and  turpentine  and  mixing  them  by  the  t)ld  laborious  method. 

Factories,  Mills,  Hotels,  Public  Buildings,  Steamships,  all  big  eonsumers— will  be  glad  to  get  Champion  Liquid 
White  Lead  and  save  the  labor  expense  of  the  old-time  hand  mixing. 

Get  ready  for  the  painting  season.  Put  in  a  stock  oi  Champion  Liquid  White  Lead.  It  will  sell  readily— and 
make  extra  sales  for  you,  once  your  customers  know  that  ready-to  use  liquid  white  lead  is  available. 

IVrite  us  for  sample  tin  and  full  information 

STEWART  &  WOOD  LIMITED 


PAINTS.  VARNISHES,  GLASS.  GLUE.  ETC. 

TORONTO,  CANADA 


Meet  us  at  | 
Booth  22  \ 
Exhibition  Hall  j 
Hamilton  I 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


February,  1922 


I      HARDWARE  MARKET  SITUATION  | 

^liliiiiiHiuuiinniiMinniMiMiiNijniMiiriiuiniiniiiiMiMirJiiinMiiMMiHMiiiiiiiirMiiijnnMJiniHiuMMiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiMiiMiiiMiiM 


Continued  lowering  quotations  pre- 
vail. This  does  not  induce  heavy  buy- 
ing, though  jobbers  state  a  fair  volume 
of  hardware  is  moving  out  daily,  and 
that  shipping  staffs  are  busily  em- 
ployed. Orders,  however,  are  for  small 
quantities  and  shipments  are  light. 

One  good  indication  is  reported  by  a 
patent  shipping  box  manufacturer  who 
st-ated  that  of  late  they  have  been  ex- 
ceedingly busy,  more  so  than  for  a 
year  past,  in  making  cases  of  all  kinds 
for  wholesale  houses  for  shipping  pur- 
poses. 

The  toll  of  mercantile  failures  con- 
tinues to  mount.  January  was  very 
high.  Eetail  hardware  dealers  do  not 
figure  extensively  in  the  total,  and 
most  of  the  failures  are  for  amounts 
under  $5,000. 

While  most  of  the  items  whose  quota- 
tions are  changing  are  downward,  a 
noticeable  exception  is  made  in  regard 
to  sisal  rope,  which  has  advanced,  ow- 
ing to  increased  shipping  charges  and 
higher  labor  costs  in  primary  markets. 

The  month's  price  changes  are  noted 
below: 

The  Month's  Price  Changes 

Building  Papers — Eeduced  10  cents  a 
roll  for  Xo.  1  quality. 

Ammunition — Decline  of  about  20 
per  cent,  on  Dominion  and  American 
cartridges. 

Cotton  Waste — ^Decline  of  three- 
quarter  cents  a  pound. 

Fuel  Oil — Blight  reduction. 
Bope  and  Lath  Yams — 'Advanced  one 
cent  a  pound. 

Winchester  Eifles — Eevised  quota- 
tions show  decline. 

Iron  Eivets  and  Burrs — 52%  per  cent, 
off  list,  a  decline  of  2%  per  cent. 

Tacks — New  list  revising  discounts 
from  70  and  15  to  60  and  25  per  cent. 

Tacks — Eevised  list  shows  discounts 
65  and  25  as  against  70  and  15  per  cent. 

Pipe  Fittings — Bigger  discounts  by  5 
per  cent. 

Soil  Pipe — Lower  by  10  per  cent. 

Hoes — Lower.    Now  $6.75  a  dozen. 

Alarm  Clocks — Lower  prices. 

Mattocks — Down  $1.50  a  dozen. 

Picks — Declined  $1.25  a  dozen. 

Ready  Roofing — Eevised  prices  show- 
ing declines  of  10  cents  a  roll. 

Fence  Stapels — Declined  45  cents  a 
keg. 

Bale  Ties — New  quotations  showing 
lower  prices  on  Laidlaw  Co.  goods. 

Portland  Cement — Increased  about  25 
cents  a  barrel. 

Universal  Food  Choppers — New  list 
at  much  lower  quotations. 

Glaziers'  Points — Decline  of  a  cent  a 
pound.  Half-pound  package  now  7 
cents  each. 

Corrugated  Sheets — New  discounts  of 
10  yier  cent. 

Eavetrough  and  Conductor  Pipe — 
Decline  of  about  10  per  cent. 

Poultry  Netting  Staples — New  quota 
tions  show  slightly  lower  prices  over 
last  year. 

Wrenches  and  Pliers — Decline  shown 
on  new  list  of  Williams'  make  of  goods. 

Oils — Slight  reduction  on  black  oil, 
cylinder,  machine  and  engine  oil. 

Agricultural  Wrenches — Eeduced  an 
extra  5  per  cent.    The  new  discounts 


now  being  50  and  5  per  cent. 

Butts  and  Hinges — New  list  issued  on 
wrought  steel  and  niekelled  butts  and 
hinges  at  little  change  in  prices. 

Chain — Lower. 

Stanley  Tools — New  list  issued  show- 
ing all  recent  price  changes. 

Wiss  and  Heinich  Shears — Declined 
about  15  per  cent. 

Galvanized  Metal  Ceilings  and  Walls 
— Eeduced  from  10  to  12%  per  cent. 

Coke  Tin  Plates — Declined. 

Universal  Food  Choppers  —  Lower.. 
The  new  prices  are:  No.  O,  $16.50  a 
dozen;  No.  1,  $20.40;  No.  2,  $24.80;  No. 
3.  $33. 

Borax — Declined  to  10  cents  a  pound. 

Red  Lead — Higher. 

Linseed  Oil — Higher  by  6  cents  a 
gallon  during  month. 

Turpentine — Increased  10  cents  a  gal- 
lon in  month. 


Welsh  tinplate  is  again  competing 
with  U.  S.  stocks  in  British  Columbia, 
the  first  shipment  of  2,900  tons  since 
before  the  war  having  arrived  in  Van- 
couver recently.  A  second  shipment  of 
700  tons  is  on  the  way. 

The  Port  Arthur  (Ont.)  Shipbuilding 
Co.  are  in  the  market  for  4,000  tons  of 
steel  for  one  or  two  new  lake  boats 
they  are  building. 

Major  C.  Snell,  of  the  Birmingham 
Small  Arms  Co.,  England,  representing 
nine  firms  who  are  considering  locating 
in  Canada,  addressed  the  fourth  annual 
meeting  of  the  Western  Ontario  united 
boards  of  trade  at  Woodstock  on  Jan. 
20.  He  said  that  many  British  manu- 
facturers were  convinced  that  the  time 
was  ripe  to  handle  their  Canadian  trade 
through   Canadian  establishments. 

Both  the  rod  and  the  wire  mills  at 
the  Sydney  (C.B.)  steel  plant  have 
opened  up  within  the  month,  orders 
having  been  booked  that  will  keep  them 
busy  for  some  time. 


FAVORABLE  TRADE  BALANCE 

Canada's  imports  and  exports  were 
almost  equal  in  value  in  the  calendar 
year  1921,  according  to  the  report  of 
the  Dominion  Bureau  of  Statistics. 
The  tendency  to  discriminate  in  pur- 
chasing is  indicated  by  the  figui'es, 
but  there  is  still  much  room  for  the 
exercise  of  economy.  It  is  significant 
that  the  great  bulk  of  Canada's  ex- 
ports consists  of  raw  materials,  and 
a  large  proportion  of  its  imports  con- 
sists of  finished  products,  some  of 
which  could  be  economically  produced 
in  this  country. 

Iron  and  steel  imports  were  valued 
at  $102,467,745,  comparing  with  $213,- 
316,321  in  1920,  and  $150,500,893  in 
1919.  Tin  imports  were  at  $5,997,773, 
as  against  $15,395,518  in  1920. 

The  most  important  changes  in  the 
foreign  trade  situation  were  the  big 
drop  in  importations  from  the  United 
Kingdom,  amounting  to  over  $108,- 
000,000,  a  decrease  of  $223,000,000  in 
exports  to  the  United  States,  and  a 
decrease  of  $366,000,000  in  imports 
from  that  country.    The  falling  off 


in  buying  of  goods  from  the  United 
States  was  the  cause  of  the  shifting 
from  a  $42,000,000  unfavorable  trade 
balance  in  1920  to  a  favorable  balance 
of  three  and  one-third  millions  in  the 
calendar  year  1921. 


CANiVDA'S  IRON  PRODrCTION 

The  production  of  pig  iron  in  Can- 
ada during  December  declined  to  the 
lowest  level  for  the  year,  the  total 
pig  iron  made  amounting  to  only 
39,917  long  tons,  all  of  which  was 
made  in  blast  fumaces.  By  kinds  of 
iron  produced  the  outputs  for  Decem- 
ber were  as  follows:  Basic,  30,698 
tons;  foundry,  2,948  tons;  and  malle- 
able, 6,271  tons.  Practically  all  the 
basic  iron  was  made  by  the  operators 
for  their  own  further  use,  only  516 
tons  being  made  for  direct  sale. 
Foundry  iron,  while  showing  a  con- 
siderable decline  from  the  amount 
produced  in  Uovember  was  for  the 
most  part  made  for  direct  sale,  a 
total  of  2,882  tons  having  been  cre- 
dited to  this  item  during  the  month. 
For  the  first  month  since  August  a 
production  of  malleable  iron  was  re- 
corded and  a  total  of  6,271  tons  was 
produced  for  sale. 

Only  two  fumaces  were  active  on 
December  31,  one  operated  by  the 
Steel  Company  of  Canada  at  Hamil- 
ton and  one  by  the  Dominion  Steel 
Corporation  at  Sydney.  Throughout 
the  greater  part  of  the  year  at  least 
five  furnaces  were  active,  December 
being  the  only  month  in  which  fewer 
than  five  were  in  blast. 

The  average  monthly  output  of  pig 
iron  in  Canada  during  the  twelve 
months  ending  December  was  50,000 
tons,  or  less  than  the  average  monthly 
record  for  any  year  since  1908. 
Throughout  the  entire  period  during 
which  a  total  of  595,000  long  tons  of 
pig  iron  was  made,  the  market  was 
decidedly  quiet  and  the  suspension  of 
interest  in  iron  was  general. 

The  low  price  of  steel  in  December 
was  not  only  the  low  for  the  year,  but 
was  lower  than  at  any  time  since 
January,  1916.  While  the  production 
of  steel  during  1921  was  less  than  for 
any  preceding  year  since  1908,  the 
outlook  is  for  an  early  resumption  of 
'activity  and  the  hope  was  everywhere 
expressed  that  the  early  months  of  the 
new  year  would  be  marked  by  a  re- 
sumption of  construction  work  as  a 
result  of  the  more  favorable  purchas- 
ing market  established,  and  that  as  a 
conseouence  a  considerable  develop- 
ment in  the  production  of  steel  might 
be  expected. 


DISPI^YS  AT  FURNITURE  SHOW 

The  Hall  Zryd  Foundi-y  Co.,  Ltd., 
Hespeler,  Ont.,  made  a  splendid  dis- 
play of  their  Pilot  Superior  pipeless 
furnace  and  their  various  styles  and 
sizes  of  Pilot  stoves  and  ranges  at  the 
recent  furniture  exhibition  held  at  To- 
ronto. Mr.  Hambly  was  in  charge  of 
the  display. 

Another  firm  that  showed  at  the  To- 
ronto furniture  exhibition  was  the'C. 
P.  Tabien  Eefrigerator  Co.  of  Montreal. 
This  was  the  first  time  the  company  dis- 
played in  Ontario.  They  make  22  styles 
of  household  refrigerators. 

The  McClary  Mfg.  Co.,  London, 
showed  stoves,  ranges  and  enamelware, 
a  very  large  range  of  kitchen  utensils 
being  shown. 


Meet  Us  At  The  Convention 


Booth  No.  67  at  the  Hardware  Exhibition 

We  cordially  invite  you  to  visit  our  booth  in  the  Armouries,  Hamilton,  during  the 
Convention  of  the  Ontario  Retail  Hardware  Association,  February  1 4th  to  1 8th. 

You  will  be  welcome. 


Meakins  Brushes 


Oval  Paint  Brushes:  Varnish,  Stencil  and  Glue 
Brushes;  Sash  Tools;  Small  Brushes;  House- 
hold Brushes;  Factory,  Flat  Wall  and  Beaver 
Wall  Brushes;  Flat  Paint  Brushes;  Kalsomine, 
Tar  Roofing,  Whitewash,  Skimming,  Paste,  Bill 
Posters',  Paperhangers'  and  Wall  Stipplers' 
Brushes;  Painters'  Duster  and  Seam  Brushes; 
Graining  Combs;  Painters'  Scrubs,  Stencil 
Marking  and  Artist  Brushes;  Copying  Brushes; 
Writing  Brushes;  Ox-hair  Color  Brushes; 
Lettering,  Lining,  Sable,  Water  Color,  Sweep- 
ing, Parlor  Floor,  Dust,  Whisk  or  Corn  Brushes; 
Bakers'  Factory,  Hearth,  Cornice,  Radiator, 
Window,  Bottle,  Jar  and  Automobile  Brushes, 
Wipers  and  Pot  Scrubs;  Staple,  Closet,  Wire, 
Casting  and  Boiler  Tube  Brushes;  Tanners'  and 
Printers',  Sink  and  Kitchen  Brushes.  Our 
catalogue  will  give  you  the  complete  list. 


Write  for  complete  Catalogue.     Order  through  your  jobber. 

Meakins  &  Sons,  Limited,  Hamilton,  Ont. 

Warehouses:  Winnipeg,  London,  Toronto,  Montreal,  Vancouver;  Pilkington  Bros.,  Calgary,  Alta. 


32 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


February,  1922 


The  quotations  below  are 
approximately  correct  for 
large  lots  in  Toronto  on  the 
date  mentioned. 


CURRENT  PRICES 

TORONTO,  FEBRUARYS,  1922 


They  may  not  be  the  same 
in  any  other  jobbing  centre 
owing  to  freight  and  other 
conditions. 


Aluminum — Per  pound,  27c. 

Antimony — Per  pound,  8e. 

Brass — Sheets,  base,  23c;  rods,  base 
^2  to  1  in.,  roiind,  21c.;  tubing,  seam- 
less, base,  2ocr    F.o.b.  Toronto. 

Copper — Casting  ingot,  base,  17V.>c; 
rods,  Vo  to  2  in.,  20c;  soft  sheets,  plain, 
16  oz.  and  heavier,  lb.,  30c ;  plain  tin- 
ned, IG  oz.  and  heavier,  lb.,  37c;  pol- 
islied  and  tinned,  16  oz.  and  heavier,  lb., 
42c;  tubing,  lb.,  29c. 

Above  prices  are  full  slieets  and  bars. 
Cut  sheets  and  bars  are  5c  per  lb. 
higher. 

Coppers,  Soldering — Base,  4  to  8  lbs., 
35  cents  per  lb.;  3-lb.,  38c;  2yo-lb.,  39c; 
2-lb.,  41c;  ly^-lb.,  44c;  1-lb.,  48c  per  lb. 
F.o.b.  Toronto,  Hamilton. 

Iron,  Tinned — Lion  and  Crown  Brand, 
Toronto  in  22,  24  and  26  gauge.  36  x 
96,  21c  per  lb.;  48  x  96,  21c  per  lb.  Less 
than  case,  50c  per  100  lbs.  extra. 

Lead  (pig) — $6.75  per  hundred  lbs. 

Iron — Bar,  base,  $3.25  per  cwt.;  angle 
iron,  $3.55;  horseshoe  iron,  $4.10;  Nor- 
wav.  $15;  to  caulk,  $4.50. 

Steel— Mould  bars,  $3.25;  bands,  $3.- 
75;  tire,  $3.75;  spring,  $6;  sleigh  shoe, 
$3.25;  hoop,  $4.25;  crucible  cast  sheet, 
$36;  cast  tool,  $25  to  $36,  according 
to  grade. 

Slieets,  Blue  Annealed — 10  gauge,  $4.- 
50  per  100  square  feet;  12  gauge,  $4.55; 
14  gauge,  $4.60;  16  gauge,  .$4.65. 

Slieets,  Black — 18  to  20  gauge,  $5.05 
per  100  square  feet;  22  to  24  gauge, 
$5.10;  26  gauge,  $5.15;  28  gauge,  $5.25. 

A  change  of  25  cents  per  cwt.  is  made 
for  less  than  case  lots;  and  an  extra 
10  cents  per  cwt.  is  charged  on  sheets 
26  inches  wide. 

Sheets,  Corrugated — No.  28  gauge, 
$6.50  per  100  sq.  ft.;  26  gauge,  $7;  24 
gauge,  $9;  22  gauge,  $11;  20  gauge, 
$12.50;  18  gauge,  $16;  lighter  than 
24  gauge  and  wider  than  27  inches,  75 
cents  a  square  extra.  Discount  10  per 
cent. 

Queen 's  Fleur- 
Sheets,  Galvanized —  Head  de  lis 
28  gauge,  per  100  lbs..  $8.25  $7.75 
26  gauge,  per  100  lbs..  8.00  7.50 
24  gauge,  per  100  lbs..  7.60  7.10 
22  gauge,  per  100  lbs.  .  7.25  6.75 
18-20  gauge,  100  lbs...  7.10  6.60 
Premier  Apollo 
10%  oz.,  per  100  lbs...  $6.25  $7.00 
28  gauge,  per  100  lbs. .  5.85  6.60 
26  gauge,  per  100  lbs..  5.55  6.30 
24-22  gauge,  100  lbs...  5.40  6.15 
20-18  gauge,  100  lbs...  5.25  6.00 
16  gauge,  per  100  lbs..  5.10  5.85 
14-12  gauge,  100  lbs. . .  4.95  5.70 
Plates  (Coke  Tin)— IC.  20x28,  112 
sheets,  $13.50;  IX,  20x28,  112  sheets, 
$16.50;  IX.,  20x28,  56  sheets,  $9. 

Plates  (Charcoal  Tin)— IX,  20x28,  56 
sheets,  $14;  IXX,  20x28,  56  sheets,  $16. 


Plates,  Teme — IC,  14x20,  112  sheets, 
$12.00. 

Spelter — Per  pound,  7%c. 

Tin— Ingots  (100  lbs.),  per  lb.,  38y2C. 

Zinc — Sheets,  per  lb.,  12c. 


PLUMBERS  AND  TINNERS' 
SUPPLIES 


Boilers  (Range) — 30-gal.,  standard, 
$8.75  cash;  30-gal.,  extra  heavy,  $11.25. 

Fittings — Cast  iron  fittings,  30%; 
malleable  bushings,  32%;  cast  bushings, 
32%;  unions,  47%;  flanged  unions, 
30%:  plugs,  cast  iron,  30%,;  plugs, 
solid.  10%;  plugs,  countersunk,  net; 
couplings,  4  in.  and  under,  30%;  do., 
2y2  in.  and  larger,  10%. 

Nipples,  Wrought — 'Close  and  short,  4 
in.  and  under,  50%;  4%  and  larger, 
40%^;  long,  4  in.  and  under,  60%;  4y2 
in.  and  larger,  50%;  running  thread,  4 
in.  and  under,  30%. 

Oakum — Special  No.  1,  $15;  plumb- 
ers', $7. 

Packing  —  Fine  .jute,  17c  a  pound; 
coarse  jute,  18c;  hemp,  36e;  square 
braided  hemp,  38e;  No.  1  Italian,  44c; 
No.  2  Italian,  36c. 

Wrought  Pipe — Price  List  No.  54, 
Dec.  22,  1921. 

Standard  Buttweld  Pipe  S-C  per  100 
Size.  Blk.      Galv.     Blk.  Galv. 

Steel  Gen.Wrot.Iron 


% 

V2 


1% 

iy2 

2 

2yo 

Q 

3y2 


$  6.00 
3.84 
3.84 
4.85 
5.87 
8.16 
11.04 
13.20 
17.76 
28.08 
36.72 
47.84 
56.68 


$  8.00 
5.94 
5.94 
6.46 
7.71 
11.05 
14.95 
17.88 
24.05 
38.03 
49.73 
63.48 
75.21 


7.20 
7.20 
7.31 
8.86 
12.58 
17.02 
20.35 
27.38 


9.30 
9.30 
8.93 
10.70 
15.30 
20.70 
24.75 
33.30 


Standard  Lapweld  Pipe  S-C,  per  100 


Size. 


2y2 

3 

3y2 

4 

4yi 


8L 


lOL 
10 


m. 
in. 
in. 
in. 
in. 
in. 
in. 
in. 
in. 
in. 
in. 
in. 
in. 
in. 


Blk.  Galv. 

Steel 
21.46 


31.50 
41.31 
48.76 
57.77 
66.04 
76.96 
1.00 
1.33 
1.40 
1.61 
1.97 
1.32 
2.35 


27.38 
40.05 
53.55 
65.32 
77.39 
86.36 
100.64 
1.31 
1.76 
1.85 
2.13 
2.59 
2.40 
3.09 


Blk.  Galv. 
Gen.Wrot.Iron 
31.08 


46.80 
61.20 
72.68 
86.11 
1.04 
1.21 
1.57 
2.02 
2.13 
2.45 
2.97 
2.75 
3.54 


37.00 
56.16 
73.44 
89.24 
105.76 
1.24 
1.45 
1.88 
2.45 
2.58 
2.97 
3.59 
3.33 
4.28 


Pipe  (conductor),  plain,  round  or  cor- 
rugated, in  10-ft.  lengths— 2  in.,  $18.40 
per  100  ft.;  3  in.,  $22.30;  4  in.,  $29.60; 
5  in..  $40;  6  in.,  $49.  Less  70  and  10 
per  cent. 

Elbows — (For  conductor  pipe)  2  incli, 
$5.25;  3  inch,  $6;  4  inch,  $10.50;  5  inch. 


$24;  6  inch,  $29.    Less  60  per  cent. 

Pipe  (soil) — Med.  and  extra  heavj' — 
2  in.,  3  in.,  40%;  4  in.,  40-10%,;  5,  6 
in.,  40% ;  8  in.,  net. 

Soil  Pipe  Fittings— 2,  3,  4,  5,  6  in., 
50%,  8  in.,  net.  , 

Pipe  (stove) — Net  list. 

Registers — Warm  air,  japanned  and 
common  oxidized,  20%  from  standard 
list.    No.  3,  $10.75. 

Tinners'  Trimmings — Plain  50  and 
10,  retinned,  50%,. 

Trough  (Eave) — 0.  G.  Square  bead 
and  half  round:  Per  100  ft.:  8  in., 
$15.90:  10  in.,  $17.70;  12  in.,  $21.20;  15 
in.,  $28.80;  18  in.,  $36.50.    Less  70  and 

10  per  cent. 
Valves    Brass    (Penberthy)  —  Gate 

valves,  25%;  regrinding  valves,  20%; 
swing  cheek  valves,  10%;  compodisk 
valves,  20%  ;  J.M.T.  valves,  25  and  10% 
off. 

Valves,  Foot — 1%  in.,  blk.  70e,  galv. 
$1;  IV2  in.,  blk.  85c,  galv.  $1.30;  2  in., 
blk.  $1.20,  galv.  $2.10. 

Washers,  Wrought  —  Bound,  plain. 
Sizes  given  are  size  of  hole.  In  boxes 
of  50  lbs.  list  prices  per  100  lbs. — %  in., 
$28;  5/16  in.,  $34.40;  %  in.,  $22.80; 
7/16  in.,  $21;  y2  in.,  $19.60;  9/16  in., 
.$18.80;  %  in.,  $18.60;  11/14  in.,  $18.40; 
34  in.,  $18.20;  13/16  in.,  $18;  1  1/16  in., 
lyg  in.,1%  in.,  1  5/16  in.,  $18.90;  1% 
in.,  iy2  in.,  1%  in.,  $18.40;  1%  in.,  1% 
in.,  2  in.,  2ys  in.,  $19.  Discount,  60% 
f.o.b.  Montreal,  Hamilton,  Toronto, 
London  and  Halifax. 

Car  lots  allowance  to  following 
points:  Windsor,  Walkerville,  St.  John, 
Moneton,  Amherst,  New  Glasgow, 
Freight  allowance:  Fort  William  and 
West,  10c  per  100  lbs. 

Net  extras,  26  to  40  lbs.  of  a  size, 
$1;  25  lbs.  of  a  size  or  less,  $2  per  100 
lbs.  Package  allowances — if  taken  in 
kegs  about  175  lbs.  each,  allowance  10c 
per  100  lbs.;  if  taken  in  bags  about  100 
lbs.,  allowance  15c  per  100  lbs. 


HARDWARE 


Ammunition  (American) — Winchester 
and  Savage  advance  on  American  list, 
for  rim  fire  ball  cartridges,  2%%;  cen- 
fire  blank  and  shot  cartridges,  15%. 
Remington    Union    Metallic    list  plus 

2y2%. 

Ammunition  (Dominion)  —  Discount 
30  and  20%. 

Shot,  standard,  100  lbs.,  Toronto, 
$14.25;  Montreal,  $13.50;  net  extras,  as 
follows,  subject  to  cash  discounts  onlv: 
Chilled,  $1.50;  buck  and  seal,  80c;  No. 
28  ball,  $1.20  per  100  lbs.;  bags  less 
than  25  lbs.,  y2C  per  lb.;  f.o.b.  Mont- 
real, Toronto,  Hamilton,  London,  St. 
John  and  Halifax  freight  equalized. 

Animal  Ties — Cow  ties,  list  plus  37 
per  cent.;  trace  chains,  list  plus  25  per 
cent.;  dog  chains,  list  plus  20  per  cent.; 
halter  chains,  net;  tie-out  chains,  net; 


February,  1922 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


33 


Bale  Ties 


NAILS 


WIRE 


lllll! 


I  Laidlaw  | 

I    Time -Tested  Efficiency  | 

M  Laidlaw  Bale-Ties  are  made  from  Bessemer  Steel.  M 

g  Out  Ties  have  been  thoroughly  tested  in  general  use  = 

5  throughout  the  Dominion  and  most  of  the  foreign  M 

s  countries  of  the  world.     Practical  use  has  convinced  s 

=  buyers  of  Laidlaw  efficiency.  This  has  made  Laidlaw  M 

M  Bale-Ties  the  g 

I  Dominion  and  World-Wide  Choice  | 

^  Strong,  reliable  and  of  practical  design,  Laidlaw  g 

M  Bale-Ties  make  good  and  prevent  broken  bales  and  s 

^  consequent  commercial  loss.    Laidlaw  Bale-Ties  are  — 

=  made  in  "Single-Loop"  and  "Cross-head"  styles  of  p 

^  fastening.  ^ 

I    The  Laidlaw  Bale-Tie  Company  | 

=  Limited  = 

M  Hamilton                                Canada  ^ 

—  — Agencies —  = 
=  A.  T.  Diggins,  Stair  Bldg.,  Toronto  — 
M  H.E.  O.  Bull.  184  Mance  St.,  Montreal  = 

—  M.  Bryan  24  Aldgate,  London,  Eng.  ZZ 
S  Norman  Jeisiman,  505  Hastings  St.  West,  — 
— '-  Vancouver,  B.  C.  = 


Black  Diamond  File  Works 


Established  1863 


Incorporated  1895 


Twelve  Medals 
of  Award  at 

INTERNATIONAL 
Expositions 


Special  Grand 
Prize 
GOLD  MEDAL 
Atlanta,  1895 


Copy  of  Catalogue  will  be  sent  free  to  any 
interested  File  User  upon  application. 

G.&H.BARNETT  COMPANY 

Philadelphia,  Pa. 

Owned  and  operated  by 
NICHOLSON  FILE  CO.,  PORT  HOPE,  ONT. 


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HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


stall  fixtures,  Dominion,  $2.80  per  doz. ; 
heavy,  $2. 

Axes — Boys',  doz.,  $15.50;  Hunters', 
doz.,  $14.50;  single  bits,  doz.,  $19.50; 
double  bits,  doz.,  $24.  Bench  axes, 
45<rr  off  list. 

On  weights  heavier  than  base  add  to 
list  as  follows:  Group  2,  50e;  group  3, 
$1;  group  4,  $1.50;  group  5,  $2;  group 
6,  $2.50;  group  7,  $3.50. 

BaJe  Ties — Single  loop — No.  12,  $4.80; 
No.  13,  $490;  No.  14,  $5.10;  No.  15,  $5.- 
35;  No.  16,  $5.70.  Cross  head— No.  12, 
$5.10;  No.  13,  $5.20;  No.  14.  $5.50;  No. 

15,  $5.95;  No.  16,  $6.40. 

Baskets  (Willow) — Delivery  (handl- 
ed), per  doz.,  $7.50  to  $11;  splint, 
clothes  or  meat,  per  doz.,  $2  to  $2.85; 
oblong  clothes,  per  doz.,  $10.50  to 
$14.75. 

Baskets  (Wire) — Vegetable  —  Half 
bushel,  each,  90e:  1  bushel,  each,  $1.30; 
IVo  bushel,  each,'  $1.80. 

Belting  (Leather) — Discounts  apply 
to  revised  list  of  Nov.  4th,  1920.  Extra 
quality,  15/10  per  cent.  Standard  qual- 
ity, 15/10/10  per  cent.  Side  lace  leath- 
er, lb.,  $1.60;  cut  lace  leather,  lb.,  $1.85. 

Belting  (Canvas) — 60    per    cent,  off 

Bits.  Auger — (Standard  list  prices 
per  dozen):  3-16,  $6;  4-16,  $5;  5-16, 
$5;  6-16,  $5;  7-16,  $5;  8-16,  $5;  9-16,  $6; 
10-16,  $6;  11-16,  $7;  12-16,  $7;  13-16, 
$8.25;  14-16,  $8.25;  15-16,  $9.50;  16-16, 
$9.50;  17-16,  $12;  18-16,  $12;  19-16,  $14; 
20-16,  $14;  21-16,  $16;  22-16,  $16;-23-16, 
$18;  24-16,  $18;  2516,  $21;  26-16,  $21; 
27-16,  $24;  28-16,  $24;  29-16,  $27;  30- 

16,  $27;  31-16,  $30:  32-16,  $30. 
Discounts  from  Standard  list  prices: 

Ford  auger  bits,  add  15%;  Ford  car 
bits,  add  71/2%;  Beaver,  35%;  Gilmour 
auger  bits,  10%;  Gilmour  eye  augers, 
add  5%;  Irwin  auger  bits,  add  5%; 
Irwin  car  bits,  less  7%% 

Boards  (Bake) — 
No.  0—16  X  22,  doz. 
No.  1—18  X  24,  doz. 
No.  2—18  X  29,  doz. 
No.  3—20  X  30,  doz. 

Boards  (Ironing) — No.  1,  Daisy,  $38 
per  doz.;  No.  10,  Daisy,  $43  per  doz.; 
No.  33,  21  per  doz.;  No.  35,  $38  per 
doz.;  No.  36,  $43  per  doz.;  Perfection, 
$48  per  doz. 

Boards  (Wash)— Baby  Globe,  $2.45 
per  doz.;  Beaver  (brass),  $8  per  doz.; 
Competition  Globe  (metal),  $5.90  per 
doz.;  Diamond  King  (glass),  $8  per 
doz.;  Enamel  Queen,  $9  per  doz.;  Glass 
Globe,  $8  per  doz.;  Improved  Globe, 
$5.25  per  doz.;  Jubilee,  $5.80  per  doz.; 
Neptune,  $5.25  per  doz.;  Newmarket 
King,  $5.80  per  doz.;  Pony,  $2.45  per 
doz.;  Eoyal  Globe  (zinc),  $5.25  per 
doz.;  Original  Globe,  solid  back,  $5.95 
per  doz.;  Standard  Globe,  $5.25  per 
doz.;  Supreme  (zinc),  $6.50  per  doz.; 
Western  King  (Enamel),  $9  per  doz. 

Bolts  and  Nuts — Discounts  herewith 
apply  to  standard  list.  Carriage  bolts 
($1  list),  %  in.  diameter  and  smaller, 
6  in.  and  shorter,  47%%.  Carriage 
bolts  ($1  list),  %  in.  and  longer 
lengths,  30%.  Carriage  bolts  ($1  list), 
7/16  in.  and  larger,  40%.  Machine 
bolts,  %  in.  and  smaller.  4  in.  and 
shorter,  55%.  Machine  bolts,  %  in. 
and  smaller,  longer  lengths,  42%%. 
Machine  l>olts,  7/16  in.  and  larger, 
42%%.  Sleigh  shoe  bolts,  all  sizes, 
30%.  Coach  and  lag  screws,  55%.  Bolt 
ends,  421/2%.  Square  head  blank  bolts, 
42%%.  Plow  bolts,  1,  2,  3  head,  35%. 
Elevator  bolts,  corrugated  heads,  60%. 
Fancy  head  bolts,  30%.  Shaft  bolts 
($3  list;,  30%.    Step  bolts,  large  head 


8  Rim. 
.$  8.90 
.  10.78 
.  12.10 
.  13.86 


4  Rim 
$12.50 
12.80 
14.75 
17.75 


($3  list),  30%.  Whiffletree  bolts,  30%. 
Tire  bolts,  52%%.  Stove  bolts,  72%%. 
Nuts,  2  in.  and  smaller,  square.  Blank, 
off  net  list,  $1.25.  Nuts,  2  in.  and 
smaller,  square,  tapped,  net  list.  Nuts, 
2  in.  and  smaller,  hexagon.  Blank,  off 
list,  75c.    Tapped,  off  list,  75c. 

Terms — Cash  in  30  days  from  date  of 
shipment,  less  2  per  cent. 

Borax — Lump  crystal  borax,  10c  lb. 

Brooms — No.  5,  4  strings,  $6.65  per 
doz.;  No.  5,  standard,  $7.50  per  doz.; 
Little  Beauty,  $9.40  per  doz.;  Royal 
Blue,  $13.90  per  doz. 

Butts  —  (Wrought  Steel)— No.  840, 
less  10%;  No.  800,  net;  No.  838,  less 
5%;  No.  808,  add  10%;  No.  804,  less 
5%;  No.  802,  plus  5%;  No.  810,  add 
25%;  No.  814,  add  20%. 

Cans  (Milk)— At  list  plus  15%. 

Cement  (Portland) — In  carload  lots, 
per  bbl.,  $3,770.  Less  than  car  lots:  Per 
bbl.,  f.o.b.  yard,  $4.00  per  bbl.,  deliv- 
ered, $5.00.  Single  bags,  $1.25  each,  4 
bags  to  barrel.  Extra  charge  of  $1.50 
per  load  on  less  than  24  bag  lots.  Re- 
bate, 20  cents  for  empty  sacks. 

Choppers  (Food) — Universal — No.  0, 
$16.50  a  doz.;  No.  1,  $20.40  a  doz.;  No. 
2,  $24.80  a  doz.;  No.  3,  $33.00  a  doz. 
F.o.b.  Montreal  and  Toronto. 

Chums  (Barrel) — No.  0,  each,  hand, 
$10.30;  power,  $15.50.  No.  1,  hand, 
$10.30;  power,  $15.50.  No.  2,  hand, 
$10.90;  power,  $16.20.  No.  3,  hand, 
$11.75;  power,  $17.10.  No.  4,  hand, 
$13.60;  power,  $18.45.  No.  5,  hand, 
$15.10;  power,  $19.80.  Net  list  f.o.b. 
Montreal,  Ottawa,  Kingston,  Toronto, 
Hamilton,  Fergus,  London,  St.  Mary's. 

Clippers  (Horse) — New  market,  $3.50 
per  pair.  No.  1  B.B.  Stewart  Horse  Clip- 
per, $14  list,  less  25  per  cent. 

Clocks  (Alarm) — Big  Ben  and  Baby 
Ben,  each,  $3.43;  Good  Morning,  each, 
$1.37;  Lookout,  $1.88;  Sleepmeter,  $2.06. 

Clothes  Bars — No.  2,  $19  per  doz.; 
No.  3,  $14.40  per  doz.;  No.  4,  $11  per 
doz.;  No.  5,  $16  per  doz.;  No.  6,  $13  per 
doz. 

Clothes  Horses  (folding)  6  feet,  per 
doz.,  $16;  5  feet,  $13;  4  feet,  $11. 

Extension— 6  feet,  $82;  5  feet,  $26; 
4  feet,  $22. 

Clothes  Lines  (G-alvanized) — No.  18, 
100  ft.  lengths,  $6.50  per  1,000  feet; 
50  ft.  lengths,  $7.10;  No.  19,  100  ft. 
lengths,  $5.50;  50  ft.  lengths,  $6.75. 

Clothes  Line  Eeels — No.  3,  $17.50  per 
dozen;  No.  3%,  $19.75;  No.  4,  $32.50. 

Cobbler  Sets — Common,  per  set,  $1.14. 

Coil  Chain—  Proof  BBB 

3/16  inch,  electric  weld. $16.25  $19.50 
%  inch,  electric  weld...  15.50  17.75 
5/16  inch,  electric  weld.  12.75  15.75 
%  inch,  electric  weld.  .  .  10.60  .... 

%  inch,  fire  weld   13.65  16.00 

7/16  inch,  fire  weld          11.25  13.75 

%  inch,  fire  weld   11.25  11.75 

%  inch,  fire  weld   10.50  .... 

Combs,  Curry — No.  101,  $1.40  per 
dozen;  No.  Ill,  $1.60;  No.  121,  $1.70; 
No.  127,  $2.30. 

Combs,  Cattle — No.  98,  $2  per  dozen; 
No.  100,  $2.85. 

Cord  (Sash) — No.  6,  59c  a  pound; 
No.  7,  58e;  Nos.  8,  9,  10,  12,  57c. 

Crowbars— «S8. GO  per  100  lbs. 

Dampers^ — Cast,  Champion,  5  in.,  $1.42 
a  dozen;  6  in.,  $1.57;  7  in.,  $2.10. 

Doors,  Screen — Kasement,  No.  2,  oak 
stain,  varnished,  including  hardware 
sets:  2  ft.  6  in.,  $45  per  dozen;  2  ft. 
8  in.,  $45.60;  2  ft.  10  in.,  $46.70;  2  ft. 


7  in.,  $46.80. 

Drills-Standard  lists.  Blacksmiths' 
%  m  X  2%  in.  shank,  each,  %,  45c 
5/32,  45c;  3/16,  50c;  7/32,  55c;  60c 
9/32,  65c;  5/16,  70c;  11/32,  75c;  % 
80c;  13/32,  85c;  19/32,  $1.20;  %,  $1.30 
21/32,  $1.40;  11/16,  $1.50;  23/32,  $1.60 
%,  $1.70;  25/32,  $1.80;  13/16,  $1.90 
27/32,  $2;  %,  $2.10. 

Drills— 7/16,  90e;  15/32,  95e;  %,  $1 
17/32,  $1.05;  9/16,  $1.10-  29/32,  $2.20 
15/16,  $2.30;  31/32,  $2.40;  1,  $2.50.  In- 
termediate sizes  take,  list  of  next  larger. 

Bit  Stock — List  per  doz.,  less  45%: 
3/32,  $2.70;  %,  $3;  5/32,  $3.50;  3/16, 
$4;  7/32,  $4.50;  %,  $5;  9/32,  $6;  5/16, 
$7;  %,  $8.50;  7/16,  $10.50;  %,  $13; 
9/16,  $15.50;  %,  $18;  11/16,  $21;  %, 
$24;  %,  $30.  Blacksmiths',  %  in. 
shank,  straight  shank,  wire,  taper 
shank,  50%  off. 

Files  and  Rasps — These  discounts  ap- 
ply to  list  of  Nov.  1,  1899:  Great  West- 
ern, Amer.,  50%;  Kerney  Foot  Arcade, 
60/5%;  J.  Barton  Smith,  Eagle,  55%; 
P.  H.  and  Imperial,  60/5%;  Globe, 
60/5%;  Nicholson,  40%;  Black  Dia- 
mond, 40%;  Delta  Files,  20%;  Firth 
Files,  50%. 

Grindstones — Under  40  lbs.  weight- 
Smaller  than  2  in.  face,  $5.25  per  hun- 
dred pounds;  two  in.  and  over,  $4.50. 

40  to  80  lbs.  weight— Under  2  in. 
face,  $4.75  per  hundred  pounds;  2  ins. 
and  over,  $4.25;  Bi-Treadle,  each,  $9.75; 
Cycle  BB,  $8.75. 

Grindstone  Fixtures — No.  22,  $8.67 
per  dozen;  No.  23,  $9.37;  No.  2%,  $10; 
No.  3,  $11.50. 

Halters,  Rope — Sisal,  7-16  in.,  $21  per 
gross;  9-16,  $33.  Jute,  7-16  in.,  $19; 
9-16  in.,  $28.50, 

Hame  Fasteners — (Dodson),  $4.60  per 
dozen. 

Hammers,  Nail — No.  21,  $12  per 
dozen;  No.  1,  $15.40;  Nos.  1%,  61%, 
$15.20. 

Hammers,  Sledge — (Canadian),  2-2% 
lbs.,  $22.50  per  cwt.;  3-4%  lbs.,  $20.70; 
5  lbs.  and  over,  $14.40. 

Masons— 2-3%  lbs.,  $28.35  per  cwt.; 
3-4%  lbs.,  $25.50;  5  lbs.  and  over, 
$20.70. 

Hammers,  Striking— No.  38,  No.  46,  5 
lbs.  and  over,  $14.40  per  dozen. 

Hammers,  Machinist — No.  30,  1  lb., 
$10.20  per  dozen;  No.  30,  1%  lb.,  $11. 

Handles  (Wood) — All  hickory  han- 
dles, list  plus  20%;  all  oak,  ash  and 
maple  handles,  list  plus  10%;  hay  fork, 
hoe  rake,  shovel  and  manure  fork,  net 
list;  Whiffletrees,  double-trees  and  neck- 
yokes,  list  plus  20%;  wood  rakes,  list 
plus  10%;  horse  pokes,  list  plus  10%. 
Terms,  all  goods  f.o.b.  factories,  2%  10 
days,  net  30  days.  0-Cedar  Mop  Han- 
dles, less  30%.  ■ 

Hangers,   Bam    and  Parlor — Storm 
King  No.  42,  list  less  20-10%;  Safety 
No.  20,  list  less  20-10%;  Reliable  No.  1 
list  less  20-10%;    Round    Trolley  No 
1917,  list  less  33  1-3-5%.    Atlas  No.  0 
$13.35;  No.  1,  $13.80;    No.    2,  $15.85 
Stearns,  4  in.,  $12.80;  5  in.,  $16.00.  Per 
feet.  No.  1,  $10.50;     Canada,  $13.25 
Hatch,  $13.25;  National,  $12;  America, 
$19;  Great  West,  $30. 

Hatchets,  Shingling— No.  1,  $10.25 
per  dozen;  No.  2,  $11.25. 

Hatchets,  Lath — ^No.  3,  $10.25  per 
dozen;  No.  4,  $11.25. 

Hatchets,  Barrelling — Nos.  50  and  60, 
$15.75  per  dozen. 

Hatchets,  Claw— No.  7,  $12.25  per 
dozen;  No.  8,  $13. 

Hinges  (Blind)— Clark 's  No.  1,  $2.22 


February,  1922 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


35 


tloglaze 

FOR  THE 

HOME  6. FARM 


'mpewal  Varnish  s  Color 

|>«"».PtG     TORONTO  VAN«U<^ 


'Save  the  surface  and 
you  save  all  ^^7^ 


The  Seven 


}l6jflaze 


lines 


are 


Home  and  Farm  Finishes 
Auto  Finishes 

Art  Shades 
Velvet  Finishes 
Porch  and  Veranda  Floors 
Lac  Shades 
Exterior  Finishes 


The  Finish  That  Endures 


Home  and 


Fzurm 


(The  Can  With  The  Yellow  and  Blue  Label) 

More  than  ever  before  the  year  1922  will  find 
you  looking  for  such  lines  as  will  net  you  the 
l3iggest  profit,  and  quickest  turnover,  on  the 
least  investment  of  capital. 

FLOGLAZE  HOME  AND  FARM  shades  give 
you  a  decid'3d  advantage  over  the  possibilities 
of  an  ordinary  paint,  owing  to  its  many  uses 
and  concentrated  number  of  liaes.  Can  be 
used  on  practically  everything  about  the  home 
and  farm  for  finishing  and  re- 
finishing  indoors  and  out-of- 
doors. 

FLOGLAZE  HOME  AND 
F'ARM  shades  wear  equally 
well  on  wood  or  metal  sur- 
faces. 


Let  us  prove  to  you  by  ac- 
tual demonstration  why  you 
should  have  this  line. 


Our  dealer's  booklet  "A  Guide  to  larger  Profits" 
gives  detailed  description  of  Floglaze  "Home 
and  .Farm"  and  six  other  Floglaze  lines.  Write 
for  a  copy. 


"Make  1922  Your  Greatest  Paint  and  Varnish  Year" 

ImperialVarnish  &  Color  Co. 

HEAD  OFFICE 

MONTREAL 


LIMITED 


Entt^Tn  Distributors 

PAINT&VARNISH 

LIMITED 

MONTREAL 

243  Beaver  Hall  Hill 


WINNIPEG 

Sole  Diatribulore  for  Manitoba, 
Samkalchewan  and  Albmrta 


CANADA 

VANCOUVER 


MILLER-MORSE  HARDWARE 

n'iL-THE  BIG  WINNIPEG  H0u7e'±>^; 


Distributors  for  British  Columbia: 
The  Callander  Shore  Co.,  Limited 
155  Pender  St.  West 
Vancouver 


36 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


Fdiruary,  1922 


per  dozen  sets. 

Hinge,  (Spring)— Xo.  200  and  No.  20, 
$25  per  gross;  Ajax  Floor  No.  3111, 
$1.85  per  set. 

Eeliance  Door  No.  270 — Light,  per 
doz.,  $3.15;  medium,  per  doz.,  $4.20; 
heavy,  per  doz.,  $C.40. 

Hinges — Heavy,  in  bulk.    Doz.  pairs: 

4  in.,  strap,  $1.50;  tee,  $1.80.  5  in., 
strap,  $1.90;  tee,  $2.20.  6  in.,  strap, 
$2.15;  tee,  $2.40.  8  in.,  strap,  $2.40; 
tee,  $3.20.  10  in.,  strap,  $4.30;  tee, 
$5.70.  12  in.,  strap,  $6.90;  tee,  $7.10. 
14  in.,  strap,  $7.50;  tee,  $8.05.  Net 
prices. 

Light— Net  prices- 3  in.,  strap,  90c; 
tee,  90c.    4  in.,  strap,  $1.08;  tee,  $1. 

5  in.,  strap,  $1.26;  tee,  $1.17.  6  in., 
strap,  $1.53;  tee,  $1.35. 

Screw  Hook  and  Strap  Hinges — List 
prices,  per  dozen  pairs — 6  in.,  $4.30;  8 
in.,  $4.80;  10  in.,  $6.40;  12  in.,  $7;  15 
in.,  $7.50;  18  in.,  $11;  21  in.,  $12.40; 
24  in.,  $16;  27  in.,  $17.20;  30  in.,  $18.50; 
33  in.,  $21.50;  36  in.,  $24.50.  Discount, 
30%. 

Heaters,  Electric  —  Glower  Heater, 
$10;  Heatray  Heater,  $12.  Discount, 
25%-33%,  according  to  quantity. 

Majestic,  1  burner,  $11;  2  burner, 
$16.    Discount,  271/0%. 

Universal,  $13.80.  Discount,  20  and 
5%. 

Hoes — Grub,  $6.75  per  dozen. 

Hooks  (Grass)- Canadian,  No.  2, 
$3.90  per  dozen;  No.  3,  $4;  No.  4,  $4.10; 
No.  5,  $4.30;  Little  Giant,  $6.50;  Bar- 
den  Pat.,  $6.50. 

English  Fox— No.  2,  $7.50  a  dozen; 
No.  3,  $8;  No.  4,  $8.50. 

Horseshoes —  Price  per  keg 

No.  2  No.  1 
Sizes  and  and 
made  smaller  larger 

Light  iron    0-7    $7.75  $8.00 

Long  heel  light  iron    3-7  7.75 

Medium  iron    1-8     7.75  8.00 

Heavy  iron    6-8  7.75 

Snow    1-6     8.00  8.25 

New  light  XL  steel.  1-6  8.20  8.45 
Featherweight 

XL  steel   0-4     9.60  all  siz. 

Special  countersunk.  0-4  10.10  all  siz. 
Toe  weight  (front 

only)    1-4    10.60  all  siz. 

Packing — Up  to  3  sizes  in  one  keg, 
10c  per  100  lbs.  extra.  More  than  3 
sizes,  25c  per  100  lbs.  extra.  F.o.b. 
Montreal. 

Terms — Cash  in  thirty  days,  less  2% 
discount. 

Hose,  Lawn — Corrugated,  per  hun- 
dred feet:  %  in.,  $13.25;  %  in.,  $15.50; 
%  in.,  $18.  Less  5%  for  full  reel,  500  ft. 

Irons  (Sad)— Mrs.  Potts,  polished, 
$1.90  per  set;  nickel  plated,  $1.95. 

Handles  for  above  japanned,  $20.75 
per  gross. 

Common,  No.  1  ,4  and  5  lbs.,  $20.60 
per  cwt.;  6  lbs.  and  up,  ewt.,  $15. 

Irons,  Electric — Model  B,  $6.50  list. 
Classic,  $8  list.  Discount,  25%  to  33%, 
according  to  quantity. 

Knives,  Hay — Spear  Point,  $15  per 
dozen;  Lightning,  $14;  Heath's,  $14. 

Ladders  —  Step  Ladders— Standard, 
46e  a  foot;  Household,  35c;  Shelf  Lock, 
4  to  8  ft.  only,  32c;  Faultless,  4  to  8  ft. 
only,  46c;  Faultless,  10,  12  and  14  ft., 
50c. 

Single  and  Fruit  Picking — 10  ft.  to 
16  ft.,  28c  per  foot;  18  ft.  to  20  ft.,  29c. 

Roped  and  Straight  Extension  Lad- 
ders—20  to  32  ft.,  32c  a  foot;  36  to  44 
ft.,  3.5c;  over  44  ft.,  43c;  special  qual- 
ity, 20  to  40  ft.,  45c;  three  section  ex- 
tension, 45c. 


Fire  ladders  up  to  32  feet  are  twice 
the  price  of  ordinary  extensions.  Over 
32  ft.  are  supplied  with  supporting  legs 
at  three  times  the  price. 

Lanterns — ^Short  or  long  globe,  plain, 
$12;  japanned,  $12.75;  Dash,  plain, 
$18.75;  japanned,  $19.25;  search  (round 
reflection),  $15.75;  Little  Bobs,  2  10-4 
20. 

Lantern  Globes — Cold  blast,  short  or 
long,  1  doz.  eases,  $1.35  doz.;  3  doz. 
cases,  $1.20  doz.;  6  doz.  eases,  $1.15 
doz.;  Cold  Blast  genuine  ruby,  $5.40 
doz.    F.o.b.  factory. 

Latches — Steel  Thumb,  No.  2,  $2  per 
dozen;  No.  3,  $2.50;  No.  4,  $3.75;  Bam 
Door,  No.  5,  $3.30;  No.  9,  $6.15. 

Macliines  (Washing)  —  Dowswell, 
$12.75  each;  Noiseless,  $17.50;  Hamil- 
ton, $14;  Peerless,  $14.50;  Snowball, 
$19.50;  New  Century,  style  A,  $19.75; 
style  B,  $21.75;  electric,  $160.00;  Play- 
time, engine  drive,  $27;  Ideal  Power, 
$30;  Seafoam,  electric,  style  J^,  $105; 
engine  drive,  $50;  Sunshine,  $10.25; 
Popular,  $14.50;  Economic,  $16;  Puri- 
tan, $19.50;  New  Champion,  $21.50; 
Home,  $21.50;  Vacuum,  $28;  Home  Wa- 
ter, motor,  $28;  Whirlpool,  water  power, 
$31;  Hydro,  1  Tub,  engine  drive,  $57; 
electric,  $116.50;  Eotary  water  motor 
washer,  $29;  Connor  ball-bearing,  with 
rack,  $22.75;  Perfection,  engine  drive, 
$65;  electric,  $132;  Beaver,  $26;  power, 
$27;  Connor,  vacuum,  $27.50;  Patriot, 
$21.50;  Jubilee,  $12.50;  Canada  First, 
$21.50.  These  prices  are  less  30%. 
Freight  equalized  with  Montreal,  Ot- 
tawa, Toronto,  Hamilton,  Kingston, 
London  and  St.  Mary's,  or  shipments  of 
quarter  dozen  and  upwards. 

Stands,  Washtub — Dowswell,  $44.10 
per  dozen. 

Mattocks — Cutter,  $10.00  per  dozen; 
Pick,  $10.00. 

Mixed  Bread — ^Canuck— No.  4,  $36.24 
dozen;  No.  8,  $40.92. 

Universal — No.  $40,00  a  dozen;  No. 
8,  $52. 

Mops — Liquid  Veneer,  $16  per  dozen; 
0-Cedar,  less  handle,  $14;  O 'Cedar,  with 
handle,  $10;  S.  W.  Mops,  complete, 
$4.35;  Mop  Sticks,  No.  8,  $2;  Cast  Head 
Mop,  $2;  Crescent,  No.  10,  $2.60;  Crank 
wringing,  $7.35;  Smarts',  $4. 

Mop  Wringers — White,  No.  1,  $16.40 
per  dozen;  white.  No.  2,  $16.80;  white. 
No.  3,  $24. 

Mowers,  Lawn — (List  of  Sept.  12, 
1921) — Adanae,  Woodyatt,  Empress, 
Mayflower,  Ontario  Daisy,  Star,  all  at 
20%  off  list;  Whippet,  Thousand  Island, 
Eed  Wing,  Blue  Bird  are  all  net. 

Nails— List  adopted  Sept.  10,  1920. 
Advance  over  base  on  common  wire 
nails  in  kegs:  1  in.,  $1.50;  1%  in., 
$1.40;  1%  in.,  $1.15;  11/2  in.,  80c ;  1% 
in.,  75c;  2  in.,  60c;  2%  in.,  55e;  21/2  in., 
30e;  2%  in.,  30c;  3  in.,  20c;  3%  in., 
15c ;  3%  in.,.  10c;  4  in.,  5c;  41/2  in.,  5c; 
5  in.,  base;  5%  in.,  base;  6  in.,  base. 
6%  to  12  in.  2  ga.  and  heavier,  25c 
over  base. 

Standard  steel  wire  nails,  f.o.b.  Lon- 
don, Hamilton,  Milton,  Toronto,  Owen 
Sound,  Collingwood,  Montreal,  $3.90 
base.  Freight  equalized  on  above 
points. 

Windsor,  Walkerville,  Sandwich, 
f.o.b.  factory  prices,  carload  freight  al- 
lowed, $4.00. 

Sault  Ste.  Marie,  Port  Arthur,  Fort 
William,  $4.15  base,  f.o.b.  factory;  no 
freight  allowance. 

Moulding,  Flooring,  Slating,  Box, 
Fence,  Barrel  Nails,  25c  per  100  lbs. 
over  common    nail    prices.  Finishing 


nails,  50c  per  100  lbs.  advance  over  com- 
mon nail  price. 

Miscellaneous  wire  nails,  70%  off 
miscellaneous  list,  f.o.b.  Toronto,  Mont- 
real, Hamilton  and  London. 

Nails,  cut — $4.70. 

Eoofing  Nails — American,  large  head, 
keg,  $10.50.    Less  quantities,  $12.50. 

Nails  (Horse) — Capewell  C  Brand — 
No.  5,  $6.75  per  25  lb.  box;  No.  6,  $6.50; 
No.  7,  $6.25;  No.  8,  $6;  No.  9,  $5.75. 
Discount,  10%. 

"M.E.M."  Brand— Net  price  list. 
No.  3,  5%  in.  long,  $20.25  per  25  lb. 
box;  No.  4,  1%  in.  long,  $10.25;  No.  5, 
1  15/16  in.  long,  $5.25;  No.  6,  2y8  in. 
long,  $5;  No.  7,  2  16/16  in.  long,  $4.75; 
No.  8,  21/2  in.  long,  $4.75;  No.  9,  2  11/16 
in.  long,  $4.50;  No.  10,  2%  in.  long, 
$4.50;  No.  11,  3  1/16  in.  long,  $4.50;  No. 
12,  314  in.  long,  $4.50. 

Netting,  Poultry — 2  in.  mesh  and  19 
gauge  wire — 12  in.,  $1.80  per  50-yard 
roll;  18  in.,  $2.65;  24  in.,  $3.40;  30  in., 
$4;  36  in.,  $4.75;  42  in.,  $5.50;  48  in., 
$6.20;  60  in.,  $7.70;  72  in.,  $9.20;  84  in., 
$10.50;  96  in.,  $12. 

1%  in.  mesh  and  19  gauge  wire— 12 
in.,  $3.50  per  50-yard  roll;  18  in.,  $5; 
24  in.,  $6.30;  30  in.,  $7.75;  36  in.,  $9.90; 
42  in.,  $10.50;  48  in.,  $12;  60  in.,  $15; 
72  in.,  $18. 

1  in.  mesh  and  20  gauge  wire — 12  in., 
$4;  18  in.,  $5.50;  24  in.,  $7;  30  in., 
$8.50;  42  in.,  $12;  48  in.,  $14;  60  in., 
$17;  72  in.,  $20 

%  in.  mesh  and  20  gauge  wire — ^24 
in.,  $10.50;  30  in.,  $12.75;  36  in.,  $15. 

%  in.  mesh  and  22  gauge  wire — 24 
in.,  $16.50;  30  in.,  $20;  36  in.,  $24. 

Discounts  at  present  quoted  apply 
only  to  land  2  in.  mesh  setting.  Other 
prices  have  been  withdrawn  and  are 
quoted  only  on  application. 

Toronto,  London,  Montreal,  Canadian 
netting,  2  in.  mesh,  12%%  off;  1  in. 
mesh,  12%%  off.  American  netting,  1 
in.  mesh,  121/2%  off. 

Invincible— No.  1848,  80c  a  rod;  2060, 
88c.  Put  up  in  10,  20  and  30  rod  rolls. 
F.o.b.  Montreal. 

Blue  Eibbon — 24  in.,  $5.50  per  roll; 
36  in.,  $7.15;  48  in.,  $8.35;  60  in.,  $9.85; 
72  in.,  $11.25.    Put  up  in  10  rod  rolls. 

Paper  (Building) — Drv  fibre,  No.  1, 
Anchor,  $1.15  per  400  ft.  roll;  No.  2, 
Anchor,  65c;  No.  2,  Elephant,  65c. 

Tarred  Fibre,  No.  1— Anchor,  $1.20; 
No.  2,  85c. 

Elephant  Brand,  tarred,  No.  2,  85c; 
Surprise  Fibre,  70c;  Empress  Dry 
Sheathing,  $1.45;  Stag  Sheathing,  70c: 
Cyclone,  dry,  $1.15;  tarred,  $1.20.  .Joli- 
ette  Sheathing,  65c;  tarred,  85c. 

Monarch  Sheathing,  white,  $5.50  per 
100  pounds;  grey,  $4.50;  Straw  Sheath 
ing,  $5.50;  Imp.  Grey  Sheathing,  $4.50; 
tarred  straw,  $3.40;  Imp.  White  Sheath- 
ing, $5.7 J;  Imp.  Grey  Sheathing,  $4.75; 
Scythe  and  dry  straw,  $3.15;  Spruce 
Sheathing,  36  in.  and  72  in.  wide,  $6.00, 
Asbestos  Sheathing,  $10;  carpet  felt, 
$3.90;  tarred  felt,  7,  10  and  16  oz., 
$3.45. 

Paste  (Stick-Fast) — In  barrels,  250 
lbs.,  14c  a  pound.  Barrels  of  5  lbs., 
cotton  bags,  15c.  In  kegs,  125  lbs.,  16c ; 
in  50-lb.  boxes,  18e;  in  25-lb.  boxes, 
19c. 

Solpar,  barrels  (200  lbs.),  14c  a 
pound;  2  lb.  pkgs.,  case  lots,  lb.,  16c; 
1  lb.  pkgs.,  case  lots,  lb.,  17c. 

Picks-^Clay,  5  to  6  lbs.,  $7.80  a  doz.; 
0  to  7  lbs.,  $8.50. 

Eock— 7  to  8  lbs.,  $9.25  dozen;  8  lbs., 
$9.75. 


February,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


37 


HAMS  LTON 

HARDWARE   CONVENTION  NUMBER  i..^. 


Boeckh's 

Brush 

News 


This  Boeckh  Brush  Display 
Is  A  Big  Business  Bringer 

EALERS'  who  put  in  this  display  find  that  it  not  only  helps  to  increase  their  volume  of  brush 
sales,  but  also  increases  their  sales  of  the  higher-priced  brushes.    People  who  come  in  to 
buy  a  25-cent  brush  to  do  a  bit  of  painting  around  the  house  will  nearly  always  buy  a  better  brush 
if  you  can  show  them  something  better. 

The  display  board  shows  your  line  at  a  glance.     It  is  a  silent  but  effective  salesman. 

The  Board  Is  Supplied  Free 

We  charge  only  for  the  actual  stock  displayed.  When  ordering  it  is  your  privilege  to  say  what 
brushes  go  on  the  board  and  the  usual  practice  is  to  make  the  display  fully  representative  of  all  the 
types  of  brushes  you  carry  in  stock. 

Send  us  your  order  for  a  board  now.  Get  ready  for  the  big  annual  "paint-up"  and  "clean-up" 
drive.    A  brush  display  in  your  window  will  bring  you  a  gratifying  increase  of  business. 

The  BOECKH  COMPANY  Ltd. 

Makers  of  everything  in  good  brushes  since  1856 

TORONTO 

DISTEIEUTORS: 

Montreal — The  H.  E.  Smith  Sales  Co.,  150  Craig  Street  West.  Winnipep' — Mr.  J  E   Bnckha-n.  661  Broadway. 

Vancouver  and  Victoria — The  T.  S.  Griffiths,  1080  Hamilton  Street,  Vancouver,  B.C. 


/ 


38 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


February,  1922 


Pius,  Clothes — 5  gruss,  i  in.  (loose), 
$'2.25  a  case;  4  gross  (cartons),  4  in., 
$2.25;  Spring,  2  grcss  to  box,  $1.90. 

Pitch — Pine,  black,  per  bbl.,  $13.25; 
Xavy  pitch,  per  bbl.,  $6.50;  Coal  tar 
pitch,  per  ewt.,  $1.55. 

Planters,  Corn— King  of  Field,  $13.20 
a  dozen;  Triumph,  $11. 

Folisli  (0-Cedar) — 4  oz.  bottles,  per 
dozen,  net,  $2.40;  12-oz.  bottles,  $4.80; 

1  qt.  can,  $12;  1/2  gal.  cans,  $20;  1  gal. 
cans,  $28. 

Liquid  Veneer — 4  oz.  bottle,  per  doz., 
net,  $2.40;  12  oz.,  $4.80;  32  oz.,  $10;  64 
oz.,  each,  $1.34;  128  oz.,  each,  $2.34. 

Pulleys— Axle,  No.  1,  1%  in.,  80c  a 
dozen;  2  in.,  90e;  2^/4  in.,  95c;  Palmer's, 
90c. 

Pulleys,  Clothes  Line — No.  58,  japan- 
ned, $4.35  per  dozen;  No.  158,  galvan- 
ized, $4.45;  No.  59,  japanned,  $4.45; 
No.  159,  galvanized,  $4.55. 

Pumps —  Pitcher  Closed 

Spout  Spout 

No.  2,  each    2.85  3.10 

No.  3,  each    3.15  3.40 

No.  4,  each    3.75  4.10 

No.  70,  each   6.00 

No.  80,  each   ...  8.00 

Pumps,  Redwing — No.  0,  $6.85;  No.  1, 
$7.50;  No.  2,  $8.75;  No.  3,  $10.75;  No. 
4,  $12.75;  No.  5,  $15.25;  No.  6,  $18. 

Rifles,  Winchester — Model  1890,  $27.75 
each;  1892,  $35.70;  1894  (30  and  32 
round),  $42.40;  1894,  (30  and  32  octa- 
gon), $45.50;  1895,  $55.50;  1902,  $8.35; 
1904,  $10.20;  1905,  $53.65;  1906,  $24.05, 
1906,  expert,  $27.75;  1907,  $64.75;  1894, 
carbine,  with  sling  and  strap,  $46.65; 
1912,  gun,  $61. 

Rivets  and  Burrs — Iron  rivets,  7-16 
inch  and  smaller,  blacked  and  tinned, 
521/2%;  Iron  burrs,  521/2%  oft  list 
on  200-lb.  kegs.  Extras,  add  le  to  list 
on  100-lb.  kegs;  3c  on  50-lb.  boxes;  4e 
on  25  lb.  boxes,  8c  on  1  lb.  pkgs. 

Copper  rivets,  usual  proportion  of 
burrs,  321/2%  off;  burrs,  add  10%.  Ex- 
tras on  copper  rivets,  %  lb.  pkgs.,  Ic 
per  lb.;  %  lb.  pkgs.,  2c  lb.  Coppered 
rivets,  net  extras,  3c  per  lb. 

Roofing — Samson,   1  ply,  $2.65  roll; 

2  ply,  roll,  $3.10;  3  ply,  roll,  $3.80. 
Red  Star,  2  ply,  $1.85  roll;  Bed  Star, 

3  ply,  $2.20. 

Everlastic,  1  ply,  $1.70;  Everlastic,  2 
ply,  $2.C5;  Everlastic,  3  ply,  $2.40. 

Panamoid,  1  ply,  $1.50;  Panamoid,  2 
ply,  $1.85;  Panamoid,  3  ply,  $2.20. 

Everlastic  Multi-Shingles  (4  shingles 
in  one),  per  square,  $6.00. 

Everlastic  Liquid  Roofing  cement — 
Per  gal.,  in  bbls.,  70c;  5  and  10  gal. 
lots,  gal.,  80c;  1  gal.  cans,  gal.,  doz., 
$10.50. 

Coal  Tar  (refined),  per  barrel,  $10.50; 
coal  tar  (crude),  $9.25. 

Roofix  Roofing  Cement — In  bbls.,  per 
gallon,  fiOc;  in  Vj  bbls.,  per  gal.,  65c; 
in  5s  and  lOc,  70c;  1  gal.  cans,  per  doz., 
$9. 

Rope — Pure  Manila  basis.  23c  a 
pound;  Beaver  Manila  basis,  20c;  New 
Zealand  hemp  basis,  20c;  Sisal  basis, 
18c.  These  quotations  are  basis  prices, 
%  in.  and  larger  diameter.  The  follow- 
ing advances  over  basis  are  made  for 
smaller  sizes:  %  in.,  i/ic;  9-16  to  7-16 
in.,  inclusive,  Ic;  %  in.,  l%e;  Vi  and 
5-16  in.,  2c;  3-16  in.,  2V2C  extra. 

Single  lath  yarn  basis,  18c;  double 
lath  yarn,  18V^c;  halyards,  50c;  Beavei 
halyards,  white,  %  in.  hiasis,  35c. 

Hemp,  deep  sea  line  basis,  50c;  hemp, 
tarred  ratline  basis,  45c;  hemp,  tarred 


bolt  roj)e  basis,  45c;  marline  and  house- 
line,  45e.  Extra  charge  for  shorter 
lengths  than  half  coils,  2e  per  pound 
additional. 

Cotton,  %in.,  51c  a  pound;  5.32  in., 
50c;  3-16  in.,  47c;  %  in.  and  up,  45c. 

Sandpaper — B.  &  A.  sandpaper,  less 
5%;  Star  sandpaper,  less  5%;  B.  &  A. 
emery  cloth,  plus  25%  on  list. 

Scales — Champion,  including  stamp- 
ing, list  net:  4  lb.,  $6.60;  10  lb.,  $8.65; 
240  lb.,  $12.65;  600  lb.,  $35.80;  1,200 
lb.,  $43;  2,000  lb.,  $57.10;  2,000  lb.  drop 
lever,  $64.75. 

Scjrthes — 'Cast  steel,  $15  a  dozen; 
Golden  Clipper,  $16;  Little  Giant,  $17; 
Bush,  $16. 

Snaths — 1  loop,  $16.80  a  dozen;  2 
loops,  $15.80;  3  loops,  $14.70;  Bush, 
$18.20. 

Screws — Discounts  off  Standard  List 
—Wood,  r.H.,  bright,  821/2%;  Wood, 
R.H.,  bright,  80%,;  Wood,  O.H.,  bright, 
80%;  Wood,  r.H.,  brass,  771/2%;  Wood, 
R.H.,  brass,  75%;  Wood,  O.H.,  brass, 
75%;  Wood,  R.R.,  bronze,  72i/2%; 
Wood,  O.H.,  bronze,  70%;  Square  cap, 
40%;  Hexagon  cap,  40%;  Set  Screws, 
70%. 

Screws,  Iron  Bench,  No.  14 — 1  in., 
$11.25;  1%  in.,  $13.50;  1%  in.,  $15.65. 

Spiders— Cast,  No.  7,  $1;  No.  8,  $1.05; 
No.  9,  $1.15. 

Cast— Nickel  Plated— No.  7,  $1.26; 
No.  8,  $1.35;  No.  9,  $1.50;  No.  10,  $1.75. 

Spades,  Shovels  and  Scoops — Plain 
back  shovels  and  spades,  draining  tools, 
hollow  back  scoops,  sand  shovels,  hol- 
low back  shovels,  hollow  back  coal 
shovels,  riveted  back  scoops,  miners' 
spring  point  shovels.  1st.  2nd  and  4th 
grades,  all  55%.  These  discounts  apply 
whether  goods  are  sold  in  carload  or 
less  than  carloads,  and  apply  only  to 
Black  List,  Black  List  prices  being  as 
follows: 

Plain  back  shovels  and  spades.  No.  2 
black— 1st,  $29;  2nd,  $28;  3rd,  $25. 

Draining  tools,  No.  2  black — 1st,  29; 
2nd,  $27.50. 

Hollow  back  scoops.  No.  2,  black — 
1st,  $34.50;  3rd,  $32. 

Coal    shovels,    hollow    back,  No.  2, 
black— 1st,  $32;  3rd,  $30. 
Sand  shovels.  No.  2,  black— 1st,  $27.50; 
3rd,  $24. 

Hollow  back  shovels,  No.  2,  black — 
1st,  $27.50;  3rd,  $24. 

Riveted  back  scoops.  No.  2,  black — 
1st.  $37.50;  2nd,  $35.50;  3rd,  $34. 

Miners'  spring  point  shovels.  No.  2 — 
1st,  $36.50.. 

Net  Extras — For  each  size  larger  than 
No.  2,  add  35c  dozen  net.  Full  polished, 
add  $1  per  dozen  net.  Half  polished, 
add  50c  per  dozen  net.  F.o.b.  London, 
Hamilton,  Toronto,  Gananoque,  Ottawa, 
Collingwood,  Sherbrooke,  Montreal, 
Quebec,  Halifax,  St.  John,  Moncton  and 
freight  may  be  equalized  thereon.  On 
shipments  less  than  5  dozen  f.o.b.  fac- 
tnrv  only. 

Spikes,  Ship — Base,  %  in.  and  larger, 
.$5  per  100  lbs.  %  and  5/16  in.,  $5.50 
per  cwt.  F.o.b.  Montreal,  Belleville, 
Toronto  and  Hamilton,  with  freight 
equalized  on  those  points. 

Spouts,  Sap — Eurekn,  $15  per  thous. 

Staples  (Fence)— Bright,  $4.40  per 
100  lb.  keg;  galvanized,  $5.40. 

Stoves  (Oil  Bumins;  Cooking) — Per- 
ffT'tinn  Xn.  .■'.2.  2  burner.  $21.50  each; 

Staples  (Poultry  netting) — Bright, 
$7.25  per  100  pounds  in  kegs;  galvan- 
ized, $8.25.  Discount  10  per  cent.  Net 
extras  (not  subject  to  discount) — Cop- 
pering, 60  cents  per  100  pounds,  10-lb. 


wooden  boxes,  $1.50  per  100  pounds; 
25-lb.  and  50-lb.  wooden  boxes,  $1. 
Perfection  No.  33,  3  burner,  $26;  Per- 
fection No.  34,  4  burner,  $34;  No.  22G 
oven  for  above  stoves,  $8.  Discount, 
30%  off  list. 

McClary  Glass  Front  Oven,  No.  170, 
each,  net,  $4.75.  Detroit  Glass  Front 
Oven,  No.  85,  each,  net;  Hot  Blast, 
plus  %. 

Oil  Burning  Heaters — No.  525,  $8.75 
each;  No.  530,  $9.75;  No.  630,  $12.50. 
Discount  30%  off  list  on  these  three 
numbers.  Hot  Blast,  plus  10%. 

Stretchers,  Wire  —  Hercules,  $3.60 
doz.  Stretchers,  curtain — Star,  No.  1, 
$27.60  doz.;  Star,  No.  2,  $30  doz.;  Sun, 
No.  1,  $20;  Sun,  No.  2,  $22. 

Swinfl;s — Ontario,  4-passenger,  $8.75. 
Tacks — Wire  tacks,  60/25%  from  re- 
vised hardware  tack  list  adopted  Janu- 
ary, 1922;  double-pointed  tacks,  60/25%o 
Shoe  Findings — List  adopted  Novem- 
ber 21,  1921. 

Tapes,  Measuring  (Lufkin) — 263,  50 
ft..  Challenge,  steel,  $4.95  each;  103,  50 
ft.  Reliable  Jr.,  steel,  $5.25  each;  243, 
50  ft.  Rival,  steel,  $4.40  each;  553,  50 
ft.  Steel,  $3.95  each;  1243,  50  ft.  Rival 
Jr.,  steel,  $4.06  ea.;  603,  50  ft.  Metallic, 
$3.17  each;  604,  66  ft.,  Metallic,  $3.54 
each;  403,  50  ft.  Linen,  $2.39  each; 
713,  50  ft.  Ass  Skin,  $6.15  doz.;  714,  66 
ft.  Ass  Skin,  $7.37  doz.;  143,  3  ft.  Steel 
Pocket,  $7.27  doz.;  145,  5  ft.  Steel 
Pocket,  $9.20  doz.;  175,  5  ft.  Linen 
Pocket,  $6.35  doz.;  165,  5  ft.  Cotton 
Pocket,  $1.55  doz. 

Toasters,  Electric — Universal,  $7.80; 
C.  G.,  $5.  Discount,  20  and  10%.  Can- 
adian Beauty,  $5.43;  Upright,  with 
rack,  $6.40. 

Tools,  Harvest — Waverley,  Welland- 
vale,  Rixford,  Maple  Leaf,  Bedford, 
60%  off  new  list. 

Track,  Bam  Door — Hatch  Trolley, 
per  ft.,  221/20;  brackets  for  this,  per 
doz.,  $2.20. 

National  Flat  Track,  1%  in.  per  100 
ft.,  $10.85.  Storm  King  Flat,  No.  60, 
list  less  20-10%.  Safety  Flat,  No.  60, 
list  less  20-10%.  Reliable  No.  1  and  2, 
20c  per  ft.,  less  20-10%.  Round  Trolley 
No.  1918,  20c  per  ft.,  less  20-10%. 

Traps  (Game) — Victor,  No.  1  Giant, 
$3.35  per  dozen;  Jump,  No.  1,  $3.50; 
Hawley  &  Norton,  No.  1,  $5;  Newhouse, 
No.  1,  $7.50.    All  these  include  chains. 

Tubs,  Wood — No.  0,  $26  per  dozen; 
No.  1,  $23.10;  No.  2,  $20.90;  No.  3, 
$17.60.    F.o.b.  Newmarket. 

Twine,  Binder— 500  ft.,  17i/4c  a  foot; 
550  ft.,  18%c;  600  ft.,  20%e;  650  ft., 
21i/4c.  Freight  prepaid  to  nearest  sta- 
tion in  lots  of  300  lbs.  and  over.  (This 
applies  to  Eastern  Canada  only.)  Re- 
bate of  %  cent  lb.  on  10,000  lbs.  and  % 
cent  lb.  on  20,000  lbs. 

Twine  (Cotton) — 5-lb.  sack,  3-ply,  lb., 
471/2C;  4  ply,  lb.,  50e. 

Cones,  3  ply,  lb.,  44c ;  4  ply,  lb.,  47c. 

Tin  and  Enamelwares — 

Britannic,  list  plus  15%. 

Scotch  Grey  Ware,  50  and  10%. 

Colonial,  40%. 

Imperial  ware,  40%. 

Pearl,  40%. 

Premier,  20%. 

Canada  ware,  20%. 

Crescent,  50  and  10%. 

White  ware,  50  and  10%. 

Japanned  ware,  net  list. 

Japanned  ware,  white,  list,  plus  10_%. 

Plain  and  japanned  sprinklers,  list, 
10%. 

Stamped  ware,  plain,  50  and  10%. 
Stamped  ware,  retinned,  50%. 


/ 


February,  1922  HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


Copper  bottoms,  plus  40%. 

Tinners'  trimmings,  plain  50/10%. 

Tinners'  trimmings,  retinned,  50%. 

Tinners'  trimmings,  general,  write 
for  prices. 

Factory  milk  cans,  list,  plus  15%. 

Milk  can  trimmings,  list,  plus  33i/^%. 

Cream  cans,  write  for  prices. 

Eailroad  cans,  write  for  prices. 

Sheet  iron  ware,  list,  plus  10%. 

Pieced  ware,  ordinary,  list,  plus  20%. 

Pieced  tinware,  C.  B.,  list,  plus  30%. 

Fry  pans.  Acme,  33i^%. 

Fry  pans,  Quick  Meal,  net  list. 

Spiders,  steel,  net  list. 

Fire  shovels,  japanned,  list,  plus  10%. 

Fire  shovels,  japanned,  list,  plus  10%. 

Steel  sinks,  galvanized,  net  list. 

Steel  sinks,  painted,  net  list. 

Light  galv.  pails  and  tubs,  net  list. 

Heavy  galv.  pails  and  tubs,  net  list. 

Hollow  ware,  add  40  per  cent. 

Garbage  pails,  net  list. 

Jap.  coal  hods,  list  plus,  33i/5%- 

Galv.  coal  hods,  list,  plus  33i/5%- 

Paper  lined  boards,  40%. 

Wood  lined  boards,  25%. 

Copper  boilers,  10%. 

Copper  tea  kettles,  10%. 

Copper  tea  and  coffee  pots,  10%.  ' 

Stove  and  other  pipe,  net  list. 

Stove  pipe  elbows,  black  and  galv., 
net  list. 

Stove  pipe  thimbles,  60%. 

Wire  —  Annealed  or  Bright  —  Ad- 
vances over  base  price  on  sizes  light- 
er than  No.  9.  No.  9  and  heavier,  (5c; 
No.  11,  12c;  No.  12,  20c;  No.  13,  30c; 
No.  14,  40c;  No.  15,  55c;  No.  16,  70c. 

Annealing,  no  extra.  Oiled  and  an- 
nealed extra,  15c.  Coppering  and  liquor 
finish  extra,  $1  to  $1.50.  Tinning  ex- 
tra, $2  to  $3. 

Bright  base,  $4.30.  Annealed  base, 
$4.30.    Galvanized  base,  $4.60. 

Barbed  wire,  $5.50.  Coiled  spring 
wire,  9  gauge,  $4.65. 

Extra  net,  per  100  lbs.— Oiled  wire, 
15c;  bright,  soft  drawn,  25c-70c. 

Stovepipe  Wire— No.  18,  $8.75;  No. 
19,  $9.25. 

Weights,  Sash — Sectional,  1  lb.  per 
100  lbs.,  $2.75;  sectional,  %  lb.,  per  100 
lbs.,  $2.85;  solid,  3  to  30  lbs.,  per  100 
lbs.,  $2.50. 

Wheelbarrows — Navvy,  steel  wheel, 
$105  a  dozen;  garden  steel,  $78.75;  light 
garden,  $84.  F.o.b.  Montreal,  Toronto, 
London. 


NOTICE 

TO  AUTOMOBILE  DEALERS 

Sealed  tenders  marked  "Tender  for  Con- 
tract No.  660"  will  be  received  by  the 
undersigned  until] 2 o'clock  noon  on  Friday, 
February  17lh.l922for  the  purchase  of  the 
following-  used  Motor  Vehicles,  ai  d  for 
their  replacement  with  Motor  Vehicles  of 
the  same  type  or  as  approved :- 
McLauehliQ  Motor  Cars,  1 1  Ford  Roadsters, 
26  Ford  Touring  Cars,    1  Ford  One  Ton  Truck. 

The  above  used  cars  may  be  seen  at  the  Ontario 
{lOvernment  Garage  20  Surrey  Place, Toronto. 
Furtherinformation  and  tender  envelopes  mny 
be  obtained  at  the  office  of  the  underslg-ned. 
The  lowcit  or  any  tender  not  necessarily  accepted. 

W.  A.  McLean. 

Deputy  Minister  of  Hghways. 
Dept.  of  Public  Highways,  Ontario 
Toronto,  January  .31st.in22 


r 


IT  PAYS  YOU  TO 
SELL  PEERLESS  QUALITY 

It  pays  you  to  handle  PEERLESS,  a  quality  fence.  We  absolutely 
stand  back  of  every  rod  you  sell.  You  are  sure  of  satisfied  customers 
and  future  business.  With  the  complete  Peerless  line  you  have  a  fence 
for  every  need. 

Peerless  Farm  Fence 

Strong  enough  to  withstand  any  strain  demanded.  '  Endued  with 
long  life  because  heavily  galvanized.  Locked  with  the  same  weight 
wire  as  the  strands  themselves.  A  complete  ranges  of  heights  and 
styles. 

» 

Peerle«s  Poultry  Fence 

Peerless  Poultry  Fence  supplies  the  increasing  demands  of  Poultry 
Breeders.  Made  in  any  height,  frcm  three  to  eight  feet.  Heavier  than 
netting  and  less  expensive. 

Peerless  Ornamental  Fence 

Appeals  to  every  farmer  or  home  owner  who  really  wants  to  improve 
his  property  and  have  an  attractive  residence.  Made  now  in  seven 
styles.  Any  height  up  to  six  feet  and  in  three  finishes,  galvanized, 
green  or  white.    A  postal  brings  you  our  new  booklet. 

See  Booths  76  and  77  at  the  Convention 

A  cordial  invitation  to  visit  the  as  hibition  of  Peerless  Fences  and, 
Gates,  with  Mr.  Jenkins  in  charge,  is  extended  to  all  Hardware  Deal- 
ers. 

The  Peerless  plant,  on  Lottridge  Street  will  also  be  op'en  for  inspec- 
tion by  delegates  during  Convention  Week. 

THE  BANWELl-HOXIE  WIRE  FENCE  CO.,  LIMITED 

Hamilton,  Ontario  Winnipeg.  Manitoba 


i3c= 


WSSm 


40 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


February,  1922 


PAINTS  AND  OILS 


Alabastine— Colors  and  white  — 2'^  lb. 
packages,  $10.10  tor  100  lbs.;  5  lb.  packages, 
J9.60  for  100  lbs.  F.o.b.  Paris  or  nearest 
jobbing  house. 

Beeswax — Small  quantities,  45c  per  pound ; 
larger  quantiites,  40c. 

Blue  Stone — Per  lb.,  bbls.,  7c;  less  quan- 
tities, 10c. 

Borax — Lump  crystal  or  powdered  borax, 
rOc  pound. 

Bronzing  Liquid — Bronzing  liquid,  No.  1, 
$2.25  a  gallon.     Banana  oil,  $4.25.  a  gallon. 

Bruslies — Floor  waxing — Acme,  15  povmds, 
$2.70  each;  20  pounds,  $3.25;  25  pounds, 
$3. SO. 

Coating: — Cement  coating,  P.  &  L.,  $5.40. 

Coal  Tar — In  quart  tins,  per  case  of  three 
dozen,  $3.75  per  dozen;  less  than  cases,  $3.95 
per  dozen. 

Colors   (Dry) — Per  pound — 

Raw  and  Burnt  Umber,  100  lb.  kegs.  No. 
1,   6-9^ic;  less  quantities,  ll-15c. 

Raw  and  Burnt  Sienna.  100  lb.  kegs, 
6-91/,c;   less   quantities,  12-15c. 

Imp.  green,  100  lb.  kegs,  15c. 

Chrome  green,  CP.,  40-45c. 

Chrome  yellow,  25-35C. 

Brunswick  green,  100  lb.  keg,  ll-13c. 

Indian  red.  100  lb.  keg,  15-20c;  No.  1, 
100  lb.  keg.  8c. 

Lamp  Wack,  in  bulk,  24c;  packages,  25- 
28c. 

Venetian  red,  best  bright,  6% -9c;  No.  1, 
3»i-5%c. 

Drop  black,  pure  dry.  12-15C. 

Golden  Ochre,  100  lb.  kegs.  5c. 

White  ochre,  100  lb.  keg,  6c;  barrels,  5c. 

Tellow  ochre,  barrels,  3-6c. 

French  ochre,  bbls.,  5-Sc. 

Spruce  ochre.  100  lb.  keg,  5-8c. 

Can.  red  oxide,  bbls.,  3c. 

Super  magnetic  red,  5c. 

Vermillion,  Mexican,  75c. 

English  Vermillion,  $1.85. 

Colors  in  Oil — Pure,  in  1  lb.  tins: 

Venetian  red.  27c;  Indian  red,  30c;  Chrome 
yellow,  pure,  50c;  Golden  ochre,  pure,  34c; 
French  spruce  ochre,  pure,  29c;  Greens, 
pure.  35c;  Siennas,  36c;  Umbers,  36c;  Ultra- 
marine blue,  70c;  Prussian  blue,  95c; 
Chinese  blue,  95c;  Drop  black,  42c;  Ivory 
black,  44c;  Signwriters'  black,  pure,  48c; 
Imperial   black,   25  lb.   irons,  39p. 

Colors — Mortar — Brown,  per  pound,  2ViC; 
red,  214c;  black,  7c;  buff,  3c. 

Dryers — I.  V.  housepainters'  japan,  gal 
cans,  $3;  I.  V.  liquid  dryer,  $2  75.  Discount, 
50  per  cent,  on  both  these.  Housepainters', 
$1.15. 

Enamels  (White) — Per  gallon:  Dougall 
white  enamel,  $7.43;  Vitralite,  $7.77;  Dura- 
lite,  $6;  Old  Dutch,  $6.27;  B-H  "White" 
Enamel,  $6.50;  Martins,  white,  $7;  Satinette, 
$7.23;  C.  P.  Co.  Albagloss,  $6.30;  C.  D.  Mas- 
ter Painters,  $6.75;  Mooramel,  $7;  Lowe 
Bros.,  Linduro,  ?7;  Sunshine,  white,  $G; 
Kyanize,  $8;  Solpar,  $4.50;  Paripan,  $9; 
Jasperlac,  $4.25;  Invincible,  $6:  Hillcrest, 
$7;  Adelite,  A.  &  E..  $7.65;  Ad&lite,  A.  & 
E.,  $5.40;  Floglazs.  $4.50;  Ripolin,  $7.09. 

Glue — English,  sheet,  per  lb,  24  to  30c; 
White  pigsfoot,  50c;  Cake  bone,  112  lb.  bags, 
24  to  30c;  Hides,  112  lb.  bags,  30  to  32c; 
Ground  glues,  112  lb.  bags — English,  per  lb., 
22  to  24c;  Canadian,  16  to  18c. 

Glass —  Star  or  Double 

Case  lots.  16  oz,  or  24  oz. 

Up  to  25    $  5.50        5  9.05 

26  to  40    6.95  11.40 

41  to  50    7.65  12.55 

Bl  to  60    7.95  13.05 

61  to   70    .  .'.   8.35  13.65 

71  to  80    8.80  14.40 

81  to  84    10.30  17.70 

85  to  90    10.85  18.55 

91   to  95    20.80 

96  to  100    22.60 

Cut  size  sheet  glass,  75  per  cent,  oft  No- 
vember, 1920.  list. 

Glaziers'  Points — Zinc  coated,  7c  %  lb. 
package. 

I/ead,  White — (Ground  In  oil) — Prices  are 
per  100  lbs.  In  ton  lots.  Less  than  ton  lots 
are  35c  per  100  lbs.  higher  than  quoted  be- 
low. F.o.b.  Brantford,  50c;  London,  55c; 
Windsor,  60c  per  100  lbs.  F.o.b.  Toronto 
William  and  Port  Arthur.  75c  per  100  lbs. 
Maritime  differential  50c  per  100  lbs.  over 
Montreal. 

Montreal.  Toronto 

Anchor,    pure    $12.75  $13.20 

CJhamplon,  pure    12.75  13.20 

Oown  Diamond,  pure  ....  12.75  13.20 
and  Hamilton,  45c  per  100  lbs.     F.o.b.  Port 

Green  Seal  pure    12.75  13.20 

I.  V.  Perfection    12.75  13.20 

Ramsay's  pure    12.75  13.20 


Moore's  pure    12.75  13.20 

Tiger,    pure    12.75  13.20 

O.P.W..  Dec,   pure    12.75  13.20 

Elephant  Genuine    13.25  13.70 

BB  Genuine,  less  than  tons    14.10  14.55 

Lead  (Red  Dry) — Per  100  lbs. — Genuine, 
560  lb.  casks,  $11.00;  Genuine,  100  lb.  casks, 
$12.00;  less  quantity,  $13.00.  F.o.b.  Mont- 
real and  Toronto. 

Linseed  Oil — (Raw) — Per  gal. — 1  to  2 
bbls..  90c.    Boiled — 1  to  2  bbls.,  93c. 

Litharge — Casks,  per  cwt.,  $9.25 ;  smaller 
quantities,  per  lb.,  10  %c. 

Muresco — Per   100   lbs.  White.  Tints. 

350   ib.   bbls   $7.15  $8.25 

200  lbs.,  halt  bbls   8.00  9.10 

100  lbs.,  kegs    8.25  9.35 

Cases.  20  5-lb.  pkgs   8.80  9.90 

Paints,  Prepared — Price  per  gallon,  1  gal- 
lon can  basis — ■ 

C.  P.  Co.  Elephant  white.  $3.85;  Sanitone, 
white,  $3.45;  Sanitone,  colors,  $3.35;  C.  P. 
Co.,  pure  white,  $3.95;  C.  P.  Co.,  pure  colors, 
$3.00;  C.  P.  floor  paint,  $3.55;  Elephant  floor 
paint,   $3.30;  Victoria  floor  paint,  $2.90. 

B-H  English,  colors,  $3.60;  English,  white, 
$3.95;  Fresconette,  white,  $3.45;  Fresconette, 
colors,  $3.35;  floor,  $3.55;  porch  floor,  $3.60. 

CroAvn  Diamond,  white,  $3.70;  colors, 
$3.35;  floor,  $3,30;  porch,  $3.30;  flat  wall 
tone,  white,  $3.45;  colors,  $3.35. 

Moore's  House  Colors,  white,  $4.35;  House 
Colors,  colors,  $4.10;  Preesrvo  Paint,  white, 
$2.95;  colors,  $2,85;  floor  paint,  $3.80;  Sani- 
Flat.  $3.80;  Porch  and  Deck  Paint,  $4.10. 

I.  V.  Elastica,  white,  $3.55;  Blastica,  col- 
ors, $3.70;  Flatine.  int.  wall,  white,  $3.45; 
Flatine,  int.  wall,  cilors,  $3.35. 

Lowe  Bros.,  H.  S.  White,  No.  328,  $3.95; 
H.  S.,  color,  $3.60;  H.  S.  floor,  hard  drying, 
$3.55;  H.  S.  Porch.  $3.60;  Mellotone,  flat 
wall,  white,  3.50;  color,  $3.35. 

Jamieson's  Crown  Anchor,  $3.45. 

O.P.W.  Canada  Brand,  white,  $3.95;  col- 
ors, $3.60;  floor.  $3.55;  Flat  Wall,  white, 
$3.45;  color,  $3.35. 

Ramsay's  Pure,  white,  $3.80;  colors,  $3.45; 
floor,  $3.40;  porch,  $3.45. 

Glidden's  white,  $3.95;  colors,  $3.60. 

Martin-Senour,  lOOc/^.  white,  $3.95;  col- 
ors, '$3.00:  porch,  $3.60;  Neutone,  white, 
$3.45;  Neutone,  colors,  $3.35;  floor  paint, 
$3.35. 

Sherwin-Williams,  white,  $3.95;  colors, 
$3.60;  floor.  $3.60;  porch.  $3.60;  Flat  Tone, 
white,   $3.45;  colors.  $3.35. 

Maple  Leaf,  white,  $3.95;  colors,  $3.60; 
floor,  $3.55. 

Pearcy's  Prepared,  colors,  $3.05;  white, 
$3.40:  floor,  $3. 

Adelite,  white,  $3.95:  colors,  $3.60;  Indus- 
trial white,  $3.50. 

Barrett's  Everjet  Elastic  Carbon  Paint — 
Barrels,  per  gal.,  80c;  half  barrels.  85c;  5s 
and  10s,  95c;  Is,  per  case,  doz.,  $12.00. 

Ever.jet  Black  Enamel — Crates,  2  doz.,  8 
oz.,  $1.45;  crates  12  doz.,  8  oz.,  $1.40;  1  gal. 
cans,  gal.,  $1.50:  5-10  gal.  cans,  gal.,  $1.35; 
barrels-half  bbls.,  gal.,  $1.25. 

Carboso'.a  Liquid  Creosote  Oil — Barrels, 
60c;  half  barrels,  65c;  5s  and  10s,  gal.,  95c; 
Is  (case  12  gals.),  Montreal,  $8.50:  Toron- 
to, $9.50. 

H„  T.  &  A.  Co.'s  Creosote  Oil — Barrels, 
45c;  halt-barrels,  50c;  5s  and  10s,  60c.  F.o.b. 
Montreal  and  Toronto. 

Paris  Green — 100  lb.  lots — %  lb.  paper 
cartons,  per  lb.,  52c;  1  lb.  paper  cartons, 
50c;  %  lb.  tins,  54c;  1  lb.  tins,  52c;  25  lb. 
tins,  48c;  50  and  100  Ib.  drums,  46c;  250  Ib. 
kegs.  44%c;  100  lb.  barrels,  44c.  Terms: 
1  per  cent.  15,  or  30  days  net.  F.o.b.  Mont- 
real. Toronto,  Hamilton,  London,  Ottawa, 
Quebec,  Moncton,  St.  John's  and  Halifax. 
Yarmouth  and  P.  E.  I.  points  %c  per  Ib. 
extra. 

Polish  (O-Cedar) — 4  oz.  bottles,  doz., 
$2.10;  12  oz.  bottles,  $4.20;  1  qt.  can,  $10.50; 
H  gal.  cans,  $16.80;  1  gal.  cans,  $25.20. 

Putty  (Standard) — Less  than  tons — Bulk, 
bbls.  (800  lbs),  per  cwt.,  $5.90;  100  lb. 
drums,  $6.75;  25  lb.  drums.  $7;  12%  lb. 
irons,  $7.25;  Bladders  in  bbls.  (400  lbs.), 
$7.65;  in  cases  (100  lbs.),  $7.75.  Tons  35c 
lower.  Pure  linseed  putty,  $2  cwt.  advance 
on  above  prices.  Hamilton  prices  same  as 
Toronto;  Windsor  and  London  5c  advance 
on  above. 

Plaster  Paris — .Single  barrels,  $4. 

Rosin — Barrel  lots,  per  100  lbs. — G.,  meid- 
lum  grade,  $5  to  $7.50:  water  white,  $7  to 
$9.50. 

Remover  (Paint  and  Varnish) — High  Stan- 
dard, $3:  Taxite,  1  gal.  cans,  $3:  B-H  Van- 
isher.  «3:  Chalco,  $3:  Klensa.  $3.60:  Cumoff, 
$3:  Dougall  Lingerwett.  $3.26;  Takeoff,  $3; 
O  P.W.  Presto,  $2.60;  Solvo,  $3.60;  Varn-off, 
$3:  Adelite.  $3. 

Shellac — Per  gal.  in  bbla — White,  $4.65; 
orange,  $4.15.  Gal.  jugs,  white,  $5;  orange, 
$4.50.     F.o.b.  Toronto,  London,  Montreal. 

Sulphur — In  100  Ib.  bags,  per  pound,  4V4c. 


Shingle  Stains — 

Ordinary  Colors.  Greens 

Sherwin-WilliannLS    $1.39  $1.60 

B-H  Anchor    1.40  1.60 

M.  L.  Creosote    1.40  1.60 

Soligum    1.25  '  1.60 

Martin  Senours    1.40  1.60 

Elastica    1.40  1.60 

Hillcrest    1.40  1.60 

"CD."   Shingle   Stain    1.20  1.40 

Canada  Paint    1.75  2.00 

O.P.W.  Creolin    1.30  1.60 

Tar — Coal  tar,  refined,  $10.50;  crude,  $9.25. 

Turpentine — Single  bbls.,  gal.,  $1.30;  2-4 
bbls.,  gal,,  $1.29;  5  gal.  lots,  per  gal.,  $1.45. 

Varnishes — Per  gal.  cans — B-H  Floors, 
$4.08;  Maritime  Spar,  $5.13;  Hard  oil,  $2.76; 
Gold  Medal,  $3.42;  Elastilite,  $3.85;  Grani- 
tine  Floor  Finish,  $3.85;  Hydrox  Spar,  $3.95. 

C.  P.  C.  Sun  Varnish,  $4.30;  Sun  Aero 
Spar,  $4.50;  Sun  Waterproof  Floor.  $4.40. 

Glidden  Wearette,  $3.90;  floorette,  $3.90. 

I.  V.  Elastica,  No.  1,  $4.89;  No.  2,  $4.48; 
Floor,  $4. 

Jasperite  Interior  and  Exterior,  $3.75;  In- 
destructo,  floor,  $3.75;  Pale  Hard  Oil,  $3.75. 
P.  &  L.,  No.  61,  $5.04. 
Jamieson's  Copaline,  $4. 

M-S  Marble-Ite  Floor,  $4.22;  Wood-Var, 
$4.06;  Durable  Spar,  $5.13;  Finest  Interior, 
$4.87. 

Moorlastic  Floor,  $4.25;  T.  45  Floor,  $3.50; 
Moorvar  Interior,  $3.25;  Moore's  Spar,  $5. 

S.  W.  Elastic  Interior,  $3.14;  Mar-not, 
$3.93;  Quick  Action  House,  $2.65;  Rexspar, 
$5.04;   Scar-Not,  $4.66. 

Lowe  Bros.,  durable   floor,  $4.50. 

Solpar,  Spar  Marine,  $6;  House  Spar,, 
$4.50;  Floor,   $4.50;  Interior,  $3.50. 

Kyanize  Spar,  $5.15;  Cabinet  Rubbing, 
$4.85;  Interior  and  Floor,  $4.85. 

Luxeberry  light,  $4.72;  Granite,  $4.90; 
Spar,  $5.62. 

Ramsay's  Universal,  $3.75;  Agate  Floor, 
$3.95;  400  Hard  Oil,  $3.25. 

"C.  D.  Big  4"  Exterior,  $5;  Interior,  $4.50; 
General   purpose,   $4.18;  Furniture,  $2.25. 

Dougall  Univernish,  clear,  $4.40;  Trans- 
parent, spar,  $4.90;  Transparent,  floor,  $4.40. 

Adelite,  No.  103,  Floor,  $3.90;  No.  105, 
Flat,  $3.00;  No.  100,  Spar,  $5.70.  F.o.b. 
Montreal  and  Toronto. 

AVater  Paints — Per  100  lbs.  in  5  Ib.  pack- 
ages— Frescota,  white,  $7.60;  Decotint,  white, 
$8.50;  Coraiite,  white,  $9;  Pertecto,  white, 
$8.50;  Rockface,  bbls.,  250  lb.,  5c;  Opalite, 
300  lb.  bbls.,  17V4c;  Opalite,  100  lb.  pkg., 
ISVac;  1  gal.  packages,  per  pkg.,  $1;  hi  gal. 
package,  per  pkg.,  52 14c;  Ramsay's  "Ideal," 
310  lb.  bbls.,  40Vic;  Sturgeon's  Solpar,  40c. 

AVaste — Cream,  polishing,  19c. 

White — XXX,  18c;  xx,  16c;  x,  15c;  xc,  14c; 
XXX  ex,  lOVzc;  xx  grad.,  15%c;  XLCR,  14%c; 
X  empire,  13c;  X  press,  ll%c. 

Colored— No.  1,  13',4c;  No.  lA,  llHc;  No. 
17,  12 %c:  No.  IB,  10 1/4 c;  Fancy,  14c;  Lion, 
12y2c;  Standard,  11c;  Popular,  10c;  Keen,  9c. 
Discount  for  quantity. 

Wax — B-H  Wax,  45c;  Berry  Bros.,  70c; 
Imperial     Floor     Wax,    35c;     Anchor,  38c; 

0.  P.W.  Lion  Brand,  38c;  Old  English,  67c; 
Johnson's,  67c;  Jamieson's  liquid  wax,  gal., 
$3.50  ;Ramsay's,    45c;    Martin-Senours,  38c; 

1.  V.  Wax,  38c;  Sherwin-Williams,  <60c;  Sol- 
par, $8.80  to  $9.90;  Ctown  Diamond,  40c; 
Hillcrest,  45c;  Plymouth  Rock,  45c;  Cham- 
pion white,   50c;  Ad-el-ite  paste,  45c. 

Whiting — Plain,  in  bbls..  $2.50;  Gilders, 
bolted  in  bbls,  $2.75. 

Wood  Alcohol — Per  gal. — In  Ave  gallons. 
$1.75;  Methylated  Spirits.  $1.90  to  $2.55. 

Wood  Filler  (Paste) — Kleartone — Forest 
green,  fumed  and  mahogany — 1  Ib.  cans,  30c 
a  pound;  2  Ib.,  35c;  5  and  10  lb.,  33c;  25  lb., 
31c.     Discount  50  per  cent. 

Wood  Filler  (Liquid) — Crown  Diamond, 
per  gal.  in  qt.  tins,  $1.70. 


EAGLE  LAMP  BLACK 

Made  only  by 

THE  L.  MARTIN  COMPANY 
81  Fulton  Street,  NEW  YORK 
Agenh  in 
Montreal,  Winnipeg  and  Toronto 


THE  PARMENTER  BULLOCK  CO. 

Limited 

GANANOQUE,  ONT. 
Iron  and  Copper  Rivets,  Iron  and  Copper 
Burrs,  Bifurcated  and  Tubular  Rivets, 
Wire  Nails.  Copper  and  Steel  Boat  and 
Canoe  Nails,  Escutcheon  Pins,  Leather 
Shoe  and  Overshoe  Buckles,  Fence  Plates. 


February,  1922 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


41 


Si^n  and  Send  It 

Nayvf 

Just  a  penny  postcard  requesting  us  to  send  you  particulars  of  the  Elastica 
agency  proposition. 

The  work  of  a  monent  but  a  moment  well  spent.  By  return  mail  we  will  send 
you  detailed  information  about 


The  Complete  Line  of  Paints  and  Varnishes 

and  will  show  you  the  many  and  varied  advantages  that  will  accrue  to  you  through  the  exclusive  ag- 
ency for  these  widely  known  and  popular  Paint  and  Varnish  Products. 

Some  of  Canada's  most  successful  Paint  Dealers  have  found  the  Elastica  Agency  the  straight  road 
to  bigger  and  better  paint  and  varnish  sales.  The  very  fact  that  it  offers  a  Complete  Line — a  paint, 
varnish,  stain  or  enamel  for  every  customer's  reqinrements — is  a  point  worth  remembering. 


Bear  in  mind  that  your  post  card 
enauirv  involves  no  obligation  at 
all.    We  jiist  think  you'll  be  inter- 


ested and  will  be  glad  of  the  op- 
portunity 'o  place  our  proposals 
before  you. 


MONTREAL 


WINNIPEG 


TORONTO 


HALIFAX 


VANCOUVER 


42  HARDWARE   AND    ACCESSORIES  February,  1922 

£.Mlllll^|lNlUllUl(llllNllll:tl:ltlllM^lUl•l^M^ll'ln^NUlllhllSl^lnllllUllllli:ll^n'lllMllMlllllUlllli1lM 

I  INDEX  TO  ADVERTISEMENTS 

^llllllllllllinillllllllllllUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIII.IiiMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII  IIIIMIlif  fllI'dllllllllllllMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMII.IIIIIIIIII  nillllllllllllMII  IIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII  tlllllllllMIIMIIIII  IIMIinniUIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMilllMIIIIIIIIIIIIJIIIIINIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIJ?^ 

W.  D.  Beath  &  Son   27 

Boeckh  Co..  Ltd   37 

G.  &  H.  Harnett  Co   33 

Banwell-Hoxie  Wire  Fence  Co   39 

Canadian  National  Carbon  Co   40 

Collins  Never-Fail  Products  Ltd   5 

Coleman  Lamp  Co   33 

Canadian  National  Carbon  Co   23 

Dennis  Wire  &  Iron  Works  Co   4 

Department  of  Highways   39 


THE  GENDRON  MANUFACTURING  COMPANY,  Limited 

Maimers  of 

a  complete  line  of 
CHILDREN'S  VEHICLES 

Bathroom  Fittings 

THE  GENDRON  MANUFACTURING  COMPANY.  LIMITED,  TORONTO 

Order  Now  For  Spring 

Keystone  Flexible  Steel  Mats  and  Matting 

The  Most  Durable  and  Satisfactory  Steel  Mat  Made 


Made  Of  Galuanized 
Ribbon  Steel 
Continuous  Crimp 
No  Short  Pieces 


Keyetone  Mats  are  reversible  and  flexible.  Will  adjust  them- 
selves to  uneven  surfaces.    Do  not  warp  or  turn  up  at  the  edges 

THE  IDEAL  DOOR  MAT,  of  rigid  construction,  made  in 
three  sizes  16x24,  18x30,  and  22  x  33  inches,  is  the  lowest 

priced  Wire  Mat  made. 

Ask  us  for  information 

PORT  HOPE  MAT  &  MFG.  CO.,  PORT  HOPE,  ONT. 


Dominion  Belting  Co   6 

Frost  Wire  Fence  Co   6 

Gurney  Foundry  Co.  Ltd   7 

Gendron  Mfg.  Co.,  Ltd  42 

Hall-Zryd  Foundry  Co  cover  2 

Imperial  Varnish  &  Color  Co  35 

Int.  Business  Machines  Ltd  cover  4 

International  Varnish  Co  41 

S.  C.  Johnson  &  Son   9 

Laidlaw  Bale  Tie  Co  33 


Luther  Grinder  Co   8 

L.  Martin  Co  40 

Maxwells,  Ltd   10 

Meakins  &  Son  31 

North  Bros.  Mfg.  Co   -1 

Port  Hope  Mat  Mfg.  Co  ^2 

Parmenter  Bullock  40 

Sherwin-Williams  Co.,  Ltd  cover  3 

Stewart  &  Wood  29 

Samuel,  Benjamin  Limited  cover  1 

Sturgeons,  Ltd   3 


EXHIBIT 

Hamilton  Hardware  Convention 

(Section  No.  62)  Armouries 

Feb.  14th.  to  17th. 

See  oar  representatives 


Matting  made  in  1 00ft 
rolU,  all  widths,  from 
which   any  length  of 
mats  can  be  made 


February,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


^^^^ 


1^ 


Sherw/j/W/luaMS 

HES 


Sherwn-Williams 

^UTO  pINISHES 

— A  group  of  Sherwin-Williams  "Cover  The  Earth"  Products, 
made  specially  for  the  refinishing  of  automobiles. 

No  man  likes  to  drive  a  shabby  car.  And  not  every  man  is 
disposed  to  incur  the  expense  involved  in  having  his  auto  re- 
finished  by  a  professional.  Sherwin-Williams'  Auto  Finishes 
simplify  the  problem,  because  by  their  means  any  car  owner  can 
himself  make  an  old  car  look  like  new  at  a  trifling  expenditure  of 
time  and  money. 

The  line  is  complete  and  includes 


Auto  Enamel 

Auto  Polish 

Auto  Metal-Brite 

Flat  Black  Lamp  Enamel 


Tire  and  Mat  Paint 
Rim  Paint 

Mohair  Top  Dressing 
Rubber  Tog 'Dressing 
Flaxoap 


Lining  Dye 
Leather  Seat  Dressing 
Gasket  Shellac 
Engine  Enamel 


-each  one  made  up  to  the  world-famous  "Cover  The  Earth"  quality  standard. 

The  S.W.  Agency  will  connect  you  with  the  demand  for  these  and 
the  other  S.  W.  Paint  Products.  May  we  send  you  full  particulars? 


The  Sherwin-Williams  Co. 


of  Canada,  Limited 


'Save  the  surface  and 
you  saveaU"^^.^.^ 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


February,  1922 


For  Lighter  Work  and  Larger  Profits 

in  the  Hardware  Trade 

Equip  your  store 
with  the 


DAYTON 

Hardware  Scale 


and  your  weighing  becomes  scientific  in  its 
exactness.  Certainly  takfs  iFe  place  of 
guesswork.  Profils  do  not  trickle  away 
in  faulty  weights.  Place  a  Dayton  in  each 
department  of  your  store  and  you  provide  for 
yourself  at  a  trivial  cost  Effective  Prcfit 
Insurance. 


Here's  another  real  protector  for  the  merchant: 

THE  INTERNATIONAL 
TIME  RECORDING  DOORLOCK 

Visitors  to  the  exhibition  being  held  in  connection  with  the  Hardware  Men's  Convention 
in  Hamilton  should  see  this  wonderful  new  equipment  which  assures  absolute  protection 
to  the  store.  This  lock  furnishes  a  printed  record  of  the  time  your  store  was  opened;  of 
who  opened  it  and  who  closed  it;  of  whether  or  not  anyone  was  in  your  store  outside  of 
business  hours  and  for  how  long. 

Don't  miss  the  demonstration  of  this  Recording  Lock  at 
the  International  Business  Machines  Co.,  Booth  No.  45 

International  Business  Machines  Co.,  Limited 


F.  E.  Mutton,  Vice  President  and  General  Manager 


Head  Office  and  Factory  :    300  Campbell  Ave.,  TORONTO 


For  your  convenience  we  have  Service  ^nd  Sale*  Officei  in — Vancouver,  Calsnry,  Edmonton.  Saskatoon.  Regina.  Winripeg,  Welkeivil!e, 
London,  Hamilton,  Toronto,  Ottawa,  Montreal,  Quebec,  Halifax,  St. Johns,  Newfoundland. 

Also  munuFacturerg  of  /niernational  Time  Recorders  and  International  Electric  Tabulators  and  Sorters. 


March,  1922 


CANADIAN  HARDWARE  JOURNAL  and  the  CAN ADIAN  TIRE  &  ACCESSORY  JOURNAL 
Have  been  connolidated  into  HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


$1  Yearly 


Vol.  14,  No.  3 

OLD  SERIES 


Published  Monthly  by  WESTON  WRIGLEY 

123  BAY  STREET.  TORONTO 


Vol  3,  No.  3 

NEW  SERIES 


The  New  "Oakville"  Handle 


Fits  snugly  under  the  bead  with- 
out cracks  or  openings  for  dirt 
or  germs  to  lodge. 


Convenient  handy  design  with 
generous  hole  in  the  handle  for 
hanging. 


Handle  is  cool,  sanitary;  fits  the 
hand;  has  rounded  grip  and  is 
highly  polished. 


All  Leading  Jobbers  in  Canada  (yf\k\l\  /llTll^^  Send  For  Catalogue  Showing  Our 

Sell  "OAKVILLE"  Ware  '^pfflU^  Complete  Line. 

The  Aluminium  Ware  Manufacturing  Company,  Limited 

Selling  Representative*  .—Richardson  &  Bureau,  Montreal  OAJi$:VILLE,  ONTARIO 


CANADA'S  ONLY  NATIONAL  HARDWARE  MONTHLY 


HARDWARE   AND    ACCESSORIES  March,  1922 


1922  The  Banner  Year  For  Columbia 


COLUMBIA  dealers  should 
prepare  for  the  largest 
sales  of  Columbia  Dry  Cells 
they  have  ever  enjoyed.  The 
prestige  of  the  Columbia  line 
is  in  itself  an  assurance  of  a 
steadily  increasing  sale  —  but 
the  advertising  and  sales 
plans  which  will  be  put  into 
effect  by  the  Company  this 
year  will  make  Columbia 
Sales  increase  faster  and  to  a 
greater  volum.e  than  ever  be- 
fore. 

The  dealer  who  stocks  and 
pushes  Columbia  Dry  Cells 
has  the  advantage  of  his  com- 
petitor. Columbia  Dry  Cells 
have  an  enviable  reputation 
for  quality  and  long  life  —  a 
reputation   built   up  through 


years  of  testing  by  a  critical 
public. 

Columbia  advertising  is  na- 
tion-wide. It  reaches  into  the 
hamlets  and  villages  as  well 
as  into  the  towns  and  cities 
where  many  thousands  of  Dry 
Cells  are  used. 

Not  only  will  newspaper,  ma- 
gazine, and  farm  paper  ad- 
vertisements be  used  to  create 
public  demand  but  the  dealer 
will  be  plentifully  supplied  with 
striking  window  and  store  dis- 
plays. 

If  you  are  not  already  a  Col- 
umbia dealer,  ask  our  represen- 
tatives or  your  jobber's  sales- 
man about  Columbia  Dry  Cells. 
It  will  pay  you  in  handsome 
profits. 


Always  specify  "  Columbias"  by 
name  when  ordering  dry  cells. 

CANADIAN  NATIONAL  CARBON  CO.,  LIMITED 

TORONTO  MONTREAL  WINNIPEG  VANCOUVER 

Columbia 

Diy  Batteries 

^theij  Last  Longer 


March,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


3 


1 

Why  "Owl"  Roofing  Dealers 
Meike  Big  Profits 

Because — 

— Easy  to  Sell 

— Widely  Advertised 

— Quality  Proven 

— Unusually  Generous 
Margin  of  Profit 

Owl  Brand  Roofing  is  a  tremendous  success  because  every  roll  fully  substantiates 
its  guarantee— no  effort  or  expense  is  spared  to  give  the  soundest  quality  through- 
out. To  handle  Owl  Roofing  means  "more  profit,"  "more  enthusiasm"  and 
"more  business."  We  make  a  good  proposition  to  "Owl"  dealers  because  we 
want  the  best — and  we  want  their  best  energy  and  push  behind  "Owl"  Roofing, 
so  that  this  splendid  product  will  be  quickly  made  known  at  the  time  the  public 
need  it  most.  Owl  Roofing  is  made  from  an  all-rag  felt,  coated  on  both  sides 
with  pure  asphalt  stjck — either  side  can  be  laid  to  the  weather — Owl  Roofing 
is  fire  resisting  and  free  from  taint  in  rain  water — Owl  Roofing  is  made  32  inches 
wide— 108  sq.  feet,  nails,  cement  for  seams  and  instructions  for  laying  with 
each  roll. 

Write  now  for  Prices  and  other  particulars 

W.  WALKER  &  SON,  limited 

Wholesale  Hardware  and  Iron  Merchants 

10-16  Alcorn  Ave.        -  Toronto 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


March,  1922 


Hardwaremen!  Do  You  Want 

More  Revenue? 

We  are  making  an  advertising  drive  this  month  for  the  sale  of  Dennisteel  Lockers 
and  Cabinets.  Here  are  lines  needed  in  every  factory  and  office,  there  are  some  need- 
ed right  in  your  town  to-day  and  you  should  be  able  to  make  sales  for  us. 

We  want  hardwaremen,  the  best  in  each 
district,  to  act  as  our  agents.  You  don't 
need  to  stock  our  goods — have  your  cus- 
tomers order  from  catalogue,  and  we  will 
fill  their  orders  promptly  and  allow  you  a 
good  commission. 

Write  to-day  for  folders  and  particulars 

The  Dennis  Wire  and  Iron 
Works  Co.  Limited 


Halifax 

Montreal 

Ottawa 


London 

Toronto 

Hamilton 

Windsor 


Winnipeg 

Calgary 

Vancouver 


"YANKEE" 

VISES 

FOUR  SIZES 

With  Detachable  Swivel  Base 


Dimensions 

1991 

1992 

1993 

1994 

Jaw  Opening 
Height  Over  All 
Length  Over  All 
Net  Weight 

\% 

4H 

3 

1  15/16 

t 

3% 
14 

4  in. 
12M" 

41  lbs 

.Your  Jobber 
^will  supply 
you 


This  vise  is  accurately  machined  on  the  bottom,  sides  and  end,  for  use  in  holding  work  in  several 
positions  on  drill  press,  shaper,  etc.,  allowing  it  to  pass  through  several  operations  before  necessary  to 
change  it  in  the  vise.  An  entirely  distinct  feature  in  vises  and  one  that  is  quickly  appreciated  by  Tool 
Makers,  Pattern  Makers  and  Machinists. 

NORTH  BROS.  MANUFACTURING  CO. 

PHILADELPHIA,  PA. 


March,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


6 


X3 


M 


We  have  begun  shipments  of  our  new 
Model  "C"  Valet  AutoStrop  Razor,  which 
retails  at  $1.00,  and  hope  to  have'a  limited 
quantity  in  every  dealer's  hands  by  March 
15th.  We  are  behind  in  our  shipments 
at|the  present  time,  but  are  working  over- 
u  time,  and  hope  to  catch  up  with  orders 
^  shortly.  It  is  the  best  value  on  the  Razor 
market  and  will  help  you  get  your  share 
of  the  business  of  2,550,000  prospects. 


r — ^- 


This  Razor  is  bound  to  go  with  a  rush. 
Orders  will  be  filled  in  rotation.  Send  in 
orders  or  repeats  to  your  jobber  promptly. 
Your  price  (in  one  shipment)  :  Less  than 
1  dozen,  $9.00  per  dozen,— 3  dozen  $8.10 
per  dozen— 12  dozen,  $7.70  per  dozen. 

AUTOSTROP  SAFETY  RAZOR  CO., 
LIMITED  TORONTO 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


March,  1922 


Make  the  best  of  this  Opportunity 

Before  the  farmer  gets  too  much  tied  up  with  his  spring  work — why 
not  do  some  intensive  selling  ?    Put  Frost  Fence  out  front. 

The  farmer  is  looking  for  fence  with  permanency  in  its  quality.  Call  his 
attention  to  Frost  extra  heavy  galvanizing,  the  Frost  hold-tight  lock — to  the 
many  outstanding  features  that  mean  extra  value  to  the  farmer  for  his 
money — features  that  save  him  expense  in  erection,  maintenance  and 
ensure  years  of  service.    Start  your  campaign  now. 


Frost  Steel  and  Wire  Company  Limited 

Hamilton       -:•  Ontario 

Galvanized  and  Bright  Wire — Hay  Wire  and  Bale  Ties — Woven  Wire — Farm,  Factory 
and  Ornamental  Fences  Galvanized  Gates  Manufacturers'  Wire  Supplies. 


For  Your 

TIN  SHOP 

Bright,  galvanized 
and 

coppered  wire. 


SOLE  MANUFACTURERS  OF  THE  CELEBRATED 

"MAPLE  LEAF"  BRAND 

STITCHED  COTTON  DUCK  BELTING 

STRONG    DURABLE    ECONOMICAL    TRUE  RUNNING 

Mr.  Hardware  Merchant- Look  over  your  stock  and 
send  in  your  orders  Now,  to  secure  present  prices,  as  the 
cost  of  duck  has  been  steadily  advancing. 

MAPLE  LEAF  BELT  DRESSING 

The  Best  for  all  Kinds  of  Belts 
WRITE  FOR  SAMPLES  AND  PRICES 
Quebec  Branch:    51  Duluth  Building,  Montreal 

DOMINION  BELTING  CO.,  Limited 


Maple  Leaf 


I  Dominion  Belting  Co.. 

Hamilton.  OnT. 


HAMILTON 


ONTARIO 


CANADA 


Marcli,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


7 


Buad  Up  a  ProfMfle 

Fence  Business ! 


'T'HE  reduction  in  the  prices  of  Peerless  Fence  announced  recent- 
ly  appeals  to  the  farmer.  He  has  neglected  his  fences  during 
the  last  few  seasons  waiting  for  lower  prices.  With  to-day's  prices 
you  can  sell  Fence  to  the  farmer  who  has  been  holding  off  for  this 
reduction.  Peerless  Fence  prices  are  on  the  same  level  as  bar  iron. 
In  one  case  you  get  a  finished  product  heavily  galvanized,  in  the 
other  simply  raw  material.  Weigh  up  a  roll  of  Peerless  Fence 
and  figure  out  the  price  per  pound  and  you  will  realize  that  the 
farmer  cannot  afford  not  to  buy  fence  this  season.  When  you  can 
sell  quality  fence  at  the  price  of  rough  iron  you  surely  are  giving 
the  farmer  his  money's  worth. 

Peerless  Long  Span  Gates  are  down  in  price  too.  Like  Peerless 
Fences  they  are  built  to  last — Braced  like  a  steel  bridge — Can't  sag 
or  twist — A  thousand  times  better  than  ordinary  Gates — Your  cus- 
tomers will  appreciate  the  difference. 

You  should  have  stock  to  fill  the  farmer's  orders  when  he  is  in  town 
ready  to  take  his  fence  home.  Write  for  our  proposition  to  dealers. 


BANWELL-HOXIE  WIRE  FENCE  CO.,  LIMITED 

HAMILTON,  ONTARIO  -  WINNIPEG  MANITOBA 

PEERLESS  FENCES 

Stand  Every  Test 


1 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


March,  1922 


DUNLOP  TIRES 

Ensure 

High-Mileage      -  Double-Life 

Dunlop  leadership  in  Tiredom  is  most  manifest.  Mileage  records  almost  unbeliev- 
able are  piling  up  all  over  Canada. 

The  Special  Mileage-Making  Process,  which  is  the  basis  ot  our  Fabric  Tires,  has 
worked  wonders. 

Perfect  shape  and  balance,  stronger  side  walls  to  resist  curb  and  rut  abuse,  special 
wear-resisting  anti-skid  tread,  etc.,  add  the  last  touch  to  popularizing  to  the  full  a 
tire  that  has  long  stood  in  high  favor. 
Dunlop  "Cords"  made  good  from  their  inception. 

These  tires  taught  motorists  to  expect  more  resiliency,  greater  air  space,  larger 
amount  of  material,  better  carrying  capacity — in  short,  bigger  mileage  ;  and  that 
is  the  standard  by  which  all  Cord  Tires  are  judged  to-day. 


Dunlop  Tire  &  Rubber  Goods  Co. 


LIMITED 


Head  Office :  TORONTO 


Branches  in  Leading  Cities 


PISTONS  AND  PISTON  RINGS 

FOR  POPULAR  CARS 

Ford  Chevrolet  Dodge  Studebaker 
McLaughlin       Maxwell       Overland  and  others 


Regular  and  Oversizes  carried  in  stock. 

Pistons  made  from  high  grade  semi-steel.    Machined  to  Manufacturers'  limits. 
Material  and  Workmanship  guaranteed  in  every  detail. 

Special  Oil  Proof  Piston  Rings  and  Standard  Step- Cut  Rings  of  all  sizes, 

ORDER  FROM  YOUR  JOBBER  OR  DIRECT 

The  White  Machine  Works  Limited 

Windsor  -  Ontario  , 


March,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


9 


A  Counter  Cabinet  that 
Selk  Silverware  ''-^--ai,ne' 

ISSlfRi  ROGERS  IrJaI  Silverware 


has  been  especially  designed  for  effective  Counter  Display.  It  is  beautifully  made,  approximately  18 
inches  square,  covered  with  black  imitation  leather  and  lined  with  blue  plush.  When  opened  and 
placed  on  the  counter,  it  presents  a  very  attractive  appearance,  and  displays  the  wide  range  of  pieces 
with  splendid  effect.  The  tray  in  the  Cabinet  contains  a  set  of  lacquered  samples  which  will  not  tarnish; 
and  the  compartment  beneath  the  tray  contains  a  stock  of  the  staple  and  most  popular  pieces. 

Inside  the  cover  is  a  striking  display  card  in  colors  which  lists  the  pieces  with  the  prices.  The  Cabinet 
IS  a  complete  silent  salesman  and  it  has  proven  to  be  a  real  business-getter  in  Hardware  stores.  As  the 
silver  is  sold,  you  simply  order  a  sufficient  supply  to  restock  the  Cabinet. 

This  is  a  profitable  investment  for  you  to  make.  Write  us  for  the  price  of  the  Cabinet  complete  with  silver. 

Canadian  Wm.  A.  Rogers  Limited 

570  King  St.  West,  Toronto 


Downtown  Showroom, 


Kent  Building 


10 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


March,  1922 


EACH  SEASON  BRINGS  INCREASED 

DEMAND 


Insist  on  T.  F.  Pruners  and  You  Have  the  Best 


TAYLOR-FORBES  COMPANY 

LIMITED 
Head  Office  a;  d  Works 

GUELPH,  ONT. 

TORONTO  MONTREAL  VANCOUVER 

QUEBEC.      sr.  JOHN,      HALIFAX,      WINNIPEG,      REGINA,  CALGARY 


March,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


11 


Including 
CANADIAN 
HARDWARE 
STOVE  AND 
PAINT 
JOURNAL 

Established 
1909 


Including 

CANADIAN 
TIRE  AND 
ACCESSORY 
JOURNAL 

Eitabiished 
1906 


Published  Monthly  by  Weston  Wrigley,  123  Bay  St.  Toronto. 

Subscription  Rates  Jl.OO  per  year  in  Canada,  82.00  to  Great  Britain  Her  Dominions,  and  the  United  StatcF. 


Volume  14 


TORONTO  MARCH  1922 


NUMHER  3 


A  SUCCESSFUL  CONVENTION 

The  Ontario  Retail  Hardware  Convention,  held  at 
Hamilton  in  February,  excelled  in  many  respects  any 
previous  gathering  of  hardvs^aremen  in  Ontario. 

The  most  important  object  of  getting  together  is  ex- 
change if  ideas,  and  the  writer  does  not  recall  a  con- 
vention in  Ontario,  New  York,  Massachusetts,  Ohio, 
Michigan,  Illinois  or  Wisconsin,  at  which  meetings 
were  attended  more  promptly  and  regiilarly  by  a  larger 
percentage  of  dealers  present,  where  the  members 
stayed  through  to  adjournment  in  such  large  numbers, 
or  where  such  well  conducted  and  interesting  question 
box  discussions  were  held. 

The  attendance  was  not  as  large  as  expected,  but 
compared  favorably  with  previous  Ontario  conventions. 
With  a  membership  of  about  300  an  attendance  of  150 
retailers  was  considered  good,  but  this  year,  because 
of  the  splendid  work  of  Secretarj^  MacPherson  and  the 
co-operation  of  the  Mutual  Fire  Insurance  representa- 
tives, the  membership  increased  to  over  500  and  an 
attendance  of  300  was  hoped  for.  Only  about  200  were 
present,  however. 

A  pleasing  thing  about  the  increased  membership  is 
the  change  in  the  character  of  hardwaremen  who  are 
joining  the  Association  and  participating  in  its  meet- 
ings. It  was  customary  for  some  critical  manufac- 
turers' representatives  a  few  years  ago  to  refer  to  the 
Retail  Hardware  Association  as  "a  lot  of  small  country 
dealers."  Those  country  dealers  who  had  the  courage 
of  their  convictions  are  still  members,  but  they  have 
been  joined  by  many  city  hardwaremen  whose  busi- 
nesses have  turnovers  of  from  $50,000  to  nearly  half  a 
million  yearly. 

The  Ontario  Retail  Hardware  Association  is  to-day 
an  institution  of  which  its  founders,  its  early  members, 
its  present  officers,  and  the  trade  generally  have  reason 
to  be  proud,  and  it  is  a  sign  of  the  times  to  see  progres- 
sive manufacturers  coming  forward  to  boost  the  organi- 
zation and  assist  in  the  organization  of  local  branches 
or  clubs. 

Two  features  of  the  recent  convention  are  worth  not- 
ing. The  attendance  of  ladies  was  encouraged  at  this 
convention  and  instead  of  the  one  lady  from  Rodney 
who  has  so  faithfully  attended  for  a  dozen  years,  a 
score  or  more  attended  this  year,  and  the  fair  sex  was 
well  represented  at  the  first  annual  banquet  at  which 
the  retailers  were  hosts.  The  second  feature  is  a  reflex 
of  the  first.  Although  firewater  was  less  in  evidence  at 
the  1922  convention  than  at  previous  conventions,  those 
who  over-indulged  brought  strong  censure  upon  their 


heads,  and  if  the  sentiments  expressed  at  the  closing 
session  of  the  convention,  reported  elsewhere  in  this 
issue,  are  borne  in  mind,  the  retailer  or  visitor  who 
brings  a  shipment  from  Montreal  to  the  1923  conven- 
tion will  be  told  where  he  gets  off  at.  The  day  for 
John  Barleycorn  at  hardware  conventions  has  passed. 

A  strong  sentiment  exists  in  favor  of  holding  the 
1923  convention  and  exhibition  in  the  large,  new  Arena 
Building  at  Toronto,  and  the  Executive  Committee  will 
carefully  consider  the  possibilities  of  holding  a  success- 
ful convention  in  Toronto.  Hamilton  has  been  a  splen- 
did meeting  place,  its  manufacturers,  jobbers  and  re- 
tailers have  been  ideal  hosts,  and  they  are  considering 
the  erection  of  a  larger  exhibition  hall  to  accommodate 
the  larger  number  of  manufacturers  who  display  their 
products  at  the  annual  conventions. 


BETTER  WARM  AIR  FURNACE  INSTALLATION 

Warm  air  furnace  installers  in  Toronto  have  started 
something  which  ought  to  be  followed  up  in  every  Can- 
adian city. 

At  a  meeting  held  in  Toronto  in  February  attended 
by  about  fifty  hardware  dealers  and  furnace  contrac- 
tors, as  well  as  by  representatives  of  practically  every 
warm  air  furnace  manufacturer  in  Ontario,  who  are 
enthusiastically  supporting  the  installers.  Plans  were 
laid  for  a  campaign  of  publicity  to  educate  the  public 
to  demand  quality  instead  of  price  in  the  installation 
of  furnaces. 

An  inspector  has  been  appointed  whose  duty  it  is  to 
thoroughly  inspect  the  piping  and  furnace  on  jobs 
where  his  services  are  requested  and  to  issue  a  certifi- 
cate of  inspection  where  the  work  is  done  in  a  com- 
petent manner.  The  publicity  campaign  will  aim  to 
encourage  building  contractors  and  house-owners  to 
demand  the  certificate  of  inspection  and  to  refuse  to 
accept  jobs  where  the  certificate  is  not  given. 

Toronto  is  logically  a  city  where  warm  air  heating 
should  be  the  most  popular,  but  for  years  furnace  heat- 
ing has  been  damned  by  poor  installations,  many  fur- 
nace men  being  shortsighted  enough  to  cut  prices  to 
the  bone  in  order  to  meet  the  demands  of  speculative 
builders  and  other  for  Ioav  jjriced  jobs.  The  result  has 
been  to  encourage  hot  water  heating  and  increase  build- 
ing costs. 

Warm  air  heating  provides  ventilation  and  is  more 
healthful  for  house  heating,  and  the  furnace  installers 
and  ma)!ufactnrers  deserve  success  in  the  good  work 
thev  have  undertaken. 


12 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


ASSOCIATION  SETS  1,000  MEMBERS  GOAL 

riMiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiMniHiniiiiijniiiiiiniiMniiniiiMiuiniinininiijnuininuNiMniriMMMiniiJiiiiMUMiiiMiMinjiMMiiiniMiiiMiiiiiJiiiiniMiMiiiniuiiMiiiiini 

Seventeenth  Annnal  Convention  of  Ontario  Retail  Hardware  Association  held  at  Hamilton 
Febraaryl4  to  17— Live  discussions  and  good  attendance — Splendid  Exhibition. 

inMnilUIIIIUMIIIIMIIIIIIHIIIIIIIMIIIIIIMIMUIMIIIIinilMnMIMnMnMIIIIIMIIIMIMIIIIIMIIIMIIIMMIIIIIIIMIIMIMMMIMIMIMIIMIIMIIIIJIIJinilUIIIIIHIIJ^ 


SERVICE  was  the  keynote  struck  at  the  Seven- 
teenth Annual  Convention  of  the  Ontario  Retail 
HardAvare  Association,  held  on  February  14,  15, 
16  and  17  at  the  Royal  Connaught  Hotel  at  Hamilton. 
The  attendance  and  enthusiasm  measured  up  to  any 
previous  convention,  and  set  in  motion  the  big  cam- 
paign for  a  thousand  association  members  for  1923. 

Following  an  executive  session  on  the  previous  day. 
President  Nelson  Mills  called  the  convention  to  order 
on  Tuesday  morning,  February  14,  after  a  half -hour's 
sing-song  had  been  indulged  in  by  members  assembled. 
In  fact,  this  community  singing  was  indulged  in  at  the 
beginning  of  every  morning's  session,  led  by  Mr.  John- 
ston of  the  Mills  Hardware  Company's  store. 

With  the  singing  of  "God  Save  the  King,"  and  an 
invocation  by  Rev.  Dr.  W.  H.  Sedgewick,  President 
Mills  called  on  Mayor  Coppley,  who  welcomed  the  dele- 
gates to  Hamilton.  The  Mayor  said  there  was  in  pros- 
pect in  Hamilton  a  bigger  building  construction  pro- 
gram for  1922  than  was  the  case  last  year,  which  meant 
that  more  hardware  would  be  used  and  would  help  in 
bringing  about,  he  hoped,  more  stabilized  conditions. 

He  had  noticed  in  the  press  the  statement  made  that 
the  retailer  was  to  blame  for  keeping  up  prices.  He 
did  not  think  it  applied  to  the  hardware  trade.  Ham- 
ilton was  a  hardware  manufacturing  city — the  centre 
of  basic  steel — and  no  trade  feels  the  return  of  good 
times  as  does  hardware. 

After  thanking  Dr.  Sedgewick  and  the  Mayor  for 
their  addres.ses,  Mr.  Mills  read  his  presidential  address, 
which  was  referred  to  the  Resolutions  Committee. 

Practical  Suggestions  From  President  Mills 

Address  by  Retiring  T'resident  Urges  Formation  of  Local 
Clubs  and  Commends  Secretary's  Wor^.. 

ANOTHER  year  has  passed  and  once  more  we  meet  as 
a  body  of  serious-minded  business  men  for  the  definite 
purpose  of  making  progress  for  ourselves  and  our  in- 
dustry. As  we  assemble  in  convention  to  record  our  achieve- 
ments, and  plan  greater  ones,  we  should  feel  that  it  is  a 
privilege  to  be  present  and  take  part  in  the  making  of  this, 
our  17th  year  of  association  activities.  The  past  is  valuable 
only  as  it  gives  us  hope  for  the  future,  and  now  at  the  dawn 
of  a  new  association  year  we  look  forward  with  added  cour- 
age and  enthusiasm  for  bigger  and  better  accomplishments. 
The  achievements  of  a  single  year  are  not  always  immedi- 
ately apparent,  and  may  not  bear  fruit  at  the  moment,  but 
on  the  whole,  things  accomplished  are  of  lasting  value  and  of 
great  importance  to  our  industry.  In  fact,  considering  the 
conditions  of  the  past  year,  we  are  obliged  to  admit  that  the 
officers  have  to  a  large  degree  fulfilled  their  expectations  of 
one  year  ago.  This  convention  is  your  opportunity.  It  gives 
promise  of  greater  things  and  I  invite  you  to  enter  whole- 
heartedly into  and  take  advantage  of  each  session.  We  are 
here  to  contribute  our  best  thought  and  energy  towards  the 
development  of  ourselves  and  the  organization  of  which  we 
are  proud  to  hold  membership. 

"It  is  not  my  intention  to  review  the  history  of  our  asso- 
ciation or  even  the  progress  of  the  past  year,  because  the 
reports  will  show  this  in  detail. 

"I  believe  it  will  be  more  profitable  to  dwell  upon  some  of 
the  oustanding  features  and  give  expression  to  certain  im- 
pressions gained  through  my  experience  in  office.    No  man 


can  be  president  of  this  association  without  receiving  some 
definite  impressions  and  without  making  observations  and 
forming  convictions  as  to  the  fields  of  service  which  the  asso- 
ciation should  enter. 

"The  primary  function  of  this  association  should  be  to 
raise  the  standard  of  efficiency  of  the  retail  hardware  mer- 
chant; to  place  the  industry  on  a  higher  level  in  the  commun- 
ity; also  on  a  more  profitable  basis  to  ourselves,  and  at  the 
same  time  supply  the  needs  of  the  consumer  as  economically 
as  similar  service  is  rendered  by  other  agencies. 

"This  cannot  be  done  in  a  day;  it  will  take  years,  but  we 
are  on  the  way.  The  principal  thing  is  to  have  the  vision, 
and  by  organization  and  co-operation  we  some  day  shall  reach 
that  ideal. 

"Let  us  work  for  a  future  benefit  rather  than  a  temporary 
advantage.  It  may  seem  to  some  of  you  that  the  progress  is 
slow,  but,  judging  by  the  reports,  you  will  agree  with  me  that 
during  the  past  year  we  hit  on  all  four  cylinders. 

Secretary's  Splendid  Work 

"I  would  be  failing  in  my  duty  if  I  did  not  emphasize  on 
your  behalf,  as  well  as  on  behalf  of  the  executive,  our  appre- 
ciation of  the  unfailing  services  of  our  secretary.  While  he 
has  been  on  full  time  service  only  seven  months,  he  has  given 
not  merely  freely  but  generously  of  his  time  and  ability.  He 
has  put  into  the  work  his  whole  heart;  no  sacrifice  of  time 
or  effort  has  been  too  great  in  the  discharge  of  his  duties  to 
advance  the  foundation  work  of  a  new  and  gi-eater  associa- 
tion. It  is,  therefore,  proper  that  a  richly  deserved  tribute 
be  paid  to  whom  all  credit  is  due,  rather  than  let  any  com- 
mendation be  credited  to  the  administration  now  reaching 
its  end. 

"The  association  may  find  men  who  will  render  good  ser- 
vice in  future,  but  none  who  can  render  better.  It  has  been 
a  pleasure  and  I  have  gained  knowledge  working  with  Secre- 
tary MacPherson,  and  I  hope  that  you  will  see  to  it  that 
he  is  supported  by  a  strong  and  able  executive.  The  reports 
will  show  wonderful  progress  made  in  membership,  also  ser- 
vice rendered  such  as  the  price  book  and  the  fire  insurance. 
I  am  pleased  also  to  record  a  splendid  healthy  financial  posi- 
tion. I  would  say  too  healthy.  I  would  rather  that  we  owe 
money  and  have  rendered  added  service,  which  means  we 
must  in  future  deal  in  bigger  figures  to  accomplish  greater 
things.  Men,  to  do  all  this  we  must  think,  we  must  study 
conditions  as  never  before,  we  must  protect  our  industry  and 
justify  our  existence  in  the  economic  scheme  of  things.  No 
hardware  man  can  stand  alone  in  times  such  as  these.  We 
must  syndicate  our  interests,  organize  and  co-operate  or  we 
cannot  reach  the  fullest  degree  of  our  possibilities. 

"The  association  has  made  great  strides,  but  I  urge  that 
we  continue  to  increase  our  strength  until  every  retail  hard- 
ware man  is  an  association  member;  then  and  then  only  will 
we  have  combined  effort  sufficient  to  accomplish  results.  One 
of  the  duties  of  this  association  should  be  to  assist  in  organ- 
izing local  clubs  in  each  town  or  city.  The  retail  hardware 
merchants  of  Toronto  recently  organized  and  we  are  proud 
to  report  that  our  association  was  represented  and  showed 
our  co-operation  on  that  occasion.  We  were  not  the  pioneers, 
however;  full  credit  is  due  the  Toronto  Paint  and  Varnish 
Club,  but  they  showed  us  what  we  should  be  doing.  This  is 
where  the  need  of  co-operation  and  organization  comes  in. 
We  must  have  as  our  objective  a  local  association,  a  provin- 
cial association  and  ultimately  a  Dominion  association,  and  I 
hope  that  I  am  still  a  retail  hardware  merchant  when  that 
ideal  is  reached.  Under  such  conditions  the  retail  hardware 
merchant  shall  become  a  greater  factor  in  the  business  world. 
There  is  also  a  great  need  for  acquaintanceship;  getting  to 
know  the  other  fellow,  seeing  his  side  of  things,  and  compar- 
ing them  with  yours.  This  convention  brings  you  men  to- 
gether, that  you  may  know  one  another,  for 
'When  you  get  to  know  a  fellow 
And  you  understand  his  ways. 
Then  his  faults  won't  really  matter, 
For  you'll  find  a  lot  to  praise.' 


March.  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


13 


Keep  Stocks  Well  Assorted 

"Now  just  a  word  on  the  business  situation;  really  I  am 
loath  to  approach  this  subject.  It  seems  to  me,  however, 
from  reports  that  the  retailer  is  going  very  cautions,  and  I 
b«lieve  he  is  justified  in  doing  so.  We  have  passed  through 
many  changing  conditions  since  the  world  war  began  and 
ended,  and  the  experience  gained  has  if  anything,  been  bene- 
ficial to  the  retail  merchant.  A  return  to  normal  conditions 
does  not  mean  a  return  to  1913  prices,  but  means  reaching 
a  basis  on  which  the  prices  of  products  bear  the  proper  rela- 
tion to  the  cost  of  manufacture.  It  is,  therefore,  essential 
for  all  three,  manufacturer,  jobber  and  retailer,  to  adjust 
merchandise  to  replacement  value,  and  write  off  your  loss. 
If  you  didn't  do  so  in  1921  you  will  eventually  be  compelled 
to  take  much  greater  losses  as  time  goes  on.  I  am  of  the 
opinion  that  it  is  good  business  from  now  on  to  work  on  a 
turnover  basis,  and  be  in  a  position  to  purchase  merchan- 
dise at  the  lowest  figures  as  prices  decline. 

"The  decline  in  prices  will  in  all  probability  be  a  step  by 
step  process  covering  a  period  of  several  years.  I  can  only 
suggest  that  you  keep  your  stocks  well  assorted.  Don't  hesi- 
tate to  buy  new  goods;  use  the  jobber  often,  advertise  wTiat 
you  have  to  sell  and  you  will  be  kept  so  busy  that  you  will 
not  worry  about  conditions. 

"I  would  like  to  quote  in  passing  how  Ralph  B.  Wilson  of 
the  Babson  organization  sums  up  conditions.  He  says  that, 
'Business  conditions  are  not  determined  by  statistics,  but  by 
the  character  of  the  people.' 

"In  periods  of  prosperity,  the  people  develop  habits  of 
extravagance  indifference,  inefficiency,  immorality  and  selfish- 
ness. These  qualities  developed  in  a  period  of  prosperity  lay 
the  foundation  for  and  cause  a  period  of  depression. 

"In  periods  of  depression  and  unemployment,  the  people 
develop  habits  of  thrift,  industry,  efficiency,  morality  and  ser- 
vice. These  qualities  developed  in  a  period  of  depression  lay 
the  foundation  for  and  cause  a  period  of  prosperity.  Here  is 
a  true  picture  of  the  ups  and  downs  of  our  business  career, 
and  let  us  be  thankful  that  we  are  laying  the  foundation 
which  causes  a  period  of  prosperity. 

"With  no  desire  to  censure,  and  with  the  best  interests  of 
the  hardware  trade  in  mind,  I  have  come  to  believe  that 
hardware  men  should  read  more  trade  publications.  Our 
trade  papers  have  bent  every  effort  to  improve  our  industry 
and  place  it  on  the  highest  plane  possible.  They  keep  us 
well  informed  in  matters  of  greatest  value  and  importance, 
and  it  is  our  duty  not  only  to  subscribe  to  them,  but  to  digest 
them  and  transform  their  contents  into  action. 

"Although  I  retire  as  president  at  this  convention,  my 
interest  in  the  association  is  so  firmly  grounded  that  I  will 
continue  to  work  for  it  and  with  it  in  the  endeavor  to  see  the 
association  go  on  to  greater  things.  This  has  been  a  won- 
derful year  to  me,  and  for  the  opportunity  of  serving  you. 
We  have  not  accomplished  all  that  we  would  have  liked  to, 
but  we  have  done  our  best.  Service  is  the  keynote  of  the 
association  and  the  best  members,  the  most  successful  busi- 
ness men  and  the  men  who  get  the  most  out  of  life  are  the 
men  who  serve  their  community  and  their  association  and 
interest  themselves  in  the  welfare  of  others. 

"It  is  this  kind  of  service  that  paves  the  way  for  useful 
co-operation,  which,  after  all,  is  service  in  its  most  valued 
application." 

The  Question  Box,  here  introduced,  held  the  atten- 
tion of  the  convention  for  the  next  half  hour,  one  of 
the  matters  arising  therein — in  regard  to  jobbers  low- 
ering prices — was  referred  to  the  Resolutions  Commit- 
tee, composed  of  R.  Hawkins,  Smith 's  Falls ;  D.  K. 
Clarke,  Hamilton ;  W.  Hanna,  Port  Carling,  and  James 
McGregor,  Caledonia. 

Secretary  Macpherson  presented  a  copy  of  the  pro- 
posed amended  association  by-laws  and  asked  for  these 
to  be  referred  to  the  Resolutions  Committee,  which  was 
done. 

The  balance  of  the  morning  was  taken  up  with  two 
interesting  addresses:  "The  Maintenance  of  Estab- 
lished Resale  Prices  on  Well  Advertised  Products,"  by 
H.  J.  Haire,  of  the  Alabastine  Co.,  and  another  on 
"How  Dealers  May  Successfully  Advertise,"  by  L.  R. 
Green,  advertising  manager  of  Tucketts,  Ltd.,  and 
formerly  advertising  manager  for  the  Sherwin-Wil- 
liams Company. 


A  Splendid  Increase  In  Membership  Reported 

Secretary's  and  Treasurer's  Reports  avd  Discussion  cn  Mutual 
Fife  Insurance  Features  W et  nesday  Morrirg  Session. 

The  second  day's  session  of  the  convention  was  opened 
with  a  discussion  of  the  Question  Box,  with  Geo.  E.  May, 
Toronto,  as  chairman,  followed  by  the  presentation  of  Trea- 
surer Caslor's  report  and  the  report  of  Secretary  MacPher- 
son,  as  follows: 

Secretary  MacPherson's  Report 

AS  authorized  by  resolution  passed  at  last  annual  con- 
vention, recommending  appointment  of  your  secretary 
as  permanent  secretary,  your  executive  at  a  meeting 
held  May  11th  last,  made  your  resolution  effective,  services 
on  this  basis  to  begin  on  June  1st. 

"This  report  largely  covers  work  accomplished  since  that 
date.  The  membership  at  last  report  was  342.  On  Dec.  31st. 
1921,  our  paid  up  membership  was  504,  and  in  addition  some 
forty  memberships  are  in  course  of  collection  through  the 
Canadian  Hardware  and  Implement  Underwriters,  in  accord- 
ance with  our  agreement  with  them.  With  the  co-operation 
of  our  officers  and  members  I  aim  at  an  objective  of  1,000 
members  before  next  convention,  and  with  this  high  aim  in 
view  ask  for  a  whole-hearted  and  loyal  support. 

"During  the  summer  months  I  spent  several  weeks  away 
from  my  office,  on  extension  work.  Starting  on  August  15th, 
accompanied  by  Mr.  Martin,  Ontario  representative  of  the 


NELSON  MILLS 
Haniiton,  Retiring-  President  of  GEORGE   E.  MAY 

the    Ontario    Retail    Hardware  Toronto,    elected    President  of 
Association  O.R.H.A.   for  1921 


Big  Three  Hardware  Mutual  Fire  Insurance  Companies,  we 
covered  the  principal  points  in  the  eastern  part  of  the  pro- 
vince, and  met  with  a  most  favorable  reception  of  the  asso- 
ciation and  its  services.  Early  in  September  I  spent  a  couple 
of  days  in  Toronto,  and  in  company  with  the  best  chauffeur 
in  that  city,  our  veteran  Treasurer  John  Caslor  certainly 
exceeded  the  speed  limit  in  placing  association  service, 
namely,  'One  Price  Book  every  15  minutes.' 

"On  October  15th,  accompanied  by  Mr.  Martin,  we  started 
a  three  weeks'  trip,  covering  a  number  of  counties  west  of 
Hamilton,  meeting  with  universal  success,  averaging  25  Price 
Book  services  a  week,  which  included  a  goodly  number  of 
new  memberships. 

"With  the  exception  of  a  few  additional  days  spent  in 
Toronto,  Hamilton  and  Ottawa  on  extension  work,  my  time 
has  been  taken  up  in  office  work,  correspondence  and  devel- 
opment of  Price  Book  service. 

"Association  Price  Book.  Owing  to  the  steadily  growing 
demand  for  this  price  service,  much  in  advance  of  my  anti- 
cipations, the  large  amount  of  work  involved  has  retarded 
somewhat  the  growth  of  the  volume.  However,  the  extra 
work  caused  in  connection  with  the  convention  and  exhibi- 
tion now  being  over,  the  next  couple  of  months  will  see  a 
large  number  of  new  pages  provided. 

"The  book  now  contains  upwards  of  150  pages,  the  growth 
of  less  than  six  months'  work.  My  forecast  of  100  volumes 
as  probable  issue,  made  at  last  convention,  for  the  year  just 
closed,  has  been  exceeded  by  211,  the  number  issued  to  date 
being  311.  To  illustrate  the  work  involved,  I  would  only 
mention  issue  of  replacement  sheets  sent  out  Feb.  1st,  there 
being  21,000  sheets  in  this  single  mailing.    The  convention 


14 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


Marcn,  1922 


progi-am  provides  a  place  for  discussion  of  this  service,  and 
I  would  welcome  all  suggestions  which  would  tend  to  its 
betterment. 

"During  the  year  I  have  had  many  requests  from  our 
members  for  information  on  varied  subjects,  and  would  only 
repeat  that  the  secretary's  office  is  for  your  use  and  I  always 
welcome  correspondence  from  our  members. 

"I  desire  to  record  my  appreciation  of  the  splendid  sup- 
port accorded  me  by  the  officers  of  the  past  year,  and  espe- 
cially of  our  president,  Nelson  Mills,  a  loyal,  capable  and 
persistent  worker  in  the  interest  of  our  association  from  start 
to  finish. 

"In  conclusion,  I  would  ask  you  to  take  up  the  slogan, 
'One  thousand  members  before  next  convention.'  The  I'ealiza- 
tion  of  an  organization  of  one  thousand  members  means  more 
to  you  than  would  appear  at  first  glance.  In  unity  is  strength. 


Let's  up  and  at  it." 

Treasurer  Caslor's  Report 

Receipts 

Balance  on  hand,  31st  December,  1920  $  709.33 

Cash  from  Exhibition    2,400.00 

"    Membership  Fees    2,455.00 

"    Associate  Membership  Fees   82.00 

"    From  Price  Book    2,620.00 

"    From  Exchange    3.25 

"    Exhibitors  Com   15.00 

"    Bank  Interest    25.54 


$8,310.12 

Expenditures 

Convention  Expenses  ........  ^  $  202.13 

Exhibition  Expenses    1,496.21 

Printing    292.90 

Executive  Meetings    154.70 

Secretary's  Salary   2,083.30 

Secretary's  Travelling  Expenses   845.47 

Secretary's  Office  Expenses    203.46 

Secretary's  Postage    20.35 

Grand  &  Toy,  Supplies    1,192.90 

United  Tj-pewriter  Co.,  Typing  and  Supplies   306.51 

Victoria  Paper  &  Twine,  Supplies   30.46 

Collection  on  Drafts    24.00 

Treasurer's  Honorarium   75.00 

Auditors'  Fees    10.00 

Travelling  Expenses  (Caslor  and  May)    10.00 


$6,947.39 

Balance  on  hand  $1,362.73 

General  Standing 

Cash  on  Hand  $1,362.73 

Due  on  Price  Books   380.00 

Office  Supplies,  less  depreciation    500.00 


$2,242.73 

Liabilities  1921  Account 

Nil. 

Membership 

At  last  report,  Dec.  31,  1920    342 

As  on  Dec.  31,  1921    504 


Increase    162 


JOHN  CASLOR,  Treasurer. 
J.  W.  PEACOCK,  Auditor. 
GEORGE  MATHEWSON,  Auditor. 
Report  of  Executive  Committee 

"Your  Executive  Committee  beg  to  report  having  held 
three  meetings  during  the  year. 

"At  meeting  held  Feb.  18th,  at  the  close  of  last  convention, 
a  resolution  was  passed  endorsing  the  proposition  of  the 
Canadian  Hardware  and  Implement  Underwriters,  subject  to 
satisfactory  reports  from  Vice-President  George  E.  May  and 
the  secretary,  on  financial  and  service  records,  the  secretary 
to  visit  the  New  York  Retail  Hardware  Convention  at  Roch- 
ester for  the  purpose  of  investigation.  Both  reports  being 
favorable,  the  endorsation  of  the  association  was  sent  to  the 
said  undenvriters  with  promise  of  full  co-operation. 

"On  May  11th  a  meeting  was  held  in  Toronto,  at  which 
the  executive  formally  concurred  in  endorsement  of  C.H. 
and  I.  Underwriters.  President  Mills  and  the  .secretary  were 
authorized  to  join  with  President  Birkett  and  Secretary 
Hardy  of  the  Canadian  Wholesale  Hardware  Association  to 
wait  on  the  Minister  of  Justice  in  reference  to  proposed  fire 
arms  legislation.    This  deputation  duly  waited  on  the  min- 


ister, were  well  received  and  consideration  given  to  our 
representation. 

"The  secretary  was  instructed  to  take  a  referendum  on 
holding  a  summer  session  in  Toronto,  during  the  Exhibition. 
There  was  not  sufficient  support  promised  to  warrant  holding 
same. 

"The  permanent  secretary  was  appointed,  effective  June  1. 

"On  August  31st,  a  meeting  was  held  in  Toronto  to  make 
arrangements  for  the  annual  convention  and  exhibition,  and 
the  necessary  committees  named  to  carry  out  same." 

Papers  were  read  by  J.  P.  Bell,  general  manager  of 
the  Bank  of  Hamilton,  on  "The  Banker  and  the  .Re- 
tailer"; C.  L.  Clarke,  Winnipeg-,  Canadian  manager  of 
the  Hardware  and  Implement  Underwriters,  on  "Hard- 
ware Mutnal  Fire  Insurance",  and  T.  J.  Penberthy,  of 
Lowe  Bros.,  on  "Business  Disease."  Pertinent  discus- 
sion took  place  on  all  these  topics,  and  this  took  up  the 
time  till  adjournment  for  lunch. 


W.  p.  MacPHERSON  "HONEST"    JOHN  CASLOR 

Prescott.      Secretary     of  the  Toronto,    re-elected  Treasure? 

Ontario   Retail    Hardware  As-  O.R.H.A.    for    the  seventeenth 

sociation  since  1915  time 


THURSDAY'S  SESSION 

As  on  the  previous  day,  the  third  day's  business  of 
the  convention  opened  with  a  discussion  of  the  Ques- 
t'on  Box  under  the  leadership  of  H.  N.  Joy  of  Toronto. 

Papers  were  read  and  presented  on  "Save  the  Sur- 
face Campaign  and  How  to  Make  More  Money  Out  of 
it,"  by  H.  E.  Mihell,  Toronto,  an  executive  member  of 
the  "Save  the  Surface  Campaign";  and  on  "Econo- 
mics, as  Applied  to  Every-day  Business,"  by  Prof.  W. 
C.  Clark,  director  of  Courses  of  Commerce  of  Queen's 
University.  These  were  followed  by  a  discussion  on 
present  business  conditions  and  prospects  given  by  W. 
Maedonald  of  the  Canad'an  Manufacturers'  Associa- 
tion and  President  Thos.  Birkett  of  the  Wholesale 
Hardware  Association. 

Association's  Price  Book 

There  are  now  311  price  books  in  use  by  members 
of  the  association,  according  to  Secretary  Macpherson, 
who  outlined  briefly  this  service  of  the  0.  R.  H.  A. 
Manufacturers'  standard  lists  are  used  as  the  basis  of 
the  various  price  sheets,  and  on  these  the  columns  of 
net  costs,  discounts,  percentage,  etc.,  are  worked  out, 
change  sheets  being  sent  out  from  time  to  time.  A 
basis  of  20  per  cent,  has  been  figured  for  overhead,  and 
a  range  of  profits  from  10  to  30  per  cent,  allowed  on 
goods  according  to  the  lines  quoted. 

Before  the  noon  adjournment  a  resolution  was  pro- 
posed by  J.  N.  McGregor,  Oakville,  and  Geo.  E.  May, 
Toronto,  voicing  the  association's  sympathy  towards 
Mr.  Wood,  of  Wood,  Alexander  &  James,  Hamilton,  in 
the  recent  death  of  his  wife. 


March,  1922 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


In 


FRIDAY'S  SESSION 

On  Friday  morning  the  convention  concluded  its 
business,  the  Resolutions  Committee  recommending  the 
adoption  of  the  Treasurer's  Report,  Secretary's  Report 
and  the  Auditor's  Report,  and  the  reporting  as  fol- 
lows : 

That  as  a  matter  of  principle,  the  function  of  the 
jobbers  should  be  to  sell  to  recognized  retailers  who 
carry  stock  of  goods  offered  for  sale,  except  special 
cases,  such  as  factories,  etc.,  when  a  slight  preferential 
in  prices  should  be  allowed  the  dealers. 

That  this  Association  sanction  the  action  of  the 
executive  in  endorsing  and  making  arrangements  with 
the  Canadian  Hardware  and  Implement  Underwriters 
to  make  favorable  terms  for  insurance  of  hardware 
stocks. 

That  the  incorporation  of  the  Ontario  Retail  Hard- 
ware Association  be  proceeded  with  and  the  constitu- 
tion and  by-laws  as  prepared  by  the  Secretary  be 
adopted. 

That  the  thanks  of  the  Association  be  tendered  the 
exhibitors  and  manufacturers'  associations  for  their 
support  and  co-operation  which  contributes  so  much 
to  the  success  of  the  convention ;  to  the  retailers  of 
Hamilton,  and  to  the  hotel  management  for  the  excel- 
lent arrangements  for  comfort  and  convenience  of  the 
guests,  and  particularly  in  connection  with  the  ban- 
quet served  on  behalf  of  our  association :  to  the  speak- 
ers for  their  instructive  addresses,  and  last,  but  not 
least,  our  appreciation  of  the  very  valuable  support 
and  services  rendered  by  the  hardware  trade  papers. 

That  the  following  members  be  appointed  to  canvass 
amongst  the  retailers  to  enlist  further  membership  and 
urge  a  moi'e  extensive  attendance  at  future  conven- 
tions:  E.  J.  Carter,  Jarvis;  James  Hunter,  Wiarton ; 
D.  B.  Wilson,  Napanee;  Iven  Cook,  Leamington;  H.  A. 
Mistele,  Rodney ;  James  Wright,  Glencoe ;  E.  J.  Creep- 
er, Owen  Sound ;  F.  A.  Rieard,  Sudbury ;  A.  W.  Allin, 
Lindsay;  C.  C.  Lee,  Goderich,  and  James  Duke,  Grand 
Valley. 

ELECTION  OF  OFFICERS 

The  election  of  officers  was  then  held,  the  result  be- 
ing as  follows : 

President — Geo.  E.  May,  Toronto. 

Vice-President — F.  B.  Smith,  Belleville. 

Secretary — W.  F.  Macpherson,  Prescott. 

Treasurer — John  Caslor,  Toronto. 

Executive  Committee — Nelson  Mills,  Hamilton ;  R. 
Hawkins,  Smith's  Falls;  H.  N.  Joy,  Toronto,  and  W. 
H.  Bartlett,  St.  Mary's  Hardware  Co.,  St.  Mary's. 

President  May  Speaks  Out 

Following  his  installation,  President-elect  May  ac- 
cepted the  office  in  a  brief  address  in  which  he  said 
he  considered  it  a  distinguished  honor  to  be  elected 
president  of  the  0.  R.  H.  A. 

"I  can  assure  you  that  it  gives  me  great  pleasure  to 
accept  this  office  and,  in  view  of  the  splendid  Secretary 
we  have  and  the  fine  Executive  Committee,  and  the 
anticipated  help  of  my  good  friends,  the  past  presi- 
dents and  the  trade  press,  I  am  hopeful  that,  along 
with  the  sympathetic  co-operation  of  the  entire  mem- 
bership of  the  association  we  shall  all,  pulling  together, 
be  able  to  maintain  the  fine  traditions  of  our  organiza- 
tion. 

"When  I  remember  all  the  distinguished  gentlemen 
who  have  presided  over  our  association  in  past  year,  I 


feel  I  will  have  to  aim  high  and  walk  very  circum- 
spectly to  maintain  the  standards  set  by  them. 

"This  a.ssociation  has  had  remarkable  growth.  It 
appeals  to  the  best  men  in  the  trade  because  we  are 
giving  invaluable  assistance  to  the  hardware  trade  of 
this  province.  We  want  1,000  members  for  1922  and 
we  want  997  to  attend  our  next  convention.  The  odd 
three  are  the  ones  who  persistently  come  here  and  get 
drunk  and  cast  a  shadow  on  us  all.  Candidly,  gentle- 
men, I  think  the  time  has  come  when  we  can  get  along 
without  that  class  of  member.  It  brings  disgrace  not 
only  upon  himself,  but  on  our  organization." 

Honorary  Secretary  Weston  Wrigley  congratulated 
Mr.  May  on  his  courage  in  speaking  out  on  a  matter 
the  evils  of  which  all  recognized,  but  few  dared  to 
deal  with. 

"Now  that  the  President  has  taken  a  stand  he  should 
be  supported  by  every  member  who  has  the  good  of 
the  association  at  heart,"  said  Mr.  Wrigley.  "With 
our  membership  over  500  we  are  in  a  position  to  take 
a  stand,  and  if  the  President  will  appoint  a  select  com- 
mittee to  politely  pass  the  word  along  that  the  associa- 


A.   J.  WRIGHT  WESTON  WRIGLEY 

Past  President  who  conducted  Honorary  Secretary  and  former 

the  Prize  Drawing.  Secretary  O.R.H.A. 

tion  will  not  tolerate  drinking  parties  at  hardware 
conventions,  it  will  result  in  strengthening  the  mem- 
bership and  convention  attendance.  It  is  discouraging 
to  have  the  Secretary  work  hard  to  enroll  members  and 
then  have  these  members  attend  conventions  only  to 
return  home  disgusted,  with  their  minds  made  up  not 
to  attend  another  year." 

Mr.  Wrigley  told  of  one  association  member  who  had 
brought  his  wife  to  the  convention,  but,  unable  to  sleep, 
had  to  remind  the  occupants  of  the  adjoining  room 
that  ladies  were  present.  Another  case  of  a  member 
who  came  intending  to  keep  on  the  water  wagon,  but 
who  found  the  influences  too  strong  for  him,  was  also 
related. 

The  applause  which  followed  Mr.  May's  and  Mr. 
Wrigley 's  remarks  indicated  the  unaiiimous  approve- 
of  the  members  was  Avith  the  President  in  anything  he 
would  do  to  deal  with  this  problem,  Avhich  was  really 
less  in  evidence  at  this  convention  than  at  previous 
gatherings. 

Prize  Drawing  Contest 

The  last  item  of  convention  business  was  a  drawing 
for  prizes  donated  by  exhibitors,  the  first  prize  being 
a  cabinet  of  silver  given  by  Oneida  Community,  Ltd., 
and  won  by  W.  A.  Spratt,  Inglewood.  Nearly  a  score 
of  valuable  gifts  such  as  sets  of  auto  tire  chains,  Auto- 
Strop  razors,  aluminum  sets,  etc.,  were  drawn  by  the 
members  who  remained.  Past  President  A.  J.  Wright, 
Hamilton,  conducted  the  drawing. 


lb 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


March,  1922 


JOBBERS  PRESIDENT  PREACHES  OPTIMISM 

aiiiinniiniMiiiHiiiMiiiiniiiuniiiiiiiriiMniijiiiiiiiiinMniiiriiiMniiiijMiiMi:MiMiiiiiiMMMniiiMinniJMMiiiiMiiMiiiiiniiiiMiiiiMiiiiiMiiiii^ 

Thomas  Birkett,  Ottawa,  President  Canadian  Wholesale  Hardware  Assn.,  Says  1921  was  year  of 

Deflation  and  1922  a  year  of  E,e-adjustment. 

inninlUniniiriMnUIMMIMIItllMliniMIIMIIIMirillMIMIINIIIIIMMMMMIIMIMIIIMIMIIMIMIIMinilllinillllMIIIIMIIMIIMMIIMIMIIMIMIMIIMIIMIM 


DUEING  and  immediately  after  the  war,  there  was  a  de- 
cided shortage  of  raw  material,  particularly  of  steel, 
due  to  the  tremendous  consumption  for  war  purposes, 
and  to  so  many,  in  fact,  almost  every  available  man  being 
at  war;  consequently  every  factory,  wholesaler  and  retailer's 
stock  of  all  the  commodities,  necessities  particularly,  were 
pretty  well  exhausted. 

All  during  1921  there  was  a  steady  reduction  of  stocks 
in  the  hardware  and  steel  trade  of  Canada,  while  these  con- 
ditions generally  had  not  advanced  during  the  past  few  years, 
in  comparison  with  woolens,  foodstuflFs,  freight  rates  and 
railway  wages,  etc.,  there  was,  during  19pl,  a  decided  reduc- 
tion in  the  prices  of  many  lines  of  hardware,  it  being  most 
pronounced  in  the  heavy  lines;  for  example,  wire  nails  about 
$2  per  keg,  bars  about  2  cents  per  pound  and  bolts  and  nuts 
over  40  per  cent.  This  was  some  drop,  and  one  which  re- 
quired care  to  handle,  and  some  of  the  generally  recognized 
adjustments  made  by  the  steel  trade  of  the  world  during 
1921 ;  not,  mark  you,  without  heavy  loss,  for  example,  as 
losses  reported  by  the  United  States  Steel  Cor- 
poration for  1921,  approximately  15  to  20  mil- 
lion dollars,  after  payment  of  only  5  per  cent, 
on  the  common  stock.  This  is  the  position  in 
all  American  steel  companies.  They  all  show 
losses  in  proportion. 

Competition  has  been  most  keen  among  the 
steel  companies,  which  brought  market  prices 
down  farther  than  costs.  The  workmen  of  the 
steel  industry  have  not  escaped,  for,  from  ac- 
counts, there  is  no  industry  that  has  made 
wage  adjustments  more  promptly  and  of  such 
a  drastic  character  than  they. 

Common  labor,  at  twenty-five  to  thirty 
cents  per  hour,  with  the  usual  increases  for 
the  various  classes  of  skilled  workmen,  but 
with  employment  only  three  days  per  week  or 
less,  have  brought  a  degree  of  hardship,  and 
it  is  apparent  that  further  economies,  at  the 
expense  of  the  workmen,  are  difficult  of  ar- 
rangement, under  the  conditions  of  limited 
activity  at  present  existing. 

Hope  has  been  expressed  that  i-eductions 
of  freight  rates  will  bring  much  needed  relief 
to  the  steel  trade,  but  it  is  evident  that  reduc- 
tions in  freight  rates  will  be  of  gradual  and 
slow  evolution.  The  American  railroads  are 
finding  it  difficult,  even  at  present  rates  of 
freight,  to  earn  the  agreed  upon  rate  of  6  per  cent,  on  rail- 
way stocks,  and  there  are  a  great  many  repairs  and  replace- 
ments needed. 

Moreover,  the  railway  workers  are  being  paid  very  high 
rates  of  wages,  out  of  proportion  to  all  other  industrial 
activities,  but  are  so  well  organized  that  the  railway  labor 
unions  will  stoutly  resist  any  but  slow  and  gradual  reduc- 
tions in  rates  of  pay. 

Looking  at  the  situation  from  this  angle,  our  factories 
have  made  a  wonderful  come-back;  and,  gentlemen,  if  labor 
would  come  from  its  high  horse,  and  give  the  factories  the 
production  they  are  paying  them  for,  things  would  be  in  a 
still  better  position,  but  unless  this  does  come  to  pass,  and 
the  railroads  lessen  their  excessive  freight  charges,  prices 
are  about  as  low  as  they  can  go. 

Much  Progress  Made 

While  there  is  still  an  abundance  to  be  done  before  busi- 
ness can  be  normal,  let  us  think  of  some  great  progress  that 
has  been  brought  about  in  the  following  grave  problems: 

More  reasonable  attitude  of  labor. 

Liquidation  of  stocks  both  in  Canada  and  United  States. 
Political  position  improved  throughout  the  world. 
Irish  question  nearer  solution. 
Adju.stment  of  prices  and  costs. 

Greater  money  supply  and  better  conditions  of  funds  with 
United  States. 

Strength  of  .sterling  and  its  influence  with  the  world. 

United  States  showing  more  sympathy  to  their  banks  for 
extension  of  financial  help  to  Europe. 


THOMAR  BlRKETT 
Ottaw!!.      Pi'psident  Canadian 


Wholesale 


Disarmament  agreement. 

Coming  back  to  the  "Great  War,"  it  was  not  only  instru- 
mental in  forcing  the  United  States  to  take  more  interest  in 
world  politics,  but  Canada  was  also  forced  in  the  same  man- 
ner to  trade  with  the  world,  and  now  she  must  export  all 
she  can  to  enable  her  to  pay  her  vastly  increased  govern- 
ment and  other  obligations  arising  out  of  the  war. 

Foreign  markets  that  have  been  dead  for  the  past  several 
months  ai'e  now  making  enquiries  for  Canadian  products 
and  manufactures,  which  will  have  a  stimulating  effect  on 
our  Canadian  trade  in  general.  I  have  on  good  authority 
that  large  bookings  have  been  made. 

Don't  buy  any  slow-selling  goods;  the  factory,  or  whole- 
salers, will  not  thank  you.  You  are  in  business  for  your- 
selves, so  act  according  to  your  better  judgment;  but  tell 
your  troubles,  if  you  have  them,  to  your  policeman,  be  he  a 
jobber  or  a  manufacturer,  so  that  you  can  co-operate  with 
one  another,  when,  with  the  slogan  "Effort,"  you  will  win 
out. 

1921  has  passed  into  history,  and  it  was  a 
year  which  none  of  us,  I  think,  wish  to  see 
again;  we  all  learned  many  a  good  lesson 
(some  of  which  cost  good  money).  Some  of 
these  lessons  we  deserved,  for  we  continued 
to  buy  in  a  war-time  manner,  and  when  values 
started  to  come  down  and  down  we  saw  our 
dollars  going.  It  was  hard  to  watch,  but,  I 
venture  to  say,  there  is  not  one  man  present 
this  morning  who  did  not  think  it  was  right, 
and  he  was  ready  and  vdlling  to  take  his  loss. 
After  all,  did  not  all  make  money  when  the 
prices  were  going  higher  and  higher;  there- 
fore, in  the  end,  you  are  not  making  a  loss  but 
only  averaging  up  with  your  profits  with  the 
margin  well  on  the  profit  side. 

Not  Altogether  Right  Yet 

Business  could  not  continue  with  conditions 
as  they  were,  and  although  these  conditions 
are  very  much  improved,  they  are  not  alto- 
gether right  yet;  they  have,  however,  im- 
proved to  such  an  extent  that  we  have  become 
more  optimistic,  and  are  willing  to  take  off 
our  coats  and  get  to  work,  for  no  end,  ever 
so  humble,  can  be  obtained  without  work. 
The  opportunity  is  there,  gentlemen,  so  let  us 
try  again  and  obtain  it,  remembering  that  old 
normal  times  will  never  return.  We  will  have 
a  new  and  better  normal,  and  one,  I  think,  that  will  bring 
more  real  pleasures  into  business  in  the  future  than  thei'e 
ever  was  before. 

Signs  point  to  improvement  in  pulp  and  paper  trade,  and 
lumber  trade,  and  the  spirit  of  optimism  in  the  trade  and 
business  circles,  where  the  general  feeling  abounds  that  1922 
cannot  possibly  be  as  severe  in  business  adjustments  as 
1921,  for  it  was  in  1921  that  deflation  occurred  and  a  com- 
paratively safe  foundation  laid  for  future  good. 

Steel  and  iron  stocks  are  low  and  should  show  greater 
volume  this  year,  coupled  with  a  change  in  labor,  which  now 
seeks  work  rather  than  striking  for  the  greater  wage. 

The  railroad  requirements  are  very  heavy  and  cannot  be 
delayed  much  longer,  and  it  won't  be  long  until  they  come 
into  the  market  for  large  tonnage  of  steel,  etc. 

With  the  shortage  of  housing  privileges,  the  building 
trades,  if  they  can  pass  one  year  without  striking,  should  be 
active. 

Canada  has  what  the  world  wants,  in  her  farms,  mines, 
water  powers  and  forests,  and  with  their  continued  develop- 
ment in  a  conservative  manner  it  will  mean  prosperity  *o 
us  all. 


Hardware 
tion 


If  we  were  all  as  aggressive  in  our  selling  as  we 
are  in  our  buying,  we'd  be  feeding  on  pheasant  every- 
day for  breakfast  and  riding  around  town  in  a  Rolls 
Royce, 


March,  1922 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


17 


Hammers  To  Construct  And  Build 

Slogan  for  hardware  dealers  during  1922 — Successful  banquet 
given  with  Retail  Hardware  Association  as  hosts. 

VERY  successful  was  the  first  annual  banquet  of  the 
O.R.H.A.,  held  on  the  Wednesday  evening  of  convention 
week  in  the  ballroom  of  the  Royal  Connaught.  The 
menu  was  a  splendid  one  and  full  justice  was  done  it  by  all 
who  attended. 

The  speaker  of  the  evening  was  D.  Wells,  a  Buffalo  news- 
paperman, who  humoresquely  and  poetically  told  of  a  trip 
"back  home  to  the  little  village  of  his  birth." 

President  Nelson  Mills  was  toastmaster  and,  after  honor- 
ing the  toast  to  "The  King"  and  "Canada,"  introduced  the 
various  speakers.  Col.  C.  R.  McCullough,  of  Hamilton,  who 
responded  to  the  "Canada"  toast,  instanced,  in  his  opening 
remarks,  the  place  occupied  by  the  hardwareman  in  the  mer- 
cantile life  of  the  country  in  his  early  days.  In  those  days 
boys  graduating  from  school  and  not  intended  for  the  pro- 
fessions, looked  to  the  bank,  the  office  or  the  hardware  store 
for  their  first  insight  into  business  life.  "And  I  think  to- 
day," said  he,  "the  character  of  a  community  is  indicated 
pretty  well  by  its  hardware  store.  If  you  look  into  the 
hardware  store  you  will  find  there  what  is  the  life  of  the 
community." 

Referring  to  the  hardware  exhibition,  Col.  McCullough 
said:  "When  I  saw  that  fine  display  at  your  exhibition  hall 
I  was  sorry  we  had  no  better  facilities  for  showing  your 
goods.  We  in  Hamilton  must  do  something;  we  must  find 
ways  and  means  to  keep  you  coming  here  for  many  years  to 
come."  He  hoped  the  "Made  in  Canada"  idea  would  be 
propagated  by  all  hardware  dealers  when  they  returned  to 
their  homes. 

The  Colonel  told  a  story  about  the  silver  hammer  used  at 
the  death  of  every  Pope,  and  finishing,  he  said,  let  our  em- 
blem for  this  year  be  a  hammer — a  hammer  to  construct  and 
to  build  for  bigger  things. 

Opinion  of  Manufacturer  and  Jobber 

Geo.  Spence,  general  sales  manager  of  the  Steel  Co.  of 
Canada,  speaking  on  behalf  of  the  hardware  manufacturers 
of  Hamilton,  told  of  the  tiying  times  last  year,  "and  it  looks," 
said  he,  "as  if  competition  will  be  very  keen  this  year." 
Iron  and  steel  manufacturers  had  taken  their  share  of  the 
deflation  last  year.  Reports  from  United  States  manufac- 
turers were  not  satisfactory.  He  hoped  Canadian  companies 
reports  would  not  be  so  unsatisfactory.  The  year  1922  will 
show  economies,  and  this  means  we  must  put  forth  our  best 
efforts  to  make  more  efficient  our  business  interests. 

S.  H.  Alexander,  of  Wood,  Alexander  and  James,  instanced 
the  comparatively  few  hardware  failures  in  a  time  of  busi- 
ness distress.  Looking  at  the  markets  as  he  saw  them,  he 
thought  the  present  a  good  time  to  buy.  The  dealer  who 
held  off  buying  now,  waiting  to  get  a  possible  10  per  cent, 
advantage  later  on,  was  not  wise.  There  may  be  increases 
in  some  lines  as  well  as  declines.  We  are  now  headed  for 
spring,  and  his  reasonable  opinion,  after  38  years'  experience, 
was  that  it  was  safe  to  buy  goods  now. 

Manufacturers  Entertain  Retailers 

Lieutenint-Governor  Cockshult  guest  of  honor—  Optinjstic 
addresses  on  business  conditiors. 

Hamilton  hardware  manufacturers  entertained  the  visit- 
ing retailers  at  an  elaborate  banquet  on  Thursday  evening, 
the  guest  of  honor  being  Lieut. -Governor  Cockshutt,  plow 
manufacturer,  and  the  toastmaster  Robert  Hobson,  president 
of  the  Steel  Company  of  Canada,  both  being  past  presidents 
of  the  Canadian  Manufacturers'  Association  and  business 
friends  for  27  years. 

"I  am  one  of  those  who  believe  in  business  men  getting 
together  in  associations,"  said  Lieut.-Gov.  Cockshutt,  in  com- 
mending the  hardwaremen  for  holding  annual  conventions 
to  find  the  best  and  newest  methods  of  conducting  their 
businesses. 

In  proposing  the  toast  of  "Our  Guests,"  Norman  Slater, 
of  N.  Slater  Co.,  Ltd.,  said  that  however  trying  conditions 
had  been  in  Canada  during  the  past  year,  other  countries 
had  suffered  more,  and  no  country  is  in  better  shape  for  a 
revival  of  trade  than  Canada.  Oj)timism  ought  to  be  our 
greatest  asset.  "Your  stocks  are  low,  you  are  getting  rid  of 
high-priced  goods  and  you  can  see  daylight  ahead. 

"■The  manufacturers  have  had  a  year  of  declining  values 
and  it  is  one  year  in  which  we  can  say  we  have  sold  you 


goods  at  less  than  cost.  We  are  glad  to  have  had  your  con- 
vention in  Hamilton  each  year,  and  I  am  glad  that  Nelson 
Mills,  a  personal  friend  of  mine,  is  president." 

Mr.  Slater  said  he  was  thankful  he  was  brought  up  in  the 
hardware  business.  'One  particularly  good  thing  about  it," 
said  Mr.  Slater,  "is  the  scarcity  of  failures,  which  may  either 
be  attributed  to  the  profits  made  in  this  business  or  the  early 
training  the  merchant  gets." 

Mr.  Nelson  Mills,  in  reply,  extended  the  appreciation  of 
the  retail  association  for  courtesies  extended  by  the  manu- 
facturers of  Hamilton  each  year,  and  was  specially  glad  to 
note  the  interest  taken  by  these  manufacturers  in  the  work 
of  hte  association. 

Steel  Situation  Reviewed 

Reminding  the  hardware  jobbers  and  retailers  that  he  had 
addressed  them  a  year  ago  on  business  conditions,  Mr.  Robert 
Hobson  said  he  had  been  an  optimist  then,  but  was  just  as 
optimistic  to-day  as  he  was  then. 

"Since  1896  I  have  seen  ups  and  downs  in  business  and 
I  never  failed  to  see  the  ups  beat  the  downs.    If  I  was  to 


ROBERT  HOBSON 
Hamilton,  Prefident  Steel  Ccmpany  cf  Canada, 
and  toastmastri  at  manufacturers'  banquet 

get  an  absolutely  honest  confession  from  the  jobbers  and 
retailers,  you  would  confess  that  your  shelves  are  very  bare. 
They  are  bare  in  the  U.  S.  and  other  countries,  and  you  are 
going  to  be  forced  to  buy  very  soon. 

"In  the  steel  and  iron  business  to-day,  with  the  present 
freight  rates  and  steel  selling  as  it  is,  if  we  get  back  to  1914 
levels  steel  would  have  to  sell  at  about  75  cents  per  cwt. 
Steel  has  gone  just  about  as  far  as  it  can  go,  and  the  trade 
is  about  due  for  a  big  business  revival.  I  am  not  going  to 
prophesy  beyond  that  we  are  on  the  eve  of  good  times.  Wall 
Street  is  composed  of  the  cleverest  lot  of  men  in  the  world. 
You  watch  the  quotations  and  the  price  at  which  seats  are 
sold  on  the  exchange.  I  notice  U.  S.  Steel,  after  having  gone 
behind  nearly  twenty  million  dollars  last  year,  went  up  to  91 
on  the  stock  market  to-day.    Watch  for  advancing  prices." 

Thomas  Birkett,  president  of  the  Canadian  Wholesale 
Hardware  Association,  and  James  Hardy,  secretary,  re- 
sponded for  the  jobbers.  Mr.  Hardy  predicted  the  greatest 
business  era  Canada  had  ever  enjoyed.  "Exchange  on  the 
Canadian  dollar  is  over,  the  Peace  Conference  is  over  and 
price  reductions  are  over — or  ought  to  be,"  said  Mr.  Hardy. 
"Clean  out  your  old  stocks,  replace  with  lower  priced  goods 
and  sell  at  a  fair  profit." 

S.  H.  Alexander,  also  speaking  as  a  wholesaler,  said  his 
firm.  Wood,  Alexander  and  James,  had  kept  up  their  stock. 
'We  had  an  opening  order  the  other  day  for  1,768  items  of 
hardware  and  we  filled  1,751  of  them,  receiving  the  order  on 
Wednesday  and  shipping  on  Friday." 

Brief  addresses  were  also  delivered  by  H.  P.  Hubbard,  of 
E.  C.  Atkins  &  Co.,  Cyrus  A.  Birge,  vice-president  Steel 
Company  of  Canada,  and  W.  F.  MacPherson,  secretary, 
O.R.H.A. 


18 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


March,  1922 


INTERESTING  QUESTION  BOX  DISCUSSIONS 

■iHiMiMiMMMiiJiiininMiiujiiiniMiiHiiNuniniMriiiuiMiniiijiuiHiiiMHiriiiniHMiiiiiiininiiiiMinniJiiniuiiMiiniiiiiiiMiiiiiMiiniMinMMiMiiMiMiMii 

Daily  Sessions  devoted  to  Solving  Trade  Problems  attracted  marked  interest — Clerk's  wages, 
workshop  costs,  price  reductions,  merchandising  tires,  accessories,  among  questions  discussed. 

MiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiniiiiMiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiinntiNiiiiiiiMiiiiniiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiJiiiiiiiiiii  iiMiiMMjininjMiiiiiiinijinMiiiiiMniiiiniiMiijMiiiijiiMiMMiiiiniiiiMMniMiiiMMiiMiiMMiiMiiniinniiiiMniiiiniiniiniiniininiMninntJtMiiiii^ 


THE  Question  Box  was  a  big  feature  at  the  recent  Hard- 
ware Convention  at  Hamilton.  It  occupied  a  place  on 
the  program  at  the  four  daily  sessions,  Past  President 
Wanless  being  chaii-man  of  the  first  day's  session.  Geo.  E. 
May,  Toronto,  presided  the  second  day,  and  H.  N.  Joy, 
Toronto,  took  the  chair  at  the  third  day's  session,  all  proving 
capable  leaders. 

"Ho%v  closely  should  ive  follow  declining  markets 
in  adjusting  our  selling  prices?" 

F.  B.  Smith,  Belleville,  thought  President  Mills  had 
answered  the  query  when  he  stated  in  his  address  that  "we 
take  our  losses  now." 

G.  A.  Binns,  Newmarket,  tried  to  change  his  prices  as 
quickly  as  he  could,  in  fact,  just  as  quickly  as  an  auctioneer. 
When  prices  were  going  up  he  did  this  too,  but  with  some 
disadvantage,  because  his  competitor  did  not  follow  so  closely. 
But  the  competitor  is  still  holding  back  on  a  declining  mar- 
ket, with  the  result  that  while  his  competitor  had  the  better 
of  it  on  a  rising  market,  he  (Mr.  Binns)  is  on  top  on  the 
declining  market.  Mr.  Binns  thought  Canadian  dealers  gen- 
erally had  much  to  learn  from  U.S.  dealers  in  regard  to  tak- 
ing losses  quickly  and  immediately. 

Geo.  E.  May,  West  Toronto,  said  he  took 
his  losses  immediately  at  replacement  values. 

R.  Hawkins,  Smiths  Falls,  also  marked  his 
prices  at  replacement  values  and  let  the  public 
know  of  the  cut. 

"Are  the  jobbers  as  prompt  as 
they  might  be  in  meeting  the  declin- 
ing market?" 

W.  A.  Rankin,  Ottawa — Yes,  jobbers  are 
like  ourselves.  If  any  particular  jobber  does 
not  come  down  we  don't  need  to  buy  from  him. 
The  jobbers  have  an  association  and  can  regu- 
late these  things.  If  they  can  do  this  equaliz- 
ing of  prices,  let  us  take  our  hats  off  to  them. 
Blame  Manufacturers,  Not  Jobbers 

Mr.  Smith,  Cornwall — Jobbers  are  meeting 
prices  as  fast  as  they  can,  but  the  manu- 
facturers are  not.  Some  of  them  seem  to  be 
holding  up  prices  and  getting  an  excess  profit. 
They  are  not  dropping  prices  as  they  should. 
One  manufactui-er  had  told  him  he  was  reduc- 
ing his  goods  .5  per  cent,  now  and  another  5 
per  cent,  in  the  fall,  giving  as  his  reason  that 
he  was  allowing  the  retailer  to  ease  off  his  stock  of  goods. 
A  better  way  would  be  to  reduce  the  line  25  per  cent,  right 
now  and  let  us  all  take  our  losses. 

On  motion  of  Mr.  Oldham,  Weston,  the  matter  of  manu- 
facturers not  reducing  prices  wes  referred  to  the  Resolu- 
tions Committee. 

"What  shall  tve  do  with  the  wage  question  as  the 
high  living  costs  decline?" 
A.  J.  Wright,  Hamilton,  made  a  10  per  cent,  cut  in 
wages  two  weeks  ago  and  his  clerks  accepted  it  without  a 
comment.  They  knew  he  was  losing  money  and  were  willing 
to  do  their  part.  Otherwise,  he  would  have  been  forced  to 
drop  some  from  his  staff. 

H.  N.  Joy,  Toronto — Overhead  is  a  serious  matter  with 
us.  He  would  like  to  know  what  were  the  rates  of  wages 
paid  elsewheie. 

Mr.  Wright  before  the  war  was  paying  $16.  This  went  to 
$25,  and  is  now  down  to  $22.50. 

Mr.  Joy  had  only  been  two  years  in  his  present  location. 
His  predecessor  had  paid  his  clerk  $16  before  the  war.  This 
went  up  to  $35  and  $45. 

E.  J.  Wanless,  Chatham,  had  received  a  letter  from  a  man 
in  Toronto  in  which  he  found  that  in  Chatham  wages  were 
double  those  paid  in  Toronto.  Sheet  metal  workers  were 
paid  more  than  clerks  in  his  place.  He  sympathized  with  the 
clerks;  they  were  longer  on  their  feet  and  used  more  of  their 
grey  matter.  He  had  on  his  staff  boys  who  were  real  men. 
He  had  not  cut  wages  and  would  not  do  so  until  he  was 
forced.    He  employed  the  highest-priced  men  in  Chatham. 

Mr.  Rowden,  Cobalt,  has  only  one  clerk  to  whom  he  pays 
$35.    He  doesn't  like  to  cut  that  wage  as  he  believes  in  a 


little  humanity. 

Mr.  Clarke,  Hamilton — Clerks  have  to  pay  high  living 
costs.  We  should  try  to  do  for  our  clerks  wliat  we  would 
like  them  to  do  for  us. 

"How  can  the  cost  of  doing  business  be  cut  and 
yet  maintain  service?" 

"Hustle"  and  "get  a  larger  volume  of  business,"  shouted 
a  number  of  voices. 

Ed.  Wanless,  Chatham,  told  of  how  one  hardware  dealer 
had  got  20  per  cent,  more  business  by  offering  his  clerks  a 
bonus  on  sales  above  their  normal  quota. 

Mr.  Smith,  Cornwall,  thought  that  dealers  in  small  towns 
allowed  mail  order  houses  to  get  away  with  a  great  deal  of 
business.  He  believed  that  small  town  retailers  should  get 
together  and  get  out  a  catalogue  similar  to  the  mail  order 
houses  and  send  it  out  twice  a  year,  offering  the  same  in- 
ducements and  prices.  He  and  several  other  retailers  in  his 
town  were  trying  out  such  a  catalogue  this  spring. 

Mr.  Joy  asked  if  such  a  catalogue  was  not  tried  out  in 
Hamilton. 

Weston  Wrigley — Creeper  &  Griffin  of  Owen  Sound  pub- 
lished a  catalogue  for  a  group  of  dealers  suc- 
cessfully for  several  years  until  war  conditions 
unsettled  price  quotations. 

"What  new  lines  did  you  add  dur- 
ing 1921  that  have  proved  profitable?" 
Mr.  Gerry,  of  Fort  William,  had  added  a 
number  of  lines,  but  he  could  not  say  as  yet 
what  were  the  profitable  ones.  He  asked  if 
anyone  had  tried  out  the  personal  canvas. 
Since  putting  in  an  electrical  stock  he  had 
tried  the  house-to-house  canvas,  leaving  a  card 
with  a  souvenir  of  the  store,  and  drawing 
attention  to  the  line  of  electrical  goods.  He 
had  two  clerks,  and  with  these  he  intended 
doing  one  section  of  his  city  thoroughly  dur- 
ing the  month  of  March. 

Mr.  Wanless  instanced  the  sevdng-machine 
men  in  their  house-to-house  canvas.    His  firm 
hadn't  done  much  of  this  in  Chatham,  but  it 
had  proved  very  successful  in  the  country. 
"Hoiv  many  dealers  present  pay  a 
bonus  on  sales  by  clerks?" 
W.  A.  Rankin,  Ottawa,  pays  a  small  bonus. 
Geo.  E.  May,  Toronto— During  December 
we  gave  a  Christmas  gift  to  our  help  in  the  shape  of  a  bonus 
on  sales  made  in  that  month,  but  the  plan  had  not  been 
successful. 

"Could  not  active  steps  be  taken  by  this  Associa- 
tion to  prevent  wholesalers  from  doing  a  retail  busi- 
ness?" 

H.  N.  Joy,  Toronto,  thought  active  steps  should  be  taken 
in  this  regard,  and  we  should  go  on  record  as  saying  that 
wholesalers  should  sell  to  retailers  only.  The  Association 
should  speak  out  on  this  question. 

F.  R.  Jackson,  Toronto,  wanted  to  know  where  to  draw 
the  line  between  wholesaler  and  retailer.  The  Association 
should  have  taken  up  this  question  long  ago.  He  instanced 
the  buying  of  bushings  retail  in  one  store  at  five  cents  each, 
while  in  another  part  of  the  same  stoi-e  the  wholesale  price 
to  dealers  was  five  cents  and  a  fraction.  We  should  co-oper- 
ate in  our  buying. 

W.  A.  Rankin  said  that  in  Ottawa  manufacturers  sell 
direct  to  blacksmiths  and  small  factories.  That  business 
should  go  to  retailers. 

Mr.  Oldham,  Weston,  thought  the  matter  not  so  very 
serious.  If  instances  such  as  mentioned  were  taken  up  in- 
dividually and  personally  with  the  wholesalers  a  lot  of  diffi- 
culties would  be  overcome. 

Mr.  Thomson,  Owen  Sound,  believed  the  wholesalers 
should  be  memorialized  asking  them  to  offset  this  condition. 
They  would  be  quite  willing  to  rectify  any  complaint.  He 
moved  that  the  Resolutions  Committee  should  take  this 
matter  up.  Carried. 

"What  is  the  best  way  to  get  results  from  adver- 
tising folders,  etc.,  as  furnished  by  manufacturers?" 


ED.  WANLESS 

Cliafham,       Past  President, 
O.R.H.A..    who    presided  over 
Question  Box 


March,  1922 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


19 


Mr.  Gerry,  Fort  William,  used  these  by  sending  out  on 
a  direct  mailing  list. 

Geo.  E.  May,  Toronto,  uses  a  No.  9  envelope  to  enclose 
these  circulars  and  addresses  these  to  "Mr.  &  Mrs  Hard- 
ware User"  and  then  distributes  them  in  his  neighborhood. 

F.  R.  Jackson,  Toronto,  thought  if  the  retailer  would 
read  them  first  he  would  know  what  to  do  with  them. 

"How  much  should  a  dealer  pay  for  goods  he 
takes  out  of  stock  for  his  own  use?" 

Mr.  Gerry,  Fort  William,  said  to  charge  them  up  at 
wholesale  cost. 

Mr.  Morrison,  Toronto,  figured  that  as  he  charges  him- 
self a  salaiy  against  the  business  he  should  charge  retail 
prices. 

Mr.  Joy  asked  Mr.  Morrison  what  he  would  do  with  the 
sales  tax  in  such  a  charge. 

Albert  Wideman,  Markham,  charges  up  goods  taken  for 
personal  use  at  wholesale  prices.  He  also  allows  his  help 
to  buy  at  wholesale  costs. 

Nelson  Mills,  Hamilton,  charges  at  the  cost  laid  down. 
The  sales  tax  is  changing  business  conditions  and  we  have  to 
allow  for  this. 

Geo.  E.  May  said  in  selling  goods  to  help  in  his  store  he 
allowed  20  per  cent,  off  the  retail  price,  this  left  the  store 
about  10  per  cent,  for  handling  the  goods. 

"What  should  properly  he  included  in  overhead 
expense?" 

R.  Hawkins,  Smiths  Falls,  thought  every  expense  in- 
volved in  conducting  business  should  be  included  in  over- 
head— rent,  taxes,  insurance,  help  hire,  cartage  freight — in 
fact,  everything  outside  of  personal  expense  at  home. 

Mr.  Oldham,  Weston,  said  the  question  had  been  threshed 
out  by  other  associations  and  the  conclusion  arrived  at  was 
that  everything  should  be  included  in  overhead  after  the 
arrival  of  goods.  Transportation  was  included  in  the  cost  of 
the  goods. 

Mr.  Clarke,  Hamilton,  asked  if  charitable  contributions 
were  an  overhead  charge. 

Mr.  Hawkins  said  if  such  an  item  was  included  in  the 
cost  of  doing  business  the  tax  officials  would  not  allow  it. 

Messrs.  May  and  Smith  both  thought  such  an  item  should 
be  charged  to  advertising. 

Mr.  Creeper,  Owen  Sound— We  have  a  retail  bureau  of 
the  Owen  Sound  Board  of  Trade,  the  secretary  of  which  gives 
permission  before  any  charitably  disposed  persons  can  solicit 
for  help  in  that  town  either  in  the  way  of  ticket  selling  or 
soliciting  advertising.  This  bureau  has  saved  the  merchants 
of  Owen  Sound  hundreds  of  dollars  a  year.  We  have  a  card 
which  hangs  in  our  stores  and  on  which  it  states  that  no 
contributions  may  be  solicited  by  order  of  the  Board  of 
Trade  except  for  the  Y.M.C.A.,  the  Hospital,  or  the  Chil- 
dren's Shelter. 

Mr.  Mills — Here  in  Hamilton  the  Chamber  of  Commerce 
investigates  every  request  for  contributions  and  grants  a 
card  if  the  object  is  worthy.  It  is  then  up  to  us  to  contribute 
if  we  think  fit.  But  no  request  is  entertained  unless  the 
party  has  a  card  from  the  Chamber  of  Commerce.  As  to 
placing  such  a  contribution,  Mr.  Mills  thought  it  should  be 
charged  to  advertising,  as  it  was  given  because  of  publicity. 
Speaking  of  overhead,  he  said  there  were  wastes  about  a 
store  which  should  be  charged  against  overhead.  Everything 
that  costs  money  about  the  store  and  for  which  there  was 
no  return  should  be  charged  to  overhead.  It  is  the  leaks  that 
prevent  us  making  money. 

One  member  wanted  to  know  if  he  could  charge  last 
year's  income  tax  against  overhead. 

Mr.  Bartlett,  St.  Mary's,  as  well  as  Mr.  Mills  said  the 
Government  authorities  would  not  allow  this. 

"What  is  the  average  wage  paid  to  clerks,  tin- 
smiths and  plumbers;  and  have  any  dealers  reduced 
wages  as  yet?" 

F.  B.  Smith,  Belleville — As  to  tinsmiths  and  plumbers, 
the  pay  is  different  in  different  sections;  the  unions  recog- 
nize this,  and  the  wages  paid  are  what  custom  demands 
and  the  union  agrees. 

F.  R.  Jackson,  Toronto — When  wages  went  up,  instead  of 
increasing  our  clerks'  pay  we  adopted  the  bonus  system, 
paying  five  per  cent,  over  and  above  what  I  considered  was 
the  amount  of  business  we  would  ordinarily  do.  We  started 
this  in  1917,  agreeing  on  a  certain  figure.  This  has  helped 
solve  our  difficulty. 

Mr.  Gerry,  Fort  William,  believed  in  paying  a  straight, 


good  salary.  His  clerks  got  $35,  $30,  $28  and  $24.  The 
driver  got  $28,  and  he  was  worth  it.    He  had  tried  out  the 

J.  N.  McGregor,  Oakville,  said  that  with  tinsmiths  scarce, 
he  did  not  see  why  a  workshop  should  not  pay  if  properly 
five  per  cent,  bonus  scheme,  but  found  he  had  to  get  on  two 
more  clerks,  which  with  present  price  conditions,  he  found 
was  making  him  lose  out. 

A  clerk  in  the  convention  hall  told  of  getting  a  bonus 
last  year.  This  bonus  amounted  to  $300,  which  he  earned 
after  business  hours  by  boosting  his  sales  above  $35,000. 

Walter  Bell,  Beeton,  asked  the  clerk  to  tell  his  story. 

The  clerk  said  he  was  paid  a  straight  salary  and  was 
offered  a  bonus  of  two  per  cent,  on  all  sales  above  $35,000 
business.  He  had  earned  last  year  on  this  percentage  basis 
$339  by  selling  washing  machines  in  the  evening  after  busi- 
ness hours  in  calling  at  homes  in  his  town. 

The  chairman  thougM  this  plan  of  getting  our  clerks 
more  interested  on  our  business  would  solve  a  lot  of  our 
problems,  if  all  clerks  were  like  the  last  speaker.  This 
clerk's  plan  of  distributing  manufacturers'  literature  also 
showed  how  valuable  this  class  of  advertising  matter  could 
be  when  properly  placed. 

On  a  further  question  the  clerk  who  had  previously 
spoken  said  he  had  always  pushed  advertised  goods.  So 
successful  had  he  been  in  this  regard  that  he  had  got  five 
raises  in  three  years. 

Mr.  May  said  he  had  seven  on  his  staff — one  who  looked 
after  the  windows,  one  who  attended  to  deliveries,  the  others 
had  their  own  work  to  do.  The  head  clerk  looks  after  the 
store,  and  when  anything  goes  wrong  it  is  the  head  clerk 


W.  H.  BARTLETT  h.    N.  JOY 

St.  Mary's,  elected  as  member         West  Toronto,  Executive  Mem- 
of    O.E.H.A.    Executive.  ber  O.R.H.A.  and  President  of 

the    roroiiti;  Club. 


who  gets  the  calling  down.  As  a  consequence,  Mr.  May  did 
not  have  much  difficulty  with  his  staff — the  head  clerk  saw  to 
it  that  everything  ran  all  right. 

Mr.  May  had  tried  out  the  bonus  system,  but  not  with 
satisfactory  results. 

Mr.  Mills  had  a  staff  of  25.  Bonuses  were  paid,  like  the 
banks  do,  when  they  have  a  successful  year. 

Mr.  Joy  gave  his  experience  with  a  tinshop  in  connection 
with  a  hardware  store,  which  was  not  very  satisfactory.  He 
had  no  tinshop  now. 

"Has  anyone  definite  information  regai-ding  the 
workshop  in  connection  with  a  hardware  store? 
Does  it  pay?" 

Mr.  Christie,  Owen  Sound — We  have  a  workshop  in  con- 
nection with  our  store  and  it  pays.  We  have  a  system  which 
tells  us  at  the  end  of  the  day,  week  and  month,  whether  we 
are  making  or  loosing  money.  We  give  every  man  in  our 
workshop  a  book  in  which  he  enters  and  accounts  for  every 
hour  of  the  day,  and  on  these  entries  he  is  paid  his  wages. 

When  any  work  or  repair  job  is  going  through  the  shop 
a  tag  is  attached  and  on  this  tag  is  entered  the  time  con- 
sumed and  the  materials  used.  Our  books  show  us  whether 
or  not  a  man  is  paying  us  and  whether  he  should  be  kept 
on  our  staff. 

In  answer  to  a  question  from  the  body  of  the  hall,  Mr. 


20 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


March,  1922 


Christie  said  his  staff  was  from  four  to  ten  men,  according 
to  the  season  and  the  amount  of  work  on  hand. 

F.  B.  Smith,  Belleville,  has  a  tinshop,  but  it  is  not  paying 
as  yet.   He  was  glad  to  get  Mr.  Christie's  experience. 

Albert  Wideman,  Markham — We  have  a  shop  in  connec- 
tion with  our  business  and  it  pays.  Every  job  that  goes 
through  bears  its  own  share  of  cost  and  has  to  show  a  profit, 
handled.  He  employs  four  men,  and  his  shop  makes  a  better 
profit,  proportionately,  than  does  any  other  department  of 
his  business. 

Mr.  Christie  gave  his  experience  of  some  time  ago  looking 
into  leaks  about  his  business.  He  knew  his  hardware  sales, 
so  went  into  his  workshop.  We  should  not  guess  at  our 
charges;  we  should  know  our  costs.  The  only  way  to  do  this 
is  to  have  a  ticket  or  card  system. 

Mr.  Smith  asked  what  proportion  of  business  overhead 
was  charged  against  the  workshop. 

Mr.  Christie  figured  his  overhead  at  20%  per  cent.  He 
charged  two-thirds  of  this  against  the  hardware  shop  and 
one-third  against  the  workshop. 

R.  Hawkins,  Smiths  Falls,  said  he  also  had  some  tinshop 
experience.  He  had  found  it  hard  to  get  the  right  man  to 
take  charge  and  to  accept  responsibility.  If  there  was  a 
partner  in  the  business  one  could  then  look  after  the  work- 
shop. He  intended  trying  out  some  plan  similar  to  Mr. 
Christie's. 

A.  J.  Wright,  Hamilton,  believed  the  auto  repair  shop 
had  brought  out  a  new  system  with  its  time  card,  etc.,  which 
could  be  adopted  by  workshops. 

Mr.  Thomson,  Owen  Sound,  uses  the  Addison  price  system 
in  connection  with  his  plumbing  department.  This,  he 
found,  worked  out  well. 

"What  is  the  best  way  to  handle  slow  accounts 
without  offending  customers?" 

Mr.  Allin,  Lindsay,  said  customers  who  were  given  credit 
were  often  driven  away  from  the  store  because  they  owed 
accounts. 

Mr.  Joy,  Toronto,  thought  that  Mr.  Penberthy  answered 
this  question  in  his  address  of  the  day  before  when  he  said 
that  it  was  very  necessai-y  to  collect  outstanding  accounts 
as  quickly  as  possible,  for  customers  who  owe  money  to  mer- 
chants avoid  them  and  that  means  loss  of  custom  to  the  store. 

"What  is  the  average  percentage  of  loss  on  credit 
accounts?" 

Mr.  Smith,  Cornwall,  lost  very  little  until  last  year,  when, 
owing  to  the  failure  of  a  manufacturing  plant,  a  customer 
of  his,  he  lost  $1,600.  In  the  past  five  years  he  wrote  off 
(including  the  above  $1,600)  $2,100. 

He  incidentally  referred  to  his  method  of  collecting  where 
his  monthly  statements  did  not  seem  to  bring  any  results. 
He  added  the  amount  of  the  next  account  to  the  statement 
and  this  brought  in  the  delinquent  customer  to  call  attention 
to  the  error.  Mr.  Smith  then  said  he  was  sorry  and  would 
make  out  a  new  account  with  the  right  amount  "and  would 
he  receipt  it?" 

W.  H.  Bartlett,  St.  Mary's,  found  the  farmer  to  pay 
promptly  with  him.  Its  the  townsfolk  who  owe  me.  We 
put  in  accounts  on  the  first  of  every  month  to  all  who  owe  us 
money,  and  post  them  through  the  mails. 

Mr.  Barton,  Port  Arthur,  does  quite  a  credit  business. 
He  figured  his  loss  about  four  per  cent.  He  gives  five  per 
cent,  off  to  get  cash  sales.  His  losses  were  due  during  the 
war  years  to  enlistments,  and  some  to  industrial  depression, 
creditors  being  forced  to  leave  town  to  get  work  elsewhere. 
He  is  more  careful  now,  which  is  one  reason  why  he  is 
offering  the  inducement  for  cash  sales.  Plumbing  and  tin- 
smithing  brought  about  his  chief  losses. 

F.  B.  Smith,  Belleville,  uses  a  red  sticker  or  rather  series 
of  stickers  on  his  overdue  statements  going  out,  drawing 
attention  to  the  amount  of  the  account  and  the  date  of  its 
being  incurred. 

W.  F.  Macpherson  said  that  in  twenty  years  in  business, 
he  had  not  lost  $400.  Where  locality  is  good  and  attention 
is  given  to  business,  losses  should  not  amount  to  one  per  cent. 

Mr.  May  doesn't  do  a  credit  business,  and  never  lost 
over  one  per  cent. 

George  Mathewson,  Toronto,  said  his  losses  were  less  than 
one  per  cent.,  although  from  65  to  75  per  cent,  of  his  busi- 


ness was  on  credit.  He  allows  30  and  60  days'  credit  on 
some  accounts. 

"Have  any  members  successfully  turned  a  credit 

business  into  a  cash  business?" 

Mr.  Joy,  nine  years'  ago,  went  into  Northern  Ontario 
and  soon  found  that  mining  towns  were  the  worst  places  in 
the  world  to  give  chedit.  He  changed  from  credit  to  cash, 
sending  out  a  circular  giving  30  days'  notice  of  the  change, 
and  offering  five  per  cent,  off  for  cash  sales  after  that  date. 

Mr.  Allen,  Lindsay,  went  into  the  cash  business  on  Sep- 
tember 1  last.  Farmers  are  his  big  and  best  customers. 
He  had  been  considering  the  change  for  some  time,  but  was 
afraid  to  offend.  Taking  courage,  he  placed  half-page  ads 
in  nine  papers — two  locals,  the  others  in  surrounding  coun- 
try— telling  of  the  change  from  credit  to  cash.  He  also 
sent  out  circular  letters  to  all  customers  telling  of  the  new 
c.o.d.  plan  of  bringing  the  cash  store  to  the  customer's  door. 
As  a  result,  the  business  for  last  September  and  October 
was  double  that  of  the  same  months  the  previous  year. 

He  had  on  the  books  now  nearly  as  much  money  owing 
as  before,  but  the  number  of  accounts  had  been  greatly  cut 
down.  He  found  that  he  had  to  carry  painters,  contractors 
and  large  corporations  from  month  to  month.  When  chang- 
ing he  had  discounted  goods  10  per  cent,  to  introduce  cash 
sales. 

"In  changing  credit  to  cash  business  would  it  be 
advisable  to  allow  monthly  accounts  to  telephone  cus- 
tomers and  to  customers  who  are  building  or  paint- 
ing?" 

Geo.  E.  May,  Toronto,  said  he  did  a  telephone  order  busi- 
ness. He  used  to  put  these  on  the  books,  but  now  all  these 
sales  are  c.o.d.  Builders  and  painters  are  not  good  accounts 
with  him.  The  only  exception  he  makes  is  in  factory  ac- 
counts. 

"What  experience  have  dealers  present  had  in 
handling  auto  supplies,  tires,  etc.,  in  a  small  town? 
Do  they  find  it  profitable,  or  is  most  of  the  business 
going  to  garages?  If  hardware  dealers  get  bulk  of 
the  business,  how  do  they  do  it? 

One  small  town  dealer  said  he  had  to  give  quite  a  bit  of 


Si 


R.  HAWKINS  F.  B.  SMITH 

Smith's    Falls,    re-elected  an              Belleville,    elected  Vice  Presi- 

executive      member      of  the              dent  Ontario  Retail  Hardware 

O.R.H  .V.  Association 

credit  on  this  line.  There  are  three  garages  in  his  town> 
but  he  sells  just  as  much  as  they  do. 

Mr.  Gerry  was  just  starting  with  tires  and  auto  acces- 
sories.  He  couldn't  say  yet  whether  it  would  pay  or  not. 

Wm.  Kerr,  Dundas,  said  there  were  two  hardware  stores 
and  three  garages  in  his  town.  He  sells  as  much  auto  sup- 
plies as  the  three  garages  combined,  excepting  only  tires. 

K.  I.  Thomson,  Owen  Sound,  doesn't  handle  accessories, 
but  had  looked  into  the  question  of  tires  and  found  that  a 
certain  well  advertised  and  popular  make  was  not  sold  in 
his  town.  He  applied  for  and  got  the  agency  for  that  tire. 
He  doubled  that  tire's  business  in  his  vicinty  the  first  year 
and  doubled  the  first  year's  sales  the  second  year.  Only  a 
cash  business  is  done.  He  covers  a  radius  of  40  miles.  If 
he  gets  an  order  by  telephone  from  out-of-town,  he  gets  the 
tire  out  on  the  first  train.  He  handles  only  the  one  line  of 
tire,  and  has  not  gone  out  specially  after  the  business. 


March,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


21 


THE  CURE  FOR  "BUSINESS  DISEASE" 

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F.  J.  Penberthy,  Managing  Director,  Lowe  Bros.  Ltd.,  Toronto,  urges  Dealers  to  Develop  their 

Business  Intensively — More  Sales  the  Cure. 

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THERE  is  nothing  remarkable  about  the  period  of  busi- 
ness depression  which  we  have  passed  through.  The 
law  that  depression  follows  prosperity  would  seem  from 
past  experience  to  be  almost  as  inevitable  as  the  law  of 
gravity. 

The  really  remarkable  thing  about  hard  times  is  that  so 
few  of  us  realized  that  hard  times  were  bound  to  come  and 
made  provision  against  them.  That  very  lack  of  realization 
made  hard  times  harder;  made  recovery  more  difficult;  and 
made  them  last  longer  and  the  recovery  slower.  Gentlemen, 
the  term  "Lack  of  Realization"  covers  a  multitude  of  sins, 
and,  incidentally,  discloses  the  nature  of  my  address  and  the 
disease  in  question. 

If  the  observations  made  during  my  recent  travels  north, 
south,  east  and  west,  in  Canada  and  the  other  side  count 
for  anything.  If  the  analysis  that  I  have  made,  in  an 
effort  to  get  at  the  root  of  the  cause  of 
many  failures  and  near  failures,  has  any 
weight.  If  investigations  conducted  and 
statistics  recorded  by  the  foremost  busi- 
ness men  of  the  continent  are  at  all  ac- 
curate. If  the  statements  of  representa- 
tive hardware  merchants  themselves  are 
true,  and  they  are  true,  then  I  may  safely 
define  business  disease  as  a  complex  ail- 
ment of  the  mind,  having  for  its  constitu- 
tion a  combination  of  some  or  all  of  these 
oustanding  characteristics : 

Lack    of    understanding    of  business 
fundamentals — economic  and  other- 


Like  all  others 
has  its  symptoms, 
it  is  lack  of  faith 
There  seems  to  be 
that   the  way  to 


Lack  of  appreciation  of  the  possibili- 
ties of  the  goods  you  handle; 
Lack  of  concentration  or  division  of 

effort  and  indolence; 
Lack  of  knowledge; 
Guesswork. 

the  business  disease 
In  the  present  case 
and  lack  of  courage, 
an  irresistible  feeling 
business  salvation  is 
through  the  avenue  of  cheap,  and  neces- 
sarily undependable,  goods^ — <;utting  down 
of  expenses,  and  sitting  tight  until  busi- 
ness improves.  There  seems  to  be  an  in- 
clination to  follow  the  crowd  wherever  it 
leads — in  other  words,  an  inclination  to 
follow  the  line  of  least  resistance  and  it  is 
time  to  take  precaution  against  the  disease  that  is  sure  to 
follow  these  symptoms. 

Mistake  to  Duplicate  Lines 
I  speak  of  lack  of  faith,  lack  fo  courage,  desire  for  cheap 
goods,  cutting  down  expenses,  and  sitting  tight.  One  might 
have  faith  and  still  lack  the  courage  of  his  convictions.  If 
he  loses  a  sale,  on  account  of  price,  his  courage  fails  him, 
and  he  immediately  believes  that  it  is  necessary  for  him  to 
have  a  cheap  line  of  goods  as  well  as  quality  goods.  By  so 
doing  he  is  putting  himself  in  a  worse  position  than  he  was 
before.  He  is  investing  double  the  capital  in  order  to  make 
some  meagre  sales  and,  therefore,  his  profits  instead  of  being 
available  for  re-investment  and  turn-over  remain  on  his 
shelves. 

I  was  in  a  hardware  store  just  a  short  time  ago  and 
noticed  five  different  lines  of  floor  wax  and  four  different 
lines  of  brass  polishes  on  the  dealer's  shelves.  How  much 
floor  wax  and  how  much  brass  polish  will  that  man  have  to 
sell  before  the  working  capital  and  profit  which  remains  on 
his  selves  will  be  turned  into  an  actual  profit  for  re-invest- 
ment? 

The  cutting  down  of  unnecessary  expenses,  provided  they 
are  unnecessary,  is  to  be  commended,  but  great  care  should 
be  exercised  in  determining  just  what  expenses  are  unneces- 
sary, so  that  in  making  a  reduction  your  business  will  not 
suffer. 

In  our  business,  I  do  not  care  how  much  our  factory  wages 


F.  J.  PENBERTHY 
Toronto,    Vice    President  and 
General    Manager    Lowe  Bros. 
Lintiited 


are  in  dollars  and  cents,  nor  do  I  care  what  the  factory  ex- 
pense is.  In  our  overhead  I  care  nothing  about  what  the 
salesmen's  expenses  are,  nor  what  the  advertising  expense 
is,  nor  do  I  care  about  general  expense — including  interest, 
discount  nd  exchange,  clerk  hire,  stationery  and  other  in- 
cidentals— providing  none  of  these  exceed  their  proportion 
of  percentage.  And  the  only  way  that  that  percentage  can 
be  prportioned  is  for  us  to  sell  the  goods  to  make  the  per- 
centage proportionate. 

During  the  trying  months  of  October,  November  and  De- 
cember, we  ran  our  factory  full  time.  We  did  not  reduce 
the  wages  of  a  single  employee  in  our  factory  nor  in  our 
office.  We  had  confidence  in  our  ability  to  sell,  we  had  con- 
fidence in  our  dealers,  we  had  confidence  in  the  future  of 
Canada  and,  with  the  confidence  we  had,  we  went  ahead  and 
filled  our  warehouse  with  manufactured  goods  in  order  that 
the  purchasing  power  of  the  men  who 
served  us  faithfully  would  not  be  im- 
paired. The  result  has  been  very  gratify- 
ing. Our  men  made  the  goods;  our  pack- 
ing room  packed  the  goods;  our  salesmen 
have  sold  the  goods  and  at  the  closing  of 
our  five  months'  period  which  ended  Janu- 
ai-y  31st,  our  business  shows  a  very  satis- 
factory condition.  We  attribute  this  show- 
ing to  greater  activity,  which  I  am  going 
to  dwell  on  later  on. 

Our  overhead  expenses  as  shown  in  our 
books  in  dollars  and  cents  are  alarming, 
but  our  percentage  of  overhead  to  sales 
as  shown  in  our  selling  records  has  gone 
down  to  almost  where  it  should  be  and 
prospects  of  an  even  greater  reduction 
with  the  best  period  of  our  year — the 
Spring — still  before  us. 

More  Sales  is  the  Remedy 
You,  gentlemen,  should  be  iiLthe  same 
position.  You  are  entering  a  period  when 
your  expenses  will  be  corrected  in  propor- 
tion as  you  turn  over  your  merchandise. 
You  cannot  sit  in  your  store  wondering 
what  is  going  to  turn  up.  You've  got  to 
make  something  turn  up.  Sitting  around 
doing  nothing  will  not  pay  your  rent;  will 
not  pay  your  factory;  your  electric  light 
bill;  your  clerk  hire;  or  your  delivery. 
The  only  thing  that  will  pay  those  things 
is  profit.  The  only  way  to  make  profit  is 
sales;  the  only  way  to  make  sales  is  to 
apply  the  energy  that  God  gave  you  to  sell  something.  The 
inertia  displayed  by  some  clerks  and  even  proprietors  of 
retail  stores  is  absolutely  astonishing.  A  salesman  on  the 
road  would  starve  to  death  in  two  months  if  he  were  to  apply 
the  same  tactics  as  displayed  by  a  great  many  clerks  who 
are  drawing  fair  money  for  practically  driving  permanent 
custom  away  from  the  store. 

I  have  given  you,  gentlemen,  our  OAvn  experience  in  cop- 
ing with  and  overcoming  the  tendencies  to  business  stagna- 
tion, and  I  have  tried  to  show  you  that  in  the  Isat  analysis, 
whether  or  not  your  business  is  prosperous  depends  absolutely 
on  your  volume  of  sales.  I  have  tried  to  more  firmly  establish 
the  proposition  already  conceded  generally  that  MORE 
SALES  is  the  cure  for  all  negative  business  tendencies. 

With  these  generally  acknowledged  facts  before  us  we 
must  conclude  that  the  only  corrective  for  slumps,  depres- 
sions, etc.,  summed  up  in  two  words  is  MORE  SALES.  That 
is  the  antidote  for  a  rising  overhead.  That  is  the  counterac- 
tion for  the  growing  pains  of  expenses,  which,  the  less  we 
sell,  is  the  more  acute,  and,  that  is  the  way  to  beat  the  law, 
which  exacts  a  fearful  toll  for  inactviity,  be  it  forced  or 
characteristic. 

It  cannot  be  gainsaid  that  there  are  rare  circumstances 
which  temporarily  cripple  the  hardware  business.  No  one 
better  appreciates  than  I  the  immediate  depression  which 
follows  the  closing  down  of  a  large  industry  on  which  the 
community  depends  for  its  purchasing  power.    In  these  cir- 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


Marcn,  1922 


cumstances  there  is  much  to  be  considered,  and  I  would  not 
be  sincere,  nor  would  it  be  logical  for  me  to  state  that  the 
activity  which  we  are  agreed  is  the  cure  for  the  busniess  dis- 
ease would  change  such  a  condition  overnight  to  one  of  pros- 
perity. But,  gentlemen,  we  are  not  all  doing  business  in 
communities  of  this  nature,  and  to  those  even  who  ai-e  so 
situated  a  great  deal  can  be  done  through  concentrated  and 
intelligent  sales  effort  to  greatly  improve  these  negative  busi- 
ness conditions.  There  are  always  men  in  your  community 
who  have  money — there  are  doctors,  lawyers,  dentists,  railway 
employees,  barbers,  butchers,  etc.,  who  through  direct  solici- 
tation, aggressiveness  and  service  could  be  attracted  to  your 
place  of  business.  There  are  tovms  within  the  Dominion 
which,  through  the  closing  down  of  a  key  industry,  might  be 
termed  unfortunate,  but  not  more  so  than  the  man  who  helps 
heap  niisfoi-tune  on  the  community  and  himself  by  figura- 
tively pulling  the  blinds  and  waiting  for  business  to  improve. 

Originality  Needed 

We  are  passing  through  a  period  when  originality  of 
thought  and  action  will  prove  of  far  more  benefit  than  fol- 
lowing the  lead  of  others.  At  no  other  time  in  the  history 
of  business  has  the  law  of  the  survival  of  the  fittest  so  re- 
lentlessly demanded  its  pound  of  flesh  as  it  does  at  the  pres- 
ent. It  is  up  to  us  as  individuals  to  devise  ways  and  means 
which  will  best  enable  us  to  grapple  with  those  problems 
peculiar  to  our  respective  communities  and,  in  order  to  do 
this,  we  must  put  on  our  "thinking  caps"  and  act  produc- 
tively. 

Systematic  and  intelligent  thought  applied  to  our  business 
will  reveal  the  fact  that  our  different  paths  are  intersected 
with  periods  of  opportunity.  These  opportunities  taken  in 
the  light  of  present  day  conditions  can  be  best  grasped  by 
personal  dealings.  Narrow-minded  and  stereotyped  examples 
will  not  assist  us  to  the  end  in  view.  It  will  take  that 
individual  action  which  is  the  result  of  business  acumen  and 
personal  study  of  the  situation.  It  is  necessary,  therefore, 
for  us  to  devote  more  thought  and  more  productive  energy 
to  our  business.  The  most  experienced  counsel  can  only  advise 
us  according  to  his  own  state,  while  we  with  the  close  knowl- 
edge of  the  conditions  which  surround  us  can — if  we  will — 
proceed  intelligently  and  independently  towards  that  success 
which  may  only  be  achieved  by  personal  initiative  and  effort. 

To  wait  for  things  to  improve  is  nothing  short  of  disas- 
trous to  your  business.  There  never  was  a  time  when  intelli- 
gent action  was  calculated  to  produce  such  marked  beneficial 
effects.  Mr.  Nelson  Mills,  your  president,  told  me  some  time 
ago  that  it  was  his  intention  to  leave  his  office  and  go  behind 
the  counter  so  that  he  could  meet  his  customers;  know  what 
they  expected  and  how  best  to  serve  them;  so  that  he  could 
keep  in  close  touch  with  his  clerks  with  a  view  to  increasing 
their  sales  efficiency;  so  that  he  could  stimulate  the  enthusi- 
asm necessary  to  service  and  selling,  and  so  that  out  of  his 
action  would  arise  that  keen  competition  among  his  clerks 
that  is  conducive  to  the  highest  type  of  business  ability. 

And  why?  Simply  because  Nelson  Mills  has  realized 
that  conditions  call  for  different  treatment;  analyzed  the 
proposition,  and  appreciates  that  for  every  action  there  is  a 
reaction,  that  with  increased  effort  he  is  bound  to  have  in- 
creased sales.  Nelson  Mills  is  personally  going  to  take  a 
hand  in  steering  his  ship  through  a  choppy  sea  to  calmer 
waters,  because  he  is  satisfied  that  to  help  business  condi- 
tions as  affecting  his  store  more  thought  and  greater  effort 
is  required.  In  a  word,  he  believes  that  prevention  is  better 
than  ciire,  and  he  is  taking  the  necessary  precautions  against 
the  business  disease. 

Gentlemen,  we  need  more  of  that  spirit.  It  is  the  only 
cure  for  the  incipient  business  disease.  I  have  not  the  words 
in  my  vocabulary  to  impress  you  with  the  necessity  of  activ- 
ity during  the  next  twelve  months.  We  have  only  a  short 
period  to  go  through  where  this  activity  is  really  necessary, 
and  if  we  have  desire  enough  we  will  have  courage  enough  to 
provide  sufficient  energy  to  cany  us  through  that  shoi't  period 
and,  by  the  momentum  it  will  have  gained,  for  several  years 
after  that. 

Alake  Sales  by  Suggestion 

Much  has  already  been  written  and  spoken  about  the 
value  of  suggestion  in  selling  and,  while  no  retail  merchant 
whom  I  have  met  has  thought  contrarily,  yet  there  is  a  de- 
plorable lack  of  appreciation  of  this  valuable  method  of 
increasing  sales — perhaps  becau.se  of  its  simplicity,  perhaps 
because  the  suggestion  is  not  clothed  in  scientific,  brainrack- 
ing  terms,  which  seem  to  appeal  to  human  nature. 

In  my  home  a  short  time  ago  I  had  occasion  to  go  to  the 
flour  bin,  in  which  I  found  an  old  broken  cup  which,  when 
I  attempted  to  use,  scattered  the  flour  all  over  the  kitchen. 


I  inquired  of  the  general  manager  of  our  culinary  department 
(my  wife)  if  tl»at  was  the  best  utensil  she  had  for  the  pur- 
pose, and,  upon  being  informed  that  it  was,  I  immediately 
set  out  to  buy  a  flour  scoop.  How  many  hardware  stores  I 
entered  would  be  hard  to  say.  Suffice  it  that  I  quit  when  I 
got  tired  and  there  was  not  to  be  had  in  the  whole  neighbor- 
hood. Now  I  presume,  reasonably,  that  there  are  hundreds 
of  families  in  that  vicinity  who  would  be  very  glad  to  buy  a 
small  fifteen-cent  flour  scoop  if  someone  would  ask  them  to — 
if  someone  would  show  one  to_^  the  prospective  customer — if 
someone  would  only  suggest  that  it  was  so  much  more  handy 
and  inexpensive  than  a  cup. 

Times  out  of  number  Mrs.  Penberthy  has  asked  me  to  buy 
a  flashlight  for  the  house.  We  haven't  one  yet.  The  reason 
is  that  on  every  occasion  that  I  have  visited  a  hardware  store 
it  has  been  for  something  of  a  totally  different  nature  and  I 
have  never  thought  of  a  flashlight.  Probably  all  of  you  sell 
fuses.  Did  it  ever  occur  to  you  how  handy  a  flashlight  is 
when  putting  in  a  fuse?  Had  someone  called  my  attention  to 
flashlights  when  I  was  buying  fuses  he  would  have  made  a 
very  easy  sale. 

So  much  for  the  part  that  suggestion  plays  in  creating 
sales  and  as  a  cure  for  the  business  disease.    Here  are  two 
instances  of  two  transgressions  of  the  laws  of  salesmanhip. 
How  Sales  are  Lost 

A  short  time  ago  an  industrial  institution  in  a  small  town 
in  the  vicinity  of  Toronto  wrote  to  us  asking  if  we  would 
supply  them  with  some  of  our  goods  to  finish  a  job  they  had 
started.  We  referred  them  to  our  agent  in  their  town  and 
the  industrial  people  wrote  back  stating  that  our  agent  did 
not  carry  Lowe  Brothers'  flat  wall  paint,  he  only  carried 
varnish  stain.  We  wrote  again,  stating  that  we  were  sure 
our  agent  would  order  whatever  they  wanted,  but,  if  he  was 
not  disposed  to,  the  goods  could  be  procured  at  a  certain 
store  on  the  outskirts  of  Toronto.  This  man  drove  eleven 
miles  and  placed  an  order  for  $30  worth  of  our  material  with 
a  Toronto  merchant,  and  the  merchant  in  the  smaller  town 
wonders  why  business  is  so  bad! 

In  the  city  a  short  time  ago  we  had  a  call  from  a  pros- 
pective purchaser  of  our  products.  We  referred  him  to  our 
agent,  who  was  less  than  fifteen  minutes'  distance  from  our 
factory.  During  the  day  there  were  three  different  people 
referred  to  that  store,  and  were  turned  away  because  the  mer- 
chant did  not  carry  the  products  they  wanted.  In  other 
words,  he  was  not  sufficiently  interested  in  his  business  to 
go  to  the  telephone  and  order  his  customers'  requirements  to 
be  sent  direct.  He  lost  probably  $15,  possibly  $100,  by  his 
indifference,  and  he  would  consider  us  hard  if  we  pressed 
him  for  his  bill. 

Manufacturers  have  spent  thousands  of  dollars  in  organ- 
izing a  service  department,  or,  where  there  is  not  a  service 
department,  dealer  helps,  with  the  desire  to  co-operate  with 
the  dealers  in  increasing  their  sales.  Our  experience  has 
been  that  only  a  small  prcentage  of  the  dealers  use  the  sales' 
helps  at  their  disposal  or 'even  try  to  interest  their  clerks  in 
the  use  of  such  assistance.  It  is  significant,  however,  that 
those  who  do  use  it  are  usually  the  most  progressive  and 
prosperous  merchants. 

In  the  seeking  of  MORE  SALES,  gentlemen,  the  applica- 
tion of  every  possible  honest  means  to  create  sales  is  the 
answer  to  your  problems,  not  only  these  particular  months  of 
uncertainty,  but  any  others  that  might  come  within  your 
future  experience.  It  is  the  one  dependable  formula,  the  one 
antidote  to  all  your  business  diseases.  Mor  thought,  more 
activity,  MORE  SALES. 

Do  Not  Neglect  Collections 

There  is  one  more  caution,  gentlemen,  that  I  would  like 
to  give  and  that  concerns  collections.  A  letter  came  to  my 
desk  a  few  days  ago  from  a  small  account  in  as  small  a 
village.  His  account  is  long  overdue  and  he  has  written  us 
asking  for  an  extension.  'The  letter  is  a  very  fearful  one. 
He  is  doubtful  as  to  when  he  will  be  able  to  pay  his  account 
and  it  is  evident,  if  you  read  between  the  lines,  that  he  is 
much  disturbed  over  his  financial  condition. 

He  mentions  that  he  has  outstanding  several  thousand 
dollars  in  a  community  of  three  or  four  hundred.  Plainly, 
his  store  has  been  affected  by  the  business  disease.  The  man 
has  been  waiting  for  business  to  improve  and  he  has  become 
so  used  to  waiting  that  the  same  inertia  is  applied  to  the 
collection  of  his  accounts.  His  lack  of  foresight  has  placed 
him  in  financial  quicksand  from  which  he  is  going  to  find  it 
very  difficult  to  extricate  himself.  Of  this  unfortunate  indi- 
vidual we  will  say  no  more.  You  will  draw  your  own  con- 
clusions. He  is  but  representative  of  hundreds  of  i-etail 
merchants  throughout  the  Dominion  of  Canada. 


March,  1922 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


23 


I  do  wish,  however,  to  suggest  a  few  thoughts  that  might 
be  of  immediate  value  to  you.  Indiscriminate  credit  is  one 
of  the  most  disastrous  things  a  merchant  can  permit.  It  is 
human  nature  for  the  man  who  owes  you  to  avoid  you,  even 
though  he  may  be  an  honest  man.  It  is  human  nature  for 
the  man  to  withhold  payment  longer,  the  greater  the  debt. 
If  John  Smith  owes  you  $10  and  has  been  your  debtor  for 
three  months,  John  Smith  knows  that  you  expect  the  money. 
If  he  needs  a  wrench  he  will  go  to  your  competitor,  for  he 
does  not  want  to  meet  you. 

Mrs.  Smith  owes  you  for  a  casserole.  That  is  nothing, 
she  will  pay  you  the  next  time  she  calls  at  your  store.  But, 
she  does  not  call  for  a  month  or  two,  during  which  time  she 
has  bought  on  credit  another  $15  worth  of  merchandise — she 
now  owes  you  $30.  Thirty  dollars  is  something  and  she  is 
waiting  for  thing  s  to  improve — for  her  husband  to  get  a 
raise  or  for  the  chickens  to  multiply  before  you  get  yours. 
Waiting!  Waiting  is  synonymous  with  disintegration,  with 
atrophy.  If  your  customers  all  wait  and  you  wait  with  them, 
and  we  wait  with  you,  all  three  eventually  are  broken.  If 
they  cannot  pay  their  bills  you  cannot  run  your  business.  If 
you  cannot  conduct  your  business  we  fail.  If  we  fail  Mrs. 
Smith's  husband  is  out  of  a  job  and  we  have  a  depression. 

Gentlemen,  activity  applied  to  the  collection  of  your  out- 
standing accounts  is  as  necessary,  if  not  more  necessary,  than 
the  consideration  of  activity  as  applied  to  your  sales.  Less 
waiting  on  the  part  of  the  individual  and  more  activity  in 
selling  and  collecting  the  money  for  what  you  do  sell  is  the 
simple  formula  I  have  to  suggest. 

Cheap  Goods  a  Poor  Investment 

Summarily,  the  progressive  merchant  has  been  startled 
into  consciousness  of  the  fact  that  stagnation  is  the  worst 
enemy  of  business  progress,  and  it  is  infinitely  better  to  clear 
his  shelves  of  slow  moving  or  stagnant  stock  at  cost,  or  less 
than  cost  if  needs  be,  than  to  have  his  investment  tied  up 
and  daily  depreciating  with  the  stock  so  represented. 

This  awakening,  if  it  may  be  so  termed,  augurs  well  for 
the  prosperity  of  the  individual  and  the  community  at  large, 
since  on  business  activity  and  the  ability  to  keep  in  circula- 
tion the  commodities  of  life  virtually  hangs  the  economic  fate 
of  the  nation — not  to  speak  of  the  individual. 

The  cure  for  an  ailing  business  is  not  cheap  goods  which, 
being  cheap,  are  undependable  and  calculated  to  impair  your 
business  progress.  Cheap  goods  are  a  poor  investment  not 
only  from  the  standpoint  of  future  considerations,  but  from 
the  immediate  standpoint  of  percentage  of  profit.  I  would 
be  glad  if  I  had  time  to  prove  this  to  you. 

Cutting  down  your  expense  by  laying  off  hands  or  those 
agencies  which  are  instrumental  in  the  process  of  selling  is 
no  better  cure.    Doing  what  the  other  fellow  does  is  worse. 
You  need  everybody  who  and  everything  which  can  assist  you 
to  the  end  in  view — MORE  SALES.    The  more  you  enjoy, 
automatically,  the  less  your  overhead.    The  less  your  over- 
head  compared  with   a   satisfactory  volume  of  sales,  the 
healthier  your  business.    Let  us  rouse  ourselves  from  the 
lethargy  which  has  been  responsible  for  a  great  deal  of  this 
business  stagnation,  this  business  depression,  spend  some  ana- 
lytic and  constructive  thought  on  our  requirements,  enlist 
the  co-operation  of  all  who  can  help  us — particularly  our 
clerks  and  our  suppliers — and  let  us 
Buy  discriminately. 
Sell  enthusiastically, 
Collect  aggressively, 
and  prepare  to  ward  off  or  cure  the  business  disease  and  make 
1922  our  greatest  selling  year. 

Mr.  Penberthy,  to  drive  home  one  of  the  points  made  in 
his  discourse — that  in  regard  to  sales  suggestions — sent  a 
messenger  across  the  road  from  the  convention  hall  to  a  hard- 
ware store.  The  messenger  asked  for  a  set  of  hinges  for  a 
new  stonn  door.  The  clerk  in  the  store  supplied  his  wants 
and  asked  'Anything  else?"    "No,  sir,"  said  the  messenger. 

Now,  said  Mr.  Penberthy,  if  the  clerk  had  said  you  want 
a  thumb  latch  and  the  other  necessary  articles  for  that  new 
storm  door,  he  might  have  made  a  bigger  sale,  because  we 
do  want  those  other  things.  All  we  have  now  is  the  storm 
door  and  a  set  of  hinges.  That  clerk,  because  of  his  lack 
of  suggestion,  lost  two-thirds  of  a  possible  sale. 

Another  instance  cited  by  Mr.  Penberthy  was  that  of  a 
lady  who  called  at  a  hardware  store  for  a  tin  of  linoleum 
varnish.  By  judicious  questioning  the  dealer  found  out  that 
the  lady  had  got  some  new  linoleum  for  her  kitchen.  He 
suggested  brightening  up  the  woodwork  and  sold  some  dark 


oak  varnish;  suggested  a  brush,  and  sold  that.  That  dealer 
increased  a  30-cent  sale  to  a  dollar  sale. 

Mr.  Penberthy  knew  there  was  great  possibilities  in  the 
power  of  suggestion  because  in  his  own  home  he  does  not  own 
a  tack  hammer.  He  has  been  times  without  number  in  a 
hardware  store,  but  no  hardwareman  yet  has  suggested  a 
tack  hammer  to  him.   If  he  had  he  would  make  a  sale. 

British  Columbia  Hardware 
Convention 

The  Largest  gathering  yet  held  in  Pacific  Province — 
New  officers  elected — Interesting  program. 

THE  annual  convention  of  the  B.C.  Hardware  Club,  held 
at  Vancouver  on  February  1,  1922,  was  the  largest  con- 
vention yet  convened  in  British  Columbia.  Victoria  had 
a  particularly  large  delegation,  and  representatives  were  pres- 
ent from  nearly  all  the  larger  centres  of  British  Columbia. 

Various  committees  of  the  Club  presented  reports  on  their 
activities  during  the  past  year,  and  the  president,  secretary 
and  treasurer's  reports  were  read  and  adopted.  All  of  these 
reports  showed  the  Club  to  be  in  an  extremely  prosperous 
condition,  both  as  to  membership  and  finance,  and  they  were 
all  optimistic  in  their  tone  as  to  the  business  done  in  1921 
and  the  probabilities  for  1922.  The  election  of  officers  re- 
sulted as  follows: 

Honorary  president,  A.  Peterson,  Cowichan  Merchants, 
Ltd.,  Duncans;  Honorary  President,  A.  McPhail,  McPhail- 
Smith  Hardware  Co.,  Armstrong;  president,  T.  H.  Latimer, 
Latimer  &  Sons,  Vancouver;  first  vice-president,  G.  Keams, 
manager  retail  department  of  Martin,  Finlayson  &  Mather, 
Vancouver;  second  vice-president,  W.  H.  Hudson,  hardware 
merchant,  Vancouver;  treasurer,  W.  C.  Stearman,  hardware 
merchant,  Vancouver;  secretary,  R.  A.  Ogilvie,  Vancouver. 

R.  R.  Taylor,  president  of  the  Victoria  Hardware  Club, 
extended  an  invitation  to  the  members  of  the  Club  to  be  their 
guests  at  a  get-together  meeting  in  Victoria  on  June  14,  1922. 
His  invitation  was  received  with  great  applause  by  the 
assembled  delegates,  as  the  Victoria  members  are  noted  for 
their  generous  hospitality. 

At  the  afternoon  session  addresses  on  topics  of  interest  to 
the  trade  were  delivered  by  Frank  Parsons,  of  the  Gregory 
Tire  Company,  on  the  campaign  for  "Made  in  B.C.  Products" ; 
C.  P.  W.  Schwengers,  managing  director  of  E.  G.  Prior  & 
Co.,  Victoria,  on  "Future  Business,"  and  by  E.  Munton,  vice- 
president  of  the  Canadian  Credit  Men's  Association  on  "Cre- 
dits as  they  affected  the  Retail  Trade."  W.  C.  Stearman  also 
presented  an  instructive  paper  on  "The  Advantages  to  the 
Hardware  Dealer  of  taking  cash  discounts." 

In  the  evening  a  banquet  and  dance  was  held  in  the  large 
ballroom  at  the  Hotel  Vancouver.  About  four  hundred  and 
fifty  delegates  and  friends  were  present  and  singing  and 
dancing  was  indulged  in  until  midnight.  The  community 
singing,  under  the  leadership  of  W.  G.  Chester,  was  a  fea- 
ture of  the  evening,  and  all  of  the  songs  were  rendered  with 
great  vigor  and  in  splendid  style. 

=Mllilimi>lllliillliilliiiiliiiimillllii  iiiHiiiiiiititiiiiiitiiimiiinniittmniiiimii  iniiii  i  I'ti  ujiiiiiiniiiiiri  iiiimiiiti  iiiiiiiiiiiiniiiii| 

HARDWARE  BUSINESS  WANTED 

f  The  Editor  of  Hardware  and  Accessories  | 

1  would  like  to  get  in  touch  with  hardware  deal-  [ 

i  ers  in  live  Western  Ontario  towns  of  3,000  [ 

I  population  and  over,  or  in  cities,  who  wish  to  | 

i  dispose  of  their  businesses.    Information  to  be  i 

1  supplied  as  follows  and  treated  as  strictly  j 

1  confidential:  | 

f  Amount  of  stock  carried.  1 

1  Turnover,  1919,  1920,  1921.  I 

1  Expense,  1919,  1920,  1921.  1 

I  Net  profit,  1919,  1920,  1921.  j 

I  Rental  paid  for  store,  or  if  owned.  i 

I  Rental  required  from  purchaser  of  stock.  | 

I         Infor-mation  desired  as  soon  as  possible.  | 


24 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


March,  1922 


MUTUAL  FIRE  INSURANCE  A  BIG  SUCCESS 

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C.  L  Clarke,  Manager  Canadian  Hardware  and  Implement  Underwriters,  Winnipeg,  tells  of  the 
Large  Dividends  Rebated  to  Hardware  Merchants  and  Large  Accumulated  Reserves. 

IIIMIIIIIIIIIl  liniMIIMINIIMIIIMMIIIIinilMIMIMIIIIIIIIIMIinilMIIMMMMIIMMMMIIIIIinilllllMIIIIIMIIMIMIMIMIIMIMMIIIIIMIIIIIMMMMIMIinilMIIMIMMMMIIMII^  llllll>:IIM|l"lllllllll  II.IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIfJIMIIIIIIIIIinillJIIIIIIIUIIn 


THE  formal  introduction  of  a  representative  of  the  Hard- 
ware Mutuals  is  hardly  necessary  as  so  many  of  you 
have  our  calling  cards  in  the  shape  of  policies.  It  seems 
to  me,  such  being  the  case,  we  can  plunge  immediately  into 
our  discussion  of  Hardware  Mutual  Fire  Insurance. 

In  the  first  place,  gentlemen,  why  was  it  necessary  to 
organize  a  mutual  company  for  hardwaremen?  Twenty 
years'  ago  there  were  scores  of  stock  companies  ready  and 
willing  to  do  business  with  the  hardwaremen.  In  fact,  these 
same  stock  companies  were  donig  business  with  the  hard- 
waremen and  of  this  fact  none  wei'e  better  aware  than  the 
dealers  themselves,  for  they  were  the  ones  who  made  out  the 
cheques  in  payment  of  the  premiums.  The  only  drawback 
to  the  stock  companies  system  was  that  the  hardware  men 
knew  they  were  being  charged  too  much  for  their  fire  in- 
surance protection.  The  rates  were  out  of  proportion  and 
more  than  the  business  warranted.  The  result  was  inevitable 
and  is  now  insurance  history.  Nine  hardware  men  of  Min- 
nesota got  together  in  1899,  guaranteed  the 
necessary  S20,000  to  obtain  Articles  of  Asso- 
ciation from  the  State  and  in  1900  the  first 
policy  issued  by  a  hardware  mutual  was 
issued  by  the  Retail  Hardware  Mutual  of 
Minneapolis. 

You  have  already  been  appraised  of  the 
success  of  this  company;  how  the  members 
agreed  to  pay  board  rates  and  take  back  at 
the  end  of  the  year  whatever  saving  was 
made;  how  at  the  end  of  the  first  year  a 
dividend  of  25  per  cent,  was  declared;  how 
that  dividend  was  gradually  increased  until 
in  1908  the  company  was  paying  a  dividend 
of  50  per  cent,  and  has  continued  to  pay  the 
same  dividend  every  year  since.  Also  you 
know  that  a  similar  organization  was 
launched  in  Wisconsin  in  1903  and  that  in 
1908  this  company  paid  a  dividend  of  50  per 
cent.,  which  it  continued  unfailingly  to  do 
every  year  since.  In  1907  the  organized  im- 
plement dealers  of  Minnesota  made  the  Min- 
nesota Implement  Mutual  their  oflScial  com- 
pany and  in  1913  this  company  started  to  pay 
a  dividend  of  50  per  cent.  These  companies 
are  the  ones  that  have  extended  their  facili- 
ties to  you  hardwaremen  and  I  am  firmly 
convinced  that  you  have  the  foresight  of  the 
early  members  to  thank  for  the  financial 
strength  of  to-day.  These  members  could  have  taken  larger 
dividends  years  ago  but  they  started  out  to  make  their  com- 
panies leaders  in  the  field  and  this  they  have  certainly  done. 

Financial  Backing 

It  is  not,  however,  the  savings  which  these  companies 
make  for  you  that  I  want  to  particularly  emphasize.  It  is 
the  financial  backing  of  the  companies  and  the  deductions 
to  be  drawn  from  their  success.  Is  it  not  remarkable  that 
these  three  companies  in  addition  to  returning  such  large 
dividends,  have  accumulated  a  reinsurance  reserve  of 
$2,251,000,  and  a  surplus  sufficiently  large  to  guarantee  the 
safety  of  the  companies  and  the  prompt  payment  of  losses. 
The  companies  started  from  nothing  and  in  the  short  space 
of  twenty  years  have  accumulated  as.sets  of  over  $4,000,000 
and  a  net  cash  surplus  of  over  $2,000,000.  After  all,  you 
buy  insurance  for  protection  and  safety  is  the  first  considera- 
tion, saving  the  next.  The  net  cash  surplus  of  an  organiza- 
tion is  its  strength,  for  that  is  what  it  must  fall  back  upon 
if  losses  are  abnormal.  By  charging,  therefore,  the  same 
premiums  as  board  companies  and  returning  a  dividend  of 
50  per  cent,  at  expiration  of  the  policy,  we  have  a  surplus 
which  belongs  to  our  policy  holders  of  two  millions  over  and 
above  all  liabilities.  Where  would  that  two  millions  of  sur- 
plus be  to-day  were  it  not  for  the  Hardware  and  Implement 
Mutuals?  Why,  in  the  coffers  of  the  stock  companies  to  be 
sure,  instead  of  belonging  prportionately  to  each  and  every 
policy  holder.  Hence,  deduction  number  one — ^board  rates 
on  hardware  stores  are  still  too  high. 


Please  do  not  misunderstand  me  in  my  references  to  the 
stock  companies.  It  is  necessary  that  I  refer  to  them  for  the 
purpose  of  comparison  for  we  are  using  their  figures  as  a 
basis  to  work.  Their  aim  is  to  maintain  excessive  rates,  ours 
is  to  reduce  the  net  cost  for  you.  They  want  you  to  help  pay 
for  losses  on  more  hazardous  risks.  In  support  of  the  latter 
statement  I  would  call  your  attention  to  the  recent  order  of 
the  Superintendent  of  Insurance  of  the  State  of  Kansas  to 
the  eff'ect  that  the  various  classes  should  pay  their  own  way 
and  that  one  profitable  class  should  not  be  called  upon  to  pay 
for  the  losses  of  classes  which  have  shown  a  high  loss  ratio. 
Kansas  ordered  increases  of  40  per  cent,  on  steam  railway 
properties,  from  50  to  75  per  cent,  on  automobile  business, 
15  per  cent,  on  mining  and  oil  properties  and  20  per  cent,  on 
crop  insurance.  They  ordered  a  decrease  of  20  per  cent,  on 
mercantile  business  which  is  the  hardwaremen  class.  We 
commend  the  Kansas  department  for  its  action,  but  really, 
gentlemen,  it  is  20  years  behind  the  idea  of  the  Hardware 
Mutuals  and  their  slogan  "Hardware  Insur- 
ance for  the  Hardwareman."  Then  again  we 
have  the  order  of  the  Missouri  department 
ordering  decreases  averaging  15  per  cent,  on 
all  classes.  Nearer  home  we  have  the  On- 
tario department  hot  and  heavy  after  the 
board  companies  demanding  that  they  reduce 
the  cost  of  acquiring  business  with  propor- 
tionate decreases  to  the  purchaser.  Do  these 
eruptions  in  the  business  world  mean  noth- 
ing to  you?  Can  you  not  see  the  reaction 
against  stock  company  control?  I  wish  I 
had  the  time  to  draw  back  the  curtain  and 
display  the  machinations  of  the  stock  com- 
panies. How  at  every  turn  in  the  road  they 
are  trying  to  block  the  irresistable  advance 
of  the  mutuals  not  only  by  vile  propaganda, 
but  by  lobbying  legislation.  What  a  howl 
went  up  from  their  camp  when  a  mutual  man 
was  put  at  the  head  of  the  newly  created 
insurance  division  of  the  United  States 
Chamber  of  Commerce.  Figures  were  hastily 
prepared  by  them  in  an  endeavor  to  show 
that  the  premium  income  of  the  mutuals  was 
so  small  as  not  to  warrant  the  elevation  of 
one  of  their  men  to  a  position  of  this  im- 
portance. Think  of  it!  The  mutuals  were 
very  glad  to  show  their  real  strength  and 
herein  lies  food  for  considerable  thought. 
The  mutual  man  stayed  at  the  head  of  the  insurance  division. 

The  old  order  must  change.  While  other  companies 
have  been  bewailing  the  loss  of  premiums  our  companies  have 
been  experiencing  an  increase  of  business.  Any  company 
which  held  its  own  last  year  as  far  as  premium  income  is 
concerned  did  remarkbly  well.  I  am  glad  to  say  to  you  that 
our  companies  made  an  increase  in  premium  receipts  last 
year  of  approximately  $400,000.  Why  was  it?  Simply  be- 
cause the  dealer  is  looking  closer  into  his  personal  economics 
at  this  time  than  ever  before.  Conditions  compel  him  to  do 
so.  If  he  can  reduce  his  fire  insurance  ovei'head  by  50  per 
cent,  why  on  earth  should  not  that  be  the  first  reduction  in 
his  general  overhead.  Many  of  our  policy  holders  reduced 
their  insurance  on  account  of  decreased  values.  This  de- 
crease was  recovered  and  some  added  by  placing  on  our  books 
dealers  who  during  the  war  were  content  to  let  well  enough 
alone.  But  necessity  has  forced  them  to  decrease  running 
expenses  and  our  companies  have  thereby  profited. 

Loss  Ratio  on  Half  of  Stock  Companies 

The  question  is  often  asked  after  we  have  presented  the 
results  of  a  year's  operations — How  do  you  do  it?  There  are 
a  number  of  courses  we  pursue  in  order  to  save  you  50  per 
cent.  Probably  the  greatest  is  the  question  of  losses  and  the 
next  that  of  expense.  I  can  only  say  with  reference  to  the 
loss  ratio,  that  deduction  number  one  becomes  again  deduc- 
tion number  two — the  board  rates  are  too  high.  Year  after 
year  our  loss  ratio  is  about  one-half  that  of  stock  companies. 
Take  our  Canadian  experience  for  1921  as  an  example.  The 


C.  h.  CLARKE, 
Winnipeg,    Manager  Canadian 
Hardware       and  Implement 
Underwriters 


March.  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


25 


estimated  loss  ratio  for  all  companies  in  Canada  for  the 
year  1921  is  65  per  cent.  Our  loss  ratio  on  Canadian  busi- 
ness was  30  per  cent.  The  estimated  expense  ratio  for  all 
companies  in  the  United  States  and  Canada  is  45  per  cent, 
yet  our  companies  ran  true  to  form  with  approximately  20 
per  cent.  As  to  the  expense  ratio  on  our  Canadian  business, 
I  would  say  that  it  was  considerably  above  normal  in  1921, 
but  that  is  easily  accounted  for  in  the  equipment  of  our  chief 
office  in  Winnipeg,  advertising  and  the  hundred  and  one 
necessary  items  in  the  opening  of  a  new  field.  Admittedly, 
a  company  cannot  expect  to  experience  a  normal  expense 
ratio  the  first  year  in  a  new  territory.  But  the  result  of  our 
January  1922  business  indicates  that  when  the  ratios  are 
computed  for  1922  there  will  be  no  great  difference. 

Peferring  again  to  the  question  of  losses,  I  would  like  to 
point  out  that  our  inspections  have  a  great  deal  to  do  with 
keeping  down  the  number  of  fires.  However,  the  best  in- 
spector is  yourself  and  as  a  policy  holder  in  this  organization 
you  are  vitally  interested  in  the  amount  of  losses  both  in- 
dividually and  collectively.  Individually  because  it  is  the 
individual  losses  which  make  up  the  whole  and  whole  is  the 
figure  upon  which  we  compute  our  experience.  Therefore, 
it  behooves  us  all,  and  this  applies  to  everyone  whether 
applicable  to  our  insurance  or  not,  to  watch  your  own  risk 
carefully.  Clean  it  up  daily,  keep  the  rubbish  and  packing 
out  of  the  basement.  Allow  nothing  to  accumulate  which 
would  assist  the  spread  of  fire.  By  all  means  take  particular 
care  of  your  oils.  Do  not  let  them  drip  on  wood  floors  but 
provide,  and  you  can  do  so  at  a  very  moderate  expense,  a 
drip  pan  for  every  barrel.  You  know  you  can  fill  a  gallon 
measure  with  coal  oil,  place  a  lighted  match  on  the  surface 
and  the  only  result  will  be  that  the  match  will  burn  itself 
out,  but  let  that  coal  oil  soak  into  wood  or  waste  and  water 
will  not  put  it  out.  If  waste  is  necessary  have  an  enclosed 
can  purposely  for  it.  Have  your  electric  wiring  checked 
over  pei-iodically.  If  any  of  it  is  supported  by  nails  take  it 
down  at  once,  for  there  is  a  fine  place  for  fire  to  start.  Even- 
tually the  insulation  of  the  wires  will  wear  off  and  when  wires 
come  in  contact  with  the  nail  short  circuit  results  and  a  fire  is 
started  in  no  time.  If  necessary  to  suspend  wiring  do  it 
with  twine.  By  being  individually  careful  you  keep  down 
the  enormous  fire  waste  of  this  country  and  reduce  your  fire 
insurance  cost  at  the  same  time.  Our  representatives  are  al- 
ways more  than  glad  to  go  into  these  matters  with  you  and 
will  welcome  your  inquiries. 

An  Important  Point 

We  come  now  to  a  point  over  which  there  has  been  much 
needless  discussion,  that  is  the  question  of  our  mutual  policy 
conditions  reading  as  follows:  "The  contingent  mutual 
liability  of  each  member  of  this  company  for  the  payment  of 
losses  and  expenses  not  provided  for  by  its  cash  fund,  shall 
be  a  sum  equal  to  and  in  addition  to  one-third  of  the  cash 
premium  written  in  this  policy."  That  means  a  total  assess- 
ment liability  of  one  additional  premium  or  one-third  to 
each  company.  Reflect  for  a  moment  on  the  reason  for  in- 
serting this  clause  in  our  contract  originally.  When  the 
companies  were  young  the  various  policy  holders  required 
definite  assurances  that  if  the  premium  deposits  were  insuffi- 
cient to  pay  the  losses  that  should  they  be  one  of  those  un- 
fortunate enough  to  suffer  a  loss  they  would  know  they  could 
collect,  and  in  purchasing  the  policy  could  feel  absolute  safety 
in  so  doing.  What  was  the  result.  Instead  of  being  com- 
pelled to  collect  additional  funds  under  the  option  of  the 
policy  conditions  it  was  found  that  the  deposits  based  on 
the  board  rates  more  than  cleared  the  expenses  and  losses 
and  that  dividends  could  be  paid  even  after  setting  aside  a 
specific  sum  for  surplus.  Still  the  clause  was  considered  a 
safety  valve  and  even  though  the  surpluses  of  the  three  com- 
panies indvidually  are  so  large  now  that  non-assessable  poli- 
cies are  permitted  them  by  the  States  in  which  they  are 
domiciled,  we  still  feel  that  the  clause  should  remain  for 
your  indvidual  protection.  I  tell  you  frankly,  gentlemen, 
that  if  the  time  ever  comes  when  it  is  necessary  for  us  to 
use  that  clause  and  make  an  assessment  you  will  find  the 
largest  stock  companies  in  the  hands  of  receivers.  Let  me 
read  you  what  former  Commissioner  of  Insurance,  Hon.  F.  H. 
Hardison,  of  the  State  of  Massachusetts,  has  to  say  on  the 
subject:  "Is  the  liability  to  assessment  in  a  well  established 
and  well  managed  full  advance  premium  mutual  company 
probable?  I  challenge  the  production  of  any  records  that  it 
is.  It  is  no  more  probable  than  that  a  well  established  and 
well  managed  stock  company  will  be  unable  to  pay  its  losses. 
Neither  the  assessment  nor  the  insolvency  will  come  without 
a  catastrophe,  and  seldom,  under  modern  methods  of  distribu- 
tion and  reinsurance,  even  if  the  catastrophe  gets  in  its 
dread  blow.    Hence  I  hold  that  the  liability  to  assessment 


in  such  a  mutual  company  is  negligible."  Any  competitor 
that  uses  our  mutual  policy  conditions  for  their  own  gain 
immeasurably  weakens  his  own  case. 

Following  Mr.  Clarke's  talk  on  mutual  fire  insurance 
that  gentleman  invited  questions.  In  answer  to  which  Mr. 
Smith,  of  Belleville,  told  of  his  experience  last  year  when 
he  co-ordinated  all  his  policies  and  placed  all  his  insurance 
with  the  Hardware  Mutual.  His  first  year's  premium  was 
$114.50,  half  of  which  he  had  just  received  a  cheque  for, 
this  representing  the  profits  of  his  placed  insurance  for  last 
year. 

Mr.  Joy  told  of  his  experiences  with  fire  in  Minnesota 
and  in  the  Porcupine  district,  and  what  insurance  meant  to 
him. 

Mr.  Wright  asked  about  the  Hardware  Mutual's  opera- 
tions, and  was  told  that  $80,000  was  the  largest  policy  so 
far  placed;  that  $5,000,000  insurance  was  carried  in  Canada; 
and  that  in  case  of  a  large  conflagration  which  would  eat 
up  all  reserves  an  assessment  would  be  placed  on  policy 
holders  in  Canada  and  the  United  States  that  would  return 
to  the  sufferers  who  were  insured  in  the  Mutual  100  per 
cent,  of  the  value  of  their  policies. 


J.  WALTON  PEART 
Regina,  Sask..  and  formerly  of  St.    Mary's,  Ontario. 

Before  adjournment  Honorary  Secretary  Weston 
Wrigley  called  the  attention  of  the  chair  to  the  pres- 
ence of  J.  Walton  Peart  of  Regina,  one  of  the  founders 
of  the  Ontario  Retail  Hardware  Association,  a  former 
first  vice-president  and  the  pioneer  of  Hardware  Mu- 
tual Fire  Insurance  in  Canada.  Mr.  Peart  acknowl- 
edged the  honor,  saying  he  was  pleased  to  see  how  the 
association  had  progressed.  He  was  particularly  glad 
to  note  that  the  matter  of  mutual  insurance  was  occu- 
pying the  attention  of  Ontario  hardware  dealers.  He 
had  brought  the  matter  to  the  attention  of  the  mem- 
bers in  the  early  days  of  the  associaion.  It  would  be 
well,  he  considered,  for  the  hardware  dealers  present 
to  investigate  the  key  rates  charged  for  insurance  in 
their  various  communities,  and  instanced  several  eases 
where  the  board  rate  charged  was  based  on  conditions 
which  had  existed  years  before.  Mr.  Peart  congratu- 
lated the-  officers  of  the  association  on  their  work  as 
shown  in  the  growth  of  the  association  during  the  past 
seventeen  years. 

THE  TRADE  PRESS  THANKED 

I  Hardware  and  Accessories,       Toronto.  j 

I  Dear  Sirs, — By  resolution  passed  at  our  Con-  | 

I  vention,  the  thanks  of  the  Association  were  | 

I  extended  to  the  Trade  Papers  for  their   co-  f 

I  operation  in  Association  work.  f 

I  Permit  me,  then,  to  convey  to  Hardware  and  | 

1  Accessories  very  hearty  thanks  for  this  co-  j 

I  operation,  both  willingly  and  cheerfully  given.  j 

I  W.  F.  MACPHERSON,    Secretary.  | 


26 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


March,  1922 


THE  RESALE  PRICES  ON  ADVERTISED  LINES 

llllllllllllllliailllimillimillllllinilllllMIIIIII  nMIIJIIIJIMIIIIJMJIHinihllJnilDIMMMIIIIMIIIMIMMMIIIIMIIIMMIMIIIMMIIIIIinMniMIMMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMMIIMIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIln   lllirillllHrillllllllllllllllllllllllllllimi 

H.  J.  Haire,  of  the  Alabastine  Co.,  Paris  Ont.,  urges  that  trade  stimulated  by  the  cooperation  of 
manufacturers  and  retailers  in  maintaining  Standard  Prices  on  Advertised  Specialities. 

IIIIIIMIIIJIIIIIIIIIIIIIIJIIIIIirilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllMIIJIIJIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMI  IIIIIMII  I  I  Illllll  IJ  Illlllll  IIIIIIIJIIIIIIIJIJIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII  IllllllllUlllllliriJIII  IJMJIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIII  jrMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII  Illllllllllll  II 


I am  delighted  to  have  this  opportunity  of  appearing  before 
you  hardware  dealers  of  Ontario,  because  I  sincerely  be- 
lieve that  the  enterprise,  the  honesty  and  integrity  of  our 
retail  merchants  have  been  a  very  vital  factor  in  upbuilding 
every  Canadian  community,  and  in  rearing  and  maintaining 
the  great  structure  of  our  commerce,  and  of  all  classes  of 
trade;  it  is  freely  acknowledged  by  business  men  everywhere 
that  the  hardware  trade  is  the  cleanest,  most  substantial  and 
most  satisfactory  of  all,  to  do  business  with. 

I  am  here  as  representative  of  a  factory  that  has  been 
marketing  its  product  only  through  regular  wholesale  and 
retail  channels  in  Ontario  for  the  past  35  years.  As  a  result 
of  our  experience  we  long  ago  decided  that  the  hardware 
trade  was  the  most  satisfactory  class  of  accounts  and  have 
acted  accordingly.  I  see  here  representatives  of  several  other 
manufacturers.  Let  me  say  to  you  as  we  are  saying  in  our 
advertising  to  the  public.  "Your  local  dealer  is  entitled  to 
your  trade."  I  believe  the  hardware  dealer  is  entitled  to 
your  protection  now;  on  the  other  hand,  if  the  manu- 
facturer protects  the  hardware  trade,  he  feels 
he  is  entitled  to  expect  co-operation  from 
the  hardware  dealer,  and  that  is  what  brings 
me  here  to  talk  to  you  to-day. 

A  manufacturer  protects  the  dealer  by 
standardizing,  trade  marking  and  advertis- 
ing. The  dealer  co-operates  by  recommend- 
ing the  goods,  keeping  an  adequate  stock, 
and  maintaining  a  fixed  price. 

It  would  seem  to  be  the  natural  condition 
for  a  man  to  know  his  wishes  or  needs  and 
to  indicate  them  to  those  who  had  the  goods 
or  service  to  supply,  but  the  fact  is  that  men 
do  not  always  know  their  needs  or  do  not 
feel  them  strongly  enough  to  supply  them 
without  solicitation.  A  farmer  may  need  a 
gas  engine,  but  almost  invariably  he  will  not 
buy  until  influenced  by  oral  or  printed  soli- 
citation. FurtheiTnore,  human  needs  are 
subject  to  constant  change  and  development. 
Staple  goods  for  which  there  is  a  regular 
demand,  move  in  the  world's  markets  with  a 
minimum  amount  of  sales'  effort.  The  con- 
sumer must  have  food,  clothing,  nails,  rope, 
etc.  The  luxuries,  sanitary  goods  and  novel- 
ties demand  more  sales  effort.  But  time 
moves  swiftly,  and  the  luxury  or  novelty  of 
one  year  will  be  a  staple  in  the  next.  An  attractive  new 
article  like  a  thermos  bottle  or  a  vacuum  sweeper  fills  a 
real  need,  though  the  consumer  did  not  know  before  its 
appearance  that  such  an  article  was  a  possibility.  But 
immediately  the  article  appeared,  thousands  became  pur- 
chasers, and  the  cost  of  living  went  up  $5  or  $50  because  of 
them. 

It  has  been  charged  that  advertising  has  helped  increase 
the  cost  of  living  and  that  if  goods  were  not  exploited  by 
expensive  sales  efforts,  prices  could  be  decreased  and  the  cost 
of  living  reduced.  This  conclusion  is  a  fallacious  one  for  it 
overlooks  the  important  economic  principle  that  with  the 
exception  of  goods  that  are  imitative  of  successfully  ex- 
ploited goods,  and  sold  by  reason  of  the  similarity,  every- 
thing but  the  most  staple  merchandise  must  be  promoted 
in  order  that  successful  sales  may  be  built  up.  How  many 
cash  registers  or  adding  machines  would  have  been  sold  if  the 
makers  had  merely  perfected  the  machine  and  waited  for  the 
demand  to  manifest  itself?  If  sales  were  to  be  confined  to 
hundreds  instead  of  tens  of  thousands  the  cost  of  such 
machines  would  be  prohibitive  to  the  average  buyer.  Even 
the  sales  of  staple  goods  is  increased  by  advertising  methods 
as  ready-mixed  paint,  or  biscuits,  or  chocolate.  If  it  is 
argued  that  the  constant  changing  and  creating  of  needs 
makes  up  a  wrong  system  of  economics,  it  might  as  well  be 
argued  that  man  should  gi-adually  retrograde  to  the  savage 
state  where  his  needs  are  few  and  simple.  Civilization  in- 
creases and  changes  man's  needs.  It  may  add  to  the  cost 
of  living  and  even  tend  to  extravagance,  but  extravagance 
must  be  charged  to  the  individual  and  to  popular  ideas  rather 


H.  J.  HAIRE 
Sales    Manager    of  Alabastine 
Company,  Limited. 


than  to  the  salesman.  The  modem  tendency  is  to  eliminate 
certain  needless  handling  of  goods  and  .unnecessary  profits 
and  to  supply  the  customer  as  directly  as  possible. 

The  Dean  of  the  Commercial  Science  Department  of  New 
York  University,  in  an  article  in  Printers'  Ink  aptly  de- 
scribed the  new  order  of  things  as  follows: 

Modem  Methods  of  Merchandising 
"The  old  static  idea  that  the  wants  of  the  public  can  be 
gauged  like  the  depth  of  a  well,  and  that  there  continuously 
exists  a  certain  measure  of  demand  for  a  certain  kind  of 
goods,  is  no  longer  held  by  economists.  The  modern  ceonomic 
idea  is  dynamic  intsead  of  static,  and  demonstrates  that  man 
is  a  bundle  of  potential  wants,  infinite  in  number  and  impos- 
sible of  hard  and  fast  measurement.  Furthermore,  it  demon- 
strates how  wants  can  and  are  being  created,  and  that  it  is 
impossible  to  tell  beforehand  what  new  want  will  develop. 

"This  old-time  static  economics,  which  fitted  production 
to  a  given  quantity  of  want,  had  worked  out  a  beautiful  com- 
pensating system  of  accurate  quantities  and  their  accurate 
distribution  which  never  missed  a  cog  nor 
recognized  for  a  moment  an  element  of  un- 
certainty. 

"To  these  old  economists  all  articles  were 
staple,  and  that  elusive  quality  which  distin- 
guishes wants  as  we  now  know  them  to  be, 
was  blissfully  unknown.  The  newer  modem 
economists  to-day  judge  a  civilization  and  a 
country  by  the  number  and  complexity  of 
its  wants,  recognizing  that  progress  and 
civilization  move  in  direct  relation  to  the 
number  of  wants  developed.  In  the  new 
dynamics  there  is  nothing  fixed.  You  cannot 
count  on  my  wants  for  next  week  and  much 
less  can  you  count  on  them  for  next  year. 

"The  advertising  man  is  he  who  sits  on 
a  potential  want  and  hatches  it  into  a  clam- 
orous reality,  who  loses  no  opportunity  to 
tell  me  with  his  best  word  and  picture  in  the 
medium  I  am  most  apt  to  turn  to,  of  the 
chami,  the  irresistibility,  the  economy,  the 
efficiency,  the  need  represented  in  his  product. 
And  one  by  one,  new  tastes,  new  needs  are 
developed  in  me  and  my  family  as  the  adver- 
tising man  succeeds  in  informing  and  con- 
vincing me  of  the  desirability  of  the  things 
that  men  are  making. 
"My  old  father  visited  me  once,  and  after  observing  what 
,we  had  and  what  we  did,  in  comparison  with  his  simple,  old- 
fashioned  life,  he  vowed  that  we  were  squandering  money. 
We  had  a  great  number  of  things,  he  maintained,  which  he 
never  had.  'Yes,'  I  replied,  'and  my  son  will  have  things  of 
which  neither  you  nor  I  yet  dream.' 

"But  there  is  a  peculiar  thing  about  satisfying  wants. 
You  will  observe  that  we  are  obliged  to  starve  other  wants 
whenever  we  select  a  new  one.  If  we  buy  an  automobile 
we  will  not  be  able  to  flash  the  gold,  the  silver,  the  silk,  and 
the  fine  linen  which  we  might  otherwise  have  flashed.  In  our 
subconscious  way,  we  put  the  things  on  the  scales  and  we 
decide  which  we  want  most." 

Successful  Advertising 

In  view  of  the  leadership  on  every  hand  of  concerns  that 
advertise  there  is  hardly  any  need  to  argue  for  successful 
advertising  as  one  of  the  essentials  of  successful  merchandis- 
ing. Advertising  is  the  greatest  aid  the  salesman  has.  In 
some  lines  of  business  advertising  completes  sales  that  the 
salesman  could  not  complete,  or  does  the  work  more  economic- 
ally than  a  salesman  could  do  it.  When  it  does  not  complete 
sales,  advertising  informs  the  public,  interests  it,  and  partly, 
or  entirely,  develops  the  demand  so  as  to  make  the  work  of 
the  salesman  easy.  If  every  retailer  could  be  sure  that  every 
prospective  purchaser  of  his  goods  would  enter  his  store  and 
see  the  goods  offered  for  sale,  or  even  go  down  his  street  and 
inspect  his  windows,  he  might  hope  to  do  without  newspaper 
advertising  and  similar  forms,  but,  of  course,  he  could  not 
reasonably  expect  this. 

Nor  can  the  kitchen-cabinet  manufacturer  hope  that  all 


March,  1922 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


27 


the  women  able  to  purchase  a  cabinet  will  see  one  of  his 
cabinets  on  exhibition  or  learn  about  it  from  a  purchaser 
or  a  salesman.  He  must  use  advertising  mediums  to  inform 
them.  At  the  same  time  he  must  do  such  distributing  of  his 
goods  and  he  must  plan  such  sales  work  that  he  can  get  the 
full  benefit  of  what  he  spends  in  advertising.  Advertising 
multiplies  the  work  of  the  salesman  and  enables  the  manu- 
facturer or  the  merchant  to  talk  to  thousands  where,  without 
advertising,  he  would  talk  to  hundreds.  It  is  easy  to  lose 
fortunes  quickly  through  injudicious  advertising,  but  judi- 
cious advertising  makes  the  field  of  many  concerns  almost 
limitless. 

Advertising  is  of  much  more  importance,  however,  to  some 
lines  than  it  is  to  others.  Such  staples  as  bread,  sugar, 
coffee,  etc.,  if  of  good  quality,  can  be  sold  without  advertis- 
ing, though  it  will  be  freely  admitted  that  the  advertised 
bread  or  coffee  is  much  easier  to  sell  than  the  unadvertised 
brand. 

When  the  goods  are  unkown  to  the  consumer,  though 
they  may  be  of  excellent  quality,  the  salesman  has  the  burden 
of  making  the  favorable  impression,  of  convincing  the  con- 
sumer that  the  goods  are  the  equal  of  some  well-known 
brand.  This  is  sometimes  an  easy  thing  to  do,  but  at  other 
times  it  is  difficult.  Retailers  concede  that  advertising  cre- 
ates sales  and  brings  many  orders  that  they  would  never 
get  if  no  advertising  were  done  for  the  goods,  but  they  some- 
times argue  against  advertising  on  the  ground  that  it  per- 
mits the  manufacturers  to  get  too  much  control  of  the  retail- 
ers' trade.  Some  large  retailers,  especially,  ai'S  inclined 
toward  having  their  own  lines  of  goods,  or  lines  that  bear 
their  own  label,  as  far  as  possible. 

In  a  way,  it  is  unfortunate  that  an  aggressive  advertising 
campaign  usually  makes  it  possible  for  manufacturers  of 
competitive  goods  to  follow  in  the  wake  of  the  advertised 
goods  and  get  considerable  patronage  from  retailers  who  in- 
cline toward  the  policy  of  handling  the  goods  on  which  the 
largest  profits  can  be  made  and  which  they  can  control  more 
easily  than  goods  that  are  well  advertised  by  manufacturers. 
The  successful  retailer  of  good  capital  and  a  large  following 
is  in  a  better  position  to  force  his  private  brands  than  are 
others.  Manufacturing  problems  are  too  much  for  most 
retailers.  Well-known  brands  often  give  more  prestige  than 
a  retailer's  name. 

Standardized  Goods  are  Advertised  Goods 

In  nearly  every  line  some  manufacturer  so  far  excels 
the  others  that  his  goods  are  acknowledged  as  the  standard 
which  others  try  to  equal.  Nine  times  out  of  ten,  yes,  ninety- 
nine  times  out  of  a  hundred,  the  standardized  goods,  the 
goods  the  others  try  to  imitate,  are  well  advertised,  and  the 
imitation  is  not  advertised,  or  only  sparingly  so. 

In  the  old  days  of  the  west,  stray,  unbranded  calves  were 
called  "Mavericks,"  they  were  without  pedigree,  without 
identity,  without  known  value,  they  were  just  "Mavericks." 

To-day,  unbranded,  unadvertised  merchandise  is  plentiful 
upon  the  market,  because  the  manufacturer  has  not  trade- 
marked  his  product.  You  know  not  whence  it  comes.  Who 
is  responsible  for  it,  who  sponsors  its  quality,  and  vouches 
for  its  worth?  Nobody.  It  is  a  "Maverick"  among  mer- 
chandise. 

An  advertised,  trade-marked  article  has  the  100  per  cent, 
backing  of  the  man  who  made  it.  It  is  an  established  pro- 
duct. It  is  only  such  because  it  has  passed  the  acid  test  of 
public  use,  or  if  it  is  new,  the  trade-mark  is  the  manufac- 
turer's pledge  to  stand  behind  the  article  and  see  it  make 
good,  or  make  good  for  it.  But  it  is  his,  he  wants  you  to 
know  it,  and  he  tells  you  with  his  trade-mark.  He  is  so  sure 
of  its  quality  that  he  is  willing  to  stand  the  full  force  of 
possible  complaints.  So  I  say  to  you,  for  safety  and  economy 
to-day,  buy  trade-marked  goods  of  known  value. 

Purchasers  of  merchandise  have  no  time,  money  or  ability 
to  waste  in  experimenting.  In  the  factories  and  laboratories 
where  advertised  goods  are  perfected,  specialists  are  employed 
to  do  the  testing  and  experimenting,  and  after  the  finished 
goods  are  placed  on  the  market  with  the  maker's  trade-mark, 
there  is  no  necessity  for  mistakes  in  using  the  article. 

The  dealer  who  offers  his  goods  to  the  public,  sees  to  it 
that  those  goods  are  of  standing  quality,  then  he  must  deter- 
mine the  amount  of  profit  he  can  sell  his  goods  at  and  fixes 
his  price  accordingly,  considering  all  necessary  overhead 
costs  in  his  expenses.  He  cannot  allow  his  stock  to  be  carried 
away  promiscuously  with  no  system,  or  his  trade  would  not 
get  a  square  deal  and  his  business  would  go  to  smash  in  a 
short  time.    His  goods  represent  his  stock-in-trade. 

Professional  men  must  act  on  the  same  principle  and 
secure  an  equivalent  for  that  which  he  dispenses  to  his  cli- 


ents. Material  that  has  been  on  the  market  for  a  good  many 
years,  has  been  made  on  honest  principles,  perfected,  and 
never  sold  for  reduced  prices  is  worthy  to  be  considered  and 
preferred. 

Unknown  Brands  not  Wanted 

A  really  pitiful  thing  in  the  market  to-day  is  the  un- 
known brand,  nobody  knows  it,  nobody  wants  it,  though  it 
may  be  perfectly  worthy.  Selling  it  is  a  thankless  job,  and 
using  it  may  prove  to  be  a  disappointment  with  no  redress. 

Profits  come  from  turnovers,  not  from  leftovers,  and  ad- 
vertising helps  to  increase  the  turnover.  The  manufacturer 
who  advertises  his  product  stakes  his  reputation  on  the  qual- 
ity of  his  goods,  which  is  an  insurance  of  merit.  It  is  esti- 
mated that  dealers'  patrons  change  from  25  to  40  per  cent, 
yearly,  and  stores  handling  advertised  products  do  not  have 
to  re-educate  this  constantly  changing  clientele.  Standard 
brands  bring  repeat  sales  and  thus  the  quicker  turnover 
enabled  by  standard  brands  gives  a  larger  number  of  profits 
during  the  year.  Advertisements  are  very  much  like  soap 
after  a  blanket  is  washed,  you  don't  see  the  soap,  but  you 
know  it  has  done  its  work. 

Three  actors  on  the  stage  in  a  New  York  theatre  were 
discussing  what  each  had  done  to  help  win  the  war.  One  of 
them  joined  the  army  and  had  gone  to  France.  The  second 
had  joined  the  navy  and  gone  to  sea.  The  third  man  said 
he  was  a  producer.  He  had  stayed  home  and  produced  food. 
The  others  acknowledged  that  his  service  was  just  as  neces- 
sary as  theirs  and  asked  what  kind  of  food  he  had  produced. 
He  said  he  fattened  hogs.  They  asked  him  if  he  found  it 
profitable.  He  said,  "Well,  I  bought  10  hogs  for  $25  a  piece, 
I  fed  them  $250  worth  of  feed  and  sold  them  for  $50  each." 
The  soldier  said  "Why  you  didn't  make  any  money  on  them, 
you  just  broke  even."  "Yes,  I  know,"  said  the  man  who 
stayed  at  home,  "but  it  was  the  patriotic  thing  to  do,  and 
then  I  had  the  use  of  the  hogs  all  winter."  Just  the  same 
with  unstandardized,  non-advertised  merchandise,  you  buy 
it  because  it  is  cheap,  you  keep  it  on  the  shelves  and  when 
you  have  had  the  use  of  it  for  six  months  you  have  to  stand 
up  by  the  counter  and  persuade  people  to  buy  it  cheap.  After 
all  this  fun,  what  about  the  space  it  has  taken  up  and  the 
expense,  either  in  rent  or  interest  on  your  investment? 

The  manufacturer,  in  fixing  a  firm  wholesale  and  retail 
price  has  studied  the  question  from  all  angles  and  is  pretty 
sure  to  put  the  retail  price  as  low  as  possible  and  still  allow 
a  fair  margin  of  profit  to  the  dealer.  Many  firms  insist  on 
a  contract  in  the  order  form  binding  the  merchant  to  main- 
tain a  price,  but  others  depend  on  the  self  interest  of  the 
merchant  to  market  the  article  at  the  regular  price,  and 
after  all,  this  is  the  right  principle.  You  cannot  so  well 
force  a  man  to  do  your  will  as  you  can  infiuence  him  from  a 
regard  to  his  own  interest,  and  by  his  sense  of  fairness  to 
his  customer  and  to  his  supplier.  By  fixing  the  price,  the 
manufacturer  protects  the  dealer  from  loss  by  a  sudden  de- 
cline in  the  market,  while  the  stock  in  hand  in  case  of  a  rise 
naturally  returns  a  greater  profit  if  the  dealer  wishes  to 
take  advantage  of  it.  Unadvertised  goods  of  a  staple  nature, 
commonly  pass  through  more  hands,  such  as  commission 
men,  brokers,  importers,  exporters,  etc.,  then  special  and 
advertised  articles.  In  times  of  scarcity,  therefore,  prices 
are  unduly  enhanced,  and  in  a  panic  the  market  goes  to 
pieces,  making  an  element  fo  risk  that  the  merchant  cannot 
always  discount.  It  is  much  easier  to  manufacture  credit- 
able goods  than  it  is  to  build  up  a  profitable  market  for  them. 
To  sell  successfully  goods  must  be  meritorious,  but  the  long 
list  of  manufacturers  and  dealers  of  meritorious  goods  who 
have  failed  to  build  up  a  highly  successful  business  should 
convince  anyone  that  the  handling  of  a  product  after  it  is 
made  plays  the  largest  part  in  the  success  or  failure  of  the 
product. 

There  comes  a  time  in  the  life  of  every  small  boy  when 
he  walks  into  a  grocery  store  and  after  making  sure  that 
there  is  a  safe  line  for  retreat  asks  the  grocer  if  he  keeps 
eggs,  and  when  answered  in  the  affirmative  says  "Why  don't 
you  sell  them,"  and  immediately  departs  as  fast  as  his  young 
legs  will  carry  him. 

Learn  From  the  Small  Boy 

We  very  frequently  think  that  there  is,  after  all,  a  lesson 
in  this  youthful  impertinence,  a  lesson  certainly  for  the 
smaller  town  dealer.  In  the  large  city  the  tremendous  com- 
mercial organization  known  as  department  stores  make  no 
distinct  effort  at  individual  salesmanship,  because  they  carry, 
or  are  supposed  to  carry,  everything  and  their  advertising 
is  merely    matter  of  tabulating  merchandise  and  quoting 

(  Continued  on  page  51 J 


28 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


March,  1922 


BOOSTS  "SAVE  THE  SURFACE"  CAMPAIGN 

ilnliniMHIMIMIMMIIIInnilllMIMIUMMIIIIMIMIIMIMilinillilllinilMlllllninillllMIMIIIIMMIMMIIIIMIIMIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIMIIIIIIIUIIIMIIMMMIIn 

H.  E.  Mihell,  Imperial  Varnish  and  Color  Co.,  Toronto,  and  executive  member  of  the  "Save  The 
Surface"  campaign  committee  tells  how  paint  sales  are  developed  for  hardware  and  paint  dealers. 

WHIMIIIIIIMinMIMnilUinilJIMI>l"IJIIMIMMMINMIMniiniMllinMlltlMlirjllllllJMIMIIIini»inillMIIIIMIMIMMIMMIMIIIIIIIIMIUIIMIMIIIMIIIJJ>IIIIIIM  IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIM'IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIJIIIIIIIIIIIMIJIIIMIIMIIIIIIMIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIII 


LET  me  talk  with  you  to-day  on  the  "Save  the  Surface" 
Campaign  and  see  if  I  can  point  out  reasons  why  you 
should  make  more  out  of  it  and  some  suggestions  as  to 
how  you  can  make  more  money  out  of  it.  For,  after  all,  this 
campaign  is  yours  to  make  money  out  of.  As  it  stands  to- 
day it  is  more  yours  than  it  has  ever  been  before.  The  cash- 
ing in  on  it  is  largely  up  to  you.  If  as  a  representative  of 
the  committee,  I  can  feel  that  our  representation  here  has 
been  more  than  justified.  However,  before  reaching  the 
"cashing  in"  portion  of  this  talk  with  you,  I  want  to  scan, 
very  briefly,  the  aims  and  objects  of  the  campaign  and  its 
history  to  the  present  day. 

The  "Save  the  Surface"  Campaign  has  not  been  the  re- 
sult of  a  momentary  inspiration,  nor  was  it  born  in  a  day. 
Several  years  before  it  was  put  into  operation  a  few  far- 
sighted  men  in  the  trade  realized  that  the  paint  and  varnish 
trade  had  scarcely  scratched  its  possibilities  for  sales.  We 
have  never  at  any  time  been  anywhere  near  the  condition  of 
a  "glutted  market"  of  adequately  painted  property. 

Two  big  factors  were  suffering  from  this  attitude  of  the 
consumer  and  the  seller  of  paints  and  varnishes  towards 
painting.  The  property  owner  was  suffering  from  lack  of 
protection  to  his  property.  Even  to-day  a  great  many  are 
suffering  from  the  same  reason.  Paint  manufacturers,  paint 
distributors  and  retailers  were  and  are,  to-day,  suffering  a 
big  loss  from  the  profits  they  are  not  obtaining  from  the 
possibilities  that  lie  at  their  very  doors  and  which  are  not 
being  taken  advantage  of. 

Pays  to  "Save  the  Surface" 

I  want  to  illustrate  in  concrete  form  something  of  what 
these  losses  might  be.  Based  on  the  census  of  1911,  it  has 
been  estimated  that  only  a  partial  loss  on  Canadian  property, 
due  to  lack  of  paint  and  proper  upkeep,  amounts  to  the  total 
annual  sum  of  $71,851,098.00.  This  figure  is  made  up  as 
follows:  2  per  cent,  depreciation  on  urban  homes  alone,  or 
§28,000,000.00;  2  per  cent,  depreciation  of  farm  property 
amounting  to  $17,849,944.00  and  10  per  cent,  on  farm  imple- 
ments amounting  to  $26,001,154.00.  You  will  note  that  this 
includes  only  three  classes  of  property  and  does  not  include 
many  others  we  might  take  into  account. 

You  are  all  well  aware  that  loss  through  lack  of  paint  or 
varnish  is  inevitable  and  continuous,  but  that  loss  through 
fire  is  only  probable  or  accindental. 

Our  average  annual  fire  losses  generally  vary  between 
twenty  and  thirty  million,  yet  what  are  the  people  of  Canada 
doing  to  protect  themselves  against  both  forms  of  loss?  Tak- 
ing the  figures  of  1917  as  more  nearly  to  normal  than  any 
others  available,  we  find  that  the  Canadian  public  spent 
$5.44  per  capita  for  fire  premiums  as  against  approximately 
75c  per  capita  for  paint  and  varnish  protection.  In  other 
words,  they  spend  about  14  per  cent,  for  protection  against 
inevitable  loss  compared  with  what  they  spend  for  probable 
or  accidental  loss. 

This  single  condition  of  affairs  alone  points  to  the  tre- 
mendous opportunity  for  better  paint  selling  and  the  neces- 
sity of  an  advertising  campaign  to  awaken  the  consuming 
public  from  their  indifferent  attitude  towards  painting. 

Not  Enougt  Faint  Produced 

Now  as  to  what  the  paint  trade  has  suffered.  I  knew 
that  from  the  incident  cited  above  and  other  facts  which  I 
have  not  the  time  to  present  to-day,  that  you  should  be 
di.stributing  four  times  the  amount  of  paint  and  varnish 
that  you  have  ever  done  before,  and  that  instead  of  Canada 
producing  $19,506,653  worth  of  paint  and  varnish  materials 
in  1919,  we  should  have  produced  sixty  to  seventy  millions, 
and  you  should  have  your  proportionate  share  in  that  distri- 
bution. 

There  is  this  also  to  bear  in  mind,  that  if  the  public  can 
be  taught  to  realize  the  value  of  proper  upkeep  of  property, 
not  only  will  it  effect  bigger  paint  and  varnish  sales,  but  it 


will  bring  about  bigger  sales  in  many  lines  of  hardware 
necessary  for  proper  maintenance. 

Another  desire  that  underlay  the  forming  of  the  cam- 
paign was  to  impress  upon  the  public  the  fact  that  paints 
and  varnishes  wei-e  an  economic  necessity  and  not  a  decora- 
tive luxury. 

A  third  factor  had  probably  more  to  do  with  its  immediate 
formulation  and  that  was  the  excessive  prosperity  of  war  and 
post-war  conditions  and  the  possibility  of  a  slump  in  indus- 
trial and  general  market  conditions.  This  slump  was  looked 
upon  as  inevitable.  The  problem  then  was  to  commence  ad- 
vertising during  the  period  of  prosperity  so  as  to  ensure 
good  business  during  the  period  of  decline.  In  other  words, 
we  sought  to  insure  our  future.  Many  other  minor  considera- 
tions arose,  but  the  above  were  the  oustanding. 

How  were  these  problems  to  be  solved?  The  answer  was 
to  create  by  disinterested,  educational,  co-operative  adver- 
tising, a  sentiment  in  the  public  mind  in  favor  of  painting 
as  a  protective  and  preservative  means  of  conserving 
property. 

The  solution  was  the  "Save  the  Surface  and  You  Save  all" 
campaign. 

Selling  the  Public  an  Idea 

In  the  execution  of  this  campaign  I  want  to  point  out 
clearly  the  duty  of  the  Campaign  Committee  towards  the 
paint  and  varnish  trade  as  a  whole.    The  committee,  as  a 


H.  E.  MIHELL 
Sales  Manager  Imperial  Varnish  &  Color  Co.,  Toton/o. 

committee,  has  absolutely  nothing  in  the  way  of  goods  to 
sell.  We  are  not  interested  in  any  particular  line,  whether 
ready-mixed  paint,  lead  and  oil,  good  paint  or  indifferent 
paint.  We  are  endeavoring  to  advertise  and  sell  an  idea,  a 
sentiment,  or  perhaps  I  can  put  it  stronger  by  saying  the 
creation  of  a  conviction  in  the  public  mind  that  they  should 
use  paints  and  varnishes  more  adequately.  If  we  can  change 
the  habits  of  the  people  of  this  Dominion  of  Canada  in  regard 
to  the  greater  and  better  use  of  paints  and  varnishes  for  the 
protection  of  their  property,  our  work  will  not  have  been  in 
vain.  It  has  not  been  in  vain  either  in  service  rendered  to 
the  consuming  public  nor  to  the  paint  and  varnish  retailer, 
in  creating  bigger  and  better  business. 

When  this  conviction  has  become  established,  what  is 
your  duty  and  mine?  My  duty,  as  a  salesman,  of  a  manu- 
facturer, is  to  go  out  and  in  every  rightful  manner  endeavor 
to  cash  on  it.  Your  duty,  as  a  retail  distributor,  is  to  push 
home  the  idea  to  your  consuming  trade  and  cash  in  on  it. 
Any  good  salesman  will  admit  that  conviction  is  90  per  cent. 


March,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


29 


of  the  battle  in  selling  godds.  After  that,  getting  the  name 
on  the  dotted  line  or  getting  the  cash  is  an  easy  matter. 

Undoubtedly  this  conviction  has  become  established  in 
the  minds  of  a  great  many,  but  there  is  a  vast  majority  to 
whom  it  has  not  come  as  it  should,  or  if  it  has  come,  has  not 
yet  reached  the  stage  of  buying  action  which  we  want  to  see. 
It  is  here  that  the  responsibility  of  the  retail  distributor 
rests,  in  carrying  on  the  campaign  in  his  own  community 
and  which  I  shall  dwell  on  later. 

A  very  brief  history  of  the  campaign  will  illustrate  our 
position  as  it  stands  to-day,  and  serve  to  show  why  you,  as 
retail  distributors,  should  play  a  greater  part  in  the  develop- 
ment of  the  campaign  in  the  future. 

A  Five  Year's  Campaign  Planned 

During  the  first  year  the  subscribers  and  the  committee 
in  charge  pioneered  the  launching  of  this  campaign  in  sheer 
faith,  but  with  a  very  definite  idea  of  what  they  desired  to 
accomplish.  They  realized  that  its  development  could  only 
take  place  through  time  and  make  progress  through  phases 
or  stages  of  growth.  They,  therefore,  committed  themselves 
to  the  conduct  of  the  campaign  for  five  years.  The  next 
phase  was  the  development  of  the  manufacturers'  salesmen 
into  apostles  of  its  great  idea,  so  that  they  could  carry  it  to 
you.  To-day  we  stand  before  you  extending  greater  co- 
operation towards  the  retail  trade  and  seeking  greater  co- 
operation from  you.  Already  the  campaign  has  carried 
sufficient  conviction  and  displayed  sufficient  confidence  to  win 
your  respect  and  support. 

As  I  have  said,  the  campaign  belongs  to  you  as  much  as 
anyone  else.  We  want  you  to  use  it  as  freely  as  any  sub- 
scriber on  our  list.  In  fact,  we  want  you  to  become  a  sub- 
scriber in  so  far  as  it  can  affect  your  own  local  community 
and  do  so  with  the  feeling  that  you  have  the  backing  of  a 
big,  strong,  rational  campaign  behind  you. 

What  has  brought  about  this  desire?  The  objects  of  the 
campaign  and  the  arguments  used  have  revealed,  in  an  or- 
ganized way,  possibilities  for  the  sale  of  paints  and  varnishes 
that  were  not  dreamed  of  before  its  inauguration.  TJhe 
objective  of  the  campaign  has  created  a  greater  family  feel- 
ing of  common  interest  in  the  paint  and  varnish  trade,  but 
the  family  i§  incomplete  without  the  retail  distributor.  He 
is  needed  in  this  family  as  he  needs  us  in  it.  Perhaps  if  we 
add  the  word  "family"  to  the  sometimes  overworked  word 
"co-operation"  we  can  add  new  zest  to  the  furthering  of  our 
common  interest. 

Both  the  work  and  what  has  been  accomplished  already 
by  the  campaign  has  made  the  situation  such  that  the  retail 
distributor  can  more  readily  use  it  and  make  money  out  of  it. 
We  have  likewise  reached  the  stage  where  he  must  play  a 
much  more  prominent  part  in  its  development,  if  he  is  to 
obtain  his  rightful  share  from  it. 

Opportunity  for  the  "Go-getter" 

I  take  it,  gentlemen,  that  we  are  not  here  to-day  to  pass 
mere  platitudes  or,  in  common  parlance,  to  kid  ourselves  or 
each  other,  for  this  reason,  I  shall  be  perfectly  frank  in  say- 
ing that  the  "Save  the  Surface"  Campaign  will  be  of  little 
use  to  the  man  who  is  a  mere  order  taker  or  whose  sole  func- 
tion is  to  ring  up  the  cash  register. 

But,  it  can  be  a  mighty  useful  instrument  in  the  hands 
of  the  man  who  is  properly  functioning  as  a  merchandiser 
of  paints  and  varnishes  and  the  other  lines  in  his  store. 
The  "go-getter"  type  of  retailer  and  the  fellow  who  is  wear- 
ing out  shoe  leather  beyond  his  counter  instead  of  shining 
his  trouser  seats  behind  it,  can  use  this  campaign  and  its 
arguments  towards  getting  bigger  paint  and  varnish  business. 

I  don't  think  there  is  a  town  in  Ontario  but  what  the 
National  "Save  the  Surface"  Campaign  has  had  its  effect 
upon.  Whether  it  is  Vankleek  Hill,  Cochrane,  Wiarton,  Am- 
herstburg,  Fort  Erie  or  Hamilton,  more  or  less  of  their 
inhabitants  have  seen  its  advertisements  and  have  had  more 
or  less  conviction  brought  to  them  by  its  arguments. 

But  like  all  other  articles  advertised,  there  must  be  a 
source  of  immediate  supply  before  that  conviction  can  be 
realized  in  bringing  action.  We'll  pick  on  Jones  who  might 
live  in  any  town  in  Canada.  He  has  become  convinced, 
through  the  unique  arguments  of  the  "Save  the  Surface" 
Campaign,  that  he  ought  to  paint  his  property.  The  retailer 
who  has  properly  linked  up  his  paint  selling  with  the  cam- 
paign stands  a  pretty  good  chance  of  getting  Jones'  business. 
On  the  other  hand,  if  there  is  no  local  linking  up,  Jones' 
enthusiasm  may  die  a  natural  death,  and  the  business  you 
might  have  obtained  is  lost. 

Dealer  Must  Sell  Mr.  Brown 

But  there's  another  man  by  the  name  of  Brown  who  has 
possibly  seen  the  national  advertisements  but  remained  un- 
convinced because  these  were  not  linked  up  with  local  or 


immediate  interest  in  his  community.  If  he  had  seen  his  local 
man's  name  linked  up  with  it  the  idea  would  have  gotten 
across  with  him.  There  are  hosts  of  Brov^ns  of  this  sort  in 
every  community,  and  it  is  with  such  men  as  these  that  your 
great  responsibility  as  retail  distributors  rests.  We  want 
the  weight  that  your  name  carries  in  your  own  community, 
added  to  the  effect  of  the  national  campaign  to  bring  such 
business  to  your  store. 

I  need  not  emphasize  the  fact  that  post-war  conditions 
have  made  selling  a  real  salesman's  job  to-day.  Merely  in- 
serting advertising  in  a  national  campaign  is  not  going  to 
sell  goods  or  an  idea.  We  have  got  to  have  the  direct  per- 
sonal contact  of  the  salesman,  be  he  manufacturers'  sales- 
man', jobbers'  salesman  or  retail  clerk.  We  have  got  to 
back  up  our  advertising  with  direct  convincing  word  of 
mouth  salesmanship.  We  have  got  to  strengthen  up  our 
personal  contact  all  down  the  line.  The  manufacturer  and 
the  jobber  are  limited  in  their  opportunity  for  personal  con- 
tact with  the  consuming  public,  but  the  retail  distributor  has 
unlimited  scope  for  exercising  it  if  he  is  performing  his 
proper  function  as  a  retail  distributor.  I  have  called  it  a 
proper  function,  it  is  his  rightful  function  which  no  manu- 
factui-er  or  jobber  wishes  to  encroach  upon  if  the  retailer 
performs  it  properly.  This  applies  to  every  form  of  goods, 
not  alone  paints  and  varnishes. 

How  is  the  retail  distributor  to  function  properly  in  con- 
nection with  the  "Save  the  Surface"  idea?  My  answer  em- 
bodies the  practical  means  afforded  by  the  committee  and 
which  I  will  briefly  describe.  Before  doing  so,  however,  I 
wish  to  point  out  that  the  retail  distributor  who  links  up 
closely  with  the  campaign  is  bound  to  be,  together  with  his 
clerks,  saturated  with  the  "Save  the  Surface"  arguments, 
which  can  be  made  a  tremendous  selling  force  in  his  personal 
contact  with  his  customers.  In  fact,  it  is  essential  that  such 
should  be  the  case.  Realizing  the  important  function  you 
have  to  perform  in  this  respect,  the  committee  have  formu- 
lated a  series  of  four  letters  each  one  outlining  very  clearly 
how  you  can  carry  this  out. 


RE-SALE  PRICES  ON  ADVERTISED  LINES 

{Continued  from  page  00) 

prices.  They  exercise  no  influence  upon  public  taste  carry- 
ing chiefly  these  goods  upon  which  there  is  an  established 
demand  or  goods  which  they  can  buy  in  quantities  at  a  very 
attractive  figure. 

The  merchant  in  the  small  town,  however,  has  upon  his 
shoulders  the  responsibility  of  being  a  public  educator.  He 
is,  or  should  be,  an  authority  upon  what  people  should  buy, 
his  stock  should  be  representative  of  the  ideal  of  merchan- 
dise in  his  community.  In  very  few  cases  should  he  accept 
inferior  merchandise,  even  if  he  sells  it  as  such  at  a  price, 
and  in  every  instance  should  he  advise  his  customers  indi- 
vidually that  the  best  economy  is  in  the  purchase  of  the  best 
materials. 

The  public  which  he  sei-ves  does  not  expect  in  a  store  of 
moderate  acquisitions  an  exhibition  of  all  kinds  of  merchan- 
dise. They  rather  expect  the  storekeeper  to  exert  a  power 
of  selection  to  supply  them  with  the  things  that  they  need 
at  a  price  consistent  and  of  a  quality  which  he  can  personally 
recommend. 

We  have  eminent  respect  for  the  dealer  in  the  small  com- 
munities. In  ninety-nine  cases  out  of  a  hundred  he  is  a 
strong  influence  for  the  good;  he  is  fair  in  his  prices  and 
fair  in  his  dealings  with  others,  and  we  know  of  few  in- 
stances, when  given  a  choice,  where  he  has  not  chosen  for 
his  trade  the  best  of  two  pieces  of  merchandise.  It  is  com- 
paratively rare  when  this  man  does  not  place  quality,  utility, 
satisfactory  service  to  his  customers  above  the  immediate 
profit  in  a  single  sale. 

There  has  been  a  tendency  among  a  certain  class  of 
merchants  to  overlook  the  benefits  of  the  fixed  price  arrange- 
ment and  to  use  a  well-known  fixed  price  article  as  a  leader 
in  his  bargain  announcement.  This  practice  is  unfair  to 
the  manufacturer,  tends  to  destroy  the  confidence  of  the  pub- 
lic in  the  real  value  of  the  goods,  and  disturbs  the  trade  gen- 
erally without  bringing  to  the  price-cutter  much  advantage. 
I  would  like  to  see  a  resolution  put  through  this  meeting  to 
bind  the  members  first  to  consult  the  manufacturer  of 
branded  and  well  advertised  goods  before  advertising  a  bar- 
gain price  on  those  goods. 

In  concluding  his  paper,  Mr.  Haire  offered  a  suggestion 
in  regard  to  the  sales  tax.  He  thought  that  if  the  sales  tax 
was  added  to  the  cost  of  the  goods  by  the  manufacturer  and 
shown  as  such  this  would  allow  the  retailer  to  collect  the  tax 
from  the  consumer  and  allow  him  a  fair  profit  on  his  goods. 


30 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


March,  1922 


MANUFACTURERS  MAKE   FINE  DISPLAYS 

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Nearly  one  huadred  Canadian  manufacturers  exhibit  their  products  while  two  dozen  others  could 

not  obtain  space — Larger  hall  needed. 

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THE  exhibits  of  hardware  products  made  at  Hamilton 
showing  of  Canadian-made  hardware  goods  ever  seen 
during  the  1922  convention  was  unquestionably  the  finest 
in  the  Dominion.  Over  one  hundred  exhibitors  displayed 
their  goods,  and  to  those  who  from  year  to  year  have  viewed 
these  exhibits  the  improvement  noted  in  the  finish,  the 
utility,  the  packing  and  the  set-up  of  the  various  lines  were 
most  marked.  If  our  Canadian  hardware  manufacturers  con- 
tinue improving  their  goods  and  enlarging  their  lines  United 
States  .and  British  manufacturers  will  find  it  difiicuii  to  re- 
gain any  of  their  lost  trade  in  supplying  the  needs  of  Can- 
adian people. 

A  brief  summary  of  the  goods  shc'vn  and  their  utility  and 
merits  is  listed  below: 

ACCESSORIES  AND  SPORTING  GOODS 

The  Ace  Chain,  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  made  a  showing  and  gave 
a  demonstration  of  their  non-skid  tire  chain.  This  "Ace" 
chain,  which  is  guaranteed,  is  the  result  of  eighteen  years' 
scientific  study  and  practical  experiment.  It  is  a  chain  made 
from  selected  case-hardened  steel,  which  gives  maximum 
traction,  and  prevents  skidding  on  wet,  muddy,  icy  or  other 
bad  roads.  It  has  a  patent  lever  fastener  of  a  new  design, 
which  makes  the  "Ace"  chain  snug-fitting  and  easily 
adjusted. 

The  Coleman  Lamp  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  exhibited  and 
demonstrated  their  "Quick-Lite"  lamps  and  lanterns  and  a 
new  gasoline  stove  which  they  are  putting  on  the  market. 
During  the  night  of  the  exhibition  when  the  electric  power 
failed  the  coleman  lamp  made  the  best  of  its  opportunity  and 
capably  fulfilled  all  the  requirements  set  for  it.  These  lamps 
and  lanterns  are  made  in  various  styles — reading  lamps,  lan- 
tern for  outdoor  use,  chandelier  or  wall  bracket  lamps.  The 
claim  is  made  for  this  lamp  that  it  gives  a  300-candlepower 
light,  and  is  twenty  times  as  bright  as  the  old-fashioned  oil 
lamp;  that  it  makes  and  burns  its  own  gas  made  from  com- 
mon motor  gasoline;  that  it  will  light  with  an  ordinary 
match;  that  a  quart  of  gasoline  will  keep  it  alight  18  hours; 
that  it  will  burn  dry  without  harm  that  it  can't  explode  even 
when  turned  over;  and  that  to  operate  will  cost  less  than 
three-quarters  of  a  cent  an  hour.  The  Coleman  Quick-fill 
tire  pump,  which  is  now  well  introduced  to  the  hardware 
and  accessories  trades,  was  also  a  feature  of  the  display. 

Canada  Cycle  &  Motor,  Ltd.,  Weston,  concentrated  their 
display  on  automobile  skates  and  bicycles,  all  the  makes  of 
this  company  being  represented  in  the  bicycle  line.  The 
C.  C.  M.  triplex  hanger  was  the  thing  most  prominently  fea- 
tured. This  hanger  gives  more  speed,  pep  and  power.  The 
company  prides  itself  in  the  fact  that  all  its  bicycles  are  90 
per  cent.  made-in-Canada  and  100  per  cent,  perfect. 

Canada  Needle  &  Fishing  Tackle  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  made 
an  elaborate  and  interesting  display  of  fishing  tackle  in  sets, 
boxes,  outfits  and  single  articles.  A  big  showing  of  fishing 
rods  was  among  the  exhibits,  and  a  complete  range  of  Eng- 
lish-made trout  rods,  reels  and  flies.  The  booth  was  always 
the  centre  of  a  number  of  hardware  dealers  interested  either 
as  sportsmen  or  as  merchants  handling  fishing  tackle  as  a 
line  in  the  hardware  store. 

The  Premier  Tire  &  Rubber  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  specially 
featured  their  patented  "Epok"  inner  tube  for  auto  tires. 
They  also  are  handling  accessories  for  automobiles,  having 
the  Canadian  rights  for  the  National  auto  lens;  the  Violet 
Ray  lens,  for  appearance;  the  il-Nock  automatic  bearing 
adjuster;  and  the  Given  gasoline  range  for  telling  the  quan- 
tity of  gas  In  the  tank. 

Their  own  fabric  line  of  tires,  and  their  Grey  Wing  line, 
No.  1  and  No.  2,  were  displayed.  The  company  will  shortly 
put  on  the  market  a  line  of  cord  tires. 

Riehards-Wilcox  Canadian  Co.,  Ltd.,  London,  made  a 
specialty  of  their  "Slidetite"  garage  door  sets.  These  "Slide- 
tite"  fixtures  combine  the  advantages  of  swing  and  sliding 
doors  without  the  di.sadvanlages  of  either.  They  fit  tight 
like  a  swing  door,  but  do  not  bind,  stick  or  warp.  Instead 


of  sticking  out  against  wind,  snow  and  ice,  they  fold  in.side 
and  lie  back  against  the  wall  out  of  the  way.  They  come  in 
various  designs  and  sizes  from  three  to  six-door  sets. 

Other  barn  door  hangers,  garage  door  sets,  tracks,  etc., 
were  also  shown,  as  was  an  "air-way"  set  for  sunrooms,  hos- 
pitals, etc. 

Canadian  National  Carbon  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  showed 
their  Columbia  batteries  and  dry  cells  and  Eveready  flash- 
lights. In  thf  Columbia  line  is  the  multiple  battery  for 
motor  boats,  hot  shot  battery  for  motor  ignition,  ignitor  dry 
cell,  and  Columbia  bell-ringer. 

In  the  Eveready  line  was  shown  the  new  Eveready  spot- 
light with  a  light  range  of  300  feet;  unit  cells  for  flashlight 
batteries,  and  flashlight  cases  in  a  numerous  and  varied  pro- 
fusion. 

Tallman  Brass  &  Metal,  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  made  a  big  show- 
ing of  their  metal  lines,  including  "Arctic"  babbit,  copper 
and  dye  castings.  In  addition  they  displayed  a  number  of 
specialties.  Among  these  latter  were  the  Tallman,  rotary 
and  oscillating  sprinklers  for  lawns  and  market  gardens; 
Tallman  pumps  for  automobile  tires,  and  combination  oil 
and  grease  guns. 

In  the  Ray  Lite  fixtures  the  Tallman  Co.  have  an  electric 
light  that  is  said  to  increase  general  effectiveness  25  per  cent. 
The  fixtures  have  been  designed  to  meet  the  demand  for  a 
lighting  unit  that  gives  the  essentials  of  good  lighting — in- 
tensity, quality,  economy  and  appearance.  Its  light  is  clear, 
steady  and  restful.  Nitrogen  gas-filled  lamps  are  used,  and 
the  mechanical  features  are  simple  and  practical. 

The  Gray  Ball  Bearing  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  making  of 
automotive  wrenches  and  accessories,  showed  samples  of 
their  goods,  attractively  set  out  on  display  boards.  Among 
these  were  their  socket  wrenches,  specially  adapted  for  auto- 
mobile work,  made  by  a  new  process  in  a  new  design. 
Double-end  straight  wrench  sets;  demountable  rim  wrenches; 
brace  and  double  offset  socket  wrenches  were  also  shown. 

SILVERWARE  AND  CUTLERY 

The  Oneida  Community,  Niagara  Falls,  featured  their 
newer  patterns  in  sets,  giving  especial  prominence  to  two 
new  periods,  "Adam"  and  "Grosvenor."  Other  fine  lines 
were  the  "Vernon,"  "Bridal  Wreath"  and  "Primrose'  sots.  All 
the  goods  were  shown  in  cases,  one  new  case  being  shown 
for  the  first  time  contained  a  "Patrician"  set.  The  chest  was 
a  combination,  made  of  mahogany,  with  winged  trays.  The 
booth  in  its  deep  blue  trimmings  beautifully  set  off  this  dis- 
play of  Community  plate. 

AutoStrop  Safety  Razor  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  featured  their 
new  Model  C  Valet  AutoStrop  razor  in  a  telescope  arrange- 
ment which  drew  the  attention  of  all  passers-by.  This  new 
self-stropping  razor  is  put  on  the  market  to  sell  at  a  dollar, 
and  the  outfit  consists  of  a  highly  polished,  nickel-plated 
razor,  three  Valet  AutoStrop  blades  and  a  horsehide  strop. 
These  are  packed  in  an  attractive  metal  case,  finished  in 
black  and  velvet  lined.  The  strop  is  packed  in  a  separate 
carton. 

Taylor  Bros.  Cutlery  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  had  a  very  nice 
display  of  cutlery,  artistically  arranged  on  wall  panels,  one 
of  these  panels  showed  a  butcher  knife  in  process  of  manu- 
facture. All  these  knives  are  forged,  tempered  and  giound  in 
the  Hamilton  factory  and  made  from  Sheffield  steel.  Coco- 
bola  and  beechwood  handles  are  used  on  all  knives.  House- 
hold slicers,  chef's  knives  and  boning  knives  were  among  the 
prominent  lines  shown. 

The  Durham-Duplex  Co.  showed  their  safety  razors  in  a 
booth  decorated  with  their  red  advertising  posters.  These 
razors  claim  smooth-cutting  qualities,  are  oil-tempered,  and 
always  safe.  The  Maple  Leaf  blades  used  in  Durham-Dup- 
lex razors  were  demonstrated  by  those  in  charge  of  the 
exhibit. 

ALUMINUM  AND  KITCHEN  WARE 

The  Aluminium  Ware  Mfg.  Co.,  Ltd.,  Oakville,  made  a 
decidedly  neat  display  of  their  many  and  varied  aluminium 


March,  1922 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


31 


wares.  This  Oakville  ware  is  made  from  metal  that  is  more 
than  99  per  cent.  pure.  Each  article  is  stamped  and  spun 
from  a  single  sheet  of  metal,  there  being  no  cracks  or  seams 
in  which  dirt  could  lodge.  Each  article  is  made  heavy  enough 
for  its  intended  use.  The  quality,  finish  and  workmanship 
are  of  the  best.  Two  of  the  latest  additions  to  this  Ime  are 
a  potato  or  vegetable  cooker,  polished,  has  strainer  spout; 
the  handle  when  in  use  locks  the  cover.  The  other  article 
is  a  milk  or  oyster  pail  made  in  two  sizes. 

The  Diiro  Aluminum,  Ltd.  Hamilton,  made  a  complete 
showing  of  their  durable  line  of  aluminum  ware,  which  lays 
claim  to  being  99  per  cent,  pure  aluminum.  Among  Ihe  new 
articles  shown  was  a  tea-kettle  with  welded  spout  and  handle 
of  flat  steel.  An  ebonized  knob  is  on  lid,  and  it  has  also  an 
ebonized  wood  grip.  The  handle  will  stand  erect  if  desired. 
The  "Duchess"  teapot  was  also  an  attractive  article  shown 
with  its  ebonized  handle  and  welded  spout. 

Veribest  Aluminum  Ware  was  featured  by  D.  G.  Moody, 
Toronto.  An  especial  attraction  was  an  old  English  de- 
signed teapot  with  separate  handles  of  glass,  wood  or  steel. 
The  representatives  for  "Veribest"  claim  for  this  line  of 
aluminum  ware  all  that  the  name  implies. 

McClary  Mfg.  Co.,  Ltd.,  London,  made  a  varied  exhibit  of 
their  hardware  lines.  A  new  combination  "Tortoise'  heater 
and  cook  stove  was  among  these;  an  electric  water  heater 
was  another;  a  Florence  oil  water  heater,  an  electric  stove, 
Florence  oil  stove  and  Success  oven,  were  other  specialties. 

The  new  stove  line  was  represented  by  a  "Tccumseh" 
range,  and  McClary's  porcelain-enamelled  cooking  utensils 
by  a  number  of  articles  of  Imperial  ware. 

The  booth  with  its  black,  red  and  gold  decorations  was 
one  of  the  attractions  of  the  exhibition. 

Thos.  Davidson  Mfg-.  Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal,  had  several 
kitchen  lines  in  their  display.  The  "Frost  River'  all-steel 
refrigerator  was  one  of  these.  A  feature  of  this  refrigerator 
is  the  fact  that  the  drip-pipe  is  outside,  and  does  not  run 
through  the  food  chanaber,  a  "U"  at  the  back  takirg  care 
of  it.  Metal  waste  baskets,  range  boilers  and  sick-room  and 
hospital  enamelled  outfits  were  other  exhibits. 

The  "Marathon"  enamelware  line  was  the  "new  goods" 
feature.  This  is  a  brown-mottled  colored  line.  TJie  white 
and  the  blue  enamelled  lines  were  also  in  evidence,  as  also 
were  gas  ovens  and  cake,  flour  and  cereal  camsters  in  sets. 

Richardson  &  Bui-eau,  Montreal,  exhibited  the  various  lines 
for  which  they  are  Canadian  agents — the  "Fry"  oven  glass- 
ware; a  new  seal  glass  for  oven  use;  a  glass  tea  set  with 
glass  teapot,  cups  and  saucers,  guaranteed  not  to  break  in 
heat.  Also  shown  was  the  Sabatier  French  cook  knife  line; 
St.  Mary's  hockey  sticks  and  basball  bats;  Hercules  cold 
solder  and  Mephisto  auger  bits. 

The  E.  T.  Wright  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  had  three  booths  to 
house  their  exhibit.  In  the  first  booth  they  displayed  their 
"Wrico"  kitchen  wares  and  housecleaning  lines — fry  pans, 
pails,  bird  cages,  watering  cans,  bake  tins,  garbage  cans, 
bread,  cake,  flour  and  cereal  boxes.  A  new  feature  on  these 
latter  is  a  hinged  cover;  the  gold  color  also  is  new  this  year. 
The  new  lanterns  were  also  featured.  These  have  a  carriage 
lock  to  make  them  secured  on  a  vehicle,  and  projecting  from 
the  carriage  show  a  red  light.  Much  was  made  of  the 
"Canuck"  bread  mixer. 

Nickelled  bathroom  fittings  and  nickelled  and  brass  taps 
from  the  "Well-Worth"  line  were  set  out  in  another  booth. 
This  nickel-plated  line  showed  up  very  well.  Included  in 
the  display  also  were  nickelled  hot  water  bottles  and  brass 
lawn  sprays. 

The  Wentforth  Mfg.  Co.,  Hamilton,  displayed  "Well- 
Worth"  aluminum  ware  line,  covering  the  whole  range  of 
the  company's  goods  from  spoons  to  teapots  and  boilers. 
Some  nickel-plated  wares  and  brassware  were  as  well  shown 
in  connection  with  the  "WellWorth"  goods. 

The  Newell  Mfg.  Co.,  Ltd.,  Prescott,  made  a  splendid  dis- 
play of  their  bathroom  fixtures,  extension  curtain  rods,  house- 
hold fixtures,  nickel  goods  and  pole  ends.  Hacksaw  frames 
are  the  latest  addition  to  the  company's  manufactured  lines, 
though  nickel-plated  goods  are  also  quite  recent.  All  the 
company's  productions  are  made  of  steel  and  then  nickelled. 

ELECTRICAL  GOODS  AND  SPECLVLTIES 

Equator  Mfg.  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  displayed  electrical 
wares  and  appliances — toasters,  a  glue  pot  stove,  radiators, 
automobile  engine  and  carborator  heater,  a  utility  stove  and 
an  electric  heater. 

The  National  Electric  Heating  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  made  a 
somewhat  elaborate  display  of  electric  stoves,  heaters,  grates 
and  household  appliances.     The  stove  and  range  line  runs 


from  the  small  disc  stove  to  hot  plates;  portable  ovens;  two, 
three  and  four  plate  stoves;  and  six  plate-three  oven  ranges. 
Electric  circulation  water  heaters  are  also  included  in  this 
group,  together  with  the  open  hearth  and  mantle  type  grates. 
Electric  irons,  toasters,  percolators  and  heatrays  are  included 
in  the  smaller  electric  home  appliances. 

The  Hoover  Suction  Sweeper  Co.,  Hamilton,  demonstrated 
a  couple  of  their  machines,  with  their  heating-sweeping  suc- 
tion brushes,  the  use  of  which  the  company  claims  will  pro- 
long the  carpet's  life,  straighten  the  nap  and  restore  the 
coloring.    The  Hoover  is  easy  to  operate  and  lasts  fo.  years. 

Canadian  Westinghouse  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  besides 
showing  a  variety  of  their  electric  lines  like  toasters,  irons, 
Mazda  lamps,  etc.,  also  showed  some  of  their  larger  lines  in 
the  shape  of  electric  stoves,  heaters  and  ranges.  Their 
"Cosy  Glow  Radiator"  was  one  of  these.  Possibly  their  little 
"Spark-C"  ignition  tester  attracted  most  attention.  This 
little  article,  about  the  size  and  shape  of  a  fountain  pen,  has 
a  small  window  in  its  side  which  shows  fiashes  of  light,  these 
flashes  indicating  the  condition  of  the  ignition  s>stem  of  a 
motor  car.  It  seems  a  useful  little  article  and  should  prove 
of  utility  to  car  owners. 

Maxwells,  Ltd.,  St.  Mary's,  exhibited  and  demon-trated 
their  "Home"  washing  machines  for  hand,  and  water-power, 
and  featured  especially  their  "Minimax"  and  "Mono-Vac" 
electric  washers.  The  "Minimax" — minimum  work  for  maxi- 
mum results — is  an  easy-operating,  quiet-running  r^iachine 
of  the  dolly  type.  It  has  the  newest  dolly,  the  wing  design. 
The  "Mono-Vac" — the  cup's  the  thing — has  distinctive  fea- 
tures. One  large  vacuum  cup  operates  on  all  the  clothes  at 
once,  pressing  the  air  and  suds  through  the  clothes  on  the 
downward  stroke,  and  lifting  the  water  back  through  on  the 
upward  stroke,  cleansing  rapidly,  and  without  weai  or  tear 
the  finest  of  fabrics,  as  well  as  washing  blankets  and  heavy 
pieces.  Wringers  are  attached  to  both  these  electric  washing 
machines. 

Churns,  lawn  mowers,  wheelbarrows,  pumps  and  general 
utensils  used  about  home  and  farm  also  were  part  of  the 
Maxwell  exhibit. 

The  "1900"  Washer  Co.,  Toronto,  demonstrated  their  com- 
plete "1900"  line  of  hand,  water  and  electricity  washing  ma- 
chines. Their  Agitator  electric  washing,  a  machine  simple  in 
design  and  construction,  was  featured.  The  working  parts 
of  this  machine  are  all  enclosed,  to  protect  the  operator,  and 
run  in  oil,  giving  long  life  to  the  machine.  The  "19U0"  is  so 
constructed  that  when  placed  in  front  of  stationary  tubs  the 
electric  wringer  may  be  swung  around  between  t'ne  sta- 
tionary tubs  to  help  wring  the  clothes  in  the  various  washing 
processes. 

The  new  "1900"  electric  metal  washer  agitates  the  water 
so  that  it  makes  a  complete  figure  8  in  the  process  of  wash- 
ing the  clothes.  Besides  this  new  electric  machine  the  com- 
pany also  showed  a  new  44-inch  electric  ironer. 

The  Easy  Washing  Macliine  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  demon- 
strated their  "Easy"  vacuum  electric  washer,  which  works 
on  the  "suction"  principle.  Two  vacuum  cups  inside  the  tub 
move  up  and  down  in  constantly  changing  positions  at  the 
rate  of  60  times  a  minute.  The  air  in  the  cups  on  the  down 
stroke  forces  the  soapy  ivater  through  the  mesh  of  the  gar- 
ments and  the  suction  sucks  the  water  back  again  on  the 
up  stroke.  The  capacity  of  the  tub  is  ten  sheets  or  fourteen 
pounds  of  dry  clothes  at  one  wash. 

The  tub  is  24  -inches  in  diameter,  made  of  copper  with 
inside  tinned  to  prevent  discoloring.  A  motor  suppLes  the 
energy,  and  a  gas  heater  maintains  the  water  at  any  desired 
temperature.  The  frame  is  metal  and  the  washer  can  be 
swung  to  any  position. 

Dow'swell,  Lees  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  extensively  dis- 
played their  various  washing  machines  and  wringers.  Two 
machines  were  specially  featured,  the  "Playtime"  dolly  type 
wash  for  hand  or  engine  drive,  and  the  "Seafoam"  improved 
electric  washer.  With  the  use  of  the  latter  machine  ^he  only 
hard  work  about  wash  day  is  hanging  out  the  clothes.  The 
machine  is  a  sturdy,  reliable  washer  and  wringer  of  s.x-sheet 
capacity.  The  operating  mechanism  is  simple  and  is  pro- 
tected. The  washing  principle  is  a  wooden  dolly  which 
mo\es  back  and  forth,  forcing  the  hot  suds  through  the 
clothes.    The  wringer  will  run  in  either  direction. 

A.  R.  Limdy,  Toronto,  demonstrated  the  "Liberty"  elec- 
tric power  washer,  with  swinging  wringer.  The  wai.ntub  is 
of  oscillating  type,  made  of  Virginia  white  cedar.  The  opera- 
tion is  by  Lundy  engine,  magneto  equipment.  The  shipiiing 
weight  of  the  power  washer,  crated,  is  225  pounds. 

Beatty  Bros.,  Ltd.,  Fergus,  exhibited  various  moaels  of 
their  house  and  well  suction  pumps;  washing  mai  hines, 
wringers,   step-ladders,   and  general   woodenware.      A  new 


32 


HARDWARE   AND   ACCESSORIES  , 


March,  1922 


fruit-picking-  ladder  with  three  legs  only,  to  make  it  more 
secure  on  uneven  ground,  was  shown  for  the  first  time,  as 
also  was  a  painter's  extension  scaffold. 

The  feature  of  the  display  was  a  "White  Cap"  electric 
washing  machine  in  operation.  For  this  machine  the  com- 
pany lays  claim  to  it  washing  faster,  washing  better  and  cost- 
ing less  than  most  other  similar  machines.  It  washes  a  tub- 
ful  of  dirty  clothes  in  ten  minutes  and  does  a  whole  washing 
in  an  hour.  The  reversing  mechanism  in  the  tub  swirls  gal- 
lons of  hot  water  through  the  clothes  120  times  every  min- 
ute. The  wringer  makes  60  revolutions  a  minute.  The 
"White  Cap"  has  quick  release,  metal  wringer,  handy  switch, 
covered  gears,  and  tightener  for  belt.  It  iS  a  Canadian  in- 
vention, made  in  Canada  from  Canadian  material  by  Cana- 
dian men. 

The  Collield  Washer  Co.,  Hamilton,  demonstrated  their 
washing  machine.  The  "Coflield"  is  as  strong  as  "know- 
how"  workmanship  can  make  it.  It  is  expertly  built,  with 
a  balance  so  perfect  that  it  runs  silently  and  without  vibra- 
tion. The  motor  needs  to  be  oiled  but  twice  a  year  It  is 
a  simple  machine,  easily  understood,  constructed  entirely  of 
metal,  the  frame  being  steel  and  the  wash  boiler  copper. 
The  cost  of  operation  is  small,  the  "Coffleld"  will  clean  and 
wring  out  two  tubs  full  of  dirty  clothes — from  16  to  24 
pounds — for  from  two  to  three  cents. 

The  Slade  Mfg.  Co.,  Ltd.,  Owen  Sound,  displayed  and 
demonstrated  one  of  their  "Klymax"  electric  vacuun;  wash- 
ers, which  lays  claim  to  being  the  latest  development  in  elec- 
tric washing  machines,  as  it  washes,  rinses,  boils  and 
wringer-dries  without  the  use  of  a  wringer.  No  handling  of 
the  clothes  is  necessary  until  ready  to  hang  on  the  line.  The 
"Klymax"  works  on  the  vacuum  cup  principle,  three  of  these 
cups  making  up  and  down  movements.  It  is  an  all-metal 
construction  machine;  simple  to  understand  and  operate; 
is  safe  to  set  in  motion,  all  working  parts  being  enclosed,  and 
has  a  capacity  of  from  six  to  eight  sheets. 

The  Hurley  Macliinc  Co.,  Toronto,  showed  their  'Thor" 
electric  clothes  washer.  Walker  electric  dish  washer, 
"Sweeper-Vac"  electric  sweeper,  and  a  new  electric  'roner. 

STOVES  AND  FURNACES 

The  Mack  Furnace  Co.,  Ltd.,  Chatham,  Ont.,  exhibited 
one  of  their  latest  model  pipeless  furnaces.  This  is  a  new 
company  with  a  new  product,  and  the  display  was  the  first 
one  made  by  the  company.  Among  the  salient  features  of 
this  furnace  are — the  ash  pit  holds  three  inches  of  water; 
steam  rising  from  this  water  aids  combustion,  the  water  also 
moistens  the  ashes,  thereby  eliminating  all  dust  from  the 
ashes.  The  lock  joints  on  this  furnace  makes  it  gas,  smoke 
and  dustproof  for  life. 

The  fire-pot  is  deep  and  roomy,  measuring  from  to  31 
inches,  respectively,  according  to  size.  The  feed  section  has 
a  number  of  tumblers  in  its  walls,  which  cause  the  smoke 
and  gas  to  mix  and  pass  laterally  across  the  fire  for  lurther 
consumption,  and  besides  give  60  per  cent,  additional  radiat- 
ing surface.    The  radiator  is  entirely  of  cast  iron. 

The  Gurney  Foundry  Co.  showed  their  latest  des'gi.ed  gas 
and  coal  stoves,  ranges  and  combinations.  A  Scorcher" 
pipeless  furnace  also  formed  part  of  this  display.  Ihe  im- 
portant features  were  the  new  all-enamelled  gas  ;  toves — 
white,  grey  and  blue — and  the  newest  wrinkle  two-oven  com- 
bination stoves  (below  for  coal  heat  and  above  for  gi&). 

A  demonstration  feature  was  the  Gurney  gai>  water 
heater,  which  may  be  installed  on  any  water  connecLions  al- 
leady  in  the  home.  It  is  specially  suitable  for  summer  use 
when  hot  water  is  wanted  quickly  and  without  ligntiiig  the 
furnace  and  heating  up  the  whole  house.  This  htai.er  has 
all  the  latest  fixtures  and  attachments  to  make  it  '.-fRcient 
and  economic  to  use. 

Flndlay  Bros.  Co.,  Ltd.,  Carleton  Place,  makers  cf  "Fa- 
vorite" stoves  and  ranges,  put  on  display  two  new  ,.ipeless 
furnaces  and  two  new  ranges.  The  new  Findlay  pipeless 
has  improved  tripUx  grate,  large  dust-tighf  ash-pit,  heavy 
two-piece  firepot  and  large  combustion  dome  and  ra,diator, 
in  addition  to  its  other  better-known  qualities.  For  t!>e  pipe- 
les.s  the  claim  is  made — and  the  company  has  letters  o  back 
up  its  assertion — that  it  will  free  heating  the  houte  from 
work  and  dirt;  will  keep  every  corner  of  every  roo'ii  warm, 
and  save  one-third  or  more  on  fuel. 

In  ranges  Findlay's  "A"  range  was  one  of  the  chosen 
exhibits.  It  is  an  all-cast  range  built  from  the  standpoint  of 
a  woman  for  convenience  and  comfort.  Its  service  is  guar- 
anteed. It  burns  either  coal  or  wood.  The  other  range  dis- 
played was  one  of  Findlay's  new  six-hole  "Tortoise  Cook,"  a 
combination  cooking  and  Quebec  heating  stove.  it  has  a 
large  oven;  drop  door,  with  thermometer;  burns  either  wood 


or  coal,  and  was  built  in  response  to  the  demand  for  a  larger 
combination  than  the  four-hole  "Tortoise." 

The  Happy  Thought  Foundry  Co.,  Ltd.,  BrantfoiU,  dis- 
played a  number  of  their  new  and  standard  sto.es  and 
langes.  Among  these  was  the  large  No.  209  steei  licnge,  a 
modernized  "Happy  Thought,"  with  drop  oven  door,  invis- 
ible smoke-pipe  and  nickel-plated  trimmings.  One  of  these 
209  was  shown  with  plain  steel  high  closet,  and  anotner  with 
decorated  tile  closet. 

The  "Happy  Thought"  cast-iron  range  was  also  shown  in 
various  sizes  and  designs,  as  also  were  a  number  of  their 
other  popular  steel  ranges — "Harvest  Home,"  "Britannia," 
"Northern"  and  smaller  stoves  like  the  "Cosy  Home,  "Ma- 
gic," "Star"  and  "Welcome." 

A  "Happy  Thought"  pipeless  furnace  also  founa  part  of 
this  display. 

The  Pease  Fotmdry  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  exhibited  both  a 
pipe  and  a  pipeless  furnace.  The  "Economy"  line  of  fur- 
naces arc-  well-known  and  these  two  exhibits  attractja  much 
attention.  The  company  is  directing  attention  this  year  to 
their  "Economy"  wood-burning  warm-air  furnace,  uuilt  in 
four  sizes.  It  is  of  cast  iron  construction,  has  corrugated 
combustion  chamber,  large  feed  and  ashpit  dooro,  and  all 
the  other  features  of  their  up-to-date  coal  furnacej 

The  Doherty  Mfg.  Co.,  Sarnia,  exhibited  four  of  thoir  most 
prominent  stoves  and  ranges — "Banquet,"  •llii.iblem," 
"Oiion"  and  "Doherty."  This  latter  has  both  maia  ^nd  top 
ovens;  deep  and  roomy  firebox  duplex  grates;  the  front  is 
full-nickelled,  and  the  sanitary  base  leaves  the  flooi  clear  for 
sweeping. 

Besides  the  stoves  shown  the  Doherty  Co.  make  tne  "Fa- 
vorite" line — "Superb  Favorite,"  "Family  Favoric^"  and 
"Imperial  Oak"  heaters. 

Monitor  Stove  Co.,  Toronto,  exhibited  a  "CaloriC"  ipeless 
turnace,  which  uses  coal,  wood,  gas  or  oil.  It  has  a,  double- 
ribbed  firepot  made  of  high  quality  pig  iron,  is  an  extra 
heavily  built  furnace,  and  is  guaranteed  for  five  years. 

The  Hamilton  Stove  &  Heater  Co.,  Ltd.,  makers  cf  "Sou- 
venir" stoves  and  ranges  showed  a  couple  of  thiir  latest 
combinations  and  a  pipeless  "New  Idea"  furnace,  rhi-  "Sou- 
venir Su^Derheater"  was  also  in  evidence.  This  is  a  large- 
sized  heater  on  the  pipeless  furnace  style  for  city  or  country 
homes. 

Gurney-Hamilton  locks  and  builders'  hardware  was  also 
feature  in  this  display. 

The  Perfection  Stove  Co.,  Ltd.,  Sarnia,  dispia'  f^d  and 
demonstrated  their  "New  Perfection"  oil  cook  stoves  and 
ovens,  and  the  various  utensils  that  have  been  adued  as 
auxiliaries.  The  claims  for  the  "Perfection"  stoves  are  that 
they  are  clean,  steady,  speedy  and  hot.  The  auxiliary  line  is 
comjDosed  of  a  "New  Perfection"  kerosene  water  heater; 
Junior  stoves;  broiler,  toaster. 

In  addition  the  company  showed  their  new  '  Sani-Can," 
which,  as  its  name  implies,  is  a  sanitary  garbage  „an  for  in- 
door use.  The  pail  is  removeable  from  a  metal  fraii:  ,  a  foot 
press  lifts  the  lid;  and  in  the  lid  is  a  disinfectant  <.o.itainer 
which  sprinkles  a  deodorant  oxer  the  contents  every  c.me  the 
cover  is  closed. 

The  D.  Moore  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  showed  somi  of  their 
latest  model  coal,  gas  and  electric  stoves  and  heateii.  They 
featured  especially  their  new  electric  range,  the  first  model 
of  this  line  being  the  one  on  display.  The  claims  lOr  this 
range  are  that  it  is  reliable,  is  clean,  is  safe,  is  coOi  is  con- 
venient, and  is  healthful.  The  oven  is  full-size  />  th  re- 
moveable runners,  and  the  range  has  a  warming  uven  as 
well.  The  oven  has  two  burners  and  the  cooking  top  three 
burners. 

Besioes  the  electric  range  the  company  showed  tiioir  steel 
and  cast  ranges,  particularly  their  "Othello"'  and  '  Sritish," 
as  well  as  a  Quebec  heater,  combination,  with  16-inch  oven, 
high  closet,  reservoir,  etc. 

BUILDERS'  HARDWARE  AND  TOOLS 

The  James  Smart  Plant  of  the  Canada  Foundrico  &  Forg- 
ings,  Ltd.,  occupied  a  double  booth  to  display  their  produc- 
tions. Ihe  centre  of  the  booth  was  occupied  by  the  com- 
pany's newest  product,  a  large  lawn  mower,  named  thfe 
"Great  Canadian."  The  back  of  the  booth  was  mad"  to  rep- 
resent a  hardware  store,  with  dummy  drawers  on  which 
were  attached  sample  tools  made  at  the  Brockvillc  plant, 
such  as  pulleys,  latches,  hinges,  sad  irons,  handles  axes, 
hatchets,  hammers,  sledges,  etc.  One  side  wall  had  as  de- 
coration several  panels  of  hammers  set  out  in  artib-ic  man- 
ner, the  opposite  wall  being  taken  up  with  a  line  of  steel 
£ry-pans,  nickelled,  which  caught  the  eye  of  most  visitors. 


March,  1922 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


33 


Rae  Machine  Tool  Works,  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  showed  ma- 
chinists' and  woodworlcers'  tools- — planes,  vises,  bar  clamps 
and  hand-screws.  Tom  Wright  is  representing  this  line,  as 
well  as  the  National  Hardware  Co.  of  Orillia,  the  Canadian 
Tool  Co.  of  Bridgeburg,  and  the  Canadian  Edge  Too.l  Co.  of 
Gait,  the  latter  making  carpenters'  sleeks;  framing,  corner 
and  primer  chisels;  draw  knives,  cold  chisels  and  b^nch  axes. 

N.  Slater  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  displayed  to  advantage 
their  hinges,  door  hangers  and  other  hardware  lined.  They 
specialized  this  year  on  their  "Crosby"  clip  for  fastening  wire 
rope.  These  clips  are  made  of  drop-forged  steel,  galvanized, 
and  will  hold  any  wire  that  is  made. 

Norman  Macdonald,  Toronto,  displayed  samples  f'-om  the 
^■arious  lines  h&  handles — Carborundum  and  Alox.t'='  razor 
hones;  Wiss  shears;  Kraeuter  automobile  and  mechanics' 
pliers;  and  the  products  of  the  Forged  Steel  Prodactv  Co.  of 
Newark. 

E.  C.  Atkins  &  Co.,  Hamilton,  had  as  a  centrevicce  two 
circular  saws  in  motion  and  around  the  walls  samples  of 
their  hand  saws  and  edged  tools.  These  were  sot  out  in 
attractive  groupings.  The  goods  on  display  were  iiiade  up 
in  the  Hamilton  plant,  and  the  company  pride  thembalves  on 
<he  fact  that  these  goods  are  equal  to  any  made  in  America. 
Especial  attention  was  drawn  to  their  No.  70  and  No.  51  hand 
saws. 

All  the  Atkins  saws  arp  made  of  Atkins  silver  steel  and 
the  handles  are  of  the  old-style  straight  across  shape  and 
the  new  improved  perfection  pattern.  These  saws  a,re  made 
in  a  hundred  patterns  for  practically  all  cutting  purposes. 

The  Loudon  Macliinery  Co.  of  Canada,  Ltd.,  Guel^.h,  fea- 
tured their  Louden  adjustable  bird-proof  barn  door  hangers. 
These  hangers  permit  the  door  to  be  adjusted  both  lateral 
and  vertical,  and  double-bracket  makes  the  track  biia-proof. 

Pulleys,  hooks,  ice  tongs  were  other  Louden  1  n^s  dis- 
played, besides  the  Louden  special  inside  auto  garage  doors. 

The  Steel  Co.  of  Canada,  Ltd.,  had  their  booth  repre- 
sent a  hardware  store  with  the  various  goods  they  manufac- 
ture in  packets  on  the  shelves,  and  larger  articles  L,bout  the 
store.  As  these  lines  cover  practically  all  the  letters  in  the 
f.Iphabet,  it  can  readily  seen  that  the  exhibits  were  very  ex- 
tensive. There  were  bars,  bolts,  nails,  bright  wire  goods,  car- 
riage forgings,  escutcheon  pins,  fencing  and  gates,  hooks, 
hinges,  nuts,  screws,  shot,  staples,  tacks,  washers,  a^'  e,  taps, 
and  many  other  items. 

WOODENWARE  AND  TOYS 

The  Stratford  Mfg.  Co.,  Ltd.,  prominently  displayed  their 
woodenware  lines,  especially  featuring  their  ladder  lines,  in- 
cluding steps,  extension,  fruit-picking  and  kitchen  folding 
iadder  chairs.  Garden  and  lawn  seats,  camp  chair»,  folding 
chairs  and  tables  were  also  shown,  as  were  ironing  ai'd  bake 
Ijoards,  clothes  horses  and  driers,  etc. 

Particular  attention  was  paid  to  the  latest  additio.i  to  the 
Stratford  goods — the  Sammie  car — a  new  handcar  lor  chil- 
dren. From  the  child's  point  of  view  the  bright  red,  white 
and  blue  colors  of  the  car  attract  attention  instantly;  it  is 
easy  to  operate  by  the  smallest  child  has  plenty  o,*'  action, 
and  automatically  becomes  a  coaster  when  the  child  stops 
pumping. 

The  toy  car  appeals  to  parents,  as  it  provides  sensible 
health-building  exercise  indoors  and  out,  and  the  Sammie 
car  from  the  dealers'  standpoint,  provides  a  new  idea  in 
toys;  it  is  easily  converted  to  any  size  for  a  child  ii<  m  two 
to  eight  year,  and  is  nationally  advertised. 

Gendron  Mfg.  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  in  their  booth  made  a 
.splendid  display  of  their  extensive  line  of  bathroom  fixtures 
in  artistic  panel  arrangement  on  the  back  wall  of  the  booth. 
These  fixtures  are  all  nickel-plated,  except  the  tov>el  bars, 
some  of  which  are  clear  glass  and  others  opaque  glass,  as 
well  as  nickelled  bars. 

The  wagon  and  velocipede  line  was  shown  in  artillery 
cars,  sleds.  Blue-devil  velocipedes,  and  the  new  "  Beaver" 
coaster  wagons  with  the  ball-bearing  wheels.  These  Beaver 
wagons  are  the  latest  in  this  department  and  are  guaranteed. 

The  Canadian  Buffalo  Sled  Co.,  Ltd.,  made  an  c.:hibit  of 
their  1922-3  models  of  "Fleetwing"  racer  sleighs,  children's 
sleds,  baby  sleighs,  lawn  swings,  auto-wheel  coaster  \ragons, 
with  spoke  and  disc  wheels,  and  other  novelties  for  tne  hard- 
ware and  toy  trade.  The  new  improvements  to  uie  auto- 
wheel  coasters  are  that  they  have  roller  bearings,  which  are 
non-frictionable.  The  disc  wheels  also  are  new.  Patents 
are  pending  on  these.  Bob-sleighs,  steering  sleds  and  Buf- 
falo wagons  were  as  well  displayed. 

Kasement  Skrene  Dore  Co.,  Toronto,  had  half  a  dozen 
samples  of  their  screen  doors  on  display,  one  of  th-^n;  a  new 


addition  to  the  line  this  year.  Instead  of  a  screen  to  the 
bottom  of  the  door  it  has  a  wood  panel  to  meet  the  sugges- 
tion and  needs  of  those  who  state  that  children  son.etimes 
kick  holes  in  the  lower  section  of  the  screen. 

"Kasement"  doors  are  made  in  four  stock  sizes  and  in 
two  kinds  of  wire  cloth. 

The  McFarlane  Mfg.  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  manufacturers  of 
'ladders,  washboards  and  kitchen  woodenware — extension  and 
folding  clothes  bars,  curtain  stretchers,  clothes  baskatJ,  etc. — 
made  a  good  display  of  all  these  lines.  They  especially 
featured  their  ladders,  from  their  "Special"  to  "Heavy  Duty" 
in  steps  to  their  various  sized  extension  ladders.  "lockey 
sticks,  too,  formed  part  of  this  exhibit. 

WIRE  GOODS  AND  ROOFING 

The  Frost  Steel  &  Wire  Co.,  Hamilton,  showed  samples 
of  their  Frost  fences  for  every  purpose,  bright  and  gal  'anized 
wire,  and  particularly  featured  their  non-climbable  property 
protection  fence. 

Banwell  Hoxie  Wire  Fence  Co.,  Ltd.,  HamiltOii,  made 
their  booth  into  miniature  chicken-run  to  demonstrate  more 
effectively  their  "Peerless"  fences  and  gates.  The  cnickens 
gave  life  to  the  display  and  always  attracted  '  eholders. 
Around  the  sides  and  back  of  the  booth  were  set  out  vamples 
of  the  products  of  the  company — staples,  farm  and  field  fenc- 
ing, stretching  tools,  barb  and  coiled  wire,  window  guards, 
flower  trellises,  steel  posts,  etc. 

The  Canada  Wire  and  Iron  Goods  Co.,  Hamilton,  make 
a  big  rar.ge  of  wire  rope  lines  for  all  purposes,  wire  cioih,  and 
besides  do  general  ornamental  wire  and  iron  wor'i.,  many 
samples  of  their  work  in  this  regard  being  on  exhibition. 
Among  these  were  displayed  double  crimped  wire  cioth,  per- 
forated sheet  metal,  concrete  reinforcements,  gravel  and 
stone  screening,  foundry  supplies,  bank  and  ofl^ice  lailings, 
laboratory  testing  sieves,  wrought  iron  guards  aiid  grills, 
metal  clothes  lockers,  wire  baskets,  register  faces,  garden  bor- 
dering, fireplace  screens,  trellises  and  arches  for  c..mbing 
plants. 

The  Brantford  Roofing  Co.,  Ltd.,  Brantford,  made  a  splen- 
did display  of  their  varied  roofing  products.  Speciu'ly  no- 
ticeable were  the  sample  Winthrop  tapered  asphali,  slates, 
which  combine  the  fire-resisting  qualities  of  slate  with  a  bond 
composed  principally  of  asphalt.  These  shingles  aio  elastic 
and  can  be  bent  around  corners  and  curved  surfaces  of  artis- 
tic roofs.  These  Winthrop  shingles  can  be  laid  over  olJ  wood 
shingles. 

Brantford  asphalt  slab  slates  (four-in-one)  wc^e  also 
shown,  as  was  the  regular  line  of  roll  roofings  in  one,  two  and 
three-ply — Climax  sheathing,  Brantford  asphalt,  Biantford 
rubber,  Sandon,  Standard,  Mohawk,  Crystal  and  jtiiers,  in 
red  and  green  colorings. 

Toronto  Asphalt  Roofing  Mfg.  Co.,  Ltd.,  Mount  Deanis,  one 
of  the  r.ewest  roofing  companies  manufacturing  in  Canada, 
showed  a  number  of  samples  of  their  various  lines  They 
are  making  a  one,  two  and  three-ply  "Toronto"  quality  of 
smooth-finish  roofing;  a  special  line  of  rolled  roofing  in  fl.ve 
thicknesses;  a  rock-faced  roofing  in  red  and  green  t.nish  in 
rolls  of  18  and  32  inches  width  also  a  line  of  indivicual  slab 
slates,  and  a  three-graded  line  sanded  on  both  sides. 

Bird  &  Son,  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  had  a  small  model  hju.se  dis- 
playing one  of  their  roofings  as  a  centrepiece  around  which 
was  grouped  their  ready  roofings,  building  papers,  wall-board 
and  patent  shingles  (Caandian  and  Neponset  twins)  and 
rubber  roofing.  Especially  featured  was  the  "Art -Craft 
Roof,"  a  ready  roofing  which  can  be  put  over  old  s^nngles. 
It  is  surfaced  in  red  or  green,  with  a  printed  tile  eltoct,  to 
give  an  artistic  finish  to  any  building  on  which  it  is  used. 
Art-Craft  has  been  approved  by  the  Underwriters'  labora- 
tories. Its  advantages  are — fire-safe,  attractive,  weaiher  and 
waterproof,  can't  curl,  wind  won't  blow  off,  easily  applied, 
fadeless. 

SCALES,  PUMPS  AND  CORDAGE 

International  Business  Machines  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toroiiio,  put 

on  display  a  couple  of  their  Dayton  scales  for  hardware  deal- 
ers. Tnis  scale  gives  a  range  of  prices  from  4  c^nts  to  60 
cents  a  pound,  and  a  total  adder  cj'linder  up  to  9  0  pounds. 
The  capacity  of  the  scale  is  up  to  100  pounds. 

The  R.  McDougall  Co.  of  Gait  made  a  big  showing  of  their 
extensive  pump  lines,  featuring  their  Gait  electric  house  ser- 
vice pumps  and  their  self-oiling  "Bulldozer"  for  deep  well 
purposes.  This  company  makes  pumps  for  all  "  practical 
purposes. 

Brantford  Computing  Scales,  Ltd.,  showed  one  of  their 
computing  hardware  scales  for  "hard  ware."    This  computer 


34 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


March.  1922 


gives  automatically  the  exact  weight  and  value  instn.i^ly  the 
goods  are  placed  on  the  scale. 

The  Consumers  Cordage  Co.,  Toronto,  made  an  tiaborate 
showing  of  their  ropes  and  twines  in  fantastic  settings.  There 
was  rope  of  all  sizes  and  for  all  uses.  Manila  and  sitiut  strands 
were  bunched  on  the  walls  and  sample  clothes  lines  and  hemp 
halyards  and  plowlines  were  set  in  pyramids  al  tiie  front 
of  the  booth.  "Lion"  brand  manila,  tarred  marline  in  hanks, 
square-braided  packing,  African  hemp  twine  and  LJIue  Rib- 
bon" twine  were  featured  prominently. 

PAINTS,  BRUSHES  AND  GliASS 

Stewart  &  Wood,  Ltd..  Toronto,  made  a  large  and  attrac- 
tive display  of  their  many  and  varied  lines,  featuring  parti- 
cularly their  "Champion"  pure  liquid  white  lead.  Tnls  lead 
is  ready  for  use,  mixed  with  pure  refined  linseed  oit  and 
spirits  of  turpentine. 

Also  shown  were  the  McArthur,  Irwin  paint  anr"  jOougall 
varnish  lines,  which  are  distributed  by  Stewart  &  Wood. 

MeaUins  &  Sons,  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  displayed  their  brushes 
atiractively  set  out  on  panels  fixed  to  the  walls.  Th<  re  were 
hundreus  of  different  brushes  shown.  The  Meakins  line  of 
brushes  is  rubber  set,  and  their  trade  mark,  as  their  litera- 
ture hat'  it,  is  the  symbol  of  true  quality  and  dependability. 

The  company  has  a  new  display  feature  this  year  It  is 
a  plaster  model  of  a  painter  holding  a  brush  in  eaoh  hand. 
They  albo  have  a  new  counter  display  box  for  their  .rushes, 
each  be:  holding  a  dozen  brushes.  In  speaking  of  '.he  dis- 
play, one  of  the  salesmen  said  the  Meakins'  brushes  wtre  the 
brushes  that  took  the  pain  out  of  painting,  which  is  a  very 
good  slogan. 

Benjamin,  Moore  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  featured  their 
"Muresco"  for  wall  and  ceiling  decoration,  besides  showing 
samples  of  their  other  paint  lines,  especially  theli  "Sani- 
Flat,"  a  sanitary  flat  oil  paint,  ready-prepared,  for  all  in- 
terior painting.  The  use  of  "Sani-Flat"  produces  d,n  ideal 
soft  veUet  finish. 

Lowe  Brothers,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  decorated  the  walls  of  their 
booth  with  advertising  matter  and  color  charts,  m  which 
they  prominently  set  out  the  cardinal  points  of  their  policy — 
ser\'ice,  confidence,  fair  dealing — and  gave  a  list  of  their 
dealers'  1922  sales  service  and  publicity  pampaign. 

"High  Standard"  paint  and  varnish  samples  v  cie  dis- 
played. These  products  are  well  known  to  the  hardware 
trade. 

S.  C  Johnson  &  Son,  Brantford,  made  a  very  full  ^showing 
of  all  their  productions,  starting  with  Johnson's  prepared 
wax  for  floors  and  furniture  in  paste,  liquid  and  poivdered 
form.  .Johnson's  enamel,  Johnson's  undercoat,  wood  dye, 
wood  filler  and  wood  finishes  were  also  shown  and  demon- 
strated. 

Johnson's  carbon  remover,  car  savers  and  car  cleaner  for 
automobiles  are  the  good  things  for  car  owners,  and  John- 
son's varnishes,  valve  grinding  compound  and  "Hustle 
Patch"  for  rubber  mending  are  among  the  newer  lines  of 
the  company. 

Sanderson,  Pearcy  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  made  a  splendid 
di.splay  of  their  Hillcrest  paint  lines,  sample  tins  in  "  arious 
sizes,  of  all  colors  and  tints  being  on  show.  The  booth  was 
decorated  in  yellow  and  black  hangings  to  correspond  with 
the  colors  of  the  "Hillcrest"  labels.  Hillcrest  prepare:^  paints 
are  for  exterior  and  interior  work,  and  besides  gloss  paints 
the  Hillcrest  brand  is  made  in  fiat  white  and  Looi  paint. 
Hillcrest.  too,  has  been  used  as  a  name  on  the  company's 
varnish,  oil  stain,  and  other  products. 

The  Boeckh  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  had  their  whole  exhibit 
set  out  in  trays,  which  were  attached  to  the  back  and  walls 
of  the  booth.  Prominent  in  the  display  was  their  srerilized 
rubber-set  shaving  brushes.  All  the  Boeckh  bruches  are 
rubber-set,  and  the  bristles  won't  come  out.  As  a  dealer's 
help  the  company  set  up  their  goods  ordered  on  display 
panels  for  use  in  the  store.  This  is, an  aid  that  always  helps 
sell  more  brushes. 

A  new  article  this  year  is  an  automobile  spray-oiush  for 
washing  cars.  Water  can  be  sprayed  through  the  brush  with- 
out the  necessity  of  using  a  hose  and  a  brush.  N'cw  brass- 
etch  display  cards  showing  the  Boeckh  trade  mark  vv*  re  in- 
terspersed with  the  goods  on  display. 

The  Alaba.stine  Co.,  Paris,  Ltd.,  besides  showing  "  arious 
treatments  made  with  Church's  cold  water  "AlaDastine," 
demonstrated  particularly  their  new  opaline  process,  by  which 
it  is  po.ssible  through  the  use  of  a  sponge  to  mottle  jr  stipple 
the  basic  color  on  the  wall  with  one  or  more  tintp  and  give 
a  very  pretty  effect. 

AlabaHtine  is  a  .sanitary  wall  coloring;  is  easily  n.ixed  and 
applied,  and  has  good  lasting  qualities. 

The  Boulton  Paint  Co.,  Toronto,  featured  their  perfected 


fioor  wax  and  their  pure  shellac.  The  Boulton  floor  wax  is 
a  product  of  eleven  years'  experience,  and  is  specially  adapted 
to  hardwood  floors,  where  a  good  appearance  is  dco  red. 

The  GUdden  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  in  a  booth  decoiated  in 
green  and  white  to  match  the  colors  of  the  labels  on  their 
cans,  showed  their  various  Glidden  Endurance  paints,  Jap-a- 
lac,  etc.  A  special  feature  was  the  display  and  demonstra- 
tion of  Ripolin  enamel,  the  original  Holland  enamel  paint, 
for  which  the  Glidden  Company  are  manufacturers  and  dis- 
tributors in  Canada.  Ripolin  is  known  the  world  over  for 
its  wonderful  working  and  wearing  qualities.  Long  in  oil, 
long  in  service,  and  beautiful  in  effect,  it  is  used  on  many 
of  the  most  representative  public  and  private  building  in  both 
Europe  and  North  America.  Ripolin  will  not  crack,  craze, 
peel,  flake  or  blister.  To  prove  this  a  piece  of  tin  was 
bent  and  twisted  and  hit  with  a  hammer,  but  the  enamel  was 
not  cracked. 

The  display  was  in  charge  of  B.  D.  Blackwell  a^d  F.  H. 
Uebbing. 

,  The  Ohio  Varnish  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  demonstrated  their 
"Chi-Namel,"  a  ready-to-use  graining  product.  Tlie  "Chi- 
Namel"  graining  process  is  a  practical  method  of  applying 
hardwood  grain  effects  over  old,  dirty  or  discolored  softwood, 
or  previously  painted  floors,  doors,  woodwork,  furniture,  etc. 
A  graining  tool  and  comb  are  the  implements  used  with  the 
"Chi-Namel"  to  give  it  the  finished  grain  effect. 

The  George  Cooke  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  featured  thc.r  C.  & 
B.  fioor  wax  in  paste  and  liquid  form,  also  in  povvuer  form 
for  dancing  floors. 

Another  line  is  their  "Aluminet,"  for  cleaning  aluminum 
utensils,  and  white  and  orange  shellac,  painters'  stains  and 
varnishes. 

Home  Products  Co.,  Hamilton,  manufacturers  of  Lustro" 
piano  cream.  "Nucedar"  floor  polish,  "Water-tite"  water- 
proofing for  shoes,  and  "Abso-Safe"  silver  cream,  showed  and 
demonstrated  thees  articles.  Besides  the  "Nu-Lusto"  cream 
for  pianos  a  "Nu-Lustro"  auto  renewer  has  been  brought  out. 
It  is  composed  of  an  emulsion  of  oils  which  loosens  and  amal- 
gamates with  all  grease,  dirt  and  old  coating,  whicii  aie  then 
easily  removed,  restoring  and  preserving  the  natural  i.olor. 

.Standard  Paint  &  Varnish  Co.,  Ltd.,  Windsor,  specially 
gave  prominence  to  their  Windsor  Solvent  Stains.  The  use  of 
these  stains  does  not  change  the  finish  on  old  wood,  but  does 
change  the  color.  Flintcoat  stain  and  finish,  and  Flintcoat 
graining  comijound  were  also  featured  in  this  exhibit. 

Canadian  Libby-Owens  Sheet  Glass  Co.,  Ltd.,  Hamilton, 
made  a  showing  of  their  flat-drawn  window  glass  made  in 
their  Hamilton  plant  which  was  highly  praised  by  all  hard- 
ware dealers  present.  A  large  block  or  cake  of  glass  was  a 
centrepiece  of  the  display  and  samples  of  sheet  glass  were 
set  about  the  booth.  For  this  line  of  glass  the  claim  is 
made  that  it  is  absolutely  flat;  gives  a  perfectly  clear  vision; 
is  uniform  in  thickness;  retains  its  natural  finish,  is  per- 
fectly annealed;  it  breaks  on  the  cut;  and  is  made  in  Canada. 


PAINT  MANUFACTURERS'  OFFICERS 

At  the  annual  meeting  of  the  Canadian  Paint,  Oil  and 
Varnish  Association,  held  at  Montreal  in  February,  officers 
were  elected  for  1922  as  follows: 

President,  George  Henderson,  Brandram,  Henderson,  Lim- 
ited; vice-presidents,  Walter  B.  Ramsay  (A.  Ramsay  &  Son 
Company),  L.  C.  Stephens  (G.  F.  Stephens  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  Win- 
nipeg), T.  F.  Monnypenny  (Imperial  Varnish  and  Color  Co., 
Ltd.,  Toronto) . 

"Save  the  Surface"  Committee:  R.  C.  Mission,  Shei-win- 
Williams  Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal;  H.  E.  Mihell,  Imperial  Varnish 
and  Color  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto;  John  Irwin,  McArthur-Irwin, 
Ltd.,  Montreal;  George  Henderson,  Brandram-Henderson, 
Ltd.,  Montreal;  Royal  Cluxton,  Canada  Paint  Co.,  Ltd.,  Mont- 
real; L.  C.  Stephens,  G.  F.  Stephens  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  Winnipeg; 
and  J.  C.  Pendray,  British  Columbia  Paint  Mfg.  Co.,  Vic- 
toria, B.C. 


TORONTO  RETAILERS  TO  MEET 

Hardware  and  paint  dealers  in  Toronto  are  invited  to  at- 
tend a  meeting  of  the  Toronto  Retail  Hardware  and  Paint 
Club  on  Tuesday,  March  14,  at  6.30  p.m.,  in  the  Board  of 
Trade  rooms  on  the  20th  floor  of  the  Royal  Bank  Building, 
King  and  Yonge  streets.  A  dollar  dinner  will  be  served  and 
business  will  follow.  The  work  of  the  organization  meeting 
in  January  will  be  discussed  and  organization  completed  at 
this  meeting. 

Some  interesting  addresses  and  other  features  are  planned 
and  representatives  of  the  Paint  and  Oil  Club,  who  will  be 
guests,  are  expected  to  make  some  practical  suggestions  for 
increasing  spring  trade.    Every  live  retailer  should  attend. 


March,  1922 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


Prepare  For  Spring  Trade  In  Tires 

Some  Praclical  Suggestions  For  Hardware  Dealers 
Who  Cater  To  Trade  Of  Motorists. 


The  majority  of  hardware  merch- 
ants throughout  the  country  carry 
more  or  less  complete  lines  of  auto- 
mobile accessories.  They  have  been 
tried  and  have  not  been  found  w^ant- 
ing.  They  constitute  a  highly  profit- 
able line  and  they  make  for  a  rapid 
turnover  as  well.  The  days  of  experi- 
mentation in  auto  accessories  have 
passed  and  they  are  now  included  as 
staples.  Motorists  are  to  be  found 
in  every  section  of  the  country  and 
they  are  always  in  need  of  something 
for  their  cars.  Tires  are  absolutely 
essential  to  the  car,  and  unless  they 
are  reliable  the  pleasure  of  touring 
is  reduced  to  a  decided  extent.  Why 
not  carry  them? 

The  hardware  merchant  is  an  ideal 
channel  for  the  distribution  of  tires. 
He  is  usually  one  of  the  central,  es- 
tablished figures  of  the  community, 
and  the  fact  that  he  handles  an  art- 
icle is  usually  sufficient  guarantee  as 
to  its  worth  and  reliability. 

One  often  hears  the  argument 
raised  as  to  whether  or  not  a  mer- 
chant should  confine  himself  to  a 
single  line  of  tires.  Opinions  differ 
as  to  this  and  practically  every  man 
has  a  different  answer.  Many  have 
found,  however,  that  they  obtained 
excellent  results  by  carrying  two 
lines,  one  a  high-priced  line  and  the 
other  somewhat  lower  in  price.  It  is 
a  peculiar  fact,  but  some  motorists 
have  a  pet  aversion  to  a  certain  tire 
^nd  cannot  be  induced  to  purchase  it, 
hence  the  value  of  two  lines.  Care 
should  be  used  in  stocking  and  the 
hai'dware  merchant  should  regulate 
the  sizes  carried  according  to  the  de- 
mands of  the  community.  It  would 
be  worse  than  foolish  for  a  store  lo- 
cated in  a  district  in  which  Fords 
were  the  principal  means  of  convey- 
ance to  stock  up  on  giant  truck  pneu- 
matics. 

In  a  medium  sized  community  it 
is  an  easy  matter  for  the  hardware 
merchant  to  know  every  car  in  the 
locality.  In  larger  towns  he  can  regu- 
late his  purchases  by  getting  in  touch 
with  the  registration  authorities  and 
compiling  an  up-^to-date  index  as  to 
the  cars  and  their  tire  requirements. 

While  on  the  subject  of  stocking  it 
would  be  well  to  say  a  word  regard- 
ing the  keeping  of  stock  records.  Too 
often  a  motorist  drops  into  a  store  in 
search  of  a  tire  only  to  be  told  that 
the  size  he  desires  is  out  of  stock. 
Right  there  he  decides  to  go  elsewhere 
where  he  can  be  accommodated.  It 
is  an  easy  matter  to  keep  an  accurate 
record  of  the  condition  of  the  tire 
stock  so  that  the  merchant  need  never 
have  to  say,  "We  haven't  it  in  stock." 
Keep  Record  of  Stock 

One  of  the  simplest  methods  we 
know  of  and  one  used  to  considerable 
extent  is  to  make  out  a  card  for  every 
size  of  tire  in  stock,  ruled  with  paral- 
lel lines  and  also  ruled  vertically.  In 
the  upper  left-hand  corner  is  found 
the  size  of  tire,  and  in  the  upper  right- 
hand  corner  is  the  minimum  num- 
ber of  this  size  to  be  carried  in  stock. 
The  column  at  the  left  contains  the 


name  of  the  tire.  Next  comes  a  col- 
umn headed  "Cost"  in  which  is  shown 
the  cost  of  the  individual  tire  of  that 
brand.  The  next  records  dates.  The 
next  column  contains  the  entries  of 
tires  ordered  and  is  followed  by  those 
received.  The  two  last  columns  are 
given  over  to  the  number  of  tires  sold 
and  the  number  in  stock. 

Let  us  suppose  that  the  size  of  the 
tire  in  question  is  a  30  x  3%  clincher 
type.  And  also  let  us  imagine  that 
jhe  minimum  number  of  this  size  to 
be  carried  in  stock  is  twenty.  An 
inventory  of  stock  is  taken  and  it  is 
found  that  there  are  twenty-five  tires 
of  this  size  in  stock.  Accordingly,  on 
Jan.  10  an  order  for  twenty-five  tires 
of  this  size  is  sent  to  the  "Bank  Tire 
&  Rubber  Co."  The  date  on  which  the 
order  is  sent  is  recorded  in  the  third 
column  and  the  number  ordered,  in 
this  case  twenty-five,  is  put  in  the 
next  column.  The  name  of  the  tire 
ordered  is  inserted  in  the  first  col- 
umn and  the  price  of  the  individual 
tire  is  placed  in  the  second. 

The  order  is  received  on  Jan.  25, 
and  accordingly  the  date  is  entered  in 
the  third  column  and  the  number  of 
tires  received  in  the  fifth  column. 
This  brings  the  total  number  in  stock 
up  to  fifty  and  accordingly  it  is  en- 
tered in  the  column  headed  "Stock," 
which  is  the  last  to  the  right.  On 
Feb.  2  five  tires  are  sold.  The  date  is 
entered  and  the  number  sold  is  piit 
down  in  next  to  the  last  column. 
This  leaves  foi'ty-five  remaining  in 
stock,  and  so  that  number  is  put  down 
in  the  last  column.  On  Feb.  6  fifteen 
tires  are  sold  and  the  entries  are  ac- 
cordingly made.  This  brings  the 
number  in  stock  down  to  thirty,  and 
if  the  merchant  thinks  he  is  nearing 
the  danger  line  he  reorders. 

The  value  of  this  system  is  that 
the  merchant  can  check  up  his  stock, 
number  of  tires  sold  and  money  re- 
ceived at  a  glance.  He  can  ascertain 
the  condition  of  his  stock  by  looking 
at  the  lowest  figure  in  the  last  column 
to  the  right.  He  can  check  up  the 
number  of  tires  sold  by  adding  up 
the  figures  in  the  "Sold"  column.  He 
can  total  his  receipts  by  multiplying 
the  figures  in  the  sold  column  by  the 
price  of  the  individual  tire.  If  more 
than  one  brand  is  carried  and  has 
been  sold,  the  card  will  also  show  this. 

Go  Out  After  Business 

The  man  who  waits  for  the  business 
to  come  to  him  may  make  money  in 
the  long  run,  but  he  will  make  it 
much  quicker  if  he  will  only  go  out 
after  it. 

The  man  handling  tires  will  find  it 
worth  his  while  to  go  and  get  it.  The 
tire  dealers  do  it,  so  why  not  the 
hardware  merchants?  The  wide- 
awake merchant  can  note  the  condi- 
tion of  the  tires  on  the  cars  that  stop 
at  his  door,  and  call  the  attention  of 
their  ovraers  to  the  fact  tha  they 
need  tires  and  that  he  carries  them. 
If  they  do  not  stop  he  can  get  the  car 
numbers  and  drop  them  a  postal  card 
or  a  circular  letter  to  that  effect.  He 


can  get  a  salesman  who  knows  tires 
to  offer  practical  advice  in  regard  to 
alignment,  proper  care,  etc.  Above 
all  things,  advertise  and  advertise 
consistently.  Once  you  have  the  tires 
in  your  store  do  not  put  them  away 
in  a  dark  corner.  Keep  them  out 
where  they  will  be  seen  and  take  par- 
ticular pains  to  see  that  they  are  seen. 
Keep  your  tires  racked  and  if  you 
want  them  to  catch  the  eye,  paint  the 
racks  a  brilliant  orange  or  scarlet. 
They  will  be  seen,  no  doubt  of  it.  A 
good  idea  in  racking  tires  is  to  put 
your  new  stock  behind  the  old  and 
keep  pushing  the  tires  forward  as 
they  are  sold.  In  this  way  you  will 
find  that  none  of  them  will  remain  in 
stock  for  too  long  a  period. 

And  last  of  all  comes  display. 
You'll  never  know  what  you  can  do 
in  the  way  of  displaying  tires  until 
you  have  tried  it.  Ifr  you  are  at  all 
handy  with  the  brush,  make  up  some 
screens  of  beaver  board,  stencil  them 
with  ornamental  designs,  and  use 
them  for  backgrounds.  You  will  be 
surprised  at  the  effect  produced. 

Tires  were  not  purchased  heavily 
in  1921  and  cars  cannot  be  run  on 
bare  rims.  This  being  the  case,  tires 
will  be  purchased  during  1922.  Other 
hardware  merchants  will  sell  them 
and  will  profit  thereby.  How  about 
yourself? 


CANADIAN  MINERAL  PRODUC- 
TION 

The  Dominion  Bureau  of  Statis- 
tics has  published  a  preliminary  re- 
port on  the  mineral  production  of 
Canada,  which  shows  that  the  eco- 
nomic minerals  produced  during  the 
calendar  year  1921  reached  a  total 
value  of  $172,327,580,  as  compared 
with  $237,422,857  for  the  preceding 
year. 

The  ten  principal  products  of  the 
mineral  industries  of  Canada  in  1921, 
arranged  in  order  of  value,  were: 
Coal.  $74,273,000;  gold,  $21,327,000; 
silver,  $9,185,000;  copper,  $7,459,000; 
nickel  $6,752,000,  natural  gas,  $4,902,- 
000;  asbestos,  $4,807,000;  lead,  $3,- 
855,000;  zinc,  $2,758,000  and  gypsum, 
$1,726,000. 

The  report  contains  forty-three 
pages  of  reading  matter  and  tables, 
giving  in  detail  the  statistics  relating 
to  the  production  of  Canadian  miner- 
als during  1921.  Copies  may  be  had 
on  application. 


PAINT  PUBLIC  BUILDINGS 

The  Buffalo  Evening  News  states; 
"As  a  method  to  relieve  unemploy 
ment.  Mayor  Schwab  has  suggested 
that  many  of  the  fire  and  police  sta- 
tions need  painting  or  renovating.  It 
is  understood  that  he  proposes  to  ask 
an  appropriation,  at  an  early  date, 
for  $100,000  to  provide  work  for  those 
out  of  jobs. 

"The  Mayor  has  conferred  with 
some  of  the  councilmen  on  the  subject. 
He  believes  that,  if  money  is  appropri- 
ated it  should  be  used  to  provide  work 
rather  than  to  give  charity  to  the  un- 
employed." 

Why  not  suggest  this  to  the  Mayor 
of  your  city? 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


March,  1922 


Trade  News  From 

A  Mouthly  Summary  of 
Jobbers,  Manufacturers 

ALBERTA 

Amisk — Jas.  W.  Street  opening 
hardware  store. 

Coaldale — J.  B.  Schimek  starting  a 
garage. 

Edmonton — Percy    J.    Woods  has 
opened  a  hardware  store. 

Edmonton — David   Oscarson  open- 
ing garage. 

Lament — Thomas  Dallas,  hardware 
merchant,  dead. 

Penhold — Stewart  Bros,  fire  loss. 
BRITISH  COLUMBIA 

Chilliwack — Watson  &  Thomas 
Hardware  Co.  has  been  succeeded  by 
the  Munro  Hardware  Co.. 

Cumberland — Hargraves    &  Smith 
selling  to  K.  Nakanishi. 

Vancouver — Marshall  Wells  Com- 
pany, Winnipeg  and  Edmonton,  re- 
ported to  be  buying  out  Wood,  Val- 
lance  &  Leggett,  wholesale  hardware 
merchants. 

Vancouver — R.  A.  Ogilvie,  713  Do- 
minion Building,  is  now  British  Col- 
umbia representative  of  the  E.  T. 
Wright  Co.,  Hamilton,  Ont. 

Victoria — Milner  Toy  Manufactur- 
ing Company  has  been  incorporated 
with  a  capital  of  $5,000. 

MANITOBA 

Winnipeg — C.  C.  Craig  Co.  have 
been  appointed  western  representa- 
tives of  the  Pike  Manufacturing  Co., 
Pike,  New  Hampshire. 

Winnipeg — Porcupine  Mfg.  Co.  has 
been  incorporated  with  a  capital  of 
$15,000  to  deal  in  auto  accessories. 

Winnipeg  —  Canadian  Specialty 
Mfg.  Co.  have  opened  a  manufac- 
turers' agent's  business  in  auto  acces- 
sories at  304  Mclntyre  Block. 

Winnipeg — Peoples  Paint  &  Wall- 
paper Co.  was  incorporated  recently. 
MARITIME  PROVINCES 

St.  John — Campbell  &  Fowler,  Ltd., 
manufacturers  of  Campbell  edge  tools 
and  axes,  are  now  repi-esented  in  the 
western  provinces  by  F.  G.  Maxwell 
&  Co.  Ontario  and  Quebec  represent- 
atives are  T.  Mortimer  &  Co.,  Toronto. 
QUEBEC 

Montreal — Richardson  &  Bureau 
are  now  situated  at  52  Craig  St.  W., 
fire  having  destroyed  the  building 
where  they  were  formerly  located. 

Montreal — N.  Petersen  has  resigned 
as  manager  of  the  Gillette  Safety 
Razor  Co.  of  Canada,  Montreal,  and 
T.  P.  Flanagan  has  been  appointed  to 
succeed  Mr.  Petersen,  who  had  been 
for  15  years  associated  with  Mr.  A.  A. 
Bittues  in  the  production  and  manage- 
ment of  the  Canadian  end  of  the  Gil- 
lette Razor  Company's  business. 

Montreal — Lacroix  &  Leger,  whole- 
sale and  retail  hardware,  recently 
suffered  fire  loss. 

Montreal — A.  St.  German  has  reg- 
istered his  hardware  business. 

Montreal — National  Stove  Manu- 
facturing Co.  recently  suffered  a  fire 
loss. 

St.  Lambert— A.  W.  Gaylat  &  Co., 
hardware  dealers,  have  been  regis- 
tered. 


Coast  To  Coast 

News  Among  Dealers, 
and  Allied  Interests 

Terrebonne — J.  B.  Gauthier  suc- 
ceeds Josephat  Allaire. 

ONTARIO 

Atwood — George  Douglass  succeeds 
Mrs.  S.  E.  Stockford. 

Bothwell — Dent  Bros,  hav  discon- 
tinued their  grocery  business  and  are 
devoting  their  energies  to  hardware 
and  auto  accessories. 

Burlington — W.  W.  Main  succeeds 
Colton  &  Lorimer,  hardware. 

Fort  William— W.  S.  Piper,  slight 
fire  loss. 

Hamilton  —  Thompson  Hardware 
opening  store  at  695  Barton  St.  E. 

Kingston  —  The  Monarch  Battery 
Co.,  Ltd.,  has  been  incorporated  with 
a  capital  of  $40,000  to  make  and  sell 
batteries. 

Newmarket — N.  F.  Bennett  opening 
a  hardware  store. 

Ottawa — The  Beauty  Brush  Co.  in- 
corporated at  $50,000. 

Ottawa — Plaunt  Hardware  Co.,  fire 
loss. 

Sarnia — Prendergast  Fence  Co.,  Ltd., 
incorporated,  capital  $100,000,  to 
manufacture  fences  and  fencing  ma- 
terials. 

Sudbury- — C.  J.  Brown  and  H.  C. 
Brown  of  Montreal  have  succeeded 
Home  Bros.,  Sudbury. 

Toronto — Geo.  Garrett,  1244  Ger- 
rard  St.  E.,  discontinued  business. 

Toronto — McClary  Mfg.  Co.,  Lon- 
don, have  purchased  the  Republic 
Stamping  &  Enameling  Co. 

Toronto — Fletoher-Reid  Brush  Co., 
Ltd.,  have  been  incoi'porated  at  $60,- 
000  to  manufacture  brushes,  brooms, 
etc. 

Toronto — Flint  Varnish  &  Color 
Works  of  Canada  has  been  registreed 
at  Toronto. 

Toronto — Craig  Damper  Regulator 
Co.  of  Canada,  incoi-porated  to  man- 
ufacture metal  products,  etc. 

Toronto^ — International  Accessories, 
Ltd.,  incorporated  at  $100,000  to  man- 
ufacture and  sell  auto  accessories. 

Toronto — General  Hardware,  To- 
ronto, has  been  registered. 

Toronto — Wiggley  Toys  of  Canada 
has  been  registered. 

Woodstock — Alex.  Gardner  &  Co. 
have  sold  their  hardware  business  to 
Lindsay  Howell. 

SASKATCHEWAN 

Dummer — Patterson  &  Park  suffer- 
ed fire  loss. 

Moose  Jaw — Latham's  Hardware, 
Ltd.,  has  been  incorporated  with  a 
capital  of  $200,000. 

Trail  —  Wagstaff  Hardware  suc- 
ceeds Wagstaff  and  Vestrup. 

Nakusp — Vestrop  Hardware  suc- 
ceeds Wagstaff  and  Vestrup. 


IRONMONGER  DIARY 

The  Ironmonger,  London,  England, 
has  supplied  its  readers  with  a  mag- 
nificent flexible  covered  diary  for 
1922,  containing  a  mass  of  interesting 
data,  including  a  trade  marks  index, 
buyers'  guide,  trade  lists,  director  of 
trade  associations,  etc.  together  with 


a  large  diary  for  daily  use.  This  is 
the  54th  year  of  publication. 


NEW  HAMILTON  MANUFACTURER 

A.  C.  Jones  Co.,  Ltd.,  386  King 
William  St.,  Hamilton,  have  begun  the 
manufacture  of  door  hangei's,  tracks 
and  small  lines  of  hardware.  Mr. 
Jones  has  had  a  wide  connection  with 
the  hardware  trade,  being  for  a  num- 
ber of  years  with  the  Aikenhead 
Hardware  Co.,  Toronto,  and  more  re- 
cently sales  manager  for  N.  Slater, 
Ltd.,  Hamilton.  Associated  with  Mr. 
Jones  are  Mr.  F.  S.  Rosser  and  Mr. 
John  W.  Anderson,  also  formerly  con- 
nected with  N.  Slater,  Ltd.,  as  sales 
representative  and  factory  superin- 
tendent. 


"IMPERIAL"  DEALERS  ENTER- 
TAINED 

A  number  of  retail  hardware  and 
paint  dealers  of  Toronto  and  vicinity 
were  entertained  at  dinner  at  the 
Carls-Rite  Hotel  on  Wednesday  even- 
ing, Feb.  22,  by  the  executive  and 
sales  staff  of  the  Imperial  Varnish  & 
Color  Co.,  Limited. 

T.  F.  Monypenny,  vice-president 
and  sales  manager,  occupied  the  chair 
and  took  occasion  to  discuss  with  those 
present  the  prospects  for  making  1922 
a  greater  paint  and  varnish  year. 

Problems  involving  the  selling  of 
the  company's  products  were  dis- 
cussed and  many  questions  bearing  on 
the  technical  selling  of  Floglaze  and 
other  paint  and  varnish  products  were 
answered  by  members  of  the  factory 
and  selling  staff. 


NEW  PERFECTION  SPRAYERS 

The  New  Perfection  Sprayer  Co., 
Gait,  Ontario,  are  introducing  two 
new  lines  which  should  have  a  large 
sale  through  the  hardware  and  paint 
trades.  One  of  these  new  lines  is  a 
small,  compressed  air,  two-gallon 
sprayer  which  can  be  carried  around 
a  garden  like  a  small  sprinkling  can. 
It  is  fitted  with  an  automatic  control 
operated  by  the  finger,  and  the  com- 
pressed air  contained  in  the  tank  gives 
a  powerful  spray  from  a  brass  nozzle, 
which  can  be  directed  upon  flowers 
or  other  vegetation  as  readily  as 
water  can  be  sprayed  from  a  sprink- 
ling can.  The  other  new  line  is  a 
small  two-gallon  Floor  Oil  Sprayer, 
similar  in  size  and  operation,  but 
using  oil  which  vaporizes  making  it 
possible  to  spray  a  floor  very  quickly 
and  get  into  the  most  inaccessible  cor- 
ners very  readily.  Particulars  of 
these  two  sprayers  will  be  supplied  by 
the  manufacturer  on  request. 


REGISTERS  TRADE  MARK 

The  Banwell  Hoxie  Wire  Fence  Co., 
Limited,  fo  Hamilton,  Ontario,  and 
Winnipeg,  Manitoba,  have  registered 
their  trade  mark  "Peerless"  for  their 
farm,  poultry  and  lawn  fences,  gates 
and  fence  accessories.  The  registered 
trade  mark  is  similar  to  that  which 
has  been  used  in  their  advertising  for 
some  time.  It  shows  the  character- 
istic lock  in  a  circle  together  with  th« 
words  "Peerless,  the  all-round  fence." 


March,  1922 


HARDWARE    AND  ACCESSORIES 


37 


IN  PLACING  FIRE  INSURANCE 

for  the  coming  year  bear  in  mind  the  strength,  loss  paying  record  and  saving  of 
the  company  you  choose. 

One  glance  at  the  following  statement  will  prove  our  strength  as  unquestionable. 
Fire  companies  have  just  past  through  probably  one  of  the  hardest  years  of  the 
business,  yet  our  companies  were  able  to  make  quite  an  increase  in  surplus — which, 
after  all  is  the  real  strength  of  a  company. 

AS  TO  LOSSES— well  the  fact  that  we  have  never  had  a  lawsuit  over  the  adjust- 
uent  of  an  honest  loss  speaks  for  itself.  Losses  are  paid  immediately  upon  receipt 
of  proofs  of  loss  from  the  adjuster  and  NO  DISCOUNT. 

SAVINGS? — Our  hardware  companies  are  now  on  their  15th  year  of  providing 
liardwarem3u  with  fire  insurance  at  exactly  one  half  the  cost  of  board  companies. 
THINK  OF  IT! 

Statement  of  Assets  and  Liabilities  backing  the  policy  we  issue. 

ASSETS 

Cash  and  investments  $4,038,357.52 

Interest  accrued   79,827.89 

Premiums  in  course  of  collection   400,730.32 

Other  assets   139,125.63 

Total  cash  assets   $4,658,041.36 

LIABILITIES 

Reserve  for  reinsurance  $2,251,088.30 

Reserve  for  taxes   62,000.00 

Reserve  for  losses   227,481.61 

Unpaid  Accounts   6,689.37 

Other  Liabilities   103,697.83 

Total  liabilities  $2,650,957.1 1 

■  ^  ^'  •  cash  surplus   2,007,084.25 

Cash  Assets    $4,658,041.36 

Increase  in  surplus  since  Jan.  1,  1921.  .  .  .$  155,312.58 
Total  insurance  in  force   327,669,079.00 

Can  you  afford  to  disregard  the  opportunity  offered YOU 

-THE- 

Canadian  Hardware  &  Implement  Underwriters 

C.  L.  Clark,  Manager 
WINNIPEG  MANITOBA 

Endoned  fcv    /ONTARIO  RETAIL  HARDWARE  ASSOCIATION 
cnaonea  oy,  \  MANITOBA  RETAIL  MERCHANTS'  ASTQCIATION 


Provincial  managers  will  give  personal  attention  to  inquiries  in  the  following  provinces — Alberta, 
Saskatchewan,  Manitoba,  Ontario,  Quebec. 


38 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


March,  1922 


£.l>lli  IllllllllllllllllJIIIIrlllll  MniHIIinHMIIIIIIIinMJIUMinilinUhlMMIMMniUIIMIiniMMnillMIIIIIIIIIMIMIMIIIIIMIIMIIIIIIIIIIIMIIMIMIIIIIIIIIMIIMMIIMMIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIJ: 

I      HARDWARE  MARKET  SITUATION  1 


JlininillllllllllllllllllllMIJIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIII  IMIIIIIIIIIIIIIJIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIilll  lllinilMII 


lllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIi; 


Quotations  continue  to  be  lowered  on 
many  hardware  lines.  This  acts  as 
somewhat  of  a  damper  to  the  placing 
of  big  orders.  Trading,  however,  is 
improving,  and  quite  a  lot  of  goods  are 
moving. 

Business  seems  to  have  rounded  the 
corner,  and  though  the  climb  may  seem 
hard  we  are  improving  as  time  goes  on. 
Manufacturers  in  the  smaller  centres 
are  busier  now  than  three  months  ago, 
and  there  is  greater  confidence,  in  the 
opinion  of  men  who  closely  scrutinize 
the  trend  of  trade. 

Linseed  oil  and  glass  are  two  com- 
modities that  have  increased  in  pries 
during  the  month;  practically  all  other 
lines  handled  b_y  hardware  dealers,  and 
showing  changes,  have  declined. 

This  month  of  March  should  see  a 
larger  shipment  of  spring  goods  going 
out  on  earlier  bookings.  This  will 
doubtless  denude  some  jobbers'  ware- 
houses for  a  time.  From  now  until 
June  hardware  manufacturers  and  job- 
bers should  see  a  great  deal  move  life 
to  trade. 

The  Month's  Price  Changes 

Horseshoes — Eeduced  85  cents  a  l:eg. 

Binder  Twine— Xew  1922  prices  is- 
sued. About  35  per  cent,  lower  than 
last  season. 

Glass — ^Advanced  50  cents  a  case  on 
Star  and  75  cents  on  double  diamond. 

Fuel  Oil — Two  reductions  in  month. 
Xow  at  10  cents  a  gallon,  barrel  lots. 

Linseed  Oil — Several  increases.  Now 
at  $1.15  and  $1.18  for  raw  and  boiled 
respectively  in  single  barrel  lots. 

Turpentine— Xow  at  $1.35  a  gallon 
for  single  barrels. 

Enterprise  Meat  Choppers— Eeduced, 
following  lower  prices  on  other  Enter- 
prise lines. 

Copper  and  Brass  Wire— Eeduced 
about  2  per  cent. 

Brass  Rods — Down  a  cent  a  pound  to 
20  cents. 

Bar  Iron — Decline  on  all  iron  and 
steel.    Bar  iron,  base  price  now,  $2.75. 

Miscellaneous  Wire  Nails — Increased 
discount.  Xow  72^2  instead  of  70  per 
cent. 

Butts  (Wrought  Steel)— Eeductions 
on  some  sizes.  X'o.  838  now  10  per  ceat. 
off;  Xo.  804,  17%  off;  Xo.  802,  net. 

Tie-out  Chains — Eevised  prices.  X'o. 
1,  30  feet,  now  $8.40  a  dozen. 

Halter  Chains — Revised.  4%  feet  by 
1-0,  $4.70  a  dozen. 

Waste  Cloths — Decline  on  all  grades. 
White  cotton  runs  from  14  to  18  cents 
a  pound;  cream  polishing  is  at  18  cents; 
and  colored,  about  13  cents. 

Galvanized  Wire  Clothes  Lines— Re- 
duced prices  now  obtainable. 

Asbestos  Sheathing-— Down  to  $8.50 
per  liuiidicd  iiouiids. 

Range  Boilers— Xew  list  issued.  Prac- 
tically at  old  firiees. 

Galvanized  Sheets— Declined  25  cents 
per  liundr(-dw('iglit. 

Gem  Food  Choppers — Down  25  oer 
cent,  below  January  (juotations. 

Pipe  (lead;— Per  pound,  121/^  cents; 
wastes,  less  than  8  inch  Hst,  131/2 
cents;  over  8  inch,   UMi  cents.  Dis- 


count, 10  per  cent.  Traps  and  bends, 
10  per  cent.  off. 

Solder — Wire,  32%  cents  a  pound; 
strictly,  22%  cents;  commercial,  21 
cents;  guaranteed,  24  cents;  wiping,  21 
cents. 

Gas  Stoves — A  decline  of  over  5  per 
cent,  is  noted  on  these  goods. 

Shoeflnders'  Tacks — New  revised  list 
showing  reduction  on  steel  wire  shoe 
rivets. 

Copper  Tea  and  Coffees — Now  at  net 

list.    An  advance  of  10  per  cent. 

Sash  Cord — Declined  six  cents  a  lb. 

Auto  Tubes  and  Casings — Declined 
10  per  cent. 

Axes — -Reduced  quotations  averaging 
25  per  cent,  below  January  prices. 

Wood  Screws — Declined,  by  increas- 
ing discounts  2%  per  cent. 

Stillson  Wrenches— New  discount  at 
55  off  list  lowers  prices  about  2%  per 
cent. 

Hatchets — Lower  quotations.  , 
Bench    Axes  —  Discount  increased 
from  45  to  60  per  cent,  off  list. 

Handled  Brush  Hooks — Lower  prices. 
Light  are  at  $14.40  a  dozen,  and  me- 
dium at  $15.60. 

Plumbers'  Oakum— Declined  half  a 
cent  a  pound  to  $6.50  per  cwt. 

Gilmore  Augers — Lower  quotations. 
Now  at  22%  off. 

Sledge  Hammers— Lower  by  about  $2 
a  dozen. 

Sandpaper  and  Emery  Cloth — De- 
clined a'bout  five  per  cent. 

Compression  Goods — Reduced  5  per 
cent. 

Leather  Soles  —  Reduced  prices 
amounting  to  15  per  cent,  on  leather 
top  soles. 


OLD  TRAVELLER  DEAD 

Coleman  Miller,  who  for  over  forty- 
eight  years  was  connected  with  Sam- 
uel &  Benjamin,  Limited  (formerly 
M.  &  L.  Samuel,  Benjamin  &  Co.), 
died  at  his  residence,  540  Huron  St., 
Toronto,  on  Feb.  14.  For  forty  years 
Mr.  Miller  had  been  a  travelling 
salesman  and  a  familiar  figure  in  the 
chief  cities  and  towns  of  Ontario.  He 
was  born  in  Toronto,  and  was  an  ex- 
member  of  the  Queen's  Own  Rifles. 
He  was  distinctly  one  of  the  bid  guard 
of  travelling  men,  and  had  hosts  of 
friends  throughout  the  province. 


A.  W.  Poole,  managing  director,  of  Stew, 
art  &  Wood,  Toronto,  has  returned  to  busi- 
ness after  an  operation  for  appendicitis. 


C'A.SOLENE-KEROSENE  TORCH 

Turner  Brass  Works,  Sycamore,  111., 
offers  the  trade  the  Turner  Gasoline- 
Kerosene  Torch  with  hot  blast,  double 
jet,  that  burns  either  gasoline  or  kero- 
sene without  adjustment  changes.  By 
means  of  a  baffle  in  the  burner  tube, 
filled  with   asbestos,   on   which  the 


flame  is  constantly  applied,  the  pres- 
ent fuel  is  generated.  A  slot  on  the 
top  of  the  burner  tube  forces  the 
flame  onto  the  baffle  so  that  the  fuel 
is  generated  into  hot  dry  gas.  The 
double  jet  feature  makes  the  heat 
supplied  more  intense  than  a  single 
jet  flame.  An  improved  air  pump  is 
used  on  this  torch. 


SVN  WATCH  FITS  VEST  POCKET 

Boy  Scouts  and  other  young  nature 
lovers  will  be  interested  in  the  new 
Ansonia  Sun  Watch  offered  the  trade 
by  the  Ansonia  Clock  Co.,  99  John 
Street,  New  York  City.  This  time- 
piece consists  chiefly  of  a  compass 
and  a  sun  dial. 

The  compass,  and  sun  dial,  with 
latitude,  longitude  and  variation 
tables  are  combined  in  a  satin  finished 
brass  case  which  can  be  carried  in 
the  pocket  the  same  as  an  ordinary 
watch.  The  watch  may  be  used  in 
any  part  of  the  country.  The  tables 
and  charts  tell  how  to  gage  the  correct 
time  by  the  sun's  reflection,  giving 
the  correct  basis  of  figuring  the  right 
time. 

A  little  booklet  telling  in  a  fairly 
romantic  strain  the  history  of  time 
keeping,  along  with  directions  for  use 
of  the  sun  watch,  is  enclosed  with  each 
one  of  these  novel  devices. 


NEW  TOY  SA\TEEPER 

The  Bissell  Carpet  Sweeper  Co., 
Niagara  Falls,  Ont.,  offers  the  trade 
a  new  addition  to  its  line  of  toy-size 
carpet  sweepers.  It  is  known  as  the 
Little  Jewel  and  will  actually  sweep 
up  like  a  genuine  full  size  Bissell 
sweeper. 

It  measures  about  9  in.  in  length, 
is  5%  in.  wide  and  2%  in.  high,  fin- 
ished in  a  high  gloss  varnish  dark 
mahogany  with  a  dainty  gold  border 
and  lettering.  It  weighs  about  17 
ounces.  The  handle  is  nicely  fur- 
nished. The  sweeper  box  has  a  braid 
band,  a  genuine  bristle  brush  and  a 
regular  dust  pan  with  a  dump  lever. 
The  case  is  of  sturdy  fibre  board  on 
top  with  wood  ends  and  sides. 


FACTS  ABOUT  CANADA 

Few  people  realize  that  26,445  Can- 
adian ex-service  men  have  been  estab- 
lished on  the  land  and  are  nearly  all 
making  good;  that  Canada's  water- 
power  development  represents  an  in- 
vestment of  $475,000,000,  while  the 
power  produced  would  otherwise  re- 
quire 18,000,000  tons  of  coal  yearly;  or 
tiat  nearly  88  per  cent,  of  the  world 's 
supply  of  asbestos  comes  from  the  Pro- 
vince of  Quebec.  The  Natural  Re- 
sources Intelligence  Branch  of  the  De- 
partment of  the  Interior  has  just  issued 
a  revised  edition  of  "Compact  Facts," 
which  contains  in  concise  form,  infor- 
mation regarding  Canada;  its  area, 
population,  trade  and  industries;  their 
extent,  capital  invested,  wages  paid, 
values  of  live  stock,  principal  crops  and 
amounts  produced;  mineral  resources 
and  present  production;  also  forest-re- 
sources and  forest  products.  Copies  of 
the  booklet  are  available  on  applica- 
tion to  the  Superintendent,  Natural  Re- 
sources Intelligence  Branch,  Depart- 
ment of  the  Interior,  Ottawa. 


March,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


39 


The  above  are  reproductions  of  a  few  of  the  advertisements  which 
will  appear  in  ieoding  publications  all  over  Canada  this  Spring 

We're  OfF— 

and  nothing  can  stop  us! 

With  the  entire  Paint  and  Varnish  Industry  lined  up  solidly  behind  the 
campaign  to  make  1922  the  Greatest  Paint  and  Varnish  Year,  nothing 
can  stop  us.  The  public  needs  the  paint  and  needs  the  varnish — 
and  needs  them  badly. 

From  coast  to  coast  the  new  "Save  the  Surface"  advertising  is  being 
read  by  millions.    It  is  urging  them  to  protect  their  property. 

Therefore,  now  is  the  time  for  you  to  get  busy.  Don't  fail  to  keep  the 
Save  the  Surface  idea  to  the  front.  Every  passerby  should  be  reminded 
when  he  is  in  front  of  your  store,  to  Save  the  Surface. 

Keep  a  window  display  in  constantly,  and  in  all  your  newspaper  adver- 
tising use  the  million  dollar  slogan. 


To-day  order  a  cut  of  the  slogan  as  shown  below. 


Save  the  Surface  Campaign 


509  Royal  Trust  Chambers 
107  St.  James  Street 
MONTREAL 


'Cave  the  surface  and  ^ 
you  save  aU  ^ 


Electros  of  this  slogan  cut  suitable 
for  newspaper  advertisine  will  be 
eupplied  at  forty-eight  cents  each. 


40 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


March,  1922 


The  quotations  below  are 
approximately  correct  for 
large  lots  in  Toronto  on  the 
date  mentioned. 


CURRENT  PRICES 

TORONTO,  MARCH  6,  1922 


They  may  not  be  the  same 
in  any  other  jobbing  centre 
owing  to  freight  and  other 
conditions. 


METALS  and  SHEETS 


Aluminum — Per  pound,  27c. 

Antimony — Per  pound,  8c. 

Brass — Slieets,  base,  23c;  rods,  base 
Vi  to  1  in.,  round,  20c;  tubing,  seam- 
less, base,  25c.    F.o.b.  Toronto. 

Copper — Casting  ingot,  base,  llVjc; 
ro4a,  %  to  2  in.,  28c;  soft  sheets,  plain, 
16  oz.  and  heavier,  lb.,  30e;  plain  tin- 
ned, 16  oz.  and  heavier,  lb.,  37c;  pol- 
ished and  tinned,  16  oz.  and  heavier,  lb., 
42e;  tubing,  lb.,  29c. 

Above  prices  are  full  sheets  and  bars. 
Cut  sheets  and  bars  are  5c  per  lb. 
higher. 

Coppers,  Soldering — Base,  4  to  8  lbs., 
35  cents  per  lb.;  3-lb.,  38c;  2y2-ib.,  39c; 
2-lb.,  41c;  IVo-lb.,  44c;  1-lb.,  48c  per  lb. 
F.o.b.  Toronto,  Hamilton. 

Iron,  Tinned — Lion  and  Crown  Brand, 
Toronto  in  22,  24  and  26  gauge.  36  x 
96,  21c  per  lb.;  48  x  96,  21c  per  lb.  Less 
than  case,  50c  per  100  lbs.  extra. 

Ijead  (pig) — $6.75  per  hundred  lbs.; 
sheets,  4  to  6  pounds  per  sq.  foot,  in 
rolls,  9c  per  lb.  Cut  sheets  to  size,  Ic 
extra. 

Iron — Bar,  base,  $2.75  per  cwt.;  angle 
iron,  $2.95;  horseshoe  iron,  $3.60;  Nor- 
way, $12.50;  toe  caulk,  $4.00. 

Steel— Mild  bars,  $2.85;  bands,  $3.35; 
tire,  $3.35;  spring,  $5.50;  sleigh  ilioe, 
$2.85;  hoop,  $3.75;  crucible  cast  shett, 
$30;  cast  tool,  $18  to  $31,  according 
to  grade. 

Slieets,  Blue  Annealed — 10  gauge,  $4.- 
50  per  100  square  feet;  12  gauge,  $4.55; 
14  gauge,  $4.60;  16  gauge,  $4.65. 

Sheets,  Black— 18  to  20  gauge,  $5.05 
per  100  square  feet;  22  to  24  gauge, 
$5.10;  26  gauge,  $5.15;  28  gauge,  $5.25. 

A  change  of  25  cents  per  cwt.  is  made 
for  less  than  case  lots;  and  an  extra 
10  cents  per  cwt.  is  charged  on  sheets 
26  inches  wide. 

Sheets,  Corrugated — No.  28  gauge, 
$6.50  per  100  sq.  ft.;  26  gauge,  $7;  24 
gauge,  .$9;  22  gauge,  $11;  20  gauge, 
$12.50;  18  gauge,  $16;  lighter  thau 
24  gauge  and  wider  than  27  inches,  75 
cents  a  square  extra.  Discount  10  per 
cent. 

Queen's  Fleur- 
Sheets,  Galvanized —  Head  de  lis 
28  gauge,  per  100  lbs..  $8.00  $7.50 
26  gauge,  per  100  lbs..  7.70  7.25 
24  gauge,  per  100  lbs..  7.35  6.85 
22  gauge,  per  100  lbs. .  6.90  6.40 
18-20  gauge,  100  lbs. . .  6.75  6.25 
Premier  Apollo 
10%  02.,  per  100  lbs...  $6.00  $6.75 
28  gauge,  per  100  lbs.  .  5.60  6.35 
26  gauge,  per  100  lbs. .  5.30  6.05 
24-22  gauge,  100  lbs...  5.15  5.90 
20-18  gauge,  100  lbs...  5.00  5.75 
16  gauge,  per  100  lbs..'  4.80  5.60 
14-12  gauge,  100  lbs.  . .  4.70  5.45 
Plates  (Canada)— Dull,  60  sheets, 
$5.65;  ordinary,  52  sheets,  $5.60. 


Plates  (Coke  Tin)— IC.  20x28,  112 
sheets,  $13.50;  IX,  20x28,  112  sheets, 
$16.50;  IX,  20x28,  56  sheets,  $9. 

Plates  (Charcoal  Tin)— IX,  20x28,  56 
sheets,  $14;  IXX,  20x28,  56  sheets,  $16. 

Plates,  Teme — IC,  14x20,  112  sheets, 
$12.00. 

Spelter — Per  pound,  7e. 

Tin— Ingots  (100  lbs.),  per  lb.  SSVaC. 

Zinc — Sheets,  per  lb.,  10c. 


5  in. 

76.96 

100.64 

1.21 

1.45 

6  in. 

1.00 

1.31 

1.57 

1.88 

7  in. 

1.33 

1.76 

2.02 

2.45 

8L  in. 

1.40 

1.85 

2.13 

2.58 

8  in. 

1.61 

2.13 

2.45 

2.97 

9  in. 

1.97 

2.59 

2.97 

3.59 

lOL  in. 

1.32 

2.40 

2.75 

3.33 

10  in. 

2.35 

3.09 

3.54 

4.28 

PLUMBERS  AND  TINNERS' 
SUPPLIES 


Boilers  (Range) — 30-gal.,  $17.50, 
standard  disc.  50  per  cent.;  extra  heavy, 
disc.  40  per  cent. 

Compression  and  Fuller  Work — Com- 
pression work  (standard),  discount, 
45%.  Fuller  work  (standard),  30%. 
Bath  cocks,  compression,  35%;  fuller, 
25%.  Flat  way  stop  and  watte  cocks 
(standard),  54%.  Brass  steam  cocks 
(standard),  43%. 

Fittings — Cast  iron  fittings,  30%; 
malleable  bushings,  32%;  cast  bushings, 
32%;  unions,  47%;  flanged  unions, 
30%:  plugs,  cast  iron,  30%;  plugs, 
solid.  10%;  plugs,  countersunk,  net; 
couplings,  4  in.  and  under,  30%;  do., 
2%  in.  and  larger,  10%. 

Nipples,  Wrought — 'Close  and  short,  4 
in.  and  under,  50%;  41/2  and  larger, 
40%;  long,  4  in.  and  under,  60%;  41/2 
in.  and  larger,  50%;  running  thread,  4 
in.  and  under,  30%. 

Oakum — Special  No.  1,  $15;  plumb- 
ers', $6.50  per  cwt. 

Packing  —  Fine  jute,  17c  a  pound; 
coarse  jute,  18c;  hemp,  36c;  square 
braided  hemp,  38c;  No.  1  Italian,  44c; 
No.  2  Italian,  36c. 

Pipe    (Wrought)— Price   List   No.  54, 

Dec.  22,  1921. 

Standard  Buttweld  Pipe  S-C  per  100 

Size.  Blk.     Galv.     Blk.  Galv. 

Steel  Gen.Wrot.Iron 
%  in.  $  6.00  $  8.00  $  .  .  .  $  .  .  . 
%  in.  3.84  5.94  7.20  9.30 
%  in.  3.84  5.94  7.20  9.30 
1/2  in.  4.85  6.46  7.31  8.93 
%  in.        5.87       7.71       8.86  10.70 

1  in.  8.16  11.05  12.58  15.30 
1%  in.  11.04  14.95  17.02  20.70 
11/2  in.       13.20     17.88     20.35  24.75 

2  in.  17.76  24.05  27.38  33.30 
21/2  in.       28.08  38.03   

3  in.       36.72  49.73   

31/2  in.       47.84  63.48   

4  in.       56.68  75.21   

Standard  Lapweld  Pipe  S-C,  per  100 

Size.  Blk.      Galv.     Blk.  Galv. 

Steel  Gen.Wrot.Iron 

2  in.  21.46  27.38  31.08  37.00 
2%  in.      31.50     40.05     46.80  56.16 

3  in.  41.31  53.55  61.20  73.44 
3V2  in.      48.76     65.32      72.68  89.24 

4  in.  57.77  77.39  86.11  105.76 
4%  in.       66.04     86.36       1.04  1.24 


Pipe  (conductor),  plain,  round  or  cor- 
rugated, in  10-ft.  lengths— 2  in.,  $18.40 
per  100  ft.;  3  in.,  $22.30;  4  in.,  $29.60; 
5  in..  $40;  6  in.,  $49.  L^ss  70  and  10 
per  cent. 

Elbows — (For  conductor  pipe)  2  inch, 
$5.25;  3  inch,  $6;  4  inch,  $10.50;  5  inch, 
$24;  6  inch,  $29.    Less  60  per  cent. 

Pipe  (soil) — Med.  and  extra  heavv — 
2  in.,  3  in.,  40%;  4  in.,  40-10%;  5,  6 
in.,  40%;  8  in.,  net. 

Pipe  (Soil)  Fittings — 2,  3,  4,  5,  6  in., 
50%,  8  in.,  net. 

Pipe  (stove) — Net  list. 

Registers — Warm  air,  japanned  and 
common  oxidized,  20%  from  standard 
list.    No.  3,  $10.75. 

Tinners'  Trimmings — Plain  50  and 
10,  retinned,  50%. 

Trough  (Eave) — O.  G.  Square  bead 
and  half  round:  Per  100  ft.:  8  in., 
$15.90;  10  in.,  $17.70;  12  in.,  $21.20;  15 
in.,  $28.80;  18  in.,  $36.50.    Less  70  and 

Valves  —  Globe,  angle  and  check 
(standard),  25%;  J.M.T.,  20  and  10%; 
J.M.T.C.,  25  and  10%;  J.M.T.  gate 
valves,  25  and  10  %;  Jenkins'  gate  or 
straightway,  25  and  10%;  Jenkins' 
Globe,  19  and  10%;  radiator  valves 
(standard  and  removable  disc),  58%; 
Emco  check  valves  (standard),  25%; 
Emco  J.D.  rad.  valves  (screwed),  33%; 
Emco  swing  check  valves,  %  and  %  in. 
sizes,  40%;  other  iizes,  33%;  Webber 
gate  valves,  33%;  Emco  gate  valve* 
(standard),  25%;  Em.o  globe  valves 
(standard),  25%. 

Valves,  Foot — 1%  in.,  blk.  70c,  galv. 
$1;  IV2  in.,  blk.  85c,  galv.  $1.30;  2  in., 
blk.  $1.20,  galv.  $2.10. 

Washers,  Wrought  —  Round,  plain. 
Sizes  given  are  size  of  hole.  In  boxes 
of  50  lbs.  list  prices  per  100  lbs. — %  in., 
$28;  5/16  in.,  $34.40;  %  in.,  $22.80; 
7/16  in.,  $21;  %  in.,  $19.60;  9/16  in., 
$18.80;  %  in.,  $18.60;  11/14  in.,  $18.40; 
%  in.,  $18.20;  13/16  in.,  $18;  1  1/16  in., 
IVa  in.,  1%  in.,  1  5/16  in.,  $18.90;  1% 
in.,  lya  in.,  1%  in.,  $18.40;  1%  in.,  1% 
in.,  2  in.,  2%  in.,  $19.  Discount,  60% 
f.o.b.  Montreal,  Hamilton,  Toronto, 
London  and  Halifax. 

Car  lots  allowance  to  following 
points:  Windsor,  Walkerville,  St.  John, 
Moncton,  Amherst,  New  Glasgow, 
Freight  allowance:  Fort  William  and 
West,  10c  per  100  lbs. 

Net  extras,  26  to  40  lbs.  of  a  size, 
$1;  25  lbs.  of  a  size  or  less,  $2  per  100 
lbs.  Package  allowances — if  taken  in 
kegs  about  175  lbs.  each,  allowance  10c 
per  100  lbs.;  if  taken  in  bags  about  100 
lbs.,  allowance  15c  per  100  lbs. 


March,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


41 


BOECKH'S  BRUSH  NEWS 


ALL  BOECKH'S  BRUSHES 


ARE    MADE    IN  CANADA 


That  Great  Teacher —'Experience 


W 


ITH  all  the  good  inten 
long  experience  often 
is  true  of  every  activity 

And  this  is  still  another  reason 
ted  satisfaction  enjoyed  by  dea 


tions  in  the  world,  the  lack  of 
leads  to  many  mistakes.  This 
— ^brush  manufacture  included. 

for  the  great  and  uninterrup- 
lers  who  sell  Boeckh's  Brushes. 

has  devoted  its  energies  to  mak- 
every  kind  for  every  purpose 
ning  combination  of  good  ma- 
good  finish. 

exceptional — unique.  There  is 
brushes  which  we  have  not 
of  the  new  and  improved  meth- 
been  developed  by  Boeckh  ex- 


1(4  id  *. 


Ever  since  1856  this  company 
ing  good  brushes — brushes  of 
— brushes  which  have  that  win 
terial,  good  workmanship  and 

This  company's  experience  is 
no  problem  in  connection  with 
solved — and  a  large  proportion 
ods  of  brush  mtmufacture  have 
perts. 

The  result  is  a  product  that  is  absolutely  dependable — a  guar- 
antee that  we  are  not  only  willing,  but  able,  to  make  good  to 
the  very  u'termost. 

An  Invitation  To  You 


We  are  here  to  give  you  service.  We  do  not  consider  that  our 
relations  with  our  customers  end  with  the  sale  of  a  bill  of 
goods,  but  are  prepared  to  help  you  out  with  your  brush  sell- 
ing problems  If  there  is  anything  in  connection  with  brush- 
es about  which  you  need  experienced  counsel,  do  not  hesitate 
to  write  us.  It  is  a  pleasure  and  a  privilege  for  us  to  place 
our  brush  experience  at  your  disposal. 


The  BOECKH  COMPANY 


Montreal— 

The  H.  E.  Smith  Sale*  Co. 
130  Ciaig  Street  West. 


TORONTO,  CANADA 
Established.  1856 


Winnipeg — 
Mr.  J.  B  Buckham 
664  Broadway. 


Vancouver  and  Victoria- 


~The  T.  S.  Griffiths  Company, 
1080  Hamilton  Street, 
Vancouver,  B.  C. 


42 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


March.  1922 


HARDWARE 


Ammiuiition  (American) — Winchester 
and  Savage  advance  on  American  list, 
for  rim  fire  ball  cartridges,  2%%;  cen- 
fire  blank  and  shot  cartridges,  15%. 
Remington    Union    Metallic    list  plus 

Ammunition  (Dominion)  —  Discount 
30  and  20^:^. 

Sliot,  standard,  100  lbs.,  Toronto, 
$14.25;  Montreal,  $13.50;  net  extras,  as 
follows,  subject  to  cash  discounts  onlv: 
Chilled,  $1.50;  buck  and  seal,  80c;  No. 
28  ball,  $1.20  per  100  lbs.;  bags  less 
than  25  lbs.,  %c  per  lb.;  f.o.b.  Mont- 
real, Toronto,  Hamilton,  London,  St. 
John  and  Halifax  freight  equalized. 

Animal  Ties — Cow  ties,  list  plus  37% 
per  cent.;  trace  chains,  list  plus  25  per 
cent.;  dog  chains,  list  plus  20  per  cent.; 
halter  chains,  net;  tie-out  chains,  net; 
stall  fixtures,  Dominion,  $2.80  per  doz.; 
heavy,  $2. 

Axes — Boys',  doz.,  $10.50;  Hunters', 
doz.,  .$9.50  single  bits,  doz.,  $15.00; 
double  bits,  doz.,  $17. 

Bencli  Axes — Per  doz..  No.  1,  $35; 
No.  2.  $40;  No.  3,  $45;  No.  4,  $49;  No. 

5,  ,$54;  No.  6,  $60;  No.  7,  $66.  Dis- 
count, 60  per  cent. 

On  weights  heavier  than  base  add  to 
list  as  follows:  Group  2,  50c;  group  3, 
$1;  group  4,  $1.50;  group  5,  $2;  group 

6,  .$2.50;  group  7,  $3.50. 

Bale  Ties— Single  loop— No.  12,  $4.80; 
No.  13,  $490;  No.  14,  $5.10;  No.  15,  $5.- 
35;  No.  16,  $5.70.  Cross  head— No.  12, 
$5.10;  No.  13,  $5.20;  No.  14.  $5.50;  No. 

15,  $5.95;  No.  16,  $6.40. 

Baskets  (Willow) — Delivery  (handl- 
ed;, per  doz.,  $7.50  to  $11;  splint, 
clothes  or  meat,  per  doz.,  $2  to  $2.85; 
oblong  clothes,  per  doz.,  $10.50  to 
$14.75. 

Baskets  (Wire)— Vegetable  —  Half 
"bushel,  each,  90c;  1  bushel,  each,  $1.30; 
bushel,  each,  $1.80. 

Belting  (Leather) — Discounts  apply 
to  revised  list  of  Nov.  4th,  1920.  Extra 
quality,  15/10  per  cent.  Standard  qual- 
ify, 15/10/10  per  cent.  Side  lace  leath- 
er, lb.,  $1.60;  cut  lace  leather,  lb.,  $1.85. 

Belting  (Canvas) — 60   per   cent,  off 

Bits.  Auger — (Standard  list  prices 
per  dozen):  3-16,  $6;  4-16,  $5;  5-16, 
$5;  6-16,  $5;  7-16,  $5;  8-16,  $5;  9-16,  $6; 
10-16,  $6;  11-16,  $7;  12-16,  $7;  13-16, 
$8.25;  14-16,  $8.25;  15-16,  $9.50;  16-16, 
$9.50;  17-16,  $12;  18-16,  $12;  19-16,  $14; 
20-16,  $14;  21-16,  $16;  22-16,  $16;  23-16, 
$18;  24-16,  $18;  25-16,  $21;  26-16,  $21; 
27-16,  $24;  28-16,  $24;  29-16,  $27;  30- 

16,  $27;  31-16,  $30;  32-16,  $30. 
Discounts  from  Standard  list  prices: 

Ford  atiger  bits,  add  15%;  Ford  car 
bits,  add  7Va%:  Beaver,  35%;  Gilmour 
auger  bits,  22%%;  Gilmour  eye  augers, 
add  5%;  Irwin  auger  bits,  add  5%; 
Irwin  car  bits,  less  7%% 

Boards  (Bake) —  %  Rim.  %  Rim 
No.  0-10  X  22,  doz.  ...$  8.90  $12.50 
No.  1—18  X  24,  doz.  ...  10.78  12.80 
No.  2—18  X  29,  doz.  ...  12.10  14.75 
No.  3—20  X  30,  doz.  ...  13.86  17.75 

Boards  (Ironing) — No.  1,  Daisy,  $38 
per  doz.;  No.  10,  Daisy,  $43  per  doz.; 
No.  33,  21  per  doz.;  No.  35,  $38  per 
doz.;  No.  36,  $43  per  doz.;  Perfection, 
$48  per  doz. 

Boards  (Wash) — Baby  Globe,  $2.45 
per  doz.;  Beaver  (brass),  $8  per  doz.; 


Competition  Globe  (metal),  $5.90  per 
doz.;  Diamond  King  (glass),  $8  per 
doz.;  Enamel  Queen,  $9  per  doz.;  Glass 
Globe,  $8  per  doz.;  Improved  Globe, 
$5.25  per  doz.;  Jubilee,  $5.80  per  doz.; 
Neptune,  $5.25  per  doz.;  Newmarket 
King,  $5.80  per  doz.;  Pony,  $2.45  per 
doz.;  Royal  Globe  (zinc),  $5.25  per 
doz.;  Original  Globe,  solid  back,  $5.95 
per  doz.;  Standard  Globe,  $5.25  per 
doz.;  Supreme  (zinc),  $6.50  per  doz.; 
Western  King  (Enamel),  $9  per  doz. 

Bolts  and  Nuts — Discounts  herewith 
apply  to  standard  list.  Carriage  bolts 
($1  list),  %  in.  diameter  and  smaller, 
6  in.  and  shorter,  47%%.  Carriage 
bolts  ($1  list),  %  in.  and  longer 
lengths,  30%.  Carriage  bolts  ($1  list), 
7/16  in.  and  larger,  40%.  Machine 
bolts,  %  in.  and  smaller.  4  in.  and 
shorter,  55%.  Machine  bolts,  %  in. 
and  smaller,  longer  lengths,  42%%. 
Machine  bolts,  7/16  in.  and  larger, 
42%%.  Sleigh  shoe  bolts,  all  sizes, 
30%.  Coach  and  lag  screws,  55%.  Bolt 
ends,  42%%.  Square  head  blank  bolts, 
42%7o.  Plow  bolts,  1,  2,  3  head,  35%. 
Elevator  bolts,  corrugated  heads,  60%-. 
Fancy  head  bolts,  30%.  Shaft  bolts 
($3  list),  30%.  Step  bolts,  large  head 
($3  list),  30%.  Whiffletree  bolts,  30%. 
Tire  bolts,  52%%.  Stove  bolts,  72%%. 
Nuts,  2  in.  and  smaller,  square.  Blank, 
off  net  list,  $1.25.  Nuts,  2  in.  and 
smaller,  square,  tapped,  net  list.  Nuts, 
2  in.  and  smaller,  hexagon.  Blank,  off 
list,  75c.    Tapped,  off  list,  75c. 

Terms — Cash  in  30  days  from  date  of 
shipment,  less  2  per  cent. 

Borax — Lump  crystal  borax,  lOe  lb. 

Brooms — No.  5,  4  strings,  $6.65  per 
doz.;  No.  5,  standard,  $7.50  per  doz.; 
Little  Beauty,  $9.40  per  doz.;  Royal 
Blue,  $13.90  per  doz. 

Butts— (Wrought  Steel)— No.  840, 
less  10%;  No.  800,  net;  No.  838,  less 
10%;  No.  808,  add  10%  ;  No.  804,  less 
12%%;  No.  802,  net;  No.  810,  add 
25%  ;  No.  814,  add  20%. 

Cans  (Milk)— At  list  plus  15%. 

Cement  (Portland) — In  carload  lots, 
per  bbl.,  $3,770.  Less  than  car  lots:  Per 
bbl.,  f.o.b.  yard,  $4.00  per  bbl.,  deliv- 
ered, $5.00.  Single  bags,  $1.25  each,  4 
bags  to  barrel.  Extra  charge  of  $1.50 
per  load  on  less  than  24  bag  lots.  Re- 
bate, 20  cents  for  empty  sacks. 

Choppers  (Food) — Universal — No.  0, 
$16.50  a  doz.;  No.  1,  $20.40  a  doz.;  No, 
2,  $24.80  a  doz.;  No.  3,  $33.00  a  doz. 

Choppers  (Meat) — Enterprise  line, 
$1.50  each;  No.  1,  $1.75  each;  No.  2, 
$2.15  each;  No.  3,  $2.90  each. 

Gem— No.  20%,  $21.60  a  doz.;  No.  22, 
$25.80;  No.  24,  $34.20. 

Chums  (Barrel) — No.  0,  each,  hand, 
$10.30;  power,  $15.50.  No.  1,  hand, 
$10.30;  power,  $15.50.  No.  2,  hand, 
$10.90;  power,  $16.20.  No.  3,  hand, 
.$11.75;  power,  $17.10.  No.  4,  hand, 
.$13.60;  power,  $18.45.  No.  5,  hand, 
$15.10;  power,  $19.80.  Net  list  f.o.b. 
Montreal,  Ottawa,  Kingston,  Toronto, 
Hamilton,  Fergus,  London,  St.  Mary's. 

Clippers  (Horse) — New  market,  $3.50 
per  pair.  ^0.  1  B.B.  Stewart  Horse  Clip- 
per, $14  list,  less  25  per  cent. 

Clocks  (Alarm) — Big  Ben  and  Baby 
Ben,  each,  $3.43;  Good  Morning,  each, 
$1.37;  Lookout,  $1.88;  Sleepmeter,  $2.06. 

Clothes  Bars— No.  2,  $19  per  doz.; 
No.  3,  $14.40  per  doz.;  No.  4,  $11  per 
doz.;  No,  5,  $16  per  doz,;  No,  0,  $13  per 
doz. 


Clothes  Horsss  (folding)  6  feet,  per 
doz.,  $16;  5  feet,  $13;  4  feet,  $11. 

Extension — 6  feet,  $32;  5  feet,  $26; 
4  feet,  $22. 

Clothes  Lines  (G-alvanized)' — No.  18, 

100  ft.  lengths,  $5.65  per  1,000  feet; 
50  ft.  lengths,  $6.25;  No.  19,  100  ft. 
lengths,  $4.75;  50  ft.  lengths,  $5.56. 

Clothes  Line  Reels — No.  3,  $17.50  per 
dozen;  No.  3%,  $19.75;  No.  4,  $32.50. 

Cobbler  Sets — Common,  per  set,  $1.14. 

Coil  Chain—  Proof     B  B  B 

3/16  inch,  electric  weld. $16.25  $19.50 
%  inch,  electric  weld...  15.50  17.75 
5/16  inch,  electric  weld.  12.75  15.75 
%  inch,  electric  weld...  10.60  .... 

%  inch,  fire  weld   13.65  16.00 

7/16  inch,  fire  weld....  11.25  13.75 

%  inch,  fire  weld......  11.25  11.75 

%  inch,  fire  weld   10.50   

Combs,  Curry — No.  101,  $1.40  per 
dozen;  No.  Ill,  $1.60;  No.  121,  $1.70; 
No.  127,  $2.30. 

Combs,  Cattle — No.  98,  $2  per  dozen; 
No.  100,  $2.85. 

Cord  (Sash)— No.  6,  53c  a  pound; 
No.  7,  52c;  Nos.  8,  9,  10,  12,  51c. 

Crowbars— <?8.00  per  100  lbs. 

Dampers — Cast,  Champion,  5  in.,  $1.42 
a  dozen;  6  in.,  $1.57;  7  in.,  $2.10. 

Doors,  Screen— Kasement,  No.  2,  oak 
stain,  varnished,  including  hardware 
sets:  2  ft.  6  in.,  $45  per  dozen;  2  ft. 
8  in.,  $45.60;  2  ft.  10  in.,  $46.70;  2  ft. 
7  in.,  $46.80. 

Drills— Standard  lists.  Blacksmiths', 
%  m  X  2%  in.  shank,  each,  %,  45c; 
5/32,  45c;  3/16,  50c;  7/32,  55c;  %,  60c; 
9/32,  65c;  5/16,  70e;  11/32,  75c;  %, 
80e;  13/32,  85c;  19/32,  $1.20;  %,  $1.30; 
21/32,  $1.40;  11/16,  $1.50;  23/32,  $1.60; 
%,  $1.70;  25/32,  $1.80;  13/16,  $1.90; 
27/32,  $2;  %,  $2.10. 

Drills— 7/16,  90c;  15/32,  95c;  %,  $1; 
17/32,  $1.05;  9/16,  $1.10;  29/32,  $2.20; 
15/16,  $2.30;  31/32,  $2.40;  1,  $2.50.  In- 
termediate sizes  take  list  of  next  larger. 

Bit  Stock — List  per  doz.,  less  45%: 
3/32,  $2.70;  V»,  $3;  5/32,  $3.50;  3/16, 
$4;  7/32,  $4.50;  %,  $5;  9/32,  $6;  5/16, 
$7;  %,  $8.50;  7/16,  $10.50;  %,  $13; 
9/16,  $15.50;  %,  $18;  11/16,  $21;  %, 
$24;  %,  $30.  Blacksmiths',  %  in. 
shank,  straight  shank,  wire,  taper 
shank,  50%  off. 

riles  and  Rasps — These  discounts  ap- 
ply to  list  of  Nov.  1,  1899:  Great  West- 
ern, Amer.,  50%;  Kerney  Foot  Arcade, 
60/5%;  J.  Barton  Smith,  Eagle,  55%; 
P.  H.  and  Imperial,  60/57o;  Globe, 
60/5%;  Nicholson,  40%,;  Black  Dia- 
mond, 40%;  Delta  Files,  20%;  Firth 
Files,  50%. 

G-rindstones — Under  40  lbs.  weight — 
Smaller  than  2  in.  face,  $5.25  per  hun- 
dred pounds;  two  in.  and  over,  $4.50. 

40  to  80  lbs.  weight — Under  2  in. 
face,  $4.75  per  hundred  pounds;  2  ins. 
and  over,  $4.25;  Bi-Treadle,  each,  $9.75; 
Cycle  BB,  $8.75. 

Grindstone  Fixtures — No.  22,  $8.67 
per  dozen;  No.  23,  $9.37;  No.  2%,  $10; 
No.  3,  $11.50. 

Halters,  Kope — Sisal,  7-16  in.,  $21  per 
gross;  9-16,  $33.  Jute,  7-16  in.,  $19; 
9-16  in.,  $28.50. 

Hame  Fasteners — (Dodson),  $4.60  per 
dozen. 

Hammers,  Nail — No.    21,    $12  per 

dozen;  No.  1,  $15.40;  Nos.  1%,  61%, 
$15.20. 

Hammers,  Sledge — (Canadian),  2-2% 
lbs.,  $20  per  ewt.;  3-4%  lbs.,  $18;  5 
lbs.  and  over,  $12.50. 


March.  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


43 


Oval  Dinner  Pail 


VfKTl    The  Popular 
^  Aluminum 

Four  Utensils  of  the  Finest  Aluminumware  ! 


We  illustrate  four  of  the  finest  uten 
for  instance,  has  a  polish  finish; 
rain  out. 

The  Sink  Strainer  is  polish  finish; 
are  up  to  the  same  standard. 
Viiko   Utensils  are   stamped  from 
aluminum. 

Every   article   illustrated   in  our 
against  any  defect  in  material  or 
We  authorize  our  dealers  to  replace 
which  should   prove   defective  in 


sils  you  can  sell.  The  Dinner  Padl, 
with  slip-over  cover  to  keep  dirt  and 

inside,  sunray  finish.    The  others 

hard,  thick,  99  per  cent,  pure  sheet 

catalogue  is  absolutely  guaranteed 
workmanship, 
at  our  expense  any  Viko  utensils 
either  workmanship  or  material. 


Catalogue  and  Price  Litl  on  Requett. 


Aluminum  Specialty  Co. 


of  Canada 


60  John  Street 


Toronto 


Omelet  Pan 


Triplicate  Saucepan 


BISSONNETTE  &  BISSONNETTE 

Representatives  for  Quebec 


Sink  Strainer 


Black  Diamond  File  Works 


Established  1863 


Incorporated  1895 


Twelve  Medals 
of  Award  at 

INTERNATIONAL 
Exposition* 


Special  Grand 
Prize 
GOLD  MEDAL 
Atlanta,  1895 


Copy  of  Catalogue  will  be  sent  free  to  any 
interested  File  User  upon  application. 

G.&H.BARNETT  COMPANY 

Philadelphia,  Pa. 

Owned  and  operated  by 
NICHOLSON  FILE  CO.,  PORT  HOPE,  ONT. 


When  you  are  in  the  Market  for 


BALE  TIES 


We  are  the  largest  manufacturers  in  Canada  of  this  line  in 
the  Single  Loop  or  Cross  Head  Dimensions. 


WIRE  NAILS 


Packed  in  steel  hoop  kegs  which  is  a  guarantee  of  arrival  at 
destination  in  good  shape 


WIRE  STAPLES 


Bright  or  galvanized  Fence  and  Poultry  netting. 


BLACK  WIRE 


Our  Oiled  and  Annealed  Wire  is  second  to  none. 

WIRE 

ANY  SIZE:— 3^"  to  40  guage. 

ANY  SHAPE: — Round,  half-round,  oval,  flat,  square,  octagon  and 
triangle. 

ANY  FINISH  :  —Bright,  Annealed,  Coppered  or  Liquer  Finish.  Tinn- 
ed and  galvanized  in  line  >ize>. 

I!!^  Laidlaw  Bale-Tie  Co.,  l^a^ 

."""■f^'o"  Hamilton 

  Agenciei  at   

TORONTO.  MONTREAL,  WINNIPE  .  VANCOUVER.  &  LONDON  (ENG.) 


Write  us  for  Prices 


44 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


March,  1922 


Blacksmith  Sledge — Under  5  lbs., 
$18.75;  5  lbs.  and  over,  $13  per  cwt. 

Masons — ^2-3  ^4  lbs.,  $24  per  cwt.; 
3-411.  lbs.,  $24;  5  lbs.  and  over,  $18.70. 

Hammers,  Striking — No.  38,  No.  46,  5 
lbs.  and  over,  $12.50  per  cwt.  Double- 
face  striking — Under  5  lbs.,  $18.75;  5 
lbs.  and  over,  $13  per  cwt. 

Hammers,  Macliinist — No.  30,  1  lb., 
$9.20  per  dozen;  No.  30,  1%  lb.,$9.90. 

Handles  (Wood) — All  hickory  han- 
dles, list  plus  20%;  all  oak,  ash  and 
maple  handles,  list  plus  10%;  hay  fort, 
hoe  rake,  shovel  and  manure  fork,  net 
list;  Whiffletrees,  double-trees  and  neck- 
yokes,  list  plus  20%;  wood  rakes,  list 
plus  10%;  horse  pokes,  list  plus  10%. 
Terms,  all  goods  f.o.b.  factories,  2%  10 
days,  net  30  days.  0-Cedar  Mop  Han- 
dles, less  30%. 

Hangers,  Bam  and  Parlor — ^Storm 
King  No.  42,  list  less  20-10%;  Safety 
No.  20,  list  le«s  20-10%;  EeUable  No.  1, 
list  less  20-10%;  Bound  Trolley  No. 
1917,  list  less  33  1-3-5%.  Atlas  No.  0, 
$13.35;  No.  1,  $13.80;  No.  2,  $15.85; 
Stearns,  4  in.,  $12.80;  5  in.,  $16.00.  Per- 
fect, No.  1,  $10.50;  Canada,  $13.25; 
Hatch,  $13.25;  National,  $12;  America, 
$19;  Great  West,  $30. 

Hatchets,  Shingling — No.  1,  $9.75  per 
dozen;  No.  2,  $10.75. 

Hatchets,  Lath — Nos.  3  and  4,  $10 
per  dozen. 

Hatchets,  BarreUing — Nos.  50  and  60, 
$14.50  per  dozen. 

Hatchets,  Claw — No.  7,  $12.00  per 
dozen;  No.  8,  $12.75. 

Hinges  (Blind)— Clark 's  No.  1,  $2.22 
per  dozen  sets. 

Hinge,  (Spring)— No.  200  and  No.  20, 
$25  per  gross;  Ajax  Floor  No.  3111, 
$1.85  per  set. 

Eeliance  Door  No.  270 — Ldght,  per 
doz.,  $3.15;  medium,  per  doz.,  $4.20; 
heavy,  per  doz.,  $6.40. 

Hinges — Heavy,  in  bulk.    Doz.  pairs: 

4  in.,  strap,  $1.50;  tee,  $1.80.  5  in., 
strap,  $1.90;  tee,  $2.20.  6  in.,  strap, 
$2.15;  tee,  $2.40.  8  in.,  strap,  $2.40; 
tee,  $3.20.  10  in.,  strap,  $4.30;  tee, 
$5.70.  12  in.,  strap,  $6.90;  tee,  $7.10. 
14  in.,  strap,  $7.50;  tee,  $8.05.  Net 
prices. 

Light — Net  prices — 3  in.,  strap,  90c; 
tee,  90c.    4  in.,  strap,  $1.08;  tee,  $1. 

5  in.,  strap,  $1.26;  tee,  $1.17.  6  in., 
strap,  $1.53;  tee,  $1.35. 

Screw  Hook  and  Strap  Hinges — List 
prices,  per  dozen  pairs — 6  in.,  $4.30;  8 
in.,  $4.80;  10  in.,  $6.40;  12  in.,  $7;  15 
in.,  $7..50;  18  in.,  $11;  21  in.,  $12.40; 
24  in.,  $16;  27  in.,  $17.20;  30  in.,  $18.50; 
33  in.,  $21.50;  36  in.,  $24.50.  Discount, 
30%. 

Heaters,  Electric  —  Glower  Heater, 
$10;  Heatray  Heater,  $12.  Discount, 
25%-33%,  according  to  quantity. 

Majestic,  1  burner,  $11;  2  burner, 
$16.    Discount,  27%%. 

Universal,  $13.80.  Discount,  20  and 
5%. 

Hoes — Grub,  $6.75  per  dozen. 
Hooks  (Grass) — Canadian,  No.  2, 
$3.90  per  dozen;  No.  3,  $4;  No.  4,  $4.10; 
No.  5,  $4.30:  Little  Giant,  $6.50;  Bar- 
den  Pat.,  .$6.50.  English  Fox— No.  2, 
$7.50  a  dozen;  No.  3,  $8;  No.  4,  $8.50. 
Horseshoes —  Price  per  keg 

No.  2  No.  1 
Sizes  and  and 
made  smaller  larger 

Li^ht  iron   0-7    $6.90  $7.15 

Long  heel  light  iron    3-7  6.90   

Medium  iron    1-8     6.90  7.15 


Heavy  iron    6-8  6.90  .... 

Snow    1-6  7.15  7.40 

New  light  XL  steel.  1-6  7.35  7.60 

Featherweight 

XL  steel    0-4  9.60  all  siz. 

Special  countersunk.  0-4  8.75  all  siz. 
Toe  weight  (front 

only)    1-4  10.60  all  siz. 

Packing — Up  to  3  sizes  in  one  keg, 
10c  per  100  lbs.  extra.  More  than  3 
sizes,  25c  per  100  lbs.  extra.  F.o.b. 
Montreal. 

Terms — Cash  in  thirty  days,  less  2% 
discount. 

Hose,  Lawn — Corrugated,  per  hun- 
dred feet:  Vz  in.,  $13.25;  %  in.,  $15.50: 
%  in.,  $18.  Less  5%  for  full  reel,  500  ft. 

Irons  (Sad) — Mrs.  Potts,  polished, 
$1.90  per  set;  nickel  plated,  $1.95. 

Handles  for  above  japanned,  $20.75 
per  gross. 

Common,  No.  1  ,4  and  5  lbs.,  $20.60 
per  cwt.;  6  lbs.  and  up,  cwt.,  $15. 

Irons,  Electric — Model  B,  $6.50  list. 
Classic,  $8  list.  Discount,  25%  to  33%, 
according  to  quantity. 

Knives,  Hay — Spear  Point,  $15  per 
dozen;  Lightning,  $14;  Heath's,  $14. 

Ladders  —  Step  Ladders — Standard, 
46c  a  foot;  Household,  35c;  Shelf  Lock, 
4  to  8  ft.  only,  30c;  Faultless,  4  to  8  ft. 
only,  44c;  Faultless,  10  to  16  ft.,  49c. 

Single  and  Fruit  Picking — 10  ft.  to 
16  ft.,  28c  per  foot;  18  ft.  to  22  ft.,  29c. 

Roped  and  Straight  Extension  Lad- 
ders—20  to  32  ft.,  30c  a  foot;  36  to  40 
ft.,  33c;  44  ft.,  36e;  three  section  ex- 
tension, 45e. 

Fire  ladders  up  to  32  feet  are  twice 
the  price  of  ordinary  extensions.  Ovei 
32  ft.  are  supplied  with  supporting  legs 
at  three  times  the  price. 

Lanterns — Short  or  long  globe,  plain, 
$12;  japanned,  $12.75;  Dash,  plain, 
$18.75;  japanned,  $19.25;  search  (round 
retlection),  $15.75;  Little  Bobs,  2  10-4 
20. 

Lantern  Globes — Cold  blast,  short  or 
long,  1  doz.  cases,  $1.35  doz.;  3  doz. 
eases,  $1.20  doz.;  6  doz.  cases,  $1.15 
doz.;  Cold  Blast  genuine  ruby,  $5.40 
doz.    F.o.b.  factory. 

Latches — Steel  Thumb,  No.  2,  $2  per 
dozen;  No.  3,  $2.50;  No.  4,  $3.75;  Bam 
Door,  No.  5,  $3.30;  No.  9,  $6.15. 

Machines  (Washing)  —  Dowswell, 
$12.75  each;  Noiseless,  $17.50;  Hamil- 
ton, $14;  Peerless,  $14.50;  Snowball, 
$19.50;  New  Century,  style  A,  $19.75; 
style  B,  $21.75;  electric,  $160.00;  Play- 
time, engine  drive,  $27;  Ideal  Power, 
$30;  Seafoam,  electric,  style  A,  $105; 
engine  drive,  $50;  Sunshine,  $10.25; 
Popular,  $14.50;  Economic,  $16;  Puri- 
tan, $19.50;  New  Champion,  $21.50; 
Home,  $21.50;  Vacuum,  $28;  Home  Wa- 
ter, motor,  $28;  Whirlpool,  water  power, 
$31;  Hydro,  1  Tub,  engine  drive,  $57; 
electric,  $116.50;  Eotary  water  motor 
washer,  $29;  Connor  ball-bearing,  with 
rack,  $22.75;  Perfection,  engine  drive, 
$65;  electric,  $132;  Beaver,  $26;  power, 
$27;  Connor,  vacuum,  $27.50;  Patriot, 
$21.50;  Jubilee,  $12.50;  Canada  First, 
$21.50.  These  prices  are  less  30%. 
Freight  equalized  with  Montreal,  Ot- 
tawa, Toronto,  Hamilton,  Kingston, 
London  and  St.  Mary's,  or  shipments  of 
quarter  dozen  and  upwards. 

Stands,  Washtuh — Dowswell,  $44.10 
per  dozen. 

Mattocks — Cutter,  $10.00  per  dozen; 
Pick,  $10.00. 

Mixed  Bread — Canuck— No.  4,  $36.24 
dozen;  No.  8,  $40.92. 


Universal — No.  $40,00  a  dozen;  No. 
8,  $52. 

Mops — Liquid  Veneer,  $16  per  dozen; 
0-Cedar,  less  handle,  $14;  0 'Cedar,  with 
handle,  $16;  S.  W.  Mops,  complete, 
$4.35;  Mop  Sticks,  No.  8,  $2;  Cast  Head 
Mop,  $2;  Crescent,  No.  10,  $2.60;  Crank 
wringing,  $7.35;  Smarts',  $4. 

Mop  Wringers — White,  No.  1,  $16.40 
per  dozen;  white.  No.  2,  $16.80;  white. 
No.  3,  $24. 

Mowers,  Lawn — (List  of  Sept.  12, 
1921) — Adanac,  Woodyatt,  Empress, 
Mayflower,  Ontario  Daisy,  Star,  all  at 
20%  off  list;  Whippet,  Thousand  Island, 
Eed  Wing,  Blue  Bird  are  all  net. 

Nails — List  adopted  S^pt.  10,  1920. 
Advance  over  base  on  common  wire 
nails  in  kegs:  1  in.,  $1.50;  1%  in., 
$1.40;  1%  in.,  $1.15;  11/2  in.,  80c;  1% 
in.,  75c;  2  in.,  60c;  2%  in.,  55c;  2%  in., 
30c;  2%  in.,  30c;  3  in.,  20c;  3%  in., 
15c;  3%  in.,  10c;  4  in.,  5c;  4%  in.,  5e; 
5  in.,  base;  5%  in.,  base;  6  in.,  base. 
6%  to  12  in.  2  ga.  and  heavier,  25c 
over  base. 

Standard  steel  wire  nails,  f.o.b.  Lon- 
don, Hamilton,  Milton,  Toronto,  Owen 
Sound,  CoUingwood,  Montreal,  $3.90 
base.  Freight  equalized  on  above 
points. 

Windsor,  WalkervUle,  Sandwich, 
f.o.b.  factory  prices,  carload  freight  al- 
lowed, $4.00. 

Sault  Ste.  Marie,  Port  Arthur,  Fort 
William,  $4.15  base,  f.o.b.  factory;  no 
freight  allowance. 

Moulding,  Flooring,  Slating,  Box, 
Fence,  Barrel  Nails,  25c  per  100  lbs. 
over  common  nail  prices.  Finishing 
nails,  50c  per  100  lbs.  advance  over  com- 
mon nail  price. 

Miscellaneous  wire  nails,  72%%  off 
miscellaneous  list,  f.o.b.  Toronto,  Mont- 
real, Hamilton  and  London. 

Nails,  cut — $4.70. 

Eoofing  Nails — American,  large  head, 
keg,  $10.50.    Less  quantities,  $12.50. 

Nails  (Horse) — Cape  well  C  Brand — 
No.  5,  $6.75  per  25  lb.  box;  No.  6,  $6.50; 
No.  7,  $6.25;  No.  8,  $6;  No.  9,  $5.75. 
Discotint,  10%. 

"M.E.M."  Brand— Net  price  Ust. 
No.  3,  5%  in.  long,  $20.25  per  25  lb. 
box;  No.  4,  1%  in.  long,  $10.25;  No.  5, 
1  15/16  in.  long,  $5.25;  No.  6,  2%  in. 
long,  $5;  No.  7,  2  16/16  in.  long,  $4.75; 
No.  8,  21/2  in.  long,  $4.75;  No.  9,  2  11/16 
in.  long,  $4.50;  No.  10,  2%  in.  long, 
$4.50;  No.  11,  3  1/16  in.  long,  $4.50;  No. 
12,  3%  in.  long,  $4.50. 

Netting,  Poultry — 2  in.  mesh  and  19 
gauge  wire — 12  in.,  $1.80  per  50-yard 
roll;  18  in.,  $2.65;  24  in.,  $3.40;  30  in., 
$4;  36  in.,  $4.75;  42  in.,  $5.50;  48  in., 
$6.20;  60  in.,  $7.70;  72  in.,  $9.20;  84  in., 
$10.50;  96  in.,  $12. 

1%  in.  mesh  and  19  gauge  wire — 12 
in.,  $3.50  per  50-yard  roll;  18  in.,  $5; 
24  in.,  $6.30;  30  in.,  $7.75;  36  in.,  $9.90; 
42  in.,  $10.50;  48  in.,  $12;  60  in.,  $15; 
72  in.,  $18. 

1  in.  mesh  and  20  gauge  wire — 12  in., 
$4;  18  in.,  $5.50;  24  in.,  $7;  30  in., 
$8.50;  42  in.,  $12;  48  in.,  $14;  60  in., 
$17;  72  in.,  $20 

%  in.  mesh  and  20  gauge  wire — 24 
in.,  $10.50;  30  in.,  $12.75;  36  in.,  $15. 

%  in.  mesh  and  22  gauge  wire — 24 
in.,  $16.50;  30  in.,  $20;  36  in.,  $24. 

Discounts  at  present  quoted  apply 
only  to  land  2  in.  mesh  setting.  Other 
prices  have  been  withdrawn  and  are 
quoted  only  on  application. 

Toronto,  London,  Montreal,  Canadian 
netting,  2  in.  mesh,  12%%  off;  1  in. 


Vlarch,  1922 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


45 


An  Old  Friend 
in  a  New  Box 


Increase  your  Brush  Sales  by  Dis- 
playing Meakins  Rubberset 
Varnish  Brushes  in  this  new 
Three  Color  Display  Box. 


COUNTER  DISPLAYS  MAKE  SALES 

A  Meakins'  counter  display  is  really  a  silent  partner  in  your  business.  Placed 
upon  your  counter  it  catches  the  eye  of  waiting  customers  and  draws  attention 
to  the  quality  materials,  skilled  workmanship,  and  superior  finish  of  Meakins' 
Brushes.  As  sales  producers  our  Counter  Display  Boxes  are  decidedly  popular. 

Include  one  of  our  Special  Household  Assortment  Boxes 

in  your  next  order. 

Assortment  Box  No.  199  contains  half  dozen  each  of  2^  inch,  3  inch  and  3}4  inch 
black  bristle  flat  paint  brushes  to  sell  at  35c,  50c  and  60  cents. 

Assortment  No.  157  has  one  dozen  assorted  brushes,  retailing  at  from  20c  to  45  cents, 
mounted  on  an  attractive  five  color  Counter  Display  Card. 

Write  for  one  of  our  New  Catalogues 


MEAKINS  &  SONS,  Limited 


HAMILTON,  ONTARIO 


Warehouses:    Winnipeg        -        London        -        Toronto         -  Montreal 

PILKINGTON  BROS.,  Calgary,  Alberta 


Vancouver 


46 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


March,  1922 


mesh,  12%9c  off.  American  netting,  1 
in.  mesh,  12%%  off. 

Invincible— Xo.  1848,  80c  a  rod;  2060, 
88c.  Put  up  in  10,  20  and  30  rod  rolls. 
F.o.b.  Montreal. 

Blue  Eibbon — 24  in.,  $5.50  per  roll; 
36  in.,  $7.15;  48  in.,  $8.35;  60  in.,  $9.85; 
72  in.,  $11.25.    Put  up  in  10  rod  rolls. 

Paper  (Building) — Dry  fibre,  No.  1, 
Anchor,  $1.15  per  400  ft.  roll;  No.  2, 
Anchor,  65c;  No.  2,  Elephant,  65c. 

Tarred  Fibre,  Xo.  1— Anchor,  $1.20; 
No.  2,  85c. 

Elephant  Brand,  tarred,  No.  2,  85e; 
Surprise  Fibre,  70c;  Empress  Dry 
Sheathing,  $1.45;  Stag  Sheathing,  70c: 
Cyclone,  dry,  $1.15;  tarred,  $1.20.  Joli- 
ette  Sheathing,  65c;  tarred,  85c. 

Monarch  Sheathing,  white,  $5.50  per 
100  pounds;  grey,  $4.50;  Straw  Sheath 
ing,  $5.50;  Imp.  Grey  Sheathing,  $4.75; 
tarred  straw,  $3.40;  Imp.  White  Sheath- 
ing, $5.7:,;  Imp.  Grey  Sheathing,  $4.75; 
Scythe  and  dry  straw,  $3.15;  Spruce 
Sheathing,  36  in.  and  72  in.  wide,  $6.00. 
Asbestos  Sheathing,  $8.50;  carpet  felt, 
$3.90;  tarred  felt,  7,  10  and  16  oz., 
$3.45. 

Picks— Clay,  5  to  6  lbs.,  $7.80  a  doz.; 
C  to  7  lbs.,  $8.50. 

Eock— 7  to  8  lbs.,  $9.25  dozen;  8  lbs., 
$9.75. 

Pins,  Clothes — 5  gross,  4  in.  (loose), 
$2.25  a  ease;  4  gross  (cartons),  4  in., 
$2.25;  Spring,  2  gross  to  box,  $1.90. 

Pitch— Pine,  black,  per  bbl.,  $13.25; 
Navy  pitch,  per  bbl.,  $6.50;  Coal  tar 
pitch,  per  ewt.,  $1.55. 

Planters,  Corn — King  of  Field,  $13.20 
a  dozen;  Triumph,  $11. 

Pulleys — ^Axle,  No.  1,  1%  in.,  80c  a 
dozen;  2  in.,  90c ;  2^/4  in.,  95e;  Palmer's, 
90c. 

Pulleys,  Clothes  Line — No.  58,  japan- 
ned, $4.35  per  dozen;  No.  158,  galvan- 
ized, $4.45;  No.  59,  japanned,  $4.45; 
No.  159,  galvanized,  $4.55. 

Pumps —  Pitcher  Closed 

Spout  Spout 

No.  2,  each    2.85  3.10 

No.  3,  each    3.15  3.40 

No.  4,  each    3.75  4.10 

No.  70,  each   6.00 

No.  80,  each    8.00 

Pumps,  Redwing — No.  0,  $6.85;  No.  1, 
$7.50;  Xo.  2,  $8.75;  No.  3,  $10.75;  No. 
4,  $12.75;  Xo.  5,  $15.25;  No.  6,  $18. 

Rifles,  Winchester — Model  1890,  $27.75 
each;  1892,  $35.70;  1894  (30  and  32 
round),  $42.40;  1894,  (30  and  32  octa- 
gon), $45.50;  1895,  $55.50;  1902,  $8.35; 
1904,  $10.20;  1905,  $53.65;  1906,  $24.05, 
1906,  expert,  $27.75;  1907,  $64.75;  1894, 
carbine,  with  sling  and  strap,  $46.65; 
1912,  gun,  .$61. 

Rivets  and  Burrs — Iron  rivets,  7-16 
inch  and  smaller,  blacked  and  tinned, 
521/2%;  Iron  burrs,  521/2%  off  list 
on  200-lb.  kegs.  Extras,  add  Ic  to  list 
on  100-lb.  kegs;  3e  on  50-lb.  boxes;  4e 
on  25  lb.  boxes,  8e  on  1  lb.  pkgs. 

Copper  rivets,  usual  proportion  of 
burrs,  321/2%  off;  burrs,  add  10%.  Ex- 
tras on  copper  rivets,  %  lb.  pkgs.,  Ic 
per  lb.;  %  lb.  pkgs.,  2c  lb.  Coppered 
rivets,  net  extras,  3c  per  lb. 

Roofing — Samson,  1  ply,  $2.65  roll; 

2  ply,  roll,  .$3.10;  3  ply,  roll,  $3.80. 
Bed  Star,  2  ply,  $1.85  roll;  Red  Star, 

3  ply,  $2.20. 

Everlastie,  1  ply,  $1.70;  Everlastic,  2 
ply,  $2.05;  Everlastic,  3  ply,  $2.40. 

Panamoid,  1  ply,  $1.50;  Panamoid,  2 
ply,  $1.85;  Panamoid,  3  ply,  $2.20. 

Everlastic  Multi-Shingles  (4  shingles 
in  one),  per  square,  $6.00. 


Everlastie  Liquid  Roofing  cement — 
Per  gal.,  in  bbls.,  70c;  5  and  10  gal. 
lots,  gal.,  80c;  1  gal.  cans,  gal.,  doz., 
$10.50. 

Coal  Tar  (refined),  per  barrel,  $10.50; 
coal  tar  (crude),  $9.25. 

Roofix  Roofing  Cement — In  bbls.,  per 
gallon,  60e;  in  %  bbls.,  per  gal.,  65c; 
in  5s  and  10c,  70c;  1  gal.  cans,  per  doz., 
$9. 

Rope — Pure  Manila  basis,  23c  a 
pound;  Beaver  Manila  basis,  20c;  New 
Zealand  hemp  basis,  20c;  Sisal  basis, 
18e.  These  quotations  are  basis  prices, 
%  in.  and  larger  diameter.  The  follow- 
ing advances  over  basis  are  made  for 
smaller  sizes:  %  in.,  %c;  9-16  to  7-16 
in.,  inclusive,  Ic;  %  in.,  l%c;  %  and 
5-16  in.,  2c;  3-16  in.,  2V2C  extra. 

Single  lath  yarn  basis,  18e;  double 
lath  yarn,  18%e;  halyards,  50e;  Beavei 
halyards,  white,  %  in.  basis,  35c. 

Hemp,  deep  sea  line  basis,  50e;  hemip, 
tarred  ratline  basis,  45c;  hemp,  tarred 
bolt  rope  basis,  45c;  marline  and  house- 
line,  45c.  Extra  charge  for  shorter 
lengths  than  half  coils,  2c  per  pound 
additional. 

Cotton,  %in.,  51c  a  pound;  5.32  in., 
50c;  3-16  in.,  47c;  %  in.  and  up,  45c. 

Sandpaper — B.  &  A.  sandpaper,  less 
10%;  Star  sandpaper,  less  10%;  B.  & 
A.  emery  cloth,  plus  20%  on  list. 

Scales — Champion,  including  stamtp- 
ing,  list  net:  4  lb.,  $6.60;  10  lb.,  $8.65; 
240  lb.,  $12.65;  600  lb.,  $35.80;  1,200 
lb.,  $43;  2,000  lb.,  $57.10;  2,000  lb.  drop 
lever,  $64.75. 

Sc3rthes — 'Cast  steel,  $15  a  dozen; 
Golden  Clipper,  $16;  Little  Giant,  $17; 
Bush,  $16. 

Snaths — 1  loop,  $16.80  a  dozen;  2 
loops,  $15.80;  3  loops,  $14.70;  Bush, 
$18.20.  ^ 

Screws — Discounts  off  Standard  List 
—Wood,  F.H.,  bright  85%;  Wood,  R.H., 
bright  771/2%;  Wood,  O.H.,  bright, 
821/2%  ;  Wood,  F.H.,  brass,  75%;  Wood, 
R.H.,  brass,  80%;  Wood,  O.H.,  brass, 
771/2%;  Wood,  F.H.,  bronze,  771/2%; 
Wood,  R.H.,  bronze,  721/2%;  Wood, 
O.H.,  bronze,  72%%;  Square  cap,  50%; 
Hexagon  cap,  50%;  Set  Screws,  55%. 

Screws,  Iron  Bench,  No.  14: — 1  in., 
$11.25;  li/s  in.,  $13.50;  1%  in.,  $15.65. 

Spiders— Cast,  No.  7,  $1;  No.  8,  $1.05; 
No.  9,  $1.15.  Nickel  Plated— No.  7, 
$1.26;  No.  8,  $1.35;  No.  9,  $1.50;  No. 
10,  $1.75. 

Spades,  Shovels  and  Scoops — Plain 
back  shovels  and  spades,  draining  tools, 
hollow  back  scoops,  sand  shovels,  hol- 
low back  shovels,  hollow  back  coal 
shovels,  riveted  back  scoops,  miners' 
spring  point  shovels.  1st.  2nd  and  4th 
grades,  all  55%.  These  discounts  apply 
whether  goods  are  sold  in  carload  or 
less  than  carloads,  and  apply  only  to 
Black  List,  Black  List  prices  being  as 
follows: 

Plain  back  shovels  and  spades.  No.  2 
black— 1st,  $29;  2nd,  $28;  3rd,  $25. 

Draining  tools.  No.  2  black — 1st,  29; 
2nd,  $27.50. 

Hollow  back  scoops.  No.  2,  black — 
1st,  $34.50;  3rd,  $32. 

Coal    shovels,    hollow    back.  No.  2, 
black— 1st,  $32;  3rd,  $30. 
Sand  shovels.  No.  2,  black — 1st,  $27.50; 
3rd,  $24. 

Hollow  back  shovels.  No.  2,  black — 
1st,  $27.50;  3rd,  $24. 

Riveted  back  scoops.  No.  2,  black — 
1st,  $37.50;  2nd,  $35.50;  3rd,  $34. 

Miners'  spring  point  shovels.  No.  2 — 
1st,  $36.50. 


Net  Extras — For  each  size  larger  than 
No.  2,  add  35e  dozen  net.  Full  polished, 
add  $1  per  dozen  net.  Half  polished, 
add  50c  per  dozen  net.  F.o.b.  London, 
Hamilton,  Toronto,  Gananoque,  Ottawa, 
Collingwood,  Sherbrooke,  Montreal, 
Quebec,  Halifax,  St.  John,  Moncton  and 
freight  may  be  equalized  thereon.  On 
shipments  less  than  5  dozen  f.o.b.  fac- 
tory only. 

Spikes,  Ship — Base,  %  in.  and  larger, 
$5  per  100  lbs.  14  and  5/16  in.,  $5.50 
per  cwt.  F.o.b.  Montreal,  Belleville, 
Toronto  and  Hamilton,  with  freight 
equalized  on  these  points. 

Spouts,  Sap — Eureka,  $15  per  thous. 

Staples  (Fence) — Bright,  $4.40  per 
100  lb.  keg;  galvanized,  $5.40. 

Staples  (Poultry  netting)  —  Bright. 
$7.25  per  100  pounds  in  kegs;  galvan- 
ized, $8.25.  Discount  10  per  cent.  Net 
extras  (not  subject  to  discount) — Cop- 
pering, 60  cents  per  100  pounds,  10-lb. 
wooden  boxes,  $1.50  per  100  pounds; 
25-lb.  and  50-lb.  wooden  boxes,  $1. 

Stoves  (Oil  Burning  Cooking) — Per- 
fection No.  32,  2  burner,  $21.50  each; 
Perfection  No.  33,  3  burner,  $26;  -Per- 
fection No.  34,  4  burner,  $34;  No.  22G 
oven  for  above  stoves,  $8.  Discount, 
30%  off  list. 

MeClary  Glass  Front  Oven,  No.  170, 
each,  net,  $4.75.  Detroit  Glass  Front 
Oven,  No.  85,  each,  net;  Hot  Blast, 
plus  %. 

Stoves  (Oil  Heaters)— No.  525,  $8.75 
each;  No.  530,  $9.75;  No.  630,  $12.50. 
Discount  30%  off  list  on  these  three 
numbers.  Hot  Blast,  plus  10%. 

Stretchers,  Wire  —  Hercules,  $3.60 
doz.  Stretchers,  curtain — Star,  No.  1, 
$27.60  doz.;  Star,  No.  2,  $30  doz.;  Sun, 
N'o.  1,  $20;  Sun,  No.  2,  $22. 

Swings  (Stratford) — 4  ft.,  $7;  5  ft., 
$9;  6  ft.,  $11.  Ontario,  4-passenger 
lawn  swing,  $7.50;  awning,  $4.50. 

Tacks— Wire  tacks,  60/25%  from  re- 
vised hardware  tack  list  adopted  Janu- 
ary, 1922;  double-pointed  tacks,  60/25% 

Shoe  Pindings — List  adopted  X^ovem- 
ber  21,  1921. 

Tapes,  Measuring  (Lufkin) — 263,  50 
ft.,  Challenge,  steel,  $4.95  each;  103,  50 
ft.  Reliable  Jr.,  steel,  $5.25  each;  243, 
50  ft.  Rival,  steel,  $4.40  each;  553,  50 
ft.  Steel,  $3.95  each;  1243,  50  ft.  Rival 
Jr.,  steel,  $4.06  ea.;  603,  50  ft.  Metallic, 
$3.17  each;  604,  66  ft..  Metallic,  $3.54 
each;  403,  50  ft.  Linen,  $2.39  each; 
713,  50  ft.  Ass  Skin,  $6.15  doz.;  714,  66 
ft.  Ass  Skin,  $7.37  doz.;  143,  3  ft.  Steel 
Pocket,  $7.27  doz.;  145,  5  ft.  Steel 
Pocket,  $9.20  doz.;  175,  5  ft.  Linen 
Pocket,  $6.35  doz.;  165,  5  ft.  Cotton 
Pocket,  $1.55  doz. 

Toasters,  Electric — Universal,  $7.80;' 
C.  G.,  $5.  Discount,  20  and  10%.  Can- 
adian Beauty,  $5.43;  Upright,  with 
rack,  $6.40. 

Tools,  Harvest — Waverley,  Welland- 
vale,  Eixford,  Maple  Leaf,  Bedford, 
60%  off  new  list. 

Track,  Bam  Door — Hatch  Trolley, 
per  ft.,  2214c;  brackets  for  this,  per 
doz.,  $2.20. 

National  Flat  Track,  1%  in.  per  100 
ft.,  $10.85.  Storm  King  Flat,  No.  60, 
list  less  20-10%.  Safety  Flat,  No.  60, 
list  less  20-10%.  Eeliable  No.  1  and  2, 
20c  per  ft.,  less  20-10%.  Bound  Trolley 
No.  1918,  20c  per  ft.,  less  20-10%. 

Traps  (Game) — Victor,  No.  1  Giant, 
$3.35  per  dozen;  Jump,  No.  1,  $3.50; 
Hawley  &  Norton,  No.  1,  $5;  Newhouse, 
No.  1,  $7.50.    All  these  include  chains. 

Tubs,  Wood — No.  0,  $26  per  dozen; 


March,  1922 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


47 


No.  1,  $23.10;  No.  2,  $20.90;  No.  3, 
$17.60.    F.o.b.  Newmarket. 

Twine,  Binder — 500  ft.,  llViC  a  foot; 
550  ft.,  18%e;  600  ft.,  20%c;  650  ft., 
21%c.  Freight  prepaid  to  nearest  sta- 
tion in  lots  of  300  lbs.  and  over.  (This 
applies  to  Eastern  Canada  only.)  Re- 
bate of  Va  cent  lb.  on  10,000  lbs.  and  % 
cent  lb.  on  20,000  lbs. 

Twine  (Cotton) — 5-lb.  sack,  3-ply,  lb., 
47y2c;  4  ply,  lb.,  50c. 

Cones,  3  ply,  lb.,  44c ;  4  ply,  lb.,  47c. 

Tin  and  Enamelwares — 

Britannic,  list  plus  15%. 

Scotch  Grey  Ware,  50  and  10%. 

Colonial,  40%. 

Imperial  ware,  40%. 

Pearl,  40%. 

Premier,  20%. 

Canada  ware,  20%. 

Crescent,  50  and  10%. 

White  ware,  50  and  10%. 

Jaipanned  ware,  net  list. 

Japanned  ware,  white,  list,  plus  10%. 

Plain  and  japanned  sprinklers,  list, 
10%. 

Stamped  ware,  plain,  50  and  10%. 
Stamped  ware,  retinned,  50%. 
Copper  bottoms,  plus  40%. 
Tinners'  trimmings,  plain  50/10%. 
Tinners'  trimmings,  retinned,  50%. 
Tinners'    trimmings,    general,  write 
for  prices. 

Factory  milk  cans,  list,  plus  15%. 
Milk  can  trimmings,  list,  plus  33J^%. 
Cream  cans,  write  for  prices. 
Eailroad  cans,  write  for  prices. 
Sheet  iron  ware,  list,  plus  10%. 
Pieced  ware,  ordinary,  list,  plus  20%. 
Pieced  tinware,  C.  B.,  list,  plus  30%. 
Fry  pans.  Acme,  33i/^%. 
Fry  pans.  Quick  Meal,  net  list. 
Spiders,  steel,  net  list. 


Fire  shovels,  japanned,  list,  plus  10%. 

Fire  shovels,  japanned,  list,  plus  10%. 

Steel  sinks,  galvanized,  net  list. 

Steel  sinks,  painted,  net  list. 

Ligli/t  galv.  pails  and  tubs,  net  list. 

Heavy  galv.  pails  and  tubs,  net  list. 

Hollow  ware,  add  40  per  cent. 

Garbage  pails,  net  list. 

Jap.  coal  hods,  list  plus,  3Sy^%. 

Galv.  coal  hods,  list,  plus  33i/^%. 

Paper  lined  boards,  40%. 

Wood  lined  boards,  25%. 

Copper  boilers,  net. 

Copper  tea  kettles,  net. 

Copper  tea  and  coffee  pots,  net. 

Stove  and  other  pipe,  net"  list. 

Stove  pipe  elbows,  black  and  galv., 
net  list. 

Stove  pipe  thimbles,  60%. 

Wire  —  Annealed  or  Bright  —  Ad- 
vances over  base  price  on  sizes  light- 
er than  No.  9.  No.  9  and  heavier,  6c; 
No.  11,  12c;  No.  12,  20c;  No.  13,  30c; 
No.  14,  40c;  No.  15,  55c;  No.  16,  70c. 

Annealing,  no  extra.  Oiled  and  an- 
nealed extra,  15c.  Coppering  and  liquor 
finish  extra,  $1  to  $1.50.  Tinning  ex- 
tra, $2  to  $3. 

Bright  base,  $3.55.  Annealed  base, 
$3.55.    Galvanized  base,  $3.90. 

Barbed  wire,  $4.30.  Coiled  spring 
wire,  9  gauge,  $3.95. 

Stovepipe  Wire— No.  18,  $8.50;  No. 
19,  $9.00. 

Weights,  Sash — Sectional,  1  lb.  per 
100  lbs.,  $2.75;  sectional,  %  lb.,  per  100 
lbs.,  $2.85;  solid,  3  to  30  lbs.,  per  100 
lbs.,  $2.50. 

Wheelbarrows — Navvy,  steel  wheel, 
$105  a  dozen;  garden  steel,  $78.75;  light 
garden,  $84.  F.o.b.  Montreal,  Toronto, 
London. 


Wrenches,  Crescent,  list  plus  10%. 

Wringers,  Clothes  —  Domestic,  No. 
531E,  $115;  Dom.  Bencih,  No.  541EB, 
$174;  Favorite,  No.  511E,  $105;  Favor- 
ite, No.  512,  $112;  Royal  Canadian,  $94; 
Favorite,  No.  514,  $133;  Ottawa,  No. 
331E,  $105;  Ottawa  Bench,  No.  341EB, 
$162;  Challenge,  No.  311E,  $95;  War- 
ranty, $115;  Bicycle,  11  in.,  $105;  Eze, 
$102;  Rapid,  $92;  Eureka,  $64;  Blue 
Belle,  $115;  Blue  Belle,  Folding  B, 
164;  Rival,  $105;  Model,  $97;  Imperial, 
$102.    Discounts  from  above  list  30%. 


EAGLE  LAMP  BLACK 

Made  only  by 

THE  L.  MARTIN  COMPANY 
81  Fulton  Street,  NEW  YORK 
A  genii  in 

Montreal,  Winnipeg  and  Toronto 


THE  PARMENTER  BULLOCK  CO. 

Limited 
GANANOQUE,  ONT. 
Iron  and  Copper  Rivets,  Iron  and  Copper 
Burrs,  Bifurcated  and  Tubular  Rivets, 
Wire  Nails,  Copper  and  Steel  Boat  and 
Canoe  Nails,  Escutcheon  Pins,  Leather 
Shoe  and  Overshoe  Buckles,  Fence  Plates. 


Gasoline  Pumps  and  Tanks,  Air  Pres- 
sure Tanks  and  Receivers,  Air  Compres- 
sors, Pneumatic  Tanks  and  Pumps, 
Galvanized  Tanks,  round  and  square. 
Write  for  New  Catalogue. 


THE  5TEELTR0UGH  8.  MACHINE  CO.LTD. 

TWEED  -  ONT. 


Diamond  Dual  Circulating 
Pumps  For  Ford  Cars 


This  better  pump  is 
the  result  of  scien- 
tific constrck.  t  ion 
Among  the  features 
of  improvement  is  a 
specially  construct- 
ed stuffing  box  which 
preventt  leakage;  a 
screw  propeller 
which  forces  circu- 
lation, and  an  oak 
lea  her  belt,  special- 
ly treated,  insuring 
long  life.  Easily  in- 
stalled, no  drilling  or 
mechanical  change 
being  necessary. 

Price  $5.00 

Jobbers  and  deal- 
ers: Bigger  sales 
and  fasten  ales  are 
assured.  Write  for 
proposition. 


Luther  Grinder  Manufacturing  Co. 

DepailmenI  62 

Milwaukee  Wis.  U.  S.  A. 


How  is  Your  Stock  of 
SWINGS  and  LADDERS? 


With  the  coming  of  Spring  the  de- 
mand for  swings  and  ladders  in- 
creases. House  cleaning,  painting, 
home  repairing,  etc.,  all  make  for 
ladder  sales.  We  make  ladders  of 
every  description. 


Other  products  of  ours  include: 

Lawn  Swings,  Garden  Seats,  Camp  Chairs 
and  Tables,  Meat,  Ironing  and  Bake 
Boards,  Clothes  Bars,  Furniture  etc. 

Our  Catalogue  " P"  will  interest  pou.    Write  for  it. 


Stratford  Manufacturing  Co.  Ltd. 

Stratford,  Ontario 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


March,  1922 


PAINTS  AND  OILS 


AJabastine — Colors  and  white  —  2%  lb. 
packages,  {10.10  for  100  lbs.;  5  lb.  packages, 
$9.60  for  100  Ihs.  F.o.b.  Paris  or  nearest 
jobbing  house. 

Beeswax — Small  quantities,  45c  per  pound; 
larger  quantiites,  40c. 

Blue  Stone — Per  lb.,  bbls.,  7c;  less  quan- 
tities, 10c. 

Borax — Lump  crystal  or  powdered  borax, 
10c  pound. 

Bronzing:  Liquid — Bronzing  liquid.  No.  1, 
$2.25  a  gaJlon.     BaJiana  oil,  $4.25.  a  gallon. 

Brushes — Floor  waxing — Acme,  15  pounds, 
$2.70  each;  20  pounds,  $3.25;  25  pounds, 
$3.80. 

Coating — Cement  coating,  P.  &  L,.,  $5.40. 

Coal  Tar — In  quart  tins,  per  case  o£  three 
dozen,  $3.75  per  dozen;  less  than  cases,  $3.95 
per  dozen. 

Colors   (Dry) — Per  pound — 

Raw  and  Burnt  Umber,  100  lb.  kegs,  No. 
1,   6-9V,.c;  less  quantities,  ll-15c. 

Raw  and  Burnt  Sienna,  100  lb.  kegs, 
6-9V(>c;   less  quantities,  12-15c. 

Imp.  green,  100  lb.  kegs,  15c. 

Chrome  green,  CP.,  40-45c. 

Chrome  yellow,  25-35c. 

Brunswick  green,  100  lb.  keg,  ll-13c. 

Indian  red,  100  lb.  keg,  15-20c;  No.  1, 
100  lb.  keg,  8c. 

Lamp  black,  in  bulk,  24c;  packages,  25- 
28c. 

Venetian  red,  best  bright,  6% -9c;  No.  1, 
3%-5^4c. 

Drop  black,  pure  dry,  12-15c. 

Golden  Ochre,  109  lb.  kegs,  5c. 

White  ochre,  100  lb.  keg,  6c;  barrels.  Be. 

Yellow  ochre,  barrels,  3 -6c. 

French  ochre,  bbls.,  5-8c. 

Spruce  ochre,  100  lb.  keg,  5-8c. 

Can.  red  oxide,  bbls.,  3c. 

Super  magnetic  red,  5c. 

Vermillion,  Mexican,  75c. 

English  Vermillion,  $1.85. 

Colors  in  Oil — Pure,  in  1  lb.  tins: 

Venetian  red,  27c;  Indian  red,  30c;  Chrome 
yellow,  pure,  50c;  Golden  ochre,  pure,  34c; 
French  spruce  ochre,  pure,  29c:  Greens, 
pure,  35c;  Siennas,  36c:  Umbers,  36c;  Ultra- 
marine blue,  70c;  Prussian  blue,  95c; 
Chinese  blue,  95c;  Drop  black,  42c;  Ivory 
black,  44c;  Signwriters'  black,  pure,  48c; 
Imperial   black.   25  lb.   irons,  39c. 

Colors — Mortar — Brown,  per  pound,  2^4c; 
red,  2»4c:  Mack,  7c;  buff,  3c. 

Dryers — I.  V.  housepalnters'  Japan,  gal 
cans,  $3;  I.  V.  liquid  dryer,  $2  75.  Discount, 
50  per  cent,  on  both  these.  Housepalnters', 
$1.15. 

Enamels  (White) — Per  gallon:  Dougall 
white  enamel,  $7.43;  Vitralite,  $7.77:  Dura- 
nte, $6;  Old  Dutch,  $6.27;  B-H  "White" 
Bnamel,  $6.50;  Martins,  white.  $7;  Satinette, 
$7.23:  C.  P.  Co.  Albagloss,  $6.30;  C.  D.  Mas- 
ter Painters,  $6.75;  Mooramel,  $7;  Lowe 
Bros.,  Linduro.  $7;  Sunshine,  white,  $6; 
Kyanize,  $8;  Solpar,  $4,50;  Paripan,  $9; 
Jasperlac,  $4.25;  Invincible,  $6;  Hillcrest, 
$7;  Adellte,  A.  &  E..  $7.65;  Adeillte.  A.  & 
E.,  $5.40;  Floglaze,  $4.50;  Ripolin,  $7.09. 

Giue — English,  sheet,  per  lb,  24  to  30c; 
White  pigsfoot,  50c;  Cake  bone,  112  lb.  bags, 
24  to  30c:  Hides,  112  lb.  bags,  30  to  32c; 
Ground  glues,  112  lb.  bags — English,  per  lb., 
22  to  24c:  Canadian,  16  to  18c. 


Glass —  Star  or  Double 

Case  lots.  16  oz.  or  24  oz. 

Up  to  26                                     $  6.00  $  9.80 

26  to  40                                           7.46  12.29 

41   to  60                                           8.10  13.30 

51   to  60                                           8.46  13.80 

61   to  70                                           8.80  14.40 

71   to  80                                          9.30  15.16 

81  to  84                                         10.85  17.65 

86  to  90                                         11.40  18.50 

91   to  96    20.65 

96   to  100    22.35 

  26.05 

  27.80 


Cut  size  sheet  glass,  75  per  cent,  off  No- 
vember,  1920.  list. 

Glaziers'  Points — Zinc  coated,  7c  %  lb. 
package. 

Lead,  Wliite — (Ground  In  oil) — Prices  are 
per  100  lbs.  In  ton  lots.  Less  than  ton  lots 
are  35c  per  100  lbs.  higher  than  quoted  be- 
low. F.o.b.  Brantford,  50c;  London,  55c; 
Windsor,  60c  per  100  lbs.  F.o.b.  Toronto 
William  and  Port  Arthur.  75c  per  100  lbs. 
Maritime  differential  50c  per  100  lbs.  over 
Montreal. 

Montreal.  Toronto 

Anchor,    pure    $12.75  $13.20 

Champion,  pure    12.75  13.20 

Crown  Diamond,  pure  ....  12.75  13.20 
and  Hamilton,  45c  per  100  lbs.  F.o.b.  Port 
Oreen  Seal  pure    12.76  13.20 


.  12.75 

13.20 

13.20 

12.76 

13.20 

12.76 

13.20 

12.75 

13.20 

13.25 

13.70 

BB  Genuine,  less  than  tons  14.10 

14.55 

Lead    (Red  Dry) — Per 

100  lbs. 

— Genuine, 

560  lb.  casks,  $11.00;  Genuine,  100  lb.  casks, 
$12.00;  less  quantity,  $13.00.  F.o.b.  Mont- 
real and  Toronto. 

Linseed  Oil — (Raw) — Per  sal, — \  to  2 
bbls.,  $1.15.     Boiled— 1  to  2  bbls.,  $1.18. 

Litharge— Casks,  per  cwt.,  $9.25;  smaller 
quantities,  per  lb.,  10%c. 


Muresco — Per  100   lbs.          White.  Tints. 

350   lb.   bbls                                   $7.15  $8.25 

200  lbs.,  half  bbls                         8.00  9.10 

100  lbs.,  kegs                                 8.25  9.35 

Cases,  20  5-lb.  pkgs                     8.80  9.90 


Faints,  Prepared — Price  per  gaJlon,  1  gal- 
lon can  basis — 

C.  P.  Co.  Elephant  white,  $3.85;  Sanitone, 
white,  $3.45;  Sanitone,  colors,  $3.35;  C.  P. 
Co.,  pure  white,  $3.95;  C.  P.  Co.,  pure  colors, 
$3.60;  C.  P.  floor  paint,  $3.55;  Elephant  floor 
paint,   $3.30;  Victoria  floor  paint,  $2.90. 

B-H  English,  colors,  $3.60;  English,  white, 
$3.95;  Fresconette,  white,  $3.45;  Fresconette, 
colors,  $3.35;  floor,  $3.55;  porch  floor,  $3.60. 

Crown  Diamond,  white,  $3.70;  colors, 
$3.35;  floor,  $3.30;  porch,  $3.30;  flat  wall 
tone,  white,  $3.45;  colors,  $3.35. 

Moore's  House  Colors,  white,  $4.35;  House 
Colors,  colors,  $4.10;  Preesrvo  Paint,  white, 
$2.95;  coJors,  $2.85;  floor  paint,  $3.80;  Sani- 
Flat,  $3.80;  Porch  and  Deck  Paint,  $4.10. 

I.  V.  Elastica,  white,  $3.55;  Elastica,  col- 
ors, $3.70;  Flatine,  int.  wall,  white,  $3.45; 
Flatlne,  int.  wall,  cilors,  $3.35. 

Lowe  Bros.,  H.  S.  White,  No.  328,  $3.95; 
H.  S.,  color,  $3.60;  H.  S.  floor,  hard  drying, 
$3.55;  H.  S.  Porch,  $3.60;  Mellotone,  flat 
wall,  white,  3.50;  color,  $3.35. 

Jamieson's  Crown  Anchor,  $3.45. 

O.P.W.  Canada  Brand,  white,  $3.95;  col- 
ors, $3.60;  floor,  $3.55;  Plat  Wall,  white, 
$3.45;  color,  $3.35. 

Ramsay's  Pure,  white,  $3.80;  colors,  $3.45; 
floor,  $3.40;  porch,  $3.45. 

Glidden's  white,  $3.95;  colors,  $3.60. 

Martin-Senour,  lOOc/^,  white,  $3.95;  col- 
ors, $3.60;  porch,  $3.60;  Neutone,  white, 
$3.45:  Neutone,  colors,  $3.35;  floor  paint, 
$3.35. 

Sherwin-Williams,  white,  $3.95;  colors, 
$3.60;  floor,  $3.60;  porch,  $3.60;  Flat  Tone, 
white,  $3.45;  colors,  $3.35. 

Maple  Leaf,  white,  $3.95;  colors,  $3.60; 
floor,  $3.55. 

Pearcy's  Prepared,  colors,  $3.05;  white, 
$3.40;  floor,  $3. 

Adelite,  white,  $3.95;  colors,  $3.60;  Indus- 
trial white,  $3.50. 

Barrett's  Everjet  Elastic  Carbon  Paint — 
Barrels,  per  gal.,  80c;  half  barrels.  85c;  5s 
and  10s,  95c;  Is,  per  case,  doz.,  $12.00. 

Everjet  Black  Enamel — ^Crates,  2  doz.,  8 
oz.,  $1.45;  crates  12  doz.,  8  oz.,  $1.40;  1  gal. 
cans,  gal.,  $1.50;  5-10  gal.  cans,  gal.,  $1.35; 
barrels-half  bbls..  gal..  $1.25. 

Carbosota  Liquid  Creosote  Oil — Barrels, 
60c;  half  barrels.  65c:  5s  and  10s,  gal.,  95c: 
Is  (case  12  gals.),  Montreal,  $8.50;  Toron- 
to. $9.50. 

H.,  T.  &  A.  Co.'s  Creosote  Oil — Barrels, 
45c;  half-barrels,  50c;  5s  and  10s,  60c.  F.o.b. 
Montreal  and  Toronto. 

Paris  Green — 100  lb.  lots — %  lb.  paper 
cartons,  per  lb.,  52c;  1  lb.  paper  cartons, 
50c;  %  lb.  tins,  54c:  1  lb.  tins,  52c;  25  lb. 
tins,  48c;  50  and  100  lb.  drums,  46c;  250  lb. 
kegs,  44V4c:  100  Ih.  barrels,  44c.  Terms: 
1  per  cent.  15,  or  30  days  net.  F.o.b.  Mont- 
real. Toronto,  Hamilton,  London,  Ottawa, 
Quebec,  Moncton,  St.  John's  and  Halifax. 
Yarmouth  and  P.  E.  I.  points  %c  per  lb. 
extra. 

Polish  (O-Cedar) — 4  oz.  bottles,  doz., 
$2.10;  12  oz.  bottles,  $4.20;  1  qt.  can.  $10.50; 
%  gal.  cans,  $16.80;  1  gal.  cans,  $25.20. 

Putty  (Standard) — Less  than  tons — Bulk, 
bbls.  (800  lbs),  per  cwt.,  $5.90;  100  lb. 
drums,  $6.75;  25  lb.  drums,  $7;  12%  lb. 
irons,  $7.25;  Bladders  in  bbls.  (400  lbs.), 
$7.65:  in  cases  (100  lbs.),  $7.75.  Tons  35c 
lower.  Pure  linseed  putty.  $2  cwt.  advance 
on  above  prices.  Hamilton  prices  same  as 
Toronto;  Windsor  and  London  5c  advance 
on  above. 

Plaster  Paris — Single  barrels,  $4. 

Bosin — Barrel  lots,  per  100  lbs. — G.,  med- 
ium grade,  $5  to  $7.50;  water  white,  $7  to 
$9.50. 

Remover  (Paint  and  Varnish) — High  Stan- 
dard, $3:  Taxite,  1  gal.  cans,  $3:  B-H  Van- 
Isher.  $3;  Chalco,  $3;  Klensa,  $3.60;  Cumoff, 
$3:  Dougall  Llngcrwett,  $3,25;  Takeoff,  $3; 
O.P.W.  Presto,  $2.60;  Solvo,  $3.60;  Varn-off, 
$3:  Adellte,  $3. 

Shellac — Per  gal.  in  bbls — White,  $4.65: 
orange,  $4.15.  Gal.  jugs,  white,  $6:  orange, 
$4.50.     F.o.b.  Toronto,  London,  Montreal. 

Sniphnr — In  100  lb.  bags,  per  pound,  4%c. 


Shingle  Stains — 

Ordinary  Colors.  Greens 


Sherwin-Williams    $1.39  $1.60 

B-H  Anchor    1.40  1.60 

M.  L.  Creosote    1.40  1.60 

Soligum    1.25  1.60 

Martin  Senours    1.40  1.60 

Elastica    1.40  1.60 

Hillcrest    1.40  1.60 

"CD."   Shingle   Stain    1.20  1.40 

Canada  Paint    1.75  2.00 

O.P.W.  Creolin    1.30  1.50 


Tar — Coal  tar,  reflned,  $10.50;  crude,  $9.26. 

Turpentine — Single  bbls.,  gal.,  $1.30;  2-4 
bbls.,  gal.,  $1.29;  5  gal.  lots,  per  gal.,  $1.45. 

Varnishes — Per  gal.  cans — B-H  Floors, 
$4.08;  Maritime  Spar,  $5.13;  Hard  oil,  $2.76; 
Gold  Medal,  $3.42;  Elastilite,  $3.85;  Grani- 
tlne  Floor  Finish,  $3.85;  Hydrox  Spar,  $3.96. 

C.  P.  C.  Sun  Varnish,  $4.30;  Sun  Aero 
Spar,  $4.50;  Sun  Waterproof  Floor,  $4.40. 

Glidden  Wearette,  $3.90;  floorette,  $3.90. 

I.  V.  Elastica,  No.  1,  $4.89;  No.  2,  $4.48; 
Floor,  $4. 

Jasperite  Interior  and  Exterior,  $3.75;  In- 
destructo,  floor,  $3.75;  Pale  Hard  Oil,  $3.75. 
P.  &  L.,  No.  61,  $5.04. 
Jamieson's  Copaline,  $4. 

M-S  Marble-Ite  Floor,  $4.22;  Wood-Var, 
$4.06;  Durable  Spar,  $5.13;  Finest  Interior, 
$4.87. 

Moorlastic  Floor,  $4.25;  T.  45  Floor,  $3.50; 
Moorvar  Interior,  $3.25;  Moore's  Spar,  $5. 

S.  W.  Elastic  Interior,  $3.14;  Mar-not, 
$3.93;  Quick  Action  House,  $2.65;  Rexapar. 
$5.04;  Scar-Not,  $4.66. 

Lowe  Bros.,  durable   floor,  $4.50. 

Solpar,  Spar  Marine,  $6;  House  Spar,, 
$4.50;  Floor,  $4.50;  Interior,  $3.50. 

Kyanize  Spar,  $5.15;  Cabinet  Rubbing, 
$4.85;  Interior  and  Floor,  $4.85. 

Luxeberry  light,  $4.72;  Granite,  $4.90; 
Spar,  $5.62. 

Ramsay's  Universal,  $3.75;  Agate  Floor, 
$3.95;  400  Hard  Oil,  $3.25. 

"C.  D.  Big  4"  Exterior,  $5;  Interior,  $4.60; 
General  purpose,   $4.18;  Furniture,  $2.25. 

Dougall  Univernish,  clear,  $4.40;  Trans- 
parent, spar,  $4.90;  Transparent,  floor,  $4.40. 

Adelite,  No.  103,  Floor,  $3.90;  No.  105, 
Flat,  $3.90;  No.  100,  Spar,  $5.70.  F.o.b. 
Montreal  and  Toronto. 

Water  Paints — Per  100  lbs.  in  5  lb.  pack- 
ages— Frescota,  white,  $8.50;  Decotint,  white, 
$8.50;  Coralite,  white,  $9;  Perfecto,  white, 
$8.50;  Rockface,  bbls..  250  lb.,  5c;  Opalite, 
300  lb.  bbls.,  17%c;  Opalite,  100  lb.  pkg., 
18%c;  1  gal.  packages,  per  pkg.,  $1;  %  gal. 
package,  per  pkg.,  52i^c;  Ramsay's  "Ideal," 
310  lb.  bbls.,  40  ^4c:  Sturgeon's  Solpar,  40c. 

Waste — Cream,  polishing,  19c. 

White — XXX,  18c;  xx,  16c:  x,  15c;  xc,  14c; 
xxx  ex,  16%c;  xx  grad.,  15%c;  XLCR,  14Hc; 
X  empire,  13c;  X  press,  ll%c. 

Colored — No.  1,  13Hc;  No.  lA,  ll%c;  No. 
17,  12'^c;  No.  IB,  Ifli^c;  Fancy,  14c;  Lion, 
12»^c;  Standard,  lie;  Popular,  10c;  Keen,  9c. 
Discount  for  quantity. 

Wax — B-H  Wax.  45c;  Berry  Bros.,  70c: 
Imperial     Floor     Wax,    35c:     Anchor.  38c; 

0.  P.W.  Lion  Brand,  38c;  Old  English,  67c; 
Johnson's,  67c;  Jamieson's  liquid  wax,  gal., 
$3.50  ;Ramsay's,    45c;    Martin-Senoiirs,  38c; 

1.  V.  Wax,  38c:  Sherwin-Williams,  60c;  Sol- 
par, $8.80  to  $9.90;  Crown  Diamond,  40c; 
Hillcrest,  45c;  Plymouth  Rock,  45c;  Cham- 
pion white,  50c:  Ad-el-ite  paste,  45c. 

Whiting — Plain,  in  bbls..  $2.50;  Gilders, 
bolted  in  bbls,  $2.75. 

Wood  Alcohol — Per  gal. — In  Ave  gallons, 
$1.75;  Methylated  Spirits,  $1.90  to  $2.55. 

Wood  Filler  (Paste) — Kleartone — Forest 
green,  fumed  and  mahogany — 1  lb.  cans,  30c 
a  pound;  2  lb.,  35c;  5  and  10  lb.,  33c;  25  lb., 
31c.     Discount  50  per  cent. 

Wood  Filler  (Liquid) — Crown  Diamond, 
per  gal.  in  qt.  tins,  $1.70.  ' 

Oas— Eoyalite,  21e  a  gallon;  Pala- 
cine,  24c ;  Gasoline,  net,  32%c.  Above 
prices  net. 

Black  oil  (summer),  23. le  a  gallon; 
Black  oil  (winter),  24.1c;  Capital,  cy- 
linder, 75.6c;  mach.  oil,  reg.  grades, 
43.6c;  Imperial  gas  engine  oil,  63.6c; 
Paraffine,  23.6.   List  less  10%  on  above. 

Imperial  kerosene,  tractor,  heavy,  $1; 
extra  heavy,  $1.10.    List  less  15%. 

Polarine,  $1.15  per  gallon;  Polarine, 
medium,  $1.15;  Polarine,  heavy,  $1.15; 
Polarine,  ex-heavy,  $1.50.  List  less 
25%. 

Fuel  oil,  per  barrel,  net,  09.90  cents 
a  gallon;  from  tank  wagons,  net,  08.90c ; 
tank  cars,  net,  07.90c.  Prices  shown  are 
barrel  basis,  unless  otherwise  specified. 
Barrels  charged  extra. 


March,  1922 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


49 


TRADE  MARK 


HOUSEHOLD  LACQUER 


VARNISH  STAINS 

It  Sells,  Satisfies  and  Pays  The 
Dealer  A  Handsome  Profit 


Lacqueret  is  a  household  laquer  designed  to  beautify  and 
preserve  old,  marred  or  scratched  furniture,  dingy  wood 
work,  dirt  stained  floors  and  the  hundred  and  one  odds 
and  ends  around  the  home. 

Composed  of  soluble,  permanent  colors,  combined  with 
a  special  elastic,  hard  drying  floor  varnish  Lacqueret 
will  not  cloud  or  disfigure  the  natural  grain  of  the  wood. 
It  possesses  exquisite  color  richness  and  retains  its  beauty 
for  an  exceedingly  long  time. 

Lacqueret  is  put  up  in  cans  with  an  eye-catching  label 
that  gets  attention  quickly  and  makes  displays  resultful. 
It  is  one  of  our  most  powerful  sale  producers. 
In  addition  to  Lacqueret,  International  Varnish  special- 
ties include  a  varnish,  paint,  stain  or  enamel  fit  for  any 
and  every  requirement. 

May  we  send  you  price  list  and  full  particulars  about 
our  complete  line  of  Elastica  products. 


"Save  the  surface  and 
you  save  aU  ^^^^ 

Made  In  Canada  By 


Montreal      Winnipeg      TORONTO      Halifax  Vancouver 


50 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


March,  1922 


;:iiiiriniiiiliiiiliiiliiiuiiiiiiiuiiiiiir'i>ii<iiiuuii'iiiiiiiiii  I'liiiiiJiiimiiiiiniiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii  iiiiiiimiiiiiimiiiuiiimi  iMiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiii  iiiiiiiiiMitMiiiMiiiiii  iiitiiiiiiiiiiMiiMiiiiiiMiuiriiiM.iii  ii::iiiiiiiiimimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiji  iiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiL' 

INDEX  TO  ADVERTISEMENTS 

FlIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIII  nillllllllllllllllllllllll.lillllllllllJIII  IIIIIIMIIllnilllllllllllJI'OIIIIIIIIIIIIIIJIIIIIII  Illllllll  Jllllllllltllllllllllllllllllllllll  IIIIIJIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII  IIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIItllMIIIIIM  IIIIMJIMIhllllfllMllllirilirilllMI  Illlllllllllllllll,^ 


Aluminum  Specialty  Co   43 

Aluminum  Ware  Mfg.  Co  cover  1 

Auto  Strop  Safety  Razor  Co   5 

Boeckh  Co.,  Ltd   40 

G.  &  H.  Barnett  Co   43 

Banwell-Hoxie  Wire  Fence  Co   7 

Canadian  Nationaal  Carbon  Co. ...cover  2 

Canadian  Wm.  Rogers  Co   9 

Canadian  Hdwe  &  Implement  under- 
writers  37 


Dennis  Wire  &  Iron  Works  Co   4 

Dunlop  Tire  &  Rubber  Goods  Co....  8 

Dominion  Belting  Co   6 

Frost  Steel  and  Wire  Fence  Co   6 

Harley  &  Son..   50 

Imperial  Varnish  &  Color  Co  cover  4 

Int(;rnational  Varnish  Co  .-  50 

Laidlaw  Bale  Tire  Co   47 

Luther  Grinder  Co   47 

L.  Martin  Co   47 


Meakins  &  Son   45 

North  Bros.  Mfg.  Co   4 

Parmenter  Bullock   47 

Sherwin-Williams  Co.,  Ltd  cover  3 

Sturgeons,  Ltd   50 

Save  the  Surface  Committee   39 

Stratford  Mfg.  Co   43 

Steel  Trough  &  Machine  Co   47 

Taylor  Forbes  Co.,  Ltd   10 

W.  Walker  &  Son   3 

White  Machine  Works   8 


HARLEY  &  SON 

DECORATORS  FOR  EXHIBITIONS,  CARNIVALS 
and  TOWN  CELEBRATIONS 

We  Decorated  the  Armouries  for  the  1921  and  1922  Hardware  Conventions  and  for  the  "Made  in 
Hamilton"  Exhibition — all  great  Successes. 

Let  us  do  your  next  special  decorating  job.    No  job  too  small — none  too  large. 

45  Charles  St.  HAMILTON 


Telephone  Cpossarm  Treated  with  Solignum.  Dipped  And  Sawn  in  half  after  three  days 
Note  Penetration  at  points  where  needed. 


Proprietors — 
MAJOR  &  Co., 
Hull,  England 


Solignum  is  supplied  in — 
Browns,  Reds,  Greens  and 
Greys — in  one,  five  and 
forty  gallon  packagss. 

Write  for  Agency  Plan 


Solignum  is  recommended  for:  all  EXTERIOR  WOODWORK 
such  as  SHINGLES,  half  tinber  work,  timbers  set  in  concrete,  bridge 
timbers,  telegraph  poles,  scows,  tables,  fences,  posts,  pig  pens,  ties,  etc. 

Solignum  Interior  Stain  is  a  new  line  and  splendid  seller  also. 

STURGEONS,  LIMITED,  66  Richmond  St.  East,  Toronto 

fThe  " Solignum" Distrihulors  for  Canada.) 


March,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


EniiCTCustomefs  ' 
Always  Relv  Upon- 


JT'S  a  Sherwin-Williams  Product— one  of  the  "Cover  the  Earth"  quality 
group — made  to  furnish  paint  insurance  on  Barns,  Silos,  Outhouses, 
Wood  Roofs,  Fencing  and  other  farm  property  requiring  protection 
against  wind  and  weather. 

Commonwealth  Barn  Paint  is  a  rich  heavy -bodied  Red  or  Gray  of 
unusual  covering  power,  even  on  rough  lumber.  Good  looking  and 
extremely  durable,  it  is  just  the  kind  of  paint  a  farmer  will  appreciate — 
the  kind  that  reflects  favorably  upon  the  dealer  selling  it. 

Farmers  everywhere  know  Commonwealth  Barn  Paint  and  the 
other  "Cover  the  Earth"  Paints  and  Varnishes.  That's  why 
these  S.W.  Products  are  so  easily  sold  and  why  S.W.  dealers 
everywhere  are  securing  the  greater  share  of  the  paint  demand. 


'SaEve  the  surface  and 
you  save  air^^^ 


Why  not  investigate  this  agency  proposition  ?    A  post 
card  addressed  to  any  of  our  branches  will  bring  you 
full  particulars  by  return  mail 


The  Sherwin-Williams  Co. 

of  Canada,  Limited 

PAINT.  VARNISH  A  COLOR  MAKERS 
LINSEED     OIL  CRUSHERS 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


March,  1922 


**The  Finish  That  Endures** 


The  Seven 


LINES:- 

Exterior  Surfaces  Velvet  Finishes 

Home  &  Farm  Porch  &  Verandah 

Art  Shades  Lac  Shades 

Auto  Finishes 


ImperialVarmish  &  Color  Co. 

HEAD  OFFICE    TORONTO  CANADa""'™ 

MONTREAL       WINNIPEG  VANCOUVER 


Soim  Diatrihuti^f  M  la?  Mc. 


*  ^'  E  tatmrn  Diatributort  ) 

PAINT  dtVARNISH 

LIMITED 

MONTREAL 

243  Bciver  Hall  Hill 


Satkatchmwan  and  Albmria 


DimtributoTM  for  Britith  Cotiimbta: 
The  Callander  Shore  Co.,  Limited 
155  Pender  St.  West 

Vancouver 


April  1922 


Vol.   14,  No  3. 
(Old  Series) 


FEATURING  SPRING  BUYING 


(New  Series) 

$1.00  Yearly 


;RANDRAM  '  S 


GENUINE  B  B 
WHITE  LEAD 

pronounced  the  best  by 
an   independent  expert. 

When  one  of  the  foremost  chem- 
ists on  the  continent  states  that  he 
has  never  seen  a  finer  White  Lea(i 
than  Brandram's  Genuine  B.  B.,  it 
speaks  volumes  for  the  superiority 
of  our  Canadian  product. 
Dnring  ten  generations  Brand- 
ram's Genuine  B.  B.  White  Lead 
has  maintained  its  world-wide  rep- 
utation as  the  premier  White  Lead 
in  oil, excelling  as  it  does  in  spread- 
ing ami  covering  qualities  as  well 
as  in  durability. 


BRANPRAM -HENDERSON 


MONTQSAL  M, 

MEDICINE  MAT 


I  ST  UOH^4  TORONTO  WIMM 

CAI_0ARY  EDMONTON  VANCOUVER 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES   .  April,  1922 


"OAKVILLE" 


Globe  Teopot 
3  to  4  Pints 


Perlcy  Teapot 
3  to  4  Pints 


The  Aluminium  Ware 
Par  Excellence 

Aluminium  Ware  has  firmly  established  itself  with 
the  housewives  of  Canada.  They  take  pride  in 
their  accumulations  of  it  —  adding  one  piece  after 
another  until  their  outfits  are  complete.  The  dealer 
who  sells  durable,  dependable  "OAKVILLE" 
Ware  is  sure  of  a  steady,  growing  patronage. 

New  Selling  Features 
For  1922  Include — 

Welded  Spouts 
on  Tea  Kettles 
and  Tea  Pot 


A  sample  order  will  prove  that 
*'OAKVILLE"  ware  sells  readily. 


Will  Outware 
Any  Wear 


All  Leading  Jobbers 
Sell  "OAKVILLE" 


Aluminium  Ware  Mfg.  Co.,  Limited 

Oakville,  Ont. 

Richardson  and  Bureau,  Montreal,    Selling  Representatives 


April,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


8 


WRITE  FOR  PRICES 

Owl  Biand  Strip  Slates, 

size  36  X  12,  red  and 
green.  They  save  time 
and  will  not  curl. 

Owl  Brand  Slate  Sur- 
faced Roofing,    red  and 

g-reen,  108  square  feet, 
85-1  b.  roll.  Write  for 
dealer  samples. 


BE  WISE! 


I?Eei5TERED 
IRADE  MARK 


FACTS  WORTH  WHILE 

Owl  Roofing  is  made  in 
1,  2,  3,  4,  5-ply;  is  fire 
resisting  and  free  from 
taint  in  rainwater;  each 
roll  contains  108  square 
feet,  32  inches  wide:  en- 
ough to  cover  a  space 
100  feet  square,  and  allow 
sufficient  lap.  Nails,  cem- 
ent for  seams  and  instruc- 
tions for  laying  are  in- 
cluded. 


BE  READY  FOR  A  VIGOROUS  DEMAND 


Owl  Brand  Roofing  has  captured  a  big  bunch  of  enthusiastic 
dealers  and  everything  points  to  a  whirlwind  Spring  business 
with  the  the  fastest  selling  Roofing  on  the  market.  Owl  Brand 
Roofing  makes  the  most  profit  for  you,  and  brings  customers 
back  for  more — write  for  samples  and  our  proposition  to 
dealers. 

W.  WALKER  &  SON,  limit  ed 

Wholesale  Hardware  and  Iron  Merchants 

10-16  Alcorn  Ave.        -  Toronto 


4 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


April,  1922 


"Hobbs  Gold  Medal  Grade" 


The  First  for  Quality 


The  Best  for  Value 


"Gold  Medal" 
Farm  and  Harvest 
Tools  are  real  money 
savers.    High  quality  con- 
sidered, they  are  the  lowest 
priced  tools  made.    Made  of 
the  highest  grade  tempered 
steel,  especially  adapted  for 
Farming  Tools',  selected  Sec- 
ondGrowth  Handles.polished, 
waxed,  and  attractively  labell- 
ed.     Each  tool  is  carefully 
tested  as  to  balance,  hang  and 
set.  Handles  encased  in  paper 
bag,  ensuring  clean  stock. 

ABSOLUTELY  GUARANTEED 

Have  you  received  our  Spring  and 
Automobile  Accesiories  Cata- 
logue*?    Gladly  sent  on  request. 


THE  HOBBS  HARDWARE  CO.,  LIMITED 

LONDON  r>  ONTARIO 


April,  1922 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


B 


The  "Why" 

of  the  Safety  Razor 


YOUR  customer  comes  to  yoa  sold  on  the  safety  razor 
principle— good,  clean  shaving-  without  the  bother  of 
stropping  or  honing— wanting  this  operation  done  for 
him — VvilJing  to  charge  his  blades  to  "Convenience." 

The  sale  that  builds  business  is  the  article  that  gives  a 
man  exactly  what  he  goes  after. 

With  the  Brownie  Gillette  to  take  care  of  one  class  of  your 
tra  le,  and  the  New  Improved  Gillette  for  the  man  who 
wants  only  the  best,  you  can  give  all  your  customers  what 
they  want — the  simplest  and  best  means  of  shaving. 

Neither  razor  has  parts  that  can  wear  out  or  get  out  of 
order  Both  razors  use  the  same  fine  Gilllette  blades  you 
have  always  known. 

The  Brownie  gave  the  best  shave  that  was  know  uuntil  the 
New  Imprvved  Gillette  was  invented.  The  New  Improved 
Gillette  gives  the  closest,  cleanest,  and  most  comfortable 
shive  known  to  modern  science. 


^Tfie  Ts/ew  Improved 


^^^H^^^    V> :\4ris-v%'k-o.A  r*AviA/l^  Alio  ^ 


Safety 
Sazor 

Patented  Ccuiada  Aug.  51,  19  zo 


6 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


April,  1922 


A  Double  Message  to  Hardware  Merchants 

Here  is  a  sales-making  opportunity  that  you  should  not  pass  by — 

Silverware  prices  are  down 
A  new  Counter  Cabinet  that  sel  Is  Silverware 

This  is  the  combination  that  has  proven  a  sales- reviver  and  a  profit-maker  to  Hardware  Mer- 
chants all  over  Canada.  Look  at  the  cabinet.  It  is  a  handsome  rase  that  sits  on  your  coimler. 
A  display  card  in  colors  attracts  the  attention  of  your  customers.  In  the  velvet-lined  tray,  a 
variety  of  pieces  are  arranged  for  convenient  display.  eBneath  the  tray  is  your  slock  of  flatware. 
Can  you  imagine  any  way  more  attractive,  more  interesting  to  your  customers,  and  more  con- 
venient to  yourself  for  displaying  flatware? 

Ihe  beautiful  Revere  pattern  shown  on  the  page  opposite  is  regularly  sold  with  the  Display 
Cabinet. 

The  Cabinet  and  complete  set  of  Flat  ware  is  sold  to  dealers  at  a  very  at- 
tractive price — the  resale  prices  make  a  generous  profit.  Write  to  us 
to-day  for  particulars  or  ask  our  salesmen. 

Canadian  Wm.  A.  Rogers  Limited 

570  King  St.  West,  Toronto 

Downtown  Showroom,  Kent  Building 


s 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


April,  1922 


TWO 

Connor  Electrics 


The  P^coiiomy  Electric  is  designed  to  en-' 
able  liardwaie  merchants  to  meet  the 
definite  demand  for  moderately  priced 
electric  washing  machines.  The  Econ- 
omy Electric  does  that  and  more. 
Consider  a  few  of  its  selling  points ;  Tub 
of  stave-leg  design,  mounted  on  four,  full- 
swivel  castors;  from  Cypress  lumber  of 
best  quality,  (the  wood  most  suitable  for 
washing  machine  construction),  station- 
ary wringer,  11-in.  rolls  of  best  quality; 
safety  release  ;  reversible  water  board ; 
simple  in  design. 


The  Connor 
Electric  Model  1. 

To  describe  this  briefly  : 
best  quality  extra  thick- 
ness Cypress  tub,  mount- 
ed on  a  strongly  braced 
steel  frame  galvanized ; 
tilting  tub  for  thorough 
drainage.  Swinging 
wringer  with  best  qual- 
ity 12"  rolls,  reversible 
water  board,  and  safety 
release. 

Write  for  prices  on  our  full  line. 
Electric,  belt  driven,  water  pow- 
er, hand  operated  washers,  clothes 
wringers,  woodenware. 


J.  H.  CONNOR  &  SON 

LIMITED 

Manufacturers       .•  —  Electric,  Belt  Driven,  Water  Power  and 
Hand  operated  Washing  Machines,  Clothes  Wringei  s. 


OTTAWA 


Woodenware,  etc. 


ESTABLISHED  1875 


CANADA 


310  Chainb.!rs  St.,  Winnipeg,  Man.     McPherson  Teetzel  Co., 
Vancouver,  B.  C. 


April,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


9 


One  Way  of  Buying 
That  Doesn't  Pay 

time  is  past  for  buying  fencing  on  a  hand  to  mouth  basis.  Your 
^      customers  are  making  up  their  minds  to  buy  and  they  don't  like  to  be 
kept  waiting.    If  you  haven't  the  stock  on  hand  to  supply  their  requirements 
they  are  very  apt  to  buy  across  the  street. 

The  recent  demand  for  Peerless  Fence  has  been  heavy  enough 
to  reduce  our  stocks  of  several  styles  to  a  low  point.  This  may 
possibly  mean  some  delay  in  shipping. 

For  this  reason  don 't  put  off  ordering  Peerless  Fence  until 
the  last  minute.  Anticipate  your  customers*  demands,  it 
will  give  you  a  reputation  for  quick  service  that  will  build 
business. 


BANWELL-HOXIE  WIRE  FENCE  CO.,  LIMITED 

HAMILTON,  ONT.  WINNIPEG,  MAN. 

"Peerless  means  best  fence  on  earth  — 
Fences  land  and  adds  to  worth  " 


Because  PK-erless  Poultry  Fence 
comes  ID  all  heights  from  2  to  8  feet 
you  can  supply  ail  requirements. 
Poultry  raisers  are  making  good 
profits  and  are  buying  supplies. 
You  should  be  ready  for  their 
business. 


PEERLESS  FENCE 


Stands  Every  Test 


10 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


April,  1922 


No  11  or  12 
1)1  or  112 


No.  153 


Strike  While  the  Iron  is  Hot ! 


In  almost  every  town  where  ice  can  be  obtained  there 
are  REAL  opportunities  for  the  LIVE  merchant  to 
sell  more  Refrigerators 

This  year  particularly  opportunities  will  be  more  num- 
erous, due  to  the  unfortunate  experiences  of  many  who 
existed  last  Summer  without  a  Refrigerator. 
— and  this  year  the  price  is  lower, 


No.  155 


No.  157 


THE  PARIS  LINE 

Success  depends  to  a  large  extent  on  your  selection  of  the  right 
line  to  push. 

The  Paris  line  merits  your  careful  consideration.    Quality,  Service 
and  Price  are  all  that  could  be  desired.    We  will  gladly  submit  a 
proposition  to  you  and  send  copy  of  our  1922  catalogue. 
Furthermore — 

We  advise  a  prompt  decision  in  this  matter.  Get  your  samples 
in  early,  and  let  people  know  you  are  in  the  business.  Advertising 
matter  and  electros  supplied  free. 

You  will  find  it  worth  while  to  get  in  touch  with  us 


No.  31  or  33 


No.  19  or  29 


No.  47  or  77 


The  Sanderson  Harold  Co. 

LIMITED 
Refrigerators. 

Screen  Doors  Window  Screens 

Combination  Doors  Ventilators 


No.  161 


April,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


II 


Millions  of 
Dollars 

Spent  in  Advertising 
McClary's  Name 


It  has  cost  a  lot  of  money  to  make  McCLARY'S  name  a  house- 
hold word. 

But  it  has  been  done,  even  at  the  cost  of  millions. 

Throughout  the  past  three  generations,  year  in,  year  out, 
consistently,  painstakingly,  the  name  of  McCLARY'S  has  reached 
the  individual  Canadian  and  Immigrant. 

Through  every  Medium  possible,  the  strong,  forceful  message 
has  been  flung  Dominion-wide. 

Persistency  wins  in  every  business  game — we  have  built  on 
the  foundation  of  goodwill,  created  with  good  goods  and  sus- 
tained with  sound,  logical  Advertising. 

1922  is  following  on.  The  most  effective  campaign  of  the 
past  years  has  started. 

Your  biggest  opportunity,  Mr.  Dealer,  is  presented  to  you  now 
to  tie  up  with  the  name  McCLARY'S.  Cash  in  on  its  productive- 
ness.   Make  the  Cash  Register  ring. 

Our  Branches  and  Salesmen  will  advise  you  of  our  business- 
getting  Campaigns— keep  in  touch  with  them. 


Head  Office  and  factories: 

London,  Canada 

Branch  Offices  and  W arehouses: 

TORONTO      MONTREAL     WINNIPEG  VANCOUVER 
ST.  JOHN,  N.  B.       HAMILTON  CALGARY 
SASKATOON  EDMONTON 


]2 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


April,  1922 


Hardwaremen!  Do  You  Want 
More  Revenue? 

We  are  making  an  advertising  drive  this 
month  for  the  sale  of  Dennisteel  Lockers 
and  Cabinets.  Here  are  Hnes  needed  in 
every  factory  and  office,  there  are  some  need- 
ed right  in  your  town  to-day  and  you  should 
  be  able  to  make  sales  for  us. 

We  want  hardwaremen,  the  best  in  each  district,  to  act  as  our  agents.  You  don't 
need  to  stock  our  goods — have  your  customers  order  from  catalogue,  and  we  will  fill 
their  orders  promptly  and  allow  you  a  good  commission. 

Write  to-day  for  folders  and  particulars 

The  Dennis  Wire  and  Iron 
Works  Co.  Limited 
London 


Halifax 

Montreal 

Ottawa 


Toronto 

Hamilton 

Windsor 


Winnipeg 
Calgary 
Vancouver 


"YANKEE" 

QUICK  RETURN 


In  3  Sizes 


With  spring  in  the 
handle  to  drive  bit 
quickly. 


Holds  it  extended 
for  overhead  work. 


No.  130  —  For  all  gen- 
eral work.  Very  popular. 

No.  131  — Heavy  pattern  for  gen- 
eral house  carpentry  and  heavy  screw 
driving.    Becoming  very  popular. 

No.  135  —  Small  size,  for  smaller  screws,  electric 
work,  and  wherever  a  large  number  of  small  screws 
are  frequently  driven.    Your  Jobber  will  supply  you. 

NORTH  BROS.  MFG. 

Philadelphia,  Pa. 


April,  1922 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


13 


Maxwell  Lawn  Mowers  sell  by 
merit.  Obtainable  both  plain  and 
ball-bearing,  with  4  or  5  best  qual- 
ity steel  knives  and  culrting  plate. 
Handsomely  finished  in  colors  and 
aluminum. 


PRODUCTS 


The  Standard  of  Value 
and  Economy  in  Farm 
and  Home  Utensils 


The  "Minimax"  is  the 
newest  dolly  type  Elec- 
tric Washer  and  Wringer. 
It  combines  all  the  ad- 
vanced features  of  a  high- 
priced  machine,  but  sells 
at  a  moderate  cost. 


The  "Mono-Vac"  Electric 
Washer  and  Wringer  op- 
erates on  the  vacuum  sys- 
tem. No  effort  has  been  Ij 
spared  in  its  manufacture 
to  produce  a  perfect-run- 
ning and  handsome  ma- 
chine. 


Maxwell's  H  &  P  (Hand  and  Power)  Washer  is  a 
light-running  machine  with  cut  gears  giving  minimum' 
of  noise  and  vibration.  Designed  especially  for  pur- 
chasers w;io  may  later  on  desire  to  use  engine  power. 


The  "Home  65"  Food  Chop- 
per is  an  invaluable  asset  to 
kitchen  equipment.  It  has 
four  sharp  cutting  plates,  is 
watertight,  and  so  construct- 
ed as  to  be  easily  cleaned 
after  use.  Made  in  two 
sizes,  family  size  and  medium. 


The  "  Favorite  " 
Bow  Lever  Churn 
is  a  late  improved 
model.  Large  rol- 
ler-bearings, smooth 
action  and  durable. 
Left  or  right-hand 
operation. 


The  "Imperial" 
Clothes  Wringer  is 
one  of  Maxwell's 
several  excellent 
types.  Has  covered 
gears,  ball  bearings 
and  improved  clamp 
to  fit  any  tub. 


MAXWELLS  LIMITED 

St.  Marys,  Ontario 

•     Represenlatioes  : 
BISSET  &  WEBB      JAS.  S.  PARKES  &  CO. 
126  Lombard  St.,  29a  St.  Paul  St.  W., 

Winnipeg.  MontreaL 


14 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


April,  1922 


How  to  Stir  up  More  Fence  Sales 


/^F  course  you  can't  know  all  the  fences 
that  should  be  renewed  in  your  territory — 
so  why  not  ask  every  farmer  who  comes  into 
your  store  how  his  fences  are.  That's  the 
way  to  set  him  thinking  just  now  when  he  is 
soon  to  put  his  valuable  stock  into  the  pastures! 
Explain  the  Frost  Hold  Tight  Lock  and  the 
many  other  superiorities  by  which  Frost  Fence 
proves  itself  the  greatest  fence  value  ever  offered. 
Do  this  now  and  you  will  stir  up  many  a  sale 
you  otherwise  would  not  make. 


Frost  Hold-tight  Lock 


Frost  Steel  and  Wire  Co.,  Limited,  Hamilton,  Canada 

Manufacturers  of:—  Galvanized  and  Bricht  Wire;  Hay  Wire  and  Bale  Ties,  Woven  wire.  Farm,  Factory,  and 
Ornamental  Fences;  Galvanized  Gates,  Manufacturers'  Wire  Supplies. 

Write  for  Catalogue 


SOLE  MANUFACTURERS  OF  THE  CELEBRATED 

"MAPLE  LEAF"  BRAND 

STITCHED  COTTON  DUCK  BELTING 

STRONG    DURABLE    ECONOMICAL    TRUE  RUNNING 

Mr.  Hardware  Merchant- Look  over  your  stock  and 
send  in  your  orders  Now,  to  secure  present  prices,  as  the 
cost  of  duck  has  been  steadily  advancing. 

MAPLE  LEAF  BELT  DRESSING 

The  Best  for  all  Kinds  of  Belts 
WRITE  FOR  SAMPLES  AND  PRICES 
Quebec  Branch:    51  Duluth  Building,  Montreal 

DOMINION  BELTING  CO.,  Limited 


Maple  Leaf 


I  Dominion  Belting  Co.. 

Howinow.  Ont. 


HAMILTON 


ONTARIO 


CANADA 


April,  1922 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 

ANNOUNCING 


15 


"RED  WHEEL  BRAND 
HARDWARE 

For  Barns,  Garages, 
Factories  and  Warehouses 

"The  Best  Hardware 
at  Reasonable  Prices  *  * 


OUR  AIM-TO  UPHOLD  QUALITY 


Something  New  and  Something  Better 


Our  No.  42 
"SCOOTER" 
HANGER 
and  No.  40 
TRACK 


We  specialize  on 
DOOR  HARDWARE 
Let  us  serve  you. 


We  are  now  manufacturing  in  our  new 
factory  an  extensive  line  of  "Red  Wheel 
Brand"  Hardware  for  Industrial  Buildings, 
a  few  of  the  new  lines  being-- 

No.  40     Square  Trolley  Track 

40C      Centre  Bracket(with  coach  or  lag  screws) 

41  Traveler  Square  Trolley  Hanger 

42  Scooter  Square  Trolley  Hanger 
1      Screen  Door  Pull 

4  Steel  Door  Pull 

5  Steel  Door  Pull 
10     Heavy  Pitcher  Grips  Door  Pull 

Alligator  Sliding  Door  Latches  and  a  full 
line  of  FIRE  DOOJEi  HARDWARE. 


We  guarantee  everything  we  make. 
Ask.  for  our  Quantity  Prices.      They  will  interest  \fou. 

A.  C.  Jones  Company,  Limited 

386  King  William  Street  -  Hamilton,  Ontario 


16 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


April,  1922 


The  Clay  Lawn  Dryer 


Let  us  give  you  a  real 
proposition    on  the 
Clay    Lawn  Dryer. 
It's    a   quick  seller. 
The  price   is  right. 


This  Dryer  is  a  household  necessity.      As  a  labor  saver  it  ranks 

with  the  electric  washer  or  the  electric  iron. 

The  whole  washing  is  hung  up  or  taken  down  without  a  lift  or 

step.  No  over-reaching,  no  clothes  poles  to  bother   with.  The 

line  is  always  clean  and  the  clothes  spotless. 

This  Dryer  folds  up  like  an  umbrella.    Light  and  easy  to  handle. 

The  yard  is  left  clear. 

Write  us  for  particulars. 


CANADIAN  METAL  PRODUCTS,  LIMITED 

GUELPH  ONTARIO 


Folded 


5025  Colander 


54311/2  Percolator 


VIKO 


5625  Panel  Tea  Kettle 


-  A  FAST  SELLING  LINE  OF  ALUMINUMWARE 

yiKO  aluminum-ware  is  popular  because  every  piece  of  aluminum  kitchen  equipment  bearing  the  name  VIKO 
is  absolutely  guaranteed  against  defective  materials  or  faulty  workmanship.  The  material  that  goes  into 
VIKO  products  is  the  best  obtainable— 99  per  cent,  pure  aluminum.  And  VIKO  utensils  are  designed 
right— that  is  an  important  consideration.    The  VIKO  line  is  a  complete  line 

GOOD  MATERIALS— GOOD  WORKMANSHIP— GOOD  DESIGNS.  That  is  why  VIKO  sells  fast  and  why 
you  should  sell  it.    We'll  send  a  catalogue  on  request,    A  post  card  will  do! 

GOOD  MATERIAL  —  GOOD  WORKMANSHIP  —  GOOD  DESIGNS 


ALUMINUM  SPECIALTY  CO. 

OF  CANADA 
60  JOHN  STREET        TORONTO,  ONT. 


QUEBEC  AGENTS 

BISSONETTE  &  BISSONETTE 
363  ONTARIO  ST.  E.  MONTREAL 


April,  1922  HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES  17 


EVEREADY 
Octagon  Head  Diffused 
Light 


EVEREADY  Diffused 
Light  Type 


EVEREADY 
Pocket  Light 


Eveready  Unit  Cells 

The  battery  is  the  power 
house  of  the  flashlight.  It's 
easy  to  keep  your  flash- 
light always  in  working 
order  with  bright-burning, 
long-lived  Eveready  Unit 
Cells.  They  fit  and  improve 
all  tubular  flashlights. 


Are  You  Getting  Your  Share 
of  the  Flashlight  Business? 

The  increase  in  sales  of  Flashlights  in  the  last  few  years 
is  the  best  evidence  that  flashlights  are  a  profitable  line  for 
the  dealer  to  sell. 

There  are  dealers  in  Canada,  with  comparatively  small 
stores,  who  are  turning  over  thousands  of  dollars  in  Flash- 
light and  Flashlight  Battery  Sales  every  year.  Why?  Be- 
cause Eveready  Flashlights  are  the  most  convenient,  de- 
pendable and  economical  form  of  portable  light  made,  and 
the  public — your  customers — know  it. 

Eveready  advertising  has  made  every  man,  woman,  and 
child  familiar  with  the  Eveready  Flashlight.  The  sturdy 
construction  of  Eveready  Flashlights  and  the  long  life  of 
Eveready  Batteries  brings  safety  and  comfort  wherever  a 
light  is  needed  for  temporary  use  at  night. 

You  should  have  a  share  of  this  profitable  business.  Write 
to  us  for  details  and  prices — or  ask  your  jobber's  salesmen. 

CANADIAN  NATIONAL  CARBON  CO. 

Limited 

Montreal  Toronto  Winnipeg  Vancouver 

EVEREADY 

FLASHLIGHTS 

— For  Safety's  Sake 


2TE 


18 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


April,  1922 


Clamps  For  All  Requirements 


TAYLOR-FORBES  COMPANY 

LIMITED 
Head  Office  and  Works 

GUELPH,  ONT. 

TORONTO  MONTREAL  VANCOUVER 

QUEBEC.      ST.  JOHN.      HALIFAX.      WINNIPEG.      REGINA,  CALGARY 


Member  Canadian  Business  Publishers  Association 


Including 
CANADIAN 
HARDWARE 
STOVE  AND 
PAINT 
JOURNAL 

Ectablished 
1909 


Including 

CANADIAN 
TIRE  AND 
ACCESSORY 
JOURNAL 

Established 
1906 


Published  Monthly  by  Weston  Wrigley,  123  Bay  St.  Toronto. 

Subscription  Rates  $1.00  per  year  in  Canada,  ?2.00  to  Great  Britain  Her  Dominions,  and  the  United  States. 


VOLU.ME  14 


TORONTO  APRIL  1922 


Number  4 


WHAT  ABOUT  YOU  ? 

A  Spring  Song  by  Roger  Banwell 

Up  through  the  dark  soil  thrusting. 
Up  from  the  waking  earth, 
Burst  ing  its  winter  bondage, 
Coming  again  to  birth. 
Guerdon  of  autumn  sowing 

Hidden  the  long  months  through, 
Ev'rything  now  is  growing. 

What  about  you  ? 

Near  in  the  fields  and  hedgerows. 

Far  on  the  distant  wold. 
Flower  and  leaf,  unfolding 

Purple  and  green  and  gold, 
Prove  in  their  beauty  glowing 

Promise  of  spring  come  true, 
Ev'r thing  now  is  growing. 

What  about  you  ? 

Over  a  world  in  clamour 
Rings  there  a  mighty  call, 

Nature  sends  forth  a  challenge. 
Asking  of  each  and  all — 

"  What  have  you  got  for  showing  ? 
Bring  now  your  works  to  view. 

Ev'rything  else  is  growing  : 

WHAT  ABOUT  YOU  ?  " 


WHEN  EARLY  BOOKING  PAYS 

No  goods  are  really  sold  until  tihey  are  used  or  dn  the 
consumers  hands.    Wise  salesmen  realize  this  and 
do  not  overload  their  customers. 
And  successful  salesmen  go  a  step  farther  by  helping  their 
retail  customers  move  their  goods  out  of  the  store  and  into 
the  consumers  hands. 

One  paint  salesman  in  Ontario  who  has  a  reputation  for 
helping  his  customers  turn  over  their  stocks  completed  the 
canvass  of  his  'territory  and  had  every  one  of  ihis  130 
customers  booked  up  hy  March  1,  this  year. 

With  his  "quota"  secured  and  all  their  expected  require- 
ments booked,  the  salesman  could  relax  bis  efforts  if  he  so 
desired.  But  insitead,  he  is  planing  a  few  months'  active 
work  moving  the  stock  off  his  customers  shelves.  He  will 
dress   windows,  make   a  personal    canvas  of  prospective 


builders  and  paint  users  iwhose  names  are  given  by  his 
dealers,  and  he  will  keep  his  sales  manager  supplied  with 
lists  of  farmers,  hui'lders  and  house  owners  who  are  live 
prosipects  for  (paint  this  season. 

And  frequently  he  will  make  sales  greater  than  the 
dealers  has  in  stock,  thus  creating  an  immediate  order  for 
his  house. 

Early  booking  pays  both  dealer  and  salesman.  To  make 
sales  the  retailer  must  have  goods.  And  how  much  better 
to  book  early  and  give  the  salesman  an  opportunity  to 
devote  his  efforts  to  complete  the  sale  of  his  goods  by 
helping  to  get  them  into  the  consumers'  hands. 


PAINT  AND  H(^RSE  POW TR 

ALL  the  horse-ipower  of  Niagara  is  simply  beautiful 
scenery  unless  it  is  harnessed  and  set  productively  to 
work,"  said  Ernest  T.  Trigg,  addressing  the  conven- 
tion of  paint  manufacturers  in  Atlantic  City  recently. 

He  might  have  gone  further,  points  out  the  National 
Hardware  Bulletin,  and  said  that  even  aifter  the  horse-power 
is  harnessed  and  is  producing  millions  of  kilowatts  of 
energy,  even  after  the  wires  carrying  that  energy  are 
stretched  to  the  homes  of  men,  there  is  nothing  more  than 
scenery  until  those  to  whom  the  current  is  made  available 
take  advantage  of  their  opportunity. 

A  Niagara  of  horse-power  has  been  harnessed  and  set 
productively  to  work  in  the  paint  industry.  A  tremendous 
campaign,  financed  by  the  paint  and  varnish  manufacturers 
as  a  group,  is  under  way.  The  object  of  this  campaign 
is  to  quicken  the  buying  impulses  of  the  property  owners — 
to  sell  him  more  than  ever  the  idea,  "Save  the  Surface  and 
You  Save  All." 

The  wares  that  cai  ry  this  power  are  stretched  to  the  home 
of  every  property  owner  in  the  United  States  and  Canada. 
It  needs  now  but  the  turning  of  the  switch  by  the  retailer 
to  compete  the  circuit.  Without  such  cooperation  the 
efforts  of  manufacturers  will  be  largely  wasted. 

For  the  reason  that  he  has  pride  in  his  town,  pride  in  its 
appearance  and  the  upkeep  of  its  property,  he  can  afford 
to  go  the  whole  way. 

Foir  the  reason  that  he  owes  it  to  his  customers  to  help 
them  to  conserve  their  resources,  and  with  his  knowledge 
that  when  you  have  saved  the  surface  you  have  saved  all, 
he  can  use  every  legitimate  eff  ort  to  persuade  his  customers 
to  spread  pdint  in  1922  as  they  have  never  done  before. 

For  the  selfish  reason  that  with  the  tremendous  advertis- 
ing influence  that  is  behind  him,  paint  selling  will  be  easier 
this  year  than  ever  be'fore,  bringing,  consequently,  greater 


1 


20 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


April,  1922 


Next  Month  Is  May 

By  Edward  Dreier 

I was  out  in  the  stock  room  about  a  month  ago  and 
happened  to  see  about  fifteen  lawn  swings  that  had 
been  left  over  from  the  year  before,  and  it  seemed  to  me 
that  here  was  money  lying  idle,  money  that  should  be  in 
circulation. 

"At  our  daily  meeting  after  the  store  was  closed  that 
night  I  talked  over  the  matter  with  the  men  in  the  store. 
When  I  told  them  that  I  wanted  some  lawn  swings  sold 
during  the  week  they  thought  I  was  joking.  They  didn't 
know  how  such  sales  could  be  made. 

"Last  year,  toward  the  end  of  the  summer,  we  had 
several  enquiries  for  these  swings,  but  when  it  came  to 
selling  them  our  prospects  though  they  would  wait  over 
until  this  year.  We  told  them  that  they  would  have  to  pay 
more  money,  but  that  didn't  seem  to  trouble  them  much. 
Conditions  were  too  good  for  them  to  bother. 

"I  proposed  calling  on  these  prospects  to  give  them  an 
opportunity  to  buy  then  and  save  the  increase  that  would 
be  put  on  later  in  the  year.  We  had  seven  names  on  our 
list  and  we  made  five  sales:  that  left  ten  more  to  get  rid  of. 
We  picked  out  likely  looking  prospects  and  went  after  them 
hammer  and  tongs,  told  them  how  they  would  save  money 
by  buying  at  once.  We  sold  all  of  them  in  two  weeks,  and 
then  we  carry  a  line  of  paints  and  varnishes;  and  to  move 
these  lines  we  suggested  to  our  customers  that  they  get  their 
lawn  and  porch  furniture  fixed  up  for  the  days  to  come — 


it  would  be  ready  when  the  warm  weather  struck  the 
when  they  would  not  care  to  do  much  chasing  around,  and 
it  would  be  readw  when  the  warm  weather  struck  the 
country.  Wc  certainly  added  to  our  income. 

"Why  shouldn't  people  buy  garden  tools  during  the 
months  when  they  haven't  anything  particular  to  do  in  the 
evenings?  When  spring  comes  they  are  outfitted  to  begin 
wortk. 

"I'm  beginning  right  now  to  plail  wtat  I'm  going  to  do 
for  June.  There  are  fourteen  couples  in  our  town  who  have 
already  set  the  dates  for  their  marriages.  Two  of  those  cou- 
ples have  ordered  their  entire  household  outfits.  I'm  get- 
ting the  others  into  line  to  get  their  orders.  Out  in  the 
country  there  are  others  who  are  getting  married  this 
spring— I'm  not  waiting  for  them  to  come  to  me.  You  see, 
they  might  not  come  and  I  don't  want  to  take  a  chance  of 
losing  their  business. 

"How  do  I  get  the  names  ?  I've  made  friends  with  some 
of  the  country  correspondents  for  the  local  paper;  they 
keep  me  in  touch  with  gossip  in  their  localities.  Then  the 
countrv  records  and  the  papers  give  me  more  information. 
I  get  a  record  of  all  the  building  permits  and  follow  them 
up.  Most  of  the  builders  are  my  friends.  Oh,  we  work 
pretty  close  together  in  our  town  and  all  of  us  make  a  little 
profit  out  of  it. 

"Next  month  is  moving  time,  and  we  already  have  names 
of  thirty-nine  people  who  are  going  to  move.  Investigation 
has  shown  us  that  each  one  will  need  various  items  from  our 
store.  The  little  work  we  do  in  following  up  certainly  pays 
us  welL' 


*AIN'T  IT  A  GRAND  AND  GLORIOUS  FEELING  * 


By  BRIGGS. 


whGm  YotJ  Givit.  Your 
Fer-»Ce5     Akio    Ci-D  OUT 

Bvj'i-Si'^6S  A  Nice 
CoftT  OP  Paint! 


A 


AMD    You    NVAK£    Trie    LT^E  OP 
10,000,000,000,000,  GERmS  MiieR^^BLit 

By  CHAiiwo'  Them  of^F  tour. 

PREMiSeS  WITH 

BRusHes,  MOPS 
ETC.  eTC 


-  Ar^lr)    Yoo   CLG'^nJ   OuT  A 

Lot  of  oi_D  RueBi3i-< 

AnjD   G/».RBP«&eL    Th/\T  ^ 
I?eGl^4M.rJc   To  GtT 

Rather  i«v\e.L«.V 


-  AisiO  Them  You  Decide-  tv> 

Clean  up  and  paint  v>p 

^EvERYThimg   Ycu  ovaJM  -  Aiv>D  You 
SET  A  Good   exArAPL£    To  YowR 
NJE16HB0R3 


And  You  .SvAJeeP  OUT  Tmat 
Pile  op  REi^u.se  That  mas 
ACCUMucAxep  iKi 
Your  BftCK  yard 


-a-mD   vomEw   Yoo  have   COMPLETeD  ThS 
Job    AmD  oasCRweD    The  RgSUUT-" 
OH  M  BOY!?f  AiMT  tT 

A  GR  R  R  R'^'^O  amD 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


Clean  Up  And  Paint  Up 


Written  for  Hardware  and  Accessories  by  Dr.  Frank  Crane. 


It  is  time  to  clean  up. 

A  movement  started  in  St.  Louis  has  become  an  international  campaign. 
Its  motto  is:  "Clean  Up  and  Paint  Up!" 

Its  gospel  is :  Away  with  the  rubbish  piles !  Banish  the  plague  spots ! 
Clean  up  the  streets  and  alleys !  Cut  the  weeds,  mow  the  lawns,  trim  the 
hedges,  and  repair  and  paint  the  homes ! 

If  whole  communities  can  be  induced  to  do  this,  whether  by  logic  or 
hurrah,  it  will  be  a  good  thing. 

For  our  mortal,  universal,  sleepless,  and  most  cruel  enemy  is  Dirt. 

Henrv  Ward  Beeeher  said:  "Yellow  fever  is  God  Almighty's  opinion  of 
dirt." 

The  movement  has  already  secured  the  co-operation  of  some  7,000  com- 
munities, including  big  cities  and  small  villages. 

It  ought  to  receive  the  support  of  all  classes.  For  dirt  recognizes  no  class. 
Dirt  and  his  two  brothers,  Disease  and  Death. 

The  greatest  of  Democracies  is  Health.   It  is  each  for  all  and  all  for  each. 

It  is  a  communal  affair,  as  we  find  out  when  a  disease  germ  from  the 
slums  crawls  over  and  kills  the  baby  in  the  palace. 

The  Blue  Book  of  the  Clean  Up  Movement  is  an  interesting  pamphlet. 
It  shows  how  all  may  help. 

Mayors  and  health  officers  should  lead  the  way. 

The  Health  Department  of  the  city  realizes  the  enormous  value  of  clean- 
liness, for  dirt  heaps  and  stagnant  puddles  breed  mosquitoes,  which  start 
fever  epidemics,  and  flies,  which  are  probably  man's  greatest  foe,  as  they  buzz 
about  our  food  and  over  the  baby's  face,  carrying  their  fearsome  load  of  dip- 
theria,  scarlet  fever,  typhoid,  smallpox,  and  what  not. 

The  Street  Department  should  not  be  stinted.  And  it  ought  to  secure  the 
aid  of  the  army  of  boys  and  girls. 

The  Fire  Department  knows  the  danger  of  rubbish  heaps. 

The  Board  of  Trade,  Chamber  of  Commerce,  the  Rotary  and  Kiwanis 
Clubs,  Women's  organizations  and  all  civic  organizations  should  give  atten- 
tion to  this  vital  matter. 

The  Newspapers  should  preach  incessantly  the  gospel  of  civic  cleanliness, 
and  the  Preachers  and  School  Teachers  should  lend  a  hand  to  the  propaganda. 

The  Iowa  State  Board  of  Health,  in  its  proclamation  urging  all  citizens 
to  join  in  the  movement,  uses  this  verse : 

"Little  beds  of  flowers. 

Little  cans  of  paint. 
Make  homes  bright  and  healthy 

Out  of  them  that  ain't." 


Copyright 


BY  Dr. 


Frank  Crane 


22 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


April,  1922 


TORONTO  TO  CLEAN  UP  AND  PAINT  UP 

mimiinmiiiiiniumiiiuiiuiuiiiuiiiiiiiiuiwiiuiniiiiiiu^  iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiirjiii  niiiiiiiiiii  i  iiriiiiiiiiiiijiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiu  iiihiiiiiiiiiiiiij  iiiiiiiiiii!i!it:iiiii:iiiiii:siii!S 

Newly  Formed  Toronto  Hardware  and  Paint  Club  Endorses  Plan  to  put  over  a  "Clean  Up"  week 
in  May  and  spend  about  $3,000  on  Publicity — Paint  Manufacturers  and  Jobbers  to  assist. 

mMiuiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiMiMiMiiuMiniiMMiiMUMiiiiiininiiiinnHiuiMMiMHiniitiniiiiiiliinniiiiiiiiininiHiiiiMiiiiniiiiiiiiiliiiiuiiiiiMiiiniMiiriiiiiHiMiiiiniin 


SIXTY  Toronto  hardware  and  paint  dealers  attended 
a  meeting  of  the  Toronto  Retail  Hardware  and 
Paint  Club  on  March  14  at  the  Board  of  Trade 
luncheon  club  rooms,  the  purpose  of  the  meeting  being 
to  complete  the  Avork  of  organization  and  to  discuss 
matters  of  trade  interest.    Officers  chosen  at  the  organi- 
zation meeting  in  January  were  confirmed  in  office  for 
the  coming  year  as  follows : 
President,  H.  N.  Joy. 
Vice-President,  F.  R.  Jackson. 
Secretary,  Y.  Mathewson. 
Treasurer,  A.  H.  Lake. 

Executive,  Harry  M.  Dow,  John  Caslor,  George  Math- 
ewson, W.  Piatt  and  W.  Pritchard. 

The  constitution  of  the  club  was  taken  up  clause  by 
clause  and  adopted,  the  object  being  to  cultivate  friendly 
relations  among  its  members  and  membership  to  be  com- 
posed of  retailers  and  managers  of  hardware  and  paint 
businesses  conducted  by  limited  companies.  Partners  or 
clerks  may  become  associate  members,  and  editors  of 
trade  newspapers  honorary  associate  members.  Fees 
will  be  $3  annually  for  members  and  $1  for  associate 
members.  Meetings  will  be  held  on  the  second  Monday 
of  each  month. 

Call  Members  by  First  Name 

A  resolution  incorporated  in  the  constitution  was  as 
follows:  The  names  of  all  members  shall  be  written  in 
full  on  the  membership  roll  and  during  meetings  mem- 
bers shall  address  each  other  by  using  their  christian 
name,  its  abbreviation  or  the  name  that  they  are  gener- 


H.  N.  JOY 

President  Toronto  Setail  Hardware  and  Paint  Club. 

ally  known  by,  in  connection  with  their  surname,  and  it 
will  be  the  duty  of  any  member  to  draw  the  presiding 
officer's  attention  to  any  violation  of  this  rule,  when 
the  violating  member  shall  be  immediately  penalized  by 
a  fine  of  10  cents  to  be  paid  to  the  secretary. 

!Much  amusement  was  occasioned  during  the  evening 
by  President  "Harry"  N.  Joy,  in  trying  to  start  the 


"first  name"  fellowship  movement,  he  saving  himself 
from  being  assessed  about  $1  in  fines  by  ruling  that  the 
regulation  did  not  come  into  force  until  the  badges  for 
members  had  been  obtained. 

Splendid  addresses  were  delivered  by  H.  E.  (Ted) 
Mihell  and  "Frank"  J.  Penberthy,  while  short  talks 
were  also  given  by  "George"  D.  Davis,  '  Weston" 
Wrigley,  publisher  of  Hardware  and  Accessories, 
"George"  E.  May,  president  Ontario  Retail  Hardware 
Association,  and  "Tom"  F.  Monypenny,  manager  the 
Imperial  Yarnish  &  Color  Company. 

Paint  Selling  Possibilities  Unlimited 

H.  E.  Mihell  says  that  as  Sellers  of  Paint 
Insurance  Hardwaremen  are  a  lot  of  Pikers. 

H.  E.  Mihell,  sales  manager  of  the  Imperial  Yarnish 
&  Color  Company,  Toronto,  addressing  the  members 
of  the  Toronto  Retail  Hardware  and  Paint  Club,  said 
they  should  feel  encouraged  as  they  were  on  the  brink 
of  starting  a  movement  the  results  from  which  would 
be  appreciated  in  future  years. 

The  paint  manufacturers  had  inaugurated  the  "Save 
the  Surface"  movement  in  times  of  war  prosperity  and 
the  benefits  were  just  being  felt.  Last  year  had  been 
the  acid  test  for  "Save  the  Surface"  and  the  amount 
of  business  secured  had  proved  that  the  campaign  had 
been  worth  while.  "In  Canada  the  "Save  the  Sur- 
face" campaign  had  passed  through  three  stages," 
said  Mr.  Mihell.  "One  was  when  subscriptions  were 
being  taken  up,  another  was  making  our  own  sales- 
men apostles  of  the  campaign.  To-day  as  it  stands,  it 
is  the  campaign  of  the  retailers ;  it  is  more  yours  to- 
day than  before,  and  we  expect  that  from  now  on  it 
will  become  more  so. 

"The  scope  of  the  campaign  is  nation-wide;  we  can- 
not go  into  all  the  localities  throughout  the  countr}^, 
but  we  encourage  local  organizations  such  as  youi-s  to 
do  this  work.  The  campaign  does  not  attempt  to  pro- 
mote civic  welfare  except  insofar  as  sanitary  condi- 
tions are  concerned.  There  is  no  similar  co-operative 
campaign  which  has  done  as  much  for  any  trade  as 
this.  The  shoe  trade  is  one  example  of  a  trade  Avhich 
has  envied  our  success. 

"We  are  frequently  faced  with  the  question  'what 
is  there  in  it  for  me'?  It  is  difficult  for  us  to  define 
the  extent  to  which  the  campaign  has  taken  effect, 
but  the  broadness  of  the  idea  has  caused  men  to  sit 
down  and  figure  out  just  what  it  can  do  for  them. 
Few  realize  the  fact  that  only  one-tenth  of  the  pro- 
perty in  the  Dominion  is  properly  protected.  There 
are  possibilities  for  four  or  five  times  the  business  in 
paint  which  has  ever  been  done,  and  I  think  to-day 
we  are  more  or  less  asleep  to  the  possibilities  which 
exist." 

Each  Toronto  Dealer  Should  Sell  $8,900  Paint  Yearly 

"Dealing  with  the  possibilities  for  paint  trade,  T 


April,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


23 


would  point  out  that  the  last  assessment  return  gives  ' 
Toronto  105,516  buildings.  A  low  estimate  of  the 
paint,  varnish,  etc.,  which  should  be  used  on  these 
buildings  would  be  $15,  but  at  that  figure  there  would 
be  $1,582,740  worth  of  paint  needed  in  Toronto.  This 
city  is  in  the  advantageous  position  of  having  a  major- 
ity of  homes  occupied  by  owners  who  will  buy  good 
material  to  protect  their  property.  There  are  also 
2,412  vacant  houses,  and  9,325  stores  in  Toronto. 

"There  are  54,691  homes  occupied  by  owners  in 
Toronto,  which  with  an  expenditure  of  paint  annually 
amounting  to  $15,  would  total  $820,345 ;  33,943  homes 
occupied  by  tenants  spending  $10  on  paint,  totalling 
$339,430.  Vacant  homes  and  stores  also  at  $15  would 
total  336,180  and  $139,575  respectively,  making  a 
grand  total  at  wholesale  prices,  of  $1,335,850  worth  of 
paint.  This,  divided  by  150  hardware  merchants  in 
the  city,  gives  $8,900  worth  of  business  to  each. 

"Painters  for  painting  those  100,371  stores  and 
houses  in  Toronto  would  get  an  average  of  $40,  thus 
giving  them  $4,014,840,  which,  spread  over  four  years, 
would  give  painters  an  annual  business  of  $1,003,710. 

"We  cannot  hope  to  achieve  this  end  in  one  year, 
but  let  us  start  and  let  the  cumulative  effect  pile  up 
the  total  toward  the  objective  we  set." 
What  Canadians  are  Spending  for  Paint  Protection 

The  total  paint  production  in  1919,  at  wholesale 
prices,  was  valued  at  $19,506,653.  Of  this  60  per  cent, 
was  for  manufacturing  purposes,  leaving  $7,802,662 
used  for  protection  of  property. ,  Based  on  a  popula- 
tion of  eight  and  one-half  millions,  it  was  evident  we 
were  spending  92  cents  per  capita,  or  an  average  of 
$3.68  per  family  annually  for  home  protection,  for 
paint,  varnish,  etc. 

Compared  with  this  the  per  capita  expenditure  for 
fire  protection  in  1917  was  $5.44.  We  are  only  spend- 
ing 15  per  cent,  of  that  amount  on  paint,  although  loss 
by  depreciation  is  continuous  while  fire  loss  is  only 
accidental. 

"Many  people  will  allow  property  to  go  year  after 
year  without  paint,  not  realizing  that  they  are  losing 
at  the  rate  of  2  per  cent,  per  annum,"  said  Mr.  Mihell. 
"This  figures  out  at  a  loss  of  $112  per  annum  on  a 
$5,600  house,  or  $448  in  four  years.  Half  that  amount 
would  paint  the  property,  and  if  the  owner  neglects 
it  in  regard  to  paint  it  is  likely  he  will  neglect  it  from 
other  standpoints.  The  hardware  merchant  in  induc- 
ing more  painting  is  promoting  business  along  many 
other  lines  of  hardware  as  well." 

Taking  the  1911  census  as  a  basis,  the  annual  depre- 
ciation on  property  through  insufficient  painting,  as 
2  per  cent  on  urban  homes,  totalling  $28,000,000  per 
annum ;  farm  property,  $17,849,000 ;  farm  implements, 
$26,000,154,  totalling  $71,850,154,  not  taking  into  con- 
sideration depreciation  on  railroads  and  other  con- 
struction. 

Fire  losses  in  1919  were  $25,341,240;  in  1920, 
$28,745,590,  and  in  1921  $45,615,930.  It  was  pointed 
out  that  the  highest  fire  loss  for  years  does  not 
approach  the  depreciation  through  lack  of  paint. 

The  value  of  Toronto  property  in  1922  was  shown  to 
be  $723,695,846.  Constructed  property,  which  will 
require  paint,  was  valued  at  $361,847,923.  Deprecia- 
tion at  the  rate  of  2  per  cent,  annually  on  this  would 
amount  to  $7,236,958,  a  figure  much  in  excess  of  the 
possibilities  outlined  as  existing  for  Toronto  hardware 
merchants. 

"In  view  of  these  figures,"  continued  Mr.  Mihell, 


'you  are  rendering  a  service  to  humanity  when  you 
sell  paint,  apart  from  the  gain  in  your  paint  depart- 
ment. 

Advertising  Must  be  Backed  up  by  Salesmanship 

Mr.  Mihell  traced  the  progress  of  advertising  back 
to  the  stage  of  bartering,  pointing  out  that  advertising 
has  never  become  anything  more  than  a  branch  of 
selling.  "When  you  try  to  separate  the  two  they  both 
fall,"  he  continued.  "You  cannot  make  advertising 
an  alibi  for  poor  salesmanship;  you  have  got  to  back 
it  up.  Advertising  takes  many  different  forms.  All 
forms  have  some  publicity  value,  and  some  forms  are 
better  suited  to  certain  problems  than  are  others.  The 
test  of  your  advertising  should  be,  'does  it  sell  goods?' 

"Our  salesmen  hear  a  good  deal  about  different 
forms  of  advertising.  We  hear  about  the  painted 
sign  on  the  wall.  My  personal  opinion  is  that  this  is 
not  worth  anything  except  as  general  publicity.  We 
also  hear  of  the  retailer  who  says  that  he  has  not  got 
time  to  'talk'  that  particular  line.  If  you  do  not 
want  to  'talk'  your  lines,  get  out  from  behind  the 
counter  because  you  are  just  a  waiter.  It  is  not  the 
volume  of  talk,  but  the  way  in  which  you  deliver  it, 
that  counts. 

"A  woman  comes  in  and  buys  a  mop  in  the  spring. 
You  know  that  woman  is  going  to  houseclean,  and  by 


H.  E.  MIHELL 
Sales  Manager  Imperial  Varnish  &  Color  Co.,  Toronto. 

a  discreet  question  you  can  find  out  what  she  is  going 
to  do.  Practically  every  woman  has  in  mind  some 
surface  in  her  home  which  she  wants  to  protect  or 
brighten  and  it  only  needs  your  question  to  bring  her 
to  the  brink  of  buying.  Your  personal  contact  with 
the  consuming  public  is  worth  much.  The  manufac- 
turer has  not  got  it. 

Personal  Contact  Puts  the  Sale  Over 

"Watching  the  trend  of  retailing  in  the  last  few 
years,  it  is  evident  that  if  you,  as  retailers,  do  not 
function  along  that  line,  there  is  going  to  be  something 
else  come  between  you  as  retailers  and  the  consuming 
public.  Your  function  is  to  apply  the  advantages  of 
your  contact  wiht  the  public.  ' 

"Salesmen  from  competing  houses  state  that  mer- 
chants are  receiving  too  much  advertising,  and  this 
is  making  some  of  them  lazy.  There  was  said  to  have 
been  such  a  flood  of  advertising  put  on  the  retailer 


24 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


April,  1922 


that  he  is  using  it  as  an  excuse  for  selling."  Mr. 
Mihell  cited  the  case  of  a  merchant  who  brought  a 
hardware  store  in  Eastern  Ontario  and  on  coming  to 
the  company  to  look  over  the  stock,  asked  for  a  set  of 
paddles.  Mr.  Mihell  explained  to  him  that  the  man 
from  whom  he  bought  the  store  had  been  provided 
with  a  set,  whereupon  the  man  replied  that  his  pre- 
dece.ssor  had  used  the  paddles  for  mixing  chicken 
mash. 

"It  is  discouraging  to  the  manufacturer  to  see 
money  wasted  in  this  manner,"  said  Mr.  Mihell,  refer- 
ring to  the  practice  of  some  merchants  in  using  color 
cards  to  light  the  furnace  in  the  fall,  and  having  none 
on  hand  in  the  .spring  when  required. 

Advertising  Helps  Salesmanship 

"There  is  a  hardware  merchant  not  forty  miles  from 
Toronto  who  ten  years  ago  was  given  three  months  to 
go,  and  he  is  to-day  the  predominant  merchant,  and  his 
sales  are  double  those  of  his  competitors  combined,  in 
stoves  and  other  lines.  This  merchant  goes  among 
his  customers  and  talks  stoves.  Another  merchant 
loads  a  stove  and  a  sewing  machine  on  his  wagon  each 
time  he  goes  out  through  the  country,  and  he  seldom 
comes  back  with  them.  Another  bought  three  cars  of 
roofing  and  sold  it  in  two  months  by  going  after  every 
prospect,  after  he  had  been  told  he  was  crazy  buying 
even  one  car  as  no  one  had  ever  done  it  before  in  that 
town. 

"A  department  store  in  this  city  employed  a  man 
who  travelled  throughout  Canings  for  painting  acti- 
vity during  the  Fall  but  to  farmers'  houses,  to  stay 
over-night,  and  get  his  meals.  He  would  discuss  mat- 
ters with  the  farmer,  the  wife  and  the  hired  man.  He 
was  finding  out  what  the  people  of  that  community 
needed :  he  was  not  selling.  He  sent  his  information 
to  his  firm  and  this  was  used  in  adapting  a  mail  order 
catalogue  to  the  needs  of  that  community.  You  are 
living  right  in  the  community ;  do  you  ever  go  out  and 
size  up  the  situation? 

"A  young  hardware  clerk  this  week  was  going 
down  street  and  saw  a  man  sweeping  out  his  store.  He 
inquired  if  he  would  be  needing  paint,  and  succeeded 
in  selling  him  half  a  gallon.  He  went  out  to  a  summer 
resort  and  found  a  Chinaman  fixing  up  a  restaurant 
and  sold  him  $19  worth  of  paint,  varnish,  etc. 

"Mathewson  Hardware  Co.  distributed  circulars 
mentioning  paint  in  conjunction  with  other  hardware 
lines.  This  circular  was  not  distributed  until  5  p.m., 
and  before  the  store  closed  six  customers  had  come 
for  goods  advertised." 

May  Charge  for  Advertising 

Mr.  Mihell  suggested  that  manufacturers  sell  their 
advertising  matter  to  retailers,  citing  the  ease  of  a 
foreign  missionary  who  in  dealing  with  foreigners 
found  that  bibles,  tracts,  etc.,  secured  much  more 
attention  when  sold  at  a  nominal  price  than  when 
given  away.  The  value  of  displaying  color  panels, 
enclosing  color  cards  in  parcels,  etc.,  was  pointed  out, 
and  Mr.  Mihell  said  that  if  a  merchant  had  his  money 
invested  in  these  cards  that  he  will  not  throw  them 
away. 

"We  want  you  to  share  a  fair  amount  of  the  cost 
of  putting  across  a  special  paint  week  in  Toronto," 
said  Mr.  Mihell,  in  conclusion.  "We  feel  you  will 
take  a  greater  interest  in  it  and  will  receive  much 
better  returns. 


May  8  to  1 3  to  be  Paint  Up  Week 

F,  J.  Penberlhy  talks  on  Salesmanship  and  Induces  Retailers  to 
Co-operate  with  Manufacturers  on  a  Clean  Up 
and  Paint  Up  Campaign. 

F.  J.  Penberthy,  vice-president  Lowe  Bros.,  Ltd.,  fol- 
lowed Mr.  Mihell,  giving  some  practical  advice  on 
retail  selling  and  a  warning  against  overbuying. 

"One  of  the  nicest  pieces  of  salesmanship  I  ever  saw 
took  place  in  John  Caslor's  .store,  recently,"  said  Mr. 
Penberthy.  "A  little  boy  came  in  and  said  he  wanted 
a  hockey  stick.  John  said  'There  they  are,  15  cents 
each,  don't  pick  out  the  best  one.'  The  boy  kept  sort- 
ing them  over  for  a  long  time,  evidently  looking  for 
the  second  best  when  John  said  to  him  'take  the  best 
one  my  boy,  they  are  all  fifteen  cents!'  John  Caslor 
made  a  friend  of  that  little  fellow,  and  he  is  not  likely 
to  go  anywhere  else  to  buy  anything  in  the  hardware 
line  in  future. 

"We  must  take  advantage  of  every  opportunity  to 
make  a  sale.  Suppose  a  woman  comes  in  and  says 
'I  want  7  feet  of  28"  wire  netting.'  Naturally  she 
will  say  '  how  much  ? '  You  will  say  31/2  cents  a  foot  or 
about  25  cents.  You  might  say  to  her,  1  can  give  you 
this  black  netting  for  31/2  cents,  but  it  won't  last  long. 
I  have  galvanized  at  7  cents  that  will  last  forever.  By 
taking  just  a  few  minutes  to  explain  that,  you  have 


F.  J.  PENBEETHY 
Toronto,  Vice-President  and  General  Manager  Lowe  Bros.  Limited. 

oz.  tack  that  will  not  allow  the  netting  to  sag.  There 
is  another  sale.  Now  there  is  new  netting  in  the  door 
and  the  customer  may  need  a  can  of  varnish  to  protect 
it.  Also  a  brush.  Turpentine  is  needed  to  clean  the 
brush.    Your  25  cent  sale  has  grown  to  $1.50  or  $2.00. 

"There  is  hardly  a  thing  asked  for  in  your  store  but 
what  you  can  suggest  something  else  and  by  the  power 
made  a  fifty  cent  sale.  Nine  times  out  of  ten  you  will 
be  able  to  make  a  much  bigger  sale  than  was  at  first 
apparent.  Then  there  are  other  lines  which  can  be 
sold  to  this  customer.  You  might  enquire  about  tacks, 
and  if  she  says  she  has  some  carpet  tacks  at  home  you 
can  tell  her  she  should  not  use  carpet  tacks,  but  a  4 
of  suggestion  you  can  do  the  very  thing  that  you  need 
to  do  this  year,  that  is,  to  keep  your  sales  in  proper 
proportion  to  overhead. 

"Linoleum   varnish  suggests   that   the   woman  is 


April,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


25 


cleaning  up  the  kitchen.  She  is  a  prospect  for  stove 
pipe  enamel,  aluminum  paint,  turpentine,  etc. 

"There  are  many  hardware  concerns  that  are  not 
going  to  suffer  this  year  if  this  plan  is  followed.  While 
there  are  some  which  are  going  to  be  in  a  bad  financial 
condition  if  such  plans  are  not  followed. 

"There  is  a  tendency  I  want  to  warn  you  against, 
and  that  is  doubling  your  stocks.  You  cannot  keep 
your  money  working  if  your  profit  and  your  stock  is 
on  the  shelves.  If  any  salesman  wants  to  give  you  a 
long  time  dating  on  a  big  stock  or  an  extra  5  per  cent, 
for  a  large  volume,  fire  him  out.  Make  your  money 
work,  you  must  sell  the  goods  before  you  can  pay 
your  bills." 

Manufacturers  ask  for  Retailers  Co-operation 

"Mr.  Mihell  touched  on  the  question  of  a  co-opera- 
tive campaign  this  spring,"  said  Mr.  Penberthy.  "We, 
in  the  Paint  and  Varnish  Club,  have  found  the  need 
of  the  co-operation  of  the  retail  dealers,  the  retailers 
being  the  stream  through  which  we  must  market  our 
products.  And  now  that  the  stream  has  commenced 
we  want  to  put  before  you  a  plan  we  have  in  mind." 

"We  want  one  week  to  be  called  Clean-up  and 
Paint-up  Week  in  Toronto.  We  want  to  put  on  a 
campaign  to  create  a  large  volume  of  business  for 
yourselves  and  for  us.  The  Paint  and  Varnish  Club 
cannot  put  on  such  a  campaign  because  it  would  look 
too  much  like  an  advertising  campaign  for  manufact- 
urers, but  we  would  like  your  club  to  put  on  such  a 
campaign  some  week  during  the  month  of  May,  and 
we  will  back  you  in  whatever  you  do. 

The  profits  from  such  a  campaign  will  be  distributed 
all  over  the  world.  Australia  and  India  will  get  a  share, 
the  latter  for  shellac ;  France  for  ochre,  Belgium  for 
lithopone,  Russia  for  bristles,  England  for  oxides,  Japan 
for  gold  paint,  Africa  for  varnish  gums,  Canada  for 
linseed  oil,  lead,  etc.  Florists  will  profit  by  the  sale  of 
shrubs,  etc.  Glass  manufacturers,  wall  paper  firms, 
seed  firms,  painters,  carpenters,  laborers,  etc.,  all  will 
share  the  profits.  If  we  put  on  such  a  campaign  we  are 
sending  a  little  money  all  over  the  world.  The  week 
would  have  to  have  the  support  of  the  street-cleaning 
department.  The  Fire  Prevention  League  will  be  asked 
to  have  their  campaign  the  same  week.  We  will  have  the 
support  of  the  Department  of  Works ;  garbage  wagons 
will  bear  banners  and  we  will  have  to  get  the  school  chil- 
dren interested. 

"We  have  pledged  among  ourselves  at  present  about 
$1,500.  I  think  we  can  raise  that  to  $2,000.  There  is  a 
proviso  that  we  will  contribute  providing  you  can  get  the 
hardwaremen  to  make  a  contribution.  What  we  want  is 
$5  each  from  every  hardware  merchant  in  Toronto.  If  we 
can  have  that  we  can  put  on  one  of  the  finest  campaigns 
you  ever  saw.  You  will  get  out  of  it  just  what  you  put  in 
it.  Your  $5  is  wasted  unless  you  get  behind  it.  For  it  you 
will  get  not  only  the  profits,  but  you  get  posters,  window 
trims,  stickers,  all  well  colored  and  attractive,  buttons  for 
distribution  to  children,  etc.  You  could  not  buy  for  the 
money  we  hope  to  get,  the  posters,  etc.  in  small  quan- 
tities. 

Dealers  Names  in  Newspaper  Ads 

"A  week  before  this  we  plan  to  run  quarter  pages  in 
the  local  newspapers  each  day,  the  retailers'  names  only 
to  be  put  at  the  bottom  of  each  ad.  We  will  be  the  first  to 
attempt  this  movement  on  such  a  large  scale  in  Canada, 
and  if  we  can  successfully  carry  it  through  this  year,  it 
will  only  be  a  start  of  what  can  be  accomplished  in  the 


future.  Next  year  we  will  find  the  Rotarians,  Kiwanians 
and  other  clubs  will  be  only  too  glad  to  co-operate  be- 
cause, after  all,  it  is  a  civic  proposition.  If  we  spend  two- 
thirds  on  this  campaign  you  should  willing  to  spend  one- 
third  of  the  total  cost.  Manufacturers  are  spending 
$40,000  on  the  'Save  the  Surface'  campaign,  to  educate 
the  public  to  paint.  We  spent  $35,000  last  year  and 
didn't  ask  for  a  cent. 

"I  think  your  organization  will  approve  my  request 
for  $5  each  from  you  for  this  purpose.  You  are  going  to 
put  the  campaign  on,  not  us,  and  if  you  cannot  cash  in 
on  this  there  is  something  the  matter  with  you,  not  with 
the  campaign.  You  will  sell  paint,  varnish,  specialties, 
brushes,  nails,  hinges,  glass,  putty,  garden  tools,  polish 
and  many  other  lines  as  a  result  of  this  campaign." 

Mr.  Penberthy  also  outlined  a  plan  whereby  the 
Toronto  Retail  Hardware  and  Paint  Club  will  give  three 
prizes  of  $5,  $10  and  $15  for  the  best  essays  from  chil- 
dren in  regard  to  the  use  of  paint,  varnish,  etc.  The  con- 
test will  close  on  June  1.  Each  retailer  will  receive  the 
essays  submitted  by  the  children  in  his  district  for  the 
purpose  of  a  prospect  to  be  followed  up. 

In  the  ensuing  discussion  it  was  decided  to  hold  Clean- 
up Week  in  Toronto  from  May  8  to  13,  inclusive. 

After  Mr.  Penberthy  concluded,  a  brief  discussion 
took  place  on  the  proposed  ''Clean  up  and  Paint  up" 
week,  and  the  proposal  met  with  hearty  endorsation.  A 
show  of  hands  was  called  for,  and  the  plan  was  approved 
unanimously,  the  club  expressing  its  determination  to 
secure  $5  each  from  150  hardware  and  paint  dealers  in 
Toronto  as  the  retailers  part  of  the  campaign. 


THE  BAR  OF  PUBLiC  OPINION^' 
THE  SENTENCE;- 


26 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


April,  1922 


Plans  For  "Saving  The  Surface" 

Hardware  Dealers  must  Get  Behind  the  Manufacturers 
Advertising  to  Get  the  Best  Results. 
By  D.  G.  Madnnis 

To  push  paint  selling  campaign  is  to-day  a  much  simpler 
problem  than  it  was  five  years  ago.  Manufacturers  are 
offering  so  much  assistance  to  the  dealers  there  can  be  no 
excuse  for  a  slow  moving  article.  They  are  appreciaiting 
that  money  spent  in  aiding  the  hardw£ireiman  to  make  sales 
is  money  well  invested.  It  brings  quicker  results  as  it  per- 
mits more  concentrated  advertising  on  a  particular  district. 

Leaders  in  this  movement  are  the  paint  manufacturers. 
The  campaign  to  "save  the  surface"  which  has  been  carried 
on  nationally  has  certainly  helped  to  increase  the  volume  of 
every  dealers  paint  sales  to  a  very  appreciable  degree.  The 
policy  of  educating  the  public  to  save  by  using  more  paint 
has  benefited  every  hardwareraan;  and  in  their  turn  they 
have  their  part  to  play. 

If  it  is  going  to  bring  continued  results,  a  campaign  of 
this  kind  must  be  sponsored  by  everyone  engaged  in  selling 
the  goods  that  are  being  advertised.  In  this  case,  it  is  not 
enough  that  the  manufacturers  and  their  salesmen  be 
apostles  of  the  need  to  save  the  surface.  The  dealer  must 
also  use  the  slogan.  It  is  the  personal  touch  that  counts 
the  mosit  in  making  a  sale. 

Some  householders  have  read  of  the  "Save  the  Surface" 
idea  and  at  a  glance  the  dire  necessity  to  preserve  the  in- 
terior and  exterior  of  their  buildings  by  the  greater  use  of 
paint.  On  the  other  hand,  there  are  a  great  many  who 
renrain  unconvinced  by  the  newspapers.  These  are  the 
customers  that  the  dealers  must  handle  themselves.  The 
customers  have  read  ahout  it  because  it  is  impossible  to  be 
a  regular  reader  of  any  one  of  the  daily  papers  and  not  see 
something  about  it.  The  dealers  problem  is  to  clinch  the 
argument  in  the  minds  of  those  slow  to  be  convinced.  It 
is  his  own  arguments  backing  up  those  put  up  by  the  manu- 
facturers that  will  make  the  sale. 

But,  how  to  do  it?  There  are  numerous  plans  that  have 
been  used  by  dealers  some  of  which  are  only  applicable  to 
the  country  while  others  are  successful  only  in  the  citv. 
Few  have  failed  when  the  dealers  has  worked  hard  to  put 
his  arguments  across. 

One  means  has  been  by  using  forcible  circular  letters 
through  the  mail.  Moores  Hardware,  Oakville,  Ont.,.have 
proved  the  value  of  this  form  of  advertising.  When  thev 
decide  to  link  up  with  the  manufacturers  in  the  campaign 
they  took  the  matter  up  with  the  firm  that  made  the  brand 
of  paint  that  they  carried.  At  Moore's  expense  they  drew  up 
a  short  circular  letter  and  had  them  printed  on  their  letter- 
heads. These  were  delivered  to  Moores  all  ready  to  be 
mailed  to  the  prospective  customers  in  the  community; 
each  of  the  series  following  the  other  at  short  intervals. 
At  the  same  time  an  advertisement  was  run  in  the  local 
paper. 

Their  increased  paint  business  was  a  very  pleasant  sur- 
prise to  them.  People  of  the  surrounding  district  who  had 
been  accustomed  to  do  their  buying  in  Toronto  patronized 
the  home  store.  The  Avhole  result  has  been  that  Moores  have 
built  up  a  very  nice  paint  business. 

As  has  been  said  before,  a  scheme  that  is  good  for  a 
smaller  town  or  the  country  may  bring  very  poor  results 
in  the  courvtry.  As  the  conditions  vary  to  such  a  great 
extent  this  method  used  by  Moores  might  not  pull  results 
in  a  larger  town. 

Prince  &  Co ,  Bloor  Street  West,  Toronto,  are  using 


circulars  on  somewhat  the  same  plan  that  Moores  used  them 
in  the  country  with  the  exception  that  Princes  are  having 
the  circulars  delivered  from  house  to  house  instead  of 
using  the  mail.s  This  method  has  enahled  them  to  cover 
the  whole  ground  at  a  minimum  of  cost.  They  report  that 
their  paint  business  is  already  reaching  good  proportions 
this  season. 

In  the  same  city  district  is  the  Kehoe  &  Keoch  Co.,  who 
use  an  entirely  different  medium  to  good  purpose.  They 
advertise  in  a  district  advertising  journal.  Which  is 
delivered  to  five  thousand  homes  in  the  district  so  that  the 
advertisement  inserted  by  Kehoe  and  Keoch  is  certain  to 
receive  some  notice.  Their  increased  sales  prove  that  this  is 
true. 

There  are,  of  course,  many  other  ways  of  going  after 
paint  business.  Locality  has  a  great  deal  to  do  with  the 
success  of  any  plan  to  increase  sales.  The  dealer  should 
study  his  location  and  see  for  himself  how  he  can  apply 
the  experience  that  someone  else  has  found  profitable,  to 
his  own  business. 

The  whole  point  to  be  brought  out  is — no  matter  how 
much  national  advertising  the  manufacturers  may  do,  it  is 
up  to  every  dealer  to  put  his  shoulder  to  the  w'heel  and 
push  the  campaign  up  the  hill  to  success. 


CLEANING  UP  HULL 

The  Rotary  Club  is  behind  a  "Clean  Up"  Week  to  be 
put  on  at  Hull,  Quebec,  this  Spring.  Two  cash  prizes, 
are  being  offered  for  essays  by  school  children  on  "Clean- 
Up"  subjects  and  the  campaign  will  be  waged  through  the 
sdhools,  electric  railway,  public  organizations  of  Hull, 
churches,  newspapers  and  the  municipality. 

"Clean  Up  And  Paint  Up"  In  West 

Movement  in  Winnipeg  is  Extending  to  Other  Cities 
with  Live  Hardware  and  Paint  Men  behind  it. 

Writing  to  hardware  and  accessories  J.  Leonard  Paul, 
Manager,  Brandram-Henderson,  Ltd.,  Winnipeg,  and 
president  of  the  Paint  Oil  and  Varnish  Club,  says,  that 
we  are  being  prepared  for  an  aiggressive  "Clean  Up  and 
Paint  Up"  campaign  in  Winnipeg  with  the  Board  of  Trade 
and  city  officials  actively  behind  the  movement. 

Addressing  a  recent  gathering  of  hardware  merchants  in 
Winnipeg  Mr.  Paul  urged  the  extension  of  the  campaign 
to  the  cities  and  towns  throughout  the  West. 

"If  you  go  to  your  reeve  or  mayor  and  the  council  and 
stir  things  up,  the  campaign  is  headed  toward  success, 
said  Mr.  Paul. 

"It's  to  the  very  best  interest  of  the  retail  hardware 
dealer  to  see  that  this  campaign  is  a  success.  When  the 
people  start  to  clean  up  they  have  to  buy  rakes  and  shovels, 
and  scrubbing  brushes  and  the  like.  You  all  know  that 
vou  must  have  a  clean  surface  before  you  can  paint.  If 
you  have  not  got  that  clean  surface  you  are  not  going  to 
sell  paint.  Aftfei  buying  hardware  goods  with  which  to  clean 
up,  it  follows  naturally  that  they  buy  paint  with  which  to 
paint  up.  After  that  ccmes  vacuum  cleaners,  and  curtains, 
blinds,  and  other  things  too  numerous  to  mention  which  the 
people  find  they  need  for  their  newly  cleaned  and  newly 
painted  premises. 

"Then  a  clean  bright  town  attracts  business.  A  clean 
town  will  grow  faster  than  a  dirty  town.  The  campaign 
costs  little  and  accomplishes  enormous  good  to  social  life 
and  to  business.  In  Winnipeg  this  campaign  has  helped  the 
hardware  dealers  wonderfully.    I  can  give  you  any  amount 


April,  1922 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


27 


of  specific  instances  where  dealers  doubled  and  tripled 
business  by  reason  of  this  caimpaign." 

Another  way  in  which  paint  sales  could  be  stimulated, 
Mr.  Paul,  suggested,  was  by  the  dealers  pushing  the  "Save 
the  Surface"  slogan  to  the  utmost  of  their  ability. 

"You  should  put  this  slogan  on  your  bills,  letter  heads, 
envelopes,  monthly  statements — in  fact  anywhere  and 
everywhere  you  can,"  he  declared.  "Here  are  seven  words 
which  tell  the  whole  story  of  paint  and  varnish.  They  are 
the  truest  words  ever  spoken. 

"We  do  not  regard  the  . 'Clean-up  Paint-up'  slogan  as 
weakening  the  'Save  the  Surface'  campaign.  In  fact  we 
regard  it  as  a  distinct  help.  It's  like  having  two  rail- 
roads to  a  city.  Both,  though  differing  in  routes  come  to 
the  same  point,  and  that  is  the  main  thing.  Both  campaigns 
help  to  sell  paint,  and  sell  other  hardware  as  well." 

Edmonton  to  Have  Paint  Campaign 

Successful  "Clean  Up"  and  "City  Beautiful"  Campaigns 

to  be  followed  by  a  "Save  the  Surface  Week. 
By  W.  Brockie,  Manager  Edmonton  Paint  and  Glass  Company 

Two  years  ago  our  Paint  Club  w^iidh  represents  the  paint 
jobbers  and  manufacturers  in  Edmonton  and  which  consists 
of  six  members,  decided  to  put  on  a  Clean  Up  and  Paint  Up 
Campaign. 

We  first  interviewed  the  Mayor  and  had  him  issue  a 
proclamation  that  a  Clean  Up  and  Paint  Up  Campaign 
would  commence  on  May  1st.  We  then  organized  under 
six  different  committees  with  a  member  of  our  club  as  chair- 
man of  each  committee.  The  writer  was  elected  chairman  of 
the  campaign  and  also  chairman  of  newspaper  publicity. 
We  contracted  with  our  two  local  papers  for  a  certain 
amount  of  advertising  to  appear  daily,  but  the  co-operation 
which  the  papers  gave  us  in  the  way  of  free  publicity,  was 
largely  due  to  the  real  success  of  our  campaign. 

The  second  was  Chairman  of  the  Finance  Committee. 

The  third  committe  had  charge  of  our  outdoor  adver- 
tising which  consisted  of  Clean  Up  and  Paint  Up  banners 
on  street  cars,  streamers  across  the  principal  streets.  Clean 
Up  and  Paint  Up  signs  on  each  street  corner,  also  barmers 
on  delivery  wagons  and  automobiles. 

The  fourth  committee  had  charge  of  the  store  window 
display  in  which  we  had  a  competition  for  the  best  store 
window  featuring  Clean  Up  and  Paint  Up  with  uniform 
Clean  Up  and  Paint  Up  cards  in  all  store  windows. 

The  fifth  committe  had  charge  of  the  "Tin  Can"  Com- 
petion.  We  circularized  the  schools  offering  the  children 
prizes  for  the  largest  pile  of  old  tin  cans.  The  city  was 
divided  into  eight  sections  and  three  prizes  given  in  each 
section.  This  competition  developed  into  the  largest 
feature  of  our  campaign  and  the  school  children  gathered 
up  over  a  thousand  wagon  loads  of  tin  cans. 

The  sixth  was  chairman  of  the  street  parade.  This 
parade  was  headed  by  the  Mayor  followed  by  our  News- 
boys Band  and  the  Fire  Brigade,  followed  up  by  floats 
and  Boy  Scouts.  This  parade  was  a  huge  success  and  was 
over  a  mile  in  length. 

Together  wii:h  these  commlittees  and  the  co-operation 
which  we  received  from  the  City  Officials  and  the  different 
community  leagues  and  other  organizations  in  the  City, 
helped  to  put  this  campaign  over  in  a  big  way. 

Last  year  the  Board  of  Trade  took  up  this  work  under  a 
heading  called  the  "City  Beautiful  Campaign"  whidh  was 
also  a  big  success.  This  year  our  Paint  Club  figure  on  put- 
ting on  another  campaign,  but  it  is  our  intention  to  link  our 
campaign  up  closely  with  the  "Save  the  Surface"  movement. 


In  appreciation  of  the  efforts  made  by  all  participants 
in  the  tin  can  competition,  arrangements  were  made  for  to 
visit  a  special  moving  picture  show  in  the  Empress 
Theatre,  Saturday  morning  from  9  o'clock  until  12  o'clock 
mid-day. 

Every  boy  or  girl  who  took  part  in  the  campaign  was 
privileged  to  attend  the  special  movie  show. 

YOUR  CUSTOMERS  NEED  PAINT 

One  thing  you  can  be  sure  of — all  your  customers  need 
to  have  painting  and  varnishing  done.  You  know  that  before 
they  come  in  the  door.  A  polite  reminder  from  you  or  your 
clerks  is  bound  to  result  in  additional  sales.  There  are  two 
ways  to  open  the  subject.  "Do  you  want  any  paint  and  var- 
nish today?"  The  answer  to  that  is,  "No  thanks — ^^guess 
not."  "How  long  since  you  "Saved  the  Surface"  of  your 
porch  floor?"  is  a  better  way  to  approach  the  man  who  has 
come  in  to  buy  a  hamnjer  or  to  buy  paint  for  some  other 
purpose. 

SELL  PAINT  BY  MAIL 

First  get  up  a  mail  list  of  good  prospects  if  you  haven't 
one  now,  and  keep  it  up  to  date.  Circularize  this  list  often 
enough  to  make  it  pay.  Make  your  letters  personal.  Use 
all  the  good  suggestions  and  selling  helps  supplied  to 
you  by  manufacturers,  and  do  it  systematically.  Sell 
surface  protection,  and  you  will  sell  more  paint  and  varnish. 
Your  customer  is  not  nearly  so  much  interested  in  your 
proposition  as  he  is  in  his  own.  When  you  talk  paint 
and  varnish,  you  are  talking  your  business.  When  you 
talk  surface  protection,  you  are  talking  his  property. 

Program  For  Clean  Up  Week 

A  program  which  is  being  followed  in  many  cities  where 
"Clean  Up  and  Paint  Up."  Campaigns  are  being  carried 
on  is  as  follows : 

Sunday — ^Church  Co-operation  Day 

All  clergymen  of  the  oity  will  use  in  their  sermons  the 
theme  that  '^Cleanliness  is  next  to  Godliness,"  and  make 
sipecial  announcements  of  the  following  days  of  the 
campaign : 

Monday — Fire  Prevention  Day 
Clean  your  basements  and  attics  of  rubbish,  greasy  rags 
and  waste  paper.   "All  fires  are  the  same  size  at  the  start." 
Tuesday — Front  Yard  Day 
Cut  lawns,  prepare  gardens  and  flower  beds  for  plant- 
ing, clean  walks  and  gutters,  salt  cracks-in  sidewalks,  exter- 
minate ants. 

Wednesday — Flower  Bed  Day 
Dig  dandelions,  exchange  plants,  plant  flower  beds  and 
trim    shrubbery.      The    dandelion    pest    has  decreased 
perceptibly  in  the  last  three  years.    Keep  up  this  fight. 
Thursday — Paint  Day 
Paint  and  brighten  up  inside  and  out,  porches,  fences, 
woodwork,  screens  and  porch  dhairs.    Downtown  business 
houses  clean  windows  and  replace  awnings.     "A  little 
Paint  Works  Wonders." 

Friday— Back  Yard  Day 
Clean  alleys,  repair  fences  and  sheds,  screen  garbage  cans, 
put  fly-traps  on  garbage  cans.    Put  up  screens,  plant  thrift 
gardens. 

Saturday — Vacant  Lot  Day 
Everybody  join  in  and  help  sdiool  children  clean  vacant 
lots  and  remove  tin  cans,  paper  and  dead  weeds.    Plow  and 
lolant  garden  plots  wherever  possible. 


28 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


April,  1922 


FUTURE  BUSINESS  CONDITIONS  BRIGHTER 

C.  P.  W.  Schwengers,  General  Manager  of  E.  G.  Prior  &  Co.,  Wholesale  Hardware,  Victoria  and 
Vancouver,  talks  Logic  and  Optimism  to  the  British  Columbia  Hardware  Association  Convention. 


I HAVE  been  asked  to  say  a  few  words  to  you  to-day 
on  future  business  conditions.    The  first  thought 
that  occurs  to  me  in  connection  thereAvith  is  the  old 
saying-  that,  "A  prophet  is  no  good  in  his  own  country." 
As  it  is  my  intention  to  strike  a  vein  of  optimism,  I  hope 
that  in  the  pi*esent  instance  such  will  not  be  the  case. 

At  our  Convention  a  year  ago,  we  had  just  passed 
through  a  period  of  unprecedented  business  inflation. 
Our  Balance  Sheets  were  more  or  less  full  of  Avater,  the' 
basic  cause  of  which  was  the  issuance  of  so  much  paper 
money.  The  tide  had  turned,  and  we  Avere  facing  a  de- 
pression the  intensity  of  which  could  not  be  gauged.  T 
think  I  am  right  in  saying  that  at  that  time  there  were 
few  business  men  A\ho  were  not  regarding  the  future 
Avith  a  good  deal  of  anxiety. 

XoAv,  it  is  a  fact  that  one  of  the  attributes  which  dis- 
tinguish the  human  species  from  the  loAver  animals  is 
the  desire  or  gift  of  looking  to  and  providing  for  the 
future.  If  Ave  analyze  our  daily  actions  and  motives 
we  find  they  are  nearly  all  based  on  making  provision 
for  the  time  to  come.  So  strongly  is  this  impregnated  in 
us  that  the  average  man  is  usually  prepared  to  make 
some  sacrifice  for  the  present  in  order  to  reap  greater 
benefits  later  on.  If  it  were  not  for  this  faculty,  we 
could  not  successfully  conduct  business,  and  as  a  matter 
of  fact,  it  is  very  much  in  accordance  with  our  ability 
to  gauge  the  future,  that  we  are  successful  in  our  daily 
work. 

I  Avould  ask  you  to  remember  that  there  is  only  one 
way  in  which  Ave  are  able  to  foretell,  or  at  all  events, 
guess  Avith  any  degree  of  accuracy  what  is  probably 
going  to  transpire,  and  that  is  by  the  experience  of  the 
past.  You  can  tell  AA'hen  Halley's  Comet  will  reappear 
because  you  know  that  it  has  recurred  in  the  past  at 
exact  spaces  of  time.  If  you  are  ill  your  doctor  can 
diagnose  your  case  only  based  upon  the  experiences  of 
the  past.  When  you  Avant  to  gauge  the  commercial 
future  you  likewise,  have  only  the  past  to  guide  you. 

It  is,  therefore,  natural  that,  when  a  year  ago  we  were 
all  wondering  what  we  had  to  face  in  the  way  of  a 
depression,  that  Ave  should  cast  back  to  history  as  our 
only  guide.  The  closest  analogy  we  could  find  to  the 
then  conditions  Avere  the  years  following  the  American 
Civil  War.  We  knew  that  deflation  between  1865  and 
1870  Aviped  out  a  considerable  percentage  of  the  mer- 
cantile community  of  the  United  States,  and  we  looked 
back  on  the  panics  Avhich  had  folloA\'ed  subsequent  peri- 
odical commercial  booms.  We  remembered  how  the 
banks  of  Australia  suspended  payment  one  after  the 
other  on  one  occasion.  We  recalled  the  moratorium  that 
Seattle  had  to  declare.  We  knew  to  our  cost  of  the 
enormous  losses  made  in  191.3  and  1914  in  our  midst. 
The  outlook  was  not  a  cheerful  one,  because  in  the 
present  instance  the  boom  had  risen  to  much  more  dizzy 
heights  and  Ave  thought  the  fall  would  be  the  greater. 

Expected  Panic  Didn't  Materialize 

Xotwith.standing  this,  we  can  look  back  over  the  past 
twelve  months  and  I  think  that  Ave  are  all  agreed  that 
the  proce.ss  which  we  have  and  are  going  through  has 
not  been  nearly  a.s  dreadful  as  we  expected  it  might  be. 
There  has  been  no  panic  in  Great  Britain,  no  panic  in 


Canada,  no  panic  in  the  United  States,  no  panic  in 
France. 

During  the  past  year  or  two  Ave  find  that  pig  iron  has 
dropped  from  $48.50  to  $18.00  a  ton.  Wire  rods  from 
$60.00  to  $29.00.  Copper  from  30c  to  13c.  Hides  from 
40e  to  16c.  Cotton  from  32c  to  16c,  and  so  on  right 
through  the  whole  commercial  fabric.  All  this  water 
has  been  squeezed  out  of  the  balance  sheets  of  manu- 
facturers and  merchants.  It  is  a  remarkable  thing  to 
contemplate  that  in  spite  of  all  this,  failures  have  not 
been  abnormal  and  as  I  just  said,  we  have  experienced 
no  panic.  Why  is  this?  It  can  be  summed  up  in  the 
one  phrase,  "more  efficient  organization." 

Compared  with  previous  times,  the  business  Avorld 
to-day  is  organized  to  protect  itself  and  the  public  as  it 
never  was  before.  There  are  Associations  of  Bankers, 
Associations  of  Railways,  Associations  of  Manufacturers, 
Associations  of  Merchants.  You  have  your  own  little 
organization  right  here,  and  if  ever  you  had  an 
object  lesson  as  to  the  value  to  yourselves  and  to  the 
public  of  your  Retail  Hardware  Association,  you  have 
had  it  during  the  past  year. 

When  you  feel  that  injustices  have  crept  in,  always 
remember  that  your  own  organization  has  done  it's 
small  share  towards  safely  steering  the  world  through 
the  most  critical  period  in  it's  business  history.  May 
the  thought  inculcate  in  each  of  our  members  a  spirit  of 
tolerance  and  give  and  take,  which  is  always  essential  to 
successful  co-operation  and  mutual  benefit. 

What  About  the  Future 

So  much  for  the  past — But  your  thoughts,  like  mine, 
are  more  concerned  for  the  future,  and  we  are  all  won- 
dering what  the  coming  year  and  years  hold  for  us  in 
a  business  sense.  If  I  am  addressing  any  pessimists,  let 
me  first  say  this ;  that  when  business  is  booming,  when 
trade  is  at  it's  highest  peak,  when  it  seems  as  if  good 
times  are  obliged  to  go  on  for  years,  then  history  shows 
us  that  we  are  rapidly  approaching  the  downward  turn. 
On  the  other  hand,  when  the  business  outlook  appears 
at  its  worst,  when  we  are,  so  to  speak,  bumping  along 
the  bottom  of  depression,  as  we  have  been  for  some 
twelve  months,  then  we  are  very  nearly  approaching 
the  turn  to  brighter  days. 

It  is  the  old  story  of  its  being  darkest  before  the 
dawn,  and  bears  out  that  greatest  of  all  business  axioms 
to  "Buy  AA^hen  everyone  wants  to  sell,  and  sell  when 
CA'cryone  wants  to  buy." 

One  thing  I  Avant  to  impress  on  you  with  all  the  force 
I  can,  and  that  is  that  there  is  very  little  guesswork  in 
the  cycles  of  business:  They  can  be  gauged  in  their 
periods  with  almost  as  great  accuracy  as  the  astronomer 
can  foretell  the  movements  of  the  stars. 

We  must  remember  that  there  is  no  middle  course  in 
nature  or  in  business.  It  is  always  the  swing  of  the 
pendulum,  and  periods  of  activity  and  recuperation  or 
rest  follow  each  other  as  night  follows  day.  We  see  it 
in  the  seasons  of  the  year,  in  the  functions  of  our  body, 
in  our  mental  process,  and  it  is  just  the  same  in  business. 

The  statistics  available  over  a  long  period  of  years 
form  a  basis  which  enables  us  to  indicate  with  very 
great  precision,  subject  of  course,  to  unforseen  eventu- 


April,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


29 


alities,  such  as  war,  pestilence,  etc.,  the  commercial  move- 
ments of  activity  and  repose. 

Based  on  all  this  vast  mass  of  information,  I  can  tell 
you  to-night  that  the  future  holds  out  good  cheer  and 
hope. 

I  am  going  to  say  a  few  words  to  you  that  may  pos- 
sibly be  of  interest  as  indictating  the  line  of  thought  by 
Avhich  this  is  gauged. 

One  criterion  is  the  rapidity  or  otherwise  with  which 
the  money  on  deposit  in  the  banks  is  turned  over.  When 
business  is  on  the  boom,  money  changes  hands  very  fast 
and  each  additional  turnover  forces  business  to  a  greater 
height  and  prices  to  a  higher  level  until  the  re-action 
comes.  Not  for  years  has  the  turnover  in  the  banks  of 
the  United  States  been  at  such  a  low  level.  It  indicates 
that  the  man  who  has  the  money  is  allowing  it  to  lie  idle. 
He  is  not  using  it,  because  he  is  afraid  that  by  so  doing 
he  will  incur  loss.  He  is  filled  with  uncertainty.  He  is 
not  sure  that  prices  have  reached  their  lowest  figure.  He 
cannot  afford  to  do  this  for  ever  and  men  with  money 
cannot  and  will  not  allow  their  funds  to  remain  idle  a 
day  longer  than  they  think  is  necessary.  They  are  wait- 
ing for  the  first  indication  and  the  first  signs  to  show 
that  the  time  has  arrived  when  they  can  once  more  use 
those  funds  to  their  own  advantage.  When  these  signs 
begin  to  be  in  evidence,  and  we  are  fast  approaching 
that  time,  activity  starts. 

Stocks  of  Merchandise  Below  Normal 

Then  we  have  the  stocks  of  merchandise  in  the  hands 
of  retailers  and  jobbers.  In  1920  the  stocks  on  hand 
were  nearly  50  per  cent,  greater  than  normal.  To-day 
they  are  nearly  50  per  cent,  below  normal,  or  not  suffi- 
cient or  anything  like  sufficient  to  provide  for  the  moder- 
ate requirements  of  the  country  at  large.  What  will 
happen  when  it  dawns  upon  the  mercantile  community 
that  the  time  has  come  when  prices  are  so  low  that  they 
should  again  build  up  their  stocks,  and  in  order  to  bring 
them  to  a  normal  level,  have  got  to  nearly  double  what 
is  at  present  carried  on  hand  in  the  aggregate? 

No  better  proof  is  wanted  as  to  the  tremendous  reduc- 
tion in  stocks  of  merchandise  than  the  enormous  demand 
and  the  rapid  increase  in  the  value  of  high  grade  bonds. 
When  manufacturers  and  merchants  reduce  their  stocks 
to  such  a  large  extent  as  they  have  done  within  the  last 
eighteen  months,  they  release  an  enormous  amount  of 
cash.  It  would  not  be  good  business  for  them  to  carry 
this  surplus  cash  in  the  banks,  yielding  them  2i/2  per 
cent  or  3  per  cent  interest,  so  they  invest  in  high  grade 
bonds  which  have  been  able  to  yield  them  even  more 
than  6  per  cent.  They  know  that  they  can  turn  these 
bonds  into  cash  at  a  moment's  notice,  and  that  such  in- 
vestments are  just  as  safe  as  bank  deposits. 

The  fact  that  the  percentage  of  increase  in  the  price 
of  bonds  during  the  last  six  months  has  been  the  greatest 
in  the  history  of  the  world  and  that  every  new  flotation 
is  immediately  absorbed,  should  indicate  to  you  the 
extent  to  which  liquidation  of  stocks  has  taken  place. 

Persistent  increase  in  the  price  of  bonds  is  always  the 
first  indication  of  the  approach  of  better  business  condi- 
tions and  good  times.  This  is  usually  followed  at  a 
shortly  later  period  by  an  advancing  stock  market. 

Some  people  look  on  the  New  York  Stock  Market  as 
nothing  but  a  huge  gambling  den.  This  is  not  so.  There 
is  nothing  as  sensitive  to  business  conditions  as  the  stock 
market  of  New  York.  It  foretells  with  a  wonderful 
degree  of  accuracy  the  fut^^re  of  business.  Where  you 
get  a  persistent  and  constant  increase  over  a  period  of 


some  months  of  standard  stocks,  it  has  always  in  the 
past  been  a  certain  indication  that  it  will  be  followed 
later  by  a  corresponding  expansion  of  business.  You 
only  have  to  take  the  stock  market  of  last  November  and 
compare  the  prices  then  with  the  prices  of  to-day,  to 
realize  why  I  should  speak  to  you  to-day  in  hopeful  vein. 

Then,  we  have  the  banking  conditions  as  another  very 
reliable  guide.  The  Federal  Reserve  Banks  of  the 
United  States  a  year  or  two  ago  had  outstanding  loans 
to  the  extent  of  two  billion  nine  hunderd  million  dol- 
ars.  These  loans  have  been  liquidated  to  such  an  extent 
that  to-day  they  have  been  reduced  to  something  like 
nine  hundred  million  dollars  only.  At  the  same  time 
the  deposits  in  the  Federal  Reserve  Banks  have  remained 
at  practically  the  same  level  as  they  were  at  that  time, 
and  in  addition  to  this  the  gold  reserve  of  the  country 
has  vastly  increased.  A  year  ago,  the  Federal  Reserve 
Bank  of  New  York  had  a  ratio  of  Reserve  to  Liabilities 
of  about  34  per  cent,  to-day  it  is  81  per  cent,  and  the 
entire  Federal  Reserve  system  of  the  United  States  has 
increased  its  reserve  from  something  like  40  per  cent,  to 
70  per  cent.  This  means,  of  course,  that  there  are  now 
enormous  sums  available  when  business  opportunity  is 
favorable. 

Bankers  cannot  conduct  their  business  with  such 
enormous  reserves  on  hand  and  earn  maximum  profits. 
They  must  utilize  their  funds  just  as  a  merchant  must 
turn  over  his  stock,  or  they  cannot  be  prosperous. 
Seldom  in  history  have  the  American  banks  been  so  re- 
plete with  funds  and  they  have  never  been  in  a  more 
advantageous  position  to  facilitate  the  developments  of 
new  business  than  they  are  to-day. 

Pig  Iron  as  a  Barometer 

There  is  another  and  very  certain  barometer  of  busi- 
ness conditions,  and  that  is  Pig  Iron.  If  we  follow  the 
course  of  Pig  Iron  in  its  movements  as  to  both  price  and 
output,  we  follow  by  the  same  line  the  contraction  or 
expansion  of  business.  It  is  a  fact  that  the  output  of 
Pig  Iron  is  at  its  greatest  a  short  time  previous  to  the 
peak  of  a  period  of  inflation.  The  output  of  Pig  Iron 
commences  to  go  down  before  the  bursting  of  a  boom. 
When  the  output  of  Pig  Iron  commences  to  be  curtailed, 
it  never  stops  on  the  down  grade  until  it  has  reached 
the  bottom  of  a  business  depression. 

One  of  the  first  indications  of  a  turn  from  depression 
to  renewed  prosperity  is  w^hen  the  output  of  Pig  Iron 
again  commences  to  increase.  When  the  output  does 
begin  to  climb  it  never  stops  growing  until  it  has  reached 
the  peak  of  another  period  of  prosperity.  This  line 
follows  a  straight  downward  movement  from  top  to 
bottom  and  a  straight  upward  movement  from  bottom  to 
top. 

Now  what  has  been  the  history  during  the  last  year 
or  two  in  Pig  Iron  ?  If  we  take  the  output  at  the  middle 
of  1920  at  100  per  cent.,  we  find  that  in  January  1921 
the  output  was  85  per  cent.  This  fell  a  little  month  by 
month  until  August,  when  the  output  was  only  about  30 
per  cent.  In  September  the  tide  turned.  Each  succes- 
sive month  has  shown  an  increase.  In  December  the  out- 
put was  about  55  per  cent,  of  normal,  and  so  it  is  grow- 
ing month  by  month,  and  indicates  that  it  will  continue 
to  grow,  followed  by  increased  activity  until  it  leads  up 
to  another  period  of  prosperity. 

It  is  a  true  saying  that  Steel  is  the  barometer  of  the 
world's  prosperity. 

There  have  only  been  two  occasions  in  the  past  when 
every  known  factor  has  pointed  an  unerring  finger  to- 


30 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


April,  1922 


wards  improved  conditions,  and  following  each  of  these 
the  upward  movement  came  suddenly.  It  caught  the 
bankers  with  a  plathora  of  money,  the  public  and  the 
merchants  with  depleted  stocks,  and  brought  about  a 
sudden  scramble  in  buying  with  increased  values  and 
abnormal  demand.  Merchants  who  wanted  goods  badly 
coiild  get  them  in  time  and  were  obliged  to  pay  higher 
prices  and  iu  many  cases  go  without  merchandise  to  the 
sacrifice  of  their  sales. 

The  present  is  the  third  period  in  which  every  known 
factor  again  points  in  the  one  direction. 

Wluit  I  have  told  you  is  not  guesswork.  It  is  going 
to  dawn  upon  the  people  suddenly  that  the  liquidation 
which  has  taken  place  has  reached  its  extreme  limit, 
that  the  pendulum  has  swung  too  far  in  the  one  direc- 
tion, with  the  inevitable  result — It  has  already  occurred 
in  Wheat. 

We  do  not  realize  how  nearly  the  price  of  basic  mater- 
ials is  to  pre-war  levels.  I  can  give  you  a  few  compari- 
sons between  the  year  1913  and  the  present  time : 

1913  1922 

Pig  Iron    $16.45  18.00 

Steel  Billets    28.40  29.00 

Wire  Rods    30.00  86.00 

Steel  Bars    1.65  1.85 

Tank  Plates    1.50  1.50 

Barbed  Wire    3.47  4.00 

Copper    16.90  13.50 

Spelter    7.05  4.85 

Pig  Lead    4.20  4.70 

Steel  Pipe    80%  71% 

When  we  take  into  consideration  the  enormously  in- 
creased price  of  labor  and  of  transportation,  and  the 
fact  that  manufacturers  are  to-day  operating  in  most 
ca.ses  at  a  loss,  we  must  realize  that  the  tide  has  nearly 
turned  and  that  we  are  fast  approaching  the  lowest  ebb 
of  market  prices.  Let  us  realize  it  before  it  is  too  late, 
for  when  it  is  generally  felt,  there  may  be  a  scramble 
for  goods. 

Apart  from  all  these  statistics,  we  should  review  the 
situation  also  in  a  general,  broad  sense. 

Railways  Starved  for  Equipment 

The  Government  of  the  United  States  is  credited  with 
a  determination  to  bring  about  by  legislation  or  other- 
wise, renewed  prosperity.  They  are  proposing  to  lend 
the  railway  companies  huge  sums  of  money  to  purchase 
equii)ment.  The  railways  constitute  the  one  greatest 
purchasing  power  in  America,  and  to-day  they  are  abso- 
lutely starved  for  equipment  and  improvement. 

In  the  United  States  their  earnings  have  improved 
tremendously  during  the  last  six  months  and  many  lines 
are  fast  getting  on  their  feet  financially  again.  There 
never  was  so  much  money  available  for  investment  on 
this  continent  as  at  the  present  time.  There  is  a  dearth 
of  goods  the  world  over.  Europe,  when  she  can  buy, 
will  only  be  restricted  in  her  purchases  by  the  funds  she 
finds  available. 

We  have  the  richest  country  in  the  world  right  at 
our  doors,  interested  in  us  and  closely  interlocked  with 
us  in  business. 

Let  us  look  at  this  wonderful  Canada  of  ours.  Its 
untouched  natural  resources.  Our  vast  prairies,  as  yet 
hardly  scratched.  Our  mines,  our  fisheries,  our  forests 
anfl  our  water  powers.  Everything  available  to  enable 
people  to  ceaselessly  bestow  their  energies  in  develop- 
ment; and  populated  by  the  most  virile  race  on  earth. 

When  we  reflect  on  all  this,  1  say  to  you,  and  I  ask 


you  to  say  to  me,  that  in  spite  of  our  vast  spaces  there  is 
no  room  amongst  us  for  the  pessimist.  Let  us  be  opti- 
mists and  as  such  step  forward  to  the  better  times  to 
come. 


Salesman  or  Wrapper  Boy 

Some  Experiences  Illustrating  how  Sales  can  be  made  by 
Suggestions  to  Customers. 

■A  man  presents  himself  in  front  of  the  counter  in  a 
paint  store. 

"Gimme  thirteen  gallons  of  light  yellow  paint  and 
four  gallons  of  white  paint." 

"Righto,"  says  the  wrapper  boy  as  he  hands  out  the 
goods  and  names  the  price. 

But  a  salesman — what  does  he  do? 

"I  judge  from  the  colors,  you're  going  to  paint  the 
house,"  he  observes.  "Good  idea;  can't  afford  to  have 
any  wood  or  metal  work  on  buildings  going  to  decay 
now  adays;  cost  too  much  to  replace  them,  eh?  But 
haven't  you  some  gutters  on  that  house  that  would  be 
saved  from  rust  by  a  coat  of  special  rust  inhibitive 
paint?" 

"By  gosh,"  replies  the  customer,  "I  forgot  that. 
Glad  you  mentioned  it.  Gimme  enough  of  that  for  about 
sixty  feet  of  eaves  troughs." 

"Any  fence  around  your  house,  friend?"  inquires  the 
salesman.  The  wrapper  boy  doesn't  know  there  is  any 
such  thing  as  a  fence. 

"Yes— why?" 

"Well,  you  know,"  volunteers  the  salesman,  "that 
house  isn't  going  to  look  as  well  as  it  should  with  a 
shabby  old  fence  around  it.  You  wouldn't  put  a  nice 
new  picture  in  an  old  battered,  dingy  frame,  would 
you?  Besides,  fences  and  gate  posts  decay  too  if  not 
protected  by  paint." 

"Guess  that's  right  too,"  agrees  the  customer.  "I 
have  about  two  hundred  feet  of  fence.  WTiat  color 
d'yu  think  would  look  good  with  that  yellow  house  with 
white  trim,  and  how  much  will  it  take?" 

The  salesman  figures  it  up,  suggests  the  color  and 
sells  the  goods.  The  wrapper  boy  would  have  saved  him- 
self all  this  trouble  and  had  time  for  another  cigarette 
out  in  front. 

"Got  enough  now  for  your  outbuildings?"  asks  the 
salesman,  "or  haven't  you  any?" 

"Um,  yes,  I  have  a  detached  summer  kitchen  and 
woodshed,"  says  the  customer,  "but  I  wasn't  calculat 
ing  on  spending  any  money  on  that." 

"Looks  pretty  good  as  she  is,  eh?"  remarks  the 
salesman. 

"No,  don't  look  any  too  good,  but  er — say,  I  guess 
what  you  say  about  that  shabby  fence  and  the  old  pic- 
ture frame  goes  for  that  shack  too.  It's  one  story,  tin 
roof,  about  12x16.  Might  as  well  do  this  job  right. 
Gimme  enough  more  yellow  and  white  paint  for  the 
walls  and  some  red  for  the  roof." 

The  salesman  adds  the  cans  to  the  pile.  He  has  sold 
the  man  thirty  per  cent,  more  goods  than  he  expected 
to  buy.  A  wrapper  boy  would  have  spent  the  time  josh- 
ing the  bookkeeper  girl  so  that  she  couldn't  work  either. 

There's  many  a  wrapper  boy  posing  as  a  salesman 
and  drawing  a  salesman's  pay  in  half  the  paint  stores 
of  the  country.  They  are  an  expensive  luxury  for  the 
boss  to  maintain. 


April,  1922 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


31 


PUSH  ACCESSORIES  AND  SPORTING  GOODS 

IJIUIirillMMIIMIJMIMIIIIIIIIMMIIIIIIIMIJMIMIIMIIJIIMIMIIIIIMIMMhll^llMMIIMIMIMIMMIMIMIIIIMIIMIMMIIIIIIIIIlllllllMMIIIIIMMlin  lllllllllllllllllllllllllllltllllllllllllllllllMIIIMIMIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIII!IIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIJIIMII 

Real  Salesmanship  is  what  counts  nowadays — Gasoline  tank  brings^ustomers  to  the  store — 

Suggested  Stock  of  Accessories — Fishing  Contests. 

'IIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIMIIMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIMIIMIMIIMMIIII!IMi:illMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIMIMIIIIMIi:iMMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMn 


Selling  is  a  different  thing  today  from  what  it  was  two 
years  ago.  Today  to  sell  means  "take  the  merchandise 
in  your  hand  and  ask  folks  to  buy  it."  Some  fellows 
ask  for  it."  But  that  isn't  getting  very  far  today,  because 
they  aren't  asking  for  it  nearly  as  much  as  they  were  previ- 
ously. So  the  man  who  takes  the  merchandise  in  his  hand 
and  asks  the  folks  to  buy  it,  stands  a  far  better  chance  of 
making  the  sale,  no  matter  whether  he  has  a  monkey  wrench 
or  a  platinum  necklace  in  his  hand. 

Automobile  salesmen  around  the  country  find  that  they 
can  make  sales  sometimes  where  the  dealer  has  not  been  able 
to  do  so.  How  they  make  these  sales  presents  some  interest- 
ing pointers,  the  experience  of  one  of  them  who  called  on  a 
garage  man  being  as  follows: 

"Business  is  rotten  and  you  can't  sell  a  thing.  Just 
look  at  those  F  ord  steering  wheels  I  bought  last  Summer — 
dead  stock^ — don't  sell  ,  said  the  garage  man. 

As  we  were  talking  the  local  doctor  came  in  with  his 
Ford  and  told  the  garageman  to  have  it  looked  over.  "It 
steers  hard,"  he  said 

"All  right,"  the  boss  said,  "we  will  look  it  over." 

I  took  doiwn  a  steering  wheel  from  the  shelf  and  said: 
"Doctor,  this  is  what  you  need  on  your  car.  You  will  be 
more  than  pleased  witli  the  way  the  car  will  handle  with 
a  large  wheel." 

"All  night,"  he  said,  "I'll  take  your  word  for  it  and  have 
it  put  on." 

"NEVER  THOT  OF  SELLING  HIM  A  WHEEL,"  said 
the  garageman  after  the  doctor  had  gone  out. 

"THAT  IS  THE  REASON  YOU  HAVE  THEM  ON 
YOUR  SHELF,"  I  told  him.  "GO  AFTER  THEM  AND 
YOU  WON'T  HAVE  A  WHEEL  LEFT  WHEN  I  SEE  YOU 
AGAIN." 

Another  accessory  salesman  told  of  calling  on  a  hardware 
store  and  while  he  was  talking  to  the  dealer  a  car  owner 
came  into  the  store  and  asked  for  a  certain  well  known 
make  of  tire.  The  dealer  did  not  carry  that  maike  in  stock 
and  directed  him  to  a  competitor's  place.  Tower  was  very 
much  surprised  that  the  dealer  had  not  tried  to  sell  him  one 
of  the  tires  he  had  in  stock  and  expressed  curiosity  as 
to  why  he  made  no  effort  to  bring  the  advantages  of  his 
tire  to  the  man's  attention. 

The  dealer  replied:  "It  takes  too  long  to  change  his 
mind." 

The  car  owner  heard  the  conversation  and  asked  to  see 
the  tire.  Tower  showed  him  the  tire  and  explained  its 
good  points  but,  due  to  the  fact  that  it  was  higher  in  price 
than  the  tire  originally  asked  for,  was  unable  to  put  t'he  sale 
across  and  the  man  went  out.  But  he  came  back  in  five 
minutes  and  bought,  showing  that  it  is  worth  while  to 
suggest  and  show  an  article,  even  if  is  not  carried  in  stock, 
the  particular  article  called  for. 

In  every  business  there  is  a  certain  number  of  customers 
who  came  to  store  unsolicited,  and  who  thus  eliminate  the 
necessity  for  seeking  them  out;  but  there  is  one  business 
in  which  practically  all  prospects  for  sales  come  unsolicited 
and  at  no  expense  to  the  trader.  That  business  is  the  sale 
O'f  gasolene  to  car  owners. 

It  is  not  necessary  to  ask  the  customers  to  come,  or  to 
sell  certain  lines  at  a  loss  so  as  to  attract  them  to  the 


estalblishment.  Here,  then,  is  the  salesman's  opportunity. 
For  instance,  when  a  woman  drives  up  to  the  gasolene 
pump  on  a  rainy  day  the  "Ask  'Em  to  Buy"  salesman 
tells  her  that  a  windshield  wiper  would  be  a  great  con- 
venience for  her,  and  of  course  she  buys  it.  On  another 
occasion  wheii  a  car  comes  along  with  an  under-inflated 
tire,  the  "Ask  'Em  to  Buy"  salesman  sells  the  car  driver  a 
tire  gauge  so  that  he  may  know  when  his  tires  are 
adequately  inflated. 

Sample  Stock  of  Accessories 

Tires  are  the  leading  line  in  any  accessories  department 
and  the  variety  of  additional  lines  to  stock  varieties  with  the 
conununity  in  which  the  dealer  is  doing  business  in.  The 
sample  stock  outlined  below  furnishes  a  good  foundation 
for  a  complete  accessory  department  and  can  be  revised 
to  suit  the   local   needs   of  each  dealer  by  the  jobbers 


salesman. 

Unit 

Whole- 

Unit 

sale 

Retail 

Price 

Price 

Article 

Quantity 

Price 

Proifit 

$4.69 

$6.25 

Ami  Skid  Chains,  30x30%. 

.    12  pr.  : 

$52.50 

$22.50 

3.38 

4.50 

Tire  Covers,  assorted  sizes. 

.  6 

18.00 

9.00 

4.50 

6.00 

5 

22.50 

7.50 

3.00 

4.00 

5 

15.00 

5.00 

.48 

.09 

Valve  Cores  

.  100 

4.85 

2.15 

1.08 

1.50 

6 

6.48 

2.52 

.38 

.50 

6 

2.28 

.72 

.50 

.75 

.  10 

5.00 

2.50 

.56 

.85 

50 

28.00 

14.50 

.03 

.10 

Ignition  and  Light  Wire . .  . 

.  100 

3.00 

7.00 

.94 

1.25 

5 

4.70 

1.55 

6.00 

12.00 

Ignition  Coils  

.  2 

16.00 

8.00 

.03 

.05 

100 

3.00 

2.00 

.20 

.30 

20 

4.00 

2.00 

1.13 

1.50 

Trouble  and  Dash  Lamps . 

.  2 

2.26 

.74 

1.50 

2.00 

3 

4.50 

1.50 

.29 

.45 

50 

14.50 

8.00 

.94 

1.25 

Eleotric  Tail  Lamp  

.  5 

4.20 

1.55 

7.50 

10.00 

6 

40.00 

20.00 

.50 

.75 

6 

3.00 

1.50 

.64 

.85 

Body  Polish  , 

10 

5.70 

2.80 

2.25 

3.00 

2 

4.50 

1.50 

.25 

.50 

5 

1.25 

1.25 

.15 

.25 

Grease  Cups  

.  10 

1.50 

1.00 

.50 

.75 

10 

5.00 

2.50 

.52 

.80 

100  ft. 

43.60 

37.40 

.40 

.60 

18  ft. 

7.20 

3.60 

1.50 

2.00 

Cut  Out  

3 

4.50 

1.50 

.45 

.60 

25 

11.25 

3.75 

.25 

.40 

Grinding  Compound  

6 

1.50 

.90 

7.50 

10.00 

3 

22.50 

7.50 

1.00 

1.50 

1 

1.00 

1.50 

7.50 

10.00 

5 

37.50 

12.50 

2.25 

3.00 

Windshield  Wiper  

3 

6.75 

2.25 

2.25 

3.00 

1 

2.25 

.75 

7.50 

10.00 

Fire  Extinguisher  

1 

7.50 

2.50 

3.19 

4.25 

1 

3.19 

1.06 

7.50 

10.00 

5 

33.05 

6.65 

6.50 

10.00 

1 

6.50 

3.50 

.70 

1.00 

10 

7.00 

3.00 

.56 

.75 

10 

5.00 

2.50 

.20 

.35 

Screw  Drivers  

10 

2.00 

1.50 

5.00 

7.00 

3 

7.32 

2.43 

2.44 

3.25 

3 

7.32 

2.43 

.38 

.50 

Priming  Cups  

10 

3.80 

1.20 

7.50 

20.00 

1 

22..50 

7.50 

.50 

.75 

6 

3.00 

1.50 

Cost 

Profit 

$511.13  $236.27 

32 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


April,  1922 


SELLING  MORE  IMPORTANT  THAN  BUYING 

IMIIrlHMIIMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIMirillllirilllllllllllllllrlll  'll'lirillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll  llllll  I:iIIIMIIII|I:|I!III|IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIMIIII!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIII  llllllllllllllllllllltllllllllllllllllllllinillllllllllllMlllllltlllllllllllllllllllllllllllMIIIIIII 

Buyers  Often  Fool  Themselves  seeking  that  "Extra  Five" — The  Selection  and  Assortment  of  Mer- 
chandise Bought  More  Essential  than  Price  Paid. 

IIIIHIIIIIIHll!ini:ilinillllllllllllHIIIIIIMIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMMIIIIMIIIIIMIIJI»niJllnlUIIMMIIIIIIIMIIMMIIIIIIMtJinillll^ 

By  Saunders  Norvell 


LET  us  start  here  with  the  retail  merchant  when  he 
goes  to  market  to  buy  his  opening  stock.  I  have 
sold  hundreds  of  stocks  of  goods  and  have  there- 
fore been  present  at  the  birth  of  hundreds  of  new  mer- 
chants. In  selling  these  "new  stocks"  there  was  fre- 
quently very  hard  competition.  A  number  of  jobbing 
houses  were  trying  to  sell  the  merchant  and  to  con- 
vince him  that  it  would  be  to  his  interest  to  cast  in 
his  lot  with  them.  I  was  fairly  successful  in  selling 
these  stocks,  and  now  I  am  going  to  give  you  one  of 
the  secrets  of  my  success. 

It  is  very  simple.  I  simply  told  the  merchant  the 
plain  truth  about  the  retail  business  as  I  saw  it.  Most 
of  my  competitors  attempted  to  make  the  customer 
believe  they  would  sell  him  the  goods  at  cost  or  at 
least  very  much  cheaper  than  any  one  else. 
In  a  word,  all  of  them  talked  price. 
As  a  result,  most  of  these  new  merchants  became 
imbued  with  the  idea  that  there  was  just  one  problem 
in  doing  business,  viz.,  to  buy  goods  cheap,  and  that 
somebody  was  going  to  "rob"  them  in  the  price. 

Then,  without  belittling  the  necessity  of  buying 
their  goods  at  the  right  prices,  I  attempted  to  prove 
to  them  that  the  price  at  which  goods  are  bought  in 
the  retail  business  is  not  the  main  consideration.  I 
tried  to  .show  them  that  most  merchants  paid  just 
about  the  same  price  for  their  goods.  The  thing  that 
I  emphasized  was  that  the  main  point  in  buying  new 
stock  was  to  get  the  right  assortment  of  goods — goods 
that  would  sell  in  their  community — and  to  buy  these 
goods  in  the  quantities,  sizes  and  styles,  just  as  they 
sold.  Sometimes  a  merchant  was  doubtful  in  regard 
to  this  proposition,  and  then  I  put  it  to  him  this  way : 

^  "Suppose  you  and  I  wish  to  buy  out  a  retail  stock. 
Suppose  we  went  to  ten  towns,  say"  of  5,000  population, 
and  looked  over  ten  running  retail  stores  with  a  stock 
of  merchandise  worth  .say  $5,000.  Now,  I  put  the 
question  to  you:  In  your  opinion  how  much  cheaper 
would  the  closest  and  most  careful  buyer  of  these  ten 
stores  buy  his  goods  than  the  most  careless  bu.yer?" 
On  the  entire  stock  it  would  usually  be  agreed  that 
the  close  buyer  would  not  get  an  inside  of  more  than 
5%. 

In  other  words,  the  difference  would  be  $250  on  the 
total  stock. 

"Now,"  .said  I,  "in  your  opinion  how  much  differ- 
ence would  there  be  in  value  between  the  best  assorted 
stock  and  the  poorest— that  is— by  reason  of  unsalable 
goods,  dead  stock,  wrong  sizes,  etc?"  We  usually 
agreed  that  this  difference  would  amount  to  fully  25% 
to  .30%.  ^ 

"It  is  for  this  reason,"  I  would  then  .say,  "that  I 
hold  that  the  character,  condition  and  a.ssortment  of 
goods  in  a  retail  store  is  of  greater  importance  than 


the  extra  5%  a  merchant  may  obtain  b.v  the  closest 
attention  to  buying. 

Now,  this  new  merchant  would  say,  "Well,  why 
can't  I  buy  cheap  and  also  get  the  right  assortment?" 
My  answer  to  this  was,  ' '  Simply  because  it  is  a  peculiar 
twist  of  human  nature  that  the  man  who  always  wishes 
to  buy  things  cheaply  devotes  so  much  thought  to  the 
extra  5%  that  he  forgets  other  considerations  entirely. 

The  close  buyer  is  almost  invariably  overstocked  with 
"widows"  because  in  order  to  get  his  extra  5%  he  has 
been  compelled  by  the  seller  to  buy  in  large  quantities- 
much  larger  quantities  than  he  actually  needs. 

Then  many  a  retail  buyer  in  his  vain  desire  to  buy 
direct  from  a  manufacturer  and  to  get  the  extra  5% 
has  had  to  buy  more  goods  than  he  needed  to  make  up 
a  shipment  from  this  manufacturer  when  it  would  have 
been  much  better  for  him  to  have '  bought  in  a  more 
moderate  quantity  even  at  a  somewhat  higher  price 
from  his  local  jobber. 

Then  I  called  the  attention  of  this  new  merchant  to 
another  fact  that  probably  had  not  occurred  to  him. 
It  is  a  simple  matter  to  get  a  salesman  to  make  prices 
when  he  has  a  price-book  in  front  of  him.  The  making 
of  prices  for  reasons  that  will  follow  later  in  this 
article  does  not  take  much  salesmanship.  As  a  matter 
of  fact,  the  average  salesman  has  very  little  leeway, 
but  when  we  leave  the  question  of  prices  and  get  to 
the  question  of  assortment  of  goods,  then  it  takes  real 
salesmen  with  knowledge  and  experience  to  see  that 
the  new  merchant  is  put  into  business  right. 

I  went  on  the  r'oad  when  I  was  nineteen  years  of  age. 
I  went  out  West,  where  business  was  booming.  In 
those  first  two  or  three  years  as  a  salesman  I  had  manj- 
"new  stock"  orders  thrust  upon  me.  Will  the  good 
Lord  ever  forgive  me  for  what  I  did  to  some  of  these 
merchants  in  helping  them  select  some  of  their  assort- 
ments? When  Gabriel's  Horn  blows  and  I  am  called 
to  judgment,  some  of  the  charges  I  will  have  to  answer 
I  am  sure  will  be  preferred  by  the  ghosts  of  some  of 
my  former  trade.  I  gave  them  prices,  all  right.  That 
was  easy.  The  prices  were  in  my  book,  but  there  was 
no  guide  to  assortment,  and  the  confiding  merchant 
got  merchandise  for  which  there  was  not  a  call  within 
five  hundred  miles. 

Passes  on  Dead  Stock 

I  suppose  this  accumulation  of  dead  stock  is  still  on 
the  shelves,  covered  with  the  dust  of  the  years  and 
with  the  fly  specks  of  many  generations  of  flies.  I 
never  knowingly  overcharged  a  customer.  I  never 
asked  more  than  our  sellng  price.  My  conscience  does 
not  prick  me  on  the  score  of  prices,  but,  oh,  those 
a.ssortments  that  I  scattered ! 

Do  you  realize  that  25%  of  all  the  capital  invested 
in  business  is  tied  up  in  the  ends  of  the  line? 

Then  there  was  another  fact  that  I  used  to  call  to 


April,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


33 


the  attention  of  these  merchants  who  had  the  idea 
that  their  main  object  in  life  was  to  buy  goods  cheaper 
than  their  competitors.  This  idea  was  that  about  25% 
of  the  average  retail  stock  consisted  of  goods  on  which 
the  manufacturer  fixed  the  price — there  was  only  one 
price.  Then  there  was  another  25%,  which  consisted 
of  jobbers'  special  brands,  where  the  jobber  fixed  the 
price — there  was  but  one  price. 

Then  there  was  another  25%  of  goods,  on  which  no 
man  could  tell  whether  the  price  was  right  or  not — 
goods  bought  on  trust. 

For  instance — who  knows  the  real  value  of  a  medium 
or  high-priced  razor  strop?  In  order  to  know  the  real 
value  of  this  strop  you  would  have  to  know  whether 
the  hide  was  cut  over  the  back,  the  side  or  the  belly 
of  the  cow.  Leather  from  each  locality  has  a  different 
value,  and  you  certainly  cannot  tell  this  leather  when 
it  is  fixed  up  in  a  razor  strop. 

Then  take  brushes.  How  can  you  tell  the  exact 
value  of  a  brush  unless  you  count  each  bristle,  and  so 
know  just  how  many  bristles  and  how  much  tampico 
is  in  the  brush? 

So  if  the  above  statements  are  correct,  we  have  75% 
of  a  retailer's  stock  on  which  he  absolutely  pays  a 
fixed  price.  This  leaves  25%  of  staple  items  on  which 
he  can  occasionally  puggle  an  extra  5%,  but  is  the 
game  worth  the  candle?    Personally,  I  think  not. 

I  have  always  prescribed  and  I  still  preach  that  the 
main  thing  in  the  retail  business  is  salesmanship  and  the 
ability  to  sell  goods.  When  your  goods  are  bought  in 
right  assortments  then  comes  the  question  of  moving  the 
goods.  Here  comes  the  art  of  salesmanship,  and  in  this 
art  I  include  the  arrangement  of  the  store,  show-window, 
show-case,  and  the  smile  on  the  face  of  the  clerk. 

If  you  will  investigate  the  historj'^  of  the  most  suc- 
cessful retail  merchants  that  this  country  has  pro- 
duced, you  will  find  that  judgment  in  the  purchase  of 
their  merchandise  and  not  the  obsession  to  buy  some- 
thing cheap,  built  their  reputation  and  their  fortune. 
A.  T.  Stewart,  the  first  of  the  great  merchant  princes, 
grew  from  the  smallest  of  storekeepers,  with  an  origi- 
nal capital  of  less  than  $1,000,  to  a  volume  of  over 
$20,000,000  a  year  on  this  principle — Stewart  assort- 
ments were  selected  with  the  finest  discrimination 
with  the  view  to  their  selling,  not  their  saving  qualities. 

Charles  L.  Tiffany,  founder  of  the  great  world- 
famous  jewelry  house,  started  business  September 
18th,  1837 — the  year  of  the  terrible  national  panic — 
with  but  $500  capital.  In  his  first  three  days  his  total 
receipts  were  but  $4.88.  But  Tiffany  had  what  other 
merchants  didn't  have — taste,  refinement,  judgment, 
and  psychic  sense.  In  buying  his  initial  stock,  he 
aimed  for  distinction  of  its  quality,  and  then,  when 
his  merchandise  arrived,  infused  into  its  display  the 
love  of  an  artist.  Folks  who  came  into  his  store  went 
away  and  told  all  their  friends  of  the  elegant  line  of 
merchandise  he  carried  and  the  exquisite  taste  shown 
in  its  display.  The  day  before  Christmas — three 
months  after  starting — he  took  in  $236,  and  the  day 
before  New  Year's  the  receipts  jumped  for  the  day  to 
$675.  From  that  day  business  soared  higher  and 
higher.  When  the  French  Revolution  of  1848  sent 
Louis  Phillipe  into  exile,  and  his  nobles  into  pawn, 
Tiffany  hurried  to  Europe  and  bought  all  the  diamonds 
of  the  hard-up  aristocrats  and  a  part  of  the  French 
crown  jewels,  including  a  zone  once  worn  by  Marie 
Antoinette.     Tiffany   aimed   high — sought   quality — 


assortment — not  price,  always  keeping  in  mind  their 
selling  appeal. 

Study  the  history  of  Marshall  Field  and  you'll 
observe  the  same  principle  at  work — with  the  same 
result.  Stewart,  Tiffany  and  Field,  besides  using 
judgment  in  what  they  bought,  met  their  customers 
at  the  front  door  with  a  smile  and  insisted  on  their  em- 
ployees doing  likewise. 

Do  Not  Forget  to  Smile 

If  I  were  running  a  retail  store,  I  think  the  first 
thing  I  would  do  every  morning  would  be  to  get  my 
clerks  together  and  say:  "Gentlemen,  now  let  us  all 
smile.  Let  us  see  who  can  put  on  the  best  smile  to 
start  the  day's  work."  If  you  have  a  grouchy  clerk 
in  your  store,  if  you  can  not  cure  him  of  the  grouch, 
put  him  to  work  in  the  basement.  Do  not  let  him  get 
in  front,  where  he  will  come  in  contact  with  your 
customers. 

The  other  day  I  dropped  into  a  cigar  store  and  as  I 
was  lighting  my  cigar,  an  old  man  came  in  and  mum- 
bled something  to  the  clerk.  The  clerk  was  very  sharp 
and  short  in  serving  the  old  man.  As  he  went  out,  the 
clerk  turned  to  me  and  said:  "A  lot  of  dubs  do  come 
in  here."  "Yes,"  I  answered,  "the  only  trouble  with 
that  old  man  is  that  he  is  deaf  and  you  are  not  a  keen 
enough  observer  to  remark  that  fact.  Of  the  two,  my 
dear  boy,  I  think  you  showed  ixp  as  the  dub." 

Let  us  not  forget  that  some  of  the  most  famous  per- 
sonages of  the  world  have  been  hard  of  hearing,  in- 
cluding Beethoven,  the  world's  greatest  musician; 
Julius  Caesar,  the  world's  greatest  soldier;  Dr.  Swift, 
the  world's  greatest  satirist,  and  a  host  of  others  little 
less  distinguished,  among  whom  may  be  mentioned 
Coleridge,  the  poet;  Harriet  Martineau,  the  essayist; 
Sir  Joshua  Reynolds,  one  of  the  world's  great  painters, 
and  our  own  Thomas  Alva  Edison.  Of  the  100,000,000 
inhabitants  of  the  United  States,  an  estimate  was  made 
some  time  ago  that  approximately  3,000,000  suffered 
in  one  degree  or  another  from  impairment  of  the  hear- 
ing sense,  including  the  wives  of  three  of  the  richest 
men  in  America.  Look  out — be  considerate  to  the 
hard  of  hearing — they  can  help  or  hurt  you,  depending 
upon  whether  you  please  or  offend  them. 

Have  you,  as  the  proprietor  of  your  store,  ever  told 
your  clerks  to  look  out  for  the  deaf  and  those  who  can 
hardly  see? 

People  who  are  almost  blind  and  who  are  deaf  are 
very  sensitive  in  regard  to  their  affliction.  Usuallj^ 
you  can  tell  a  deaf  person  because,  strange  to  say,  a 
deaf  person  speaks  in  a  very  low  voice.  You  can  gen- 
erally notice  those  who  have  very  poor  eyesight  be- 
cause they  hesitate  in  walking.  A  retail  clerk  who 
will  study  these  things,  who  will  speak  loud  and  clearly 
to  the  deaf,  and  who  will  take  pains  to  explain  things 
verbally  to  the  almost  blind  is  a  pearl  vpithout  price. 
I  wonder  how  often  in  your  store  you  have  had  your 
clerks  assemble  and  discuss  the  handling  of  different 
kinds  of  customers? 

The  basis  of  all  good  salesmanship  is  to  be  pleasant 
and  agreeable,  and  the  best  way  to  go  into  training  to 
become  a  star  salesman  is  to  start  at  home  by  being 
pleasant  and  agreeable  in  your  oWn  family.  The 
aspiring  young  salesman  should  try  at  the  evening 
dinner  to  entertain  the  family.  He  should  tell  about 
the  amusing  things  that  have  occurred  to  him  during 
the  day ;  but,  better  still,  he  should  try  to  be  amusing 
to  his  family  at  breakfast. 


84 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


April,  1922 


Push  Tire  Sales  In  Spring 

The  best  tire  business  is  the  spring  tire  business  that 
comes  just  when  the  motorists  are  getting  out  their  cars 
after  their  winter  rest.  Even  the  owner  wbo  does  not  have 
his  car  overhauled  or  the  engine  .cleaned  up  takes  the 
care  they  should  of  their  tires  through  the  winter,  and  they 
come  out  in  the  spring  ready  to  blow  out  on  the  first  warm 
day.  If  a  man  does  not  think  he  needs  any  new  tires 
when  he  first  begins  using  the  car  he  is  very  likely  to  find 
out  his  mistake  before  he  has  driven  a  hundred  miles. 

Every  Motorist  is  going  to  want  new  tires,  and  new  tubes, 
and  the  tire  dealer  expecting  this  and  gets  everything  ready 
for  the  rush  before  it  comes,  will  be  able  to  take  care  oif  it 
and  get  the  bulk  of  the  profit  of  the  early  spring  days. 
The  dealer  who  can  handle  the  early  business  right  is  going 
to  please  his  customers  and  make  them  feel  like  continuing 
to  come  to  him  through  the  season. 

The  time  to  start  after  the  spring  business  is  right 
now,  unless  you  have  done  even  better  and  started  before 
this.  You  ought  to  have  your  increased  stock  of  tires  and 
tire  accessories  all  bought  and  delivery  made  or  arranged 
for  to  take  care  of  the  earliest  demands.  You  ought  to  have 
a  good  mailing  list  and  you  should  be  getting  out  letters  to 
this  list,  urging  upon  owners  the  importance  of  having 
their  tires  put  in  condition  before  their  first  country  trip. 

If  vou  want  the  tire  business  of  your  community,  you  can 
get  it.  You  have  all  the  chance  in  the  world  to  land  the 
bulk  of  the  business,  because  no  other  dealer  is  doing  any- 
thing like  all  he  might  to  get  it  himself.  You  ought  to 
advertise  tires  in  the  newspapers,  in  letters  by  mail,  with 
good  window  displays,  roadside  signs  and  signs  on  the 
front  or  side?  of  your  place  of  business.  You  ought  to 
give  your  tire  business  so  much  publicity  that  when  any 
motorist  in  your  town  thinks  of  tires,  he  thinks  of  you. 

Advertising  the  make  of  tires  you  handle,  of  course. 
See  that  people  all  know  what  brands  are  yours,  so  you 
will  profit  by  the  general  advertising  done  by  the  manu- 
factures. Call  on  the  manufacturers  to  supply  you  with 
advertising  and  display  matter  and  use  it.  Don't  change 
makes  every  new  moon.  Pick  out  the  good 
ones  you  want  to  handle  and  stick  to  them, 
so  you  can  profit  by  the  repeat  business  of 
satisfied  buyers,  and  so  you  can  continue 
to  tell  your  people  that  such  and  such  tires 
are  the  best  and  not  have  them  come  bagk 
at  you  with,  "Last  vear  you  told  us  So-and- 
So  tires  were  best." 


Here  is  some  good  material  for  a  circular  letter  on  ad- 
vertisement for  your  tire  department: 

DON'T  TAKE  TIRE  CHANCES 

Tires  are  not  made  of  steel.  Rubber  is  perishable 
stuff  and  the  condition  of  your  tires  this  Spring  depends 
not  only  upon  how  good  they  seemed  to  be  last  Fall,  but 
upon  how  well  you  cared  for  them  through  the  Winter. 

Sometimes  a  tire  is  as  good  as  it  looks,  but  that  is 
not  the  case  when  it  has  stood  all  winter,  especially  if  it 
was  not  deflated,  removed  from  the  rim  and  cleaned. 

There  is  no  economy  in  trying  to  save  the  last  two  or 
three  hundred  miles  in  a  casing.  That  kind  of  economy 
may  land  you  and  your  friends  in  the  ditch.  Get  the  old 
tires  off  and  out  of  the  way  before  they  make  you  trouble. 

Think  of  the  tube,  too.  Why  spoil  a  good  tube,  worth 
three  or  five  dollars,  trying  to  get  a  last  dollar's  worth  out 
of  the  shoe? 

The  best  automobile  economy  calls  for  keeping  the 
car  well  shod,  all  the  tires  in  safe  condition,  at  least.  Let 
us  examine  your  tires  and  prescribe  for  them.  If  you  need 
one  or  more  new  tires  this  Spring,  don't  put  off  getting  them 
until  you  have  to  spend  hours  on  the  road  in  repair  work. 
Put  your  tire  equipment  in  good  condition  for  the  first  trip 
out  in  the  car. 


A  Tire  Newspaper  Ad 

The  Glenfell  Milling  Co.,  Glenfell,  Sask.,  are  exten- 
sive users  of  nevpspaper  advertising.  One  of  their 
recent  effective  announcements  pertaining  to  tires  was 
vporded  as  follovv^s : 

"WE  OFFER  TIRES 
With  records  for  maximum  mileage  service. 
They  cost  less  per  mile  of  service  than  almost 
any  other  tire  we  knovp.  Better  get  a  set  next 
time.  Remember  it  isn't  w^hat  you  pay  but 
what  you  get  for  your  money  that  counts." 
At  the  top  of  the  ad  was  the  sketch  of  a  mechanic 
about  to  put  a  new  tire  on  a  car. 


High  Class  Hardware 

Call  in  and  tee  us.  We  can  show  you  a  good  line  of 

Ranges  and  Heating  Stoves 
Washing  Machines 

Cream  Separators 
Guns,  Rifles  &  Ammunition 
Fishing  Tackle 

Automobile  Accessories  and  Tires 
Dealer  in  Maxwell  Cars — "That  good  Car" 
Genuine  Ford  parts  in  stock 

Special:    See  the  "Tiger"  Tire 

GEORGE  R.  SIMMONS 


Phone  58 


Bracebridge 


T^c  hardv/are  store  8eUs  all  the  year,  while  many 
country  garages  close  during  the  winter  months. 


How  one  Ontario  dealer  advertises  accessories. 


April,  1922 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


35 


The  Gendron  Mfg.  Co.,  Limited 

Makers  of 

Children's  Vehicles 


Our  newest  Ball  Bearing  "  DISCO  "  wheel  coaster.  Made  in  three 
sizes.    Rubber  Tires  only.    Ask  for  our  advertising  matter. 

'^^^  Gendron  Mfg.  Co.,  Limited  Toronto 


LAWN  FURNITURE 

now  seasonable 

Thearrivalof  Spring 
and  it's  beautiful 
days  will  create  a 
big  demand  for 
lawn  furniture.  Will 
you  be  able  to  sup- 
ply your  customers 
with  the  lawn  furn- 
iture they  need? 


Outario  Lawn  Swing 


We  illustrate  here  the  Ontario 
Lawn  Swing,  a  popular  line  at 
this  time  of  year. 

We  make  ladders  of  all  kinds 
camp  cots  one  chairs,  folding 
chairs  and  tables,  park  seats> 
suspended  lawn  swings,  etc. 

Our  Catalogue  "P" 
Is  Free. 


The    Faultlecs  Si  epic  dc  cr 


Stratford  ManufacturingCo.  Ltd. 

Stratford,  Ontario 


DUNLOP 

CORD  TIRES  FABRIC 


Dunlop  Mile-age 


"Mileage"  is  the  magic  word  in  Tiredom  these  days,  and  Dunlop  Tires  right  across  the  continent  are 
rolling  up  record  after  record. 

To  think  about  a  5,000-mile  Tire  is  to  live  in  the  past;  to  talk  about  a  10,000-mile  Tire  is  to  be 
"just  ordinary  ;"  to  dwell  on  a  1  5,000,  20,000,  25,000  mile  Tire  is  to  get  into  that  rubber  sphere 
where  Dunlop  is  pre-eminently  the  leader. 

Ask  for  Dunlop  Cord  and  specify  "Traction."    Then  you  are 
on  your  way  to  a  new  experince. 

Dunlop  Tire  &  Rubber  Goods  Co. 


LIMITED 


Head  Office  and  Factories:  TORONTO 


Branches  in  Leading  Cities 


36 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


Apra,  1922 


Sporting  Goods  Window  Displays 

By  ERNEST  A.  DENCH 

;Many  liardware  dealers  have  not  the  time  to  ^ive  to 
the  phiiiniiifi:  of  new  and  original  displays,  but  they 
stand  ready  to  keep  their  show  windows  attractive  if 
they  can  be  spared  of  the  imaginative  part.  It  is  with 
this  idea  in  mind  that  the  following  displays  have  been 
gathered  fi-om  near  and  far. 

Tires  as  Display  Fixtures 

Holt,  Renfrew  &  Co.,  Quebec  City,  Canada,  utilized 
motor  ear  tires  as  display  fixtures  in  connection  with  a 
window  exhibit  of  leather  motor  coats.  Two  large  cord 
tires  were  used  as  holders  through  which  the  coats  were 
drained.  These  fixtures  i)roved  both  admirable  and  ap- 
proi)riate  for  this  particular  i)urpose.  The  letters  on 
each  side  of  the  tires  were  gilded.  Motoring  gloves, 
scarves  and  goggles  were  exhibited  in  other  parts  of  the 
trim. 

A  Gun  of  Tires 

A  clever  window  displa}'  was  arranged  by  a  Montreal 
concerii.  A  big  cannon  was  rigged  up  in  the  window, 
making  the  gun  proper  from  tires  placed  one  ahead  of 
the  other.  The  tires  ranged  from  the  largest  pleasure 
car  size  down  to  the  motor  cycle.  The  mouth  of  the 
cannon  was  finished  with  a  solid  wheel  foxnii,  while  the 
gun  was  pointed  at  an  angle  of  about  forty-five  degrees. 
The  wheels  of  the  gun  were  made  of  very  large  tractor 
style  truck  tires.  A  background  of  palms  set  off  the 
exhibit  to  effective  advantage. 

Calling  Attention  to  Stock  Carried 

The  Plaunt  Hardware  Co.,  Ottawa,  convinced  anglers 
by  effective  window  displays  that  they  carried  an  exten- 
sive line  of  fishing  tackle.  A  varied  range  of  fishing 
lines  were  exhibited  on  sloping  panels  across  the  rear. 
The  panels  were  covered  with  white  cheese  cloth.  In 
front  of  the  panels  were  three  different  units  composed 
of  sloiMug  steps,  on  which  bait  pails  and  fish  baskets 
were  i)laced.  The  central  exhibit  consisted  of  fishing 
rods  arranged  in  tepee-shape  formation.  The  display 
was  bac^ked  up  by  the  following  card : 

"Let  us  supply  your  wants  in  fishing  tackle. 
We  have  the  finest  assortment  in  Ottawa." 

Preparing  for  Season's  Opening 

The  John  Ilallam  Company,  Toronto,  singled  out  troiit 
fishing  for  an  appropriate  window  display.    A  card  en 
quired : 

"Are  you  prepared  for  the  opening  of  the 
trout  fishing  season?" 
Ruiuiing  from  the  card  was  a  ribbon  streamer,  which 
extended  to  a  calendar  ))asted  on  the  window  glass.  The 
day  on  which  the  trout  fishing  season  opened  was  ringed 
oji  the  calendar. 

A  Timely  Appeal  to  Anglers 

The  Bancroft  Drug  Store,  J>ancroft,  took  newsi)aper 
advertising  .space  to  remiiul  local  fishermen  of  the  open- 
ing of  the  fishing  season.  Their  announcement  stated 
that : 

FISHING  SEASON  OPENS  IN  FOUR 
DAYS 

Remember  we  are  headquarters  for 
FISHING  TACKLE  OF  ALL  KINDS 
Buy  Tackle  that  will  land  the  "BIG  ONES" 


An  Angling  Contest 

Squire's  Hardware  Store,  Brantford,  appealed  to  the 
angler  with  a  timely  contest.  There  was  a  prize  for  the 
largest  small-mouthed  bass,  another  for  the  largest  fish 
caught  in  the  Grand  River,  and  the  third  for  the  biggest 
ti'out.  This  stunt  was  an  excellent  business  producer 
in  that  it  indiiced  local  anglers  to  buy  their  tackle  at 
Squire 's. 

The  Iced  Exhibit 

Nelson's,  Hamilton,  attracted  attention  to  their  win- 
dow display  by  a  large  fish  encised  in  a  block  of  real 
ice.  On  top  of  the  ice  was  a  card  pointing  out  that  this 
fish  was 

"Caught  bv  Mr.  A.  Williamson,  who  used 
OUR  BAIT.  'Weight  ISi/g  pounds."  • 
At  each  side  of  the  exhibit  two  fishing  rods  were  crossed 
lengthways.  Another  card  gave  publicity  to  the  ice 
company  that  froze  the  fish  free  of  charge:  "This  fi.sh 
was  frozen  in  ice  by  Inkselter  &  Myers."  During  the 
spring  and  summer  months,  when  warm  days  make  it 
impossible  to  exhibit  fish  in  their  natural  state,  the  ice 
freezing  stunt  is  an  excellent  one. 

Novel  BTethods  Result  in  Business 

Lisle  Fraser,  A'ancouver,  B.C.,  is  said  to  sell  more  fish- 
ing tackle  than  any  other  Vancouver  store  because  of 
his  unusual  advertising  methods.  Every  Friday  and 
Saturday  during  the  season  a  series  of  bulletins  are 
posted  on  the  windows  of  the  store.  These  bulletins  fur- 
nish information  regarding  the  various  angling  places  in 
the  district,  the  information  for  which  is  supplied  by 
friends  and  scouts.  The  bulletins  tell  how  the  fish  are 
biting  in  several  locations,  what  fish  are  biting,  what 
tackle  should  be  taken  there,  and  the  catches  that  have 
been  made  there,  and  why.  Here  is  one  such  bulletin 
that  caught  my  eye  on  a  recent  trip: 

"Sea  fishing  is  good  sport.    It's  easy  to  get 

bass,  cod,  flounder,  sole,  T(mimy  cod,  rock  cod, 

whiting,  etc.,  anywhere  off'  the  rocks  or  wharves. 

Take  a  boat  and  get  a  little  off  shore,  anchor, 

and  start  fishing.    You'll  have  a  mess  of  fresh 

fish  before  you  know  it." 
Fraser  also  adds  a  little  human  interest  to  his  price 
tickets,  which  are  all  alike — small  white  cards,  with  the 
printing  done  in  black  ink  with  a  sign  writer's  pen,  in 
italics.  In  a  chatty  sort  of  way  something  is  told  about 
each  article,  as  per  the  following  typical  examples : 
"Rods — Rod  makers  use  all  sorts  of  cane,  and 

some  of  them  don't  care  where  it  comes  from. 

The  best  is  from  India.    Split  rod  canes,  $4.00 

to  $25.00." 

"A  good  rod  for  short  trips.  Not  made  for 
hard,  continiious  use,  but  for  the  man  who  is 
learning." 

"English  Willow — These  are  the  quality  one 
expects  in  0\d  Country  Baskets." 

Another  plan  occasionally  resorted  to  is  to  display  on 
Monday  a  catch  of  fish  made  during  the  week  end.  The 
other  Monday  Fraser  had  about  forty  small  trout  neatly 
laid  out  on  a  sheet  of  glass,  decorated  with  fernery.  An 
accompanying  card  gave  the  time  and  place  of  catch, 
iiame  of  the  angler  and  the  tackle  that  he  used. 

The  remaining  displays  deal  with  other  kinds  of  sea- 
sonable sporting  goods. 

The  Timely  Tennis  Trim 

Goodwins,  Ltd.,  Montreal,  put  in  a  display  at  the  time 
of  tiio  Intenuitional  Tennis  Competition,  but  with  the 


April,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


37 


removal  of  the  flags,  it  could  be  wsed  at  any  time.  The 
tennis  net  that  served  to  drape  the  background  was 
caught  up  at  one  side  with  one  group  of  flags  attached. 
The  British,  French  and  American  flags  represented  the 
different  countries  participating  in  the  tournament. 
Tennis  rackets  and  balls  were  scattered  about  the  win- 
dow floor,  with  one  tennis  ball  caught  up  in  the  loop  of 
a  man's  belt.    Tennis  clothing  was  exhibited  on  racks. 

Canoe  as  Window  Feature 

Ketchum  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  Ottawa,  had  an  attractive  dis- 
play of  boating  goods.  The  main  feature  of  this  trim 
was  a  huge,  four-seater  canoe  that  was  suspended  from 
the  ceiling  at  the  centre. 

A  Time  for  Play 

Fawcett  Hardware  Co.,  Ltd.,  Saskatoon,  draped  the 
door  of  their  sporting  goods  trim  with  rose  plush,  with 
dumb-bells  alternately  crossed  and  placed  upright. 
There  were  pairs  of  boxing  gloves  at  each  side  of  the 
trim,  backed  up  by  a  card  at  the  centre : 

"All  work  and  no  play  makes  Jack  a  dull 
boy.  Summer  Sporting  Goods — large  assort- 
ment.   Priced  moderately." 

An  Effective  Display 

The  A.  L.  Schavoir  Co.,  Bridgeport,  put  in  a  simple 
but  effective  display  of  tires.  Both  sides  were  occupied 
by  a  group  of  motor  car  tires,  arranged  in  such  a  man- 
ner that  two  tires  in  one  direction  were  crossed  by  two 
tires  in  the  opposite  direction.  This  produced  the  effect 
of  a  globe.  A  group  in  the  centre  was  arranged  with  a 
broadside  view  of  a  single  tire,  with  three  rolls  of  hose 
pipe  slanting  against  the  lower  edge  of  the  tire  rim. 

Motor  Tourist  Needs 

The  Dancer-Brogan  Co.,  Lansing,  had  a  window  drive 
on  articles  necessary  for  the  comfort  of  the  motor  tour- 
ist. In  the  window  was  a  group  of  automobile  tires, 
with  blankets  artistically  draped  through  them.  Scat- 
tered in  and  out  of  the  tires  were  such  articles  as  thermos 
bottles,  picnic  baskets  and  motor  road  maps. 


ASK  'EM  TO  BUY 

The  Automotive  Equipment  Association  has  been  cre- 
ating selling  enthusiasm  amongst  accessory  dealers  by 
showing  a  film  entitled  "Ask  'Em  to  Buy"  around  the 
country,  and  the  jobbers  and  manufacturers'  salesmen 
have  been  trying  to  make  salesmen  of  the  men  who  sell 
gasoline,  etc.,  at  garages  and  service  stations  throughout 
the  country. 

Harry  Brasier  of  the  Willys-Overland  Sales  Co.,  To- 
ronto, was  one  of  those  who  saw  the  film  and  saw  oppor- 
tunities for  sales  which  had  been  neglected. 

An  accessory  counter  was  established  inside  the  front 
door  and  a  window  devoted  to  accessories.  A  salesman 
to  push  accessories  was  also  employed  and  in  two  weeks 
the  volume  of  accessory  sales  increased  twelve-fold. 

A  special  "First  Aid  Kit  for  Overland  Cars"  was 
also  made  up  in  a  box  attractively  lettered  .  and  suffi- 
ciently large  to  hold  two  headlight  bulbs,  four  spark 
plugs  and  a  block  of  wood  bored  with  holes  into  which 
are  fitted  four  tire  valve  insides,  two  small  light 
bulbs  and  a  spare  switch  knob.  It  retails,  in  this  case, 
for  $6.00,  and  no  difficulty  has  been  experienced  in  sell- 
ing it.  It  has  several  selling  points.  One  of  the  most 
important  is  that  of  arrangement  of  the  plugs,  bulbs, 


etc.,  in  the  box  protects  them  against  breakage  through 
being  jolted  around  in  the  car  owner's  tool  kit. 

The  experience  of  the  Overland  sales  office  has  been 
quite  in  conformity  with  that  of  any  other  business 
establishments  that  have  under  taken  the  merchandis- 
ing of  accessories  on  tlie  "Ask  'Em  to  Buy"  principle. 


Have  a  Fishing  Competition 

Sporting  goods  have  a  fascination  for  every  boy  that 
probably  no  other  line  of  merchandise  can  equal,  and 
while  these  youthful  customers  don't  have  any  great  amount 
of  money  to  spend  as  a  usual  'ihing,  it  is  good  to  have  them 
around  and  they  buy  quite  a  lot  of  goods  in  a  year's  time, 
when  all  the  small  sales  are  totalled. 

Something  for  nothing  appeals  to  the  older  boys  just  as 
it  does  to  the  youngsters,  and  the  sporting  goods  depart- 
ment can  specialize  on  this  trait  lin  connection  with  fishing 
tackle. 

A  prize  was  offered  for  the  first  trout  caught,  for  the  first 
bass,  the  first  pike,  etc.,  and  these  prizes,  in  each  instance 
some  good  item  from  the  stock  of  tackle,  created  consider- 
able interest  among  local  rod  wielders.  The  prize  in  each 
contest  was  claimed  on  the  first  day  the  season  opened  on 
each  species  of  fish. 

In  additio;i  to  prizes  for  the  first  fish  caught,  the  store 
offers  more  substantial  prizes,  also  fishing  equipment,  for 
the  biggest  fish  of  each  of  tlie  several  varieties  of  game  fish 
prevalent  here  caught  during  the  season.  In  this  contest 
the  fish  must  be  brought  to  the  store  and  weighed.  A  record 
of  the  different  big  fellows  is  made  and  posted  in  the  store. 

This  stunt  brings  the  fishermen  in  and  helps  us  to  sell 
a  lot  of  tackle.  Fishermen  like  to  talk  fishing  and  they 
can  usually  find  someone  in  here  who  has  an  interest  com- 
mon with  them.  We  want  our  store  to  be  the  headquaters 
for  fishermen  during  the  season,  and  our  first  catch  and  big 
fish  contests  are  helping  to  bring  ihis  about. 

Conversations  about  fish  and  fishing,  arguments  over  dif- 
ferent kinds  of  tackle  are  a  mighty  good  thing  in  a  sporting 
goods  store.  Fish  stories  very  often  pave  the  way  for  some 
nice  sales  of  tackle. 


TORONTO  RETAILERS  ARE  ACTIVE 

Alex  Henry,  of  the  Sheet  Metal  Products  Company, 
Toronto,  gave  a  very  instructive  talk  on  the  processes  of 
manufacturing  enamehvarc  at  the  April  meeting  of  the 
Toronto  Retail  Hardware  and  Paint  Dealers'  Club  on  April 
10.  Part  of  his  address  was  also  devoted  to  suggestions 
how  to  se'll  enamelware,  Mr.  Henry  giving  the  arguments  in 
favor  of  enamelware  as  against  copper  or  aluminumware, 
being  free  to  make  a  comparison  as  his  firm  manufactures 
kitchenware  of  all  materials. 

The  club  also  discussed  plans  for  the  Clean  Up  and  Paint 
Up  week  in  Toronto,  May  8  to  13,  and  committees  were 
chosen  to  canvas  dealers  in  all  parts  of  the  city  and  district 
for  their  co-operation. 

An  address  on  the  manufacture  and  sale  of  brushes  will 
be  the  feature  of  the  next  monthly  meeting  at  Hunt's  Res- 
taurant, Yonge  and  Blcor  streets,  on  Monday,  May  8  at 
7  p.m.,  this  being  the  first  evening  of  the  "Clean  Up  and 
Paint  Up"  week. 

It  will  pay  any  retail  dealer  to  attend  these  meetings  and 
be  on  hand  promptly.  There's  nothing  so  valuable  in  busi- 
ness as  knowing  and  having  the  friendship  of  other  men  in 
your  same  line  of  business — that  is  if  a  man  doesn't  already 
know  all  that's  worth  knowing — or  thinks  that  he  does. 


3g  ,  HARDWARE    AND   ACCESSORIES  April,  1922 


Pilot  Alerta 


This  made  in  two  sizes:  16"  x  20"  and  20" 
X  20"  oven  so  that  you  can  offer  your  cus- 
tomers a  choice  in  size.  It  is  also  supplied 
with  or  without  reservoir.  From  the  illustra- 
tion you  can  easily  judge  the  beauty  of  this 
handsome  range.  Note  the  bright,  attractive, 
nieel  trimming,  the  white  enamel  and  the 
mirror  in  the  decorative  top. 


THREE  PILOT  RANGES 

We  show  here  some  of  this  handsome 
line  that  brings  business  to  the  hardeware 
merchant  and  satisfaction  and  delight  to 
their  customers. 

Look  over  the  illustrations:  note  the  hand- 
some, striking  appearance  of  the  Alerta. 
This  is  apparent  to  your  customers  at  first 
glance  and  makes  a  favorable  first  impres- 
sion that  paves  the  way  for  you  as  you 
point  out  the  various  convincing  selling 
points  of  this  and  other  members  of  this 
good  line;  such  as,  the  Pilot  Combination 
and  the  Pilot  Quebec. 


The  New  No.  21 

Pilot 
Combination 

This  is  a  handsome  range, 
neatly  and  tastefully  trimmed. 
Not  only  does  it  interest  your 
range  buying  prospects  by  its 
appearance,  but  it  thoroughly 
convinces  them  by  its  features 
of  good  workmanship,  sensible 
design  and  high-grade  mater- 
ials. Notice,  especially,  the 
warming  closets,  and  the  oven 
with  glass  doors  and  thermom- 
eters. The  gas  side  is  free 
fi-oiii   projecting  pipes,  etc. 

Pilot  Quebec 
Heater 

This  is  a  particularly  nice 
looking  Quebec  Heater.  Very 
attractive  in  trim,  having  con- 
siderable nickel  and  white 
enamel  about  it  and  a  decora- 
tive top  with  a  mirror.  This 
has  a'  strong  appeal  to  your 
customers  that  want  a  nice- 
looking  and  extremely  service- 
able Quebec  Heater  with  a  fine 
oven  that  bakes  and  roasts  to 
perfection. 


Pilot  Quebec  Heaters 


PUot  Combination 


April,  1922 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


39 


THE  PILOT  SUPERIOR 

PIPELESS  FURNACE 

Any  handy  man  can  install  it  in  five  hours.    Every  dealer  should  have  one  to  show. 


ONLY 
ONE  REGISTER 

There  is  only  one  principle 
involved  in  the  Pilot  Super- 
ior Pipeless — gravity,  Nat- 
ure's unfailing  force.  Cold 
air,  being  heavier  than 
warm  air,  falls,  and  the  fall- 
ing of  this  cold  air  displaces 
the  warm  air  and  drives  it 
through  the  house. 

The  single  register  acts  as  a 
combination  intake  for  cold 
air.  As  the  warm  air  passes 
through  the  centre  of  the 
register  the  cold  air  drops 
through  the  outside  of  the 
register  down  through  the 
outer  casing,  is  moistened 
by  the  vapor  from  the  large 
water  pan  and  thoroughly 
heated  by  contact  with  the 
radiator  and  other  heating 
surfaces  of  the  furnace. 
Thence  the  warm  air  passes 
through  the  centre  of  the 
register,  providing  health- 
ful, warm  air  for  every  nook 
and  corner  of  the  house, 
continuing  as  long  as  the 
fire  is  burning. 


cold  air        wann  air       cold  air 


Adjustable  Collar 
to  Adapt  Heater  for 
Various  Heights 


Galvanized  Outer 
Casing 


Direct  and  Indirect 
Damper  Handle 


Correctly  Propor- 
tioned Combustion 
Chamber 


Arrangement  for 
Hot  Water  Coil 


Tin  and  Asbestos 
Lined  Galvanized 
Inner  Casing 


Fire  Pot  in  Two 
Sections  to 
Allow  for 
Expansion  and 
Contraction 


Every  Joint 
a  Deep,  Wide 
Cup  Joint 


Large 
Wat^r  Pan 


Anti  Clinker  Four 
Triangular  Grate 
(Simplest  and  Best 
Grate  Ever  Invented) 


Deep^ftordniy  Ash  Pit         Cast  Iron  As™Pit  Bottom  Dust  Damper 


The  HaU  Zryd  Fountlry  Company,  Limited 


Western  Branch:  Post  Office  Box  687,  Winnipeg,  Man. 
Manufacturers  of  pilot  Stoves,  Ranges  and  Furnaces 


Hespeler 


Ontario 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


April,  1922 


ADVERTISING  METHODS  OF  RETAIL  STORES 

inlHIIIIUIIIIIIMiriUMIIIMLIirilJIUHMKIMIIIIIMMIiliniliniMJIIIIMlllUIIIIIIIIIIMIilinnillllNINIIIMIMIIIIIIMIIIMIIIII  IIMIIIIIMIIIIIIMIIIIMIIIIIMIIIMIIIIIMIIMIIIIIIIIMIIIMIMIIIIIMIIIMIMIMIMIIIMIIIMMIMIIMIIIiniinMIIMIIMMIIMIIMMIMIIMMIiniMIIIIMIini^ 

Send  us  your  advertisements  for  discussion  and  comment— Some  current  advertisements  analyzed. 

IJIHIIlllMnUIUIIIIIIIUIIinilllUJMUIII:IIMIinillMlrMniniMMIIinilMIIIIMIIIMIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIMMIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIMIIMIIIIIMIMI^ 


M.  "Weicliel  &  Son,  Elmira,  Out.,  in  a  large  circular 
15  X  20  inches  in  size  announced  a  January  "Mark 
Down"  sale.  "Two  weeks  of  sensational  cut  prices. 
We  must  reduce  our  stock  before  im^entory  and  we've 
made  prices  that  will  do  it,"  said  the  advertisement. 
"Business  has  been  quiet  and  for  that  reason  we  insti- 
tuted this  sale,  which  was  a  success.  We  turned  over 
and  cleaned  out  a  lot  of  Enamel  and  Aluminum  ware. 
Ranjres  were  practically  nil,  although  Ave  cleaned  up 
some  of  the  heaters  and  etc.  We  usually  have  a  sale 
in  January  and  this  year  our  sales  for  the  two  weeks 
were  up  to  previous  years.  We  were  well  satisfied  and 
what  would  have  proven  a  dull  two  weeks,  was  turned 
into  good  business,"  writes  Mr.  Weichel  regarding  the 
results  of  the  sale. 


WEICHEL'S  JANUARY 

Mark  Down  Sale 


There'*  f  »ina  lo  be  »omt  liveW  icUiny  around  here,  from  Jantnry  9lh  to  Janbary  21(1.  Thit  sale  will  be  a  money  makef 
fo»  fow  Two  «*«kt  of  tenaational  cut  pHcca  We  mc*!  reduce  our  dock  before  inventory  and  we've  made  pricet  thai  will  do 
>l    Remember  Jariuarv  Sale  prite*  are  the  loweat  of  the  year  Come  one. come  all,  and  buy  at  liberally  »i  your  pune  will  permil. 

Sale  Starts  January  9th  and  Ends  January  21st. 


ENAMELWARE 


Price.  Cut  to 'Kef  <«o«t  NMcIi 
u-1  Rue*  and  H  -'      BUnk.  tr 


ALLUMINUMWARE 


SPICY 
BARGAINS 

Mitts  &  Gloves 

25  per  ctnl 
DiKounl  on 
.11  Ihoc 

EXTRA  SPECIAL 

Pricei  .11  c^t  to  . 

Furniture 
Polishes 


Some  Rattling  Good  Bart^dir 


  II 


DuriAC  Ihi-  .al.  jc-- 


I  .  REDUCED  TRICE 


M.  WEICHEL  &  SON 

ELMIRA,  ONT.  ^o-^ 


REDUCED  PRICES 


Another  Ontario  retailer  who  is  not  as  live  in  his 
newspaper  and  store  publicity  as  M.  Weichel  &  Son, 
ran  this  ad  in  their  local  paper  in  .January  Last. 

'lUiliiMlli'lli.olini  ^'1  III||:||||M|||||IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIMIMIIIIIIIIIIUIM1IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII! 

I                  COLD  FALL  WEATHER  I 

I  Brings  many   new  needs  about  the  heating  1 

I  plant  in  your  home.  | 

1                    GET  IT  DONE  EARLY  1 

I                         OSCAR  WEILER  | 

I                       Stoves,  Tinware,  etc.  1 

.irniiiii;iiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiniiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiHiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiniiiiiHiMiiiiiiiiHi;Miiiiiiiir 


Community  pride  and  the  saving  spirit  is  appealed 
to  in  the  ad  of  the  W.  W.  Thomas  Hardw^are  Co., 
whose'  store  slogan  is  "Hardware  that  stands  Hard 
wear. ' ' 

The  argument  of  beauty  and  pride  in  attractive 
homes  and  well-kept  lawns  is  effective  with  a  great 
majority  of  the  people.  Indeed,  the  advertisement 
goes  so  far  as  to  intimate  that  its  stock  is  piimarily 
intended  "for  folks  Avho  appreciate  pretty  lawns." 

As  a  matter  of  fact,  there  is  a  subtle  flattery  in  the 
classification  of  "folks  who  appreciate  pretty  lawns." 

^MIIMIMIIMIMIMIIIIIIMMIMMIIMIIIIIMIIIIMIMIMMIIMIIMIMIIIIMIIMIMIMIMIMMIIIMIMI/IMIinllllllllllllMIIIMIIMiHIillnnillllllllllMIM 

I  WHAT  WILL  A  RUN-DOWN  LAWN  COST  | 
I  YOU  ?  1 

I  Ever  stop  to  think  that  indifference  as  to  appear-  | 

I  ances  is  a  costly  thing?    The  man  who  fails  | 

I  to  keep  his  house  well  painted  and  in  good  | 

I  repair,  is  the  man  whose  lawn  is  not  worth  | 

I  spending  a  few  dollars  on.  1 

I  Often  you  ride  past  a  street  of  homes  and  hear  | 

I  the  expression,  "There's  a  beautiful  place!"  | 

I  Think  back  now.    Don't  you  remember  those  | 

I  "beautiful  places,"  set  back  from  green,  well-  | 

I  kept  lawns?  | 

I  Let  us  hope  one  of  these  "beautiful  places"  was  | 

I  yours.    And  for  you  we  have  just  received  a  | 

I  new  lot  of  two-year  guaranteed  | 

I     Garden  Hose,  %  inches,  5-ply,  per  foot  12c  | 

I  For  Folks  Who  Appreciate  Pretty  | 

I  Lawns,  We  Carry  in  Stock —  | 

I  Lawn  Mowers   (14  to  16-inch  blades).  Hose  | 

I  Reels,  Nozzles,  Lawn  Sprinklers,  | 

I  ,           Grass  Catchers,  etc.  | 

I  W.  W.  THOMAS  HARDWARE  CO.  | 

I  " Hardware  That  Stands  Hard  Wear"  | 

=  illlllUIIIIMIHIMIIIIIlllMIMIIIIIIHIIIUIIMlllllllli:i>IUIinMIIIIIIMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIMIIIMJIMIIIIIi;illlMi:illMMMIIMIi:illlllMIIIIMI>ll^ 

No  one  wants  to  acknowledge  that  he  is  indifferent  to 
the  appearances  of  his  home  and  his  property.  If  he 
has  been  neglectful  he  can  be  stirred  to  action  by 
advertisements  of  this  kind.  Emulation  is  easily 
aroused. 


G.  Vincent  White,  advertising  manager  of  the  Sum- 
ner Co.,  Ltd.,  Moncton,  who  recently  won  a  prize  com- 
petition for  the  best  advertisement  of  Philadelphia- 
Made  Hardware,  was  the  author  of  this  gas  heater 
announcement. 

The  ad  is  designed  to  move  gas  heaters  by  pointing 
out  the  disadvantages  of  delay  in  purchasing.  In  this 
appeal  the  ad  is  successful.  This  is  the  sort  of  pub- 
licity needed  to  move  seasonable  stock  which  seem  to 
be  among  the  slow  sellers. 


April,  1922 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


41 


The  copy  angle  which  is  used  in  this  ad  is  a  potent 
appeal.  When  it  is  pointed  out  to  the  reader  that 
delay  in  buying  means  that  he  will  be  compelled  to 
choose  from  stocks  that  have  been  picked  over,  he 

^'MMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIIIIIMIIIIMIMIIIIM  IIIIIIIIIMIIIIMIMII  I  IIIMIMII  Illlllllll  IIIIIIIIIIIIIIMrillMIIIIIIIIIIIII^' 

I  DON'T  PUT  IT  OFF  TOO  LONG!  | 

I  If  You  Are  Going  to  Need  Another  Gas  | 

I  Heater  this  Winter  now  is  the  | 

I  time  to  get  it  set  up  | 

1  Why  wait  till  you  are  freezing  and  | 

I  stocks  are  nearly  all  cleaned  out — and  | 

I  you  have  to  take  Avhat  you  can  get — not  | 

I  what  you  want — and  put  it  up  yourself  | 

i  because  the  pipe  fitters  are  all  busy.  | 

1  NO!  GET  IT  TO-DAY  | 

I  Never  have  we  had  a  better  assortment  | 

I  for  you  to  choose  from  than  we  have  now.  | 

I  Priced  from  $4.00  up.  | 

I  Showroom  second  floor.  | 

1  SUMNER  CO.,  LIMITED,  | 

I  Main  St.,  Moncton,  N.B.  | 

^MMIMininillMiniMIIIIUiniiniJIMIMMIIIIMIMIIMIIIIIIMMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIinHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMMIlllllHMIIIIMIIIMIMIIIIMJrM    ^ 

invariably  responds,  provided  he  intends  to  purchase 
the  article  eventually.  Often  this  sort  of  appeal  makes 
a  sale  when  the  reader  may  have  decided  to  do  without 
the  article. 


"The  Store  That  Saves  You  Money** 

Slogan  of  the  Brace,  McKay  business  at  Summerside,  P.  E.  I. — 
"The  Small  Store  with  the  Big  Business" — Has  Own 
Special  Brand  of  Fox  Wire  netting. 
By  W.  E.  Daley 

THe  store  that  saves  you  money"  is  the  slogan  we  have 
adopted  for  our  business — that  of  Brace  ,McKay  & 
Co.,  Ltd.,,  of  Summerside,  P.  E.  I.    It  might  also 
be  called  "the  small  store  with  the  bag  business." 

The  business  was  founded  thirty  years  ago  by  J.  A.  Brace, 
and  was  incorporated  as  a  joint  stock  company  in  1913, 
with  Creelman  Mac  Arthur  as  President;  L.  R.  Allen,  Vice- 
President;  A.  S.  McKay,  Secretary-treasurer,  and  under 
thorough  supervision  of  these  executive  officers  the  business 
has  flourished  greatly  till  it  has  assumd  its  present-day 
standing  and  it  is  still  going  strong. 

A  general  store  business  is  conducted,  with  hardware  one 
of  the  leading  depar Indents.  Fox  wire  netting  is  one  of  our 
leading  hardware  items  and  is  an  item  which  is  becoming 
more  and  more  important  and  receiving  a  greater  demand 
each  year.  The  raising  of  silver  fox  on  Prince  Edward 
Island  about  fifteen  years  ago  created  a  demand  for  a  wire 
netting  which  possessed  qualities  that  were  lacking  in  the 
ordinary  farm  or  poultry  grade  of  netting.  Having  an  in- 
timate knowledge  of  the  requirements  and  also  with  an  eye 
toward  the  sale  of  such  material  as  an  extra  commodity,  our 
managers  sertmed  an  oversea  agency  from  the  manu- 
facturers, perfected  a  specification  for  a  special  made-to- 
order  gc^lvanized  fox  netting  that  was  instantly  approved  by 
all  the  leading  ranchers  throughout  the  country,  and  today 
enjoys  a  demanad  second  to  none — as  we  are  selling  it  all 
over  Canada  from  the  Atlantic  to  the  Pacific,  throughout  the 


United  States,  and  Newfoundland.  So  much  for  the  fox 
wire  netting. 

GIVE  CUSTOMERS  SQUARE  DEAL 

The  policy  of  this  firm  has  always  been  to  give  the 
customers  every  attention — to  keep  old  ones,  and  create 
new  ones,  giving  each  individual  a  fair  and  square  deal 
and  selling  only  the  best  of  everything — such  as  can  always 
be  recommended.    This  method  pays. 

One  of  the  most  successful  methods  for  increasing  sales 
we  have  found  is  to  get  several  of  the  leading  stores  to 
pool  their  interest  in  obtaining  special  trains  from  the 
Eastern  and  Western  extremities  of  the  Island,  which  gives 
the  people  an  opportunity  of  travelling  on  these  trains  at 
greatly  reduced  rates,  and  at  the  same  time  save  money  on 
many  items  of  the  big  special  sales  which  are  held. 

One  of  our  recent  plans  to  induce  bigger  buying  was  the 
giving  of  a  duplicate  ticket  free  with  every  purchase  of  a 
dollar's  worth  of  goods  in  the  store,  thus  enabling  the  hold- 
er to  guess  the  number  of  beans  in  a  sealed  jar.     This  jar 


Brace,  McKay  &  Co. 


Don't  read  ihia  adv  «nd  lh«n 
forgri  rhai  Bracks  I*  (Ix  b«i( 
place  (0  bvy  rood  furfillur«  Jmii 

I  order  hotitt  In  Canada,  and 
v-lir  reallK  thai  *'*  do  mv« 


CHAUTAUQUA  WEEK 

July  2eth...Aug  lat 


Bed*  You  Mey  Depend 
Upon 
Only 

6.50 


Soe  Our  Line  of 


Buy  at  Braces' 

The  Slon  Thai  Savr*  ^oti  Mancy 


BUY  AT  BRACES 


Just  What  VOU  Want 

IX^T"  Hammo-CoBch 


/^?^'^J\  .  AUTOMOBILE 
ACCESSORIES 


BRACE,  McKAY  &  CO.,  LIMITED 


,.  Ciaotd  Gwit,  *wei,  tt^^ 


BRACE,  McKAY  &  CO.j  LTD 

■  The  Storo  Th«t  Save*  Vou  Money  ' 


was  on  exhibition  in  another  store,  so  that  no  unfairness 
oould  be  charged.  Over  fifty  prizes  were  offered  running 
from  a  flashlight  to  a  phonograph.  This  contest  lasted  a 
week. 

Every  salesman  keeps  a  daily  record  of  his  total  sales; 
cash,  charged  and  returned,  the  totals  of  which  are  cheeked 
up  at  the  end  of  the  day  with  the  totals  obtained  from  the 
general  sales  book,  every  sale  being  thus  accounted  for  and 
duplicated.  At  the  end  of  every  month  a  general  sales  sheet 
is  made  out,  giving  the  totals  of  each  clerk  and  showing  his 
standing  with  reference  to  the  other  salesmen,  also  with  the 
same  month  of  the  previous  year.  This  method  has  heen 
found  of  very  great  importance  because  the  individual 
salesman  then  knows  just  hiw  he  ranks  with  the  others  and 
his  pet  ambition  is  to  gel  at  the  head  of  the  list  next  time. 


Keeping  so  close  to  one's  store  that  one  never  has 
time  to  see  or  find  ont  what  competitors  are  doing- 
is  the  Grand  High  Sign  of  business  palsy. 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


April,  1922 


A 


e  RigiiL  Faint 

THE  COMPLETE 

Right,  because  it's  properly  manufactured  all  the  way 
through.  The  materials  for  the  Agate  family  are 
selected  with  greatest  care.  The  finishes  shown  are 
in  demand  by  every  householder,  not  only  for  new 
work  but  for  refinishing  floors,  woodwork,  radiators, 
furniture  and  for  other  purposes  too  numerous  to 
mention.  Make  the  famous  Agate  family  work  for  you. 

A.  Ramsay  & 


The  All  Candian  Manuacturers  of 


Toronto 


nictirihtitnre  •    EDMONTON  DISTRICT-Revillon  Wholesale 


l^imited,  Edmonton,  Alta. 


CALGARY  DISTRICT- 


April,  192  . 


HARDWARE  AND  ACCESSORIES 


43 


o  Paint  Right" 


AGATE  FAMILY 

This  year,  more  than  ever,  is  a  time  to  display  your 
stock  of  Ramsay's  products.  It  is  going  to  be  a 
building  year  and  merchants  all  over  Canada  are 
planning  for  it.  The  men  who  are  ready  will  get 
the  business.  Ramsay's  products  make  good,  pulling 
displays —exhibit  your  stock  prominently  and  cash 
in  on  larger  sales. 

Son  Company 


Paints  and  Varnishes  since  1842. 


The  McDonald-Baker  Company, 
818  8th  Ave..  Calgary,  Alberta. 


4, 


couvejr 

NOVA  SCOTIA — James  Simmond>,Limited, 
Halifax,  N.S. 


.    «  'Q,^Q  the  surfece  and 
ou  save  all"^^^^ 


44 


HARDWARE   AND  ACCESSORIES 


HOW  THE  RETAILERS  SHOULD  ADVERTISE 

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L.  R.  Greene,  of  Tucketts  Ltd.,  Hamilton,  aud  formerly  of  the  Sherwin-Williams  Company  gives 
some  practical  suggestions  for  successfully  advertising  retail  stores. 

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IN  discussing  retail  advei'tising,  let  us  get  right  down  to 
basic  principles.    Advertising,  to  be  of  any  value  to  the 
retailer,  must  bring  back  to  him  his  investment  plus  a 
profit  in  the  way  of  increased  good  will  or  profitable  sales. 

When  you  mention  advertising  to  the  average  merchant, 
his  mind  is  likely  to  revert  immediately  to  the  idea  of  putting 
a  few  advertisements  in  the  newspaper,  sending  out  a  few 
circulars,  putting  up  a  few  signs,  any  one  or  all  of  these 
things.    That,  to  his  mind,  is  advertising. 

Such  a  merchant  is  not  likely  to  be  a  very  successful 
advertiser  unless  he  gets  a  much  broader  idea  of  what  adver- 
tising really  means.  The  first  thing  he  must  consider  is 
what  impression  his  business  makes  upon  those  who  should 
or  do  trade  with  him;  the  people  who  occasionally  visit  his 
store  and  buy  his  goods.  Do  they  go  away  with  a  good  im- 
pression as  to  what  they  have  bought  and  the  treatment 
they  have  received?  Do  they  like  your  store,  your  clerks, 
the  way  you  arrange  and  display  your  merchandise?  In 
fact,  does  the  atmosphere  of  your  business  impress  them 
favorably  or  are  there  things  in  your  organization  and  in 
the  way  you  handle  your  business  which  are 
objectionable  to  the  average  customer  and 
which  must  be  corrected,  if  you  are  to  make 
full  progress? 

Remember  this,  you  advertise  whether 
you  wish  to  or  not.  It  is  optional  with  you 
as  to  whether  you  put  an  advertisement  in 
the  newspaper;  as  to  whether  you  send  out 
a  circular;  but  as  long  as  you  are  in  business, 
there  is  one  kind  of  advertising  working  for 
or  against  your  business.  You  cannot  avoid 
it  and,  therefore,  it  is  of  primary  importance 
you  give  it  first  consideration.  I  refer  to 
the  appearance  of  your  store,  the  appear- 
ance of  your  windows,  the  attitude  and  ser- 
vice rendered  by  your  staff  to  the  buying 
public.  Untidiness,  carelessness,  lack  of 
courtesy,  if  they  are  in  your  business,  are 
very  much  in  evidence  of  your  customers 
and  so  repel  them  and  create  an  unfavorable 
impression,  which  drives  them  to  other  mer- 
chants for  their  purchases. 

So,  surely,  the  first  thing  to  consider  in 
retail  advertising  is  the  appearance  of  your 
store,  the  arrangement  of  your  stock,  the 
attitude  and  training  of  your  staff,  and  this  big  question  of 
service  to  the  buying  public. 

Picture  Business  in  Your  Mind 
After  this  convention,  when  you  go  back  to  your  business, 
just  for  an  hour  or  so,  forget  all  the  other  important  things 
and  helpful  suggestions  you  have  received  and  try  and  get  a 
fresh  impression  of  your  business.  Is  your  stock  well 
arranged?  Is  it  properly  displayed?  Is  your  store  neat  and 
tidy?  You  may  or  may  not  be  in  a  position  to  buy  the 
latest  and  up-to-date  fixtures,  but  that  is  neither  here  nor 
there,  so  far  as  giving  the  proper  display  to  the  goods  that 
you  handle  and  the  keeping  of  your  stock  neat,  tidy  and  well 
arranged.  Remember  that  when  a  customer  comes  into  your 
place  of  business  to  buy  a  certain  thing,  if  your  stock  gener- 
ally is  well  arranged  and  well  displayed,  he  may  see  a  dozen 
other  things  he  needs.  He  may  buy  them  at  the  time  or  he 
may  make  a  mental  note  and  come  back  later.  This  fact  is 
recognized  by  the  successful  chain  store  systems.  You  go 
into  a  "5  and  10  Cent  Store"  and  you  find  all  their  stock  is 
so  displayed  that  it  catches  the  eye  of  the  shopper.  It  is  not 
piled  away  in  packages  on  the  shelves,  but  is  laid  out  where 
the  pro.'jpective  buyer  can  see  it.  The  method  of  display  used 
by  the  h  and  10  cent  stores,  sells  far  more  goods  for  them 
than  the  work  of  the  clerks  behind  the  counter.  The  goods 
.sell  themselves  as  it  were.  They  say,  "Here  I  am,  look  me 
over,  I  am  worth  so  much."  How  much  actual  selling  does 
the  average  clerk  in  a  5  and  10  cent  store  do?  Practically 
none.  It  is  nearly  altogether  a  matter  of  clever  display. 
Remember  that. 


L.  R.  GREENE, 
Hamilton,     former  advertising 
manager    of    Sherwin  Wiliam;*, 
Limited 


counter  room.  True;  but  there  are  innumerable  items  in 
your  stock  which  you  could  display  and  which  are  tucked 
away  in  odd  corners,  and  possibly  even  you  have  forgotten 
some  of  them. 

It  does  not  matter  where  your  business  is  situated,  in 
the  big  city  or  the  small  town.  The  principle  of  display 
applies  in  either  case  and  the  sooner  you  grasp  its  possibili- 
ties and  study  it  out  for  your  business,  the  bigger  will  be 
your  returns.  Don't  thinlt  this  matter  of  display  simply 
means  piling  goods  on  the  counter,  any  old  way;  have  some 
system  and  method  in  your  efforts  along  this  line  and  you 
will  get  good  returns. 

Then  there  is  the  personal  factor  in  your  business.  What 
about  your  clerks?  Are  you  yourself  setting  them  a  good 
example  in  handling  and  treating  your  customers  courteously, 
or  are  you  simply  leaving  the  boy  to  do  the  best  he  can  and 
follow  his  natural  inclinations,  some  of  which  are  right  and 
some  of  which  are  wrong?  What  about  a  meeting  once  a 
week  with  the  boys  to  go  over  the  new  lines  of  goods  which 
have  come  in  during  that  week  and  a  discussion  of  the  selling 
points  and  the  opportunity  for  their  sale? 
Are  you  carefully  scanning  all  the  literature 
you  receive  from  manufacturers  of  the  lines 
you  handle  and  passing  the  good  pieces  along 
to  the  boys  so  they  can  study  them  and  get 
the  talking  points? 

A  salesman  calls  on  you;  he  has  a  good 
product,  he  talks  it  well,  emphasizing  its 
selling  points.  You  buy,  but  do  you  get  the 
boys  together  at  the  time  for  five  or  ten 
minutes,  or  perhaps  that  same  evening,  and 
say,  "Here!  Mr.  Jones,  you  have  sold  me 
your  goods  because  you  have  put  up  selling 
points  to  me  which  have  convinced  me  of 
their  merit,  now  pass  these  same  selling 
points  along  to  my  staff  so  that  when  those 
goods  arrive  in  this  store,  we  will  be  able  to 
sell  them  to  the  consumer." 

Trade  Papers  an  Inspiration 

A  great  source  of  information  are  the 
up-to-date  trade  papers.  You  probably  get 
and  you  read  them,  but  do  you  see  that  your 
staff  also  have  the  benefit  of  the  information 
they  contain? 

Now  you  may  say,  you  thought  this  was 
to  be  a  talk  about  retail  advertising,  but  isn't  the  talking  of 
the  goods  you  sell  to  your  customers  on  the  part  of  your 
clerks,  advertising?  Isn't  what  favorable  things  your  cus- 
tomers say  about  your  business  to  their  friends,  about  the 
good  service  and  the  goods  you  sell,  good  advertising?  Most 
assuredly  it  is,  and  if  it  is  favorable  it  is  the  best  kind  of 
advertising  you  can  get.  If  it  is  unfavorable  it  is  most 
harmful  advertising  that  you  can  receive. 

What  about  your  window?  There  you  have  one  of  the 
greatest  advertising  opportunities  possible  to  have  and  your 
windows  will  insist  upon  advertising.  If  they  are  untidy, 
dirty  and  neglected  are  they  not  likely  to  give  just  such  an 
impression  to  the  man  who  passes  your  store?  And  so  he 
sizes  up  your  business.  If  they  are  neat,  clean,  well-dressed, 
filled  with  attractive  merchandise,  they  are  working  every 
minute  to  sell  goods  for  you  and  also  to  create  good  will. 

It  is  so  obvious  that  properly  cared  for  windows  are  good 
advertising  that  it  is  astonishing  any  merchants  neglect 
them.  Let  us  take  a  lesson  from  the  great  departmental 
stores,  which  spend  thousands  and  thousands  of  dollars  on 
their  window  trimming.  They  realize  there  is  no  better  ad- 
vertising than  a  well-dressed  window.  If  that  is  so  in  the 
cities,  where  competitio