Skip to main content

Full text of "History of Worcester County, Massachusetts"

See other formats


/ 


HISTORY 


OF 

WORCESTER  COUNTY 

MASSACHUSETTS 


SUPERVISING  EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

ELLERY  BICKNELL  CRANE 

Former  Librarian  of  Worcester  Society  of  Antiquity  (now  the  Worcester  Historical 
Society),  Editor  of  Its  Proceedings  and  Former  President,  Author  “Raw- 
son  Family  Memorial,”  “The  Crane  Family,”  “History  of  the 
15th  Regiment  in  the  Revolution,”  and  Other  Works 


STAFF  HISTORIAN 

E.  MELVIN  WILLIAMS 

OF  NEW  YORK  CITY 

Historical  Editor  of  “ Americana ,”  Author  of  “Lancaster  County,  Pennsylvania,  A 
History”  1924 ;  “ Municipality  of  Buffalo,  New  York,  A 
History,  1721-1923,”  and  Earlier  Works 


VOLUME  III 


LEWIS  HISTORICAL  PUBLISHING  COMPANY,  Inc., 

NEW  YORK  AND  CHICAGO 
1924 


COPYRIGHT,  1924 

LEWIS  HISTORICAL  PUBLISHING  COMPANY,  Inc., 
NEW  YORK  AND  CHICAGO 


WORCESTER  COUNTY 

MASSACHUSETTS 


Digitized  by  the  Internet  Archive 

in  2019 


«i 


https  ://arch  i  ve .  o  rg/detai  Is/h  istoryofwo  rcest03cran 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


8t 


comb)  Ellis,  was  born  at  Bolton,  Massachusetts,  and  died 
in  Springfield,  January  21,  1877,  when  Albert  Nelson 
Ellis  was  only  a  child. 

Albert  Nelson  Ellis  was  born  at  Enfield,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  March  29,  1871.  The  family  removing  to  Athol 
when  he  was  a  child  and  not  long  afterward  making  a 
second  change  to  Springfield,  it  was  in  the  public  schools 
of  the  city  of  Springfield  that  his  education  was  re¬ 
ceived.  At  the  age  of  seventeen  years  Mr.  Ellis  returned 
to  Athol,  and  on  August  22,  1888,  entered  the  employ 
of  his  grandfather,  Nelson  Whitcomb,  in  the  coal  busi¬ 
ness.  He  was  active  in  this  connection  until  the  year 
1894,  when  he  bought  the  interest,  changing  the  name 
to  Albert  N.  Ellis  &  Company,  but  only  a  few  years 
later,  on  July  1,  1897,  he  sold  the  business,  to  accept  a 
position  with  the  firm  of  Bates  Brothers,  one  of  the 
leading  manufacturing  concerns  of  Athol,  producers  of 
pocketbooks.  Upon  the  incorporation  of  this  concern 
in  the  year  1898,  Mr.  Ellis  was  made  secretary  of  the 
company  and  later  became  assistant  treasurer.  In  the 
year  1914,  upon  the  death  of  his  father-in-law,  George 
D.  Bates,  who  for  many  years  had  been  treasurer  of 
the  corporation,  Mr.  Ellis  succeeded  to  that  office,  which 
he  still  ably  fills  at  the  present  time. 

Mr.  Ellis  is  affiliated  with  the  financial  world  of  Athol 
as  a  director  of  the  Millers  River  National  Bank,  and 
is  broadly  interested  in  all  that  pertains  to  civic  and  in¬ 
dustrial  advance.  He  was  recently  elected  delegate  to 
the  State  Chamber  of  Commerce,  after  having  been  a 
member  of  the  Athol  Board  of  Trade  for  many  years, 
and  during  the  past  three  years,  president  of  that  body. 
Politically  Mr.  Ellis  was  formerly  an  adherent  of  the 
Democratic  party,  but  now  holds  independent  convic¬ 
tions  and  gives  his  influence  to  whatever  party  or  candi¬ 
date  he  believes  best  suited  to  meet  the  needs  of  the 
people.  For  twelve  years  he  served  as  a  member  of 
the  school  committee,  but  has  otherwise  never  accepted 
political  honors.  During  the  World  War  Mr.  Ellis  was 
active  as  a  member  of  Company  E,  20th  Regiment, 
Massachusetts  State  Guard,  and  was  sent  to  Boston,  Sep¬ 
tember  10,  1919,  and  was  returned  on  October  11,  of  the 
same  year.  He  was  on  duty  during  the  intervening 
period  at  Scollay  Square,  Boston,  this  unit  being  active 
in  the  quelling  of  the  strikes  and  riots  of  that  period. 
Mr.  Ellis  enlisted  as  a  private,  was  later  made  corporal 
and  was  mustered  out  of  the  service  second  lieutenant. 
Active  in  all  that  counts  for  community  advance  and  pub¬ 
lic  welfare,  he  has  served  for  some  years  as  president  of 
the  Athol  branch  of  the  Massachusetts  Society  for  the 
Prevention  of  Cruelty  to  Children.  Fraternally  Mr. 
Ellis  is  widely  prominent,  being  a  member  of  Star 
Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted  Masons,  of  which  he  served 
as  Master  in  iqoi  and  in  1913;  Union  Chapter,  Royal 
Arch  Masons ;  Harris  Council,  Royal  and  Select  Mas¬ 
ters,  all  of  Athol ;  also  Athol  Commandery,  Knights 
Templar;  and  1914  was  District  Deputy  Grand  Master 
of  the  Masonic  order.  He  is  further  a  member  of 
Lodge  No.  1296,  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of 
Elks,  of  Greenfield,  Massachusetts;  and  of  Tully  Lodge, 
Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows.  His  clubs  are  the 
Poquaig,  of  Athol,  of  which  he  is  vice-president;  and 
the  Greenfield  Country.  In  religious  endeavor  Mr.  Ellis 
has  long  borne  a  constructive  part,  being  a  member  of 
Hope  Congregational  Church  of  Springfield,  and  also  of 


the  First  Church,  Unitarian,  Inc.,  of  Athol.  Pie  was 
one  of  the  moving  spirits  in  the  agitation  which  resulted 
in  the  combining  of  the  First  and  Second  Unitarian 
churches  of  Athol  into  one  body,  which  is  now  called 
the  First  Church  Unitarian,  Inc.,  and  has  acted  as  col¬ 
lector  for  this  parish  for  twenty  years.  Mr.  Ellis  is 
one  of  the  foremost  men  of  this  community,  and 
although  he  has  never  accepted  public  responsibility  of 
any  great  importance,  he  is  one  of  the  most  influential 
men  in  the  progress  of  all  forward  movements. 

Mr.  Ellis  married,  in  Athol,  Massachusetts,  Maude 
Emily  Bates,  who  was  born  at  Montague,  Massachusetts, 
December  24,  1870,  the  ceremony  taking  place  June  20, 
1894.  Mrs.  Ellis  is  a  daughter  of  George  D.  and  Har¬ 
riet  Wheat  (Warner)  Bates.  Her  father,  who  died 
February  5,  1914,  had  been  a  leading  manufacturer  of 
Athol  since  1870.  He  was  a  native  of  South  Deerfieldj 
Massachusetts,  and  his  mother,  who  was  born  at  Green¬ 
field,  Massachusetts,  died  at  Athol,  in  the  year  1876. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Ellis  have  two  children :  Margaret,  who 
was  born  at  Athol,  July  16,  1904,  is  a  graduate  of  Athol 
High  School,  class  of  1922,  and  is  now  a  student  at  the 
Boston  Conservatory  of  Music,  specializing  on  the  piano 
and  organ;  and  Richard  Bates,  born  at  Athol,  May  27, 
1906,  now  attending  Athol  High  School.  The  beautiful 
Ellis  residence,  at  No.  124  Ridge  Avenue,  Athol,  is  the 
center  of  a  wide  social  circle. 


PATRICK  F.  CANNON,  a  man  of  sterling  char¬ 
acter,  whose  natural  qualities  for  leadership  have  won 
for  him  many  honors  at  the  hands  of  his  associates,  has 
been  for  nearly  twenty  years  a  practicing  attorney  in 
Clinton.  Mr.  Cannon  is  of  Irish  birth  and  parentage, 
having  been  born  in  County  Galway,  Ireland,  February 
10,  1861.  Both  his  parents  were  born  on  Bobbin  Island. 
The  father,  Arthur  Cannon,  who  was  engaged  in  farm¬ 
ing  throughout  his  life,  died  in  1904.  The  mother,  who 
before  her  marriage  was  Bridget  O’Malley,  died  in  1886. 

Mr.  Cannon  acquired  his  early  education  in  the  public 
schools  of  his  native  land,  supplemented  with  studies  in 
the  Clinton  schools  after  the  removal  of  the  family  to 
this  country.  He  next  took  a  commercial  course  at 
Bryant  &  Stratton’s  Business  College,  after  which  he 
attended  the  Boston  University  Law  School,  and  was 
admitted  to  the  Massachusetts  bar  in  1904.  Immediately 
opening  his  office  in  Clinton,  he  began  to  build  up  a  prac¬ 
tice,  meeting  with  flattering  success,  and  has  continued 
to  follow  his  profession  throughout  the  years  to  the 
present  time.  His  office  is  located  in  the  Bank  Block. 

In  leading  social,  religious,  and  political  circles,  as 
well  as  professional,  Mr.  Cannon  has  always  played  a 
conspicuous  part  in  the  community  life  of  Clinton, 
bringing  the  weight  of  his  influence  to  bear  upon  what¬ 
ever  project  was  proposed  for  the  improvement  of  con¬ 
ditions  here.  In  political  life  he  is  high  in  the  councils 
of  the  Democratic  party,  and  for  seven  years  served  as 
secretary,  treasurer  and  chairman  of  the  Democratic 
Town  Committee.  He  also  was  solicitor  for  the  town 
of  Clinton  for  two  years.  He  is  a  devout  communicant 
of  St.  John’s  Roman  Catholic  Church  of  Clinton,  and 
very  active  in  various  prominent  Catholic  organizations. 
In  the  Ancient  Order  of  Hibernians  in  Clinton  he  has 
filled  all  the  offices  of  the  order,  including  those  of  the 
president  and  treasurer  of  the  Clinton  order,  president  of 


Wor — 6 


82 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


the  county  order,  secretary  of  the  State  organization, 
and  vice-president  of  the  national  order.  Of  the  Massa¬ 
chusetts  Catholic  Order  of  Foresters  he  has  been  Chief 
Ranger  and  treasurer,  as  well  as  Deputy  High  Chief 
Ranger.  He  is  also  a  prominent  member  of  St.  John’s 
Temperance  Society,  and  of  the  Benevolent  and  Protec¬ 
tive  Order  of  Elks.  For  two  years  he  served  as  presi¬ 
dent  of  the  Clinton  Chamber  of  Commerce,  and  has 
always  been  one  of  its  most  influential  members. 

The  marriage  of  Mr.  Cannon  and  Mary  A.  McGrath, 
of  Clinton,  took  place  in  1906,  and  they  have  one  child, 
Arthur  P.  Cannon,  who  was  born  here  March  21,  1908. 


DR.  GEORGE  MOSSMAN — In  choosing  the  med¬ 
ical  profession  as  the  field  of  his  life  work  Dr.  Moss- 
man  followed  in  the  footsteps  of  his  honored  father 
and  in  his  success,  his  choice  has  been  well  justified.  Dr. 
Mossman  comes  of  Scotch  and  English  ancestry,  and  is 
a  son  of  Dr.  Alvero  E.  and  Mary  A.  (Eacott)  Moss¬ 
man,  his  father  of  Scotch  parentage  and  his  mother  a 
native  of  London,  England.  Dr.  Alvero  E.  Mossman 
was  born  in  Sweetland,  California,  his  parents  having 
crossed  the  plains  to  that  State  from  Illinois  in  a 
prairie  schooner  at  the  time  of  the  gold  rush  in  1849. 
They  returned  to  the  East  via  the  Isthmus  of  Panama, 
thence  by  boat  to  New  York  City  and  located  in  Dracut, 
in  the  vicinity  of  Lowell,  Massachusetts.  Thirteen 
years  of  age  when  he  became  a  resident  of  this  State, 
Alvero  E.  Mossman,  upon  the  completion  of  his  elemen¬ 
tary  and  preparatory  studies,  entered  Bellevue  Hospital 
Medical  College,  in  New  Yoi'k  City,  and  was  graduated 
in  the  class  of  1884.  Locating  in  Westminster,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  he  followed  the  practice  of  medicine  until  his 
death,  which  occurred  December  19,  1913.  Prominent 
in  medical  circles  in  the  East,  he  was  a  member  of  the 
first  medical  staff  of  the  Henry  Heywood  Memorial 
Hospital,  of  Gardner,  and  had  an  extensive  practice  in 
the  town  of  Gardner,  as  well  as  in  Westminster.  He 
was  active  in  civic  affairs  in  both  communities  and  was 
well  known  fraternally,  having  been  a  member  of  all  the 
Masonic  bodies  up  to  and  including  the  commandery. 
The  mother  survived  her  husband  for  nearly  two  years, 
passing  away  August  6,  1915.  They  were  married  in 
Lowell,  in  1878. 

George  Mossman,  son  of  these  parents,  was  born  at 
Westminster,  Massachusetts,  November  16,  1889.  His 
education  was  begun  in  the  local  public  schools  and  he 
later  attended  Fitchburg  High  School,  then  Cushing 
Academy,  at  Ashburnham,  Massachusetts,  and  was  grad¬ 
uated  from  that  institution  in  the  class  of  1909.  He  then 
took  one  year  of  pre-medical  work  at  Harvard  Uni¬ 
versity,  after  which  he  entered  the  college  of  medicine 
at  Burlington,  Vermont,  from  which  institution  he  re¬ 
ceived  the  degree  of  Doctor  of  Medicine  upon  his  grad¬ 
uation  with  the  class  of  1914.  One  year’s  internship 
followed  at  the  Burbank  Hospital  at  Fitchburg,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  also  a  year’s  internship  at  the  Carney  Hos¬ 
pital,  at  Boston,  Massachusetts,  where  he  had 
charge  of  the  special  work  in  orthopedic  sur¬ 
gery.  With  this  excellent  and  unusually  compre¬ 
hensive  preparation  Dr.  Mossman  entered  upon  the 
private  practice  of  medicine  in  Westminster  in  1916,  then 
in  December,  1921,  he  removed  to  Gardner,  where  he  now 
resides.  He  still  retains  his  Westminster  office  and 


divides  his  time  between  that  community  and  the  city  of 
Gardner,  his  practice  being  very  extensive  in  both  places. 
Dr.  Mossman  stands  high  in  the  profession,  is  assistant 
surgeon  and  obstetrician  at  the  Henry  Heywood  Me¬ 
morial  Hospital,  of  Gardner,  and  is  dispensing  physician 
for  the  Society  for  the  Prevention  and  Control  of  Tu¬ 
berculosis,  of  Gardner.  Dr.  Mossman  is  a  member  of 
the  American  Medical  Association,  the  Massachusetts 
State  Medical  Society,  and  the  Worcester  North  District 
Medical  Society,  also  the  Gardner  Medical  Society.  In 
October,  1917,  Dr.  Mossman  enlisted  in  the  United 
States  Medical  Corps  and  was  assigned  to  the  ortho¬ 
pedic  section,  going  to  France  with  Base  Hospital  Unit 
No.  1 14,  in  May,  1918.  He  saw  much  service  in  France 
with  this  unit  at  Beau  Desert,  and  was  later  transferred 
to  Buffalo  Unit  Hospital,  at  Vittel,  France,  where  he 
remained  until  the  signing  of  the  armistice.  He  was 
then  returned  to  Base  Hospital  No.  114,  and  reaching 
the  United  States  on  July  1,  1919,  received  his  honorable 
discharge  from  the  service  on  the  fourth  day  of  the 
same  month.  He  was  commissioned  first  lieutenant  on 
his  enlistment  and  was  promoted  to  the  rank  of  captain 
during  his  period  of  service.  Dr.  Mossman  is  a  mem¬ 
ber  of  Burlington,  (Vermont)  Lodge,  No.  100,  Free  and 
Accepted  Masons;  Burlington  Chapter  No.  3,  Royal 
Arch  Masons;  Rajah  Temple,  of  Reading,  Ancient 
Arabic  Order  Nobles  of  the  Mystic  Shrine ;  and  Calwell 
Consistory,  of  Bloomsburg,  Pennsylvania,  Ancient  Ac¬ 
cepted  Scottish  Rite.  He  is  also  a  member  of  Gardner 
Lodge,  No.  1426,  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of 
Elks.  His  chief  relaxation  is  water  sports  and  golf, 
and  he  is  a  member  of  the  Gardner  Boat  Club,  the 
American  Legion,  and  the  Oak  Hill  Country  Club,  of 
Fitchburg. 

Dr.  Mossman  married,  on  June  25,  1921,  Esther  Jane 
Curtis. 


FRANK  L.  MacNEILL,  as  president  of  the  New 
England  Envelope  Company  of  Worcester,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  holds  a  leading  position  in  executive  circles  in  the 
industrial  life  of  Worcester,  Massachusetts.  A  native 
of  Nova  Scotia  he  has  been  a  resident  of  the  United 
States  since  his  youth,  and  during  the  greater  part  of 
the  time  has  been  identified  with  the  business  life  of 
Worcester.  He  is  a  son  of  Joseph  L.  and  Joanna  A. 
(Israel)  MacNeill.  His  father  was  a  sea  captain,  and 
sailed  from  Baltimore  and  Philadelphia  to  foreign 
countries,  his  vessels  carrying  grain. 

Frank  L-  MacNeill  was  born  in  Freeport,  Nova 
Scotia,  August  15,  1870.  Receiving  a  practical  education 
in  the  public  schools  of  his  birthplace,  he  left  home  at 
the  age  of  seventeen  years,  and  coming  to  Boston,  he 
secured  a  position  with  the  Bay  State  Watch  Case 
Company,  manufacturers  of  watch  cases.  There  he  was 
active  in  office  work  for  about  one  year,  after  which  he 
came  to  Worcester  and  secured  employment  with  C.  H. 
Ellsworth,  a  leading  dry  goods  merchant,  then  in  the 
Burnside  Building.  Remaining  in  this  connection  for 
about  six  months,  he  later  entered  the  employ  of  the 
W.  H.  Hill  Envelope  Company.  Forming  this  connec¬ 
tion  with  a  view  to  permanency  Mr.  MacNeill  began  in 
the  packing  department,  then  later  served  in  the  ship¬ 
ping  department,  eventually  going  into  the  office  and 
continuing  with  that  firm,  in  all,  for  about  nineteen  years. 


. 

.  ->■ 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


83 


Then,  in  November,  1906,  he  began  the  manufacture  of 
envelopes  independently,  under  the  name  of  the  New 
England  Envelope  Company.  Mr.  MacNeill  acted  as 
superintendent  of  the  plant,  also  directing  the  business 
office  of  the  enterprise  personally,  and  went  forward  until 
February  22,  1922,  when  the  concern  was  reorganized, 
Mr.  MacNeill  becoming  president,  and  Charles  I.  New¬ 
ton,  treasurer.  This  concern  has  attained  a  very  high 
position  in  local  business  circles  and  also  in  the  trade 
generally,  their  product  being  distributed  widely  in 
the  East.  As  the  head  of  the  organization,  Mr.  Mac¬ 
Neill  is  doing  much  to  carry  the  interest  constantly  for¬ 
ward,  and  his  practical  ability  has  long  since  placed  it 
on  a  stable  and  enduring  foundation.  He  is  further  in¬ 
terested  in  the  business  world  of  Worcester  as  president 
of  the  Standard  Paper  Goods  Manufacturing  Company, 
and  is  a  member  of  the  Worcester  Chamber  of  Com¬ 
merce.  Fraternally,  Mr.  MacNeill  is  widely  prom¬ 
inent,  being  a  member  of  Morning  Star  Lodge,  Free  and 
Accepted  Masons;  Worcester  Chapter  Royal  Arch 
Masons ;  Hiram  Council,  Royal  and  Select  Mas¬ 
ters;  Worcester  Lodge  of  Perfection;  Goddard  Coun¬ 
cil,  Princes  of  Jerusalem;  Lawrence  Chapter,  Rose 
Croix ;  Massachusetts  Consistory,  Ancient  Accepted 
Scottish  Rite;  and  Alethia  Grotto;  also  Aleppo  Temple, 
Ancient  Arabic  Order  Nobles  of  the  Mystic  Shrine.  He 
is  a  member  of  the  Economic  Club  of  Worcester,  and  his 
political  convictions  align  with  the  principles  of  the  Re¬ 
publican  party,  but  he  is  never  an  office  seeker.  He 
attends  the  South  Baptist  Church. 

Mr.  MacNeill  married,  in  Worcester,  on  December  12, 
1892,  Florence  M.  Wright,  daughter  of  Horace  and  Mary 
Wright,  and  they  have  two  children:  Stanley  W.,  born 
September  22,  1895;  and  Phyllis  M.,  born  September  16, 
1899,  now  the  wife  of  E.  E.  Eaton,  and  they  have  one 
son,  Albert  Conrad  Eaton. 


CLARENCE  G.  STEVENS,  of  Worcester,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  in  one  of  the  most  necessary  and  practical  lines 
of  commercial  endeavor,  is  bearing  a  part  in  the  public 
welfare  and  achieving  large  success.  As  one  of  the 
younger  executives  of  the  city  he  fills  a  responsible 
position  in  one  of  the  oldest  enterprises  of  its  kind  in 
Worcester  County,  for  many  years  known  under  the 
firm  name  of  the  Genery  Stevens  Company,  wholesale 
dealers  in  butter,  eggs,  cheese,  lard,  and  flour,  with  the 
most  complete  and  modern  cold  storage  facilities. 

Genery  Stevens,  founder  of  this  business,  was  born 
in  Athol,  Massachusetts,  and  died  in  the  city  of  Wor¬ 
cester,  August  1,  1921,  aged  seventy-five  years  and  one 
month.  His  first  business  experience  in  the  field  in 
which  he  won  distinction  was  gained  in  the  employ  of  a 
dealer  named  Heslor,  whose  organization  he  entered 
in  1867.  During  the  two  years  in  which  he  was  con¬ 
nected  with  this  interest  he  became  thoroughly  familiar 
with  the  business,  and  in  1869  established  his  own  interest 
in  partnership  with  a  Mr.  Chamberlain.  This  affili¬ 
ation  continued  for  about  five  years,  the  location  of  the 
business  being  at  No.  525  Main  Street,  Worcester, 
Massachusetts.  The  firm  was  known  as  Stevens  & 
Chamberlain  until  1874,  when  Mr.  Stevens  purchased 
the  interest  of  his  partner.  Later,  when  his  son,  William 
A.  Stevens,  became  sixteen  years  of  age,  he  was  re¬ 
ceived  into  the  organization  as  an  employee,  and  event¬ 


ually  became  the  head  of  the  firm.  Meanwhile,  the 
scope  of  the  business  was  widened,  and  its  growth  was 
steady,  therefore  larger  quarters  were  required,  so  in 
1895  Mr.  Stevens  built  the  storehouse  at  No.  64  Bridge 
Street,  where  they  are  still  located.  Five  stories  were 
added  to  the  building  in  1915.  The  founder  continued 
at  the  head  of  the  organization  until  his  retirement  from 
all  business  activity  in  the  year  1918.  He  was  a  man  of 
large  prominence  in  many  branches  of  forward  en¬ 
deavor,  having  been  a  member  of  all  the  Masonic  bodies, 
active  in  benevolent  matters,  and  a  deacon  in  the  old 
South  Congregational  Church.  On  February  22,  1868, 
he  married  Ada  S.  Blakesley,  of  Barre,  and  they  cel¬ 
ebrated  their  golden  wedding  in  1915. 

William  A.  Stevens,  son  of  Genery  and  Ada  S. 
(Blakesley)  Stevens,  was  born  in  Worcester,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  April  4,  1880.  Educated  in  the  local  schools,  he 
has  been  closely  identified  with  the  above  organization 
since  the  completion  of  his  studies,  and  from  the  early 
years  of  his  activity  has  been  an  important  factor  in  the 
development  of  the  business.  Even  before  his  father’s 
retirement  he  held  a  large  measure  of  responsibility,  and 
when  the  concern  was  incorporated  on  April  1,  1919, 
William  A.  Stevens  became  president  and  treasurer  of 
the  company.  Recognized  as  an  able  and  progressive 
executive,  he  is  highly  esteemed  by  his  contemporaries  in 
every  field  of  commercial  advance.  He  spends  his 
leisure  in  outdoor  interests,  and  is  a  member  of  the 
Commonwealth  Club  of  Worcester  and  the  Worcester 
Country  Club.  He  married,  in  August,  1897,  Florence 
E.  Kingston,  daughter  of  George  and  Georgiana  (Kin¬ 
dred)  Kingston,  and  they  are  the  parents  of  two  chil¬ 
dren  :  Clarence  G.,  of  whom  further ;  and  Muriel  C., 
born  September  27,  1905. 

Clarence  G.  Stevens  was  born  December  15,  1901.  He 
received  his  education  in  the  public  and  high  schools  of 
the  city  of  Worcester,  and  as  a  young  man  became  inter¬ 
ested  in  the  affairs  of  the  Genery  Stevens  Company,  of 
which  his  grandfather  was  then  still  the  head.  Taking 
a  subordinate  position  in  the  organization,  Mr.  Stevens 
familiarized  himself  with  every  detail  of  the  business. 
He  is  now  filling  a  position  of  executive  responsibility, 
and  is  counted  among  the  broadly  alert  and  promising 
young  men  of  the  day  in  the  business  life  of  Worcester 
County.  Mr.  Stevens  is  well  known  and  popular  in 
social  and  club  circles  in  Worcester,  and  is  deeply  in¬ 
terested  in  all  lines  of  progressive  effort  for  the  com¬ 
munity. 

Mr.  Stevens  married,  on  March  29,  1922,  Eleanor  C. 
Miller,  of  Worcester,  and  they  reside  in  the  suburbs 
of  this  city. 


JOHN  EDWARD  TALBOT,  A.  B.,  LL.  B.,  M.  D. 

— One  of  the  foremost  names  in  the  medical  profession 
in  the  city  of  Worcester,  Massachusetts,  is  that  of  Dr. 
John  Edward  Talbot,  whose  training  was  received  in 
the  institutions  of  his  native  State,  and  who  has  been 
in  active  practice  in  this  city  for  about  ten  years.  Dr. 
Talbot  is  prominent  also  fraternally  and  among  club 
circles  in  this  city.  He  is  a  son  of  Zephaniah  Talbot, 
who  was  active  in  the  United  States  Navy  during  the 
Civil  War,  and  for  two  years  prior  to  that  struggle  was 
chief  engineer.  He  later  became  a  prominent  manu¬ 
facturer  of  Boston,  and  his  lifetime  was  spent  in  the 


84 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


production  of  shoe  nails  and  tacks.  The  mother,  Eliza 
Frances  (Paul)  Talbot,  was  also  a  member  of  a 
Massachusetts  family. 

John  Edward  Talbot  was  born  at  Holliston,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  November  i  1879.  His  education  was  begun  in 
the  local  public  schools  and  he  later  attended  the  Boston 
Latin  School  and  thereafter  Volkman’s  Private  School, 
where  his  preparatory  studies  were  covered.  Entering 
Harvard  University,  he  received  his  Bachelor  of  Arts 
degree  from  that  institution  in  the  class  of  1902,  after 
which  he  took  up  the  study  of  law  at  the  same  univer¬ 
sity  and  received  his  Bachelor  of  Laws  degree  in  1905. 
Determining  thereafter  to  make  the  profession  of  med¬ 
icine  the  scene  of  his  life  work,  he  entered  Harvard 
Medical  School  and  was  graduated  in  the  class  of  1912, 
with  the  degree  of  Doctor  of  Medicine.  His  hospital 
experience  was  unusually  comprehensive,  for  he  was 
first  active  as  interne  at  the  Free  Hospital  for  Women, 
then  was  identified  with  the  medical  service  of  the 
Massachusetts  General  Hospital,  after  which  he  was 
active  at  the  Boston  Lying-in  Hospital.  Coming  to 
Worcester  to  take  up  the  practice  of  his  chosen  profes¬ 
sion,  Dr.  Talbot  has  been  engaged  along  this  line  con¬ 
tinuously  since,  specializing  in  obstetrics.  He  has  been 
largely  successful  and  is  considered  an  authority  along 
the  lines  of  his  specialty,  in  which  he  is  widely  sought 
in  this  city  and  vicinity.  In  political  affairs  Dr.  Talbot 
supports  the  Republican  party,  but  his  professional  ac¬ 
tivities  have  commanded  his  attention  so  fully  that  he 
has  never  as  yet  found  leisure  to  take  a  leading  part 
in  public  affairs.  He  is  a  member  of  the  American 
Medical  Association  and  the  Massachusetts  Medical 
Society,  and  fraternally  is  a  member  of  Mount  Hollis 
Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted  Masons,  of  which  he  is  Past 
Master ;  Mt.  Lebanon  Chapter,  Royal  Arch  Masons ; 
Milford  Commandery,  No.  11,  Knights  Templar;  Aleppo 
Temple,  Ancient  Arabic  Order  Nobles  of  the  Mystic 
Shrine.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Boylston  Society  and 
the  Aesculapian  Society.  He  belongs  to  the  Worcester 
Club  and  the  Tatnuck  Country  Club,  and  is  also  a 
member  of  the  Bohemians.  His  religious  affiliation  is 
with  the  Unitarian  church. 

Dr.  Talbot  married  (first),  at  Framingham,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  June  12,  1907,  Florence  Sanger,  who  died 
March  12,  1908.  He  married  (second),  at  Brookline, 
Massachusetts,  April  8,  1916,  Florence  L.  Moore.  John 
E.  and  Florence  (Sanger)  Talbot  were  the  parents  of 
one  child,  Elizabeth,  born  March  7,  1908,  and  died 
March  24,  1908. 


CAPTAIN  HERBERT  F.  HARTWELL,  A.  B.— 

In  the  industrial  world  of  Gardner,  Massachusetts,  Cap¬ 
tain  Hartwell  holds  a  broadly  responsible  position  as 
export  manager  for  the  John  A.  Dunn  Company,  manu¬ 
facturers  of  chairs,  reed  furniture  of  various  kinds,  and 
baby  carriages.  Educated  both  in  America  and  in 
France,  and  with  extensive  experience  as  a  member 
of  the  American  Expeditionary  Forces  during  the 
World  War,  Mr.  Hartwell  is  especially  fitted  for  his 
present  responsibilities,  and  his  work  is  giving  great 
impetus  to  the  export  business  of  the  concern.  Captain 
Hartwell  comes  of  a  very  old  family  of  Massachusetts, 
for  many  years  residing  in  Bridgewater,  where  they 
fettled  late  in  the  eighteenth  century.  Captain  Hart¬ 


well’s  grandfather,  Isaac  Hartwell,  was  a  lieutenant  in 
the  Continental  Army  during  the  Revolutionary  War. 
Francis  Hartwell,  Captain  Hartwell’s  father,  was  born 
and  reared  in  old  Plymouth  Colony,  but  is  now  a  resi¬ 
dent  of  Brockton,  and  holds  a  prominent  position  in  the 
shoe  industry  in  that  city.  He  married,  in  Brockton, 
in  the  seventies,  Nellie  Mowry,  who  was  also  born 
and  reared  in  old  Plymouth  Colony,  and  is  still  living. 

Captain  Herbert  F.  Hartwell  was  born  at  Brockton, 
Massachusetts,  June  8,  1880.  His  education  was  begun 
in  the  public  schools  of  the  city,  and  he  is  a  graduate  of 
Boston  University,  from  which  he  received  the  degree 
of  Bachelor  of  Arts,  with  the  class  of  1903.  He  later 
went  abroad  and  attended  the  Sorbonne,  at  Paris, 
France,  during  1903-04,  then,  in  the  fall  of  1904,  he  re¬ 
turned  to  America.  He  was  made  an  instructor  at  the 
Boston  University,  filling  that  position  for  one  year. 
He  then  took  up  public  school  work  and  was  made  the 
head  of  the  modern  language  department  of  the  Portland 
(Maine)  High  School.  He  later  filled  a  similar  posi¬ 
tion  at  the  Technical  High  School,  at  Springfield, 
Massachusetts,  and  his  work  in  this  field  covered  a 
period  of  about  eleven  years.  It  was  from  such  duties 
as  these  that  he  left  civilian  life  to  enter  the  military 
service,  and  his  record,  which  follows  below,  is  one  of 
honor  and  distinction.  Upon  his  return  to  civilian  life  in 
June,  1919,  Captain  Hartwell  accepted  his  present  re¬ 
sponsible  position  with  the  John  A.  Dunn  Company, 
of  Gardner,  and  as  their  export  manager  has  carried 
the  interests  of  the  concern  into  new  fields,  where  they 
are  meeting  with  constantly  widening  success.  His 
work  carries  him  abroad  once  or  twice  each  year,  and  his 
marked  executive  ability,  added  to  his  extensive  ex¬ 
perience  in  foreign  countries,  gives  the  Dunn  interests 
an  executive  of  unusual  worth  in  Captain  Hartwell.  He 
is  a  member  and  director  of  the  Gardner  Chamber  of 
Commerce,  and  is  active  in  all  that  pertains  to  the  wel¬ 
fare  and  advance  of  the  community,  serving  also  as 
vice-chairman  of  the  Gardner  School  Board. 

The  military  record  of  Captain  Herbert  F.  Hartwell 
began  some  years  ago,  when  he  enlisted  in  the  National 
Guard  of  the  State  of  Maine.  He  was  later  identified 
with  the  National  Guard  of  the  State  of  Massachusetts 
for  a  period  of  eight  years,  was  commissioned  second 
lieutenant  in  1913,  and  two  years  later  was  commissioned 
captain.  On  March  25,  1917,  on  the  call  of  the  Presi¬ 
dent  of  the  United  States,  Captain  Hartwell’s  regiment, 
the  2d  Massachusetts  Infantry,  was  sworn  into  the 
Federal  service  and  became  the  104th  Infantry,  26th  Di¬ 
vision,  American  Expeditionary  Forces.  They  sailed 
for  France  on  September  26  1917,  and  this  was  the  first 
complete  American  division  to  reach  French  soil  prepared 
for  service  in  the  field.  Captain  Hartwell  was  under 
this  command  until  June  1,  1918,  when  he  was  trans¬ 
ferred  to  the  Liaison  Service  American  Expeditionary 
Forces,  and  was  attached  to  the  headquarters  of  the 
20th  French  Army  Corps.  During  his  service  in  this 
connection  he  received  two  decorations  from  the  French 
Government,  the  Croix  de  Guerre,  citation  by  Marshal 
Petain  for  the  capture  of  a  German  bombing  plane  with 
officers  and  crew,  and  the  Legion  of  Honor  on  citation 
of  the  commander  of  the  20th  French  Corps,  also  cita¬ 
tions  from  General  Edwards,  commanding  the  26th  Di¬ 
vision,  his  regimental  commander,  and  the  chief  of  the 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


85 


Liaison  Service,  American  Expeditionary  Forces.  Cap¬ 
tain  Hartwell  was  returned  to  the  United  States  in  June, 
1919,  and  he  received  his  honorable  discharge  from  the 
service.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Cercle  Nationale  des 
Armees  de  Terre  et  de  Mer  of  Paris,  France,  a  French 
army  and  navy  club.  Captain  Hartwell  is  a  member  of 
the  Y.  D.  Club,  of  Boston,  and  is  deeply  interested  in 
the  Boy  Scout  movement,  acting  as  president  of  the 
Gardner  Council  of  Boy  Scouts.  Fraternally  he  is 
identified  with  Hope  Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted  Masons; 
Goddard  Council,  Princes  of  Jerusalem;  and  Worcester 
Lodge  of  Perfection,  Ancient  Accepted  Scottish  Rite. 
His  clubs  are  The  Gardner  Boat  and  the  Chair  City,  and 
he  is  a  member  of  the  association  of  the  Levi  Heywood 
Memorial  Association.  His  church  association  is  with 
Saint  Paul’s  Episcopal  Church,  of  which  he  is  vestryman. 

Captain  Hartwell  married,  in  1906,  Georgia  M.  Rodick, 
of  West  Roxbury,  Massachusetts,  and  they  are  the 
parents  of  five  children:  Hope,  a  junior  in  Gardner 
High  School  (1923)  ;  H.  Roger,  a  freshman  in  Gard¬ 
ner  High  School;  Constance  G. ;  Priscilla  F. ;  and  Pa¬ 
tience  R. ;  the  younger  children  all  in  the  grammar 
schools  of  Gardner. 


ROY  M.  THOMAS — The  city  of  Leominster,  Mas¬ 
sachusetts,  is  fortunate  in  its  large  number  of  busi¬ 
ness  men  who  have  by  energy  and  ability  worked  their 
way  up  from  the  bottom  to  responsible  and  important 
business  positions,  either  in  the  employ  of  large  con¬ 
cerns  or  as  owners  and  managers  of  a  business  of  their 
own.  Among  the  latter  is  Roy  M.  Thomas,  who  since 
1916  has  been  the  owner  and  manager  of  a  prosperous 
plumbing  and  heating  establishment  in  Leominster. 

Roy  M.  Thomas  was  born  in  Worcester,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  December  25,  1892,  his  parents  Farwell  N.  Thomas, 
a  meat  cutter  of  Worcester,  and  Jennie  M.  (Marshall) 
Thomas.  He  received  his  earliest  education  in  Worces¬ 
ter,  but  in  1904,  when  he  was  twelve  years  of  age,  moved 
with  his  parents  to  Leominster,  where  his  education  was 
completed.  He  was  deeply  interested  in  mechanical 
and  engineering  lines,  and  even  during  his  school  days 
he  utilized  his  spare  time  studying  various  branches  of 
the  engineering  business.  When  his  school  training  was 
completed  he  apprenticed  himself  to  John  B.  Farnsworth, 
plumber  and  steam  fitter,  of  Leominster,  in  whose  em¬ 
ploy  he  remained  from  1908  to  1914.  During  this  period 
he  was  still  using  much  of  his  spare  time  in  study  and 
experiment,  and  was  steadily  becoming  more  expert  as 
a  plumber  and  steam  fitter.  In  1914  he  severed  his  con¬ 
nection  with  Mr.  Farnsworth  and  became  identified  with 
the  Thompson  &  Spear  Company,  of  Boston,  plumbers, 
by  whom  he  was  employed  as  an  estimator.  Two  years 
later  he  returned  to  Leominster  and  purchased  the  in¬ 
terests  of  John  B.  Farnsworth,  his  first  employer,  and 
since  that  time  has  continued  to  successfully  conduct  a 
steadily  growing  business.  In  December,  1916,  the 
business  was  incorporated  under  the  name  of  the  J.  B. 
Farnsworth  Company,  Roy  M.  Thomas,  president; 
Joseph  B.  Spear,  treasurer,  and  Frank  S.  Farnsworth, 
director.  Mr.  Thomas  has  made  for  himself  a  repu¬ 
tation  as  a  skillful  and  reliable  plumber,  and  has  built 
up  one  of  the  best  known  plumbing  establishments  in 
Leominster.  The  firm  has  filled  many  important  plumb¬ 
ing  and  heating  contracts,  including  the  Nashua  High 


School,  of  Nashua,  New  Hampshire;  F.  A.  Whitney 
Carriage  Company,  of  Leominster;  The  Viscoloid  Com¬ 
pany,  of  Leominster;  Forbes  Lithographing  Company, 
of  Boston;  Plunkett  Hospital,  of  Adams,  Massachusetts; 
Marine  Barracks,  of  Portsmouth,  New  Hampshire; 
Noland  School,  of  Fitchburg,  Massachusetts;  Bigelow  - 
Hartford  Carpet  Company,  of  Thompsonville,  Connect¬ 
icut;  Young  Women’s  Christian  Association,  of  Bridge¬ 
port,  Connecticut;  Turner  Center  Creamery,  of  Provi¬ 
dence,  Rhode  Island;  and  the  Rialto  Theatre  of  Leomin¬ 
ster.  In  1918  a  Boston  branch  office  of  the  business  was 
opened  at  No.  44  Broomfield  Street,  and  the  work  of  the 
firm  now  extends  all  over  New  England  and  other 
points. 

Along  with  his  business  activities  Mr.  Thomas  has 
always  been  ready  to  do  his  part  as  a  public-spirited  cit¬ 
izen,  and  has  always  taken  an  interest  in  local  public 
affairs.  During  the  World  War  he  was  detailed  for 
special  government  work,  stationed  at  Fort  Adams, 
Newport,  Rhode  Island,  and  later  at  Fort  Trumbull,  as 
one  of  the  United  States  Coast  Guard,  at  New  London, 
Connecticut.  At  the  latter  place  he  had  charge  of  the 
installations  of  the  plumbing  and  heating  apparatus  of 
the  entire  camp.  Mr.  Thomas  is  well  known  in  fraternal 
circles,  being  a  member  of  Leominster  Lodge,  No.  86, 
Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows;  Leominster  Lodge, 
No.  1237,  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks;  Co¬ 
lumbian  Lodge,  No.  100,  Knights  of  Pythias;  and 
Wachusetts  Tribe,  No.  41,  Improved  Order  of  Red 
Men.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  Sons  of  Veterans, 
and  of  the  United  Commercial  Travelers’  Association, 
and  his  clubs  are  the  Leominster  and  the  Monoosnock 
Country  Club.  His  religious  affiliation  is  with  the  First 
Baptist  Church  of  Leominster. 

On  May  26,  1915,  at  Lunenburg,  Massachusetts,  Roy 
M.  Thomas  married  Elsie  G.  Fish,  daughter  of  Wellman 
and  Lyra  (Heywood)  Fish,  her  father  a  prominent 
farmer  and  dairyman  of  Lunenburg.  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Thomas  are  the  parents  of  three  children :  Ruth  Lyra, 
born  in  West  Medford,  Massachusetts  May  28,  1916; 
Roger  Wellman,  born  in  Leominster,  October  27,  1917; 
and  Rachel  Barbara,  born  in  Leominster,  March  1,  1920. 


ALVIN  WARREN  BANCROFT— The  ancestor  of 
this  branch  of  the  Bancroft  family,  Lieutenant  Thomas 
Bancroft,  was  born  in  England  in  1622,  son  of  John  and 
Jane  Bancroft.  He  came  to  New  England,  bought  land 
at  now  Lynnfield,  and  built  a  home  near  Beaver  Dam. 
At  the  time  of  his  second  marriage  in  1648,  he  is 
spoken  of  as  “of  Reading,”  where  it  is  known  that  he 
owned  land.  He  married  (first)  at  Dedham,  in  1647, 
Alice  Bacon,  daughter  of  Michael  Bacon,  of  Dedham, 
and  married  (second),  in  1648,  Elizabeth  Metcalfe, 
daughter  of  Michael  and  Sarah  Metcalfe.  Children : 
Thomas,  of  whom  further;  Elizabeth,  John,  Sarah, 
Raham,  Sarah  (2),  Ebenezer,  and  Mary.  Thomas  Ban¬ 
croft  died  August  19,  1691. 

(II.)  Deacon  Thomas  Bancroft,  son  of  Lieutenant 
Thomas  and  Elizabeth  (Metcalfe)  Bancroft,  was  born  in 
1649,  and  died  November  9,  1691.  He  was  an  officer 
in  King  Philip’s  War,  and  a  Selectman  of  Reading  for 
several  years.  He  lived  in  the  Bancroft  homestead  in 
the  western  part  of  Reading,  and  his  was  the  fourth 
house  built  in  the  West  Parish.  He  married,  in  1673, 


86 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


Sarah  Poole,  daughter  of  Jonathan  and  Judith  Poole. 
Children,  all  born  in  Reading,  Massachusetts:  Thomas 
(3),  Jonathan,  Sarah,  Mehitable,  Jonathan  (2),  Raham, 
of  further  mention;  Judith,  Samuel,  died  young;  Sam¬ 
uel  (2),  and  Elizabeth. 

(III.)  Deacon  Raham  Bancroft,  son  of  Deacon 
Thomas  and  Sarah  (Poole)  Bancroft,  was  born  in  1684 
and  died  in  1758.  Rev.  Mr.  Hobby,  in  recording  his 
death,  said :  “That  good  man,  my  friend,  Deacon  Ban¬ 
croft.”  He  married  (first),  in  1706,  Abigail  Eaton, 
daughter  of  Thomas  and  Hannah  (Mason)  Eaton.  She 
died  in  1728,  aged  forty.  They  were  the  parents  of 
David,  of  whom  further.  He  married  (second),  in  1730, 
Ruth  Kendall,  who  died  in  1758,  daughter  of  Samuel 
and  Mary  Kendall.  Raham  Bancroft’s  children  were : 
Joshua,  Abigail,  James,  died  young;  Ruth,  Abigail 
(2),  Judith,  and  James  (2). 

(IV.)  David  Bancroft,  son  of  Deacon  Raham  and 
Abigail  (Eaton)  Bancroft,  was  born  at  Reading,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  in  1718,  and  died  at  Auburn,  Massachusetts, 
April  16,  1782.  He  married  (first)  Eunice,  surname  un¬ 
known,  who  died  October  15,  1777,  aged  fifty-seven.  He 
married  (second)  Abigail,  surname  unknown,  who  died 
January  4,  1779.  He  married  (third)  Ruth,  surname 
unknown,  who  died  August  2,  1809,  aged  ninety-four. 
Children:  Eunice,  David,  Jonas,  John,  Ebenezer,  Jon¬ 
athan,  of  further  mention;  Mary,  Ruth,  Hannah,  Tim¬ 
othy,  and  Nathaniel. 

(V.)  Jonathan  Bancroft,  son  of  David  and  Eunice 
Bancroft,  came  from  Auburn  to  Gardner,  Massachusetts, 
and  followed  his  trade  of  shoemaker  in  connection  with 
farming.  He  was  a  soldier  of  the  Revolution,  and  was 
at  the  surrender  of  Burgoyne  in  1777.  He  married 
Sarah  Case,  and  they  were  the  parents  of  seven  children : 
Jonathan,  Smyrna,  of  further  mention;  Sarah,  Mary, 
Betsey,  Lucy,  and  Roxanna.  Sarah  (Case)  Bancroft 
died  February  17,  1816,  and  he  married  a  second  wife, 
Elizabeth,  who  died  December  2,  1822.  He  died  Sep¬ 
tember  25,  1826. 

(VI.)  Smyrna  Bancroft,  son  of  Jonathan  and  Sarah 
(Case)  Bancroft,  was  born  May  15,  1776,  died  May  5, 
1818.  He  married  Sarah  Whitney,  of  Winchendon, 
Massachusetts,  and  they  were  the  parents  of  six  chil¬ 
dren:  Harvey  M.,  Smyrna  Winslow,  of  further  men¬ 
tion;  Mary  E.,  Sarah  W.,  Amasa,  and  Viola. 

(VII.)  Smyrna  Winslow  Bancroft,  son  of  Smyrna 
and  Sarah  (Whitney)  Bancroft,  was  born  December  13, 
1804.  He  married  Lucy  Jackson,  daughter  of  Elisha 
and  Relief  (Beard)  Jackson,  and  they  were  the  parents 
of  seven  children :  Sarah  W.,  Walter,  Mary,  Charles,  of 
further  mention ;  Elmira,  Amasa,  and  Eugene. 

(VIII.)  Charles  Bancroft,  son  of  Smyrna  Winslow 
and  Lucy  (Jackson)  Bancroft,  was  born  in  Gardner, 
Massachusetts,  May  5,  1836.  He  married  Lydia  Maria 
Parish,  and  they  were  the  parents  of  Alvin  Warren,  of 
whom  further. 

(IX.)  Alvin  Warren  Bancroft,  son  of  Charles  and 
Lydia  Maria  (Parish)  Bancroft,  was  born  in  Gardner, 
Massachusetts,  August  9,  1873,  and  there  completed 
public  school  courses  of  study  with  graduation  from 
high  school.  He  then  entered  Harvard  University, 
whence  he  was  graduated  Bachelor  of  Science,  class  of 
1895.  After  leaving  Harvard  he  entered  the  office  em¬ 
ploy  of  the  Heywood  Brothers  &  Wakefield  Company. 


He  was  advanced  in  position  with  the  years  and  filled 
each  place  so  efficiently  that  he  rapidly  rose  in  rank, 
becoming,  in  February,  1920,  general  manager  of  the 
Gardner  plant.  He  fills  an  important  place  in  the  busi¬ 
ness  life  of  the  State  and  fills  it  most  ably.  He  is  also 
a  director  of  the  Gardner  Savings  Bank. 

Mr.  Bancroft  is  a  member  of  Gardner  Lodge,  No. 
1426,  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks,  and  of 
the  Gardner  Boat  Club.  The  family  are  members  of  St. 
Paul’s  Episcopal  Church.  He  is  a  Republican  in  poli¬ 
tics,  and  for  several  years  has  been  a  member  of  the 
School  Board.  The  family  home  is  in  Gardner. 

Mr.  Bancroft  married,  August  21,  1900,  Emily  Wash¬ 
burn,  of  Gardner,  and  they  are  the  parents  of  two  sons: 
Raymond  Washburn,  a  graduate  of  Harvard  Univer¬ 
sity,  Bachelor  of  Arts,  class  of  1922,  completing  the 
course  in  three  years;  and  Richard,  now  a  freshman 
at  Harvard. 


CHARLES  EDWARD  THOMPSON,  M.  D.— A 

native  of  Massachusetts,  Dr.  Thompson  is  a  son  of 
Charles  Edward  and  Ellen  Louise  (Simpson)  Thomp¬ 
son,  both  natives  of  York,  Maine.  The  father  was  en¬ 
gaged  in  mercantile  pursuits  in  the  city  of  Portland  for 
many  years,  but  his  business  was  entirely  swept  away  by 
the  disastrous  and  historic  Portland  fire,  and  having 
advanced  in  years,  he  practically  retired  from  activity 
following  that  event.  He  died  in  Middleton,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  in  the  year  1890.  The  mother  still  survives  him, 
and  is  a  resident  of  Malden,  Massachusetts. 

Dr.  Charles  Edward  Thompson  was  born  at  Middle- 
ton,  Massachusetts,  on  January  24,  1879.  His  educa¬ 
tion  was  begun  in  the  local  public  schools,  and  he  is  a 
graduate  of  the  Holden  High  School,  of  the  class  of 
1898.  Entering  Harvard  University  Medical  School 
after  special  preparation,  he  was  graduated  from  that 
institution  in  the  class  of  1902,  with  the  degree  of  Doc¬ 
tor  of  Medicine.  Even  during  his  student  days,  Dr. 
Thompson  gave  especial  attention  to  mental  diseases, 
and  six  months  prior  to  his  graduation  he  entered  the 
Massachusetts  State  Infirmary  as  an  interne  and  served 
in  this  capacity  for  a  year  and  a  half.  He  was  then 
made  a  member  of  the  staff  of  this  institution  and  con¬ 
tinued  in  that  capacity  until  coming  to  Gardner  in  Oc¬ 
tober,  1904.  At  that  time  he  accepted  the  position  of 
assistant  superintendent  of  the  Gardner  State  Colony, 
and  continued  in  that  capacity  for  two  years  and  a 
half.  In  April,  1907,  he  was  made  superintendent  and 
physician-in-chief  of  the  Gardner  State  Colony,  in  which 
position  he  has  since  continued  with  the  exception  of 
two  and  a  half  years.  It  was  in  October,  1911,  that  he 
resigned  from  the  colony  to  accept  the  appointment  of 
executive  officer  of  the  State  Board  of  Insanity,  the  offi¬ 
cers  of  this  board  being  in  the  State  House  at  Boston. 
Dr.  Thompson  ably  filled  the  responsibilities  of  this 
position  until  February  1914,  when  he  returned  to  the 
Gardner  State  Colony,  and  has  since  been  in  charge  as 
before.  The  institution  has  nine  hundred  and  twenty- 
five  patients  and  two  hundred  officers.  In  all  these 
activities  Dr.  Thompson  has  done  much  constructive 
work,  looking  toward  the  betterment  of  conditions,  not 
only  in  the  care  of  the  mentally  afflicted,  but  toward 
the  possibility  of  prevention  of  serious  mental  disorders. 
He  was  instrumental  in  organizing  the  Massachusetts 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


87 


Society  of  Mental  Hygiene,  of  which  he  has  been  sec¬ 
retary  since  its  inception.  The  chief  aim  of  this  organi¬ 
zation  is  the  study  of  causes  as  related  to  results  in 
mental  diseases  and  to  secure  better  care  for  the  men¬ 
tally  afflicted,  also  the  endeavor  to  awaken  the  people 
to  the  study  and  prevention  of  mental  troubles,  which 
are  rapidly  increasing.  Dr.  Thompson  has  given  this 
subject  the  most  extensive  research,  has  written  more 
or  less  regarding  it,  and  is  quoted  as  one  of  the  foremost 
authorities  of  the  day  on  the  treatment  of  mental  affec¬ 
tions.  He  is  a  member  of  the  American  Psychiatric 
Association,  the  New  England  Society  of  Psychiatry, 
the  Boston  Society  of  Psychiatry  and  Neurology,  and 
the  Massachusetts  Medical  Society.  Fraternally  he  is 
identified  with  Hope  Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted  Masons ; 
Gardner  Chapter,  Royal  Arch  Masons ;  Ivanhoe  Com- 
mandery,  Knights  Templar;  and  the  Massachusetts  Con¬ 
sistory,  Ancient  Accepted  Scottish  Rite. 

Dr.  Thompson  married,  in  May,  1907,  Enza  Leone 
MacGill  of  Malden,  Massachusetts. 


ARTHUR  NELSON  BALL,  M.  D.— As  assistant 
superintendent  of  the  Gardner  State  Colony,  Dr.  Ball 
is  bearing  a  noteworthy  part  in  the  care  and  treatment 
of  mental  diseases  in  this  State,  and  his  success  is 
counting  for  the  advance  of  the  institutions  and  the  wel¬ 
fare  of  its  patients.  Dr.  Ball  is  a  native  of  Berkshire 
County,  Massachusetts,  and  is  a  son  of  William  and 
Mary  (Pierce)  Ball.  His  father  was  born  in  Oswego, 
New  York,  and  was  a  farmer  and  lumberman  by  occu¬ 
pation,  becoming  a  prominent  figure  in  this  industry  in 
Windsor,  Massachusets,  where  he  operated  a  saw  mill 
for  a  number  of  years,  his  death  occurring  while  in 
that  business.  The  mother,  who  was  born  at  Peru, 
Massachusetts,  still  survives  him,  and  is  now  a  resi¬ 
dent  of  Cummington. 

Dr.  Ball  was  born  in  Peru,  Berkshire  County,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  March  7,  1884.  His  early  education  was  ac¬ 
quired  in  the  public  schools  of  Windsor,  and  he  later 
attended  Kimball  Union  Academy,  at  Meriden,  New 
Hampshire,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in  the  class 
of  1906.  His  choice  of  a  profession  early  made,  he  en¬ 
tered  the  medical  school  of  the  University  of  Pennsyl¬ 
vania,  at  Philadelphia,  and  was  graduated  from  that  in¬ 
stitution  in  the  class  of  1911,  with  the  degree  of  Doctor 
of  Medicine.  One  year’s  interneship  followed  at  the 
General  Hospital  of  Paterson,  New  Jersey,  and  there¬ 
after  he  became  assistant  physician  at  the  Northampton 
State  Hospital,  at  Northampton,  Massachusetts.  His 
work  at  that  institution  was  interrupted  by  his  enlist¬ 
ment  in  the  Medical  Corps  of  the  United  States  Army  on 
January  15,  1918.  He  was  commissioned  first  lieuten¬ 
ant  and  was  later  promoted  to  the  rank  of  captain, 
serving  for  five  months  at  Camp  Shelby,  Mississippi,  and 
at  Camp  Hancock,  Georgia,  for  eight  months;  there¬ 
after  at  Fort  Logan  (Colorado)  Army  Post,  for  three 
months,  and  finally  at  Camp  Grant,  Illinois,  where  he 
remained  until  June  30,  1919,  when  he  received  his  hon¬ 
orable  discharge  from  the  service.  Immediately  after 
his  discharge  Dr.  Ball  returned  to  the  Northampton  State 
Hospital  as  senior  assistant  physician  of  that  institution, 
and  remained  until  November  2,-1921,  when  he  became 
assistant  superintendent  of  the  Gardner  State  Colony,  in 
which  capacity  he  now  serves.  During  his  entire  ex¬ 


perience,  including  that  in  the  military  camps  at  vari¬ 
ous  points,  he  has  made  a  special  study  of  neuro¬ 
psychiatry  treatment,  and  is  rapidly  gaining  a  position  of 
prominence  in  the  treatment  and  prevention  of  mental 
diseases.  Dr.  Ball  is  a  member  of  the  American 
Psychiatric  Association,  of  the  New  England  Psy¬ 
chiatric  Society,  and  the  American  Medical  Association, 
and  the  Worcester  North  Medical  Society.  Fraternally 
he  is  identified  with  the  Free  and  Accepted  Masons, 
but  otherwise  has  few  interests  which  do'  not  closely  align 
with  his  work. 

Dr.  Ball  married,  on  August  12,  1918,  Mae  Turner, 
of  Cummington,  Massachusetts. 


HARRISON  GREENWOOD — As  a  successful 
man,  as  an  enterprising  and  public-spirited  citizen,  as 
well  as  in  fraternal  circles,  Harrison  Greenwood  of  the 
insurance  concern  which  operates  under  the  name  Green¬ 
wood  Brothers,  is  well  known  and  highly  esteemed  in 
Gardner,  Worcester  County,  Massachusetts. 

Alson  J.  Greenwood,  father  of  Harrison  Greenwood, 
was  born  in  Hubbardston,  Massachusetts,  September  27, 
1829,  and  after  receiving  a  good  practical  education 
in  the  public  schools  of  his  native  district,  engaged  in 
farming,  which  occupation  he  followed  throughout  his 
active  life.  In  spite  of  his  out-of-door  life,  however, 
he  was  not  a  man  of  rugged  health,  and  when,  at  the 
beginning  of  the  Civil  War,  he  tried  to  enlist  for  ser¬ 
vice  he  got  no  further  than  Greenfield,  Massachusetts, 
where  he  was  rejected  because  he  could  not  pass  the 
physical  tests.  He  married  Martha  G.  Moulton,  daugh¬ 
ter  of  Sewell  and  Polly  (Hunting)  Moulton,  and  they 
were  the  parents  of  four  sons :  Dr.  Sewell  E.,  of 
Templeton,  Massachusetts,  now  deceased :  Arthur  D.,  of 
Hubbardston,  Massachusetts,  now  deceased ;  Silas  A., 
of  Winchendon,  Massachusetts;  and  Harrison,  of  fur¬ 
ther  mention. 

Harrison  Greenwood  was  born  in  LIubbardston, 
Massachusetts,  August  31,  1863,  and  received  his  educa¬ 
tion  in  the  public  schools  of  Hubbardston.  Upon  the 
completion  of  his  high  school  course  he  entered  the  em¬ 
ploy  of  S.  Bent  &  Company,  Inc.,  serving  in  the  capac¬ 
ity  of  shipping  clerk,  and  this  connection  he  maintained 
for  a  period  of  ten  years.  At  the  end  of  that  time  he 
accepted  a  position  in  the  office  of  S.  K.  Pierce  &  Son 
Company,  with  whom  he  remained  for  a  period  of  three 
years.  He  then,  in  1895,  engaged  in  the  insurance  busi¬ 
ness  in  association  with  his  brother.  Since  that  time, 
under  the  firm  name  of  Greenwood  Brothers,  insurance, 
the  two  brothers  have  built  up  a  large  and  successful 
insurance  business.  They  deal  in  all  kinds  of  insurance, 
and  have  made  for  themselves  an  enviable  reputation 
as  straightforward  and  honest  business  men,  as  well 
as  being  experts  in  their  line.  Mr.  Greenwood  is  well 
known  in  fraternal  circles  in  Gardner.  He  is  a  member 
of  Hope  Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted  Masons  of  Gard¬ 
ner,  and  is  Past  Master  of  same;  and  of  Ivanhoe 
Commandery,  No.  46,  Knights  Templar;  he  is  also  a 
member  of  Gardner  Lodge,  No.  1426,  Benevolent  and 
Protective  Order  of  Elks;  and  of  the  Improved  Order 
of  Red  Men.  He  has  always  taken  an  active  interest 
in  the  public  welfare  of  the  city  of  Gardner,  and  has 
rendered  efficient  service  as  a  member  of  the  Gardner 
Chamber  of  Commerce,  and  in  addition  to  his  respon- 


88 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


sibilities  and  activities  in  the  insurance  business,  he  is 
also  treasurer  of  the  Gardner  Cooperative  Bank. 

Harrison  Greenwood  married,  on  July  15,  1885,  Alice 
M.  Priest,  of  Delaware,  daughter  of  Abraham  and  Mary 
A.  (Wilder)  Priest.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Greenwood  are 
the  parents  of  two  children:  1.  Howard  P.,  who  was 
born  in  Gardner,  Massachusetts,  December  4,  1887,  and 
died  in  November,  1918,  during  the  “flu”  epidemic.  He 
married  Jessie  G.  Stevens,  and  they  became  the  parents 
of  two  children:  Willard  P.,  who  was  born  October  16, 
1912;  and  Barbara,  who  was  born  November  5,  1916.  2. 
Grace  G.,  who  was  born  in  Gardner,  November  13,  1888; 
she  married,  May  2,  1923,  Lester  H.  Carter. 


WILLIAM  DAGGETT  EARL— When  William 
Daggett  Earl  came  to  Leominster  in  1870  he  was  a 
man  of  forty  with  a  wide  business  experience  gained 
in  many  fields.  He  signalized  his  coming  by  organizing 
the  firm  of  W.  D.  Earl  &  Company,  manufacturers  of 
horn  combs  and  buttons,  a  company  which  he  suc¬ 
cessfully  developed  and  managed  more  than  forty 
years  before  surrendering  control  to  his  successor,  his 
son,  William  Bruce  Earl,  who  had  been  associated  with 
him  in  business  for  sixteen  years.  When  William  Dag¬ 
gett  Earl  retired  from  the  business  he  founded  and  had 
managed  for  forty-one  years,  he  had  reached  the  age 
of  eighty-one.  The  old  veteran  survived  his  retirement 
five  years,  and  then  at  the  age  of  eighty-six  passed 
quietly  and  peacefully  away,  honored  and  beloved  by  all 
who  knew  him,  and  few  there  were  in  his  community 
who  did  not.  He  was  the  son  of  William  Henry  and 
Maria  (Daggett)  Earl,  and  is  believed  to  have  been  a 
descendant  of  Ralph  Earl,  who  settled  in  Newport, 
Rhode  Island,  in  1634,  and  died  in  Portsmouth,  Rhode 
Island,  in  1678.  He  was  a  man  of  importance  in  the 
colony,  and  at  his  death  left  sons,  Ralph  and  William. 
Since  then  Ralph  and  William  have  been  persistent 
names  in  the  family,  finally  descending  upon  William 
Henry  Earl,  who  conferred  it  upon  his  son,  William 
Daggett  Earl  and  he  upon  his  son,  William  Bruce  Earl 
(q.  v.) 

On  the  Daggett  side  he  was  a  descendant  of  Thomas 
and  Hannah  (Mayhew)  Daggett,  of  Martha’s  Vineyard, 
who  were  also  the  ancestors  of  John  and  David  Dag¬ 
gett,  of  Attleboro,  the  latter  a  graduate  of  Yale  in  1783; 
a  member  of  the  Connecticut  Legislature,  1791-1814; 
speaker  of  the  House  in  1794;  State  Senator,  1797-1804; 
United  States  Senator,  1813-1819;  Judge  of  the  Connec¬ 
ticut  Supreme  Court,  1826-1832;  Chief  Justice,  1832- 
1834,  when  he  reached  the  age  limit  and  retired,  dying 
in  New  Haven,  Connecticut,  April  12,  1851,  at  the  age 
of  eightv-seven. 

William  Daggett  Earl  was  born  in  Attleboro,  Massa¬ 
chusetts  (in  that  part  afterward  incorporated  as  North 
Attleboro),  August  5,  1830,  and  died  at  his  home  in 
Lowell,  Massachusetts,  June  13,  1916.  He  obtained  his 
early  education  in  the  public  schools  of  his  district  and 
at  North  Attleboro  Academy,  being  there  a  classmate  of 
Oliver  Ames,  afterward  Governor  of  Massachusetts.  In 
1848  he  entered  Norwich  University,  at  Norwich,  Ver¬ 
mont,  and  there  remained  one  year,  leaving  the  univer¬ 
sity  at  the  age  of  nineteen  to  enter  business  life.  He 
began  his  business  connection  with  manufacturing,  as  an 
employee  of  Whitney  &  Davenport,  going  from  that 


company  to  H.  M.  Richards,  both  being  engaged  in  the 
manufacture  of  jewelry  in  North  Attleboro.  In  1857 
he  formed  a  partnership  with  his  brother,  Thomas  A. 
Earl,  and  John  Ferguson,  they  forming  the  firm  Earl, 
P'erguson  &  Company,  manufacturing  jewelers,  of  North 
Attleboro,  William  D.  Earl  retiring  from  the  firm  in 
the  fall  of  1858.  In  the  fall  of  that  year  he  was  elected 
to  represent  Attleboro  in  the  Massachusetts  Legisla¬ 
ture,  and  at  the  close  of  the  session  of  1859  Mr.  Earl 
entered  the  employ  of  H.  F.  Barrows,  a  large  manufac¬ 
turer  of  jewelry,  located  in  North  Attleboro. 

In  1862  Mr.  Earl  was  again  elected  Representative 
from  Attleboro.  At  the  expiration  of  his  term  he  be¬ 
came  an  inspector  in  the  United  States  Armory  at 
Springfield,  continuing  in  that  position  two  and  a  half 
years.  He  then  removed  his  residence  to  Boston,  there 
finding  a  position  with  his  old  employer,  H.  M.  Rich¬ 
ards,  who  had  removed  his  business  to  Boston.  He  re¬ 
mained  with  Mr.  Richards  for  three  years,  then  formed 
a  partnership  with  M.  W.  Carr,  under  the  firm  name 
M.  W.  Carr  &  Company,  and  for  two  years  they  engaged 
in  manufacturing  jewelry  in  Boston.  In  1869  Mr.  Earl 
retired  from  the  firm  and  removed  to  Leominster, 
Massachusetts,  where  he  began  business  with  his  brother, 
Thomas  A.  Earl,  as  partner,  they  operating  as  William 
D.  Earl  &  Company,  manufacturers  of  horn  combs  and 
kindred  articles  made  from  horn.  Horn  manufacture 
is  a  favorite  Leominster  activity,  but  no  firm  prospered 
more  abundantly  than  William  D.  Earl  &  Company. 
Thomas  A.  Earl  retired  from  the  firm  in  1899,  William 
D.  Earl  continuing  alone  until  his  retirement  in  1911. 

Mr.  Earl’s  experience  in  politics  taught  him  it  was  the 
part  of  wisdom  for  a  business  man  to  avoid  its  entice¬ 
ments  until  settled  and  in  circumstances  to  take  the 
time  from  his  business  that  a  public  position  demands, 
consequently,  for  the  balance  of  his  life  he  gave  him¬ 
self  to  the  interests  of  William  D.  Earl  &  Company, 
and  persistently  refused  all  further  political  honors.  He 
was  a  Free  Soil  Whig  until  the  forming  of  the  Repub¬ 
lican  party,  afterward  usually  supporting  the  candidates 
of  that  party,  but  he  was  not  partisan,  and  never  bound 
himself  to  any  party  so  closely  that  it  deprived  him 
of  the  privilege  of  independent  thought  and  action.  In 
religious  faith  he  was  a  Universalist  and  always  most 
tender  hearted  and  charitable  in  his  judgments  of  his 
fellow-men. 

William  Daggett  Earl  married,  June  23,  1857,  Helen 
B.  Corliss,  daughter  of  John  L.  and  Lydia  (Woodbury) 
Corliss,  of  Lowell,  Massachusetts.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs 
Earl  four  children  were  born:  Florence,  died  in  infancy; 
Josephine,  lives  in  Lowell,  Massachusetts;  Mary  (Earl) 
Woods,  lives  in  Lowell;  and  William  Bruce,  whose 
sketch  follows.  Mrs.  Helen  B.  (Corliss)  Earl  died  in 
June,  1869,  at  Lowell,  Massachusetts. 


WILLIAM  BRUCE  EARL— In  the  year  1895  Wil¬ 
liam  Bruce  Earl  came  to  Leominster,  Massachusetts,  a 
young  man  of  twenty-six  years,  and  there  became  asso¬ 
ciated  with  his  father  in  the  firm  of  William  D.  Earl  & 
Company,  manufacturers  of  horn  combs,  ivory  buttons, 
and  similar  products.  The  years,  twenty-eight,  which 
have  since  intervened,  have  brought  high  business  rep¬ 
utation,  and  when  the  founder  retired  from  the  manage¬ 
ment  in  1911,  at  the  age  of  eighty-one,  the  son  assumed 


. 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


89 


the  responsibility,  and  the  firm,  now .  the  corporation, 
has  steadily  pursued  a  successful  course  through  the 
ofttimes  troubled  business  seas.  He  is  the  only  son  of 
William  Daggett  and  Helen  B.  (Corliss)  Earl,  who,  at 
the  time  of  the  birth  of  their  son,  were  living  in  Low¬ 
ell,  Massachusetts. 

William  Bruce  Earl  was  born  in  Lowell,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  April  25,  1869,  and  there  began  his  education  in  the 
public  schools.  After  finishing  preparatory  school 
work  he  entered  Dartmouth  College,  whence  he  was 
graduated  Bachelor  of  Science,  class  of  1892.  After 
graduation  he  spent  three  years  in  New  York  City  with 
the  jewelry  house  of  Aiken,  Lambert  &  Company,  of 
Maiden  Lane,  then,  in  1895,  joined  his  father  and  uncle 
in  the  firm  of  William  D.  Earl  &  Company,  organized 
in  1869.  Four  years  later  the  uncle,  Thomas  A.  Earl, 
retired,  father  and  son  continuing  in  close  business  as¬ 
sociation  until  1911,  when  the  father  retired,  leaving  the 
son  in  control.  In  January,  1912,  the  business  was  in¬ 
corporated  as  W.  D.  Earl  &  Company,  Incorporated, 
William  B.  Earl,  treasurer,  an  office  he  yet  ably  fills. 
The  company  manufactures  a  line  of  horn  and  ivory 
goods  in  large  quantities,  leading  all  other  Leominster 
manufacturers  of  that  class  of  goods.  The  company  has 
now  been  in  business  as  firm  and  corporation  under  the 
same  name  for  fifty-four  years,  1869-1923,  and  is  still 
owned  in  the  Earl  name,  as  it  has  been  from  the  be¬ 
ginning. 

Mr.  Earl  is  a  member  of  the  Unitarian  church,  serv¬ 
ing  on  the  official  board  and  as  chairman  of  the  parish 
committee.  In  political  faith  he  is  a  Republican,  and 
in  civic  progress  a  member  of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce 
and  ex-president.  He  is  also  a  member  of  Leominster 
Red  Cross,  of  which  he  is  past  president;  member  of 
Wachusetts  Camp,  Boy  Scouts  of  America,  and  (1923) 
vice-president  and  counsel.  His  clubs  are  the  Leomin¬ 
ster  and  the  Monoosnock  Country.  His  favorite  rec¬ 
reations  are  traveling  and  golf. 

On  October  12,  1904,  William  B.  Earl  married  Joanna 
Thayer,  of  Milford,  Massachusetts,  daughter  of  George 
and  Agnes  (Cook)  Thayer.  They  are  the  parents  of 
two  children:  Agnes  Helen,  born  January  30,  1909;  and 
William  Bruce  (2),  born  April  11,  1911. 


GEORGE  FREDERICK  CURLEY,  M.  D.,  a  rep¬ 
resentative  physician  of  Milford,  Worcester  County, 
Massachusetts,  has  for  twenty-five  years  practiced  in 
this  community  and  has  won  a  very  high  place  in  the 
confidence  and  regard  of  the  people.  Dr.  Curley  is  a 
native  of  the  State  of  Massachusetts,  where  his  family 
has  lived  for  many  years,  and  he  is  a  son  of  Walter  and 
Mary  (Sullivan)  Curry. 

George  Frederick  Curley  was  born  at  Upton,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  June  1,  1872.  His  early  education  was  acquired 
in  the  local  public  schools  and  the  high  school,  and  he 
was  graduated  from  the  Massachusetts  College  of  Agri¬ 
culture,  at  Amherst,  in  the  class  of  1893.  Then  choosing 
the  medical  profession  for  the  field  of  his  life  work, 
he  entered  Jefferson  Medical  College,  at  Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania,  and  was  graduated  from  that  institution 
in  the  class  of  1896,  with  the  degree  of  Doctor  of  Med¬ 
icine.  During  the  year  following  his  graduation,  Dr. 
Curley  acted  as  interne  at  the  General  Hospital  of 
Elizabeth,  New  Jersey,  then  in  1897  returned  to  his 


native  State  to  practice,  settling  at  Milford.  He  early 
gained  the  good  will  of  the  people  and  his  success  was 
assured  from  the  first.  He  has  now  for  many  years 
held  a  leading  position  in  the  profession  in  this  part  of 
the  county  of  Worcester,  and  is  a  member  of  the  Amer¬ 
ican  Medical  Association,  the  Massachusetts  Medical 
Society,  and  the  Worcester  County  Medical  Society.  He 
serves  on  the  surgical  staff  of  the  Milford  Hospital,  and 
for  a  number  of  years  has  acted  as  assistant  medical 
examiner  of  Worcester  County.  A  Democrat  by  polit¬ 
ical  affiliation,  Dr.  Curley  lends  his  support  to  all  branches 
of  public  advance,  but  has  never  accepted  official  re¬ 
sponsibilities,  except  along  the  lines  of  his  professional 
work.  He  was  active  in  many  branches  of  home  en¬ 
deavor  during  the  World  War,  also  served  as  chair¬ 
man  of  the  medical  advisory  board.  He  is  a  member 
of  the  local  lodge  of  the  Knights  of  Columbus,  and  of 
St.  Mary’s  Roman  Catholic  Church. 

Dr.  Curley  married,  in  Milford,  Massachusetts,  on 
June  20,  1900,  Cecelia  McGann,  daughter  of  John  and 
Mary  McGann,  and  they  are  the  parents  of  one  daugh¬ 
ter,  Regina. 


THE  HON.  GEORGE  J.  BRUNELL,  one  of  the 

most  prominent  figures  in  Webster,  Massachusetts,  in 
manufacturing  circles,  in  civic  affairs,  in  fraternal  mat¬ 
ters,  and  in  all  social  and  benevolent  advance,  has  for 
many  years  been  identified  with  the  progress  of  the 
community,  and  is  now  enjoying  more  than  local  prom¬ 
inence  as  a  manufacturer  of  confectionery.  Mr.  Brunell 
is  a  son  of  Ambroise  and  Celina  (Huot)  Brunell.  His 
father  was  a  painter  and  interior  decorator  and  for 
many  years  was  employed  in  the  car  shops  of  Springfield, 
Massachusetts,  in  this  capacity. 

George  J.  Brunell  was  born  at  St.  Cesaire,  Province 
of  Quebec,  Canada,  November  1,  1866.  The  family  re¬ 
moving  to  Springfield,  Massachusetts,  in  his  childhood, 
and  he  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  that  city, 
covering  both  grammar  and  high  school  courses.  While 
still  at  school  and  for  a  time  thereafter  he  was  em¬ 
ployed  at  various  clerical  positions,  such  as  a  youth  with 
only  slight  experience  can  handle,  then  he  went  to  Wor¬ 
cester,  Massachusetts,  to  become  associated  with  his 
brother,  A.  H.  Brunell.  This  brother  was  engaged  in 
the  manufacture  of  confectionery,  and  there  Mr.  Brunell 
thoroughly  familiarized  himself  with  the  trade  in  all  its 
branches,  eventually  having  charge  of  the  factory  and 
becoming  a  partner.  Coming  to  Webster  in  the  year 
1899,  Mr.  Brunell  started  for  himself  in  a  small  way, 
jobbing  confectionery  .and  during  the  early  years  of  this 
experience  was  more  or  less  on  the  road  as  a  salesman. 
In  time  he  enlarged  his  business  materially  and  added 
a  manufacturing  branch  and  his  success  has  enabled  him 
to  expand  the  interest  very  largely.  He  now  has  a 
thoroughly  up-to-date  factory,  well  built  and  spacious, 
fitted  up  with  all  the  improved  machinery  and  equip¬ 
ment  for  the  manufacture  of  a  strictly  high  class  prod¬ 
uct.  His  product  is  marketed  through  jobbers  and  to 
the  retail  trade,  and  he  employs  twenty-five  to  thirty 
people.  Mr.  Brunell  is  a  man  of  genial  spirit,  and 
from  the  Webster  school  boy  who  calls  at  the  store  with 
his  penny  to  the  biggest  order  from  Southern  Texas  or 
Western  Oklahoma,  every  customer  feels  the  cordiality 
with  which  he  meets  the  trade.  His  success  has  been 


90 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


well  earned,  and  to  all  who  know  him  he  is  the  type 
which  represents  the  best  American  citizenship.  Mr. 
Brunell  has  for  many  years  been  active  in  any  progres¬ 
sive  effort  or  movement  which  promised  to  be  of  benefit 
to  the  community  of  Webster.  Politically  he  supports 
the  Republican  party,  and  for  fourteen  years  he  has 
served  as  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Selectmen,  now 
acting  as  chairman  of  the  board.  For  five  years  he 
represented  this  district  in  the  Massachusetts  State 
Legislature,  his  work  as  a  legislator  reflected  credit 
not  only  on  himself  but  on  his  constituents.  During  the 
World  War  Mr.  Brunell  was  very  active  as  chairman  of 
the  Advisory  Board  and  Public  Safety  Committee,  also 
chairman  of  “four-minute”  men.  He  is  a  forceful  and 
persuasive  public  speaker  and  devoted  much  of  his  time 
to  addressing  gatherings,  both  impromptu  and  on  pro¬ 
grammes  prearranged,  in  the  interest  of  recruiting  and 
also  for  the  many  drives  of  the  time.  Mr.  Brunell  was 
a  foremost  worker  for  the  honor  roll  tablet,  which  now 
is  the  pride  of  Webster,  raising  a  larger  portion  of  the 
money  required.  Fraternally  he  is  identified  with  the 
Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks,  the  Knights 
of  Columbus,  the  Improved  Order  of  Red  Men,  and  as¬ 
sociate  member  of  the  Grand  Army  of  the  Republic.  He 
is  a  member  of  Club  Gagnon,  and  is  a  charter  member 
and  one  of  the  founders  of  the  Worcester  Commercial 
Travelers’  Club.  His  religious  affiliation  is  with  the 
Sacred  Heart  Roman  Catholic  Church. 

Mr.  Brunell  married,  at  Webster,  Rose  A.  Authier, 
daughter  of  Hubert  and  Laura  (Benoit)  Authier.  Mr. 
Authier  was  a  veteran  of  the  Civil  War,  and  for  many 
years  a  member  of  the  Grand  Army  of  the  Republic; 
also  prominent  in  town  affairs,  serving  as  a  member  of 
the  Board  of  Selectmen,  being  Mr.  Brunell’s  predeces¬ 
sor  on  the  board.  He  was  a  grocer  by  occupation. 


EDWIN  F.  BRAINARD — A  prominent  executive  of 
the  world-famous  chair  industry  of  Gardner,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  is  Edwin  F.  Brainard,  who  for  upwards  of 
twenty-nine  years,  has  been  identified  with  the  firm  of 
S.  K.  Pierce  &  Son  Company  a  leading  concern  in  this 
field  in  the  Chair  City.  Mr.  Brainard  is  preeminently 
a  man  of  business,  and  his  interests  are  broad  in  their 
scope. 

The  Brainard  family  is  one  of  the  very  old  families 
of  New  York  City,  and  there  James  F.  Brainard  Mr. 
Brainard’s  father,  was  born.  Reared  and  educated  in 
the  metropolis,  James  F.  Brainard  was  a  youth  of  eigh¬ 
teen  years  when  the  war  broke  out  between  the  North 
and  the  South,  and  fresh  from  school  he  enlisted  in 
defence  of  the  Union.  One  of  the  very  first  volun¬ 
teers  of  that  stirring  time,  he  joined  the  Hawkins’ 
Zouaves,  and  served  with  that  body  until  the  battle  of 
Antietam,  in  which  he  was  wounded.  Following  his 
discharge  from  the  hospital,  he  was  assigned  to  detached 
duty,  and  sent  to  New  York  City,  where  he  served 
until  the  close  of  the  war.  Upon  his  return  to  the  ac¬ 
tivities  of  civilian  life  James  F.  Brainard  associated 
himself  with  the  internationally  known  firm  of  Belding 
Brothers,  silk  manufacturers,  securing  a  position  in  their 
New  York  office.  There  he  displayed  a  marked  genius 
for  the  matching  of  colors,  a  talent  particularly  valu¬ 
able  to  the  concern  in  their  line  of  industrial  endeavor. 
He  was  sent  to  the  Northampton  (Massachusetts)  fac¬ 


tories  of  the  company,  where,  until  the  close  of  his 
active  career  he  held  the  position  of  color  expert.  He 
died  in  the  year  1904,  at  the  age  of  sixty-three  years,  a 
man  of  high  character  and  signal  usefulness,  honored 
by  his  associates  and  esteemed  by  all  who  knew  him. 
James  F.  Brainard  married,  in  New  York  City,  Mary  H. 
Andruss,  also  a  member  of  one  of  the  early  families  of 
New  York  City,  and  she  is  now  deceased. 

Edwin  F.  Brainard,  son  of  these  parents,  was  born 
in  New  York  City,  June  8,  1868.  His  education  was 
begun  in  the  public  schools  of  his  native  city,  and  he 
was  graduated  from  the  New  York  City  Normal  School 
in  the  class  of  1883.  Caring  little,  however,  for  a  career 
in  the  professions,  he  interested  himself  in  industrial 
advance  immediately  following  the  completion  of  his 
education.  His  first  position  was  in  the  engineering  and 
drafting  department  of  the  Thomas  A.  Edison  Company 
in  their  New  York  office.  But  when  the  family  removed 
to  Northampton,  Massachusetts,  not  wishing  to  leave 
home,  he  accompanied  them  to  that  city.  There  he 
secured  a  position  in  the  employ  of  the  Florence  Machine 
Company,  a  pioneer  concern  in  the  manufacture  of  sew¬ 
ing  machines  and  oil  stoves.  Beginning  with  this  com¬ 
pany  as  cost  clerk,  he  remaining  with  them  in  the  same 
capacity  until  the  time  when  practically  all  the  manufac¬ 
turers  of  oil  stoves  consolidated,  then  went  with  the 
new  concern  to  Boston,  where  he  was  placed  in  charge 
of  the  interests  of  the  company  at  that  point,  as  man¬ 
ager  of  their  Boston  office.  Active  thus  until  he  fall 
of  1893,  Mr.  Brainard  was  stricken  with  typhoid  fever, 
and  was  compelled  to  resign  his  position,  as  the  con¬ 
valescent  stage  lingered  for  more  than  a  year.  In  the 
spring  of  1894  he  came  to  Gardner  and  became  associ¬ 
ated  with  S.  K.  Pierce  &  Son  Company  in  the  capac¬ 
ity  of  traveling  salesman,  and  represented  the  concern 
on  the  road  for  about  two  years.  His  executive  ability 
and  thorough  familiarity  with  business  conditions  were 
appreciated  by  the  concern,  and  he  was  called  into  the 
office  and  made  general  manager  of  the  business.  This 
position  he  filled  with  definite  and  increasingly  success¬ 
ful  results,  until  the  incorporation  of  the  concern,  which 
occurred  on  January  x,  1920,  when  he  was  elected  vice- 
president.  This  office  he  has  held  since,  and  also  still 
fills  the  responsible  position  of  general  manager.  This 
interest,  which  was  founded  by  Sylvester  K.  Pierce  in 
the  year  1830,  is  one  of  the  important  industries 
of  Gardner.  Besides  the  factory  in  this  city  they  have 
two  commodious  warehouses,  one  in  Boston,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  and  one  in  Brooklyn,  New  York.  They  ship  their 
product  to  all  parts  of  the  world,  and  hold  a  very  high 
position  in  the  trade.  During  the  period  of  nearly  three 
decades  in  which  Mr.  Brainard  has  been  identified  with 
this  concern  his  work  has  contributed  largely  to  their 
present  eminence  and  their  great  success.  Mr.  Brainard’s 
further  business  affiliations  include  the  presidency  of 
the  Metropolitan  Chair  Company,  of  New  Haven  and 
Hartford,  Connecticut,  and  directorships  in  the  Gardner 
Trust  Company  and  the  Chair  Town  Cooperative  Bank, 
of  Gardner.  His  success  is  his  own  achievement.  In 
fraternal  circles  he  is  prominent,  being  a  member  of 
Hope  Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted  Masons;  Gardner 
Chapter,  Royal  Arch  Masons ;  Ivanhoe  Commandery, 
Knights  Templar;  Massachusetts  Consistory,  Ancient 
Accepted  Scottish  Rite;  also  Aleppo  Temple,  Ancient 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


9i 


Arabic  Order  Nobles  of  the  Mystic  Shrine,  of  Boston. 
He  further  holds  membership  in  Gardner  Lodge,  No. 
1426,  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks.  Hs  is 
a  member  of  the  Gardner  Boat  Club,  which  he  served 
as  president  in  1919-21 ;  the  Oak  Hill  Country  Club,  of 
Fitchburg;  the  Worcester  Country  Club;  the  Ridgely 
Country  Club,  of  Gardner;  and  is  also  a  member  of  the 
Monadnock  Sporting  Club  of  Monadnock,  New  Hamp¬ 
shire.  His  religious  affiliation  is  with  St.  Paul’s  Epis¬ 
copal  Church  of  Gardner,  with  which  his  family  are  also 
connected. 

Edwin  F.  Brainard  married,  in  1890,  Abbie  Kirtland 
Brown,  of  Northampton,  Massachusetts,  daughter  of 
Dr.  Rufus  D.  and  Catherine  Sherwood  (Cone)  Brown, 
her  father  a  well-known  dental  surgeon  of  that  com¬ 
munity.  They  are  the  parents  of  four  children:  Mabel 
K.,  who  died  at  the  age  of  fourteen  years;  E.  Warren, 
who  is  employed  as  shipping  clerk  with  S.  K.  Pierce  & 
Son  Company;  Francis  N.,  who  has  completed  his  junior 
year  at  Boston  University;  and  Richard  B.,  now  a  junior 
at  Gardner  High  School. 


JOSEPH  E.  CASEY  — Professional  circles  in  Clin¬ 
ton,  Massachusetts,  number  among  their  most  progres¬ 
sive  and  promising  young  members  Joseph  E.  Casey, 
who  has  for  the  past  three  years  been  engaged  in  the 
practice  of  law  in  this  community.  Mr.  Casey  is  a 
member  of  a  family  who  are  old  residents  of  Clinton, 
and  was  himself  born  there,  December  27,  1898,  his  par¬ 
ents  being  John  E.  Casey,  a  native  of  Clinton,  who>  was 
in  the  machinery  business  here  until  his  retirement,  and 
Winifred  F.  Casey,  who  was  born  at  Heckla,  New  York. 

After  completing  his  studies  in  the  Clinton  High 
School,  Joseph  E.  Casey  entered  Boston  College,  and 
then  took  a  course  at  Boston  University,  graduating 
from  that  institution  of  learning  with  the  class  of  1920, 
and  receiving  with  his  diploma  the  degree  of  Bachelor 
of  Laws.  The  same  year  he  began  the  practice  of  his 
profession  in  Clinton,  having  formed  the  firm  of  Casey 
&  Scanlon,  with  offices  at  No.  136  High  Street.  Mr. 
Scanlon  later  located  at  Boston,  and  Mr.  Casey  is,  ac¬ 
cordingly,  conducting  the  legal  practice  of  the  firm 
unassisted.  He  has  been  very  successful  in  his  en¬ 
deavors,  and  is  serving  a  constantly  growing  clientele 
in  Clinton  and  the  surrounding  section. 

Outside  of  his  profession  Mr.  Casey  is  interested  in 
social  and  civic  affairs,  and  was  town  moderator  for  one 
year,  while  he  also  served  for  a  similar  period  as  town 
solicitor.  He  is  active  in  the  work  of  the  Knights  of 
Columbus,  and  is  a  communicant  of  St.  John’s  Roman 
Catholic  Church.  He  is  well  known  as  a  member  of 
the  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks,  and  be¬ 
longs  to  the  American  Legion.  During  the  World 
War  Mr.  Casey  served  with  the  8th  Brigade  at  Camp 
Devens,  Massachusetts,  in  the  United  States  Army,  later 
being  sent  to  the  Officers’  Training  Camp  at  Camp  Lee, 
Virginia,  where  he  remained  until  the  armistice  was 
signed,  when  he  was  discharged  with  the  rank  of  private. 


MARCUS  NEWELL  WRIGHT— Among  the  young 
men  of  Gardner,  Massachusetts,  who  are  holding  posi¬ 
tions  of  large  responsibility  Mr.  Wright  is  a  leading 
figure,  as  cashier  of  the  First  National  Bank.  A  native 
of  Gardner  and  reared  in  this  community,  he  faithfully 


discharged  his  duty  to  the  nation  during  the  recent 
World  War,  and  has  since  served  in  his  present  capacity, 
enjoying  the  confidence  and  esteem  of  all  who  know  him. 

The  Wright  family  is  a  very  ancient  one  in  England, 
and  for  many  generations  has  been  established  in  the 
United  States,  Nathaniel  Wright,  Mr.  Wright’s  great¬ 
grandfather,  was  a  resident  of  Gardner,  Massachusetts, 
and  his  son,  Marcus  Wright,  owned  a  saw  mill  here, 
conducting  a  very  extensive  business  for  his  time.  He 
was  succeeded  by  his  son,  Lewis  A.  Wright,  who  inher¬ 
ited  his  property.  Lewis  A.  Wright  conducted  the  saw 
mill  for  several  years,  then  became  lumber  buyer  for  the 
great  concern  which  holds  so  important  a  position  in  the 
industrial  affairs  of  Gardner,  the  Heywood  Brothers  & 
Wakefield  Company,  one  of  the  largest  manufacturers  of 
chairs  in  the  world.  Lewis  A.  Wright  married  Edith  G. 
Newell,  who  is  also  still  living. 

Marcus  Newell  Wright  was  born  at  Gardner,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  June  26,  1889.  His  education  comprised  the 
usual  course  of  the  elementary,  grammar,  and  high 
schools  af  Gardner,  his  graduation  from  high  school 
having  been  with  the  class  of  1907,  and  having  been 
followed  by  a  special  business  course.  For  one  year 
following  the  completion  of  his  studies  he  was  employed 
in  the  city  of  Worcester,  then  in  1909  he  returned  to 
Gardner  to  accept  a'  position  as  bookkeeper  at  the  First 
National  Bank.  By  assiduous  application  to  his  work, 
Mr.  Wright  familiarized  himself  with  the  principles  of 
banking  and  made  himself  necessary  to  the  institution. 
He  was  appointed  assistant  cashier  in  the  year  1913,  at 
the  age  of  twenty-four  years.  About  four  years  later, 
on  September  21,  1917,  he  laid  down  the  interests  of 
peace  to  take  up  the  activities  of  war,  and  while  he  was 
in  the  service  he  was  elected  cashier  of  the  First  Na¬ 
tional  Bank  of  Gardner,  the  duties  of  which  office  he 
assumed  upon  his  return  to'  civilian  life.  He  commands 
the  respect  and  confidence  of  his  associates  and  business 
contemporaries  as  well  as  the  general  public,  and  is 
counted  among  the  leading  young  men  of  the  city. 

The  military  record  of  Marcus  N.  Wright  began  with 
his  enlistment  in  the  United  States  Army  on  September 
21,  1917.  He  was  assigned  to  the  Depot  Brigade,  then 
was  transferred  to  the  finance  division  of  the  surgeon- 
general’s  office  at  Washington,  District  of  Columbia, 
with  which  he  was  connected  for  five  months,  during 
which  period  he  was  made  sergeant  of  the  Medical 
Corps.  Later  appointed  chief  clerk  of  the  Medical 
Supply  Depot  at  Camp  Devens,  at  Ayer,  Massachusetts, 
he  was  made  sergeant  of  the  first  class  while  at  that 
point,  then  was  made  hospital  sergeant.  On  September  5, 
1917,  he  was  commissioned  second  lieutenant  and  as¬ 
signed  to  duty  at  the  recruiting  camp  at  Syracuse,  New 
York,  where  he  remained  until  November  20,  1918,  when 
he  was  transferred  to  the  Medical  Supply  Depot  at  New 
York  City,  serving  there  until  his  discharge,  on  December 
24,  1918,  with  the  rank  of  second  lieutenant.  Mr.  Wright 
is  now  a  member  of  Gardner  Post,  No.  129,  American 
Legion,  of  which  he  was  the  first  treasurer,  serving  for 
four  years.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Gardner  Chamber 
of  Commerce,  which  he  serves  on  the  board  of  directors, 
and  politically  holds  independent  convictions. 

Fraternally  Mr.  Wright  is  affiliated  with  Hope  Lodge, 
Free  and  Accepted  Masons ;  Gardner  Chapter,  Royal 
Arch  Masons,  of  which  he  is  Scribe;  Ivanhoe  Com- 


92 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


mandery,  Knights  Templar,  of  which  he  is  treasurer; 
and  Gardner  Lodge,  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order 
of  Elks,  of  which  he  is  also  treasurer.  He  takes  a  deep 
interest  in  all  that  contributes  to  the  welfare  of  the 
people,  and  is  treasurer  of  the  Levi  Hey  wood  Memorial 
Library  of  Gardner.  His  clubs  are:  The  Oak  Hill 
Country,  the  Gardner  Boat,  the  Chair  City. 

Mr.  Wright  married,  on  October  4,  1913,  Mary  L. 
Harriman,  of  Cambridge,  Massachusetts,  and  they  re¬ 
side  in  Gardner,  attending  the  First  Unitarian  Church 
of  this  city. 


JAMES  COTTON  — A  name  which  has  meant  much 
to  Athol,  Massachusetts,  is  that  of  James  Cotton,  who 
was  active  in  the  lumber  business  until  his  retirement, 
and  was  an  able  and  broadly  noteworthy  executive.  But 
the  history  of  Mr.  Cotton’s  life  is  by  no  means  bounded 
by  the  scope  of  his  business  interests.  His  usefulness 
to  the  community  was  a  constant  influence  in  the  right 
direction  and  from  boyhood  until  his  death  he  gave  of 
his  best  to  all  forward  endeavors.  He  participated  in 
the  closing  year  of  the  Civil  War,  although  he  was  still 
under  sixteen  years  of  age  upon  his  enlistment,  and  this 
eagerness  to  champion  any  good  cause  was  an  exponent 
of  his  lifelong  character.  Mr.  Cotton  was  a  son  of 
Michael  and  Katherine  (McCarthy)  Cotton,  of  Prince¬ 
ton,  Massachusetts,  progressive  people  of  an  early  day. 
The  father  owned  a  large  farm  in  Princeton  and  was  a 
farmer. 

James  Cotton  was  born  at  Princeton  Massachusetts, 
November  1,  1848.  His  education  was  begun  in  the 
local  public  schools  and  following  his  graduation  from 
grammar  school  he  came  to  Athol  when  only  fifteen 
years  of  age  and  secured  employment  in  the  plant  of 
the  Miller’s  River  Manufacturing  Company.  The  Civil 
War  was  at  that  time  raging  and  was  the  topic  of  daily 
conversation  in  every  group  throughout  the  country.  In 
August,  1864,  some  three  months  prior  to  his  sixteenth 
birthday,  Mr.  Cotton  enlisted  in  Company  H,  4th  Regi¬ 
ment,  Massachusetts  Heavy  Artillery,  and  served  until 
the  close  of  the  war.  Upon  his  return  to  civilian  life 
he  entered  the  match  business  in  partnership  with  J.  M. 
Cheney,  of  Athol,  in  which  connection  he  was  active  until 
the  year  1878.  Mr.  Cotton  then  struck  out  indepen¬ 
dently  in  the  lumber  business  and  early  developing  a 
substantial  interest,  he  carried  it  forward  to  steadily 
increasing  importance  and  was  at  the  head  of  the  enter¬ 
prise  until  his  retirement  from  active  life,  which  took 
place  in  the  year  1912.  For  several  years  thereafter  he 
continued  his  activities  for  community  advance,  but  ill 
health  at  last  compelled  him  to  give  up  all  interests,  and 
he  died  of  diabetes,  at  his  home  on  School  Street,  in 
Athol,  at  8  o’clock  on  the  morning  of  August  1,  1916. 

For  many  years  Mr.  Cotton  held  a  leading  place  in 
the  civic  and  welfare  advance  of  Athol.  For  twenty 
years  he  served  as  constable  of  the  town,  and  for  eight 
years  as  Selectman.  Fraternally  he  was  very  promi¬ 
nent,  holding  membership  in  Star  Lodge,  Free  and  Ac¬ 
cepted  Masons;  Union  Chapter,  Royal  Arch  Masons; 
Athol  Commandery,  Knights  Templar;  and  also  was 
a  member  of  the  Ancient  Arabic  Order  Nobles  of  the 
Mystic  Shrine.  He  was  for  many  years  a  leading 
member  of  Parker  Post,  Grand  Army  of  the  Republic; 
and  his  benevolences  among  the  comrades  of  his  early 


war  experiences  were  many,  although  known  only  to 
the  beneficiaries.  He  was  long  a  member  of  the  Poquaig 
Club,  of  Athol,  and  in  many  social  circles  was  welcomed 
for  his  genial  spirit,  as  well  as  for  his  high  standing  in 
the  community.  It  was  through  his  generosity  that  the 
bell  was  hung  in  the  Our  Lady  Immaculate  Church,  his 
donation  being  in  memory  of  his  daughter.  It  was  pur¬ 
chased  in  the  year  1910,  and  its  mellow  tone  is  the  pride 
of  the  parish.  Mr.  Cotton’s  chief  leisure  interest  was 
horses,  and  especially  during  his  latter  years  he  took 
great  delight  in  the  races.  He  knew  and  loved  horses 
and  did  much  for  the  encouragement  of  humane  treat¬ 
ment  of  these  servants  of  men. 

Mr.  Cotton  married,  November  15,  1866,  Maria  Plun¬ 
kett,  of  Athol,  Massachusets,  who  died  September  20, 
1914.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Cotton  were  the  parents  of  the  fol¬ 
lowing  children:  Mrs.  Joseph  Egger,  Frederick,  John, 
Thomas,  James,  Mrs.  Edward  D.  Leonard,  and  Mrs. 
L.  N.  Giddings,  of  Worcester. 

There  are  few  interests  either  of  a  public  or  social 
nature  in  the  town  of  Athol  which  were  not  affected  by 
the  death  of  this  worthy  and  broad-minded  citizens.  His 
lingering  illness  made  the  event  one  not  unexpected,  but 
when  the  news  went  abroad  that  he  was  gone  the  entire 
community  mourned.  His  interest  in  every  branch  of 
progress  had  been  so  keen  and  his  judgment  in  all 
serious  affairs  so  wise  and  practical,  that  his  loss  was 
felt  most  deeply  in  every  circle.  His  genial  disposition 
had  made  him  a  friend  of  every  man,  and  the  thought 
that  he  has  passed  out  of  human  reach  brought  sadness 
to  all  who  had  known  him.  His  funeral  services  were 
largely  attended  and  were  held  at  the  chapel  at  Silver 
Lake  Cemetery,  in  charge  of  Athol  Commandery, 
Knights  Templar.  He  is  gone  but  his  memory  remains 
for  all  whose  privilege  it  was  to  know  him,  at  once  a 
benediction  and  an  inspiration  to  higher  effort. 


CHARLES  R.  ABBOTT,  M.  D.— A  prominent  rep¬ 
resentative  of  the  medical  profession  in  this  section 
of  Worcester  County,  Massachusetts,  is  Dr.  Charles  R. 
Abbott,  of  Clinton,  who  has  been  engaged  in  practice 
here  since  1913.  Dr.  Abbott  came  originally  from  San- 
bornton,  New  Hampshire,  where  he  was  born  Septem¬ 
ber  7,  1883.  The  family  were  early  settlers  in  that 
State.  His  paternal  grandfather  was  Dr.  James  B. 
Abbott,  who  was  born  at  Northfield,  New  Hampshire, 
where  he  was  a  practicing  physician  for  twenty-six 
years,  and  a  well  known  and  highly  respected  member 
of  the  profession,  having  been  president  of  the  New 
Hampshire  Medical  Society  in  i860.  His  grandmother 
was  Sarah  Gerrish,  born  at  Canterbury,  New  Hampshire, 
and  died  in  1893.  His  father,  Joseph  G.  Abbott,  was 
also  a  native  of  Sanbornton,  where  he  was  born  Novem¬ 
ber  4,  1845,  and  was  engaged  as  a  travelling  salesman 
until  his  death  on  March  25,  1914.  His  mother,  Sarah 
A.  (Peck)  Abbott,  was  a  native  of  Jericho,  Vermont, 
whose  birth  occurred  July  24,  1847,  and  who  passed 
away  February  25,  1915. 

Dr.  Abbott  received  his  early  education  through  the 
medium  of  the  district  schools  of  his  native  community 
and  at  Boscawen,  New  Hampshire,  later  entering  the 
Kimball  Union  Academy  at  Meriden,  of  the  same  State, 
from  which  he  graduated  with  the  class  of  1902.  Fol¬ 
lowing  this  he  went  into  business  as  a  druggist  at  Han- 


''cfyTn  eXi 


& 


v 


4 


S'. 


■  ■ 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


93 


over,  New  Hampshire,  continuing  in  this  line  for  five 
years,  after  which  in  1907,  he  took  up  the  study  of 
medicine  at  the  Dartmouth  Medical  College,  receiving  his 
diploma  with  the  class  of  1911,  and  also  the  degree  of 
Doctor  of  Medicine.  The  two  years  subsequent  to  his 
graduation  he  was  house  surgeon  in  the  Worcester  City 
Hospital,  and  at  the  end  of  this  period,  in  1913,  he  came 
to  Clinton  to  establish  a  practice,  and  has  remained  here 
ever  since,  his  offices  being  at  No.  70  Walnut  Street.  He 
is  also  a  member  of  the  Clinton  Hospital  staff,  as  junior 
surgeon  and  Rontgenologist  and  surgeon  for  the  Wick- 
wire  Spencer  Steel  Corporation. 

Dr.  Abbott  is  a  man  of  progressive  character  and 
keeps  fully  abreast  of  the  times  in  his  profession,  main¬ 
taining  membership  in  many  of  the  leading  professional 
organizations,  including  the  American  Medical  Associ¬ 
ation,  Massachusetts  Medical  Society,  Worcester  Dis¬ 
trict  Medical  Society  New  England  Rontgen  Ray  So¬ 
ciety,  and  the  American  College  of  Surgeons.  His  col¬ 
lege  fraternity  is  the  Alpha  Kappa  Kappa  of  Dartmouth, 
and  he  belongs  to  Trinity  Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted 
Masons,  and  is  a  prominent  member  of  the  local  Cham¬ 
ber  of  Commerce.  His  religious  affiliation  is  with  the 
Congregational  church. 

Dr.  Abbott  married,  in  1915,  Gladys  I.  Jeffrey  a  native 
of  Clinton.  They  have  two  children:  Charles  R.,  Jr., 
born  February  26,  1917;  and  Constance,  born  April 

29,  1919- 


FRED  T.  COFFIN — Standing  among  the  foremost 
manufacturers  of  Gardner,  Massachusetts,  Mr.  Coffin 
holds  a  prominent  position  in  the  industrial  world  of 
Worcester  County,  and  his  activities  as  the  founder 
and  owner  of  the  Coffin  Chair  Company  place  him  in  the 
front  line  of  progress.  Mr.  Coffin  is  a  son  of  Tristram 
T.  and  Esther  (Gilman)  Coffin.  The  father  was  born  in 
Bath,  Maine,  and  was  a  well-known  manufacturer  of 
currier’s  tools  of  Woburn,  Massachusetts.  He  was  a 
man  of  enterprising  spirit,  and  his  death  at  the  com¬ 
paratively  early  age  of  forty-one  years,  in  1874,  removed 
from  the  industrial  circles  of  that  section  a  man  of 
genuine  worth  and  ability.  The  mother,  who  was  born 
at  Dover,  New  Hampshire,  survived  him  for  many  years, 
passing  away  in  1896,  when  about  sixty-two  years  of  age. 

Fred  T.  Coffin  was  born  at  Woburn,  Massachusetts, 
January  24,  1865,  and  his  education  was  acquired  in 
the  public  schools  of  Hubbardston  and  Gardner  in  this 
county.  Only  nine  years  of  age  when  the  death  of  his 
father  occurred,  and  with  no  resources  whatever,  he 
was  obliged  to  make  his  own  way  from  this  early  age, 
and  after  reaching  his  seventeenth  year  he  supported  his 
mother  and  three  sisters.  Realizing  the  lack  of  oppor¬ 
tunities  of  an  educational  nature  which  he  suffered  from 
this  necessity,  the  young  man  then  took  up  regular 
courses  of  reading  and  study  to  suplement  his  limited 
advantages.  Meanwhile,  from  his  eleventh  year,  Mr. 
Coffin  was  employed  on  a  farm,  then  later  transferred 
his  time  to  work  in  a  saw  mill  and  in  this  connection 
rose  to  the  position  of  foreman.  He  was  identified  with 
saw  mill  activities  until  1901,  when  he  came  to  Gardner 
and  secured  a  position  with  the  John  A.  Dunn  Com¬ 
pany,  one  of  the  leading  chair  manufacturing  concerns 
of  this  community.  From  the  first  his  advance  was 
rapid.  He  spent  six  months  in  the  capacity  of  cost  clerk, 


after  which  he  was  promoted  to  shipping  clerk,  and  a 
year  and  half  afterward  he  was  made  superintendent 
of  the  plant.  In  this  important  position  he  served  the 
concern  until  1910,  when  he  resigned  to  engage  in  the 
manufacture  of  chairs  for  himself.  He  began  operations 
at  Hubbardston,  where  he  continued  for  two  years,  after 
which  he  organized  and  incorporated  the  Gardner  Chair 
Company,  of  which  he  was  made  treasurer  and  general 
manager.  In  the  spring  of  1917  Mr.  Coffin  sold  his  interest 
in  this  company  to  Joseph  P.  Carney  and  immediately  after¬ 
ward  established  the  present  business  in  Gardner.  With  a 
factory  at  No.  450  Chestnut  Street,  he  has  developed  a 
large  and  important  interest  in  the  six  years  which  have 
intervene  between  that  time  and  the  present.  He  has 
built  up  the  business  and  quadrupled  its  capacity.  It  is 
to-day  one  of  the  important  industrial  concerns  of  Gard¬ 
ner,  taking  rank  with  others  of  longer  activity.  Polit¬ 
ically  Mr.  Coffin  is  an  independent,  endorsing  many 
principles  of  the  Republican  party,  but  while  he  is  polit¬ 
ically  interested  in  all  public  advance,  he  has  never  thus 
far  accepted  public  honors  or  responsibilities.  Fra¬ 
ternally  he  is  identified  with  Gardner  Lodge,  No.  1426, 
Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks,  and  of  the 
Ancient  Order  of  United  Workmen.  He  also  is  a 
member  of  the  Gardner  Chamber  of  Commerce.  He  is 
a  member  of  the  Universalist  church. 

Mr.  Coffin  married  (first),  in  1890,  Clara  E.  Smith, 
of  Medway,  Massachusetts,  who  died  in  1920.  He  mar¬ 
ried  (second),  in  1921  Elsie  Hockman,  a  native  of  Fin¬ 
land,  who  came  to  the  United  States  in  1912,  and  they 
reside  in  Gardner. 


RAYMOND  L.  MIDDLEMAS — Numbered  among 
the  successful  business  men  of  Leominster,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  is  Raymond  L.  Middlemas,  treasurer  of  the  Leo¬ 
minster  Savings  Bank  who  after  a  wide  and  varied  ex¬ 
perience  in  other  institutions  came  to  Leominster  to 
accept  the  position  in  the  institution  with  which  he  is 
now  connected. 

Born  in  Millbury  Massachusetts,  June  18,  1889,  Ray¬ 
mond  L.  Middlemas  is  a  son  of  George  Edgar  Middle¬ 
mas,  a  native  of  Middletown,  Nova  Scotia,  who  during 
the  greater  part  of  his  active  life  was  engaged  as  a  me¬ 
chanic,  and  of  Alice  A.  (Williams)  Middlemas,  who  was 
bom  in  Lawrence,  Massachusetts,  and  is  now  living 

(1923). 

Raymond  L.  Middlemas  received  his  early  education 
in  the  public  schools  of  Brooklyn,  New  York,  and  upon 
the  completion  of  his  high  school  course  there,  became 
a  student  in  Worcester  Business  Institute,  of  Worcester, 
Massachusetts.  When  his  business  training  was  com¬ 
pleted  he  found  his  first  employment  as  clerk  in  the  em¬ 
ploy  of  the  Harrington  &  Richardson  Arms  Company  of 
Worcester,  with  whom  he  remained  for  a  period  of  three 
years.  At  the  end  of  that  time  he  associated  himself 
with  the  Mechanics’  National  Bank  of  Worcester,  where 
for  one  year  he  rendered  efficient  service  and  at  the 
same  time  gained  valuable  experience.  He  then  made 
a  change,  severing  his  connection  with  the  Mechanics’ 
National  Bank  in  order  to  accept  a  position  with  the 
Worcester  Mechanics’  Savings  Bank,  where  he  remained 
for  a  period  of  ten  years,  serving  as  chief  clerk.  At  the 
end  of  that  time,  in  1921,  he  removed  to  Leominster, 
Massachusetts,  where  he  accepted  the  official  position 


94 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


of  treasurer  of  the  Leominster  Savings  Bank.  Since 
that  time  he  has  proved  himself  to  be  an  able,  efficient, 
and  faithful  executive,  and  a  man  of  integrity  and  honor. 
He  has  won  the  confidence  and  esteem  of  his  associates 
in  the  bank  and  of  the  people  of  Leominster,  and  in  the 
short  time  he  has  been  a  resident  of  Leominster,  has 
made  many  friends.  He  is  secretary  of  the  Massachu¬ 
setts  Savings  Bank  Officers’  Club;  secretary  of  the 
Massachusetts  Mutual  Savings  Bank  (Group  Ten)  ;  and 
is  a  member  of  the  Leominster  Club.  He  takes  an 
active  interest  in  the  welfare  of  the  city  of  Leominster, 
and  is  always  ready  to  give  his  support  to  those  projects 
which  seem  to  him  well  planned  for  the  public  good.  His 
religious  connection  is  with  the  Pleasant  Street  Baptist 
Church  of  Worcester. 

Raymond  L.  Middlemas  married,  on  June  2,  1914, 
Susie  Bowater,  who  was  born  in  Sharon,  Pennsylvania, 
daughter  of  Richard  and  Elizabeth  (Gill)  Bowater.  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Middlemas  are  the  parents  of  two  children: 
Elizabeth,  born  August  21,  1916;  and  Raymond  L-,  born 
September  15,  1922. 


CHARLES  FRANCIS  WASHBURN,  secretary 
and  vice-president  of  the  Washburn  &  Moen  Manufac¬ 
turing  Company,  was  born  in  Harrison,  Maine,  August 
23,  1827,  and  died  in  Worcester,  July  20,  1893,  a  son 
of  Charles  and  Zibeah  Cary  (Blake)  Washburn.  He  at¬ 
tended  the  public  schools  of  Worcester  and  prepared 
for  college  at  Leicester  Academy,  from  which  he  was 
graduated.  He  was  prevented  by  illness  from  entering 
college,  as  he  had  planned,  but  he  pursued  his  studies 
and  extended  his  knowledge  by  private  reading,  and 
after  an  extended  trip  abroad,  began  his  business 
career  in  the  Washburn  rolling  mills  at  Quinsigamond. 
From  the  first  he  showed  special  aptitude  for  the  busi¬ 
ness,  and  in  many  ways  possessed  the  qualities  that 
characterized  his  uncle  as  well  as  his  father.  He  mas¬ 
tered  thoroughly  the  details  of  the  manufacturing  end 
of  the  business,  working  successively  in  all  the  different 
departments,  acquiring  mechanical  skill  as  well  as  a 
knowledge  of  the  counting  room.  In  1857  he  was  ad¬ 
mitted  to  partnership  under  the  firm  name  of  Charles 
Washburn  &  Son.  As  new  methods  came  into  use  and 
new  steel  products  came  into  demand,  the  business  ex¬ 
panded  rapidly.  The  company  kept  pace  with  the  ex¬ 
tension  of  uses  for  steel  and  iron. 

After  the  consolidation  of  the  plants  under  the 
name  of  the  Washburn  &  Moen  Manufacturing  Com¬ 
pany,  he  continued  active  in  the  business  as  secretary 
and  director,  later  vice-president.  The  greatest  period 
of  growth  followed.  Wire  for  every  purpose  was  man¬ 
ufactured  as  the  demand  was  created  in  invention.  Be¬ 
tween  i860  and  1870  great  quantities  of  wire  were 
used  for  hoopskirts.  Then  came  the  use  of  wire  for 
fences,  and  later,  for  telephone  and  telegraph  lines,  so 
new  departments  were  added  accordingly.  Mr.  Wash¬ 
burn  devoted  himself  with  the  utmost  energy  to  the 
management  and  development  of  the  wire  business,  and 
to  him  belongs  much  of  the  credit  for  its  growth  and 
for  placing  the  concern  among  the  foremost  wire 
mills  of  the  country. 

In  politics  Mr.  Washburn  was  of  the  Free  Soil  party, 
one  of  the  founders  of  the  Republican  party.  Though 
his  interest  in  municipal  affairs  and  in  politics  was  keen, 


the  demands  of  business  upon  his  time  and  energy  were 
so  great  that  he  had  to  decline  to  enter  public  service. 
The  only  office  he  held  was  in  the  Common  Council. 
He  was  a  communicant  of  All  Saints’  Protestant  Epis¬ 
copal  Church ;  active  in  various  charities ;  vice-presi¬ 
dent  of  the  Memorial  Hospital;  and  president  of  the 
Home  for  Aged  Women.  He  was  always  a  student, 
and  spent  all  his  leisure  hours  in  his  library.  In  his 
death  the  city  lost  a  strong,  able,  upright,  conscientious 
and  unselfish  citizen. 

Mr.  Washburn  married,  October  10,  1855,  Mary  Eliz¬ 
abeth  Whiton,  eldest  daughter  of  James  M.  Whiton,  of 
Boston,  Massachusetts,  and  Plymouth,  New  Hampshire. 
They  had  seven  sons  and  one  daughter:  Charles  Gren- 
fill;  James  M.,  who  died  in  infancy;  Philip,  born  August 
2,  1861,  died  October  6,  1898;  Miriam,  born  July  12, 
1864;  Robert  Morris;  Henry  B.,  born  December  2,  1869; 
Reginald;  and  Arthur,  born  May  27,  1877. 


WARREN  HASKINS  GOODALE,  a  successful 
business  man  of  Leominster,  Massachusetts,  organizer 
and  owner  of  the  Goodale  Comb  Company,  has  since 
1904  been  engaged  in  the  manufacture  of  celluloid  hair¬ 
pins  and  combs.  His  factory  is  at  the  rear  of  No.  93 
Water  Street,  and  consists  of  four  floors,  which  pro¬ 
vide  space  for  the  seventy  employees  required  to  pro¬ 
duce  the  large  output  which  is  sent  from  the  plant  to  all 
parts  of  the  country. 

Mr.  Goodale  was  born  in  Sterling,  Massachusetts, 
September  3,  1877,  son  of  Roland  W.  Goodale,  a  native 
of  Temple,  New  Hampshire,  who  was  engaged  in  farm¬ 
ing  until  the  time  of  his  death  in  1915,  and  of  Lucy  E. 
(Haskins)  Goodale,  who  was  born  in  North  Brookfield, 
Massachusetts,  and  died  in  1893.  He  received  his  early 
education  in  the  schools  of  Sterling,  Massachusetts,  and 
of  Leominster,  Massachusetts,  and  then  completed  his 
preparation  for  active  life  by  taking  a  commercial  course 
in  the  Fitchburg  Business  College.  He  had  begun  work 
at  the  age  of  fourteen,  and  after  completing  his  com¬ 
mercial  course  he  found  employment  as  factory  hand  in  a 
comb  factory,  where  he  remained  until  1900,  gaining  the 
experience  which  he  needed  for  the  successful  manage¬ 
ment  of  a  business  of  his  own.  Then,  with  partners, 
he  organized  the  Columbia  Comb  Company,  and  the  same 
year  their  factory  burned  to  the  ground.  He  then  en¬ 
gaged  in  the  horn  manufacturing  industry  for  himself, 
specializing  in  horn  hairpins  and  a  line  of  horn  combs, 
changing  in  1908  to  celluloid.  The  enterprise  has  been  suc¬ 
cessful  from  the  beginning,  and  at  the  present  time 
(1923)  the  Goodale  Comb  Company  is  ranked  among 
the  foremost  manufacturers  of  high-grade  hairpins  in 
the  country.  Mr.  Goodale  is  well  known  as  an  enter¬ 
prising  business  man  of  sound  principles  and  excellent 
judgment,  and  he  is  often  called  upon  to  express  his 
opinion  concerning  mooted  questions  in  business  affairs. 
In  addition  to  his  responsibilities  as  owner  and  man¬ 
ager  of  the  Goodale  Comb  Company,  he  is  president  of 
the  G.  W.  Lathe  Shoe  Company,  .with  stores  in  Clinton, 
Leominster,  Fitchburg,  Greenfield,  and  Northampton, 
and  is  a  member  of  the  board  of  directors  of  Leominster 
National  Bank. 

Fraternally  Mr.  Goodale  is  a  member  of  Leominster 
Lodge,  No.  1237,  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of 
Elks ;  of  Leominster  Lodge,  No.  86,  Independent  Order 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


95 


of  Odd  Fellows;  and  of  Wachusett  Tribe,  No.  41,  Im¬ 
proved  Order  of  Red  Men.  He  is  well  known  in  club 
circles,  being  a  member  of  the  Monoosnock  Country  Club, 
the  Leominster  Country  Club,  and  the  Bass  Point  Club. 
He  is  also  a  member  and  a  director  of  the  Leominster 
Chamber  of  Commerce;  his  religious  affiliation  is  with 
the  Episcopal  church  of  Leominster. 

Warren  H.  Goodale  married,  on  April  25,  1900,  Lotta 
E.  Whipple,  who  was  born  in  Providence,  Rhode  Island, 
daughter  of  Weston  W.  and  Mary  Ann  (Watson) 
Whipple.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Goodale  are  the  parents  of 
two  children:  Elaine  W.,  now  a  student  in  Vassar  Col¬ 
lege;  and  George  W.,  a  junior  in  Leominster  High 
School. 


HERBERT  WILLIAM  ELLAM,  M.  D.— Holding 
a  foremost  position  in  the  medical  profession  of  Wor¬ 
cester  County,  Massachusetts,  and  counted  among  the 
largely  successful  practitioners  in  the  realm  of  surgery, 
Dr.  Ellam,  of  Gardner,  is  a  noteworthy  figure  in  pro¬ 
fessional  activities  in  this  section.  He  is  a  son  of  John 
W.  Ellam,  who  was  born  in  Yorkshire,  England,  and 
came  to  the  United  States  in  infancy,  the  family  locating 
in  Clinton,  Massachusetts,  where  he  was  reared  and  edu¬ 
cated.  For  many  years  he  was  active  in  the  newspaper 
business  as  proprietor  and  editor,  first  in  Clinton,  and 
later  in  Southbridge,  Massachusetts.  He  is  still  living, 
although  retired  from  active  business  interests,  and 
making  his  home  with  his  son,  Dr.  Ellam.  He  married 
Anna  M.  O’Brien,  who  was  born  in  Harvard,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  and  died  in  Gardner,  in  1915. 

Dr.  Ellam  was  born  in  Clinton,  Massachusetts,  Sep¬ 
tember  3,  1879.  Attending  first  the  Southbridge  public 
schools,  he  was  graduated  from  high  school  in  the  same 
community  in  1897,  and  later,  in  1900,  he  entered  Har¬ 
vard  University  Medical  School,  from  which  he  re¬ 
ceived  his  degree  of  Doctor  of  Medicine  as  a  member 
of  the  class  of  1904.  Meanwhile,  during  the  summers  of 
1903-04,  he  acted  as  interne  in  the  Boston  Floating  Hos¬ 
pital.  From  1904-06,  he  filled  a  similar  position  in  the 
Worcester  City  Hospital,  then,  on  June  13,  1906,  he  took 
up  the  practice  of  his  chosen  profession,  opening  an 
office  in  Gardner.  Dr.  Ellam  has  been  heard  to  remark 
with  a  smile  that  his  telephone  number  is  thirteen  and 
that  one  of  his  diplomas  was  dated  on  the  twenty-third 
of  the  month,  but  it  was  clear  that  no  superstition  at¬ 
taching  to  these  numbers  has  influenced  him  in  his 
progress,  for  he  has  become  one  of  the  most  successful 
practitioners  in  his  field  in  Worcester  County.  Highly 
esteemed  both  in  the  profession  and  among  the  people, 
he  has  won  his  way  to  an  enviable  position  both  in  med¬ 
icine  and  in  surgery,  and  he  has  gained  great  breadth 
of  experience  through  his  military  service  in  the  World 
War.  Dr.  Ellam  enlisted  in  November,  1917,  as  a  mem¬ 
ber  of  the  United  States  Medical  Corps,  was  commis¬ 
sioned  first  lieutenant,  and  was  sent  to  Camp  Greenleaf, 
Georgia,  where  he  remained  until  about  the  middle  of 
June,  1918.  He  was  then  sent  to  the  Army  Medical 
School  at  Washington,  District  of  Columbia,  but  two 
weeks  later  was  transferred  to  the  Harvard  Medical 
School  for  special  orthopaedic  training.  Remaining  at 
Harvard  during  July  and  August,  he  was  sent  on  the 
first  of  December  to  the  Post  Hospital  at  Fort  Meyer, 
Virginia,  where  he  remained  for  about  five  months,  then, 


in  the  latter  part  of  January,  1919,  he  was  transferred 
to  the  Base  Hospital  at  Camp  Meade,  Maryland.  There 
he  remained  until  his  discharge  on  July  26,  1919,  when 
he  returned  to  Gardner  to  resume  his  professional  career. 
Dr.  Ellam  is  a  member  of  the  Gardner  Chamber  of  Com¬ 
merce,  of  the  American  Medical  Association,  the 
Massachusetts  State  Medical  Society,  the  Massachusetts 
Medico-Legal  Society,  the  Worcester  North  District 
Medical  Society,  and  the  Gardner  Medical  Society,  and 
is  assistant  medical  examiner  of  the  Second  Worcester 
District.  He  has  been  a  member  of  the  surgical  staff 
of  the  Heywood  Memorial  Hospital  of  Gardner  since 
its  founding;  and  also  has  had  charge  of  the  children’s 
department  of  same  for  a  some  years.  He  is  well  known 
fraternally,  being  a  member  of  Hope  Lodge,  Free  and 
Accepted  Masons;  Gardner  Chapter,  Royal  Arch  Ma¬ 
sons;  Ivanhoe  Commandery,  No.  46,  Knights  Templar; 
and  Aleppo  Temple,  Ancient  Arabic  Order  Nobles  of  the 
Mystic  Shrine,  of  Boston;  and  is  also  a  member  of 
Gardner  Lodge,  No.  1426,  Benevolent  and  Protective 
Order  of  Elks.  His  clubs  are:  The  Harvard,  of  Bos¬ 
ton;  the  Worcester  Country,  the  Oak  Hill  Country,  and 
the  Gardner  Boat  Club.  He  is  still  single. 


CHARLES  ERNEST  GREEN— When  a  child  of 
ten  years,  Charles  E.  Green  came  to  the  city  of  Leo¬ 
minster,  Massachusetts,  and  there  has  established  a  busi¬ 
ness  which  is  recognized  as  the  leading  pharmacy  in 
that  city.  He  is  also  widely  associated  with  fraternal 
and  social  organizations  of  the  community.  He  is  the 
grandson  of  Andrew  J.  Green,  born  in  Melrose,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  where  he  was  engaged  in  the  shoe  industry,  and 
served  his  country  during  the  Civil  War.  He  married 
Sarah  Peterson,  of  Nova  Scotia,  and  to  them  was  born 
a  son,  Charles  A.  Green,  at  Reading,  Massachusetts, 
August  2,  1862,  who  is  now  treasurer  and  manager  of 
the  Whitney-Reed  Corporation.  He  married  Emma 
Woolridge,  of  England,  and  they  are  the  parents  of 
Charles  Ernest  Green,  of  this  review. 

Charles  Ernest  Green,  son  of  Charles  A.  and  Emma 
(Woolridge)  Green,  was  born  at  Wakefield,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  March  16,  1887,  and  after  completing  the  pub¬ 
lic  school  course  in  Leominster,  began  an  apprentice¬ 
ship  at  the  drug  business  with  C.  F.  Nixon,  which  con¬ 
tinued  for  four  years.  Passing  the  State  board  examina¬ 
tions  for  registered  pharmacists,  he  was  associated  with 
F.  P.  Porter  in  the  drug  business  for  nearly  three  years, 
leaving  to  accept  a  position  with  Liggett  &  Company,  in 
Brockton,  Massachusetts,  where  he  remained  only  a  short 
time.  Following  that,  he  was  manager  of  a  drug  store 
in  Fitchburg,  and  in  1915  returned  to  Leominster  to  en¬ 
gage  in  the  drug  business  independently,  purchasing 
for  this  purpose  the  business  then  operated  by  Frank  I. 
Pearson.  This  store  has  been  under  Mr.  Green’s  man¬ 
agement  ever  since,  and  is  known  as  the  Green  Drug 
Store. 

Fraternally  he  is  a  member  of  the  Free  and  Accepted 
Masons,  and  the  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of 
Elks.  He  also  is  a  member  of  the  Sons  of  Veterans, 
Leominster  Club,  Monoosnock  Country  Club,  and  the 
Chamber  of  Commerce;  also  of  the  Wholesale  Drug 
Company  of  Boston,  Massachusetts,  of  which  he  is  a 
stockholder;  and  of  the  Massachusetts  State  Pharma¬ 
ceutical  Association.  Mr.  Green  enlisted  in  the  United 


96 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


States  Army  in  March,  1918,  and  was  stationed  for  four¬ 
teen  months  at  Base  Hospital,  Camp  Devens,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  with  the  rank  of  private  of  the  first  class,  and  was 
master  of  the  medical  and  surgical  wards  there.  Mr. 
Green  is  a  member  of  the  Unitarian  church.  He  is  fond 
of  golf,  touring  and  fishing,  these  being  his  favorite  rec¬ 
reations  in  his  hours  “off  duty.”  In  politics  he  is  a  Re¬ 
publican. 

Mr.  Green  married,  June  20,  1923,  Madge  Anna 
Emory,  daughter  of  Francis  F.  and  Helen  (Ackerman) 
Emory,  of  Fitchburg.  Mrs.  Green  was  educated  in  the 
Fitchburg  grammar  and  high  schools,  and  Sargent’s 
School  for  Girls  at  Boston,  then  for  two  years  was  a 
student  in  nursing  at  Newton  Hospital,  Newton,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  receiving  a  diploma  as  a  registered  nurse. 
When  the  United  States  declared  a  state  of  war  with 
Germany,  Miss  Emory  volunteered  her  services,  was  sent 
overseas,  and  for  nine  months  was  in  France,  where  she 
saw  war  in  all  its  horrors  while  doing  her  work  of  mercy 
and  love.  Upon  returning  to  the  United  States,  she  pur¬ 
sued  a  special  course  of  training  in  public  health,  then 
for  three  years  was  in  charge  of  the  Industrial  Health 
and  Welfare  Work  among  the  factory  workers  of  Ware 
Shoals,  South  Carolina.  After  resigning  that  position 
she  toured  Europe  and  visited  the  battlefields  of  the 
great  World  War.  She  returned  to  the  United  States  in 
the  spring  of  1923,  and  was  married  to  Charles  E.  Green 
on  June  20,  following. 


CHARLES  BRADLEY  SMITH— Among  the  largely 
successful  industrial  executives  of  Worcester  County, 
Massachusetts,  Charles  B.  Smith  holds  a  leading  posi¬ 
tion  in  the  progressive  city  of  Fitchburg,  as  sole  owner 
and  active  manager  of  the  Star  Worsted  Company  of 
that  place.  A  leader  in  various  branches  of  public  ad¬ 
vance,  influential  in  all  endeavors  for  the  industrial  or 
civic  welfare,  Mr.  Smith  is  a  prominent  figure  in  every 
civic  and  social  interest.  He  is  a  son  of  Charles  Watson 
and  Abigail  W.  (Crocker)  Smith,  his  father  for  many 
years  identified  with  the  boot  and  shoe  industry,  and  in 
the  year  1864  a  member  of  the  Home  Guard  in  the  city 
of  Worcester. 

Charles  Bradley  Smith  was  born  at  Paxton,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  March  9,  1857.  The  family  removing  to 
Worcester  in  his  childhood,  he  attended  the  public  schools 
of  that  city  and  was  graduated  from  the  Worcester 
High  School  in  the  class  of  1874.  His  early  business 
experience  was  in  the  woolen  textile  industry  at  the 
Beoli  mill  of  Rockwell  &  Phillips,  of  West  Fitchburg, 
Massachusetts,  now  owned  by  the  American  Woolen 
Company.  Having  become  identified  with  the  textile 
industry,  in  the  year  1882  he  entered  the  organization 
of  the  Fitchburg  Worsted  Company,  of  Fitchburg,  and 
was  active  with  this  concern  for  twelve  years  in  the  ca¬ 
pacity  of  a  designer  of  fancy  worsted  fabrics.  This  mill 
is  also  now  owned  by  the  American  Woolen  Company. 
In  the  year  1894,  in  association  with  the  late  Mr.  C.  T. 
Crocker,  Mr.  Smith  purchased  the  Star  Worsted  Com¬ 
pany  in  Fitchburg,  and  for  eighteen  years  these  able  and 
progressive  men  carried  the  business  forward,  developing 
it  largely  and  placing  it  among  the  really  important  in¬ 
dustries  of  Fitchburg.  In  1912  Mr.  Smith  became  sole 
owner  of  this  interest,  which  he  still  holds.  As  an  in¬ 
dependent  plant  this  enterprise  is  taking  a  very  prom¬ 


inent  place  in  the  industrial  life  of  Fitchburg,  and  under 
Mr.  Smith’s  efficient  management  is  still  going  forward 
to  constantly  larger  success.  Mr.  Smith’s  affiliation  with 
other  business  interests  has  frequently  been  sought,  and 
he  is  one  of  the  directors  of  the  Safety  Fund  National 
Bank  of  Fitchburg,  having  served  as  clerk  of  the  board 
of  directors  since  1915.  He  is  also  president  of  the 
Rockwell  Woolen  Company,  of  Leominster,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  and  of  the  Belle  Vue  Mills  of  Clinton,  Massachu¬ 
setts.  Mr.  Smith  was  brought  forward  in  the  public 
service  of  the  community  as  a  member  of  the  School 
Board  and  served  in  that  capacity  for  a  period  of  nine 
years,  from  1891  until  1900.  In  1902  he  became  a  mem¬ 
ber  of  the  Board  of  Aldermen  of  the  city  of  Fitchburg, 
and  three  years  later  he  was  elected  Representative  to 
the  General  Court  of  the  State  of  Massachusetts. 
Thenceforward,  for  about  twelve  years  Mr.  Smith  was 
not  active  in  any  leading  position  in  the  public  service, 
although  as  always  he  gave  his  best  endeavors  to  the 
promotion  of  any  worthy  cause.  In  November,  1917,  he 
was  made  chairman  of  the  Fuel  Committee  of  Fitch¬ 
burg  and  served  in  that  capacity  until  1919.  His  clubs 
are:  The  Fay  Club,  of  Fitchburg;  the  Oak  Hill  Coun¬ 
try  Club,  of  Fitchburg;  the  Tatnuck  Country  Club,  of 
Worcester;  the  Exchange  Club,  of  Boston;  and  the 
Episcopal  Club  of  Boston.  His  religious  affiliation  is 
with  Christ  Church,  of  Fitchburg,  of  which  he  was 
treasurer  for  about  twenty-six  years. 

Mr.  Smith  married,  on  December  26,  1881,  at  Wor¬ 
cester,  Massachusetts,  Mary  Isabel  Tilton,  daughter  of 
Emery  and  Ruth  (Ingraham)  Tilton.  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Smith  are  the  parents  of  two  children:  Florence  May, 
born  October  2,  1882,  who  married  Phillip  W.  Flint, 
and  whose  children  are :  Elizabeth,  Mary,  Rosamond ;  and 
Katharine,  born  March  1,  1892,  who  married  Ralph 
Heighwav  Fales. 


CLARENCE  CRAVEN  COULTER— One  of  the 

most  important  enterprises  in  the  town  of  Clinton,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  is  that  now  represented  by  Clarence  C.  Coulter 
as  its  executive  head,  this  being  The  W.  J.  Coulter  Press, 
Incorporated,  publishers  and  general  printers.  Clarence 
Craven  Coulter  was  bom  in  Clinton,  Massachusetts, 
educated  there,  and  has  spent  his  entire  life  in  the  print¬ 
ing  and  publishing  business  which  was  owned  by  his 
father  before  him  and  in  which  he  is  now  engaged.  His 
birth  occurred  June  1,  1868,  his  parents  being  William 
James  and  Selina  (Craven)  Coulter. 

His  father,  William  James  Coulter,  who  died  in 
January,  1922,  was  a  three  months’  volunteer  at  the  out¬ 
break  of  the  Civil  War,  and  was  engaged  in  the  first  gen¬ 
eral  engagement  at  Bull  Run.  At  the  end  of  this  en¬ 
listment  he  again  volunteered,  his  time  for  three  years, 
was  promoted  to  first  lieutenant,  and  took  part  in  the 
battles  of  Antietam,  Gettysburg,  Cold  Harbor,  and 
Petersburg,  where  he  was  captured,  serving  nine  months 
in  captivity.  He  then  returned  to  Clinton  and  bought 
the  “Courant,”  which  was  conducted  under  his  man¬ 
agement  until  1914.  when  the  business  was  incorporated 
under  the  name  of  The  W.  J.  Coulter  Press,  Incorporated, 
William  J.  Coulter  becoming  president;  Clarence  C. 
Coulter,  treasurer  and  general  manager;  and  Annie  M. 
Coulter,  clerk.  W  J.  Coulter  was  a  member  of  the 
Grand  Army  of  the  Republic,  the  Loyal  Legion,  and 


f 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


97 


was  a  charter  member  of  the  Prescott  Club.  Besides 
publishing  the  “Courant,”  which  is  a  weekly  paper  and 
was  originally  established  in  184.6,  the  Coulter  Press 
publishes  the  “Item,”  which  was  started  as  a  daily  paper 
in  1893,  and  has  ever  since  been  published  each  evening 
except  Sundays  and  holidays,  and  is  Clinton’s  only  daily 
newspaper.  In  addition  to  putting  out  these  two  pub¬ 
lications  regularly,  the  W.  J.  Coulter  Press,  Incorporated, 
handles  a  large  amount  of  general  printing  for  other 
business  concerns  of  Clinton  and  surrounding  territory, 
and  has  a  fully-equipped  plant,  with  modern  presses  and 
auxiliary  machinery,  enabling  it  to  turn  out  high-grade 
printed  matter  of  every  kind  and  description  in  both 
book  and  job  lines. 

Clarence  C.  Coulter  is  reckoned  among  the  most  pro¬ 
gressive  and  public-spirited  citizens  of  the  community, 
and  maintains  membership  in  many  leading  organizations. 
Among  these  are:  The  Prescott  Club,  the  Chamber  of 
Commerce,  Camp  No.  19,  of  the  Sons  of  Veterans;  and 
Masonic  bodies,  including  Trinity  Lodge,  Free  and  Ac¬ 
cepted  Masons ;  Aleppo  Temple,  Ancient  Arabic  Order 
Nobles  of  the  Mystic  Shrine;  and  the  Grotto.  He  is 
also  a  member  of  the  Association  of  New  England  Daily 
Papers,  the  Massachusetts  Press  Association,  and  is  a 
non-resident  member  of  the  Boston  Press  Club. 

Mr.  Coulter  married,  in  1897,  Mabel  Houghton  Walk¬ 
er,  who  was  born  at  Oxford,  Massachusetts,  and  they 
have  one  son,  Craven  Houghton  Coulter,  born  Novem¬ 
ber  24,  1900,  and  now  (1923)  a  student  at  Dartmouth 
College.  The  family  attends  the  Episcopal  church  in 
Clinton,  of  which  Mr.  Coulter  is  junior  warden. 


FRED  BENNETT  COLBY,  M.  D.,  a  native  of  the 
old  Pine  Tree  State,  has  given  to  his  professional  work 
much  of  the  energy  and  ability7-  which  the  world  has 
learned  to  expect  of  the  sons  of  the  State  of  Maine. 
Added  to  these  excellent  qualities,  his  natural  talent  for 
his  profession  and  his  keen  delight  in  it  have  carried 
him  far  and  high  among  the  physicians  and  surgeons  of 
his  day,  and  in  Dr.  Fred  B.  Colby  the  city  of  Gardner 
claims  a  leading  figure  in  the  medical  profession  in 
Massachusetts.  He  is  a  son  of  William  Henry  and  Anna 
Lucinda  (Barrett)  Colby.  His  father  was  born  in 
Gardiner,  Maine,  and  by  trade  was  a  blacksmith  and 
general  mechanic,  always  considered  a  genius  in  the 
shoeing  of  horses  and  all  kinds  of  iron  work.  He 
died  in  1888,  at  the  age  of  forty-eight  years.  The 
mother  was  born  in  Andover,  Maine,  and  is  still  living,  a 
resident  of  Auburn,  in  that  State. 

Fred  Bennett  Colby  was  born  at  Andover,  Maine, 
May  30,  1869.  His  education  was  begun  at  Hebron 
Academy,  in  Hebron,  Maine,  and  he  covered  his  higher 
classical  courses  at  Bowdoin  College,  at  Brunswick, 
Maine.  Having  early  chosen  the  medical  profession 
he  then  entered  Dartmouth  Medical  School  from  which 
he  was  graduated  in  the  class  of  1895,  receiving  the  de¬ 
gree  of  Doctor  of  Medicine.  Serving  an  interneship  at 
the  State  Hospital,  at  Bridgewater,  Maine,  for  one  year, 
he  then  went  to  the  Boston  Insane  Hospital  as  a  mem¬ 
ber  of  the  medical  staff,  remaining  there  until  April, 
1905.  He  had  tendered  his  resignation  one  year  prior 
to  that  date,  but  was  induced  to  remain  until  his  place 
could  be  filled.  During  his  stay  in  this  institution  the 


employees  presented  him  with  a  very  handsome  office 
desk  suitably  engraved,  in  appreciation  of  the  esteem  in 
which  he  was  held  among  them.  Going  next  to  High¬ 
land  Falls,  New  York,  near  West  Point  Military  Acad¬ 
emy,  Dr.  Colby  conducted  the  private  practice  of  med¬ 
icine  for  about  two  years,  when  a  threatened  breakdown 
compelled  him  to  seek  rest.  In  the  hope  of  averting  the 
threatened  collapse  he  went  to  Rangely  Lakes,  Maine, 
where  he  remained  for  eleven  years.  During  that  period 
he  brought  to  the  little  lumber  town  of  the  north  woods 
something  of  the  progressive  spirit  of  the  outside  world, 
merging  his  strong  personality  with  the  spirit  of  the 
community  and  leading  the  people  to  higher  apprecia¬ 
tion  of  their  privileges  as  a  community.  Through  his 
influence  many  people  seeking  relief  from  business 
worries  came  and  established  summer  homes  near  the 
lakes,  also  taking  the  interest  of  citizens  in  the  little 
settlement  of  which  they  became  members.  Dr.  Colby 
brought  about  the  utilization  of  many  of  the  natural 
advantages  of  the  section  and  organized  a  concern  for 
the  development  of  electric  power.  He  was  made  pres¬ 
ident  and  general  manager  of  the  electric  lighting  plant  of 
Rangely.  To  accomplish  the  production  of  electricity 
the  community  required  water  power,  which  but  for  Dr. 
Colby’s  work  could  not  have  been  secured.  It  was 
controlled  by  the  Union  Water  Power  Company  and  the 
Berlin  Mills,  and  Dr.  Colby  went  before  the  Legislature 
where  he  brought  about  the  passing  of  bills  giving  the 
people  of  Rangely  the  right  by  eminent  domain,  thereby 
permitting  them  to  use  such  power  as  they  required  for 
this  public  utility  purpose.  When  Dr.  Colby  had  brought 
the  plant  into  successful  operation  he  resigned  from 
the  offices  of  president  and  manager.  In  1918  he  ac¬ 
cepted  an  insistent  invitation  many  times  repeated  from 
a  resident  of  Gardner,  to  visit  this  place,  with  the 
result  that  he  returned  to  Rangely  only  to  pack  and 
move  to  Gardner,  where  he  has  since  resided.  He  took 
up  the  practice  of  his  profession  in  Gardner  upon  his 
arrival  here  as  a  resident,  and  has  become  one  of  the 
foremost  professional  men  of  the  city,  winning  his  way 
to  the  confidence  and  esteem  of  the  people.  Since  1919 
he  has  been  on  the  medical  staff  of  Heywood  Me¬ 
morial  Hospital. 

Dr.  Colby  is  a  member  of  the  American  Medical  As¬ 
sociation,  the  Massachusetts  State  Medical  Society,  and 
the  Worcester  County  North  District  Medical  Society. 
Politically  he  supports  the  Republican  party,  and  has 
now  served  for  four  years  as  a  member  of  the  Gardner 
Board  of  Health,  and  is  ex-chairman  of  the  same.  Fra¬ 
ternally  Dr.  Colby  is  a  member  of  Kemaukeag  Lodge, 
No.  213,  Free  and  Accepted  Masons,  of  Rangely,  Maine, 
of  which  lodge  he  was  the  second  Master ;  of  Gardner 
Chapter,  Royal  Arch  Masons ;  Ivanhoe  Commandery, 
Knights  Templar;  Gardner  Lodge  No.  1426,  Benevolent 
and  Protective  Order  of  Elks;  and  is  also  a  member  of 
the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  and  the  Knights 
of  Pythias.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Gardner  Boat  Club, 
the  Oak  Hill  Country  Club,  of  Fitchburg,  and  the  Wor¬ 
cester  Country  Club.  His  recreation  is  golf. 

Dr.  Colby  married,  in  1905,  Mary  Elizabeth  Judge, 
of  Summerville,  and  they  have  four  children:  Fred  B., 
Jr.,  and  Beatrice  A.,  both  students  in  Gardner  High 
School ;  Kenneth  G.,  attending  grammar  school  in  Gard¬ 
ner;  and  Marie  J. 


Wor — 7 


98 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


RUSSELL  B.  LOWE,  a  native  son  of  Fitchburg, 
Massachusetts,  has  entered  heartily  into  the  business 
and  social  life  of  his  city,  which  has  been  his  lifetime 
home.  He  is  a  son  of  Arthur  H.  and  Annie  E.  (Park- 
hill)  Lowe,  his  father  a  cotton  manufacturer  and  a  prom¬ 
inent  figure  in  both  city  and  State  politics. 

Russell  B.  Lowe  was  born  in  Fitchburg,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  February  14,  1880.  He  finished  public  school  study 
with  graduation  from  Fitchburg  High  School  in  1898, 
then  entered  Massachusetts  Institute  of  Technology, 
whence  he  was  graduated  class  of  1902.  Immediately 
after  graduation  he  entered  business  life  in  Fitchburg, 
and  during  the  two  decades  that  have  since  elapsed  he 
has  reached  high  position  as  a  cotton  manufacturer, 
being  now  president  of  the  Parkhill  Manufacturing 
Company.  He  is  a  man  of  energy,  enterprise,  and  pub¬ 
lic  spirit,  a  safe  and  sane  executive,  and  is  interested  in 
all  that  pertains  to  the  welfare  of  his  city.  He  is  di¬ 
rector  of  the  Fitchburg  Bank  and  Trust  Company,  the 
Merchants’  National  Bank  of  Boston,  Boston  Manu¬ 
facturing  Company,  Indian  Company,  Sprague,  Grout  & 
Sons,  and  with  other  business  enterprises  of  his  section, 
and  was  president  of  the  National  Cotton  Manufacturers’ 
Association.  In  politics  Mr.  Lowe  is  a  Republican, 
and  serves  the  city  of  Fitchburg  as  a  member  of  the 
Board  of  Park  Commissioners.  He  holds  the  rank  of 
captain  in  the  Massachusetts  State  Guard,  but  has  no 
fraternal  affiliations.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Fay  Club, 
Oak  Hill  Country  Club,  Worcester  Country  Club,  and 
the  Union  League  of  New  York  City.  In  religious  faith 
he  is  a  Congregationalist 

Mr.  Lowe  married,  in  Chicago,  Illinois,  in  1909,  Nath¬ 
alie  Wells,  daughter  of  M.  D.  and  Elizabeth  (Corwith) 
Wells.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Lowe  are  the  parents  of  three 
children:  Nathalie,  born  in  1911;  Margaret,  born  in  1916, 
Russell  B.,  Jr.,  born  in  1922.  The  family  home  is  at 
No.  575  Blossom  Street,  Fitchburg,  Massachusetts. 


HENRY  GRATON  GOULD,  comptroller  of  The 
Graton  &  Knight  Manufacturing  Company,  and  name¬ 
sake  of  one  of  its  founders,  Henry  Clay  Graton,  was 
born  in  Springfield,  Massachusetts,  June  6,  1879,  son  of 
George  H.  and  Mary  A.  Gould.  He  traces  his  ances¬ 
try  back  seven  generations,  prior  to  the  marriage  of 
John  Prescott,  on  April  11,  1629,  founder  of  Lancaster, 
Massachusetts,  thus  going  back  to  John  Gawkroger,  of 
Sowerby  Parish,  Halifax,  Yorkshire,  England,  whose 
name  occurs  there  from  1447  to  1505.  He  received  his 
early  education  in  the  public  schools  of  Springfield 
and  in  Childs’  Business  Institute.  After  leaving  school 
he  entered  the  employ  of  Ladd,  Weaver  &  Wright, 
which  at  that  time  was  the  largest  insurance  agency  in 
Springfield.  Here  he  remained  two  or  three  years, 
after  which  he  became  connected  with  the  eastern 
division  of  the  American  Bicycle  Company,  where  he 
remained  for  some  time,  being  connected  with  the 
selling  and  credit  end  of  the  business.  Just  before  the 
Bicycle  Trust  was  dissolved  he  resigned  from  this 
company  to  accept  a  position  as  representative  in  Rhode 
Island  for  a  New  York  stock  and  bond  house.  Here  he 
remained  for  three  years,  returning  to  Springfield  to 
accept  a  position  with  W.  H.  Gilbert  &  Company,  of 
that  city,  as  travelling  salesman.  He  afterwards  had 
the  entire  charge  of  the  selling  end  of  their  business. 


Mr.  Gould  came  to  Worcester  as  manager  of  the 
Royal  Typewriter  Company,  where  he  shared  a  part 
of  the  office  occupied  by  the  Claflin-Sumner  Coal  Com¬ 
pany,  No.  9  Pleasant  Street.  When  the  Royal  Type¬ 
writer  Company  decided  to  consolidate  their  Worcester 
and  Boston  offices  Mr.  Gould  decided  to  remain  in  Wor¬ 
cester,  and  accepted  a  position  with  the  Worcester  Mar¬ 
ket  Company  in  January,  1910.  At  the  request  of  Mr. 
Graton,  Mr.  Gould  entered  the  employ  of  The  Graton 
&  Knight  Manufacturing  Company  in  June,  1911,  in  the 
cost  department,  and  since  then  he  has  served  as  clerk 
and  departmental  manager  in  nearly  all  the  departments 
of  their  office.  In  July,  1916,  he  was  put  at  the  head  of 
the  accounting  division  of  the  company,  and  on  July  1, 
1917,  he  was  appointed  comptroller  by  the  board  of 
directors.  At  the  annual  meeting  of  the  stockholders 
in  January,  1918,  he  was  elected  a  director,  and  reap¬ 
pointed  comptroller  by  the  board. 

Mr.  Gould  is  a  member  of  Ridgely  Lodge,  No.  112, 
Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows;  Quinsigamond 
Lodge,  Ancient  Free  and  Accepted  Masons;  and  a  life 
member  of  Eureka  Chapter,  Royal  Arch  Masons;  Hi¬ 
ram  Council,  Royal  and  Select  Masters ;  and  Worcester 
County  Commandery,  No.  5,  Knights  Templar.  He  is 
also  a  life  member  of  Worcester  Lodge  of  Perfection; 
Goddard  Council,  Princes  of  Jerusalem;  Lawrence 
Chapter,  Rose  Croix ;  and  the  Massachusetts  Consistory 
of  Aletheia  Grotto,  No.  13;  and  Aleppo  Temple,  Ancient 
Arabic  Order  Nobles  of  the  Mystic  Shrine,  for  North 
America.  He  is  a  member  of  the  corporation  of  the 
Worcester  Five  Cents  Savings  Bank.  He  is  a  member 
of  the  Worcester  Country  Club,  Commonwealth  Club, 
and  Worcester  Economic  Club. 

Mr.  Gould  married,  September  18,  1905,  Corinne  L. 
Morin,  of  Springfield. 


FREDERICK  W.  MORSE— Taking  a  constructive 
and  practical  part  in  the  advance  and  development  of 
the  city  of  Worcester,  Massachusetts,  Frederick  W. 
Morse  is  contributing  much  to  the  general  welfare,  his 
activities  being  along  the  line  of  real  estate  and  insur¬ 
ance  brokerage.  With  offices  at  Suite  No.  825,  the 
Slater  Building,  he  has  won  a  prominent  position  in  the 
business  life  of  the  city,  although  he  is  still  a  young 
man  and  has  been  active  in  the  business  world  for 
scarcely  more  than  a  decade.  Mr.  Morse  is  a  son  of 
Frederick  J.  Morse,  who  was  born  in  England,  and 
came  to  the  United  States  as  a  young  man,  engaging  in 
the  bakery  business  in  the  city  of  Worcester,  in  which 
he  is  largely  successful.  The  mother,  Henrietta  (Hines) 
Morse,  was  born  in  Nova  Scotia,  and  is  also  still  living. 

Frederick  W.  Morse  was  born  in  Worcester,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  August  7,  1893.  His  education  was  received 
in  the  local  institutions,  beginning  his  studies  in  the 
public  schools  and  finishing  at  Worcester  Academy.  His 
early  business  experience  was  in  the  real  estate  and 
insurance  field,  in  association  with  Ernest  C.  Mulvey. 
In  1916  he  withdrew  from  the  partnership  to  enter  the 
same  field  independently,  and  has  won  large  success. 
Meanwhile,  for  about  two  years,  Mr.  Morse  was  active 
in  the  newspaper  world  on  the  Worcester  “Telegram,” 
in  a  reportorial  capacity.  He  is  a  member  of  the 
Massachusetts  Real  Estate  Exchange,  and  is  broadly 
interested  in  all  that  pertains  to  the  civic  and  general 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


99 


advance,  bearing  a  part  in  all  forward  movements.  He 
is  a  member  of  Morning  Star  Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted 
Masons ;  of  Aletheia  Grotto ;  the  Knights  of  Pythias,  the 
Loyal  Order  of  Moose;  and  his  recreations  are  outdoor 
sports.  He  has  been  active  in  athletics  since  his  boy¬ 
hood,  and  was  a  member  of  the  old  English  High  track 
team,  in  which  connection  he  won  many  medals  and 
cups. 

Frederick  W.  Morse  married,  on  January  6,  1919, 
Mildred  E.  Hubbard,  who  was  born  in  Worcester, 
daughter  of  George  E.  Hubbard,  a  contractor  and 
builder  of  Worcester.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Morse  have  two 
daughters :  Virginia  Ruth  and  Barbara  Jean. 


GEORGE  E.  O’HEARN,  of  Gardner,  for  many 
years  a  prominent  figure  in  the  industrial  world  of  Wor¬ 
cester  County,  became  the  head  of  an  independent  interest 
on  January  1,  1923,  and  has  now  launched  a  large  and 
most  promising  enterprise  in  the  manufacture  of  fibre 
furniture  and  kindred  products.  Mr.  O’Hearn  is  a 
man  of  large  executive  ability  and  long  practical  ex¬ 
perience,  thereby  well  fitted  to  assume  a  position  of 
leadership  in  his  field,  and  his  success  in  his  own  busi¬ 
ness  is  beyond  a'  peradventure. 

Patrick  O’Hearn,  Mr.  O’Hearn’s  father,  was  for  many 
years  one  of  the  most  interesting  figures  of  Gardner,  as 
the  oldest  resident  of  this  community.  He  was  born  in 
Killa,  County  Cork,  Ireland,  and  came  to  the  United 
States  as  a  young  man.  After  a  short  stay  in  Connec¬ 
ticut,  he  went  to  Lake  George,  New  York,  and  with  his 
young  bride  settled  in  the  virgin  forest,  clearing  a 
little  space  and  hewing  out  the  timber  for  his  little  log 
cabin.  He  developed  a  prosperous  farm,  then  some 
years  later  removed  to  Glens  Falls,  New  York,  where 
he  was  employed  as  a  longshoreman  until  the  year  1873. 
Then  coming  to  Gardner,  Massachusetts,  he  was  em¬ 
ployed  variously  up  to  the  time  of  his  death,  continu¬ 
ing  active  and  alert  to'  the  affairs  of  the  times  until  he 
passed  away,  in  April,  1922,  at  the  great  age  of  one 
hundred  and  three  years.  The  wife  and  mother,  whom 
he  wooed  in  their  native  County  Cork,  she  also  born  at 
Killa,  who  as  his  betrothed  came  to  America  on  the 
same  ship  in  the  same  party,  and  whom  he  married  in 
Connecticut,  their  first  stopping  place,  bravely  bore  her 
part  in  his  early  struggles  to  establish  a  home  in  the  new 
country,  and  died  in  1866,  when  George  E.  O’Hearn, 
their  youngest  child,  was  still  an  infant. 

George  E.  O’Hearn  was  born  at  Lake  George,  New 
York,  February  22,  1865.  His  education  was  acquired 
in  the  public  and  high  schools  of  Gardner,  and  his  en¬ 
tering  the  world  of  men  and  affairs  in  his  fourteenth 
years,  was  coincidental  with  the  opening  of  manufac¬ 
turing  operations  in  the  baby  carriage  department  of  the 
great  plant  of  Heywood  Brothers  &  Co.,  now  Heywood- 
Wakefield  Company.  The  youth  secured  a  position  in 
this  new  branch  and  continued  with  it  for  a  period  of 
forty-four  years,  advancing  by  his  own  efforts  through 
the  various  steps,  constantly  carrying  greater  respon¬ 
sibilities  until  in  1890  he  was  appointed  superintendent 
of  the  plant.  This  position  he  filled  until  January  1, 
1923,  when  he  resigned  to  go  forward  for  himself.  The 
new  plant  was  at  that  time  nearly  completed,  under 
cover,  and  ready  for  the  final  touches  and  the  installa¬ 
tion  of  machinery  and  equipment.  It  is  expected  that 


the  plant  will  be  in  full  operation  by  midsummer  of  the 
present  year  (1923),  and  this  new  enterprise  will  take  a 
leading  place  in  the  field  of  production  for  which  Gard¬ 
ner  is  already  famous.  The  building  is  of  the  most  ap¬ 
proved  construction  and  is  to  be  fitted  up  and  equipped 
in  the  most  up-to-date  manner,  with  every  provision 
made  for  the  comfort  and  well-being  of  the  employees 
as  well  as  for  the  turning  out  of  a  product  of  high 
quality.  Mr.  O’Hearn  has  few  interests  outside  of  his 
business  activities,  but  is  a  director  of  the  First  Na¬ 
tional  Bank  of  Gardner.  Fraternally  he  is  affiliated 
with  the  Knights  of  Columbus;  Gardner  Lodge,  No. 
1426,  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks.  He  is 
also  a  member  of  Oak  Hill  Country  Club,  and  Sacred 
Heart  Roman  Catholic  Church. 

Mr.  O’Hearn  married,  in  1896,  Emma  J.  Rourke,  of 
Gardner,  and  they  are  the  parents  of  six  children : 
Dorothy  C.,  a  graduate  of  Wheaton  College,  at  Nor¬ 
ton,  Massachusetts,  class  of  1919;  George  E.,  Jr.,  a 
graduate  of  St.  Michael’s  College,  at  Winooski,  Ver¬ 
mont,  now  identified  with  his  father  in  the  above  enter¬ 
prise;  Edward,  deceased;  Alma,  a  graduate  of  Worces¬ 
ter  Business  College;  Robert,  deceased;  and  Richard, 
attending  the  public  schools  of  Gardner. 


GEORGE  L.  TOBEY,  SR.,  a  member  of  an  old 
family  in  Maine,  and  well  known  as  a  medical  prac¬ 
titioner  in  Clinton,  Massachusetts,  has  contributed  largely 
to  the  development  of  medical  societies  by  his  activity 
as  a  member.  Mathias  Tobey,  grandfather  of  Dr. 
Tobey,  Sr.,  served  as  a  captain  during  the  Revolutionary 
War,  and  his  body  is  laid  in  the  cemetery  at  Machias 
Port,  Maine.  His  son,  Samuel  Tobey,  married  Nancy 
B.  Robinson,  of  St.  George,  Maine,  and  they  were  the 
parents  of  George  L.  Tobey,  Sr.  The  father  followed 
the  carpenter’s  trade  until  his  death  in  1873 ;  the  mother 
died  in  1894. 

George  L.  Tobey,  Sr.,  was  born  in  Machias  Port,  Maine, 
June  17,  1853,  and  there  began  his  education  in  the  pub¬ 
lic  schools.  Later  he  attended  Washington  Academy, 
at  East  Machias,  and  then  Coburn  Classical  Institute,  at 
Waterville,  Maine,  then  completed  a  course  in  the  study 
of  medicine  at  Bowdoin  College,  Brunswick,  Maine.  He 
first  commenced  to  practice  his  profession  in  1879,  at 
Shrewsbury,  where  he  remained  for  a  year  and  a  half, 
and  moved  to  Lancaster,  Massachusetts,  for  a  period  of 
fifteen  years.  After  that  length  of  time  he  decided  to 
settle  in  Clinton  and  has  continued  to  practice  here  ever 
since,  being  located  at  No.  205  Church  Street. 

Dr.  Tobey,  Sr.,  became  medical  examiner  for  the  Fourth 
District  of  Worcester  County  in  1897,  and  continues  as 
such.  For  ten  years  he  served  as  a  member  of  the 
Board  of  Health  for  Lancaster,  Massachusetts,  and  as 
a  member  of  the  School  Board  for  five  years,  also 
served  as  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Health  in  Clinton 
for  a  number  of  years.  Fraternally  he  is  affiliated  with 
the  Free  and  Accepted  Masons.  He  is  a  member  of  the 
following  clubs :  The  Prescott,  Chamber  of  Commerce, 
American  Medical  Association,  Worcester  County  Med¬ 
ical  Society,  Massachusetts  Medical  Society,  Massachu¬ 
setts  Association  of  Boards  of  Health  since  its  organ¬ 
ization;  and  the  Massachusetts  Medical  Legal  Society. 
He  has  been  on  the  staff  of  surgeons  of  Clinton  Hospital 
for  twenty-five  years.  During  the  World  War  he  was  a 


IOO 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


member  of  the  Clinton  Riflemen  and  of  Division  No.  14, 
Draft  Board. 

Dr.  Tobey,  Sr.,  married,  in  1880,  Abbie  A.  Grant,  a 
native  of  Machias  Port,  Maine.  The  children  born  to 
Dr.  and  Mrs.  Tobey  are  as  follows:  1.  Dr.  George  L. 
Tobey,  Jr.,  who  was  commissioned  a  captain  in  the 
United  States  Medical  Corps  and  served  from  1917  to 
the  end  of  the  war.  2.  Guy  D.,  engaged  in  the  real  es¬ 
tate  business  in  Boston,  Massachusetts.  3.  Dr.  Harold 
Grant,  who  served  with  the  first  Harvard  Medical  Unit 
which  embarked  for  France  at  the  outbreak  of  the  World 
War  and  remained  there  six  months  before  returning 
to  the  United  States.  Later  he  went  back  with  the 
Massachusetts  General  Hospital  Unit,  having  charge 
of  the  eye,  ear,  nose,  and  throat  work  at  the  Bordeaux 
Base  Hospital. 


WILLIAM  JOSEPH  MOORE,  in  his  professional 
activities,  is  one  of  the  leading  figures  of  Milford,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  but  in  the  other  lines  of  progress  in  which  he 
is  constantly  active  his  work  is  equally  noteworthy,  for 
in  educational  progress,  in  fraternal  organizations,  and 
as  a  musician,  he  is  holding  a  leading  place  in  the  com¬ 
munity.  Mr.  Moore  is  a  native  of  this  place,  and  a  son 
of  Luke  and  Eleanor  (Mulcahy)  Moore,  for  many  years 
esteemed  residents  of  Milford. 

William  Joseph  Moore  was  born  in  Milford,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  August  5,  1886.  His  education  was  begun  in 
the  public  schools,  and  he  also  covered  the  local  high 
school  course,  after  which  for  his  preparatory  work  he 
entered  Dean  Academy,  at  Franklin,  Massachusetts,  from 
which  he  was  graduated  in  1907.  For  his  classical 
course  he  entered  Notre  Dame  University,  at  South 
Bend,  Indiana,  and  was  graduated  the  following  year. 
Taking  up  his  professional  studies  at  the  Boston  Uni¬ 
versity  Law  School,  he  was  graduated  from  that  insti¬ 
tution  in  the  class  of  1911.  Mr.  Moore  was  admitted  to 
the  bar  of  the  State  of  Massachusetts  and  has  since 
practiced  in  Milford.  Well  grounded  in  the  law  and 
possessing  marked  ability  as  a  speaker,  Mr.  Moore  has 
won  his  way  to  large  success  and  is  counted  among  the 
foremost  attorneys  of  Worcester  County.  In  all 
branches  of  civic  and  community  advance  Mr.  Moore 
has  always  been  deeply  interested,  and  for  a  number  of 
years  he  has  held  the  responsible  position  of  principal  of 
the  Milford  Evening  School.  In  this  connection  his 
work  has  done  much  for  the  encouragement  and  advance 
of  that  part  of  the  population  which  makes  up  the  ranks 
of  the  industrial  workers  and  still  looks  forward  to 
higher  achievement  through  the  acquisition  of  wider  edu¬ 
cation.  His  practical  attitude  towards  commercial  and 
industrial  progress  has  given  his  work  in  this  school 
special  value  to  the  young  people  for  whom  it  is  partic¬ 
ularly  designed,  and  his  leadership  is  greatly  appreciated. 
One  of  the  leading  figures  in  fraternal  circles  in  Mil¬ 
ford,  Mr.  Moore  is  Past  Grand  Knight  of  the  Knights 
of  Columbus,  a  member  of  the  Benevolent  and  Protec¬ 
tive  Order  of  Elks,  and  an  associate  member  of  the 
Grand  Army  of  the  Republic.  He  is  a  member  of  the 
Worcester  County  Bar  Association  and  is  influential  in  its 
advance.  His  religious  affiliation  is  with  St.  Mary’s 
Roman  Catholic  Church,  of  Milford,  and  he  is  musical 
director  of  the  choir  of  this  church,  also  holds  member¬ 
ship  in  the  Holy  Name  Society  of  this  church. 


Mr.  Moore  married,  in  Milford,  Massachusetts,  on  Oc¬ 
tober  18,  1922,  Eleanor  V.  Broughey,  daughter  of 
Stephen  and  Margaret  (Murphy)  Broughey. 


ROBERT  KENDALL  SHAW,  librarian  of  the 
Free  Public  Library,  was  born  in  Worcester,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  July  18,  1871.  He  attended  the  public  schools 
there,  and  was  salutatorian  of  the  class  of  1890  in  the 
Worcester  Classical  High  School.  He  graduated  from 
Harvard  College  in  1894  with  the  degree  of  Bachelor 
of  Arts,  surnma  cum  laude,  taking  final  honors  in  clas¬ 
sics.  During  the  next  three  years  he  was  a  teacher  in 
the  Highland  Military  Academy  under  his  father.  From 
1898  to  1901  he  was  on  the  staff  of  the  New  York  State 
Library,  and  from  1901  to  1904  assistant  in  the  Library 
of  Congress  at  Washington.  In  1904-05  he  was  li¬ 
brarian  of  the  public  library  of  Brockton.  He  returned 
to  Worcester  in  1905  to  accept  the  position  of  assistant 
librarian  of  the  Free  Public  Library,  and  when  Samuel 
Swett  Green,  the  veteran  librarian,  resigned  in  Janu¬ 
ary,  1909,  Mr.  Shaw  was  elected  to  succeed  him,  con¬ 
tinuing  to  the  present  time. 

Mr.  Shaw  was  thoroughly  in  sympathy  with  the  pro¬ 
gressive  policies  in  which  Mr.  Green  was  a  pioneer,  and 
has  extended  the  service  at  every  opportunity,  seeking 
to  make  the  books  of  the  greatest  possible  service,  and 
the  library  itself  a  really  popular  institution,  cooper¬ 
ating  with  the  teachers  and  pupils  of  the  public  schools 
and  colleges  of  the  city;  assisting  writers  in  searches; 
aiding  newspaper  workers,  and  answering  every  ques¬ 
tion  possible.  While  keeping  pace  with  the  great  de¬ 
mand  for  fiction,  Mr.  Shaw  has  given  every  attention 
to  presenting  to  the  public  the  more  useful  and  instruc¬ 
tive  works.  The  usefulness  of  the  library  had  grown 
constantly.  The  addition  of  the  branch  libraries  at 
Greendale,  Quinsigamond  and  South  Worcester  had 
aided  in  extending  and  broadening  the  field  of  useful¬ 
ness.  The  public  shares  in  the  opinion  expressed  by 
the  trustees  of  the  library  in  their  fifteenth  annual 
report,  relating  to  Mr.  Shaw : 

During  the  past  year,  he  has  discharged  the  duties 
of  his  position  with  a  degree  of  fidelity,  ability  and 
courtesy  which  has  merited  and  received  the  com¬ 
mendation  of  the  patrons  of  the  library,  and  the  ap¬ 
probation  of  the  board  of  directors. 

Mr.  Shaw  is  a  member  of  the  American  Library  As¬ 
sociation,  the  Massachusetts  Library  Club,  the  Bay  Path 
Literary  Club,  the  Phi  Beta  Kappa  Fraternity,  of  Har¬ 
vard,  the  Worcester  Economic  Club,  the  Shakespeare 
Club  and  the  Harvard  Club  of  Worcester.  He  was 
president  of  the  Massachusetts  Library  Club  in  1910-11. 
He  delivered  an  address  at  the  dedication  of  the 
Fobes  Memorial  Library  at  Oakham  in  1908;  at  the 
dedication  of  the  Merriam  Library  at  Auburn  in  June, 
1909;  and  at  the  dedication  of  the  Beaman  Memorial 
Library  at  West  Boylston  in  1912.  In  1911  he  read  a 
paper  on  Elihu  Burritt  before  the  Worcester  Society 
of  Antiquity.  He  was  one  of  the  speakers  at  the  dedica¬ 
tion  of  the  three  new  branch  libraries  which  are  under 
his  charge,  known  as  the  Carnegie  branches  of  the  Wor¬ 
cester  Public  Library  In  July,  1918,  he  was  appointed' 
a  member  of  the  Library  War  Finance  Committee  of 
the  United  States. 

Mr.  Shaw  married,  September  29,  1902,  at  Eau  Claire,. 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


IOI 


Wisconsin,  Bertha  Mower  Brown,  who  was  born  at 
Porter’s  Mills,  Wisconsin,  December  27,  1875,  a  daugh¬ 
ter  of  James  Harding  and  Anna  Sarah  (Taft)  Brown. 


RENALDO  GUILMETTE — In  the  manufacturing 
world  of  Southern  Worcester  County,  Massachusetts, 
Mr.  Guilmette  is  a  leading  figure  as  president  of  the 
Central  Optical  Company,  Incorporated.  Mr.  Guilmette 
is  a  native  of  Canada,  but  has  been  a  resident  of  South- 
bridge,  Massachusetts,  for  the  past  seventeen  years,  and 
during  that  entire  period  has  been  affiliated  with  this 
industry.  He  is  a  son  of  Anthime  Guilmette,  who  was 
born  at  St.  Hugues,  Canada,  and  was  active  in  farming, 
also  was  one  of  the  earliest  manufacturers  of  butter 
and  cheese  in  that  section,  continuing  actively  in  that  line 
until  his  death,  which  occurred  in  1920.  The  mother, 
Alexina  (de  Blois)  Guilmette,  was  born  at  St.  Fran¬ 
cois,  Canada,  and  died  in  1921. 

Renaldo  Guilmette  was  born  in  St.  Hugues,  Canada, 
June  28,  1879.  His  education  was  begun  in  the  local 
public  schools  and  after  completing  the  high  school 
course  he  made  special  preparations  for  his  career  at 
the  Sherbrooke  Business  College.  Thereafter  coming  to 
the  United  States,  Mr.  Guilmette  located  at  Central 
Falls,  Rhode  Island.  He  learned  the  trade  of  machin¬ 
ist  in  the  employ  of  the  Brown  &  Sharpe  Company,  of 
Providence,  the  world-famous  manufacturers  of  lathes 
and  other  machine  tools.  After  mastering  the  trade  he 
remained  with  this  concern  for  a  time  and  in  all  spent 
six  years  in  their  employ,  after  which  he  was  connected 
with  the  Fales  &  Jenks  Spinning  Machinery  Company, 
of  Pawtucket,  for  about  two  years.  He  was  then  iden¬ 
tified  with  the  Taft-Pierce  Company,  of  Woonsocket, 
Rhode  Island,  and  was  active  in  that  connection  for 
about  three  years.  In  the  year  1906  Mr.  Guilmette 
became  associated  with  the  Central  Optical  Company, 
Incorporated,  of  Southbridge,  Massachusetts,  in  the 
capacity  of  master  mechanic  and  soon  acquired  an 
interest  in  the  business.  Fie  was  made  vice-president  of 
the  concern  in  1911,  and  in  1916  was  elected  president  of 
the  company,  which  office  he  still  ably  serves.  This  en¬ 
terprise,  which  is  now  rounding  out  twenty-three  years 
of  existence,  was  incorporated  in  the  second  year  of  its 
history  and  has  developed  to  be  one  of  the  foremost 
interests  of  its  kind  in  this  section.  The  company  is 
now  officered  as  follows:  Renaldo  Guilmette,  president; 
Hector  M.  Le  Clair,  vice-president  and  treasurer;  Ed¬ 
ward  E.  Le  Clair,  secretary;  and  the  plant  is  located 
at  No.  76  Elm  Street,  occupying  three  floors  and  em¬ 
ploying  one  hundred  people.  This  concern  has  won  an 
enviable  reputation  for  quality  and  integrity,  and  their 
product  includes  spectacles,  eyeglasses,  and  industrial 
goggles,  this  company  being  a  leader  in  this  field  in 
Southbridge.  Mr.  Guilmette  is  a  member  of  the  Manu¬ 
facturers’  Association  the  Associated  Industries  of 
Massachusetts,  and  the  Optical  Manufacturers’  Associ¬ 
ation.  He  is  vice-president  of  the  Southbridge  Co¬ 
operative  Bank,  is  a  director  of  the  People’s  National 
Bank,  and  takes  a  deep  interest  in  all  that  pertains  to 
local  advance.  Fraternally  he  is  affiliated  with  the 
Artisans’  Order  of  Mutual  Protection,  of  which  he  is 
one  of  the  national  directors,  and  is  also  a  member  of 
Societe  St.  Jean  Baptiste.  His  principal  club  is  the 


Circle  Canadian,  and  he  attends  the  Roman  Catholic 
Church  of  Notre  Dame. 


HON.  BENJAMIN  ALBERT  COOK— Success  in 
business  marks  the  career  of  the  Flon.  Benjamin  Albert 
Cook,  who  has  taken  a  line  of  commercial  advance  and 
carried  it  forward  until  he  holds  a  worthy  position  in 
his  field  in  New  England.  His  endeavors  in  public  life, 
and  in  the  affairs  which  closely  concern  the  welfare  of 
the  municipality  and  the  Commonwealth,  have  been  given 
the  same  energy  and  forward-looking  spirit  which  have 
won  him  success  in  the  business  world.  Mr.  Cook  is 
prominent  in  Worcester  County,  Massachusetts,  being 
ex-Mayor  of  the  city  of  Fitchburg  and  a  former  Rep¬ 
resentative  of  this  city  in  the  Legislature  of  the  State 
of  Massachusetts.  He  is  well  known  in  fraternal  circles, 
and  is  considered  one  of  the  representative  men  of  the 
day  in  Fitchburg.  A  son  of  Mark  Henry  and  Emily 
(Thayer)  Cook,  Mr.  Cook’s  ancestry  is  distinguished  in 
the  State  of  Vermont,  his  father  having  served  in  the 
Civil  War  as  a  member  of  the  First  Vermont  Cavalry 
for  three  years  and  eight  months.  Early  in  life  he  had 
been  active  in  agricultural  pursuits,  and  he  died  in  1912. 

Benjamin  Albert  Cook  was  born  in  Guilford,  Ver¬ 
mont,  June  30,  1867.  His  elementary  studies  covered, 
he  entered  the  Brattleboro  High  School  in  his  native 
State  and  was  graduated  from  that  institution  in  due 
course.  Mr.  Cook  began  his  business  career  in  the  year 
1895,  as  the  B.  A.  Cook  &  Company,  dealers  in  hardware, 
paint,  and  wall  paper,  and  the  importance  to  which  this 
firm  has  grown  in  this  and  other  States  well  appraises 
the  calibre  of  the  man  at  its  head.  The  substantial 
block  fronting  on  Oliver  Street  he  built  in  1908,  and 
the  business  now  practically  fills  the  building.  Mr.  Cook 
is  trustee  and  member  of  the  auditing  committee  of  the 
Fitchburg  Savings  Bank,  and  director  and  member  of 
the  investment  board  of  the  Fitchburg  Cooperative 
Bank.  He  was  a  candidate  for  Representative  to  the 
Massachusetts  State  Legislature  and  served  in  that  po¬ 
sition  during  1908  and  1909.  In  1914  the  people  of  Fitch¬ 
burg  called  him  to  the  highest  local  office  of  the  civic 
body,  and  in  1914  and  1915  he  served  as  Mayor  of  the 
city  of  Fitchburg.  During  the  World  War  Mr.  Cook 
was  active  as  chairman  of  the  Liberty  Loan  drives,  hav¬ 
ing  jurisdiction  over  twenty-three  cities  and  towns 
in  the  northern  part  of  Worcester  County.  During 
those  years,  also,  1917-18-19,  he  served  as  a  member  of 
the  Massachusetts  Constitutional  Convention.  He  has 
borne  an  ever  self-forgetful  part  in  the  fulfillment  of 
his  public  duties.  Fraternally  Mr.  Cook  is  affiliated  with 
Aurora  Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted  Masons;  Thomas 
Chapter,  Royal  Arch  Masons;  Jerusalem  Commandery, 
Knights  Templar,  of  which  he  has  served  as  Com¬ 
mander;  Lady  Emma  Chapter,  Order  of  the  Eastern 
Star;  he  is  a  Past  Noble  Grand  of  Mount  Roulstone 
Lodge,  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows ;  Fitchburg 
Lodge,  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks ;  and 
Clark  S.  Simonds  Camp,  Sons  of  Veterans.  His  clubs 
are  the  Fay  and  Oak  Hill  Country,  and  he  attends  the 
First  Parish  Unitarian  Church. 

Benjamin  Albert  Cook  married,  in  Fitchburg,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  April  5,  1892,  Minnie  Louise  Prouty,  daughter 


102 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


of  Herbert  C.  and  Mary  A.  (Phillips)  Prouty,  and  they 
have  one  son:  Russell  Phillips,  born  March  17,  1900. 
The  Cook  residence  is  at  No.  18  Mount  Vernon  Street, 
Fitchburg,  Massachusetts. 


VINCENT  EATON  TOMLINSON,  pastor  of  the 
First  Universalist  Church,  of  Worcester,  Massachusetts, 
was  bom  in  Perry,  New  York,  March  20,  1862,  the  son 
of  Rev.  Dewitt  Clinton  Tomlinson,  who  was  born  at 
Gaines,  Orleans  County,  New  York,  August  24,  1824,  and 
was  for  forty  years  a  Universalist  minister.  He  mar¬ 
ried  Emeline  C.  Eaton,  who  was  born  May  20,  1830, 
at  Perrinton,  Monroe  County,  New  York.  They  had 
three  children:  Carrie,  who  died  in  infancy;  Irving  C., 
born  April  22,  i860;  Mary  E.,  born  August  16,  1870, 
died  April  19,  1907. 

Vincent  E.  Tomlinson  prepared  for  college  in  the 
preparatory  school  of  Buchtel  College,  at  Akron,  Ohio, 
taking  a  four-year  course,  and  then  entered  the  college, 
from  which  he  graduated  in  1880  with  the  degree  of 
Bachelor  of  Science.  He  entered  Tufts  Divinity  School 
the  following  term  and  graduated  in  1884.  In  1903  he 
received  the  honorary  degree  of  Doctor  of  Divinity 
from  Tufts.  He  was  ordained  in  1884  and  became  pas¬ 
tor  of  the  Universalist  church  in  Valley  Falls,  Rhode 
Island.  From  1887,  when  he  resigned  his  first  pas¬ 
torate,  until  1890,  he  was  pastor  of  the  Ballou  Univer¬ 
salist  Church  in  Providence,  Rhode  Island;  from  1890  to 
1895  he  was  pastor  of  the  First  Universalist  Church  in 
Hudson,  New  York;  from  1895  to  1900,  of  St.  Paul’s 
Universalist  Church  at  Little  Falls,  New  York.  He 
assumed  the  pastorate  of  the  First  Universalist  Church 
in  Worcester,  May  1,  1900,  and  is  the  present  pastor. 
Dr.  Tomlinson  has  been  in  a  certain  way  a  minister  for 
the  churchless  people  of  the  city,  responding  to  every 
call  to  attend  funerals  and  minister  to  the  sick  and 
needy.  His  popularity  has  extended  far  beyond  the 
limits  of  his  own  church,  and  his  ability,  kindness,  and 
charity  have  won  the  esteem  of  the  entire  community. 
He  has  been  called  into  the  public  service,  being  a  mem¬ 
ber  of  the  School  Committee  from  1904  to  1912,  and  its 
chairman  in  1910-12;  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Alder- 
men,  1916-17,  and  president  in  his  second  year.  At  the 
end  of  his  term  the  members,  as  a  testimonial  to  the 
fairness  and  impartiality  of  Dr.  Tomlinson  as  presid¬ 
ing  officer,  gave  him  a  handsome  desk  set,  and  in  the 
speeches  delivered  at  the  last  meeting,  paid  him  the 
highest  compliments,  in  which  the  Democratic  minority 
joined.  He  is  now  a  director  of  the  Free  Public  Li¬ 
brary,  elected  for  a  term  of  six  years,  from  January  1, 
1918.  In  politics  he  has  always  been  a  Republican.  He 
is  a  member  of  Montacute  Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted 
Masons  ;  Eureka  Chapter,  Royal  Arch  Masons  ;  Worces¬ 
ter  Commandery,  Knights  Templar;  of  the  Worcester 
Chamber  of  Commerce;  the  Worcester  Economic  Club, 
of  which  he  has  been  president;  the  Public  Education 
society,  of  which  he  was  president  in  1915;  the  Wor¬ 
cester  Fresh  Air  Work,  of  which  he  has  been  presi¬ 
dent  since  1909;  the  Worcester  Country  Club.  He  is 
one  of  the  advisory  board  of  this  work.  He  is  also  a 
director  since  1916  of  the  Young  Men’s  Christian  Asso¬ 
ciation. 

Rev.  Vincent  E.  Tomlinson  married,  in  Valley  Falls, 


Rhode  Island,  September  27,  1887,  Clarissa  A.  Hindley, 
who  was  born  in  Manchester,  England,  May  15,  1866, 
daughter  of  John  S.  and  Clarissa  (Stott)  Hindley.  Mrs. 
Tomlinson  is  a  member  of  the  Worcester  Woman’s 
Club.  Their  only  child,  Ruth,  was  born  April  18,  1894, 
graduate  of  the  Worcester  High  School,  1910;  Smith 
College  (A.  B.,  1914)  ;  Radcliffe  College  (A.  M.,  1916)  ; 
graduate  student  at  Johns  Hopkins,  1916-17;  now  pro¬ 
fessor  of  history  of  Kentucky  College  for  Women, 
Danville,  Kentucky,  (1917-18).  Dr.  Tomlinson’s  home 
is  at  No.  32  Irving  Street.  He  has  a  summer  place  at 
Wakefield,  Rhode  Island. 


JOHN  ALLEN  WALLACE  — In  the  world  of 
finance  in  Milford,  Massachusetts,  the  name  of  John 
Allen  Wallace  is  a  familiar  one,  and  Mr.  Wallace  is 
taking  a  very  definite  part  in  the  local  advance  through 
his  responsibilities  as  cashier  of  the  Home  National 
Bank  of  Milford.  For  upwards  of  eighteen  years  he 
has  been  identified  with  this  institution  entering  the 
organization  in  the  year  1906,  and  his  rise  through  the 
various  grades  to  his  present  position  has  been  achieved 
solely  on  the  merit  of  his  service.  Mr.  Wallace  is  a 
son  of  James  and  Mary  (Winters)  Wallace,  his  father 
now  deceased. 

John  Allen  Wallace  was  born  in  Milford,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  June  8,  1882.  His  education  was  begun  in  the 
local  public  schools  and  he  is  a  graduate  of  the  Milford 
High  School,  class  of  1899.  Shortly  after  his  gradu¬ 
ation  Mr.  Wallace  entered  the  business  world  of  Milford 
in  the  capacity  of  bookkeeper  and  was  thus  identified 
with  various  local  business  concerns  for  about  seven 
years.  Then  taking  up  a  similar  position  in  the  Home 
National  Bank  of  Milford,  Mr.  Wallace  acted  as  book¬ 
keeper  of  that  institution  for  twelve  years,  after  which 
in  the  year  1918  he  was  promoted  to  he  office  of  cashier. 
He  still  ably  fills  the  duties  of  this  position  and  is 
counted  among  the  progressive  and  really  significant 
men  of  the  community.  He  is  also  a  director  of  this  in¬ 
stitution  and  is  further  identified  with  the  financial  world 
of  Milford  as  a  director  of  the  Milford  Cooperative 
Bank,  and  a  member  of  the  Corporation  of  the  Milford 
Savings  Bank.  Keeping  in  touch  with  all  community 
and  general  progress,  Mr.  Wallace  supports  the  Repub¬ 
lican  party  in  political  affairs,  but  has  never  thus  far 
accepted  public  responsibility.  Fraternally  he  is  a  mem¬ 
ber  of  Montgomery  Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted 
Masons;  Mt.  Lebanon  Chapter,  Royal  Arch  Masons; 
Milford  Commandery,  Knights  Templar;  Milford  Lodge’ 
No.  223,  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows;  Frater¬ 
nity  Rebecca  Lodge,  No.  178;  Milford  Grange,  No.  271, 
Patrons  of  Husbandry.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Boston 
Masonic,  and  the  Cinosam  clubs.  His  religious  affili¬ 
ation  is  with  Pine  Street  Baptist  Church,  of  Milford. 

Mr.  Wallace  married,  on  October  5,  1920,  at  Milford, 
Massachusetts,  Agnes  Mary  Gilmore,  daughter  of 
William  T.  and  Sophia  Gilmore. 


CHARLES  A.  GROSVENOR — In  the  manufacture 

of  felt  footwear,  Charles  A.  Grosvenor  stands  among 
the  prosperous  and  widely  prominent  manufacturers  of 
Worcester  County,  with  interest  centering  in  the  city 
of  Worcester.  With  life  experience  in  the  shoe 
business  in  one  branch  or  another  Mr.  Grosvenor  is  well 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


103 


fitted  for  his  present  activities,  and  from  the  inception 
of  the  present  enterprise  has  carried  it  forward  to  con¬ 
stantly  larger  success.  It  is  now  an  important  business 
in  the  industrial  world  of  the  city  of  Worcester. 

Charles  A.  Grosvenor  was  born  in  Worcester,  Massa¬ 
chusetts  February  9,  1878,  and  is  the  son  of  S.  Avery 
and  Eva  L-  (Mclntire)  Grosvenor.  His  education  was 
acquired  in  the  public  and  high  schools  of  the  city,  and 
as  a  young  man  he  entered  the  employ  of  the  Heywood 
Boot  &  Shoe  Company  of  Worcester,  in  their  retail 
store.  He  was  later  associated  with  his  father  in  the 
retail  shoe  business  for  a  time,  under  the  firm  name  of 
the  S.  A.  &  C.  A.  Grosvenor  Shoe  Company,  their  store 
having  been  advantageously  located  at  the  corner  of 
Main  and  Front  streets.  This  interest  was  established 
in  1900  and  was  continued  for  about  seven  years,  at  the 
end  of  which  period  the  store  was  purchased  by  the 
Ware-Pratt  Company,  and  C.  A.  Grosvenor  continued 
with  the  new  firm  in  charge  of  their  shoe  department. 
Remaining  in  this  connection  for  a  number  of  years,  Mr. 
Grosvenor  later  struck  out  for  himself  as  a  shoe  jobber, 
and  for  about  two  and  one-half  years  was  very  success¬ 
ful  in  this  field.  It  was  here,  perhaps,  that  Mr.  Gros¬ 
venor  gained  the  general  familiarity  with  the  market 
which  has  been  of  such  great  advantage  to  him  since. 
On  June  16,  1917,  he  began  the  manufacture  of  felt 
footwear  in  a  small  way,  with  plant  located  on  Austin 
Street.  The  business  grew  rapidly  and  he  was  soon 
obliged  to  find  larger  quarters,  which  were  available  at 
the  present  address,  No.  70  Central  Street.  Removing 
to  this  location  in  November,  1919,  he  expanded  the  busi¬ 
ness  materially,  also  began  the  manufacture  of  new  lines 
and  fresh  patterns.  In  November,  1922,  Mr.  Grosvenor 
added  to  the  scope  of  his  activity  by  purchasing  the 
slipper  shop  in  Oxford,  Massachusetts.  The  consoli¬ 
dated  interests  now  form  a  large  and  important  business, 
and  the  plants  have  a  capacity  of  more  than  12,000  pairs 
of  shoes  and  slippers  per  day.  The  product  is  marketed 
through  jobbers  and -large  department  stores  from  coast 
to  coast.  Under  the  firm  name  of  the  Charles  A.  Gros¬ 
venor  Shoe  Company,  Mr.  Grosvenor  is  sole  owner  of  the 
interest  and  is  carrying  it  forward  with  the  policy  of 
ever-increasing  expansion.  The  plants  are  operating  to 
capacity  during  the  greater  part  of  the  time,  and  Mr. 
Grosvenor  contemplates  further  additions  in  the  not 
far  distant  future. 

Mr.  Grosvenor  is  a  prominent  member  of  Quinsiga- 
mond  Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted  Masons,  holding  mem¬ 
bership  in  both  the  York  and  Scottish  Rite  bodies.  He 
also  is  a  member  of  Aleppo  Temple,  Ancient  Arabic 
Order  Nobles  of  the  Mystic  Shrine;  and  is  identified 
with  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  the  Rotary 
Club  of  Worcester,  and  the  Worcester  Golf  and  Coun¬ 
try  clubs.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Worcester  Chamber 
of  Commerce,  and  takes  a  deep  interest  in  all  civic 
progress,  lending  his  influence  and  support  to  every 
movement  which  has  for  its  object  the  betterment  of 
the  people.  A  Republican  by  political  affiliation,  he  is 
a  worker  in  the  ranks  of  the  party,  but  has  never  thus 
far  accepted  the  responsibilities  nor  honors  of  office. 
Mr.  Grosvenor  is  gifted  with  a  very  fine  tenor  voice 
of  really  wonderful  range  and  timbre,  and  for  eighteen 
years  has  been  a  tenor  soloist  in  the  Worcester  churches, 
for  nine  years  at  the  Piedmont  Congregational  Church 


Charles  A.  Grosvenor  married,  on  October  31,  1906, 
Della  B.  Savage,  daughter  of  C.  B.  and  Firilla  (Cross¬ 
man)  Savage,  and  the  family  are  members  of  the  Wes¬ 
ley  Methodist  Episcopal  Church. 


EDMUND  Q.  ABBOT— In  insurance  circles  in  the 
city  of  Worcester,  Massachusetts,  Edmund  Q.  Abbot  is 
a  mjan  of  large  prominence  as  the  Worcester  represen¬ 
tative  of  the  Mutual  Benefit  Life  Insurance  Company 
of  Newark,  New  Jersey.  With  offices  at  No.  311  Main 
Street,  he  is  successfully  handling  the  extensive  interests 
of  this  concern  in  the  Worcester  district,  and  is  counted 
among  the  really  noteworthy  men  of  the  day  in  Wor¬ 
cester  County.  Mr.  Abbot  is  a  son  of  William  F.  Abbot, 
who  for  many  years  was  numbered  among  the  dis¬ 
tinguished  men  of  this  city.  Born  in  Boston,  William 
F.  Abbot  was  highly  educated,  and  for  forty  years 
served  as  an  instructor  in  the  Classical  High  School  of 
Worcester,  his  scholarly  mind,  lofty  ideals,  and  benev¬ 
olent  spirit  giving  his  influence  over  the  young  people 
under  his  charge  great  significance  for  good.  His 
death,  which  occurred  April  21,  1922,  was  mourned  by 
all  who  knew  him.  The  mother,  Caroline  W.  (Sewall) 
Abbot,  was  born  in  Wilmington,  Delaware,  and  still 
survives  her  husband. 

Edmund  Q.  Abbot  was  born  in  the  city  of  Worcester, 
Massachusetts,  July  26,  1884.  Receiving  his  early  edu¬ 
cation  in  the  local  public  schools,  he  was  graduated  from 
the  Classical  High  School  in  the  class  of  1902.  There¬ 
after  entering  Harvard  University  for  his  course  in  the 
liberal  arts,  he  was  graduated  from  that  institution  in 
the  class  of  1906  with  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts. 
He  then  took  up  the  study  of  law  at  the  same  university, 
but  ill  health  compelled  him  to  abandon  his  plans  for  a 
professional  career,  and  for  two  years  he  travelled  in 
the  hope  of  regaining  his  strength.  The  lure  of  the 
great  West  held  him  for  a  time  thereafter,  and  he  was 
active  in  the  cattle  business  until  the  year  1916,  when  he 
returned  to  his  native  city  to  become  associated  with 
the  Mutual  Benefit  Life  Insurance  Company,  as  their 
Worcester  representative.  He  was  more  than  success¬ 
ful,  and  continuing  in  this  connection  permanetly,  has 
won  the  highest  esteem  of  his  business  associates  and  con¬ 
temporaries. 

The  military  record  of  Edmund  Q.  Abbot  begins  with 
his  enlistment  in  the  United  States  Army  in  December, 
1917,  as  a  private.  He  was  later  transferred  to  the  311th 
Infantry  Regiment,  78th  Division,  American  Expedi¬ 
tionary  Forces,  and  was  promoted  shortly  to  corporal, 
and  later  to  sergeant.  With  his  unit  he  sailed  for 
France  on  May  19,  1918,  and  was  detailed  to  the  Army 
Candidates’  School,  at  Langres-sur-Marne,  France.  On 
July  30,  1918,  he  was  commissioned  second  lieutenant  of 
infantry,  and  on  September  25,  of  the  same  year,  was 
assigned  to  the  316th  Machine  Gun  Battalion  of  the  81st 
Division.  From  October  6  until  the  seventeenth  of  the 
same  month  he  was  active  in  the  defensive  sector  of  St. 
Die,  then,  on  November  7,  entered  the  fearful  strain  of 
the  Meuse-Argonne  offensive,  serving  at  Haudiomont, 
Watronville,  and  Grimacourt,  east  of  Verdun,  until  the 
signing  of  the  Armistice.  In  March,  1919,  Lieutenant 
Abbot  was  detailed  to  the  Army  University  at  Beaune, 
France,  as  head  of  the  Life  Insurance  Department  of 
the  College  of  Business,  remaining  in  this  connection 


104 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


until  sailing  for  the  United  States  on  June  9,  1919-  He 
received  his  honorable  discharge  from  the  service  in 
July,  1919,  with  the  rank  of  second  lieutenant. 

Mr.  Abbot  is  a  member  of  the  Worcester  Chamber  of 
Commerce,  and  is  prominent  fraternally,  holding  mem¬ 
bership  in  all  the  Scottish  Rite  bodies  of  the  Masonic 
order,  up  to  and  including  the  thirty-second  degree;  also 
is  a  member  of  the  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of 
Elks,  and  the  American  Region.  He  is  a  well-known 
member  of  the  Harvard  Club  of  Worcester,  and  is 
affiliated  with  the  First  Unitarian  Church. 

Mr.  Abbot  married,  on  May  7,  1918,  Melinda  W. 
Rockwood,  who  was  born  in  Brooklyn,  New  York,  and 
they  have  two  children :  Richard  Rockwood,  born  April 
22,  1920;  and  Persis  Lovejoy,  born  October  8,  1921. 


RAYMOND  A.  RICE — Prominent  in  the  industrial 
world  of  Southern  Worcester  County,  Massachusetts, 
as  treasurer  and  general  manager  of  the  Southbridge 
Printing  Company,  Mr.  Rice  is  a  noteworthy  figure  in 
the  business  progress  of  Southbridge.  With  experience 
in  the  same  general  line  of  activity  in  which  he  is  now 
engaged,  Mr.  Rice  came  to  his  present  position  as  a 
capable  executive.  He  has  become  a  significant  member 
of  the  present  organization  and  is  affiliated  with  various 
other  industrial  concerns,  also  with  current  lines  of 
community  advance.  He  is  a  son  of  Charles  L.  Rice, 
who  was  born  at  Oswego,  New  York,  and  is  a  veteran 
insurance  broker  of  that  section,  still  being  active  in 
this  field  of  endeavor  in  New  York  City.  The  mother, 
Ellen  (Booth)  Rice  who  was  a  native  of  New  York 
State,  died  in  the  year  1883,  at  an  early  age. 

Raymond  A.  Rice  was  born  at  Scranton,  Pennsyl¬ 
vania,  December  9,  1879.  Receiving  his  early  education 
in  the  public  schools  of  his  birthplace,  he  also  covered 
the  high  school  course  in  that  city.  In  the  year  1899 
Mr.  Rice  came  to  Southbridge  and  entered  the  employ 
of  the  Southbridge  Printing  Company,  being  first  active 
in  the  engraving  department.  He  not  only  familiarized 
himself  with  the  mechanics  of  engraving,  but  has  now 
for  some  years  been  treasurer  and  general  manager  of 
that  company,  and  is  also  treasurer  of  the  Fiskdale  Fin¬ 
ishing  Company,  located  in  the  outskirts  of  the  town  of 
Southbridge.  The  activities  of  these  plants  contribute 
much  to  the  advance  of  the  textile  industry  of  this  sec¬ 
tion,  and  Mr.  Rice  is  bearing  a  significant  part  in  their 
progress  and  prosperity.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Manu¬ 
facturers’  Association  of  Southbridge,  and  is  broadly  in¬ 
terested  also  in  those  avenues  of  organized  advance 
which  pertain  to  the  civic  and  social  welfare  of  the  com¬ 
munity.  In  politics  he  is  a  Republican.  He  served  as 
a  member  of  the  Southbridge  Board  of  Selectmen  for 
two  terms,  and  during  the  World  War,  from  the  year 
1918  to  1919  inclusive,  was  active  as  first  lieutenant  of 
the  Massachusetts  State  Guard.  Fraternally  Mr.  Rice  is 
affiliated  with  Quinebaug  Lodge,  Ancient  Free  and  Ac¬ 
cepted  Masons;  Doric  Chapter,  Royal  Arch  Masons; 
and  he  is  a  member  of  the  Commonwealth  Club  of  Wor¬ 
cester,  the  Putnam  Country  Club,  the  Leicester  Country, 
and  the  Quinebaug  clubs,  these  club  connections  revealing 
his  great  pleasure  in  outdoor  interest.  He  attends  the 
Episcopal  church. 

Mr.  Rice  married,  in  1914,  Sarah  Jupp,  who  was  born 


in  Cincinnati,  Ohio,  and  they  are  the  parents  of  two 
children:  Ellen  Booth  and  Alfred  Jupp. 


HON.  FRANK  WESLEY  FENNO— A  lifelong 
resident  of  Worcester  County,  Massachusetts,  Mr. 
Fenno  has  risen  from  the  position  of  the  struggling 
youth  without  friends  or  influence  to  that  of  president 
of  one  of  the  foremost  financial  institutions  of  this 
part  of  the  State,  a  record  of  which  any  man  might 
well  be  proud,  and  which  he  has  achieved  by  virtue  of 
tireless  endeavor  along  useful  lines  of  activity,  and  the 
lofty  personal  integrity  which  commands  the  respect  of 
every  man.  His  usefulness  in  the  public  service  has 
added  significance  to  his  record  of  honorable  personal 
achievement,  and  he  is  counted  among  the  really  im¬ 
portant  men  of  Gardner,  where  his  business  interests 
center,  and  Westminster,  of  which  he  has  been  a  lifelong 
resident. 

The  Fenno  family  is  a  very  old  one  in  Westminster, 
and  Captain  Reuben  Fenno,  Mr.  Fenno’s  grandfather, 
was  a  farmer  and  shoemaker  of  this  community  early 
in  the  nineteenth  century.  Frank  Bond  Fenno,  his  son 
and  Mr.  Fenno’s  father,  was  born  in  Westminster,  was 
a  soldier  of  the  Civil  War,  serving  in  a  Massachusetts 
volunteer  regiment,  in  which  he  enlisted  in  1861.  He 
died  in  1875,  at  the  age  of  forty-two  years.  He  mar¬ 
ried  Mahala  Gould  Estabrook,  also  a  native  of  West¬ 
minster,  who  died  in  1910,  at  the  age  of  seventy-six 
years. 

Frank  Wesley  Fenno  was  born  in  Westminster,  Oc¬ 
tober  24,  1861.  His  education  was  begun  in  the  local 
public  schools,  and  it  was  only  through  his  own  efforts 
that  the  boy,  left  fatherless  in  his  thirteenth  year,  se¬ 
cured  any  formal  training.  His  education  has  been 
largely  self-acquired,  his  alert  and  retentive  mind  gain¬ 
ing  useful  and  valuable  information  from  every  source. 
At  the  age  of  seventeen  years  he  was  working  on  a 
farm  in  Princeton,  Worcester  County,  Massachusetts, 
receiving  $12  per  month  for  his  services.  Thereafter, 
securing  the  means  of  a  short  course  at  the  Bryant  & 
Stratton  Business  College  in  Boston,  he  entered  the 
offices  of  Nichols  Brothers,  chair  manufacturers  of 
Westminster,  at  the  age  of  twenty  years,  in  the  capacity 
of  bookkeeper.  Some  four  years  later,  in  partnership 
with  a  fellow  workman,  he  began  manufacturing  chairs 
in  spare  hours,  doing  all  the  work  themselves  and  plac¬ 
ing  their  goods  on  sale  as  they  had  opportunity.  At 
the  age  of  twenty-five  years  Mr.  Fenno  was  offered  the 
cashiership  of  the  Westminster  National  Bank,  a  rare 
tribute  to  the  character  of  a  young  man  of  no  experi¬ 
ence  whatever  in  banking.  His  acceptance  of  this  offer 
placed  Mr.  Fenno  in  a  field  of  business  endeavor  for 
which  he  was  especially  fitted,  and  in  which  he  has  re¬ 
mained  continuously  since.  The  history  of  the  West¬ 
minster  National  Bank  was  merged  with  that  of  the 
Gardner  Trust  Company  in  the  year  1916,  and  upon 
the  death  of  John  A.  Dunn,  who  had  served  as  president 
of  both  institutions,  Frank  W.  Fenno  was  elected  presi¬ 
dent  of  the  Gardner  Trust  Company,  which  position 
he  ably  filled  until  January,  1923,  when  elected  chairman 
of  the  board,  rounding  out  thirty-seven  years  since  his 
first  entrance  into  the  world  of  finance.  Mr.  Fenno  is 
affiliated  with  several  industrial  concerns  of  Worcester 


. 


' 


I  I  'MM 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


105 


County,  being  vice-president  of  the'  Nichols  &  Stone 
Company,  chair  manufacturers  of  Gardner,  a  director 
of  Tom  Wye,  Incorporated,  of  Winchenden,  and  he  is 
also  a  director  of  the  Bean  &  Simonds  Company  of  East 
Jaffrey,  New  Hampshire,  match  block  manufacturers. 
He  is  a  member  of  the  Gardner  Chamber  of  Commerce. 

In  public  affairs  Mr.  Fenno  has,  for  many  years,  been 
a  progressive  leader.  For  thirty-five  years  he  has  held 
the  office  of  treasurer  of  the  town  of  Westminster,  and 
has  taken  a  foremost  part  in  all  movements  for  the  bet¬ 
terment  of  the  community  and  vicinity.  In  1902  he  was 
elected  to  the  Legislature  of  the  State  as  Represen- 
ative  from  the  Third  Worcester  District.  His  record 
as  a  legislator  was  one  of  which  the  people  were  proud, 
and  he  was  given  large  responsibilities  in  that  body,  serv¬ 
ing  as  chairman  of  the  Committee  on  Towns  and  as  a 
member  of  the  Committees  on  Mercantile  and  Military 
Affairs.  Through  his  efforts  the  bill  which  provided  for 
the  turning  over  to  the  State  the  care  of  roads  about 
the  State  colony  which  are  located  in  the  towns  of  West¬ 
minster  and  Gardner,  was  brought  before  the  Senate 
and  became  a  law.  He  was  returned  to  the  House  the 
following  year,  when  the  bill  he  introduced  to  settle  the 
dispute  for  damages  between  Fitchburg  and  Westmin¬ 
ster  on  account  of  taking  property  for  a  water  supply 
became  a  law;  this  called  for  a  cash  payment  from 
Fitchburg  to  Westminster,  and  was,  perhaps,  Mr. 
Fenno’s  greatest  achievement  in  the  House.  In  1904 
he  was  a  candidate  for  the  State  Senate,  his  defeat  at 
that  time,  by  one  vote,  having  been  credited  to  the 
manoeuvers  of  the  “machine.”  Mr.  Fenno  served  for 
many  years  as  chairman  of  the  Republican  Town  Com¬ 
mittee  of  Westminster,  Massachusetts.  He  also  kept  in 
touch  with  the  progress  of  agricultural  affairs  in  this 
section,  being  a  member  of  the  Westminster  Grange, 
and  was  formerly  president  of  the  Westminster  Far¬ 
mers’  and  Mechanics’  Association.  He  is  a  charter 
member  and  Past  Commander  of  Camp  No.  101,  Sons  of 
Veterans,  and  fraternally  is  identified  with  Hope  Lodge, 
Free  and  Accepted  Masons ;  Ivanhoe  Commandery, 
Knights  Templar;  and  Gardner  Lodge,  No.  1426,  Benev¬ 
olent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks,  and  is  a  member  of 
the  Gardner  Boat  Club. 

Mr.  Fenno,  married,  on  October  24,  1893,  Mary  A. 
Nichols,  of  Westminster,  daughter  of  Charles  Nichols, 
chair  manufacturer  and  banker  of  Westminster  and 
Gardner.  Mrs.  Fenno  died  March  24,  1912,  leaving 
six  children:  1.  Doris  Martha,  a  teacher  in  the  West¬ 
minster  schools.  2.  Thaddeus  B.,  postmaster  of  West¬ 
minster,  who  in  taking  up  the  duties  of  this  office  at  the 
age  of  twenty- five  years,  walked  through  the  same  door 
which  his  father  entered  at  the  same  age  to  assume  the 
duties  of  cashier  of  the  Westminster  National  Bank. 
3.  Alice  Mahala,  a  graduate  of  Simmons’  College,  with 
the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Science,  who  holds  a  respon¬ 
sible  position  in  Lowell.  4.  Barbara  May,  a  graduate  of 
the  Sargent  School  of  Physical  Education,  and  at  pres¬ 
ent  an  instructor  in  Lasell  Seminary,  Auburndale, 
Massachusetts.  5.  Frank  Wesley,  Jr.,  a  midshipman  at 
Annapolis  Naval  Academy.  6.  Charles  Nichols,  in  the 
United  States  Marine  Service. 


FRANCIS  H.  OLIN,  M.  D.— Holding  a  leading 
position  in  the  medical  profession  in  Southern  Worces¬ 


ter  County  Massachusetts,  Dr.  Francis  H.  Olin  has  been 
active  in  practice  in  Southbridge  for  the  past  thirty- 
four  years,  and  has  won  not  only  a  large  measure  of 
success  but  has  become  also  one  of  the  most  beloved  and 
revered  physicians  of  this  part  of  the  State,  people  of 
the  community  and  the  surrounding  villages  looking  up 
to  him  as  an  advisor  and  friend,  as  well  as  in  his  pro¬ 
fessional  capacity.  Dr.  Olin  is  a  son  of  Francis  M.  Olin, 
who  was  born  at  Liverpool,  Ohio,  and  was  engaged  in 
foundry  work  practically  until  his  death,  although  he 
lived  to  the  great  age  of  ninety-four  years.  He  passed 
away  in  1919  in  Falls  Village,  Connecticut.  The  mother, 
Caroline  (Segar)  Olin,  was  born  in  New  Hartford, 
Connecticut,  and  also  lived  to  an  advanced  age,  passing 
away  in  1913. 

Francis  H.  Olin  was  born  at  Falls  Village,  Connec¬ 
ticut,  February  23,  1855.  His  early  education  was  ac¬ 
quired  in  the  public  schools  of  his  birthplace  and  he  later 
attended  Rocky  Dell  Institute,  also  Sedgwick  Institute, 
then  after  completing  his  preparatory  studies  under  the 
preceptorship  of  Drs.  Hobart  and  Jordan  of  Worcester, 
he  entered  the  University  of  Michigan  in  the  medical 
department,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in  the  class 
of  1881  with  the  degree  of  Doctor  of  Medicine.  Follow¬ 
ing  one  year  of  hospital  work,  Dr.  Olin  returned  to  his 
native  State  in  1882  and  opened  his  offices  for  the  prac¬ 
tice  of  medicine  at  Woodstock,  Connecticut.  There 
he  was  active  for  about  seven  years,  then  in  the  year 
1889  he  was  persuaded  to  remove  to  Southbridge  and 
has  since  been  active  in  practice  here  at  No.  27  Hamil¬ 
ton  Street.  He  was  successful  from  the  first,  and  his 
ability  as  a  physician  has  been  augmented  by  his  wide 
experience.  He  has  seen  the  children  whom  he  has 
brought  into  the  world  grow  to  youth  and  maturity  and 
take  useful  positions  in  life,  and  in  recent  years  his 
own  status  in  the  community  is  more  truly  that  of  the 
father  and  family  friend  than  that  of  the  professional 
man  and  he  is  most  highly  esteemed  in  all  circles. 
Dr.  Olin  is  a  member  of  the  American  Medical  Associ¬ 
ation,  Massachusetts  Medical  Society,  and  the  Worcester 
County  Medical  Society,  and  for  a  number  of  years  he 
has  been  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Health  of  South- 
bridge.  During  the  World  War  he  was  very  active  as 
a  member  of  the  medical  advisory  board  at  Palmer, 
Massachusetts,  and  gave  his  best  endeavors  to  all  the 
home  activities  of  that  trying  period.  Fraternally  Dr. 
Olin  is  affiliated  with  the  Ancient  Free  and  Accepted 
Masons  and  all  the  York  Rite  bodies  of  the  Masonic 
order,  also  the  Ancient  Arabic  Order  Nobles  of  the  Mys¬ 
tic  Shrine.  He  is  further  a  member  of  the  Independent 
Order  of  Odd  Fellows.  His  religious  affiliation  is  with 
the  Episcopal  church. 

Dr.  Olin  married,  in  1911,  Mary  N.  Simpson,  who  was 
born  in  Dallas,  Texas. 


HAROLD  G.  PRATT,  as  junior  partner  of  the  con¬ 
cern  known  as  E.  O.  Pratt  &  Son,  is  associated  with  the 
largest  hardware  establishment  in  the  city  of  Clinton, 
also  with  one  of  the  oldest  and  best  known  enterprises 
of  its  kind  in  Worcester  County. 

Eugene  O.  Pratt,  father  of  Harold  G.  Pratt,  was 
bom  in  Irving,  Massachusetts,  May  9,  1856,  son  of  Gil¬ 
bert  Pratt,  a  native  of  Royalston,  Massachusetts,  who 
was  engaged  in  business  as  a  chairmaker  to  the  time  of 


io6 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


his  death  in  1865,  and  of  Julia  A.  (Delaney)  Pratt,  a 
native  of  Canada,  who  died  in  1917.  He  received  a 
good,  practical  education  in  the  public  schools  of  Athol, 
Massachusetts,  and  after  completing  his  school  training 
became  associated  with  the  hardware  business.  He 
later,  in  1890,  purchased  the  old  concern  which  was 
established  by  H.  E.  Starbird  in  i860,  and  from  1890 
to  1920  conducted  a  prosperous  business  under  the  name 
of  E.  O.  Pratt.  When,  in  1920,  his  son,  Harold  G.,  was 
taken  into  partnership  the  firm  name  was  changed  to  E. 
O.  Pratt  &  Son,  and  under  that  style  has  continued  to 
the  present  time.  Eugene  O.  Pratt  has  been  associated 
with  the  hardware  business  for  more  than  fifty  years, 
and  there  are  few  in  his  section  of  the  State  who  are 
more  familiar  with  that  branch  of  business  activity  than 
is  he.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Clinton  Chamber  of  Com¬ 
merce,  and  for  forty-five  years  has  been  a  member  of 
the  Masonic  order,  his  lodge  being  Star  Lodge,  Free 
and  Accepted  Masons,  of  Athol.  He  is  also  a  member 
of  the  Prescott  Club  and  the  Clinton  Historical  Society. 
His  religious  interest  is  with  the  Congregational  church 
of  Clinton,  of  which  he  is  a  member.  He  is  a  director 
of  Wachusets  National  Bank.  On  January  15,  1880, 
Eugene  O.  Pratt  married  Stella  R.  Maynard,  who  was 
born  in  Orange,  Massachusetts,  daughter  of  Charles 
and  Caroline  (Reynolds)  Maynard.  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Eugene  O.  Pratt  are  the  parents  of  two  children:  Beulah 
M.,  who  was  born  in  Orange,  Massachusetts,  December 
5,  1889;  and  Harold  G.,  of  further  mention. 

Harold  G.  Pratt  was  born  in  Clinton,  Massachusetts, 
July  19,  1894,  and  received  his  early  education  in  the 
public  schools  of  Clinton.  He  then  became  a  student 
in  the  famous  Phillips-Exeter  Academy,  from  which  he 
was  graduated  in  June,  1914.  The  following  fall  he 
entered  the  Massachusetts  Technical  Institute,  where  he 
continued  his  studies  for  two  years,  when  the  World 
War  interfered.  Upon  the  completion  of  his  war  ser¬ 
vice,  he  associated  himself  with  his  father  in  the  hard¬ 
ware  business  under  the  firm  name  of  E.  O.  Pratt  &  Son, 
and  that  connection  has  been  maintained  to  the  present 
time.  The  business  is  a  steadily  growing  one,  and  as 
the  largest  in  Clinton,  has  made  for  itself  an  enviable 
record.  4 

Shortly  after  the  entrance  of  the  United  States  into 
the  World  War,  Mr.  Pratt  enlisted,  October  6,  1917, 
and  was  assigned  to  the  76th  Division  with  the  rank  of 
private.  In  May,  1918,  he  was  commissioned  a  second 
lieutenant  in  the  United  States  Infantry,  and  on  Septem¬ 
ber  8,  1918,  he  was  promoted  to  the  rank  of  first  lieu¬ 
tenant,  United  States  Infantry.  He  was  discharged 
March  5,  1919,  holding  the  last-named  rank.  In  addi¬ 
tion  to  his  business  interest  Mr.  Pratt  finds  time  for 
various  social  and  other  connections.  He  is  a  member 
of  the  Clinton  Chamber  of  Commerce,  in  the  activities 
f>f  which  he  takes  a  keen  interest,  and  he  is  also  a 
member  of  the  Prescott  Club  and  of  James  R.  Kirby 
Post,  American  Legion,  of  Clinton.  His  religious  affili¬ 
ation  is  with  the  Congregational  church  of  Clinton.  For 
his  recreation  he  indulges  in  the  game  of  golf. 


REV.  JAMES  WILLIAM  DOLAN— Under  the 
spiritual  leadership  of  Rev.  James  William  Dolan  the 
people  of  Saint  Martin’s  Parish,  in  Otter  River,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  are  going  forward  to  ever  higher  attainments. 


Father  Dolan  has  been  pastor  of  this  church  for  the 
past  seven  years,  and  his  work  in  this  parish  and  in  the 
community  has  contributed  in  no  slight  degree  to  the 
general  advance.  Covering,  as  his  pastorate  here  has, 
the  recent  years  of  conflict  and  sorrow,  his  spirit  of 
benevolence  and  loving  kindness  has  meant  much  to  the 
people  of  this  section,  and  he  is  beloved  as  well  as 
esteemed  both  among  the  members  of  his  church  and 
among  the  people  generally. 

Father  Dolan  was  bom  in  Worcester,  Massachusetts, 
November  3,  1868,  and  is  a  son  of  Lawrence  and  Ellen 
(Mulvey)  Dolan,  his  father  active  throughout  his  life¬ 
time  as  a  teamster.  Father  Dolan’s  education  was  be¬ 
gun  in  the  public  schools  of  his  birthplace,  and  he  at¬ 
tended  Holy  Cross  College,  of  Worcester,  for  four 
months,  then  entered  Saint  Michael’s  College,  at  To¬ 
ronto,  Canada,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in  due 
course,  taking  his  degrees  from  Toronto  University. 
Taking  up  his  theological  studies  at  Grand  Seminary, 
in  Montreal  Canada,  he  completed  his  course  in  theology 
and  philosophy  at  the  Catholic  University,  in  Washing¬ 
ton,  District  of  Columbia.  He  was  ordained  to  the 
priesthood  in  Springfield,  Massachusetts  on  December 
24,  1892,  and  his  first  appointment  was  as  assistant 
priest  in  Salem,  Massachusetts.  He  was  next  sent  to 
Springfield,  Massachusetts,  in  a  similar  capacity,  then 
was  appointed  to  the  Church  of  St.  Bernard,  at  Fitch¬ 
burg,  Massachusetts,  where  he  did  excellent  service  in 
encouraging  the  people  in  their  forward  labors  and  im¬ 
proving  the  church  property.  Successively  active  there¬ 
after  at  Adams  and  Webster,  Massachusetts,  Father 
Dolan  came  to  Otter  River  in  October,  1916,  and  has 
since  been  the  honored  and  beloved  pastor  of  Saint 
Martin’s  Church.  He  not  only  gives  to  his  own  con¬ 
gregation  the  devoted  care  which  leads  the  people  ever 
to  higher  spiritual  levels  but  endorses  all  community 
advance  and  bears  a  constructive  part  in  the  general 
progress  of  the  day.  He  will  be-longest  remembered  in 
Fitchburg  for  his  activities  among  the  young  men  of 
the  city.  He  organized  and  brought  to  its  very  highest 
the  Young  Men’s  Catholic  Lyceum,  which,  during  all 
his  years  there,  was  the  leader  in  every  branch  of  clean 
sport.  This  club  house  was  the  centre  of  all  sporting 
activities  of  the  city  and  surrounding  towns.  From  it 
went  many  young  men  to  the  various  colleges,  Holy 
Cross  naturally  leading,  where  they  became  known 
throughout  he  college  world.  Father  Dolan  commands 
the  esteem  and  admiration  of  all  the  people  and  of  his 
contemporaries  of  the  cloth  in  whatever  religious  de¬ 
nomination. 


SOLON  WILDER,  one  of  the  most  widely  known  of 
the  younger  business  men  of  Gardner,  Massachusetts, 
lived  a  very  busy,  useful,  successful  life  that,  measured 
in  figures  of  time,  was  all  too  short.  His  success  as  a 
business  man  was  the  natural  result  and  reward  of  tire¬ 
less  diligence  in  the  manifold  duties  laid  upon  him  by 
needy  causes,  sorority  institutions,  and  business,  and  of 
honorable  dealing  with  his  fellow  men,  which  forgot 
itself  in  kindly  interest  for  others.  A  devoted  church¬ 
man  and  member  of  several  fraternal  orders,  his  circle  of 
friends  extended  far  beyond  the  church  or  lodge  and 
included  college  fellows,  kindred  spirits  in  appreciation 


Eng.  by  E.  G.  Williams  &  Bro.N.YL 


Leans  Historical  Pub.  G a. 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


107 


of  music,  business  associates  widely  scattered,  employees, 
and  various  classes  of  his  fellow-men. 

He  came  from  an  ancient  English  family  recorded 
in  Berkshire  as  land  owners  in  1407,  Nicholas  Wilder 
receiving  lands  from  his  king. 

The  American  ancestor  in  this  branch  is  Thomas  (2) 
Wilder,  son  of  Thomas  and  Martha  Wilder,  a  great- 
grandson  of  Nicholas  Wilder,  and  a  resident  of  Ship- 
lake,  Oxfordshire,  England.  Two  of  the  sons  of 
Thomas  and  Martha  Wilder  came  to.  New  England, 
Thomas  settling  in  Charlestown  and  Edward  settling  in 
Hingham.  After  the  death  of  her  husband  Martha 
Wilder  joined  her  sons  in  New  England,  coming  on  the 
ship  “Confidence,”  in  1638,  with  her  daughter  Mary, 
and  settling  near  her  son  Edward  in  Hingham. 

Thomas  (2)  Wilder,  son  of  Thomas  and  Martha 
Wilder,  was  born  in  Shiplake,  Oxfordshire,  England,  in 
1618,  and  was  a  proprietor  of  Charlestown,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  in  1638.  He  was  admitted  a  freeman  June  2,  1641 ; 
in  1659  moved  to  Lancaster;  was  Selectman  in  1660  and 
in  1667,  and  held  other  offices.  His  wife,  Ann,  whom  he 
married  in  1641,  died  June  10,  1692,  surviving  her  hus¬ 
band  twenty-five  years,  he  dying  October  23,  1667.  The 
line  of  descent  from  Thomas  and  Ann  Wilder,  the  Amer¬ 
ican  ancestors  is  thus  traced:  Thomas  Wilder  and  his 
wife  Ann;  Lieutenant  Nathaniel  Wilder  (killed  by 
Indians)  and  his  wife,  Mary  Sawyer;  Ensign  Oliver 
Wilder  and  his  wife,  Mary  Fairbanks ;  Moses  Wilder 
and  his  wife,  Submit  Frost;  John  Wilder  and  his  wife, 
Sally  Whipple;  John  Warren  Wilder  and  his  wife, 
Betsey  Wellington;  Jonas  Brooks  Wilder  and  his  wife, 
Louisa  Davidson;  William  Henry  Wilder  and  his  wife, 
Helen  Marion  Laws ;  Solon  Wilder  and  his  wife,  Edith 
Leavens;  Richard  Wilder,  born  September  11,  1911. 

John  Warren  Wilder  of  the  sixth  generation,  moved 
from  Massachusetts  to  Belfast,  Maine,  where  his  son 
Jonas  Brooks  Wilder,  and  his  grandson,  William 
Henry  Wilder,  were  born.  Jonas  Brooks  Wilder  was  a 
mechanic  and  inventor,  the  design  of  the  hillside  plow 
being  credited  to  him. 

William  Henry  Wilder,  M.  C.,  of  the  eighth  genera¬ 
tion,  was  born  at  Belfast,  Maine,  May  14,  1855,  died  in 
Washington,  District  of  Columbia,  September  11,  1913, 
being  a  member  of  the  Sixty-third  Congress  of  the 
United  States.  In  1866  Massachusetts  again  became  the 
family  home,  he  finding  employment  in  Gardner.  At  the 
age  of  seventeen  years  he  began  business  under  his  own 
name  as  a  contractor  of  painting  and  house  decoration, 
passing  from  that  business  in  1884  to  an  association  with 
A.  M.  Greenwood  and  Calvin  H.  Hill,  through  whose 
influence  oil  stove  manufacturing  became  a  Gardner  in¬ 
dustry.  Mr.  Wilder’s  inventive  genius  was  of  great 
benefit  to  the  business,  and  for  a  quarter  of  a  century, 
1884-1909,  there  was  not  a  year  that  he  did  not  obtain 
at  least  one  patent,  and  they  numbered  half  a  hundred. 
His  partners  were  more  interested  in  chair  manufacture, 
and  the  oil  stove  business  was  left  to  Mr.  Wilder,  who 
developed  a  large  business.  He  was  a  prominent  factor 
in  bringing  about  a  consolidation  of  the  various  plants 
under  the  corporate  name  of  the  Central  Oil-Gas  Stove 
Company,  and  was  its  treasurer.  Factories  were  op¬ 
erated  in  Connecticut,  Massachusetts,  and  Michigan, 
with  warehouses  in  Boston,  New  York,  and  Chicago  In 
1895,  through  no  fault  of  his  own,  he  found  himself 


involved  in  business  disaster  with  a  quarter  of  a  million 
dollars  indebtedness.  He  assumed  these  obligations  and 
before  his  death  the  entire  amount  was  paid  or  abun¬ 
dantly  secured.  In  1896  he  organized  the  business  in 
Gardner  now  conducted  under  the  name  Central  Oil- 
Gas  Stove  Company.  In  1897  he  placed  on  the  market 
the  famed  blue-flame  oil  stove  made  under  his  own 
patents,  and  built  up  a  business  which  restored  his 
fortunes. 

Mr.  Wilder  was  a  man  of  great  energy  and  public 
spirit,  doing  a  great  deal  for  his  community.  He  was  a 
Republican  from  early  life,  and  at  the  time  of  his  death 
was  representating  the  district  in  Congress,  his  second 
term.  He  made  five  trips  to  the  Pacific,  four  trips  to 
Europe,  and  in  1909  spent  a  month  in  Panama.  He  was 
an  active  member  of  the  First  Congregational  Church  of 
Gardner;  a  member  of  lodge,  chapter,  command- 
ery,  and  consistory  of  the  Masonic  order;  a  Noble 
of  the  Mystic  Shrine;  honorary  member  of  the  Grand 
Army  of  the  Republic;  and  greatly  interested  in  his 
farm  near  Gardner. 

Mr.  Wilder  married  (first),  June  20,  1876,  Helen 
Marion  Laws,  born  March  7,  1855,  in  Gardner,  died 
there  November  30,  1909,  daughter  of  Samuel  Newell 
and  Fidelia  (Whitney)  Laws.  He  married  (second), 
March  22,  1912,  Irene  Paula  Uibel,  who  survived  him. 
By  his  first  marriage  five  children  were  bom,  the  eldest 
a  son,  Solon. 

Solon  Wilder,  eldest  son  of  William  Henry  and  Helen 
Marion  (Laws)  Wilder,  was  born  in  Gardner,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  May  19,  1883,  and  there  died  December 
5,  1922.  He  was  educated  in  the  public  schools 
of  Florence  and  Gardner,  Massachusetts,  finish¬ 
ing  with  graduation  from  Gardner  High  School 
in  1901.  He  then  entered  Harvard  University, 
whence  he  was  graduated  Bachelor  of  Arts,  class  of 
1905.  For  two  years  after  leaving  college  he  represented 
the  interests  of  the  Central  Oil-Gas  Stove  Company  on 
the  road,  and  succeeded  his  father  as  president  of  that 
company  after  the  latter’s  death  in  1913.  The  business 
became  one  of  the  largest  industries  of  Gardner.  Solon 
Wilder  inherited  the  strong  business  ability  of  his  father, 
and  under  his  management  the  prestige  of  the  Wilder 
name  grew  greater  in  the  business  world.  Affable, 
genial,  warm  hearted,  and  generous,  he  made  many 
friends  and  won  all  hearts. 

In  the  Masonic  order  Mr.  Wilder  was  affiliated  wfith 
all  bodies  of  both  York  and  Scottish  rites.  He  was  a 
Master  Mason  of  Hope  Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted 
Masons ;  a  companion  and  Past  High  Priest  of  Gardner 
Chapter,  Royal  Arch  Masons  (his  father  the  first  High 
Priest  of  that  chapter)  ;  District  Deputy  of  Masonic 
District  No.  1 1 ;  a  Sir  Knight  of  Ivanhoe  Commandery, 
Knights  Templar;  all  of  Gardner.  In  the  Scottish  Rite 
he  held  the  thirty-second  degree;  was  a  noble  of  Aleppo 
Temple,  Ancient  Arabic  Order  Nobles  of  the  Mystic 
Shrine,  of  Boston;  was  a  member  of  the  Independent 
Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  Sons  of  Veterans,  and  Benev¬ 
olent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks.  His  clubs  were 
the  Gardner  Boat,  Ridgely,  Fay,  Oak  Hill  Country, 
Worcester  Country,  Harvard,  and  Boston  City.  In 
politics  Mr.  Wilder  was  a  Republican  and  in  religious 
faith  a  lifelong  member  of  the  First  Congregational 
Church.  He  was  a  lover  of  music  and  an  accomplished 


io8 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


performer  on  piano,  pipe  organ,  and  cello.  He  often 
acted  as  organist  at  church  functions,  and  aided  largely 
in  maintaining  the  music  of  the  church.  To  him  is 
largely  due  the  high  character  of  the  vesper  concerts, 
which  became  the  special  contribution  of  the  First 
Church  to  community  life,  and  every  Sunday  he  lent 
the  inspiration  and  influence  of  his  presence  at  the  church 
service.  Fie  gave  of  his  business  ability  to  the  church 
council,  and  when  his  pastor  pronounced  the  eulogy 
over  his  friend  he  paid  an  eloquent  and  heartfelt  tribute 
to  the  man  who  had  been  a  pillar  of  strength  to  the 
church  and  to  its  pastor. 

While  the  Central  Oil-Gas  Stove  Company  was  the 
chief  business  interest  of  Mr.  Wilder’s  life,  he  had 
other  connections  of  importance.  He  was  president  of 
the  Meals  Printing  Company  and  a  director  of  the  First 
National  Bank,  both  of  Gardner.  One  of  his  marked 
characteristics  was  his  deep  interest  in  the  public  welfare, 
and  while  he  never  held  public  office  he  wielded  a  strong 
influence  in  community  affairs.  He  served  as  secretary 
of  the  City  Hall  Memorial  Building  Committee,  and 
was  always  ready  to  “lend  a  hand”  to  aid  either  a  cause 
or  an  individual.  As  a  mark  of  public  esteem  all  town 
offices,  factory  offices,  and  stores  throughout  his  city 
were  closed  during  the  funeral  services.  He  was  laid 
at  rest  in  Crystal  Lake  Cemetery,  the  funeral  services 
being  conducted  in  part  under  the  beautiful  ritual  ser¬ 
vice  of  the  Knights  Templar,  of  which  he  was  an 
honored  member.  From  the  “Memory  Book,”  compiled 
from  tributes  to  his  character,  life  and  virtues,  from' 
minister  and  friends,  old  and  new,  of  college  days,  and 
social  and  business  association,  a  few  excerpts  are  here 
reproduced. 


Mr.  Wilder  lived  a  busy,  successful,  helpful  life. 
His  success  as  a  business  man,  as  an  honored  citizen 
and  a  widely  known  and  deeply  beloved  friend  was 
not  the  result  of  chance.  It  was  rather  the  natural 
result  and  reward  of  tireless  diligence  in  the  manifold 
duties  laid  upon  his  great  shoulders  and  heart  by 
needy  causes,  worthy  institutions  and  business  inter¬ 
ests,  of  honorable  dealing  with  his  fellow-men,  and  of 
a  pleasing  brotherly  personality  which  forgot  itself  in 
kindly  interest  for  others.  Because  he  chose  such 
principles  to  be  the  foundation  of  his  life,  it  is  as 
natural  as  the  harvest  which  follows  the  sowing  and 
the  long  patient  _  cultivation  that  his  life  should  be 
the  kind  these  friends  and  this  community  recognizes 
and  honors.  “We  reap  as  we  sow,”  and  to  him  death 
is  only  a  passing,  a  transition. 

Barrie  says:  “God  gave  us  memory  that  we  may  have 
roses  in  December,”  and  the  roses  of  friendliness  and 
cordiality  that  he  scattered  to  brighten  the  paths  of 
all  who  approached  him  are  crystallized  by  memory 
into  a  monument  that  is,  after  all,  the  only  measure 
of  success. 


I  am  not  very  apt  to  exaggerate  much  in  my  idea 
of  my  friends — 'but  I  could  and  have  without  anv  diffl 
culty,  pictured  him  as  Governor  of  his  State,  or  Sen 
tt  °rv.  U  .?n.e  the  biff  financial  and  industrial  men 
^  ln,  him,  but  those  careers  or  a  combinatioi 
°i  c°uld  have  added  nothing  to  what  we  heart 

at  tbe  Gardner  station,  when  a  brakeman,  or  express 
man,  or  whatever  he  was,  said:  “Mr.  Wilder  was  nr 
fuend,  he  was  the  best  liked  man  in  Gardner,  he  wa" 
I,e  real  thing;  lots  of  people  in  this  town  put  up  ; 
blu  .v.bT.  he*  .nev,e£  did.  He  was  genuine  and  wa: 
everybody  s  friend.  There  are  men  we  can  admire 
many  of  them  there  are  men  whom  we  can  love,  bu 
there  are  few  for  whom  we  can  blend  love  and  admir 
ation  as  we  did  for  him.  Tenderness  without  soft 
ness,  strength  without  harshness,  freedom  of  though 
without  vulgarity,  courage  without  arrogance.  ke*u 
understanding  of  people  without  sourness,  high  self 
^spect  without  conceit,  artistic  and  intellectual  ap 
preciation  without  snobbishness;  these  are  some  o 
the  reasons  why  we  loved  him  and  believed  in  him  am 
expected  big  things  of  him,  also  why  we  did  not  thinl 
we  could  spare  him,  because  the  world  does  not  perm 
us  to  know  many  such.  ^  1 


Solon  Wilder  married,  June  12,  1907,  Edith  Leavens, 
bom  in  Brooklyn,  New  York,  November  15,  1883,  daugh¬ 
ter  of  Thomas  C.  and  Fanny  (Birch)  Leavens.  To 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Wilder  three  children  were  born:  Ruth, 
born  February  28,  1910,  in  Gardner,  there  died  March 
31,  1911;  Richard,  born  in  Gardner,  September  11, 
1911;  and  Robert  Dinsmoor,  born  April  2,  1916.  The 
family  home  in  Gardner  was  at  No.  34  Woodland  Ave¬ 
nue,  the  summer  home  at  Friendship,  Maine.  Mrs. 
Wilder  survives  her  husband,  a  resident  of  Gardner. 


ELMER  G.  FOSGATE,  M.  D.— (I)  John  Fosgate 
was  born  in  1636,  and  died  in  1689.  He  was  a  soldier 
of  King  Philip’s  War  in  1675,  and  lived  at  Charlestown, 
Massachusetts.  His  son,  Robert,  is  of  further  mention. 

(II.)  Robert  Fosgate,  son  of  John  Fosgate,  was  born 
in  1672  at  Charlestown,  Massachusetts.  He  made  ap¬ 
plication  for  a  soldier’s  grant  of  land  at  what  is  now 
Ashburnham,  Massachusetts. 

(III.) Robert  Fosgate,  son  of  Robert  Fosgate,  was 
born  April  1,  1704.  He  married  Sarah  Howe,  and 
settled  at  Gates  Farm,  Berlin,  Massachusetts.  He  was 
a  soldier  of  the  Revolution  and  was  with  the  expedition 
that  marched  against  Crown  Point,  although  then  far 
past  military  age.  Robert  and  Sarah  (Howe)  Fosgate 
were  the  parents  of  five  sons  and  eight  daughters,  one 
of  whom,  Joel,  is  mentioned  below. 

(IV.)  Joel  Fosgate,  sixth  child  of  Robert  and  Sarah 
(Howe)  Fosgate,  was  born  in  1751,  and  died  in  1824. 
He  was  also  a  soldier  of  the  Revolution. 

(V.)  Robert  Fosgate,  son  of  Joel  Fosgate,  was  born 
August  15,  1779.  He  married  Hannah,  daughter  of 
William  Sawyer,  and  resided  at  Winchester,  New  Hamp¬ 
shire.  He  died  in  1844. 

(VI.)  Joel  Fosgate,  son  of  Robert  and  Hannah  (Saw¬ 
yer)  Fosgate,  was  born  in  1814,  and  died  in  1903.  He 
was  a  farmer  of  Winchester,  New  Hampshire,  which 
was  the  birthplace  of  both  himself  and  his  wife,  Mal¬ 
vina  A.  Doolittle.  They  were  the  parents  of  Dr.  Elmer 
G.  Fosgate,  of  this  review,  who  for  the  last  quarter  of 
a  century  has  been  a  practicing  physician  of  Ashburn¬ 
ham,  Massachusetts. 

(VII.)  Elmer  G.  Fosgate,  son  of  Joel  and  Malvina 
A.  (Doolittle)  Fosgate,  was  born  at  Winchester,  New 
Hampshire,  July  20.  1859.  He  was  educated  in  the 
public  schools  of  Winchester,  passing  thence  to  Dart¬ 
mouth  Medical  College,  and  there  receiving  the  degree 
of  Medical  Doctor,  class  of  1888.  During  the  years 
prior  to  obtaining  his  degree,  Dr.  Fosgate  was  for  four 
years  employed  as  a  drug  clerk,  and  during  the  same 
period  taught  school.  After  graduation  he  conducted 
a  drug  business  for  a  few  months,  then  began  medical 
practice  in  Rindge,  New  Hampshire,  there  remaining 
seven  years,  until  the  fall  of  1895,  when  he  located  in 
Ashburnham,  Massachusetts,  and  has  there  been  con¬ 
tinuously  in  the  practice  of  his  profession. 

Dr.  Fosgate  is  a  Republican  in  politics,  and  for  the 
past  six  years,  1917-1924,  has  been  chairman  of  the 
Board  of  Selectmen,  having  also  been  a  member  of  the 
board  for  the  six  years  preceding  1917.  For  seventeen 
years  he  has  been  on  the  School  Board,  and  was  chair¬ 
man  of  the  Republican  Town  Committee.  In  1913  and 
1914  he  represented  the  Second  Worcester  District  in 
the  State  Legislature.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Massa- 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


109 


chusetts  State  Medical  Society,  a  member  of  the  Grange, 
of  which  he  is  Past  Master,  and  of  the  Worcester  County 
Medical  Society.  Pie  is  a  member  of  the  standing  com¬ 
mittee  and  a  deacon  of  the  Congregational  church. 

Dr.  Fosgate  married  (first),  January  1,  1889,  at  Win¬ 
chester,  New  Hampshire,  Julia  T.  Bliss,  who  died  June 
12,  1901.  He  married  (second),  December  25,  1902,  at 
Ashburnham  Massachusetts,  Sadie  M.  Dane,  daughter  of 
David  and  Sophia  (Morris)  Lane.  A  daughter,  Hazel 
E.  Fosgate,  was  born  in  Ashburnham,  Massachusetts, 
September  22,  1892,  to  Dr.  Elmer  H.  and  Julia  T.  (Bliss) 
Fosgate.  She  graduated  from  Mt.  Holyoke  College 
with  the  degrees  of  Bachelor  of  Arts  and  Master  of  Arts, 
and  is  now  a  teacher  in  the  American  International 
College. 


VICTOR  WELLINGTON  COLLIER,  in  the  world 
of  finance  in  Worcester  County,  Massachusetts,  is  a 
foremost  figure,  and  in  his  present  position  as  president 
of  the  Milford  National  Bank  he  wields  an  influence  for 
progress  in  every  line  of  effort.  His  long  experience 
and  the  ability  which  has  carried  him  to  his  present 
noteworthy  position  equip  men  in  a  very  practical  way 
for  his  present  responsibilities,  and  he  is  interested  also 
in  many  forms  of  organized  activity,  taking  a  leading 
part  in  fraternal  advance  and  giving  constructive  aid  to 
every  worthy  movement.  Mr.  Collier  comes  of  an  old 
Massachusetts  family,  and  is  a  son  of  William  W. 
Collier,  who  was  active  in  the  United  States  Navy  dur¬ 
ing  the  Civil  War,  and  whose  lifetime  was  principally 
spent  in  the  calling  of  marine  engineer.  The  mother, 
Carrie  A.  (Coffin)  Collier,  is  also  a  native  of  Massa¬ 
chusetts. 

Victor  Wellington  Collier  was  born  at  Chelsea, 
Massachusetts,  September  18,  1877.  His  education  was 
begun  in  the  local  schools  and  he  is  a  graduate  of 
Williams  School  of  Chelsea,  also  of  the  Bellingham 
High  School,  of  Chelsea.  As  a  youth  he  entered  the 
employ  of  the  National  Shawmut  Bank,  of  Boston,  and 
remained  with  that  concern  for  many  years,  rising  in  the 
organization  from  a  subordinate  position  to  one  of  large 
responsibility.  In  the  year  1920  Mr.  Collier  came  to 
Milford  to  become  associated  with  the  Milford  National 
Bank  as  president,  and  in  this  position  has  since  been 
active.  His  previous  experience  was  of  the  greatest 
use  to  him  in  coming  to  this  institution,  which  forms  a 
center  of  financial  activity  in  the  smaller  community. 
In  the  civic,  fraternal,  and  social  advance  of  Milford, 
Mr.  Collier  has  taken  a  leading  part  since  his  residence 
in  this  section,  his  home  being  in  the  nearby  village  of 
Hopedale.  He  is  a  Republican  by  political  affiliation, 
but  although  always  active  in  party  affairs,  he  has  never 
accepted  official  honors.  During  the  Spanish-American 
War  Mr.  Collier  served  in  the  United  States  Navy  and 
saw  active  service  at  Santiago  and  El  Mariel.  He  is 
a  member  of  the  Milford  Chamber  of  Commerce,  of 
the  United  Spanish  War  Veterans,  and  the  Military 
Order  of  Serpent.  Fraternally  Mr.  Collier  is  affiliated 
with  Converse  Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted  Masons,  of 
Malden ;  Mount  Lebanon  Chapter,  Royal  Arch  Masons, 
of  Milford ;  Milford  Council,  Royal  and  Select  Masters ; 
Milford  Commandery,  Knights  Templar;  and  Aleppo 
Temple,  Ancient  Arabic  Order  Nobles  of  the  Mystic 


Shrine,  of  Boston.  He  is  further  affiliated  with  the 
Royal  Arcanum,  the  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of 
Elks,  and  the  Old  Williams  School  Association.  His 
clubs  are  the  Boston  City  and  the  Cinosam,  of  Milford. 
He  has  for  many  years  identified  himself  with  religious 
advance,  and  holds  membership  in  the  Unitarian  church. 

Mr.  Collier  married,  in  Chelsea,  Massachusetts,  Sep¬ 
tember  18,  1900,  Florence  Elizabeth  Learned,  daughter 
of  George  Grant  and  Elizabeth  (Lent)  Learned,  and 
they  have  three  children :  William  Wellington,  bom 
February  1,  1903;  Elizabeth  Learned,  born  July  25, 
1904;  and  Hilma,  born  December  31,  1911. 


GEORGE  A.  MARSHALL,  as  an  efficient  business 
man  and  a  public-spirited  citizen,  is  well  known  in  Leo¬ 
minster,  Massachusetts,  where  practically  his  entire  life 
has  been  passed.  He  has  a  host  of  friends,  and  among 
his  business  associates  he  is  most  highly  esteemed. 

Born  in  Leominster,  Massachusetts,  April  5,  1873,  son 
of  Alvin  Marshall,  a  piano  case  maker,  and  Mary 
(Morse)  Marshall.  Mr.  Marshall  is  a  descendant  of 
“Mayflower”  ancestry,  and  belongs  to  one  of  the  oldest 
families,  which  has  from  the  beginning  of  the  history 
of  this  country,  contributed  valuable  service  to  its 
descendants.  He  received  his  early  and  preparatory 
education  in  the  grammar  and  high  schools  of  Leomin¬ 
ster,  and  then  prepared  for  a  business  career  by  taking 
a  commercial  course  in  Eastman’s  Business  College  at 
Poughkeepsie,  New  York.  When  his  business  training 
was  completed  he  entered  the  employ  of  the  Whitney 
Paper  Box  Company,  of  Leominster,  as  bookkeeper,  and 
was  soon  given  charge  of  the  folding  box  department, 
in  addition  to  his  duties  as  bookkeeper.  For  eight  years 
he  continued  to  efficiently  discharge  the  duties  of  that 
position,  and  then,  in  1903,  when  the  Howe  Comb  Com¬ 
pany  was  incorporated,  he  was  made  secretary  of  the 
latter  concern,  Charles  A.  Howe  being  president  and 
treasurer.  Ten  years  later,  in  1913,  Mr.  Howe  retired 
and  Mr.  Marshall  became  president  and  treasurer,  and 
Edward  Earl,  secretary.  They  made  a  specialty  of  cel¬ 
luloid  novelties  and  horn  hairpins,  sending  their  prod¬ 
ucts  to  all  parts  of  the  country.  During  the  World 
War  he  attended  to  the  production  and  manufacturing 
of  buttons,  sending  out  thousands  of  gross  of  these 
articles  but  has  not  further  expanded  this  feature. 

In  addition  to  his  responsibilities  as  a  manufacturer, 
Mr.  Marshall  is  also  a  member  of  the  board  of  directors 
of  the  Leominster  National  Bank.  He  is  a  member  of 
the  Leominster  Chamber  of  Commerce,  and  has  always 
taken  an  active  interest  in  the  public  welfare  of  his 
native  city.  He  is  a  Republican,  politically,  and  frater¬ 
nally  is  associated  with  Leominster  Lodge,  No.  1327, 
Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks.  His  clubs 
are :  The  Leominster,  Monoosnock  Country,  and  the 
Leominster  Country.  His  religious  affiliation  is  with 
the  Pilgrim  Congregational  Church  of  Leominster. 

On  January  18,  1897,  at  Leominster,  Massachusetts, 
Mr.  Marshall  married  Marion  M.  Lawrence,  daughter  of 
S.  Henry  and  Sarah  (Moore)  Lawrence,  and  they  are 
the  parents  of  two  children:  1.  Lawrence,  born  January 
1,  1899,  a  graduate  of  Worcester  Academy,  and  now 
(1923)  associated  with  his  father  in  business.  During 
the  World  War  he  served  with  the  United  States  Naval 


no 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


Reserve;  he  married  Doris  Caulfield.  2.  Barbara,  born 
March  26,  1905,  a  student  in  the  Kathrine  Gibbs  School 
in  Boston,  taking  a  secretarial  course. 

HENRY  CLAY  GRATON,  treasurer  of  the  Graton 
&  Knight  Manufacturing  Company  and  one  of  its 
founders,  was  born  in  Leicester,  Massachusetts,  July  10, 
1830,  son  of  William  and  Lucy  L.  (Adams)  Graton. 
His  given  name  was  Riley,  as  shown  by  the  vital  records 
of  the  town  of  Leicester,  but  in  early  childhood  it  was 
changed  to  Henry  Clay.  His  father  was  also  a  native 
of  Leicester,  born  September  1,  1797.  For  many  years 
he  was  engaged  in  the  card  clothing  business  in  this  city, 
and  he  died  here  in  1877.  His  mother  was  born  April 
8,  1798,  and  died  in  Worcester,  September  6,  1867,  a 
daughter  of  Daniel  Emerson  Adams.  She  was  de¬ 
scended  from  Revolutionary  and  Colonial  stock.  The 
first  settler,  Henry  Adams,  was  ancestor  of  President 
John  Adams  and  President  John  Quincy  Adams.  He 
came  from  England  and  settled  before  1639  in  Mount 
Wollaston,  part  of  Boston,  later  the  town  of  Braintree, 
where  he  died  in  June,  1646;  to  his  memory  President 
Johft  Adams  erected  a  monument,  commemorating  the 
“piety,  humility,  simplicity,  prudence,  patience,  temper¬ 
ance,  frugality,  industry,  and  perseverance  of  Henry 
Adams.”  It  may  be  said  here  that  these  virtues  describe 
with  remarkable  accuracy  the  characteristics  of  Henry 
Clay  Graton,  who  doubtless  inherited  much  from  his 
Adams  ancestry. 

Ensign  Henry  Adams,  son  of  the  immigrant,  settled 
in  Medfield,  and  became  a  leading  citizen  of  that  town, 
an  officer  of  the  military  company,  Selectman,  and  Dep¬ 
uty  to  the  General  Court.  He  married  Lydia  Rockwood, 
daughter  of  Richard  and  Agnes  (Bicknell)  Rockwood. 
John  Adams,  of  the  next  generation,  married  Deborah 
Partridge,  and  followed  farming  in  Medway.  His  son, 
Eleazer,  the  next  of  the  line,  was  one  of  the  founders 
of  West  Medway,  and  was  Selectman  eight  years.  He 
was  one  of  the  pioneers  of  the  Baptist  faith,  and  was 
sent  to  the  Boston  jail  in  1753  for  refusing  to  pay  his 
parish  tax  for  the  support  of  the  Congregational  church. 
John  Adams,  son  of  Eleazer  Adams,  came  to  Brook¬ 
field,  and  was  a  soldier  in  the  Revolution.  His  son, 
James  Adams,  was  father  of  Daniel  Emerson  Adams, 
and  grandfather  of  Mr.  Graton.  Daniel  Emerson 
Adams  married  Tamara  Converse,  daughter  of  Luke 
Converse.  Mr.  Graton  is  descended  from  many  of  the 
early  settlers  of  the  Massachusetts  Bay  Colony,  and  is 
old  New  England  stock  in  every  branch  of  maternal 
line. 

Ruth  L.  Graton,  sister  of  Henry  Clay  Graton,  was 
born  June  4,  1832,  married  Haskey  Wight,  and  lived  at 
Lawrence,  Kansas;  John  R.  Graton,  a  brother,  born 
April  21,  1836,  died  at  Falmouth;  his  widow  afterwards 
lived  in  Lawrence,  Kansas. 

Henry  Clay  Graton  received  his  early  schooling  in  his 
native  town,  in  the  public  schools  and  Leicester  Academy. 
At  the  age  of  fifteen  he  began  his  career  as  a  shop  hand, 
employed  in  preparing  leather  for  card-setting  ma¬ 
chines,  and  after  completing  his  apprenticeship  he 
worked  in  the  card-clothing  factory  of  Earle  &  Eames 
and  Timothy  K.  Earle  &  Company,  in  Worcester,  for 
eight  years,  being  in  charge  of  the  business  for  four 
years.  The  business  now  conducted  under  the  cor¬ 


porate  name  of  the  Graton  &  Knight  Manufacturing 
Company,  was  established  by  Mr.  Graton  and  Joseph 
A.  Knight  in  February,  1861,  when  they  formed  a  part¬ 
nership  and  purchased  the  belt  department  of  T.  K. 
Earle  &  Company,  doing  business  at  first  under  the  firm 
name  of  Graton  &  Knight.  A  short  time  afterward, 
the  firm  moved  its  business  from  the  card  clothing  fac¬ 
tory  on  Grafton  Street  to  two  rooms,  each  20x60  feet, 
in  the  Old  Harding  Block  on  Front  Street.  The  firm 
started  in  a  modest  way  on  a  small  scale.  For  several 
years  most  of  the  labor  was  performed  by  the  two  part¬ 
ners,  who  worked  early  and  late;  they  were  their  own 
salesmen,  too,  and  they  often  went  on  foot  from  mill  to 
mill  to  solicit  business  and  dispose  of  their  stock.  But 
year  by  year  the  business  grew,  and  from  time  to  time 
additional  space  was  added  to  the  factory.  In  1868  the 
firm  built  a  small  tannery  on  Bloomingdale  Road  in 
order  to  manufacture  leather  specially  adapted  for 
making  belts.  The  resulting  improvement  in  the  goods 
of  the  firm  led  to  the  construction  of  an  addition  to  the 
tannery  in  the  following  year.  The  business  was  in¬ 
corporated  in  1872  under  its  present  name,  with  a  cap¬ 
ital  of  $100,000,  Joseph  A.  Knight  being  president,  Mr. 
Graton  treasurer,  and  Walter  M.  Spaulding,  vice-pres¬ 
ident  and  secretary.  Mr.  Knight  continued  active  in 
the  business  to  the  time  of  his  death.  In  1875  the  com¬ 
pany  began  to  send  out  traveling  salesmen,  and  in  that 
year  the  capital  stock  was  doubled  to  afford  a  larger 
plant  and  more  working  capital.  A  third  building  for 
tannery  purposes  was  erected  on  Bloomingdale  Road 
in  1880.  In  1893  the  capital  stock  was  increased  to 
$300,000,  and  a  four-story  building  was  erected  on 
Bloomingdale  Road,  they  then  vacating  the  Harding 
Block,  three-quarters  of  which  was  used  by  the  belting 
business  at  that  time.  In  the  more  than  twenty-five 
years  that  have  passed  the  plant  has  been  repeatedly  en¬ 
larged  to  provide  greater  facilities  for  the  business, 
which  has  grown  steadily  and  rapidly.  The  company  is 
known  throughout  the  world  and  stands  at  the  head  of 
its  line  of  business.  The  Graton  &  Knight  Manufactur¬ 
ing  Company  now  has  a  paid-up  capital  of  $2,000,000. 
Factories  have  been  added  at  Cleveland  and  Detroit, 
where  a  complete  stock  of  belting  and  sundries  is  car¬ 
ried.  Each  branch  is  equipped  to  install  or  repair  belts 
of  all  kinds.  The  Cleveland  factory  is  located  at  Nos. 
1604-08  West  Third  Street;  the  Detroit  factory  at  No. 
266  Jefferson  Avenue,  East.  The  company  also  main¬ 
tains  branch  stores  in  fifteen  large  cities,  viz. :  Nos.  93-95 
Forsyth  Street,  Atlanta,  Georgia;  No.  33  Lincoln  Street, 
Boston;  Nos.  32-34  South  Jefferson  Street,  Chicago; 
No.  177  Bedford  Street,  Fall  River;  No.  712  Delaware 
Street,  Kansas  City,  Missouri;  No.  103  West  Water 
Street,  Milwaukee,  Wisconsin;  No.  310  Third  Avenue, 
North,  Minneapolis,  Minnesota;  No.  46  St.  Alexander 
Street,  Montreal,  Canada;  No.  72  Warren  Street,  New 
York  City;  No.  132  North  Third  Street,  Philadelphia; 
No.  327  Water  Street,  Pittsburgh;  No.  51  First  Street, 
Portland,  Oregon;  No.  247  Mission  Street,  San  Fran¬ 
cisco,  California;  No.  320  Occidental  Avenue,  Seattle, 
Washington;  Nos.  701-11  North  Eighth  Street,  St.  Louis, 
Missouri.  Their  selling  agents  in  Texas,  the  Graton  & 
Knight  Manufacturing  Company  of  Texas,  has  head¬ 
quarters  at  No.  309  North  Austin  Street,  Dallas. 

In  1867  Graton  &  Knight  could  tan  only  a  few  hun- 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


in 


dred  skins  in  a  year;  at  the  present  time  more  than  200,- 
000  are  tanned  in  a  year.  The  company  received  medals 
for  their  exhibits  at  the  Louisiana  Purchase  Exposition 
in  1904;  at  the  Lewis  &  Clark  Exhibition  at  Portland, 
Oregon,  in  1905 ;  at  the  Jamestown  Tercentennial  Ex¬ 
position,  Virginia,  in  1907;  and  at  the  Alaska-Yukon 
Exposition  at  Seattle,  Washington,  in  1909,  each  being 
the  highest  award  granted  to  belt  manufacturers  at 
these  expositions.  In  addition  to  belting,  the  company 
manufactures  lace  leather,  belt  cement,  belt  dressings, 
leather  packings,  strapping,  automobile  leather,  shoe 
counters,  innersoles,  welting,  and  box  toes,  besides  a 
great  variety  of  other  leather  articles.  The  plant  is 
conceded  to  be  the  largest  and  best  equipped  in  the 
world  for  tanning  and  currying  hides  and  manufactur¬ 
ing  leather  belts.  The  officers  are:  Walter  M.  Spauld¬ 
ing,  president;  Mr.  Graton,  treasurer;  George  T.  Dewey, 
vice-president;  W.  Virgil  Spaulding,  secretary  and  as¬ 
sistant  treasurer;  Frank  H.  Willard,  assistant  general 
manager,  and  Henry  G.  Gould,  comptroller. 

Mr.  Graton  has  been  treasurer  of  the  company  from 
the  beginning,  and  few  men  in  the  country  have  had  the 
satisfaction  of  seeing  such  an  extensive  business  develop 
during  their  lifetime.  The  present  plant  contrasts  viv¬ 
idly  with  the  two  rooms  in  which  the  business  was 
started.  The  plant  covers  eight  acres,  and  1,300  hands 
are  employed.  In  the  office  alone  more  than  sixty  are 
on  the  payroll.  Seventy  traveling  salesmen  sell  an  an¬ 
nual  product  of  more  than  $10,000,000.  The  company 
has  made  great  advance  in  caring  for  the  health  and 
comfort  of  its  employees;  a  modern  heating  and  ven¬ 
tilating  system  keeps  the  air  fresh,  free  from  odors,  and 
at  the  proper  temperature;  in  summer  a  refrigerating 
plant  is  used  to  keep  the  workrooms  comfortably  cool. 

As  the  founder  of  one  of  its  greatest  industries,  Mr. 
Graton  is  entitled  to  one  of  the  foremost  places  of  honor 
in  the  history  of  the  city.  After  more  than  sixty  years 
of  active  and  strenuous  business  he  is  still  the  same 
able,  clear-sighted,  kindly  man  of  earlier  years,  beloved 
by  his  subordinates  and  respected  in  the  business  circles 
of  the  city.  For  more  than  thirty  years  he  lived  at 
No.  37  Providence  Street;  his  present  home  is  at  No. 
690  Pleasant  Street,  opposite  Newton  Hill. 

In  religion  Mr.  Graton  is  a  Methodist,  joining  the 
Coral  Street  Methodist  Church  early  in  life,  now  a  mem¬ 
ber  of  the  Church  of  the  Covenant,  of  which  he  was  a 
member  of  the  building  committee.  He  has  been  a 
liberal  benefactor  of  many  other  churches  of  various 
denominations,  of  the  Boys’  Club,  the  Young  Men’s 
Christian  Association,  and  many  other  charitable  and 
religious  organizations  of  the  city.  No  man  of  means 
is  more  unostentatious,  however,  in  his  giving  and  none 
more  anxious  to  have  his  wealth  devoted  to  useful  pur¬ 
poses.  In  politics  Mr.  Graton  has  been  a  lifelong  Re¬ 
publican,  though  he  has  studiously  avoided  public  office. 

Mr.  Graton  married,  June  7,  1863,  Lucretia  M.  Gould, 
born  July  30,  1838,  and  died  in  this  city,  December 
10,  1910,  a  daughter  of  Charles  M.  and  Rebecca  (Har¬ 
ris)  Gould.  Their  only  child,  Minnie  Etta,  died  at  the 
age  of  four  years.  Mrs.  Graton  was  prominent  in  the 
work  of  the  church,  in  the  Woman’s  Christian  Tem¬ 
perance  Union,  the  Worcester  Reform  Club,  and  in 
various  other  charitable  and  social  service  organizations. 


She  was  a  modest,  kindly,  pious  woman  of  many  endear¬ 
ing  qualities,  caring  nothing  for  modem  society,  adher¬ 
ing  closely  to  the  standards  of  life  and  faith  of  her 
Puritan  ancestry. 

Mrs.  Graton  spent  her  girlhood  days  in  Massachu¬ 
setts,  with  the  exception  of  the  first  three  years,  which 
were  spent  at  Swan  Lake,  Maine,  her  birthplace.  Wor¬ 
cester  was  her  home  from  1843  to  the  time  of  her  death. 
We  quote  from  an  eulogy,  written  by  Rev.  Robert  J. 
Floody,  and  published  in  a  book  with  a  collection  of 
her  poems,  entitled  “Heavenly  Jewels’’: 

To  none  could  the  term  minister  be  more  fittingly 
applied.  She  believed  in  the  gospel  of  the  Good  Sa¬ 
maritan  and  felt  the  force  of  the  command,  “Go  and 
do  thou  likewise.”  Besides  doing  her  duty  to  the 
charities  and  philanthropies  of  the  city,  she  expended 
her  energies  and  means  in  many  other  directions. 
She  kindly  lent  her  assistance  to  many  students  at 
various  universities,  colleges,  academies,  schools,  who 
were  struggling  to  educate  themselves  and  complete 
their  courses.  The  conductors,  motormen  and  railroad 
men  became  recipients  of  her  graces,  and  warmly 
responded.  The  workingman  who  had  struggled  with 
misfortune  found  in  Mrs.  Graton  a  ministering  angel 
who  lifted  his  burden  and  made  his  heart  rejoice. 
The  poor  servant  girl  without  a  friend  found  a  friend 
in  this  hand-maiden  of  the  Lord.  The  inmates  of  the 
Home  Farm  were  cheered  by  her  personal  presence 
and  personal  gifts.  Those  incarcerated  within  prison 
walls  were  favored  by  her  attentions  and  personal 
services. 

Her  activities  in  a  very  special  way  extended  into 
the  temperance  field.  She  was  one  of  the  early  cru¬ 
saders,  being  a  devoted  worker  and  a  leading  factor; 
also  was  she  an  earnest  laborer  in  the  Woman’s 
Christian  Temperance  Union  and  always  lent  her 
prayers,  influence  and  personal  work  in  the  no¬ 
license  campaign.  The  great  Peace  Movement  enlisted 
her  special  interest  and  she  attended  some  of  its  great 
conferences  at  Lake  Mohonk.  Social  settlement,  Gar¬ 
den  City  Work  and  all  other  agencies  for  human  bet¬ 
terment  found  a  ready  helper  in  this  remarkable  wo¬ 
man.  The  little  children  soon  recognized  the  charm 
of  her  personality  and  clung  to  her.  She  could  be  a 
little  child,  play  games  with  them,  tell  stories  and 
enter  completely  into  their  life.  A  little  card  or  gift 
at  Christmas  revealed  to  the  children  she  had  not  for¬ 
gotten  them.  Wherever  she  could  bestow  a  kindness, 
show  a  favor,  lend  a  helping  hand,  she  never  failed  to 
do  it. 

The  following  stanza  of  one  of  her  poems  well  il¬ 
lustrates  her  life: 

“There  is  a  God,  there  is  a  way, 

Where  we  may  find  true  rest, 

It  is  in  the  sweet  life  of  love, 

And  doing  just  our  best.” 

Her  religious  life  is  not  less  remarkable  in  its  activ¬ 
ity  and  richness  than  her  practical  life.  She  had  a 
deeply  devotional  nature  that  did  not  stop  with  the 
outward  and  superficial.  No  one  desired  more  ear¬ 
nestly  to  conscientiously  get  at  the  source  of  truth. 
Never  would  she  enter  upon  any  duty  without  con¬ 
sulting  the  Father.  She  virtually  talked  with  the 
Lord.  Her  Bible  was  her  constant  companion.  Her 
faith  was  strong  and  optimistic.  Her  poems  reveal 
how  much  her  mind  dwelt  on  the  spiritual.  She  ad¬ 
hered  to  the  Methodist  form  of  belief  and  was  a  loyal 
member  of  Coral  Street  Church,  Worcester,  for  thirty- 
six  years. 

Her  good  sense  was  as  remarkable  as  her  devotion. 
She  had  charity  for  all  those  who  differed  with  her  on 
religious  things.  Her  creed  was  sprinkled  with  a 
great  deal  of  good  sense.  It  is  very  seldom  that  there 
is  found  in  one  individual,  deep  devotion,  good  sense 
and  practical  work  combined  in  such  a  degree  as  in 
Mrs.  Graton.  Her  life  was  without  the  show  and  zeal 
of  high  official  positions,  but  it  was  rather  a  dynamic 
influence  that  moulded  for  God  and  righteousness. 
Her  life  more  accords  with  the  Master,  who  went 
about  doing  good — “About  his  Father’s  business.”  We 
will  have  to  search  long  before  we  will  find  one  who 
tried  so  conscientiously  to  be  “about  her  Father’s 
business.” 

“The  life  that’s  lived  for  self  alone, 

Shall  weak  become  and  small; 

But  life  we  give  to  one  and  all, 

Shall  never,  never  fall.” 

(Poem  on  Unselfishness  by  Mrs.  Graton.) 


1 12 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


WILLIAM  WALLACE  HOLMES,  in  commercial 
advance  in  the  public  service  and  in  fraternal  activity, 
is  a  leading  figure  in  Webster,  Massachusetts.  Active 
in  his  younger  days  in  the  grocery  business  and  also 
in  the  shoe  industry,  he  has  for  the  past  twenty  years 
and  more  been  engaged  in  the  distribution  of  grain,  flour, 
feed,  and  so  forth,  also  building  and  masons’  materials. 
Mr.  Holmes  is  a  son  of  Rev.  Lucius  Holmes,  prom¬ 
inent  Universalist  minister,  who  held  pastorates  in  both 
Massachusetts  and  New  York  State,  and  preached  many 
times  at  Webster.  The  mother,  Sophia  (Bates)  Holmes, 
was  the  sister  of  A.  J.  Bates,  the  well-known  shoe  man¬ 
ufacturer  of  Webster. 

William  Wallace  Holmes,  son  of  these  parents,  was 
born  at  North  Adams,  Massachusetts,  June  17,  1874. 
The  family  removed  to  Orange,  Massachusetts,  when 
he  was  two  years  of  age,  later  removing  to  Charlton  and 
thereafter  to  Natick,  then  back  to  Orange,  as  the  father 
was  called  from  one  church  to  another.  During  these 
years  Mr.  Holmes  received  his  education  in  the  public 
schools,  principally  at  Orange,  where  he  attended  high 
school  and  where  his  business  life  was  begun  as  an 
employee  in  a  grocery  store.  Coming  to  Webster  on 
March  28,  1892,  Mr.  Holmes  entered  the  employ  of  the 
A.  J.  Bates  Company,  shoe  manufacturers,  of  which  his 
uncle  was  the  head  and  remained  with  the  concern  for 
a  period  of  ten  years.  During  that  time  he  became 
thoroughly  familiar  with  the  business  and  rose  to  the 
position  of  foreman  and  eventually  assistant  super¬ 
intendent.  In  1902  Mr.  Holmes  struck  out  in  an  inde¬ 
pendent  business,  purchasing  the  hay  and  grain  store 
theretofore  conducted  by  his  cousin,  Oscar  Shumway. 
The  business  was  established  in  1846  by  Mr.  Holmes’ 
uncle,  William  Holmes.  Mr.  Holmes  has  largely  de¬ 
veloped  and  built  up  this  business,  extending  its  scope 
and  increasing  its  patronage.  He  now  handles  besides 
grain,  flour  and  feed,  lime,  cement,  and  all  kinds  of 
Masons’  materials,  and  in  his  success  is  counting  largely 
for  the  progress  of  construction  activity  in  this  part  of 
Worcester  County.  Mr.  Holmes  is  affiliated  with  the 
financial  world  of  Webster  as  vice-president  of  the  Web¬ 
ster  Five-Cent  Savings  Bank  and  director  of  the  Web¬ 
ster  National  Bank.  He  has  for  many  years  been  an 
active  worker  in  the  ranks  of  the  Republican  party,  and 
has  served  on  the  Board  of  Registrars.  In  1914  he  was 
elected  Town  Treasurer  of  Webster,  and  in  this  very 
responsible  position  has  served  since,  the  community 
realizing  much  benefit  from  his  practical  ability  and 
still  retaining  him  in  this  office.  For  the  past  twenty 
years  he  has  been  a  trustee  of  the  Webster  Public  Li¬ 
brary,  and  at  all  times  gives  his  best  efforts  to  the  ad¬ 
vancement  of  any  worthy  cause.  During  the  World 
War  he  served  on  all  committees  of  the  various  loan 
drives  and  gave  largely  of  his  time  and  means  to  the 
many  war  activities.  During  the  period  of  its  existence 
he  was  very  active  in  the  Webster  Chamber  of  Com¬ 
merce,  and  served  as  its  last  president.  Mr.  Holmes 
is  largely  prominent  in  the  Masonic  order,  in  which  he 
holds  the  thirty-second  degree,  being  a  member  of 
Webster  Lodge,  Ancient  Free  and  Accepted  Masons,  of 
which  he  is  Past  Master ;  the  Royal  Arch  chapters  in 
both  Webster  and  Southbridge;  Massachusetts  consistory, 
and  Aleppo  Temple,  Ancient  Arabic  Order  Nobles  of 
the  Mystic  Shrine  of  Boston  of  which  he  is  a  life 


member.  His  religious  affiliation  is  with  the  First  Con¬ 
gregational  Church  and  he  has  been  on  the  parish  com¬ 
mittee  of  the  church  for  many  years. 

Mr.  Holmes  married  Mary  Buell  of  Woburn,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  daughter  of  Frederick  and  Myra  Buell.  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Holmes  are  the  parents  of  four  children:  Eliz¬ 
abeth,  Barbara  Sophia,  Patricia,  and  Mary  Buell. 


FRANCIS  HENRY  LALLY,  M.  D.— The  medical 
profession  is  represented  in  Worcester  County  by  as 
broadly  progressive  a  group  of  men  as  could  readily  be 
found  in  any  section,  and  in  the  town  of  Milford,  Dr. 
Lally  holds  a  very  prominent  position.  He  is  a  son  of 
Michael  C.  Lally,  who  was  born  in  County  Kings,  Ire¬ 
land,  and  came  to  the  United  States  at  the  age  of  six 
years.  He  enlisted  in  the  Civil  War  as  a  member  of 
Company  J,  57th  Regiment,  of  Milford,  Massachusetts, 
Volunteer  Infantry,  and  served  throughout  the  period  of 
the  war,  at  one  time  being  confined  in  Andersonville 
prison.  He  was  wounded  severely  in  more  than  one 
engagement,  but  survived  to  return  to  civilian  life  and 
live  to  an  advanced  age,  passing  away  in  Milford,  Feb¬ 
ruary  8,  1913.  He  was  one  of  the  charter  members  of 
the  Worcester  Post,  Grand  Army  of  the  Republic,  in 
which  he  retained  his  membership  until  his  death.  The 
mother,  Bridget  M.  (McManus)  Lally,  is  now  living. 
They  were  the  parents  of  four  children,  of  whom  Dr. 
Lally  was  the  eldest,  and  the  other  three  were  triplets, 
who  died  in  infancy. 

Francis  Henry  Lally  was  born  at  Milford,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  March  14,  1875.  The  family  later  residing  in  the 
city  of  Worcester,  he  attended  the  Worcester  High 
School,  then  later  entered  Holy  Cross  College,  from 
which  he  was  graduated  in  the  class  of  1898.  Thereafter 
taking  up  his  professional  studies  at  Dartmouth  College 
Medical  School,  he  was  graduated  from  that  institu¬ 
tion  in  the  class  of  1902.  Before  the  close  of  the  same 
year,  Dr.  Lally  took  up  his  practice  in  Milford,  and  in 
the  twenty  years  and  more  which  have  since  elapsed  he 
has  won  large  success.  He  now  has  a  very  extensive 
practice  along  general  lines  of  medicine  and  surgery  and 
both  in  the  profession  and  among  the  people  generally, 
he  is  considered  one  of  the  progressive  and  leading  physi¬ 
cians  of  the  day.  During  the  World  War  Dr.  Lally 
enlisted  at  Boston,  in  July,  1918,  in  the  Medical  Corps 
of  the  regular  army  and  was  transferred  to  Camp 
Oglethorpe,  Georgia,  where  he  served  until  his  dis¬ 
charge  on  December  27,  1919.  With  this  added  ex¬ 
perience  Dr.  Lally  returned  to  Milford,  then  again 
took  up  the  practice  of  his  profession  there.  He  now 
serves  as  a  member  of  the  Milford  Board  of  Health,  and 
is  affiliated  with  the  American  Medical  Association,  the 
Massachusetts  State  Medical  Society,  the  Worcester 
County  South  Medical  Society,  the  Association  of  Mili¬ 
tary  Surgeons,  and  the  Thurber  Medical  Society.  He 
has  been  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Health  for  eighteen 
years,  United  States  Bureau  physician  since  his  discharge 
from  the  army,  and  volunteer  medical  examiner  after 
his  discharge  from  the  army  with  the  rank  of  captain. 
Fraternally  Dr.  Lally  is  a  life  member  of  the  Benev¬ 
olent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks,  of  Milford,  and  is 
also  a  member  of  the  Knights  of  Columbus,  and  the 
Foresters  of  America.  He  served  as  the  first  executive 
officer  of  the  Sergeant  John  Bowers  Post,  No.  59, 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


American  Legion,  and  is  still  a  member.  Politically  Dr. 
Lally  is  an  independent  in  politics,  but  except  along  the 
Kne  of  his  profession,  he  has  never  thus  far  accepted 
public  responsibilities.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Roman 
Catholic  church. 

Dr.  Lally  married,  in  Milford,  Massachusetts,  on 
August  3,  1906,  Beatrice  Bourne,  daughter  of  William 
H.  and  Ucelia  (Walker)  Bourne,  and  they  have  one 
son,  Robert  Francis,  born  February  8,  1909. 


GEORGE  CROMPTON,  SR. — When,  in  1851,  the 
late  George  Crompton,  Sr.,  with  Merrill  E.  Furbush, 
established  the  original  fancy  loom  works  in  the  city  of 
Worcester,  a  most  valuable  contribution  to  the  economic 
life  of  the  city  was  made,  and  during  the  seventy  years 
which  have  passed  since  that  time,  the  industries  founded 
by  him  have  been  of  increasing  importance  in  the  life 
of  the  city.  The  service  of  George  Crompton,  Sr.,  ufas 
not  limited  to  the  city  of  Worcester,  however,  for,  like 
his  father,  he  was  an  inventor,  and  his  improved  loom 
quadrupled  production  and  revolutionized  the  textile 
industry. 

William  Crompton,  father  of  George  Crompton,  Sr., 
was  born  in  England,  where  he  became  thoroughly  ac¬ 
quainted  with  the  textile  industry.  He  came  to  this 
country  and  settled  in  Taunton,  Massachusetts,  where 
in  1836  he  invented  the  first  fancy  power  loom.  The 
power  loom  invented  by  Edmund  Cartwright  in  1785, 
was  a  cam  motion  loom  and  could  be  used  for  weaving 
plain  fabrics  only,  all  fabrics  of  complicated  design 
were  woven  on  hand  looms.  The  principal  improve¬ 
ment  in  William  Crompton’s  loom  was  the  use  of  harness 
motion.  In  his  loom  the  figure  or  pattern  could  be  set 
up  on  what  is  known  as  a  chain  or  series  of  bars  con¬ 
nected  by  links.  On  the  bars  were  rollers  or  pins, 
placed  in  such  positions  that  as  the  chain  revolved  it 
lifted,  at  predetermined  intervals,  levers,  which  in  turn 
caused  the  harnesses  to  be  raised  in  such  order  as  to 
produce  the  required  design.  The  success  of  this  loom 
was  demonstrated  in  1840,  when  the  first  piece  of  fancy 
woolen  cloth  ever  woven  by  power  in  the  world  was 
woven  at  the  Middlesex  Mills  on  looms  equipped  with 
William  Crompton’s  device.  William  Crompton  mar¬ 
ried  Sarah  Low,  and  among  their  children  was  George, 
of  further  mention. 

George  Crompton,  Sr.,  son  of  William  and  Sarah 
(Low)  Crompton,  was  bom  at  Holcombe,  near  Bury, 
Lancashire,  England,  March  23, 1829,  and  died  in  Wor¬ 
cester  Massachusetts,  December  29,  1886.  He  came  to 
Taunton,  Massachusetts,  with  his  parents  in  1839,  and 
was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Taunton  and 
Worcester.  He  also  attended  Millbury  Academy.  On 
completion  of  his  schooling  he  worked  in  his  father’s 
office  and  later  was  connected  with  the  Colt  Pistol  Fac¬ 
tory,  in  Hartford,  Connecticut.  In  1851,  having  by  a 
personal  visit  to  Washington  secured  an  extension  of 
his  father’s  patent  for  seven  years,  he  formed  a  partner¬ 
ship  with  Merrill  E.  Furbush,  and  this  new  firm  began 
the  manufacture  of  looms  in  the  Merrifield  Building,  in 
Worcester.  The  first  looms  built  by  this  concern  were 
like  the  looms  made  by  those  who  manufactured  under 
licenses  granted  by  William  Crompton.  They  were 
narrow  looms  and  ran  at  a  speed  of  forty-five  picks  per 
minute,  that  is,  each  minute  forty-five  weft  or  cross 


IT3 

threads  of  the  fabric  were  woven.  In  1857  George 
Crompton,  Sr.,  constructed  and  patented  an  improved 
loom  nearly  double  the  width  of  the  old  loom,  and 
demonstrated  that  this  new  loom  could  be  run  at  the 
then  extraordinary  speed  of  eighty-five  picks  per  minute, 
thus  quadrupling  the  production,  for  both  the  width 
and  speed  of  the  loom  had  been  doubled.  This  was  a 
great  improvement.  No  improvement  before  or  since 
has  so  increased  the  production.  Moreover,  this  loom 
was  the  first  fancy  loom  made  in  the  general  form  and 
proportions  w’hich  have  since  proved,  by  experience,  to 
be  the  most  satisfactory.  Shown  at  the  great  Paris 
Exposition  of  1867,  this  machine,  in  competition  with 
the  products  of  the  best  textile  machine  manufacturers 
of  England,  Germany,  France,  and  Belgium,  was 
awarded  the  only  medal.  Its  proportions  and  princi¬ 
pal  mechanisms  were  from  that  time  to  a  considerable 
extent  adopted  by  most  European  manufacturers. 

On  August  1,  1859,  the  firm  of  Furbush  &  Crompton 
was  dissolved,  with  the  understanding  that  the  terri¬ 
tory  covered  by  the  patents  owned  by  the  firm  should 
be  divided,  Mr.  Crompton  to  hold  the  New  England 
States  with  New  York,  Mr.  Furbush  to  have  all  the  rest 
of  the  territory  of  the  United  States.  Mr.  Crompton 
continued  manufacturing  looms,  bought  the  Red  Mill 
property,  and  in  i860  erected  a  new  building  with  room 
to  expand  up  to  sixty  hands.  During  1861-65  he  added 
to  his  line  of  manufacture,  tools  for  making  gun  stocks, 
but  after  the  Civil  War  curtailed  the  production  of 
guns  he  again  directed  his  energies  to  building  weaving 
machinery.  He  took  out  over  one  hundred  patents  for 
improvements  on  looms  and  for  devices  outside  of  his 
own  business.  In  1876  he  won  a  medal  by  exhibiting 
his  improved  loom  at  the  Centennial  Exposition  in  Phila¬ 
delphia.  In  the  late  seventies  he  introduced  the  Keighley 
Dobby  to  the  American  manufacturer,  and  in  associ¬ 
ation  with  Horace  Wvman,  improved  this  harness  mo¬ 
tion,  simplifying  it  and  changing  its  position  from  the 
centre  of  the  arch,  as  on  English  looms,  to  the  end  of 
the  arch.  Also  in  association  with  Mr.  Wyman  he  in¬ 
vented  and  improved  the  Crompton  gingham  loom,  now 
the  standard  gingham  loom  in  the  country.  Few  men 
have  accomplished  more  important  and  useful  work  for 
mankind  than  George  Crompton,  Sr.  At  his  death,  the 
Crompton  Loom  Works  employed  nearly  1,000  men. 

Not  only  was  George  Crompton,  Sr.,  deeply  concerned 
in  his  own  private  affairs,  but  he  also  reached  out  and 
aided  in  Worcester’s  development.  He  was  the  founder 
and  president  of  the  Crompton  Carpet  Company,  the 
predecessor  of  the  Whittall  Mills,  now  one  of  the  largest 
carpet  mills  in  this  county,  and  one  of  Worcester’s  fore¬ 
most  industries.  He  was  for  many  years  a  director  of 
the  Worcester  National  Bank,  also  director  of  Worces¬ 
ter  General  Freight  Company,  and  was  one  of  the 
founders  and  directors  of  the  Hartford  Steam  Boiler 
Insurance  Company.  In  public  affairs  he  always  stood 
for  progress  and  good  government.  In  1863  and  1864 
he  was  an  Alderman  of  the  city,  and  in  1871  he  was 
Republican  candidate  for  the  office  of  Mayor.  He  was 
chairman  of  the  Soldiers’  Monument  Committee,  and  it 
was  largely  through  his  efforts  that  Randolph  Rogers 
was  secured  as  the  designer  of  this  monument.  At  its 
dedication,  July  15,  1874,  he  nade  the  presentation 
speech. 


Wor— 8 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


1 14 

At  the  time  of  Mr.  Crompton’s  death  the  Worcester 
“Spy”  said : 

George  Crompton  was  one  of  the  foremost  of  Wor¬ 
cester  manufacturers.  He  came  of  a  race  of  mechan¬ 
ics  and  inventors,  and  was  as  ingenious  and  success¬ 
ful  as  any  of  them.  His  sagacity  as  a  man  of  business 
was  as  remarkable  as  his  mechanical  faculty,  and  his 
uprightness  and  fidelity  to  his  engagements  were  not 
less  conspicuous  traits  of  his  character.  He  had  not 
much  time  for  public  affairs,  but  he  was  for  some 
years  an  active  and  useful  member  of  the  board  of 
aldermen,  and  in  other  ways  his  influence  was  dis¬ 
tinctly  felt  in  the  business  of  the  city.  But  in  general, 
his  life  was  that  of  a  private  citizen,  active  and 
strenuous  in  business,  having  not  many  intimate 
friends  beyond  his  home  circle,  but  enjoying  domestic 
pleasures  with  a  keen  zest  and  having  a  cultivated 
taste  for  art  in  all  its  forms.  He  will  be  sadly  missed 
in  the  business  circles  of  Worcester,  and  as  to  his 
family  his  death  is  an  exceedingly  sore  blow. 

George  Crompton,  Sr.,  married,  January  9,  1853,  Mary 
Christina  Pratt,  daughter  of  Charles  Pratt,  of  Hart¬ 
ford,  Connecticut.  They  were  the  parents  of  nine  chil¬ 
dren:  Isabel  M.,  Cora  E.,  Stella  S.,  Georgietta  F.,  mar¬ 
ried  Albert  D.  Wood;  Mary  K.,  Charles,  Mildred  M., 
married  Harry  W.  Smith;  George,  whose  sketch  fol¬ 
lows;  and  Randolph. 


GEORGE  CROMPTON — The  name  Crompton  has 
been  identified  with  the  industrial  and  civic  life  of  the 
city  of  Worcester  for  nearly  three-quarters  of  a  cen¬ 
tury,  and  during  that  time  has  stood  for  progress.  It 
was  Mr.  Crompton’s  father,  the  late  George  Crompton, 
Sr.,  a  sketch  of  whom  precedes,  who  in  1851  established 
the  first  fancy  loom  business  in  this  country  with  Mer¬ 
rill  E.  Furbush,  in  Worcester,  which  has  since  been  such 
an  important  element  in  the  development  of  the  city. 

George  Crompton,  son  of  George,  Sr.,  and  Mary 
Christina  (Pratt)  Crompton,  was  born  in  Worcester, 
June  7,  1872.  After  attending  private  schools  in  Wor¬ 
cester,  he  prepared  for  college  at  the  Worcester  Acad¬ 
emy,  from  which  he  graduated  in  1891,  and  then  entered 
Harvard  College  in  the  fall  of  the  same  year,  gradu¬ 
ating  in  1895.  Shortly  after  his  graduation  he  entered 
the  employ  of  the  Crompton  Loom  Works,  of  which 
he  had  been  for  several  years  a  director,  and  in  1896  he 
was  elected  president  and  treasurer  of  the  Crompton 
Associates,  a  real  estate  corporation.  In  1897,  upon 
the  formation  of  the  Crompton  &  Knowles  Loom  Works, 
he  was  elected  treasurer  and  a  director  of  the  corpora¬ 
tion,  from  which  positions  he  resigned  in  the  fall  of 
1900,  when  the  Crompton  interest  in  the  Crompton  & 
Knowles  Loom  Works  was  sold.  In  May,  1903,  he 
entered  into  a  partnership  with  Edward  D.  Thayer, 
William  B.  Scofield,  and  his  brother,  Randolph  Cromp¬ 
ton,  and  under  the  name  of  the  Crompton-Thayer  Loom 
Company  this  partnership  began  the  manufacture  of 
looms.  In  1907  the  Crompton-Thayer  Loom  Company 
was  sold  to  the  Crompton  &  Knowles  Loom  Works,  and 
Mr.  Crompton  again  became  a  director  of  the  Cromp¬ 
ton  &  Knowles  Loom  Works.  In  1912,  upon  the  con¬ 
solidation  of  the  F.  E.  Reed  Company  and  Prentice 
Brothers’  Company,  both  manufacturers  of  machine 
tools,  into  the  Reed-Prentice  Company,  Mr.  Crompton 
was  elected  a  treasurer  and  director  of  the  new  corpora¬ 
tion.  He  resigned  from  this  position  on  January  1, 
1916.  Mr.  Crompton  is  a  director  of  the  Crompton  & 
Knowles  Loom  Works,  the  Merchants’  National  Bank, 
the  Worcester  Gas  Light  Company,  and  a  trustee  and 


member  of  the  board  of  investment  of  the  People’s  Sav¬ 
ings  Bank.  He  is  vice-president  of  the  board  of  trus¬ 
tees  of  St.  Vincent’s  Hospital,  a  member  of  the  board  of 
trustees  of  Worcester  Academy;  a  corporator  of  the 
Clarks  School  for  the  Deaf,  Northampton,  Massachu¬ 
setts;  vice-president  of  Worcester  Welfare  Federation; 
vice-president  of  the  Associated  Charities  of  Worces¬ 
ter;  a  member  of  the  Commission  of  Public  Welfare  of 
the  State  of  Massachusetts;  and  trustee  of  Rural  Cem¬ 
etery.  He  is  well  known  in  club  circles,  being  a  mem¬ 
ber  of  the  Worcester  Club;  Tatnuck  Country  Club;  the 
Worcester  Country  Club,  of  Worcester,  Massachusetts; 
the  Union  and  Harvard  clubs,  of  Boston,  Massachusetts ; 
the  Harvard  Club,  of  New  York;  and  the  Pocasset  Golf 
Club,  Pocasset,  Massachusetts.  Politically  he  gives  his 
support  to  the  Republican  party,  and  his  religious  affili¬ 
ation  is  with  the  Roman  Catholic  church. 

Mr.  Crompton  married  Alice  Hastings,  daughter  of 
Dr.  and  Mrs.  William  H.  H.  Hastings,  of  Boston,  April 
11,  1896.  He  has  two  sons:  1.  George,  Jr.,  born  May  7, 
1897,  holds  the  rank  of  lieutenant,  senior  grade,  in 
the  United  States  Naval  forces.  He  married  Nancy 
Earle  Smith,  daughter  of  the  late  Frank  Bulkeley, 
of  Worcester,  and  Nancy  (Hacket)  Smith,  and  they  are 
the  parents  of  a  son  George  (3),  born  March  14,  1921; 
and  a  daughter,  Nancy  Earle,  who  was  born  July  3, 
1922.  2.  David  Hastings  born  February  6,  1909. 


ROMEO  E.  ALLEN — Along  those  lines  of  endeavor 
and  general  advance  which  count  most  definitely  and 
practically  for  the  general  welfare,  Romeo  E.  Allen  has 
for  many  years  been  active,  and  in  his  professional 
capacity  as  civil  engineer,  he  has  done  much  work,  the 
permanence  of  which  will  extend  his  usefulness  far  into 
the  future.  A  native  of  the  town  of  Shrewsbury,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  Mr.  Allen  is  a  son  of  Henry  E.  W.  and  Cyn¬ 
thia  B.  (Whitney)  Allen,  for  many  years  residents  of 
this  community  and  both  members  of  old  and  honored 
families  of  New  England.  Mr.  Allen  now  occupies 
the  old  homestead  settled  by  Elnathan  Allen  in  1725.  The 
descent  is  through  his  son  Elnathan,  Jr.,  who  fought  in 
the  Revolution,  and  his  son,  Israel  Allen,  his  son,  Liberty 
Allen,  who  was  born  in  1776,  just  as  the  Declaration  of 
Independence  was  signed,  and  was  therefore  named  Lib¬ 
erty.  His  son,  Henry  E.  W.  Allen,  was  the  father  of 
our  subject. 

Romeo  E.  Allen  was  born  in  Shrewsbury,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  October  17,  1852.  His  education  was  begun  in  the 
local  public  schools,  and  after  the  completion  of  the 
high  school  course,  Mr.  Allen  secured  employment  under 
Charles  A.  Allen,  a  noted  civil  engineer  of  the  city  of 
Worcester.  He  served  an  apprenticeship  covering  a 
period  of  three  years  (1872-1875)  ;  then  deciding  that 
he  wished  to  identify  himself  permanently  with  the 
progress  of  his  native  place,  he  returned  to  Shrewsbury, 
where  he  has  since  been  professionally  active.  In  this 
period  of  nearly  half  a  century  Mr.  Allen  has  handled 
many  important  commissions  not  only  in  this  immedi¬ 
ate  section,  but  in  many  parts  of  his  native  State  and 
more  distant  points  in  New  England.  He  holds  a  very 
eminent  position  in  engineering  circles  in  New  England. 

A  staunch  Republican  by  political  affiliation  since  at¬ 
taining  his  majority,  Mr.  Allen  has  served  the  town  of 
Shrewsbury  in  various  official  capacities.  He  was  active 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


as  a  Selectman  for  several  years,  for '  fourteen  years 
was  Town  Auditor,  and  acted  as  moderator  for  a  full 
quarter  of  a  century.  In  1895  he  represented  the  town 
of  Shrewsbury  in  the  Massachusetts  Legislature,  and 
his  usefulness  and  distinguished  service  brought  about 
his  return  to  that  body  in  1898.  His  broad  familiarity 
with  business  conditions  and  his  excellent  judgment  on 
all  current  affairs  made  him  one  of  the  useful  members 
of  the  legislative  body  and  gave  to  his  service  in  an 
official  capacity  the  usefulness  which  contributes  to  the 
general  welfare  and  prosperity  of  the  commonwealth, 
as  well  as  to  the  location  in  which  he  was  individually 
interested.  In  all  his  services  in  local  town  affairs  the 
welfare  of  the  people  is  his  highest  consideration,  and  he 
has  done  much  to  promote  local  progress  and  prosperity. 
Mr.  Allen  is  a  member  of  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd 
Fellows,  and  also  of  the  Patrons  of  Husbandry.  He  is 
a  director  of  the  Grafton  Cooperative  Bank,  and  inter¬ 
ested  in  all  that  pertains  to  the  economic  progress  of  the 
community.  Identified  with  the  Congregational  church 
since  his  youth,  he  has  for  thirty-three  years  been  clerk 
of  the  parish,  and  has  also  for  a  long  period  served  in 
the  Sunday  school  as  treasurer. 

Mr.  Allen  married  Abbie  R.  Green,  daughter  of 
Charles  O.  and  Maria  (Abbott)  Green,  at  Shrewsbury, 
and  they  are  the  parents  of  two  children:  1.  Charles 
Edward,  born  in  1878,  who  married  Helen  E.  Harlow, 
daughter  of  Henry  Harlow,  their  two  sons  being,  Charles 
E.,  Jr.,  born  February  11,  1906;  and  Stuart  H.,  born 
December  28,  1910.  2.  Lee  C.,  a  sketch  of  whom 
follows : 


LEE  C.  ALLEN — In  the  engineering  world  of  south 
Worcester  County,  Massachusetts,  Lee  C.  Allen  is  a 
largely  noteworthy  figure,  his  long  association  with  his 
honored  father,  Romeo  E.  Allen,  of  Shrewsbury,  form¬ 
ing  one  of  the  really  noteworthy  partnerships  in  this 
field  in  this  part  of  the  State.  Trained  with  special  at¬ 
tention  to  his  purpose  of  entering  his  present  profession, 
Mr.  Allen  took  up  his  work  with  fine  personal  equip¬ 
ment,  and  his  success  followed  in  an  entirely  natural 
way. 

Lee  C.  Allen  was  born  at  Shrewsbury,  Massachusetts, 
February  21,  1883,  and  is  a  son  of  Romeo  E.  and  Abbie 
R.  (Green)  Allen  (see  preceding  sketch).  Attending 
first  the  local  public  schools,  Mr.  Allen  covered  the  high 
school  course,  then  secured  a  position  in  the  employ  of 
A.  W.  Woods,  a  prominent  civil  engineer  of  the  city 
of  Worcester,  and  was  active  in  that  connection  for  a 
period  of  eight  years.  During  that  time  he  gained  a 
broadly  practical  familiarity  with  the  profession,  mas¬ 
tering  its  intricacies  and  accumulating  a  large  fund  of 
experience.  In  1907  Mr.  Allen  returned  to  Shrewsbury 
to  become  associated  as  a  partner  with  his  father,  who 
had  long  held  a  leading  position  in  local  engineering 
affairs.  First  as  his  father’s  associate  and  assistant 
and  later  as  a  partner  of  the  interest,  Lee  C.  Allen  has 
steadily  risen  in  the  profession  until  now  he  holds  a 
leading  position  in  the  engineering  world  of  Worcester 
County.  He  does  all  the  engineering  work  of  the  town 
of  Shrewsbury,  and  is  otherwise  active  in  local  affairs, 
having  been  elected  within  the  past  few  years  to  respon¬ 
sible  offices.  In  1922  he  was  elected  Selectman  and 
was  reelected  in  1923.  In  1923  he  was  also  a  member 


115 

of  the  local  Board  of  Health.  Mr.  Allen  is  a  trustee 
of  Shrewsbury  Cemetery,  also  a  trustee  of  the  Howe 
Memorial  Library,  and  is  a  prominent  member  of  the 
Shrewsbury  Historical  Society.  Interested  in  many 
phases  of  public  progress,  he  is  identified  with  the  Pa¬ 
trons  of  Husbandry,  and  keeps  in  close  touch  with  the 
movement  of  affairs  in  many  fields  of  advance.  His 
religious  connection  is  with  the  Congregational  church. 

Mr.  Allen  married,  at  Worcester,  May  1,  1907,  Alice 
Carlson,  daughter  of  John  and  Carolina  L.  (Swenson) 
Carlson.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Allen  are  the  parents  of  three 
children:  Roger  E.,  born  in  Shrewsbury;  Carolyn  B., 
and  Howard  C.,  bom  December  21,  1919. 


HON.  CHARLES  HENRY  HARTSHORN— The 

career  of  the  Hon.  Charles  Henry  Hartshorn  is  one  of 
remarkable  achievement,  revealing  the  tenacity  of  pur¬ 
pose  which  overcomes  all  obstacles  and  dominates  con¬ 
ditions,  adverse  though  they  may  be.  It  might  almost 
be  said  that  his  private  career  has  been  a  definite  and 
comprehensive  preparation  for  his  public  career.  Cer¬ 
tain  it  is  that  in  the  struggles  by  which  he  has  achieved 
success,  Mr.  Hartshorn  has  gained  a  strength  of  mind 
and  spirit  which  during  his  public  activities  has  meant 
much  to  the  people  of  Gardner  and  of  the  State,  Massa¬ 
chusetts.  He  is  a  son  of  Charles  Hartshorn,  of  an  old 
Massachusetts  family,  who  was  born  in  Townsend, 
Massachusetts,  June  6,  1819,  and  as  a  young  man  came 
to  Gardner,  where  he  resided  for  over  fifty  years,  dur¬ 
ing  the  most  of  which  time  he  was  in  the  employ  of 
Heywood  Brothers  &  Company.  At  about  the  time  of 
his  coming  to  Gardner,  he  married  Frances  Elizabeth 
Walker,  June  30,  1842,  who  was  bom  in  New  Ipswich, 
New  Hampshire,  and  died  in  Gardner  May  14,  1873,  at 
the  age  of  fifty-four  years.  Charles  Hartshorn  died 
January  27,  1895,  at  the  age  of  seventy-five. 

Charles  Henry  Hartshorn  was  born  in  Gardner, 
Massachusetts,  February  11,  1859,  and  his  education 
was  obtained  in  the  local  public  schools.  By  nature  a 
student  of  affairs  and  conditions,  and  gifted  with  an 
acquisitive  and  retentive  mind,  Mr.  Hartshorn  has 
gained  from  every  experience  in  life,  knowledge  which 
he  has  made  of  value  to  himself  or  those  with  whom 
he  has  come  in  contact.  At  the  age  of  nineteen  years, 
in  1878,  Mr.  Hartshorn  entered  the  employ  of  Heywood 
Brothers  &  Company,  and  continued  with  this  concern 
for  about  thirteen  years,  later  establishing  in  business 
for  himself.  He  began  on  a  very  modest  scale,  but 
with  good  credit  and  a  host  of  friends.  The  quality, 
fine  workmanship,  and  attractive  designs  of  the  product 
soon  made  a  demand  for  Hartshorn  furniture,  while 
the  sterling  principles  upon  which  the  business  was 
conducted  so  won  the  trade  that  not  many  years  passed 
before  larger  quarters  were  required.  More  employees 
were  added,  a  variety  of  new  patterns  were  brought  out, 
and  later  reed  baby  carriages,  which  proved  exceed¬ 
ingly  popular,  became  a  part  of  the  product  of  the  plant. 
In  1907  a  new  four-story  building  was  begun  and  com¬ 
pleted  in  1908,  and  at  that  time  the  factory  force  num¬ 
bered  about  thirty  people.  That  building  proving  utter¬ 
ly  inadequate  after  a  few  years,  additions  were  made 
in  1914,  1916,  and  1920,  and  at  the  present  time  (1923) 
the  factory  contains  more  than  50,000  square  feet  of 
floor  space,  the  product  now  comprising  an  extensive 


Ii6 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


variety  of  reed  and  fibre  furniture  and  children’s  baby 
carriages.  On  July  I,  1923,  the  business  was  incorpor¬ 
ated  as  C.  H.  Hartshorn,  Incorporated,  with  Charles  H. 
Hartshorn,  president;  Stanford  H.  Hartshorn,  treas¬ 
urer  and  general  manager;  and  Charles  Henry  Harts¬ 
horn,  Jr.,  clerk. 

It  would  be  difficult  to  point  out  so  definitely  the  be¬ 
ginning  of  Mr.  Hartshorn’s  interest  in  public  life,  but 
his  progress  in  the  service  of  the  people  is  readily 
traced.  Offices  have  sought  him,  for  he  had  no  leisure 
or  inclination  to  go  about  seeking  them.  But  when  a 
practical,  energetic  man  is  needed  in  public  life,  the 
people  have  come  to  look  for  a  busy  man.  From  the 
time  of  attaining  his  majority,  Mr.  Hartshorn  has  sup¬ 
ported  the  Republican  party,  and  as  early  as  1888  he 
was  made  chairman  of  the  Republican  Town  Commit¬ 
tee,  an  office  to  which  he  has  been  repeatedly  elected. 
For  six  successive  years  he  filled  the  office  of  Selectman, 
two  years  of  which  he  was  chairman  of  the  board,  and 
for  nine  years  he  served  as  a  member  of  the  Town  Ad¬ 
visory  Board,  three  years  of  which  he  was  chairman. 
Perhaps  the  most  remarkable  record  in  the  public  ser¬ 
vice  is  the  fact  that  for  twenty-one  consecutive  years  he 
has  been  chosen  moderator  of  all  regular  and  special 
town  meetings,  every  one  of  the  sixty-eight  elections  to 
this  office  being  made  without  opposition.  In  1916,  by 
the  vote  of  his  fellow-townsmen,  Mr.  Hartshorn  took 
his  seat  in  the  House  of  Representatives  of  the  State  of 
Massachusetts,  and  so  praiseworthy  has  been  the  record 
of  his  work  as  a  legislator  that  by  reelections  he  has 
been  retained  in  the  House  until  the  present  year,  when 
he  was  advanced  to  the  higher  legislative  body  as  Sen¬ 
ator  from  the  Third  Worcester  District.  During  the 
seven  years  of  his  service  in  the  House,  he  was  for  five 
years  a  member  of  the  important  Committee  on  Ways 
and  Means  and  also  served  on  the  Rules  Committee. 
For  two  years  he  was  active  on  the  Committee  on  Street 
Railways,  and  also  was  appointed  to  the  Committee  on 
Public  Service,  of  which  he  was  made  chairman.  Another 
important  committee  with  which  he  did  commendable 
work  was  that  on  taxation.  As  a  Senator  he  is  show¬ 
ing  the  same  broadly  useful  qualities  which  were  so 
conspicuous  in  the  House,  and  his  constituents  feel  that 
he  is  reflecting  honor  upon  them  and  upon  the  city  of 
Gardner. 

Mr.  Hartshorn  has  been  a  member  of  the  Gardner 
Chamber  of  Commerce  since  its  organization,  and  in 
1922  was  elected  president  of  that  body.  He  is  affili¬ 
ated  with  the  Gardner  Trust  Company  as  a  member  of 
the  board  of  directors,  and  is  also  a  director  of  the 
American  Fibre  Corporation  of  Gardner,  and  of  the 
Robert  Machine  Company,  Inc.,  of  Worcester.  He  is 
one  of  the  prominent  men  of  Gardner  in  fraternal  circles, 
being  affiliated  with  Hope  Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted 
Masons;  Gardner  Chapter,  Royal  Arch  Masons;  Ivan- 
hoe  Commandery,  Knights  Templar,  of  which  he  is  Past 
Commander ;  Massachusetts  Consistory,  Ancient  Ac¬ 
cepted  Scottish  Rite;  Aleppo  Temple,  Ancient  Arabic 
Order  Nobles  of  the  Mystic  Shrine  of  Boston;  Gardner 
Lodge,  No.  1426,  Benevolent  and  Protective  .Order  of 
Elks;  and  William  Ellison  Lodge,  No.  185,  Independent 
Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  of  which  he  is  a  Past  Noble 
Grand.  He  has  been  an  Odd  Fellow  for  forty-two 
years,  and  belongs  to  the  encampment  and  to  the 


Rebekahs.  Mr.  Hartshorn  also  seeks  out-of-door  in¬ 
terests,  and  he  holds  membership  in  the  Gardner  Boat 
Club,  the  Oak  Hill  Country  Club  of  Fitchburg,  and  the 
Worcester  Country  Club  of  Worcester.  He  is  active 
in  religious  and  charitable  work,  and  an  attendant  and 
supporter  of  the  First  Congregational  Church  of 
Gardner. 

Mr.  Hartshorn  married,  on  April  25,  1889,  Lilian  May 
Sawyer,  of  Gardner,  daughter  of  James  and  Mary  Ellen 
(Harding)  Sawyer.  James  Sawyer  was  a  successful 
chair  manufacturer  and  a  direct  descendant  of  Thomas 
Sawyer,  who  came  from  Lincolnshire,  England,  to  this 
country  in  1635,  at  the  age  of  twenty-one  years,  and 
married  Mary  Prescott.  Mary  Ellen  Harding  was  a 
direct  descendant  of  Stephen  and  Catharine  (Iddenden) 
Hosmer,  of  Hawkhurst,  Kent,  England,  the  date  of 
whose  marriage  was  July  8,  1600.  Their  son,  James 
Hosmer,  came  to  America  in  April,  1635. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hartshorn  are  the  parents  of  four  chil¬ 
dren:  1.  Stanford  Harding,  a  sketch  of  whom  follows. 
2.  Dorothy  Frances,  a  graduate  of  the  Gardner  High 
School,  Lasell  Seminary,  Auburndale,  and  Miss  Wheel- 
ock’s  Kindergarten  Training  School  of  Boston.  She 
married  Clinton  J.  Underwood,  a  prominent  business 
man  of  Gardner,  and  is  an  important  factor  in  Gard¬ 
ner’s  public  life.  Mrs.  Underwood  is  a  leader  of  the 
Girl  Scout  movement,  and  in  1922  was  elected  a  mem¬ 
ber  of  the  Gardner  School  Board.  3.  Charles  Henry, 
Jr.,  now  a  senior  at  Dartmouth  College,  class  of  1924. 
4.  Edward  Hosmer,  a  beautiful  little  boy  of  much  prom¬ 
ise,  who  was  killed  in  an  automobile  accident  on  Sep¬ 
tember  3,  1915,  shortly  before  his  fifth  birthday. 


STANFORD  HARDING  HARTSHORN,  member 
of  an  old  and  honored  family  of  Massachusetts,  is  now 
counted  among  the  representative  young  men  of  Wor¬ 
cester  County.  Trained  for  his  career  in  a  leading 
Massachusetts  educational  institution,  he  has  gained 
experience  of  value  in  the  twelve  years  since  his  grad¬ 
uation,  and  has  now  for  some  time  been  active  as  gen¬ 
eral  manager  of  the  C.  H.  Hartshorn  plant,  in  the  manu¬ 
facture  of  reed  furniture  and  baby  carriages. 

Stanford  Harding  Hartshorn  was  born  in  Gardner, 
Massachusetts,  February  21,  1890,  and  is  a  son  of 
Charles  Henry,  a  sketch  of  whom  precedes  this,  and 
Lilian  M.  (Sawyer)  Hartshorn.  His  education  was 
begun  in  the  public  schools,  and  he  was  graduated  from 
the  Gardner  High  School  in  the  class  of  1907.  Later, 
entering  the  Massachusetts  Institute  of  Technology,  in 
Boston,  he  was  graduated  in  the  class  of  1911,  with 
the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Science  in  chemical  engi¬ 
neering.  For  two  years  following  his  graduation  he  was 
engaged  as  chemist  with  the  Great  Northern  Paper 
Company  in  Millinocket,  Maine,  the  largest  independent 
paper  company  in  the  United  States.  In  1913  he  re¬ 
turned  to  Gardner  to  become  associated  with  his  father 
in  the  manufacture  of  baby  carriages  and  reed  furni¬ 
ture,  where  he  soon  became  general  manager,  and  owing 
to  his  ability,  energy,  and  faithfulness,  the  business  has 
continued  to  succeed  and  prosper.  On  July  1,  1923,  the 
business  was  incorporated  with  Charles  H.  Hartshorn, 
president;  Stanford  H.  Hartshorn,  treasurer  and  gen¬ 
eral  manager;  and  Charles  Henry  Hartshorn,  Jr.,  clerk. 

Stanford  H.  Hartshorn  is  connected  with  the  Gard- 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


ner  Savings  Bank  as  a  trustee,  is  a  director  of  the 
Chairtown  Cooperative  Bank,  a  member  of  the  Cham¬ 
ber  of  Commerce,  and  is  deeply  interested  in  all  that 
pertains  to  the  progress  of  the  city  and  to  the  welfare 
of  the  people.  A  Republican  in  politics,  he  has  never 
accepted  public  honors,  but  lends  his  support  to  all 
party  activities.  Fraternally  he  is  affiliated  with  Hope 
Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted  Masons,  of  which  he  is  Past 
Master ;  Gardner  Chapter,  Royal  Arch  Masons ;  Ivan- 
hoe  Commandery,  Knights  Templar,  of  which  he  is 
Past  Commander;  and  of  Massachusetts  Consistory, 
Ancient  Accepted  Scottish  Rite,  of  Boston ;  Aleppo 
Temple,  Ancient  Arabic  Order  Nobles  of  the  Mystic 
Shrine;  and  Gardner  Lodge,  No.  1426,  Benevolent  and 
Protective  Order  of  Elks.  His  clubs  are  the  Gardner 
Boat  Club,  of  which  he  is  president;  the  Oak  Hill  Coun¬ 
try  Club  of  Fitchburg;  and  the  Worcester  Country  Club 
of  Worcester.  He  and  his  wife  are  both  members  of 
the  First  Congregational  Church  of  Gardner. 

Stanford  H.  Hartshorn  married,  in  1916,  Julia  Ellen 
Elizabeth  Krantz,  of  Washington,  District  of  Colum¬ 
bia,  a  graduate  of  Emerson  College  of  Oratory,  and  they 
are  the  parents  of  a  daughter,  Barbara  Ellen. 


THOMAS  P.  LINDSAY — Among  the  younger  men 
of  Worcester  County,  Massachusetts,  who,  after  actively 
serving  throughout  the  period  of  the  participation  of  the 
United  States  in  the  World  War,  are  now  devoting  their 
energies  to  scientific  agriculture  and  stock  raising,  is 
Thomas  P.  Lindsay,  who  is  cultivating  a  300-acre  farm 
in  Southboro,  and  is  caring  for  a  herd  of  sixty  pure¬ 
bred  Guernsey  cattle.  Mr.  Lindsay’s  experience  has 
been  a  most  adventurous  and  interesting  one,  and  his 
military  record  is  a  distinguished  one. 

Mr.  Lindsay  was  bom  in  Washington,  District  of 
Columbia,  April  12,  1881,  son  of  Rev.  John  S.  and  Caro¬ 
line  (Smith)  Lindsay.  For  many  years  he  was  rector 
of  St.  Paul’s  Church,  the  present  cathedral,  and  was 
chairman  of  the  general  convention  of  the  Episcopal 
church.  After  receiving  his  early  education  in  the  local 
public  schools,  he  prepared  for  college  in  St.  Paul’s 
Preparatory  School  at  Concord,  New  Hampshire,  from 
which  he  was  graduated  in  1899.  He  then  became  a 
student  in  Harvard  College,  from  which  he  was  grad¬ 
uated  in  1904  with  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts.  He 
then  taught  in  a  private  schools  in  Boston  for  two  years, 
and  for  one  year  was  traveling  salesman  for  a  wholesale 
dry  goods  house  in  New  York  City.  He  then  entered 
the  Law  School  of  Boston  University,  where  he  com¬ 
pleted  his  legal  studies  with  graduation  in  1910,  at  which 
time  he  received  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Laws.  He 
at  once  became  associated  with  the  law  firm  of  Choate, 
Hall  &  Stewart,  which  connection  he  maintained  until 
the  time  of  the  entrance  of  the  United  States  into*  the 
World  War.  He  then,  May  x,  1917,  handed  in  his  resig¬ 
nation  and  enlisted  for  service.  He  was  sent  to  Plattsburg, 
New  York,  where  he  graduated  from  the  training  school 
with  the  rank  of  first  lieutenant  of  infantry,  National 
Army,  in  August,  1917.  He  was  then  assigned  to  duty 
at  Camp  Devens  with  the  303d  Infantry,  but  later  was 
transferred  to  act  as  aide  to  the  commanding  general 
at  headquarters.  Later,  in  1918,  he  was  commissioned 
captain,  and  in  June  of  that  year  he  sailed  for  France. 
Landing  in  Liverpool,  he  went  to  France,  and  in  July  of 


11 7 

the  same  year  was  promoted  to  the  rank  of  major  in  the 
regular  army  and  assigned  to  assist  the  chief  of  staff  of 
the  76th  Division.  After  a  time  he  was  detached  from 
the  76th  Division,  and  assigned  to  duty  as  brigade  ad¬ 
jutant  of  the  156th  Brigade  in  the  88th  Division,  Second 
Army  Corps,  which  rank  he  held  until  the  time  of  the 
signing  of  the  armistice,  in  November,  1918.  In  Decem¬ 
ber,  1918,  he  was  detailed  to  special  duty  at  Rome,  in 
command  of  the  guard  of  honor  which  accompanied 
President  Wilson  during  his  visit  there.  In  February, 
1919,  he  sailed  for  home  on  the  “Leviathan,”  and  arrived 
at  Camp  Dix,  Wrightstown,  New  Jersey,  in  Februaiy, 
1919,  from  which  place  he  was  mustered  out  of  ser¬ 
vice  in  March,  1919.  Upon  his  return  to  civilian  life  he 
at  once  returned  to  the  firm  of  Choate,  Hall  &  Stewart, 
with  whom  he  remained  until  1920.  He  then  resigned 
in  order  to  engage  in  agricultural  pursuits.  Since  that 
time  he  has  been  continuously  and  successfully  engaged 
in  cultivating  his  300  acres  and  in  taking  care  of  his 
splendid  herd  of  pure-bred  Guernsey  cattle.  He  plans 
to  make  the  breeding  of  pure-bred  live  stock  a  special 
feature  of  his  agricultural  enterprise,  and  has  care¬ 
fully  prepared  for  that  field  of  activity.  His  success 
during  the  more  than  three  years  in  which  he  has  been 
devoting  his  time  to  agriculture  and  stock  raising  gives 
evidence  of  a  successful  and  prosperous  future.  Mr. 
Lindsay  has  always  been  fond  of  out-of-door  life,  and 
his  military  experience  did  not  mark  the  beginning  of 
his  out-of-door  adventures  or  even  of  his  experience  with 
the  German  Army.  In  1914  he  was  in  Africa  collecting 
specimens  for  the  Smithsonian  Institute  at  Washington, 
and  when  the  World  War  began  he  narrowly  escaped 
capture  by  the  German  authorities  there.  He  walked 
for  more  than  1,000  miles  in  order  to  escape  capture, 
and  finally  succeeded  in  making  his  way  back  to  the 
United  States. 

Fraternally,  Mr.  Lindsay  is  a  member  of  the  Hasty 
Pudding  Club  of  Harvard  College;  of  the  D.  K.  E. 
college  fraternity;  Delphic  Club  of  Cambridge;  Somer¬ 
set  Club  of  Boston;  Tennis  and  Racket  Club;  New 
York  Harvard  Club;  Metropolitan  Club  of  Washington; 
Southboro  Golf  Club;  Framingham  Golf  Club;  also  of 
St.  Bernard’s  Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted  Masons,  of 
Southboro,  Massachusetts ;  Houghton  Chapter,  Royal 
Arch  Masons,  of  Marlboro;  and  of  Southboro  Grange. 
He  is  a  member  of  the  Episcopal  church  of  Southboro. 

On  July  1,  1905,  at  York  Harbor,  Maine,  Thomas  P. 
Lindsay  married  Florence  Field,  daughter  of  Henry 
Field,  of  Chicago’s  family  of  Field,  and  of  Florence 
(Lathrop)  Field,  a  member  of  the  Alexandria,  Vir¬ 
ginia,  family  of  Lathrop.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Lindsay  are 
the  parents  of  three  children,  all  born  at  Southboro : 
Minna,  who  was  born  May  27,  1908;  Florence,  born 
June  1,  1911;  and  John,  born  December  12,  1917. 


ELMER  A.  MacGOWAN — Among  the  broadly  use¬ 
ful  and  progressive  men  of  Worcester  County,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  Elmer  A.  MacGowan  holds  a  position  of  prom¬ 
inence  in  the  financial  world  as  assistant  treasurer  of 
the  Worcester  County  Institute  for  Savings  which  is  lo¬ 
cated  in  the  city  of  Worcester.  A  native  of  this  city, 
Mr.  MacGowan  was  reared  in  its  traditions  and  educated 
in  its  institutions,  and  from  the  completion  of  his 
studies  has  been  active  in  banking.  He  is  a  son  of 


n8 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


John  and  Harriet  Augusta  (Miller)  MacGowan.  His 
father,  who  was  born  in  Canada,  was  for  many  years 
identified  with  railroad  interests  as  a  stationary  engi¬ 
neer,  and  was  thus  active  until  his  death,  which  occurred 
in  1922.  The  mother,  who  was  born  at  South  Ryegate, 
Vermont,  died  in  1916. 

Elmer  A.  MacGowan  was  born  at  Worcester,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  March  27,  1881.  He  covered  the  elementary 
and  grammar  grades  in  the  local  schools,  and  is  a  grad¬ 
uate  of  the  Worcester  High  School  class  of  1901.  His 
first  business  experience  was  in  the  employ  of  the  City 
National  Bank,  but  he  remained  with  this  institution  for 
only  a  short  time,  in  1903  becoming  identified  with  the 
Worcester  County  Institute  for  Savings.  He  was  first 
employed  here  in  the  capacity  of  clerk,  but  has  risen 
throught  the  various  grades  to  the  position  which  he 
now  holds,  as  assistant  treasurer,  winning  his  way  up¬ 
ward  entirely  on  his  merit.  He  is  counted  among  the 
really  substantial  men  of  the  day  in  Worcester  County, 
and  enjoys  the  esteem  and  confidence  of  his  associates 
and  the  business  men  of  the  city.  Mr.  MacGowan  is 
a  member  of  the  Exchange  Club  of  Worcester,  and  is  a 
member  of  the  Baptist  church. 

Mr.  MacGowan  married,  on  December  5,  1908,  Mabel 
E.  Brissette,  who  was  born  in  Putnam,  Connecticut,  and 
they  are  the  parents  of  two  children:  Elmer  Allison, 
Jr.,  and  Barbara. 

ALBERT  FAY  LOWELL,  A.  B.,  M.  D.,  F.  A. 

C.  S. — A  leading  physician  and  surgeon  not  only  of 
Gardner,  but  of  Worcester  County  and  the  State  of 
Massachusetts,  Dr.  Lowell  is  doing  much  for  the  people 
of  Gardner  and  vicinity  as  the  senior  surgeon  of  the 
Henry  Heywood  Memorial  Hospital  of  Gardner,  with 
which  he  has  been  connected  since  its  opening  in  the 
year  1907.  His  private  practice  is  very  extensive,  and  he 
is  considered  one  of  the  most  successful  surgeons  of  the 
day. 

Dr.  Lowell  comes  of  an  old  Vermont  family,  and  is  a 
son  of  Albert  P.  Lowell,  who  was  born  at  Derby  Line, 
Vermont,  February  10,  1836,  and  died  in  Fitchburg, 
Massachusetts,  August  8,  1911.  He  was  for  many  years 
located  in  Burlington,  Vermont,  where  he  was  engaged 
as  a  building  contractor.  He  married,  in  Wolcott,  Ver¬ 
mont,  on  May  27,  1867,  Alma  Whitcher,  who  was  born 
in  Westfield,  Vermont,  October  30,  1847,  and  is  still 
living,  residing  with  another  son,  Dr.  Alverne  P. 
Lowell,  of  Fitchburg. 

Albert  Fay  Lowell  was  born  in  Burlington,  Vermont, 
November  5,  1875.  His  education  was  begun  in  the  pub¬ 
lic  schools  of  Burlington,  and  he  is  a  graduate  of  the 
Burlington  High  School,  class  of  1894.  His  choice  of 
a  profession  early  determined,  he  entered  the  Univer¬ 
sity  of  Vermont  for  the  classical  course,  and  was  grad¬ 
uated  from  that  institution  in  1898,  with  the  degree  of 
Bachelor  of  Arts.  During  the  latter  years  of  his  aca¬ 
demic  studies  he  also  attended  medical  lectures  at  the 
University  of  Vermont  College  of  Medicine,  from  which 
institution  he  eventually  received  his  degree  of  Doctor 
of  Medicine  in  the  year  1900.  Upon  his  graduation,  Dr. 
Lowell  did  out-patient  work  in  connection  with  the  Bos¬ 
ton  City  Hospital,  and  also  the  Children’s  Hospital  of 
Boston.  In  October,  1900,  he  went  to  Winchenden, 
Massachusetts,  where  he  served  as  interne  at  “The 


Highlands,”  a  private  sanitorium.  He  came  to  Gardner 
in  December,  1901,  and  has  since  been  located  here, 
carrying  forward  general  practice  of  medicine  and  sur¬ 
gery  with  great  success.  He  was  attending  surgeon  of 
the  Henry  Heywood  Memorial  Hospital  when  that  in¬ 
stitution  was  opened  to  the  public,  and  has  continued 
without  interruption  as  a  member  of  the  surgical  staff, 
now  being  senior  attending  surgeon,  in  point  of  age, 
in  the  hospital.  Dr.  Lowell  is  also  consulting  and  op¬ 
erating  surgeon  of  the  State  Colony  for  the  Insane,  in 
Gardner,  and  consulting  surgeon  in  the  Peterboro  Hos¬ 
pital,  Peterboro,  New  Hampshire;  he  stands  very  high 
in  his  profession.  He  is  a  member  of  the  American 
Medical  Association;  a  fellow  of  the  American  College 
of  Surgeons ;  a  member  of  the  Medico-Legal  Society 
of  Massachusetts;  the  Massachusetts  Medical  Society; 
and  the  Worcester  County  North  Medical  Society.  He 
served  on  the  medical  examining  board  during  the  World 
War,  and  also  as  a  member  of  the  Volunteer  Medical 
Service.  A  member  of  the  Gardner  Chamber  of  Com¬ 
merce.  Dr.  Lowell  served  as  associate  medical  exam¬ 
iner  of  the  Second  District  of  Worcester  County,  of 
which  Gardner  is  the  centre,  from  1910  until  his  resig¬ 
nation,  which  took  effect  in  1921.  He  is  a  member  of 
the  Greek  Letter  Academic  Society,  the  Alpha  Tau 
Omega  fraternity,  and  the  Delta  Mu  fraternity  (Med¬ 
ical).  He  is  a  member  of  Gardner  Lodge,  No.  1426, 
Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks ;  of  the  Gard¬ 
ner  Boat  Club;  and  the  Gardner  Riding  and  Driving 
Club;  and  also  of  the  Levi  Heywood  Memorial  Library 
Association.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  Chair  City 
Lunch  Club,  and  North  Worcester  County  Fish  and 
Game  Club. 

Dr.  Lowell  married,  on  June  2,  1903,  Helen  Louise 
Cann,  daughter  of  George  Wade  and  Ella  V.  (Derby) 
Cann.  George  Wade  Cann  was  a  prominent  attorney 
and  counsellor-at-law,  a  member  of  the  New  York 
and  Massachusetts  State  bars,  but  in  his  later  years 
was  identified  with  the  chair  manufacturing  of  P.  Derby 
&  Company,  and  acted  as  the  New  York  representative 
of  this  internationally  famous  concern.  Philander 
Derby,  the  founder  of  this  concern  was  Mrs.  Lowell’s 
grandfather,  and  was  one  of  the  pioneer  chair  manufac¬ 
turers  of  Gardner.  Dr.  and  Mrs.  Lowell  are  the  parents 
of  three  children,  of  whom  two  are  living:  Sidney  Cann, 
and  Alberta,  both  of  whom  are  students  in  the  Gardner 
High  School. 

Mrs.  Lowell  is  a  member  of  the  Daughters  of  the 
American  Revolution,  through  Richard  Sanger,  the  sixth 
generation  removed  on  the  paternal  side,  who  served 
in  the  Second  Provincial  Congress  from  Sherbom, 
Middlesex  County,  Massachusetts.  This  Congress  con¬ 
vened  February  1,  1775,  and  Richard  Sanger  was  made 
a  member  of  the  committee.  Mrs.  Lowell  holds  her 
membership  also  through  Josiah  Jackson,  a  maternal 
ancestor,  five  times  removed,  who  served  as  a  sergeant 
under  Colonel  Bridges  in  the  Worcester  County  Militia, 
at  East  Hoosick,  New  York,  and  as  a  private  in  Colonel 
John  Whitcomb’s  company.  Mrs.  Lowell  is  very  ac¬ 
tive  in  many  branches  of  civic,  benevolent,  and  welfare 
work.  She  is  a  charter  member  and  was  the  first  presi¬ 
dent  of  the  Gardner  Women’s  Club;  is  a  trustee  of  the 
Levi  Heywood  Memorial  Library;  and  for  two  and  a 
half  years  served  on  the  Gardner  School  Committee. 


J 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


She  is  also  a  member  of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce. 
During  the  World  War  Mrs.  Lowell  was  active  on  the 
executive  board  of  the  Gardner  Chapter  of  the  Ameri¬ 
can  Red  Cross,  to  which  she  was  elected  shortly  after 
the  intervention  of  the  United  States  in  European  affairs, 
and  served  until  November,  1922.  Dr.  and  Mrs.  Lowell 
are  members  of  St.  Paul’s  Episcopal  Church. 


CHARLES  HUNT  TYLER— A  career  like  that  of 
Mr.  Tyler  is  an  inspiration  to  every  thoughtful  man, 
for  in  his  breadth  of  usefulness  both  as  a  business  man 
and  a  citizen,  he  gave  to  his  day  and  generation  the 
countless  daily  services  which  make  up  the  sum  of 
human  happiness.  Added  to  these  his  honorable 
record  as  a  soldier  of  the  Civil  War  places  his  name 
among  those  of  the  heroes  of  his  country  and  completes 
the  history  of  a  worthy  and  honored  life.  Mr.  Tyler 
was  a  man  of  the  people,  who  rose  to  a  position  of  suc¬ 
cess  and  influence  entirely  through  his  own  efforts.  One 
of  a  family  of  thirteen  children,  he  was  a  son  of  J. 
Warren  Tyler,  who  was  born  at  Hinsdale,  New  Hamp¬ 
shire,  and  was  a  school  teacher  by  occupation.  Teaching 
in  the  district  schools  of  Chesterfield  and  Hinsdale,  in 
his  native  State,  he  was  a  man  of  lofty  ideals  and 
forward-looking  spirit,  although  perhaps  somewhat  lack¬ 
ing  in  those  practical  gifts  which  are  so  necessary  to 
the  accumulation  of  personal  wealth.  He  instilled  into 
his  pupils  lessons  of  honor  and  right  purposes  together 
with  the  three  “Rs”  and  a  due  respect  for  Webster’s 
rules  of  spelling.  J.  Warren  Tyler  married  Eleanor 
Thomas,  of  Chesterfield,  New  Hampshire,  and  both  are 
now  long  since  deceased. 

Charles  Hunt  Tyler  was  born  at  Hinsdale,  New 
Hampshire,  December  19,  1838,  and  died  in  Athol, 
Massachusetts.  His  education  was  begun  in  the  district 
primary  schools  of  his  birthplace  and  completed  at  the 
grammar  schools  of  Athol,  when  he  was  assisting  his 
elder  brother  in  the  latter’s  grocery  store.  When  still 
a  child  Mr.  Tyler  became  a  member  of  his  brother’s 
household  in  Athol.  This  brother,  Pitts  Tyler,  owned 
and  managed  a  grocery  store  on  Main  Street,  which  had 
formerly  been  conducted  as  a  union  store  many  mem¬ 
bers  of  the  community  holding  ownership.  Pitts  Tyler 
bought  up  the  various  shares  as  he  was  able,  eventually 
becoming  sole  owner  of  the  interest.  Charles  H.  Tyler 
worked  for  his  brother  until  the  outbreak  of  the  Civil 
War,  when  he  enlisted  in  the  53d  Massachusetts  Volun¬ 
teer  Regiment,  and  served  throughout  his  enlistment. 
During  his  absence  in  the  army  Pitts  Tyler  sold  his 
Athol  store  and  going  to  Royalston,  Massachusetts, 
opened  a  similar  enterprise  there,  but  the  venture  proved 
less  profitable  than  he  had  anticipated.  Upon  receiving 
his  honorable  discharge  from  the  service  of  his  coun¬ 
try,  Charles  H.  Tyler  returned  to  Massachusetts  and 
joined  his  brother  in  Royalston.  Shortly  thereafter  both 
returned  to  Athol  permanently,  the  elder  brother 
again  purchasing  the  store  which  he  had  formerly 
owned.  Eventually  the  younger  brother  bought  the  store 
from  him  and  Pitts  Tyler  retired.  Charles  H.  Tyler  re¬ 
mained  at  the  head  of  the  enterprise  for  a  quarter  of 
a  century,  when  ill  health  compelled  him  to  retire. 
Meanwhile,  Mr.  Tyler  had  received  his  son,  E.  Warren 
Tyler,  into  partnership,  and  for  a  number  of  years  the 


119 

latter  carried  forward  the  interest,  which  was  finally 
sold  to  A.  H.  Bowker. 

During  all  these  years  Charles  H.  Tyler  had  prac¬ 
ticed  thrift,  and  with  the  energy  and  business  ability 
which  he  had  given  to  his  activities  along  mercantile 
lines,  he  became  a  prosperous  man.  His  great  faith  in 
the  future  of  Athol  as  a  business  and  residential  center 
led  him  to  invest  heavily  in  real  estate  in  this  community. 
Frequently  buying  and  selling,  constantly  improving  the 
property  which  he  held,  Mr.  Tyler  did  much,  not  only 
for  his  own  profit,  but  for  the  upbuilding  and  advance 
of  the  town,  and  through  his  willingness  to  extend  to 
them  the  opportunity,  many  working  people  of  this  sec¬ 
tion  became  the  owners  of  homes.  His  real  estate  in¬ 
terests  comprised  his  entire  activity  after  retiring  from 
his  store,  but  his  health  failed  steadily,  and  for  some 
time  before  his  demise  he  was  confined  to  the  house. 
Mr.  Tyler  was  also  prominent  in  the  public  life  of  the 
community,  and  by  political  affiliation  was  a  staunch  Re¬ 
publican.  Always  standing  for  all  that  contributes  to 
the  welfare  of  the  community,  feeling  the  interest  of  the 
people  to  be  the  paramount  consideration  in  all  advance, 
Mr.  Tyler  gave  to  the  community  of  his  best  and  among 
those  who  remember  him,  his  genial  spirit  and  kindly 
face  are  recalled  as  a  benediction.  Fond  of  social  ac¬ 
tivity,  he  made  countless  friends,  but  never  cared  to 
assume  a  position  of  leadership  or  command  in  any 
circle  or  in  working  for  any  cause.  He  was  one  of  the 
finest  examples  of  the  self-made  American,  capable, 
always  alert  to  progressive  effort,  always  sharing  in 
any  good  work.  He  was  very  prominent  in  the  Masonic 
order,  being  a  member  of  all  bodies,  and  one  of  the 
best  loved  men  in  his  local  lodge  and  chapter.  His 
years  of  ill  health  necessarily  segregated  him  from  ex¬ 
tensive  social  or  fraternal  activities  during  the  latter 
par  of  his  life,  and  then  his  chief  recreations  were  euchre 
and  whist,  with  a  few  close  friends.  He  was  a  member 
of  the  Poquaig  Club  of  Athol,  and  his  religious  convic¬ 
tions  were  those  of  the  Unitarian.  He  supported  this 
church  generously,  as  he  did  all  Christian  work,  but  was 
not  actively  affiliated  with  it. 

Mr.  Tyler  married  Sarah  A.  Cook,  who  was  born  at 
Royalston,  Massachusetts,  and  resided  there  until  twenty 
years  of  age,  Mr.  Tyler  is  a  daughter  of  Caleb  A.  and 
Susan  (Herrick)  Cook,  of  Royalston,  Massachusetts. 
Mr.  Cook  was  a  jeweler  of  Royalston  and,  deciding  to 
change  his  place  of  business  and  residence,  came  to 
Athol  where  he  continued  in  the  same  line  of  mercan¬ 
tile  endeavor,  only  on  a  much  larger  scale.  He  became 
one  of  the  most  prominent  jewelers  of  this  section  and, 
spending  the  remainder  of  his  life  time  in  this  community, 
was  a  leader  in  many  lines  of  community  advance  until 
his  death,  which  occurred  in  Athol,  April  13,  1888.  His 
wife  died  in  Athol,  in  April,  1882. 

E.  Warren  Tyler,  son  of  Charles  Hunt  and  Sarah  A. 
(Cook)  Tyler,  was  born  at  Athol,  Massachusetts,  Feb¬ 
ruary  19,  1874.  His  education  was  begun  in  the  local 
public  schools  and  following  his  completion  of  the  gram¬ 
mar  course  he  entered  Worcester  Business  College, 
at  Worcester,  Massachusetts.  Only  sixteen  years  of 
age  when  his  father  died,  Mr.  Tyler  nevertheless  took 
over  the  responsibility  of  his  father’s  business,  which  he 
conducted  for  several  years.  His  interests  however, 
followed  other  lines  of  advance,  and  settling  the  estate, 


120 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


he  associated  himself  with  the  world  of  finance  in  Athol. 
He  has  now  for  many  years  been  identified  with  the 
Athol  National  Bank,  of  which  in  the  year  1919  he  was 
elected  president,  still  ably  serving  in  this  largely  re¬ 
sponsible  office.  Mr.  Tyler  is  deeply  interested  in  agri¬ 
cultural  advance,  and  owns  a  fine  farm  and  apple  orchard 
in  Phillipston,  Massachusetts,  where  his  leisure  time 
is  principally  spent.  He  is  one  of  the  largely  progres¬ 
sive  men  of  Athol,  and  a  leader  in  all  that  makes  for  the 
welfare  of  the  people  and  the  progress  of  the  com¬ 
munity.  He  married  Bertha  Matthews,  of  Westboro, 
Massachusetts,  and  they  have  three  children :  Elinor, 
Rachel,  and  Robert. 


WILLIAM  GARDINER  LORD — Even  as  a  young 
man  Mr.  Lord  engaged  in  duties  devolving  upon  a  public 
official,  because  of  the  illness  of  his  father,  and  later  in 
life  served  his  community  in  various  capacities.  He  is 
well  known  as  a  real  estate  broker,  financier,  and  fra¬ 
ternity  member  in  Athol,  Massachusetts,  where  he  re¬ 
sides.  He  is  a  son  of  Gardiner  and  Mary  (Barker) 
Lord.  His  father  was  born  in  Athol,  February  26,  1824, 
and  died  there  November  1,  1899.  For  many  years  he 
had  been  a  boot  manufacturer,  but  later  devoted  his 
time  to  public  office  as  Selectman,  Overseer  of  the  Poor, 
Deputy  Sheriff  for  thirty  years,  Highway  Commissioner, 
and  member  of  the  Board  of  Assessors. 

William  Gardiner  Lord  was  born  at  Athol,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  September  7,  1871,  and  there  attended  the  pub¬ 
lic  schools,  being  graduated  as  class  president  and  with 
class  honors  in  1888.  It  had  been  his  purpose  to  pursue 
a  college  course  however,  but  this  was  denied  him  on 
account  of  his  father’s  illness,  which  necessitated  the 
young  man’s  attention  to  public  duties.  Until  the  father 
died,  William  G.  was  not  free  to  follow  his  own  course. 
From  1897  to  1900  he  was  associated  with  E.  V.  Wil¬ 
son,  an  attorney.  In  1900  he  took  a  trip  to  Europe,  and 
upon  his  return  to  Athol  started  a  real  estate  brokerage 
business,  which  is  still  his  vocation.  He  also  is  presi¬ 
dent  of  the  Athol  Cooperative  Bank,  and  vice-president 
of  the  Athol  National  Bank. 

Mr.  Lord  has  served  as  Town  Moderator  for  the  past 
twenty  years;  Overseer  of  the  Poor  for  four  years,  1907 
to  1911;  and  as  member  of  the  Legislature  from  1917 
to  1919.  During  the  World  War  he  was  active  on  the 
Public  Safety  Committee  and  in  all  of  the  Liberty  Loan 
drives,  serving  as  a  “four-minute”  speaker.  He  was  a 
member  of  the  Legal  Advisory  Board,  and  is  prominent 
as  a  Mason,  being  a  member  in  that  order  of  all  bodies 
except  the  council,  holding  the  thirty-second  degree, 
and  is  a  member  of  the  Shrine.  Pie  also  affiliates  with 
the  local  Knights  of  Pythias  and  stands  second  in  line 
for  the  high  office  of  Grand  Chancellor  for  the  State 
of  Massachusetts.  Pie  is  a  member  of  the  Poquaig 
Club,  and  in  religion  is  a  Baptist,  having  been  treasurer 
of  the  Baptist  church  in  Athol  for  nineteen  years. 

CHARLES  W.  GATES — For  over  a  century  and  a 
half  that  branch  of  the  Gates  family  to  which  Charles 
W.  Gates  (present  owner  of  the  pleasant  homestead 
known  as  “The  Elms”)  belongs,  has  been  identified  with 
the  community  life  of  Petersham,  Massachusetts.  The 
Gates  family  is  an  old  one  in  this  country,  and  in  Eng¬ 
land  dates  back  for  nine  generations,  Stephen  Gates, 


the  immigrant  ancestor  being  in  the  tenth  generation  in 
the  English  line  from  Thomas  Gates  of  Pligheaster  and 
Thursteubie,  Essex  County,  England,  the  line  being 
traced  through  William;  his  son,  Geoffrey,  who  mar¬ 
ried  Agnes  Baldington,  daughter  of  Sir  Thomas 
Baldington,  of  County  Oxford,  England;  their  son, 
William,  who  married  Mabel  Capdow,  daughter  and 
heiress  of  Thomas  Fleming,  of  Essex,  England;  their 
son,  Geoffrey,  who  married  Elizabeth  Clapton,  daughter 
of  Sir  William  Clapton,  Knight  of  Kentwell,  Sussex, 
England;  their  son,  Geoffrey,  of  Higheaster,  England, 
who  married  -  Pascall,  of  Essex ;  their  son,  Geof¬ 

frey,  who  married  Joan  Wentworth;  their  son,  Peter,  of 
London,  England,  who  married  Mary  Josselyn;  their  son, 
Thomas,  of  Norwich,  Norfolk  County,  who  became  the 
father  of  the  immigrant  ancestor.  The  Gates  families 
of  Semer,  Yorkshire,  and  Essex,  England,  were  entitled 
to  bear  the  following  arms : 

Arms— Per  pale,  gules  and  azure,  three  lions  ram¬ 
pant  gardant  or. 

Crest — A  demi-lion  rampant  gardant  or. 

These  are  recorded  in  the  visitations  of  York  in  1584 
and  1665,  but  records  of  the  original  grant  have  not 
yet  been  found. 

(I.)  Stephen  Gates,  son  of  Thomas  Gates,  of  Norwich, 
Norfolk  County,  mentioned  above,  and  immigrant  ancestor 
of  the  branches  of  the  Gates  family,  to  which  Charles  W. 
Gates  belongs,  came  from  Hingham,  England,  in  the 
ship  “Diligent,”  of  Ipswich,  in  1638,  accompanied  by 
his  wife,  Ann  (Hill)  Gates,  and  two  children.  He 
settled  first  at  Hingham,  Massachusetts,  and  then  re¬ 
moved  to  Lancaster,  subsequently  becoming  a  resident 
of  Cambridge,  where  he  died  in  1662.  His  will  was 
dated  June  9,  1662,  and  proved  October  1,  1662,  and 
bequeathed  to  his  son,  Stephen,  the  home  and  lot  in 
Lancaster,  and  to  the  wife  and  son,  Simon,  the  home 
in  Cambridge,  the  son  Thomas  to  remain  with  them  at 
pleasure.  The  widow,  Ann,  later  married  Richard 
Woodward,  of  Watertown,  Massachusetts,  but  after  the 
death  of  the  latter,  February  16,  1665,  she  resumed 
the  name  Gates.  Children  of  Stephen  and  Ann  (Hill) 
Gates  were:  Elizabeth,  Mary,  Stephen,  Thomas,  Simon, 
of  further  mention;  Isaac,  and  Rebecca. 

(II.)  Simon  Gates,  son  of  Stephen  and  Ann  (Hill) 
Gates,  was  born  in  1645,  and  died  April  21,  1695,  at 
Brockton,  Massachusetts.  He  resided  first  on  the  heme 
estate  at  Cambridge,  but  later  removed  to  Lancaster, 
and  finally  to  Muddy  River,  (now  Brookline)  Massa¬ 
chusetts.  He  married  Margaret  - ,  and  they  were 

the  parents  of  eight  children :  Abigail,  born  August  14, 
1671,  died  in  1776;  Simon,  born  September  1,  1673,  died 
January  2,  1675-6;  Simon,  born  January  5,  1675-6,  of 
further  mention;  George,  born  April  6,  1678,  died  May 
23,  1679;  Amos,  born  1681,  married,  May  19,  1703,  Han¬ 
nah  Oldham;  Jonathan,  born  June  22,  1683,  married 
Persis  Sheppard;  Samuel,  born  August  n,  1685;  and 
Margaret  born  August  13,  1689,  married  James  How. 

(III.)  Simon  Gates,  son  of  Simon  and  Margaret  Gates, 
was  born  January  5,  1676,  and  died  March  10,  1735. 
He  married  in  the  year  1710,  Sarah  Wood,  daughter 
of  John  and  Lydia  Wood,  of  Marlboro,  Massachusetts. 
They  settled  in  Marlboro,  where  she  died  in  1751.  Chil¬ 
dren:  1.  Simon,  born  December  11,  1710,  died  April  xi, 
1777;  married  Sarah  How.  2.  Sarah,  born  October  15. 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


121 


T712,  died  at  Hubbardston;  married,  February  3,  1736, 
Ephraim  Church,  of  Rutland.  3.  Susannah,  born  De¬ 
cember  19,  1714;  married  Captain  John  Phelps,  of  Rut¬ 
land.  4.  Stephen,  born  August  20,  1718,  died  October 

5,  1773;  married,  February  4,  1742-3,  Damaris  How, 
and  resided  at  Rutland.  5.  Solomon,  born  May  14,  1721, 
died  March  2,  1761,  at  Worcester;  married  Mary  Clark. 

6.  Samuel,  of  further  mention.  7.  Silas,  born  February 

3,  1727,  died  August  25,  1793;  married,  May  9,  1754, 
Elizabeth  Bragg.  8.  John,  born  January  27,  1729,  died 
young. 

(IV.)  Samuel  Gates,  son  of  Simon  and  Sarah  (Wood) 
Gates,  was  born  February  28,  1722,  and  died  at 
Petersham,  Massachusetts.  He  married  Caroline  How. 
Samuel  Gates  was  the  first  of  the  family  in  Petersham 
and  is  said  to  have  bought  lands  of  the  Indians  and  thus 
avoided  trouble  with  them.  He  had  his  grant  also  as 
proprietor  of  the  town,  and  part  of  the  original  home¬ 
stead  is  owned  and  occupied  by  Charles  W.  Gates,  a 
lineal  descendant,  having  remained  in  the  family  from 
the  first  settlement  with  the  exception  of  two  years. 
Samuel  Gates,  of  Rutland,  Massachusetts,  responded  to 
the  Lexington  alarm  and  served  six  days.  In  1777  he 
is  credited  with  service  as  a  private  in  Captain  Jon¬ 
athan  Gates’  company.  In  1778  Samuel  Gates  was  cor¬ 
poral  in  Captain  Harrington’s  company  and  in  Captain 
Munroe’s  Company  in  Rhode  Island.  Some  of  this 
service  may  belong  to  Samuel  Gates  of  Rutland,  whose 
son,  Samuel  Gates,  Jr.,  was  also  in  the  Revolution. 
Children:  1.  John,  of  further  mention.  2.  Solomon, 
born  October  4,  1761,  died  January  21,  1847;  married, 
June  6,  1789,  Esther  Whitney,  who  was  born  December 
10,  1769,  and  died  August  16,  1848.  He  was  a  soldier 
in  the  Revolution.  3.  Samuel,  born  in  1766,  at  Petersham, 
died  there  in  1 822.  He  married  Hannah  Dike  in  1789. 

4.  Susannah,  married,  September  8,  1788,  Samuel 

McNear,  and  had  one  child,  Lewis  McNear,  born  in 
1792,  and  died  in  1858.  5.  Polly,  born  October  30,  1773, 
died  March  20,  1848.  She  married,  October  22,  1795, 
Samuel  Henry,  of  Rutland.  6.  Caroline,  born  December 
25,  1774;  died  in  March,  1854.  She  married  Joel  Ballou, 
at  Petersham.  7.  Oliver  Cromwell,  born  1776,  at 
Petersham,  died  there  in  1841,  married  Mary  How,  No¬ 
vember  31,  1805,  who  was  born  in  1776,  and  died  in  1841. 

(V.)  John  Gates,  son  of  Samuel  and  Caroline  (How) 
Gates,  was  born  October  7,  1759,  at  Petersham,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  and  died  there  November  23,  1824.  He  mar¬ 
ried,  July  11,  1806,  Betsey  Gleason,  of  Barre  (intentions 
dated  June  1).  She  was  born  March  5,  1780,  daughter 
of  John  and  Ruth  (White)  Gleason,  who  were  married 
on  April  5,  1771,  at  Petersham;  she  died  at  Petersham 
October  8,  1835.  He  was  a  soldier  of  the  Revolution, 
a  private  in  Captain  Jonathan  Gates’  Company  from 
December  15,  1776,  to  March  1,  1777;  sergeant  in  the 
same  company,  serving  at  Saratoga  at  the  surrender  of 
Burgoyne;  in  1778  was  a  corporal  in  the  guard  at  Rut¬ 
land,  Major  Read,  commanding,  and  is  credited  with 
six  months’  service.  Children,  all  born  at  Petersham: 
1.  Samuel,  born  May  3,  1807,  died  there  February  17, 
1810.  2.  Charles,  of  further  mention.  3.  Samuel  Flint, 
born  in  1811,  died  July  23,  1812.  4.  Harriet,  born  Au¬ 
gust  18,  1813,  died  January  4,  1894;  married  (first) 
Thomas  E.  Winchester;  married  (second),  June  17, 
1856,  Joseph  W.  Upton.  5.  Elizabeth,  bom  March  3, 


1822,  died  March  8,  1882;  married,  September  10,  1850, 
P.  Ames  Fobes,  of  Oakham,  Massachusetts.  Their  son, 
Charles  Ames  Fobes,  was  born  May  12,  1859,  at  Marion, 
Iowa,  and  died  at  Kingston,  Jamaica,  March  11,  1905. 
He  and  his  parents  are  buried  in  the  West  Cemetery, 
Oakham,  Massachusetts.  A  bequest  in  his  will  gave 
$4,000  to  the  town  of  Petersham,  Massachusetts,  in 
memory  of  his  mother.  This  money  was  used  toward 
building  the  schoolhouse  in  the  centre  in  1906.  The 
same  amount  was  bequeathed  to  Oakham,  Massachusetts, 
in  memory  of  his  father,  for  a  public  library. 

(VI.)  Charles  Gates,  son  of  John  and  Betsey  (Glea¬ 
son)  Gates,  was  born  at  Petersham,  Massachusetts, 
November  5,  1808,  and  died  April  4,  1872.  He  was  edu¬ 
cated  in  the  public  schools  of  Petersham,  and  lived  on 
the  farm  inherited  from  his  father.  He  was  also  engaged 
for  many  years  in  the  palm  leaf  business.  At  first 
palm  leaf  hats  were  made  and  wagons  sent  with  the 
stock  to  farm  houses  in  all  the  surrounding  towns,  giv¬ 
ing  employment  to  hundreds  of  women  and  children  in 
their  homes.  Later  he  manufactured  shaker  hoods. 
The  “webs”  and  “binds”  for  the  hoods  were  woven 
and  knotched  braid  made  by  the  busy  fingers  of  the 
housewives,  then  taken  to  the  shop  at  Petersham,  where 
they  were  made  into  shaker  hoods.  The  finished  goods 
were  shipped  to  Boston  and  New  York.  The  palm  leaf 
was  bought  in  crude  form  and  was  split  and  dyed  by 
Mr.  Gates  in  his  shop.  He  was  an  expert  in  the  dyeing 
of  palm  leaf  and  did  considerable  business  in  dyeing 
for  other  manufacturers.  The  colors  most  in  vogue 
were  black  and  green,  Mr.  Gates  being  one  of  the  first 
to  color  palm  leaf  green  successfully.  The  business 
for  a  short  time  was  conducted  by  the  firm  of  Gates  & 
Tower,  but  mostly  under  his  own  name.  It  was  finan¬ 
cially  successful  and  was  conducted  from  1850  until 
1866.  From  1864  to  18 66  he  had  a  grocery  store  in 
Petersham.  In  1867  and  1868  he  had  a  hardware  store 
in  Athol,  conducted  under  the  firm  name  of  Charles 
Gates  &  Company.  The  firm  manufactured  tinware  of 
various  kinds,  and  sent  the  familiar  old  tin  peddler’s 
carts  about  the  country  selling  the  goods  in  exchange 
for  paper,  rags,  etc.  He  removed  the  tinware  business 
to  Petersham.  He  continued  all  the  time  to  live  on  the 
homestead  at  Petersham,  and  managed  it  in  addition  to 
his  other  business  interests. 

In  politics  Mr.  Gates  was  a  Whig  until  that  party 
went  to  pieces,  when  he  became  a  Republican.  Although 
interested  always  in  town  affairs,  he  preferred  not  to 
hold  office  himself.  He  was  on  the  School  Committee 
in  District  No.  4  for  some  years.  In  religion  he  was 
a  Universalist,  and  an  active  member  of  the  church. 
When  visiting  clergymen  came  to  Petersham,  they  were 
entertained  at  his  house,  and  the  visits  of  such  emi¬ 
nent  men  as  Rev.  Hosea  Ballou  and  Rev.  Sylvanus  Cobb 
are  still  remembered  by  the  older  citizens.  Mr.  Gates 
was  of  a  genial,  pleasant  disposition.  In  business  he 
was  strictly  honest  and  honorable,  and  was  shrewd  and 
successful  in  making  money,  but  too  generous  and  trust¬ 
ful  in  the  honor  of  others  to  save  his  money. 

He  married  (first)  Mercy  T.  White,  May  31,  1832, 
who  died  at  Petersham,  June  25,  1834,  aged  twenty-five 
years.  He  married  (second),  March  7,  1836,  Mary  Ann 
Tower,  who  was  born  August  11,  1812,  and  died  March 
28,  1895,  daughter  of  Jonas,  who  was  bom  March  8, 


122 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY! 


1768,  and  Fanny  (Parmenter)  Tower,  who  were  married 
February  16,  1792,  at  Petersham.  To  the  first  marriage 
one  child,  Alfred  White,  was  bom,  June  5,  1834,  died 
October  22,  1871,  at  East  Saginaw,  Michigan;  married 

Mary  Gleason,  of  Munson,  Massachusetts;  had  a  gen¬ 
eral  store  at  Belchertown,  Massachusetts;  later  in  the 
hotel  and  livery  stable  business  at  Enfield,  Massachu¬ 
setts;  afterward  at  East  Saginaw,  Michigan,  where  he 
conducted  a  large  livery  stable  and  stage  business.  Chil¬ 
dren  born  at  East  Saginaw :  Mildred,  born  August  28, 
1861,  married,  March  1,  1886,  Eugene  F.  Sanborn,  and 
resides  in  Los  Angeles,  California.  Charles  Alfred, 
born  October  6,  1868,  married,  June  15,  1892,  Edith  M. 
Van  Alstine,  of  West  Bay  City,  Michigan,  now  living 
in  Dallas,  Texas;  vice-president  of  the  Southwestern 
Telegraph  and  Telephone  Company.  Children  of  Charles 
and  Mary  Ann  (Tower)  Gates,  all  born  in  Petersham: 
1.  Marcia  Jane,  born  February  3,  1837,  married,  July  18, 
i860,  Edward  F.  Clark,  died  February  8,  1923,  while  on 
a  visit  to  Worcester.  2.  Mary  Josephine,  born  February 
22,  1839,  married,  December  19,  1865,  Sextus  P.  God¬ 
dard,  of  Petersham;  she  died  September  17,  1878,  at 
Petersham.  Children :  i.  Sextus  Elwin  Goddard,  born 
October  11,  1867,  died  at  Petersham,  March  9,  1876. 
ii.  Mary  Emily  Goddard,  born  March  3,  1869,  died  at 
Petersham,  September  24,  1869.  iii.  Malcolm  Rupert 
Goddard,  born  June  29,  1871,  died  January  19,  1873,  at 
Worcester,  iv.  Mabel  Josephine  Goddard,  born  May  I, 
1873,  at  Worcester,  v.  Alice  May  Goddard,  born  Janu¬ 
ary  20,  1875,  at  Petersham,  vi.  Willie  Goddard,  born 
July  7,  1877,  died  August  23,  1877.  3.  Ella  Frances, 
born  April  14,  1841,  died  February  20,  1871.  4.  John 
Tower,  born  September  20,  1843,  married,  September  20, 
1864,  Henrietta  E.  Buxton,  he  died  February  21,  1870. 
Children :  i.  Ernest,  born  April  9,  1866,  died  at  Peters¬ 
ham,  August  13,  1867.  ii.  Edith  M.,  born  October  2, 
1867,  at  Athol,  Massachusetts,  is  now  residing  at  West 
Boylston.  John  Tower  Gates  was  in  business  with  his 
father.  5.  Elizabeth  Louisa,  born  April  20,  1850,  died 
December  28,  1873.  6.  Charles  William,  of  further 
mention. 

(VII.)  Charles  William  Gates,  son  of  Charles  and 
Mary  Ann  (Tower)  Gates,  was  born  in  Petersham, 
Massachusetts,  October  20,  1855,  and  received  his  educa¬ 
tion  in  the  public  schools  of  his  native  town,  with  which 
his  ancestors  have  been  identified  for  the  past  four  gen¬ 
erations.  He  owns  and  occupies  the  Gates  farm,  known 
as  “The  Elms,”  in  the  east  part  of  Petersham,  and  has 
throughout  the  period  of  his  mature  life  taken  an  active 
interest  in  the  affairs  of  that  community.  The  high 
standards  of  citizenship  and  service  which  are  tradi¬ 
tional  in  the  Gates  family  have  been  most  faithfully 
maintained  by  Mr.  Gates.  He  was  one  of  the  coop¬ 
erators  in  the  project  which  resulted  in  the  building  of 
the  Petersham  Library,  and  though  never  an  active  figure, 
he  has  most  efficiently  and  faithfully  borne  his  share  of 
the  burden  of  public  office.  For  twenty-six  years  he 
has  served  as  Town  Tax  Collector,  his  first  appointment 
being  received  in  1890,  and  since  1904  he  has  held  that 
office  continuously.  In  1915  he  was  appointed  Town 
Treasurer,  which  important  office  he  has  continued  to 
hold  to  the  present  time.  Politically  he  gives  his  sup¬ 
port  to  the  principles  and  the  candidates  of  the  Repub¬ 
lican  party.  During  the  World  War  he  was  active 


in  raising  money  for  the  Red  Cross  and  for  the  success 
of  the  Liberty  Loan  drives,  and  there  have  been  few 
movements  for  progress  in  Petersham  during  the 
last  forty  years  in  which  Mr.  Gates  has  not  been  one 
of  the  supporters.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Grange  of 
Petersham,  which  he  has  served  both  as  assistant  stew¬ 
ard  and  as  steward,  and  he  is  also  a  member  of  the 
Petersham  Historical  Society.  He  is  an  attendant  of  the 
Orthodox  Congregational  Church,  which  organization 
he  has  served  for  many  years  as  treasurer  and  collector 
and  as  a  member  of  the  board  of  trustees. 

Charles  W.  Gates  married,  in  Worcester,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  December  12,  1901,  Sarah  E.  Buckminster,  of 
Worcester,  Massachusetts,  a  graduate  of  the  Mt.  Sinai 
Training  School  for  Nurses,  New  York  City,  and 
daughter  of  Miles  S.  and  Emily  E.  (Buxton)  Buck¬ 
minster,  the  latter  of  whom  was  born  in  South  Royal- 
ston,  March  12,  1840.  Miles  S.  Buckminster  was  born 
in  Roxbury,  New  Hampshire,  July  22,  1817,  and  was 
among  those  who  crossed  the  continent  in  1849  with 
the  hope  of  quickly  gaining  wealth  in  the  gold  fields.  In 
1855  he  settled  in  Keene,  New  Hampshire,  where  he 
lived  during  the  remainder  of  his  life  and  where  he  died 
March  24,  1887.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Charles  W.  Gates  have 
no  children. 

CHESTER  PAGE  PEARSON— With  the  acces¬ 
sion  of  dignity  which  came  to  Gardner,  Massachusetts, 
as  a  civic  center  on  January  1,  1923,  the  name  of  Chester 
Pag'e  Pearson  was  honored  by  the  people,  Mr.  Pearson 
having  been  elected  first  Mayor  of  the  city  of  Gardner. 
Mr.  Pearson  has  for  many  years  stood  among  the 
foremost  men  of  the  day  not  only  in  Gardner,  but  in 
other  cities  of  Massachusetts,  New  Hampshire,  and 
Vermont,  where  he  has  important  mercantile  interests. 

The  Pearson  family  has  long  been  established  in  Ver¬ 
mont,  and  Samuel  Howe  Pearson,  Mr.  Pearson’s  father, 
was  born  in  Albany,  Vermont,  later,  with  his  parents, 
going  to  Coventry,  Vermont,  where  he  was  a  prominent 
farmer  throughout  his  lifetime,  and  a  leading  figure  in 
local  political  affairs,  also  participating  in  the  legisla¬ 
tive  business  of  the  State  as  Representative  from  his 
district.  He  was  a  man  of  broad  interests  and  the  high¬ 
est  integrity,  esteemed  by  all  who  knew  him.  The 
mother,  Sarah  (Gray)  Pearson,  was  born  in  Coventry, 
Vermont,  and  both  are  now  deceased. 

Chester  Page  Pearson  was  born  at  Coventry,  Vermont, 
July  4,  1873.  His  education  was  begun  in  the  district 
schools  of  his  birthplace,  and  was  continued  at  Crafts- 
bury  Academy.  After  teaching  school  for  two  terms, 
he  entered  Becker’s  Business  College  of  Worcester, 
Massachusetts,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in  the 
class  of  1894.  His  early  business  experience  was  in  the 
capacity  of  clerk,  in  the  employ  of  the  New  York,  New 
Haven  &  Hartford  Railroad,  at  their  Worcester  freight 
office,  but  a  short  time  thereafter  he  became  cashier  for 
the  American  Telephone  &  Telegraph  Company,  at 
their  Worcester  office.  Mr.  Pearson  then  became  iden¬ 
tified  with  the  general  line  of  activity  in  which  he  has 
since  won  wide  renown  as  well  as  large  success — the 
dry  goods  business.  He  began  as  a  clerk  in  the  store 
of  Goodnow  Brothers  &  Company,  at  East  Jaffrey,  New 
Hampshire,  where  he  filled  this  subordinate  position  for 
four  years.  Then  on  August  2,  1899,  Mr.  Pearson  was 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


123 


received  into  partnership  with  Walter  L.  Goodnow,  of 
East  Jaffrey,  New  Hampshire,  and  Windsor  H.  Goodnow 
of  Keene,  New  Hampshire.  As  a  member  of  this  mercan¬ 
tile  organization  Mr.  Pearson  came  to  Gardner  to  es¬ 
tablish  a  store  in  this  community  before  the  close  of 
that  year.  He  founded  the  interest  on  a  small  scale, 
first  employing  only  one  clerk,  but  under  his  efficient 
and  progressive  management  has  developed  one  of  the 
largest  and  most  important  department  stores  of  any 
in  a  city  of  similar  size  in  the  State  of  Massachusetts. 
The  concern  now  employs  here  as  many  as  112  clerks, 
and  their  trade  is  drawn  from  many  of  the  surrounding 
towns  and  villages  as  well  as  from  the  city  of  Gardner 
itself.  The  Goodnow-Pearson  organization  has  widened 
and  grown,  becoming  established  in  several  other  New 
England  cities  and  towns,  until  now  Mr.  Pearson  is 
president  of  the  Goodnow-Pearson  Company,  of  Fitch¬ 
burg,  Massachusetts;  president  of  the  Goodnow-Pearson- 
Orton  Company  of  Athol,  Massachusetts ;  vice-president 
of  the  Goodnow-Hunt-Pearson  Company  of  Nashua, 
New  Hampshire;  vice-president  of  Goodnow-Hunt- 
Pearson,  Incorporated,  of  Laconia,  New  Hampshire; 
and  is  a  partner  of  Goodnow,  Pearson  &  Hunt  of 
Brattleboro,  Vermont;  also  Goodnow,  Jewett  &  Bishop 
of  Bellows  Falls,  Vermont.  All  the  above  organizations 
are  leading  department  stores  of  the  various  communities 
in  which  they  are  located,  and  Mr.  Pearson’s  associates 
in  these  enterprises  are  men  of  high  calibre,  progres¬ 
sive,  forward-looking  executives  who  are  bearing  a 
constructive  part  in  the  business  advance  of  the  day. 
Mr.  Pearson’s  interests  center  in  Gardner,  and  his  most 
recent  enterprise  is  the  floating  of  a  project  which  will 
mean  much  to  the  city  as  a  business  center.  This  is 
the  Gardner  Hotel  Company,  of  which  Mr.  Pearson  is 
president,  which  has  raised  $300,000  for  the  erection  of 
a  modern  hotel  in  this  city,  which  will  adequately  en¬ 
tertain  the  traveling  public  and  add  to  the  importance  of 
the  city  as  a  business  and  residential  center.  Mr.  Pear¬ 
son  is  a  member  of  the  board  of  directors  of  the  First 
National  Bank  of  Gardner,  and  also  of  the  Chairtown 
Cooperative  Bank. 

Holding  this  broad  significance  to  the  business  world 
of  Gardner,  it  was  but  natural  that  Mr.  Pearson  should 
be  brought  forward  into  public  service,  and  for  some 
years  he  has  been  a  member  of  the  Advisory  Board  of 
the  town  of  Gardner,  during  1920-21-22  serving  as  chair¬ 
man  of  the  board.  On  December  5,  1922,  Mr.  Pearson 
had  the  honor  of  being  chosen  as  chief  executive  of 
the  city  of  Gardner,  and  he  took  up  the  duties  of  this 
high  office  on  January  1,  1923,  when  the  new  form  of 
government  went  into  effect.  In  emerging  from  the 
comparative  obscurity  of  the  town  to  the  broader  re¬ 
sponsibilities  of  the  municipal  form  of  government,  the 
people  of  Gardner  took  a  step  which  they  looked  upon 
as  a  civic  duty,  and  in  their  choice  of  the  executive  who 
was  to  lead  them  out  into  the  untried  experience,  they 
turned  to  one  in  whom  they  felt  the  utmost  confidence. 
Few  men  of  Gardner  are  better  known  to  the  people — 
few  are  more  closely  in  touch  with  the  leaders  of  com¬ 
mercial  and  industrial  activity,  and  none  hold  more  fully 
the  confidence  and  esteem  of  all.  The  new  era  opened 
auspiciously,  and  with  the  cordial  cooperation  of  the 
people  Mr.  Pearson  is  going  forward  with  the  best  in¬ 
terests  of  the  municipality  at  heart,  its  ever  higher  stand¬ 


ing  among  the  cities  of  New  England  his  unfaltering 
purpose.  In  his  more  personal  interests  Mr.  Pearson  is 
broadly  in  touch  with  fraternal  affairs.  He  is  a  mem¬ 
ber  of  Hope  Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted  Masons  of  Gard¬ 
ner;  of  Gardner  Chapter,  Royal  Arch  Masons;  Ivan- 
hoe  Commandery,  No.  146,  Knights  Templar;  and 
Massachusetts  Consistory,  Ancient  Accepted  Scottish 
Rite  of  Boston;  also  of  Aleppo  Temple,  Ancient  Arabic 
Order  Nobles  of  the  Mystic  Shrine  of  Boston.  He  is 
a  member  of  Gardner  Lodge,  No.  1426,  Benevolent  and 
Protective  Order  of  Elks ;  and  William  Ellison  Lodge, 
No.  185,  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows.  Well 
known  socially,  he  is  a  member  of  the  Ridgely  Club  of 
Gardner,  is  president  of  the  Gardner  Boat  Club,  a  mem¬ 
ber  of  the  Gardner  Luncheon  Club,  and  of  the  Worces¬ 
ter  Country  Club  and  the  Oak  Hill  Country  Club  of 
Fitchburg.  In  benevolent  and  charitable  activities  he 
always  bears  a  part,  and  since  its  organization  has 
been  chairman  of  the  Home  Service  Committee  of  the 
Gardner  Red  Cross. 

Mr.  Pearson  married,  on  November  1,  1899,  Fanny 
Holmes  Kittredge,  of  East  Jaffrey,  New  Hampshire, 
and  they  have  three  children :  Alfred  Kittredge,  gradu¬ 
ate  of  Phillips-Andover  Academy,  now  in  his  soph¬ 
omore  year  at  Yale  University;  Norman  Holmes,  now 
in  the  seventh  grade  of  the  Gardner  public  schools;  and 
Eleanor,  in  the  fourth  grade. 


FREDERIC  CARLETON  NICHOLS— For  many 
generations  the  Nichols  family  has  exemplified  in  New 
England  that  type  of  energetic,  intelligent  citizenship 
that  leads  in  national  growth  and  progress.  This  re¬ 
view  considers  in  particular  a  son  of  the  eighth  gen¬ 
eration,  a  banker  of  Fitchburg,  the  city  of  his  birth,  and 
a  descendant  of  William  Nichols,  one  of  the  several  men 
of  the  name  who  came  to  New  England  and  New  Am¬ 
sterdam  in  the  first  half  of  the  seventeenth  century. 

(I.)  William  Nichols,  born  about  1599,  was  living  in 
Salem,  Massachusetts,  as  early  as  1637.  In  1651  he 
bought  land  in  Topsfield,  Massachusetts,  where  he  re¬ 
sided  until  his  passing  in  1695.  His  will  dated  Febru¬ 
ary  17,  1693,  made  provisions  for  his  wife,  Mary,  and 
children. 

(II.)  John  Nichols,  only  son  of  William  and  Mary 
Nichols,  was  born  about  1640  and  was  a  resident  of 
Topsfield  until  his  death  in  1700.  He  married  Lydia 
- ,  who  bore  him  nine  children. 

(III.)  Thomas  Nichols,  son  of  John  and  Lydia 
Nichols,  was  born  in  Topsfield,  January  20,  1669.  He 
married,  in  Salem,  December  13,  1694,  Joanna  Towne, 
born  January  22,  1677,  in  Topsfield,  daughter  of  Joseph 
and  Phebe  (Perkins)  Towne. 

(IV.)  Isaac  Nichols,  eldest  son  of  Thomas  and  Joanna 
(Towne)  Nichols,  settled  in  Sutton,  Massachusetts,  but 
no  record  of  his  death  is  there  found.  He  married,  in 
Boxford,  Massachusetts,  February  1,  1726,  Sarah  Wil¬ 
kins,  born  May  27,  1704,  in  Boxford,  who  survived  him 
until  April  9,  1779,  remaining  a  widow. 

(V.)  Henry  Nichols,  eldest  son  of  Isaac  and  Sarah 
(Wilkins)  Nichols,  was  born  at  Sutton,  Massachusetts, 
March  17,  1732,  and  died  in  Royalston,  Massachusetts, 
November  19,  1814.  He  married  (first),  September  22, 
1757,  in  Sutton,  Elizabeth  Towne,  born  May  13,  1704, 


124 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


died  September  n,  1781,  daughter  of  John  and  Mercy 
(Towne)  Towne. 

(VI.)  Elijah  Nichols,  fifth  son  of  Henry  and  Eliz¬ 
abeth  (Towne)  Nichols,  was  born  in  Royalston,  July 
25,  1770,  and  there  died  May  2,  1856.  He  married 
(first),  October  16,  1827,  Asenath  (Wilder)  Fairbanks, 
born  in  1785,  died  August  19,  1847,  a  daughter  of 
Reuben*  and  Mary  (Pierce)  Wilder,  and  widow  of  Jon¬ 
athan  Fairbanks. 

(VII.)  Joseph  Towne  Nichols,  second  son  of  Elijah 
and  Asenath  (Wilder-Fairbanks)  Nichols,  was  born 
in  Royalston,  Massachusetts,  February  8,  1832,  and  there 
died  May  20,  1915.  He  spent  his  boyhood  at  the  home 
farm  then,  at  the  age  of  eighteen  years,  spent  four 
years  in  Albany,  New  York,  returning  to  Royalston, 
where,  in  1861,  he  enlisted  in  Company  I,  25th  Regiment, 
Massachusetts  Volunteer  Infantry,  for  service  in  the 
Union  Army.  He  served  three  years  under  this  en¬ 
listment  then  was  transferred  to  Company  H,  55th  Reg¬ 
iment,  was  commissioned  first  lieutenant  and  continued 
with  that  command  until  the  war  closed  in  1865.  He 
then  returned  to  Royalston  and  for  three  years  drove 
a  stage,  carrying  mail,  express,  and  passengers  between 
Royalston  Center  and  South  Royalston.  He  sold  that 
business  and  located  in  Fitchburg,  Massachusetts,  where, 
under  M.  W.  Cummings,  he  learned  the  undertaker’s 
trade  and  business.  For  a  third  of  a  century  he  served 
Royalston  as  undertaker,  and  to  his  work  brought  a 
tender,  heartfelt  sympathy  and  kindly  consideration  that 
earned  him  the  respect  and  gratitude  of  his  townspeople. 

In  connection  with  his  undertaking  he  engaged  in 
farming  and  served  the  town  for  ten  years  as  Selectman, 
holding  also  in  turn  about  every  office  in  the  town.  He 
was  a  good  business  man,  an  efficient  town  official,  his 
judgment  and  his  executive  ability  earning  him  public 
favor.  Joseph  T.  Nichols  married,  April  7,  1858, 
Martha  G.  Turner,  born  May  19,  1836,  in  Phillipston, 
Massachusetts,  daughter  of  Leonard  R.  and  Mary 
(Pierce)  Turner.  Children:  Leonard,  born  April  17, 
1869;  Mary  L.,  married  S.  Weston  Wheeler;  Frederic 
Carleton,  of  whom  further;  and  Agnes  A.,  married  Cor¬ 
nelius  Quinlan. 

(VIII.)  Frederic  Carleton  Nichols,  second  son  of  Jo¬ 
seph  Towne  and  Martha  G.  (Turner)  Nichols,  was  born 
in  Fitchburg,  Massachusetts,  December  27,  1873,  and 
there  completed  his  education  in  the  public  schools.  As  a 
boy  he  served  as  page  to  the  Massachusetts  Legislature 
in  1891,  1892,  and  1893,  entering  the  employ  of  the  Fitch¬ 
burg  National  Bank  in  1893.  He  continued  with  that 
bank  for  three  years,  but  in  1895  transferred  his  al¬ 
legiance  to  the  Fitchburg  Savings  Bank,  an  institution 
with  which  he  has  now  been  connected  for  twenty-eight 
years,  1895-1923.  He  now  holds  the  office  of  treasurer, 
to  which  he  was  elected  in  1906,  after  two  years  of  special 
preparation  as  assistant  treasurer.  He  is  the  executive 
officer  of  the  Savings  Bank,  director  of  the  Fitchburg 
Bank  and  Trust  Company,  and  member  of  the  execu¬ 
tive  committee  of  the  board,  also  a  director  and  member 
of  the  executive  committee  of  the  Fitchburg  Mutual 
Fire  Insurance  Company  and  of  the  Grant  Yarn  Com¬ 
pany.  He  is  a  trustee  of  the  Fitchburg  Home  for  Old 
Ladies,  and  chairman  of  its  finance  committee. 

For.  two  years  Mr.  Nichols  was  president  of  the 
Massachusetts  Savings  Bank  Treasurers’  Club,  for  four 


years  was  treasurer  of  the  Massachusetts  Bankers’  As¬ 
sociation,  and  he  is  an  ex-president  of  the  Fitchburg 
Chamber  of  Commerce.  He  has  been  a  member  of  the 
city  government  of  Fitchburg,  and  for  three  years  rep¬ 
resented  Fitchburg  in  the  Massachusetts  House  of  Rep¬ 
resentatives.  He  is  a  member  of  Charles  W.  Moore 
Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted  Masons;  Thomas  Chapter, 
Royal  Arch  Masons;  Jerusalem  Commandery,  Knights 
Templar  (now,  1923,  serving  as  Generalissimo)  ;  Apollo 
Lodge,  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows ;  Fitchburg 
Lodge,  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks  (Past 
Exalted  Ruler)  ;  former  president  of  the  Fitchburg 
Family  Welfare  Association;  a  member  of  the  Fay  Club, 
of  Fitchburg;  and  the  Algonquin  Club,  and  Boston  Ath¬ 
letic  Association,  of  Boston;  the  First  Parish  Unitarian 
Church,  of  Fitchburg,  and  the  Fitchburg  Young  Men’s 
Christian  Association. 

Frederic  Carleton  Nichols  married,  in  Plainfield,  New 
Jersey,  October  5,  1899,  Ethel  Holmes,  born  at  Amelia 
Court  House,  Virginia,  daughter  of  Augustus  D.  and 
Plannah  M.  (Perry)  Holmes.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Nichols 
are  the  parents  of  two  children :  Anna  Holmes,  born 
October  24,  1907;  and  Louise,  born  March  29,  1913.  The 
family  home  is  in  Fitchburg. 


ARTHUR  JOHN  BERRY — For  several  years  now 
Arthur  John  Berry,  president  of  the  Lee  Brothers  Com¬ 
pany,  has  been  one  of  the  well-known  and  successful 
business  men  of  Athol,  Massachusetts.  He  has  been 
identified  with  the  business  of  manufacturing  needles 
since  the  beginning  of  his  active  career,  and  is  recog¬ 
nized  as  an  expert  in  that  line  of  business  activity. 

Mr.  Berry  is  of  English  ancestry,  his  grandfather 
having  been  a  manufacturer  of  various  fancy  articles  in 
England,  who  made  a  specialty  of  fancy  snuff  boxes. 
On  one  occasion  he  presented  one  of  his  very  finest  de¬ 
signs  of  that  article  to  the  Lord  Mayor  of  London. 

John  Berry,  father  of  Arthur  John  Berry,  was  bom 
in  Manchester,  England,  and  as  a  boy  of  ten  years  ac¬ 
companied  his  parents  on  the  long  six  weeks’  voyage  in 
a  sailing  vessel  to  this  country.  He  became  a  manu¬ 
facturer  of  skates,  and  was  the  inventor  of  the  skates 
known  as  the  Barney  &  Berry  skates.  Later  he  became 
superintendent  of  the  National  Needle  Company,  at 
Springfield,  Massachusetts.  He  married  Ellen  Sullivan, 
of  Boston,  Massachusetts,  and  later  became  a  resident 
of  Springfield. 

Arthur  John  Berry  was  born  in  Springfield,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  June  15,  1868.  He  received  his  education  in 
the  public  schools  of  his  native  city,  where  he  graduated 
from  the  high  school  in  1886.  He  then  found  his  first 
employment  with  the  National  Needle  Company,  for 
whom  his  father  was  serving  as  superintendent,  and 
that  connection  was  maintained  for  a  period  of  eleven 
years.  At  the  end  of  that  time  he  removed  to  Orange, 
Massachusetts,  where  he  organized  and  equipped  a  needle 
factory  for  the  New  Home  Sewing  Machine  Company, 
and  where  he  remained  as  superintendent  of  the  factory 
for  eighteen  years.  He  then  made  a  change,  at  the 
urgent  solicitation  of  his  brother-in-law,  W.  Starr  Lee, 
and  went  to  Athol,  Massachusetts,  to  assist  in  the  busi¬ 
ness  of  the  Lee  Brothers  Company,  manufacturers  of 
shoes.  He  soon  became  president  of  that  concern,  Mr. 
Lee  acting  as  business  manager  and  treasurer,  but 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


125 


shortly  after  his  arrival  in  Athol  Mr.  Lee  died.  Mr. 
Berry  has  continued  to  be  the  efficient  chief  executive 
of  the  concern  however,  to  the  present  time.  He  is  a 
member  of  the  board  of  directors  of  the  Athol  National 
Bank,  and  is  well  known  among  the  business  men  of  that 
city  as  a  conservative  and  able  business  man.  Mr.  Berry 
gives  his  support  to  the  principles  of  the  Republican 
party,  but  generally  takes  no  active  part  in  political 
affairs.  He  did,  howrever,  serve  on  the  City  Board  of 
Trade  for  a  time.  At  the  time  of  the  Spanish-American 
War  he  enlisted  for  service  and  was  made  first  sergeant 
of  Company  K,  2nd  Massachusetts  Regiment,  United 
States  Volunteers,  the  first  company  of  Massachusetts 
to  be  mustered  in  for  service  in  that  conflict.  During 
the  World  War  he  served  actively  in  the  work  of  the 
Red  Cross,  and  on  the  Liberty  Loan  Committee.  He 
was  treasurer  of  the  finance  committee  of  the  local 
chapter  of  the  Red  Cross,  and  was  influential  in  the 
success  of  several  of  the  campaigns  for  funds.  Fra¬ 
ternally  he  is  a  member  of  Orange  Lodge,  Free  and  Ac¬ 
cepted  Masons,  of  Orange,  Massachusetts;  Crescent 
Chapter,  Royal  Arch  Masons ;  Orange  Commandery, 
No.  45,  Knights  Templar;  Harris  Council,  Royal  and 
Select  Masters;  and  Aleppo  Temple,  Mystic  Shrine. 
He  has  also  been  a  member  of  the  Improved  Order 
of  Red  Men,  is  a  member  of  the  Paquaig  Club,  of  Athol, 
Massachusetts ;  the  Past  Commanders’  Association,  of 
Boston,  Massachusetts ;  and  Athena  Chapter,  Order  of 
Eastern  Star.  He  has  served  for  a  number  of  years  on 
the  executive  board  of  Camp  Chenego  Association,  and 
is  a  member  of  the  board  of  trustees  of  the  Athol  Pub¬ 
lic  Library.  His  religious  affiliation  is  with  the  Uni¬ 
tarian  church. 

Arthur  John  Berry  married,  on  June  26,  1909,  at  Athol, 
Massachusetts,  Marion  Howe  Lee,  daughter  of  Charles 
Milton  and  Minnie  (Howe)  Lee,  the  father  was  a  native 
of  Athol,  Massachusetts,  and  the  mother  of  Post  Mills, 
Vermont.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Arthur  John  Berry  are  the 
parents  of  one  son,  Arthur  Lee,  who  was  born  May  6, 
1910,  and  is  now  a  student  in  the  public  schools  of 
Athol, 

EVERETT  W.  COATES,  M.  D.,  in  professional 
circles  in  Northern  Worcester  County,  Massachusetts, 
holds  a  noteworthy  position  and  is  broadly  represen¬ 
tative  of  present  day  advance  in  medicine.  He  is  a  son 
of  Wallace  Bruce  and  Alice  (Walton)  Coates,  his  father 
active  in  the  shoe  industry. 

Everett  W.  Coates  was  born  at  Lynn,  Massachusetts, 
in  April,  1886.  His  education  was  begun  in  the  public 
schools  of  his  birthplace  and  following  his  course  at  the 
Lynn  Classical  High  School,  he  entered  the  employ  of 
the  First  National  Bank,  afterwards  the  Essex  Trust 
Company.  Here  he  remained  for  about  three  and  one- 
half  years,  then  worked  for  a  banking  house  in  Boston 
for  a  while,  and  later  was  associated  with  a  business  con¬ 
cern  in  Maine.  After  this  experience  he  decided  to  study 
medicine,  and  entered  the  Boston  University  of  Med¬ 
icine,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in  the  class  of  1912 
with  the  degree  of  Doctor  of  Medicine.  Plis  interneship 
was  spent  in  three  different  institutions,  the  Massachu- 
sets  Homeopathic  Hospital,  of  Boston;  the  Westboro 
State  Hospital,  at  Westboro,  Massachusetts;  and  the 
Trull  Hospital,  of  Biddeford,  Maine.  With  this  widely 


comprehensive  preparation  Dr.  Coates  entered  up  his 
professional  career,  taking  up  the  practice  of  medicine 
in  Farmington,  New  Hampshire,  where  he  was  active 
for  four  years.  Here  he  established  his  own  private 
hospital  and  conducted  it  for  three  years,  and  there¬ 
after  he  was  engaged  in  practice  in  Concord,  New 
Hampshire,  for  one  year,  when  his  progress  was  inter¬ 
rupted  by  his  military  service.  He  enlisted  in  the  United 
States  Medical  Corps  on  July  10,  1918,  and  received  his 
commission  as  first  lieutenant.  Stationed  immediately 
at  Fort  Oglethorpe,  Georgia,  he  was  soon  assigned  to 
Base  Hospital  No.  133,  Overseas  Unit,  later  being  trans¬ 
ferred  to  Camp  Sheridan,  at  Montgomery,  Alabama,  and 
he  was  thence  ordered  to  proceed  to  Hoboken  for  em¬ 
barkation  overseas.  Before  the  date  of  sailing  arrived 
the  armistice  was  signed  and  Dr.  Coates  remained  on 
this  side  with  his  unit  and  received  his  honorable  dis¬ 
charge  from  the  service  on  December  10,  1918.  Coming 
to  Fitchburg  a  short  time  afterward,  Dr.  Coates  opened 
his  office  in  this  city  on  January  6,  1919,  and  has  con¬ 
tinued  in  general  practice  here  since.  He  is  winning 
recognition  also  in  surgery,  and  is  considered  one  of  the 
thoroughly  successful  professional  men  of  the  city.  He 
is  a  member  of  the  American  Institute  of  Homeopathy, 
the  Massachusetts  Homeopathic  Medical  Society,  the 
York  and  Cumberland  (Maine)  Medical  societies,  the 
Massachusetts  Medical  Society,  Worcester  North  Med¬ 
ical  Society,  and  the  Fitchburg  Medical  Society.  Fie 
Is  also  a  member  of  the  Alpha  Sigma,  now  the  Phi 
Chi  fraternity.  Dr.  Coates  is  affiliated  fraternally  with 
the  Aurora  Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted  Masons,  of  Fitch¬ 
burg;  Thomas  Chapter,  Royal  Arch  Masons;  Harris 
Council,  Royal  and  Select  Masters,  of  Athol,  Massachu¬ 
setts;  and  Jerusalem  Commandery,  Knights  Templar, 
of  Fitchburg;  also  Aleppo  Temple,  Ancient  Arabic 
Order  Nobles  of  the  Mystic  Shrine,  of  Boston.  Fie 
helped  to  organize  the  Kiwanis  Club,  of  Fitchburg,  of 
which  he  is  a  director,  and  is  broadly  interested  in  all 
that  counts  for  local  advance  in  the  civic  life  of  the 
community. 

Dr.  Coates  married,  on  October  23,  1913,  Grace  E. 
Robbins,  of  Ashby,  Massachusetts,  daughter  of  Fred  E. 
and  Julia  E.  (Fletcher)  Robbins.  Mrs.  Coates  is  a 
graduate  nurse  of  the  Massachusetts  Homeopathic  Hos¬ 
pital,  of  Boston,  Massachusetts,  and  served  as  assistant 
superintendent  and  later  as  superintendent  of  the  Buf¬ 
falo,  New  York,  Homeopathic  Hospital. 


EDWARD  S.  STROUT— The  State  of  Maine  has 
given  to  the  world  many  men  of  vigorous  spirit  and  con¬ 
structive  ability  whose  lives  have  been  full  of  usefulness, 
and  one  of  these  men  is  Edward  S.  Strout,  who  for  the 
past  fifteen  years  has  been  associated  with  the  Fiske- 
Carter  Construction  Company,  of  Worcester,  Massa¬ 
chusetts.  Reared  in  the  atmosphere  of  the  lumber  in¬ 
dustry,  it  was  perhaps  but  natural  that  Mr.  Strout 
should  have  chosen  the  field  of  construction  for  the 
scene  of  his  life  work.  Certain  it  is  that  his  activities 
in  the  Worcester  district  are  contributing  in  a  marked 
degree  to  the  general  welfare.  He  is  a  son  of  Willis 
C.  Strout,  who  was  born  at  Alexander,  Maine,  and  was 
active  in  lumbering  and  farming  enterprises.  He  now 
lives  retired  at  Grafton,  Massachusetts.  The  mother, 


126 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


Almira  (Towers)  Strout,  was  born  at  Milltown,  New 
Brunswick,  Canada,  and  is  also  still  living. 

Edward  S.  Strout  was  born  at  Alexander,  Maine, 
at  the  family  homestead,  September  7,  1879.  After 
completing  his  studies  in  the  public  schools  of  Alex¬ 
ander,  Baring,  and  Calais,  Maine,  he  became  identified 
with  construction  work  in  Worcester,  Massachusetts, 
where  he  has  remained  permanently.  In  1908  Mr.  Strout 
became  identified  with  his  present  associates  in  the  or¬ 
ganization  of  the  Fiske-Carter  Construction  Company, 
the  incorporators  of  this  concern  being  as  follows :  Bur¬ 
ton  C.  Fiske,  president;  William  W.  Carter,  treasurer; 
Edward  S.  Strout,  secretary  and  assistant  treasurer. 
With  offices  at  No.  11  Foster  Street,  this  concern  handles 
general  construction  work  of  all  kinds.  Their  work  is 
not  confined  to  this  locality  by  any  means,  but  extends 
throughout  the  New  England  States,  and  with  two 
branch  offices  in  the  South,  they  go  throughout  the 
Southern  States  east  of  the  Mississippi  River.  They 
have  done  much  important  work  of  lasting  significance 
to  the  people,  and  to  the  sections  in  which  they  have  been 
active.  The  young  men  of  this  organization  are  still  in 
the  prime  of  life,  progressive,  forward-looking  men  of 
the  day,  and  this  enterprise  is  understood  to  be  the 
most  important  in  its  field  now  centered  in  Worcester. 
The  company  specializes  in  building  construction,  and 
among  the  contracts  which  they  have  carried  out  may 
be  mentioned  the  Pacolet  Manufacturing  Company  of 
Pacolet,  South  Carolina,  and  New  Holland,  Georgia. 
In  these  two  places  villages  were  constructed,  including 
the  erection  of  houses,  installation  of  sewers,  water  sys¬ 
tem,  etc.  Similar  work  has  been  done  for  the  Wood- 
side  Cotton  Mills,  of  Greenville,  South  Carolina.  Mr. 
Strout  is  a  member  of  the  Worcester  Chamber  of  Com¬ 
merce,  and  fraternally  holds  membership  in  Quinsiga- 
mond  Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted  Masons;  Eureka  Chap¬ 
ter,  Royal  Arch  Masons;  and  the  Independent  Order  of 
Odd  Fellows.  He  is  a  well-known  member  of  the 
Worcester  Automobile  Club. 

Mr.  Strout  married,  in  1910,  Emily  Ashworth,  who 
was  born  in  Rochdale,  Massachusetts. 


JOHN  LOVELL  (J.  LOVELL)  JOHNSON— 

There  may  be  men  living  who  have  never  heard  of  the 
Iver  Johnson  firearms,  nor  the  Iver  Johnson  bicycle, 
but  where  would  one  go  to  find  them  ?  At  the  head  of  the 
great  works  and  company  manufacturing  and  marketing 
these  products  of  the  inventive  genius  and  mechanical 
skill  of  his  father,  Iver  Johnson,  who  has  passed  away 
but  lives  in  the  memory  of  the  men  of  the  great  plant 
at  Fitchburg,  stands  John  Lovell  Johnson,  manufac¬ 
turer,  business  man,  and  eminent  citizen.  He  has  gained 
his  entire  business  experience  with  the  manufacture  and 
sale  of  the  products  of  the  Iver  Johnson’s  Arms  &  Cycle 
Works,  Fitchburg,  Massachusetts,  having  other  interests, 
but  all  subordinate  in  his  life  to  the  great  interests 
whose  destinies  he  guides  as  chief  executive. 

Iver  Johnson,  the  founder,  was  a  son  of  John  John¬ 
son,  a  farmer  of  Nordfjord,  Norway,  the  farm  on 
which  he  was  born  was  a  family  possession  for  cen¬ 
turies.  Iver  Johnson  was  born  at  the  old  homestead  in 
Norway,  February  14,  1841,  died  at  his  home  in  Fitch¬ 
burg,  Massachusetts,  August  3,  1895,  and  was  buried 
at  Worcester.  At  the  age  of  sixteen,  he  began  an  ap¬ 


prenticeship  at  gunmaking  in  Bergen,  Norway,  serving 
five  years  until  1862,  then  for  a  year  worked  as  a 
journeyman  gunmaker  in  Christiana,  Norway.  In  1863 
he  came  to  the  United  States  and  settled  at  Worcester, 
Massachusetts,  where  for  eight  years  he  was  employed  in 
gunmaking  shops.  In  1871  he  entered  into  partnership 
with  Martin  Bye,  and  as  Johnson  &  Bye  they  started  in 
a  single  room  in  a  Church  Street  building,  a  gun  shop 
from  which  grew  the  great  Iver  Johnson’s  Arms  &  Cycle 
Works,  of  Worcester,  now  of  Fitchburg,  and  The  Iver 
Johnson  Sporting  Goods  Company,  of  Boston,  Wor¬ 
cester,  and  Fitchburg. 

Two  years  after  the  founding  of  Johnson  &  Bye  the 
business  of  the  firm  had  outgrown  the  single  room,  and 
two  rooms  were  rented  in  the  Armsby  Building,  on  Cen¬ 
tral  Street.  There  fifty  hands  were  employed,  and  two 
years  later  the  firm  bought  the  building,  and  by  1881 
were  using  its  entire  floor  space  for  their  own  purposes. 
In  1883  Iver  Johnson  bought  his  partner’s  interest  and 
thereafter  conducted  the  business  under  the  firm  name, 
Iver  Johnson  &  Company.  To  the  finest  mechanical  skill 
as  a  gunmaker,  Iver  Johnson  added  fertile  inventive 
genius,  and  he  devised  patterns  for  bicycles  and  small 
arms  which  he  fully  protected  with  patents.  In  his  own 
plant  he  used  the  best  and  most  modern  machinery  and 
was  constantly  devising  new  machines  and  implements. 
Within  a  few  years  he  was  shipping  goods  all  over  the 
United  States,  and  agencies  were  established  in  Canada 
and  Mexico. 

In  1885  the  Iver  Johnson  bicycle  was  placed  on  the 
market,  and  soon  1,000  bicycles  of  that  pattern  were  being 
made  annually,  and  in  five  years  1 5,000  was  the  annual 
output.  More  factory  space  than  he  could  secure  at  his 
Worcester  plant  caused  Mr.  Johnson  to  purchase  the  Fitch¬ 
burg  plant  of  the  Walter  Hey  wood  Chair  Manufacturing 
Company  plant,  and  there  with  additions  and  new  buildings 
he  conducted  one  of  the  largest  industrial  plants  in  the 
city  of  Fitchburg.  After  moving  his  factory  to  Fitch¬ 
burg,  Iver  Johnson  retained  his  home  at  Worcester  until 
his  later  years,  when  he  moved  to  Fitchburg  to  be  near 
his  factory.  He  built  up  a  tremendous  demand  for  Iver 
Johnson  firearms  and  bicycles,  and  lived  fully  up  to  his 
business  slogan,  “Honest  goods  at  honest  prices.”  His 
sons  became  associated  with  him  in  the  business,  and 
when  their  honored  father  passed  away  they  succeeded 
him,  and  an  uninterrupted  growth  and  prosperity  has 
attended  them. 

Iver  Johnson,  while  a  resident  in  Worcester,  was  a  di¬ 
rector  of  the  Sovereign’s  Cooperative  Store,  and  of 
three  cooperative  banks.  For  many  years  he  was  presi¬ 
dent  of  the  Equity  Cooperative  Bank,  and  vice-president 
of  the  Home  Cooperative  Bank.  He  was  a  trustee  of 
the  Fitchburg  Savings  Bank,  director  of  the  Fitchburg 
National  Bank,  and  of  the  Fidelity  Cooperative  Bank 
of  Fitchburg.  He  toured  Europe  in  1884,  visiting  his 
native  land  and  many  manufacturing  centers.  He  was 
a  Republican  in  politics,  a  member  of  lodge,  chapter, 
commandery,  and  consistory  of  the  Masonic  order,  hold¬ 
ing  the  thirty-second  degree;  was  a  noble  of  the  Mystic 
Shrine,  and  most  charitable  and  philanthropic. 

Iver  Johnson  married,  April  9,  1868,  Mary  Elizabeth 
Speirs,  daughter  of  John  and  Janet  (Adams)  Speirs, 
of  Norwich,  Connecticut.  To  them  were  born  five  chil¬ 
dren :  Janet  Bright,  who  died  young;  Frederick  Iver, 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


127 


John  Lovell,  of  further  mention;  Walter  Olaf,  and  a 
daughter,  Mary  L.  Otto. 

John  Lovell  Johnson,  son  of  Iver  and  Mary  Eliza¬ 
beth  (Speirs)  Johnson,  was  born  in  Worcester,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  June  26,  1876.  He  was  educated  in  the  public 
schools  of  Worcester  and  Fitchburg,  grammar  and  high, 
and  in  Worcester  Polytechnic  Institute.  Upon  finishing 
school  he  entered  the  Iver  Johnson  plant,  in  1896,  and  is 
now  (1923)  president  of  the  Iver  Johnson’s  Arms  & 
Cycle  Works,  of  Fitchburg;  president  of  the  Iver  John¬ 
son  Sporting  Goods  Company,  of  Boston,  Worcester, 
and  Fitchburg;  and  of  the  Johnsonia  Company,  Incor¬ 
porated,  of  Fitchburg.  The  Iver  Johnson’s  Arms  & 
Cycle  Works  now  comprise  five  brick  buildings  and 
several  wooden  ones,  with  a  floor  space  of  about  200,000 
feet,  equipped  with  all  modem  machinery  and  appli¬ 
ances.  Large  wholesale  depots  are  maintained  in  New 
York,  San  Francisco,  and  Chicago,  and  with  branches 
in  England  and  Australia,  practically  the  whole  world 
is  covered.  Expert  and  skilled  mechanics  and  metallur¬ 
gists  are  employed,  and  laboratories  test  all  materials 
chemically  and  mechanically.  Iver  Johnson  arms  and 
bicycles  have  world-wide  reputation,  and  it  is  claimed 
that  the  output  of  small  firearms  and  shotguns  from  the 
Iver  Johnson  Works  is  greater  than  of  all  other  small 
firearms  manufactured  in  the  country.  J.  Lovell  John¬ 
son  has  given  his  entire  business  life  to  the  business  of 
which  he  is  the  capable  head,  and  is  complete  master  of 
its  every  important  detail. 

Mr.  Johnson’s  other  business  interests  are  entirely 
financial,  he  being  vice-president  and  director  of  he 
Fitchburg  Bank  &  Trost  Company,  vice-president  and 
director  of  the  Fitchburg  Mutual  Fire  Insurance  Com¬ 
pany,  trustee  and  member  of  the  board  of  investment  of 
the  Fitchburg  Savings  Bank,  all  of  Fitchburg;  director 
of  the  Merchants’  National  Bank,  of  Boston;  Mer¬ 
chants’  National  Bank  of  Worcester;  Clinton  Trust 
Company  of  Clinton;  Boston  Casualty  Company  of 
Boston;  and  Fitchburg  Cooperative  Bank. 

In  politics  Mr.  Johnson  is  a  Republican,  and  has  long 
been  active  in  public  life  and  in  party  councils.  He  has 
served  as  chairman  of  the  Republican  City  Committee 
of  Fitchburg,  and  as  treasurer  of  the  Republican  State 
Central  Committee  of  the  State  of  Massachusetts.  In 
1916  he  was  a  delegate  to  the  National  Republican  Con¬ 
vention  that  nominated  Charles  E.  Hughes  for  Presi¬ 
dent,  and  is  one  of  the  influential  men  of  his  party.  In 
1901  he  was  elected  a  member  of  the  Fitchburg  Board  of 
Aldermen,  serving  three  years,  and  as  president  of  the 
board  during  the  last  two  years  of  his  term.  In  1907  he 
was  chosen  State  Senator  for  two  years,  and  during 
1909-10,  he  was  State  Councillor  for  the  Seventh  Dis- 
rict.  In  religious  faith  he  is  an  Episcopalian.  In  the 
Masonic  order  Mr.  Johnson  is  Past  Master  of  Charles 
W.  Moore  Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted  Masons;  is  a:  com¬ 
panion  of  the  Royal  Arch ;  a  Knight  Templar,  and  a 
thirty-second  degree  member  of  the  Ancient  Accepted 
Scottish  Rite.  He  is  a  Noble  of  the  Mystic  Shrine,  a 
Past  Exalted  Ruler  of  the  Benevolent  and  Protective 
Order  of  Elks,  and  a  member  of  the  Ancient  and  Hon¬ 
orable  Artillery  Company,  His  clubs  are :  The  Algon¬ 
quin,  Boston  Athletic,  and  Boston  City,  of  Boston ; 
Worcester  and  Tatassit,  of  Worcester;  Fay,  Oak  Hill 
Country,  and  Sportsman’s,  of  Fitchburg. 


REV.  STANISLAUS  JOSEPH  CHLAPOWSKI— 

The  life  of  Father  Chlapowski  has  been  so  closely 
interwoven  with  the  history  of  the  city  of  Gardner  in 
recent  years  that  it  is  peculiarly  fitting  to  inscribe  the 
record  of  his  work  in  the  permanent  annals  of  Worcester 
County.  His  broad  vision  of  life  and  his  utter  sur¬ 
render  of  himself  to  the  service  of  God  and  humanity 
form  a  chapter  of  deep  interest  to  the  people.  A  na¬ 
tive  of  Poland,  Father  Chlapowski  is  a  son  of  Joseph 
and  Elizabeth  (Rydlewicz)  Chlapowski,  who  came  to  the 
United  States  in  the  middle  eighties,  locating  in 
Webster,  Massachusetts.  They  are  still  living  in  that 
community,  the  father  having  been  active  as  a  farmer 
for  many  years. 

Rev.  Stanislaus  Joseph  Chlapowski  was  born  in  Poland 
August  21,  1883,  and  was  only  a  little  child  when  he  came 
with  his  parents  to  Webster,  Massachusetts.  He  re¬ 
ceived  his  early  education  in  the  parochial  schools  of 
Webster,  attending  evening  school  as  well  as  day  ses¬ 
sions,  then  later  entered  SS.  Cyrillious  and  Methodius 
College  and  Seminary,  at  Detroit,  Michigan,  where  he 
covered  a  five  years,  classical  course,  graduating  magnet 
cum  laude  in  1908.  Later  going  to  Montreal,  Quebec, 
Canada,  he  spent  two  years  in  the  study  of  philosophy, 
then  entered  the  Grand  Seminary,  where  in  three  years 
and  a  half  he  completed  his  theological  studies.  On  De¬ 
cember  20,  1913,  he  was  ordained  to  the  holy  priest¬ 
hood  at  St.  James’  Cathedral,  in  Montreal,  by  the  Rt. 
Rev.  Archbishop  Paul  Bruchesi,  D.  D.  Following  his 
ordination  Father  Chlapowksi  returned  to  Webster, 
Massachusetts,  where  he  assisted  in  the  services  of  St. 
Joseph’s  Roman  Catholic  Church  for  about  three  months. 
He  was  then  appointed  to  the  Three  Rivers  (Palmer, 
Massachusetts)  Church  as  assistant  priest,  and  served 
for  about  eight  months,  after  which  he  was  appointed 
pastor  of  St.  Joseph’s  Church,  of  Gardner.  He  took  up 
his  duties  here  on  November  22,  1914,  and  has  led  his 
people  forward  through  the  trying  years  which  have 
since  intervened,  winning  their  sincere  affection  by  his 
self-sacrifice  and  devotion.  Father  Chlapowski  has  not 
only  revealed  himself  as  a  highly  exemplary  spiritual 
leader  of  his  flock,  but  has  lived  before  the  world  such 
a  truly  Christ-like  life  that  all  who  know  him  have 
learned  to  love  and  revere  him.  During  the  ravages  of 
the  influenza  epidemic  which  has  gone  down  in  history 
as  unexampled  before  or  since,  he  ministered  to  what¬ 
ever  need  he  found,  no  matter  what  that  need  might  be. 
In  homely  but  heartfelt  eulogy  it  was  said  of  him  at 
that  time : 

Father  Chlapowski  rolled  up  his  sleeves  and  went  to 
work  among  those  stricken  with  the  disease.  He 
stayed  at  the  bedside  of  those  who  had  no  one  to  look 
after  them,  he  built  fires,  buying-  coal  where  there  was 
no  fuel,  he  bought  supplies  where  there  was  no  food, 
and  ministered  to  the  afflicted  irrespective  of  religion, 
race  or  creed.  His  services  reached  the  heroic  stage. 

It  was  said  by  those  who  were  in  closest  touch  with 
his  work  at  this  fearful  time,  when  the  plague  claimed 
its  victims  by  the  hundreds,  that  for  six  weeks  or  more 
Father  Chlapowski  never  took  any  relief,  snatching  a 
few  moments  of  sleep  only  as  he  had  opportunity.  When 
he  was  able  to  leave  one  patient  he  sought  others,  ques¬ 
tioning  only  their  need,  nothing  else.  Wherever  he  could 
find  a  sick  and  suffering  human  being  there  he  did  all 
that  could  be  done,  leaving  only  to  seek  further  oppor- 


128 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


tunities  of  service.  No  wonder  that  in  Gardner  he  is 
“the  priest  whom  everybody  loves.”  In  all  the  war¬ 
time  activities  he  was  a  leader.  He  organized  a  Polish 
war  chest,  and  carried  his  church  “over  the  top”  in  every 
Liberty  Loan  and  Red  Cross  drive,  selling  among  his 
people  from  $25,000  to  $30,000  in  every  drive  inaug¬ 
urated  by  the  United  States  Government.  Whenever 
there  was  any  war  organization  work  to  do  he  took  a 
leading  part  in  it. 

St.  Joseph’s  Church  has  grown  and  prospered  much 
under  Father  Chlapowski’s  pastorate.  The  congregation 
now  numbers  more  than  1,100  souls,  and  he  is  leading 
them  ever  to  higher  spiritual  attainments  as  well  as  ma¬ 
terial  prosperity  as  a  church  body.  He  has  re-decorated 
the  church  and  has  otherwise  beautified  and  improved  the 
church  property.  He  is  active  also  in  all  branches  of  civic 
endeavor,  is  a  member  of  the  board  of  directors  of  the 
Gardner  Chamber  of  Commerce,  is  a  member  of  Gard¬ 
ner  Council,  No.  396,  Knights  of  Columbus,  and  is  a 
director  of  the  Community  Girls’  Club.  He  takes  a  sin¬ 
cere  pride  in  the  growth  and  dignity  of  the  new  city  ad¬ 
ministration  and  is  a  member  of  the  memorial  building 
committee,  which  has  in  charge  the  erection  of  a  new 
city  hall.  Father  Chlapowski  is  a  broad-gauged  man  in 
the  highest  sense  of  the  term,  and  numbers  among  his 
friends  and  admirers  the  best  people  of  the  community 
without  regard  to  theological  differences  or  any  barriers 
of  creed.  Still  a  young  man,  a  life  of  great  and  ever- 
increasing  usefulness  unquestionably  lies  before  him. 


WARREN  B.  HARRIS — For  many  years  active 
along  industrial  lines  in  the  town  of  Millbury,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  Warren  B.  Harris  holds  a  prominent  position 
in  the  business  affairs  of  the  community,  and  his  ac¬ 
tivities  are  contributing  to  the  progress  of  the  textile 
industry  through  the  production  of  special  parts  for 
textile  equipment.  Mr.  Harris  is  a  native  of  this  com¬ 
munity,  and  a  member  of  a  very  old  New  England  family, 
which  has  been  represented  in  the  professions  and  in¬ 
dustries  for  many  generations,  also  bearing  a  part  in 
patriotic  and  public  endeavors  from  time  to  time.  War¬ 
ren  A.  Harris,  Mr.  Flarris’s  father,  was  born  in  Mill¬ 
bury,  Massachusetts,  and  was  active  as  a  farmer  for 
many  years,  also  in  the  wood  and  ice  business  until  his 
death,  which  occurred  in  August,  1918.  Fie  married 
Sarah  Frances  Bryant,  of  Lynnfield,  Massachusetts. 

Warren  B.  Harris  was  born  at  Millbury,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  March  29,  1884.  His  education  was  begun  in  the 
local  public  schools,  and  following  his  course  at  the 
Millbury  High  School,  Air.  Harris  prepared  for  college 
at  Worcester  Academy,  then  entered  Brown  University, 
at  Providence,  Rhode  Island,  in  the  class  of  1907.  His 
first  business  experience  was  in  the  employ  of  the 
Crompton  &  Thayer  Loom  Works,  where  he  remained 
for  one  year  in  the  experimental  department.  He  then 
purchased  the  Millbury  Alachine  Company,  formerly 
owned  by  E.  J.  Humphrey,  and  has  since  carried  this 
business  forward,  manufacturing  window  frame  ma¬ 
chinery.  In  connection  with  this  interest  they  do  a  gen¬ 
eral  line  of  jobbing  and  repair  work,  and  in  1912  Mr. 
Harris  bought  out  the  Rice  Dobby  Chain  Company  and 
has  continued  the  two  interests  as  one  until  the  present 
time.  This  newer  concern  manufactures  dobby  chains 
for  looms,  and  in  this  branch  of  his  activity  Mr.  Harris  is 


doing  a  very  prosperous  and  constantly  growing  business. 
When  he  took  over  the  interest  in  1907  only  three  men 
were  employed,  and  the  floor  space  occupied  was  only 
about  4,000  square  feet.  He  has  now  more  than  doubled 
his  space,  and  employs  about  twenty-five  men.  As  a 
practical  business  executive  of  Millbury  Mr.  Harris  has 
been  sought  by  other  interests  and  is  now  affiliated  with 
the  Millbury  National  Bank  as  a  director,  and  is  a  trus¬ 
tee  of  the  Millbury  Savings  Bank,  and  also  a  director 
and  treasurer  of  the  Community  House  of  Alillbury. 
He  was  brought  forward  in  the  public  service  several 
years  ago  and  was  elected  Selectman  for  the  town  of 
Alillbury  in  1917,  serving  for  a  period  of  five  years,  dur¬ 
ing  the  latter  half  of  this  time  acting  as  chairman  of 
the  Board  of  Selectmen.  Fraternally  he  is  identified 
with  the  Masonic  order,  being  a  member  of  all  bodies, 
both  York  and  Scottish  Rites,  and  the  Ancient  Arabic 
Order  Nobles  of  the  Mystic  Shrine.  He  is  a  member 
of  the  Rotary  Club  of  Worcester,  and  attends  the  Fed¬ 
erated  Church. 

Mr.  Harris  married,  April  25,  1912,  Rena  Gates,  who 
was  born  in  Worcester,  and  they  are  the  parents  of  two 
children:  Warren  Gates,  born  April  29,  1913;  and  Dor¬ 
othy  Virginia,  born  July  2,  1917. 


EDWARD  ARTHUR  DENNY— In  the  city  of 
Worcester,  Massachusetts,  the  name  of  Edward  A. 
Denny  has  for  nearly  thirty  years  been  closely  identi¬ 
fied  with  that  branch  of  economic  advance  known  as  life 
insurance,  and  in  this  field  Air.  Denny  holds  a  posi¬ 
tion  of  wide  prominence  as  assistant  secretary  of  the 
State  Mutual  Life  Insurance  ’Company.  Air.  Denny 
comes  of  distinguished  antecedents,  long  prominent  in 
the  old  Bay  State,  and  is  a  son  of  Daniel  Edward  and 
Martha  Alice  (Fisher)  Denny.  The  Hon.  Daniel  Ed¬ 
ward  Denny  was  a  man  of  unusual  prominence  of  his 
day  in  the  State  of  Massachusetts.  As  a  young  man 
he  enlisted  for  service  in  the  Civil  War  in  the  42d  Reg¬ 
iment,  Massachusetts  Volunteer  Infantry,  and  served 
with  honor  and  distinction  throughout  he  period  of  the 
W’ar.  He  was  for  many  years  a  leading  figure  in  the 
political  advance  of  the  city  of  Worcester,  and  prom¬ 
inent  in  the  Republican  party.  He  was  elected  repeatedly 
to  the  Massachusetts  House  of  Representatives  and  also 
to  the  Senate,  and  was  for  a  number  of  years  a  member 
of  the  Governor’s  Council,  serving  on  that  body  during 
the  administrations  of  Governors  Eugene  N.  Foss  and 
David  I.  Walsh.  He  is  now  retired  from  all  business 
and  public  activity,  but  he  is  still  keenly  alert  to  the 
movements  of  the  time,  and  his  venerable  figure  is  well 
known  in  many  circles  in  this  city.  He  is  often  sought 
in  an  advisory  capacity  on  matters  of  both  commercial 
and  public  import. 

Edward  Arthur  Denny  was  born  in  Worcester,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  December  16,  1872.  His  education  was  begun 
in  the  public  schools  of  the  city,  and  he  covered  the 
usual  course  at  the  Worcester  Classical  High  School, 
from  which  he  was  graduated  in  1892.  Shortly  there¬ 
after,  Mr.  Denny  became  identified  with  the  State  Afu- 
tual  Life  Insurance  Company  in  a  subordinate  capacity, 
then,  within  a  few  years,  was  given  the  responsible  po¬ 
sition  of  cashier.  He  was  later  made  assistant  secre¬ 
tary,  which  office  he  still  ably  fills.  During  his  connec¬ 
tion  with  this  concern,  which  now  covers  a  period  of 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


129 


some  three  decades,  Mr.  Denny  has  been  closely  identi¬ 
fied  with  its  progress  and  has  been  a  significant  factor 
int  its  growth.  In  the  various  interests  of  the  city,  civic, 
fraternal,  and  benevolent,  Mr.  Denny  has  always  borne 
a  part.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Worcester  Chamber  of 
Commerce,  which  he  served  as  treasurer  in  1922,  still 
filling  that  office  this  present  year  (1923).  Politically 
he  has  been  a  loyal  supporter  of  the  principles  of  the 
Republican  party  ever  since  attaining  his  majority,  but 
has  never  sought  nor  accepted  public  honors.  Fra¬ 
ternally,  Mr.  Denny  is  identified  with  Morning  Star 
Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted  Masons,  of  Worcester,  of 
which  he  was  Master  in  1909  and  1910,  and  of  which  he 
has  been  treasurer  since  1911.  He  is  a  member  of  Eu¬ 
reka  Chapter,  Royal  Arch  Masons;  and  Worcester 
County  Commandery,  Knights  Templar.  He  attends 
the  Central  Congregational  Church  of  Worcester,  and  is 
active  in  its  social  and  benevolent  organizations. 

Mr.  Denny  married,  on  September  19,  1900,  Bertha 
Julia  Griswold,  daughter  of  Frank  C.  and  Mary  A. 
Griswold,  of  Plainville,  Connecticut,  and  they  have 
one  daughter,  Barbara,  born  July  19,  1912. 


JOSEPH  A.  LOVE,  A.  B.,  LL.  B.— Successful  in 
the  practice  of  the  law,  his  chosen  field  of  professional 
endeavor,  Joseph  A.  Love  has  won  a  high  position  in 
Webster,  Massachusetts,  where  he  has  practiced  for  the 
past  eighteen  years  or  thereabouts.  His  prominence  in 
civic  affairs  and  his  leadership  in  patriotic  endeavor 
place  him  among  the  representative  men  of  the  day,  and 
he  is  also  well  known  in  fraternal  and  club  circles.  He 
is  a  member  of  an  old  family  of  Worcester  County,  and 
a  son  of  John  J.  Love,  of  Webster,  Massachusetts,  and 
for  many  years  active  in  the  granite  business  as  the 
head  of  an  important  monument  works  there.  John  J. 
Love  was  a  very  prominent  citizen,  a  Democrat  by  polit¬ 
ical  affiliation,  long  a  Selectman  of  the  town  of  Webster, 
and  for  two  terms  Postmaster  under  President  Cleve¬ 
land;  also  for  a  long  period  a  trustee  of  the  public  li¬ 
brary.  He  died  June  20,  1915,  and  his  passing  was  a 
great  loss  to  the  community.  The  mother,  Ann 
(Hogan)  Love,  died  at  an  early  age,  March  23,  1884. 

Joseph  A.  Love  was  bom  at  Dudley,  Massachusetts, 
November  10,  1875.  His  early  education  was  received 
at  St.  Louis’  Parochial  School,  and  he  later  attended 
the  Webster  High  School,  from  which  he  was  gradu¬ 
ated  in  the  class  of  1892.  Covering  his  preparatory 
work  at  Phillips-Exeter  Academy,  he  was  graduated 
from  that  institution  in  the  class  of  1894.  He  then 
served  three  years  as  Assistant  Postmaster  under  his 
father,  and  one  year  in  the  same  capacity  under  his 
father’s  successor.  In  the  fall  of  1898  he  entered  Har¬ 
vard  University,  from  which  he  received  the  degree  of 
Bachelor  of  Arts  in  1902,  with  magna  cum  laude  for 
general  work  and  final  honors  for  special  work  in  his¬ 
tory  and  government,  and  received  a  detur,  and  the 
degree  of  Bachelor  of  Laws  two  years  later.  Serving  a 
clerkship  in  the  offices  of  Raymond  &  Gordon,  of  Bos¬ 
ton,  for  one  year,  Mr.  Love  then  returned  to  Webster 
following  his  admission  to  the  bar  of  the  State,  and 
took  up  the  practice  of  law  in  this  community  in  No¬ 
vember  of  the  year  1905.  He  has  successfully  conducted 
a  general  practice  since,  and  now  holds  front  rank  in 


the  profession  in  Southern  Worcester  County.  Always 
deeply  interested  in  all  advance,  Mr.  Love  has  for  years 
served  in  various  public  offices.  He  is  a  Democrat  in 
his  politics,  and  he  was  elected,  in  1908,  Moderator  of 
the  town  meeting,  and  subsequently  served  in  the  same 
capacity  in  1913,  1914,  and  1915.  In  1916  he  was  elected 
alternate  delegate  to  the  National  Democratic  Conven¬ 
tion  at  St.  Louis.  In  1917  he  was  made  a  delegate  to 
the  Massachusetts  Constitutional  Convention  from  the 
Sixth  Worcester  representative  district,  and  served  dur¬ 
ing  that  year  and  the  following;  and  in  1917,  also,  he 
was  elected  a  member  of  the  Webster  School  Commit¬ 
tee  and  has  been  reelected  twice  as  the  candidate  of 
both  parties.  He  is  now  chairman  of  that  committee. 
During  the  World  War  he  acted  as  associate  member  of 
the  Legal  Advisory  Board.  He  was  also  in  charge,  for 
the  United  States  Government,  as  agent,  of  licensing 
the  use  of  explosives  under  the  Department  of  the  In¬ 
terior.  He  was  further  identified  as  a  volunteer,  with 
the  work  of  the  United  States  Secret  Service,  serving 
under  United  States  Attorney  George  Anderson,  and 
had  charge  of  that  work  in  Webster,  Dudley,  South- 
bridge,  Charlton,  Oxford,  Douglas,  Sutton,  and  Ux¬ 
bridge,  and  also  as  district  inspector  of  the  American 
Protective  League.  He  also  filled  many  positions  on 
local  committees  in  war  welfare  work.  Mr.  Love  was  a 
charter  member  of  the  Webster  Chamber  of  Commerce, 
and  has  served  that  body  as  counsel  from  its  inception, 
always  taking  the  deepest  interest  in  its  work.  Fie  is 
a  member  of  the  Massachusetts  State  Bar  Association, 
the  Worcester  County  Bar  Association,  and  the  Southern 
Worcester  Bar  Association.  His  fraternal  affiliations 
include  membership  in  the  Knights  of  Columbus,  Web¬ 
ster  Lodge,  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks, 
the  Phi  Beta  Kappa  fraternity,  the  Delta  Epsilon,  the 
Thayer  Law  Club  of  Harvard  University  School  of 
Law,  and  the  Kappa  Epsilon  Pi  of  Phillips-Exeter 
Academy.  He  is  a  member  of  Putnam  Country  Club. 
His  religious  faith  is  that  of  the  Roman  Catholic,  in 
which  he  was  reared,  and  he  is  a  member  of  St.  Louis’ 
Church. 

Mr.  Love  married  Mary  Elizabeth  Lafford,  of  Web¬ 
ster,  Massachusetts,  daughter  of  William  C.  and  Annie 
(Sheehan)  Lafford,  esteemed  people  of  this  community. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Love  have  two  children :  Mary  Gertrude, 
born  April  3,  1917;  and  Louise,  born  June  8,  1920. 


HOWARD  M.  PARKS — Nine  generations  of  the 
Parks  family  are  recorded  in  New  England  history, 
but  in  the  earlier  records  the  name  more  often  appears 
as  Parks  and  Park,  while  in  one  line  the  spelling  Peirks 
prevailed  for  several  generations.  Richard  Parks  was 
the  founder  of  the  first  of  these  generations  which  ter¬ 
minates  in  this  review  with  Howard  M;.  Parks,  of  Fitch¬ 
burg,  Massachusetts,  president  of  the  Parks,  Cramer 
Company,  he  being  of  the  ninth  generation. 

Richard  Parks  was  of  Cambridge,  Massachusetts, 
where  he  became  a  proprietor  in  1636,  owning  eleven 
acres,  on  which  he  built  a  house  that  stood  until  1800. 
He  owned  other  lands,  and  his  will,  dated  July  12,  1665, 
shows  him  to  have  been  one  of  the  wealthy  men  of  the 
colony.  He  married  Sarah  Brewster,  widow  of  Love 
Brewster,  son  of  Elder  William  Brewster,  and  daughter 


Wor — 9 


130 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


of  William  and  Jane  Collier.  The  line  of  descent  from 
Richard  and  Sarah  (Brewster)  Parks  is  through  their 
son,  Thomas  Parks  (1629-1690)  and  his  wife,  Abigail 
Dix;  their  son,  John  Parks,  (1656-1718)  and  his  sec¬ 
ond  wife,  Elizabeth  Miller;  their  son,  John  (2)  Parks, 
(1696)  and  his  wife,  Esther  Parks;  their  son,  John  (3) 
Parks,  (1719-1804)  and  his  wife,  Hannah  Hammond; 
their  son,  Samuel  Parks,  (1761-1820)  and  his  wife,  An¬ 
nie  Muzzy;  their  son,  William  Parks,  (1805)  and  his 
wife,  Dolly  S.  Mclntire;  their  son,  Gilbert  M.  Parks, 
and  his  wife,  Abbie  F.  Sampson;  their  son,  Howard  M. 
Parks. 

Gilbert  M.  Parks  was  born  in  Westminster,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  August  15,  1842,  died  December  16,  1914.  He  was 
educated  in  the  public  schools  and  learned  the  gas  and 
steam  fitter’s  trade  in  Fitchburg,  Massachusetts.  In 
1872  he  established  with  John  H.  Carpenter  a  business 
which  they  jointly  conducted  until  1887,  when  Mr.  Parks 
bought  his  partner’s  interest  and  continued  alone  until 
1901.  In  that  year  with  his  sons,  Robert  S.,  Frederick 
W.,  and  Howard  M.,  he  incorporated  the  business  as  the 
G.  M.  Parks  Company,  Gilbert  M.  Parks,  president, 
the  sons  as  co-directors.  This  became  one  of  the  largest 
and  most  completely  equipped  industrial  piping  plants  in 
New  England,  Mr.  Parks  ranking  with  the  best  business 
men  of  his  city.  He  was  a  director  of  the  Lancaster 
Cotton  Mills,  a  member  of  Mt.  Roulstone  Lodge,  Inde¬ 
pendent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows ;  a  Republican  in  politics, 
and  an  attendant  of  the  Unitarian  church.  He  was  a 
man  of  rare  quality,  and  his  many  years  were  filled  with 
the  labor  of  one  who  worked  for  the  joy  of  working. 
Gilbert  M.  Parks  married,  October  27,  1870,  Abbie  F. 
Sampson,  daughter  of  Captain  Robert  Sampson,  of 
Fitchburg,  and  to  them  three  sons  and  two  daughters 
were  born:  1.  Robert  S.,  born  March  10,  1872,  his 
father’s  business  associate.  He  married  Caroline  H. 
Goodwin.  2.  Frederick  W.,  born  December  21,  1874, 
associated  in  business  with  his  father  and  brothers.  He 
married  Ruth  W.  Chapin.  3.  Jennie  A.,  born  February 
11,  1877,  married  H.  G.  Townend.  4.  Howard  M.,  of 
further  mention.  5.  Helen  A.,  born  August  8,  1884. 

Howard  M.  Parks,  third  son  and  fourth  child  of  Gil¬ 
bert  M.  and  Abbie  F.  (Sampson)  Parks,  was  born  in 
Fitchburg,  Massachusetts,  December  26,  1878.  He  was 
educated  in  the  grade  and  high  schools  of  the  city,  and 
when  school  years  were  over  he  entered  the  family  busi¬ 
ness  with  his  father  and  brothers,  learning  the  details 
of  the  gas  and  steam  fitting  business.  When  the  G.  M. 
Parks  Company  was  incorporated  in  1901  he  became  a 
director  of  that  corporation,  so  continuing  until  1917, 
when  that  company  was  absorbed  by  the  Cramer  Com¬ 
pany,  of  Charlotte,  North  Carolina,  forming  the  Parks- 
Cramer  Company,  of  Fitchburg,  Massachusetts,  Howard 
M.  Parks,  president.  The  company  specializes  in  indus¬ 
trial  piping  and  humidifying,  their  business  being  large 
and  reputation  high.  Mr.  Parks  has  practically  spent 
his  life  in  the  business  of  which  he  is  now  the  executive 
head,  and  has  intimate  knowledge  of  its  every  detail 
and  process.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Fitchburg  Cham¬ 
ber  of  Commerce,  the  Fay  Club,  and  Oak  Hill  Country 
Club,  of  Fitchburg.  The  company  is  a  member  of  the 
Associated  Industries  of  Massachusetts. 

Howard  M.  Parks  married,  June  20,  1906,  Hazel  H. 
Hopkins,  daughter  of  Chester  and  Lilia  (Woodward) 


Hopkins,  of  Hopkins,  Minnesota.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Parks 
are  the  parents  of  a  daughter,  Jane,  born  February  23, 
1909,  she  of  the  tenth  generation  of  the  family  founded 
in  New  England  by  Richard  Parks. 


HENRY  G.  PEARSON,  one  of  the  foremost  busi¬ 
ness  executives  of  Fitchburg,  Massachusetts,  is  directing 
large  affairs  both  in  his  capacity  as  treasurer  of  the 
Goodnow-Pearson  Company  of  this  city,  and  as  presi¬ 
dent  of  the  Fitchburg  Chamber  of  Commerce.  Mr. 
Pearson  has  had  wide  and  practical  experience  in  the 
business  world,  although  for  many  years  with  the  same 
concern,  for  he  has  filled  executive  responsibilities  in  the 
interests  of  this  organization  in  the  various  localities  in 
which  the  company  is  active,  and  has  now  for  many  years 
been  a  member  of  the  concern.  Mr.  Pearson  is  inter¬ 
ested  in  organized  advance  and  participates  in  all  for¬ 
ward  endeavor. 

The  Pearson  family  is  one  of  dignity  and  distinction 
in  New  England,  and  Moses  Pearson,  Mr.  Pearson’s 
grandfather,  was  an  early  resident  of  Sudbury,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  later  removing  to  Albany,  Vermont,  and  event¬ 
ually  to  Coventry,  Vermont.  There  his  son,  Samuel 
Howe  Pearson,  became  one  of  the  leading  men  of  the 
community  and  a  largely  successful  farmer.  Samuel 
Howe  Pearson  married  Sarah  Gray,  a  granddaughter 
of  Obadiah  Gray,  a  pioneer  settler  of  Coventry,  Ver¬ 
mont,  who  later  went  to  Keene,  New  Hampshire,  and 
became  a  leading  lumberman  of  his  time.  Rev.  Asahel 
Gray,  son  of  Obadiah  Gray,  and  father  of  Sarah  (Gray) 
Pearson,  was  an  early  pastor  of  the  Congregational 
church  and  for  forty-four  consecutive  years  served  as 
a  minister  of  that  church. 

Henry  G.  Pearson  was  born  in  Coventry,  Vermont, 
September  5,  1871.  Receiving  his  early  education  in 
the  public  schools  of  his  birthplace,  he  later  covered  a 
college  preparatory  course,  then  attended  Lyndon  Semi¬ 
nary,  of  Lyndon,  Vermont.  As  a  young  man  Mr.  Pear¬ 
son  secured  a  position  with  W.  L.  Goodnow  in  his 
mercantile  establishment,  at  East  Jaffrey,  Cheshire 
County,  New  Hampshire.  He  remained  with  this  in¬ 
terest  for  four  years,  then  went  to  Keene,  New  Hamp¬ 
shire,  where  he  was  engaged  for  a  similar  period  in  the 
Goodnow  store  in  that  city.  Next  he  transferred  his 
activities  to  the  Bellows  Falls  store,  which  was  con¬ 
ducted  under  the  title  of  Goodnow,  Jewelt  &  Bishop, 
there  remaining  for  about  three  years.  Thereafter 
going  to  Brattleboro,  Vermont,  he  was  active  for  a 
second  period  of  three  years,  under  the  firm  name  of 
Goodnow  &  Pearson,  then  came  to  Fitchburg  in  the  year 
1903  as  manager  of  the  Goodnow-Pearson  interests  and 
treasurer  of  the  company.  The  city  of  Fitchburg  takes 
pride  in  this  thoroughly  modern  and  efficiently  conducted 
department  store  where  the  people  find  a  shopping 
place  second  to  none  in  New  England  in  its  atmosphere 
of  courtesy  and  willingness  to  oblige,  also  in  the  thor¬ 
ough  excellence  of  the  stock  carried.  Mr.  Pearson,  as 
a  leading  business  man  of  Fitchburg,  was  elected  presi¬ 
dent  of  the  Fitchburg  Chamber  of  Commerce  in  De¬ 
cember,  1922.  He  is  a  trustee  of  the  Worcester  North 
Savings  Institute  and  interested  in  all  that  pertains  to 
the  public  advance.  He  was  a  member  of  the  City 
Council  for  three  consecutive  years  some  time  ago 
(1904-5-6)  but  his  busy  life  has  compelled  him  to  decline 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


the  honors  and  responsibilities  of  public  office.  Fra¬ 
ternally  Mr.  Pearson  is  affiliated  with  the  Free  and 
Accepted  Masons,  of  Brattleboro,  Vermont.  He  is  a 
member  of  the  Masonic  Club  of  Fitchburg,  the  Rotary 
Club,  also  of  Fitchburg;  the  Columbia  Club,  the  Oak 
Hill  Country  Club,  and  the  Fay  Club  of  Fitchburg. 

Henry  G.  Pearson  married,  at  Brattleboro,  Vermont, 
June  15,  1907,  Ella  Tanner  Waite,  and  they  are  the 
parents  of  two  children:  Gray  Waite,  bom  December 
20,  1909;  and  Lucretia,  born  October  5,  1915,  both  chil¬ 
dren  being  born  in  Fitchburg,  Massachusetts. 


FRANK  W.  MORRISON — In  legal  circles  in  Wor¬ 
cester,  Massachusetts,  Frank  W.  Morrison  holds  a 
prominent  position,  his  long  experience  and  splendid 
ability  giving  him  a  place  among  the  really  noteworthy 
professional  men  of  that  city.  Mr.  Morrison  is  a  son 
of  George  W.  Morrison,  who  was  born  in  Rockingham, 
Vermont,  and  was  active  here  as  a  farmer  and  live  stock 
dealer  until  his  death,  which  occurred  in  1898.  The 
mother,  Harriet  Barton  (Wetherbee)  Morrison,  was 
born  at  Grafton,  Vermont,  and  still  survives  her  husband. 

Frank  W.  Morrison  was  born  at  Rockingham,  Ver¬ 
mont,  July  16,  1871.  Receiving  his  early  education  in  the 
public  schools  of  his  birthplace,  he  later  attended  Ver¬ 
mont  Academy.  In  1896  he  was  graduated  from  Stan¬ 
ford  University,  in  California',  with  the  degree  of  Bach¬ 
elor  of  Arts.  Subsequently  he  took  a  post  graduate 
course  in  law  at  this  university.  In  1901  he  entered 
practice  in  San  Francisco,  specializing  in  mining  law. 
Mr.  Morrison  returned  East  in  1910,  and  opened  law 
offices  in  Worcester.  Since  1918  his  offices  have  been  at 
No.  340  Main  Street,  in  the  State  Mutual  Building,  and 
at  Whitinsville,  Massachusetts.  He  quickly  developed  a 
large  practice,  for  his  habit  of  making  a  client’s  cause 
his  own,  his  thorough  preparation  of  every  case,  together 
with  a  virile  personality  which  inspires  confidence,  have 
won  for  him  a  wide  circle  of  friends.  Mr.  Morrison 
holds  an  important  place  in  the  legal  profession  in  Wor¬ 
cester,  and  has  appeared  as  attorney  in  many  important 
cases.  He  prepared,  conducted,  and  argued  the  famous 
case  of  the  Commonwealth  of  Massachusetts  vs.  the  City 
of  Methuen.  In  compliance  with  the  statutes  it  was 
necessary  to  bring  the  action  in  the  name  of  the  At¬ 
torney  General.  This  was  a  quo  warranto  proceeding 
to  set  aside  that  city’s  charter,  and  the  question  was  as 
to  whether  quo  warranto  was  the  proper  form  of  action. 
Mr.  Morrison’s  research  in  the  preparation  of  the  case 
took  him  back  into  English  court  proceedings  as  early  as 
the  twelfth  century.  The  history  of  similar  actions 
during  all  the  intervening  centuries  verified  his  judg¬ 
ment  The  argument  was  heard  in  a  special  session  of 
the  Supreme  Court,  at  which  all  the  Justices  were  pres¬ 
ent.  They  listened  with  rapt  attention,  frequently  in¬ 
terrupting  with  questions  that  would  have  been  discon¬ 
certing  to  an  advocate  less  thoroughly  prepared.  In 
1921  the  Supreme  Court  handed  down  a  decision  setting 
aside  the  charter  of  he  city  of  Methuen.  This  has  at¬ 
tracted  wide  attention  and  has  become  a  ruling  case. 
Mr.  Morrison  has  been  a  resident  of  Uxbridge  for  a 
number  of  years,  serving  that  town  as  counsel  for  five 
years,  and  for  a  similar  period  served  as  counsel  for 
the  town  of  Northbridge.  He  is  attorney  for  the 
Whitinsville  National  Bank,  and  several  industrial  cor¬ 


131 

porations,  and  serves  as  a  trustee  of  the  Whitinsville 
Savings  Bank,  an  office  he  has  held  since  1916. 

Reared  on  a  farm,  he  has  never  lost  his  love  of  the 
soil,  and  his  chief  diversion  from  the  exactions  of  his 
professional  vocation  is  found  in  conducting  a  dairy  farm 
at  Saxton’s  River,  Vermont,  under  the  name,  “Green 
Mountain  Farms.”  The  farm  comprises  about  six  hun¬ 
dred  acres,  and  includes  the  two'  hundred  and  twenty- 
five-acre  homestead  of  his  grandfather  and  father.  One 
hundred  acres  are  under  cultivation.  With  ample  pas¬ 
turage,  he  also  raises  all  his  feed  and  fills  three  large 
silos  with  winter  fodder.  The  herd  of  fifty  head  of 
registered  Brown  Swiss  dairy  cattle  produces  not  less 
than  three  hundred  quarts  of  milk  a  day,  and  at  times 
the  quantity  runs  much  higher. 

Mr.  Morrison  has  an  aversion  to  the  term  “gentleman 
farmer,”  which  often,  if  not  generally,  connotes  con¬ 
ducting  an  agricultural  enterprise  at  a  financial  loss, 
blacked  by  the  practical  experience  gained  in  his  youth, 
he  believes  that  farming  can  be  made  as  profitable  as  any 
other  industry  by  the  application  of  scientific  methods 
and  the  exercise  of  that  care  and  sound  judgment  which 
are  at  the  basis  of  success  in  every  business.  He  is  a 
lover  of  trees,  and  the  subject  of  reforestation  has 
claimed  his  interest  for  some  time.  It  is  safe  to  say 
that  if  a  good  percentage  of  people  who  own  suitable 
land  would  follow  Mr.  Morrison’s  example,  little  con¬ 
cern  need  be  felt  for  our  future  supply  of  lumber. 
Already  he  has  set  out  6,000  Norway  spruce  and  some 
white  pines  on  his  “Green  Mountain  Farms.”  This  is 
to  be  followed  by  other  plantings,  guided  by  the  experi¬ 
ence  gained  in  this  first  experiment. 

The  production  of  maple  syrup  and  sugar  is  one  of 
the  three  principal  industries  upon  which  the  State  of 
Vermont  must  depend.  Yet  Mr.  Morrison  is  probably 
the  first  man  to  approach  the  subject  of  producing  maple 
sap  with  a  plan  to  which  the  term  efficient  might  prop*- 
erly  be  applied.  At  present  the  business  is  carried  on 
in  a  very  crude  manner.  No  maple  orchard  has  ever 
been  set  out  in  a  systematic  manner;  the  trees  grow  in 
clumps,  here  and  there,  and  the  sap  is  gathered  in  the 
same  slow,  laborious,  expensive  way  followed  by  the 
forefathers.  Mr.  Morrison’s  idea  is  to  set  out  maple 
seedlings  six  feet  apart,  making  about  twelve  hundred  to 
the  acre.  As  the  trees  will  be  planted  on  a  hillside,  a 
system  of  piping  can  be  used  that  will  collect  the  sap 
from  the  trees  and  convey  it  by  gravity  to  the  boiler 
houses.  This  method  will  greatly  reduce  the  expense  of 
manufacturing,  and  at  the  same  time  increase  the  quan¬ 
tity  of  product.  Mr.  Morrison  plans  to  tap  every 
other  row  of  trees  in  each  direction  when  they  are  about 
fifteen  years  old.  Besides  yielding  some  sap,  and  thus 
getting  an  early  financial  return  from  the  orchard,  it  is 
expected  that  this  early  tapping  will  kill  the  trees,  which 
it  is  intended  shall  be  thinned  out  and  used  for  cord 
wood.  This  will  not  only  give  the  remaining  trees 
needed  room  for  development,  but  it  will  provide  a 
system  of  roadways  which  will  enable  sap  to  be  gathered 
by  teams  should  anything  put  the  gravity  system  of 
piping  out  of  commission. 

When  Mr.  Morrison  first  broached  this  plan  to 
the  State  Forestry  Department  of  Vermont  it  aroused 
no  enthusiasm ;  but  he  hammered  away  in  persistent  law¬ 
yer  fashion  until  the  spring  of  1923,  when  he  succeeded 


132 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


in  closing  a  contract,  by  the  terms  of  which  the  State 
of  Vermont  is  to  deliver  to  him  18,000  sugar  maple 
seedlings,  in  the  spring  of  1925,  at  the  cost  of  growing 
them.  Maple  syrup  now  sells  for  $2.50  per  gallon,  and 
it  is  safe  to  say  the  price  will  never  be  lower.  It  is 
expected  that  the  orchard  here  described  will  yield 
10,000  gallons  per  year  when  the  trees  have  reached  the 
sap-producing  age.  It  is  believed  this  is  the  first  project 
of  its  kind  in  this  country,  and  it  is  sufficiently  unique 
and  important  to  have  gained  special  notice  from  the 
great  editorial  writer,  Arthur  Brisbane.  In  his  column, 
“Tc-dav,”  he  said  recently: 

In  one  bright  spot  in  Vermont,  in  the  State  nurser¬ 
ies,  will  grow  18,000  sugar  maple  trees.  When  three 
years  old  they  will  be  delivered  to  a  Mr.  Morrison, 
who  will  plant  them  twelve  hundred  to  an  acre,  on  the 
side  of  a  hill,  that  the  sap,  as  collected,  may  run  down 
by  gravity. 

Inferior  trees  will  be  cut  for  cord  wood,  thinning 
out  the  grove.  The  State  will  be  enriched  and  the  food 
supply  increased.  That's  real  civilization,  better  than 
war. 

Interested  broadly  in  all  civic  and  social  advance,  Mr. 
Morrison  showed  his  patriotism  during  the  World  War 
by  serving  as  corporal  in  the  Massachusetts  National 
Guard,  and  he  also  served,  without  compensation  (even 
paying  his  own  expenses),  as  government  appeal  agent 
for  seven  towns  under  the  Selective  Draft.  This  was 
an  arduous  position  involving  much  driving.  It  has 
already  been  noted  that  Mr.  Morrison  possesses  the 
capacity  for  taking  infinite  pains,  and  his  work  as  appeal 
agent  was  done  with  such  characteristic  care  and  thor¬ 
oughness,  that  the  board  accepted  his  decisions  in  every 
case.  Mr.  Morrison  is  a  member  of  the  Worcester 
County  Bar  Association,  and  his  social  affiliations  in¬ 
clude  Solomon’s  Temple  Lodge,  Ancient  Free  and  Ac¬ 
cepted  Masons;  the  Composite  Club,  and  the  Congre¬ 
gational  Club  of  Whitinsville.  He  is  also  a  member  of 
the  Congregational  Church  Society  of  that  town. 

On  January  27,  1907,  Frank  W.  Morrison  married 
Alice  Parkis,  who  was  born  in  Slatersville,  Rhode  Island, 
and  they  have  one  child,  Frances  Parkhurst,  who  was 
born  November  2,  1907. 


WELLS  L.  HILL,  one  of  the  important  figures  in 
the  prosperous  town  of  Athol,  Massachusetts,  who  for 
more  than  half  a  century  has  been  owner  and  editor  of 
the  Athol  “Transcript,”  one  of  the  most  progressive 
weekly  newspapers  in  Worcester  County,  Massachusetts, 
is  a  native  of  Athol,  and  a  son  of  John  C.  and  Dolly 
(Smith)  Hill,  this  family  being  leaders  in  the  civic  and 
social  life  of  the  community  for  generations.  Mrs.  Hill 
was  a  granddaughter  of  Aaron  Smith,  one  of  the  first 
settlers  of  the  town.  John  C.  Hill  was  prominent  in  the 
local  world  of  finance  and  business,  and  the  moving 
spirit  in  the  organization  of  the  Athol  Savings  Bank, 
which  was  incorporated  in  the  year  1867. 

Wells  L.  Hill  was  born  in  Athol,  Massachusetts,  July 
25.  1850.  Following  his  elementary  studies  he  was 
overtaken  by  a  calamity  which  in  a  man  of  lesser  calibre 
would  have  precluded  a  life  of  such  breadth  of  useful¬ 
ness.  Recovering  from  a  severe  attack  of  scarlet  fever, 
he  was  left  totally  deaf,  at  the  age  of  twelve  years.  His 
speech  and  eyesight  were  spared  to  him,  however,  and 
with  valiant  courage  he  set  to  work  to  make  something 
of  his  life,  regardless  of  this  handicap.  He  became  a 


graduate  of  Gallaudet  College  for  the  Deaf  at  Wash¬ 
ington,  District  of  Columbia,  and  graduated  as  a  member 
of  the  class  of  1872.  Early  in  tne  following  year  he  pur¬ 
chased  a  third  interest  in  the  Athol  “Transcript”  and  be¬ 
came  its  editor.  Under  his  leadership  this  paper,  which  had 
previously  had  a  short,  but  varied,  history,  was  stabilized 
and  became  an  influence  for  good  both  in  the  homes  of 
the  community  and  its  surrounding  towns  and  in  the 
business  life  of  his  section. 

The  Athol  “Transcript”  was  founded  in  the  year  1871 
by  Lucien  Lord,  the  leading  real  estate  dealer  of  Athol, 
theretofore  postmaster  of  the  town,  and  also  the  builder 
of  the  Academy  of  Music.  Associated  with  him  in  the 
“Transcript”  business  was  Edward  F.  Jones,  the  most 
prominent  local  printer  of  that  time,  and  Dr.  Vernon 
O.  Taylor,  a  highly  esteemed  physician  of  Athol,  was 
made  the  editor.  The  first  issue  of  the  paper  appeared 
on  January  31,  1871.  Not  long  afterward  the  first  editor 
was  succeeded  by  Colonel  George  H.  Hoyt,  a  veteran  of 
the  Civil  War,  who  shortly  before  that  struggle  had 
become  nationally  famous  as  one  of  the  defenders  of 
John  Brown  in  his  trial  following  his  historic  raid  at 
Harper’s  Ferry.  Colonel  Hoyt  was  in  Kansas  there¬ 
after  until  the  breaking  out  of  the  Civil  War,  where 
he  won  his  rank.  He  returned  to  Athol  after  the  war, 
opened  a  law  office  and  bought  an  interest  in  the  “Tran¬ 
script.”  Upon  Colonel  Hoyt’s  election  to  the  State 
Legislature  he  sold  his  interest  to  Edgar  A.  Smith,  who 
had  previously  been  a  resident  of  Fitchburg,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  and  at  this  time  Mr.  Hill  bought  his  interest  in  the 
paper  and  became  its  editor.  A  few  years  later  Mr.  Hill 
purchased  the  interests  of  his  partners,  and  he  has  since 
been  at  the  head  of  the  business. 

Mr.  Hill’s  policy  has  always  been  one  of  advance.  A 
job  printing  department  has  kept  pace  with  the  news¬ 
paper  in  growth  and  usefulness,  until  now  the  plant  is 
one  of  the  most  thoroughly  up-to-date  of  any  in  the 
State,  with  the  most  modern  improved  machinery  and 
equipment.  They  make  a  specialty  of  constantly  adding 
new  type  faces  and  designs,  keeping  their  equipment 
always  fresh  and  complete.  Two  linotypes  are  now  in 
use  in  the  office. 

The  “Transcript”  has  always  supported  the  principles 
and  policies  of  the  Republican  party  in  political  issues 
of  local,  State  or  national  import,  but  has  been  and  still 
is  thoroughly  devoted  to  the  many  branches  of  endeavor 
which  count  for  local  betterment  and  the  integrity  and 
security  of  the  home.  It  has  undergone  many  changes, 
improvements  and  enlargements  during  its  life,  and  is 
now  the  largest  weekly  newspaper  in  this  section  of  the 
State,  printing  from  twelve  to  twenty  pages,  as  required 
by  its  extensive  advertising  patronage.  In  fact,  it  is  a 
broadly  representative  American  newspaper  of  the  better 
class,  circulating  extensively  in  Worcester  County  and 
north,  west  and  eastern  Franklin  County.  The  head 
printer  is  W.  Paul  Cook,  a  graduate  of  Dartmouth  Col¬ 
lege,  and  an  expert  craftsman. 

Wells  L.  Hill  married,  May  11,  1875,  Abbie  M.  Earle, 
daughter  of  Luke  and  Lucy  Abby  Earle,  of  Greenwich, 
and  their  four  children  are:  1.  J.  Clarence,  a  graduate 
of  the  Athol  High  School;  entered  the  “Transcript” 
office  immediately  following  his  graduation,  and  is  now 
general  manager  and  associate  editor  of  the  paper  and 
stands  at  the  head  of  the  business,  a  thoroughly  pro- 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


gressive  young  man  of  Athol.  2.  Louett  E.,  who  is  a 
general  assistant  in  the  business.  3.  Raymond  E.,  who 
served  in  the  World  War  with  the  rank  of  captain,  and 
is  now  one  of  the  publicity  managers  of  the  world-famous 
Winchester  Arms  Company,  of  New  Haven,  Connecticut. 
4.  Nettie  E.,  who  resides  with  her  brother  in  New 
Haven. 


FREDERICK  H.  LEE,  of  the  Lee  Hardware  Com¬ 
pany,  has  spent  practically  his  entire  life  in  Athol, 
Massachusetts.  He  is  a  descendant  of  two  of  the  oldest 
families  in  the  community,  the  Fish  family,  of  which  his 
father  is  a  descendant,  being  one  of  the  first  group 
which  settled  in  Athol,  and  the  ancestors  of  the  Lee  fam¬ 
ily  coming  soon  afterward. 

Samuel  Lee,  father  of  Frederick  H.  Lee,  commenced 
a  retail  business  in  1854,  and  from  1854  to  the  time  of 
his  death,  with  the  exception  of  one  year,  during  which 
he  built  the  hotel  known  as  the  “Summit  House,”  in 
1857-58,  was  engaged  in  retail  business,  founding  the 
Lee  Hardware  Company  in  1873.  He  took  an  active  part 
in  political  affairs,  and  for  many  years  was  one  of  the 
active  and  progressive  citizens  of  Athol.  He  married 
Hattie  L.  Nourse,  of  Wallingford,  Vermont,  and  their 
children  were:  Richard  H.,  who  died  in  infancy,  and 
Frederick  H.,  subject  of  this  review. 

Bora  in  Athol,  Massachusetts,  March  30,  1867,  Fred¬ 
erick  H.  Lee  received  his  education  in  the  public  schools 
of  his  native  city.  When  school  days  were  over  he  be¬ 
came  associated  with  his  father  in  the  hardware  business, 
and  he  continued  to  be  his  father’s  faithful  and  efficient 
assistant  to  the  time  of  the  death  of  the  latter,  October 
3,  1916.  On  January  1,  1917,  he  formed  a  partnership 
with  A.  B.  Perkins,  and  from  that  time  to  the  present 
(1923)  the  partners  have  continued  to  conduct  the  busi¬ 
ness  under  the  name  of  Lee  Hardware  Company.  The 
concern  sells,  besides  hardware,  seeds  and  paints,  and 
has  built  up  a  very  large  and  profitable  business.  Mr. 
Lee  is  one  of  the  corporators  of  the  Athol  Savings  Bank, 
and  he  is  generally  known  as  a  conservative  business 
man,  who  may  be  trusted  to  see  all  sides  of  a  business 
proposition,  and  also  as  one  who  is  progressive  enough 
to  undertake  a  new  enterprise.  Politically,  he  gives  his 
support  to  the  principles  and  the  candidates  of  the 
Democratic  party,  and  he  has  always  been  ready  to  bear 
his  share  of  the  burden  of  local  public  office.  For  fifteen 
years  he  served  as  a  member  of  the  School  Committee, 
and  at  the  present  time  (1923)  is  a  member  of  the  Cem¬ 
etery  Committee.  During  the  World  War  he  aided  in 
all  the  ways  which  citizens  at  home  found  to  forward 
the  work  of  the  war,  giving  freely  to  the  Red  Cross 
work,  and  using  his  influence  to  insure  the  successful 
accomplishment  of  the  work  of  the  various  war  com¬ 
mittees  of  the  community.  Mr.  Lee  stands  high  in  the 
Masonic  order,  being  a  member  of  all  bodies,  both  York 
and  Scottish  Rites,  as  far  as  and  including  the  consistory, 
where  he  received  the  thirty-second  degree.  In  1904  he 
was  Commander  of  Athol  Commandery,  Knights  Temp¬ 
lar,  and  for  the  past  seventeen  years  he  has  been  re¬ 
corder.  He  takes  an  active  part  in  the  work  of  the 
Unitarian  church.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Old  First 
Unitarian  Church  of  Athol  until  1922,  when  through  the 
efforts  of  Mr.  Lee  and  Mr.  F.  E.  Wing,  the  First  and 
Second  Unitarian  churches  were  combined  into  one  con¬ 


133 

gregation,  which  is  known  as  the  First  Church,  Uni¬ 
tarian,  Inc.,  of  Athol,  Massachusetts. 

Frederick  H.  Lee  has  been  twice  married.  He  mar¬ 
ried  (first)  Emma  J.  Tooley,  of  Athol,  who  died  in 
Springfield,  Massachusetts,  in  1920.  He  married  (sec¬ 
ond),  at  Boston,  Massachusetts,  Susan  M.  Perkins,  the 
sister  of  his  partner  in  business,  and  daughter  of  Rob¬ 
ert  Rodger  and  Mary  Jane  (Wiggins)  Perkins.  His 
second  marriage  occurred  in  June,  1922. 


HERBERT  E.  JENNISON,  of  Fitchburg,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  holds  a  prominent  position  in  the  industrial  af¬ 
fairs  of  the  city,  his  position  as  a  leading  official  of  three 
important  concerns  placing  him  in  the  front  rank  of 
local  industrial  progress.  Mr.  Jennison  is  a  practical 
business  man,  gifted  with  large  executive  ability  and 
the  breadth  of  vision  which  applies  that  ability  to  per¬ 
manently  useful  purposes. 

As  president  of  the  Jennison  Company,  Mr.  Jennison 
is  taking  a  widely  important  part  in  plumbing,  heating, 
and  sheet  metal  activities  in  New  England.  In  associ¬ 
ation  with  James  H.  Mack,  Mr.  Jennison  took  over  this 
enterprise  which  was  founded  by  A.  A.  Spear  &  Com¬ 
pany,  then  for  a  time  conducted  under  the  title  of  the 
C.  M.  Converse  Company.  As  Mack  &  Jennison,  the 
business  went  forward  from  1885,  at  which  date  only 
about  fifteen  men  were  employed.  The  business  then 
consisted  only  of  local  plumbing,  heating,  and  sheet 
metal  work.  Throughout  the  entire  subsequent  period 
the  same  general  line  of  advance  has  been  followed, 
but  the  scope  of  the  interest  has  extended  very  largely. 
They  now  have  for  many  years  taken  care  of  the  needs 
of  mills  and  other  industrial  plants,  also  large  buildings 
of  every  description,  and  their  efficient  work  has  brought 
them  commissions  from  all  parts  of  New  England.  This 
entire  section  now  comprises  their  territory  and  they 
employ  about  two  hundred  and  fifty  men.  On  April  1, 
1923,  the  interest  was  incorporated  under  the  laws  of 
the  State  of  Massachusetts  for  the  sum  of  $250,000, 
Herbert  E.  Jennison  becoming  president,  and  Colonel  W. 
H.  Dolan,  treasurer.  Mr.  Jennison  is  also  president  and 
treasurer  of  the  Blake  Pump  &  Condenser  Company, 
with  plant  located  at  Sawyer  Passwav,  in  Fitchburg, 
and  is  an  important  enterprise  in  its  field.  This  con¬ 
cern  produces  general  pumping  machinery,  including  the 
hydraulic  apparatus  for  work  of  this  kind,  which  was 
in  great  demand  during  the  World  War.  Mr.  Jennison’s 
long  experience  has  been  of  the  greatest  value  in  the 
progress  of  this  company,  which  was  incorporated  in  the 
year  1907.  With  F.  C.  Smith  as  works  manager  and 
during  the  busy  season  a  full  complement  of  men  em¬ 
ployed,  this  concern  holds  a  leading  position  in  its  field. 

Further  active  as  the  owner  of  another  interest  known 
as  the  Thomson  Company,  Mr.  Jennison  is  in  this  con¬ 
nection  participating  in  the  continuous  forward  move¬ 
ment  for  the  benefit  of  dumb  animals.  The  business  con¬ 
sists  of  the  manufacture  of  zinc  horse  collars,  and  was 
founded  in  1877  hy  Alexander  Thomson.  During  Mr. 
Thomson’s  activities  he  conducted  the  business  under 
the  title  of  the  Thomson  Steel  Horse  Collar  Company, 
and  for  more  than  thirty  years,  or  until  his  death,  carried 
the  interest  forward  successfully.  It  was  then  taken 
over  by  Mr.  Jennison,  who  conducts  its  affairs  under 
the  title  of  the  Thomson  Company.  Mr.  Jennison  has 


134 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


not  exploited  the  affairs  of  this  concern  as  extensively 
as  in  the  case  of  his  other  interests,  but  its  growth  has 
been  steady  and  its  field  of  distribution  is  principally 
furnished  by  the  United  States  Government  and  various 
city  fire  departments  still  using  horse-drawn  equipment. 
Within  the  past  four  years  important  improvements 
have  been  made  in  the  construction  of  the  collar,  which 
is  now  pronounced  by  the  Society  for  the  Prevention  of 
Cruelty  to  Animals  to  be  the  best  device  ever  invented 
for  the  horse.  In  these  varied  activities  Herbert  E. 
Jennison  bears  a  progressive  and  useful  part  in  present 
day  affairs  and,  interested  in  all  progress,  he  endorses 
constructive  effort  in  every  line  of  advance. 


MARTIN  VAN  BUREN  HOWE,  the  venerable 
and  honored  head  of  the  well-known  chair  manufac¬ 
turing  concern  of  Howe,  Spaulding  Company,  Incor¬ 
porated,  is  still  one  of  the  active  figures  in  the  business 
life  of  Gardner,  Massachusetts.  Although  he  is  in 
the  eighty-seventh  year  of  his  age,  he  is  still  alert  to 
the  conditions  of  the  moment  and  as  active  as  many  men 
a  quarter  of  a  century  his  junior.  He  is  first  at  his 
desk  in  the  morning  and  one  of  the  last  to  leave  at 
night.  Loving  his  work  and  uneasy  when  not  busy,  he 
is  one  of  the  best  informed  men  of  the  day  regarding 
conditions  and  prospects  in  the  chair  manufacturing  in¬ 
dustry.  Mr.  Howe  is  a  son  of  Spooner  and  Phoebe 
(Briggs)  Howe,  his  father  a  native  of  Jamaica,  Ver¬ 
mont,  and  his  mother  of  Dartmouth,  Massachusetts. 
The  father  was  a  shoemaker  by  trade  in  the  early  period 
when  all  work  of  this  kind  was  done  by  hand,  and  con¬ 
ducted  a  shop  in  Jamaica,  Vermont,  until  the  time  of 
his  death.  Both  Mr.  Howe’s  parents  died  in  Jamaica 
many  years  ago. 

Martin  Van  Buren  Howe  was  born  at  Jamaica,  Ver¬ 
mont,  April  7,  1837.  His  education  was  received  in  the 
little  country  school  house  on  the  edge  of  the  woods, 
about  three  miles  from  the  village  of  Jamaica,  and  he 
completed  the  course  available  in  his  sixteen  year.  Born 
on  the  farm,  he  bore  a  part  in  the  activities  of  the  place 
even  as  a  child,  and  when  his  schooling  was  completed 
took  up  the  work  of  the  farm,  taking  a  man’s  place 
beside  his  step-father.  His  tastes,  however,  inclined 
him  more  to  a  business  career,  and  in  1855  he  came  to 
Massachusetts  and  found  employment  in  a  chair  factory 
in  East  Templeton.  About  two  years  later  he  went  to 
Ashburnham,  Massachusetts,  and  entered  the  employ 
of  the  Winchester  Brothers,  also  chair  manufacturers, 
with  which  firm  he  remained  for  about  ten  years.  Dur¬ 
ing  his  connection  with  the  Winchester  interests  Mr. 
Howe  worked  for  about  six  years  in  the  machine  shop 
of  the  plant,  learning  the  machinist’s  trade,  as  well  as 
that  of  pattern  maker.  In  April,  1867,  he  resigned  from 
their  employ  and  came  to  Gardner,  Massachusetts, 
where  he  entered  the  machine  shop  of  the  Heywood 
Brothers  &  Company.  About  a  year  later  he  was  trans¬ 
ferred  to  the  chair  department  of  the  same  concern, 
and  was  for  some  time  active  in  contract  work,  having 
sixty-five  men  under  him.  This  work  continued  for 
about  four  years,  then  he  was  placed  in  charge  of  the 
wood  working  department  of  the  same  concern,  in  which 
connection  he  served  for  about  fifteen  years.  In  March, 
1900,  Mr.  Howe  resigned  from  this  position  to  engage 
in  business  for  himself,  founding  the  present  interest 


of  Howe,  Spaulding  &  Company,  his  son-in-law,  George 
W.  Spaulding,  being  his  partner  in  the  business.  A 
period  of  widespread  financial  depression  came  on 
shortly  after  the  establishing  of  this  interest  and  during 
that  time  Mr.  Howe  managed  to  keep  his  head  above 
water.  Thereafter,  however,  his  advancement  was 
rapid  and  his  success  became  an  assured  fact.  He  went 
forward  with  the  courage  of  a  man  who  has  been  tried 
and  has  proven  his  own  ability,  and  he  has  developed 
one  of  the  successful  chair  manufacturing  concerns  of 
Gardner,  incorporated  July  1,  1923,  as  Howe,  Spaulding 
Company,  Incorporated;  M.  V.  B.  Howe,  president  and 
treasurer;  G.  W.  Spaulding,  vice-president;  G.  M.  Howe, 
clerk.  He  is  one  of  the  oldest  men  still  active  in  the 
business  life  of  this  city,  and  both  among  his  associates 
and  employees  is  looked  up  to  and  revered.  Among  the 
people  generally,  he  is  most  highly  esteemed,  and 
although  he  has  few  interests  outside  of  his  business, 
he  has  always  lent  his  influence  to  any  movement  which 
had  for  its  purpose  the  progress  of  the  community  or 
the  welfare  of  the  people. 

Mr.  Howe  married,  on  February  10,  i860,  Sarah  S. 
Metcalf,  of  Ashburnham,  Massachusetts,  who  survived 
until  recent  years  passing  away  on  June  28,  1922,  after 
sixty-two  years  of  happy  married  life.  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Howe  were  the  parents  of  four  children:  Two  sons  and 
two  daughters,  of  whom  three  are  living;  Alice  M.,  the 
wife  of  George  W.  Spaulding,  a  member  of  the  firm  of 
Howe,  Spaulding  Company,  Incorporated ;  Herbert  L., 
active  in  business  in  South  Gardner;  and  George  M., 
assistant  manager  for  Howe,  Spaulding  Company  In¬ 
corporated. 


ALVAN  TRACY  SIMONDS — As  the  present  head 
of  an  interest  which  for  upwards  of  a  century  has  been 
carried  forward  under  the  administration  of  members 
of  his  family,  Alvan  Tracy  Simonds  holds  a  position  of 
wide  usefulness,  and  in  carrying  this  enterprise  to  its 
present  importance  he  has  won  large  success.  The 
Simonds  Saw  and  Steel  Company,  of  Fitchburg,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  is  a  leading  concern  in  its  field  in  the  United 
States,  and  is  one  of  the  foremost  industrial  organiza¬ 
tions  of  Worcester  County. 

The  Simonds  family  came  from  England  to  America 
in  early  Colonial  times,  and  early  records  give  the  name 
of  the  pioneer  as  Samuel  Simonds,  Gentleman.  He 
settled  at  Ipswich,  Massachusetts,  and  was  considered  a 
leader  in  the  little  company  of  Puritans  who  settled 
the  Massachusetts  Bay  Colony,  serving  as  deputy  and 
assistant  under  Governor  Winthrop,  and  in  the  year  1673 
becoming  Deputy  Governor  of  Massachusetts. 

Abel  Simonds,  the  eighth  generation  in  direct  descent 
from  Samuel  Simonds,  was  bom  in  Fitchburg,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  December  10,  1804,  and  died  in  the  place  of 
his  birth,  April  22,  1874.  As  a  young  man  twenty-eight 
years  of  age,  he  became  active  in  business  in  partnership 
with  A.  T.  Farwell,  purchasing  a  mill  privilege  in  West 
Fitchburg.  There  in  1832  he  built  his  first  shop,  which 
formed  the  nucleus  of  the  present  interest,  and  this 
business  was  conducted  under  the  firm  name  of  J.  T. 
Farwell  &  Company.  In  the  year  1851  the  partnership 
was  dissolved  and  Abel  Simonds  continued  the  business 
independently  until  1864,  when  he  retired,  and  the  enter¬ 
prise  was  taken  over  by  his  sons  and  another  associate, 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


135 


under  the  title  of  Simonds  Brothers  '&  Company.  The 
personnel  of  the  company  was  then  Alvan  A.  Simonds, 
George  F.  Simonds,  and  Benjamin  Snow.  Prosperity 
and  steady  growth  continued  the  rule,  and  the  necessity 
for  the  expansion  of  the  plant  became  imperative.  Ac¬ 
cordingly,  in  1868,  the  business  was  incorporated  as  the 
Simonds  Manufacturing  Company,  among  its  charter 
members  being:  George  F.,  Alvan  A.,  Thomas  T.,  Daniel, 
and  Edwin  F.  Simonds.  A  new  and  for  the  time  highly 
modern  structure  was  erected  at  the  present  location  in 
the  city  of  Fitchburg.  Up  to  this  time  the  business  had 
comprised  the  manufacture  of  mower  knives  and  planer 
knives,  and  for  about  a  decade  no  radical  change  was 
made  in  the  product.  Tn  1878  they  disposed  of  their 
interest  in  the  manufacture  of  mower  knives,  at  the  same 
+ime  enlarging  the  other  department,  also  beginning  the 
manufacture  of  saws.  In  this  new  branch  they  employed 
n  entirely  new  system  of  tempering  and  straightening 
which  turned  out  a  product  greatly  superior  to  any 
previously  made.  Two  years  had  been  devoted  to  ten¬ 
tative  developments  in  this  special  field,  beginning  with 
circular  saws,  and  after  the  department  was  established 
they  added  cross-cut,  band,  and  hand  saws.  Meanwhile, 
for  twenty  years,  from  the  date  of  incorporation  until 
the  year  1888,  George  F.  Simonds  ably  filled  the  office  of 
president,  and  great  credit  is  due  to  his  far-sighted 
management  and  excellent  judgment  for  the  breadth  of 
activity  which  was  eventually  attained.  George  F. 
Simonds  then  resigned  to  form  a  new  company  and  enter 
a  different  field  of  endeavor,  and  he  was  succeeded  by 
Daniel  Simonds,  who  filled  the  office  of  president  from 
1888  until  his  death,  which  occurred  May  5,  1913.  Alvan 
A.  Simonds  left  the  concern  in  1875.  Before  and  during 
the  presidency  of  Daniel  Simonds  a  definite  policy  of 
expansion  was  followed.  Branch  offices  were  opened 
at  intervals  in  the  following  cities :  Chicago,  Illinois, 
(1880)  ;  San  Francisco,  California,  (1886)  ;  New  Or¬ 
leans,  Louisiana,  (1888);  Portland,  Oregon,  (1891); 
New  York  City,  (1892);  Seattle,  Washington,  (1898); 
Montreal,  Quebec,  (1906)  ;  St.  John,  New  Brunswick, 
(1906)  ;  and  Vancouver,  British  Columbia,  (1911). 

During  this  period  an  additional  factory  was  erected 
in  Chicago  in  1892,  and  eight  years  later  a  steel  mill  was 
established  by  the  company  in  the  same  city.  In  1911 
the  steel  mill  was  removed  to  Lockport,  New  York, 
where  a  complete  new  and  modern  equipment  was  in¬ 
stalled.  The  Fitchburg  plant  was  rebuilt  and  enlarged 
in  1905-06,  and  in  the  latter  year  the  present  great  fac¬ 
tory  in  Montreal,  Canada,  was  placed  in  operation.  In 
1906  also  the  manufacture  of  hack  saw  blades  and  files 
was  undertaken  in  a  separate  factory,  and  this  branch  of 
the  business  grew  so  rapidly  that  in  more  recent  years 
new  buildings  have  been  continually  added  to  accom¬ 
modate  the  routine  operation  of  the  interest.  Daniel 
Simonds  received  into  association  with  him  in  the  busi¬ 
ness  his  three  sons:  Alvan  T.,  who  since  1913  has  been 
president  of  the  company,  of  further  mention ;  Gifford 
K.,  now  general  manager,  of  further  mention;  and  Har¬ 
lan  K.,  now  treasurer,  of  further  mention.  These 
brothers  act  as  directors  also,  the  board  numbering 
four  other  members :  Thomas  F.  Howarth,  John  E. 
Kelley,  Charles  L.  Sands,  and  Albert  E.  Culley.  In  De¬ 
cember,  1922,  shortly  after  the  opening  of  the  branch 
office  in  Detroit,  Michigan,  the  company  sold  its  assets 


in  the  Simonds  File  Company,  in  combination  with  other 
interested  parties,  to  a  new  incorporation  known  as  the 
Simonds  Saw  and  Steel  Company,  the  personnel  of  this 
concern  comprising  the  same  officers  and  directors.  The 
product  of  this  concern  is  distributed  throughout  the 
world,  wherever  wood  or  metal  is  cut.  In  the  various 
factories  and  branch  offices  at  the  present  time  (1923) 
no  less  than  2,200  people  are  employed. 

Alvan  Tracy  Simonds,  eldest  son  of  Daniel  and  Ellen 
M.  Simonds,  was  born  at  Fitchburg,  Massachusetts,  De¬ 
cember  23,  1876.  His  education  was  begun  in  the  local 
schools,  and  he  was  graduated  from  the  Fitchburg  High 
School  in  the  class  of  1894.  Next  attending  Phillips- 
Exeter  Academy  for  one  year,  he  later  entered  Har¬ 
vard  University,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in  the 
class  of  1899.  Specializing  at  this  institution  in  eco¬ 
nomics  and  metallurgy,  Mr.  Simonds  then  took  up  ad¬ 
vanced  research  in  the  latter  field  at  the  School  of 
Metallurgy,  at  Sheffield,  England,  his  graduation  occur¬ 
ring  in  the  year  1900.  Thus  completing  his  preparations 
for  his  work  at  the  steel  center  of  the  old  world,  he 
entered  upon  his  career  well  equipped  for  responsibility. 
First  filling  the  position  of  laboratory  assistant  with  the 
Simonds  Saw  and  Steel  Company,  he  gained  invaluable 
experience  in  both  the  production  and  distribution  de¬ 
partments  of  the  plant.  He  next  filled  the  position  of 
department  foreman,  then  successively  order  entry  clerk, 
cost  accountant,  advertising  manager,  purchasing  agent, 
and  vice-president,  succeeding  to  the  presidency  of  the 
corporation  on  the  death  of  his  honored  father.  He 
is  further  identified  with  the  industrial  advance  as  a 
director  of  the  Hunter  Arms  Company,  Incorporated, 
of  Fulton,  New  York,  and  is  a  director  of  the  Fitchburg 
Bank  &  Trust  Company.  Mr.  Simonds  was  elected  a 
director  of  the  United  States  Chamber  of  Commerce  in 
May,  1922.  He  is  a  member  of  the  National  Manufac¬ 
turers’  Association,  the  American  Iron  and  Steel  Insti¬ 
tute,  a  director  of  the  American  Supply  &  Machinery 
Manufacturers’  Association  of  New  York  City,  and  a 
member  of  the  Fitchburg  Chamber  of  Commerce.  Dur¬ 
ing  the  World  War  he  served  with  the  rank  of  captain, 
from  May  until  December,  1917,  in  charge  of  the  pur¬ 
chase  and  production  of  helmets  and  body  armor  for 
the  United  States  Army,  then  at  the  close  of  that  period 
Captain  Simonds  was  relieved  from  duty  at  Washington, 
where  he  had  served  under  the  immediate  direction  of 
the  ordnance  department,  to  manufacture  arm/or  plate 
for  this  department.  In  many  other  phases  of  progres¬ 
sive  effort  Mr.  Simonds  holds  executive  responsibility 
or  bears  a  constructive  part.  He  was  a  founder  and 
guarantor  of  the  Fitchburg  Open  Forum,  and  held  his 
office  during  the  years  1919,  1920,  and  1921.  He  is  a 
member  of  the  visiting  committee  of  the  Harvard  School 
of  Business  Administration,  of  the  Harvard  Club  of 
Boston,  the  Engineers’  Club  of  New  York,  the  Brookline 
Country  Club  of  Boston,  and  the  Fay  and  Oak  Hill 
Country  clubs  of  Fitchburg.  He  attends  the  Calvanistic 
Congregational  Church. 

Alvan  Tracy  Simonds  married,  on  April  16,  1901, 
at  Albany,  New  York,  Susan  Gansevoort  Lansing,  and 
they  are  the  parents  of  two  children :  Robert  McClellan, 
born  April  ix,  1902;  and  Daniel,  born  February  28,  1906. 

Gifford  Kingsbury  Simonds,  second  son  of  Daniel 
and  Ellen  M.  Simonds,  was  born  at  Fitchburg  Massa- 


136 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


chusetts,  November  29,  1880.  Following  his  early  and 
preparatory  studies  in  the  city  of  his  birth,  he  attended 
military  school  at  Ossining,  New  York,  then  completed 
his  formal  education  at  Hopkinson  School,  in  Boston. 
He  then  spent  five  years  in  the  Fitchburg  factory  of  the 
concern,  working  through  the  different  departments, 
thereafter  devoting  a  certain  period  of  time  to  each  of 
the  various  office  departments,  thereby  familiarizing  him¬ 
self  thoroughly  with  every  branch  of  the  business.  He 
subsequently  became  treasurer  of  the  corporation,  and 
is  now  also  general  manager.  He  is  further  active  as  a 
director  of  the  First  National  Bank  of  Boston,  and  is  a 
director  of  the  Safety  Fund  National  Bank  of  Fitch¬ 
burg.  He  is  prominent  in  various  local  affairs,  was  at 
one  time  Alderman  of  Fitchburg,  is  a  member  of  the 
Fay,  Oak  Hill  Country,  and  Tedesco  Country  clubs,  all 
of  Fitchburg;  of  the  Corinthian  Yacht  Club  of  Marble¬ 
head,  Massachusetts,  and  the  Eastern  Yacht  Club.  He 
attends  the  Calvanistic  Congregational  Church.  Gif¬ 
ford  K.  Simonds  married,  at  Fitchburg,  Ruth  Wood¬ 
ward,  daughter  of  Frederick  F.,  and  Elizabeth  (How¬ 
land)  Woodward,  and  they  are  the  parents  of  three 
children :  Priscilla,  born  in  191 1 ;  Kingsbury,  born  in 
1914;  and  John,  born  in  1917. 

Harlan  Kenneth  Simonds,  youngest  son  of  Daniel  and 
Ellen  M.  Simonds,  was  bom  January  5,  1883.  His  early 
education  was  received  in  the  local  institutions,  and  he 
later  attended  military  school  at  Ossining,  New  York, 
also  the  Hopkinson  School  of  Boston.  As  his  brothers 
had  done,  he  entered  the  plant  of  the  Simonds  Company 
and  learned  all  branches  of  the  business  through  the 
eminently  practical  method  of  experience.  Thus  fitting 
himself  for  the  executive  responsibility  which  now  de¬ 
volves  upon  him  as  treasurer  of  the  concern,  he  is  hold¬ 
ing  high  rank  in  the  business  world  of  Fitchburg. 


ELMER  ALONZO  ONTHANK— Those  who  build 
up  and  safeguard  the  interests  of  financial  institutions 
which  encourage  thrift  and  protect  the  savings  of  the 
public  serve  the  community  as  well  as  the  organization 
with  which  they  are  connected,  in  a  substantial  way.  To 
them  is  committed  much,  and  upon  their  integrity  and 
faithfulness  depends  much  of  happiness.  If  they  fail  in 
honor  or  in  watchfulness,  misfortune  and  unhappiness 
must  come  to  many.  One  of  the  many  faithful  pro¬ 
tectors  of  financial  prosperity  of  others  is  Elmer  Alonzo 
Onthank  president  of  the  Safety  Fund  National  Bank  of 
Fitchburg,  Massachusetts. 

Mr.  Onthank  is  a  native  of  New  England,  a  son  of 
Nahum  Ball,  a  portrait  painter,  whose  work  may  be  seen 
in  many  of  the  prominent  galleries  of  the  country,  and 
of  Caroline  Heath  (Clancey)  Onthank.  Born  in  West 
Newton,  Massachusetts,  April  5,  1870,  he  completed  his 
education  in  the  English  High  School  of  Boston,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  and  then  began  his  long  association  with  the 
banking  business.  His  first  position  was  with  the  old 
Blackstone  National  Bank  of  Boston,  in  the  employ  of 
which  he  held  various  positions  for  a  period  of  nine 
years,  from  1888  to  1897.  In  the  latter  year  he  severed 
his  connection  with  the  Blackstone  National  Bank  in 
order  to  accept  the  position  of  cashier  of  the  Safety 
Fund  National  Bank,  of  Fitchburg,  Massachusetts. 
During  the  more  than  a  quarter  of  a  century  which 
has  passed  since  that  time,  he  has  continuously  main¬ 


tained  his  connection  with  that  institution,  giving  to  the 
advancement  of  its  interests  his  constant  care  and  de¬ 
votion.  The  value  of  his  service  has  been  fully  appre¬ 
ciated,  and  in  1907  he  was  made  president  of  the  bank. 
His  ability  and  his  knowledge  of  banking  affairs  have 
brought  to  him  responsibilities  which  affect  the  interests 
of  many  financial  institutions  outside  of  Fitchburg,  and 
in  1919  he  was  made  president  of  the  Massachusetts 
Bankers’  Association,  serving  until  1920.  In  that  year 
his  sphere  of  activities  was  widened  and  he  became  a 
member  of  the  executive  council  National  Bank  Division 
of  the  American  Bankers’  Association  for  the  New  Eng¬ 
land  division,  which  office  of  trust  he  still  holds  (1923). 
He  is  also  chairman,  stockholder  and  on  the  advisory 
committee  of  the  Federal  Reserve  Bank  of  Boston. 

Fraternally  Mr.  Onthank  is  a  member  and  Past  Mas¬ 
ter  of  Aurora  Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted  Masons,  in 
which  order  he  has  taken  all  the  degrees  up  to  and  in¬ 
cluding  the  thirty-second.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the 
Sons  of  the  American  Revolution.  He  is  well  known 
in  club  circles,  being  affiliated  with  the  Algonquin  Club  of 
Boston,  Bankers’  Club  of  New  York  City,  Corinthian 
Yacht  Club  of  Marblehead,  Massachusetts;  and  Fay 
Club  and  Oak  Hill  Country  Club  of  Fitchburg,  Massa¬ 
chusetts.  He  has  many  friends  who  esteem  him  both 
for  his  business  ability  and  for  his  personal  character¬ 
istics.  He  religious  affiliation  is  with  the  First  Parish 
Unitarian  Church  of  Fitchburg. 

Elmer  Alonzo  Onthank  married,  on  March  10,  1903, 
at  West  Roxbury,  Massachusetts,  Grace  Bandini  Pierce, 
daughter  of  Josiah  and  Mary  (Stearns)  Pierce.  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Onthank  are  the  parents  of  three  sons :  Pierce, 
who  was  born  January  18,  1904;  Curtis  Heath,  who  was 
born  May  24,  1905 ;  and  Elmer  Alonzo,  J r.,  who  was 
born  June  4,  1910. 


FRED  M.  JOHNSON — Throughout  the  entire 
period  of  his  business  career  Fred  M.  Johnson  has  been 
identified  with  the  lumber  industry,  and  as  treasurer  of 
the  W.  A.  Fuller  Lumber  Company  of  Leominster,  and 
principal  owner  of  the  F.  M.  Johnson  Lumber  Company 
of  Fitchburg,  he  is  connected  with  two  of  the  important 
concerns  of  their  kind  in  the  county.  He  is  also  identi¬ 
fied  with  other  lumber  interests  and  is  thoroughly  fa¬ 
miliar  with  all  angles  of  the  lumber  business. 

Born  in  Newport,  Vermont  October  8,  1868,  Mr. 
Johnson  is  a  son  of  Isaac  D.  Johnson,  a  native  of  Jay, 
Vermont,  who  was  engaged  in  the  insurance  business  to 
the  time  of  his  death  in  1920,  and  of  Elizabeth  (Sias) 
Johnson,  born  in  Swanton,  Vermont,  died  in  1920.  He 
attended  the  public  schools  of  his  native  district,  and 
when  his  school  term  was  completed  found  his  first 
employment  in  a  lumber  concern,  which  line  of  business 
he  has  continued  to  follow.  At  the  present  time  he 
is  treasurer  of  the  W.  A.  Fuller  Lumber  Company  of 
Leominster,  which  concern  is  one  of  the  well  known 
and  oldest  establishments  of  the  State.  Pie  is  also  asso¬ 
ciated  with  the  Foster-Johnson  Company  as  one  of  the 
partners  in  a  lumber  operating  company,  which  has  large 
holdings  in  Maine,  and  is  also  the  principal  owner  and 
treasurer  of  the  F.  M.  Johnson  Lumber  Company  of 
Fitchburg.  The  latter  is  the  successor  of  a  concern 
which  had  for  years  been  operated  as  a  branch  of  the 
W.  A.  Fuller  Lumber  Company  of  Leominster  Massa- 


■ 


■ 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


137 


chusetts.  On  January  1,  1922,  it  was  incorporated  as 
the  F.  M.  Johnson  Lumber  Company.  The  plant  is  lo¬ 
cated  on  one  of  the  most  desirable  sites  in  Fitchburg, 
and  has  a  ground  area  of  40,000  square  feet,  about  half 
of  which  is  covered  by  modern  buildings.  The  opera¬ 
tions  of  the  concern  extend  beyond  Fitchburg  to  the 
cities — Gardner,  Ashby,  Westminster,  Princeton,  and 
other  parts  of  that  section  of  the  State.  Throughout 
his  long  career  Mr.  Johnson’s  close  and  continuous  as¬ 
sociation  with  the  lumber  trade  has  made  him  an  expert 
in  that  field,  and  he  is  widely  known  as  one  of  the  best 
authorities  on  the  lumber  market  and  on  lumber  qualities 
in  the  East.  He  is  well  known  in  Masonic  circles,  being 
a  member  of  all  bodies  of  the  York  Rite  as  far  as  that 
of  the  Knights  Templar,  and  his  club  is  the  Leominster 
Club.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce, 
and  is  also  president  of  the  Mutual  Cooperative  Bank 
of  Leominster.  His  religious  affiliation  is  with  the  First 
Church  of  Christian  Scientists. 

Mr.  Johnson  married,  September  14,  1892,  Mary  G. 
Graves,  who  was  born  in  West  Shefford,  Canada,  daugh¬ 
ter  of  Sylvester  and  Mary  (Kent)  Graves.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Johnson  are  the  parents  of  one  son,  Stanley  G. 
Johnson,  who  was  born  August  23,  1903,  and  is  now 
manager  of  the  F.  M.  Johnson  Lumber  Company  of 
Fitchburg,  Massachusetts. 


ALFRED  FREE,  Ph.  D. — Of  wide  social  experience 
and  varied  scholastic  attainments,  Dr.  Free  has  had  an 
enviable  career  not  only  as  a  minister  of  the  gospel,  but 
also  as  an  educationalist.  He  was  bom  at  La  Grange, 
New  York,  April  2,  1850,  son  of  John  T.  and  Mary 
E.  (Doughty)  Free.  His  father,  who  was  a  member 
of  an  old  New  York  family  that  had  long  been  resident 
in  Dutchess  County,  was  a  veteran  of  the  Civil  War. 
He  served  during  the  entire  period  of  the  conflict,  having 
been  one  of  the  first  to  enlist  and  one  of  the  last  that  was 
mustered  out.  When  the  war  was  over  he  returned  to 
his  farm  and  began  to  rebuild  his  business,  which  had 
been  sadly  interrupted  by  his  long  period  of  military 
service.  The  owner  of  a  fine  tract  of  land,  he  spent  the 
remainder  of  his  life  in  the  cultivation  of  the  soil.  A 
great  believer  in  scientific  methods  in  agriculture,  he 
experimented  unceasingly  and  took  an  active  part  in  all 
public  matters  relating  to  the  needs  of  the  land  and  the 
efficient  transportation  and  marketing  of  farm  products. 

As  a  boy  Dr.  Free  enjoyed  exceptional  educational  ad¬ 
vantages,  his  parents  sparing  themselves  no  expense  in 
an  effort  to  give  him  an  ideal  cultural  and  scientific  edu¬ 
cation.  At  an  early  age  he  was  entered  as  a  pupil  of 
the  La  Grange  public  schools.  After  he  was  graduated 
from  high  school  he  proceeded  to  Colgate  College  at 
Hamilton,  New  York,  graduating  therefrom  in  the  year 
1872  with  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts.  In  Europe 
he  became  a  post-graduate  student  at  Leipsic  Univer¬ 
sity  and  was  graduated  from  that  famous  institution  of 
higher  learning  with  the  degree  of  Doctor  of  Philosophy. 

Returning  to  his  native  land  Dr.  Free  was  ordained 
to  the  ministry  of  the  Baptist  Church.  His  first  charge 
was  at  Norwich,  Connecticut,  where  for  three  years  he 
was  actively  engaged  in  ministerial  work.  From  Nor¬ 
wich  he  was  transferred  to  Philadelphia,  Pennsylvania, 
and  for  the  next  thirteen  years  he  carried  on  his  work 
in  that  «'ity  as  pastor  of  the  Falls  of  Schuylkill  Baptist 


Church.  In  1880  Dr.  Free,  whose  theological  ideas  had 
slowly  been  undergoing  a  change  decided  to  resign  from 
the  Baptist  ministry  in  order  to  enter  the  Unitarian 
Association.  As  a  Unitarian  minister  his  first  charge 
was  at  Turner’s  Falls,  Massachusetts.  In  1896  he  went 
to  Florence,  Northampton,  where  he  remained  until 
1909,  in  charge  of  the  Free  Congregational  Society.  For 
the  past  fourteen  years  he  has  had  charge  of  the  Church 
of  the  Unity  at  Winchendon,  where  by  his  preaching, 
popular  lectures,  and  entertainments  he  has  endeavored 
to  foster  an  enlightened  interest  in  religious  and  edu¬ 
cational  affairs.  His  first  service  in  connection  with  the 
public  schools  were  given  during  his  pastorate  in  Phila¬ 
delphia,  where  for  several  years  he  was  a  member  of 
the  School  Board.  He  has  been  a  member  of  the 
School  Board  at  Turner’s  Falls,  and  also  at  Winchen¬ 
don.  Widely  known  as  a  scholar  and  thinker,  Dr.  Free 
has  delivered  many  lectures  on  popular  science.  Mining 
engineering  is  one  of  his  favorite  subjects  of  study,  and 
he  is  regarded  as  an  authority  in  matters  concerning 
mining  laws  and  regulations,  as  well  as  a  geological 
expert  of  long  experience  in  the  practical  study  of  min¬ 
ing  problems.  Dr.  Free’s  intellectual  interests  have 
always  been  wide,  and  he  has  followed  up  many  lines 
of  thought  and  conducted  many  researches  to  advance 
the  sum  of  human  knowledge.  He  has  had  the  ines¬ 
timable  privilege  of  coming  into  contact  with  the  best 
minds  both  here  and  abroad,  and  is  widely  known  for 
his  scientific  and  philosophical  attainments. 

Dr.  Free  is  a  member  of  the  Independent  Order  of 
Odd  Fellows,  and  belongs  to  the  Grand  Lodge  of  that 
organization  of  Pennsylvania.  He  also  belongs  to  the 
Avon  Club  of  Winchendon. 

Dr.  Free  married  (first)  May  Morton  Woodbury  of 
Willimantic,  Connecticut.  In  1917  he  married  (second) 
Marion  Moore  Perkins,  daughter  of  Thomas  A.  and 
Delia  A.  Perkins.  Mrs.  Free  is  a  native  of  Norwich, 
Connecticut.  Dr.  Free  has  no  children. 


GEORGE  ELI  HOV/E — One  of  the  long  familiar 
and  always  honored  names  of  New  England  is  that  of 
Howe,  and  George  Eli  Howe,  of  Lancaster,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  is  a  direct  descendant  through  both  paternal  and 
maternal  lines  of  the  immigrant  ancestor  of  this  family, 
who  settled  in  Massachusetts  in  the  early  half  of  the 
seventeenth  century.  Mr.  Howe  is  a  leading  citizen  of 
Lancaster,  and  in  many  branches  of  organized  advance 
in  this  part  of  Worcester  County  he  bears  a  construc¬ 
tive  and  progressive  part. 

John  Howe,  the  pioneer  of  this  family  in  America, 
settled  at  Sudbury,  Massachusetts,  in  1639  and  shared 
in  the  division  of  Sudbury  Meadows  in  that  and  the  fol¬ 
lowing  year.  With  the  progressive  spirit  of  his  time 
he  reached  outward  to  wider  possibilities,  and  became 
one  of  the  petitioners  for  the  grant  of  land  which 
eventually  comprised  the  town  of  Marlborough,  Massa¬ 
chusetts.  To  that  locality  he  removed  from  Sudbury,  in 
1657  or  1658,  and  was  one  of  the  earliest,  if  not  the 
first  white  inhabitant  of  Marlborough.  He  opened  the 
first  tavern  in  that  town  about  1661,  and  his  influence  in 
the  community  was  great.  He  had  served  as  Selectman 
in  Sudbury,  and  from  1661-64  he  was  active  as  Select¬ 
man  of  Marlborough. 

In  direct  descent  from  John  Howe  through  his  son, 


138 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


Josiah  Howe,  Eli  E.  Howe,  father  of  the  subject  of 
this  review,  is  the  seventh  generation  from  the  pioneer. 
Eli  E.  Howe  was  engaged  as  a  farmer  throughout  his 
active  lifetime,  but  has  for  a  considerable  period  been 
retired,  and  is  now  (1924)  still  living,  at  the  advanced 
age  of  ninety-two  years.  In  direct  descent  from  John 
Howe  through  his  son,  Samuel  Howe,  Joseph  Toombs 
Howe,  late  of  Natick,  Massachusetts,  was  the  seventh 
generation  from  the  pioneer,  and  his  daughter,  Ella  J. 
Howe,  became  the  adopted  daughter  of  George  W. 
Howe,  late  of  Lancaster,  Massachusetts.  Eli  E.  Howe 
married  Ella  J.  Howe,  thus  uniting  the  two  lines  after 
the  lapse  of  more  than  two  centuries. 

George  Eli  Howe,  son  of  Eli  and  Ella  J.  (Howe) 
Howe,  was  born  at  Lancaster,  Massachusetts,  May  19, 
1874.  Receiving  his  early  education  in  the  public  and 
high  schools  of  his  birthplace,  Mr.  Howe  later  attended 
Worcester  Polytechnic  Institute.  From  that  time  for¬ 
ward  for  twenty  years  Mr.  Howe  served  as  private 
secretary  to  George  W.  Howe.  Meanwhile,  various 
public  duties  commanded  his  attention,  and  from  the 
year  1912  he  served  as  member  and  secretary  of  the 
Board  of  Health  of  Lancaster.  He  was  appointed  milk 
inspector  in  1914  and  became  prominently  identified  with 
the  Social  Service  Association.  He  has  now  for  a 
number  of  years  served  as  chairman  of  the  Public  Health 
Committee,  and  in  this  capacity  he  has  general  charge 
of  the  work  of  this  organization.  He  has  also,  since 
1899,  ably  filled  the  office  of  Justice  of  the  Peace,  and 
through  both  his  public  and  private  activities  has  con¬ 
tributed  in  no  slight  degree  to  the  general  progress  and 
welfare.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Massachusetts  Asso¬ 
ciations  of  Boards  of  Health,  and  is  one  of  the  trustees 
of  the  Lancaster  Charitable  Fund.  He  is  a  member  of 
the  Unitarian  church,  and  chairman  of  the  standing  com¬ 
mittee  of  the  official  board. 

George  Eli  Howe  married,  on  September  4,  1907,  at 
Lancaster,  Massachusetts,  Mabel  Ward,  daughter  of 
Richard  and  Fannie  A.  (Andrews)  Ward,  both  of  Lan¬ 
caster,  but  formerly  of  Boston.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Howe 
reside  in  Lancaster  and  are  leading  figures  in  the  social 
and  welfare  activities  of  the  community. 


REV.  ROBERT  C.  DOUTHIT— In  the  religious 
advance  of  Worcester  County,  Massachusetts,  Rev. 
Robert  C.  Douthit  holds  a  prominent  position  as  pastor 
of  the  Petersham  Unitarian  Church,  which  office  he  has 
now  consecutively  filled  since  the  year  1912.  In  all  that 
pertains  to  community  advance,  as  well  as  along  the 
special  line  of  religious  duties,  Mr.  Douthit  keeps  in 
touch  with  all  progress,  and  is  a  supporter  of  individual 
and  community  effort  in  the  right  direction.  Entertain¬ 
ing  broadly  liberal  convictions,  his  natural  benevolence 
of  spirit  and  keen  interest  in  humankind  fit  him  in  a 
peculiarly  happy  way  for  the  duties  of  his  sacred  office, 
and  he  has  done  much  for  the  local  advance  and  the 
spiritual  welfare  of  the  people.  He  is  a  son  of  Jasper 
L.  and  Emily  (Lovell)  Douthit,  his  father  a  Unitarian 
clergyman  since  1867  and  now  (1923)  one  of  the  ven¬ 
erated  figures  of  the  church. 

Robert  C.  Douthit  was  born  at  Shelbyville,  Illinois, 
and  following  his  early  studies  entered  the  Meadville, 
Pennsylvania,  Theological  School,  from  which  he  was 
graduated  in  due  course.  He  later  took  up  special  post¬ 


graduate  work  at  the  University  of  Wisconsin,  and  was 
ordained  to  the  ministry  in  1894.  His  first  charge  was 
the  Unitarian  church  at  Baraboo,  Wisconsin,  and  there¬ 
after  he  served  successively  at  Dover,  Massachusetts,  and 
Castine,  Maine.  In  Petersham, Massachusetts,  Mr.  Douthit 
has  served  two  pastorates,  having  been  appointed  to  the 
local  Unitarian  church  in  1898,  and  serving  at  that  time  for 
a  period  of  four  years,  then  later  returning  in  1912. 
Since  the  latter  date  he  has  continued  active  in  this 
community,  his  work  counting  in  a  large  measure  for 
the  public  advance  as  well  as  for  the  welfare  and  spirit¬ 
ual  growth  of  his  congregation.  Supporting  the  Repub¬ 
lican  party  as  a  rule  in  public  affairs,  Mr.  Douthit  nev¬ 
ertheless  endorses  all  worthy  effort  of  whatever  nature, 
or  under  whatever  auspices.  He  served  as  moderator 
of  the  town  meeting  for  several  years,  but  has  other¬ 
wise  never  accepted  public  office.  Fraternally  Mr. 
Douthit  is  affiliated  with  the  Free  and  Accepted  Masons, 
the  Patrons  of  Husbandry,  of  which  he  was  master  of 
the  Petersham  Grange  for  two  years,  and  the  Knights 
of  Pythias. 

Robert  C.  Douthit  married,  at  Shelbyville,  Illinois, 
August  8,  1894,  Lillian  McGilvra,  daughter  of  Alex¬ 
ander  McGilvra,  and  they  are  the  parents  of  two  chil¬ 
dren:  Alison  M.  D.  Beardsley,  born  January  6,  1896; 
and  Macleod  L.,  born  September  26,  1898. 


FRANK  H.  FOSS — Broadly  successful  in  the  con¬ 
struction  world  of  Worcester  County,  Massachusetts, 
and  indeed  active  throughout  a  wide  region  in  New 
England,  Frank  H.  Foss  is  a  noteworthy  figure  in  the 
business  life  of  this  State,  and  with  interests  centering 
in  the  city  of  Fitchburg  is  bearing  a  practical  part 
in  the  general  advance.  Mr.  Foss  is  a  son  of  Orrin  F. 
and  Hannah  H.  (Fiske)  Foss,  his  father  for  many 
years  a  successful  mason  contractor  in  the  State  of 
Maine,  and  later  active  along  the  same  line  of  endeavor 
at  Medfield,  Massachusetts. 

Frank  H.  Foss  was  born  at  Augusta,  Maine,  Septem¬ 
ber  20,  1865.  His  education  was  begun  in  the  public 
schools  of  Maine,  and  he  later  attended  Kents  Hill,  Semi¬ 
nary,  Maine.  Meantime,  when  still  in  school,  Mr.  Foss 
devoted  the  summer  months  to  activity  with  his  father, 
and  under  the  instructions  of  the  older  man  served  a 
regular  apprenticeship,  thoroughly  mastering  the  trade, 
and  gaining  at  the  same  time  a  general  familiarity  with 
the  business  side  of  contracting  activities.  In  the  year  1884, 
the  family  removing  to  Livermore  Falls,  Maine,  Mr. 
Foss  became  associated  with  his  father  in  business  under 
the  firm  name  of  O.  F.  Foss  &  Son,  masons  and  contrac¬ 
tors.  This  enterprise  continued  successfully  for  a  period 
of  eight  years,  then  both  father  and  son  were  induced 
to  locate  in  Medfield,  Massachusetts,  and  become  fore¬ 
men  for  Darling  Brothers,  leading  contractors  of  Wor¬ 
cester  and  Medfield.  About  one  year  later  Mr.  Frank 
H.  Foss  became  associated  with  Walter  K.  Wiley  of 
Fitchburg,  Massachusetts,  under  the  firm  name  of  Wiley 
&  Foss,  and  together  they  have  developed  a  very  exten¬ 
sive  and  largely  prosperous  interest.  They  are  engaged 
along  various  lines  of  contracting,  their  activities  em¬ 
bracing  construction  work  of  many  kinds,  masonry, 
building,  cement,  the  setting  of  foundations  for  boilers, 
etc.,  also  stucco  work  and  outside  plastering.  They 
hold  a  leading  position  in  their  field  in  this  State. 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


139 


In  various  interests  of  the  city,'  the  State  and  the 
Nation,  Mr.  Foss  keeps  in  touch  with  the  movement  of 
the  times,  and  has  served  in  the  public  administration 
of  the  city  of  Fitchburg  on  more  than  one  occasion.  As 
far  back  as  the  year  1906  he  was  elected  to  the  City 
Council,  and  served  for  three  successive  years.  In  1909 
he  was  elected  to  the  Board  of  Aldermen,  and  was  a 
member  of  that  body  for  four  successive  years.  During 
1914-15-16  he  was  active  on  the  Water  Board,  and  in 
1916  he  was  elected  to  the  highest  local  office  in  the 
gift  of  the  people — that  of  Mayor.  He  ably  served 
in  this  responsible  capacity  during  a  period  of  four 
years,  his  reelections  definitely  appraising  his  efficiency 
and  usefulness  in  the  public  service.  Mr.  Foss  was 
elected  a  member  of  the  Republican  State  Committee  in 
the  year  1915,  and  that  body  elected  him  as  their  chair¬ 
man  in  1921,  which  position  he  still  holds  (1924).  In 
the  local  world  of  finance  his  name  is*  also  influential  as 
a  director  of  the  Fidelity  Cooperative  Bank,  and  he 
serves  on  the  board  of  investments  of  the  Fitchburg 
Savings  Bank.  He  is  widely  affiliated  fraternally,  being 
a  member  of  Aurora  Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted  Masons ; 
Thomas  Chapter,  Royal  Arch  Masons;  Jerusalem  Com- 
mandery,  Knights  Templar;  Massachusetts  Consistory, 
Ancient  Accepted  Scottish  Rite,  in  which  he  holds  the 
thirty-second  degree;  and  Aleppo  Temple,  Ancient 
Arabic  Order  Nobles  of  the  Mystic  Shrine;  also  a 
member  of  the  Masonic  Club.  He  is  a  member  of  the 
Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks,  the  Boston 
Athletic  Association,  the  Fay  and  Oak  Hill  Country 
clubs  of  Fitchburg,  and  is  identified  with  the  Universalist 
church. 

Frank  H.  Foss  married  Sibyl  S.  Alden,  daughter  of 
Dr.  Isaiah  and  Dora  (Staples)  Alden,  of  Wyoming  City, 
Iowa.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Foss  have  three  children :  I,  Ray 
Alden,  born  in  May,  1895 ;  a  graduate  of  Worcester  Tech¬ 
nical  Institute  (1918),  who  enlisted  in  the  aviation 
branch  of  the  United  States  Army  in  November,  1917, 
detailed  to  Kelly  Field,  at  San  Antonio,  Texas,  where  he 
was  assigned  to  engineering  work,  and  was  discharged 
in  November,  1918;  is  now  active  as  chemist  for  the 
American  Woolen  Company.  2.  Ruth  Hannah,  born  in 
April,  1900;  a  graduate  of  Simmons  College,  of  Boston 
(1922),  now  employed  by  the  Sanborn  Manufacturing 
Company.  3.  Dorothy  Sibyl,  born  in  1901,  a  graduate  of 
Siirimons  College  (1923),  now  active  in  the  employ  of 
the  Fitchburg  Mutual  Fire  Insurance  Company. 


CHARLES  CARUSO— The  life  of  Charles  Caruso 
exemplifies  in  a  very  marked  and  noteworthy  manner, 
fineness  and  beauty  of  usefulness.  In  a  business  way 
he  has  attained  large  success,  but  far  from  devoting  his 
gains  to  wholly  personal  uses,  he  has  rather  given  con¬ 
stant  thought  and  effort  to  the  needs  and  welfare  of 
others,  and  his  residence  town  of  Milford,  Massachusetts, 
bears  many  evidences  of  his  benevolences  of  spirit.  A 
native  of  Italy,  Mr.  Caruso  came  to  this  country  as  a 
young  man,  settling  in  Milford  nearly  forty  years  ago. 
He  has  since  given  to  the  progress  of  the  community 
his  best  efforts,  contributing  to  every  advance  movement, 
leading  many  public  endeavors  for  worthy  purposes,  and 
personally  executing  various  beneficent  deeds.  He  is 
a  son  of  Vincent  and  Mary  Caruso,  his  father  died  in 
America  at  the  age  of  seventy-four  years,  while  his 


mother  lived  to  the  great  age  of  ninety-four  years,  also 
spending  the  latter  part  of  her  life  in  America,  where 
she  died. 

Charles  Caruso  was  bom  at  Isernia,  Italy,  June  21, 
1864.  He  had  the  advantage  of  an  excellent  education 
in  his  native  land,  and  at  the  age  of  twenty  years  came 
to  America  and  settled  in  Milford,  Massachusetts.  This 
was  in  1884,  and  he  immediately  opened  business,  estab¬ 
lishing  a  bank  under  the  title  of  the  Bank  of  the  People. 
Two  years  later  he  established  a  steamship  agency  in 
connection  with  this  bank.  This  shortly  became  and 
has  ever  since  continued  one  of  the  leading  Italian 
banking  institutions  of  Worcester  County,  holding  high 
rank  among  the  banks  in  its  field  in  the  State  of  Massa¬ 
chusetts.  This  is  not,  however,  Mr.  Caruso’s  only  in¬ 
terest.  He  early  became  a  shareholder  in  other  enter¬ 
prises,  and  for  years  past  has  owned  the  Caruso  Monu¬ 
mental  Company,  a  concern  which  was  doing  a  very  ex¬ 
tensive  business  and  is  leading  its  field  in  this  part  of 
the  State.  He  has  long  owned  large  real  estate  holdings 
and  has  done  more  or  less  development  work  in  this 
connection.  He  built  several  houses,  and  the  Roman 
Catholic  Church  of  the  Sacred  Heart  of  Jesus  stands 
as  a  monument  to  his  devoted  efforts  and  his  business 
ability  applied  to  a  worthy  cause.  He,  with  others, 
built  and  financed  the  entire  project  of  the  church,  stand¬ 
ing  back  of  all  the  costs  of  its  completion  and  the 
beautifying  of  the  grounds.  In  the  public  life  of  the 
community  Mr.  Caruso  has  long  taken  the  deepest 
interest  and  has  served  in  various  capacities,  his  en¬ 
deavors  counting  broadly  for  the  public  welfare.  For 
thirty-two  years  he  has  been  constable  of  Milford,  and 
has  long  served  as  a  member  of  the  local  committee  on 
public  safety  and  the  local  Board  of  Trade.  He  has 
done  much  detective  work,  for  which  he  has  become 
widely  famous,  his  cleverness  and  alertness  giving  it 
great  value  to  the  public.  He  was  an  enthusiastic 
worker  in  all  the  home  war  activities,  and  since  then 
aroused  the  interest  of  the  people  in  the  building  of  a 
beautiful  monument  on  the  public  square  in  memory  of 
the  veterans  of  the  World  War,  a  really  fine  work  of 
art,  built  of  native  granite,  which  he  personally  designed 
and  had  erected.  Fraternally  Mr.  Caruso  holds  mem¬ 
bership  in  Milford  Lodge,  Benevolent  and  Protective 
Order  of  Elks ;  the  Knights  of  Columbus ;  the  Foresters 
of  America ;  the  Central  Labor  Union ;  the  Italian  Mondo 
Socorso;  and  is  vice-president  of  the  local  Police  Asso¬ 
ciation.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Roman  Catholic  Church 
of  the  Sacred  Heart  of  Jesus. 

Charles  Caruso  married,  in  Franklin,  Massachusetts, 
on  November  26,  1889,  Teresa  Fiorani,  daughter  of 
Raphael  and  Santina  Fiorani.  They  are  the  parents  of 
one  son,  Alfred  B.,  born  January  12,  1894,  in  Milford, 
who  was  educated  in  the  local  high  school  and  at  the 
Boston  School  of  Designing,  and  who  now  manages  his 
father’s  many  business  enterprises.  He  married,  in  Mil¬ 
ford,  on  April  21,  1918,  Alma  Hammerquist,  and  they 
have  one  child,  Norma  M.  In  these  two  figures  above, 
father  and  son,  are  represented  the  finest  type  of  Italian- 
American  citizenship. 


ROBERT  SHURTLEFF  WALLACE— Standing 
at  a  vital  point  in  the  production  of  cotton  textile  goods 


140 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


in  New  England,  Robert  S.  Wallace,  of  Fitchburg,  is 
prominent  in  the  manufacture  of  cotton  yarns,  as  treas¬ 
urer  of  the  Fitchburg  Yarn  Company.  In  this  enter¬ 
prise  he  is  associated  with  some  of  the  leading  citizens 
of  Fitchburg,  and  his  name  is  an  influential  one  in  the 
progress  of  the  city.  Mr.  Wallace  is  a  son  of  Herbert 
I.  and  Amy  Louise  (Upton)  Wallace,  his  father  for 
many  years  connected  with  the  Fitchburg  Paper  Com¬ 
pany  but  now  retired. 

.Robert  S.  Wallace  was  born  in  Fitchburg,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  September  28,  1888.  His  education  was  begun  in 
the  local  schools,  and  he  is  a  graduate  of  the  Middlesex 
School,  of  Concord,  Massachusetts,  class  of  1907,  and 
Harvard  University,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in 
1911.  Mr.  Wallace  has  been  associated  with  the  Fitch¬ 
burg  Yarn  Company  since  the  early  years  of  his  experi¬ 
ence  in  the  business  world,  mastering  the  various 
branches  of  the  enterprise  and  thoroughly  familiarizing 
himself  with  the  work  of  the  different  departments.  His 
natural  business  ability  and  thorough  training  have  been 
factors  in  his  success,  and  he  is  counted  among  the  really 
significant  figures  of  the  day  in  Fitchburg.  The  per¬ 
sonnel  of  this  organization  is  as  follows :  President,  J. 
P.  Lyman;  vice-president  and  general  manager,  George 
P.  Grant;  and  treasurer,  Robert  S.  Wallace.  H.  I. 
Wallace  was  the  predecessor  of  the  present  treasurer, 
who  has  served  since  the  year  1913.  This  concern 
operates  60,000  spindles  and  employs  about  four  hundred 
people.  During  the  World  War  Mr.  Wallace  was  com¬ 
missioned  captain  of  the  Quartermaster’s  Department  of 
the  United  States  Army  in  October,  1917.  He  was 
detailed  to  Boston  in  charge  of  cotton  goods  production 
throughout  New  England.  Mr.  Wallace  was  retained  on 
this  side  of  the  Atlantic  throughout  the  period  of  the 
war,  and  received  his  honorable  discharge  from  the 
service  on  June  14,  1919.  Mr.  Wallace  is  a  director  of 
the  Fitchburg  Bank  &  Trust  Company,  a  director  of  the 
Rodney-Wallace  Company,  of  Fitchburg,  and  is  well 
known  in  club  circles,  being  a  director  of  the  Marl¬ 
boro  Country  Club  and  a  member  of  the  board  of 
governors  of  the  Oak  Hill  Country  Club.  He  is  further 
a  member  of  the  Harvard  clubs  of  Boston  and  New 
York. 

Mr.  Wallace  married,  on  June  27, 1911,  Florence  Louise 
Lyman,  daughter  of  J.  P.  and  Mary  Grace  (Chapman) 
Lyman,  and  they  have  four  children:  Rosamond,  born 
December  18,  1912;  Rosemary,  born  January  25,  1914; 
Robert  S.,  Jr.,  born  May  5,  1915;  and  Penelope,  bom 
September  5,  1918. 


ALBERT  ALANSON  TISDALE— A  native  son  of 
Leominster,  whose  business  career  has  been  one  of 
notable  success,  Albert  A.  Tisdale,  has  served  his  com¬ 
munity  well,  and  to  his  energy  and  enterprise  a  great 
deal  of  the  success  of  the  corporations  with  which  he 
is  connected  is  due.  He  is  president  of  the  Whitney 
Reed  Corporation,  and  treasurer  of  the  Horn  and  Sup¬ 
ply  Company,  the  latter  of  which  he  controls,  and  has 
been  connected  with  both  since  their  organization.  He 
was  one  of  the  organizers  of  the  original  Whitney  Reed 
Chair  Company,  and  as  treasurer  and  general  manager 
was  the  principal  factor  in  the  successful  development 
of  the  concern  to  its  present  proportions.  He  was  one 


of  the  organizers  of  the  Horn  and  Supply  Company,  and 
continues  its  active  head. 

Stephen  A.  Tisdale,  father  of  Albert  A.  Tisdale,  was 
also  a  native  of  Leominster,  born  there  October  18,  1828, 
and  was  also  engaged  in  the  manufacturing  business,  his 
line  being  horn  goods,  in  which  he  continued  to  the  time 
of  his  death  in  1906.  During  the  Civil  War  he  served 
as  a  musician  in  the  1st  Massachusetts  Band,  receiving 
his  honorable  discharge  at  the  close  of  the  war  and  he 
was  a  member  of  Stevens  Post,  Grand  Army  of  the  Re¬ 
public,  of  Leominster.  He  married  Ann  E.  Whitcomb, 
who  was  born  in  Leominster,  Massachusetts,  October  22, 
1835,  and  died  February  12,  1916. 

Albert  A.  Tisdale,  son  of  Stephen  A.  and  Ann  E. 
(Whitcomb)  Tisdale,  was  born  in  Leominster,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  October  7,  1857,  and  after  receiving  a  practical 
education  in  the  public  schools  of  his  native  city,  pre¬ 
pared  for  a  business  career  by  taking  a  thorough  course 
in  Comer’s  Commercial  College  in  Boston.  When  his 
business  course  was  completed  he  became  an  employee 
of  the  local  mills,  but  he  soon  engaged  in  business  for 
himself  under  the  firm  name  A.  A.  Tisdale  &  Company, 
until  he  became  one  of  the  organizers  of  the  Whitney 
Reed  Chair  Company,  associating  himself  with  F.  A. 
Whitney,  J.  P.  Holman,  and  W.  C.  Burdette,  under  the 
firm  name  of  the  Whitney  Reed  Chair  Company,  of 
which  he  was  made  treasurer  and  general  manager.  The 
company  is  engaged  in  the  manufacture  of  reed  chairs 
and  baby  carriages,  and  from  the  organization  to  the 
present  Mr.  Tisdale  has  devoted  his  energies  to  the 
advancement  of  the  interests  of  that  business.  Under 
his  vigorous  and  efficient  management  the  enterprise 
grew  rapidly,  and  later  was  incorporated  under  the  name 
of  the  Whitney  Reed  Corporation,  of  which  Mr.  Tisdale 
was  made  vice-president  and  later  president.  That 
official  executive  position  he  has  continued  to  hold,  and 
he  is  still  an  important  factor  in  the  continued  growth 
and  prosperity  of  the  corporation.  Mr.  Tisdale  has  a 
host  of  friends  in  Leominster  and  vicinity,  and  is  well 
known  in  fraternal  and  club  circles.  He  is  a  member 
of  Wilder  Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted  Masons;  and  of 
Leominster  Lodge,  No.  86,  Independent  Order  of  Odd 
Fellows ;  his  clubs  the  Leominster  and  the  Camp  Fire  Club 
of  America.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  Leominster 
Chamber  of  Commerce;  and  his  religious  affiliation  is 
with  the  Unitarian  church  of  Leominster.  In  addition 
to  his  business  responsibilities  already  mentioned,  Mr. 
Tisdale  is  a  member  of  the  board  of  directors  of  the 
Leominster  National  Bank. 

On  January  20,  1891,  Albert  A.  Tisdale  married  Flor¬ 
ence  E.  Tenney,  who  was  born  in  Keene,  New  Hamp¬ 
shire,  daughter  of  William  B.  and  Mary  J.  (Carter) 
Tenney.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Tisdale  are  the  parents  of  one 
daughter,  Ruth  M.,  educated  in  Leominster  public 
schools,  grade  and  high  (valedictorian),  finishing  at 
Dana  Hall,  Wellesley,  Massachusetts;  she  married  How¬ 
ard  H.  Chase,  president  of  the  Leominster  Worsted 
Company  (q.  v.). 


GEORGE  F.  PIERCE,  as  president  and  treasurer  of 
the  Pierce  Direct  Advertising  Company  of  Worcester 
is  meeting  every  practical  need  of  the  business  houses  of 
the  city  of  Worcester,  and  his  activities  are  contribut- 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


ing  materially  to  the  general  business  prosperity.  Mr. 
Pierce  is  a  son  of  George  Edward  Pierce,  who  was  born 
at  Lunenburg,  Worcester  County,  Massachusetts,  and  is 
now  engaged  in  the  fruit  and  produce  business  in  the 
city  of  Worcester.  The  mother,  Mary  McKenna  Pierce, 
was  bom  in  Southbridge,  Massachusetts,  and  is  also  now 
living. 

George  F.  Pierce  was  born  in  the  city  of  Worcester, 
Massachusetts,  September  4,  1897.  His  education  was 
begun  in  the  public  schools  of  this  city,  and  he  is  a 
graduate  of  Washington  and  Jefferson  College,  of 
Washington,  Pennsylvania,  of  the  class  of  1919.  Fol¬ 
lowing  his  graduation  Mr.  Pierce  returned  to  Worcester 
and  became  identified  with  the  Park  Mailing  Company, 
Incorporated,  which  was  founded  in  this  city  in  the 
year  1917.  At  that  time  the  business  was  known  as  the 
H.  &  D.  Direct  Advertising  Company,  under  which  name 
it  was  known  until  1919,  when  it  was  incorporated  under 
the  name  of  the  Park  Mailing  Company.  Mr.  Pierce 
became  president  of  the  organization  and  Marie  E. 
Martocci,  secretary  and  treasurer.  In  1923  Mr.  Pierce 
took  over  the  duties  of  treasurer  in  connection  with  the 
presidency,  Miss  Martocci  becoming  at  that  time  an 
inactive  member  of  the  firm.  Later,  in  July,  1923,  the 
Park  Mailing  Company  discontinued  and  Mr.  Pierce 
opened  offices  at  No.  414  Main  Street,  under  the  name 
of  the  Pierce  Direct  Advertising  Company.  This  busi¬ 
ness  consists  of  designing,  illustrating,  and  writing  copy 
for  booklets,  folders,  and  many  kinds  of  advertising  ma¬ 
terial,  also  the  writing  of  sales  letters,  the  multigraphing 
of  letters  of  any  kind,  the  compiling  of  mailing  lists, 
and  the  mailing  of  any  advertising  or  other  matters 
which  are  prepared  for  the  mails  in  quantity.  They  are 
the  largest  house  of  this  kind  in  Worcester.  Mr.  Pierce 
is  a  member  of  the  Worcester  Chamber  of  Commerce, 
the  United  Commercial  Travelers’  Association,  the  Credit 
Men’s  Association,  and  served  at  the  Officers’  Training 
School  at  Washington,  Pennsylvania,  during  the  World 
War.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  American  Legion,  and 
his  clubs  are  the  Kiwanis  and  the  Tatassit.  He  attends 
St.  Paul’s  Roman  Catholic  Church. 

Mr.  Pierce  married,  on  September  3,  1918,  Florence 
Curtis,  who  was  born  in  Worcester,  and  they  have  one 
son,  George  F.,  Jr.,  born  September  22,  1919. 


ARTHUR  OSGOOD  YOUNG— The  city  of  Wor¬ 
cester,  Massachusetts,  may  well  be  proud  of  its  long 
list  of  able  business  men  who  are  developing  enter¬ 
prises  which  bring  to  the  city  assured  prosperity  and 
continued  growth.  As  president  of  the  Clafln-Sumner 
Coal  Company,  Arthur  Osgood  Young  is  at  the  head  of 
a  concern  which  has  been  steadily  developing  for  nearly 
a  half  century,  and  which  is  recognized  as  one  of  the 
well-established  business  organizations  of  the  city. 

Mr.  Young  received  his  education  in  the  public  schools 
of  Worcester,  and,  immediately  upon  the  completion  of 
his  school  training,  began  his  connection  with  the  con¬ 
cern  with  which  he  is  still  identified.  He  was  associated 
with  Charles  L.  Claflin,  the  founder  of  the  business, 
who  came  to  Worcester  and  established  a  coal  yard  at 
Central  Street  in  the  early  seventies,  and  was  a  partner 
in  the  original  firm  of  C.  W.  Claflin  &  Company.  In 


141 

1875  C.  L.  Clafln  was  placed  at  the  head  of  the  Wor¬ 
cester  branch  of  the  business,  and  a  wholesale  depart¬ 
ment  was  established  in  Boston.  For  many  years  the 
firm  was  composed  of  C.  L.  Claflin,  Mr.  Young  and 
Edward  W.  Pierce,  of  Brookline,  Mr.  Pierce  having 
charge  of  the  Boston  office.  During  the  five  decades 
which  have  passed  since  the  establishment  of  the  orig¬ 
inal  business  the  enterprise  has  steadily  grown  and  pros¬ 
pered,  changing  its  name  and  its  form  of  organization 
several  times,  but  always  expanding.  The  old  firm  of 
C.  W.  Claflin  &  Company  later  became  known  as  the 
Claflin  Coal  Company,  and  on  April  1,  1910,  the  Claflin 
Coal  Company  was  merged  with  the  Sumner  Coal  Com¬ 
pany  under  the  name  of  the  Claflin-Sumner  Coal  Com¬ 
pany,  under  which  corporate  name  the  business  has  been 
continued  to  the  present  time  (1923).  The  main  office 
is  now  located  at  No.  9  Pleasant  Street,  and  there  are 
yards  at  Nos.  241  and  401  Southbridge  Street,  No.  301 
Shrewsbury  Street,  and  at  No.  215  Ludlow  Street.  As 
president  of  the  concern,  Mr.  Young  is  devoting  his 
time  and  energies  to  the  advancement  of  its  interests,  and 
his  ability  and  skill  have  been  important  factors  in  the 
continued  growth  and  prosperity  of  the  enterprise.  In 
addition  to  his  responsibility  as  the  chief  executive  of 
the  Claflin-Sumner  Coal  Company,  Mr.  Young  is  also  a 
member  of  the  board  of  directors  of  the  Worcester 
Bank  and  Trust  Company.  As  a  member  of  the  Wor¬ 
cester  Chamber  of  Commerce,  he  keeps  closely  in  touch 
with  the  general  economic  situation  in  the  city  and  con¬ 
tributes  a  valuable  share  to  the  advancement  of  the  gen¬ 
eral  prosperity  of  the  city.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Com¬ 
monwealth  Club,  of  the  Tatnuck  Country  Club,  and  the 
Worcester  Country  Club.  Politically  he  gives  his  sup¬ 
port  to  the  principles  and  the  candidates  of  the  Repub¬ 
lican  party.  Mr.  Young  has  many  friends  in  the  city  of 
Worcester  and  vicinity,  and  he  is  well  known  as  a  pro¬ 
gressive  business  man  and  an  energetic  and  public- 
spirited  citizen. 

Arthur  Osgood  Young  married,  on  January  16,  1890, 
Mary  Valentine  Claflin,  who  was  born  at  Hopkinton, 
November  3,  1855,  daughter  of  Charles  Winslow  and 
Anna  Maria  (Valentine)  Claflin.  Mrs.  Young  is  de¬ 
scended  from  Robert  Claflin,  a  Scotch  soldier,  captured 
by  Cromwell  and  sent  with  other  prisoners  of  war  to 
New  England,  about  1650;  settled  in  Wenham;  died 
September  19,  1690.  The  name  was  originally  spelled 
McClaflin,  McLaughlin,  etc.  Daniel  Claflin,  son  of  the 
pioneer,  was  born  in  Wenham,  moved  to  Hopkinton; 
married  Sarah  Edwards,  and  from  about  1715  to  the 
present  time  the  Claflins  have  been  one  of  the  leading 
families  of  Hopkinton.  Isaac  Claflin,  of  the  fifth  gen¬ 
eration,  was  a  soldier  in  the  Revolution.  In  all  her  lines 
of  ancestry,  Mrs.  Young  is  descended  from  the  early 
English  settlers  of  the  Old  Bay  Colony.  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Young  are  the  parents  of  three  children:  1.  Charles 
Claflin,  born  December  5,  1893,  member  of  the  Tatnuck 
Country  Club,  the  Worcester  Country  Club,  the  Com¬ 
monwealth  Club,  and  the  Kiwanis  Club;  now  a  director 
and  assistant  treasurer  of  the  Claflin-Sumner  Coal  Com¬ 
pany;  married  Edna  T.  Smith,  of  Worcester,  and  they 
reside  at  No.  221  Burncoat  Street.  Mrs.  Young  is  a 
member  of  the  Worcester  Country  Club  and  the  Tatnuck 
Country  Club.  2.  Margaret  Valentine,  bom  February  1, 


142 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


1897.  3-  Arthur  Osgood,  Jr.,  born  November  5,  1898; 
now  treasurer  of  the  Framingham  Coal  Company,  of 
Framingham,  Massachusetts. 

ARTHUR  EDWARD  CASWELL,  as  president  of 
Bates  Brothers  Company,  of  Athol,  Massachusetts,  is  a 
representative  figure  in  the  business  life  of  this  com¬ 
munity  and  is  bearing  a  practical  part  in  its  welfare. 
He  is  a  son  of  Otis  E.  Caswell,  who  was  born  at  White¬ 
hall,  Washington  County,  New  York,  and  died  at  Mon¬ 
tague,  Franklin  County,  Massachusetts,  in  the  fall  of 
1888.  He  was  a  farmer  by  occupation,  as  most  men  in 
the  rural  communities  of  Massachusetts  at  that  time 
were,  and  a  man  of  progressive  spirit,  esteemed  by  all 
who  knew  him.  The  mother,  Maria  G.  (Hunt)  Caswell, 
was  born  at  New  Salem,  Massachusetts,  and  died  in 
Montague,  in  the  year  1885. 

Arthur  Edward  Caswell  was  born  at  Montague, 
Massachusetts,  September  30,  1851.  He  attended  the 
public  schools  of  Montague,  and  as  a  young  man  was 
variously  employed  in  that  vicinity.  In  the  year  1867 
he  began  to  learn  the  manufacture  of  fancy  leather  goods 
and  pocket  books,  and  in  this  general  field  he  has  been 
active  since.  On  September  1,  1871,  Mr.  Caswell  came 
to  Athol  and  entered  the  employ  of  Palmer  &  Bates, 
now  Bates  Brothers  Company,  manufacturers  of  pocket 
books.  He  soon  won  promotion  to  the  position  of  fore¬ 
man,  and  at  the  death  of  Mr.  Charles  A.  Bates,  who  had 
been  a  member  of  the  concern  for  many  years,  Mr.  Cas¬ 
well  was  made  superintendent  of  the  plant,  an  office 
which  he  still  ably  fills.  He  is  a  director  of  the  Athol 
Cooperative  Bank,  and  by  political  affiliation  is  a  Dem¬ 
ocrat,  taking  only  the  interest  of  the  progressive  citizen 
however,  in  public  affairs.  Mr.  Caswell  is  a  member  of 
the  Free  and  Accepted  Masons,  the  Royal  Arch  Masons, 
and  the  Knights  Templar,  of  Athol ;  also  the  Poquaig 
Club  of  Athol,  Massachusetts.  His  religious  affiliation 
is  with  the  First  Church,  Unitarian,  Inc.,  of  Athol. 

Mr.  Caswell  married,  at  South  Deerfield,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  August  13,  1861,  Elizabeth  E.  Perkins,  who  was 
born  at  Fredericton,  New  Brunswick,  Canada,  and  is 
a  daughter  of  John  Perkins. 


ALBERT  W.  FARWELL — Broadly  active  in  the 
world  of  mechanics  for  many  years,  Albert  W.  Farwell, 
of  Worcester  County,  Massachusetts,  is  bearing  a  worthy 
and  constructive  part  in  present-day  advance  in  his 
field,  and  the  industries  of  this  section  are  feeling  the 
influence  of  his  work.  He  has  now  for  more  than 
thirty-three  years  been  associated  with  the  W.  A.  Fuller 
Lumber  Company  and  a  branch  company,  the  F.  M.  John¬ 
son  Lumber  Company,  of  Fitchburg.  His  public  services 
also  contribute  in  a  definite  way  to  the  general  welfare. 
Mr.  Farwell  is  descended  from  distinguished  ancestry, 
is  a  grandson  of  Levi  and  Lucy  (Willard)  Farwell, 
early  settlers  of  Lancaster,  Massachusetts,  and  in  their 
day  prominent  in  the  business  and  social  circles  of  the 
community.  Levi  Daniel  Farwell,  son  of  these  parents 
and  father  of  the  subject  of  this  review,  was  born  in 
Lancaster,  Massachusetts,  but  was  for  many  years  a 
resident  of  Clinton,  also  in  this  county,  and  was  a 
successful  carpenter,  prominent  in  the  entire  section.  He 
married  Christianna  Cunningham,  daughter  of  John  and 


Louisa  (Rice)  Cunningham,  the  father  a  native  of  Scot¬ 
land,  the  mother  a  direct  descendant  of  the  historic 
“Mayflower”  company  of  1620. 

Albert  W.  Farwell  was  bom  at  Clinton,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  November  5,  1868.  His  education  was  begun  in 
the  local  public  schools,  and,  following  his  completion 
of  the  high  school  course,  he  covered  special  work  in 
mechanical  drawing  and  general  drafting  at  evening 
school.  Serving  an  apprenticeship  to  the  trades  of  ma¬ 
chinist  and  steam  engineer,  Mr.  Farwell  gained  his  first 
experience  in  the  plant  of  the  Bigelow  Carpet  Company, 
now  the  Bigelow-Hartford  Carpet  Company  of  Clinton, 
Following  this  activity  he  went  to  Oil  City,  Pennsyl¬ 
vania,  where  for  about  one  year  he  was  identified  with 
the  Oil  Well  Supply  Company,  as  machinist  and  tool- 
maker.  Thereafter  returning  to  his  native  place,  Mr. 
Farwell  became  associated  with  the  W.  A.  Fuller  Lum¬ 
ber  Company  of  Clinton  and  Leominster.  This  was  in 
November  of  the  year  1890,  and  he  has  since  continu¬ 
ously  remained  with  these  interests.  Since  the  organ¬ 
ization  of  the  F.  M.  Johnson  Lumber  Company,  Mr. 
Farwell  has  had  entire  charge  of  production  in  both 
plants,  the  main  offices  of  the  company  being  at  Leo¬ 
minster.  He  acts  as  consulting  engineer  as  well  as 
production  manager.  A  resident  of  the  town  of  Ster¬ 
ling,  Mr.  Farwell  has  been  more  or  less  active  in  the 
public  service  for  a  considerable  period,  and  in  recent 
years  has  filled  official  responsibility,  now  acting  as 
clerk  of  the  Board  of  Selectmen,  on  which  board  he  has 
served  since  the  year  1920.  During  the  same  period  he 
has  been  Overseer  of  the  Poor,  and  he  has  frequently 
served  on  various  committees,  including  the  Republican 
Town  Committee.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  Board 
of  Library  Trustees.  Mr.  Farwell  is  further  active 
for  the  general  good  as  a  mechanical  expert  in  legal 
cases  arising  from  accidents  of  various  kinds.  Fra¬ 
ternally  he  is  affiliated  with  Clinton  Lodge,  No.  89,  In¬ 
dependent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  and  he  is  a  member  of 
the  Unitarian  church,  in  the  choir  of  which  church  he 
has  sung  for  many  years. 

Mr.  Farwell  married,  at  Sterling,  Massachusetts,  De¬ 
cember  24,  1900,  Annie  M.  Nixon,  daughter  of  Charles 
Otis  and  Maria  (Pratt)  Nixon. 


CHARLES  M.  PROCTOR,  D.  M.  D. — Bearing  a 

famous  name  long  of  beneficent  significance  both  in  old 
England  and  New  England,  Dr.  Charles  M.  Proctor  of 
Southboro,  Massachusetts,  is  giving  to  the  progress  of 
dental  science  to-day  a  threefold  service;  efficiency  in 
practice,  ability  in  public  addresses  on  the  subject  of 
his  profession,  and  the  permanence  of  original  research 
in  printed  form.  Locally,  Dr.  Proctor’s  fame  is  a  mat¬ 
ter  of  pride  to  the  people,  as  well  as  direct  benefit 
through  his  service  as  a  dental  practitioner,  and  to  all 
who  are  familiar  with  the  Proctor  family  in  New  Eng¬ 
land,  his  life  and  career  are  of  interest. 

The  name  of  Proctor  is  derived  from  the  Latin 
procurator,  signifying  one  who  acts  for  another,  i.  e.,  a 
proxy.  An  ancient  family  in  England,  the  Proctors 
were  originally  prominent  in  Yorkshire,  but  at  the  be¬ 
ginning  of  the  sixteenth  century  the  family  was  estab¬ 
lished  at  Shawdon.  Robert  Proctor,  the  pioneer  in 
America,  came  to  New  England  and  was  made  a  free- 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


143 


man  at  Concord,  Massachusetts,  in  1643.  Ten  years 
later  he  was  one  of  the  founders  of  Chelmsford,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  the  story  of  this  settlement  being  one  of  his¬ 
toric  interest.  In  association  with  Richard  Hildreth, 
his  father-in-law,  and  twenty-seven  other  pioneers  of 
the  time,  Robert  Proctor  petitioned  the  General  Court 
in  1653  for  a  “grant  of  land  six  miles  square,  to  begin 
at  Merrimack  River  at  a  neck  of  land  next  to  Concord 
River  and  so  run  up  Concord  River,  south  and  west 
into  the  country  to  make  up  that  circumference  or 
quantity  of  land  as  is  above  expressed.”  Mr.  Proctor 
married,  December  31,  1645,  Jane  Hildreth,  the  eldest 
daughter  of  Richard  Hildreth,  of  Concord  and  Chelms¬ 
ford,  the  ancestor  of  the  Hildreths  of  America,  who 
died  at  Chelmsford  in  1688,  and  whose  younger  daughter, 
Abigail,  became  the  wife  of  Moses  Parker.  Robert 
Proctor’s  elder  children  were  bom  in  Chelmsford,  but 
his  younger  children,  to  the  number  of  four  or  five,  were 
bom  in  Concord.  Among  his  descendants  many  settled 
in  the  neighboring  towns,  but  others  pressed  into  the 
wilderness,  founding  settlements  in  New  Hampshire, 
Vermont  and  New  York  State,  and  eventually  scatter¬ 
ing  far  into  the  West.  Robert  Proctor  died  April  28, 
1697,  Chelmsford,  and  twelve  children  survived  him. 
The  line  of  descent  from  Robert  Proctor  is  through 
James  (I),  James  (II),  James  (III),  Jonathan,  James 
(IV),  Hiel  and  Isaac  K.  Jonathan  Proctor  was  a 
drummer  of  the  Second  Precinct  Company  of  Woburn 
during  the  Revolutionary  War  and  saw  active  service 
in  the  battle  of  Bennington.  James  (IV)  Proctor  was 
a  soldier  in  Captain  Jeremiah  Marston’s  company  of 
New  Hampshire,  this  company  being  a  part  of  Colonel 
John  Goffe’s  regiment,  and  served  in  the  Colonial  forces 
at  the  battle  of  Crown  Point  and  other  actions  in  the 
Revolutionary  War.  He  died  on  his  way  home  from 
Ticonderoga,  November  11,  1776. 

Isaac  K.  Proctor,  the  eighth  and  direct  descendant 
from  Robert,  the  immigrant,  and  father  of  Dr.  Proctor, 
was  born  at  Franklin,  New  Hampshire,  and  later  became 
a  resident  of  Chelsea  and  Malden,  Massachusetts.  He 
married  Emma  Bucknam,  a  native  of  Columbia  Falls, 
Maine,  and  a  member  of  a  prominent  family  of  that 
section. 

Charles  M.  Proctor,  son  of  Isaac  K.  and  Emma 
(Bucknam)  Proctor,  was  born  in  Chelsea,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  March  29,  1880.  His  early  education  was  received 
in  the  public  schools  of  Malden,  Massachusetts,  and  as 
a  young  man  he  realized  an  early  ambition  in  entering 
Tuft’s  College  Dental  School,  where  he  prepared  for 
his  chosen  profession.  He  was  graduated  from  that 
institution  in  1901,  receiving  his  degree  in  dentistry.  He 
has  been  active  in  practice  since  in  Boston,  his  offices 
now  being  at  No.  19  Bay  State  Road  in  that  city,  while 
he  resides  at  Oak  Hill  Road,  Southboro,  Massachusetts. 
Dr.  Proctor’s  largest  prominence  has  been  won  through 
his  institutional  activities  and  his  authoritative  writings 
on  topics  connected  with  dental  science.  In  1912  he 
was  appointed  demonstrator  of  clinical  dentistry  at 
Tuft’s  College  Dental  School,  then  three  years  later  he 
was  elected  assistant  professor  of  oral  surgery,  event¬ 
ually,  in  1918,  being  elected  professor  of  oral  surgery, 
which  position  he  has  since  ably  filled. 

On  October  24,  1904,  Mr.  Proctor  was  elected  an 


active  member  of  the  Massachusetts  Dental  Society,  and 
has  served  as  its  councillor  from  the  metropolitan  district 
during  the  years  1910,  1911,  and  1912.  He  was  elected 
assistant  secretary  in  1912  and  served  until  1915,  when 
he  was  elected  to  the  presidency.  He  is  an  ex-president 
of  the  East  Middlesex  Dental  Society;  a  member  of  the 
American  Medical  Association;  the  American  Dental 
Association;  the  American  Academy  of  Dental  Science; 
the  Robert  R.  Andrews  Society  of  Research  of  Tuft’s 
College;  an  honorary  member  of  the  Maine  Dental  So¬ 
ciety;  a  member  of  the  Psi  Omega  dental  fraternity, 
and  the  Boston  and  Tufts  Dental  Alumni  Association; 
consultant  in  oral  surgery  at  the  Carney  Hospital;  oral 
surgeon  to  the  Roxbury  Hospital,  Boston  Dispensary, 
and  Marlboro  Hospital,  Marlboro,  Massachusetts.  He 
was  formerly  a  member  of  the  visiting  staff  of  the  For¬ 
syth  Dental  Infirmary  and  Massachusetts  General  Hos¬ 
pital.  He  is  a  member  of  the  First  District  Dental  So¬ 
ciety  of  New  York  and  also  a  member  of  the  Clinical 
and  Surgical  Association  of  Massachusetts,  Sixth  In¬ 
ternational  Dental  Congress  of  London  in  1914,  and  the 
Panama-Pacific  Dental  Congress  in  1916.  During  the 
World  War  he  was  State  director  of  the  Preparedness 
League  of  American  Dentists,  under  the  direction  of  the 
Commission  of  Public  Safety.  He  is  a  member  of  the 
Boston  Medical  Library  Association. 

The  published  work  of  Dr.  Proctor  includes  the  fol¬ 
lowing,  which  have  been  published  in  various  profes¬ 
sional  journals  allied  to  dentistry:  “Infections  Through 
the  Dental  Path,”  “Oral  Sepsis,”  “Character  as  Devel¬ 
oped  by  Dentistry,”  “Do  We  Justify  Our  Existence?” 
“Dental  Officers  on  the  Hospital  Staff,”  “Pyorrhoea 
Alveolaris,”  “Independent  Journalism  as  a  Factor  in 
Elevating  Our  Professional  Position,”  “The  Need  of 
the  Dental  and  Oral  Surgeon  on  the  Hospital  Staff,” 
“The  Dental  Profession  and  the  War,”  “A  Young  Doc¬ 
tor’s  Sign,”  “New  Facts  About  Osteogenesis,”  “Mouth 
Hygiene,”  “The  Power  of  the  Machine” ;  president’s 
address  to  the  Massachusetts  Dental  Society,  in  June, 
1916;  address  delivered  at  the  fiftieth  anniversary  of  the 
Maine  State  Dental  Society,  June  30,  1915 ;  address  de¬ 
livered  at  the  dedication  of  the  memorial  to  Dr.  Chester 
Twitchell  Stockwell,  Springfield,  Massachusetts,  Oc¬ 
tober  14,  1915- 

Dr.  Proctor  is  widely  affiliated  in  fraternal  circles, 
being  a  member  of  Converse  Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted 
Masons,  of  which  he  is  Past  Master,  and  is  a  member 
of  the  Past  Masters’  Association  of  the  Seventh  Masonic 
District  of  Massachusetts;  is  also  a  member  of  St.  Ber¬ 
nard’s  Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted  Masons,  and  Omar 
Grotto  of  Southboro,  Massachusetts;  Tabernacle  Chap¬ 
ter,  Royal  Arch  Masons,  of  which  he  is  Past  High 
Priest ;  Melrose  Council,  Royal  and  Select  Masters,  of 
Malden,  Massachusetts ;  De  Molay  Commandery,  Knights 
Templar,  of  Boston;  Aleppo  Temple,  Ancient  Arabic 
Order  Nobles  of  the  Mystic  Shrine;  also  the  Royal 
Arcanum  and  the  Ancient  Order  of  United  Workmen. 
His  clubs  are :  The  University  Club  of  Boston,  Framing¬ 
ham  Country  Club,  and  he  served  as  a  member  of  the 
Southboro  School  Committee  during  1918  to  1921,  ana 
was  chairman  of  the  board  the  last  year.  His  religious 
affiliation  is  with  the  Newton  Center  Methodist  Episco¬ 
pal  Church,  of  which  he  is  a  steward. 


144 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


Dr.  Proctor  married,  April  12,  1903,  Clara  M.  Shute, 
of  Malden,  Massachusetts.  Dr.  and  Mrs.  Proctor  are 
the  parents  of  four  children:  Robert  Raisbeck;  Virginia 
Kent,  Helen  Bucknam,  and  Aurelie  Louise. 


HERBERT  M.  ABBOTT  was  born  at  Lawrence, 
Massachusetts,  February  28,  1886,  and  is  a  son  of 
William  E.  and  Eveline  R.  (Landers)  Abbott,  his  father 
a  native  of  Hancock,  Maine,  and  the  mother  of  King- 
field,  Maine,  both  now  living  and  the  father  prominent 
in  the  textile  industry  in  Lawrence,  Massachusetts. 

Educated  in  the  public  and  high  schools  of  the  city  of 
Lawrence,  Mr.  Abbott  became  identified,  at  the  age  of 
twenty  years  with  the  Lawrence  National  Bank,  begin¬ 
ning  in  the  capacity  Of  messenger.  For  five  years  he 
was  active  with  this  institution,  and  when  the  Merchants’ 
Trust  Company  took  over  the  Lawrence  National  Bank 
he  remained  with  the  new  organization  until  1917,  when 
he  enlisted  in  the  United  States  Army,  his  record  fol¬ 
lowing  below.  Subsequent  to  his  discharge  from  the 
service,  Mr.  Abbott  came  to  Worcester,  where  he  be¬ 
came  associated  with  the  Merchants’  National  Bank, 
accepting  the  position  of  auditor.  This  he  filled  until 
February,  1921,  when  he  became  vice-president  and  treas¬ 
urer  of  the  Parker  Trust  Company,  in  which  capacity 
he  acted  until  July  1,  1922.  On  that  date  this  institu¬ 
tion  was  consolidated  with  the  Merchants’  National  Bank 
and  Mr.  Abbott  became  a  vice-president  of  the  new 
institution,  in  which  capacity  he  still  serves.  His  broad 
experience  and  native  ability  well  fit  him  for  the  re¬ 
sponsibilities  of  this  position,  and  while  conservative 
and  cautious,  he  is  still  a  man  of  progressive  spirit  and 
broad  vision,  and  his  connection  with  this  institution  is 
a  force  for  its  advance. 

Mr.  Abbott’s  military  record  began  with  his  enlist¬ 
ment  on  May  15,  1917.  He  was  sent  to  the  Plattsburg 
Training  Camp,  where  he  was  commissioned  second  lieu¬ 
tenant  of  the  Quartermasters’  Corps  on  August  15,  1917. 
On  the  first  day  of  September  he  was  transferred  to 
Camp  Devens,  Massachusetts,  where  he  was  made  as¬ 
sistant  finance  officer  and  served  in  this  capacity  until 
July  14,  1918.  He  then  went  overseas  with  the  76th 
Division  and  served  as  finance  officer  with  this  divi¬ 
sion  until  October  30,  1919,  during  this  period  being  pro¬ 
moted  to  the  rank  of  captain.  He  received  his  discharge 
from  the  service  on  the  last  mentioned  date  and  is  now  cap¬ 
tain  of  the  Reserve  Corps  and  finance  officer  of  the  94th 
Division.  Mr.  Abbott  is  identified  with  Phoenician 
Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted  Masons,  of  Lawrence,  Massa¬ 
chusetts;  and  Lawrence  Chapter,  Royal  Arch  Masons; 
and  also  the  American  Legion.  He  is  a  prominent  mem¬ 
ber  of  the  Lions  Club  of  Worcester,  of  which  he  is  at 
this  time  (1923)  president;  a  member  of  the  Common¬ 
wealth  Club  and  the  Automobile  Club.  He  holds  a 
seat  in  the  Worcester  Chamber  of  Commerce,  and  is 
a  member  of  Wesley  Methodist  Episcopal  Church,  in 
which  he  serves  on  the  board  of  trustees. 

Mr.  Abbott  married,  on  October  29,  1921,  Grace 
Sears,  who  was  born  in  Worcester,  and  is  a  member  of 
a  prominent  family  of  this  city.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Abbtt 
are  the  parents  of  a  daughter,  Shirley  Evelyn  Abbott, 
born  June  12,  1923. 


CHARLES  A.  KIDDER— With  the  exception  of 
twelve  years,  the  entire  period  of  the  active  career  of 
Charles  A.  Kidder  has  been  identified  with  the  banking 
concern  of  Kidder,  Peabody  &  Company,  of  Boston,  with 
which  firm  he  is  now  associated  as  manager  of  the  trans¬ 
fer  department. 

Mr.  Kidder  was  born  in  Boston,  Massachusetts,  July 
22,  1858,  son  of  Henry  P.  and  Caroline  W.  (Archbald) 
Kidder,  and  after  receiving  a  good  practical  education 
in  the  public  schools  of  Boston,  prepared  for  college 
in  the  Noble  Preparatory  School,  and  then  became  a 
student  in  Harvard  College,  from  which  he  was  gradu¬ 
ated  in  1879  with  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts.  Im¬ 
mediately  after  the  completion  of  his  college  course,  he 
secured  a  position  with  Kidder,  Peabody  &  Company, 
bankers  of  Boston,  beginning  his  connection  with  that 
firm  as  a  clerk,  and  finally,  in  1886,  becoming  a  member 
of  the  firm.  Three  years  later,  in  1889,  he  resigned, 
severing  his  connection  with  the  firm  both  as  a  member 
of  the  firm  and  as  an  employee.  In  1901  he  renewed 
his  connection  with  Kidder,  Peabody  &  Company,  how¬ 
ever,  and  at  the  present  time  he  is  the  efficient  manager 
of  the  transfer  department.  Along  with  his  business 
responsibilities  Mr.  Kidder  has  found  time  for  club  as¬ 
sociation  and  now  holds  membership  in  the  Somerset 
Club,  the  Exchange  Club,  and  the  Harvard  Club,  all  of 
Boston.  Mr.  Kidder  is  well  known  in  the  Southboro  and 
Boston  section  of  Worcester  County,  having  many 
friends  in  both  places. 

Charles  A.  Kidder  married,  on  October  11,  1888, 
Josephine  Burnett,  daughter  of  Joseph  and  Josephine 
(Cutter)  Burnett,  of  Southboro,  Massachusetts.  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Kidder  are  the  parents  of  two  children:  1. 
Francis  Fiske,  born  December  2,  1892,  died  January 
30,  1893.  2.  Henry  P.,  of  whom  further. 

Henry  P.  Kidder  was  born  October  2,  1893.  He  re¬ 
ceived  his  early  education  in  the  Fay  School,  and  then 
became  a  student  in  St.  Mark’s  School  at  Southboro, 
from  which  he  was  graduated  with  the  class  of  1914. 
He  matriculated  the  following  fall  in  Harvard  College, 
from  which  he  was  graduated  in  1918  with  the  degree 
of  Bachelor  of  Arts.  Upon  the  entrance  of  the  United 
States  into  the  World  War  he  at  once  enlisted  and  was 
located  at  the  Recruiting  Officers’  Training  Camp  at 
Plattsburg,  New  York,  from  April  17  to  August  15, 
1917.  He  was  commissioned  first  lieutenant  of  artil¬ 
lery,  Officers’  Reserve  Corps,  August  15,  1917,  and  two 
days  later  was  assigned  to  the  302d  Field  Artillery  and 
transferred  to  Camp  Devens,  at  Ayer,  Massachusetts. 
He  served  with  that  unit  until  the  time  of  departure 
for  France,  July  14,  1918,  at  which  time  he  was  appointed 
regimental  information  officer,  in  which  capacity  he  was 
in  active  service  at  the  front  in  France,  serving  in  the 
Meuse-Argonne  sector  during  the  St.  Hilaire  offensive 
campaign,  and  being  returned  with  his  regiment  May  13, 
1919.  He  received  his  honorable  discharge  from  ser¬ 
vice  in  May,  1919,  and  is  now  associated  with  Kidder, 
Peabody  &  Company,  of  Boston. 

Henry  P.  Kidder  married  Julia  E.  Howell,  daughter 
of  George  D.  and  Grace  (Hurd)  Howell,  of  Boston,  the 
ceremony  taking  place  June  24,  1922.  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Henry  P.  Kidder  reside  at  Concord,  Massachusetts. 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


145 


REV.  DENIS  P.  SULLIVAN— Worcester  County, 
Massachusetts,  has  given  to  every  branch  of  human 
endeavor  men  who  have  become  leaders,  teachers,  and 
disciples  of  progress,  and  no  less  in  the  church  than  in 
the  professions  and  the  industries  have  the  sons  of  Wor¬ 
cester  County  gone  forth  to  high  endeavor.  Rev.  Denis 
P.  Sullivan,  who  was  born  in  this  country  and  reared 
in  its  institutions,  has  done  a  wonderful  work  in  distant 
places,  following  here  and  there  at  the  call  of  duty, 
and  within  the  past  few  years  has  returned  to  this  part 
of  his  native  State  as  pastor  of  the  Roman  Catholic 
church  of  Uxbridge. 

Father  Sullivan  was  born  at  Gilbertville,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  November  5,  1875,  and  is  a  son  of  Michael  and 
Mary  (Carroll)  Sullivan.  His  education  was  begun  in 
the  local  schools  and  continued  in  the  Ware  High 
School.  Dedicated  to  the  priesthood  from  his  youth, 
he  then  entered  Holy  Cross  College  in  Worcester,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  and  was  graduated  from  that  institution  in  the 
class  of  1897,  with  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts. 
Later  going  to  Montreal,  he  entered  the  Grand  Seminary 
of  that  city,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in  1899,  then 
going  abroad  to  complete  his  studies,  he  attended  St. 
Sulpice  Seminary  at  Paris,  France,  and  was  ordained 
in  Paris  August  15,  1901.  Returning  to  this  country, 
Father  Sullivan  received  his  first  appointment  as  curate 
at  St.  Peter’s  Cathedral  at  Marquette,  Michigan,  where 
he  served  until  1902.  He  was  then  appointed  to  Glad¬ 
stone,  Michigan,  as  pastor,  and  serving  there  for  two 
years,  he  later  came  to  Springfield,  Massachusetts,  as 
pastor  in  1904,  remaining  for  four  years.  He  was  then 
sent  to  South  Hadley  Falls,  Massachusetts,  where  he 
served  as  pastor  until  April,  1913,  when  he  was  sent  to 
Shelburne  Falls.  Active  there  until  December,  1919, 
he  came  to  Uxbridge  at  that  time  and  has  since  served 
the  people  of  this  church  with  devotion  and  ability.  In 
all  his  work  in  these  various  parishes,  Father  Sullivan 
has  been  most  active  in  building  up  the  churches  and 
leading  the  people  to  higher  moral  responsibility  and 
spiritual  attainment.  The  organizations  connected  with 
the  church  through  which  the  people  are  benefited  both 
spiritually  and  materially  have  felt  the  inspiration  and 
impetus  of  his  constant  care.  Since  coming  to  Ux¬ 
bridge  Father  Sullivan  has  done  much  for  the  local 
church,  taking  up  his  duties  with  the  high  courage  and 
faith  of  the  true  apostle.  He  has  increased  the  member¬ 
ship  of  the  church  and  improved  and  beautified  the 
church  property.  He  commands  the  esteem  and  confi¬ 
dence  of  his  contemporaries  of  the  cloth,  irrespective  of 
denominational  differences,  and  in  all  the  work  of  civic 
and  welfare  organizations  in  the  community,  lends  his 
influence  for  widespread  good  and  constant  progress. 
During  the  World  War  he  served  on  Liberty  Bond  com¬ 
mittees,  and  in  every  way  did  all  in  his  power  to  pro¬ 
mote  the  many  welfare  activities  of  the  period.  He  is 
chaplain  of  the  Knights  of  Columbus  of  Uxbridge,  and 
also  the  Daughters  of  Isabella  and  the  Ancient  Order 
of  Hibernians. 


SETH  H.  HOWES,  manager  of  the  Marlboro  Dairy 
Company,  Inc.,  of  Marlboro,  Massachusetts,  is  one  of 
the  well-known  citizens  of  Worcester  County.  He  was 
born  in  Chatham,  Massachusetts  (on  the  Cape)  October 


2,  1862,  son  of  Seth  C.  and  Jedidiah  (Ryder)  Howes. 
Throughout  his  childhood  and  youth  the  subject  of  this 
sketch  was  constantly  associated  with  seacoast  activities. 
From  the  time  he  was  old  enough  to  be  of  use  in  the  care 
of  a  boat  he  followed  the  sea,  and  during  the  vacations 
and  other  periods  when  he  was  not  attending  school,  he 
was  frequently  to  be  found  fishing  off  the  banks  of 
Newfoundland.  He  attended  the  public  schools  of  his 
native  district,  and  after  the  completion  of  his  high 
school  course  became  a  student  in  Comer’s  Business 
College  of  Boston.  When  his  commercial  course  was 
completed  he  secured  a  position  with  Mahn  &  Barnes, 
of  South  Natick,  Massachusetts,  a  firm  which  was 
engaged  in  the  manufacture  of  baseballs.  For  about  a 
year  he  was  identified  with  that  concern  in  the  capacity 
of  clerk.  At  the  end  of  that  time  he  removed  to  Med- 
field,  Massachusetts,  where  he  found  employment  with 
the  Medfield  Straw  Factory  in  the  capacity  of  general 
handy  man.  That  connection  he  maintained  for  a  short 
time  and  then,  in  1883,  became  associated  with  the  Deer- 
foot  Farm,  and  during  that  period  his  energy,  ability, 
and  faithfulness  were  important  factors  in  the  rapid 
development  of  that  branch  of  the  enterprise.  In  1918 
he  resigned  his  position  as  manager  of  the  dairy  depart¬ 
ment  of  the  Deer  foot  Farm  in  order  to  accept  a  posi¬ 
tion  as  treasurer  of  the  Grafton  County  Dairy  Company 
of  Haverhill,  New  Hampshire,  which  official  position  he 
still  holds.  Although  still  holding  the  last-named  po¬ 
sition  (1923),  Mr.  Howes  has  recently  (1922)  been  en¬ 
gaged  as  manager  of  the  New  Marlboro  Dairy  Company, 
Inc.,  of  Marlboro,  Massachusetts.  His  long  experience 
in  the  management  of  a  modern  dairy,  combined  with 
his  general  ability,  enabled  him  to  bring  to  the  new 
enterprise  just  the  qualities  most  needed  to  place  the 
business  on  a  firm  foundation.  Mr.  Howes,  who  is  a 
descendant  of  one  of  the  “Mayflower”  group,  is  related 
to  the  author  of  the  well-known  Hawes  genealogy.  He 
also  traces  to  Elder  William  Brewster,  John  Howland, 
Elizabeth  Tilley,  the  Hopkins,  and  other  Colonial  fam¬ 
ilies,  also  to  John  Graham  an  officer  in  King  Philips 
War.  He  is  deeply  interested  in  the  general  subject 
of  economics,  and  has  devoted  much  time  to  the  theoret¬ 
ical  as  well  as  to  the  practical  aspects  of  that  subject. 
Mr.  Howes  is  a  member  of  Marlboro-  Lodge,  No.  1239, 
Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks. 

Seth  H.  Howes  married,  on  October  15,  1885,  Cath¬ 
erine  Lavelle,  daughter  of  Michael  and  Ann  (O’Toole) 
Lavelle,  of  Southboro,  Massachusetts.  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Howes  are  the  parents  of  eight  children:  1.  Robert 
Howard,  who  is  now  postmaster  of  Southboro,  Massa¬ 
chusetts  ;  married  Mary  Burke,  and  Ijias  two  sons :  Rob¬ 
ert  and  Richard.  2.  Addie  Lavelle,  who  married  Harry 
Wisell,  and  has  one  son,  Donald.  3.  Annie  Azubah, 
who  married  Julian  W.  Pollard ;  now  resides  in  Wash¬ 
ington,  District  of  Columbia.  4.  Seth  Francis,  who  mar¬ 
ried  Ruth  Bullard,  and  they  have  two  daughters :  Ruth 
and  Catherine.  5.  Ellen  Bryan,  who  married  Daniel  F. 
Buckley,  and  has  one  daughter,  Catherine.  6.  Alfred 
Winslow.  7.  Richard  Odin.  8.  Constance  Catherine. 


PHILIP  HENRY  DUPREY— Real  estate  opera¬ 
tions  are  the  field  which  Mr.  Duprey  has  made  the  chief 
instrument  of  his  service  to  his  community,  and  although 


Wor — 10 


146 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


he  has,  on  occasion,  accepted  public  office,  it  has  not 
been  necessary  for  him  to  leave  the  duties  of  every  day 
to  find  an  effective  means  for  the  advancement  of  the 
general  welfare.  The  largest  and  most  successful  real 
estate  operator  of  Worcester,  he  has  through  over  a 
quarter  of  a  century  of  consistently  resultful  effort  ably 
fostered  the  progress  and,  literally  and  figuratively,  the 
upbuilding  of  the  community. 

Mr.  Duprey  is  a  descendant  of  French-Canadian  an¬ 
cestry,  the  line  founded  in  Massachusetts  by  his  grand¬ 
father,  Henry  Duprey,  who  came  to  this  State  from  his 
Canadian  home.  Mr.  Duprey’s  father  was  Joseph  H. 
Duprey,  deceased,  a  farmer  of  West  Boylston;  his 
mother,  Addie  Duprey  of  Parisian  French  parentage, 
now  living  in  Worcester.  Joseph  H.  and  Addie  Duprey 
were  the  parents  of:  Philip  Henry,  of  whom  further; 
Joseph  H.,  head  of  the  Duprey-Faulman  Company, 
dealers  in  table  necessities  at  Detroit,  Michigan;  Celina, 
who  married  Frank  J.  Bousquet,  of  Worcester. 

Philip  Henry  Duprey  was  born  in  West  Boylston,  Wor¬ 
cester  County,  Massachusetts,  September  29,  1877,  and  was 
educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Worcester  and  St.  Ann’s 
Parochial  School,  where  he  perfected  his  knowledge  of 
the  French  language,  which  he  speaks  as  fluently  as 
English.  He  was  fourteen  years  of  age  when  he  began 
active  life,  entering  the  office  of  a  real  estate  dealer  as 
office  boy,  and  gaining,  as  opportunity  presented  itself, 
a  general  knowledge  of  the  business.  On  March  1,  1897, 
before  he  had  attained  his  majority,  he  established  an 
independent  enterprise  with  a  capital  of  fifty  dollars.  He 
opened  a  real  estate  office  in  the  Walker  building  on 
Main  Street,  Worcester,  his  early  activity  being  agent 
for  property  owners  in  negotiating  sales.  Possessing 
a  strong  natural  aptitude  for  this  line  of  work  and  early 
adopting  the  straightforward  policies  that  have  dom¬ 
inated  all  his  dealings,  he  acquired  substantial  standing 
among  local  realtors.  As  his  resources  increased  he 
began  independent  development,  and  he  has  now  to  his 
credit  the  development  of  more  sub-divisions  than  any 
other  individual  in  Worcester.  One  of  the  most  noted 
of  these  is  “Hillcroft,”  while  others  are  Indian  Lake 
Park,  within  two  miles  of  the  business  center  of  Wor¬ 
cester,  adjoining  Indian  Lake  and  approached  by  Grove 
Street  and  Salisbury  Park,  on  Salisbury  Street,  covering 
seventy-five  acres,  twenty  acres  of  which  have  been  laid 
out  as  a  park.  That  aspect  of  Mr.  Duprey’s  work  which 
has  reacted  most  beneficially  upon  community  life  has 
been  his  encouragement  of  individuals  of  moderate 
means  in  home  owning.  Large  initial  payments  have 
never  attracted  him,  for  he  has  found  his  customers 
among  salaried  working  men,  to  whom  he  has  extended 
terms  and  credit  to  meet  their  needs,  their  character,  and 
records  the  prime  consideration  in  the  transaction.  The 
houses  which  Mr.  Duprey  has  built  in  such  large  num¬ 
bers  constitute  a  real  artistic,  as  well  as  economic,  asset 
to  Worcester,  where  he  has  for  many  years  been  one  of 
the  heaviest  taxpayers.  He  is  widely  known  as  one  of 
the  best  informed  authorities  on  realty  values  in  Wor¬ 
cester  and  vicinity,  and  for  twenty-two  years  has  been 
appraiser  of  real  estate  for  the  Worcester  Mechanics’ 
Savings  Bank,  although  the  best  of  his  energies  and 
time  have  been  given  to  his  real  estate  business  and  an 
insurance  and  mortgage  business  that  has  naturally  ac¬ 


companied  it.  Mr.  Duprey  has  discharged  executive 
responsibilities  as  president  of  the  Worcester  Lunch 
Car  Manufacturing  Company,  pioneer  builders  of  lunch 
cars,  and  as  president  of  the  People’s  Loan  Association. 

Mr.  Duprey  is  a  member  of  the  Benevolent  and  Pro¬ 
tective  Order  of  Elks,  and  his  clubs  are  the  Worces¬ 
ter  Automobile,  of  which  he  is  a  director,  the  Worcester 
Country,  and  the  Commonwealth.  A  Republican  in  pol¬ 
itics,  he  has  long  taken  a  public-spirited  part  in  public 
matters,  and  as  the  representative  of  Ward  One,  in  the 
Worcester  City  Council,  has  served  on  numerous  im¬ 
portant  committees,  including  finance,  streets,  water, 
education,  public  buildings,  and  military.  He  is  a  man 
of  pleasing  personality,  whose  touch  with  community 
life  has  been  helpful  and  constantly  conducive  toward 
progress  and  improvement. 

Mr.  Duprey  married,  January  6,  1904,  Clara  Frances 
Mulvey,  daughter  of  James  and  Margaret  (Claffey)  Mul- 
vey,  and  they  are  the  parents  of :  Dorothea  M.,  who  was 
born  November  21,  1906;  Ruth  O.,  who  was  born  June 
18,  1909;  Barbara  J.,  who  was  born  March  28,  1911,  and 
Mary  E.,  who  was  born  December  8,  1914.  The  family 
home  is  a  beautiful  residence  on  Kenwood  Avenue,  and 
their  summer  home  is  at  Bass  Rocks,  Gloucester,  Massa¬ 
chusetts. 


WILLIAM  C.  KLEBART— Allied  with  the  con¬ 
struction  world  in  the  wholesale  and  retail  distribution 
of  plumbing  supplies,  Mr.  Klebart  is  bearing  a  very 
practical  part  in  the  community  advance  of  Webster, 
Massachusetts.  He  has  had  experience  in  various  lines 
of  business  activity,  and  is  a  son  of  Albin  and  Eliza 
(Steinberg)  Klebart,  his  father  for  many  years  active 
in  the  hotel  business  in  Webster. 

William  C.  Klebart  was  born  at  Putnam,  Connecticut, 
April  5,  1871.  Four  months  old  when  the  family  moved 
to  Webster,  Massachusetts,  he  acquired  his  education 
in  the  public  schools  of  this  community,  and  as  a  young 
lad  was  employed  at  various  clerical  jobs  such  as  a  boy 
can  handle,  then,  after  a  time,  took  over  his  father’s 
hotel  business.  This  he  continued  successfully  for  a 
number  of  years,  after  which  he  bought  the  Webster 
Press,  Inc.,  and  was  associated  with  this  enterprise  with 
his  cousin,  Henry  J.  Steinberg.  This  is  a  weekly  paper 
enjoying  a  wide  circulation,  and  connected  with  it  is  a 
thriving  iob  printing  business.  The  young  men  changed 
the  name  of  the  firm  to  Klebart  &  Steinberg,  Inc.,  but 
eventually  sold  the  interest,  and  the  name  of  the  paper 
has  since  been  changed  to  the  Webster  “Times.”  Mr. 
Klebart’s  next  venture  was  in  the  plumbing  supply  busi¬ 
ness,  and  he  opened  a  store  at  Webster,  under  the  title 
of  the  Webster  &  Putnam  Plumbing  Supply  House. 
Covering  a  wide  field  as  jobbers  of  plumbing  and 
heating  supplies,  Mr.  Klebart  is  now  associated  with 
George  A.  Rawley,  of  Putnam,  in  partnership.  In  addi¬ 
tion  to  the  general  run  of  small  supplies  the  firm  repre¬ 
sents  the  Standard  Sanitary  Company,  manufacturers 
of  enameled  iron  plumbing  fittings,  the  American  Radi¬ 
ator  Company’s  products,  the  United  States  Radiator 
Company’s  products,  and  other  important  stocks.  They 
have  achieved  marked  success  and  are  doing  an  exten¬ 
sive  and  constantly  growing  business,  keeping  in  touch 
with  the  movements  of  the  times  and  giving  the  people 


-  * 


.  % 


/ 


J 


' 


5* 


■■■>  V'.- 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


147 


of  Webster  and  vicinity  a  comprehensive  and  up-to-date 
service  in  their  field.  Mr.  Klebart’s  other  business  affili¬ 
ations  include  directorship  in  the  Webster  National 
Bank  and  the  Webster  Cooperative  Bank.  He  is  a 
staunch  supporter  of  the  Republican  party,  and  has  for 
a  number  of  years  been  prominent  in  public  life,  serving 
for  two  years  as  chairman  of  the  Republican  Town  Com¬ 
mittee,  and  for  seven  years  on  the  Board  of  Selectmen. 
Following  the  close  of  that  period  of  activity  Mr. 
Klebart  was  not  a  member  of  that  board  for  two  years, 
but  was  reelected  in  1922  and  is  now  serving.  During 
the  World  War  he  was  very  active  on  all  committees, 
having  in  charge  the  various  drives  of  that  time.  Mr. 
Klebart  is  an  associate  member  of  the  Grand  Army  of 
the  Republic  also  of  the  Sons  of  Veterans.  Fraternally 
he  is  a  leading  member  of  Webster  Lodge,  Free  and  Ac¬ 
cepted  Masons ;  Doric  Chapter,  Royal  Arch  Masons,  of 
Southbridge;  the  chapter,  Royal  and  Select  Masters,  of 
Webster;  Massachusetts  Consistory,  and  Aletheia  Grotto, 
of  Webster.  He  also  holds  membership  in  the  Fraternal 
Order  of  Eagles,  the  Foresters  of  America,  the  Benev¬ 
olent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks,  and  Siegel  Lodge, 
D.  O.  H. 

Mr.  Klebart  married  Elizabeth  A.  Rawley,  of  Put¬ 
nam,  Connecticut,  daughter  of  Thomas  and  Lena  (Falk) 
Rawley,  the  former  was  superintendent  of  a  woolen 
mill  in  that  section;  they  reside  in  Putnam.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Klebart  have  one  son,  William  A.  R. 


FREDERICK  H.  SPRAGUE  was  born  at  North 
Dana,  Massachusetts,  in  the  year  1866,  and  is  a  son  of 
Elbridge  and  Ellen  (Doane)  Sprague,  lifelong  residents 
of  the  town  of  North  Dana.  Mr.  Sprague’s  father  was 
for  a  great  many  years  in  the  meat  business. 

Frederick  H.  Sprague  received  only  a  common  school 
education,  and  in  1880  became  clerk  in  the  country  store 
of  Lindsey  &  Freeman,  in  North  Dana.  In  1882  he 
entered  the  employment  of  the  Orange  Clothing  Company, 
Orange,  Massachusetts,  as  clerk,  where  he  continued 
until  1892,  when  he  began  the  manufacture  of  men’s 
pants  in  connection  with  George  E.  Whitney,  of  South 
Royalston,  Massachusetts,  under  the  name  of  Fred’k  H. 
Sprague  &  Company,  Orange,  Massachusetts,  putting 
their  work  out  to  families  to  make  at  home,  and  were 
burned  out  in  the  big  fire  at  Orange  in  1892.  In  1899 
the  firm  was  changed  to  Mann  &  Sprague,  and  in  1904 
Frank  L.  Grout  bought  out  the  interests  of  T.  S.  Mann, 
and  they  continued  the  business  under  the  name  of 
Fred’k  H.  Sprague  Company.  In  1916  they  moved  to 
Fitchburg,  where  they  continue  to  manufacture  boys’ 
clothing  only.  In  1917  Mr.  Sprague  was  made  manager 
of  the  Fitchburg  Garment  Company,  of  which  Russell 
B.  Lowe  is  proprietor,  where  they  manufacture  girls’ 
gingham  dresses.  In  1919,  on  the  death  of  Frank  L. 
Grout,  the  Orange  factory  was  reorganized  under  the 
name  of  Sprague,  Grout  &  Lowe,  Inc.,  of  which  Mr. 
Sprague  is  vice-president  and  general  manager,  where 
they  manufacture  men’s  and  boys’  pants.  Mrs.  Frank 
L.  Grout  retains  the  interest  of  Frank  L.  Grout  in  the 
Fred’k  H.  Sprague  Company.  Mr.  Sprague,  to-day,  is 
the  active  manager  of  these  three  concerns,  which  are 
known  to  the  trade  as  “The  Sprague  Lines.” 

He  ia  past  president  of  the  “Old  Home  Day”  at  North 


Dana,  chairman  of  the  Orange  Centenary  of  1910.  He 
is  a  director  of  the  Fitchburg  Chamber  of  Commerce, 
and  fraternally  is  affiliated  with  the  Orange  Lodge, 
Free  and  Accepted  Masons;  Thomas  Chapter,  Royal 
Arch  Masons,  of  Fitchburg;  Orange  Commandery, 
Knights  Templar;  Social  Lodge,  Independent  Order  of 
Odd  Fellows,  of  Orange;  Fitchburg  Lodge,  Benevolent 
and  Protective  Order  of  Elks;  and  Orange  Lodge,  Im¬ 
proved  Order  of  Red  Men.  Mr.  Sprague  takes  a  deep 
interest  in  many  branches  of  welfare  and  benevolent 
activities,  and  is  president  of  the  Fitchburg  Council  of 
Boy  Scouts.  His  further  affiliations  include  member¬ 
ship  in  the  Rotary  and  Fay  clubs,  of  Fitchburg. 

Mr.  Sprague  married,  in  January,  1890,  Lillian  P. 
Carter,  of  Athol,  Massachusetts,  daughter  of  Alba  and 
Hannah  (Morse)  Carter. 


EDWIN  CHESTER  DEXTER— The  town  of. 
Petersham,  Massachusetts,  has,  during  the  last  year,, 
been  conscious  of  a  vacancy  which  cannot  easily  be  filled. 
Many  citizens  of  high  merit  and  large  ability  have  con¬ 
tributed  to  the  civic,  social,  and  economic  welfare  of 
the  community,  but  few  have  occupied  so  large  a  place 
in  the  esteem  of  their  associates  in  that  town  as  the 
late  Edwin  C.  Dexter,  who  though  born  in  Albany,  New 
York,  devoted  the  latter  part  of  his  life  to  the  advance¬ 
ment  of  the  interests  of  Petersham. 

The  Dexter  family  is  an  old  one  in  England  and  New 
England,  dating  back  to  Thomas  Dexter,  who  came  to 
America  either  with  the  Endicott  in  1629,  or  in  the  fleet 
with  Governor  Winthrop  in  1630.  He  settled  in  1630 
on  a'  farm  of  eight  hundred  acres,  in  the  town  of  Lynn, 
Massachusetts,  and  in  1631  was  made  a  freeman.  His 
house  was  on  the  west  bank  of  the  Saugus  River,  where 
the  Saugus  Iron  Works  were  later  built.  In  1633  he 
built  a  bridge  over  the  river,  stretched  a  weir  across  it, 
and  afterward  built  a  mill  there.  He  was  largely  in¬ 
terested  in  the  establishment  of  the  Lynn  Iron  Works, 
interested  English  capital  in  the  enterprise,  and  became 
general  manager  but  when  convinced  of  the  unprofitable¬ 
ness  of  the  enterprise,  withdrew.  He  was  an  impulsive 
man,  often  involved  in  law  suits,  and  at  one  time  tem¬ 
porarily  lost  his  rights  as  a  freeman.  He  acquired  ex¬ 
tensive  tracts  of  land,  and  spent  his  last  days  with  his 
daughter  Mary,  wife  of  Captain  Oliver,  in  Boston, 
where  he  died  in  1677.  He  had  two  sons,  Thomas  and 
William;  and  two  daughters,  Mary  and  Frances.  The 
line  of  descent  from  the  immigrant  ancestor,  Thomas 
Dexter,  to  Edwin  C.  Dexter,  is  through  the  immigrant’s 
son,  William;  his  son,  John;  his  son,  John  (2);  his 
son  David;  his  son,  Charles;  his  son,  Chester,  and  his 
son,  Edwin  Chester,  of  further  mention. 

Edwin  Chester  Dexter  was  bom  in  Albany,  New 
York,  March  21,  1845,  and  after  attending  a  private 
school  in  Troy,  New  York,  for  a  short  time,  became  a 
student  in  the  public  schools  of  that  city.  He  then  went 
to  Wilbraham  Academy,  and  after  completing  his  aca¬ 
demic  course,  finished  his  preparation  for  an  active  life 
by  taking  a  business  course  in  the  Bryant  &  Stratton 
School.  He  found  his  first  remunerative  employment 
with  J.  M.  Warren  Company,  of  Troy,  with  whom  for 
two  years  he  was  employed  as  salesman.  At  the  end 
of  that  time  he  was  taken  into  the  business  of  his  uncle, 


148 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


R.  G.  White,  as  the  junior  partner,  the  firm  being  or¬ 
ganized  under  the  name  of  White,  Pevey  &  Dexter 
Company,  pork  packers,  of  Worcester,  Massachusetts. 
At  the  time  of  the  death  of  Mr.  Pevey,  Mr.  White  and 
Mr.  Dexter  sold  their  interests  to  the  Swift  Company 
and  retired.  Mr.  Dexter  then  removed  to  Petersham, 
where  he  purchased  the  old  Deacon  Willard  home, 
one  of  the  oldest  pieces  of  property  in  the  town,  and 
there  in  the  midst  of  the  old  apple  orchard  planted  by 
Deacon  Willard  nearly  one  hundred  and  fifty  years  ago, 
he  built  his  home.  His  retirement  from  the  active  re¬ 
sponsibilities  of  business  life  however,  did  not  mean 
for  him  a  period  of  idleness.  During  all  of  the  years  of 
his  residence  in  Petersham  he  was  one  of  the  most  ac¬ 
tive  and  energetic  of  its  citizens,  devoting  the  greater 
part  of  his  time  and  energies  to  the  advancement  of  the 
welfare  of  that  community.  He  held  at  different  times 
practically  every  office  in  the  gift  of  the  town,  serving 
as  Selectman  for  thirteen  years,  and  in  addition  to  his 
numerous  civic  responsibilities,  the  duties  of  which  he 
met  with  considerable  efficiency,  he  was  also  exceedingly 
active  in  the  affairs  of  the  Unitarian  church.  He  served 
as  treasurer  of  the  new  Unitarian  Church  Building  Fund, 
and  at  the  very  first  meeting  raised  $20,000,  a  large  sum 
to  be  raised  so  quickly  in  so  small  a  town.  For  sev¬ 
eral  years  he  served  as  superintendent  of  the  Bureau 
of  Highways,  in  which  connection  he  came  in  contact 
with  many  business  men  and  with  many  political  offi¬ 
cials  of  the  county,  and  few  men  have  been  more  popular 
in  the  town  of  Petersham  than  was  Mr.  Dexter.  The 
business  ability  and  the  personal  characteristics  which 
won  for  him  a  ready  success  in  the  business  affairs,  also 
won  him,  in  the  town  of  Petersham,  an  enviable  reputa¬ 
tion  for  sound  management  and  progressive  principles. 
Politically  he  gave  his  support  to  the  principles  and  the 
candidates  of  the  Republican  party,  but  he  considered  the 
welfare  of  the  town  and  of  the  county,  rather  than 
party  success,  as  the  goal  toward  which  a  public  official 
should  strive.  Wherever  he  came  in  contact  with  other 
citizens,  whether  in  business,  social  or  political  con¬ 
nection,  he  won  new  friends,  who  in  the  course  of  time 
became  old  friends,  and  who  learned  to  hold  him  in  the 
highest  esteem  both  as  a  public-spirited  citizen  and  as  a 
personal  friend  of  sterling  qualities  of  character.  He 
was  a  member  of  the  Commonwealth  Club  of  Worcester, 
Massachusetts,  and  his  religious  affiliation  was  with  the 
Unitarian  church.  His  death,  June  8,  1922,  left  a  va¬ 
cancy  which  the  town  of  Petersham  has  not  been  able 
to  fill,  and  caused  the  deepest  grief  among  his  many 
friends  and  associates.  It  is  true,  however,  that  though 
Mr.  Dexter  has  passed  from  the  scene  of  his  labors  of 
the  latest  years  of  his  life,  his  influence  has  not  passed 
with  him,  but  remains,  the  potent  influence  for  good  in 
the  community  which  he  served  so  long  and  so  well. 

Mr.  Dexter  married  (first)  Alice  F.  White,  of  Wor¬ 
cester,  Massachusetts,  on  June  2,  1886,  and  she  died  the 
same  year.  He  married  (second),  on  December  12, 
1898,  at  Boston,  Massachusetts,  Mary  V.  Mackenzie, 
who  was  born  in  New  Brunswick,  Canada,  February  14, 
1870,  Rev.  George  L.  Perin  performing  the  ceremony. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Dexter  are  the  parents  of  one  child,  Kath¬ 
erine  Tyler,  born  February  5,  1901,  at  Petersham,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  who  attended  Dana  Hall  and  Miss  Capen’s 


School,  and  upon  the  completion  of  her  education  en¬ 
gaged  in  private  tutoring  at  home. 


WILLIAM  H.  ROSE,  M.  D. — Standing  among  the 
foremost  surgeons  of  Southern  Worcester  County, 
Massachusetts,  Dr.  William  H.  Rose  is  one  of  the  most 
noteworthy  figures  in  professional  circles  in  the  city 
of  Worcester  to-day.  With  rarely  comprehensive  train¬ 
ing  and  the  natural  genius  for  his  work,  which  counts 
for  success  in  any  field  of  endeavor,  Dr.  Rose  has 
won  an  enviable  position  in  his  chosen  field  of  endeavor. 
He  is  a  son  of  John  and  Emma  (Cooper)  Rose,  his 
father  a  master  mechanic  by  occupation. 

William  H.  Rose  was  born  at  Worcester,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  February  20,  1876.  His  early  education  was  re¬ 
ceived  in  the  local  public  schools  and  he  later  covered  the 
high  school  course  in  his  native  city.  His  choice  of  a 
profession  early  made,  he  entered  Harvard  University 
Medical  School,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in  the 
class  of  1898,  with  the  degree  of  Doctor  of  Medicine. 
Shortly  thereafter  he  entered  Boston  City  Hospital  as 
interne,  and  was  active  in  the  surgical  service  of  that 
institution  until  the  year  1900.  Then,  with  the  purpose 
of  specializing,  Dr.  Rose  associated  himself  with  the 
Boston  Lying-in  Hospital,  where  he  was  active  for  a 
year  or  more.  Coming  to  the  Worcester  City  Hospital 
in  1902,  he  was  active  in  that  institution  as  obstetrician 
for  ten  years,  meanwhile,  also,  from  1902,  he  served 
as  chief  surgeon  for  the  American  Steel  and  Wire  Com¬ 
pany.  Since  1912  Dr.  Rose  has  acted  as  consulting  ob¬ 
stetrician  for  the  Worcester  City  Hospital,  and  in  1903 
he  became  assistant  surgeon  at  the  Memorial  Hospital, 
and  has  been  surgeon  there  for  about  ten  years.  He  has 
also  developed  an  extensive  private  practice  wholly  along 
surgical  lines.  He  has  gained  a  wide  reputation  as  an 
authority  along  the  line  of  his  specialty,  and  in  all  sur¬ 
gical  science  he  is  counted  among  those  men  who  are 
pioneers  in  worthy  effort  in  every  branch  of  professional 
advance.  He  is  a  member  of  the  American  Medical 
Association ;  is  a  fellow  of  the  American  College  of 
Surgeons,  and  a  member  of  the  Massachusetts  Medical 
Society.  Politically  he  supports  the  Republican  party, 
but  takes  only  the  interest  of  the  progressive  citizen  in 
public  affairs,  his  time  being  wholly  commanded  by  the 
exactions  of  his  profession.  Fraternally  he  is  affiliated 
with  Athelstan  Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted  Masons;  Eu¬ 
reka  Chapter,  Royal  Arch  Masons ;  Hiram  Council, 
Royal  and  Select  Masters ;  Worcester  County  Com- 
mandery  Knights  Templar;  Aleppo  Temple,  Ancient 
Arabic  Order  Nobles  of  the  Mystic  Shrine,  of  Boston. 
His  clubs  are:  The  Worcester  and  the  Tatnuck  Coun¬ 
try.  His  religious  affiliation  is  with  the  Congregational 
church. 

Dr.  Rose  married,  at  Winchester,  Massachusetts,  No¬ 
vember  10,  1908,  Grace  M  Martin,  daughter  of  William 
and  Susan  (Hopkins)  Martin. 


JOHN  F.  HAYDEN,  one  of  the  foremost  figures  in 
the  public  life  of  the  town  of  Athol,  Massachusetts, 
whose  career  has  been  spent  in.  local  public  affairs,  and 
whose  business  ability  is  counting  in  a  marked  degree 
for  the  welfare  and  advance  of  the  community,  is  a 
man  of  energy  and  initiative,  possessed  of  the  good 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


149 


judgment  which  form  an  excellent  balance  for  these 
characteristics,  and  his  work  is  of  broad  significance  to 
the  people. 

John  F.  Hayden  was  born  in  Athol,  Massachusetts, 
July  12,  1879.  Receiving  his  early  education  in  the  ele¬ 
mentary  and  grammar  schools  of  the  community,  he  was 
graduated  from  Athol  High  School  in  the  class  of  1895. 
Thereafter  making  special  preparations  for  his  career 
at  Prouty’s  Business  College,  he  was  graduated  from 
that  institution  in  the  class  of  1897.  He  at  once  became 
identified  with  the  public  service  of  the  community  as 
Tax  Collector,  in  which  responsible  office  he  served  for 
a  period  of  twelve  years.  He  has  also  acted  as  a  mem¬ 
ber  of  the  Board  of  Assessors  for  seven  years,  and  for  a 
similar  period  he  has  been  identified  with  the  Athol 
Board  of  Trade  as  secretary  of  that  body,  which  office  he 
still  ably  fills,  having  been  also  one  of  the  founders.  In 
this  connection  he  serves  as  secretary  of  the  Town  Hall 
Building  Commission  and  the  Town  By-Laws  Commis¬ 
sion,  and  is  one  of  the  promoters  and  a  trustee  of  the  Athol 
Fair  Association.  Mr.  Hayden’s  ability  to  grasp  every 
phase  of  a  situation  is  counting  far  for  the  public  ad¬ 
vance,  and  his  far-sightedness  and  general  efficiency 
make  him  an  able  and  useful  public  servant.  During  the 
World  War  he  was  a  member  of  the  Massachusetts  Na¬ 
tional  Guard  (1917-18),  also  one  of  the  founders  of  the 
Public  Safety  Association.  He  also  was  a  “four-minute” 
man,  speaking  in  various  sections  of  the  State.  Fra¬ 
ternally  Mr.  Hayden  is  very  prominent,  being  a  mem¬ 
ber  of  the  Foresters  of  America,  in  which  order  he  held 
the  office  of  Grand  Chief  Ranger  of  the  State  of  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  being  elected  in  1922,  this  placing  him  at  the 
head  of  the  order  in  this  State,  and  is  now  Supreme 
Deputy  in  the  national  order  for  the  State.  He  is  also 
a  member  of  the  local  lodges  of  the  Knights  of  Colum¬ 
bus,  the  Improved  Order  of  Red  Men,  and  Order  of 
Pocahontas,  and  a  member  of  Gardner  Lodge,  Benev¬ 
olent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks.  He  is  a  mem¬ 
ber  of  the  High  School  Alumni  Association,  of  which 
he  is  past  president;  the  High  School  Athletic  Coun¬ 
cil,  one  of  the  founders  and  vice-president;  and  the 
Poquaig  Club.  In  the  benevolences  and  the  charitable 
endeavors  of  the  community  he  takes  a  deep  interest, 
and  serves  as  a  member  and  trustee  of  the  Hospital  As¬ 
sociation,  also  as  vice-president  of  the  Athol  Chapter 
of  the  American  Red  Cross.  He  is  a’  member  of  the 
Massachusetts  Collectors’  Association,  the  Massachu¬ 
setts  Assessors’  Association,  and  other  bodies  of  or¬ 
ganized  endeavor.  He  is  identified  with  the  Church 
of  Our  Lady  Immaculate. 


GRANBY  A.  BRIDGES — In  the  manufacturing  ac¬ 
tivities  of  Worcester,  Massachusetts,  Mr.  Bridges  holds 
a  noteworthy  position  as  treasurer  of  the  Williams  & 
Bridges  Company,  for  in  the  product  of  this  concern 
one  of  the  daily  needs  of  various  industries  of  Worcester 
is  filled.  It  is  in  the  manufacture  of  wood  and  paper 
boxes  and  packing  cases  that  this  concern  has  gained 
its  present  eminence,  and  they  stand  among  the  pro¬ 
gressive  and  enterprising  industrial  organizations  of 
the  day  in  Worcester  County.  Mr.  Bridges  is  a  son  of 
Augustus  Bridges,  who  was  born  in  Hopkinton,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  and  was  active  in  the  shoe  industry  until  his 


death,  which  occurred  in  the  year  1906.  The  mother, 
Sarah  A.  (Stevens)  Bridges,  was  born  in  Phillipston, 
Massachusetts,  and  died  in  1914. 

Granby  A.  Bridges  was  born  in  Hopkinton,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  August  18,  1859.  His  education  was  received  in 
the  public  schools  of  his  native  place,  and  following  the 
completion  of  his  studies  he  became  active  in  the  ex¬ 
press  business,  which  he  carried  forward  for  about  ten 
years.  His  next  experience  was  in  the  shoe  industry, 
and  he  was  employed  in  this  field  for  a  similar  period. 
He  then  became  affiliated  with  his  present  associates 
as  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Williams  &  Bridges.  This 
enterprise  is  one  of  the  long  established  industrial  or¬ 
ganizations  of  the  city  of  Worcester,  having  been 
founded  in  the  year  1840  by  I.  N.  Keyes,  who  continued 
at  the  head  of  the  business  for  fifty-six  years.  Then,  in 
1896,  the  plant  was  purchased  by  George  A.  and  W.  K. 
Williams,  and  the  business  was  continued  under  the  name 
of  Williams  Brothers.  Only  a  year  later,  however,  a 
further  change  in  the  name  was  occasioned  when  Mr. 
Bridges  purchased  an  interest,  and  thenceforward  until 
its  incorporation  the  concern  was  known  as  Williams  & 
Bridges.  When  the  incorporation  took  place,  in  1904, 
the  title  of  the  concern  became  Williams  &  Bridges 
Company.  At  that  time  Fred  H.  Claflin  was  received 
into  the  concern  and  the  officials  became  as  follows :  G. 
A.  Williams,  president;  F.  H.  Claflin,  vice-president; 
and  G.  A.  Bridges,  treasurer.  Mr.  Claflin  was  made 
president  in  1910,  and  since  the  death  of  Mr.  Williams, 
in  1918,  the  business  has  been  carried  forward  without 
change  of  name  by  Messrs.  Bridges  and  Claflin.  They 
manufacture  a  general  line  of  wood  and  paper  boxes 
and  packing  cases,  and  with  their  main  plant  located  at 
Nos.  74-86  Central  Street,  Worcester,  they  employ  about 
eighty  people,  this  being  probably  the  largest  concern 
in  this  field  in  the  city  of  Worcester.  In  the  year  1889 
a  branch  factory  was  established  in  Hopkinton,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  and  in  1910  this  plant  was  removed  to  the  town 
of  Framingham,  where  it  is  still  located,  and  is  one  of  the 
prosperous  industries  of  that  place.  Mr.  Bridges  is  a 
member  of  the  Worcester  Chamber  of  Commerce,  and 
when  a  resident  of  Hopkinton  served  for  one  term  on 
the  Board  of  Selectmen;  but  the  demands  of  his  busi¬ 
ness  have  latterly  prevented  his  participating  in  an  offi¬ 
cial  capacity  in  public  affairs.  He  is  a  prominent  mem¬ 
ber  of  the  Masonic  order,  belonging  to  both  the  York 
and  Scottish  Rite  bodies,  including  the  consistory  and 
Ancient  Arabic  Order  Nobles  of  the  Mystic  Shrine.  He 
is  a  member  of  the  Rotary  Club,  attends  the  Congrega¬ 
tional  church,  and  is  affiliated  with  the  Congregational 
Club. 

Mr.  Bridges  married  Edith  L.  Howard,  who  was  born 
in  the  city  of  Worcester. 


HON.  ALBERT  E.  HUTT— Strength  of  spirit  and 
singleness  of  purpose  are  leading  characteristics  of  Al¬ 
bert  E.  Hutt,  whose  prominence  in  southern  Worcester 
County,  Massachusetts,  is  a  matter  of  many  years 
standing,  and  has  brought  about  his  present  service 
as  a  Representative  of  the  town  of  Southboro,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  in  the  Legislature  of  the  State.  Mr.  Hutt  has 
been  a  resident  of  Southboro  for  forty  years,  and  has 
borne  a  constructive,  although  largely  unofficial  part  in 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


150 

the  growth  of  the  community  and  its  progress  as  a  civic 
body.  Mr.  Hutt  comes  of  sturdy  pioneer  ancestry  of 
Nova  Scotia,  and  is  a  son  of  Peter  Hutt,  who  was  an  old 
time  fisherman  from  the  port  of  Halifax.  Peter  Hutt 
married  Sarah  Ann  Conrad. 

Albert  E.  Hutt  was  born  in  Tangier,  Halifax  County, 
Nova  Scotia,  near  the  city  of  Halifax,  April  7,  1865.  As 
a  lad  he  attended  the  common  schools  of  his  native  town. 
His  father  was  drowned  when  he  was  four  years  old, 
and  he  worked  in  the  gold  mines  in  Tangier  from  his 
sixteenth  to  his  eighteenth  year.  Coming  to  Southboro 
at  the  age  of  eighteen  years  he  worked  for  the  towns¬ 
people  of  this  community  in  various  position,  such  as 
gardening,  fanning,  and  teaming,  and  was  employed  by 
William  Collins,  and  also  by  a  Mrs.  Chamberlain,  act¬ 
ing  as  her  gardener  for  five  years.  Later  he  was  em¬ 
ployed  by  Samuel  Long  for  one  year,  when  he  bought 
the  Simpson  farm,  where  he  now  lives,  and  developed 
it  in  to  a  wonderfully  fine  and  model  place  along  the  line 
of  diversified  farming.  A  tireless  worker,  and  devoted 
to  any  undertaking  with  which  he  identifies  himself, 
Mr.  Hutt  has  won  an  enviable  reputation  as  a  man  who 
accomplishes  things  without  bluff  or  bluster,  but  with 
the  force  of  the  man  of  large  mental  resources.  Fur¬ 
thermore,  Mr.  Hutt  is  a  man  who  takes  his  own  way, 
and  gives  to  his  associates  or  his  opponent  equal  priv¬ 
ileges  along  the  pathway  of  progress,  never  casting  a 
slur  upon  the  name  of  another,  no  matter  how  widely 
his  interests  or  principles  may  differ.  Mr.  Hutt  has 
served  the  town  on  various  committees,  always  keeping 
the  best  interest  of  the  people  in  mind.  He  has  cared 
little  for  the  honors  of  public  life,  and  except  in  com¬ 
mittee  work  and  the  local  activities  that  carry  neither 
official  title  nor  salary,  he  has  not  accepted  public  re¬ 
sponsibility  until  recent  years.  He  was  elected  to  the 
House  of  Representatives  of  the  State  of  Massachusetts, 
where  he  served  in  1923  and  1924,  and  his  reelection 
returned  him  to  the  same  body.  Mr.  Hutt’s  record  as  a 
Legislator  is  one  of  honor  and  distinction,  and  the  people 
feel  that  they  are  well  represented  in  his  activities  at 
the  State  House.  Mr.  Hutt’s  quiet  dignity  and  careful 
attention  to  every  phase  of  the  public  business  mark 
him  as  a  man  who  deserves  the  esteem  and  confidence 
of  the  people,  and  he  is  constantly  making  new  friends, 
while  those  who  have  known  him  long  deeply  esteem  and 
admire  him.  Fraternally  he  holds  membership  in  the 
Royal  Arcanum,  in  which  order  he  held  the  office  of 
Deputy  Grand  Regent;  and  of  Parkman  Council,  of 
Westboro,  Massachusetts.  He  has  been  a  member  of 
the  Patrons  of  Husbandry  for  thirty-eight  years,  and  is 
influential  in  many  branches  of  agricultural  advance. 
He  is  a  member  of  the  City  Club  of  Boston,  and  of  the 
Royal  Arcanum  Club  of  Massachusetts,  and  he  attends 
the  Congregational  church. 

Albert  E.  Hutt  married,  December  24,  1890,  Mary 
Ann  Shellnutt,  daughter  of  Henry  Shellnutt,  of  Pleasant 
Harbor,  Halifax  County,  Nova  Scotia.  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Hutt  are  the  parents  of  three  children :  Pearl,  born  Oc¬ 
tober  16,  1892,  now  the  wife  of  A.  W.  Ruggles;  Walter, 
born  in  1893,  who  is  now  associated  with  his  father  in 
the  work  of  the  farm ;  and  Grace,  bom  September  7, 
1899.  Mr.  Hutt  takes  the  greatest  pride  in  his  three 
grandchildren,  who  are  the  children  of  Mrs.  Ruggles: 


Cortland,  born  October  7,  1913;  Vida  Jane,  born  Janu¬ 
ary  25,  1915;  and  Alberta  Pearl,  born  August  10,  1917. 
The  Hutt  residence  is  on  Middle  Road,  Southboro. 


MILTON  L.  CUSHING  is  president  and  manager 
of  the  J.  Cushing  Company,  one  of  the  largest  distrib¬ 
utors  of  grain  products  in  New  England,  in  which  con¬ 
cern  he  has  been  active  for  thirty-five  years.  He  is  a 
son  of  Milton  Marble  Cushing,  who  was  a  partner  in 
the  firm  of  J.  Cushing  Company  from  1866  until  his 
death  in  1879,  and  a  descendant  in  the  tenth  generation 
of  Matthew  Cushing,  who  was  a  son  of  Peter  Cushing, 
of  Hardingham  and  Hingham,  England,  and  whose 
ancestry  has  been  traced  through  Peter  (XX),  Thomas 
(XIX),  John  (XVIII),  William  (XVII),  Thomas 
(XVI),  William  (XV),  through  fourteen  generations 
to  one  Hrolf  Nefja  Jarl,  a  Viking,  whose  deeds  are  re¬ 
corded  in  the  “Scandinavia  Sagas,”  relating  to  the  latter 
half  of  the  eighth  century. 

(I.)  Matthew  Cushing,  immigrant  ancestor,  was  bap¬ 
tized  in  Hingham,  England,  March  2,  1589,  died  in 
Hingham,  Massachusetts,  September  30,  1660.  With  his 
wife,  four  sons,  and  his  wife’s  sister  Frances  Beecroft, 
widow,  he  sailed  from  Ipswich  in  1638,  on  the  ship 
“Diligent,”  John  Marton,  master.  He  left  England  ow¬ 
ing  to  religious  troubles.  He  settled  in  Hingham, 
Massachusetts,  where  he  at  once  became  identified  with 
public  affairs.  He  was  a  town  officer  and  a  deacon  of 
Rev.  Thomas  Hobart’s  church.  He  married,  August 
5,  1613,  in  England,  Nazareth  Pitcher,  baptized  Oc¬ 
tober  30,  1586,  died  in  Hingham,  January  5,  1682,  aged 
ninety-six,  daughter  of  Henry  Pitcher,  of  the  family 
of  Admiral  Pitcher,  of  England,  and  they  were  the 
parents  of  five  children:  Daniel,  of  further  mention; 
Jeremiah,  baptized  July  21,  1621 ;  Matthew,  baptized 
April  s,  1623;  Deborah,  baptized  February  17,  1625, 
married  Matthias  Briggs;  and  John,  bom  1627. 

(II.)  Daniel  Cushing,  son  of  Matthew  and  Nazareth 
(Pitcher)  Cushing,  was  baptized  in  Hingham,  England, 
April  20,  1619,  died  December  3,  1700.  He  settled  in 
Hingham,  Massachusetts,  where  he  was  granted  land 
in  1665.  He  was  admitted  a  freeman  in  1671,  and  was 
an  active  magistrate  for  many  years.  He  was  town 
clerk  of  Hingham  and  left  a  valuable  set  of  records, 
which  are  of  great  value  to  the  antiquary.  From  1682 
for  many  years  he  kept  a  general  store.  He  was  Select¬ 
man  in  1665,  and  many  years  after;  in  1680-82-95,  dep¬ 
uty  to  the  General  Court.  A  book  called  “Extracts 
From  the  Minutes  of  Daniel  Cushing  of  Hingham,”  with 
a  photograph  of  his  manuscript,  etc.,  was  printed  in 
1865.  His  will  was  dated  September  1 1, 1693.  He  married 
(first),  January  19,  1645,  Lydia  Gilman,  born  in  Eng¬ 
land,  died  in  Hingham,  March  12,  1689,  daughter  of 
Edward  and  Mary  (Clark)  Gilman.  He  married  (sec¬ 
ond),  March  23,  1691,  Elizabeth,  widow  of  Captain 
John  Thaxter,  and  daughter  of  Nicholas  and  Mary 
Jacob.  Children  bom  in  Hingham :  1.  Peter,  born 
March  29,  1646.  2.  Daniel,  born  July  23,  1648.  3.  Deb¬ 
orah,  bom  November  13,  1651,  married  (first),  Septem¬ 
ber  25,  1679,  Henry  Tarleton;  (second),  August  31, 
1686,  Rev.  Benjamin  Woodbridge,  died  January  15,  1710. 
4.  Jeremiah,  born  July  3,  1654.  5.  Theophilus,  of  further 
mention.  6.  Matthew,  bom  July  15,  1660. 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


(III.)  Captain  Theophilus  Cushing,  son  of  Daniel 
and  Lydia  (Gilman)  Cushing,  was  born  in  Hingham, 
Massachusetts,  June  7,  1657,  died  January  7,  1717-18. 
He  was  a  farmer  and  Selectman  in  1697-1707-15,  and  a 
deputy  to  the  General  Court  in  1702-03-04-07-13.  His 
house  was  on  Main  Street,  Hingham.  He  married,  No¬ 
vember  28,  1688,  Mary  Thaxter,  born  August  19,  1667, 
daughter  of  John  and  Elizabeth  (Jacobs)  Thaxter.  She 
married  (second),  January  xi,  1721-22,  Captain  Joseph 
Herrick,  of  Beverly.  Children  born  in  Hingham :  Ne- 
hemiah,  born  July  18,  1689;  Mary,  born  February  9, 
1690-91,  died  August  8,  1699;  Adam,  born  January  1, 
1692-93;  David,  born  in  December,  1694;  Abel,  of  fur¬ 
ther  mention;  Rachel,  born  August  17,  1698,  died  Sep¬ 
tember  9,  1699;  Mary,  born  September  26,  1701,  died 
August  30,  1716;  Theophilus,  born  June  16,  1703;  Seth, 
bom  December  13,  1705;  Deborah,  bom  September  26, 
1707,  and  Lydia,  born  February  13,  1709-10,  died  young. 

(IV.)  Captain  Abel  Cushing,  son  of  Theophilus  and 
Mary  (Thaxter)  Cushing,  was  born  in  Hingham,  Oc¬ 
tober  24,  1696,  died  May  20,  1750.  He  was  a  farmer 
and  mill  owner,  and  Selectman  of  Hingham  for  many 
years.  His  house  was  on  South  Pleasant  Street.  He 
married,  November  24,  1720,  Mary  Jacob,  born  Sep¬ 
tember  29,  1698,  daughter  of  Peter  and  Hannah  (Allen) 
Jacob.  Children,  born  in  Hingham:  Mary,  born  Au¬ 
gust  12,  1722,  died  October  12,  1726;  David,  born  July 
12,  1724,  died  October  17,  1726;  David,  of  further  men¬ 
tion;  Abel,  born  January  26,  1729-30,  married,  January 

29,  1758,  Hannah  Crocker;  Mary,  born  January  28,  1731- 
32,  married,  March  25,  1753,  Rev.  Daniel  Shute;  Laban, 
born  February  21,  1733-34,  died  May  18,  1747;  Infant, 
born  January  21,  1736-37,  died  same  day;  Lydia,  born 
April  23,  1738,  married,  January  31,  1759,  Gideon  Hay¬ 
ward;  Abigail,  born  June  14,  1741,  married,  October  2, 
1761,  Thomas  Hersey. 

(V.)  Colonel  David  Cushing,  son  of  Abel  and  Mary 
(Jacob)  Cushing,  was  born  in  Hingham,  September  7, 
1727,  died  February  15,  1800.  He  lived  on  Pleasant 
Street,  Hingham,  and  was  an  energetic  and  prominent 
man  in  town  affairs.  He  was  Selectman  in  1768-69-70- 
71  -75-76.  He  served  in  the  Revolution,  fourth  lieutenant 
of  Captain  Jotham  Boring's  Company,  on  the  Lexington 
alarm,  April  19,  1775;  sergeant  in  Captain  Pyam  Cush¬ 
ing’s  Company,  Colonel  Solomon  Lovell’s  Regiment,  at 
Hull  and  Dorchester  in  1776;  lieutenant-colonel  of  the 
same  regiment,  commissioned  February  7,  1776;  and 
colonel  of  the  2d  Suffolk  Regiment,  in  Brigadier  Gen¬ 
eral  Lovell’s  Brigade,  in  1778.  He  married  (first), 
April  9,  1752,  Ruth  Lincoln,  baptized  February  25, 
1 732-33,  died  July  6,  1761,  daughter  of  Samuel  and 
Ruth  (Cushing)  Lincoln,  of  Hingham.  He  married 
(second),  January  23,  1763,  Mabel  Gardner,  born  Janu¬ 
ary  6,  1738-39,  died  August  14,  1798,  daughter  of  Hosea 
and  Mary  (Whiting)  Gardner.  Children  bom  in  Hing¬ 
ham,  by  first  wife :  Ruth,  born  November  1,  1752,  married, 
August  30,  1770,  Perez  Cushing ;  David,  of  further  men¬ 
tion;  Molly,  born  September  26,  1756,  married,  January 

30,  1783,  Joshua  Mann;  Jonathan,  born  April  13,  1759; 

Lydia,  born  June  2,  1761,  married,  September  3,  1786, 
Asaph  Tracy.  Children  by  second  wife:  Abel,  born 
October  22,  1763,  married,  November  14,  1784,  Sarah 
Wilder;  Hosea,  born  May  29,  1765;  Charles 


151 

Whiting,  born  November  7,  1766;  Russell,  born 

April  24,  1768,  died  February  2,  1851;  Nancy, 

bom  March  10,  1770,  died  unmarried,  December 

27,  1835;  Jane,  born  April  3,  1772,  married,  No¬ 
vember  6,  1796,  Lemuel  Dwelley;  Lucy,  born  October 
I8,  1773,  married,  May  24,  1798,  David  Lewis;  Chris¬ 
tiana,  born  March  14,  1775,  died  unmarried,  July  1, 
1822;  Elnathan,  born  April  30,  1777,  removed  to  Scitu- 
ate;  Jerusha,  born  February  3,  1779,  died  unmarried, 
September  18,  1862;  Josiah,  born  April  8,  1781;  and 
Mabel,  born  March  6,  1783,  married,  1810,  William 
Rouse,  of  Bath,  Maine. 

(VI.)  Captain  David  Cushing,  son  of  Colonel  David 
and  Ruth  (Lincoln)  Cushing,  was  born  in  Hingham, 
Massachusetts,  July  2,  1754,  and  died  May  3,  1827.  He 
served  in  the  Revolutionary  War  as  fourth  lieutenant  in 
Captain  Jotham  Loring’s  (Hingham)  company,  in  1775, 
and  also  as  sergeant  in  Captain  Pyam  Cushing’s  com¬ 
pany,  Colonel  Solomon  Lovell’s  regiment,  in  1776.  He 
took  an  active  part  in  the  public  affairs  of  Hingham, 
serving  as  Constable  in  1784,  and  consecutively  through 
1787,  and  also  from  1790  to  1794  inclusive.  He  was  a 
tanner,  an  innkeeper,  and  a  farmer,  and  in  1798  he  re- 
mbved  to  Ashburnham,  Massachusetts.  He  married, 
October  14,  1779,  Hannah  Cushing,  daughter  of  Joseph 
and  Sarah  (Leavitt)  Cushing,  who  was  born  in  Hing¬ 
ham,  April  26,  1760,  and  died  March  13,  1823.  Their 
children  were:  Joseph,  Hannah,  David,  Susannah,  La¬ 
ban,  of  further  mention;  Deborah,  Moses,  and  Sarah 
Leavitt. 

(VII.)  Laban  Cushing,  son  of  Captain  David  and 
Hannah  (Cushing)  Cushing,  was  born  in  Hingham, 
Massachusetts,  April  29,  1791,  and  died  in  Ashburnham, 
Massachusetts,  October  17,  1847.  He  served  as  a 
drummer  in  the  War  of  1812,  and  in  1817  removed  to 
Brooklyn,  Pennsylvania,  from  which  place  he  returned 
to  Ashburnham,  Massachusetts,  in  1830.  He  married, 
April  23,  1811,  Nancy  Whitney,  daughter  of  Silas  Whit¬ 
ney.  She  died  in  Fitchburg,  Massachusetts,  January 
27,  1871.  Their  children  were:  Nancy  Whitney,  Sarah 
Whittington,  Joseph,  of  further  mention;  Laban,  Re¬ 
becca,  Susan,  Mary  Jane,  Charles  G.,  Harriet  Maria, 
George  Russell,  David  M.,  and  Hannah  Elizabeth. 

(VIII.)  Joseph  Cushing,  son  of  Laban  and  Nancy 
(Whitney)  Cushing,  was  born  in  Brooklyn,  Pennsyl¬ 
vania,  October  6,  1817,  and  died  July  3,  1894.  In  1830 
he  removed  to  Ashburnham,  Massachusetts,  from  which 
place  he  later  removed  to'  Fitchburg,  Massachusetts,  and 
resided  in  the  latter  place  for  a  period  of  thirty  years. 
He  married  (first),  July  22,  1841,  Elmira  Marble,  daugh¬ 
ter  of  Stephen  Marble.  She  died  in  1845,  and  he  mar¬ 
ried  (second),  January  31,  1847,  Mary  Ann  Arnold. 
She  died  August  23,  1866,  and  he  married  (third), 
March,  1868,  Elizabeth  Cushing,  daughter  of  Moses 
and  Gertrude  (Polley)  Cushing.  Elizabeth  (Cushing) 
Cushing  died  September  23,  1875.  To  the  first  marriage 
one  son  was  born,  Milton  Marble,  of  further  mention. 
Children  of  the  second  marriage  are :  Joseph  and  Susan. 

(IX.)  Milton  Marble  Cushing,  son  of  Joseph  and  El¬ 
mira  (Marble)  Cushing,  was  born  in  Fitchburg,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  September  4,  1844,  and  after  receiving  his  edu¬ 
cation  in  the  schools  of  Fitchburg  and  Groton,  and  at 
Eastman  Business  College,  became  identified  with  the 


152 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


firm  of  J.  Cushing  Company,  a  concern  founded  by  his 
father,  Joseph  Cushing.  In  i860  he  became  a  partner 
is  the  business  and  continued  to  devote  his  energies  to 
the  advancement  of  its  interests  to  the  time  of  his 
death,  May  9,  1879.  He  married,  June  12,  1867,  Ellen 
Maria  Leland,  and  they  were  the  parents  of  seven 
children:  Ethel  (twin),  who  was  born  March  11,  1868, 
and  died  May  26,  1876;  Joseph  (twin),  born  March  11, 
1868,  died  August  4,  1868;  Milton  L.,  of  further  men¬ 
tion;  Ellen  M.,  who  was  born  January  4,  1873;  Joseph, 
who  was  born  September  11,  1874,  and  died  Septem¬ 
ber  18,  1896;  Anna  W.,  who  was  born  November  27, 
1876;  and  Matthew,  who  was  born  February  21,  1878. 

(X.)  Milton  Eeland  Cushing,  son  of  Milton  M.  and 
Ellen  Maria  (Leland)  Cushing,  was  born  at  Fitchburg, 
Massachusetts,  January  13,  1871.  Following  his  early 
education  in  the  local  public  schools  he  attended  Fitch¬ 
burg  High  School,  then  went  to  Poughkeepsie,  New 
York,  where  he  took  the  usual  course  at  Eastman’s  Busi¬ 
ness  College.  In  1891  Mr.  Cushing  became  identified 
with  the  J.  Cushing  Company  and  taking  a  minor  posi¬ 
tion,  familiarized  himself  with  the  business  by  the  prac¬ 
tical  method  of  experience  in  every  department,  until 
now  for  the  past  seven  years  he  has  filled  the  office  of 
president  and  manager.  Other  affiliations  being :  Di¬ 
rector  of  the  Safety  Fund  National  Bank,  of  Fitchburg, 
and  a  trustee  of  the  Worcester  North  Savings  Institu¬ 
tion,  also  of  Fitchburg;  was  one  of  the  founders,  first 
vice-president,  and  is  now  treasurer  of  The  Grain 
Dealers’  Mutual  Insurance  Company,  of  Boston,  Massa¬ 
chusetts  ;  and  is  a  member  of  the  Fitchburg  Chamber  of 
Commerce;  Boston  Chamber  of  Commerce,  and  of  the 
Chicago  Board  of  Trade.  He  was  a  member  of  the  City 
Council  in  1905,  and  in  1906  was  elected  to  the  School 
Committee  of  Fitchburg,  on  which  he  served  for  three 
years.  During  the  World  War  he  was  a  member  of  the 
Massachusetts  National  Guard  at  Boston,  as  a  member 
of  Company  C,  1st  Motor  Corps  (1917-1918).  He  is  a 
member  of  the  Fay  Club  and  the  Oak  Hill  Country  Club, 
of  Fitchburg;  and  the  Exchange  Club  and  City  Club,  of 
Boston.  His  religious  affiliation  is  with  the  Unitarian 
church,  of  Fitchburg. 

Milton  Leland  Cushing  married,  at  Fitchburg,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  June  19,  1895,  Gertrude  Carolyn  Brown, 
daughter  of  James  and  Flora  (Wood)  Brown,  and 
they  are  the  parents  of  four  children:  1.  Barbara, 
born  April  23,  1897,  was  educated  in  Fitchburg  gram¬ 
mar  and  high  schools,  Garland  School  of  Boston,  and 
Vassar  College;  married  Bigelow  Crocker,  and  has  two 
children:  Rosemary  and  Bigelow,  Jr.  2.  Whitney,  born 
March  16,  1899,  attended  Andover  Preparatory  School 
and  graduated  from  Yale  in  1924  with  the  degree  of 
Bachelor  of  Science.  3.  Joseph,  born  November  7, 
1900,  educated  in  Fitchburg  schools,  in  Andover  Pre¬ 
paratory  School,  and  Williams  College.  4.  Carolyn, 
born  July  4,  1905,  and  educated  in  Fitchburg  schools 
and  Miss  Marot’s  Private  School,  at  Thompson,  Connec¬ 
ticut. 


ELLSWORTH  MINOTT  BROWN,  president  of 
the  widely  known  firm,  Brown  Brothers  Company,  of 
Gardner,  Massachusetts,  is  a  man  who  may  well  be  called 
a  man  of  action.  That  his  energy  and  initiative  have 


counted  both  for  his  own  advantage  and  for  the  pros¬ 
perity  of  the  community  is  clearly  evidenced  by  the  im¬ 
portance  of  the  industry  of  which,  for  more  than 
twenty-five  years,  he  has  been  the  head.  Mr.  Brown  is 
a  son  of  Franklin  O.  and  Mary  A.  (Patch)  Brown.  The 
father,  who  was  born  in  Templeton,  Massachusetts,  in 
1826,  went  to  Winchendon  in  his  youth,  and  there  en¬ 
tered  the  lumber  business  as  an  employee,  later  owning 
his  own  business  and  operating  a  small  saw  mill.  A 
young  man  of  high  spirit  and  great  patriotism,  he  en¬ 
listed  in  the  Civil  War,  and  served  with  honor  and  dis¬ 
tinction,  the  hardships  of  this  experience  becoming,  in  a 
large  measure,  responsible  for  his  early  death,  in  Oc¬ 
tober,  1874.  Mary  A.  (Patch)  Brown,  born  in  Brattle- 
boro,  Vermont,  in  1826,  removed  to  South  Royalston, 
Massachusetts,  but  after  her  children  had  settled  in 
Gardner,  Massachusetts,  she  wished  to  be  near  them 
and  finally  did  remove  to  Gardner,  where  she  passed 
away  in  1919. 

Ellsworth  Minott  Brown  was  born  in  Winchendon, 
Massachusetts,  April  5,  1864.  He  attended  the  public 
schools  of  Templeton  and  Winchendon  until  twelve 
years  of  age,  but  from  that  time  had  few  school  advan¬ 
tages.  From  the  age  of  ten  years,  when  he  was  left 
fatherless,  he  lived  out  with  other  families,  working 
at  whatever  he  could  find  to  do  in  order  to  earn  his  own 
living  and  relieve  his  mother  of  the  burden  of  his  sup¬ 
port.  When  he  was  able  to  be  of  some  assistance  to 
her,  he  returned  home  for  two  years,  then,  in  1880,  he 
located  in  Gardner  and  secured  employment  in  a  chair 
factory.  About  a  year  later  he  joined  the  factory  force 
of  the  firm  of  S.  Bent  &  Brothers,  with  whom  he  was 
associated  for  a  period  of  twelve  years.  There  Mr. 
Brown  gained  much  practical  experience,  thoroughly 
familiarizing  himself  with  the  production  end  of  the 
business,  and  also  gaining  a  broad  general  idea  of  the 
methods  of  distribution.  In  1892  he  resigned  his  posi¬ 
tion  with  the  Bent  Brothers  to  become  associated  with 
his  brother,  Charles  F.  Brown,  in  the  retail  wood  busi¬ 
ness,  they  also  conducting  a  carpet  cleaning  department, 
which  was  not  only  profitable  but  was  greatly  appreci¬ 
ated  by  the  local  housekeepers.  In  1898,  in  association 
with  another  brother,  Benjamin  J.  Brown,  he  founded 
the  chair  manufacturing  business  which  has  been  for 
years  a  leader  in  its  field  in  Gardner.  The  brothers 
continued  partners  until  the  death  of  Charles  F.  Brown, 
January  20,  IQOI,  and  in  1902  the  business  was  in¬ 
corporated,  with  Ellsworth  M.  Brown  as  president. 
Nearly  a  year  prior  to  incorporation,  Jesse  E.  Bodette 
had  come  into  the  partnership,  and  on  incorporation  he 
was  elected  vice-president.  He  died  July  24,  1905.  On 
January  1,  1904,  Mar  den  H.  Turner  bought  an  interest 
in  the  company,  and  in  1907  was  chosen  vice-president, 
the  officers  of  Brown  Brothers  Company  now  being 
(1923),  Ellsworth  M.  Brown,  president;  Marden  H. 
Turner,  vice-president;  Benjamin  J.  Brown,  treasurer 
and  secretary. 

LTnder  the  leadership  of  Ellsworth  M.  Brown  this  en¬ 
terprise  has  advanced  to  a  foremost  position  in  the  manu¬ 
facture  of  chairs,  tea  room,  and  breakfast  room  furni¬ 
ture  and  a  line  of  sp  jialties  of  this  general  character. 
For  a  number  of  years  they  have  transacted  an  annual 
business  of  about  $400,000,  their  banner  year  (in  war 


7—^- 


* 


.* 


I 


I 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


153 


times)  having  been  very  near  a  half  million.  As  presi¬ 
dent  of  this  important  company,  Ellsworth  M.  Brown 
holds  a  prominent  position  in  the  business  world  of 
Gardner,  and  is  a  member  of  the  Chamber  of  Com¬ 
merce.  He  is  affiliated  with  the  Chair  Town  Cooperative 
Bank  as  a  stockholder  and  director,  and  for  three  years 
served  as  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Selectmen  of 
Gardner.  Fraternally  he  is  identified  with  Hope  Lodge, 
Free  and  Accepted  Masons;  Gardner  Chapter,  Royal 
Arch  Masons;  and  Gardner  Lodge,  No.  1426,  Benevolent 
and  Protective  Order  of  Elks.  He  is  a  member  and 
Past  Commander  of  Charles  Sumner  Camp,  No.  37, 
Sons  of  Veterans,  and  Past  Division  Commander  of 
the  Massachusetts  Division  of  that  order.  Politically 
he  supports  the  Republican  party. 

Ellsworth  M.  Brown  married,  in  1884,  Lizzie  E.  Holt, 
of  Hubbardston,  Massachusetts,  daughter  of  Elias  O. 
and  Lucy  (Underwood)  Holt.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Brown 
are  the  parents  of  three  children:  1.  Estelle,  a  graduate 
of  Gardner  High  School,  class  of  1904.  2.  Franklin  O., 
a  graduate  of  Gardner  High  School,  class  of  1906,  and 
an  employee  of  Brown  Brothers  Company.  3.  Harold 
F.,  a  graduate  of  Gardner  High  School,  class  of  1910, 
and  of  the  Worcester  Polytechnic  Institute,  B.  S.,  class 
of  1915,  now  identified  with  Brown  Brothers  Company. 
He  married,  October  28,  1916,  Jessie  I.  Lusk,  daughter 
of  Frank  and  Louisa  (Dargie)  Lusk. 


BENJAMIN  J.  BROWN  — As  one  of  the  founders 
and  for  many  years  treasurer  of  the  Brown  Brothers 
Company,  of  Gardner,  Massachusetts,  Benjamin  J. 
Brown  has  been  an  important  factor  in  the  progress  of 
that  company,  manufacturers  of  chairs,  breakfast  and 
tea-room  furniture  and  other  specialties  of  that  general 
class.  He  is  a  son  of  Franklin  O.  and  Mary  A.  (Patch) 
Brown,  the  father  born  in  Templeton,  Massachusetts,  in 
1826.  Franklin  O.  Brown  went  to  Winchendon  as 
a  young  man  and  became  identified  in  the  lumber  busi¬ 
ness  there,  eventually  engaging  in  business  for  himself 
and  operating  a  small  saw  mill.  He  was  a  veteran  of 
the  Civil  War,  and  died  at  a  comparatively  early  age. 
in  October,  1874,  the  exposure  and  hardships  of  the  war 
hastening  his  death.  Mary  A.  (Patch)  Brown,  born  in 
Brattleboro,  Vermont,  in  1826,  removed  to  South  Roy- 
alston,  Massachusetts,  but  after  her  children  had  settled 
in  Gardner,  yearning  to  be  near  them,  passed  her  de¬ 
clining  years  there,  her  death  occurring  in  1919. 

Benjamin  J.  Brown  was  born  at  Winchendon,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  March  4,  1870.  Only  four  and  one-half  years 
of  age  when  the  death  of  his  father  occurred  and  the 
family  being  left  without  means  of  support,  he  began, 
when  still  a  small  child,  to  contribute  his  mite  towards 
the  maintenance  of  the  family.  Thus  his  education  was 
very  limited  and  while  he  attended  the  schools  of  South 
Royalston,  he  helped  with  the  work  which  was  brought 
home  from  the  factory  nearby,  the  caning  of  chairs 
being  placed  out  in  the  different  homes  of  the  town, 
where  from  childhood  to  old  age,  all  members  of  the 
family  participated  in  the  work.  As  soon  as  he  was 
able  to  assume  larger  responsibilities  Mr.  Brown  en¬ 
tered  the  employ  of  the  American  Woolen  Mills,  where 
he  remained  for  a'  time.  In  the  spring  of  1882  he  came 
to  Gardner  and  during  that  .summer  was  employed  in 


the  chair  factory  of  S.  K.  Pierce  &  Son.  Returning  to 
South  Royalston  in  the  fall,  he  attended  school  the  fol¬ 
lowing  winter,  working  morning  and  evening  and  every 
spare  hour  at  the  caning  of  chairs.  In  1883  he  again 
came  to  Gardner  and  once  more  entered  the  S.  K. 
Pierce  &  Son's  factory.  For  seventeen  years  he  con¬ 
tinued  active  in  the  chair  industry  in  Gardner,  during 
twelve  years  of  that  period  with  the  L.  B.  Ramsdall 
Company.  There  he  began  in  the  capacity  of  assistant 
to  Thomas  E.  Cody,  who  is  now  president,  but  at  that 
time  general  manager.  Mr.  Brown  worked  with  Mr. 
Cody  in  the  management  of  the  business  until  1898, 
then  resigning  to  establish  himself  in  business  in  a 
similar  line  of  manufacture.  In  partnership  with  his  two 
brothers,  Ellsworth  M.  and  Charles  F.  Brown,  the  firm 
of  Brown  Brothers  was  founded  and  the  present  in¬ 
dustry  established.  In  1902  the  business  was  incor¬ 
porated  under  the  name  of  the  Brown  Brothers  Com¬ 
pany,  Benjamin  J.  Brown  becoming  secretary  and  treas¬ 
urer,  also  general  manager  of  the  plant,  and  was  jointly 
instrumental  in  building  up  the  business  and  developing 
it  to  its  present  importance.  They  have  for  some  years 
done  an  annual  business  amounting  to  fully  $400,000,  and 
their  heaviest  year,  which  occurred  during  the  World 
War,  showed  a  volume  of  nearly  a  half  million  dollars. 
Ellsworth  M.  Brown  has  been  president  of  the  com¬ 
pany  since  its  incorporation,  but  Charles  F.  Brown,  the 
other  partner,  died  January  20,  1901,  the  year  prior  to 
the  incorporation.  A  brother-in-law,  Jesse  E.  Bodette, 
purchased  the  interest  of  the  deceased  partner  and  be¬ 
came  vice-president,  and  later  Marden  H.  Turner  was 
made  vice-president,  an  office  he  still  holds. 

Benjamin  J.  Brown  is  a  member  of  the  Gardner 
Chamber  of  Commerce,  which  he  serves  as  a  member 
of  the  board  of  directors  and  vice-president;  is  a  direc¬ 
tor  and  vice-president  of  the  Gardner  Trust  Company, 
and  a  trustee  of  Gardner  Savings  Bank.  A  Republican 
in  political  affiliation,  he  is  interested  in  all  civic  advance, 
and  for  the  past  half  a  dozen  years  has  served  as  a 
member  of  the  Board  of  Water  and  Sewer  Commis¬ 
sioners.  Fraternally  Mr.  Brown  holds  membership  in 
Hope  Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted  Masons;  Gardner  Chap¬ 
ter,  Royal  Arch  Masons ;  Ivanhoe  Commandery,  Knights 
Templar;  Aleppo  Temple,  Ancient  Arabic  Order  Nobles 
of  the  Mystic  Shrine  ;  Gardner  Lodge,  No.  1426,  Benev¬ 
olent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks ;  and  is  a  member  of 
Charles  Sumner  Camp,  No.  37,  Sons  of  Veterans.  His 
clubs  are:  The  Gardner  Boat,  the  Oak  Hill  Country, 
and  the  Monomonack  Sporting  Club. 

Benjamin  J.  Brown  married,  January  10,  1889,  Maude 
A.  Gilbert,  of  Gardner,  and  they  are  the  parents  of 
four  children :  Clayton  E.,  an  employe  of  Brown  Broth¬ 
ers ;  Frances  Adeline,  at  home;  Guy  B.,  also  employed  by 
the  Brown  Brothers ;  and  Clarence  E.,  who  died  at  the 
age  of  four  years. 


JOHN  EDWARD  SWIFT,  one  of  the  professional 
men  of  Worcester  County,  Massachusetts,  is  active  in 
civic  and  political  affairs,  and  has  been  engaged  in  legal 
practice  in  Milford  and  in  Boston  since  1902. 

Born  in  Milford,  Massachusetts,  December  7,  1879, 
Mr.  Swift  is  a  son  of  Thomas  J.,  now  retired  from 
active  life,  and  Mary  J.  (McDonough)  Swift,  who  died 


T54 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


September  8,  1921.  He  received  his  early  education  in 
the  public  schools  of  Milford,  Massachusetts,  and  after 
his  graduation  from  the  high  school  there,  in  1896, 
became  a  student  in  Boston  College,  from  which  he  was 
graduated  in  1899.  He  then  began  his  professional 
studies  in  the  law  school  of  Boston  University,  com¬ 
pleting  his  course  there  in  1902.  During  the  two  decades 
which  have  passed  since  that  time  he  has  been  steadily 
and  continuously  engaged  in  legal  practice  in  Milford 
and  Boston.  He  has  built  up  a  large  and  important 
patronage  and  has  made  for  himself  a  reputation  which 
is  a  valuable  business  asset. 

He  has  always  taken  a  deep  interest  in  local  civic  affairs 
and  in  political  affairs  in  general,  has  served  as  Town 
Treasurer  for  eleven  years,  and  has  been  a  member  of 
the  School  Board  for  eighteen  years.  Politically  he 
gives  his  support  to  the  principles  and  candidates  of  the 
Democratic  party,  and  has  been  chosen  to  serve  as  dele¬ 
gate  to  the  Democratic  National  Convention.  He  was 
a  candidate  in  1922  for  the  office  of  Attorney  General  of 
Massachusetts.  He  is  District  Deputy  of  the  Knights 
of  Columbus;  a  member  of  Milford  Lodge,  Benevolent 
and  Protective  Order  of  Elks ;  of  the  Catholic  Foresters ; 
of  Division  7,  Ancient  Order  of  Hibernians;  and  pro¬ 
fessionally  is  affiliated  with  the  Massachusetts  Bar  As¬ 
sociation,  the  Worcester  County  Bar  Association,  and 
a  member  of  the  United  States  Supreme  Court  Bar.  He 
is  also  a  member  of  the  Boston  City  Club.  His  re¬ 
ligious  affiliation  is  with  the  Roman  Catholic  Church 
of  St.  Mary’s,  at  Milford. 

John  Edward  Swift,  married,  on  April  18,  1917,  at 
Milford,  Massachusetts,  Emily  L.  Lee,  daughter  of 
William  and  Virginia  (Parker)  Lee.  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Swift  are  the  parents  of  three  children :  John  Edward, 
Jr.,  who  was  born  January  20,  1918;  Marilyn  I.,  born 
May  5,  1920;  and  Francis  Lee,  born  December  7,  1923. 


ARTHUR  H.  TURNER — The  progressive  activities 
of  the  town  of  Harvard,  Massachusetts,  have  commanded 
the  constructive  attention  of  Arthur  H.  Turner  for  many 
years,  and  in  both  his  individual  interests  and  public 
service  he  has  done  much  to  forward  the  welfare  of  the 
community  and  stabilize  economic  conditions.  He  is 
numbered  among  the  broadly  useful  and  estimable  men 
of  Worcester  County.  Mr.  Turner  is  a  member  of  an 
old  and  distinguished  family  of  this  State,  his  great¬ 
grandfather,  Prince  Turner,  having  served  in  the  Rev¬ 
olutionary  War,  supporting  the  cause  of  the  colonies. 
Luther  Turner,  Mr.  Turner’s  grandfather,  was  an  hon¬ 
ored  figure  of  his  time,  and  with  his  wife,  Abigail,  bore 
a  leading  part  in  the  social  progress  of  the  day.  Oliver 
Turner,  son  of  these  parents  and  Mr.  Turner’s  father, 
was  among  the  early  settlers  of  the  community  now 
known  as  Harvard,  and  was  by  trade  a  pump  maker, 
but  during  his  later  years  was  employed  by  the  United 
States  Government  in  the  tempering  of  steel.  He  spent 
the  decline  of  life  on  the  farm.  Oliver  Turner  married 
Rebecca  Harrod,  daughter  of  Major  William  K.  and 
Rebecca  (Staples)  Harrod,  her  father  a  blacksmith,  of 
Harvard,  her  mother  of  Maine  stock. 

Arthur  H.  Turner  was  born  at  Harvard,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  September  26,  1858.  His  education  was  received 
in  the  public  schools  of  Lancaster  and  at  Lawrence  Acad¬ 


emy,  at  Groton,  Massachusetts,  and  his  natural  taste 
and  ability  for  mathematics,  largely  determined  his 
future.  Mr.  Turner  has  devoted  considerable  time  and 
attention  to  farming  activities  since  his  youth,  but  dur¬ 
ing  his  entire  career  has  been  engaged  in  bookkeeping 
and  accounting  along  with  his  other  interests.  For 
many  years  he  was  a  prominent  factor  in  the  public  ad¬ 
vance,  and  for  seventeen  years  served  on  the  local 
School  Committee.  His  activities  as  Overseer  of  the 
Poor  did  much  for  the  permanent  welfare  of  wards  of 
the  community,  and  he  served  acceptably  in  the  exacting 
office  of  Assessor  for  one  year.  Elected  treasurer  of 
the  town  of  Harvard  in  the  year  1912,  he  has  ably 
filled  this  office  since.  These  various  positions  of  local 
usefulness,  however,  were  only  such  as  contribute  to 
the  immediate  progress  and  steady  growth  of  the  civic 
body.  As  long  ago  as  the  year  1895  Mr.  Turner  was 
elected  Representative  of  the  town  of  Harvard  in  the 
House  of  Assembly  of  the  State  of  Massachusetts,  and  in 
the  discharge  of  his  duties  in  the  legislative  halls  of  the 
State  he  not  only  gained  personal  distinction,  but  re¬ 
flected  credit  upon  the  constituency  which  placed  him  in 
this  position  of  honor.  He  was  again  elected  Repre¬ 
sentative  in  1920,  and  added  to  the  usefulness  which 
marked  his  previous  services  to  the  State,  his  long  ex¬ 
perience  in  affiairs  and  familiarity  with  conditions 
counted  constructively  in  the  deliberations  of  the  legis¬ 
lative  body.  Mr.  Turner  is  prominent  in  fraternal 
circles  as  a  member  of  Harvard  Lodge,  No.  149,  Inde¬ 
pendent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  and  Harvard  Grange, 
Patrons  of  Husbandry.  He  attends  the  Unitarian 
church,  and  acts  as  treasurer  of  the  church  society. 

Arthur  H.  Turner  married,  at  Sterling,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  in  November,  1888,  Emily  G.  Hey  wood,  daughter 
of  Moses  B.  and  Maria  (Nichols)  Heywood,  who,  for 
many  years,  were  well  known  in  the  industrial  and  social 
life  of  Sterling.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Turner  are  the  parents 
of  two  sons:  Earl  O.,  of  whom  further;  and  Stanley  H., 
of  whom  further. 

Earl  O.  Turner  was  born  at  Harvard,  Massachusetts, 
May  19,  1893.  Following  the  completion  of  his  elemen¬ 
tary  and  intermediate  studies,  he  entered  the  Massa¬ 
chusetts  Institute  of  Technology,  from  which  he  was 
graduated  in  the  class  of  1914  with  the  degree  of  Bach¬ 
elor  of  Science.  He  has  been  active  since  as  professor 
of  engineering  and  hydraulics  at  the  University  of  New 
Brunswick,  at  Fredericton,  New  Brunswick.  He  is 
a  veteran  of  the  World  War,  having  enlisted  in  the 
United  States  Army  Aviation  Signal  Corps  in  Decem¬ 
ber,  1917.  Commissioned  second  lieutenant  in  March 
of  the  following  year,  he  was  detailed  to  the  North¬ 
west  on  engineering  activities  for  the  government.  He 
was  active  there  in  the  building  of  railroads  and  the 
getting  out  of  spruce  lumber  for  the  construction  of 
aeroplanes.  Mr.  Turner  taught  the  use  of  the  gas  mask 
in  Tennessee,  but  the  signing  of  the  armistice  intervened 
before  he  was  called  overseas,  and  he  received  his  hon¬ 
orable  discharge  from  the  service  on  December  31,  1918. 

Stanley  H.  Turner  was  born  in  Harvard,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  November  3,  1900.  His  early  education  covered, 
he  entered  Worcester  Technical  Institute,  from  which 
he  was  graduated  in  the  class  of  1922,  with  the  degree 
of  Bachelor  of  Science.  Professionally  active  for  one 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


155 


year,  he  took  up  post-graduate  work  in  the  fall  of  1923, 
in  the  Massachusetts  Institute  of  Technology  School 
of  Business  Administration,  where  he  is  now  (1924) 
a  student 


HON.  RODNEY  WALLACE— The  Fitchburg 
Paper  Company  with  its  immense  output  and  far- 
reaching  economic  influences  is  a  worthy  memorial  to 
the  energy  and  ability  of  its  founder,  Hon.  Rodney 
Wallace,  who  at  the  age  of  twelve  years,  began  his  ac¬ 
tive  career  by  hiring  himself  to  a  farmer  for  forty 
dollars  a  year  and  the  privilege  of  attending  school  for 
eight  weeks  during  the  winter  term.  Ability,  tireless 
effort,  and  sound  principles  brought  large  rewards,  and 
fifty  years  after  receiving  his  forty  dollars  for  the 
labor  of  twelve  months  Hon.  Rodney  Wallace,  presented 
to  the  city  of  Fitchburg  the  Wallace  Library  and  Art 
Building,  erected  by  him  at  a  cost  of  $100,000.  Later, 
he  presented  the  town  of  Rindge,  New  Hampshire,  with 
a  public  library  building.  These  gifts,  beautiful  and 
useful  as  they  are,  however,  do  not  represent  the  vital 
part  of  Mr.  Wallace’s  contribution  to  the  welfare  of  his 
fellow-citizens.  He  took  an  active  part  in  local  public 
affairs,  was  a  generous  supporter  of  all  well-planned 
projects  for  the  advancement  of  the  public  good,  and 
was  chosen  to  represent  his  district  in  the  National 
Congress. 

(I.)  John  Wallis  (as  the  name  was  formerly  spelled) 
and  his  wife  Elizabeth  were  residents  of  Stow,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  as  early  as  1721.  He  removed  to  Townsend, 
Massachusetts,  previous  to  November  12,  1731,  at  which 
time  he  purchased  land  there.  He  was  one  of  the  six¬ 
teen  original  members  of  the  church  there,  and  in  1747 
served  as  Selectman  of  the  town.  He  died  May  20, 
1763,  aged  eighty-seven  years,  survived  by  his  second 
wife,  Elizabeth,  whose  death  occurred  January  25,  1765, 
at  the  age  of  seventy-two  years.  His  children  were: 
John,  of  further  mention ;  Susannah ;  Elizabeth ;  Mat¬ 
thew;  Jonathan;  Isaac;  William,  died  young;  William, 
and  David. 

(II.)  John  Wallace  (or  Wallis),  son  of  John  Wallis, 
was  born  1694  (or  1695  according  to  gravestone)  and 
died  September  30,  1777,  aged  eighty-three  (or  eighty- 
two)  years.  He  removed  with  his  father  from  Stow 
to  Townsend  in  1731.  He  married  (first),  February 
15,  1722,  Sarah  Wheeler,  daughter  of  Zebediah  Wheeler, 
of  Stow.  She  died  March  25,  1752.  He  married  (sec¬ 
ond),  February  15,  1753,  Mary  White,  of  Groton.  He 
married  (third),  November  6,  1759,  Mrs.  Martha 

(Stevens)  Pudney.  Children  of  John  and  Sarah 
(Wheeler)  Wallace  (or  Wallis)  were:  William;  Sarah; 
Benoni,  of  further  mention ;  Zebdiah ;  and  Relief. 

(III.)  Benoni  Wallace  (or  Wallis),  son  of  John  and 
Sarah  (Wheeler)  Wallace  (or  Wallis),  settled  in 
Lunenburg,  and  died  there.  The  records  show  that  he 
was  in  Lunenburg  two  years  before  his  marriage,  when 
he  objected  to  the  manner  in  which  a  highway  was  laid 
over  his  land  in  Lunenburg,  and  later  the  highway  was 
relaid,  apparently  to  his  satisfaction.  He  is  the  im¬ 
mediate  ancestor  of  the  Ashby  and  Ashburnham  families 
of  this  surname.  He  died  March  15,  1792.  His  wife 
died  August  25,  1790.  He  married,  July  22,  1755,  Re¬ 
becca  Brown,  of  Lynn.  Their  children,  born  in  Lunen¬ 


burg,  were:  Benjamin;  Curwin;  David,  of  further  men¬ 
tion  ;  Molly ;  Ebenezer,  Frederick,  died  young ;  and 
Rebecca. 

(IV.)  David  Wallace  (or  Wallis),  son  of  Benoni  and 
Rebecca  (Brown)  Wallace,  was  born  in'  Lunenburg, 
Massachusetts,  October  16,  1760,  and  died  January  12, 
1842.  He  served  three  terms  of  enlistment  in  the  Rev¬ 
olution,  and  in  1786  removed  to  Ashburnham,  where  he 
was  a  farmer,  and  enjoyed  the  rewards  of  a  peaceful, 
well-ordered  life.  He  married,  April  11,  1797,  Susannah 
Conn,  who  died  March  24,  1847,  daughter  of  John  and 
Ruth  (Davis)  Conn,  of  Ashburnham.  Their  children 
were:  David,  of  further  mention;  James  Parks;  Ruth 
Davis;  John  Wyman;  Lucy  Spalding;  and  Frederick. 

(V.)  David  Wallace,  son  of  David  and  Susannah 
(Conn)  Wallace,  was  born  July  14,  1797,  and  died 
May  29,  1857.  He  established  the  “Wallace”  form  of  the 
family  name,  and  his  descendants  have  followed  his  ex¬ 
ample.  He  was  in  early  life  a  clothier  in  Fitchburg, 
and  owned  land  and  a  mill  near  the  Cushing  Mill,  on 
Laurel  Street.  Later  he  was  a  farmer  in  New  Ipswich, 
and  in  Rindge,  New  Hampshire.  He  was  a  worthy  man 
and  a  good  citizen.  He  died  May  29,  1857.  He  married 
Roxanna  Gowan,  of  New  Ipswich,  who  died  in  Fitch¬ 
burg,  February  27,  1876.  Their  children  were:  Harriet; 
Rodney,  of  further  mention;  David  K. ;  John  A.;  Charles 
E. ;  George  F. ;  Romanzo  A.;  and  William  E. 

(VI.)  Rodney  Wallace,  son  of  David  and  Roxanna 
(Gowan)  Wallace,  was  born  in  New  Ipswich,  New 
Hampshire,  December  21,  1823,  and  died  February  27, 
1903.  In  his  youth  his  parents  removed  to  Rindge,  New 
Hampshire.  At  the  age  of  twelve  he  left  his  home  to  work 
for  a  farmer  for  a  year  for  forty  dollars,  with  the  priv¬ 
ilege  of  attending  school  during  the  term  O'f  eight  weeks. 
At  the  age  of  sixteen  he  began  to  drive  freight  from, 
Bellows  Falls,  Vermont,  and  Rindge,  New  Hampshire, 
to  Boston,  taking  lumber  and  produce  and  bringing  back 
merchandise  from  the  city.  In  1843,  when  he  was 
twenty  years  old,  he  entered  the  employ  of  Dr.  Stephen 
Jewett,  of  Rindge,  New  Hampshire,  the  proprietor  of 
Jewett’s  famous  patent  medicines,  and  subsequently  trav¬ 
eled  as  the  doctor’s  agent,  selling  the  medicines  through 
five  of  the  New  England  States.  In  1853  he  removed  to 
Fitchburg  and  actively  engaged  in  business  in  the  whole¬ 
sale  trade  in  books,  stationery,  and  paper  stock,  which 
was  conducted  under  the  firm  name  of  Shepley  &  Wal¬ 
lace,  and  later  of  R.  Wallace  &  Company,  his  partner 
being  Stephen  Shepley.  In  1865  he  organized  the  Fitch¬ 
burg  Paper  Company,  and  the  former  partnership  with 
Mr.  Shepley  was  dissolved  July  1,  1865,  Mr.  Wallace 
retaining  the  cotton  waste  department,  which  has  since 
grown  to  large  proportions  and  become  very  profitable. 
The  Wallace  interests  now  handle  several  hundred  thou¬ 
sand  dollars’  worth  of  this  waste  annually.  The  Fitch¬ 
burg  Paper  Company,  which  was  made  up  of  Mr. 
Shepley,  Mr.  Wallace,  and  Benjamin  Snow,  bought  the 
Lyon  Paper  Mill  and  Kimball  Scythe  Shops  at  West 
Fitchburg,  and  began  the  manufacture  of  paper  there. 
Stephen  E.  Denton  was  later  admitted  to  the  firm  and 
took  charge  of  the  manufacturing.  In  July,  1865,  when 
the  business  was  just  getting  under  way,  Mr.  Shepley 
sold  his  interests  to  Mr.  Wallace  and  Mr.  Snow.  In 
June,  1866,  Mr.  Denton  died,  and  on  January  7  1869, 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


156 

Mr.  Wallace  purchased  Mr.  Snow’s  interests.  On 
January  23,  1869,  Mr.  Wallace  purchased  the  interests  of 
the  Denton  estate,  and  since  then  he  and,  later,  his 
sons  have  had  the  sole  ownership  of  the  business  of  the 
Fitchburg  Paper  Company.  Mr.  Wallace  soon  made 
improvements  in  his  mill  whereby  the  output  was 
doubled.  In  1876  he  built  a  substantial  stone  dam  and 
improved  the  water  power.  In  1878  he  built  a  new  brick 
mill  and  increased  the  product  to  six  tons  of  paper  daily. 
In  1887  he  built  another  large  brick  mill  near  the  junc¬ 
tion  of  Phillips  Brook  and  the  Nashua  River,  and  since 
that  time  numerous  improvements  have  been  made.  The 
Fitchburg  Mills  manufacture  card  and  lithograph  paper 
and  similar  high-class  products.  Many  cottages  have 
been  built  by  Mr.  Wallace  and  his  company  for  the.  ac¬ 
commodation  of  employees,  and  a  village  built  by  the 
company  has  grown  up  about  the  mills.  The  mills  have 
their  own  freight  house  and  freight  yard. 

Mr.  Wallace  by  no  means  confined  his  energies  to  the 
paper  business.'  He  was  interested  in  many  lines  of  busi¬ 
ness  and  all  were  successful.  He  became  the  leading 
citizen  of  the  town,  a  position  he  unquestionably  occu¬ 
pied  for  a  number  of  years.  He  was  a  man  of  great 
public  spirit.  He  was  president  and  director  of  the 
Fitchburg  Gas  Light  Company  from  1864  until  his 
death  in  1903;  a  director  of  the  Fitchburg  National 
Bank,  1866-1903;  was  for  many  years  a  trustee  of  the 
Fitchburg  Savings  Bank;  director  of  the  Parkhill  Man¬ 
ufacturing  Company,  and  the  Putnam  Machine  Com¬ 
pany;  director  of  the  Fitchburg  Mutual  Fire  Insurance 
Company;  partner  in  the  Fitchburg  Woolen  Mill;  a  di¬ 
rector  in  the  Fitchburg  Railroad  Company  and  Spring- 
field  Trust  Company;  a  trustee  of  Smith  College,  North¬ 
ampton.  He  has  been  entrusted  with  the  settlement  of 
several  large  estates.  His  ambition  in  the  political 
world  was  restrained  by  the  exacting  burdens  of  business 
•and  the  magnitude  of  the  interests  claiming  his  atten¬ 
tion.  He  was  Selectman  of  the  town  of  Fitchburg  in 
1864,  1865,  and  1867;  in  1873  represented  Fitchburg  in 
the  General  Court,  and  was  unanimously  renominated 
the  following  year,  but  declined  reelection  on  account  of 
his  health ;  was  in  the  Governor’s  Council  through  the 
entire  administration  of  Governor  Long.  In  1884  he 
was  a  delegate  to  the  Republican  National  Convention. 
In  1889  and  1890  he  represented  his  district  in  Congress. 

The  Wallace  Library  and  Art  Building  is  an  enduring 
monument  to  Mr.  Wallace’s  interest  in  educational  and 
literary  affairs.  In  1881  he  purchased  a  site  suitably 
located  on  Main  Street  for  a  public  library.  Here  he 
erected  a  substantial  building  at  a  cost  of  nearly  $100,000, 
and  presented  it  to  the  city  of  Fitchburg  for  a  free  pub¬ 
lic  library,  reading  rooms  and  art  galleries.  The  Wal¬ 
lace  Library  and  Art  Building  was  dedicated  July  1, 
1885,  the  exercises  being  held  in  the  library,  Mayor 
Alonzo  Davis  presiding.  In  presenting  the  building  Mr. 
Wallace  said: 

The  best  materials  of  all  kinds  were  selected,  the 
best  mechanics  employed,  and  more  faithful  service 
could  not  have  been  rendered  had  each  man  employed 

been  the  sole  owner  of  the  building . Our  best 

thoughts  have  been  given  to  have  the  building  adapted 
to  the  purposes  for  which  it  was  intended,  and  I  have 
found  pleasure  in  giving  it  my  personal  attention.  No 
pains  or  expense  have  been  spared  to  make  the  build¬ 
ing  first-class  in  all  respects,  and  it  is  nearly  or  quite 
fireproof.  Cost  of  building  $70,000;  cost  of  furniture 
$2,000;  cost  of  land  $12,000;  total  $84,000. 


In  the  hands  of  the  city  government  and  under  the 
management  of  the  trustees,  I  have  perfect  confidence 
that  the  building  will  be  well  cared  for,  and  as  a  home 
for  the  Library,  Works  of  Art  and  Free  Reading 
Rooms  it  will  be  of  increasing  value  to  our  people. 
With  pleasure  and  the  most  earnest  wish  that  to  many 
of  our  people  these  rooms  may  prove  to  be  a  place  of 
rest  and  profit,  and  help  make  the  journey  of  life  more 
pleasant  and  useful,  I  now  present  to  you  the  deed  of 
this  property  and  keys  of  the  building. 

The  dedicatory  address  of  Governor  John  D.  Long 
was  appropriate,  eloquent,  and  impressive.  The  manu¬ 
script  is  preserved  in  the  Relic  Room  at  the  Library.  A 
poem  by  Mrs.  Caroline  Mason  was  read  by  Ray  Greene 
Huling,  principal  of  the  high  school.  The  city  has  an 
excellent  collection  of  books  and  pictures,  and  the  library 
is  growing  constantly  better,  owing  to  additions  by  gift 
and  purchase.  The  Fitchburg  Public  Library,  which 
was  founded  in  1859,  is  one  of  the  finest  institutions  of 
the  city  since  it  has  had  its  new  home.  Among  the 
trustees  who  have  been  interested  in  having  the  purposes 
of  its  donor  carried  out  are  Herbert  Ingalls  Wallace, 
son  of  Rodney  Wallace,  and  Ezra  S.  Stearns,  formerly 
Secretary  of  State  of  New  Hampshire,  a  distinguished 
historian  and  genealogist,  and  a  close  personal  friend 
of  Mr.  Wallace,  who  in  his  “History  of  Ashburnham” 
wrote : 

Mr.  Wallace  is  courteous  and  affable  in  manner  and 
loyal  in  his  friendship.  In  the  reserve  of  his  nature 
he  is  restrained  from  impetuous  demonstration,  but, 
in  every  social  and  public  duty  his  friendship,  his  in¬ 
fluence  and  his  assistance  are  put  forth  with  command¬ 
ing  effect.  If  his  activities  are  circumscribed  by  rea¬ 
son  and  prudence,  his  conclusions  are  deliberately 
formed  and  founded  upon  a  comprehensive  study  of 
the  attending  facts.  In  him  are  combined  diligence 
and  sagacity,  and  above  all  a  lofty  standard  of  honor 
and  integrity. 

He  also  gave  the  town  of  Rindge,  New  Hampshire,  a 
public  library  building  in  1894. 

Mr.  Wallace  married  (first),  December  1,  1853,  Sophia 
Ingalls,  born  May  5,  1828,  daughter  of  Thomas  and 
Sophia  (Shurtleff)  Ingalls,  of  Rindge,  New  Hampshire. 
She  died  June  20,  1871,  leaving  two  sons.  He  married 
(second),  December  28,  1876,  Sophia  F.  (Billings) 

Bailey,  of  Woodstock,  Vermont,  born  November  1,  1826, 
died  November  9,  1895,  daughter  of  Oel  and  Sophia  W. 
Billings,  of  Royalton,  Vermont,  and  widow  of  Hon. 
Goldsmith  F.  Bailey.  The  children  of  Rodney  and 
Sophia  (Ingalls)  Wallace  were:  1.  Herbert  Ingalls, 
born  in  Fitchburg,  and  graduated  from  Harvard  Uni¬ 
versity  in  1877.  Upon  the  completion  of  his  college 
course  he  became  associated  with  his  father’s  business, 
and  later  was  head  of  the  Fitchburg  Paper  Company 
and  his  father’s  successor  in  various  other  important 
enterprises.  As  trustee  of  the  Wallace  .Library  and 
Art  Building  he  has  gathered  an  excellent  musical  li¬ 
brary  for  the  institution.  He  married,  October  23,  1879, 
Amy  Louise  Upton,  daughter  of  John  and  Louise 
(Willis)  Upton,  and  their  children  are:  Fred;  Rodney, 
deceased;  Sophia  I.;  Amy  L.,  deceased;  and  Robert  S. 
2.  George  R.,  born  in  Fitchburg,  Massachusetts,  June  29, 
1859,  studied  in  Massachusetts  Institute  of  Technology 
in  Boston,  and  then  became  associated  with  the  Fitch¬ 
burg  Paper  Company,  of  which  he  took  charge  upon  the 
death  of  his  father.  He  married,  November  10,  1886, 
Helen  (Nellie)  M.  Howland,  of  Fitchburg,  and  has  four 
children:  Helen  S.,  George  R.,  Jr.,  (q.  v.)  ;  Elizabeth, 
and  Rachel. 


' 


/ 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


157 


MAJOR  GEORGE  RODNEY  WALLACE,  JR.— 

A  leading  executive  in  the  paper  industry  in  New 
England  is  Major  George  Rodney  Wallace,  Jr.,  vice- 
president  of  the  Fitchburg  Paper  Company,  whose 
energy  and  efficiency  have  carried  him  to  a  noteworthy 
position  in  the  business  world.  Mr.  Wallace  comes  of 
a  prominent  and  highly  honored  family  of  Fitchburg, 
and  is  a  son  of  George  R.  and  Helen  M.  (Howland) 
Wallace,  his  father  the  president  of  the  Fitchburg  Paper 
Company  and  for  many  years  one  of  the  principal  forces 
in  the  development  and  present  eminence  of  the  con¬ 
cern.  The  maternal  line  also  traces  back  through  a 
prominent  family  of  Massachusetts  to  pioneer  origin. 

George  Rodney  Wallace,  Jr.,  was  born  in  Fitchburg, 
Massachusetts,  October  2,  1889.  His  early  education 
was  received  in  the  public  and  high  schools  of  his  native 
city,  and  his  higher  studies  were  mapped  out  with  di¬ 
rect  relation  to  his  future  responsibilities  as  an  exec¬ 
utive  of  the  Fitchburg  Paper  Company.  He  covered  a 
comprehensive  course  at  the  Massachusetts  Institute  of 
Technology.  Received  into  the  firm  immediately  fol¬ 
lowing  his  graduation,  Mr.  Wallace  mastered  the  prac¬ 
tical  application  of  his  technical  knowledge  and  con¬ 
tinues  with  the  concern  in  his  present  official  capacity. 
He  is  further  affiliated  with  the  business  world  of  Fitch¬ 
burg  as  a  director  of  the  Fidelity  Cooperative  Bank  and 
as  a  director  of  the  Fitchburg  Bank  &  Trust  Company. 
He  also  serves  on  the  board  of  investments  of  the  Fitch¬ 
burg  Savings  Bank.  Major  Wallace  is  a  veteran  of  the 
World  War,  having  enlisted  in  the  2d  Regiment,  Massa¬ 
chusetts  Field  Artillery,  United  States  Army,  on  July 
19,  1917.  He  was  promoted  to  sergeant  on  September  1 
of  the  same  year,  then  on  the  23d  of  the  following  No¬ 
vember  was  promoted  to  captain  and  transferred  to  the 
regular  army.  Nearly  a  year  later,  on  November  1, 
1918,  he  was  promoted  to  the  rank  of  major  while  on 
the  field  in  France.  He  sailed  overseas  in  July,  1918, 
and  was  active  in  the  Meuse-Argonne  offensive,  receiv¬ 
ing  a  citation  from  General  Pershing.  Returned  to  the 
United  States  the  following  spring,  Major  Wallace  re¬ 
ceived  his  honorable  discharge  from  the  service  on 
April  22,  1919,  and  returned  to  the  interests  of  civilian 
life.  He  is  a  Republican  by  political  affiliation,  and 
chairman  of  the  Republican  City  Committee,  also  par¬ 
ticipating  in  the  activities  of  the  Republican  State  Com¬ 
mittee  as  a  member  of  that  body.  Fraternally  he  is 
affiliated  with  the  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of 
Elks,  and  his  clubs  are  the  Oak  Hill  Country,  and  the 
Fay.  He  is  identified  with  the  Unitarian  church. 

Major  Wallace  married,  on  May  24,  1923,  in  Fitch¬ 
burg,  Massachusetts,  Alice  G.  Wellington,  daughter  of 
Arthur  J.  and  Susan  (Lloyd)  Wellington,  of  Fitchburg. 
His  son  by  a  former  marriage,  George  R.  Wallace, 
third,  was  born  August  29,  1915. 


DAVID  HALE  FANNING— The  city  of  Worcester, 
Massachusetts,  takes  a  very  proper  pride  in  the  great 
industries  which  have  developed  the  municipality,  and 
which  provide  for  the  economic  security  and  well  being 
of  the  people  as  well  as  for  the  permanence  and  dig¬ 
nity  of  the  civic  body.  Back  of  every  industry,  as  the 
force  which  brought  it  into  existence  and  governs  its 
progress,  stands  some  man  or  group  of  men,  whose 


breadth  of  vision  and  ceaseless  energy  have  made  pos¬ 
sible  these  monuments  to  human  endeavor.  There  is 
no  name  of  greater  significance  to  this  city  than  that  of 
David  Hale  Fanning,  and  no  product  more  universally 
known  the  world  over  than  the  Royal  Worcester  Corsets, 
of  which  he  is  the  originator.  For  sixty-two  years  Mr. 
Fanning  has  stood  at  the  head  of  this  enterprise,  from 
the  time  when  his  force  of  employees  numbered  two 
women,  to  the  present  day  when  he  presides  over  the 
greatest  industry  of  its  kind  in  the  world,  although  he 
has  nearly  reached  the  ninety-third  anniversary  of  his 
birth.  The  life  story  of  this  aged  man  with  the  spirit 
of  youth  still  animating  his  being,  reads  like  one  of 
those  industrial  romances  in  which  the  old  and  young 
take  equal  delight. 

David  Hale  Fanning  was  born  in  Jewett  City,  Connec¬ 
ticut,  August  4,  1830.  Left  an  orphan  at  the  age  of 
seven  years,  he  was  cared  for  by  older  brothers  and  sis¬ 
ters,  and  attended  public  school  until  he  was  fifteen  years 
of  age.  He  was  then  placed  in  a  small  factory  owned  by 
a  brother,  who  manufactured  twine  and  cotton  batting. 
But  the  lad  was  urged  to  higher  endeavors  by  some 
ambition  hidden  within  himself.  Lacking  the  mature 
counsel  and  unselfish  love  of  father  or  mother,  it  re¬ 
mained  for  him  to  strike  out  blindly  when  the  time  came 
that  he  determined  upon  independent  action.  A  graphic 
word  picture  of  the  boy  was  included  in  the  handsome 
brochure  published  by  the  company  on  the  sixtieth  an¬ 
niversary  of  the  founding  of  the  business  : 

One  bright  Sunday  morning  while  he  stood  at  the 
well-curb  drawing  a  pail  of  water,  listening  to  the 
church  bells  ring  the  hour  of  9.30,  notifying  the  people 
to  get  ready  for  the  service  an  hour  later,  his  vague 
dreams  suddenly  blossomed  into  a  definite  resolution 
to  strike  out  for  freedom.  This  was  on  August  9,  1S46, 
and  was  the  first  important  decision  in  the  career  of  a 
man  noted  for  quick  and  sound  decisions. 

With  only  a  few  dollars  in  his  pocket,  the  lad  walked 
the  eighteen  miles  or  thereabouts  to  Danielson,  Connec¬ 
ticut,  and  spent  the  night  at  a  country  inn.  Taking  a 
train  to  Worcester  the  next  day,  he  searched  for  work 
in  this  city,  but  found  no  opening.  Could  the  business 
men  of  that  day  have  pre-visioned  the  mental  power 
and  constructive  energy  of  the  plain,  direct-spoken  lad 
who  applied  for  the  means  of  mere  existence,  the  his¬ 
tory  of  the  Royal  Worcester  Corset  Company  might 
never  have  been  written,  for  his  energies  would  have 
been  directed  into  existing  channels,  rather  than,  as 
transpired,  cutting  new  paths.  Shortly  after  he  se¬ 
cured  work  in  Clinton,  operating  the  picker  and  lapper 
in  a  cotton  mill.  Remaining  there  for  two  years,  he 
then  decided  to  learn  the  trade  of  machinist,  but  event¬ 
ually,  upon  completing  his  apprenticeship,  he  returned 
to  mill  work.  By  this  time  the  young  man  was  accus¬ 
tomed  to  think  and  act  for  himself,  and  one  day  aston¬ 
ished  his  overseer  by  declaring  his  intention  never  to  do 
another  day’s  work  in  a  cotton  mill.  He  had  accumu¬ 
lated  a  little  capital  and  started  a  grocery  store  at  Groton 
Junction,  near  Ayer,  Massachusetts,  but  his  did  not  sat¬ 
isfy  his  ambition,  even  as  a  stepping  stone  to  higher 
achievement.  Horace  Greeley’s  famous  advice  to  “go 
west”  reached  him,  and  selling  his  store,  M!r.  Fanning 
went  to  Chicago,  then  a  crude  municipality  of  some  80,000 
population,  situated  on  low,  marshy  ground.  The  hills 
of  New  England  called  him  back,  but  stopping  at 


158 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


Cleveland,  Ohio,  en  route,  he  was  employed  there  for 
a  time  as  bookkeeper.  In  1861  Mr.  Fanning  returned  to 
Worcester,  and  his  desire  to  serve  his  country  in  her 
time  of  need  proved  futile,  for  upon  enlistment  he  was 
refused  on  account  of  disability.  He  formed  an  un¬ 
shakable  purpose  to  embark  upon  his  own  responsibility 
in  some  productive  enterprise.  Keenly  practical  at  all 
times,  he  settled  upon  the  popular  hoop  skirt  of  the  day 
as  the  opportunity  of  the  moment,  and  began  its  man¬ 
ufacture.  Procuring  the  rental  of  a  room  fifteen  feet 
square,  Mr.  Fanning  made  his  start,  employing  two 
women  and  doing  his  own  designing,  cutting,  and  so 
forth.  It  is  interesting  to  note  in  passing  that  one  of 
these  original  employees  is  still  living.  Quality  of 
product  was  an  unvarying  policy  of  this  manufacturer 
from  his  earliest  venture,  and  the  hoop  skirts  found  a 
brisk  sale  in  the  dry  goods  stores  of  Worcester.  Then 
Mr.  Fanning’s  keen  vision  comprehended  the  probable 
changes  of  fashion  and  branched  out  along  a  line  which, 
throughout  all  the  vagaries  of  the  modes,  had  for  cen¬ 
turies  been  a  staple  article  of  apparel,  and  would  in  all 
likelihood  continue  such — corsets.  He  personally  made 
the  first  corset  in  his  plant,  shaping  and  combining  five 
pieces  of  cloth,  a  few  steels  and  eyelets,  but  daily  keep¬ 
ing  in  touch  with  what  was  being  accomplished  in  his 
field,  and  always  seeking  a  higher  degree  of  perfection 
in  his  own  product,  Mr.  Fanning’s  rise  was  a  matter  of 
his  own  achievement  alone.  Co-partnerships  he  tried, 
when  he  felt  the  need  of  more  numerous  executives,  but 
they  proved  fetters  to  progress,  and  he  at  length  organ¬ 
ized  a  corporation,  keeping  thenceforward  in  his  own 
hands  all  executive  responsibility.  During  the  thirty-five 
years  which  have  since  elapsed  the  regular  quarterly 
dividend  to  the  stockholders  has  never  failed. 

Meantime,  the  growth  of  the  interest,  the  original 
capital  for  which  was  practically  nothing  but  business 
ability  and  courage,  was  steady  and  great.  The  plant 
outgrew  such  structures  as  had  been  available,  and  in 
1895  land  was  bought  at  the  corner  of  Wyman  and 
Hollis  streets,  where  a  factory,  very  large  for  that  day, 
in  Worcester,  was  erected.  It  has  been  necessary  since, 
however,  to  increase  enormously  the  original  space,  and 
from  that  time  until  the  present  a  large  addition  has  been 
erected  every  five  years,  the  last  being  completed  in 
the  year  1921.  Throughout  the  great  plant  every  de¬ 
partment  is  equipped  in  the  most  approved  manner,  and 
the  product  of  the  factory  to-day,  comprising  the  Royal 
Worcester  and  Bon  Ton  corsets,  goes  to  all  parts  of  the 
civilized  world.  But  perhaps  the  more  noteworthy  feat¬ 
ure  of  this  great  enterprise  is  the  happy  cooperation 
that  exists  between  the  executive  and  production  forces, 
and  the  paternal  benevolence  of  the  revered  and  ven¬ 
erable  man  whose  interest  is  as  keen  in  the  welfare  of 
his  employees  as  in  the  success  of  his  business.  With 
the  first  establishing  of  the  little  shop  more  than  sixty 
years  ago,  he  looked  ahead  to  a  time  when  he  could  make 
special  provision  for  the  comfort  and  recreation  of  his 
employees,  and  in  the  newest  building  he  realized  his 
dream  to  the  full,  although  during  all  his  previous  his¬ 
tory  this  had  been  a  special  phase  of  the  progress  of  the 
business.  The  building  completed  in  1921  has  a  great 
dance  floor  and  a  complete  stage  and  footlights,  also  a 
most  charming  and  attractive  rest  room  with  luxurious 


wicker  furniture  upholstered  in  gay  cretonnes,  with 
writing  desks  conveniently  placed  and  a  large  library 
close  by.  The  plant  occupies  an  entire  city  block, 
222x158  feet,  and  the  large  lawn  is  always  kept  in  per¬ 
fect  order.  In  short  the  Royal  Worcester  plant  is  one 
of  the  show  places  of  the  city,  and  the  pride,  not  only 
of  those  connected  with  it,  but  of  every  citizen  of  Wor¬ 
cester. 


HERBERT  PARKER — Prominent  among  the  men 
of  the  legal  profession  in  Worcester  County  is  Herbert 
Parker,  who  has  been  successfully  engaged  in  legal  prac¬ 
tice  in  Worcester  and  in  Boston  since  1884,  principally 
as  a  trial  lawyer.  Tn  addition  to  caring  for  his  large 
private  practice  he  has  served  as  Associate  Justice  of  the 
District  Court,  as  District  Attorney,  and  as  Attorney 
General  of  the  State  of  Massachusetts.  He  is  also 
officially  connected  with  an  important  business  organiza¬ 
tion,  and  has  been  active  in  organizations  not  connected 
with  his  profession. 

Born  in  Charlestown,  Massachusetts,  March  2,  1856, 
Mr.  Parker  is  a  son  of  George  A.  and  Harriet  Newell 
(Felton)  Parker.  After  completing  his  preliminary  and 
preparatory  work  he  became  a  student  in  Harvard  Col¬ 
lege  as  a  member  of  the  class  of  1878,  and  received  the 
degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts.  In  1905  he  received  the 
honorary  degree  of  Doctor  of  Laws  from  Tufts  College. 
In  the  meantime,  he  had  been  admitted  to  the  Massa¬ 
chusetts  bar  in  1883,  and  immediately  thereafter  was  pri¬ 
vate  secretary  at  Washington  to  Senator  G.  F.  Hoar.  In 
1884  he  entered  into  the  practice  of  his  profession.  He 
was  well  prepared  for  his  work  and  possessed  ability 
and  energy,  qualities  which  soon  brought  the  reward  of 
growing  patronage.  He  took  an  active  interest  in  local 
public  affairs,  and  in  1886  was  made  Associate  Justice 
of  the  Second  District  Court  of  Eastern  Worcester.  In 
1887  he  was  appointed  Assistant  District  Attorney,  and 
later  elected  District  Attorney  of  the  Middle  Massa¬ 
chusetts  District,  the  latter  of  which  official  positions 
he  held  until  1899.  In  1901  he  was  elected  to  the  im¬ 
portant  office  of  Attorney  General  of  the  State  of 
Massachusetts,  the  duties  of  which  office  he  efficiently 
discharged  until  1905.  Mr.  Parker  was  counsel  for 
Police  Commissioner  Curtis,  his  term  including  the 
period  of  the  famous  police  strike  in  Boston.  He  was 
also  a  member  of  the  Massachusetts  State  Constitutional 
Convention  during  1917-1919.  He  was  fortunate  in 
his  direct  personal  association  with  the  late  Senator 
Hoar  of  Massachusetts,  in  whose  office  he  conducted 
his  studies  for  admission  to  the  bar.  In  addition  to  the 
numerous  professional  activities  already  mentioned,  Mr. 
Parker  has  served  as  trustee  of  the  State  Mutual  Life 
Insurance  Company  of  Worcester;  of  the  Clinton, 
Massachusetts,  Hospital  Association,  of  Clark  College; 
and  of  Clark  University  since  1907,  He  is  a  member  of 
the  Medico-Legal  Society  of  Massachusetts ;  of  the 
American  Ornithologists’  Union ;  was  vice-president  of 
the  Military  Efficiency  Association;  and  vice-president 
of  the  Massachusetts  League  for  Preservation  of  Amer¬ 
ican  Independence.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  Union 
Club,  and  of  the  Tavern  Club  of  Boston.  Politically,  he 
gives  his  support  to  the  Republican  party,  and  his  re¬ 
ligious  affiliation  is  with  the  Unitarian  church. 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


159 


Herbert  Parker  married,  September  22,  1886,  Mary 
Carney  Vose,  of  Lowell,  Massachusetts,  and  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Parker  are  the  parents  of  six  children:  1.  George 
A.,  born  October  8,  1887,  a  graduate  of  Harvard  Uni¬ 
versity,  and  of  the  Harvard  Law  School.  He  was  in  the 
Massachusetts  State  Militia,  and  went  to  the  Mexican 
border  with  Battery  A,  1st  Massachusetts  Field  Artillery, 
as  lieutenant.  After  his  return  from  the  border  he  was 
made  captain  of  Battery  C,  1st  Massachusetts  Artillery, 
which  was  mustered  into  Federal  service  as  the  101st 
Field  Artillery  and  sent  overseas  in  September,  1917. 
He  took  part  in  the  offensives  and  was  wounded  and 
gassed  in  action  at  Chateau  Thiery,  in  July,  1918.  After 
his  release  from  the  hospital  he  returned  to  his  regi¬ 
ment  and  was  in  the  St.  Mihiel  drive  and  continued  with 
the  American  advance  until  the  armistice.  He  was 
promoted  to  the  rank  of  major,  and  returned  with  the 
I02d  Field  Artillery  in  April,  1919.  He  is  now  com¬ 
mander  of  the  Massachusetts  State  Police  Patrol.  2. 
Katherine  V.,  educated  in  private  finishing  schools.  3. 
Edith,  educated  in  private  finishing  schools,  and  also  a 
graduate  nurse  of  the  Massachusetts  General  Hospital. 
4.  Haven,  educated  at  the  Milton  Academy,  a  graduate 
of  Harvard  University,  and  now  a  student  in  the  Har¬ 
vard  Law  School.  5.  Mary  Carney,  educated  at  Miss 
Walker’s  Private  School,  and  now  (1923)  attending  Bryn 
Mawr  College.  6.  Harriet  Felton,  educated  also  at  Miss 
Walker’s  School,  and  now  a  student  at  Bryn  Mawr 
College. 


REV.  ELLSWORTH  WASHINGTON  PHIL¬ 
LIPS,  a  minister  of  the  Congregational  church,  began 
his  pastoral  career  at  Worcester  in  1891,  and  there  he 
is  yet,  as  executive  secretary  of  the  Worcester  City 
Missionary  Society,  after  a  ministerial  career  covering 
more  than  three  decades,  although  his  service  has  been 
with  different  churches  of  Worcester  and  with  the  First 
Church,  of  Whitman,  Massachusetts.  He  is  a  son  of 
Washington  and  Eliza  E.  (Day)  Phillips,  his  father  a 
farmer. 

Ellsworth  W.  Phillips  was  born  August  5,  1861.  He 
began  his  education  in  the  village  public  school.  He 
prepared  in  Kimball  Union  Academy,  Meriden,  New 
Hampshire,  finishing  with  graduation  as  valedictorian 
in  the  class  of  1883.  From  the  academy  he  passed  to 
Williams  College,  Williamstown,  Massachusetts,  there 
receiving  the  Bachelor’s  degree,  class  of  1888.  Decid¬ 
ing  upon  the  holy  profession,  he  entered  Hartford 
Theological  Seminary,  at  Hartford,  Connecticut,  and 
thence  was  graduated,  class  of  1891.  At  the  comple¬ 
tion  of  his  theological  course  in  1891,  Mr.  Phillips  was 
installed  pastor  of  Hope  Congregational  Church,  of 
Worcester,  Massachusetts,  and  there  continued  until 
1906.  He  then  accepted  a  call  from  the  First  Congre¬ 
gational  Church,  of  Whitman,  Massachusetts,  and  served 
that  society  faithfully  and  acceptably  for  five  years, 
1906-1911.  During  the  years  1912-1914  he  was  assistant 
to  the  pastor  of  Union  Congregational  Church,  of  Wor¬ 
cester.  In  1915  he  was  called  to  the  executive  secre¬ 
taryship  of  the  City  Missionary  Society  of  the  Congre¬ 
gational  Churches.  In  this  capacity  he  organized,  in 
1916,  the  Hadwen  Park  Congregational  Church,  over 
which  he  had  the  pastoral  care  until  1920,  when  he 


accepted  the  pastorate  of  the  Memorial  Congregational 
Church,  which  was  founded  and  endowed  in  1855,  as  a 
mission  church,  by  the  late  Deacon  Ichabod  Washburn, 
noted  as  the  man  who  established  the  first  wire  business 
in  America,  and  gave  Worcester  her  greatest  industry, 
and  has  been  the  city’s  greatest  benefactor.  By  this  ar¬ 
rangement  the  city  mission  church  and  the  City  Mis¬ 
sionary  Society  were  brought  into  close  cooperation,  and 
Mr.  Phillips  continues  to  hold  the  dual  relationship  of 
pastor  of  the  church  and  secretary  of  the  society  at  the 
time  of  this  writing,  December,  1923.  His  work  for  the 
church  has  been  greatly  blessed,  and  he  is  one  of  the 
strong  men  of  his  denomination.  Rev.  Ellsworth  W. 
Phillips  is  a  member  of  many  religious  bodies  and 
societies,  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  and 
Worcester  Congregational  Club. 

He  married,  in  Sharon,  Vermont,  October  7,  1891, 
Charlotte  May  Chamberlin,  daughter  of  Edward  Bing¬ 
ham  and  Jennie  (Moore)  Chamberlin.  Rev.  and  Mrs. 
Phillips  are  the  parents  of  four  children :  Robert  Ells¬ 
worth,  born  November  2,  1892;  Ruth  Chamberlin,  bom 
January  20,  1896;  Charlotte  Day,  bom  July  27,  1901; 
Margaret  Moore,  born  October  1,  1904. 


HON.  FRANCIS  PRESCOTT— As  president  of 
the  Savings  Bank  of  Grafton,  and  as  representative  of 
his  fellow-citizens  in  both  houses  of  the  State  Legisla¬ 
ture,  Hon.  Francis  Prescott  has  rendered  valuable  ser¬ 
vice  to  the  community  and  the  district  in  which  he  lives. 
Few  men  of  Grafton  are  better  known  and  none  are 
more  highly  esteemed  than  is  Mr.  Prescott. 

The  Prescott  family  is  the  oldest  in  Worcester  County, 
tracing  its  descent  from  John  Prescott,  the  pioneer 
settler  in  that  section  of  the  State.  Otis  B.  Prescott, 
of  Beacon  Street,  Boston,  grandfather  of  Hon.  Francis 
Prescott  was  a  native  of  Lancaster,  Massachusetts.  Fie 
married  Ruth  W.  Brooks,  of  Cambridge,  daughter  of 
Calvin  and  Ruth  (Wetherbee)  Brooks,  and  they  were 
the  parents  of  Calvin  B.,  who  married  Lucy  E.  Francis, 
of  Boston,  daughter  Nathaniel  and  Mary  (Leavitt) 
Francis. 

Hon.  Francis  Prescott,  son  of  Calvin  B.  and  Lucy 
E.  (Francis)  Prescott,  was  born  in  Newton,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  December  28,  1877,  and  received  his  early  educa¬ 
tion  in  the  public  schools  of  Newton.  After  two  years’ 
residence  abroad  he  entered  Harvard  College,  from 
which  he  was  graduated  in  1901,  with  the  degree  of 
Bachelor  of  Arts.  In  1906,  after  several  years  spent 
with  banking  institutions  in  Boston,  he  removed  to 
Grafton,  Massachusetts,  and  interested  himself  in  farm¬ 
ing  and  with  the  development  of  what  is  now  known 
as  the  Savings  Bank  of  Grafton.  That  institution  has 
been  developed  and  placed  on  a  sound  footing,  and  is 
now  known  among  the  well-established  financial  con¬ 
cerns  of  Worcester  County.  In  addition  to  his  activ¬ 
ities  and  responsibilities  in  connection  with  the  Grafton 
Savings  Bank,  Mr.  Prescott  has  taken  an  active  part  in 
public  affairs,  and  in  1915  was  elected  to  represent  his 
district  in  the  State  House  of  Representatives.  He 
served  with  notable  efficiency  in  1916  and  1918,  when 
he  was  elected  to  the  State  Senate,  where  he  again  rep¬ 
resented  his  constituents  faithfully  and  with  notable 
ability  until  1920.  He  has  served  locally  as  chairman  of 


i6o 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


the  Board  of  Selectmen,  and  has  held  various  other 
town  offices.  In  1917,  at  the  beginning  of  the  World 
War,  he  was  appointed  by  the  President  as  a  member 
of  the  Selective  Service,  and  both  in  his  local  official 
service  and  in  the  wider  responsibilities  he  assumed,  he 
gave  full  satisfaction  to  those  whom  he  represented,  and 
holds  the  respect  and  esteem  of  his  fellow-citizens.  He 
is  well  known  in  club  circles,  being  a  member  of  the 
Worcester  Club,  the  Harvard  Club  of  Worcester 
and  of  Boston,  and  the  Exchange  Club  of  Boston. 
His  religious  affiliation  and  that  of  his  family  is  with  the 
Congregational  church. 

On  January  6,  1906,  at  Newton,  Massachusetts,  Hon. 
Francis  Prescott  married  Louisa  Stearns,  daughter  of 
Frank  W.  and  Emily  W.  (Clark)  Stearns,  and  they  are 
the  parents  of  four  children:  Emily  and  Elizabeth 
(twins),  born  October  6,  1907;  Francis  Stearns,  born 
March  4,  1910;  and  John  Clark,  born  December  16,  1911. 


AUSTIN  E.  LIVINGSTONE,  LL.  B.,  counted 
among  the  progressive  and  forward-looking  young  men  of 
Gardner,  Massachusetts,  has  been  a  successful  attorney 
since  coming  of  age.  He  bore  a  part  in  the  activities 
of  the  World  War  and  has  since  been  brought  forward 
in  the  public  service  of  Gardner,  where  his  legal  train¬ 
ing  and  professional  experience  is  making  him  useful  to 
the  people.  Mr.  Livingstone  is  a  son  of  Edward  J. 
Livingstone,  who  was  born  in  Hopkinton,  Massachusetts, 
and  became  identified  with  the  street  railway  service  of 
Framingham,  Massachusetts,  at  the  time  of  its  being 
opened  to  the  public.  He  is  still  active  in  that  connec¬ 
tion.  Edward  J.  Livingstone  married  Mary  F.  McNa¬ 
mara,  who  was  born  in  Chicago,  Illinois,  and  was 
brought  East  by  her  parents  when  an  infant  in  arms, 
her  lifetime  having  been  spent  in  Framingham  and  vi¬ 
cinity. 

Austin  E.  Livingstone  was  born  in  Framingham, 
Massachusetts,  April  5,  1890.  He  first  attended  the  pub¬ 
lic  schools  of  Framingham  and  later  of  Milford,  and 
was  graduated  from  the  Milford  High  School  in  the 
class  of  1907.  He  then  entered  Boston  University  Law 

School,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in  the  class  of 

1910  with  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Laws.  At  that 
time  still  under  twenty-one  years  of  age,  he  could  not 
take  up  the  practice  of  law,  and  accordingly  he  spent  a 
year  as  clerk  in  the  law  office  of  James  Milton  Hall,  of 

Boston,  then  passed  the  bar  examinations  and  was  ad¬ 

mitted  to  the  bar  in  Massachusetts,  in  August,  1911. 
Shortly  thereafter  coming  to  Gardner,  he  opened  his 
law  office  here  and  has  been  in  practice  independently 
since.  Mr.  Livingstone  has  built  up  an  enviable  reputa¬ 
tion  through  his  ability  as  an  advocate  and  his  exhaust¬ 
ive  knowledge  of  the  law,  having  achieved  marked  suc¬ 
cess.  His  commodious  offices  are  in  the  Gardner  Sav¬ 
ings  Bank  Building.  Enlisting  in  the  service  in  the 
World  War  in  December,  1917,  Mr.  Livingstone  was 
detailed  to  the  Officers’  Training  Camp  at  Columbus, 
Ohio,  where  he  was  commissioned  second  lieutenant  on 
March  9,  1918,  following  which  he  was  sent  to  the  Wil¬ 
bur  Wright  Field,  at  Dayton,  Ohio.  There  he  re¬ 
mained  on  duty  until  his  discharge  on  December  16, 
1918. 

Politically  Mr.  Livingstone  supports  the  Republican 


party.  He  was  brought  forward  as  a  member  of  the 
Town  Advisory  Board  in  1917,  serving  for  two  years, 
and  in  1919  was  made  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Health, 
serving  one  year,  and  is  now  a  member  of  the  School 
Committee  of  Gardner.  A  cordial  and  earnest  worker 
in  all  movements  for  civic  advance  and  public  welfare, 
he  is  esteemed  as  one  of  Gardner’s  able  lawyers  and 
progressive  citizens.  Mr.  Livingstone  is  a  member  of 
Gardner  Council,  No.  396,  Knights  of  Columbus,  and 
the  Bishop  Beaven  Assembly  (fourth  degree)  Knights 
of  Columbus.  He  is  a  member  of  Gardner  Lodge,  No. 
426,  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks ;  the 
Ancient  Order  of  Hibernians;  and  the  Gamma  Eta 
Gamma,  a  legal  fraternity.  He  is  a  member  of  the 
American  Legion,  the  Oak  Hill  Country  Club,  and  the 
Chair  City  Club  of  Gardner,  and  is  a  member  of  the 
Gardner  Chamber  of  Commerce.  , 

Mr.  Livingstone  married,  on  August  17,  1915,  Mary 
Sullivan,  of  Ware,  Massachusetts,  and  they  have  one 
child,  Edward  Austin,  born  May  29,  1922. 


WALTER  NAHUM  HOWE— For  the  last  twenty- 
four  years  Walter  Nahum  Howe  has  been  the  effi¬ 
cient  business  manager  of  the  Leominster  “Enterprise,” 
with  which  concern  he  has  been  associated  throughout 
the  entire  period  of  his  active  career.  He  is  widely 
known  in  Worcester  County,  and  is  one  of  the  im¬ 
portant  factors  in  the  success  of  the  publication  with 
which  he  is  identified. 

Walter  Nahum  Howe  was  born  in  Fitzwilliam,  New 
Hampshire,  February  13,  1866,  son  of  Nahum  Howe 
and  Nancy  A.  (Harris)  Howe,  the  former  of  whom  was 
engaged  first  as  a  mill  operator  and  later  as  the  pro¬ 
prietor  of  a  saw  mill.  Walter  Nahum  Howe  received 
his  earliest  education  in  the  public  schools  of  his  native 
district,  and  then  became  a  student  in  Cushing  Academy. 
When  his  academic  course  was  completed  he  prepared 
for  his  business  career  by  taking  a  commercial  course 
in  the  Bryant  &  Stratton  Business  School  of  Boston. 
On  August  2,  1886,  he  became  an  apprentice  in  the 
employ  of  the  Leominster  “Enterprise,”  where  he  learned 
the  printer’s  trade.  He  was  energetic  and  industrious, 
and  it  was  characteristic  of  the  man  that  he  was  con¬ 
tent  with  nothing  less  than  the  best  degree  of  skill  in 
whatever  work  he  undertook.  He  was  soon  made  fore¬ 
man,  and  after  a  few  years  became  a  member  of  the 
firm,  in  which  organization  he  held  the  office  of  treasurer. 
For  the  last  twenty-four  years,  as  has  been  stated,  he 
has  held  the  position  of  business  manager,  and  it  is  to 
his  enterprise  and  energy  that  a  large  degree  of  the 
success  of  the  business  is  due.  He  has  steadily  in¬ 
creased  the  subscription  list,  has  succeeded  in  collecting 
bills  where  more  than  one  person  has  failed,  and  has  held 
the  organization  to  a  high  standard  of  business  honor  and 
integrity.  He  is  a  “hustler”  in  the  best  sense  of  the  word, 
and  the  service  he  renders  is  invaluable.  In  addition 
to  his  responsibilities  in  connection  with  the  “Enterprise” 
office,  Mr.  Howe  has  for  several  years  served  as  a 
member  of  the  board  of  trustees  of  the  City  Library, 
and  that  position  he  still  holds.  He  is  a  member  of  the 
Associated  Press,  and  finds  recreation  in  traveling, 
especially  in  an  automobile.  Fraternally  he  is  a  member 
of  Monoosnock  Council,  Royal  Arcanum,  of  T.eomin- 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


161 


ster,  which  several  years  ago  he  served  as  Regent  He 
is  also  a  member  of  Wilder  Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted 
Masons,  of  Leominster;  Thomas  Chapter,  Royal  Arch 
Masons,  of  Fitchburg;  Jerusalem  Commandery,  Knights 
Templar,  of  Fitchburg;  and  of  Leominster  Lodge,  No. 
86,  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows.  He  holds 
membership  in  the  Masonic  Club,  and  his  religious  con¬ 
nection  is  with  the  Pilgrim  Congregational  Church  of 
Leominster,  of  which  he  is  a  member  and  has  been  clerk 
of  same  for  twenty-three  years. 

Mr.  Howe  married,  at  Leominster,  Massachusetts,  Oc¬ 
tober  22,  1890,  Hattie  M.  Wright,  daughter  of  George 
O.  and  Mary  (Blood)  Wright.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Howe  are 
the  parents  of  five  children :  Mildred  W.,  who  was  born 
October  5,  1892 ;  Helen  M.,  who  was  born  May  29,  1895, 
married  William  James,  of  Leominster,  and  they  have 
one  child,  Robert  Howe,  born  September  13,  1921; 
Laura  E.,  who  was  born  March  29,  1897;  Ruth  E.,  who 
was  born  August  4,  1900;  and  Evelyn  L.,  who  was  born 
September  19,  1911. 


HON.  JOEL  D.  MILLER— A  life  which  meant 
much  to  the  people  of  Leominster,  Massachusetts,  and 
indeed  to  Worcester  County  and  to  the  State  of  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  was  that  of  the  Hon.  Joel  D.  Miller,  clergy¬ 
man,  editor,  public  servant,  and  at  all  times  the  pro¬ 
gressive  spirit,  the  benevolent  citizen,  the  fearless  agi¬ 
tator  for  right  and  condemner  of  wrong,  in  short,  the 
Christian  gentleman.  Senator  Miller’s  life  from  youth 
down  through  the  years  to  the  hour  of  his  passing  was 
an  example  of  the  highest  virtues  and  an  exponent  of 
worthy  effort,  and  his  memory  forms  one  of  the  cher¬ 
ished  treasures  of  the  people  of  Leominster. 

Joel  D.  Miller  was  born  at  Athol,  Massachusetts,  Oc¬ 
tober  10,  1837.  His  early  education  was  acquired  in  the 
local  schools  and  after  a  preparatory  course  at  Ber- 
nardston  Academy,  he  entered  Williams  College,  at 
Williamstown,  Massachusetts,  from  which  he  was  grad¬ 
uated  in  the  class  of  1864,  with  the  degree  of  Bachelor 
of  Arts,  and  entitled  to  the  Phi  Beta  Kappa  pin.  Two 
years  after  his  graduation  he  supplied  a  pulpit  at  West 
Royalston,  Massachusetts,  and  at  that  time  was  ordained 
a  minister  of  the  Baptist  church.  The  opening  before  him 
of  other  worthy  branches  of  professional  effort  determined 
him  upon  declining  a  regular  pastorate,  and  as  long  as 
he  lived,  although  he  preached  frequently  and  much  good 
resulted  from  his  public  utterances,  he  never  held  a  reg¬ 
ular  charge.  Although  ordained  in  the  Baptist  church, 
the  pulpits  of  many  denominations  were  the  scenes  of 
his  Christian  service,  and  in  later  years  he  became  a 
deacon  emeritus  of  the  Pilgrim  Congregational  Church. 
The  profession  of  pedagogy  was  Mr.  Miller’s  early  field 
of  endeavor,  and  after  teaching  in  Jewett  (New  York) 
Academy  and  the  Athol  (Massachusetts)  High  School, 
he  was  made  principal  of  the  Field  High  School  of 
Leominster,  Massachusetts,  March  27,  1867,  thereby  be¬ 
coming  the  thirteenth  principal  of  that  institution.  He 
served  in  that  capacity  for  about  a  quarter  of  a  century, 
giving  the  influence  of  a  great  spirit,  and  impressing 
upon  the  plastic  minds  of  the  youth  who  came  under 
his  teachings  the  mark  of  his  own  lofty  ideals.  Many 
young  men  and  women  of  that  day  graduated  from  this 
school,  went  out  into  the  world  to  lives  of  broad  useful¬ 


ness  in  the  professions  and  in  commercial  and  industrial 
activities  and  carried  with  them  inspiring  memories  of 
Mr.  Miller’s  personality  and  teachings.  These  memories 
bore  deep  significance  to  their  lives,  for  they  had  loved 
him  and  had  learned  of  him  the  lessons  of  truth  and  fidelity 
to  the  principles  of  right  in  a  way  which  never  could 
have  been  accomplished  under  a  less  genial  and  under¬ 
standing  instructor.  His  influence  remained  with  them 
through  the  years  and  followed  them  into  their  every 
relation  in  life,  giving  them  courage  in  trying  circum¬ 
stances  and  faith  at  all  times  in  the  good  and  worthy. 

In  the  year  1885  Mr.  Miller  entered  upon  a  field  of 
effort,  wider,  because  its  scope  is  unlimited,  and  because 
in  this  field  the  utterance  of  the  man  finds  permanent 
form — journalism.  At  that  time  he  purchased  the  Leo¬ 
minster  “Enterprise,”  a  weekly  paper  founded  many 
years  previous,  but  in  his  taking  over  the  management 
of  the  concern  and  the  editing  of  the  sheet,  its  scope 
was  widely  increased  and  its  significance  to  the  public 
became  more  definite.  It  has  been  said  of  Mr.  Miller’s 
work  as  a  writer : 

His  writings  were  such  pure  English  as  to  attract 
widespread  attention.  At  one  time  they  were  given 
prominence  among  the  classics  at  Clark  University. 
When  Mr.  Miller  cared  to  be  critical  his  invective  was 
sharp,  but  he  never  struck  an  unfair  blow.  He  fought 
hard  for  the  right  and  fought  fairly,  “with  malice 
toward  none  and  charity  for  all.”  His  skill  in  debate 
was  proverbial.  Never  at  loss  for  words,  ready  with 
a  pun  or  apt  story  in  repartee,  he  was  considered  a 
formidable  opponent  in  any  sort  of  a  deliberate 
assembly. 

The  paper  became  a  daily  under  his  management  in  the 
year  1895,  and  this  very  naturally  brought  a  great  in¬ 
crease  in  subscriptions  and  a  consequent  widening  of  the 
influence  of  the  paper.  The  company  was  incorporated 
in  the  year  1898,  under  the  title  of  the  J.  D.  Miller 
Company,  Mr.  Miller  continuing  throughout  his  lifetime 
as  president.  It  was  perhaps  his  significance  to  the  pub¬ 
lic  as  a  fearless  and  conscientious  journalist  that  led  to 
Mr.  Miller’s  candidacy  for  State  Senator.  He  was 
elected  in  the  year  1894  and  served  for  three  years  in  the 
higher  body  of  the  State  Legislature  with  distinction 
and  eminent  credit,  both  to  himself  and  to  his  constitu¬ 
ents.  In  educational  affairs  in  the  State  Senator  Miller 
was  largely  influential  and  was  always  given  a  place  of 
leadership.  He  served  on  the  State  Board  of  Education 
from  1895  to  1909,  and  during  this  period  the  estab¬ 
lishment  of  the  State  Normal  School  in  the  city  of 
Fitchburg  was  accomplished  largely  through  his  ef¬ 
forts.  His  work  in  this  connection  was  commemorated 
by  the  naming  of  one  of  the  buildings  in  his  honor,  the 
Miller  Dormitory.  In  local  affairs,  as  well  as  those  of 
wider  import,  Senator  Miller  took  an  eminently  con¬ 
structive  part,  but  although  he  was  frequently  sought 
as  a  candidate  for  one  office  or  another,  he  generally 
declined  political  honors  in  the  town  of  his  residence. 
He  served  for  many  years,  however,  as  a  trustee  of  the 
Public  Library,  and  both  in  this  connection  and  in  every 
advance  movement  or  worthy  effort  he  devoted  much  of 
his  time  to  the  general  progress.  He  was  widely  affili¬ 
ated  fraternally,  holding  membership  in  Wilder  Lodge, 
Free  and  Accepted  Masons,  Monoosnock  Council,  Roy¬ 
al  Arcanum,  and  was  Past  Master  of  the  lodge  and  a 
charter  member  of  the  council.  He  was  also  a  member 
of  Tahanto  Lodge,  Ancient  Order  of  United  Workmen. 


Wop — 11 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


162 

Not  only  in  organized  fraternities,  but  in  every  human 
relation  Senator  Miller’s  brotherly  spirit  was  a  part 
of  his  daily  life.  Toward  all  who  held  any  claim  upon 
him,  whether  friend,  beneficiary,  or  employee,  he  was 
always  a  wise  counsellor  and  a  steadfast  friend.  The 
mourning  was  deep  and  universal  when  he  died.  The 
end  was  not  unexpected.  Senator  Miller  fell  at  his  home 
in  Washington  Street,  July  10,  1919,  and  sustained  a 
broken  hip.  At  his  advanced  age  this  was  a  very  serious 
matter,  and  in  spite  of  the  best  of  medical  and  surgical 
care  he  succumbed  to  the  complications  which  ensued. 
His  death  occurred  on  September  21,  1919,  and  it  evoked 
countless  expressions  of  the  deepest  regret  and  the  most 
lasting  affection  for  this  man  among  men.  The  gen¬ 
eral  sentiment  was  well  expressed  in  an  appreciation 
published  in  the  Leominster  “Enterprise” : 

Those  who  know  and  love  Mr.  Miller  best  will  re¬ 
member  his  strong  attachment  to  life  in  its  fullest 
sense,  his  keen  appreciation  of  true  mirth  and  humor, 
his  sincere  and  deep  enjoyment  of  friendship  in  all  its 
possible  meaning,  his  joyful  spirit  that  rose  superior 
to  all  the  sorrows  and  trials  of  earth  and  that  “shineth 
ever  more  and  more  unto  the  perfect  day.”  That  spirit 
and  that  love  must  transcend  the  last  great  change 
and  find  an  eternal  reunion  with  all  he  loved  below. 

Senator  Miller  married  Maria  Sanderson,  who  sur¬ 
vived  him,  and  they  were  the  parents  of  two  children : 
1.  Carrie  L.,  who  after  graduating  from  the  high  school 
assisted  her  father  in  that  institution,  and  died  in  1887, 
aged  twenty-one  years.  2.  Florence  M.,  who  was  grad¬ 
uated  from  Leominster  High  School,  and  after  attending 
Radcliffe  College  for  one  year  became  a  student  in  the 
Fitchburg  Normal  School,  whence  she  was  graduated 
in  1898.  From  1900  to  1919  she  was  continuously  en¬ 
gaged  as  a  teacher  in  the  latter  institution,  with  the  ex¬ 
ception  of  a  two-year  leave  of  absence. 


GEORGE  R.  GODFREY— A  life  enriched  by  the 
fullness  of  duties  performed  and  work  accomplished; 
by  the  passing  on  of  that  legacy  of  labor  created  by  his 
own  efforts,  George  R.  Godfrey  departed  this  life  hav¬ 
ing  gone  beyond  the  many  milestones  of  threescore  years 
and  ten.  His  character,  by  the  sheer  force  of  which 
he  built  up  an  industry  that  lives  on  as  his  best  monu¬ 
ment,  was  one,  too,  that  made  him  beloved  and  honored 
in  the  community  where  he  came  a  young  man,  penni¬ 
less  and  alone.  He  reaped  riches  from  his  life  and 
labors,  and  he  gave  service  that  will  long  make  his 
memory  one  to  awaken  thoughts  and  emotions  of  esteem 
and  honor  among  the  citizens  of  his  adopted  city. 

George  R.  Godfrey  was  born  at  North  Wiltshire, 
Prince  Edward  Island,  and  came  to  the  United  States  at 
the  age  of  sixteen  years,  alone  and  without  friends  or 
influence,  to  make  his  own  way  to  success  in  life.  He 
settled  first  in  Portland,  Maine,  where  he  served  an 
apprenticeship  to  a  harness  maker,  and  when  he  had  ac¬ 
complished  this  he  worked  as  a  journeyman  in  Newport, 
New  Hampshire,  gaining  experience  in  the  trade.  He 
then  opened  a  small  shop  of  his  own  in  Hinsdale,  New 
Hampshire,  but  in  1869  it  was  entirely  destroyed  by  fire, 
and  not  having  had  it  insured  he  was  left  utterly  penni¬ 
less  by  this  disaster.  On  March  31,  1869,  he  came  to 
Gardner,  and  with  nothing  now  but  his  knowledge  as  a 
master  craftsman  he  opened  a  business  without  a  dollar, 
on  the  smallest  scale,  presenting  himself  as  a  harness 


maker,  ready  to  do  any  kind  of  work  or  repairs  in  the 
leather  line.  He  was  located  on  Chestnut  Street,  one 
of  the  main  thoroughfares,  and  his  industry  and  zeal, 
his  honesty  and  integrity,  soon  gained  for  him  a  repu¬ 
tation  among  the  important  manufacturing  concerns  as 
a  young  man  of  fine  character,  and  his  good  work 
brought  its  own  reward  in  a  steadily  growing  business. 
Not  content  with  a  local  trade,  he  branched  out,  and 
gradually  developed  interests  that  carried  his  harness 
and  other  leather  goods  to  continually  increasing  points 
of  distance,  until  finally  he  had  created  a  trade  that 
covered  in  area  places  in  all  parts  of  the  United  States. 
He  continued  the  operation  of  his  business  alone  until 
1920,  when  he  had  it  incorporated  as  the  G.  R.  Godfrey 
Company.  In  the  meantime,  however,  about  six  years 
earlier,  he  had  taken  his  son,  Henry  R.  Godfrey,  into 
his  employ,  and  his  activities  had  materially  assisted  in 
the  growth  of  the  establishment,  while  his  other  son, 
Edgar  L.  Godfrey,  had  also  been  in  his  employ,  and 
later  developed  an  active  interest  in  its  progress.  At 
the  time  of  its  incorporation  Mr.  Godfrey  felt  that  he 
had  reached  an  age  where  he  wished  to  give  to  other 
and  younger  hands  the  main  responsibilities  of  the  busi¬ 
ness,  feeling,  too,  that  he  had  earned  a  respite  and  the 
privilege  of  taking  a  little  more  leisure  for  other  occu¬ 
pations  that  were  of  interest  to  him.  His  son,  Henry  R., 
was  therefore  made  the  president  of  the  corporation,  and 
George  R.  Godfrey  kept  the  responsibilities  of  the  office 
of  treasurer.  Mr.  Godfrey,  besides  his  interest  in  his 
own  business,  was  active  in  civic  matters  and  prominent 
in  other  and  various  industrial  matters.  It  was  through 
his  enthusiastic  labors  that  the  Gardner  Board  of  Trade 
was  established,  and  he  became  one  of  its  first  presidents. 
He  later  became  also  president  of  the  Gardner  Business 
Men’s  Association,  and  his  progressive  spirit  was  ac¬ 
tive  in  all  matters  that  tended  to  the  growth  and  de¬ 
velopment  and  betterment  of  conditions  in  Gardner. 
He  was  a  member  of  Hope  Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted 
Masons;  Ivanhoe  Commandery,  Knights  Templar;  the 
Gardner  Lodge,  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows; 
Knights  of  Pythias;  and  Improved  Order  of  Red  Men. 
Mr.  Godfrey  died  on  January  26,  1923,  at  the  age  of 
seventy-nine  years. 

He  married  Addie  Randall,  of  Manchester,  New 
Hampshire,  and  they  were  the  parents  of  two  sons, 
Henry  R.  and  Edgar  L.  Mr.  Godfrey  is  survived  by 
his  widow  and  his  sons. 

A  man  of  strong  personal  magnetism,  genial  and 
affable,  he  won  for  himself  many  friends  in  all  walks  of 
life,  and  the  place  he  leaves  in  the  commercial,  social, 
civic,  and  fraternal  life  of  his  city  will  long  remain  un¬ 
filled.  The  firm  he  established  more  than  half  a  century 
ago  he  built  upon  so  solid  a  foundation  of  character 
that  it  stands  to-day  an  edifice,  honoring  his  memory 
in  all  its  varied  activities. 


HENRY  R.  GODFREY,  as  treasurer  of  the  G.  R. 
Godfrey  Company,  manufacturers  of  harness  and  leather 
goods,  holds  a  leading  position  in  the  business  world  of 
Gardner,  Massachusetts.  This  firm,  which  is  nationally 
known  and  is  a  leader  in  its  field,  was  founded  in  1869 
by  George  R.  Godfrey,  Mr.  Godfrey’s  father. 

Henry  R.  Godfrey  was  bom  in  Gardner,  Massachu- 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


setts,  February  18,  1892,  elder  son  of  George  R.  and 
Addie  (Randall)  Godfrey.  His  education  was  begun 
in  the  public  schools  of  Gardner,  and  he  was  graduated 
from  the  Gardner  High  School  in  the  class  of  1909. 
Subsequently  entering  Clark  University,  at  Worcester, 
Massachusetts,  he  was  graduated  from  that  institution 
in  the  class  of  19x2,  with  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts. 
Thereafter  for  two  years  Mr.  Godfrey  was  identified 
with  the  New  England  Telephone  and  Telegraph  Com¬ 
pany,  working  out  of  the  Boston  office,  but  in  1914  he 
associated  himself  with  his  father  in  the  present  busi¬ 
ness.  Beginning  at  the  bottom  and  familiarizing  him¬ 
self  with  its  various  departments  by  the  practical  method 
of  active  work  in  each,  he  fitted  himself  for  the  execu¬ 
tive  responsibility  which  was  placed  in  his  hands  upon 
the  incorporation  of  the  firm  in  1919,  when  he  was  made 
president  of  the  company.  This  office  he  held  until 
the  death  of  his  father,  when  the  present  officers  were 
elected :  Edward  E.  Godfrey,  president;  Henry  R.  God¬ 
frey,  treasurer;  and  Addie  (Randall)  Godfrey,  clerk; 
Henry  R.  Godfrey  taking  over  the  responsible  office 
that  his  father  had  held  before  him. 

Mr.  Godfrey  now  stands  among  the  influential  and 
successful  men  of  the  day  in  Gardner  and  is  counted 
among  the  most  progressive  young  men  of  this  section. 
He  is  a  member  of  the  Gardner  Chamber  of  Commerce, 
and  fraternally  is  identified  with  Hope  Lodge,  Free  and 
Accepted  Masons;  Gardner  Chapter,  Royal  Arch 
Masons;  Ivanhoe  Commandery,  Knights  Templar;  and 
Aleppo  Temple,  Ancient  Arabic  Order  Nobles  of  the 
Mystic  Shrine.  His  chief  recreations  are  those  of  the 
outdoor,  and  he  is  a  member  of  the  Gardner  Boat  Club. 
His  religious  affiliation  is  with  the  Congregational 
church,  which  he  serves  as  a  member  of  the  board  of 
trustees. 

Henry  R.  Godfrey  married,  in  1915,  Blanche  Carlton, 
daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  H.  E.  Carlton,  proprietor  of 
the  Carlton  Engraving  Company  of  Worcester,  Massa¬ 
chusetts.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Godfrey  have  two  children: 
Margery  L.  and  Eleanor  C. 

Associated  with  Henry  R.  Godfrey  in  the  manage¬ 
ment  of  the  G.  R.  Godfrey  Company  is  his  brother, 
Edgar  L.  Godfrey,  younger  son  of  George  R.  and 
Addie  (Randall)  Godfrey,  who  was  born  in  Gardner, 
Massachusetts,  May  27,  1894.  He  attended  the  grammar 
schools  of  his  native  town,  and  graduated  from  the 
Gardner  High  School,  class  of  1912.  He  then  went  to 
Amherst  College,  Amherst,  Massachusetts,  and  followed 
this  by  attending  the  Wharton  Schools  of  the  University 
of  Pennsylvania.  At  this  time,  1917,  the  World  War 
was  entered  by  the  United  States  and  he  enlisted  in 
the  Navy  Officers’  Training  Camp,  at  Pelham  Bay,  New 
York.  After  the  war  he  went  with  the  Goodyear  Tire 
and  Rubber  Company,  taking  charge  of  their  promotional 
and  advertising  work  in  Brazil,  South  America,  and  in 
May,  1921,  he  entered  the  firm  of  G.  R.  Godfrey  Com¬ 
pany,  as  sales  manager.  In  1923,  after  the  death  of 
his  father,  he  was  made  president  of  the  company,  in 
which  position  he  is  to-day.  Mr.  Godfrey  is  affiliated 
with  the  First  Congregational  Church  of  Gardner.  He 
is  a  member  of  the  Gardner  Boat  Club;  the  Benevolent 
and  Protective  Order  of  Elks ;  Hope  Lodge,  Free  and 


163 

Accepted  Masons;  and  is  also  a  member  of  the  Theta 
Delta  Psi  fraternity. 


HON.  AUGUSTUS  E.  WRIGHT— A  leading  fig¬ 
ure  in  public  affairs  in  mercantile  advance  and  in  fra¬ 
ternal  activity  in  Southboro,  Massachusetts,  is  Hon. 
Augustus  E.  Wright,  whose  interests  center  in  Boston, 
but  who  for  many  years  has  been  identified  with  the 
local  affairs  of  Southboro,  the  town  in  which  he  was 
born.  Mr.  Wright  has  been  interested  in  various  lines 
of  commercial  advance,  and  is  influential  in  this  com¬ 
munity  in  every  progressive  endeavor.  He  is  a  son  of 
Francis  and  Clara  (Stevens)  Wright,  long  esteemed 
citizens  of  this  community.  His  father  was  for  more 
than  fifty  years  the  owner  and  proprietor  of  a  general 
store  in  Fayville,  and  continued  in  this  interest  until 
1916,  when  he  retired.  His  death  occurred  April  20, 
1921. 

The  Wright  family  has  been  identified  with  Worcester 
County  for  several  generations.  Mr.  Wright’s  paternal 
grandfather  operated  shoddy  and  woolen  mills  at  Far- 
numville  and  Barre.  His  son,  Francis  Wright,  was 
born  in  Famumville. 

Augustus  E.  Wright  was  born  at  Fayville,  town  of 
Southboro,  Massachusetts,  February  25,  1878.  Receiv¬ 
ing  his  early  education  in  the  local  public  schools,  he 
prepared  for  college  at  the  Phillips-Andover  Academy, 
at  Andover,  Massachusetts,  from  which  he  was  gradu¬ 
ated  in  the  class  of  1896.  He  pursued  a  course  of  study 
at  Harvard  University  in  the  class  of  1900.  Mr. 
Wright’s  first  business  experience  was  in  association 
with  George  H.  Newton,  of  Boston,  a  leading  archi¬ 
tect  of  that  time,  but  he  remained  in  this  connection 
for  only  a  comparatively  short  period.  In  1902  he  be¬ 
came  associated  with  his  father  in  the  conduct  of  the 
general  store  at  Fayville  and  remained  in  this  connec¬ 
tion  for  a  period  of  fourteen  years  and  more.  From 
1917  until  the  early  part  of  1923  Mr.  Wright  was  in  the 
employ  of  the  Standard  Steel  Motor  Car  Company  of 
Boston,  as  manager  of  their  retail  department.  In 
March,  1923,  he  associated  himself  with  the  firm  of 
Rand  &  Crane,  Inc.,  jewelers,  silversmiths,  and  watch¬ 
makers,  of  Boston,  and  in  this  affiliation  he  is  winning 
a  large  success,  his  long  experience  in  other  lines  of 
commercial  advance  contributing  in  a  marked  degree  to 
his  present  prosperity.  In  the  public  life  of  the  town 
of  Southboro,  Massachusetts,  of  which  Fayville  is  a 
part,  Mr.  Wright  has  for  many  years  been  active, 
although  only  at  times  in  an  official  capacity.  For  sev¬ 
eral  years  he  served  on  the  Advisory  Committee  of  the 
town,  and  in  1911  he  was  made  Representative  of  South¬ 
boro  in  the  Massachusetts  State  Legislature.  His  pub¬ 
lic  activities  have  been  such  as  to  give  his  name  broad 
significance  to  the  people  and  reflect  honor  upon  him¬ 
self,  and  his  townsmen  feel  that  he  has  contributed  in 
a  large  degree  to  the  local  prosperity.  Fraternally,  Mr. 
Wright  is  affiliated  with  St.  Bernard’s  Lodge,  Free  and 
Accepted  Masons,  and  he  is  a  member  of  the  South¬ 
boro  Golf  Club,  also  the  Harvard  Club  of  Boston. 

Hon.  Augustus  E.  Wright  married,  on  January  28, 
1903,  at  Southboro,  Massachusetts,  Helen  M.  Buck, 
daughter  of  Francis  H.  Buck  of  this  place,  and  they 


164 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


are  leading  figures  in  the  social  life  of  the  community, 
the  family  residence  being  at  Oak  Hill  Road,  Fayville, 
Massachusetts. 


LINCOLN  RUFUS  WELCH — It  is  said  that  peace 
of  mind  and  a  sense  of  security  are  the  necessary  con¬ 
ditions  of  creative  work.  If  that  be  true,  then  those 
business  organizations  which  devote  their  resources  to 
the  economic  protection  of  their  patrons  render  a  service 
which  extends  far  beyond  the  values  which  can  be 
estimated  in  dollars  and  cents,  and  help  to  lay  the  foun¬ 
dations  and  protect  the  growth  of  all  that  is  best  in 
human  development  and  achievement.  Disaster  in  the 
form  of  loss  by  fire  has  caused  much  suffering  and 
crippled  or  wrecked  many  plans  for  business,  social 
and  moral  advancement,  and  to  those  well-managed  or¬ 
ganizations  which  for  a  moderate  consideration  assume 
the  risk,  and  in  case  of  loss  indemnify  the  policy  holder, 
society  is  indebted  for  the  success  of  many  enterprises 
and  projects  which  are  daily  adding  to  the  sum  of  human 
happiness  and  well  being.  One  of  the  well-known  cit¬ 
izens  of  Fitchburg,  Massachusetts,  who  is  devoting  his 
energy  to  the  protection  of  the  public  from  losses  by  fire 
is  Lincoln  Rufus  Welch,  president  and  treasurer  of 
the  Fitchburg  Mutual  Fire  Insurance  Company,  who  has 
been  actively  associated  with  the  insurance  business 
since  1883. 

Mr.  Welch  was  bom  in  Lowell,  Massachusetts,  April 
19,  1865,  and  received  his  education  in  the  public  schools 
of  that  city,  graduating  from  Lowell  High  School  in 
June,  1883.  In  July,  1883,  he  entered  the  employ  of  the 
Traders’  and  Mechanics’  Insurance  Company,  and  dur¬ 
ing  the  four  decades  which  have  passed  since  that  time 
he  has  been  devoting  his  time  and  his  energy  to  the  ad¬ 
vancement  of  the  interests  of  two  insurance  enterprises. 
He  maintained  his  first  connection  for  fourteen  years, 
handing  in  his  resignation  to  the  Traders’  and  Me¬ 
chanics’  Insurance  Company  June  30,  1897,  in  order  to 
accept  the  official  position  of  secretary  of  the  Fitch¬ 
burg  Mutual  Fire  Insurance  Company,  to  which  he  was 
elected  by  the  directors  of  the  latter  concern  July  1,  1897. 
For  thirteen  years  he  discharged  the  duties  of  that  offi¬ 
cial  position  in  such  a  manner  as  to  greatly  advance  the 
interests  of  the  organization,  and  at  the  end  of  that 
period  of  notably  effective  service,  he  was  elected  in 
August,  1910,  president  and  treasurer  of  the  company. 
For  the  past  thirteen  years  he  has  guided  the  business 
policy  of  the  enterprise  from  one  triumph  to  another 
in  the  line  of  progress  and  expansion.  The  Fitchburg 
Mutual  Fire  Insurance  Company  is  at  the  present 
time  (1923)  one  of  the  best  known  and  thoroughly  es¬ 
tablished  fire  concerns  of  New  England,  and  its  field 
of  operation  extends  far  beyond  the  limits  of  that  sec¬ 
tion  of  the  country.  As  a  good  citizen,  Mr.  Welch  is 
deeply  interested  in  local  public  affairs,  and  has  been 
willing  to  contribute  his  share  to  the  active  duties  of 
citizenship.  He  was  elected  a  member  of  the  City 
Council  of  Lowell,  Massachusetts,  in  1897,  and  in  1923 
was  made  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Health,  of  Fitch¬ 
burg,  the  last-named  official  position  being  one  in 
which  he  is  still  giving  active  and  able  service.  Fra¬ 
ternally,  he  is  a  member  of  all  the  bodies  of  the  Masonic 
fraternity,  and  is  also  a  member  of  Fitchburg  Lodge, 


Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks.  He  is  well 
known  in  club  circles,  being  a  member  of  the  Fay  Club, 
and  of  Oak  Hill  Country  Club,  both  of  Fitchburg, 
Massachusetts;  of  Vesper  Country  Club  of  Lowell, 
Massachusetts ;  and  of  the  City  Club  of  Boston,  Massa- 
chsetts.  His  religious  affiliation  is  with  the  First  Uni- 
versalist  Church  of  Fitchburg,  Massachusetts. 

He  married  (first),  at  Lowell,  Massachusetts,  May  15, 
1891,  Sadie  L.  Joyce,  daughter  of  James  H.  and  Alletta 
F.  (Gibbs)  Joyce.  He  married  (second),  at  Lincoln, 
Nebraska,  May  22,  1915,  Mrs.  Mary  C.  Hitchcock. 


FREDERICK  WHITCOMB  PORTER— The  suc¬ 
cessful  conduct  of  any  large  business  enterprise  is  de¬ 
pendent  upon  the  ability  and  faithfulness  of  many.  Each 
official  incumbent  and  each  departmental  executive,  as 
well  as  each  of  the  many  “men  in  the  ranks,”  must  meet 
the  duties  of  his  position  faithfully  and  ably,  if  the 
enterprise  is  to  reach  its  highest  development  and  render 
its  maximum  of  service.  One  of  those  who  is  serving 
ably  as  an  official  in  the  insurance  field  is  Frederick 
Whitcomb  Porter,  secretary  of  the  Fitchburg  Mutual  Fire 
Insurance  Company,  who,  like  the  president  and  treas¬ 
urer  of  that  concern,  has  been  identified  with  the  busi¬ 
ness  of  protecting  the  public  from  fire  losses  from  the 
beginning  of  his  active  career. 

Mr.  Porter  is  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  oldest  Massa¬ 
chusetts  families,  tracing  his  descent  from  Richard 
Porter,  who  was  in  Weymouth,  Massachusetts,  as  early 
as  1635,  the  line  being  traced  as  follows : 

(I.)  Richard  Porter  settled  in  1635  in  Weymouth, 
Massachusetts,  where  he  was  one  of  the  prominent  cit¬ 
izens  of  that  place,  serving  in  most  of  the  local  public 
offices  and  upon  numerous  committees,  and  where  he  died 
between  December  25,  1688,  and  March  6,  1689.  His 
children  were:  John,  of  further  mention;  Ruth,  Thomas, 
and  Mary. 

(II.)  Sergeant  John  Porter,  son  of  Richard  Porter, 
lived  in  Weymouth,  Massachusetts,  where  he  received 
many  land  grants.  He  also  purchased  much  land  in 
ancient  Bridgewater.  He  married,  February  9,  1660, 
Deliverance  Byram,  daughter  of  Nicholas  and  Martha 
(Shaw)  Byram,  and  their  children  were:  Mary, 
Susanna,  John,  Samuel,  of  further  mention;  Nicholas, 
Ruth,  Thomas,  Ebenezer,  and  Sarah. 

(III.)  Samuel  Porter,  son  of  Sergeant  John  and  De¬ 
liverance  (Byram)  Porter,  was  a  town  officer  in  Wey¬ 
mouth  in  1709,  and  probably  removed  to  Abington  soon 
after  that  date.  He  married,  about  1698,  Mary  Nash, 
daughter  of  Jacob  and  Abigail  (Dyer)  Nash,  of  Wey¬ 
mouth,  and  died  August  31,  1725.  Children:  Samuel, 
of  further  mention;  Mary,  David,  Jacob,  Hannah,  John, 
and  Abigail. 

(IV.)  Samuel  (2)  Porter,  son  of  Samuel  (1)  and 
Mary  (Nash)  Porter,  was  bom  May  14,  1699,  and  lived 
in  Abington  and  Bridgewater.  He  married  (first), 
July  2,  1722,  Sarah  Josselyn,  daughter  of  Joseph  and 
Sarah  (Ford)  Josselyn;  (second),  May  31,  1764,  Widow 
Ruth  Reed.  His  children,  all  of  the  first  marriage, 
were:  Sarah,  Mary,  Samuel,  Joseph,  of  further  mention; 
Ebenezer,  Mary,  Adam,  Hannah,  Batterius,  Noah,  Jon¬ 
athan,  Deliverance,  Abigail,  Tabitha,  and  Sarah. 

(V.)  Lieutenant  Joseph  Porter,  son  of  Samuel  (2) 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


and  Sarah  (Josselyn)  Porter,  was  bom  in  Abington, 
Massachusetts,  June  io,  1730,  and  died  January  15,  1803. 
He  removed  to  Bridgewater  about  1765,  and  in  1777 
removed  to  Stoughton.  He  was  a  lieutenant  in  the 
militia  during  the  time  of  the  Revolutionary  War.  He 
married,  January  25,  1753,  Elizabeth  Burrill  of  Wey¬ 
mouth,  daughter  of  Samuel  and  Content  (Whitcomb) 
Burrill,  and  their  children  were:  Elizabeth,  Joseph, 
Hannah,  Robert,  Isaac,  Content,  Mehitable,  Lebbeus,  of 
further  mention,  and  Cyrus. 

(VI.)  Lebbeus  Porter,  son  of  Lieutenant  Joseph  and 
Elizabeth  (Burrill)  Porter,  was  born  in  Stoughton, 
Massachusetts,  April  22,  1771,  and  died  April  17,  1848, 
aged  seventy-seven  years.  He  lived  in  Stoughton  and 
,iri  Wrentham,  and  is  recorded  as  being  an  “upright 
Christian,  father,  husband,  citizen.”  He  married  (first), 
December  4,  1794,  Polly  Brastow,  daughter  of  Thomas 
and  Susannah  (Fisher)  Brastow,  of  Wrentham,  Massa¬ 
chusetts.  She  died  June  2,  1810,  and  he  married  (sec¬ 
ond),  April  23,  1812,  Nancy  Hall.  She  died  February 
27,  1815,  and  he  married  (third),  August  19,  1816, 
Nancy  King,  daughter  of  Samuel  King.  She  died  De¬ 
cember  31,  1822,  and  he  married  (fourth),  November  28, 
1839,  Roxa  Day,  who  died  January  8,  1852.  Children  of 
the  first  marriage  were:  Polly,  Martha,  Whitcomb,  of 
further  mention;  Joseph,  William  Glover,  Elizabeth 
Burrill,  Caroline,  Thomas  Brastow,  and  Susannah  Fisher. 
Children  of  the  second  marriage :  John  Hall,  Nancy  King, 
Harriett  Everett,  and  Samuel  King. 

(VII.)  Whitcomb  Porter,  son  of  Lebbeus  and  Polly 
(Brastow)  Porter,  was  born  in  Stoughton,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  March  10,  1799.  He  was  a  carpenter  by  trade, 
but  was  also  engaged  in  business  as  a  merchant  and  an 
insurance  agent.  He  went  to  Weymouth  about  1820, 
then  to  Quincy,  where  he  was  a  highly  esteemed  citizen. 
He  married,  December  7,  1826,  Susan  Bowditch  Hunt, 
daughter  of  Ebenezer  and  Betsey  (Nash)  Hunt,  of  Wey¬ 
mouth,  and  their  children  were:  John  Whitcomb,  of 
further  mention;  George  Edward,  born  in  Weymouth, 
November  4,  1828;  Henry  Thomas,  born  in  Weymouth, 
July  13,  1832;  Susan  Brastow,  born  July  17,  1836;  Ann 
Marie  Hunt,  born  October  26,  1838,  died  January  23, 
1842 ;  Charles  Hunt,  born  in  Quincy,  April  3,  1843 ;  and 
Helen  Maria,  bom  in  Quincy,  March  15,  1847. 

(VIII.)  John  Whitcomb  Porter,  son  of  Whitcomb  and 
Susan  Bowditch  (Hunt)  Porter,  was  born  in  Wey¬ 
mouth,  Massachusetts,  August  2,  1827,  and  died  Novem¬ 
ber  11,  1890.  He  was  engaged  in  business  as  an  insur¬ 
ance  agent  at  No.  27  State  Street,  Boston,  and  was  for 
several  years  a  member  of  the  Boston  School  Commit¬ 
tee.  He  married,  July  17,  1851,  Ellen  Howland,  who 
was  bom  May  10,  1832,  daughter  of  Jabez  and  Dorcas 
(Jenkins)  Howland,  of  West  Parish,  Barnstable,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  and  a  direct  descendant  of  John  Howland,  who 
came  over  in  the  “Mayflower.”  They  were  the  parents 
of:  Francis  Howland,  born  June  4,  1854;  John  Ilsley, 
born  August  16,  1856;  William  Wallace,  born  March  24, 
1859;  Ellen  Wild,  bom  July  23,  1861;  Henry  Herbert, 
born  March  23,  1865,  died  January  13,  1866;  Frederick 
Whitcomb,  of  further  mention ;  and  Arthur  Butler,  born 
November  16,  1873. 

(IX.)  Frederick  Whitcomb  Porter,  son  of  John  Whit¬ 
comb  and  Ellen  (Howland)  Porter,  was  bom  in  the 


165 

family  home  at  No.  34  Port  Norfolk  Street,  Dorchester 
District,  Boston,  Massachusetts,  July  14,  1867.  After 
receiving  his  early  education  in  the  schools  of  his  native 
city  and  Minot  Grammar  School,  he  became  a  student 
in  the  English  High  School  at  Boston,  where,  after 
completing  the  regular  course,  he  took  a  post-graduate 
business  course.  When  his  special  business  course  in 
the  English  High  School  was  completed  he  at  once  en¬ 
gaged  in  the  insurance  business,  taking  an  agency  for 
the  Dorchester  Mutual  Fire  Insurance  Company  of  Bos¬ 
ton,  the  First  National  Insurance  Company  of  Worces¬ 
ter,  Massachusetts,  and  the  Glens  Falls  Fire  Insurance 
Company  of  Glens  Falls,  New  York,  and  locating  at  No. 
27  State  Street,  Boston.  Mr.  Porter  was  able  and  en¬ 
ergetic,  and  deeply  interested  in  his  work,  and  after  a 
time  was  made  secretary  of  the  Dorchester  Mutual  Fire 
Insurance  Company,  which  position  he  continued  to 
maintain  until  the  time  he  was  made  secretary  of  the 
Lynn  Mutual  Fire  Insurance  Company.  In  all  of  these 
connections  he  demonstrated  his  ability  both  as  a  sales¬ 
man  and  as  an  organizer  and  administrator.  His  ability 
to  get  new  business  and  to  inspire  others  to  more  ef¬ 
fective  efforts  in  the  securing  of  new  business  was  rec¬ 
ognized  and  greatly  appreciated,  and  in  1917  he  was  made 
Secretary  of  the  Fitchburg  Mutual  Fire  Insurance  Com¬ 
pany,  which  official  position  he  continues  to  hold  at  the 
present  time  (1923).  His  long  experience  in  the  insur¬ 
ance  field,  as  well  as  his  natural  ability,  has  made  him 
one  of  the  recognized  authorities  in  his  line,  and  also 
enables  him  to  contribute  a  valuable  share  to  the  ad¬ 
vancement  of  the  interests  of  the  concern  with  which 
he  is  now  identified.  With  all  his  business  responsibil¬ 
ities  and  activities  he  has  found  time  for  club  affiliation. 
He  is  a  member  of  the  executive  committee  of  the  Fay 
Club,  and  derives  out-of-door  recreation  as  a  member 
the  Oak  Hill  Country  Club.  He  is  a  member  of  the 
Fitchburg  Chamber  of  Commerce,  Mutual  Insurance 
Association  of  New  England,  and  the  National  Fire 
Protective  Association.  His  religious  interest  is  with 
the  First  Unitarian  Church  of  Fitchburg  Massachusetts, 
of  which  he  is  a  member.  He  votes  the  Republican 
ticket.  Mr.  Porter  is  well  known  in  the  city  of  Fitch¬ 
burg  and  vicinity,  and  has  many  friends  who  esteem 
him  not  only  as  a  successful  business  man  but  as  a 
valued  personal  friend  and  a  worthy  citizen. 

On  February  11,  1892,  at  No.  46  Port  Norfolk  Street, 
Dorchester,  Massachusetts,  Frederick  Whitcomb  Porter 
married  A.  Louise  Bowker,  daughter  of  Henry  and  A. 
Louise  (Miers)  Bowker.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Porter  are  the 
parents  of  three  children:  Marjorie  Whitcomb,  bom 
March  31,  1893;  Jeannette  Howland,  born  May  25,  1894; 
and  John  Whitcomb,  born  September  10,  1898. 


CHARLES  W.  PENDER — In  the  business  life  of 
Worcester  County,  Massachusetts,  Charles  W.  Pender  is 
a  well-known  figure  as  a  leading  real  estate  dealer  in 
the  city  of  Worcester.  With  experience  in  other  lines 
of  endeavor,  and  the  practical  ability  which  counts  for 
success  in  every  field,  Mr.  Pender  has  won  his  way  to 
an  enviable  position  and  is  counted  among  the  influ¬ 
ential  and  significant  men  of  the  day  in  the  city  of  Wor¬ 
cester.  A  member  of  a  family  identified  with  the 
progress  of  the  industries  in  the  State  of  Massachusetts 


i66 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


for  many  years,  he  is  a  son  of  James  Maxwell  Pender, 
who  was  born  in  Newburyport,  Massachusetts,  but  re¬ 
sided  in  the  western  part  of  the  State  for  many  years. 
James  M.  Pender  was  active  in  the  textile  industry  until 
his  death,  which  occurred  in  Worcester  in  1921.  He 
married  Nancy  Ann  Croft,  who  was  born  in  North 
Adams,  Massachusetts,  and  died  in  Worcester  in  1920. 

Charles  W.  Pender  was  born  in  Pittsfield,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  February  9,  1874.  Educated  in  the  public 
schools  of  that  city,  his  early  years  were  spent  in  the 
textile  industry  there,  and  he  followed  this  general  line 
of  endeavor  for  about  twenty  years,  during  the  greater 
part  of  the  time  in  an  executive  position.  In  1909  Mr. 
Pender  definitely  severed  his  connection  with  the  in¬ 
dustrial  world  to  enter  the  real  estate  business  in  the 
city  of  Worcester,  and  his  success  has  proved  the  wis¬ 
dom  of  the  step.  He  has  not  only  gained  a  high  posi¬ 
tion  in  his  chosen  field  of  activity,  but  has  contributed 
much  to  the  general  advance  of  the  city  and  its  environs. 
Mr.  Pender  was  one  of  the  organizers  of  the  Fairview 
Improvement  Society  of  Worcester,  which  he  served 
as  president  for  three  years.  He  built  the  Community 
Hall,  which  with  its  land  cost  $30,000.  This  is  located 
in  what  is  called  New  Worcester,  and  the  fame  of  this 
community  undertaking  has  spread  throughout  the 
country.  With  offices  at  No.  1034  the  Slater  Building, 
he  handles  large  interests  in  real  estate,  and  is  also 
active  in  the  various  branches  of  insurance  which  make 
up  the  present  day  protection  available  against  all  forms 
of  loss  and  damage.  His  judgment  and  ability  are  so 
highly  prized  in  the  business  world  that  he  is  retained 
as  appraiser  for  the  Merchants’  National  Bank  of  Wor¬ 
cester,  also  the  Clinton  Savings  Bank,  the  Five  Cent 
Savings  Bank,  and  the  Worcester  County  Institute  for 
Savings.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Worcester  Chamber  of 
Commerce;  was  one  of  the  organizers  and  a  charter 
member  of  the  Worcester  Real  Estate  Exchange;  is 
president  of  the  Fairview  Improvement  Society,  and  is  a 
leading  member  of  the  Exchange  Club  and  the  Wor¬ 
cester  Automobile  Club.  He  attends  the  First  Baptist 
Church  of  Worcester. 

Mr.  Pender  married,  in  1898,  Cora  E.  Lee,  who  was 
born  in  Uxbridge,  Massachusetts,  and  they  are  the 
parents  of  the  following  children:  William  W.,  now  as¬ 
sociated  with  his  father  in  business ;  Anna  L.,  also  con¬ 
nected  with  the  business;  Cora  M.,  a  student  at  the  Wor¬ 
cester  High  School ;  Robert  R.,  a  student  at  the  Worces¬ 
ter  Trade  School;  Burton  B.,  attending  Gates  School; 
and  John  J.,  also  in  the  Gates  School.  The  family  home 
is  at  No.  2  Abington  Street,  Worcester,  and  is  the 
center  of  a  delightful  social  group. 


JOHN  H.  JOHNSON  was  bom  at  Dana,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  December  9,  1864,  the  son  of  Hon.  Nathaniel 
L.  and  Margaretta  (Harsha)  Johnson.  Mr.  Johnson  is 
a  member  of  a  very  old  family  of  this  section,  his  great¬ 
grandfather,  Stephen  Johnson,  having  come  from  Marl¬ 
boro,  settled  in  Dana  in  1763,  and  became  the  first  chair¬ 
man  of  Selectmen  of  the  new  town  of  Dana,  and  was 
largely  instrumental  in  founding  the  town.  He  was  a 
Magistrate  under  the  King,  a  soldier  of  the  Revolution, 
and  again  a  Magistrate  under  the  Commonwealth.  He 
represented  the  town  in  the  General  Court,  and  his 


son,  Nathaniel  Johnson,  was  also  a  member  of  the  Gen¬ 
eral  Court  and  Trial  Justice,  as  was  his  grandson,  the 
Hon.  Nathaniel  L.  Johnson. 

John  H.  Johnson,  following  his  early  studies  in  the 
local  district  schools,  attended  New  Salem  Academy,  at 
New  Salem,  Massachusetts,  then  Cushing  Academy,  at 
Ashburnham,  Massachusetts,  after  which  he  entered 
Dartmouth  College  with  the  class  of  1888,  later  leaving 
that  institution  to  take  up  the  study  of  law  at  the  Boston 
University  with  the  class  of  1889,  with  which  he  was 
graduated.  Within  the  year,  Mr.  Johnson  was  ad¬ 
mitted  to  the  bar  of  his  native  State,  and  entered 
upon  the  practice  of  law  in  association  with  W.  A.  Gile, 
of  Worcester,  Massachusetts,  where  he  was  active  for 
two  years.  He  then  entered  upon  the  general  practice 
of  law  independently,  in  Worcester,  following  along  this 
line  of  activity  for  about  ten  years.  Thereafter,  Mr. 
Johnson  returned  to  the  homestead  farm  at  Dana,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  where  he  still  resides  and  is  active  in  practice 
at  the  present  time.  He  has,  until  recent  years,  carried 
on  the  manufacturing  business  of  which  his  father  was 
for  many  years  the  head,  producing  palm  leaf  products. 
During  the  World  War  he  was  unable  to  procure  the 
necessary  materials,  so  simply  discontinued  the  business 
and  has  not  resumed  it. 

Mr.  Johnson  has  for  many  years  been  a  leading  figure 
in  the  public  life  of  Dana,  and  has  served  as  Selectman 
for  ten  years,  during  all  but  the  first  year  of  which 
period  he  acted  as  chairman  of  the  board.  He  has  been  an 
Assessor  for  nine  years,  and  for  five  years  was  active 
as  town  auditor,  and  for  a  similar  period  served  on  the 
School  Committee.  This  breadth  of  usefulness  in  the 
public  service  led  to  Mr.  Johnson’s  nomination  for  dis¬ 
trict  Representative  on  an  independent  ticket,  in  the 
year  1922,  and  his  popularity  in  the  community  was  well 
demonstrated  by  the  fact  that  he  carried  the  town  by  a 
vote  of  one  hundred  and  eighty-one  to  thirty-four.  The 
activities  of  the  World  War  commanded  much  of  Mr. 
Johnson’s  time  and  energy,  and  he  served  on  the  local 
Draft  Board,  and  also  supported  every  horfie  war  ac¬ 
tivity  of  that  period.  Mr.  Johnson’s  time  is  now  almost 
wholly  devoted  to  his  public  services  of  a  local  nature. 
He  is  a  member  of  the  Theta  Delta  Chi  of  Dartmouth 
College,  and  attends  the  Universalist  church. 

Mr.  Johnson  married,  at  Sterling,  Massachusetts,  No¬ 
vember  19,  1889,  Flora  P.  Barnes,  born  at  Norwich, 
Connecticut,  a  daughter  of  William  and  Ellen  Jane 
(Holyoke)  Barnes,  of  that  city.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Johnson 
are  the  parents  of  four  children :  Marion  E.,  bom  March 
6,  1897,  in  Worcester,  Massachusetts,  and  educated  at 
Barre  High  School,  Cushing  Academy,  and  Worcester 
Business  College;  Nathaniel  L.,  bom  in  Worcester,  in 
1898,  died  in  that  city  in  1900;  twins,  Steven  Dans  and 
Stanley  Phillips,  born  in  North  Dana,  Massachusetts, 
in  1901 ;  Steven  Dans  died  in  1901 ;  and  Stanley  Phillips 
in  Worcester,  in  1918,  of  the  influenza. 


FRANK  EDWARD  WING— As  a  constructive 
business  man,  a  public  speaker,  a  community  leader,  one 
of  the  foremost  Masons  in  the  State,  and  as  one  of  the 
best  loved  and  most  widely  known  men  of  his  town, 
the  life  of  Frank  Edward  Wing  presents  a  scope  of 
endeavor  and  diversity  of  attainments  seldom  equalled 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


167 


and  rarely  surpassed.  His  death,  at  the  very  height 
of  his  usefulness  and  powers,  was  a  distinct  loss  to  his 
church,  his  community,  his  business  and  his  fraternity. 
Scores  of  newspapers  and  trade  journals  published  eulo¬ 
gistic  surveys  of  his  exemplary  life,  that  showed  only 
too  clearly  how  much  this  leading  citizen  had  meant  to 
his  fellow  townsmen,  and  how  greatly  he  would  be 
missed.  Although  comparatively  short  in  years,  the  life 
of  Frank  Edward  Wing  was  long  and  full  in  the  num¬ 
ber  and  variety  of  his  achievements.  An  upright  man 
and  Mason,  he  has  gone  in  search  of  further  light  in  the 
great  fraternity  he  loved  so  well  and  served  so  faith¬ 
fully. 

Frank  Edward  Wing  was  bom  in  Conway,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  June  27,  1865,  a  son  of  Edward  Everett  and  Helen 
Jane  (Newman)  Wing,  and  was  one  of  the  fifth  genera¬ 
tion  of  the  family  of  Wing  in  Conway.  He  was  of  the 
tenth  generation  removed  from  the  family  progenitor, 
Matthew  Wing,  or  Wynge,  of  Banbury,  in  Oxford 
County,  England.  The  family  bore  arms  as  follows : 

Arms — Per  pale  argent  and  vert,  a  maunch  counter- 
changed. 

Crest — A  maunch  per  pale  argent  and  vert,  between 
two  wings  or. 

Motto — Tout  pour  Dieu  et  ma  patrie. 

The  line  of  descent  of  the  American  branch  is  as 
follows:  John  and  Deborah  (Batchelder)  Wing,  of 
Saugus,  now  Lynn,  Massachusetts ;  John  and  Eliza¬ 
beth  Wing,  of  Lynn  and  Yarmouth,  Massachusetts; 
Ananias  and  Hannah  Wing,  of  Yarmouth;  John  and 
Mary  (Knowles)  Wing,  of  Plymouth,  Eastham,  and 
Brewster,  Massachusetts;  John  and  Abigail  (Snow) 
Wing,  of  Harwich  and  Conway;  the  Rev.  Isaiah  and 
Zelinda  (Allis)  Wing,  of  Conway,  Massachusetts;  Lu¬ 
cius  Bliss  and  Abigail  (Wilson)  Wing,  of  Conway;  and 
Edward  Everett  and  Helen  Jane  (Newman)  Wing,  of 
Conway,  Massachusetts.  Among  Mr.  Wing’s  forebears, 
his  great-great-great-great-grandfather,  Ananias  Wing, 
served  as  a  soldier  in  King  Phillip’s  War  (1675);  his 
great-grandfather  served  in  the  Revolutionary  War  in  the 
famous  Colonel  Nicholas  Dike’s  regiment  (1776)  ;  his 
great  uncle  was  one  of  the  firing  squad  when  Major 
Andre  was  executed  as  a  spy.  The  family  of  Wing 
ranks  as  one  of  the  finest  and  oldest  of  the  old  New 
England  families. 

Frank  Edward  Wing’s  early  education  was  received 
in  the  public  schools  of  Conway,  following  which  he  at¬ 
tended  Smith  Academy  at  Hatfield,  Massachusetts,  from 
which  he  was  graduated  in  the  year  1882.  He  matricu¬ 
lated  at  Yale  University  in  the  fall  of  the  same  year, 
and  was  graduated  with  the  class  of  1886  with  the  de¬ 
gree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts.  He  was  chosen  by  his  class 
as  fence  orator  and  class  historian,  two  signal  honors 
won  only  by  ability  and  popularity.  He  was  also  chosen 
chairman  of  the  editorial  board  of  the  “Yale  Courant,” 
a  college  periodical  of  more  than  usual  excellence.  Dur¬ 
ing  his  undergraduate  days  he  was  further  honored  by 
election  to  Psi  Upsilon,  one  of  the  foremost  of  the 
national  Greek-letter  fraternities.  Mr.  Wing’s  dominant 
but  winning  personality  that  so  endeared  him  to  the 
citizens  of  Athol  was  just  as  evident  in  his  collegiate 
years,  as  was  evinced  by  the  unusual  popularity  and 
the  correlative  honors  accorded  him.  He  was  persona 
grata  at  all  college  functions  and  with  all  college  classes, 


and  this  general  regard  was  destined  to  become  amplified 
and  intensified  with  the  years.  Frank  E.  Wing  came  to 
Athol,  Massachusetts,  in  April,  1887,  and  entered  the 
employ  of  the  late  Laroy  S.  Starrett  in  the  capacity  of 
bookkeeper  and  clerk,  constituting  at  that  time  the 
entire  office  force.  The  sound  and  gradual  growth  of 
the  L.  S.  Starrett  Company  was,  to  a  great  degree,  given 
impetus  by  the  skill  and  ability  of  Mr.  Wing.  In  1900, 
the  business  had  grown  from  a  small,  one-room  shop  to 
a  large  and  commodious  plant,  and  upon  its  incorpora¬ 
tion  Mr.  Wing  was  chosen  clerk  and  director,  both  of 
which  offices  he  held  and  ably  filled  until  1912,  when  his 
duties  and  responsibilities  were  greatly  increased  by 
being  given  still  another  position,  that  of  treasurer. 
These  three  important  offices  were  held  and  their 
many  duties  admirably  discharged  by  Mr.  Wing  up 
to  the  time  of  his  death.  In  his  work  he  was  indefat¬ 
igable.  He  constantly  kept  in  touch  with  all  divisions 
of  the  business  and  watched  the  pulse  of  trade  intently. 
In  order  to  better  get  in  touch  with  the  foreign  trade  he 
became  a  student  of  the  languages,  especially  that  of  Span¬ 
ish,  and  personally  supervised  the  compilation  of  data  to 
be  used  in  the  foreign  advertising.  His  work  in  bring¬ 
ing  the  L.  S.  Starrett  Company  up  to  its  present  size 
and  excellent  condition  can  not  be  over-emphasized.  Mr. 
Wing’s  other  business  connections  and  interests  were 
with  the  Athol  Machine  Company,  in  which  concern  he 
had  held  the  offices  of  clerk  and  director  since  the  year 
1905.  He  had  also  been  a  trustee  of  the  Athol  Savings 
Bank  since  1900,  filling  the  position  with  his  customary 
ability. 

In  his  military  service  he  was  sergeant  of  Company  8, 
18th  Regiment,  Massachusetts  State  Guard,  and  during 
the  World  War  he  served  as  a  “Four  Minute  Man,”  and 
was  also  chairman  of  the  Massachusetts  Industrial  Com¬ 
mittee  of  Athol  during  that  period.  For  many  years  he 
was  chairman  of  the  Athol  Library  Board,  and  in  his 
political  affiliations  was  a  member  of  the  Republican 
party,  of  which  he  was  a  staunch  supporter,  serving  his 
party  and  his  community  as  a  member  of  the  Town 
Committee,  and  as  a  delegate  to  the  nominating  conven¬ 
tions.  Town  and  community  affairs  were  always  of  deep 
interest  to  him,  many  newspapers  having  since  spoken 
of  the  great  love  he  bore  for  his  town  and  townspeople. 
As  chairman  of  the  Athol  School  Committee  he  gave 
valuable  service  from  the  year  1900  to  1906.  He  was 
also  a  library  trustee  for  the  years  1903,  1904,  and  1905, 
and  was  at  one  time  chairman  of  the  appropriation  com¬ 
mittee.  No  matter  how  occupied  with  his  many  business 
duties,  Mr.  Wing  would  always  lend  his  personal  and 
financial  support  to  any  movement  designed  to  further 
the  advancement  of  the  public  welfare  or  to  improve  civ¬ 
ic  or  community  conditions.  His  fraternal  record  is 
especially  worthy  of  more  than  cursory  mention.  He 
was  a  Free  Mason  and  a  Knights  Templar  in  the  fullest 
and  finest  meanings  of  the  terms.  He  was  a  Past  Mas¬ 
ter  of  Star  Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted  Masons ;  Past 
High  Priest  of  Union  Chapter,  Royal  Arch  Masons; 
and  Past  Commander  of  Athol  Commandery,  Knights 
Templar.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Harris  Council, 
Select  Masters,  secretary  of  the  chapter  for  ten  years, 
and  recorder  of  the  commandery  for  two  years.  Of  his 
work  in  these  last  three  offices,  Mr.  E.  V.  Wilson  says : 


i68 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


His  records  are  models  of  their  kind  for  being  com¬ 
prehensive,  complete,  concise  and,  added  to  this,  their 
print-like  legibility  and  the  artistic,  hand-illumined 
initials  and  other  decorations,  place  them  in  a  class 
by  themselves. 

In  the  year  1900  Mr.  Wing  was  appointed  District 
Deputy  Grand  High  Priest  of  the  district,  and  served 
for  the  three  following  years.  He  was  then  elected 
Excellent  Scribe  of  the  Grand  Royal  Arch  Chapter 
of  the  State  of  Massachusetts,  which  election  made  him 
a  permanent  member  of  that  Grand  body.  From  1906 
up  to  the  time  of  his  death  he  had  acted  as  treasurer  of 
Athol  Commandery,  Knights  Templar.  He  presided  at 
the  twenty-fifth  anniversary  celebration  of  Athol  Com- 
mandery  as  Eminent  Commander,  and  at  the  fiftieth 
year  anniversary  of  Star  Lodge  he  delivered  the  oration, 
which  “was  received  with  the  unstinted  applause  of  the 
brethren,  who  listened  with  rapt  and  undivided  atten¬ 
tion.”  Mr.  Wing’s  forensic  ability  was  unusual,  and 
consequently  he  was  in  demand  out  of  all  proportion  to 
his  time  and  strength.  During  the  fiftieth  anniversary 
of  Union  Chapter,  Free  and  Accepted  Masons,  he  pre¬ 
sided  as  toastmaster.  Mr.  Wing  was  also  a  Past  Pa¬ 
tron  of  Themis  Chapter,  Order  of  the  Eastern  Star. 
While  he  was  Master  of  Star  Lodge  he  began  a  corre¬ 
spondence  with  his  Grace,  the  Duke  of  Atholl,  Scotland, 
with  the  result  that  his  Grace  presented  the  lodge  with 
a  gavel  made  from  the  larchwood  trees  from  the  forests 
of  Atholl. 

Frank  Edward  Wing  married,  at  Athol,  Massachusetts, 
September  28,  1892,  Edith  Mary  Smith,  a  daughter  of 
Henry  Alanson  and  Maria  (Smith)  Smith,  members  of 
an  old  Massachusetts  family.  Mrs.  Wing’s  paternal 
grandfather  was  Joseph  Smith,  and  her  maternal  grand¬ 
father  was  Lafayette  M.  Smith.  Mrs.  Wing’s  father, 
Henry  A.  Smith,  was  a  Civil  War  veteran. 

Edith  Mary  (Smith)  Wing  was  born  at  Petersham, 
Massachusetts,  June  27,  1870,  her  early  education  being 
obtained  in  the  Athol  graded  schools,  and  afterwards 
the  Athol  High  School,  and  upon  being  graduated  from 
that  institution  she  took  a  special  course  at  the  Boston 
Conservatory  of  Music.  Mrs.  Wing  is  a  member  of 
the  Themis  Chapter  of  the  Order  of  the  Eastern  Star, 
and  has  been  both  associate  conductress  and  conductress 
of  her  chapter.  She  is  also  a  charter  member  of  the 
Woman’s  Club  of  Athol,  and  is  past  vice-president  of  it. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Wing  were  the  parents  of  one  child,  Don¬ 
ald  Goddard,  who,  having  been  graduated  from  the 
public  and  high  schools  of  Athol,  matriculated  at  Yale 
University,  his  father’s  alma  mater,  and  is  now  in  his 
sophomore  year. 

The  death  of  Frank  Edward  Wing  occurred  May  12, 
1923,  at  his  home  in  Athol,  after  a  long  illness,  during 
which,  in  spite  of  his  failing  health,  he  attended  to  the 
duties  of  his  office.  The  passing  of  so  prominent,  so 
widely  respected,  and  so  well  loved  a  man  and  Mason 
as  Mr.  Wing  evoked  a  multitude  of  eulogies,  editorials, 
and  memoriams  in  the  local,  State,  and  even  national 
press,  excerpts  of  which  are  herewith  presented :  The 
editor  of  the  Athol  “Transcript”  says: 

No  death  in  town  could  be  more  generally  regretted. 
for  Mr.  Wing  was  a  man  respected,  honored  and  be¬ 
loved  more  than  is  the  common  lot  of  men,  and  none 
will  be  more  fervently  missed  in  the  community, 
which  he  has  so  generously  and  nobly  served,  ever 
since  becoming  a  citizen. 


Judge  E.  V.  Wilson,  in  an  appreciative  sketch  in  the 
“Transcript,”  says,  in  closing: 

Since  1904  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Wing  had  lived  at  their  home 
in  Union  Street,  which  with  discriminating  taste  and 
judgment  they  had  continued  to  beautify  and  adorn 
until  it  had  become  one  of  the  most  attractive  places 
in  Athol,  and  where  the  home  life  was  worthy  of  all 
commendation.  Mr.  Wing  will  be  sadly  missed.  He  exem¬ 
plified  to  a  marked  degree  the  Yale  spirit  of  faithfully 
serving  the  community  in  which  he  lived  and,  with 
true  Yale  tenacity,  he  held  himself,  in  spite  of  con¬ 
tinually  failing  health,  to  the  line  of  duty  until  his 
physical  strength  would  not  permit  him  to  go  farther, 
and  then,  in  a  few  short  days,  he  had  passed  on. 

Another  leading  newspaper  of  Athol  expressed  the 
following  sentiments : 

Announcement  of  the  death  of  Frank  E.  Wing  at 
his  home  last  Sunday  morning  came  as  a  shock  to  the 
entire  community.  With  his  passing  away  Athol  loses 
her  foremost  citizen  and  beyond  a  doubt  the  outstand¬ 
ing  intellectual  figure  of  our  town.  Broad  in  his  view¬ 
point,  with  a  superbly  cultivated  mind  and  blessed 
with  the  ability  to  express  himself  in  just  the  right 
way  on  all  occasions,  he  was  sought  after  by  his  fel¬ 
low  citizens  to  lend  dignity  and  character  at  public 

gatherings,  as  well  as  at  semi-public  functions . 

few  men  had  the  ability  of  Mr.  Wing  to  say  so  much 
in  a  few  words;  words  that  linked  up  a  perfect  sen¬ 
tence.  This,  together  with  his  sterling  character,  his 
clean-cut  business  ability  in  the  larger  affairs  of  the 
community  and  his  love  for  the  town  of  his  adoption 
makes  his  loss  all  the  more  keenly  felt.  Though  a 
most  kindly  man,  devoted  to  his  home,  family  and 
friends,  he  had  no  weaknesses. 

Eulogistic  reviews  of  the  life  of  Mr.  Wing  were  also 
published  in  the  “Boston  Globe,”  the  “Worcester  Tele¬ 
gram,”  the  “Springfield  Republican,”  and  others,  besides 
many  trade  journals,  including  the  “American  Builder,” 
the  “American  Machinist,”  “Canadian  Machinery,”  the 
“Hardware  Age,”  “Hardware  and  Metal,”  the  “Iron 
Age,”  “Machinery,”  the  “Manufacturers’  Record,”  “Mo¬ 
tor  Age,”  the  “National  Hardware  Bulletin,”  “N.  E. 
Hardware  News,”  “Power,”  and  the  “Pacific  Hardware 
Journal.” 

The  “Church  Record”  says,  in  part: 

By  Mr.  Wing’s  death,  Athol  loses  a  citizen  univer¬ 
sally  respected,  the  business  world  a  keen  and  honor¬ 
able  life,  his  church  a  devoted  and  faithful  member, 
and  the  Masonic  order  one  who  was  a  true  exponent 
of  its  life. 

The  “Christian  Register,”  in  closing  its  memorial 
sketch  of  Frank  Edward  Wing,  says,  in  part: 

One  of  the  most  valuable  services  rendered  by  Mr. 
Wing  was  his  successful  effort,  with  others,  to  unite 
the  two  Unitarian  churches  in  Athol  into  one  organ¬ 
ization.  This  work  took  considerable  of  his  time 
and  when  he  was  suffering  from  an  incurable  disease. 
The  gratifying  result  was  the  continuation  of  the  old 
First  Church  with  the  Second  Society,  which  thus 
inherits  the  honor  and  prestige  of  the  oldest  church 
society  in  town,  and  brings  together  the  two  peoples 
in  a  pleasant  and  harmonious  way. 

In  the  death  of  this  man  the  Athol  Unitarian  Church 
suffers  an  irreparable  loss,  in  common  with  the  whole 
town,  and  its  members  feel  that  this  official  recogni¬ 
tion  of  his  personal  worth  and  his  noble  Christian 
character,  as  displayed  in  all  the  duties  that  he  was 
called  upon  to  discharge,  is  eminently  proper  and 
desirable. 


MARTHA  WILLSON  BROOKS— The  life  of 

Martha  Willson  Brooks  is  a  record  of  interest  to  her 
many  friends  in  Worcester  County,  Massachusetts,  and 
particularly  to  the  people  of  Petersham,  her  birthplace. 
Miss  Brooks  has  done  much  for  the  growth  and  pros¬ 
perity  of  this  community,  is  broadly  alert  to  present- 
day  advance,  and  her  constructive  efforts  in  many 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


169 


branches  of  civic  and  social  progress  give  her  name 
permanent  significance  and  value  to  the  people  of  her 
native  town  and  State. 

The  Brooks  family  traces  back  to  Thomas  Brooks, 
who  was  born  in  England,  of  a  very  ancient  family, 
and  came  to  America  in  early  Colonial  days,  settling  in 
Concord,  Massachusetts.  Descendants  of  this  worthy 
pioneer  became  allied  in  marriage  with  various  other 
distinguished  families,  and  thus  Miss  Brooks  traces 
back  to  John  Bigelow  and  Mary  Warren,  whose  marriage 
was  the  first  recorded  in  the  town  of  Watertown,  Massa¬ 
chusetts.  Through  her  paternal  line  she  is  also  con¬ 
nected  with  the  first  settler  of  Lunenburg,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  by  name  Page,  and  Miss  Brooks  is  a  great-grand¬ 
daughter  of  President  Dunster,  the  first  president  of 
Harvard  University,  of  Cambridge,  Massachusetts. 

Aaron  Brooks,  Jr.,  Miss  Brooks’  father,  a  direct 
descendant  of  Thomas  Brooks,  the  pioneer,  and  a  grand¬ 
son  of  Colonel  Jonathan  Trout,  who  was  a  member  of 
the  First  American  Congress  under  the  Federal  Consti¬ 
tution,  was  born  in  Petersham,  Massachusetts,  and  be¬ 
came  a  famous  lawyer  of  his  day.  A  man  of  brilliant 
mental  capacity,  he  was  endowed  with  an  unquenchable 
ambition  to  serve  widely  and  well,  this  spirit  of  loyalty 
to  his  ideals  costing  the  world  one  of  its  noblest  men; 
for  he  drove  himself  beyond  his  strength,  and  died  in 
the  flower  of  his  manhood,  leaving,  however,  a  deep  and 
lasting  impression  upon  his  time.  His  prominence 
brought  him  clients  from  Greenfield,  Worcester,  and 
many  cities  and  towns,  distant  then,  when  the  means 
of  transportation  were  difficult  and  hazardous.  He  won 
the  trust  and  confidence  of  every  one  with  whom  he  came 
in  touch,  and  his  influence  for  the  progress  of  the  com¬ 
munity  was  a  force  which  counted  in  many  lines  of  ad¬ 
vance.  He  served  in  the  Massachusetts  Militia  with  the 
rank  of  major.  Aaron  Brooks,  Jr.,  married  (first)  Abby 
Morgan,  who  had  three  children:  Francis  August,  who 
practiced  law  for  many  years  in  Boston;  Frederick  and 
Sarah,  who  died  in  childhood.  He  married  (second) 
Martha  Amelia  Willson,  daughter  of  Rev.  Luther  and 
Sally  (Bigelow)  Willson,  and  they  were  the  parents 
of  four  children:  James  Willson,  who  followed  in  his 
father’s  footsteps  in  his  choice  of  a  profession,  devot¬ 
ing  himself  untiringly  to  the  welfare  of  Petersham ;  he 
was  internationally  prominent  for  a  number  of  years 
as  Vice-Consul  from  the  United  States  to  France, 
with  John  Bigelow,  Consul ;  Abby  Morgan,  who  became 
the  wife  of  Professor  John  Fiske,  the  historian;  Martha 
Willson,  of  further  mention;  and  John,  a  graduate  of 
Harvard  University,  for  many  years  prominent  in  the 
world  of  finance  with  Chicago  institutions ;  his  son, 
Arthur  Hendricks  Brooks,  is  now  a  successful  lawyer 
of  Boston.  Harvard  University  is  the  alma  mater  of 
Aaron  Brooks’  sons  and  his  grandson. 

Martha  Willson  Brooks  was  born  at  the  family  home¬ 
stead  in  which  she  still  resides,  in  Petersham,  March 
27,  1842.  Her  father’s  death  occurred  when  she  was 
three  years  of  age.  Her  education  was  a  liberal  one, 
her  early  school  attendance  being  at  the  Leicester  Acad¬ 
emy,  at  Leicester,  Massachusetts.  Later  attending  Lasell 
Seminary',  at  Auburndale,  Massachusetts,  she  thereafter 
covered  successive  courses  at  Groton  Academy,  at 
Groton,  Massachusetts,  Miss  Lyman's  School,  at  Cam¬ 


bridge,  Massachusetts,  and  Professor  Agassiz’s  School, 
also  at  Cambridge.  In  1863  Miss  Brooks  went  abroad 
and  joined  her  brother,  James  W.  Brooks,  who  was  then 
Vice-Consul  in  Paris,  a  year  later  returning  home  to 
Cambridge,  Massachusetts.  In  1890  James  W.  Brooks 
remodeled  and  improved  the  Petersham  homestead,  and 
brother  and  sister  have  since  then  made  their  residence 
here.  The  charm  of  the  old  Colonial  mansion  was 
carefully  preserved,  and  its  grounds  were  beautified  in 
keeping  with  old  Colonial  traditions.  The  Brooks  home¬ 
stead  is  now  one  of  the  loveliest  of  the  many  stately 
structures  of  this  section,  which  have  sheltered  genera¬ 
tion  after  generation  of  the  old  New  England  families. 
Miss  Brooks  takes  the  deepest  pride  in  historic  Peter¬ 
sham,  and  her  endeavors  for  the  civic  welfare  and  social 
progress  of  the  community  are  ceaseless.  She  was  one 
of  the  first  members  of  the  Petersham  Historical  So¬ 
ciety,  which  in  the  beginning  of  its  activities  was  known 
as  the  Historical  Club.  She  personally  copied  and  in¬ 
dexed  the  first  town  records  of  Petersham  to  facilitate 
the  labors  of  the  many  descendants  of  New  England  stock 
who  came  to  search  these  records.  Making  an  exact 
copy  of  every  page,  she  had  the  records  bound  in  proper 
sequence,  and  this  work  of  her  hands  forms  a  per¬ 
manent  benefit  to  the  community.  Miss  Brooks  donated 
the  site  upon  which  the  proposed  building  of  the 
Petersham  Historical  Building  is  to  be  erected,  and  in 
every  way  she  strives  to  encourage  the  preservation  of 
those  records  or  published  volumes,  which  now  repre¬ 
sent  the  culture  of  a  day  gone  by.  One  of  her  highly 
prized  possessions  is  a  volume  of  Shakespeare,  more 
than  one  hundred  years  old,  which  was  presented  to  her 
father  by  pupils  he  had  tutored  in  his  youth.  She  shared 
the  research  labors  of  her  brother,  James  W.  Brooks, 
who  wrote  for  the  celebration  in  1904  the  monograph, 
“The  One  Hundred  and  Fiftieth  Anniversary  of  Peters¬ 
ham.”  Miss  Brooks  has  always  been  interested  in  the 
march  of  public  events,  and  in  recent  years  has  never  failed 
to  exercise  the  franchise,  supporting,  as  the  family  has 
always  done,  the  Republican  party.  She  attends  the 
Unitarian  church  of  Petersham,  of  which  her  grand¬ 
father,  Rev.  Luther  Willson,  was  the  first  Unitarian 
pastor.  Pie  had  been  tried  for  heresy  in  Connecticut, 
and  was  invited  to  the  Unitarian  church  in  Petersham. 
Dr.  Channing,  about  this  time,  asked  him  to  visit  him  in 
Boston,  and  gave  him  a  watch  in  consideration  of  his 
“sturdy  manhood.”  His  son,  Rev.  Edmund  B.  Willson, 
born  in  Petersham,  was  for  thirty-six  years  pastor  of 
the  North  Church  in  Salem,  Massachusetts,  beloved  by 
every  one  with  whom  he  came  in  contact. 


JOSEPH  A.  SMITH,  M.  D.,  one  of  the  foremost 
practitioners  in  Worcester  County,  and  a  prominent 
Roentgen  expert  of  Massachusetts,  was  born  at  Pe¬ 
tersham,  Massachusetts,  June  8,  1875,  a  son  of  Henry 
A.  and  Maria  (Smith)  Smith,  the  father  dying  when 
Dr.  Smith  was  but  one  and  a  half  years  of  age,  the 
mother  still  living  at  Athol,  Massachusetts.  Dr.  Smith 
is  a  brother  of  Edith  Mary  (Smith)  Wing,  widow  of 
the  late  Frank  Edward  Wing  (q.  v.),  and  F.  U.  Smith  of 
Boston. 

Dr.  Joseph  A.  Smith’s  early  education  was  obtained 
in  the  Athol  public  schools,  following  which  he  entered 


170 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY' 


Cushing  Academy,  a  college  preparatory  school,  and 
was  graduated  in  the  year  1894,  being  a  member  of  the 
first  class  to  be  graduated  from  the  new  main  building, 
which  was  destroyed  by  fire  in  October,  1923.  He  then 
matriculated  at  Boston  University,  in  the  Medical  De¬ 
partment,  and  was  graduated  in  the  year  1898  with  the 
degree  of  Doctor  of  Medicine,  whereupon  he  immediately 
began  to  practice  medicine  in  the  city  of  Boston,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  and  followed  his  profession  successfully  for 
two  years.  In  1900  he  removed  to  Athol,  Massachusetts, 
and  entered  upon  a  general  medical  practice,  to  which 
he  devoted  all  his  time  and  energy.  Of  late  years  Dr. 
Smith  has  been  engaged  in  special  practice;  as  an  X 
Ray  (Roentgen)  expert  and  a  specialist  in  electro  thera¬ 
peutics  his  work  stands  second  to  none  in  Worcester 
County.  Dr.  Smith’s  medical  service  during  the  late 
World  War  was  a  noteworthy  achievement.  As  chief 
physician  and  secretary  of  the  local  board  of  Division 
No.  12,  State  of  Massachusetts,  he  had  full  supervision 
over  nine  towns  and  eighteen  villages,  and  personal  di¬ 
rection  of  all  assistants.  The  work  was  so  exacting  and 
strenuous  that  not  only  did  he  sacrifice  his  own  medical 
practice,  but  he  also  suffered  a  physical  breakdown. 

Dr.  Smith’s  political  affiliations  are  with  the  Repub¬ 
lican  party.  He  was  the  first  school  physician  to  be 
appointed  in  Athol,  which  position  he  still  holds.  He 
was  also  the  first  police  surgeon  to  be  appointed  in  Athol, 
and  is  the  present  incumbent  of  that  office.  In  1923 
he  was  elected  to  the  School  Board,  and  is  the  chairman 
of  that  body.  For  several  years  Dr.  Smith  was  a  mem¬ 
ber  of  the  Board  of  Health.  Fraternally,  Dr.  Smith 
is  an  active  and  interested  member  of  Star  Lodge,  Free 
and  Accepted  Masons,  of  Athol,  and  is  prominent  in 
the  chapter,  council,  commandery,  and  Themis  Chapter, 
Order  of  Eastern  Star,  of  Athol,  and  of  the  Shrine  of 
Boston.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  Knights  of  Pythias, 
of  Athol,  Massachusetts.  His  medical  societies  include 
the  Massachusetts  Society  of  Homeopathy,  the  Worces¬ 
ter  County  Society  of  Homeopathy,  the  Hahnemann 
Medical  Society  of  Boston  University,  and  the  Medical 
Veterans’  Association  of  the  World  War.  He  is  also 
a  member  of  the  Massachusetts  Association  of  Selective 
Service  Officers,  a  local  director  of  the  Massachusetts 
Society  for  the  Prevention  of  Cruelty  to  Children,  and 
a  member  of  the  local  branch  of  the  American  Red 
Cross,  to  which  latter  institution  he  has  devoted  much 
of  his  spare  time.  Dr.  Smith  is  a  golf  enthusiast  when 
the  exigencies  of  his  profession  allow  him  to  play.  He 
is  a  member  of  the  Greenfield  Country  Club,  the  Pequaig 
Club  of  Athol,  and  the  Boston  Athletic  Association. 

Dr.  Joseph  A.  Smith  married,  at  Athol,  Massachusetts, 
December  12,  1906,  Grace  (Lord)  Goddard.  Dr.  and 
Mrs.  Smith  are  affiliated  with  the  First  Church  Uni¬ 
tarian  of  Athol,  and  are  active  both  in  church  work  and 
in  the  social  life  of  their  community. 


ORRA  LAVILLE  STONE,  the  son  of  a  veteran  of 
the  American  Civil  War,  and  a  distinguished  member 
of  the  Massachusetts  State  bar,  was  born  at  Worcester, 
Massachusetts,  May  27,  1873,  the  son  of  Louis  L.  and 
Josephine  A.  (Cheney)  Stone,  both  of  whom  are  mem¬ 
bers  of  families  that  have  long  been  domiciled  in  Massa¬ 
chusetts.  His  father,  who  has  retired  from  active  par¬ 


ticipation  in  business  affairs,  enlisted  as  a  private  in  the 
60th  Massachusetts  Infantry  and  served  throughout  the 
Civil  War  with  distinction.  He  is  a  member  of  the 
Grand  Army  of  the  Republic  and  takes  the  keenest  in¬ 
terest  in  all  the  activities  of  that  patriotic  organization. 
Mr.  Stone’s  mother  traces  her  descent  to  the  English 
family  of  Cheney,  of  which  the  Massachusetts  Cheneys 
are  a  branch.  The  Coloniel  ancestry  of  the  Cheney  fam¬ 
ily  is  well  known  and  so  also  is  the  ancestry  of  the 
Massachusetts  family  of  Stone. 

Mr.  Stone  received  his  preliminary  education  in  the 
public  schools  of  Clinton,  Massachusetts.  He  was  grad¬ 
uated  from  the  Clinton  High  School  with  the  class  of 
1890,  and,  after  an  interim  of  several  years,  during  which 
time  he  acquired  a  fund  of  practical  experience  and  a 
great  deal  of  general  knowledge,  he  proceeded  to  Boston 
University,  Boston,  Massachusetts,  where,  in  1898  he 
matriculated  and  was  enrolled  as  a  student  of  the  School 
of  Law.  Bringing  to  the  study  of  the  law  a  judicial 
temperament,  a  power  of  forensic  phrase,  and  a  broad 
fundamental  knowledge  of  life  and  affairs,  in  addition 
to  a  profound  respect  for  the  whole  body  of  ethical 
thought  represented  by  the  enunciated  doctrine  of  the 
law,  Mr.  Stone  greatly  distinguished  himself  as  a  student, 
and  at  the  end  of  his  course  was  graduated  as  a  mem¬ 
ber  of  the  class  of  1901,  with  the  degree  of  Bachelor 
of  Laws,  cum  laude. 

As  previously  stated,  the  business  career  of  Mr.  Stone 
began  some  years  before  he  became  a  member  of  the 
legal  profession.  He  entered  the  field  of  journalism 
immediately  after  his  graduation  from  the  Clinton  High 
School,  joining  the  staff  of  the  Worcester  “Daily  Spy” 
as  a  reporter  in  1890  and  continuing  in  this  capacity 
for  three  years.  His  daily  assignments  covered  every 
field  of  newspaper  reporting  and  brought  him  into  con¬ 
tact  with  all  classes  of  the  community.  Of  a  literary 
turn  of  mind,  and  able  even  at  an  early  age  to  express 
himself  in  clear,  concise,  and  direct  English,  Mr.  Stone 
made  his  mark  as  a  reporter,  and  his  ability  was  very 
generally  recognized  by  the  veterans  of  the  press  who 
watched  his  course  with  sympathetic  interest  and  ap¬ 
preciation.  In  1893,  at  the  age  of  twenty  years,  he  be¬ 
came  local  editor  of  the  Clinton  “Daily  Item,”  and  for 
the  next  five  years  he  filled  this  position  in  such  a 
manner  as  to  contribute  greatly  to  the  power  and  influ¬ 
ence  of  the  paper,  following  in  all  respects  the  best  tra¬ 
ditions  of  Massachusetts  journalism. 

In  1898,  well-tempered  by  wide  reading,  journalistic 
training,  and  practical  experience,  Mr.  Stone  embarked 
upon  his  legal  career.  After  his  graduation  from  the 
Boston  University  School  of  Law  he  returned  to  Clin¬ 
ton,  and,  in  September,  1901,  was  admitted  to  the  Massa¬ 
chusetts  State  bar.  He  thereupon  became  a  member  of 
the  law  firm  of  Buttrick  &  Stone,  and  the  partnership  so 
established  has  continued  without  change  ever  since.  In 
1904  Governor  Bates  appointed  Mr.  Stone  to  the  office 
of  clerk  of  the  court  of  the  Second  District  Court  of 
Eastern  Worcester,  and  in  1909  Governor  Draper  re¬ 
appointed  him  to  the  same  office.  Upon  first  assuming 
the  clerkship  of  this  court,  in  April,  1904,  Mr.  Stone  was 
appointed  probation  officer  by  the  Honorable  Justice  of 
the  Court,  and  served  in  this  capacity  for  nine  years. 
In  1913,  having  resigned  as  clerk  of  the  court  and  as 


yvu^ 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


probation  officer,  he  became  private  secretary  to  the  Hon. 
Calvin  D.  Paige,  member  of  the  United  States  House 
of  Representatives  from  the  Third  Massachusetts  Dis¬ 
trict.  He  was  associated  with  Mr.  Paige  from  Novem¬ 
ber,  1913,  to  March,  1917,  and  his  official  duties  at  Wash¬ 
ington  during  the  trying  years  that  preceded  America’s 
entry  into  the  World  War  gave  him  a  vivid  insight  into 
world  politics  as  well  as  a  first-hand  acquaintance  with 
a  page  of  American  social  and  political  history  in  the 
making.  He  resigned  his  Congressional  secretaryship  in 
March,  1917,  to  become  membership  secretary  of  the 
Associated  Industries  of  Massachusetts..  In  Decem¬ 
ber,  1918,  he  became  general  manager  of  this  organiza¬ 
tion,  a  position  he  still  occupies. 

Upon  leaving  Washington  in  1917  in  order  to  enter 
the  Associated  Industries  of  Massachusetts,  Mr.  Stone 
enlisted  in  the  Massachusetts  State  Guard  and  served  with 
the  colors  of  this  military  organization  during  the  period 
1917-1918.  A  Republican  in  politics,  and  widely  known 
for  his  unswerving  fidelity  to  Republican  candidates  and 
principles,  Mr.  Stone  was  continuously  occupied  with 
political  affairs  from  1901  until  the  end  of  1921,  attend¬ 
ing  various  political  conferences  and  taking  a  leading 
part  in  discussions  affecting  the  welfare  of  the  Repub¬ 
lican  party  in  Massachusetts.  In  1912  he  served  as  a 
member  of  the  Republican  State  Committee  of  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  Second  Worcester  Senatorial  District.  In  1913 
he  became  chairman  of  the  Third  Massachusetts  Con¬ 
gressional  District  Committee,  serving  in  this  capacity 
until  1917.  He  was  also  from  1901  to  1912,  secretary  of  the 
Fourth  Massachusetts  Congressional  District  Committee, 
and  rendered  valuable  assistance  to  his  party  in  this  capac¬ 
ity.  In  1918  he  was  elected  chairman  of  the  School  Com¬ 
mittee  of  Clinton,  and  held  office  in  this  capacity  until 
1921.  In  all  of  these  various  positions  Mr.  Stone  has 
rendered  distinguished  service  to  his  party,  his  talent 
for  organization  nowhere  displaying  itself  to  better  ad¬ 
vantage  than  in  the  work  of  welding  diverse  political 
elements  within  the  ranks  into  a  single  compact  and 
powerful  whole.  As  time  goes  on,  Mr.  Stone  may  be 
expected  to  take  a  larger  share  in  the  political  life  of 
the  Commonwealth.  Few  men  have  politics  at  their 
fingers’  ends  more  completely  than  he,  and  if  the  ex¬ 
igencies  of  his  business  life  should  prevent  him  from 
holding  public  office  to  any  great  extent,  his  analytic 
mind,  organizing  methods,  and  vigorous  pen  would  still 
continue  to  make  his  influence  felt  in  the  political  affairs 
of  his  State  and  party. 

Mr.  Stone  is  a  member  of  various  fraternal  and  social 
organizations.  He  has  at  various  times  held  the  office 
of  commander  of  the  Lieutenant  A.  L.  Fuller  Camp,  No. 
19,  of  the  Sons  of  Veterans,  at  Clinton.  From  1902  to  1903, 
inclusive,  he  served  as  division  commander  of  the 
Massachusetts  Division  of  the  Sons  of  Veterans,  and 
during  this  period  the  organization  made  a  net  increase 
in  its  membership  of  more  than  1,200  sons  of  veterans. 
A  Mason  of  long  standing,  Mr.  Stone  belongs  to*  Trin¬ 
ity  Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted  Masons,  at  Clinton;  and 
to  Clinton  Royal  Arch  Chapter.  He  also  holds  member¬ 
ship  in  Clinton  Lodge,  No.  199,  of  the  Independent  Order 
of  Odd  Fellows ;  Clinton  Lodge,  Knights  of  Pythias ; 
and  Clinton  Lodge,  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of 
Elks.  During  his  college  days  Mr.  Stone  was  elected 


171 

to  the  Greek  letter  fraternities,  Sigma  Alpha  Epsilon 
and  Phi  Delta  Phi.  He  is  an  eminent  archon  of  the 
Sigma  Alpha  Epsilon,  in  which  he  belongs  to  the  Beta 
Upsilon  Chapter.  He  is  at  present  holding  office  as 
treasurer  and  president  of  the  Lamsdec  Club,  an  office 
he  has  held  for  several  years;  and  also  belongs  to  the 
Prescott  Club  of  Clinton. 

In  religious  faith  Mr.  Stone  is  a  member  of  the  First 
Unitarian  Church  at  Clinton.  He  takes  an  active  part 
in  the  work  of  this  congregation  and  holds  office  as  clerk 
of  the  church  corporation,  and  has  been  for  many  years 
superintendent  of  the  Sunday  school.  He  was  presi¬ 
dent  of  the  Worcester  County  Conference  of  Unitarian 
Churches  during  the  period  1912-1913.  Mr.  Stone  is 
unmarried. 


GEORGE  WILSON  OLNEY — A  broadly  repre¬ 
sentative  figure  in  the  business  life  of  Worcester 
County,  Massachusetts,  was  that  of  George  Wilson 
Olney,  whose  life  was  devoted  to  the  advance  of  the 
textile  industry,  and  whose  success  contributed  in  no 
small  degree  to  the  prosperity  of  this  section  and  the 
welfare  of  the  people.  A  man  of  large  ability,  gifted 
with  the  genius  for  accomplishing  deeds  of  definite  sig¬ 
nificance,  he  had  no  desire  to  magnify  himself  in  the 
public  eye,  and  while  a  man  of  few  words,  he  was  of  con¬ 
stant  activity  along  lines  that  meant  much  to  the  gen¬ 
eral  advance.  Nearly  three  decades  have  gone  since  his 
passing,  but  he  is  still  remembered  by  the  older  residents 
of  southern  Worcester  County  as  an  able  executive  and  a 
man  upon  whom  the  community  depended  in  times  of 
crises  or  perplexity,  a  man  whose  judgment,  never  pre¬ 
maturely  formed,  counted  for  progress  in  any  field  of 
endeavor. 

The  Olney  family  is  one  of  the  very  old  English  lines 
in  Massachusetts,  Thomas  Olney  having  come  to  this 
State  from  St.  Albans,  Hertfordshire,  England,  in  1635, 
settling  at  Salem.  He  was  excommunicated  from  the 
Salem  church  for  espousing  the  cause  of  Roger  Wil¬ 
liams,  and  in  June,  1637,  old  records  state  that  he  was 
with  Roger  Williams  in  Providence,  Rhode  Island.  The 
following  year  Thomas  Olney  was  one  of  thirteen  cor¬ 
porate  members  of  the  town,  and  became  one  of  the 
founders  of  the  first  Baptist  church  organized  on  Amer¬ 
ican  soil.  Descendants  of  Thomas  Olney  were  closely 
identified  with  the  early  progress  of  the  community 
known  as  “Providence  Plantations,”  also  doing  much 
for  the  early  development  of  the  adjacent  section  of 
the  Colony  of  Massachusetts. 

(I.)  Richard  Olney,  in  direct  line  from  Thomas  Olney, 
the  pioneer,  was  born  at  Smithfield,  Rhode  Island,  in 
1770.  When  still  a  young  man  he  became  a  prosperous 
merchant  with  interests  centering  in  Providence.  He 
owned  the  packet  “Huntress,”  plying  between  Provi¬ 
dence,  New  York,  and  Savannah,  Georgia,  which  car¬ 
ried  both  passengers  and  freight,  the  latter  principally 
cotton.  She  was  eventually  lost  at  sea.  Richard  Olney 
was  a  pioneer  in  the  manufacture  of  cotton  in  this  part 
of  the  country,  and  about  the  year  1810  he  had  become 
a  noted  cotton  manufacturer  of  Providence,  still  retain¬ 
ing  his  mercantile  interests,  which  included  an  extensive 
West  Indian  trade.  Samuel  Slater,  a  contemporaneous 
cotton  manufacturer  of  Pawtucket,  was  one  of  the  prin- 


172 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


cipal  rivals  of  the  Olney  interests  in  this  field,  and  both 
Mr.  Olney  and  Mr.  Slater  contemplated  expansion  at  the 
same  time.  In  November,  1811,  Mr.  Olney  purchased 
from  Ezekiel  Preston  a  deed  of  three-quarters  of  a  tract 
of  land  on  Mumford  River,  at  East  Douglas,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  for  the  purpose  of  erecting  a  mill  plant  for 
spinning,  in  a  locality  where  weaving  could  be  placed 
out  in  the  families  of  the  farming  people.  Included  in 
this  deed  were  rights  for  mills,  machine  shops,  and  kin¬ 
dred  structures.  Mr.  Olney  had  two  associates  in  this 
enterprise,  and  it  was  nearly  simultaneous  with  Mr. 
Slater’s  activities  along  similar  lines  at  Webster,  Massa¬ 
chusetts.  Mr.  Olney  organized  a  company,  and  they 
went  forward  successfully  under  the  firm  name  of  Rich¬ 
ard  Olney  &  Company.  This  later  became  known  as 
the  Douglas  Cotton  Manufacturing  Company,  and  in 
1817  Mr.  Olney  removed  to  Douglas,  extending  his  op¬ 
erations  to  this  community,  then  in  the  spring  of  the 
following  year,  opened  further  interests  in  Oxford, 
Massachusetts.  All  these  additional  activities  were  by 
way  of  expansion,  rather  than  removal,  and  the  in¬ 
terests  of  the  company  centered  at  Douglas  until  1822, 
when  Mr.  Olney  disposed  of  his  share,  evidently  about 
two-thirds,  selling  five  thirty-sevenths  of  the  property 
to  one  Ziba  Angell,  and  twenty  thirty-sevenths  to  Jon¬ 
athan  Adams  and  Adams  Foster,  prominent  men  of 
Providence.  The  subsequent  activities  of  Richard  Olney 
were  principally  in  connection  with  the  Oxford  Woolen 
Company,  although  he  made  some  changes  of  residence, 
and  in  1836  he  became  the  principal  owner,  continuing 
thus  until  his  death. 

Meanwhile,  in  April,  1819,  Richard  Olney  purchased 
the  Campbell  Tavern  at  Oxford  Centre,  where  he  was 
innkeeper  and  “trader”  for  four  years ;  then,  in  the  spring 
of  1823,  he  removed  to  the  house  then  standing  on  the 
present  site  of  the  Oxford  Episcopal  Church.  In  1826 
he  purchased  a  farm  west  of  the  river,  now  known  as 
the  Woodbury  place,  and  there  resided  until  1833,  when 
he  bought  a  fine  estate  in  the  locality  known  as  the 
Plain.  There  he  resided  until  he  sold  that  place  in  1837, 
then,  for  two  or  three  years,  resided  where  now  stands 
the  Methodist  church,  thereafter  removing  the  Burrill- 
ville,  his  place  of  residence  at  the  time  of  his  decease. 
For  several  years  before  his  death  Mr.  Olney  was  in 
precarious  health,  and  in  the  fall  of  1841  he  went  to 
Saratoga  in  the  hope  of  gaining  strength.  Receiving 
scant  benefit  from  the  change,  he  set  out  on  his  return 
journey,  but  stopped  at  Oxford,  near  Town’s  Pond,  to 
tarry  for  a  time  with  an  old  friend,  Alexander  C. 
Thurston,  where  he  failed  rapidly,  and  passed  away  Oc¬ 
tober  22,  1841,  at  the  age  of  seventy-one  years.  It  was 
said  of  Richard  Olney  by  a  biographer  that  he  “had 
native  force  of  character,  sagacity,  and  business  ability.” 

In  the  public  life  of  his  time,  and  in  community,  State, 
and  National  interests,  he  bore  a  noteworthy  part.  An 
original  proprietor  of  the  Oxford  Bank,  his  name  was 
second  on  its  first  board  of  directors,  and  he  was  presi¬ 
dent  of  the  institution  from  1833  until  1836.  In  1820 
he  served  as  a  member  of  the  Constitutional  Conven¬ 
tion;  then,  for  five  years  (1824  and  at  various  times 
until  1836),  was  town  agent;  meanwhile,  from  1821  to 
1828,  inclusive,  he  was  Selectman  of  the  town,  and  from 
1826  until  1829,  inclusive,  represented  his  town  in  the 


State  Legislature.  Always  interested  in  religious  ad¬ 
vance,  he  was  in  early  life  an  officer  of  the  Restorationist 
Church,  of  which  Rev.  Seth  Chandler  was  the  head,  but 
later  affiliated  himself  with  the  Methodist  society. 

Richard  Olney  married,  April  3,  1795.  at  Cumberland, 
Rhode  Island,  Abigail  Wilson,  who  died  August  16, 
1855,  aged  seventy-nine  years.  They  were  the  parents 
of  the  following  children:  1.  Lucina,  bom  March  31, 
1796,  at  North  Providence,  Rhode  Island,  later  the  wife 
of  Cromwell  Moulton  and  the  mother  of  nine  sons.  2. 
Cynthia,  born  April  12,  1797,  at  North  Providence,  mar¬ 
ried  at  Douglass,  John  White,  their  children  being  four 
sons  and  five  daughters.  3.  Hannah,  bom  April  27, 
1799,  at  Providence,  married,  in  July,  1819,  Simon 
Wheeler,  of  Seekonk,  and  was  the  mother  of  six  sons 
and  three  daughters.  4.  Wilson,  of  further  mention.  5. 
Lucinda,  born  October  22,  1803,  later  the  wife  of  Charles 
J.  Stratford.  6.  Simon  L.,  born  August  3,  1805,  who 
left  home  as  a  young  man  and  was  never  heard  from 
afterward.  7.  Amy,  bom  June  29,  1807,  at  Providence, 
was  the  wife  of  Samuel  C.  Butler,  son  of  Peter  Butler. 
8.  Elisha,  born  August  7,  1809,  at  Providence,  died  in 
Iowa,  having  resided  in  the  West  many  years,  married, 
and  had  one  daughter.  9.  Hannah,  who  became  the  wife 
of  Thomas  Hardy,  their  son,  Harry,  born  about  1876. 
10.  Moses,  born  in  1814,  drowned  at  Oxford,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  in  1820.  11.  Abigail,  born  November  20,  1817,  at 

Douglass,  married,  December  3,  1836,  William  Knight, 
of  Leicester,  their  children  being  six  sons  and  three 
daughters.  12.  William  B.,  born  July  31,  1819,  at  Ox¬ 
ford,  married  Lavina  Morey,  resided  many  years  at 
Burrillville,  later  at  Upton  until  his  death  in  1891,  his 
three  children,  born  at  Burrillville:  William  M.,  Sep¬ 
tember  13,  1842;  Amy,  March  21,  1844;  and  Oscar,  April 
13,  1845- 

(II.)  Wilson  Olney,  fourth  child  and  eldest  son  of 
Richard  and  Abigail  (Wilson)  Olney,  was  bom  at  Prov¬ 
idence,  Rhode  Island,  January  10,  1802.  Endowed  with 
a  brilliant  mentality  and  scholarly  tastes,  he  taught  school 
at  the  age  of  seventeen  years,  and  was  also  active  in 
his  father’s  store  from  1819  until  1823,  inclusive,  in  the 
village  of  Oxford,  Massachusetts.  He  was  later  en¬ 
gaged  in  mercantile  interests  at  Providence,  Rhode 
Island,  at  Hyde  Park,  New  York,  and  Little  Falls,  New 
Jersey,  until  1829,  when  he  returned  to  Oxford.  At  that 
time  he  became  identified  with  the  Oxford  Woolen 
Mill  Company,  as  an  accountant,  which  position  he  filled 
for  about  two  years.  He  then  established  a  mercantile 
interest  on  the  Plain,  which  he  conducted  until  1836, 
when  he  removed  to  Kentucky.  There  he  continued 
in  the  same  field  of  activity  until  1842,  when  he  re¬ 
turned  permanently  to  Worcester  County,  Massachu¬ 
setts.  As  an  executor  of  his  father’s  estate,  he  had 
the  management  of  the  Oxford  Woolen  Company’s  af¬ 
fairs  until  1846,  after  which  he  became  associated  with 
George  Hodges  in  the  manufacture  of  flannel  for  sev¬ 
eral  years,  then  removed  to  the  Plain  in  1853.  Always 
commanding  the  respect  and  confidence  of  his  associ¬ 
ates  and  the  people  generally,  these  latter  years  of  his  life 
were  marked  with  many  honors,  and  in  1855  he  was 
elected  cashier  of  the  Oxford  Bank.  This  office  he  ably 
filled  until  advancing  years  occasioned  his  retirement, 
and  his  death  occurred  shortly  thereafter. 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


i/3' 


Wilson  Olney  married,  March  26,  1832,  Eliza  L. 
Butler,  daughter  of  Peter  Butler,  (See  Sigourney-Butler 
VI),  who  died  February  24,  1874,  she  surviving  him  for 
only  a  few  months,  and  passing  away  May  2,  1874.  They 
were  the  parents  of  four  sons:  1.  Richard,  born  Sep¬ 
tember  15,  1835,  was  a  graduate  of  Brown  University 
(1856),  and  Harvard  University  School  of  Law  (1859). 
Practiced  law  in  association  with  Judge  Benjamin  F. 
Thomas,  of  Boston,  he  won  high  rank  in  his  profession, 
and  became  a  leader  in  public  affairs,  serving  as  Repre¬ 
sentative  in  the  State  Legislature,  also  being  brought 
forward  as  his  party’s  candidate  for  State  Senator. 
Under  President  Cleveland  he  served  in  the  Cabinet  as 
Attorney-General,  and  later  as  Secretary  of  State,  and 
during  President  Wilson’s  administration  he  was  offered 
the  post  of  Ambassador  to  England.  He  married, 
March  6,  1861,  Agnes  P.  Thomas,  daughter  of  Judge 
Thomas,  and  their  children  were:  Agnes,  born  in  De¬ 
cember,  1861 ;  and  Mary  T.,  born  in  August,  1865.  2. 
George  W.,  of  whom  further.  3.  Peter  B.,  was  born 
at  Oxford,  Massachusetts,  July  21,  1843.  He  was  a 
graduate  of  Harvard  University  in  both  the  liberal  arts 
and  the  law  courses,  the  latter  in  the  class  of  1866.  He 
also  studied  law  with  William  M.  Evarts,  of  New  York 
City,  where  he  began  practice  in  1868.  He  was  a  leader 
in  public  advance,  participating  in  the  overthrow  of  the 
“Tweed  Ring”  in  1871-72;  in  1879  was  appointed  one  of 
three  commissioners  to  compile  and  thereafter  revise 
State  legislation  bearing  upon  local  metropolitan  mat¬ 
ters.  In  1883  he  was  appointed  District  Attorney  for 
the  city  and  county  of  New  York  by  Governor  Cleveland, 
serving  until  his  term  expired,  January  1,  1885.  He 
married,  November  12,  1879,  Mary  Sigourney  Butler, 
daughter  of  Peter  Butler,  of  Boston,  (see  Sigourney- 
Butler  VII),  and  they  were  the  parents  of  four  chil¬ 
dren  :  Peter  B.,  born  April  9,  1881 ;  Richard,  born  Feb¬ 
ruary  24,  1883;  Wilson,  born  August  13,  1885;  and 
Sigourney  Butler,  born  February  22,  1888.  All  except 
Richard  were  born  in  New  York  City,  but  he  was  born 
at  their  country  home  at  Cedarhurst,  Long  Island.  4. 
Frederick  A.  was  born  at  Oxford,  Massachusetts,  Janu¬ 
ary  11,  1846.  He  became  a  leading  hardware  merchant 
of  Kingston,  New  York,  a  man  of  high  character,  greatly 
esteemed  in  all  circles  in  which  he  moved.  He  married, 
May  21,  1879,  Effie  L.  Chapin,  and  they  were  the  parents 
of  two  children :  Ruth  L.,  born  in  April,  1880,  at  Wor¬ 
cester,  Massachusetts;  and  Persis  C.,  born  at  Kingston, 
New  York.  5.  Gertrude  G.,  born  at  Oxford,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  in  May,  1850.  She  became  the  wife,  on  Septem¬ 
ber  6,  1872,  of  Eben  Sutton  Stevens,  son  of  Henry  H. 
Stevens,  formerly  a  prominent  citizen  of  Dudley,  and 
grandson  of  Captain  Nathaniel  Stevens,  of  North  An¬ 
dover.  Eben  S.  Stevens  became  a  successful  woolen 
manufacturer  of  Quinebaug,  Connecticut,  proprietor  of 
the  mill  and  estates  connected  with  it,  and  a  broadly 
influential  citizen,  and  was  elected  to  the  Massachusetts 
Senate  in  1891.  One  daughter  was  born  to  these 
parents,  Gertrude  O.,  born  November  15,  1873. 

(III.)  George  Wilson  Olney,  second  son  of  Wilson 
and  Eliza  L.  (Butler)  Olney,  was  born  at  Louisville, 
Kentucky,  August  27,  1840,  and  died  at  Cherry  Valley, 
Massachusetts,  February  28,  1894.  As  a  young  lad  he 
attended  the  public  schools  of  Oxford,  Massachusetts, 


to  which  community  the  family  had  returned  in  his 
childhood.  He  later  entered  Nichols  Academy,  at  Dud¬ 
ley,  Massachusetts,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in  due 
course.  Interested  in  the  industrial  activities  of  this 
section,  and  professional  life  holding  no  appeal  for  him, 
he  definitely  chose  the  career  of  the  manufacturer.  He 
learned  the  manufacture  of  flannel  with  George  Hodges, 
then  agent  at  the  Milton  Mills  of  New  Hampshire, 
where  he  was  active  from  April,  1868,  until  the  year 
1874.  Possessing  ample  means  to  finance  his  own  ven¬ 
tures  in  the  realm  of  his  choice,  he  bought  the  mills  at 
Cherry  Valley,  in  the  town  of  Leicester,  Massachusetts, 
August  1,  1874.  This  plant  contained  seven  sets,  and 
under  his  judicious  management  the  business  steadily 
throve  and  grew.  He  also  acquired  a  controlling  interest 
in  a  mill  of  eight  sets  at  Lisbon,  Maine,  and  kept  the 
general  oversight  of  that  plant,  although  he  resided 
in  Worcester  County,  Massachusetts.  Mr.  Olney  was  a 
man  of  large  ability,  a  far-sighted  business  man,  fear¬ 
less  in  advance,  yet  cautious,  well  considering  every 
move.  He  was  eminently  fair  in  his  dealings  with  all, 
associate,  customer,  employee,  and  was  a  genial,  whole¬ 
hearted  friend,  a  loyal  and  progressive  citizen.  In  the 
public  life  of  the  community  he  accepted  responsibility 
only  as  it  was  urged  upon  him  as  a  duty.  A  Democrat 
by  political  affiliation,  he  was  elected  Selectman  of  the 
town  of  Leicester,  serving  for  several  years,  and  was 
also  for  some  time  a  member  of  the  School  Committee. 
In  every  phase  of  community  advance  he  bore  a  con¬ 
structive  part,  and  was  a  member  of  the  Episcopal 
church,  which  he  served  as  senior  warden. 

George  Wilson  Olney  married,  at  Oxford,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  November  18,  1862,  Waity  Maria  Harwood,  daugh¬ 
ter  of  Elihu  and  Hannah  (Beals)  Harwood.  They  were 
the  parents  of  five  children:  Thomas  W.,  born  June  9, 
1864,  died  October  19,  1904;  Robert  S.,  bom  August  26, 
1868,  died  May  1,  1900;  Richard,  born  January  5,  1871; 
George  H.,  born  August  8,  1872;  and  Catharine,  born 
December  16,  1881. 

In  such  a  life  as  that  of  George  Wilson  Olney,  the 
world  of  to-day  may  well  find  a  fruitful  subject  for  re¬ 
flection,  and  an  example  worthy  of  emulation.  Modest 
and  unassuming,  giving  to  life  the  high  efforts  of  a  man 
among  men,  when  with  his  means  he  might  have  spent 
his  days  in  a  round  of  pleasures.  Mr.  Olney  was  such 
a  man  as  the  world  needs.  Nearly  thirty  years  have 
passed  since  he  was  called  on  to  a  higher  life,  yet  the 
work  he  did  and  the  forces  he  set  in  motion  have  lived 
through  these  years  in  beneficent  activity,  carried  for¬ 
ward  by  those  who  have  felt  the  inspiration  of  his  mem¬ 
ory  and  who  delight  to  do  him  honor.  His  was  a  useful 
life,  not  merely  for  the  hour — the  day — the  time  in  which 
he  lived,  but  for  the  industrial  and  civic  progress  of  to¬ 
day,  and  in  good  measure  useful  to  all  who  shall  come 
after. 

(The  Sigourney-Butler  Line). 

(I.)  Andrew  Sigourney  fled  from  France  after  the 
revocation  of  the  Edict  of  Nantes,  and  was  a  leader  in 
the  settlement  of  Oxford,  Massachusetts,  in  1687.  He 
died  in  Boston,  April  16,  1727.  He  married  Charlotte 
Pairan,  and  they  were  the  parents  of  five  children,  three 
of  whom  were:  Andrew,  of  further  mention;  Susan, 
Barthelmy. 


174 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


(II.)  Andrew  Sigourney,  son  of  Andrew  and  Char¬ 
lotte  (Pairan)  Sigourney,  was  bom  in  France  in  1673, 
and  died  in  1748.  He  resided  in  Boston,  where  he  was 
engaged  in  business  as  a  distiller.  He  married  Mary 
Germaine,  who  was  born  in  France  in  1680,  and  they 
were  the  parents  of  children,  among  whom  was  Anthony, 
of  further  mention. 

(III.)  Anthony  Sigourney,  son  of  Andrew  and  Mary 
(Germaine)  Sigourney,  was  born  August  17,  1713.  He 
married  (first),  April  10,  1740,  Mary  Watus,  of  Salem; 
(second)  Elizabeth  Breed.  To  the  first  marriage  was 
born  Mary,  of  further  mention.  Children  of  the  second 
marriage  were:  Anthony,  born  in  1751;  and  Andrew, 
born  in  1752.  These  three  children  of  Anthony  Sigour¬ 
ney,  of  Boston,  were  the  first  of  the  Sigourney  family 
to  return  to  Oxford,  Massachusetts,  Anthony,  Jr.,  buy¬ 
ing  property  there  in  1774,  and  Mr.  Butler  and  his  wife, 
and  Andrew  coming  toward  the  close  of  the  Revolu¬ 
tionary  War. 

(IV.)  Mary  Sigourney,  daughter  of  Anthony  and 
Mary  (Watus)  Sigourney,  was  born  March  23,  1742. 
She  married  James  Butler,  (son  of  James,  (5),  James 
(4),  James  (3),  James  (2),  Stephen  (1),  who  came 
from  England  about  1640).  Their  children  were:  Mary 
B.,  James  D.,  Anthony,  Elizabeth,  Hannah,  John,  Peter, 
of  further  mention;  Sarah,  and  Celia. 

(V.)  Peter  Butler,  son  of  James  and  Mary  (Sigour¬ 
ney)  Butler,  was  born  in  1774.  He  married  (first)  Me- 
hitable  Corbin,  daughter  of  Samuel  and  Lucy  (Larned) 
Corbin,  of  Dudley,  Massachusetts;  (second),  in  1841, 
Widow  Abigail  Davis.  His  children  were:  James,  Sam¬ 
uel  C.,  Lucy,  Mary  S.,  Eliza  L-,  of  further  mention; 
Sarah  M.,  Hannah  H.,  Peter,  of  further  mention;  and 
Charlotte. 

(VI.)  Eliza  L.  Butler,  daughter  of  Peter  and  Me- 
hitable  (Corbin)  Butler,  was  born  August  28,  1810.  She 
married  Wilson  Olney.  (See  Olney  II). 

(VI.)  Peter  Butler,  son  of  Peter  and  Mehitable  (Cor¬ 
bin)  Butler,  was  born  in  1820,  and  became  a  partner  in 
the  hardware  business  of  his  father-in-law,  in  Boston, 
later  he  was  head  of  the  firm  of  Butler  Keith  & 
Company.  He  was  very  prominent  in  Boston,  helped 
to  supplant  English  goods  with  American  products,  and 
aided  in  building  up  Boston’s  foreign  and  domestic  trade. 
He  lived  for  thirty  years  in  the  Quincy  Mansion,  at 
Quincy,  Massachusetts.  After  losing  heavily  in  the 
great  fire  he  retired  from  business.  He  had  a  choice 
library  and  a  rare  collection  of  curios.  He  married, 
September,  1843,  Lucia  Proctor,  daughter  of  Deacon 
John  C.  Proctor,  and  settled  in  Boston,  but  later  re¬ 
moved  to  Quincy.  His  children  were :  Lucia  C.,  Mary 
Sigourney,  of  further  mention;  Isabel,  and  Sigourney, 
who  graduated  from  Harvard  Law  School  in  1879,  and 
was  the  second  Comptroller  of  the  Treasury  under 
President  Cleveland. 

(VII.)  Mary  Sigourney,  daughter  of  Peter  (2)  and 
Lucia  (Proctor)  Butler,  was  born  April  15,  1850.  She 
married  Peter  B.  Olney.  (See  Olney  II). 


GEORGE  HOWARD  HADLEY— In  the  indus¬ 
trial  life  of  Worcester  County,  Massachusetts,  the  name 
of  George  Howard  Hadley  is  one  of  prominence,  his 
activities  as  a  leading  manufacturing  executive  of  Tem¬ 


pleton,  Massachusetts,  doing  much  for  the  prosperity 
and  economic  welfare  of  the  community.  His  experi¬ 
ence  in  many  fields  of  endeavor  has  given  him  a  broad 
outlook  for  the  work  in  which  he  is  now  engaged,  and 
as  a  leading  executive  for  two  important  manufac¬ 
turing  concerns,  Mr.  Hadley  is  taking  a  very  significant 
part  in  present  day  advance  in  this  part  of  Worcester 
County.  He  is  secretary,  treasurer,  and  director  of  the 
F.  W.  Lombard  Company  of  South  Ashburnham,  and  a 
director,  vice-president,  and  secretary  of  the  firm  of 
Hendrickson  &  Company,  Incorporated,  of  East  Temple¬ 
ton,  Massachusetts. 

Mr.  Hadley’s  father  is  Lucien  Norman  Hadley,  who 
is  now  retired  at  the  age  of  seventy-eight  years,  after 
a  long  and  useful  life,  and  who  is  a  Mason,  holding  the 
thirty-second  degree  in  the  Ancient  Accepted  Scottish 
Rite,  and  one  of  the  honored  and  venerable  figures  of 
Templeton,  who  for  sixty  years  has  sung  in  the  Uni¬ 
tarian  church  choir,  and  served  for  twenty-five  years  as 
treasurer  of  the  Unitarian  parish.  The  mother,  Jeanette 
(Bourn)  Hadley,  died  January  15,  1915,  at  the  age  of 
sixty-four  years,  eleven  months.  She  was  the  oldest 
daughter  of  Isaac  Bourn,  who  was  the  founder  of  the 
Bourn  Hadley  Company.  She  was  a  woman  of  strong 
character,  very  charitable,  and  an  active  worker  in  the 
Unitarian  church,  and  was  for  many  years  treasurer  of 
the  Alliance  of  that  church. 

George  Howard  Hadley  was  born  at  Brooks  Village, 
in  the  town  of  Templeton,  Massachusetts,  August  28, 
1879.  His  education  was  begun  at  the  Brooks  Village 
district  school,  and  he  later  attended  the  Templeton 
Center  Grammar  School,  after  which  he  was  a  student 
at  the  Templeton  High  School  and  was  graduated  in 
the  class  of  1896.  Thereafter  entering  Becker’s  Busi¬ 
ness  College  of  Worcester,  Massachusetts,  he  was  grad¬ 
uated  from  that  institution  in  the  class  of  1897  as  book¬ 
keeper  and  accountant,  and  from  the  same  institution  the 
following  year  in  stenography  and  typewriting,  being 
president  of  this  class,  1908.  Mr.  Hadley’s  first  busi¬ 
ness  experience  was  in  the  employ  of  the  Graton  and 
Knight  Manufacturing  Company  of  Worcester,  in  the 
office  of  which  concern  he  was  active  for  about  two 
years  and  two  months.  In  May,  1900,  he  entered  the 
employ  of  the  Eastern  Bridge  and  Structural  Company 
of  Worcester  in  their  offices  on  Front  Street,  but  later 
identified  himself  with  the  factory  as  assistant  super¬ 
intendent.  In  February,  1903,  Mr.  Hadley  formed  a 
partnership  with  Irwin  A.  Drury  formerly  of  Athol, 
Massachusetts,  and  purchased  a  market  and  grocery 
store  at  No.  253  Lincoln  Street,  Worcester.  This  en¬ 
terprise  went  forward  under  the  title  of  Drury  & 
Hadley  for  about  two  years,  after  which  Mr.  Hadley 
sold  his  interest  to  his  partner  and  became  a  stockholder 
in  the  Menthol  Products  Company.  He  was  made 
secretary  of  this  concern  and  was  thus  engaged  for  about 
two  years,  when  he  severed  his  connections  with  the 
interest  and  came  to  Templeton.  Here  he  purchased  an 
interest  in  the  Bourn  Hadley  Company,  of  which  he 
became  secretary  and  a  director.  In  October,  1919,  he 
interested  himself  in  the  manufacture  of  chairs  with  his 
brother,  Herbert  B.  Hadley,  and  purchased  the  F.  W. 
Lombard  Company  of  South  Ashburnham,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  Mr.  Hadley  becoming  secretary,  treasurer,  and 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


175 


director,  which  offices  he  still  ably  fills.  He  has  given 
considerable  personal  attention  to  the  development  and 
growth  of  this  enterprise,  but  recently  added  to  this 
interest  further  activities  in  the  same  general  field.  On 
May  S,  1923,  in  association  with  Emile  Hendrickson, 
Walter  Hendrickson  and  William  E.  Bourn,  Mr.  Had¬ 
ley  organized  Hendrickson  &  Company,  Incorporated, 
East  Templeton,  of  which  he  was  chosen  a  director,  also 
vice-president  and  secretary.  This  organization  manu¬ 
factures  reed  chairs  and  tables,  and  the  promise  of  the 
future  is  very  bright,  Mr.  Hadley’s  chief  interest,  how¬ 
ever,  remaining  with  the  Bourn,  Hadley  Company,  and 
especially  in  that  department  which  is  engaged  in  the 
manufacture  of  post  office  equipment,  bank  and  store 
fixtures ;  their  market  in  this  line  covers  chiefly  all  of  New 
England  and  nearby  States,  but  extends,  in  the  port¬ 
able  post  office  equipment,  into  every  State  in  the  Union. 

These  varied  and  broadly  useful  activities  have  placed 
Mr.  Hadley  among  the  really  noteworthy  citizens  of 
Templeton,  and  he  has  been  active  in  many  branches 
of  civic  and  welfare  advance.  He  has  always  stood 
for  temperance,  which  is  a  strong  trait  in  both  branches 
of  the  family.  He  is  a  trustee  of  the  Templeton  Savings 
Bank,  and  the  Jehu  Richardson  Fund  and  the  Masonic 
Fund,  the  income  of  both  the  latter  being  distributed  for 
charitable  purposes,  the  trustees  being  chosen  by  the 
town  each  year.  Mr.  Hadley  has  served  in  this  con¬ 
nection  for  a  number  of  years.  In  the  spring  of  1923 
he  was  elected  Tax  Collector  of  the  town  of  Templeton. 
In  1918  Mr.  Hadley  took  the  civil  service  examinations 
for  postmaster  of  Templeton  and  was  appointed  to  that 
office,  but  the  duties  connected  with  it  becoming  too 
arduous  with  his  other  activities,  he  resigned  in  1919. 
He  is  trustee  and  secretary  of  the  Templeton  Village 
Improvement  Society,  which  owns  the  Templeton  Inn. 
He  is  affiliated  with  Hope  Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted 
Masons,  of  Gardner,  and  is  a  member  of  the  First 
Parish  Unitarian  Church  of  Templeton,  and  has  been 
president  of  the  Young  People’s  Union,  which  is  con¬ 
nected  with  this  church,  since  the  year  1909.  In  Janu¬ 
ary,  1924,  he  was  elected  director  of  the  new  Gardner- 
Templeton  Street  Railway  Company,  a  corporation 
formed,  which  purchased  the  street  railway  of  the  North¬ 
ern  Massachusetts  Street  Railway  Company  to  operate 
from  Riley’s  Switch  and  Baldwinville,  through  East 
Templeton  to  West  Gardner,  and  South  Gardner,  thence 
to  Greenwood  Associates. 

Mr.  Hadley  is  one  of  seven  children,  his  brothers 
and  sisters  being:  1.  Lizzie  Etta,  a  teacher  in  Norwood, 
Massachusetts.  2.  Arthur  Lucien,  of  Fort  Wayne, 
Indiana,  who  married  Nellie  Richey,  and  they  have  three 
children,  Gladys,  Norman  and  Elizabeth.  3.  Mary 
Ann,  also  a  teacher  in  Norwood.  4.  Lucy  Jeanette,  at 
home  with  her  father.  5.  Herbert  Bourn,  married  Edith 
Beaman  and  they  have  five  children,  Willard,  Violet, 
Robert,  Adelma,  and  Herbert  B.,  Jr.  6.  Walter  Norman, 
a  Harvard  University  and  Law  School  graduate,  mar¬ 
ried  Ann  Harris  Crawford.  In  July,  1923,  this  brother 
became  interested  in  the  F.  W.  Lombard  Company  with 
his  other  brothers. 

George  Howard  Hadley  married,  December  19,  1905, 
at  Worcester,  Massachusetts,  Lydia  Pauline  Carr,  bom 
November  22,  1876,  at  Ellington,  Iowa.  Mrs.  Hadley 


is  a  daughter  of  Lewis  Philip  Carr,  born  in  Meriden, 
New  Hampshire,  in  1847,  and  died  October  7,  1912. 
He  was  master  mechanic  for  the  United  States  Hame 
Company,  Andover,  New  Hampshire.  He  was  a  man 
of  singularly  lovable  disposition,  very  fond  of  children, 
and  deeply  interested  in  educational  advance,  being  a 
trustee  of  Proctor  Academy,  and  a  trustee  of  the  Uni¬ 
tarian  church  at  Andover,  New  Hampshire.  Her 
mother,  Martha  Elizabeth  (Howes)  Carr,  was  born  in 
New  York  State,  in  1847,  and  died  February  24,  1916. 
Mrs.  Hadley  has  two  brothers,  David  Eugene  and  Lewis 
Philip,  and  one  sister,  Frances  Permelia.  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Hadley  have  one  son,  Howard  Carr,  born  October  1, 
1912,  now  (1924)  in  the  sixth  grade  of  the  Temple¬ 
ton  schools. 


LESTER  GILES  TAFT — Among  the  younger  men 
in  the  newspaper  world  of  Worcester  County,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  Lester  Giles  Taft  holds  a  prominent  position 
as  the  publisher  of  the  “Blackstone  Valley  News”  and 
manager  of  the  Uxbridge  Printing  Company,  where 
the  newspaper  is  published.  Mr.  Taft  has  had  wide  ex¬ 
perience  in  some  of  the  leading  newspaper  plants  of  New 
England,  and  with  his  natural  ability  and  deep  interest 
in  his  work  he  is  doing  much  for  the  local  advance 
through  the  columns  of  his  paper. 

Mr.  Taft  comes  of  a  noted  family  of  Worcester 
County,  for  many  years  residents  of  Uxbridge,  and 
his  father,  William  J.  Taft,  is  one  of  the  foremost  men 
of  this  section.  An  attorney  and  counsellor-at-law  by 
profession  and  largely  successful  in  his  chosen  field, 
William  J.  Taft  has  been  identified  with  the  public 
life  of  the  town  of  Uxbridge  for  many  years,  and  was 
long  active  as  a  member  of  the  law  firm  of  Dodge  & 
Taft,  located  in  the  State  Mutual  Building  in  Worcester, 
Massachusetts.  This  partnership  continued  for  a  period 
of  thirty  years,  having  been  formed  in  1890,  and  in  1920 
Mr.  Taft  removed  his  office  to  Uxbridge,  where  has.  has 
so  long  resided,  and  is  now  Town  Solicitor  of  Uxbridge. 
It  is  frequently  said  of  William  J.  Taft  that  he  might 
have  won  greater  honors  in  public  life,  for  he  was 
elected  to  the  Massachusetts  General  Assembly  in  1901 
and  1902,  but  while  his  services  as  a  legislator  were 
above  criticism  and  constructive  in  a  large  degree,  he 
refused  the  re-nomination  which  was  urged  upon  him  and 
practically  retired  from  public  life,  devoting  his  at¬ 
tention  subsequently  to  his  private  practice.  He  is  a 
prominent  member  of  the  Free  and  Accepted  Masons, 
the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  and  the  Ancient 
Order  of  United  Workmen.  The  mother,  Ella  W. 
(Giles)  Taft,  is  also  still  living  and  is  a  leader  in  social 
circles  in  Uxbridge. 

Lester  Giles  Taft  was  bom  in  Uxbridge,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  May  16,  1892.  His  education  was  acquired 
in  the  local  public  schools,  and  following  the  completion 
of  the  grammar  school  course,  and  two  years  in  high 
school,  feeling  no  interest  in  a  professional  life,  he  ap¬ 
prenticed  himself  to  the  printing  trade  in  the  employ 
of  the  old  Transcript  Company  of  Uxbridge.  After 
mastering  the  trade,  Mr.  Taft  identified  himself  with 
newspaper  work,  securing  a  position  on  the  New  Lon¬ 
don  “Telegraph.”  To  gain  breadth  of  experience,  Mr. 
Taft  left  his  first  position  and  subsequently  was  active 


176 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


on  the  Worcester  “Gazette,”  the  Worcester  “Telegram,” 
and  the  Boston  “American.”  He  was  also  the  editor 
and  manager  of  the  “Maine  Woods,”  published  by  the 
J.  W.  Brackett  Company  of  Phillips,  Maine,  for  sev¬ 
eral  months.  To  gain  further  experience  in  the  mechan¬ 
ical  departments  of  the  trade,  Mr.  Taft  then  entered  the 
employ  of  the  Blanchard  Press  of  Worcester,  but  when 
this  plant  was  consolidated  with  the  Commonwealth 
Press  in  1913,  he  went  to  the  D.  H.  Bacon  Company  of 
Derby,  Connecticut,  as  foreman  of  their  printing  plant. 
Later  he  was  active  for  a  time  as  editor  and  manager 
of  the  Thompsonville  (Connecticut)  “Press.”  In  1916 
Mr.  Taft  settled  permanently  in  his  native  town  of 
Uxbridge,  and  with  his  brother,  Carlton  W.  Taft,  who 
died  of  “flu”  in  December,  1918,  organized  the  Ux¬ 
bridge  Printing  Company.  In  1919  he  purchased  the 
Transcript  Company  plant  and  consolidated  it  with  the 
Uxbridge  Printing  Company.  He  has  since  carried 
this  interest  forward  with  marked  success,  and  the 
growth  of  the  business,  together  with  the  constant  ex¬ 
tension  of  the  circulation  of  the  paper,  well  appraise 
the  ability  and  energy  which  he  is  putting  into  his  work 
in  this  connection. 

Mr.  Taft’s  career  has  been  interrupted  only  by  his 
service  during  the  World  War.  He  was  called  out  with 
the  6th  Company,  Coast  Artillery  Corps,  Rhode  Island 
National  Guard,  of  Woonsocket,  Rhode  Island,  on  July 
25,  1917,  and  was  later  transferred  to  the  20th  Com¬ 
pany,  coast  defences  of  Narragansett  Bay,  and  was  sent 
overseas  to  France  with  replacement  troops  as  first  ser¬ 
geant  of  Coast  Artillery  Corps.  During  the  early  part 
of  his  stay  in  France  Mr.  Taft  was  attached  to  the 
Heavy  Artillery  Training  Battalion  at  Angiers,  in  the 
work  of  transporting  replacements,  but  after  the  ar¬ 
mistice  was  transferred  to  the  Anti-Aircraft  Replacement 
Battalion,  being  stationed  at  Fort  De  Staine,  France. 
Upon  his  return  to  the  United  States  he  received  his 
honorable  discharge  at  Camp  Devens,  Massachusetts, 
on  January  28,  1919,  with  the  rank  of  first  sergeant.  Mr. 
Taft  went  into  the  World  War  as  a  trained  soldier, 
having  been  a  member  of  the  Massachusetts  and  Rhode 
Island  National  Guard  for  a  period  of  eight  years. 

Upon  his  return  to  civilian  life,  Mr.  Taft  returned 
to  his  publishing  activities  in  Uxbridge,  and  under  his 
management  the  “Blackstone  Valley  News”  has  taken 
great  strides.  This  paper  is  the  sole  successor  of  the 
former  papers  of  the  town,  the  Uxbridge  “Compendium,” 
the  Uxbridge  and  Whitinsville  “Transcript.”  The 
“Blackstone  Valley  News”  is  now  the  only  newspaper 
published  between  Millbury  and  Woonsocket.  The 
sheet  is  distributed  in  the  towns  of  Uxbridge,  North- 
bridge,  Douglas,  Mendon,  Grafton,  Sutton,  Upton,  Hope- 
dale,  Millville,  and  Blackstone.  Independent  in  its 
political  utterances,  the  editorial  policy  of  the  paper  is 
doing  much  for  all  advance  and  commands  the  respect 
and  admiration  of  all  the  people,  irrespective  of  political 
convictions.  After  the  death  of  his  brother,  Carlton 
Taft,  who  died  while  Lester  G.  Taft  was  in  France,  a 
younger  brother,  William  J.  Taft,  Jr.,  conducted  the 
business  until  the  return  of  his  brother,  who  took  him 
into  the  business  February  1,  1919. 

Fraternally,  Mr.  Taft  is  a  member  of  Manawa  Tribe, 
No.  58,  Improved  Order  of  Red  Men,  of  Uxbridge, 


Massachusetts,  of  which  he  was  first  Chief  of  Records 
and  is  a  Past  Sachem;  Nipmuc  Council,  No.  92,  Degree 
of  Pocahontas;  Friendship  Lodge,  and  Agawam  En¬ 
campment,  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  of 
Thompsonville,  Connecticut ;  Lieutenant  Harold  F.  Flynn 
Post,  Veterans  of  Foreign  Wars  of  the  United  States, 
of  Woonsocket,  Rhode  Island ;  Waucantuck  Lodge, 
Ancient  Order  of  United  Workmen. 

Mr.  Taft  married,  at  New  London,  Connecticut,  Sep¬ 
tember  9,  1913,  Anna  C.  Cooney,  of  Whitinsville,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  daughter  of  John  J.  and  Rachael  Cooney.  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Taft  are  the  parents  of  three  children:  Theo¬ 
dore  Roy,  born  October  1,  1914;  Lester  G.,  Jr.,  born 
September  2,  1916;  Virginia  Madeline,  born  August  1, 
1918.  Mrs.  Taft  is  a  member  of  Nipmuc  Council,  No. 
92,  Degree  of  Pocahontas,  and  is  the  present  Pocahontas ; 
she  is  also  a  member  of  Waucantuck  Lodge,  Ancient 
Order  of  United  Workmen. 


EDWIN  FRANCIS  LILLEY— Few  citizens  of  Mil¬ 
ford,  Massachusetts,  are  more  actively  useful  and  more 
usefully  active  than  Edwin  Francis  Lilley,  whose  mer¬ 
cantile  endeavors  have  contributed  to  the  commercial 
advance  of  the  community,  while  his  public  service  and 
fraternal  activities  place  him  among  the  really  signifi¬ 
cant  men  of  this  part  of  Worcester  County.  An  emi¬ 
nently  practical  man  of  marked  executive  ability,  he  has 
given  to  his  work  for  the  people  the  same  energy  and 
constructive  effort  that  have  placed  him  in  the  front 
rank  of  commercial  progress.  Mr.  Lilley  is  a  son  of 
Thomas  and  Maria  E.  (Hanson)  Lilley,  esteemed  resi¬ 
dents  of  Milford  for  many  years. 

Edwin  Francis  Lilley  was  born  in  Milford,  Massachu¬ 
setts  August  29,  1870.  He  received  his  education  in  the 
elementary  and  grammar  schools  of  this  community,  but 
though  his  privileges  in  this  line  were  limited,  his  ability 
as  a  student  of  men  and  conditions  has  supplemented 
his  formal  knowledge,  and  he  was  won  large  success. 
He  became  identified  with  the  jewelry  business  at  the 
age  of  thirteen  years,  entering  the  employ  of  C.  W.  Wil¬ 
cox,  a  prominent  Milford  jeweler  of  that  day.  Finding 
this  business  congenial  and  feeling  that  his  natural  taste 
for  commercial  affairs  appraised  latent  ability,  the  young 
man  started  in  business  for  himself  in  the  same  field  in 
1893.  The  intervening  period  of  thirty  years  has  meas¬ 
ured  great  advance  in  Mr.  Lilley’s  business,  and  he  is 
now  one  of  the  foremost  men  in  his  field  in  Worcester 
County.  Far  from  confining  his  endeavors  and  activ¬ 
ities  to  his  own  individual  progress,  Mr.  Lilley  has  al¬ 
ways  taken  the  deepest  interest  in  the  public  welfare.  It 
was  not,  however,  until  the  year  1909  that  he  accepted 
public  responsibility,  although  from  his  majority  he  had 
been  a  worker  in  the  ranks  of  the  Republican  party. 
He  served  on  the  Board  of  Selectmen  of  the  town  of 
Milford  for  two  years  (1909-1910),  was  chairman  in 
1910,  and  for  years  was  chairman  of  the  Town  Com¬ 
mittee.  His  record  in  the  duties  which  he  fulfilled  in 
the  local  affairs  of  a  public  nature  was  such  that  he  was 
elected  to  the  Massachusetts  House  of  Representatives, 
taking  up  the  duties  involved  by  this  honor  in  the  year 
19x2,  his  reelection  retaining  him  at  the  Capitol  for  a 
second  term.  His  work  as  a  legislator  was  construc¬ 
tive  and  permanently  useful,  and  included  his  service  on 


178 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


Wilder’s  grandfather,  was  a  prominent  farmer  of  Ster¬ 
ling  in  the  early  days,  and  Frank  L.  Wilder,  his  son, 
and  Mr.  Wilder’s  father,  was  a  leading  citizen  of  Sterling 
throughout  his  lifetime,  being  one  of  the  founders  of 
the  present  firm  of  Wilder,  Walker  &  Davis  Company. 
Frank  L.  Wilder  married  Mary  L.  Bruce,  a  daughter  of 
Mark  Bruce,  and  a  member  of  a  family  founded  in 
Sterling  at  the  time  of  the  earliest  settlement  here. 
Frank  L.  and  Mary  L.  (Bruce)  Wilder  were  the  parents 
of  four  children :  Anna  M.,  born  April  29  i860;  Katy, 
born  September  5,  1862;  Arthur  S.,  of  further  mention; 
and  Emma  A.,  born  November  28,  1865. 

Arthur  S.  Wilder  was  born  in  Sterling,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  March  6,  1864.  His  education  was  begun  in  the 
public  schools  of  his  birthplace.  Later  attending  Leo¬ 
minster  High  School,  he  returned  to  Sterling  upon  the 
completion  of  his  studies  and  engaged  in  farming  on 
the  old  Wilder  homestead.  This  estate  has  been  in  the 
possession  of  the  Wilder  family  since  the  year  1783,  and 
is  one  of  the  fine  old  dignified  farm  homes  of  Wor¬ 
cester  County.  Mr.  Wilder  has  been  successful  in  his 
agricultural  operations,  and  in  connection  with  these  ac¬ 
tivities  he  has  for  some  years  also  been  associated  with 
the  firm  of  Wilder,  Walker  &  Davis  Company,  lumber 
dealers  of  Sterling.  This  concern  buys  standing  timber 
and  disposes  of  fire  wood  and  lumber  entirely  at  whole¬ 
sale.  This  concern,  in  the  establishing  of  which  Frank 
L.  Wilder  bore  a  part,  was  from  the  beginning  officered 
also  by  W.  S.  Walker  and  Jonathan  A.  Davis,  these 
three  progressive  men  having  been  associated  throughout 
their  lifetime.  Arthur  S.  Wilder  has  been  identified 
with  the  public  service  for  twenty-seven  years,  having 
been  elected  to  the  local  school  committee  in  1896,  hav¬ 
ing  served  for  nine  years  with  that  body.  He  also  was 
active  on  the  Board  of  Assessors,  having  served  a  sim¬ 
ilar  period  on  that  board.  In  1922  he  was  elected  to  the 
Board  of  Selectmen,  in  which  connection  he  is  still  en¬ 
gaged.  Fraternally  Mr.  Wilder  is  affiliated  with  Trin¬ 
ity  Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted  Masons,  of  Clinton ;  and 
the  Ancient  Order  of  United  Workmen.  He  attends  the 
Congregational  church. 

Mr.  Wilder  married,  on  August  9,  1898,  Ella  C. 
Abbot,  daughter  of  Harris  and  Caroline  Ann  (Greeley) 
Abbot,  both  of  Wilton,  New  Hampshire.  Mrs.  Wilder 
is  a  granddaughter  of  Ezra  and  Rebecca  (Hale)  Abbot, 
her  grandmother  a  native  of  Coventry,  Connecticut,  and 
a  niece  of  Nathan  Hale,  the  Revolutionary  patriot.  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Wilder  are  the  parents  of  five  children:  Flor¬ 
ence  C.,  born  August  3,  1899,  a  graduate  of  Smith  Col¬ 
lege,  class  of  1922;  Katherine  A.,  born  August  12,  1901, 
a  graduate  of  Smith  College,  class  of  1923;  Frank  Har¬ 
ris,  born  April  26,  1903,  a  junior  at  the  Massachusetts 
State  Agricultural  College;  Edwin  Arthur,  born  March 
13,  1906,  a  graduate  of  Leominster  High  School,  now 
attending  Cushing  Academy;  and  Anna  Hale,  born 
January  14,  1909,  now  a  junior  at  Sterling  High  School. 


OLIVER  MARTIN  WING,  a  leading  figure  in  the 
world  of  finance  in  Bristol  County,  Massachusetts,  is  a 
native  and  practically  lifelong  resident  of  Grafton, 
Massachusetts,  and  has  for  several  years  been  treasurer 
of  the  Grafton  Savings  Bank,  also  of  the  Grafton  Co¬ 
operative  Bank.  Mr.  Wing  is  a  noteworthy  figure  in 


various  branches  of  organized  effort,  chiefly  along  fra¬ 
ternal  lines,  and  is  bearing  a  constructive  part  in  the 
economic  security  and  progress  of  the  day.  He  is  a 
son  of  Hon.  Henry  F.  and  Mary  E.  (Tobey)  Wing,  his 
father  formerly  treasurer  of  the  Grafton  Savings  Bank, 
and  Representative  to  the  State  Legislature. 

Oliver  Martin  Wing  was  born  at  Grafton,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  September  3,  1859.  Attending  the  elementary  and 
grammar  schools  of  his  birthplace,  he  was  graduated 
from  the  local  high  school  in  the  class  of  1877.  Vari¬ 
ously  employed  for  a  time  he  became  identified  with  the 
J.  S.  Nelson  &  Son  Shoe  Company,  of  Grafton,  in  the 
year  1881,  and  for  a  full  quarter  of  a  century  was  active 
with  this  concern.  From  that  time  until  1920,  a  period 
of  thirteen  years,  Mr.  Wing  was  active  with  the  F.  E. 
Powers  Company,  of  Worcester,  Massachusetts,  in  ca¬ 
pacity  of  secretary  of  the  organization.  Since  1920 
Mr.  Wing  has  been  active  in  his  present  office  as  treas¬ 
urer  of  two  of  the  leading  financial  institutions  of 
Grafton,  as  mentioned  above.  His  work  in  this  con¬ 
nection  places  him  in  the  front  rank  of  financial  ad¬ 
vance  in  this  community,  and  his  long  experience  in  the 
business  world  contributes  in  no  slight  degree  to  the 
security  and  prosperity  of  these  institutions.  Frater¬ 
nally  Mr.  Wing  is  a  member  of  Franklin  Blue  Lodge  of 
Grafton,  and  of  both  the  York  and  Scottish  Rites  of 
the  Masonic  order,  including  Eureka  Chapter,  Royal 
Arch  Masons,  of  Millbury,  Massachusetts;  Hiram 
Council,  Royal  and  Select  Masters,  of  Worcester,  and 
Worcester  County  Commandery,  Knights  Templar.  He 
is  a  member  of  the  West  Congregational  Church,  of 
Grafton. 

Oliver  Martin  Wing  married,  at  Grafton,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  September  17,  1885,  Amy  E.  Putnam,  daughter  of 
George  E.  Putnam,  and  they  are  the  parents  of  three 
children:  Alice  Christine,  born  November  10,  1886,  a 
graduate  of  Vassar  College,  class  of  1908,  now  the 
wife  of  S.  Lathrop  Davenport,  their  three  children  being 
Jean  Wing,  Phylis,  and  Fayer,  all  born  in  Danvers, 
Massachusetts;  Nelson,  born  December  12,  1887;  and 
Philip  Henry,  born  December  26,  1896.  Nelson  Wing  is 
a  graduate  of  Worcester  Institute  of  Technology,  class 
of  1909,  and  is  now  active  as  a  civil  engineer  on  the  New 
York  Central  Railroad,  being  detailed  to  Washington, 
District  of  Columbia.  Philip  Henry  Wing  attended 
Massachusetts  Agricultural  College,  enlisted  in  the 
United  States  Navy  during  the  World  War,  and  was 
active  in  convoy  duty  during  that  period. 


LAURENCE  JOHN  DALY— Participating  in  a 
very  definite  and  progressive  way  in  the  activities  of 
his  day,  Laurence  John  Daly,  of  Webster,  Massachusetts, 
is  bringing  to  bear  upon  the  progress  of  his  residence 
community  strong  influence  in  the  right  direction.  As 
editor  of  the  “Webster  Evening  Times,”  his  survey  of 
of  passing  events  reveals  the  thoughtful  and  forward- 
looking  attitude  of  the  man  whose  energies  are  conse¬ 
crated  to  the  well  being  of  the  people.  Mr.  Daly  is  a 
son  of  John  and  Hannah  (Harney)  Daly,  his  father  a 
machinist  throughout  his  lifetime,  and  a  man  of  the 
highest  integrity. 

Laurence  John  Daly  was  born  in  Sturbridge,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  April  20  1885.  Receiving  his  early  education 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


179 


in  the  public  schools  of  his  birthplace,  he  later  attended 
Hitchcock  Academy  at  Brimfield,  Massachusetts.  En¬ 
tering  the  newspaper  world  as  a  young  man,  Mr.  Daly 
was  first  affiliated  with  the  “Worcester  Telegram”  in 
the  capacity  of  reporter,  and  remained  with  that  sheet 
until  accepting  the  editorial  chair  of  the  “Webster 
Evening  Times”  in  the  year  1917.  Giving  to  the  ad¬ 
vance  of  this  newspaper  the  constructive  endeavor  of 
the  natural  executive,  and  bringing  to  bear  upon  its  im¬ 
provement  the  experience  gained  in  his  work  as  a  re¬ 
porter,  Mr.  Daly  has  greatly  increased  the  circulation 
of  the  “Times”  through  his  editorial  policy,  and  it  is 
now  considered  one  of  the  outstanding  dailies  of  Central 
Massachusetts.  He  gives  his  editorial  sanction  to  every 
local  movement  which  promises  to  benefit  the  people, 
and  is  considered  one  of  the  thoroughly  noteworthy  men 
of  the  day  in  journalistic  affairs  in  this  State.  Fra¬ 
ternally  he  is  affiliated  with  the  Knights  of  Columbus 
of  Webster,  and  attends  Saint  Louis’  Catholic  Church. 

Laurence  John  Daly  married,  in  Warren,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  October  9,  1903,  Josie  Sullivan,  daughter  of  Pat¬ 
rick  and  Elizabeth  (Welch)  Sullivan,  and  they  are  the 
parents  of  two  children :  Mary  Elizabeth,  born  March 
8,  1905;  and  Laurence  John,  Jr.,  born  November  18, 
1918.  The  Daly  residence  is  at  No.  14  Whitcomb  Street, 
Webster. 


FREDERICK  WILLARD  BATEMAN,  a  distin¬ 
guished  figure  in  Worcester  County,  Massachusetts, 
whose  natural  ability  was  supplemented  by  a  comprehen¬ 
sive  educational  preparation  for  his  life  work,  and  whose 
part  in  the  engineering  world  has  been  one  of  impor¬ 
tance,  is  still  broadly  active  in  his  chosen  profession, 
and  his  record  of  public  usefulness  links  his  name  with 
some  of  the  most  honored  positions  of  the  Common¬ 
wealth.  Well  known  in  fraternal  and  social  circles,  he 
is  highly  esteemed  by  all  with  whom  he  comes  in  con¬ 
tact.  Mr.  Bateman  is  a  son  of  William  Frederick  and 
Louisa  Harrod  (Willard)  Bateman,  his  father  active 
for  many  years  as  railroad  station  agent,  also  as  Post¬ 
master  of  Still  River,  Massachusetts. 

Frederick  Willard  Bateman  was  born  in  Harvard, 
Massachusetts,  December  17,  1852.  His  education  was 
begun  in  the  local  common  schools ;  later  he  attended 
Lancaster  Academy,  then  entered  Worcester  Polytech¬ 
nic  Institute,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in  the  class 
of  1871.  The  extensive  railway  construction  activities 
at  that  period  in  process  of  development  in  New  Eng¬ 
land  engaged  Mr.  Bateman’s  attention  for  a  considerable 
time,  and  through  the  succeeding  years  of  his  career  he 
became  broadly  interested  in  hydraulic,  municipal,  and 
general  engineering  practice  throughout  this  general 
section.  Mr.  Bateman’s  activities,  however,  were  not 
limited  even  to  the  New  England  States,  but  reached 
throughout  New  York,  Ohio,  and  various  Middle  States, 
many  commissions  of  an  exacting  and  important  nature 
having  been  placed  in  his  hands.  He  has  risen  to  a 
position  of  large  prominence  in  the  engineering  world  of 
to-day.  He  was  for  several  years  consulting  engineer  for 
one  of  the  leading  railroad  corporations  of  New  England, 
and  is  now  a  partner  in  the  firm  of  Parker,  Bateman  & 
Chase,  civil  engineers,  with  offices  at  Clinton  and  Fitch¬ 
burg,  Massachusetts.  Mr.  Bateman  is  further  affiliated 
as  a  director  with  the  Chaffee  Brothers  Company  of 


Oxford,  Massachusetts,  and  these  various  responsibil¬ 
ities  give  his  name  broad  significance. 

A  Republican  by  political  convictions,  and  always  loyal 
to  the  interests  of  the  party,  Mr.  Bateman  has  served 
in  local  public  offices  of  greater  or  less  importance  for 
many  years.  First  elected  public  library  trustee  of  the 
town  of  Harvard,  his  residence  community,  Mr.  Bate¬ 
man  has  also  served  as  cemetery  trustee,  as  trustee  of  the 
Warner  Lecture  Fund,  and  as  a  member  of  the  Board 
of  Health.  His  eminent  usefulness  in  these  connec¬ 
tions,  and  his  progressive  spirit  towards  all  advance, 
led  to  his  election  as  Representative  of  the  town  of  Har¬ 
vard  in  the  Massachusetts  State  Legislature,  and  in 
the  deliberations  of  that  body  he  participated  to  his  own 
credit,  his  work  also  reflecting  honor  upon  his  constit¬ 
uency.  It  is  all  to  little  to  say  in  appreciation  of  Mr. 
Bateman’s  career  that  he  is  one  of  the  foremost  citizens 
of  Harvard,  and  holds  a  distinguished  rank  in  his  native 
State.  Fraternally  he  is  identified  with  the  Boston 
Society  of  Civil  Engineers;  American  Society  for  Test¬ 
ing  Materials;  New  England  Water  Works  Association; 
also  the  Massachusetts  Forestry  Association ;  and  his 
clubs  are  the  Prescott  of  Clinton,  and  the  Massachusetts 
Republican. 


HOWARD  H.  CHASE,  of  Leominster,  of  the  ancient 
Chase  family  founded  in  early  Colonial  days  by  Aquilla 
and  William  Chase,  is  of  the  New  Hampshire  branch, 
a  son  of  William  Howard  Chase,  born  in  North  Weare, 
New  Hampshire,  March  18,  1857.  He  was  a  resident  of 
Weare  until  1882,  having  been  in  the  insurance  business 
and  an  overseer  in  the  weaving  department  of  the  Smith- 
Converse  Woolen  Mills.  He  moved  to  Leominster  in 
1882  and  became  overseer  in  the  E.  M:.  Rockwell  mills, 
a  position  he  held  for  years.  He  then,  in  association 
with  William  Rodgers,  founded  the  Leominster  Worsted 
Company,  of  which  he  was  treasurer  until  his  death, 
January  4,  1918.  Mr.  Chase  was  also  a  director  of  the 
Leominster  National  Bank  and  a  trustee  of  Leominster 
Savings  Bank.  He  was  an  able  man  of  affairs,  a  master 
of  the  manufacturing  of  worsted  and  a  wise  financier. 
A  Republican  in  politics,  he  served  Leominster  long  and 
well.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Sinking  Fund  Com¬ 
mission  for  sixteen  years ;  member  of  the  Board  of 
Water  Commissioners  twenty-five  years,  and  twenty- 
three  of  those  years  was  chairman.  Under  his  direction 
the  Fall  Brook  and  Morse  reservoirs  were  built  and 
other  vital  improvements  made.  In  1916  Mr.  Chase  re¬ 
signed  the  place  he  had  held  so  long.  He  was  a  mem¬ 
ber  of  the  Masonic  order;  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd 
Fellows ;  the  Worcester  Continentals ;  was  an  ardent 
sportsman,  having  hunted  big  game  in  the  Rocky  Moun¬ 
tains  ;  was  a  member  of  the  Camp  Fire  Club  of  America ; 
Home  Market  Club;  the  Republican  Club;  Country 
Club  and  Sportsman’s  Association ;  and  Leominster 
Chamber  of  Commerce.  In  religious  faith  he  was  a 
Unitarian,  and  when  the  church  of  that  faith  was 
erected  he  served  as  chairman  of  the  building  commit¬ 
tee.  He  was  an  ardent  champion  of  the  road  committee 
of  the  Massachusetts  Automobile  Association.  He  was 
one  of  the  pioneer  automobile  owners  of  the  Leomin¬ 
ster  section,  and  greatly  enjoyed  his  tours.  He  was 
widely  known  and  esteemed  both  as  a  business  man  and 
citizen,  his  genial,  kindly  nature  making  him  a  welcome 


i8o 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


addition  to  any  group.  He  was  held  in  high  regard  in 
the  textile  industry,  and  the  Leominster  Worsted  Mills 
grew  prosperous  and  greatly  expanded  during  his  tenure 
of  office  as  treasurer. 

William  Howard  Chase  married  Ann  S.  Harwood, 
born  in  Harvard,  Massachusetts,  died  in  Leominster  in 
1903,  and  they  were  the  parents  of  Howard  H.  Chase 
of  this  review. 

Howard  H.  Chase,  son  of  William  Howard  and  Ann 
S.  (Harwood)  Chase,  was  born  in  Leominster,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  December  18,  1889.  He  was  educated  in  Leomin¬ 
ster  public  schools,  passing  from  high  school  to  Worces¬ 
ter  Technical  Institute,  whence  he  was  graduated  B.  S., 
class  of  1913.  From  the  schoolroom  he  went  to  the 
Leominster  Worsted  Mills,  and  there  was  privileged  to 
have  four  years  business  association  with  his  father. 
Upon  the  death  of  William  H.  Chase,  in  1918,  Howard 
H.  Chase  was  elected  president  of  the  Leominster  Wor¬ 
sted  Company,  founded  by  his  father,  and  now  for  five 
years  under  the  executive  management  of  the  son.  The 
mills  of  the  company  are  the  largest  woolen  mills  in 
Leominster,  and  the  product  is  widely  distributed. 

Howard  H.  Chase  has  been  and  is  very  much  inter¬ 
ested  in  the  new  Leominster  Hospital,  is  on  the  finance 
committee,  and  active  in  the  work.  He  is  a  director  of 
the  Leominster  National  Bank;  director  and  vice-presi¬ 
dent  of  the  Leominster  Cooperative  Bank;  a  member  of 
the  Leominster  Chamber  of  Commerce;  Monoosnock 
Country  Club,  Bass  Point  Club,  and  the  Masonic  Club. 
His  fraternity  is  Sigma  Alpha  Epsilon,  and  he  holds 
membership  in  the  Masonic  order.  He  is  a  Unitarian 
in  religion,  and  is  a  member  of  the  parish  committee, 
chosen  as  chairman  in  1922.  He  '  finds  recreation  in 
hunting  and  fishing. 

On  September  16,  1916,  Howard  H.  Chase  married 
Ruth  M.  Tisdale,  born  in  Leominster,  daughter  of  Albert 
A.  and  Florence  E.  (Tenny)  Tisdale.  Mrs.  Chase  be¬ 
longs  to  the  Fortnightly  Club  and  the  Musicale  Club, 
being  interested  in  both. 


ALFRED  NEWTON  LITCH,  for  more  than  thirty 
years  has  been  identified  with  the  Leominster  Worsted 
Company,  of  which  he  is  now  treasurer.  Before  com¬ 
ing  to  Leominster  Mr.  Litch  had  gained  valuable  ex¬ 
perience  in  two  lines  of  activity  and  is  well  known  in 
Worcester  County  as  an  able  and  successful  business  man 
and  a  public-spirited  progressive  citizen.  While  he  now  re¬ 
views  a  career  of  business  achievement  most  creditable 
to  him,  he  reached  that  position  through  hard  work  and 
close  application  to  the  business  he  had  chosen  as  his 
life  work.  He  began  his  connection  with  the  Leomin¬ 
ster  Worsted  Company  on  a  borrowed  capital,  and  the 
success  that  has  come  to  him  has  been  fully  earned.  In 
the  best  sense  of  the  term  he  is  a  self-made  man.  His 
business  career  began  at  the  age  of  nineteen  and  now, 
at  sixty-four,  he  is  enjoying  the  fruits  of  those  early 
years  of  devotion  to  the  responsibilities  he  had  assumed 
as  a  manufacturer  and  financier. 

Mr.  Litch  inherited  a  keen  business  instinct  and  a  natural 
inclination  for  trade  through  his  father,  Aaron  Kimball 
Litch,  a  successful  hardware  merchant  of  Fitchburg, 
Massachusetts,  the  city  of  his  birth.  Aaron  K.  Litch 
was  one  of  the  original  members  of  the  Fitchburg  Band, 
a  well-known  musical  organization,  of  which  he  was  for 


many  years  leader  and  treasurer.  He  was  also  a  mem¬ 
ber  of  Green’s  Orchestra,  a  leading  organization  of  its 
kind  in  that  section  of  the  State.  He  married  Abby 
Newton,  born  in  Templeton,  Massachusetts,  who  died  at 
the  age  of  seventy-eight  years.  Aaron  K.  Litch  died 
in  Worcester,  Massachusetts,  October  27,  1892,  having 
retired  from  active  business  several  years  prior  to  his 
death. 

Alfred  Newton  Litch,  son  of  Aaron  Kimball  and 
Abby  (Newton)  Litch,  was  born  in  Fitchburg,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  December  4,  1858,  and  after  receiving  a  prac¬ 
tical  education  in  the  public  schools  of  his  native  city, 
found  his  first  employment  in  the  office  of  Parks  &  Car¬ 
penter,  steamfitters.  He  remained  with  that  firm  for 
three  years  and  subsequently  entered  the  employ  of 
James  Phillips,  Jr.,  in  what  is  now  known  as  the  Arden 
Mills,  which  connection  he  maintained  for  a  period  of 
ten  years.  During  the  period  prior  to  going  with  Mr. 
Phillips,  he  was  employed  by  J.  B.  Fransworth,  in  Leo¬ 
minster,  and  spent  two  years  in  New  York  City.  In 
1883  he  removed  to  Leominster,  Worcester  County,  per¬ 
manently,  and  in  1891  became  associated  with  the  Leo¬ 
minster  Worsted  Company,  in  the  capacity  of  secretary 
and  assistant  treasurer.  During  the  thirty-two  years 
which  have  passed  since  that  time,  he  has  continued  his 
official  connection  with  that  company,  being  now  its 
honored  treasurer,  having  been  elected  to  that  office  in 
1918.  He  is  a  man  of  sound  business  principles  and  has 
been  an  important  factor  in  the  upbuilding  and  pros¬ 
perity  of  the  corporation,  whose  financial  destinies  he 
guides.  In  addition  to  his  connection  with  the  Leo¬ 
minster  Worsted  Company,  Mr.  Litch  is  president  of  the 
Merchants’  National  Bank  of  Leominster;  president 
of  the  Leominster  Cooperative  Bank,  and  a  member  of 
the  board  of  trustees  of  the  Leominster  Savings  Bank. 
He  is  a  member  of  the  Leominster  Chamber  of  Com¬ 
merce,  and  is  actively  interested  in  the  advancement  of 
the  public  welfare  of  Leominster.  He  was  one  of  the 
men  of  that  community  that  combined  in  an  effort  to 
raise  the  necessary  funds  to  build  and  equip  a  new  Leo¬ 
minster  Hospital  and  now  is  serving  that  institution  as 
a  member  of  its  board  of  trustees. 

Mr.  Litch  holds  fraternal  relations  with  Leominster 
Lodge,  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks,  and  in 
social  membership  is  connected  with  the  Leominster  and 
the  Monoosnock  Country  clubs  of  Leominster,  and  the 
Fay  Club  of  Fitchburg.  His  religious  connection  is  with 
the  Unitarian  society.  He  enjoys  travel,  in  fact  that  is 
his  favorite  recreation. 

Mr.  Litch  married  (first),  on  October  27,  1885, 
Mary  Adams  Porter,  of  Leominster,  Massachusetts, 
who  died  September  26,  1893.  Mr.  Litch  married 
(second),  May  19,  1909,  Alice  Coles  Robbins,  who  was 
born  in  Boston,  Massachusetts,  daughter  of  Calvin  and 
Julia  (Coles)  Robbins. 


HAMILTON  MAYO— With  the  passing  of  Ham¬ 
ilton  Mayo,  on  January  26,  1924,  Leominster,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  suffered  a  loss  that  from  the  viewpoint  of  the  en¬ 
tire  citizenry  of  the  section  was  incalculable,  inasmuch 
as  Mr.  Mayo  bore  the  title  of  leading  citizen,  that  in¬ 
cluded  the  exemplary  civic  virtues  of  right  living  and  of 
noble  dealing.  Standing  unequivocally  for  the  highest 
ideals  in  the  community,  he  was  a  man  who  weighed 


. 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


181 


matters  carefully,  judged  impartially,  and  administered 
honorably.  Half  a  century  ago  he  was  admitted  to 
practice  at  the  bar,  and  continued  in  his  profession  up 
to  the  time  of  his  last  illness.  He  was  widely  read  in 
the  law,  and  his  advice  was  repeatedly  sought  in  intri¬ 
cate  legal  matters;  he  was  honored  with  office  in  civic 
institutions  of  both  State  and  town,  and  in  his  turn 
honoring  such  institutions  with  his  membership  and 
presence;  he  was  likewise,  an  official  in  all  organizations 
established  for  the  progress  and  general  usefulness  of 
the  town;  was  a  liberal,  though  unostentatious  dispenser 
of  charity;  and  at  his  passing  Leominster  could  truly 
say :  “A  great  man  among  us  is  fallen  to-day.” 

Mr.  Mayo  was  born  at  the  family  homestead  at  West¬ 
minster,  Massachusetts,  February  26,  1851,  son  of 

William  and  Mary  Mayo,  neither  of  whom  survives. 
There  he  attended  the  public  schools  and  prepared  him¬ 
self  for  his  life  work,  and  was  graduated  from  Meriden 
Academy  in  1869;  from  Dartmouth  College  in  1873; 
and  from  the  Albany  Law  School  in  1874.  In  1874  he 
was  admitted  to  the  bar,  and  in  February  of  1875, 
opened  an  office  in  Leominster.  In  1883  he  was  ap¬ 
pointed  trial  justice,  holding  that  office  four  years.  Up 
to  the  year  1917  he  was  president  of  the  Leominster 
National  Bank,  resigning  then,  and  being  succeeded  by 
Fred  A.  Young.  Mr.  Mayo  continued  as  a  director,  and 
was  also  actively  interested  in  the  Leominster  Savings 
Bank,  as  a  member  of  the  corporation  and  board  of  in¬ 
vestment  and  trustees.  He  served  Leominster  in  the 
State  Legislature  in  1904-1905,  and  as  Town  Auditor 
and  chairman  of  the  School  Board,  and  had  been  a 
trustee  of  the  public  library  since  1907,  besides  filling 
minor  offices  from  time  to  time.  He  was  elected  to  the 
City  Council  when  Leominster  became  a  city,  and  was 
subsequently  president  of  the  Council.  He  was  the 
first  president  of  the  Leominster  Home  for  Old  Ladies, 
and  was  prominent  in  the  Leominster  Historical  Society. 
His  fraternal  affiliations  were  with  Leominster  Lodge, 
Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  since  1876;  and  his 
clubs  were  the  Leominster  and  the  Monoosnock  Country 
Club.  He  was  one  of  the  most  active  and  valued  mem¬ 
bers  of  the  Unitarian  church. 

He  is  survived  by  his  wife,  Laura  S.  Mayo,  a  daugh¬ 
ter,  Esther  W.,  wife  of  Dr.  Willard  H.  Foss;  a  son, 
Councillor  Winthrop  M.  Mayo;  and  a  sister,  Mrs.  Emma 
F.  Creed,  of  Gardner,  Massachusetts. 


FRANK  E.  KINSMAN  passed  away  at  his  home  in 
Leominster,  Massachusetts,  on  February  5,  1924,  a  prom¬ 
inent  townsman  of  that  community  retiring  from  life’s 
action;  and  all  who  know  aught  of  the  wonderful  story 
of  the  beginnings  and  the  development  of  the  telephone, 
were  aware  of  the  fact  that  a  pioneer  inventor  in  that 
sphere  of  world-wide  usefulness  had  died.  Few  men 
living  in  our  day,  either  in  this  country  or  elsewhere, 
had  been  more  closely  identified  with  the  various  tele¬ 
phone  interests,  nor  more  vitally  related  to  the  origin 
and  the  simple  equipment  of  the  childhood  day  of  the 
great  invention.  An  inventor  of  note,  he  was  chief 
among  those  who  worked  to  introduce  the  earlier  mech¬ 
anisms  and  methods  that  helped  to  establish  the  busi¬ 
ness  of  the  telephone.  His  life  was  signalized  through¬ 
out  by  kindred  discoveries,  and  it  is  recorded  that  he 


had  received  some  fifty  patents  for  his  inventions.  Be¬ 
sides  his  telephone  patents  he  patented  the  devices  for 
automatically  controlling  the  motive  power  and  the 
airbrakes  of  railroad  trains ;  and  later  he  put  them  in 
operation  in  the  express  services  of  the  New  York 
City  subway  and  the  Boston  Elevated  Railroad.  Mr. 
Kinsman  was  a  pioneer  in  these  matters;  a  member  of 
leading  engineering  associations;  and  in  his  home  city 
prominent  in  many  lines  for  his  efforts  for  the  public 
good  and  general  progress.  He  was  a  son  of  Cyrus  and 
Helen  Dorothy  (Allen)  Kinsman,  both  lifelong  resi¬ 
dents  of  Leominster. 

Frank  E.  Kinsman  was  born  in  Leominster,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  August  14,  1852,  and  received  his  education  in 
the  public  schools  of  this  city.  Throughout  his  life  he 
gave  his  complete  attention  to  the  discovery  and  applica¬ 
tion  of  inventions  that  have  proven  of  unbounded  sig¬ 
nificance  to  the  advance  of  civilization.  Besides  his 
many  other  activities  in  the  telephone  world,  he  was  the 
first  to  design  and  work  out  the  central  office  system, 
and  to  build  a  central  office  telephone  line,  this  taking 
place  early  in  the  summer  of  1876.  In  1877  he  estab¬ 
lished  the  telephone  central  office  business  in  Chicago, 
and  in  less  than  a  year  after  he  went  there,  invented  the 
multiple  telephone  switchboard,  which  has  become  the 
vitally  important  element  in  the  telephone  central  office 
system  of  to-day.  During  the  years  1879-1880,  he  was 
the  first  superintendent  of  repairs  and  attachments  of 
the  New  York  Telephone  Company,  from  which  posi¬ 
tion  he  resigned  to  form  the  firm  of  Kinsman  &  Toby, 
of  which  he  was  president  until  1890,  during  which 
time  the  low  tension  circuit  arc  lamp  and  many  other 
electrical  improvements  were  introduced  under  his  di¬ 
rection.  From  that  time  onwards  he  was  consulting 
engineer  for  several  large  electrical  and  business  estab¬ 
lishments,  and  in  1907  became  president  of  the  Kinsman 
Block  System  Company,  which  owns  his  automatic 
control  patents  referred  to. 

When  Leominster  was  a  town,  Mr.  Kinsman  was  a 
member  of  the  Board  of  Selectmen;  a  member  of  the 
Planning  Board,  and  served  as  Superintendent  of  Streets. 
He  had  been  Councillor  from  Ward  One  for  several  years. 
In  his  fraternal  affiliations  he  was  a  member  of  the  Free 
and  Accepted  Masons;  of  the  Knights  Templar;  and  he 
was  a  Noble  of  Mecca  Temple,  Ancient  Arabic  Order 
Nobles  of  the  Mystic  Shrine.  He  was  a  member  of  the 
American  Society  of  Electrical  Engineers;  the  Telephone 
Pioneers  of  America;  the  American  Signal  Association; 
and  of  the  Merchants’  Association  of  the  city  of  New 
York,  in  which  he  served  on  various  important  com¬ 
mittees.  He  is  survived  by  his  wife  and  three  children : 
Cyrus  Kinsman,  of  Detroit,  Michigan;  Annie  and  Grace 
K insman,  of  Leominster ;  and  by  a  brother,  Arthur  Kins¬ 
man,  of  Baltimore,  Maryland. 


HARRY  WILLIAMS  GODDARD,  president  of 
the  Spencer  Wire  Company  of  Worcester,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  was  bom  at  Holyoke,  September  14,  1863,  son 
of  Dorrance  Sibley  and  Mary  Howe  (Williams)  God¬ 
dard.  He  attended  the  public  schools  of  Worcester. 
After  two  years  in  the  high  school  he  left  to  work  in  the 
wire  mills  of  the  Washburn  &  Moen  Manufacturing 
Company  at  Quinsigamond,  beginning  as  a  scale  boy. 


1 82 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


weighing  wire.  Afier  two  years,  however,  he  returned 
jo  school  and  spent  a  year  in  Wilbraham  Academy.  At 
the  age  of  seventeen  he  started  in  the  wire  business 
again,  literally  at  the  foot  of  the  ladder,  in  the  employ 
of  the  Spencer  Wire  Company,  then  located  in  Spencer, 
doing  all  kinds  of  work  and  mastering  every  detail  step 
by  step,  and  when  he  came  of  age  he  was  made  super¬ 
intendent  of  the  mill,  succeeding  the  president  of  the 
company,  Mr.  Sugden,  who  had  previously  been  his  own 
superintendent.  At  that  time  the  Spencer  Wire  Com¬ 
pany  was  an  old  and  somewhat  conservative  concern, 
growing  from  small  beginning  to  a  place  of  importance, 
employing  seventy-five  hands.  Mr.  Goddard  was  also 
secretary  of  the  corporation.  After  the  death  of  Mr. 
Sugden,  in  1895,  Hr.  Goddard  bought  of  his  heirs  his 
interests  in  the  company,  and  obtained  a  controlling 
interest,  continuing  as  principal  owner  to  the  present 
time,  and  as  president  and  general  manager  of  the  com¬ 
pany.  in  1900  a  big  step  forward  was  made  by  erecting 
a  new  and  model  plant  in  Worcester  at  the  corner  of 
Webster  and  Jacques  streets.  The  general  offices  were 
moved  to  the  new  location  and  the  business  rapidly 
extended.  The  company  manufactures  all  kinds  of 
uncovered  steel  and  iron  wire  and  employs  at  present 
(1917)  about  eight  hundred  hands.  Mr.  Goddard  is 
treasurer  of  the  Hobbs  Manufacturing  Company.  For 
ten  years  he  was  president  of  the  Springfield  Drop 
Forging  Company,  and  is  now  president  of  the  Mills 
Woven  Cartridge  Belt  Company  of  Worcester. 

In  1903  he  was  elected  president  of  the  Board  of 
Trade  (now  the  Chamber  of  Commerce)  of  Worcester 
ar.d  reelected  the  following  year.  Under  his  admin¬ 
istration,  the  activities  of  the  board  were  extended  in  ail 
directions,  and  its  usefulness  greatly  increased.  When 
President  Taft,  then  Secretary  of  War,  came  to  Wor¬ 
cester  in  1905  to  speak  at  the  annual  banquet  of  the 
Board  of  Trade,  Mr.  Goddard  had  the  pleasant  duty  of 
entertaining  him  at  his  beautiful  residence  on  Salisbury 
Street.  In  politics  Mr.  Goddard  is  a  Republican,  and 
he  has  always  taken  an  active  part  in  public  affairs, 
serving  as  delegate  to  the  various  nominating  conven¬ 
tions.  He  is  a  director  of  the  Mechanics’  National 
Bank  and  trustee  of  the  People’s  Savings  Bank ;  mem¬ 
ber  of  the  Maine  Coast  Club,  the  Quinsigamond  Boat 
Club,  the  Commonwealth  Club,  the  Tatnuck  Country 
Club,  and  the  Worcester  Country  Club. 

In  a  sense  Mr.  Goddard  is  one  of  the  self-made  man¬ 
ufacturers  of  the  city.  Beginning  as  a  laborer  himself, 
he  has  possessed  the  proper  point  of  view  in  considering 
the  needs  and  ambitions  of  those  in  his  employ.  He 
made  a  small  plant  a  great  industry  by  his  force  of  char¬ 
acter,  insight,  and  energy.  Inheriting  a  taste  and  apti¬ 
tude  for  his  business,  he  has  made  the  most  of  his 
opportunities,  and  by  his  success  has  helped  materially 
in  the  growth  of  the  city.  His  place  among  the  leading 
manufacturers  of  the  city  has  been  fairly  won  by  force 
of  ability,  character,  and  tireless  energy. 

Mr.  Goddard  married,  December  14,  1887,  Grace  Wat¬ 
son,  daughter  of  George  and  Eleanor  Watson,  of  Spen¬ 
cer.  Their  children  are:  Eleanor  Grace,  bom  March 
25,  i88g;  and  Marion  Williams,  born  August  29,  1893. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Goddard  made  known  their  intention 
to  erect  a  home  for  the  corporation  known  as  the  Home 
for  Aged  Men,  in  Worcester,  in  memory  of  Mr.  God¬ 


dard’s  father  and  mother,  at  the  meeting  of  the  trustees, 
April  s,  1917.  The  new  fireproof  structure  was  to  cost 
$75,000  or  more,  and  to  be  a  model  of  its  kind,  extend¬ 
ing  greatly  the  usefulness  of  the  institution.  It  was  to 
be  erected  on  the  old  site  of  the  institution,  at  No.  1199 
Main  Street,  the  old  building  to  be  taken  down.  A 
building  committee,  consisting  of  Mr.  Goddard,  Francis 
H.  Dewey,  and  Franklin  B.  Durfee,  was  appointed  at 
the  time. 


WALTER  REEVES  DAME — Immediately  after  the 
incorporation  of  Clinton,  Worcester,  Massachusetts, 
John  Thompson  Dame,  father  of  Walter  Reeves  Dame, 
began  the  practice  of  law  there,  being  the  pioneer  law¬ 
yer  of  the  town.  He  was  a  son  of  Dr.  John  Dame,  an 
eminent  physician  of  Lyme,  New  Hampshire,  and  a 
State  Senator.  Dr.  John  Dame  married  Abigail  Thomp¬ 
son,  and  their  only  child  was  John  Thompson  Dame. 

Walter  R.  Dame,  of  this  review,  was  of  the  eighth 
American  generation  of  the  family  founded  in  New 
England  by  John  Dame,  bom  in  England  about  1610, 
who  came  to  New  England  about  1633,  settled  at 
Dover,  New  Hampshire.  John  Dame  was  a  deacon  of 
the  first  parish  church  at  Dover  in  1675,  and  had  his 
first  grant  of  land  at  Dam  Point.  He  and  Nicholas 
Dame  were  signers  of  a  petition  to  the  Governor  of 
New  Hampshire  in  1689.  He  married  Elizabeth  Pom- 
fret,  daughter  of  William  Pomfret,  and  they  were  the 
parents  of  six  children.  From  John  and  Elizabeth 
(Pomfret)  Dame  the  line  of  descent  is  traced  through 
the  generations  as  follows : 

(II.)  William  Dame,  born  in  Dover,  New  Hampshire, 
October  14,  1652;  and  his  wife,  Martha  Pomfret;  six 
children. 

(III.)  William  (2)  Dame,  born  in  Dover,  New 
Hampshire,  November  14,  1686,  and  his  wife,  Sarah 
Kimmin ;  four  children. 

(IV.)  William  (3)  Dame,  born  February  20,  1710. 

(V.)  Theodore  Dame,  born  about  1740,  and  his  wife, 
Martha.  Theodore  Dame  was  a  soldier  of  the  Revolu¬ 
tion  and  settled  in  Oxford,  New  Hampshire,  and  was  a 
man  of  prominence.  He  was  a  lieutenant  under  Arnold 
in  his  attack  on  Quebec. 

(VI.)  Dr.  John  Dame,  born  June  7,  1773,  a  noted 
physician  of  his  day,  and  his  wife,  Abigail  Thompson. 

(VII.)  John  Thompson  Dame,  born  in  Oxford,  New 
Hampshire,  October  21,  1816,  and  his  wife,  Eliza  Elmira 
Reeves. 

(VIII.)  Walter  Reeves  Dame,  of  further  mention. 

John  Thompson  Dame,  of  previous  mention,  was  early 
orphaned,  and  was  reared  in  the  home  of  a  cousin,  whom 
he  always  remembered  with  love  and  gratitude.  He 
was  graduated  from  Dartmouth  College  in  1840  with 
Phi  Beta  Kappa  honors,  and  later  prepared  for  the 
profession  of  law  under  private  preceptors  and  at  Har¬ 
vard  Law  School.  He  was  admitted  to  the  bar  in  1843 
and  began  private  practice  in  Marlboro,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  going  thence  in  1844,  to  Lancaster.  He  remained 
in  practice  in  Lancaster  for  five  years,  serving  the  last 
two  years  as  Police  Magistrate.  On  April  1,  1850,  he 
moved  to  Clinton,  Massachusetts,  then  newly  incorpor¬ 
ated,  and  the  same  year  was  appointed  Police  Magis¬ 
trate.  He  held  that  office  until  1858,  when  he  ex¬ 
changed  it  for  the  office  of  Police  Justice,  an  office  he 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


held  until  1863.  The  resolutions  adopted  by  the  bar  as¬ 
sociation  at  the  time  of  his  death,  are: 

As  a  magistrate  and  practitioner,  he  brought  to  the 
discharge  of  all  his  duties,  an  intelligent  and  compre¬ 
hensive  knowledge  of  the  law,  a  well-trained,  vigor¬ 
ous  mind,  habits  of  untiring  industry,  and  a  strong 
love  of  justice  which  always  distinguishes  the  impar¬ 
tial  judge  and  the  successful,  upright  lawyer.  He  had 
a  keen  sense  of  the  obligations  of  his  profession  to 
the  community,  and  he  used  his  influence  and  oppor¬ 
tunities  as  a  counsellor  to  discourage  strife  and  pro¬ 
mote  a  peaceful  settlement  between  contending  par¬ 
ties.  While  always  true  to  his  clients,  and  faithful 
and  painstaking  in  his  clients’  cause,  he  was  equally 
loyal  to  the  court,  and  in  all  hiis  transactions  as  a  law¬ 
yer,  he  kept  both  the  letter  and  the  spirit  of  the  attor¬ 
ney’s  oath. 

Mr.  Dame  was  a  Democrat  in  politics,  and  under 
President  Pierce  was  appointed  Postmaster  of  Clinton, 
and  reappointed  under  President  Buchanan,  serving 
from  September  7,  1853,  until  April  6,  1861.  He  was  a 
staunch.  Union  man,  and  it  was  on  his  motion  that  Clin¬ 
ton  appropriated  money  for  the  relief  of  soldiers’  fam¬ 
ilies.  He  was  a  member  of  the  School  Committee  for 
seventeen  years,  and  chairman  all  but  three  of  those 
years.  Although  called  the  “watch  dog  of  the  treasury,” 
he  was  most  liberal  in  appropriations  for  the  schools, 
and  was  deeply  interested  in  the  Bigelow  Free  Public 
Library,  which  he  served  as  director.  He  wrote  a  his¬ 
tory  of  Clinton  for  the  county  history  of  1879,  his  useful 
life  closing  in  Clinton  on  July  3,  1894,  “a  life  fraught 
with  blessings  to  the  town,  both  in  deed  and  example,  a 
life  of  service,  both  through  private  and  public  channels, 
a  life  of  high  ideals  in  education,  of  unswerving  integ¬ 
rity,  and  of  Puritan  simplicity.” 

John  T.  Dame  married  Eliza  Elmira  Reeves,  who  died 
in  1899,  and  whose  ancestors  settled  in  Wayland  (then 
Sudbury),  Massachusetts,  in  1675.  She  was  a  daugh¬ 
ter  of  Jacob  Reeves,  who  was  Town  Clerk  and  Trial 
Justice  of  Wayland  for  many  years.  Both  John  T. 
and  Eliza  E.  (Reeves)  Dame  were  members  of  the  Con¬ 
gregational  church.  They  were  the  parents  of  six  chil¬ 
dren  :  1.  John,  who  died  in  infancy.  2.  Abby  E.,  a 
teacher.  3.  Myra,  deceased.  4.  Agnes  R.,  deceased.  5. 
Frances  E.,  of  Clinton.  6  Walter  Reeves,  of  further 
mention. 

Walter  Reeves  Dame,  son  of  John  T.  and  Eliza  E. 
(Reeves)  Dame,  was  born,  June  22,  1861,  and  died 
January  6,  1924.  He  completed  the  courses  of  Clinton 
public  schools,  including  high,  and  finished  college  prep¬ 
aration  at  Phillips-Exeter  Academy.  He  entered  Har¬ 
vard  University  for  a  classical  course,  and  was  gradu¬ 
ated  A.  B.,  cum  laude,  class  of  1883.  Deciding  upon 
the  profession  of  law,  he  spent  a  year  in  his  father’s 
office,  then  entered  the  law  department  of  the  Boston 
University,  whence  he  was  graduated  LL.  B.  cum  laude, 
class  of  1886.  He  was  at  once  admitted  to  the  Suffolk 
County  bar,  and  until  the  death  of  his  honored  father 
in  1894  they  practiced  as  a  firm,  he  the  only  partner  his 
father  ever  had.  From  1894  until  1923,  Walter  R.  Dame 
practiced  his  profession,  and  all  through  the  years  was 
largely  interested  in  other  activities  than  the  law.  He 
long  maintained  a  general  insurance  department,  fire, 
life,  and  fidelity;  was  one  of  the  organizers  of  the  Clin¬ 
ton  Cooperative  Bank,  and  a  director;  was  a  member  of 
the  board  of  directors  that  completed  the  Clinton  Rail¬ 
road,  and  became  interested  in  public  utilities  in  the 


183 

States  of  Florida,  Vermont,  and  Massachusetts.  The 
most  important  of  these,  the  Public  Electric  Light  Com¬ 
pany,  is  founded  on  the  franchises  of  the  Vermont  Pow¬ 
er  and  Manufacturing  Company,  which  Mr.  Dame  and 
his  associates  bought  in  1916  and  developed  to  a  point 
where  it  is  supplying  the  greater  part  of  the  power  used 
in  the  northern  part  of  the  State  of  Vermont,  includ¬ 
ing  the  cities  of  St.  Albans,  St.  Albans  Bay,  Westford, 
Colchester,  Cambridge,  Jeffersonville,  and  Burlington. 
Mr.  Dame,  in  addition  to  owning  a  large  interest,  was 
chairman  of  the  board  and  managing  director  and  chief 
counsel  for  the  corporation  up  to  the  time  of  his  passing 
away. 

In  politics  Mr.  Dame  was  a  Democrat,  and  long 
served  his  town  as  Town  Committeeman,  first  chosen  in 
1884;  and  as  secretary  of  the  Board  of  Selectmen,  first 
appointed  in  1887.  He  was  also  secretary  of  the  Board 
of  Water  Commissioners,  but  had  entirely  retired  from 
politics.  Both  as  a  lawyer  and  as  a  business  man  his 
standing  was  very  high,  and  as  a  citizen  he  was  public 
spirited  and  progressive.  He  was  a  trustee  of  the 
Weeks  Fund  of  Clinton,  an  attendant  of  the  Unitarian 
church;  a  member  of  Trinity  Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted 
Masons;  Clinton  Chapter,  Royal  Arch  Masons;  Trinity 
Commandery,  Knights  Templar;  Clinton  Lodge,  Inde¬ 
pendent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows;  a  member  of  the  Sons 
of  the  American  Revolution;  of  the  National  Electric 
Light  Association;  the  Harvard  Club  of  Boston;  Pres¬ 
cott  Club  of  Clinton ;  and  the  Owl  and  the  Champlain 
Country  clubs,  of  St.  Albans,  Vermont. 

Walter  R.  Dame  married  (first),  in  1894,  Augusta 
Vickery,  who  died  in  1895,  daughter  of  Charles  A.  Vick¬ 
ery,  one  of  the  old  established  dry  goods  merchants  of 
Portland,  Maine.  He  married  (second)  Jennie  E.  Stone, 
who  died  in  1917,  daughter  of  Judge  Christopher  C. 
and  Ardella  Stone.  He  married  (third)  Elizabeth 
Ayling,  daughter  of  George  A.  and  Julia  (Carter) 
Ayling.  While  the  family  home  is  in  Clinton,  Mr. 
Dame  had  his  winter  home  at  Daytona,  Florida,  and 
there  spent  several  months  each  year. 


GILBERT  MOSES  BILLINGS- A  force  for  prog¬ 
ress  in  Worcester  County,  Massachusetts,  for  more  than 
one-half  a  century,  the  life  of  Gilbert  Moses  Billings, 
of  Milford,  stands  in  direct  relation  to  the  welfare  of 
the  people,  his  forty-two  years  of  experience  as  editor 
and  publisher  of  the  “Milford  Gazette”  having  linked 
his  name  with  every  branch  of  community  and  general 
advance.  Mr.  Billings  is  still  active,  and  his  tireless 
endeavors  over  this  long  period  of  time  form  a  record 
of  worthy  concentration  of  energies  which  has  been 
crowned  with  large  success.  Mr.  Billings  is  a  son  of 
William  L.  and  Eunice  E.  (Kelly)  Billings,  his  father 
for  many  years  active  in  the  trucking  and  transfer  busi¬ 
ness,  also  Superintendent  of  Streets  in  the  town  of 
Milford. 

Gilbert  Moses  Billings  was  born  in  East  Blackstone, 
Massachusetts,  February  18,  1853.  Receiving  his  early 
education  in  the  public  schools,  he  later  attended  the 
Milford  (Massachusetts)  High  School,  from  which  he 
was  graduated  in  the  class  of  1869.  For  thirteen  years 
thereafter  Mr.  Billings  was  engaged  as  a  bookkeeper 
with  local  concerns,  then  established  the  “Milford  Ga- 


i84 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY. 


zette,”  of  which  he  is  editor  and  publisher.  Its  editorial 
policy  is  progressive,  endorsing  every  forward  move¬ 
ment  and  holding  to  the  highest  standard  of  civic  and 
social  advancement.  Mr.  Billings  has  for  many  years 
been  more  or  less  closely  identified  personally  with  local 
affairs,  and  has  served  several  terms  as  a  member  of 
the  School  Board.  Taking  a  deep  interest  in  all  benev¬ 
olent  and  charitable  endeavors,  he  has  served  for 
twenty-two  years  as  a  trustee  of  the  Milford  Hospital, 
and  for  more  than  twelve  years  was  a  member  of  the 
managing  board  of  that  institution.  Fraternally  he  is 
affiliated  with  the  Ancient  Order  of  United  Workmen, 
of  which  he  is  a  Past  Master  Workman,  and  attends  the 
Universalist  parish  of  Milford,  Massachusetts. 

Gilbert  Moses  Billings  married,  in  Milford,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  November  26,  1874,  Edith  L.  Blake,  daughter 
of  George  B.  and  Harriet  C.  Blake,  and  they  have  one 
son,  George  William,  born  September  18,  1878,  who 
married  Adeline  C.  Teele,  and  they  are  the  parents  of 
one  son,  Robert  Teele,  born  May  7,  1910. 


JOSEPH  PALMER  HOLMAN,  son  of  Joshua  Reed 
and  Nancy  (Palmer)  Holman,  was  born  in  Harvard, 
Massachusetts,  January  16,  1850,  and  there  attended  the 
public  school  until  becoming  a  wage  earner  at  an  early 
age.  In  1868  he  first  came  to  Leominster,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  and  there  has  since  continuously  resided. 

He  obtained  employment  with  F.  A.  Whitney,  as  a 
driver  of  Mr.  Whitney’s  horses,  which  were  used  both 
for  factory  hauling  and  carriage  driving.  Through  this 
introduction  to  Leominster  and  its  great  manufacturing 
plant,  Mr.  Holman  began  his  career,  and  the  years  have 
brought  a  wonderful  rise  in  fortune,  he  being  now  the 
honored  president  of  the  F.  A.  Whitney  Carriage  Com¬ 
pany,  the  same  firm  with  which  he  began  as  a  driver. 
In  1870  he  was  given  a  position  in  the  factory,  where  he 
worked  in  a  subordinate  capacity  for  fifteen  years,  but 
made  such  good  use  of  his  opportunities  to  gain  an 
intimate  knowledge  of  the  business  in  all  its  details, 
that  in  1885  he  became  a  stockholder,  and  was  made 
superintendent  of  the  plant.  In  1888  he  was  elected 
a  member  of  the  board  of  directors,  and  advanced  to  the 
rank  of  general  manager.  Mr.  Holman  continued  as 
director  with  general  supervision  of  the  plant  until 
1898,  when  F.  A.  Whitney  resigned  as  president  of  the 
F.  A.  Whitney  Carriage  Company,  and  on  July  19,  1898, 
Mr.  Holman  was  elected  his  successor. 

During  the  period  of  his  active  administration  of  the 
duties  of  the  executive  office,  June,  1898,  to  June,  1920, 
the  business  was  wonderfully  expanded,  and  attained  its 
greatest  development,  being  now  the  largest  of  its  kind 
in  the  world.  In  June,  1920,  Mr.  Holman  retired  from 
the  more  active  duties  of  president,  but  he  is  still  the 
executive  head  of  the  company  he  entered  in  his  youth, 
and  of  that  business,  in  the  creation  of  which  he  has 
been  such  an  important  factor.  Mr.  Holman,  although 
deeply  engrossed  in  his  work,  always  gave  liberally  of 
his  time  to  civic  affairs  and  his  achievements  were  many, 
which  he  fostered,  and  notably  helped  to  a  realization. 

He  was  intensely  interested  and  active  in  acquiring 
the  site  for  a  new  post  office  for  Leominster,  to  be 
located  at  the  corner  of  Merriam  Avenue  and  Main 
Street,  and  this  site  is  now  government  property.  He 
served  as  a  member  of  the  committee  which  built  the 


new  city  hall,  and  the  lights  at  the  West  Street  entrance 
are  a  part  of  his  personal  contribution.  He  was  trus¬ 
tee  of  the  Leominster  Hospital  Association  and  a  mem¬ 
ber  of  the  building  committee.  He  was  a  charter  mem¬ 
ber  of  the  Leominster  Country  Club,  and  for  many 
years  its  president,  and  he  took  an  active  part  in  organ¬ 
izing  and  in  the  building  of  the  club  house  of  the 
Monoosnock  Country  Club,  and  was  a  member  of  the 
club.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  Leominster  Club, 
the  Fay  Club  of  Fitchburg,  and  Boston  Athletic  Asso¬ 
ciation.  He  was  one  of  the  promoters  and  past  presi¬ 
dent  of  the  Leominster  Cooperative  Bank;  was  a  di¬ 
rector  in  the  Leominster  National  Bank,  Fitchburg  Safe 
Deposit  and  Trust  Company,  and  later  the  Fitchburg 
Bank  and  Trust  Company.  During  the  World  War  he 
was  chairman  of  the  finance  committee  of  the  Public 
Safety  Committee.  In  politics  Mr.  Holman  is  a  Re¬ 
publican,  but  political  preferment  was  not  a  part  of  his 
scheme  of  life  and  he  never  sought  public  office.  His 
fraternity  is  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows. 
Mr.  Holman  was  a  great  lover  of  nature  and  outdoor 
life.  It  was  characteristic  of  him  to  rarely  be  without 
a  button  hole  bouquet.  His  hobby  was  horses,  and  he 
was  often  seen  driving  a  fleet-stepping  steed  both  on  the 
highway  and  race  track. 

Joseph  P.  Holman  married,  November  11,  1873,  Emma 
Jane  Potter,  born  October  12,  1850,  died  November  10, 
1896,  aged  forty-six  years.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Holman  were 
the  parents  of  two  children:  William  E.,  a  sketch  of 
whom  follows;  and  Edith,  a  graduate  of  Leominster 
High  School,  and  who  also  attended  Smith  College. 
She  married  Fred  A.  Russell,  of  Leominster,  June  25, 
1907. 


WILLIAM  E.  HOLMAN,  only  son  of  Joseph  Pal¬ 
mer  and  Emma  Jane  (Potter)  Holman,  (q.  v.)  was 
born  in  Leominster,  Massachusetts,  May  2,  1875.  He 
was  educated  in  the  public  grammar  and  high  schools, 
finishing  with  a  course  in  business  college.  In  1894,  at 
the  age  of  nineteen,  he  entered  as  a  clerk  the  office  of 
the  F.  A.  Whitney  Carriage  Company,  manufacturers  of 
baby  carriages  in  Leominster,  the  city  of  his  birth. 
Nearly  three  decades  have  since  elapsed,  and  there  has 
been  no  change  in  business  connections,  the  only  change 
having  been  in  relationship.  During  that  entire  period 
he  has  been  a  contemporary  with  his  father  in  the  same 
corporation.  He  advanced  rapidly,  and  in  1895  was  ad¬ 
mitted  to  the  corporation  and  elected  clerk.  In  1903  he 
was  made  a  director,  and  in  June,  1920,  upon  the  retire¬ 
ment  of  his  father  from  the  active  duties  of  the  presi¬ 
dency,  he  was  made  manager  by  the  board  of  directors. 
In  1921  he  was  elected  vice-president,  general  man¬ 
ager  and  acting  president. 

Mr.  Holman  has  largely  confined  his  energies  to  the 
business  of  the  corporation  with  which  he  has  spent  his 
mature  life.  This  does  not  mean,  however,  that  he  has 
not  been  actively  interested  in  the  civic  and  social  life 
of  the  city,  for  he  has  always  given  liberally  of  his 
time  and  means  to  such  affairs.  During  the  World  War 
he  was  actively  associated  with  the  several  drives,  and 
was  also  chairman  of  the  volunteer  aid  and  emergency 
fund  committee  of  the  Committee  on  Public  Safety. 
He  was  a  member  of  the  committee  which  had  charge  of 
the  building  of  the  new  Leominster  Hospital,  and  is  one 


■ 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


185 


of  the  trustees  of  that  institution.  Mr.  Holman  is 
affiliated  with  several  clubs,  being  a  member  and  presi¬ 
dent  of  the  Leominster  Country,  member  of  the  Leo¬ 
minster,  Monoosnock  Country  of  Leominster,  Worcester 
Country,  Fay  and  Oak  Hill  Country  clubs  of  Fitchburg, 
and  Old  Colony  Club  at  Boston.  He  is  also  a  member 
of  the  Congregational  church,  Leominster  Chamber  of 
Commerce,  and  the  Leominster  Lodge  of  Elks.  He  is  a 
director  in  the  Merchants’  National  Bank  of  Leomin¬ 
ster,  and  the  Safety  Fund  National  Bank  of  Fitchburg. 
Mr.  Holman  is  exceedingly  fond  of  outdoor  life,  his 
hobby  being  horseback  riding.  In  politics  he  is  a  Re¬ 
publican. 

Mr.  Holman  married,  on  October  9,  1899,  Alice  Rock¬ 
well,  daughter  of  Edward  M.  and  Martha  (Smith) 
Rockwell.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Holman  are  the  parents  of 
two  children :  Lois  R.,  born  October  5,  1900,  educated  in 
Leominster  Grammar  and  High  schools,  Walnut  Hill 
Preparatory  School,  and  Vassar  College,  now  residing 
at  home;  and  Paul  R.,  born  February  22,  1904,  now 
(1923)  preparing  for  college.  The  family  home  is  in 
Leominster. 

(F.  A.  Whitney  Carriage  Company). 

Leominster  has  long  been  the  seat  of  the  baby  car¬ 
riage  industry,  in  fact,  before  the  Civil  War,  the  indus¬ 
try  started  which  was  the  beginning  of  the  F.  A.  Whit¬ 
ney  Carriage  Company.  At  that  time,  over  sixty-five 
years  ago,  there  were  in  Leominster  two  cousins,  F.  A. 
and  F.  W.  Whitney,  who  were  of  an  inventive  and  re¬ 
sourceful  turn  of  mind.  It  happened  that  one  day  while 
he  was  in  Greenfield,  F.  W.  Whitney  was  attracted  by 
what  to  him  was  an  unusual  sight,  a  baby  carriage  of 
a'  much  more  pleasing  design  than  that  of  the  prevailing 
pattern  with  which  he  was  then  familiar.  The  old  style 
of  baby  carriage  was  rude  in  shape  and  construction. 
The  one  which  he  saw  in  Greenfield  was  so  graceful, 
and  had  so  many  new  ideas  of  construction  that  it  set 
him  thinking,  and  by  the  time  he  had  returned  to  Leo¬ 
minster  his  ideas  had  so  far  crystallized  that  they  were 
soon  to  bear  fruit  in  an  industry  in  the  town  in  which 
he  lived.  Feeling  confident  that  the  manufacture  of 
such  carriages  would  be  a  profitable  undertaking,  upon 
his  return  to  Leominster,  he  discussed  with  his  cousin, 
F.  A.  Whitney,  the  probable  success  of  a  company  en¬ 
gaged  in  manufacturing  similar  carriages  in  Leomin¬ 
ster,  and  also  talked  over  the  details  necessary  to  the  or¬ 
ganization  of  such  a  company.  As  a  result  of  this,  they 
began  in  1838,  under  the  firm  name  of  F.  W.  &  F.  A. 
Whitney,  the  industry  now  known  as  the  F.  A.  Whit¬ 
ney  Carriage  Company,  which  to-day  is  the  largest  of 
its  kind  in  the  world. 

They  hired  the  basement  of  the  old  Lockey  shop,  a 
building  where  corn  planters  and  apple  parers  were 
manufactured,  on  the  easterly  side  of  the  railroad 
crossing  on  Mechanic  Street,  and  started  with  half  a 
dozen  employees.  Seventy-five  carriages,  two-wheeled 
and  with  a  long  tongue  and  a  supporting  standard  in 
front,  were  made  during  the  first  year.  The  new  busi¬ 
ness  met  with  a  severe  loss  in  1862  when  fire  destroyed 
the  building  which  it  occupied.  Both  stock  and  equip¬ 
ment,  except  for  one  planer,  which  was  still  in  use  until  a 
few  years  ago,  were  completely  swept  away.  The 
cousins  had  begun  with  very  little  capital,  and  as  there 


was  no  insurance,  they  were  only  able  to  reestablish  the 
business  by  borrowing  from  their  friends.  Their  sec¬ 
ond  beginning  was  in  the  small  building  now  standing 
near  the  track  on  the  right  of  Water  Street  as  one 
crosses  the  New  York,  New  Haven  &  Hartford  Rail¬ 
road,  on  the  way  to  the  present  plant  of  the  F.  A. 
Whitney  Carriage  Company  at  the  foot  of  the  hill. 
For  several  years  they  occupied  this  building  in  connec¬ 
tion  with  two  other  buildings  across  the  street,  where 
the  passenger  station  now  stands,  which  were  used  for 
upholstering  and  finishing. 

Mr.  F.  A.  Whitney  sold  his  interest  to  Mr.  F.  W. 
Whitney  in  February,  1865,  to  enter  the  service  in  the 
Christian  Commission  of  the  Civil  War,  but  bought 
back  his  interest  upon  his  return  the  following  July. 
In  November  he  purchased  Mr.  F.  W.  Whitney’s  share, 
thus  becoming  in  his  turn  sole  owner  of  the  business. 
In  1865  he  was  requested  to  vacate  this  location,  and 
then  arose  a  problem  difficult  to  solve;  where  should  he 
next  locate,  as  the  industry  was  growing  rapidly.  The 
water  privilege  to  be  obtained  upon  a  tract  of  land  at 
the  foot  of  the  hill  settled  the  question,  and  he  at  once 
erected  a  building  situated  where  the  westerly  group  of 
present  buildings  now  stand.  From  the  woods  on  this 
land,  known  as  “Paradise,”  and  formerly  a  part  of  the 
old  Houghton  estate,  came  Leominster’s  first  flag  pole, 
which  was  placed  on  the  Common  soon  after  the  Civil 
War,  where  it  stood  for  many  years.  Mr.  Whitney’s 
original  two  and  a  half  story  building  measured  sixty 
by  thirty-two  feet.  Additions  and  alterations  have  been 
made  nearly  every  year  since  the  time  of  its  erection  to 
keep  pace  with  the  growth  of  the  industry.  During  the 
first  two  years,  carriages  ready  for  shipment  were 
hauled  half  a  mile  in  a  roundabout  way  through  the 
woods,  to  the  freight  station,  but  at  Mr.  Whitney’s 
urgent  appeal,  the  town  finally  decided,  on  October  16, 
1867,  to  build  a  wooden  bridge  across  the  stream  on 
Water  Street,  although  the  Selectmen  doubted  at  the 
time  whether  the  new  industry  could  ever  pay  enough 
in  taxes  to  give  interest  on  money  thus  expended.  An 
iron  bridge,  which  replaced  the  wooden  one  in  1890, 
was  followed  by  the  present  steel  structure  eleven 
years  ago  at  the  time  of  the  construction  of  the  “Loop 
Line,”  a  part  of  the  Worcester  Consolidated  Railway 
which  now  passes  the  plant. 

About  1870  Mr.  F.  W.  Whitney,  who  had  decided  to 
begin  a  business  of  his  own,  bought  a  strip  of  land  bor¬ 
dering  on  Mr.  F.  A.  Whitney’s  purchase,  from  Caldwell 
&  Miller,  tub  manufacturers,  and  erected  a  building  for 
the  making  of  baby  carriages,  two  and  four-wheeled 
wagons,  and  toy  carts.  Associated  with  him  were  F. 

A.  Whitney’s  younger  brother,  William,  and  Sumner 
M.  Frost,  a  brother-in-law.  This  separate  manufacture 
did  not  have  a  long  existence,  for  Mr.  F.  A.  Whitney 
induced  its  promoters  to  enter  his  business,  and  in  1871 
incorporated  the  F.  A.  Whitney  Carriage  Company  with 
F.  A.  Whitney,  president;  F.  W.  Whitney,  treasurer; 
Sumner  M.  Frost,  secretary  and  salesman ;  and  William 

B.  Whitney,  superintendent  of  the  wood  and  iron  de¬ 
partment.  These  four  men  were  also  the  directors  of  the 
organization  and  owned  the  entire  stock.  The  new 
company  continued  the  manufacture  of  carts,  but, 
although  this  business  proved  a  prosperous  one,  it  came 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


1 86 

to  an  end  after  seven  or  eight  years,  as  space  was  lim¬ 
ited  and  the  firm  had  become  more  interested  in  the 
making  of  baby  carriages. 

The  purchase  of  a  water  right  from  Caldwell  &  Miller 
m  1876  added  a  nineteen- foot  dam  to  the  original  six- 
foot  one  of  the  F.  A.  Whitney  Carriage  Company.  For 
several  years  the  company  sold  power  to  four  separate 
industries  which  were  connected  with  its  water  wheel  by 
cables.  The  first  hydraulic  elevator  in  the  plant  and 
also  the  first  in  Leominster,  was  installed  during  the 
summer  of  1881.  Before  then  it  had  been  necessary  to 
carry  everything  up  and  downstairs.  There  are  now 
five  elevators  in  the  plant,  four  hydraulic  and  one  elec¬ 
tric.  It  was  also  in  1881  that  Mr.  William  Look  made 
the  first  reed  carriage  built  by  the  company,  from  a  pat¬ 
tern  designed  by  Mr.  Frank  H.  Shaw.  Sumner  Ml 
Frost  retired  in  1885,  and  William  C.  Burdett,  Joseph 
P.  Holman,  Philip  Lothrop,  and  Frank  H.  Shaw,  em¬ 
ployees  of  the  company,  became  stockholders.  Mr.  Hol¬ 
man,  who  had  begun  work  at  eighteen  as  chore  boy 
for  Mr.  F.  A.  Whitney,  was  also  made  superintendent 
of  the  entire  plant.  In  1886  William  B.  Whitney  with¬ 
drew  from  the  business  and  George  W.  Foster,  formerly 
of  Foster  Brothers  &  Kenney,  entered  the  company. 
Soon  after  Mr.  F.  H.  Shaw  sold  his  interest  and  retired. 

In  1888  the  organization  consisted  of  F.  A.  Whitney, 
president  and  treasurer;  William  C.  Burdett,  secretary; 
George  W.  Foster,  salesman;  W.  C.  Burdett,  G.  W. 
Foster,  J.  P.  Holman,  P.  Lothrop,  F.  A.  Whitney,  and 
F.  W.  Whitney,  directors.  The  output  of  the  plant  that 
year  was  35,000  carriages,  a  large  number  then,  but 
small  when  compared  with  the  present  figures.  The 
organization  remained  the  same  from  1888  to  1891,  when 
Mr.  Foster  died.  The  yearly  output  of  carriages  had 
increased  to  nearly  40,000,  and  the  employees  numbered 
about  two  hundred.  In  1895  W.  E.  Holman,  son  of  J. 
P.  Holman,  was  admitted  to  the  company  as  secretary, 
and  W.  H.  Cropper,  of  Fitchburg,  became  treasurer. 
Mr.  F.  J.  Shaw  was  admitted  as  a  stockholder  of  the 
company  and  elected  a  director.  Mr.  F.  W.  Whitney 
had  died  the  previous  year,  leaving  the  directors  W.  H. 
Cropper,  J.  P.  Holman,  P.  Lothrop,  F.  J.  Shaw  (super¬ 
intendent  of  the  reed  department),  and  F.  A.  Whitney. 
These  directors  remained  the  same  until  Mr.  Lothrop 
retired  in  1899,  three  years  before  his  death.  In  the 
summer  of  1898,  Mr.  F.  A.  Whitney,  who  for  a  num¬ 
ber  of  years  had  been  interested  in  Wachusett  Shirt 
Company,  resigned  as  president  of  the  F.  A.  Whitney 
Carriage  Company,  and  on  July  19,  Mr.  J.  P.  Holman 
was  elected  to  succeed  him.  During  Mr.  J.  P.  Holman’s 
administration  the  business  expanded  to  an  extent  be¬ 
yond  all  expectation,  and  achieved  its  greatest  develop¬ 
ment  under  his  management.  He  associated  with  him¬ 
self  in  the  business  men  of  capabilities  in  their  various 
lines,  and  it  was  this  keen  sightedness  in  organization 
which  contributed  largely  to  the  development  of  the  in¬ 
dustry,  which  he  managed  up  to  June,  1920,  when  he 
retired  from  active  duties.  Mr.  W.  E.  Holman  became 
a  director  of  the  company  in  1903.  Two  years  later 
Mr.  F.  A.  Whitney  severed  his  connection  by  selling  to 
Mr.  J.  P.  Holman  the  remainder  of  his  holdings,  some 
of  which  he  had  sold  the  previous  year. 

At  the  outbreak  of  the  World  War  the  supply  of  reeds 
which  had  been  imported  from  Germany,  and  from 


which  practically  all  of  the  carriages  in  use  at  that  time 
were  made,  was  cut  off.  It  became  necessary  for  the 
company  to  develop  the  splitting  of  reeds  from  rattan 
which  was  imported  from  China  and  the  British  East 
Indies.  Special  machinery  had  to  be  built  to  convert  the 
rattan  into  reeds.  Up  to  this  time  there  were  but 
three  concerns  in  America  doing  such  work,  and  Mr. 
J.  P.  Holman  realized  the  immediate  necessity  of  de¬ 
veloping  this  source  of  raw  materials,  which  has  grown 
into  a  very  important  department  of  the  business  to-day, 
and  by  his  prompt  action  at  that  time  the  F.  A.  Whitney 
Carriage  Company  was  able  to  supply  its  customers  dur¬ 
ing  a  period  when  it  would,  otherwise,  have  been  prac¬ 
tically  impossible  to  do  so.  The  weaving  of  twisted 
paper  into  fiber,  a  substitute  for  reed,  patented  by  Mr. 
F.  J.  Shaw  in  1904,  has  become  a  large  part  of  the 
business,  the  lack  of  German  reeds  during  the  war 
bringing  this  new  material  into  great  prominence.  Other 
manufacturers,  upon  using  it,  found  it  so  satisfactory 
that  its  weaving,  on  looms  made  at  the  plant,  is  now 
an  industry  in  itself.  Seventy-five  per  cent  of  the  car¬ 
riages  shipped  by  the  F.  A.  Whitney  Carriage  Company 
are  of  fiber,  which  has  replaced  the  equally  large  reed 
business  of  five  years  ago.  Other  inventions  of  value 
have  also  been  patented.  A  reversible  handle  for  baby 
carriages,  devised  by  William  Whitney  in  1876,  was 
used  for  many  years.  When  the  inch-wide  leather 
straps,  which  formerly  ran  from  one  gear  of  the  car¬ 
riage  to  the  other  as  in  the  old  stage  coaches,  were 
changed  to  steel,  William  Whitney  practically  orig¬ 
inated  the  steel  spring  for  this  purpose,  learning  how 
to  temper  it  successfully.  Perhaps  most  important  of 
all  is  the  anti-friction  wheel  fastener,  a  simple  device, 
patented  in  1898  for  fastening  wheels  on  axles  without 
the  use  of  a  nut,  thus  making  it  very  easy  to  assemble 
the  parts  after  shipment. 

The  company  had  about  seven  hundred  employees  in 
1906,  its  business  for  that  year  amounting  to  nearly 
$1,000,000.  The  manufacture  of  doll  carriages  for  the 
Christmas  season  was  begun  just  before  this  time  as  a 
solution  to  the  problem  of  retaining  employees  and  keep¬ 
ing  the  plant  busy  through  the  summer  months,  when 
orders  for  baby  carriages  were  few.  Thirty-five  dif¬ 
ferent  styles  of  doll  carriages  are  now  made,  resembling 
the  baby  carriages  in  every  detail.  The  company  has 
had  several  losses  in  property,  but  has  continued  bravely 
on  its  course.  The  first  large  fire  of  consequence  in 
nearly  fifty  years,  since  the  burning  of  the  Lockey  shop, 
occurred  on  April  18,  1909,  when  the  paint  shop  was 
burned.  The  fire  was  on  a  Sunday  morning,  and  the 
following  Monday  was  a  holiday,  but  on  April  20,  this 
department  of  the  plant  was  in  full  working  order  in 
an  unused  basement  cleared  out  for  the  purpose.  A 
second  fire  on  February  26,  1910,  destroyed  the  mill 
room,  a  wooden  building,  which  was  immediately  re¬ 
placed  by  a  brick  one.  With  the  exception  of  a  short 
period  during  the  war,  additions  to  the  plant  have  been 
made  each  year.  The  third  and  last  fire  was  on  January 
5,  1918,  when  one  of  the  storehouses  burned  to  the 
ground.  Over  four  thousand  carraiges  ready  for  ship¬ 
ment  were  destroyed,  but  the  filling  of  orders  was  not 
interrupted  by  this  unfortunate  circumstance. 

Mr.  C.  E.  Potter  became  a  director  in  1908,  and  from 
that  year  until  1917,  when  Mr.  F.  J.  Shaw  died,  the 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


1 87 


officers  remained  the  same,  the  longest  period  without 
change  in  the  history  of  the  company.  Harold  F.  Shaw, 
son  of  F.  J.  Shaw,  was  elected  a  director  and  stock¬ 
holder  in  1918,  and  George  B.  Ambler,  George  H. 
Roukes,  and  Bertram  H.  Hayes  became  stockholders  the 
same  year.  In  1921  W.  E.  Holman  was  made  vice- 
president  and  general  manager.  F.  L.  Butler,  now 
now  treasurer,  came  to  the  company  in  1922  to  fill  the 
position  when  Mr.  Cropper  retired.  The  present  offi¬ 
cers  are:  J.  P.  Holman,  president;  W.  E.  Holman,  act¬ 
ing  president  and  vice-president;  F.  L.  Butler,  treasurer; 
J.  P  Holman,  W.  E.  Holman,  F.  E.  Butler,  C.  E.  Potter, 
and  H.  F.  Shaw,  directors.  From  its  single  unit  which 
comprised  the  plant  in  1858,  the  F.  A.  Whitney  Carriage 
Company  has  grown  to  an  industry  which  requires  for 
its  production  and  housing  over  twelve  acres  of  land 
and  twenty-nine  distinct  buildings.  So  admirably  are 
these  buildings  placed  and  so  efficiently  are  the  machines 
arranged  that  the  raw  material  in  the  shape  of  wood, 
reed,  iron,  and  steel  can  be  said  virtually  to  come  into 
one  part  of  the  plant,  go  through  in  the  process  of 
manufacture  the  buildings  which  are  arranged  in  a 
circle,  and  come  out  in  the  shipping  department,  the 
finished  carriage  ready  for  transport.  From  this  plant 
baby  carriages  go  to  nearly  every  city  and  hamlet  in 
America  that  is  reached  by  railroad  or  by  mail,  and  to 
the  most  distant  points  of  the  world.  One  aim  has  been 
constant  during  its  sixty-five  years  of  production,  and 
that  is  to  improve  and  make  more  beautiful  its  prod¬ 
ucts,  and  to-day  the  vehicles  of  the  F.  A.  Whitney  Car¬ 
riage  Company  go  into  the  homes  of  the  most  exclusive, 
as  well  as  into  the  homes  of  the  most  humble. 


FRED  LANE  BUTLER,  treasurer  of  the  F.  A. 
Whitney  Carriage  Company  of  Leominster,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  was  formerly  for  many  years  a  resident  of  Gard¬ 
ner,  where  he  was  associated  with  the  Heywood-Wake- 
field  Company,  formerly  Heywood  Brothers  &  Company. 
He  was  born  at  Pittsfield,  New  Hampshire,  June  13, 
1868,  son  of  Charles  and  Mary  J.  (Lane)  Butler.  His 
father  was  employed  in  a  shoe  factory  at  Pittsfield,  and 
Mr.  Butler  grew  up  in  that  town. 

He  received  his  preliminary  education  in  the  public 
schools  of  Pittsfield,  and  after  having  completed  his 
grammar  school  studies  proceeded  to  the  Pittsfield 
Academy.  He  completed  a'  full  course  of  study  at  the 
academy,  and  having  a  natural  aptitude  for  business 
and  commercial  subjects,  proceeded  to  Bryant  &  Strat¬ 
ton’s  Business  College  at  Manchester,  New  Hampshire, 
from  which  he  graduated  in  April,  1888.  After  careful 
consideration  he  decided  to  begin  his  business  career  at 
Gardner,  Massachusetts,  where  he  was  offered  an  ad¬ 
vantageous  opening  in  the  dry  goods  business.  He  found 
his  connections  at  Gardner  agreeable  and  maintained  his 
association  with  the  dry  goods  business  for  two  years, 
until  1890.  In  that  year,  however,  he  decided  to  accept 
a  position  as  bookkeeper  with  the  firm  of  Heywood 
Brothers  &  Company,  manufacturers  of  furniture  and 
baby  carriages.  The  connection  then  established  was 
destined  to  endure  for  the  next  thirty-one  years,  and 
throughout  the  whole  of  that  long  period  Mr.  Butler’s 
relations  with  the  firm  were  of  the  most  friendly  and 
agreeable  nature.  During  the  early  period  of  his  em¬ 
ployment  with  this  firm  Mr.  Butler  began  studying  in 


the  evenings  to  better  his  position,  and  when  this  was 
later  discovered  by  the  treasurer,  Mr.  George  H.  Hey¬ 
wood,  he  suggested  that  Mr.  Butler  work  in  the  various 
departments  to  gain  a  general  knowledge  of  the  business 
in  both  the  office  and  the  factory,  and  in  1897  he  began 
this  study  of  the  workings  of  the  organization,  acquir¬ 
ing  a  practical  knowledge  through  positions  and  actual 
work  in  the  manufacturing  and  also1  in  the  business 
branches  of  the  concern.  Mr.  Heywood  was  always  his 
good  friend;  they  made  satisfactory  arrangements  for 
the  continuance  of  this  plan,  which  was  followed  by  Mr. 
Butler  until  1912,  when  his  long  and  faithful  services 
were  rewarded  by  his  election  to  the  office  of  treasurer 
of  the  company.  This  position  he  was  eminently  fitted 
to  occupy,  and  during  the  next  eight  years  he  was  the 
active  manager  of  the  Gardner  factory.  In  March, 
1920,  the  office  of  general  factory  manager  was  created 
and  he  was  selected  for  the  position.  In  July,  1920,  he 
was  transferred  to  the  executive  office  at  Boston,  ful¬ 
filling  the  duties  of  this  office  in  addition  to  his  work 
as  treasurer.  In  December,  1921,  to  the  great  regret  of 
his  associates  in  business,  he  resigned  and  thus  the  long 
connection  between  the  Heywood-Wakefield  Company 
and  himself  was  brought  to  an  end. 

During  the  next  six  months  Mr.  Butler  was  engaged 
in  attending  to  various  matters  of  private  business,  his 
interests  in  the  business  world  being  by  no  means  con¬ 
fined  to  his  connection  with  Heywood-Wakefield  Com¬ 
pany.  In  July,  1922,  he  accepted  the  position  of  treas¬ 
urer  and  director  of  the  F.  A.  Whitney  Carriage  Com¬ 
pany  (q.  v)  of  Leominster,  and  this  position  he  still 
holds.  The  Whitney  Company  is  widely  known  in  Wor¬ 
cester  County,  and  far  beyond  its  confines  as  one  of 
the  most  prominent  carriage  building  companies  in  the 
State.  Founded  many  years  ago,  it  has  from  the  be¬ 
ginning  maintained  the  highest  standards  of  craftsman¬ 
ship  and  has  faithfully  followed  the  best  traditions  of 
New  England  business  enterprise.  By  his  long  experi¬ 
ence  and  thorough  knowledge  of  every  phase  of  office 
and  factory  management,  Mr.  Butler  is  well  suited  to  the 
position  of  treasurer  of  the  company,  and  his  position 
of  treasurer  of  the  company,  and  his  connection  there¬ 
with  seems  destined  to  endure  for  many  years  to  the 
mutual  advantage  of  himself  and  of  the  company. 
Keenly  interested  in  business  prosperity  and  social  wel¬ 
fare  and  progress  of  every  description,  Mr.  Butler, 
before  leaving  Gardner  had  been  very  active  in  civic 
affairs.  He  was  one  of  the  organizers  and  the  first 
president  of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce  of  Gardner,  and 
still  retains  his  membership  in  that  body.  He  was  a 
member  of  the  Board  of  Auditors  of  the  town  of  Gard¬ 
ner  for  five  years ;  he  was  also  on  the  Town  Advisory 
Board  from  1912  until  1921,  when  it  became  a  city. 
During  the  World  War  he  was  active  in  the  drives  of 
the  Young  Men’s  Christian  Association,  and  was  also 
chairman  of  the  Public  Safety  Committee  throughout 
that  period.  He  is  a  director  of  the  First  National 
Bank  of  Gardner,  which  his  removal  to  Leominster  has 
not  changed,  as  it  has  also  not  changed  his  many  other 
business  and  social  connections,  although  he  is  taking 
an  active  interest  also  in  his  present  place  of  residence, 
being  a  director  of  the  Merchants’  National  Bank  of 
Leominster,  and  a  member  of  the  Leominster  Club.  He 
is  also  a  member  of  the  Gardner  Boat  Club,  the  Wor- 


i88 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


ccster  Country  Club,  the  Boston  City  Club,  and  the 
Monoosnock  Country  Club  of  Leominster,  and  he  is 
also  a  stockholder  and  member  of  the  Monoosnock 
Sporting  Club,  a  large  camp  at  Rindge,  New  Hampshire. 
A  Mason  of  long  standing,  Mr.  Butler  belongs  to  Hope 
Lodge,  Free  and  Accepter  Masons  of  Gardner;  Gardner 
Chapter,  Royal  Arch  Masons ;  and  Ivanhoe  Command- 
ery,  Knights  Templar;  he  is  a  Past  High  Priest  of  the 
chapter  and  Past  Commander  of  the  commandery,  and 
has  always  been  a  consistent  and  vigorous  supporter  of 
Masonic  principles  and  ideals.  In  religious  faith  he  is 
a  member  of  the  Congregational  church  of  Gardner. 
In  politics  he  has  always  been  a  staunch  Republican. 
Mr.  Butler  enjoys  all  out-of-doors  sports  generally. 

Mr.  Butler  married  (first)  Alice  J.  McGowan,  who 
died  September  5,  1916.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Butler  had  one 
daughter,  Marguerite  Ruth,  bom  November  15,  1892, 
and  who  is  Mr.  Butler’s  only  child.  She  was  educated 
in  Gardner  Grammar  School  and  High  School,  and 
took  her  preparatory  course  at  Cushing  Academy,  re¬ 
ceiving  her  degree  of  A.  B.  in  1916  from  Mt.  Holyoke 
College.  She  married,  August  7,  1920,  Windsor  W. 
Allen,  treasurer  of  the  Frank  W.  Smith  Silver  Com¬ 
pany  of  Gardner,  and  they  have  one  child,  Marguerite 
Allen.  Mr.  Butler  married  (second)  Anna  S.  Moore, 
daughter  of  William  and  Ellen  E.  (Mower)  Moore,  of 
Peterboro,  New  Hampshire,  April  27,  1918. 


JOHN  PATRICK  LESLIE,  president  of  the  real 
estate  firm  of  W.  H.  Leslie  &  Company,  which  has  been 
largely  instrumental  in  developing  the  west  side  business 
and  residential  sections  of  Leominster,  Massachusetts, 
has  had  an  extremely  interesting  business  career.  He 
was  born  at  North  Kingston,  Rhode  Island,  March  27, 
1873,  son  of  John  and  Mary  E.  (Cronnelly)  Leslie.  His 
parents  belonged  to  families  that  had  long  been  residents 
at  North  Kingston,  and  closely  identified  with  its  social 
and  commercial  life. 

Mr.  Leslie  received  his  education  in  the  public  schools 
of  Rhode  Island.  After  leaving  school  various  plans 
presented  themselves  to  him,  but  he  was  unable  to  decide 
immediately  upon  a  life  occupation,  and  considered  that 
his  time  would  be  best  spent  if  he  obtained  temporary 
employment  that  would  enable  him  to  acquire  a  trade 
and  some  knowledge  of  business  methods,  and,  in  gen¬ 
eral,  enable  him  to  attain  a  point  of  view  from  which 
he  could  survey  his  prospects  and  choose  an  occupation 
that  would  suit  his  abilities.  Accordingly,  he  entered 
one  of  the  North  Kingston  cloth  mills  and  began  to 
work  as  a  weaver.  Practical  experience  in  the  manu¬ 
facturing  of  textiles,  obtained  in  this  way,  gave  him  ex¬ 
pert  knowledge  of  piece  goods,  and  in  1900  he  moved 
to  Leominster,  where  he  capitalized  his  knowledge  by 
setting  up  a  cloth  and  remnant  store.  This  venture  was 
highly  successful  and  might  have  attained  large  develop¬ 
ment,  but  the  attention  of  its  owner  was  turned  aside  to 
the  business  of  buying  and  selling  real  estate.  A  study 
of  the  opportunities  which  Leominster  at  that  time 
offered  to  a  man  with  the  vision  and  capacity  to  aid  in  the 
city’s  development  caused  Mr.  Leslie  to  enter  into  part¬ 
nership  with  W.  H.  Leslie  and  John  T.  Cummings,  and 
in  connection  with  these  partners  he  founded  the  firm 
of  W.  H.  Leslie  &  Company,  of  which  he  is  now  presi¬ 
dent.  The  first  office  occupied  by  the  new  firm  was  at 


No.  4  Water  Street,  but  the  firm  moved  to  the  Mayo 
Block  as  soon  as  that  building  was  completed,  and  have 
maintained  their  offices  in  the  same  place  ever  since. 

In  1915,  owing  to  the  fact  that  his  partners  purchased 
the  Reliance  Yarn  Company  of  Norwich,  Connecticut,  as 
well  as  the  Blackstone  Stocking  Company  of  Pawtucket, 
Rhode  Island,  practically  the  entire  management  of  the 
real  estate  business  devolved  upon  Mr.  Leslie,  and  his 
responsibilities  in  this  connection  became  very  heavy. 
The  firm  had  the  misfortune  to  lose  Mr.  Cummings,  who 
died  April  14,  1918,  and  in  the  reorganization  of  the 
company  that  afterwards  took  place,  Mr.  Leslie  became 
president,  and  Mr.  W.  H.  Leslie  was  appointed  to  fill 
the  office  of  treasurer,  the  firm  continuing  to  be  known 
as  W.  H.  Leslie  &  Company.  Mr.  W.  H.  Leslie  is  now 
very  actively  engaged  in  the  woolen  business,  and  the 
management  of  his  extensive  interests  in  the  manufac¬ 
turing  field  is  of  such  a  nature  that  he  is  no  longer 
able  to  devote  much  of  his  time  to  the  real  estate  busi¬ 
ness.  A  natural  sense  of  property  values  and  ability  in 
the  management  of  real  estate  have  placed  Mr.  Leslie 
in  the  forefront  of  the  business  world  of  Worcester 
County.  He  is  an  exponent  of  modern  methods,  and 
has  a  very  high  idea  of  the  duties  and  responsibilities 
of  property  agents,  and  believes  that  they  should  exert 
a  strong  influence  upon  public  opinion,  to  the  end  that 
buildings  and  grounds  may  be  kept  in  a  good  state  of 
repair,  and  town  planning  and  gardening  be  given  at¬ 
tention.  His  own  influence,  and  his  ability  to  transform 
a  bare  subdivision  into  a  neighborhood  of  real  homes, 
has  been  making  itself  felt  at  Leominster  for  the  past 
twenty-two  years,  and  he  still  has  many  plans  for  im¬ 
proving  the  appearance  of  the  city  by  the  addition  of 
new  residences  and  business  structures.  In  religious 
faith  Mr.  Leslie  is  a  Catholic,  being  a  prominent  mem¬ 
ber  of  the  congregation  of  St.  Leo’s  Roman  Catholic 
Church,  where  he  takes  an  active  part  in  the  various 
parochial  activities  of  the  church.  His  recreational  va¬ 
cations  he  likes  to  take  at  the  seashore,  usually  at  Nar- 
ragansett  Pier. 

On  November  24,  1904,  he  married  Elizabeth  A.  Ward, 
daughter  of  Matthew  and  Ann  (McLaughlin)  Ward. 


ALONZO  AMASA  BEMIS,  one  of  Worcester 
County’s  prominent  men  in  professional,  public,  and 
private  life,  is  a  descendant  of  an  old  and  honored 
English  family,  emigrants  of  which  came  to  America 
and  settled  in  the  New  England  States,  where  they  and 
their  numerous  offspring  exerted  an  incalculable  influ¬ 
ence  upon  the  growth  and  advancement  of  their  several 
localities.  To-day  throughout  the  New  England  States 
are  many  hundreds  who  bear  this  distinguished  pa¬ 
tronym.  The  numerous  Bemis  families  of  Spencer  and 
of  Worcester  County,  are  all  descended  from  Joseph 
Bemis,  the  emigrant  ancestor,  who  was  born  in  England 
in  1619,  and  came  to  America  while  a  young  man, 
settling  in  Watertown,  Massachusetts,  where  he  is  listed 
as  a  planter  as  early  as  1640.  He  became  a  town  officer 
and  one  of  Watertown’s  foremost  citizens,  his  death 
occurring  at  that  place  in  1684.  The  lineal  descent 
goes  from  Joseph  to  John  (1),  to  John  (2),  to  John  (3), 
to  Abijah,  to  John  (4),  to  Samuel,  and  to  Amasa,  grand¬ 
father  of  Alonzo  Amasa  Bemis. 

Amasa  Bemis  was  bom  in  Spencer,  February  25,  1831, 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


189 


and  married  Laura  Pike,  a  native  of  Brookfield,  and 
they  were  the  parents  of  Edwin  Amasa  Bemis,  through 
whom  the  line  continues.  Edwin  Amasa  Bemis,  the 
father  of  Alonzo  Amasa  Bemis,  of  whom  this  biograph¬ 
ical  record,  was  born  on  December  25,  1824,  at  Spencer, 
Massachusetts,  where  he  spent  his  long  life  as  an  agri¬ 
culturist,  and  where  he  died  on  November  27,  1887.  He 
was  married,  at  Spencer,  in  1847,  to  Julia  Draper 
Watson,  who  was  born  at  Leicester  on  July  15,  1826,  a 
daughter  of  Robert  Watson,  who  was  a  descendant  of 
an  old  Scotch  family  that  at  an  early  date  emigrated  to 
America,  settling  at  Leicester,  where  scions  of  that 
patronym  later  became  of  great  influence  and  importance. 
Julia  Draper  (Watson)  Bemis  survived  her  husband  until 
1908.  To  Edwin  Amasa  and  Julia  Draper  (Watson) 
Bemis  were  born  eleven  children,  two  girls  and  nine  boys. 

Alonzo  Amasa  Bemis,  the  ninth  child  of  Edwin  Amasa 
and  Julia  Draper  (Watson)  Bemis,  and  a  representa¬ 
tive  of  the  tenth  generation  of  the  Bemis  family  in 
America,  was  born  at  Spencer,  Worcester  County, 
Massachusetts,  on  May  2,  1864.  His  early  education 
was  obtained  in  the  local  public  schools,  following  which 
he  entered  high  school.  In  1885  he  matriculated  in  the 
Dental  Department  of  the  University  of  Maryland, 
from  which  institution  he  was  graduated  with  the  class 
of  1887,  receiving  the  degree  of  D.  D.  S.  After  two 
years  of  study  with  Dr.  A.  A.  Howland,  of  Worcester, 
before  graduation,  he  engaged  in  the  pactice  of  his  pro¬ 
fession  in  West  Brookfield,  where  he  remained  for  three 
years.  He  then  returned  to  his  native  city,  where  he 
opened  offices  and  built  up  a  large  clientage,  practising 
with  steadily  increasing  success  in  the  same  suite  of 
offices  for  a  period  of  thirty-six  years.  Recently  Dr. 
Bemis  has  removed  his  office  to  a  new  block,  built  ex¬ 
pressly  by  him  for  his  dental  practice,  and  here  he  con¬ 
tinues  in  a  profession  in  which  he  has  no  peer  in  his 
native  county. 

Politically  Dr.  Bemis  gives  his  hearty  support  and  co¬ 
operation  to  the  Republican  party.  He  is  a  trustee  of 
the  Sugden  Library,  the  Sugden  Block,  and  of  the  Bemis 
Memorial  Park  Association,  and  a  member  of  the 
Massachusetts  Dental  Society.  His  religious  affiliation 
is  given  to  the  Congregational  church,  of  which  body  he 
is  a  sincere  member  and  an  earnest  worker. 

Dr.  Bemis  married  (first),  October  4,  1887,  Nellie 
M.  Thayer,  daughter  of  Clarke  and  Nancy  Thayer,  of 
Natick,  Massachusetts.  She  died  December  15,  1907, 
and  Dr.  Bemis  married  (second),  April  8,  1911,  Maud 
Etta  Varney,  daughter  of  Arthur  W.  and  Cora  L. 
(Baker)  Varney,  of  Hermon,  Maine. 

Some  years  ago  Dr.  Bemis  undertook  the  arduous 
task  of  compiling  a  complete  and  comprehensive  gene¬ 
alogy  of  the  Bemis  family,  which,  with  the  able  assist¬ 
ance  of  his  mother,  he  brought  to  a  successful  comple¬ 
tion.  This  genealogy  to-day  stands  as  an  invaluable 
historical  record  of  a  family  whose  members  were  pro¬ 
tagonists  in  the  upbuilding  and  advancement  of  the  early 
colonies.  Alonzo  Amasa  Bemis  maintains  his  residence 
at  No.  12  High  Street,  Spencer,  Worcester  County, 
Massachusetts. 


JOSEPH  BURNETT — Every  community  owes  much 
to  those  who  have  lived  and  worked  and  contributed 
their  share  to  the  general  welfare  and  have  then  passed 


on  to  the  “larger  life,”  leaving  behind  them  the  founda¬ 
tions  upon  which  others  of  later  generations  continue  to 
build.  Among  those  who,  during  an  active  life,  founded 
business  enterprises  which  are  still  growing,  was  the 
late  Joseph  Burnett,  who  for  many  years  was  well  known 
in  Boston  and  Southboro,  Massachusetts,  as  the  founder 
and  developer  of  the  firm  of  Joseph  Burnett  &  Company, 
later  known  as  the  Joseph  Burnett  Company  of  Boston. 

The  Burnett  family  is  one  of  the  oldest  in  New  Eng¬ 
land,  having  been  established  there  by  Robert  Burnett, 
who  came  to  Dorchester  in  1638.  He  located  at  Lynn 
Meadows,  now  known  as  Reading,  in  1701.  Benjamin 
Burnett,  a  son  of  the  immigrant,  located  in  Hopkinton, 
and  their  grandson,  Charles  Ripley  Burnett,  married 
Lavinia  Matthews,  of  Southboro,  since  which  time  this 
branch  of  the  Burnett  family  has  been  identified  with 
that  town.  Charles  Ripley  Burnett’s  brother,  Dr.  Joel 
Burnett,  was  a  graduate  of  Harvard  Medical  School, 
and  was  the  first  to  announce  the  theory  of  the  trans¬ 
mission  of  disease  by  means  of  germs.  In  his  research 
along  that  line  he  was  assisted  by  his  son,  Waldo;  but 
they  were  so  far  in  advance  of  their  time  that  the  idea, 
now  almost  universally  accepted,  was  then  derided. 

Joseph  Burnett,  son  of  Charles  Ripley  and  Lavinia 
(Matthews)  Burnett,  was  bom  in  Southboro,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  November  11,  1820,  and  died  in  Southboro,  Au¬ 
gust  11,  1894.  He  received  his  early  education  in  the 
district  schools  of  his  native  town,  and  afterward  pur¬ 
sued  the  higher  English  branches  and  Latin  in  the  Wor¬ 
cester  schools.  He  grew  up  on  the  farm  where  his 
father  had  settled,  and  when  school  days  were  over 
apprenticed  himself  to  a  druggist  in  Worcester,  named 
Spurr.  When  he  was  seventeen  years  of  age,  seeking 
a  wider  field  for  his  energies,  he  went  to  Boston  and 
entered  the  employ  of  the  famous  druggist,  Theodore 
Metcalf.  His  energy  and  ability  as  well  as  the  knowl¬ 
edge  gained  in  the  Worcester  pharmacy  enabled  him  to 
render  valuable  service,  and  he  was  made  a  partner  in 
the  business.  In  1854  he  sold  his  interest  back  to  Mr. 
Metcalf,  and  began  business  for  himself  as  a  manufac¬ 
turing  chemist,  locating  on  Central  Street,  in  Boston. 
That  enterprise  has  become  one  of  the  largest  extract 
manufacturing  concerns  in  the  world.  At  that  time 
flavoring  extracts  were  made  by  druggists,  and  Mr. 
Burnett  was  the  first  to  manufacture  extracts  on  a 
commercial  scale  in  the  United  States.  His  first  place 
of  business  was  a  small  space  in  a  building  on  Central 
Street,  Boston.  The  business  grew  steadily  and  more 
space  was  added,  until  in  1893  larger  quarters  were 
rented  on  India  Street.  There  Mr.  Burnett  continued  to 
develop  a  steadily  growing  enterprise  as  long  as  he  lived. 
The  present  plant,  which  is  the  last  word  in  modem 
construction  and  equipment,  was  built  about  1920  by  his 
son,  Harry  Burnett  (q.  v.). 

Mr.  Burnett’s  Southboro  home,  where  his  summers 
were  spent  as  long  as  he  lived,  and  his  winters  until  1875, 
when  he  first  occupied  his  Beacon  Street  resi¬ 
dence  in  Boston,  was  the  Deerfoot  mansion,  which 

he  built  about  1850.  He  eventually  became  the 

owner  of  an  estate  in  Southboro  of  five  hun¬ 

dred  acres,  which  gave  employment  to  many.  When 
Joseph  Burnett  first  went  to  work  in  Boston,  Southboro 
had  no  railroad  facilities,  and  it  was  necessary  for  him 
to  travel  from  Southboro  to  Marlboro  by  stage.  At 


190 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


the  time  of  his  death  he  was  probably  the  oldest  com¬ 
muter  on  the  line.  Outside  his  business  and  his  family 
Joseph  Burnett’s  chief  interest  was  the  town  of  South- 
boro.  He  was  the  founder  of  Deerfoot  Farm,  and  im¬ 
ported  one  of  the  first  herds  of  thoroughbred  Jersey 
cattle  brought  to  America.  That  was  in  1854.  He  was 
much  interested  in  religious  work  and  education.  He 
founded  St.  Mark’s  Episcopal  Church,  and  after  con¬ 
ferring  with  Dr.  Coit,  of  St.  Paul’s  School,  of  Concord, 
New  Hampshire,  who  heartily  approved  of  the  idea  and 
gave  the  assistance  of  his  advice  and  experience,  Mr. 
Burnett  founded  St.  Mark’s  School  at  Southboro,  an 
institution  that  has  not  only  accomplished  much  in 
giving  splendid  preparatory  training  to  boys  but  has  done 
much  to  spread  abroad  the  fair  fame  of  the  town  of 
Southboro.  In  1878  and  1879  he  was  president  of  the  Bos¬ 
ton  Druggists’  Association.  In  1865-66  he  was  president  of 
the  Middlesex  South  Agricultural  Society.  He  was  also 
one  of  the  fifty  members  of  the  Commercial  Club  of  Bos¬ 
ton,  a  body  representing,  as  has  been  well  said,  the  “old 
school  of  merchants,  renowned  for  their  integrity  and 
conservatism,  honored  by  all  men.”  Originally  a  Daniel 
Webster  Whig,  Mr.  Burnett  in  his  later  years  was  a 
firm  friend  and  supporter  of  President  Grover  Cleve¬ 
land.  He  never  sought  office,  but  was  sometimes  induced 
to  accept  a  position  of  public  trust,  the  duties  of  which 
he  failed  not  to  discharge  with  ability  and  faithfulness. 
Appointed  as  Prison  Commissioner  by  Governor  Rice, 
he  was  chairman  of  that  body  while  in  charge  of  the 
erection  of  the  Women’s  Reformatory  at  Sherborn.  In 
Southboro  he  served  for  a  time  on  the  School  Board,  as 
Road  Commissioner,  and  as  chairman  of  the  Building 
Committee  of  the  town  hall.  A  zealous  churchman,  for¬ 
merly  a  vestryman  of  the  Church  of  the  Advent  in 
Boston,  St.  John’s  Church  of  Framingham,  and  of  St. 
Paul’s  of  Hopkinton,  Mr.  Burnett  at  the  time  of  his 
departure  from  this  life  was  senior  warden  of  St. 
Mark’s  Parish,  Southboro,  of  which  he  was  one  of  the 
founders  in  i860.  The  stone  church  was  given  by  him 
to  the  parish  in  1862.  The  death  of  Mr.  Burnett,  which 
occurred  on  August  11,  1894,  was  caused  by  an  accident 
while  he  was  out  driving.  Sincere  sorrow  was  felt  by 
all  who  had  known  him.  Habitually  considerate  of 
others,  sweet-tempered,  courteous,  and  kindly,  Mr.  Bur¬ 
nett  had  won  the  regard  of  many  friends.  In  South¬ 
boro  his  loss  was  felt  as  a  public  calamity.  On  Wednes¬ 
day,  August  15,  at  St.  Mark’s  Church,  at  10:30  A.  M., 
the  impressive  funeral  rites  were  conducted  by  Bishop 
Lawrence,  assisted  by  the  Rev.  G.  S.  Converse,  D.  D., 
and  the  Rev.  A.  St.  John  Chambre,  archdeacons.  Sor¬ 
rowing  kindred  and  friends  filled  the  church  to  over¬ 
flowing,  conspicuous  among  the  mourners  being  some 
who  had  been  his  employees  for  thirty  years. 

Joseph  Burnett  married,  in  1848,  Josephine  Cutter, 
daughter  of  Edward  and  Ruth  (Torrey)  Cutter,  of 
Boston,  Massachusetts,  and  they  were  the  parents  of 
twelve  children. 

Robert  Manton  Burnett,  son  of  Joseph  and  Josephine 
(Cutter)  Burnett,  who  with  his  brother,  Harry,  con¬ 
ducts  the  manufacturing  business  of  the  Joseph  Burnett 
Company,  and  is  also  the  head  of  Deerfoot  Farm. 
-Deerfoot  Farm  comprises  about  one  thousand  acres, 
and  is  in  every  respect  a  model  farm.  By  example  and 
precept  Mr.  Burnett  has  probably  done  more  to  raise 


the  standard  of  farming  and  dairying  in  Southboro  and 
vicinity  than  any  other  individual.  The  farm  has  busi¬ 
ness  connections  with  one  hundred  and  twenty  other 
farms,  and  for  thirty-five  years  Mr.  Burnett  has  been 
long  helping  farmers  to  get  fair  prices  for  their  prod¬ 
ucts.  He  has  for  some  years  taken  a  prominent  part 
in  State  politics  and  has  served  as  chairman  of  the 
Democratic  State  Committee.  He  is  treasurer  and  di¬ 
rector  of  the  Deerfoot  Farm  Company,  and  a  member 
of  the  board  of  directors  of  the  Boston  “Herald,”  Incor¬ 
porated,  of  the  Boston  and  Maine  Railroad,  and  of  the 
Eastern  Advertising  Agency.  His  home  is  in  Southboro, 
Massachusetts. 

Harry  Burnett,  son  of  Joseph  and  Josephine  (Cutter) 
Burnett,  was  born  in  Boston,  Massachusetts,  December 
1,  1850.  His  education  was  begun  in  the  local  schools 
of  his  birthplace,  and  he  was  graduated  from  St.  Mark’s 
Preparatory  School,  class  of  1869.  Thereafter  entering 
Harvard  University,  he  was  graduated  from  that  insti¬ 
tution  in  the  class  of  1873,  with  the  degree  of  Bachelor 
of  Arts.  Upon  the  completion  of  his  studies,  Mr.  Bur¬ 
nett  associated  himself  with  his  father,  who  was  then 
at  the  head  of  the  firm  of  Joseph  Burnett  &  Company, 
manufacturing  chemists  of  Boston,  and  has  been  con¬ 
nected  with  this  concern  ever  since.  He  has  now  for 
many  years  been  treasurer  and  general  manager  of  the 
enterprise,  and  has  been  a  definite  influence  in  the  de¬ 
velopment  and  expansion  of  the  business  to  its  present 
great  proportion.  The  concern  manufactures  flavoring 
extracts  of  every  kind,  coloring  pastes,  and  other  articles 
in  this  same  general  class  for  culinary  purposes.  In 
various  avenues  of  advance  Mr.  Burnett  is  broadly  in¬ 
fluential,  especially  in  those  organized  efforts  which 
count  for  the  welfare  or  security  of  the  people.  He  is 
manager  of  the  Massachusetts  Hospital  and  treasurer 
of  St.  Mark’s  School  of  Southboro,  a  position  which 
he  has  held  since  the  year  1894;  and  is  affiliated  unoffi¬ 
cially  with  many  other  organizations,  being  also  treasurer 
of  St.  Paul’s  Cathedral.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Har¬ 
vard  and  Tavern  clubs,  and  of  the  Somerset  Club  of 
Boston,  Massachusetts. 


STANLEY  H.  WHEELOCK— The  Wheelock  fam¬ 
ily  of  Uxbridge,  Massachusetts,  of  which  Stanley  H. 
Wheelock  is  representative,  have,  since  the  time  of  Jerry 
Wheelock,  of  the  sixth  generation,  been  residents  of 
Uxbridge,  and  identified  with  woolen  manufacturing. 
Jerry  Wheelock  was  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Daniel 
Day  &  Company.  Daniel  Day  the  builder,  in  1810,  of 
the  first  woolen  mill  in  the  vicinity  of  Uxbridge.  Jerry 
Wheelock  retired  in  1846,  and  was  succeeded  by  his 
son,  Silas  Mandeville  Wheelock,  who  for  sixty  years 
was  connected  with  woolen  manufacturing  companies. 
He,  in  turn,  was  succeeded  by  his  sons,  one  of  them, 
Arthur  Wheelock,  whose  life  has  likewise  been  spent 
in  woolen  manufacturing  in  official  position.  To  the 
business  followed  by  his  father,  grandfather,  and  great¬ 
grandfather  came  Stanley  H.  Wheelock,  from  the  modem 
training  of  The  Lowell  Textile  School,  and  in  turn 
he  has  taken  a  leading  position  in  the  textile  trade  as 
secretary-treasurer  of  The  Stanley  Woolen  Company 
of  Uxbridge. 

The  family  is  traced  in  England  back  into  the  cen¬ 
turies  to  the  founding  of  the  village  of  Wheelock,  to 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


which  village  in  1285  Hugh  de  Wheelock  secured  from 
Robert  Manning  all  claim  to  the  village.  To  this 
estate  Thomas  de  Wheelock  later  succeeded,  and  was 
made  Lord  of  Wheelock  Manor.  The  Wheelock  Coat 
of  Arms  is  as  follows : 

Arms — Argent,  a  chevron  between  three  catharine- 
wheels  sable. 

In  the  early  days  there  was  a  marriage  between  the 
Wheelocks  and  the  Leversages,  and  the  two  families 
have  since  been  associated  in  the  village  of  Wheelock. 
The  Leversage  arms  are  as  follows : 

Arms — Argent,  a  chevron  between  three  plough¬ 
shares  sable. 

Crest — A  leopard’s  head,  face  jessant  a  fleur-de-lis. 

(I.)  The  American  ancestor,  Ralph  Wheelock,  was 
bom  in  Shropshire,  England,  in  1600,  and  died  in  Med¬ 
ford  Massachusetts,  in  November,  1683.  He  was  a 
graduate  of  Cambridge,  A.  M.,  1631,  and  was  ordained 
a  clergyman  of  the  Church  of  England.  He,  however, 
became  a  non-conformist,  and  in  1637,  with  his  wife, 
Rebecca,  and  his  daughter,  came  to  New  England,  lo¬ 
cating  first  in  Watertown,  going  thence  to  Dedham,  and 
there  founded,  with  others,  the  town  and  church.  He 
was  admitted  a  freeman  of  Dedham  on  March  13,  1638, 
served  as  Selectman,  1651-1655;  and  for  several  years 
sat  in  the  General  Court  as  a  Deputy  from  Dedham. 
Ralph  Wheelock,  a  man  learned,  devout,  unselfish,  and 
practical,  opened  and  taught  the  first  public  school  in 
Dedham  in  1655.  He  was  also  a  commissioner  to  end 
causes;  a  local  Magistrate,  and  had  authority  “to  join 
persons  in  marriage.”  He  built  a  house  in  Dedham  in 
1652,  but  became  one  of  the  founders  of  Medfield  in 
1649,  and  several  years  later  moved  there,  building  his 
home  at  the  comer  of  North  and  High  streets.  He  was 
one  of  the  signers  of  the  famous  “Dedham  Covenant,” 
was  on  a  committee  to  solicit  funds  for  Harvard  Col¬ 
lege,  and  held  various  positions  of  honor  and  trust. 
He  never  resumed  preaching  after  coming  to  New 
England,  but  taught  school  all  of  his  active  years,  except 
the  two  that  he  served  as  a  member  of  the  General 
Court.  Descent  in  this  line  is  through  Benjamin 
Wheelock,  third  son  of  Ralph  and  Rebecca  Wheelock. 

(II.)  Benjamin  Wheelock,  son  of  Ralph  and  Rebecca 
Wheelock,  was  bom  in  Dedham,  Massachusetts,  January 
8,  1639-40,  but  his  youth  was  largely  spent  in  Medfield. 
He  settled  in  Mendon  in  1685,  and  there  died.  He  mar¬ 
ried,  in  1688,  Elizabeth  Bullen,  and  they  were  the 
parents  of  Benjamin,  second  of  their  sons,  of  further 
mention. 

(III.)  Benjamin  Wheelock,  son  of  Benjamin  and 
Elizabeth  (Bullen)  Wheelock,  was  born  in  Medfield, 
Massachusetts,  in  1678,  and  died  in  Mendon,  Massa¬ 
chusetts  having  been  a  farmer  of  Mendon  all  his  active 
life.  He  married,  December  9,  1700,  Huldah  Thayer, 
and  they  were  the  parents  of  eight  children,  the  seventh 
a  son,  Silas,  of  further  mention. 

(IV.)  Silas  Wheelock,  son  of  Benjamin  and  Huldah 
(Thayer)  Wheelock,  was  born  in  Mendon,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  in  March,  1718,  and  there  spent  his  life.  He  mar¬ 
ried,  May  20,  1740,  Hannah  Albee.  Their  children  num¬ 
bered  ten,  their  first  born  a  son,  Simeon,  of  further 
mention. 

(V.)  Simeon  Wheelock,  son  of  Silas  and  Hannah 


191 

(Albee)  Wheelock,  was  born  in  Mendon,  Massachusetts, 
March  29,  1741.  He  served  as  a  soldier  in  the  French 
War  of  1760,  being  orderly  to  Colonel  Christopher 
Harris,  of  a  Rhode  Island  regiment,  stationed  at  Crown 
Point.  In  1763  he  settled  in  Uxbridge,  Massachusetts; 
was  on  the  Uxbridge  Committee  of  Safety  and  Corre¬ 
spondence  in  1774;  and  marched  with  the  “minute-men” 
of  Uxbridge  on  the  “Lexington  Alarm,”  April  19,  1775, 
as  first  lieutenant  of  Captain  Joseph  Chapin’s  company 
and  remained  in  active  service  afterwards.  He  joined 
the  government  in  suppressing  Shay’s  Rebellion,  and 
was  in  business  in  Uxbridge  as  a  blacksmith,  his  shop 
said  to  have  been  opposite  his  house  in  Uxbridge,  about 
where  the  Academy  stands.  In  1773-1777  he  was  Town 
Clerk.  Shortly  before  his  death  he  sold  his  house  in 
the  village  and  moved  to  a  larger  house  three  miles 
away.  He  died  in  Springfield,  Massachusetts,  during 
Shay’s  Rebellion,  in  September,  1786,  his  death  caused 
by  a  fall  while  ascending  Arsenal  Hill.  He  married, 
November  28,  1763,  Deborah  Thayer,  of  Mendon,  a 
descendant  of  Ferdinando  Thayer,  one  of  the  pioneers. 
Lieutenant  Wheelock  left  a  wife  and  eight  children, 
descent  following  through  the  youngest  child,  Jerry 
Wheelock,  the  founder  of  woolen  manufacturing  in  the 
family,  of  further  mention. 

(VI.)  Jerry  Wheelock,  son  of  Simeon  and  Deborah 
(Thayer)  Wheelock,  was  born  in  Uxbridge,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  September  19,  1784,  and  there  died,  after  a  long 
illness,  October  10,  1861.  He  was  but  two  years  of  age 
when  his  father  died,  leaving  his  family  in  straitened 
circumstances,  but  with  a  well  educated,  capable  mother, 
who  kept  her  family  together  and  educated  them  herself 
to  a  large  extent.  The  lad,  Jerry  Wheelock,  learned  a 
trade  now  superseded  by  machinery,  later  learned  wood 
turning,  made  spools  and  bobbins,  and  later  made  chairs. 
In  1810  the  first  woolen  mill  came  to  Uxbridge,  and  in 
1811  machinery  was  installed  and  set  in  motion  by  Daniel 
Day,  the  owner  and  builder.  Jerry  Wheelock  became 
interested  in  this  mill,  and  being  a  son-in-law  of  the 
founder,  was  admitted  a  partner  in  the  firm  of  Daniel 
Day  &  Company.  Mr.  Wheelock  was  a  natural  me¬ 
chanic,  preferring  to  build  a  machine  to  operating  them, 
so  after  a  few  years  engaged  in  manufacturing  he  re¬ 
tired  from  the  company  and  engaged  as  an  “erector” 
with  Arthur  Dryden,  of  Holden,  a  manufacturer  of  wool 
carding  machines.  In  1814  the  Rivulet  Manufacturing 
Company  was  organized  at  Uxbridge,  Jerry  Wheelock 
a  shareholder,  mechanical  engineer,  and  mill  superinten¬ 
dent  during  the  first  four  years  of  its  existence.  In  1818 
he  began  to  build  woolen  mill  machinery  under  his  own 
name  and  continued  a  successful  maker  of  machinery 
until  1834.  He  invented  many  devices  and  improve¬ 
ments  in  woolen  mill  machines  and  established  the 
highest  reputation  for  excellence  in  workmanship  and 
material,  many  mills  placing  their  plants  under  his  care 
to  be  kept  in  repair  so  far  as  machinery  was  involved. 
He  became  widely  known  throughout  New  York  and 
New  England,  but  after  1834  he  retired  from  manufac¬ 
turing  machinery  and  entered  into  partnership  with 
his  sons  to  make  woolens.  This  continued  until  1846, 
when  he  retired  and  spent  the  last  fifteen  years  of  his 
life  free  from  business  cares,  but  was  practically  an 
invalid  for  several  years.  He  held  many  positions  of 
trust  that  were  faithfully  executed,  and  he  was  one  of 


192 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


the  men  who  wrought  mightily  for  the  upbuilding  of 
Uxbridge. 

Jerry  Wheelock  married,  January  24,  1811,  Suky  Day, 
daughter  of  Daniel  and  Sylvia  (Wheelock)  Day,  of 
Uxbridge.  They  were  the  parents  of  six  children,  the 
third  a  son,  Silas  Mandeville,  of  further  mention. 

(VII.)  Silas  Mandeville  Wheelock  was  born  at  Ux¬ 
bridge,  Massachusetts,  November  11,  1817,  and  died  at 
his  home  in  Uxbridge  October  18,  1901.  His  attend¬ 
ance  at  the  district  school  winter  and  summer  terms 
gave  him  twenty  weeks  of  schooling  each  year,  and  this 
was  later  supplemented  by  a  few  terms  at  private  school. 
At  the  age  of  nine  he  began  at  that  child’s  job,  “piecing 
rolls  for  the  billy,”  earning  fourteen  cents  daily.  From 
that  age  until  his  retirement  sixty  years  later,  he  was 
almost  constantly  engaged  in  some  form  of  work  con¬ 
nected  with  the  manufacture  of  woolens.  He  learned  the 
business  thoroughly  in  the  old-fashioned  way;  was 
superintendent  of  some  mill  departments;  was  manager; 
agent;  and  at  one  time  managed  the  wool  department 
of  commission  houses  in  New  York  and  Boston.  In 
1846,  when  his  father  retired,  Charles  A.  and  Silas  M. 
Wheelock  formed  the  firm  C.  A.  &  S.  M.  Wheelock,  and 
manufactured  satinets,  plaid  linseys,  and  tweeds.  They 
prospered,  and  the  business  is  yet  carried  on  in  the 
family.  In  1870  Silas  M.  Wheelock  bought  the  plant  of 
the  Harris  Woolen  Company  at  Putnam,  Connecticut, 
of  which  he  became  treasurer  and  manager.  This 
became  a  very  profitable  plant,  but  owing  to  his  other 
interests  Mr.  Wheelock,  in  1887,  retired  from  its  man¬ 
agement. 

In  1883  he  bought  the  Central  Mill  in  Uxbridge,  and 
formed  The  Calumet  Woolen  Company  to  operate  that 
extensive  plant.  In  1886  that  company  bought  the 
Uxbridge  Woolen  factory  (now  the  Hecla  Mill),  which 
they  operated  in  connection  with  the  Calumet  Mill  until 
1905.  From  1846  until  1891,  Mr.  Wheelock  was  owner 
of  Waucantuck  Mills,  as  the  plant  of  the  C.  A.  &  S.  M'. 
Wheelock  Company  was  called.  For  over  sixty  years 
Mr.  Wheelock  was  connected  with  woolen  companies  and 
always  proved  himself  a  wise  and  resourceful  manager. 
Every  debt  he  contracted  he  paid,  and  though  conserv¬ 
ative,  he  never  lacked  courage  to  follow  his  judgment  in 
entering  into  new  enterprises  or  in  meeting  emergencies. 
He  held  the  good  will  and  respect  of  his  men,  and  was 
highly  regarded  as  a  business  man  and  a  citizen.  For 
forty-three  years,  1858-1901,  he  was  a  director  of  the 
Blackstone  National  Bank. 

Mr.  Wheelock  was  originally  a  Whig  in  politics,  and 
voted  for  William  Henry  Harrison  and  for  Henry  Clay 
for  President.  He  joined  in  the  movement  that  brought 
the  Republican  party  into  being;  served  Uxbridge 
as  Selectman  for  three  years ;  and  represented 
the  Second  Worcester  Senatorial  District  in  the  Massa¬ 
chusetts  Legislature,  1888  and  1889.  He  was  a  delegate 
to  the  Republican  National  Convention  of  1900,  held 
at  Philadelphia,  that  nominated  William  McKinley  for 
the  Presidency.  He  was  a  member  of  the  First  Congre¬ 
gational  Church  and  of  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd 
Fellows,  holding  all  chairs  of  the  local  lodge. 

Silas  M.  Wheelock  married,  May  5,  1841,  Irene  Taft, 
born  in  Uxbridge,  September  19,  1816,  died  January  26, 
1900,  a  woman  of  strong  religious  faith  and  character. 
She  was  a  daughter  of  Luke  Taft,  son  of  James,  son  of 


Moses,  son  of  Captain  Joseph,  son  of  Robert  Taft,  the 
ancestor  of  the  family  in  New  England.  Silas  M.  and 
Irene  (Taft)  Wheelock  celebrated  their  golden  wedding 
day,  and  nine  years  later  the  wife  passed  away,  followed 
the  next  year  by  her  husband,  he  dying  at  his  home  in 
Wheelockville,  Uxbridge,  October  48,  1901,  in  his  eighty- 
fourth  year.  They  are  buried  in  Prospect  Hill  Ceme¬ 
tery,  Uxbridge.  They  were  the  parents  of  five  children: 

1.  Ellen  Maria,  born  September  2,  1842,  died  in  1871, 
wife  of  Eben  B.  Haywood.  2.  Eugene  Augustus,  born 
February  15,  1846,  a  manufacturer  of  woolens;  married 
Sarah  Smith  Taft.  3.  Alice  Augusta,  born  January  22, 
1849,  died  in  September,  1891,  wife  of  Henry  R.  Smith. 
4.  Arthur,  of  further  mention.  5.  Henry,  born  January 
14,  1857,  died  November  13,  1881,  a  woolen  manufac¬ 
turer.  He  married,  November  3,  1880,  Jennie  G.  Taft. 

(VIII.)  Arthur  Wheelock,  son  of  Silas  M.  and  Irene 
(Taft)  Wheelock,  was  born  in  Uxbridge,  Massachusetts, 
March  26,  1851,  and  there  resides  (1923).  He  was  edu¬ 
cated  in  Uxbridge  grammar  and  high  schools  and  at 
Wilbraham  Academy.  He  began  business  life  at  the  age 
of  seventeen,  with  the  firm  of  C.  A.  &  S.  M.  Wheelock, 
continuing  as  bookkeeper  and  assistant  buyer  until  1883, 
when  he  became  agent  and  a  director  of  the  Calumet 
Woolen  Company,  and  succeeded  his  father  as  treasurer 
in  1889.  In  1905  he  liquidated  the  Calumet  Woolen 
Company  and  bought  their  Calumet  Mill,  and  the  same 
year  he  organized  the  Stanley  Woolen  Company,  and 
has  been  president  of  same  since  that  time.  He  is  now 
president  of  the  Putnam  Woolen  Company;  vice-presi¬ 
dent  and  director  of  the  Blackstone  National  Bank;  life 
trustee  of  the  Uxbridge  Savings  Bank,  and  a  trustee  of 
the  Prospect  Hill  Cemetery  Corporation.  He  was  a 
promoter  and  first  president  of  the  Uxbridge  and  North- 
bridge  Electric  Company;  and  is  a  life  trustee  of  the 
Uxbridge  Free  Public  Library. 

In  politics  Mr.  Wheelock  is  a  life-long  Republican ; 
an  ex-director  of  the  Home  Market  Club  of  Boston,  and 
is  an  ex- Selectman  and  School  Committeeman.  His 
fraternal  order  is  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fel¬ 
lows,  he  being  a  Past  Grand.  His  religious  faith  is 
Unitarian,  and  for  half  a  century  he  has  been  a  member 
of  the  Uxbridge  church. 

Arthur  Wheelock  married  (first),  October  15,  1873, 
Emogene  Atchinson,  born  in  Wilbraham,  Massachusetts, 
died  in  Uxbridge,  April  12,  1898,  daughter  of  Daniel 
Atchinson.  Mr.  Wheelock  married  (second),  June  12, 
1900,  Harriet  E.  Fuller,  of  Springfield,  Massachusetts. 
To  Arthur  and  Emogene  (Atchinson)  Wheelock  two 
children  were  bom:  1.  Stanley  H.,  of  further  mention. 

2.  Anne,  a  graduate  of  Uxbridge  High  School,  the  Burn¬ 
ham  School  of  Northampton,  and  Smith  College.  She 
married  Donald  G.  Robbins,  of  Springfield.  She  died 
October  5,  1918,  leaving  two  children:  Donald  G.,  Jr., 
and  Arthur  W. 

(IX.)  Stanley  H.  Wheelock  son  of  Arthur  and  Emo- 
gfene  (Atchinson)  Wheelock,  was  born  in  Uxbridge, 
Massachusetts,  July  15,  1879,  and  there  resides  (1923), 
fourth  of  his  name  in  direct  line  to  bear  prominent  part 
in  woolen  manufacture  in  Uxbridge.  After  public 
school  study  he  finished  college  preparations  at  Phillips 
Academy,  Exeter,  New  Hampshire,  graduating  in  1898, 
and  passing  thence  to  Williams  College,  and  there  re¬ 
ceiving  his  A.  B.  with  the  class  of  1902.  He  then  pur- 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


193 


sued  a  technical  course  at  Lowell  Textile  School,  pre¬ 
paratory  to  entering  the  family  business,  finishing  with 
graduation  in  1905  and  completing  the  three-year  course 
in  two  years. 

During  these  educational  years  he  had  the  advantage 
of  association  with  his  father  in  his  textile  manufac¬ 
turing  concern,  which  fact  made  his  course  through 
textile  school  both  easier  and  more  valuable  to  him.  In 
1905  the  Stanley  Woolen  Company  was  organized  by 
Arthur  Wheelock  and  his  son,  Stanley  H.,  and  with  this 
corporation  both  are  yet  connected,  Stanley  H.  Wheelock, 
the  present  secretary-treasurer  and  a  member  of  the 
directorate.  The  Stanley  Mill  has  the  distinction  of 
being  the  first  American  mill  to  manufacture  domestic 
woolens  for  men’s  wear.  Mr.  Wheelock  is  also  a  trus¬ 
tee  of  The  Uxbridge  Savings  Bank. 

Like  his  father  and  grandfather,  Stanley  H.  Wheelock 
is  a  Republican  in  politics,  and  has  for  five  or  six  years 
been  a  member  of  the  State  Republican  Committee.  He 
served  as  a  member  of  the  Town  Republican  Committee 
for  many  years,  a  large  part  of  the  time  as  secretary; 
has  been  for  several  years  a  trustee  of  the  Uxbridge 
Free  Public  Library;  and  for  three  years  president  of 
the  board  and  therefore  a  member  ex  officio  of  the  Taft 
Memorial  Park  Association.  He  has  been  a  member  of 
the  Uxbridge  School  Commission  for  a  number  of 
years.  He  is  a  member  of  King  Solomon’s  Lodge,  Free 
and  Accepted  Masons ;  Uxbridge  Lodge,  Independent 
Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  of  which  he  is  Past  Grand;  the 
Williams  Club  of  New  York,  and  the  Tatnuck  Country 
Club  of  Worcester.  He  is  also  a  member  and  acting 
president  of  the  Worcester  County  Manufacturers’  Tex¬ 
tile  Association,  and  one  of  the  directors  of  the  Black- 
stone  Valley  Agricultural  Society  for  many  years. 

During  the  World  War  he  served  as  chairman  of  the 
local  Food  Conservation  Commission  and  also  served 
on  the  Public  Safety  Commission,  and  had  charge  of 
several  of  the  war  drives  for  funds,  including  the  Young 
Men’s  Christian  Association,  and  had  charge  of  the  Red 
Cross  and  Salvation  Army  drives,  and  served  on  the 
Liberty  Loan  committees. 

Stanley  H.  Wheelock  married,  December  18,  1915, 
Harriet  F.  Tobey,  born  September  13,  1887,  daughter 
of  Walter  and  Mary  (Baber)  Tobey,  both  her  parents 
born  in  New  York  State.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Wheelock  are 
the  parents  of  three  sons:  1.  Philip  Stanley,  born  in 
Boston,  August  31,  1916.  2.  Arthur  Kingsland,  born  in 
Boston,  September  19,  1918.  3.  Walter  Tobey,  born  in 
Boston,  July  4,  1923.  The  family  home  is  in  Uxbridge, 
Massachusetts,  a  town  to  which  the  Revolutionary  an¬ 
cestor,  Lieutenant  Simeon  Wheelock  led  the  Wheelocks 
in  1763. 


C.  BERTRAM  GAY,  M.  D.,  a  leading  physician  and 
surgeon  of  Fitchburg,  Massachusetts,  eminently  suc¬ 
cessful  in  his  chosen  calling  and  prominent  in  all  en¬ 
deavors  for  community  and  benevolent  advance,  is  a 
broadly  representative  figure  in  the  professional  world 
of  Worcester  County.  Coming  of  old  New  England 
stock,  he  is  a  son  of  Henry  Gordon  Gay,  who  was  born 
in  Lebanon,  Connecticut,  and  was  a  widely  known 
clergyman  of  the  Baptist  church.  Rev.  Mr.  Gay  was 
a  graduate  of  Brown  University,  of  the  class  of  1865, 
and  served  in  the  Civil  War  as  a  member  of  the  26th 


Regiment,  Connecticut  Volunteer  Infantry.  He  was  mus¬ 
tered  out  of  the  service  with  the  rank  of  second  lieu¬ 
tenant.  He  became  one  of  the  widely  prominent  min¬ 
isters  of  the  Massachusetts  Conference,  a  man  revered 
and  loved  by  all  that  knew  him  and  a  force  for  good 
in  every  field  in  which  he  labored.  He  died  in  April, 
1917,  in  the  eighty-second  year  of  his  age.  Rev.  Mr.  Gay 
married  Hattie  A.  Marshall,  who  was  bom  at  Hudson, 
New  Hampshire,  and  died  in  August,  1917,  at  the  age 
of  seventy-six  years. 

Dr.  Gay  was  born  at  Hudson,  Massachusetts,  Febru¬ 
ary  5,  1873.  His  education  was  begun  in  the  public 
schools  of  Southboro,  Massachusetts,  and  he  was  grad¬ 
uated  from  Peter’s  High  School  in  the  class  of  1890. 
Subsequently  entering  Worcester  Academy  as  a  junior 
of  the  class  of  1892,  he  was  graduated  from  that  institu¬ 
tion,  then  later  covered  his  pre-medical  studies  in  a  two 
years’  course  at  Brown  University.  Finally  entering  the 
medical  department  of  the  University  of  Pennsylvania,  at 
Philadelphia,  he  was  graduated  from  that  institution  in 
the  class  of  1899.  Meanwhile,  in  June,  1898,  Dr.  Gay 
enlisted  in  the  Medical  Corps  of  the  United  States 
Army  for  service  in  the  Spanish-American  War  and 
was  active  in  this  connection  until  the  following  October, 
when  he  resumed  his  medical  studies  at  the  University 
of  Pennsylvania.  In  the  autumn  following  his  gradu¬ 
ation  from  medical  school,  Dr.  Gay  entered  Rhode 
Island  Hospital,  at  Providence,  as  a  surgical  interne, 
and  was  thus  engaged  until  the  summer  of  1900.  He  was 
later  made  assistant  physician  at  the  Butler  Hospital  of 
Providence,  an  institution  for  the  treatment  of  nervous 
and  mental  diseases.  For  four  years  he  filled  this  im¬ 
portant  position,  then  in  1904  came  to  Fitchburg  and 
entered  upon  the  private  practice  of  his  profession.  Be¬ 
ginning  along  general  lines  of  medicine  and  surgery 
Dr.  Gay  has  placed  himself  very  high  in  the  ranks  of 
the  profession,  and  has  won  extensive  fame  as  a  sur¬ 
geon.  For  the  past  nine  years  he  has  been  a  member  of 
the  surgical  staff  of  the  Burbank  Hospital  of  Fitchburg, 
and  now  handles  scarcely  any  except  surgical  cases. 
Dr.  Gay  is  a  member  of  the  Fitchburg  Medical  Society, 
of  which  he  was  formerly  president;  a  member  of  the 
Worcester  North  District  Medical  Society,  the  Massa¬ 
chusetts  State  Medical  Society,  a  life  member  of  the 
Rhode  Island  State  Medical  Society,  and  a  member  of 
the  American  Medical  Association.  He  is  further  a 
member  and  vice-president  of  the  Clinical  and  Surgical 
Association  of  Massachusetts.  In  civic  and  other  pro¬ 
gressive  activities  of  a  local  nature  Dr.  Gay  takes  a 
leading  part.  He  served  as  President  of  the  Common 
Council  of  Fitchburg  during  1915  and  1916,  and  was 
for  three  years  a  member  of  that  body.  For  many 
years  he  has  been  active  in  the  work  of  the  Young 
Men’s  Christian  Association,  and  for  the  past  three 
years  has  served  that  organization  as  president.  He  is 
a  member  of  Aurora  Lodge,  Free  and  Accepted  Masons, 
of  Fitchburg;  the  Masonic  Club;  the  Fay  Club,  of  which 
he  was  elected  president  in  1922,  and  now  (1923)  is 
still  serving  in  that  office,  and  is  also  a  member  of  the 
Oakhill  Country  Club.  He  is  a  member  of  the  First 
Baptist  Church  of  Fitchburg. 

Dr.  Gay  married,  on  July  3,  1917,  Mettie  Fstella 
Holder  of  Lenoir,  North  Carolina,  and  they  have  two 
children:  Gwendolyn  and  Lorene  Maude. 


Wor — 13 


194 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


HON.  WILFRID  J.  LAMOUREUX— In  a  very 
practical  line  of  mercantile  endeavor,  Wilfrid  J. 
Lamoureux  is  winning  large  success  in  Southbridge, 
Massachusetts,  and  in  his  progress  is  definitely  contrib¬ 
uting  to  the  public  welfare.  Mr.  Lamoureux  is  a  native 
of  this  community,  a  son  of  George  J.  Lamoureux,  who 
was  born  at  St.  Ours,  Canada,  and  was  engaged  as  a 
carpenter  until  his  death.  He  came  to  Southbridge  as 
a  young  man  and  became  one  of  the  prominent  citizens 
of  this  community,  serving  as  Overseer  of  the  Poor  for 
a  period  of  eleven  years  and  bearing  a  worthy  part  in 
all  forward  movements  until  his  death,  which  occurred 
in  1908.  The  mother,  Domitilde  (Bourdeau)  La¬ 
moureux,  was  born  at  Leicester,  Massachusetts,  and 
died  in  1906. 

Wilfrid  J.  Lamoureux  was  born  in  Southbridge, 
Massachusetts,  December  13,  1869.  His  education  was 
begun  in  the  local  public  schools,  and  as  a  young  man 
he  attended  Grand  Seminary,  at  Montreal,  and  also  St. 
Joseph’s  Academy,  at  Watertown,  New  York.  Upon 
the  completion  of  his  education  Mr.  Lamoureux  re¬ 
turned  to  Worcester  County,  Massachusetts,  and  for 
about  six  years  he  was  employed  by  the  American  Op¬ 
tical  Company  of  Southbridge.  Then  in  the  year  1900 
he  purchased  the  business  formerly  owned  and  conducted 
by  Charles  S.  Ayers,  who  carried  on  a  house  furnishing 
business.  Mr.  Lamoureux  has  been  at  the  head  of  this 
interest  continuously  since  and  has  developed  it  exten¬ 
sively,  adding  new  lines  of  stock  from  time  to  time, 
and  in  every  way  keeping  step  with  the  advance  of  the 
moment  in  his  general  field.  With  headquarters  at  No. 
86  Main  Street,  he  now  has  one  of  the  foremost  enter- 
prices  of  its  kind  in  this  section,  and  especially  in  the 
furniture  department  is  doing  a  very  extensive  and 
lucrative  business.  Mr.  Lamoureux  is  a  member  of  the 
Southbridge  Chamber  of  Commerce,  and  is  one  of  the 
foremost  figures  in  civic  advance  in  this  community. 
From  his  majority  a  supporter  of  the  Democratic  party 
and  a  worker  in  its  ranks,  Mr.  Lamoureux  has  served 
in  many  public  offices  of  large  responsibility.  He  was 
first  made  a  member  of  the  Democratic  Town  Com¬ 
mittee  in  the  year  1908  and  has  served  on  that  body  con¬ 
tinuously  since,  acting  as  chairman  of  the  committee 
for  four  years.  Since  the  year  1911  he  has  been  a 
Selectman  of  the  town  and  its  chairman  since  1913,  and 
for  nine  years  he  has  acted  as  Sewer  Commissioner. 
Serving  on  the  Finance  Committee  for  twelve  years,  he 
has  acted  as  chairman  for  one-half  of  the  time,  and 
for  six  years  has  been  a  member  of  the  Library  Com¬ 
mittee.  These  local  offices,  however,  are  only  a  part  of 
the  public  service  which  has  given  Mr.  Lamoureux  a 
leading  position  in  the  community.  In  the  year  1909  he 
was  elected  to  the  Massachusetts  State  Legislature  and 
served  through  two  successive  years,  1910-11,  inclusive, 
and  again  in  1918-19  served  this  community  as  repre¬ 
sentative  to  the  same  body.  His  work  as  a  legislator 
was  marked  with  many  constructive  phases,  and  while 
the  did  much  for  his  home  community  and  this  general 
section,  he  nevertheless  gave  his  best  efforts  to  those 
interests  which  affected  the  welfare  of  the  entire  Com¬ 
monwealth.  In  the  year  1920  Mr.  Lamoureux  was  sent 
as  a  delegate  to  the  Democratic  National  Convention 
in  San  Francisco.  In  all  his  public  service  he  has  dis¬ 
played  the  breadth  of  mental  vision  and  the  progressive¬ 


ness  of  spirit  which  count  for  permanent  well-being  in 
the  community  and  the  State.  Mr.  Lamoureux  has  done 
much  for  Southbridge  in  various  ways,  particularly  in 
encouraging  those  institutions  which  give  the  people  an 
opportunity  to  plan  for  their  future  and  establish  them¬ 
selves  in  positions  of  dignity  and  responsibility.  He  was 
one  of  the  founders  and  was  the  first  president  of  the 
Southbridge  Cooperative  Bank,  and  was  one  of  the  in¬ 
corporators  and  is  still  a  director  of  the  People’s 
National  Bank.  He  has  served  as  Notary  Public  for 
twenty-seven  years.  Fraternally  Mr.  Lamoureux  is 
affiliated  with  the  Knights  of  Columbus ;  the  Catholic 
Order  of  Foresters,  of  which  organization  he  is  at  the 
present  time  (1923)  State  Treasurer ;  the  Fraternal  Order 
of  Eagles;  the  Improved  Order  of  Red  Men;  and  the 
Societe  St.  Jean  de  Baptiste.  He  is  also  a  member  of 
the  Circle  Canadien,  and  attends  the  Notre  Dame  Roman 
Catholic  Church. 

Mr.  Lamoureux  married,  on  October  1,  1894,  Georgi- 
ana  Berthiaume,  who  was  born  at  Southbridge,  and  they 
are  the  parents  of  two  children :  Leo  G.,  who  was  born 
August  22,  1895,  served  in  the  United  States  Army 
during  the  World  War  as  a  member  of  the  Military 
Police,  and  married  Mabel  Nichols,  of  Brimfield;  and 
Annette  L.,  born  on  February  2,  1898,  married  Wilfrid 
C.  Granger,  D.  D.  S.,  of  Worcester,  and  has  one  son, 
Wilfrid  Richard,  born  December  23,  1922. 


CHESTER  B.  KENDALL,  in  the  commercial  activ¬ 
ities  of  the  city  of  Gardner,  Massachusetts,  is  a  figure 
of  more  than  usual  prominence,  standing  at  the  head  of 
a  long  established  coal  and  ice  business,  and  although 
more  than  four  score  years  have  passed  since  his  birth, 
he  is  still  active  in  he  management  of  this  interest  and 
alert  to  the  progress  of  the  times,  and  is  found  at  his 
desk  every  day.  Mr.  Kendall  is  a  son  of  Cruso  and 
Minerva  (Gates)  Kendall,  both  natives  of  Hubbardston, 
Massachusetts.  Cruso  Kendall  was  during  his  lifetime 
engaged  in  the  manufacture  of  churns  in  Hubbardston, 
but  was  cut  down  in  the  flower  of  his  manhood,  when 
the  subject  of  this  sketch  was  only  an  infant.  The 
mother  subsequently  married  Silas  Joslin,  but  is  long 
since  deceased.  Chester  B.  Kendall  was  bom  at  Hub¬ 
bardston,  Massachusetts,  October  18,  1842.  His  educa¬ 
tion  was  acquired  in  the  graded  schools  of  that  com¬ 
munity  and  his  stepfather  being  a  man  of  humble  means 
the  boy  was  compelled  to  leave  school  at  an  early  age 
and  to  provide  for  his  own  needs.  He  worked  in  Hub¬ 
bardston  for  a  time  at  such  odd  jobs  as  he  could  secure, 
then,  in  1861,  at  the  breaking  out  of  the  Civil  War,  he 
came  to  Gardner  and  secured  a  position  in  the  chair 
factory  of  Derby  &  Knowlton.  About  a  year  and  a 
half  later  he  changed  to  the  plant  of  Wright  &  Moore, 
with  which  firm  he  remained  for  about  four  years. 
Then  with  this  experience  behind  him  and  little  more 
than  his  own  courage  and  faith  in  himself,  Mr.  Kendall 
struck  out  for  himself,  buying  and  operating  a  stage 
and  express  line  between  Gardner  and  Hubbardston. 
This  interest  he  operated  successfully  for  about  eight 
years,  its  operation  meaning  much  to  the  communities 
along  the  route,  before  the  present  day  of  easy  and 
convenient  transportation.  Meanwhile,  in  1872,  Mr.  Ken¬ 
dall  established  his  present  coal  and  ice  business,  be¬ 
ginning  in  a  small  way,  with  one  horse  and  wagon.  He 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


195 


peddled  ice  three  days  in  the  week,  handling  some 
three  hundred  tons  during  the  frst  summer.  This  in 
comparison  with  his  present  business  gives  a  clear  idea 
of  its  growth,  as  in  the  year  just  passed  he  sold  at  retail 
some  5,000  tons  and  wholesaled  fully  15,000  tons  of 
ice.  Mr.  Kendall  recently  bought  out  the  coal  concern 
long  known  under  the  firm  name  of  the  Osgood  &  Son 
Coal  Company.  He  had  for  some  years  handled  from 
10,000  to  15,000  tons  of  coal  annually,  but  now  his  output 
is  greatly  increased.  The  Osgood  interests  comprise 
one  of  the  oldest  coal  concerns  in  Worcester  County, 
and  the  merger  has  placed  under  Mr.  Kendall’s  immedi¬ 
ate  direction  a  very  extensive  business.  Mr.  Kendall 
is  a  member  of  the  Gardner  Chamber  of  Commerce,  and 
in  all  civic  affairs  lends  his  influence  to  the  promotion 
of  the  public  good.  He  served  for  seven  years  as  a 
member  of  the  Board  of  Selectmen  of  Gardner,  his 
period  of  activity  in  this  connection  extending  from  the 
year  1884  to  1891.  Fraternally  he  is  identified  with 
William  Ellison  Lodge,  No.  185,  Independent  Order  of 
Odd  Fellows,  of  which  he  is  Past  Noble  Grand;  and  is 
also  a  member  of  the  Rebekahs. 

Mr.  Kendall  married,  on  December  28,  1869,  Josephine 
Morse,  of  Hubbardston,  and  they  have  three  children : 
1.  Florence  E.,  at  home.  2.  Harry  S.,  who  married 
Marion  Mason,  of  Baldwinsville,  Massachusetts,  and 
they  are  the  parents  of  two  children :  Chester  M.  and 
Donald  W.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Ancient  Free  and 
Accepted  Masons  of  Gardner;  the  Benevolent  and  Pro¬ 
tective  Order  of  Elks  of  Gardner;  the  Gardner  Boat 
Club,  Gardner  Chamber  of  Commerce,  Oak  Hill  Country 
Club,  and  the  Ridgley  Club.  3.  Ernest  L.,  who  married 
Linnie  Searls,  of  Templeton,  Massachusetts,  and  they 
have  a  son,  Richard  Searls.  He  is  a  member  of  the 
Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks,  the  Gardner 
Boat  Club,  and  the  Gardner  Chamber  of  Commerce. 
Both  sons,  Harry  S.  and  Ernest  L-,  are  managing  the 
business  under  the  firm  name  of  C.  B.  Kendall  Com¬ 
pany.  The  family  attends  the  Unitarian  church,  of 
which  Mrs.  Kendall  is  a  member. 


JOHN  WHEELDON,  general  manager  of  the 
Wickwire  Spencer  Steel  Corporation  of  Worcester, 
Massachusetts,  was  born  in  Manchester,  England,  Sep¬ 
tember  16,  1875,  son  of  Edward  and  Martha  (Cart¬ 
wright)  Wheeldon,  the  former  of  whom  was  a  native 
of  Buxton,  Derbyshire,  and  the  latter  of  whom  was 
born  in  Manchester,  England.  The  father  became  a 
skilled  steel  roller,  and  was  one  of  the  three  men  sent 
to  America  by  Bedson,  the  machinery  manufacturer  of 
Manchester,  to  install  the  first  continuous  rod  mill  in 
America  for  the  Washburn-Moen  Company  of  Worces¬ 
ter,  Massachusetts.  That  was  in  1876.  Mr.  Wheeldon 
came  under  a  two-year  contract  to  install  and  start  the 
operation  of  the  plant,  and  when  the  term  of  his  con¬ 
tract  had  expired  he  was  prevailed  upon  to  continue 
with  the  firm,  and  accordingly  he  sent  for  his  wife  and 
family  to  join  him.  He  continued  with  the  Washburn- 
Moen  Company  and  their  successor,  the  American 
Steel  and  Wire  Company,  until  his  death,  in  1904.  He 
was  a  member  of  the  Sons  of  Saint  George  of  Worces¬ 
ter,  the  Knights  of  Pythias,  and  the  Independent  Order 
of  Odd  Fellows  of  Manchester. 

John  Wheeldon  was  educated  in  the  grammar  and 


high  schools  of  Worcester,  and  at  the  age  of  fourteen 
years  went  to  work  in  the  rolling  mill  of  the  Washburn- 
Moen  Company,  but  though  his  school  training  ended 
at  that  time,  his  education  has  been  continued  through¬ 
out  his  career.  Mr.  Wheeldon  very  modestly  disclaims 
possession  of  more  than  a  common  school  education, 
but  one  who  has  followed  his  career  closely  for  years 
is  authority  for  the  statement  that  he  was  born  a 
student,  and  that  since  leaving  school  down  to  and  in¬ 
cluding  the  present  time  there  never  has  been  an  extended 
period  when  he  was  not  devoting  a  share  of  his  spare 
time  to  serious  study.  And  this  must  be  true,  for  he 
could  not,  without  a  well-trained  mind  and  a  store  of 
knowledge  outside  the  practical  and  technical  details  of 
his  business,  meet  all  the  varied  requirements  of 
an  executive  position  of  such  importance  as  the  one 
which  he  ably  fills.  Mr.  Wheeldon’s  career  offers  inspi¬ 
ration  to  any  aspiring  lad,  for  he  has  won  his  way  to 
the  top  by  his  own  unaided  efforts,  and  in  doing  so  has 
had  to  overcome  disadvantages  and  obstacles  such  as 
few  of  the  youth  of  the  present  day  are  called  upon  to 
face.  For  instance,  when  he  went  to  work  in  the  mill 
his  working  day  was  twelve  hours  and  his  compensation 
five  cents  an  hour.  Later,  we  find  him  in  the  roll  shop, 
turning  rolls  and  working  his  way  up  until  he  became 
roll  designer  at  the  South  Works  of  the  American  Steel 
and  Wire  Company.  He  was  made  boss  roll  turner  in 
1897,  and  after  he  had  been  in  that  position  about  a 
year  he  was  put  in  charge  of  the  34-inch  blooming  mill 
as  foreman.  This  was  practically  a  new  mill  and  he 
started  it  in  operation.  After  about  two  years  he  was 
made  night  superintendent  and  continued  in  that  posi¬ 
tion  for  some  five  years.  He  was  then  (1907)  sent  to 
New  Haven,  Connecticut,  to  establish  the  company’s 
plant  there.  A  year  later  he  was  brought  back  to 
Worcester  and  made  superintendent  of  the  North  Works 
of  the  company.  After  two  years  he  was  sent  to  Cleve¬ 
land  to  build  up  the  company’s  Cuyahoga  plant  there, 
and  continued  in  charge  for  five  and  a  half  years.  He 
was  then  recalled  to  Worcester  and  made  superintendent 
of  the  company’s  South  Works  plant — the  very  mill  in 
which,  as  a  boy,  he  had  begun  his  career,  sweeping 
floors  and  carrying  water.  After  a  year  in  that  position 
he  resigned  to  accept  the  general  managership  of  the 
Elyria  Iron  and  Steel  Company  of  Cleveland,  Ohio.  He 
was  in  that  position  when  the  United  States  entered  the 
World  War,  and  after  having  spent  about  one  and  a 
half  years  at  Cleveland,  he  resigned  to  take  charge  of 
the  transportation  of  freight  for  the  United  States  Gov¬ 
ernment  at  Yorktown,  Virginia.  In  1919  he  entered 
the  employ  of  the  Spencer  Wire  Company  on  special 
work,  and  on  March  1  of  that  year  was  appointed  gen¬ 
eral  superintendent  of  the  Spencer  Wire  Company,  in 
charge  of  the  Webster  Street  works  and  of  the  Wire 
Village  plant  at  Spencer.  In  November,  1919,  Mr. 
Wheeldon  was  made  superintendent  of  the  Clinton 
Wright  Company,  which  was  formed  by  merging  the 
Spencer  Wire  Company’s  properties,  the  American 
Spring  Company’s  properties,  the  National  Wire  Com¬ 
pany,  the  Wright  Wire  Company,  and  the  Clinton  Wire 
Cloth  Company  of  Clinton,  and  he  served  in  that  official 
capacity  until  August,  1922,  when  he  was  made  general 
manager  of  the  Wickwire  Spencer  Steel  Corporation, 
the  Wickwire  interests  having  come  into  the  combination 


196 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


about  1920.  Wr.  Wheeldon  has  about  forty-five  hun¬ 
dred  men  under  his  supervision,  and  he  holds  their 
confidence  and  their  loyalty  in  a  high  degree. 

The  following  estimate  of  Mr.  Wheeldon’s  personality, 
character,  and  work,  made  by  one  who  is  intimately  ac¬ 
quainted  with  his  career,  is  enlightening: 

“He  has  a  seemingly  inexhaustible  store  of  energy,” 
says  this  impartial  observer,  “a  nervous  temperament, 
is  quick  in  action,  both  mental  and  physical, — and 
knows  human  nature.  He  is  a  born  diplomat,  but 
knows  how  and  when  to  be  firm  and  unyielding.  Hav¬ 
ing  traveled  all  the  way  from  floor  sweeper  to  general 
manager,  he  knows  by  practical  experience  the  view¬ 
point  and  the  psychology  of  the  men  in  his  employ. 
Moreover,  they  know  that  he  has  come  from  the  ranks, 
and  this  fact,  together  with  absolute  fairness  in  his 
dealings,  holds  the  respect,  confidence,  and  loyalty  of 
his  men.  They  do  not  stand  in  awe  of  him.  He  has 
won  his  way  by  indefatigable  industry,  by  the  natural 
endowment  of  a  fine  intelligence,  and  by  a  fine  sense 
of  honor  and  loyalty  to  those  whose  interests  he 
serves.” 

In  addition  to  his  responsibilities  in  connection  with 
the  Wickwire  Spencer  Steel  Company,  Mr.  Wheeldon 
is  also  a  member  of  the  board  of  directors  and  vice- 
president  of  the  American  Wire  Fabrics  Corporation. 
Fraternally  he  is  affiliated  with  Montacute  Lodge,  Free 
and  Accepted  masons,  of  Worcester,  in  which  order  he 
has  taken  all  the  York  and  Scottish  Rite  degrees,  and  is 
a  member  of  Aleppo  Temple,  Ancient  Arabic  Order 
Nobles  of  the  Mystic  Shrine,  of  Boston;  and  of  Aletheia 
Grotto  of  Worcester.  He  is  also  a  member  of  Ridgley 
Lodge,  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows ;  Knights  of 
Pythias ;  and  of  the  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of 
Elks.  He  is  well  known  in  club  circles,  being  a  mem¬ 
ber  of  the  Commonwealth  Club,  Rotary  Club,  Temple 
Club,  Worcester  Country  Club,  of  Blue  Grass  Country 
Club  of  Cave  City,  Kentucky;  and  of  Tatassit  Canoe 
Club,  of  Unity  Club,  and  of  Claiborne  Yacht  Club  of 
Cleveland,  Ohio. 

Mr.  Wheeldon  married  Anna  Frederickton,  who  was 
born  in  Worcester,  Massachusetts,  daughter  of  Gustav 
Frederickton.  Mrs.  Wheeldon  is  very  active  in  the 
work  of  Trinity  Methodist  Episcopal  Church.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Wheeldon  are  the  parents  of  two  children:  Ed¬ 
ward  Stanley,  who  was  born  in  1903,  and  is  a  student  at 
Huntington  Preparatory  School,  in  Boston;  and  Marion 
Alberta,  who  was  born  in  1907. 


ALVAH  CROCKER — The  name  of  Crocker  has 
become  a  prominent  one  in  Worcester  County,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  especially  in  the  town  of  Fitchburg,  where  for 
half  a  century  Alvah  Crocker  was  identified  with  all  the 
important  interests  of  the  community,  chief  among  them 
being  the  building  of  the  railroad  that  connected  Fitch¬ 
burg  with  Boston,  and  at  the  same  time  successfully 
carried  on  the  business  of  paper  manufacturing,  besides 
serving  in  the  State  Legislature  and  later  in  Congress. 
Put  to  work  in  a  paper  factory  when  but  eight  years 
old,  with  scant  opportunity  for  education,  there  was  ap¬ 
parently  little  in  his  early  environment  to  prepare  him 
for  a  successful  career,  either  in  business  or  in  service 
to  his  fellow  men.  During  his  entire  boyhood  and 
youth  the  monotony  of  twelve  hours  a  day  of  hard 
manual  labor,  at  a  daily  compensation  of  twenty-five 
cents,  was  varied  only  by  six  weeks  each  year  when  he 
was  permitted  to  attend  school.  Truly  this  would  to-day 
be  considered  a  poor  preparation  for  a  successful  life, 


and  the  fact  that  Alvah  Crocker  did  succeed  in  spite  of 
his  limitations  argues  for  other  influences  than  environ¬ 
ment,  and  these  may  possibly  be  found  in  his  environ¬ 
ment. 

(I.)  The  Crocker  family  was  of  great  distinctive 
antiquity  in  the  annals  of  Old  England.  Captain  John 
Crocker,  the  great-grandfather  of  Alvah  Crocker,  was 
bom  in  England  in  1692,  and  upon  coming  to  New  Eng¬ 
land,  settled  in  Newburyport,  Massachusetts,  where  he 
was  both  a  skipper  and  a  ship  owner.  At  that  time  the 
town  was  famous  for  its  shipbuilding,  and  was  one  of 
the  most  active  ports  in  the  colonies.  In  1748  Captain 
Crocker  obtained  permission  from  the  town  to  erect  a 
rope  walk,  the  first  to  be  built  there.  He  married,  in 
1 727,  Mary  Savage,  daughter  of  Thomas  Savage,  and 
had  four  sons  and  four  daughters.  He  died  in  1763. 

(II.)  Benjamin  Crocker,  the  third  child  of  Captain 
John  and  Mary  (Savage)  Crocker,  was  born  in  Boston 
in  1732,  and  was  reared  and  lived  in  Newburyport.  He 
was  also  interested  in  shipping  and  was  a  part  owner 
with  his  father  of  the  brig  “Ranger”  in  1758.  He  mar¬ 
ried,  September  9,  1761,  Sarah  Somerby,  daughter  of 
Samuel  Somerby,  of  Hampton,  New  Hampshire,  and 
had  nine  children,  the  eighth  child  being  Deacon  Samuel, 
the  father  of  Alvah. 

(III.)  Deacon  Samuel  Crocker  was  born  in  New¬ 
buryport  March  22,  1774,  two  years  before  his  father’s 
death.  He  was  brought  up  in  Newburyport,  attending 
school  there  and  afterwards  learning  the  paper-making 
trade.  In  1796  he  moved  to  Leominster,  Massachusetts, 
and  entered  the  employment  of  Nichols  &  Kendall,  who 
had  just  started  the  first  paper  mill  there.  This  partner¬ 
ship  was  dissolved  in  1804,  but  Samuel  Crocker  con¬ 
tinued  in  the  employ  of  Jonas  Kendall,  who  acquired 
the  business.  The  house  in  which  he  lived  and  raised  his 
family  still  stands.  Religious  zeal  was  Deacon  Crocker’s 
outstanding  characteristic,  and  he  and  his  wife  were 
active  and  influential  members  of  the  Baptist  church. 
It  is  said  that  he  rarely  conversed  without  introducing 
the  subject  of  religion,  and  that  the  only  books  in  his 
home  besides  the  Bible  were  “Edwards  on  Religious 
Affection,”  “Lives  of  Watts  and  Doddridge,”  “King 
Philip’s  Indian  Wars,”  and  “The  Westminster  Assem¬ 
blies  Lesser  Catechism.”  He  married,  in  1798,  Com¬ 
fort  Jones,  daughter  of  Samuel  and  Hannah  (Adams) 
Jones,  of  Medway,  Massachusetts.  She  was  born  Au¬ 
gust  23,  1777,  and  was  a  descendant  of  the  Adams 
family  of  Massachusetts,  whose  reliance  and  indepen¬ 
dence  of  character  she  inherited.  She  made  a  noble 
struggle  against  adverse  circumstances  and  reared  her 
large  family  in  habits  of  honest  industry,  teaching  the 
children  to  exert  themselves  from  choice  as  well  as  from 
necessity.  Iri  the  summer  months,  during  their  child¬ 
hood,  the  boys  were  sent  out  to  work  for  farmers,  and 
with  this  help  the  insufficient  income  of  the  father  cov¬ 
ered  their  necessities,  while  early  habits  of  industry  and 
thrift  were  inculcated. 

(IV.)  The  Hon  Alvah  Crocker,  their  eldest  child, 
was  born  in  Leominster,  Massachusetts,  October  14, 
1801.  From  his  mother  he  inherited  his  most  promi¬ 
nent  characteristics.  Beginning  work  when  he  was  but 
eight  years  old,  in  the  mill  where  his  father  was  em¬ 
ployed,  with  but  little  time  allowed  for  schooling,  he 
was  fortunate  in  having  placed  at  his  disposal  the  library 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


197 


of  his  employer,  Israel  Nichols,  which  was  a  good  one 
for  those  times,  and,  browsing  among  the  books,  he  ac¬ 
quired  a  broad  and  general  store  of  knowledge,  greater, 
perhaps,  than  that  attained  by  most  boys  by  attending 
school  at  his  age.  In  this  environment,  and  spurred  by 
his  mother’s  early  teachings  of  industry  and  application, 
he  conceived  a  desire  and  an  ambition  to  have  a  college 
education,  and  this  desire  growing  by  what  it  fed  upon, 
he  taxed  all  his  strength  and  energies  to  earn  enough 
money  to  save  the  necessary  funds.  By  the  time  he 
was  sixteen  years  old  he  had  saved  fifty  dollars,  and 
entered  Groton  Academy,  where  he  pursued  his  studies 
until  his  funds  were  gone.  He  then  went  to  work 
again,  but  so  steadily  did  he  devote  his  evenings  to 
study  that  he  was  enabled  to  keep  pace  with  his  class  in 
the  academy.  In  1820  he  was  employed  in  a  paper  mill 
in  Franklin,  New  Hampshire,  and  three  years  later  he 
entered  the  employ  of  General  Leonard  Burbank,  the 
pioneer  paper  manufacturer  of  Fitchburg.  In  1826  Mr. 
Crocker  borrowed  capital  and  erected  a  mill  in  a  birch 
swamp  situated  in  that  part  of  North  Fitchburg  now 
known  as  Crockerville.  From  that  time  until  1830  his 
life  was  a  continuous  struggle  to  meet  financial  obliga¬ 
tions,  times  were  hard,  a  freshet  damaged  his  mill,  and 
machinery  began  to  take  the  place  of  manual  labor;  to 
compete  successfully  with  other  manufacturers  he  was 
compelled  to  incur  increased  expense,  but  courage  and 
force  of  will,  faith  and  his  known  honest  character  car¬ 
ried  him  through.  He  was  hampered  by  insufficient 
working  capital,  and  thereupon  made  arrangements  with 
a  Boston  commission  house  to  procure  through  them 
his  raw  materials  and  chemicals  in  exchange  for  his 
finished  product,  which  he  transported  himself  by  team 
to  Boston.  At  this  time  he  owed  $12,000  on  the  orig¬ 
inal  purchase  of  his  mill  and  yet  felt  impelled  to  raise 
$10,000  more  for  new  machinery.  To  add  to  his 
troubles  the  commission  house  demanded  payment  of  a 
balance  against  him  of  $4,000  not  yet  due.  In  spite  of 
these  hindrances  he  struggled  on,  liquidated  his  debts 
and  pushed  his  business  to  substantial  success.  In  the 
course  of  time  he  built  additional  paper  mills  and  also 
became  interested  in  railroad  construction.  The  firm 
of  Crocker,  Burbank  &  Company,  which  had  been  or¬ 
ganized  in  1850,  later  obtained  control  of  seven  mills, 
producing  fifteen  tons  of  paper  daily,  these  mills  being 
the  Snow,  or  Upper  Mill ;  the  Cascade  Mill,  the  Upton 
Mill,  the  Whitney  Mill,  the  Hanna  Mill,  the  Lyon  Mill, 
and  the  Stone  Mill,  built  over  a  period  extending  from 
1839  to  1854,  and  being  acquired  respectively  by  this 
firm  in  1862,  1863,  1859,  i860,  1868,  1869,  and  1871.  Mr. 
Crocker  identified  his  private  interests  with  the  interests 
of  the  town,  realizing  that  what  would  increase  the  pop¬ 
ulation  and  the  industries  and  resources  of  the  town  of  his 
adoption  would  benefit  each  individual  citizen.  A  man 
of  broad  understanding  and  sympathies,  his  long  and 
useful  life,  helped  in  the  upbuilding  of  the  community. 
He  was  instrumental  in  the  building  of  the  Fitchburg 
Railway,  now  a  part  of  the  Boston  &  Maine  Railway. 
He  also  supervised  the  construction  of  the  Hoosac  Tun¬ 
nel  and  the  Hoosac  Tunnel  route,  achievements  in  the 
engineering  world  whose  successful  accomplishment  was 
obtained  under  the  most  adverse  conditions.  His  ser¬ 
vices  to  his  fellow  citizens  were  not  unrecognized,  and 
in  1835  he  was  elected  Representative  to  the  Massachu¬ 


setts  Legislature.  In  that  body,  in  1836,  he  voted  for 
the  subscription  by  the  State  of  $1,000,000  to  complete 
the  Western  Railroad,  and  but  for  his  advocacy,  it  is 
probable  that  the  subscription  would  not  have  been 
made  at  that  time.  On  his  return  home,  he  aroused  the 
citizens  of  his  town  and  the  surrounding  country  on  the 
importance  of  railroads  and  direct  railroad  connections 
with  Boston,  with  the  result  of  building  such  communi¬ 
cation,  and  in  his  being  returned  to  the  Legislature 
again  in  1842.  On  March  5,  1845,  he  rode  into  Fitch¬ 
burg  on  the  first  locomotive  that  passed  over  the  road, 
and  he  was  elected  first  president  of  the  Fitchburg 
Road.  He  later  resigned  that  office  to  become  the  pres¬ 
ident  of  the  Vermont  and  Massachusetts  Railroad  Com¬ 
pany.  He  later  became  engaged  in  railroad  operation 
in  various  parts  of  the  State,  and  his  work  in  this  con¬ 
nection  was  of  great  benefit  to  the  people.  He  was  in¬ 
strumental  in  establishing  a  complete  system  of  water 
works  in  Fitchburg,  and  he  erected  buildings  for  various 
manufactures,  thus  aiding  in  the  establishment  of  new 
industries  in  the  town.  Later  Mr.  Crocker  became  in¬ 
terested  in  Turner’s  Falls  and  organized,  with  other 
capitalists,  the  Turner’s  Falls  Company,  in  1866.  This 
corporation  purchased  the  rights  and  franchises  of  the 
old  organization  known  as  “The  Proprietors  of  the 
Upper  Locks  and  Canals  on  the  Connecticut  River,  in 
the  county  of  Hampshire,”  and  bought  lands  in  Mon¬ 
tague,  on  the  river  front,  near  the  falls.  A  dam  with 
a:  fall  of  thirty  feet,  and  a  capacity  of  30,000  horse 
power  was  constructed,  and  from  1866  to  the  end  of  his 
life  the  daring  projector  worked  indefatigably  for  the 
success  and  prosperity  of  the  new  town,  spending  his 
own  money  freely  and  inducing  others  to  do  likewise. 
He  had  planned  the  establishment  of  a  public  library 
and  other  institutions  at  Turner’s  Falls,  when  death 
claimed  him.  Mr.  Crocker  was  instrumental  in  organ¬ 
izing  the  Crocker  National  Bank,  the  Crocker  Institu¬ 
tion  for  Savings  in  Turner’s  Falls,  and  he  was  one  of 
those  who  founded  the  Rollstone  National  Bank  of 
Fitchburg,  in  1840,  a  member  of  its  board  of  directors 
for  the  remainder  of  his  life,  and  was  chosen  its  presi¬ 
dent  in  1870.  Mr.  Crocker  worked  incessantly  for  the 
development  of  the  resources  of  Northwestern  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  and  his  ability  and  public  spirit  were  recog¬ 
nized  generally,  and  he  was  chosen  to  fill  the  unexpired 
term  in  Congress  of  the  Hon  William  B.  Washburn, 
who  was  elected  Governor  of  the  State.  He  took  his 
seat  on  January  2,  1872,  and  was  reelected  to  the  Forty- 
third  Congress,  receiving  14,919  votes.  On  December 
19,  1874,  while  attending  to  his  Congressional  duties  in 
Washington,  he  was  seized  with  what  appeared  to  be  a 
cold  that  was  epidemic  at  the  time  in  the  national  cap¬ 
ital,  and  left  for  his  home,  and  his  death  followed  a 
week  later,  on  December  26,  1874. 

Mr.  Alvah  Crocker  married,  August  14,  1829,  Abigail 
Fox,  who  died  August  21,  1847,  leaving  four  daughters 
and  one  son.  Mr.  Crocker  married  (second),  April  9, 
1851,  Lucy  A.  Fay,  who  died  January  29,  1872.  On  No¬ 
vember  20,  1872,  he  married  (third)  Minerva  Cushing. 
One  of  his  children  was  Charles  Thomas,  of  whom 
further. 

(V.)  Charles  Thomas  Crocker  was  bom  March  2, 
1833,  at  Fitchburg,  Massachusetts,  son  of  the  Hon.  Alvah 
and  Abigail  (Fox)  Crocker,  and  died  in  1911.  He  re- 


198 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


ceived  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  his  birth¬ 
place,  following  which  he  immediately  entered  the  em¬ 
ploy  of  the  Crocker  &  Burbank  Company,  of  which  his 
father  was  the  head.  Upon  the  death  of  his  father  in 
1874,  Charles  T.  Crocker  became  the  senior  member  of 
this  firm,  and  under  his  leadership  it  was  carried  for¬ 
ward  with  success  until  1900,  when  Mr.  Crocker  retired 
from  active  business  life.  He  was  a  director  of  the 
Crocker  National  Bank  at  Turner’s  Falls,  and  a  trustee 
of  the  Crocker  Institute  for  Savings,  in  the  same  town, 
both  of  which  organizations  had  been  established  by  his 
father. 

Charles  Thomas  Crocker  married  (first),  October  14, 
1857,  Helen  E.  Tufts,  whose  death  occurred  twenty 
years  later,  in  1877.  He  married  (second),  June  1,  1881, 
Helen  T.  Bartow.  Mr.  Crocker  had  two  sons,  Alvah,  of 
whom  further;  and  Charles  T. 

(VI.)  Alvah  Crocker,  son  of  Charles  Thomas  and 
Helen  E.  (Tufts)  Crocker,  and  a  member  of  the  sixth 
generation  of  the  Crocker  family  in  America,  was  born 
at  Fitchburg,  Massachusetts,  August  21,  1858.  His  early 
education  was  obtained  in  the  public  schools  of  Fitch¬ 
burg,  following  which  he  entered  and  was  graduated 
from  the  Fitchburg  High  School.  He  then  matriculated 
at  Harvard  University,  taking  the  liberal  arts  course. 
He  was  graduated  from  Harvard  with  the  degree  of 
Bachelor  of  Arts  in  1879. 

Alvah  Crocker  married,  October  14,  1880,  Charlotte 
Bartow. 


HENRY  FARNSWORTH  SAWTELLE— The  rec¬ 
ords  in  Somersetshire,  England,  contain  data  of  the 
Sawtelle  family  earlier  than  the  beginning  of  the  reign 
of  Queen  Elizabeth  (1558),  and  according  to  those 
records,  it  is  evident  that  Richard  Sawtell,  the  immi¬ 
grant  ancestor,  who  founded  the  Sawtelle  family  in  New 
England,  was  born  in  Aller,  Somersetshire,  in  1604,  and 
married  Elizabeth  Pople,  of  High  Ham,  Somersetshire, 
in  1628,  and  came  to  Massachusetts  Bay  among  the 
early  settlers. 

(I.)  Richard  Sawtell  was  one  of  the  proprietors  of 
Watertown,  Massachusetts,  and  lived  there  from  1636 
until  1661,  when  he  and  his  family  moved  to  Groton, 
Massachusetts,  and  he  had  a  twenty-acre  right.  He  was 
chosen  the  first  Town  Clerk,  and  served  for  three  years, 
1662-63-64,  the  first  years  that  town  records  were  kept. 
Butler’s  “History  of  Groton”  refers  to  him  as  follows: 
“Various  were  the  modes  of  expression,  chirographies, 
and  orthographies  used  by  the  several  clerks.  Richard 
Sawtell’s  style  in  each  of  these  particulars  was  very  good, 
and  very  similar  to  the  records  in  the  county  offices  made 
at  and  about  the  same  period.  His  records  prove  him 
to  have  been  a  scholar.”  Green’s  “Historical  Sketch  of 
Groton,  Massachusetts,”  states:  “Without  doubt,  he  was 
the  Richard  Sawtell  who  served  in  Major  Appleton’s 
company  during  Philip’s  War.”  Richard  Sawtell  and 
his  wife,  Elizabeth,  had  ten  children,  among  them  Zach- 
ariah,  of  whom  later.  Richard  and  his  wife  subse¬ 
quently  returned  to  Watertown,  where  he  died  August 
21,  1694,  and  his  widow,  Elizabeth,  only  survived  him 
until  October  18  of  the  same  year. 

(II.)  Zachariah  Sawtell,  son  of  Richard  and  Eliz¬ 
abeth  Sawtell,  was  born  at  Watertown,  Massachusetts, 
May  26,  1643.  He  went  to  Groton  in  1661  and  became 


one  of  the  original  proprietors.  He  married  (first) 
Elizabeth  Parker,  and  (second)  Mary,  family  name 
unknown.  They  had  five  children,  one,  Zachariah,  Jr., 
of  whom  further.  During  King  Philip’s  War  Zach¬ 
ariah  Sawtell  with  his  family  and  other  inhabitants  of 
Groton  were  obliged  to  remove  elsewhere  for  safety,  and 
it  was  probably  during  that  period  (1675-6)  that  Zach¬ 
ariah,  Jr.,  was  born. 

(III.)  Zachariah  Sawtell,  Jr.,  son  of  Zachariah  and 
Elizabeth  (Parker)  Sawtell,  was  born  about  1675-6,  and 
died  at  Groton,  October  2,  1737.  He  was  a  farmer  and 
brickmaker,  and  resided  at  Groton  during  all  of  his  ac¬ 
tive  years.  His  wife  was  Mary  or  Marcy,  family  name 
unknown.  They  had  ten  children,  all  born  at  Groton; 
one,  Daniel,  of  whom  further. 

(IV.)  Daniel  Sawtell,  son  of  Zachariah,  Jr.,  and  Mary 
or  Marcy  Sawtell,  was  born  in  Groton,  September  21, 
1704,  and  married,  at  Concord,  Massachusetts,  February 
28,  1727,  Esther  Heald,  of  that  town,  and  settled  at 
Groton,  where  their  seven  children  were  born ;  one, 
Oliver,  of  whom  later.  It  is  probable  that  Daniel  and 
his  wife,  Esther,  moved  to  Springfield,  Vermont,  after 
three  of  their  sons  located  there. 

(V.)  Oliver  Sawtell,  son  of  Daniel  and  Esther 
(Heald)  Sawtell,  was  born  in  Groton,  Massachusetts, 
June  5,  1743.  A  party  of  ten  from  Groton  and  vicinity 
were  among  the  first  settlers  in  Springfield,  Vermont, 
after  John  Nott,  who  was  there  in  1752.  The  “History 
of  Springfield”  states  that  probably  in  1753  a  settlement 
was  made  in  that  town  by  Daniel,  Jacob,  and  Oliver 
Sartwell,  on  a  ridge  of  land  later  known  as  Sartwell’s 
Hill.  At  that  time  they  were  about  nineteen,  sixteen, 
and  ten  years  of  age,  respectively.  In  the  early  records 
of  Springfield,  Vermont,  the  name  Sawtell  was  spelled 
Sartwell,  but  elsewhere  the  name  was  spelled  Sawtell, 
which  was  the  original  English  form.  However,  the 
more  modern  form  of  spelling  is  Sawtelle.  Oliver 
Sawtell  was  a  prominent  citizen  of  Springfield,  and  was 
elected  a  Constable  in  1773,  a  lister  in  1781  and  1782,  and 
a  grand  juryman  for  several  years.  In  1780  he  was  a 
soldier  in  the  Revolution  in  the  Springfield  company, 
Captain  Abner  Bisbee,  in  Colonel  Wood’s  Regiment.  In 
1781  he  served  in  the  company  of  Captain  Peter  Page, 
regiment  of  Lieutenant-Colonel  Ebenezer  Walbridge. 
Oliver  Sawtell  married  (first)  Mary,  family  name  un¬ 
known,  who  died  in  Springfield,  Vermont,  August  15, 
1774.  He  married  (second)  Hannah  Taylor,  Decem¬ 
ber  25,  1777.  There  were  three  children  by  the  first 
marriage,  one  named  Haile,  of  whom  further.  Oliver 
Sawtell  died  November  20,  1807,  and  Hannah,  his  second 
wife,  died  September  22,  1812,  both  in  Springfield, 
Vermont. 

(VI.)  Haile  Sawtell  (Sartwell),  son  of  Oliver  and 
Mary  Sawtell  (Sartwell),  was  born  in  Springfield,  Ver¬ 
mont,  February  24,  1767,  and  married  (first)  Eleanor 
Sartwell,  May  19,  1789.  By  this  marriage  there  were 
three  children,  one,  Moses,  of  whom  further.  He  mar¬ 
ried  (second)  Dolly  Wood,  September  17,  1809,  and  they 
had  seven  children.  In  1810  they  moved  to  Crown  Point, 
New  York,  which  was  then  but  a  small  settlement,  and 
his  work  was  that  of  a  pioneer.  He  died  at  Ticonderoga, 
New  York,  January  25,  1842,  and  his  wife,  Dolly,  died 
March  5,  1863. 

(VII.)  Moses  Sawtell,  son  of  Haile  and  Eleanor 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


199 


(Sartwell)  Sawtell,  was  born  in  Springfield,  Vermont, 
February  11,  1793.  He  was  educated  in  that  town,  and 
came  to  Massachusetts  when  a  young  man,  and  resided 
for  a  time  at  Fitchburg,  Massachusetts,  where  he  mar¬ 
ried  Clarissa  Farnsworth,  of  Groton,  Massachusetts, 
October  5,  18x7.  They  had  eight  children,  one,  Charles 
Farnsworth,  of  whom  further.  Moses  Sawtell,  after 
living  a  few  years  at  Fitchburg,  Massachusetts,  moved 
to  Westminster,  Massachusetts,  where  he  resided  for  a 
number  of  years,  and  later  moved  to  Jaffrey,  New 
Hampshire,  on  a  farm  at  the  foot  of  Monadnock 
Mountain,  where  he  died  February  16,  1857.  His  widow, 
Clarissa  (Farnsworth)  Sawtell  died  at  Bolton,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  October  30,  1862. 

(VIII.)  Charles  Farnsworth  Sawtelle,  son  of  Moses 
and  Clarissa  (Farnsworth)  Sawtell,  was  born  in  Fitch¬ 
burg,  Massachusetts,  November  27,  1819.  He  was  edu¬ 
cated  in  the  Fitchburg  schools,  and  during  his  boyhood 
days  lived  on  a  farm,  and  later,  for  about  thirty  years 
operated  sawmills,  either  for  himself  or  others,  and 
was  located  during  those  years  at  Fitzwilliam,  New 
Hampshire,  Jaffrey,  New  Hampshire,  Rindge,  New 
Hampshire,  Leominster,  Massachusetts,  and  Bolton, 
Massachusetts.  In  1870  he  bought  a  farm  in  the  south¬ 
erly  part  of  Leominster,  to  which  he  moved  with  his 
family  and  which  he  successfully  operated  until  1895, 
when,  on  account  of  advancing  years,  he  leased  his  farm 
and  bought  a  residence  at  No.  128  Central  Street,  Leo¬ 
minster,  where  he  lived  until  he  passed  away,  February 
12,  1911,  in  his  ninety-second  year,  a  man  remarkably 
well  preserved  for  one  of  his  age.  He  was  a  member 
of  the  First  Baptist  Church  of  Leominster,  and  in  pol¬ 
itics  was  a  Republican.  He  was  a  man  of  sterling  char¬ 
acter  and  upright  life,  vigorous  and  strong,  a  perfect  type 
of  the  sturdy,  prosperous  New  England  farmer.  Charles 
Farnsworth  Sawtelle  married  (first)  Mary  Ann  Osborne, 
of  Fitchburg,  Massachusetts,  September  10,  1844,  who 
died  July  26,  1850.  By  this  marriage  there  was  one 
child,  Mary  Maria  Sawtelle,  born  June  10,  1850,  who 
died  September  7,  of  the  same  year.  He  married  (sec¬ 
ond)  Mary  Brown  Woodbury,  March  17,  1853,  who 
was  born  June  8,  1827,  daughter  of  Luke  Woodbury 
and  Sally  (Conant)  Woodbury,  of  Bolton,  Massachu¬ 
setts.  She  was  a  member  of  the  First  Baptist  Church 
of  Leominster,  and  died  March  20,  1915,  in  the  eighty- 
eighth  year  of  her  age.  The  Woodbury  family  trace 
their  ancestry  to  the  immigrant  ancestor  who  came  to 
this  country  from  England  in  1624  and  settled  on  the 
northern  coast  of  Massachusetts  Bay  at  that  location 
which  is  now  the  city  of  Beverly.  To  Charles  Farns¬ 
worth  Sawtelle  and  Mary  Brown  (Woodbury)  Sawtelle 
two  sons  were  born:  1.  Charles  Woodbury,  was  born  in 
Leominster,  Massachusetts,  January  4,  1854.  He  was 
educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Bolton  and  Leomin¬ 
ster  and  resided  at  home,  assisting  his  father  on  the 
farm,  and  was  deeply  interested  in  agriculture.  He  was 
a  member  of  the  First  Baptist  Church  of  Leominster, 
Massachusetts,  and  in  politics  was  a  Republican.  He 
died  January  10,  1910.  2.  Henry  Farnsworth,  of  whom 
further. 

(IX.)  Henry  Farnsworth  Sawtelle,  younger  son  of 
Charles  Farnsworth  Sawtelle  and  Mary  Brown  (Wood¬ 
bury)  Sawtelle,  was  born  in  Bolton,  Massachusetts, 
November  30,  1863.  He  was  educated  in  the  public 


schools  of  Leominster  and  at  Eastman  Business  Col¬ 
lege,  Poughkeepsie,  New  York.  For  the  following  five 
years  he  was  employed  as  bookkeeper  and  clerk  in  a 
hardware  store  in  Leominster.  In  1888  Mr.  Sawtelle, 
in  company  with  Joseph  W.  Estabrook,  established  in 
Leominster  a  hardware  and  paint  store,  under  the  firm 
name  of  Sawtelle  and  Estabrook,  that  firm  continuing 
until  1893,  when  Mr.  Sawtelle  bought  his  partner’s 
interest  and  became  sole  owner.  Later  he  bought  the 
block  he  occupied,  which  is  known  as  Sawtelle  Block, 
and  has  so  continued  business  to  date  (1924).  By  his 
strict  integrity  and  careful  attention  to  the  requirements 
of  his  customers  he  has  conducted  a  prosperous  business. 
He  has  been  a  large  real  estate  owner  for  many  years, 
has  been  interested  in  real  estate  developments,  and  has 
extensive  real  estate  holdings  in  several  States.  Mr. 
Sawtelle  is  a  Republican  in  politics,  is  a  member  of  the 
Chamber  of  Commerce,  Improved  Order  of  Red  Men, 
Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks,  Loyal  Order 
of  Moose  and  the  Leominster  Historical  Society.  From 
1910  to  1916  he  was  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Select¬ 
men,  and  was  chairman  the  last  five  years.  In  1915  Leo¬ 
minster  voted  to  become  a  city,  and  city  government  was 
inaugurated  in  January,  1916.  Mr.  Sawtelle  had  the 
honor  of  being  elected  the  first  Mayor,  and  he  is  now 
serving  on  his  fifth  consecutive  two-year  term.  At  three 
elections  he  had  no  opposition,  and  at  each  of  the  other 
two  elections  he  received  an  overwhelming  majority. 
Mayor  Sawtelle  married,  October  12,  1898,  Effie  Adams, 
a  direct  descendant  of  President  John  Adams.  She  was 
born  in  Portsmouth,  New  Hampshire,  February  20,  1866, 
the  daughter  of  Hanson  Hoyt  Adams  and  Martha  Jane 
(Paul)  Adams. 


HON.  WILLIAM  ANDREW  MURRAY— Promi¬ 
nent  in  legal  circles,  and  also  in  the  public  life  of  the 
State  of  Massachusetts,  William  A.  Murray  is  one  of 
the  foremost  figures  in  the  professional  world  of  Mil¬ 
ford,  Massachusetts,  and  with  law  offices  in  the  city  of 
Boston,  also,  he  is  counted  among  the  largely  successful 
and  widely  noted  lawyers  of  this  State.  He  is  well 
known  also  in  fraternal  circles,  and  in  every  branch 
of  civic  and  social  advance  lends  his  influence  to  all 
worthy  effort. 

William  A.  Murray  was  born  at  Milford,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  June  17,  1889,  a  son  of  James  and  Teresa  (Taft) 
Murray.  His  education  was  begun  in  the  local  public 
schools,  and  following  his  graduation  from  the  Milford 
High  School,  he  entered  Boston  University  School  of 
Law,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in  1910.  He  was 
admitted  to  the  Massachusetts  bar  when  twenty-one  years 
of  age.  Mr.  Murray  immediately  became  associated 
with  various  prominent  law  firms  of  Boston,  continu¬ 
ing  until  November,  1918,  when  he  established  his  own 
offices  both  in  Boston  and  in  Milford.  Residing  in  Mil¬ 
ford,  and  a  leading  citizen  of  this  community,  his  time 
is  perhaps  more  fully  commanded  by  his  practice  in  the 
courts  of  Suffolk,  Middlesex,  Norfolk,  and  Worcester 
counties  than  any  lawyer  of  his  age  in  the  community, 
and  he  holds  high  rank  in  the  profession,  his  practice  in¬ 
cluding  many  important  legal  cases  carried  to  a  suc¬ 
cessful  conclusion. 

An  able  speaker,  as  well  as  an  authority  on  many 
branches  of  law,  Mr.  Murray  has  been  brought  into  the 


200 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


public  service  in  various  ways.  He  is  a  loyal  advocate 
of  the  principles  and  the  policies  of  the  Democratic 
party,  and  was  elected  from  a  Republican  district  to  the 
House  of  Representatives  of  the  State  of  Massachu¬ 
setts  for  two  consecutive  terms,  he  first  being  elected  in 
1916,  at  the  age  of  twenty-seven  years.  No  Democrat 
ever  since  has  managed  to  be  elected  in  this  district 
since  Mr.  Murray  retired  in  1922.  He  was  brought  for¬ 
ward  also  as  a  candidate  for  State  Senator,  but  although 
defeated,  the  narrow  margin  which  his  opponent  gained 
was  significant  of  his  popularity,  for  it  was  in  a  Re¬ 
publican  stronghold  that  he  so  nearly  defeated  the 
Republican  candidate,  reducing  a  Republican  plurality 
in  1920  of  9,000  to  the  small  number  of  244.  Mr.  Mur¬ 
ray’s  work  as  a  legislator  counted  not  only  for  the  wel¬ 
fare  and  progress  of  his  own  locality,  but  for  the  general 
advance  of  conditions  throughout  the  State,  and  his 
constituents  felt  that  in  their  representative  they  and  the 
community  as  well  were  honored.  During  the  World 
War  Mr.  Murray  served  on  the  Legal  Advisory  Board, 
and  also  as  local  investigator  for  the  War  Risk  Bureau, 
further  giving  largely  of  his  time  and  means  in  the  ad¬ 
vancement  of  the  many  home  war  activities.  Fraternally, 
Mr.  Murray  is  identified  with  Milford  Lodge,  No.  628, 
Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks,  of  which  he 
is  Past  Grand  Exalter  Ruler;  also  the  Knights  of  Co¬ 
lumbus,  of  which  he  is  Past  Grand  Knight;  and  the 
Fraternal  Order  of  Eagles;  and  the  Ancient  Order  of 
Hibernians.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Roman  Catholic 
Church. 

Mr.  Murray  married,  at  Milford,  September  21,  1914, 
Mary  E.  De  Pasquale,  a  Milford  public  school  teacher. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Murray  are  the  parents  of  three  children: 
William,  Jr.,  Mary  Norma,  and  Joseph. 


HELEN  GRACE  ESTEY — An  interesting  and  use¬ 
ful  career  is  that  of  Helen  Grace  Estey,  who  for  a 
number  of  years  has  been  identified  with  various  impor¬ 
tant  libraries  of  the  State  of  Massachusetts,  and  is  now 
librarian  of  the  Athol  Public  Library.  Highly  educated 
and  always  in  close  touch  with  all  advance  relevant  to 
her  work,  Miss  Estey  is  doing  much  for  the  progress 
and  benefit  of  this  institution,  and  is  making  it  broadly 
useful  to  the  people.  Miss  Estey  is  a  native  of  this 
State  and  county,  and  a  daughter  of  George  Franklin 
and  Victoria  Stewart  (Wishart)  Estey,  her  father  well 
and  favorably  known  in  Gardner,  Massachusetts,  in  the 
trucking  and  jobbing  business. 

Helen  Grace  Estey  was  born  at  Gardner,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  October  15,  1885.  Following  the  elementary  and 
grammar  courses,  she  attended  Gardner  High  School, 
from  which  she  was  graduated  in  the  class  of  1904. 
She  then  entered  Drexel  Institute  Library  School,  and 
was  graduated  the  following  year,  after  which  she  took 
up  library  work  as  her  vocation.  More  recently  she 
has  covered  an  employment  management  course  at 
Boston  University,  also  a  University  Extension  Course 
in  French  and  Spanish.  Miss  Estey’s  first  experience  in 
her  chosen  field  was  at  Leominster  Public  Library,  as¬ 
suming  her  duties  in  July,  1905,  and  in  September,  1905, 
she  was  made  assistant  librarian  of  that  institution.  She 
was  active  in  this  library  for  a  period  of  about  twelve 
years,  and  during  that  time  the  library  moved  into  a 
fine  new  building,  where  its  facilities  and  circulation 


were  materially  increased.  In  1917,  after  taking  the 
Massachusetts  Civil  Service  examinations,  Miss  Estey 
received  appointment  to  the  important  position  of  li¬ 
brarian  of  the  Massachusetts  Bureau  of  Statistics. 
With  the  consolidation  of  the  State  departments  about 
two  years  later,  she  was  appointed  librarian  of  the  De¬ 
partment  of  Labor  and  Industries.  This  position  Miss 
Estey  filled  for  more  than  two  years,  and  during  her 
stay  in  Boston  she  participated  in  the  founding  of  the 
Special  Libraries’  Association  of  that  city,  taking  a  deep 
interest  in  its  meetings  and  in  the  development  of  its 
activities.  In  September,  1922,  she  accepted  her  present 
position  as  librarian  at  the  Athol  Public  Library.  This 
institution  is  one  of  the  progressive  organizations  in  its 
field  in  the  State  of  Massachusetts,  and  comprises  a  col¬ 
lection  of  12,818  volumes,  suitably  divided  between 
adult’s  and  children’s  books,  and  embracing  a  very  wide 
scope  of  serious  and  scientific  literature  as  well  as  fiction. 
The  circulation  for  the  year  1922  amounted  to  60,663 
volumes.  Miss  Estey  has  won  the  confidence  and  esteem 
of  the  patrons  of  the  library  and  its  officials  as  well, 
and  her  work  is  contributing  definitely  to  the  advance  of 
education  and  to  the  general  well-being.  Miss  Estey  is 
the  compiler  of  a  really  important  work,  the  bibliog¬ 
raphy  of  the  “Cost  of  Living  in  the  United  States.” 

In  the  civic  and  benevolent  advance  Miss  Estey  takes 
a  part,  lending  her  influence  to  all  progressive  effort. 
She  is  a  supporter  of  the  Republican  party,  was  secre¬ 
tary  of  the  Leominster  Suffrage  Club,  and  acted  as  teller 
in  the  Gardner  organization.  She  is  a  member  of  Signet 
Chapter,  No.  22,  Order  of  the  Eastern  Star,  and  in  ad¬ 
dition  to  her  connection  with  the  Special  Libraries’  Asso¬ 
ciation  of  Boston,  she  holds  membership  in  the  American 
Library  Association,  the  Massachusetts  Library  Club, 
and  was  formerly  a  member  of  the  Leominster  Fort¬ 
nightly  Club,  and  active  in  its  civic  department.  She  is 
a  member  of  the  American  Red  Cross,  and  an  earnest 
worker  in  its  behalf. 


WILLIAM  H.  HOBBY — Standing  back  of  the  con¬ 
structive  activities  of  the  Chair  City  of  Gardner,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  William  H.  Hobby  is  counted  among  the  most 
important  business  executives  of  the  business  world  of 
this  community,  and  is  the  senior  partner  of  the  firm  of 
Hobby  Brothers,  proprietors  of  the  Gardner  Machine 
Works.  Trained  for  his  present  activities  in  some  of 
the  foremost  industrial  plants  of  the  State  of  Massachu¬ 
setts,  Mr.  Hobby  has  built  his  success  on  the  enduring 
foundation  of  ability  and  practical  experience,  and  has 
not  only  achieved  a  high  position  in  his  chosen  field  but 
has  done  much  for  this  and  allied  fields  of  industrial 
endeavor. 

The  Hobby  family  is  an  old  one  in  the  State  of 
Massachusetts,  and  William  Hobby,  Mr.  Hobby’s  grand¬ 
father  was  a  pioneer  in  the  chair  industry  in  Boston, 
when  all  the  work  was  done  by  hand.  The  name  of 
William  Hobby  has  been  carried  down  in  the  family 
from  the  pioneer  ancestor  of  early  Colonial  times,  and 
many  men  of  this  family  have  gained  renown.  The 
first  doorkeeper  of  the  United  States  Congress  was  a 
Hobby,  and  Captain  John  Hobby  was  an  officer  in  the 
War  of  the  Revolution,  in  the  Continental  army.  Wil¬ 
liam  M.  Hobby,  Mr.  Hobby’s  father,  was  born  in  Mel¬ 
rose,  Massachusetts,  and  by  occupation  was  an  expert 


(Xsu t/V_ 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


201 


machinist,  for  many  years  employed  in  the  Boston 
Navy  Yard.  A  veteran  of  the  Civil  War,  he  served  in 
that  struggle  as  a  member  of  Company  I,  12th  Regi¬ 
ment,  Massachusetts  Volunteer  Infantry,  better  known 
as  Colonel  Thatcher’s  regiment,  which  was  almost  an¬ 
nihilated  during  their  period  of  service.  William  M. 
Hobby  was  a  man  highly  esteemed  by  all  who  knew 
him,  and  his  death,  at  the  age  of  forty-seven  years,  in 
1883  was  mourned  by  all.  He  married  Lucy  A.  Elm, 
who  was  born  in  Camden,  Maine,  and  survived  him  for 
eleven  years,  passing  away  in  1894,  at  the  age  of  sixty- 
seven  years. 

William  H.  Hobby,  son  of  these  parents,  was  born  in 
Charlestown,  now  a  suburb  of  Boston,  Massachusetts, 
December  6,  1866.  His  education  was  begun  in  the  pub¬ 
lic  schools  of  Boston,  his  graduation  from  high  school 
occurring  in  1883.  Thereafter  he  took  a  three  years’ 
course  in  designing  and  drafting  in  a  technical  school 
founded  by  a  Boston  philanthropist,  and  had  just  passed 
his  examinations  preparatory  to  entering  the  Massa¬ 
chusetts  Institute  of  Technology  when  financial  matters 
compelled  him  to  forego  the  completion  of  his  educa¬ 
tion  and  assume  the  responsibility  of  his  mother’s  sup¬ 
port.  He  secured  employment  with  an  uncle,  who  had 
charge  of  a  department  in  the  Walworth  Manufacturing 
Company’s  brass  and  iron  foundry.  There  he  learned 
drafting  and  pattern-making,  and  following  the  comple¬ 
tion  of  his  apprenticeship  he  came  to  Gardner.  This 
was  in  1887,  and  Mr.  Hobby  at  once  secured  a  position 
in  the  plant  of  L.  G.  Knight,  a  manufacturer  of  chair 
machinery.  There  he  soon  became  a  competent  all¬ 
round  machinist,  continuing  with  the  firm  for  about 
three  years.  Finding  his  life  mapped  out  for  him  along 
different  lines  that  he  had  contemplated,  Mr.  Hobby 
simply  made  the  best  of  the  situation,  and  determined 
upon  fitting  himself  for  the  highest  possible  attainment 
in  the  field  in  which  he  was  engaged.  He  went  to 
Boston  to  perfect  himself  in  another  branch  of  the  ma¬ 
chinist’s  trade,  namely,  gear  cutting,  and  remained  there 
for  about  two  years.  Upon  his  return  to  Gardner  Mr. 
Hobby  entered  the  employ  of  the  Heywood  Brothers  & 
Company,  and  in  this  connection  mastered  the  practical 
application  of  his  knowledge  to  the  chair  industry.  Dur¬ 
ing  all  the  foregoing  period  Mr.  Hobby’s  activities  had 
been  broadly  constructive,  and  in  1894,  with  this  splen¬ 
did  preparation  and  equipment,  he  established  the  present 
interest  in  partnership  with  his  brother,  Edgar  N. 
Hobby.  In  the  twenty-seven  years  which  have  since 
intervened,  as  the  head  of  this  increasingly  important 
interest,  Mr.  Hobby  has  won  his  way  to  large  prominence 
in  the  industrial  life  of  Gardner.  Beginning  as  manu¬ 
facturers  of  chair  machinery  only,  and  that  principally 
for  the  local  demand,  the  brothers  have  extended  the 
scope  of  the  business  until  they  now  make  machinery 
for  many  different  industries,  and  their  product  goes  to 
all  parts  of  the  world.  Chair  machinery  has  been  their 
specialty,  however,  throughout  their  entire  history,  and 
in  this  connection  William  H.  Hobby  has  taken  a  place 
of  far  more  than  ordinary  significance.  Possessed  of 
large  inventive  genius,  he  has  solved  many  problems  of 
the  chair  industry,  and  has  designed  and  built  machines 
which  have  revolutionized  the  chair  industry  and  are  in 
general  use  to-day,  tripling  and  quadrupling  the  output 
of  the  plants  where  they  are  installed.  Mr.  Hobby  has 


never  capitalized  his  inventive  talent,  but  looking  upon 
life  from  the  point  of  view  of  the  philanthropist,  prefers 
the  greatest  good  for  the  greatest  number,  rather  than 
personal  gain.  Had  he  chosen  to  realize  for  himself 
all  that  could  be  wrung  from  his  many  inventions,  he 
would  undoubtedly  be  a  very  wealthy  man. 

Mr.  Hobby  is  a  member  of  the  Gardner  Chamber  of 
Commerce,  and  served  for  some  years  on  the  Republi¬ 
can  Town  Committee,  but  otherwise  takes  only  the  in¬ 
terest  of  the  progressive  citizen  in  public  life.  He  is  a 
member  of  Charles  Sumner  Camp,  Sons  of  Veterans;  of 
Gardner  Lodge,  No.  1426,  Benevolent  and  Protective 
Order  of  Elks ;  also  of  the  Improved  Order  of  Red  Men. 

William  H.  Hobby  married,  in  1889,  Ada  G.  Clapp, 
of  Gardner,  and  they  are  the  parents  of  two'  daughters : 
Nettie  L.,  wife  of  Ellery  Trickell,  of  Portland,  Oregon; 
and  Alice,  wife  of  Henry  Le  Blanc,  teller  of  the  First 
National  Bank  of  Gardner. 


JAMES  E.  YOUNG,  a  member  of  the  Massachu¬ 
setts  State  Legislature,  was  born  at  Charlestown,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  November  4,  1885,  son  of  Charles  D.  and  Annie 
M.  (Griffith)  Young.  His  father,  who'  was  born  at 
Annapolis  Valley,  in  Nova  Scotia,  settled  in  the  United 
States  at  an  early  age.  He  had  an  adventurous  career 
as  an  Indian  fighter  on  the  Western  frontier,  and  was 
one  of  Custer’s  scouts.  Mr.  Young’s  mother,  who  was 
born  in  England,  is  of  Welsh  descent  and  belongs  to 
a  branch  of  the  Griffith  family  of  Carnarvon. 

Mr.  Young  received  his  preliminary  education  in  the 
public  schools  of  Massachusetts.  After  his  graduation 
from  the  Winchendon  High  School  he  proceeded  to 
Lawrence  Scientific  School  and  took  a  course  in  civil 
engineering.  He  was  graduated  as  a  civil  engineer  from 
Lawrence  and  might  have  entered  at  once  upon  the  prac^ 
tice  of  his  profession,  if  he  had  not  received  an  advan¬ 
tageous  offer  from  the  glove  manufacturers,  Simon, 
Hatch  &  Whittier,  to  represent  them  as  a  traveling  sales¬ 
man.  This  firm  had  at  a  previous  time  recognized  Mr. 
Young’s  pronounced  selling  ability,  and  on  that  account 
wished  to  enroll  him  as  a  permanent  member  of  their 
sales  force.  Mr.  Young  accepted  their  offer  and  for 
eight  years  remained  in  association  with  them,  selling 
gloves  of  their  manufacture  to  the  wholesale  and  retail 
trade  in  various  parts  of  the  country.  During  these 
years  of  salesmanship  he  made  a  great  many  friends 
and  acquired  invaluable  experience  of  modern  business 
methods  and  an  accurate  knowledge  of  the  conditions 
that  underlie  many  of  the  trade  problems  of  the  present 
day.  The  relations  between  himself  and  the  members  of 
the  firm  were  always  of  the  most  cordial  and  agree¬ 
able  character,  and  when  he  finally  decided  to  give  up 
his  position  as  one  of  their  traveling  representatives,  his 
departure  was  a  matter  of  deep  regret  to  his  employers 
as  well  as  to  all  his  other  associates  in  the  business. 
Acting  in  accordance  with  the  terms  of  a  decision  he  had 
arrived  at  some  months  before,  Mr.  Young,  upon  leaving 
Simon,  Hatch  &  Whittier,  returned  to  Winchendon  and 
established  himself  in  practice  as  a  civil  engineer. 
Widely  known  for  his  public  services,  he  has  continued 
to  make  Winchendon  his  home  and  business  headquar¬ 
ters  ever  since. 

In  political  faith  Mr.  Young  is  a  Republican.  He  has 
been  a  member  of  the  Republican  Town  Committee  for 


202 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


the  past  fifteen  years,  and  at  the  present  time  and  for 
two  years  past  he  has  served  as  chairman  of  the  Win- 
chendon  Board  of  Selectmen.  For  ten  years  he  has 
filled  the  office  of  Town  Engineer,  and  for  nine  years 
was  a  member  of  the  Sewer  Commission.  He  served 
two  years  as  a  member  of  the  Massachusetts  State 
Legislature.  Keenly  interested  in  the  political  ques¬ 
tions  of  the  hour  and  having  a  bias  toward  quick, 
practical,  and  efficient  solutions  in  politics,  as  in  all  other 
human  affairs,  Mr.  Young  is  regarded  as  one  of  the 
leaders  of  thought  in  Worcester  County,  and  men  of 
all  parties  admit  the  soundness  of  his  views  in  regard 
to  politics  in  general,  however  much  they  may  disagree 
with  him  in  details.  With  Mr.  Young,  the  old  idea  of 
the  greatest  good  to  the  greatest  number  is  not  enough. 
He  believes  that  everybody  should  have  a  fair  chance, 
and  that  so  far  as  is  humanly  possible,  citizens  should  be 
taught  and  encouraged  and  inspired  to  make  the  most 
of  themselves,  their  lives,  and  their  opportunities.  A 
hard  worker  himself  and  a  man  of  great  mental  energy 
and  resourcefulness,  Mr.  Young  exerts  a  personal  in¬ 
fluence  in  public  affairs  which  extends  beyond  the  con¬ 
fines  of  any  creed  or  party  and  on  this  account  his  views 
carry  great  weight  in  public  discussions.  Mr.  Young  is 
a  member  of  the  Unitarian  faith,  and  is  a  Mason  of  the 
thirty-second  degree.  He  holds  all  the  orders  up  to 
and  including  the  Shrine,  and  belongs  to  Aleppo  Temple 
at  Boston.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Avon  Club  of  Win- 
chendon. 

Mr.  Young  married,  on  June  30,  1910,  at  Winchendon, 
Abby  L.  Bent,  daughter  of  Elisha  M.  and  Julia  R. 
(Chaplain)  Bent.  Mrs.  Young’s  parents  are  both  natives 
of  Fitzwilliam,  New  Hampshire,  where  she  herself  was 
born.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Young  have  one  child,  Julia  R., 
who  is  named  for  her  mother’s  mother,  and  who  was 
born  at  Winchendon  September  2,  1916. 


PERCY  A.  ATHERTON,  A.  B.,  LL.  B.,  was  born 
in  Harvard,  Worcester  County,  Massachusetts,  June  24, 
1877,  the  son  of  Charles  P.  and  Sarah  (Sawyer)  Ather¬ 
ton.  He  attended  the  public  schools  in  Harvard,  and 
after  graduating  from  the  Bromfield  School,  in  Har¬ 
vard,  in  June,  1896,  entered  Harvard  College  with  the 
class  of  1900.  In  June,  1900,  he  was  given  the  degree  of 
Bachelor  of  Arts.  He  then  attended  the  Harvard  Law 
School  from  September,  1900,  to  June,  1903,  and  in 
June,  1903,  was  given  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Laws. 
After  being  admitted  to  the  bar  in  October,  1903,  he  was 
associated  with  the  firm  of  Morse  &  Friedman,  in  Bos¬ 
ton,  later  becoming  a  member  of  the  firm.  He  is  at 
present  practicing  law  in  Boston  as  a  member  of  the 
firm  of  Friedman,  Atherton,  King  &  Turner,  with  offices 
at  No.  30  State  Street. 

From  1903  to  1915  Mr.  Atherton  served  in  the  Massa¬ 
chusetts  Volunteer  Militia,  resigning  in  the  latter  year 
with  the  rank  of  major.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Uni¬ 
versity  Club  of  Boston,  the  Harvard  clubs  of  New  York 
and  of  Boston  the  Harvard  Musical  Association  of 
Boston,  and  the  Worcester  Country  Club.  He  is  inter¬ 
ested  in  apple  growing  on  the  former  Luke  Whitney 
farm,  in  Harvard,  where  he  spends  the  summer  months 
with  his  family. 

Mr.  Atherton  was  married,  at  Boston,  June  4,  1910, 
to  Louise  Newhall  Valpey,  daughter  of  Henry  R.  and 


Nancy  (Newhall)  Valpey  of  Cambridge.  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Atherton  have  three  children :  Henry  V alpey,  born  May 
6,  1911 ;  Sarah  Sawyer,  born  December  12,  1913;  and 
Nancy,  born  September  14,  191 7. 


FRANCIS  H.  LEE— A  name  which  meant  much  to 
his  day  and  generation  was  that  of  Francis  H.  Lee, 
whose  lifetime  was  spent  principally  in  philanthropic 
work,  his  health  during  the  greater  part  of  his  career 
precluding  extensive  activity  in  the  business  world.  The 
life  of  Mr.  Lee  was  one  which  to  the  world  of  men 
and  affairs  might  have  seemed  futile,  but  like  a  flower 
in  a  place  of  shadow  its  beauty  was  known  and  loved 
by  those  whose  privilege  it  was  to  come  in  touch  with 
his  gracious  spirit  or  share  in  his  benevolence.  Mr.  Lee 
was  a  son  of  John  C.  Lee,  who  was  born  at  Salem, 
Massachusetts,  and  became  a  leading  figure  in  the  world 
of  finance  in  the  city  of  Boston.  Educated  in  his  native 
city  and  acquiring  some  experience  in  his  chosen  field 
of  endeavor,  John  C.  Lee  became  one  of  the  founders  of 
the  Lee  &  Higginson  Bank  of  Boston,  a  private  finan¬ 
cial  institution  of  that  early  day  which  made  a  long  and 
eminently  useful  record.  He  was  counted  among  the 
largely  progressive  men  of  his  day,  and  his  name  stands 
on  the  permanent  records  of  the  city  as  one  of  honor 
and  distinction,  although  he  has  now  for  many  years 
been  deceased.  He  married  Harriet  Paine  Rose,  who 
was  born  on  the  island  Antigna,  West  Indies,  the  daugh¬ 
ter  of  Dr.  William  Paine,  of  Worcester,  Massachusetts, 
but  whose  life  was  principally  spent  in  Worcester,  Massa¬ 
chusetts. 

Francis  H.  Lee,  son  of  these  parents,  was  born  at 
Salem,  Massachusetts,  December  23,  1836,  and  died 
October  7,  1913.  His  education  was  begun  in  the  pri¬ 
mary  schools  of  Salem  and  following  the  completion 
of  the  common  school  course  he  went  to  Boston,  where 
he  was  affiliated  with  his  brother  in  an  office,  in  the 
capacity  of  clerk.  He  was  active  in  that  connection  for 
two  years,  then  continued  in  business  life  until  the  out¬ 
break  of  the  Civil  War.  He  was  one  of  the  earliest  of 
the  Salem  young  men  to  respond  to  the  need  of  his 
country  when  the  Union  was  threatened  and  he  enlisted 
in  Company  F,  23d  Regiment,  Massachusetts  Volunteer 
Infantry,  and  went  early  to  the  scene  of  action.  When 
his  first  enlistment  had  expired,  he  reenlisted  and  con¬ 
tinued  under  his  country’s  colors  throughout  the  period 
of  the  war,  returning  to  his  native  city  after  the  close 
of  hostilities.  He  made  his  life  one  of  rare  beauty  and 
benevolence.  Having  learned  sympathy  through  suf¬ 
fering,  the  need  of  every  human  being  reached  him  with 
deep  appeal,  and  he  made  his  life  interest  the  doing 
of  good.  His  contributions  to  organized  charity  and 
benevolence  were  always  generous,  but  it  was  in  his 
private  benefactions  that  he  took  the  deepest  interest, 
and  whenever  he  could  do  so  he  avoided  the  possibility 
of  his  name  appearing  on  the  public  records  of  any 
charitable  movement.  To  the  many  poor,  ill,  and  needy 
who  personally  knew  Mr.  Lee  his  life  was  a  blessing, 
and  his  interest  saved  numberless  people  from  despond¬ 
ency  or  actual  suffering  for  the  necessities  of  life. 
He  never  discussed  his  work  in  this  field,  preferring 
always  to  do  good  for  its  own  sake.  He  was  deeply  in¬ 
terested  in  public  affairs  in  the  town,  the  State,  and  the 
Nation,  but  his  modest,  retiring  disposition  made  the 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


203 


prominence  of  public  life  distasteful  to  him,  and  while 
he  supported  the  Republican  party  in  political  affairs  and 
did  all  in  his  power  in  an  unostentatious  way  for  the 
advancement  of  all  good  efforts,  he  never  accepted  the 
honors  of  public  office.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Uni¬ 
tarian  church  of  Salem,  Massachusetts,  and  gave  largely 
of  his  means  to  the  advancement  of  religious  progress. 
Such  a  life  as  that  of  Francis  H.  Lee  exemplifies  the 
usefulness  of  unheralded  self-sacrifice.  Yet  it  is  the 
pleasure  of  the  biographer  to  attempt  in  some  degree  to 
convey  to  the  people  of  the  present  day  and  those 
who  shall  come  after,  something  of  the  gracious  sig¬ 
nificance  of  such  a  life  to  the  world.  The  name  of 
Francis  H.  Lee  fittingly  stands  on  these  permanent 
records  of  worthy  effort  and  human  progress. 

Francis  H.  Lee  married,  in  Salem,  Massachusetts,  on 
October  17,  1871,  Sophia  E.  Willson,  daughter  of  Rev. 
Edmund  B.  Willson,  who  was  bom  in  Petersham,  Massa¬ 
chusetts,  August  15,  1820,  and  died  in  Salem,  Massachu¬ 
setts,  June  13,  1895.  A  prominent  minister  in  his  day 
in  the  Unitarian  church,  he  served  for  thirty-six  years 
in  this  connection  and  became  a  distinguished  figure  in 
the  progress  of  his  denomination  in  Salem.  He  bought 
the  home  in  Petersham,  Massachusetts,  now  occupied 
by  his  daughters :  Mrs.  Lee  and  Miss  Willson,  in  the 
year  1883.  He  was  deeply  interested  in  all  that  pertained 
to  the  completing  of  records  both  of  family  interest  and 
of  public  import,  and  he  was  the  author  of  a  work  pub¬ 
lished  many  years  ago,  entitled  “The  One  Hundredth 
Anniversary  of  Petersham.”  He  married  Martha  A. 
Buttrick,  who  was  born  July  20,  1815,  and  died  Novem¬ 
ber  7,  1891.  Mrs.  Willson  was  a  daughter  of  Major  John 
Buttrick,  on  whose  farm  the  battle  of  Concord  took 
place  in  the  Revolutionary  War.  Mrs.  Lee  survives  her 
husband  and  resides  at  No.  28  Chestnut  Street,  Salem, 
Massachusetts,  spending  her  summers  in  the  beautiful 
old  Colonial  homestead  in  Petersham. 


JOHN  WILSON  BISHOP,  president  of  the  J.  W. 
Bishop  Company,  of  Worcester,  Massachusetts,  was,  at 
his  death,  October  22,  1923,  probably  the  oldest  building 
contractor  actively  engaged  in  the  business  in  New 
England.  In  1924  he  would  have  rounded  out  a  full 
half-century  of  active  business  life  in  Worcester,  and 
he  had  reason  to  be  proud  of  his  record,  for  he  won  a 
degree  of  success  and  prominence  equalled  by  few  in 
the  same  line  of  business.  Many  are  the  factors  that 
contributed  to  his  achievement;  thorough  mastery  of  his 
trade,  sound  judgment  in  estimating  and  vision,  which 
has  been  defined  as  “seeing  what  others  do  not  see; 
seeing  farther  than  they  see ;  and  seeing  before  they  see.” 
His  energy  and  endurance  were  remarkable,  and  his  in¬ 
dustry  indefatigable.  One  characteristic  of  Mr.  Bishop 
that  could  not  escape  observation,  even  in  a  casual  con¬ 
versation,  was  his  high  ethical  ideal — his  strong  sense  of 
right  and  wrong,  and  his  insistence  on  fair  play.  Having 
arrived  at  a  decision  as  to  what  was  a  just  course  to 
pursue,  he  carried  out  his  purpose  with  irresistible  de¬ 
termination.  He  mounted  each  rung  of  the  ladder  from 
the  ranks  of  the  apprentice,  and  therefore  regarded  a 
problem  or  situation  from  the  workman’s  point  of  view 
with  a  just  appreciation  of  what  was  fair  and  right 
to  employee  as  well  as  employer.  Hundreds  of  his  men 


had  been  with  him  for  years,  many  of  them  since  the 
days  of  their  apprenticeship,  and  few  builders  of  his 
time  were  so  free  from  labor  troubles.  His  bricklayers 
had  not  gone  out  on  strike  in  twenty-three  years.  Such 
loyalty  is  an  impressive  tribute  to  his  personality,  char¬ 
acter,  and  methods.  Mr.  Bishop  possessed  rare  insight 
in  judging  the  character  and  abilities  of  others,  and 
built  an  organization  of  high  efficiency  and  dependability, 
including  some  of  the  ablest  men  in  the  building  business. 

John  Wilson  Bishop  was  born  in  White  Sands,  Prince 
Edward  Island,  now  a  province  of  Canada,  May  29, 
1846,  son  of  William  and  Sarah  (Hooper)  Bishop.  His 
father,  a  ship  carpenter  by  trade,  came  down  from 
Plymouth,  England,  to  Canada,  in  1818,  and  was  for 
many  years  employed  in  the  shipyards  at  St.  John,  New 
Brunswick,  also  following  farming  at  White  Sands,  in 
the  southern  part  of  the  island.  His  mother  was  also  a 
native  of  England,  a  daughter  of  William  Hooper.  In 
1857  the  family  removed  to  Lonsdale,  Rhode  Island. 
There  were  nine  children,  and  those  who  lived  to  ma¬ 
turity  made  their  homes  in  Lonsdale,  Providence,  and 
Smithfield. 

Following  the  custom  of  the  times,  John  W.  and  the 
other  boys  went  to  work  in  the  cotton  mills  when  very 
young.  Their  schooling  was  extremely  short.  At  the 
age  of  fifteen  John  W.  left  the  cotton  mill  to  learn  the 
trade  of  carpenter  in  the  employ  of  Ezra  Bliss,  of  Paw¬ 
tucket.  Two  years  later  he  went  to  Providence  and 
worked  for  a  year  or  more  for  John  &  Charles  Hull, 
builders.  Though  he  had  had  but  a  year  of  school 
altogether,  he  realized  the  importance  of  education  and 
applied  himself  with  characteristic  energy  to  study 
during  his  spare  hours.  It  is  safe  to  say  that  he  kept 
pace  with  other  boys  who  had  the  advantages  of  the  best 
school  training. 

When  he  came  of  age  Mr.  Bishop  left  home  and  came 
to  Worcester,  entering  the  employ  of  H.  W.  Eddy,  a 
contractor  and  builder,  having  a  carpenter’s  shop  on 
Norwich  Street.  Afterward  he  worked  for  other  build¬ 
ers  in  the  city,  for  William  Sibley,  Thomas  G.  Learned, 
and  George  S.  Clough.  He  was  a  skillful  craftsman, 
and  when  he  engaged  in  business  as  a  builder,  in  1874, 
he  had  had  a  thorough  training  in  all  branches  of  car¬ 
penter  and  shop  work.  He  rented  a  carpenter  shop  on 
Central  Street,  and  his  first  contract  was  for  the  con¬ 
struction  of  the  large  brick  stables  of  Harrington 
Brothers,  on  Central  Street,  a  work  of  some  magnitude 
for  a  young  contractor.  Then  he  built  the  residence  of 
Thomas  B.  Eaton,  on  Boynton  Street,  and  later  the  resi¬ 
dences  of  C.  S.  Goddard  and  W.  B.  Fay,  on  Irving 
Street,  both  fine  and  costly  houses.  He  succeeded  and 
his  business  developed.  In  1880  he  joined  hands  with 
George  H.  Cutting,  another  capable  builder,  and  the 
partnership  continued  for  thirteen  years  under  the  firm 
name  of  Cutting  &  Bishop.  The  business  of  the  firm 
was  extensive  from  the  first,  placing  the  partners  among 
the  foremost  builders  of  the  State.  When  the  firm 
was  dissolved  in  1893  Mr.  Bishop  continued  in  business 
alone  under  the  name  of  J.  W.  Bishop  &  Company,  and 
the  extent  and  aggregate  of  his  contracts  multiplied. 
In  1899  he  deemed  it  wise  to  incorporate  the  business, 
and  from  that  time  he  was  president  and  principal  owner 
of  the  J.  W.  Bishop  Company. 


204 


HISTORY  OF  WORCESTER  COUNTY 


The  monuments  to  Mr.  Bishop’s  ability  and  attain¬ 
ments,  numerous  and  enduring,  may  be  seen  in  the 
private  and  public  buildings  that  he  erected  in  all  parts 
of  the  country,  palaces  at  Newport  and  Lennox,  great 
government  buildings,  substantial  business  blocks.  The 
list  of  his  contracts  would  fill  pages,  and  the  full  story 
of  his  life  work  would  require  a  volume  by  itself.  But 
just  as  enduring  as  the  brick  and  stone  will  be  the 
story  of  his  rise  from  humble  circumstances  by  his  own 
efforts,  his  self-training  and  his  long  and  successful 
career.  His  life  is  one  of  the  best  as  a  guide  and 
example  to  ambitious  youth,  an  encouragement  for  the 
young  men  starting  on  the  road  he  traveled. 

The  offices  and  mill  of  the  J.  W.  Bishop  Company 
are  located  at  Nos.  107  and  109  Foster  Street.  The 
woodwork  for  contracts  in  this  section  and  the  orna¬ 
mental  iron  work  as  well  are  wrought  in  these  shops. 
The  Boston  office  is  in  the  Essex  Building,  No.  683 
Atlantic  Avenue;  the  New  York  office  at  No.  101  Park 
Avenue;  other  offices  are  located  in  New  Bedford,  Prov¬ 
idence,  and  Bridgeport.  Mr.  Bishop’s  son,  John  Warren 
Bishop,  Jr.,  is  vice-president  and  general  manager,  and 
Herbert  N.  Leach  is  treasurer  of  the  company.  Other 
vice-presidents  are:  Hey  wood  S.  French,  Boston;  Robert 
F.  Brown,  New  York.  The  aggregate  business  for 
many  years  has  amounted  to  several  millions  a  year. 
Mr.  Bishop  had  little  time  for  other  enterprises  than 
his  own,  but  organized  various  subsidiary  companies  to 
manufacture  material  used  in  his  business.  He  was  a 
director  of  the  Clason  Architectural  Metal  Works,  and 
president  of  the  Bishop  Securities,  Incorporated. 

Mr.  Bishop  was  a  member  of  Athelstan  Lodge, 
Ancient  Free  and  Accepted  Masons ;  Eureka  Chapter, 
Royal  Arch  Masons;  Worcester  Lodge,  Independent 
Order  of  Odd  Fellows;  the  Worcester  County  Me¬ 
chanics’  Association;  the  Worcester  Country  Club;  the 
Turks  Head  Club,  Providence,  Rhode  Island;  and  the 
Worcester  Chamber  of  Commerce.  In  politics  he  was 
a  Republican.  He  attended,  with  his  family,  the  Pil¬ 
grim  Congregational  Church. 

Mr.  Bishop  married,  January  4,  1870,  Sarah  A.  Fos¬ 
ter,  daughter  of  Thomas  and  Sarah  Jane  (Fales)  Foster. 
Mrs.  Bishop,  who  died  October  17,  1923,  was  descended 
from  Samuel  Foster,  the  first  of  the  family  in  this 
country,  who  was  born  in  England  in  1619,  and  settled 
in  Dedham,  early  ;  and  from  James  Fales,  the  immigrant, 
who  came  from  England  to  Dedham  in  1650.  Lemuel 
Fales,  of  the  fourth  generation,  was  a  soldier  in  the  Rev¬ 
olution,  and  Abner  Torrey,  Jr.,  another  ancestor  of  Mrs. 
Bishop,  served  in  the  Revolution.  All  her  lines  of 
ancestry  are  traced  to  the  pioneers  of  New  England. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Bishop  had  the  following  children:  1. 
Mina,  born  January  24,  1871,  died  in  infancy.  2. 
William  Thomas,  born  February  25,  1872,  died  in  Oc¬ 
tober,  1 91 1 ;  he  was  associated  with  his  father  in  busi¬ 
ness,  and  was  vice-president  of  the  J.  W.  Bishop  Com¬ 
pany.  3.  Frederick  Herbert,  born  November  19,  1874, 
died  in  infancy.  4.  Florence  Jane,  born  August  24,  1875. 
5.  Marion  Edith,  born  August  16,  1877;  married  March 
4,  1897,  Thomas  H.  Coe,  of  Worcester.  6.  John  War¬ 
ren,  Jr.,  a  sketch  of  whom  follows.  7.  Sarah  Adelaide, 
born  July  6,  1881,  died  May  12,  1912.  8.  Alice  Marie, 
born  July  7,  1884,  died  in  infancy.  9.  Nathaniel  Smart, 
born  January  31,  1886,  died  April  13,  1904. 


JOHN  WARREN  BISHOP,  JR.  — To  hew  to  a 

given  line  is  a  task  far  more  exacting  than  to  cut  full  and 
free,  and  it  is  a  debatable  question  whether  the  advantages 
of  a  distinguished  ancestry  outweigh  the  psychological 
handicap  of  a  goal  so  lofty  and  difficult  of  attainment. 
When  John  Warren  Bishop,  Jr.,  entered  active  business 
life  he  was  not  confronted  with  the  necessity  of  placing 
his  family  name  in  a  position  of  commanding  respectful 
attention  and  honor,  but  of  so  ordering  his  own  endeav¬ 
ors  that  the  high  standards  established  by  the  founders 
of  the  business  should  be  the  measure  of  his  own  achieve¬ 
ment.  Responsibilities  were  early  thrust  upon  him,  and 
the  burdens  increased  as  he  proved  his  ability  to  bear 
them.  Thus  for  years  he  has  shown  himself  able  to 
maintain  the  prestige  of  the  family  name. 

In  Plymouth,  England,  the  Bishop  family,  in  this 
branch,  was  identified  for  many  generations  with  such 
endeavors  as  added  to  the  sum  of  human  happiness  and 
contributed  to  the  general  welfare  and  prosperity  of  the 
civic  body.  William  Bishop,  Mr.  Bishop’s  grandfather, 
a  ship  carpenter  by  trade,  emigrating  from  Plymouth 
to  Canada  in  1818,  founded  the  family  on  this  side  of  the 
Atlantic,  settling  at  White  Sands,  Prince  Edward  Island. 
He  later  followed  his  trade  for  many  years  at  St.  John, 
New  Brunswick,  in  the  great  shipyards  of  that  city. 
He  married  Sarah  Hooper,  and  the  family  removed  to 
Lonsdale,  Rhode  I