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AL EN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 


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833 02099 4569 


Gc 929.2 R25au 
Ault, Helene B. 

T h e Ho n. John Read, 
qe n11e ma n, 16 79-174 9 

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1749 


PRESENT ED 


BEFORE THE 


BY HELEN E B. AULT 

REDDING HISTORY CLUB 
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FOREWORD 


Mrs. Helene B. Ault presented before the Redding 
History Club this paper on "The Hon. John Read, Gentleman", 
first settler of Redding, Connecticut and an eminent lawyer 
in Massachusetts Province where he died in 1749. 

Correspondence with the Custodian of Harva_rd 
College archives, Mr. Clifford K. Shipton, brought a gracious 
response with some new data from Massachusetts; also helpful 
and quoted freely here, was an earlier address delivered in 
1886 by Mr. Isaac Beers, who in that year lived adjacent to 
the land where John Read was born in 1679, son of William Read 
and Deborah Baldwin. 








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- 1 - 


The snow does not last long in Fairfield. It is 
probable that the day of John Read's birth in January, 1679, 
was mild and beautiful, with those misty shades which dimly 
reveal Long Island across the smooth expanse of ?/ater south of 
the salt meadows. 

Since the Pequots had been decisively defeated in 
1675 i Fairfield had settled down into the tranquil village which 
it has been to this day. Founded in 1639 by men from Hartford 
and New Haven Colonies, the Town had been laid out in orderly 
blocks, with wide avenues cut through the primeval forest trees. 
In the very heart of the settlement was the old Westcott home 
where John's mother, Deborah Baldwin, had been born in 1652; 
but John's place of birth was probably at "CALVES' PASTURE", 
a 3-acre farm which his father, William Read, had bought in 
1673 from Cornelius Hull — part of an original grant given by 
the Town to Hull in 1653. (See Vol. A, pages 35 and 214.) 

Later on, in 1786, William Read did acquire the 
former place, belonging to his wife's kin, and John grew up in 
that more pretentious old home, and inherited both places. The 
Baldwin home had been built very early by Richard Westcott, an 
original settler, whose widow, Joanna, had brought this home to 
her second husband, Nathaniel Baldwin, (before I 65 O), and then 
to her third husband, Thomas Skidmore. By subsequent transfers, 
it came to William Read — but not until John was seven years 


old. 

























- 2 - 


This later home was better placed, being on the main 
Highway (now the Old Post Road), opposite the (present) old 
Academy, and near the Town Church and the residence of the 
minister. The Rev. Samuel Wakeraan, a Harvard man, who was also 
probably the best qualified, if not the only tutor at that time. 

In Book A of the Town Records was entered the simple 
statement: "John Read, the son of William Read, was born the 
29th day of January, 1679". Reversing the large volume, we come 
upon a deed of gift, whereby the father, William Read, although 
he did not die for four years later on, did in 1693 seek to 
secure to his only son, John Read, all his estate. (A-188) Sept. 

2 , 1693. 

Although John was only fourteen then, and about to 
go far off to school, William Read drew up the desired division 
of his lands, certain meadows for Sara and Abigail, his daughters, 
and the record states: "All other lands, meadows, house, barn, 

orchards and fences are to go to my loving son, John Read". 

Raised in an environment reflecting the simple exist¬ 
ence of his time — (that of Charles II; Edmond Andros was then in 
New York Colony; William Penn was just founding Pennsylvania), John 
Read had a background both tender and substantial. He lost Ms 
young mother, Deborah Read, when he was but a child; but she had 
not only a brother, Samuel Baldwin, and a sister, Sara (wife of 
Joseph Barlow), but her father and mother had each had four 































- 3 - 


children by previous marriages, and no doubt all cared for the 
three children of Deborah Read until the father remarried. The 
Baldwin family had come from Buckinghamshire to early Milford, 
Connecticut, and thence to Fairfield where Deborah's father, 
Nathaniel Baldwin, brought his four children and married Joanna, 
the widow of Richard Westcott, whose own four children married 
and removed to Stamford, Connecticut and Bedford, II. Y. and to 
New Jersey. 

John Read's own uncle, Samuel Baldwin, was (to quote 
a member of his own family), "a man of powerful but uncultivated 
mind", who appreciating his 07 m lack of opportunities moved to 
New Haven where his children could have advantages of the "highest 
kind", and he was rewarded by numbering among his descendants 
several notable men — a Member of Congress, a U. S. Senator, a 
University President (Abraham Baldwin of Georgia), a Speaker of 
the First House in Ohio; (Ruth Baldwin, wife of our Joel Barlow, 
came from the Michael Baldwin line.) Some of this thirst for 
knowledge — certainly a great respect for knowledge, must have 
been implanted in young John Read, as he was sent, when only 14, 
to far off Cambridge to be educated at Harvard. No doubt as a 
boy he had been tutored in Fairfield, probably by the minister, 
Rev. Samuel Wakeman. We can imagine that he swam in the Sound, 
and sailed with others between Milford and Stamford on family 
visits. He had probably been over in Long Island, where many 
Fairfield families were taking up land. If he spent vacations 
at home in Fairfield from far off Boston, he may have explored 












































- 4 - 


the watercourses inland as far as Hartford, or gone on foot or by 
horse to Danbury, founded when he was but ten by Norwalk families 
and still new and exciting territory. 

Who can say what were the horizons and the dreams of 
a youth in this magnificient unspoiled wilderness.where every 
hill top, arduously gained, spread out visions of new and beautiful 
stretches of unclaimed land! This was John Read's real background — 
love of the land, and the accompanying procedure of punctiliously 
recorded documents as the land was acquired, transferred or 
inherited. He was born to be a lawyer, not a minister, but for 
a time the family decisions and environment prevailed; so John Read 
in 1693 was sent to Harvard. There was then no Yale at hand, yet 
perhaps the inspiration for this important step came from men who 
did found Yale; for if William Read and John visited their kinfolks 
in Milford, they were probably vastly influenced by that fine old 
pastor, Rev. Samuel Andrews, who (a graduate himself of Harvard in 
1675) had come to Milford to a charge which was to last fifty 
years and in 1701, he and others did form Yale College. 

At this period, of course, all ministers had to come 
from Harvard .College. In 1693 William and ?,!ary College in Virginia 
received a charter brought over that year by Edmond Andros who was 
then coming to take over for James II the government in Virginia, 
lately recovered from a series of poor (and often absent) adminis¬ 
trators. 

At any rate, this motherless lad left the home of 



























his father in Fairfield and traveled (we wonder how) to the great 
metropolis in Boston and entered a new world and this is no figure 
of speech, for Massachusetts (that largest and most independent of 
New England Colonies) was just recovering from the blackest and 
most staggering pages of her history, and to understand the new 
world upon which John Read entered, we go back a few years. 

We have heard from Mr. Dillon of the distinctly 
different concepts of government which evolved in Connecticut and 
Massachusetts. Connecticut, relatively less troubled by external 
events, had become more and more democratic in processes; but 
Massachusetts (growing greater through her world traffic and sea¬ 
ports) had still held, as far as she was able, to the original 
theocratic ideals wherein onl 3 r church members could vote. It had 
become increasingly difficult, however, to hold English-bred men 
to this idea, while asking them to join in the common defense 
and pay taxes — and in fact, 13 years earlier, liberal thinkers 
had seceded from the strict orthodox First Church in Boston and set 
up the Old South Church. Only the danger coming upon them from 
Charles II in 1686-9, forced a reconciliation between them. 

For years Massachusetts had agreed to a few edicts from 
Charles II and had diplomatically postponed action on others until 
they could be ignored in time. But now England found excuse for 
many unsettled grievances. James II (following his Stuart brother 
in 1685) sent Edmond Andros over and he and a few quislings really 
carried out orders. They had gone through many County Towns in 



























- 6 - 


England and gathered back their Charters and no-ff, in 1687, they 
did the sane in New England. Plymouth Colony had never had a 
charter, so it was at once annexed to Massachusetts Colony. The 
private charters of Maine and New Hampshire were annulled. They 
were taken from Massachusetts and made Crown Colonies to the King. 
Rhode Island and Connecticut had their charters annulled but they 
were not put into effect . New Haven Colony, — that "theocratic 
offshoot" of Massachusetts, was dissolved and thrown into the 
"ungodly arms of Connecticut Colony" at Hartford. But Massachusetts 
was to be humbled into resigning her charter. Not a hand in the 
Assembly was raised to do so; so Edmond Andros formally revoked the 
charter and furthermore, dissolved the General Court (comparable to 
our losing our Supreme Court). From Delaware to Maine, the whole 
sweep of New England was made to feel a servitude never known before, 
or since, by Englishmen. 

But Providence, which in 1635 had interposed in behalf 
of Massachusetts by carrying off Charles II with a stroke, now again 
saved the day in 1689 through word from England, that James II had 
been deposed by the long-suffering English who had endured enough 
from the Stuarts, and had brought over William and Mary from Orange 
to be their new Protestant rulers. 

Edmond Andros who had spent three years in Boston (a 
faithful servant of James II as a soldier under orders) was promptly 
jailed and returned to England. The old charter was re-instated and 
ex-Govornor Simon Bradstreet recalled to administer the government. 





















. r.-' 










- 7 - 


*5 


This capable old gentleman was 86, bom in 1603 in Lincolnshire, 
graduate of Cambridge in England, Secretary to the Earl of Warwick 
and a capable administrator during his life time. His wife was a 
daughter of ex-Governor Thomas Dudley, the Elder, both of these 
Governors being ancestors of our ex-President Herbert Hoover. With 
the crisis in government miraculously passed, Massachusetts had 
next experienced the dreadful witchcraft delusion which had engulfed 
Salem and nearby sections. But, by this year of our Lord 1692, the 
pious leaders (including Judge Sewall and Cotton Mather) had recovered 
their sanity and were tearfully acknowledging their remorse in public. 

It was, then, the following year, 1693, that our 
Connecticut boy, John Read, entered College at Kevrtown, now Cambridge, 
where in 1696 he finished 7th in a class of 14. No doubt, the broad 
experience of these formative years had much to do with his later 
life and contributed to his return later from the life of a Connecti¬ 
cut Squire to the forum of the country's busiest city. 

He saw here two churches existing in Boston — one, the 
established Episcopal Church forced upon Boston by Andros, and he 
probably read many speeches against tyranny and heard notable sermons. 
There is no doubt but that John Read lived in the midst of great minds 
and great times and absorbed a greater breadth of vision in these 
three years. For us, the records of his college life are few. 

It seems that while he was in College, a certain Peter 
Burr was entrusted by the elder Read to deal out John's spending 
money, and his Mss. Account Book (now in the Massachusetts Histori- 



























cal Society) enters charges for the usual necessities of a student, 
viz: "a pair of gloves, two pen knives, six pewter spoons, three 
"ink orns", four handkerchiefs and 1^- lbs. liquorish balls"; also 
a dozen pipes and beer and cider to the value of 9 shillings. The 
College Quarterly said he was a lively student. He once paid a 
fine of 7 sh. 9 pence; and one Quarter bill for commons and sizing 
was no less than L 5 - 2 - 11 q. Years later. Read gave Thomas 
Prince a somewhat different impression of his undergraduate 
diversions, saying: "When I wa.s a senior sophister at College in 
1696 , there being a day of prayer, I and several others went from 
College to attend the exercise, and after a day of solid preaching 
and praying in relays, *£r. Torrey stood up and prayed nearly two 
hours, but all his prayer so entirely new and various, without 
tautologies, so exceedingly pertinent, so regular, so natural, so 
free, lively and affecting that towards the end of his prayer, hint¬ 
ing at still new and agreeable scenes of thought, we could not help 
wishing him to enlarge upon them. But time obliged him to close to 
our regret; we could gladly have heard him an hour longer." 

This detached evaluation shows the analytical quality 
of our subject’s mind. He probably adopted a similar style, as he 
had a very engaging manner in the pulpit, in which he soon found 
himself. Returned from College, and following the loss of his father, 
John Read within the year was preaching at Waterbury, though not 
quite 20 years of age. To be sure, Waterbury was not the industrial 
city that we know. It had a ratable estate of only L 1700 but the 
Town "voted a rate of 3 half pennies in the Pound" to defray his 























I 

salary, and twice renewed the offer of a permanent Pastorate — each 
time declined, although the nominal position continued until December 
! 29 # 1699 when he resigned. On November 12th next, he joined the First 

I 

: Church of Hartford where he served three years, again declining to be 

1 

• regularly installed; also declining an invitation to serve in 
\ 

Windsor, Connecticut* 

i 

< 

I Now in 1703, it happened that the people of old Stratford 

j had occa.sion to supply their puloit and voted ’’that Nathaniel Sherman 

I 

3 proceed forthwith with all convenient soeed to Hartford and endeavor, 

I • 

; by all lawful means, the obtaining of Rev. John Read to supply the 

i vacancy in the ministry # made by the decease of the Rev. Isreal Chauncey, 

* 

9 

' and that he be voted L 40 in money and L 6 in firev:ood for half a year 

V 

! 

| and that the Committee take care of transporting Mr. Read’s family and 
; find suitable habitation for him. ,, This referred to his wife Ruth 

I 

i Talcott, daughter of Col* John Talcott (later to be Governor of 

j 

Connecticut), and by this time a daughter Ruth, and a son John Read 

( 

Jr., had been born; (this is Col. John Read of Lonetown, born 1701, 

* died 1786). In all there were at least eight children most of whom 
<; married in Boston and lived in the East and in Halifax and Rhode 

i 

y Island. At Stratford young Rev. John Read served the Congregational 
Church faithfully for throe years; but in 1706 the Town and Church 
were rocked to their common foundation. 

The faint specter of the English Established Church, which 
had already set up in Massachusetts in the King's chapel by Edmond 
Andros, now appeared on the Connecticut horizon. Newly arrived 























- 10 - 


Englishmen knew nothing of the New England Church. They retained a 
traditional affection for the home church, although "worshipping in 
faithful spirit with the dissenting communities amongst whom their 
lot was cast". Meanwhile, ministers about to be ordained were ex¬ 
amining the doctrinal fundamentals, knowing the judicial mind of our 
subject, we may understand his more tolerant idea of religious freedom - 
scarcely formulated,' (this was 80 years before our Bill of Rights). He 
probably defended the right of both churches to exist; (both Maryland 
and Rhode Island had more tolerance). 

Aware of considerable criticism going on behind his back, he 

\ 

hailed certain members of his congregation before a church council for 
"contempt of him and his ministry". The usual remedy of Town Meeting 
and a day of fasting and prayer resulted in the appointment of the 
Reverends Pierpont, Andrew’s, Chauncey and Webb to look into the charge 
of the young minister. These exonerated the Town and Church saying: 
"they had found no indication of anything offensive to fur. Read ex¬ 
cept the intimation that he had made overtures to join the 
Episcopal Church". 

At this moment came the Rev. George Muirson from England, 
a missionary, accompanied by Col. Heathcote, who rode fully armed 
into the midst of a gathering of the Church, nearly overturning the 
faithful Elders who could not possibly at that date visualize the 
existence of two doctrinally opposed faiths in the same community at 
one time. Mr. Read now openly expressed his preference for the 
Episcopal form of worship and withdrew as his parishioners viewed it 
"into the papistical ways of Muirson’s people". Many expected him 






































L. 


- 11 - 

to become an English Churchman. Col. Heathcote wrote back to the 
Society for the Propagation of the Gospel that "Mr. Read of this 
place is inclinable to come over to our church and being by far the 
most ingenious man amongst them, v/ould be very capable to serve the 
church". 


Contrary, however, to the general impression, young Mr. 

Read gave up his clerical career entirely, not, however, before 
preaching the First Congregational Church sermon delivered at New 
Milford whither he had been drawn (says Orcutt) by ownership of 
land and had built a house. VTnether young John Read had been study¬ 
ing law during his years of ministry or not, it seemed amazing that 
he should have qualified so soon, as early as May in 1709, at the 
New London, Connecticut Bar. He shortly became Prosecuting Attorney 
for New Milford in an action against a Stratford Company for tres¬ 
pass — trepass on a large tract of land at Wiantenoclc, which he 
stated "belonged to ye Inhabitants of Milford and included certain 
land of his own". He had been defending his own land for some time 
evidently. 

The same gifts of expression which had made him sought after 
as a minister now served him in the court room. The jury found for 
the plaintiff. The case being carried to the Governor and his 
Assistants, Read was awarded treble damages and costs. This dispute 
carried on for some time. Fifteen times it was brought up and each 

i 

time Attorney Read, "Queen*s Counselor", won the case. The six¬ 
teenth trial lost the land to the claimants 1 This reversal was 

■> »- i WJIH ' H ' L<WI'« 1. » i i.» _ - ^ „ __ _, | - , 



























6> T 0 O 


CORRECTION TO H. B. AULT'S "JOHN READ, GENT." 97 

The parentage of the immigrant Baldwin brothers, Nathaniel, Timothy and 
Joseph, cm given in the chart included in the subject pamphlet is incor- 


fifty 


iect 



jhe first five children of the children listed were those of Rich¬ 

ard and Ellen (Apuks) Baldwin as indicated. However, tbs lest three Tfere 
great gpsndchildroa of Richard's brother, John Baldwin of La Hale (Hsyle). 

C. C. Baldwin's "Baldwin Genealogs’’ shows Richard Baldwin of Cholesbuxy 
(husband of Isabel end father of Nathaniel, Timothy and Joseph) to be the 
son of R±chsrd( II) and grandson of Richard (1) and Ellen Baldwin. 

After modem research in England, Herbert Furman Ssversmith'a contsnpo- 
rnry work corrects the line ago to r3ad as followss 

At. Robert Baldwin bom ca lU75> died post 1528 cf Dundridge and Aston 
Clinton, Co. Bucks. His wife uas Agnes, daughter of Willi esa Dclto 
of Rickmanworth, Co. Herts. In addition t-o John next, he was the 
father of Richard of Dur.dridge • who married Ellen. 

F-. John Baldwin of La Hale (Hayle)Died 1565. Wifo unknown. 

C-. Thomas Baldwin of Hypers, Chatham, Bucks, died in 1570 leaving wife 
Johns sad several minor child* en. Jo sac was perhaps Joan Tyndall, 
as Thomas refers to hie brother John Tyndall. 

B. Richard Baldwin bom Hypers, Iheshan, Buclce circa. 1575* died l6l5. 
Resided Cholesbury, Bucks. He married "Agmcndeshan (Americhaa) 31 
Kay 1593 Isabella Harding. 

E» Nathaniel Baldwin, Timothy Baldwin and Joseph Baldwin, immigrants . 
to Ihlford, Connecticut, *<a;haniel’s daughter, Deborah, married 
.Willian Read, and uas the mother of John Read. 


February, 1953 



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References and Authorities Quoted 


1. George B. Reed - "Sketch of the Life of The Hon. John Read 
of Boston" (Boston, 1903) P» 5 

2. Peter Burr - Mss. Account Book - Mass. Hist. Soc. p. 19-39 

3. Hugh Adams — See in Harvard Archives 

4 . Henry Bronson - History of Waterbury — 1858 

5 . Memorial Edition of Hartford County - oy Trumbull 

6 . History of Stratford and Bridgeport - by Orcutt p. 296-7 Vol. 1 

7. Biographical Sketches of Eminent Lawyers - by Knapp - p. 157-161 

8 . History of Harvard University - by Josiah Quincy 

9. Annals of King’s Chapel - by Heniy W. Foote 

10. Winthrop Papers - in Mass. Hist. Society - vol. 5 
405-418-426 

11 . John Adams - Y, T orks - IH-533 IX-572 

12. Life of James Otis - by Wm. Tudor (Boston 1823) p. 12 

13. Jacob W. Reed - "The Reed Family" (Boston 1861) - p. 209 

14. Boston Weekly Post Boy - Feb. 13, 1749 - P* 2 / 1 

15. Fiske’s New England Colonies 

16. Land Records of Newtown, Conn. - vol. 1 

17. History of Redding, Conn., by Todd 

18. W. A. Beers - "John Reed, the Colonial Lawyer" - Fairfield 
County Historical Society 

19. Archives of Harvard College - Mr. C. K. Skipton Custodian 

20. Addison Gallery of Art - Phillips Andover Academy, Andover, 
Massachusetts 


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$ 


ARCHIVES of HARVARD COLLEGE 


; No 292 


11-337-13 


SP 60 


F M 


145 


; WORKS 

S 

Various legal papers of Read are preserved in the court files 

; 

\ 

of Connecticut and Massachusetts, The M. H. S. has a number of 
miscellaneous papers and letters, some of which are in the Winthrop, 

% 

Mss. and not listed in the general catalogue* Some of his writings 
have been printed in the following places: 6 Coll. M. H. S. v 
(Winthrop Papers); Law Papers, III (Coll. C on n. Hist. Soc. xv); 

■f 

\ 

t 

Talcott Papers II (Coll, Conn. Hist. Soc. v); Edmund F. Slafter, 

t 

John Checkley (Prince Society, 1897), II, 38-44; Jeremy Belknap, 

j 

History of New Hampshire (Boston, 1792), III, 359-65; George B. 

\ 

Reed, John Read (ed. 1903)• 


His only printed work is A LATIN GRAMMAR 
PP- (2), 34, 20. AAS, BA, CHS. 


.Boston, 1736. 




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HARVARD COLLEGE LIBRARY CLIPPING SHEET 


Ware- Celebration opens. 


-r\ 


’ 9 t, . 

' / V- -V. 


SEAD 'MEMORIAL UNVEILED. 


* v • 

• i . ■ : <*' Liv ►e\* T-r 

exercises at THE OLD CE K T RR 


\r*\' !•}' 

\ V V * 


.♦ •• .I* < 

- • —• / /- 


-5 


ADDRESS BY REV ARTHUR CHASE. 


LO 


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1 I... .-iA.J 

Rwt .R. d. .tawytr, H. C; .Darla and 
f- . Harwood Also lp«alo—Tha 
®* c «lpnt IfOan Exhibit. 


im it 


_ 7 ,v .!•• •- { 

./•The^ old common before' r the .historic 1 
chuY4h.it ‘.Tyxre Center. 'which down 
through the, years baa 'seen, the coming' 

and gofbg of.generations, which has seen 
so taany neighborly gatherings after iueet- 
lag, bas seen.'the happyJthroniraL Yome 
from all the .coaptry-alae to.jnake^inerrH- 
“t A wedding and the same oh£s. gather to( 
mourn a neighbor gud relative, gvliich has 
fert . the martial ; tread of soldiers being 
trained for'.’the'wars, '.yesterday ‘ looked 
npoa a eight /be' like of which it had. 

5®y, cr |ec*n. V H er c on tills commoir 
gut Iiered ^_tbe--people of the pre*ent-dsy, 
''_ are - 'They, came from ,the •,'ftrrn and! 
from th$ loom, f rom rhe Connqug-roonij 
and the .stbre.^.f^pi ,-»far 4 n 0 imar' to lid, 
honor to the man Who <fode oWned thrfi 
land All. about and iwbo-ftn 'dlla -lifetime’ 
IFirteiUwiffa, only tbla onpdpnrcel which, 
went (0 make & sltf forAJje ohurch ana 
tb ff Common. Tbp men of to-day : ln wbosd 
minds Wsd'bord dhs IdeaTof 4 celebrating 
Wste’t 150th AnntTefsai^-bad decided tits t: 

S recognition (hough tardy, ahouid be made* 

°f tl>^Ji£SofJoha Bead and. his benefne- 
lions To tHr Ware River parish <$ffwhlchf 
**« V a * Wtro» and proprietor! .^ jt J. 

'Tuft' exercises began at ;8 q'doclr. with ] 
*e!ection#v ,, by''&n‘ orch^stYn. Afteyrelfigin^ j 

*yrd^t&*l'jfchndf<ih ^rsawyeYH 

l<a<rt6r-®f >the’' Ware Center r dinrch'• gavq 
the unveiling address, taklng^^lfrw‘Rib*-* 


PmarW were ss follows:-^ - ' % t 

Into the great pulsating life of onr na- 1 
tion no .better blood has ever-flowed than 
that flowing from -the cross-rofacls*; rural 
life- /Prom Mhirfe -to California, frdm xhe| 
great lakes to the gulf, you will fiqd every-: 
where the dona and daughters of the cross¬ 
roads holding positions of usefulness. (mat' 
ind/honor. And into mat^great irnir of| 
xrantrysldc men and.-wOmcn,. Ware Oenreet 
has sent its atH>hz.taYnhla ; -'lip|fe poriulL 
has poured fortn into the great world ont- 


nae; botfrtisefnl private* for theT*Yi1a sod* 
iJe and lenders fot position* of rtjinenct*., 4 

In the^orid of business,i-nnitie^ 4 mny be 
ound adorning- city block*•tbaC’.onre werd 
icrnwlod on the seats of ^fortder "school:. 
the professional world has nonoruble nun 
k.it^ ranks that were recruited from th* 
:ds; u Whq. ; s pne time ran ;baTMfooftd . uftet 
le I 90 WS glong tliese roads. who'aa 

[ ds and youths held tbe plowSfld dropped 
ie corn in these fields hnre passo^oiit' 
ato the larger world to argue the aniKlei 

<*eg tha ns in-qjphodi 

~^rW»»ngTne?Hn?T>lit* ^br^ruclnim 
he .tfotd 6f Oud. - fn > thi;»iWys of tlie' 
this mltlslh-ecnt men. 
sjthegy^^ t J )r .p^vatc>m(»eket and to 
. 1 ‘ ,n 1 ' , "'a "word. And. Jntq the 
, ,uu " t . h,, P° rt *ur j hiW» of "nil. 
the Industrial ranks, the hewdrii of Wood 
ind .-drawers of water hare men and 

th l“ p * r1 "^ KOBf.-.. And t<>- 
,, ay Dalive son ol “his place is 

th? Aklllet! manipulator of the great ma¬ 
chine whose tireless muscle* of. iron and 
Ateel curries on the; world’s production. 
m™v reare V, » nd . « iv ?n strength on .these 
1 i*j^A ve rP e /i * ,e ^ tbe mines be- 
cpnd. the Hockiee; the broad, batten prai- 

n m of # th f A Y est ha T e " fc * en tpnted Into 

adds of flowipg -gralu*under the magic 
touch of Wn and sklij^that .wenTout 
fronr here; theAwild xyUfea pf-ithe ocean 
have'rocked the mariner,''who as a’cliild 
waa-rocked In a Ware Center cradle. 
.Jn.the grMt movements-./pc human bet- 
terment find reform, from the'Revolution' 
Ind «ha/i»'s rebellion down to (lie-present 
rumble of nurest at social injustice, voices 
oo b.eliolf#off humanity have gone un 
rom-' thia place. - Not only those who 
lave- gone >ppL: from ’ here,-* but-those whd 
|aye ( romaiW to bond thefr: baqke to the 
httrdens of life, and toil give us evidence 
ffl*t<the native of this parish may feel 
like the - Apostle Paul, that he la a native 
of “no mean city." .. . 

ATo^lay, standing on the threshold of the 
Axerdae* tha.t.mark the IKOlh snaiversarv 
ftf the Incorporation of ‘Ware as a town 
to* arerto nncttrlf.A.permanent memoriai 
to the man whpw .-KlatioaunndL iu**r* -iu 
if 'Jf ™alce *tbls pariih^salble' thm 
eny^outCr mun'Of'hiw otvnreT pfJa later ^ 
A\e aro to unveilJiet*4t this cross- 1 
toad* a monutrfdit. a tnemorinl in stone 
;tpd hronse. _tb testify for all time that 
ttqr e? Were today appreciate 

? tne Wprft and honor the memory of John 
e *y<f ihe.-first lienefaetor - of the town, 
e founder of the Manoiir of Peace! 

I he • name • of John^ Rcrfd must never 
reuse to- be iionored in ^he Ware riVer val- 
Riy.sAUd so standing hePe on thVlhistori.j 
FJP°H' this church common,- .hallowed 
ground of the old-time Manour ouPcace, 7 
up-as the chairman of the committee hai-w 
“ng'these dedication exerdses in charr*, 

At spokesman for the general commit- 
pnd-tliose citizens who conceived the 
i . ibis monument; as pastor of the 
, re l That -occuplee theJaDd given by 
*.a^^ 0n d uliove all as a represenla- 

t vg of- all the citizens of tlie town, both 
resent and past, in this multifold ca- 
city. I do now commit to the fntnre 
tizens of this town, to all who shall 
nywhere honor human worth, this bowl- 
dediCAtocl- ; John ••^ Read ‘and his 









































Manour or'.fence. 

H ^ f ■ ~ 

y> The Memorial Unveiled. 

' Following the address of Mr gnwycr 
bree little daughters of Ware Center, 
\flsses Rachel Cummings. Rosalind Saw- 
er nnd Rose McManus. s tepped forth 

, rtncl drew" the cord 'that lield the veiling 
< in plnee. TMr Sawyer's remarks and i. e 
I unveiling were followed hr a selection by 
Che orchestra, after which ^thcrc were 
dedicatory addresses by Henry C. D*v. : s 
of Ware and Albert L. Hnrwood of Bos¬ 
ton. Both mer> felicitated fhc residents 
of W are town on,their achievements nnd 
told them always to foster there the 
spirit which had made to-day's events 
possible. j , , 

H*t < Arthar Chase's Historical Ad- 

' » T - - , • ' 

j , ^(Irrti. 

These speakers were followed by Rev 
-Acfbnr r*h««e r tirtor - of TVinifv TTru-,f\ 
pal church at Ware, whose historical ad¬ 
dress was in part as follows:— 

It Is certainly n matter of pride for 
•ny town to be associated with the name 
of an eminent man. In some instances 
such association la through the aecideut 
of birth. In others of residence. In ours 
It comes through a double tie—that of 
ownership nnd that of benefaction. John 
Head was the proprietor of this great, 
realm, the Manour of Peace, and the bene¬ 
factor of Ware River parish. John Read., 
as the fine bronze plate upon this bowlder 
tells yon. was born in the year 1080 on 
the 14tli day of February of that year In 
the colony of Connecticut He was the 1 
son of Samue] Head and a grandson of 1 

John Read, who came from England with 
the great fleet in 1030 and Bottled in 
Massachusetts. At the age of 17 lie ~rndu- 

and. following 
the traditions or.that institution of learn- 
Ing, prepared, himself for the sacred tnin- 
Istry for which work he was ready when 
but 18 year* of age.',. The field of 1.1s 
ministry waa. In. the colony of Connect¬ 
icut, where f < he served- for eight years, 
holding charges at*Waterbnry. East Hart-| 
ford and Stratford. .-Youthful though lie| 
waa, he made himself a name in his call- 
In the old parish records of Strat- 
lora. which I have examined, it is staled 
tliat the committee „agnt to East Hart¬ 
ford to extoDd him a, trail Was instructed 
to employ ©very reasonable-menns to In¬ 
duce the young man-to accept the-Strat¬ 
ford charge. He wan already at this 
time married to Ruth Talcott alster of, 
Oov Joseph Tnlcott and daughter of Llcnt- 
Col John -Talcott. - who mmmnndwl thej 
Connecticut forces in King Philip's war. 1 
" But it was. iropoaslble for John-Read, 
with keen business ability, to subordinate 
Administrative talents to ministerial 
Resides being n clergyman he wn 
j.-Weritably a man of affaira. Having been 
unwillingly Into lawsulta concernlm 
Tootle to certain lands, lie became deep 
fin teres ted In thfc study of ' law; and 
5n*dedded to devote himself to Its sejy 
*v*£^* nd practice. " Hla abandonment of 
" alnlstry . for that purpose need not 
^ ^fded. by us as in the least rep- 
reneasible, for, according to the Congre- 
gaaOBal policy of that time, g. man wi*i 
a minister only while holding a charge by 
ylrtxnj of hla ordination at the hands of 
Titos© .over whom he ,was placed. 8o 
when he ceased to be a minister of the 
b'trajford congregation he became, t a£tnr 
his dismissal, a layman again. The fact 
la that, having chosen the ministry at 17, 
he djacovered, reaching maturity, that 


# 


ok'wiri J er' V fi7M lnflea Uieruiness would m,,I 
ider field in another profession c>- 
tnm it is that he remained to tne end 

£££" noest ■ cdGM 

B supcrior abilities soon at J 

his «lf f l te i n,10D T and he rapidly a 

Y profession. In 1712. when Quoea 

w?s UP ° n - the Britifih throne. h a 

of r^n d att0rn °. 7 for the colour 

several ve*™'’ *r£ ° fflc0 ] vhich lie heId fn ' r 
several >ears. During this time he livnl 

" n . e8tatc which he named Lono- 

, a ? d t° wh »ch he added from time 

Tndui, f !’t of lands from his 

Indian neighbors. One such tract win 

known as "Chickens’s farm.” after the 
shirtless Indian named "thickens." from 

" b ™ l " - Jt - , TheHe Connecticut 
r V,' ,n , tbc neighborhood of 
btratford and from them was formed the 
present town of Reeling, or Reading. 

we~ m„ Rcnd ^ 8ervkcti to Connecticut 
“ any aud Ktcat. but In 1721 he dc- 

cedonv* 0 thT°f° l ° th C Mas8a chusettn Bar 
coloqy. the former home of his father 

•nd grandfather. Hia son. John. Jr and 

Connoff ht » er ' Ilutb - remained upon tlnj 
Connecticut estates. j 

Upon his arival in. Boston, Mr Read an 

one* received the xecogpitW that hiS 

character aud legal-attainments merited] 

Sfort illTl fa h' 8 ° mro ' « u 'l witliln 
gen^sl 1 n "r "i’tx'lnted nftOrnevl 

*? f lu 0 P rorinr e. In 1738 he trail 
elected by the voters of Boston to ronre4 

b^^ rm ? »“«' Oeneral Co£ r t 

becoming t ins .the first lawyer to sit IrJ 
that august body. -Mr Read's legal'at J 

£‘ ri n “ c "'" 7 efHyf 7 l from hl " wntemwJ 

low^i fnM * l ' ,m 1 10 Kcneratioiis. that fob 
i®"* 1 f »'' reixignition. -Both Massarhti- 
a " d r ^ nect , ,cut upv'oyrt hltu upon 
Pi)3l ir '" boundary disputes of the pe- 
riod He was regarded ns an authority 

?«" ' ,hn . pin, t muc ’h of the legisln- 

tlon of Massachusetts during those years 

b for the pre ; servnt(on of the cre<lit of 
the colony. ,\or is his fame altogether 
forgotten even "in these days. AThci 
making inquiries concerning an old prov- 

To'hn “lYel that probably 

its farming arKC,y ln "trunienta| in 

In mo. while still « citizen of the Con-' 
John Read bought the 
tract of land In tlie midst of which we are 
now standing, over -11.000 -acres i n ex- 
tent, which he - proeeedad to develop after 
the fashion of an English gentleman’s 1 
country estate, and t 0 which he gave th H 
poetic name of "the Manour of Peace.’] 

1 ho alArmn^of-the-Indian wars that had 

R.7i" taf t d :? robk6 '- K1 011 «a‘t anl 

Hadley to the'.westward had ceased t d 
sound in tins portion of Mansnchusett J 

nf a ,. bftV T n {n \ n P°r f l°n at leaii 

of those multitudes whose spirit could no 
longer brook the troublous wavs of the 
old world and who were coming to our 
shores from England. Scotland and Ire¬ 
land, to seek the peaceful habitation that 
corrupt politics and religious differences 
denied them there. The Manour of Peace 
a land of forest nnd meadow, -of hills 

ar Vl-.Tv^"' «P rin *« "nd of water brooks. 

Within 10 years of his purchase Mr 
KeHd had begun developing the tract Un¬ 
fortunately the records of tho$e davs are 
meager. very v meager: hut certainly it 
wns not long before the land was dotted 
with tenants cultivating farms which they 
held under lease at most reasonable terms 
grinding their-corn and rye at-tlje"mills I 













I 




wfticfr *pmn£ iin henide tne water courses. 


wentv-fivo shillings a year gave n man 
lOO acres, together with nianr common 
privileges enjoyed by the tenants as a 


j Of years "the traditions or tne jinnotir 
i were forgotten. The very name of the 
1 proprietor has long been strange to the 
! ears of the townspeople. We revive his 
name and his fame to-day and especially 
the name which he gave to . the estate. 
“The Manour of Peace.” - 


Politically the Manour was a part of 
Kingston, and for religious privileges the' 
settlers looked to Palmer Center, as it is 
now railed, where a church was earlv 


now called, where a church was early 
established. But as soon as sufficient fam¬ 
ilies had settled upon the Manonr and 
.adjacent lands to the east, a petition, 
signed hy 30 householders, was sent tn t ho 


Fcflowing Mr Chases’s address the ex¬ 
ercises were .closed with singing find an 
orqhestral selection. The committee 'In 
charge of the > dedication exercises were: 
Rev -Roland D. •■Sawyer, .chairman.'' Frank 
W. .Harwood.* George M. Sanford. - 'Pat¬ 
rick J. McManus, J.-Warren Cummings. 
Mrs A. G. Buffington, Miss Mary 8. 
Rich and Miss M. R. Howard. 


adjacent lands to the east, a petition. 



“for the petitioners” headed the list of 
signatures, and added to its weight and 
dignity. He was the “friend at court.” 
I the natrbn and proprietor, to whom the 
I people constantly looked for assistance 
and advice. The petition being granted in 
due time, the proprietor took measures to 
establish the church on a good foundation. 
After taking up his residence at Boston, 
j Mr Read had associated himself with thfl 


dignity. He was the “friend at court. 


The bowlder dedicated yesterday stands 
on the old common facing the cross-roads. 
It is - a large rough stone and has on its 
face a beautiful bronze tablet which bears 
the Inscription:— 


To the honourable 


John (lead 
1030 1740 


I church of Fngtnnd and became a vcetry- 


Proprietor of the Mnn * ~ 
Benefactor of Wnre 

* This memorial — —— 

Is erected by the citizens of the town on the 
150th anniversary of Its Incorporation as a 
• district 

. * ion. _« . 




gregational polity. He gave a hundred 
acres to be used as a glebe, half a mila 
west of here, at the center of the Manour, 



and offered other encouragements toward 
the building of a church and the settling 


i ! 

1 



of a minister, promise* which were fuR 
filled by his heirs after his death. Ho 
himself did not live to see the churchi 
building erected, for he died in February 
14, 1748, old style, or 1740, as we reckon 
to-day, aged 00 years, and wai buried in 


the crypt of King'a chapel, Boston. It! 
was two years later. In 1751, that our 
first minister was installed, an occasion 
graced by the presence of Mr Read’s chil¬ 
dren. who took the Jong journey from: 
Boston or Providence, or Stratford. Ct.< 
to show their interest in the proceedings. 

It was not the wish of our first inhabit-' 
ants to place the church upon the lot 
which their patron had provided for thei 
pursue. I am sure that all will agree) 
that this site here In the pleasant valley 
hv the brooksirlo was far more eligible. 
Mr Read's heirs met the wishes of thei 
pi-ople, and gave them this spot, a com-| 
mon, a site for the meeting-house, and a) 


plot for n burial place.- The first meeting-* 
bouse was placed east and west, like thei 
churches of the old country, following the* 
snme sentiment that prompted the burial 
of the dead with their feet toward tho 
j east, that on the resurrection morning; 
| they might arise fneing the sun of right¬ 
eousness. So also the congregation ivor- 
sbi[>ed, looking with expectant eves to¬ 
ward Hint part of the heavens, whence 
ancient types foreshadowed that the judge., 
should come Neither John Read nor any; 
member of his immediate family, so far as 
I have been able to learn, ever dwelt*, 
upon the Manour lands. 

With the death of John Read therei 
died n Iso the hope of maintaining the' 
Manour as a single estate. , * The first' 
proprietor never sold an acre of the land.i 
having parted with only the one tract of| 
]<>0 acres which he devoted to religiousi 
uses. Six years passed, during which the| 
heirs were developing a new policy, set-1 
j tling on a division of the territory amongj 
the.mselvcs in order that '.each share! 
I might be disposed of as should suit the.i 
1 several owners. Gradually the lessees! 
bought the farms, new* occupants ap-j 
peared upon the scene, and in the lapse) 



























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HECKMAN 

BINDERY INC. 


W 


3k MAR 91 



N. MANCHESTER, 
INDIANA 46962