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Part I!. Extended Flight Phase, First Annual Period 
(July 1, 1966 -July 1, 1967) 



L introduction 

A. Synopsis of Significant Events 

The Pioneer VI spacecraft was used in making obser- 
vations of several solar disturbances and a radar bounc- 
ing experiment with the planet Mercury during the first 
annual phase of extended flight. A special series of ob- 
servations by the spacecraft was made in August 1966, 
on passes 235, 236, and 237, to learn of any solar activity 
that might affect a Lunar Orbiter laimch. The first solar 
alert of the period was on pass 207 (July 10, 1966). Dur- 
ing the last part of May, special coverage was provided 
for two periods of solar flare activity. Coverage of 27 h 
was provided for the first period and 12 h for the second. 
Other solar flare observation passes noted were passes 210 
and 428, The radar bouncing experiment with Mercury 
was performed on pass 557 (June 25, 1967). 

B. Signifieont Changes in Project Requirements 

The need for JPL to produce Stanford University pre- 
dicts ceased with the end of the experiment (July 13, 
1966). However, because the Pioneer Project Office was 
using the round-trip flight time information transmitted 
in conjunction with the Stanford predicts that were no 



longer produced, JPL was requested to transmit a copy 
of the nominal predicts for one of the deep space sta- 
tions to the Project Office on a regular basis. 

C. Support Beyond Minimum Commitments 

During the first annual period reported here (the first 
year after DSS 14 officially took tracking responsibility), 
there were increasing responsibilities for TDS facilities 
and personnel. Five major launches were supported 
within a 5-wk interval in the August-September period. 
Pioneer VII was launched August 17. And, in addition 
to scheduled tracking of Pioneer VI, DSS 14 tracked 
Mariner IV on a once-a-month basis, and performed 
Mercury bistatic experiments in conjunction with Venus 
station (DSS 13). 

D. Overall Performance ©f i*4etw©rk 

That the DSN met its growing responsibilities was 
acknowledged in a December 19, 1966, message from 
the Pioneer Project Manager, Charles F. Hall, to the 
personnel at the JPL and the DSN facilities. 

"The Pioneer VI mission on Day 350, 0731.20 GMT, 
1966, has successfully completed an operational life- 



JPl TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM 33-426, ¥Ol. ¥ 



13 



time of one year. The scientific data collected over 
this period has proven to be valuable to the scientific 
community in initiating an understanding of the solar 
system and its environment. Pioneer VI is continuing 
its success with regularly scheduled tracking mis- 
sions utilizing the Mars 210-ft antenna system. Yoiu- 
efforts as part of the Pioneer team have played an 
important role in establishing the above statements 
as facts. As part of the Pioneer family we invite you 
to join us in celebrating this occasion." 

1. Data rate. DSS 14 obtained good data from 
Pioneer VI at a data bit rate of 64 bits/s, providing at 
least a 9 dB improvement in performance by DSS 14 
over other deep space stations. At 64 bits/s and an error 
rate of one error per 1000 bits, the station extended the 
range capability for 64 bits/s from 33 million km to 
110 million km. The largest portion of gain was attrib- 
uted to a considerable improvement in system noise tem- 
perature (29 °K) and other ground system performance 
elements. 

2. Prime tracking function. DSS 14 assumed the prime 
tracking function of the Pioneer VI spacecraft effective 
with pass 196. The bit rate was 64 bits/s. However, 
DSS 12 (Echo station at Goldstone) continued to provide 
the command and telemetry processing, through its 
ground operational equipment, and recording. Command 
transmission was provided as needed. During command 
operations, the DSS 12 antenna receiver/exciter, trans- 
mitter, and the tracking data handling subsystem were 
placed in operation. (The spacecraft was at 8 bits/s duty 
cycle store during nontracking periods.) 



11. Engineering and Operofions 

A. Tracking Interruption 

The most serious problem during the first annual 
period of activity of the extended flight phase was an 
antenna mechanical problem that shut down the 210-ft- 
diam antenna Mars station for a month and a half. Be- 
cause of a recurring hydrostatic thrust bearing anomaly 
that caused short tracking interruptions, the station was 
shut down for major rework by JPL from March 10 to 
April 28, 1967. Reshimming between the annular ring 
and the bearing surface finally eliminated mechanical 
distortion occurring when the pad passed over the bear- 
ing surface. (It was possible during this rework effort to 
put the antenna into normal operation for a 5-h period. 
This was done to provide maximum capability listening 



support diuring the Surveyor III terminal sequence and 
initial operation on the moon.) 

1. Bearing improvement. After initial installation of 
the ground shims, the bearing film height was improved 
to a minimum of 0.004 in., with 10 areas showing less 
than 0.005 in. By comparison, on January 27, 1967, there 
were 21 areas in which film height was 0.003 in. or less. 
In addition, the overall height variation of the runner 
was reduced from 0.070 in. measured during construc- 
tion to 0.015 in., and "dramatic" improvements were 
made in the flatness in local areas. During May, engi- 
neering evaluation and appropriate local area reshim- 
ming were continued to improve the minimum film 
height and to attain a satisfactory bearing pump redun- 
dancy operating condition with permanent shims. 

2. Other antenna changes. Adjustments were made to 
reduce the axis cross coupling of the infrared spectrome- 
ter (IRS) autocoUimation in order to reduce the bias 
voltage used to offset the fixed alignment error in the 
cross elevation axis. 

During the shutoff period, sensitive level measure- 
ments of the thermal stability of the instrument tower 
indicated the angular movement of the top of the instru- 
ment tower was greater than 15 arc seconds. Plans were 
made to insulate the outside of the wind and thermal 
shield to reduce the heat transferred into the instrument 
tower. A new reference groove was cut in the azimuth 
gear for measuring the runner profile. 

The 20-kW transmitter was modified to make the 
transmitter usable at both the DSN operation frequency 
band 2110-2120 MHz and the DSN experimental fre- 
quency of 2388 MHz. The conversion consisted of re- 
placing the klystron then in use with a klystron with a 
broader tuning range (2100-2400 MHz). An additional 
waveguide directional coupler was added to the wave- 
guide systems for power monitoring at 2388 MHz. An 
automatic switching circuit was used to switch the 
monitoring circuits to the directional coupler correspond- 
ing to the frequency being used. The 20-kW transmitter 
modification which allowed operation at either 2110- 
2120 MHz or 2388 MHz increased flexibility, enabling 
the station to perform special scientific and advanced 
engineering experiments in addition to the two-way co- 
herent tracking and/or command mission support. 

The existing 20-kW waterload was moved to the posi- 
tion allocated for the 100-kW waterload. This move was 



14 



JPL TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM 33-426, VOt. V 



required so that the diplexer could be bypassed when 
the transmitter was operating at 2388 MHz. Waveguide 
was installed from the waterload position to the 2388- 
MHz transmitter input port of the special 2110-2120-, 
2290-2300-, 2388-MHz feed cone. 

B. Anomalies Related to Data Losses 

On the whole, DSN support of the Pioneer VI mission 
during the period of this report was considered good. 
The big exception, the shutdown of DSS 14 from pass 423 
to pass 502, has been noted previously. Before and after 
shutdown, instances of lost data were minor and attrib- 
uted in part to burn-in or random failure of the relatively 
new equipment in use. Some of the instances of lost data 
and equipment anomahes and the steps made for im- 
provement are described in the following paragraphs. 
More are noted subsequently in tabular material present- 
ing pass chronology. 

When the station became operational again (pass 502), 
occasional low-film indications necessitated braking of 
the antenna during some passes. In each instance, check- 
ing of the actual film thickness revealed a satisfactory 
condition. As a result of braking, though, some data was 
lost. The shimming correction was refined. Table 4 
shows the signal strength expected for pass 505. The 
indicated average was —163.8 dBmW. DSS 14 used its 
diplexer for uplink, but not for downlink. A special cone 
configuration wherein the uplink is left-hand circular 
polarization (LHCP), through the diplexer, and the 
downlink is right-hand circular polarization (RHCP), 
bypassing the diplexer, was used. This was possible be- 
cause of the use of an experimental cone and because 
the spacecraft was linearly polarized. The system noise 
temperature was lower in this configuration, averaging 
about 29 °K instead of the normal 36 °K with the diplexer 
included. The signal was thus improved by about 0.8 dB. 

The transmitter went off because of an interlock fail- 
ure on the power cabinet during pass 515. As a result, 
2.5 h of engineering telemetry data was lost before 
demodulator lock. This time included the long round- 
trip light time involved in acquisition. Pass 517 was 
cut short to provide command capability for DSS 51 
with Pioneer VII. 

On pass 557, DSS 14 was in a receive-only mode 
because of a transmitter modification. This modification 
was incorporated to allow radar bouncing at 2388 MHz 
for performing experiments with the planet Mercury. 



Table 4. Abbreviated tefeeommunieation design eonfroi 
(shannel 6, pass 505) 



No. 


Parameter 


Value 


Tolerance 


1 


Total transmitter power, dBmW 


-^38.4 


+0.2 


-0.2 


2 


Transmitting circuit loss, dB 


-1.6 


-1-0.5 


-0.65 


3 


Transmitting antenna gain, dB 


-1-11.0 


-1-0.5 


-0.5 


4 


Transmitting antenna pointing 
loss 


Included in (3) 






5 


Space loss, dB (2292 MHz, 
R = 200 X 10-" km) 


-265.6 






6 


Polarization loss, 0.7-dB ellip- 
tical ratio, dB 


-3.0 


-1-0.3 


-0.3 


7 


Receiving antenna gain 
(2I0-ft), dB 


61 


+ 1.0 


-0.5 


8 


Receiving antenna pointing 
loss, dB 









9 


Receiving circuit loss, dB 


-0.2 


+0.1 


-0.1 


10 


Net circuit loss, dB 


-198.4 


+2.4 


-2.1 


11 


Total received power, dBmW 


-160.0 


+2.6 


-2.3 


12 


Receiver noise spectral density 
(N/B^), dBmW/Hz (tem- 
perature system = 29°K) 


-184.1 


+ 0.7 


-0.9 


13 


Carrier modulation loss 
(0 = 0.9 ± S%), dB 


-4.1 dB 


+0.5 


-0.5 


14 


Received carrier power, dBmW 


-164.1 


+ 3.1 


-2.8 


15 


Carrier APC noise BW 
(2Bio = 12 Hz), dB 


10.8 


+ 0.0 


-0.5 


^Ho 


se power/bandwidth. 









DSS 12 was requested to try to acquire upHnk for com- 
mand purposes, and 2 h was scheduled for this purpose 
during the end of the pass. However, because of the 
marginal signal strength at the spacecraft (Table 5) and 
tbe limited time available (RTLT was 25 min), satisfac- 
tory lock was not obtained. 

Although the transmitter was down on passes 551, 559, 
and 561, no data was lost because the station was able 
to track in a one-way mode. In contrast to the ground 
transmitter, the receiver was in both one- and two-way 
lock case. 

C. RF Peiformance 

1. Uplink, downlink signal strengths. Tables 6 through 
11 present downlink receiver signal strengths for 
passes 197 through 561. Figures 5 and 6 present exam- 
ples of spacecraft uplink receiver signal strength and 
uplink signal strength vs time, respectively. 



JPl TECHNICAL MEMORANmM 33-426, VOL V 



15 



Tobte 5. DiS 12 uplink, poss SS7 



No. 


Parameter 


Vafue 


Tolerance 


1 


Total transmitter power, dBmW 


+70.0 


+ 0.5 


-0.0 


2 


Transmitting circuit loss, dB 


-0.4 


+0.1 


-0.1 


3 


Transmitting antenna gain, dB 


+51.0 


+ 1.0 


-0.5 


4 


Transmitting antenna pointing 
loss 


Included in 3 






5 


Space loss, dB 

(2110.9 MHz; R = 
2.294 X 10' km) 


-266.14 


0.0 


-0.0 


6 


Polarization loss, dB 


-3.0 


+ 0.5 


-0.5 


7 


Receiving antenna gain, dB 


+ 10.5 


+ 0.5 


-0.5 


8 


Receiving antenna pointing loss 


Included in 7 






9 


Receiving circuit loss, dB 


-1.5 


+ 0.25 


-0.25 


10 


Net circuit loss, dB 


-209.54 


+ 2.35 


-1.85 


11 


Total received pov/er, dBmW 


-139.54 


+ 2.85 


-1.85 


12 


Receiver noise spectral density 
(N/B), dBmW/Hz 


-164.0 


+ 1.0 


-0.5 


13 


Carrier modulation loss, dB 


-3.46 


+ 0.4 


-0.4 


14 


Received carrier power, dBmW 


-143.0 


+ 3.25 


-2.25 


15 


Carrier APC noise bandwidth 
(2Bio = 20 ± 5 Hz), dB 


+ 13.0 


+ 1.25 


-1.0 




Carrier perforr 


nance 






16 


Threshold SNR in 281,0, dB 


6.0 






17 


Threshold carrier power, dBmW 


-145.0 


+ 2.25 


-1.5 


18 


Performance margin, dB 


+ 2.0 


+ 4.75 


-4.5 




Command data pe 


rformance 






19 


Modulation loss (1.25 rad 
± 0.5%), dB 


-2.83 


+0.21 


-0.27 


20 


Received data subcarrier 
power, dBmW 


-142.37 


+ 3.06 


-2.12 


21 


Bit rate (1/T), bits/s 


0.0 






22 


Required system temperature 
(N/B), dB 


+ 1.94 


+ 1.2 


-1.0 


23 


Threshold subcarrier power, 
dBmW 


-144.6 


+2.25 


-1.5 


24 


Performance margin, dB 


+2.23 


+4.56 


-4.37 



Figure 7 indicates measxired downlink receiver signal 
strength vs predicted signal strength, showing where 
(passes 411 through 416) recalibration occurred after an 
error was discovered in the RF cabling calibration. Dis- 
covery of the error helped to explain the 1- to 2-dBmW- 
higher signal strength reported by the station as 
compared with the expected signal strength. The recali- 
bration of the system at DSS 14 was accomplished on 



Table 6. Downlink receiving signal sfrengtli, 
passes 197-257 



Pass 


DSS 


Day 


Average value, 
dBmW 


197 


14 

1 


181 


-156.8 


202 






186 


-156.3 


206 






190 


-156.7 


207 


14 


191 


-156.7 


208 


14/12 


192 


-166.4/- 156.5 


210 






194 


-166.8 


211 






195 


-156.9 


215 






199 


-156.8 


218 






202 


-157.9 


223 






207 


-157.2 


226 






211 


-157.4 


230 


14/12 


214 


-157.3 


232^ 


14 


216 


-158.1 


235 






219 


-158.8 


236 






220 


-157.8 


237 






221 


-157.9 


238 






222 


-158.0 


248 


14 


232 


-157.7 


250 


14/12 


234 


-157.8 


254 


14/12 


238 


-158.4 


257 


14/12 


241 


-158.5 


^Record-only track 



5: 

E 



< 

z 



-130 



-140 



-150 



° o-ioo o 



196 



206 



216 

PASS 



226 



236 



Fig. 5. Uplink regeiver signcil sfrengtli, posses 1 96-257 

February 2, with a 2-dBmW adjustment being made as 
a result. The actual dovsoilink signal strength on pass 416 
therefore reflected that 2-dBmW adjustment. The pre- 
dicted value, as of pass 416, was within a 1-dBmW 



16 



JPL TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM 33-426, VOL. V 



Table 7. Downlink cind uplink receiver signal strength, 
passes 26©-'320, D§S 14 



Pass 


Day 


Downlink, dBmW 


Uplink, dBmW 


260 


244 


-158.0 


-128 


265 


249 


-158.4 


-127 


267 


251 


-158.6 


-127 


27! 


255 


-158.3 


-127 


274 


258 


-158.5 


- 


278 


262 


-158.9 


-127 


282 


266 


-158.7 


-125 


285 


269 


-158.7 


-128 


288 


272 


-159.2 


-128 


292 


276 


-159.0 


-127 


295 


279 


-158.3 


-128 


296 


280 


-158.7 


-128 


299 


283 


-158.8 


-127 


302 


286 


-158.7 


-127 


306 


290 


-159.4 


-128 


309 


293 


-158.1 


-128 


3J3 


297 


-158.7 


-128 


315 


299 


-158.9 


-128 


316 


300 


-158.8 


-128 


320 


304 


-159.3 


-128 



Table 8. Downlink receiver signal strength/ passes 322-408 



Pass 


Day 


Predicted, dBmW 


Receiver 
(average), dBmW 


Threshold, 
dBmW 




Pass 


Day 


Predicted, dBmW 


Receiver 
(average), dBmW 


Threshold, 
dBmW 


322 


306 


-160.0 


-157.8 


-172 


364 


348 


-160.9 


-156.2 


-173 


324 


308 


- 160.0 


-158.7 


-172 




366 


350 


-160.9 


-157.4 


-172 


327 


311 


-160.1 


-158.4 


-172 




369 


353 


-161.0 


-158.1 


-173 


329 


313 


-160.1 


-158.2 


-173 




371 


355 


-161.0 


-158.5 


-173 


331 


315 


-160.2 


-158.3 


-172 




372 


356 


-161.0 


-158.3 


-173 


334 


318 


-160.2 


-158.5 


-173 




377 


361 


-161.1 


-158.5 


-173 


336 


320 


-160.3 


- 158.0 


-173 




380 


364 


-161.2 


-158.8 


-173 


338 


322 


-160.3 


-158.5 


172 




387 


006 


-161.3 


- 158.4 


-172 


343 


327 


-160.5 


-158.6 


-173 




390 


009 


-161.3 


-157.6 


-172 


348 


332 


-160.5 


-157.8 


-173 




392 


010 


-161.3 


-158.1 


-173 


350 


334 


-160.6 


-158.4 


-173 




394 


013 


-161.3 


-157.9 


-173 


355 


339 


-160.7 


-157.3 


-172 




404 


023 


-161.4 


-159.4 


-171 


357 


341 


-160.7 


-158.3 


-173 




406 


025 


-161.4 


-158.4 


-173 


359 


343 


-160.8 


-157.8 


-173 




408 


027 


-161.5 


-158.4 


-173 


■^Bandwid 


h = 12 Hz; 


maser amplification. 













JPl TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM 33-426, VOL V 



17 



Table 9. Downliitk receiver signol strength," 
posses 411—443 



tolerance (Table 9). (RF cabling calibration was per- 
formed every 6 mo as DSS 14 procedure.) 



Pass 


Day 


Predicted, dBmW 


Receiver 
(average), dBmW 


Threshold, 
dBmW 


411 


030 


-161.6 


-158.5 


-172 


416 


035 


-161.6 


-160.6 


-174 


418 


037 


-161.6 


-160.6 


-175 


420 


039 


-161.7 


-161.0 


-175 


422 


041 


-161.7 


-160.4 


-175 


425 


044 


-161.8 


-160.7 


-175 


427 


046 


-161.8 


-161.1 


-175 


428 


047 


-161.9 


-161.0 




429 


048 


-161.9 


-160.8 


-175 


432 


051 


-162.0 


-161.2 


-175 


439 


058 


-162.0 


-161.4 


-175 


443 


062 


-162.1 


-162.4 


-176 


=^Bandwid 


th = 12 Hz 


; maser amplification. 





E 



o 
z 



< 

z 
o 



-140 
-138 



-136 



-132 
-130 



GOG 

— — -6 — o o — o — o 

o 

— o ' — 



Data on Pioneer VI indicated that DSS 14 was 9 dBmW 
better than the 85-ft antenna station network. DSS 14 
transmitted on one polarization and received on another 
while tracking Pioneer VI. Uplink power for the chan- 

Table 10. Oownlink receiver signal strength," 
passes 502-523 



Pass 


Day 


Predicted, dBmW 


Receiver 
(average), dBmW 


Threshold, 
dBmW 


502 


121 


-162.4 


-163.4 


-174 


505 


124 


-162.4 


-163.8 


-175 


508 


127 


-162.5 


-164.1 


-175 


510 


129 


-162.5 


-163.4 


-174 


515 


134 


-162.5 


-164.4 


-175 


517 


136 


-162.5 


-164.0 


-174 


519 


138 


-162.6 


-164.4 


-173 


522 


141 


-162.6 


-163.9 


-175 


523 


142 


-162.6 


-164.1 


-174 


"Bandwidth = 12 Hz 


; maser amplification. 





Table 1 1 . Downlink receiver signal strength," 
passes 536-561, DSS 14 



5 

o 



z 
< 



20 








lb 








lU 
5 









145 



3: 

E 



o 
< 



-165 



-160 



155 



165 



DAY OF YEAR (1967) 



Fig. 6. Uplink signal strength vs time, 
passes 536-561, DSS 14 



-155 



PREC 
•AVE 


ICTED SIG 
(AGE SIGh 


NAL STRENGTH 

JAL STRENGTH VS Tl/ 


v\E 

ccDoed 


'0(^6 c 


o 


s 


G O0 01| 


9 


« 


9 







"320 340 360 380 400 

PASS 



420 440 460 



Fig. 7. Downlink meoswed signol strength vs predicted 



Pass 


Day 


Predicted, 
dBmW 


Receiver 

(average), 

dBmW 


Threshold, 
dBmW 


526 


145 


-162.6 


-164.0 


-175 


529 


148 


-162.6 


-164.3 


-174 


532 


151 


-162.7 


-164.7 


-174.5 


536 


155 


-162.7 


-165.1 


-175 


538 


157 


-162.7 


-164.8 


-174.5 


541 


160 


-162.8 


-164.6 


-174 


543 


162 


-162.8 


-164.7 


-174 


545 


164 


-162.8 


-164.8 


-174 


548 


167 


-162.8 


-164.2 


-174 


550 


169 


-162.8 


-164.5 


-173.5 


552 


171 


-162.8 


-164.6 


-175 


555 


174 


-162.9 


-165.0 


-174 


557 


176 


-162.9 


-165.2 


-174 


559 


178 


-163.0 


-164.8 


-174.5 


561 


180 


-163.1 


-164.7 


-174.5 


"Bandw 


idth = 12 


iz; maser amplification. 





18 



JPL TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM 33-426, VOi. ¥ 



nel 7 receiver had a range of — 131 to — 136 dBmW for 
10-kW ground transmitter power from pass 196 through 
pass 561. The calculated threshold for channel 7 was 
— 147 dBmW, leaving a —11- to — 16-dBmW margin 
before threshold would be reached. 



2, Percentage in-lock performance for the DSS. The 
performances for tracking commitments, transmitter on, 
and receiver two-way lock status are, given in Figs. 8 
through 11 and in Table 12. The percentages show the 

Table 1 2. Tracking pes^ormcsnee: in-loek vs aetual and 
scheduled, passes 536-S6I 





Time, min 


Percentoge'i 


Scheduled 


7710 


100.00 


Actual 


7763 


100.68 


Transmitter on 


6190 


80.28 


Receiver in-lock 


7185 


93.19 


One- and two-way 






Good tracl(ing data 


6918 


89.72 


I'The indicated percentages 


are calculated with 


the scheduled 


time used as a reference. 







Uj" 



100 



80 



60 



40 



20 





88.6% 




93.5% 
\\\\V\ 


97.5% 


1 






1 

III 




|i| 

1 
1 




1 

III 






8 




ll 




8 





DSS performance during two-way lock with the space- 
craft, but do not indicate the amount of data taken. The 
difference between two-way lock time and tracking time 
is mainly a result of the long round-trip light time re- 
quired (20 to 25 min) to lock the receiver in two-way 
(Fig. 12). However, from pass 555 through pass 561, the 

100 



80 






60 



40 



20 





87.5% 


98.8% 


ill 

1 


97.8% 


1 



































Fig. 9. Tracking performance, passes 502-523 



30,000 




21,600 
















20,000 




i| 


»-™ 1».700 




III 
lil 

II 




1 

l°l 

i 

is 




17,900 




10,000 





y/yyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy 

yy/ RECEIVER IN TWO-WAY LOCK /^ 

yyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy/y 











Fig. i. Tracking performonce, passes 322-443 



Fig. 1 0. Tracking performance: In-loek vs actual and 
scheduled, passes 322-443 



Wl TECHNICAL MBMORANDUM 33-426, ¥Ol. V 



19 



60U0 




4624 




4569 




4473 












|i| 
I'l 




\V\Vs 

|l| 

|s| 






3999 




2000 









11 

II 
|i| 











Fig. 11. Tracking performance: in-lock vs actual 
and scheduled, passes 502~523 



DSS 14 transmitter was down for repairs. As a result, 
the "transmitter-on" percentage was only 80.28 of the 
scheduled tracking time. The receiver was in both one- 
and two-way lock case. The one-way data preceding 
two-way lock was not computed in the percentage. In 
contrast, from pass 322 through pass 523 the percentage 
was 97.7. During the transmitter down time (pass 555 
through pass 561), no data was lost because the station 
was able to track in a one-way mode. 

D. Parity Error Rate 

Figures 13-15 and Tables 13-17 present parity error 
rate information for the period covered by this docu- 
ment. Generally, DSS 14 performance was free of errors 
at 16 bits/s. However, the telemetry was not error-free at 
16 bits/s during passes 536 through 561. Tables 18 and 19 
give system noise temperature data. (A parity error rate 
of 0.116 was equivalent to one error in 1000 consecutive 
bits of information and was regarded as the limiting 
value for the uncoded and convolution-coded unit modes 
of information.) 



16 



12 



E 

s 



3 

o 













oo" 
oO 
nO 


« o o 

p°° 


O O O o 


° °o O < 


) o o 




range = 

C = SPEED 


RTLT X C/2 
OF LIGHT, 299 


792.5 km/s 


( 

o° 

o° 
o 
o 

n 


















i 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 

n° 


) 












noQQ°°°\ 


,0000°°°' 


d 
^o° 


5 















20 



2 

o 
z 
< 



-20 



oooooooOooooooopo 



)00000 



1 oOoOooAoooooooA 



OOo 



OOOo, 



Ooo 



O—oAq—O— o— cr 



O 00 6 <^'~^ 



40 



80 



120 



160 200 240 

DAYS FROM LAUNCH 



280 



320 



360 



400 



Fig. 1 2. Round-trip fight time vs day of year 



20 



JPL TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM 33-426, VOL. V 



5; 

J 



o 
z 



< 

z 
o 

O 
> 



154 
158 
162 
166 
170 
174 

178 
1000 
800 

600 

400 

200 


BAD 



D^ 



1 1 1 r 

BIT RATE LEGEND 



cTV^ 



[•^' - ■ d' 



DSS LEGEND 
D 12 
Cf 12/14 



1 = 512 bits/s 

2 = 265 bits/s 

3 = 64 bits/s 

4 = 16 bits/s 

5 = 8 bits/s 

> 



nM3 

■ 85-ft ANTENNA PREDICTED SIGNAL STRENGTH 



n — c 



-L 



J_ 



jL 



J_ 



-e, j- 



d-s.-C( 



T \ 1 \ 1 1 1 1 1 \ 1 r 



1 1 1 r 



\ A / SCMMASER n 



J I L 




24 12 24 12 24 12 24 



197 



181 



201 



185 



202 



186 



12 



205 



189 




J Ej 1 "^"ta. 




207 



191 



GOE I 

OUTAGE—. ^"^ I 



12 24 12 24 12 24 12 



208 



192 



210 



194 



211 



195 



O 

Z 



< 

z 

o 



> 



150 


1 1 


1 


1 1 1 


1 1 1 


1 1 


1 1 


II 1 




154 


- 














- 




- cf-^ 




o^-^ 


a%— cT 


^ y 




cf--^ 


- 


158 


if- l/ 


162 


- 














- 


166 


_ 










DSS LEGEND 


BIT RATE LEGEND 




170 


- 










a 12 
tf 12/14 


1 = 5)2 bits/s 

2 = 256 bits/s 


- 


174 
178 


/— 85-ft ANTENNA PREDICTED SIGNAL STRENGTH 








3 = 64 bits/s 

4 = 16 bits/s 

5 = 8 bits/s 

1 1 1 


- 


187 


1 1 


1 

1 


1 1 1 


1 1 1 


1 1 


1 1 





< 




12 

215 

199 



216 



200 



218 



202 



12 


24 


12 

TIME, h 


24 


219 


1 


223 
PASS 


1 


203 


1 


207 
DAY 


1 



227 



211 



228 



212 



230 



214 



12 
231 

215 



Fig. 13. ieceived sigsiol sfrengfli and parity error rofe, passes 197—257 



JPl TECHNICAi MEMORANDUM 33-426, VOt, ¥ 



21 



150 
154 
158 
162 
166 
170 
174 
178 



"1 1 \ 1 1 1 1 1 1 I r 

h* DSS 14 



/Vv 



5 



^ tfV^^ ,f^-^ 



DSS LEGEND 
D 12 
D'12/14 



BIT RATE LEGEND 

1 = 512 bits/s 

2 = 256 bits/s 

3 = 64 bits/s 

4 = 16 faits/s 

5 = 8 bits/s 
_l I 



J I I L 



J L_ L 




"1 r 



24 12 24 12 24 



235 



219 



ANTENNA POINTING 
PROBLEMS CAUSED 
HIGH BIT RATE ERROR 



J iVf I t=l_J L 



r-i^ 



236 



220 



237 



221 



238 



222 





24 12 




TIME, h 


J 


1 239 




PASS 


> 


1 223 




DAY 


Fig. 


13 (esnfd) 



24 12 24 12 24 12 24 12 24 



248 



232 I 



250 



234 



254 



238 



257 I 



241 



500 
400 
300 
200 
100 


g BAD 

g 24 

q; 
(^ 

UJ 

> 

< 



1 \ r 

d'=DSS 12/14 
4 = 16 bits/s 
5=8 bits/s 



1 \ \ r 



1 r 



4 4, 5 



4 4, 5 



^ 




257 



260 



4 4, 5 
\ 



4, 5 



4 4, 5 



4 4, 5 



\ 




J 1 I L 



J L 



4 4,5 



v\ V^ - 



J L 



265 



TIME, h 



271 



278 



285 



PASS 



288 



12 24 12 24 '2 24 '^ 24 '^ 24 '^ 24 '^ ^4 '^ 



292 



300 
200 
100 


BAD 



I I \ r 

4 r-f 4, 5 



4 4, 5 4 4, 5 



1 I I n r 

4 4, 5 4 4, 5 



'* "*' ^ \ 1 / ■* ^' ^ 4 4, 5 4 4, 5 4 4, 5 4 4, i 

:^ W \A W W V\ W 



J L 



J L 



J \ \ L 



12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 

24 24 24 24 24 24 24 24 



292 



306 



309 



TIME, h 
313 315 

PASS 



316 



320 



Fig. 14. Received signal strength and parity error rate, passes 257—320 



22 



JPL TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM 33-426, VOt. V 



Table 13. Predicted vs 0€tual bit rote chonge, passes 196-i57 



Prsdicfed 


Actual 


TFl,» days 


Bit rale, bits/s 


Ronge, km X 10° 


TFt,°- days 


Bit rate, bits/s 


Range, km X 10" 


69 


512 


9.1255085 


74 


512 


11.8 


84 


256 


13.463865 


91 


256 


18.0 


114 


64 


27.0773285 


119 


64 


34.2 


130 


16 


39,0452085 


144 


16 


54.8 


176 


8 


76.295235 


164 


8 


72.8 


1 + 159 days: parity error rate reached specified maximum of 1 X 10"' or 0.10%. 






L + 166 days: 85-ft antenna data threshold reached. Parity error rate 1 X 10"" at 8 bits/s. 






L + 196 days: DSS 14 (210-ft antenna) began tracking at 64 bits/s with zero bit error rate. 






^Time from launch on December 16, 1965 (Day 350) at 0731:20 GMT. 



Table 14. Parity error rate (bit rate = 16 bits/s), passes 322-416 



Pass 


Day 


Parity error rate 
(average) 


Receiver signal 

strength (average), 

dBmW 




Pass 


Day 


Parity error rate 
(average) 


Receiver signal 

strength (average), 

dBmW 


322 


306 




-157.8 


366 


350 


0.004 


-157.4 


324 


308 


0.001 


-158.7 




369 


353 


0.035 


-158.1 


327 


311 


0.005 


-158.4 




371 


355 


Record only 


-168.5 


329 


313 


0.002 


-158.2 




372 


356 


0.001 


-158.3 


331 


315 


0.006 


-158.3 




377 


361 


0.001 


-158.5 


334 


318 


0.003 


-158.5 




380 


364 


0.004 


-158.8 


336 


320 


0.005 


-158.0 




387 


006 


0.003 


-158.4 


338 


322 


0.000 


-158.5 




390 


009 


0.002 


-157.6 


343 


327 


0.007 


-158.6 




392 


Oil 


0.001 


-158.1 


348 


332 


0.050 


-157.8 




394 


013 


0.002 


-157.9 


350 


334 


0.000 


-158.4 




404 


023 


0.020 


-159.4 


355 


339 


0.020 


-157.3 




406 


025 


0.001 


-158.4 


357 


341 


0.005 


-158.3 




408 


027 


0.005 


-158.4 


359 


343 


0.006 


-157.8 




411 


030 


0.006 


-158.5 


364 


348 


0.000 


-156.2 




416 


035 


Record only 


-160.6 



JPL TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM 33'426, VO£. V 



23 



Toble 15. Parity error rate (bit rate = 16 bifs/s), 

passes 41 i-443 



Table 1 7. Parity err©r rate (bit rote =16 bits/s), 
passes i2i-i§1 



Pass 


Day 


Parity error 
ra»e (average) 


Receiver signal 

strength (average), 

dBmW 


418 


037 


0.002 


-160.6 


420 


039 


0.010 


-161.0 


422 


041 


0.005 


-160.4 


425 


044 


0.000 


-160.7 


427 


046 


0.050 


-161.1 


428 


047 


0.000 


-161.0 


429 


048 


0.002 


-160.8 


432 


051 


0.005 


-161.2 


439 


058 


0.010 


-161.4 


443 


062 


0.050 


-162.4 



Table 16. Parity error rate, passes 502-523 







Parity error 


Bit 


Receiver signal 


Pass 


Day 


rate (average, 


rate. 


strength (aver- 






computed) 


bits/s 


age), dBmW 


502 


121 


N/A 


16 


-163.4 


505 


124 


0.0563 


16 


-163.8 


508 


127 


0.0603 


16 


-164.1 


510 


129 


0.0925 


16 


-163.1 


515 


134 


0.074 


16 


-164.4 


517 


136 


0.107 


16 


-164.0 


519 


138 


0.115 


16 


-164.4 


522 


141 


0.119 


16,8 


-163.9 


523 


142 


N/A 


16,8 


-164.1 



E 



o 

z 



< 

z 
o 



z 
o 



166.0 



165.0 



164.0 



163.0 



2 °-^ 

° O 

o 



0.1 0.2 

AVERAGE ERROR RATE 



0.3 



Pass 


Day 


Parity error 
rate (overage) 


Receiver signal 

strength (average), 

dBmW 


526 


145 


0.0670 


-164.0 


529 


148 


0.1123 


-164.3 


532 


151 


0.0933 


-164.7 


536 


155 


0.0675 


-165.1 


538 


157 


0.1006 


-164.8 


541 


160 


0.1571 


-164.6 


543 


162 


0.0961 


-164.7 


545 


164 


0.1788 


-164.8 


548 


167 


0.1360 


-164.2 


550 


169 


0.0911 


-164.5 


552 


171 


0.0961 


-164.6 


555 


174 


0.305 


-165.0 


557 


176 


0.2635 


-165.2 


559 


178 


0.2115 


-164.8 


561 


180 


0.2287 


-164.7 



Fig. 15. Pority error rate vs signol strength, 
passes 536-561, DSS 14 



i. Predicted Frequency Performance 

Figure 16 is a plot of the rest frequency measurements 
from launch for channel 7. Predicted curves for rest fre- 
quency were superimposed in order to show the accuracy 
of the predictions. Figure 17 plots channel 6 rest fre- 
quency. Figure 18 is an updated plot of measured auxil- 
iary oscillator frequency. The data compared favorably 
with the predicted values. Spacecraft receiver and trans- 
mitter auxiliary oscillator temperatxu-es are given in 
Fig. 19. Parameters monitored in non-real-time were as 
follows. 

(1) Station tracking time and mode configuration. 

(2) Pre and post signal-to-noise ratio. 

(3) Command performance. 

(4) On-off events such as the transmitter, receiver, bit 
rate mode changes, and power level changes. 

(5) Demodulator, analog tape recorder, and TCP in- 
lock percentage. 

(6) Two-way RF in- and out-of-lock times in per- 
centages. 



24 



JPL TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM 33-426, VOL V 



Toble 18. System nalse temperature, °K, DSS 14 



Pass 


Prepass 


Postpass 












Receiver 1 


Receiver 2 


Receiver 1 


Receiver 2 


197 


30.3 


— 


30.8 




202 


29.9 


- 


32.5 


- 


206 


29.8 


- 


29.5 


- 


207 


37.6 


- 


37.9 


- 


208 


28.4 


- 


29.3 


29.6 


210 


39.6 


- 


37.4 


- 


211 


30.2 


- 


- 


- 


215 


27.8 


- 


29.8 


- 


218 


28.4 


- 


30.2 


- 


223 


30.0 


- 


29.1 


- 


226 


29.6 


29.1 


30 


- 


230 


31.4 


30.5 


30.4 


- 


232 


- 


- 


31.5 


- 


235 


31.4 


- 


31.9 


- 


236 


31.6 


31.9 


32.9 


- 


237 


- 


- 


33.0 


- 


238 


- 


- 


33.0 


- 


248 


- 


- 


30.8 


- 


250 


- 


- 


31.0 


- 


254 


- 


- 


- 


- 


257 


- 


- 


- 


- 



Table 19. System noise temperature, °K, pre- and 
postealibrafion 



(7) Average receiver AGC, average bit error rate, and 
average uplink power readings. 

(8) TrackiQg data/doppler mode, VCO frequency, and 
angle performance. 

(9) Tracking frequencies, tuning rates, lock times, and 
drop-lock times for spacecraft acquisition. 

Most of these parameters are stored on computer cards 
for further statistical computation. 

F. Predicts and Commands 

Predicts generated for Pioneer VI to July 1, 1967, are 
presented in Table 20. A total of 4487 commands had 
been transmitted by July 1, 1967, the end of this report- 
ing period, with 1219 transmitted during the period. 
Tables 21 and 22 present a summary of operations. 



Pass 


Day 


Precalibrafion 


Postcalibration 


260 


244 


32.7 


30.2 


265 


249 


30.4 


30.3 


267 


251 


28.5 


29.3 


271 


255 


28.7 


29.6 


274 


258 


- 


- 


278 


262 


- 


30.9 


282 


266 


- 


29.6 


285 


269 


- 


- 


288 


272 


- 


- 


292 


276 


- 


30.0 


295 


279 


29.3 


29.4 


296 


280 


29.1 


29.0 


299 


283 


28.8 


28.7 


302 


286 


30.0 


31.2 


306 


290 


30.1 


31.2 


309 


293 


29.4 


30.0 


313 


297 


29.6 


30.1 


315 


299 


30.7 


30.1 


316 


300 


30.0 


30.5 


320 


304 


29.6 


29.2 



X 
X 
X 
X 



3 

a 



z 
z 
< 




320 480 

PASS 

Fig. 1 6. Cliannei 7 best-lock rest frequency vs 

poss number 



Wl TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM 33-426, VOL V 



25 



^ 5420 


1 




1 


9 


^ 


TIME OF 


TIME OF 


TIME OF 


s 

Si 


PERIHELION 


PERIHELION PERIHELION 


i 


i 




k 


h 


CM 

to 


CM 

> 5380 








SDA PREDICT 


la 










r, 


y 








O ACTUAL DATA 


z 












z 


2 


''^s 


/ 
1 
1 


*^\ 




N 


UJ 

2 


LL 


°>^ 


\ 
\ 


1 
1 


\ 
\ 




J3 5340 
o 


















i t 


b 


/ ^ 


\ 
\ 


!^ 


_l 




o. 


/TIME OF \ 


/time of \ 


—I 


z 




oo. 


,^ APHELION ^~- 


■' APHELION ^^_ 


y 


z 


TIME OF S 




o 


S s.inn 


APHELION 






i 



160 



320 



480 



640 



800 



PASS 



Fig. 17. Channel 6 best-loek rest frequency vs 
pass number 



4000 



2000 



0.0 



-2000 



-4000 



TIME OF 

PERIHELION" 



% 



TIME OF 
PERIHELION 
(MARCH 27, 1967)- 



(P 



TIME OF 
APHELION 



O 
O 



TIME OF 
APHELION 



-^ 



TIME OF 
PERIHELION 



PERIOD: 311 DAYS 
O ACTUAL DATA 



TIME OF 
APHELION 



160 



320 



480 



640 



800 



PASS 



Fig. T8. Auxiliary oscillator frecjueney vs pass number 



RECEIVERS 1 AND 2 TEMPERATURES (ACTUAL) 



60 - 



S 40 



e«e««a9« '«99aBe>!M lewsmsoso 



e iMaa«e «»a »aoses»9i 






- 30 

- 34 
~ 40 

- 44 



10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150 



yo 




















































70 
tin 


« «» 


e 


e e 


.. 


» 


» 


e 


e 9e 


»»«« 


e 


»»e* 


9 e 


«« 


» » 


» 


« 




1 


« 


« 


« 


m 









150 160 170 180 190 200 210 220 230 240 250 260 270 280 290 300 

TRANSMITTER DRIVER TEMPERATURE (NOMINAL) 



50 

30 
34 
40 
44 
50 



u 

z 



3 



80 



60 



40 



»»ee»9««« «^»»e»e«« »eese«ae» «»a 



esssee< <as«9'^ ®"< 



10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 1 00 110 120 1 30 1 40 1 50 



80 
















































60 


» » e 9 > 




© 


« ® 


»® 


s . 


» 


® a © © » 


ee» e®@ 


9 




» 


» 


a 


•n. 


« 


a 


® 


® 


9 1 


S 







36 



U 

Z 



u 
O 



52 



150 160 170 180 190 200 210 220 230 240 250 260 270 280 290 300 

DAYS AFTER LAUNCH 

Fig. 19. Spocecraff receiver und transmitter csyxiliary oscillator temperatures 



26 



Mi TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM 23-426, ¥01. V 



Table 20. Predkiion summary 



Predict 


Deep Space 
Stations 


Auxiliary oscillator 
frequency, MHx 


Ground iransmilter 

synthesizer frequency, 

MHz 


Coverage 


Sample 
rate, s 


61A 


14 


2292.052500 


21.985295 


10/23/66-11/24/66 


900 


61B 


14 


2292.052500 


21.988900 


10/23/66-11/11/66 


300 


61C 


14 


2292.052500 


21.988900 


11/10/66-11/24/66 


300 


62A 


14 


2292.052500 


21.985295 


10/23/66-1/1/67 


900 


62B 


14 


2292.052500 


21.988900 


10/23/66-1/1/67 


300 


63A 


14 


2292.052500 


21.985295 


12/30/66-2/2/67 


300 


63B 


14 


2292.052500 


21.988870 


12/30/66-2/2/67 


300 


63C 


12,14 


2292.052500 


21.988870 


12/20/66-12/22/66 


60 


63C 


12,14 


2292.052500 


21.988870 


12/22/66-1/2/67 


300 


63D 


12 


2292.052500 


21.985295 


12/20/66-1/2/67 


300 


64A 


14 


2292.052500 


21.985295 


1/31/67-3/2/67 


300 


64B 


14 


2292.052500 


21.988855 


1/31/67-3/2/67 


300 


65A 


14 


2292.050500 


21.985317 


2/28/67-4/1/67 


900 


65B 


14 


2292.050500 


21.988825 


2/28/67-4/1/67 


900 


66A 


14 


2292.051400 


21.985324 


5/1/67-6/1/67 


900 


66B 


14 


2292.051400 


21.988842 


5/1/67-6/1/67 


900 


67B 


14 


2292,051950 


21.988855 


6/1/67-7/1/67 


900 


67Z* 


Stanford 


2292.051400 


21.985324 


6/1/67-7/1/67 


300 


^A = channel 6. B = channel 7. *= made on magnetic tape 


or 1 mo. C and D = special predict runs for DSS 12 for the last 


10 days in 


December 1966. DSS tracked one pass (noncommittal) at very 


low signal (—167 dBmW). The tracking data was for correlation wi 


th tracking 


data from the then new 210-ft antenna (DSS 14). 







JPl TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM 33-426, VOL V 



27 



Table 21. Summary of operations, passes 196-25J 



Pass 


Deep Space 
Station 


Number of 
commands 


Average 

received signal 

level, dBmW 


Transmitter 
power, kW 


Ground 
modes 


Remarks 


196 


14/12 


6 


-154.3 


10 


1- and 2-way 


This was the first official traclcing pass of Pioneer VI by 
















DSS 14. Bit rate, 64 bits/s 


197 


14/12 


10 


-156.8 


10 






Bit rate, 64 bits/s 


202 


14/12 


5 


-156.5 


10 






Bit rate, 64 bits/s 


206 


14/12 


10 


-156.7 


10 






Bit rates, 8 and 64 bits/s 


207 


12 


14 


-166.4 


10 






Pass tracked in support of a solar flare alert. Bit rate, 
8 bits/s 


208 


14/12 


7 


-156.5 


10 






TCP computer failed twice, cause undetermined. Bit rate, 
64 bits/s 


210 


12 


8 


-166.8 


10 






Pass tracked in support of a solar flare alert. Command 
3-100 delayed 6 min due to synthesizer failure. Bit 
rate, 8 bits/s 


211 


14/12 


5 


-156.9 


10 






Bit rate, 64 bits/s 


215 


14/12 


10 


-157.4 


ID 






Bit rates, 8 and 64 bits/s 


218 


14/12 


11 


-157.9 


10 






Bit rate, 64 bits/s 


223 


14/12 


9 


-157.3 


10 






Transmitter interrupted twice due to high body current. 
Bit rate, 64 bits/s 


226 


14/12 


7 


-157.4 


10 


1- and 2-way 


Bit rate, 64 bits/s 


230 


14/12 


2 




10 


1- and 3-way 


Bit rate, 64 bits/s 


232 


14 


None 




10 


1-way 


Bit rate, 64 bits/s. This was a record-only pass. 


235 


14/12 


15 




15 


1- and 2-way 


First pass using the DSS 14 transmitter. This and the three 
passes following were in support of the Lunar Orbifer 
launch wherein special observations were to be made 
by Pioneer VI of solar activity which might affect Lunar 
Orbifer. Bit rate, 64 bits/s 


236 


14/12 


16 




10 






Bit rate, 16 bits/s 


237 


14/12 


16 




10 






Transmitter off briefly due to beam current interlock 
operation. Bit rates, 16 and 64 bits/s 


238 


14/12 


15 




10 






Antenna made emergency stop in both axes due to 














tangling of coolant lines in cable wrap. Transmitter off 














twice (unscheduled) due to klystron air interlock opera- 














tion and arc detector interlock operation. Bit rate. 














64 bits/s 


248 


14/12 


8 




10 


1- and 2-way 


Station experienced brief primary power failure at 
0245 GMT. A problem in transmitting the command 
microwave tones developed between the multiple mis- 
sion support area at DSS 12 and the transmitter at 
DSS 14. It was corrected after several minutes and the 
cause was unreported. Bit rate, 64 bits/s 


250 


14/12 


10 




10 


1- and 2-way 


Bit rate, 64 bits/s 


254 


14/12 


17 




10 


1- and 2-way 


Transmitter off twice due to arcing in the waveguide. 
Bit rate, 64 bits/s 


257 


14/12 


20 




10 


1- and 2-way 


Transmitter kicked off four times for brief periods; cause 
undetermined. 400-Hz power supply interrupted 
briefly. Bit rates, 16 and 64 bits/s 



28 



JPL TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM 33-426, ¥Ol. V 



Tcible 22. Symmory @f Operations, Passes 263-561 



Pass 
No. 


Station 
(DSS) 


Day of Year 
(GMT) 


Acq. 
(GMT) 


End of 
Track 
(GMT) 


Or 
(Start an 

1-Way 


ound Mode 
1 End Tim 

2 -Way 


s 
3S GMT) 

3 -Way 


Avg. Reed. 

Sig. Level 

(dbm) 


Commands 

Total 


Equipment Failures and Anomalies; Significant Events; Remarks 


260 


14 


244 


090642 


1709 


090642 
093740 


093740 
170725 




-158.5 


28 


Pass abbreviated due to Mariner IV mission requirements. 


265 


14 


249 


091047 


222150 


091047 
094925 


095341 
222150 




-158.8 


42 


None 


Ibl 


14 


251 


090914 


2225 


090914 
093831 


093831 
222410 




-158.5 


None 


None 


271 


14 


255 


090949 


221830 


090949 
094300 


094414 
221615 




-158.4 


24 


None 


274 


14 


258 


Q'iiiQI 


1 ^aofio 


091104 
095932 


100051 
180000 




-158.6 
-158.4 


None 


Record -only pass. 

Station was secured early by Operations Control Chief to prepare 
for Surveyor test. 


278 


14/12 


262 


091238 


221800 


091238 
094845 


09 5022 
221620 




-158.7 


20 


None 


282 


14 


266 


091919 


180800 


091919 
093000 


09 3000 
180800 




-158.8 


None 


None 


285 


14 


269 


091542 


220300 


091542 
094748 


094910 
220300 




-158.8 


21 


None 


288 


14 


272 


091740 


220300 


091740 
094625 


094625 
220120 




-158.98 


11 


None 


292 


14 


276 


091935 


2158 


091935 
094722 

215620 
215800 


094722 
215620 




-159.2 


12 


None 


295 


14 


279 


092140 


2152 


0921 
095247 

215057 
2152 


095247 
215057 




-158.36 


10 


None 


296 


14 


280 


092148 


190000 


092148 
094826 


094839 
190000 




-158.8 


None 


Record -only pass. 


299 
302 


14 
14 


283 


092456 


1858 


092456 
095802 


095944 
185800 




-158.9 


11 


At 1738 a glitch occurred in the Beta Computer, possibly caused 
by station personnel working behind Alpha Computer. At 1802 
DSS 12 had a major power failure because of storm activity in the 
area. Power was restored and computer was back in lock at 
180315. 


286 


093154 


1858 


093154 
100915 


100915 
1856 




-158.8 


12 


None 


306 


14/12 


290 


093726 


185614 


193726 
101414 


101414 
185614 




-159.3 


13 


At 094300, Tracking Data Handling equipment garbled the voltage- 
controlled oscillator printout. 

At 105800, Datex AZ encoder was not operating properly. Encoder 
was cleaned, and was back in proper operation at 112000. 

Receiver dropped lock several times between 093726 and 101540. 


309 


14 


293 


093450 


185800 


093450 
101700 


101700 
185630 




-158.4 


11 


Command encoder was switched at DSS 12. 

At 0935, the telemetry line to DSS 12 failed. Trouble was caused 
by an intermittent cable at DSS 12 and was repaired at 1039. 
From 1700 to 1730, the Western Union line to JPL was not work- 
ing. Trouble developed in the Telemetry and Command Process- 
ing System (TCP), causing command zero printouts . Trouble 
was corrected by changing TCP computer. 



i¥l TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM 33-426, VOi. ¥ 



29 



ToUe 22 (eontd) 



Pass 
No. 


Station 
(DSS) 


Day of Year 
(GMT) 


Acq. 
(GMT) 


End of 
Track 
(GMT) 


Gr 
(Start an 

1-Way 


ound Mode 
1 End Tim 

2 -Way 


BS GMT) 
3 -Way 


Avg. Reed. 

Sig. Level 

(dbm) 


Commands 
Total 


Equipment Failures and Anomalies; Significant Events; Remarks 


313 


14/12 


297 


0934 


1858 


0934 
105300 


105433 
185714 




-158.83 


11 


Station Controller indicated that Predicts 61B appeared to have 
been generated with waong station coordinates . 


315 


14 


299 


093610 


154800 


093610 
100359 


100359 
154800 




-158.9 


7 


Station tracked 108 minutes past scheduled time due to error in 
reading schedule . 


316 


14/12 


300 


093650 


1858 


093650 
100319 


100319 
185620 




-158.6 


11 


Pass scheduled for Day 301 but moved ahead one day due to VIP 
visitors to Ames Research Center. TCP lost lock due to inadvert- 
ent disconnection of telemetry patch to microwave line at DSS 14 . 


320 


14 


304 


094145 


1600 


094145 
100411 


100411 
155530 




-158.5 


11 


None 


322 


14 


306 


094440 


1400 


094440 
101509 


101550 
1400 




-158.3 


12 


All doppler data was lost for entire pass due to operator making a bad 
patch. 


324 


14 


308 


094236 


183130 


094236 
1000 

103530 
105934 


110104 
183110 




-158.6 


10 


Station was required to shut down at i830Z, due to Mariner IV 
commitment. Requirement verbally confirmed by OCC. 


327 


14 


311 


0945 


181600 


0945 
1013 


1013 
181600 




-158.4 


14 


None 


329 


14 


313 


094648 


1357 


094648 
101512 


101512 




-158. 3 


9 


None 


331 


14 


315 


094810 


1818 


094810 
102412 


102412 
181540 




-158.8 


13 


None 


334 


14 


318 


113340 


2117 


113340 
120855 


121050 
211700 




-158.68 


13 


Station experienced difficulty in obtaining spacecraft and. after 
obtaining it, difficulty in retaining lock. Problem traced to Maser. 


336 


14 


320 


095637 


1958 


095637 
102610 


102715 
195800 




-158.3 


13 


None 


338 


14 


322 


095536 


211300 


095536 
102555 


103154 
211300 




-158.3 


13 


None 


343 


14 


327 


095943 


195400 


095943 
lOlOOQ 


111413 
195400 




-158.5 


13 


DIS subsystem failed to pull predict tape. 

Antenna was driven oif spacecraft by DIS, which pulled Angle Data 
early. 


350 


14 


334 


100815 


1947 


100815 


123352 




-158.2 


13 


Transmitter turned off several times during pass due to leaking heat 
exchanger water hose. Water tank was manually filled for remainder 
of pass, and water hose replaced after completion of pass. At 132834, 
transmitter turned off due to operator hitting wrong switch while 
filling water tank. 


355 


14 


339 


125442 


2050 


125442 
133042 


133147 




-157.4 


12 


Loose connector on waveguide switch caused 2 hour, 40 minute delay 
in acquisition. 


357 
359 


14 


341 


101753 


2038 


101763 
104853 


104924 
2038 




-158.4 


13 


None 


14 


343 


102141 


2037 


102141 
104640 


104716 




-157.4 


13 


None 


364 


14 


348 


102932 


2040 


102932 
100502 


110502 
2040 




-155.8 


13 


None 


366 


14 


350 


103138 


2022 


103138 
110042 


110116 
2022 




-157.8 


14 


None 



30 



JPL TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM 33-4M, ¥01. V 



Table 22 (c@ntd) 



Pass 
No. 


Station 
(DSS) 


Day o( Year 
(GMT) 


Acq. 
(GMT) 


End of 
Track 
(GMT) 


Gr 
(Start am 

1-Way 


ound Mod 
End Tim 

2-Way 


es GMT) 
3-Way 


Avg. Reed. 

Sig. Level 

(dbm) 


Commands 
Total 


Equipment Failures and Anomalies: Significant Events; Remarks 










L 














369 


14 


353 


103414 


h 

2024 


h 

103414 
110630 

111645 
114133 

114415 
121315 

133015 
135406 


110710 
111329 

114207 
114259 

121345 
132852 

135437 
2024 




-157.6 


10 


Station had considerable trouble staying 2-way on channel 7 when 
tuning above 8880 Mc. Slower tuning rate was attempted but did not 
help. At 135437 station retained acquisition on channel 7 at 8880 Mc, 
which was 10 cycles below track syn frequency. 


371 


12 


355 


103(J4Q 




103940 
115509 


120044 
203000 




-168.4 





Pass for tracking data only. No commands were sent and no telemetry 
data were received. 


372 


14 


356 


104109 


202900 


104109 
110744 


110827 
2029 




-158.2 


11 


None 


377 


14 


361 


105004 


2023 


105004 
113520 


1 1 3600 
2023 




-158.6 


13 


None 


380 


14 


364 


105420 


202300 


105420 
112326 


112417 
202045 




-158.8 


13 


None 


387 


14 


006 


1158 


202500 


1158 
1304 

1833 
1849 


1304 
1831 

1849 
2022 




-158.4 


12 


Power failure occured at station several hours before track time 
causing Maser to warm up. Inability to start one of the auxiliary 
power units contributed to Maser warming up. 

Master equatorial failure due to tripped circuit breaker in HA channel 
RCVR in lock. 


390 


14 


009 


111443 


202200 


111443 
114403 


114443 
202200 




157.6 


11 


16 bps, TXR 10 kw 


392 


14 


Oil 


111758 


1952 

L- — 


111758 
114508 


120600 
195050 




-158.0 


7 


Transmitter power 10 kw, TLM bit rate 16 


394 


14 


" 1 

013 


112112 


202200 


112112 
1320 

180530 
184400 


132033 
180255 

184457 
202U2 




-158.3 


17 


TXR at 15 kw, TLM bit rate 16 bps 


404 


14 


1 
023 


113815 


202200 


113815 
1205 


120609 
202100 




159.4 


13 


TXR power at 10 kw, TLM bit rate 16 bps 


406 


14 


025 


114200 


2023 


114200 
120925 


120959 
202055 




-158.5 


15 


Bit rate 16 bps. TXR at 10 kw 


408 


14 


027 


114617 


2023 


114617 
121452 


121624 


1 


1 

-158.5 


15 


Bit rate 16 bps. TXR at 10 kw 


411 


14 


030 


115023 


2022 


115023 
121953 


122050 
202157 




1 

-158.6 


15 


TXR at 10 kw. TLM at 16 bps 


416 


14 


035 


120218 


2031 


120218 
203100 




1 


1 

-160.6 





Record only. 


4iS 


14 


037 


1203 


1954 


1203 
123031 


123132 
195142 





-160.7 


16 


TLM at 16 bps. TXR at 10 kw 


420 


14 


039 


120516 


1953 


120516 
123031 


123220 
195300 




-160.9 


15 


TLM at 16, bps. TXR at 10 kw 



JPi TECHMCAl mEmORAHDUm 33-426, VOL V 



3! 



Teibla 22 (c@nfd) 



Pass 
No. 


Station 
(DSS) 


Day of Year 
(GMT) 


Acq. 
(GMT) 


End of 
Track 
(GMT) 


Gp 
(Start anc 

1-Way 


ound Mod 
End Tim 

2-Way 


es GMT) 
3-Way 


Avg. Reed. 

Sig. Level 

(dbm) 


Commands 
Total 


Equipment Failures and Anomalies: Significant Events; Remarks 


422 


14 


041 


121100 


1954 


121100 
123650 

184415 
192502 


123720 
183438 

192614 
195115 




160.4 


13 


TXR at 10 kw. TLM at 16 bps 


425 


14 


44 


121423 


2038 


121423 
124230 


124407 
203800 




-160.9 


14 


TXR at 10 kw. TLM at 16 bps 


427 


14 


046 


121500 


1527 


121500 
124220 


124250 
1527 




-161.3 


8 


TXR at 10 kw. TLM at 16 bps and 8 bps 


428 


14 


047 


161428 


2029 


161428 
164059 


164405 
2029 




-161. I 


7 


TXR at 10 kw. TLM at 16 and 8 bps. Solar flare pass. 


429 


14 


048 


121645 


2038 


121645 
124238 


124405 
203715 




-160.85 


19 


TXR at 10 kw. TLM at 16 bps 


432 


14 


051 


121942 


2023 


121942 
133244 


133750 
2022 




-161. 18 


15 


TXR at 10 kw. TLM at 16 bps 


439 


14 


05« 


122403 


1856 


122403 
125647 


125832 
1855 




-161.4 


11 


TXR at 10 kw. TLM at 16 bps 


443 


14 


062 
March 3. 1967 


1254 


1908 


1254 
132805 


133030 
1908 




162.3 


11 


TXR at 10 kw. TLM at 16 bps 


502 


14 


121 
May 1, 1967 


1 14644 


2130 


1146 


1246 
2122 




-163.46 


11 


TXR at 10 kw. TLM at 8 bps. Antenna stopped 3 times due to low 
oil alarm on pad No. 3. 


505 


14 


124 


1330 




1330 
1406 


1406 
2023 




-163.766 


14 


TXR at 10 kw. TLM at 8 bps 


508 


14 


127 


140000 




140000 
144047 


144221 
2056 




164.2 


12 


TXR at 10 kw. TLM at 16 bps 


510 


14 


129 


1200 


1800 


1200 
124030 


124525 
1854 




163.2 


12 


TXR at 10 kw. TLM at 8 bps 


515 


14 


134 


113915 


1800Z 


113915 
122654 


122840 
1800 




-163.7 


11 


TXR at 10 kw. TLM at 16 bps 


517 


14 


136 


112506 


2116Z 


112506 
121448 


121624 
2116 




-163.7 


14 


Pass cut short 11/2 hours to provide command capability for 
51 PN-7 pass. 


519 


14 


138 


112658 




112658 
121242 


121358 




-164.3 


12 


TXR at 10 kw. TLM at 16 bps 


522 


14 


141 


1120 


222500 


112045 
120909 


121655 
222500 




164.4 


14 


TXR at 10 kw. TLM at 8 and 16 bps 


523 


14 


142 


111815 


192500 


111815 
120236 


120314 
192500 




164.2 


16 


TXR at 10 kw. TLM at 16 bps 


526 


14 


145 


111532 


1817 


111532 
120703 


120752 
1817 




164.1 


13 


TXR at 10 kw. TLM at 8 and 16 bps 



32 



JPL TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM 23-426, ¥Oi. ¥ 



Table 22 (ranfd) 



Pass 
No. 


Station 
(DSS) 


Day of Year 
(GMT) 


Acq. 
(GMT) 


End of 
Track 
(GMT) 


Gi 
(Start an 

1-Way 


ound Mode 
i End Tim 

2 -Way 


s 
es GMT) 

3 -Way 


Avg. Reed. 

Sig. Level 

(dbm) 


Commands 
Total 


Equipment Failures and Anomalies: Significant Events; Remarks 


529 


14 


148 


111258 


2300 


111250 
120700 


120800 
2255 




164.3 


13 


TXR at 10 kw. TLM at 8 and 16 bps 


532 


14 


151 


112540 


1900 


1125 
1215 


1215 
1900 




164,7 


13 


TXR at 10 kw. TLM at 8 and 16 bps 


536 


14 


155 


1115 


2243 


1115 
1206 


1206 
2243 




-165.0 


18 


TLM bit rate at 8 and 16 bps. TXR power at 10 kw 


538 


14 


157 


110330 


-2314 


110330 
114856 


115030 




-164.8 


13 


TLM bit rate at 8 and 16 bps. TXR power at 10 kw 


541 


14 


160 


110044 


1904 


1 10044 
114809 


114856 
1904 




-164.5 


13 


TLM bit rate at 8 and 16 bps. TXR power at 10 kw 


543 


14 


162 


111345 


2257 


111345 
120310 


120339 




-164.7 


17 


TLM bit rate at 8 and 16 bps. TXR power at 10 kw 


545 


14 


164 


105839 


1642 


105839 
114729 


114821 




-164.7 


15 


TLM bit rate at 8 and 16 bps. TXR power at 10 kw 


548 


14 


167 


105515 


185700 


105515 
114726 


U4902 
185700 




-164.4 


14 


TLM bit rate at 8 and 16 bps. TXR power at 10 kw 


550 


14 


169 


105243 


2319 


1052 
1218 


1218 
2319 




-164.4 


17 


TLM bit rate at 8 and 16 bps. TXR power at 10 kw 


552 


14 


171 


105215 


1900 


105215 
114204 


114245 
1857 




-164.6 


14 


TLM bit rate at 8 and 16 bps. TXR power at 10 kw. 

Command 3/016 sent 6 seconds early because of GOE time error. 


555 


14 


174 


104952 


1600 


104952 






-165.0 


None 


TLM bit rate at 16 bps. 


557 


14/12 


176 


111335 


1846 


111335 
170329 

181145 
182523 


1718 
181101 

184125 
1846 




-165.8 


None 


Attempted to use DSS 12 for uplink DSS 14 for downlink. DSS 14 
unable to hold 2-way lock, signal level varying between -170 dbm 
and threshold. Station 14 performed RCV search with RCV 2 at 
channel 6 frequency and was obtaining internaittent lock at that 
frequency; DSS 12 TXR apparently not able to hold S/C RCV in 
two-way, causing switching between channel 6 and 7. Dropped 
S/C PN-6 at 1846 to reconfigure to PN-7. 


559 


14 


178 


1051 


1605 


105100 






-164.5 


None 


TLM bit rate at 16 bps 


561 


14 


180 


104545 


1604 


104545 
1604 






-164.7 


None 


TLM bit rate at 16 bps 



G. Pass Chronology 

Tracking periods covered are identified by the pass 
number, which is the number of times since launch that 
the spacecraft was above the horizon of a particular sta- 
tion. Unless otherwise noted, the following entries refer 
to DSS 14. 



Pass 196. A failure in the azimuth A lubricating system 
was corrected by readjustment of a microswitch. A failed 
TDH doppler frequency counter was repaired by replac- 
ing a loose wire that had been shorting. Because of an 
operator error, the station tracked in the 4.5-kHz teleme- 
try bandwidth. 



Pass 197. An operator inadvertently hit the antenna 
offset, causing loss of lock for 2 min. 



Pass 207. Numerous random receiver glitches^ occurred 
at DSS 12 because of low signal level. After transmitter 
failure at DSS 12, the transmitter was reset; there was 
no repetition of the failure. 



Pass 208. Restarting of the computer program and re- 
seating of loose cards resulted in normal operation for 
TCP 920 computer programs after a failure. Operation 
of FR-1400 recorder B modulator tracks returned to 
normal after a drive belt was replaced. There had been 
no output during posttrack cahbration, and tape speed 
was 75% off. 

Pass 210. The GOE computer buffer power supply 
was replaced after DSS 12 was unable to obtain TCP 



^Momentary intermittent anomalies. 



JPL TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM 33-42d, ¥01. V 



33 



lock for first 3 h 32 min of track. DSS 12 also experi- 
enced numerous receiver glitches resulting from low 
signal strength. Replacement of a fuse restored normal 
operation after a DSS 12 doppler counter was inopera- 
tive for 27 min. 

Pass 211. A backup computer was employed when the 
TCP 920 computer failed because of an intermittently 
operating module. The module was replaced. 

Pass 218. Because of a wiring error, the wrong data 
condition code was printed. The wiring error was 
corrected. 

Pass 223. When DSS 12 transmitter failed twice be- 
cause of high body current, the focus current was 
adjusted, returning operation to normal. 

Pass 226. Investigation was started when the VCO 
counter in the TDH and a spare counter failed because 
of bad circuit boards. 



Pass 254. The station transmitter was off twice because 
of arcing in the waveguide. 

Pass 257. The transmitter was off four times. The servo 
brake went on because of a blown fuse in the 400-Hz 
power source. The fuze was replaced and operation re- 
turned to normal. 

Pass 299. A local storm caused a major power failure 
at DSS 12; approximately 2 min of GOE computer data 
was lost. 

Pass 309. The telemetry microwave link to DSS 12 
was out for 4 min until the faulty cable at DSS 12 was 
isolated and repaired. The TCP computer B failed at 
DSS 12, requiring switch to computer; 12 min was lost. 

Pass 316. The telemetry patch to the microwave line 
at DSS 14 was inadvertently pulled, causing the GOE/ 
TCP at DSS 12 to lose lock. The problem was corrected 
after 2 min 46 s had elapsed. 



Pass 230. Because of tape recorder stoppage, 1 min 
50 s of data was lost before the recorder was restarted. 



Pass 322. Because of incorrect frequency bias, some of 
the doppler data was bad. 



Pass 232. The TDH doppler counter failed in transmit- 
ter 2 mode during prepass calibration; transmitter 1 
mode was used for pass. 



Pass 343. While tuning to lock channel 7, the DSS 14 
antenna was driven off spacecraft because the DIS did 
not pull the paper tape. 



Pass 235. The station elevation axis encoder hung up 
three times and caused signal losses during tracking; 
interim Datex encoding system was the cause. 

Pass 235. The station prepared six trouble/failure re- 
ports (TFRs) for failure of TDH punch 1 and 2. Trans- 
mitter failure resulted from beam voltage overcurrent, 
body overcurrent, and low water flow. Antenna brake 
red indicator light was on. 

Pass 237. The DSS 14 transmitter went off because 
of beam current interlock. 

Pass 238. The antenna came to emergency stop in both 
axes because of a coolant line entangled in the cables. 
The transmitter went off once because of a klystron air 
interlock, and then again because of the detector. 

Pass 248. DSS 14 received no command modulation 
from DSS 12 GOE for a portion of the pass because of 
microwave link breakdown. 



Pass 350. Because of a heat exchanger problem, the 
transmitter was off. 

Pass 371. The station was on spare synthesizer for a 
special tracking data requirement. 

Pass 416. The antenna was in a brake mode for a 
special film height test. 

Passes 418 through 422. The DSS 14 transmitter was 
on and off in a series of TCP/GOE and TCP locks. 

Passes 425 through 432. The bit rate was switched 
from 16 to 8 bits/s. 

Pass 443. This was the last pass tracked by DSS 14 
until pass 502, during which time the station was shut 
down for major bearing rework. 

Pass 502. DSS 14 was again operational on day 121 
(May 1, 1967). The transmitter was at 10 kW and the 



34 



JPL TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM 33-426, VOl. V 



telemetry at 8 bits/s. The antenna stopped three times 
because of low oil alarm on pad 3. 

Pass 515. The transmitter went off because of power 
cabinet interlock failure; 2.5 h of telemetry data was lost 
before demodulator locked. 

Pass 517. The pass was cut short to provide command 
capability for DSS 51 with Pioneer VII. 

Pass 526. The receiver went out of lock because of a 
glitch in the master equatorial system. 

Pass 536. The receiver went out of lock as a result of 
the master equatorial hitting the prelimits. 



Pass 552. The transmitter subsystem was turned off for 
60 s because of a beam voltage overload. 

Passes 555, 559, and 561. Tracked without maintaining 
any uplink (one-way). 

Pass 557. The pass was an effort by DSS 12 and 
DSS 14 to track Pioneer VI jointly. DSS 12 provided the 
uplink but was unable to hold good lock on the space- 
craft receiver. DSS 14 maintained the downlink. 

Pass 561. The TDH incorrectly listed spacecraft ID as 
Pioneer VII. The ID was corrected to read Pioneer VI. 

Tables 21 and 22 give a more extensive summary of 
operations by pass. 



JPL TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM 33-426, VOL V 



35