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Maryland Horse 

June 1991 / $3.50 ** The Thoroughbred magazine for the Mid-Atlantic region 


The Thoroughbred magazine for the Mid-Atlantic region 



Tom Bob captures 
Maryland Hunt Cup 

' - !/ V 





The Boys at 




r v 

/ 



Clockwise from top left: 

CORRIDOR KEY 

(Danzig—Come My Prince, by Prince John) 
CITIDANCER 

(Dixieland Band—Willamae, by Tentam) 
ALLEN'S PROSPECT 
(Mr. Prospector—Change Water, by Swaps) 
CARNIVALAY 


(Northern Dancer—Obeah, by Cyane). 




ESTABLISHED 1933 

MARYLAND'S OLDEST FAMILY-OWNED BREEDING FARM 
P.O. Box 107, Bel Air, Maryland 210.14 ■ (301) 879-1952 or 877-7422 ■ FAX (301) 879-6207, 




























Inaugural Summer 
Two-Year-Olds In Training 
and Horses of Racing Age Sale 

July 21st 


Timoniuni Sales Pavilion 

Two-year-olds will be required to work % of a mile atul be starting gate afjpnwed. 


For further information 


120 South Broad Street Kennett Square. PA 19348 (215) 444 9000 ( 301) 252 3860 (213) 444 9003 1 

T. Mason Grasty, Executive Vice President 


Upcoming 1991 
Maryland Fund Stakes 

Offering $2 million annually in purse money 
for registered Maryland-breds. 


2-YEAR-OLDS 

August 

Rollicking Stakes 

$50,000-guaranteed, 6 fur. 

November 

Devil's Bag Stakes 

$75,000-guaranteed, 7 fur. 

December 

Maryland Juvenile Championship 

$ 150,000-guaranteed, lVi 6 mi. 

2-YEAR-OLD LILLIES 

August 

Smart Angle Stakes 

$50,000-guaranteed, 6 fur. 

OctTNov. 

What a Summer Stakes 

$75,000-guaranteed, 7 fur. 

November 

Maryland Juvenile Filly Championship 

$150,000-guaranteed, 1 Vi 6 mi. 

December 

Heavenly Cause Stakes 

$60,000-guaranteed, 6 V 2 fur. 

3-YEAR-OLDS 

June/July 

Humphrey S. Finney Stakes 

$75,000-guaranteed, 176 mi., turf 

Sept ./Oct. 

Northern Dancer Stakes 

$100,000-guaranteed, 17s mi. 

3-YEAR-OLD LILLIES 

June/July 

Pearl Necklace Stakes 

$75,000-guaranteed, IV 16 mi., turf 

August 

Twixt Stakes 

$100,000-guaranteed, 1 Vs mi. 

3 & UP 

August 

Find Stakes 

$75,000-guaranteed, 17s mi., turf 

OctTNov. 

Challedon Handicap 

$60,000-guaranteed, 7 fur. 

3 & UP, LILLIES & MARES 

September 

Timonium 

Alma North Stakes 

$40,000-added, IV 16 mi. 

December 

Laurel 

All Brandy Handicap 

$75,000-guaranteed, 17s mi. 


Another $2 million will be distributed in bonus awards for breeders, owners and stallion owners 
of registered Maryland-breds. 

An additional $50,000 in stakes funds may also be paid for split races, enhanced purses or allowance races. 

For more information, contact Maryland Horse Breeders Association, 

RO. Box 427, Timonium, MD 21093 (301) 252-2100 


Maryland Horse Breeders 
Association 

The purposes of the Maryland Horse 
Breeders Association, a corporation 
chartered in 1929, are to encourage, pro¬ 
mote, protect and improve the horse 
breeding industry in Maryland. 

In addition to representing the Mary¬ 
land Horse industry on legislative and 
regulatory matters, the MHBA functions 
as an informational resource for Thor¬ 
oughbred breeders and owners, for the 
media, for national, community and gov¬ 
ernmental organizations, and for the 
general public. 

Officers 

PRESIDENT 

King T. Leatherbury 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

J.W.Y. Martin Jr. 

SECRETARY-TREASURER 

Betty Shea Miller 

EXECUTIVE VICE-PRESIDENT 

Richard W. Wilcke 
Directors 

William Albright, J. William Boniface, William K. 
Boniface, Thomas Bowman, Kimball C. Firestone, 
King T. Leatherbury, Donald P. Litz Jr., Robert T. 
Manfuso, J.W.Y. Martin Jr., James McManus, Betty 
Shea Miller, John C. Mobberley, Joseph P. Pons Jr., 
Barclay Tagg, Katharine M. Voss 
DIRECTOR OF SPECIAL EVENTS 
Cricket Goodall 

DIRECTOR OF ADMINISTRATION 

Edward W. Despeaux 

ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT 

Karen Shike 

DIRECTOR OF PUBLICATIONS 

Barrie B. Reightler 

ADMINISTRATOR, MARYLAND FUND 

Georgia L. Dovell 

RECEPTIONIST 

Gale Shaffer 

Maryland Million Ltd. 

Maryland Million Ltd. is a member¬ 
ship association chartered in 1985 and 
dedicated to the improvement and pro¬ 
motion of Thoroughbred racing and 
breeding in Maryland. Its main event is 
Maryland Million Day, the richest state 
stallion stakes program in America, fea¬ 
turing nine title-sponsored races for 
Maryland-conceived Thoroughbreds. 
Maryland Million Day is the culmination 
of official "Thoroughbred Week in Mary¬ 
land." 

Executive Committee 

CHAIRMAN 

James McManus (Jim McKay) 

PRESIDENT 

Geoffrey A. Huguely 

VICE-PRESIDENT 

J. William Boniface 

SECRETARY-TREASURER 

Katharine M. Voss 

David Hayden, King T. Leatherbury, Robert T. 
Manfuso, J.W.Y. Martin Jr., R. Richards Rolapp 

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 

Richard W. Wilcke 

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR 

Cricket Goodall 

DIRECTOR OF PUBLICITY 

Joseph B. Kelly 

ADVISORY BOARD 

Lawrence J. Abbundi, Howard M. Bender, Ernest J. 
Colvin, Joseph A. De Francis, Charles Fenwick Jr., 
Kimball C. Firestone, C. Oliver Goldsmith, Richard 
J. Hoffberger, C. Frank Hopkins, Dan G. Lay, 
Robert P. Levy, John A. Manfuso Jr., Betty Shea 
Miller, Howard M. Mosner Jr., Lynda J. O'Dea, 
Michael Pons, Carlos Rivera, Wayne W. Wright 


2 


Maryland Horse 


























Maryland Horse serves 
Thoroughbred breeders, trainers, 
owners and enthusiasts in a six-state 
region: Maryland, Delaware, 
Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Virginia and 
West Virginia. The magazine's primary 
purpose is to promote the 
Thoroughbred racing and breeding 
industry in Maryland along with its 
vital secondary markets— 
steeplechasing, eventing, hunting, 

showing, polo, etc. 

EDITOR 

Richard W. Wilcke 

DIRECTOR OF PUBLICATIONS 
ADVERTISING & DESIGN 

Barrie B. Reightler 

MANAGING EDITOR 

Lucy Acton 

SENIOR EDITOR 

Marge Dance 

PRODUCTION 

Betty Fairbank 

ADVERTISING 

Kristen Mowery 

CIRCULATION 
Anne M. Warner 
RESEARCH 
Cindy Deubler 
CONTRIBUTING EDITOR 
Margaret Worrall 
PHOTOGRAPHERS 

Neena Ewing 
Cappy Jackson 

Maryland Horse (ISSN 0025-4274) is 
published 11 times per year, monthly ex¬ 
cept bi-monthly July/August, by the 
Maryland Horse Breeders Association, 
201 West Padonia Road, Lutherville- 
Timonium, Md. 21093. (301) 252-2100. 
Subscription rate $30 per year, which en¬ 
titles subscriber to receive Mid-Atlantic 
Thoroughbred Stallion Directory and 
Mid-Atlantic Thoroughbred Statistical 
Review. Foreign subscription rate $39 per 
year (surface mail), payable by U.S. mon¬ 
ey order or by bank draft payable in U.S. 
funds. Subscription price included in an¬ 
nual membership dues to the Maryland 
Horse Breeders Association. 

Second-class postage paid at Luther- 
ville-Timonium, Md. 21093 and addi¬ 
tional mailing offices. 

POSTMASTER: Send address changes 
to Maryland Horse, P.O. Box 427, Ti- 
monium, Md. 21093. 

Single Copies : $3.50, back issues past six 
months $5. Mid-Atlantic Stallion Di¬ 
rectory, $10. Mid-Atlantic Statistical Re¬ 
view, $10. 

Maryland Horse Shows Association, Inc. : 
Maryland Horse has been designated 
the official publication of the Maryland 
Horse Shows Association, Streett E. 
Moore, President; Rebecca Foster-Mark- 
ward. Secretary. 

Acknowledgements: Statistics and re¬ 
sults of North American racing, as given 
in Maryland Horse, are based upon the 
copyrighted charts and tabulations of 
Bloodstock Research, Inc., Daily Racing 
Form and American Racing Manual, pub¬ 
lished by Daily Racing Form, Inc. Special 
line drawings by Paul Brown. 

Printed by WAVERLY PRESS, INC., Easton, Md. 

® Copyright 1991 

Maryland Horse Breeders Association, Inc. 


June, 1991 

Maryland Horse 

The Thoroughbred magazine for the Mid-Atlantic region 


Volume 57, Number 6 


Table of Contents 

10 Race of a lifetime 

Rusty Carrier's Tom Bob overcame many obstacles to carry 
Sanna Neilson to 30-length victory in Maryland Hunt Cup. 

18 Trainer Bruce Miller sweeps Grand National features 

Cabral, with Blythe Miller aboard, wins Grand National; B.H. 
Murray Memorial goes to Night Train Lane and Billy Meister. 

24 Family day at My Lady's Manor 

Millers, Fenwicks dominate events, with Cabral scoring in 
feature. Magical in John Rush Streett Memorial. 

34 Early spring point-to-points blossom with activity 

Jack Fisher-trained and ridden horses went six for ten at Howard 
County/Iron Bridge, Elkridge-Harford and Marlborough. 


Departments 

4 Sporting Calendar 
8 Personal Perspective 
29 What's New in Maryland 
32 Maryland sire rankings 

42 Around the Farms 

43 Maryland-Bred Stakes Winners 
48 MHBA Awards Dinner 

50 Maryland Fund 
55 Pimlico Special 
57 National News 

59 Mid-Atlantic sire rankings 

60 Mid-Atlantic Report 

62 Virginia point-to-points 
66 Looking Back 
72 Editorial 

Cover—Sanna Neilson clears the last Maryland Hunt Cup fence aboard 
Tom Bob, becoming the third woman rider to win the famed tim¬ 
ber classic. (Photograph by Cappy Jackson) 


June 1991 


3 




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Special Events 

June 

23—Fifty-seventh annual MHBA 
Yearling Show, Timonium 

September 

8—Maryland Million 


Mid-Atlantic Tracks 


Atlantic City (N.J.)—June 5 to Aug. 31 
Charles Town (W.Va.}—-Jan. 2 to Dec. 29 
Delaware Park (Del.)—March 17 to Nov. 
4 

Laurel (Md.)—July 4 to Aug. 23 
Monmouth (N.J.)—May 31 to Aug. 2 
Mountaineer Park (W.Va.)—Jan. 1 to 
Dec. 31 

Penn National (Pa.)—Jan. 2 to Dec. 15 
Philadelphia Park (Pa.)—Jan. 1 to Dec. 
31 

Pimlico (Md.)—March 14 to July 3 
Timonium (Md.)—Aug. 24 to Sept. 4 

Other Tracks 

Arlington Park—May 12 to Oct. 9 
Belmont Park—May 8 to July 22 
Calder—May 4 to Nov. 16 
Churchill Downs—April 27 to June 30 
Del Mar—July 24 to Sept. 11 
Finger Lakes—March 29 to Dec. 3 
Hollywood Park—April 24 to July 22 
Ladbroke (DRC)—March 15 to Nov. 24 
Rockingham—Jan. 1 to Dec. 31 
Saratoga—July 24 to Aug. 26 
Thistledown—March 2 to Dec. 9 
Woodbine—April 28 to Oct. 27 

Maryland Auctions 

Two-Year-Olds in Training and Horses 
of Racing Age, Fasig-Tipton Midlan- 
tic, Timonium Sales Pavilion. (215) 
444-9000 or (301) 252-5860. July 21. 
August Mixed, Equivest, Timonium 
Sales Pavilion. (800) 666-4677. Aug. 
4. 

Chesapeake Yearlings, Equivest, 
Timonium Sales Pavilion. (800) 
666-4677. Sept. 22, 23. 

Fall Selected Yearlings, Fasig-Tipton 
Midlantic, Timonium Sales Pavilion. 
(215) 444-9000 or (301) 252-5860. 
Sept. 29. 


Fall Mixed, Equivest, Timonium Sales 
Pavilion. (800) 666-4677. Nov. 17, 18. 
December Mixed, Fasig-Tipton Midlan¬ 
tic, Timonium Sales Pavilion. (215) 
444-9000 or (301) 252-5860. Dec. 1, 2. 


Out-of-State Sales 


Open Selected Two-Year-Olds in Train¬ 
ing and Horses of Racing Age, Ocala 
Breeders' Sales, Ocala, Fla. (904) 
237-2154. June 10, 11. 

Horses of Racing Age, Fasig-Tipton 
New York, Belmont Park, Elmont, 
N.Y. (516) 328-1800. June 11. 

Selected Yearlings, Keeneland, Lex¬ 
ington, Ky. (800) 456-3412. July 
15-17. 

Horses of Racing Age, Equivest, Bel¬ 
mont Park, Elmont, N.Y. (800) 
666-4677. July 16. 

Selected Yearlings, Fasig-Tipton Ken¬ 
tucky, Lexington, Ky. (606) 
255-1555. July 18, 19. 

Yearlings, Keeneland, Lexington, Ky. 
(800) 456-3412. July 25. 

Selected Yearlings, Fasig-Tipton New 
York, Saratoga Springs, N.Y. (516) 
328-1800. Aug. 6-8. 

Preferred Yearlings, Fasig-Tipton New 
York, Saratoga Springs, N.Y. (516) 
328-1800. Aug. 11. 

Horses of Racing Age, Fasig-Tipton 
New York, Saratoga Springs, N.Y. 
(516) 328-1800. Aug. 13. 

Mixed, Beulah Park Sales, Beulah Park, 
Grove City, Ohio. (614) 871-9600. 
Aug. 13. 

Open Selected Yearlings, Ocala Breed¬ 
ers' Sales, Ocala, Fla. (904) 237-2154. 
Aug. 26. 

Open Yearlings, Ocala Breeders' Sales, 
Ocala, Fla. (904) 237-2154. Aug. 27. 


Shows, Trials, etc. 

Carroll County English Horse, Get¬ 
tysburg Riding Club. (717) 334-4896. 
June 2. 

UPPERVILLE COLT AND HORSE, Up¬ 
perville, Va. (703) 347-2675. June 4-9. 
Southern Maryland Horse Association 
Schooling, Prince George's Eques¬ 
trian Center, Upper Marlboro. 
843-1305. June 8, 9; July 6, 7; Sept. 
28, 29; Oct. 19, 20. 


4 


Maryland Horse 


























The 

HOTTEST 

mixed sale 
of the year. 

Equivest’s August Mixed Sale 

August 4,1991 at Timonium 
Entries Close June 25 

Featuring under-tack 2-year-olds and horses of racing age 
as well as weanlings, yearlings and breeding stock. 
Call for additional information 













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Carroll County English Horse, 
Goucher College, Towson. 337-6000. 
June 8, 9; July 13, 14. 

LOUDOUN HOSPITAL BENEFIT, Rose 
Mount Farm, Spotsylvania, Va. (703) 
687-3455. June 13-16. 

Miller's-USET National Dressage 
Championship, Gladstone, N.J. 
(617) 784-4386. June 13-16. 

USET Festival of Champions, Glad¬ 
stone, N.J. (617) 784-4386. June 

13- 22. 

USET Pairs Driving Championship, 
Gladstone, N.J. (617) 784-4386. June 

14- 16. 

Carroll County English Horse, Tran¬ 
quility Manor, Monkton. 628-6531. 
June 15; Aug. 24. 

Summer Horsemanship Clinics, St. 
Timothy's School, Stevenson. 
486-5483. June 17-21; June 24-28. 
KENT COUNTY HORSE, Worton. 
778-4847. June 22. 

Rolex-USET Show Jumping Talent Der¬ 
by, Gladstone, N.J. (617) 784-4386. 
June 22. 

USET Show Jumping Championship, 
Gladstone, N.J. (617) 784-4386. June 
22 . 

Carroll County English Horse, 
McDonogh School, McDonogh. 
581-4707. June 22, 23; July 27, 28; 
Aug. 10, 11. 

WARRENTON PONY, Warrenton, Va. 

(703) 347-1744. June 28-July 1. 
Baltimore County Horse, St. Timothy's 
School, Stevenson. 486-5483. June 
29. 

Carroll County English Horse, Lehigh 
Riding Club. 751-1366. June 30; July 
21 . 

Carroll County English Horse, Thera¬ 
peutic Riding Center. 854-6505. July 
6,7. 


MID-ATLANTIC HORSE & WELSH 
PONY, Rose Mount Farm, Spot¬ 
sylvania, Va. (703) 687-3455. July 

15-17. 

DENTON VOL. FIRE CO. HORSE, 
Denton. 479-1220. July 21. 
EASTERN NATIONAL HORSE & 
WELSH PONY, Quentin, Pa. (703) 
687-3455. July 23-26. 

ROSE MOUNT FARM SUMMER, Spot¬ 
sylvania, Va. (703) 898-4440. July 
25-28. 

MARYLAND PONY BREEDERS AN¬ 
NUAL, Heavenly Waters Equestrian 
Center, Bel Air. 321-0557. Aug. 24. 
WARRENTON HORSE, Warrenton, Va. 
(703) 788-4806. Aug. 29-Sept. 2. 

Shows in capital letters are members of the 
Maryland Horse Shows Association. The 
Sporting Calendar lists show dates and in¬ 
formation free of charge. Telephone (301) 
252-2100. 

For a schedule of additional horse events in 
Maryland, contact the Maryland Horse 
Council at (301) 252-2100 or write to P.O. 
Box 4891, Timonium, Md. 21093. 


Courses/Lectures 

Equine Reproduction, Meredith Man¬ 
or, Waverly, W. Va. (304) 679-3128. 
June 5-Aug. 7. 

America's Horse Industry in a Chang¬ 
ing World, American Horse Council, 
Washington, D.C. (202) 296-4031. 
June 15-19. 

Second Annual University/Industry 
Cooperation Conference, Virginia 
Tech, Blacksburg, Va. (703) 231-9356 
or 231-9353. Sept. 29, 30. 

Maryland Farriers Association Semi¬ 
nar, Bethesda. (301) 472-3626 or 
384-5133. Oct. 13. 





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6 


Maryland Horse 




















by C. Oliver Goldsmith 



Personal Perspective 


Recalling some all-time greats 


Point-to-point racing had its origin 
in England some 250 years ago, when 
competitors met at the finish and were 
taken back four or five miles from that 
spot to make their own lines across nat¬ 
ural country. Sometimes the finish was 
a churchyard. Riders could use the 
church steeple to guide them home, 
hence the name steeplechase. The rid¬ 
ers were often local thrusters who, 
finding their mounts dead fit at the end 
of the hunting season, needed to prove 
who was the most fearless and who 
had the best horse. 

Over the years, the rules have been 
tinkered with from time to time—re¬ 
quiring that the horse must have been 
"regularly" hunted during the current 
season, nobody knowing then or now 
what "regular" means. A frequent rule 
mandated that the rider and trainer be 


"amateur" (whatever that means). 
There could be riding at "catch 
weights" (meaning as is) or fixed 
weights. Then came handicapping as to 
weight carried and/or races won by 
horse or rider. Out of all of this came 
the spectacular and thrilling sport 
called "hunt racing." 

The populace, bored with winter 
and excited at the coming of spring, 
was more than ready to take to the 
country on a lovely—or not so lovely— 
spring day to bear witness to such great 
sport. It soon became evident that a 
jumping race meet at an advantageous 
site over a flagged course would be best 
for spectators. That became the usual 
format. 

There has been a tremendous up¬ 
surge in the last 20 years in all types of 
jump racing. There are many more and 


better horses competing. It's one of the 
fastest-growing sports in America. 

The greatest timber horses over 
the past half-century? I'd name six: 
Blockade, Winton, Pine Pep, Mountain 
Dew, Jay Trump and Ben Nevis II. It's 
my privilege to have seen them all. 

Blockade, a three-time winner of the 
Maryland Hunt Cup (1938, '39 and '40), 
displayed his immense talent by lead¬ 
ing from start to finish every time. No¬ 
body cut a path for him. They couldn't 
catch him. (Rider) Fred Col will allowed 
him to run his own race. 

Stuart S. Janney Jr.'s Winton was a 
wonderful horse. He is the only horse, I 
believe, ever to have won the My Lady's 
Manor, Grand National and Hunt Cup 
three years in succession (Winton won 
the Maryland Hunt Cup with the late 



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Mr. Janney aboard in 1942, '46 and '47.) 
I remember Mr. Janney telling me Win- 
ton had never been on the ground. He 
never took a fall. He was always me¬ 
thodically ridden and well-prepared. 

Pine Pep (Mrs. W.J. Clothier's horse 
ridden to victories in the 1949, '50 and 
'52 Hunt Cups by Mikey Smithwick) 
was a stunning big chestnut with a 
blaze face. He looked very breedy. His 
veins stood out on his slick coat. He was 
one of the best I've ever seen, but I 


wouldn't put him in the same context 
with Winton, Mountain Dew and Jay 
Trump. It would be like comparing Joe 
Louis with Jack Dempsey. 

Mountain Dew and Jay Trump were 
the most closely-matched horses I've 
ever seen. Jay Trump was a marvelous 
horse. But it would be presumptuous to 
say who was better. 

In 1966, when Jay Trump came back 
from winning the English Grand Na¬ 
tional to go for his third Hunt Cup vic¬ 


tory (he'd won the race in '63 and '64), 
they both started their seasons at the 
Howard County point-to-point. I was 
the chairman of the Howard County 
races. I had gone to enormous effort to 
get them there. The day before the race 
Jay Trump's rider Tommy Smith walked 
the course, and said it had too many 
stones. I asked him if that was the only 
problem. He said it was. So we got the 
Pony Club out there to pick up the 
stones. 

Tommy said it was just a schooling 
race, as far as he was concerned. 1 told 
him that was perfectly okay with me, 
but could he get a champion beat? He 
said, "I see what you mean." The two 
coasted along the first two and a half 
miles, then ding-dong, hammer and 
tong, they came up the hill head and 
head. Mountain Dew beat Jay Trump by 
a half-length, and it wasn't because Jay 
Trump didn't try. 

Mountain Dew's owner and trainer 
Janon Fisher Jr. told me before the Hunt 
Cup he'd really be in despair if the 
course came up deep. Mountain Dew 
couldn't handle it. Naturally, that's 
what happened. Janon Fisher probably 
went to his grave believing Mountain 
Dew would have won if there had been 
a fast course. (Mountain Dew got his 
Hunt Cup victories in 1962, '65 and '67). 

Ben Nevis, who won the 1977 and 
'78 Hunt Cups and the English Grand 
National in 1980, was the worst-looking 
horse I ever saw win the Hunt Cup. He 
was anything but pretty to look at, but 
golly he could run and jump. 

^Afhich rider would I put on top? 
Maybe a guy who didn't like it very 
much. Of all the riders I've ever seen. 
Tommy Smith was the most thorough. 
He left no stone unturned. He always 
walked a course many times before he 
rode, and planned his route in every 
race. He jogged and worked out in a 
gym, to stay absolutely fit. But he has 
long since quit, and gone on to a career 
that has nothing to do with horses. 

Perhaps Mikey Smithwick, Charlie 
Fenwick . . . and Stuart Janney must 
also be considered. 

Strange, I ran one of my horses in 
the $100,000 Gallorette Handicap-G3 at 
Pimlico on the last Saturday in April 
and found myself at the Maryland 
Hunt Cup ... □ 


Mr. Goldsmith, a NSHA steward and for¬ 
mer Master of the Howard County Hounds, 
owns and operates Longwood Farm in Glen- 
wood, Md. 


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it Worrall 


Greeting triulnphant Sanna Neilson and TonvBob 
are owner Joy Carrier (on pon^f, Sana's 
mother Nina and stepfather George Strawbridge I 
(baseball ^ap>, and trainer Russell Carrier. 
Fifth-pla^* Blythe Miller and Cabral are at right. 





























Tunny things, unusual things, happen in the 
Maryland Hunt Cup. This year's renewal, on a glori¬ 
ous, sparkling April 27, was no exception. 

Tom Bob (Ire), a 12-year-old gelding on the verge of 
being retired because of a bleeding problem, a horse 
with only one other win under rules and two others in 
point-to-points, overwhelmed the largest field (13 
starters) in three decades to win the world's most re¬ 
nowned timber race by 30 lengths. 

"It's just what I wanted for this wonderful horse! He 
deserves it!" exclaimed owner/trainer Rusty Carrier of 
Unionville, Pa. "Tommy has always been a champion 
in his heart, and now he's shown it to everyone else." 

Tom Bob, by Proverb—Calamity Jane, by Never 
Dwell, was purchased for Joy and Rusty Carrier's Fat 
Chance Farm in the Ballsbridge/Tattersalls Derby sale 
as an unbroken 4-year-old. "This is a National Hunt 
sale, specializing in horses the Irish breed to run over 
jumps," Carrier explained. "Tom Bob was nothing 
outstanding, but he came from a family we liked. From 
the beginning, I saw him as a Maryland Hunt Cup 
horse." 

The handsome chestnut got his first chance at the 
demanding four-mile race in 1988, finishing second in 
a thrilling stretch duel of brother against brother and 
mother against daughter. Billy Meister, riding Free¬ 
man's Hill (owned and trained by Joy Carrier's mother, 
Jill Fanning), edged out his older brother Jay on Tom 
Bob. 

Jay Meister and Tom Bob tried again the next two 
years, coming third both times, never beaten by much. 
Uncle Merlin was the victor in 1989 and The Hard 
Word, another Irish-bred, ridden by Billy Meister, won 
in 1990. 

Alas for Jay Meister, he did not take the call on Tom 
Bob in 1991. Following the 1990 renewal, Tom Bob bled 
profusely. Carrier indicated at the time that he would 
probably retire the horse. "I can't blame Jay at all for 
making the decision not to commit to our horse," said 
Carrier. "I wasn't sure Tom Bob would ever run again." 

Over the summer. Carrier grasped at one final ap¬ 
proach. He decided to keep Tom Bob unstabled at all 
times, away from the dust and air of a barn. "That's the 
only thing different," Carrier explained. "Tommy is 
living out in a five-acre field with just a run-in shed, 
doing what horses do naturally." 

In the fall of 1990, Sanna Neilson, daughter of train- 
er/rider Louis (Paddy) Neilson III and Nina Stewart 



—WRN 



Strawbridge, took over the jockey duties. In their first 
start together, the Pennsylvania Hunt Cup, Tom Bob 
finished second by a short nostril to 1990 timber horse 
of the year Joe's O.K. 

"I asked Sanna to ride because I liked the great job 
she had done with Gateshead (a successful hurdle/ 
timber convert owned by her stepfather's Augustin 


12 


Maryland Horse 


















Stables)/' Carrier continued. "She's a powerful girl 
and a good athlete. At the same time, however, she is 
very sympathetic to the horses. She can get the most 
out of them. 

"Or maybe," Carrier laughed, "Tommy only likes 
girls. The only other races he has won, at Radnor un¬ 
der rules and two point-to-points, Joy rode him." 



Clockwise from top left: Sanna Neilson (right) was not 
only competing against her best friend Blythe Miller (left), 
but also her father Paddy (next picture), who at 49 was 
riding his 17th Hunt Cup (three wins). Also veterans 
are Turney and Liz McKnight, each of whom won the race 
on Tong. Three days after Ned Halle's second-place 
finish, wife Cindy presented him with a daughter. Jay and 
Kenna Meister relax before the race. In his first Hunt 
Cup, Mike Elmore wound up third aboard Tingles Image. 


Chief among Tom Bob's competition this year was 
Cabral, a Chilean-bred gelding ridden by Sanna 
Neilson's closest friend, Blythe Miller. Owned by Old 
Home Farm, Cabral had scored back-to-back victories 
in the My Lady's Manor and the Grand National. A 
win in the Maryland Hunt Cup would be the first such 
triple since Jay Trump accomplished the feat in 1964. 

There were two more female jockeys in the race as 
well: Liz McKnight (winner of the 1986 MHC on Tong) 
riding her husband's Pleasant Sea and Anne Moran on 
Mrs. Edgar Scott Jr.'s The Wool Merchant. Four in the 
race that allowed no women as recently as 20 years ago 
was a record. Even more remarkably, Sanna Neilson 
was the first daughter or son to compete against a 
parent. 


June 1991 


13 












Neena Ewing (2) 




Blythe Miller on Cabral leads the first flight over the 
third (top), followed by (from left) Tom Bob (Sanna Neilson), 
Pleasant Sea (Liz McKnight), The Wool Merchant (Anne 
Moran) and Capital K. (Joe Gillet), who parted company at 
this fence. Another casualty was Billy Meister on Night 
Train Lane (below), but still very much in contention were 
(from left) Tom Bob, Pleasant Sea, Paddy Neilson on 
Daydream Believer and Ballybranogue with Jay Meister. 


Her 49-year-old father Paddy was making his 17th 
assault on the race (three wins), piloting Irv Naylor's 
Daydream Believer. 

Filling out the field were Ned Halle on his own Ges¬ 
ticulate; Michael Elmore on Mrs. T. A. Randolph's Tin¬ 
gles Image, David DeMichele on his mother's mare 
Primal Bee, Michael Traurig on Cary Jackson's Quisi- 
tor, and Jack Fisher on Dover Ridge Farm's Free Run¬ 
ner, all having their first Maryland Hunt Cup rides; 
plus Jay Meister on Fancy Hill Farm's Ballybranogue, 
brother Billy Meister on Night Train Lane, owned by 
Beth Lamotte, and last year's second-place jockey, Joe 
Gillet, on Rosedale Stable's Capital K. 

Liz McKnight on Pleasant Sea got the best of the 
starter's flag, only to be passed by the powerhouse 
Cabral by the first fence. 

Typical of the dark brown frontrunner, Cabral set 
the pace until he began to tire at the three-mile mark. 
The 10-year-old labored over the 13th, slammed the 
16th with his knees, and nearly lost Blythe Miller at the 
17th where she stood on the saddle like a circus per¬ 
former. 

"The fences just took so much out of him," Miller 
lamented. "Once we had two bad fences and I wasn't 
holding him back, then he quit running. He knew he 
was beat when he wasn't in the lead anymore." 


14 


Maryland Horse 





















Early contender Ballybranogue, plagued through¬ 
out his career with foot problems, was backing out of 
the race as well by now, while The Wool Merchant 
maintained his steady pace. 

Absent the early fallers at the third. Night Train 
Lane and Capital K., 11 approached the 18th with Tom 
Bob now comfortably in front. 

The first flight—Tom Bob, Cabral, The Wool Mer¬ 
chant, Quisitor and Daydream Believer—made it over, 
but Free Runner was not so lucky. 

His fall diverted Pleasant Sea to the next panel, over 
which the son of Pleasant Colony and Liz McKnight 
parted company. Also shifting to the left. Bally- | 
branogue and Gesticulate were successful, but Primal § 
Bee came acropper. ^ 

Trailer Tingles Image managed to avoid the melee £ 
and decided the time had come to get in the race. 

The field was reduced by one more when Jay Meis- 
ter pulled up Ballybranogue at the 19th. "I made the 
decision at the last minute. Bally would have tried it," 
said Meister sadly, "but he was absolutely wobbly- 
legged by this point." 

Although Tom Bob never faced a serious challenge 
from those remaining, second place became a horse 
race. Showing a tremendous kick after nearly four 
miles. Gesticulate caught up by the 20th, survived the 


In his usual frontrunning style, Cabral went to the lead 
immediately, taking the first fence (top) ahead of Pleasant 
Sea, The Wool Merchant, Capital K., Night Train Lane 
and Ballybranogue. Clearing the 13th together (below) are 
Quisitor (Michael Traurig) and Gesticulate (Ned Halle). 



June 1991 


15 

















Lees 


16 


Maryland Horse 















After guiding Tom Bob to the wire 30 lengths to the good 
of the other six finishers, Sanna Neilson celebrated with Joy 
and Rusty Carrier, who own and train the Irish-bred. 

Joy won the Hunt Cup aboard Cancottage in 1980 and 1981. 


June 1991 


Cappy Jackson (insei) 


traffic jam at the water jump, and took over second 
place at the last to gallop home three lengths to the 
good of an equally surprising Tingles Image, who fin¬ 
ished third. 

The only jarring note to the race was a claim of foul 
by David DeMichele, who alleged that Ned Halle had 
interfered with his approach to fence 18 and caused his 
mishap. The stewards did not support the claim. 

There was also some discussion among spectators 
as to the propriety of Tom Bob's owner Joy Slater Carri¬ 
er cantering her lead pony alongside Tom Bob as he 
approached the final fence all alone. However, there 
was no official inquiry into this unusual occurence. 

Ned Halle's second-place finish was a popular tri¬ 
umph for the locals, vindicating his horse's brutal fall at 
the 19th the year before. 

"This time Gessie really held himself together," 
Halle recounted. "Bruce and Charlie (Fenwick) had 
told me that I'd be amazed at the way my horse would 
remember the course from last year and jump much 
more carefully. They were absolutely right." 

Gesticulate, an 8-year-old by Elocutionist—Setting 
Trick, is a tried-and-true foxhunter, spending his fall 
and winters with the Green Spring Valley Hounds and 
only his spring season running over jumps. 

"Our biggest problem this year was getting the 
horse to eat as he got racing fit," Halle went on. "I have 
to credit Jock Dett (local foxhunter and blacksmith) for 
his help. He came up every day and rubbed on this 
horse, and encouraged him. And Susie Queitzche 
who works for me did a super job putting the bottom in 
him." 

(Halle had a particularly exciting end to April 1991. 
With impeccable timing reminiscent of her prowess on 
the polo field, Ned's wife Cindy presented him with 
their first child, a daughter whom they named Ellen 
Wilson Halle, three days after the Maryland Hunt 
Cup.) 

With her victory, Sanna Neilson joins Joy Slater Car¬ 
rier and Liz McKnight to become the third woman to 
have accomplished this feat in nearly 100 years. As 
expected, the 22-year-old gives all the credit to her 
mount. 

"Tom Bob couldn't have gone better," Neilson ex¬ 
claimed jubilantly. "He was on the bridle the whole 
time, and he jumped so well. He never missed a fence." 

Rusty Carrier was equally effusive. 

"The horse just sprang back from the race," he said. 
"There wasn't a scratch on him anywhere." 

Experience was certainly a plus with Tom Bob, but it 
is interesting to note that of the seven who finished, 
four of the riders (Sanna Neilson, Elmore, Traurig and 
Miller) were riding in the Maryland Hunt Cup for the 
first time. Of the seven horses, only Tom Bob, Gesticu¬ 
late and The Wool Merchant had seen the fences close 
up before. □ 

17 




















By Margaret Worrall 



18 


Maryland Horse 




































Grand National day, April 20, was Bruce Miller 
day. The Cochranville, Pa.-based trainer sent out his 
daughter Blythe on Cabral (Chi) to win the 89th renew¬ 
al of the Grand National and Billy Meister on Night 
Train Lane to take the secondary feature, the 26th Ben¬ 
jamin H. Murray Memorial. 

Trainer Tom Voss had a similarly successful foray on 
the flat. Daughter Elizabeth posted a resounding victo¬ 
ry on Thistledown in the medium pony race to begin 
the cool, cloudy afternoon in Butler, while Fractious 
put away six challengers to capture the John K. Shaw 
Memorial for Tom's wife Mimi, owner of the 5-year-old 
mare. 

With their victory in the Grand National, rider 
Blythe Miller and Cabral made it two weeks in a row, 
having bested a good field the week before at My 
Lady's Manor. 

The team was duplicating its 1989 double in the 
companion features, the John Rush Streett and the 
Benjamin H. Murray, with one major difference. In 
1991, there was to be no holding back; Cabral was 
headed for the Maryland Hunt Cup. 

Owned by Pennsylvanians John and Nicole Frazier 
and 77-year-old Stitler Vipond, racing as Old Home 
Farm, Cabral took up his habitual frontrunning at the 
third fence in this year's Grand National. 

Nearest of the seven challengers, a totally new 
group from the previous week, was Jay Meister on Not 
Too Fancy Stable's Sensory Perception, who stuck 
close to the leader. The two soared the biggest fence on 
the course, the eighth, as a team, some half dozen 
lengths ahead of Capital K., ridden by Joe Gillet. 

As runners rounded the turn for home after the 
12th fence. Sensory Perception pushed just ahead of 
Cabral, and they opened up an even greater margin 
over the field. 

Spectators lose good sight of the race at this point, 
and consequently were surprised to see Liz McKnight 
and Pleasant Sea side by side with the two leaders as 
horses reappeared. 

Sensory Perception seemed unable to quicken as 
Cabral and Pleasant Sea drove into the final obstacle 
together. Pleasant Sea took out a board, but continued 
on strongly nevertheless. Cabral put in a careful fence, 
and the two were still nose to nose in the stretch. 

Just as he had done in the My Lady's Manor, Cabral 
led the field for virtually the entire three-mile distance, 
although Pleasant Sea challenged him at the finish. 


19 









Neetia Ewing (2) 




Cabral prevailed at the wire, sticking a short head in 
front of Pleasant Sea, with Sensory Perception some 
three lengths back, ten lengths to the good of the re¬ 
mainder of the field, strung out behind. There were no 
fallers. 

"When you ask Cabral to run, he usually re¬ 
sponds," recounted Blythe Miller following the race. 
"After the last, I had to ask him because we didn't have 
too good a fence. It wasn't really a bad one, but it was 
cautious and we lost momentum. 

"I know Dad would have liked to see him soar the 
last one," Blythe added with a grimace. "I made him 
put in a check over it instead." 

Miller, a 22-year-old student at Mount Vernon Col¬ 
lege, won only seven races last year because of an inju¬ 
ry, yet managed to take second place in leading riders, 
money won. Aboard Virginia Kraft Payson's Uptown 
Swell, also trained by her father, Blythe won the Caroli¬ 
na Cup and finished second in the $750,000 Dueling 
Grounds Steeplechase. 

In 1989, Blythe finished third on the leading jockeys 
list in both money and races won (22 wins, $264,185), 
the first woman in history to make the top ten among 
NSHA jockeys. 

Bruce Miller gave Billy Meister a leg up on Beth 
Lamotte's Night Train Lane for the trainer's second 
victory of the afternoon. 


Frank Bell, who worked for Janon Fisher and took care 
of Mountain Dew, watched with his grandson. Presentation 
following the Grand National includes (from left, top) 
Nancy and Bruce Miller, Stitler Vipond, Blythe Miller, 
Nicole and John Frazier and Margaret Brewster. 


20 


Maryland Horse 











The gray gelding settled distinctively in the middle 
of the pack of nine contesting the Benjamin H. Murray 
Memorial, for non-winners of two over timber. Liz 
McKnight on Cotuit and Jeb Hannum on Our Ski Lift 
set the pace over the initial fences, never separated by 
more than half a length. 

As the field emerged from behind the Griswolds' 
house, however, it was Jack Fisher on Dover Ridge 
Farm's Free Runner who held the lead, the aforemen¬ 
tioned pair of horses close behind. 

"I came at them at the far end of the course, about six 
fences out," explained Meister. "I moved into second 
place behind Free Runner there, and Jack and I jumped J 
the next two fences together. j§ 

"I dropped off for a breather at the third from |° 
home," the jockey continued, "jumped the second last Q 
head and head (with Free Runner), and was all alone at 
the last. It was sweet!" 

(Especially so, no doubt, as both Meister's mounts 
the week before at the Manor, Grape and Sea Speed, 
had fallen.) 

Indeed, Night Train Lane put away Free Runner by 
12 lengths at the wire, with that horse ten lengths bet¬ 
ter than Sanna Neilson on Fat Chance Farm's Tom Bob 
(Ire). 

Our Ski Lift and Roman Tent, ridden by Nicholas 
Schweizer, had promised to be in contention at the 


Both Our Ski Lift (left) and Roman Tent fell at the 16th 
in the Murray Memorial, but neither John Hannum III nor 
Nicholas Schweizer was hurt. Boom Town Bob (#5) 
went on to finish fourth. Top, gray Murray winner Night 
Train Lane was mid-pack behind Cotuit at water jump. 



June 1991 


21 












Neena Ewing 




Douglas Lees 


J.W. DeLozier and Indiantown Maiden cross finish line 
ahead of Leslie Falini on Leocrie to win junior race. Atop 
winner's wagon after the Murray Memorial are (from 
left, top) Nina Strawbridge, Cynthia Murray, Scat, 
Meredith and Billy Meister, Daphne Neilson (with trophy) 
William and Beth Lamotte, Liza Neilson and a friend. 


finish, but both went down at the next to the last obsta¬ 
cle. Counselor's Kids had lost rider Steve Williams at 
the seventh, leaving Boom Town Bob, Cotuit and Lets 
Tango to finish in that order. 

Night Train Lane, an 8-year-old by Kirby Lane— 
Midnight Hush, was making his second sanctioned 
start over timber. Last spring Meister finished second 
on the gray at Fair Hill's Memorial Day meeting. This 
year they won the lightweight timber at the Bran¬ 
dywine (Pa.) point-to-point, then came to Butler for a 
repeat. 

Owner Beth Lamotte of Unionville had been racing 
the horse herself, but got sidelined through injury. "I 
broke my neck on this same horse last spring, and I'm 
told that I can't ride races anymore," said Lamotte sto¬ 
ically. "However, I'm still the exercise girl, so I know 
how well the horse is going. We just might try the Hunt 
Cup." 

The Grand National card was completed with the 
running of the John K. Shaw Memorial, two miles on 
the flat. 

Mimi Voss' homebred Fractious (Compliance— 
Bupersrose), a 5-year-old half-sister to stakes winner 
Mickey Free, led from the drop of starter Patrick Wor- 
rall's flag, easily withstanding Beth Fenwick's chal¬ 
lenge on Dogwood Stable's Make Azilian. Ridden by 
Becky Driver, Fractious crossed the wire with three 


22 


Maryland Horse 
















lengths to spare. Make Azilian was second and Sanna 
Neilson on Augustin Stables' Montand (Chi) third. 

In 1989, Fractious broke her maiden in a $50,000 
claimer at Philadelphia Park and earned over $16,000. 
Started over jumps at Camden (S.C.) in 1990, she was a 
winner the first time out, following with seconds at 
Unionville and Mason-Dixon. 

According to her trainer, the classy chestnut bled 
after a fall at Fair Hill last May, but Voss is confident that 
problem will not hold his horse back this spring. 

Three junior races opened the day's activities, which 
also included a benefit party for the Maryland chapter 
of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. 

Following Elizabeth Voss' medium pony victory, 
Emily Fenwick won the large pony division on J.A. 
Nicely. J.W. DeLozier triumphed in the junior horse 
race, run in memory of Mrs. Hamilton Moses, on Alex 
Campbell's Indiantown Maiden. □ 


Mimi Voss (right) and her sister Janice Larkins display 
trophy won by Voss' homebred Fractious (second left, 
above) in the Shaw Memorial flat race. Ridden by Rebecca 
Driver, the half-sister to stakes winner Mickey Free 
led all the way, with Make Azilian (left) finishing second. 



June 1991 


23 









By Margaret Worrall 


In the tried and true tradition of American timber 
racing, families acted in concert to win at the My Lady's 
Manor Point-to-Point on April 13. 

In the feature event over the three-mile Monkton 
course, Cabral (Chi), ridden by 22-year-old Blythe Mil¬ 
ler and trained by her father Bruce, took the lead early 
and held on to it tenaciously to edge out Joe Gillet on 
his stepfather John Schapiro's Pacific Parley by a 
length. 

In the companion John Rush Streett Memorial for 
maidens, Bruce Fenwick scored a two-length victory 
aboard Maryland-bred Magical, who is trained by his 
wife Patty and owned by Redmond Finney. Second 
was Michael Elmore on Mrs. T.A. Randolph's Tingles 
Image, with Brooks Durkee on Oliver Brown's Crab 
Apple a length back in third. 

Cabral, a strapping, powerful dark brown gelding, 
literally dragged petite Blythe Miller to the front after 
she lost her stirrups over the first fence. 

"I didn't get them back until the third," said Miller, 
breathless with the excitement. "I had hoped to rate 
Cabral back a bit, but he just wouldn't settle until he 
had the lead. We had some very rough moments. He's 
really happier in front." 

Owned by the Old Home Farm partnership of Stitler 
Vipond and Mr. and Mrs. John Frazier, all of Ligonier, 
Pa., Cabral won the John Rush Streett at the Manor in 
1989 under similar rainy conditions and with Miller in 
the saddle. The team repeated its triumph a week later 
at Butler in the B.H. Murray, winning by 15 lengths. 

Because Cabral was competing on an old bowed ten¬ 
don, the decision was made to skip the 1989 Maryland 
Hunt Cup and set the Pennsylvania Hunt Cup in the 
fall as that year's major goal. Unfortunately, Cabral 


Savoring Cabral's victory in the My Lady's Manor 
point-to-point are rider Blythe Miller, whose father Bruce 
trains the Chilean-bred, and co-owner Stitler Vipond. 

The winner was led to the post (opposite) by Anna Rushton. 


bowed in the "good" leg before he could get to that 
race. 

Rested for the 1990 season, Cabral had been fox¬ 
hunted through the winter as preparation for 1991, 
with the Grand National and the Maryland Hunt Cup 
as his defined objectives. 

"If he has all four legs, we'll be there," promised 
owner Nicole Frazier. 

The second-place finisher. Pacific Parley, ridden and 
trained by Joe Gillet, was also very impressive over the 
upright post-and-rails and hills of the Manor. 



24 


Maryland Horse 


Cappy Jackson (2) 

















































Gillet rated the 7-year-old son of ^Hawaii just off the 
pace set by Cabral and Liz McKnight on Cotuit. On the 
galloping stretch parallel to Jarrettsville Pike, Pacific 
Parley and Thomas Ashbridge's The Snow Flaker, rid¬ 
den by Mike Elmore, passed Cotuit and drove up the 
hill to the last two fences in a valiant but vain effort to 
catch Cabral and Miller. 

Cotuit finished fourth, some 30 lengths ahead of 
Anne Moran on Cary Jackson's Quisitor. Three other 


starters—Grape, Dynamite, and Masher Stage Door— 
were fallers while the final entry. Primal Bee, was 
pulled up by rider David DeMichele after being divert¬ 
ed off course by the spill of Masher Stage Door at the 
eighth. 

In the John Rush Streett Memorial, Magical's victory 
was just that. 

A 7-year-old mare by Magic Banner—Dr. Billie, by 
Running Scholar, Magical won over $72,000 in her flat 
racing career. As a 3-year-old, she broke her maiden in 
a $50,000 claimer, then won at Saratoga for the same 
amount, and finished with an allowance victory at Bel¬ 
mont, plus two seconds and five thirds in 15 starts. 

In the next two years, she failed to win a race. Final¬ 
ly, New York owner William C. McMillen Jr., who has 
long had horses with steeplechase trainer Charlie Fen¬ 
wick, elected to try the mare over jumps. She ran twice 
last spring over hurdles and finished last in both at¬ 
tempts. 

"She just didn't seem right," said Charlie Fenwick. 
"We had everyone look at her, and no one could deter¬ 
mine exactly the problem, but it was obvious that 
something was awry." 

Fenwick neighbor and cousin-in-law Redmond Fin¬ 
ney took Magical to his farm to make her a broodmare, 
with the agreement that McMillen would get the first 


26 


Maryland Horse 











\ 



foal in return for the mare. Bred to Hay Halo at 
Sagamore, Magical aborted after 70 days. For lack of 
other alternatives, she then became a hunter for Fen¬ 
wick's 13-year-old daughter Emily. 

"The mare did so well at foxhunting and was look¬ 
ing so great that I agreed to let Bruce and Patty Fenwick 
(Charlie's brother and sister-in-law) take her for a 
point-to-point horse with the idea that we'd breed her 
back in the spring," explained Finney. 

Magical started hors concours in the Founders Cup 
foxhunter race at Howard County-Iron Bridge, cross¬ 
ing the finish line in first place with ease. She followed 
with a second place at Elkridge-Harford in a race sus¬ 
pended and then restarted because of a fallen horse. 
For technical purposes, the Streett Memorial was Mag¬ 
ical's initial competition over a timber course. 

"The idea was to get Bruce another good point-to- 
point horse to get him fit," said Magical's current train¬ 
er, Patty Fenwick. "The mare has turned out to be 
much better than we ever expected. She seems to love 
what she's doing now." 

Indeed, Magical is doing everything right these 
days. As planned, she was returned to Hay Halo this 
spring. An ultrasound examination indicated positive 
results. 

"Now I can't decide whether to be happier at having 
a good timber horse or a good broodmare," said Fin¬ 



Young Will Fenwick entertains his parents, Bruce, who 
won the Streett Memorial on Magical (top), and Patty. 
Opposite, frontrunning Cabral leads Cotuit (#10) and The 
Snow Flaker over the eighth in the My Lady's Manor. 
Below, stewards Duck Martin, Bonsai White and Walter 
Brewster hold a conference over the paddock fence. 

ney. "But it's not too bad a situation to be in. Bruce and 
Patty and Charlie have done a fantastic job with the 
mare." 


June 1991 


27 


Cappy Jackson 










Farm Credit has 
Horse Sense 


Thoroughbred, standardbred, 
saddlebred, 5th wheel trailers, 
yearling sales, standing at stud . . . 
it’s the language of horse breeding, 
and we’ve got to speak it to succeed 
in this area. 


We make all kinds of short and 
long-term loans to horse owners for 
breeding stock, operating expenses, 
whatever you need for your horse 
breeding operation. 

Call or come by today. 

Central Maryland Farm Credit 


Frederick 

925 East St. 
Frederick, 21701 
301/663-4192 


Bel Air 

730 Belair Rd. 
Bel Air, 21014 
301/879-2550 


Hereford 
16938 York Rd. 
Monkton, 21111 
301/329-2179 


FARM CREDITS 

Nobody knows the field better. 




Waiting in the paddock before the My Lady's Manor are 
(top) Anne Moran and Quisitor's owner, Cary Jackson, and 
(below) The Snow Baker's team—rider Michael Elmore, 
owner Thomas Ashbridge III and trainer Mikey Smith wick. 

As the nine runners sorted themselves out. Crab 
Apple, a distinctive roan making his first sanctioned 
start of the season after three wins in Virginia point-to- 
points, settled just behind the early leader, Mrs. Edgar 
Scott's The Wool Merchant, ridden by Anne Moran, 
with Magical in second place. Fenwick hit the throttle 
on Magical to take the lead after the 13th of the 16 
fences, with Crab Apple and The Wool Merchant 
pushing on as well. 

Following the race, Moran remarked that her 10- 
year-old just couldn't maintain the pace at the end. 
Crab Apple, in turn, blasted the last board obstacle, 
leaving the way clear for a come-from-behind rush by 
Mike Elmore on Tingles Image, the trailer throughout 
most of the race, who got up to finish second. 

An accomplished jumper. Tingles Image, a Ran¬ 
dolph homebred by Hurok, is a candidate for the 
Maryland Hunt Cup, according to trainer Mikey 
Smithwick. Although Elmore is still an apprentice 
steeplechase jockey, he has considerable jumping ex¬ 
perience in the show ring world. 

Magical, on the other hand, will head for the Silver 
Cup novice race on Virginia Gold Cup day. 

Five others started in the Streett Memorial, all fin¬ 
ishing except Billy Meister on Sea Speed, who came 
acropper at the 13th. □ 


28 


Maryland Horse 


Douglas Lees (2) 









What's New in Maryland 




Mignon C. Smith received a 
$13,000 cash award, presented by 
J.W.Y. Martin Jr., thanks to the 
accomplishments of her 1989 
Yearling Show entry Conga Tempo. 

Yearling show awards 

Winners of this year's MHBA Year¬ 
ling Show purse were announced at the 
MHBA's awards dinner. 

The leading horses, their exhibitors 
and their 1990 race track earnings are as 
follows: Conga Tempo, Mede Cahaba 
Stable & Stud, $60,736; One Tuff Oop, 
Everett Ayers, $20,210; Traveling Treat, 
Mrs. Gordon L. Wheeler, $16,320; and 
Beaustark Beauty, David P. Reynolds, 
$14,080. 


Each year, a portion of the Maryland 
Fund is appropriated to exhibitors of 
the Yearling Show contestants who 
earn the most while racing as 2-year- 
olds in North America. Current distri¬ 
bution is $13,000 to first place, $4,000 to 
second, $2,000 to third and $1,000 to 
fourth. 

The judge's selections in the show 
have no bearing on the awards and, in 
fact, the top-placing yearlings rarely 
turn out to be top-earning 2-year-olds. 
Only one of this year's purse winners 
was pinned by judge Shug McGaughey 
at the 1989 Yearling Show. Reynolds' 
Beaustark Beauty (Far Out East—Miss 
Beaustark by Graustark) placed fourth 
in Class IV (for fillies foaled in Mary¬ 
land, by out-of-state stallions). 

Mede Cahaba, which submitted 
nine entries—the most of any exhib¬ 
itor—at the 1989 Show, did not earn a 
ribbon with Conga Tempo. But the 
Baederwood—Conga Time by Mongo 
colt flashed genuine talent as a 2-year- 
old, winning the World's Playground 
Stakes at Atlantic City and finishing a 
game second behind the California- 
based Xray in the Crown Central Petro¬ 


leum Maryland Nursery on Maryland 
Million Day. He was the first Maryland- 
bred 2-year-old to win a stakes last sea¬ 
son. 

Mede Cahaba is the stable name for 
Mignon C. Smith, of Birmingham, Ala. 
Ms. Smith, a Washington, D.C., bureau 
chief for an Alabama radio network, 
has bred and raced in Maryland for 
many years. 

Jerkens to judge show 

Hall of Fame trainer H. Allen Jer¬ 
kens will judge the 57th annual Thor¬ 
oughbred Yearling Show sponsored by 
the Maryland Horse Breeders Associa¬ 
tion on June 23 at the Maryland State 
Fairgrounds in Timonium. 

Jerkens, a former Eclipse award win¬ 
ner and, in 1975, the youngest trainer 
ever inducted into Thoroughbred 
racing's Hall of Fame, is best known for 
his stirring upsets of favored champi¬ 
ons, notably Kelso on three occasions 
and Secretariat twice. 

The MHBA Yearling Show, which 
was started in 1932 to help local breed¬ 
ers improve their abilities to select pro¬ 
spective race horses, has most often 
been judged by a successful trainer, ac- 


HUNT CUP PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS 


The 1991 
Maryland 
Hunt Cup 

ON VIDEO 




ALSO AVAILABLE 

MANOR, GRAND NATIONAL, 
HARFORD, MARLBOROUGH 
AND MANY OTHER 
STEEPLECHASE RACES 

Please contact: 

Sam Slater (215) 383-4155 
P.O. Box 202, Unionville, PA 19375 


June 1991 


29 














cording to Rich Wilcke, executive vice- 
president. 

"We're glad to have Allen Jerkens 
join our prestigious list of previous 
judges, which begins with Sunny Jim 
Fitzsimmons in 1932," said Wilcke. 

The MHBA Yearling Show is open to 
the public and begins at 10 a.m. in the 
horse show ring at the north gate to the 
Maryland State Fairgrounds on York 
Road in Timonium. For entry informa¬ 
tion call (301) 252-2100. 

Farrier/veterinarian directory 

The Maryland Farriers Association 
has prepared a directory listing all far¬ 
riers and equine veterinarians in Mary¬ 
land. For a copy, send $1 to the MFA, 
P.O. Box 779, Cascade, Md. 21719. 

Auction schedule expands 

A summer 2-year-olds in training 
and horses of racing age auction has 
been added to Fasig-Tipton Midiantic's 
schedule of auction sales at Timonium. 
The sale, to take place July 21, was "for¬ 
mulated as a direct response to sugges¬ 
tions made by our consignors," said T. 
Mason Grasty, Fasig-Tipton executive 
vice-president. "It is an opportune time 
for purchasers to buy 2-year-olds ready 
to go on with their racing careers." 

All 2-year-olds offered will be re¬ 
quired to work at least three-quarters of 
a mile and must be starting gate ap¬ 
proved. 

Green Spring hunter pace 

A large and enthusiastic group of 
foxhunters participated in the Green 
Spring Valley Hounds hunter pace 
event on April 7 in Upperco. 

In a hunter pace, teams of any size 
(two minimum) attempt to complete 
the course in either the fastest time or 
the time closest to the pre-set optimum 
time (14:12 at Green Spring). Three 
teams opted for fast time while 23 com¬ 
peted for the optimum. 

Fastest were George Mahoney and 
Irv Naylor, who finished in 9:56. They 
were followed by Sheila Williams and 
Jack Fisher, with the Lee McGehee 
team third. 

Vic Hencken and Kathleen Snyder's 
time of 14:07 placed them first in the 
optimum division, over the Redmond 
Finney-Fenwick-Merryman team. Erica 
Caplan and Becky Barnett finished 


30 


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MYOTHERAPY 

is a form of trigger point therapy which 
releases spasm. If your equine athlete 
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muscular aspect of the problem. 

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P.O. Box 1754. Westminster. MD 21157 
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Maryland Horse 























third and the Marr-Howard team 
fourth. 

Flannery works at Saratoga 

This year's summer exhibition at the 
National Museum of Racing and Hall of 
Fame, "Summer Scenes: Paintings by 
Vaughn Flannery/' will feature works 
by a well-known Maryland artist. 

Opening June 22, the show will be 
on view in the special exhibition gallery 
through October 15. The paintings will 
be on loan from the collections of Mr. 
and Mrs. John Gaines, Mrs. John M. 
Gaver, Mrs. Walter M. Jeffords, Harry 
Stevens, Alfred Vanderbilt and Mrs. 
John Hay Whitney. They depict a vari¬ 
ety of racing scenes, farms and tracks, 
including Pimlico, Sagamore, Aiken, 


Saratoga and Greentree, as well as fa¬ 
mous horses such as Man o' War. 

Born in 1898, Flannery spent his 
childhood in Kentucky. He developed 
an interest in art when his mother gave 
him pastels for amusement while re¬ 
covering from diphtheria. In 1929 he 
bought a farm in Maryland and began 
breeding race horses. Flannery soon 
considered Maryland his home and, as 
a member of the Maryland Jockey Club, 
he came to feel that the Preakness was a 
superior race to the Kentucky Derby. 

This year's tribute to Flannery is the 
second in the museum's history. The 
first, "The Maryland Horse" in 1969, 
dealt only with Flannery's images of 
what he considered his home state. 
This year's exhibition will explore a 


wide range of the artist's interest. As 
part of the museum's permanent dis¬ 
play, the Flannery painting "Fitzsim¬ 
mons Saddling the Wheatley-Stone En¬ 
try" can be seen year round. 



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(301) 592-8529 



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Short Stirrup to Grand Prix. 
Show jackets tailored for boys. 

Schooling outfits. 
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Featuring a full line of pony 
equipment: bits, bridles, girths, 
saddles, and more. 


Call for our brochure. 


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Owings Mills, MD 21117 
301-581-0800 

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STANDING OVATION 


June 1991 


31 


























Maryland Stallion Rankings 


Maryland's Leading Active Sires in 1991 

(Statistics compiled by Bloodstock Research Information Services. They include racing of May 2.) 



Runners 

Starts 

Winners 

Races 

Won 

Earnings 

%Winners/ 

Starters 

Avg.l 

Start 

Avg.l 

Runner 

Caveat . 

. 69 

299 

26 

31 

$460,885 

37.7 

$1,541 

$ 6,679 

Baederwood. 

. 56 

252 

30 

50 

444,542 

53.6 

1,764 

7,938 

Oh Say. 

. 54 

258 

30 

44 

419,370 

55.6 

1,625 

7,766 

Deputed Testamony. 

. 48 

212 

22 

39 

413,674 

45.8 

1,951 

8,618 

Shelter Half. 

. 52 

235 

25 

41 

381,685 

48.1 

1,624 

7,340 

Horatius . 

. 61 

272 

26 

36 

375,444 

42.6 

1,380 

6,155 

Thirty Eight Paces. 

. 44 

199 

20 

23 

355,548 

45.5 

1,787 

8,081 

Aloma's Ruler . 

. 52 

234 

26 

38 

303,790 

50.0 

1,298 

5,842 

John Alden . 

. 45 

219 

18 

26 

280,927 

40.0 

1,283 

6,243 

Smarten . 

. 48 

183 

18 

22 

279,284 

37.5 

1,526 

5,818 

Believe the Queen. 

. 25 

88 

13 

20 

274,282 

52.0 

3,117 

10,971 

Hail Emperor. 

. 42 

190 

17 

26 

263,752 

40.5 

1,388 

6,280 

Lord Gaylord. 

. 39 

152 

14 

19 

261,685 

35.9 

1,722 

6,710 

Two Punch. 

. 19 

74 

8 

12 

207,522 

42.1 

2,804 

10,922 

Parfaitement. 

. 32 

118 

14 

21 

196,097 

43.8 

1,662 

6,128 

Salutely . 

. 28 

122 

12 

15 

187,136 

42.9 

1,534 

6,683 

Allen's Prospect . 

. 26 

105 

6 

7 

182,888 

23.1 

1,742 

7,034 

Double Zeus . 

. 50 

245 

17 

23 

181,046 

34.0 

739 

3,621 

Clever Champ . 

. 26 

118 

14 

20 

174,750 

53.8 

1,481 

6,721 

Dancing Count .. 

. 33 

129 

13 

24 

173,739 

39.4 

1,347 

5,265 

Silver Badge . 

. 18 

72 

5 

10 

173,631 

27.8 

2,412 

9,646 

Assault Landing . 

. 35 

166 

10 

15 

155,041 

28.6 

934 

4,430 

Carnivalay . 

. 28 

114 

11 

14 

145,113 

39.3 

1,273 

5,183 

Rollicking . 

. 34 

159 

12 

20 

136,013 

35.3 

855 

4,000 

Iron. 

. 29 

146 

13 

15 

123,786 

44.8 

848 

4,268 

Northern Raja. 

. 20 

86 

6 

11 

109,061 

30.0 

1,268 

5,453 

Travelling Music . 

. 29 

144 

11 

15 

108,273 

37.9 

752 

3,734 

North Tower . 

. 21 

114 

8 

11 

101,534 

38.1 

891 

4,835 

Hasty Spring . 

. 28 

144 

10 

19 

101,170 

35.7 

703 

3,613 

Marine Brass . 

. 16 

69 

10 

12 

96,123 

62.5 

1,393 

6,008 

Poles Apart . 

. 7 

37 

5 

8 

93,616 

71.4 

2,530 

13,374 

Brilliant Protege . 

. 22 

104 

8 

12 

88,649 

36.4 

852 

4,030 


Maryland's Leading Active Sires Lifetime 

(Statistics compiled by Bloodstock Research Information Services. They include racing of May 2.) 



Runners 

Starts 

Winners 

Races 

Won 

Earnings 

%Winners/ 

Starters 

Avg.l 

Start 

Avg.l 

Runner 

Rollicking . 

. 311 

10,060 

265 

1,505 

$14,563,000 

85.2 

$1,448 

$46,826 

Lord Gaylord. 

. 234 

4,668 

186 

775 

10,594,700 

79.5 

2,270 

45,277 

Dancing Count. 

. 301 

7,359 

241 

1,037 

9,754,420 

80.1 

1,326 

32,407 

Smarten. 

. 210 

4,400 

161 

650 

9,681,350 

76.7 

2,200 

46,102 

Horatius. 

. 215 

4,820 

167 

629 

7,348,320 

77.7 

1,525 

34,178 

Shelter Half . 

. 154 

3,449 

120 

515 

6,529,520 

77.9 

1,893 

42,399 

Caveat . 

. 136 

2,243 

91 

252 

5,157,000 

66.9 

2,299 

37,919 

Friend's Choice . 

. 157 

5,235 

125 

697 

5,093,040 

79.6 

973 

32,440 

John Alden . 

. 120 

2,710 

87 

334 

5,008,270 

72.5 

1,848 

41,736 

Anticipating . 

. 138 

4,173 

98 

557 

4,715,800 

71.0 

1,130 

34,172 

Christopher R . 

. 192 

4,845 

141 

663 

4,686,780 

73.4 

967 

24,410 

Oh Say. 

. 137 

2,341 

107 

326 

4,321,980 

78.1 

1,846 

31,547 

Double Zeus. 

. 154 

3,897 

114 

461 

4,215,470 

74.0 

1,082 

27,373 

Double Edge Sword. 

. 150 

5,053 

110 

500 

3,900,430 

73.3 

772 

26,003 

Silver Badge. 

. 177 

4,754 

121 

446 

3,785,260 

68.4 

796 

21,386 


32 


Maryland Horse 




















































Races %Winnersl Avg.l Avg.l 



Runners 

Starts 

Winners 

Won 

Earnings 

Starters 

Start 

Runner 

Baederwood. 

. 119 

2,112 

87 

284 

3,160,860 

73.1 

1,497 

26,562 

Thirty Eight Paces. 

. 79 

1,317 

59 

200 

3,150,630 

74.7 

2,392 

39,881 

Aloma's Ruler. 

. 143 

2,526 

109 

339 

3,077,960 

76.2 

1,219 

21,524 

Salutely. 

. 62 

1,619 

50 

236 

2,700,990 

80.6 

1,668 

43,564 

Jolly Johu. 

. 96 

2,664 

70 

312 

2,700,040 

72.9 

1,014 

28,125 

Fuzzbuster. 

. 104 

2,831 

83 

370 

2,533,550 

79.8 

895 

24,361 

Hail Emperor. 

. 95 

1,852 

62 

234 

2,496,720 

65.3 

1,348 

26,281 

Deputed Testamony. 

. 73 

1,220 

51 

173 

2,447,070 

69.9 

2,006 

33,522 

Sir Ivor Again. 

. 46 

1,086 

31 

155 

2,380,600 

67.4 

2,192 

51,752 

Brilliant Protege. 

. 102 

2,383 

68 

252 

2,357,650 

66.7 

989 

23,114 

Full Intent. 

. 63 

1,625 

49 

269 

2,256,680 

77.8 

1,389 

35,820 

North Tower. 

. 122 

2,472 

91 

312 

1,965,390 

74.6 

795 

16,110 

Travelling Music. 

. 98 

1,738 

69 

230 

1,859,400 

70.4 

1,070 

18,973 

Providential (Ire). 

. 96 

1,240 

56 

149 

1,640,070 

58.3 

1,323 

17,084 

North Pole. 

. 78 

1,302 

51 

189 

1,535,860 

65.4 

1,180 

19,690 

Eager Native. 

. 68 

1,491 

46 

192 

1,477,790 

67.6 

991 

21,732 

Parfaitement. 

. 79 

1,239 

68 

178 

1,449,560 

86.1 

1,170 

18,349 

Carnivalay. 

. 42 

511 

28 

69 

1,448,570 

66.7 

2,835 

34,490 

Northern Raja . 

. 55 

1,072 

38 

122 

1,364,840 

69.1 

1,273 

24,815 

Buck Hill. 

. 100 

1,874 

62 

167 

1,362,890 

62.0 

727 

13,629 

Believe the Queen. 

. 54 

678 

42 

96 

1,343,050 

77.8 

1,981 

24,871 

Rio Carmelo (Fr) . 

. 89 

1,504 

51 

158 

1,266,880 

57.3 

842 

14,235 

Quartermaster. 

. 81 

1,671 

64 

238 

1,245,980 

79.0 

746 

15,382 

Assault Landing. 

. 67 

1,123 

46 

127 

1,218,200 

68.7 

1,085 

18,182 

Coppabarb. 

. 62 

1,542 

48 

1% 

1,018,340 

77.4 

660 

16,425 

Authenticity. 

. 47 

1,208 

37 

188 

981,942 

78.7 

813 

20,892 

Pilot Ship. 

. 38 

545 

18 

59 

953,159 

47.4 

1,749 

25,083 

Hasty Spring. 

. 66 

1,362 

38 

114 

903,320 

57.6 

663 

13,687 

Blues Parade. 

. 53 

1,112 

34 

95 

857,009 

64.2 

771 

16,170 


Maryland's Leading Active 2-Year-Old Sires Lifetime 

(Statistics compiled by Bloodstock Research Information Services. They include racing of May 2.) 






Races 


% Winners! 

Avg.l 

Avg.l 


Runners 

Starts 

Winners 

Won 

Earnings 

Starters 

Start 

Runner 

Rollicking. 

. 205 

1,009 

103 

191 

$2,737,530 

50.2 

$2,713 

$13,354 

Smarten. 

. 133 

551 

53 

76 

1,868,920 

39.8 

3,392 

14,052 

Lord Gaylord. 

. 78 

274 

37 

59 

1,079,510 

47.4 

3,940 

13,840 

Shelter Half. 

. 79 

351 

42 

74 

1,031,590 

53.2 

2,939 

13,058 

Baederwood. 

. 60 

275 

27 

49 

824,064 

45.0 

2,997 

13,734 

Caveat. 

. 84 

359 

24 

34 

795,228 

28.6 

2,215 

9,467 

Oh Say. 

. 56 

204 

20 

28 

673,204 

35.7 

3,300 

12,022 

Dancing Count. 

. 118 

486 

54 

67 

630,038 

45.8 

1,296 

5,339 

Horatius. 

. 113 

434 

43 

63 

577,067 

38.1 

1,330 

5,107 

Aloma's Ruler. 

. 70 

288 

31 

38 

530,502 

44.3 

1,842 

7,579 

Christopher R. 

. 94 

394 

40 

54 

490,843 

42.6 

1,246 

5,222 

Thirty Eight Paces. 

. 30 

105 

8 

12 

470,387 

26.7 

4,480 

15,680 

John Alden. 

. 72 

306 

26 

35 

407,059 

36.1 

1,330 

5,654 

Silver Badge. 

. 102 

414 

27 

38 

406,054 

26.5 

981 

3,981 

Allen's Prospect. 

. 26 

111 

14 

18 

398,120 

53.8 

3,587 

15,312 

North Pole. 

. 45 

185 

16 

22 

388,026 

35.6 

2,097 

8,623 

Anticipating. 

. 66 

250 

19 

27 

289,966 

28.8 

1,160 

4,393 

Double Zeus. 

. 72 

276 

25 

33 

288,587 

34.7 

1,046 

4,008 

Two Punch. 

. 20 

86 

13 

17 

270,864 

65.0 

3,150 

13,543 

Salutely. 

. 35 

137 

12 

18 

267,898 

34.3 

1,955 

7,654 

Assault Landing. 

. 47 

206 

17 

23 

263,360 

36.2 

1,278 

5,603 

Double Edge Sword. 

. 85 

370 

26 

30 

255,865 

30.6 

692 

3,010 

Hail Emperor. 

. 57 

225 

18 

24 

250,510 

31.6 

1,113 

4,395 

Carnivalay. 

. 22 

112 

9 

12 

242,601 

40.9 

2,166 

11,027 

Fuzzbuster. 

. 56 

287 

23 

27 

227,636 

41.1 

793 

4,065 

Friend's Choice. 

. 69 

304 

19 

22 

223,578 

27.5 

735 

3,240 

Pilot Ship. 

. 20 

86 

5 

9 

218,970 

25.0 

2,546 

10,949 

Travelling Music. 

. 43 

161 

21 

24 

217,964 

48.8 

1,354 

5,069 

Providential (Ire). 

. 42 

157 

15 

18 

216,545 

35.7 

1,379 

5,156 

Jolly Johu. 

. 42 

194 

16 

25 

215,354 

38.1 

1,110 

5,127 

North Tower. 

. 47 

185 

21 

26 

201,781 

44.7 

1,091 

4,293 

Deputed Testamony. 

. 43 

170 

8 

11 

190,405 

18.6 

1,120 

4,428 

Brilliant Protege. 

. 48 

1% 

14 

22 

183,5% 

29.2 

937 

3,825 

Quartermaster. 

. 36 

159 

14 

21 

175,170 

38.9 

1,102 

4,866 

Clever Champ. 

. 25 

109 

11 

14 

152,739 

44.0 

1,401 

6,110 

Parfaitement. 

. 40 

129 

14 

18 

152,449 

35.0 

1,182 

3,811 


June 1991 


33 







































































. 


Neena Ewing 

















Jack Fisher dominates 
preliminary hunt meets 

By Margaret Worrall 


Ivain or shine. Jack Fisher-trained and ridden 
horses dominated Maryland's early spring point-to- 
points, winning six of the ten timber contests carded 
and finishing second in another. 

On a cold, sodden March 23 at Howard County-Iron 
Bridge, 27-year-old Fisher began his campaign aboard 
Sheila Williams' classically bred Shining Beacon (Ma¬ 
jestic Light—Trouver, by Buckfinder) in the Howard 
County Cup. 

Joe Gillet on Pacific Parley and Steve Williams on 
Aristoskip led the way, with Fisher next and the re¬ 
mainder of the eight-horse field strung out behind. 
The three leaders all picked up speed as they raced into 
the final two jumps of the three-mile course, but Shin¬ 
ing Beacon gained the advantage in the uphill drive to 
the wire, besting Pacific Parley by a length and a half, 
with Aristoskip just back in third. 

Two weeks later, at Elkridge-Harford on April 6, 
Shining Beacon was equally impressive under sunny 
skies and summertime temperatures. 

In the second division of the George C. Clement 
novice timber event, Fisher galloped home an easy 25- 
length winner over Let's Tango of the Obrecht-Brew- 
ster Stable and Frank Bonsai's High As Paul, the only 
other finishers in the six-horse field. 

And Fisher duplicated that feat at both race meets 
with another of Sheila Williams' runners, a 5-year-old 
son of Chati named Gus's Boy. 

At Howard County, Gus's Boy took the lead at the 
drop of the flag for the Alda Clark Challenge Plate and 
easily withstood the final challenge of Tom Ash- 
bridge's Boom Town Bob, who wound up two lengths 
back in second, with Billy Santoro on his own 
Crowned Monarch third. 

Jack Fisher trained and rode Sheila Williams' Shining 
Beacon to victory in a division of the Clement Memorial at 
Elkridge-Harford (left) two weeks after they captured 
the Howard County Cup on a cold and wet Saturday (right). 


Gus's Boy was again the frontrunner at Elkridge- 
Harford, comfortably winning the first division of the 
Clement Memorial. However, circumstances made 
this victory less conclusive. 

Kasai, ridden and trained by Brad MacKinnon, 
dwelled at the start of the Clement, and then had a 
crashing fall at the third fence. Because there is only 
one place to cross the hard-surfaced driveway, the 



June 1991 


35 


Cappy Jackson 







Cappy Jackson (4) 


Although she finished sixth in her debut as a jockey, 
Sheila Williams (right) took home the Howard County Cup, 
thanks to Shining Beacon and Jack Fisher. Enjoying 
Roman Tent's score in the heavyweight race are (from left, 
below) Jack Fisher, Lehr Jackson, Tim, Nicholas and 
Barbara Schweizer. Middle, small pony division goes to 
the post. Bottom, Marilyn Commer, Dr. Roger Scullin 
and Malcolm Commer celebrate the latter's victory in the 
Founders Cup. From the top, opposite: Becky Driver 
gets Caveat Fumator home first in the Linton Mile; Bill 
Santoro and Crowned Monarch hold a temporary lead over 
Jack Fisher on Gus's Boy in the Alda Clark; Joe Gillet 
tells John Schapiro about his winning ride on Val d'Argent. 




field, now reduced to eight, was forced to pull up on 
the second circuit while MacKinnon was placed in an 
ambulance. (MacKinnon suffered facial fractures and 
is now recovering at his home in Jarrettsville. Kasai 
was unhurt.) 

After a wait of several minutes, riders were given 
the choice of retiring or having another start in front of 
the second fence and continuing for one more circuit. 
All but Joe Gillet on Malcolm Commer's Manor Maid 
chose to go on. 

Gus's Boy once again took the lead and had it all his 
own way, defeating Bruce Fenwick on Magical and 
John Bosley on Fred the Welder, who were second and 
third. 

Unfortunately for the competition, Fisher still 
wasn't finished winning at either meet. 

Fisher-trained Roman Tent, owned by Tim Schwei¬ 
zer and Lehr Jackson and ridden by the former's son 
Nicholas, survived a foul claim by owner/trainer/rider 
Steve Williams, aboard Architecture, to win the own¬ 
er-rider heavyweight race at Howard County-Iron 
Bridge. 

And Fisher notched yet another victory with his 
mother's superb 6-year-old bay gelding Revelstoke in 
Elkridge-Harford's Edward S. Voss open timber. Com¬ 
ing from just off the pace, Fisher drove through the 
uphill finish ten lengths to the good of 1990 timber 
champion Joe's O.K. Veteran Capital K. finished third. 

Sheila Williams made her first start over jumps in 
the Howard County Cup on Dover Ridge Farm's Free 
Runner, trained by the ubiquitous Fisher, finishing 


36 


Maryland Horse 









sixth. Said Williams, "My goal was to stay out of trou¬ 
ble, but I really enjoyed the race." 

Williams and Free Runner returned at Elkridge- 
Harford in the Babe Saportas Memorial ladies timber. 
In serious contention this trip, Williams set the pace, 
opening up a 20-length margin on the first circuit. But 
Liz McKnight (a great-niece of the late Babe Saportas) 
bided her time on Pleasant Sea, kicking into gear over 
the last fence and cruising by Free Runner to a four- 
length score. Another 25 lengths back was 15-year-old 
Big Conoy, ridden by Patty Fenwick. 

Spectators at the Marlborough Hunt Races on April 
7, the day after Elkridge-Harford, enjoyed equally 
beautiful weather while participants benefited from 
Jack Fisher's absence. 

The glory was equitably dispersed, with no one 
trainer, owner or rider dominating the hotly contested 
events. And there was no dearth of contestants, three 
of the nine races carded requiring two divisions. 

Greg Ryan was the winning jockey on Alicia Mur¬ 
phy-trained Circuit Bar in division one of the Raborg 
maiden hurdle. In the second flight, Danny War¬ 
rington rode Bruce Davidson-owned and trained Cas¬ 
tle Keepsake to a two-length victory. 

One of the happiest people on the grounds was pad- 
dock judge Jervis Marshall. Circuit Bar and Alison Far- 
well's Tall Choice, winner of the second division of the 
maiden flat, are both 4-year-old sons of Mokhieba, 
who stands at Marshall's Whitehackle Farm in Upper- 
co. 

The feature race, an open hurdle event run in mem¬ 
ory of John D. Bowling, made up in quality what it 




37 


June 1991 


Cappy Jackson (3) 












lacked in size. Only five horses went to the post but, 
after nearly two miles, all five came over the final fence 
together. Mrs. Miles Valentine's Smokey Native and 
Doug Worrall's E.V.'s Big Shot battled through the 
stretch, with Smokey Native edging off to win by half a 
length. 

The John Murray Begg Memorial open timber was 
even closer. Across the backside of the three-mile 
route, Greg Ryan opened up a lead on the Virginia 
invader, Dr. Blase, stalked inexorably by Steve 
Williams and the diminutive Aristoskip. Leaving the 
rest of the field, the two fought it out, Dr. Blase eventu¬ 
ally claiming the win by a whisker. 

An outlaw on the flat tracks. Dr. Blase won several 
point-to-point hurdle races before turning to timber 
this season. The 10-year-old gelding, owned by Wolver 


Hill Farm and trained by Charles Cornwell, had 1991 
wins at Casanova and Blue Ridge in Virginia prior to 
his Marlborough score. 

The Benjamin H.C. Bowie novice timber race went 
to Chrissy Keys Cockburn's Eternally Irish, ridden and 
trained by her husband Bay. Steve Williams' Architec¬ 
ture picked up his second placing of the season and 
Herb Sheppard's Commanding Dance was a nose back 
in the show position. 

A sparkling moment on the Maryland spring jump 
circuit was the victory of University of Maryland 
equine economist Malcolm Commer on Manor Maid in 
the Howard County-Iron Bridge Founders Cup. 

Despite giving weight to most of his competition, 
Commer was also the first person over 40 to cross the 
wire as well as the first finishing member of Howard 






County-Iron Bridge Hounds. "And remember/' said 
the gleeful Commer, a native of Memphis, Tenn., "I 
never jumped a fence until two years ago." □ 

Howard County-Iron Bridge (March 23 ) 

Linton Mile, about one mile on the flat. Time 1:56. 1. 
Phoenix Stable's Caveat Fumator (Caveat—Swan); trainer 
Thomas Voss; rider Rebecca Driver. 2. Ann Merry man's Po¬ 
litical Profit; same; Matt McCarron. 3. Stephen C. Clark Jr.'s 
Thurston Hill; D.M. Smithwick; Alex White. Also ran: Wild 
Response, Boat Girl, Brandy's Child. 

Howard County Cup, about three miles over timber. Time 
5:55. 1. Sheila Williams' Shining Beacon (Majestic Light— 
Trouver); trainer/rider Jack Fisher. 2. John Schapiro's Pacific 
Parley; trainer/rider Joe Gillet. 3. R.S. Williams' Aristoskip; 
trainer/rider same. Also ran: Daily Desire, My Happy Way, 
Free Runner, Gesticulate, Ya Wannabid. 


Meriwether, about one and one-half miles on the flat; 
riders limited to members of ARCA. Time 2:02. 1. Labadie 
Mill Farm's Val d'Argent (Val de 1'Orne-Fr—Glittering Leg¬ 
end); trainer Dr. William Wright; rider Joe Gillet. 2. Jesse M. 
Henley Jr.'s Johnny Garland; Thomas Voss; Rebecca Driver. 
3. Sharon Clark's Dandy; same; Liz Collard. Also ran: Sabas, 
Rushwin, Mucho Carino (Chi), Gibson Island, Kasai. 

Cattail River Pony Races. Small division —1. Hobby Horse 
May Fly; rider Leigh Offutt. 2. Natalie; Kelly Conaway. 3. 
Gambi; Sabrina Morris. Also ran: Pollyanna, Molly McButter 
(lost rider). Medium division —1. Scuttlebutt; rider Kevin Sel¬ 
by. 2. Thistledown; Elizabeth Voss. 3. Famley Whist; Ashley 
Farland. Also ran: Phantom of the Opera, Mistletoe, Oakie 
Dokie. Large division —1.Cindy Lou; rider Jonathan Kiser. 2. 
Somerset; Casey Hinsdale. 3. Georgie; Nicole Williams. Also 
ran: El Coffey, Pebbles, Andrena, Zsa Zsa. 

Alda Clark Challenge Plate, about three miles over tim¬ 
ber for novice horses. Time 6:16. 1. Sheila Williams' Gus's 



Jack Fisher on Gus's Boy leads John Bosley and Fred 
the Welder over the second in first division of the Clement. 
Kasai (#13) fell with Brad MacKinnon at the next fence. 


Neena Ewing 










Ld 

td 

t_| | j 





Boy (Chati—Hatta); trainer/rider Jack Fisher. 2. Mrs. Thomas 
Ashbridge's Boom Town Bob; D.M. Smithwick; Mike 
Elmore. 3. William Santoro's Crowned Monarch; trainer/rid¬ 
er same. Also ran: Snow Maker, Beach Builder, Counselor's 
Kids. 

Owner-Rider Heavyweight Race, about three miles over 
timber for fairly hunted horses; 180 lbs. minimum. Time 
6:18.1. Schweizer-Jackson Stable's Roman Tent (Hail Emper¬ 
or—Cracker's Tribute); trainer Jack Fisher; rider Nicholas 
Schweizer. 2. R.S. Williams' Architecture; trainer/rider 
same. 3. John Beasley's First Throne; trainer/rider same. Also 
ran: Dudley Doright. 

Founders Cup, about three miles over timber for foxhun- 
ters. Time 7:24. 1. Malcolm Commer's Manor Maid (Talk 
About Luck—Redemptorist); trainer/rider same. 2. Frank 
Bonsai's High as Paul; same; Jeffrey Schlesinger. 3. Louise 
Siegert's Charley; trainer/rider same. Also ran: Magical 
Touch, Northeast Form, Amber, Party Fool, Snow Crest, 
Touchy. 



Appropriately enough, Liz McKnight (above) took the 
ladies race named for her great-aunt. Babe Saportas, with 
Pleasant Sea. In the Voss open timber (top), Revelstoke 
and Jack Fisher show the way for Joe's O.K. (#8), Kevino 
(gray) and Capital K. Opposite, members of ARCA 
compete in the Christmas flat race, won by Fractious. 


Elkridge-Harford (April 6) 

Lurman Stewart Memorial, one mile on the flat for maid¬ 
ens. Division one —Time l:45 4 /s. 1. D.M. Smith wick's Kings- 
clere (Clever Champ—Wine Scandal); trainer same; rider 
Alex White. 2. Isabelle de Tomaso's Irish Club Trick; Audrey 
Riker; Terry Erickson. 3. Southern Oaks Farm's Peach's Pros¬ 
pect; Edwin Merryman; Beth Fenwick. Also ran: Best Taste, 
Navigate. Division two —Time 1:45V5. 1. Perry Bolton's My 
Last Affair (Ultramate—Stone Ginger); trainer/rider Joe Gil- 
let. 2. Robert Ingham's Military Pride; trainer/rider R.S. 
Williams. 3. Robert Nields' Nick Nijinsky; Louis Neilson III; 
Ed Graham. Also ran: Such, Captain Montbars, Softie Mai, 
Bronze Angle. 

Edward S. Voss Memorial, three miles over timber. Time 
6:00 2 /s. 1. Mrs. J.R.S. Fisher's Revelstoke (Smarten—Per- 
ahim-Fr); trainer/rider Jack Fisher. 2. Mrs. Oliver Keelan's 
Joe's O.K.; Alicia Murphy; John Bosley. 3. Rosedale Stable's 
Capital K.; Janet Elliot; Joe Gillet. Also ran: Counselor's Kids, 
Kevino (GB). 

A.P. Smithwick Junior/Pony Dashes. Small division — 1. 
Natalie; rider Kelly Conaway. 2. Elfin Blue Magic; Mandy 
Howes. 3. Pollyanna; Jamie Yeager. Medium division —1. 
Thistledown; rider Elizabeth Voss. 2. Okie; Britt Steele. 3. 
Mistletoe; Josh Horner II. Large division —1. J.A. Nicely; rider 
Emily Fenwick. 2. Taboo; Danielle Brewster. 3. Cindy Lou; 
Jonathan Kiser. Also ran: Raining Diamonds, Somerset, Zsa 
Zsa, Georgie. Junior horse division —1. Dust Devil; rider Rene 
Phillips. 2. Rollin Slew; Charles Conaway III. 

George C. Clement Memorial, three miles over timber for 
novice horses. Division one —1. Sheila Williams' Gus's Boy 
(Chati—Hatta); trainer/rider Jack Fisher. 2. William 
McMillen's Magical; Patricia Fenwick; Bruce Fenwick. 3. Eliz¬ 
abeth Bird's Fred the Welder; same; John Bosley. Also ran: 
Roman Tent, Snow Maker, Our First Venture, Kasai (fell), 
Hornblower (fell). Manor Maid (did not finish). Division 
two —Time 5:52. 1. Sheila Williams' Shining Beacon (Majestic 
Light—Trouver); trainer/rider Jack Fisher. 2. Obrecht-Brews- 
ter Stable's Lets Tango; Toinette Neilson; Louis Neilson III. 3. 
Frank Bonsai's High as Paul; same; Jeffrey Schlesinger. Also 


40 


Maryland Horse 



















ran: Ya Wannabid, Dexter Manley, Crowned Monarch, Flori¬ 
da Law. 

B. Frank Christmas Memorial, one mile on the flat; riders 
limited to members of ARCA. Time 1:42. 1. Mrs. Thomas 
Voss' Fractious (Compliance—Bupersrose); trainer Thomas 
Voss; rider Rebecca Driver. 2. Sarah Merryman's Princely 
Rooster; Edwin Merryman; Joe Gillet. 3. Stephen C. Clark 
Jr.'s Oficio (Chi); D.M. Smithwick; Alex White. Also ran: 
Larking's Hope, Key to the Dungeon, Silver Icecapade, Em¬ 
brace Her, Peace of the Rock, No Fat Chicks. 

Babe Saportas Memorial, three miles over timber for 
ladies. 1. H.T. McKnight's Pleasant Sea (Pleasant Colony— 
Wicked Sea); trainer same; rider Elizabeth McKnight. 2. 
Dover Ridge Farm's Free Runner; Jack Fisher; Sheila 
Williams. 3. Bruce Fenwick's Big Conoy; trainer/rider Patricia 
Fenwick. Also ran: Party Fool, Northeast Form (pulled up). 

Marlborough (April 7) 

William H. Brooke Memorial, about one mile on the flat 
for maidens. Purse $500. Division one —Time 1:56. 1. Mrs. 
Rodion Cantacuzene's Menace (Shelter Half—Lady Gantlet); 
trainer Ridgely White; rider Hilary Thorpe. 2. Mrs. A.C. 
Randolph's Bidder 7 s Lov; D.M. Smithwick Jr.; Colvin Ryan. 3. 
F.B. Miller's Plural; same; Blythe Miller. Also ran: Liam Ma¬ 
gee, Casablanca Memory, Hi Ed, Amateus, Sea Surge. Divi¬ 
sion two —Time l:53 3 /s. 1. Alison Farwell's Tall Choice (Mok- 
hieba—Man's Choice); trainer Michael Moran; rider Nora 
Sadler. 2. James Steele's Sutton Bank; trainer/rider Dennis 
Logan. 3. Roy McDaniel's Artillery; same; Mike Gordon. 
Also ran: Black Sea Dancer, Taxi, Fight Talk, Brandy's Child, 
Raleigh's Track, Runaway Mirage. 

Raborg Maiden, about one and one-half miles over hur¬ 
dles. Purse $750. Division one —Time 2:507s. Michael Mur¬ 
phy's Circuit Bar (Mokhieba—Bar Fus); trainer Alicia Mur¬ 
phy; rider Colvin Ryan. 2. Bruno Favre's Run to Court; 
trainer/rider same. 3. Stephen C. Clark Jr.'s Thurston Hill; 
D.M. Smithwick; Peter Walsh. Also ran: Assignment 
Abroad, Paul's Caviar (fell). Pride of My Girl (fell). More 
Than a Friend (pulled up). Division two —Time 2:54 3 /s. 1. 
Bruce Davidson's Castle Keepsake (*Slady Castle—Silent Su¬ 
perstar); trainer same; rider Danny Warrington. 2. Mrs. V.K. 
Payson's Vast Master; F.B. Miller; Blythe Miller. 3. Patricia 
Ward's Charly Come Lately; Alicia Murphy; Colvin Ryan. 
Also ran: Mucho Carino (Chi), Lil Mark, Alphamatic, Never 
Golden (fell). 

Benjamin H.C. Bowie Memorial, about three miles over 
timber for novice horses. Purse $750. Time 6:12 2 /s. 1. Chrissy 
Cockburn's Eternally Irish (Sicalu-Ire—Chic Alors); trainer/ 
rider Bay Cockburn. 2. R.S. Williams' Architecture; trainer/ 
rider same. 3. D. Herbert Sheppard's Commanding Dance; 
Douglas Worrall; C.J. Meister III. Also ran: Boom Town Bob, 
Son of the Sun (lost rider), Maui Boy (fell), Kool Mars, Cool 
David (pulled up), Zaphir (NZ). 

John D. Bowling Memorial, about two miles over hur¬ 
dles. Purse $1,500. Time 3:55 2 /s. 1. Mrs. Miles Valentine's 
Smokey Native (Our Native—Smokey Spender); trainer 
Russell Carrier; rider Peter Walsh. 2. Douglas Worrall's E. V.'s 
Big Shot; same; Colvin Ryan. 3. D.M. Smith wick's Gibson 
Island; same; Mike Elmore. Also ran: Hilliate, Patagonico 
(Arg). 



Trident Plate, about one mile on the flat. Purse $1,000. 
Division one —Time 1:51. 1. Nelson Gunnell's Nose Knows 
(True Colors—Third Power); trainer D.M. Smithwick Jr.; rid¬ 
er Gerry Newman. 2. Christy Clagett's Speak of Fools; same; 
Bruno Favre. 3. Arcadia Stables' Three Bells for Me; Charles 
Fenwick Jr.; Victoria Schlesinger. Also ran: Navarro Sunland 
(Ire), Salokcin, Noumea, Fortunatus' Cap, Brilliant Stepper. 
Division two —Time l:52 3 /s. 1. Augustin Stable's Jamaica Bay 
(Lypheor-GB—Flighting-GB); trainer/rider Sanna Neilson. 
2. Rockwater Farm's Mortsie's Pride; trainer/rider Melinda 
Strimel. 3. Alix White's Flexograph; A. Timothy White; Hil¬ 
ary Thorpe. Also ran: Jean's Zeus, Young Jedi, Master's Rid¬ 
dle, Naskra Express, Kenneth's Kingdom, Light Trouble. 

Raymond R. Ruppert Memorial Junior Race. Small divi¬ 
sion —1. Hobby Horse May Fly; rider Leigh Offutt. 2. Elfin 
Blue Magic; Mandy Howes. Medium division —1. Phantom of 
the Opera; rider Meleksah David. 2. Okie; Britt Steele. Large 
division — 1. Somerset; rider Casey Hinsdale. 2. Cindy Lou; 
Jonathan Kiser. 3.Georgie; Nicole Williams. Also ran: Wig¬ 
gles, Jack Straw. 

Lansdale G. Sasscer Memorial Junior Race, about one 
mile on the flat. Time l:54 2 /s. 1. Barry Wiseman's Slang; 
trainer same; rider Dennis Nobles. 2. Alison Hershbell's Ta¬ 
ble Top; Kevin Whyte; Alison Hershbell. 3. Melville Church 
Ill's Cane Mill; T.C. Gregory; Larry Figgins. 

John Murray Begg Memorial, about three miles over tim¬ 
ber. Purse $2,000. Time 6:057s. 1. Wolver Hill Farm's Dr. 
Blase (Lucky Colonel S.—Bye Bye Paris); trainer Charles 
Cornwell; rider Colvin Ryan. 2. R.S. Williams' Aristoskip; 
trainer/rider same. 3. Michael Turner's Sir Fieldmont; same; 
Peter Walsh. Also ran: Influenced, Ilovit, Body Music, Carlo 
Friend, Best Northern, Ocean City Gold (fell). 

Mattaponi, about two miles on the flat; riders limited to 
members of ARCA. Purse $1,000. Time 3:45 2 /s. 1. Beale 
Wright's Val d'Argent (Val de l'Orne-Fr—Glittering Legend); 
trainer Dr. William Wright; rider Joe Gillet. 2. Sharon Clark's 
Dandy; same; Liz Collard. 3. Christy Clagett's Wicked Hit; 
trainer/rider same. Also ran: Tingles Image, The Snow 
Flaker, Yankee Passer, Lone Star Lester. 


June 1991 41 









Around the Farms 



Ryehill Farm's Smarten colt out of Ambitious Ace (Bold Ambition), born five 
and a half weeks prematurely on April 8, is shown when three weeks old. 


Ryehill Farm 

Jim and Linda Ryan's 300-acre estab¬ 
lishment in Mount Airy is the birth¬ 
place of champions Smart Angle and 
Heavenly Cause and classic winner 
Caveat. But of the hundreds of foals 
born at the nursery, none has gotten 
more attention than the "miracle baby" 
born in the early morning hours of 
April 8. The bay colt, by Smarten out of 
multiple stakes producer Ambitious 
Ace by Bold Ambition, was born five 
and a half weeks prematurely but is 
now thriving. 


CUSTOM-BUILT 
ARENAS, BARNS, STABLES, 
RUN IN SHEDS, FENCES, 
DECKS 

No job too large. 

Licensed & bonded. 

MHIC No. 24367 
Ftee estimates. 

References upon request. 

REECE CONSTRUCTION, INC. 

(301) 972-1177 


Jim Ryan credits the foal's survival to 
the long hours and tender loving care 
of Marnie Carter, who oversees 
Ryehill's horse operation. Marnie, in 
turn, credits the foal's tremendous will 
to live. She gave a detailed account of 
the events: "No one was aware when 
Ambitious Ace foaled out in one of the 
fields before 6 a.m. She had started to 
"bag up" in late February—her due 
date was May 16—and Dr. Allan Garst, 
our veterinarian, placed her on Regu- 
mate, in addition to sulfa tablets for a 
possible infection. She waxed in mid- 
March and dripped milk on and off un¬ 
til she foaled, but on April 7, she didn't 
give any other indication that she was 
going to foal the next day." 

The half-brother to three stakes win¬ 
ners was found in a separate field more 
than five hours after the foaling. In 
struggling to get to his feet, he had 
worked his way under a fence, across a 
grassy aisleway, and under a second 
fence. "The mare and foal were brought 
into the barn about 11 a.m., where the 
colt was given a tetanus antitoxin and 


colostrum. He was bottle fed every 
hour," recounted Carter. "We would 
stand him up to feed him, and he had a 
strong nursing instinct. But he was so 
small, he couldn't reach the mare's ud¬ 
der." Dr. Garst, who later commented 
that he did not know of any foal this 
young to have survived, checked on the 
foal several times during the day. Treat¬ 
ment included giving the colt plasma. 

"By the end of the first day, he 
showed the desire to follow his dam," 
says Carter. "So to give the foal some 
exercise and try to stimulate him, we 
walked the mare on a grassy area out¬ 
side the barn and let the foal follow. Af¬ 
terwards, we would feed him, while at 
the same time trying to encourage him 
to go to the mare to nurse." By the end 
of day two, the colt could get to his feet 
without assistance. By the third day, he 
started to nurse on his own. 

"This foal is now progressing as any 
normal foal," continued Carter. "His 
milk teeth have come through, he picks 
at hay and grass and even tries to eat his 
dam's grain ..." The colt, who weighed 
about 60 pounds at birth, approx¬ 
imately half the size of a normal new¬ 
born foal, has put on at least 25 pounds 
the first three weeks. 

Another problem surfaced during 
the first few weeks. The colt's forelegs, 
which were crooked at birth, grew 
weaker at the knees. In an effort to sup¬ 
port the immature bones, the knees 
were wrapped with support bandages. 
Two front leg casts were then made to 
immobilize the knees. "We also supple¬ 
mented his diet with calcium powder to 
help solidify the bone. The casts were 
left on for eight days. After we removed 
them, the legs were straighter and he 
gets stronger every day," notes Carter. 
By the end of April, the colt had ad¬ 
vanced to the point where it was safe to 
ship him and his dam to Bonita Farm, 
about an hour and a half away. Ambi¬ 
tious Ace was bred to John Alden, the 
same mating that resulted in stakes 
winners Alden's Ambition, Alden's 
Ace and Ambitious John. 



42 


Maryland Horse 










1991 Maryland-Bred Stakes Winners 

Profiles by Lucy Acton 

AMERI RUN 

HAYMAKER 

RITCHIE TRAIL 

June, p. 43 

March, p. 61 

March, p. 63 

BALOTRA 

May, p. 43 

RUN SPOT 

May, p. 46 

IN THE CURL 

May, p. 44 

BEYOND SLEW 

May, p. 43 

SILVER TANGO 

June, p. 45 

June, p. 46 

April, p. 62 

JET STREAM 

May, p. 45 

COLONEL HILL 

April, p. 61 

May, p. 42 

June, p. 47 

LOCAL THRILLER 

TANK 

DUE NORTH 

June, p. 46 

June, p. 44 

March, p. 62 

PER QUOD 

TEN OUT OF TEN 

FOREST FEALTY 

June, p. 45 

March, p. 62 

April, p. 60 

PICNIC ISLAND 

TONG PO 

FORRY COW HOW 

March, p. 61 

May, p. 46 

March, p. 60 

REPUTED TESTAMONY 

WIDE COUNTRY 

GALA SPINAWAY 

May, p. 47 

April, p. 61 

May, p. 47 

RISK IT 

May, p. 48 

June, p. 44 

May, p. 44 

June, p. 47 


AMERI RUN 

dk.b. or br.c., 1988 

1991 

$40,000 Hirsch Jacobs Stakes, 6 fur., 3-year-olds. Pimlico, 
April 6. 

Bred by Hal C.B. Clagett 

Owned by Hal C.B. Clagett; trained by John J. Robb 
Foaled at Weston, Upper Marlboro 


Amerrico 


Dr. Fager 

Ameri Lib 


Rough'n Tumble 

Aspidistra 

*Amerieo 

Liberal Lady 

Run Equine Run 

Run Fool Run 

Little Bold Sphinx 

*Beechpark 

Missy K. 

Bold Ambition 
Restless Sphinx 

1990 

starts 1st 

4 1 

2nd 

1 

3rd earnings 

1 $10,660 

1991 (SW) 

7 


J_ 

1 56,330 


11 

4 

2 

2 $66,990 

(through April 6) 


Most of breeder/owner Hal C.B. Clagett's horses are 
closely related, as you can tell by looking at the names. 

The most successful runner he's ever bred is mil¬ 
lionaire Little Bold John (by John Alden out of the Bold 
Ambition mare Little Bold Sphinx). Little Bold Sphinx's 
dam was Restless Sphinx, by Restless Native. And so it 
goes, generation after generation, at Clagett's Weston 
farm in Upper Marlboro (Md.) 

The latest good homebred to race for Mr. Clagett is a 
3-year-old colt, Ameri Run (by Amerrico—Run Equine 
Run). Ameri Run led wire-to-wire and scored by a length 
and a quarter in Pimlico's unrestricted Hirsch Jacobs 
Stakes. Since breaking his maiden in $25,000 claiming 
company last December, Ameri Run has steadily moved 


up the ladder. He had two allowance victories (one by a 
compelling nine lengths) in February and March, and was 
fourth, beaten three and a half lengths by the winner Risk 
It, in the Mister Diz Stakes, before getting his first stakes 
win. 

Ameri Run's dam is a half-sister to Little Bold John. 
"Little Bold Sphinx required surgery for a staph infection, 
back in 1978, when she was carrying a foal by Run Fool 
Run," explains Mr. Clagett. "Dr. Fred Peterson cared for 
her at his Maryland Equine Center in Cockeysville. We 
never thought the foal would survive. But she did. And 
we named her Run Equine Run, after Dr. Peterson's clin¬ 
ic." 

Run Equine Run, a foal of 1979, was not nearly so 
illustrious as her younger brother. But she won or placed 
in 16 of her 48 starts, including a second in the Toddler 
Stakes, and earned $50,342. 

Ameri Run is her third foal. Her two earlier foals are 
winners Run Nicoma Run (a 1984 John Alden filly) and 
Run Lyllos Run (a 1986 Lyllos-Fr colt). Barren for 1989 and 
'90, Run Equine Run produced a "three-quarter nephew" 
to Little Bold John—a John Alden colt—on April 4, and 
was bred back to John Alden. 



JUNE 1991 


43 
















Star Choice 


Spinnaker Sal 


In Reality 
Some Swinger 
Fast Hilarious 
Cool Control 


Intentionally 
My Dear Girl 
Tirreno 

Batting a Thousand 
Hilarious 
Fast Cookie 
Solo Landing 
Chilly Wind 


1990 (SW) 

starts 

6 

1st 

2 

2nd 

2 

3rd 

1 

earnings 
$ 51,830 

1991 (SW) 

7 

3_ 

2 

0 

144,495 

13 

5 

4 

1 $196,325 

(through April 13) 


— 

GALA SPINAWAY 

b.c., 1988 

1990 

$35,000 Bimelech Stakes, 7 fur., 2-year-olds. Laurel, 
Sept. 30. 

1991 

$100,000-guaranteed Cherry Hill Mile-G3, 1 mi., 3-year- 
olds. Garden State, March 30. 

$75,000-guaranteed Deputed Testamony Stakes, IVb 
mi., registered Maryland-bred 3-year-olds. Pimlico, 
April 13. 

Bred by Nancy M. Leonard 

Owned by Gertrude Leviton; trained by Bernard P. 
Bond 

Foaled at Glade Valley Farms, Frederick, Md. 


Gala Spinaway easily dominated his Maryland-bred 
rivals in the Deputed Testamony Stakes. Odds-on favor¬ 
ite, he was ridden out to a 13-length victory over Septem¬ 
ber Star. A Call to Rise, Why Can't I and Aaron's Halo 
completed the field. 

It was his second stakes win in a row. Two weeks 
earlier, he registered by a narrow margin in the Grade 3 
Cherry Hill Mile at Garden State. Gala Spinaway is owned 
by Gertrude and Leonard (Skip) Leviton, of Atlantic City, 
N.J. Longtime clients of Glade Valley Farms, near Fred¬ 
erick (Md.), the Levitons purchased the colt privately 
from his breeder. Glade Valley co-owner Nancy Leonard, 
after he failed to meet his reserve at last year's Fasig-Tip- 
ton Midlantic Select Two-Year-Olds in Training sale. 


TANK 


ch.c., 1988 

1991 

$150,000-guaranteed Garden State Stakes-G3, lVs mi., 
3-year-olds. Garden State, April 13. 

Bred by Mrs. Richard C. duPont 
Owned by Bohemia Stable; trained by Ben W. Perkins 
Jr- 

Foaled at Woodstock Farm, Chesapeake City, Md. 


Tank's Prospect 


Native Zone 


1990 

1991 (SW) 


Mr. Prospector 

Midnight Pumpkin 

Exclusive Native 

Zonely 

1st 2nd 

1 0 

_2_ A 

3 0 


Raise a Native 
Gold Digger 
Pretense 
Me Next 
Raise a Native 
Exclusive 
Round Table 
Zonah 

3rd earnings 

0 $ 10,200 

_2_ 109,740 

2 $119,940 

(through April 13) 


starts 

1 

5 


Allaire duPont opted not to run Tank in the Kentucky 
Derby. But, given the situation, most other owners would 
have jumped right on a plane to Louisville. 

Mrs. duPont's Bohemia Stable homebred over¬ 
whelmed the opposition in the Grade 3 Garden State 


Stakes, coming from off the pace and romping to a seven 
and a half-length victory over the hard-hitting challenger 
Near the Limit. Prior to that, on April 1, he scored by 
seven lengths in a mile and a sixteenth allowance race at 
Pimlico. 

On the other hand, the handsomely bred son of 
Tank's Prospect would have been going into the Derby off 
of only five career starts. And Mrs. duPont, who has nev¬ 
er had a Derby starter, was reluctant to submit her colt to 
the grind. "What's best for the horse" is her sincere motto. 

Long recognized as a leading lady of the sport, Mrs. 
duPont gained her greatest fame in the 1960s as owner/ 
breeder of five-time horse of the year Kelso. From her 
Woodstock Farm in Chesapeake City, an idyllic spot on 
the Bohemia River, have come a number of other good 
runners, including Maryland-bred champions Politely, 
Believe the Queen and Crowned. 

Like most of Mrs. duPont's horses. Tank, trained by 
Ben Perkins Jr., has a pedigree that goes back generations 
at Woodstock. His dam Native Zone (by Exclusive Native) 
is a daughter of Mrs. duPont's mare Zonely (by Round 
Table). Zonely, who placed in stakes, produced Grade 1 
winner Victory Zone and stakes-placed runners Passing 
Zone and Sharp Zone. 

Native Zone, who was unraced, did not achieve 
much note as a broodmare until Tank came along. Her 
first three foals (by Halo, The Minstrel and Assert-Ire, in 
1985, '86 and '87) are moderately successful winners. Na¬ 
tive Zone was sold (in foal to Waquoit) at the 1989 Keene- 
land November breeding stock sale for $45,000. 


44 


Maryland Horse 















PER QUOD 

b.g., 1985 

1988 

$29,070 Royal Caledonian Hunt Cup and Doonside Cup, 

l 3 /s mi., turf, 3 & up. Ayr, Scotland, Sept. 14. 

1990 

$77,459 Premio Roma Vecchia-G3, VU mi., turf, 3 & up. 
Rome, Italy, Nov. 11. 


1991 

$135,947 Coppa d'Oro di Milano-G3, l 7 /s mi., 4 & up. 
Milan, Italy, April 20. 


1987 

starts 1st 2nd 3rd 
unraced 

earnings 

1988 (SW) 

(in U.S. and England) 

13 6 4 0 

$ 74,835 

(in North America, England, Ireland, 

France and Germany) 

1989 10 2 3 3 184,180 

1990 (SW) 

1991 (SW) 

(in France, Germany, England, 
Italy and Ireland) 

11 1 3 3 

J_ J_ _0 _0_ 

155,298 

73,628 


35 10 10 6 

$487,941 


(through April 20) 


Bred by H. Turney McKnight and June H. McKnight 
Owned by H. Turney McKnight; trained by Ben Han- 
bury 

Foaled at Clover Hill Farm, Monkton, Md. 


Lyllos (Fr) 


Allegedly 


Lyphard 
Lybos 
Sir Ivor 
Princess Pout 


Northern Dancer 

Goofed 

Silly Season 

Lesbos 

Sir Gaylord 

Attica 

Prince John 

Determined Lady 


Turney McKnight's Per Quod made his 1991 debut in 
the Coppa d'Oro di Milano-G3 and won by a length and a 
half over nine other starters. 

The son of former Country Life Farm stallion Lyllos 
(Fr), now deceased. Per Quod has been a top competitor 
in Europe for three seasons. His dam Allegedly (by Sir 
Ivor) is a half-sister to champion and leading sire Alleged, 
who was bred by McKnight's mother, June McKnight. 


BEYOND SLEW 

dk.b. or br.m., 1986 

1991 

$35,000-guaranteed Lady Mannequin Handicap, 6 fur., 
fillies and mares, 3 & up. Thistledown, April 20. 

Bred by Barbara J. Givler 

Owned by Greg P. Navarro; trained by Mike Mazur 
Foaled at Green Willow Farms, Westminster, Md. 


One More Slew 


Seattle Slew 
Theia (Fr) 


Beyond Limits 


Carry Back 
Too Much 


Bold Reasoning 
My Charmer 
Caro (Ire) 
Cavadonga 

Saggy 

Joppy 
*Tudor Way 
Too Pampered 


1988 

starts 

4 

1st 

0 

2nd 

1 

3rd 

1 

earnings 
$ 2,890 

1989 

17 

5 

4 

5 

31,948 

1990 

10 

7 

1 

0 

49,350 

1991 (SW) 

7 

J3_ 

J_ 

2 

44,092 


38 

15 

7 

8 $128,280 
(through April 20) 


Barbara Givler wasn't aware she had bred a stakes 
winner, until she got a call from the Maryland Horse. 
"That's the best news I've gotten all day!" said the Down- 
ington (Pa.) resident when told that 5-year-old Beyond 
Slew had captured the Lady Mannequin Handicap at 
Thistledown. 

Mrs. Givler's fling with horses was brief but exciting. 
"My husband died in 1982," she explained. "He and I had 
always talked about breeding Thoroughbreds—we'd only 
planned to have one broodmare at a time. A year or so 
after he died, I bought a Carry Back mare (Beyond Limits) 
from an old horse trader." Bred to Masked Dancer, Be¬ 
yond Limits produced a 1984 filly. Masked Minute, who 
raced for Mrs. Givler in partnership with Ron and Betsy 
Houghton. "She won her first time out (a $13,500 maiden 
claiming race at Atlantic City). It was like a Cinderella 
story—watching my own horse win like that," says Mrs. 
Givler. 

Unfortunately, Mrs. Givler became ill with cancer 
soon after that. She sold Beyond Limits and the mare's 
One More Slew filly (Beyond Slew) when Beyond Slew 
was a yearling, and has owned no more horses since then. 

Beyond Slew, who was bought by Billy Dixon, has 
competed mostly in mid-level claiming races, changing 
hands several times over the years. Her present owner 
Greg P. Navarro claimed her for $14,000 at Philadelphia 
Park last July. Beyond Slew scored by a half-length in the 
Lady Mannequin Handicap, and boosted her lifetime 
earnings to $128,280. "I'm so happy for those people," 
said her breeder. 


June 1991 


45 














IN THE CURL 

b.m., 1984 

1987 

$40,000 Loch earn Handicap, 6 fur., fillies and mares, 3 & 
up. Pimlico, Oct. 11. 

$35,000 Heirloom Stakes, 6 fur., 3-year-old fillies. Phila¬ 
delphia Park, Nov. 14. 

1989 

$50,000 Primonetta Handicap, 6 fur., fillies and mares, 3 
& up. Pimlico, April 15. 

$30,000 Hydrangea Stakes, 6 fur., fillies and mares, 3 & 
up. Meadowlands, Nov. 10. 

1990 

$50,000 Stefanita Handicap, 6 fur., fillies and mares, 3 & 
up. Laurel, Nov. 4. 

1991 

$25,000-guaranteed Liberation Handicap, 6 fur., fillies 
and mares, 3 & up. Philadelphia Park, March 10. 

$25,000-guaranteed Musket Handicap, 6 fur., fillies and 
mares, 3 & up. Philadelphia Park, April 7. 

$40,000 Primonetta Handicap, 6 fur., fillies and mares, 3 
& up. Pimlico, April 20. 

Bred by Dark Hollow Number One Partnership 
Owned by N.E. Rinaldi; trained by Dale Capuano 
Foaled at Carol Hill Farm, Upperco, Md. 


Shelter Half 


Ocean Girl 


Tentam 
Gay Matelda 
Rollicking 
Pennsylvania Girl 


Intentionally 

Tamerett 

Sir Gaylord 

Hasty Matelda 

Rambunctious 

Martinetta 

Tumiga 

Bank Kook Sadye 


1986 

starts 

8 

1st 

0 

2nd 

5 

3rd 

0 

earnings 
$ 37,142 

1987 (SW) 

13 

6 

1 

2 

105,145 

1988 

13 

4 

4 

2 

113,212 

1989 (SW) 

18 

6 

7 

2 

203,424 

1990 (SW) 

12 

3 

3 

3 

106,506 

1991 (SW) 

5 

J3 

J_ 

1 

67,560 

69 

22 

21 

10 $632,989 

(through April 20) 


April wasn't a cruel month for In the Curl. Nick 
Rinaldi's mare added nearly $50,000 to her bankroll, fin¬ 
ishing second to the good filly Hero's Hurrah in an over¬ 
night handicap at Pimlico and winning back-to-back 
stakes at Philadelphia Park and Pimlico. 

In Pimlico's Primonetta Handicap, In the Curl turned 
the tables on Hero's Hurrah, holding on to defeat that filly 
by a nose. Less than two weeks earlier, she captured Phil¬ 
adelphia Park's Musket Handicap by three-quarters of a 
length over Silver Spool. 



46 


LOCAL THRILLER 

b.m., 1985 

1989 

$20,000 Sadie Hawkins Stakes, 7 fur., fillies and mares, 3 
& up. Charles Town, Aug. 5. 

$40,000 Alma North Handicap, lVi6 mi., registered 
Maryland-bred fillies and mares, 3 & up. Timonium, 
Sept. 2. 

1990 

$50,000 Lady Baltimore Handicap, lVi6 mi., turf, fillies 
and mares, 3 & up. Pimlico, June 9. 

$40,000 Alma North Handicap, lVi6 mi., registered 
Maryland-bred fillies and mares, 3 & up. Timonium, 
Sept. 1. 


1991 

$25,000 Sweet n Sassy Stakes, 6 fur., fillies and mares, 3 & 
up. Delaware Park, April 21. 


Bred by Kimball C. Firestone 

Owned by John Korman Jr.; trained by Robert Bailes 
Foaled at Glenstone Farm, Middletown, Md. 


Benefice 


Local Cause 


Damascus 
Shuvee 
Advocator 
Backfence Gossip 


Sword Dancer 
Kerala 
Nashua 
Levee 

Round Table 
Delta Queen 
The Scoundrel 
Risque Me 


1987 

starts 

2 

1st 

0 

2nd 

2 

3rd 

0 

earnings 
$ 4,070 

1988 

6 

2 

0 

1 

17,190 

1989 (SW) 

9 

4 

0 

0 

66,316 

1990 (SW) 

9 

4 

3 

0 

122,225 

1991 (SW) 

2 

\ 

0 

0 

18,540 

28 

11 

5 

1 $228,341 

(through April 21) 


Trainer Meredith (Mert) Bailes deserves a lot of credit 
for developing Local Thriller into a stakes winner at ages 4 
and 5. And he is also to be admired for the start he has 
given his 26-year-old son Robbie. "I'm trying to do for him 
what my own father did for me," says Bailes, who inher¬ 
ited the job as farm trainer for the late Christopher T. 
Chenery's Meadow Stud from his father in 1972. 

Mert Bailes has had a public stable at Bowie since 
1979, his best recent success coming with the good filly 
Misty Ivor and 1991 John B. Campbell Handicap-G3 win¬ 
ner J. R.'s Horizon. 

Local Thriller, who races for John Korman, a retail 
furniture store owner from Richmond (Va.), is one of sev¬ 
eral horses Mert has turned over to his son. The 6-year- 
old mare came back from a layoff to finish fifth behind 
Hero's Hurrah in an overnight handicap at Pimlico on 
April 1. She returned in Delaware Park's Sweet n Sassy 
Stakes, scoring by a half-length over Silver Spool. 


Maryland Horse 















Bred by Jeanne F. Begg 

Owned by Constance Capuano; trained by Gary Cap- 
uano 

Foaled at Roedown Farm, Davidsonville, Md. 


Silver Badge 


Royal Tango 


Poker 


Silver True 


Princely Pleasure 
Tango in Paris 


Round Table 
Glamour 
Hail to Reason 
Silver Fog 
What a Pleasure 
Princess Tiki 
Cyane 

Dancer's Gem 


1990 

1991 (SW) 


starts 

1 

6 

7 


1 st 

1 

5 

6 


2 nd 

0 

J_ 

1 


earnings 
$ 7,200 
142,870 

$150,070 


(through April 27) 


SILVER TANGO 

ch.f., 1988 

1991 

$25,000-guaranteed Mountain Laurel Stakes, 6 fur., 
3-year-old fillies. Philadelphia Park, Feb. 24. 

$40,000 Forsythia Stakes, 6 fur., 3-year-old fillies. Pimlico, 
March 16. 

$60,000-guaranteed Politely Stakes, 6 fur., registered 
Maryland-bred 3-year-old fillies. Pimlico, April 7. 

$25,000 Bustleton Stakes, 1 mi., 70 yds., 3-year-old fillies 
who had never won $18,000 two times at one mile or 
over other than maiden, claiming or starter. Phila¬ 
delphia Park, April 27. 


Silver Tango upheld her nearly untarnished reputa¬ 
tion with a length victory as even-money favorite in 
Pimlico's Politely Stakes, followed by an odds-on score in 
the Bustleton Stakes at Philadelphia Park.. 

The 3-year-old filly owned by Connie Capuano and 
her husband Phil and trained by their son Gary has now 
won six of her seven lifetime starts, including four stakes. 
Phil Capuano purchased her privately last year after she 
failed to meet her reserve at the Fasig-Tipton Midlantic 
Two-Year-Olds in Training sale. The $3,800 he paid to 
breeder Jeanne Begg has turned out to be a pittance. 

The 121-pound high weight in the Politely, Silver Tan¬ 
go gave seven pounds to the runner-up Overdue Ghost. 
Others, in order of finish, were Nicki, Eager n Crafty, 
Reckon Say, Rollicking Stream, Sisaroo and Missy's Mu¬ 
sic. Silver Tango has earned $150,070. 


WIDE COUNTRY 

ch.f., 1988 

1990 

$50,000-guaranteed Smart Angle Stakes, 6 fur., regis¬ 
tered Maryland-bred 2-year-old fillies. Pimlico, Aug. 
19. 

$150,000-guaranteed Maryland Juvenile Filly Champion¬ 
ship, 1Vi 6 mi., registered Maryland-bred 2-year-old 
fillies. Laurel, Nov. 24. 

$60,000-guaranteed Heavenly Cause Stakes, 6 V 2 fur., 
registered Maryland-bred 2-year-old fillies. Laurel, 
Dec. 9. 

1991 

$40,000 Flirtation Stakes, 6 V 2 fur., 3-year-old fillies. Lau¬ 
rel, Feb. 10. 

$75,000-guaranteed Jameela Stakes, IV 16 mi., registered 
Maryland-bred 3-year-old fillies. Laurel, Feb. 23. 
$50,000 Genuine Risk Stakes, IV 16 mi., 3-year-old fillies. 
Laurel, March 9. 

$200,000-guaranteed Pimlico Oaks-G3, IV 16 mi., 3-year- 
old fillies. Pimlico, March 30. 

$75,000-guaranteed Caesar's Wish Stakes, IV 16 mi., reg¬ 
istered Maryland-bred 3-year-old fillies. Pimlico, April 
28. 

Bred by Diana W. Carlson 

Owned by Tom Tanner; trained by Robert W. Camac 
Foaled at Brookwood Farm, Fulton, Md. 


Magesterial 


Bazooka Babe 


Northern Dancer 
Courting Days 
Mullineaux 
Rustic Gal 


Nearctic 
Natalma 
Bold Lad 
Admiring 
Hail to Reason 
Bramalea 
Good Behaving 
Barn Dance 


1990 (SW) 

starts 

7 

1 st 

4 

2 nd 

2 

3rd 

0 

earnings 

$173,340 

1991 (SW) 

5 

5 

0 

0 

268,695 


12 

9 

2 

0 $442,035 

(through April 28) 


Wide Country stretched her winning streak to seven 
in a row with a decisive length and a half victory in 
Pimlico's Caesar's Wish Stakes. The 3-10 favorite, she car¬ 
ried high weight of 122 pounds, five pounds more than 
runner-up Ritchie Trail, who gave a game effort. Ritchie 
Trail finished a half-length in front of John's Decision, 
followed by Reckon Say, Little Bold Lookin, Dancing 
Olivia, Eager n Crafty and Nicki. 

Purchased by owner Tommy Tanner, of Wilmington, 
Del., as a 2-year-old for $50,000, Wide Country has now 
earned $442,035. She was Maryland's champion juvenile 
filly in 1990, and is well on her way to a second title. 


June 1991 


47 













MHBA hosts 63rd 
annual awards dinner 


Photographs by Jerry Frutkoff 


The MHBA paid tribute to leading 
Maryland-bred performers of 1990 at 
a dinner held April 26 in the Pimlico 
Sports Palace. Breeders David and Jo 
Ann Hayden (below), flanked by 
MHBA vice-president J.W.Y. Martin 
Jr., left, and president King T. 
Leatherbury, were honored for 
achievements of Maryland's horse of 
the year. Breeders' Cup Sprint-Gl 
winner Safely Kept, and her dam 
Safely Home, named broodmare of 
the year. Opposite page: Leatherbury 
presented special achievement 
awards (2) and (3) to Safely Kept's 
sire Horatius (accepting was former 
Thornmar manager Dean Schneider) 
and Eclipse award-winning 


apprentice jockey Mark Johnston; (4) 
Country Life partner John Pons, 
right, received leading freshman sire 
award earned by Allen's Prospect 
from Thoroughbred Times's Scott Rion; 
(5) Charles Peoples, left, longtime 
manager of Mr. and Mrs. Bayard 
Sharp's farm, accepted breeder of the 
year award on behalf of his 
employers from Larry Edinger of The 
Blood-Horse ; (6) double honors went to 
Country Life, Joseph P. Pons Sr. 

(left), receiving Carnivalay's stallion 
of the year award from MHBA 
executive vice-president Richard W. 
Wilcke. Honored as breeders of 
Maryland-bred champions were 
Haymaker's breeder Eleanor 


Sparenberg (7), presentation by 
Barclay Tagg; (8) Diana Carlson, who 
received Wide Country's plate from 
William K. Boniface; (9) Valay Maid's 
breeders Betty and Joe Hamilton, 
right, accepting from Bob Manfuso; 
(10) Daniel Ryan, co-breeder of 
French Hill, given award by Katy 
Voss; (11) Northern Wolf's 
co-breeders Dr. Howard Hoffman, 
left, and Dr. John Meeks, right. Bill 
Albright making the presentation; 
(12) Ten Keys's breeder Richard 
Bendit, right, who was given his 
award by J.W.Y. Martin Jr.; (13) and 
Geri C. Hughes, right, breeder of 
Restless Con, accepting from Betty 
Shea Miller. 



Maryland Horse 





















Maryland Fund Report 


Statistics for Pimlico at Laurel 
Maryland Fund Program 

February 14 through March 13, 1991 



Total Funds Available to 

Handle Maryland Fund Breakage 


Simulcast 

Fees 


Interest Surplus from 

Earned Previous Meeting Distributed 


$36,455,477 $401,010 


$9,847 


$6,465 


$3,213 $173,755 $391,153 


Fund Expenditures: 


Distribution other than purses: 


Yearling show. $ 6,250 

Breeder awards. 126,001 

Stallion awards. 39,904 

Owner awards. 67,591 

Maryland Million purses. 11,402 

Service charge to MHBA. 20,004 


Total. $271,153 


Purses in Maryland Fund races: 


Available for purses. $135,182 

Surplus from previous meeting. 173,755 

308,937 

Purse distribution. 120,000 

Surplus to be carried over. $188,937 


NINTH DAY (February 23). Purse 
$75,000-guaranteed. Jameela Stakes. 
For 3-year-old fillies, registered Mary- 
land-breds. lVi6 mi. 5 competed. 
(Closed with 17 nominations.) Winner: 
WIDE COUNTRY, by Magesterial. 
Breeder Bonus: Diana W. Carlson 
($5,941.71). Stallion Bonus: None. Sec¬ 
ond: RITCHIE TRAIL, by Allen's Pros¬ 
pect. Breeder Bonus: Estate of Orme 
Wilson Jr. ($1,980.57). Stallion Bonus: 
Allen's Prospect Syndicate ($990.29). 
Third: JOHN'S DECISION, by John Al- 
den. Breeder Bonus: Janet L. Wayson 
($1,089.31). Stallion Bonus: John Alden 
Syndicate ($544.66). Fourth: AVIE'S 
DAISY, by Lord Avie. Breeder Bonus: 
Jilerlane Stables ($594.17). Stallion Bo¬ 
nus: None. 

TWENTY-FIRST DAY (March 10). 
Purse $60,000-guaranteed. Conniver 
Handicap. For 3-year-olds & up, fillies 
and mares, registered Maryland- 
breds. 7 furlongs. 8 competed. (Closed 
with 20 nominations.) Winner: RUN 
SPOT, by North Sea. Breeder Bonus: 
Mr. and Mrs. John B. Merryman 
($4,753.37). Stallion Bonus: Alfred G. 
Vanderbilt ($2,376.68). Second: Mc- 
KILTS, by Deputed Testamony. Breeder 


Bonus: North Highland Farm 
($1,584.46). Stallion Bonus: Deputed 
Testamony Syndicate ($792.23). Third: 
DOUBLE ARTEMIS, by Double Zeus. 
Breeder Bonus: Dwight N. Hikel 
($871.45). Stallion Bonus: Double Zeus 
Syndicate ($453.73). Fourth: CROWNED, 
by Chief's Crown. Breeder Bonus: Mrs. 
Richard C. duPont and Woodstock En¬ 
terprises ($475.34). Stallion Bonus: 
None. 

Breeder Bonuses 

David I. Abse—JAY'S ALLY: Feb. 15, 5th 
race, $459.49. 

Adventure Partnership—SPACE MATE: 

March 7, 1st race, $1,267.56. 

Audley Farm, Inc.—WITCH HALF: March 
2, 4th race, $950.67. 

Marjorie Barry—ABBEYS GAIT: Feb. 19, 
10th race, $673.39. 

Dan Basil—ACCORTE: Feb. 23, 2nd race, 
$752.62. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles N. Bassford—COOL 
BRILLIANCE: Feb. 24, 1st race, $554.56. 
GOLD RUSHER: Feb. 24, 9th race, $950.67. 
($1,505.23) 

Caroline T. Benson—ONCE OVER 
KNIGHTLY: Feb. 24, 12th race, $435.73. 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Bertazon Jr.—UN¬ 
CLE BUSTER: March 1, 1st race, $594.17. 


E.H. Hawkins, Bonita Farm, et al—RE¬ 
PUTED TESTAMONY: Feb. 19, 9th race, 
$3,168.91; March 2, 11th race, $1,584.46. 
($4,753.37) 

Anna B. Boskin—MARY B.: March 2, 9th 
race, $1,346.79. 

Braim Road Associates—BE CAREFUL: 

March 5, 10th race, $499.10. 

William R. Buehler—HALF ENGLISH: 

March 1, 5th race, $491.18. 

Caberosa Partnership—PANNER: Feb. 24, 
5th race, $491.18; March 5, 1st race, 
$514.95. ($1,006.13) 

Diana W. Carlson—WIDE COUNTRY: Feb. 
23, 10th race, $5,941.71; March 9, 10th 
race, $4,345.37. ($10,287.08) 

Jane A. Cartwright—LUCILLE LISA: March 
5, 7th race, $752.62. 

Kenneth R. Cecil—CANDY'S MAGIC: 

March 5, 3rd race, $491.18. 

Mr. and Mrs. William G. Christmas— 
CLAIR'S SAY: March 2, 7th race, $950.67. 
Hal C.B. Clagett—AMERI RUN: Feb. 26, 6th 
race, $1,346.79; March 7, 9th race, 
$1,505.23. ($2,852.02) 

Mrs. Ben Cohen—MAJESTIC GAME: Feb. 

22, 6th race, $1,188.34. 

Albert H. Cohen and Randy L. Cohen—TI- 
GORS: March 4, 9th race, $1,663.68. 

Julie Bassford Collison—BRILLIANT 
PACES: March 2, 1st race, $554.56. 


50 


Maryland Horse 





























Paul F. Coster—LONGLEGED PAUL: Feb. 

19, 2nd race, $1,505.23. 

Estate of Frank J. De Francis—EMPEROR'S 
DARLING: March 5, 5th race, $491.18. PO¬ 
TENT POCKET: Feb. 24, 4th race, $792.23. 
($1,283.41) 

Victor DiVivo—COLONEL HILL: March 3, 
10th race, $1,451.10. WOODBEATEASE: 
March 12, 6th race, $713.01. ($2,164.11) 
Mrs. Richard C. duPont/Woodstock Enter¬ 
prises—CROWNED: Feb. 18, 11th race, 
$1,584.46; March 10, 10th race, $475.34. 
($2,059.80) 

Mrs. O. Anderson Engh—KING BAR: Feb. 

14, 1st race, $594.17. 

Annette Eubanks—JOHNNY ROME: Sept. 

21, 7th race, $1,029.90. 

Stephen R. Ferguson—CROOKED TOWER: 

Feb. 15, 8th race, $1,188.34. 

Edmond D. Gaudet—CAMABARA: Feb. 14, 
2nd race, $713.01. 

Glade Valley Farms, Inc.—BOLDEST 
BLADE: March 4, 8th race, $1,109.12. 
RECKON SAY: March 3, 7th race, 
$1,267.56. ($2,376.68) 

Richard L. Golden—BLUSHING PUNCH: 

Feb. 18, 5th race, $491.18. 

C. Oliver Goldsmith—CAPP THE POWER: 
March 9, 4th race, $1,822.12. FOR ALL: 
Feb. 22, 8th race, $1,663.68. HIS ACAL- 
LADE: Feb. 18, 10th race, $1,267.56. 
($4,753.36) 

Barbara C. Graham—ROLLODKA: Feb. 21, 
1st race, $713.01; March 2, 6th race, 
$713.01. ($1,426.02) 

Green Willow Farms—LADY OF DECO¬ 
RUM: March 4, 4th race, $1,148.73. 
William R. Harris—SAUCY BIRD: Feb. 22, 
5th race, $752.62. 

Mark Hayden—DANS LES BOIS: March 12, 
10th race, $459.49. 

Marshele E. Bassford Heffron—MISS PRO¬ 
TEGE: March 5, 6th race, $1,663.68. 

John C. Heil—D. C. MAXWELL: Feb. 19,1st 
race, $1,346.79. 

Dwight N. Hikel—DOUBLE ARTEMIS: 

March 10, 10th race, $871.45. 

John Hinder—GRANGRAD JOHN: Feb. 26, 
1st race, $831.84. 

Peter Jay—CIDERMILL HILL: Feb. 26, 8th 
race, $1,109.12. 

Meriam M. Jenkins—CHRIS' HOLIDAY: 

March 1, 6th race, $1,029.90. 

Jilerlane Stables—AVIE'S DAISY: Feb. 23, 
10th race, $594.17. 

Penelope-Ann Keating—HOOLIGANISIM: 

March 2, 11th race, $475.34. 

Barbara M. Kees—CLOUDY WINTERS: 
March 12, 2nd race, $752.62. FOR YOUR¬ 
SELF: Feb. 24, 3rd race, $435.73. RA- 
JAMUFFIN: Feb. 19, 8th race, $1,346.79. 
($2,535.14) 

Alan S. Kline—MURRAY'S RULER: March 
7, 10th race, $673.39. 

Jane G. Kramer—GALLANT VICTOR: Feb. 

15, 3rd race, $459.49. 

Estate of Alvin E. Kraus—P. M. SPIFF: Feb. 
17, 3rd race, $491.18. 

K. T. Leatherbury Assoc., Inc.—THIRTY 
EIGHT GO GO: Feb. 18, 11th race, 
$475.34. 



Jameela Stakes 

Presentation after Wide Country's head victory over Ritchie Trail in the 
Jameela Stakes includes (from left) owners Barbara and Tommy Tanner, 
jockey Santos Chavez, Jameela's trainer Hap Ravich and Robert Camac. 


June 1991 


51 















Maiyland Fund Report **««**> 


Nancy M. Leonard—GALA SPINAWAY: 

Feb. 24, 8th race, $1,663.68. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. Lewis—ALDEN'S 
CROWN: Feb. 16, 6th race, $792.23. 

James F. Lewis III—GRONWOHLD: March 
9, 2nd race, $871.45. 

Lester P. Mackebee—THIRTYEIGHTCALI- 
BER: Feb. 17, 10th race, $1,663.68. 

Marilyn MacVey and Katharine M. Voss— 
SALVE: March 2, 5th race, $419.88. 

James A. Maenner—TIPEACE: March 7, 4th 
race, $594.17. 

John A. Manfuso—A CALL TO RISE: March 

9, 6th race, $1,663.68. ALL LAUGHTER: 
March 7, 5th race, $491.18. ($2,154.86) 

Mrs J.W.Y. Martin Jr.—SISAROO: Feb. 14, 
3rd race, $950.67; March 3, 9th race, 
$1,346.79. ($2,297.46) 

Mr. and Mrs. John B. Merryman—RUN 
SPOT: March 10, 10th race, $4,753.37. 
Robert E. Meyerhoff—CREATIVE ACT: 
March 4, 1st race, $1,029.90. SAWMILL 
RUN: March 7, 3rd race, $491.18. SKY- 
SPACE: Feb. 15, 7th race, $950.67. 
($2,471.75) 

Gretchen B. Mobberley—JET STREAM: 
March 2, 11th race, $4,753.37. SILAS 
GREEN: Feb. 23, 4th race, $1,029.90. 
($5,783.27) 

Moncrief, Inc., Howard Bender and Sondra 
Bender—ROLLICKING STREAM: Feb. 19, 
7th race, $1,267.56. 

Harold C. Morris—CHRISHEIK: March 12, 
1st race, $491.18. 

Dr. Frederick E. Musser—INTENDED 
RULLAH: March 9, 3rd race, $435.73. 
North Highland Farm—McKILTS: March 

10, 10th race, $1,584.46. 

Sture G. Olsson—WHY CANT I: Feb. 23,1st 
race, $1,029.90. 

Pegasus Farm—WON ON POINTS: Feb. 17, 
5th race, $491.18. 

Joseph Piccioni Sr. and Barbara Piccioni— 
NEW GUY IN TOWN: Feb. 24, 7th race, 
$514.95. 

Christina M. Pino—A JOYFUL DANIELLE: 

Feb. 23, 8th race, $1,029.90. 

John W. Polek—JUSTINS TESTAMONY: 

March 2, 10th race, $1,505.23. 

Helen M. Polinger—TAMMY'S LEGS: Feb. 

26, 4th race, $1,188.34. 

Robert L. Quinichett—TONG PO: March 3, 
5th race, $1,346.79. 

Raymond Regan—TOR'S PACES: March 3, 
12th race, $1,109.12. 

David P. Reynolds—GAYLORD'S ANNIE: 

Feb. 23, 9th race, $1,663.68. 

Dr. and Mrs. James W. Ross—BROOK- 
WOOD: March 4, 7th race, $950.67. 
WEATHER RAIL: Feb. 26, 5th race, 
$752.62. ($1,703.29) 

Ross Valley Farm—HAYMAKER: March 3, 
10th race, $4,353.29. 

Lisa D. Ruch—SAN DIEGO'S ISLE: Feb. 26, 
3rd race, $459.49. 

James P Ryan Jr.—FIRST DOWN: Feb. 18, 
11th race, $871.45. 

Ryehill Farm—ANNIE'S WARNING: Feb. 
18, 2nd race, $459.49. TEMPER TIME: 
March 2, 11th race, $871.45. ($1,330.94) 


y — m 



Conniver Handicap 

Retiring press box manager Eddie McMullen (left) gives Conniver Hand¬ 
icap trophy to (from left) Edgar Prado, John Merryman and Katy Voss 
following Run Spot's narrow triumph over McKilts and Double Artemis. 


52 


Maryland Horse 
















Charles Kelly Smith—DANTELL: Feb. 15, 
1st race, $1,029.90. 

P.J. Torsney Jr.—ALLTHATHECOULDSEE: 

March 12, 9th race, $1,822.12. 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Townsend—CLEVER 
FOREVER: Feb. 16, 3rd race, $594.17. 

Mrs. Anthony E. Verdi—DOUBLETIME 
MISS: March 10, 1st race, $594.17. 

Janet L. Wayson—JOHN'S DECISION: Feb. 

23, 10th race, $1,089.31. 

Dan D. Westland—BARBARA'S LAST: Feb. 
16, 12th race, $435.73; March 12, 4th race, 
$514.95. ($950.68) 

Mrs. Gordon L. Wheeler—BOXWOOD: 

Feb. 15, 4th race, $871.45. 

Warren D. Williams—BORC: Feb. 16, 4th 
race, $594.17; March 8, 2nd race, $594.17. 
($1,188.34) 

Willowdale Farm Breeding and Racing Part¬ 
nership—GOLD PROOF: March 9, 9th 
race, $792.23. 

Estate of Orme Wilson Jr.—RITCHIE 
TRAIL: Feb. 23, 10th race, $1,980.57. 
Worth A Try Stables—BIG UPHEAVEL: Feb. 

24, 10th race, $1,267.56. 


Owner Bonuses 

John V. Alecci—DANTELL: Feb. 15,1st race, 
$1,418.38. MISS PROTEGE: March 5, 6th 
race, $2,291.22. ($3,709.60) 


Elaine L. Bassford—GOLD RUSHER: Feb. 

24, 9th race, $1,309.27. 

Sondra D. Bender—ROLLICKING 

STREAM: Feb. 19, 7th race, $1,745.69. 
Mary B. Boskin—MARY B.: March 2, 9th 
race, $1,854.80. 

Hal C.B. Clagett—AMERI RUN: Feb. 26, 6th 
race, $1,854.80; March 7, 9th race, 
$2,073.01. ($3,927.81) 

Paul F. Coster—LONGLEGED PAUL: Feb. 

19, 2nd race, $2,073.01. 

Foxglove Stable—BROOKWOOD: March 4, 
7th race, $1,309.27. 

C. Oliver Goldsmith—CAPP THE POWER: 
March 9, 4th race, $2,509.43. HIS ACAL- 
LADE: Feb. 18, 10th race, $1,745.69. 
($4,255.12) 

G & O Stable—SILAS GREEN: Feb. 23, 4th 
race, $1,418.38. 

Carolyn L. Green—LADY OF DECORUM: 

March 4, 4th race, $1,582.03. 

Matt P. Kane et al—REPUTED TES- 
TAMONY: Feb. 19, 9th race, $4,364.23. 
Gertrude Leviton—GALA SPINAWAY: Feb. 

24, 8th race, $2,291.22. 

John A. Manfuso—A CALL TO RISE: March 
9, 6th race, $2,291.22. 

Mrs. J.W.Y. Martin Jr.—SISAROO: Feb. 14, 
3rd race, $1,309.27; March 3, 9th race, 
$1,854.80. ($3,164.07) 

John B. Merryman—SPACE MATE: March 
7, 1st race, $1,745.69. 


Robert E. Meyerhoff—CREATIVE ACT: 

March 4, 1st race, $1,418.38. 

Jane D. Miller—D. C. MAXWELL: Feb. 19, 
1st race, $1,854.80. 

Richard D. Norling—FOR ALL: Feb. 22, 8th 
race, $2,291.22. 

One & Won Stable—TIGORS: March 4, 9th 
race, $2,291.22. 

John W. Polek—JUSTINS TESTAMONY: 

March 2, 10th race, $2,073.01. 

Lorraine R. Quinichett—TONG PO: March 
3, 5th race, $1,854.80. 

Charles J. Reed—CROOKED TOWER: Feb. 

15, 8th race, $1,636.59. 

David P. Reynolds—GAYLORD'S ANNIE: 

Feb. 23, 9th race, $2,291.22. 

Rick-Gene Stables—TAMMY'S LEGS: Feb. 

26, 4th race, $1,636.59. 

Nicholas E. Rinaldi—BIG UPHEAVEL: Feb. 

24, 10th race, $1,745.69. 

Rolli-Dott Manor Farms—RECKON SAY: 

March 3, 7th race, $1,745.69. 

Rough Cut Stable—THIRTYEIGHTCALI- 
BER: Feb. 17, 10th race, $2,291.22. 

Yvonne J. Stoner—MAJESTIC GAME: Feb. 

22, 6th race, $1,636.59. 

P.J. Torsney Jr.—ALLTHATHECOULDSEE: 
March 12,9th race, $2,509.43. WHY CANT 
I: Feb. 23, 1st race, $1,418.38. ($3,927.81) 
Costas N. Triantafilos—RAJAMUFFIN: Feb. 
19, 8th race, $1,854.80. 


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June 1991 


53 










Maryland Fund Report 


Stallion Bonuses 

ACALLADE (His Acallade: Feb. 18, 10th 
race, $633.78): Acallade Syndicate. 

AFFILIATE (Jay's Ally: Feb. 15, 5th race, 
$229.75): Affiliate Syndicate. 

ALLEN'S PROSPECT (Panner: Feb. 24, 5th 
race, $245.59; March 5, 1st race, $257.47. 
Ritchie Trail: Feb. 23, 10th race, $990.29): 
Allen's Prospect Syndicate—$1,493.35. 

AMBERNASH (Allthathecouldsee: March 
12, 9th race, $911.06): Thornmar Farm. 

BAEDERWOOD (Boxwood: Feb. 15, 4th 
race, $435.73. Dans les Bois: March 12, 
10th race, $229.75. Woodbeatease: March 
12, 6th race, $356.50): Baederwood Syndi¬ 
cate—$1,021.98. 

BARA PRINCE (Camabara: Feb. 14, 2nd 
race, $356.60): Schelford North Farm, Inc. 

BRILLIANT PROTEGE (Cool Brilliance: Feb. 
24, 1st race, $277.28. Miss Protege: March 
5, 6th race, $831.84): Brilliant Protege Syn¬ 
dicate—$1,109.12. 

CAVEAT (Annie's Warning: Feb. 18, 2nd 
race, $229.75. Be Careful: March 5, 10th 
race, $249.55. Once Over Knightly: Feb. 
24, 12th race, $217.86): Caveat Syndicate— 
$697.16. 

CHRISTOPHER R. (Chris' Holiday: March 
1, 6th race, $514.95): Shamrock Farms. 


CLEVER CHAMP (Clever Forever: Feb. 16, 
3rd race, $297.09): Clever Champ Syndi¬ 
cate. 

DANCING COUNT (Dantell: Feb. 15, 1st 
race, $514.95): Dancing Count Syndicate. 

DEPUTED TESTAMONY (Gronwohld: 
March 9, 2nd race, $435.73. Justins Tes- 
tamony: March 2, 10th race, $752.62. 
McKilts: March 10, 10th race, $792.23. Re¬ 
puted Testamony: Feb. 19, 9th race, 
$1,584.46; March 2, 11th race, $792.23): 
Deputed Testamony Syndicate—$4,357.27. 

DOUBLE ZEUS (Double Artemis: March 10, 
10th race, $435.73. Doubletime Miss: 
March 10, 1st race, $297.09): Double Zeus 
Syndicate—$732.82. 

FULL INTENT (Intended Rullah: March 9, 
3rd race, $217.86): Mrs. Robert Beall. 

FUZZBUSTER (Uncle Buster: March 1, 1st 
race, $297.09): Fuzzbuster Syndicate. 

HAIL EMPEROR (Emperor's Darling: March 
5, 5th race, $245.59. Salve: March 2, 5th 
race, $209.94. Why Cant I: Feb. 23,1st race, 
$514.95): Hail Emperor Syndicate— 
$970.48. 

HASTY SPRING (Big Upheavel: Feb. 24, 
10th race, $633.78): Hasty Spring Syndi¬ 
cate. 

HORATIUS (Johnny Rome: Sept. 21, 7th 
race, $514.95): Horatius Syndicate. 


I AM THE GAME (Brookwood: March 4, 7th 
race, $475.34): I Am the Game Syndicate. 

ISLAND CHAMP (D. C. Maxwell: Feb. 19, 
1st race, $673.39): John C. Heil. 

JOHN ALDEN (Alden's Crown: Feb. 16, 6th 
race, $396.11. Barbara's Last: Feb. 16, 12th 
race, $217.86; March 12, 4th race, $257.47. 
For Yourself: Feb. 24, 3rd race, $217.86. 
John's Decision: Feb. 23, 10th race, 
$544.66): John Alden Syndicate— 
$1,633.96. 

JOYFUL CHARGER (A Joyful Danielle: Feb. 
23, 8th race, $514.95): John A. Manfuso. 

LIVELY KING (King Bar: Feb. 14, 1st race, 
$297.09): Lively King Syndicate. 

LORD GAYLORD (Gaylord's Annie: Feb. 23, 
9th race, $831.84. Lady of Decorum: March 
4, 4th race, $574.37): Lord Gaylord Syndi¬ 
cate—$1,406.21. 

MARINE BRASS (Grangrad John: Feb. 26, 
1st race, $415.92): K.T. Leatherbury and 
Murmur Farm. 

NORTHERN RAJA (Rajamuffin: Feb. 19, 8th 
race, $673.39. Sisaroo: Feb. 14, 3rd race, 
$475.34; March 3, 9th race, $673.39): 
Northern Raja—$1,822.12. 

NORTH SEA (Run Spot: March 10, 10th 
race, $2,376.68): Alfred G. Vanderbilt. 

NORTH TOWER (Crooked Tower: Feb. 15, 
8th race, $594.17): North Tower Syndicate. 

OH SAY (Clair's Say: March 2, 7th race, 
$475.34. First Down: Feb. 18, 11th race, 
$435.73. Reckon Say: March 3, 7th race, 
$633.78): Oh Say Syndicate—$1,544.85. 

PEACE FOR PEACE (Tipeace: March 7, 4th 
race, $297.09): Peace for Peace Syndicate. 

POLES APART (A Call to Rise: March 9, 6th 
race, $831.84. All Laughter: March 7, 5th 
race, $245.59): John A. Manfuso Sr.— 
$1,077.43. 

RAMBO (Ire) (Hooliganisim: March 2, 11th 
race, $237.67. Saucy Bird: Feb. 22, 5th race, 
$376.31): T.J. Rooney and Thoroughbred 
Trust of Ireland—$613.98. 

ROLLICKING (Rollicking Stream: Feb. 19, 
7th race, $633.78. Rollodka: Feb. 21, 1st 
race, $356.50; March 2, 6th race, $356.50): 
Mrs. Robert Leonard—$1,346.78. 

SHELTER HALF (Half English: March 1, 5th 
race, $245.59. Mary B.: March 2, 9th race, 
$673.39. Witch Half: March 2, 4th race, 
$475.34): Shelter Half Syndicate— 
$1,394.32. 

SHIFTY SHEIK (Chrisheik: March 12, 1st 
race, $245.59): Shifty Sheik Syndicate. 

THIRTY EIGHT PACES (Abbeys Gait: Feb. 
19, 10th race, $336.70. Brilliant Paces: 
March 2, 1st race, $277.28. Jet Stream: 
March 2, 11th race, $2,376.68. Thirty- 
eightcaliber: Feb. 17, 10th race, $831.84. 
Thirty Eight Go Go: Feb. 18, 11th race, 
$237.67. Tor's Paces: March 3, 12th race, 
$554.56): Double Paces Stable—$4,614.73. 

TWO PUNCH (Blushing Punch: Feb. 18, 5th 
race, $245.59. Haymaker: March 3, 10th 
race, $2,176.65): Two Punch Partnership— 
$2,422.24. 

ULTRAMATE (Space Mate: March 7, 1st 
race, $633.78): Ultramate Syndicate. 


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54 











PIMLICO 


Never has a more stellar field of horses lined up 
together in the starting gate at Pimlico. 

Summer Squall returned to the scene of his 1990 
Preakness victory along with Unbridled, winner of last 
year's Kentucky Derby, for their first rematch since last 
May. 

Jolie's Halo brought with him a near-perfect record 
that included brilliant wins in two Grade 1 stakes. 

Festin (Arg)—billed as the "now" horse—was there 
to prove that his defeat of Jolie's Halo, Unbridled and 
Farma Way in the April 13 Oaklawn Park Handicap-Gl 
was not just the result of a sloppy track. 

And Farma Way, unquestionably the best handicap 
horse in California this season, was unleashed by the 
ever-powerful D. Wayne Lukas. 

They were drawn together on May 11 by the Grade 1 
$750,000-guaranteed Pimlico Special, which gained ex¬ 
tra stature this year as the fourth leg of the new Ameri¬ 
can Championship Racing Series, a ten-race program 
that includes the country's most important races for 
older horses. 

Except for the two longshots. Silver Survivor and 
Reputed Testamony, they appeared evenly matched, a 
showcase of talent. 

But the others ended up chasing an emerging su¬ 
perstar. 

Farma Way set every fraction and won by three 
lengths over Summer Squall, giving one of the most 
powerful running displays ever seen at Old Hilltop. 
His time (l:52 2 /s) for the mile and three-sixteenths 
took three-fifths of a second off the track record set by 
another of trainer Wayne Lukas's charges. Criminal 


Never headed in the Pimlico Special, Farma Way set 
a new track record in defeating a stellar field, including 
Summer Squall, Jolie's Halo, Festin and Unbridled. 


Farma Way has 
it all his way in 
Pimlico Special 

By Lucy Acton 


Type, in last year's Pimlico Special, and equaled the 
North American record Riva Ridge set while winning 
the Brooklyn Handicap at Aqueduct in 1973. 

"This is the best handicap horse in the world, and he 
will prove it over and over and over again," was 
Lukas's post-race analysis. The nation's all-time lead¬ 
ing trainer in virtually every category, Lukas had felt 
slighted by the lack of respect given Farma Way up to 
the Special. (As fourth choice at Pimlico, the winner 
paid $14.40.) "I've had a lot of good horses," said the 
trainer, "and this is a damn good horse. He's so ver¬ 
satile. He can do it any way you want—come from 
behind, or on the lead ..." 

Rider Gary Stevens allowed Farma Way to go to the 
front in the early stages. Farma Way, stalked by Jolie's 
Halo, passed the first quarter-mile in :23 2 /s and half- 
mile in :46 4 /s—relatively slow times considering the 
level of competition. When it came time for the others 
to make their moves, the pace accelerated and there 
were no serious challenges. In spite of Summer 
Squall's game try, Farma Way was gaining ground at 
the end. 

A tiring Jolie's Halo finished two and a half lengths 
back, followed by Festin, Silver Survivor, Unbridled 
and Reputed Testamony. 

Farma Way, bred in Kentucky by Coleman D. Calla¬ 
way III and Susan Clay Callaway, waited a long time to 
displace Summer Squall and Unbridled in the lime¬ 
light. The 4-year-old colt by Marfa—Fine Tribute by 
Diplomat Way brought $6,700 as a weanling at the 
Fasig-Tipton Kentucky November sale. He was resold 
as a yearling for $25,000, then purchased by his owner 
George Bunn for $145,000 at the 1989 Fasig-Tipton 
Florida Select 2-Year-Olds in Training sale at Calder. 

Although he finished second in the Grade 1 Holly¬ 
wood Futurity as a 2-year-old and won one stakes (the 












Baldwin Stakes on the turf at Santa Anita) as a 3-year- 
old last year, it wasn't until last fall when he was 
switched to Wayne Lukas that his career began in ear¬ 
nest. Farma Way won the San Carlos Handicap-G2, 
San Pasqual Handicap-G2, San Antonio Handicap-G2 
and Santa Anita Handicap-Gl at progressively longer 
distances last January through March, and suffered 
his only 1991 loss in the Oaklawn Park Handicap. 

By far the best horse ever to campaign for George 
Bunn's Quarter B Farm, Farma Way has earned 
$1,652,176, with the bulk of that amount ($1,353,350) 
coming in 1991. Up to now, his owner has been best 
known as the president of Bunn-O-Matic Coffee 
Makers. 

Local note: on the day of the Pimlico Special, Bunn 
was accompanied at the races by his "best friend" 
David P. Reynolds, a longtime Maryland breeder and 
uncle of Worthington Farms co-owner Glennie Martin. 
The two men (Bunn is 75 and lives in Springfield, Ill.; 
Reynolds, 76, has his home in Richmond, Va.) were 
schoolmates at Lawrenceville Prep and Princeton Uni¬ 
versity and have remained close ever since. Bunn, who 
owns a share in the Worthington Farms stallion Lord 
Gaylord, toured Worthington twice during his stay in 
Maryland, reported Glennie's husband Duck Martin. 

"They stayed at the Hunt Valley Inn, but Mr. Bunn 
and his farm manager Tim Boyer were out here on 
Friday afternoon and Saturday morning, along with 
relatives and grandchildren." The Martins' son Bill 
and Mr. Bunn's grandson Carter Brown graduated to¬ 
gether this spring from Lawrenceville Prep. 

While Farma Way's crowd celebrated, they were not 
the only ones affected by the outcome of the race. 

Following Unbridled's lackluster performance, it 
was announced that he had bled—"a substantial 
amount was found in the trachea"—and was to be 
shipped back to trainer Carl Nafzger's home base at 
Arlington Park. The Special was Unbridled's third start 
this season. He beat Housebuster in near-track-record 
time while winning the seven-furlong Deputy Minis¬ 
ter Handicap at Gulfstream Park on March 16, but the 
Special was his second disappointment in a row, he 
having finished fifth in Festin's Oaklawn Park Hand¬ 
icap. 

On the other hand. Summer Squall's connections 
had plenty of reasons to be pleased. "Obviously we 
were disappointed he didn't win," said Maryland na¬ 
tive Jack Sadler, public relations director for Cot Camp¬ 
bell's Dogwood Stable, which manages the syndicate- 
owned colt. "But we tied the track record, by finishing 
second. Summer Squall could go back to the barn with 
his head held high. He came back fine—he's sound, 
without any signs of bleeding." Summer Squall had 
started only once this year, winning a six and a half¬ 
furlong allowance race at Keeneland on April 11. 

Several of Summer Squall's owners (members of the 
limited partnership known as Dogwood Classic) live in 
the Mid-Atlantic region. Those who came to watch him 
run in the Special were Donald and Barbara Weir, of 


York, Pa., Peter and Rosemary Haas, of Denville, N.J., 
and Eleanor and Ben Sparenberg, of Sparks, Md. 

Reputed Testamony was the only Mid-Atlantic-bred 
starter in the Special. Although his credentials were 
marginal at best, the 4-year-old son of 1983 Preakness 
winner Deputed Testamony deserved the opportunity, 
in the opinion of his trainer and part-owner Richard 
Hemmings. Reputed Testamony had been competitive 
in his races here in Maryland, winning the Jennings 
Handicap at Pimlico in March, and coming back in his 
latest effort to be second by a nose to J.R.'s Horizon in 
the Grade 3 Campbell Handicap. 

"He ran faster than he'd ever run. It was a very 
tough race; it was great to be in it," commented Hem¬ 
mings the following morning. Reputed Testamony 
came back fine, the trainer added. "We'll give him 
some time off, and drop him down a notch or two. He 
learned a lot from running against those horses. Who 
knows—we may be back at that level some time." 

The Special was an undreamt-of goal when Hem¬ 
mings and his partners Matt Kane, a Washington, 
D.C., policeman, and Herb Lichtenstein, a Baltimore, 
Md., wholesale food merchant, purchased the colt at 
the 1989 Fasig-Tipton Midlantic Open Two-Year-Olds 
in Training sale at Timonium for $8,000. Foaled at the 
Boniface family's Bonita Farm in Darlington (Md.) and 
bred by Bonita Farm in partnership with E. Holmes 
Hawkins and Jonathan T. Ginn, Reputed Testamony 
(out of the Val de l'Orne-Fr mare Remnant) has earned 
$221,989. He is still the horse of a lifetime for Hem¬ 
mings, who has been in the business since 1987, and 
has four horses stabled at Laurel. 

This year marked the fourth running of the modern- 
day Pimlico Special, which has been a blockbuster for 
every renewal. Bet Twice defeated Alysheba in 1988, 
Blushing John (1989) went on to be champion older 
horse, and Criminal Type (1990) launched himself to 
horse of the year honors. 

For 1990, the purse for the Special was raised to $1 
million guaranteed, making it Maryland's first and 
only million-dollar race. The purse was lowered again 
this year, due to expenses involved in the American 
Championship Racing Series. 

But the ACRS, conceived and promoted by Match¬ 
maker Racing Services president Barry L. Weisbord 
(whose own filly, Maryland-bred champion Safely 
Kept, obligingly won her 1991 debut on the same day 
as the Pimlico Special), has been a resounding success 
so far—as evidenced by the Pimlico Special. The pur¬ 
pose of the series is to draw top handicap horses to¬ 
gether, in nationally-televised (ABC Sports) events, to 
promote wider interest in racing. 

Six more ARCS events are scheduled this season: 
the Nassau County Handicap-G2, June 8, Belmont; 
Hollywood Gold Cup-Gl, June 29, Hollywood; New 
England Classic, July 20, Rockingham; Pacific Classic, 
August 10, Del Mar; Philip Iselin Handicap-Gl, Sept. 
1, Monmouth; and the Woodward Stakes-Gl, Sept. 15, 
Belmont. □ 




From The Jockey Club 

The Jockey Club mailed the first 
batch of blood-typing kits for foals of 
1991 during the first week of May 
Drawing blood and completing the 
necessary paperwork can become time- 
consuming—not to mention costly—if 
a re-test is called for just because it 
wasn't done correctly the first time. 
The Jockey Club has prepared the fol¬ 
lowing list of do's and don'ts to help 
avoid the most frequent mistakes. 

Don't: 

■ Draw blood or ship samples when it 
means they will arrive during a 
weekend or holiday period. The 
Post Office does not take respon¬ 
sibility for refrigerating blood sam¬ 
ples when delivery to the laboratory 
is delayed. The Jockey Club recom¬ 
mends drawing and mailing sam¬ 
ples early in the week to minimize 
the risk of re-testing. 

■ Remove stoppers from the tubes. 
This can make the red blood cells 
unsuitable for testing. 

■ Freeze blood samples. 

■ Ship samples on dry ice or frozen 
cold packs. This can freeze the red 
blood cells, making the sample unfit 
for testing. 

Do: 

■ Draw two samples from each animal 
to be blood-typed. The red-stop¬ 
pered tube is for a clotted sample; 
the yellow-stoppered tube contains 
an anti-coagulant. 

■ Draw blood samples in the tubes pro¬ 
vided, using a clean, sterile "Vacu- 
tainer" needle. 

■ Fill the tubes to within three-quarter 
inch of the top. 

■ Invert the yellow-colored tube sever¬ 
al times; however, do not shake it. 

■ If the tube loses its vacuum and you 
must use a syringe, use a sterile 20 
cc syringe and at least a 16 gauge 
needle. When transferring the 
blood from the syringe into the 


blood tube, hold the blood tube at an 
angle and allow the blood to flow 
gently into the tube. Use a sterile sy¬ 
ringe and needle for each horse. 

■ Complete the description and dia¬ 
gram of the horse on the form pro¬ 
vided every time you draw blood on 
the horse. This helps assure The 
Jockey Club that you are drawing 
blood on the correct horse. 

■ Refrigerate samples for at least two 
hours after obtaining them. 

■ When shipping by air, use air couri¬ 
ers which deliver direct to the labo¬ 
ratory, not just to the airport. 

■ Send samples in the white mailing 
box provided with the preprinted 
laboratory address. 

■ If you discover that you have col¬ 
lected samples from the wrong 
horse, notify The Jockey Club im¬ 
mediately, and before samples are 
mailed to the laboratory. 

Remember . . . registration/blood-typ¬ 
ing forms should be completed and 
mailed at the same time as blood is 
drawn. If they are not, breeders run 
the risk of having to re-start the 
blood-testing process at an addition¬ 
al cost. 

AHC conference 

Robert E. Mulcahy III, president and 
CEO of the New Jersey Sports and Ex¬ 
position Authority, will be keynote 
speaker at the American Horse Council 
racing conference to be held in Wash¬ 
ington, D.C. on June 17 and June 18. 
Mr. Mulcahy will speak on June 17 on 
the role of racing in the '90s. 

Sports betting, Indian gaming, a 
comparison of off-track wagering in the 
United States and Great Britain, and 
Australian racing are some of the topics 
to be explored at the conference. 

In addition to the previously an¬ 
nounced speakers for the Council's rac¬ 
ing conference—which included. 


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among others. Congressman John 
Bryant (D-Tex.), Anthony Hope, chair¬ 
man of the National Indian Gaming 
Commission, David Goodwill, presi¬ 
dent of Ladbroke Racing Corporation, 
and Andrew Beyer, turf writer for The 
Washington Post —several outstanding 
experts have been added to the pro¬ 
gram. 

Dr. Robert Lawrence, professor of 
economics and chairman of the Equine 
Industry Program of the University of 
Louisville, will act as chair of a panel 
dealing with the economic aspects of 
race horse ownership. In addition. Dr. 
Lawrence will analyze purses being 
paid to both Thoroughbred and har¬ 
ness horses. Other members of the 
panel are Tim Capps, first vice-presi¬ 
dent at Laurel and Pimlico, who will fo¬ 
cus on the shortage of race horses, and 
Dave Carrico, vice-president of market¬ 
ing at Churchill, who will explain a new 
marketing program directed to encour¬ 
aging new owners to invest in racing. 
Robert Manfuso will give the perspec¬ 
tive of the Thoroughbred owner and 
breeder in today's market, and Michael 
Chasanoff will give the viewpoint of a 
Standardbred owner and breeder. 


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58 


Maryland Horse 











































Mid-Atlantic Region 
Leading Active Sires in 1991 

Stallions standing in Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia 

(Statistics compiled by Bloodstock Research Information Services. They include racing of May 1.) 



Foals 

Runners 

Starts 

Winners 

Races 

Won 

Leading Earner 

Earnings 

%Wnrs./ 

Starters 

Avg.l 

Runner 

Baederwood (Md). 

192 

55 

246 

30 

50 

Forest Fealty ($82,075) 

$443,532 

55.0 

$ 8,064 

Caveat (Md). 

187 

66 

284 

25 

29 

J. R.'s Horizon ($92,720) 

440,843 

38.0 

6,679 

Deputed Testamony (Md) ... 

115 

46 

204 

22 

39 

Reputed Testamony ($121,000) 

405,231 

48.0 

8,809 

Oh Say (Md). 

208 

54 

246 

27 

39 

Balotra ($55,532) 

385,230 

50.0 

7,134 

Shelter Half (Md). 

. 215 

52 

228 

25 

39 

In the Curl ($67,560) 

368,752 

48.0 

7,091 

Horatius (Md). 

304 

60 

257 

26 

36 

Forry Cow How ($53,520) 

367,469 

43.0 

6,124 

Thirty Eight Paces (Md). 

134 

44 

194 

20 

23 

Jet Stream ($58,050) 

353,828 

45.0 

8,042 

Aloma's Ruler (Md). 

189 

51 

225 

22 

34 

Southern Sooner ($45,640) 

283,946 

43.0 

5,568 

Smarten (Md). 

300 

48 

178 

18 

21 

Smart Alec ($39,126) 

272,227 

38.0 

5,671 

Believe the Queen (Md). 

84 

23 

82 

13 

20 

Wait for the Lady ($129,780) 

267,160 

57.0 

11,616 

John Alden (Md). 

. 180 

44 

205 

18 

26 

My Treasure ($82,995) 

264,256 

41.0 

6,006 

Lord Gaylord (Md). 

294 

39 

143 

13 

18 

Risk It ($46,620) 

256,284 

33.0 

6,571 

Quadratic (Va). 

. 348 

62 

263 

22 

32 

Forty Weight ($37,800) 

238,583 

35.0 

3,848 

Pappa Riccio (NJ). 

61 

21 

115 

7 

15 

Shuttleman ($108,803) 

230,733 

33.0 

10,987 

Hail Emperor (Md). 

. 139 

42 

182 

17 

23 

Flaming Emperor ($31,800) 

222,627 

40.0 

5,301 

Two Punch (Md). 

68 

18 

67 

8 

12 

Haymaker ($84,570) 

203,242 

44.0 

11,291 

Contare (Va). 

. 151 

42 

178 

22 

28 

Alanna ($32,220) 

194,954 

52.0 

4,642 

Salutely (Md). 

111 

27 

118 

12 

15 

Seven Salutes ($40,360) 

185,441 

44.0 

6,868 

Parfaitement (Md). 

129 

30 

112 

12 

18 

Micheal's Rep ($33,738) 

178,377 

40.0 

5,946 

Val de TOrne (Fr) (Va). 

374 

27 

100 

11 

14 

Normandie Cross ($36,780) 

176,754 

41.0 

6,546 

Double Zeus (Md). 

208 

49 

236 

17 

22 

Double Artemis ($31,825) 

176,436 

35.0 

3,601 

Clever Champ (Md). 

85 

25 

113 

14 

20 

Clever Mary ($30,720) 

170,148 

56.0 

6,806 

Allen's Prospect (Md). 

95 

26 

101 

6 

7 

Ritchie Trail ($70,780) 

166,508 

23.0 

6,404 

Dancing Count (Md). 

407 

32 

125 

12 

23 

Dantell ($27,680) 

165,194 

38.0 

5,162 

Five Star Flight (NJ). 

179 

38 

165 

18 

32 

Thundrbforthestorm ($37,200) 

156,704 

47.0 

4,124 

Silver Badge (Md). 

232 

17 

63 

3 

7 

Silver Tango ($127,030) 

153,756 

18.0 

9,044 

Assault Landing (Md). 

115 

35 

157 

10 

15 

Snork ($29,650) 

151,239 

29.0 

4,321 

Carnivalay (Md). 

97 

28 

108 

11 

13 

Wannamoisett ($31,960) 

137,035 

39.0 

4,894 

Pas Seul (Va). 

156 

26 

92 

7 

9 

Maybe Next Week ($29,750) 

135,682 

27.0 

5,219 

Sir Jinsky (NJ). 

154 

30 

135 

13 

19 

Without Contempt ($17,129) 

134,928 

43.0 

4,498 

Rollicking (Md). 

368 

34 

146 

12 

20 

Paya ($23,800) 

128,698 

35.0 

3,785 

The Cool Virginian (Va). 

163 

42 

167 

15 

22 

The Real Virginian ($31,266) 

127,340 

36.0 

3,032 

Gilded Age (Va). 

101 

28 

111 

12 

17 

Blandy ($16,780) 

118,820 

43.0 

4,244 

Iron (Md). 

76 

28 

138 

11 

13 

Neat Pleat ($23,940) 

117,411 

39.0 

4,193 

Northern Raja (Md). 

98 

20 

81 

6 

10 

Rajamuffin ($34,620) 

107,361 

30.0 

5,368 

Dancing Czar (WV). 

29 

11 

45 

5 

7 

Sharp Dance ($63,520) 

101,608 

45.0 

9,237 

North Tower (Md). 

181 

20 

107 

8 

11 

Crooked Tower ($29,970) 

100,469 

40.0 

5,023 

Travelling Music (Md). 

. 153 

29 

134 

10 

14 

Missy's Music ($9,900) 

98,426 

34.0 

3,394 

Give It a Chance (NJ). 

16 

3 

14 

2 

5 

Coroly ($87,460) 

97,170 

67.0 

32,390 

Better Arbitor (NJ). 

. 131 

18 

79 

7 

11 

Eleven Spurs ($29,282) 

95,460 

39.0 

5,303 

Executive Pride (Ire) (Va) ... 

44 

16 

82 

10 

14 

Sitting On Top ($34,840) 

95,395 

63.0 

5,962 

Hasty Spring (Md). 

89 

28 

136 

10 

18 

Big Upheavel ($31,220) 

95,379 

36.0 

3,406 

Great Prospector (NJ). 

125 

26 

110 

11 

14 

Leroy's Regal Son ($17,720) 

95,350 

42.0 

3,667 

Marine Brass (Md). 

67 

16 

68 

10 

12 

Royal Brass ($27,150) 

94,693 

63.0 

5,918 

U. S. Flag (NJ). 

47 

16 

53 

6 

7 

Idle Isle ($31,155) 

92,133 

38.0 

5,758 

Poles Apart (Md). 

22 

7 

35 

4 

7 

A Call to Rise ($66,890) 

91,816 

57.0 

13,117 

To the Quick (Va). 

. 333 

27 

100 

9 

11 

Raise Me Quick ($18,200) 

91,319 

33.0 

3,382 

Nepal (Pa). 

41 

11 

38 

4 

4 

Concomitant ($56,040) 

88,414 

36.0 

8,038 

Brilliant Protege (Md). 

150 

22 

101 

8 

12 

Miss Protege ($40,850) 

87,829 

36.0 

3,992 

Christopher R. (Md). 

240 

18 

93 

10 

13 

Chris' Holiday ($22,810) 

81,417 

56.0 

4,523 

Pilot Ship (Md). 

74 

12 

44 

4 

7 

Am Possible ($57,252) 

72,570 

33.0 

6,048 

Aye's Turn (WV). 

71 

17 

95 

9 

15 

Cavalry Turn ($19,260) 

69,827 

53.0 

4,107 

Two Davids (Md). 

103 

27 

92 

10 

13 

Cheerfy ($13,900) 

68,928 

37.0 

2,553 

Sentimental Slew (Md). 

32 

7 

27 

2 

3 

Slew's Desire ($54,008) 

68,335 

29.0 

9,762 

Double Leader (Pa). 

81 

18 

80 

5 

9 

Dame's Double ($22,047) 

68,092 

28.0 

3,783 

Really Secret (Va). 

18 

6 

23 

3 

4 

Caliche's Secret ($47,825) 

67,572 

50.0 

11,262 


June 1991 59 






























































Pennsylvania 

■ Tom Bob's victory in the Maryland 
Hunt Cup made waves at the Lyman 
family's Maui Meadow Farm in Chester 
County. 

That's because the Carriers' horse is 
one of their regular patrons. "He's here 
swimming in our pool about three 
times a week," says Charles Lyman Jr. 
"Rusty Carrier has used our facility as 
part of his training program for a cou¬ 
ple of years." 

Maui Meadow was founded by Ly¬ 
man's father in 1946. Today it is staffed 
by three generations of the family: Mrs. 
Charles Lyman Sr.; Charles Jr. and his 
wife Erika; Charles III and his wife 
Emma and sister Eri Lyman Bailey. 

A "complete horse facility" with one 
stallion, T. V. Alliance (by T. V. Commer¬ 
cial) who stands for $1,000 live foal, 
Maui Meadow does a lot of training and 
rehabilitation work for outside clients 
and also breeds and races homebreds. 

Swimming is one of the major ser¬ 
vices offered at Maui Meadow. The fa¬ 
cility is also frequently used by trainer 
Jonathan Sheppard. 

■ "I could talk about him all day," says 
Peter Giangiulo of his new horse Cara- 
jas. A stakes-placed son of Raise a Na¬ 
tive, Carajas moved into the stallion 
barn at Giangiulo's family-owned Cas¬ 
tle Rock Farm in Unionville on April 1, 
and has since won a number of new 
admirers. "He's big and brazen and fun 
to have around," in the words of Mr. 
Giangiulo. 

Carajas, who brought $550,000 on a 
bid by Allen Paulson at a California 
2-year-olds in training sale, is out of the 
stakes-winning, stakes-producing La 
Jalouse by Nijinsky II. A foal of 1982, he 
entered stud at Blue Ridge Farm in Vir¬ 
ginia in 1989, then was put back in 
training. So he is, for most intents and 
purposes, a new stallion. 

An attorney, Mr. Giangiulo practices 
general law from an office on the farm 


The Mid-Atlantic Report 


while also overseeing the Thorough¬ 
bred breeding operation, which in¬ 
cludes two other stallions. Consul Gen¬ 
eral (by Secretariat) and Leematt (by 
Turn to Reason). All three Castle Rock 
stallions stand for $1,000 live foal. 

The farm was founded by Gian¬ 
giulo's father, Joseph, in 1957. Peter 
Giangiulo took over upon his father's 
death in 1979, and converted it from a 
private to commercial operation. His 
mother Julia Giangiulo and sister Bar¬ 
bara Geraghty are also involved in 
bookkeeping and decision-making. 
"We attempt to meet the needs of the 
horseman who breeds to race," says 
Giangiulo. "The farm isn't oriented to¬ 
ward sales-type horses." 

Castle Rock, comprised of 170 acres, 
has eight home-owned broodmares 
and a number of year-round boarders. 
Among the best of its own mares are 
Sleep Lonely (by Pia Star), dam of 
graded stakes winner Quantra; and 
Foxy J.G. (by Mister Pitt), a stakes win¬ 
ner of over $150,000. 

■ Mid-Atlantic horsemen fare well at 
most steeplechasing meets, and this 
year's Dueling Grounds International 
Hurdle, at Dueling Grounds (Ky.) on 
April 21, was no exception. Pennsylva¬ 
nia-based trainer Janet Elliot saddled 
Victorian Hill to a nine and a half- 
length victory in the event, which was 
worth $165,000 to the winner. Victorian 
Hill is owned by William Lickle, an ex¬ 
ecutive with Morgan Christiana Corpo¬ 
ration in Wilmington, Del. 

Ms. Elliot has risen to the top of her 
profession over the last several years. 
The only woman to have trained a 
Breeders' Cup Steeplechase winner 
(Census, 1986) and a former assistant to 
Jonathan Sheppard, she has been on 
her own since 1980. The sixth-leading 
trainer by total purses in the history of 
the sport, Ms. Elliot leads the 1991 
trainer standings in both races won and 


money won, with seven wins and 
$297,925. 

Victorian Hill, a 6-year-old gelding 
by Dickens Hill (Ire), was bred in Flori¬ 
da by John H. Hartigan. Victorian Hill 
and his owner have overwhelming 
leads in their respective money-won 
standings. Victorian Hill has earned 
$175,000 this season and Lickle's overall 
1991 stable earnings are $195,500. 

West Virginia 

■ Charles Town's richest race will be 
richer this fall, when the track hosts the 
fifth anniversary running of the West 
Virginia Breeders Classics. The purse 
for the featured Kamora Classic has 
been increased to $200,000, reports 
Classics executive director Carol Hold¬ 
en. Previously worth $125,000, it will 
again be sponsored by Jim Beam. 

This year's West Virginia Breeders 
Classics is scheduled for September 27. 
ESPN will cover the event, and re¬ 
broadcast it at 5:30 p.m. September 29. 

As always, a number of social events 
and other activities are being planned 
in conjunction with the Classics. They 
include a dinner dance gala at O'Sul¬ 
livan Farm, a golf tournament, and a 
5-K people race to benefit the Jefferson 
County Animal Welfare Society. 

■ Another potential star has just 
emerged from Country Roads Farm, 
Suzanne and Vinnie Moscarelli's estab¬ 
lishment near Charles Town. Her name 
is Cafe West. Making her first career 
start against $50,000 maidens at Pimlico 
on April 23, the 3-year-old daughter of 
Shelter Half gave a gutsy performance, 
setting every fraction and holding on to 
win by a nose. 

Cafe West is the first foal from Coun¬ 
try Roads' good mare Media Girl, who 
captured the 1984 Rhododendron 
Handicap. Vinnie Moscarelli is the 
trainer. 

■ Suzanne Moscarelli notes that April 
23, the day of Cafe West's victory, was a 


60 


Maryland Horse 
















big day for Charles Town trainers at 
Pimlico. After Vinnie Moscarelli sad¬ 
dled the winner of the first race, trainer 
Jeff Runco won the fourth, a $16,000 
claiming event, with Flying Tempo. 
Then Lee Couchenour sent Icey Call 
out to win the allowance feature. 

■ Charles Marcus, former owner of 
Charles Town Races and owner/opera¬ 
tor of the nearby Turf Motel and Restau¬ 
rant, died April 23 at Jefferson Memori¬ 
al Hospital. He was 66. 

In 1982, Marcus, along with 14 area 
businessmen, purchased Charles Town 
from Rapid America Corp. for $12 mil¬ 
lion, completing a deal that had been 
two years in the making. Marcus 
served as president of the track before 
selling his shares in December, 1986, 
due to poor health. 

Survivors include his wife Wenonah 
(Scottie) McKee Marcus; two daugh¬ 
ters, Lana M. Schultz of Charles Town 
and Karen M. Lack of New York; two 
sons, Terry L. and Ronald E., both of 
Charles Town; a brother, Townsend 
Lee Marcus of Glendora, Calif., and 
eight grandchildren. 

Virginia 

■ Paying big money for a broodmare 
doesn't guarantee results. But John and 
Joan Belotti have certainly had things 
go their way with 12-year-old Metrica 
(by Holy War), a $215,000 purchase at 
the 1986 Ocala Breeders' Sales Compa¬ 
ny winter mixed sale. 

A 3-year-old filly champion in Puer¬ 
to Rico and half-sister to graded stakes 


winner Bold Southerner (by Sovereign 
Dancer), Metrica was in foal to Sover¬ 
eign Dancer when the Belottis bought 
her. That Sovereign Dancer colt 
brought $425,000 as a yearling at Sar¬ 
atoga. (Named Sovereign Dex, he later 
failed to break his maiden in three ca¬ 
reer starts.) 

Because another of Metrica's half¬ 
siblings (the filly Alcancia) happened 
to be a stakes winner by Cannonade, 
the Belottis bred their mare back to 
Cannonade's son Caveat for 1987. From 
that mating came J.R.'s Horizon, win¬ 
ner of the recent Grade 3 John B. Camp¬ 
bell Handicap at Pimlico. 

Mr. and Mrs. Belotti sold J.R.'s Hori¬ 
zon at the 1989 Fasig-Tipton Midlantic 
Select Two-Year-Olds in Training sale, 
getting $30,000 on a bid by Marvin 
Champion of Alexandria, Va. The 
4-year-old gelding campaigns for 
Champion under the care of Bowie- 
based trainer Mert Bailes. 

"I didn't like it when the trainer re¬ 
ferred to him as a juvenile delinquent!" 
remarked Mrs. Belotti, "but he's a lot 
like his mother. They're both small 
(Metrica is only I 5 .IV 2 ). She's not 
mean; she just feels good." J.R.'s Hori¬ 
zon competed without success in last 
year's Preakness, but was second in the 
Federico Tesio Stakes-G3 and third in 
the Broad Brush Stakes before getting 
his first stakes win in the Campbell. He 
has earned $203,030. 

Trainer D. Wayne Lukas purchased 
Metrica's current 2-year-old, another 
Sovereign Dancer colt, for $55,000 at 
last year's Saratoga auction. Metrica 


also has a yearling colt by Northern 
Baby, and was due to foal to Clever 
Trick in late May. 

Metrica is one of four broodmares 
owned by Mr. and Mrs. Belotti at their 
65-acre Hi-Rock Farm in Hay market. 
"She's our first big horse," says Mrs. 
Belotti. They have been in the horse 
business for about 15 years. Mr. Belotti 
is a land developer and president of an 
electrical contracting firm headquar¬ 
tered in Fairfax, Va. 

■ Bonner Farm's 5-year-old Miss Josh 
has had to overcome chonic foot prob¬ 
lems. But she took flight once again in 
Pimlico's Gallorette Handicap-G3 on 
April 27, scoring by a length and three- 
quarters as odds-on favorite. 

The 121-pound highweight, she 
gave between six and ten pounds to 
each of her five rivals, and boosted her 
1991 earnings to $144,320. Miss Josh 
had a lucrative winter campaign in 
Florida, with a victory in the $100,000- 
guaranteed Fort Lauderdale Handicap 
on April 7 and a troubled but game sec¬ 
ond to Canadian champion Izvestia in 
the Canadian Turf Handicap-G2. All of 
Miss Josh's good races have been on the 
grass. 

The winner's circle at Pimlico wasn't 
large enough to accommodate all of her 
connections after she won the Galloret¬ 
te. The photograph had to be taken on 
the track. Miss Josh races for her breed¬ 
er, George E. Rowand, of Orlean, Va., 
and his family, and is trained by Mary¬ 
land-based conditioner Barclay Tagg. 

■ Hollywood Hendrson collapsed and 
died of an apparent heart attack after 


Do you own or train a VIRGINIA-SIRED 2-year-old colt 
or filly, or a VIRGINIA-SIRED 3 -year-old filly? 

If the answer is YES, you should know about the 

VIRGINIA STALUON STAKES 

($40,000-added, seven furlongs, for Virginia-sired 2-year-olds) 

and the 

VIRGINIA STALUON OAKS 

($25,000-added, one mile on the turf, for Virginia-sired 3-year-old fillies) 



For more information contact: 

Virginia Thoroughbred Association, 38 Garrett Street, Warrenton, VA 22186 (703) 347-4313 


June 1991 


61 







Springtime in Virginia 
means point-to-points 

Photographs by Douglas Lees 




Dr. Blase (#6) and Greg Ryan won the Baldwin Memorial at Bay Cockbum on Song of Songs (#11) got up to score over 
Blue Ridge, with John Bosley fading to fourth on Florida Law. Jay Meister on No Triskadekafobia in Blue Ridge open timber. 




En route to victory in a division of the Spring Hill at Casanova, 
Dr. Blase and Greg Ryan lead the field over a board fence. 


Patrick Worrall and Free Throw (right) defeated North 
Atlantic (left) and Kool Mars in Orange County open timber. 


62 


Maryland Horse 
































Maryland Horse 

^ The Thoroughbred magazine for the Mid-Atlantic region 


SAVE 49% off the cover price. 

My $30 subscription entitles me to 11 issues of Maryland Horse 
(published monthly except August-September) and I will receive 
absolutely free the Mid-AtlanticThoroughbred Stallion Directory 
published in January and Mid-AtlanticThoroughbred Statistical 
Review published in March. 


Name 


Address 


City State Zipcode 

□ Bill Me □ Payment Enclosed □ Visa □ MasterCard 6/91 

Account No._Expire Date_ Signature_ 


Enclose 
payment now 
and receive a 
beautiful full 
color map of 
Maryland's 
famed hunt 
country 

FREE. 

























NO POSTAGE 
NECESSARY 

IF MAILED 

IN THE 

UNITED STATES 


BUSINESS REPLY MAIL 

FIRST CLASS PERMIT NO. 34 BALTIMORE, MD 

POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE 


Maryland Horse 

Circulation Department 
P.O. Box 427 

Timonium, Maryland 21093-9739 




























Henry Wood took the Greenhalgh Memorial owner-rider timber 
at Blue Ridge with Topeador, trained by Speedy Smithwick. 



Bay Cockburn rode Blue 
Rocket to maiden timber 
victory at Rappahannock. 




Nomoniker (middle) carried Michele Rouse to score over Bob Happy Michele Rouse re- 
the Cat (left) and Mocito Bien in the ladies race at Casanova. turns after her success 

aboard Nomoniker (left). 



Old Dominion Hunt Cup went to Henry Wood on his Topeador, 
who held off the gray Dr. Brice, with Brice Fitzgerald up. 



Woods Winants partners 
Hansel Rag to open hur¬ 
dle win at Orange County. 



Speedy Smithwick and his 
wife Eva enjoy North At¬ 
lantic's Blue Ridge score. 



At Warrenton, Tillo (left) 
beat No Triskadekafobia 
in the open timber event. 



Peter Walsh got David's 
Passing past Best North¬ 
ern (left) in Casanova win. 


June 1991 


63 






















covering a mare on March 26 at Mr. and 
Mrs. T.E. Pittenger Jr/s Blackacre near 
Palmyra, Va. The 12-year-old son of 
Irish Castle—Baylor by ^Vaguely Noble 
won the 1982 Bowie Stakes and W.P. 
Burch Stakes, earning $210,430. He en¬ 
tered stud at Blackacre in 1986. 

■ "Virginia Derby Night," an evening 
of racing to benefit the Marion duPont 


Scott Equine Medical Center, will take 
place June 1 at the center in Leesburg. 

Five races, taped from the post pa¬ 
rade to the finish, will be broadcast 
during a seated dinner under a tent in 
the center's courtyard. Veteran stee¬ 
plechase announcer Will O'Keefe will 
be master of ceremonies, with unoffi¬ 
cial betting available at high-tech termi¬ 


nals like those used at major race 
tracks. Winners can spend their earn¬ 
ings at a silent auction held that eve¬ 
ning. 

Benefit tickets cost $100 and include 
cocktails, dinner and a small betting 
"stake." All proceeds will benefit the 
Equine Medical Center. For ticket infor¬ 
mation, call (703) 771-6800. 

Delaware 

■ Matthew O'Keefe, a 17-year-old se¬ 
nior at A.I. duPont High School in 
Wilmington, Del., has been named the 
recipient of the 36th annual Fred 
Russell-Grantland Rice Thoroughbred 
Racing Associations scholarship to 
Vanderbilt University in Nashville, 
Tenn. 

The scholarship is awarded annu¬ 
ally to a student with special interests 
and potential in the field of sports writ¬ 
ing. Winners also serve a summer in¬ 
ternship in a field related to journalism 
and/or horse racing. 

A National Merit scholar and sports 
editor of his high school newspaper, 
O'Keefe is the only high school mem¬ 
ber of the Delaware Sportswriters and 
Broadcasters Association. 

The scholarship, co-sponsored by 
Vanderbilt, was begun in 1956 and 
named in honor of the late Grantland 
Rice, an alumnus of the university. In 
1986, the name was changed to honor 
another Vanderbilt alumnus, Fred 
Russell, the longtime Nashville Banner 
sports columnist who helped guide the 
scholarship and its recipients from the 




Specializing In 

EQUINE SPORTS MEDICINE 

Rehabilitation • Training • Layups 


Authorized Distributor 
Equi-Genesis 
All-Natural Medicinal 
& Performance Supplements 


Sales & Rental Representatives 
of Stole of the Art 
Therapeutic Equipment 

Lasers • Galvanators • Magnetic Field 
• Ultra Sound 


Pam Fisher • West Grove, PA • 215-869-9753 • FAX # 215-869-3432 


The WEST VIRGINIA THOROUGHBRED BREEDERS ASSOCIATION 


It’s worth your while to take a closer 
look at our breeders’ program: 


$2-Million Thoroughbred Development Fund 
$250,000 West Virgi nia Breeders Classic 
West Virg inia Breeders Futurity 
Stallions by the Nation’s Top Sires 


For further information, contact: The West Virginia Development Fund Program (304) 725-7001 ext. 318 

The WEST VIRGINIA THOROUGHBRED BREEDERS ASSOCIATION 


64 


Maryland Horse 



















beginning. That year, the TRA pre¬ 
sented a grant of $500,000 to ensure the 
scholarship's future. 


New Jersey 

■ It seems like only yesterday when 
Bill Purdey's good homebred Spruce Fir 
was making headlines. The 8-year-old 
mare (by Big Spruce—Queen Marian 
by Maribeau) retired at age 6 after win¬ 
ning 12 stakes (four in graded compa¬ 
ny) and earning $698,703. 

This January, Spruce Fir had her first 
foal, a Deputy Minister filly, at Mr. Pur¬ 
dey's Greenfields Farm in Colts Neck, 
N.J. The owner reports that she was 
bred back to Miswaid and has been pro¬ 
nounced in foal. 


Spruce Fir is the best horse Purdey 
has had in some 24 years in the busi¬ 
ness. But she is by no means Purdey's 
only claim to fame as a horseman. Cur¬ 
rently serving his second term as presi¬ 
dent of the Thoroughbred Breeders' 
Association of New Jersey, Purdey is 
the full-time proprietor of his family's 
115-acre breeding establishment. 
"Greenfields was started by my mater¬ 
nal grandfather, W.H. LaBoyteaux, in 
1937," he explains. "My grandfather is 
best remembered for breeding and rac¬ 
ing Imperatrice, granddam of Secre¬ 
tariat. Mr. (C.T.) Chenery bought her 
when my grandfather died, in 1947." 

Today Greenfields stands two stal¬ 
lions: Marine Patrol (by Sail On-Sail 
On) and Mannerism (by *Grey Dawn 


II), each for a $1,000 stud fee, and has a 
small band of home-owned brood¬ 
mares who foaled this spring to such 
stallions as Mogambo, Green Forest 
and Wavering Monarch. □ 


STITCHES 


by 




•JJockey Colors • d4e(met Covers 
. bCintp-s * Gift Items 

P.O. Box 819 
Arnold, MD 21012 
(301) 464-3840 (Bowie) 

FAX: 301-647-6861 


PENNSYLVANIA BREEDING FUND PROGRAM AT PENN NATIONAL 

• Races restricting entry to PA-breds carrying purse premiums of 35% (maiden and conditioned allowance 
races only, effective April 1). 

• PA-breds are preferred starters in all overnight races (effective February 1). 

• Purse bonuses of 25% for PA-breds in all non-restricted overnight races other than: (1) when entered for a 
claiming price of less than $3,500 at Penn National; and (2) maiden races (effective April 1). 

• All non-restricted maiden races will carry a 10% owner’s award for the winner. 

• Lucrative stakes program restricted to PA-breds. 

• 30% Breeder awards for PA-breds (PA-sired) finishing first, second or third in any race. 

• 20% Breeder awards for PA-breds (non-PA-sired) finishing first, second or third in any race. 

• 10% Stallion awards earned by PA-breds (PA-sired) finishing first, second or third in any race. 

• Special trainer’s award for PA-breds breaking their maidens. 



GARY D REIHART 
President 

MARK A McDERMOTT 
Executive Secretary 


PENNSYLVANIA HORSE BREEDERS ASSN, continually strives 
to make the PA Breeding Fund program the best of its kind If 
you have any questions, or suggestions as to how it may be 
improved, please feel free to contact us any time. 

203 North Union St.. Kennett Square. PA 19348 
(215) 444-1050 


Get New Jersey's Fax 


Fact: New Jersey's breeders' program is one of the best in the country. 

Fact: New Jersey awarded breeders $2,079,016 in 1989, nearly $500,000 more than Maryland and over 
$1,000,000 more than Pennsylvania. 

Fact: Maryland breeds twice as many horses as New Jersey (2,000) while Pennsylvania breeds the same 
amount as New Jersey (1,000). 

Fact: The New Jersey program totaled $8,680,044 in 1989 which included state-bred races, breeder, 
stallion and owner awards, while Maryland's was $4,671,720 and Pennsylvania's was $3,120,713. 
Fact: 499 races were run for New Jersey-breds with purses totaling $5,971,557. 

Fact: $500,000 more will be distributed in awards in New Jersey this year than in 1989. 

Fact: All horses who earn money in New Jersey (1st through 5th) receive awards in both open and 
closed races regardless of whether they are Grade 1 or maiden claiming races. 

Thoroughbred Breeders’ Association of New Jersey 
231 Crosswicks Road, Bordentown, New Jersey 08505 
Stanley Panco, Executive Director, (609) 298-6401 



June 1991 


65 





































LOOKING BACK . . . 


50 Years Ago... 

■ A youthful Eddie Arcaro appeared 
on the cover, with black-eyed Susans 
draped across his lap. The hero of the 
hour, of course, was his mount 
Whirlaway, the Calumet Farm 
homebred who had just secured the 
middle jewel for his Triple Crown, 
scoring decisively in the Preakness. 

■ "Other years have seen Pimlico 
packed with fans but never before has 
Old Hilltop been such a mass of 
humanity. A steady flow of arrivals 
started in the morning, swelling to a 
throng of 40,000 by mid-afternoon," 
reported Maryland Horse staff 
writer Priscilla Fuller. "... Shortly 
before five o'clock the eight Preakness 
starters danced out before the 
grandstand to the tune of 'Maryland, 
My Maryland.' National celebrities as 
well as prominent figures in the horse 
world looked down from their boxes 
while Mr. General Admission peered 
through the part in someone's hair in 
hope of catching a glimpse. 

"The center of attention was that 
small red colt with a tail nearly 
touching the ground. Since his win in 
the Derby the preceding week he had 
been the cause of much controversy. 
Even now the crowd argued . . . Can 
he repeat that performance? ... Is 
there anything that can beat 
Whirlaway? There was always the 
possibility that the Calumet Farm colt 
would revert to his temperamental 
way of running out in spite of the fact 
that trainer Ben Jones had cleverly 
shielded the right eye with a blinker." 

■ Boosted by a stupendous (for those 
days) Preakness day handle of 
$1,005,939, Pimlico's spring meeting 
was the most successful in more than 
a decade. It was the first time since 
the "boom of 1929" that a million 
dollars had been wagered in one day 
at a Maryland track. 

■ Trainer Sunny Jim Fitzsimmons 
returned, like the trouper he was, to 
serve for a tenth time as judge of the 
MHBA's Annual Yearling Show. The 
1941 grand champion was Holly 

66 


Beach Farm's bay colt by *Kantar— 
Monel by *Sir Greysteel. 


30 Years Ago... 

■ "Not since Native Dancer thrilled a 
partisan crowd by avenging his 
Kentucky Derby defeat in the 1953 
Preakness had a renewal of the Triple 
Crown's middle jewel evoked quite so 
much enthusiasm and admiration 
among Maryland horsemen as this 
year when little (15.1, 960 pounds) 
Carry Back made the experts eat 
crow," wrote Joe B. Hickey Jr. 

Conceived in Maryland, at the 
Pons family's Country Life Farm, the 
son of Saggy came from last place to 
win the Preakness by three-quarters 
of a length over Leonard P. Sasso's 
Globemaster. 

■ Bliss Flaccus's Simple Samson, 
trained by Sidney Watters, rallied to 
an eight-length victory in the 
Maryland Hunt Cup, giving rider 
Crompton (Tommy) Smith his second 
score in the famed timber classic. 
Three years earlier. Smith piloted H. 
Robertson Fenwick's victorious 
Fluctuate. 

■ A list of the leading breeders of 
Maryland-breds so far in 1961 showed 
Alfred G. Vanderbilt enjoying a wide 
lead, his state-bred runners having 
earned $30,555. Next on the list were 
W. Taylor Leatherbury ($18,135) and 
Mrs. S. M. Pistorio ($12,350). 

■ "It's all there and it's worth 
framing," commented editor 
Snowden Carter of Joe Hickey's new 
labor of love, a composite history of 
all-time leading Maryland-bred 
money-winners. Find ($795,651) led 
the list, followed by Social Outcast 
($668,300) and Vertex ($453,424). 

"The editor thought Hickey should 
get a little bonus for this splendid 
work, but money, of course, was out 
of the question," said Mr. Carter. "So 
we did the next best thing. We ran his 
picture on this page. As any 
unmarried young lady can see, he's a 
handsome fellow." (Current editor's 


note: Just goes to show what happens 
when you advertise in the 
Maryland Horse. This year marks 
the 25th wedding anniversary for Joe 
and his wife Arlene.) 


10 Years Ago... 

■ On the post-Derby press box scene: 
"It was like the Duke of Windsor on 
stage first, followed by Don Rickies." 
Pleasant Colony's owner/breeders, 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Mellon Evans, 
and trainer John P. Campo were the 
main characters in the Kentucky 
Derby/Preakness story. Omitted from 
the script was Marylander O'Donnell 
Lee, who trained the winner until 
eight weeks before his Churchill 
Downs triumph. 

■ "Maybe I should have gone with 
just the bay filly in the Oaks and 
saved the gray for the Derby," 
reflected trainer Woody Stephens 
after Stephens-trained stablemates 
Heavenly Cause and De la Rose 
finished a close one-two in the 
Kentucky Oaks-Gl. The "gray" was 
Maryland-bred star Heavenly Cause, 
owned and bred by Jim Ryan's Mt. 
Airy-based Ryehill Farm. 

■ Don and Judy Miller expressed 
mixed emotions about the burgeoning 
career of their 17-year-old son Donnie 
Jr., Maryland's leading apprentice 
rider. "My father used to love to go 
around and tell people his son was a 
jockey," said Don Sr. "Now he tells 
people his son was a jockey, but his 
grandson is a good jockey . . . Horse 
racing is a business I wouldn't wish 
on my worst enemy. Once you're in it, 
nothing can drive you away." 

■ Dramatic strength was evidenced at 
Fasig-Tipton's Two-Year-Olds in 
Training sale, with gross receipts 
jumping 35 percent and average up 28 
percent over 1980 figures. The sales 
topper, a $50,000 yearling, was an 
Olden Times colt purchased for 
$100,000 by trainer Dean Gaudet. □ 

Maryland Horse 






Fine Country Properties 


Real Estate For Sale 


CECIL COUNTY, MD.: 70-acre horse farm with 
equine swimming pool and fine owner’s residence. 
Over 50 stalls plus run-in sheds. Permanent 
boarders will stay on if buyer wants. Also income 
from use of equine pool, breeding shed and veteri¬ 
nary facilities. A going business in an excellent 
location. Other horse properties available, some 
waterfront and waterview. Call Jan Churchill, 
Chesapeake Real Estate Exchange, (301) 
885-5900. 

GAITHERSBURG HORSE FACILITY: $350,000 
5.2 ac. w/lighted grass ring and sand track. 4-stall 
barn, board fencing, hay storage, tack rm. and 
access to park & trails. 4-bdrm., front balcony 
colonial w/master suite w/sitting rm. First fl. family 
rm., bdrm. and Florida rm. Awninged deck gives 
view of this landscaped estate. Gerrie Sims, (301) 
972-3226 or (301) 916-1400. 

FREDERICK COUNTY, MD.: 148-acre grain farm 
w/state easements intact. Gently rolling w/long 
road and river frontage. Stone home circa 1794 
(updated), large bank barn, pond, 55’x110’ open 
span steel bldg., inground pool w/enclosed whirl¬ 
pool. Truly a good farm. $640,000. Please call Al 
Noblin, agent, O’Conor, Piper & Flynn (301) 
876-1982. 


CARROLL COUNTY, MD.: Excellent working farm, 
104 gently rolling acres, half tillable, half fenced 
pasture, good outbuildings. Stone home in good 
condition with much potential. Streams on proper¬ 
ty. Off conveyance and state easement rights in¬ 
tact. A farm priced for farmers—not developers! 
Call Al Noblin, Agent, O’Conor, Piper & Flynn (301) 
876-1982. 


CARROLL COUNTY, MD.: 15V2-acre equestrian 
facility being sold to settle estate. Recently ap¬ 
proved perc test for building new home. 20-stall 
barn w/indoor and outdoor arena, only 2 years old. 
Now priced at $205,000 (below replacement 
cost). Large stone/brick historic home on V 2 acre 
adjoining, zoned BL, available separately or with 
farm at added cost. Available immediately. Call Al 
Noblin, agent, O’Conor, Piper & Flynn (301) 
876-1982. 


Real Estate Rentals 


HORSE FACILITY FOR RENT: Near Church Hill, 
Queen Annes County, MD. 20+ stalls, 3 small & 3 
large paddocks. Housing available if required. Call 
(202) 965-0615 or (301) 556-6400 (weekends). 


FOR SALE 

PRISTINE 
HORSE FARM 



* Two Houses: 

1. 4-bedroom, living room, dining 
room, kitchen/family room, glass 
porch. 

2. 3-bedroom cottage, living room, 
kitchen/family room. 

* Four Stables: 

35 box stalls total (some broodmare). 
*138 +/- acres. 

* Implement/storage buildings. 

* $690,000. May be sold in 2 parcels. 
Beautiful established horse operation. 
Ideal for professional or enthusiast. 
Call for further details. 



PROPERTIES 

301/820-8000 



realtor. - off ering you the Best - 




Thoroughbred Nursery/ 
Breeding Farm For Sale 

33 large box stalls; stallion bam; 
broodmare and yearling barns. 42 
acres board-fenced; 26 acres under 
cultivation and rented. 
Sophisticated high-tech operation 
in Harford County. 4-BR Colonial 
dating back 110 years. Call for 
details. $385,000 

Thomas Close (301) 836-2270 
Joan Ryder (301) 893-1792 
The Prudential Preferred Properties 
312 S. Main SL, Bel Air, MD 21014 
(301) 879-3880 


FARM FOR SALE 

m 



Kingsville, Maryland 

29 acres. Beautiful 2,800 sq. ft. 
rancher w/club basement. 2-car 
att. garage, 1-car detached. 
Renovated tenant house. 

Heated pool, pond w/island, 
bank bam, 80% pasture 
w/board fencing. Many 
amenities. (SF12410BE) 

Call Steve Feazell, 

The Prudential Preferred 
Properties, (301) 879-3880. 

Independently owned and operated. 


Gentleman’s Estate 
Howard County 

woodbine, Maryland 


75 ± acres adjoining 
Thoroughbred horse 
farm with possibility of 
shared facilities. Portion 
abuts state park with 
riding trails. Air strip for 
your transportation 
needs. Conv. to major 
roads including 97,1-70 
and 40. Easily accessible 
to Washington, Baltimore 
and Frederick. Close to 
new golf and country 
club. Truly a remarkable 
offering worthy of your 
inspection. 

For a private showing 
call Bobbie Judge, 

(501) 730-7373 Or 
(301) 995-1920. 



June 1991 


67 


































FOUR GREAT BUYS 


Near Baltimore & DC 

11+ ac. Possible 1-ac. zoning 6 
nearly new 3-DR contemporary 
home in rhe high $200,000s. 

Near DC & 1-270 

Your own park in rhe country. 
Sitting on almost 2 ac. w/1+ ac 
fenced w/srable. Lg. workshop/ 
garage combo. King-sized all 
brick rancher for only $169,900. 

Near DC 

230-ac. form & 5 homes for 
$695,000. Development potential. 

Carroll County 

Bring your horses, dogs & kids to 
this 4.3-ac. formette. Enjoy rhe 
view from this 3-DR, 4-level split 
w/walkour basement & FP Only 
$195,000. 

Call BOB ZIRKLE, 

(301) 795-2941 or 831 -7500. 


FOR SALE 

4102 Valley View Road, Middletown 
Frederick County, Maryland 

80-ACRE HORSE FARM. Circa 1880 farm 
house, bank bam, 96’xl20’ horse barn with 18 stalls 
and 60’xl20’ indoor riding ring. Call Charlotte 
Warrenfeltz, Video Realty, (301) 371-7789. 




SUNSET HILL FARM 


This renowned working Thoroughbred horse farm is 
located in the pristine rolling hills of conservation oriented 
Howard County, Maryland. Consisting of 120 protected 
acres. Sunset Hill is a fully operational facility featuring 54 
broodmare stalls, a modern 4 stall stallion complex with 
breeding shed, office, run-in sheds, numerous ancillary 
buildings, and a pond. The five conveniently located 
residential dwellings are highlighted by a totally updated, well appointed two-story stone home, 
featuring expansive rooms with cathedral ceilings and magnificent views of Sunset Hill Farm. 


For additional information contact: 


The availability of this strategically located property 
allows one the opportunity of gracious country living in 
a convenient, yet rural, atmosphere. 


Si 


tterson 

hwartz 


REAL ESTATE 

LAND & FARM DIVISION 


A. John Price or Clinton H. Rosenberger 
Land & Farm Division 
680 South College Avenue 
Newark, DE 19713 
1-800-336-LAND or 302-733-7050 

























Horse Farms for Sale 


Wonderful 33-acre training farm 
in Southern Chester County, Pa., 
very near the Fair Hill Training 
Center. 50-plus stalls, well-con¬ 
structed and maintained barns, 
lovely duplex home in very good 
condition, 3-car garage, well- 
maintained '/ 2 -mile training track 
with gate, covered 4-horse hot 
walker. Ideal small training farm. 
Convenient to Maryland, Dela¬ 
ware, Pennsylvania and New Jer¬ 
sey tracks. Asking $640,000. 


40-stall training bam at Fair Hill 
Training Center, outstanding op¬ 
portunity to be in the best of facili¬ 
ties. “Like training on the farm.” 
One-mile training track, 7 /s-mile 
wood chip track, grass fields, 
hills, wooded trails. The perfect 
training environment convenient 
to Maryland, Delaware, Pennsyl¬ 
vania and New Jersey tracks. Real¬ 
istically offered at $140,000. 


Lovely 100-acre broodmare opera¬ 
tion in the vicinity of the North- 
view Stallion Station in Chesa¬ 
peake City, Maryland. Featuring 
two 24-stall (asphalt center aisle) 
block bams with foaling stalls, of¬ 
fices and tack rooms, large fields, 
small wooded area, two 3-bed¬ 
room brick homes. Asking 
$775,000. 


Magnificent 93 ± acre training 
operation (formerly the Wind- 
fields Farm Training Division). 
Two outstanding barns com¬ 
prising 50 stalls, 3 attractive 
well-constructed homes, main¬ 
tenance buildings, asphalt 
roads, 5 /s-mile track with 
7-furlong turf gallop, in the 
middle of beautiful Chesapeake 
City, Maryland horse country. 
Restricted property. 

Reduced to $1.2 million. 



Patterson 

Schwartz 


REAL ESTATE 

LAND & FARM DIVISION 


For additional information please contact: 
A. John Price 

PATTERSON-SCHWARTZ REAL ESTATE 
Land & Farm Division 


1-800-336-LAND 


40-acre farm in horse country. 
Lovely renovated brick home, new 
6-stall frame bam (tack and feed 
rooms), wash area, attached run- 
in shed, pond, gently rolling 
fields, stream, protected land. 
Asking $295,000. 

Adorable 51-acre horse farm. 
Gently rolling fields, modem 17- 
stall block barn, 10-stall bank 
bam, 3-bay garage and workshop, 
renovated 10-room, 2-story home 
in very good condition. Asking 
$749,000. 

Wonderful 120 ± acre farm. Roll¬ 
ing fields, tree-lined asphalt drive, 
pond, 58 stalls in 5 bams, 2 tenant 
homes and a lovely stone and 
frame owner’s residence. Mature 
trees throughout, great privacy, 
breed or train from this lovely 
property. Asking $1.8 million. 

Outstanding 98-acre farm. Great 
privacy, 36 stalls in two bams, 4 
run-in sheds. Asking $475,000. 
(Restricted land). 


66-acre operating training farm, 
70 stalls, '/ 2 -mile training track, 
lovely small office building, large 
Victorian-style farmhouse, pond, 
mature shade. Asking $750,000. 


June 1991 


69 








BUCKS COUNTY, PA. HORSE FARM 



REAL ESTATE AUCTION 


A magnificent 86 acre showplace facility in picturesque Bucks County, Pa. Located 
only 1 hour from NYC and Philadelphia near scenic New Hope, PA and Flemington, 
NJ. 7 handsomely appointed barns with 25 stalls, impressive office complex, 4 
charming residences. Easy access to race tracks in PA, NJ, NY, MD, and Del. 
Currently serving as a Thoroughbred breeding and yearling operation. To be sold at 
auction on July 10, 1991. For detailed brochure or appointment, call (800) 272-1171. 



PA NO AU-001117-L 


A SANFORD A 

Alderfer Auction Company 

P.O. Box 1, Harleysville, PA 19438 



MY LADY'S MANOR 


NORTHERN BALTIMORE COUNTY 

A comfortable contemporary 
hillside home recently updated 
with 4 bedrooms, 4 baths, a total 
of 13 rooms featuring a 46' 

"great room." 

Located on 13.4 rolling acres in 
two fenced pastures with Little 
Gunpowder stream running 
through middle of property. 

Large Pennsylvania Dutch bank 
barn, circa 1930, with 5 stalls, 
tack room, loft and water. 

20' X 40' heated pool. 
Greenhouse. Separate garage 
building houses offices easily 
convertible to caretaker quarters. 

40 minutes to trains, 55 
minutes to BWI airport, 20 
minutes to private plane airport. 
$549,000. 

Call Peg Castle, Coldwell 
Banker 1-301-252-8666 for 
information or brochure. EHO 


70 


Maryland Horse 



























BLINKERS 


Classified Advertisements 


Horses, Ponies 


PRETTY AQHA-REGISTERED MARE: 6 years By 
Boons Star out of Sandy Bar Gill. $1,800. (301) 
876-2640 after 5 or weekends (301) 326-1240. 

Stallions 


MR. WILFORD: 17-hand son of PASS CATCHER, 
out of multiple stakes producer CLAROOLA (Mool¬ 
ah Bux). New York wins include 6 V 2 fur. in 
1:1 6 V 5 and 4th in Remsen S-G2. Earned over 
$142,000. $750 l.f. Standing at Rainbow Valley in 
Linwood, MD. WATAUGA LAKE: Sire of 70% win¬ 
ners from foals of racing age to date. Son of graded 
SW LONDON COMPANY ($478,910), out of Placid 
Lake, dam of SW WHAT LAKE, Baltic Shore (win¬ 
ner in GB) and $500,000 Keeneland sales yearling. 
From family of KOOTENAI, SANS ARC, BATTLE¬ 
FIELD, etc. $500 l.f. Standing at Rainbow Valley in 
Linwood, MD. Inquiries to Martha C. Green (301) 
875-2284 or J.C. Ankeney (301) 777-9129. 

FOR SALE: Season or share in NORTH POLE 
(Northern Dancer—Canalu). No reasonable offer 
refused. Respond to: A.J.M., 652 Biddle St., 
Chesapeake City, MD 21915. 

DOUBLE IMAGE: By Spring Double. Winner of 
over $21,000 before injury. Free stud fee to ap- 
proved mares. Call (301) 821-6844 or 255-4200. 

Boarding, Training, Layups 

S7/DAY BROODMARES: SlO/day layups. Cus- 
tomized boarding. 20 acres and 5 fields. Lighted 
riding ring. Center-aisle barn, 35 stalls. Ample 
safe turn-out. ECHO VALLEY FARM (301) 
836-2666 or 836-2034. 

STONEWORTH FARM: Boarding broodmares and 
weanlings. New barn and fencing. Excellent pas¬ 
tures. Quiet environment. Foaling services by 
manager with over 25 years experience. Call Skee- 
ter Figgins at (301) 833-6549. 

BROODMARE CARE: $7 a day. MARES & FOALS 
$10 a day. Have room for 2 mares. Springwater 
Farm, Shrewsbury, PA. (717) 235-6663. 


Broodmares , Yearlings Weanlings 

Large box stalls available in our new, well-equipped, 
modern barn. Ample turnout in well-maintained 
pastures. Excellent care—owners on premises. 
Reasonable rates. Exit 33 off 1-83 in Northern Md. 

Barn CIRCADIAN FARMS Rcs , dtn(x . 

(301)357-8380 (301)343-0817 


Horse Transportation 


WILSON HORSE TRANSPORTATION: Middleburg, 
Va. Horse transportation at its best. (703) 
253-5262; (800) 325-0119. _ 

Trailers, Vans 


CLASSIC ALUMINUM TRAILERS: NOW AVAILABLE 
FROM OCTOBER FARM * CLASSIC, Box 209A, RR 2, 
Titusville, NJ 08560. (609) 737-9645. 


1989 SOONER: All aluminum, 6-horse slant, with 
self-contained 12’ living quarters. Generator, gas 
furnace, A/C, full bath, fully equipped kitchen, 
sleeps 3-4, walk-in tack rm., awning, roof rack. 
Cost $53,000. Must sell, make offer. (301) 
876-1982. 


Help Wanted, Available 

AVAILABLE: Experienced part-time office manag¬ 
er/secretary for Thoroughbred operation. At my 
home or your farm. Reply to Drawer 239, MH, PO. 
Box 427, Timonium, MD 21093. 


Miscellaneous 


HORSE MANURE REMOVAL: Prompt, regular 
pickup. Year-round service. Frezzo Bros., Box44, 
Avondale, PA 19311. (215) 268-8258. 

EQUINE DENTISTRY: Michael J. Dougherty, West 
Chester, PA (215) 431-3184 or Centreville, MD 
(301) 758-2749. 

WILL DESIGN & BUILD: Custom horse barns to 
your needs at competitive costs. (301) 833-1840. 

FENCES: Built and painted. Barns repaired and 
painted. Trees trimmed, hedgerows cleared. (301) 
848-0637. 


FARRIER: Professional services for farms. 
M.R.C. license. Bobby Burns (717) 382-4906. 

FENCE SPRAYING: DISTINCTIVE DECORATORS 
Interior & exterior painting, wall coverings. All 
home & business services, farm repairs. (301) 
592-7433 or 592-9598. 


BLACKTOP, TAR & CHIP: Driveways, parking lots, 
barns. STREAKER CONSTRUCTION AND AS¬ 
PHALT. (301) 442-2409. 

PAINTING & CONSTRUCTION: Andy R Sadler— 
fence and barn. (301) 857-4391. 

RACE HORSE TRAINERS TEST: Over 30 pages 
Questions/Answers . . . Covers Vet Test. . Barn 
Test. . . Stewards Test. $16 postpaid. MR. TEST, 
Box 1185, Chino Valley, AZ 86323. 

FREE MEDI-T0TE TRAY: ($10.00 value) with your 
first order of $50.00 + . Call Toll-Free (800) 
321-0235 for your FREE Horse Health USA prod¬ 
ucts catalog. Big savings on hundreds of name 
brand items. Same day shipments from Des 
Moines, IA or Canton, OH. Call or write: 5200 Park 
Ave., Des Moines, IA 50321 or 2800 Leemont 
Ave., N.W., Canton, OH 44709. Get your FREE 
Medi-Tote Tray today! MDC 91 

RWK CONTRACTING CO.: Custom Equestrian Fa- 
cilities and Pole Buildings to accommodate your 
equine needs. Guaranteed to beat any written esti¬ 
mate by 15%. (301) 836-1794. 

RESTORES/PRESERVES: Fine leathers, saddles, 
bridles, shoes, purses. $3/lb. Send postage paid 
envelope: A-1 Auction, 4606 Tammy, Wichita Falls, 
TX 76306. 

R & L HAY AND STRAW: (301) 526-6892 


TRADITIONAL AND FORM-FITTING 
SILKS AND CAPS 
CUSTOM SADDLE CLOTHS 


RACEWEAR 

Janet Turcotte and Linda Logan 
(301) 262-7589 


Index to Advertisers 

STALLIONS 

Allen's Prospect.Inside front cover 

Camivalay.Inside front cover 

Citidancer.Inside front cover 

Corridor Key.Inside front cover 

Deputed Testamony.Back cover 


OTHER ADVERTISERS 

Anderson Feed Co. 72 

Bloodstock Research. 9 

R.D. Bowman & Sons. 57 

Circadian Farms. 71 

DeGarmo Constructors & Assoc. 8 

DiBella Vans. 58 

DR™ Trimmer/Mower. 30 

Equine Dentistry. 31 

Equivest Sales. 5 

Farm Credit Bureau. 28 

Fasig-Tipton Midlantic. 1 

Horse transportation: 

C. Mills. 30 

R.F. Kohl. 58 

Porter. 4 

Tamberino. 6 

Winner's Choice. 6 

Hunt Cup Productions. 29 

Insurance: 

Hoffberger Insurance Group. 53 

Paoli Insurance. 58 

Maryland Fund. 2 

Maryland Saddlery. 31 

MHBA Yearling Show. 7 

Myotherapy. 30 

New Jersey Breeders' Association. 65 

North Glade Feed & Supply. 57 

North view Stallion Station.Inside back cover 

Pennsylvania Horse Breeders Association .... 65 

Race wear. 71 

Real estate: 

Alderfer Auction Company. 70 

Cold well Banker. 70 

LaMotte Properties. 67 

Long & Foster. 68 

O'Conor, Piper & Flynn. 67 

Patterson Schwartz.68, 69 

The Prudential Preferred Properties. 67 

Video Realty. 68 

Reece Construction, Inc. 42 

RWK Contracting Co. 58 

Steppin' Stone Farm. 64 

Stitches by Chloe. 65 

Schwatka Farm Services. 6 

Upperville Barns. 4 

Virginia Thoroughbred Association. 61 

West Virginia TBA. 64 

White Hall Feed Co.54, 72 


June 1991 































































































Editorial 


White Hall 
Feed Co. 

17106 York Road 
Hereford, MD S (301) 329-2171 



Anderson 
Feed Co. 

423-425 South Main St. 
Shrewsbury, PA S (717) 235-4485 


♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 


Full Line of Horse Feeds 

PURINA 

WAYNE 

TIZWHIZ 

and our own special mix: 
HUNT COUNTRY FEED 

Feeding Consultations 

Complete Line of Horse 
Supplies, Treatments 
and Supplements 

Hay, Straw and Shavings 

Pet Foods and Pet 
Supplies 

Delivery Available 




The Nature of Good Luck 


Although nearly every breeder has a pet theory or two about 
how to produce winners, it's well accepted in the Thoroughbred 
business that there are no sure-fire formulas. Every new racing sea¬ 
son serves as a reminder that the most important ingredient of cham¬ 
pionship success, far surpassing money invested, is luck. 

Believe it or not, there are serious scholars who have written 
learned articles, and even whole volumes, on the nature of chance, 
good fortune, or, as some prefer to call it, luckiness. There are two 
conclusions which are widely shared: 

1) In the long run, virtually everyone seems to have some 
instances or periods of good luck. The notion that some people 
never have any good luck is almost never found to be true. 

2) For reasons not understood, good luck very often seems to 
occur in streaks. Casino gamblers intuitively know to make big bets 
when on a winning streak, but small ones when losing. 

According to the experts, the "luckiest" people are usually 
those who are adept at maximizing their good luck and minimizing 
their bad. Conversely, those who seem most "snake bit" usually fail 
to cash in on their occasional good luck, but have a habit of exag¬ 
gerating and wallowing in their bad. 

For Thoroughbred breeders, whether promoting stallions or 
raising runners, the lesson in this is to strive constantly to be pre¬ 
pared to take the fullest possible advantage of any good luck, or 
good-luck streak, when it occurs. Sooner or later, fortune smiles on 
everyone. Be ready to seize it. 


/Richard W. Wilcke 


72 


Maryland Horse 






















ri'Time>Turf 




BAEDERWOOD 

1975 Tentam - 

Royal Statute, by'Northern Dancer 
1991 Fee: $3,500 


CAVEAT 

1980 Cannonade - 
Cold Hearted, by The Axe II 
1991 Book Full 


INCA CHIEF 

1986 Mr Prospector - 
Katonka, by Minnesota Mac 
1991 Fee: $2,500 


PRIVATE TERMS SMARTEN TWO PUNCH 

198 5 Private Account - 1976 Cyane - 1983 Mr Inspector - 

laughter, by Hold Ruler Smartaire, by *Quibu Heavenly Cause, by "Grey Dawn II 

1991 B(x)k Full 1991 B(x>k Full 1991 B<x>k Full 

All Northview stallions nominated to the Breeders' Cup and The Maryland Million 


WAQUOIT 

1983 Relaunch- 
Grey Parlo, by *Grey Dawn ll 

1991 Book Full 


55 Northern Dancer Drive ♦ Chesapeake City, MD 21915 ♦ Inquiries to: Linda Bench (301) 885-2855 ♦ Fax:(301)885-5985 ♦ Tom Bowman, DVM (301) 778-0439 


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75% of his 


stakes winners 
are graded runners. 

Grade 3 Honey Bee H winner UNDER OATH ($354,373; SSI 12.13) 

1991 Grade 3 John B. Campbell H-placed REPUTED TESTAMONY ($221,989; SSI 9.46) 

1991 Grade 3 Betsy Ross H-placed McKILTS ($193,608; SSI 10.99) 

Classic winner DEPUTED TESTAMONY is a nationally-ranked F87 stallion and a leading Mid- 
Atlantic sire. His four crops to run have earned $2,474,325 with 71% winners from starters. 


$5,000 live Foal; Traffic Cop—Proof Requested by Prove It 
Nominated to Maryland Million and Breeders’ Cup 



J. William Boniface, William K. Boniface (301) 879-5324 or 734-6906