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JAKFBANCI8C0 HISTORY CENTER 




*f780.5 Pir 



225380 



NOT TO BE TAKEN FROM THE LIBRARY 



Fonn No. 37-6M-»-a4— C.P. 



LOS ANGELES MUSICAL REVIEW-SEE PAGE 5 






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THE OLDEST MUSICAL JOURNAL IN THE GREAT WEST 



VOL. XLVII. No. 1 



SAN FRANCISCO, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1924 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



GRAND OPERA SEASON FINANCIAL SUCCESS EDITOR'S PLEA FOR INDEPENDENT JOURNAL 



Gaetano Merola Announces That Net Profits of This Year's Grand Opera After Twenty-three Years of Experience in Musical Tournahsrn We Find 
Season Amount to Betwe^en $30,000 and_$40,000-Arrangement of Box It Impossible to Publish an Ideal Music Journal When It Is Necessary 

to Depend Upon Advertising— We Therefore Ask the Musical 



Seats Improved Over Last Season — Other Seats Leave Much to 



Be Desired — Public Complains About Treatment at Box Office 



Public to Assist Us to Become Independent of Advertisements 



BY ALFRED METZGER 



The second grand opera season given 
under the auspices of the San Francisco 
Opera Association and the general direc- 
tion of Gaetano Merola has gone into his- 
tory. According to official information 
47.000 people attended the ten perform- 
ances and the net profits of the associa- 
tion amounted to between $30,000 and 
$40,000. The seating capacity of the aud- 
itorium, as arranged on this occasion 
accomodated about 6.200 people. Accord- 
ing to the figures above stated there was 
an average attendance of about 4,500 peo- 
ple. The prices were from one dollar to 
five dollars, and six dollars for boxes, or 
an average of $2.50 per person, or be- 
tween $11,000 and $12,000, per perform- 
ance. The cost of the season, therefore, 
after deducting the net profits, was be- 
tween $80,000 and $90,000. To our way 
of thinking this is entirely too big an 
expense for grand opera. As long as 
only 'en performances are given, and as 
long as the auditorium seats 6,200 peo- 
ple, the cost to the public is not extrava- 
gant. But if it is taken into consider- 
ation that a new opera house wil seat 
at the utmost 3,500 people and the season 
will have to e'Stend over three or four 
months, our readers will see that San 
Francisco will find a genuine operatic 
season a very extravagant form of enter- 
tainment. 

If it is necessary to charge $5 for the 
highest price in an auditorium that seats 
6.200 it will be necessary to charge from 
$8 to $10 for the highest price in an 
auditorium that seats half that many 
people. If it is the intention of the San 
Francisco Opera Association to make 
grand opera only accessible to the weal- 
thy people then the arrangement is per- 
fectly reasonable, but if grand opera is 
intended to be made accessible to stu- 
dents and the general public then the 
cost of such opera is entirely out of pro- 
portion to the ability of the masses of 
the people to pay for it. Now is the 
time for the members of the San Fran- 
cisco Opera Association to decide as to 
whether the opera house to be built, and 
the performances to be given in it, should 
be an oportunity for the general public 
to enjoy grand opera by distinguished 
artists, or whether it should become an 
artistic enjoyment only to be presented 
to those fortunate enough to possess suf- 
ficient wealth to attend it. Tlie writer, 
under the present conditions, could not 
afford to attend such an opera season, 
and he is one of those who would enjoy 
it more than many a wealthy business 
man we know. Here is a problem well 
worth thinking over. It is the writer's firm 
conviction that many a proficient singer 
with an excellent voice and gratifying 
histrionic ability can be obtained for con- 
siderable less remuneration than artists 
with well advertised names whose ser- 
vices are paid through their reputation 
rather than their merit. 

The remaining performances consisted 
of a production of L'Amico Fritz by Mas- 
cagni and of Puccini's Gianni Schicchi 
on Thursday evening, a Testimonial Per- 
formance to Gaejano Merola on Friday 
evening, participated in by practically 
all of the artists, and consisting of var- 
ious acts of operas given during the en- 
gagement- and a performance of Trav- 
iata which took place on Saturday even- 
ing. We have nothing to add to the com- 
ment we made in last' week's issue of 
this paper. The artists received the 
usual ovations and Mr. Merola in his 
closing address on Saturday testified to 



the financial and artistic success of the 
season. We still maintain that Mr. Mer- 
ola is entitled to full credit for the suc- 
cess of the opera season. He was the 



BY ALFRED METZGER 

There are occasions when the musical 
profession and the musical public are in 
need of a publication that is sufliciently 
fearless and independent to champion 




ANNIE LOUISE DAVID 

The Widely Admired American Harp Virtuoso Who Has Been Chosen 

as Soloist at the First Concert of Pacific Musical Society's 

Prolific Season of 1924-1925 



one to bring together the various ele- 
ments financially able to back and sup- 
port such an enterprise. In other words 
he made it possible for San Francisco to 
co-operate toward the end of supporting 
an operatic organization. No one has a 
right to envy Mr. Merola his success. If 
anyone feels that he or she should have 
had this opportunity, it was within their 
{Continued on rage 7. Column li 



their cause. The Pacific Coast Musical 
Review has had several opportunities 
during the twenty-three years of its exis- 
tence to prove to the profession the nec- 
essity of a fearless music journal. Twice 
it has taken the side of the teachers 
against unjust taxation. It has constant- 
ly fought the cause of the resident artists 
for recognition. In backing enthusiastic- 
ally the seasons of symphony concerts 



under the direction of Alfred Hertz we 
have contributed toward the increase In 
musi(!al interest and therefore in the 
Kixjwth of the teachers' activities. The 
time will come when the teachers' will 
have to confront unfair competition from 
the outside when imported pedagogues 
will endeavor to curtail the earning ca- 
pacity of efficient resident teachers by 
unfair means. 

Other situations may arise occasionally 
like the relation between symphonic and 
operatic organizations toward the gen- 
eral public, when the latter will need a 
champion for its cause. If the musical 
profession, the students and the musical 
public wants to see certain conditions 
improved and certain of its pet organ- 
izations retained it needs a medium that 
expresses its wishes. The Pacific Coast 
Musical Review has done a great deal 
of this sort of thing during the past 
years, but it can do a great deal more 
in future if it were put upon a basis 
where it did not need to depend so much 
upon advertising support. It Is true that 
advertisements are necessary for the pub- 
lication of a music journal, but such 
journal should not have to depend en- 
tirely upon such support. 

There is only one way to prevent a 
musical journal from having to consider 
its advertising support in the emulation of 
worthy musical luovements. That is to es- 
tablish such a large circulation that the 
profits from that are sufficient to pay its 
expenses. That means that several thous- 
and subscribers must be added to the sub- 
scription list of this paper. If that can be 
ilone we promise on our part to give the 
musical public a Journal representative of 
tile highest musical principles and contain- 
ing every possible angle of information 
associated with the musical life of the cen- 
tral Pacific Coast territory. We shall con- 
<pntrate our energy upon this part of the 
Coast only and leave the exploitation of 
musical progress in other sections to 
others for the present. 

Hitherto, in order to retain a sufllcient 
advertising support, to maintain this pub- 
lication, we had to devote altogether too 
much space to complimentary articles 
such as quotations of press notices, ad- 
vance notices of impending events, publi- 
cations of portraits, extensive reports of 
unimportant events and other material of 
no big interest compared to the predomi- 
nating events of the day. In future we 
woultl likf to devote more space to edi- 
torial opinion. European and Kastern 
news, occasional treatises by distin- 
guished musicians, and especially art- 
icles for the protection of the teacher, 
the recognition of the risldent artist of 
experienct; and important musical move- 
ments such as symphony concerts during 
the summer, an opera house and the re- 
lation of the public toward musical enter- 
prises of Importance. 

As long as we have to depend solely 
upon advertisements to pay expenses 
our activities are handicapped. Hut If we 
can make the subscription list pay for 
such expenses, with the addition of adver- 
tisements, that do not demand too much 
free space, we can publish a musical 
journal of which the central Paclflc 
Coast territory will be proud. No one 
knows the shortcomings of the present 
paper better than we do. A city that 
has VU.OOO people attending symphony 
concerts, 50,000 a" tending opera and 5,0ni) 
attending chamber music recitals should 
be able to support a paper of at least 
(Continued on Paee 7, Column I) 



PACIFIC COAST .MUSICAL REVIEW 



October 10. 1924 



The years bear witness 



d. 



The story that is told by the Steinway 



position of honor, standing among the 
famous portrait paintings of great musicians in 
Steinway Hall, in lower New York, you will find 
it today. It is the piano that Henry Steinway, 
seventh' years ago, built as a labor of love. He 
built it as a present to his bride. 
Now 1, who am also a Steinway piano, stand 
among the other Steinway pianos at Sherman. 
Clay k Co„ here on the western coast. The years 
that lie between rae and that original Steinway 
piano have seen many changes. But two changes 
they have not seen. They have not seen Steinway 
pianos made in any other spirit than a spirit of 
lo\-e: and they have not seen them under any 
other supervision than Steinway supervision. 
When I left the Steinway factory on Long Island 
and began my long journey to the Coast I had been 
six years in the seasoning and making. The control 
and management of the business was in the hands 
of the third and fourth generations of the house- 
hold of Steinway. Eight members of the Steinway 
farailv had direcie I my evolution from the raw 
wood, sreel and glue into the completed piano. 
Nearly all the skilled workmen in those great 
shops had been in those shops for many years. I 
was wood and steel and glue until they shaped me. 
Now, I am as much of the spirit of Steinway as the 
first piano Henry Steinway built. 
What doc5 this mean in my own career as a Stein- 
It means that I have been built with an individual 
interest, a conscientiousness, a deep determination 
that I should be worthy of my name. 
It means that the mountain spruce of my sounding- 
board, for example, is the finest procurable. After 
careful inspection and purchase it was dried for 
six months at the sawmill, then dried for another 
year in the Steinway yards, then seasoned for two 
or three years in special sheds, then kiln-dried and 
re-dried in strip and board— in all. a seasoning and 
dr\-ing process of five full years. 
It means that, following the seasoning of this and 




possess me as long as materials shall cling together. 
So after six years of such patient fashioning, I left 
the Long Island factory and came West. I was 
unloaded from my long cruise and carefully gone 
over in the Sherman, Clav & Co. shops. And now 
I stand on the floor at Sherman, Clay & Co. among 
other pianos, waiting for the purchaser who shall 
come to claim me. 

Sometimes I talk over the old days in our original 
home with the other Steinwav pianos here at Sher- 
man. Clay & Co. We miss the' cheery companionship 
of the old square grand, with its rosewood case—- 
the piano that Henry Steinway built. It used to 
preside over us like a proud little old great-grand- 
mother. But usually we discuss the future. We 
discuss the homes that each of us, in the days to. 
come, will be carried away to like brides. 
Some of us are eager to preside over great man- 
sions, with servants to dust us off, and drawing 
rooms to inhabit. Some of us are ambitious to 
have careers on the concert stage. But I have a 
different ambition. 



— 'J^^Y'^-^ -^ 

my other wood, nine months were spent shaping 
and fashioning me in the factory. In that one gen- 
eral factory every part of me was made, including 
plate, rim, hammers, brass castings, action, and all 
special hardware. Nothing was let out on contract. 
Nothing was left to outside influence. 
It means that I am, in fact, a Steinway piano— 
that my charm will endure for years to come, that 
my resonance will last, that my full, rich, singing 
tone and responsive action will delight those who 



I want to 


be 


the piano near the 


firesid 


e, where a 


modest fa 


mil 


v gathers about me a 


nd pla 


vs fan 


liliar 


melodies. 


I 


want to be the com 


panion 


, from the 


very first. 


to 


little children as th 


ev lea 


rn to 


ouch 


mv Icevs. 


I 


vant to be the discr 


et— a 


id the 


onlv 


—third p 


Ers 


)n present between 




I wa 


nt to 


spend my 


da 


ys in a little happy 


home. 


Sure 


v if 


»ome fam 


Iv 


knew how eager i 


am to 


make 


their 


love for 


me 


worthwhile, thev 


vould 


come 


and 


claim me 


Wl 


hout delay. Doesn t 


some 


ouple 


with 


a modest 


ho 


rae and purse want 


to come in 


and 


discover h 


ow 


It can claim its Sle 


nway 


piano 





Sherman Kay & Go. 

Kearny ind Sutter Sts., San Francisco 
CALIFORNIA-OREGON-WASHINGTON 



L 



RENA 

LAZELLE 

SOPRANO 
San Francisco Opera Company 

H«-«d of Vocal Departmrnt. San Francisco Conacn 

atorr of MdbIc — Available for Recltala, Open 

Oratorio, Concert 



EMILIE LANCEL 

OPERATIC MEZZO-SOPRANO 

After Two Years' Absence in Europe 
Available For 

OPERA— ORATORIO— CONCERT 

Management ALICE SECKELS 
63 Post Street 

Residence: 433 Eighteenth Avenue, San Francisco 
Tel. Bayview 1461 



ANNIE LOUISE DAVID 

HARP SOLOIST AND TEACHER 

ON THE PACIFIC COAST DURING 
SEASON 1924-1925 

Address: Hotel Claremont, Berkeley 
Tel. Berkeley 9300 

Management Alice Seckels, 68 Post Street 
Tel. Douglas 7267 



KARL RACKLE 

1330 PINE STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 
Telephone Grayslone 1925 



ALICE GENTLE 

M.\NAGEME>'T 

CATHARINE A. BAMMAN 
53 West 39th Street New York, N. Y. 



DOUGLAS SOULE-Pianist 

.tD\.*NiED PUPILS ACCEPTED 

Wednesday and Friday Mornings at StDdio; 002 

Kobier « Chane Bids., San Pranclsco. Telephone 

Kearny 5-454. ReHldence Studio; l.'O 3lonte Vista 

Ave.. Oakland. Telephone Piedmont 708. 



WALLACE A. SABIN 

?J5"f'n. ■""?""? Emann EI. FIr.l Church of Chrl.t Scl- 
I?" V Director I,orine Club. S. F.. Wed.. 1015 Sacramento 
cl.„ i. ^1°°* S "■•.?."=*= *°'- •"'"< Christian Science 
Church. Phone Franklin J.-;07; Res. Studio, 31« tewl.ton 
Ave.. Berkeley. Phone Piedmont 2 428 

MISS DOROTHEA MANSFELDT 

Preparlngr Teacher for 

'"'*• OSCAR MANSFELDT. Pianist 

-07 t hcrry St.. Bet. Washington & Clay Tel. Pac. » .1(WI 

The College of the Holy Names 

LAKE .MERRITT. OAKLAND 

ry Course — Piano. Harp. Violin, 
ony. History 

DURINI VOCAL STDDIO 

DIRECTION OF MME. LILLIAN SLINKEY DURINI 

Italian Method — Voice Placement — Breathlne 

l»72E.ll,St. OP'—CHurch-Oratorlo ^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^ 

THE LICHTENSTEIN VIOLIN SCHOOL 

AICTOR LICHTENSTEIN, Director 
,..- ..- From Besinnlne to Professional Activity 
.114.. »nshincIon St.. S. F. ui. . Fillmore B14B 



AUGUSTA HAY DEN 

SOPRANO 

ATllIable for Concerts and Recltala 

Address: 471 37th Avenue 

Tel. Pac. B.12 

HOMER HENLEY 

BARITONE — TEACHER OF SINGING — CONDUCTOR 

Director California Club Choral 

An Oratorio Authority 

lesldence Studio: 1249 Bay, at Franklin. Tel. FllL 10S3 



LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM 



PASMORE VOCAL STUDIOS 



Road. Berkeley 



CONTRALTO 

Teacher of SInElnK. Complete Course of Operatic Tratn- 

InB. 2730 Pierce St. Tel. Fillmore 45.-.3 

Dominican College School of Music 

S\N RAFAEL. CALIFORNIA 

Mnale Courses Thorough and Proirressive. Public School 

Muxir. .\ccredited Diploma 

EDWARD PEASE 

BARITONE SOLOIST. TEACHER AND DIRECTOR 

Director of Euterpean Club. Westminster Pres. Church. 
The B'nnI B-rith SynnRoeue. and Director of The Pease 
Music Studios at Sarrnmenfo. Studios — Snn Francisco. 
Wednesdays, Suite lOIII Kohler * Chase BidB- Telephone 
nento, Odd Fellows' Temple. Tele- 



MR. ANDREW BOGART 
Teacher of Singing 

Pupils Prepared for Opera, Oratorio, Church and 
Concert. New Address: Suite 600, Kohler & Chase 
BIdg.. 26 0-Farrell Street. Telephone Douglas 9256 



MUSIC PRINTING? 

SCHOLZ, ERICKSON & CO., Inc. 

521 Howard Street Phone Douglas 4273 

San Francisco 



Manning School of Music 

JOHN C. M.\NNIN«, Director 
S242 Washlnsrton Street Telephone Fillmore a 

PEARL HOSSACK WHITCOMB 



The larger the circulation of a Music Journal 
the better for the members of the profession and 

student. 



( )ct<ilK-r 10. 1924 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



JMir €dm Wa^icd %ibi^ 



Itll'SICAL HEVIEW COMPANY 

le sot. Knhirr * Chaxr lllilE.. 2n (I'l'arrrll St., 
San Franclaco, Calif. Tel. Garfleld 5250-5251 



ALFRED METZGER 



Editor 



Make all eherkii. drnrm. niunej ordera ur other 
reiiiittnnoe pnj^able to 
P.4CIKIC C<>.\ST MlISICAl. I<EVIE\V 



Dd-Berkele7-AlaiHeda f>tl1ce 1117 Pi 
Tel. Alameda 155 
MUa E:iUal>etb Wpatsate in Charge 



St.. Alaaaeda 



San Joae 1581 



l.oa Angelea Office 

eio Soathern California Mnalc Co. BnlldlnB, 

BiKkth and Oroadnar Tel., MetropolttaB 43M 

Ilrnno Uavld Ca.'iher in Charge 

VOL. XLVII FRIDAY, OCT. 10, 1924 NO. 1 



■econd-eia 



Iter at S. P. PoaloHle 



TWENTY-FOURTH YEAR 



IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT 

When the San Francisco Post Office decided, 
with the hearty approval of the citizens of San 
Francisco, to declare Saturday a half holiday, the 
Pacific Coast Musical Review, in order to have the 
paper distributed on the day of publication, 
changed such date from Saturday to Monday. 
Since that time we have found that our principal 
advertisers, those who announce concerts, find 
this date of publication inconvenient. And upon 
inquiry we discovered that they preferred to have 
the paper distributed on Friday instead of Mon- 
day. To comply with the wishes of our advertisers 
and to facilitate our service in order to meet with 
the requirements of artists and managers, we will 
now change our date of publication to Friday in- 
stead of Monday. This being the first number of 
the 47th volume and the beginning of the 24th 
year of the paper's consecutive publication, we be- 
lieve the time specially appropriate for a change. 
Every effort will be made by us to see that our 
subscribers will receive their paper promptly on 
Fridays, while the music houses will have them on 
sale Thursday afternoons. 



S. F. MUSICAL CLUB ENJOYS FOUNDERS DAY 

Four Hundred Members and Guests Assemble at Ball- 
room of Fairmont Hotel and Enjoy a Most Delight- 



ful Program of Old Fr 



ch Compositi 



By ALFRED METZGER 

The San Francisco Mu.sical Club celebrated its Thirty- 
fourth Anniversary with a Founder.? Day Tea at the 
Fairmont Hotel Ballroom on Thursday afternoon, Octo- 
ber 2, in the presence of four hundred members and 
guests. Mrs. Horatio F. Stoll. President of the Club, did 
the honors as Toastmaster and thanks to her grace and 
tact succeeded in presiding over one of the most dis- 
tinct, individual and characteristic events ever given by 
this ingeniou.s organization. Mrs. Faull, chairman of the 
program committee, certainly deserves credit for the 
picturesque and musically refiued atmosphere associ- 
ated with the performance, and the hearty applause 
which the members so readily and spontaneously be- 
stowed upon the various numbers was indeed richly 
merited. 

The scene consisted of an entertainment at the court 
of Louis XVI of France, at the Palace in Versailles. 
This gave opportunity for picturesque costuming and 
dancing in the form of minuets. There was an orches- 
tra consisting of the following able musicians from the 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra: Kajetan Attl, 
harp; Walter Ferner, 'cello: Walter Oesterreicher, flute; 
H. Randall, clarinet, and Mr. Addimando, oboe. That 
such excellent and representative musicians were 
able to do justice to the splendid music and phrase with 
taste and discretion goes without question. That tempi 
were difficult to blend with soloists without a conductor 
is also a matter of course. 

The vocal artists, all of whom possessed excellent 
voices, sang with judgment and taste and deported 
themselves with ease and naturalness, were: Harold 
Dana, baritone; Pearl Hossack Whitcomb, contralto; 
Ferrando Ybarra, tenor; Hazel Gilbert MacKay, so- 
prano; Miriam Elder Sellander, soprano. Those par- 
ticipating as members of the Court were: Marion de 
Guerre Steward, Elsa C. Woolams, Edna Horan, Lenore 
Woolams, Mable Coghlan, Esther Malcom. .Maud Mc- 
Faul, Anna Short, Roberta Stone and Patricia .Morbio. 
The Ballet consisted of: Jeanne Peterson, solo dancer; 
Kathryn Deals, Carol Heals, Pbyllis Cohan and Rutli 
Gibney. The dances were most artistically interpreted. 
Miss Petersen being specially effective as to grace and 



lighlness. The combination of instrumenls used in the 
orchestra shows what character of music was playeil. 
and it is only fair to say that everything went smoothly 
and the performance was delightful to follow. It lasted 
less than an hour and a big amount of artistry was 
crowded into this space of time. 

Among the guests of honor were Mr. and Mrs. Alfred 
Hertz. .Mr. and .Mrs. Giuseppe de Luca, Mrs. Lillian 
Birmingham, president of the California Federation of 
Music Clubs; presidents of other clubs of San Francisco 
and the various critics of the newspapers. The San 
Francisco Musical Club has reason to congratuhite 
itself upon another event of decided merit. 



NYIREGYHAZI A PRODIGIOUS TECHNICIAN 

Brilliancy of Style and Virility of Expression Form This 

Noted Hungarian Virtuoso's Principal Artistic 

Traits at Private Hearing 

By ALFRED IVIETZGER 

In the presence of a few invited guests, the majority 
of whom were critics, .Vyireghazi, the distinguished 
Hungarian piano virtuoso, gave a program of artistic 
magnitude. His claim to virtuosity may easily be ac- 
cepted when it is known that the first two numbers on 
his program consisted of Chromatic Fantasie and Fugue 
by Bach and Liszt's Sonata in B Minor in one move- 
ment. The former immediately introduced the artist's 
prodigious technical facility and skill, while the latter 
added those vital emotional faculties without which no 
artist can lay claim to distinction. The Liszt Sonata 
owing to its immense difficulty, and partly to its length 
is rarely played in public. Mr. Nyireghazi interpreted 
both works with a masterly grasp of their intellectual 
depths which left no doubt as to his right to be placed 
among the leading pianists of the day. 

While these flrst two numbers were no doubt in- 
tended to reveal the artist's academic force, the second 
group was principally selected to show his romantic and 
poetic instinct. The compositions were: Duo d'Amour 
(Granados), Intermezzo in E Flat Minor (Brahms) Pol- 
onaise in A Flat Major I Chopin I. Although the phras- 
ing here showed many traces of fine shading, the virility 
of the pianist's style was ever in evidence. He is a 
forceful, convincing and red-blooded pianist who pos- 
sesses the rare faculty to arouse his audiences to the 
highest pitch of enthusiasm. We could well imagine how 
a crowded concert hall would have risen to the occa- 
sion. 

The concluding numbers consisted of Nocturne 
(Grieg) and Ballade in D Flat (Liszt). While we were 
compelled to admire N'yiregyhazi's exceptional versa- 
tility— his never-failing adaptability to contrasting 
forms of composition, we found him ever pre-eminent in 
his Liszt interpretations. He certainly impressed us as 
a specially convincing exponent of the Liszt style and 
one who gives that master's compositions a most effec- 
tive and memorable expression. The piano students and 
teachers who have an opportunity to hear this master 
of the pianoforte should take advantage of the same, 
for it is not likely that he will give a public concert at 
this time. It would be a musical joy, if it were not too 
late, to have this artist as soloist of the first symphony 
concert on October 31. The private hearing took place 
at Knabe Hall of the Kohler & Chase Building, and 
those composing the audience were the guests of George 
Q. Chase, president of Kohler & Chase. 



PAUL STEINDORFF TO COACH REPERTOIRE 

Paul Steindorff. the distinguished conductor, pianist 
and pedagogue, has reopened his Oakland studio for the 
season and announces as a special feature that he will 
accept pupils for repertoire study. Mr. Steindorff has 
had vast experience in conducting both grand and light 
opera in the principal centers of the United States. He 
has been associated as conductor and pianist with some 
of the world's greatest artists. As orchestral leader as 
well as director of choral societies he has gained the 
experience necessary to attain profound knowledge of 
the classics, and his operatic experience of many years 
accumulated in his mind a treasure trove of valuable 
information. 

Mr. Steindorff's long affiliation with the Tivoli Opera 
House at the height of his triumphs form memories of 
splendid performances by distinguished artists and his 
contribution to the musical culture of San Francisco, 
which makes now possible such enterprises as the San 
Francisco Symphony Orchestra and the San Francisco 
Opera Association, were indeed most effective at the 
time. Mr. Steindorff's removing his place of residence 
across the Bay should not have been instrumental to 
disassociate him from the musical activities of San 
Francisco. We feel that his services have been and 
still are valuable. His experiences are certainly worth 
taking advantage of in the course of study and are far 
more solid and valuable than some of the new-fangled 
notions invented to coax the nimble dollars from gulli- 
ble students. 



Mrs. Marion Hovey Brower, who spent last winter In 
New York, has been coaching there with Lazar Samol- 
loff who was enthusiastic about her voice and capacity 
for work. Mrs. Brower sang last season solos from Dcr 
Freischutz for Walter Damrosch at his lecture on that 
opera and received muih favorable criticism from the 
reviewers, specially from W. J. Henderson. .Mr Samoi- 
loff predicts a brilliant future should she decide to make 
New York her home, and has offered lier most flattering 
inducements to remain in the metropolis. ,Mrs. Brower 
returned to California to continue her coaching with 
Mr. Samoilotf during the summer ami will probably 
return to New York in the fall. Mrs. Brower was tor 
several years a pupil of Olive Reed Cushnian who is 
justly proud of the former's New York success. 




KAJETAN ATTL 

SOLO HARPIST, SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Mealern llrprrarnlative 
of l.^on & lleair llarpa 



i'or I cHKM'rl lOnKnicenienla and Inatrurtiun Apply 
Kill I ivuhlrr A: I hnae IlidK., I'el. Duuislna KI7M. on 
Wedneaday nnd Saturday Afterni>on« t>\l,\', ileal- 
dence Phone: llayvlew 120-1 



A METHOD FOR THE HARP 

lly liiijvtiin Attl 

(Aiti. I'iSIIKII, l-uhlUher 

I'or Sale at Sherman, CIny A Co., Kohler & Cbaa 
Henry tirohe and Kajetan Attl 



FREDERIC 

POWELL 

VOICE SPECIALIST 
TEACHER OF SINGING 

RESTORATION OF LOST OR 
IMPAIRED VOICES 

705 Kohler & Chase BIdg., Tuesdays and Fridays 
Residence Phone Sunset 6524 



BENJAMIN 

MOORE 



2636 UNION STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Fillmore 1624 

BY APPOINT.MENT 



LINCOLN 

BATCHELDER 

Pianist -- Accompanist 

Studio 412 Cole St. : Phone Hemlock 368 



MAX DOLIN 

Distinguished 
Composer - Violinist 



NOW coNiircTixt; tiik 

KM.AIIGUU OltCIIIOSTRA 



California Theatre 






i 



San Francisco 



LIPSCHULTZ 
SAN FRANCISCANS 

A New Bureau of Music 



Complete Faculty for Teaching 



Soloists — Orchestras 
Bands for Every Occasion 

Suite 414 Loew'i Wai^elH Theatre Building 
Telephone Franklin 814 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



October 10, 1924 



Gossip Among Musical People 



Don Jose Mojica, the Spanish Lyric tenor of the Chi- 
cago Opera Company, whose success with the San Fran- 
cisco Opera Company is well known, has chosen a pro- 
gram for his Oakland concert which opens with an 
Italian aria and French songs, but which will feature 
old Spanish folk songs and love songs. These latter 
groups will be sung in the rich red velvet costume of 
a Spanish Cavalier, many of the silver trimmings hav- 
ing been worn by one of his ancestors who was one of 
the signers of the Declaration of Mexican Independence 
from Spain. This opening concert of Alice Seckels Mat- 
inee Musicals on Thursday afternoon. October 16, at 
2:30 in the Oakland Hotel Ballroom, promises much in 
the way of novelty. 



Vivienne Consula Sengler, gifted Berkeley composer- 
pianist has re-opened her Piano School for the ensuing 
season and is appearing frequently as both soloist and 
accompanist with great success before many of the lead- 
ing Eastbay clubs including the Beethoven Piano Club; 
Twentieth Century Club. Monday Study Club. Xorthbrae 
Women's Club. Hotel Claremont, Garfield Parent- 
Teachers' Association. Codomices Club, Berkeley Piano 
Club. Business and Professional Women's Club, and at 
many private and public musicals and radio programs. As 
a pianiste Miss Sengler is of the modern impressionist 
school and her playing reveals a temperament of great 
versatility and refinement of expression. 



Radiana Pazmor, Mary Pasmore and Grace Becker 
scored a triumph before the Teachers' Institute of 
Xorlhern California at Ckiah on September 22nd and 
23rd. They appeared in three short programs before 
three sessions of the Institute, giving solo and ensemble 
numbers and were received with unreserved enthusiasm 
by the teachers and townspeople. After their final pro- 
gram they were obliged to bow many times before the 
speaker for the day was able to commence his address 
and the program, which was planned for half an hour, 
was forcibly extended for over an hour, because of the 
insistent demand of the audience for encores. Miss 
Pazmor created a veritable sensation with the aria Adieu 
Forets by Tschaikowsky. which was given with violin 
and cello obligato. She also excited universal admira- 
tion by accompanying not only herself, but the other 
soloists, a feat possible to very few singers. The three 
artists were immediately re-engaged fdr next season. 



Suzanne Pasmore, pianist, left on September ISth to 
accept the position of associate professor of piano at 
Kansas State Agricultural College. Manhattan. Kansas. 
This college has a music school with a faculty of 
eighteen and the town boasts of a symphony orchestra 
and Htv" choral society. It was through the concerts of 
the Pi: • e Trio in Kansas that the College became 
inter*-?" m Mme. Pasmore and when a vacancy 
occurrt-.i ;i. the (acuity a very flattering offer was made. 
w'v I. 'fri,. Pasmore finally accepted. She will remain 
in Kansas until next May. when she will return to 
California. 

Mary Pasmore, violinist, and Dorothy Pasmore, tellist, 
have both been engaged by Conductor Hertz to play iri 
the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra this season. 
With Mrs. Helen Atkinson they are the only women to 
become members of the Symphony, with the exception 
of Barbara Merckley. harpist, who has played with the 
orchestra for several seasons. Women have long been 
orchestra players in such European organizations as the 
Henry Wood Orchestra in London and the Lamoureux 
and Colonne Orchestras in Paris, but have so tar been 
barred in America, for no apparent reason. Mr. Hertz 
is surely to be congratulated on his broad-minded atti- 
tude in securing the best artists available, regardless of 
sex. 

The Half Hour of Music at the Greek Theatre on Sunday 
August 31st at fotir o'clock was given by the well 
known 'V'iolin Ensemble under the direction of Orley 
See. Mr. See. who is a member of the San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra, has presented this splendid en- 
semble at the Greek Theatre for four years. Under the 
direction of this noted Chamber Music player the music 
offered by the Violin Ensemble has always been of the 
finest. The program for the concert was as follows: 
Suite op. 58 (Emil Sochting), 'Violin Ensemble; Golden 
Sonata (Henry Purcclll. Mr. Pease. Miss Gilcrest, Miss 
Dingwall. Serenade fAug. Chapvis). Mr. Schreiber. Miss 
Patrick, Mr. Pease, Miss Gilcrest; Gavolte (Bach-Kreis- 
ler); Prize Song (Wagner-Wilhelmj), Miss Patrick, Miss 
Bevitt; Two Portraits (Hugh Altavater) Miss Patrick, 
Mr. Pease, Miss Gilcrest, Mr. Schreiber. The violin 
ensemble is composed of the following numbers: Miss 
Rova Patrick, Miss Geraldine Gilcrest, Miss Adella 
Whelan, Miss Mary Cook; Rowan Pease. Oscar Schrei- 
ber, Herman Stultz. Raymond Smith, Miss Margaret 
Dingwell, Miss Louise Bevitt at the piano. 



THE COMPLETE CYCLE 

Beethoven's Sonatas 

FOR PIANO AND VIOLIN 

ADA CLEMENT and EDOUARD DERU 

Thursiiay Evening, October 9, 1924 
Thursday Evening, October 16, 1924 

.VT Hr.'tO *)MI,(KK 

Satur(3ay Afternoon at 3 o'clock 

Tl.keli. for SFrio, W.OO; Sludrnls, »2.M; SInele 

tilmixiilon. »i.50; Studpntn. »l.0« 

On '»alt- at ^faeminn, (iay A i tt.'n nnd Son Francisco 

toni.er>atnry of Mu«ic 



NOVELTIES ON SYMPHONY PROGRAM 

Local music lovers will not feel any lack of novelties 
on the programs of the San Francisco Symphony Or- 
chestra during the coming season, judging by the list 
of new additions to the Orchestra's library which con- 
ductor .\lfred Hertz has just prepared. Hertz has not 
only made a careful .selection from the modern com- 
posers, but also has secured a number of works bv the 
older masters which have previously been very difficult 
to obtain, and which will therefore be somewhat in the 
nature of novelties also. 

It is interesting to note that a number of American 
composers' works are included, among which are the 
First Symphony of Frederick .lacobi, Rubin Goldmark's 
Xegro Rhapsody. Deems Taylor's suite Through the 
Looking Glass. From the Northland, by Leo Sowerby, 
the Three Jewish Poems of Ernest Bloch, a symphony 
by Howard Hanson, an Oriental Suite by Henry Eich- 
heiin, a ballet suite of Joseph Clokey and a new suite 
by Nino Marcelli. The three last named composers 
are residents of California, while Frederick Jacobi was 
a member of San Francisco's music colony for a num- 
ber of years, and Howard Hanson was head of the 
music department at the College of the Pacitic in San 
Jose prior to his winning the Prix de Rome. 

Other new works listed tor the coming season are 
Respighi's Antique Dances for the Lute and Ballat-a 
Delle Gnomidi. the St. Paul's Suite of Gustav Hoist, 
the Intermezzi Goldoniani of Bossi, Goosen's Tarn 
O'Shanter, a Dance Rhapsody of Delius, Vivaldi's A 
minor Concerto arranged for a string orchestra. Galil- 
eo's Euphorion, The Wasps of Vaughn Williams, a suite 
of Cassella, Scriabine's Poeme de I'Extase, Hans Pfitz- 
ner's overture to Das Christ Elfiein. an Adagio for 
Strings by Lekeu, and Schenck's In a Withered Garden. 
Compositions by the better known writers will be 
Tschaikowsky's fantasia Francesca da Rimini, the D 
major Symphony of Mozart. Debussy's Danseuses de 
Delphes. a Poeme of Chausson, Richard Strauss' gigan- 
tic tone poem Ein Heldenleben. Dvorak's F major Sym- 
phony, the Bach-Steinberg Chaconne. Dohnanyi's Sym- 
phony No. 9, Cesar Franck's Redemption and the F 
major Brandenberg Concerto of Bach. 

These, together with a number of the standard fav- 
orites which have not been heard during the last tew 
seasons, wil make up a repertoire which symphony 
patrons will undoubtedly warmly welcome Among the 
standard works to be expected are Beethoven's Sixth 
and Seventh Symphonies, the Berlioz Fantastic Sym- 
phony. Debussy's Nocturnes and Iberia, Enesco's Rou- 
manian Rhapsody, the Chasseur Maudit of Cesar 
Franck. Goldmark's Rustic Wedding. Haydn's Surprise 
Sy,mphony, the Scheherazade of Rimsky-Korsakow, 
Richard Strauss' Till Eulenspigel, Tschaikowsky's Man- 
fred and Fifth Symphonies, and Wagner's Faust Over- 



GRAVEURE'S GREAT PROGRAM 

Louis Graveure, the noted baritone who will be the 
first of the world's great artists to have a recital appear- 
ance in San Francisco this season, will start the musical 
activities of the year at the Curran Theatre next Sunday 
afternoon. He will appear in a long list of songs and 
Iieder. many of which will be heard here for the first 
time. Graveure. who appears under Selby C. Oppen- 
heimer's management, has arranged a special program 
for his coming appearance at the Curran. Four groups 
— one in German, one composed of American folk lore, 
one in French, and one consisting of a carefully selected 
bouquet of English ballads, are on the program list. 
But these will form but a small part of the Graveure 
offermg. for it is noted that his special brilliancy is 
exhibited in the attractive encore numbers which he 
always so liberally presents. 

Johannes Brahms is responsible for the compositions 
scheduled in the German classical list which Graveure 
has elected to sing— Auf dem Kirchhofe, Salamander 
An Eine Aeolsharfe, and Botschatt. The California 
Serenade, of Gertrude Ross; Marianne's Loves Dream- 
land Opens Here and Forward, March, Grenadiers (folk 
music of Louisiana), and Humphrey Mitchell's Stay in 
the Field, O Warrior— a Negro Spiritual are the inter- 
esting works in group two. 

France will be represented by Duparc's L'invitation 
au Voyage. Franck's Ninon. Debussy's De Soir, and 
Larmes. by Faure, in addition to which Graveure will 
render Goetz' Melisande in the Wood, Bryeson Tre- 
harne's Come Be My Valentine, Richard Hammond's 
The •Two Corbies, and This Is the Island of Gardens 
by Coleridge-Taylor. Arpad Sander will be at the piano. 

ALICE SECKELS MATINEE MUSICALES 

At the Fairmont Hotel this winter the Alice Seckels 
Matmee Musicales will be continued for their fifth con- 
secutive season. The Fairmont management is creating 
a new ballroom and concert hall for these events which 
promises to be one of the most fascinating little audi- 
toriums in the nation. Remarkably harmonious effects 
have been created by K. Hope Hamilton, the noted 
artist, and it is claimed the new room will be the most 
ideal setting for musical events possible to contemplate 

Mme. Ina Bourskaya, the noted Russian mezzo-so- 
prano, who was associated with the leading opera com- 
panies of her native land for a number of years before 
the outbreak of the world war, will be the first Seckels 
attraction on October 20th. Bourskaya came to this 
country m 1921 as prima donna of the Russian Grand 
Opera Company and immediately created a sensation 
Her personal success was outstanding, not alone in the 
Russian repertoire but as well in Italian and French 
operas. The Metropolitan and Chicago Opera Companies 
immediately engaged this sterling artist for leading 
roles, a signal honor for a newcomer upon her first 
American visit. 



Giacomo Minkowski 

Stndio at COS Kotaier & Chiise Btiildine 
Tel, Kearny .'>454 



CLAIRE DUX CONCERT 

On Sunday afternoon, October 19th, at the Curran 
Theatre, Selby C. Oppenheimer will present the popular 
soprano Claire Dux. Coming to San Francisco a stranger 
last season Mme. Dux's success was so emphatic that 
she was brought back to California tor a second tour 
in the same year, specially engaged as soloist at the 
Spring Music Festival, and was sought by music clubs 
throughout the state for recital programs. Dux, with 
Seidler Winkler at the piano, will give an unusually 
brilliant program including Mozart, Schumann, Richard 
Strauss, Leoncavallo, Bachelet. Gordigiani, Edward 
German, Frank LaForge. Deems Taylor, John Alden 
Carpenter, and others. 



LA GAITE FRANCAISE 



The Gaite Francaise will give its reopening perform- 
ance on Wednesday. October 15th, at 8:15 p. m sharp, 
with a modern three-act Comedy entitled Le Docteur 
Knock, otherwise: Le Triomphe de la Medecine. The 
Triumph of Medicine. In spite of the extra work fur- 
nished by Andre Ferrier in Manon and Gianni Schicchi 
at the San Francisco Opera Company, he is none the 
less directing the rehearsals of his comedies in his 
cozy little Theatre of La Gaite Francaise. The scenery 
painted by Miss Maxim Marshall is ready and the act- 
ing near perfection while at the same time a series of 
plays and operas are being prepared. Greatly encour- 
aged by the success of the preceding seasons, A. Ferrier 
begs to announce that he intends to perform three 
times a week instead of two. Wednesdays, Fridays and 
Saturdays, and that the curtain will rise at 8:15 sharp. 

A JOINT FLUTE AND PIANO RECITAL 

Christine Howells Pfund. the young California flutist, 
and Jessie Moore, pianist, will give a joint recital, offer- 
mg an air of novelty, in the Italian Room at the Hotel 
St. Francis, on Friday evening. October 17th. Miss 
Moore is a pupil of Rudolph Ganz and of the La Forgo- 
Berumen Studios, New York, having had her founda- 
tion work with Frederick Maurer and Warren D. Allen 
She will appear in the dual capacity of soloist ani 
accompanist for Christine Howell's fund, and for Eula 
Grandberry, soprano, who is the assisting artist 

Much interest is felt in the appearance of Miss Grand- 
berry, who has made an enviable reputation for herself 
in California, and who won one of the scholarships re- 
cently awarded by Lazar SamoIofT. The program will 
be varied and comprise soli with flute obligato piano 
soil and flute soli. Howard Hanson's Rhythmic Etude 
still in manuscript will be played by Miss Moore in 
addition to a Moszowski Scherzo. Debussy Ballade and 
the Chopin F. Minor Ballade. 

Miss Ptund will play the Widor Suite tor flute, and 
the Andante, Mozart; Praeludium. Handel- Largo 
Bach; Minuetto in F, Mozart; and Rondeau La Barre' 
The concert is under the direction of Alice Seckels 



COLOSSAL SUCCESS 



Second Season Summer Vocal Master Classes of Yeat- 
man Grifiith, internationally famous vocal pedagogue 
held m Los Angeles, Cal., and Portland, Oregon, closed 
September 10th. They have proved the largest and most 
successful Vocal Master Classes held on the Pacific 
Coast. Sixty teachers and eighty artists and students 
were active members of the 1924 Master Classes Fifty- 
one cities, twenty states and three countries were rep- 
resented. All the members of these classes and many 
new applicants petitioned Yeatman Griffith to return 
next summer. This he will do including San Francisco 
despite many flattering offers from abroad and other 
large cities in the country. Mr. and Mrs. Y'eatman 
Griffith and daughter Lenore (who have accompanied 
him on this tour) return to New York October 1st when 
their New York Studios— which are the meeting place 
of artists from all over the world— reopen with a sched- 
ule filled to the brim. 



PAUL STEINDORFF 

-MASTER COACH 
ilete Grand anil Light Oiiera Rcpertoir 



Miss Elizabeth Westgate 

Teacher of Piano, Organ, Harmon,-. Organist and Musical 
Director of First Presbyterian Church, Alameda. Home 
Stndio: HIT PARU STREET, AL-iMEDA. Telephone Ala- 
meda 155, Thursdays, Merrinian School, B87 Eldorado Ave 
Oakland. Telephone Piedmont 2770. 





PASMORE TRIO 




Mary 


Violin — Suzanne, Piano — Dorothy, 
CONCERTS — PUPILS 


Cello 


2oa» 


Green St. Tel, Plllmo 


re 9071 



ncl(;lKT 10, VI24 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



THE FUNDAMENTAL TONE 

By J. WHITCOMB NASH 



Previous articles have endeavored to cover the prop- 
osition that the normal use and purpose of the voice is 
self-expression, and that normal conditions are vital to 
vocal development. By the same token vocal develop- 
ment is commensurate with the development of normal 
conditions. The voice v\'ill be perfect in proportion to 
the directness of its revelation and spiritual energy, 
rather than in proportion to any revelation of physical 
force or manipulation. The physical condition of the 
singer is not considered in this series, but successful 
singing calls for high conditioning of the physique. 

Vocal exercises can do more harm than good, and 
that this is generally so is because of misunderstandings 
in regard to the nature of conditions responsible for 
vocal tone. Manipulations of the voice and the vocal 
mechanism often result from introspection, and any 
exercise that may bring about this condition must be 
avoided. Practically all tricks of placement are of this 
nature. 

The previous article dealt with a method of investi- 
gating some of the fundamental conditions underlying 
the phenomenon of voice, and careful and extended in- 
vestigation along the line suggested will open up a 
variety of possibilities to the sincere investigator. Ex- 
periments will be suggested from time to time whose 
purpose will be a means of observation of the normal 
activities. 

Any vocalize may be considered good, but it may be 
productive of perversions, and probably will be if its 
purpose is not quite understood. Some of the essentials 
of a vocalize may be stated in a general sense, but the 
application must be specific, direct, and adapted to the 
individual. The following conditions will be found essen- 
tial and students should see to it that they apply the 
principles. 1. All exercises should be practiced for a 
specific reason. 2. They should develop in the direction 
of normalcy. 3. Practice should emphasize some funda- 
mental function rather than some peculiar characteristic 
of the voice. 

To the above many minor conditions might be added, 
but the desire is to simplify as much as possible. Effec- 
tive exercise will be seen to be co-ordinative. A sense 
of freedom accompanies all normal activity, the co- 
ordinations producing and multiplying power within 
normal limitations so long as they are not interfered 
with or manipulated extraneously. 

An experimental exercise whose purpose is the obser- 
vation of normal activity accompanying vocal tone pre- 
supposes normal vocal tone. Here again we see the 
need for genuine self-expression; for without it tone is 
hardly likely to be normal. This involves a direction of 
the consciousness into the effect, and a consciousness of 
the convincing character of the tone. It will be seen 
that the conversational or speech habit is the most 
direct line of approach. For instance, if we take the 
phrase "I know what you mean," and say it over, we 
may give it as many different shades of meaning as it 
has syllables. First, emphasize the first syllable, then 
the second. Compare them. The impression, the mean- 
ing, is quite different, and will be so each time the 
emphasis is changed from one syllable to another. 
Practice this for a while and you will not fail to rec- 
ognize the value of true self expression. Observe that 
you have not been concentrating upon the voice, but 
upon the effect produced by the voice. 

Now, if you can retain the true conditions of self 
expression, you may call into play the apperceptive 
faculty. In this way you may learn of expansions and 
relaxations which should give you clues to further ex- 
periments and advancement. Qualities in the voice, 
hitherto unnoticed, will soon become apparent The' 
next step involves a different purpose, but the qualities 
which have been observed in the experiment should be 
preserved. To conform to musical values and at the 
same time preserve the normal conditions of self ex- 
pression, suppose we use the first degrees of the major 
scale and the same phrase. This exercise is to all in- 
tents and purposes, as the exercise in the previous 
article, and may be exchanged fo-- it if so desired. The 
difference is in its purpose. Let us now make sure that 
the conditions of self expression are still true but 
observe more particularly the quality of the voice and 
Its general increase of agility, flexibility and power in 
proportion to our ability to convince. Notice, too, that 
m gaining this power of carrying conviction, the fluency 
01 rhythm and movement has strengthened. Notice also 
that certain syllables will carry a fitting accent, while 
others will not. There are many qualities to be observed 
in this way which can be leanied in no other 

Not the least of these qualities ij the characteristic 
timbre of the individual voice. Tlie high front resonance 
will be quite understood, and the fact will also be appre- 
ciated that voice-development is really a purifying or 
refining process. Primary, secondary and sympathetic 
vibration will be understood it self-expression is com- 
plete and satisfying during the time of observation of 
the apperceptive faculty. Only in proportion to the 
completeness of the understanding of the thing to be 
expressed, and the sincerity of expression will the tonal 
capacity be realized. This exercise will not be mastered 
upon the first attempt, and if you arrive at a condition 
where the realization of the purpose seems to come to 
a standstill you are probably handicapping yourself by a 
ack of genuine self-expression. Dy this time we should 
begm to see that singing is more psychological than 
physical; more mental than muscular. More co-ordinate 
than manipulate. These, then, are fundamentals; and 
without them the student is headed downwards Organ- 
isms, under abnormal conditions degenerate, but by well 
directed exercise can be so developed as to discharge 
their functions more effectively. 



No exercise has virtue In itself; no trick or rule can 
take the place of thought. An exercise should imply 
purpose, and pointless singing is bound to result from 
pointless practice. Psychology does not take the place 
of training, but every effective teacher applies the laws 
of psychology, and practical psychology is part of the 
make-up of every true artist even though he is uncon- 
scious of it. Hooting or screaming the top notes, bawl- 
ing, mouthing and other vulgarities are not likely to be 
practiced if one realizes the purpose of singing. But If 
we stop to think, the people who practice, yes, and even 
teach, or at least tolerate such things in their teachings, 
fondly imagine they are learning to sing. The funda- 
mental tone can be made a stabilizing influence in all 
vocal investigation. It is the only tone capable of de- 
velopment to the limit of one's capacity, To sing well 
it is necessary that the fundamental conditions coincide 
with the spontaneous activities of expression. This does 
not mean that all voices are normal. Far from it. But 
the practical method of rendering them normal is by 
observation of the speech habit, for if a voice contains 
normal conditions at all they will be observed in the 
speech habit. The production of voice is a voluntary, 
conscious, rational act, and, if normally performed, the 
mechanism is never manipulated by conscious direction, 
but by spontaneous co-ordinations of mind, body and 
spirit which are manifested in the tone. This is the true 
fundamental tone. 



EMILIE LANCEL SINGS IN ROSS 

At the concert given by the Woman's Association of 
San Anselmo at the Ross Grammar School on Friday, 
September 19th, under the direction of Uda. Waldrop, 
Miss Lancel sang by request several of the numbers tliat 
figured in the program of her recent recital at the St 
Francis Hotel. The aria of Dalila particularly received 
long, hearty and insistent applause. Miss Lancel's 
reading of Saint-Saens' exquisite music has been com- 
mented upon both in Paris and in London by the "gen- 
tlemen of the press" and San Francisco's foremost 
critics but lately reiterated their praises. Wrapped in 
a stunning Roman shawl, she has brought back from 
Italy our California Carmen gave us as encore her in- 
dividual and fascinating interpretation of the Habanera. 



Tllli UlRKEL CO. 

STEIN WAY 




Even Musicians Wonder 

— at the cnclurp c qualities of 
tlie STEINWAY Pia.io. 

Yet with its plastic and delicate 
touch it far outlasts other Pianos. 
From $925 upwards. 

South COMPANY 

Broadway <^ir Stcinwa>' House 




FITZGERALD'S ■ for the cAdvancement of S^usic 

"^he ZOELLNER QUARTET 

This iniernationally renowned Quartet announce the Seventh 
Series of six Concerts, to be held on Monday evenings In the 
MU.S1C Room of the Biltmore Hotel. 

All of the Zoellner programs have been models of their kind, 
nd this season vvill see a series of artistically superlative 



performances. 
The Zoellnci- Qu 



the supcrh 



KNABE 



in all their concerts, anti each i 
individual home use. The Knalx 
iioelhier Conservatory. 



has purchased one for 
the oHicial piano of the 




HILL STREF.T ^'^T AT 7hi7-729 

LOS ANGELES 



CALMON LUBOVISKI 

CONCERT VIOLINIST 



ATallabIc for Co 



LlMlted Number of Adva 

VIollnlal Loa AnKrlra frjo 
Studloi 334 Mnalc Aria Studio llldK. 



nd Recltala 
-d I'uplU A«eepted 



CHARLES BOWES 

TEACHER OF VOICE 
440 S. Grand Vim. fbonr 6.MU4S. I,oa Ansrira 



LOUISE GUDE 


SOPRANO 


I.O. Aneelea 


Wealern Reprenentallvp Iferix-n WItheranoun 


Studios, .\e«T Vorii 


Concert Direction Ilnrrj- and Artliur Culberlaon 


New \orl«. ChicnKu, l-orllnnd 



L. E. Behymer 

MANAGER OF DISTINGUISHED ARTIBTt 

Executive Offices: 

70S Auditorium Bidg., Loa Angelea 



ALMA STETZLER 

VOICE cuLTiinR — coACiii.va i.%- ihci-khtoire: 



Alexander Bevani 

AI.I, IIKANCHEft OF THE 

VOCAL ART 



Calif. Miialr Cl 



ILYA BRONSON 

Anicrlr. T 
nalrurliun. 
neiR I, a MIrada. 



tluar 



Solo 'Ceiiiat 
rhiiiiarnionlr tlrcheatra 
III. i'bllharmunlc 
hanilirr .Muair Hecltala 
rhiinf. Holly .'Itm 



ABBIE NORTON JAMISON 



INV — VtiCAI, COACH 



TelFPhone lira 



THE PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL 
REVIEW 

HAS FOUGHT FOR TIIF RE.SIIIK.NT ARTIST 

mjRIlVG THE LAST TWK.XTV-TWO VKARS — IS 

SUCH A PAPER WORTH SIinsCRIIIINO FORI 

IF SO, DON'T WAIT ANV LONGER. 



A.KOODLACH 

VIOLIN HtKER A M> REPAIRER 

ConniilNaeur — Appralaer 
riOS Majrallr Thi-iitri- IlldB.. I.na Anici-lia Tucker 4010 

JOHN SMALLMAN 

IIAHITONF,— TEACHER OP SINGINO 

Voice Trial hj Appiiinlmenl, f;i.OO. SludUii M(KI-H04 So. Cal. 

>lu«lc (11. llldK. \ iviiiii llroln, .Srcrrlurr 



ZOELLNER CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



Complete ITacaKir of Arllat Taaakera 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



C)L-tobcT 10, 1924 



ELWYN CONCERT BUREAU SEASON TICKET SALE 

Reinald Werrenrath. who is scheduled for a local 
appearance on the Elwyn Artist Series, is one of the 
foremost American baritones of today, one of the most 
interesting personalities among the artists now before 
the public and one of the most popular singers this 
country ever possessed. The announcement of his com- 
ing will no doubt be welcome news to his numerous 
local admirers. Other artists whose appearances are 
called for on this remarkable concert course are: Moriz 
Rosenthal, pianist: Cecelia Hansen, violinist; Isa Kre- 
mer, international balladist: Jascba Heifetz, violinist; 
Maria Ivogun, coloratura soprano; Roland Hayes, Negro 
tenor: Albert Spalding. American violinist; Mabel Gar- 
rison, gracious and gifted soprano; The London String 
Quartet, an unsurpassed chamber music ensemble, and 
Merle .\lcocls, leading contralto of the Metropolitan 
Opera Company. 

Nine of the eleven attractions will be evening concerts 
at Scottish Rite Hall. The concerts of Jascha Heifetz 
and Roland Hayes will be Sunday afternoon concerts at 
the Casino Theatre. This change from the Scottish Rite 
for these two concerts is necessit.ited on account of the 
enormous drawing powers of these two great artists. 
Season tickets covering the entire eleven attractions 
are now on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co. The same re- 
served seat may be purchased for each concert at a 
considerable saving over the prices of admission if 
purchased singly for each concert. 



BEETHOVEN SONATA CYCLE 



MISS SIMPSON PRESENTS BRILLIANT PIANIST 

A concert of great interest was given at the Twentieth 
Centurj- Club in Berkeley on September 17th by Helen 
Eugenia Merchant, one of the most gifted young pianists 
in this region, and a pupil of Elizabeth Simpson. A 
capacity audience was present to honor the young 
artist, and showed its approval of her exquisite playing 
by every means in its power. Miss .Merchant was heard 
in an exacting program which included two brilliant 
solo groups: Beethoven's great C minor Sonata for 
piano and violin, in which Antonio de Grassi collabor- 
ated, and the splendid Fantasie Hongroise by Liszt for 
piano with orchestra, which roused the audience to a 
pitch of enthusiasm that resulted in a genuine ovation. 

Miss Simpson was showered with congratulations on 
the great success of this gifted young pupil, whose 
pianistic education has been in her hands tor several 
years, and who gives every indication of a brilliant 
future. This is the first of a series of concerts to be 
given through the season by Miss Simpson's artist 
pupils and members of her coaching class. The pro- 
gram was as follows: Sonata in C Minor, for Violin and 
Piano (Beethoveni; Impromptu, Bb Major (Schubert), 
E:iude. E major (Chopin), Valse Brilliante (Moskowski); 
En Automne (Moskowski). Impromptu, F sharp major 
(Chopfni. Concert Etude (MacDowell); Fantasie Hon- 
groise n Is'zt). (Orchestral accompaniment on second 
piano D\ Miss Simpson). 



WARFIELD THEATRE 



Following the current attraction of In Hollywood with 
Potash and Perlmutter the Warfield Theatre will pre- 
sent Buster Keaton. the srilemn faced comedian, in his 
latest production, The Navigator. The Navigator is said 
to have cost in the neighborhood of $600,000 — the most 
expensive picture ever made by Keaton, and, according 
to all critics, the best. For the filming the S. S. Buford, 
of the Pacific-Alaska Line, was chartered for two months 
and most of the action taken at sea. In the latter part 
of the picture, the concluding reels, are many scenes 
made under water — the first time in the historj- of the 
screen that comedy scenes were staged on the bottom 
of the ocean. There will be other screen attractions. On 
the stage Fanchon and Marco will present their latest 
Ideas, with Gino Severi handling the Warfield Music 
Masters. 



ALICE SECKELS PRESENTS 

Christine Howells Pfund 

Flutist 

Jessie Moore 

Pianist 

Assisting Artist 

EULA GRANDBERRY, Soprano 

Italian Room, Hotel St. Francis 
FRIDAY EVENING, OCT. 17, 8:15 

Tickets $1.00 (plus tax) 
At Sherman, Clay & Company's 



Myra Palache 

PIANIST 

LECTURES ON MUSIC 
APPRECIATION 



San Frant'iiirn Idilrrxx 

rhnnr Wnl 

"11 W i-ilnrxiln;. a | 



The complete cycle of Beethoven's Sonatas tor piano 
and violin, will be played this month in three recitals. 
by Ada Clement and Edouard Deru, at the San Fran- 
cisco Conservatory of Music, 3435 Sacramento Street. 
At the first recital, on Thursday evening, October !). 
they will offer the first three sonatas. Op 12, published 
in ITS!) and dedicated to Salieri, who taught Beethoven 
the art of vocal music in accordance with the Italian 
traditions of that period. These works show a sti'ong 
Haydn influence, and in them one finds the same lim- 
pidity of style, the same method of development and the 
three part classification, — Allegro, Theme and Varia- 
tion, or Andante, Rondo and .\negro. From this Bee- 
thoven developed the passionate intensity of his later 
works, and formed the real Beethoven Sonata freed 
from the restrictions of tradition. It is interesting to 
students of music to hear the sonatas chronologically 
to trace Beethoven's own development. These early 
sonatas liave great beauty and charm and are easy 
to understand. The second recital will be on Saturday 
afternoon, October 11. at 3 o'clock, and the last will 
take place on Thursday evening, October IG, at S:30 
o'clock. 



FARRAR TO APPEAR AS CARMEN 

GeraUline Farrar's modernized version of Carmen 
will be presented, under the direction of Frank \V. 
Healy. at the Casino Theatre. San Francisco, on Sun- 
day afternoon, November 16, 1924. The delightful and 
sympathetic role of Micaela will be sung by a young 
American girl, Emma Noe. who has made an enviable 
reputation for herself during the few short years of 
her career as a singer. 

Gifted with a charming personality. Miss Noe has en- 
joyed a share of success that rarely falls to the lot of a 
young artist. She was born in Hopkinsville, Ky., and 
educated in Chicago. I^pon graduating from Miss Baur's 
conservatory in Cincinnati, she was granted an audi- 
tion by the late Cleofonte Campanini, then Director of 
the Chicago Opera Company, and an engagement as a 



NEW SONGS FOR TEACHER AND SINGER 


It's a Mighty Good World 




O'Hara 


Golden Moon 
Come to My Heart 
Wood Fairies 




Rolt 

English 

Wilfrid Jones 






Wood 


Land of Might Have Been 




Novello 


Rose Marie of Normandy 
Spring Comes Laughing 
Beauty 




Del Rigo 
Carew 


Lohr 


Piper of Love 




Carew 


The Market 




Carew 


Among the Willows 

A Good Heart All the Way 




Phillips 
Clarke 


Dancing Time in Kerry 






Sweet Navarre 




Carne 


My Heart's Haven 




Phillips 








My Little Island Home 






Ragged Vagabond 




Randolph 


CHAPPELL-HARMS, INC. 
185 Madison Avenue New York City 



member of that organization immediately followed. She 
has made appearances as solo artist with the Minne- 
apolis and Cincinnati Symphony Orchestras, the North 
Shore Festival, and many others. Her New York de- 
but as a recital artist took place last November at 
Aeolian Hall and was an acknowledged success. She 
is typically American, and brings to her audiences a 
glowing example of what native training can accomplish 
when coupled with natural ability. 

Carlo Peroni, whom San Franciscans will remember 
for his excellent conducting of the performances given 
at the Exposition Auditorium, San Francisco, by the 
Scotti Grand Opera Company, has been engaged by 
Miss Farrar as her conductor. Maestro Peroni. under 
date of September 23, 1924, wrote to Mr. Healy, as fol- 
lows: "You can assure your music public that Miss 
Farrar's version of Carmen is a most artistic produc- 
tion. Miss Farrar has spared no expense for costumes, 
scenery, artists, orchestra and rehearsals to make every- 
thing beautiful, and I am sure she will have splendid 
success." 



GREEK THEATRE PROGRAM 

The Committee on Music and Drama at the Univer- 
sity announces that the program for the Halt Hour of 
Music on Sunday. October .ith, was given by Mr. Wm. 
Edward .lohnson, the baritone soloist. Since the open- 
ing of his studio in Oakland, Mr. Johnson has gained 
great popularity and has been heard with considerable 
success by several Clubs in Oakland, San Leandro, San- 
ta Cruz, San Jose and elsewhere. He has also appeared 
as soloist with a number of Choral societies in the East 
and in England. Gertrude Blanchard Rost acted as ac- 
companist for the program as follows: God is my Shep- 
ard (Dvorak), Recitative: I Feel the Diety Within and 
Aria Arm, Arm ye Brave (Handel). II lacerato spirito 
(From Simon Bocanegra) (Verdi); The Two Grena- 
diers (Request in English) (Schumann). Pilgrim's Song 
(Tschaikowsky); Vision Fugitive (From Herodiade) 
(Massenet); Pleading (Elgar); Gypsy John (Clay): 
Mother My Dear (Treharne); Tally Ho (Leoni) ; I 
Fear No Foe (Pinsuti). 



Selby C. Oppenheimer Concerts 



G 



LOUIS 

RAYEURE 

Baritone 



CL,A.IR.E 

DUX 

r ^ SOPRANO 

^l M>\\ \l II It NOON. <>CTtMIKR 1!) 




T^JCirXi^T^ '"* *" :f- 00 (plUM tax). \o« on Sale 
J- i.\-'-IVii< J- O „ »,h, pman, rlay and Co.'s or Order 
Tickets hs Mail lo S( 1U> <'. Opiienheimer, eare above 



Elwin A. Calberg 



Soloist and Accompanist 
Available Season 1924-1925 



Lo E W'S ^ W AR FIElD 

Week Commencing Sat., October 4th 
BUSTER KEATON 

"THE "n A VI GAT OR" 
GINO SEVERI 

and the 

Warfield Music Masters 

F-V\rH<IN .WD MAIiCO "IDE AS" 



ROSEMARY ROSE 



A Singer Who Teaches — Consolidates Her Studios 

Formerly of Milwaukee, Sheboygan 

and Plymouth 



In Los Angeles 



437 SO. KEXMORE STREET TEL. 3«r 

.\uilitions By Apiioiiitineiit Only 
Ruth Brodinaii, Regrislrar 



J. WHITCOMB NASH 

THE VOICE 

Special Normal Couri^es for Teachers 

700 Kohler «& Chase Building. San Francisco, Calif. 



STENGER VIOLINS 

Exemplify Intrinsic Excellence and Are 
Pre-eminently Superior 

A IHe'» devotion of uninterrupted study and labor, 
involvlne the mastery of prlneiplca of niusleal 
acouHtles, timber physies. and ensrlneerln^, ha« 
yielded (he understundine of Ihoae principles nhlch 
exemplify the "Stenger Idea" In violin maklnfr, and 
mark the foesrinnlne of a new era In this noble art 

W. C. STENGER 

INCORPORATED 

Maktr of Fine Violins 
617-618 Steinway Hall, Chicago 



AUDREY BEER SOREL 

PIANIST — TEACHER 



ALFRED HURTGEN 

PIANIST. ACCOMPANIST, Ml'SICAI, DIRECTOR 

COACH, PIANO INSTRICTION 
Sludlo: 277S Inlon Street Tel. Fillmore S240 



Octolxr 10, 1924 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



GRAND OPERA 

(I'ontiiivuil from I^ase 1. Column :M 
reach to do what Mr. Merola has done, 
but since they did not do it. they have 
no jnstiflable right to find fault. 

Mr. Merola has again demonstrated 
that he is able to bring a season he 
started to a successful conclusion. How- 
ever, this year he was handicapped by 
most inefficient business management. 
When it was announced that an experi- 
enced impresario was engaged to take 
a hold of this year's opera season the 
writer was pleased, for good business 
management always means public sup- 
port or successful artistic enterprises. 
But soon we discovered that our grati- 
fication over the selection of this year's 
executive manager was premature. The 
press was neglected to a shaniful de- 
gree, the seating arrangement was about 
as bad as it could be. the public was 
treated discourteously at the box office, 
it was announced with a great deal of 
braggadocio that no one could get through 
the doors free of charge, and according 
to the papers the increase in receipts 
was only IS per cent more than last 
year, 'ft'hoever attended to the distri- 
bution of press and other complimentary 
tickets evidently was used to doing busi- 
ness in provincial towns and not in cities 
of metropolitan size. Otherwise the crit- 
ics wauld have been taken care of 
FIRST, and not after all scats of any 
advantageous locations had been dis- 
posed of. Either you extend a courtesy 
with good grace and give the recipient 
of such courtesy the BEST, or you do not 
extend courtesies. To extend courtesies 
grudgingly and with an idea that they are 
not deserved, is worse than not extend- 
ing any courtesy at all. Goodness knows 
the press is doing enough for public en- 
terprises of an artistic nature to be treat- 
ed fairly and squarely by those in charge 
of them. 

Regarding this extension of courtesies 
we hear from reliable sources that offi- 
cials of the San Fi-ancisco Musical Asso- 
ciation, who really were responsible for 
the opera association being able to utilize 
the symphon.v orchestra, were ignored by 
the business management until attention 
was called to the negligence by promi- 
nent ladies of the San Francisco Opera 
Association. When a business manage- 



ment charges $.i as the price tor the best 
seats, then the.v should be actually the 
BEST seats. To charge $5 for seats on 
the sides, where people could not see. 
or in the orchestra circle where it was 
almost impossible to see and barely pos- 
sible to hear, was an imposition on the 
public and we certainly agree with those 
who complained to us by phone or word 
of mouth or letter regarding the unsat- 
isfactory position of their $5 seats. Meas- 
ures should be taken that the seating 
arrangement is changed next season. 
There are other people attending opera 
besides the box holders. 

The writer has received numerous com- 
plaints regarding the treatment at the 
box office. The concensus of the public 
being that grouches presided over that 
important part of the operatic enterprise. 
We want to state frankly that courtesy 
should be extended at box offices. Peo- 
ple who buy tickets should not be in- 
sulted. Even though certain people are 
unreasonable, or may labor under a tem- 
porary nervous strain, or may be impa- 
tient, they should be treated with cour- 
tesy and this applies specially to ladies. 
It is (he business of the ticket seller to 
humor the patrons. If it is difficult to do 
this, then he must ascribe this difficulty 
to the character of his position. It he 
does not possess sufficient manners or 
breeding to treat the public decently he 
has no business in the box office and 
should seek other employment. The 
more excited a ticket purchaser is. the 
calmer the ticket seller should be. Most 
patrons are reasonable, and if matters 
are explained to them in a calm and con- 
vincing manner they will leave the box 
office satisfied, instead of in a state of 
high temper. 

If it is a rule of the box office not to 
reserve tickets until payment is made, 
such rule should apply to EVERYBODY. 
and not to some people only. We know 
of several instances where exceptions 
were made at the box office in this re- 
spect. If the public is informed that only 
certain undesirable seats are left in the 
house, such statements should be based 
upon TRUTH, and the patrons should not 
be able to discover afterwards that some- 
one behind them in line is able to secure 
desirable locations while they are told 
there are no better seats in the house. 
We know of one lady who. after inquir- 
ing repeatedly about the possibility of 



obtaining certain seats, was spoken to 
in a decidedly rough manner, and she 
afterwards made the remark thai she re- 
fused to accept any "imported impu- 
dence." no doubt meaning that strangers 
occupied the box office and that "local" 
people she knows are more courteous 
than what she termed imported box office 
talent. 

The article published in the daily pa- 
pers referring to the increase of 18 per 
cent receipts on the opening night is 
evidence tiiat last year's opening night 
was better attended. For it must not be 
forgotten that this year the price was 
raised from $4 to $."> and there were 
more low priced seats last year than this 
year. In order to be attended the SAME 
as last year the increase in receipts 
should have been between 20 and 2.") per 
cent instead of IS per cent, and to be 
better attended the increase should have 
been even more. As a matter of tact the 
attendance was not as good as last year 
throughout the season and this was due 
partly to the fact that publicity was be- 
gun too late in the season, so that OUT- 
SIDE patrons did not make up their 
minds to come to San Francisco soon 
enough, and partly to the tinsatisfactory 
arrangement of seats which forced peo- 
ple to pay $.') for seats from which they 
could neither hear nor see well. 

Regarding the bragging about keeping 
people out of the Auditorium the man- 
agement would have done better to do 
a little bragging about the people that 
went INTO the auditorium. Selby C. 
Oppenheimer, (iuring the engagement of 
the Chicago Opera Association, published 
a statement that whenever the occasion 
permitted orphans and poor people, un- 
able to pay admission had been invited 
to attend the performance. We consider 
Mr. Oppenlieimer's statement about in- 
viting people unable to pay to hear the 
opera more worthy of attention than the 
present manager's statement about how 
many he could keep out. To place special 
policemen at the doors to watch the door- 
keepers was an insult to the doorkeep- 
ers. We know every one of them and 
are positive that they would not per- 
mit anyone to enter unless they were en- 
titled to do so. They are above reproach 
and suspicion. To put them to the incon- 
venience and annoyance of being watched 
■was to say the least stupid and un- 
gracious. 



The printing of tickets was unsatis- 
factory. The uniform color of the tickets 
made it difficult for ushers to find the 
right places for the patrons. Every even- 
ing there was (rouble about people being 
shown to wrong seals. This is another 
feature which needs Improvement. Now, 
we hold no brief for Selby C. Oppenhei- 
mer. but compared to this year's manage- 
ment last year's was so good that we are 
inclined to take off our hat to .Mr. Oppen- 
heimer. We sincerely hope that there 
will be a radical improvement in the 
business management of the grand opera 
season next year. Otherwise there will 
be even a greater decline of attendance 
than this year. 

These statements are made because 
we are interested to see the grand opera 
season a brilliant financial as well as 
artistic success. We do not believe that 
the officers of the association know of 
these things. Those in charge ot the busi- 
ness office and box office always And 
some way of minimizing the seriousness 
of the attitude of the public. They al- 
ways find excuses. We feel that we are 
helping the cause of grand opera In San 
Francisco by preventing the public from 
becoming disgusted at the treatment it 
receives. The producing managers of 
legitimate drama lost the support of the 
public for ignoring its wishes the pro- 
ducers of moving pictures are beginning 
to lose the confidence of the public be- 
cause of their grasping natures, the man- 
agers of baseball are being severely crit- 
icised for their frenzied financial atti- 
tude, for the love of all that is fair and 
reasonable do not let us lose the people's 
confidence in those who are In charge 
ot our musical affairs. 



EDITOR'S PLEA 



ic'oiitinuij fr..m I'aKi- I. Column I) 
sixteen pages steadily, containing news 
from all parts of the world and dealing 
with important questions regarding musi- 
cal progress. 

Last year we intended beginning a sub- 
scription campaign, distributing prizes to 
students and teachers who help us in ob- 
taining these subscriptions, but we found 
we had to wait until the Musical Blue 
Book of California had been published. 
We are now entirely free to conduct this 
campaign with whatever assistance is 



I'ai 



Mrs. William Steinbach Laura Wertheimber fti vitT^^T T 17' ivr VliK«s; 

VOICE (I I.TIRK PreoarmorT Temcher tor M.<r^A^MyM ^M jM jRj i> J.x^ViX.*Vr^ 

.Sludiii: 
»02 KOHI.ER & CHASE PLDG.. 
Sun Frnnciaco rhnne Kearnr W."i4 

ACHILLE L. ARTIGUES 

C.rnduale of Schola Cnntorum. Paris. Or- 

f^nnfNt -St. .■*lary'.s Cntbvdrul. Piano I>e- 

partmrnt. Ilanilln Kt'hool. Orenn and 

Piano. Arrillncn Mllii.nl Collree 

KURT VON GRUDZINSKI 

BARITO.XE — VOICE CCLTIIRE 

AatborI<ed to Tenrb >Imp. SchoFn- 

■ trne'a Mrlhod 

1314 Lenvenirorlh St. t*hone PrOMpeet 02S3 

EVA M. GARCIA 



Preparatory Teacher for 

^Ira. Noah Brandt 

2211 Seott St. Telephone Fillmore 1522 

Evelyn Sresovich Ware 



Joseph George Jacobson 



ROSE RELDA CAILLEAU 

Opera Coiulque. Paris 

Studio: aiOT Washlnelon Street 

Phone Klllniore IN47 

SIGMUND BEEL 

Master Clasaea tor Violin 



CONTRALTO 

laSS 2eth Avenue Phone Sunset 2005 

Voli-e Culture. >iondnfs P. M. .'•till Kiihler 

.V < hOMi- llldK. I'el. luirlleld I IT'J 



Joseph Greven 

Voice Culture ; — Opera, Oratorio. 
Concert and Church Singing in all 
languages. 



PIERRE DOUILLET, PIANO 
NITALIA DOUILLET. VOICE 

-i\T. Kohirr A Chnse Hid. Tel. Setter 73.S7 

DOMENICO BRESCIA 

VOICE SPECI.AMST — COMPOSI'I'ION 

Slodloi aOS-tXM Kohler .(: Chase Ilulldlne 

Phone Kearny r.ir.l 

Madame Charles Poulter— Soprano 



Oakland — Tel. Oakland 207SI 

Mary Coonan McCrea 

TEAt HEK OF SINtil.NG 
Studio: 30 GalTneT nullcUnK, 370 Sutter St. 
Tel. Douelns 41-33. ilea. Tel. Kearn}- ::34U 

MRS. A. F. BRIDGE 

TEACHER OF SINfJING 
stndloi 1»20 Seott St. Phone Fillmore ir.«l 

HELEN COLBURN HEATH 

Soprano Soloist. Temple Emanu F.I. Con- 
cert and Church Work. Vocal Instruction. 
2.">.3n Clajr Street. Phone West 4M!in 

HENRIK GJERDRUM 

PIANIST 
2H21 JarkHon Sfrt'et nilmnre :t2r.<t 



MARY ALVERTA MORSE 

SOPRANO 
Teacher of SlndnK; Studio. Tuesday and 
Frldar. Ivohler di Chase llld£.. S. F.; Ileal- 



SAN FRANCISCO CONSERVATORY 



OF MUSIC 



NBN 



MRS. CARROLL NICHOLSON 

t ONTIIAI.TO 
Teacher of SInelne. 32 Lorrtta Ave.. Pled- 
nionl. Tel. Piedmont 304. .>lon., Kohler .tl 
I hnse llldg.. s. F. Telephone KenrnT fH.VI 

Brandt's Conservatory of Music 



Mrs. Noah Rrandt. Piano 

ALMA SCHMIDT -KENNEDY 

PIANIST 

Studio: l.'>37 Euclid Avenue. Ilerkeler. Cal. 

Phone IlcrkelcT MOUO 

MRS. ZAY RECTOR BEVITT 

PIANO and HARMONY 

Institute of Music of San Francisco. 
Kohler & Cliase nide. Tel. Kearny .'^454 



Dorothy Goodsell Camm MARION RAMON WILSON 



I OI.IIK All l( V SOPH V' 
Teacher of Ilcl t anlo. Id. Iln' 
or I'ieduiont 1330. Ily Apiiiilnti 



Irnnindc ( ontralto. Opera Successes In 

lOuropc. Concert Successes in the I lilted 

States. .Address: lM:S.'i Leavenworth Street. 

Telephone Franklin 3501. 



MRS. J. GREVEN 

Piano and Harmony 

S741 Sacramento St. Tel. Bayview 5278 

TEACHERS* DIRECTORY 



MISS EDITH CAUBU 
376 Sutter Street Phone Douglas 26» 

JANET ROWAN HALE 
Kohler <£. Chase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 5454 

J. B. ATWOOD 
2111 Channlng Way Berkeley, Cal. 

MISS LORRAINE EWING 
833 Ashbury St Phone Park 1974 

RUTH VIOLA DAVIS 
515 Buena Vista Avenue— Park 341 

LOUIS FELIX RAYNAUD 
1841 Fulton St. Tel. Bayview 6008 

ELSIE COOK HUGHES LARAIA 
3325 Octavia St. Phone Filmore 6102 

There is no way to obtain concert en- 
gagements unk'ss a name is sufliciently 
known. There is no other way to make 
a name known except through publicity. 
C'on.sequently. if you tlo not advertise you 
can not possibly secure steatly engage- 
ments. 



MACKENZIE GORDON 
8832 Jackson Street Phone West 467 



ANTOINE DE VALLY 
2201 Scmt St. Phone Wett mi 



MME. M. TROMBONI 
601-2 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Kearny 5464 



JACK EDWARD HILLMAN 
601 Koliler & Chase Bldg. Kearny 5464 



ADELE ULMAN 
178 Commonwealth Ave. Phone Pac. 33 



JULIUS HAUG 
4032 Irving St. Tel. Sunset 436 



HOTHER WISMER 

oTOl Clay Street Phone Bayview 77 



ARTHUR CONRADI 
906 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 64*4 



G. JOLLAIN 
376 Sutter St. Tel. Kearny 2637 



ANNA W. McCORMICK 
1380 Taylor St. Tel. Pros. 9887 

JEANNETTE BRANDENSTEIN 
1916 Octavia Street Tel- Fillmore 433 

AlCIt \ \(.l';i< Of M I Hie 

C. B. FRANK 
400 Pantages Bldg. Tel. Garfield 1334 

If a music journal is worth while to 
publish programs and views of musical 
events, it is worth while to patronize. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



October 10, 1924 



ADVANCED COACHING 

THE ART OF INTERPRETATION— SOLFEGE 

NORMAL COURSES 



The San Francisco Sayings and Loan Society 

vTHE SAX FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRU.\RV lOth, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks in California. 

the .\ssels of which have never been increased 

by merfiers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Gal. 
JUNE 30th, 1924 

AweU $93,198,226.96 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 3,900,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 446,024.41 

MISSION BRANCH Mission .nd 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAJS-HT STREET BRANCH Haii=ht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and UUoa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (4 J 4) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 




When 
Work is 
Pleasure 



\\\-.-. ; ' alth and happiness are present, when surroundings are 

con^jii.o:, when one is "making good" in a worth while job, it is a 

pleasure to work. 

For the typist, add to these conditions the "SILENT SMITH " 

typewriter, ball bearing, easy running and equipped with all the 

time and labor saving devices — then the pleasure of work is 

complete. 

Send for booklet and folder Form 601. 

L.C. Smith & Bros. Typewriter Co. 

Executive Offices - Syracuse, N. Y. 

217 Citizens' Natl. Bank BIdg., Los Angeles 

432 Market Street, San Francisco 



EDITOR'S PLEA 
K-'ontinu-.I frc.m PaKe 7, Column i) 
necesaar)- and are ready to enlist the 
names of all those eager to help us pub- 
lish an independent musical Journal, ed- 
ited in the interests of the public and the 
profession only. Most of the visiting 
artists, encouraged by their eastern man- 
agers, are anxious to accept the support 
and generosity of the California musical 
public, but indifferent as to the patronage 
of its musical journals. Eastern manu- 
facturers are anxious to sell musical In- 
struments in California, but do not feel 
inclined to support California music pa- 
pers. Therefore, not having the patro 
nage of distinguished artists, wealthy 
manufacturers. Eastern music schools, 
the Musical Review must find other 
means to give the public of the Pacific 
Coast a music paper comparable to any 
published in the country. This is pos- 
sible if everyone interested in music in 
the central part of the Pacific Coast 
will help us to swell our subscription 
list to a number making the paper self- 
supporting. In return we shall see that 
the deserving members of the profes- 
sion—teachers, artists, orchestra musi- 
cians, composers, amateur organization.^, 
choral societies and indeed every orgaui. 
zation employed in preaching the gospel 
of music will benefit by this universal 
circulation. At the same time we shall 
protect the musical profession against un- 
fair outside competition. Additional an- 
nouncements will appear in next weeks' 
issue. 



Alexander McCurdy, Jr., the well known 
young organist of St. Luke's Cathedral of 
San Francisco, gave a farewell organ 
recital at the First Presbyterian Church, 
Berkeley, on Tuesday evening, September 
2nd, and left the following day for New 
York, where he will study for a year with 
Lynwood Farnum, the distinguished 
organist. Mr. McCurdy was assisted in 
his recital by Hugh Williams, tenor of 
Grace Cathedral of San Francisco. Mr. 
McCurdy's organ playing has been ad- 
mired for some time by music lovers and 
the best wishes of his friends and ad- 
mirers accompany the young musician, 
together with anticipations of a bright 
musical future. The program, enthusi- 
astically applauded by a large audience 
was as follows: Sketch in F Minor 
(Schumann) ; The Pilgrims' Song of Hoiio 
(Batiste); Recitative and Air: Comfort 
Ye and Every Valley from the Messiah 
(Handel), Mr. Williams, (a) Gavotte 
(Edward Elgar), (b) Liebestraum (Franz 
Liszt); Angelus from Scenes Picter- 
esque (J. .Massenet); (a) Berceuse 
(Delbruck), (b) Bouree in D (Wallace 
A. Sabin); (a) Ah, Moon of My Delight 
from In a Persian Garden (Lehman). 
(b) The Lost Chord (with piano and 
organ) (Sullivan), Mr. Williams, Wallace 
A. Sabin at the piano; March and Chorus 
from Tannhauser (Wagner). 



If you want to become known to the 
musical public of California, advertise in 
the Pacific Coast Musical Review 



y f jr^ T^ ¥^ f Playing Privately at 

Kohler & Lnase Blag. 

UNDER DIRECTION OF LEONARD DAVIS 



Nyiregyhazi 

(Near-e-gatz-e) 

THE GREAT WORLD PIANIST 

"MOST SENSATIONAL HUNGARIAN MASTER 
ARTIST OF ALL TIME" 



Nyiregyhazi, pianistic genius, is to- 
day the strange figure of the musi- 
cal world. Tall, thin almost to the 
point of emaciation and with long, 
tapering hands, he has much the 
same weird atmosphere that marked 
Paganini. With an air of utter, 
weary indifference to all external 
influences, he seems almost to have 
reached the impassive calm of the 
Oriental. Yet this Hungarian youth, 
for he is hardly more than a boy, 
flames into an instant, electric vital- 
ity once he sits before the key- 
board. 



Brilliant runs, thunderous bass and 
crashing chords alternate with 
lyric, melodious passages, marked 
throughout with an individuality of 
interpretation that distinguishes 
him as a pianist of keen intelli- 
gence as well as passion. It is as if 
his entire mental and physical re- 
sources were held in reserve until 
he plays. Then it is that he seems 
to pour forth his whole soul in his 
music. 



"The Coming- Pianist 
of The World" 

—Says Tita Ruffo. 

What the Press says of Nyiregyhazi : 

Nyiregyhazi played here tor the first time. He is in his nineteenth year. The 
ringmaster used to say of the dashing equestrienne in the circus: •'She rides 
wfti H,'i«°°L'f- ''°"°f,r' '^^f compliment is often paid a young pianist, but 
with this addition: When he is older, he will play with greater thoughttul- 
ness, or his performance is said to be not yet "mature." Youth is not an 
atrocious crime. Better the dash and enthusiasm of the young than the 
apathy of middle age, or the coolness of academic reserve. 

—Philip Hale in the Boston Herald. 
Genius is wisdom and youth. This is said by Edgar Lee Masters, and it was 
proved again at the concert given by the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Pierre 
Jlonteux. conductor, yesterday afternoon in Symphony Hall On that occa- 
sion the eighteen-year-old Hungarian pianist, Erwin Nyiregyhazi, made his 
Boston debut. He played Liszt's A Major Concerto like a poet and a whfrl 

Tnd th^se wfoT^."^"?" 1** «''■■""'"'• ^°' ""^ ^°°<=^'-t° '^ °°t child's play, 
w °?^ fi ''°^'"^, '"'■ '^"^ "''^' ""<= °^ ^ youns man, mostly arms and 

La^v ; ,Tp J» f r f ° 'T'^ "'I' ^^^y "''"'^^ "^'^ ^'^«^'«^ ^'^e"' too short and 
gave the effect of two fans when he spread his hands over the keyboard— 
those who looked on this shook their heads, and wondered where in the 
L'nl ^1 7^^ ^°?,^ 1° ^""^ "'" '™<= '" compete with Liszt's extremely bril 
hant and frequently heavy and noisy orchestration. 

— Olin Downgs in the Boston Post 

His long arms have enormous power. He goes crashing and smashing 

through a concerto in a way to astound one. His brilliancy is enormous ^ 

—Excerpt from the Boston American. 



HERE! 



Hear him play Tuesdays and 
Thursdays (afternoon and 
evening) at Knabe Studios 



Knabe Piano Used 



&iBr (ha^tMxMiWiMa 



THE 01,DEST MUSICAL JOURNAL IN THE GREAT WEST 



VOL. XLVII. No. 2 



SAN FRANCISCO, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1924 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



FESTIVAL CHORUS BEING ORGANIZED NOW MUSICAL REVIEW RECEIVES CO-OPERATION 



Singers With Natural Voices and With the Incentive and Enthusiasm 

That Arouses in Them a Love for Music and for Knowledge of the 

Great Choral Works Are Needed by the City of San Francisco 

and Alfred Hertz — Everyone Should Help in This Cause 



BY ALFRED METZGER 



Prominent Music Teachers and Many Pupils Volunteer Services to Make 
Weekly Music Journal as Much as Possible Independent of Advertise- 
ments — Need for Medium to Protect Profession Against Imposi- 
tion and Public Against Organized Selfishness Recognized 

BY ALFRED METZGER 



The Festival Committee appointed by 
Mayor James Rolph, Jr. for the Second 
Spring Music Festival to be given by the 
City of San Francisco and the Musical As- 
sociation of San Francisco, assisted by 
the Community Service of which Chester 
W. Rosekrans is executive secretary, held 
its first meeting in the Board of Super- 
visors room of the City Hall on Tuesday 
afternoon, October 15. There was a very 
gratifying number of leading elements in 
the musical life of the community in 
attendance. Many interesting proposi- 
tions were offered and many valuable 
suggestions made. It was specially 
noticeable that representatives of the 
army and navy of the United States 
were present to offer assistance in the 
way of furnishing material for the chorus 
which this time is expected to include 
one thousand voices. 

Supervisor J. Emmet Hayden presided 
in his usual genial and tactful manner, 
avoiding friction and diplomatically plac- 
ading those who are inclined to be some- 
what critical. It was an excellent meet- 
ing and gave evidence that there is full 
co-operation among the members of the 
committee. Alfred Hertz outlined the 
plans for the impemling festival ajid 
urged those present to do all in their 
power to obtain the names of members 
for the chorus which is to begin rehear- 
sals next week. Mr. Hertz emphasized 
the necessity of organizing the chorus 
early inasmuch as too many rehearsals 
were necessary last year when the chorus 
was brought together too late. This year 
the plan is to give only one rehearsal a 
week. At first the sopranos, altos, ten- 
ors, baritones and basses will have sep- 
arate rehearsals one evening each week, 
and each group on a different evening. 
Later on the various groups will be grad- 
ually brought together until .iust before 
the "festival when there may have to be 
one or two extra rehearsals. 

Mr. Nash thought that to organize a 
real municipal chorus will require more 
than one season and that certain choral 
Works might be too ambitious for such 
a beginning, but this, after all, is not the 
aim of the Music Festival. Practical ex- 
perience can only come in time. A be- 
ginning must be made some day. ."^nd 
it is better to get the chorus used at 
once to sing only the best and biggest 
music, then to bring it through a grad- 
ual evolution or emancipation from little 
things to big things. The Festival 
Chorus must consist of matured singers 
as well as young students with fine and 
well-placed voices. Everyone who has 
music at heart should join this splendid 
organization. Mr. Hertz stated that spe- 
cial efforts have been made this year 
to have someone direct the chorus who 
does not teach singing. This is a wise 
move. As long as human nature is what 
it is, and teachers are suspicious that 
others may take advantage of the pres- 
tige to seek pupils studying with others 
it is unwise to act contrary to this con- 
dition. 

Mrs. Birmingham suggested that the 
niontbars of the chorus should be paid, 
if it were only $5 each to which Charles 
C. Woodman of the Call replied that in 
Europe choruses of a thousand, five thou- 
sand and twenty thousand are not only 
not paid, but pay for the privilege of 
enjoying such splendid treats. The 
writer agrees with Mr. Woodman. We 
are fully in sympathy with Mrs Birming- 
ham in her campaign to obtain recogni- 
tion r.nd remuneration for resident ar- 
tists. We believe in adequate remunera- 
tiou for choir singers, and organists. Wo 
like to see orchestral musician:' receive 
living and satisfactory wages. We want 
to see resident teachers of ability recog- 



nizfd and their work duly paid for. But 
to pay a chorus would defeat the very 
purpose for which it is organized. 

The moment choruses and orchestras 
are paid there begins a gradual combina- 
tion for increase of pay and eventually 
the financial problem of a chorus would 
be unsurmountable. We find amateur 
singers, and by this we mean singers of 
ability and love for music, who do not 
make a living from music, the only pos- 
sible material for a really fine chorus. 
Certain prospective artists make poor 
chorus material for they want to be 
soloists and think it beneath them to 



The editor of the Pacific Coast Musi- 
cal Review received one of the greatest 
surprises of his career when immediately 
after publication of the last issue of the 
Pacific Coast Musical Review a number 
of the most prominent teachers of the 
bay region and also unexpectedly many 
pupils, volunteered their services in our 
attempt to secure so many subscribers 
in the central Pacific coast territory that 
the paper does not need to depend any 
more upon its advertising patronage ex- 
clusively. Evidently the need of a musi- 
cal medium that can defend the cause 
of the profession and public without fear 



S 




CLAIRE DUX 

Famous European Soprano, Whose Recital Will Take Place at the 

Curran Theatre Next Sunday Afternoon 



sing in a chorus. Only those who have 
music so greatly at heart that they feel, 
in their own mind, that it not only bene- 
fits them and it gives them pleasure 
and happiness to sing in a chorus and 
study the great works of the masters 
under able direction. 

In Dr. Hans Leschke, formerly of Berlin 
and more recently of the great Wagner- 
ian Opera Company of New York, whose 
chorus was lauded by the critics as one 
of the stellar attractions of the season, 
the Festival Chorus has found a capable 
presiding officer. He has experience, 
knowledge, musicianship, executive abil- 
ity and rare faculty of imparting to oth- 
ers that which he himself has gathered. 
The members of the chorus will find in 
him a master of his craft and training 
(Cuntinued on Page 7. Column 1) 



of being financially hampered by discon- 
tinuance of advertisements is b.idly need- 
ed here, and if the profession and pub- 
lic stands by us in this matter we guar- 
antee that such a paper will be pub- 
lished here. 

The Pacific Coast Musical Review has 
been the first journal on the Pacific coast 
to come out frankly in favor of the Amer- 
ican artist and composer, the resident 
artist and teacher, the increase of musi- 
cal taste in this territory, the encourage- 
ment of budding talent, and the gradual 
growth of musical appreciation on the 
part of the public. We have faithfully 
and loyally continued this policy during 
twenty-three difficult and trying years. 
At the same time we have opposed the 
policy of Indiscriminate praise and 
"boosting." Bragging Is provincial and 



will never get us the respect of metro- 
politan centers, while It Is likely to ob- 
tain for us the ridicule of great com- 
munities. 

California may easily be proud of that 
which it has actually accomplished In 
music, being a comparatively young 
commonwealth. There Is no need In 
claiming something that Is not so, like 
some people pretend that the San Fran- 
cisco Opera Company is the equal of the 
Metropolitan and Chicago Opera Com- 
panies. This is ridiculous. In the first 
place these organizations have their own 
opera house, they have three companies 
(Italian, French and German), they have 
from three to four months of opera sea- 
sons, they have orchestras of from eighty 
to one hundred men, they have more and 
superior scenic equipment, they have 
large ballets and other advantages which 
the San Francisco Opera Company does 
not possess. Nevertheless San Francisco 
has reason to feel gratified with the 
achievement it has made. The principal 
factor to be proud of is that It has organ- 
ized in one association all elements of 
the snrial and business world who are 
financially capable to eventually sup- 
port as great an organization as either 
the Chicago or New York companies. If 
thpy want to do so. This is a splendid 
foundaticm to build on. But to broadcast 
extravagant claims that cannot be sub- 
stantiated does not benefit anyone, and 
in some cases may serve as a decided 
injiiry. 

.\nd so the Pacific Coast Musical Re- 
view wants the profession to assist in be- 
coming a medium that can actually help 
by obtaining the confidence of the pub- 
lie to such an extent that Its very en- 
dorsement means a valuable asset to any- 
one receiving it. Pupils and parents are 
too frequently led into the error that be- 
cause a paper makes a certain extrava- 
g;int statement that such statement Is 
equivalent to artistic facts. This la not 
so. On the contrary extravagant and 
false pretensions arouse In the public 
false anticipations and expectations, so 
that the pupil or artist will have to come 
up to a standard which ho cannot reach. 
The result Is failure. The truth Is the 
only thing that counts If a young artist 
claims to have sung in European opera 
houses and has had experience In such 
work and then comes here and still re- 
veals evident signs of amateurishness 
the public will lose confidence In his pre- 
tensions. In the end such artist will be 
a failure. 

Our ambition Is to encourage worthy 
artists and teachers, help a pupil In the 
beginning of his career by minimizing 
his faults, but not by exaggerating his 
merit, and protect the profession and 
public against Impositions of all kinds. 
To do this we must necessarily antag- 
onize certain Interests who advertise 
their plans, and we must bo In a posi- 
tion to be Independent of such patronage. 
As we said last week, the only way In 
which we can do this Is by Increasing 
our subscription list sufficiently to meet 
our obligations from subscriptions and 
those advertisers that do not require 
coaxing, and fondling, and nursing and 
commercial love making. 

We are carefully compiling our ela- 
borate plans for a subscription campaign 
to be started shortly, and during which 
we will distribute valuable prizes among 
teachers and pupils (either cash or mer- 
chandise) and which will Include the 
central part of the Pacific Coast, begin- 
ning with San Francisco and the bay 
region. Those who have already klnd- 
Iv offered their assistance together with 
others no doubt will not object when we 
(Continued on P.-igo 7, Column 2) 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



October 17, 1924 



The years bear witness 



J.. 



The story that is told by' the Steinway 



n a position of honor, standing among the 
famous portrait paintings of great musicians in 
Steinway Hall, in lower New York, you will find 
it today. It is the piano that Henry Steinway, 
scventj* years ago, built as a labor of love. He 
built it as a present to his bride. 
Now I, who am also a Steinway piano, stand 
among the other Steinway pianos at Sherman, 
Clay k Co.. here on the western coast. The years 
that lie between me and that original Steinway 
piano have seen many changes. But two changes 
they have not seen. They have not seen Steinway 
pianos made in any other spirit than a spirit of 
love; and they have not seen them under any 
other supervision than Steinway supervision. 
When I left the Steinway factory on Long island 
and began my long journey to the Coast I had been 
six years in the seasoning and making. The control 
and management of the business was in the hands 
of the third and fourth generations of the house- 
hold of Steinway. Eight members of the Steinway 
family had directed my evolution from the raw 
wood, steel and glue into the completed piano. 
Nearly all the skilled workmen in those great 
shops had been in those shops for many years. I 
was wood and steel and glue until they shaped me. 
Now, I am as much of the spirit of Steinway as the 
first piano Henry Steinway built. 
What docs this mean in my own career as a Stein- 
It means that I have been built with an individual 
interest, a conscientiousness, a deep determination 
that I should be worthy of my name. 
It means that the mountain spruce of my sounding- 
board, for example, is the finest procurable. After 
careful inspection and purchase it was dried for 
six months at the sawmill, then dried for another 
year in the Steinway yards, then seasoned for two 
or three years in special sheds, then kiln-dried and 
re-dried in strip and board— in all, a seasoning and 
drying process of five full years. 
It means that, following the seasoning of this and 




my other wood, nine months were spent shaping 
and fashioning me in the factory. In that one gen- 
eral factory every part of me was made, including 
plate, rim, hammers, brass castings, action, and all 
special hardware. Nothing was let out on contract. 
Nothing was left to outside influence. 
It means that I am, in fact, a Steinway piano--- 
that my charm will endure for years to come, that 
my resonance will last, that my full, rich, singing 
tone and responsive action will delight those who 



possess me as long as materials shall cling together. 
So after six years of such patient fashioning, I left 
the Long Island factory and came West. I was 
unloaded from my long cruise and carefully gone 
over in the Sherman, Clay & Co. shops. And now 
I stand on the floor at Sherman, Clay & Co. among 
other pianos, waiting for the purchaser who shall 
come to claim me. 

Sometimes I talk over the old days in our original 
home with the other Steinway pianos here at Sher- 
man, Clay k Co. We miss the cheery companionship 
of the old square grand, with its rosewood case— - 
the piano that Henry Steinway built. It used to 
preside over us like a proud little old great-grand- 
mother. But usually we discuss the future. We 
discuss the homes that each of us, in the days to 
come, will be carried away to like brides. 
Some of us are eager to preside over great man- 
sions, with servants to dust us off, and drawing 
rooms to Inhabit. Some of us are ambitious to 
have careers on the concert stage. But I have a 
different ambition. 

I want to be the piano near the fireside, where a 
modest family gathers about me and plays familiar 
melodies. I want to be the companion, from the 
very first, to little children as they learn to touch 
my keys. I want to be the discreet---and the only 
—third person present between lovers. I want to 
spend my days in a little happy home. Surely, if 
iome family knew how eager I am to make their 
love for me worthwhile, they would come and 
claim me without delay. Doesn't some couple with 
a modest home and purse want to come in and 
discover how It can claim Its Steinway piano? 



Sherman Bay & Go. 

Kearny and Sutter Sts., San Francisco 
CALIFORNIA-OREGON-WASHINGTON 



RENA 

LAZELLE 

SOPRANO 
San Francisco Opera Company 

■d of Vocal Department. San Francisco Co-one 

rr of Moslc — Available for Kecitala, Ope 

Oratorio, Concert 

S436 Sacramento St.. San Franclflco 



EMILIE LANCEL 

OPERATIC MEZZO-SOPRANO 

After Two Years' Absence in Europe 
Available For 

OPERA— ORATORIO— CONCERT 

Management ALICE SECKELS 
63 Post Street 

Residence: 433 Eighteenth Avenue, San Francisco 
Tel. Bayview 1461 



ANNIE LOUISE DAVID 

HARP SOLOIST AND TEACHER 

ON THE PACIFIC COAST DURING 
SEASON 1924-1925 

Address: Hotel Claremont, Berkeley 
Tel. Berkeley 9300 

Management Alice Seckels, 68 Post Street 
Tel. Douglas 7267 



PASMORE VOCAL STUDIOS 

Suite KM, Kohler « Cbaac BIdK-. S>n FrancLica 

«KM 0*Uc«e Atc. Bcrkclcr. RccUcBce, 201 Alvarado 

Road. Berkeley 



KARL RACKLE 

1330 PINE STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 
Telephone Graystone 1925 



ALICE GENTLE 

5IA\AGEMENT 

CATHARINE A. BAMMAN 
53 West 39th Street New York, N. Y. 



DOUGLAS SOULE-.Pianist 

ADVANCED PUPILS .ACCEPTED 

Wedneadar nod Friday Mornings at Studio: S02 

Kohier & Chase Bldf^.. San Francisco. Telephone 

Kearny S454. Residence Studio: ISO Monte Vista 

. Ave.. Oakland. Telephone Piedmont 766. 



AUGUSTA HAYDEN 

SOPRANO 

Available for Concerts and Recltala 

Address! 471 .17th .\venne 

Tel. Psc. 6.1S 

HOMER HENLEY 

BARITOXE T^;A^I1ER OF SINGING — CONDUCTOR 

Director California Club Choral • 

An Oratorio Anlhorlty 
Residence Studio: 1240 Rny, at Franklin. Tel. FIIL 1033 



LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM 



CONTRALTO 

Teacher of SlnsrinK. Complete Course of Operatic Traln- 

1ns. -'•W Pierce St. Tel. Fliiniore 45r,a 

Dominican College School of Music 

S\N RAFAEL, CALIFOUMA 

Music Courses Thorouprh and ProprcsslTe. Public School 

Music, .\ccredited Diploma 

EDWARD PEASE 

n.ARITONE SOLOIST, TEACHER AND DIRECTOR 

Director of Eutcrpean Club, Westminster Pres. Church, 
The U'n.nl H'rllh SynaBocue, and Director of The Pease 
Music Studios at Sacramento. Studios — San Francisco, 
\Vcdnesdars. Suite 1010 Kohier & Chase Ride. Telephone 
Kearny K4S4i Sacramento, Odd Fellon-a' Temple. Tele- 



WALLACE A. SABIN 

Organist Temple Emanu EI, First Church of Christ Sci- 
entist, Director Lorine Club. S. F., Wed., 1915 Sacramento 
Street. Phone West 3753: Sat.. First Christian Science 
Church, Phone Franklin 1307; Res. Studio, 3142 Lewlston 
Ave., Berkeley. Ph one Piedmont 2428 

MISS DOROTHEA MANSFELDT 

PreparlnK Teacher for 

MRS. OSCAR MANSFELDT, PUnlst 

-07 Cherry St.. Bet. Washington dt Clay T eL Pac. 9S0« 

The College of the Holy Names 

LAKE MERRITT, OAKLAND 
Complete Conservatory Course — Piano, Harp, Violin, 
'Cello. Voice. Counterpoint. Harmony. History 

DURINI VOCAL STUDIO 

DIRECTION OF MME. LILLIAN SLINKEY DURINI 
Italian Method — Voice Placement — Breathing 



1072 Ellis St. 



Opera — Church — Oratorio 



TeL ^Vest S9S 



THE LICHTENSTEIN VIOLIN SCHOOL 

VICTOR LICHTENSTEIN. Director 
From Beginning to Professional Activity 
' Wnshlnirlon St.. S. F. Phone Fillmore «I4« 



MR. ANDREW BOGART 
Teacher of Singing 

Pupils Prepared for Opera, Oratorio, Church and 
Concert. New Address: Suite 600, Kohlep& Chase 
BIdg., 26 O'Farrell Street. Telephone Douglas 9256 



MUSIC PRINTING? 

SCHOLZ, ERICKSON & CO., Inc. 

521 Howard Street Phone Douglas 4273 

San Francisco 



pho 



Ha 



4ooe. 



Manning School of Music 

JOHN C. MANNINR, Director 
3242 Washington Street Telephone PlUmore S9H 

PEARL HOSSACK WHITCOMB 

MEZZO-CONTRALTO 

Absolute Method of Voice ITpon the Breath 

Monday and Thursday, 1005 Kohier & Chase Bulldlnc. 

TeL Kearny 5454. Res. Phone Prospect 420. 

The larger the circulation of a Music Journal 
the better for the members of the profession and 
student. 



October 17, 1924 



Ijrifir (EdaM Wa^koi ^MM 



MUSICAL HKVIKW COMI-ANV 

SoKe 80I, Kohlrr * CbnMf lllilit.. 2(1 (I'Fnrrrll S 

Sob Francl.co, Cnllf. TeL Garllcld r.250-5251 



ALFRED METZGER 



Editor 



H.ke .11 ch.-ck.. draf... money order, or other farm, of 

remlllDtire payable to 

PACIFIC COAST MliSICAl, REVIEW 

O.kUnd-Berkeley-A lamed. Oltlce 1117 P.ra St., AUmed. 

TrI. Alamed. 1K5 

Mia. Elisabeth We.tKate In Ch.rse 



flIO Son 
BIchth and Bro.dir.y 

llruno IJ.vId I 



Lorn AnKele. Offlee 
C.llfornl. Mn.lc Co. Bolldlns. 

Tel., MelropolK.B 4388 



FRIDAY, OCT. 17, 1924 



Untered .. .econd-cia 



mall matter at S. F. Po.tofllca. 



TWENTY-FOURTH YEAR 



STATEMESIT OF THE 0\V.\EHSHIP, M A.\ AGEMENT. 
CIHCIILATIO.V ETC., I(EaLIHEI> UV THE ACT 

Of Pacific Coast Musical Review, published weekly at San 

!• rancisco, California, tor October 1, 1S2I. 
State of California, 
County of San Francisco. 

Before me. a Notary Public In and for the State and 
county aforesaid, personally appeared Alfred Metzger, 
who, having been duly sworn according to law deuoses 
and says that he is the Editor of the Pacific Coast Musi- 
it ^V',"^'- '^",'^J'!!^\ ""' following is, to the best of his 
knowledge and belief, a true statement of the ownership 
management (and If a dally paper, the circulation), et<5^ 
of the aforesaid publication for the date shown in thi- 
above caption, required by the Act of August 24, 191S, 
embodied in section 443. Postal Laws and Regulktions 
printed on the reverse side of this form, to-wit: 

1. That the names and addresses of the publisher, edi- 
tor, managing editor and business managers are: 
,, ,.,. ^''""'^. °' — Postofflce Address — 

Publisher. The Musical Review Company ^^^^^^^ 

„,,,, -;-,;—J--.;- ^* O'Parrell St., San' Krancisco 

Editor. Alfred Metzger 26 O'Farrell St. San Francisco 

Managing Editor. None. 

Business Manager, None. 

tn^;„T?,f„'i ""^ owners are: (Give names and addresses of 

ih „r^ owners, or, it a corporation, give name and 

iZ^t J^"^ ^""i f/:I<J''esses of stockholders owning 1 per 

S.1, »/ ^"'',®, ?''.'" '2'^' '""°"n' o' stock). 

The Musical Review Company 

«i.,:;a-,;> ■; ^^ O'Farrell St.. SanFrancisco 

I Thft thf^k;;nwn -i; -2«,0'Farrell St.. San PrtSclscS 

8e?urT!V^Vo';d^^s"Tw"n&"'oV^V^o7d'i„^°['||f«|;,f"„'J°^her 

are:° None'""""' °' '""'^'' '"<"-'eaSfs,'orithlr"'se°curTt'ies 
4. That the two paragraphs next above eivins- the 
names of the owners, stockholders, and secv^rify holdenf 
iecS??'tV "hnV/J.". ""Si'"'*' ""^ "^' °' sfockhofders and 
Jomnan'V hm »i.^^ }'"''^ appear upon the books of the 
ti!^,^rf,J'h}^,/ ^'''°' '" '^'^""^ where the stockholders or 
11 tri,^eeJ nr fn''fSS''^1"P°"«,""=•''°°''» "' ">e company 
n? Jh^ „. '" ^"'^ """•■■ fiduciary relation, the name 

of the person or corporal on tor whom such triisfee i« 

?a,n"f tafe^'e^ts' e",lfh° =""^' '"I,'"'"' 'wTp^^SgraX'^c'-on! 
bel"et as tS^tSe cfr?,?m^,';'»"„^.«'''"'''i' •' 'V, Knowledge and 
=t„J.i,i,„T.i circumstances and condit ons under which 

Spo'n the books"^„f''J^hrl'^ """^"^ "h" do not appiar 
aSd ,ecifriM., in I i=S company as trustees, hold stock 

rHH n'^£f«^ .' Harn°o'^r^L'o';,''?o•h^^fieVe''tran«n^^ 

fiis^ik '^'^itlHSS^Hi^^^^ ------- 

ALFRED METZGER. 
ow"*er")''* °' ^^"'"■' ""'"'sher, business manager, or 



this Fourth day of 



Sworn to and subscribed befor 
October. 1924. 

(My commission e,vplres .September 23, 192C.) 
PACIFIC MUSICAL SOCIETY OPENS SEASON 

Annie Louise David, Harpist: Max Gegna, Cellist; Isa- 
belle Arndt, Pianist, and Ellen Marshall, Accom- 
panist Delight Large Audience. 

BY ALFRED METZGER 

The Pacific Musical Society opened its new season 
at the Fairmont Hotel with a program including such 
sincere artists as Annie Loui.se David Iiariiisf Max 
Gegna. cellist; Isabelle Arndt, pianist and Ellen Mar- 
shall, accompanist. At the same time it was the first 
appearance of the new president, Mrs. Frederick Crowe 
Although Mrs. Crowe had been president two years 
ag() the reception accorded her showed how much she 
had endeared herself to the members of the Pacific 
Musical Society, and her introductory speech was dip- 
lomatic and revealed ambitious plans beneficial to the 
musical life of the community. If the first program 
under Mrs. Crowe's presidency is any indication of 
those that are to follow, her administration has a right 
to be welcomed with gratitude. 

Max Gegna, cellist, and Isabelle Arndt, pianist, opened 
the program with an exceptionally enjoyable interpre- 
tation of Boellman's Variations Symphoniques, that 
old war horse of cello virtuosi. Mr. Gegna overcame 
the technical difficulties of this work with ease and 
professional fiuency and phrased it with intelligence 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 

and understanding. Miss Arndt proved a very skilUul 
pianist whose technlc and musicianship have been 
carefully developed and wliose sense of artistic balance 
riiveals itself in impressive phases. These musicians 
played a group of cello numbers later includlnK a 
delightful sonata by Locatelll, Kol Nldre (another war 
horse) by i3ruch and liUentanz by Proppcr, the latter 
also not exactly a novelty. 

Annie Louise David charmed her audience with the 
grace of her interpretations as well as the daintiness 
of her personality. In her first group she Interpreted a 
number of trench compositions which she arranged 
specially for the harp and which, because of the melo- 
dious attraction of their character and the limpidity 
ol the artist's execution brought enthusiastic applause 
at the conclusion of every number. Miss David de- 
served the response of h.;r audience as she played with 
poetic instinct and fine adherence to the details of ade- 
duate harp interpretation. Accompanied by Kllen Mar- 
shall, who aciiuilted herself most creditably in every 
respect, Miss David played a Fantasie by Dubois with 
buoyancy and spirit. Together with Max Gegna she 
interpreted the closing numbers for cello and harp 
It was altogether a most enjoyable event and the tol- 
Iciwing program was heartily received. Variations Sym- 
phomque, (Boellman), Max Gegna, Isabelle Arndf Bar- 
carolle, (Zabel), Bourr^e, (Bach), Clair de Lune, (Be- 
bussy), Au Matin, (Tournier), Annie Louise David- 
Sonate (allegro movement) (Locatelli), Kol Nidre'i 
(Bruch), KItentanz (Popper), Max Gegna, Isabelle Arndt 
at the piano, Fantasie, (Dubois), Annie Louise David 
Ellen Marshall at the piano; Ave Maria, (Schubert) 
Shepherd Boy, (Savoyard), Annie Louise David Majc 
Gegna. 



GRAVEURE MASTER OF TONE AND DICTION 

Large Audience in Curran Theatre Responds to Great 
Appeal of Distinguished Vocal Artist in Pro- 
gram of Musicianly Dignity. 

There are artists who never fail to appeal to the in- 
stinct of the laymen as well as the cognescenti and 
to these belongs Louis Graveure the distinguished bari- 
tone soloist who appeared at the Curran Theatre last 
Sunday afternoon under the direction of Selby C Op- 
penheimer. And the reason why Mr. Graveure has such 
wide appeal is first because of the beauty and ringing 
character of his voice and secondly because of the 
clearness of his diction. Like any artist who wishes to 
gam fame it is necessary for Mr. Graveure to reveal 
something besides a fine voice and clear diction and 
that is an individuality of style sufficiently artistic to 
justify dignified recognition. 

And herein Mr. Graveure appeals to many serious 
music lovers. He certainly does not hesitate to com- 
pose his program from works of the highest artistic 
nature and also of the most versatile and contrasting 
messages. He delivers these messages with a sin- 
cerity and emphasis that leaves them long in the 
memory of those who hear them. He is specially 
addicted to a preference tor certain mezza voce or 
head tone effects which closely resemble so-called fal- 
setto phrases but while in other singers too frequent re- 
petition of these effects would be obnoxious, under the 
nursing care of Graveure they assume a pleasant as- 
pect. There can not be any doubt regarding the fact 
that prospective artists may learn a great deal from 
Graveure, if they have the knack to listen to an artist 
with intelligent understanding. 

.His program included a group of songs by Brahms, 
a group of works by American composers, including 
a Serenata by California's Gertrude Ross, a group of 
French works and finally a group of English composi- 
tions. Every one of these works Mr. Graveure inter- 
preted with careful and individualistic accentuation. 
He possesses a delightful faculty to sustain effective 
emotional coloring and herein consists possibly the 
most important feature of his popularity with the 
masses. He can appeal successfully to their hearts 
with a voice of ringing clearness. 

The surprise of the concert was no doubt the accom- 
paniments and solos of Arpad Sandor who revealed him- 
self as a refined interpreter and one who thorotighly 
understands the creation of a sympathetic bond between 
the soloist and the accomjianying artist In his solo 
work Mr. Sandor displayed 'flexible technic and dainty 
shading. He deserved the cordial attitude of his 
audience toward him. Mr. Graveure will give a second 
recital in this city at the Curran Theatre on Sunday 
afternoon, October 26. 



THE PFUND-MOORE RECITAL 

Keen interest centers abount the concert to be given 
by Christine Howells Pfund, flutist and Jessie .Moore, 
pianist, assisted by Eula (Jrandberry, goiirano, in the 
Italian Room of the Hotel St. Francis under Alice 
Seckel's direction. Miss I'fund and Miss Moore have 
pursued their musical studies here since childhood and 
their Eastern successes have created an Increasing 
interest in their forthcoming appearance when the fol- 
lowing program will be presented: Flute — Andante, 
(Mozart). Praludium, (Handel); Largo, (Bach); Minu- 
etto in F, (Mozart); Rondeau, (La Barre) ; Piano- 
Ballade. (Debussy). Rhthymic Etude (In manuscript), 
(Howard Hanson); Scherzo, (MoszkowskI). Songs^ 
Nina. (Pergolesi). Sweet Bird— Recitative and Air, 
(Handel), with flute obligato. Flute — Suite, Ro- 
mance, Scherzo, Moderato, (Wider). Piano — Ballade, 
F minor. Op. 52. (Chopin). Songs— L'Heure Exquise, 
(Poldowski); Songs of Grusia. (Rachmaninoff); Song 
of the Shepherd Lehl, (Rlmsky-Korsakoff), with flute 
obligato. 




KAJETAN ATTL 

80L0 HARPIST, SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 



We.tern llepreaenlatlve 
"f l.yon A He.ljr II. rp. 



foiieert EnKaicenirnf n nnd la.truetlon Appir 
IIHII Kohler A: I hl.,e ilidlt.. Tel. i)„„Kl„. I«7K. oo 
Weiliiexday nnd Nnturdny Afternoon. O.M.V. Ileal. 
dime i'lione: lln>vlm IZOI 



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A METHOD FOR THE HARP 

lly Kujeliin AttI 

CAIII, FI.SIIEK, l-ul>IUher 

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Henry Urohe and Kajetan AttI 



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POWELL 

VOICE SPECIALIST 
TEACHER OF SINGING 

RESTORATION OF LOST OR 
IMPAIRED VOICES 

705 Kohler & Chase BIdg., Tuesdays and Fridays 
Residence Phone Sunset 6524 



BENJAMIN 

MOORE 

2636 UNION STREET 

SA.V FUANCISCO 

Telephone Fillmore 1624 

BV APPOI.NTMKNT 



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BATCHELDER 

Pianist -- Accompanist 

Studio 412 Cole St. : Phone Hemlock 368 



MAX DOLIN 40^ 

Distinguished Ul^ *6r 
Composer - Violinist 

NOW CONDIICTINC THE // / 
E.M.ARCEn OnCIIESTRA / 

California Theatre -:- San Francisco 




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SAN FRANCISCANS 

A New Bureau of Music 




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Soloists — Orchestras 
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Suite 414 Loew's Warfleld Thsatr* lulldlni 
Telephon* Franklin 114 





PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



October 17, 1924 



ARTHUR BLISS ENTERTAINS MUSICIANS 

First Attraction of Ida G. Scott's Fortnightlys Appeals 

to Musical Colony and Tells Interesting Things 

About Modern English Music. 

BY ALFRED METZGER 
The first ol this season's Fortnightlys. under the 
direction of Ida G. Scott, took place in the Colonial 
Ballroom ot the St. Francis Hotel on Monday evening, 
October 6. The material increase of the audience over 
the attendance last season shows that Miss Scott made 
no mistake in changing these events from the afternoon 
to the evening. / Mr. Bliss was a most fortunate open 
ing attraction, j/ He is one of England's foremost mas- 
ters of composition and it was a foregone conclusion 
that he had much to say. We felt however, that 
he left most of the important things about modern 
English literature imsaid, while emphasizing what 
seemed to us the more trivial works of popular writers. 
Mr. Bliss is very clever and skillful, although not 
a speaker who is easily understood inasmuch as his 
diction has been somewhat neglected. He has, as most 
modem composers must have, a very keen sense of 
humor and is willing to apply it to himself as well as 
to others. He concentrated most ot his comment upon 
the works of Vaughn Williams, Goossens and himself. 
The former two he illustrated, as it were, on the piano 
with a fine touch and a keen sense of artistic propor- 
tions. Specially delightful was his splendid shading 
of phrases that under less skillful hands would sound 
somewhat banal. His own works he illustrated by 
means of a talking machine, and whUe Mr. Bliss seems 
to think this a more satisfactory means of transmitting 
his musical thoughts than through the keyboard of a 
piano, the writer is not of such opinion. 

Of course, he wanted to show himself as a writer of 
orchestral and ensemble music which he could not do 
Tery successfully on the piano. But if we are not mis- 
taken Mr. Bliss composed some fine things for the piano 
and it would have been interesting and, no doubt, enjoy- 
able to hear the composer himself interpret them. 
Not being in sympathy with the ultra modern school, 
although cheerfully acknowledging the right of others 
to enjoy the same to their heart's content, we could not 
keep step with Mr. Bliss when he felt Inclined to be- 
little Mendelssohn and exalt a few modern English 
writers. \ Mr. Bliss contended that Mendelssohn be- 
longed to a class of composers who begin as geniuses 
and end as talents. \We are under the Impression that 
U an artist is once a genius he is always a genius, no 
matter how he may occasionally deteriorate. If Caruso 
occasionally was somewhat "off color" this did not 
lessen his greatness. The moment a genius is not a 
genius he becomes a paradox, and that is something we 
bare not yet discovered in our artistic experience. 

Neither can we keep step with Mr. Bliss when he 
considers banalites and trivialities worthy ot serious 
musical settings. The noise made by a subway train, 
and the impressions obtained by a traveler therein, 
may be interesting subjects for descriptive music ot 
a very ordinary kind, but such excellent music which 
Mr. Bliss wrote to this subject certainly did not impress 
us as being convincing realism of the rather matter-ot- 
fact and obviously humerous subject which he chose.^ 
We would like to hear Mr. Bliss again, but on a more 
serious subject. We would have liked to hear some- 
thing ot the more important works and individualities 
of the justly famous modem English composers. We 
hare a great deal ot respect and admiration for Mr. 
Bliss, but his lecture left us disappointed, because ot 
the things he omitted rather than the things he pre- 
sented. t 

Madelene O'Brien. Sue Thome, Caroline Breuner, Martin 
O'Brien, Alice Wilson, Veronica Davis and Beulah Mas- 
terson. pupils of the well known vocalist and teacher, 
Madame Rose Relda Cailleau. will broadcast from the 
KPO Radio station at Hale Bros., on October 20. A 
program of special interest, one that will appeal to the 
Radio enthusiasts, is now in preparation and those in 
the habit of listening in may anticipate an enjoyable 
musical entertainment. 



LORING CLUB BEGINS FORTY-EIGHTH SEASON 

Scottish Rite Auditorium Packed to the Doors When 

Popular Male Chorus Starts New Season Under 

Dynamic Leadership of Mr. Sabin. 

BY ALFRED METZGER 

The Loring Club of San Francisco under the dominat- 
ing leadership of Wallace A. Sabin gave the first con- 
cert ot its forty-eighth season at Scottish Rite Auditor- 
ium on Tuesday evening, October 14, in the presence 
of an audience that crowded the auditorium to its ca- 
pacity and that applauded with an enthusiasm and 
persistence that resulted in practically every number 
being encored. Jlr. Sabin knows so well how to please 
audiences who enjoy choral music. He selects com- 
positions of a melodious, yet dignified character. He 
is careful to include rhythm in his interpretations. Oc- 
casionally he introduces a little humor which gives zest 
to the variety of the program. 

The soloists he chooses tor the chorus are always 
capable artists, whether they are selected from visiting 
or resident artists or from members of the club. The 
orchestra of which William Laraia is the first violin, 
is also competeut and so every number on the program 
is enjoyed so much that it is usually sung twice. Many 
times even a third hearing is demanded. The soloist 
on this occasion was Annie Louise David, the dis- 
tinguished American harp virtuoso, who delighted her 
audience with two groups of compositions as mentioned 
in the program appended hereto. She played with her 
usual ease of manner and fluency of technic and was 
specially appreciated because of the emphasis with 
which she brought out the melodic themes ot the works 
she had chosen for interpretation. 

One feature we specially admire in the Loring Club 
is the precision and conciseness ot the diction, every 
word being easily audible even without the words so 
generously furnished in the program books. Then there 
are the splendid and spontaneous attacks, the uni- 
form crescendi and diminuendi and the remarkable 
pianissimo passages. The vocal material ot the club 
is also excellent and Mr. Sabin, as well as the mem- 
bers of the Loring Club, are entitled to hearty praise 
for the splendid work they are doing tor San Fran- 
cisco's choral colony. The complete program was as 
follows: Song of the World Adventurers (F. S. Con- 
verse), from the music ot the Masque ot St. Louis; 
There Be None ot Beauty's Daughters (Giuseppe Din- 
elli); Harp solos— Prelude iPalmgren), Introduction 
and Cadenza tor harp concerto (written tor Miss David) 
(Turrell). Miss Annie Louise David; Dreams (Georges 
Bizet) ; I Hear a Harp (Johannes Brahms) ; The Norse- 
men (Edvard Grieg); Forest Harps (Edwin Schultz), 
Soloist G. A. Rogers; Now Sleeps The Crimson Petal 
(Mark Andrews) Harp solos — Marguerite au rouet (Za- 
bel), .Memento Capriccioso (Prokofleff), Preislied from 
Die Meistersinger (Wagner), Miss Annie Louise David- 
The Musical Trust (Henry Hadley) (By Request); In- 
troduction and Hymn to the Sun (Mascagni), from' the 
opera Iris. Benjamin Moore played the piano part with 
his well-known surety and taste. 



THE PUBLIC SQUARE 

AND OTHKR SHORT VKBSK, 

BY RELDA M. CAILLEAU 

MESS.VGKS III' ill MAN I NTr.lll:S|- 

I'llK K, »1.J.-. 

For Sale at tkr -VMilte llouar nnil city <>r I'nrlx 



11 SUPREME Qd» 

1 EVENTS 0^> 

Elwyn Artist Series 

JASCHA HEIFETZ 

WORLD FAMOUS VIOLINIST 

ROLAND HAYES 

SENSATIONAL NEGRO TENOR 
>ini)l/, IIIISKM'II At. ■■i.iniol 

<'F;(|i.i\ ii\>^i:n \ii,i.i,i.. 

ISA KItKMKIt llnllndiHt 

M.\Rll IV<)<;t \ s„,,.„„„ 

ALBKKT SI'AI.I>I\(; \i„linl>>l 

MABF.I, r;ARnisCI\ >^»|irnnf> 

I.OMJOV .STKI\<; Ql ARTKT 

REI>.*LI> WERHKNRATII Haritonp 

3IERI.E AI.COCK lonlrnllii 

Xt'ff,^-, SaTlnca on Sennoii TIrkelx 

SeaKon Prlrm; ^lIT.no. »Il.r.O, fS.tm (pliiH toT I 

Vovr on Sale. Shrrmnn. flny A Co. 

neiroz and llaye> roncerl« will he Klven on Snnilny 

nffernoon<« at Canlnn Thenfer. .ill other eoneertM nt 

ScottlRh Rite nail (eTenlncHl. SeaMon: \ov. to %nr. 



GIGLI PRAISES ROMAN SINGERS 

Rev. Antonio Grimaldi, leading basso, tor the past six- 
teen years, at the Sistine Chapel ot the Vatican at Rome, 
and sixteen others, representing the "master singers' ot 
the Patriarchial Roman Basilicas and the Sistine Chapel 
of the Vatican, will arrive in New York City on the 
steamer Guiseppe Verdi, November 26th tor the purpose 
ot making an extended concert tour throughout the Uni- 
ted States and Canada, to be followed by a tour ot Aus- 
tralia, all under the general direction ot Manager Frank 
W. Healy, of San Francisco. The organization, which is 
to be known as "The Roman Choir" includes in its per- 
sonnel, four male sopranos, four male contraltos, tour 
tenors, two baritones and two bassos. 

Beniamino Gigli, the Metropolitan tenor, who recently 
appeared in San Francisco, was shown the list ot Roman 
Singers by Mr. Healy. Mr. Gigli said that several ot the 
singers were fellow students with him at the St. Cecelia 
Conservatory at Rome. He spoke in glowing terms of 
two of the tenors named Clementi and Soffiantini, and 
was enthusiastic over the coming to -America ot the 
(elebrated Roman basso. Commendatory Tischi Rubini. 

Mr. Healy. who managed the very successful tour of 
the Sistine Chapel Choir, under the direction ot Mons- 
ignor .-Antonio Rella, perpetual vice-Director ot the Sis- 
tine Charel at Rome, anticipates that this tour will be, 
likewise, ot vital importance from an educational and 
cultural standpoint. Already Mr. Healy has received 
hundreds of letters from Catholic organizations and 
trom the leading concert managers throughout the 
United States and Canada, asking tor bookings. 



Corinne Keefer, contralto, an artist pupil ot Madame Rose 
Relda Cailleau entertained a large audience of music 
lovers at the Twentieth Century Club House in Berkeley 
Miss Reefer's voice is both beautiful and powerful, one 
which lends itself with facility to the slightest wish of 
its possessor. Upon this occasion. Miss Keefer sang the 
aria. Suicidio from Ponchielli's La Gioconda, a group of 
English songs and several of the German Lieder. It 
was in the latter group that Miss Keefer's art was dis- 
played to the greatest advantage tor she exhibited a 
thorough understanding of the style required for the in- 
terpretation of these classics and imbued them with 
sympathy and intelligence. 

•VTTRACTIVE LARGE STl'DIO 

To rent Ttllh Grand Pinna: nnilnhle Vocal or InHtmnlcntnl. 

" ill rent Honie Ntitdio for evening eoiieertN. Party can 

have iiKe of Kanie .Mondayn and ThnrxdayH. Rent very 

reaNonahle. Phone Donglaa 2774 all day. 



Giacomo Minkowski 



' WARFIELD THEATRE 



Elinor Glyn, poetess of passion and considered one 
of the most popular ot all writers., supplies the next 
screen story at the Warfield. the visualization ot her 
latest drama ot heart throbs and thrills. His Hour. A 
story of Imperial Russia, of the pleasure mad children 
of the Czar. His Hour ranks even higher than Mrs. 
Glyn's Thi-ee Weeks in dramatic intensity. John Gilbert 
and Aileen Pringle, called "the ideal lovers" by Mrs. 
Glyn are cast in the leading roles with an exceptional 
cast of supporting players. The staging, it is a Metro- 
Goldwyn special, is one of the finest examples of cinema 
lavishness. 

On the stage Fanchon and Marco will present Ideas 
ot Samoa. As usual with the Warfield management the 
very extreme has been resorted to in making this Idea 
a thing ot exceptional merit and beauty. Marco has se- 
cured a troup ot twenty Samoans, real natives tor the 
weird and fantastic dances of the tar-away islands. 
Gino Severi and the Music Masters will be heard in 
concert. Saturday and Sunday only, will witness the per- 
sonal appearance ot Mrs. Elinor Glyn on the stage of the 
Warfield. Mrs. Glyn is a highly cultured woman and in 
her talk to the audience one may look tor some startling 
truths and comments. 



E. ROBERT SCHMITZ' COAST TO COAST TOUR 



Interest in E. Robert Schmitz' coast to coast tour, start- 
ing immediately after his recital here at Aeolian Hall on 
the 22nd ot October, reached a peak this week when no 
less than six telegrams in one day came in clamoring 
for dates. The tour is so solidly booked that much diffi- 
culty was found in stretcliing the weeks to a more than 
seven day capacity. However, Denver was accommo- 
dated with the 15th ot December tor a benefit at the 
City Auditorium tor the Music Library, and the Woman's 
College at Hattiesburg, Miss., was assigned November 
25th tor a Recital. 



Selby C. Oppenheimer 
Presents 

DUX 

SOPRANO 

iirog'rniu of niusicnl novelties. 
ical Kenis and old and nesv 
including Moxart. Schumann, 
avello, Gordigiani. Uachelet, 

CURRAN THEATRE 

NEXT SUNDAY AFTERNOON 

OCTOBER 19, 2:45 P. M. 




G 



LOUIS' 

RAYEURE 

Baritone 

n.\AL CONCERT 



CURRAN THEATRE 
SUNDAY AFTERNOON, OCT. 26 



COMING FOR ONE RECIT.VL ONLY 

ALMA GLUCK 

America's 3lost Popular Sinf^er 

AVDITORIUM 

SUND.VY APTERN00.1J. NOA'EMBEIl JO 

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3IA.STER COACH 
Complete Grand and Light Opera Repertoii 



Miss Elizabeth Westgate 

Teacher of Piano. Ore:an, Harmony. Organist and 3Iosical 
Director of First Preshyterian Church. Alaniedn. Home 
Studio: 1117 PARU STREET, ALAMEDA, Telephone Ala- 
meda 15.^. Thursdays, Merriman School, 5!)7 Eldorado Ave^ 
Oakland. Telephone Piedmont 2770. 



PASMORE TRIO 

Mary, Violin — Suseanne. Piano — Dorothy, Cello 

CONCERTS — ^PUPILS 
2009 Green St. TeL Fillmore 0071 



October 17, 1924 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



ELIZABETH WITTER'S SONG RECITAL 

Elizabeth Witter, a young San li'rant-isco mezzo so- 
prano ,wlio spent a number of years In Europe, gave a 
song recital at the Colonial Ballroom of the St. Fran- 
cis Hotel on Friday evening, October 10 in the presence 
or a fashionable audience who nearly filled the spacious 
hall. The event took place under the direction of Ida 
G. Scott. As will be noticed by the program appended 
to this review. Miss Witter had set for herself a most 
ambitious task, for it was a program of an exceptionally 
serious character and one that would have taxed the 
resources of the most distinguished artists. But evi- 
dently Miss Witter knows no such thing as lack of 
confidence or nervousness. 

She approaches her task with the assurance of a 
veteran and from beginning to end of the program 
tackles the most unsurpassable difficulties with the 
confidence of the experienced recitalist. She began 
with a group of French songs, which were followed 
by an Italian group ami the program was concluded 
with Gennan songs by Brahms and Strauss. Surely a 
prodigious undertaking. It must be admitted that Miss 
Witter possesses a mode of expression entirely at 
variance with other artists which no doubt may be 
termed her individuality of style. Her voice posesses 
certain phases of beauty and is frequently used with 
careful adherence to the technical requirements of 
vocal art. 

Notwithstanding the courage necessary to prepare 
such a prodigious program there were evidences of a 
nervous strain in the beginning which later were not 
observable. One thing is certain Miss Witter is sin- 
cere in the prosecution of her art and no doubt will 
continue to attJ-act a large following of friends and 
admirers. Before we express a more detailed opinion 
regarding Miss Witter's various vocal accomplishments, 
it will be necessary to hear her again. In the meantime 
we can not but admire her for preparing a program of 
such artistic character as the following: 

Orlando de Lassus, 15.'i2-1594 — Mon Coeur se Recom- 
mande a Vous, Claudio Monteverde, 1567-164-3 — Las- 
ciatemi Morire, Lamento from Arianna; Giovanni Bat- 
tista Lully, 1633-1687— Air de Venus, Jean Philippe 
Rameau, 1683-1764— A I'Amour Rendez les Amies, 
Gavotte Chante; Domenico Paradies, 1719-1792— Aretta, 
Ancient Minuet, eighteenth century, anonymous, Paris 
est au Roi; Ottorino Respighi, 1890 — Nebbie (iMists); 
Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco, 1892 — Nina Nanna, Old 
Song from Twelfth Night, Three Songs from As You 
Like It. Johannes Brahams, 1833-1897- Geistliches 
Wiegenlied (Holy Cradle Song) with clarinet, Die 
Mainacht (The Night in May), Am Sonntag Morgen 
(On Sunday Mom), Der Schmied (The Smith); Richard 
Strauss, 1864 — Freundliche Vision (A Welcome Vision), 
Allerseelen (All Soul's Day), Staendchen (Serenade). 

The accompaniments of Ellen Edwards were certain- 
ly praiseworthy. They presented the character of the 
composer's message in unerring fidelity. They proved 
a great background for the soloist. Harold G. Ran- 
dall's clarinet obligate also revealed splendid musician- 
ship. ^ 

ELWYN ARTISTS TO APPEAR DURING SEASON 

Cecilia Hansen came to America one year ago this 
month; within a fortnight she had made one of the most 
sensational debuts in the annals of American music. Her 
tone, is extraordinary and cannot well be described. It is 
individual, of tremendous power and purity. Last season 
she appeared twice as soloist with the Chicago Sym- 
phony Orchestra; this.is an unusual custom and was the 
first time that any soloist appeared at two pairs of sym- 
phonies with the Chicago Orchestra. 

Miss Hansen will appear In San Francisco during the 
coming season under the management of the Elwyn 
Concert Bureau. Other artists on the Elwyn lists to be 
heard during the winter mofaths are: Moriz Rosenthal, 
master pianist. Isa Kremer, international balladist, Jas- 
cha Heifetz, young Russian violinist; Maria Ivogun, 
coloratura soprano who sang last season with the San 
Francisco Symphony Orchestra; Albert Spalding, fore- 
most American violinist; Roland Hayes, sensational col- 
ored tenor and the greatest single attraction to come 
to this city during the season; Mable Garrison, gifted 
and gracious Metropolitan soprano; Reinald Werrenrath, 
baritone and great favorite of local concert patrons; 
Merle Alcock, leading contralto of the Metropolitan 
Opera and the London String Quartet, England's great- 
est chamber music organization. 

Season tickets covering the entire eleven concerts may 
be purchased at a material saving. All concerts, with the 
exception of the Hayes and Heifetz recitals, will be 
evening attractions at the Scottish Rite Hall. The Hayes 
and Heifetz, owing to their tremendous drawing powers, 
will be presented in the Casino Theatre on Sunday 
afternoons. , 

CALIFORNIA MUSIC LEAGUE CONCERT 

The program committee of the California Music League 
announces the completion of the program of orchestra 
music tor the first concert of the orchestra, to be given 
in Harmon Gymnasium Tuesday evening. October 21, 
as follows: Bach — Suite in B minor; Beethoven — Sym- 
phony No. 2 in B major; Glazounow — Suite of the Mid- 
dle Ages; Schubert — Rosamunde Overture. 

The committee states that there is also to be a guest 
vocal soloist, the selection to be announced later. Sev- 
eral are under consideration tor the place, it being con- 
sidered quite an honor to appear with the orchestra. 
The high state of efficiency attained by the orchestra, 
under the direction of Dr. Alloo of the music department 
of the University, is the subject of much favorable com- 
ment by the few who have been privileged to hear some 
of the music for the forthcoming concert played at 
rehearsals. An improvement in the playing is also 
noted through the addition of a number of new players 
since the close of the season last spring. 



ALMA GLUCK— GREAT ARTIST, GREAT MOTHER 

"Woman's most important profession Is motherhood," 
says Alma Gluck, the favorite American soprano, and 
that she not only preaches this, but practices it, is 
evidenced by three bright and carefully reared children. 
Gluck will appear here on Sunday afternoon, Novem- 
ber 16, at the Exposition Auditorium, under Selby C. 
Oppenhelmer's management, to renew acquaintance 
with her many ailmirers. Her two younger children, 
Maria Virginia Zimbalist and Efiem Zimbalist, Jr., have 
been left in good hands and arc well along their way in 
education and development, but the tour will be a short 
one and only a few cities will be visited before she 
returns to them. 

Each time a child has come to her Mme. Gluck has, 
of necessity, retired from her operatic and concert 
activities for a time, and her subsequent tours have been 
curtailed so that she could give most of her time to 
caring for her children. To one whose fee for a concert 
is among the highest in the world, this entails a con- 
siderable financial sacriflce, and it is conservatively 
estimated that each one of her children has so far cost 
the great singer $150,000 in performances declined and 
tours curtailed. 

But Alma Gluck does not call this a sacrifice. She 
prefers to call it an investment, and feels that her 
children are well worth the nearly half-million dollars 
they have cost. Undoubtedly, if one of them should later 
show such talent as the mother, Alma Gluck, or the 
father, Efrem Zimbalist, all the monetary sacrifice they 
have made will be well repaid. 



has prepared an entirely new program. Songs— Ger- 
man, French and English, together with Irish folk songB, 
have been carefully selected from his extensive reper- 
toire, and to say that a great musical treat awaits those 
who will assemble on this occasion Is to put It mildly. 
Arpad Sandor, the talented young Hungarian, will 
again serve In the i-.apaclty of accompanist, as well as 
interpreting a group of solos. The program follows: 
German Songs— Meeres-Stllle, (Schubert). Roeselein, 
Roeseleln!, (Schuman); IJem Unendllchen, (Schubert); 
Auf deni Wasser zu singeu, (Schubertt. Irish Folk 
Songs— Silent O Moyle, The Blatherskite, The Sledges, 
I Love the Din of Beating Drums, (all arranged by 
Arms-Fisher). Piano Solos — (a) Intermezzo. (Brahms); 
(b) Khapsodio, C major, iDohnanyl), Arpad Sandor. 
French Songs— Null D'autrefols. (Khcne Baton); Petite 
Main, (SaintSaens); Apaisemont. (Chaussoni; Leg 
Cloches Du Soir. (Franck): A Toi, (Bcmlicrg). English 
Songs— Too late!, (Colerldge-Tayiorl ; The Old Gentle- 
man, (Graner); If Thou Wert Blind, (Noel Johnson); 
Fate, (Woodford Finden). 



GRAVEURE RETURN 



Louis Graveure is scheduled for a second and final 
appearance at the Curran Theatre Sunday afternoon. 
There is little left to tell music-lovers concerning this 
distinguished artist. His name is known in every home 
in the nation where music finds the smallest interest. 
His occupies a commanding position among contempor- 
ary vocal artists and his place in the musical sun is 
as firmly established as that of any of his confreres. 

For his appearance at the CuiTan on Sunday Graveure 



IMPENDING MUSICAL ATTRACTIONS 

Following the appearances of Claire Dux, soprano, 
IjOuIs Graveure, baritone, and Alma Gluck, America's 
popular singer, during this and next month, Selby C. 
Oppcnheimer has arranged for the appearance of two 
of the world's greatest artists and one dance attrac- 
tion of unusual proportions during December. 

Mischa Elman, the extraordinary Russian violinist, 
will appear in two recitals at the Columbia Theatre on 
the Sunday afternoons of December 7 and 21. Sophie 
Braslau, popular contralto and one of the foremost 
of the world's recitalists, is scheduled for an appearance 
at the same theatre on Sunday afternoon, December 14. 

At the Curran Theatre, during the week beginning 
Monday night, December 15, Oppcnhcinifr will present 
Ruth St. Denis, America's world-famous dancer, Ted 
Shawn, and the entire Denishawn dancing organization, 
including orchestra, in a series of fascinating pro- 
grams which will include some of the most colorful pre- 
sentations contemporary stage has given us for many 
years. 




FITZGERALD'S for ihe oAd-vancement of ^usic 

ELLIS RHODES 

This well known Concert Ariist and Teacher of Voice an- 
nounces the opening of his new residence studio at 510 S. 
Kenmore Avenue, Los Angeles. 

He is director of the Orange County Choral Union, director 
and soloist of the Immanuel Presbyterian Church Choir, and 
director of the Los Angeles Children's Chorus. 
During the coming season he will be heard in and about Los 
Angeles in recital programs. He has used the superb 



KNABE 



exclusively for six years and sjys: "lis richness of tonal qual- 
ity is a never-failing source of inspiration." 



HILL STREET NS*' AT 7&7-72Q 

LOS ANGELES 



ANNOUNCEMENT 



OWING TO DELAY IN THE MAILS AND 
CHANGE OF PUBLICATION DATE, OUR LOS 
ANGELES LETTER WILL APPEAR NEXT 
WEEK. 



CHARLES BOWES 

TEACHER OF VOICE 

4-46 S. Grand Vim. Phone SS-IV45, boa Anscira 



CALMON LUBOVISKI 

CONCERT VIOLINIST 
ATSIIablr for Concerla and RccKala 

Limited IVninbrr of Adrancrd Pnplla Aeeeptad 

VIoIlnlal L,o» Anseiea Trio 

Sludlo: 334 Mualc Arta §liidlo IlldK. Phonei 821181 



L. E. Behymer 

MANAGER OF DISTINGUISHED ARTI8T8 

Executive Officea: 

705 Auditorium BIdg., Lot Angele* 



ALMA STETZLER 

VOICE CUI.TUBE — COACHING IN IlKPKllTOinK 



Alexander Bevani 

ALL bhanchks of the 

VOCAL ART 

Stadloi 012 So. Calif. Maalc Co. Bids. 
Telephone 8Z2-R20 



Hulle 604 §o. Calif. Mnale Co. Hide. 



Phone ZSI-NOS 



ABBIE NORTON JAMISON 

PIANO — HARMONV — VOCAL COACH 

lllreelorof 

JAMISON aUARTETTE 

802 SoDlhern Collfornla Moalc Co. nidc. 

SIndloa: tl4T Weat 21al St. Telephone Ilearon 7707 



THE PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL 
REVIEW 

HAS FOUGHT FOR THE RF,Sini;\T ARTIST 

DURING THE LAST TWENTV-TWO VEARS— IS 

SUCH A PAPER WORTH SIIIISCRIIIING FORI 

IF SO, DON'T WAIT AN V LONGER. 



ILYA BRONSON ,.h„h.r«;;„lc''Vr*chea.ra 

I.oa Anselea Trio. Phllharnionir 

Qaarfet InalrutMlon. Chaniher Mu.ir Reeltala 

RaiB La Mlrada. Phone H0II7 •«*'<4 

A.KOODLACH 

VIOLIN MAKER ANI> REPAIRER 

<'nnnolnaeur — Appralaer 
503 Majrxllc Thenlre IlldK.. I.op. Aniirlra Toeker 4010 

JOHN SMALLMAN 

HARITONE— TEACHER OF SINOINO 

Voice Trial hj Appointment, »3.00. Stndloi WKI-S04 So. Cal. 

MunIc Co. IlldK. \l4liiu Itralxi, Serrefnrr 

ZOELLNER CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

LOS ANtiEIRS 

12S« Wladaor Honlevard HSIN HollTwood BoBUvard 

Complete Faealtr of Arttat Taaahcra 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



October 17, 1924 



JOSEPH GEORGE JACOBSON'S PIANO-CLASS 



The Joseph George Jacobson Piano-Class gave their 
first monthly recital of the season on October 10. at 
the Baldwin Studios. A large, appreciative audience 
gathered to greet the players who. throughout the pro- 
gram lived up to the high standard set by the class. 

The opening number was the C major Concerto by 
Beethoven of which Vera Adelstein played the first 
movement with Mr. Jacobson at the second piano. The 
young lady has made considerable progress since last 
season and. with the exception of some passages which 
were taken a little too fast, showed fluency and expres- 
sion in her playing. The spirit of the Polish Krakoviak 
dance was caught and expressed correctly when Antoin- 
ette Rathmann played Paderewskis Cracovienne. Her 
performance pleased much. The second number was 
a dainty composition by Koningsby Clarke. Third on 
the program came Rebecca Nacht. who by her rendi- 
tion of The Two Larks by Leschetizky and Lasberg's 
Spinning Song, showed great advancement in her work. 
Her technique is clear and she has gained considerable 
strength. She promises to become a good pianist. 

Lucille Borovic made her first appearance before the 
class and made a very favorable impression. She 
possesses strength and fluency and plays with assur- 
ance. The Fantasie Impromptu by Chopin was taken 
at too great a speed for her present development. Flor- 
ence Reid then played Liszt's Second Rhapsody in the 
Bendel arrangement. At each performance the young 
player shows a steady advancement. Her octaves are 
clear and she has gained much in strength and agility. 
The next numbers were a real treat when Marian 
Patricia Cavanaugh played the Dance of the Gnomes 
by Liszt and the C sharp minor Prelude by Rachmanin- 
off. The Liszt number was charmingly expressed. Her 
technique is astounding in a girl of her age. 

Myrtle Edna Waitman deserves much praise for her 
fine rendition of the Eighth Rhapsody of Liszt. She 
has brilliancy and good rhythm and we can notice con- 
siderable progress. With the exception of a little 
unevenness in some parts the composition was played 
well throughout. She seems to be on the right road. 
We surely enjoyed the Pastorale Variee by Mozart as 
played by Sam Rodetsky. His touch was soft and pli- 
ant as called for in this composition, the execution clear 
and fluent, the phrasing correct. As his second num- 
ber he played the Rondo Brillante by Weber. A sec- 
ond piano part by Kraegen was played by Mrs. J. E. 
Lane with fine discernment and correctness. Although 
of interest, it rather detracted from the beauty of the 
Weber composition. 

A word of praise is due to the man behind the wheel, 
who makes possible these performances and Mr. Jacob- 
son is to be congratulated for the good work he is do- 
ing. There is a distinction noticeable in all his pupils 
and the results are evident 



PFUND-MOORE FLUTE-PIANO RECITAL 

Christine Howells Pfund. flutist and Jessie Moore, 
pianist, will offer lovers of music a program this (FYi- 
day) evening. October 17, in the Italian Room of the 
Hotel St. Francis which will skillfully balance musical 
value and flavor of novelty. Eula Grandberry, soprano, 
will be the assisting artist. The flute has found tew 
Totaries among women and Miss Pfund has a natural 
talent which she has developed at home under Louis 
Newbauer with which Frederick Griffith. M. Giraud of 
the Conservatoire de Lausanne, Switzerland, and more 
recently with the famous George Barrere. This will 
be Miss Pfund's first recital since her New York sea- 
son when she played with success. The critics uni- 
versally Stress her poetic style and the purity and 
flexibility of tone, dependable intonation and technique. 
She needs little introduction to San Franciscans for she 
has been a favorite here since childhood. 

Miss Grandberry will be welcomed to the concert 
platform where she appears all too seldom. The con- 



CHAMBER MUSIC SOCIETY 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Sale of Single Seats 

OPENS 

Monday, Oct.20atl0a.in. 

PRICES — $2.00, $1.50, $1.00 
On Sale at Sherman, Clay & Co. 



Myra Palache 

PIANIST 

LECTURES ON MUSIC 
APPRECIATION 



Franclaro .\ddrexii. 2,->30 Union Street. 

Phone Walnut «3A 
On Wednexday. 'J p. m. to p. m. 



cert is under the direction of Alice Seckels. The fol- 
lowing is the complete program: Flute — Andante, (Moz- 
art); Praludium. (Handel); Largo. (BachI; Minuetto in 
F, (Mozart); Rondeau. (La Barrel, Piano — Ballade. 
(Debussy); Rhj-thmic Etude, (in manuscript), (Howard 
Hanson); Scherzo. (Moszkowski). Songs — Nina. (Per- 
golesi). Sweet Bird, Recitative and Air, (Hanjdel), 
with flute obligato. Flute — Suite — Romance, Scherzo. 
Moderato. (Widor). Piano — Ballade in F minor. Op. 52. 
(Chopin). Songs — L'Heure Exquise, (Poklowski); 
Songs of Grusia, (Rachmaninoff); Song of the Shepherd 
Lehl, (Rimsky-Korsakoff), with flute obligato. 



TICKETS ON SALE FOR CHAMBER MUSIC 



The sale of single tickets for the first concert of 
the Chamber Music Society of San Francisco's season 
will open to the public on Monday, October 20. at the 
Chamber Music Society's box office at Sherman, Clay 
and Company at 10:00 a. m. Mr. W. J. Riley will be 
in charge. 'This opening concert is being looked tor- 
ward to eagerly by the public and will mark the open- 
ing of the musical season for San Francisco. 

The program on this occasion is an extremely inter- 
esting one and will include a new string quartet by 
Frederick Jacobi. based on Indian Themes, as well as 
the F major quartet of Mozai't and the stirring and 
dramatic string quartet of Taneieff, the famous Russian 
composer. Owing to the large demand it is advisable 
to make reservations promptly. 



GREEK THEATRE PROGRAM 

The Committee on Music and Drama at the University 
announces as the program for the Half Hour of Music 
at the Greek Theatre on Sunday, October 19, a piano 
recital by Miss Lena Minehart, a pupil of Miss Caroline 
E. Irons, who will assist at a second piano. The pro- 
gram in full follows: Fantasia (Mozart), Lena Mine- 
hart; second piano accompaniment (Grieg), Caroline 
E. Irons; Etude. (Liszt); The Fountain, (Douillet). 
Nocturne. (Chopin); Rhapsody, (Brahms), Lena Mine- 
hart; Polonaise, (Liszt), Lena Minehart. 



NEW SONGS FOR TEACHER AND SINGER 


It's a Mighty Good World 

Golden Moon .. 
Come to My Heart 
Wood Fairies ... 
Brown Bird Singing 
Land of Might Have Been 
Rose Marie of Normandy 




..'. O'Hara 

Rolt 

English 

Wilfrid Jones 

Wood 




Del Riga 


Beauty 




Lohr 














The Market 










Phillips 


A Good Heart All the Way 




Clarke 


Dancing Time in Kerry 
Sweet Navarre 




Hampson 




Phillips 






My Little Island Home 




Baden 
Randolph 


Ragged Vagabond 




CHAPPELL-HARMS, INC. 
185 Madison Avenue New York City 



MUSICAL ARTS INSTITUTE PUPILS' RECITAL 

The Musical Art^ Institute gave a pupils' recital at 
its headquarters, 1990 California street, on Friday eve- 
ning, October 3. The directors of the Institute are 
Artur Argiewicz and Carel van Hulst, and the faculty 
includes some of the bay region's foremost pedagogical 
talent. The program was thoroughly enjoyed by a large 
and representative audience, and every one of the pupils 
acquitted themselves most creditably in both artistic 
and technical respect. The complete program was as 
follows: Requiem, for three celli and piano, (D. Pop- 
per). Misses Jean Allen, Dorothea Ulsh, Laurine Mat- 
tern; Eratic (Grieg), Miss Gertrude Heskins; Deh vieni 
non tardar, Le nozze de Figaro (Mozart), Miss E. Jon- 
geneel; Menuet (Porpora-Kreislej-). Schon Rosmarin 
(Kreisler), Mr. Harry Strauss; (a) Etude, Op. 25. No. 1 
(Chopin), (b) Ballet music from Rosamunde (Schubert- 
(Ganz) (e) Polihinelle (Rachmaninoff). Mr. Walter 
Frank Hensel; Concerto in C. major (Haydn-Popper), 
Mr. Augustine Allen; Die Allmacht (Schubert), Miss 
Emilie Zaretsky; Andante and Allegro from Concerto 
for two violins (J. S. Bach), Mr. Harry Strauss and Har- 
vey Peterson. 



harilone 



F-AJ^NINCj 

BER.TR.AHD - SR-OW/V 
PEKSONAL REPRESENTATIVE 
AEOLIAN HALL ■ Wew YORK 




JOINT RECITAL 
Eugenia Argiewicz-Bem 

Viollnixt 

Lev Shorr 

rinnLst 



Friday Eve., Oct. 24 




Elwin A. Calberg 



Soloist and Accompanist 
Available Season 1924-1925 



LOEW^S warfielD 

Week Starting Saturday, October 11 
ELINOR GLYNN 



r.sonaUy .Vpiiearin 

Only- 

.VILEEN PRINGI 



I Saturday and Sunday 
sentlne 
lid JOHN GILBERT 



^^HIS HOUR>> 

FANCHON AND M.-IRCO 

**ldeaM of Samoa" 

GINO SEVERI MltSlC M-VSTERS 



ROSEMARY ROSE 



A Singer Who Teaches — Consolidates Her Studios 

Formerly of Milwaukee, Sheboygan 

and Plymouth 

In Los Angeles 

437 SO. KENMORE STREET TEL. 5«7«18 

Auditions By Appointment Only 

Ruth Brodman, Registrar 



J. WHITCOMB NASH 

THE VOICE 
Special Normal Courses for Teaclier 
TOO Kohler & Clia 



STENGER VIOLINS 

Exemplify Intrinsic Excellence and Are 
Pre-eminently Superior 

A life's devotion of uninterrupted study and labor, 
Involvlner the mastery of principles of musical 
acoustics, timber physics, and enelneerlne, ha> 
yielded the understandingr of those principles irhich 
exemplify the "Steneer Idea" In TtoIIn making, and 
mark the besrlnnin^ of a new era In this noble art. 

W. C. STENGER 

mCORPORATED 

Maker of Fine yiolins 
617-618 Steinvfay Hall, Chicago 



AUDREY BEER SOREL 

PIANIST — TEACHER 
Pupil of Leopold Godowsky and Arthur De GraeflT (Brus- 
sels). Studiot 2925 McCIure St., Oakland. TeL Oak. SS95. 



ALFRED HURTGEN 

PIANIST, ACCOMPANIST, MIJSIC.\L DIRECTOR 

COACH. PIANO INSTRUCTION 
Studio; 2778 Union Street Tel. Fillmore 8210 



October 17, 1924 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



SPRING FESTIVAL 



iCunllnucd from Pat,'.-- 1. CciUimii :: I 

under him far more valuable than they 
could ever pay tor. They will have one 
lesson or more a week tor live or six 
months without any expense to them. 
Dr. LesehHe. although German, has con- 
quered the English language to a degree 
where he can make himself perfectly 
understood. The writer will be so in- 
terested that he expects to attend many 
of the rehearsals for his own benetit. 

Miss Estelle Carpenter made a very 
eloquent plea for the chorus and the fes- 
tival speaking of dozens of people, thou- 
sands we believe she said, who expressed 
themselves happy from the experience 
of listening to last year's Spring Festi- 
val. She said that all of us will be proud 
to assist the City of San Francis.co in its 
endeavour to perpetuate this festival un- 
der the direction of Mi Hertz, and the 
festival chorus under Dr. Leschke's lead- 
ership. I'nless such real love for music 
and unselfishness of purpose is manifest- 
ed a genuine festival chorus becomes im- 
possible. 

J. Emmet Hayden eulogized the work 
of Alfred Hertz whom he referred to as 
a genius for whom other communities are 
covetous but whom San Francisco will 
retain even at a sacrifice it necessary. 
The enthusiastic and prolonged applause 
that punctuated the conclusion of this 
eulogy was evidence for the sentiments 
of those present. A. W. Widenhara spoke 
of the difficulties presented in the organi- 
zation of the Festival Chorus last sea- 
son and his confirtence that this season 
another and larger chorus will be pre- 
sented. Mr. Widenham, like the writer 
and later Ray C. B. Brown of the Chron- 
icle, favored the idea of personal solici- 
tation tor members of the chorus. Act- 
ing upon these suggestions Chairman 
Hayden called for a motion to appoint 
those present as a chorus committee 
which motion was unanimously carried. 
The City of San Francisco, the Musical 
Association of San Francisco, Community 
Service and the Festival Committee are 
looking for people so interested in music, 
so proud of their city, so greatly in love 
with the art and so enthusiastic about 
giving this city the best in the world that 
they find joining the chorus a source 



of satisfaction and happiness. They 
want the truly big-hearted and broad- 
minded music-loving people in this. The 
others are not eligible tor this great en- 
terprise. 

Chester W. Rosekrans, executive sec- 
retary of community service, and Mr. 
Hooke, associated with most worth-while 
chorus movements in and about San 
Francisco, were others who gave some 
excellent advice and offered their hearty 
co-operation. Among the guests present 
was Mrs. Jamison of Los -Angeles who 
took a great interest in the proceedings. 
And now it is a duty tor every one inter- 
ested in music to boost tor the chorus. 
The slogan is that a chorus of one thou- 
sand must be ready by next week. Glenn 
Wood of Oakland has again been select- 
ed as director of the Oakland section of 
the chorus and no doubt he will do his 
best which is a whole lot. 



SUBSCRIPTION CAMPAIGN 



(fiMitinui-il fr 



Pas;.- 1, 



ask them to allow us to publish their 
names as a committee endorsing our 
plan. As soon as all our literature is 
printed and prepared we shall begin to 
enlist pupils and teachers willing to as- 
sist us in this campaign and shall pub- 
lish in addition to the prizes certain 
recognition in the way of publicity which 
we will gladly present to those specially 
active in this campaign. 

We feel positively certain that the suc- 
cess of this subscription campaign will 
enable us to produce a music journal of 
dignified, serious, Interesting and help- 
ful proportions. The profession and pub- 
lic will receive as great a benefit from 
such a Journal as we will, and we know 
that the intelligent portion of the profes- 
sion will be happy to welcome an Inde- 
pendent, dignified music journal that can 
follow a policy conformant to the highest 
principles of the profession and that 
does not need to stoop to ridiculous sus- 
taining of extravagant contentions on the 
part of unreasonable advertisers. Besides 
we will be able to devote weekly depart- 
ments to important subjects which at 
present we are regretfully compelled to 
omit. 



SINCERE TRIBUTE TO MANSFELDT 

Ray C. B. Brown In S. F. Chronicle Pub- 
lishes Well Justified Tribute In Be- 
half of Distinguished Virtuoso 

The editor of the Pacific Coast Musical 
Review having been prevented from at- 
tending the event referred to in the fol- 
lowing article, takes pleasure in quoting 
what Ray C. B. Brown has to say in the 
S. F. Chronicle of September 28. and em- 
phatically endorses this opinion from for- 
mer hearings of this master's virtuosity: 

"If Hugo Mansfeldt turns into a cus- 
tom the practice that he has begun this 
season — that of appearing personally on 
programs with his artist pupils in fort- 
nightly recitals — there is pleasure in 
store for those who can find room in his 
residence studio on these occasions. It 
is. moreover, a privilege, to hear a master 
of the piano after he has voluntarily 
withilrawn from the fatigues and stresses 
of the concert stage while his artistry 
remains unimpaired. 

So consistent is the stream of new 
names calling upon our attention that we 
are inclined to forget those who do not 
keep themselves in the glare of publicity. 
There was a day when Hugo Mansfeldt's 
name was new, and the fame that he won 
then and in succeeding years was cred- 
ited to California. Now that he is no 
longer in (luest of mure laurels, it is well 
for Californians to ketp well in mind cer- 
tain facts about him — that he had a nat- 
ural and original genius as a pianist that 
triumphed over tremendous obstacles in 
its development; that he invented his 
own piano technique; that he was the 
first California pianist to lour Europe; 
that his playing won the commendation 
of Franz Liszt ; that he long enjoyed the 
reputation of being one of the most bril- 
liant American artists. 

"It was my privilege to be present at 
the first of the fortnightly recitals this 
season and to hear him play a Bach sar- 
abande. a Mozart sonata, a Chopin noc- 
turne and a ballade of his own. The clar- 
ity of his style, the precision of his tech- 
nique and the expressiveness of his tone 
were qualities possible only for a vir- 
tuoso-poet. 

Associated with him on the program 
were three students, who unconsciously 



exemplified the progress that every linn 
ist makes from technician to Interpre- 
ter. Euniii' Ryder, who played Liszt's 
llerolde— Eleglaque' and Grieg's suite, 
'Aus Holberg's Zelt,' Is on tile crest of 
the technical stage. Rosalma Niclas who 
was heard In Liszt's I) flat major concert 
etude and l.a Campanella.' Is past the 
crest and working well Into Interpreta- 
tive undei-standlng. Violet Caldwell, In 
Drangosch's I) minor gavole. Heller's D 
major sclierzo and 'In Remembrance" 
and Karganov's G sharp minor tarantelle, 
is In the midst of the expressive stage 
and has a very promising poetic power. 



The Half Hour of Music at the Greek 
Theatre of the I'niverslty of California, 
which took place Sunday afternoon. 
September 14th, was given by violin 
pupils of Cedrick Wright who Interpreted 
the following program was very credit- 
ably: Romance (Svendsen), Dorothy 
Crowell; Chaconne (Vllall-.-\uer), Helen 
HJelte; Preludlum and Allegro (Pugnani- 
Kreisler), Klenore Webber; Concerto In 
D Minor, first movement ( WienlawskI). 
Dorothy Dunyon; Andante for four 
violins (Joseph Helmesberger), Dorothy 
Crowell, Helen HJelle. Elenore Webber 
and Dorothy Dunyon; accomipanlsts were 
Margaret Coif, Grace HJelle and Helen 
Crawford. 



Mary Cam Moore, the widely known com- 
poser, gave a lecture recital in the Foul 
Elder Gallery on Thursday afternoon. 
October Ifi. the subject of which was 
Historic and Patriotic .\spects of Nar- 
clssa. This is an opera composed by Mrs. 
Moore and given its initial production In 
Seattle some years ago and since present- 
ed in tabloid or lecture form before prom- 
inent musical clubs in Califi>rnia by .Mrs. 
Moore. On this occasion Mrs. Moore had 
the able assistance of .Mrs. E. E. Bruner, 
soprano, who interpreted the arias allot- 
ted to her with excellent voice and splen- 
did interpretive faculty. Mrs. Moore 
played the orchestral pari on the piano. 
A very appreciative audience was pres- 
ent, who gave evidence of its enjoyment 
by enthusiastic applause and close atten- 
tion. It is to be hoped that Mrs. Moore's 
efforts to bring this work to the atten- 
tion of music lovers will result in Us pub- 
lic presentation. 



rONTBAI.TO 

1»3S 28th Avrnur Phan« SnnMt 299S 

Vuli-i- I iiltiirr. M<>nilii}'n ■■. M. rM\ Kohirr 

.V rliiix- lll<lK. IVI. <inrn<.|il 44T^ 



Mrs. William Steinbach Laura Wertheimber ¥« vtii<^¥ T 1<^ XI Vl^¥v«i4 

VOICE CIILTIRE PreoarBlorT Teacher for Kr^A^lyljl^t^Mj i>X.iVXViVk3 

SIndloi 
902 KOHLER & CHASE BLDG., 
San FranciMco Phone Kearnr .%4.'>4 

ACHILLE L. ARTIGUES 

Graduate of Schola Cnnforam, Parla. Or- 
sanUt Ht. Mary'n CathetlraL I*Lano De- 
partment. Hamlin SehooL Orean and 
Piano. Arrlllaea Muiiieal College 

KURT VON GRUDZINSKI 

BARITONE — VOICE CULTURE 

Anthorlzed to Teach Mme. Schoen~ 

Rene'M Method 

1314 Leavenworth St. Phone Pronpeot 0253 

EVA M, GARCIA 



Preparatory Teacher for 

Mra. Noah Ilrandt 

2311 Scott St. Telephone Fillmore 1522 

Evelyn Sresovich Ware 



Joseph George Jacobson 



ROSE RELDA CAILLEAU 



PIERRE DOUILLET, PIANO 
NITALIA DOUILLET, VOICE 

•MIR Kohler « Chnae nid. Tel. Sotter 7387 

DOMENICO BRESCIA 



Madame Charles Poulter— Soprano 

Voice Calture, Piano 



Mary Coonan McCrea 

TEACHER OF SINGING 
Studloi 36 GalTner BulldJnK, 37(1 Sutler St. 
Tel. DooKlaa 4233. Rea. Tel. FCearny 2.140 

MRS. A. F. BRIDGE 



HELEN COLBURN HEATH 

Soprano Sololat. Temple Emanu El. Co 

eert and Church Work. Vocal Inatrnctlc 

2539 Clay Street. Phone ^Veat 4HftO 

HENRIK GJERDRUM 



SiGMUND BEEL 

Maater Claaaea for VIoUn 

Studio BDlldluK, 1.173 Poat Street 

Tel. « lllnut 04 

MARY ALVERTA MORSE 



Friday, Kohler dt Chaae lllds., S. F.i Real- 
dence Studio, 106 Santa Ruaa Ave., Oak- 
land. Phone Humboldt 101. 

SAN FRANCISCO CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 



MRS. CARROLL NICHOLSON 

CONTRALTO 
Teacher of SInelnK. 32 l.oretta Ave.. Pied- 
mont. Tel. Piedmont 304. Mon., Kohler & 
< hn«e lllilE.. S. F. Telenlmne KenrnT .%4M 

Brandt's Conservatory of Music 

2211 Scott Street, llet. Clar ^^ WoahlnEton 
Mr. Noah Ilrandt. Violin 
Mra. Nonb llnindt. Piano 

ALMA SCHMIDT-KENNEDY 



Phone llrrkelry IIIMtO 

MRS. ZAY RECTOR BEVITT 
PIANO and HARMONY 

Institute of Music of San Francisco, 
Kohler & Chase PMg. Tel. Kearny 5454. 



Dorothy Goodsell Camm MARION RAMON WILSON 



COI.OR.^TIRA SOPRANO 
Teacher of Bel Canto. Tel. Bayvlew 3K3II 
or Piedmont 1330. By Appointment Only. 



Ic C<i 

Europe. Concert SucceaKca In the Ignited 

Statea. Addreaa: ]H2n I^eavenvvorth Street. 

Telephone Franklin 3S01. 



Joseph Greven 

Voice Culture ; — Opera, Oratorio, 
Concert and Church Singing in all 
languages. 

MRS. J. GREVEN 

Piano and Harmony 

S741 Sacramento St. Tel. Bayview 5278 

TEACHERS' DIRECTORY • 



MISS EDITH CAUBU 
376 Sutter Street Phone Dougl&a tst 

JANET ROWAN HALE 
Kohler & Chase BIdg. Tel. Kearny 5454 

J. B. ATWOOD 

2111 ChannIng Way Berkeley, Cal. 

MISS LORRAINE EWING 
833 Athbury St. Phone Park 1(74 

RUTH VIOLA DAVIS 
515 Buena Vlafa Avenue— Park 341 

LOUIS FELIX RAYNAUD 
1841 Fulton St. Tel. Bayview 6008 

ELSIE COOK HUGHES LARAIA 
3325 Octavia St. Phone Filmore 6102 

There Is no way to ohtain concert en- 
Kagemenls unless a name is sufficiently 
known. There is no other way to make 
a name known except through publicity. 
Consequently, if you do not advertise you 
can not possibly secure steady engage- 
ments. 



MACKENZIE GORDON 
2832 Jackson Street Phone West 4(7 



ANTOINE DE VALLY 

2201 Scolt St. Phone Welt U41 



MME. M. TROMBONI 
601-2 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Kearny 54E4 



JACK EDWARD HILLMAN 
601 Kohler & Chase BIdg. Kearny 5464 



ADELE ULMAN 
178 Commonwealth Ave. Phone Pac. 33 



JULIUS HAUO 
4032 Irving St. Tel. Sunset 436 

HOTHER WISMER 
3701 Clay Street Phone Bayview 7780 

ARTHUR CONRADI 
906 Kohler & Chaae Bldg. Tel. Keemr S4*4 

G. JOLLAIN 
376 Sutter St. Tel. Kearny 2637 

ACCOMPANISTS 

ANNA W. McCORMICK 
1380 Taylor St. Tel. Pros. 9887 

JEANNETTE BRANDENSTEIN 
1916 Octavia Street Tel. Fillmore 433 

AlinWt.lOH (IP Ml SIC 

C. B. FRANK 
400 Pantages Bldg. Tel. Garfield 1334 

If a music journal Is worth while to 
publish programs and views of musical 
events. It is worth while to patronize. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



October 17, 1924 



ADVANCED COACHING 

THE ART OF INTERPRETATION— SOLFEGE 

NORMAL COURSES 

STl DIGS: 

roi KOIll.KR * CHASK Bl ILUING. SAX KHANCISCO 

251SU. ETNA STRKKT. UERKELllY 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

iTHE SAX FRANCISCO BAx\K) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th. 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 

the Assets of which have never been increased 

by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member .\ssociated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1924 

AsseU $93,198,226.96 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 3,900,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 446,024.41 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Qement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Halpht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West PortalAve. and UUoa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (4I4) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



Karl Rackle, the excellent pianist and 
critic, editor of the Question Column of 
the Pacific Coast Musical Review, is now 
located in New York and has opened a 
studio. He is getting rapidly acquainted 
and no doubt with his ability in pianistic 
interpretation and his faculties as a 
writer he should become quickly identi- 
fied with the leading musical elements of 
the metropolis. 

Don Jose Mojica, the Spanish tenor of 
the Chicago Grand Opera Company, had 
the able assistance of Gyula Ormay. that 
sterling accompanist, who is now return- 
ing to the concert platform. -Mr. Mojica 
returned from his Los -\ngeles opera en- 
gagement with Merola en route to Chi- 
cago, and stopped long enough to give 
one recital in Oakland on Thursday after- 
noon. October 16. in the ballroom of the 
Hotel Oakland, opening Alice Seckels' 
Matinee Musicales in that city. The last 
halt of the program was given in the 
costume of a Spanish cavalier and in- 
cluded Spanish folk and love songs. 

Wade Thomas, Jr., an exceptionally 
gifted young pianist, pupil of Audrey 
Beer Sorel, will play at the Exposition 
Auditorium of this city on Friday. Octo- 
ber 22, during the great Industrial Expo- 
sition. Young Thomas has appeared re- 
cently on several public occasions and 
made such an excellent impression that 
he has been quite in demand. 

George Lipschultz, the genial and pop- 
ular orchestra leader, who has attracted 
national attention since his association 
with the Warfield Theatre of this city, is 
scoring the greatest success of his 
career in Los .Angeles at present. He is 
directing a big orchestra at the Loew 
Theatre and the public has quickly taken 
to his fine mtisicianship. His solo work, 
conducting and picture scoring has cre- 
ated universal enthusiasm. It is gratify- 
ing to know that Mr. Lipschultz' splendid 
efforts have been so quickly recognized 
in the Angel City. 

Miss Beatrice Clifford, the well known 
pianist, gave a reception in honor of Miss 
Marion Kislingbury. pianist, at the West- 
em .\rts Club on Thursday evening, Octo- 
ber 9. The following excellent program 
was ably interpreted by Miss Clifford, 
Miss Elsie Ingham, soprano, and Miss 
Kislingbury: Vocal Solos— The Enchant- 
ress (HattonK The Silver King (Cham- 
inade), .Miss Elsie Ingham, Miss Marion 
Kislingbury, at the piano: Piano Solo- 
Theme and Variations (Rameau), Miss 
Beatrice Clifford; Two Characteristic 
Songs — The Shadow .March (Del Riegol 
Waiata Pol (Hill). Miss Elsie Ingham' 
Miss Marion Kislingbury at the piano- 
Piano Solo— Etude (Chopin), .Miss Beat- 
rice Clifford: Vocal Solos— Three Fishers 
(Old English) (Hullah), Calm as the 



Night (Bohm , The Sweetest Flower That 
Blows (Hawley), Miss Elsie Ingham, Miss 
Marion Kislingbury at the piano. 
Carrie Jones, fonner artist pupil of 
-■Mma Schmidt-Kennedy of Berkeley, after 
two years of study in Berlin. Vienna and 
London, has returned to Vienna tor a 
third year of study. She is working with 
Richard Buhlig. the well known pianist, 
who has a master class in Vienna and 
who is also concertizing extensively in 
England and on the Continent this sea- 



Anita Weichhart, one of Elizabeth West- 
gate's young pupils, was engaged as solo- 
ist for the recent County Teachers' In- 
stitute at Vallejo. Miss Weichhart chose 
the following program: Etude Op. 10, No. 
12 (Chopini, Polonaise, A flat (Chopin), 
Seguidilla (Albeniz), Country Gardens 
(Percy Grainger), Gavotte (Gluck- 
Brahms), Rhapsodie No. S (Liszt). She 
was obliged to play several encores. Her 
playing is marked by crystal-clear tech- 
nic, intelligent phrasing, deep but con- 
trolled emotional skill, and a youthful en- 
thusiasm. Miss Westgate is planning a 
recital tor Miss Weichhart for the late 
Fall, when the program will range from 
the Chromatic Fantaisie and Fugue of 
Bach to the music of the ultra modern. 



Warren D. Allen, Stanford University or- 
ganist, has prepared for his Memorial 
Church program selections entirely 
based upon hymn melodies, ancient and 
modern. The programs in full will be as 
follows: Thursday, October 16, at 4:15 
p. m., and Sunday, October II). at 4 p. m. : 
Festival Prelude on A Mighty Fortress Is 
Our God (William Faulkes); Prelude on 
a Welsh Hymn-Tune, Rhosymedre ( Ralph 
Vaughan-Williams ; Choral-Prelude, Re- 
joice Ye (Nun freut euch) (.1. S. Bach): 
Shining Shore (Schirmer) (Edward Ship- 
pen Barnes); Chorale-Prelude, Rejoice Ye 
Pure in Heart (Gray) (Leo Sowerby). 
Tuesday, October 21, at 4:15 p. m. — 
Meditation in Ancient Tonality (Harvey 
Grace); In dulci jubilo (Bach): Toccata 
on a Gregorian Theme (Edward S. 
Barnes ; Variations on Lassi nus geben 
Festal Prelude on Ein Feste Burg (Fritz 
Renter). 



Emilie Lancel, the delightful California 
operatic mezzo-soprano, made her bow be- 
fore a San Francisco public, after her re- 
turn from Europe, at the Colonial Ball- 
room of the St. Francis Hotel last Thurs- 
day evening. A large and enthusiastic 
audience was present to express its ap- 
proval of the vocalist's efforts. A detailed 
review of the event will appear in the 
next issue of this paper. 

If a Music Journal Is worth while to 
extend courtesies it should be worth 
while to subscribe for. 



"Y f T~^ T^ TT^ f Playing Privately at 

Kohler & Chase Blag. 

UNDER DIRECTION OF LEONARD DAVIS 



Nyiregyhazi 

(Near-e-gatz-e) 

THE GREAT WORLD PIANIST 

"MOST SENSATIONAL HUNGARIAN MASTER 
ARTIST OF ALL TIME" 



Nyiregyhazi, pianistic genius, is to- 
day the strange figure of the musi- 
cal world. Tall, thin almost to the 
point of emaciation and with long, 
tapering hands, he has much the 
same weird atmosphere that marked 
Paganini. With an air of utter, 
weary indifference to all external 
influences, he seems almost to have 
reached the impassive calm of the 
Oriental. Yet this Hungarian youth, 
for he is hardly more than a boy, 
flames into an instant, electric vital- 
ity once he sits before the key- 
board. 



Brilliant runs, thunderous bass and 
crashing chords alternate with 
lyric, melodious passages, marked 
throughout with an individuality of 
interpretation that distinguishes 
him as a pianist of keen intelli- 
gence as well as passion. It is as if 
his entire mental and physical re- 
sources were held in reserve until 
he plays. Then it is that he seems 
to pour forth his whole soul in his 
music. 



"The Coming- Pianist 
of The World" 

—Says Tita Ruifo. 

What the Press says of Nyiregyhazi : 

Nyiregyhazi played here tor the first timet He is in his nineteenth year The 
rmgmaster used to say of the dashing equestrienne in the circus: "She rides 
'^'^H \°J- °^^J^.° young." This compliment is often paid a young pianist, but 
with^this addition: "When he is older, he will plav with greater thoughtful- 
ness,^ or his performance is said to be not yet "mature." Youth is not an 
atrocious crime. Better the dash and enthusiasm of the young than the 
apathy of middle age, or the coolness of academic reserve. 

— Philip Hale in the Boston Herald. 
Genius is wisdom and youth. This is said by Edgar Lee Masters, and it was 
proved again at the concert given by the Boston Symphony Orchestra Pierre 
Monteux. conductor, yesterday afternoon in Symphony Hqll On that occa- 
sion the eighteen-year-old Hungarian pianist, Erwin Nyiregyhazi. made his 
Boston debut. He played Liszt's A Major Concerto like a poet and a whirl- 
wind. He was very much of a, surprise, for this concerto is not child's plav 
and those who looked for the first time on a young man, mostly arms anti 
legs, w'lth fingers so long that they made his sleeves seem too short and 
gave the effect of two tans when he spread his hands over the keyboard— 
those who looked on this shook their heads, and wondered where in the 
wcrld he was going to get the tone to compete with Liszt's extremely bril- 
liant and frequently heavy and noisy orchestration. 

— Olin Downgs in the Boston Post 
His long arms have enormous power. He goes crashing and smashine 
through a concerto in a way to astound one. His brilliancy is enormous. 

—Excerpt from the Boston American. 



HERE! 



Hear him play Tuesdays and 
Thursdays (afternoon and 
evening) at Knabe Studios 



Knabe Piano Used 



rijr^ THE OLDEST MUSICAL JOURNAL IN THE GREAT WEST jjlj 



VOL. XLVII. No. 3 



SAN FRANCISCO, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1924 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



DUX ART LAST WORD IN CONCERT SINGING LOS ANGELES WELCOMES SYMPHONY SEASON 



Exceptionally Musical and Intelligent Audience Accords Eminent Soprano 

the Greatest Ovation Witnessed in San Francisco for Years. 

Claire Dux Greatest Vocal Artist Among the Newcomers 

and Fully on a Par With the Song Queens of Old 



Conductor Walter Henry Rothwell Enthusiastically Applauded When 

Entering the Stage to Give the Signal for the Beginning of the 

Sixth Season of the Philharmonic Orchestra — The First 

Brahms Symphony Feature of Introductory Concert 



BY ALFRED METZGER 



BY BRUNO DAVID USSHER 



Anyone who missed hearing Claire Dux 
at the Curran Theatre last Sunday after- 
noon missed one of the most thrilling ex- 
cerieiices in the art of concert singing 
ever heard in San Francisco. Any vocal 
student who, knowing Mme Dux art, 
failed to crowd into the theatre, simply 
cannot be called an artist, nor even one 
justified to waste any money on a vocal 
education. Of what use are master 
classes, so called, when they do not pro- 
duce students whose artistic instinct 
simply compels them to attend a ™n<-ert 
like that given by Claire Dux By this 
statement we do not wish to infer that 
the audience greeting Mme. D"!' /' her 
concert last Sunday was unsatisfactory 
in size Indeed we could not see many 
vacant seats, notwithstanding the spring 
weather and temptation to enjoy a drive 

"it'tvas'""- large and superlatively en- 
thusiastic audience of intelligent music 
lovers who enjoyed every moment and 
gave evidence of such affection and ad- 
miration for the artist that the latter 
ToU drawn toward Tier hearers and sang 
n a manner that we have never heard 
surnassed in our twenty-five years of 
experience in concert going. To listen 
to Mme Dux sing is an education in 
it-elt She can draw tears at one mo- 
ment' and smiles at the next. She sings 
with exceptional intellectual force and 
produces her tones with a limpidity and 
accuracy of pitch that is a veritable ]oy 
to listen to. It any resident artist wishes 
to hear how high tones should be pro- 
duced and manipulated there is no better 
lesson in the world than to hear Mme. 
Dux. 

Her Mozart singing is the quintessence 
of refinement and delicacy. It is pre- 
sented with a finesse and accuracy that 
is positively enchanting. Her tone 
coloring is one of the most admirable 
vocal feats we have ever heard per- 
formed The Schumann and Strauss 
songs were interpreted with a poetic and 
romantic elegance that cannot be sur- 
passed and that hardly can be equalled. 
Schumann's Mondnacht, Sandraann, Nuss- 
baum and the encores, among which 
Strauss' Standchen stood out prom- 
inently, were sung with inexpressilile 
beauty of tone and enchantment of ex- 
pression. Words fail to describe the 
emotions experienced by intelligent 
music lovers when listening to Claire 
Dux interpret the classics. It is an ex- 
perience that will remain in the memory 
of those who heard the artist to the end 
of their day. 

Among the English group of songs 
there were som? not exactly endowed 
with depth or warmth, and yet in Mme. 
Dux' care they became works of excep- 
tional musical value, attaining an im- 
portance which even their composers 
hardly expected them to possess Mme. 
Dux is past master in the art of tone 
profluction and tone coloring. Her low 
tones are resonant and rich. Her middle 
tones are warm and appealing. Her 
high tones are bell like, velvety and true. 
Her great art is specially evident in her 
high notes. She attacks them with a 
tenderness that caresses the ear. She 
sings her crescendi and dimminuendi 
with surpassing elegance of style. Her 
breatii control is astounding and her 
attainment of climaxes is truly match- 
less We have never heard an artist in 
whom purity of tone, accuracy of pitch, 
intelligence of phrasing, clarity of dic- 
tion, beauty of coloring and warmth of 
expression were so uniformly represented 
as they are in Mme. Claire Dux. We can- 
not imagine an adjective sufliciently ex- 
travagant to surpass the admiration we 
experienced when listening to Mme. Dux' 
vocal art. 



Not less excellent in his sphere than 
Mme. Dux proved in hers was Seidler 
Winkler, an accompanist par excellence. 
His accompaniments proved the essence 
of artistic skill and musicianship. His 
touch is velvet like in its softness and 
yet sufficiently firm to assert itself at all 
times. He phrases with a finish and ar- 
tistic judgment we have never heard sur- 
passed. His accompaniment to Schu- 
mann's Mondnacht was specially effec- 



LOS ANGELES. Oct. 17.— As if to give 
a high pledge for the sixth season now 
starting the Philharmonic Orchestra, 
under Conductor Walter Henry Rothwell, 
gave a heartwarming performance when 
the new concert series opened Friday 
afternoon, October 10th There prevailed 
an expectant, almost festive mood in the 
Philharmonic Auditorium before and dur- 
ing the concert. The audience, of capac- 
ity size, welcomed the maestro with 




KAJETAN ATTL 

The Distinguished Solo Harpist of the San Fran- 
cisco Symphony Orchestra, Who Has Contribu- 
ted So rviuch Toward an Increasing Interest in 
Harp Playing in San Francisco and Vicinity. 

(See Page 5, Column 1) 



five and enchanting. His interpretation 
of the piano part to The Fairy Pipers was 
the highest achievement of a real master. 
It is rare indeed that one hears two such 
artists so thoroughly equipped, so splen- 
didly attuned, so evenly matched than 
Claire Dux and Seidler Winkler. And if 
you add to her artistic accomplishments 
the inexpressible charm, cordiality and 
generosity of her personality you have in 
Claire Dux one of the rarest artists ever 
appearing before a musical audience. 

The complete program rendered on 
this occasion was as follows: Ilidente la 
Calma (Mozart). Les belles manieres 
(French air breton) (Arr. by Deems Tay- 
lor), Preghiere (Gordigiani), Mondacht 
(Schumann), Sandman (Schumann), 
Nussbaum (Schumann), .Vlein Auge (It 
Strauss), Fruehlingsgedraenge (It. 
Strauss). Chere nuit (Bachelet), Serenade 
francaise (Leoncavallo) ; Charming Chloe 
(Edward German), Little Star (Mexican 
Folk Song) (Arr. by Frank La Forge), 
Les Silhouettes (.John Alden Carpenter), 
The Fairy Pipers (A. H. Brewer), The 
South Winds (T. Densmore). 



cordial aiiplause and many Joined the 
orchestra when it rose to greet their 
Jupiter tonans. 

Something of the mood felt at a re- 
union filled lobby and hall. The vestibule 
was crowded with glad people keen on 
hearing great music by a great orchestra. 
There were many grateful smiles for 
William Andrews Clark Jr.. the man who 
at so great expense founded, and, faithful 
to lofty ideals, maintains the orchestra. 
In the carpet-laid foyer tall silver-vases 
brimmed over with huge bouquets of 
giant chrysanthemums E v i' r y w h e r e 
something of a birthday spirit. And In- 
deed it was a birthday, the sixth since 
that momentous evening when the or- 
chi'stra first sounded forth. 

That mood lived on the stage. Phoenix- 
like, out of the ashes of recess and ardent 
rehearsals, it seemed the orchestra soared 
upward on the strains of Brahms' first 
symphony. In truth, the Philharmonic 
Orchestra had never played more beauti- 
fully. It was more than a concert — a 
consecration to another year's senrlce 
for the public in the name of noble art. 



In Uavel's chnrpiigraphic time poem Le 
Valsc and finally during Death and 
Transfiguration by Hichard Strauss great 
beauty of tone In compelling interpreta- 
tions. Impressive unity, lovely blending, 
rhythmic vigor and contrasts ranging 
from deft lyricysms to climaxes reared 
high on broad basis or hurled like thun- 
derbolts of Zeus. And still more, a plia- 
bility and freedom of shades and phras- 
ing which is the tonal key to the listen- 
ing heart Public thanks then were gen- 
erous. Director Rothwell had to bow 
again and again and as the orchestra 
stood in acknowledgement plaudits still 
grew. Thus one is inclined to reverse the 
adage and take as a happy omen for the 
new season that all Is well which begins 
well. 

Le Valse by Joseph Ravel, eminent 
French modernist, was the novelty of the 
concert. The classic first symphony of 
Brahms and Death and Transfiguration 
by Richard Strauss fianked the new work. 
Doth have been presented several times. 
Ravel in this opus has dispensed with 
extreme impressionistic picturlzation He 
indulges in a mental al fresco method 
blended with the dabs of the pointilllst. 
Out of a dark, almost vaporous, con- 
stantly changing maze of a sound a 
simple Viennese valse tune is heard, like 
stars gleaming through shreds of shift- 
ing clouds and again hiilden. The Valsc 
theme is modernly harmonized, strange 
and yet telling of languor, love, desire 
crying unconsciously out for fulfillment. 
There are bitter, threatening outbursts. 
In this picture of Vienna smiling through 
war misery? (The composition was writ- 
ten during the war.) In mood the work 
has something in common with Schel- 
ling's Victory Ball based on the verses 
of Alfred Noyes: 
"The cymbals crash and the dancers 

walk 
With long silk stockings and arms of 

chalk. 
Shadows of dead men stand by the wall 
Watching the fun of the victory ball." 
According to Ravel it is a picture of an 
Imperial Court (18,"i4) ball under Napo- 
leon, but even so, the music In part por- 
tends the social and military debacle 
France had to meet sixteen years later 
It is a striking composition, fascinating 
as the valse rhythm moves on conslanlly, 
at times languid, at others angrily, 
breathlessly contracted. With a violently 
swee|iing apotheosis the opus ends. It Is 
clever. entcrt;ilnlng music Its effects 
poignantly emphasized In the rendition. 
The audience may have been surprised 
at the treatment of a valse theme, but 
enjoyed the work, judging from cordial 
applause. 

In the program for the second Sym- 
phony Pair to be played by the Los An- 
geles Philharmonic Orchestra this (Fri- 
day) afternoon. October 24th, and Satur- 
day evening, October 2i), Walter Henry 
Rothwell, conductor of the orchestra, has 
followed the policy begun with the In- 
augural concert of this season of playing 
works new to Los Angeles and that of 
the moderns too. Of the five numbers 
to he given. Including the two arias to 
be sung by the soloist, Mme. Thalia Sa- 
banleva. four are having their Los An- 
iieles premiers. 

The concert opens with the rendition 
of Glazounow's Symphony No. 6 In C 
minor. This is one of the greatest works 
of this most brilliant Russian composer 
of the modern school. Then Mme. Thalia 
Sabanieva. Greek prima donna who has 
created a furor with her rendition of 
Russian roles at the Metropolitan Opera 
in New York City, and whose appear- 
ances with the Los Angeles Grand Opera 
(Continued on I'aup 8, Col. I) 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



ncto1.cr24. 1924 



The years bear witness 



(7 

■\^ n a position of honor, standing among the 
famous portrait paintings of great musicians in 
Steinway Hall, in lower New York, you will find 
it today. It is the piano that Henry Steinway, 
sevent)- years ago, built as a labor of lo»'e. He 
built it as a present to his bride. 
Now I, who am also a Steinway piano, stand 
among the other Steinway pianos at Sherman, 
Clay & Co., here on the western coast. The years 
that lie between me and that original Steinway 
piano have seen many changes. But two changes 
they have not seen. They have not seen Steinway 
pianos made in any other spirit than a spirit of 
love; and they have not seen them under any 
other supervision than Steinway supervision. 
When I left the Steinway factory on Long Island 
and began my long journey to the Coast I had been 
six years in the seasoning and making. The control 
and management of the business was in the hands 
of the third and fourth generations of the house- 
hold of Steinway. Eight members of the Steinway 
familv had directed my evolution from the raw 
wood, steel and glue into the completed piano. 
Nearly all the skilled workmen in those great 
shops had been in those shops for many years. I 
was wood and steel and glue until they shaped me. 
Now, I am as much of the spirit of Steinway as the 
first piano Henry Steinway built. 
What does this mean in my own career as a Stein- 
It means that I have been built with an individual 
interest, a conscientiousness, a deep determination 
that I should be worthy of my name. 
It means that the mountain spruce of my sounding- 
board, for example, is the finest procurable, .^fter 
careful inspection and purchase it was dried for 
six months at the sawmill, then dried for another 
year in the Steinway yards, then seasoned for two 
or three years in special sheds, then kiln-dried and 
re-dried in strip and board---in all, a seasoning and 
drying process of five full years. 
It means that, following the seasoning of this and 



The story that is told by the Steinway 




my other wood nine months were spent shaping 
and fashioning me in the factory. In that one gen- 
eral factory every part of me was made, including 
plate, rim, hammers, brass castings, action, and all 
special hardware. Nothing was let out on contract. 
Nothing was left to outside influence. 
It means that I am, in fact, a Steinway piano— 
that my charm will endure for years to come, that 
my resonance will last, that my full, rich, singing 
tone and responsive action will delight those who 



possess me as long as materials shall cling together. 
So after six years of such patient fashioning, I left 
the Long Island factory and came West. I was 
unloaded from mv long cruise and carefully gone 
over in the Sherman, Clay & Co. shops. And now 
I stand on the floor at Sherman, Clay & Co. among 
other pianos, waiting for the purchaser who shall 
come to claim me. 

Sometimes I talk over the old days in our original 
home with the other Steinway pianos here at Sher- 
man, Clay & Co. We miss the cheery companionship 
of the old square grand, with its rosewood case--- 
the piano that Henry Steinway built. It used to 
preside over us like a proud little old great-grand- 
mother. But usually we discuss the future. We 
discuss the homes that each of us, in the days to 
come, will be carried away to like brides. 
Some of us are eager to preside over great man- 
sions, with servants to dust us off, and drawing 
rooms to inhabit. Some of us are ambitious to 
have careers on the concert stage. But I have a 
different ambition. 

I want to be the piano near the fireside, where a 
modest family gathers about me and plays familiar 
melodies. I want to be the companion, from the 
very first, to little children as they learn to touch 
my keys. I want to be the discreet---and the only 
---third person present between lovers. I want to 
spend my days in a little happy home. Surely, if 
some family knew how eager I am to make their 
love for me worthwhile, they would come and 
claim me without delay. Doesn't some couple with 
a modest home and purse want to come in and 
discover how it can claim its Steinway piano? 



Sherman jiiay & Go. 

Kearny ind Sutter Sts., San Francisco 
CALIFORNI.'i-ORECON-W.'VSHINCTON 



RENA 

LAZELLE 

SOPRANO 
San Francisco Opera Company 



Head of Vocal Dep 
ator7 of Ma>l( 



M3C Bacram 



tment, San Francisco ConncrT- 
ailable for Recitala. Opera. 

Oratorio, Concert 

St.. San Franclaco 

TeL Fillmore SOS 



EMILIE LANCEL 

OPERATIC MEZZO-SOPRANO 

After Two Years' Absence in Europe 

Available For 
OPERA— ORATORIO— CONCERT 

Managemer)t ALICE SECKELS 
63 Post Street 

Residence: 433 Eighteenth Avenue, San Francisco 
Tel. Bayvlew 1461 



ANNIE LOUISE DAVID 

HARP SOLOIST AND TEACHER 

ON THE PACIFIC COAST DURING 
SEASON 1924-1925 

Address: Hotel Claremont, Berkeley 
Tel. Berkeley 9300 

Management Alice Seckels, 68 Post Street 
Tel. Douglas 7267 



PASMORE VOCAL STUDIOS 



KARL RACKLE 

1330 PINE STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 
Telephone Graystone 1925 



ALICE GENTLE 

MANAGEMENT 

CATHARINE A. BAMMAN 
53 West 39th Street New York, N. Y. 



DOUGLAS SOULE-.Pianist 

ADVANOKD PUPILS ACCEPTED 

Wednesdny and Pridnr Mornings at Studio: »02 

Kohier & Chase Bide.. San Frnnci.ico. Telephone 

Kearnr S454. Residence Slndlo: ISO Monte Vista 

Ave., Oakland. Telephone Piedmont 76C. 



AUGUSTA HAYDEN 



SOPRANO 

Dllable tor Concerts a 

Addressi 471 37th A 

Tel. Pae. fi.12 



HOMER HENLEY 

BARITONE — TEACHER OF SINGING — CONDUCTOR 

Dirertor California Club Choral 

An Oratorio Authority 

Residence Stndio: 124S Bar. at Franklin. Tel. Fill. 1033 



LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM 



CONTRALTO 
Complete Course of Operatic Tr 
erce St. Tel. Fillmore 45.'.3 



Road. Berkeley 



Dominican College School of Music 

SAN RAFAEL,. CALIFORNIA 

Music Courses Thoroueh and ProEreasIve. Public School 

Music. Accredited Diploma 

EDWARD PEASE 

BARITONE SOLOIST, TEACHER AND DIRECTOR 

Director of Eoterpenn Club, Westminster Prc«. Church. 
The B'nnI B'rith SynnEOKue, and Director of The Pease 
Music Studios at Sacramento. Studios — Snn Francisco, 
Wednesdays, Suite 1010 Kohler & Chase BldB. Telephone 
Kearny 64&4I Sacramento. Odd Felloivs' Temple. Tele- 
phone Main 4006. 



WALLACE A. SABIN 

nana El. First Church of Christ Scl- 
r Lorine Club. S. F., Wed., 1015 Sacramento 
Street. Phone West :!7.-.3: Sat., First Christian Science 
Church, Phone Franklin I.S07j Res. Studio, 3112 Le^yiston 
Ave. Berkeley, Phone Piedmont 24 28 

MISS DOROTHEA MANSFELDT 

PreparInK Teacher for 

MRS. OSCAR MANSFELDT, Pianist 

207 Cherry St.. Bet. W n»hing lon .t Clay Tel. Pac. 9306 

The College of the Holy Names 

l.AKE MERRITT. OAKLAND 

Complete Conserv.itory Course — Piano. Harp. Violin, 

•Cello. Voice. Counterpoint. Harmony. History 

DURINI VOCAL STUDIO 



1073 Ellis St. 



Oper.n — Church — Or 



TeL West 595 



THE LICHTENSTEIN VIOLIN SCHOOL 

AICTOR LICHTENSTEIN, Director 

From Bceinnine to Professional Activity 

"' " W nshington St.. s. F. Phone Fillmore «14« 



MR. ANDREW BOGART 
Teacher of Singing 

Pupils Prepared for Opera, Oratorio, Church and 
Concert. New Address: Suite 600, Kohler & Chase 
Bldg., 26 O'Farrell Street. Telephone Douglas 9256 



MUSIC PRINTING? 

SCHOLZ, ERICKSON & CO., Inc. 

521 Howard Street Phone Douglas 4273 

San Francisco 



Mzmning School of Music 

JOHN C. MANNING, Director 
.1242 Washington Street Telephone Fillmore a 

PEARL HOSSACK WHITCOMB 



The larger the circulation of a Music Journal j 
the better for the members of the profession and 
student. 



I ),-t,,l.cr-'4. I'LM 



Brifir €dml Husiral IkW^ 



THE OLDEST HUSICA 



THE GREAT WEST 



Ml SICAI, HKVII;\V lOMI-ANY 
SOI. K..liler A <lm«<- IlKiK.. 2<1 OTBrrell 
n Franc-Nco. Calif. Tol. Gorllcld r.2r.0-52.11 



ALFRED METZGER 

Mnk 



II <l>i-ck«. di 
PACII'lC 



tiioiiey ordcm or olhcr foi 
nii.i- iinjiil.lc lo 
ST Ml SKAI. HEVIKW 



Oliklnml-l<"l'«'l'^y-AlHn 



1117 I'liru St.. Alameda 
lie In I'harcc 



im In ClinrKe 



el. Sao Joac 1S81 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 

This will be the first performance of this work any- 
whi'ie and the composer has dedicated it to the Chamber 
Music Society of San Francisco, who. some years ago. It 
will be recalled, gave this delightful Serenade for 
Strings. 

Other numbers on the program will be the F major 
String Quartet of Mozart and the stirring and dramatic 
quartet for strings by Taneieft. the remarkable Russian 

\ composer. The sale of single tickets for the first concert 

Editor of the Chamber Music Society of San Francisco's season 

is now i)|)cn to the public at the Chamber Music Society's 

box iillicc at Sherman. Clay & Company. Mr. W. J. Hlley 
in charge. 

This opening concert is being looked forward to eager- 
ly by the public and will mark the beginning of the 
musical season for San I'Vancisco. The program on this 
occasion is an extremely interesting one, and owing to 
the large demand, it is advisable to make reservations 
promptly. 



I.oa Anselra UHlee 
nif \venlie. llullyivtHHi. Cnllfornla 
una llavia Un.iIht in Chnrse 



VOL.XLVll FRIDAY, OCT. 24^1924 ^ 

The PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW la '"f •■>' 
the »hee« n..i»lo deparlmentH of all leading mualc at^ 



F. Poaiollle 



TWENTY-FOURTH YEAR 



EDITORIAL ANNOUNCEMENT 

The Pacific IVIusical Review does not brag. Conse- 
Quentlv we do not consider the size of the paper, or the 
circulation or the mer.t of our edilorials or cr.ticsms 
in comparison with those of our contemporar.es. as a 
diqnified or useful subject for discussion. There are 
t me=^ like now. when for obvious reasons we are com- 
pelled to reduce the size of the paper to eight pages. 
There are times when we publish twelve pages Fre- 
ouently we publish sixteen pages and once a yea'' "'« 
publish eighty pages. The volume of material we pub l.sh 
does not represent the value of the paper to the profes- 
sion and the public. 

What we are trying to do is to make life easier for 
the artists and the teachers. We want to combat the un- 
reasonable prejudice against resident artists, teachers 
and composers. We want to help everyone who is worthy 
of it To do this we feel that as many musical people 
as possible should subscribe for the paper. Only through 
an extraordinarily large subscription list can we he 
somewhat independent in regard to our advert, sing de- 
partment. We are now trying to see whether the musici 
profession of the Pacific Coast wants an independent 
music journal or whether it wants advertisers to sup- 
port a music journal in exchange for special privileges. 
During the season 1924-25 we shall continue to give our 
readers a music journal with a backbone and with a 
policy of encouragement for resident artists and teach- 
ers of merit. 

JACOBI WORK OPENS CHAMBER MUSIC SEASON 

The opening concert of the Chamber Music Society of 
Sw Francisco on Tuesday evening. October .28th. at 
Scottish Rite Hall, will present a first performance of 
a new string quartet by Frederick Jacob;. Mr. Jacob! is 
a San Franciscan, who has made a distinguished place 
for himself among American composers. His songs, 
symphonic works and chamber music pieces have re- 
ceived widespread recognition and are to be found on 
the programs of the leading artists, orchestras and en- 
semble groups of .\mei'ica. The new work is the result 
of Mr Jacobi's researches among the aboriginal tribes 
of Xew Mexico Indians and is based principally upon 
the themes, rhythms and musical atmosphere of these 
people which impressed themselves upon him during 
his sojourn among them. In this quartet the composer 
has attempted to convey the spirit, rather than the 
letter of the remarkable music of this people. 

Concerning this Indian music. Mr. Jacobi has the fol- 
lowing to sav: "Indian music has failed, so tar, to make 
a deep impression on the civili'/.ed world. Perhaps the 
fault lies not in the music itself, but in us. .\rt has only 
recently broken the bonds of classicism and turned to- 
wards strange countries and primitive peoples in Its 
search for new aspects of beauty. We have perhaps not 
been ready before now to appreciate the wild and stri- 
dent music of our North American Indians. 

Like all things new. Indian music seems at first to be 
chaotic and vague. It is only as one knows it better that 
it crystallizes and becomes definite. It seems at first to 
be monotonous and childishly simple. One finds later 
that within its sphere it expresses a variety of moods 
and that, rhythmically at least, it is often amazingly 
complex. With the voice and drum— melody and rhythm 
—the Indians have created music which is free and 
strong It is music which intoxicates with the strength 
of its regular pulsation and excites with the suddenness 
of its unexpected vagaries. It is music which, in its crude 
way has mastered the artistic principle of unity and 
contrast. And it is excellently constructed, for the 
Indians have a fine sense of design. It is the music of 
a primitive race. limited, perhaps in its scope and not, 
in our sense, emotionally warm. But it has the supreme 
attribute of an intense and thrilling vitality— a funda- 
mental and barbaric energy And when one considers 
It in connection with the ritualistic dances, of which it is 
most often a part, it acquires a symbolic significance 
which is not related to spiritual depth." 



DOMINICAN COLLEGE ANNOUNCES NEW SEASON 

We take pleasure to quote from last Sunday's musical 
page of the Examiner the following commendable plans 
for the new season by the Dominican College of San 
Rafael, an institution or rare artistic eminence and one 
to whom the people of Marin County as well as the 
students of the college are greatly indebted; 

The third season of the Artists' Series at the School 
of Music. Dominican College. San Rafael, under the man- 
agement of Alice Metcalf will open on Wednesday eve- 
ning, October 29 at S:!5, with the Russian Cathedral 
Quartet. Their program is richly varied — Russian 
chants, folk songs and operatic selections are sung in 
tlie original Russian and then in our own language are 
presented a number of favorite English and American 
songs. Seven concerts given during the season when 
the following artists will appear: 

Second concert. Tuesday evening. December 9, Eva 
Gauthier, mezzo soprano, known as "the high priestess 
of modern song." 

Sunday afternoon, January 11, Charles Bulotti, tenor, 
and Marguarite Raas Waldrop, soprano, in a joint re- 
cital. 

Thursday evening. February 5. San Francisco Cham- 
ber Music Society, Elias Hecht. founder. 

Wednesday evening, March 11, Erno Dohnanyi. Hun- 
garian pianist and composer. 

Wednesday evening, April 22, Reinald Werrenrath, 
American baritone. 

Sometime in May. Kajetan Attl. harpist, and Walter 
Ferner, 'cellist, both of the San Francisco Symphony, 
in a joint recital. 

These concerts, which were first sponsored by a small 
group of music lovers in San Rafael and Ross, have 
now become an established factor in the cultural life 
of Marin county. 



DELIGHTFUL JOINT VIOLIN AND PIANO RECITAL 

Eugenia Argiewicz Bern, Violinist, and Lev Shorr, 
Pianist, Will Appear at the Fairmont Hotel Ball- 
room Next Friday Evening. 

A concert which promises to be unusually interesting 
and artistically distinctive is the one announced by 
Lulu J. Blumberg to take place in the Ballroom of the 
Fairmont Hotel on Friday evening, October 24. This 
event will consist of a joint violin and piano recital 
by Eugenia Argiewicz Bern and Lev Shorr, Mrs Bern 
is so well-known in California as a violinist of the 
rarest accomplishments and skill that it is almost un- 
necessary to go into further details. However, it is 
not superfiuous to say that this exceptional virtuoso 
is an artist of such charming qualities that her appear- 
ance should be the signal for every music lover who 
enjoys a big, round and luscious tone and an interpre- 
tation that exhales emotion and colorful poetry to pur- 
chase tickets immediately after reading this. 

Mr Shorr is not so well-known by the public in geii- 
eral ' However, those who have heard him are unani- 
mous in their expression of enthusiasm over his re- 
markable technical resources and his numerous ntellec- 
tual feats in classic interpretations. He will prove 
a delightful surprise to those who have never heard hini 
and an agi'eeable treat to those who are familiar with 
his work. The complete program to be presented on 
this occasion will be as follows: 

Senate Appassionata. Op. .i7 (Beethoven), Lev Shorr, 
Concerto, Op. 20, F major (Edouard Lalo) l<'Ugenia 
Bern: Etudes— E major. C sharp minor. (<luet, !• < 
minor (revolutionary!, (Chopin), Ballade. Op. -i, t. 
minor (Chopin), Lev Shorr: Concerto, E minor, played 
without pauses. (Jules Conns), Eugen ia Bern. 

PERSINGER-JACOBI PIANO RECITAL 

Louis Persinger. violinist, and Irene Ja.obi. pianist 
will join forces in one of the most interesting Sim.ita 
programs of the season to take place Thursday "■'■■""«; 
November 20th. in the ballroom of the Paimiont lot 
under Alice Seckels' direction Mr. and Mrs. Jacobi will 
bo in San Francisco until after this recital since Mr. 
Jacobi's works will be produced this season by both t k 
Chamber Music Society at its opening concert and the 
Symphony Orchestra at its second concert. His wlte is 
an authority on chamber '""s'^ P'f >■'"?: J'"'; ,1^'^u 
splendid success In Sonata recitals in New Yoik «itb 
Mchel I'cnha. first cellist of the Philadelphia Symphony, 
She has studied at the Institute of Musical Art and with 
Galileo in New York, and has coached with the famous 
Fritz Kneisel. having given numerous recitals wit, his 
artist pupils It will be a delight to hear Mr. Persingei 
again in Sonatas. They will perform Brahms Sonata 
in D minor, Mozarfs Sonata in C major and the Richard 
Strauss Sonata in E flat major. 




KAJETAN ATTL 

SOLO HARPIST, SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 



For Concert lOnlcnKementa and Inalruellon Apply 
lUOl Kohler A: c hniie llldic.. Tel. DuuKin* 1U7N. un 
Hednendny nnd Siilurdny Afternoona U.M.V. Heal- 



A METHOD FOR THE HARP 

llr Knjeinn Atll 

CAKI. FINIIER, I'ublUher 

For «nle at Sherman, Clay A Co., Kobler A Cbaa 
Henrr Urobe and Knielan Altl 



FREDERIC 

POWELL 

VOICE SPECIALIST 
TEACHER OF SINGING 

RESTORATION OF LOST OR 
IMPAIRED VOICES 

705 Kohler & Chase BIdg., Tuesdays and Fridays 
Residence Phone Sunset 6524 



BENJAMIN 

MOORE 

2636 UNION STREET 

SA.N FUANCISCO 

Telephone Fillmore 1624 

BV APPOINTMENT 



LINCOLN 
BATCHELDER 

Pianist -• Accompanist 

Studio 412 Cole St. : Phone Hemlock 368 



MAX DOLIN 

Distinguished 
Composer - Violinist 



NOW CONDUCTING THE 
KNLARGEID OnCIIBSTIlA 



California Theatre 






San Francisco 



LIPSCHULTZ 
SAN FRANCISCANS 

A New Bureau of Music 



Complete Faculty for Teaching 



Soloists— Orchestras 
Bands for Every Occasion 

Suite 414 Loew'i Warfleld Theatre Building 
Telephone Franklin 814 



Pacific coast musical review 



October 24, 1924 



RESIDENT ARTISTS REVEAL ARTISTIC SKILL 

San Francisco Musical Club Concert. Pfund-Moore Flute 

and Piano Recital and Second Event of Ida G. 

Scott's Fortnightlys Well Attended 

By ALFRED METZGER 

There was a large audience in attendance at the Ball- 
room ot the Fairmont Hotel on Thursday morning, 
October 16th. when the San Francisc-o Musical Club 
gave one of its regtilar programs The compositions 
selected lor interpretation included Italian and Spanish 
works and were refreshingly interpreted by some of 
the city's prominent disciples of the muses. The open- 
ing number ot the program consisted of Wolf-Ferrari's 
Trio in D major, which, although somewhat modern, 
did not contain those elements that offend the sensitive 
ears of conservative musicians. The work consists ot 
four movements and was interpreted by Myra Palache. 
piano, Winifred Forbes, violin, and Jean Allen, violon- 
cello, in a manner that showed careful preparation, 
artistic adaptability and pleasing ensemble concerning 
the blending of tone quality and phrasing. 

Pearl Hossack Whitoomb. soprano, sang a group of 
Italian songs including O Bocca Dolorosa, Villanelle. 
Sur Ta Bouche (Sibella). and Triste Ritorna (Barthel- 
emy) with exceptional dramatic or lyric instinct, as the 
case necessitated, and a clear voice. Mrs. Whitcomb 
showed versatility ot conception and individuality of 
style and merited the enthusiastic applause that re- 
warded her for her artistic efforts. Lincoln Batchelder 
played the accompaniments with unusual judgment and 
with that finish which characterizes all his work. 

Marion de Guerre Steward played the following group 
of piano compositions: Triana (Albeniz). Malaguena 
(Albeniz). Danse Rituelle du Feu l-Manuel de Falla) 
and as usual delighted her hearers with the ease of her 
technic and the emotional character of her phrasing. 
Virginia Treadwell sang: En Cuba (.Arranged by La 
Ftirgei, Preguntales a las Estrellas (Arr. by La Forge I 
and Clavelitos (Velverdel with flexible voice, pleasing 
rhythm and colorful expression. The entire program 
was thoroughly enjoyed and the audience manifested its 
pleasure by frequent and prolonged tokens of appreci- 
ation. 

Christine Howells Pfund. flutist, and Jessie Moore. 
pianist, assisted by Eula Grandberry. soprano, gave a 
very interesting program in the Italian Room of the St. 
Francis Hotel on Friday evening. October 17th. when 
representative music lovers and professional musicians 
gave evidence of their approval by heartily applauding 
the participants. Mrs. Pfund. as on previous occasions, 
punctuated her interpretations with her temperament 
and phrasing and played the representative flute compo- 
sitions in a manner showing serious study and pains- 
taking preparation. She is a a very sincere young artist 
who deserves the success she achieves. 

Miss .Moore is an exceptionally accomplished pianist 
who both technically and emotionally brings out the 
finer aspect of pianistic art. She is unusually endowed 
and has added to a natural talent an intelligent grasp of 
the artistic proprieties of piano interpretations. She 
understands thoroughly how to obtain the most pleasing 
effects from ultra-modern works, while at the same time 
grasping the poetic beauty of the older classics. 

Miss Grandberry gives evidences of being an experi- 
enced vocal artist whose lyric soprano voice is ringing 
in quality and who takes her singing seriously. She ex- 
hibits taste and individuality of expression and never 
falls to elicit hearty and spontaneous applause. The 
complete program of this event, which was given under 
the direction of Alice Seckels. was as follows: Flute — 
Andante (Mozart). Praludium (Handel). Largo (Bach). 
Mlnuetto in F (Mozart). Rondeau (La Barrel; piano — 
Ballade (Debussy). Rhythmic Etude (in manuscript) 
(Howard Hanson). Scherzo (Moszkowski i ; songs — Nina 
(Pergolesi). Sweet Bird, recitative and air (Handel). 
with flute obligate: flute — Suite: Romance, Scherzo. 
Moderato (Widon: piano — Ballade in F minor, op. 52 



THE PUBLIC SQUARE 

.V\r> OTHKB SIIOKT vf;rsf', 

BY RELDA M. CAILLEAU 

mess-\<;ks ok hi m.%\ interest 

PRUK, J11.2.-i 
For Sale at the Whilr ILiuni- and Cftr of Parlii 



11 SUPREME rf»Q 

1 EVENTS npO 

Elwyn Artist Series 

JASCHA HEIFETZ 

WORLD FAMOUS VIOLINIST 

ROLAND HAYES 

SENSATIONAL NEGRO TENOR 

MOIII'/. IIIISKN I 11.^1, Plani»I 

<1-;<II.I\ ll\>si:v Viulini«l 

IS.\ Ki<i:ili:il Ilalladi>t 

M.\HI\ l\ui.(\ Sop-ano 

.»i,iti;iir «r-\i i.i\<; viollnlai 

>'»'"! '■ utril^ON Soprano 

I.OMI(i\ sIHIMi tlHRTET 

REINAI.I) U i:ltKE-\R.\TH Daritonr 

MERLE .\l.r<IIK Contralto 

33H-: Savlnea on Seaoon Tirkeo 

Seanon PriPeM: 9IT.no. fJi'M, 9S.00 ( iHum tax) 

Now on Sale. Sbrrman. CIny * Co. 

Helfeti and IlaycM rcnt-rrrx nill hr eivcn on SundaT 

aflernoono at < a«ln» Thinler. All olher rnncrrtii at 

SroltiKh Rile Hall <evenlnE«(. Sea>nn: Nov to »pr 



(Chopin); songs — L'Heure Exquise (Poldowski). Songs" 
ot Grusia (Rachmaninoff). Song of the Shepherd Lehl 
(Rimsky-Korsakof), with flute obligato. 

The second fortnightly soiree took place in the 
Colonial Ballroom of the St. Francis Hotel when Ida G. 
Scott, true to her policy of encouraging resilient artists, 
presented Ellen Edwards, pianist; Lawrence Strauss, 
tenor, and Elizabeth Allexander. pianist, to give a mod- 
ern English program. While Miss Scott is heartily to be 
commended for giving our musical audiences an oppor- 
tunity to hear the best ot the ultra modern school pre- 
sented by capable artists, it is only natural that a writer 
cannot express himself contrary to the dictates ot his 
conscience. The program appended to this comment 
contained representative works by modern English com- 
posers which made up in difiiculty of technical require- 
ments and bizarre characteristics of theoretical treat- 
ment what they lacked in soundness of ideas and con- 
tinuity ot thematic development. The artists are entitled 
to hearty praise for the manner in which they overcame 
the almost unsurraountable technical and emotional ob- 
stacles which these works presented. Miss Edwards 
surely rose in the estimation of her audience because 
of the thoroughness with which she interpreted the 
difficult, though banal. Ireland Sonata. Later she inter- 
preted The Dew Fairy by Frank Bridge and In a Vodka 
Shop by Arnold Bax with equal ingenuity and skill. She 
is an excellent pianist and plays with intellectuality and 
sympathetic understanding. Her interpretations are al- 
ways musicianly and she plays with head and heart 




KELIJ V .11. C. 



'inni»t Who Has Jnst PoblLxhed 
1 Poems of Exeeplional Huninn 
( See Pace .s. Column 1 ► 



alike. Lawrence Strauss displayed his versatility and 
masterly perception in adequate interpretations and de- 
lighted his hearers with the successful presentation ot 
works ot a somewhat questionable artistic value. 

This knack to present something that seems rather 
unimportant and change it into something worth while 
to listen to is the evidence of artistic perception and 
Mr, Strauss on this occasion. like on previous ones, has 
added to his enviable reputation as vocalist of excep- 
tional force and intelligence. The accompaniments of 
Miss Alexander were indeed charming and discriminat- 
ing. They proved the pianist to be possessed ot special 
talent and endowed with the rare gift ot artistic in- 
stinct. The complete program was as follows: Sonata 
for Piano (John Ireland); song— The Seal Man (Mase- 
fleld) (Rebecca Clark); piano solos — (a) The Dew Fairy 
(Frank Bridget, lb) In a Vodka Shop (Arnold Bax); 
songs — Chanson de Barberine (Alfred de Musset (Eu- 
gene Goossens). I Heard a Piper Piping (Joseph Camp- 
bell) (Arnold Bax). The Hare (Walter de la Mare) 
(Arthur Bliss). A Lullaby (Cahal G'Bryne) (Hamilton 
Harty). A Song ot London (Rosamund Watson) (Cyril 
Scott). It Was a Lover and His Lass (Shakespeare) 
(Roger Quilteri. 

The next Fortnightly will take place on Monday eve- 
ning. November 3rd. and will consist ot a chamber music 
program to be presented by May Mukle. violoncello- 
Lajos Fenster. violin, and Ellen Edwards, piano. 

INA BOURSKAIA OPENS SECKELS SERIES 

The Alice Seckels Matinee Musicales tor the season 
1924-25 were inaugurated in the Ballroom ot the Fair- 
mont Hotel on Monday afternoon. October 20th. in the 
rresence of a large audience by Ina Boui-skaia, the dis- 
tinguished Russian mezzo soprano, who has been heard 
in San Francisco on previous occasions and who has 
become identified with tl)e Metropolitan and Chicago 
Opera Companies during th e last two years. This was 

Attractive Large Studio 

To rent nllh »;RA\D PIANOj ■ultable Voeiil or Inslr.i 
mental. Parly .an have use of same Saturday, "r f"r 
coneert work eveninBs. Rent Very Reasonable. 
Phone Uonelass 2774 All Day 



Giacomo Minkowski 



the HrBt time the San Francisco musical public has 
heard this artist in concert. It cannot be conscien- 
tiously asserted that she made as deep an impression 
with her concert program as she has done with her 
operatic work. 

While the voice is rich and sonorous it is not used 
with that finish of tone production and eveness ot 
quality which a truly great concert artist should reveal. 
Furthermore there is occasionally a deviation from the 
pitch when such discrepency is especially annoying 
Miss Bourskaia also uses her high tones in a manner to 
exhibit a brittleness and stridency which would not be 
evident it she understood the knack ot covering her high 
tones. Vocal art is a most serious and difficult study 
and many faults in tone production and phrasing as 
well as breathing are hidden in operatic work, where 
orchestra, chorus and ensemble numbers coyer a mul- 
titude of sins. Concert work, however, is an entirely 
new field and altogether a different phase of musical 
artistry. Too many operatic singers are under the im- 
pression that concert singing is just as easy as operatic 
work. They are mistaken. 

Possibly with further practical experience in concert 
work and with added understanding ot the intricacies 
that must be overcome in the interpretation ot such 
classics as Beethoven's In Questa Tomba. Liszt's Die 
Lorelei, Schubert's Der Leiermann. Mozart's Alleluia 
and others Miss Bourskaia will possibly please serious 
music lovers moi-e than she does now. It she ever at- 
tains that stage of her concert career when the expres- 
sion of her vocal art matches the charm of her person- 
ality, then indeed will she have attained a high standard 
in the skill of concert giving. 

In Mrs Hennion Robinson ot Los Angeles Miss Bours- 
kaia selected an unusually artistic accompanist who 
understands the art ot administering instrumental sup- 
port ot the soloist to a high degree. Her accompaniments 
were marked by serious musicianship and expressive 
judgment. ALFRED METZGER. 



Caroline E. Irons presents her pupil, Lena Minehart, 
pianist, at the Halt Hour ot Music at the Greek Theatre 
ot the University of California Sunday afternoon, 
October 19th. The following program has been selected 
tor this occasion: Fantasia (Mozart). Lena Minehart; 
Second piano accompaniment (Grieg), Caroline E. Irons; 
Etude (Liszt). The Fountain (Douillet). Nocturne 
iChopin). Rhapsody (Brahms). Lena Minehart; Pol- 
onaise (Liszt). Lena Minehart. 



"SUCCESS AND ANOTHER 
CONCERT" 



G 



LOUIS 

RAYEURE 

Baritone 



Sings Again — Last Time — Another Great 

and "All-Different Program" in 

Four Languages 

CURRAN THEATRE 
SUNDAY AFTERNOON AT 2:45 

Tickets; 50e to »2.00. at Sherman, Clay * Co. 

AUDITORIUM 
SUNDAY AFTERNOON NOV. 16 

ALMA GLUCK 



Selby C. Oppenbeinier. care of Sherii 
Manag^eiiieirt Selby C. Oppe 



PAUL STEINDORFF 

MASTER COACH 
»Iete Grand and L.i£;ht Opera Reper 



Miss Elizabeth Westgate - 

Teacher ot Piano. Organ. Harmony. Organist and Musical 
Director of First Presbyterian Chnrch. Alameda. Home 
Studio: 1117 P.\RIJ STREET. Ab.VMEDA. Telephone Ala- 
meda 15S. Thursdays. Merriman School, 507 Eldorado Are., 
Oakland. Telephone Piedmont 2770. 



PASMORE TRIO 

Mary, Violin — Suzanne. Piano — Dorothy. Cello 

CONCERTS — PUPILS 
20«9 Green St. TeL Fillmore B071 



()ctoher24, !924 



L. E. BEHYMER'S BRILLIANT COURSES 

Enterprising and Energetic Impresario Again Presents 

to His Loyal Patrons a Galaxy of the World's 

Most Distinguished Artists 

Continuing his policy of grouping the world famous 
artists, vocalists, instrumentalists ami dancers, whom 
he annually brings to Los Angeles, thereby bringing 
the price of season tickets well within the reach of 
every music patron's pocketbook. Manager Behymer is 
announcing the usual Tuesday and Thursday courses. 
Each series will offer twelve events, commencing in 
October and ending in April. Maria .feritza, the famous 
Mennese diva, who, upon the occasion of her debut at 
tlie Metropolitan two years ago broke operatic tradi- 
tious and hurdled herself into the hearts of the public 
at one and the same time, will be heard tor the first 
time in Los Angeles on the Thursday evening series. 

Feodor Chaliapin, the outstanding operatic .igure of 
the day, a favorite here from his previous appearances 
in opera and concert, is scheduled for these courses. 
Among the other vocalists of distinction and popular 
appeal will be Mme. Ernestine Schumann-Heink, the 
dowager queen of the vocal world, Louis Graveure, bari- 
tone. Ina Bourskaya, mezzo-soprano, remembered locally 
from her appearances with the Russian Opera, and who 
since that time has been one of the principal members 
of the Metropolitan. Chicago and Ravina Park Opera 
companies. Claudia Muzio, whose successes in opera in 
Paris, Monte Carlo and Buenos Aires were further veri- 
fied by her engagement at the Metropolitan and Chicago 
Opera Houses, will be heard for the first time in recital 
on the Thursday series; Royal Dadmun, with his pop- 
ular type of program, Rosa Ponselle, already a favorite 
locally. Clair Dux of the Chicago Company and Florence 
Easton of the .Metropolitan will each be heard in re- 
cital in Los Angeles tor the first time on these courses; 
Sophie Braslau. contralto. Tito Schipa and the delight- 
ful Frieda Hempel in her Jenny Lind impersonation will 
all be heard on this Tuesday series. 

Those interesting pianistic twins. Guy Maier and Lee 
Pattison. whose one appearance with the orchestra two 
years ago makes their return in recital eagerly antici- 
pated, Percy Grainger, composer-pianist, and " Mieczy- 
slaw Munz, the brilliant young Polish pianist, with the 
always welcome Mischa Elman and, Erna Rubinstein, 
violinists, will each be heard on these courses. 

Two novel types of programs will be introduced this 
year by Manager Behymer. First the deReszke singers, 
four American boys, whose vocal achievements were 
such that the great Jan deReszke loaned them the use 
of his name. This quartet, with its programs of Old 
English madrigals, modern English. Sailor chanties, and 
a group of lieder has enjoyed a vogue during the past 
two seasons in Paris and London. Alberto Salvi, protege 
of the Italian government, acclaimed by the critics as 
the world's finest harpist, will be heard for the first time 
in Los Angeles on the Tuesday course. Accredited with 
having revolutionized harp playing, giving it power and 
character as well as musical feeling, Salvi has achieved 
a success that might well be envied by any prima donna 
Anna Pavlowa and the Ruth St. Denis Companies, the 
only two important touring terpsichorean artists before 
the p,ublic today, will each present programs- on the 
courses. This year will be Pavlowa's farewell and to 
the end of making her final appearances in America 
unforgettable events, she is bringing both Novikoft and 
Volmine as dancing partners, new ballets, costumes and 
scenic investiture. Don Quixote, which she just pro- 
duced with immense success in London, has been chosen 
for the program on the Thursday series. 

St. Denis is already a popular figure locally. Since her 
departure from California three years ago, her success 
has been unprecedented, tar exceeding the hopes of 
even her most ardent admirers. The productions in point 
of colorful imagery, bizarre yet historically correct cos- 
tuming and in conception of interpretation have 
achieved for her the unqualified praise of the press and 
the greatest compliment of all— unstinted applause and 
capacity audiences. 



KAJETAN ATTL'S EDUCATIONAL INFLUENCE 

Those of our music lovers who admire Kajetan \ttrs 
brilliant harp interpretations with the San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra and occasionally his effective 
solos at concerts of the highest character, do not know 
what admirable influence this splendid musician exer- 
cises over the young students who are becoming some 
of California's leading harpists. At present Mr Attl's 
class includes forty harp students and it is rapidly 
approaching the fifty mark. Since Mr. Attl's arrival in 
han Francisco a great interest in haq-i> playing has been 
aroused. Where formerly comparatively few students 
took up the harp as an instrument, except at some of 
the Convents where music has always been a serious 
branch of study, at present there are many young musi- 
cians adopting harp playing as. a profession. 

Where formerly it was difficult to obtain extra harpists 
for orchestras now there is no difficulty whatever to 
obtain the services of competent young harp plavers 
with the result that a number of theatre orchestras that 
formeriy dispensed with a harp are now adding this 
instrument to their ensemble. Pupils and former pupils 
of Mr Attl are now playing at the California Theatre 
the Warfield Theatre, with the San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra with the Cleveland Symphony Orchestra and 
with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. 

Mr. Attl has been affiliated regularly with the faculty 
of the Dominican College of San Rafael for the last 
eight years, and feels highly appreciative of the honor 
to be associated with what he considers one of the 
most efficient and prominent music schools in the 
country. While Mr. Attl will be greatly occupied with 
his symphony work and his pupils he will have sufficient 
time to fill a number of concert engagements, some of 
which have already been arranged. Mr. Attl's new Harp 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 

Method is greatly in demand and has received the high- 
est commendation from leading artists and critics 
throughout the country. The work is recognized as the 
linest work of its kind ever published and represents a 
iiimplete education in modern harp playing. 

-♦- . 

SCHOOL CHILDREN SING AT EXPOSITION 

The California Industries Exposition, which started 
on Monday afternoon, October 20th, introduced as one 
of Its principal features a chorus of three hundred chil- 
dren from the Bay View, Commodore Sloat and Hamil- 
ton James (High) Schools, who sang on the opening 
night a number of classical and patriotic songs which 
w-ere directed by Estelle Carpenter, director of music 
of the ban Francisco Public School Department accom- 
panied by the Municipal Band under the direction of 
Mr. Sapiro An interesting song which was featured 
was Rudy Seiger's California Lullaby written for the 
Family Club and much loved by the children as Miss 
Carpenter has given it to all the Public Schools of the 
City. The other songs rendered were the Star Spangled 
Banner. I Love You California, All the World Loves San 
Francisco, The Heavens Resound, Pilgrims' Chorus My 
Own United States, and San Fi-ancisco Evermore 'The 
children participate on Monday, Wednesday and Friday 
of each week. Pupils from different schools appear on 
each occasion and all the children sing without re- 
hearsals. Altogether 2,400 children will participate dur- 
ing the course of the exposition. 



Hother Wismer, the well known violinist, has prepared a 
splendid program for his concert to be given on Thurs- 
day evening, November 6th. in the concert room of the 
Fairmont Hotel. Mr. Wismer is a member of the San 
Francisco Symphony Orchestra and one of the best 
known and most successful musicians in California The 
program to be presented on this occasion will be as 
follows: Suite op. 11 (Goldmark), Violin Concerto E 
flat major (Mozartl, Farewell to the Forest (Wheeler 
Beckett), Improvisation and Rejoicing (Ernst Blochl 
La Trille du diable (Tartini), Adagio and Allegro in B 
minor (Bach I, Meditation No. 1 op. 42 (Tschaikowskv) 
Charles Hart will be the accompanist, and a better 
choice could not have been made. 



THE BIRKLL CO. 



STEINWAY 




Even Musicians Wonder 

— at the enduri' g qualities of 
the STEINWAY Piano. 

Yet with its plastic and delicate 
touch it far outlasts other Pianos. 

From $925 upwards. 



BIRREL 



446 

South COMPANY 

Broadway 97i« Stciiiway House 




FITZGERALD'S for the cAd-vancement of Slfusic 

William Tyroler 

This great Musical Director and Teacher was AssislanI Direc- 
tor of the Metropolitan Opera House for more than twelve 
years He achieved notable success as conductor of the great 
Wayfarer Chorus. 

He savs of the superb 

KNABE 

which he uses exclusively: "Use of ,he Knabe in concert tours 
all over America with Rosa Ponselle. and other great Artists, 
has tlioroughly and s.ncerely won me to this great instrument." 




LOS ANGELES 



J 



ROSEMARY ROSE 



A Singer Who Teaches— Consolidates Her Studios 

Formerly of Milwaukee. Sheboygan 

and Plymouth 

In Los Angeles 

■J:!- so. IvICNMOIti; .STHIOKT TEI,. .1«7(HS 

.Vuditlonn lly Aniioliilmrnt Only 

Ruth llroditiaii, Ri-KlMtror 



CHARLES BOWES 

TEACHER OF VOICE 
440 §. Grand View. I'honr BM645. Loa AoKrlra 



L. E. Behymer 

MANAGER OF DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS 

Executive Officet: 

rOb Auditorium BIdg., Lot Angolas 



ALMA STETZLER 

VOICE CULTURE — COACIII.XG IN REPERTOIRE 



CALMON LUBOVISKI 

CONCERT VIOLINIST 
Available for Conrrrla and Rrcllala 



ullr 604 So. Calif. .Mualr Co. Uldc 



Phone 2NI-NOft 



Limited Nombrr of Advanred Pnplla Aceented 
VIollnlat Lo« ^nEefea Trio 

Phone: H21 



Studio: 334 Music Aria §tudlo llldic. 



Alexander 


Bevani 


ALL lll(A^<'IIKS 


OF TUB 


VOCAL ART II 


Studio: 012 So. Calif. J 


lualo Co. Bids. 


Telephone H2 


2-.-.20 



ABBIE NORTON JAMISON 

PIA.M)— If AUMOXV — VOCAL COACH 

Director of 

JA.MISON QIAKTKTTE 

602 Southern California Mn«le Co. IlldK. 
Stndloa: 1147 Weat 21at St. Telephone Beacon T707 



ILYA BRONSON ,..,,. "■■i- ■;>'''■'. 

Loa Ansetra Trio, I'h II harmonic 

Quartet Inalrurtion. (hnmhrr Mualr lt«cltaU 

5<I1S Ka Mlrada. rhunr Holly 3044 

A.KOODLACH 

VIOLIN MAKKH AMI REPAIRER 

ConnnlNHCur — Appralaer 
503 Majeatic Theatre Illdic.. l.o> AnKelea Tucker 4010 

JOHN SMALLMAN 

IIAHITONI.;— TEACIIKR OF SINOINO 

Voice Trial hr Appnlnlmenl. »3.00. Studio: M03-N04 So. C«I. 

MuHic I o. III.IK. Mvinu llraln. Secrrlarr 



ZOELLNER CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

I.OM AKfiELRS 

IZSO Wladaor BouleTard esiN llollrnood BoDlaTari 

Complete Faenltr oC Artlal 'faaehcra 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



October 24, 1924 



CLAIRE DUX 

CONCERT MANAGEMENT ARTHUR JUDSON 
FISK BUILDING, NEW YORK CITY 



Soprano 

LIEDER SINGER 

BRUNSWICK RECORD 



LUCILE WHITE TO SING AT FAIRMONT 

Already a favorite with a large number of San Fran- 
cisco music lovers. Lucile White, coloratura soprano. 
will make her formal debut at the Fairmont Hotel 
Wednesday evening. October 29th. under the manage- 
ment of M;\dame Vought with Lincoln Batchelder. Di- 
anist. and Alice Guthrie Poyner. violinist, as assisting 
artists. -Miss White was winner of one of the scholar- 
ships offered bv the Vought School of Music for 1924-2o. 
and Alfred Hurtgen. one of the judges, was enthusi- 
astic over the beautv of her voice and its development. 
She has been studying with Madame Vought for upward 
of two vears Her program will include old Italian. 
French and English songs and a group by American 
composers in addition to operatic arias. 

Batchelder is one of the foremost resident artists. He 
studied with Joseph Lhevinne and other masters of the 
piano and has made a splendid record alike as a soloist 
and accompanist. Mrs. Poyner always commands a re- 
spectful hearing for her work as a violinist, which is 
characterized by fine technic and tone, the result of long 
study and absolute devotion to her art. 

Following will be their program: Piano solos — (a) 
Etude E major (Chopin), (b) Concert Etude (Scholzer). 
Lincoln Batchelder. Soprano solos — la) Old Italian. Se 
tu m'ami (Pergolesi). (bl Old English, The Plausible 
Lover. Pastoral i Henry Carey), (c) Old PVench. Chantos 
les amours de Jean larr. by Weckerlin). Lucile White; 
Violin solos — (a) Legende ( Wieniawski). (b) Sieiliano, 
Ic) Rigaudon (Francoeur-Kreisler), .\lice Guthrie Poy- 
ner; Soprano solos— (a) Songs My Mother Taught Me 
(Dvorak). (b» Aria, Je suis Titiana, Mignon (Thomas). 
Lucile White; Songs by American composers — (a) Do 
Not Go. Mv Love (Hageman). (b) Yesterday and Today 
(Sprossl. ('c) The Answer iTerry), Lucile 'nTiite: Violin 
Solo — Zigeunerweisen (Sarasate). Alice Guthrie Poyner; 
Soprano solo — Aria. Waltz Song from Romeo and Juliet 
(Ciounod). 



PERCY GRAINGER OPENS AUDITORIUM SEASON 

Jazz numbers raised to the height of respectability 
are being presented by Eva Gauthier. famous mezzo 
soprano, as part of her regular concert program this 
sea.son with greatest success. Miss Gauthier will be 
featured as guest artist with the San Francisco Sym- 
phony Orchestra. Alfred Hertz conductor, in the second 
of the municipal popular concerts to be held in Civic 
.\uditorium. 

Eastern critics were at first doubtful over the innova- 
tion presented in the singer's program, but later were 
loud in her praise. The Literary Digest several months 
ago devoted an entire page to Miss Gauthier's pioneer- 
ing work in presenting truly -American compositions in 
a program with the usual concert numbers 

Percy Grainger. Australian pianist, will open the 
municipal concert series this season on the night of 
November 10. Supervisor J. Emmet Hayden, chairman 
of the .\uditorium Committee, announces that the 
season seats for this group of five concerts is going 
exceptionally well. A number of block reservations have 
been made by musical societies. The city concerts will 
have as their guest artists during the season Mischa 
Elman. celebrated violinist, and other musicians of note. 
Seats are selling at from two to four dollars for the 
entire series of five concerts. 



THE ROMAN CHOIR BEING RAPIDLY BOOKED 

Frank W. Healy. who has completed all arrangements 
for bringing The Roman Choir, comprising the master 
singers of the Patriarchal Roman Basilicas and the Sis- 
tine Chapel of the Vatican to America this season, r.n- 
nounces that they will arrive in New York City on the 
steamer Giuseppe Verdi November 26th prepared to give 
their opening concert on Thanksgiving Day. Mr. Healy 
has received inquiries for concerts from hundreds of 
Havana. Cuba, the first five to be given in the National 
Theatre and others at the great Jai Alai Building, all 
under the patronage of His Lordship, Bishop Gonzales 
Estrada and the Catholic Association of Cuba, and under 
the management of the Tolon Theatrical Syndicate. 



Myra Palache 

PIANIST 

LECTURES ON MUSIC 
APPRECIATION 



20 nROOKSIDR. nEKKELBV 
Telephone Berkeley 40fil 

rancinco Addren>. :.',20 L nion $ 

Phone M nlnnt «3» 
>n Wedneadar, 13 p. m. to G p. ni 



ELWYN BUREAU TO PRESENT GREAT ARTISTS 

Suffuient guarantee that all artists announced for the 
1924-25 Elwyn Artist Series are only artists of the high- 
est standing is evidenced in the fact that all have been 
selected from the list of America's oldest and largest 
musical bureau: The Wolfsohn Musical Bureau of New 
York. This organization, famous in the annals of the 
world's concert fields, is ever in search of new talent, 
but engages only artists of the very highest artistic 
merit. 

The Elwyn Concert Bureau is now part of the Wolf- 
sohn Bureau and has priority booking rights on all the 
parent organizations attractions coming to the Pacific 
Coast. The Artist Series announced for the coming 
season will consist of eleven popular priced concerts, 
with the exception of two attractions all will be pre- 
sented in Scottish Rite Hall. The concerts of Jascha 
Heitetz. violinist, and Roland Hayes, phenomenal negro 
tenor, will be at the Casino Theatre. 

The following are those who will be heard at Scottish 
Rite. Moriz Rosenthal, pianist; Cecilia Hansen, violinist 
and peer of the Auer clan; Isa Kremer. young Russian 
singer of international folk songs; Maria Ivogun, 
Europe's greatest coloratura soprano; .Albert Spalding, 
foremost American violinist; Mabel Garrison, gifted and 
gracious soprano: The London String Quartet, unsur- 
passed chamber music ensemble Reinald Werrenrath. 
greatest concert baritone, and ilerle Alcock, leading 
contralto of the I\Ietropolitan Opera House. 

Arrangements have been made whereby subscribers 
may purchase season tickets covering the entire eleven 
attractions at a special reduced price. 



NEW SONGS FOR TEACHER AND SINGER 

It's a Mighty Good World O'Hara 

Golden Moon ....- Rolt 

Come to My Heart English 

Wood Fairies Wilfrid Jones 

Brown Bird Singing Wood 

Land of Might Have Been Novello 

Rose Marie of Normandy Del Rigo 

Spring Comes Laughing Carew 

Beauty Lohr 

Piper of Love Carewf 

Love's a Merchant Carew 

The Market Carew 

Among the Willows Phillips 

A Good Heart All the Way Clarke 

Dancing Time in Kerry Hampson 

Sweet Navarre Carne 

My Heart's Haven Phillips 

Love Pipes of June Day 

My Little Island Home Baden 

Ragged Vagabo nd Randolph 

CHAPPELL-HARMS, INC. 
185 Madison Avenue New York City 



WARFIELD THEATRE 

Following the current engagement of The Mine With 
the Iron Door at the Warfield Theatre comes the Frank 
Lloyd production of The Silent Watcher, this important 
production to open on Saturday. October 25th. 

It will be remembered that Frank Lloyd produced the 
Gertrude .\therton story. Black Oxen, and his Sea Hawk 
was recently seen in San Francisco. The Silent Watcher 
is a screen version of the Mary Roberts Rinehart story. 
The Altar on the Hill, and is said to be the best drama 
that Mr. Lloyd has given to the screen. The principal 
players are Glenn Hunter. Bessie Love, Hobart Bos- 
worth and .\lma Bennett. 

With The Silent Watcher will come the first anni- 
versary of the Fanchon and Marco Ideas at the Warfield. 
A novel and new type of entertainment, the Ideas have 
come to be recognized all over the country as the highest 
type of picture theatre entertainment. The anniversary 
week program will be the greatest in the history of the 
Warfield — eclipsing anything that has gone before and 
with a company that will number more than fifty people. 
There will be shorter film subjects and Gino Severi 
and the Music Masters. 



MRS. EDWARD SCHNEIDER DIES SUDDENLY 

The many friends of Edward Schneider, the well 
known pianist, composer and teacher, will be shocked 
to hear that his wife died suddenly during the last week 
in September. Without previous sickness she under- 
went what was believed to be a slight operation and 
afterward complications appeared which resulted in 
the well known and much beloved singer's untimely 
death. Mrs. Schneider was born in Denmark and under 
the name of Catherine .\dler became noted as a Lieder- 
singer of exceptional merit. Her tame became so widely 
known that Cosima Wagner became interested in her 
and no doubt her career would eventually have brought 
her international recognition, but she met Mr. Schneider 
when he studied in Germany and their marriage was 
the result of a romance. Mrs Schneider is remembered 
by our concert goers of fifteen or twenty years ago 



when she appeared in public with brilliant artistic re- 
sults and became one of the best known resident Cali- 
fornia artists. In recent years Mrs. Schneider devoted 
her time to teaching, being associated with Mills College 
for some time. The entire musical profession joins this 
paper in extending to Mr. Schneider their heartfelt 
sympathy. 

The San Francisco Music Teachers' Association will 
give a dinner in honor of Frank Carroll Giffen, presi- 
dent of the Music Teachers' Association of California, 
on Monday evening, October 27th, at the Hotel Whit- 
comb, This will be Mr. Gitfen's official visit to the San 
Francisco association in his capacity as State president. 
The following program will be presented: Soprano 
solo — (a) J'ai pleure en reve (Hue), (b) Lotus Isles 
(Beach), (c) Ariette (Vidal), Miss Helen Coburn Heath, 
soprano, Frank Walter Wenzel, accompanist; piano 
solos — (a) Jardins sou la pluie (Debussy), (b) Bird 
Song (Palmgren), (c) Klavierstueck op. 32 No. 6 (Bar- 
giel), (d) Jeu des ondes (Leschetitzky), (e) La Cam- 
panella (Liszt). 

The Chamber Music Society of San Francisco has re- 
turned from a tour to the Northwest, where they ap- 
peared in Seattle, Vancouver. B. C, and Portland under 
the direction of the Elwyn Concert Bureau They scored 
as usual a brilliant artistic success and particulars will 
appear later in this paper. 



Elwin A. Calberg 



Soloist and Accompanist 
Available Season 1924-1925 



Lo E W^S ^ WAR FIElD 

Week CommenC'ng Saturday, Oct. 25 



'THE SILENT WATCHER" 



Annlver.^iary of the 

FAXf'HO>' .VND M.4,RCO "IDEAS" 

(■«»nipany of 50 People 

SEVERI .VXD THE MUSIC M.VSTERS 



J. WHITCOMB NASH 




THE VOICE 




Special Normal Courses for Teachers 




700 Kohler & Chase Building, San Francisco 
Kearny 4991 


, Calif. 



STENGER VIOLINS 

Exemplify Intrinsic Excellence and Are 
Pre-eminently Superior 

A life's devotion of oninterrapted stndy and Inbor. 
invoivine the mastery of principles of musical 
acoustics, timber physics, and enfirlneering. hn» 
yielded the understandlnsr of those principles Trhieh 
exemplify the "Stenger Idea" in violin making, and 
mark, the beginnlne: of a new era in this noble art. 

W. C. STENGER 

INCORPORATED 

Maker of Fine Violins 
617-618 Steinway Hall, Chicago 



AUDREY BEER SOREL 

PIANIST — TEACHER 



ALFRED HURTGEN 

PIANIST. ACCOMPANIST, MUSICAI, DIRECTOR. 

COACH, PIANO INSTRUCTION 
Studio: 3-78 Union Street Tel. FtUmore 8240 



(1ot.)her24, 1024 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



CLARENCE EDDY AT MUNICIPAL ORGAN 

Supervisor J. Emmet Hayden. chairman of tlie Audito- 
rium Committee of the Board of Supervisors, yestei-day 
reported that Clarence Eddy, Dean of American organ- 
ists, will give a free Sunday afternoon recital November 
9 in Civic Auditorium. The recital will include a number 
by General Charles D. Dawes, who is a musician of 
ability. Eddy promises to give a popular program on the 
Exposition organ, having presided at its conr.ole for 
forty-nine or more concert recitals during the I'anama 
Pacific International Exposition. 



at the Fairmont Hotel in the Halln 
noon, November 8rd. 

A program entii 
Sunday is announ^ 
gatos by Louis 1' 

et's Agnus dci. l)r cic 



)ni on Monday after- 



Doris Osborne, formerly contralto of the Interdenomi- 
national Church of Berkeley, and a pupil of Homer Hen- 
ley, recently sang for Alme. Valeri in New York, with 
whom she is studying now. It is gratifying to read in a 
letter to her former teacher the following words of 
appreciation: "She {Jlme. Valeri) was most enthusi- 
astic over your method of production as she called it 
in studying my voice, and called in her husband to 
listen, and she said to me that she was so glad to know 
where to find you and that if she goes to Europe she is 
glad to know someone she could recommend her pupils 
to." 



ALMA GLUCK TO SING NEXT MONTH 

Alma Gluck. one of America's most popular sopranos, 
is coming, back and will be heard in San Francisco in 
a single recital in the Exposition Auditorium on Sunday 
afternoon. November 16th. This announcement ha.s al- 
ready brought floods of inquiries to Selby C. Oppen- 
heimer's office, .-\lnia Gluck's career has "been one of 
extraordinary interest. Its earlier periods were com- 
pletely occupied with hard work and ambitious striving; 
its later years to operatic and concert triumphs, and— 
motherhood The latter, which she considers the more 
important profession, kept her from the public view 
more than fifty per cent of the time during the past 
decade. ^ 

CLAIRE DUX TO RETURN 

San Francisco has never experienced a concert thrill 
more potent than that delivered by Claire Dux at the 
Curran Theatre last Sunday. Encore after encore re- 
warded the matchless art and irresistible charm of this 
favorite soprano; singing such as she exhibited has 
rarely fallen to the lot of a recital audience, and en- 
thusiasm such as she evoked, not alone from her hear- 
ers but from the critical reviewers of a united press 
has not often fallen to the lot of even the world's great 
artists. 

And now, Selby C. Oppenheimer announces that Claire 
Dux will return from the south for what will positively 
be her farewell appearance in San Francisco this 
season; she is to be the next feature attraction of the 
Alice Seckels .Matinee .Musicales series and will appear 



cnl from thai presented last 
vill include, with violin obli- 
-Mozarfs II re pastore and 
an lieder she will sing Schu- 
bert s Gretchen am Spinnrad, Schlummerlied, Auf dem 
Wasser zu singen and Muscnsohn. Henry Iladley's My 
True Love (from manuscript I. Kivals by Deems Taylor, 
and The Years at the Spring by Mrs. Beach are selected 
for the English group of the program, which concludes 
with three Puccini gems. O mio babbino caro from 
Gianni Schicchi. In quelle trine morbidc anri I.'nra o 
Tirsi, 

THE MUSICAL BLUE BOOK OF CALIFORNIA 

The Jlusical Blue Book of California is now off the 
presses and is being distributed. It contains four hun- 
dred pages of valuable information and includes about 
10,000 names of professional musicians, music club 
members and patrons of opera and symphony concerts. 
It is handsomely bound, printed and illustrated and is 
sold for $5 a copy. For the present the book may be 
obtained through the Musical Blue Book of California 
Office, SOI Kohler & Chase Building, and will be .sent 
postpaid upon receipt of price. The editor of the l'a-i<i<> 
Coast Musical Review is also the editor of the Blue 
Book, and M. L. Helpman, Jr., is the business manager, 
and he arranged the work for publication. There are a 
number of interesting articles concerning musical edu- 
cation, how to start a musical career, reviews of the 
past and impending music season, biographies of pro- 
fessional musicians and critics and invaluable informa- 
tion of numerous subjects appertaining to the musical 
life and conditions in California. It is a most needful 
reference for anyone directly or indirectly interested in 
music in California. Since the edition is necessarily 
limited to the number of books already ordered, with 
the addition of a number of extra copies for those who 
failed to order the book, it is natural that it will be 
advisable to order your book as soon as possible before 
the present supply is exhausted. 














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SCHMIT2' TEACHING RECOGNIZED INFLUENCE 

Following the lead of several other schools, the Mac- 
Phail School of Music in Minneapolis has incorporated 
into its curriculum for the post-graduate course, the 
piano technique, based on scientific law, of E. Robert 
Schmitz under the supervision of Mrs. Charles S. Hardy, 
authorized teacher of Mr, Schmitz. Forty weeks' study 
of these technical principles is obligatory to all pupils 
who wish to qualify as teachers. This goes to empha- 
size the value of Mr. Schmitz' work, and re-engagements 
for the Kansas and Missouri State Teachers' Convention 
testify to the musical intelligence and acumen of the 
schools which are bringing him back to learn his art of 
interpretation. 



THE DERU-CLEMENT SONATA RECITALS 

.Just before going to press we found that through some 
oversight the series of Sonata recitals given recently 
by Miss Ada Clement and Edouard Deru, the prominent 
pianist and violinist, respectively, at the San Francisco 
Conservatory of Music on Sacramento street, and at- 
tended by the editor of this paper, are not included in 
this number's reviews. They surely will appear In the 
next number as their artistic importance and the skill 
of their interpretation was too meritorious to be over- 
looked. 

Madam Dorothy Raegen Talbot, noted coloratura so- 
prano, who is now in Chicago doing concert work, has 
met with the most enthusiastic reception. Mme. Talbot 
will riiurn to her home in Berkeley some time next 



Mrs. William Steinbach 

VOICE CIILTIRE 

Studio: 

002 KOHLER * CHASE BLDG., 

San FrancLsco Phone Kearnj- ,',4.',4 

ACHILLE L. ARTIGUES 

Graduate of Srhola Cantorum, Parla. Or- 
Baniat St. .Mary's CathedraL Pinna De- 
partment, Haniliu Sohool. Orsan and 
Piano. ArrlHaga Musi cal Colleee 

KURT VON GRUDZINSKI 

BARITONE — VOICE CULTURE 

AolhorUed to Teach Mme. Schoen- 

Reno'a Method 

1S14 Leavemrorth St. Phone Prospect 9253 

EVA M. GARCIA 



PIERRE DOUILLET, PIANO 
NITALIA DOUILLET, VOICE 

•^ri Knhlrr * Chase Bid. Tel. Suiter T3S7 

DOMENICO BRESCIA 

VOICE SPECIALIST— COMPOSITION 

Stndloi 003-604 Kohler dt Chase Buildlne 

Phone Kearny ry4r,4 

Madame Charles Poulter— Soprano 

Voice Culture. Piano 

Residence Studio, .WK 27th Street 

Oakland — TeL Oakland 207n 

Mary Coonan McCrea 

TEACHER OF SINGING 
Studio: 36 Gaflfney BulldInK, 370 Sutter S| 
Tel. Dogglas 4233. Re s. Tel. Kearny 2340 

MRS. A. F. BRIDGE 

TE.VCHER OP SINGING 
"tudloi l»20 Scott St. Phnne Fillmore ir.«l 

HELEN COLBURN HEATH 

nple Eninnu El. Con- 



HENRIK GJERDRUM 



Laura Wertheimber 

Preparatory Teacher for 

Mrs. Noah Brandt 

2211 Scott St. Telephone Klllmore 1522 

Evelyn Sresovich Ware 

Pianist and Accompanist 

Studio: 1003 Kohler <«: Chase llulldine 

IMlonc Gurll.ld (i72a 

Joseph George Jacobson 



ROSE RELDA CAILLEAU 

Opera Comlqne, Paris 

Studio: 3107 n nshlnglon Street 

Phone Fillmore 1S47 

SIGMUND BEEL 

Master ( las.nrs for Violin 

Studio llullillnc. 1.173 Post Street 

Tel. W.ilnut 01 

MARY ALVERTA MORSE 

SOPRANO 
Teacher of SlnicInK! Studio. Tuesday and 
Friday, Kohler & Chase Bids,, S. F.; Resi- 
dence Studio. 10« Santa Kosa Ate., Oak- 
land. I'hone Humboldt 101. 

SAN FRANCISCO CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 



ISABEI.I.1: MAUKH 

CONTRALTO 

i;t3.S 2flth Avenue Phone Sunset 2005 

\oice Culture, Mondays P. M. .'Ill; Kohler 

.V t hase Bid;;. Tel. Garlleld 4 172 

Joseph Greven 

Voice Culture; — Opera, Oratorio 
Concert and Church Singing in all 
languages. 

MRS. J. GREVEN 

Piano and Harmony 

3741 Sacramento St. Tel. Bayview 5278 

TEACHERS' DIRECTORY 



MACKENZIE GORDON 
8832 Jackson Street Phone West 46 



ANTOINE DE VALLY 
2201 Scott St, Phone We«l IXl 



MME. M. TROMBONI 
601-2 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Kearny 64S< 



JACK EDWARD HILLMAN 
601 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Kearny 6464 



ADELE ULMAN 
178 Commonwealth Ave. Phone Pae. 33 



MRS. CARROLL NICHOLSON 



Brandt's Conservatory of Music 

2;:n Scolt street. Bet. Clay .V: Washington 
Mr. Noah Brandt, Violin 
Mrs. Noah Brandt. Piano 

ALMA SCHMIDT-KENNEDY 



Phone Berkeley OIHIII 

MRS. ZAY RECTOR BEVITT 

PIANO and HARMONY 

Institute of Music of San Francisco. 
Knhler & Chase Blrte. Tel. Kp.-irny .';4.'i4 



Dorothy Goodsell Camm MARION RAMON WILSON 



COLORATI:r.\ SOPRANO 

Teacher of Bel Canto. Tel. Bayvlen 3S3n 

or Piedmont 1330. By .4ppolntnieul Only. 



nranintic Contralto. Opera Succt-sses In 

Kuropc. Concert Successes in the lulled 

States. Address: IS2.1 Leavenworth Street. 

Telephone Franklin 3501. 



MISS EDITH CAUBU 
S7fi Sutter Street Phone DouKlas 26» 

JANET ROWAN HALE 
Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 5454 

J. B. ATWOOD 

2111 Channing Way Berkeley, Cal 

MISS LORRAINE EWING 
833 Ashbury St. Phone Park 197< 

RUTH VIOLA DAVIS 
515 Buena Vista Avenue — Park 34i 

LOUIS FELIX RAYNAUD 

1841 Fulton St. Tel. Bayview enoo 

ELSIE COOK HUGHES LARAIA 
3325 Octavia St. Phone Fllmore 6102 

There is no way to obtain concert en- 
gagement.s unless a name is sufliciently 
known. There is no other way to make 
a name known except through publicity. 
Consequently. If you do not advertise you 
can not possibly secure steady engage- 
ments. 



JULIUS HAUQ 
4032 Irving St. Tel. Sunset 436 

MOTHER WISMER 
3701 Clay Street Phone Bayview 7780 

ARTHUR CONRAOI 
906 Knhler & Chaae Bldg Tel Kearny 641 

G. JOLLAIN 
376 Sutter St. Tel. Kearny 2637 

AI I OMPAMSTS 

ANNA W. McCORMICK 
1380 Taylor St. Tel. Proi. 9887 

JEANNETTE BRANDENSTEIN 
1916 Octavia Street Tel. Fillmore 433 

ARRANtiKR OK MISIC 

C. B. FRANK 
400 Pantages Bldg. Tel. Garfield 1334 

If a music journal is worth while to 
publish programs and views of musical 
events. It is worth while to patronize. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



October 24, 1924 



ADVANCED COACHING 

THE ART OF INTERPRETATION— SOLFEGE 

NORMAL COURSES 

STlDlOSs 

701 KOHLER & CHASE Bl ILDIXG, SAN FRANCISCO 

2S1SH ETXA STREET. BERKELEY 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAX FRAXCISCO BAXK) 

SAVINGS COMMSRCIAI. 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 

the Assets of which have never been increased 

by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member .\ssoclated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1924 

Assets $93,198,226.96 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funtls 3,900,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 446,024.41 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 2Ist Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haipht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE QUARTER {4}i) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



NOW PUBLISHED 

(§f (Caltfornta 
FIVE DOLLARS POSTPAID 

ANYWHERE IN THE UNITED STATES 



Address: MUSICAL BLUE BOOK OF CALIFORNIA 

801 Kohler & Chase Building 

26 O'Farrell Street, San Francisco, California 



L. A. SYMPHONY CONCERT 

(Continued from Page 1. Col. 4] 
AssociatioD were acclaimed by Los An- 
geles audiences, will sing the first o£ her 
two arias the beautiful Hymn to the Sun. 
sung by the Queen of Shemakha in the 
second act of the last of the gifted Rim- 
sky-Korsako£fs fifteen operas, Le Coque 
d' Or. 

The Symphonic poem. La Procession 
Xocturne. by Henri Rabaud, the next 
selection on the program, is being heard 
for the first time in Los Angeles and will 
provide a welcome opportunity to ap- 
praise the talent ot this French composer. 
who will be remembered for having been 
conductor of the Boston Symphony Or- 
chestra during the season of 191819. 
Mme. Sabanieva's second selection is An- 
tonieda's Aria, from one of the outstand- 
ing moments in the opera \ Life for the 
Tsar by the Russian composer Michael 
Ivanovich Glinka Weber's overture to 
Der Freischutz. which closes the concert. 
appeals because ot its melodies and also 
because of the romantic dramatic atmos- 
phere of the work. 



of age, she seems to have obtained a 
correct view ot lite and the verses are 
technically correct as to meter and grace 
in literary conception. The book is dedi- 
cated to Mme. Cailleau. the mother ot the 
author, and a friend, F. E. B., one ot Miss 
Cailleau's school girl friends. It is tor 
sale at the White House and the City ot 
Paris. 



CHARMING COLLECTION OF VERSE 

Miss P.elda .M. Cailleau. the clever 
young pianist and daughter of .Mme. Rose 
Relda Cailleau. has recently published a 
book of verses entitled The Public 
Square and Other Short Verse, which is 
one of the most delightful contributions 
to poetic literature we have come across. 
Every poem transmits a message and 
contains a remarkably correct philosophy 
ot life. The poems are written with a cer- 
tain individuality ot style that makes 
them very appealing in sentiment. Al- 
though Miss Cailleau is only fifteen years 



CLAIRE DUX BUSY IN CALIFORNIA 

Mme. Claire Dux is exceptionally busy 
during her sojourn in California. On 
October 24 she will sing in Fresno, on 
October 2.5 she will appear in San Diego, 
on October 29 she will be in Hollywood, 
on October 30 she will be in Sacramento, 
on October 31 she is announced tor Pied- 
mont, on .November 3 she will sing at the 
Alice Seckels Music Matinee in San Fran- 
cisco, and on .November 6 she will give a 
concert in Berkeley. Prior to her appear- 
ance in San Francisco last Sunday, Mme. 
Dux sang in Tacoma, Spokane, Aberdeen. 
Portland and Salt Lake City, Wherever 
she appeared she made an instantaneous 
impression and the enthusiasm of her 
audiences was overwhelming. However, 
she considered her San Francisco audi- 
ence specially responsive and musically 
discriminating and felt immediately 
drawn toward the same. No doubt her 
appearance next Monday will bring her 
another enthusiastic ovation. 



Eleanor Rathke; talented pupil of Mrs, H. 
I. Krick, played four piano solos and a 
duet, the Overture to Zampa, with Mrs. 
Krick, last Wednesday evening, October 
8, from KLX, the Tribune Broadcasting 
Station. She delighted listeners-in with 
her excellent playing. Her selections 
were from Kreisler. Godard, Newlands 
Karganoff and Herold. 



HERE! 



Playing Privately at 
KNABE STUDIOS 
Kohler & Chase Bldg. 



UNDER DIRECTION OF LEONARD DAVIS 



Nyiregyhazi 

(Near-e-gatz-e) 

THE GREAT WORLD PIANIST 

"MOST SENSATIONAL HUNGARIAN MASTER 
ARTIST OF ALL TIME" 



Nyiregyhazi, pianjstic genius, is to- 
day the strange figure of the musi- 
cal world. Tall, thin almost to the 
point of emaciation and with long, 
tapering hands, he has much the 
same weird atmosphere that marked 
Paganini. With an air of utter, 
weary indifference to all external 
influences, he seems almost to have 
reached the impassive calm of the 
Oriental. Yet this Hungarian youth, 
for he is hardly more than a boy, 
flames into an instant, electric vital- 
ity once he sits before the key- 
board. 



Brilliant runs, thunderous bass and 
crashing chords alternate with 
lyric, melodious passages, marked 
throughout with an Individuality of 
interpretation that distinguishes 
him as a pianist of keen Intelli- 
gence as well as passion. It is as if 
his entire mental and physical re- 
sources were held in reserve until 
he plays. Then it Is that he seems 
to pour forth his whole soul in his 
music. 



"The Coming Pianist 
of The World" 

—Says Tita Ruffo. 

What the Press says of Nyiregyhazi: 

Nyiregyhazi played here tor the first time. He is in his nineteenth year. The 
ringmaster used to say of the dashing equestrienne in the circus; "She rides 
well for one so young." This compliment is often paid a young pianist, but 
with this addition: "When he is older, he will play with greater thoughttul- 
ness," or his performance is said to be not yet "mature." Youth is not an 
atrocious crime. Better the dash and enthusiasm ot the young than the 
apathy of middle age, or the coolness pt academic reserve. 

— Philip Hale in the Boston Herald. 

Genius is wisdom and youth. This is said by Edgar Lee Masters, and it was 
proved again at the concert given by the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Pierre 
Monteux, conductor, yesterday afternoon in Symphony Hall. On that occa- 
sion the eighteen-year-old Hungarian pianist, Erwin Nyiregyhazi, made his 
Boston debut. He played Liszt's A Major Concerto like a poet and a whirl- 
wind. He was very much ot a, surprise, tor this concerto is not child's play, 
and those who looked tor the first time on a young man, mostly arms and 
legs, with fingers so long that they made his sleeves seem too short and 
gave the effect ot two tans when he spread his hands over the keyboard— 
those who looked on this shook their heads, and wondered where in the 
world he was going to get the tone to compete with Liszt's extremely bril- 
liant and frequently heavy and noisy orchestration. 

— Olin Downgs in the Boston Post 
His long arms have enormous power. He goes crashing and smashing 
through a concerto in a way to astound one. His brilliancy is enormous. 

— Excerpt from the Boston American. 



HERE! 



Knabe Piano Used 



Hear him play Tuesdays and 
Thursdays (afternoon and 
evening) at Knabe Studios 



Static fa^i 




THE OLDEST MUSICAL JOURNAL IN THE GREAT WEST 



VOL. XLVII. No. 4 



SAN FRANCISCO. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1924 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



SUBSCRIPTION CAMPAIGN WARMLY RECEIVED INAUGURATION OF CHAMBER MUSIC SEASON 



Homer Henley Asks Pupils to Subscribe for Musical Review— Vivian 
Sengler Endorses Music Journal Independent of Advertising— Many 
Pedagogues Assure Editor of Their Support— Subscription Cam- 
paign Is to Give Profession a Fearless and InfluentialDefender 

By ALFRED METZGER 



Scottish Rite Auditorium Crowded With Music Lovers Who Express Their 

Enthusiasm by Exceptional Demonstrations-Jacobi Quartet Ingenious 

and Effective— Delightful Interpretation of Mozart Work— Tanieff 

Composition Given a Spirited and Thrilling Performance 

BY ALFRED METZGER 



The Pacific Coast Musical Review's 
campaign for a sufBciently large subscrip- 
tion list to make the paper independent 
of advertising patronage is gaining 
ground in the Bay region. A number of 
the mrst prominent pedagogues and pro- 
fessional musicians have pledged their 
support to this movement and are await- 
ing further announcements to induce 
their pupils to enlist. Recently there 
have been so many efforts made to 
IMPORT talent and teachers and so little 
effort to encouraee and support those of 
us who are already here, that the Pacific 
Coast Musical Review, with the assist- 
ance of every worthwhile member of the 
profession, music student and music 
lover intends to put a stop to a move- 
ment that takes the bread out of the 
mouth of worthy musicians resident in 
California. We are sick and tired and 
disgusted with this business of sneering 
at our own people who seem to be good 
enough to donate their services and pay 
large fees, but not good enough to be 
considered worthy of recognition and 
adequate reward for service. THIS 
BUSINESS MUST STOP, AND WE CAN 
STOP IT. 

When the Pacific Coast Musical Review 
is ready to start its fight to the finish in 
behalf of the profession the musical pub- 
lic and the music students it may an- 
tagonize certain elements to the extent 
of losing a percentage of its advertising 
patronage. Therefore it will be neces- 
sary to enlarge the subscription list to 
an extent where the paper dos not need 
to depend entirely upon its advertising 
pages. We are ready to take up the 
cudgels in behalf of resident artists, 
teachers, composers and organizations of 
educational impcrtance. Of course they 
must be efficient. There are enough of 
these here to be regarded with respect. 
Now. when we start a fight we want to 
finish it with flying colors. This fight 
is going to be the biggest in the career 
of the paper and we need the support of 
the united profession and pupils. We 
can not start it unless we are sure of 
this. 

Have the teachers and students suf- 
ficient pride and interest in their work 
to help us win their fight against preju- 
dice and inexcusable ignoring of their ex- 
istence and their efforts? If so they can 
help us begin by registering their names 
so that we can appoint a committee of 
leading musicians to whom we shall ex- 
plain our plan. It will readily be seen 
that it can not possibly be a commercial 
proposition. For unless a journal is able 
to secure advertising to an extent where 
it requires taxation of the profession 
beyond any possible chance of return to 
the advertiser, either in funds or service, 
a publisher of a musical journal can not 
get rich. But a sufiiciently large sub- 
scription with a paper of limited size will 
enable us to make a living such as any- 
one who does his work is entitled to. 

The price of the Pacific Coast Musical 
Review is only less than six cents a week 
—less than ONE CENT a day. You 
artists, teachers, members of music 
faculties, ambitious pupils, faithful con- 
cert and opera goers — is it worth while 
to help establish a music journal that is 
published in your interests, that fights 
your battles, that tells you the TRUTH 
without fear or favor and that HELPS 
YOU BUILD UP YOUR PROFESSION, 
DFMANDS RECOGNITION FOR YOU, 
HELPS YOU START A CAREER and 
KEEPS OUT GREEDY PARASITES 
WHO HYPNOTIZE YOU INTO SPEND- 
ING YOUR HARD EARNED MONEY? 
Is it worth a cent a day? If so you need 
not be afraid to advise your pupils or 
friends to participate in a subscription 



campaign that will pay them returns in 
valuable prizes, including musical instru- 
ments concert tickets and scholarships. 
Unless this message we have is dis- 
tributed among thousands of people in 
and about San F'l-ancisco as well as 
throughout the State we can not win your 
fight for you. The Music Teachers' As- 
sociation, the California Federation of 
Music Clubs and every music school 
choral society and, indeed, everybody in- 
terested in music will benefit from this 



The Chamber Music Society gave the 
opening concert of its eighth season at 
the Scottish Rite Auditorium on Tuesday 
evening, October 2Sth, before an audi- 
ence that crowded the big hall to its ca- 
pacity. The enthusiasm revealed the pop- 
ularity of this organization with the finest 
element of our concert goers. The wel- 
come accorded Messrs. Louis Persinger, 
Louis Ford, Nathan Firestone and Wal- 
ter Ferner proved that the audience was 
happy to welcome this organization back 




ALFRED HERTZ 

The Distinguished Conductor of the San Francisco Symphony, Who 

Begins a Greater and More Artistic Season Than Ever. 



fight to secure respect and esteem for 
the worth-while artists and teachers re- 
siding among us. Since the other side 
is making propaganda to take the bread 
and butter out of the mouths of resident 
artists and teachers, our side must work 
and fight to make this State a better 
place to live and work in for the mem- 
bers of the profession. If we do not 
begin and finish our fight RIGHT NOW 
it may be too late. 

Homer Henley, who evidently is in 
sympathy with the writer, has posted up 
the following notice on the walls of his 
studio: 

"Every pupil in the Henley studios is 
most earnestly urged to subscribe at 
once for the Pacific Coast Musical Re- 
view. Mr. Alfred Metzger, the editor, and 
a personal friend of long standing to Mr. 
Henley, has, in the latter's opinion, been 
a musical force in San Francisco second 
to no other person or organization. His 
work has been a labor of loving service 
absolutely free from the tinge of selfish- 
ness in regard to self-seeking or any 
(Continued on Page 7. Col. 1 i 



in its fold and the increasing demonstra- 
tions throughout the evening proved that 
the result of the summer rehearsals was 
thoroughly in accord with the highest 
artistic principles. The opening number 
of the program was the Mozart Quartet 
in F major (Koechel No. 590). and the 
finished manner in which this work was 
presented convinced every serious music 
lover that the members of the Chamber 
Music Society continue to represent the 
very finest ellort of expression in musical 
art to be heard in this community. 

Like all organizations of artistic merit 
the Chamber Music Society, no matter 
how well it may have sustained its repu- 
tation during a preceding season, never 
fails to exhibit surprising Improvement 
during the subsequent season, and al- 
though we already held a high opinion of 
this delightful quartet last year, this 
most recent event raised the organization 
even more in our estimation. We can 
not imagine a more satisfying and enjoy- 
able interpretation of a Mozart Quartet 
than the one we listened to last Tues- 
day evening. Balance of tone, blending 



of expression, accuracy as to intonation, 
and uniformity of rhythm combined to 
impress us with the musicianship and 
artistic refinement of these four musi- 
cians. 

The feature of the program was the 
first performance of Frederick Jacobi's 
Quartet, dedicated to the Chamber 
Music Society. Mr. .lacobl possesses 
above all a very ingenious knack of ar- 
ranging for quartet. He has selected his 
themes in a manner to emphasize the 
emotional value of Indian music. Prim- 
itive emotions can not be changed with- 
out lessening their "punch." and Mr 
Jacobi very wisely adhered to the themes 
of these Indian melodies without chang- 
ing their fundamental purpose. It Is 
difiicult for anyone but an Indian to 
grasp the significance of this music, but 
if it is possible at all to do so Mr. Jacobi 
has succeeded in impressing us with 
whatever musical value it may possess. 
However, the most valuable contribution 
of Mr. Jacobi to musical literature Is his 
skill in bringing out the elementary 
sentiments of these Indian strains with- 
out encroaching upon their primitiveness 
and still obtaining an effect In arrange- 
ment which is theoretically clever and 
enjoyable. The arrangement of this 
quartet is exceptionally original and ef- 
fective. The rhythmic vitality can not 
help but arouse sympathy In any Intel- 
ligent listener. There is enough melody 
to create continuity of expression and 
the barbarian character of the music Is 
not lost, even though the refinement of 
harmonic arrangement has been applied. 
The work was Indeed worthy of the cor- 
dial reception it received and Mr. Jaco- 
bi's personal triumph was Indeed well 
merited. 

The concluding number consisted of 
Taneieffs Quartet in C major op. ,^i. a 
composition of exceptional vigor and 
Slavic Intensity. The constant demand 
for force and impetuosity becomes at 
times somewhat monotonous, as one 
would like to hear an occsional respite 
from fervor and unchanging passionate 
surrender, but. in the main, the work 
shows Individuality and character and 
the members of the Chamber Music So- 
ciety proved themselves thoroughly com- 
petent to cope with the technical and 
musical difficulties associated with the 
interpretation of this work. It formed 
a most worthy climax to an exceptionally 
gratifying and craftsnianllko artistic 
performance. 

Ellas M. Hecht is entitled to repeated 
acknowledgment of gratitude for making 
the continuous Chamber Music seasons 
possible. In a community where those 
most able to contribute to the culture of 
the citizens are not always able to se- 
lect the musical activities most likely to 
create such refinement a patron like Mr. 
Hecht must be hailed with special enlhu- 
slsm. The Chamber Music season this 
year has begun most auspiciously and we 
feel inclined to predict that It will con- 
tinue to be universally appreciated and 
supported throughout the present series. 



Mr. Ybarra, the skillful young Spanish 
tenor, pupil of Mrs. Pearl Hossack Whlt- 
comb, who created an excellent impres- 
sion at the Tea recently given by the 
San Francisco Musical Club, continues to 
score artistic successes at various public 
and private functions. 

Harriet Murton, a successful young color- 
ature soprano, pupil of Mrs. Pearl Hos- 
sack Whltcomb, has been engaged to 
sing In a concert with Kajetan AttI under 
the direction of J'^sslca Colbert this 
season. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



October 31, 1924 



The years bear witness 



7 

i^ii a position of honor, standing aniong the 
famous portrait paintings of grtat musicians in 
Steinway Hall, in lower New York, you will find 
it today. It is the piano that Henry Steinway, 
seventy years ago, built as a labor of love. He 
built it as a present to his bride. 
Now I, who am also a Steinway piano, stand 
among the other Steinway pianos at Sherman, 
Clay i- Co.. here on the western coast. The years 
that lie between me and that original Steinway 
piano have seen many changes. But two changes 
they have not seen. They have not seen Steinway 
pianos made in any other spirit than a spirit of 
love; and they have not seen them under any 
other supervision than Steinway supervision. 
When I left the Steinway factory on Long Island 
and began my long journey to the Coast I had been 
six years in the seasoning and making. The control 
and management of the business was in the hands 
of the third and fourth generations of the house- 
hold of Steinwav. Eight members of the Steinway 
family had directed my evolution from the raw 
wood, steel and glue into the completed piano. 
Nearly all the skilled workmen in those great 
shops had been in those shops for many years. I 
was wood and steel and glue until they shaped me. 
Now, I am as much of the spirit of Steinway as the 
first piano Henry Steinway built. 
What does this mean in my oivn career as a Stein- 
way piano? 

It means that I have been built with an individual 
interest, a conscientiousness, a deep determination 
that I should be worthy of my name. 
It means that the mountain spruce of my sounding- 
board, for example, is the finest procurable. After 
careful inspection and purchase it was dried for 
six months at the sawmill, then dried for another 
vear in the Steinway yards, then seasoned for two 
or three years in special sheds, then kiln-dried and 
re-dried in strip and board---in all, a seasoning and 
drying process of five full years. 
It means that, following the seasoning of this and 



The story that is told by the Steinway 






lere at Sher- 
mpanionship 







possess me as long as materials shall cling together. 
So after six years of such patient fashioning, I left 
the Long Island factory and came West. I was 
unloaded from my long cruise and carefully gone 
over in the Sherman, Clay & Co. shops. And now 
I stand on the floor at Sherman, Clay & Co. among 
other pianos, waiting for the purchaser who shall 
come to claim me. 
Sometimes I talk over the old days 
home with the other Steinway piano 
man, Clay & Co. We miss the cheery 
of the old square grand, with its rosewood case— 
the piano that Henry Steinway built. It used to 
preside over us like a proud little old great-grand- 
mother. But usually we discuss the future. We 
discuss the homes that each of us, in the days to 
come, will be carried away to like brides. 
Some of us are eager to preside over great man- 
sions, with servants to dust us off, and drawing 
rooms to inhabit. Some of us are ambitious to 
have careers on the concert stage. But I have a 
different ambition. 

I want to be the piano near the fireside, where a 
modest family gathers about me and plays familiar 



my other wood, nine months were spent shaping 
and fashioning me in the factory. In that one gen- 
eral factory every part of me was made, including 
plate, rim, hammers, brass castings, action, and all 
special hardware. Nothing was let out on contract. 
Nothing was left to outside influence. 
It means that I am, in fact, a Steinway piano-— 
that my charm will endure for years to come, that 
my resonance will last, that my full, rich, singing 
tone and responsive action will delight those who 



melodies. I w 


nt 


to 


be 


the 


compa 


nion 


, from the 


very first, to li 


ttle 


cf 


ildr 


en a 


s they 


lea 


rn to touch 


my keys. I wa 


nt 


to 


be the d 


screet- 


-a 


id the or 


ly 


—third person 


pr 


ese 


nt betwe 


en lovers. 


I want 


to 


spend my days 




a 


litt 


e ha 


ppy home 


Surely, 


it 


6ome famiiv kn 


ew 


h 


3W 


=ager 


I am 


to 


make th 


ir 


love for me \ 




thi 


»hil 


, th 


ev wo 


dd 


come a 


nd 


claim me witho 


ut 


de 


ay. 


Doe 


sn't sor 


ne 


ouple w 


th 


a modest home 


a 


nd 


pu 


se \ 


pant to 


come in a 


nd 


discover how i 




n 


:lair 


n its 


SteinvN 


ay 


piano? 





Sherman liiay & Go. 

Kearny and Sutter Sts., San Francisco 
CALIFORNIA-OREGON- WASHINGTON 



RENA 

LAZELLE 

SOPRANO 
San Francisco Opera Company 

Head of Voe»I Depn 
atorr of Mualc — J 



EMILIE LANCEL 

OPERATIC MEZZO-SOPRANO 

After Two Years' Absence in Europe 

Available For 
OPERA— ORATORIO— CONCERT 

Management ALICE SECKELS 

63 Post Street 

Residence: 433 Eighteenth Avenue, San Francisco 

Tel. Bayview 1461 



ANNIE LOUISE DAVID 

HARP SOLOIST AND TEACHER 

ON THE PACIFIC COAST DURING 
SEASON 1924-1925 

Address: Hotel Claremont, Berkeley 
Tel. Berkeley 9300 

Management Alice Seckels, 68 Post Street 
Tel. Douglas 7267 



KARL RACKLE 

1330 PINE STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 
Telephone Graystone 1925 



ALICE GENTLE 

MAN.4GEMENT 

CATHARINE A. BAMMAN 
S3 West 39th Street New York, N. Y. 



DOUGLAS SOULE-Pianist 

ADVANOED PUPILS ACCEPTED 

WednesdaT and Pridnf Mornlnsfi at Studio: 002 

Kobier * ChaHe BIdg., San FranolKCo. Telephone 

Kearnr 5454. Re.sldence Studio: l.')0 Monte Viuta 

Ave.. Oalsland. Telephone Piedmont TOO. 



WALLACE A. SABIN 

Orsanlitt Temple Emann El. First Chureh of Christ Scl- 
entlat. Director Loring Club. S. F., M'ed., 1915 Sacramento 
Street. Phone \Ve8t 3753 ; Sat., FIral Christian Science 
Church. Phone Franklin 1307; Res. Studio, 3142 Lentston 
Ave., BerkelcT. Phone Piedmont 242S 

MISS DOROTHEA MANSFELDT 

PreparlnK Teacher for 

MRS. OSCAR MANSFELDT, Pianist 

207 Cherry St., Bet. Washington A Clay Tel. Pae. 930« 

The College of the Holy Names 

LAKE BIERRITT, OAlvLAND 

•atory Course — Piano. Marp. Violin, 
Counterpoint. Harmony. History 

DURINI VOCAL STUDIO 

DIRECTION OP MME. LILLIAN SLINKEY Dl'RINI 

Italian Method — Voice Placement — Breathlns 

Opera — Church — Oratorio 

1072 Ellia St. TeL Weat SOS 



AUGUSTA HAYDEN 



PASMORE TRIO 



Mary, Violin — Su» 



Piano — Dorothy, Cello 



CONCERTS — PUPILS 



2000 Green St. 



TeL Fillmore 9071 



SOPRANO 
aiiable for Concerts and Re 
Address: 471 37th Avenue 
Tcl. Pno. «a2 



HOMER HENLEY 

BARITONE — TEACHER OK SINGING — CONDUCTOR 

Director Cnlirornia Club Choral 

An Oratorio Authority 

Residence Studio: 1249 Bay. a t Pranhlln. Tel. FIIL lOSS 

LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM 

CONTRALTO 
Teacher of Singing. Complete Course of Operatic Train- 
ing. 2730 Pierce SI. Tel. Fillmore 45.'i3 

Dominican College School of Music 

SAN RAFAEL. CALIFORNIA 
Music Courses Thorough and Progressive. Public School 



Miss Elizabeth Westgate 

Teacher of Piano. Organ. Harmony. Organist and Musical 
Director of First Presbyterian Church. Alameda. Home 
Studio: 1117 P.\RU STREET. AL.\MEDA. Telephone Ala- 
meda 155. Thursdays, Merrlman School, 507 Eldorado Ave.< 
Oakland. Telephone Piedmont 2770. 



MUSIC PRINTING? 

SCHOLZ, ERICKSON & CO., Inc. 
521 Howard Street Phone Douglas 4273 



PASMORE VOCAL STUDIOS 

Suite 606. Kofaler A Chaae Blder<. San FrancUco 

ttSO CoUese Ave., Berkeley. R«aldence. 201 Alvarado 

Road. Berkeley 



MR. ANDREW BOGART 
Teacher of Singing 

Pupils Prepared for Opera, Oratorio, Church and 
Concert. New Address: Suite 600, Kohler & Chase 
BIdg., 26 O'Farrell Street. Telephone Douglas 9256 



Manning School of Music 

JOHN C. MANNINO, Director 
Sa42 Washington Street Telephone Pillmore 391 

PEARL HOSSACK WHITCOMB 

DRAMATIC SOPRAXO 

AbHOlnte Method of Voice Upon the Breath 

niondar and Thnrsdny. 10O5 Kohler «& Chaae Bnlldlns. 

Tel. Garfield 6728. Rea. Phone Prospect -i2A 



October 31, 1924 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



^fir (Sidm Hn^iral ^^Md 



THE GREAT WEST 



WIISICAI, IIKXIKW COMPANY 

Snile NOI. Kohirr A ('hiiF.i- lllilic.. :« OTBrrrll St., 

San Franel.co. Calif. Tel. C.arneld B250-5251 



ALFRED METZGER 



Editor 



Make all ehecka, drafln, money orderM or ulher 
reinlttanee payable to 
PACII--IC COAST KIUSICAI. UEVIKW 



UaklaDd-llerkeley-Alameda olDee 1117 
Tel. AInnirda 155 
Mlaa Kll/abelh WeaCKnIe In Charce 



St., Alamada 



l.oa An^elea Office 
Seenlc .\venue. Iliillynood, Cnllfarnla 
Uruno Uavld UM.-«ller In Charge 



VOL. XLVII FRIDAY, OCT. 31, 1924 






at H. P. Poatomce. 



SUBSCRIPTIONS 
Annually In Advance, IncludlnK PoatnKet 

United Statea «3.00 

Foreign Countrlea ., 4,00 



TWENTY-FOURTH YEAR 



MUSICAL BLUE BOOK CORDIALLY RECEIVED 

Music Editors of Call, Chronicle and Examiner Express 

Themselves Pleased With First Publication of Its 

Kind, Regarding It as a Valuable Work 



The editor of the Musical Review is deeply appre- 
ciative and grateful to Ray C. B. Brown, Redtern 
Mason and Charles Woodman, music editors of the San 
Francisco Chronicle. Examiner and Call, respectively, 
for their cordial reception of the debut of the Musical 
Blue Book of California. The work has been compiled 
and arranged during the last two years. Its publication 
has been associated with a great deal of worry and an- 
noyances, including some very hard work. Commer- 
cially the publisher and editor is unable to receive any 
advantage from this first or pioneer effort We felt 
that the musical profession and musical public needed 
such a work and we made up our mind to get it out. 
Notwithstanding innumerable difficulties we stuck to the 
ship and did not rest until the work was off the presses. 

However, we could not have accomplished this task 
alone. Had it not been for the co-operation of M. L. 
Helpman, the business manager and arranger of the 
book, the work would most likely have never been pub- 
lished and the editor would have had to sustain a very 
heavy loss. We feel that Mr. Helpman is entitled to the 
credit of finally bringing the book before the public. 
We certainly appreciate the kindly thoughts of our col- 
leagues and consider their friendly and encouraging at- 
titude as ample reward for any work or trouble we may 
have had in connection with the publication of this 
book. 

Everyone interested in musical affairs will find the 
Musical Blue Book of California a valuable reference 
work, for it endeavors to include every important 
musical activity in the State. However, the critics tell 
the story even better than we could: 
Ray C. B. Brown, S. F. Chronicle, October 26 — Now Cali- 
fornia has its Musical Blue Book. 

Thanks to Alfred Metzger, editor of the Pacific Coast 
Musical Review, California has its Musical Blue Book at 
last. Rapidly as music has developed in the State during 
the last two decades, there has been no reference 
volume available for concise information as to musi- 
cians and their activities. The new Blue Book, just off 
the press, represents the first attempt to assemble data 
of this kind. Like all pioneer undertakings, it has its 
shortcomings, but they are not due to lack of editorial 
zeal. "We did not realize the magnitude of our task 
until we began to accumulate the information we re- 
quired," states the editor in his introduction. "A great 
portion of such information had to be obtained from 
members of the profession and here we ran up against 
the greatest obstacle. We addressed thousands of 
musicians, sent them return postal cards and told them 
that this registration did not cost them anything. Not- 
withstanding our efforts, we could not get every one we 
wanted to respond This failure to co-operate does not 
enable us to publish as complete, all-inclusive and ac- 
curate a work as we had planned. But we have a cer- 
tain aim in mind and we intend to attain it." 

Whatever the omissions mav be in this first issue, 
Alfred Metzger is to be complimented on what he has 
accomplished and commended for the ideal that he has 
in mind. Everyone who has made an effort to obtain 
information about organizations and individuals con- 
nected with music knows the difficulties encountered. 
The Blue Book goes far, and will go farther, in remed.v- 
ing this condition. Approximately 10,000 names and 
addresses of professional musicians and members of 
musical organizations are listed. This has been done 
very thoroughly when exact data were available. For 
examr>le, the complete membership is given of the 
American Federation of Musicians, San Francisco and 
Los Angeles locals, with the names cross-indexed in ref- 
erence to instruments. The directory section also con- 
tains lists of resident artists, music teachers and music 
dealers. 



In the section devoted to organizations are found mem- 
bership lists of the Berkeley Piano Club, the Berkeley 
Violin Club, the choral section of the California Club, 
the San Francisco Musical Club, the Lorlng Club, the 
San Francisco Opera Association, the California Fed- 
eration of Music Clubs, the California Music Teachers' 
Association, the Pacific Musical Society, the -Musicians' 
Club, the Saturday Club of Sacramento, the Kuterpe 
Club of the same city, and many organizations in other 
parts of the State. There are articles by the editor on 
Who Is a Good Teacher? Who Is a Good Pupil? The 
Foundation of a Career, The Resident Artist and His 
Opportunities, How to Obtain Legitimate Publicity, How 
to Secure Concert Engagements, The Significance of 
Music Clubs, and other pertinent subjects. .Jessie M, 
Fredericks of the San Francisco Public Library con- 
tributes an article on Music Collections in California 
Libraries. 

.\ digest of musical activities during the last season 
in this city and Los Angeles, and a forecast for Clie 
season just beginning round out this book of 400 pages. 
What its value to others may be I can surmise from the 
fact that I am placing it on my desk within easy reach 
for constant reference. 

Redfern Mason, S. F. Examiner, October 26 — Metzger's 
New Blue Book. 

Alfred Metzger of the Pacific" Coast Musical Review- 
has done a work for music in California which greatly 
needed to be done. What is more, he has done it well. 
Mr. Metzger's Musical Blue Book of California will be 
a boon to concert givers, teachers, students; in a word, 
to every one who is interested in music. Perhaps you 
are a member of the Loring Club, You will find your 
name here, and those of your companions, to boot. The 
same thing is true of the San Francisco Musical Club, 
the Musicians' Club, and Mr. Metzger does not confine 
himself to San Francisco, but covers the whole of Cali- 
fornia. 

No better way of getting an idea of the importance of 
music as a means of earning a livelihood can be had 
than that of simply glancing through the lists of mem- 
bers of the Musicians Union here and in Los Angeles. 
And the members are classified according to the instru- 
ment they play. If you are a founder of the San Fran- 
cisco Opera Association, your name is here. The same 
thing is true of the Musical Association. 

There are articles of timely musical topics, such as 
the part the municipality is playing in music. The Resi- 
dent Artist and His Opportunities, How to Obtain Legiti- 
mate Publicity, Significance of Musical Clubs, The Ob- 
ject of Musical Criticism, and so on. Alfred Metzger 
has always worked to help the resident artist; he wants 
to make San Francisco a place of musical resort in 
summer as well as winter; he stands for the good Ihings 
of art, and he has the courage of his convictions. His 
Blue Book is a valuable production. 

Charles Woodman, S, F. Call, October 25.— Musical Blue 
Book of California Wins TInstinted Praise. 

At last it is out and everyone connected with the 
musical profession and students as well owe a debt of 
gratitude to Alfred Metzger. editor of the Pacific Coast 
Musical Review, for compiling the Musical Blue Book 
of California. It really fills a long-felt want. He tells 
me the reason it has been so long deayed is that it has 
been difficut to obtain the necessary data from those it 
exploits. 

It is a compendium of valuable information. There 
are a number of photogravure pictures' of musical cele- 
brites and biographies, and the directory section in- 
cludes lists of music teachers, musicians, members of 
musical unions and others connected with the "music 
industry," and it is as complete as it could he made. 
Incidentally, any whose names have been omitted are 
invited to see that it does not happen again. This part 
is. of course, the essential feature of the book, but the 
introductory articles contain a wealth of information 
and advice that is worth more than the price of the book, 
the headings being: Wlio Is a Good Teacher? Who's 
a Good Student? The Foundation of a Career, The 
Resident Artist and His Opportunities, How to Secure 
Concert Engagements, How to Obtain Legitimate Pub- 
licity, How to Establish Yourself as a Teacher, Join the 
Teachers' Association, etc. 



(Henry Hadley), Rivals (Deems Taylor), The Yearti .. 
the Spring (H. H. A. Beach), O inio babblno caro, lu 
quelle trine niorbide, L'ora o Tlrsl (Puccini). 



CLAIRE DUX TO SING AGAIN 

Claire Dux, the paramount operatic and recital so- 
prano, whose success at the Curran Theatre a week ago 
is still the all-absorbing topic among music lovers, and 
whose magical art brought forth such encomiums as 
the praise voiced by Hedtern Mason, when he said, 
"Hers is a voice as securely poised as a bird on the 
bough, and hero, too, is the emotional depth and sin- 
cerity without which the finest technique only makes 
the singer a sort of vocal imchine," and in Ray C. B. 
Brown's Chronicle review, such praises as "Few are the 
vocalists who live on the same plane of artistry with 
Claire Dux. Her voice has the magical power attributed 
to King Midas, for however common the song, it Is 
transmuted into gold by the touch of her tone." Rarely 
has San Francisco witnessed scenes of such unalloyed 
enthusiasm, following encores more numerous than pro- 
grammed numbers. The dimming of the theatre lichts 
became necessary to quell the clamor for more from 
the auditors present. 

With a program entirely different Dux returns for a 
second and farewell San Francisco appearance at the 
Fairmont Hotel ballroom on next Monday aflernoon. the 
second listing in the Alice Seckels series. With Seidler 
Winkler at the jiiano. those are the programmed num- 
bers, to be followed, of course, by eneores without num- 
ber: II re rastore (Mozartl. .Agnus Dei(Bizct) (both with 
violin obligate by Louis Persinger) ; Gretchen am Spinn- 
rad Schlummerlied. Aug deni Wasser zu sineen. Musen- 
sohn (Schubert), My True Love (from manuscript) 



GRAINGER SOLOIST AT AUDITORIUM CONCERT 

The sale of single seats for the first concert of the 
municipal concert series opened Monday. Season tickets 
which have been on sale for about a month have been 
going very last according to an announcement by Su- 
pervisor J. Emmet Hayden chairman of the Auditorium 
committee. The opening concert, on the night of No- 
vember lOlh will be given by the eminent pianist-com- 
poser Percy Grainger, in conjunction with Alfred Hertz 
and his San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. Grainger 
expressed his eagerness to appear before the enthusi- 
astic audience which always fills the Auditorium at 
great musical events. 

The young Australian pianist will Include In his pro- 
gram the famous Grieg Concerto. This number will be 
unusually interesting as Percy Grainger was Edward 
Grieg's closest friend until Grieg's death a few years 
ago. The five concerts of this season's "pop" series 
will present a famous artist at each concert one of 
whom will be the world-renowned viollnisl Mlscha 
Elnian. 



CLARENCE EDDY AT MUNICIPAL ORGAN 

.\ popular program that will appeal to all has been 
prepared by Clarence Eddy, dean of American organists, 
for his free Sunday afternoon conceit recital In Civic 
Auditorium on November 9th. The event will be the 
first of the municipal free presentations of famous 
artists. In a telegram received from Eddy by Super- 
visor J. Emmet Hayden, chairman of the Auditorium 
committee, the organist announces that he will include 
in his program: A Southern Fantasy by Ernest F. 
Hawke. The number introduces the Suwannee River, 
Dixie. My .Maryland and Old Black Joe. The Prelude 
and I'"ugue on Bach by Liszt is another gem selected by 
Eddy. Eddy is popular in San Francisco, having given 
a halt hundred recitals on the Exposition organ during 
the World's Fair in 1915. 



LECTURES ON THE SYMPHONY PROGRAMS 

The fearsome Jabberwocky of Carroll's delicious Fairy 
Tale will disport himself at the first of Victor Llchten- 
stein's lectures on the current Symphony concert pro- 
grams, at Sorosis Hall next Friday, October 31st, at 
noon. Mr. Kolb and his gigantic contrabassoon will be 
heard in characteristic motives from Deems Taylor's 
delightful musical setting of Alice's adventures In 
Looking Glass House. Tschaikowsky's noble 5th Sym- 
phony and Lekeu's Adaigo for strings will also be dls- 
(ussed. This is Mr. Lichtenstein's second season of 
Symphony lectures which met with so much suacess 
last year. 



AMERICAN OPERA TO BE PRESENTED 

.V meeting to plan for the production of Narcissa. an 
opera by Mary Carr Moore, was held in the studio of 
Andre Ferrier, 1470 Washington street, last Monday 
afternoon. Mrs. Moore, who Is one of California's best 
known composers, wrote the work a few years ago and 
it was produced in Seattle with entire artistic success, 
critics of Eastern papers giving it worthy notices. 

The music is composed around an authentic incident 
in American history, the libretto having been written 
by the composer's mother. Sarah Pratt Carr, who, as a 
long resident of the Northwest, thoroughly familiarized 
herself with the events of the early nineteenth century. 
The story concerns Marcus Whitman and his wife, Nar- 
cissa Whitman, who journeyed West to aid In the edu- 
cation, religious and otherwise, of the Indian. That 
story of their life, intermingled with and vividly colored 
by the warlike nature of the red man. Is the main 
theme. The scenes in villages, a touch of the results 
of good teachings, beautiful romances both between 
the red people and between Narcissa and her young 
husband, form the l)asis of splendidly sentimental and 
dramatic music. The work is a tragedy and ends with 
a massacre. 

The opera is not a religious one— contrary to some 
Impression to that effect. It holds beautiful chorals, a 
prayer and a church scene; these are Incidental and 
few in the general structure of the work which Is big 
In vitality. It will be given with an orchestra of forty 
and a chorus of sixty with Mrs. Moore conducting. She 
is an American and the only woman who has composed 
and conducted her own opera at any time, while the 
story not only fulfills history to the letter but the true 
names of these historic persons have been used In the 
libretto. 

Andre Ferrier will have entire management of the 
stage, with Mrs. Moore personally rehearsing her chorus. 
Chorus and orchestra will be of local material. The 
leading roles, dramatic soprano and dramatic tenor 
will be assigned to noted singers and the rest of the 
main cast, six. will be given to resident artists, each 
role to carry an understudy. An advisory committee to 
.Mrs. Moore will comprise heads of musical associations 
and schools and mi'inbers of (he press on both sides 
of the bay. Four performances are planned for San 
Francisco and one for Oakland. Schools and school 
children will he especially solicited for the historic and 
educational value of "Narcissa," The work Is also 
being prepared In Los Angeles under Mnie. Anna 
Ruzena Sprotle, who sang a leading role, Waskema, In 
Seattle. Funds are to be raised by popular subscription 
through musical and other organizations Interested In 
the promotion of good music while honoring American 
history and an American composer. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



October 31, 1924 



EUGENIA BEM'S VIOLINISTIC VIRTUOSITY 

Unusually Endowed Artist Justly Thrills Large Audi- 
ence at Fairmont Hotel — Lev Shorn Predominates 
in Technical Facility — Representative Program 

By Alfred Metzger 

When we occasionally insist that artists of uuusual 
ability who reside in California should receive the same 
support and remuneration as visiting artists of equal 
merit we have in mind artists like Eugenia Argiewicz 
Bern. At the Fairmont Hotel last Friday evening. Octo- 
ber 24th, Mrs. Bem ag-.'.in convinced us that her artistic 
faculties justify universal recognition. Her vehicle of 
expression on this occasion consisted of Lalo's Con- 
certo op 20 in F major anil .Tules Conns Concerto in E 
minor. It is impossible to imagine a more musicianly, 
well sustained and technically sltilled performance than 
the one Mrs. Bem presented to a most enthusiastic and 
intelligent audience. Personally we can not point to 
any portion of her interpretations that conflicted with 
our sense of artistic propriety. 

Her tone is big and vigorous as well as true and 
flexible. Her phrasing is not only intelligent but intel- 
lectual. Her sense of rhythm and emotional emphasis 
is exceptionally vigorous and discriminating. Her 
understanding of the beauty of classic symmetry is 
musicianly. Technically she plays with the assurance 
and accuracy of a full tiedged virtuoso. If there is any- 
thing else required to deserve the unqualified respect 
and esteem of a musical audience the writer can not 
think of it. And added to these musical requirements 
Mrs. Bem possesses a fixed individuality of style and 
personal magnetism which, added to her numerous 
artistic faculties, justify her to be regarded as an artist 
of distinction. 

Lev Shorr. besides playing the piano part to the con- 
certos of Mrs. Bem. interpreted Beethoven's Appassion- 
ata Sonata and a group of Chopin compositions. There 
is no question regarding Mr. Shorr's technical com- 
petency. Difficulties do not seem to exist for him. and 
he exhibits a certain professional assurance and con- 
fidence that justifies hearty commendation of his work. 
But as long as Mr. Shorr is a co-artist of Jlrs. Bem it 
is necessary to view his interpretation from the same 
artistic angle. And in the matter of emotional expres- 
sion he does not come up to the standard expected of 
finished artists. His shading, accentuation and rhjthmic 
emphasis leaves much to be desired, although his clean- 
liness of technical execution somewhat makes up for 
the other deficiency. His Beethoven lacks depth and 
style. His Chopin lacks poetic suavity and refinement. 
It is not our intention to belittle Jlr Shorr's artistic 
efforts, for there is much to be commended, but in order 



to appear as an artist of superior qualifications he must 
reveal greater musicianship in interpretation than he 
did on this occasion. 




KAJETAN ATTL 

SOLO HARPIST, SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 



Fur ( oncert EnBaeeinents and InHtruction -%pply 
IUII4 Kuhler A: C baxe Ulile-. Tel. Dooelas 1U78. un 
Wrdnrxdar and Salurdar Afternoona ONLY. Real- 
drncr Phone Franklin 7S4T. 



JUST OUT! 

A METHOD FOR THE HARP 

Ur Kajetan .\(ll 

C.4RI. FISHER, PulilUher 

or Sale at Sherman, Clay £ Co., Kohirr A ChnN 
Henrr Grobc and Kajelan Alt! 



THE PUBLIC SQUARE 

.\M) OTHER SHOUT VER-^E 

BY RELDA M. CAILLEAU 

MESS.VGES OF HI MAX I.VTEREST 

PRICE, fi.-^r. 

For Sale at Ihe While Hoo«e and City of Pari« 



11 SUPREME <^Q 

1 EVENTS tpO 

Elwyn Artist Series 

JASCHA HEIFETZ 

WORLD FAMOUS VIOLINIST 

ROLAND HAYES 

SENSATIONAL NEGRO TENOR 

MORI/ mi-i:\llHL i'lanlMt 

CE<I1I\ IIWSEV VlulinlKl 

is.v khi:mi;i! Ilalladist 

.M.\KI \ l\ii(.lN Soinano 

Al.lll UT »1'VI IIIVC VIolinlHt 

>I\1I1 I. (. Mim-OX Soprano 

I.OXDDN -THINf; QV.ARTET 

REIVM.n \M;HREXRATH Ilarllone 

MERI.E .tL< OCK Contralto 

SSVfi^c Savlnpa on Seaiton Tieketa 

Season Prices: «17.00, Cll..'!a, «s.00 Iplua tax) 

>ow on Sale. Sherman, Clay & Co. 

Helfetx and Hayes rnn<>erts ^Till he eiven on Sondny 

afternoons at Casino Theater. .All other concerts at 

Seottish Rite Hall levenlncsl. Season: \av. to Apr. 



SCHMITZ RE-ENGAGEMENTS 

Nearly every one is willing to try anything once, 
through curiosity if nothing else. But a second deliber- 
ate choice implies that value has been received, and a 
demand created for more. In the case of E. Robert 
Schmitz. the sensation he first caused as the most ultra 
of modern pianists has been followed by a realization 
that he stands for something more than the obvious, that 
he is an informative as his art is seductive and that he 
interprets old masters in the terms of modern thought. 
This fact emphasizes the importance of .Mr. Schmitz' 
re-engagements this season for Minneapolis. Chicago, 
Kansas City. Denver. Salt Lake City and San Francisco 
The people in these great centers have had their curi- 
osity appeased but their appetite has not been satiated 
for the best that is offered in modern art. All these re- 
engagements are along the road of his coast to coast 
tour, which starts immediately after his recital at 
Aeolian Hall on October 22. 



LUCILE WHITE WINS MERITED APPROVAL 

The vocal recital given by Lucile White, coloratura 
soprano, winner of the Vought Scholarship, 1924-25. as- 
sisted by Alice Guthrie Poyner. violinist, and Lincoln 
Batchelder. pianist and accompanist, was a decided art- 
istic success. The concert room of the Fairmont Hotel 
was filled on this occasion and the applause that re- 
warded the artists for their praiseworthy efforts was 
spontaneous and universal. Miss White exhibits numer- 
ous artistic faculties that justify ambitious expectations 
of her musical future. The voice is correctlv placed, 
possesses clarity and charm, is used with discrimination 
and is specially notable for the ease with which the 
singer applies it to legato passages and high tones. 
There are so few of our singers who know how to 
■cover" their high tones so as to make them smooth and 
flexible that a singer like Miss White should be speci- 
ally commended for her intelligence in this respect. 

Then. too. .Miss White sings with expression. She 
exhibits a certain style and her pleasing personality 
adds not a little to the ensemble of her performance. 
Of course artists just beginning to make their way in 
the musical world do not yet possess the temperament 
and virility which they will discover with the accumula- 



Hear'^ 

California's Greatest Orchestra! 

SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

AtntEoHeitTz CoNDvcTort 

AUDITORIUM 
MONDAY EVENING, NOV. 10 

PROGRAM 

1. Symphonic Suite. "Scheherazade" 

Rimsky-Korsakow 
The Sea and Sinbad's Ship. 
The Narrative of the Calendar Prince. 
The Young Prince and the Young 
Princess. 

Festival at Bagdad. The Sea. The 
Ship Goes to Pieces on a Rook Sur- 
mounted by the Statue of a Warrior. 
Conclusion. 

2. "The Mastersingers." Introduction to Act 
III. Dance of the Apprentices and Proces- 
sion of the Guilds ._ _ Wagner 

3. Concerto for Piano, A minor Grieg 

Percy Grainger 

Percy Grainger, Soloist 



All Seals Reserved. Priees: Sl.OO. r.-.e. ,-.0e 
Sherman, t^'lay & Co. Hlreetion \udi(ori 
mitlee, J. Etninel Hayden, Chairman. 

Tiekets at Sherman. Clay &. Co. 



Elwyn Artist Series 

ONLY SAN FRANCISCO APPEARANCE 
oi' 

MORIZ 

ROSENTHAL 

"A ■■iiinistii' <;i:int ArcoiiiplishinK the Superlative" 

SCOTTISH RITE AUDITORIUM 
Monday Evening, November 17 



Giacomo Minkowski 



tion of practical experience, and in this respect Miss 
White is no exception, but she has so much to be thank- 
ful for and so much that is worthy that we can readily 
consider her concert one of the artistic successes of the 
local season. Mr. Batchelder, who played the accom- 
paniment and a group of piano compositions, is always 
dependable. His playing is so clean and devoid of 
annoying inaccuracies that it is a pleasure to listen 
to him. He is so sure of his work and he always ex- 
hibits such conscientious preparation and such depth 
of interest that his playing never fails to rivet the 
attention of his audience. He certainly did credit to 
himself on this occasion as he has done during previous 
events. 

Alice Guthrie Poyner is one of San Francisco's well 
known violinists whose efforts before musical clubs is 
specially appreciated. She plays fluently and has at- 
tained a certain technical skill that is worthy of com- 
ment. She was heartily applauded on this occasion. 
The complete program was as follows: Piano solos — 
(a) Etude in E Major (Chopin), (bl Concert Etude 
(Schlozer). Lincoln Batchelder. Soprano solos — (a) 
Old Italian Se tu m'ami (Pergolesi), (h) Old English, 
The Plausibe Lover (Henry Carey), Pastoral (Henry 
Carey), Passing By (Edward Purcell). (c) Old French, 
Chantos les Amours de Jean (Arr. by Weckerlin) Lucile 
White. Violin Solos — (a) Legende (Wieniawskil (b) 
Siciliano (Francoeur Kreisler), (c) Rigauden (Fran- 
coeur-Kreisler), Alice Guthrie Poyner. Soprano Solos — 
(a) Songs My Mother Taught Me (Dvorak), (b) Aria, 
Je Suis Titania, from "Mignon" (Thomas), Lucile 
White. Songs by American Composers — (a) Do Not 
Go, My Love (Hageman). (b) Yesterday and Today 
(Spross), (c) The Answer (Terry), Lucile White. Vio- 
lin Solo — Zigeunerweisen (Sarasate), Alice Guthrie Poy- 
ner. Soprano Solo— Waltz Song from Romeo and Juliet 
(Gounod), Lucile White. 

A. M. 



FREDERIC 

POWELL 

VOICE SPECIALIST 
TEACHER OF SINGING 

RESTORATION OF LOST OR 
IMPAIRED VOICES 

705 Kohler & Chase BIdg., Tuesdays and Fridays 
Residence Phone Sunset 6524 



BENJAMIN 

MOORE 



2636 UNION STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Fillmore 1624 



BY APPOINTMENT 



PAUL STEINDORFF 

MASTER COACH 
Complete Grnnd aud Lig^ht Opera Repertoire 



Selliy C Oppenheiiner Presents 



% 



ALMA GLUCK 

AMERICA'S MOST 
POPULAR SOPRANO 



One Recital Only! 

EXPOSITION AUDITORIUM 
Sunday Afternoon, November 16, '24 

TICKETS $1.00 to %1.Z,0 (tax extra! 
On Sale illonflnr Morning at Sherman. Clay &. Co, 



October 31, 1924 



FOURTEENTH SYMPHONY SEASON BEGINS 

Advance Ticket Sale Justifies Prediction of Two Crowded 
Houses During the First Pair of Concerts 

Marking the opening o( its fourteenth season, the San 
Francisco Symphony Orchestra under the direction of 
Alfred Hertz will give its first pair of symphony con- 
certs Friday and Sunday afternoons October 31 and No- 
vember 2, in the Curran Theatre, and Judging by the 
heavy advance demand for reservations at Sherman. 
Clay & Co., where tickets are now on sale, capacity 
audiences will be in attendance at both events. Re- 
hearsals of the orchestra commenced Monday morning 
October 21. and conductor Hertz reports that the en- 
semble was almost as perfect as if the musicians had 
been playing together all summer. The addition of 
three more men this year, together with other changes 
in the personnel has added greatly to the solidity of 
the organization. With a large number of new works 
and novelties scheduled, together with performances of 
many of the established favorites, music lovers may be 
assured of one of the most artistically satisfying seasons 
in the history of the organization. 

For the pair of concerts next Friday and Sunday, a 
splendidly balanced program has been selected, con- 
taining two works new to symphony patrons. These 
are Lekeu's melodious .-Vdagio for Strings and the suits 
Through the Looking Glass by Deems Taylor, the emi- 
nent New York critic. As may be surmised, the Taylor 
suite is based on Lewis Carroll's immortal fairy tale of 
the same name, and is divided into five parts:" Dedica- 
tion, the Garden of Live Flowers, Jabberwocky Looking 
Glass Insects and The White Knight. This suite was 
first heard in San Francisco several seasons ago at a 
concert of the New York Chamber Music Society and 
since then the composer has scored the work tor full 
orchestra. In its new form it has been performed by 
most of the leading orchestras throughout the East 
everywhere meeting with such pronounced success that 
several productions during one season have been the 
rule. 

The remaining item on the opening program is the 
Fifth Symphony of Tchaikowsky, a work which has been 
increasing in favor each year until it is now ranked on 
a level with the gi-eat Sixth Symphony in point of popu- 
larity and frequency of performance. 



TWO THOUSAND CHEER DUX IN L. A. 

Distinguished Prima Donna Soprano Arouses Los An- 
geles Critics and Music Lovers to Demonstrative 
Approval at Her Ideal Concert 

(Bruno David Ussher in L. A. Express, Oct. 22) 
More than 2000 hearts were stolen last night from a 
happily helpless public when Claire Dux. under the 
management of Impresario Behymer. superbly sang a 
lovely program at Philharmonic Auditorium. It was not 
only grand, but the grandest larceny in a long while 
committed on the recital stage, and can be compared 
only to similar acts by a Schumann-Heink, Kreisler or 
De Pachman. And yet. it was perpetrated with irresist- 
ible simplicity, ease and charm. Seriously. Claire Dux 
belongs among Schipa, Gigli. Luca, and when Gaetano 
Merola produces music drama next year for the Los 
Angeles Opera Association he would do well to include 
this leading soprano of the Chicago Civic Opera Com- 
pany. For the benefit of those who did not hear this 
great singer-interpreter last evening, be it stated that 
she will sing October 30 at 11 a. m. in and under the 
auspices of the Hollywood High School 

Ideal singing of Mozart's Voi che Sapete, old Italian 
airs, forming the opening group, at once revealed the 
well nigh perfect singer. It was bewitching Mozart so 
fragrant, limpid, finely cut like cameos, as only Melba or 
Sembnch have given it. So was her Schubert group 
The Ave Maria, usually drowned in molasses of so-called 
eeling. became a new song, a bit of romantic mysticism 
1 have been asked during the concert as to whether Dux 
did not sing songs so differently. Differently from many 
singers, yes, inasmuch as she puts the true conception 
3t the song above what some call "individual interpreta- 

Not a great and at moments on the surface only I 
believe, a trifle cool voice, yet it is of ravishing beauty 
:onsummately used at all times, in all positions, while 
.ully charged with deep expression. It is a voice which 
las the vivacious fragrance of spring, again the mature 
aepth of autumn colors and moods of that season Re- 
narkable is the head-tone pianissimo almost too deli- 
:ate for so large a hall though it is. on the whole sing- 
ng of ample caixying power and clear diction 

And back of all this, like a matter of course, is suner- 
ative musicianship, impeccable taste and a personality 
it once radiant and unaffected. In Seidler-Winkler 
.iaire Dux enjoys a partner at the piano worthy of and 
;enecting her own artistic aristocracy. 

L. A. TIMES CRITIC ALSO ENTHUSIASTIC 

(Francis Kendig, L. A. Times, October 22) 

Claire Dux, soprano, who sang last evenine at Phil 
.armonic Auditorium, is, if one can infuse a spec al 
significance into the oft-used phrase-a great artist 

Many singers have the knack of pleasing large audi- 
nces, but few can hold them with that rare type of 
rt that makes Miss Dux distinctive among singers 

ine quality that impresses most stronglv in her qine 
ig IS an exuberant happiness with which she imbues 
early everything which she does-with the exception 
, ,hJ = r^'"'^ '"' distinctly call for another mood, such 
s the Schubert Ave Maria 

When one says that she has a great art it does not 
ecessanly imply that she has a great voice, for one 

T,ulT^ ^"^ " S''*=^*^'' ""^^ '° the case of certain 
azzlmg operatic singers. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 

Instead Miss Dux has a very intimate art, and she 
reminds one of a violinist who shades and colors with 

even and beautifully controlled tone 

thJ wnrrvT""/'^ ''■'"'" '"^''"'^ permissible the use of 
the woid great,' a s.uiic ,g present in concerts very 

work u '■",?""'"•/""'. ''■"'^■'' ''^ »<--°«'=" '« Mis« Dux's 
7hIZZ, r l'^''f«"o» ot expression which makes 

the softest and quietest art also the gi-eatest art 

Miss Dux is Polish and Germiui, and this reflects in her 
singing. She gives Mozart and Schubert with poetry 
and crystal clarity. 

Nothing could he more exquisite than her pianissimo 
in Schiiberts Wohin. Other Schubert songs which 
charmed were Ave Maria. Rosleir auf der lleide Du bist 
die Ruh and Der Jungling an der Quelle 

The programed Strauss she did not sing, due. It was 
stated, to the nonarrival of the trunks containing them 
and instead offered (here Nuit by Alfred BacheTet. and 
Serenade I; rancaise Mon gentil Pierrot by Leoncavallo, 
with Mimi s ana from Boheme, the .Max Reger Lullaby 
•which she offered here a year ago with the Philharmonic 
Orchestra, and Deems Taylor's arrangement of the .sev- 
enteenth century French air (Breton) The Ways of the 
\\ Olid — these as encores. 

One of the finest numbers of the evening, and one 
truly exceptional, and also the work of an American 
was Carpenter's Silhouettes Hageman's At the Well 
was the harmonically rich last number 

In Mozart songs, and those of the classic style. Miss 
Dux s voice is pure and clear in quality, but in certain 
ot the German lieder. and in French and American 
songs, she colored the tones with unusual richness and 
mellowness. Her success was most auspicious and 
during the evening she responded to perhaps a dozen 
encores. 



ALMA GLUCK 



She was educated In the public schools ot New York 
City, and her musical education was obtained by earn- 
ing the money herself tor expenditure tor tuition and 
other necessities. There was no wealthy patron ot art 
to sponsor her and advance her career or to send her to 
h.urope tor study and operatic appearance. Her artistic 
development is entirely American, and proves that 
American girls do not have to go abroad tor their 
mus cal and vocal training. One ot the greatest voice 
teachers in New York was recommended to her but hla 
ernis were tar beyond her means. Hut this resource- 
ul g ll was not to be discouraged and she bargained 
111 this eacher. he making a ridiculously low raleil 
her. stipulating that she should < ome to his stud o 
whenever she could and take a chance ot waiting Some 
times she waited hours to receive a halt-hour lesion 
when some regular tailed to appear or came la e- at 
other times she had to come in the evening 

Once sho came about eight o'clock at night to find 
the maestro in the midst ot a dinner party In his studio 
an engagement he had forgotten when he told 'tn to 
come. He apologized tor his had memory, but as she 

go 'ahead' »n1^° ,"'""'' ,""= "'"'"■'' "■■»>"•" •''" ••'a-'her to 
go ahead and give a lesson tor th..ir entertainment. 
He did so and she had sung only a tow bars when the 
assembled guests were pleasantly surprised. Among 
hem were some officials ot the Metropolitan Operi 
vi'Jpd" Mij m 'u? *'"''-' '" enthusiastic that they In- 
v ted Miss Cluck to come to the opera house and sing 
at the next audition. She was immediately engaged 
and was gjven a secondary soprano role In Massenet's 
Werther. How' she electrified the Metropolitan audience 
in her first performance, increased her triumphs in other 
roles, and became the powerful magnet she is in con- 
cert, IS all history. 



The story ot Alma Gluck, America's most popular 
present-day soprano, who appears in San Francisco's 
Auditorium for a single recital on Sunday afternoon, 
November 16th, is one of pluck, work and good fortune 
characteristic of America, the land of opportunity to 
which she was brought in infancy from Roumania 



The San Francisco Conservatory of Music will hold a 
recital at the Fairmont Hotel on Monday evening No- 
vember 24. The work of the advanced studenu' will 
represent the teaching in every department of the school 
The recital will be invitational. On November 14 the 
regular monthly recital will take place at the Con- 
servatory. 




FITZGERALD'S ■ for the oAd-vancemenl of SMuiic 

Clifford Lott 

h.vritom; 

Lott is one ot the best known musicians in California, and 
was recently elected the only Western member of Amer- 
ican Acadcni)- of Teachers of Sin^ins; of New \'ork Cit\. 
lie uses the sweet-toned, sinj;in{; 

KNABE 

exclusively, and says, "I have never phu ed on a piano that 
ei|unls the resonance of my Kn.ibe. tlie e\enness of its 
scale, .ind its superb quality of tune." 




LOS ANGELES 



ROSEMARY ROSE 



A Singer Who Teaches— Consolidates Her Studios 

Formerly of Milwaukee, Sheboygan 

and Plymouth 

In Los Angeles 

4.iT ,S<>. KKNMOIll.; STIIIOK'I' TIOI.. .1«7«I,S 

Auilltlons Ity Aniioinliiiciil Only 

Ruth llrodmaii, KcKinlrnr 



CHARLES BOWES 

TEACHER OF VOICE 
44« S. Grand View, l-h.inr .^r.llllr.. l.o. A nsrlra 

L. E. Behymer 

MANAGER OF DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS 

Executive Offices: 

705 Auditorium BIdg.. Lo* Angelas 



ALMA STETZLEU 

VOICE ClII.Tl!IIE— C0AC1II.\0 l.\ ItEPEIITUIIIIi: 



CALMON LUBOVISKI 

CONCERT VIOLINIST 
Available (or Conrert* and Reoltala 



llf. Mimlp <o. llldK- 



Phone 2SI^K0.% 



Studios a.'M Music Ar 



Alexander Bevani 

ALL IIRAKCIIES OP THE 

VOCAL ART 

Sfndloi 012 Sn. Cnllf. MmnIc Co. Bldf. 
Telephone H22-.120 



ABBIE NORTON JAMISON 

PIANO — HARMONY — VOCAL COACH 

DlrFPlnrof 

J.*MISO.N Ql'AKTKTTM 



ILYA BRONSON ,.^,,^ •""•• ;•>''•'. 

I nllharnitinlr Orrfarstra 
l.oa Anerira Trio, I'hilharmonir 
auarlrl Inmrurllun. < hnniltrr Muair Hrcllala 
JlHin 1,1. Mirndn. Phone Holly SIHI 

A.KOODLACH 

VIOLIN M4KKIt ANII nEPAIRBR 

ConnolMMrur — Appraiser 

r.o:i MnJ<'<llr I'lirnlrc llldB.. I.na Anicelea Tucker 40111 

JOHN SMALLMAN 

IHRITOM;— TEACHER OF .HINfiINO 
Voice Trlnl Iiy Appolnlmenl. $.1.00. SIndloi SO:i-MM So. Cal. 



ZOELLNER CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

1.0*1 ANtiKI.ES 

lano Wlndaor Roulrvard «SIH llollrnoad BoaleTard 

Complete Faeally ot Arllat Tviakara 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



October 31, 1924 



CLAIRE DUX 

CONCERT MANAGEMENT ARTHUR JUDSON 
FISK BUILDING, NEW YORK CITY 



Soprano 

LIEDER SINGER 

BRUNSWICK RECORD 



SECOND ANNUAL SPRING MUSIC FESTIVAL 

The City of San Francisco is co operating this week 
with Alfred Hertz director-general of the second Spring 
Music Festival to be held in the Civic Auditorium next 
spring in his campaign to secure singers for the great 
chorus necessary to the festival's program. All branches 
of the city administration have been retiuested by Su- 
pervisor J. Emmet Hayden. chairman of the festical 
committee, to aid in the campaign for volunteers The 
festival is a municipal project, backed by the city with 
the co-operation of the San Francisco Symphony Or- 
chestra, the Musical Association of San Francisco and 
the Snn Francisco t ommunity Service Dr. Hans 
Leschke. formerly with the Wagnerian Opera Company 
of New York, is the chorus director. Rehearsals are 
being held four nights each week in the Auditorium of 
Girls High School. Enlistments will be received here or 
at the ofBce of Chester W. Rosekrans in the Community 
Service headquarters. Flood Building, third floor. 

FARRAR IN CARMEN FANTASIE 

Geraldine Farrar. who has e^'olved a novel and color- 
ful condensed version of Bizet's opera Carmen will be 
presented by Frank W. Healy at the Capitol Theatre, 
Sundav afternoon. November 16th. at 2:30 p m. 'W'ith 
costumes and scenic effects designed by Zuloaga. fore- 
most of Spanish painters, with a complete cast of princi- 
pals of proven ability, with an ensemble of orchestral 
players selected from the best, with Carlo Perom as 
conductor and with a complete force of stage mechanics 
to handle the scenic and lighting effects. Miss Farrar 
and her "modern fantasie" will be heard not only here 
but also at the Auditorium Theatre. Oakland. Saturday 
afternoon. November loth; California Theatre, Stockton. 
Wednesdav evening. November 12th; State Theatre. 
Sacremento. Thursday evening. November 13th, and 
Victory Theatre, San Jose, Tuesday evening. November 
18th. 

WARFIELD THEATER 

Norma Talmadge in The Only Woman is to be the 
attraction at the Warfield Theatre starting with the 
matinee on Saturday. November 1st. There will be a 
special "continuous performance" on election night con- 
tinuing until one in the morning. The Only Woman is 
an original story bv C. Gardner Sullivan and the sup- 



porting cast is headed by Eugene O'Brien. This is the 
most Trnportant Norma Talmadge picture since Bmilin 
Through, better indeed than either Ashes of "Vengeance 
or Secrets. The comedy of the program will be Walter 
Hiers in Short Change and there will be the Fanchon 
and Marco Ideas with Gino Severi and the Music Mas- 
ters. 



MAX DOLIN 

Distinguished 
Composer - Violinist 



XOW CONDICTING THE 
E>L.*.RCED ORCHESTRA 



California Theatre 






San Francisco 



LIPSCHULTZ 
SAN FRANCISCANS 

A Ne'w Bureau of Music 



Complete Faculty for Teaching 



Soloists — Orchestras 
Bands for Every Occasion 

Suite 414 Loew-s Warfield Theatre Building 
Teleohone Franklin 814 



Myra Palache 

PIANIST 

LECTURES ON MUSIC 
APPRECIATION 



San FranclKco .IddreHS. 2520 I'nlon St 
Phone \Valnnt «3» 
Go WedneHday. a p. m. lo « p. in. 



PACIFIC MUSICAL SOCIETY CONCERT 

The Pacific Musical Society attacted one of its largest 
audiences to the ballroom of the Fairniout Hotel on 
Thirsday evening. October 23ic!. The artists on this 
occasion were Radiana Pazmor and Lajos Fenster. 
contralto and violinist, re.-3pecuvely. Both proved dig- 
nified interpreters of musical comrositions and sus- 
tained the standard set by the Pacific Musical Society. 
Miss Pazmor again convinced her hearers with the 
judgment of her interpretaiions and the c.ire and dis- 
crimi!;;:li0D she bestows upon the adequate delivery of 
her messages. Again she selected representative and 
dignified works by well known composers and gave 
them the benefit of her intelligence of interpretation 
and judgment of phrasing. Diction, purity of intonation, 
careful use of her voice and artistic observance of the 
sentiments proved the major part of her work. She 
is unquestionably an artist of superior merit and de- 
served the enthusiasm displayed by the audience. 

Lajos Fenster has always proved himself a depend- 
able and exceptionally endowed musician. His tone 
is big and true. His technical control equal to any 
demands, no matter how difficult. His artistic percep- 
tions are backed by discriminating phrasing and his 



Humoreske (Tor Aulin). Symphonie Espagnole (Allegro 
non Troppo) (Lalo), Lajos Fenster; Where Cowslips 
Grow (Pasmore). The Miller's Daughter (Pasmore), 
Cradle Song (tSth Century) (William Byrd), Rhapsodie 
(Campbell-Tipton), Radiana Pazmor. 

The accompaniments of Violet Fenster Blagg were 
characterized by intelligent musicianship and an in- 
sight into the more important phases of musical litera- 
ture that is decidedly creditable and praiseworthy. 

ALFRED METZGER. 



NEW SONGS FOR TEACHER AND SINGER 

it's a Mighty Good World O'Hara 

Golden Moon Rolt 

Come to My Heart English 

Wood Fairies Wilfrid Jones 

Brown Bird Singing Wood 

Land of Might Have Been ..Novello 

Rose Marie of Normandy Del Rigo 

Spring Comes Laughing Carew 

Beauty Lohr 

Piper of Love Carew 

Love's a Merchant Carew 

The Market Carew 

Among the Willows Phillips 

A Good Heart All the Way Clarke 

Dancing Time in Kerry Hampson 

Sweet Navarre Carne 

My Heart's Haven Phillips 

Love Pipes of June Day 

My Little Island Home Baden 

Rag ged Vagabond Randolph 

CHAPPELL^HARMS, INC. 
185 Madison Avenue New York City 



depth of insight into the masters' Intentions is very 
obvious. His selections were chosen to reveal both his 
technical and musical qualifications and they did so in 
a manner to arouse the universal approval of his musi- 
cal audience We certainly compliment Mr. Fenster 
upon the success of his appearance. 

Henrik Gjerdrum played the accompaniments for 
Miss Pazmor in a manner to complement her work and 
no doubt earned the approval of the artist as he did 
that of the audience. The complete program was as 
follows: Von Ewiger Liebe (Brahms). Immer Leiser 
Wird Mein Schlummer (Brahms), Two Songs in Spanish 
Manner (Heine) (Swan Hennessy), Auf den Wallen 
Salamankas. Neben Mir Wohnt Don Henriquez, Radiana 
Pazmor, Henrik Gjerdrum at the piano; Preludium E 
Major (Bach), Prieslied from the Meistirsinger (Wag- 
ner-Wilhelmi), Chaconne (Vitali-Charlier), Lajos Fen- 
ster. Violet Fenster Blagg at the piano; Trois Chansons 
do Bilitis (Debussy). La Flute de Pan. La Chevelure, 
Le Tombeau des Naiades, Le Bachelier de Salamanque 
(Roussel). Radiana Pazmor; Serenite (Vieuxtemps), 



SVipHoNY 

ORCHESTRA 

mroeoHatTZ - - •--CoK/OUCTOR. 

FIRST POP CONCERT 

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 9 

2:4.-. P. M. 

CURRAN THEATRE 

TSCH AIKOWSKV FIFTH SVMPHOW 

«n«GIO FOR STRIXGS: I.EKEl! 

THROl Gil THE LOOKING GL.XSS; T.VVLOR 



LICHTENSTEIN'S SYMPHONYLOGU ES 

Victor Lichtenstein will offer a second series of his 
Symphonylogues, opening on Friday, October 31st, the 
day of the first Symphony concert, at twelve o'clock in 
Sorosis Club Hall. These lectures on symphonies and 
their meanings have passed the experimental stage 
and have become a significant link in the development 
of the highest musical taste in San Francisco. Last 
season's talks at Sorosis Hall were brilliantly success- 
ful, and those who attended found their enjoyment at 
the concerts intensified. The same plan will be fol- 
lowed this season, and additional instruments of the 
orchestra will be used in illustration. Each talk will 
be confined to the day's program. The hour is twelve 
o'clock, closing promptly ten minutes before one. These 
illustrated talks are indorsed by the Musical Associa- 
tion of San Francisco and are under the direction ol 
Alice Seckels. 



Elwin A. Calberg 



Soloist and Accompanist 
Available Season 1924-1925 



Lo EW'S ^ WAR FIElD 

Week Commenc ng November 1st 

Jos. M. Schenik PreseiH.'s 

NORMA TALMADGE 

W ilh Eneene O'llrien in 

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Special Norninl Courses for Teachers 



STENGER VIOUNS 

Exemplify Intrinsic Excellence and Are 
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A lifeN devotion of uninterrupted Mtudy and labor. 
Involving the mastery of prluciples of musical 
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mark the heeinnlne: of a new era In thU noble art. 

W. C. STENGER 

INCORPORATED 

Makir of Fine VioUm 
617-618 Steinway Hall, Chicago 



AUDREY BEER SOREL 

PIANIST — TEACHER 
Papll of Leopold GodowHky and Arthur De Graeff (Bms- 
■elii). Studio: 202S MeCInre St., Oakland. Tel. Oak. 3895 



ALFRED HURTGEN 

PIANIST. ACCOMPANIST, MUSICAL DIRECTOR, 

COACH, PIANO INSTRUCTION 
Studio: 2778 Union Street Tel. FlUmore S240 



October 31. 1924 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



SUBSCRIPTION CAMPAIGN 

(Continued from r.ise 1. ToL 2) 
mercenary motive. His first and last 
thought has ever been for the musician. 
He is a man to lie honored and our testi- 
monial should be practical. Therefore. 
I again ask you in the name of justice, 
of gratitude and of the public good of this 
city, to send in your subscription to the 
Pacific Coast Musical Review, Kohler & 
Chase Building." 

Vivian Consula Sengler of Berkeley 
sends us the following much appreciated 
letter: 

1345 Milvia Street. 

Berkeley. Cal., 
October 19, 1924. 
Mr. Alfred Metzger, 
Editor, Pacific Coast .Musical Review, 
San Francisco. Cal. 
Dear Sir: 

I take great pleasure in reading your 
articles regarding the pub'ishins; of a 
Weekly Music Journal, independent of 
advertising. Such a magazine would un- 
doubtedly be very impressive and inter- 
esting. 

I have often conceived the idea of such 
a magazine, and I am sure it cannot fail 
to be a success, providing the support of 
the profession and music-loving public 
is assured. 

When your subscription campaign com- 
mences, you may send me any literature 
which may be used in the campaign. 1 
will not make any promises, but I assure 
you that with the aid of my pupils I will 
endeavor to do my best in co-operating 
with your worthy plan. 

Sincerely yours. 
VIVIAN CONSULA SEXGLER. 
(Director of the Sengler Piano School.) 



The Dominican College Choir of San Ra- 
fael gave the following excellent program 
on Friday morning. October 10: Proces- 
sional (Organ). Mass. Opus 3, (Hohner- 
lein). Adoremus Te Christe. (Palestrine). 
Offertory. O Spem .Miriam (Perosi). 
Ave Maria (Arcadelt). O Saliitaris (Mon- 
tani). Panis Angelicus (Cesar Franck). 
Tantum Ergo (Montani). Adoremus, Tan- 
tum Ergo. (Gregorian). In the afternoon 
the pupils of the Dominican College 
School of Music appeared in the follow- 
ing program, most creditably presented: 
Prelude (Organ! Jlargaret Lind, Valse 



(Violin Quartetl. (Poldlnl). Helen 
Hughes, Emily Lees, Eva Lastreto, Ger- 
truiie Bolton: The Lake at Evening 
(Griffesl. Madaline Curry: What the 
Soul Desires (Mother Drane). Alice 
Martin. Leslie .lacobs. Claire (Ira- 
ham, Mildred Belmont, Carol Hanigan. 
Hazel Regan Mary Shallue: .lubilate, 
(Xevin). Dominican College Choral; (a) 
Romance (Lieurance), (hi Schon Ros- 
marin (Kreisler), Helen Hughes: at the 
piano, Ruth Williams: Serenade (Schu- 
bert). Ruth Williams: at the piano, Co- 
rinne Gelinas; Postlude (Organ), Laveria 
Sawyer. 

Sara Levy, a talented pupil of Lorraine 
Ewing. played two piano solos on Wed- 
nesday atlernoon. October 15. from KGO. 
Oakland. She delighted listeners-in with 
her excellent playing. Elizabeth Mc- 
Woods. another promising pupil of Miss 
Swing's, played from KPO on Thursday 
afternoon, and her numbers were delight- 
fully received. 

The Annual Breakfast of the Pacific Mu 
sical Society will be held at the Fair- 
mont Hotel on Monday, November 10. at 
12 o'clock noon. Mrs. Frederick Crowe, 
the president o'f the club, will preside. 
The Persian Garden by Liza Lahmann 
will be given under the direction of Uda 
Waldrop. Those taking part are: Flora 
Howell Bruner. soprano; Margaret Jar- 
man Cheeseman, contralto; Hugh J. Wil- 
liams, tenor, and Henry L. Perry, bass. 

GAETANO MERDLA OFF FOR EUROPE 

Gaetano Merola. director general of 
the season of grand opera recently given 
here by the San Francisco Opera Associ- 
ation, has left for a tour of the music 
centers of the East and Europe in quest 
of new ideas and artists for the produc- 
tions to be given here next tall. 

Meroli will stop off at Chicago for a 
conference there with the leaders in the 
Chicago Civic Opera Company. He will 
also spend several days in New York 
in conference with Gatti Casazza of the 
Metropolitan Opera Company. Merola 
will then sail for Paris, where he will 
make the rounds among the artists. He 
will then go to Milan for an extended 
stay and conference with the famous 
Toscanini. director of La Seala. the 
world's home of grand opera. 



Mrs. William Steinbach Laura Wertheimber 



VOICE CIILTIIRE 



i'reparnlory Teooher for 



ACHILLE L. ARTIGUES 

Graduale or Schola Canturuni, rarl.i. Or. 

(raniat St. Mary'i. Calhoilral. rUino I)e- 

parlnienl. llamllD Scliool. Orcnn and 

■ Mano. Arrlllaea Miini.al <'olli>cp 

KURT VON GRUDZINSKI 

BARITONE — VOICE CULTl'RE 

Anthorlzed to Teach Miue. Srboen- 

Itene'n Mrtboil 

1314 I.e«Tf»w or<b S«. Phonr Pro.pcct n2.%3 

EVA M. GARCIA 



PIERRE DOUILLET. PIANO 
NITALIA DOUILLET, VOICE 

•>nr. Knhirr A (hnm- Bid. Tel. Sutler 7.1S7 

DOMENICO BRESCIA 

VOICE SPECIALIST — COMPOSITION 
Stndlot tl03-«04 Kohler & Cha.se Ilulldinie 



Madame Charles Poulter— Soprano 



Mary Coonan McCrea 

TEACIIEH OK si.\(;i\(; 
studio: 38 GalTney DulIdinK. 37i; Sutler St 
Tel. Donelaa •4:::!3. Re». lel. Keart,;^ :;:i 111 

MRS. A. F. BRIDGE 



HELEN COLBURN HEATH 

oprano Sololxt. Temple Eiiinnu El. Con 

crt and Churok Work. Vocnl Inntriietinn 

■J.TOft Clay Street. Phone Wen t 4Slin 

HENRIK GJERDRUM 



Evelyn Sresovich Ware 

Pianl.t and Aeeompanl.st 

Studio: 1IMI:1 Kohler A t haNe llulldlne 

Phone (iarlierd I17::j 

Joseph George Jacobson 



ROSE RELDA CAILLEAU 



SIGMUND BEEL 



MARY ALVERTA MORSE 

SOPIIA.MI 
Teaeher of .SInElnici Studio. Tueadnr and 
Frldoy. Kohler .jt Chnae Hid;;., S. h\; KeNl- 
deuce Studio, llIU Santa Itoaa Ave.. Oak- 
land. Phone lloniholdt llll. 

SAN FRANCISCO CONSERVATORY 



OF MUSIC 



MRS. CARROLL NICHOLSON 

< l>\TU M.TO 
Teal>her of SlntlnK. :i-' l.oretia Ave.. Pied- 
mont. Tel. Plednioiil .1(11. >Io:i.. Kohler .«: 

Brandt's Conservatory of Music 

21'll Scott Street. Ilet. (lay .t n nnhlneton 
Mr. .Noah Ilrandt. Violin 
Mrx. \onh llriindt. Piano 

ALMA SCHMIDT. KENNEDY 

PIANIST 

Studio: 1.'.37 Euclid Avenue. Ilrrkelej. Cal. 

Phone Ilerkeley IIIHIII 

MRS. ZAY HECTOR HEVITT 

PIANO and lltRMONV 

Institute of Music of San Francisco. 
Knhler .C- riiasp Hide. Tel. Kenrnv MM. 



NOW PUBLISHED 

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FIVE DOLLARS POSTPAID 

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Address: MUSICAL BLUE BOOK OF CALIFORNIA 

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The San Francisco Savings and Loan Socieh 

(THE SA.M FR.\\-CISCO B.\NK) 

SAVINGS COMMEKCIAl. 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th. 1868. "^-"^ 

One of the Oldest Banks In California. 

the Assets of which have never been increased 

by mergers or consolldnlions with other Banlts. 

Member Associated Savinfis Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, CaL 
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Assets . $93,198,226.96 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 3,900,000.00 

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AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



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COLORATURA SOPRAXO 
Teacher of Bel Canto. Tel. Ilnyvlew .1.sa» 
or Plednont 1330. Bt Appointment Only. 



nrainntie Contralto. Opera Sue 
ICnrope. Coneert Sureeniie> In the irnlled 
Staten. AddreaN; 1N2.% Leavenworth Street. 
Telepbone Franklin 3Bni. 



ISAI$i:i.I.l<: MAUKS 



Joseph Greven 

Voice Culture; — Opera, Oratorio. 
Concert and Church Singing in all 
languages. 



MRS. J. GREVEN 

Piano and Harmony 

3741 Sacramento St. Tel. Bayview 5278 

TEACHERS' DIRECTORY 



MISS EDITH CAUBU 
37fi Sutter Street Phone DouKla? 26V 

JANET ROWAN HALE 
Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 5454 

J. B. ATWOOD 
2111 Channing Way Berkeley, Cal. 

MISS LORRAINE EWING 
833 Ashbury St. Phone Hemlock 749 

RUTH VIOLA DAVIS 
515 Buena Vista Avenue — Park 341 

LOUIS FELIX RAYNAUD 
1841 Fulton St. Tel. Bayview 6008 

ELSIE COOK HUGHES LARAIA 
3325 Octavia St. Phone Filmore 6102 

There is no way lo obtain concprt en- 
gagements unless a name is sulTlclcnlly 
known. There Is no other way to make 
a name known except through publicity, 
ronsequently. if you do not advertise you 
can not possibly secure steady engaRe- 
ments. 



MACKENZIE GORDON 

L's:;l' .lacks, ,n Sin-i-i liicnc' West 4.-.; 



ANTOINE DE VALLY 
22U1 Scoll St. Phone West im 



MME. M. TROMBONI 
601-2 Kohler & Chase Hldg. Kearny 54S4 



JACK EDWARD HILLMAN 
601 Kohler & Chase Bids. Kearny 5454 



ADELE ULMAN 
178 Commonwealth Ave. Phone Gar. 6046 



JULIUS HAUG 
4032 Irving St. Tel. Sunset 436 

HOTHER WISMER 
:!T01 flay Street Phone Bayview 7780 

ARTHUR CONRAOI 
wa Knhli-r & Chase BIdg Tul Keamj 64ft4 

G. JOLLAIN 
376 Sutter St. Tel. Kearny 2637 

Aim »m;i;ii op >n mi- 

C. B. FRANK 
400 Pantages BIdg. Tel. Garfield 1334 

If a music Journal Is worth while to 
publish programs and views of musical 
ivonlH. it is wiirlh while lo patronize. 

Elwrn A. Calberg, th(^ young and gifted 
jiianlst who has reienlly returned to Cali- 
fornia from .\"ew York and Europe, where 
he scored brilliant nucresses In concert, 
will give a recital at the 20th Century 
Club in Berkeley on November 25. at 
which event he will interpret a novo) 
and interesting program. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



October 31, 1924 



iElfeabrtlt i^tmpH0n - ftann 

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•THE-AMPICO' 

Alone. — 'and unassisted this musical marvel re-creates in your 
home the playing of the master musicians, — 'who have "myster 
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pronounce it the world's most magnificent musical instrument. 

BY AN OVERWHELMING 
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THE OLDEST MUSICAL JOURNAL IN THE GREAT WEST 



VOL. XLVn. No. 5 



SAN FRANCISCO, FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 7, 1924 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



ALFRED HERTZ IS WELCOMED WITH THRILLING OVATIONS 

Emotions Stirred by Virility of Tschaikowsky's Great Fifth Symphony — Mr. Hertz' 
Matchless Construction of Thrilling Climaxes Once More in Evidence — Unusual 
Emotional Effects Contained in Lekeu's Appealing Adagio — Deemes Tay- 
lor's Conception of Scenes From Alice in Wonderland Charmingly Illus- 
trated — Fritzi Lachmund Reads Lines With Fine Intelligence 

BY ALFRED METZGER 



The Curran Theatre was crowded to capacity on Fri- 
day afternoon. October 31st. when the San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra, under the direction ot Alfred 
Hertz. beVan its fourteenth season. If there had been 
anv possibility of increasing the warmth of the recep- 
tion accorded Alfred Hertz at the beginning of a season, 
consisting of long ovations and presentation of sufficient 
tioral tributes to open a flower shop, this would have 
been the case last Friday afternoon. For there could 
be no doubt concerning the attitude of the San p^-an- 
cisco musical public toward Mr. Hertz It was evident 
that everybody was happy that the symphony season 
was beginning and everyone displayed expectations of 
enjoyable moments to come. There was a punch behind 
the applause that greeted Mr. Hertz upon his entrance 
and there was the cordiality of gratification behind the 
ovation that featured the close of the symphony. And 
finally there was evident affection behind the numerous 
fragrant flower pieces that banked the stage during the 




MORIZ ROSENTHAL 

The Eminent Piano Virtuoso, Who 

Will Open the Elwyn Artists' Series 

at Scottish Rite Auditorium Monday 

Evening, October 17. 

The writer must confess that after more than seven 
months' stagnation in the way of symphony concerts, 
it was decidedly gratifying to revel once more in the 
realm of the classics directed with the authority and 
sympathy of Alfred Hertz. And surely it would have 
been difficult to select a work more inclined to test 
the emotions than Tschaikowsky's ever impressive E 
minor Symphony N'o. .'■. As we have said before, al- 
though we usually regard the most recent interpreta- 
tion of a work of great beauty by an eminent composer, 
under the direction of Mr. Hertz, as the most effective 
we have heard up to that time, every subsequent hear- 
ing reveals to us new features to be admired. Mr. 
Hertz being a genius is constantly growing in his 
mental and temperamental stature. And this growth is 
always evident and proves his adaptability for the 
position he occupies. 

We have heard practically all conductors of distinc- 
tion, but none thrill us like .Mr. Hertz. There is a 
warmth, a depth and a style about Mr. Hertz' mode of 
conducting that we miss in the other conductors. Where 
in other instances we are willing to admire technical, 
academic and scholastic readings, in Mr. Hertz we find 
a heart throb. And in gradually Increasing accumula- 
tion of climacteric episodes there is not one conductor 
that lifts us from our seat quite so frequently as Mr. 
Hertz. Indeed we know of no conductor who Is quite 
so successful in building up his climaxes as is Mr. Hertz. 
And yet, like in this very Tschalkowsky symphony, 
there are numerous instances where Mr. Hertz attains 
the most delicate nuances and poetic finish. Indeed 



it is specially in these lighter shadings wherein we Hud 
additional finesse every succeeding season. And be- 
cause of Mr. Hertz' dramatic vitality and virility his 
finer moments are so much more emphasized. Where 
there is no genuine pianissimo there can not be a stir- 
ring fortissimo for it is the contrast that accentuates 
the one from the other. Mr. Hertz' climaxes, of which 
there are numerous ones in the Tschalkowsky sym- 
pl'ony, are so irresistibly effective because he gradually 
attains them through a deliberate process of gradual 
inclination from the finest tranquility to the most stir- 
ring passion. 

The .Adagio by Lekeu arouses the desire to hear 
more of this composer and the regret concerning his 
premature suspension of creative activities. There is 
unquestionably deep sentiment in this adagio and Mr. 
Hertz with his singular skill in attaining the inner- 
most purpose ot a composer's message has the orchestra 
sing this work with almost vocal elegance of style. 
It stirred one's emotions and added to one's Joy of life. 
The third and final number of the program was Deems 
Taylor's Suite Through the Looking Glass. When we 
first heard this work by the New York String Quartet 
a few years ago we did not appreciate the fine sense 
of humor that penneated its phrases. On this occasion, 
thanks to the magic wand of Mr. Hertz, many phrases 
obscure to us at the first hearing became redolent with 
meaning and fanciful poetry. -To be absolutely honest 
there are still moments when we can not reconcile the 
ultra modern style of theoretical treatment, or thematic 
development, with its sudden and frequent change of 
keys, its "frightening" dissonances, its abrupt changes of 
themes, its novelty effects in instrumental mulings and 
other realistic and descriptive imitations of nature's 
"overtones," and above all its apparent disregard tor 
all that is symmetrical and orderly with our old fash- 
ioned, simple and obvious taste for that which is easily 
comprehensible in musical expression. 

We certainly are grateful to Mr. Hertz for giving 
us the chance to listen to the charming declamatory 
gifts of Fritzi Lachmund, a young girl of exceptional in- 
telligence and a voice of singular flexibility in speaking. 
Had it not been for this preliminary explanation of thai 
which was to fol'ow in music the writer would not have 
enjoyed the work half as much. At least we had an 
idea what the composer was striving for and we found 
that he surely obtained the eft'ects the story depicted 
But without such explanation we would have been at 
sea. This is not the case when listening to the old 
masters. For while we may not be able to always de- 
tect the exact messaee whiih the composer intends to 
convey, we obtain a meaning entirely our own. and find 
much in the music that touches our innermost mental 
sensibilities. Most of the ultra modern music is an 
absolute puzzle to us, unless some one explains it to us. 
and at times the more it is explained the less we know 
of it. , , . 

Hut among all the modern worl-.* we have heard, this 
Deems Taylor Suite possesses certain poetic phases, 
touched with humor, which makes it very pleasant to 
our ears. But then Mr. Hertz has before succeeded 
in making us li^e seme of this modern n-nslc against r)ur 
inclinations. Whether Mr. Herlz is a wizard in this 
respect or whether we are becoming used to the mod- 
ern music we are not yet ready to determine, but some- 
how we are "slipping." Maybe we will yet become 
converted. 

PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA IN FINE FORM 

Rothwell Offers Three Novelties— Glazounow's Sixth 

Symphony a Feature of Program — Sabanieva Soloist 

at Last Week's Concert 

By BRUNO DAVID USSHER 

Los Angeles, November 1, 1024 
Three out of five selections new here, the fourth an 
aria not sung before with ensemble accompaniment, 
ranked last Friday's Philharmonic orchestra concert as 
one of the most interesting given. It is a gratifying 
rolicy and record Director Walter Henry Rothwell has 
adopted and one which should win him sold-out houses. 
As a matter of fact, there were few empty seats at 
this representation of so fascinating a program, par- 
ticularly as the orchestra plays .with prodigal beauty 
(if tone discreetly co-ordinated by its conductor. 



c.lazounow's Sixth Symphony In C minor opus D8. 
Ilinri Uabaud's Procession at Night, the Cavutina and 
Hondo from Glinka's opera A Life for the Tsar, sung 
by Mme. Thalia Sabanieva. soprano, from the Metro- 
politan Opera In New York, where the noveltle? The 
llymn to the Sun from Rimsky-Korsakow's (;oq d'Or 
sung for the first time with orchestra and Weber's 
Freischutz overture completing a program well bal- 
anced In moods. 

Often it Is wished that Conductor Itotliwell could 
precede the symphony with a short piece or not place 
it at the beginning. The seating ot latecomers, after 
the first movement, causes a break In the continuity 
of the work. Moreover a previous selection will give 
the auditor the respite to attune his powers of assimila- 
tion to a major work, such as a symphony. It Is rather 
immaterial to the writer when the symphony Is played 
as he usually attends a rehearsal or two and Is "In a 
way prepared. This Is merely to voice the »"l8he8 of 
some concert patrons who jioint to an arrangement more 
desirable to them as often applied In the East and 
Europe. Those coming unavoidably late thus, too. would 
hear the most important work on the program In its 
entirety. 

Thalia Sabanieva's voice has been discussed already 
during the recent opera season. It Is flexible, clear. 
of smooth technic even in difficult passages, but rather 
colorless and often cold. Much of her singing is of 
head-tone quality, floating to a fine degree again flot suf- 
ficiently substantial. Mme. Sabanieva. being Greek, 
has inherited a super-amount of poise from her classic 
ancestors, so much that emotion Is greatly lacking. 
There was more dramatic quality in the Glinka aria. 
which, followed by Weber's Freischuetz, might have 
been written by that German master, rather than by 
Glinka, acclaimed as tlip ""falhii nf Ihe national school 




PERCY GRAINGER 

The Famous Pianist, Who Will Be Soloist at the 

First Municipal Symphony Concert at the 

Auditorium Next Monday Evening. 

of composers in Russia."' Tin- llymn to the Sun seemed 
a trille fast in tempo, but accompaniments In both vocal 
numbers were lovely. 

I'erhaps I could say nothing better of the Glazounow 
symphony than that I have heard It before, and again 
at the Thursday rehearsal and it Impressed more than 
1 expected at yesterday's performance. I anticipated 
it to be less arresting, which, despite a general super- 
ficiality of .sentiment, it Is. Glazounow's aim. to break 
away from national tendencies. Is wellnigh accom- 
plished In this opus, written 1896 when he was only 
thirty-one years old. As a result It Is not as strong 
a work as his more Russian symphony No. 4, played 
two years ago. It Is typical Glazounow. however, al- 
wavs tuneful, skillfully written though not free from 
ordinariness. The first movement Is Influenced by the 
same part of Dvorak's New World symphony, not 
thematlcally but in general effect, one also hears the 
French horns from Richard Strauss' Don .luan. The 
second movement, variation form. Is somewhat Russian 
in mood. Influenced In a degree by Tschalkowsky. In 
the dance-like Intermezzo and closing fourth movement 
Wagner (In his Masterslngers) can be sensed. The first 
and last movements, strongest In mood, interestingly 
elaborate and festive, are the most likeable conceived 
so long ago the opus, of course, is not modern, rather 
a revival of classicism In the manner of Brahms, though 
without Brahms' depth. Perhaps an opus 58. including 
six symphonies, for a composer so young. Implies great 
(rontlnufd on PaK" ' Column I i 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



November 7, 1924 
U 



J., 



The years bear witness 



position of honor, standing among the 
famous portrait paintings of great musicians in 
Sleinnay Hall, in lower New York, vou will find 
it today. It is the piano that Henry Steinwav. 
seventy years ago, built as a labor of love. He 
built it as a present to his bride. 
Now 1, who am also a Steinway piano, stand 
among the other Steinway pianos at Sherman, 
Clay & Co.. here on the western coast. The years 
that lie between me and that original Steinway 
piano have seen many changes. But two changes 
they have not seen. They have not seen Steinway 
pianos made in any other spirit than a spirit of 
love; and they have not seen them under any 
other supervision than Steinwav supervision. 
When I left the Steinway factory on Long Island 
and began my long journev to the Coast I had been 
six years in the seasoning and making. The control 
and management of the business was in the hands 
of the third and fourth generations of the house- 
hold of Steinway. Eight members of the Sleinivay 
familv had directed my evolution from the raw- 
wood, steel and glue into the completed piano. 
Nearly all the skilled workmen in those great 
shops had been in those shops for many years. I 
was wood and steel and glue until thev shaped me. 
Now, I am as much of the spirit of Steinway as the 
first piano Henry Steinway built. 
What does this mean in my own career as a Stein- 
way piano? 

It means that I have been built with an individual 
interest, a conscientiousness, a deep determination 
that I should be worthy of my name. 
It means that the mountain spruce of my sounding- 
board, for example, is the finest procurable. After 
careful inspection and purchase it was dried for 
six months at the sawmill, then dried for another 
year in the Steinway yards, then seasoned for two 
or three years in special sheds, then kiln-dried and 
re-dried in strip and board— in all, a seasoning and 
drying process of five full years. 
It means that, following the seasoning of this and 



The story that is told by the Steinway 




"^sM 



my other wood, nine months were spent shaping 
and fashioning me in the factory. In that one gen- 
eral factory every part of me was made, including 
plate, rim, hammers, brass castings, action, and all 
special hardware. Nothing was let out on contract. 
Nothing was left to outside influence. 



is that I 
charm will 



ill last, tha 



tor years to come, 
my full, rich, sin; 
ivili delight those 



possess me as long as materials shall cling together. 
So after six years of such patient fashioning, I left 
the Long Island factory and came West. I was 
unloaded from my long cruise and carefully gone 
over in the Sherman, Clav & Co. shops. And now 
I stand on the floor at Sherman, Clay & Co. among 
other pianos, waiting for the purchaser who shall 
come to claim me. 

Sometimes I talk over the old days in our original 
home with the other Steinway pianos here at Sher- 
man, Clay & Co. We miss the cheery companionship 
of the old square grand, with its rosewood case— 
the piano that Henry Steinway built. It used to 
preside over us like a proud little old great-grand- 
mother. But usually we discuss the future. We 
discuss the homes that each of us, in the days to 
come, will be carried away to like brides. 
Some of us are eager to preside over great man- 
sions, with servants to dust us off, and drawing 
rooms to inhabit. Some of us are ambitious to 
have careers on the concert stage. But I have a 
different ambition. 

I want to be the piano near the fireside, where a 
modest family gathers about me and plays familiar 
melodies. I want to be the companion^ from the 
very first, to little children as they learn to touch 
my keys. I want to be the discreet— and the only 
—third person present between lovers. I want to 
d my days in a little happy home. Surely, if 



some family knew ho 
love for me worthwhile, Thev would "come ' 
claim me without delay. Doesn't some couple 
a modest home and purse want to come in 
discover how it can claim its Steinway piano? 



Sherman Bay & Co. 

Kearny and Sutter Sts., San Francisco 
CALIFORNIA-OREGON- WASHINGTON 



ind 



RENA 

LAZELLE 

SOPRANO 
San Francisco Opera Company 

Head of Tocal Department. San Francifico Coniiei 

atorr of Mn»lc — Available for Recitals, Ope 

Oratorio. Concert 



EMILIE LANCEL 

OPERATIC MEZZO-SOPRANO 

After Two Years' Absence in Europe 
Available For 

OPERA— ORATORIO— CONCERT 

Management ALICE SECKELS 
63 Post Street 

Residence: 433 Eighteenth Avenue, San Francisco 
Tel. Bayview 1461 



ANNIE LOUISE DAVID 

HARP SOLOIST AND TEACHER 

ON THE PACIFIC COAST DURING 
SEASON 1924-1925 

Address: Hotel Claremont, Berkeley 
Tel. Berkeley 9300 

Management Alice Seckels, 68 Post Street 
Tel. Douglas 7267 



PASMORE VOCAL STUDIOS 



Suite 5I>6. Kohler A Chue Bldfr.. 
CvUttce Ave., Berkele7. R«alde 
Road. Berkeley 



KARL RACKLE 

1330 PINE STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 
Telephone Graystone 1925 



ALICE GENTLE 

CATHARINE A. BAMMAN 
53 West 39th Street New York, N. Y. 



DOUGLAS SOULE-Pianist 

ADA A\CED HVPILS ACCEPTED 

"Wednesday nnd Friday mornings at Studio; 903 

Koh.er & Ch!i«e IlldB-. San Francisco. Teleplione 

Kearny 5454. Realdence Studio: 150 Monte Viafa 

Ave.. Oakland. Telephone Piedmont 760. 



AUGUSTA HAYDEN 

SOPRANO 
Available for Concerta and Recitala 
Address: 471 .•!7<h Avenue 
Tel. Pac. «.t2 

HOMER HENLEY 

BAHITO-VF: TEACHER OF SI.VGIXG— CONDUCTOR 

Direclor Cnlifornia Club Choral 

An Oratorio Authority 

leaidence Studio: 1249 Bay, at Franklin. Tel. FIIL 10S3 



LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM 



CDXTRAI.ri) 
Complete Course of Operatic TralB- 
erce St. Tel. Fillmore 45.-.3 



Dominican ColIeg;e School of Music 

SAN RAFAEL. CALIFORXIA 
Courses Thoroueb and Procresslve. Public School 
Music. Accredited Diploma 



281 Alvarado 



MR. ANDREW BOGART 
Teacher of Singing 

Pupils Prepared for Opera, Oratorio, Church and 
Concert. New Address: Suite 600, Kohler & Chase 
BIdg., 26 O'Farrell Street. Telephone Douglas 9256 



WALLACE A. SABIN 



e-^fitf ' n. '^*?""f Emanu El, First Church of Christ Scl- 

i?r?eV. °p'ror%V^; "^37"5^?Sa^-.,"F?^sr C^rls^,?„'l^!S•' 
Church. Phone Frankllo ,W, Res'^'lVud^o'^Tl'l'jYe*,^ «o" 
Ave., Berkeley. Phone Piedmont 242S 



MISS DOROTHEA MANSFELDT 



207 Cherry St 



. Waahingrton & Clay 



The College of the Holy Names 

LAKE MERRITT. OAKLAND 



Complete Conaervatory Course Piano 

't^^""- Voice. Counterpoint. Harmon] 



DURINI VOCAL STUDIO 

""Jt'^HTn^M ^r MME. LILLIAN SLINKEV Dl'RINI 
Italian Method — Voice Placement — Breathlne 
to--. Fin «. Opera— Church— Oratorio 

107- Ellis St. TeL We,. S, 



PASMORE TRIO 

Mary. Violin— Suzanne, Piano— Dorothy, Cello 

CONCERTS — PUPILS 
2009 Green St. TeL Fillmore 9071 



Miss Elizabeth Westgate 

Teacher of Piano, Orean, Harmony. Organist and Musical 
Director of First Presbyterian Church. Alameda. Home 
Studio: 1117 PARU STREET. ALA.MEDA. Telephone Ala- 
meda l,-.5. Thursdays. Blerriman School, 597 Eldorado Ave.. 
Oakland. Telephone Piedmont 2770. 



MUSIC PRINTING? 

SCHOLZ, ERICKSON & CO., Inc. 

521 Howard Street Phone Douglas 4273 

San Francisco 



MEuining School of Music 

JOHN C. MANNINO, Director 
SM2 Washini^ton Street Telephone Flltmoi 



am 



PEARL HOSSACK WHITCOMB 

DRAMATIC SOPRANO 
Absolute Method of Vol<^ Upon the Breath 
Monday and ThuriMlnr. lOO.'S Kohler A- Chnse Building' 
le ProMpect -I2« 



Tel. Gnrflcid 0723. Re 



November 7, 1^24 



^rifif (^dm Mv^kd ^W# 



MISICAL UEVIKW COMI'ANV 

I. Kohler ,1 I'haN? llldK.. 2ti O'Fnrrell S 
rnnclKco, Cnllf. TeL Gifrfleld B250-5251 



ALFRED METZGER 



Make nil ohecka. drafts, money orders or other for 
remittance payable to 
PACIFIC COAST MISICAL REVIEW 



Oakland-Uerkeley- Alameda 

Tel. Alameda 1S5 
Mlaa ElUabeth WealKate In Charv 



HIT ParD St., Alameda 



Abbie Gerrlah-Jo 



Loa ADKelea Office 
Scenic Avenue, llollynood, California 
Bruno l>avid ftfslier iu Chnrge 



VOL. XLVII FRIDAY, NOV. 7, 1924 



«d aa aecond-clasa mall matter at S. F. PoatofUce. 



TWENTY-FOURTH YEAR 




iNew York, Oct. 29, 1924 
Dear San Francisco: 

The New York musical season has almost reached 
its lull momentum, with all the available concert halls 
iu use every day. When the opera begins at the Met 
on No\'ember 3, the season will be in full swing. Already 
some of the great lights, like Alma Gluck and Chaliapin. 
have made New York appearances, and a tour weeks' 
season of opera by the San Carlo Company has been 
comileted Stars of the song world seem to think this 
the accepted year tor vaudeville appearance. A month 
ago Mme. Cisneros made her debut with the Keith 
forces at the Palace: yesterday Mme. Gadski began a 
similar engagement at the Hippodrome. 

The musical public was greatly interested in the sale 
of the Aeolian Building. The purchaser was a private 
individual who has given a lease to the Woolworth 
Company. In the course of a few years, this building 
which bears so honorable a name in musical annals, 
will put on a red front and become a link in the chain 
of stores which binds the eastern and western coasts 
in a bargain-offering embrace. The music center of New 
Yoik is shifting uptown. Already the Chickering Com- 
pany is occupying a new building in West ."JTth street, 
and a block away on the same street a wonder-pile, 
which will be the new Steinway Building, is nearing 
completion. In April it will be ready for occupancy. 
This is in the near vicinity of Carnegie Hall. The 
Aeolian Company will not be put out of business by 
the red front link, though it is put out of home by it. 
This company will find new quarters in the new music 
center. 

There is a new music magazine and its name is 
"Music." The first issue has appeared. It is beauti- 
ful. The printing is very artistic and the illustrations 
of the best quality. The list of editors and sponsors 
includes many distinguished names. It is planned on 
an entirely new policy — a popular magazine for profes- 
sional and layman alike. It will meet the existing de- 
mand for music information and interpretation. Its 
unique feature will be editorial independence. It will 
accept no favors either in the form of advertising or 
other things from professional musicians, teachers, or 
private music schools; so that the reviews and criti- 
cisms which appear in it may be relied upon to be 
sincere, informative and independent. 

I have a question from J. G., San Francisco, to which 
I will take this opportunity to make reply. "Is it possi- 
ble." he asks, "for a person nowadays to compose a 
piece of music entirely different from any musical com- 
position that has ever been written?" A rare thing to 
do 1 should say. but possible for a genius. Our musical 
system has been very greatly worked, overworked in 
fact, but I believe there are still possibilities which have 
not yet been discovered. When you consider the work 
of Paul Whiteinan and others who are trying to advance 
popular American music in a serious way and who are 
really achieving new effects which are destined to have 
an influence on the future trend of music, you would 
hesitate to answer no to the above question. 

Sincerely. KARL RACKLE 

VOICES STILL SOUGHT FOR FESTIVAL 

Mayor Rolph's citizens committee arranging for San 
Francisco's second annual Spring Music Festival to be 
given next April in Civic Auditorium has sent out a call 
to every city department to aid in recruting voices for 
the great festival chorus. The police and fire depart- 
ments are among the municipal branches which have 
been invited to participate. Singers may enlist at the 
rehearsal meetings being held four nights each week 
in the Auditorium of the Girls High School, Geary. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 

OFarrell and Scott streets, or at Chorus Headquarters, 
Community Service offices. Flood Building. Chester W. 
Rosekrans is in charge ot the chorus recruiting. Al- 
fred Hertz is director general ot the Spring Music 
festival and Pr. Hans Leschke is choral director. Super- 
visor J. Knimii Hayden is chairman ot the citizens com- 
mitlfc. 



Editor 



FIRST FREE MUNICIPAL RECITAL 

Clarence Kddy. known in the musical world as llie 
■'dean of American organists" will give the first free 
municipal recital of the 1924-25 series in Civic Auditor- 
ium Sunday afternoon, November 9. A popular program, 
designed to appeal to all, has been announced by Super- 
visor J. Emmet Hayden, chairman ot the Auditorium- 
Committee. Eddy will give the following nvimbers on 
the great organ: 

Prelude and Fugue on Bach, Liszt: The Bells of St. 
Anne de Beaupre. Alexander Russell: Third Sonata, 
(new) Felix Borowaki; Coin' Home. Dvorak, arranged 
by H. Clough Leighter, from the New World Symphony, 
.-V Southern Fantasy, Ernest F. Hawke, introducing The 
Swanee River. My Old Kentucky Home, old BlacK ,Ioe. 
and Dixie; Russian Boatmen's Song, arranged by Clar- 
ence Eddy; .Melody, General Charles G- Dawes;" Slum- 
ber Song, Lester Groom; Londonderry Air. Henrv Cole- 
man; Allegretto in E Flat, William Wolstenhouse; and 
Grand Choeur Dialogue, Eugene Gigout. 



DERU-CLEMENT BEETHOVEN RECITALS 

.\mong the most prominent and most musicianly 
events of the beginning of the season are undoubtedly 
the three Beethoven Sonata recitals given by Edouard 
Deru, violinist, and Ada Clement, pianist, at the San 
Francisco Conservatory ot Music during the early part 
ot this month. The best proof for the artistic excellence 
of these recitals was the fact that the attendance grew 
larger at every succeeding event until at the last the 
hall was crowded and many more tickets could have 
been sold. These two artists played on this occasion all 
the Beethoven Sonatas, and they did this with an in- 
sight and artistic skill worthy of the heartiest recogni- 
tion. 

Both Mr. Deru and Miss Clement belong to the very 
best of our resident artists. They have had the experi- 
ence, the reputation and the qualifications to make 
them thoroughly competent to appear before the public. 
They play technically and musically with that element 
of intelligence and discrimination without which no 
musician has a right to demand public recognition as a 
concert artist. They prepare their programs carefully 
and interpret the classics with a serious understanding 
of the values of musical presentation. The audience 
consisted of students and music lovers who understand 
the innermost significance of musical compositions and 
who in the work of these two artists found enjoyment 
and pleasure. 

There is not enough of this kind of public work being 
done in San Francisco and vicinity, and these artists 
are entitled to hearty commendation for keeping up 
this necessary phase of public performance which, in 
addition to our symphony and chamber music concerts, 
contribute toward the creation ot a genuine musical 
atmosphere in this city. ALFRED METZER. 



MUSIC TEACHERS' ASSOCIATION BANQUET 

The San Francisco Music Teachers' Association had 
one of its annual banquets at the Whitcomb Hotel on 
Monday evening, October 27, and as usual members and 
guests enjoyed themselves thoroughly. Mrs. Alvina 
Heuer Wilson, president ot the San Francisco Associa- 
tion, did the honors as presiding officer and toastmaster 
and, possessing a keen sense of humor and ingenuity in 
entertaining, she created an atmosphere that was im- 
possible to resist. The guest of honor was Frank Car- 
roll Giften, president ot the Music Teachers' Associa- 
tion ot California who, during the course ot the eve- 
ning, made a very interesting and educational address 
on the purposes and activities ot the association. Other 
invited guests were Mrs. Florence French editor ot the 
Chicago Musical Leader; Redfern Mason, music editor 
of the San Francisco Examiner; Ray C. B. Brown, music 
editor of the San Francisco Chronicle; Charles Wood- 
man, music editor ot the San Francisco Call; .-Mtred 
Metzger, editor of the Pacific Coast Musical Review; 
Miss Cora Winchell and others whose names have 
escaped our memory at this time. 

After the conclusion of the repast there was a splen- 
did musical program, during which .Miss Ada Clement 
played some compositions by Ernst Bloch in that thor- 
ough manner for which she is noted, and Miss Helen 
Coiburn Heath sang a group ot songs, ably accompanied 
by Walter Frank Wenzell, with that sincerity and enthu- 
siasm which has created for her a coast wide reputa- 
tion. Both artists were heartily apiilauded by those 
present. In addition to .Mr. Giften's most enective ad- 
dress, Redfern Mason spoke on the subject of how to 
prepare news for the press by the Music Teachers' As- 
sociation, in which he brought out some very significant 
points necessary to know. Miss Winchell called atten- 
tion to the impending production ot .Mary Carr .Moore's 
American opera, Narcissa. and Mrs. Wilson, .Mrs. Steph- 
enson and Miss Estelle Carpenter added to the interest 
of the occasion with appropriate remarks. It was an un- 
usually successful event. 



Verba Buena School Women's Club, Miss Effie McFadden 
President, had a luncheon at 12 o'clock at the Fairmont 
Hotel on Saturday, October ISth, The program included 
an informal talk by Miss Virginia D. Heath, on her 
European experiences, and music arranged by Miss 
Estelle Carpenter, Director of Music in the Public 
Schools, was given. Miss Beatrice Cliftord, the well 
known pianist, gave variations by Rameau. Miss Muriel 



Bales Keust. a pupil of Pearl llossack Whllconib. accom- 
paniwl by Dorothy Clute, gav,- Down in the Forest by 
Ronalil and Fimes Vers by Hahn. .Miss Frances Sanford 
a pupil of Lincoln Batchehler. gave Berceuse by Chopin 
and Staccato Caprice by Vogrich. Miss Dorothy Labo- 
witch, 13. child pianist, and a pupil ot .Miss Grace Camp- 
bell, gave Prelude ot Chopin, and Debussy's Arabesque 
Miss Labowitch has played at the California Theatre 
with the orchestra and attends the Adams Public School. 

Margarets Bruntsch, whose beautiful contrallo voice 
aroused the admiration and enthusiasm of the thousands 
who heard her as Madalena in Rigoletto during our most 
recent opera season, sang at the opening concert given 
at the University ot Fine Arts on Thursday evening 
October 30, and scored a tremendous success. Madame 
Bruntsch's selections upon this occasion were: Voce Dl 
Donna from La Gioconda, Trees, and by special re- 
quest tlie aria from Samson and Delilah. All of these 
numbers were infused with opulence and beauty of lone, 
a wealth ot expression and touches of individuality all 
ot which reflected the intellectual and imaginative 
powers ot the artist. On Saturday, November 8, 
Madame Bruntsch will give a program in Santa Cruz 
and there is not the slightest doubt but that her success 
there will equal those enjoyed at all her previous ap- 
pearances. 



FIRST AUDITORIUM SYMPHONY CONCERT 

The first concert of the municipal concert series will 
be given on the night ot November 10 by Percy Grain- 
ger. Australian pianist-composer in ci.njunclion with 
the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, Alfred Hertz. 
conductor. Mr. Grainger will play the famous Concerto 
in A Minor by Grieg whom he Ueclaies. is one of the 
world's greatest composers. A contest was held re- 
cently by several eminent musicians to decide whicn 
musical composition was really the greatest and It 
was agreed that Wagner's "The .Mastersingers" Is the 
most wonderful of all compositions of a'l time. The 
third act of this number will be played by the Symphony 
Orchestra on the night of the Grainger Concert. The 
"Schenerazade" suite by Rimsky-Korsakow will also 
be rendered. 



SECOND SECKELS' OAKLAND MATINEE 

The second -Alice Seckels' Matinee Musicalcs. Wednes- 
day afternoon. November 12, in the Ballroom ot the 
Hotel Oakland, will present two artists of unusual at- 
tainments; Annie Louise David famous American harp- 
ist and Max Gegna. distinguished Russian 'cellist, will 
join forces in a progr;im unique in its combination of 
numbers for 'cello and harp. 

Although the harp is one of the oldest of instruments 
we are seldom given an opportunity of hearing It ex- 
cept for a- few moments in the orchestra. Miss David 
brings to the concert platform a rare combination of 
tone and virtuosity, as well as personal grace and 
charm. The instrument she plays is one of unusual 
beauty as it was especially made for her. Miss David 
returns to New York soon after this recital. 

Max Gegna came from New York last season to be 
cellist with the Symphonic Ensemble and has now- 
been made a member of llie San Francisco Symphony 
orchestra. The beautiful Handel Sonata for harp and 
cello will be given its first Oakland presentation and 
other harp and 'cello numbers will be the Ave Maria. 
Schubert and Shepherd Bay, Savoyard. Miss David. 
in response to numerous requests, will give a "request" 
group comprising: Momenlo Capriccio. ProkoHetT; Vale. 
Brahms: Dance of the Elves. Hasselmans. and Songs 
of the Sea, Ware. All ot these have been arranged 
by Miss David. In addition she will play the Barcarolle. 
Zabel; Hourree, Bach; Claire de Lune. Debussy; Au 
Matin. Tournier. Max Gegna will play the Fantasie 
and Variations. Schubert-Servais; Kol Neidri. Bruch 
and Elfentanz, Propper. Tickets for this concert are 
at Sherman, Clay and Company, or may be secured 
by phoning Elsie Cross— Oakland 3972. 



THE PERSINGER-JACOBI RECITAL 

Louis Persinger. violinist, is rarely heard in his own 
recital and his forthcoming appearance in a Sonata 
recital with Irene .lacobi. pianist of .New York, on 
Thursday evening, November 20 at the Fairmont Hotel. 
Is causing music lovers a thrill of anticipation. The 
concert is under the direction of Alice Secklcs. Per- 
singer has appeared as soloist with the New York 
Philharmonic, Metropolitan Opera House orchestra. 
Philadelphia orchestra, Cincinnati orchestra, Minnea- 
polis Symphony. Kansas City Symphony. San Francisco 
Symphony, Portland Symphony, etc., and in recitals 
throughout the country. Pierre V. Key, in the New 
York World called him the "First of American Violin- 
ists." He was concertmaster ot the Blulhner orchestra. 
Berlin, the orchestre du theatre Roal de la Monnale. 
Brussels (Royal Opera Orclieslia I. and llnally with the 
Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra, before coming to San 
Francisco. 

The violin which he plays is a Dominlcus Montagana. 
made in Venice in 1737. and is considered the finest 
specimen of his workmanship extant. It is known as 
the "Tarisio" Montagnana and has been a part of some 
of the most famous collections and has been played by 
many of the great violinists ot former days. Irene 
.lacobi is the wife of Fred Jacobi. one of the coninosers 
now in the forefront ot the American group of com- 
posers. Mr. and .Mrs. Jacobi are In San Francisco 
until after this recital. Mrs. Jacobi and Mr. Ivrsinger 
will play the Brahms Sonata in D Minor which she 
coached with Franz Kueisel who had the privilege of 
playing it many times with Brahm:' himself. The Moz- 
art Sonata in C Major and the Richard Strauss Sonata 
in E Flat Major will complete the program. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



November 7, 1Q24 



ALMA GLUCK'S RECITAL 

Thousunds of San Franciscan's will be regaled with 
a typical Alma Gluck program at the Exposition Audi- 
torium next Sunday afternoon. Xoveraber 16th. The 
famous prima-donna. without doubt one of America's 
favorite singers, is making a short transcontinental 
tour after a retirement of several seasons. Gluck's re- 
turn to her profession in New York was the signal of a 
great outpouring of her thousands of admirers. The 
consensus of critical opinion gave Gluck much praise, 
and the most eminent writers waxed enthusiastic. The 
event was a triumph, and long past twelve o'clock, 
midnight, before four thousand people in the Hippo- 
drome stopped their enthusiastic applause, only to be 
sent home by the turning off of the lights. 

Already Gluck is assured that she will face a large 
audience on her visit here, where but a single concert 
is scheduled, for Manager Selby C. Oppenheimer reports 
and extraordinary advance sale. 

Gluck will be assisted at this event by Mane Romaet 
Rosanoff. Russian cellist, and by the always-efficient 
Samuel Chotzinoff at the piano. The full program to 
be rendered is herewith appended: Sonata (lith Ceii- 
turv) (Sammartini). La Source (Davidoft). Mrae. Rosan- 
off' With Verdure Clad (Creation) (Haydn). My Metier 
Bids Me Bind Mv Hair (Haydn). 'Warnung (Mozart). 
Oh- Sleep Why Dost Thou Leave Me I Handel I. Der 
Ku^s (Beethoven). Mme. Gluck; O Thou Billowy Har- 
vest Field (Rachmaninoff). Song of the Shepherd Lehl 
(Rimskv-Korsakoff). Two Folk Songs of Little Russia 
(Zimbalist). Die Post (Schubertl. Canzonetta (Loewe). 
Botschaft (Brahms). Mrae. Gluck; Intermezzo (Grana- 
dosl Air (Hurel. La Fileuse (Faure). Mme. Rosanoff; 
Bird of the Wilderness (Horsman). Time of Parting 
(Hadlev) Fair Tales (Wolfti. The Cunning' Little 
Thing "(Hagemannl. Red. Red Rose (Cottenet), Mme. 

' ;iuck. • 

SOPHIE BRASLAU 

Sophie Braslau will soon be in San Francisco again. 
This will be her second visit in as many seasons, for 
here the brilliant contralto is held in high regard and 
numbers among music-lovers thousands of ardent admir- 
ers. A Braslau program is a song recitil of sheer deliaht. 
and when she sings at the Columbia Theatre on Sunday 
afternoon. December 14. hundreds of those who journey 
far to hear Braslau whenever she appears will be de- 
lighted with one of her unusual and interesting con- 
certs. « 

RUTH ST. DENIS 

Musically December will be made notable by the 
week's engagement at the Curran Theatre arranged for 



/^ 


KAJETAN ATTL 


l^\ 


SOLO HARPIST, SAN FRANCISCO 


# 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


of Lyon & Healr Harps 


IIK>4 Koble 
ilcnc-^ I'hfin 


t EnBagementB and Instrnclion .\|»ply 
& (Ihnite Ulde- T«L Uouelaa lU'S. on 
and Saturday Afternoona O.XLY. Reai- 
f i-'ranklin TVIT. 




Jt ST OIT! 


A METHOD FOR THE HARP || 




By Kajetan Atll 




CARI, FISHER, PublUher 


For Sale al 
H 


Sherman, Clay * Co.. Kohlrr & Cha.e, 
enry Grobi and Kajelan Attl 



THE PUBLIC SQUARE 

.\M> (ITHER SHORT VKRSi; 

BY RELDA M. CAILLEAU 

.IIESSXOES OF HI MAN INTEREST 

I'RKE, ti.^r. 
For Sale at the Wblle Honx- and City of I'm 



11 SUPREME d»Q 

1 EVENTS tpO 

Elwyn Artist Series 

JASCHA HEIFETZ 

WORLD FAMOUS VIOLI NIST— J AN. 18 

ROLAND HAYES 

SENSATIONAL NEGRO TENOR— FEB. 22 

^If»RI/ ltOSI-;>TII \l.. IMniii-l .. November 17 

CEtll.lV 1IVNSi;n. \l,,liMl>t Kecember 4 

ISA Klli;>li:il. Ilnllndisf Deeembrr Ii: 

M\lll\ new. IN. '•..iiriino lannary ::il 

\IIti;HT vfvi.fiiM.. \ i,,rii,l.c FehrunrySO 

^l\lll:l l.MIIll-o\. >.m|.t:imo .Marrh IK 

IciMniN «IIIIM. <ll \Hli;l .\|>rll 7 

lti:i\\l.n W |;|{KI:\H V i II. Ilurilone ,\prll20 

MKIII.E \l.<0(K. liiiilriillo .May — 

:!3!.4'; SavlnK> on Sraxon Tieketa 
Seaaon Prlcen: »l7.mi, «lll..',o. fs.lH) I pina tax) 

.Now on Sale, Sherman. Clay & Co. 

Heirets and Hayea coneerta will he Elven on Sunday 

afternoona at Caalno Theater. .411 other concerU at 

Srotllxh Rile Hall leveninea). 



Ruth St. Denis. Ted Shawn and the Denishawn Danc- 
ers. Under Selby C. Oppenheimer's management this 
extraordinary combination of artistic worth will render 
a series of programs, including much of the most valu- 
able dance lore of .American tradition. Season after 
season New York and the rest of the country huvr 
watched Ruth St. Denis exhibiting creations of beauty. 
while she has gained the name of being the greatest 
dancer America has yet produced, and from the stand- 
point of creativeness. is unsurpassed by any dancer in 
the world. 

Where the premier danseuses of European centers 
have made brilliant careers by marvelous technique 
in a style already created. Ruth St. Denis has created 
a whole new school and style of dance, and not con- 
tent with one style only, each season marks new trails 
blazed by this great pioneer. For this unusual at- 
traction Manager Selby C. Oppenheimer is now re- 
ceiving advance mail orders, which can be addressed to 
him in care of Sherman. Clay and Company. 



MISCHA ELMAN 



As year by year the great Russian violinist, Mischa 
Elman, makes his periodical visits to American cities, 
so year by year his popularity broadens and his genius 
expands. The world today knows but a few truly great 
exponents of the string and bow. and each in his way 
is marked by achievement of a different sjvt. Elman. 
among the elect, stands aloof, with an equipment in- 
cluding every phase of violinistic perfection. As a 
producer of tone he has never had an equal; as a tech- 
nician, none surpass him; and as a student of music, his 
life is devoted to the finest in the literature of his in- 
strument. 

Elman will play twice in this city on his coming visit, 
both recitals to be given in the Columbia Theatre under 
the management of Selby C. Oppenheimer. Extra. 
ordinary programs are listed. On Sunday afternoon. 
December 7 the young Russian will play the Nardini 
Sonata and an important work by Albert Dupuis. which 
he is playing for the first time in this country, and which 
is entitled Fantaisie Rapsodique. .Arrangements tor the 
violin of the Mozart Adagio. Haydn Minuet and a Chopin 
Nocturne. Rode's Etude Caprice and Rubinstein's The 
Dew is Sparkling, as well as Victor Herbert's A la 
Valse. Ernest Bloch's Nigun and Wieniawski's Polo- 
naise are scheduled. 



//ear- 
California's Greatest Orchestra! 

SYmphoMY 

ORCHESTRA 

AtrruDMcim Conductor 

AUDITORIUM 
MONDAY EVENING, NOV. 10 

PROGRAM 

1. Symphonic Suite, "Scheherazade" 

Rimsky-Korsakow 
The Sea and Sinbad's Ship. 
The Narrative of the Calendar Prince. 
The Young Prince and the Young 
Princess. 

Festival at Bagdad. The Sea. The 
Ship Goes to Pieces on a Rock Sur- 
mounted by the Statue of a Warrior. 
Conclusion. 

2. "The Mastersingers." Introduction to Act 
III. Dance of the Apprentices and Proces- 
sion of the Guilds Wagner 

3. Concerto for Piano, A minor Grieg 

Percy Grainger 

Percy Grainger, Soloist 



All Seala Reserved. Prieea: »I.0«. 7ne. SOe. On 
Shermnn. Clay & Co. l>ireetlt»n .Vudltoriiim 
niittee, J. Emmet Hayden, Chairman. 

TIeketa at Sherman, Clay * Co. 



FIRST EAENT 

Elwyn Artist Series 

ONLY SAN FRANCISCO APPEARANCE 

OF 

MORIZ 

ROSENTHAL 

"A Plnnlstie Giant Ai'<'oiii|>llnhliiu tin- Siipirlatlve" 

SCOTTISH RITE AUDITORIUM 
Monday Evening, November 17 



Giacomo Minkowski 



FIRST POPULAR SYMPHONY CONCERT 

Next Sunday afternoon in the Curran Theatre. Alfred 
Hertz will present the San Francisco Symphony Or- 
chestra in the first concert of its Popular Series. In 
keeping with the nature of these affairs, the program 
has been made up of numbers well established as 
favorites among lovers of the classics in the lighter 
forms. The list announced for the opening concert is 
made up of the overture to Smetana's Bartered Bride, 
the Henry VIll Ballet Suite of Saint-Saens. Wagner's 
powerful Rienzi Overture, the Alsatian Scene of Mas- 
senet, and Chabrier's spirited rhapsody Espana. 

The second pair of regular symphony concerts, to be 
given in the Curran Friday and Sunday afternoons of 
next week, will be distinguished by the premiere per- 
formance of a symphony by Frederick .lacobi, the well- 
known San Francisco composer. Jacobi has had several 
earlier works performed here by the symphony, and 
being in San Francisco at present, he has bestowed t^e 
honor o£ producing his newest symphonic work upon 
Hertz and his splendid body of musicians. 

The next pair of symphonies will also give symphony 
patrons their first hearing of the Franko string orches- 
tra arrangement of Vivaldi's A minor concerto, which 
has just been added to the orchestra's library, while 
the remaining item announced is the spirited Strauss 
rondo. Till Eulenspiegel's Merry pranks. 



FREDERIC 

POWELL 

VOICE SPECIALIST 
TEACHER OF SINGING 

RESTORATION OF LOST OR 
IMPAIRED VOICES 

705 Kohler & Chase BIdg., Tuesdays and Fridays 
Residence Phone Sunset 6524 



BENJAMIN 

MOORE 



2636 UNION STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Fillmore 1624 



BY APPOINTMENT 



PAUL STEINDORFF 



Selby t. Onpenbeinie 

^ -ALMA 

Gluck 

SOPRAf/O 



EXPOSITION AUDITORIUM" 

San Francisco 

SUNDAY AFTERNOON, NOV. 16 




r\KV\ AMr> AlDITORIl M TIIE.ATRE 
U/\1S.1^/\1N JJ „(,^„^, MGHT. XOV. 17 



Only Recitals in Northern California 
Tickets Now on Sale 

at Shermnn, Clay & Co., San Franeisco and Onklainl 



COMING—MIECZYSLAW MUNZ 
MISCHA ELMAN, Violinist 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



LOS ANGELES ORATORIO SOCIETY 

Musical cullure ot a people is measured by the qual- 
ity and extent, uot of concerts by visiting artists, but 
according to the music made by the people, choral 
music in particular. For that reason England, though 
producing no great composers since the days ot Puiceil. 
rhas always been accounted a highly musical nation, be- 
cause of their great choral organizations and choir 
festivals. 

I We possess in the Los Angeles Oratorio society such 
' a singing body, devoted to the performance and intro- 
duction of great works. The chart of activities shows 
a steady ascent of this organization: thanks are due to 
Director John Sma'Iman. Ch r;il i erlormances, especial y 
of new oratorios, like the activities of a great orchestra, 
are expensive and rarely self-supporting. Despite a 
steady financial struggle the Los Angeles Oratorio So- 
ciety has more and more added to the musical prestige 
of this community. It is the largest singing group on 
the coast, working altrustically. December 21 Los 
Angeles for the first time will hear the glorious "Christ- 
mas" oratorio by Bach, an undertaking difficult from 
an artistic and pecuniary standpoint. Musical success, 
I harpsn to know, is ascertained. An eminent soloist, 
Sophie Braslau, from the Metropolitan opera, sings the 
chief solo. 

In the meantime the voluntary business administra- 
tion of the Los Angeles Oratorio has started a sub- 
scription drive under John Wilferth and W. E. Monser, 
leading board members. It should be an honor matter 
for the c ncert-going public to respond lo the extent of 
sold-out houses. In turn the Los Angeles Oratorio So- 
ciety, always mindful of presenting leading Los Angeles 
artists.-will continue to engage also great eastern sing- 
ers. Hence this is not "giving" money for "charity," 
but merely paying a just fee in advance for exceptional 
musical enjoyment. 



TSCHAIKOWSKY'S PATHETIQUE NEXT 

Tschaikowsky's sixth — and last — Symphony is the 
piece de resistance in the program for the Third Sym- 
phony Pair which the Los Angeles Philharmonic Or-ches- 
tra. under the authoritative baton of the popular Wal- 
ter Henry Rothwell, plays at Philharmonic Auditorium 
on Friday afternoon, November 7, and Saturday even- 
ing, November 8. Once moi-e are patrons of the con- 
certs to be regaled with a novelty for the second number 
programed is the delightful Adventures in a Perambu- 
lator by the American composer John Alden Carpenter. 
This delicious whimsy depicts the musings of a precoc- 
ious infant on his experiences as he is being trundled 
along in his pel ambulator by what must have been a 
typii al nursemaid — and he must have been a wunder- 
kind for the intellectual quality of the musings is worthy 
of a keen, adult brain. The program closes with the 
rendition of Enesco's Rhapsodie Roumaine. which was 
received with such acclaim last season when it was 
given here for the first time. 



STEWART APPOINTED CHOIRMASTER 

Alexander Stewai-t, executive director of the Civic 
Music and Art Association of Southern California, has 
seen appointed musical director, commencing Novem- 
3er 1, at the First Baptist Church, Pastor Dr. James A. 
FYancis announces. Mr Stewart is natnoially known 
is organizer of music weeks. Before entering com- 
Dunity service work, he ranked among leading violin 
;eachers, directing several of the largest church and 
■ecular choruses in Oakland and San Francisco. In 
hat capacity he gave Pacific Coast first performances 
)f the Brahms' Requiem. Dvorak Stabat Mater, Widor's 
tfass for two choirs etc. During the Panama Pacific 
Sxcosition in the Bay City the Alameda County Ch' rus, 
ihared the first prize of $10,000 with the famous Welsh 
3hoir of Chicago under his baton. Mr. Stewart plans to 
;ive rarely heard and important classic works at the 
•"irst Baptist Church. 



Monday evening at the MacDowell Club of Allied Arts, 
:62 North Western avenue, one of the most valuable 
irograms of the organization was given. Mary Holland 
Cinkaid. novelist noted newsnatier woman, now assis- 
ant editor of "The Argonaut." spoke on books and 
luthors. having for 25 years lived in the centers of 
itei-aiy America. Musically the program offers songs 
ly Beatrice Fenner, Los Angeles girl composer, whose 
ongs were sung by Galli Curci, and Mary Newkirk 
lower, admired for her radiant soprano voice. 

rhe Zoellner Quartet, whose series of Monday evening 
oncerts at Hotel Bi'tmore were noteworthy features of 
he 1923-24 season, will this year present their seventh 
onsecutive season ot Los Angeles concerts at the same 
dace, the opening event taking place Monday evening. 
November 10. Successive dates are December 8, Jan- 
lary 5 and 26, February 2 and March 2. Six novelties, 
n average ot one to each concert, are to be presented 
his season: also prominent assisting artists will be 
leard on this year's progi-ams. The Zoellners are 
nique as an organization though a rare combination 
f talent in one family. Joseph Zoellner, sr., is direc- 
or of and plays the viola in the quartet. The rest of 
he organization's personnel includes: Miss Antoinetie 
loellner. first violin: Joseph Zoellner, jr., cello, and 
imandus Zoellner, second violin. 

Marion Ralston of Pasadena and Eleanor Remick War- 
en of Los Anseles presented compositions of their own 
t the Wawan club meeting. Both are among the lead- 
ag American women composers. The program again 
videnced the high ideals of the club in aid of Ameri- 
an music, Mrs. Grace Widney Mabee, guiding spirit of 
he club, presiding. 



PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 

(Contlnu.il fiom Pagi- 1. Column .1i 

ease of production and proportionate lack of profundity. 

Suffice it to say the performance was greatly appealing. 

the orchestra had to rise at the close of the work. 

Henri Rabaud. French c mposer who conducted the 
Boston symphony orchestra three seasons ago, was 
well received in Procession .Nocturne. ( I'rocessional 
Night), a symphonic poem. It paints the quiet of night, 
the despair of a materialistic mind seeking truth, the 
quaint effects of a procession approaching, passing and 
heard again from afar. A sincere, though not very 
original work, orchestrated effectively, it made a con- 
siderable impression on the audience. Post-Wagnerian 
in style Rabaud strives for beauty, imbueing it with 
somewhat romantic mysticism. 



Beethoven's great Ninth symphony for soloist, chorus 
and orchestra will be given late this season under Direc- 
tor Walter Henry Rothwell with the Philharmonic or- 
chestra and singers recruited Irom the glee c ubs of 
Southern Bi-anch of the state university. Professor 
Kraft and Dean Coop of the university are in charge of 
choral preparations. 

Blanche McTavish, lovely voiced soprano noted for her 
sensitive interpretations and excellent rrssentatiims, 
was feted as principal artist at the last program of the 
Hollywood Musicians' club. 

Anna Priscilla Risher, noted composer and teacher of 
piano theory and voice, with a residence studio at 2041 
Hillhurst drive. Hollywood, has returned from a short 
vacation at Laguna Beach. Miss Risher recently formed 
an ensemble bearing her name, herself at the piano: 
Cleo Rundle. violin: Miss Hendenson. cello and Reba 
Rice, soprano. This group has already filled several 
engagements with much success, including programs 
consisting entirely of Risher, Cadman or ail-American 
works. 



STEIN WAY 

'mi^nsti-umepiioPthe Immortals 



^ 



WORK of art is a work of 
art because it says more than 
it says." 

The Stei\w.\v is essentially a 
"ork of art — sonicthini; more than 
materials and mechanism, the art. 
the soul lies behind. 

Tims the Stkinw.w represents 
the sum total of perfection in pianos. 

South COMPANY 

Broadway cjf,^ Steinway House 



ROSEMARY ROSE 



A Singer Who Teaches — Consolidates Her Studios 

Formerly of Milwaukee. Sheboygan 

and Plymouth 

In Los Angeles 

4:ir so. ivioNMOKio sthi:i;t tki,. .vmiis 

.\ullltionn ll> A|>|>'>liitmeD< Only 
Rulh nrodiiinn. Ilrelntrar 



CHARLES BOM^ES 

TEACHER OF VOICE 
446 S. Grand View, ■■honr S.VIR t.-.. I.oa .tnK'lr 





ttW^^^Hi 


FITZGERALD'S for the o4d-vancemenl of &4usic 

Margaret Messer Morris 

t.(")PR.\.\0 
The appearance of this brilliant Artist on "Cadman 
Night" at the Bowl last season was a triumph acclaimed 
by thousands. 

Gifted by Nature with a beautiful, clear, true lyric so- j 
prano, she has been the favorite soloist of Charles Wake- 
field Cadman for five vears. 
She uses the superb 

KNABE 

exclusively, and says: "Never have I had greater satis- 
faction than in the use of the Knabe — it provides a tonal 
background that is an inspiration." 


HILL STREET NS?'^ AT 72.7-72& 

LOS ANGELES 







L. E. Behymer 

MANAGER OF DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS 

Executive Offices: 

705 Auditorium BIdg., Lot Angela* 



ALMA STETZLER 

VOICE CULTLRE — COACIII.NU l.\ ItKI'lCRTUIHIi: 



CALMON LUBOVISKI 

CONCERT VIOLINIST 
Available for Concerta and R«cl4ala 

Llailted Nambrr of .Advanced Popjla Accepted 

VIollnlat Loa tnKelea Trio 

Sludlo: 334 Maalc Arta Studio RldK, Phone: N2I1NI 



Suite 6(M So. Calif. Maalc Co. Uldc 



Pkone 281 -HOB 



Alexander 


Bevani 


ALL IIRA.VCHiCS 


OF TUB 


VOCAL ART 1 


Slndloi 012 So. Cniif. Vt 


■ale Co. Bids. 


Telephone M2 


!-S20 



ABBIE PQORTON JAMISON 

PIANO — IIARMO.NV — VOCAL COACH 

Spr<-lal l-lnno \iirninl Clnaaea 



ILYA BRONSON ..h,,,..''"'" T"""'a , 

i nllharmonlc Oreheatra 
Loa Ancelea Trio, rbllkarmonlr 
auarlel Inalrurfioa. Chamber .Hualc Reellala 
.t«in La Hlrada. Phone II0II7 3»44 

A.KOODLACH 

VIOLIN MAKKR ANII REPAIRER 

Connoinaear — Appralaer 

SOS Majeallc Theatre llldic.. Loa Anxelea Tucker 4010 

JOHN SMALLMAN 

RARITONI-: — TEACHKR OF SINGING 

Voire TrInI bj Appointment. $3.00. Stndloi H03-K04 So. Cal. 

Muair to. llldK. Mvinn llraUi. Nerrelurr 

ZOELLNER CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

LOS ANnRI.F.R 

I3M Wladaor BomlcTard C3I8 Hollrwosd BaalcTard 

Complete Faeullr *f Artlat Teaekara 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



November 7, 1924 



CLAIRE DUX ^l^rano 



CONCERT MANAGEMENT ARTHUR JUDSON 
FISK BUILDING, NEW YORK CITY 



LIEDER SINGER 

BRUNSWICK RECORD 



LOS ANGELES LETTER 

(Continued on Page 5. Column 21 
The Bears at the Beach four tone pictures for children 
written by flonier Gninn. rrominent composer-pianist, 
with studios at the Southern California Music building, 
constitute one of the best sellers among teacning pieces 
published by Ditson's. 

The adventures of three jovial furry companions af 
a coast resort are here entertainingly pictured in music 
and sketches. They are shown taking a perilous "Prom- 
enade on the Pier." riding "On the .Mf rry-Go-Round" to 
a pleasing waltz, footing it "In the Dance Hall" while 
the band plays a spirited tune and finally, tired out. 
falling "Fast Asleep in the Sand" when the waves crawl 
up the sunny beach. ■ A real novelty in teaching ma- 
teriil. tie pictuies graphic and amusing, the melodies 
bright and full of color. 

Tuesday morning at 10:30 the Euterpe Opera Reading 
Club held its second recital meeting at the Ambassador 
theatre. Wagner's The Fl\ing Dutchmm. not given 
here before, was presented by an able cast, headed by 
Lucille Spenser Kelley and William Tyroler. with Ruth 
Shaffner, Leslie Brigham. Frank Ridge and Earl Meeker. 
The famous overture will be rendered four-hand by Wil- 
liam Tyroler. musical director of the club, and Aglene 
Hamblen, a pupil of his. 



ROSENTHAL OPENS ELWYN SEASON 

Moriz Rosenthal, pianist, has been chosen as the first 
of the eleven attractions to be presented here during 
the coming season by Elwyn Concert Bureau. His con- 
cert on Monday evening November 17, will be the open- 
ing event of the Elwyn Artist Series at Scottish Rite 
Hall. 

Rosenthal begins early in November on his second 
American season after an tibsence of seventeen years. 
Last year, upon his triumphant return he played with 
nearly all the symphony orchestras in the country, he 
was greeted by his old friends — those that were still 
living and admirers who had heard him seventeen. 
twenty and even thirty years ago flocked to piy tribute 
to a man who is still young, who still retell his famous 
anecdotes, and still astonishes the younger critics by 
his phenomenal playing. 

Other artists toeether with the dates of their ap- 
pearances, who will comprise the popular priced con- 



MAX DOLIN 

Distinguished 
Composer - Violinist 



>OW CONDICTIXG THE 
EM.ARGCD ORCHESTRA 

California Theatre -:- 



V; 

San Francisco 



Elwin A. Calberg 



Soloist and Accompanist 
Available Season 1924-1925 



Myra Palache 

PIANIST 

LECTURES ON MUSIC 
APPRECIATION 



San Franci«ro \cld''ei<a. 2r>20 In ion 
Phone %\ ainnt liaO 
On Wedneadar* 19 p. m. to p. 



cert course offered by the Elwyn Concert Bureau are as 
follows: t ei i ia Hansen violinist and i eer ol the .^uer 
clan, December 4; Isa Kremer, international balladist 
and singer of folk songs, December 12: Jascha Heifetz, 
young Russian violinist, January IS; Maria Ivogun, 
Ei;u.pe s greatest col ratura sopr.ino Ja luary 26; Al- 
bert Spalding, foremost American violinist. February 
20; Roland Hayes, phenomenal negro tenor, February 
22; Mabel Garrison, gifted and gracious soprano, March 
IS; The London String Quartet, unsuri assed chamber 
music ensemble, April 7; Reinald Werrenrath, greatest 
concert baritone. April 20. and Merle Alcock. leading 
contralto of the Metropolitan Opera Company in early 
May. 

The concerts of Jascha Heifetz and Roland Hayes will 
be presented on Sunday afternoons at the Casino 
Theatre. All other Elwyn concerts will be evening 
attractions at the Scottish Rite Hall. The Elwyn man- 
agement announce that arrangements have been mide 
whereby subscribers may purchase season tickets for 
the entire eleven attractions at a special price reduc- 
tion. 



SECOND CHAMBER MUSIC COn ' 

Felix Salmond the distinguished English 'cellist, who 
will play here on November 25th in the second concert 
of the Chamber Music Society series, was born in Lon- 
don of a musical family, his father being Normand 
Salmond, the noted British baritone, and his mother a 



NEW SONGS FOR TEACHER AND SINGER 






O'Hara 


Golden Moon 




Rolt 


Come to My Heart 




English 


Wood Fairies 
Brown Bird Singing 




Wilfrid Jones 

Wood 

Novello 






Del Rigo 






Carew 






Lohr 






Carew 


Love's a Merchant 
The Market ... 
Among the Willows 




Carew 

Carew 

Phillips 


A Good Heart All the Way 




Clarke 


Dancing Time in Kerry 










Carne 


My Heart's Haven 




Phillips 








My Little Island Home 
Ragged Vagabond 




Baden 
Randolph 


CHAPPELL-HARMS, INC. 
185 Madison Avenue New York City 



well known pianist. At the age of twelve he began his 
first 'cello lessons at the Royal College of Music. In 
his third year he w'on a scholarship and four years 
later became the pupil of Edouard Jacobs of Brussels. 

His debut occurred in London in 1909 and he was at 
once acclaimed by both public and press as one of the 
elect among the world's 'cellists. Since then he has 
appeared with ever-growing success with every im- 
portant orchestra and in solo and joint recitals through- 
out Europe and America. It was Salmond whom Sir 
Edward Elgar selected to create his concerto for violon- 
cello in 1919 in London. Felix Salmond is not only a 
great 'cellist, but a profound musician as well. 

Chamber Music is Mr. Salmond's particular delight 
and in the understanding and performance of this field 
of music he has no superior. He has been associated 
with many chamber music organizations as visiting 
artists, appearing only with those of the very highest 
standing. In a letter to Mr. Persinger he expressed his 
great satisfaction at collaborating with the Chamber 
Music Society of San Francisco, whose superlative art 
he became well acquainted with on their tour of the East 
in 1922. 



SYMphMY 

ORCHESTRA 

aLrocoHEKTT - ' -•-CONOOCTOR. 

SECOND SYMPHONY PAIR 

NEXT FRIDAY, 3 P. M. 

NEXT SUNDAY, 2:45 P. M. 

CURRAN THEATRE 

PROGR.VM 
A Minor Convrrto for Strines r Vivaldi 

Symphony Frederick Jacobi 

rill EulrnNplCBel Richard StraUHx 

Tickets at Sherman, Clay & Co.. or 
at theatre on day of concert. 



WARFIELD THEATRE 

Nazimova has returned to the screen, and with Milton 
Sills is featured in Madonna of the Streets, the screen 
version of the W. B. Maxwell story. The Ragged Mes- 
senger. The production is by Edwin Carewe. The War- 
field theatre will present the new picture to San Fran- 
cisco. Similar in theme to The Fool and The Christian, 
Madonna of the Streets is proving one of the dramatic 
sensations of the year. The comedy will be Lloyd 
Hamilton. Gino Severi and the Music Masters will be 
heard in concert and Fanchon and Marco, in their 
"Ideas" will introduce a new musical organization to 
San Francisco, Glen Oswald and his Victor Record 
Orchestra. There will be other shorter screen attrac- 
tions. 



M1EC2YSLAW MUNZ 



Mieczyslaw Munz. of whose sensational successes 
throughout the East and more recently in Australia, 
local music-lovers have been hearing much, will be 
presented for his debut San Francisco recital by Man- 
ager Se'.by C. Oppenheimer as the December event of 
the Alice Seckles Matinee Musicales in the Ballroom of 
the Fairmont Hotel 

Munz came to America two years ago. a refugee from 
Poland. Today he is considered the legitimate succes- 
sor of Paderewski. 



George Lipschultz 

Musical Director and Violin Soloist 



Loew's State Theatre 
Los Angeles 



LoEW's ^ warfielD 

VVeek Commencing Saturoay, Nov. 8 
NAZIMOVA 

WITH Jill, TON SILl.S l\ 

MADONNA OF THE STREETS 

From \V. B. Maxivell's "The RaKBed McsscnKcr" 



KANCHOX \TiD MARCO " 
GI.KIV osn.vi.D 
And Hi» Victor Orche: 



J. WHITCOMB NASH 

THE VOICE 
Special Normal Courses for Teachers 



700 Kohler & Cha 



STENGER VIOUNS 

Exemplify Intrinsic Excellence and Arc 
Pre-eminently Superior 

A life's devotion of unfnterrapfed Htudy and labor. 
Involving; the mastery of principles of musical 
aeoastics, timber pfayNlcs. and engrlneering, ha« 
yielded the underMtandln^ of (hose principles which 
exemplify the "Sten^er Idea" In violin making:, and 
mark the heKlnnlne of a nevr era In this noble art. 

W. C. STENGER 

INCORPORATED 

Maker of fine Violint 
617-618 Steinway Hall, Chicago 



AUDREY BEER SOREL 

PIANIST — TEACHER 



ALFRED HURTGEN 

PIANIST, ACCOMPANIST, MUSICAL DIRECTOR, 



Nuvembcr 7, 1924 



SIMPSON PUPILS IN RECITAL 

An extremely interesting program was 
played at Elizabeth Simpson's Berkeley 
studio on Saturday. October 4tli. by a 
group of advanced pupils, and .Madame 
Regis Michaud, a brilliant member of 
Miss Simpson's coaching class Mme. 
Michaud. whose Berkeley concert last 
, year was one of the outstanding suc- 
cesses of the musical season, is an ex- 
ceedingly gifted pianist of broad experi- 
ence and unusual equipment, who de- 
votes herself exclusively to French 
Clavecin music and works of the ultra 
modern French school. She recently ap- 
peared as soloist at the Berkeley Piano 
Club, playing two exacting groups bv 
Rameau. Lully. Loeilly. Chabrier. Satie 
and Ravel with such exquisite finish and 
beautiful coloristic effects that she was 
forced to repeat one number. She also 
played with great success at the Alli- 
ance Francaise on the campus of the 
University of California on October 22nd 
and is planning an important public ap- 
pearance early in the .New Year. 

The program also included an attrac- 
tive group by Helen Eugenia -Merchant 
■Jhe gifted young pianist, whose concert 
in September was a delightful artistic 
triumph. The complete program was as 
follows : French Clavecin .Music— 
Eighteenth Centur.v— Gavotte et Cour- 
ante (Lullyi, Rigaudon (Rameau) 
Gigue iLoeilly). Madame Michaud Pre- 
lude C major (Chopin I. Fille aux che- 
yeaux de lin l Debussy i. Prelude G minor 
(Rachmanmoffi. Ethel Long .Martin 
May Xight (Palmgren). Barcarolle A. 
minor (Rubinstein). Margaret Fish- Bar- 
carolle (Schutt), Tarantelle (Mendel- 
ssohn i. Mary Robin Steiner: Romance 
(Schumann I, Prelude G minor (Chopin) 
George Kelly; Prelude .\o. XXI from 
VVell Tempered Clavichord (Bach) Czar- 
das (MacDowelll, Jacqueline Otto; Aria 
(Cesar Franck). Habanera (Chabrierl 
Gno.ssienne II (Satiel, Minuet et Rigau- 
?r \?"i, V'' Tombeau de Couperin 
(Ravel). .Madame Michaud. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



The Pacific Musical Society will give its 
annual Breakfast at the Fairmont Hotel 
next Monday noon. November 10th An 
interesting riogram. under the direction 
Df I'da Wahlrop will be given and will 
consist principally of Liza Lehmann's de- 



lightful song cycle In a Persian Garden. 
The quartet that will interpret this work 
will Include the following representative 
artists: Flora Howell Bruner. soprano 
Eva Grunlnger Atkinson. contralto- 
Hugh .1. Williams, tenor, and Henry l' 
Perry, bass. All reservations should be 
made through .Mrs. Ernst .1. Morck or the 
President, Mrs. Frederick Crowe Among 
the honor guests to be entertiiined on 
this occasion by the society will be- 
Percy Grainger. Mr. and Mrs. Alfred 
Hertz. Mr. and Mrs. Selby C. Oppen- 
heimer, Mr. and Mrs. Gaelana Merola, 
and Dr. Hans Leschke 



Miss Emilie Lance! has returned from 
Los Angeles, where she was the guest of 
Mrs. D. C McGarvin at her lovely home 
at Gramerey Place. While in the South- 
ern City Miss Lancel met a number of 
leading spirits in the musical world and 
enjoyed many social and musical events 
Miss Lancel has been engaged by Walter 
Henry Rothwell to sing with the Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra of Los Angeles and 
will also appear a.s soloist for the Ellis 
Club later in the season. On November 
6th Miss Lancel and Walter Wenzel will 
give a joint vocal and piano recital in 
Fresno at the California Hotel under the 
auspices of thfe Women's Overseas 
League. The long list of patronesses 
contains the names of the foremost 
women and society leaders of Fresno. 

Claire Dux sang at the Alice Seckels 
Matinee .Musicale in the Ballroom of the 
Fairmont Hotel last Monday afternoon 
and on Tuesday evening she appeared 
before a capacity audience at the Uni- 
versity in Berkeley before the Berkeley 
-Musical Association. We shall speak in 
detail of these events in the next issue 
of this paper. 



Irving Krick, well known young musician 
and a member of the Freshman Glee Club 
of the I'niversity of California, played 
four piano selections from Stephens 
Union. University of California, over 
KLX on September 29. His selections 
were from Moskowski, Liszt, Cyril Scott 
and MacDowell. He received much praise 
'— his splendid teehnie and fine clarity 



NOW P U B L I S H E 



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(Of (talifuniia 

FIVE DOLLARS POSTPAID 

ANYWHERE IN THE UNITED STATES 



Address: MUSICAL BLUE BOOK OF CALIFORNIA 

801 Kohler & Chase Buildina 

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The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS '■''"'■- ^■^-''' '•■|<-\-^'lS< O 1!.\N'K) 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY lOlh 1868 ''""MtRUAl. 

One of the Oldest Bank. In Oibfornla 

the Assets nf which have never been IncrraseJ 

by mergers „r conso lldallon s « Ith other Ba^TTs 

Member Associated Savings Banks of .San Francisco 

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Assets jgj jgg 22g qg 

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tmployees Pension Fund 446;024.4I 

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ISAIiEI.1.1: MARKS 

INTUAl.TO 



ACHILLE L. ARTIGUES 

ndunte of Schola tnntorum. Pari,. Or- 

inlst .St. .Mary's CathedraL Piano De- 

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~- Evelyn Sresovich Ware 



i:i;iM l-nih Avenue Phone Sunael 290B 

»olee < ulliire. Mondays P. M. ."Oil Kohler 
arileld lira 



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MACKENZIE GORDON 

2S:!:' .Jack.s<)n .sir.-.-i pii,,,,.- West 4.i7 



XURT VON GRITDZINSKI 

BAIIITOJVE — VOICE Cl'LTlIHE 

Antborlxed to Teach Mme. Sehneo. 

Hene's Method 

114 l.eaven»Torlh St. Ph one Proapeet 02.%3 

EVA M. GARCIA 

PIANIST AND TEACHER 
ISl Howe St. Tel. Piedmont 490S 

PIERRE DOUILLET, PIANO 
4ITALIA DOUILLET, VOICE 

'" Kohler A Chase Bid. Tel. Sntter 73S7 

DOMENICO BRESCIA 

VOICE SPECIALIST— COMPOSITION 

ndlo: U03.«04 Kohler & Chase BuildInK 

Phone Kearny .'.4.-.^ 

Madame Charles Poulfer— Soprano 



Mary Coonan McCrea 

TEACHER OF SI.\GI\f; 
ndio! 38 GalTney BuilcUnK, 370 Sutler St 
I. Doogla. 4233. Re.. Tel. Kearny 2.ild 

MRS. A. F. BRIDGE 

TE4CHER OF SI>OI>K 
""■" ">20 Seott St. Phone Fillmore l.'rfll 



Joseph George Jacobson 



— Joseph Greven !!! 



£S33 Sacramen 



I'hone Fillmore 3l 



ROSE RELDA CAILLEAU 

Opern Cunilque. I»nr 



SIGMUND BEEL 

Maaler < laMea for Violin 

Studio llulldlnic. 1.373 Poat Street 

Tel. W ninol CM 

MARY ALVERTA MORSE 

SOPHA.MI 
Teaeher of SlnslnKi Sludlo. Tucaday and 
Friday, Kohler <s <:hnae Hide., S. F.i Resi- 
dence Studio, lllu Santa Ro.a Ave., Oak- 
land. Phone lliimholdt 1111. 

SAN FRANCISCO CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 



Voice Culture ;— Opera, Oratorio, 
Concert and Church Singing in all 
languages. 

MRS. J. GREVEN 

Piano and Harmony 

3741 Sacramento St. Tel. Bayview 5278 



ANTOJNE DE VALLV 

22U1 Scon Si ph„„, „.,„ ,j„ 

MME. M. TROMBONI 
601.2 Kohler & Chase Bklg. Kearny 5464 

JACK EDWARD HILLMAN 
601 Kohler & Chase BIrtg. Kearny .14,^4 



ADELE ULMAN 
178 Commonwealth Ave. Phone Gar. 6046 



TEACHERS' DIRECTORY 



MRS. CARROLL NICHOLSON 

Nl'll \l.TO 

K. 32 l.orrlta Ave.. Pl»d- 

onl :H)I. >lon., Kohler .V 



Teaeher of 
nionl. Tel. 
<'hn>e lir.lc 



Brandt's Conservatory of Music 

2211 Seolt Street, Ilel. clay * Waahlniclon 



HELEN COLBURN HEATH ^^^^ SCHMIDT -KENNEDY 



prano SoloUt. Temple Rmanu El. Con- 
rt and Church Work. Voeal Inatruetlon 
2>%3ft Clay Stree t. Phone W'emt 4Sfl0 

HENRIK GJERDRUM 

., , , PIANIST 

.1 Jaekaon Stre et Elllmore 32.'.6 

Dorothy Goodsell Camm 

COLORATURA SOPRWO 

'p'le5»"' ^^'.S."'""- '■*'• ""Jvlevv 3S3I. 
PIed~iant IS-IO. By Appointment Only. 



IMA MS r 

Studio: 1537 Euclid Avenue, Ilerkeley, Cal. 
Phone Ilerk eley tilHUt 

MRS. ZAY RECTOK HEVITT 

PIANO and RARHOKr 

Institute of Music of .San Francisco 
Kohler * Cha,'=e RItle. Tel, Kearnv .S454. 

MARION RAMON WILSON 

nramatic Conlrnllo. Opera Sueee,«e. In 

Rurope. Concert Sncee>iaea In the Tnlled 

Stales. Addreaa: 1S2.1 Leavenvrorlh Street 

Telephone Franklin .3.'>III. 



MISS EPITH CAUBU 
376 Sutter Street Phone Douelas 26» 

JANET ROWAN HALE 
Kohler i Chase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 5454 

J. B. ATWOOD 

2111 Channing Way Berkeley, Cal. 

MISS LORRAINE EWING 

833 Ashbury St. Phone Hemlock 749 

RUTH VIOLA DAVIS 

515 Buena Vista Avenue— Park 341 

LOUIS FELIX RAYNAUD 

1841 Fulton St. Tel. Bayv lew 60O8 

ELSIE COOK HUGHES LARAIA 
3325 Octavia St. Phone Fllmore 6102 

There is no way to obtain concert en- 
gagements unless a name is sufficiently 
Itnown. There is no other way to malte 
a name known except through publicity. 
Consequently, If you do not advertise you 
can not possibly secure steady engage- 
ments. 



JULIUS HAUG 

4032 Irving St. Tel. Sunset 436 

HOTHER WISMER 
.■iTOl Clay Street I'houe Bayview 7780 

ARTHUR CONRADI 
906 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 64M 

G. JOLLAIN 
376 Sutter St. Tel. Kearny 2637 

Alia \m;i:ii or mi sic 

C. B. FRANK 
400 Pantages Bldg. Tel. Garfield 1334 

ir a music Journal is worth while to 
publish programs and views of musical 
events, it is worth while to patronize. 

May Mukle, the nolid relllHt. and Kllen 
lOdwards. the exceptional pianist, gave 
the program for the Ida i; Scon Fort- 
nightly In Ihe Colonial Ballroom of the 
St Francis Hotel l3st .Monday evening. 
A large and enthusiastic audience re- 
warded the artists foi their skill, and 
further comment will appear in these 
columns next week. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



November 7, 1924 



lEltzabrth g^tmpBnn - f tann 

ADVANCED COACHING 

THE ART OF INTERPRETATION— SOLFEGE 

NORMAL COURSES 

STl UIOS: 

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'The Hal'l'ii-st Homes in .III Creation 
Arc Homes Surronndcd b\ Recreation' 



The 
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There are so many natural features which add to the attractive- 
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foresaw the future demand for suburban homes ; hillside location^ 
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Marvelous home and cabin sites averaging in price $475 — some as 
low as S300 including permanent membership in the 

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for which $250,000 has been directed to be set aside for club huu-.c. 
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Nine Hole Golf Course^ No^ open 

Write, call or phone for complete infonnalion. 
Artist Center Division 

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Please send complete information regarding "Belle Monti" 
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•THE-AMriCO- 

Alone — and unassisted this musical marvel recreates in youi 
home the playing of the master musicians'-^ who have "myster 
lously endowed it with all the music of the world" and who also 
pronounce it the world's most magnificent musical instrument. 

BY AN OVERWHELMING 
IvlAjORlTY- MORE OF THE 
AVORLD'S GREAT PIANISTS 
OF THE PAST THREE GEN- 
ERATIONS MAY BE HEARD 
ON THE AMPICO (AND ON 
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ON ANY OTHER MUSICAL 
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THE OLDEST MUSICAL JOURNAL IN THE GREAT WEST 



VOL. XLVII. No. 6 



SAN FRANCISCO. FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 14, 1924 



HERTZ AND GRAINGERj\CCLAIMED BY 10,000 

Expositiot. Auditorium Crowded to Capacity at First of Series of Five 
Municipal Pop Concerts— Alfred Hertz Enthusiastically Welcomed 
by Loyal Music Lovers— Percy Grainger Interprets Grieg Con- 
certo in a Manner Unequalled by Any Other Great Pianist 

BY ALFRED METZGER 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



iithorilali 



iUlspi 



Th.- 



It was gratifying to anyone interested 
In music in San Francisco to note tlie 
astounding growth of tlie audiences at- 
tending symphony concerts in San Fran- 
cisco. The program announced for the 
first lluniciral Pon Concert this season 
included such classics as Symphonic 
Suite Scheherezade by Rimsky-Korsakow, 
Introduction to > ct III, Dance of the Ap- 
prentices and Procession of the Guilds 
from The Mastersingers by Wagner and 
Concerto for Piano by Grieg. This is a 
program sufRciently dignified for any 
regular symphony concert, and yet it 
was presented before 10 000 people, the 
minority of whom were neither musically 
educated nor trained to listen to the 
highest form of music. Among these ten 
thousand peorle it is safe to say that 
eight thousand would have been afraid 
to attend a symphony concert a year or 
more ago because they would have 
thought it too severe or "high brow" 
and yet today these people assembled 
from all walks of life to Psten to a 
strictly classical program, and, judging 
from their enthusiasm, revealed through 
prolonged and thunderous applause, 
showed that they actually enjoyed this 
music. 

The truth of the matter is that the 
masses of the peiiple enjoy the very 
highest form of music much better than 
"cheap" music, provided it is rresented 
to them in a manner conformant to 
ideal technical conditions. T'nless the 
best music is interpre'ed in the best 
manner the public will never like it. 
Alfred Hertz has convinced thousands 
of people that good music is p'easant 
to listen to when piayeu by thoroughly 
competent musicians and directed by a 
master of phrasing. The City of San 
Francisco, through the Mayor and the 
Bo?rd of Supervisors and the Auditorium 
Committee of which J. Emmet Hayden 
is chairman, are to be complimented for 
;he fact that tl'ey have made this music 
iccessible to the people by engaging the 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra and 
lisfinguished s'loists and. owing to the 
'act that they have no idea of making 
irofits. bring these events within the 
^each of the citizens irrespective of their 
inancial condition. 

But the City of San Francisco would 
lot be able to present the people with 
hese concerts were it n^t for the IMusical 
Association of San Francisco which 
lears the greatest burden in financing 
be San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
flth a guarantoe fund of $12.'j000 or 
lore. For. after all. without this guar- 
ntee fund there would be no Symphony 
Irchestra and it the Municipality had to 
ngage a special orchestra the prices 
•ould have to be twice as much even 
liough every seat were taken It is there- 
jre abso'utely essential that those who 
an afford doing so should help. A. W. 
I'idenham, s°cretary-manaeer of the 
lusical Association of San Francisco, to 
ecure this guarantee fund and see that 
is regulirly forthcoming, for in doing 
3 they will perpetuate the city's ability 
) engage the orchestra at prices that 
aable the humblest citizen to enjoy the 
sst of music under the most advantage- 
JS circumstances. Anyone opposing the 
incerts, if there is such, is simply put- 
ng his personal avarice and greed above 
lat of the general public. 
The new arrangement of having the 
•chestra backed by a shell proved most 
itisfactory. The writer could not dis- 
)ver any discrepancies in the way of 
;hoes, overtones or other acoustic short- 
imings. The tone was bigger and the 
ending of brass and strings more even, 
is a great improvement of the former 
mditions. The console of the organ 
!ing on the platform brings the organ- 



ist in better touch with the conductor 
and here is another marked improve- 
ment. Alfred Hertz and the San Fran- 
cisco Symphony Orchestra were in splen- 
did artistic form on this occasion. Louis 
Persinger played the solo passages with 
fine taste and purity of intonation and 
phrasing. He deserved the recognition 
accorded him by the huge audience 
^Ajthough the Scheherazade by Rimsky- 
r , , . c.^jjiigjidj, ^igj^jj heard 



Korsakow 



monslcr 

audience rose to Mr. Hertz' Wagnerian 
reading like one man and gave him a well 
merited rou.sing ovation. 

A worthy feature of such an excellent 
concert was Percy Grainger's interpre- 
tation of the Grieg A minor concerto. 
We have heard this same artist play this 
work before and still we enjoyed it as 
much as if the experience was entirely 
new. In other words we felt drawn 
toward the artist exactly the same as 
when we first heard him. We do not 
always experience iJiis same impression 
Quite frequently we feel that the first 
hearing of an artist is better than the 
subsequent ones, that is to say we are 
more favorably impressed at first and 
leas so on subsequent occasions. But the 
ottener we hear Mr. Grainger interpret 
the Grieg Concerto the better we like 
him and the work and the more we be- 
come convinced tliat his style of reading 
of the work is, according to our opinion. 



Th( 



(h.siia and Alfn^.l Hertz gave 
the pianist splendid support the orches- 
tral accompaniment being kepi within 
the confines of refined and muslclanly 
blending of sentiments. After the pro- 
gram the aiidienci' lingered for half an 
hour listening to Percy Grainger play 
some of his characteristic compositions 
and arrangements among which Brahms' 
Cradle Song was specially effective and 
delightful. Of course no one ever tires 
listening to the old Knglish and Irish 
tunes which Grainger plays and ar- 
ranges with such ingenious adherance to 
their original character. All In all It 
was a concert impossible to forget 




ELWYN CALBERG 

The Accomplished Young California Pianist Who Will Give a Concert at Twentieth 

Century Club Hall, Berkeley, on Tuesday Evening, November 

25th, After His Return From the East and Europe 



under Mr. Hertz' direction it always 
seems to present new features of beauty, 
its oriental color is never tiresome. Its 
changing moods are always interesting. 
Its melodious splendor is exhilarating. 
Its rhythmic vitality is entertaining. It 
is a work of great universal appeal and 
as interpreted by the San Francisco Sym- 
phony Orchestra and Alfred Hertz it 
will ever prove a great power of attrac- 
tion tor the people of this city. Of course, 
we need not emphasize the fact that Mr. 
Hertz is a Wagnerian interpreter of 
the rarest faculties. Indeed we know of 
no conductor at present so thoroughly 
well qualified to accentuate the virility 
of the Wagnerian works with the same 
convincing artistic discrimination. There 
is represented in this version a certain 
thrilling revelation of transcendant beau- 
ties which are not revealed under less 



more artistic and more enjoyable tlian 
that of any other artist we have heard 
play this Concerto. 

Mr. Grainger's technic is so spontan- 
eous and pure. His attacks are so pre- 
cise and clean cut; his runs and octaves 
so facile and easily performed. His touch 
is so velvety and elegant. His phrasing 
is so deliciously poetic and his pianissimi 
are so ethereal and crystalline. He be- 
longs among those artists who can make 
much out of little as for instance his ex- 
ceptionally artistic emphasis of the 
simplest folk tunes. Grainger's genius is 
exemplified in his originality of style and 
both as a comiioser and interpreter he 
exhales the air of human sentiment. He 
plays Grieg as if it were his own work, 
he plays his own works as if it gave him 
supreme joy and happiness. We can not 
imagine an artist more appealing and 
more responsive to the best that is in us. 



DUX THRILLS (VIUSIC LOVERS 

Fairmont Hotel Ballroom Packed When 

Distinguished Diva Appears as One 

of the Foremost Attractions of 

the Seckels Matinee Musicales 

By Alfred Metzger 
Kxtra chairs had to be placed in the 
si)aciou.s Fairmont Hotel Ballroom when 
Claire Dux appeared as one of the lead- 
ing attractions of the Alice Seckels Mat- 
inee Musicales on Monday afternoon 
November 3rd. While the program was 
not as elaborate nor as extensive as the 
one given at the Curran Theatre by the 
same artist, the interpretations were 
cl>aracterized by the same finished 
vocal interpretations and bv the 
same refinement of style and perfection 
of tone production. It is difficult for 
us to add anything to that which we 
have already said about this consum- 
mate artist. We can only state that the 
aujireme pleasure experienced when lis- 
tening to Mme. Dux before was again in 
evidence when hearing her on this sec- 
ond occasion. 

The smooth quality of her ideal lyric 
soprano, the excellent attacks, the easy 
and accurate production of the high 
tones, the effective sentiment introduced 
in the phrases of every composition and 
the unforgettable emotional coloring ap- 
plied to every song, no matter whether it 
be a serious classic or a light ballad, 
combine to make listening to Mme. Dux 
not only an unalloyed period of gratifica- 
tion and enjoyment, but an education 
practically invaluable in Its scope and 
nature. Seidler Winkler also repeated 
the finished art of his accompaniments 
that blended accurately with the finished 
style of the diva, and that accentuated 
the innermost musical sentiments which 
the composers weaved into their work 
Louis Persinger, whose graceful and 
poetic mode of expression has been ad- 
mired for several years In San Francisco, 
again demonstrated his fitness to be 
heard in the most distinguished com- 
pany. His violin obligalos suited the re- 
fined artistic atmosphere established by 
Mme. Dux to the last detail, and the 
pliant tone, exact intonation and delight- 
ful phrasing added to the general en.sem- 
ble of this excellent event. The com- 
plete program was as follows: 

II re pastore (Mozart), Agnus Del 
(Bizet) (both with violin obllgato by 
Louis Persinger) ; Gretchen am Spinn- 
rad. Schlummerlled, Auf dem Wasser zu 
singen. Musensohn (Schubert); My True 
Love (from manuscript) (Henry Hadley). 
Rivals (Deems Taylor). The Year's at 
the Spring (If. H. A. Beach); O mlo 
bambino cam. In quelle trine morbidc, 
L'ora O Tirsl (Puccini). 



MOTHER WISMER CONCERT 

A very large audience assembled at 
the Ballroom of the Fairmont Hotel to 
listen to Ilother Wisnier In his annual 
recital on Tuesday evening, November 
6th. As usual, Mr. Wismer had selected 
a program of the most representative 
and most serious violin compositions, in- 
cluding many of the old school and a few 
of the modern style. He put Into every 
one of the works (he full measure of his 
energy and his musical instinct, and by 
his very sincerity assured for himself 
the esteem and affection of his bearers. 
Every number was enthusiaatlcally ap- 
plauded, and with his well-known gener- 
osity Mr. Wismer was not backward In 
(Continued on PaKe 7, Col. 1) 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



November 14, 1924 



The years bear witness 



S. 



a position of honor, standing among the 
famous portrait paintings of great musicians in 
Steinway Hall, in lower New York, you will find 
it today. It is the piano that Henry Steinway, 
seventy years ago, built as a labor of love. He 
built it as a present to his bride. 
Now I, who am also a Steinway piano, stand 
among the other Steinway pianos at Sherman, 
Clay & Co., here on the western coast. The years 
that lie between me and that original Steinway 
piano have seen many changes. But two changes 
they have not seen. They have not seen Steinway 
pianos raade in any other spirit than a spirit of 
love; and they have not seen them under any 
other supervision than Steinway supervision. 
When 1 left the Steinway factory on Long Island 
and began my long journey to the Coast I had been 
six years in the seasoning and making. The control 
and management of the business was in the hands 
of the third and fourth generations of the house- 
hold of Steinway. Eight members of the Steinway 
familv had directed my evolution from the raw 
wood, steel and glue into the completed piano. 
Nearly all the skilled workmen in those great 
shops had been in those shops for many years. I 
was wood and steel and glue until they shaped me. 
Now, I am as much of the spirit of Steinway as the 
first piano Henry Steinway built. 
What does this mean in ray own career as a Stein- 
It means that I have been built with an individual 
interest, a conscientiousness, a deep determination 
that I should be worthy of my name. 
It means that the mountain spruce of my sounding- 
board, for example, is the finest procurable. After 
careful inspection and purchase it was dried for 
six months at the sawmill, then dried for another 
year in the Steinway yards, then seasoned for two 
or three years in special sheds, then kiln-dried and 
re-dried in strip and board"-in all. a seasoning and 
drying process of five full years. 
It means that, following the seasoning of this and 



The story that is told by the Steinway 




my other wood, nine months were spent shaping 
and fashioning me in the factory. In that one gen- 
eral factory every part of me was made, including 
plate, rim. hammers, brass castings, action, and all 
special hardware. Nothing was let out on contract. 
Nothing was left to outside influence. 
It means that I am. in fact, a Steinway piano-— 
that my charm will endure for years to come, that 
my resonance will last, that my full, rich, singing 
tone and responsive action will delight those who 



possess me as long as materials shall cling together. 
So after six years of such patient fashioning, I left 
the Long Island factory and came West. I was 
unloaded from my long cruise and carefully gone 
over in the Sherman, Clay Sc Co. shops. And now 
I stand on the floor at Sherman, Clay & Co. among 
other pianos, waiting for the purchaser who shall 
come to claim me. 

Sometimes I talk over the old days in our original 
home with the other Steinway pianos here at Sher- 
man, Clay & Co. We miss the cheery companionship 
of the old square grand, with its rosewood case--- 
the piano that Henry Steinway built. It used to 
preside over us like a proud little old great-grand- 
mother. But usually we discuss the future. We 
discuss the homes that each of us, in the days to 
come, will be carried away to like brides. 
Some of us are eager to preside over great man- 
sions, with servants to dust us off. and drawing 
rooms to inhabit. Some of us are ambitious to 
have careers on the concert stage. But I have a 
different ambition. 

I want to be the piano near the fireside, where a 
modest family gathers about me and plays familiar 
melodies. I want to be the companion^ from the 
very first, to little children as they learn to touch 
my keys. I want to be the discreet— and the only 
—third person present between lovers. I want to 
spend my days in a little happy hon 
some family knew how eager I am i 
love for me worthwhile, they wou: 
claim me without delay. Doesn't som. 
a modest home and purse want to come 
discover how it can claim its Steinway pia 



Surely, if 
Tiake their 



Quple 



and 



Sherman May & Go. 

Kearny md Sutter Sts., San Francisco 
CALIFORNIA-OREGON-WASHINGTON 



RENA 

LAZELLE 

SOPRANO 
San Francisco Opera Company 

Rrad of Vocal Department. San Franclaco ConnerT- 

alorj o( Maalc — ATallable tor Reeltala. Opera, 

Oratorio, Concert 



EMILIE LANCEL 

OPERATIC MEZZO-SOPRANO 

After Two Years' Absence in Europe 
Available For 

OPERA— ORATORIO— CONCERT 

Management ALICE SECKELS 
63 Post Street 

Residence: 433 Eighteenth Avenue, San Francisco 
Tel. Bayview 1461 



ANNIE LOUISE DAVID 

HARP SOLOIST AND TEACHER 

ON THE PACIFIC COAST DURING 
SEASON 1924-1925 

Address: Hotel Claremont, Berkeley 
Tel. Berkeley 9300 

Management Alice Seckels, 68 Post Street 
Tel. Douglas 7267 



PASMORE VOCAL STUDIOS 

Suite SOe. Knhler « Tliaae DIdK.. San Franclaco 

1SS0 ColleBe Atc Berkeley. Realdence. 2»1 AlTarado 

Road. Berkeley 



KARL RACKLE 

1330 PINE STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 
Telephone Graystone 1925 



ALICE GENTLE 

MANAOEMEXT 

CATHARINE A. BAMMAN 
53 West 39th Street New York, N. Y. 



DOUGLAS SOULE-Pianist 

ADVA1M..-ED PVPIbS ACCEPTED 

^'ednesday and Friday Morntnicr.s at Studio: lt02 

Koh.er & Chaxe Bids., San Francisco. Telephone 

Kearny 545J. Residence Studio: ir.O Moute Viutn 

Ave., Oakland. Telephone Picdniont 7(l«. 



AUGUSTA HAY DEN 

SOPRANO 

Available tor Concerts and Reeltala 

Address: J71 .tTlh Avenue 

Tel. Pnc. (!rt2 

HOMER HENLEY 

BARITONF; — TEACHER OK SIXGIXG — CONDUCTOR 

Director Cnlirornin CInh Choral 

An Oratorio Authority 

Residence Studio; 12t» Bay, at Franklin. Tel. PHI. 1033 

LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM 

COVTRAI TO 

Teacher of SlneinR. Complete Course of Operatic Traln- 

ingr. 27.'!0 Pierce St. Tel. Fillmore 45.-.;! 

Dominican College School of Music 

SVN RAFAEL. CAI.IFORMA 

Mnale Courses Thoroufrh and ProEresslve. Public School 

Music. Accredited niploma 



MR. ANDREW BOGART 
Teacher of Singing 

Pupils Prepared for Opera, Oratorio, Church and 
Concert. New Address: Suite 600. Kohler & Chase 
BIdg., 26 OTarrell Street. Telephone Douglas 9256 



of Christ Sel- 



WALLACE A. SABIN 

OrKanlst Temple Enianu El. First Church 

entlat. Director Loring Club. S. F.. Wed., 11)15 Sa ^ 

n!."'"'^ ^"■."''* S"'. F^^' *="•• "'"' Christian Scle 
Church. Phone Franklin 1S07; Res. Studio, ;tl.|2 Lenls 
Ave.. Berkeley, Phone Piedmont 242H 



MISS DOROTHEA MANSFELDT 



207 Cherry S 



Preparing Tcache. .„. 
MRS. OSCAR MASSFELDT, Pianist 

et. Washinston * Clay Tel. Pae. 9306 



The College of the Holy Names 

LAKE MERRITT. OAKLAND 
Complete Conservatory Course — Piano. Harn. VImll. 



DURINI VOCAL STUDIO 

E3IDIRECTI01V OF MME. LILLIAN SLINKE1 ni'RINI 
Italian Method — Voice Placement — Breathlns 
Opera — Church — Oratorio 
1072 EIII, St. TeL West 595 



PAUL STEINDORFF 

iM ASTER COACH 
iipletc Grand and Light Opera Repertoire 



Miss Elizabeth Westgate 



Teache 



of Pii 






, Organ, Harmony. Organist and M 
Director of First Presbyterian Church. Alameda. Horn. 
Studio: 1117 PAIIU STREET, ALAMEDA. Telephone Ala. 
meda ir.3. Thursday.s, Merrlman School, 31)7 Eldorado Ave. 
Oakland. Telephone Piedmont 2770. 



MUSIC PRINTING? 

SCHOLZ, ERICKSON & CO., Inc. 

521 Howard Street Phone Douglas 4273 

San Francisco 



Manning School of Music 

JOHN C. MANNINO. Director 
SS42 Washington Street Telephone Fillmore 3911 

PEARL HOSSACK WHITCOMB 

DRAMATIC SOPRA%0 

Abnolnte Slethnd of Voice Upon the Breath 

MoBdny and Thurndny. 10O.% Knhler A Chase Bulldlns. 

Tel. Garfield 0Vi3. Res. Phone Prospect 420 



.V.ivcmhei- 14, 1924 



^rifir ©aosilHu^iral "MMM 



THE OLDEST MUSICAL JOURNAL IN THE GREAT W 


EST 


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Sullf XOI. Kuhlcr .» ClmNe III.Ik.. 'M OTorre 
San Franclaco, Callt. Tel. GarOeld 5250-5: 


II St., 


ALFRED METZGER 


Editor 


Make all elieekx, drafl». money order, or other 
I'Adlif (OAST insUAI, KEVIEW 


forma of 


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Ml.. Ell«al.elh We.. Kale In Ch.rB, 


Alameda 


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Ellla HuiCKlna In Cbarse 


■e 15MI 







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0122 Scenic Avenue. Hollywood. California 

llruno Uavid llN»her in Charge 



VOL. XLVII FRIDAY, NOV. 14, 1924 



The PACIFIC COAST MUSICAI, REVIBW U for aalr at 
the .cheel muxlc dewarlmenl. of all leading mUHic atorea. 






SUnSCRIPTIOXS 
Annually In Advance, Including Poatagei 



TWENTY-FOURTH YEAR 



Warren D. Allen, Organist of Stanford Univer.sity gave 
two excellent programs at the Memorial Church en 
Thursday and Tuesday afternoons, November 6th and 
lUh. The first of these two events was the 4.52nd pro- 
gram and consisted of: Chorale from the Second Sym- 
phony (Louis Vierne); Canzona from The Seven Sket- 
ches (Edward Shippen Barnes); Adorn Thyself Be- 
loved Soul and In Thee is Joy (Bach): Symphonic 
Poem. My Country (Smetana). The second of these 
concerts represented the 453rd program which was 
given on Armistice Day and included: Piece Heroique 
(Cesar Franck). The Londonderry Air (Old Irish Folk 
Song). A. D. 1620. from the Sea Pieces (Edward Mac- 
Dowell). Largo from the New World Symphony 
(Dvorak), Symphonic Poem My Country ((Smetana)". 

The Mill Valley Musical Club gave a concert at the 
Outdoor Art Club House in .Mill Valley on October 
21st which was given by Ruth Scott Laidlaw, mezzo 
soprano, Helen Coulter, accompanist, Rodion Mende- 
levitch. violinist and Fritz Levin, accompanist. The 
program, which was thoroughly enjoyed bv a large 
audience, was as follows: Sonata for Violin and Piano 
in C minor (E. Grieg), Rodion Mendelevitch, Fritz 
Lewin: Aria, Connais tu, Mignon, (Thomas). The Last 
Song (Tosti), Bon .lour Suzon (Faure), Ruth Scott Laid- 
law, Helen Coulter at the piano; Romance from D minor 
Concerto ( Wieniawski), Canzonetta ( Mendelvitch ) 
Chanson Russe (Mendelevitch), Rodion Mendelevitch 
Fritz Lewin at the piano; The Sailor's Wife (Burleigh)! 
Ruth Scott Laidlaw: Chanson Meditation (Handel) 
Spanish Dance (Sarasate), Trepak (Rubinstein-Men- 
dlevitch), Rodion Mendelevitch; Turn Ye I'nto Me, Old 
Highland Melody (Lawson), Dreamin' Time (Strick- 
land), John's Gone Down On De Island (Burleigh! 
Ruth Scott Laidlaw, 

Blanche Ashley presented several of the Junior pupils 
in a piano recital at her residence studio in Oakland 
on Saturday afternoon, October 25th. The following 
program was enthusiastically applauded by an apprecia- 
tive audience: Folk Tunes— Home Sweet Home, Annie 
Laurie, Maybelle Case: Duetts— Richard Sisson, Phyllis 
Markey; Serenade— (Pietro Lanciani). Eileen Walker; 
Songs— (Schubert). Hark, Hark the Lark; (Browsky), 
Love in Spring, This is the House That Jack Built 
Ethel Hutchinson; Gadosky— Hunter's Song, Grainger— 
Farose Island Tune, Florence Gillam. Juanita Gillam; 
Bach— Solfigetto, Phyllis Markey: Selected— Audrey 
Sage: Mozart— Minuett, Westminister Chime, Left 
Hand Ario. Florence Gillam; Bach— Inventions in' A; 
Chopin— Prelude C: Rachmaninoff— Prelude C, Juanifi 
Murdoch; Lully — Minuet; Spindler; Beethoven— Minuet 
in G. Joan Goodwin; Durand— Waltz, Mildred (lihsnn. 

Josephine Crewe Aylwin's Modern Suite was played 
by Blanche Ashley before the Etude of Berkley 'on 
October 27th and created an excellent impression. It 
was played from manuscript and gave evidences of a 
well constructed and ingeniously conceived concert 
number. Both Mrs. Ashley's playing and Mrs. Aviwin's 
composition is worthy of serious consideration and 
comment. The complete program enjoyed on this oc- 
casion was as follows: Piano Duo. Le Matin (Chamin- 
ade». Mrs. A. T, Quayle. Mrs. H. A. Dunbar: (a) Ebb 
Tides. The Winds, (M. Wood Hill), Dawn (Pearl Cur- 
ran i. Miss Selnn Mayer. Dorothv Wines Reed at the 
piano. Les Sylvaines, Challerhie (Chaminade), Mrs. 
Emily Kaufield Bragdon: (a) Racheni (.Mana-Zucca), 
(b) O, Golden Sun (Grace Freebey). (c) See What a 
Wonderful Smile (Elizabeth Coolid'ge). (d) East Wind 
(Mary Turner Salter), Marjorie Sprague Stoner, Mrs. 
Charles F. Everett at the piano. Modern Suite (Jose- 
phipe Crew Alwin), Mrs. Blanche .Ashley. Exile (Cham- 
inade). Le Chevalier de Belle Etoile (Augusta Holmes), 
Mrs. Rudolph Druhe. Dorothy Wines Reed at the piano! 
Snowflakes (Mary Helen Brown), Shena Van( Mrs. 
H. H. A. Beach), Rain (Curran), Sweet o' The 'i'ear 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 

(■Mary Turner Salter). Choral— Lowell RedfleUl. dlrec- 
u>i . Harry .M. Perry, director for this occasion, Mrs 
lacobus at the piano. 

Ramona A. Leonard presented several of her pupils In 
a piano recital at Century Club Hall on Friday evening, 
-Nmemher ah when the following program was credit- 
ably interpreted: Demonstration of Key-board Harmony 
by class of young children— Rythmic Drill— Playing and 
writing from dictation of major, minor, diminished and 
Biigumented triads, 6-;i, and 6-4 chords, dominant or 
diminished sevenths, dom, ninth, C-5, 4-3 or 2 chords. 
Spelling dominant sevenths on any tone of any scale 
Transposing of melodies at sight.— Modulati.n: Betty 
.McDonald. Barbara Wehser, William Deyl, Edith Schra- 
der, 1 lullip Lutzi, Otto Schrader. Frances Skelly Mar- 
Jt)rif -Windsor, George Johnson, Dorothy Jacque Wehe- 
Two Etudes (F major and B minor) (Heller), George 
Johnson; Birds of Passage (Poldini), Marjorie Windsor; 
(a I Barchetta (Nevin), (b) Scarf Dance (Chaminade) 
Guinevere Loughery; Butterfly (.Merkel), Ruth Wind- 
sor; (a) Two-part Invention No. 1 (Bach), (b)) Retro- 
spects (Heller), Dorothy Jacque Wehe; (a) Erotik (b) 
Notturno (Grieg), Stella Hail; Mountain Stream (Hel- 
ler), Edmar Dunand; Berceuse (Godard), Pauline Tyler- 
la) Waltz in A flat (Brahms), (b) Concert Etude (Wol- 
enhaupt), Louise Fohl; Butterfly (Lavjlee) Eleanor 
Coburn; (a) Prelude C Sharp minor (Rachmaninoff), 
(b) En Courant (Godard), Lucy Lawlor: (al Dutch 
Dance (Beethoven), (b) Le Coucou (Daquin), (c) Ca- 
price Viennois (Kreisler), Erna Schulz; la) Shadow 
Dance (McDowell), (b) Les Fauns (Chamiqade), Arleen 
Christi; (ai Caprice Espagnole (Moskowski), (b) 
Liebstraum (Liszt), (c) Valse de Concert (Wieniawski) 
.Madeleine Church. 

Miss Elsie Ingham introduced a number of her pupils 
at a skillfully interpreted recital of vocal compositions 
at her studio on Haight Street on Tuesday evening 
October 2&th. Miss Gladys Boys, associated with Miss 
Ingham, presided at the piano. The program was as 
follows: Piano solo— .Miss Boys; Songs— The Garden 
of Your Heart (Dorel), The Valley of Laughter (Sand- 
erson), Miss Vera Pearl; Reading— Miss Dorothy Daunt 
Scott; Songs— I've Been Roaming (Rutter) An Old Gar-' 
den (Temple), Miss Ruth Hildebrant: Solo— If I Might 
Come to You (Squire), Miss Anita Kilgallen; Solo- 
Song of Songs (Moya), Jliss Lilian .MacKinnon; Songs— 
By the Waters of Minnotonka (Lieurance), The Land 
of the Sky Blue Water (Cadman), Jliss Dorothy Daunt 
Scott; Reading— .Miss Clara Ingham: Songs— In .My 
Garden (Liddle), Love's Garden of Roses (Lohr), Miss 
Edna Faulstich; Songs— Forgotten (Cowles), Resigna- 
tion (Caro Roma), Miss Mabelle Reinecke; Reading- 
Miss Dorothy Daunt Scott: Songs— Sing Joyous Bird 
(Phillips), The Toreador (Rubens). Miss Hilda Faul- 
stich, 

Marie Milliette, the excellent soprano soloist, so well 
known in California, gave her first recital of the year 
in Springfield. Massachusetts on October 21st before 
the Tuesday Morning Musical Club. She sang 'French, 
English, Irish and Spanish folk songs in costume with 
piano and lute accompaniment, and her audience re- 
sponded to her singing spontaneously. Miss Milliette 
sang on .November 5th with the Impromptu Club of 
Brookline, Massachusetts, and many other recitals are 
being arranged for her after the first of the year. 
Miss Milliette is greatly enjoying her teaching at the 
Musical College in Northampton, Massachusetts, and 
she has in the main very satisfactory material. There 
is at the college a fine conditioned harpsichord and 
Miss Milliette is planning to give unusual programs 
of old music with this instrment and the lute. 

Mme. Stella Raymond-Vought, assisted by Lincoln 
Batchelder, pianist-accompanist, gave a musical pro- 
gram at the First Congregational Church Family Gath- 
ering on Thursday evening. October 23rd when sev- 
eral of her pupils distinguished themselves in the se- 
lections: Opening chorus — Ensemble, Madame Stella 
Raymond-Vought, directing, .-\ Smile Will Go a Long 
Long Way; Baritone solos— (a) The Blind Ploughman 
(Clarke), (b) Give a Man a Horse He Can Ride 
(O'Haral, Elbert Gray; Mezzo Soprano solos — (a) 
Strida la Vampa. from II Trovatore (Verdi), (b) What's 
.in the Air Today? (Eden), Klea Grand; Ladles' Glee 
Club— (a) Little Gray Dove, (Incidental Solo), (Saar), 
Marie Cullen; (b) An Irish Love Song, (Madam Vought, 
directing), (i^ang); Soprano solos — (a) .A.ria — My Heart 
at Thy Sweet Voice, from Samson and Delilah (Saint 
Saens, (b) Lilac Tree (Gartlan), Mary Jane Johnson. 
Assisted by Master Robert Johnson. Coloratura Soprano 
solos — (a) .\ria — .\h, Fors e Lui, from Traviata (Verdi), 
lb) Serenade (Toselli), Eleanore Stadtegger: Bass 
solos— (a) The Song of the Volga Boatmen (Chaliapin- 
Koeneman), (b) The Old Bass Viol (Assisted by 
Chorus), Frederick E. Levin (winner of Vought Scholar- 
ship, 1324-1925: Coloratura Soprano solos — (al Aria — 
.lesuis Titania. from Mignon (Thomas), (bl Yesterday 
and Today (Spross) Lucille White, (winner of Vought 
Scholarship, 1924-1925); Melody Medleys— The Vought 
Harmony Boys, Ernest Losser, George Garcia; Tenor 
solos — (a) Little Mother of Mine ( lliii b'i.gli i. (Ii) .\ 
Dream (Bartlett), Ernest Losser. 

The San Francisco Trio, Hlsie Cook Laraia, piano, 
William F. Laraia, violin, Willeni Dehe, cello— will give 
the first concert of their season In the Ballroom of the 
Fairmont Hotel, on Tuesday evening November 18th. 
They are entering on their fourth successful season 
as one of the prominent chamber music organizations 
of the Pacific Coast. Their growing increase of patrons 
has necessitated the San Francisco concerts being 
given in a larger hall than in previous years. The 
Trio is already heavily booked tor out-ortown con- 
certs. 



ALMA GLUCK SINGS SUNDAY 

Sunday's concert event In the Exposition Auditorium 
will be one of the most outstanding features of the 
present musical season, tor It signalizes the return to 
her many thousands of admirers in San Francisco of 
Americas popular soprano. Alnm Gluck The great 
singer has not graced a local stage In several years 
during which time the talking machine has kept her 
decidedly before her public, for the Alma Gluck records 
have never for a moment lost their supreme popularity 
with the American people. 

The Gluck voice, art and personality Is unique iimoDK 
singers of the present day. There Is something un- 
deflnable n the artist's charm and magnetic control 
of her auditors. She has chosen for her reappearance 
in San Prancisco a program of unusually Important 
proportions for the rendition of which she will be aided 
by the young Russian cellist, .Marie Romaet RosanotT 
and the eminent pianist, Samuel Chotzliiofr The works 
listed by the artists are as follows: (a) Sonata (17th 
Century) (Sammartlnl), (b) La Source (Davldoff) Mme 
Rosanoff: (a) With Verdure Clad (Cieati.n) (n'ay<ln) 
(h) My Mother bids me bind my hair (Haydn) (c) 
Warnung (Mozart), (d) Oh! Sleep, why dost thou leave 
me (Handel), (c) Der Kuss (Beethoven). Mme. 
Gluck; (a) O Thou Billowy Harvest Field (Rachman- 
inoff), (b) Song of the Shepherd Lehl (Rimsky-Kor 
sakoff), (c) Two Folk Songs of Little Russia 
(Zinibalist), (d) Die Post (Schubert), (e) Can- 
zonetta (Loewe), (f) Botschaft (Brahms), Mme. Cluck- 
(a) Intermezzo (Granados), (b) Air (Hure), (c) La 
Fileuse (Faure), Mme. Rosanoff; (a) Bird of the Wilder- 
ness (Horsman), (b) Time of Parting (Hadley) (c) 
Fairy Tales (Wolff), (d) The Cunnin' Little Thing 
(Hagermann), (e) Red, Red Rose (Coltenel), Mme 
Gluck. 

That there will be innumerable encore numbers, and 
that these will include many of Gluck's popular achieve- 
ments such as "Fiddle and I." "Carry Me Back to 
Old Virginny," etc., goes without saying. Sunday's 
concert will draw thousands to the Auditorium, will 
start at 2:45, and tickets for the same can be secured 
at the Auditorium, where Manager Selby C. Oppenhel- 
mer, who Is bringing Gluck back to California, will main- 
tain four ticket windows for the accommodation of the 
last-minute rush. 



FELIX SALMOND IN CHAMBER MUSIC 

A striking figure, a charming personality, a forceful 
intellect, sound musicianship and great virtuosity are 
the outstanding attributes of Felix Salmond. the fa- 
mous English violoncellist who w-ill appear as guest 
artist with the Chamber Music Society of San Fran- 
cisco at Scottish Rite Hall on Tuesday evening, .Novem- 
ber 25tli. Amazingly tall and extremely thin, Salmend 
commands attention the moment he steps upon tne 
stage. And when he literally wraps himself about his 
cello, he immediately holds his audience In the hollow 
of his hands. He always gives a compelling authori- 
tative and beautiful performance. 

Salmond is a remarkably well-informed man on all 
lines. An omnivorous reader, he has the realms of hi-- 
tory, art and literature at his fingers' ends. His know.- 
edge of musical literature in all its forms is marvelous. 
No matter \\'hat comrosilion Is mentioned, vocal. Inslru. 
mental or ensemble, Salmond can at once name Its com- 
poser and give its history and thematic material. Pe- 
sides this, Salmond is acknowledged to be, with Casals, 
the outstanding figure among the great virtuosi of the 
cello. 

Salmond will he heard on the 25th in the F major 
Sonata of Brahms, with Ellen Edwards at the piano and 
in the first iierforniancc here of Bridge's Sextett for 
strings, in which Lajos Fenster. violinist will also as- 
sist. The quartett will play Borodine's lovely Second 
String Quartet. 



SECKLES' OAKLAND MATINEES 

A program of rare distinction was given as the sec- 
ond event In .-Mice Seckles' .Matinee .Musicales In Oak- 
land at the Oakland Hotel Wednesday afternoon. No- 
vember 12 at 2:30. .-Vnuie Louise David, famous Ameri- 
can harpist appeared here for the last time before 
she leaves for her home in New York. Max Gegna. 
cellist, shared the honors with Miss David. The fol- 
lowing was the program: Harp and cello — Sonata In 
G minor (Handel); harp — Barcarolle (Zabel). Bourree 
(Bach). Claire de Lune (Dobussyl. Au Matin (Tour- 
nier), arranged by .-V. L. D.; cello — Fantasle and Varia- 
tions (Schubert-Servais), Kohl .\edrl (Burch), Elfentanz 
(Propper); harp — (request solos) — Momcnto Caprlccio 
(Prokofleff), Valse (Brahms), Dance of the Elves 
(Hasselmans), Song of the Sea (a tone poem) (Harriet 
Ware), arranged by A. L, D.; cello and harp — Ave -Maria 
(Schubert-Gegna), Shepherd Boy (Savoyard). 



ROSENTHAL TO PLAY MONDAY 

Moriz Rosenthal, pianist, has been selected as the 
opening attraction, .Monday evening, November lilh 
at Scottish Rile Hall for the Artist Series of eleven 
concerts to be presented here during the coming winter 
months by the Elwyn Concert Bureau. 

So great have been the achievements of .Morlz Rosen- 
thal that they have become almost legendary. The 
name of Rosenthal Is already written large across the 
pages of the book of music, and perhaps there are some 
who hardly realize that Rosenthal is still with us. an 
active and vital artist. 

Yet Rosenthal today is even a greater artist than he 
was when he toured America seventeen years ago. 
It is thirty-five years ago since he first electrified 
America and last season's tour was his first In seven- 
teen years. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



November 14, 192' 



GERALOINE FARRAR IN CARMEN FANTASY 

Geraldine Farrar. the most popular of American 
sopranos and forty others including a complete cast of 
eminent principals. Grand Opera Orchestra under the 
direction of Carlo Peronl. well remembered in San Fran- 
cisco for his splendid work with the Scotti Grand Opera 
Company at the Exposition Auditorium, a ballet, beau- 
tiful scenery and mechanical effects, will be heard this 
Saturday afternoon (November loth) at 2:30 at the 
Auditorium Theatre, opposite Lake Merritt, Oakland 
and this Sunday afternoon (November 16th) at 2:30 
at the Capitol Theatre. San Francisco. (EHlis Street 
near Stockton) in a modern revised version of Bizet's 
famous grand opera. Carmen. Notwithstanding the 
magnitude and expense of presenting this attraction. 
F. W. Healy. local manager for Miss Farrar. has kept 
the prices of the tickets down to that usually charged 
for concert attractions. 

Recently. Miss Farrar gave this operatic fantasy in 
Syracuse. New York and Franklin H. Chase, whose read- 
ings in the Syracuse Journal are extensively copied, 
said in part, "Geraldine Farrar's production of Car- 
men' at the Wieting tor a single performance last even- 
ing w^as an artistic entertainment done in vivid and 
gorgeous costumes, with simple and colorful stage set- 
tings. Everything was beautifully done and the dra- 
matic art of Miss Farrar never seemed in finer ascen- 
dancy. There were some exceedingly clever dancers, 
a capable cast of supporting artists and Carlo Peronl. 
the conductor, achieved splendid effects." 

Tickets are on sale today for both tlie Oakland and 
San Francisco appearances at the music stores of 
Sherman. Clay and Company, and tomorrow at the 
theatres' box offices. 



AT THE GREEK THEATRE 

For the last Half Hour of Music at the Greek Theatre 
for this season, the Committee on Music and Drama 
at the University, announced a recital by William Ed- 
ward Johnson, baritone, for Sunday. October 26. Mr. 
Johnson was scheduled to appear earlier in the season. 
but the concert had to be postponed on account of the 
rain. Mr. Johnson was accompanied by Gertrude 
Blanchard Rost. and presented the following program: 
God is My Shepherd (Dvorak); Recitative: I Feel the 
Deity Within, and Aria: Arm. Arm. Ye Brave (Handel) ; 
II Lacerato Spirito. (From Simon Bocanegra). (Verdi); 
The Two Grenadiers. (Request in English). (Schu- 
mann): Pilgrim's Song (Tschaikowsky) ; Vision Fugi- 
tive. (From Herodiade . (Massenet): Pleading (Elgar): 
Gypsy John (Clay): Mother. Jly Dear (Treharne); 
Tally Ho (Leoni); I Fear No Foe (Pinsuti). 



Irving Krick. the gifted young pianist was soloist with 
the Freshman Glee Club, of the University of California. 
appearing at the Elks Club, Berkeley, on October 14th. 
He was enthusiastically applauded. He also played 
again on October 27th from Stephens Union. University 
of California, over KLX. His selections were from 
Scott. Liszt. Rubenstein, and Chopin. His excellent 
playing delighted the many listeners-in. 




KAJETAN ATTL 

SOLO HARPIST, SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 



Concert Enensrementit and Inntractlon Apply 
Kohler & Chaae Hide.. Tel. Douelas 1678, on 
nesdar and Salardar Attemaons ONLY. ReaU 



JIST OIT! 

A METHOD FOR THE HARP 

Ur Kajetan Attl 

C.\RI. FISHER, Pabllxher 

For Sale at Sherman, Clar & Co., Kohler .& Ckaae 
Hrnrj Grobe and Kajetan Attl 



THE PUBLIC SQUARE 

.\>D OTIIIJR SHORT VKRSE 

BY RELDA M. CAILLEAU 

MESSAGES OF HI .M.tX INTEREST 

TRICE, SLS.! 

For Sale at the AVulte Honne and City of Paria 



ALICE SECKELS 
IRENE JACOBI LOUIS PERSINGER 

Plnnlnt VIollnlHl 

In a Sonata Recital 

\ext ThurMday, .Xovember liO, M:I5 l». M. 
Fairmont Hotel (Gold llnllrooni) 

Reserved Seat.x $2.00 plus Tax- 
General Admission 11.50 plu.s Tax 

At 
Sherman. Clar A Co. 



SECOND MUNICIPAL "POP" CONCERT 

Eva Gauthier mezzo soprano, who recently startled 
New York by including so-called "populur" melodies 
in a concert program, will be the guest artist to appear 
with the San Fi-ancisco Symphony Orchestra, Alfred 
Hertz conductor, in the second of this season's muni- 
cipal "pop" concerts. November 26. 

Miss Gauthier. while scarcely out of her 'teens began 
a concert tour that has taken her to every civilized 
country in the world. She has appeared in England, 
France. Belgium. Holland and Denmaik in the last few 
years. She was exceptionally well received by Danish 
audiences and was decorated by the Queen of Denmark. 

Oriental and Javanese melodies are included in Miss 
Gauthier's repertoire. She spent three year in Java 
studying customs, melodies, and the language. Under 
protection of the Dutch government she was permitted 
to mingle freely with the 3ii0 wives of the Sultan of 
Java. Later she traveled in India. Siam. Japan and 
China. Next Spring, Miss Gauthier will be sponsored 
by Mrs. Calvin Coolidge at the Spring Music Festival to 
be staged in Pittsfleld, Mass. 

Supervisor J. Emmet Hayden. chainnan of the Audi- 
torium Committee, hearing of the Canadian prima 
donna's great success in the East secured her for the 
popular concert series here. Eastern critics have 
characterized iMiss Gauthier as the "high priestess of 
modern song." 



JACOBI-PERSINGER RECITAL 

Irene Jacobi. pianist, and Louis Persinger, violinist, 
are affording students and music lovers a' privilege 
which they are appreciating. -Already the demand for 
tickets for their forthcoming concert at the Fairmont 
Hotel on Thursday evening, -November 20 is such that 
to insure seats for those whose pleasure is intensi- 
fied by being near the stage. Alice Seckels. manager 
of the concert, has arranged tor a reserved section. 
Patrons should secure these in advance of the con- 
cert. Both artists have a host of admirers who will 
take this opportunity of showing their regard. The 
following is the well contrasted program representing 
three distinct periods in musical development: Sonata 
D minor. Opus lOS (Johannes Brahms): Sonata C ma- 
jor (No. S) K. No. 296 (Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart): 
Sonata E flat major, Opus 18 (Richard Strauss). 



MADAME 

JOHANNA 

KRISTOFFY 

Prima Donna Soprano 

Has Returned from Europe 

and Reopened Her 

Studio at 

740 PINE STREET 



Phone Douglas 6624 



FIRST EVENT 

Elwyn Artist Series 

ONLY SAN FRANCISCO APPEARANCE 

OF 

MORIZ 

ROSENTHAL 

"A ri.-iiiKlli- Gi.nnt AreompllNhine the Superlative" 

SCOTTISH RITE AUDITORIUM 
Monday Evening, November 17 

8:15 o'clock 

TIfKETS: ."SOo, »1.00, *I..'.0. »2.00 (nina 10% tai) 
Senta Selllne Now at Sherman. Clay & Co. 



Giacomo Minkowski 



CALBERG TO APPEAR IN RECITAL 

Zaunette W, Potter is presenting Elwin A. Calberg 
brilliant, young California pianist, in recital at th 
Twentieth Century Clubhouse, on Tuesday evening 
November 25. Calberg has but recently returned fron 
a year's travel and study in the east, during which tim 
he played with great success in New York and wa 
also heard in a recital at the home of Mr. and Mrs 
Donald Home, of Pelhamwood. N. Y. His talents si 
impressed eastern critics that he was offered grea 
inducements to remain permanently in the east, bu 
after a recent trip to Paris, where he pursued advance( 
piano work with his former teacher an! coarh. Wage 
Swayne, the young artist has decided to return ti 
California and resume his professional career where ; 
large circle of friends are eagerly awaiting the concer 
in late November. The program to be rendered at thi: 
time is one of the most interesting and exacting eve: 
offered in this locality, including the great Prelude 
Fugue and Chorale, by Mendelssohn. Schumann's beau 
titul G minor Sonata. Chopin's F minor Fantasie. anc 
a brilliant group of \iltra modern ccrn'osit'ori^ bv Gr (I^s 
Rachmaninoff, and Ravel, some of which will have theii 
premiere performance in California on this occasion 
Whi e in New York Calberg did strenuous wo k wit! 
Paolo Galileo, and is now coaching with Miss Elizabett 
Simpson, who forecasts a pr mising future fcr Iho eas 
bay pianist. Since his return a month ago. Calberg 
has filled several important engagements with the Sat 
Francisco Musical Club. Stockton Musical Club. Stat( 
Teachers College in San Jose, and the Adelphian Clul 
of Alameda. Prominent social and musica' folk o: 
the bay region are vitally interested in the coming con 
cert which promises to be one of the finest musica! 
events o£ the season. 



FREDERIC 

POWELL 

VOICE SPECIALIST 
TEACHER OF SINGING 

RESTORATION OF LOST OR 
IMPAIRED VOICES 

705 Kohler & Chase BIdg., Tuesdays and Fridays 
Residence Phone Sunset 6524 



BENJAMIN 

MOORE 



2636 UNION STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Fillmore 1624 



BY APPOINTMENT 



Selby C. Oppenheinier Pre: 

^ 'ALMA 

QLUCK 

sop/iAr/o 

Aineriea'-s Favorite 




EXPOSITION AUDITORIUM 

San Francisco 

NEXT SUNDAY AFT., NOV. 16 



OAKLAND "DITORll ,1 THEATRE 
MONDAY NIGHT, NOV. IT 



Only Recitals in Northern California 
Tickets Now on Sale 

nt Sherinnn, Clay * Co., San Franeisoo and Oakland 

COMING— MIEC2YSLAW MUNZ 
MISCHA ELMAN, Violinist 



November 14, 1924 



ABBIE NORTON JAMISON BACK FROM EAST 

Well Known and Popu'ar Pec'arogue and Club Leader 

Returns After Four Months' Absence Due to 

an Unfortunate Accident. 

The editor of the Pacific Coast iMusical Review re- 
ceived the following letter from Mrs. .\bl)ie Norton 
Jamison of Los Angeles, one ot the best known and 
most popular members of California's musical colony, 
and we are sure all our readers will be interested 
ai>d sympathize with Mrs. Jamison's unfortunate ex- 
perience: 

Los Angeles, Oct. 20, 1924 
Editor Pacific Coast Musical Review: — 

I have just returned from an unexpectedly lonB stay 
in the east and would be glad to have you announce 
my return, it you will. I attended an Institute in 
btircii, and just as I was enthusiastically planning to 
bring back my treasures of added knowieuKe, luaj-ira- 
tion and health. J had the misfortune to break my left 
wrist. The surgeon there has almost performed a mira- 
cle with it and it will soon be as good as new but I 
was gone over four months, in order to bring' about 
that result. 

When 1 was finally allowed to leave Detroit, I stopped 
in Chicago a few days with Mrs. A. J. Ochsner, the 
former president of the N". F. M. C. and had a delight- 
ful time renewing old musical friendships. Saw many 
of my friends at a dinner given for Leo Sowerby, who 
has just returned to Chicago after his three years' stay 
In Rome, wLeie as you know he was awarded the Pnx 
de Rome. He gave a most sensible little after dinner 
speech, too. Mr. and Mrs. Geoffrey O'Hara were also 
guests at this dinner and at another one where I also 
was a guest. They hope to come out here next 
Spring. 

In lan Francisco I got in just in time to attend the 
first meeting of their Music Festival Committee with 
Mrs. Birmingham and in the evening attended a board 
meeting ot the California State Federation ot .Music 
Cluos, where plans were made for the coming year. 
Mrs. Birmingham will be down here during the first 
week ot November. I am resuming my teaching this 
week and the Pimo Normal cL.ss that had be = n an- 
nounced tor September will be started on Saturday, 
November 1st, instead. 

From the looks of the mail that awaited me I have 
missed even more "jobs" than ordinarily tall to my 
lot. Evidently musical activities did anything but slow 
up during the summer. The enforced rest has been 
good tor me, and though at first it seemed dreadful 
to have such a thing happen way off there, I realize 
now that it it had to "happen," it was best to have it 
there. 

ABBIE NORTON JAMISON 



THE MASTER SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

Announcement is made this week ot ten masters ot 
music who will comprise the faculty of the San Fran- 
cisco Master School of Musical Arts which will open 
May 1 under the direction of Lazar S. Samoiloff. 

Miss Alice Seckels. who will manage the school has 
received word from Samoiloff and Mrs. Alice Campbell 
Macfarlane, principal donor of the $150 000 endowment 
fund, thnt the following famous artists wi'l be teachers- 
Josef Lhevinne, piano; Sigismund Stojowski, piano and 
composition: Felix Salmond, noted English 'cellist 
■cello and chamber music: Ju'ia Claussen. Metropolitan 
opera star, voice and opera technique: Cesar Thomson 
viohn. assisted by Samuel Gardner: William J Hender- 
son, vrtpran nius'c critic of the New York Sun lectures 
on music; Richard Hagemann, composer, coaching in- 
siiULior in aecomianying and conducting; Lazar S 
Samoi'off. v-ire- Fmil J. Polak, coach; A. Kostelanetz 
accompanist and coach. 

The Master School of Musical Arts has for its object 
the develorment ot musical talent on the Pacific Coast 
and will be conducted by the masters for six months 
of the year, with the artists alternating between San 
Francisco and Los Angeles. Teachers trained by the 
masters will continue their work during the six months 
at their absence. An opera class will train San Fran- 
cisco singers tor grand opera roles. 

A scholarship fund will provide an unlimited number 
3f deserving talented students in every branch of the 
musicil arts. In addition to the seho'arships covered 
By endowment, the masters will contribute their time 
[or other worthy students. 



REDUCED PRICES FOR ELWYN CONCERT 

"I want to go to concerts, but I can't atfoid them " is 
;he often heard remark by music students and the pub- 
ic generally who love to hear good music as given by 
irtists of national and international reputation The 
ilwyn Concert Bureau has solved this problem for the 
nusie lovers in San Francisco and rffers tic''e(s at 
'prices you can afford to pay," if the student and public 
renerally avail themselves of the exceptional season 
icket offer which this bureau has made. Season tickets 
or ten concerts are priced from seven to fifteen dol'ars 
V furtbr offer is made to students through the teachers 
vhere by taking a block of ten seats a still greater 
laving may be made. 

The striking thing about the Elwyn Artist Series is 
he acknowledged eminence and great popularity of the 
irtists announced to aprear on the course. The attrac- 
ions are, in the order ot their appearance, Moriz Rosen- 
hal, the friend and pupil of Liszt and one of the great- 
ist ot living pianists, who opens the series on Monday 
November 17th. Other attractions include: Cecilia Han- 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 

.sen, violinist: Isa Kremer. Russian singer of folk songs; 
Jascha Heifetz, violinist ylarla Ivogun, coloratura so- 
prano of the Vienna and Munich Operas; Albert Spald- 
ing, violinist; Roland Hayes, the sensitlonal negro 
tenor: M.bel Garrison, sojirano; London String Quar- 
tet: Reinald V\ erreniatb. baritone; Merle Alcock, con- 
tralto of the Metropolitan Opera Company, who created 
such a favorable impression as soloist with the San 
Francisco Music Festival last season. None ot these 
artists are mediocrities. Miss Kremer and Miss Hansen, 
the least known in San Fr.in<isco, are both ai lists more 
worthy to be ranked with Heifetz, Rosenthal and Roland 
Hayes. 

A similar course is being put on In New York City at 
Carnegie Hall by the Wolfsohn Musical Bureau, ot which 
the Elwyn Bureau of San Francisco is a part. Six ot 
the artists appearing on the New York course are also 
on the San Francisco series. The liastern course has 
caused a great deal of editorial comment and needless 
to add the hall is practically sold out with subscripti .ns. 
Nine ot the concerts on the San Francisco Elwyn 
Course are scheduled tor evenings at the Siottish Rite 
.•\uditorium, the dates are such ihal there :ir no r.ii- 
flicts with the Symphony or Chamber Music The 
Heifetz and Hayes concerts are scheduled for the Casino 
Theatre en Sunday matinees. A saving ot over a third 
is made by securing a season subscription, while stu- 
dents, by going together and getting a b'ock of ten 
seats, cut the cost ot concerts practically in half. Teach- 
ers and students may get complete information by call- 
ing at the Elwyn box office at Sherman Cl.iys. 



Florence Stern, the precocious young violinist, gave a 
recital at Carnegie Hall, New York, on Saturday after- 
noon, October 18th. Not having received any details 
so far regarding the press comments we take pleasure 
in publishing the following ambitious and representa- 
tive program, given on this occasion: Concerto (1660- 
1743) A minor (Vivaldi-Nachez) : Chaconne (Bach); 
Romanza .'indaluza (Sarasate), Scherzo (Dittersdorf- 
Kreisler), Melodic (GIuck-Kreisler), Souvenir De Mos- 
cow (Wieniawski); Walther's Preislied (Wagner-Wil- 
helmj), Moses Fantasie (on the G String) (Pasaninii. 



LANCEL-WENZEL RECITAL IN FRESNO 

Miss Emilie Lancel, mezzo sopr.no, and Walter Frank 
Wenze], i lanlsta.comi unlst, give a Joint recital In the 
ballnom of the California Hotel in Fresno .n Thur»- 
day evening November Gth. Miss Lancel opened the 
piograni with u masterly presentnth.n of O mio Fern- 
ando from La Favorlti. The Daily Telcsraph of London 
has said: "The first group of , Id H;illan soni:s showeil 
clearly she can vitalize «n;h things Into something 
more i crsonal than a dry formula ' Indeed Miss La-icel 
rut such lender appeal and irresistible vlia'lly Into 
Donizetti's music that it sprang Into new Hie and 
brought a shower of hearty, spontaneous ariliuse 

Tliroughout the proi:ram eveiy number was w irmly 
received Miss Lancel sanw in French, Italian German 
and English. Among the 1 n'^lish songi was an anpc I- 
ing lyric by Dugmar Frisclle wi:lch has been set D 
music by Grace E. Wharton. Your Blue Earthen Jar 
in a song which finds its way to the heart The melody 
IS graceful and fitting and has re.;l charm. Mr Wenzel 
gave a c ear and musiclanly leading of bis numbers 
and pla.\ed the ac! ompanlmenls with underslandini; and 
s>nirathetic tone. 

Among the tatroncsies were women who he id the 
social and musical life of Fresno. Tt:e list included' 
Mesdames Wingate Lake, Plain Rogers, Emil Gundel'- 
finger, Geo. Osborne, Carlos .McClatcl y Arthur Ander- 
son, R yman Hunkins, 1 aiker iTiselle, Kohrlen Whar- 
ton, Filch, Sanford, McDonal 1, I ulh im, Bu tour. Hiram 
Routh, Shepherd, Hariy ColTee. Wlshon, Walter Wlesc 
Miss Maud Schaeffer Henry Alrla. Denver Church W 
F. Toomey Sawtell, Nellie M itterson, Dahlgren Miss 
Beverage, Misses Aspwell and Einstein. 



Miss Rena Lazelle, head of the vocai depatment of the 
San Francisco Conservatory ot Music, will hold a voca' 
Round Table and lecture at the Censervalory. 343.5 
Sacramento Street Monday evening, November 17th al 
8:15. The subject will te. Tie Vocal Instrument. This 
will te the second of a series ^f five lectures which 
Miss Lazc-lle is giving. The lectures arc (ne to the 
general public. 




FITZGERALD'S ■ for the cAd-vancement of £Music 

Margaret Messer Morris 

^sOPK \.\() 
The appearance of this brilliant Artist on "Cadman 
Night" at the Bowl last season was a triumph acclaitncd 
by thousands. 

Gifted by Nature with a beautiful, clear, true lyric so- 
prano, she has been the favorite soloist of Charles Wake- 
field Cadman for live years. 
She uses the superb 

KNABE 

exclusively, and savs: "Never have 1 had gr:;atcr satis- 
faction than in the use of the Knabe — it provides a tonal 
background tliat is an inspiration." 

HILL ST R KPT NS/ .\t 7 Si ~ -72^ 



ROSEMARY ROSE 

SOPRANO 

A Singer Who Teaches— Consolidates Her Studios 

Formerly of Milwaukee, Sheboygan 

and Plymouth 

In Los Angeles 

W! SO. KrOMIORF, STlll:i:T 'll-;l,. .IdTdlS 

AiidlllonH Ily A|>|Miliilmi>nt Oiily 

Rulh nrodnian, l(i>einlrnr 



CnARLES no WES 

TEACHER OF VOICE 
-l-lll S. (;rnn<l \ l<>>r. IMLiiK- .',r. Ill I.-,, I.,,,, tnerlr 



L. E. Behymer 

MANAGER OF DISTINGUISHED ARTI8T8 

Executive Officoi: 

705 Auditorium BIdg.. Lot Angelet 



ALMA STKTZLEU 

VOICii: CIII.TI.KK— «'OA( IIIM; I\ KKI-KII'I'Ollle 



CALMON LUBOVISKI 

CONCERT VIOLINIST 

Available for (onrrrta nnd llrrltala 

Llnlled Nomhrr of tdvanrrd I'nplla Arrrptxl 

VIollnlaf l.n. tnKrIra Trio 

Studio: .1.H Mualc An, Studio RldE. Phonr: K2I1KI 



Ir ntM So. rnllf. Mil 



i'hi.nr i-y- 



Alexander Bevani 

ALL IIIIAVrilRS OP THE 

VOCAL ART 

Stndloi 012 So. rnllf. MMalc Co. Bids. 
TrlpMhooe N2:!..',2n 



ABBIE ISORTON JAMISON 

PIAXO— IIAHMO.M — Vt)rAL <'OA< if 

S|ii><-lnl i'lano Noriiinl flnniii-ii 

Studio: n02 Southern California Mu«lo Co. llldK. 

H7 \\i-«t 21«t Street Telephone Ilea m 



iLYA BRONSON i.„„H„:;'^;:„;;v.';;he.,ra 

Lou Anuele. I'rl,.. I-I.llliori„o„l, 

(luarli-l in-lrui'll.pn. < liii r tlu.le llrellala 

-111.-, I,„ tllrii.li. fh..,,.- Mollr aim 

A.KOODLACII 

VII>LI\ IIMiKII AMI IIKPtlKRH 

('onnol..riir— Apiiral.rr 

i:i Male. tie Theatre ItldK.. I.o. Aliiiel.-. Tneker JDIIl 

.lOHiN SMALLMAiN 

11 Mill iim:- ri: \i'iii:i( op si\tii\<j 

olee Trial liy A tipolntnienl. »:t.llll. Sludloi so:{-K04 5o. Cal. 
Mii.le I.I. u. \l>l.'Mi II nil. •>.- r.l r. 



ZOELLNER CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

I 111 »m;i:i i:« 

I2S0 Wlnd'or llnulevard IKIIS llolWnood lloalrTard 

Complete Faeullr of Artlat 'Teaehrra 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



November 14, 1924 



CLAIRE DUX ^«p'^«"« 



CONCERT MANAGEMENT ARTHUR JUDSON 
FISK BUILDING, NEW YORK CITY 



LIEDER SINGER 

BRUNSWICK RECORD 



A NEW WOOD-WIND ENSEMBLE 

A new wood wind ensemble which will be on the 
order of the Barrere Ensemble of New York is being 
organized by C. Addimando. oboist of the San Fran- 
cisco S>-mphony Orchestra. The ensemble is to be com- 
posed of H. Benkman. flutist; Zanini. clarinet: Kubic- 
hek. bassoon: Charles E. Tryner. French horn. The 
pianist of the organization will be announced at a later 
date. The ensemble is to be under the management 
of Lulu J. Blumberg and will be available for engage- 
ments during this winter season. 



GERALDINE 

F A R R A R 

AND il 07Hir S IN 

SUNDAY A:^ ^N- ON NO 7. 16 

at 2:-0 p. -m. 

CAPITOL THEATRE, El'is St near S;octton St. 

Tickets on sa'e at Sierm^n < lay & Co. 

Management Frank W. Healy 



LINCOLN 

BATCHELDER 

Pianist -- Accompanist 

Studio 412 Cole St. : Phone Hemlock 368 



MAX DOLIN 

Distinguished 
Composer - Violinist 



NOW COXDICTIXG THE 
E.XLARGEO ORCHE:sTRA 



California Theatre 



San Francisco 



Elwin A. Calberg 



Soloist and Accompanist 
Available Season 1924-1925 



Rrnldrnee Studio 812 Enol li;ib SI., Onklnnil 
Pbiinr: Mrrrllt :iscil 



Myra Palache 

PIANIST 

LECTURES ON MUSIC 
APPRECIATION 



FrnnclKCo \d<l r>>i. 2-20 I nion 

I'bnne U nlnul ILin 
On A\'edneMday. 'J p. m. to (J p. 



SAN FRANCISCO TO HEAR MIECZYSLAW MUNZ 

When an artist who has never before appeared in any 
city ila}s tor tte first time it is always interesting to 
know whit others think of his playing. Probably the 
tol owina estimite by H. T. Parker, the noted writer 
on the Bost n Tianscri^t. gives one a better idea of 
tte ait of Mieczyslaw Munz, the newest pianistic sen- 
s ticn in tfce Tas', in I- urope and in the Orient, who will 
make his first San Francisco appearance in the Eall 
ro m of the Fairm-nt Hotel on Mondiy afternoon. 
December 1st, as a feature of the j^lice Se ke's 'Mat- 
inee" series under Selby C. Oirenheimer's manage- 
ment, than anything else published about him: 

"> Tale is this y uthtul aifst minded to make his 
way, first in these United States. He began the adven- 
ture two years ago and found it not too discouraging. 
Ui oa it. accoidingly, he now presses forward. Like 
every twentieth-century piinis' he abounds in technical 
ease rn-1 resource, and he prefers to put these posses- 
sions into service to the f remost c-mpositions and to 
his own transmitting imagination. His mind plays pen- 
etratingly over the music before him: his spirit wums 
to it: from both tl ese his tones take shape, motion, 
colo;-. He is net al. ne an ana yst. finely as he srins a 
raltern in music. No more is he c ntent with senti- 
ment, mood, picture although he touches all thiee with 
imagination. W.de is his range of tonal color and tonal 



NEW SONGS FOR TEACHER AND SINGER 


It's a Mighty Good World 


O'Hara 


Golden Moon 


Rolt 


Come to My Heart 

Wood Fairies 

Brown Bird Singing 

Land of Might Have Been 

Rose Marie of Normandy 


English 

....Wilfrid Jones 

Wood 

Novello 


Spring Comes Laughing 

Beauty 


Carew 


Piper of Love 




Love's a Merchant 


Carew 


The Market . 




Among the Willows ... 




A Good Heart All the Way 

Cancing Time in Kerry 

Sweet Navarre 


Clarke 

Hampson 


My Heart's Haven 

Love Pipes of .June 

My Little Island Home 


Phillips 

Day 

Baden 


Ragged Vagabond 


Randolph 


CHAPPELL-HARMb, INC. 
185 Madison Avenue New York City 



power: yet he prefers to refine upon both. By these 
signs. Mr. Munz in his early twenties is a sensitive, 
icised, fuU-iounded' rianist. At any age, they are not 
many: while at every age such playing as comes ti om 
Munz deserves an audience of every student within 
the range of miles." ' 



Pearl Hossack Whitcomb has reason to be enthusiastic 
over I he success of her artist pupils, a number of whom 
are filling professional engagements in interior Cali- 
fornia cities. Miss Harrette Murton. colorature so- 
prano, has just returned from a week's engagement at 
Stockton, and on October 15th she appeared in a joint 
recital with Kajetan Attl in Palo .41to. She will make 
her second appearance at the California Theatre Sun- 
day morning concert very soon having made a brilliant 
success at her first engagement there. Fernando 
Ybarra, lyric tenor, was engaged last month for the 
San Francisco Musical Club's Founder's Day program 
together with five soloists of the San Francisco Sym- 
phony Orchestra. Mme. Whitcomb will present eight 
of her pupils in the first of this season's monthly re- 
citals. 



SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

/Xtraeo//rirr - - .- • - Co/vouCTOR. 

FRIDAY. NOV. 14, 3 P.M. 
SUNDAY, NOV. 16, 2:45 P. M. 

CURRAN THEATRE 
i'Rogram.me: 

.\ mlno- Concerto tor St Iu(5» Vlvnldi 

S>ir.p;.o!iy Prvdprlck Jac-<;l 

(Fi.st poiformance) 
ni Kul ns|il.~ecl Slrau. 



Tli^ketx 



.She 



Charles M. Courboin, famous Belgian organist will give 
a free municipal concert-recital in Civic Auditorium on 
the night of Dei ember 1 according to En announcement 
by Surervsor J Emmet Hayden, chaiiman of the Audi- 
torium Committee. The org;.nist has been decorated 
by the King of Belgium and is soloist for the famous 
Wanamaker organ in Phi'adelfhia. The name ol 
Courbcin, has become a symbol of virtuosity on two 
continents. He won highest bcnors at Brussels Conser 
vat ry. and was organist of Antwerp Cathedral at 
eighteen years of age. 

I 



h^rilotie 



rAMKINCI 

BER.m.AND - BR.OV/H 
PERSONAL REPRESBNTATIVE 
AEOLIAN HALL ■ NEW YORK 



George Lipschullz 

Musical Director and Violin Soloist 

^— . 

Loe'w's State Theatre 
Los Angeles 



Lo E W'S ' W AR FIElD 

Week Commencing Sat., Nov. 15, 24 

"HE— WHO 

GETS SLAPPED" 



With Lon Chaney, Norma Shea 


er, John 


Gilbert 


PANCHON AND MAHtO 

Lloyd Hamilton Con 


■IDEAS" 

ledy 





SEVERI AND MUSIC MASTERS 
Glen Oswald's Orchestra 



J. WHITCOMB NASH 

THE VOICE 
Special IVormnl CourNes for Tenchera 

700 Kohler & Chase Duilding. San Francisco Calif 
Kearny 49»1 



STENGER VIOLINS 

Exemplify Intrinsic Excellence and Are 
Pre-eminently Superior 



A life's devotion of unlnlerrupied Kludy nnd labor, 

l^nvolvinB the mu.lery of priueiple» of mu«lpal 

■ " U». tiniber phj'Nlm, nnd endneerinR, has 

ndlni: of Ihoxe pi Inelplesi nhlch 

.J .. . i^^ii^ ninklns. and 

In Itala noble art. 



fielded the unde 

exemplify (he "Stenfir 

mark the heelnnln(; of a new 



W. C. STENGER 

JKCORPORATED 

Maker of Fine fiolinj 
<17-<18 Steinway H all, Chicago 



AUDREY BEER SOREL 

PIANIST — TEA CHER 
Papll of Leopold GodowKky nnd Arthur De GraefT (Brna- 
.el«>. Studio, aiiar. MeClure St.. Oakland. TeL Oak. .•Wl.'S. 



ALFRED HURTGEN 

PIANIST, ACCOMPAIVIST. MUSICAI. DIRECTOR 

COACH, PIANO INSTRUCTIO.X ■^'- ' ""• 

Studloi 2778 Union Street Tel. Fillmore 8340 



November 14, 1924 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



MOTHER WISMER CONCERT 



ed tr 



Page 1. Cul. 4) 



adding encores to the already generous 
extent of the program. 

The preparation and final execution of 
the program was not a small task, and 
Mr. Wismer's joy in giving his talents 
to the puhlic was evidenced by the skill 
witli which he invested the interpreta- 
tions He was ably supported by Charles 
Hart, pianist who belongs among the 
foremost artists residing in the Pacific 
West. Mr. Hart is a musician of rare 
faculties. His pianistic art represents 
the highest offered among us, and his 
accompaniments as well as ensemble 
work certainly leave nothing to be de- 
sired from an artistic point of view. It 
is a privilege to count an artist of Air. 
Hart's calibre among our musical colony. 
The complete program rendered on 
this occasion was as follows: Carl Gold- 
mark— Suite in E Major, Op. 11. .Allegro, 
Andante sostenuto; Tschaikowsky — Re- 
membrance of a Beloved Spot. Op. 42, 
No. 1; J. S. Bach— .Adagio, Allegro, B 
Minor: Tartini— Le Trille du Diable; 
Mozart — Violin Concerto in E flat, 
Hother Wismer. Wheeler Beckett — Fare- 
well to the Forest. Ernest Bloch— Impro- 
visation from Baal Shem (Hebraic tone 
poem), Granados-Kreisler — Spanish 
Dance, Robert Schumann — Romance. Op. 
9i-. Gluck— Melody from Elysian Fields, 
Orpheus; Tartini-Kreisler — on Corelli 
Theme con Varlazioni, Hother Wismer. 
A. M. 



and admirers have expressed great satis- 
faction at being given the opportunity of 
hearing the first rerformance 

The balance of this week's programme 
is made up of the A minor concerto of 
Vivaldi, arranged for string orchestra by 
Sam Franko. and the ropular Rondo of 
Richard Strauss, "Till Eulenspiogel's 
Merry Pranks." 

The season's second Sunday afternoon 
popular concert will be given a week 
from next Sunday, November 23. at the 
Curran. and as usual Hertz has prepared 
an extremely attractive programme of 
lighter numbers The items sc'ipdnled 
for next week are Massenet's "Phedre" 
Overture, the popular "Coppeli" Ballet 
Suite of Delibes, Saint-Saens' Prelude to 
"The Deluge" with violin solo by Louis 
Fersineer." Smetana's symphonic poem. 
"The Moldau." Liszt's familiar "Love's 
Dream," and the overture to Rossini's 
"La Gazza Ladra." 



NEW JACOBI WORK AT SYMPHONY 

At the pair of regular symphony con- 
certs to be given Friday and Sunday 
afternoons of this week in the Curran 
Theatre by the San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra under the leadership ot Alfred 
Hertz, the principal feature will be the 
premiere production of a new symphony 
by Frederick Jacobi, the prominent San 
Francisco composer. Jacobi has had a 
number of his compositions performed 
by Hertz during the last few seasons, 
among which are the "Pied Piper," the 
"California" Suite, and a symphonic pre- 
ude, "The Eve of St Agnes." The sym- 
phony to be given this week is his first 
ivork in this form, and his many friends 



MUSICAL SOCIETY'S BREAKFAST 

Under the presidency of Mrs. Fred- 
erick Crowe, the Pacific Musical Society 
gave a very enioyible hrenkfast at the 
Fairmont Hotel Ballroom on Monday 
noon. November 10th. A number ot 
guests of honor, who included Percy 
Grainger. J. Emmet Hayien. Mr. an-1 
Mrs. Selby C. Oppenheimer. members of 
the press and presidents of other musical 
and literary clubs, participated in this 
event After the break'ast was served 
and some ot the guests had been invited 
to make a few appropriate remarks. T.i-'a 
I ehmann's In a Persian Garden was in- 
terpreted under the direction of Uda 
Wa'drop. who also presided at the piano 
with his well-known finish and pianistic 
artistry. The song cycle was interpreted 
by Flora Howell Bruner, soprano; Eva 
Gruninger Atkinson contralto; Hugh J. 
Williams, tenor, and Henry L. Perry, 
bass. The classic beauty of this work 
was accentuated by the s'neers. who be- 
long among the foremost and best 
equipped of the community, and whose 
voices blended excellently Everyone en- 
joyed the ambitious work, and the artists 
as well as Mr. Waldrop are entitled to 
the heartiest appreciation ot the listen- 
ers, who thoroughly enjoyed every mo 
ment of this delightful program 



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PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



November 14, 1924 



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_THEOLDEST MUSICAL JOURNAL IN THE GREAT WEST 



VOL. XVII. No. 7 



SAN FRANCISCO. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21. 1924 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



JACOBI SYMPHONY INGENIOUS COMPOSITION GRAINGER ON AMERICAN AND MODERN MUSIC 



Composer Bases His Work Upon Three Distinct Moods, the First of Which 

Is One of Savagery and Brutality— Consistency and Continuity Marks 

Theoretical Development— Score Ingeniously Arranged and 

Intelligently Applied— Vivaldi Concerto and Strauss' Till 

Eulenspiegel Form Balance of Interesting Program 

BY ALFRED METZGER 



Before setting down his impressions 
received from a first hearing of Fred- 
ericli Jacobi's S.vmphony No. 1 the edi- 
tor of the Pacific Coast Musical Review 
devoted a great deal of thought as to how 
to describe his ideas without revealing 
any prejudices concerning the style and 
form of the work which belongs to the 
ultra modern school of composition and 
at the same time without stultifying him- 
self and hide his honest convictions be- 
hind a platitude of words for fear of 
offending a good friend. After consider- 
able thought and deliberation we have 
come to a definite conclusion and are 
ready to present the result of our study 
at this new work of an able, studious and 
intelligent creative artist which was so 
cordially received at the Curran Theatre 
last Friday afternoon under the skillful 
Jirection of Alfred Hertz. 

First of all we want it understood that 
«e believe Frederick Jacobi to be abso- 
utely sincere, honest and consistent in 
lis convictions. His work has character, 
ityle and originality. The writer not hav- 
ng as yet been able to fathom the 
Mental attitude and the artistic pur- 
)Ose of the ultra modern composer 
laturally is not sufficiently equipped to 
>ass definite judgment on a work of this 
;ind. The composition which is based 
ipon the following ideas unquestionably 
las a certain musical message: "My war 
harlots crush men and beasts and bod- 
es of my enemies. The monuments 
fhich I erect are made of human corpses 
rom which I cut the heads and the limbs. 

cut off the hands of all those whom 1 
apture alive. * * * » It is the poem of 
trength of murder and of hunger." These 
xtracts are taken from Elie Faure's de- 
cription of an Assyrian bas-relief en- 
itled The Lion Hunt. 

What we have to consider is did Mr. 
acobi in his conception of this thought 
esire to describe the physical or actual 
rocesses of these actions, or had he in 
is mind a symbolical impression of the 
'ork of Assyrian art which the poem 
ndeavors to elucidate. If his purpose 
■as to give a programmatical idea of the 
escription of the bas-relief we could not 
nd in the music the brutality, ruthless- 
ess and barbarism which the words im- 
ly. But if Mr. Jacobi had in mind a 
rmbolical tone picture of the fact that 
Assyrian art is of a terrible simplicity. 
Ithough an almost flat silhouette (one 
lat is barely shadowed by undulation) 
:one marks out the forms, that form 

bursting with life, movement force, 
ivage character." then we find in Mr. 
icobi's music a certain purpose and aim. 
'e believe Mr. Jacobi has succeeded in 
eating a spiritual impression from a 
lysical description. It is evident that 
le entire first movement of the sym- 
lony is redolent with vitality, force and 
■utality and because of this it remains 
iparently chaotic in construction. In 
der to actually understand what Mr. 
icobi is driving at it is necessary to 
imprehend the state of his mind when 
imposing the work. And it it is ini- 
issible to put yourself in Mr. Jacobi's 
ace it is practically impossible to under- 
and the music in this first movement 
the symphony, 
And right here is one of the intricacies 

ultra modern composition which the 
■iter has not yet been able to grasp, 
it is necessary to understand the mood 

the mental process that inspired a 
mposer when forming a composition 
e receptivity of the hearer regarding 
is work is naturally limited. You may 
tain an idea of your own concerning 
composition such as a Beethoven sym- 
ony or a Strauss symphonic poem and 
II you obtain a certain artistic satis- 
ition even though you may not have 



fathomed the thought of the composer 
when he wrote the work. Such composi- 
tions possess an emotional and an intelli- 
gent message whether you guess what 
the composer meant or not. 

But a modern composition goes deeper 
than this. You can not get a comprehen- 
sive message from an ultra modern work 
unless you know what happened in the 
composer's mind when he wrote it. That 
is one of the intricacies of ultra modern 
art whether it is painting, sculpture or 
music. And until the musical public and 
critics have become sufliciently advanced 
to be able to grasp the intellectual pro- 
cesses by which a composer obtains cer- 
tain emotional effects they will be unable 
to understand ultra modern music. And 
the writer must confess that he still 
belongs among that class. We are told 
that if we heard this movement more 
frequently we would gradually under- 
stand it. We do not agree. We must 
understand Mr. Jacobi's mental process 
when writing this movement before we 
can understand this music. And unless 
Mr. Jacobi tells us himself what he felt, 
we are afraid we would never guess it 
without aid. We are speaking seriously 
and are not endeavoring to be facetious 
in any way. 

In the second movement we find some- 
thing we understand.' There is melody, 
there is simplicity of development, there 
is congruity of thematic treatment and 
there is unquestionably natural emotion- 
al color. One could easily think of the 
poetry of "moonlight bathing a city at 
night" even though the program did not 
tell exactly what it represented. And 
Anthony Linden succeeded in investing 
the flute phrases with extraordinary 
grace and poetic shading. The final 
movement again becomes somewhat vig- 
orous and bright, sheds simplicity of 
form and dons the ultra modern garb. 
It is not as emotionally incomprehen- 
sible to the writer as the first move- 
ment, but it nevertheless attains intri- 
cacies in thematic treatment and scor- 
ing that are bewildering, although un- 
questionably coherent and intelligent as 
well as ingenious. 

What we are saying here is not in- 
tended as a reflection on the musical 
value of the work. On the contrary 
technically speaking Mr. Jacobi shows 
all the earmarks of a master in composi- 
tion. His work has character and origin- 
ality. It has a purpose. It is scored 
with the skill of a genius in orchestra- 
tion. It is fearless, striking out for it- 
self new paths and new ideas. It is 
honest and sincere for the heart of the 
composer is in it. It is effective for 
it aroused a large part of tlie audience 
to approval. Mr. Hertz conducted the 
work in a manner creating the convic- 
tion that he liked it and intended to give 
it the best chance for recognition and he 
really succeeded in doing so in spite 
of almost unsurmountable technical dif- 
ficulties that had to be overcome. 

We must admire Mr. Hertz' style in ar- 
ranging program. In putting the Vivaldi 
concerto ahead of the Jacobi work he 
presented two extremes in composition. 
The former belonging to the old classic 
school, the latter to the ultra modern 
school. Naturally those used to the intri- 
cacies of modern orchestral scoring had 
a chance to compare this with the sim- 
plicity and grace of the older school. 
And that the orchestra was able to do the 
one as finished and artistically as the 
other showed the wonderful progress the 
musicians have made since Mr. Hertz be- 
gan to conduct the orchestra in 191,S. No 
ordinary versatility and skill is required 
to give such convincing interpretations 
of two such contrasting works. Specially 
(Continued Col. 4. This Page) 



In Interview With Editor of Pacific Coast Musical Review Distinguished 

Composer-Pianist Speaks of Contributing Large Share of His Income 

m Publishing Works of National American Character-Has Good 

Word for Jazz — Believes in Ultra Modern Development 

of Music Upon the Theory That Music Must Progress 

BY ALFRED METZGER 



We do not know of any artist with 
whom we have the honor to be acquaint- 
ed whose conversational chats cause ns 
greater delight than Percy Grainger. His 
ideas are so sane, his convictions so 
wholesome, his generosity of spirit so 
contagious and his own intellectual pow- 
ers so endless that a talk with Percy 
Grainger is an education in itself. We 
have been reading the various interviews 
appearing in the musical and daily papers 
of the country and decided to select three 
subjects that occur in all of them. namely. 
Jazz, American National Music and Ultra 
Modern Music. In the hour's talk we 
had with Mr. Grainger we received 
enough information to fill this edition 
twice over, and so our readers will have 
to excuse us when we just pick out the 
high lights from the wealth of material 
gathered during our chat with the dis- 
tinguished p-'-'uist-composer. 

"Your attitude toward jazz is of great 
interest to nie," said the writer. "Synco- 
pation, the underlying foundation of jazz 
is nothing new. Rhythm and ingenuity 
of expression is nothing new. But don't 
you think it is injurious for a composer 
to use another's work and distort it?" 

"No, I don't think so. I think it per- 
fectly justified to use an old classic com- 
position and arrange it according to mod- 
ern moods. If some of the old masters 
had lived today and understood the mod- 
ern orchestra, they would have scored 
their work differently. And I think it 
justified to use a classic composition and 
arrange it in modern style." 

"But," I replied, "do you think it fair 
to use another composition and pretend 
It is your own?" 

"No," said Grainger emphatically, "that 
is one of the bad features of jazz music 
of a certain kind." 

"Do you think it justified." I continued, 
"to write a certain composition and then 
permit every instrumentalist in the orch- 
estra to use his own ingenuity in chang- 
ing certain phrases, or an arranger to 
add ornaments and extra notes and queer 
effects?" 

"Yes," replied the composer. "Don't 
you think it is wise to permit the ingenu- 
ity of the instrumentalist to have its 
way? I believe in arousing the inventive 
powers of the player so that he is more 
than a mere autonioton that reproduces 
exactly what someone else has written." 
"Speaking of American music," con- 
tinued the writer, "Is there such a thing 
as actual National music in this country? 
Is negro plantation music, Indian music 
and ragtime the basis of a future national 
school in America?" 

"There is a great deal of American 
national music of which many people 
have never heard. There is folk music 
in the mountainous regions of the East. 
I am devoting as much of my income as 
I can spare to promoting compositions of 
English and American composers based 
upon the folk music of this country. A 
number of such works have been pub- 
lished. The Juba Dance has American 
characteristics." 

By the way, Mr. Grainger's Country 
Gardens, which he played at his San 
Francisco concert, are selling at the rate 
of 17,000 copies a year, showing that folk 
music is becoming more and more popu- 
lar in these days of jazz. 

Mr. Grainger Is a firm believer In mod- 
ern and ultra modern music. While there 
is a certain phase of this music which 
Mr. Grainger does not cherish, he is In 
sympathy with the movement as a whole. 
He believes in progress and emancipa- 
tion. He thinks that we have some 
splendid masters today and that it would 
be impossible to go ahead with only that 
music which the old masters had com- 
posed. 



'Now practically all of your music." I 
told Mr. Grainger. "I comprehend. It 
has melody, rhythm and continuity. It 
is pleasing to the ear and easily remem- 
bered. It is possible for me to get a 
message from it without explanation. 
Hut most of the modern music means 
nothing to me. I am bewildered. I get 
no message. Possibly it is for the rea- 
son that 1 am trained in the old school 
and can not divest myself of convention- 
al principles. The fact remains It is 
difiicult for me to listen understandlngly 
to ultra modern music." 

"But there is no question regarding the 
artistic value of ultra modern music" 
Mr. Grainger added. "While the mes- 
sage may not always be obvious to every- 
one, it is there nevertheless. Sometimes 
it is not intended that a certain object, 
after which the composition is named, 
should be reflected in the music. It is 
rather intended that the thoughts which 
such object inspires may be recorded. 
The whole axis around wnich ultra mod- 
ern music revolves is to get away from 
a much used and abused mode of writ- 
ing music and create something more 
in keeping with our enlightened age We 
must always progress. We can not stand 
still. It is a mistake to suppose thai 
ultra modern music has no form, no 
coherance and no purpose. It is Just as 
classic in form as the oldest music. It 
is just as simple and understandable as 
Bach." 

Mr. Grainger expressed his regret that 
he was unable to appear in a concert of 
his own in San Francisco this time. He 
is very much impressed with the city, 
and when Grainger says it he means it, 
for he is not given to flattery or "bull." 
He preferred to appear with the sym- 
phony orchestra this time, because he 
had not played with an orchestra in this 
city for several seasons. After leaving 
San Francisco he was to appear in twelve 
concerts during two weeks. He has been 
exceedingly busy and when it is consider- 
ed that in addition to his numerous con- 
certs, he also composes a great deal it 
will be noted how active an artist Grain- 
ger really is. His compositions are great- 
ly in demand by leading artists and sym- 
phony orchestras throughout the world. 
Such works as Shepherd's Hey, Molly 
on the Shore. Handel in the Strand, 
Country Gardens. Children's March, 
Suite in a Nut Shell. Mock Morris, Colon- 
ial Song. Irish Tune of County Derry. are 
among the most popular. 

Mr. Grainger's fondness for the ultra 
modern school notwithstanding tho 
writer prefers to listen to his dainty ar- 
rangements of folk music every time In 
preference to the majority of the other 
modern works. 



JACOBI SYMPHONY 

(Continued from Col. 2. Thl.i Page) 
admirable were the string soil by Louis 
Perslnger, violin, Artur Arglewlcz, vio- 
lin, Lajos Fenster, viola and Walter Fer- 
ner, cello. 

The program closed with Richard 
Strauss' symphonic poem Till Eulenspie- 
gel. There was a time when the writer 
listened to Till Eulenspiegel as lie lis- 
tens today to a Stravinsky composition. 
He could not get anything comprehen- 
sive from It. And yet today he finds 
melodies where he discovered noise and 
he finds continuity where he imagined 
chaos. There still remain sudden changes 
of keys and themes and moods, but on 
the whole we are getting used to Strauss 
and understand his message and the 
beauty of his works. Till Eulenspiegel 
has become one of our favorites on a 
symphony program, when a number of 
years ago It seemed incomprehensible. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



November 21, 192- 



The years bear witness 



J.. 



n a position of honor, standing among the 
famous portrait paintings of great musicians in 
Steinway Hall, in lower New York, you will find 
it today. It is the piano that Henry Steinway, 
seventy years ago, built as a labor of love. He 
built it as a present to his bride. 
Now I, who am also a Steinway piano, stand 
among the other Steinway pianos at Sherman, 
Clay & Co., here on the western coast. The years 
that lie between me and that original Steinway 
piano have seen many changes. But two changes 
they have not seen. They have not seen Steinway 
pianos made in any other spirit than a spirit of 
love ; and they have not seen them under any 
other supervision than Steinway supervision. 
When I left the Steinway factory on Long Island 
and began my long journey to the Coast I had been 
six years in the seasoning and making. The control 
and management of the business was in the hands 
of the third and fourth generations of the house- 
hold of Steinwav. Eight members of the Steinway 
familv had directed my evolution from the raw 
wood, steel and glue into the completed piano. 
Nearly alt the skilled workmen in those great 
shops had been in those shops for many years. I 
was wood and steel and glue until they shaped me. 
Now, I am as much of the spirit of Steinway as the 
first piano Henry Steinway built. 
What does this mean in my own career as a Stein- 



interest, a conscientiousness, a deep determination 
that I should be worthy of my name. 
It means that the mountain spruce of my sounding- 
board, for example, is the finest procurable. After 
careful inspection and purchase it was dried for 
six months at the sawmill, then dried for another 
year in the Steinway yards, then seasoned for two 
or three years in special sheds, then kiln-dried and 
re-dried in strip and board— in all, a seasoning and 
drying process of five full years. 
It means that, following the seasoning of this and 



The Story that is told by the Steinway 







my other wood, nine months were spent shaping 
and fashioning me in the factory. In that one gen- 
eral factory every part of me was made, including 
plate, rim, hammers, brass castings, action, and all 
special hardware. Nothing was let out on contract. 
Nothing was left to outside influence. 
It means that I am, in fact, a Steinway piano — 
that my charm will endure for years to come, that 
my resonance will last, that my full, rich, singing 
tone and responsive action will delight those who 



possess me as long as materials shall cling together. 
So after six years of such patient fashioning, I left 
the Long Island factory and came West. I was 
unloaded from my long cruise and carefully gone 
over in the Sherman, Clay & Co. shops. And now 
I stand on the floor at Sherman, Clay & Co. among 
other pianos, waiting for the purchaser who shall 
come to claim me. 

Sometimes I talk over the old days in our original 
home with the other Steinway pianos here at Sher- 
man, Clay & Co. We miss the cheery companionship 
of the old square grand, with its rosewood case— - 
the piano that Henry Steinway built. It used to 
preside over us like a proud little old great-grand- 
mother. But usually we discuss the future. We 
discuss the homes that each of us, in the days to 
come, will be carried away to like brides. 
Some of us are eager to preside over great man- 
sions, with servants to dust us off, and drawing 
rooms to inhabit. Some of us are ambitious to 
have careers on the concert stage. But I have a 
different ambition. 

I want to be the piano near the fireside, where a- 
modest family gathers about me and plays familiar 
melodies. I want to be the companion, from the 
very first, to little children as they learn to touch 
my keys. I want to be the discreet— and the only 
---third person present between lovers. I want to 
spend my days in a little happy home. Surely, if 
some family knew how eager I am to make their 
love for me worthwhile, they would come and 
claim me without delay. Doesn't some couple with 
a modest home and purse want to come in and 
discover how it caii claim its Steinway piano? 



Sherman play & Co. 

Kearny and Sutter Sts., San Francisco 
CALIFORNIA-OREGON-WASHINGTON 



RENA 

LAZELLE 

SOPRANO 
San Francisco Opera Company 



flfod of Vocal Depai 



tment, San Francisco Conserv- 
lallable for RecitaU, Opera, 
forlo. Concert 



EMILIE LANCEL 

OPERATIC MEZZO-SOPRANO 

After Two Years' Absence in Europe 
Available For 

OPERA— ORATORIO— CONCERT 

Management ALICE SECKELS 
63 Post Street 

Residence: 433 Eighteenth Avenue, San Francisco 
Tel. Bayview 1461 



ANNIE LOUISE DAVID 

HARP SOLOIST AND TEACHER 

ON THE PACIFIC COAST DURING 
SEASON 1924-1925 

Address: Hotel Claremont, Berkeley 
Tel. Berkeley 9300 

Management Alice Secl<els, 68 Post Street 
Tel. Douglas 7267 



KARL RACKLE 



LAMBS CLUB, NEW YORK CITY 



WALLACE A. SABIN 



ALICE GENTLE 

MAIVAGEMENT 

CATHARINE A. BAMMAN 
53 West 39th Street New York, N. Y. 



DOUGLAS SOULE.-Pianisl 

ADVANOED PUPILS ACCEPTED 

Wedneada}' and Friday Mornings at Studio: 902 

Kohier & Chase Bide., San Francisco. Telephone 

Kearny B454. Residence Studio: 1,10 Monte Vista 

Aye., Oakland. Telephone Piedmont 70S. 



AUGUSTA HAYDEN 

SOPRANO 

Available for Concerts and Recltala 

Address! 471 37th Ayenne 

Tel. Pac. «.t2 

HOMER HENLEY 

BARITONE — TEACHER OF SINGING — CONDrCTOR 

Director California Club Choral 

An Oratorio Authority 

Residence Studio: 1248 Bay, at Franklin. Tel. FIIL lOSS 

LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM 

CONTRALTO 

Teacher of SlneinK. Complete Course of Operatic Traio- 

InB. 2730 Pierce St. Tel. Fillmore 4553 

Dominican College School of Music 

SAN RAFAEL.. CALIFORNIA 

Mnale Conrses Thoroufch and ProKrcsslve. Public School 

Music. Accredited Diploma 



PASMORE VOCAL STUDIOS 

Suite SOe, Kohier <& Chase Bide.. San FrancUeo 

WSO OoUece Ave., Berkeley. Residence, 291 Alyarado 

Road. Berkeley 



MR. ANDREW BOGART 
Teacher of Singing 

Pupils Prepared for Opera, Oratorio, Ciiurcii and 
Concert. New Address: Suite 600, Koliler & Ciiase 
BIdg., 26 O'Farrell Street. Telepiione Douglas 9256 



Organist Temple Emanu El, First Church of Christ Sc|. 

entlst. Director Lorlng: Club. S. P., Wed., 1915 Sacrament) 
It 3753! Sat., First Christian Sclenci 
nklln l.'!07; Res. Studio, 3142 Lewistoi 
"' " 2428 



Street, Phone \V 
Church, Phone Pi 
Ave.. Berkeley, Phone Pled 

MISS DOROTHEA MANSFELDT 

Preparing: Teacher for 

MRS. OSCAR MANSFELDT, Pianist 

207 Cherry St., Bet . Washington & Clay Tel. Pac. »S0« 

The College of the Holy Names 

LAKE MERRITT, OAKLAND 
Complete Conservatory Course — Piano, Harp, Violin 
'Cello. Voice. Coun terpoint. Harmony. History 

DURINI VOCAL STUDIO 

SglDIRECTION OF MME. LILLIAN SLINKEY DITRINI 
Italian Method — Voice Placement — BreathlnK 



1072 Ellla St. 



Opera — Church — Oratorio 



TeL West BSg 



PAUL STEINDORFF 

MASTER COACH 
Complete Grand and Light Opera Repertoire 



Miss Elizabeth Westgate 

Teacher of Piano, Organ, Harmony. Organist and Musical 
Director of First Presbyterian Church, Alameda. HoUK 
Studio: 1117 PARU STREET, ALAMEDA. Telephone Ala- 
meda 155, Thursdays, Merrlman School, 597 Eldorado Ave,- 
Oakland. Telephone Piedmont 2770. 



MUSIC PRINTING? 

SCHOLZ, ERICKSON & CO., Inc. 

521 Howard Street Piione Douglas 4273 

San Francisco 



Manning School of Music 

JOHN C. MANNINn, Director 
SZ43 WaahlnrtOB Street Telephone Fillmore 3 

PEARL HOSSACK WHITCOMB 

DRAMATIC SOPRANO 

Absolute Method of Voice Upon the Breath 

Monday and Thursday, 1005 Kohier & Chase BnlldlB^ 

Tel. Garflcid 6723. Res. Phone Prospect 420 



NovcmlKT 21, 1924 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 





THE 


DEST MUSICAL JO 


JRNA 


IN 1 


HE GREAT W 


EST 




§ 


iltr HO 
San F 


MUSICAL HE\ 
, Kohler « (ha 
ranclaco, Calif. 


itzn 

He II 
TeL 


COMPANY 
•Ik.. 2<1 O'Karrell St., 
Garaeld r.2S0-S25I 




ALFRED 


METZGER 






- 


Editor 


Hake 


all checka, drafla. niunrj- orde 

remittance payable 

PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL 


a or other 
to 
REVIEW 


forma 


of 



llaklaad-Berkeley-Alanieda Omee HIT Para St., AUmada 

Tel. Alameda IBS 

Mlaa Elisabeth Weatsate In Ckarse 



Seattle Olilce, lllS 23rd Ave. North, Seattle, WaahlnsloB 
Hra. Abble Gerrlah-Jonea In Charse 

'/ Loa Anvalea once 

ai22 Scenle Avenue, Hollrtvuod, California 
Bruno Uavid ITaaher In Charge 



VOL. XLVI 



FRIDAY, NOV. 21, 1924 



No. 7 



The PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW la for aale at 
the aheet mnalr departmentn of all lendlner munle Mtoren. 

, nifrcd aa aecond-claaa mall matter nt S. F. Poaioinee 

SUBSCRIPTIONS 
Annaally In Advance, Including Poataffei 

rolled Statea »3.00 

KorelKn Countrlea „ ., 4^0O 

TWENTY-FOURTH YEAR 



EDITORIAL DISCUSSION 



We sincerely trust that our friends will be patient 
with us in regard to starting the big subscription cam- 
paign which we are planning. In order to have every 
little detail complete so that the campaign can progress 
rapidly without a hitch we must be careful to make all 
arrangements for prizes beforehand. We certainly will 
start the campaign on time so that some of the prizes 
will be distributed before Christmas. To accentuate 
the purpose of this campaign we wish to repeat that 
It is our intention to give California a music journal 
that can work in the interests of the profession and the 
musical public independent of its advertising columns 
It is not our purpose to refuse advertising. That would 
be stupid. But we do not like to be entirely dependent 
upon advertising. To attain this end it is necessary 
that several thousand new subscribers be added to our 
liBt. and we are willing to give students and teachers 
worth-while prizes for their effort in helping us to gain 
these new subscriptions. 

There are 5.000 music teachers. 50.000 music students 
and 100,000 music lovers in Northern California. Surely 
it is not too much to expect that of these 155,000 people 
directly interested in music at least 10.000 should want 
to read a music journal made of special interest to 
them. Beginning next week we are going to make this 
paper as interesting as we know how. We shall try 
to suit the taste of as many different people as possible. 
While our space is limited, we must reduce the space 
hitherto allotted to advance notices of concerts, but to 
make up for this reduction we shall publish a weekly 
musical calendar tor the benefit of our readers and the 
managers of concerts. We also want our subscribers to 
have the paper on Fridays. For this reason we want 
all copy in our office on Tuesdays before five o'clock 
p. m. Copy reaching us later than this will have to 
wait until the next issue. 

We shall endeavor to include in the paper the fol- 
lowing departments: Critical reviews of current events 
of importance; musical news from Northern and South- 
ern California in brief paragraphs; .New York musical 
news; European musical news; occasional interviews 
with distinguished visiting and resident artists; educa- 
tional articles by leading pedagogues; a department of 
humor and anecdotes; biographical sketches of famous 
artists and composers and occasional reviews of new 
publications. If the subscription campaign proves a 
success we shall naturally increase the size of the 
paper according to the number of subscriptions and 
advertisements until we have reached a weekly paper 
from twenty to twenty-four pages, which we consider 
sufficient tor the Pacific West. The next step will be 
to form a committee of representative teachers and 
artists to help us launch and superintend the cam 
palgn. 



CRITICS PRAISE BRASLAU 

If ever a young singer had adulatory notices, it is 
the American contralto. Sophie Braslau, who is again 
touring this country in a long season of concerts. After 
her recital in Chicago last year, Herman Devries in the 
American hailed her as "the Schumann-Heink of the 
younger generation." "Could anyone." he asked, "sing 
Gustav Mahler's Immortal 'Human Life' with a deeper 
understanding of its intellectual and poetii' import, with 
more feeling, more tonal sensitiveness?" Edward Moore. 
in the Chicago Journal, asserted that "today she stands 
as a leader among contraltos," and Karleton Hackett, 
in The Post, said of her voice that it is "one of the few 
contraltos on our present stage." Sophie Braslau is an- 
nounced by Manager Selby C. Oppenheirner for a single 
concert at the Columbia 'Theatre on Sunday afternoon. 
December 14th. 



MANY CONCERTS DURING WEEK OF NOV. 16TH 

Geraldine Farrar in Miniature Version ot Carmen — 

Alma Gluck Sings for More Than Three Thousand 

at Auditorium — Moriz Rosenthal a Sensation 

By ALFRED METZGER 

During the lirsl part of the week beginning Sunday, 
November 10th. not less than seven Important con- 
certs were given. These do not include events across 
the Bay nor minor affairs of a musical nature. We shall 
confine our.selves to the more important events in this 
review. 

Geraldine Farrar— The Capitol Theatre was crowded on 
Sunday afternoon when Geraldine Farrar, under the 
direction of Frank W. Healy. appeared in a miniature 
production of Carmen. The personality of Farrar al- 
ways attracts a large number of people. Although the 
diva does not take kindly to newspaper people, and re- 
fuses to be interviewed, the newspapers have actually 
made her by publishing sensational stories about her 
and thus make the public anxious and curious to "see" 
her, even though they do not care to hear her. Miss 
Fairar is very ungrateful to the press, and if the papers 
would act toward her like she does toward the papers 
her name would not appear at all in any of the columns 
of the newspapers, with the result that her concerts 
would not be attended by anybody. 

Judging from her distortion of Carmen. Miss Farrar 
has no reason to feel unkindly toward the press. It is 
one ot the most inartistic, outrageous and inexcusable 
distortion of a really worthy composition that has ever 
come to our attention. She should have been hissed 
off the stage. Arias were transported from one act to 
another, songs that should have been interpreted by 
Carmen were given to other characters ot the cast. 
The brilliant and thrilling entrance of the Toreador 
in the second act was sung by four young women in a 
very indifferent manner. The acting was entirely out 
of mood with the continuity of the performance. The 
singers, while possessing pleasing voices, were incapa- 
ble from an histrionic standpoint to do justice to the 
lines. Altogether it was a performance that would 
have resulted in Bizet's turning over in his grave had 
he known about it. 

Miss Farrar herself was not in her usual mood. Her 
voice, although better in quality, especially in the high 
notes, has lost in quantity. The middle and low tones 
could hardly be heard. Her acting lacked the vitality 
and energy that used to mark it. She has grown some- 
what more slended than she used to be and her per- 
sonal appearance has gained rather than lost. But 
apart from displaying some pugilistic characteristics in 
the fight with the cigarette girl during the first act 
there was nothing in the performance that had a punch. 
Indeed, we are convinced that the entire production 
was an imposition on Miss Farrar's managers as well as 
on her audience and we are thoroughly disappointed 
regarding the artist's musical taste and attitude toward 
seiious music lovers. 

The orcliestra. under the direction of Signor Peroni. 
was inadequate in numbers and instruments, although 
the conductor was the only one in the organization that 
could be regarded as artistically proficient. The dancing 
while graceful was entirely unsuited to the character of 
the opera, while the scenery and costumes, although 
neat and colorful, were entirely out of place and in no 
way adapted for the scenic correctness of the story. 
The tempi were mostly too slow. There was no vitality 
nor virility to the performance. Some of the important 
scenes and lines were cut, while much important and 
irrelevant material was introduc-ed. Miss Farrar ought 
to be ashamed of herself to put such a distortion of a 
beautiful operatic work before the musical public. 

Alma Gluck — Between three and four thousand people 
assembled at the Exposition Auditorium to hear Alma 
Gluck in her only San Francisco concert this season. 
Owing to the fact thai the editor ot the Pacific Coast 
Musical Review was attending the Farrar concert he 
has to rely upon the report of the Gluck recital on 
others As usual the personal charm ot the artist again 
gained her the sympathy of her audience last Sunday 
afternoon. Her pleasing voice, when used sparingly 
and in limited range, has a certain appealing effect dur- 
ing the rendition ot folk songs and ballads of which 
Mnie. Gluck's programs abound. In the more severe 
works of vocal literature the singer is somewhat lack- 
ing in intellectual and emotional vitality. Mr. Chotzin- 
off, the nccompanist, again demonstrated his artistic 
proficiency with his unquestionably musicianly inter- 
iretalions, while Miss Rosanoff, the 'cellist, added to 
the aitistic ensemble of the performance. The program 
was published several times in these columns and needs 
no repetition at this lime. 

Moriz Rosenthal — After listening to Moriz Rosi'nihal 
at Scottish Rite Auditorium last Monday evening we 
are more convinced than ever that this master of 
pianist ic art is our favorite interpretor of piano litura 
ture. This is a day of specialists. We have pianists 
predominating the interpretation of the ultra modern 
school, and some of the Bach and Beethoven variety, 
some ot the Chopin mood, and some of the Russian 
orchestral category. The tendency of today Is to 
"tickle" the ivories and be afraid to play a fortissimo. 
When a pianist dares to play vigorously and follow the 
suggestion of the composers a few lady-like music 
lovers should hold their ears and proclaim: "My. how- 
he pounds" 

The writer feeds relieved, like encountering a cool 
breeze on a hot day. when he listens to Moriz Rosen- 
thal. Here is an artist who is not afraid of his artistic 
convictions. He i.Iays poetically and tenderly when 
interpreting a Mozart Sonata or a Chopin Prelude or 
Nocturne. He plays with red blocMl In his veins when 
he Interprets Liszt in Hungarian Rhapsodic. His tech- 



nique is simply unbelievable. While other pianists spe 
ilalize in certain phases of planistic art. Rosenthal is 
equally convincing in everyllilng he does. We cannot 
imagine a more intellectual or artisllc inli-rpri'tallon of 
Schumann's Fanlasle than the one Rosiiitlial gave us. 
By the way, this Fantasle was originally divided In the 
following three Bubtllles by Sehuminn: I— Ruins; II — 
Triumphal Arches; III— Stars. In RoKenlb:irK Interpre- 
tation these movements stood out In uiii|ue»tlonnhle 
plasticity. 

While it Is not exactly necessary that a pianist should 
be absolutely a<curate in the presentation of his score, 
we feel grateful to Mr. Rosenthal for convliKing us that 
It is possible to play an entirely difficult and repre 
sentative piano program without one error. We could 
not hear one wrong note during the entire concert, and 
If anyone says that Rosenthal has no temperament or 
emotional depth, we certainly are inclined to doubt his 
proficiency or capability to form a correct judgment 
for Rosenthal convinced us and the majority of the 
audience that he has not only emotional qualilicH, but 
vitality, virility and temperament to an extraorill- 
narily developed degree. 

His technlc is positively uncanny. Uuring the Liszt 
Rhapsodic he played a passage that most pianists play 
in glissando. while he played it in a run almost as fasi 
as a glissando and more smoothly. The Chopin Minuet 
waltz in thirds was also a feat worthy of admiration. 
It is astounding how Rosenthal retains the artisllc at- 
mosphere of this waltz even though complicating its 
technical characteristics. The enthusiasms grew with 
the progress of the concert until finally the audience 
refused to leave until Rosenthal had played a number 
of enchanting encores, including Poldinl's Dansante 
Poupee. We cannot imagine a more enjoyable piano 
recital nor a greater master of pianoforie Interpreta- 
tion than Moriz Rosenthal's event at Scottish Rite Audi- 
torium last Monday evening. It was a triumph of the 
highest order. 

San Francisco Trio — The Fairmont Hotel Ballroom was 
crowded last Tuesday evening when the San Francisco 
Trio gave the first concert of its season. This organiza- 
tion consists of Elsie Cook Laraia, pianist, Willem 
Dehe, 'cellist, and William Laraia, violinist. The pro- 
gram included: Trio D minor op. 19 (Mendelssohn), 
Sonatii C minor op. 45 (Grieg I, and Trio B major op. 
8 (Brahms I. The size of the audienci' is evidence for 
the popularity of this organization, for to attract such 
a number of people to a chamber music concert, even 
though no admission were charged, is a feat in itself. 
And to keep such an audience interested from begin- 
ning to end and in a frame of mind where approval 
results in enthusiastic applause requires a certain 
artistic craftsmanship which lannot l>o denied. Every 
one of the artists comprising the San Francisco Trio is 
a musician ot unquestionable proficiency. Inasmuch as 
interpretation of standard compositions is a matter of 
taste and that barely two out of fifty people will agree 
on a subject of this kind it is difficult to pass judgment 
regarding the Trio's ideas of the works it interpreted. 
Personally we felt that a little more virility or force 
might have Improved much of the excellent work done 
by this Trio. Mrs. Laraia is a splendid pianist, who 
both technically and emotionally represents predomi- 
nating ideals In interpretation. Laraia has a smooth 
tone, somewhat small but decisive and interprets with 
technical accuracy. Willem Dehe draws a rich, luscious 
tone and phrases with poetic instinct and musicianly 
judgment. It is certain that the audience enjoyed the 
program and no doubt will be ready to come again tor 
the next concert, which will take place at the Fair- 
mont Hotel on Tuesday evening, January 27th. 

Fortnightly— May Mukle, 'cellist, Ellen Edwards, pi- 
anist, and Lajos Fenster, violinist, gave the most recent 
of the Ida G. Scott Fortnlghtlys at the St. Francis 
Hotel last Monday evening, November 17th. Every one 
of the artists represents the most delightful phase of 
interpretative musical art. .Miss Mukle is a 'cellist 
whose beautiful, rich tone and whose surety of execu- 
tion combine to enable her to Interpret the most mod- 
ern as well as the oldest composition in a manner con- 
formant to the finest principles. She was entitled to 
the enthusiasm she aroused. Miss Edwards is a pmnist 
whose sincerity of purpose, intelligence of expression 
and accuracy of technlc contribute to making her an 
arilst of high standing whose success in this com- 
munity is indeed well justified. Mr. Fenster la a violin- 
ist who understands his art from A to 'A and who in- 
terprets the works of masters In a manner to emphasize 
their intrinsic artistic values. Techni.ally and musi- 
cally he succeeds in obtaining the most delightful 
effects Miss Scott has reason to feel much gratified 
with the success of this most recent of her enjoyable 
events. 



MUCH INTEREST IN CALBERG RECITAL 

Exceptional interest Is being taken in the forthcom- 
ing piano recital to be given by Elwin A Calberg at he 
Twentieth Century Clubhouse in Berkeley <.n Tues.lay 
even"ng, November 25th. Mr. Calberg has been n 
PuroDe and New York studying with inl.Tnatlonaly 
fZZl masters and this event will he -'- ""' ;X»:; 
program he will present since his return^ T'',r,/h"Mr 

ng array of rei.resenlatlve compositions which Mr. 
calberg knows so well how to make attract ve con- 
s m ite the evening's proceedings: Prelude and Fugue. 
E ino (M.^ndelssohn); Pastorale Varle (Mozart); 
SonaaG minor (Schumann): Fanlasle F minor 
(Chopin) Preludes-F sharp minor. F sharp major B 

1 ™V„or V flat malor F major. 1) minor (Chopin). 

The Fountain at the Acqua Paola 'Griffcs), Toccata 

(Ravel). 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



November 21, 1924 



NOVELTIES AT NEXT SYMPHONY PAIR 

An announcement which has been received with great 
interest by local music lovers is that of the first per- 
formance here of the Oriental Impressions of Henry 
Eiehheim, which is to be given at the pair of regular 
symphony concerts next Friday and Sunday afternoons 
under the direction of Alfred Hertz. Eiehheim. who is 
a resident of Santa Barbara, will come to San Francisco 
to conduct the work, bringing with him his famous col- 
lection of rare Oriental instruments, many of which 
have been utilized in the scoring of his "Impressions." 
The suite is based on themes coUscted while traveling 
in the Orient, and reports from eastern performances 
of the work indicate that symphony patrons may expect 
a production both delightful and interesting. It was 
originally written for small orchestra at the suggestion 
of Mrs. F. S. Coolidge tor the Pittsfield Chamber Music 
Festival in 1921. It was later arranged for full orchestra 
and was first produced in this form by the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra in 1922. The remainder of the 
program for this pair of concerts will consist of the 
r»opular Second Symphony of Brahms and the Tschai- 
kowsky fantasia. Francesco da Rimini. The latter num- 
ber is new in the orchestra's repertoire, but Hertz pre- 
dicts that it will become one of the most popular of 
Tschaikowsky's works. 

The Popular Concert, to be given Sunday afternoon. 
December 7, will present Walter Ferner, principal cel- 
list of the orchestra as soloist. He will be heard in the 
well-known "Kol Nidrei" of Bruch. The orchestral 
items announced for this concert are Gluck's "Iphigenie 
in Aulis" Overture, the Unfinished Symphony of Schu- 
bert. Beethoven's powerful Leonore Overture, No. 3, 
"The Irish Washwoman" of Leo Sowerby. Mendelssohn's 
Spring Song and Spinning Song and the overture to 
"'The Gypsy Baron" of Johann Strauss. 



ELMAN RETURNS AN AMERICAN 

On May 17, 1923. before one of the Justices of the 
Kew York State Supreme Court, Mischa Elman, the 
celebrated violinist, whose first San Francisco recital 
of the present season is booked for the Columbia 
Theatre. Sunday afternoon. December 7th. took an oath 
pledging his allegiance to the Vnited States and was 
awarded final papers making him a full-fledged citizen 
of this country. 

Elman has arranged a superbly important program 
for his first Columbia Theatre recital, included thereon 
being the lovely D major Sonata by Nardini; Carl 
Frieberg's arrangement of Mozart's Adagio; Hart- 
mann's transcription of Haydn's Minuet: the Wilhelm] 
arrangement of Chopin's Nocturne; a characteristic 
work by Victor Herbert, entitled A la Valse; the 
Humoresque California, arranged by Arthur Loesser 
after the style of Paladilhe; Ernest Bloch's Nigun; the 
Wieniawski Polonaise in D major: and Elman's own 
arrangements of Rode's Elude Caprice and Rubinstein's 
The Dew Is Sparkling. In addition to these, an im- 
portant presentation will be that of Albert Dupuis' 
Fantaisie Rapsodique — a work in concerto form which 
is to be presented for the first time in America. 




KAJETAN ATTL 

SOLO HARPIST, SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 



of Lj-on ^ Ileair Harp* 

EneaeementH and Inntructlon Apply 
& Ihaae Ulde.. T«l. Douelaa ia78, on 
nd Saturdar Afternoona UXLY. Real- 
r'rankllji 7S47. 



jisT oit; 

A METHOD FOR THE HARP 

Ily Kajelon AIll 

CARI. FISHKK. FublUher 

nr Sale at Slierman, Claj- <& Co., Koblrr A Chaa 
Hcnrjr Urobr and Kajctan AttI 



THE PUBLIC SQUARE 

A.\D OTIIKK SHORT VKRSK 

BY RELDA M. CAILLEAU 

MKSSAGKS OK HI.MAN IVTKHKST 

PRICE, »l.2.-, 

ir Sale at the White Houhf and (ily of Paria 



CHAMBER MUSIC SOCIETV 

Scottish Rite Hall 

Tuesday Eve., Nov. 25, 8:15 P. M. Sharp 

FELIX SALMOND 

VIOLONCELLIST 

Assisting Artist 

Also 

Ellen Edwards and Lajos Fenster 

Seats $2 00, $1.50, $1.00 

At Sherman, Clay & Company 



MME. CAILLEAU'S FORTHCOMING RECITAL 

A concert of prime importance is that which Madame 
Rose Relda Cailleau, the San Francisco soprano, will 
give on Monday evening, December 1 in the Fairmont 
Hotel Ballroom. This will be Madame Cailleau's first 
recital here in a number of seasons, and due to her 
artistry, which is of the first magnitude, and her 
gracious personality, the singer enjoys unusual popu- 
larity. The many admirers of Madame Cailleau will 
welcome the opportunity of hearing her interpret the 
following well chosen program: Aria from II Re Pas- 
tore (Mozart), Wiegenlied (Reger), Niemand Hats 
Geschen (Loewe), By the Fountain (Ware), Robin's 
Song (While). Throughout this entire group, Madame 
Caille.-iu will have the co-operation of Mrs. Christine 
Howells Pfund, who will play flute obligates. Mrs. 
Pfund. with Jessie Moore at the piano, will play a 
group of flute solos, which will be followed by another 
charming group of songs by the soprano; Fabliau from 
Manon (Massenet), Les Filles de Cadix (Delibes), 
L'Oasis (Fourdrainl. Chanson Norvegienne (Fourdrain), 
Cradle Song (Waldrop), When I Was Seventeen (Kra- 
mer), The Look (Rosalie Housman), The Singer (Max- 
well). Madame Cailleau's little daughter, Relda M. 
Cailleau. will accompany her mother at the piano 
throughout the entire program. 



The Pacific Musical Society will hold the second con- 
cert of November on Friday night. November 28th. at 
the Fairmont Hotel, as the regular date falls on Thanks- 
giving. The following program will be presented: 
Scenes from Childhood (Schumann), Charles Hart; 
Omio Fernando aria from Favorita (Donizetti), Emilie 
Lancel; Nocturne Op. 37. No. 2, Two Mazurkas Op. 24. 
No. 4; Op. 59. No. 2. Fantasie Op. 49, Charles Hart; 
Waldesgesprach (Schumann). Mondnacht (Schumann), 
Legend of St. Dorothee (Fourdrain). Beau Solr (De- 
bussy). Love Lilt, Kismul's Galley, From songs of the 
Hebrides (Kennedy Fraser), Emilie Lancel; Paraphrase 
de Concert, Eugene Onegin (Tschaikowsky-Pabst), 
Charles Hart. « 

Tile San Francisco Music Teachers' Association will 
hold its regular monthly meeting at the studio of Frank 
Carroll Giffen at the corner of Hyde and Chestnut 
streets on Monday evening, November 24th, and a spe- 



MADAME 

JOHANNA 

KRISTOFFY 

Prima Donna Soprano 

Has Returned from Europe 

and Reopened Her 

Studio at 

740 PINE STREET 



Phone Douglas 6624 



Elwyn Artist Series 

At SCOTTISH RITE HALL— SEASON 1924-1925 

11 SUPREME EVENTS 



$7.00, $10 00, $15.00 

(Plu.« 111% Tax) 

EVA GAUTHIER, Thi.-5day Eve. Dec 4 
CECILIA HANSEN, : nday Eve Dec 22 
ISA KREMER, Frid'y Eve Dec 12 
JASCHA HEIFETZ. 'jnday Mat., Jan 18 
MARIA IVOGUN, IV nday Eve., Jan 26 
ALBERT SPALDING, Friday Eve Feb 20 
ROLAND HAYES, Sunday Mat., Feb 22 
MABEL GARRISON. Wednesday Eve. March 
LONDON STRING QUARTET, Tues Eve Anr 
REINALD WERRENRATH, Monday Eve'Aor' 
MERLE ALCOCK, Early May 

ALL ATTRACTIONS INCLUDED 
Season TIefceta Now on Sale— Sherman, Clay & . 



u 



Giacomo Minkowski 

studio nt 605 Kohler & Chnse Buildine 
Tel. Kearny 5454 

cially interesting evening is in view. In addition to 
important discussions of interest to the music teachers 
there will be a most enjoyable program by Elsa Naess, 
the Norwegian pianist of which we shall speak in de- 
tail next week. 



MIECZYSLAW MUNZ 



A new luminary will peep through the portals of 
Fame at San Francisco music-lovers a week from Mon- 
day afternoon (December 1st) when young Mieczyslaw 
Munz, celebrated pianist, makes his first appearance 
here. Munz comes heralded as one of the real pianistic 
geniuses of the age — perhaps the one outstanding 
figure among newcomers who has firmly established 
a place for himself as one of the world's greatest. 

Munz has been lauded throughout the eastern part 
of the nation and has successfully invaded Australia 
and the Antipodes. From a series of forty recitals in 
Australian cities he will reach California for the first 
time, and his first appearance here will be in the Alice 
Seckels "Matinee" series at the Fairmont Hotel. Man- 
ager Selby C. Oppenheimer, under whose direction 
Munz plays, is satisfied that local music-lovers will co- 
incide with their eastern brethren in proclaiming the 
young genius an artist to be reckoned with in the future. 

Munz will make his western debut in a program that 
will include Busoni arrangement of Bach's Organ Toc- 
cata in C major, the ever-delightful Beethoven Moon- 
light Sonata, a group of Chopin works including the 
F minor Nocturne, D flat major 'Valse. C minor Etude 
and six of the lovely Preludes, Debussy's La Cathe- 
drale engloutie, Rachmaninoff's G minor Prelude and 
Dohnanyi's arrangement of Delibes' Naila. 



FREDERIC 

POWELL 

VOICE SPECIALIST 
TEACHER OF SINGING 

RESTORATION OF LOST OR 
IMPAIRED VOICES 

705 Kohler & Chase BIdg., Tuesdays and Fridays 
Residence Phone Sunset 6524 



BENJAMIN 

MOORE 



2636 UNION STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Fillmore 1624 



BY APPOINTMENT 



Tickets Now Selling 



IVf ISCMA 




lyioLirwisT 

Two Recitals 

Columbia Theater Sunday Afternoons, 
Dec. 7, Dec. 21 




BRASLAU 



LEADING CONTRALTO 
METBOP-CHICAGO OPERA CD'S 



Columbia — Sunday Afternoon, Dec. 14 



RUTH ST. DENIS 

AnierU.ir» Greatest Daneine Star 

TED SHAWN and the 

DENISHAWN DANCERS 

Curran — 'Week of December IS 

1"", threk'\vondkrpix prS^TramI' ""'" 

Ihnmber Muale OreheNtra Company of 40 






Xovembor 21. l''J4 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



MUSIC IN LOS ANGELES 

By BRUNO DAVID USSHER 



Is Los Angeles a nuisieal city? Judging t'nun tlie dis- 
gracefully small attendance at last evening's superb 
violoncello recital of Felix Salmond. ours is a musical 
"dumb-bell" community. Philhannonic Auditorium was 
about two-thirds empty. Granted tliat the general pub- 
lic may have been unfamiliar with the name and repu- 
tation of this pre-eminent English artist, yet. where 
I were the music teachers and their advanced students, 
of whom there are sufliciently many to more than fiU 
the hall several times. As for the roncert-goers at 
large, if they would patronize a musical journal, they 
would have realized that Salmond is well worth hearing. 
■ There is no excuse for the music teacher, for even if he 
does not read a music journal, the very quality of the 
program should have been sufficient urge to come and 
with his older pupils. The trouble is that the majority 
of the piano teachers at best hear only pianists, the 
I vocal teacher singers and the violinists fiddlers. A 

very narrow, uncultured and unmusical attitude. 
, Hence the Brahms sonata opus 99. rid Italian compo- 
, sitions by Nardini. Pianelli. the French composer 
; Senaille, Dvorak's 'cello concerto meant nothing to our 
"instructors" of music, although most of these works 
have never been heard here before. Salmond is of the 
Casals class among 'cellists and Casals, be it said, is 
the greatest 'cellist today. Hence I need not dwell on 
Salmond's technic. His tone sings, is wonderfully clear 
and sweet even in extreme high and low positions. It 
is of Platonic sensuousness as it were. If any fault 
could be found it is a tendency of giving too much tone 
at times. This London musician is an eloquent interpre- 
ter and his Brahms was an experience, for it is technic- 
ally and emotionally a taxing work. (Bv way of infor- 
mation, the encore after the first groups was from a 
sonata by Eccles. the last one Glazounoff's Dance Es- 
pagnole.) Suffice to say that those present feted the 
artist and his unfailingly discreet and musical accom- 
paniste. Miss Ellen Edwards. The concert constituted 
the second event of the Auditorium Artist Series. George 
Leslie Smith, manager. 

Excellent work has been done by the National Fed- 
eration of Music Clubs along the lines of betterment in 
church music through the devoted, unselfish and highly 
constructive services of a Los Angeles woman. Mrs. 
Grace Widney Mabee. the federation chairman on 
church music. Mrs. Mabee has made great sacrifices to 
carry out a country-wide survey of church music stand- 
ards. Next came plans tor their upliftment. The means 
were an entirely new hymn book containing sixty-four 
of the best tunes culled from the last three centuries. 
That meant gathering of authentic musical versions 
To this Airs. Mabee added brief but sufficientlv complete 
notes about composer and poet and history of the tune. 
The best proof for the value of her work is that no less 
a publishing house than the Century Company of New 
York volunteered its publication and widespread pub- 
licity. Not enough. Mrs. Mabee organized hymn mem- 
ory contests in thirty-nine states, with the result of a 
better hymn repertoire in hundreds of churches. This 
propaganda has reached as far as India, from where 
inquiries as to the sources of better church music was 
received. Mrs. Mabee is not resting on her laurels. A 
new and more extensive contest plan is under way! It 
is not only a musical but also a spiritual movement 
banding Sunday schools, ecclesiastic societies and 
church associations of all denominations together. 
Those interested in the coming competitions will do 
well to write to Mrs. Mabee, 321 South Van Ness avenue. 
As implied, it is finding support from leading ecclesi- 
astic authorities. 

Last, but not least, a few words about a recent San 
Francisco visitor In Los Angeles, Mrs. Lillian Birming- 
ham, president of the California Federation of Music 
Clubs, as much loved and esteemed in the Southland 
as in her own territory, the Bay Citv region. It has been 
before my pleasure to tell of the decided success of 
her administration, and her sweeping re-election is a fine 
testimonial not only to her. but also to Southern Cali- 
fornia convention delegates who voted for her irrespec- 
tive of local pride, because they believed in Mrs. Bir- 
mingham. People are judged by their work, and under 
the Birmingham regime, which has only one purpose, 
service to the state federation, this association has in- 
creased very materially in clubs and, which is more, 
prestige because of greater usefulness. While in 
Southern California Mrs. Birmingham was received with 
open arms, and clubs vied with each other to have 
this "first lady of the land" as honor guest. During her 
visit Mrs. Birmingham sponsored the affiliation of sev- 
eral clubs here and in San Diego with the state fed- 
eration. Also a presidents' conference was held at 
which the following committee appointments became 
known: Mrs. W. V. Goodfellow of Los Angeles, asso- 
ciate chairman young professional musicians' contests. 
Earl Z. Meeker, chairman church music; Ella C. Duf- 
field, chairman Junior Clubs; L. E. Behymer, chairman 
philanthropy; all above named from Los Angeles; 
Miss Dorothy Mansfield, associate chairman San Fran- 
cisco district; Mrs. Evelyn Ware of San Francisco ap- 
pointed treasurer of the federation. Apropos, the fed- 
eration treasury cannot look askance at the president, 
for there are $631 in the bank, although the annual 
revenue of the federation amounts only to $.550 a year. 
Mrs. Birmingham paid warm tribute to Mrs. Bessie 
Zuckerman. president of Santa Monica and president 
Df the Bay Cities Musical Association. Mrs. Zucker- 
man in a fine spirit of placing personal honor below the 
benefit of the commonwealth offered that the next state 
federation convention be held in San Francisco, this 
being a more expedient locality than Santa Monica in 



MOW ot the fact that California and Klastern delegates 
in large numbers would I'ass through Sun Francisco on 
lieir way to the national convention in Portland. In 
keeping with this spirit, Mrs. Birmingham announced 
that the San Francisco convention, to take place early 
next June, would be abbreviated to a day of business 
sessions and a banquet, so that delegates could pro- 
ceed qiiickly to Portland and spend more time at the 
national meeting. Plans also are under way to charter 
a railway car for Southern California delegates and a 
second conveyance for Northern California delegates to 
the national convention. Mrs. Birmingham hopes that 
California will be more than fully represented in Port- 
land, also that following the national convention dele- 
gates returning from there east via California will 
find widest hospitality, something which she trusts is 
self-understood. 

"Denishawn Magazine, a Quarterlv Review Devoted 
to the Art of the Dance." is on the desk, its first issue 
mtriguingly beautiful and full of thought, typical of 
tlie Denishawn art. There is an article by Ruth St 
Denis, "Dance as Life Experience," the first of a serial 
by 'Ted Shawn, "History of the Dance," another study 
on Havelock Ellis' "Dance of Life." "Art ot Gesture " 
by Katherine Edson. and a profusion of beautiful plates 
short comments and notes, the whole thing put in a 
form as only a Denishawn magazine can be dressed 
done by The Roycrofters. The magazine, to my mind' 
presages a new era ot Denishawn dance art. It gives 
a rich promise for the programs due us from this group 
ot dancer-musician-poets next January. Space is too 
short to quote now from this magazine, a volume ot 
aesthetic and hence spiritual writings as they deal with 
the highest meaning of dance. Ruth St. Denis is the 
principal editor, with Katherine Edson, June Hamilton 
Rhodes ot Los Angeles, now with the Pacific Coast 
Musician as manager, and Morris Colman as associate 
editors. 



STEINWAY 

^Jlnstrumeftl-^of^Llxe ImmortaL 




The larger the circulation of a Music Journal 
the better for the members of the profession and 
student. 



WORK of art is a work of 
art because it says more than 
it says." 

The Steinway is cs.sentially n 
work of art — something more tlian 
materials and mechanism, tlic art, 
the soul lies behind. 

Thus the Steinway represents 
the sum total of perfection in pianos. 

Scud, COMPANY 

Broadway 'TT,^ Steinway House 



FITZGERAL D'S ■ for the cAd-vancement of SMusic 

Eleanor Woodford 

This brilliant dramatic soprano is now filling many en- 
gagements. She has taken Constance Balfour's class while 
the latter is in Europe, and was chosen from a list of 
twenty applicants for the position ot Soloist of the Temple 
Baptist Church of Los Angeles. In addition to a voice ot 
fine dramatic quality, she possesses a magnetic personality. 
She uses the sweet-toned, singing 

KNABE 

exclusively, and says. "It is the perfection of harmony." 



HILL STREET 



AT 78.7-729 




LOS ANGELES 



ROSEMARY ROSE 



A Singer Who Teaches — Consolidates Her Studios 

Formerly of Milwaukee, Sheboygan 

and Plymouth 



In Los Angeles 



437 SO. lvE:N)IOItl<: STHICKT 

AulIItlonn Uy Ail|ii>liitini-ii 
Ruth Brodiiinn. ReKiNt 



CHARLES BOWES 

TEACHER OF VOICE 
), Grand View. I'konr SS4IMr,, I.na Am 



L. E. Behymer 

MANAGER OF DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS 

Executive Offices: 

706 Auditorium BIdg., Lo* Angelea 



ABBIE NORTON JAMISON 

PIANO — HARMONY — VOCAI. COACH 
.Sprrlnl IMnnu .Normal ClnMarx 



Alexander Bevani 

ALL UKAXCHICS OF THK 

VOCAL ART 



studio: 002 So 
147 Went 2t.st Str« 



Calirornla Munle Co. Bids- 

Teleiihone Bca<-ou 7707 



lima Jones Clark, soprano, with Pearle Brandt at the 
piano, will give a recital at the studio ot Mrs. Carroll 
Nicholson, 32 Loreta avenue. Piedmont, on Tuesday 
evening, November 24th. The following program will 
be presented: Nina (Pergolesi). Danza. danza fanchlula 
(Durante). Rendil sereno al ciglio (Handel). Serenata 
(Tosti). Aria — "II est doux. il est bon" (from "Herodi- 
ade") (Massenet). Two Folk Songs of Little Russia 
(arr. by Zimbalist). The Dove (arr. by Schindler). 
Didn't it Rain (arr. by Burleigh). Trahison (Chamin- 
ade). Sombrero (Chaminade). Le coeur de mami (Del- 
croze). Lite (Curran). Wild Flowers (Josten). Homing 
(del Riego), April, My April (Mllligan). 



ILYA BRONSON .......'is:".!'','.'"',. . 

I minarniutilc Orchratra 
Loa Ans^rlra Trio, rhUhnrnionlo 
Quartet Inatructloo. (ham her .MumIc lUcltala 
BA15 Ln MIrada. Phune llollj 3U4-I 

A.KOODLACH 

VIOLIN MAKICK AND HBI'AIHBR 

ConnoUaear — Appral«rr 

S03 M.Je.tIc Thi-nlrf Illdg.. I.o . Anic.-l.-> Turkpr -1010 

JOHN SMALLMAN 

nAlllTONK — TEACIIKR OF SINOINO 
Voice Trial br Appointment. $3.00. Studloi H03-804 So. Cat 
>lu.li- <o. nidg. VlUnn Hrnln. Si-.r^lnrv 

ZOELLNER CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

LOS ANGELES 

IISO Wladaar BooleTard (MIS Hollrnood BaalcTard 

CampUta Faeultr ot Artlai Taaakara 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



November 21, 1924 



CLAIRE DUX ^^P'^^""" 



CONCERT MANAGEMENT ARTHUR JUDSON 
FISK BUILDING, NEW YORK CITY 



LIEDER SINGER 

BRUNSWICK RECORD 



SECOND MUNICIPAL POP CONCERT 

The second municipal popular concert which will be 
given on the night of November 26 in the Civic Audi- 
torium will present as guest artist Eva Gauthier. young 
mezzo-sprano in conjunction with the Sau Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra. Alfred Hertz conductor. Miss 
Gauthier has studied music in many countries of the 
world and has a very extensive repertoire. While in 
Holland a few years ago she became interested in 
Javanese music and obtained permission from the 
Dutch government to mingle with the three hundred 
wives of the Sultan of Java. She spent three .vears 
there and is very familiar with the quaint oriental 
melodies of the Javanese. 

At the age of ten she displayed such talent for music 
that she was hailed in her home town. Ottawa Canada, 
as a child prodigy. .\t the age of fourteen she was 
sent to Paris by her uncle. Sir Wilfrid Laurier. former 
Premier of Canada, where she remained for four years 
studying with the best instructors at the Paris Conser- 
vatoire of Music. 

Miss Gauthier is extremely modern recently startling 
a large New York audience in Aeolian Hall by singing 
several American "jazz" numbers during the course 
of her program, her belief being that "jazz" will de- 
velop into the folk song of .\merica. She has been en- 
gaged for this year's Berkshire Festival to be held 
under the patronage of Mrs. Calvin Coolidge. WTien 
Miss Gauthier appeared before the Royal family in 
Denmark she made such a favorable impression that 
she was decorated by the Queen, an honor bestowed 
upon only four women before and never upon a for- 
eigner. 



COURBOIN RECITAL— FREE SERIES 

Charles M. Courboin. famous Belgian organist and for- 
merly soloist of Antwerp Cathedral will give a free con- 
cert-recital on the great organ in Civic .Auditorium on 
the night of December 1. according to an announcement 
by Supervisor J. Emmet Hayden, chairman of the Audi- 
torium Committee. Courboin who is now guest soloist 
of the famous Wanamaker organs in Philadelphia and 
New York is a native of Antwerp. Belgium. .\t the 



SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

ALrR£DH£RTZ CONDUCTOH. 

AUDITORIUM 

Wednesday Evening. November 26th 

S:".fi ]'. M. 

EVA GAUTHIER 

«i;Z/,<> SDI'RAVO 

■The HlBh I>rle»te»« of Modern Song" 

lleKerved Neal«: fl.WI, -.'•r, SUc. .>ow on sale at 

Sherman, Clay & Co. 

I>ireelion: .\ndltoriuni Committee 

.7 Kmmn Ilaydcn, Chairman 



Elwin A. Calberg 



Soloist and Accompanist 
Available Season 1924-1925 



Myra Palache 

PIANIST 

LECTURES ON MUSIC 
APPRECIATION 



San F'rancifteo AddreMM. 2r>20 Vnion Street. 

Phone W alnnt 039 

On Wedneaday. 'i p. ro. to p. m. 



age of seven he would play the concertos of Mozart and 
Haydn symphonies from memory without an error, after 
they had been played for him. His wonderful perfor- 
mances reached the ears of the Belgian composer. Jan 
Blocks, director of .\ntwerp Conservatory, who took 
hiui as a pupil. His rise under great masters was rapid 
from this point. 

In 1902 Courboin became organist of Antwerp Cathre- 
dral. the largest church in Belgium. He later gave 
recitals at Albert Hall. London, and Queen's Hall; 
in the Trocadero and La Madeleine in Paris: in Rlieims 
Cathedral, and in many French, Belgium and German 
cities. The concert-recital here, the second of the 
city's free series this year, will be the first in San Fran- 
cisco on the Exposition organ, which ranks with the 
largest in the world. Courboin will present a recital 
of popular appeal which will include Debussy's "The 
Afternoon of a Faun." 



SECOND CHAMBER MUSIC CONCERT 

The second concert of the Chamber Music Society's 
series on Tuesday evening. November 25th. at Scottish 
Rite Hall will present a novel and extremely interesting 
program in conjunction with distinguished assisting 
artists. Felix Salmond. the famous English violoncell- 
ist, although making his lirst appearance in San Fran- 
cisco, enjoys the reputation, both in Europe and Amer- 
ica, of being amongst the foremost exponents of this in- 
strument. Mr. Salmond will be heard with Miss Ellen 
Edwards, the distinguished English pianist, in the F 



NEW SONGS FOR TEACHER AND SINGER 

It's a Mighty Good World O'Hara 

Golden Moon Rolt 

Come to My Heart English 

Wood Fairies Wilfrid Jones 

Brown Bird Singing Wood 

Land pf Might Have Been Novello 

Rose Marie of Normandy Del Rigo 

Spring Comes Laughing Carew 

Beauty Lohr 

Piper of Love Carew 

Love's a Merchant Carew 

The Market Carew 

Among the Willows Phillips 

A Good Heart All the Way Clarke 

Dancing Time in Kerry Hampson 

Sweet Navarre Carne 

My Heart's Haven Phillips 

Love Pipes of June Day 

My Little Island Home Baden 

Ragged Vagabond Ra ndolph 

CHAPPELL-HARMS, INC. 
185 Madison Avenue New York City 



major Sonata of Brahms. This work they have per- 
formed together frequently in Europe and in America 
and their interpretation is said to be entrancingly 
beautiful. Salmond is particularly noted for his Brahms 
readings. 

Together with Lajos Fenster, solo violist of the San 
Francisco Symphony Orchestra and with Messrs. Per- 
singer. Ford, Firestone and Ferner, of the Chamber 
Music Society. Salmond will appear in the first per- 
formance here of the remarkable sextette tor strings 
of Frank Bridge, one of England's best loved composers. 
This work is beautiful, sonorous and ideally written in 
the chamber music idiom. It is an excellent example of 
the sane, modern English school of composition. 

The concert will open with a performance of the 
second string quartet of Borodine. a Russian composition 
warm, colorful, melodic and lyrically charming. The 
concert promises to be one of the most attractive offer- 
ings of San Francisco's musical season. The demand 
tor seats is taxing the capacity of the hall and those 
wishing to attend are advised to make their reserva- 
tions promptly. 



SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

/XiriteoMatTZ - - • - - CoNOUCroR. 

NEXT FRIDAY, 3 P. M. 
NEXT SUNDAY, 2:45 P.M. 

CURRAN THEATRE 
HENRY EICHHEIM, Guest Conductor 

PROGRAMME 

Symphony No. 2 Brahn 

Oriental Impressions Eichhei 

(Conducted by the Composer) 

Prancesca da Rimini Tschalkowsl- 

TIeketa at Sherman, Clay & Co. 



WARFIELD THEATRE 

Richard Barthlemess in "Classmates" has been 
chosen by General Manager A. M. Bowles to follow the 
successful engagement of "He Who Gets Slapped" at 
the Warfleld — the opening date being Saturday, at the 
piatinee, November 22nd. 

Classmates, it will he remembered, was for many 
years the starring vehicle tor Robert Edeson upon the 
legitimate stage. The screen version, the army sequen- 
ces, were screened at West Point and under the super- 
vision of the army authorities at tlie famous military 
school and the highly interesting jungle scenes were 
made in the Everglades of Florida. 

John S. Robertson has again directed Barthlemess 
and Madge Evans is chief in support of an important 
company. On the stage Fanehon and Marco will offer 
"Ideas of West Point" and the punch of the "idea" 
will be the introduction of the 30th Infantry Band in 
a tableau that will symbolize the spirit of the oflicers 
and men of the United States Army service. There 
will be many other attractions with Glen Oswald and 
his Victor Record Orchestra and Gino Severi and the 
Music Masters. 

It is just as much to the interest of the musical pro- 
fession to have a music journal widely circulated among 
the musical public as it is in the interests of the pub- 
lication. There are problems which none other but a 
music journal will discuss. 



George Lipschultz 

Musical Director and Violin Soloist 

^— . 

Loew's State Theatre 
Los Angeles 



Lo E W'S ^ W AR FIElD 

Week Commencing" Sat., Nov. 22 
RICHARD BARTHELMESS 

"CLASSMATES" 

Fanehon & Marco "Ideas" 
30th Infantry Band from the U. S. Presidio 
GLEN OSWALD'S ORCHESTRA 

Special Performance on Thanksgiving Day 
GINO SEVERI AND MUSIC MASTERS 



J. WHITCOMB NASH 

THE VOICE 
Special Norninl Courses for Teacher 



STENGER VIOLINS 

Exemplify Intrinsic Excellence and Are 
Pre-eminently Superior 

A life's devotion of uninterrupted study and labor, 
Involvlns the master}- of principles of musical 
acoustics, timber physics, and engineering;, has 
yielded the understanding of those principles ivblch 
exemplify the "Stenger Idea" in violin makinfc. and 
mark the beKinnlng of a new era in this noble art. 

W. C. STENGER 

INCORPORATED 

Maker of Fine Violins 
617-618 Steinway Hall, Chicago 



AUDREY BEER SOREL 

PIANIST — TE.4CHER 



ALFRED HURTGEN 

PIANIST, ACCOMP.VNIST, Ml'Sir.\I. DIRECTOR, 

COACH, PI.VNO INSTRUCTION 
Studio: 27TS TJnion Street Tel. Fillmore S240 



I 



November 21, 1924 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIE\ 




FREDERICK 

JACOBI 






String Siuartette 

Perjurmid in Sun I'runchco, Oitohir 2S, 
1924, by the SAN FRANCISCO 
CHAMBER MUSIC SOCIETY. 



// IS Amtriaui music, anil it is rjrerit music. — RliDFERN Mason, in 
S. f. Examiner, Oct. 29, 1924. 



Symphony 

Performeil in Sun Francisco, November 14 
ami 16, 1914, by the SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, Alfred 
Hertz, Conductor. 



It is music ivith a life of its own. Its sfrings of energy are inspirational, 
and never for a moment does that energy flag. — Ray C. B. Brown 5 /•' 
Chronicle, Nov. 15, 1924. 



NOW PUBLISHED 

(Df (Ealifurnia 
FIVE DOLLARS POSTPAID 

ANYWHERE IN THE UNITED STATES 



Address: MUSICAL BLUE BOOK OF CALIFORNIA 

801 Kohier & Chase Building 

26 O'Farrell Street, San Francisco. California 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS ''""^ ^-^^ FR.V\ClSCO B.ANK) 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th. 1868.™"*'*'*"'^ 

One of the Oldest Banks In California, 

the Assets of which have never been increased 

by mergers or consolidations with other Banlts. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1924 

^''^.'" , r> $93,198,226.96 

capital, Keserve and Contingent Funds 3,900,000.00 

btnployees Pension Fund 446,024.41 

MISSION BRANCH.. " m;..;„„ ..iii.c. . 

,'','i'?J5-PRESiDIO DlSTliiCTBRANCH; ! ! ! ! ! Clemc^rSt a^d 7th >We' 

WEST"polTA^''RR'i''Nr;^'=" .Hai,ht"„"'Belvc3c,eStr'^r, 

WtST PORTAL BRANCH West Porta I Ave. und UUoa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (4}^) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



Mrs. William Steinbach 

VOICE ClII.Tl'HE 

Studio: 

002 KOHLER i CHASE ni,DG.. 

San Frnneiseo Phone Kearny r,4r^ 

ACHILLE L. ARTIGUES 

Graduate of Sehola Cnntorum. Pnrbi. Or- 
granist St. i'^lnry's CathedraL I'Lauo De- 
partment. Hamlin Sehool. Orean and 
Piano. Arriiloca itiusleal Colleee 

KURT VON GRUDZINSKI 

B.4RITt>.>E — VOICE CILTURE 

Authorised <o Teneh Mme. Scboen- 

Ilene'a 3Iethod 

13H Leaveoworth St. Phone Prosp ect 0353 

EVA M. GARCIA 



PIERRE DOUILLET, PIANO 
NITALIA DOUILLET, VOICE 

^"-. l\nhler * <hn»e Bid. Tel. Sutter 7387 

DOMENICO BRESCIA 

VOICE SPECIALIST — CO.MPOSITION 

Studio: «03-(!(M Kohier ,& Cha.ie Buildine 

Phone Kearny r,^.",! 

M3(iaine Charles Pouiter— Soprano 



Mary Coonan McCrea 

TEACHER OF SINGING 
Studio: 36 GaiTney BuildJnK. 370 Sutler St. 
Tel. Douglas 4233. Res. Tel. Ivearny 2340 

MRS. A. F. BRIDGE 

TEACHER OF SINGING 
Stndlot 1020 Scott St. Phone Fillmore 1(181 



Laura Wertheimber 

Preparatory Teacher for 



Evelyn Sresovich Ware 

PlanUt and Aeeompanist 
Studio: HMI3 Kohier * (base Bulldlne 
Phone Garfl eld 1:722 

Joseph George Jacobson 



ISAIiKI.1.1] MARKS 

CONTRALTO 

13.3S 20th Avenue Phone Sunset 2905 

Voice Culture, Mondays P. H. .'.Otl Kohier 

A Chase IlldE. Tel. (;nrlield 4472 

CAROLINE E. IRONS 

Pianist and Teacher 
3831 Mera Street Tai. Fruitvale 778W 



MACKENZIE GORDON 

2S:!2 .lafk.sdri .Strcft I h.Hi.- W.-sl i:,7 



.... .:■.■> ...inenro jt. Phone Fillmore .348 V - ^m^ 

ROSE RELDA CAIfcLEAU JOSCph GrCVeil 



Opera Comlque. Pari; 
Studio: 3107 VVashlnKton Street 
Phon e Fillmore 1NI7 

SIGMUND BEEL 

Master Claases for VloUn 

Studio BuIldlnK. 1.373 Peat street 

Tel. Walnut H4 

MARY ALVERTA MORSE 

SI>PRA.\0 
Teacher of SInKinK: Studio, Tuesday and 
Friday, Kohier & Chase Uldc. S. F.; Resi- 
dence Studio, 100 Santa Rosa Ave.. Oak- 
land. Phone Humboldt 101. 

SAN FRANCISCO CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 



MRS. CARROLL NICHOLSON 

CONTRAI.ro 
Teacher of SlnBlnft. 32 Loretta Ave.. Pied- 
mont. Tel. Piedmont 304. Mon., Kohier & 
Chnse Hide.. S. F. Telenhone Kearny .',4.\4 

Brandt's Conservatory of Music 



HELEN COLBURN HEATH ^^^^ SCHMIDT -KENNEDY 



Soloist. Temple Emnnu El. Con- 
cert and Church Work. Vocal Instruction. 
aiSSO Clay Street. Phone West 4sn0 

HENRIK GJERDRUM 

PIANIST 
2321 Jackson Street Fillmore S2!S« 



PIANIST 

Studio: 1537 Euclid Avenue, Berkeley, Cal. 
Phone B erkeley OOOO 

MRS. ZAY RECTOR BKVITT 

PIANO and H.tRMONY 

Institute of Music of San Francisco, 
Kohier & Chase BMk. Tel. Kearny .';4S4 



Dorothy Goodsell Camm MARION RAMON WILSON 



COI.OR.VTl R.\ SOPRVNO 

Teacher of Bel Canto. Tel. Bayview 38.30 

or PiedEuont 1330, By .\ppoIn1meot Only. 



Successes In 
Europe. Concert Successes In the I'nited 
States. Address: JSZ.-! Leavenworth Street. 
Telephone Franklin 3501, 



Voice Culture ; — Opera, Oratorio, 
Concert and Church Singing in all 
languages. 

MRS. J. GREVEN 

Piano and Harmony 

8741 Sacramento St. Tel. Bayview 5278 

TEACHERS' DIRECTORY 



MISS EDITH CAUBU 
376 Sutter Street Phone DouKlas 28> 

JANET ROWAN HALE 
Kohier & Chase BltJa- Tel. Kearny 5454 

J. B. ATWOOD 
2111 Channing Way Berkeley, Cal. 

MISS LORRAINE EWING 

833 Ashbury St. Phone Hemlock 749 

RUTH VIOLA DAVIS 
515 Buena Vista Avenue — Park 341 

LOUIS FELIX RAYNAUD 

1841 Fulton St. Tel. Bayv iew 6008 

ELSIE COOK HUGHES LARAIA 
3325 Octavia St. Phone Filmore 6102 

If a music journal is worth whilp to 
pulilish programs and views of mu.sical 
events, it is worth while to patronize. 



ANTOINE DE VALLY 

2201 Scott St. Phone W, 



MME. M. TRCMBONI 
601-2 Kohier & Chase Bjdg. Kearny 546i 



JACK EDWARD HILLMAN 
601 Kohier & Chase Bldg. Kearny 545< 



ADELE ULMAN 
178 Commonwealth Ave. Ph. Bayview 8196 



JULIUS HAUG 
4032 Irving St. Tel. Sunset 436 

HOTHER WISMER 
3701 Clay Street Phone Bayview 7780 

ARTHUR CONRADI 
906 Kohier & Chase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 64»4 

G. JOLLAIN 
376 Sutter St. Tel. Kearny 2637 

MARY PASMORE 
2009 Green St. Tel. Fillmore 9071 

Aim VNGER OF Ml SIC 

C. B. FRANK 
400 Pantages Bldg. Tel. Garfield 1334 

There is no way to obtain concert en- 
gagements unless a name is sufllciently 
known. There Is no other way to make 
a name known except through publicity. 
Consequently, if you do not advertise you 
can not possibly secure steady engage- 
ments. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



November 21, 1924 



lEltEabrtlt ^tmpB0n - pane 

ADVANCED COACHING 

THE ART OF INTERPRETATION— SOLFEGE 

NORMAL COURSES 

STlDIOSi 

70« KOHLER & CHASE Bl'ILDING, SAN FK WCISCO 

231SVk ETNA STREET. BERKELEY 



"Tlic Hat'picst Homes in .-ill Creation 
-■Ire Homes Surrounded b\ Recreation 



The 

Newest 

Artist Center 

Belle Monti 




There are so many natural features wliicli add to the attractive- 
ness of "Belle Monti" as an Artist and Musician Center that its 
appeal is instantaneous. 

Live oak, pine and eucalyptus trees planted years ago by men who 
foresaw the future demand for suburban homes; hillside locations 
with marine and mountain view; sheltered level lots — macadamized 
streets, electricity, water, phone and strict sanitary requirements. 
Marvelous home and cabin sites averaging in price $475 — some as 
low as $300 including permanent membership in the 

"Belle Monti" Country Club 

for which .$2.';0,000 has been directed to be set aside for club house, 
swimming pool, courts, links, etc. 

Nine Hole Golf Course^ No^ open 

II 'rite, call or phone for complete information. 
Artist Center Division 



BELLE MONTI SALES CO. 

(ivni-iEi.n 3ir.7 



212 SUTTER STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Down the 
Peninsula 
At Belmont 









ii^> 



Artist Center Division 

BELLE MONTI SALES CO. 

212 Sutter Street, San Francisco 

Please send complete information regarding "Belle Monti" 
Belle Monti Country Club to 




•THE'AMPICO' 

Alone — -and unassisted this musical marvel recreates in youi 
home the playing of the master musicians ^-^ who have "myster 
lously endowed it with all the music of the world," and who alsc 
pronounce it the world's most magnificent musical instrument. 

BY AN OVERWHELMING 
MAJORITY- MORE OF THE 
AVORLD'S GREAT PIANISTS 
OF THE PAST THREE GEN- 
ERATIONS MAY BE HEARD 
ON THE AMPICO (AND ON 
THE AMPICO ALONE)THAN 
ON ANY OTHER MUSICAL 
INSTRUMENT • ALL THIS 
MUSICAL AVEALTH IS 
AVITHIN YOUR MEANS 
ON A BASIS "WE SHALL 
BE GLAD TO ARRANGE 
FOR YOU • COME IN • HEAR 
YOUR AMPICO-AND HEAR 
OUR PLAN 

•KOHLER- &• CHASE • 



2« O'FARRELL STREET . SAN FRANCISCO 

StS 141 li Street 2460 Mission Street 

A K L A N D y~S>. SAN FRANCISCO 
S A N ) O S E /^ Mt^ SACRAMENTO 



KNABE 




AMHCX) 



^rffir (Siifs^i 




THE OLDEST MUSICAL JOURNAL IN THE GREAT WEST 



VOL. XVII. NO. 8 



SAN FRANCISCO, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1924 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



PROMINENT ARTISTS GIVE FINE CONCERTS CHAMBER MUSIC THRILLS LARGE AUDIENCE 



Sonata Recital — Alfred Hertz Conducts Splendid Popular Symphony 

Concert— California Music League Orchestra Opens Season 

Auspiciously at University of California Gymnasium 

BY ALFRED METZGER 



Music Lovers— Felix Salmond Is a Cellist of Extraordinary Qualities 

Ellen Edwards Acquits Herself Nobly at the Piano— The Frank 

Sextette for Strings an Oasis in the Desert of Modern Works 

BY ALFRED METZGER 



1* What must be regarded as one of the 
ipredominating musical events of the 
season was the Sonata Recital given at 
the Fairmont Hotel on Thursday evening, 
November 20th. by Louis Persinger, vio- 
linist, and Irene Jacobi. pianist. The 
irtis'ic character of this event may be 
iudsi'd by the fact that the audience prac- 
tically crowded the big ball room and 
that it included many of San Francisco's 
leadinK musicians and music lovers who 
rheerfully purchased tickets to hear two 
unusuiUy intelligent artists present a 
urogram of exceptional merit. The pro- 
gram consisted of three classic violin 
ind iiiano sonatas, namely, Sonata in D 
mincir, op. 108 (Brahms), Sonata C major 
(No. S), K. .\o 2(16 (Mozart) and Sonata 
B flat major op. IS (Strauss). 

The program presented three different 
periods of classic composition. The Mo- 
zart work belongs to the old school, the 
Brahms to period between Mozart and 
Strauss, and the latter belongs to the 
vanguard of the modern school To in- 
terpret these three utterly divergent 
phases of composition requires an ar- 
tistry and intellectual grasp of superior 
sharaoter. Both Mr. Persinger and Mrs. 
lacobi proved themselves thoroughly 
well equipped to do justice to the musical 
ind intellectual charactertistics of these 
'■ompositions. They were both tech- 
nically and emotionally equipped to 
bring out the innermost sentiments of 
'.hese works. Their interpretations re- 
vealed industrious study and intelligent 
ipplii ation. Their work blended in a 
aianner that evidenced thorough musi- 
cianship and musicianly skill. 

We cannot imagine a more convincing 
no r more craftsmanlike interpretation 
at these three difficult works. Mr. Per- 
singer with a tone of splendid volume 
ind quality enunciated the phrases with 
"xceptional artistic instinct. He accentu- 
ated the phrases with exceptional artistic 
instinct. He accentuated the sentiments 
with unerring judgment and the tech- 
aical intricacies he overcame with an 
;ase and surety that proclaimed him 
master of his instrument. It was a per- 
tormance of which any artist may feel 
justly proud. Mrs. Jacobi played with 
Hscrimination and thoroughness as to 
;echnical resources -and her mental 
;rasp of the purpose of the compositions 
)lended deiiehtfully with the violinistic 
nastery of Mr. Persinger Her tone was 
lonornus and resonant and her phrasing 
larmonized with the message conveyed 
n the compositions. Both artists pos- 
lessed that confidence and certainty 
vhich is such a necessary attribute of 
;enuine concert artists and the enthusi- 
istic approval of an audience of intelli- 
!enf music lovers is ample evidence for 
he justification of the enthusiasm re- 
'ealed in this report. 

Second Popular Symphony Concert— The 

irogram presented by Alfred Hertz and 
he San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
ast Sunday afternoon at the Curran 
rheatre on the occasion of the second 
'opular Symphony Concert proved of 
ipecial interest and joy to the large audi- 
ence that assembled on this occasion, 
rhe program consisted of the following 
ntellieently chosen program: Overture 
-Phedre (Massenet). Ballet Suite— Cop- 
lelia (Delibes), Prelude to the Deluge 
Saint-Saens), violin solo, Louis Per- 
inger. Symphonic Poem, the Moldau 
Smetana), Love's Dream (Liszt), Over- 
ure to La Gazza Ladra (Rossini). It 
rould be impossible to chose a program 
letter suited to a variety of tastes. There 
Pas something to please everybody. Mr. 
fertz has an almost uncanny knack of 
electing programs most pleasing to the 
eople. .And the most important fact is 



that he devotes to the preparation and 
interpretations of these so-called popular 
programs the same energy, the same 
carefulness, the same artistic finish 
which he bestows upon his most serious 
offerings. The public knows that Mr. 
Hertz is always one hundred per cent 
elhcient and this is one of the principal 
reasons for his continued popularity. 

It was of course inevitable that the 
five popular concerts at the Civic Audi- 
torium which attract approximately fifty 
thousand music lovers would effect the 



The Chamber Music Society of San 
Francisco gave the second concert of 
its eighth season at the Scottish Rite 
Auditorium on Tuesday evening. Novem- 
ber 2,5th. The event was beyond a doubt 
one of the very best and most artis- 
tically presented by this justly renowned 
•organization. The enthusiasm of (the 
audience was such as to impress the on- 
looker with the splendid educational 
benefit to be derived by this community 
from the successful activities of this 
body of musicians. The opening number 




MISCHA ELMAN 

The Famous Russian Violinist Who Will Appear at the Columbia 

Theatre on Sunday Afternoons, December 7 and 21, Under 

Selby C, Oppenheimer's Management 



regular popular concerts at the Curran 
Theatre. However, the writer would like 
to make a friendly suggestion that he 
believes would offset the advantage of 
the Auditorium concerts over those in 
the Curran Theatre, Of late Mr, Hertz 
has gradually raised the standard of the 
popular concerts in the Civic Auditorium 
to a degree where they have become to 
all intents and purposes regular sym- 
phony concerts. It might be a matter of 
wisdom to make the popular concerts at 
the Curran Theatre even more "popular" 
than they have been so far. Suppose .Mr. 
Ilcrtz would include on these programs 
an occasional selection from an operetta 
like those of .lohann Strauss, Offenbach, 
Milloecker. Suppe and an occasional 
Strauss Waltz. Indeed select an occa- 
sional program of "popular music" of 
thirty or forty years ago. The writer is 
of the conviction that we have enough 
music lovers in San Francisco who enjoy 
the lightest of the light music for a 
change. 



consisted of Quartet U major by Horo- 
dine. Messrs. Persinger, Ford, Firestone 
and Ferner interpreted this work with 
a sympathy and poetic insight into its 
significance, which naturally gained for 
them the close attention and demonstra- 
tive approval of their hearers. Tone 
quality, coloring, phrasing, emphasis and 
singing character were among the pre- 
dominating features of this interpreta- 
tion. The musicians seemed to take a 
special delight to give this work an ex- 
ceptionally impressive reading and the 
effect upon the audience was Instantan- 
eous. At times even cheers could he 
heard. 

Then we had the privilege to listen to 
Felix Salmond, 'cellist, and Ellen Ed- 
wards, pianist, interpret the Brahms 
Sonata in F major. Op. 99. Whatever 
has been told us about Mr. Salmond has 
indeed been based upon solid facts. He 
is an artist of the first rank. His intel- 
lectual and emotional taculties combine 
to make him an ensemble player of rare 



executive powers. His tone Is Ingratiat- 
ing and true. His technic la exception- 
ally clean and facile. His artistic dis- 
crimination and Judgment is authorita- 
tive and appealing. His grasp of Brahms 
IS most comprehensive and scholarly. We 
cannot possibly Imagine an interpreta- 
tion of the 'cello part of this Sonata 
more in keeping with the Brahms spirit 
than the one Mr, Salmond gave us on 
this occasion. 

Miss Edwards had here an exception- 
ally responsible duty to perform. She 
was in company of an artist thoroughly 
equipped to do Justice to the mast fas- 
tidious demands. That she acquitted 
herself nobly of this heavy task will be 
admitted by anyone who heard her and 
wlio is able to Judge. She understood 
the artistic attitude of Mr. Salmond to- 
ward this work and her piano interpre- 
tation was in accord with the Intelli- 
gence revealed by the 'cellist. She fitted 
herself closely to the atmosphere created 
by her co-artist and played with a pre- 
cision and intelligence that is worthy of 
hearty endorsement. Without unneces- 
sary predominance and yet with suffi- 
cient self assertion she gave the piano 
part of this Sonata the authority which 
it must have to be satisfactory and there- 
by established herself still further in the 
esteem of our public which already has 
admired her work for some time. 

The final number of the program con- 
sisted of Frank Bridge's Sextet for 
Strings. This was the first time the work 
was presented in this city. And proof 
of its comprehensive musical character 
may be gathered from the fact that, not- 
withstanding this first performance. It 
was thoroughly enjoyed. Although .Mr. 
Bridge is one of the modern composers, 
he does not employ the unpleasant 
means by which .so many of our recent 
writers ask our attention. True. Mr. 
Bridge employs the tone color effects 
which form such a leading factor among 
latter-day musical works, but he also em- 
ploys melody. The three movements of 
this quartet are redolent with colorful 
themes that exhibit continuity and con- 
sistency. It is possible to follow this 
work with a feeling that a message Is 
presented. The tempi are possibly some- 
what alike and therefore just a bit 
monotonous, but the development of the 
ideas are consistent and obvious. Messrs. 
Persinger, Ford, Firestone, Fenster, Sal- 
mond ami Ferner surely Invested their 
reading with that seriousness and cratt- 
manship which means so much In the 
adequate presentation of a new work. 

The entire program was one of the best 
we have heard in our career and it was 
Interpreted In a manner to bring Joy to 
one's musical {'onsclousness. We note 
with gratification that the Fhilharmonlc 
String Quartet of Los Angeles will be 
the guest at the next chamber music con- 
cert, which will take place at the Scot- 
tish Rite Auditorium on Tuesday even- 
ing. January 20th. It Is to be hoped that 
the hall will be packed on this occasion. 
The Pacific Coast Musical Review likes 
nothing better than the Interchange of 
such artistic factors In the musical life 
of California, and Ellas Hechl deserves 
the gratitude of our musical public for 
hl» farsightedness and enterprise. The 
Philharmonic Quartet of Los Angeles con- 
sists of Sylvaln Noack. first violin. Henry 
Svedrofsky. second violin, Emile Ferlr, 
viola, and Ilya Uronson. 'cello — all mem- 
bers of the Philharmonic Orchestra of 
Los Angeles are musicians of the 
first rank. It will be ;. privilege to hear 
these organizations — the Philharmonic 
Quartet and the Chamber Music Society 
— at one and the same concert. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



November 28. 1924 



Worth Any Sacrifice 

The Steinw^ay tells how it ma^ become yours 



A Stein WAV is such a human piano, and 
comes into such close association with 
people that it has acquired a deep understand- 
ing of human nature during the past seventy 
years. 

I am a Steinway. I, too, have acquired 
some knowledge of human hearts. And this is 
what I have noticed : 

That people place the most value, and take 
the greatest enjoyment in possessing, those 
things for which they have made some sacri- 
fice. 

To possess me, a Steinway piano, has called 
forth sacrifices in many a modest household. 
The Steinway that stands so proudly in the 
living room is probably there because it was 
earnestly wanted. 

That is why, altho my purchase price is 
higher than most pianos, possession of me gives 
to most people such true joy. They have 
wanted me because of what I represent. They 
have refused to be satisfied until they pos- 
sessed me. To possess me, they have made 
many little and big sacrifices. Established in 
such a home, is it any wonder that I am the 
proudest piano in the world ? 




One day a young couple same into Sherman, 
Clay & Co. and examined me critically. Then 
they turned to a salesman and said : 

"Our little daughter will be nine years old 
five years from now. She must begin her les- 
sons when she is nine years old. She should, if 
possible, begin them on a Steinway piano. If 
we pay you a small monthly sum, will you 
hold it for us, and credit the accumulating 
interest, against the day when our little daug- 
ter becomes nine years of age?" 



That was sacrifice. The young couple were 
earnestly endeavoring to accumulate the sum, 
or partial sum, of my purchase. To make cer- 
tain of their program, they were seeking to 
place that monthly sacrifice safely beyond any 
temptation to spend it for some transient pleas- 
ure. And when their little daughter possesses 
me, you can be very sure that I shall be a 
proud and happy piano. 

Is not that home itself meanwhile made 
happier, by the knowledge of this voluntary 
sacrifice? Will that home not tend to hold 
together, over the 5'ears, because of this very 
spirit? 

It is the privilege of a Steinway to be worth 
such efforts. Many a home that longs for a 
Steinway could have one, if a very little sacri- 
fice were systematically entered upon. 

I know that Sherman, Clay & Co. will be 
glad to explain why this sacrifice is so worth 
while. 

Sherman play & Co. 

Kearny and Sutter Sts., San Francisco 
CALIFORNIA-OREGON- WASHINGTON 



RENA 

LAZELLE 

SOPRANO 

San Francisco Opera Company 

■ d of Vocal Depnrtment, San Francisco Connei 

ry of Moalc — Available for Recitals, Ope 

Oratorio, Concert 



EMILIE LANCEL 

OPERATIC MEZZO-SOPRANO 

After Two Years' Absence in Europe 
Available For 

OPERA— ORATORIO— CONCERT 

Management ALICE SECKELS 
63 Post Street 

Residence: 433 Eighteenth Avenue, San Francisc 
Tel. Bayview 1461 



ANNIE LOUISE DAVID 

HARP SOLOIST AND TEACHER 

ON THE PACIFIC COAST DURING 
SEASON 1924-1925 

Address: Hotel Claremont, Berkeley 
Tel. Berkeley 9300 

Management Alice Seckels, 68 Post Street 
Tel. Douglas 7267 



PASMORE VOCAL STUDIOS 



KARL RACKLE 



LAMBS CLUB, NEW YORK CITY 



ALICE GENTLE 

MANAGEMENT 

CATHARINE A. BAMMAN 
53 West 39th Street New York, N. Y. 



DOUGLAS SOULE-.Pianist 

advan»;kd pupils accepted 

Wedneiday and Friday Mornlnea at Studio: 1)02 

Koh.er & Ctaaae Bldg., San Francisco. Telephone 

Kearny 64S4. Residence Studio: ISO Monte Vista 

Ave.. Oakland. Telephone Piedmont 766. 



AUGUSTA HAYDEN 



SOPRANO 

callable for Concerts an 

Address: 471 37th A' 

Tel. Pne. 6.12 



d RccltaU 



HOMER HENLEY 

BARITONE — TEACHER OF SINGING — CONDUCTOR 

Director California Club Choral 

An Oratorio Anthorlty 

esidenee Stndio: 1240 Bay, at Franklin. Tel. FIIL I0S3 



LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM 



InB. 2730 Pierce St. Tel. Fiilniore 45.'i3 

Dominican College School of Music 

SAN RAFAEL. CALIFORNIA 



Music Courses ThorouBh and Pn 



redited DIpIn 



sive. Public School 



Road. Berkeley 



MR. ANDREW BOGART 
Teacher of Singing 

Pupils Prepared for Opera, Oratorio, Church and 
Concert. New Address: Suite 600, Kohler & Chase 
Bldg., 26 O'Farrell Street. Telephone Douglas 9256 



WALLACE A. SABIN 



street. Phone West 375.3: Sat.. Fir 
Church. Phone Fillmore 7il2(i; Res. St 
Ave.. Berkeley, Phone Pledti 



MISS DOROTHEA MANSFELDT 

Preparing Teacher for 

MRS. OSCAR MANSFELDT, Pianist 

207 Cherry St., Bet. Washinston * Clay Tel. Pac. 9S0I 

The College of the Holy Names 

LAKE MERRITT, OAKLAND 



DURINI VOCAL STUDIO 



1072 ElUs St 



Opera — Church — Oratorio 



TeL West 59S 



PAUL STEINDORFF 

.MASTER COACH 
Complete Grand and Light Opera Repertoir 



Miss Elizabeth Westgate 

Teacher of Piano, Organ, Harmony. Organist and Musical 
Director of First Presbyterian Church, Alameda. Home 
Studio: 1117 P.VRU STREET, ALAMEDA. Telephone Ala- 
meda 133. Thursdays, Merrinian School, 5K7 Eldorado Ave« 
Oakland. Telephone Piedmont 2770. 



MUSIC PRINTING? 

SCHOLZ, ERICKSON & CO., Inc. 

52) Howard Street Phone Douglas 4273 

San Francisco 



Manning School of Music 

JOHN C. MANNINO, Director 
S242 IVashington Street Telephone Fillmore SM 

PEARL HOSSACK WHITCOMB 

DRAMATIC SOPRANO 
Absolute Slethod of Voice Upon tb« Br 



November 2S, 1924 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



Hkdiit €00^1 lilu^iral ^M^ 



THE OLDEST 



MUSICAL IIKVIKW COMrANV 

Salle NOI. Kohirr ■« Chaur lllilK., 2« O'Farrrll <l 

Snn Frnnelaco, Cnllf. Tel. Gnrfleld S2r>0-S2Sl 



Impending Musical Events 



ALFRED METZGER 



Editor 



Make all check*, driiffn. money ordera or other forma of 

remlKnnce |ia>nl>le to 

I'ACIFU' t'OAST MUSICAL UEVIHW 

Oakland-Berkeler-Alnmeda OKIce 1117 Paro St., Alameda 

Tel. Alomeda IRS 

Mlaa Kliznhetb WealKOle In Charge 



Loa Anfcelea oniee 

«IS2 Scenic Avenue, lloilj-n'ood, Cnlitornla 

Bruno David UaMlier In Charge 

VOL. XLVII F R I DAY.TioV. 28, 1924 



ed aa aeeond-elaa 



ail matter at 9. F. Poatofllee. 



TWENTY-FOURTH YEAR 



EDITORIAL DISCUSSION 



This fdition of the Pacific Coast Musital Review will 
give our readers an idea regarding the new policy and 
the new style which we consider adequate for a genuine 
music journal. The present edition is not quite what 
we expect it to be presently. With the issue of Decem- 
ber 5th. we shall begin our great subscription campaign 
which we expect to add sufficient subscribers to this 
paper to increase its size to at least sixteen pages and 
to enable us to art independently from the advertis- 
ing department. The present edition will show the 
reason why such divorce of news and advertising sec- 
tions is imperative. There are in this issue TEN 
INCHES of advertisements from managers of concerts. 
There are also in this issue TWO COLUMNS (twenty- 
seven inches) of advance notices. Originally there 
were FOUR COLUMNS of advance notices which we 
reduced to two columns. The original four columns 
would have cost us TEN DOLL.^RS to set up. The 
ten inches advertisements bring us $17.7.5. or $7.75 
more than the expense associated with the original 
four columns of advance notices. And yet for years 
the Pacific Coast Musical Review, believing that its 
liberal attitude toward artists and managers would 
be rewarded sooner or later published year in and year 
out EVERY WORD sent to this office regarding artists 
who expected to visit San Francisco. 



It is almost unbelievable tliat this liberality has not 
been recognized at all. Naturally, we are owing our 
subscribers certain news and there is no more interest- 
ing news than that appertaining to artists of repu- 
tation But when a news item is published once it 
becomes obsolete. When it is published in almost the 
same form, but in different wording it becomes purely 
advertising matter. Marc Blumenherg. founder and 
editor of the Alusical Courier of New York in conver- 
sation with the writer, told the latter that he could not 
poKsibly make a financial success of a music journal 
on the Pacific Coast if he continued lo extend courtesies 
to the extent in which he was doing. We disagreed 
with Mr. Hlumberg. but we found he was right. How- 
ever, we can not publish a music journal that makes 
Its news service dependent upon so much pay for so 
many lines. We would rather suspend this publica- 
tion than earn the reputation of publishing portraits 
and notices about artists whether visiting or resident, 
for so much cash. Mr. Plumenberg's prediction has 
come true. Our liberality and fairness has plunge"! 
this paper into debt. Had we ignored those who do ad- 
vertise and had be constantly praised those who did ad- 
vertise, we would have made more money and would 
possibly be prosperous. But we SIMPLY CA.VT DO 
THIS . 

Now our subscription campaign which opens next 
Friday is intended to prove that the musical profession 
and the musical public appreciates a music journal that 
CAN NOT BE BOUGHT. If it is impossible to induce 
Eastern managers and artists to assist in supporting a 
music journal in the Pacific West, because it has not 
as much circulation as a New York paper, or because 
If they advertise in one Pacific Coast paper they must ad- 
vertise in the terribly large number of two other Pacific 
Coast papers, our profession and musical public is aide 
to support at least ONE music journal by helping it 
to get ENOUGH SUBSCRIBERS to do without the 
advertisements of New York managers and their artists. 
We do not blame our Pacific Coast managers. They 
also are expected to pay extravagant advertising and 
office expenses for only a small percentage of their 
receipts. Now this subscription campaign is nnt r.n'v 
intended to encourage us to continue our independent 
attitude, but to give the Pacific Coasr a Iiil- weeKiy music 
Journal willing to encourage EVERYONE WORTHY 
and to condemn EVERYONE UNWORTHY. 



SELBY C. OPPENHEIMER ATTRACTIONS 

Musical expectation over the coming to San Fran- 
cisco of Mieczy.slaw Munz is extraordinarily keen, for 
the reports of the unusual successes attained by this 
young Polish genius In eastern musical centers, and 
more lately in Australian cities, have been filtering in 
regularly since his debut in New York two years ago. 
The splendid program by which the young artist will 
be introduced locally is as follows: Organ Toccata, 
Adagio and Fugue in C major (Bach Dusoni), Moon- 
light Sonata, Op. 27, No 2 (Beethoven), .Nocturne, F 
minor. Six Preludes, Valse, D flat major. Etude, C minor 
(Chopin), La Cathedrale engloutie (i:)ebu8sy). Prelude, 
G minor (Rachmaninoff), Naila (Delibes-Dohnanyi). 

The coming concerts to be given by Mischa Elman, 
famous Russian violinist, at the Columbia Theatre on 
the Sunday afternoons of December 7th and 21st are 
a'tracting unusual attention among local musi('-lovers. 
Elman's place in the musical sun of the United States 
is clearly established, and of all the violinists of the 
present day he is among the best beloved in this city. 
The Elman tone has long found its way into the hearts 
of San Frant'isco music lovers and with every appear- 
ance the young Russian more firmly becomes the idol- 
ized favorite of the violinists in these parts. After two 
years' absence, during which time the young genius 
has been winning added laurels in Europe and the 
eastern Uniteil States, he will again play in the west. 

With Josef Bonime at the piano, these splendid com- 
positions will be given: Sonata, D m.ajor (Nardini), 
Fanlaisie Rapsodique (first time in America) (Albert 
Dupuis), Adagio (.Vlozart-Friedberg), Minuet (Haydn- 
Hartmann), A la Valse (Victor Herbert), Nocturne 
(Chopin-Wilhelmj), California (Humorcsque after Pala- 
dilhe) (Arthur Loesser) ; .Nigun (improvisation from 
Baal-Shem) (Ernest Bloch), Etude Caprice (Rode-EI- 
man). The Dew Is Sparkling (Rubinstein Elman), Pol- 
onaise, D major (Wieniawski). 

Ruth St. Denis, who with Ted Shawn and the Deni- 
shawn Dancers is returning to California in December, 
has been called America's greatest creative artist. Ruth 
St. Denis was the first western artist to translate the 
spirit of the Orient. She was the first dancer to use 
dance medium for a siiiritual message. She was the 
first dancer to discard heavy, stiff drapery and to move 
beautifully and poetically without drapery. Ruth St. 
Denis invented the sandals worn so commonly now. 
She invented the circular veil; introduced all Oriental 
dancing to this country. She was the forerunner of the 
now well-known dance drama, and Omika was produced 
in this country simultaneously with Sumurun. 

Music Visualization was her concept of classic in- 
terpretation of the musical works of great composers. 
She is the world's greatest exponent of Greek Dance, 
and her plastiques have been copied in every country 
in the world. 

Sophie Braslau. the brilliant young contralto who is to 
be heard in recital at the Columbia Theatre the Sunday 
afternoon of December 14th, began her career in New 
York less than ten years ago. .\lready her recitals are 
accounted among the most important events of a musi- 
cal season. The Braslau progiam for San Francisco is 
not one chosen with a view to displaying the linguistic 
abilities of the artist, but is replete with interesting 
promise. After the opening numbers, the Ah Perfido 
aria by Beethoven, and three Schubert songs — Liebes- 
botschaft, Der Dopi)elganger and Ucr Erlkonig, there 
follows a group of songs with most intriguing titles. 
The Water. Boy is a negro song arranged by Avery 
Robinson: then there is an arrangement by Bibb of the 
old Irish Londonderry Air. Christmas by Werner Jos- 
ten is a seasonable number, and it is followed by Alice 
Barnett's Singing Girl of Shan and Cecil Forsyth's 
Mother of Lilies. Two other numbers much anticipated 
are To One Who Passed Whistling Through the Night, 
by C. Armstrong Gibbs, and The Old Refrain, by Kreis- 
ler. 

Oppenheimer concert activities after the first of the 
year will be transferred from the old to the new Co- 
lumbia Theatre— the present Tivoli Opera House Gott- 
loh, Marx and Company have practically rebuilt the 
Edtly Street playhouse and have made it into one of 
the most beautiful theatrical auditoriums in this coun- 
try. Oppenheimer's first concert attraction, and a fitting 
one to inaugurate musical activities in their new house, 
will be the ever-welcome Ernestine Schumann-Heink — 
"sixty three years young," "Mother of the Army," and 
the most idolized singer in the world today. Schumann- 
Heink is now at the aiiex of her remarkable career and 
advises Manager Opi)enhcimer that a special program, 
including Wagnerian numbers, operatic arias, German 
lleder and English and American songs, will be arranged 
for this auspicious event. 



of which were In New York and Brookljii. Her popu- 
larity in the Empire City has seldom been equalled. 

Margaret Tilly, noted English pianist, wilt be heard 
here in recital Tuesday evening. Decemi)er 2nd, in the 
Gold Room of the Fairmont Hotel under the inanaKO- 
ment of the Elwyn Concert Bureau. Considerable In- 
terest has been aroused by this announcement. This 
will be Miss Tilly's first recital in San Krancisco, but 
judging from reports that have preceded her. It Is safe 
to say that a real treat is in store. At this recital Miss 
Tilly will play the following program: Nacheplel (Arr. 
by Harold Bauer I (Job inn Christian Kittcl), Fughetta 
(Arr. by Harold Bauer) (Gottlii'b Muffalt), Pastorale, 
Scherzo (Scarlatti), Fantasia in C minor. Invention in 
P. Prelude V\isue in A Hat (Book 1) (Bach); Sonata in 
F minor. Op. 57 (Appasslonata) (Beethoven); Pour 
Preludes, Etude in G sharp minor. Scherzo In C sharp 
minor (Chopin). .Mouvemcnts Perpeluels (Poulenc); 
The Fire of Spring, Prelude (John Ireland), Reflets dans 
I'eau (Debussy), Etude en forme de valse (Salnt-Saens). 

"Eva Gauthicr Establishes a New Plural in Musical 
Parlance," was a headline In the conservative Christian 
Science Monitor after .MIss.Gauthler's famous concert 
in New York last winter. Miss Gauthler, who Is to sing 
here on Thursday evening, December 4th, at Scottish 
Rite Hall, captured not only the public but she had 
every critic with her — so much so that it was said that 
the critics on this occasion became voluntary press- 
agents in Miss'Gautbeir's behalf. 

MUNICIPAL CONCERTS 

Cecelia Hansen, young Russian violinist, will he the 
guest artist to appear with the San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra, Alfred Hertz, conductor, in (he third munici- 
pal iiopular concert to be held in Civic .Auditorium on 
the night of December lU. Although Miss Hansen came 
to America just a year ago she has already been ac- 
claimed by Eastern critics as one of the foremost musi- 
cians on the concert stage. Her debut was one of the 
most sensational in the annals of American music, 
according to critics. Her playing so impressed the first- 
nighters that "the Hansen tone" has already become a 
symbol in music lore of power and purity. Supervisor 
J. Emmet Hayden, chairman of the Auditorium Com- 
mittee of the Board of Supervisors, was successful In 
completing arrangements for the appearance of Miss 
Hansen here in the third "pop" concert. That she will 
play her way into the hearts of San Francisco music 
lovers seems certain in view of the high praise given 
her in the East. 

Charles M. Courboin. formerly organist of Antwerp 
Cathedral, Belgium, who has been decorated by the 
King of Belgium for his achievements in the world of 
music, will be presented to San Franciscans in a tree 
concert recital in Civic Auditorium next Monday night, 
December 1st. The organist is now guest artist of the 
famous Wanamaker organs in New York and Phila- 
delphia. His recitals have been considered among the 
musical treats of the two cities. Supervisor J. Emmet 
Havden, chairman of the .\uditorium Committee, under 
whose supervision the city free concert-recital will be 
given, announces that the famous organist will give the 
following program: Tocata and Fugue in I) minor by 
15ach; Aria, Lotti; Allegretto, Auguste De Boeck; 
Charles M. Widor's Allegro vivace from Fifth Sym- 
phony; Alexander Russell's Song of the Basket Weaver; 
Sketch in D flat, Schumann; The Afternoon of a Faun, 
Debussy; Marche Heroique, Camille SainlSaens. 



ELWYN CONCERT BUREAU 

When Isa Kremer appf'ars on the night of December 
12th at Scottish Rite Hall, many music lovers will be 
present to welcome her, for every one knows that Isa 
Kremer comes with a true message, as well as a reper- 
toire of new songs and a "splash" of new gowns. Miss 
Kremer has selected several songs by our own American 
composers, whose names will figure most prominently 
on the programs. She has become very much Interested 
in American composers and wants to sing as many of 
their works as her programs will allow. According to 
her manager. Miss Kremer is booked for sixty or more 
recitals this season. Last year she sang forty, eleven 



ALICE SECKELS MATINEE 

Lydia Fergusen, delightful diseuse, who will appear 
as the third artist of the Alice Seckels Matinee .Musi- 
cales, Tuesday afternoon, December 16th, In the Hotel 
Oakland Ball Room, has won for herself a large follow- 
ing. Hers is the full throated, full hearted performance 
of the concert singer. Miss Ferguson will present a 
group of 18th Century French Chansons in costume: 
Le Cycle du Vin. Les Belles Manieres, Les FlUes de la 
Rochelle, Quand on Volt Ca, Le Petit Marl, a group of 
Breton folk songs in the authoritative costume of that 
country and an American and modern Spanish group 
which includes: American Indian Lullaby, .\cgro Spir- 
itual, El Pano Moruno, Seguedilla Murciana, and Clave- 
litos, and will close with a group of Czechoslovaklan 
folk songs including: Pod tim nasim (Under Our Cot- 
tage Window), Pri Dunaju Saty I'eru, Ne Vydava] Saly, 
and Nestujte Mladenci (The Quest). Elizabeth Alex- 
ander will be the accompanist. 

SYMPHONY CONCERTS 

finder Iho composer's baton the San Francisco Sym- 
phony Orchestra will give the Hrst performance here 
of the Oriental Impressions of Henry Eicbheim at the 
pair of regular symphony <oncerls to be given FVIday 
and Sunday afternoons of this week In the Curran 
Theatre. The suite consists of Ave movements or "Im- 
pressions," a Korean Sketch, Siamese Sketch, Enton- 
raku or Chinese Ceremonial Music, Japam-se Nocturne 
and Chinese SkeKh. In this suite Mr. Eicbheim has 
utilized a number of rare and unique Oriental instru- 
ments which he collected during his travels in the 
Orient, among them being a pair of ancient bronze 
cymbals which were found in the ruins of a Pekinese 
temple, a fluctuating tam tani, large lam lams and cym- 
bals used in various religious ceremonies, a pig skin 
and fish head drum, a Koto or thirteen stringed harp, a 
set of tuned bells, and numerous other drums, gongs, 
etc The Oriental Impressions has been performed in 
Boston New York, Chicago, Philadelphia and other 
eastern cities, and has everywhere been proclaimed as 
one of the most startlngly unique aud delightful com- 
positions of its kind. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



November 28, 1924 



Music Club Activities 



The National Federation of Music Clubs is announc- 
ing the Sixth Biennial National Contest (or Young Pro- 
fessional Musicians. Every year these contests are held 
in the various States of this country, and it is the de- 
sire of the National Federation of Music Clubs that 
as many pupils as possible will enter this contest. 
Every State selects chairmen who conduct these con- 
tests and furnish any information to those wishing to 
enter them. This contest will be held in California be- 
tween February 15th and March 30th. and in view of 
the fact that this year the National Convention of the 
Federation will be held in Portland. Pacific Coast con- 
testants should be specially interested, for they may 
win the privilege of appearing at the Biennial National 
Convention. 

Mrs. Edward R. Place. 251 Ashbury Street. San Fran- 
cisco, is the State Chairman for California and she will 
be pleased to give any information to prospective con- 
testants. There is ample literature which gives all par- 
ticulars as to qualifications and conditions. The fol- 
lowing prizes can be won by efficient students: Certifi- 
cates of qualification by State and National Presidents: 
the National Federation offers $500 in cash or one year's 
scholarship, including living expenses, under a teacher 
of the highest standing in a music school of national 
reputation. Besides these cash prizes the winners are 
guaranteed two important concert appearances in some 
cases with orchestra, following their years' study. 

Further prizes are: Piano — The Edward MacDowell 
prize of $150. a national Federation prize of $350: 
Violin — The Francis MacMillen prize of $150, a National 
Federation prize of $350: Voice — The William L. Whit- 
ney prize for women, $150, National Federation prize of 
$350. the James H. Rogers prize for men. $150. National 
Federation prize, $350. There are also additional prizes 
oftered by the State Federation, all of which informa- 
tion may be obtained by addressing Mrs. Edward R. 
Place, 231 Ashbury Street. San Francisco. 



The Pacific Musical Society gave its recent concert on 
Thursday evening. November 13th, at the Fairmont 
Hotel Ballroom, before a large audience. The partici- 
pants were: Carrie Emerich, pianist, Louis Courcil, 
baritone, and Marjorie Marckres Fisher, violinist. Mrs. 
Louis Courcil and Mrs. Earl Towner were the accom- 
panists. Occasionally the Pacific Musical Society, like 
any other club or organization, introduces artists, no 
doubt of unquestionable reputation and ability, who, 
under the strain of appearing before a strange audience, 
become sufficiently self conscious and nervous to show 
this influence in their performance. This seems to have 
been the case at this concert. Miss Emerich was pos- 
sibly the one least affected by this condition. She 
played with assurance and technical certainty and was 
heartily applauded for her splendid work. However, 
we feel, in justice to Mr. Courcil and Mrs. Fisher, that 
we should suspend final judgment until we have had 
another opportunity to hear them. We feel they are 
accomplished artists, but were handicapped by nervous 
strain. The accompanists acquitted themselves most 
creditably. The complete program was as follows: 
Prelude and Fugue, D minor (Bach). Carrie Emerich; 
Occhietti amati (Guilio Caccini), Sei morta ne la vita 
mia <P. Mario Coota), Per non penar (Emanuel 
Astorga), Centenaire (Georges Martyl, Non Credo (C. 
M. Widor), Louis Courcil, Mrs. Louis Courcil at the 
piano: Sonata in G (Albert Stoessel), Marjory Marekres 
Fisher, Mrs. Earl Towner at the piano: Danse (Claude 
Debussey), Pine Trees (Marion Bauer), Clowns (John 
Powell), Roccoco (Selim Palmgren), Etude (Edward 
McDowell), Carrie Emerich; Tally-ho (Leonil, Leetle 
Bateese (O'Hara), Afterday. My Captain (Cyril Scott), 
Louis Courcil. 



The San Francisco Musical Club gave two excellent 
programs during November. The first of these took 
place on Thursday morning. November 6th, at the Ball- 
room of the Fairmont Hotel and the program proved 
of special interest inasmuch as it featured Brita Beck- 
man, who interpreted Swedish folk songs in native cos- 
tume. She delighted her hearers with her skillful in- 
terpretations. Rodolfo Caffaro, a young Italian tenor, 
with Mrs. Edward Pease, as his able accompanist, de- 
lighted with his songs and exhibited both a splended 
voice and convincing expression. Helen McClory, 
pianist, and Edna Horan, violinist, acquitted themselves 
with much credit by interpreting the Edward Grieg 
Sonata for piano and violin in G. Both artists played 
with intelligence and a thorough comprehension of the 
difficult task before them. 

On Thursday morning, November 20th. the San Fran- 
cisco Musical Club gave the second event of the month 



Pupils' Concerts and Studio News 



The College of the Holy Names of Oakland gave a 
pupils' recital at its handsome recital hall on Friday 
evening, November 21st. An excellent program was 
presented by a number of well qualified students, who 
included pianists— Catherine Clarke, Helen Potter, Mar- 
garet Kitzmiller, Grace Whipple, Wenona Winn, Mary 
Connolly. Velma Tesio, Colette Traverse, Mary Mc- 
Carran, Leslie Kerr and Virginia Silverstone. Among 
these young pianists were soloists as well as accom- 
panists, and the training of the school may be gathered 
from the fact that the young ladies were able to play 
solos as proficiently as accompanists, showing that their 
training is not confined to one phase of pianistic art. 
One of the outstanding features at concerts of the Holy 
Names College is the assurance and confidence dis- 
played by the students. For the first time since we 
attended these concerts there was a bit of nervousness 
apparent, but this is rather an advantageous sign, for 
nervousness in students means conscientiousness. 

Other young students who acquitted themselves 
creditably on this occasion were: Irene Kilgore, violin, 
CoUette Travers, soprano, Mary McCarran, soprano, 
Margaret Murphy, violin. These prospective artists 
sang or played their solos with care and undei-standing 
and were entitled to the enthusiasm they aroused. The 
Holy Names Treble Triad and the College Choral also 
contributed much to the evening's enjoyment, the voices 
blending satisfactorily and the young girls having their 
heart in their work. A most enjoyable intei-pretation 
of Jeno Hubay's Hjere Kati was successfully inter- 
pi-eted by the following ensemble: First violins — Mar- 
aret Neu, Margaret Murphy, Irene Kilgore; second 
■ '■' - Margaret Breier, Winifred Connolly, Rose Mary 
'cello — Rose Marian Breier; piano — Col- 



\'iolins 
Concannon 
lette Travers, 

The complete program on this occasion was as fol- 
lows: (a) Wedding Day at Troldhagen (Grieg), (b) 
Venetian Love Song (Nevin), first piano — Catherine 
Clarke, second piano— Helen Potter: Concert Etude (L. 
Leslie Loth), Margaret Kitzmiller: Habanera (E. 
Chabrier), Grace Whipple; Romance (Svendsen), violin- 
Irene Kilgore, at the piano — Mary Connelly: Polichinelle 
(Rachmaninoff), Wenona Winn; Rhapsodie C major 
(Dohnanyi), Mary Connolly: (a) Duet from The Mar- 
riage of Figaro (Mozart), Marcellina — Collette Traverse 
Susanna— Mary McCarran; (b) Lullaby (Humperdinck) 
at the piano— Wenona Winn; La Chevaleresque (God- 
ard), Velma Tesio; Scene de Ballet (de Beriot) violin- 
Margaret Murphy, at the piano— Collette Traverse: On 
the Wings of Song (Mendelssohn-Liszt), Mary McCar- 
ran; Rain (Pearl G. Curran) Holy Names Treble Triad, 
at the piano — Leslie Kerr; Winterreign Op 13 No 2 
(Dohnanyi), Collette Traverse; Hejre Kati' (Jeno 
Hubay), first violin— Margery Neu, Margaret Murphy, 
Irene Kilgore; second violin— Margaret Breier, Wini- 
fred Connolly, Rose Mary Concannon; 'cello— Rose Mar- 
ian Breier: piano— Colette Travers; The Snow (Elgar) 
College Choral, violin— Margaret Murphv, Margery Neu 
at the piano — Virginia Silverstone. 



The San Francisco Conservatory of Music introduced a 
number of specially gifted pupils at the Gold Room of 
the Fairmont Hotel on Monday evening, November 2'th 
The spacious auditorium was packed to the doors witli 
an audience who appeared to enjoy itself, judging from 
the spontaneous and prolonged applause that rewarded 
the young musicians at the close of their numbers It 
IS hardly fair to select anyone for special praise for 
there was evident a uniform seriousness of study and 
ot training. If anything could be said, it would be that 
the interest and the sincerity on the part ot the in- 
structors IS somewhat greater than necessary, for the 
demands made ot the students by the teachers is at 
times astounding. Compositions like Schumann's Car- 
nival and the Bach Double Concerto tor two violins 
present artistic responsibilities which even the greatest 
artists at times hesitate to assume. Therefore pupils 
must find them specially difficult to overcome, 
the tact that the young musicians endowed with these 
responsibilities played the composition without hesi- 
tancy or hitch is in itself a credit to student and 
teacher. 

The good work ot Rena Lazelle, vocal teacher 4da 
Clement, piano instructor, Anthony Linden, flute peda- 
gogue, and Edouard Deru, violin teacher, was apparent 
in the students who so ably interpreted the following 
program: Senior Choral Class, Old English Round with 
ground bass (written 1239), Sumer is e'cumen in, 
directed by Rena Lazelle; Motet for three-voice chorus- 
— Adoramus Te (Orlando di Lasso), directed by Ada 
Clement Piano— Carnival (Schumann), Marcus Gordon 
pupil of Ada Clement; Soprano— Lo! Here the Gentle 



and a large audience enjoyed a program of unusual Lark (Bishop), Annable Turner pupil of Rena I a7Plle 

character. Mrs. John McGaw played a group of piano Flute Obligato by Felva Farwell- Flute Quartet— Rnnin 

compositions in a manner that earned her enthusiastic in G (Kuhlau), Merrill Jordan,' John 'Taylor Doiielas 

approval from her delighted audience. Dorothy Dukes Slaten. Russell McFarlane, directed bv Antlionv fir, 



Dimn 



played a 'cello composition by Saure with grati- d«n; Baritone— The Two Grenadiers (SchumanTi^ in 

fying expression and fluent technic. The feature ot the drew Robertson, pupil ot Rena Lazelle- Concert for 

program was Mary Carr Moor's Song Cycle Behind Two Violins in D minor (J. S. Bach) Olive Hvde and 

These Hills, and judging from the enthusiasm with Grace Sime, pupils of Edouard Deru,' accompanied hv 

which this COmiinSltlnn U-n« TOfaiva,\ a*,»tt, *!. tha nnno^,-.,,.* c*_;__ ^ .. . . . ■ " v.v,wiiiyau 1 tiU Oy 

kindly assisted by 



which this composition was received another wreath 
has been added to this prolific composer's array of suc- 
cesses. This cycle was sung with much taste and 
poetic insight by Flora Howell Bruner, soprano, Flor- 
ence Anderson, contralto. Harrison Coles, tenor, and 
James Edwin Biegler, bass. Mrs. Moore was at the 
piano. 

The larger the circulation of a Music Journal 
the better for the members of the profession and 
student 



the Conservatory String Orchestr_, ...„„.^ c^o.o.cu d, 
the following Faculty members: Dorothy Pasmore W 
Villapando, J. Lahann and May Mukle Cembalo accom- 
panist, Herbert Jaffe, pupil of Ada Clement. 

Jeanne Krick, Irving Krick and Mrs. H. I. Krick plaved 
piano selections on a special broadcast program from 
KGO, General Electric Co., Oakland, on Saturday morn- 
ing, November 22d, between 1 and 3 o'clock sent to 
Japan, Australia, Cuba, New Zealand, Alaska and Mex- 
ico. 



Giacomo Minkowski 

stadia at 005 Kohler * Chnse BuIIdins 
Tel. Gnrfleld 0-174 



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BY RELDA M. CAILLEAU 

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FREDERIC 

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705 Kohler & Chase BIdg., Tuesdays and Fridays 
Residence Phone Sunset 6524 



BENJAMIN 

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2636 UNION STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Fillmore 1624 

BY APPOINTMENT 



Tickets Now Sellin: 

At .Sbeniian. Clny .V Co., for the PolloninK 
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^^lOLIIVIST 

\J ]^^ Two Recitals 
Columbia Theater Sunday Afternoons, 
Dec. 7, Dec. 21 



^ 



BRASLAU 

LEADING CONTRALTO 
MFmoP-CHICACO OPERA CO'S 



Columbia — Sunday Afternoon, Dec. 14 



RUTH ST. DENIS 

Anierloa's Greatest Daneing Star 

TED SHAWN and the 

DENISHAWN DANCERS 

Curran— Week of December 15 

''-\ "T^Jp^'-.l-ONOERK.!. ^^I'dl^^^r-- 
Chamber Music Orchestra Company of 40 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



MUSIC IN LOS ANGELES 

By BRUNO DAVID USSHER 



Percy Grainger, always a stellar pianist, has sur- 
passed himself. Delivering a program tremendous in 
demands of technic. interpretation, memory and physi- 
cal endurance, he revealed playing faculties even more 
stupendous than before and which is more, he has de- 
veloped more sensitive, deeper tone (lualities without 
losing his invigorating brilliance. Philharmonic Audi- 
torium, completely crowded, gave him a royal welcome 
and exacted a King's ransom in encores. 

Chopin's I! minor sonata opus 58, Bach's C sharp 
minor Prelude and Fugue, two sonatas by Domenico 
Scarlatti, the Handel Variations of Urahms alone 
would have sufficed most pianists. Not so Grainger, 
who added his own typical arrangement of a Hornpipe 
from Handel's Water Music, Guion's Sheep and Goat 
Walking in the Pasture (somewhat like Turkey in the 
Straw), phonic but set rather thickly, perha|)s in defer- 
ence to the "cows," Marion Bauer's opus l,-i. No. 1, 
written for left hand alone, enlilled a prelude (not the 
Tristan and Isolde prelude, although reminiscent). 
Howard H. Hanson's Clog Dance (stripped of Its old 
quaintness by meaningless harmonies of the average 
modern kind). Of his own compositions mentioned on 
the program. Grainger also rendered his arrangement 
of the Cradle Song by Brahms and. frankly, he shocked 
me with it. This lullaby is perfect in itself, and why 
stretch it on the Procrustes' bed of a futile fanlasie 
arrangement It is a mother's sleeping song for her 
baby, a miniature, and in the Grainger' arrangement 
reminds me of a certain male chorus here who 100 
voices strong sing it Good evening, good night. As for 
Gi'ainger's paraphrase on the Flower Waltz from 
Tschaikowsky's Nutcracker Suite, It is extremely bril- 
liant and clever in thematic juxtaposition, but it is vir- 
tuoso stuff and as boring as Godowsky's Blue Danube 
monstrosity along similar lines. 

Is it necessary to repeat what every music lover 
knows of Grainger, heart-warming pianist, whirlwind 
and zephyr of the keyboard? His was real, unaffected 
Chopin, ever free from sentimentality, but exquisite In 
grace and underlying heroism, dreamy now and rip- 
pling like cadenzas of a flute virtuoso. It is a great 
sonata, not a very coherent work, but somehow Grain- 
ger welded it together by sheer subtle vividness. Par- 
ticularly in the Chopin, one enjoyed limpidity and soft- 
ness of tone and color. His Bach playing is exemplary 
in architectural revealing and upbuilding. Immense 
was his playing of the Brahms' Handel variations, 
where his remarkably developed left hand technic and 
many-voiced playing, came to faultless evidence. Like 
in the Chopin, terrific didiculties were surmounted 
without loss in eloquent phrasing or singing tone, Grain- 
ger lives what he plays and as he is a personality, so 
different, so marked, radiant and deep he keeps his aud- 
ience en rapport. He Is informal and never fails to an- 
nounce an encore, of which there were at least eight. 
He is more than a pianist; he is a creative player. 



Those who thought Harold in Italy, symphony of 
Hector Berlioz to be pallid, and Moriz Rosenthal, pianist, 
dull and of merely machine like precision, were happily 
disappointed at yesterday afternoon's Philharmonic Or- 
chestra concert. Berlioz's music took on new life, much 
thanks to the ennobling and vivifying playing of Emil 
Ferir in the great viola solo. The Chopin piano con- 
certo Xo, 1 in E minor, too, pulsed higher. Director 
Walter Henry Rothwell winning additional honors for 
himself and his spontaneous orchestra in the closing 
Mastei'singer prelude by Wagner. The exceptionally 
fascinating program will be repeated this evening. En- 
thusiasm for both soloists gave vent to repeated ova- 
tions .Mr. Rosenthal, answering about the last of many 
recalls, barely escaped injury when he Inadvertently 
stepped on the green canvas covering the pit in front 
of the footlights. He broke through, fell, but grasping 
the border of the stage held on until assisted to the 
stage by orchestra members. 

In listening to Harold In Italy, one must recall that 
70 years ago it was played first in Paris. This com- 
position contains much which is beautiful, ingenious, 
banal and platitudinous. It stands or falls according to 
the performance of the viola solo which was the object 
of the entire work. (PaganinI asked Berloiz to write 
him an extensive viola solo,) Can I say more than that 
Ferir. principal viola of the orchestra, was impeccable 
technically and ideal as an interpreter. His viola tone 
is a strange blending of the mellow and the tart, the 
dreamy and the sardonic, the mystic and the mocking, 
Berlioz's music hardly needs a program, Ferir tells the 
"story" on his viola, making cantilene more songful, 
commonplaces less trivial and even so simple a thing 
as arpegios played "ponticello": i, e„ back of the 
bridge; (therefore the glassy timber) something weird. 
It was a memorable, hardly a forgetable performance, 

Mr. Uothwell contributed materially by retouching 
with the baton what today would sound faded in this 
old score. Having afforded the public opportunity to 
hear his star violist, why not feature Alfred Brain, for 
instance, in such a work as Richard Strauss' French 
horn concerto. 

Chopin's E minor concerto is well known, nor could 
be said more than that Rosenthal's keyboard art is 
masterly. It would be ridiculous to enumerate details 
of his magic technic. Rarely have Chopin's funda- 
mental moods, epic, lyric playful in three movements, 
glowed so proudly, softly, merrily. Unfailing as his 
runs and chords, so is Rosenthal's gigantic velocity 
proportionately able to call forth a tone of precious 
beauty. It still rings in my ears and will long con- 
tinue. 



Clifford Lott, baritone, and Blanche Rogers Lott, 
pianiste of the Lott studios, are devoting much of their 
time to teaching, but aside from their studio work are 
niling public and private engagements, Mr, Lott will 
sing In the Messiah in San Diego, In December, two 
performances, and with the Los Angeles Oratoria So- 
ciety In Bach's Christmas Oratorio. Mr, Ix)tt Is con- 
ducting two choruses of men and women, the personnel 
of which comes from Azusa. Covlna and Glendora. As 
the result of Mr, Lott's teaching ability, his pupils are 
recognized for their artistic worth in oratorio and con- 
cert. A signal honor has come to Mr. Lott. being 
unanimously elected to membership In the American 
Academy of Teachers of Singing of New York. He la 
the only teacher west of the Mississippi River upon 
whom this honor has been conferred. Blanche Rogers 
Lott will appear as pianiste in the Los Angeles cham- 
ber music series at the Blltmore Hotel, and in Alice 
Coleman Batchelder's chamber music concerts in Pasa- 
dena, 

Every year the Los Angeles Flute Club finds new and 
worthwhile music for the annual public concert. Hence, 
the large audience crowding the First Methodist Church 
last week was well pleased. Fascination was added to 
this program by the participation of the Bay Cities Musi- 
cal Association Chorus— Mrs. Joseph Zuckerman presi- 
dent. Modest Altschuler directing. Under his baton the 
chorus sang Tschaikowsky's I^egende, and particularly 
the difficult Plaintive from Borodine's Prince Igor (with- 
out accompaniment and in Russia! with good effect, 
Ippolitow-Ivanow's Hymn of the Pythagoreans to the 
Rising Sun, for chorus, flutes, harps and tuba. Is a 
striking piece of graceful pathos, finding its American 
premiere on this occasion, as Mr, Altschuler possesses 
the only and handwritten score of the composition. 
The Prelude from Massenet's Eve, arranged by Alt- 
schuler for the same ensemble plus organ (Arthur 
Blakeley), is a finely emotional work. Artistic flute 
solos preceded the choral part, limitation of space allow- 
ing merely mention of the principal performers. Jay 
Plowe and Harry Baxter. Notable, too. was the playing 
of a Thuille sextet, opus 6, a colorful work for flute (Jay 
Plowe), oboe, French horn and piano (Homer Sim- 



WARFIELD THEATRE 

Barbara La Marr and Bert Lytell in the visualization 
of the Pearl Doles Bell novel, Sandra. Ih the coming 
attraction for the Warfleld, The day Is past when Bar- 
bara 1-a Marr Is rated only as a beautiful woman — today 
she Is one of the leading actresses of the screen— her 
performance In Thy Name Is Woman and The Eternal 
City with The White Moth have made this possible, 
Bert Lytell Is one of San Francisco's favorllo players 
and the supporting cast la an Important one. 

In hook form Sandra was a year's sensation— the story 
Is that of a light-hearted woman who carries her con- 
quest of hearts In the capltola of gaiety only to Hnd, In 
the end, love in her own home. On the stage Fanchon 
and Marco will present the second edition of their great- 
est success, another Idea of the Follies Bergere, Another 
scene of the famous Parisian music hall sensation — 
another gorgeous collection of beautiful girls and dar- 
ing costumes with a clever company of principals. 

Glen Oswald and his Victor Record Orchestra and 
Gino Severl and the Warfleld Music Masters will supply 
a dlverslfled musical program with several other shorter 
Alms completing the program. 



MUSICAL BLUE BOOK WORTH WHILE 

In the Wasp of November 4. i;i24, we And the follow- 
ing appreciative reference to the recently published 
Musical Blue Book of California and tor which we heart- 
ily express our thanks: 

Alfred Metzger, the plump and amiable editor of the 
PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW, has compiled 
and published a Blue Book of musical folk of California, 
There are about 10,000 names and addresses in the 
book, which will be a handy reference tor musical edi- 
tors and critics, Ella Steiling Mighels, In her Literary 
California, gave a list of California writers, living and 
dead. Someone might take that list and compile a di- 
rectory of living California writers on the lines of Mr. 
.Metzger's Blue Book of musicians and the Blue Book 
and Social Record of prominent residents. These things 
are worth while and of value as reference l)ook8 to 
busy people. 



FITZGERALD'S for the cAd-vancement of 34usic 

Eleanor Woodford 

This brilliant dramatic soprano is now filling many en- 
gagements. She has taken Constance Balfour's class whpe 
the latter is In Europe, and was chosen from a list of 
twenty applicants for the position of Soloist of the Temple 
Baptist Church of Los Angeles, In addition to a voice of 
fine dramatic quality, she possesses a magnetic personality. 
She uses the sweet-tuneil. siuKing 

KNABE 

exclusively, and says. "It is the perfection of liarmony," 




HILL STREET "^^^ AT 727-729 

LOS ANGELES 




ROSEMARY ROSE 



A Singer Who Teaches — Consolidates Her Studios 

Formerly of Milwaukee, Sheboygan 

and Plymouth 



In Los Angeles 



,SO, KK.NMIIItl': STUIOK'r 

AiKlKlunN ■>)' Apiiiiliilmriil 
llulh Drodinun. Ili-ielalr 



CHARLES IJOWES 

TEACHER OF VOICE 
MS §, <irand \ IriT, I'honr ,%.-.4IN.'>, l,aa Am 



L. E. Behymer 

MANAGER OF DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS 

Executive Offices: 

705 Auditorium BIdg., Lo* Angele* 



ABBIK NORTON JAMISON 

PI A Ml — IIAIOHINV — VOfAI. <'<lAtll 

S|M<<<liil I'lniKi Noniiiil rlii-.HvH 

Kluillo: no:: Koiitliirn Callfornlu >lu<ili- < ». IIIiIk. 

1117 Went ;:i!il Slrfft Ti-lriiliimf lleni'mi 7707 

mons), Dr, Elmer E. Helms interspersed the i^rogram 
with a clever talk about "Flutes and Festivals," Al- 
together the program, arranged by Carroll G, Cambery, 
president of the Flute Club, was an impressive example 
of the versatility found in woodwind instruments, as 
well as of the devotion of Los Angeles artists In sharing 
the best of their beloved art with the public. The latter 
showed due appreciation. In this the following guests 
shared: Lucille Glbbs, soprano; May Hogan, harp; 
Alfred Kastner. harp; Philip Memoll, Jr., oboe; Antonio 
Raimondl, clarinet: Achille Heynee, bassoon: Alfred 
Brain, horn: Paul Mattersteig, tuba; Homer Simmons, 
piano; Arthur Blakeley, organ; Mrs, Harry Baxter, ac- 
companist; Mrs, Harry Knox, accompanist. 

It Is just as much to the Interest of the musical pro- 
fession to have a music journal widely circulated among 
the musical public as It Is in the interests of the pub- 
lication. There are problems which none other but h 
music journal will discuss. 



Alexander Bevani 

AM. IIIIAXCIII':!) OP TIIK 

VOCAL ART 



ILYA BRONSON ,.,.„„.V^'L\:a"\ . 

I nllnarrBonlc Orckeatra 
l.oa Ansrlra Trio. Thll harmonic 



A.KOODLACII 

VIOLIN MAKKK ANn IIKPAIHBR 

Connuiaarur — Appral»«r 

tl03 Majrallr Thrnlrr IIIUk.. I.oa Ancrlra Tarker 4O10 

JOHN SMALLMAN 



niilg, VIvInn llraln 

ZOELLNER CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

Lon ANIiKI.ES 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



November 28. 1924 



CLAIRE DUX ^«^'^««« 



CONCERT MANAGEMENT ARTHUR JUDSON 
FISK BUILDING, NEW YORK CITY 



LIEDER SINGER 

BRUNSWICK RECORD 



Music in New York 

By ANNA SCHULMAN 



Ralph Errolle. American lyric tenor, who won an ovation 
as well as the unanimous praise of the press at his 
debut November 8th at the Metropolitan as Romeo in 
Gounod's Opera, and Yeatman Griffith, internationally 
famous American vocal master of New York City, with 
whom Mr. Errolle has been studying and coaching for 
the past two seasons. Taken in Los Angeles this sum- 
mer, where Mr. Errolle followed Yeatman Griffith, who 
was holding summer vocal master classes in that city, to 
continue his work with him Mr. Errolle pays great 
tribute to this master who is the teacher of many world- 
famed artists. Yeatman Griffith returns next summer 
to the Pacific Coast to conduct his third season of sum- 
mer vocal master classes in Los Angeles. California, 
and Portland. Oregon, and his first season in San FYan- 
cisco. California. These master classes which Yeatman 
Griffith established in London. England in 1912, have 
proved a colossal success. The Pacidc Coast season is 
under the management of L. E. Behymer. Los Angeles: 
Ida G. Scott. San Francisco, and Otto Wedcmeyer 
Portland. 



Music in Berkeley 



Despite the fact that the month of October could 
boast two and three concerts a day. one never feels that 
the musical season is really in full swing until the opera 
makes its appearance. New Y'ork is indeed fortunate to 
have such an organization, with its wonderful voices 
and wonderful orchestra, and no less wonderful scenic 
artists. The brilliance of the opening night is truly 
dazzling — those in the Goldfcu Horseshoe glitter with 
jewels and the standees sparkle witii enthusiasm. To 
the opera Aida was given the honor of opening the 
season. It was an evening never to be forgotten. The 
audience was unusually enthusiastic; the artists sensed 
this, and gave of their very best. One of the highlights 
of the second week was the revival of the Tales of 
Hoffman, with Bori. Morgana. De Luca. Fleta and our 
own California Lawrence Tibbett. who gave an unusu- 
ally fine performance Hasselmans conducted and the 
scenes were by Urban Lohengrin. Andrea Chenier. 
Fedora. Mefistotele and Rigoletto were performed dur- 
ing the week. 

Orchestraliy speaking, we have already had with us the 
Damrosch Philharmonic and the State Symphony or- 
chestras. With the Damrosch forces. Gabrilowitsch. 
the poet of the piano, played the Schumann concerto. 
In addition, we had the Philharmonic which gave the 
Beethoven Seventh, and Novaes. who played the Saint- 
Saens No. 4 concerto. We are looking forward to the 
visit of the Boston Symphony and its new conductor. 
Koussevitzky. 

Ethel Leginska, who has been heard in San Francisco 
many times, is now in Munich, where she made her first 
formal appearance as a conductor. 

Alma Gluck, after a long absence from the New York 
concert stage, made a brilliant re-entry. She was en- 
thusiastically received, for she has the same charm as 
of old. She was assisted by Y'asha Bunchuk. the young 
Russian cellist whose, beautiful playing added much to 
the evening's pleasure. Chotzinoft accompanied, and 
was. as always, the superb accompanist. 

Since jazz has entered our concert fields. I must make 
mention of Paul Whiteman and his band, who have in- 
vaded Carnegie Hall, and successfully, too. The classi- 
cal Mana Zucca was soloist. 

The Metropolitan Opera House, hitherto sacred to the 
opera and the symphony, is giving way to the famous 
Vincent Lopez and bis Pennsylvania Hotel Orchestra. 
This organization is fast gaining the reputation of 
putting the classical into jazz. The orchestra for the 
concert numbers 50. and many novelties are included in 
the program, which will be given in detail in my next 
letter The invasion of the concert hall by jazz does not 
meet with the approval of our own Ashley Pettis, but 
so long as Lopez can fill the Metropolitan, just so long 
will he give concerts there. 

Rose Raymond, who is "partly" Californian, and who 
has been heard there many times, gave a brilliant piano 
recital in a very brilliant manner. 

Pavlowa, who seems to grow more marvellous each time 
I see her. just ended a three weeks' successful engage- 
ment at the Manhattan Opera House. She was again 
under the management of S. Hurok. 

This weeks concerts include the following; Pianists 
— Samaroff. Hutcheson. Naegle. Julia Glass. Edwin 
Hughes and Nicholas Medtner; violinists — Macmillen 
and Huberman; singers — Werrenrath and De Gorgorza, 
baritones; McCormack and Roland Hayes, tenors, and 
Tarazova, soprano. 



The San Francisco Symphony Orchestra was greeted 
by a large and enthusiastic audience Wednesday eve- 
ning when Alfred Hertz conducted the first concert of 
the season at the Harmon Gymnasium. These concerts 
are given under the auspices of the Music and Drama 
Committee of the University of California. The pro- 
gram opened with the Tschaikowsky Symphony No. 5 
which was characterized through its four movements 
by sincerity and grandeur, the reading of the second 
movement being particularly inspired. The introduction 
to Act III from Wagner's Meistersingers opened the 
second part of the program, which was followed by the 
fantastic suite Through the Looking Glass by Deems 
Taylor. The next concert by the San Francisco or- 
chestra will be given Thursday evening. December ISth. 



Harrold Kirby, English baritone, entertained his friends 
by giving two studio recitals on the 22nd and 24th. The 
program included French. Italian and English songs. 
Mr. Kirby is a particularly interesting interpreter of 
English folk songs and ballads. Nadine Shepard gave 
adequate support at the piano. 



NEW SONGS FOR TEACHER AND SINGER 


It's a Mighty Good World 




O'Hara 






Rolt 


Come to My Heart 




English 
Wilfrid Jones 


Brown Bird Singing 




Wood 
Novello 


Rose Marie of Normandy 




Del Rigo 
Carew 






Lohr 


Piper of Love. .- 




Carew 








The Market 

Among the Willows 




Carew 
Phillips 


A Good Heart All the Way 
Dancing Time in Kerry 
Sweet Navarre 
My Heart's Haven 




Clarke 


Carne 
Phillips 


Love Pipes of June 
My Little Island Home 








Baden 


Ragged Vagabond 




Randolph 


CHAPPELL-HARMS, INC. 
185 Madison Avenue New York City 



Mr. and Mrs. Cedric Wright, violinists, have announced 
two informal evenings of music at their studio on Etna 
street. December 5 and 7. The assisting artists are 
Marie Partridge Price, soprano, and Elizabeth Alex- 
ander, accompanist. 



Dr. Derrick N. Lehmer gave a group of songs, including 
Down the Stream, The Dawn, and The Harvest of Pine 
Nuts, from his cycle of Yosemite Indian Songs, at the 
Berkeley League of Fine Arts on Monday evening, the 
occasion being Laura Adams Armer. 

F. P. M. 



May Mukle. the distinguished cellist, who is well 
known to East Bay music lovers, has been invited to 
play the Concert for Cello by Saint-Saens, with the 
California Music League, at their next concert on De- 
cember 2nd. Miss Mukle has been appearing for the 
last six years both in San Francisco and in Berkeley. 
Her last appearance in Berkeley was in Wheeler Hall 
in a joint recital with Lawrence Strauss. One of the 
very front rank of living violoncellists, her playing this 
interesting work with the California Music League Or- 
chestra will be one of the outstanding musical events 
in Berkeley this year. 

The California Music League, under the direction of 
Dr. Modesto Alloo. professor of music at the University 
of California, will present the following program at 
Harmon Gymnasium: Overture, Le Roi d'Ys (Lalo); 
Symphonic Poem. Psyche (Cesar Franck). La Jeuuesse 
d'Hercule (Saint-Saensl ; Concert for Cello (Saint- 
Saens). May Mukle; Ballet. Sylvia (Delibes). Many 
new subscriptions are being received at the office of 
the Secretary of the League at 2413 Bancroft Wav. for 
the remaining three concerts. The new subscription list 
was opened as a result of numerous requests on the 
part of people in Berkeley who had not previously taken 
advantage of the opportunity to join. 

Gladys Ivanelle Wilson, a talented piano pupil of Joseph 
George Jacobson. gave an interesting program before 
the American College Club at the Palace Hotel and re- 
ceived much praise. Among her selections were: Car- 
nival (Schumann), Erotik (Jacobsonl. Love Dream 
(Liszt), Country Gardens (Grainger), Lento (Cyril 
Scott), and Scherzo B flat minor (Chopin). 



The Intermediate Piano Class of Joseph George Jacob- 
son gave a recital on Monday. November 24th. at their 
teacher's studio. 2S?:3 Sacramento Street. Those who 
took part were: Philip Roemer. Annette Grenadier. 
Melba Golumb. Pearl Fishbone. Iris Rosenbaum. Miriam 
Cushman. Flossie Asaro and Joseph Bernstein. 



^^^*. SAN FRANCISCO^ f^r 

SVmphoMY 

ORCHESTRA 

AiroeoHeaTz ----- - CONOUCTOR. 

POPULAR CONCERT 

SUNDAY, DEC. 7, 2:45 P. M. 
Curran Theatre 



WALTER FERNER, 'Cellist 



Tifkets, 50o 



Sherman. Claj- & Co. 



George Lipschultz 

Musical Director and Violin Soloist 

Loe'w's State Theatre 
Los Angeles 



Lo E W^S ^ W A R FIElD 

Week Commencing Sat., Nov. 29th 
BARBARA LA MARR 

bert lytell 

. '"'Sandra"" 

Second Edition of Fanchon &. Marco's 

NEW IDEAS OF FOLIES BERGERE 
Scores of Pretty Girls 

i;ien Os«a.d.s' t.n-lie.s.. a 
GINO SEVERI MISIC M ASTER.S 



J. WHITCOMB NASH 

THE VOICE 
Special Normal Courses for Teachers 



700 Kohler & Cha 



STENGER VIOLINS 

Exemplify Intrinsic Excellence and Are 
Pre-eminently Superior 

A life's devotion of uninterrupted study and labor, 
InvolvInK the mnsterr of principlea of musical 
acoustics, timber physics, and eneineerlne, ha> 
yielded the understanding: of those principles which 
exemplify the "Stenger Idea" in violin makins. and 
mark the heeinnine of a new era In this noble art. 

W. C. STENGER 

INCORPORATED 

Maker of Fine violins 
<17-618 Stcinvray Hall, Chicago 



AUDREY BEER SOREL 

PIANIST — TE-\CeER 
Pnpl] of Leopold Godowsky and Arthur De Graeff (BmS' 
aeU). Studioi 2925 SIcClure St., Oakland. TeL Oak. 



ALFRED HURTGEN 

PIANIST, ACCOMPANIST. MUSIC* L DIRECTOR. 

COACH, PIANO INSTRUCTION 
Studio I 2778 Union Street Tel. Fillmore 8240 



Ims-V 



November 28. 1924 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



** MABEL RIEGELMAN* 

PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO, CHICAGO GRAND OPERA COMPANY. ADDRESS: SECRETARY TO 



^ 



MABEL RIEGELMAN. 485 CALIFORN IA ST., SAN FRANCISCO 




KAJETAN ATTL 

SOLO HARPIST, SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 



AVeslcrn Reprenentntlvc 
of I.yon & Healy Harps 



For Concert EnBasrcmentii and Inntrucllon Apply 
IU04 Kohlcr & Chase Uldg.. Tel. Douelaa 1G78, on 
\^'ednesday and Saturday Afternoons OIVLV. Ilesl- 
dence Phone Franklin 7S47. 



JUST OUT.' 

A METHOD FOR THE HARP 

Uy Kajelan AttI 

CARL FISHER. Publisher 

For Sale at Sherman, Clay & Co.. Kohler & Chase. 

Henry Grebe and Kajetan Attl 



ELWYN ARTIST SERIES 

MARGARET TILLY 

PIAMST 

TUESDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 2. at 8:30 
BALLROOM. FAIRMONT HOTEL 

EVA GAUTHIER 

IIF.Z/.O SIIPKAM) 

"High Priestess of Modern Song" 

THURSDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 4. at 8:30 

SCOTTISH RITE HALL 

ISA KREMER 

Intcinallc.n.il Ilniindisi 

2 CONCERTS 
Scottish Rite Hall, Friday Evening, December 12 
Alcazar Theatre, Sunday Matinees, December 14 

Tiekets at Sherman. Clay * ( „. 
MANAGEMKXT EL« VX COIVCKRT BIREAU 



Elwin A. Calberg 

PIAMST AND TEACHER 
ist returned from New York and Paris, Franc 

Soloist and Accompanist 
Available Season 1924-1925 



Tuesdays 
Resldem 



Studio 812 East lOth St., Oakln 
Phone: Blerritt 3SeO 



Myra Palache 

PIANIST 

LECTURES ON MUSIC 
APPRECIATION 



Francisco Address, 2520 Union 

Phone Walnat 638 
On AVednesdnr. ^ p. m. f o 6 p. i 



MADAME 

JOHANNA 

KRISTOFFY 

Prima Donna Soprano 

Has Returned from Europe 

and Reopened Her 

Studio at 

740 PINE STREET 



Phone Douglas 6624 



Mrs. William Steinbach Laura Wertheimber T*i; \^ mT-T T iv xr*.i>T.jfci 

VOICE ClII.TIRFn Preo.ralor» Te-^h.r f-., '^•^■^^ Mr»XjM ^M^L, l>l.i\^l<.lV?9 



VOICE CULTURE 
Studio: 

1)02 KOHLER & CHASE BLDG.. 
Snn Francisco Phone Kearny .•i 4.-H< 

ACHILLE L. ARTIGUES 

Graduate of Seiiola Cantorum, Paris. Or- 
ganist St. Mary's CnthedraL Piano De- 
partment, Hamlin SebooL Orsan and 
Piano. Arrlllaga Mnslo al Coilree 

KURT VON GRUDZINSKI 

HARITONE — VOICE CULTURE 
Authorized to Teach Mme. Schoen- 



EVA M. GARCIA 

PIANIST AND TEACHER 
4152 Hoire St. Tel. Piedmont 4908 

PIERRE DOUILLET, PIANO 
NITALIA DOUILLET, VOICE 



DOMENICO BRESCIA 

VOICE SPECIALIST — COMPOSITION 

Studio: 603-604 Kohler & Chase Baildlns 

Phone Kearny 54.'.4 

Madame Charles Poulter— Soprano 

Voice Culture. Piano 

Residence Studio. 5S8 27th Street 

Oakland — TeL Oakland 2079 

Mary Coonan McCrea 

TEACHER OF SINGING 
Studio: 36 GalTney BulldinK, 370 Sutter St. 
TeL Douglas 42 33. Res. Tel. Kearny 2348 

MRS. A. F. BRIDGE 



HELEN COLBURN HEATH 

Soprano Soloist. Temple Emanu EI. Coi 

cert and Church Work. Vocal Instructio 

2S39 Clay Street. Phone W est 4.Sno 

HENRIK GJERDRUM 

PIANIST 
2321 Jackson Street Fillmore 321 



Preparatory Teacher for 

Mrs. Noah Brandt 

2211 Scott St. Telephone Fillmore 1522 

Evelyn Sresovich Ware 

Pianist and Accompanist 

Studio: 1003 Kohler A Chase Building 

Phone Gartield Ii72a 

Joseph George Jacobson 



ROSE RELDA CAILLEAU 

Opera Comlque. Paris 

Studio: aity7 Washington Street 

I'hone Fillmore 1S47 

SIGMUND BEEL 



MARY ALVERTA MORSE 

SOPRANO 
Teacher of Singing; Studio. Tuesday and 
Friday. Kohler * Chase Bldg., S. F.i Resi- 
dence Studio, 106 Santa Rosa Ave., Oak- 
land. Phi'ne Humboldt 191. 

SAN FRANCISCO CONSERVATORY 



CONTRALTO 

I.riS 2eth Avenue Phone Sunset 2905 

Aolcc Culture, Mondays P. M. r.Oli Kuhlcr 

A; Chase Bldg. Tel. Garlicld 4172 



CAROLINE E. IRONS 

Pianist and Teacher 
3831 Mera Street Tel. Fruitvale 778W 

Joseph Greven 

Voice Culture ; — Opera, Oratorio, 
Concert and Church Singing in all 
languages. 

MRS. J. GREVEN 

Piano and Harmony 

3741 Sacramento St. Tel. Bayview 5278 

TEACHERS' DIRECTORY 



MACKENZIE GORDON 

2S?,2 .lackson Street I'lione West 4r,- 



ANTOrNE OE VALLY 

2201 Scott St. Phone VTeat 1341 

MME. M. TRCMBONI 
601-2 Kohler & Chaae Bidg. Kearny 54S4 

JACK EDWARD HILLMAN 
601 Kohler & Chase Blrtg. Kearny 5454 

ADELE ULMAN 
178 Commonwealth Ave. Ph. Bayview 8196 



OF MUSIC 



Maalc School) 



MRS. CARROLL NICHOLSON 

CONTRALTO 
Teacher of SInKlne. 32 Lorrtta Ave.. Pied- 
mont. Tel. Piedmont 301. Mon., Kohler * 
Chnsc llldg.. S. F. Telephone Kenrny r>4.-.4 

Brandt's Conservatory of Music 

2211 Scott Street. Bet. Clay & Washington 



ALMA SCHMIDT-KENNEDY 

PIANIST 

Studioi 1537 Kuclid Avenue. Berkeley. Cal. 

Phone Berkeley 60<>6 

MRS. ZAY RECTOR BEVITT 
PIANO and HARMONY 

Institute of Music of San Francisco, 
Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 5454. 



Dorothy Goodsell Camm MARION RAMON WILSON 



COLORATURA SOPRANO 
Teacher of Del Canto. Tel. Bayview 3.S30 
or Piedmont 1330. By Appointment Only. 



MISS EDITH CAUBU 
376 Sutter Street Phone Douglas 26( 

JANET ROWAN HALE 
Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 5454 

J. B. ATWOOD 

2111 Channing Way Berkeley, Cal. 

MISS LORRAINE EWING 
833 Ashbury St. Phone Hemlock 749 

RUTH VIOLA DAVIS 
515 Buena Vista Avenue — Park 341 

LOUIS FELIX RAYNAUD 

1841 Fulton St. Tel. Bayview 6008 

ELSIE COOK HUGHES LARAIA 
3325 Octavia St. Phone Filmore 6102 

It a music journal is worth while to 
publish programs ami views of musical 
events, it is worth while to patronize. 



JULIUS HAUQ 

4032 Irving St. Tel. Sunset 436 

HOTHER WISMER 
3701 Clay Street Phone Bayview 7780 

ARTHUR CONRADI 
906 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 6U4 

G. JOLLAIN 
376 Sutter St. Tel. Kearny 2637 

MARY PASMORE 
2009 Green St. Tel. Fillmore 9071 

AIII<ANrit:it OF MISIC 

C. B. FRANK 
40O Pantages Bldg. Tel. Garfield 1334 

There is no way to obtain concert en- 
gagements unless a name is sulBclently 
known. There Is no other way to make 
a name known except through publicity. 
Consequently, it you do not advertise you 
can not possibly secure steady engage- 
ments. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



November 28, 1924 



Elfeabrtlt i>tmpH0n -- Piano 

ADVANCED COACHING 

THE ART OF INTERPRETATION— SOLFEGE 

NORMAL COURSES 

STl DIOS: 

T0« KOBLER A CHASE Bl ILDI.XG. SAX FRA>ClSCO 

2SISH ETXA STREET. BERKELEY 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAX FRANXISCO BAXK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks In California. 

the Assets of which have never been increased 

by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member .Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1924 

Assets $93,198,226.96 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 3,900,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 446,024.41 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave, and UUoa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (4 J 4) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

ANT) .MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



GOSSIP ABOUT MUSICAL PEOPLE 



Eva Gauthier. the noted French so- 
prano, who appeared as soloist with the 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra at 
the Exposition Auditorium last Wednes- 
day evening will give a concert in con- 
junction with the Chamber Music Society 
of San Francisco at Scottish Rite Audi- 
torium on Thursday evening. December 
4lh. 

The Music Teachers Association of San 
Francisco held its monthly meeting at 
the studio of Frank Carroll Giffen. cor- 
ner of Hyde and Chestnut Streets. last 
Monday evening and a large attendance 
of members enjoyed a very interesting 
event. After the regular business ses- 
sion during which Miss Cora Winchell 
explained the plans prepared to give 
Mary Carr .Moore's opera Xarcissa in San 
Francisco next spring Elsa Naess, the 
well known Norwegian pianist, and Mrs. 
Brehany, soprano, interpreted a program 
that was heartily applauded. Inasmuch 
as no attempt was made to present a 
program of concert dimension a detailed 
review is not called for. However, it 
is only just to say that both artists de- 
lighted their hearers and received enthus- 
iastic applause. Dr. Hans Leschke ad- 
dressed the teachers on the significance 
of the Festival Chorus and asked assis- 
tance in obtaining more male voices. He 
also told those assembled that the colonel 
in charge of the Presidio had sent one 
hundred soldiers to join the chorus. 

Elizabeth Simpson was hostess at a 
delightful studio At Home in her studio 
in the Kohler & Chase Building on Mon- 
day afternoon. .Xovember 17th on which 
occasion Elwln A. Calberg, the brilliant 
young pianist, gave an advance hearing 
of his Berkeley concert program which 
was this week's most distinctive feature 
in East bay musical circles. Since Mr. 
Calberg's return from Paris he has been 
coaching this program intensively with 
.Miss Simpson, and his brilliant playing 
aroused the keenest admiration in all 
present who were unanimous in praise 
of his talents and attainments. Among 
the guests were: Mrs Lillian Birming- 
ham. .Miss Alice Seckles. Miss Ida M. 
Scott. Mrs. Evelyn Sresovich Ware. Miss 
Helen Colbum Heath. Mrs. Domenico 
Bresica. Frank Carroll Giffen and others. 

Under the direction of Miss Constance 
R. Keohan. director of music of the 
Galileo High School, the Music Club of 
the school presented an unusually fine 
concert in the Galileo auditorium on 
November 7. The numbers on the pro- 
gram were rendered entirely by ama- 
teurs, yet in such a manner that all who 



took part in the concert deserved the 
highest praise and commendation tor the 
remarkable talent exhibited. Is is an 
honor for a student of the school to be 
asked to participate in these programs, 
for only the best are selected, and 
through the efforts of Miss Keohan. the 
standard of music at Galileo has de- 
veloped to a degree Uiat is worth.-, nf 
note. 

Emilio Osta. pianist, played Chopin's 
Concerto in E minor and Wieniawski's 
Concert Waltz. His masterly rendition 
of selections was indicative of true gen- 
ius and displayed a technique and a 
knowledge of expression that won for 
him the generous applause of his apprec- 
iative audience. Miss Berenice Griffln, 
soprano sang The Lass with the Delicate 
-Air and Orpheus with his Lute in a most 
charming coloratura soprano voice, with 
a lightness of tone and a clearness of 
enunciation that were delightful. Balfe's 
Bohemian Girl Overture was rendered by 
the Galileo Orchestra, conducted by Miss 
Keohan. The splendid work being done 
by the orchestra under Miss Keohan's 
guidance is worthy of great praise and 
is responsible for the fact that the orch- 
estra is the most popular and valuable 
musical asset of the school. 

Other numbers on the program includ- 
ed a piano ensemble. Morning Mood, 
Peer Gynt Suite, No. 1 (Greig) played by 
Miss Jeanette Ritschy and Val Ritschy in 
manner which indicated the talent of the 
brother and sister musicians; a vocal 
solo. Where My Caravan has Rested 
iLohr) by Miss Louise Petersen, popular 
Galileo singer: a piano ensemble. Salut 
a Pesth, by Harry Friedman and Eugene 
Guitereiz, two pianists of undoubted 
ability and promise: and a vocal solo. 
Roll On Thou Deep and Mighty Ocean 
(Pelrie) by Robert Zantell, the school's 
favorite bass soloist. 

Rena Lazelle, head of ihe vocal de- 
partment of the San Francisco Conser- 
vatory of Music, announces four vocal 
round tables with lectures to be given 
at the Conservatory on Monday evenings 
November 17th, December 1.5th. January 
12th and February 9tlL These lectures 
are free to the public. As will be noted 
the first of these events has already 
taken place and we would have been 
pleased to give an editorial review of 
this event had it not been for the fact 
that the Rosenthal concert fell on the 
same evening. Miss Lazelle is such an 
energetic and capable vocal instructor 
that we feel inclined to extend to her 
that recognition which anyone who does 
really good work is entitled to. We shall 
try to come to the second event on De- 
cember 15th. 




•THE'AMPICO' 

Alone— and unassisted this musical marvel re-creates in yow 
home the playing of the master musicians ^-' who have "myster 
iously endowed it with all the music of the world," and who also 
pronounce it the world's most magnificent musical instrument. 

BY AN OVERWHELMING 
IvlAjORlTY- MORE OF THE 
AVORLD'S GREAT PIANISTS 
OF THE PAST THREE GEN- 
ERATIONS MAY BE HEARD 
ON THE AMPICO (AND ON 
THE AMPICO ALONE) THAN 
ON ANY OTHER MUSICAL 
INSTRUMENT • ALL THIS 
MUSICAL AVEALTH IS 
^VITHIN YOUR MEANS 
ON A BASIS AVE SHALL 
BE GLAD TO ARRANGE 
FOR YOU -COME IN -HEAR 
YOUR AMPICO-AND HEAR 
OUR PLAN 

•KOHLER- &• CHASE • 



26 O'FARRELL STREET . SAN FRANCISCO 

SiS I4tli Stt««l 2460 Mission Sfreer 

_ .. K L A N D y^a>< SAN FRANCISCO 
SAN JOSE y^ Mt^ SACRAMENTO 



KNABE 




AMPICO 



"^WW^W^^^WW^WWW 



&ifir fa^l 



VOL. XVII. NO. 9 




jrHE_OLDEST MUSICAL JOURNAL IN THE GREAT WEST 



SAN FRANCISCO, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1924 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



EICHHEIM PRESENTSJUAINT CH!::L.^ MUSIC MUSIC LOVERS ENJOY BRILLIANT PROGRAMS 



A Suite of Five Chinese Themes Proves Exceedingly !•- jle'restine at Third 
Pair of Symphony Concerts— Tschaikowsky's Far mI France-ca da 
Rimini, Heard for the First Time Under th_^ - ijtion of Hertz 
Reveals Great Dramatic Force— Great W g of Brahms ' 



BY ALFRED METZr 



I Whenever .Alfred Hertz includes upon 
his program a Brahms Symphony we 
Icok forward to the concert with 
more than ordinary pleasure. And when 
it is the second symphon.v we rejoice 
even a little more By making this state- 
ment we may not increase our standing 
with serious musicians, but a little con- 
fession is sometimes good for the soul. 
We just revel in the poetic beauties of 
this work, and Mr. Hertz interprets it in 
a way to accentuate its most admirable 
artistic traits. One of the conductor's 
principal qualities is his emphasis of the 
high lishts in a composition. His plas- 
ticity of directing brings out the themes 
in unerring clarity and permits the score 
to be heard in all its richness and full- 
ness. At times the entire orchestra seems 
to sing a special'y appealing passage, and 
sonority as well as harmonic solidity be- 
comes graphically revealed. It was surely 
a treat to hear Mr. Hertz conduct this 




E. ROBERT SCHMITZ 
The Eminent Piano Virtuoso Who 
Will Be in San Francisco Next 
Month Under the Manage- 
ment of Ida G. Scott 

favorite work of ours and listen to the 
skill and receptivity of the orchestra, 
which is constantly revealing new im- 
provements and added artistic strength., 
'' It anyone had told us some time ago 
;hat we would listen to Chinese music 
ifith any degree of patience or gratifica- 
;ion we would have considered him a 
?ery incompetent prophet. But Henry 
Eichheim's Oriental Impressions in- 
Tigued us far beyond our usual attitude 
;cward such music. We found it not only 
nteresting to listen to this suite of five 
'sketches" but we derived a great deal 
)f entertainment and pleasure from do- 
ng so. The music in itself is, of course, 
imited in scope There are certain tones 
ind certain combinations that are re- 
)eated constantly. And while the rhythm 
;hanges frequently, the tone or succes- 
lon of notes remains the same. To listen 
o this music in its original form with 
my degree of intelligent observation it is 
lecessary to be a Chinaman, but to hear 
t modified or arranged into our Western 
node of orchestration represents an edu- 
;ational experience of considerable value. 
Mr. Eichheim has done his work most 
ikilltully. He has blended these singu- 
ar tones and combinations with the 
itring and reed sections of the orchestra 
n a manner to give them a quaint atmos- 
)heric mist, and he shows us what other- 
vise might be a succession of "noises" 



throusJi 5»smoke screen of modern har- 
monizat^f^J changing what would other 
wise ^gsr musical crudeness into pleas- 
ing toi,e pictures. The various Chinese 
instruments employed sounded decidedly 
unique and "palatable," and this is the 
riac? to compliment the orchestra for in- 
terpreting this unique work with such 
delightful musical skill. Mr. Eichheim 
h^s retained the Chinese character of the 
music notwithstanding his modern use of 
harmonization. And this is the most re- 
markable and praiseworthy part of his 
work. We would like some time to hear 
from Mr. Eichheim an arrangement of 
Indian music in the same manner, y 

The program closed with Tschaikow- 
sky's exceptionally dramatic Fantasia 
Francesca da Rimini, and when it is 
known that this music represents in part 
a description of the lower regions, where 
the temperature is supposed to stay 
- above two hundred degrees or more, it is 
natural that there should be considerable 
vigor in the work. We do not mean to 
inter that it sounds like — well, like the 
place we refer to, — but that it must rep- 
resent dramatic intensity in its most 
vigorous form. Mr. Hertz being specially _ 
well equipped to give dramatic climaxes"^ 
their most effective representation, the 
work certainly was heard at its best. 
Somehow there seemed lacking that 
melodic richness which so many of 
Tschaikowsky's works so lavishly reveal. 
We leave the most unpleasant part to 
the last. It is a downright shame that 
A. W, Widenham, seeretar.v-manager of 
the Musical .Association of San Francisco, 
is compelled, year after year, to beg the 
people for funds. Are we or are we not 
musical? If we are, then it seems almost 
incredib'e that a guarantee fund of $100,- 
000 is obtained with such disgusting difli- 
culty. Where are our public spirited citi- 
zens? Mr. Widenham showed where 
there isn't a city in the United States 
that does not cheerfully guarantee 
TWICE the amount which San Francisco 
is called upon to contribute, and some of 
the orchestras and conductors in those 
cities cannot compare favorably with Mr. 
Hertz. Only recently Minneapolis suc- 
ceeded in getting 600 people to guarantee 
$2,50,000. In San Francisco barely less 
than the same number of people are 
called upon to guarantee two-fifths of 
this amount, and they don't even do this. 
In a city with so many millionaires like 
San Francisco it is only possible to ob- 
tain one subscription of $5,000, four of 
$1,000, a few of $500 and the balance of 
from $100 odwn to $3. We all feel this 
niggardly attitude. Our artists, our 
chamber music societies, our music 
clubs, indeed everything associated with 
the arts cannot obtain opportunities 
to receive financial backing. There seems 
to be a great demand for FREE services, 
but — pay anybody? — perish the thought! 



Grace Henkel, a soprano ot exceptional 
voire and artistic intuition gave a con- 
cert at the State Theatre in Eureka, Cal. 
on Monday evening, November 17th The 
following extract from an extensive re 
view published in the Humboldt Times of 
November ISth speaks of the splendid 
impression made by this distinguished 
singer who enjoys a European leputa- 
tion: "Grace Henkel completely won her 
audience of Humboldt friends and scored 
an immediate success with her delight- 
fully pleasing lyric soprano voice. The 
singer's charming personality enhanced 
the interest in her recital and made a 
pleasing combination of beauty in vision 
and hearing. Mrs Henkel presented her 
nunioers with great sincerity and with 
the finish ot a true artist." 



Mme, Eva Gauthier Soloist at Mumcipal Pop Concert- Mieczyslaw Munz 

Applauded at Alice Seckels Matinee-Mme. Rosa Relda Cailleau Sings 

Representative Program-Henry Eichheim. Violinist, and Arthur 

Bhss, Pianist, Delight Audiences at Ida Scotfs Fortnightly 

BY ALFRED METZGER 



One of the gratifying signs in San 
Francisco's musical life is the faithful- 
ness with which the great musical public 
is attending the municipal symphony 
orchestra at the Exposition Auditorium. 
On Wednesday evening, November 26th, 
another audience, crowding this huge 
auditorium, was in attendance. It seems 
if the Musical Association wants to find 
out who eventually will support its con- 
certs, it must turn to the rank and file 
of the music lovers. If these audiences 
who come to the Auditorium to hear good 
music could be talked to without offend- 
ing a few so-called "public spirited citi- 
zens," the necessary funds to maintain 
the symphony orchestra would easily be 
forthcoming. Of course, we have no con- 
cert hall Here again the munificence of 
our "leading" citizens is apparent. One 
of these days someone will launch a 
movement to build a musicians' building 
containing a symphony hall without the 
consent of certain people only interested ' 
in themselves. 

It is a credit to San Francisco that the 
city government interests itself so vastly 
in music and gives thousands of people 
a chance to enjoy these feasts for so 
reasonable an entrance fee. Tschaikow- 
'sk.v's Fifth Symphony, which was re- 
Viewed a short time ago in these columns, 
aroused remarkable enthusiasm among 
these ten thousand people of various 
phases of life and conditions. It proves 
that really fine music is always enjoyed. 
The soloist was Mme. Gauthier. This 
artist seemed out ot place in the huge 
auditorium. Mme. Gauthier is best when 
among intimate surroundings. She has 
a special message that requires a special 
taste to appreciate. Every word must be 
undei stood and the artist's facial expres- 
sion noted. This was impossible in all 
parts ot the auditorium. 

The selections Mme. Gauthier sang are 
not among those that have brought her 
most of her fame. The Chinese Mother 
Goose Rhymes cannot be appreciated in 
a place ot the Auditorium's vastness, as 
their success depends so much upon in- 
flection and expression of voice. The 
Barber of Seville Aria is not exactly a 
work suited to Mme. Gauthier's art. No 
doubt she will have a finer opportunity at 
the Scottish Rite Auditorium, where she 
wi'l appear on Thursday evening (this is 
written on Tuesday) with the Chamber 
Music Society of San Francisco. For the 
sjuie reasons mentioned in connection 
with Mme. Gauthier's singing, we feel 
that Deems Taylor's Suite Through the 
Looking Glass is not suited to the vast- 
ness of the Exposition Auditorium. It is 
too intimate, too dainty, to be effective 
where there is so much loss of volume. 
Besides, we missed the lines so cleverly 
spoken by little Miss Lachmund. when 
this work was presented at the regular 
symphony concerts a short time ago. 

MIEC2YSLAW MUNZ — This interna- 
tionally known pianist gave a concert at 
the Fairmont Hotel on Monday afternoon, 
December 1st, as one of the events of the 
Alice Seckels Matinee Musicales. We 
had read and heard so much about the 
greatness of this artist that we were 
shocked to find our anticipations sadly 
uncalled for. How it is possible that 
people we know to possess intelligent 
appreciation ot music and experience in 
concert going cannot see the weakness 
ot this artist? We noted extraordinary 
speed in technic and a caressing touch. 
We are told that he is young and event- 
ually he will mature. But artistic in- 
stinct is not a matter of age. This must 
be born. It can not be acquired. 

Mr. Munz plays with a velocity posi- 
tively astounding, hut unfortunately he 
applies this velocity to everything he 



plays. He accelerates the tempi of a 
composition to a most reprehensible de- 
gree. Imagine the Beethoven Moonlight 
Sonata played almost twice as fast as 
we are used to hear it. Why, to us it 
seemed to be a veritable Moonshine So- 
nata. The Chopin compositions lost all 
vestige of suavity, poetic deliberation 
and singing character when played with 
the fierceness of slxty-miles-a-minute 
speed. This was especially true of the 
waltz. The Delibes number was almost 
unrecognizable as a waltz when Mr. 
Munz opened his technical exhanst and 
sped uphill in "high" without a moment's 
rest. Yes, it was astounding. It was 
"paralyzing." But it was not music. 

.As a final encore Mr. Munz played 
Kreisler's Liebesfreud. He took it with 
such speed that it seemed incredible. The 
second part was played as fast as the 
first and last parts. Now, we have heard 
Mr. Kreisler play this work time and 
time again. We studied piano and have 




MRS. E. R. PLACE 

•State Chairman of Sixth Biennial 

Contest of the National Federation 

of Music Clubs and President of 

the Allied Arts Club of 

San Francisco 

played most of the numbers Mr. Munz 
played frequently. Besides, we have 
heard practically all great pianists play 
these compositions repeatedly. And we 
have yet to hear these works played with 
such uncalled for speed as Mr. Munz 
played them. He played so fast that It 
was impossible to hear the themes at 
times, and quite frequently, during his 
chromatic scale runs, he had lo skip 
notes and sometimes failed to finish the 
run. But there seem to be pianists and 
critics who consider Mr. Munz a great 
artist. In Australia he received press 
notices of an extravagance matched by 
but few artists. What can be the matter 
with us? Fortunately for our peace of 
mind, we found a number ot prominent 
musicians, among them one or two very 
distinguished ones, and also one or two 
critics who assured us that we are atill 
sane. , 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank W. Healy left on 
the Overland Limited on Tuesday morn- 
ing for New York Clly to be present on 
the arrival from Rome of the Roman 
Choir. This Choir is to give an Ameri- 
can, Canadian, .Mexican and Cuban con- 
cert tour under Mr. Healy's management. 
From New York City. Mr. Hcaly will 
proceed lo Montreal, Canada to handle 
the details for three big concerts to be 
given there. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL RE\'IE\V 



December 5, 192' 



Worth Any Sacrifice 

The Stein-way tells how it may^ become yours 



ASteixway is such a human piano, and 
comes into such close association \\\x\\ 
people that it has acquired a deep understand- 
ing of human nature during the past seventy 
years. 

I am a Steinway. I, too, have acquired 
some knowledge of human hearts. And this is 
what I have noticed : 

That people place the most value, and take 
the greatest enjo>Tnent in possessing, those 
things for which they ha\e made some sacri- 
fice. 

To possess me, a Steinway piano, has called 
forth sacrifices in many a modest household. 
The Steinway that stands so proudly in the 
living room is probably there because it was 
earnestly wanted. 

That is why, altho my purchase price is 
higher than most pianos, possession of me gives 
to most people such true joy. They have 
wanted me because of what I represent. They 
have refused to be satisfied until they pos- 
sessed me. To possess me, they have made 
many little and big sacrifices. Established in 
such a home, is it any wonder that I am the 
proudest piano in the world ? 




One day a young couple came into Sherman, 
Clay & Co. and examined me critically. Then 
they turned to a salesman and said : 

"Our little daughter will be nine years old 
five years from now. She must begin her les- 
sons when she is nine years old. She should, if 
possible, begin them on a Steinway piano. If 
we pay you a small monthly sum, will you 
hold it for us, and credit the accumulating 
interest, against the day when our little daug- 
ter becomes nine years of age?" 



That was sacrifice. The young couple were 
earnestly endeavoring to accumulate the sum, 
or partial sum, of my purchase. To make cer- 
tain of their program, they were seeking to 
place that monthly sacrifice safely beyond any 
temptation to spend it for some transient pleas- 
ure. And when their little daughter possesses 
me, you can be very sure that I shall be a 
proud and happy piano. 

Is not that home itself meanwhile made 
happier, by the knowledge of this voluntary 
sacrifice? Will that home not tend to hold 
together, over the years, because of this very 
spirit? 

It is the privilege of a Steinway to be worth 
such efforts. Many a home that longs for a 
Steinway could have one, if a very little sacri- 
fice were systematically entered upon. 

I know that Sherman, Clay & Co. will be 
glad to explain why this sacrifice is so worth 
while. 

Sherman Ray & Go. 

Kearny and Sutter Sts., San Francisco 
CALIFORNIA-OREGON-WASHINGTON 



RENA 

LAZELLE 

SOPRANO 
San Francisco Opera Company 

)epartinent, San Fri 
c — ATHllable for 1 
Oratorio, Concert 



EMILIE LANCEL 

OPERATIC MEZZO-SOPRANO 

After Two Years' Absence in Europe 
Available For 

OPERA— ORATORIO— CONCERT 

Management ALICE SECKELS 
68 Post Street 

Residence: 778 Eighteenth Avenue, San Francisco 
Tel. Bayvlew 1461 



ANNIE LOUISE DAVID 

HARP SOLOIST AND TEACHER 

ON THE PACIFIC COAST DURING 
SEASON 1924-1925 

Address: Hotel Claremont, Berkeley 
Tel. Berkeley 9300 

Management Alice Seckels, 68 Post Street 
Tel. Douglas 7267 



PASMORE VOCAL STUDIOS 



R*a<. Berkale^ 



KARL RACKLE 



LAMBS CLUB, NEW YORK CITY 



ALICE GENTLE 

MANAGEMENT 

CATHARINE A. BAMMAN 
53 West 39th Street Newr York, N. Y. 



DOUGLAS SOULE-.Pianist 

ADVANCED PUPILS ACCEPTED 

Wedneadar and Friday Morniners at Studio; 902 

Koh.cr & Chaac Bide.. San Francisco. Telephone 

Kearnr S.154. Residence Studio: 150 Monte Vlata 

Ave.. Oakland. Telephone Piedmont 766. 



AUGUSTA HAYDEN 

SOPRANO 
Available for Concert* and Recltala 
Addresat 471 37th Avenue 
Tel. Pae. e.^2 

HOMER HENLEY 

BARITONE — TEACHER OF SINGING — CONDUCTOR 

Director California Clnb Choral 

An Oratorio Authority 

Reaideaee Studio; 1249 Bay. at Franklin. Tel. FtlL 10S3 

LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM 

CONTRALTO 

Teacker of Slnelne. Complete Course of Operatic Trabi- 

Ins. 2730 Pierce St. TeL FUbnore 45K3 

Dominican College School of Music 

SAN RAFAEL. CALIFORNIA 

Mnale Coursea Thoroneh and Proereaalve. Public School 

Mualc, Accredited Diploma 



MR. ANDREW BOGART 
Teacher of Singing 

Pupils Prepared for Opera, Oratorio, Church and 
Concert. New Address: Suite 600, Kohler & Chase 
BIdg., 26 O'Farrell Street. Telephone Douglas 9256 



WALLACE A. SARIN 

Orffanlst Temple Emanu E:1. Flrat Church of ChrUit Scl 
entlflt, Director Lorlns Club. S. F.. Wed.. 1915 Saeramenti 
Street, Phone W'evt 3753; Sat.. Flrat ChrUttaii Selenn 
Church, Phoce PMlImore 7920; Res. Studio. 31-12 Lewistoi 
Ave., Berkeley, Phone Piedmont 2428 

MISS DOROTHEA MANSFELDT 

Preparlns: Teacher for 

MRS. OSCAR MANSFELDT. PUnlst 

207 Cherry St.. Bet. Waahlnston & Clay Tel. Pae. »»0< 

The College of the Holy Names 

LAKE MERRITT, OAKLAND 

Complete Conaervatory Course — Piano. Harp. Vtolla, 

'Cello. Voice. Counterpoint. Harmony. History 

DURINI VOCAL STUDIO 



1072 Ellla St. 



Opera — Church — Oratorio 



TeL Weat SM 



PAUL STEINDORFF 

MASTER COACH 
Complete Grand and Light Opera Repertoire 



Miss Elizabeth Westgate 

Teacher of Piano, Organ, Harmony. Organist and Mnslcal 
Director of First Presbyterian Church, Alameda. Home 
Studio: 1117 PARI! STREET, ALAMEDA. Telephone Ala- 
meda 155. Thursdays, Merriman School, 507 Eldorado Ave.* 
Oakland. Telephone Piedmont 2770. 



MUSIC PRINTING? 

SCHOLZ, ERICKSON & CO., Inc. 

521 Howard Street Phone Douglaa 4273 

San Francisco 



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JOHN C. MANNINO, Director 
SX43 \raahlnrten Street Telephone Fillmore SM 

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DRAMATIC SOPRANO 

Absolute Method of Voice Upon the Breatk 

Monday and Thursday, 1006 Kohler & Chaae BuildtsS* 

Tel. Garfield 6723. Re«. Phone Prospect 426 



December 5, 1924 



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VOL, XLVII 



FRIDAY, DEC. 5, 1924 



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SUBSCRIPTIONS 
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TWENTY-FOURTH YEAR 



EDITORIAL DISCUSSION 



'' can not do any better than devote this space 
> to the reproduction of a very interesting and very 
isf statement concerning the adequacy of singing 
■J in English. This statement appeared in a letter 
in to the Chicago Tribune by Charles Henry Melt- 
tliH distinguished New York critic, and for five years 
I he Metropolitan Opera Association of New York 
<sistant manager. Mr. Meltzer is also an intema- 
ll.v known librettist, and therefore knows what he 
Iking about. We could not have expressed our 
1 better than Mr. Meltzer has done in the following 



(Continueci from Page 1. Col. 4) 

=^=^ Mme. Rose Relda Cailleau's Concert — the Ballroom of 
Editor ""^ Fairmont Hotel was well tilled on Monday evening, 

. December 1, with an audience that came to enjoy a con- 

rorma of (.grt i,y jjine. Rose Relda Cailleau, soprano, who has 
been such a favorite during a number of years. One of 
.Mme. Cailleaus principal Jutlflcations for public ap- 
proval is her intelligent arrangement of her programs 
and the uncompromising seriousness of her art. On this 
occasion she again demonstrated, as she has done so 
often before, that she understands the art of singing 
from the ground up and that she also comprehends the 
messages which the composers intend to transmit 
through their works. She succeeds in giving delicacy 
and poetry to the works of Mozart, Couperin, Handel 
Gaubert and Fourdrain and she also understands how to 
impart virility to the works of Reger. Loewe and Widor. 
Mme. Cailleau is one of the few artists who under- 
stand how to use their high notes without marring their 
fle.\ibility and the beauty of timbre. She is thoroughly 
aware of the necessity to produce colorature passages 
without noticeable effort and with accuracy as to pitch 
and technic. She phrases her songs with intelligence 
and natural artistic instinct and in fact reveals in 
everything she does the artist of experience and nat- 
ural adaptability. Her concert on this occasion again 
inspired her audience to spontaneous and prolonged ex- 
pressions of gratification. .Many a singer would gain 
in experience it attending a concert given by Mme. 
Cailleau. 

The soloist was assisted by Christine Howells Pfund, 
flutist, Relda .M. Cailleau, accompanist, and Lesie 
Moore, accompanist, all of whom reflected credit upon 
the concert. The complete program rendered on this 
occasion was as follows: II Re Pastore (Mozart), 
(flute obligato. Christine Howells Pfund), Rose Relda 
Cailleau; (a) Wiegenlied (Reger), (b) Niemand Hat's 
Gesehen (Loewe), (c) By the Fountain (Ware), (d) 
Robin's Song (White) (flute obligato). Rose Relda 
Cailleau; flute solo — (a) La Fleurie (Couperin), (b) 
Praludium (Handel), (c) Sur I'Eau (Gaubert), (d) 
Scherzo (Widor) Christine Howells Pfund. Jessie 
Moore. Accompanist; Fabliau de Manon (Massenet), 
Filles de Cadix iDelibes), Oasis (Foudrain), Chanson 
Norvegienne (Foudrain), Rose Relda Cailleau; Cradle 
Song (Waldrop). When I Was Seventeen (Kramer), 
The Look (Hausmann), The Singre (Maxwell), Rose 
Relda Cailleau, -Accompanist, Relda M. Cailleau. 



' Y"u have allowed Charles D. Isaacson to 'explain' 
rum Ins standpoint. 'Why Opera Is Not in English.' I 
lopi- .vou will find room for my reply. 

"Tli'-re are more 'reasons' for the present exclusion of 
In- language of Shakespeare. Milton and Coleridge from 
'ur np,-ra houses than Mr. Isaacson could conveniently 
111 iitiun. One is the inherited snobbery of many opera- 
;otis. who pretend that they enjoy and understand the 
iften ludicrous distortions of foreign languages sung to 
hem. .\nother (and most important) is the persistence 
<f a system devised wholly in the interest of foreign- 
lorn singers, directors, publishers and conductors, many 
if whom are utterly out of sympathy with .American 
ispirations and hungry to protect the virtual monopoly 
i-vhich they have, God knows why, been permitted to 

!)Ossess here. 
"Like Mr. Insull, I am myself British born. But I will 
ight till I drop tor .American art in America and for 
he use of our own tongue in opera. Mr. Isaacson was 
•ight when he suggested that, in the past, the English 
vords heard in opera have usually been abominable. 
|3ut he was wrong when he seemed to assume that what 
liad been bad and even ridiculous in the past could 
:iot be made good in the present or the future. 
' "To find easy, fluent, and sensible, perhaps also poet- 
Leal, equivalents for foreign librettos, in English, is— 
IS I know from experience— one of the most difficult 
asks imaginable. But. on my honor as a librettist, they 
:an be found. Possibly in some cases they have been 
ound already. Let me add that Mr. Isaacson errs 
itrangely in stating ex cathedra that 'whenever the 
iiperas have been given in English they (the audience) 
lave been smaller than when they were not.' 

"Mr. Insull and, I believe. Mr. Polacco, put that issue 
K) the test in 1922, when they gave one performance of 
Lohengrin' (nih a wretched libretto) in English. The 
argest audience ever seen in the Auditorium on a Sun- 
lay night packed the house from floor to gallery on that 
iccasion. Nothing, of course, can be accomplished thor- 
lUghly-with even the best English libretto.s, till the 
ingers— native and foreign — are trained, and compelled 
ly contract, if necessary, to sing the language of these 
Jnited States clearly and intelligently in our opera 
lOuses. American artists are obliged to sing French in 
■Tance. German in Germany, and Italian in Italy. 

"It IS the duty of the Chicago Civic Opera Company 
secure the librettos and train the singers. There 
hould be sense, as well as sound, in opera— which is 
ausic-drama." CHARLES HENRY MELTZER, 

"ritic and librettist, for five years assistant to the man- 
agement of the Metropolitan Opera Company. 



Irs Nellie Strong Stevenson, pianist and lecturer, pre- 
ented a most enjoyable Mendelssohn program on Mon- 
r.y, .November luth, before the Pacific Coast Women's 
ress Association. Mrs. Stevenson gave a sketch of 
lendelssohn's life and work and played some beauti- 
ul selections. She was assisted by Mrs. Teresa Turn 
iuden. Mrs. C. A. Minty and Mrs. Theolene Fohlson 
nd she gave the Overture to Midsummer Night's Dream 
s a piano duet with Mrs. Mary Gardener. The audi- 
nee was unusually enthusiastic. 



Fortnightly Concert— Henry Eichheim, violinist, gave 
a Sonata Recital in the Colonial Ballroom of the St. 
Francis Hotel on Monday evening. December 1st, rep- 
resenting one of the Fortnightlys which are being given 
under the direction of Ida G. Scott. The program con- 
sisted of Sonata in E minor (Veracini), Sonata G 
minor (Debussy) and Sonata in E minor (Goossens. 
Inasmuch as we attended the Cailleau concert on the 
same evening we were unable to hear the one compo- 
sition of the old school which possibly would have 
appealed to us more than the two of the ultra modern 
school which we had an opportunity to listen to. Both 
the Debussy and Goossens Sonata revealed those ele- 
ments that do not appeal to our personal taste possibly 
because we do not understand their significance. There 
were people present who seemed to enjoy these works 
and obtained a great deal of pleasure from listening 
to them. The writer can not see any reason why they 
should be performed unless It is because they are 
played elsewhere in the world. 

Unless a composition gives you a defnite message and 
you are able to picture to yourself certain emotional 
conditions while listening to them jve regard a composi- 
tion of no value to us. We asked some of those people 
who claimed they enjoyed the works why they did so, 
and they could not give us an intelligent reason why 
they enjoyed them, except that they did so. As long 
as such is the case we can not say that works of this 
character fill a certain need in our musical life, except 
as they may represent a transition period during which 
composers are groping for something new without hav- 
ing as yet obtained a definite objective. Dissonances, 
sudden changes of themes, incoherent development of 
thematic treatment, innumerable sudden changes of 
keys, inharmonic phrases, disagreeable and apparently 
meaningless meanderings in deserts of monotonous 
repetitions may eventually please future generations, 
but to us they do not possess any attraction. We do 
not mean to say that we are right and others are 
wrong, but we cannot see any artistic musical values 
in either the Debussy or Goossens Sonata as presented 
on this occasion. 

Of course, this was not the fault of Henry Eichheim, 
who is unquestionably an intelligent and thorough musi- 
cian, who understands the intricacies of the classic 
school. He played with enthusiasm and with evident 
comprehension of that which he was doing. In other 
words he kept faith with his audience to do the best 
he could under the circumstances. We admire Mr. 
Eichheim both as an interpreter and theoretician 
Ethel Roe Eichheim at the piano also showed herself 
thoroughly competent to cope with the difficulties put 
into her way. She played with technical facility as 
well as comprehensive expression. She also is a musi- 
cian of vitality. Arthur Bliss, the noted English com- 
poser, preceded the playing of the Goossens Sonata 
with a few words stating that he expected the audience 
to be unreceptive to the composition. He thought 
they would not like it. He was right in the majority 
of cases including ourselves. Some said they liked 
it when they really did not, and others we suppose did 
like it. There is no accounting tor tastes. If there 



liad been anything In the work comprehensible to us we 
would have liked It because .Mr. Bliss played so 
superbly In every way. 

Margaret Tilly's Concert— Under the direction of the 
Elwyn Concert Bureau, Margaret Tilly, a pianist, who 
enjoys an enviable reputation in England. Canada, 
Australia and the Eastern part of America, made her 
debut in San F'ranclsco at the Ballroom of the Fair- 
mont Hotel last Tuesday evening in presence ot a large 
audience. There can not be any question regarding 
Miss Tilly's qualification as an exceptionally well 
equipped pianist. She has plenty of technic. possesses 
considerable emotional qualities and gives evidence of 
intelligent comprehension of the more severe works of 
the masters. Her prodigious memory never fails her 
and her Judgment In interpretation convinces the hearer 
that she is superior to many pianists who appear here 
with better known names. 

Miss Tilly iiredominates in the purely academic phase 
of piano literature. She plays her Bach with unques- 
tionable understanding of its scholastic side, but some- 
how misses a little ot the emotional phase of the master. 
Since, however, the great Bach interpretors may be 
counted on the fingers of one hand, and since a good 
many compositions of llach are Intended to be primarily 
academic. Miss Tilly is justified to announce a Bach 
recital In the near future, and the writer for one shall 
be interested enough to keep himself informed of the 
impending date. Apparently placing intellectuality 
above emotionalism Miss Tilly seems to be somewhat 
heavy in her understanding of Chopin. But this is 
purely a matter of taste, and no doubt there are some 
people in harmony with her on this subject. 

We certainly admire the pianist's accuracy ot technic. 
occasional poetic insight into the composer's work, and 
her excellent discrimination in program building and 
reading ot the ultra moderns like Poulenc. Ireland and 
Debussy. If she would occasionally emphasize certain 
rhythms just a bit more noticeably, she would add 
greatly to the already considerable pleasure with which 
we listened to her praiseworthy performance. The pro- 
gram was as follows: Nachspiel (Arr. by Harold 
Bauer) (.lohann Christian Kittel). Fughetta (Arr. by 
Harold Bauer) (Gottlieb Muffatt). Pastorale. Scherzo 
(Scarlatti) ; Fantasia in C minor. Invention in F, Pre- 
lude and Fugue in A fiat (Book 1) (Bach); Sonata in 
F minor, Op. 57 (Appassionata) (Beethoven); Four Pre- 
ludes. Etude in G sharp minor. Scherzo in C sharp 
minor (Chopin). Mouvements Perpetuels (Poulenc). 
The Fire of Spring. Prelude (John Ireland); Reflets 
dans I'eau (Debussy), Etude en forme de valse (Saint- 
Saens. 



E. ROBERT SCHMITZ HERE IN JANUARY 

E. Robert Schmitz. acclaimed on three continents one 
of the outstanding pianist virtuosos and pedagogues, 
left New York after his recital there on October 22nd 
for his coast to coast tour, on which he is booked to 
capacity. He will hold a master class in San Francisco 
from January 12th to 2.'itb. This is a rare opportunity 
for pianists, teachers and music lovers to come Into 
contact with a musical genius. Mr. Schmitz is giving 
a new impetus to the musical and cultural life of this 
country tlirough his pedagogy ot piano terhnlc. which 
is recognized as epoch-making, not only by musicians 
but by many prominent scientists. His friendship and 
collaboration with men of tlie calibre of Debussy, Saint- 
Saens, D'Indy, Widor, Ravel and Milhaud bespeak his 
thorough appreciation of what is vluable In the work 
ot the moderns. Among his friends also are Maeterlinck 
and D'.Annunzio. while his interest in science has closely 
affiliated him with some of the greatest scientists of 
France. 

As a result of thorough musicianship, Mr. Schmitz' 
perception of the beauties and elusive qualities attained 
by many of the great artists enables him, by his analyti- 
cal power, to describe and Impart these elusive qualities. 
The course ot study used in his classes is broad, un- 
biased, thorough and logical — the result of research, 
observation and experience, gained as a concert pianist, 
conductor, lecturer and master. His teaching places 
great stress on the fact that all theories of piano technic 
today must be evolved from the full resources of the 
modern piano and not hindered by the traditions which 
have been established in the past by masters who wore 
considering pianos of lesser powers and sensitiveness. 
His teaching of technic has grown out of the modern 
piano together with the unlimited colorful vision of the 
modern school of composition. 

San Francisco is fortunate in having Mr. Schmitz 
booked here for several appearances — with the Sym- 
phony Orchestra for a pair ot concerts, in a piano recital 
at the Scottish Rite Auditorium and in a lecture-recital 
on the Fortnightly aeries. .Mr. Schmitz will be under 
the management of Ida G. Scott while In San Francisco. 



CONSERVATORY SCHOLARSHIP FUND CONCERT 

Miss Ada Clement, pianist, will give a recital for the 
benefit of the Scholarship Fund nt the San Francisco 
Conservatory of Music, on Wednesday evening. Decem- 
ber 10th, in the Gold Room, Fairmont Hotel. Miss 
Clement will be assisted by the noted English cellist. 
May Mukle; by Edouard Dcru, violinist; Mary Pasmore, 
violinist, and Emil Hahl, viola. This fund, raised by 
subscriptions and an annual concert, was Inaugurated 
in 1921, and enables talented pupils who wish to follow 
a musical career, but whose means are limited, to obtain 
the best instruction The tickets arc on sale at Sher- 
man, Clay & Co. and at the Conservatory. The follow- 
ing program will be offered: Cello solo — Concertino 
(Ariosti-Elkus), May Mukle; piano — In der Nacht (Schu- 
mann). Etude E. Opus 10 (Chopin), Scherzo, C sharp 
(Chopin), Ada Clement; Piano Quintet (Ernest Bloch), 
Ada Clement, Edouard Deru, Mary Pasmore, Emil Hahl 
and May Mukle. 



PACIFIC COAST MCSICAF. RlAllAV 



December 3. 1'I24 



Music Club Activities 



Pupils' Concerts and Studio News 



The Singing Society Aipenroesli pave ils winter con- 
cert at California Hall on Sunday evening. November 
23rd. under the able direction of Frederic Bruesch- 
weiler. The soloists were Mrs. Gertrude Weideman. 
soprano. Mrs. Maria Nichlas. mezzo soprano. Mrs. 
.\nge Mohr, alto. Miss Edna Horan. violin, and Marion 
Vecki. baritone. The program consisted of a number 
of German choruses from mixed voices among which 
were two by Mr. Brueschweiler entitled Motto and 
Under the Linden. The concluding number consisted 
of Schon Ellen by .Max liruch. The chorus consists 
of a number of well blending voices which appear to 
make excellent headway under Mr. Brueschweilers 
direction. While not exactly thoroughly trained ma- 
terial the members of the chorus make up in en- 
thusiasm and spontaneity what they may lack in ma- 
terial and the appreciation of the audience was evident 
throughout the concert. 

Miss Edna Horan played her violin solos — Zigeuner- 
weisen (Sarasaiei and Slumber Song from .Mignon 
I Brueschweiler I with excellent tone, discriminating 
phrasing and splendid temperament. She mertited the 
enthusiastic applause and demands tor encores that 
the audience was eager to bestow upon her. Marion 
Vecki sang his baritone solos with resonant voice, 
accurate intonation and an unusually fine sense of 
emotional values. Both his solo numbers and his 
solos in the choruses stood out prominently. Mrs. 
Weideman sang with well-placed and flexible voice and 
proved that she possessed exceptional taste in in- 
terpretation. We were sorry to be compelled -to leave 
before the close of the program but if the beginning 
was any criterion for the rest the audience no doubt 
enjoyed every moment. 

Mi-. Brueschweiler labored under some difficulty when 
he tried to conduct the chorus while sitting at the 
piano. It would seem that both the choius and the 
director would find it convenient to obtain the ser- 
vices of an accompanist so that the director can de- 
vote his entire attention to the chorus. 

The Oroville Musical Association presented Antoine de 
Vally the noted Belgian tenor, assisted by Miss Sally 
Osborne, pianist, under the management of Ada Jordan 
Prav. at the Gardella Theater, Oroville. on Monday 
evening. November 17th. A large audience showed its 
appreciation by geneious applause and demands tor 
encores Mr. DeVally singing with splendid voice and 
taste the following program: Messiah— Comfort Ye. 
Mv People (G. F. Handel). Semele — O Sleep. Why Dost 
Thou Leave Me (G. F. Handel). Iphigenie en Tauride. 
Recitatif et Air de Pylade, Unis des la plus tendre 
enfance tCh. Gluckl. Come Unto Me lA. Scailatti). 
Thou Art So Like a Flower (G. W. Chadwick). Two 
Dreams Dwell in Her Eyes iF. Maurer). Down in the 
Forest (Sir Landon Ronald). Snow Fairies (Cecil For- 
syth). .\t Night (S. Rachmaninoff), Pianoforte Solo — 
Bunte Blatter ( R. Schumann). Waltz. A fiat m ijor 
(Chopin). L'Africaine— Grand Air from Opera (G. Mey- 
erbeer). Le Roi d'Ys — Aria from Opera (Ed. Lalo). 
Flemish Folksongs — Heeft bet Roox-e miV'e Ceuren 
(Peter Benoit). Wiegeliedje (Ed. Keurvels). French 
Melodies — Reverie (Ad Locher). Si ler fleurs avient des 
yeux (J. Massenet). Bergere legere (J. B. Weckerlmi. 
Reverie dautomne (R. d'Esclavy). 

The Players' Club has been giving an exccl'.eut pro- 
duction entitled Frivolities under the direction of Reg- 
inald Travers at the players' Theater en Bu3h . treet 
The perfirmance is more in the natu.e of high class 
vaudeville than a musical presentation i ut aiaojg the 
cast are such will known artisls 3s My. tie DiUiWall, 
Beatriz Michelena, Reginald T avers anJ ct crs that 
give the production a professonal and dliniuel flavor. 
Miss Dingwall and Miss Miohe.enj a.e in excellent 
voice and create splendid impressions on every occa- 
sion. Mr. Travers shows his versatilitj tct In ccmedy 
and tragedy. Rosetta Hake;-, Lenore K.t l.y, i e en 
Crocker. Virginia Whitehead. Virginia Scl.c- y il .an 
Clark and Betty Horst add to the varic y a.d Lat;r.a ..- 
ment of the production by means ot ittcii.n, j:. : 
and graceful dances. J Wheaton Chambers, J. D. hajil- 
ton. Parmer Fuller Lewis Martin. William Cocks Rose 
Bell. Peggy Thorns n. David Eisenbach, Louis White, 
Laurelle Gaines, Marion Southern. Carley Mills a.: J 
Feliz Andres. Jr. a S3 contribute their share toward l.ic 
exceptionally clever and extensive program. 

The Pacific Musical Society gave the sencond concert in 
November at the Fairmcnt Hotel on Friday evening, 
November 28th. Tft a)tis's appearing on f-^it ccca- 
sion were Charles Hart and Emilie Lancel w t'l Walter 
Flank Wenzel as accom nnist. Mr. Hart added to his 
already enviable reputation by interpreting Schumann's 
Scenes from Childhood with decidedly musicianly skill 
revealing both technical anl emotional resources. He 
showed his \'er9itility by playing a group of Chopin 
works with decided pcetic instinct and his presentation 
of the Tschaikowsky-Pabst version of Eugene Onegin 
proved exceptionally vigoroi s and dramatic. Mr. Hart 
is one of the foremost artiss residing in San Fran- 
cisco and his public aneannces always reflect credit 
upon the community which he has chosen as his abode. 
Miss Lancel was in splendid voice and sang with even 
more expression than during her own concert She 
selected a group of songs by Schumann, Fourdrain, 
Debussy and Eraser and an aria from Donizetti's Favor- 
ita and proved herself not only a singer of gratifying 
artistic resources but one who is able to rivet the in- 
terest of her audience as long as she sings. 



Giacomo Minkowski 



JOS. GEO. JACOBSON PUPILS RECITAL 

The second monthly recital of the Joseph George 
Jacobson Piano-Class was held on November 14th. at 
tlie Baldwin Studios on Sutter Street. The hall was 
packed to overflowing and in spite of the inconvenience 
the audience was most enthusiastic while listening to 
the interesting program The opening number was a 
Polkj by Waldteutel arranged by Mr. Jacobson for two 
pianos twelve hands. It was well played by Joseph 
Bernstein. Howard Potts, Charles Doran. James Mathie 
Edward Karlin and Manuel Sousa. The next number 
was the first movement of the Beethoven Sonata Op. 
31 No. 8, and a dainty little composition by Albeniz 
played by Ju'io Valdez. The young man possesses 
talent and a nice tone. 

Miss Myrtle Waitman then followed with the last 
movement of the C minor Concerto by Beethoven. At 
each recital the young rliyer appears, a decided im- 
provement is noted. Technically she has advanced 
much and in time her touch esjecially in a soft singing 
melody rart will become better. She deserves much 
praise for the fine rendition of the Polonaise by Aren- 
sky for two pianos which she played with Gladys ^van- 
eile W'ilson both demonstrating fine musicil ability and 
understanding. The latter young lady also distinguish- 
ed herself in her solos, playing the Lento by Cyril Scott 
and Percy Grainger's Country Gardens She is becom- 
ing a good pianist. 

Florence Read then played Mendelssohn's Spinning 
Song and a Hungarian Dance by Brjhms-Philipp. The 
second number was liked best As usual Marian Patricia 
Cavanaugh received great applause tor her playing ot 
Liszt's Liebestrcum. Poldini's March No. 2 and the 
Fairy Tales by Raff. The last number p'eased most, 
although it arouses wonder that a child can play the 
Liszt number in the manner she did Sam Rodetsky 
did fine work when he played the Konzertstueck by 
Weber. He was never heard to play better, his attacks 
are clear and precise and his octaves brilliant and 
strong. It he works hard to acquire a mole velvety 
touch in the pianissimi parts he will become a pianist 
to be reckoned with. 

An added attraction to the program was a group of 
songs by Mr. Jacobson sung in a charming manner by 
Mrs. Clinton B Smith. Combined with a pleasing per- 
sonality she possesses a flexible clear soprano voice and 
the auditors were quick to recognize the cha'lenge to 
their admiration. Each of the songs was written in a 
distinct and characteristic mood and Mr. Jacobson 
showed l:imself to be an ingenious composer and, in 
the playing ot the orchestral pirts to the concertos. 
a good musician. 



MUNICIPAL POP CONCERT 

The third municipal "pop" concert of the 1924-25 
seiies will be staged in Civic Auditorium on the night 
of December 19th by the San Francisco Symphony 
rrciestra. .Mfred Hertz conductor, with Cecilia Hansen, 
brilliant young Russian violinist, as guest artist. In 
announcing Miss Hansen's appearance here. Supervisor 
En-met J. Hayden. chairman ot the Auditorium Commit- 
-..ee, declares he is giving San Francisco an opportunity 
o. hearing one ot the greatest ai lists ot the concert 
stage. She has been characterized by critics as the 
'greatest wcman violinist in the world." 



The IVii I Val ey Musical Club presented Radiana Piz- 
n:vr, mezzo contialto. Dorothy Pasmore, 'cellist, and 
Henvlk Gerdrum, a^comrauist, on November ISth at 
tie Citdror Art Club House, in Mill Valley. Tiiere w-is 
mucn enti.iisiasm au(j many encores weie added to the 
program, whlc. w;s as follows: Wldmung (Scliumann). 
I u 1 :s. wie c.ne Blume (Schumann), Marienwurmchen 
(Schumann) Er ist's (Sc-humann), Radiani Pazmor: 
Etude, Op. 27 IChoyin), Lullaby tCyiil Scott), Musette 
(Sibelius). Dorothy I'lsmore; An Old Carol (Roger 
Qullter), Five Ejcs (C. /rmstrong Gibbsl, Where Cow- 
■: 1 s Glow (H. Biclforl Fasmore), At the Well (Hage- 
raaa). Radiana Pazmor: I.e»wunden (Grieg), Vito (Fop- 
i^cr;, Dorothy Pasmore; Viel'e Chanson Espagnoie 
(Louis Aubert). Mignonette (Weckerlin), Chere Nuit 
(with 'Cello Obligato) (llacl-elet), Radiaua Pazmor. 



MARRIED FLIRTS AT WARFIELD 

An intensely interesting drama of love and marriage 
is Married Flirts, coming to the Warfield tor the week 
starting next Saturday. This story, an adaptation ot 
Louis Joseph Vance's famous novel, is the finest dra- 
m;itic achievement credited to the Metro-Goldwyn direc- 
torial stafl' this season, and brings together a trio of our 
most popular screen stars. Pauline Frederick, known 
and beloved by followers of both the stage and the 
screen, has one of the leads. Mae Busch, rated as one 
ot the most beautiful ot the new stars, is also featured, 
while Conrad Nagel, cl osen as the lover in Elinor 
Glyn's most recent production. His Hour, will be seen 
in the role of lover. Hcntley Gordon and several others 
also have prominent parts. Robert Vignola directed the 
picture. Fanchou & Marco's Ideas will also be a feature 
ot the bill presenting: Oswald's Orchestra, Gino Severi 
and the Music Masters 



E mily Lees, an exceptionally gifted violinist, the pupil 
of Guiseppe Jolluin, will give a recital on December 
13th in the studio of her tea: her. Upon this occasion 
Miss Lees wi'l play the Bruch Concerto and (he Cesar 
Fianck Sonata and a group of interesting shoit num- 
bers. Miss Lees will appear in a public recital some 
time in January. 



The Most Popular 

CHRISTMAS GIFT 

The New Necklaces— Smart Paris- 
ian Styles in Great Variety — The 
Unusual in Jewelry and Wrist 
Watches — A Complete Line of 
Jewelry — Reasonable Prices 



J. E. BIRMINGHAM 

Palace Hotel, Opposite Rose Room 

(Main Corridor) 

THE PALACE HOTEL JEWEL SHOP 



FREDERIC 

POWELL 

VOICE SPECIALIST 
TEACHER OF SINGING 

RESTORATION OF LOST OR 
IMPAIRED VOICES 

705 Kohler &. Chase BIdg., Tuesdays ani Fridays 
Residence Phone Sunset 6524 



Myra Palache 

PIANIST 

LECTURES ON MUSIC 
APPRECIATION 



FraiU'isco .Adll-ess. 2o20 i:nion St 

Phone \\ ainut fi:j» 
On \Veilnesd.-i5-. a p. ni. to 8 p. in. 



Tickets No'w Selling 

.41 SinTnian. Claj- <V Co.. for the FullutvinK 



^ 



BRASLAU 



COLUMBIA THEATRE 

0\H t'<).\fP,KT 

NEXT SUNDAY AFTERNOON 




St. Denis 

Aiiteriea's <^ireat Dancer 

TED SHAWN - 



CURRAN 
WEEK OF DECEMBER 15 



lilltnller Mtisie 



-( onipany of 40 




IV1ISCI-IA 

i\m 



k\^IOLIIVI8T 

\!j ]j^ Last Recital 

Columbia Theater, Sunday Aft., Dec. 21st 



DcccnilicT 



I'Afil'K' (OASr Ml'SRAJ. KI'Al I'.W 



MUSIC IN LOS ANGELES 

By BRUNO DAVID USSHER 



LOS ANGELES, December 1.— Those who love unusual 
choral music are advised to attend the benefit concert 
to be given for the recently formed Russian Art Society. 
Then the chorus of the Hay Cities Musical Association, 
under modest Altschuler's baton, will repeal the Rus- 
sian section of last night's program rendered with over- 
whelminSrsuccess at the Ocean Park Municipal Audi- 
torium. ' 
They vaM also hear a chorus vocally good, well 
I trained, fntelligent musically and, which is more, high 
I spirited with love for music. Last evening's program 
t opened the second season of the organization headed by 
j Mrs. Joseph Zuckerman. It found .Modest Altschuler, 
director of the Russian Symphony, and but less than 
two months conductor of the Bay Cities' chorus, mar- 
shalling his forces, his singers responding to him as 
! if they had enjoyed mutual work of considerably longer 
duration. I use the word "enjoyed " purposely, for that 
'. is the feeling one senses to prevail amidst this chorus, 
; which listens to its own singing and hence makes the 
i concert a constantly growing climax. Predictions are 
; dangerous things, but I venture to say that this chorus 
, of ilO odd men and women under Altschuler will before 
long and with artistic Justification be able to bid for 
', choral honors of Southern California. 

.Massenet's cantata. Eve, a work typical of this French 
composer in its luscious warmth of emotion and grace- 
ful suaveness of melody, opened the concert. Not an 
easy work by any means, yet sung with understanding, 
feeling and good intonation. Altschuler had rearranged 
the orchestral part effectively for string quartet, piano, 
harps and flutes, the latter of the Los Angeles Flute 
Club. The lions' share fell to the Russian String Quar- 
tet, Calmon I.uboviski, principal. It sounded like a dou- 
ble quartet in tone volume, playing excellently, Mrs. 
M. Hennion Robinson, as during the Russian selections, 
proved herself more than an accompanist. Of these 
Russian songs I hope to speak more fully when the 
chorus appears at the Russian benefit December 28 in 
Philharmonic .\uditorium. Limited space allows me to 
state only such selections as the Song of the Volga 
Boatman, or the very difficult but touchingly sung 
Plaintive from Borodine Prince Igor were deeply im- 
pressive. To hear a California chorus render Russian 
choral music in Russian with profundity of expression. 
is an experience one will remember. Altschuler's own 
atmospheric Soldiers' Song was likewise encored, the 
group including also Tschaikowsky and Ivanow choruses. 
This Russian group in particular reveals the cultural 
sincerity of communities who have risen thereby far 
beyond the mere status of pleasure resorts. Much praise 
is due the soloists, Iva Manners, soprano; A. J. Kissel- 
burgh, baritone; William Pilcher, tenor. Kisselburgh 
offered the most artistic reading, though taking over the 
part at short notice. His interpretation was compelling. 
His is a splendidly vibrant voice, which he moderates 
admirably. Diction is clear. Miss Hanners' soprano is 
of exceptional limpid sweetness and clarity, to which 
she adds a fascinating element of emotion which roots 
deeply in the music she sings. William Pilcher, tenor, 
was heard to good advantage, though in a lesser attrac- 
tive part, of which, however, he made much, winning 
cordial applause. 

Fusion of the Southland Song Festival Association 
with the Civic Music and Art Association of Southern 
California is to be welcomed. It is a step toward a more 
permanent and therefore perhaps more economical plan 
of holding community sings in the parks of Los Angeles. 
The Southland Song Festival Association, headed by 
Mrs .Martha McCann, president of the Los Angeles Park 
Commission, proposed a series of twelve community 
sings with band music during January and February. 
For this purpose William Barnhart, Eastern community 
song leader and one of its earliest exponents, was 
engaged The objection has been raised to .Mr. Barn- 
hart's coming that equally good loaders are available 
here. However, our own community music men will 
be able to stand comparison, and an infusion of new 
human material may add impetus. It is not a happy 
fact that the advent of a visitor was necessary to move 
the finance committee of the City Council into granting 
an appropriation of $5,100 for these twelve sings. The 
City Council vetoed this appropriation. Since then 
negotiations between the two above-mentioned organ- 
izations were opened. The Civic Music and Art Asso- 
ciation of Southern California, Ben F. Pearson, presi- 
dent, has for two seasons done good work along the 
Imes of community music. Its music week presenta- 
tions were formidable. It has for almost a year stimu- 
lated and guided preparations for an all-Southern Cali- 
fornia Eisteddfodd and similar community music move- 
ments. Its work is scheduled in a fashion to lead to 
permanency. From what could be learned about the 
Song Festival under the Barnhart direction it was to 
be of ephemcreal character. Under the fusion of the 
two organizations the Southland Song Festival Asso- 
ciation will become a department of the Civic Music 
and Art Association of Southern California under the 
auspices of which the sings will bo held with Mr. Barn- 
hart and perpetuated after his return east. At this new 
development designed for more lasting work the atti- 
tude of the City Council has changed favorably and a 
sanction of the $5,100 appropriation is expected in well 
informed sources. This should be the case. The moral 
and therefore civic value of these sings is unquestioned 
Los Angeles as a municipality is sadly lacking in giving 
music to the public-frequenting parks. Long Beach 
has a $120,000 budget for music and particularly for its 
band. Venice has set aside $40,000 tor its band alone. 
Los Angeles as a city is a musical or rather an unmusi- 
cal miser. 



linlhaiu ensemble iilaying opened the third season 
ol Ihe Los Angeles Chamber Music Society before an 
elite audience which crowded Ihe Uilimore Hotel music 
room yesterday. Sylvain Noack, Henry Svedrotsky. 
Molins: Kniile Perir. viola, and Ilya Hronson. cello ren- 
dered a program of much charm— Josef Suk's qiiartet 
Opus 11 in H flat major and Hugo Wolf's Italian Serenade. 
Ihe p ayers are too well known to require commenda- 
tion. .Mnie .lulia Bal de Zuniga. Helgian pianist, was guest 
artist during the performance of the C Minor Quartet 
Opus 15 by the lute French composer, Gabriel Faure. 
Mme. de Zuniga has not been heard here before and 
made a decidedly favorable impression. She is a player 
of ample technie and fine sense of rhythm and tone 
color. As during the string quartets, so in the Faure 
work, balaiice was good .Messrs. Erwin Fuhrman an.l 
Merle Armitage. who are managing the concerts this 
year, may well be satisfied with their initial success 
D, '^ 1° ll® *'°P^'' "^'" ^^""y "'I' '■""ow the policy of 
Blanche Rogers Lott, who guided the artistic destinies 
ot the series organized by her two years ago, and will 
include chamber music works for wind instruinent and 
harp, a feature that was greatly appreciated under the 
Lott regime. 

W. Richard Culberson, artist student of Roland Paul 
well-known voice teacher, sang a difficult program in a 
manner that would become well many profess"ona■s^ 
he uses wen" "mf ^'f ^ baritone of good quality which 
he uses well. His interpretations show depth and are 
enhanced by clear diction. Mr. Culberson's achievement 
IS all the more remarkable, as he has also atta ned sue 
generous."""''" -'^"'"""^'^ ''""' ^ '^■•R'^ -"<»ence was 

Victor Edmonds, eminent tenor, stirred his audience 
when singing before the Shakespeare Club of Pasadena 

n„ rch"/' .H '. '" '"'°'*" "' "^« Fi--^' Presbyterian 
Uiurch ot that community. During December Mr 
Ldmonds. in addition to various recitals, is booked lor 
five oratorio appearances, including the Bach Ora orio 
to be given at Philharmonic Auditorium December 2181 
when he sings with Sophie Braslau, contralto of the 
Metropolitan Opera Company. "■•rauo oi the 



STEINWAY 




^ 



WORK of art is a work of 
art because it says more than 
it says." 

The Steinway is es,sentially a 
work of art — somcthinK more than 
materials and mechanism, the art, 
the soul lies behind. 

Thus the Steinway represents 
the sum total of perfection in pianos. 

sou,h COMPANY 

Broadway ^7)5,. Stcinwfly House 



FITZGERALD'S- for the cAd-VM„cemc,„ of 3Wus,. 



Eleanor Woodford 

the latter is in Europe, and was chosen from a list of 
twenty applicants for the position ot Soloist of the Teiiinle 
Baptist Church of Los Angeles, In addition to a vofce of 

She ZTl" '■"""^; '^"^ Po-'^^^^^e" a magnetic personality 
bhe uses the sweet-toned, singing 

KNABE 

exclusively, and s.iys. "It is the perfection of harmony." 



niLL STREET ^^ 



AT 7S7~T2& 



LOS ANGELES 




ROSEMARY ROSE 



A Singer Who Teaches— Consolidates Her Studios 

Formerly of Milwaukee, Sheboygan 

and Plymouth 

In Los Angeles 

-l:l7 so. Ivl0>1l(lltl<: STIIKKT TKI,. .VITIMN 

AuiillloiiM lly ADiKiliitnielit Only 

llu<li llrudiiian, llrelalrar 



CIIAHLKS HOWKS 

TEACHER OF VOICE 

J-lll .S. (irnnil \ h-.T. l-hoii.- 5.-.<lPir.. I.oa < nKrlra 

L. E. Behymer 

MANAGER OF DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS 

Executive Officei: 

/06 Auditorium BIdg., Loi Angalo* 



ABBIE NORTON JAMISON 

PIANO — HAKMO.M — VOCAI. COACH 

SiM'i'lal I'Iniio \iirmul Cliiioiri. 
Stndlol 002 Southern CnlKurnln MuhIc Co. Illile. 



Alexander Bevani 

Al.l. III(AN< lil'.S <IK TIIK 

VOCAL ART 



1-17 \V 



S<ree 



■leplinny llcnc 



Homer Crunn, composer-pianist, played an interesting 
prosram of his own compositions before the .MacDowell 
Club. Of his newer works, the Fantasie Suite and 
California Suite are Indian songs. The Fantasie Suite 
is altogether one of his most convincing and in itse'f a 
distinctive work. It has strength of feeling and of 
thematic conception In fact, it is somewhat of the 
MacDowellian character, yet not reminiscent at all, but 
so by its very nature. The composer uses Indian themes 
in free manner and makes them his own. Grunn's piano 
tone is of a quality as a rule found only in visiting ar- 
tists. 

Kisted<irodd Festivals will be held in every commu- 
nity of Southern California boasting singers or players 
between now and next .May, when final competitions will 
be held here during Music Week, The movement is be- 
ing directed by Alexander Stewart, moving spirit of the 
Civic Music and Art Association of Southern California. 



I.n Hlrndn. l-liiinr lliHIj 



A.KOODLACII 

Vl<>l.l\ >I\KI',II AM) IIKI'AIRKR 

< i>ntic.l»rur— AiipraUrr 

r.0.1 MaJi-.rU- l'hi-<ilr<> K.. I c. Anii<-N'> Turkrr 40III 

JOHN SMALLMAN 

II MlirOMv TK \l IIKII or SIMIIN'G 
VaUr rrliil lij A MpcilnlnirnI, H.I.OO. Sludlni NIKI-NOI ."•«. CI 
"ii-U Illcli; \l»liin ll-nln. ■J.-.r .-iT. 

ZOELLNER CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

i.n« a,%<;ki.k.s 

IZnO » Indaor iloalrviird H»IN llolWnood BoulcTard 

Complrle Karallr of Artlat 'Taaekira 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REMEW 



December 5, 1924 



CLAIRE DUX ^'>t>rano 



CONCERT MANAGEMENT ARTHUR JUDSON 
FISK BUILDING, NEW YORK CITY 



Impending Musical Events 



SELBY C. OPPENHEIMER ATTRACTIONS 

Misoha Elman. whose first appearance in San Fran- 
cisco this season will take place at the Columbia Thea- 
tre Sunday afternoon, will face a capacity audience at 
that time, and is sure to duplicate the enormous suc- 
cesses that have fallen to his lot in this city in the past. 
Elman will visit the Southland following Sunday's ap- 
pearance, returning for a final recital at the Columbia 
on Sunday afternoon, December 21st. With Joset 
Bonime at the piano, the following program, entirely 
different from his first offering in this city, will be given: 
Partita, E minor (Bach-Xachezl ; Concerto, A minor 
No, 5 (VieuxtempsI : (a) Lullaby (Barbella-Nachez), 
(b) Contredanse (Beethoven-Elman), (c) Nocturne 
(Grieg-Elmani, (dl Hungarian Dance, .\ major (Brahms- 
Joachim I; (a I Air de Lenski, from Eugen Onegin 
(Tschaikowsky-Auer), (b) Oriental Serenade (Palm- 
greni, CO Albumblatt (Wagner-Wilhelmjl, (d) I Palpiti 
(Paganini). . 

Elman is scheduled to appear in Oakland on Friday 
night. December 12th, at which time he will play the 
following selections: Sonata, D major (Handel); Sym- 
phonie Espagnole (Laloi. Canto Amoroso (Saramartini- 
Elman). Country Dance (Weber-Elman), The Blue 
Lagoon (Winternitzi, Dans les Bois (Paganini-Volgrich). 
To Slumber Land (Kopylow-HartmannI, Valse Staccato 
(Ravina-Borisotf), Hjinn to the Sun, from Le Coq d'Or 
(Rimsky-Korsakow-Frankol : Introduction and Jota (Sa- 

rasate). 

Speaking of Russian songs in general and of Mous- 
sorgky, the master maker ol songs, in particular, brings 
to mind at once Sophie Braslau, the American contralto 
who has done so much to bring these songs to the atten- 
tion of the public, and is generally considered their 
greatest interpreter. She sang three of them in Boston 
with the Boston Symphony Orchestra, and her perform- 
ance caused one of the most profound impressions ol 
the season. The program to be given Sunday afternoon, 
December 14th, at the Columbia Theatre, under the 
Selby C. Oppenheimer management, contains several 
of these most interesting Russian works, and the Eng- 
lish group is replete with novelties. The list in full is 
as follows; Ah Perfido (Beethoven), Liebesbotschatt, 
Doppelganger, Erlking (Schubert), Water-Boy (negro 
song I (arranged by Avery Robinson), Londonderry Air 
(Old Irish I arranged by Bibb I, Christmas (Werner Jos- 
ten), Singing Girl of Shan (Alice Barnett), Mother of 
Lilies (Cecil Forsyth), To One Who Passed Whistling 
Thru the Night (C. .Armstrong Gibbs), The Old Refrain 
(Kreisler), Night (Rubinstein), Pastorale (Stravinsky), 
The Little Fish's Song (Arensky), Dneipr (by request) 
(Moussorgsky), Malaguenas (Pagano). 

One of the most unusual attractions of the current 
season, and one that merits paramount attention when 
analyzed, not only from a musical but from 
a dramatic standpoint, is the coming engagement at 
the Curran Theatre of Ruth St. Denis, Ted Shawn and 
the Denishawn Dance ensemble for six nights, with 
matinees on Wednesday and Saturday, beginning Mon- 
day night December 1.5th. The three programs to be 
presented during the week include every school of dance 
interpretation, and the settings for every ballet have 
been personally chosen by the stars themselves and 
selected in the very countries and lands from which 
the scenes are drawn. 



ELWYN ARTIST SERIES 

No matter to what country a man migrates, he still 
thinks of home and boyhood days. The American boy 
from the West or South who goes East to make his 
home never forgets the scenes and Joys of childhood. 
Last winter Isa Kremer, the great Russian singer of 
ballads, who comes to San Francisco for two concerts 
at Scottish Rite Hall December 12th and the Alcazar 
Theater Sunday matinee, December 14th, was giving 
a concert in St. Paul. She sang many Russian folk 
songs, to the delight of the mixed audience. At the 
close of the concert she was besieged by many Russians 
who had heard her a few years ago in their native land. 

Miss Kremer will present the following program: Fan- 
taisie in F minor (Chopin i. Leon Rosenblum; Rossia 
(Russian). Chi Vuol la Zinearella (Paisiello) (Italian), 
The Blue Bells of Scotland (English), Le Petit .Vavire 
(Berceuse) (French); Dushechka Dievitza (Dargomj- 
sky) (Russian). Chittarata Napolitana (Italian), The 
Butterflies (English), Hopak (Russian): Prelude in G 
Sharp .Minor (Rachmaninoff), Polonaise (Liszt), Leon 
Rosenblum ; Song of the Shepherd Lehl from "Snegou- 
rotchka" (Rimsky-Korsakoff) (Russian), Little Boy Blue 
(MacFadyen) (English), La Pastorella del Alpi 
(French), Phyllis und die Mutter (German); Lison Dor- 
mait (French). La Danza (Tarantella) (Rossini) (Ital- 
ian). The Little Sparrow (Brockway) (English), Ush Ya 
Molada (Russian). 



Music in Berkeley 



Berkeley, Dec. 2, 1924. 
The California Music League, under the direction of 
Dr. Modeste AUoo, presented the second concert of the 
season Tuesday. December 2, at the Harmon Gym- 
nasium. The program was entirely French; Lalo, 
Saint-Saens, Delibes and Franck being represented. 
Dr. AUoo conducted the orchestra with precision of 
attack and splendid virility. May Mukle, guest solo- 
ist, was forced to respond to continued applause alter 
the brilliant rendition of the Saint-Saens (Concerto (A 
minor op. 33) tor cello and orchestra. The California 
Music League purposes to give to tile members of the 
orchestra and the interested public the opportunity 
of becoming familiar with symphonic literature. 

Elwin A. Calberg appeared in a brilliant recital 
Tuesday evening at the Twentieth Century Club under 
the capable direction of Zannette W. Potter. Mr. 
Calberg has poise and certainty, and while his tone 
has unusual depth there is sufficient brilliance at all 
times to clarify the most rapid passages. Clever 
voice weaving, together with final tonal effects, char- 
acterized the -Mendelssohn Prelude and Fugue, while 



NEW SONGS FOR TEACHER AND SINGER 


It's a Mighty Good World 




O'Hara 


Golden Moon ... 




Rolt 


Come to My Heart 




English 


Wood Fairies 






Brown Bird Singing 
Land of Might Have Been 




Wood 
Novello 


Rose Marie of Normandy 
Spring Comes Laughing 
Beauty 




Del Rigo 

Carew 

Lohr 


Piper of Love 




Carew 








The Marl<et 




Carew 


Among the Willows 

A Good Heart All the Way 




Phillips 
Clarke 


Dancing Time in Kerry 
Sweet Navarre . 




Hampson 

Carne 

Phillips 


Love Pipes of June 






My Little Island Home 






Ragged Vagabond 




Randolph 


CHAPPELL-HARMS, INC. 
185 Madison Avenue New York City 



(he Mozart Pastoral Varie was given in a decidedly 
clear style marked with delicate rhythmic sense. His 
Chopin group opened with the heroic P. Minor Fantasy 
and was full of charming moods, and the six preludes 
which followed were poetically phrased. In the mod- 
em numbers Mr. Calberg showed himself equal to the 
enormous technical difficulties, and also revealed a 
surprising subtlety and charm. Mr. Calberg studied 
in New York with Paola Gallico and in Paris with 
Wager Swayue. having been away trefm Berkeley the 
past year. Since his return he has been coaching 
with the well known maker ol artists. Elizabeth 
Simpson. F. P. M. 



SYMPHONY CONCERTS 

What is probably the most attractive program to be 
offered so far this season has been prepared by Alfred 
Hertz for the Popular Concert of the San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra to be given next Sunday afternoon 
in the Curran Theatre. With the exception ol Leo 
Sowerby's Irish Washerwoman, which will be given lor 
the first time in San Francisco, practically every number 
listed is a lavorite among music lovers, the principal 
works being the Unfinished Symphony of Schubert, 
Strauss' Blue Danube Waltz, and the well-known Kol 
Nidrei ol Bruch lor cello and orchestra, the solo part 
to he played by Walter Ferner, principal cellist in the 
orchestra. The balance ol program will consist ol 
Gluck's Iphigenie in Aulis Overture. Mendelssohn's 
Spring Song and Spinning Song and the dramatic Leo- 
nore Overture No. 3 ol Beethoven. 

The pair ol regular symphony concerts, to be given 
Friday and Sunday afternoons ol next week, will present 
Mur Silba, pianist, as guest artist. Miss Silba. who 
was declared in the New York Telegraph to be "one 
ol the really great artists ol the piano." studied lor a 
number of years with Xavier Scharwenka and the great 
Theodore Leschetizky, both ol whom predicted a most 
brilliant luture lor their young pupil. Miss Silba will 
perform the E Minor Concerto ol Chopin, a work which 
has not been on the orchestra's program lor more than 
twelve years. The strictly orchestral portion ol the 
program will contain Beethoven's Pastoral Symphony 
and the Ballata delle Gnomides ol Respighi, a new work 
in the orchestra's repertoire. 



LIEDER SINGER 

BRUNSWICK RECORD 



SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

/iiroFDHatTZ - ... - COMOt/CTO/t 

NEXT FRIDAY, 3:00 P. M. 

NEXT SUNDAY, 2:45 P. M. 

Curran Theatre 

Soloist: MURI SILBA, Pianist 

PROGRAMME 

Symphony No. 6, "Pastoral" Beethoven 

Ballade of the Gnomides Respighi 

(First time in San Francisco) 

Piano Concerto, E Minor Chopin 

Tickets at Sherman, Clay & Co. 



George Lipschultz 

Musical Director anci Violin Soloist 

Loew's State Theatre 
Los Angeles 



LoEw^s ^ warfielD 
"MARRIED FLIRTS" 

With Pauline Frederick, Mae Busch 
and Conrad Nagel 

FANCHON AND MARCO "IDEAS" 
OSWALD'S ORCHESTRA 

SEVERI AND MUSIC MASTERS 



Elwin A. Calberg 

PIAMST AND TEACHER 
Just returned from New York and Paris, France 

Soloist and Accompanist 
Available Season 1924-1925 



lidence Studio S12 East lOlh St., Onkln 
Phone: Merrltt 3S66 



STENGER VIOLINS 

Exemplify Intrinsic Excellence and Are 
Pre-eminently Superior 

A life's devotion of uninterrupted study and labor, 
invoiving; the mastery of principles of muxlcal 
acoustics, timber physics, and engineering, hak 
yielded the underatnndinK of those principles TThlch 
exemplify the "Steneer Idea" In Tlolln making, and 
mark the be^lnnlns: of a new era In this noble art. 

W. C. STENGER 

INCORPORATED 

Maker of Fint Violins 
<17-618 Steinway Hall, Chicago 



It is just as much to the interest of the musical pro- 
fession to have a music journal widely circulated among 
the musical public as it is in the interests of the pub- 
lication. There are problems which none other but a 
music journal will discuss. 



i 



December 5. 1924 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL RIAIIAN' 



** MABEL RIEGELMAN * * 

PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO, CHICAGO GRAND OPERA COMPANY. ADDRESS : SE CRETARY TO MABEL RIEGELMAN. 485 CALIFORNIA ST., SAN FRANCISCO 



E. ROBERT SCHMITZ 

CELEBRATED FRENCH PIANIST 

Master Class January 13-26, 1925 — Technic and Interpretation 



.^^KAJETAN ATTL 




«Wi^y|sOLO HARPIST, SAN FRANCISCO 




S^m SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

W^.; yl Western llepreaentntlve 
\, / of l.j-on & Healy llarpa 






For Concert Enengrenients and Instrnetlon Apply 
l(HM Kohler .<: Chase Hide.. Tel. DoUBlns 1678, on 
nednesdar and Saturday Afternoons ONLV. Resi- 
dence Phone Franklin -S47. 




JIIST OUT! 




A METHOD FOR THE HARP 




Uy Kajetan Attl 




CARL FISHER, PublUher 




For Sale at Sherman, Clay & Co., Kohler «£ Chase. 
Henry Grobe and Kajetan Attl 





ELWYN ARTIST SERIES 


ISA KREMER 


TWO CONCERTS 


Scottish Rite Hall, Friday Evening, December 12 


Alcazar Theatre, Sunday Matinees. December 14 


Tickets nt Sherman, Clay iS Co. 


MANAGE.MEXT EI.WVN CONCERT BIREAU 



AUDREY BEER SOREL 

PIANIST — TEACHER 
Papll of Leopold Godowsky and Arthur De Graeff (Brus- 
■eU>. Stndloi 2825 McClure St., Oakland. TeL Oak. SS9S. 

ALFRED HURTGEN 

PIANIST, ACCOMPANIST, MISICAL niRECTOR, 

COACH, PIANO INSTRUCTION 
Studio: 2778 Union Street Tel. Fillmore 8240 



THE PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL 
REVIEW 

HAS FOUGHT FOR TIIK RESIDENT ARTIST 

DURING THE LAST TWENTV-TWO VEARS — IS 

SUCH A PAPER WORTH Sl'BSCRIBING FORf 

IF SO, DON'T WAIT ANY LONGER. 



FOR TERMS, PARTICULARS, ETC.. ADDRESS 

IDA G. SCOTT 

Kohler & Chase Building, Kearny 6417 



MADAME 

JOHANNA 

KRISTOFFY 

Prima Donna Soprano 

Has Returned from Europe 

and Reopened Her 

Studio at 

740 PINE STREET 



Phone Douglas 6624 



Mrs. William Steinbach Laura Wertheimber ISAIil^I^I^l^ MAliKS 



VOICE CULTURE 



ACHILLE L. ARTIGUES 

Graduate of Sehola Cnntomm, ParU. Or. 
sanlst St. Mary's CatbedraL Plana De- 
partment, Hamlin School. Organ and 
Piano. Arrlllaea Musical ColleEe 

KURT VON GRUDZINSKI 

BARITONE — VOICE CULTURE 

Authorized to Teach Mme. Schoen- 

Rene's Method 

IS14 LeaTen«TOrth St. Phone Prospect 92S3 

EVA M. GARCIA 

PIANIST AND TEACHER 
4152 Howe St. TeL Piedmont 4008 

PIERRE DOUILLET, PIANO 
NITALIA DOUILLET, VOICE 

•XIS Kohler A Chase Bid. Tel. Sutter T.1S7 

DOMENICO BRESCIA 

VOICE SPECIALIST — COMPOSITION 

Stndloi 603-604 Kohler & Chase Bulldine 

Phone Kearny 54r>4 

Madame Charles Poulter— Soprano 

Voice Culture, Piano 

Residence Studio, 58H 27th Street 

Oakland — TeL Oakland 2070 

Mary Coonan McCrea 

TEACHER OF SINGINti 



MRS. A. F. BRIDGE 



HELEN COLBURN HEATH 

Soprano Soloist, Temple Emnnu El. Co 

eert and Church Work. Vocal Instruclit 

2530 Clay Street. Phone West 48(10 

HENRIK GJERDRUM 



2321 Jackso 



Preparatory Teacher for 

Mrs. Noah Brandt 

2211 Scott St. Telephone Fillmore 1522 

Evelyn Sresovich Ware 



Joseph George Jacobson 



CO\ TRAl.TO 

I.1.tS 26th Avenue Phone Sunset 2005 

Voice Ciillure. Mondays V. M. Mill Kuhler 

.«: ChllKc Hide. Tci. tliirlliid 4472 

CAROLINE E. IRONS 

Pianist and Teacher 

3831 Mera Street Tel. Fruitvale 778W 



ROSE RELDA CAILLEAU JoSCph GreVCIl 

Opera Comique, Paris A 



SIGMUND BEEL 



MARY ALVERTA MORSE 

SOPRANO 
Teacher of SinKlnKl Studio. Tuesday and 
Friday. Kohler & Chase Hide., S. F. 



SAN FRANCISCO CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 

(Ada Clement Music School) 
S43S Sacramento St. Phone Klllmore MOH 

MRS. CARROLL NICHOLSON 

CONTRALTO 
Teacher of SlnKine. 32 Loretta Ave.. Pied- 
mont. Tel. IMedmont 304. Mon.. Kohler «<( 
fhnwe Hlrjg.. S. V. Telephone l\|.nrny .'',4.'.4 

Brandt's Conservatory of Music 

22II Scott Street. Bet. Clay * WnshlnEliin 
Mr. Noah Brandt. Violin 
Mrs. Noah Brandt. Piano 

ALMA SCHMIDT-KENNEDY 

PIANIST 

Studio: 1537 Euclid Avenue. Ilerkeiey. Cal. 
Phone Berkeley UIHIII 

MRS. ZAY RECTOR RKVITT 

PIANO and HARMONY 

Institute of Music of San Francisco. 
Kohler & Chase PlrtK. Tel. Kearny 5454 



Dorothy Goodsell Camm MARION RAMON WILSON 



COLORATURA SOPRANO 
Ttaeher of Bel Canto. Tel. Bnyvlew 3S.3» 
or Piedmont 1330. By Appointment Only. 



i':urope. Concert Successes in the t'nited 

States. Address; 182.% Leavenworth Street. 

Telephone Franklin 3501. 



Voice Culture ; — Opera, Oratorio. 
Concert and Church Singing in all 
languages. 

MRS. J. GREVEN 

Piano and Harmony 

8741 Sacramento St. Tel. Bayview 5278 

TEACHERS' DIRECTORY 



IVIISS EDITH CAUBU 
376 Sutter Street Phone Douglas 261( 

JANET ROWAN HALE 
Kohler & Chase BIdg. Tel. Kearny 5454 

MISS LORRAINE EWING 

833 Ashbury St. Phone Hemlock 749 

RUTH VIOLA DAVIS 
515 Buena Vista Avenue— Park 341 

LOUIS FELIX RAYNAUD 

1841 Fulton St. Tel. Bayview 6008 

ELSIE COOK HUGHES LARAIA 
3325 Octavia St. Phone Filmore 6102 

It ,1 music journal Is worth while to 
publish programs and views of musical 
events, it is worth while to patronize. 



MACKENZIE GORDON 

Js:;l' .laiksiin Sin-.-t I'lione West 4.'i 



ANTOINE DE VALLY 

22ul Scull St, riione West IJtl 



MME. M. TRCMBONI 
601-2 Kohler & Chase Bidg. Kearny 5464 



JACK EDWARD HILLMAN 
601 Kohler & Chase BIdg. Kearny 5464 



AOELE ULMAN 
178 Commonwealth Ave. Ph, Bayview8196 



JULIUS HAUQ 

4032 Irving St. Tel. Sunset 436 

HOTHER WISMER 

:i701 Clay Street Phono Dayvlew 7780 

ARTHUR CONRADI 
906 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 6414 

G. JOLLAIN 
376 Sutter St. Tel. Kearny 2637 

tVIARY PASMORE 
2009 Green St. Tel. Fillmore 9071 

Mme. Emilie Jehle, who Is known ill 
San Fianrisco as Mrs. K. lilanki-nburg. 
is scoring triumphs on an Eastern con- 
cert tour, under the miinagemcnt of 
.Alice Louise Robertson. Recently she 
tave a concert in Chicago and her hus- 
band had the bright Idea to send her 
ro.ses by air mall. Evidently this floral 
tribute arrived on lime for the follow- 
ing wire was sent to Mr. Blankenburg 
from the windy city: "('oncert grand 
success. Mme. Emille Jehle In excellent 
voice. Flowers sent by air mall arrived 
Tuesday morning In perfect condition. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL Rl'All'AV 



December 5, 1924 



lEltHabrtlt i^trnpsnu - patto 

ADVANCED COACHING 

THE ART OF INTERPRETATION— SOLFEGE 

NORMAL COURSES 

STl DIOS: 

TO<i KOHL.KR & CHA!iE HI II.DI\G, SA>' FR.WCISCO 

251SH ETSA STREET. BERKELEY 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAX FRAXCISCO BAXK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRU.^RV 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 

the Assets of which have never been increased 

by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1924 

Assets $93,198,226.96 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 3,900,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 446,024.41 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haichtand Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and UUoa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (4I4) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAW^^i QUARTERLY 



NOW PUBLISHED 

(if (Halifurnia 
FIVE DOLLARS POSTPAID 

ANYWHERE IN THE UNITED STATES 



Address: MUSICAL BLUE BOOK OF CALIFORNIA 

801 Kohler & Chase Building 

26 O'Farrell Street, San Francisco, California 



Music Students 
ylttention 

Would you like to get Concert Tickets. Scholarships, Talking- Macliines 
\'iolins, Radio .Sets and Other \aluable Prizes 

FREE 

E>y obtaining subscriptions for the Pacific Coast .Musical Review 
at only Three Dollars a Year? . If so — 

REGISTER 

Your name and address in the Pacific Coast Musical Review 
Subscription Contest 

Address or Call at 

Pacific Coast Musical Review 

801 Kohler & Chase Building 
San Francisco 




•THE-AMPICO- 

Alone. — •and unassisted this musical marvel re-creates in youi 
home the playing of the master musicians ■ — • who have "myster- 
iously endowed it with all the vfiusic of the world" and who also 
pronounce it the world's most magnificent musical instrument. 

BY AN OVERWHELMING 
MAJORITY- MORE OF THE 
^VORLD'S GREAT PIANISTS 
OF THE PAST THREE GEN- 
ERATIONS MAY BE HEARD 
ON THE AMPICO (AND ON 
THE AMPICO ALONE) THAN 
ON ANY OTHER MUSICAL 
INSTRUMENT • ALL THIS 
MUSICAL AVE ALTH IS 
AVITHIN YOUR MEANS 
ON A BASIS AVE SHALL 
BE GLAD TO ARRANGE 
FOR YOU • COME IN • HEAR 
YOUR AMPICO-AND HEAR 
OUR PLAN 

•KOHLER- er- CHASE - 





16 O'FARRELL STREET . SAN FRANCISCO 

Sit Mill Street 2460 Mission Street 
OAKLAND y~SS\. SAN FRANCISCO 
SAN JOSE f _^tK\ SACRAMENTO 

KNABE UBJ AMnCO 


1 




-^^^--——~—- 


f^^^^^^^^^^f^l 


1 



^A €0^t Ws^kai %MM 



Ml 



THE OLDEST MUSICAL JOURNAL IN THE GREAT WEST 



VOL. XVII. NO. 10 



SAN FRANCISCO, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1924 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



MISCHA ELMAN WEEK^S LEADING ATTRACTION BLOCH QUINTET "DEVOURED" BY MODERNISTS 

Distinguished Russian Violin Virtuoso Retains Bigness and Sensuousness Admirers of the Uhra Modern School of Music Revel in the Quarter 
of Tone— Presents Excellent Program of Works Rarely Heard— Eva Tones and Dissonances of the "Roaring Lion" of Modem 

Gauthier Gives Characteristic Interpretation of Unique Program Composers — Work at Times a Carnival of 

—Popular Symphony Program Finds Many Admirers Sound— Has Moments of Real Inspiration 



By ALFRED METZGER 



By ALFRED METZGER 



Mischa Elnian appeared at the Colum- 
bia Theatre last Sunday afternoon. De- 
cember 7th, under the management of 
Selby C. Oppenheimer. There was a large 
audience of music lovers who followed 
the distinguished artist through every 
moment of his exceptionally fine pro- 
gram. Although many came there to 
hear Albert Depuis' Fantaisie Rhapsodi- 
que which is being played for the first 
time in America by Mischa Elman on this 
tour they did not regret the change to 
Vieuxtemps' Concerto in A minor No. 5. 
It is rather late in the day to add any- 
thing important to that which has already 
been written in these columns about Mis- 
cha Elman on previous visits. He still 
appeals through the same channels by 
means of which he became famous. His 
fine, big. resonant tone, his rare emotion- 
al depth and his unquestionable temper- 
ament, revealing itself frequently in the 
swaying of his body and changing his 
position turning from side to side, still 
form the principal features of his inter- 
pretations. 

The outstanding claim that a musician 
has upon fame is that he be different 
from his fellow artists and that his spe- 
cial individuality and style be on a par 
with genius or greatness. Mischa El- 
man conforms to this condition. He plays 
with utter abandonment fusing his per- 
sonality into the message of the com- 
poser. He plays with a sincerity and 
depth that no other violin virtuoso can 
surpass. The Elman tone has long been 
a term of admiration among music lovers. 
The Elman style is always remembered 
by concert goers. We can now add a 
skill in program arrangement that takes 
account of the public's requirements. 
The Elman programs are not hack- 
Tleyed. They contain compositions rarely 
heard and he reveals an unusual 
amount of industry and enterprise by 
constantly adding to his repertoire. He 
is unlike other great artists, who travel 
throughout the country year after year 
with the same array of compositions. 
Elman's programs are refreshing, for 
in addition to playing works not fre- 
quently heard, he adds occasionally a 
composition entirely new to the musical 
public. For these reasons violin students 
and violinists in general can not af- 
ford to miss an Elman concert, and if 
they do so intentionally they are wast- 
ing their money on remaining in a voca- 
tion unsuitable to their taste. 

Eva Gauthiei^The Elman Concert Bu- 
reau deserves the gratitude of the mu- 
sical public for combining the forces of 
Mme. Eva Gauthier, the noted French 
cantatrice, and the Chamber Music So- 
ciety of San Francisco in one of the most 
interesting events of the season. They 
really gave the public two concerts in 
one and at the same time an affair of 
such unique and unusual character that 
it will long be remembered by those who 
attended it. Barring one number of the 
Russian School which was played with 
remarkable exhibition of virility, the 
Chamber Music Society consisting of 
.Louis Persinger, first violinist and direc- 
tor, Louis Ford, second violin, Nathan 
Firestone, viola, Walter Ferner, cello, 
and Elias M. Hecht. flutist, acted in the 
capacity of co-artist to the vocalist. And 
the members played with such skill and 
artistry that their work was not an ac- 
companiment to the singer, but a blend- 
i .ig of instrumental with vocal music 
I ."hich really, in a sense, became a vocal- 
I nstrumental chamber music concert. 

Most appealing were the songs from 

I ava, for their tone color effects and their 

armonic suavity proved specially ad- 



mirable and platable to ears used to mu.<!i- 
cal conventionalities. We can not honest- 
ly say that Mme. Gauthier fulfilled the 
demands of serious music lovers in her 
interpretation of classic songs such as 
those of Schubert, Sullivan, Tedesco, and 
Gurney Neither in temperament nor 
vocal beauty did she comply with the re- 
quirements of the art of classic interpre- 
tation. But in her interpretation of 
C'lamber Music for Voice and Various 
Combination of Instruments she seemed 
to be at home. Her voi^:-^ is singularly 
suited to blend with instiuiiuntal quality 



The concert given at the Fairmont 
Hotel Gold Room an Wednesday evening 
December 10th for the benefit of the 
scholarship fund of the San Francisco 
Conservatory of Music by Ada Clement, 
pianist. May Mukle 'cellist, Edouard Dcru, 
violinist, Mary Pasmore, violin, and Emil 
Hahl, violist, attracted several hundred 
people whose enthusiasm increased as 
the program progressed. There was evi- 
dent among those in attendance an un- r 
usually large number of professional ' 
musicians and teachers who undoubtedly - 
came drawn by the magnet of Ernest ~ 
Bloch's Piano Quintet which on this oc- r. 




MISS LUCY VANCE 

An Exceptionally Gifted Vocal Artist, Pupil of 

Mrs. Mary Coonan McCrea. Who Has Been 

Scoring Triumphs in Numerous Private 

and Public Musical Functions 



of tone and siie is able to con line herself 
to the restrictions enforced by ensemble 
work. Therefore the group including 
works by Byrd, Dowland, Wilson, Rous- 
set, ,Iacobi. Peterkin, Bliss and Marx 
proved one of the outstanding features 
of the program. 

(Continued on Page 3, Col. 2) 



The Norwegian Singing Society gave Its 
twenty-first anniversary concert in Scot- 
tish Rite Hall on Saturday evening, No- 
vember 8th, under the leadership of 
Konrad .\nderson. The assisting artists 
were Thorstein Jensen, violinist; Otto 
King, cellist, and Henrik Gjerdrum, pian- 
ist. The hall was crowded and much 
enthusiasm prevailed. 



casion received its first public presenta- 
tion in California, a little over a year 
succeeding its premiere In New York. 
Naturally this composition forms the 
pivotal point of interest of the event. 

It is practically impossible to give 
a comprehensive analytical review of this 
work from only one hearing. We under- 
stand that the artists who presented It 
worked six months in preparation of the 
performance. Therefore we can not. dur- 
ing the course of an hour, obtain accurate 
Ideas regarding the work's artistic value. 
Therefore our review this time must 
necessarily be fragmentary. Two fea- 
tures, however, stand out prominently, 
namely, the almost unbelievable techni- 
cal difflculties to be overcome by the 
players and the frequent outbursts of 
passionate climaxes that cause the music- 
ians to exert themselves to the utmost 



to create a very carnival of sound. Those 
whose taste Is attuned to the ultra- 
modern school of composition revelled 
in the performance and expressed their 
enthusiasm in terms of extravagant 
superlatives. I'nquestionably this work 
contains period of genuine inspiration 
wherein the composer shouted his artis- 
tic conviction In phrases of unconven- 
tional abandon that brought perspira- 
tion to the brows of performers and list- 
eners alike. 

More than ever do we find that Ernest 
Bloch is the "roaring Hon" among ultra- 
modern composers. He Is unquestionably 
a real genius who proclaims his mes- 
sages in stentorean tones. Mr. Bloch 
has no musical secrets. He rarely whis- 
pers and when sorrow or pain become the 
vehicles of his art you can hear him tear 
his hair, gnash his teeth and shake his 
fists. He shouts his sorrow to the world. 
He does it in quarter tones and disson- 
ances compared to which certain amateur 
orchestras are the essence of beautiful 
harmonyU^Vnd the disciples of the ultra- 
modern school inhale their breath with 
frenzied ecstasy and stare with suffused 
eyes into the mysterious beyond. There 
must be something to music that can ac- 
complish such results, even though our 
old-fogey conventional ears are not as 
yet attuned to the beauties that hide be- 
hind tonal extravagances. 

It is a marvel to us how Ada Clement, 
Edouard Deru. Mary Pasmore, Emil Hahl 
and May Mukle were able to play the 
work at all. It requires a wonderful 
sense of pitch, unlimited energy and vi- 
tality and intellectual understanding of 
the composer's message. Since the im- 
pression upon those in sympathy with 
such works was all that could be ex- 
pected the artists undoubtedly succeeded 
in paying close attention to the various 
"Bloch signals," without colliding disas- 
trously with any of the various "trains of 
thought." Even though the writer In 
his bewilderment was unable to observe 
the beauties which so many were quick to 
grasp, he certainly was grateful to the 
artists who presented a work of such 
gigantic proportions with a facility wor- 
thy of the highest praise. 

May Mukle opened the program with 
an exceptionally craftsmanlike presenta- 
tion of Ariosti-Elkus' delightful Concert- 
ino which reveals a grace and simplicity 
of ideas so greatly in contrast with the 
work that closed the program. Ada Cle- 
ment displayed her pianlstlc polish In 
the following group of representative 
piano classics: In der Nacht (Schu- 
mann), Etude E, op. 10 and Scherzo C 
sharp (Chopin). To state that the pian- 
ist showed musicianship, Judgment and 
natural instinct contains all the essen- 
ce of praise which could not be expressed 
more fully by pages of eulog ies. 
CONCERT BY MISS M YRA PALACHE 

Several hundred Invitations were sent 
out by Miss Cora W. Jenkins for a con- 
cert given at her studio on Randwlck 
Avenue, Oakland, Saturday evening, De- 
cember Gth, by Miss Myra Palache, well- 
known Berkeley pianist. Miss Palache, 
whose work as a soloist and whose lec- 
tures on music appreciation have attract- 
ed so much attention this fall, needs no 
introduction to the public, and her many 
friends were looking forward to her con- 
cert with greatest pleasure. Following is 
the program rendered: (a) La tendre Nan- 
ette (Couperln). (b) La Rappel des Ols- 
eaux (Rameau). (c) Gavotte pour les 
Heures et les Zephirs (Rameau-Dlemer); 
Sonata In G minor (Schumann): (a) Pre- 
lude in G major, (b) Prelude In F major, 
(c) Polonaise In G sharp minor, (d) Bal- 
lade in G minor (Chopin) : (a) Reflets 
dans I'Eau, (b) Sorlee dans Grenade 
(Debussy). 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REMEW 



December 12, 1924 



Worth Any Sacrifice 

The Steinway tells how it ma^ become yours 



ASteinway is such a human piano, and 
comes into such close association with 
people that it has acquired a deep understand- 
ing of human nature during the past seventy 
years. 

I am a Steinway. I, too, have acquired 
some knowledge of human hearts. And this is 
what I have noticed: 

That people place the most value, and take 
the greatest enjoyment in possessing, those 
things for which they have made some sacri- 
fice. 

To possess me, a Steinway piano, has called 
forth sacrifices in many a modest household. 
The Steinway that stands so proudly in the 
living room is probably there because it was 
earnestly wanted. 

That is why, altho my purchase price is 
higher than most pianos, possession of me gives 
to most people such true joy. They have 
wanted me because of what I represent. They 
have refused to be satisfied until they pos- 
sessed me. To possess me, they have made 
many little and big sacrifices. Established in 
such a home, is it any wonder that I am the 
proudest piano in the world ? 




One day a young couple came into Sherman, 
Clay & Co. and examined me critically. Then 
they turned to a salesman and said ; 

"Our little daughter will be nine years old 
five years from now. She must begin her les- 
sons when she is nine years old. She should, if 
possible, begin them on a Steinway piano. If 
we pay you a small monthly sum, will you 
hold it for us, and credit the accumulating 
interest, against the day when our little daug- 
ter becomes nine years of age?" 



That was sacrifice. The young couple were 
earnestly endeavoring to accumulate the sum, 
or partial sum, of my purchase. To make cer- 
tain of their program, they were seeking to 
place that monthly sacrifice safely beyond any 
temptation to spend it for some transient pleas- 
ure. And when their little daughter possesses 
me, you can be very sure that I shall be a 
proud and happy piano. 

Is not that home itself meanwhile made 
happier, by the knowledge of this voluntary 
sacrifice? Will that home not tend to hold 
together, over the years, because of this very 
spirit? 

It is the privilege of a Steinway to be worth 
such efforts. Many a home that longs for a 
Steinway could have one, if a very little sacri- 
fice were systematically entered upon. 

I know that Sherman, Clay & Co. will be 
glad to explain why this sacrifice is so worth 
while. 

Sherman jiiay & Go. 

Kearny and Sutler Sts., San Francisco 
CALIFORNIA-OREGON-WASHINGTON 



RENA 

LAZELLE 

SOPRANO 

San Francisco Opera Company 

Head of Vocal Depart 

alorT of Music — At 

Orat 

S43G Sacrame 



EMILIE LANCEL 

OPERATIC MEZZO-SOPRANO 

After Twro Years' Absence in Europe 
Available For 

OPERA— ORATORIO— CONCERT 

Management ALICE SECKELS 
63 Post Street 

Residence: 778 Eighteenth Avenue, San Francis< 
Tel. Bayview 1461 



ANNIE LOUISE DAVID 

HARP SOLOIST AND TEACHER 

ON THE PACIFIC COAST DURING 
SEASON 1924-1925 

Address: Hotel Claremont, Berkeley 
Tel. Berkeley 9300 

Management Alice Seckels, 68 Post Street 
Tel. Douglas 7267 



PASMORE VOCAL STUDIOS 

Suite SOO, Kohler A Chaae BIdK.. San FrancUco 

«BSO Collese Ave., Berkeley. R««ldence, 291 Alvarado 

Raad. Berkeley 



KARL RACKLE 



LAMBS CLUB, NEW YORK CITY 



ALICE GENTLE 

MANAGEMENT 

CATHARINE A. BAMMAN 
53 West 39th Street New York, N. Y. 



DOUGLAS SOULE-Pianist 

ADVAIVOED PUPILS ACCEPTED 

Wednesday and Friday Mornings at Studio: 902 

Kohier & Chase Bide.. San Francisco. Telephone 

Kearny 5-154. Residence Studio: 150 31ontc Vista 

Ave.. Oakland. Telephone Piedmont 760. 



AUGUSTA HAYDEN 

SOPRANO 

Available for Concerts and Recitals 

Address: 471 37th Avenue 

Tel. Pac. B.IS 

HOMER HENLEY 

BARITONE TEACHER OF SINGING — CONDUCTOR 

Direclor Cnllfornia Club Choral 

An Oratorio Authority 

Residence Stndio: 1249 Bay, at Franklin. Tel. FIIL 1033 



LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM 



CONTRALTO 

Teacher of SlnBlng. Complete Course of Operatic Tratn- 

Ine. 2730 Pierce St. Tel. Fillmore 4553 

Dominican College School of Music 

SAN RAFAEL. CALIFORNIA 

Music Courses Thorough and Propressive. Public School 

Music, .Accredited Diploma 





MR. ANDREW BOGART 
Teacher of Singing 




Pupi 
Cone 
BWg 


s Prepared for Opera, Oratorio, Church and 
ert. New Address: Suite 600, Kohler & Chase 
, 26 O'Farrell Street. Telephone Douglas 9256 



WALLACE A. SABIN 

lanu EI, First Church of Christ Sel- 
ls Club. S. F.. \Ved., 1015 Sacramento I 
Street. Phone West 3753: Sat.. First Christian Science I 
Churcli. Phone Fillmore 7920; Res. Studio. 3142 LeiTlston I 
Ave., Berkeley. Phone Piedmont 242M 

MISS DOROTHEA MANSFELDT 

Preparing Teacher for 

MRS. OSCAR MANSFELDT. Pianist 

207 Cherry St.. Bet. \Va9hinetan & Clay Tel. Pac. »30« I 

The College of the Holy Names 

LAKE MERRITT, OAKLAND 

Complete Conservatory Course — Piano. Harp. VtoIlDi i 

■Cello. Voice. Counterpoint. Harmony. History 

DURINI VOCAL STUDIO 



1072 Ellis St. 



Opera — Church — Oratorio 



TeL West S95 I 



PAUL STEINDORFF 



Repertoire 



Miss Elizabeth Westgate 

Teacher of Piano, Organ, Harmony. Organist and Musical i 
Director of First Presbyterian Church. Alameda. Home • 
Studio: 1117 PARU STREET, ALAMEDA. Telephone Ala- 
meda 155. Thursdays, Merrinian School, 597 Eldorado Aye^ 
Oal^land. Telephone Piedmont 2770. 



MUSIC PRINTING? 

SCHOLZ, ERICKSON & CO., Inc. 

521 Howard Street Phone Douglas 4273 

San Francisco 



Manning School of Music 

JOHN C. MANNING, Director 
!i7A2 Washington Street Telephone Fillmore SM' 

PEARL HOSSACK WHITCOMB 

DRAMATIC SOPRANO 

Absolute Method of Voice I'pon the Breath 

Monday and Thursday.- 'lOtKS Kcthler ifi Chase Buildlas. 

Tel. Garfield 6723. Res. Phone Prospect 426 



December 12, 1924 



I'ACIFIC COAST ML'SICAI. RFAIFAV 



^fir €dail Uln^iral S^e^i^ 



MISKAL UK\IK\V CIIMIVVW 
SOI. Kohler A riinNe ItlilK.. i:tl o'Fnrrpll S 
n Frnin-l»co, Cnllf. Tel. Garneld 5250-5251 



ALFRED METZGER 



Editor 



Make nil checks, drafln. money ordera or other for 
reiiilllnnee payable to 
P,\<IFIf t0.4ST Ml.SUAl. KKl'IKW 



Uaklaod-Berkeley-Alsnieda Ufllce 1117 Faro Si 
Tel. AInnieda 155 
Miiia Kllzaheth WealKnte In Charse 



., Alameda 



l.oa AnKelea Office 

122 Scenic .Avenue, Hollywood, California 

Ilruno Unvld UsMlier in Charge 



FRIDAY, DEC. 12, 1924 



The PACIFIC CO.AST MCSICAI. UEVIEW la fo 
the sheet ninMlc departnienta of all leading niuf*l 



Kntercd aa aecond-clasn i 



at S. F. Poatofflee. 



SIIIISCRIPTIONS 
.\nnunllr In Advance, Inclndlns: Postaset 

■ lilted Statea »3.00 

Forelen Countrlea - ■MK) 



TWENTY-FOURTH YEAR 



JOHN M. WILLIAMS PUBLICATIONS 

Two books recently received from Theodore Presser 
are not only splendid examples of the printer's art and a 
great credit to the house that issued them insofar as 
appearance goes, but their content is such, also, as to be 
convincing reason tor the enormous success of the 
writer, John M. Williams, who uses this material in his 
normal classes for piano teachers and who is scoring a 
■whirlwind success from the Atlantic to the Pacific, his 
schedule of dates appearing elsewhere in this issue. 

The first of these beautiful little books is called Tunes 
for Tiny Tots, and it is so lucid, so logical and so abso- 
lutely convincing as to prove, without a question, that 
Mr. Williams has not only studied his subject to a 
finish, but has also, in this compilation, put on record 
material which is absolutely invaluable as well as 
abundantly attractive. 

The other book (eighty pages) is called First Year at 
the Piano, and is the visible result of many years of 
research work put into the subject by Mr. Williams. 
There is not, for instance, a single exercise or small 
piece in this book which has not been tried out to a 
finish in actual work with children and not one in which 
a single flaw could be detected in such trial by fire. 

And so exhilarating and so immediately assimilable 
(to coin a w'ord) is all this material that all children 
take to it as the proverbial duck takes to water. Mr. 
Williams is doing a great work personally in his ex- 
tremely popular classes and in these printed proofs of 
his erudition and good taste he has put into black and 
white form something that will always be invaluable 
to the primary teacher, especially the one who has im- 
bibed first hand enthusiasm from the fountain-head, 
John M. Williams. — Music News. 



TEN MASTERS TO CONDUCT MASTER SCHOOL 

Announcement is made this week of ten masters of 
music who will comprise the faculty of the San Fran- 
cisco Master School of Musical Arts which will open 
May 1 under the direction of Lazar S. Samoiloff. 

Miss Alice Seckels. who will manage the school, has 
received word from Samoiloff and Mrs. Campbell Mac- 
farlane. principal donor of the endowment fund, thai 
the following famous artists will be teachers: Josef 
Lhevinne. piano; Sigsmund Stojowski, piano and com- 
position; Felix Salmond. noted English cellist, cello and 
chamber music; Julia Claussen, Metropolitan Opera star, 
voice and opera technique; Cesar Thomson, violin, 
assisted by Samuel Gardner; William J. Henderson, 
veteran music critic of the New York Tribune, lectures 
on music; Lazar S. Samoiloff, voice; Emil J. Polak, 
coach; A. Kostelanetz, accompanist and coach. 

The Master School of Musical .\rts has for its objects 
the development of musical talent on the Pacific Coast 
and will be conducted by the masters for six months 
of the year, with the artists alternating between San 
Francisco and Los .Angeles. Teachers trained by the 
masters will continue their work during the six months 
of their absence. .An opera class will train San Fran- 
cisco singers for grand opera roles. 

A scholarship fund will provide an unlimited number 
of deserving talented students in every branch of the 
musical arts. In addition to the scholarships covered 
by endowment, the masters will contribute their time 
for other worthy students. 



The Allied Arts Club, of which Mrs. Edward Ransoms 
Place is president, listens occasionally to excellent 
musical numbers. At its meeting on Wednesday, No- 
vember mth Eva Walker Kirschner, pianist, will play 
Betfs Juba Dance and Mrs. Robert S. Alexander will 
sing O Mio Babbino Caro from Puccini's Gianni Schichi. 
On Wednesday. November 26th Eva Walker Kirschner 
will play a standard piano composition to be selected 
later and Mrs. Alexander will sing Bach-Gounod's Ave 
Maria and the Largo from Handel's Opera Xerxes. 



Current Events 



(Continued from Page 1, Col. 2) 
Mine. Gauthier principal genre, however, seems to 
lie in the interpretation of French songs by Franck, 
Milhaud, Ravel and Stravinsky. She is essentially an 
apostle of the ultra modern school both in style of 
interpretation and personal appearance. She sings 
these modern songs as if she truly loved them and puts 
into them that element of personal abandon which some- 
how she misses when interpreting the older works. 
Her voice, as stated before, is more suited to ensemble 
work than solo, for it huku that "ping" and vitality as 
well as resonance whii-h solo work demands. Hut 
she does possess that quaint instinct for bizarre and 
unusual effects which ultra-modern music demands, par- 
ticularly when rare intervals of tones and occasional 
quarter-tones seem to be the hobby of the composer. 

Although her programs have been called "From Java 
to Jazz" we could not find any of the latter music on 
the program sung at Scottish Rite .Auditorium on Thurs- 
day evening, December 4th. What no doubt is supposed 
to be "jazz" appeared in the last group of songs by 
Berlin, Kern, Donaldson, Greshwing Daly and including 
such songs as Alexander's Ragtime Band. The Sirens 
Song, Carolina in the Morning, and Swanee. Now these 
are not "jazz" songs. They are so-called "ragtime" 
songs. They are distinctly .American and Mme. Gauthier 
convinced us that just as certain Geraian operas must 
be sung by Germans, certain Italian operas by Italians, 
certain French operas by Frenchmen, certain Russian 
operas by Russians, so must the American ragtime or 
jazz songs be sung by American vaudeville performers. 
Mme. Gauthier is neither an American nor a vaudeville 
singer, and if she thinks she can make these ragtime 
melodies suitable for concert purposes by refining them 
so that they are deprived of their "Broadway" flavor, 
she is greatly mistaken. It is the Broadway flavor that 
makes the ragtime or jazz song. Without this purely 
American style of interpretation the songs become 
devoid of any purpose. They originally became popular 
because of the "trimmings" that went with them, includ- 
ing several quiverings of the shoulders, arms and hand 
motions and individual changes and additions by the 
singers. If you leave out this "ad libitum" atmosphere 
you destroy the songs as far as their claims to ragtime 
and jazz are concerned. They have no connection with 
classic or serious music. They represent entertainment 
pure and simple. You can as little change these works 
into good music as you can change a farce into a Shakes- 
pearean tragedy. We honestly believe that the rag- 
time songs included in the Gauthier program are passi- 
and obsolete and can not be revived successfully even 
though they be "refined." They were not intended to 
be refined, they owe their popularity to the very oppo- 
site of refinement and they are intended tor entertain- 
ment which means for just a passing tad. You can not 
make a tad lasting. A Mozart composition, a Weber 
work, a Wagner opera will be "popular" tor years and 
even centuries, but a ragtime or jazz song life is like 
that of a butterfly, and once dead always dead. Even 
Mme. Gauthier can not revive them. 

Popular Symphony Concert. — Since the popular sym- 
phony concerts are really intended more for purposes 
of entertainment than of education there is not so 
much necessity for analytical criticism as tor reviews 
concerning the success of the conductor and orchestra 
to please the audience. The popular concert which took 
place at the Curran Theatre on Sunday afternoon, 
December 7th responded in every way to the demand of 
those who enjoy melody and rhythm. Alfred Hertz be- 
longs to the rare conductors who interpret a popular 
program with as much vim and intelligence as a classic 
program and the recent occasion was no exception to 
the rule. The soloist was Walter V. Ferner, whose in- 
terpretation of Burch's Kol Nidre delighted everybody 
tor he draws a tone of such fine warmth and appeal that 
it emphasizes the emotional accentuation with which 
he invests all his work. The enthusiasm aroused by 
Mr. Fei-ner's playing was indeed well justified. Of 
course, the Unfinished Symphony by Schubert, with its 
irresistible melodic themes and poetic grace, again 
aroused the audience to enthusiastic demonstrations. 
The Blue Danube Waltz by Strauss suited those of the 
people who enjoy the lighter form of musical composi- 
tion. Beethoven's third Leonore Overture, with its 
thrilling finale, proved one of the favorite numbers on 
the program. Other compositions received with enthus- 
iasm were: Overture, Iphigenia in Aulis (Gluck), Spring 
Song (Mendelssohn), Spinning Song (Mendelssohn), 
The Irish Washerwoman (Sowerbyl. The latter com- 
position received its first performance in San Francisco 
on this occasion. 



Virginia Pierce Revere, tile well known soprano, has re- 
turned to San Francisco from Los Angeles to spend the 
holidays with her father. Mrs. Rovere has been un- 
usually active musically in the southern portion of the 
state, having given a program ret ently for the Temple 
Israel of Long Beach, who presented the artist with a 
magnificent silver loving cup in appreciation of her 
work. Mrs. Rovere also sang tor the president's day 
of the Wednesday Club of Fresno and created a most 
favorable impression. Mrs. Rovere's husband is also a 
well known .singer and was the winner of the Tito Ruffo 
baritone contest in Los Angeles. Mrs. Rovere's last 
operatic appearance in this section of the country was 
last season when she sang several guest performances 
with Gallo's San Carlo Opera Company in Ix)8 Angeles. 
During Beniamino Gigll's operatic engagement In Los 
Angeles, Mrs. Rovere had the pleasure of appearing in 
a benefit concert with the famous tenor, who presented 
her with his photograph on which is an endorsement of 
her splendid voice and method of vocalization. 




The San Francisco Sytnphony Orchestra under the 
direction of .Mfred lliriz ai>iiMar<M| in Sim kton Friday 
evening, December 5th and the nature of its HUccesH la 
recorded in the following letter and extracts from tbo 
daily press: 

In a letter to Mr. Hertz the President of the Western 
Gas and Electric Company of Stockton wrote to Mr. 
Hertz personally as follows: "I cannot iK'gln to tell 
you what a profound impression you created last nlgbt 
as it is the ununiinous opinion of everyone with whom 
I have come in contact that the concert was the most 
stupendous and universally appreciated event of Its kind 
in the history of Stockton. It Is si)eclally gratifying 
to mc to give you such an enthusiast ir and sincere 
report, for undoubtedly you have been the direct means 
of placing an appreciation of the finer things in music 
on a higher plane locally. With kindest regards, 
Sincerely Yours, 

SANIL MALU. 

Stockton Daily Evening Record, December 6, 1924. — Th>i 
triumph of all Stockton's musical experience seems to 
have come last night in the concert of the San Fran- 
cisco Symi)hony Orchestra. The concert is a great in- 
spiration for the future. Of the 1,300 people who at- 
tended there probably is not one who is not eager to 
bring the orchestra here yearly as a big community 
venture. The Stockton Musical Club in brlngluK Alfred 
Hertz and his San Francisco Symphony Orchestra to 
Stockton for the first time has realized a long cherished 
ambition. • • • The program throughout allorded the 
most intense musical enjoyment. Alfred Hertz is not 
only a wonderful director playing on his vast orchestral 
instrument at will, but he is a good show man. His pro- 
gram was well built from the opening national air to 
the concluding waltz. On the Beautiful Blue Danube. 
• • • With the conclusion of The Beautiful Blue Danube 
the audience refused to leave its seats until Mr. Hertz 
and the orchestra had responded lime and lime again to 
the insistent curtain calls The orchestra is a magni- 
ficent organization. Any one of the numbers on last 
night's program would have been well worth while 
bringing the orchestra to Stockton, if only that one 
number were played and nothing else. The San Fran- 
cisco Symphony Orchestra is worth its price! Alfred 
Hertz as a director is a most interesting picturesque 
and romantic figure. 

SYMPHONY CONCERT 

At the Popular Concert of the San Francisco Sym- 
phony orchestra, to be given next Sunday afternoon In 
the Curran Theatre under the leadership of Alfred 
Hertz, Eugenia Argiewicz Bem, the well-known violin- 
ist and svmpbony member, will make her first appear- 
ance witli the orchestra in the capacity of soloist. On 
this occasion she will perform the F minor Concerto of 
Lalo. For the orchestral portion of Sunday's program 
Hertz has selected the overture to Aubers Fra Diavolo. 
the first Peer Gynt Suite of Grieg, the Pastorale from 
Bach's "Christmas Oratorio, the movement from Ippoll- 
tow-lvanow's Caucasian Sketches entitled In the Vil- 
lage, Hertz' popular arrangement of the Kriesler 
Caprice Viennois and the overture to The Gypsy Baron 
by Johann Strauss. 

The pair of regular symphonies, to be given Friday 
and Sunday afternoons, December 26 and 28, will pre- 
sent Louis Persinger, concert-master of the orchestra, 
in his first solo appearance of the season, performing 
the Bruch G minor Concerto. The next pair of con- 
certs will also bring forth the beautiful Parsifal Prelude 
of Wagner and Schumann's Rhenish Symphony ar- 
ranged for modern orchestra by Frederick Stock The 
second concert in the Berkeley Symphony Series Is 
scheduled for next Thursday evening in Harmon Gym- 
nasium at the University of California, for which the 
program will be made up of Beethoven's Pastoral Sym- 
phony, the Phedre Overture of Massenet. Smetanii's 
symphonic poem. The Moldau and the Francesca de 
Rimini Fantasia of Tschaikowsky. 



CHANGE OF PROGRAM 



The Commillec on Music and Drama of the University 
of California announces the followiiiK change In the pro- 
gram for the second concert to be given by the San 
Francisco Symphony Orchestra im Dec. 18lh at Harmony 
Gymnasium under the leadership of Alfred Hertz. The 
orchestra will play the following compositions: Sym- 
phony, the Phedre Overture of .Massenet. Smetana s 
Overture "Phedre" (Massenet), Symphonic Poem 
"Vltava'' (The Moldau) (Smetana), Fantasia "Francesca 
de Rimini" (Tschaikowsky)^ 

THE DECAY OF LYING 

E. Robert Schmitz, In the second of his course of lec- 
ture recitals at the MacPhail School of Music. Minne- 
apolis, based his comments, which were both witty anil 
penetrating, upon Oscar Wilde's p.iradoxical theory of 
The Decay of Lying. Mr. Schmitz earnestly recom- 
mended that both composer and music should be given 
a very wire berth in sticking to the text of any title or 
program Inilicaiions in true parallel to the 'llcentla 
poetica' of verse making. He told how Debussy very 
reluctantly consented to the demands of his publisher 
to have the source of his inspiration for each comi)o- 
sition given, and that he did so only on the condition 
that the titles be printed not at the head but at the end 
of each piece This arrangement of a set purpose has 
ever since been copied by the publishers of modern 
music in. entire Ignorance of the original reason why. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



December 12, 1924 



Music Club Activities 



The Pacific Musical Society will meet at the Fairmont 
Hotel. Wednesday evening. December 17th, at 8:30 
o'clock. The program will be given by the Ormay Trio 
and Margaret Jarman Cheeseman. mezzo soprano. The 
Shepherd's Call (unaccompanied) (Debussy K Bacinerie 
(Bach), Anthony Linden. Gyula Ormay at the piano: 
I Came 'With a Song (La Forge), Do Not Go, My Love 
(Hageman). The Soldier's Bride (Rachmaninoft'l, Dan- 
sonia Gigue (Poldowski), Margaret Jarman Cheeseman, 
mezzo soprano, Gyula Ormay, at the piano: Aquarelles — 
Soir L'Automne. Serenade (Philip Gaubert), Ormay 
Trio, Gyula Ormay, piano, Anthony Linden, flute. Otto 
Ling, 'cello: Chanson D'Amour (Hollman). Avec Tes 
Yeux Mignonne (Laffen). Margaret Jarman Cheeseman: 
Impressions of a Holiday — The Water Wheel, At the 
Fair (Eugene Goossens) L'Heure Espagnole (Ravel), 
Ormay Trio. 

The San Francisco Musical Club gave another one o£ 
its delightful programs at the Fairmont Hotel last week 
and inasmuch as the writer was unable to be present 
he cheerfully quotes what Charles Woodman has to say 
in the San Fiancisco Call of Saturday. December 6th: 

Rudy Sieger, violinist, and Mrs. Cecil HoUis Stone, 
pianist, gave the first performance here of Saint-Saems' 
Triptyque (Op. 136) at the concert of the San Francisco 
Musical Club in the ballroom of the Fairmont Hotel. 
Thursday morning. It is a charming work in the com- 
poser's lightest vein and the artists made every phrase 
ring true and clear. Sieger plays so often at the Fair- 
mont that music lovers are inclined to take his mastery 
of his instrument and the full, sweet tones he produces 
as a matter of course, but it always is a pleasure to hear 
him. Mrs. Stone long ago proved herself a skillful 
piainlst. They also gave Leclaires Le Tombeau Sonata, 
a melodious composition, in the classical style, with 
refinement and soulful expression. 

Groups of songs were given by Mrs. Alma Winchester, 
accompanied by Mrs. Thomas G. Inman; by Jlrs. George 
D. Kierulfl with Martha Dukes Parker at the piano, and 
by Patricia Morbio. Her accompanist, Marion de Guerre 
Stewart, also gave a number of short piano pieces of 
the French school with just the programmatic realism 
they required, the rattling of the old coach from En 
Bretagne ( Rhene-Baton) being made particularly vivid. 
Miss Morbio's singing impressed me most. She pre- 
faced each number with a short description, investing 
it with peculiar interest. She has a charming stage 
presence and her voice, though not of wide range, has 
appealing qualities, her tones being full, round a melo- 
dious.— C. W. 



ALICE SECKELS' MATINEE 

The third concert, for this season, of the Alice 
Seckels' Matinee Musicales, in Oakland, will present 
Lydia Ferguson, mezzo-soprano, in a charming program 
of "chansons en costume,' in the Oakland Hotel Ball- 
room next Tuesday afternoon, at 2:30 p. m. Miss Fer- 
guson's program is distinctive for its variety, present- 
ing in authoritative costume of each country, folk songs 
of France, Brittany and Czecho-Slovakia. 

The New York Evening Post had this to say of Miss 
Ferguson: "Had Lydia Ferguson sung no other inter- 
esting songs at her recital yesterday, the group 'A 
Day in Low Brittany' would have been well worth going 
far to hear. Enchantingly simple, naive songs from the 
heart, the small masteTjJi-eces appealed as only the real 
thing in art can. She aonceived them in a charming 
spirit and presented a fitting picture to the eye, with 
her pretty head bound in a white 'kerchief. She sang 
art songs, also, and sang them well. But the little songs 
of Brittany will be remembered by the hearers when 
others have been forgotten in the fog of many re- 
citals." 

Assisted by Elizabeth Alexander at the piano, the 
following program will be presented: Chansons Popu- 
laires at Satyrsdu XVIII Siecle (en costume) Le Cycle 
du Vin; Les Belles Manieres: Les Filles de la Rochelle; 
Quand On Voit Ca; Le Petit Mari; A Day in Low Brit- 
tany; Sunrise; Working in the Fields; Love Sons: 
Prayer; Angelus; Nightfall: American and Modern 
Spanish — American Indian Lullaby (arranged by 
Loomis), Negro Spiritual (arranged by Burleigh), El 
Pano Moruno (De Falla), Seguedilla Murciana (De 
Falla), Clavelitos (Valvedere) ; Czecho-Slovakia folk 
songs — Pod Tim Nasim (Under Our Cottage Window) 
(arranged by Pisek). Pri Dunaju Saty Peru (arranged 
by Novak), Xe Vydava Saty (arranged by Novak), 
Nestujte Mladenci (The Quest! (arranged by Novak). 

SCHMITZ SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS 

The E. Robert Schniitz Master Session, at Madison, 
■Wis., closed August 26th with the final awarding of 
the scholarship for work acomplished during the six 
weeks session. Two of the contestants were so close 
in their total average (less than one point in difference) 
that the scholarship was divided between them — 
Michael Cross of London, England, and Miss Ruth E. 
Dyer, Ass't. Prof, ot Music at Mt. Holyoke College, Mass. 
A third contestant, Mrs. Edith Rinquest of Denver of 
the faculty of the Blanche Dingley Mathews' School, 
tell only a little over one point below the highest mark, 
and the fourth in grading was Miss Louise Vroman, ot 
the faculty of the Wisconsin School ot Music ot Madi- 
son, Wis. 

Mr. Schmitz announces that this year's average stand- 
ard reached in the written papers on the work ot the 
technique class, exceeded in excellence those of the 
two previous years, and the high grade of work at- 
tained in all six requirements for the scholarship, 
places the work ot this session on a higher plane than 



ever before. This is the third scholarship award, and 
with the advance In each year's standard, an excellence 
of attainment is assured, which is placing the work 
ot these Schmitz Master Classes at an extremely high 
level, and is a credit to the musical work being accomp- 
lished in America. 

Invitations from several cities in different sections 
ot the country have already been given Mr. Schmitz 
for next summer's class. The place decided upon will 
be announced sometime in the late Fall. 



Giacomo Minkowski 



Lorraine Ewing's Pupils — Lorraine Ewing presented her 
junior and intermediate pupils in a piano recital at her 
studio on Ashbury Street last Saturday afternoon, De- 
cember 6th. Solos and duets from the well-known mas- 
ters were interpreted in a manner to reflect great credit 
on teachers and participants. Those taking part included 
the Misses Elizabeth McWood, Marie Matney, Rose 
Smithhurst. Edna Morris. Helen Hoffmann, Mildred Shay, 
Betty Sturmer. Lois Blumenthals, Dorothy Damarell and 
Masters Jack Belz, Edwin Bartlett, Harold Parks and 
Hunter McLaughlin. On Saturday evening, December 
20th, Miss Ewing will present her advanced students in 
a studio recital which will be reviewed in a later issue. 

Betty Sturmer, eleven-year-old pupil of Lorraine Ewing, 
played from KPO on Tuesday afternoon, November 25th. 
Her selections were Poupee Valsante by Poldini and To 
Spring By Grieg. The listeners-in were delighted with 
the interpretation of her two numbers. 



STUDIO ACTIVITIES 

The Durini Vocal Studio will introduce a number of 
pupils in a Yuletide Recital on Saturday evening. De- 
cember 20th when the following program will be pre- 
sented: 

Duett — Dramatic and Mezzo Sopranos — Chi son tu 
chlami (La Gioconda), (Ponchielli), Mrs. 'Violette Whe- 
lan, Mrs. Shirley Hoppin Porter; Basso Cantante — 
Infelice (Ernani) (Verdi), Howard Peck; Lyric Soprano 
— When You Are Far Away (Hull), Anna O'Toole: 
Baritone — (a) Non Ever (Mattel) (b) Because (D'Har- 
delot). John Ostrum. Mezzo Soprano — Habanera (Car- 
men) (Bizet). Mrs. Shirley Hoppin Porter. Lyric Tenor 
— (a) Oh tu che in seno agli angeli (Verdi), (La Forza 
del Destine), (b) Eleanore (Coleridge-Taylor), Louise 
Leimbach; Lyric Soprano — La Primavera (Strauss), 
Alice Bradley: Baritone — (a) Vi Ravisso o luoghi ameni 
(Bellini), (La Sonambula), (b) Clang of the Forge 
(P. Rodney), George E. Smith; Dramatic Soprano 
Mezzo — Pace. Pace mio Dio (La Forza del Destine), 
(Verdi), Mrs. Violette Whelan; Duett — Mezzo Soprano 
and Baritone — Se tu m'ami mio ben (Carmen) (Bizet). 
Mrs. Shirley Hoppin Porter-John Ostrum: Duett — 
Dramatic Soprano and Baritone — La ci darem la mano 
(Don Giovanni) (Jlozart), Mrs. Violette Whelan George 
E. Smith; Mezzo Soprano — Voce di donna o d'angelo 
(La Gioconda). (Ponchielli), Mrs. Shirley Hoppin Por- 
ter; Lyric Soprano — The Wren (Benedict), Alice Brad- 
ley; Duett Gay Butterfly (Hawley), Alice Bradley-Mrs. 
Shirley Hoppin Porter: Dramatic Soprano Mezzo — In 
Loveland (Mana-Zucca), Mrs Violette Whelan; Duett — 
Lyric Soprano and Tenor — Son geloso del zefflro errante 
(La Sonambula), (Bellini), Alice Bradley-Louis Leim- 
bach; Mme. Lillian Slinkey Durini, director and accom- 
panist. 



CONNIE TALMADGE AND COLUMBIA PARK BOYS 

Hollywood — It's been four days since we were in Glen- 
dale, but we'll bet they are laughing yet. For such a 
torrent of laughter was released the night that Con- 
stance Talmadge's newest picture was previewed at a 
small neighborhood theatre that we know it couldn't 
have stopped by this time. Never in all our experience 
have we heard louder and more continuous howls of 
merriment. Constance has come back with a mighty 
"bang." She is splendid as the young American heiress 
who goes to England and "starts things." She is ap- 
pealing, lovely to look upon, and gives a fine per- 
formance. 

And what a cast! Ronald Colman, who proved a sen- 
sation in drama with Lilian Gish in "The White Sister," 
proved that he is also one of the finest of comedians. 
There is a scene where he comes to the castle that he 
has just sold to Connie's father which fact he has for- 
gotten because he is much under the weather — and en- 
ters while Connie is sleeping there. A glass partition 
separates two of the rooms, and the light shines through 
from the second one. There is a scene where Colman 
tries to hang his hat on the shadow of a hat-rack that 
equals the finest things that Charlie Chaplin has ever 
done. Then you know how funny Albert Gran was In 
"Tarnish." He has an even faster role here as the 
American millionaire, and he keeps you laughing every 
minute. Jean Hersholt is the fourth to be cast for big 
opportunities, and Jean, too, sets a new mark for him- 
self. 

Her Night ot Romance was written by Hans Kraeli, 
author of The Marriage Circle, and this is a consider- 
ably superior picture. Sidney Franklin directed and has 
supplied some splendid touches and a high tension of 
action and mirth throughout. 

It's there — in every way. 

P. S.— EXTRA— Even Buster Keaton, who was pres- 
ent, LAUGHED. 

The Columbia Park Boys Band with all new tricks, 
acrobatic stunts and a whole bag full of laugh produc- 
ing comedy material, will be the big feature of the 
stage offering at the Warfield Theatre following the 
Talmadge comedy film. A comedy film, short topical 
reels and the Local Lafs will also be shown. Severi 
and the music masters will provide a concert and ap- 
propriate music with the pictures. 



The Most Popular 

CHRISTMAS GIFT 

The New Necklaces— Smart Paris- 
ian Styles in Great Variety— The 
Unusual in Jewelry and Wrist 
Watches — A Complete Line of 
Jewelry— Reasonable Prices 



J. E. BIRMINGHAM 

Palace Hotel, Opposite Rose Room 
(Main Corridor) 

THE PALACE HOTEL JEWEL SHOP 



FREDERIC 

POWELL 

VOICE SPECIALIST 
TEACHER OF SINGING 

RESTORATION OF LOST OR 
IMPAIRED VOICES 

705 Kohler & Chase BIdg., Tuesdays and Fridays 
Residence Phone Sunset 6524 



Myra Palache 

PIANIST 

LECTURES ON MUSIC 
APPRECIATION 



Francisco Address, 2520 Union Street. 

Phone Walnut 639 
On ^Vednesday, 'J p. m. to 6 p. m. 



Tickets New Selling 

At Sherman, Clay * Co., for the Following 
Selby C. Oppenhe Imer Attractions 



f SOPHIE 

BRASLAU %'''*' 
LEADING CONTRALTO ""iy 

METOOP-CHICAGO OPERA COS 

COLUMBIA, SUNDAY AFTERNOON 

December 14, 2:45 p. m. 
Tickets 50c to $2.00 at Sherman, Clay & Co. 
Daily or at Theatre on Sunday 

lyilSCKIA 

SundayAftn'n 
__ ^ December 21 

kfr^lOLINIST 2:45 p.m. 

Last Recital 

COLUMBIA 
ENTIRE CHANGE OF PROGRAM 

Tickets $1.00 to $3.00 




ElNA^ 



on Sale at She 



Clay & Co. 



SCHUMANN-HEINK 



Is Coming i 
January 
MANAGEMENT SELBY C. OPPENHEIMER 



The larger the circulation of a Music Journal 
the better for the members of the profession and 
student. 



Doxnilicr \2. 1124 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



Music in Berkeley 



Hfrkflcy. Dec. 9, 19L'4. 
Rudiaiia Paznior, mezzo contralto, appeared in a most 
satisfying recital at the Twentieth Century Club, De- 
cember 4. under the management of Zannette W. Pot- 
ter. Miss Pazmor possesses a niaKniflcent instrument 
capable of expressing the entire gamut of emotions. 
Her singing was characterized by splendid musical in- 
telligence, fine diction and dramatic intensity. The 
assisting artists included (ieorge Stewart McManus. 
pianist, Mary Pasmore. violinist, and Dorothy Pasmore, 
"cellist. The program follows: Songs in Russian — The 
Soldier's Wife (Schewtchenko) (Uaehmaninoff ), Still 
Do I See Thy Face (Maikotf) (Rimsky-Korsakoff ), O 
Thou Billowy Harvest-Field (Tolstoi) (Rachmaninoff), 
Hopak (after Schewtohenko) (Mussorgsky). Miss Paz- 
mor; Trio — Brahms, Trio in B major, op. S, George 
Stewart McManus. piano. IXirothy Pasmore, 'cello. Mary 
Pasmore, violin; Songs in Englisli — The Heart Worships 
(Holtz), Over the Mountains (old English), (arranged 
by Robert Quilter), Lullaby (old English) (Peter War- 
lock), As Ever I Saw (old English), by request (Peter 
Warlock), Miss Pazmor: Songs with Trio Accompani- 
ment — The Message (H. Bickford-Pasniore). (.\rlo 
Bates), Mandoline (Verlaine) (arranged by Pasmore) 
(Debussy). Cbere Xuit Adenis (arranged by Pasmore) 
(Bachelet), Adieu Forets (aria from Jeanne d'Arc) 
(Tschaikowsky). 

An interesting Concert-Recital was given Saturday 
evening at the Hillside Club by .Julia Hannas Cochrane, 
violinist, assisted by Kmilie Lancel. mezzo soprano. 
Grace Jurges and Walter Wenzel were the accom- 
panists. All the artists were well received. 

The Etude Club (Mrs. Frank Clark, president) gave 
their Christmas concert Monday. December 8, at the 
Twentieth Century Club, and an informal reception 
followed. The choral section of the club was lieard in 
a group of fine Christmas carols which were beauti- 
fully rendered under the capable direction of Lowell M. 
Redfield. Carrie Emerich. pianist, gave a particularly 
interesting group, including the C Sharp Minor Polo- 
naise (Chopin), Danse (Debussy), and Pan and Cava- 
lier Fantastique (Godard). Mrs. Emerich's playing is 
at all times convincing and poetic; her tone is musical 
and of splendid volume, almost vocal in fact but never 
forced. 

otiiers appearing on the program included Henry L. 
Perry. Mrs. H. B. Jacobus. Mrs. Martin Warner, Mrs. 
R. II. Mower, Florence Ruth Brown, Claire H. Upshur, 
Dnrnthy Dunyon, Selma Mayer, Dorothy Wines Reed. 
Mrs Milton Schutes and Mrs. Schnabel. 

F. P. M. 



NEW EDWARDS COIVIPOSITION TO BE HEARD 

George Edwards, well known member of the faculty 
of the Arrillaga Musical College, will present an anthem 
composed for the celebration of the hundredth anni- 
versary of the birth of Thomas Starr King. The cele- 
bration of this event is to be held at the First Unitarian 
Church, Sunday morning. December 14th. The new 
anthem has been w'ritten for tenor solo, chorus and 
on;:in accompaniment to the following poem by Bret 
Ihiite upon hearing of the news of the death of the 
i:n :it California pioneer. 

RrliovInK (liinrd 
[■ (In Memoriam Thomas Starr King) 

Came the relief. "What, sentry, ho! 

How passed the night of thy long waking?" 
"Cold, cheerle.ss, dark, as may befit 

The hour before the dawn is breaking." 



No sight? No 


The p 


over f 


And in 


your V 


An ho 


ur ago 


A star? 


There 


No. n 


ithing. 


Someho 


r it se 


Soniev 


vhere h 



the 



Dthing. 



ulllng. 



's nothing strange in tha 
but above the thicket 
med to me that God 
had just relieved a picket. 



BIIKT IIAUTi:. 



program will open and close with Christmas carols in 
special stage settings: Hark, the Herald Angels Sing 
(Mendelssohn), At Sea (from the Golden Legend) (Dud- 
ley Buck), The Big Brown Bear (Mana Zuca). Tenor 
Solos— Star Vlclno (Salvator Rosa), Thine Eyes Still 
Shincd (Edwin Schneider), Charity (Richard Hege- 
man). Lolita (Huzzi-Peccia), Charles F. Bulotti; Jesus 
of Nazareth (Gounod), with Baritone Solo by Carl F. 
Volker. Mostjuitoes (Paul Bliss); Aria for Soprano — 
Thou Brilliant Bird, from Perle du Bresil (David). Mme, 
Lorna Lachmund, accompanied on flute by Kathlyn 
Woolf; A Plainsman's Song (Paul Bliss), Going Home 
(from the New World Symphony) (Dvorak); Duet for 
Soprano and Tenor — Parigi. O Cara (from opera La 
Traviata) (Verdi), Mme. l,a<'hmund and Mr. Bulotti; 
The Waits (Past Three O'clock) (Tune London Walts), 
Mah Lindy Lou (Strickland), O, Holy .Night (Cantique 
de Noel) (Adams), Charles F. Bulotti and the Orpheus. 
The concert will be under the direction of Edwin 
Dunbar Crandall, with Bessie Beatty Roland at the 
piano. 



The members of the Junior San Francisco Club under 
the direction of Lillian Birmingham will present the 
program at the regular meeting of the San Francisco 
Musical Club. Thursday, December IS, at 10:30. The 
• members participating will be Evelyn Merrill, Julia 
Merrill, Marie Carroll, Amelia Suateque, Marian ?;ng- 
lish. Vivian Shaw, Dorothy Scholy, Dorothy Frishie, 
Helen Heilbrouner, Aileen Nichols. Marian Henderson, 
Dorothy Bostwick, Dorothy Bass, Elizabeth Coghlan, 
Virginia Coghlan. A charming Christmas Fantasy is 
being prepared by these young people. They will be 
assisted by the Junior Orchestra of the Community 
School of Music, under the direction of Miss Gertrude 
Field. 



MUNICIPAL CONCERT 



The latest of the great line of Auer pupils to win 
laurels in the American musical world is Miss Cecilia 
Hansen, young Russian violinist, who will appear as 
guest artist with the San tVanclsco Symphony Or- 
chestra, Alfred Hertz, conductor, in the third municipal 
'pop" concert, the night of December 19. Miss Hansen 
began her musical career at an early age. studying un- 
der Zukovsky, now a member of the Chicago Symphony 
Orchestra. She recently renewed acquaintance with 
her old master in a concert given with the great Chi- 
cago organization. Later the young Russian continued 
her studies under Professor Leopold Auer, and won 
first prize at the Petrograd Conservatory in 1914. Her 
classmates were Jascha Heitetz and Toscha Seidel. 

The World War interrupted her plans for an Euro- 
pean tour and she played successful concerts in Russia 
for a few years. She escaped from Bolshevik Russia, 
made a triumphant debut, and gave concerts in Finland, 
Austria, Germany and Scandinavia. Little more than a 



should sing. The same Is equally true In her singing of 
Spanish, French, Russian, German, English, or whatever 
medium she chooses. 

The following review gives a fairly good Idea of her 
style: 

"This Is but one way of trying to explain Isa K'-emer 
as a song-Interpreter of simply amazing resources. Vo- 
cally, dramatically and linguistically she Is equipped as 
is no other singer who conies to mind, and it Is evident 
at every moment that she has prepared each song with 
Infinite attention to Its possibilities as a miniature music 
drama. Nothing Is overlooked, from (he slKDlflcant 
twitch of a skirt to the eloi|uent lift of a linger; but 
nothing Is overdone. Pause and pose are assets per- 
fectly understood by this faseinallng little chinteuse. 
So Is the art of pictorial atlire. With smoothly parted 
and brushed (not bobbed, thank heaven!) black hair 
she wears large ear-rings entirely suited to her oriental 
type and puts on frocks of bold silhouette, bright color- 
ing and generous drapery. 

She is altogether almost weirdly exciting lo both the 
eye and the ear; somebody who stands quite alone in 
her field and who is unlikely to encounter any serious 
competition for a good while to come, at least In the 
United States." 

Miss Kremer will also sing In Oakland at the Lurle 
Theatre Monday evening. Deeomher IB. 



CHAMBER MUSIC SOCIETY 

On December 15th. the Chamber Music Society of 
San Francisco will appear In the second concert of Miss 
Potter's Oakland series, the first of which was so suc- 
cessful that the concert bad to ho transferred from the 
Oakland Hotel ballroom lo the .\udltorlum Theatre. 
The greatest inteiest has been arouseil in Oakland In 
the appearance of the Chamber Music Society, and this 
success has been heretofore unprecedented In Oakland. 
The program for Monday evening will be: Frank 
Bridge — Quar(et. E minor, for strings; Brand(s-Buys — 
Quintet. D major, for flute and strings; Beethoven — 
Scherzo; Schubert — Variations (Death and the Maiden) 
from the D minor quartet: Haydn — Vivace for String 
Quartet. 



FITZGERALD'S for the cAd-vancement of SMusic 

Eleanor Woodford 

This brilliant dramatic soprano is now filling many en- 
gagements. She has taken Constance Balfour's class while 
the latter is in Europe, and was chosen from a list of 
twenty applicants for the position of Soloist of the Temple 
Baptist t;hurch of Los Angeles. In addition to a voice of 
fine dramatic quality, she possesses a magnetic personality. 
Siie uses the sweet-toned, singing 

KNABE 

exclusively, and says. "It is the perfection of harmony." 



iFFfMMIfBll MUSiccalJ/ 



HILL STREET 



AT 7S7-729 




LOS ANGELES 



ROSEMARY ROSE 



A Singer Who Teaches — Consolidates Her Studios 

Formerly of Milwaukee, Sheboygan 

and Plymouth 

In Los Angeles 

437 SO. KEN.MOHK STUKKT TKI,. .lOTBlN 

AuiUllonn ll>' Alilinlnlmrnt Onlj- 

Ruth llrodman, UcicUlrar 



CHARI.es BOWES 

TEACHER OF VOICE 

44n S. <iriin<l Vim. I*hi>nr R54llin. I.oa AnKrIr 



L. E. Behymer 

MANAGER OF DISTINGUISHED ARTI8T8 

Executive Officec 

706 Auditorium BIdg., Loi Angels* 



ABBIE NORTON JAMISON 

PIANO — IIARltlOW — VOCAI. rOACH 

Siirellll I'Iniio Vormiil «ln»H.-» 

Sliidlo: <I02 Soulhern Callfornln Muxic Co. lllilK. 

1117 Wl-»< al»< .SlriTt T.-l.-lihi.n.- Ilraeiin 77 



Alexander Bevani 

Al.l. ilHAX lli:» OF TllK 

VOCAL ART 

Studloi 012 So. Calif. M«alc Co. BIdv* 
Trlrphonr N22-n2a 



i OAKLAND ORPHEUS CLUB CONCERT 

A contribution to the Yuletide season will be the 
■ concert of the Oakland Orpheus, scheduled at the \uA\- 
;torium Theatre. Oakland, Tuesday evening, December 
16th. The annual Christmas concert marks the be- 
ginning of the thirty-first season of this popular musical 
organization, whose influence has been a factor in the 
development of good choral music in the Bay Region. 
Composed of almost one hundred business and profes- 
sional men who lend their voices and financial support 
' for its maintenance, the training has developed an en- 
.' semble and tonal quality equal to the best singing so- 

icieties in America. 
That the community appreciates the aims and accom- 
plishments of the Orpheus is attested by the fact that 
the seating capacity at its concerts is inadequate, al- 
I though no tickets are sold to the public. The following 



year ago she made her American debut in New York 
Enthusiastic reports of her Eastern concerts influenced 
Supervisor J. Emmet Hayden, chairman of the Audi- 
torium Committee, to engage Miss Han.sen tor an ap- 
pearance in the city popular series. Seats are now sell- 
ing for the concert at ."jO and ".'> cents and $1.00. 

ISA KREMER 

"Live the Life. Sing the Song" Is the motto of Isa 
Kremer, famous International balladisl, who comes to 
San Francisco for two concerts, the first at Scottish Rite 
Hall Friday evening. Dec. 12 and Sunday afternoon at 
the Alcazar Theatre under the management of the El- 
wyn Concert Bureau Miss Kremer has the unusual gift of 
being able to Interpret the folk songs of nearly all nations 
so realistically that when she sings Italian, and Italian 
would think that that was the real tongue in which she 



ILYA BRONSON ,.„„.r^''nlc"o'rVk,.,r 
I.oa Anicrlra Trio. I'lillhar 



A.KOODLACIl 

VIOLIN MAKKH A\ll IIKI-AIHBB 

<'onnolaa<-ar — AppraUrr 
SOS Majrallr Thi-nlrr lli iill.. I.oa Anm-lr. Tlirktr 4OI0 

JOHN SMALLMAN 

ii\i<n<i.M;— TK\ciii;n ok si><;i\o 



ZOELLNER CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

I.OS ASCJKI.KN 
IIM Wl.d.or noulrTurd «SIR HoilTwood BouUTSr* 



PACIFIC COAST ^ilUSICAL RE\"IE\V 



December 12, 1924 



CLAIRE DUX ^.Ztrrz 



CONCERT MANAGEMENT ARTHUR JUDSON 
FISK BUILDING. NEW YORK CITY 



LIEDER SINGER 

BRUNSWICK RECORD 



Impending Musical Events 



ELMAN TO PLAY AGAIN 

Following the tumultuous acclaim with which Mischa 
Elman was received at his recital last Sunday afternoon 
comes the good news that the great Russian violinist 
is to play once more for his thousands of San Francisco 
admirers. Enthusiasm such as was witnessed last week 
has rarely fallen to the lot of a visiting artist, and in 
return a visiting artist has rarely given as gloriously of 
his art as Elman did to his auditors last Sunday. Criti- 
cal reviews of his achievements, in the San Francisco 
newspapers reached the point of highest enthusiasm. 

"Elman gets out of his violin every nuance of mean- 
ing and beauty that it possesses." "Underneath the sur- 
face of his brilliant technique is a continuous warmth, 
and his lyric tone holds an admirable singing and car- 
rying quality takes on deeper hues." "Violinist » • " 
rose higher than in any of his previous appearances in 
San Francisco." These and many other laudatory ex- 
cerpts of the pen of Redfern Mason, Ray Brown. MoUie 
Merrick and other San Francisco writers, attest to the 
conquest of his hearers made by Elman. 

With Josef Bonime. the eminent pianist, again in the 
role of accompanist. Elman will play a program en- 
tirely different from his first offering, at the Columbia 
Theatre, Sunday afternoon, December 21st. This will 
positively be his final recital appearance in San Fran- 
cisco this season, and he will play the promised Fan- 
tasie Rapsodique by Albert Dupuis which was omitted 
from his last Sunday's program. This composition is 
from the pen of the Belgian composer, was written some 
time ago but has never before been presented in 
America. It is said to be of extraordinary musical pro- 
portions and a work of profound merit. Other pro- 
gramed numbers include the Bach-Nachez Partita, in B 
minor, the Barbella-Nachez Lullaby, Elman's arrange- 
ments of "Contredanse" by Beethoven and Nocturne by 
Grieg, the Brahms-Joachim Hungarian Dance in A 
major, Auer's arrangement of Lenski's aria from Eugen 
Onegin, Palmgren's Oriental Seienade. Wagner-Wil- 
helmj Albumblatt and I Palpiti by Paganini. 



THE DENISHAWN DANCERS 

Those who love music know that there is always a 
treat in store for them in the program of the Denishawn 
Dancers, for Ruth St. Denis and Ted Shawn, aided by 
their able musical director, Louis Horst, always suc- 
ceed in bringing music of the highest quality to the ac- 
companiment of all their dances, and especially so in 
the music visualization section. This year the tendency 
runs to the modern note, but not into the freakish and 
grotesque moderns. Among the two score compositions 
which will be visualized are Suite for Piano and Violin 
by Eduard Schutt, Three Preludes by Scriabin, Adagio 
Pathetique by Godard, and Voices of Spring by Strauss, 
all of which are on the first program, to be given Mon- 
day and Tuesday nights and Wednesday afternoon, at 
the Curran Theatre, 

On this program, as well, are the Brahms Waltz (opus 
39. No. 15) and the Liszt Liehestraum. Ted Shawn will 
visualize the Adagio Pathetique of Godard in a Sculp- 
ture Plastique maner. His plastic movement is the re- 
sult of the combination of great beauty of conception 
with extraordinary muscular control, which produces 
an even and unbroken flow from posture to posture, the 
whole dance being performed on a large pedestal. It 
Is truly living sculpture. The opening and closing pic- 
ture of the Voices of Spring danced by the Denishawn 
Dancers will be an exact replica of the famous Botti- 
celli painting, Spring. 



SOPHIE BRASLAU AT COLUMBIA 

Charming Sophie Braslau, one of the few native sing- 
ers who is held in as high esteem in England as in this 
country, will face a houseful of her admirers at the 
Columbia Theatre Sunday afternoon. The story of the 
rise of Braslau fills an important page in American 
musical history. Her discovery by Gatti-Casazza at the 
home of a prominent singing teacher in New York, from 
whom she was taking vocal training, her engagement by 
the Metropolitan and her meteoric rise to fame and 
position with the foremost of the world's operatic or- 
ganizations has been told and retold, and forms the 
most striking example of the possibility of rise to the 
top by an American artist. This is her third tour to 
California in as many years, a record rarely achieved 
by any singer or instrumentalist, but according to her 
manager. Selby C. Oppenheimer. justified by the de- 
mand to hear her every season by music lovers. She is 
unique among recitalists, being the one big operatic star 
whose concert programs are at once fascinating and 
important musically. Louise Lindner will be at the 
piano and tickets are obtainable at Sherman, Clay & 
Co. or at the Columbia Sunday. The program follows; 
Ah Perflda (Beethoven), Liebesbotschaft, Der Doppel- 
ganger, Erlking (Schubert); Water-Boy (Negro song) 



(arranged by .\very Robinson I, Londonderry Air (old 
Irish) (arranged by Bibb). Christmas (Werner Josten), 
The Singing Girl of Shan (Alice Harnett). IMother of 
Lilies (Cecil Forsyth). To One Who Passed Whistling 
Thru the Xight (C. Armstrong Gibbs). The Old Refrain 
(Kreisler); Night (Rubinstein), Pastorale (Stravinsky). 
The Little Fish Song (Arensky). Dneipr (by request) 
(Moussorgsky), Malaguenas (Pagano). 



SCHUMANN-HEINK 



Local veterans of the World War are understood to 
be arranging a fitting welcome to Mme. Schumann- 
Heink when the famous contralto arrives here to sing 
on Sunday afternoon. January 11th. at the New Colum- 
bia Theatre (formerly the Tivoli). 

Known as "Mother" to thousands of doughboys and 
gobs to whom she sang almost continuously during and 
after the war in camp and in hospital, she is remem- 
bered gratefully for the lavish use of her glorious voice 
for their comfort and cheer. They have not forgotten 
her tact, her sympathy and her unfailing sense of 
humor. Most of all, they remember that no call has 
ever been made upon her time or her talents that has 
not been met as ^promptly as possible, no matter what 
the circumstances, and generally at her own expense. 
Probably no other person, certainly no other artist, is 
held by them in such affectionate esteem, and there are 
no other interests so absorbing to the greatest of con- 



NEW SONGS FOR TEACHER AND SINGER 

It's a Mighty Good World O'Hara 

Golden Moon .. Roll 

Come to My Heart Enghsh 
Wood Fairies .... Wilfrid Jones 

Brown Bird Singing Wood 

Land of Might Have Been Novello 

Rose Marie of Normandy Del Rigo 

Spring Comes Laughing Carew 

Beauty Lohr 

Piper of Love Carew 

Love's a Merchant Carew 

The Market Carew 

Among the Willows Phillips 

A Good Heart All the Way Clarke 

Dancing Time in Kerry Hampson 

Sweet Navarre Carne 

My Heart's Haven Phillips 

Love Pipes of June Day 

My Little Island Home Baden 

Ragged Vagabond Randolph 

CHAPPELL-HARMS, INC. 
185 Madison Avenue New York City 



traltos as those of "My boys." She has been the guest 
of honor at more veteran dinners, meetings, reunions 
and conventions than even any official in the country. 
Mme. Schumann-Heink comes to San Francisco un- 
der the management of Selby C. Oppenhe 



LORING CLUB CONCERT 

The program announced for the Christmas Concert of 
the Loring Club — this being the Second Concert of the 
Club's Forty eighth Season — at Scottish Rite Auditorium 
on the evening of Tuesday. December 16th. includes a 
number of compositions for men's voices to be heard on 
that occasion for the first time in San Francisco. 

Among these is an unusual work by Arnold Bax, one 
of the most famous of the Modern English Group of 
Composers, the words which he has set to music being 
a Carol of the Fifteenth Century entitled Now Is the 
Time of Christmas. This composition for chorus of 
men's voices and solo violin with accompaniment of 
strings and piano, is of boisterous gaiety and makes 
strenuous demands on all the performers; among the 
composer's directions is that one portion shall be simg 
"riotously." 

Another attractive new number is Frederic Field Dul- 
lard's Hunting Song (Oh, Who Would Stay) from his 
opera King Arthur, while Schumann's The Dreamy Lake 
is practically new to the Club program, as it has not 
been sung since sometime prior to the Fire of 1906; 
this beautiful composition of Schumann's is a capella. 
while Bullards' Hunting Song has the accompaniment of 
strings and piano. In response to the many requests 
that the program include Adolphe Adam's Cantique de 
Noel (O Holy Night) with Charles Gounod's Nazareth 
and Ring Out. Wild Bells, and the Old Carols. The First 
Nowell. The Boar's Head Carol. The Wassail Song, 
these and some others will be sung. 

The soprano soloist will be Mrs. Juanita Tennyson, 
who will sing groups of songs and with the Club in 
Adolphe Adam's Cantique de Noel. The accompaniments 
will be by Benjamin S. Moore, piano, and eight strings 
with William F. Laraia as principal violin. The con- 
cert will be directed by Wallace A. Sabin. 



SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

ja t roeoM£MTZ - • • - - CONOUCTOt*. 

POPULAR CONCERT 
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 21, 2:45 P.M. 

Curran Theatre 
Soloist: EUGENIA ARGIEWICZ BEM 

Violinist 



Tickets at Sherman, Ciay & Co. or at Theatre 
on Day of Concert 



George Lipschultz 

Musical Director and Violin Soloist 

^— . 

Loew's State Theatre 

Los Angeles 



LoEW's warfielD 

CONSTANCE TALMADGE 



In Her Niftiest, Zippiest Co 



edy 



"HER NIGHT OF ROMANCE" 



Severi 
Music 
Masters 



Oswald's 

Jazz 
Orchestra 



COLUMBIA PARK BOYS-100 OF 'EM-100 

New Tricks and Comedy Stmits>-Starts Saturday 



Elwin A. Calberg 

PIANIST .\ND TEACHKR 
1st retarned from New York mid Paris. Prano 

Soloist and Accompanist 
Available Season 1924-1925 



Residence Studio S12 IDast IGlIi St., Oakia 
Phone: Slerritt 3.S<i« 



STENGER VIOLINS 

Exemplify Intrinsic Excellence and Are 
Pre-eminently Superior 

A life's devotion of uninterrupted study and labor, 
InvolvinK the mastery of principles of musical 
acoustics, timber physics, and enfrlneeringr, ha* 
yielded the understandinK of those principles which 
eiempllfy the "Stenser Idea" in violin niaklne, and 
mark the beeinnlng of a new era in this noble art. 

W. C. STENGER 

INCORPORATED 

Maker of Fine rioHns 
617-618 Stein way Hall. Chicago 



It is just as much to the interest ot the musical pr« ' 
fession to have a music journal widely circulated amosj 
the musical public as it is in the interests ot the pul 
lication. There are problems which none other but % 
music journal will discuss. 






nccfinlicr 12, 1924 



PACIinc COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



** MABEL RIEGELMAN * * 

PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO, CHICAGO GRAND OPERA COMPANY. ADDRESS: SECRETARY TO MABEL RIEGELMAN. -185 CALIFORNIA ST., SAN FRANCISCO 



E. ROBERT SCHMITZ 

CELEBRATED FRENCH PIANIST 

Master Class January 13-26. 1925 — Technic and Interpretation 



FOR TERMS, PARTICULARS, ETC., ADDRESS 

IDA G. SCOTT 

Kohler & Chase Building, Kearny 6417 




KAJETAN ATTL 

SOLO HARPIST, SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 



I'or Concert lOnRatcenientN and InMtructlon .\ppl7 
men Kuhlcr .V < bnae Ulile.. Tel. DouKlnn KITH, on 
Wednendnf nnd Salurdar Aflernoonn O.M.Y. lleal- 
dence Plume I'rnnklln 7.>i47. 



ji ST <ii t: 

A METHOD FOR THE HARP 

11} Kiijeliin .4111 

C'ARI. I'lSIIIOIt. fuhlliiher 

or Sale at Sherman, Clay •£ Co.. Kobler & Ctaaae. 
Henry Grobe and Kajetan AttI 



AUDREY BEER SOREL 

PIANIST — TE.%CHER 



ALFRED HURTGEN 

PIAMST. AfCOMI'AMST. MrsiCAl, niRECTOR. 

COACH. IMAXO IXSTRIICTIO.X 
Stadio: 27TS I'nion Street Tel. Fillmore 8240 



ELWYN ARTIST SERIES 

ISA KREMER 

Interniillonal llnlliidlnl 

TWO CONCERTS 

Scottish Rite Hall, Friday Evening, December 12 
Alcazar Theatre, Sunday Matinees, December 14 
Oakland, Lurie Theatre, Monday Evening, Dec. 15 

Tl.-kets at Sherman. < lay .«; Co. 
M.WAGKME.NT ELWVN CONCERT DUREAII 



THE PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL 
REVIEW 

HAS FOl GUT FOR THE RESIDENT ARTIST 

Dl'RI.\G THE LAST TWE.\TV-T\VO YEARS — IS 

SICH A PAI'ER WORTH SUnsCKlDING FORf 

IP SO, DON'T WAIT ANY LONGER. 



MADAME 


JOHANNA 


KRISTOFFY 


Prima Donna Soprano 


Has Returned from Europe 


and Reopened Her 


Studio at 


740 PINE STREET 


M 


Phone Douglas 6624 



Mrs. William Steinbach 



VOICE CI i.rCRE 



ACHILLE L. ARTIGUES 

■ ^rncliiiile of Si'hola Canloruni. I'arln. Or- 

K.ini-1 St. .Mary-» Cathedral. I'lnno l>e- 

linrlMifiit. Hamlin School. tlrf^iin and 

I'l.ino. Arrlllaiia Mnnl.al Cnllrur 

KIKT VON GKIDZINSKI 

'• BARITOVE — VOICE CI I. TIRE 

i AathorUed to Teaeh Mme. Scboen- 
I Rene'it >letbod 

It 1314 Leavennrorth SI. Phone Pronpeet »2Xt 

EVA M. GARCIA 



PIERRE DOUILLET. PIANO 
NITALIA DOUILLET, VOICE 

.lor. Kohlir ,V < has.- lllil. Tel. Sutler 7:is 

DOMENICO BRESCIA"" 

\ (IKE SI'Et lAI.IST — COMPOSITION 

Sludlo: IIU3-«(>4 Kohler ><L I hase llulldhu 

Phone Kearny r.ir.l 

Madame Charles Poulter— Soprano 

\ olee Culture. Plnno 

Realdenee Studio. .'iSS :7th Street 

Oakland — Tel. Oakland 20711 

Mary Coonan McCrea 



Tel. llouKlna .12:13. IteK. lei. Kearny 23 III 

MRS. A. F. BRIDGE 



HELEN COLBURN HEATH 

Soprano Sololxt. Temple Enianu El. Co 

eert and Churek Work. Voeal Inxtruelli 

2.">:t!l Clay Street. Phone WeMt 4SItO 

HENRIK GJERDRUM 

PI.\MST 



Laura Wertheimber 

I'reparatory Teaeher for 

.>lra. Noah llraudt 

2311 Srott St. Telephone Fillmore Ili22 

Evelyn Sresovich Ware 

aulat and .leeompnnli 

IHiri Kohler « Chaxe 

Phone Garlleld 1172:9 

Joseph George Jacobson 



isaukuj: marks 

tt)i\TRAl.TO 

i:i3S 2nth Avenue Phone Sunael 2095 

Voire Culture, MondayN P. M. r.Ull Kohler 

.V Chane llldK. Tel. linrlleld 1172 



CAROLINE E. IRONS 

Pianist and Teacher 
3831 Mera Street Tel. Fruitvale 778W 



MACKENZIE GORDON 



ANTOINE DE VALLV 



ROSE RELDA CAILLEAU JoSCph GrCVeil 

Opera Coniique, Paris r 



SIGMUND BEEL 

Maaler < laaaea for Violin 

Studio lluildinK. 1.173 Post Streel 

Tel. Walnut III 

MARY ALVERTA MORSE 

SOPKA.MI 
Teacher of SlnKlnKl Studio, Tuesday and 
Friday, Kohler .<L I ha>e illds.. -'<. E.i Ilenl- 
denee Studio, Ills Santa Ro»a Ave.. Oak- 
land. Phone Humboldt 1111. 

SAN FRANCISCO CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 



MRS. CARROLL NICHOLSON 



Brandt's Conservatory of Music 

2211 Seolt Street, llet. I lay .«: Waxhlnclon 
Mr. iVoah llrandl. Violin 
Mm. Noah llrandt. Piano 

ALMA SCHMIDT -KENNEDY 



Phone llerke 



ItlHMI 



n2l Jaekxon St 



I'lllmnre 32r,« 



MKS. ZAY RECTOK BKVITT 

PIANO and RARMONT 

Institute of Music of San Francisco. 
Kohler & Chase BlrtE. Tel. Kearny .S454 



Dorothy Goodsell Camm MARION RAMON WILSON 

•^ flrnninti.. Cntrtiltn On*... S.i ,.r.e««eit In 



COI.OR.tTIRA SOPH WO 
Teaeher of Rel Canto. Tel. Ilayview 3S.3D 
or Piedmont 1330. Uy Appointment Only. 



Contralto. Oper 
Kurope. Concert Sueceaaen in the I'nited 
States. Addreas: 1N2.'. f.eavennrnrtb Street. 
Telephone Franklin 3S»1. 



Voice Culture ; — Opera, Oratorio, 
Concert and Church Singing in all 
languages. 

MRS. J. GREVEN 

Piano and Harmony 

S741 Sacramento St. Tel. Bayview 5278 

TEACHERS' DIRECTORY 



MISS EDITH CAUBU 
376 Sutter Street Phone Douglas J«» 

JANET ROWAN HALE 
Kohler A Chase BIdfl. Tel. Kearny 5454 

MISS LORRAINE EWING 
833 Ashbury St. Phone Hemlock 749 

RUTH VIOLA DAVIS 
515 Buena Vista Avenue— Park 341 

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3325 Octavia St. Phone Filmore 6102 

It a music Journal is worth while to 
publish programs and views of musical 
events, it is worth -wh4Ie to patronize. 



MME. M. TRCMBONI 
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JACK EDWARD HILLMAN 
601 Kohler & Chase Uldg. Kearny .1464 

ADELE ULMAN 
178 Commonwealth Ave. Ph. Bayview 8196 

VIRGINIA PIERCE ROVERE 

Sluilio IIIU:! KnhkT & Cluisi' I!1iIk. 
Caill.ld ilTL'L' 



JULIUS HAUG 

4032 Irving St. Tel. Sunset 436 

HOTHER WISMER 
3701 Clay Street Phone Bayview 7780 

ARTHUR CONRADI 
906 Kohler & Chase Bldg Tel Kearny 64H 

G. JOLLAIN 
376 Sutter St. Tel. Kearny 2637 

MARY PASMORE 
2009 Green St. Tel. Fillmore 9071 

The De Vally Opera Institute presented 
Bpvcral advuntod piiplls before the mem- 
bers and guests of the SI. Francis Con- 
clave No. 15. Order of the Red Cross of 
Conslantine, on Saturday evening. No- 
vember 8th. The program was marlied by 
gratlfvlng artistry and excellent taste, 
for wlilrh t!ic 111' Vally Opera Institute 
Is known throughout the Pacific Coast. 
The students appearing included: Misses 
Selma Mayer, soprano, and IClsle Julller- 
at, contralto, and Geoige O Davis, bari- 
tone. Miss Sally Osborne furnished ex- 
cellent piano accompaniments. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



December 12, 1924 



ADVANCED COACHING 

THE ART OF INTERPRETATION— SOLFEGE 

NORMAL COURSES 

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One of the Oldest Banks in California. 

the Assets of which have never been increased 

by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member .Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1924 

Assets $93,198,226.96 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 3,900,000.00 

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Attention 

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•THE'AMPICO- 

Alone— and unassisted this musical marvel re' creates in youi 
home the playing of the master mMsicians. — -who have "myster 
lously endowed it with all the music of the world," and who also 
pronounce it the world's most magnificent musical instrument. 

BY AN OVERWHELMING 
MAJORITY- MORE OF THE 
^VORLD'S GREAT PIANISTS 
OF THE PAST THREE GEN- 
ERATIONS MAY BE HEARD 
ON THE AMPICO (AND ON 
THE AMPICO ALONE)THAN 
ON ANY OTHER MUSICAL 
INSTRUMENT • ALL THIS 
MUSICAL AVEALTH IS 
^VITHIN YOUR MEANS 
ON A BASIS "WE SHALL 
BE GLAD TO ARRANGE 
FOR YOU • COME IN • HEAR 
YOUR AMPICO -AND HEAR 
OUR PLAN 

•KOHLER er- CHASE • 



26 O'FARRELL STREET . SAN FRANCISCO 
SiS Mtli Street 2460 Mission Street 

OAKLAND yS\. SAN FRANCISCO 
SAN ]OSE y^ .Jb^ SACRAMENTO 



KNABE 




AMHCO 



^rifir (hs^i 




THE OLDEST MUSICAL JOURNAL IN THE GREAT WEST 



VOL.XVII.no. 11 



HB 



SAN FRANCISCO, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1924 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



OLD AND NEW WORKS PLEASE AT SYMPHONY TWO CONCERTS OF A CONTRASTING NATURE 



Beethoven's Pastorale Symphony Retains Its Youthful Freshness — Respig- 
hi's Ballade of the Gnomides Reveals Startling Realism and Extraor- 
dinary Skillful Scoring— Muri Silba Interprets Chopin Con- 
certo in a Manner Worthy of an Artist of First Rank 



BY ALFRED 

! Like a refreshing zepliyr breeze tlie 
Beethoven Pastoral Symphony inaugur- 
ated the program of the fourth pair of 
symphonv concerts at the Curran Thea- 
tre on Friday and Sunday afternoons. 
December 12th and 14th. Surely a com- 
position that retains, after considerably 
over a hundred years, the freshness and 
fragrance which characterized it at the 
time of its tirst performance belongs to 
the immortal works of musical litera- 
ture. And when we consider that a 
number of the modern and ultra-modern 
works are played a few times and for- 
gotten we become more and more con- 
vinced that so far no genius has arisen 
on the musical horizon whose works 
possess the longevity of those of the 
masters of whom Richard Strauss is pos- 
sibly the last one. 




MME. ERNESTINE SCHUMANN- 
HEINK 
The World's Greatest Contralto and 
America's Most Popular Singer. Who 
Will Appear in San Francisco on Sunday 
Afternoon, January 11th. Under Selby C. 
Oppenheimer's Direction 

Some time ago we stated that Percy 
Grainger told us the difference between 
the old and the new school of composi- 
tion to be that the old masters prin- 
cipally described certain conditions and 
emotions, while the ultra-modern school 
deals solely with the mental processes 
of the composer while experiencing cer- 
tain conditions or emotions. However, 
we find in this pastoral symphony much 
that is felt by the composer as he wrote 
this work. But while we understand 
what Beethoven tells, and while we re- 
joice in the beautiful sentiments which 
this work conveys, most of the ultra- 
modern compositions leave us puzzled 
and confused. Beethoven touches our 
lieart and makes us happy and contented, 
the ultra-modern composer touches our 
mind and gets us excited or confused. 

It is too late now to analyze this sym- 
phony. It has been done quite frequently 
and by better writers than we are. but at 
the same time we feel tempted to re- 
joice in a work that says so much in 
so modest and unassuming a manner 



METZGER 

and that brings the freshness of the 
rustic outdoors into the concert room. 
Alfred Hertz was at his best when con- 
ducting this work He showed that he 
loved it and consequently he put his 
whole heart and soul into giving it a 
most appealing expression. The mem- 
bers of the orchestra responded readily 
and played with that exceptional refine- 
ment and suavity which this work so 
greatly requires. The writer certainly 
enjoyed listening to this symphony and 
more than ever convinced that anyone 
who sneers at Beethoven, as so many of 
the ultra-modern disciples are prone to 
do, the less we think of their taste and 
intelligence. 

In striking contrast to the convention- 
ality of Beethoven's Pastoral Symphony 
was Respighi's Ballade of the Gnomides. 
If you enjoy the lines to which this music 
has been written and the licentiousness 
which pictures the themes and episodes, 
then you will enjoy the music written 
for it. for the music is indeed a worthy 
sequel to the story. If you are repelled by 
(he experiences of the "filthy husband" 
and the "cruel widows" whom "a wild 
frenzy possesses," then, if you are sensi- 
tive, you will be repelled by the music, 
for the latter does not in any way ideal- 
ize or refine the story. The music at 
times is as "filthy" as the husband and 
as frenzied as the widows. And neces- 
sarily timid natures must shrink from it. 

But as an intellectual proposition the 
music is one of the most sKillfuUy de- 
signed programmatic works we heve ever 
listened to. It is scored with a knack 
for color effects and bizarre combina- 
tions of instrumental groups that is posi- 
tively uncanny. The composer has so 
successfully mastered the tone paintings 
of the powerful episodes of the poet that 
at times you are startled with a realism 
of the music. Naturally such music re- 
quires exceptional musicianship for ade- 
quate interpretation. Mr. Hertz has 
succeeded in briUgmg out the nio-^i grip- 
ping phases of the work with thrilling 
effectiveness and the musicians, notwith- 
standing the almost unsurmountable 
technical difficulties of the score, espec- 
ially those of woodwinds, interpreted the 
works with apparent ease and consistent 
discrimination in phrasing. 

This exceptional program closed with 
the Choipin E minor concerto No. 1, 
played by Muri Silba. a pianist of ex- 
ceptional ability. Some of our friends 
and colleagues sort of condescendingly 
speak of this young pianist as being on 
the way of becoming a first class artist. 
We do not think that any condtscension 
is necessary. Miss Silba is already an 
artist of the first rank And we can 
not believe that she is just beginning to 
make herself known. We are willing to 
wager something handsome that Miss 
Silba is an experienced concert artist 
who has achieved triumphs elsewhere 
and does not come to San Francisco to 
begin a career. Miss Silba needs no ex- 
cuses. She played the Chopin concerto 
with an artistry, an intelligence, a Judg- 
ment and a fluency of technic that stamps 
her immediately as a virtuoso of the first 
rank. Of coure, she is young, and, like 
all great artists, she will gradually ma- 
ture and broaden as her experience in- 
creases. But she is today an artist 
worthy to appear with any symphony 
orchestra in the world and Alfred Hertz 
surely had to make no concessions to add 
her to the list of distinguished soloist.^ 
appearing with the San Francisco Sym- 
phony Orchestra. 

The brilliancy of her runs and octave 
passages, the softness of her pianissimi, 
the colorful variety of her phrasing, the 
poetic daintiness of her Chopin inter- 
pretation, the caressing quality of her 
touch and the intelligent conception of 
(Continued on Col. 4) 



Isa Kremer Predominates in Her Individualistic and Rare Interpretation 

of Folk Songs, Giving Them Style and Individuality— Sophie 

Braslau, One of the Few Genuine Contraltos in the World, 

Predominates in the Refinement of Classic Interpretation 



BY ALFRED 

One of the most unique and character- 
istic musical events we have ever at- 
tended was given by Isa Kremer at Scot- 
tish Rite Hall on Friday evening. Decem- 
ber 12th. and at the Alcazar Theatre on 
Sunday afternoon. December 14th. Miss 
Kremer stands entirely alone in the sort 
of entertainment she furnishes. You can 
not regard her as a concert artist usually 
known by that title. She is more than 
that. She is an entertainer, using the 
term in its very highest and most digni- 
fied form. Her programs consist exclus- 
ively of folk songs during which the 
artist uses ten or twelve languages and 
she enunciates these languages as It she 
actually is able to converse in them. She 
knows the sense of idioms and she real- 
izes the significance of the humor or 
pathos specially adapted to various na- 
tionalities. It is an art that is so rare 
that most people can not appreciate it to 
its fullest degree. 

And the strangest part of Miss Kre- 
mer's genius is that she cau make you 
realize the pathos and the humor, or con- 
sequently is able to arouse in you tears 
or laughter, even though you do not un- 
derstand the language in which she sings. 
Of course, many artists are able to do 
this with operatic arias or classic songs 
of a specially well defined tragic or 
humorous nature, but to do this with the 
simple folk songs of the people, whose 
comroser is not even known, requires a 
simplicity of style and adaptability of 
nature which but few people possess. 
Miss Kremer is a genius. There cannot 
be any question about that And while 
her voice does not reveal any signs of 
consistent training it has the quality that 
resonates and appeals. She has her place 
among the great artists of the day, just 
like Chaliapin whose declamatory style 
is not altogether foreign to the style of 
Miss Kremer. 

The simplicity and appeal of her art 
is reflected in the simplicity and charm 
of her personality. Her acting does not 
mar the d'gnity of her singing. On the 
contrary, both her acting and her singing 
blend in a manner so that one seems to 
dovetail with the other. In order to thor- 
oughly appreciate the genius of this skill- 
ful interprctor it is necessary to under- 
stand at least some of the languages she 
employs. We were fortunate enough to 
understand her German, her English, her 
F'rench and some of her Italian, and we 
found that in every instance she did not 
obtain a correct idea of diction but she 
succeeded in establishing the atmosphere 
of the song — something that but few 
artists are able to do in any but their 
mother tongue. 

If you wish to enjoy an hour or two 
of genuine happiness and refreshment of 
mind and soul don't miss the third Kre- 
mer concert which the Elwyn Bureau 
will announce shortly. 

Notwithstanding the competition of 
two other events Sophie Braslau at- 
tracted a large audience to the Columbia 
Theatre on Sunday afternoon. December 
14th. Miss Braslau's program has been 
published in these columns repeatedly 
prior to her appearance and it is there- 
fore not necessary to repeat it again at 
this time. With the exception of but 
one slight change the program was the 
same as printed previously. Miss Bras- 
lau belongs to the few genuine contraltos 
upon the concert stage today. We have 
plenty of mezzo sopranos and so called 
mezzo contraltos, but genuine contralto 
voices are Indeed very rare. Miss Bras- 
lau Is one of the two exceptions that 
come to our mind today, Mme. Schumann- 
Helnk being the other. 

Furthermore Miss Braslau possesses a 
voice of that richness and resonance 
which lends Itself so splendidly to the 
expression of deep sentiment. She sings 



METZGER 

with an abandon and thrilling dramatic 
fervor that reaches the very depths of 
ones soul and that never falls to strike 
a responsive chord In the bearer. 
Whether It be a classic by Beethoven 
or Schubert, whether It be a folk tone of 
Hebrew origin, whether It be an Ameri- 
can or Russian song .Miss Braslau does 
not fail to sound its depths of sentiments. 
And in doing so she gives every ounce of 
energy at her disposal From the be- 
ginning of the program to the end Miss 
Braslau gives one hundred per cent of 
her art and magnetic r-rsi.M:ility. and 




JASCHA HEIFETZ 
The Distinguished Violin Virtuoso Whose 
Sensational Artistic Triumphs Have 
Been the Talk of the Musical World, and 
Who Will Play Here Sunday Afternoon, 
January 18th, Under Elwyn Concert 
Bureau 

audience that becomes more and more en- 
thusiastic as the program progresses and 
that Anally refuses to leaves the concert 
hall until Its artistic greed for more has 
been thoroughly gralillcd. 

Selby C. Oppenheimer's announcement 
that Sophie Urasluu will give another 
concert met with the thorough approval 
of the audience and since the next con- 
cert will take place at the new Columbia 
Theatre, formerly the Tlvoll Opera 
House, an even larger audience can be 
accomodated than could be attracted at 
the cozy Columbia Theatre on Geary 

Street. • 

(Conllnucd from Col. 2) 
her Interpretation, cumhined with the re- 
markably adequate and muslcianly or- 
chestral accompaniment furnished 
through the masterly direction of Alfred 
Hertz, afforded an enjuvment and delight 
that Is not frequently experienced at the 
best concerts. 



PACIFIC COAST i\IUSICAL RE\'IEW 



December 19, 1924 



Worth Any Sacrifice 

The J^teinway tells how it ma^) become yours 



ASteixway is such a human piano, and 
comes into such close association with 
people that it has acquired a deep understand- 
ing of human nature during the past seventy 
years. 

I am a Steinway. I, too, have acquired 
some knowledge of human hearts. And this is 
«hat I have noticed : 

That people place the most value, and take 
the greatest enjoyment in possessing, those 
things for which they have made some sacri- 
fice. 

To possess me, a Steinway piano, has called 
forth sacrifices in many a modest household. 
The Steinway that stands so proudly in the 
living room is probably there because it was 
earnestly wanted. 

That is why, altho my purchase price is 
higher than most pianos, possession of me gives 
to most people such true joy. They have 
wanted me because of what I represent. They 
have refused to be satisfied until they pos- 
sessed me. To possess me, they have made 
many little and big sacrifices. Established in 
such a home, is it any wonder that I am the 
proudest piano in the world ? 




One day a young couple came into Sherman, 
Clay & Co. and examined me critically. Then 
they turned to a salesman and said : 

"Our little daughter will be nine years old 
five years from now. She must begin her les- 
sons when she is nine years old. She should, if 
possible, begin them on a Steinway piano. If 
we pay you a small monthly sum, will you 
hold it for us, and credit the accumulating 
interest, against the day when our little daug- 
ter becomes nine years of age?" 



That was sacrifice. The young couple were 
earnestly endeavoring to accumulate the sum, 
or partial sum, of my purchase. To make cer- 
tain of their program, they were seeking to 
place that monthly sacrifice safely beyond any 
temptation to spend it for some transient pleas- 
ure. And when their little daughter possesses 
me, you can be very sure that I shall be a 
proud and happy piano. 

Is not that home itself meanwhile made 
happier, by the knowledge of this voluntary 
sacrifice? Will that home not tend to hold 
together, over the years, because of this very 
spirit ? 

It is the privilege of a Steinway to be worth 
such efforts. Many a home that longs for a 
Steinway could have one, if a very little sacri- 
fice were systematically entered upon. 

1 know that Sherman, Clay & Co. will be 
glad to explain why this sacrifice is so worth 
while. 

Sherman Way & Co. 

Kearny md Sutter Sts., San Francisco 
CALirORNIA-OREGON-WASHINGTON 



RENA 

LAZELLE 

SOPRANO 

San Francisco Opera Company 



Head of Toeal Depar 



for Recitala, Opera, 



Tel. Fillmore 89S 



, San Franeiaco 



EMILIE LANCEL 

OPERATIC MEZZO-SOPRANO 

After Two Years' Absence in Europe 
Available For 

OPERA— ORATORIO— CONCERT 

Management ALICE SECKELS 
68 Post Street 

esidence: 778 Eighteenth Avenue, San Francisco 
Tel. Bayview 1461 



ANNIE LOUISE DAVID 

HARP SOLOIST AND TEACHER 

ON THE PACIFIC COAST DURING 
SEASON 1924-1925 

Address: Hotel Claremont, Berkeley 
Tel. Berkeley 9300 

Management Alice Seckels, 68 Post Street 
Tel. Douglas 7267 



PASMORE VOCAL STUDIOS 



KARL RACKLE 



LAMBS CLUB, NEW YORK CITY 



ALICE GENTLE 

MANAGEMENT 

CATHARINE A. BAMMAN 
53 West 39th Street New York, N. Y. 



MADAME JOHANNA 

KRISTOFFY 

PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO 

Thorough Vocal and Dramatic Training 

740 Pine Street Phone Douglas 6624 



AUGUSTA HAYDEN 

SOPRANO 

Available for Coneerta and RecltaU 

AddreHM: 471 .371h Avenae 

Tel. Pac. OSS 

HOMER HENLEY 

BARITONE — TEACHER OF SINGING — CONDUCTOR 

Director California Club Choral 

An Oratorio Authority 

Residence Studio: 1240 Bny, at Franklin. Tel. FIIL 1033 



LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM 



CONTRALTO 
Complete Courne of Operatic Traln- 
Tcl. Flllniore 45.')3 



Dominican College School of Music 

SAN RAFAEL, CALIFORNIA 
Courses Thorough and Propressive. Public School 
Music. Accredited Diploma 



Raad. Berkaley 



MR. ANDREW BOGART 
Teacher of Singing 

Pupils Prepared for Opera, Oratorio, Church and 
Concert. New Address: Suite 600, Kohler & Chase 
BIdg., 26 O'Farrell Street. Telephone Douglas 9256 



WALLACE A. SABIN 

Organist Temple Elmanu El, First Church of Christ Sci- 
entist, Director Lorlne Club. S. F., Wed., 1915 Sacramento i 
Street. Phone West 37,">."!: Sat.. First Christian Science i 
Church, Phone Fillmore 7926: Res. Studio, 3142 LeivlstoB I 
Ave., Berkeley, Phone Piedmont 242N 

MISS DOROTHEA MANSFELDT 

Preparing Teacher for 

MRS. OSCAR MANSFELDT. Pianist 

207 Cherry St.. Bet. Washington & Clay TeL Pac. »S06 I 

The College of the Holy Names 

LAKE MERRITT, OAKLAND 

Complete Conservatory Course — Piano. Harp, Violin, i 

'Cello. Voice. Counterpoint. Harmony. History 

DURINI VOCAL STUDIO 



1072 Ellis St. 



Opera — Church- — Oratorio 



TeL West 59B I 



PAUL STEINDORFF 

MASTER COACH 
Complete Grnnd and Light Opera Repertoir 



Miss Elizabeth Westgate 

Teacher of Piano, Organ. Harmony. Organist and Musici! 
Director of First Presbyterian Church. Alameda. Horn 
Studio: 1117 PARU STREET, ALAMEDA. Telephone AIn 
meda ISS. Thursdays. Merrinian Scliool, 507 Eldorado Ave 
Oakland. Telephone Piedmont 2770. 



MUSIC PRINTING? 

SCHOLZ, ERICKSON & CO., Inc. 

521 Howard Street Phone Douglas 4273 

San Francisco 



Manning School of Music 

JOHN C. MANNINfJ, Director 
S24Z Waahlnetoa Street Telephone Fillmore 3»> 

PEARL HOSSACK WHITCOMB 

DRAMATIC SOPRANO 

Absolute Method of Voice Vpon the Breath 

Monday and Thursday. 1005 Kohler & Chase Bulldlns. < 

Tel. Garfield S723. Res. Phone Prospect 420 



December 19, 1924 



^rifir ddm Ulu^iral SeW^ 



THE OLDEST I 



ALFRED METZGER 



Editor 



Mnkr nil <'hi'<'ks. .Ir 



Oaklnnd-llrrki-lcy-Alainriln llillcr 1117 I'nr 
Ti-I. Alnnirdn ir.S 
>IN'. I'.Hxnhelh ^^ rslKnte In (ha 



■c. K105 The Alnmrila. Tel. San Jo 
Klitn HucKlnH in Charge 



Los Aneelrs Ulilee 

(lias Srenlc Avenue, llolls^nood, Cnllfomia 

llruno David I'MMhrr in Charge 



VOL. XVII FRIDAY, DEC. 19, 1924 



The PACIFIC COAST MI SICAI. REVIEW' Is for sale at 
the sheet niuHle departmentw of all leading: mUMlc ntoren. 



Entered a.«( second-elas 



ntter at S. F. Postoflle 



SlIBSCRIPTIOXS 
Annoallr in Advanee. Inelnding Pontage: 

I'Dlted States _ V3.00 

Foreign Countries 4.011 



TWENTY-FOURTH YEAR 



Editorial Discussions 



Again the holiday season is at our door. Before 
another issue of the Pacific Coast Musical Review is 
published Christmas will have again gone into histor.v. 
We do not like to have this season of the year pass by 
without extending to our readers and friends the cusom- 
ary compliments of the season. This holiday spirit 
should remind everyone dependent upon music as a 

I livelihood how necessary it is to permit the gentler 

I emotions of life to permeate one's own mode of living. 
Instead of constantly finding fault and criticising lor 

I the sake of showing one's "smartness." is it not more 
profitable in every way to assume a more tolerant at- 
titude toward our fellow men? Let us co-operate, in- 
stead of antagonize each other. Let us join our 
forces to accomplish something great tor our comnuin- 

'. Ity, instead of individually antagonizing those whom we 

' do not consider our "equal." 

How many of you who live in California realize how 
fortunate you are? A little rain, a little cold spell, 
a little storm causes complaints and hopes for im- 
provement in climatic conditions. At the same time, 
take it all in all, California has the finest climate in 
the world, and the writer knows what he is talking 
about. In the long run you will discover, it you in- 
vestigate, that the beautiful and mild days overshadow 
the disagreeable days during the course of a year. As 
it is with the weather conditions so it is in artistic 
circles. There are too many people with a chip on their 
shoulder. If things do not go their way they take it 
as an intentional personal effront which one of their 
enemies has staked for their particular benefit. If 
they can not get as many engagements as they think 
they should, they blame the public, the managers, the 
music clubs and music critics. 

The musical profession, like any other profession, 
should stand together — should co-operate. 'The music 
lovers and students should join the music clubs. The 
music teachers should join music teachers' associa- 
tions. The vocal students should join choruses, and 
artists should form an association of their own. There 
Is nothing like co-operation. The Pacific Coast Musical 
Review needs the support of the profession. It is 
willing to CO operate with the profession to increase 
its income. It is not a question of trying to get so 
much out of your fellowmen as it is a question of how 
much you can achieve by working shoulder to shoulder 
with your fellowman. There are thousands of people 
interested in music in the bay region. Imagine if you 
could get these thousands of people co-operating toward 
one great, big. unselfish end! How much could be 
accomplished in the cause of music? 

The Musical Association of San Francisco needs 
$35,000 additional funds, because some of the guaran- 
tors have not met their pledge. The Exposition Audi- 
torium holds 10,000 people. In order to raise these $3,i,- 
000 every one of the 10.000 people would only have to 
contribute $3.50. But at least 20,000 or 30,000 people are 
enjoying our symphony concerts, so that an individual 
symphony enthusiast would only have to contribute a 
little over a dollar to make up the sum necessary to 
put the symphony season on a paying basis. Surely 
A. W Widenham's appeal should be heeded and the 
comparatively insignificant sum of $35,000 distributed 
among 30 000 people ought to be quickly forthcoming. 
Affected by the spirit of the season and the immense 
usefulness of cooperation we trust that in the new 
year everyone musically interested in the community 
•will see to it that the Musical Association of San Fran- 



I'ACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



Cisco will have no more cause to complain of lack of 
financial support. With these ideas In mind we wish 
everyone a very Merrj- Christmas and a Happy and 
Prosperous New Year. 

The death of Giacomo Puccini leaves a vacancy in 
the niche of operatic life in the world. It is unneces- 
sary to tell Musical Review readers wherein Puccini 
earned for himself a place of fame In musical history. 
He is the outstanding figure in the modern school of 
Italian opera and it he had written nothing else but 
La Boheme he would be entitled to immorality. But 
in addition to this epoch-making work Puccini has 
written other operatic masterpieces that conquered the 
worlds opera lovers. His Mme. Butterlly, La Tosca. 
<;irl of the Golden West, .Manon, and others, established 
for himself a lasting fame in the musical history of the 
world. No one has done more to honor the memory of 
Puccini in San Francisco than Gino Severi, conductor of 
the Warfleld Theatre. His "Pucciniani" at the W'ar- 
field last week was indeed a most impressive memorial. 
It was played with a soulful abandon that character- 
ized the friend.ship that existed between the distin- 
guished composer and the brilliant conductor, and 
patrons of the Warfield Theatre, realizing this fact, 
were duly impressed. The world has lost another 
genius. May his soul rest in peace! 



DENISHAWN ART OF RHYTHMIC EXPRESSIONS 

Since rhythm is the foundation upon which music 
has been erected, the art of the dance is naturally in- 
timately related to music. And it you attended the 
truly exceptionally artistic productions at the Cur- 
ran Theatre this week you will agree that Ruth St. 
Denis, Ted Shawn and the Denishawn Dancers suc- 
ceeded in blending their graceful terpsichorean expres- 
sions with the beautiful music contained on their pro- 
grams. The program is so extensive and so closely 
identified with tlie performance that a mere enumera- 
tion of its various parts would mean nothing to the 
reader who tailed to witness the performance. We 
shall therefore confine ourselves to the interpreters. 

Ruth St. Denis is the personification of musical un- 
dulation. Her every motion is grace personified. Her 
every gesture is redolent with sentiment and meaning. 
She has studied the Oriental art of the dance with the 
minutest care and intelligence and every one of her 
dance interpretations become a painting of exceptional 
color blending. .\s she takes pains to select her sub- 
jects so does she take pains to select her costumes 
and the entire ensemble of the stage fits into the 
atmosphere ot the particular dance she selects. It is 
impossible to describe the beauty ot Ruth St. Denis' 
art. The writer can only say that he regards this 
terpsichorean artist as the greatest exponent of im- 
pressionistic or classic dancing before the world tody. 
Ted Shawn is equally efljcient in his splendid plastic 
demonstration of the classic dance. In his Adagio 
Pathetic, wherein he represents a statue that comes to 
life, he certainly reveals an art of expression by means 
of motion which the writer has never seen equalled. 
There is vitality in his dancing and meaning in his 
muscular reflection. Everyone of the Denishawn danc- 
ers deserves special commendation, but our space un- 
fortunately does not permit us to gratify our inclina- 
tion. We can only congratulate Ruth St. Denis and 
Ted Shawn upon the careful and discriminating selec- 
tion of their dancers. 

Since we can only include in this review tlie pro- 
gram given on Monday and Tuesday evenings we must 
include the Cuadro Flamenco, a Spanish Gypsie Dance 
scene, which was unusually picturesque and realistic 
in its pantomimic progression. Unusually striking 
were the various Spanish shawls displayed on this oc- 
casion and the colorful effect of which added to the 
striking vividness of the scene. It was a magnificent 
spectacle. Those fond of something that is genuinely 
artistic should not fail to attend the remaining per- 
formances at the Curran Theatre thi.5 week if this 
paper reaches them on time. 



H. B. TURPIN RETIRES FROM CONCERT WORK 

After an association with Cecil Fanning extending 
over a period ot 23 years, it is announced that H. B. 
Turpin, the baritone teacher and accompanist, will re- 
tire from the American concert field, and will live 
in Italy. 

Mr. and Mrs. Turpin have purchased a villa in 
Florence, where at one time the teacher-accompanist 
was assistant to the celebrated Vannucini, and soloist 
for the Philharmonic Society, later appearing as a re- 
citalist before many audiences in Italy, England and 
the United States. While teaching, Mr. Turpin "dis- 
covered " Cecil Fanning, and subsequently devoted his 
entire time to managing and accompaning this artist, 
the latter having had his entire vocal training under the 
guidance of his teacher-accompanist. 

Mr. Fanning and Mr. Turpin are now on what Is, 
in effect, the latter's farewell tour with the baritone, and 
within the past month given fourteen recitals in the 
Middle West. In addition, Mr. Fanning sang In two 
Cleveland performances ot Francesco De Leone's new 
American opera .Mglala. of which he is the author 
and librettist. 

During their two decades ot joint recitals. Mr. Fan- 
ning and Mr. Turpin have covered the United States 
and Canada many times, and have made four English 
tours. Their work has also been given unstinted praise 
by the press of Germany, France and Italy. Mr. and 
-Mrs. Turpin will sail upon the completion of a series 
ot engagements in Ohio and the Central West, motor- 
through Europe to Florence. 

Cecil Fanning will continue his concert work. Join- 
ing Mr. and Mrs. Turpin In Italy for a portion ot each 
year. 



Music in Interior California 



Emma Mesow Fitch, the well known Fresno Toral 
arlist and teacher, who.si. energy and enterprise con- 
tributes greatly to the rapid mushal dev.-lopmenl of 
the central part of the State, prisented one of her 
artist pupils— Thelina .loan Stratum— in the Ballroom ot 
the California Hotel in I'-resno on .Monday evening 
November 17th. Miss Stralton Is an exceptionally gifted 
colorature soprano and the affair was a brilliant artistic 
success. Miss Stiatton is In the springtime of her 
youth and attends to her musical education in the eve- 
ning after concluding her work in an oHlce. At least 
six hundred guests responded to Mrs. Fitch's invitation* 
a:id Miss Stratton sang right into their hearts like a 
true artist. The complete program which was thoroughly 
enjoyed was as follows: Songs — (a) Se lu ma ml (If 
Thou Lovest Me) (Fergolesi), (b) Onvre tes yens bleus 
(Open Thou My Love Thy Blue Eyes) (Massenet), (c) 
Wenn die Rosen Bluhen (When the Itoses Hloom) (Rclcb- 
ertl, .Miss Stratton lai The Wren (Clarinet Obllgatoi 
(Benedict), (b) Pierrot (Samuels), .Miss Stratton: Con- 
certino — Opus 2G (von Weber), Richard Grauel; Aria- 
One Fine Day (Madam Butterfly) (In Costume) (Puc- 
cini), Miss Stratton; (a) Vlllanelle (Clarinet Obligato) 
(Del Aqua), (bl Vale (Farewell) (Russell), .Miss Strat- 
tion; (a) Liebestot (From Tristan and Isolde) (Wagner- 
Liszt), (b) Troika (In a Three Horse Sleigh) (Tschal- 
kowsky), (c) Nocturne, F. Sharp (Chopin), Daniel Popo- 
vich: Jenny LInd Group (in Costume): (a) Silver 
Threads .\mong the Gold (Clarinet Obligato) (Danks), 
(b) Comin' Thru the Rye (Meacham), (c) The l-ast 
Rose of Summer (Marta) (Flotow), Miss Stratton. 

The assisting artists were Daniel Popovich, pianist. 
Richard Grauel, clarineti.'<t, and .Marian Fitten Darrah, 
accompanist, all of whom justly shared in the honors 
of the evening. 

Elman in California Cities — Following his appearance 
in San Francisco at the Columbia Theatre Geary and 
Mason, tomorrow afternoon, Mischa Elman will remain 
over to spend Christmas with his friend and manager, 
Selby C. Oppenheimer, He will then make a quick 
journey to Arizona, where recitals are to be given In 
Phoenix and Tucson, returning to California to All 
engagements in San Diego, Long Beach, San Jose, Santa 
Cruz and Eureka. This will be the first time a great 
artist of the world standing of Mischa Elman has ever 
appeared in either Santa Cruz or Eureka, and the music- 
lovers of those communities are exerting every effort to 
make his visit a civic as well as a great musical event. 

Marjorie Marchers Fisher, violinist, with Mrs. Earl 
Towner at the piano, gave a program of compositions 
by contemporary American composers at Scottish Rite 
Temple in San Jose on Friday evening, October 24th. 
The jirogram, which was enthusiastically received by a 
large audience, was as follows: The Ascension Sonata 
(Cecil Burleigh), Prelude No 1 (Frederick JacobI), 
Three Spanish California Folk Songs, (a) — A Fickle 
Maiden, (b) — I Know Not If You Love Me, (e) — Old 
.Vlaid's Song (Gertrude Ross), Chant Canadienne (mss) 
(Thomas V. Catorl, Humoresque (Albert Stossel). An 
Old Love Tale (Gena Branscombe), Crinoline (Albert 
Stoessel), Indian Snake Dance (Cecil Burleigh) Sonata 
in G (.Albert Stoessel). 



HAROLD PRACHT DIRECTS PROGRAM 

A musical program delighted friends of Harold 
Pracht in the handsomely furnished Ampico salon ot 
tlie Wiley B. Allen Co. on Monday evening, December 
Sth. This event inaugurated the debut ot the Mason 
& Hamlin Ampico which had been awaited for some time 
by those most interested in It. Mr. Pracht had Invited 
people prominent in musical circles to enjoy the crafts- 
manship of this splendid union of player and piano and 
incidentally listen to skilfully intepreted Muinl>ers by 
Constance Reese, soprano. Harold Dana, tenor, Harold 
Pracht, baritone, and .\ugusla Hayden, soprano. The 
critical and representative audience in attendance re- 
warded these artists with hearty and sincere applause 
revealing appreciation of their line artistic Instincts. 

Among the guests were Isa Kremer, the distinguished 
ballad singer of international reputation, and Mrs. 
Ralph Walker ot Portlan<l, Oregcm. belter known as 
Gene Bayson, a composer who enjoys considerable 
vogue in this country. Mr. Pracht preceded his pro- 
gram with a very clever dissertation on "program build- 
ing," partly based on Dr, Spaeth's book entitled Com- 
mon Sense in Music, and his remarks scintillated with 
wit and reasoning. The program, which included both 
solo and accompaniment selections by Ihe .Mason ft 
Hamlin Ampico, consisted of the following numbers: 

LAllouette (Glinka), Richard Biililig: .Mar( he Humor- 
esque iDohananyi), Dohnanyi; Lilacs (Rachmaninoff), 
Rachmaninoff; Ballade A Flat (Chopin), Leopold Go- 
ilowsky: Scherzo E .Minor (Mendelssohn), Josef Hot- 
mann; J'Eux D'eaii (Ravel), Benno .Molsewltsch; Pre- 
lude In A Minor (Debussy), E. Robert Schmitz; soprano 
solos— Vissid'arte (Puccini). Will of Ihe Wisp (Spross), 
Constance Reese; The Lorelei (Liszt), Josef Lhevlnne; 
Etude Ileroique i l.<-8chetizky), Erwin Nylregyhazl; 
Staccato Etude( Rubinstein). Mischa Levltzky: Baritone 
solo — Traum durch dl Daninierung (Richard Strauss), 
Harold Dana; 2nd and 3rd movements, .Moonlight Son- 
ata (Beethoven), Hnrald Bauer; Baritone Solo — Aller- 
seelcn (Richard Strauss), Papillons (Rosenthal), Moriz 
Rosenthal. 

It is just as much to the Interest of the musical pro- 
fession to have a music Journal widely circulated among 
the musical public as it is In the in'erests ot the pub- 
lication. There are problems which none other but a 
music Journal will discuss. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REMEW 



December 19, 1924 



Short Items of Interest 



Pupils Activities and Studio News 



The San Francisco Teacher's Institute began its ses- 
sion with a meeting in the Exposition Auditorium on 
Monday morning. Dec 15th. with J. M. Gwinn, Superin- 
tendent of Schools, presiding. The session was opened 
with organ solos b.v Vda Waldrop. municipal organist, 
and the Star Spangled Banner lead by Miss Estelle 
Carpenter, director of music in the San Francisco Pub- 
lic Schools. Mr. Gwinn's address was followed by 
speeches of Acting Mayor Ralph McLeran and Fred 
Dohrmann. President of the Board of Education. Mrs. 
Marietta Johnson of Fairtope. Ala. and Dr. George 
Strayer of Columbia College gave the lectures of the 
morning, and Mrs. .\nn Blotcky and Harry Perry ren- 
dered Tocal selections. 

Rena Lazelle, head of the vocal department of the 
San Francisco Conservatory of Music, gave the second 
of her four Vocal Round Tables with lectures at the 
Conservatory last Monday evening. December 15th. The 
subject on this occasion was Vocal Technic and it 
proved of such interest that the following event in this 
series, which will take place on Monday evening. Janu- 
ary I2ih. is being looked forward to with great 
pleasure. 

Dr. H. J. Stewart, the distinguished American com- 
poser, municipal organist of San Diego, has composed 
a Cantata in honor of the completion of the magnificant 
Legion of Honor Palace donated to the cause of the war 
heroes by Mrs. A. B. Spreckels. The Cantata is written 
for mixed quartet and chorus and has been rehearsed 
for some time. Miss Estelle Carpenter, director of 
music of the San Francisco public schools, organized 
a chorus of four hundred voices which is already letter 
perfect in the score. The quartet consists of Mrs. Bar- 
bara Blanchard. soprano: Miss Lillian Birmingham, con- 
tralto: Charles Bulotti. tenor, and Charles Lloyd, bass. 
The cantata has been composed to the text of Milton's 
Legion of Honor. The exact date of its presentation 
■will be announced soon. 

Mrs. Evelyn Sresovich Ware, the well known pianist 
and accompanist, created an excellent impression at 
the most recent meeting of the San Francisco Music 
Teachers' -Association, when she played the accompani- 
ments for Mrs. Brehany. soprano, in a very discriminat- 
ing artistic fashion. Mrs. Ware was recently elected 
treasurer of the California Federation of Music Clubs 
for which position she is especially suited because of 
her indefatigable energy and her knack to make friends. 
Mrs. Ware played at a concert given recently at the 
First Congregational Church and scored a brilliant 
triumph. 

Faith Merriman, the charming young soprano will ap- 
pear in concert in San Francisco during January. Miss 
Merriman has a large following of admirers in this 
vicinity and in the south where she now lives as well as 
In Washington, D. C. where she resided during the 
term of office of her aunt Alice M. Robertson, congress- 
woman. As a singer Miss Merriman has most satisfy- 
ing qualities — a thorough musical background in train- 
ing and experience, a gracious personality and at- 
tractive stage-presence: a ringing voice and capacity 
for dramatic expression. Her varied programs are 
proof of the singer's ability to please through a wide 
range of demands. 

The Chamber Music Society of San Francisco,, under 
the auspices of L. E. Behymer. will appear in Phoenix. 
Arizona, on December 30th, Prescott. Arizona. Decem- 
ber 31st, Santa Barbara, California. January 2nd. and 
Santa Maria, California. January 3rd. The ever grow- 
ing success of this organization has created a large 
demand from outside points for their recitals, and 
this season promises to contain the largest number of 
bookings in the history of the Chamber Societv of San 
Francisco. 

Edna Drynan Carlson played four piano solos from 
KGO General Electric on October 26th. Her program 
included compositions by Moszkowsky. Grieg and 
Scarlatti. Catherine Brown, sixteen-year-old puril of 
Mrs. Carlson also gave a group of solos from KGO on 
October 17th. 



Elwyn Artist Series 

Tickets on Sale at Sherman, Clay & Co. 

JASCHA 

HEIFETZ 

SUNDAY AFT., JANUARY 18 
BEATTYS CASINO 



COMING! 

San Carlo Grand Opera Company 

Two Weeks, Beginning February 2 

Curran Theatre 



ROLAND HAYES 

Sunday Afternoon, February 22 
Beatty's Casino 



JOS. GEO. JACOBSON PUPILS IN RECITAL 

The Joseph George Jacobson Piano Class held its 
third monthly recital on December 12th. at the Baldwin 
Studios on Sutter Street. The audience showed enthus- 
iasm and enjoyment towards the interesting program. 
The outstanding feature of the program was the playing 
of the G minor Saint Saens' Concerto by Gladys Wilson. 
She played it with temperament and discriminating 
phrasing. Sam Rodetsky's rendition of the sixth 
Rhapsody by Liszt proved that he is becoming com- 
petent to cope with technical difficulties. Marian 
Patricia Cavanaugh's Chopin numbers, the Dance Xegre 
by Cyril Scott and a Berceuse by Ilyinski merited the 
enthusiastic applause she received. Rebecca Xacht and 
Lucille Borovic played two orchestral numbers with Mr. 
Jacobson at the second piano, the G minor Concerto by 
Mendelssohn of which Miss Xacht played the first 
movement and the Capriccio brilliant Op. 22 by the 
same composer. Both have made surprising progress. 
Their technique is fluent and both played with intelli- 
gence and comprehension of the compositions. 

Myrtle Waitman played a group of solos in a manner 
that earned her enthusiastic approval from the audience 
and Vera Adelstein acquitted herself most creditably 
with the rendition of Tschaikowsky's Sleighride anil 
the Cracovienne by Paderewski. especially the latter 
number was well executed. The opening number was a 
dainty Valse composed by Mr. Jacobson for two pianos 
twelve hands and played with precision by Messrs. 
Bernstein. Potts. Doran. Mathie, Karlin, Sousa. An 
added attraction on the program was a group of songs 
by Miss Helen Haist. pupil of Marie Partridge Price, 
who sang invocation by Kursteiner. Miunelied and Meinc 
Liebe ist Grun by Brahms with much taste and poetic 
insight. She possesses a fine contralto voice, well- 
placed, and is a credit to her teacher. The rendition of 
the whole program gave evidence of seriousness of 
study and credit to the students and teacher. 



Edna Drynan Carlson's pupils gave a piano recital 
at the Berkeley Piano Club Hall on Saturday evening. 
December tith, when the following program was credit- 
ably interpreted: Waltzing Mice! Duett I (Gavnorl 
Lawrence Ellery. Margaret Aldrich: The White Bunnv 
(Mokrejsl. Grandfather's Clock (Maxim), Doris Petri- 
Through S.vlvan Glades (Risher). Gurine Jensen- 
Slumber Song (Gurlitt). Gordon Steers. (Pupil of 
Catherine Brown): A StaiTy Night (Carlson), Anne 
Lowden: The Black Forest Clock (Heinsl. Xell Ailken: 
The Pixies March (Brown), Catherine Coats: Silver 
Nymphs (Heins), Anita Barker: Chirping Sparrows 
(Trio), (Eehr). Dorothy Danim. Gurine Jensen. Wil- 
helmien Jensen: In the Boat(Franke). Jane Lee- Gipsy 
Rondo (Haydnl, Waltz in a flat (Gurlit). Janet Letson" 
Gitana (Heins) Dorothy Danim: Moment Musical (Schu- 
bert). Leontine Traganee: Impromptu Mazurka (Lack), 
Wilhelmien Jensen: Romance (Lieurance) Scarf Dance 
(Chaminade). Alan Nelson: The Swallows (Gobhaerts) 
Jean Rankie: Valse Caprice (Newlandsi. Genevieve 
Danen: Menuetto (b minor) (Schubert), Marian Let- 
son: Hungarian Dance (Brahms), Madeline Dldridge- 
Butterfly iLavalee). Seguidilla (Albeniz), Catherine 
Brown: Du hist die Ruh (Schubert- Lizst) Milton 
Biscay: Ballet Music from (Rosamunde) (Schubert) 
Waltz in f major (Chopin). Margaret Aldrich: Concert 
\alse rWiemawski), Esther Eilersen: Country I>ance (2 
pianos (Xevin). Catherine Brown. Mrs. Carlson. 

Stella Howell Samson presented some of her pupils 
in a musicale at the B. Allen Studio in Oakland on 
Monday evening, December 1st The following program 
was intelligently presented and enjoved by a large and 
demonstrative audience: la) Dancing Doll (Poldini) 
(hi Silver Spring (Mason), (c) Norwegian Bridal Pro-' 
cess-on ( Griegl, (d) Florence (Grand Valse) (Liebling) 
Gladys Bastin: (a) Country Gardens (Grainger) (hi 
Kamenio Ostrow (Rubinstein), (c) 2nd Mazurka (Saint- 
Saens). (d) Chromatic Waltz (Godard). Frances Ander- 
son; (a) Two Larks iLeschetizkv). (b) Lucia (left 
hand alone) (arr. Leschetizky). (c) Waltz Op. 64. No 
1 (Chopin), (d) Canlique d'Amour (Liszt) E-velvn 
Rowell. 



MUNICIPAL SYMPHONY CONCERTS 

Supervisor J. Emmet Hayden, chairman of the Audi- 
torium Committee announces that Mischa Elman the 
world-celebrated violinist, will be the soloist to appear in 
the fourth municipal "pop" concert in Civic Auditorium 
on the night of January 15th in conjunction with the 
San Francisco Sj-mphony Orchestra. Alfred Hertz 
conductor. Cecilia Hansen, the brilliant violinist who 
appears this Friday in the third "pop" is characterized 
by Critics as the "greatest woman" artist of the bow- 
while Elman is universally recognized as one of the 
master v;olinists of all time. Both artists are expected 
to draw record audiences. The citv series will give 
San Francisco an opportunity to hear Mischa Elman at 
popular prices. This will be the first time that he has 
appeared in the United States at such nominal admis- 
sion rates. The regular city scale of 50 and 75 cents 
and 51.00 will pertain at this conceit. 



Jast Returned From Eastern Tour -« ith 
.Mnie. Gaclski 

MARGO HUGHES 

ACCOMPA.XIST—ENSEMBLE CO.VCH 

^iSTd Green Street Xel. FUlmort 



Giacomo Minkowski 

Studio at 003 Kohler * Chase Buildins 
Tel. Garfield 0474 




KAJETAN ATTL 

*^.H|SOL0 HARPIST, SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 



For Coneert Eneasenients and Inntrnrtion Apply 
1004 Ivohler & Cha.>ie Uldg.. Tel. Douglas 1678. on 
sday and Saturday Afternoons ONLY, Rest- 



JUST OIT! 

A METHOD FOR THE HARP 

Uy Kajetan Attl 

C-\RL FISHER, Pabllsher 

or Sale at Sherman. Clay & Co., Kohler & Chas 
Henry Grobe and Kajetan Attl 



FREDERIC 

POWELL 

VOICE SPECIALIST 
TEACHER OF SINGING 

RESTORATION OF LOST OR 
IMPAIRED VOICES 

705 Kohler & Chase BIdg., Tuesdays and Fridays 
Residence Phone Sunset 6524 



Myra Palache 

PIANIST 

LECTURES ON MUSIC 
APPRECIATION 



Francisco .\ddress, 27,M Inion 

Phone -nalnnt 639 
On -n'ednesday, 3 p. lu. to 6 p. 



RETURNS ^ Trri" 

The Great American Contralto 

SOPHIE 

BRASLAU 

POSITIVELY LAST RECITAL 

NEW COLUMBIA THEATRE 

(former Tivoli — Eddy St. near Mason) 

SUNDAY AFT., DECEMBER 28 

ENTIRELY DIFFERENT 
"REQUEST" PROGRAM 

Tickets 50c to $2.00 at Sherman, Clay & Co. 

COMING— SCHU MAN N-H El NK 

Management Selby C. Oppenheimer 



MME. PARRISH MOYLE— Soprano 

l>lrs. Gilbert Moyle) 
.Vvailalile for 

Recitals and Musicales 



ALFRED HURTGEN 



Tel. FUlraore 8240 



The larger the circulation of a Music Journal 
the better for the members of the profession and 
student. 



December 19, 1924 



PACIFIC COAST MCSICAI, REX'IEW 



Music in Berkeley 



Berkeley. Dec. l.^J, 1924. 
Elizabeth Witter, mezzo soprano, was heard in a re- 
cital of songs Friday evening at the Twentieth Century 
Club House with Ellen Edwards at the piano. Her 
program was of widely divergent styles and the audi- 
ence applauded heartily with every indication of en- 
. Joynient. Miss Witter was especially convincing in her 
: final group of folk songs and responded to a number of 
, encores during the evening. Ellen Edwards played 
fluent accompaniments, achieving solo effects without 
intruding on the singer. The program follows: Secchi— 
Lungi dal Caro Bene. Gluck — O Del Mio Dolce Ardor, 
Brahms— Geistliches Wiegenlied with clarinet obligate! 
Strauss — AUerseelen, Strauss — Freundliche Vision. 
: Wolf— Der Gartner: Arr. Emile Vuillermoz— Les Trois 
Princesses. Arr. Emile Vuillernioz— Chason Bretonne, 
An.iens Noells. Arr. Leon Roques— Les Rois Mages, 
Air Leon Roques — II est ne le Divin Enfant. Arr. Julian 
Ti. isot — Le Flambeau: Anon — Words of George Munro 
— .My Lovely Celia. Arr. Cecil Sharp — The Wraggle Tag- 
gii' Gypsies, O, Old Irish— Arr. Hughes — Down by the 
Sally Gardens. Old Irish — Arr. Hughes — Ballyniire Bal- 
lad, Old Scotch — Leezie Lindsay. 

Winifred Forbes, the violinist and teacher, presented a 
l:■r^p group of pupils in recital Saturday afternoon at 
tlh Berkeley Piano Club. She was assisted by August- 
ini- .Vllen. cellist, and the accompanists were" Mrs. W. 
W Layne, Esther Anderson and Edith Landon. The 
program included compositions of St. George, Handel, 
Silt. Bach. Leclair, Mendelssohn, Tor Aulin, Tschaikow- 
sky. D'Ambrosio. Ten Have and Weber. 

Genevieve Wade Hatch presented Krelis of Slammer- 
dam "a Dutch opera in three acts,, by Hendrik Jansen, 
in the Armstrong Auditorium Saturday evening The 
principals included Harry Jay North, Shirley Hoppin 
Porter, William Henry Strehle, Dubois Ferguson. Dean 
Scott Donaldson. William A. Tremavne. Emily G 
Cleghorn. Edwin S. Scott. Valeria Post. "Stanley S Ber- 
tola and Irma Bell Kelsey. The ballet was under the 
direction of Zelma Stites McDonough The work 
abounds in tuneful numbers and the costumes were 
quaintly interesting. The composer conducted. 

F. M. P. 



The Most Popular 

CHRISTMAS GIFT 

The New Necklaces— Smai^ Paris- 
ian Styles in Great Variety— The 
Unusual in Jewelry and Wrist 
Watches — A Complete Line of 
Jewelry— Reasonable Prices 



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Palace Hotel, Opposite Rose Room 

(Main Corridor) 

THE PALACE HOTEL JEWEL SHOP 



LINCOLN 

BATCHELDER 

Pianist -• Accompanist 

Studio 412 Cole St. : Phone Hemlock 368 



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PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE 
AEOLIAN HALL ■ HEW yORK 



SYMPHONY CONCERTS 

With Louis Persinger. concertmaster. as soloist the 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra will give Its regu- 
lar pair of symphony concerts next Friday and Sun- 
day afternoons in the Curran Theatre under the leader- 
ship of Alfred Hertz. This will be Perslnger's first 
solo appearance of the season and for this occasion ho 
will perform the G minor Concerto of Bruch, 

The symphony announced for these concerts is the 
Schumann Third, generally known as the "Rheniah," 
which will be played from the modern orchestration 
arranged by Frederick Stock, conductor of the Chi- 
cago Symphony Orchestra. The prelude to Wagner's 
"Parsifal" will complete the program. 

Following this pair of concerts the orchestra will 
have Its usual mid-season vacation period of a week 
there being no concert scheduled for Sunday, January 
4. The next concert in the Sunday Popular Series will 
be given January 18, while the sixth pair of symphonies 
IS announced for PYiday and Sunday affernoons, Janu- 
ary 9 and U. At these concerts E. Robert Schmitz 
the eminent French pianist, will be presented as solo- 
ist, performing the Burleske of Strauss and Cesar 
Franck s Symphonic Variations for Piano and Orchestra. 

ST. OLAF LUTHERAN CHOIR 

Receipt of numerous mail orders and a steady local 
demand at Sherman. Clay & Co.'s ticket office presage 
crowded attendance at the two concerts to be given 
by the St. Olaf Lutheran Choir, on Sunday afternoon 
January 4, and Tuesday evening, January 6, in the 
Lxposition Auditorium. As the famous choral group 
will not sing anywhere else in this section of California 
music-lovers residing within a 200 mile radius of San 
Francisco are helping the city's people to furnish war- 
rant for prediction that the big buildings capacity 
will be taxed to accomodate all who intend to hear the 
sixty young voices that have been so enthusiastically 
eulogized by press and people throughout the East and 
Middle West. 



MUSIC TEACHERS' CHRISTMAS JINKS 

The Christmas Jinks of the San Francisco Music 
leachers Association will concern "The Wedding of 
Prince Harmony and Princess Melody." It will take 
place December 29 at the Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room, 
in Sutter Street Dinner will be served at 7:30, after 
which there will be a dinner dance and a cabaret The 
details are secret, intended as a surprise to members 
and guests. Reservations must be made by December 
27 to Miss Augusta Gillespie. 2940 .Jackson Street, or 
to Mrs. H Roy Stovel, 607 Third Avenue. Mrs. Alvina 
Heuer Willson is president of the association 



JOSIAH ZURO'S SUNDAY CONCERT 

The Sunday Symphonic Society, Inc., of New York 
will resume its free bi-monthly concerts under the 
baton of Josiah Zuro, its founder, the first program to 
be presented at the George M. Cohan Theatre next 
Sunday afternoon, December 21st, at 12:30 p m' Re- 
hearsals have been under way for several weeks ' Zuro 
plans to continue his concerts through the winter and 
spring. His programs will be presented according to 
the schedule adopted last year, when the Society gave 
a series of eight concerts. 

Programs will be of one and one-quarter hours' dura- 
tion, and will consist of an overture, a symphonic num- 
ber and an orchestral suite, in addition to a vocal or 
instrumental solo and an address by a prominent 
speaker. Besides the music of the masters which will 
form a substantial part of his offerings. Mr. Zuro will 
play several of the compositions submitted in his 
American composer's contest. A $100.00 prize will be 
awarded for the piece that has proved most popular 

Among the selections which will be given an earlv 
hearing are: Haydn's London Symphony in D- Mozart's 
G Minor Symphony: the Fifth Symphony of Tchaikow- 
sky: Shubert's Unfinished Symphony: the Entr'Acte 
from Rosamunda. by Schuliert: Riesenfeld's Romantic 
Overture: Tchaikowsky's Romeo and Juliet Overture- 
the Gluck-Mottl Suite: the Thunderbird Suite of Cad- 
man, which will be heard for Uie first time in New York 
and other numbers. 

The Sunday Symphonic Society has been increased to 
90 men and it includes musicians who have played in 
noted American and Continental orchestras. Drago 
Jovanovich. the new concert master, occupied the same 
position under Gustave Mahler and Strauss. William 
Kautzenbach, first viola, played with the Boston Sym- 
phony under Dr. Muck. Gdal Salesski, prominent 'cel- 
list is solo 'cellist, Heinrich Heide, bass principal 
played with Nikisch, Emil Wille. principal of the second 
violins, played in the London Philharmonic. 

Young American soloists, particularly artists residing 
in New York, will be given an opportunity to be heard 
on Zuro's program. 



H. Bickford Pasmore gave his third pupils' recital of 
the season at which he presented seven pupils to a large 
and greatly interested audience at his studio in the 
Kohler & Chase building. He prefaced the program with 
quotations from his teacher's (William Shakespeare's I 
latest book on singing just published, a copy of which 
he (Shakespeare) inscribed to his "old friend and faith- 
ful pupil. Those participating were: Helen I. Beckett. 
Frank Brittain, Gladys-Mary Campbell, C. K. Kany. Ixiis 
E. Mason. Benny Lipson. A. C. Young. The voices wiTe 
aU remarkable for the clarity and beauty of Kme and 
pure intonation. 

ZOELLNER CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



i-iilly of .\rtlii 



ELIZABETH SIMPSON'S SUCCESS AS A COACH 
Elizabeth Simpson, always one of the busiest teachers 

?,Val '?""'•." "^T"'" "' '"■• •"" S'"'""^ PoZn ot 
ler time to advanced coaching, her couching class num- 
bering some of the most brilliant young artists In Call- 
fornia who have been very active this season. EI win 
A. Calbergs concert in llerkeley. on .November 25th 
was one of the finest musical events of the voar and 
Mr. talberg. who has recently returiie<l from 'New 
■i ork and Paris was also heard in recital in Sun Jose 
on December Kith. Lincoln S Ilalchelder played »°ih 

Stella How i^T"'" '" 1"" ?''"'^" "" November 18th; 
Stella Howell Samson played a brilliant and oxactInK 
group at a recital given by the Senza RItmus Club In 
1 ledmont on Saturday evening, Decemb.-r 6tlr Grace 
Jurges collaborated with Julia Havens rochrane In a 
concert at the Hillside Club in Berkeley on December 
Gth. pla.ying the Tartinl G minor sonuia and Gade'g 
beautiful second sonata with fine ensemble and adroit 
ec nic; Madame Regis MIchaud recently enjoyed a 
biilliant success In two exact.ng groups of eighteenth 
century and modem French solos at the llerkeley Plani 
Club, and is soon to give a concert of French music in 
San Francisco, while several other gifted young profes- 
sional pianists will be heard in their o,ra concerts in 
San Francisco and Berkeley during the coming year. 



GREAT CAST COMING IN THE SNOB 

The Snob, coming next Saturday to Loew's Warfleld 
Theatre, boasts ol one of the most important casts of 
he season The principal leads are enacted by five of 
the best film players in film land, while a dozen noted 
inh,? P-M "!"'''"■' y,"' ''* .^^*" '" o^^'" characters. 
, u 'V.'f,'''' J'<"=<'n">' scoring hits here In His Hour 
and He Who Gets Slapped, will be seen in a new and 
fascinating role, that of "the snob." Being one of the 
screen's most popular lovers it required considerable 
daring on Gilbert's part to play such an unsympathetic 
part, but he was glad to attempt something new in the 
way of characterization. 

Beautiful Norma Shearer, whose charming person- 
ality has been the outstanding feature of several of the 
big successes of the past year, has the feminine lead 
while (.'onrad Nagle, Phyllis Haver and Hedda HopDer 
have the next important portrayals. Other novelty 
films and the Fanchon & .Marco Ideas always included 
in Warfield entertainments w.ll also be given 



The larger the circulation of a Music Journal 
the better for the members of the profession and 
student. 



ROSEMARY ROSE 



A Singer Who Teaches— Consolidates Her Studios 

Formerly of Mil-jvaukee. Sheboygan 

and Plymouth 



In Los Angeles 



4:tT .so. KOMUIIE: STIIKIOT ii;!.. .-,,17,11 

AuilltlonK II)' A|>|i»liilmrnt llnlj- 

nulh llrodiiinn. Hi-KUIror 



ABBIE NORTON JAMISON 

PIANO— HARMONY— VOCAL COACH 

Sprolnl I'lniio Xontml CIii^ni-n 

Studio: noa Southt-rn CnliCornlo >lu»l<- Co. llldK. 

11-17 WoKl 21sl slri-.-< lelriilioni- llrnron 7T07 

CHARLES BOWES 

TEACHER OF VOICE 
■nil S. I^rnixl Vl<»i. I'hcinp .',.'.1,11.',. I. on Ansrlra 



L. E. Behymer 

MANAGER OF DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS 

Executive Offices: 

70S Auditorium BIdg., Los Angeles 



Alexander Bevani 

AM. IIII\V< llr.S OF Till-: 

VOCAL ART 



I'hllhnrmonlr OrrhrXra 
l.o'. tiiKcl,.. I'rin. IMillbnrmonlr 
<lliiirl.-l ln«lrn,<,li>ii. , hnnihrr Munll- llrdlaU 
■•.111.1 l.n <llrn.ln. riioiu- H olly .1,111 

A. KOODLACH 

iioi.iv >i\Ki:i( AMI iii>:i>Aiii|.:K 

.ij.^HlIc Thrlltri' llldK., l.o> AoKrlm Tnrkrr lOIB 

JOHN SMALLMAN 



Trial hv Ipi 
MiimI<- 4 o. 



-I i: \i iiKii 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL RE\IFA\ 



December 19. 1924 



CLAIRE DUX ^"p'^««« 



CONCERT MANAGEMENT ARTHUR JUDSON 
FISK BUILDING, NEW YORK CITY 



Impending Musical Events 



SELBY C. OPPENHEIMER ATTRACTIONS 

Sophie Braslau will dedicate the new Columbia Thea- 
tre in its capacity as a Sunday afternoon concert hall 
with a gala program in the new playhouse on Eddy 
Street near Mason Sunday afternoon. December 2Sth. 
The -American contralto, whose art electrified a great 
audience last week, will present a special program 
composed largely of requested compositions culled from 
those items in her large repertoire which are of greatest 
appeal to her admiring public. 

Xo singer in recent years has received the unstinted 
tributes of press and public recently accorded the Bras- 
lau in this city. Her magnificent vocal organ coupled 
with her artistic rendition of her songs, the heart in- 
terest she succeeds in eliciting therefrom, and the fas- 
cinating personality of the singer herself, combine in 
making an afternoon of vocal entertainment rarely 
equaled and seldom excelled. 



Elman Plays Sunday. The last opportunity of hearing 
the famous Russian violinist. Mischa Elman, in a San 
Francisco recital this season presents itself Sunday 
afternoon at the old Columbia Theatre (Geary and 
Mason) when the young genius is scheduled to play 
an exemplary program composed of the choicest selec- 
tions from his repertoire. The promised composition 
by the Belgian writer. Albert Dupuis. ("Fantaisie Rap- 
sodique") will positively be rendered at this recital. 
This work is of much importance, extremely melodic. 
but strange as it may seem has never before been 
presented in America. It was written by Dupuis and 
dedicated to Eugen Ysaye and critical opinion regards 
it as an important contribution to musical literature. 

With Josef Bonime at the piano the following pro- 
gram is scheduled for Sundays recital; Patrita. E 
minor (Bach-Nachezi, Fantaisie Rapsodique (Albert 
Dupuis). (a) Lullaby (Barbella-Nachez). (b) Contre- 
danse (Beethoven-Elman), (c) Nocturne (Grieg- 
Elman). (d) Hungarian Dance. A major (Brahm.;- 
Joachim). (a) Air de Lenski. from Eugen Onegin 
(Tschaikowsky-Auerl. (b) Oriental Serenade (Palm- 
gren), (c) Albumblatt (Wagner-WilhelmJ). (d) I Pal- 
piti (Paganini). 

Schumann-Heink — One question asked repeatedly of 
every great singer in the course of a season's tour is. 
"Are there any real opportunities for young American 
singers today?" Mme. Schumann-Heink, who sings here 
at the Xew Columbia Theatre on Sunday afternoon. 
January 11th. made up her mind before the season 
opened to answer this perennial in advance. 

"1 could name a half dozen young Americans who are 
ccming rapidly to the front right now. But I'm not 
going to do it. I'm a peaceable person. This I 
will say — Let a voice of real merit appear, with musical 
sense and determination to back It up. and watch the 
managers scramble to get itl But there's the trouble. 
Young singers are too eager to 'get there!' Too many 
of them have good enough voices, but no talent. Others 
have the voice and the ability, but they simply will 
not work. The three together are absolutely necessary. 

"First, let competent critics — and when I say 'critics' 
I do not mean vocal teachers — make certain that you 
have the voice. It will quickly appear whether or not 
you have musical instincts. If you are luckly enough 
to have these, too, and if you are patient and not 
afraid of years of hard work, you ought to be successful. 
Above all, you must deny yourself luxury, must contejt 
yourself with simple living, and must not permit your- 
self to be beaten by disappointment. 

"Of course. I am speaking only of those who con- 
template a professional career. There are plenty of 
good instructors for those who desire only to sing for 
the pleasure of themselves and their friends. And we 
can't have too much of that. The more people there 
are singing in the homes, in choirs and on the local 
concert stages the better. 

"In brief, the answer is: Be sure you have the 
goods before you attempt to deliver them, then pound 
away until you do. 

"Oh, yes! Mme. Schumann-Heink uses slang. She 
says she picked it up in the army camps and hospitals 
singing for the soldiers and wounded." 

Maier and Pattison Coming— The tremendous success 
achiei,-ed by the 'twins of the piano," Guy Maier and 
Lee Pattison will be vividly recalled with the an- 
nouncement that they are shortly to return to this city 
to present more of their charming two-piano recitals 
Maier and Patti.son have brought the art of interpret- 
ing compositions on two instruments to perfection and 
it is cla med for them by the most eminent writers that 
theirs 13 the last word in synchronization and that their 
playing defies detect on as to whether they are using 
one or two pianos Maier and Pattison will appear at 
the New Columbia Theatre the latter part of January 



ELWYN ARTIST SERIES 

Jascha Heifetz, celebrated Russian violinist, returns 
to San Francisco this season for one recital at Beatty's 
Casino, Sunday afternoon. January ISth. under the 
management of the Elwyn Concert Bureau. The fol- 
lowing review from the Musical Digest covering his 
recital at Carnegie Hall on November IBth. indicates 
his continued artistic ascendancy: 

"Jascha Heifetz gave his first recital of the season 
at Carnegie Hall on November 1,5th. The audence that 
greeted him was large and extremely cordial. Mr. 
Heifetz was compelled to pla.v more encores than there 
were numbers scheduled on his program. With his 
"familiar facile brilliance of style and his smooth and 
pellucid tone," as the World phrased it, the violinist 
played a progi-am which included SaintSaens. Paganini, 
Dort-Achion. Cyril Scott and Sarasate. The accom- 
panist was Isidor -\chron. 



The San Carlo Grand Opera Company, which is now 
on its eighth annual transcontinental tour, and which 
returns to lighten and brighten our existence early 
next February, is bringing the largest and best organi- 
zation Fortuna Gallo has yet put into the field. There 
are several new artists of rare excellence, as well 
as the old favorites, and ot the fifteen operas to be 
presented one at least will be given here for the first 
time by this organization. It is Giordano's Andrea 
Chenier. which has become an established favorite at 



NEW SONGS FOR TEACHER AND SINGER 


It's a Mighty Good World 




O'Hara 


Golden Moon 




Rolt 


Come to My Heart 




English 


Wood Fairies 




Wilfrid Jones 


Brown Bird Singing 




Wood 


Land ot Might Have Been.... 
Rose Marie of Normandy 





Novello 






Carew 


Beauty 






Piper of Love 






Love's a Merchant 

The Market 




Carew 

Carew 


Among the Willows 






A Good Heart All the Way 




Clarke 


Dancing Time in Kerry 






Sweet Navarre 






My Heart's Haven 




Phillips 


Love Pipes of June 






My Little Island Home 




Baden 


Ragged Vagabond 




Randolph 


CHAPPELL-HARMS, 
185 Madison Avenue Ne 


INC. 

w York City 



the Metropolitan Opera, New York, and which has re- 
cently been added to the repertoire of the Chic^o Opera 
Company. <^ 

It is noteworthy that in his tours Fortuna Gallo takes 
his company through the length as well as the breadth 
of the continent and several cities are visited by it 
which would rarely if ever hear grand opera given in the 
grand manner but for this enterprising impresario. It 
is really a tremendous enterprise, when one comes 
to consider it. transporting a company numbering con- 
siderably over 100 persons and many tons of scenery 
and baggage right across these Unitel States, East, 
to West. North to South, branching out in a'l directions 
for thousands of miles. And Fortuna Gallo does not 
bring an ordinary touring company of stock singers, 
but numerous star performers. 



Roland Hayes, who will sing here Sunday afternoon, 
February 22nd. at the Casino Theatre, first went to 
Europe in 1920. He was then an enthusiastic young 
man, equipped with a remarkable voice, a sound vocal 
training. As a "send-off." he had a more auspicious 
debut to his credit, and warm predictions and expres- 
sions of encouragement from every hand. Yet the world 
was still before him. 

London was his first goal. The public of that city was 
immediately struck by the rich, mellow beauty of his 
voice, and by his fine intell'gence. He soon found a 
literally inexhaustible public for his recitals. Ernest 
Newman, England's leading cintic. singled him out as 
a tenor with whom few could compare. He sang before 
the King and Queen of England, who became greatly 
interested in his career. 

Roland Hayes made his French debut when he ap- 
peared with the famous Colonne Orchestra under 
Pieme. The Parisian public and press responded as 
had the English. Next, he penetrated eastward and 
sang several times in Vienna. The city ot Mozart and 
Beethoven was skeptical at the announcement of a 
serious concert by a member of a race from whom 
nothing was familiar but dance music. With his first 
song, incredulity turned into eager enthusiasm. Again, 
Roland, Hayes became "the rage." 

Management, Elwyn Concert Bureau. 638 Phelan Bldg 



LIEDER SINGER 

BRUNSWICK RECORD 



SYmphMY 

ORCHESTRA 

/X I roeoHtJiTZ --.-•• CONOVCTOft 

NEXT FRIDAY, 3:00 P. M. 

NEXT SUNDAY, 2:45 P. M. 

Curran Theatre 

LOUIS PERSINGER, Soloist 

Program 

"Parsifal" Prelude Wagner 

Violin Concerto, G Minor Bruch 

"Rhenish" Symphony Schumann 

Tickets at Sherman, Clay & Co. 



George Lipschultz 

Musical Director and Violin Soloist 



Loew's State Theatre 
Los Angeles 



Lo EW'S ^ WAR FIElD 

BEGINNING SATURDAY, DEC. 20 
"THE SNOB" 

With 
JOHN GILBERT 

and NORMA SHEARER 
Farewell Week 
OSWALD'S JAZZ ORCHESTRA 

I Sever! ■ Fanchon ■ 

and Music I and Marco I 

Masters | "Ideas" | 

Comedy and Other Films 



Elwin A. Calberg 

PIAMST .\ND TEACHER 
iRf retnrned from Ne>T York and Paris, Franc 

Soloist and Accompanist 
Available Season 1924-1925 



Residence Studio S12 East ICIh St., Oakia 
Phone: Merritt 3S66 



STENGER VIOLINS 

Exemplify Intrinsic Excellence and Are 
Pre-eminently Superior 

A life's devotlo 
Involving the 

aeousties. timber pliysli . . „^ ^. 

yielded tlie anderstandin»7 of those principles which 
exemplify the "StenBcr Idea" In violin mnklni!:, and 
mark the beRlnnine of a new era in this noble art. 



uninterrupted study and labor, 
tery of principles of musical 
d engineering, has 



W. C. STENGER 

INCORPOR.\TED 

Maher of Fine riollni 
617-618 Steinway Hall, Chicago 



It is just as much to the interest ot the musical pro- 
fession to have a music journal widely circulated among 
the musical public as it is in the interests ot the pub- 
lication. There are problems which none other but » 
music journal will discuss. 



December 19, 1924 

,^m 1.285 CITIES SING CHRISTMAS CAROLS 

Like a snow-ball, the total number ot American cities 
that have held outdoor Christmas caroling has increased 
from 3 in 1918 to an aggregate of 2.025 different places. 
Including last year's celebration. These statistics are 
embodied in "Christmas Caroling in 1923." a survey 
just issued by the National Bureau for the Advancement 
of Music. The actual number of cities that had outdoor 
caroling in 1923 was 1.2S.i. according to definite reports 
received by the lUireau. The information was gathered 
from newspaper clippings from all parts ot the country, 
as well as by direct correspondence, and it is probable 
that many cities were overlooked. 

According to the Bureau's records the number of cities 
caroling during the various years was the following: 
30 cities and towns, December, 191S 



no 

383 
712 
1173 
1285 



1919 
1920 
1921 
1922 
1923 



This last figure does not include 450 cities and towns 
included in the previous surveys but from which no 
.reports were received as to 1923, although a large per- 
centage of them undoubtedly observed the custom. 
Shortly after the inception ot the National Bureau, it 
began, at the suggestion of C. A. Grinnell. of Detroit, 
working for the country-wide expansion of the old cus- 
tom of Christmas caroling by groups called "waits." 
As a model for caroling organizations it suggested the 
plan worked out on a city-wide basis in Detroit. The 
Bureau also issued an informational booklet, "Christ- 
mas Eve Caroling Being Revived" which is now to be ob- 
tained, in revised form, by cities wishing to inaugurate 
the custom. With systematic stimulation by the Bureau 
each year the movement has now reached such national 
proportions as to indicate that it is a fi.xed annual cus- 
tom in a great number of cities. 

Communities that are taking up Christmas caroling 
this year for the first time can get full information in 
regard to the custom from the National Bureau for the 
Advancement of Music, 43 West 45th Street, New York 
City. .\ feature that is expected to be added to the 
caroling in coming Christmas holidays is the organiza- 
tion of more caroling groups consisting of men. This 
is made possible hy the publication of collections of 
carols arranged tor male voices. Another novelty that 
is increasing the beauty of the choral programs is the 
dramatization of the familiar carols and tableaux and 
pantomime. These dramatizations are presented either 
at some central point or on floats which proceed through 
the town either in a procession or singly. Each float 
is accompanied by its group of choristers who sing that 
particular carol. Specific suggestions for carrying on 
these adjuncts to the caroling are to l)e had from the 
National Bureau. 



PACIFIC CO.\ST MUSIC.M. REMEW 



WAR VETERANS ATTENTION 

Members of the Musical Profession Who Served In the 
War Should Read This Important Communication 

Warning to Veterans of World War: 

All veterans of the World War who may be suffering 
from neuropsychiatric diseases, active tuberculosis dis- 
eases, paralysis agitans. encephalitis lethargica or 
amoebic dysentery, are urged to file claims for com- 
pensation and be examined immediately. The law 
provides that such disabilities must be shown to exist 
prior to .January 1. 1925. to be entitled under the 
"WORLD WAR VETERANS' ACT, 1924." Any veteran 
who even feels that he is suffering from said disabili- 
ties should file a claim and be examined immediately, 
for an examination after January 1, 1925. may be too 
late. This urgent appeal is also made to veterans, 
whose claims for compensation on account of any ot 
said disabilities have been disallowed under previous 
laws, to notify this oflice with a request tor medical 
examination and re-rating under the new law which 
was approved by the President on June 7. 1924. 

Any person who served during the period of the World 
War. which is between April 6, 1917, and July 2, 1921, 
and feels that he or she is suffering from any of the 
above mentioned disabilities should immediately file 
with this Bureau applications for Compensation. Form 
526, carefully prepared in accordance with instructions 
contained thereon and sworn to before a Notary Pub- 
lic or other person duly authorized to administer oaths 
for public purposes and a certified copy of certificate 
of discharge. In all cases where the time limit of five 
years from date of discharge for filing applications has 
expired an accompanying aflidavit should be furnished 
showing the reason for not having filed in the re- 
quired time and requesting that the two year exten- 
sion be allowed by the Director. There should also "be 
furnished, where it is possible, a medical examination 
report from the applicant's physician showing the find- 
ings that demonstrate the existence of any of such dis- 
abilities. •RTien such an application is received in this 
Bureau a thorough medical examination by a medical 
examiner ot the United States Veterans' Bureau will be 
ordered. 

Further information and blank applications will be 
gladly furnished by Frederick A. Royse, Chief Co- 
operation Section, San Francisco Regional Office 
United States Veterans' Bureau, 8S3 Market Street' 
San Francisco, California, upon request by letter tele- 
phone, or personal call. 

Respectfully. 
S. H. CONNOR, Regional Manager. 



Ruth May Shaffner. popular soprano of the West, has 
h.id almost a sensational season In that in the past six 
months she has made her debut In opera with the San 
i-ranclsco and Los Angeles Opera Companhs and In 

riZiZ ■ ,"',"' "? *",''"'" *■'"' "•« I'l'lll'^nnonle Or- 
chestra of U,s Angeles, where she appeared with flat- 
er Ing success. The critics were most -nthuslas Ic In 
their praise ot this favorite soprano. In both her appear 

a Cnli nr^r'"","" T ? '""""' "'"B"' •'^"'"' Shaffner Is 
a California girl who has succeeded by hard work and 
a most muslclanly education. In that she was a splendW 
profess.onal accompanist and organUt before she be 
canit a sumcr. Other engagements of .mibs Shaffner's 
have been ,m the Redlands Artist Course. Orange HIkI, 
School. Am^ssador Radio Show. Ben Mkr Hills (Bur- 
bank), and as soloist with the L. A. Oratorio Society In 

Sophle'^Brasru"'' °' "" '""^'^ '''""""'''' 0™'"^'°' *"h 



The Town and Country Club ot Woodland. Cal., gave a 
chamber music concert at the Unitarian Church In 
Wood and on Saturday evening. December LUh. Lillian 

?ederation of Women's Clubs. Is heartily endeavoring 
to (rea e a held for the resident artists In the district 
o\ei «liieh she has control and this chamber music 
concert in Woodland Is one of the results ot her success- 
fu^ eflfom. The artists who participated in tM^concert 
«ere Mary Pa.smore. violin; Grace Becker, cello- Lil- 
lian Edwards, piano: Mavis Scott Goodrich, contralto 
and Mrs Fred Ellis Wilkins. accompanist. The pro: 
gram which was enjoyed by a large and discrlmlnatInK 
audience was as follows: Berceuse (Johannes Drahms. 
Norweg.an Dance (Edward Griegl. Misses Pa«mo?e 
fph^ck,'"?" ':'''""!'\; Cl'e faro senza Eurldlce (oTteo 
iGluckl, Lasiapemi Morire (Claudlo Monieverdcl (Mrs 
Goodrich, Mrs. Wilkins at the piano: Le Cygne (t"g 
Swan) iSainl-Saens), Gavotte No. 2 (David Ponnerr 

m^b H^Fr"'' f'\ """"■•"^ "' ""^ """«'"'" aTu"" 
(Robert l-ranzl, Synnoves Lied (H. Kjeruff) Cradle 
Song (Gretchaninoff), Mrs. Goodrich, Mrs Wilkins a! 
the piano: Air de Lensky (0 Days ot Youth romEu! 
gene One'gin) (Tsehaikowsky-Auer), Bird as Prophet 
(bchumann-Auer), ScherzoTarentelle (Wlenlawskl) 
Miss Pasmore. Mrs. Edwards at the piano The Sea 
(.MacDowell), Will o' the Wisp (Spross), Widow BW 

^nn? M°"''°r:'"'.'-M''^?r*' ^P'"' '''''»'" (Campbell-TIp 
ton), Mrs Goodrich, Mrs. Wilk:ns at the piano: Molto 
Allegro ed agitato from Trio In d minor (Mendelssohn) 
.Misses Pasmore, Becker and Edwards. 



Vera Adelstein and Florence Reid, both piano students 
ot Joseph George Jacobson, entertained over the r.-irtin 
KPO on December Uth. 



Marian Patricia Cavanaugh, the talented young piano 
pupil of Joseph George Jacobson, has been engage I to 
pla.v at the Civic Auditorium on Christmas Eve This 
tt-Ul be the fifth appearance of tils talented child to 
play on this date and in this place. 



Mrs. William Steinbach Laura Wertheimber ISABEI^LK MARKS 



VOICE CII.TI RE 
Studio: 

!POL- KOHLEK .M CHASE IH.DG., 
.Sun Pmini.so Phon e Kenrnr r,4T: 

ACHILLE L. ARTIGUES 

Graduate of Scholn Cautornni. Paris. ()i 
Kanl.sl S«. Mary'.s Caliiedral. Piano Ot 
partnient, Hnnilln Svlinol. Orean an 



I'reparnfon- Toaclifr for 
:ilr.s. .Noah Brandt 
it. Teleliiiont- I'illll 



-Irrilln 



Musical Coile 



KT RT VON GUinziNSKI 

UARITO.XE — VOICE CI LTl HE 

.\utllorixed to Tcarii >lnie. St-hoen- 

Kene's Mrtliod 

1314 Leaventvortli St. I'lionc Pro-npect U'27t:t 

KWS. M. GARCIA 

PIAXIST AXD TEACHER 
41.5a Hone St. Tel. Piedmont 41I0S 

PIERRE DOUILLET, PIANO 
NITALIA DOUILLET, VOICE 

.10.-. ivohler .V Chase BldK. Tel. Sutter 73.S7 

DOMENICO BRESCIA 

\ OICE SPECIALI.ST — CO.MPOSITIOV 
Studio: U0a-<iU4 Koliler * Chase IJnIldlne 
Phone K earny .■i4.-.4 

Madame Charles Poulfer— Soprano 

Kesldenre Studio. r>ss ::7th Street 
Oakland — Tel. Oakland 20711 

Mary Coonan McCrea 

TEAt HER OF SINGING 
Studio: :ill Gairney IluUdlnc. .'1711 Sutter St. 
Tel. Douglas 4a:i:i Res. Tel. Kearny a:Hfl 

MRS. A. F. BRIDGE 



Evelyn Sresovich Ware 

PinnLst and Aeeoni|ianist 
Studio: llio.f Kohler * Chase Bulldinur 
Phnn.- GarHeld li71'J 

Joseph George Jacobson 



ROSE RELDA CAII LEAU 

Oi.ern (onii.iue. Paris 

Studio: :il(17 Mnshinuton Street 

Phone l-illMiore ISI7 

SIGMUND BEEL 



MARY ALVERTA MORSE 

SOPR.WO 
Teneher of SiueiuK: Studio. Tuesday ami 
Friday. Kohler * Chase llldK.. S. F.; Resi- 
dence Studio. t«« Santa Rosa .4vc.. Oak- 
land. Phone Huniholdt 1111. 

SAN FRANCISCO CONSERVATORY 



OF MUSIC 



CO.XTRAI.TO 

ISXS 2«th Avenue Phone Sunaet 2»»5 

Aolee Culture. .Mondays P. M. .'.(I« Kohler 

A Chase BldK. Tel. Garlleld 4472 

CAROLINE E. IRONS 

Pianist and Teacher 

3831 Mera Street Tel. Fruitvale 778W 

Joseph Greven 

Voice Culture ;— Opera, Oratorio. 
Concert and Church Singing in all 
languages. 

MRS. ]. GREVEN 

Piano and Harmony 

3741 Sacramento St. Tel. Bayview 5278 

TEACHERS' DIRECTORY 



MACKENZIE GORDON 

-'s:j2 .lackson Siri'ct I'lione W.'st 4.-, 



ANTOINE DE VALLY 

2201 Scott Si Phone We.l lJ4t 



MME. M. TRCMBONI 
601-2 Kohler & Chase Bidg. Kearny 64S4 



JACK EDWARD HILLMAN 

liiil KohliT & Chase Bid?. GarHeld (i04t; 

ADELE ULMAN 
178 Commonwealth Ave. Ph. Bayview 8196 

VIRGINIA PIERCE ROVERE 

.Sludio Iiii.):; Kohler ,t Cha.se nidi; 
I lain, Id i;7l-' 



Mrs. Carroll Nicholson 

< 0\i'H \l, 111 
Teaeher ol Sinthiu:. .12 l,,.rilla A»e., Pied- 
mont. Tel. Pieilin.>Ml :iol. > Kohler ,v 

< hose BldK. S. i'. Tel.plione liearny .-. I.", 1 

Brandt's Conservatory of Music 

t. Bet. CIny .V WnshinKton 



HELEN COLBURN HEATH ^^""^ ^''^Jj^l^X'^^'^''^^^ 



.loist. Temple Kmanu Kl. (',.. 
I and Chureh « ork. Voeal Instruetlo 
a.Vin CIny street. IMione \ Vest 4SIMI 

HENRIK GJERDRUM 

PIAMST 



Berkeley, Cal. 



Saai Jaekson Street 



Fillmore 32,-> 



MRS. ZAY RECTOR BEVITT 

PIANO AND HARMONY 

'IBS. ZVV R|.-,( TOR BKVITT 

Institute of Mnsle of San Kranelseo 

Kohler .«; t hnse Bldii. Tel. Kearny .".^l.-.l 



Dorothy Goodsell Camm MARION RAMON WILSON 



COLOR.iTURA SOPRA>-0 
reaeher of Bel Canto. Tel. Bayview 3S3» 
• r Piedmont 1330. By .\piiaintment Only. 



Dramatic Contralto. Oiiera Saceesses In 

Burope. Concert Suecesses in the Inlted 

States. Address: 1S25 l.eaventvorth Street 

Telephone Friuiklln Sum 



MISS EDITH CAUBU 
376 Sutter Street Phone Douglas 26S 

JANET ROWAN HALE 
Kohler <£. Chase BIdg. Tel. Kearny 5454 

MISS LORRAINE EWING 
833 Ashbury St. Phone Hemlock 749 

RUTH VIOLA DAVIS 
515 Buena Vista Avenue — Park 341 

LOUIS FELIX RAYNAUD 

1841 Fulton St. Tel. Bayview 6008 

ELSIE COOK HUGHES LARAIA 
3325 Octavia St. Phone Filmore 6102 

If a music journal is worth while to 
puhlish programs and views of musical 
events, it is worth while to patronize. 



JULIUS HAUQ 

4032 Irving St. Tel. Sunset 436 

MOTHER WISMER 
3701 Clay Street Phone Bayview 7780 

ARTHUR CONRADI 
Snu Kohler & Chase Bldg Tel Kearny 64t4 

G. JOLLAIN 
376 Sutter St. Tel. Kearny 2637 

MARY PASMORE 
2009 Green St. Tel. Fillmore 9071 



For Sunday afternoon, December 7. at 
4 p. ni., Miss May Mukle. the famoua 
cellist, was engaged for a recital In the 
Memorial Church at Stanford Cniverslty. 
with Warren R. Allen. University or- 
ganist The London Times places Miss 
Mukle "In the very front rank of living 
violoncellists." She Is a great favorite 
In America and Is held In highest esteem 
in circles which cham.^er music of the 
highest order Is appreciated. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



December 19, 1924 



ADVANCED COACHING 

THE ART OF INTERPRETATION— SOLFEGE 

NORMAL COURSES 

sTi mosi 

70« KOULER & CHASE BIH.DIXG. SA!V PIIA.NCISCO 
2518^4 ETXA STREET, IlERKELEV 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAX FRANXISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRU.VRY 10th. 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks in California. 

the Assets of which have never been increased 

by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member .Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1924 

Assets $93,198,226.96 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funcis 3,900,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 446,024.41 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

.H.yCHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

WEST l>ORTAL BRANCH West Porta I Ave. and UUoa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (414) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND NUY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



NOW PUBLISHED 

iiuatral Mm T^aok 

©f (Ealifurnia 
FIVE DOLLARS POSTPAID 

ANYWHERE IN THE UNITED STATES 

Address: MUSICAL BLUE BOOK OF CALIFORNIA 

801 Kohler & Chase Building 

26 O'Farrell Street, San Francisco, California 



MABEL RIEGELMAN 

Soprano — an artist of distinct personality 

Grand Opera's Tiniest Prima Donna 

FRANK MOSS 

A Master at the Piano 

Jointly in 

RECITAL en COSTUME 

Carefully selected groups of songs, particularly pleasing, quaint and 
unusual. Costume changes, with exquisite color effects so appeal- 
ing to the eye. The recital in general so strikingly different; an 
artistic triumph. 

Also 

UNIQUE CHILDREN'S PROGRAM 

(Partially en costume) 

This gives to the young folks the joyous opportunity seldom vouch- 
safed them of reveling in a charming and fanciful Song-Story sur- 
prise, prepared especially for them and within the range of their 
understanding and appreciation. 

SPECIAL CONSIDERATION GIVEN WESTERN DATES 

ON PACIFIC COAST, FEB.-MAR., 1925 

For Western dates and terms, make up of programs, etc., address: 

M. L. Samuels, 485 California Street, San Francisco 




•THE'AMPICO- 

AlonC' — -and unassisted this musical marvel recreates in yow 
home the playing of the master musicians ■ — ■ who have "myster 
tously endowed it with all the music of the world," and who also 
pronounce it the world's most magnificent musical instrument. 

BY AN OVERWHELMING 
MAJORITY- MORE OF THE 
^VORLD'S GREAT PIANISTS 
OF THE PAST THREE GEN- 
ERATIONS MAY BE HEARD 
ON THE AMPICO (AND ON 
THE AMPICO ALONE)THAN 
ON ANY OTHER MUSICAL 
INSTRUMENT • ALL THIS 
MUSICAL AVEALTH IS 
AVITHIN YOUR MEANS 
ON A BASIS AVE SHALL 
BE GLAD TO ARRANGE 
FOR YOU • COME IN • HEAR 
YOUR AMPICOAND HEAR 
OUR PLAN 

•KOHLER- &• CHASE • 



2« O'FARRELL STREET . SAN FRANCISCO 

515 14 111 Street 2460 Mission Street 

_ .- K L A N D y~~S\. SAN FRANCISCO 
SAN JOSE /^ Mt^ SACRAMENTO 



KNABE 




AlvCTICO 



%it^^lli^iml ^Mr^ 



VOL. XVII. NO. 12 



THE OLDEST MUSICALJOURNAL IN THE GREATW RST 
SAN FRANCISCO, FRIDAyTdECEMRRR^^^T^^ 



VIOLIN SOLOISTS APPEAR AT THREE SYMPHONY CONCERTS 

Cecilia Hansen Creates Sensation With Artistic Interpretation of Beethoven Concerto 

Eugenia Argiewicz Bern Arouses Enthusiasm With Lalo Concerto-Lou^s 

Persinger Dehghts with Bruch Concerto-Schumann's RheiSh 

bymphony Conducted Masterly by Hertz 

BY ALFRED METZGER 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



Three symphony concerts took place in San Francisco 
during the week between Friday, December 19th and 
Friday, December 26th, They were given by the' San 
Francisco Symphony Orchestra, under the direction of 
Alfred Hertz, on Friday evening, December 19th, at the 
Civic Auditorium, on Sunday afternoon. December 21st 
at the Curran Theatre, and on Friday afternoon. Decem- 
ber 26th, at the Curran Theatre On each occasion a 
violin soloist was one of the features of the concert, and 
on each occasion a large audience assembled to give 
vent to its enthusiasm. Naturally the holiday season 
and the inclement weather, partly unprecedented rain 
and partly unusual cold, influenced somewhat a lessen- 
ing of the record audiences at the Curran Theatre, but 
at the Exposition Auditorium ten thousand people as 
usual, assembled to hear Alfred Hertz, the San Fran- 
cisco Symphony Orchestra and Cecilia Hansen on Fri- 
day evening. December 19th. 

And surely not one of the ten thousand people re- 
gretted facing the cold weather, for at the end of the 
program the audience crowded around the platform and 
demanded encore after encore from Cecilia Hansen, the 
Russian violin virtuosa. We were under the impression 
that Miss Hansen was Norwegian or Danish, but dis- 
covered that, notwithstanding her name, she was born 
in Russia and has become noted as a Russian artist. As 
a rule we do not believe in bringing personalities into 
our musical reviews, but we simply cannot help drawing 
attention to Miss Hansen's delightful personal appear- 
ance. She is truly beautiful in a most pleasing way and 
carries herself with a dignity and grace that adds much 
to her success. Artistically she gave an interpretation 
of Beethoven's only violin concerto such as we have 
never heard surpassed, and hardly ever equalled. It was 
a masterly performance. 

Miss Hansen certainly is a violinist who ia able to 
play this Beethoven concerto without a flaw, as far as 
we could hear. Her intonation was positively clean and 
pure throughout, her technic absolutely accurate in the 
minutest details, her phrasing scholarly and musicianly 
in the highest degree, her attacks clean-cut and precise 
to the last note, her cantabile passages were sung in a 
manner to vie with any great singer, and her double- 
stops were so accurate as to tone and intonation and 
spontaneity that it was a delight to hear her play them. 
The difficult cadenzas were negotiated with such ease 
and lack of effort, and without any error or "muddi- 
ness." that we simply had to marvel at the accuracy 
which, notwithstanding exceptional speed, did not reveal 
any discrepencies. If you have not heard Cecilia Hansen 
play the Beethoven concerto you certainly have missed 
one of the treats of your musical experience. 

When the classics are played like Cecilia Hansen 
Played the Beethoven concerto they stand out like a 
genuine diamond among a cluster of paste jewelry, and 
unless compositions like this sonata are played in such 
a, manner it would be better not to play them at all. 
The writer confesses himself to have been surprised. 
ind pleasantly so. for the advance information obtained 
regarding Miss Hansen, while complimentary, was not 
Jy any means descriptive of the actual importance and 
superior musicianship of ths truly brilliant artist. We 
;annot express our regret too emphatically that a con- 
cert was impossible on account of the artist's departure 
or New Orleans on the way to Cuba immediately after 
he concert We sincerely hope that Miss Hansen will 
loon return and give us a program of her own where she 
:an further desplay that matchless style and scholarly 
nusicianship which was revealed in her unexcelled 
endition of the Beethoven Concerto. 

■The orchestra under the never failing artistic leader- 
nip of Alfred Hertz played with an enthusiasm and 
irtistic finesse that was worthy of the soloist. Artist 
onductor and orchestra seemed inspired, and we do 
lot expect to hear a finer and artistically more satis- 
actory performance of the Beethoven concerto than we 
leard on this occasion, and we make no reservation, 
he remaining orchestral numbers consisted of the 
ramatic Massenet Overture Phedre the always enjoy- 
ble and poetically entrancing Unfinished Symphony by 
:hubert, and the virile Fantasia Francesca de Rimini 
' Tschaikowsky. All three works had but recently been 
ayed by the orchestra at its Curran Theatre concerts 
which time they were reviewed in these columns On 
IS occasion Alfred Hertz and the orchestra aeain in- 
•sted them with that charm, vigor and precision which 
'ade such an excellent impression on the previous 
ccasion. 



CURRENT EVENTS 

At the Fourth Popular Concert, which took place at 
Hie Curran Theatre on Sunday afternoon. December 
-1st Eugenia Argiewicz Bem. was the soloist and played 
the Lalo Concerto for violin in F minor in a manner to 
justly arouse the audience to the highest pitch of en- 
thusiasm. We do not believe that the average music 
lover has the faintest idea what a truly splendid violin 
vir uosa Mrs Bem really is. She has no reason to 

r«t L. .', I°''-,'^?-y ^"'"'^ '"■"'"• She has a tone of 
remaikable flexibility and volume. She plays with an 
abandon and emotional depth that we have not heard 
surpassed. She puts her very soul into her playing and 
draws trom the instrument every element of poetic or 



a performance of the I.alo concerto such as |q rarely 
heard on the concert platform and Mr Hertz and the 
HsHc t''ri!.';'T ^^"■Ph""^ Orchestra completed the ar- 
listic treat by rounding oiil the interpretation with a 
most remarkable support of the soloist. 

The remainder of the program Is familiar to tb08a 
attending the symphony concerts. It In, ludod Weber's 
cZ?" O^"""'^' I3«^h Air from the D major suite' 
Gnegs Peer Gynt Suite No. 1, In the Village from 
Caucasian Sketches by Ippolitow-Ivanow. „ which a 
most quaint drum effect was included. Krelsler's ever 
Ov"e,"^,?f "■""■"■? ^'«°°°'« and Strauss' Gypsle Baron 
p^eiture a most refreshing and captivating comDOsl- 
lon rendered in the genuine Viennese spirit TheTn- 
JllTT .""" "»«■'""><='"»' Bn'l prolonged and everyone 
gave the lmpres.slon of having enjoyed himself or her- 
self to the very last degree. 




MME. JOHANNA KRISTOFFY 

The Distinguished Prima Donna Soprano Who 

Has Returned From a Four Months' Trip to 

Europe and Has Reopened Her Vocal Studio. 

(See Page 5. Column 1) 



dramatic fervor as the case may be. The Lalo concerto 
was a most happy selection for it gave the artist an 
opportunity to be at her best. 

Resident artists like Mrs. Bem reflect credit upon the 
community which they honor by their presence, and It 
is artists like Mrs. Bem whom the Pacific Coast Musical 
Review wishes to see recognized and appreciated by 
our Pacific Coast managers, music clubs, and musical 
public, not only by giving them engagements, but by 
putting them upon a level with other distinguished 
artists in regard to remuneration. Unless this latter 
is done, the recognition is not complete. Mrs. Bem gave 



wM 1 F I T""" °' Symphony Concerts, the first of 
which took place on Friday afternoon, December 26th 

fnlr nf „"V1''^. ^^^^ '" '"'^""'^ '" '"Is issue on ac^ 
I ■ Christmas holiday necessitating a day's 

delay in the publication of this paper, presented to us 
Loms Persinger as the soloist. This always dependable 
and exceptionally endowed artist of the highest rank 
once more conquered for himself a place In the hearU 
of his audience. He played the unusually grateful and 
exacting work with that smoothness of tone and accur- 
acy of execution which is always one of Mr. Perslnger's 
predominating artistic traits. There is such a natural 
ease and assurance about Mr. Persingers Interpreta- 
tions that his audience is constantly drawn toward 

There are moments when Mr. Persinger Is somewhat 
nervous, but since such nervousness is usually the proof 
of his sincerity and painstaking care, it becomes one 
of the characteristics of his attractive interpretations. 
■The Persmger tone has long since become one of the 
delightful features at the symphony concerts and In his 
solos It IS always in evidence His technic Is usually 
very brilliant and precise None knows better how to 
obtain the witchery of an adagio than Mr. Persinger 
and on this occasion he again distinguished himself by 
putting every ounce of sentiment into the second move- 
ment of this beautful Bruch concerto. Whether Mr 
Persinger was at times too impulsive, or whether the 
orchestra and Mr. Hertz were somewhat to conserva- 
tive, IS diflicult for us to establish, but wc found occa- 
sionally that orchestra and soloist were somewhat at 
cro.ss purposes as to tenirio. In the main, however the 
performance was exceptionally gratifying and the en- 
thusiasm of the audience at the conclusion of the num- 
ber was ample evidence of this contention. 

Of course, there is no one that can obtain such fervor 
and depth from the Parsifal Prelude than Mr. Hertz 
can. The orchestra seems to absorb the conductor's 
emotional warmth to the utmost and the result Is an 
interpretation that we cannot imagine to be Improved 
upon. It 13 the last word in Wagnerian reading. It Is 
truly astounding how Mr. Hertz is able to make some 
of the heaviest and most severe music palatable to 
everyone and to present beauties which we never noted 
before, although having listened tl many distinguished 
conductors direct Wagnerian compositions. The pro- 
gram closed with Schumann's Rhenish Symphony No 3 
transcribed for modern oichostra by Frederick Stock' 
conductor of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra Not 
being very familiar with ths work, It is Impossible for 
us to tell how much Mr Stock has Improved It, but wo 
were able to know that It seemed to exhibit a freshness 
and buoyancy in keeping with the composer's senti- 
ments, and this demonstrated that Mr. Stock certainly 
did not spoil the work. 

It Is a most enchanting composition and we revelled 
in Its melodic and harmonic beauties, no doubt some of 
the scoring being due to Mr. Stock's skill In orchestra- 
tion. On former occasions, like his arrangements of 
certain Kreisler compositions, we found Mr. Stock put- 
ting on the paint rather heavily, and we would not bo 
surprised If on this occasion he added some "weight" 
to Schumann's natural sprlghtllness but the Impression 
received by hearing the work once Is decidedly pleasant 
and most grateful and effective as to rhythm and 
melody. This most recent event was greatly enjoyed by 
an audience who was not afraid to express Its prefer- 
ences. 

There will be no popular concert next Sunday after- 
noon. January 4th. The next concert will be the first of 
the Sixth Pair of Symphony Concerts on Friday after- 
noon. January 9th. The soloist will be E. Robert Schmltz 
and there will be three novelties: Haydn's Surprise 
Symphony In G major will receive Its first performance 
at these concerts and so will Cesar Pranck's Symphonic 
Variations for Piano and Orchestra. Richard Strauss' 
Burleske in D minor for Piano and Orchestra will be 
heard for the first time in San Francisco on this occa- 
sion. The remaining number will be Wagner's ever 
matchless Love Death from Tristan and Isolde than 
which there Is no more entrancng work, when Hertz 
conducts It 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



December 26, 1924 



Worth Any Sacrifice 

The Steinway tells how it ma}) become yours 



ASteinwav is such a human piano, and 
comes into such close association with 
people that it has acquired a deep understand- 
ing of human nature during the past seventy 
years. 

I am a Steinway. I, too, have acquired 
some knowledge of human hearts. And this is 
what I have noticed: 

That people place the most value, and take 
the greatest enjoyment in possessing, those 
things for which they ha\e made some sacri- 
fice. 

To possess me, a Steinway piano, has called 
forth sacrifices in many a modest household. 
The Steinway that stands so proudly in the 
living room is probably there because it was 
earnestly wanted. 

That is why, altho my purchase price is 
higher than most pianos, possession of me gives 
to most people such true joy. They have 
wanted me because of what I represent. They 
have refused to be satisfied until they pos- 
sessed me. To possess me, they have made 
many little and big sacrifices. Established in 
such a home, is it any wonder that I am the 
proudest piano in the world? 



,x/' 



K 



1 ; . ' ^ 



it i^ 







One day a young couple came into Sherman, 
Clay & Co. and examined me critically. Then 
they turned to a salesman and said : 

"Our little daughter will be nine years old 
five years from now. She must begin her les- 
sons when she is nine years old. She should, if 
possible, begin them on a Steinway piano. If 
we pay you a small monthly sum, will you 
hold it for us, and credit the accumulating 
interest, against the day when our little daug- 
ter becomes nine years of age?" 



That was sacrifice. The young couple were 
earnestly endeavoring to accumulate the sum, 
or partial sum, of my purchase. To make cer- 
tain of their program, they were seeking to 
place that monthly sacrifice safely beyond any 
temptation to spend it for some transient pleas- 
ure. And when their little daughter possesses 
me, you can be very sure that I shall be a 
proud and happy piano. 

Is not that home itself meanwhile made 
happier, by the knowledge of this voluntary 
sacrifice? Will that home not tend to hold 
together, over the years, because of this very 
spirit? 

It is the privilege of a Steinway to be worth 
such efforts. Many a home that longs for a 
Steinway could have one, if a very little sacri- 
fice were systematically entered upon. 

I know that Sherman, Clay & Co. will be 
glad to explain why this sacrifice is so worth 
while. 

Sherman Kay & Co. 

Kearny and Sutter Sts., San Francisco 
CALIFORNIA-OREGON-WASHINGTON 



RENA 

LAZELLE 

SOPRANO 
San Francisco Opera Company 

ad of Vocal DepnrtitieiH. San 
FT of Mu»Ic— Available fc 

Oratorio. Concert 
S43S Sacramento SI. 



EMILIE LANCEL 

OPERATIC MEZZO-SOPRANO 

After Two Years' Absence in Europe 

Available For 
OPERA— ORATORIO— CONCERT 

Management ALICE SECKELS 
68 Post Street 

Residence: 778 Eighteenth Avenue, San Francisco 
Tel. Bayview 1461 



ANNIE LOUISE DAVID 

HARP SOLOIST AND TEACHER 

ON THE PACIFIC COAST DURING 
SEASON 1924-1925 

Address: Hotel Claremont, Berkeley 
Tel. Berkeley 9300 

Management Alice Seckels, 68 Post Street 
Tel. Douglas 7267 



PASMORE VOCAL STUDIOS 



KARL RACKLE 



LAMBS CLUB, NEW YORK CITY 



ALICE GENTLE 

MANAGEMENT 

CATHARINE A. BAMMAN 
53 West 39th Street New York, N. Y. 



MADAME JOHANNA 

KRISTOFFY 

PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO 






Thorough Vocal and Dramatic Traini 


ng 




740 Pine Street Phone Doug 


as 


6624 



AUGUSTA HAYDEN 

SOPRANO 

AvaUable (or Cnncerta and Recital* 

Addrenai 471 R7th Avenue 

Tel. Par. «.S2 

HOMER HENLEY 

BARITONE — TEACHER OF SINGING — CONDUCTOR 

Director Cnllfornln Cinh Choral 

An Oratorio Authority 

Reaidence Studioi 1240 Uay, at Franklin. Tel. FIIL 1033 



LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM 



CONTRALTO 

Teacher of SlnslnK. Complete Courne of Operatic Tratn- 

Ine. 2730 Pierce St. Tel. Fillmore 45.13 

Dominican College School of Music 

SAN RAFAEL. CALIFORNIA 

Music Couraes ThorouRh and ProcreKslve. Public School 

Music. Accredited nlploma 



BAAd. BerkAley 



MR. ANDREW BOGART 
Teacher of Singing 

Pupils Prepared for Opera, Oratorio, Church and 
Concert. New Address: Suite 600, Kohler & Chase 
BIdg., 26 O'Farrell Street. Telephone Douglas 9256 



WALLACE A. SABIN 

Organlat Temple Emanu El, First Church of Chrlat Sci- 
entist. Director LorInK Club. S. F., Wed., 1915 Sacramento 
Street. Phone Went .t7S3i Sal.. First Chriatlan Science 
Church, Phone Fillmore 792«5 Res. Studio. 3142 Leiviston 
Are.. Berkeler. Phone Piedmont 242N 

MISS DOROTHEA MANSFELDT 

Preparing Teacher for 

MRS. OSCAR MANSFELDT, Pianist 

207 Cherry St., Bet. AVaahlneton * Clay TeL Pae. »S0« J 

The College of the Holy Names 

LAKE MERRITT, OAKLAND 

Complete Conservatory Course — Piano, Harp, VtollBi 

'Cello. Voice. Counterpoint. Harmony. History 

DURINI VOCAL STUDIO 

DIRECTION OF MME. LILLIAN SLINKEY DITRINI 

Italian Method — Voice Placement — Breathinc 

Opera— Church — Oratorio 

1072 Ellis St. TeL Weat 59S 



PAUL STEINDORFF 

MASTER COACH 
Coiiiplete Grand and Light Opera Repertoire 



Miss Elizabeth Westgate 

Teacher of Piano, Org:an. Harmony. Organist and Musical 
Director of First Presbyterian Church, Alameda. Home 
Studio: 1117 PARU STREET. ALAMEDA. Telephone Ala- 
meda 153. Thursdays, Merriman School, 587 Eldorado Ave« 
Oakland. Telephone Piedmont 2770. 



MUSIC PRINTING? 

SCHOLZ, ERICKSON & CO., Inc. 

521 Howard Street Phone Douglas 4273 

San Francisco 



Mzmning School of Music 

JOHN C. MANNINO, Director . 

SS42 WashlnEton Street Telephone Fillmore SH 

PEARL HOSSACK WHITCOMB 

DRAMATIC SOPRANO 

Absolute Method of Voice Upon the Breath 

Monday and Thursday. lOO.'S Kohler * Chase BnlldiB» 

Tel. Garfield 6723. Res. Phone Prospect 426 



Decemljcr 26. 1924 



^rifir (£0a^lllii^iraI3le^i# 



iii;\ii;h iompa.w 



ALFRED METZGER 



Editor 



s. nioiie>- orilerH or 
VST Ml SICAI, mo 



Dnklnnd-Derkplry-Aliimeiln Ollicc 1117 
'IVI. AIniiiedn IS." 
MlK5» Kllznbelh « esteatt- In 



Sun JoNe ISSl 



I.as Anselos Oinve 
Avtnuc. Hollfnooil, California 
Davlfl I'ssher in Charge 



FRIDAY, DEC. 26, 1924 



The PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW i: 
the sheet niu.*«le deiiarlnieuts of nil lenilin^ 



nd-elas 



at S. P. Postofllce 



SllnSCIlIPTlONS 
Annually In Advance. Including Postage: 

nited States $3.00 

nreign Countrirs 4.00 



TWENTY-FOURTH YEAR 




BY WAY OF EXPLANATION 

No doubt our readers must ha^'e wondered why their 
paper did not reach them regularly during the last week 
or two. We hasten to explain that this was partly due 
to the holidays which delayed printing at the shop and 
which was responsible tor a congestion in the postofflce 
that kept the paper buried tor several days under the 
avalanche of Christmas mail that had accumulated. No 
doubt this edition of the paper also will be late a day or 
two on account of the New Year Day falling on a Thurs- 
day when the paper is usually on the press. Naturally 
these delays cannot be avoided and they will happen 
every year. But occasionally delays of publication are 
due to lack of co-operation on the part of press agents 
and advertising managers. Copy for advance notices 
should be in this office before 5 o'clock on Tuesdays 
and the same is true of advertisements. Unless we re- 
ceive such copy on time printing of the paper is delayed. 
The Musical Review does not own its printing plant. 
It depends on an outside ofliee for this work, and since 
such printing has other publications this paper must be 
on time with its material And we cannot be on time it 
we fail to receive advance notices and advertising copy 
on time, unless those sendng such material are willing 
that we leave it out when not received promptly. This 
refers not only to San Francisco but to the entire Bay 
region. So let us resolve to be prompt during the New 
Year so that the Musical Review will be received every 
week on time. 

There appeared in the San Francisco Examiner of 
Thursday morning, December ISth, an editorial on 
Puccini in which was stated: "It is worth while to 
bear in mind that San Francisco saw the first produc- 
tion of the great Italian's loveliest opera. La Boheme." 
And later on again: "But as future years pass onward 
it will become an even greater honor tor a city to hnve 
seen the premiere performance of La Boheme." The 
Pacific Coast Musical Review likes nothing better than 
to see to it that San Fi-ancisco gets all the credit for 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 

Company of today. It used to visit South America and 
Mexico and from there come to California by way of 
Los Angeles. Even though it had the rights of the 
premiere production, which is not likely, It would not 
wait until coming to San Francisco bef re giving such 
premiere. But this city would have had the American 
premiere had the company opened its American engage- 
ni.'nt in the north instead of the south of California. 

WHY JOIN THE MUSIC TEACHERS' ASSOCIATION? 
By NELLIE STRONG STEVENSON 

One often hears teachers say: '■Why should I join 
the San Francisco Music Teachers' Association?" In 
reply several reasons may be presented to prove that 
this IS not only desirable but should be almost a sine quo 
non of teaching music. In the first place only seltlsh or 
at least self centered teachers view such a membership 
solely from the standpo.nt of personal advantage and 
simply ask: "How will it benelit me?" In other pro- 
fessions—law and medicine, even business organiza- 
tions.— there is a pride in one's calling; a desire to 
align oneself with ones co-workers and uphold the 
ranK of the profession or business in the community. 
The lack of such a view among music teachers largely 
accounts for the undeniable fact that at the present 
time our M. T. A. has so little general recognition and 
wields so small an intluence in comparison with the 
number of teachers actually at Worit in the city, the 
serious importance of musical art and the unlimited 
extent to which it is here cultivated. 

-A-gain certain teachers— and this applies to some of 
the finest, most prominent ones— object to membership 
because they consider themselves too good to bel.,ng to 
an association of so democratic a character, one open 
to all reputable teachers, no matter how modest and 
limited their achievements; but of what gojd are 
superior gifts and knoivledge if not consecrated to ser- 
vice? Even should these high-lights of the profession 
actually derive no personal pleasure or benetit from 
membership (which, however, I do not concede), their 
adherence to it adds prestige and inspires members 
lower down the professional ladder to anu higner and 
keep climbing! Here also the trouble lies in the too 
personal, narrow outlook of these musical elect. Let 
both these classes of objectors (un-conscientious ones!) 
join, even if not able to attend often, in order that their 
names may appear in the list of teachers, where they 
belong, and that their dues— almost negligible in amount 
—may help swell the treasury and so enable tlie associa- 
tion to make itself more what these outsiders claim it 
should be. Every organization needs money to carry 
out its aims. 

•As a third class, we have those whose musical work 
lies chietly in the local concert field. Such, when of the 
masculine persuasion, often belong to the Musicians' 
Club and give this as e.xcuse. Well, the JIusicians' Club 
may have high charges,— I do not know,— but certainly 
the modest dues of the M. T. A. will neither make nor 
break any one, even though belonging to other societies 
Eight lessons at Hfty cents each will defray its annual 
demand, and many of just this class hapi en to get very 
high fees! Moreover, most of them do teach also; so 
is it just that they should compete with music teachers 
pure and simple and yet scorn to openly aiign them- 
selves with the M. T. A.? It would appear that these 
too, deem themselves above the teaching profession 
and yet they follow it! Besides this, as a matter of 
tact, many members of the M T. A. not only teach, but 
do important concert work as well. Thus those 'who 
stand apart must also have just the personal, unlimited 
viewpoint. 

At the other end of the scale there are the young 
teachers, mure or less prepared, but inexperienced. 
They, perhaps, really do have very few extra dollars 
to invest in membership, but more than any others they 
need this association with their older colleagues anil 
would find real inspiration in the contact. They are 
the teachers of the future and the organization exists 
largely to put high standards before them, an aim which 
should win the cooperation of every earnest musician. 
There are nearly 2000 music teachers in San Francisco, 
and what proportion belong to the M. T. A.? An in- 
finitesimal one! All teachers should belong. For them 
it should be a sort of "noblesse oblige." If they do 
not like its present meth.ds, let them come in and help 
improve them! Come in. one and all, enjoy the good 



Boheme would fade into insignificance if that event had 
actually taken place. But neither ourselves nor any 
other San Franciscan, including the writer of the 
Examiner editorial, would like to claim something that 
the city does not deserve. 



musical honors that are her due. There are so many fellowship, which incidentally destroys many little 
such musical honors that even the premiere of La jealousies and misunderstandings sometimes credited— 

or dis credited— to the musical profession, and let us 
think more of what we can give than of what we will 
get! Let us combine our forces to promote the associa- 
tion's ideals and to translate them into live working- 
influences in San Francisco's daily life. So decide now 
to join, call up the president or secretary and ask for 
application blanks, fill them out and send in with the 
dues and thus start the New Year at hand as members 
of the only liody which represents music teachers. In 
honoring the M. T. A. and helping it take its rightful 
place in the respect of the whole community, teachers 
honor and uplift themselves and their profession. 



menta." (Of course, the llrst premise Is Incorrect, as 
Mr van de Wall does not use music merely to amuie 
the prisoners.) 

To these popular emotional reactions to the Idea Mr. 
van de Wall opposes his own experiences In the field of 
musical therapeutics. He seems t > reply to the "legal 
retributlonlsts" by relating how music Is helping to 
change "these custodial Infernos of horror" into places 
ot remedial treatment. However, he does not claim 
that music is a cure-all or that a single cure or roforma- 
iion can be credited to It as all Us own. It Is slmnly 
a detail of the new work of salvage now being under- 
taken in the old custodial sto. kades. As such, lie points 
out. it plays a unique part eflicienlly. 

Mr. van de Wall's book, which is published by the 
National liurean for the Advancement of .Music. Is di- 
vided into two parts covering, respectively correctional 
institutions and mental hospitals. In the former sec- 
tion he describes graphically his musical experiences 
with a band if bad boys, a singing club of incorrigible 
giris. a chorus among hardened female prisoners, musi- 
cal self*xpresslon among male convicts and the con- 
solation ot music among the condemned. 

Even more specific is the story of musical work 
among the insane, as now being carried on by the 
aiith r as a field representative for the Bureau of Mental 
Health. Department of Welt ire. Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania. That story is based larecly upon Mr. 
van de Wall's recent experiences at the State Hospital. 
Allentown. Pa. 

One anecdote Illustrates the method of treatment 
through music. An attractive young girl, lately In- 
carcerated, talks loudly and frequently sobs She would 
stay at hfiine from work, wmild give no explanation. 
and when asked would become angry and then laugh 
h.vsterically. Her relatives committed her to the hos- 
pital. There she hated and distrusted everybody Com- 
munity singing and some instrument playing was Intro- 
duced. "The first sensible thing they've done here since 
I came." she says. "This Is human." The melodies 
aroused old memories. The leader, a former actress. 
persuaded lier to talk about them. She wanted to marry 
a boy whom she loved, while her faml'y Insisted that 
she marry a man much her senior, whom she did not 
like. She rejected the old man but the boy ran away 
with another girl. The actress convinced her that she 
should throw some ot her pent up emotions Into the 
singing and dancing. She becomes a part of the dally 
singing and dancing class. The craving for emotional 
self-expression is released along musical lines. The 
production of a theatrical performance by the patients 
brings her forward as solo dancer and singer. A few 
weeks after the show she is ready to leave the hospital, 
convinced that she can accomplish something. She has 
found her way back, and music was one of the guides. 
Then follow narratives telling of music's share in 
healing, straight up the line to the hopeless cases where 
music can only relieve, not cure. 

A glimpse of the author's background and of the 
genesis ot his work helps one to understand the latter. 
Before the war. .Mr. van de Wall had been the harpist 
of the Metropolitan Opera orchestra Enlisting In our 
Marine Corps he was assigned to the V. S. Marine Band. 
Being ot a philosopic turn of mind and of a deeply 
spiritual nature, he utilized his residence at the Na- 
tional Capitol to take up some theologic studies at the 
George Washington I'niversit.v. Meanwhile, he became 
acquainted with the community music movement 
through his work as chorus master for the Washington 
Opera Company. This combination ot influences maile 
him feel that he could best serve his fellow man through 
his music. Joining the national staff ot Community 
Service, he began work as musical organizer in New 
York City. That work led him Into various Institutions 
and his investigative mind soon made him realize the 
public need for a more thorough knowled.ge of musical 
therapeutics. 

It happened that Dr. 0. F. Lewis, the late general 
secretary of the Prison Association of New York, as a 
result of his experience during the war as director of 
the community singing department of War Camp Com- 
munity Service, had seen the infinite possibilities of 
music in institutions. On his initiative there was 
formed the Committee for the Study ot Music In Insti- 
tutions, with Mr. van de Wall as Held director. 

His remarkable experimental work in .Nevi- York State 
led to the extension ot his activities to Pennsylvania 
under that State's own Department ot Welfare. 



Do 



WARFIELD ATTRACTION 

iicniliei 



We can readily understand how the writer of the 
editorial may have come to make that mistake. Many 
people actually believe this to be a fact. If we are not 
mistaken the press notices that appeared prior to the 
engagement of the Del Conte Opera Company at the 
California Theatre on Bush Street in the fall of ISfi? 
or Spring of 1838 contained a statement that this was 
to be tlie American premiere of the opera, but not the 
"world premiere." So it would have been if the Del 
Conte Opera Company had not appeared in Los Angeles, 
under the management ot L. E. Behymer, a week before 
it came to San Francisco and given La Boheme as part 
of its repertoire. Agostini was the Rudolfo and Mon- 
tanari the Mimi and it was truly a great production, 
packing the house on every occasion. 

The world premiere of La Boheme took place at the 
Teatro Regio in Turin on February 1. 1896. The Del 
Conte Opera Company, which gave the work in San 
PYancisco, prior to its performance in the East, but 
after its Los Angeles performance, was an organization 
like the well known Lambardi and the San Carlos Opera 



MUSIC IN PRISONS AND INSTITUTIONS 

A challenge to reactionary treatment of criminals and 
the insane is laid down by W'illcm van de Wall In a 
new book, "The Utilization ot Music In Prisons and 
Mental Hospitals." The author has encountered, on the 
part of some laymen, a sympathy with that attitude, 
which he calls the principle of social retaliation He 
quotes one ot these as saying with regard to the above 
use of music: "I don't see the use or Justice of bring- 
ing amusement to culprits and crooks. Did they amuse 
us so very much? And as tor the insane, it is foolish 
to imagine that such a diversional pastime as music 
could have any relatirn to the scientiflc and medical 
treatment of such complicated diseases as mental all- 



vou remcnilier Why Men Leave Home and The 
Dangerous .\ge? Another picture by the same director. 
John M Stahl. is coming to Locw's Warfleld on Satur- 
day. "Husbands and Lovers' is its name, and Lewis 
S Stone, who scored such a hit in these other two 
Stahl successes, has one of the leading roles, with 
Florence VIdor and Lew Cody completing the romantic 
triangle. According to the critics who have seen the 
picture. Husbands and Lovers Is Stahl's gre.itest work. 
While it has no similarity in eltlwr principle or action 
to cither Why Men Leave Home <ir The Dangerous Age. 
it has the same general baikground. married life, and 
the same general appeal. Its greatest merit Is the 
swift-running, wholesome humor that marks the produc- 
ticn from start to finish. 

The most pretentious offering yet staged by Fanchon 
and .Marco at Loews Warfleld Is now In the making, 
and will bo given In conjunction with the showing of 
Husbands and Lovers. New Years week. "Gold and 
Pearls" is the title given this one. In which the great- 
est array of talent that has yet graced the stage of any 
picture palace will be seen. Otto Ploetz. the singer so 
well known to patrons of Loew's Warfleld; Drino Beach, 
the sensational dancer; Lenora and Harry; Rlcardo 
Trio, aerial acrobats; Lola Graham, a classic dancer, 
and 16 ballet dancers make up the ensemble. Added to 
this will be Severl and the marvelous music masters. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



December 26, 1924 



Short Items of Interest 



Margo Hughes, the brilliant California accompanist, who 
toured the principal Eastern cities with Mme. Gadski 
this season, returned to San Francisco for an extended 
visit with her relatives. This will be her longest stay 
here since her departure for New York five years ago. 
In addition to her concert tours with Mme. Gadski and 
Frances Alda. Mrs. Hughes accompanied such distin- 
guished artists as Lionel Tertis. viola; Paul Kochanski. 
violinist; Jean Gordon, contralto; Marie Tiffany, so- 
prano; George Meader. Metropolitan Opera House tenor, 
Mario Laurenti, baritone, and Giuseppe de Lucca, bari- 
tone. Among Mrs. Hughes' most valuable experiences 
was her musical affiliation with Mme. Schoen-Rene, one 
of the foremost and most respected vocal pedagogues in 
New York This noted woman is the only living ex- 
ponent of the famous Garcia school, she being a pupil 
of Garcia and Pauline Viadot. Mme. Schoen-Rene sang 
Schumann songs with Clara Schumann at the piano and 
Brahms songs under the great master's personal guid- 
ance Mrs. Hughes played at the studio of this distin- 
guished pedagogue for three years, three times a week. 
This should certainly qualify her as coach for those 
anxious to study concert repertoires. 

La Gaite Francaise, of which Andre Ferrier is the able 
and distinguished director, has been giving its well 
known efficient and artistic performances since the be- 
ginning of the season. The productions so far included 
lour comedies as follows: Le Voyage de M. Perichon. 
L'Etincelle, Le Cultivateur de Chicago and La Tontine, 
and one opera comique by Offenbach entitled Le Mar- 
riage aux Lanternes. The casts of the comedies in- 
cluded such delightful histrionic artists as A. Ferrier. 
H. Chateau. Ch. Fallon. A. Frediani, A. Hurni. A Cou- 
derc. O. May. Y'vonne du Pare, Mariette Cordona, Jeanne 
G. Ferrier- Lea Calegaris. Marthe Combettes. Ruth 
Bransten. R. 'U'iel. M. de Shavitsch. Irene Bietry and 
Mary. Romiere. The personnel of the opera comique 
included such excellent talent as Marthe Combettes, 
Constance Moncla, Evelyn de Marta. Albertina Tovani, 
Amerigo Frediani, and Ch. Fallon. The attendance taxed 
the capacity of the pretty little playhouse and the per- 
formances have been throughout skillfully interpreted 
and artistically mounted and staged. Andre Ferrier, 
who puts into this, the only French Theatre in the 
United States, every vestige of his energy and genius, 
is rewarded through the enthusiasm of his associates 
and the appreciation of his audiences. 

Walter H. Podesta, representing the Music Travel Club 
of America, with offices in New Y'ork and Los Angeles, 
and with L. E. Behjiner as its leading official, visited 
San Francisco recently to appoint a representative. The 
Music Travel Club is a splendid organization. It gives 
music students an opportunity to visit Europe during 
the summer; France Italy, Germany and England being 
on the intinerary, and among the important musical 
events to be taken in are; The Bayreuth Festival, the 
Munich Festival and the Queen's Hall concert season in 
London. The noted composer and pianist, Howard 
Brockway, will accompany the club and will give lecture 
recitals during the trip, preparing the members to enjoy 
the musical feasts to come. The Music Travel Club will 
leave New York June 27th and Quebeck September 3rd, 
leaving two complete months — July and August — to en- 
joy travel and musical feasts. The price is unusually 
reasonable, considering the amount of privileges in- 
cluded, and no one able to spend the money should miss 
this valuable opportunity to visit Europe under such 
exceptional auspices. 

Jeanne Krick, a talented child pianist, daughter and 
pupil of Mrs. H. I. Krick, delighted the many listeners-in 
on KLX, Oakland Tribune with her playing of several 
Grieg numbers on the evening of December 10th. 



Just Returned Prom Eastern Tour AVIth 
.Mme. Gadski 

MARGO HUGHES 

ACCOMPAMST — ENSEMBLE — COACH 
2376 Green Street TeL Fillmore 327T 



NEW CADMAN OPERA 

Charles '^'akefield Cadman's latest work. The Sunset 
Trail, an Indian opera with text by Gilbert Moyle, has 
just been given its premiere in Denver, Colorado. 

The Sunset Trail is a departure from the usual oper- 
atic standards. While designated an "operatic cantata", 
it is so written as to admit of production either as an 
opera or a cantata. In Denver it was given as an opera 
with a chorus of ninety in addition to the seven princi- 
pals. John C. Wilcox, to whom the work is dedicated, 
conducted, and Cadman appeared at the piano. The 
Denver Music Association sponsored the production. 
Two performances were given in the municipal audi- 
torium and both were greeted with crowded houses. 

Edwin J. Stringham. director of the Wolcott Con- 
servatory and critic of the Denver Post, says; "The 
second performance of The Sunset Trail impressed one 
all the more of the importance of this choral work. 
Some of the parts are gems, among them the "Great 
Spirit theme; So Spake the Prophet, sung by Grey 
Wolf; the Eagle Legend, sung by the Medicine Man; 
the lovely a cappella chorus, Let Us Go Into the Hills; 
the chorus. Awake! Awake!; Come My Beloved, sung 
by Red Feather; the very melodious duet theme that 
goes throughout the second part. Together Down Life's 
Silver Stream (I wager this will become a popular 
piece) ; Tomorrow in the Spirit Land, sung by Red 
Feather; and the noble and majestic theme. Great 
Spirit, also a sort of motif The work has several 
emotional peaks and is very w'ell knitted together in 
thematic unity." 



Giacomo Minkowski 



Mrs. Alma Schmidt Kennedy, the well known pianist 
and teacher, gave a Christmas Musicale at her Berkeley 
studio. 1537 Euclid Avenue, on Saturday afternoon, De- 
cember 20th. It was a most delightful event, enjoyed by 
about seventy-flve people, and the work of her pupils 
was. as usual, exceptional. The studio made a most 
picturesque appearance decorated with Christmas de- 
signs, including a huge Christmas tree, and after the 
program a delightful social time was had, during which 
tea was served. The following well chosen program was 
interpreted skillfully by the participants: (a) Three 
Part Invention (No. 7) (Bach), (b) Nocturne (B flat 
major) (Field). June Beckman; Sonata (D major). Al- 
legro con brio (Haydn), Louise Hildebrand; Murmuring 
Zephyrs (Jensen-Niemann), Margaret Moloney; In the 
Hall of the Mountain-King (for two pianos) (Grieg), 
Morton Matthew and David Smith; "Christmas Pieces" 
(No. 6) (Mendelssohn), Morton Matthew; Scotch Poem 
(MacDowell). Charlotte Hanni; Serenade (Sinding), 
Ernest Hockenbeamer; Polonaise (Militaire) (Chopin), 
Helen Marion Matthew; Wedding Day at Tro'dhaugen 
(for two pianos) (Grieg), Shirley Smith and Elizabeth 
Brock; (a) Prelude (C minor) (Chopin), (b) Barcarolle 
(G major) (Rubinstein), Margaret Dyer; Romance. Op. 
45, No 2 (Schuett), Emily Schmidt; Impromptu (G flat 
major) (Schubert), Lenore Jones; Claire de Lune (De- 
bussy), Mary McCleave; Llebesfeier (Weingartner), 
Milda Nixon Bainbridge; Concerto (First Movement) 
(Schumann), Eugenie Schutt, Orchestral Accompani- 
ment by Second Piano. Milda Nixon Bainbridge; (a) 
Rondo (Beethoven), (b) Concerto (Scherzo) (Moszkow- 
ski), Janet Graham, Orchestral Accompaniment by 
Second Piano, Katherine Simon. 



The University of Wyoming of Laramie. Wyoming, pre- 
sented through the University Chorus Handel's ora- 
torio The Messiah on Sunday afternoon, December 14th, 
in the University Auditorium. The work received a 
most artistic and effective interpretation under the 
direction of George Edwin Knapp. The chorus was 
assisted by The University Orchestra. Rodger C Frisbie 
assistant conductor; Gertrude McKav, pianist, and the 
following soloists; Agnes Clark Glaister, soprano- Vera 
Neely, contralto; George Edwin Knapp, tenor and 
Samuel E. West, bass. 



MENDELSSOHN TRIO 

AUrm R HKPT. Violin 

IDA HJERl.EID-SHELLEV, Piano 

1. 1 ELLA A. LOXG. CELLO 



ELWYN CONCERT BUREAU ATTRACTIONS 



FINAL CONCERT 

ISA 

KREMER 

ALCAZAR THEATRE 
Simday Afternoon, January 4, at 2 :30 

Tickets 50c, $1.00 $1.50, $2.00 (plus tax) 
On Sale Sherman, Clay & Co. 



COMING 

JASCHA 

HEIFETZ 

BEATTY'S CASINO 
Sunday Afternoon, Jan. 18, at 2:15 

Tickets $1.00, $3.00 
On Sale Sherman, Clay & Co. 



SAN CARLO GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

Two Weeks— Beginning February 2. Mail Orders Received Now at Sherman, Clay & Co. 




KAJETAN ATTL 

SOLO HARPIST, SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 



For Concert Engasementtt and Instruction Apply 
<0U4 Kohler & Cbnse UldK-, TeL Douglas 1678, on 
Wednesdar and Salnrday Atternoona ONLY. Resi- 
dence Phone Franklin 7847. 



JUST OUT! 

A METHOD FOR THE HARP 

Br Ivajetan AttI 
CARL FISHER, Publisher 



FREDERIC 

POWELL 

VOICE SPECIALIST 
TEACHER OF SINGING 

RESTORATION OF LOST OR 
IMPAIRED VOICES 

705 Kohler & Chase BIdg., Tuesdays and Fridays 
Residence Phone Sunset 6524 



Myra Palache 

PIANIST 

LECTURES ON MUSIC 
APPRECIATION 



San Francisco Address. 2520 Union Street. 

Phone Walnut 639 

On Wednesday, a p. m. to 6 p. m. 



Management: SELBY C. OPPENHEIMER 

COMING 

SCHUMANN 
HEINK 

WORLD'S GREATEST SINGER 
ONE RECITAL ONLY 

NEW COLUMBIA 
Sun. Aft. Jan. 1 1 

Tickets Now on Sale at SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 



MME. PARRISH MOYLE— Soprano 

(Mrs. Gilbert Moyle) 
Available for 

Recitals and Musicales 

Limited Number of Pnpils Accepted 
Personal Address: 1S3S Hawthorne Terrace, 

Berkeley. Phone Berkeley 504(1 
SOI Kohler .& Chase BuIIdlns, San Francisco 



ALFRED HURTGEN 

PI.VNIST, ACCOMPANIST. MrSICAI, DIRECTOR, 

CO.\CH. PIANO INSTRUCTION 
Studio: 2778 Union Street Tel. FUlmore 8240 

The larger the circulation of a Music Journal 
the better for the members of the profession and 
student. 



December 26, 1924 



MADAME KRISTOFFY RETURNS FROM EUROPE 

The name of Johanna KristoCfy always recalls to the 
minds or local opera and concert goers one of the most 
remarkable impersonators of the roles of Aida, Des- 
demona and Santuzza ever witnessed upon the operatic 
stage in this city. Madame Kristofl'y. whose person- 
ality is most striking, whose voice is not only powerful 
and expressive, but one of beautiful texture and whose 
histrionic ability is equally convincing, has thrilled thou- 
sands of music lovers not only in California, but through- 
out Europe and the United States, where she has toured 
both as an operatic aud concert singer. It would give 
these people, who have been stirred by these unques- 
tionable gifts of Madame Kristoffy, a tremendous joy 
to hear her in opera again for there are none who excel 
her in the roles mentioned above and it is doubtful 
whether any other artists equal her. Now that Madame 
Kristoffy has definitely decided to remain in San Fran- 
cisco, where she has resided for a number of years with 
her husband and little daughter, and since we have an 
opera association of our own who should recognize a 
talent of this distinct calibre, it is to be hoped that 
Madame Kristoffy may find her opportunities again and 
be inchided in this local organization. 

Madame Kristoffy has recently returned from a four 
months' trip to Europe, having gone straight from San 
Francisco to London, taking in the Wembley Exhibition. 
While in London iMadame Kristoffy heard little or no 
music for she was not there during the music season, 
but while in Paris she heard performances of Rigoletto, 
Thais and Walkure at the Paris Opera House, all giveri 
in the French language and which, Madame Kristoffv 
states, fell far beneath the productions of these operas 
given here in America. Madame Kristoffy, with her 
family, then spent considerable time at Deauville, the 
famous watering place of France, noted mostly for its 
gambling resorts. Later, while in Venice, the singer 
heard .Martiuelli, the Metropolitan Opera tenor, in a fine 
performance of Traviata, but heard no music at all in 
either Rome or Milan. An interesting observation made 
by JIadame Kristoffy while in Europe was the fact that 
all the movies seen over there were those made in 
America, featuring such favorites as Mary Pickford and 
Jackie Coogan and several others of equal popularity 
The only difference is that these pictures are shjwn in 
Europe about two years after their release in this coun- 
try. To the European picture fans, however, they are 
new, even at this late date. There are no pictures being 
made over there to speak of In Italy a very few are 
being manufactured but the principal numbers come 
from America. 

Madame Kristoffy also tells us that conditions in Ger- 
many are deplorable, but are somewhat better in 
France. Perhaps one of the reasons for the betterment 
of conditions, Madame Kristoffy thinks, is due because 
m Pans, especially, they are making a great deal of 
money, particularly from the AMERICAN tourist who 
IS charged about twice as much for everything as any- 
one else Madame Kristoffy is more than happy to be in 
San Francisco again because it is "Home" to her She 
feels that this city, for which she holds the fondest 
affection, contains as much charm and beauty as any 
of the cities she visited while abroad. She has re-opened 
her studio again and is actively engager teaching many 
talented young pupils. 

Let us hope that Madame Kristoffy's fine dramatic 
soprano voice and other gifts will not be confined to 
her studio. Her's is a talent that should be both seen 
and heard! 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



Harry Waters, a well known instructor of the saxo- 
phone, -who directs an organization known as Harry 
Waters Saxophones, consisting of ten able executants 
ot that instrument, to which are added one oboe and 
one sarrussophone, a double reed instrument, gave an 
enjoyable program at the residence of Mrs. Amie Dean 
Wate^rs. 360 23rd Avenue, on Tuesday evening, Decem- 
ber outh, at which the following compositions were 
effectively presented before an appreciative audience- 
Mignonette. Overture Facile (J. Bauman); April Show- 
ers Valse (M. Depret) ; La Partida (vocal) (Alvarez) 
Rcdrigo E. Kern; Forest Whispers, Marceau Charac- 
taistic (F. H. Losey); Song— Mrs. Amie Waters: Frei- 
schuetz Selection (C. M. Weber): Marche Militaire 1. 
(t. Schubert): Recitation— Mrs. Amie Waters: Daugh- 
ter of Love, Waltzes (C. M Bennet): Bone Solo— Jack 
Waters: Toreador Song, from Carmen, Rodrigo E Kern- 
Down South, American Characteristic (Win. Hy Myd- 
dleton) ; Invergargill. March (Alex F. Lithgow) 



Impending Musical Events 



The Most Popular 

CHRISTMAS GIFT 

The New Necklaces— Smart Paris- 
ian Styles in Great Variety— The 
Unusual in Jewelry and Wrist 
Watches— A Complete Line of 
Jewelry — Reasonable Prices 



J. E. BIRMINGHAM 

Palace Hotel, Opposite Rose Room 

(Main Corridor) 

THE PALACE HOTEL JEWEL SHOP 



SELBY C. OPPENHEIMER ATTRACTIONS 

Ernestine Schumann Heink, hailed the world over as 
one of the greatest singers ot the day. will make her 
regular visit to San Francisco next month, appearing, 
as she always does, under Selby C. Oppenheimers man- 
agement, in a single recital at the New Columbia 
Theatre. The visits of Schumann-Helnk come all too 
seldom. The artistic services of this great woman are 
in demand wherever music plays a part in life. She 
could sing a concert every day, were she so disposed, 
and every day she would face thousands who come to 
worship at the shrine of this greatest of popular favor- 
ites. 

But as California loves Schumann-Heink. so does 
Schumann-Heink love California. In fact, she Is in a 
way an adopted daughter of the Golden State, for she 
votes in San Diego where she maintains a home on 
Coronado Isle: and so Schumann-Heink would not con- 
sider a season well spent unless at least a few recitals 
were arranged for her in this State Her coming tour 
will be limited to appearances in San Francisco, where 
she will sing but once, in Oakland, Stockton, Los 
Angeles and San Diego. She is spending the Christmas 
holidays with her family in the Southland and \vill re- 
turn to her Eastern engagements immediately after she 
has sung these half dozen California concerts. 

January 11th will therefore be a gala day tor San 
Francisco, and undoubtedly every seat in the New 
Columbia will be occupied and the aisles crowded with 
standees. A typical Schumann-Heink program will be 
rendered in which she will be assisted hy Florence 
Hardeman, violinist, and Mrs. Katherine Hoffman at 
the piano. Tickets are now on sale at Sherman. Clay 
& Company. 

Maier and Pattison Change Pianos During Recital 

JIuch curiosity and speculation has been aroused when- 
ever Guy Maier and Lee Pattison have played a recital 
of music for two pianos as to just what is the reason 
for their practice of changing pianos during the course 
ot the program — often several times in a single recital. 
Usually wiseacres in the audience come to the conclu- 
sion that it is "just a vaudeville stunt" "on the part of 
the artists to show their listeners that no sleight-of- 
hand trick is being put over. 

These artists, who are to give two recitals, under 
Selby C. Oppenheimer's management, at the New Co- 
lumbia Theatre on the Sunday afternoons of January 
25th and February 1st, have their two concert grand 
pianos arranged on the platform with the long ends 
dovetailed so that both players face each other. The 
lid is removed from the piano nearest the audience and 
the other lid then acts as a sounding board for both 
pianos. 

According to Mr. Pattison, the only reason for chang- 
ing places for any number is that one piano may be 
better than the other for carrying the theme, perhaps, 
or for getting a singing tone No two pianos, he claims, 
are exactly alike, no matter how expertly they are built. 
There is always a good musicianly reason for using one 
or the other piano and it is determined, so to sijeak, by 
the exigencies of the music itself. 

While the artists were making a tour ot Australia 
last year Mr. Maier found that some of their audiences 
were actually skeptical as to whether two separate 
pianos were being used so that at the end of their tour 
they hit upon the idea ot placing the pianos at the 
opposite ends ot the stage until the audience was seated, 
when the tuner would go out and push the two pianos 
together just before the artists came on to the platform 
to open the program. 

Alberto Salvi, one of the world's greatest harpists, who 
will appear in the Fairmont Hotel concert room on Mon- 
day afternoon, February 2nd. as an event of the .Mice 
Seckels Matinee Musicales, can also claim the distinc- 
tion of possessing the world's greatest harp. It is a 
magnificent golden instrument of extraordinary propor- 
tions, about six inches taller than the regulation harn. 
The harp has its own special keeper, who travels with 
it and protects it like a zealous mother guarding her 
young. This young man feels his responsibilities very 
heavily, for, as tar as one can ascertain, he never leaves 
his cherished charge, except at Mr. Salvi's earnest 
solicitation. Occasionally Mr. Salvi really needs the 
instrument himself, but he is often obliged to convince 
Bozo, its keeper, ot that fact. The harp, while travel- 
ing, lives in a great trunk, built especially tor it and 
lined with a soft padding. 

Jerrtra Booked — .\n important booking recently consum- 
mated through the medium of the Selby C. Oppenheimor 
concert management, will be a single appearance in 
San Francisco, at the Exposition Auditorium, on Sunday 
afternoon, March 21tth, ot Maria Jeritza Jeritza's popu- 
larity in New York and Eastern cities is well known. 
Whenever she is announced tor an appearance either in 
opera or recital, thousands are turned away who are 
unable to gain admittance. 



ELWYN ARTIST SERIES 

Isa Kremer — Since Isa Kremer, noted Russian ballad 
singer, appeared here for two recitals, December 12 
and December 14, the demand for a third appearance 

ZOELLNER CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



has been so insistent that the Elwyn Concert Buroau 
management deems a third recital necessary. The third 
recital Is scheduled Ur Sunday afternoon. January 4 
-;30 at the Alcazar Theatre. The successes which Miss 
Kremer enjoyed here were duplicated In Loa Angeles 
where a third recital Is also necessary because of the 
demand there following two recitals, December 17 and 
19. Miss Kremer will be accompanied by Mr. Leon 
Rosenbloom whose repute as a pianist in his own right 
as well as an excellent accompanist was ihorouRhly 
established here at the first and second Kr<>mer rocltala. 

Jaseha Heifetz. who will piny here on Sunday aftomoon 
January IS v>t Bealty's Casino, has received many extral 
ordinary tributes to his art and mastery of the violin 
but few which surpass the sincere expression of critical 
approval which came from the authorities on the Cleve- 
land papers when he played there recently. 

Tf Af AH M ".'""""'f ■■•, "'^' '•« '' """ "•"" alchemist 
ot the fiddle, transmitting Into tunes of gold the olatl- 
tudes of the makers of music. What held the listeners 
spellbound and stirred them to tumults of apnlause was 
not. ot course, the messa«e, but the art of the Interpre- 
ter. And never has this art shone wflh more re- 
.splendent luster. Mr. Helfetz has been coming to us 
for quite a toll of years When he llrst astonished us 
by his amazing virtuosity— this was perhaps seven years 
ago— he was a lad of, say. highschool age. Now he has 
come to man's estate." 

Mr. Rogers goes on to say: "From the l)oglnnlng he 
has played with an ease, lluencv, and certainty that 
have never been surpassed. If indeed, thev have ever 
beeti equalled. From the beginning his intonation was 
flawless, his style admirable. Since Mr. Helfetz Is the 
greatest ot violinists it is fitting that he should have 
the greatest of vicllns." 

Mr. Wilson G. Smith, in the Cleveland Press review- 
ing the same concert. docIar,.d: "He Is without doubt 
the aristocrat 01 the violin, both In style and polished 
rehnement. There is nothing of the namboyant or 
spectacular in his playing. It has been subjected to the 
refining process until It scintillates like a diamond Of 
late he has added a deeper emotionalism to both his 
concepts and interpretations 

"And it is all done with such placidity and freedom 
that one wonders if he is addicted to passionate exores- 
sion. The sentiment is there, but it is voiced with such 
a command of self-containment that one sits in admira- 
tion of both man and artist The super-emotional and 
bombastic have no translation through his bow all he 
does IS well ordered and dominated by hia sense of 
beauty and refinement." 



ROSEMARY ROSE 



A Singer Who Teaches— Consolidates Her Studl( 

Formerly of Mil-«aukee, Sheboygan 

and Plymouth 



In Los Angeles 



•137 .SO. KKMKiiii.; stiii:i;t ti-:i.. .•.iitiiis 

Aiiilllliinx II}- .V|i|i„liiltiiriil Onlf 
Kiilli Urodiiinn. Ki-BUIrnr 



ABBIE NORTON JAMISON 

PIANO— ii.\mi<)\v_viirAi. roAtii 

S|><-<>llll IMnno Norniiil ( lii..ri< 

S<uilio; 002 Simthcrn Ciiliriirnin MukIc Co. DIiIk. 

147 W.-«I 2I«« Slr.-.-< ri'lriihiinF ilrnrfin 771 



V, 



CHARLES BOWES 



TEACHER OF VOICE 

nil S. i;rniiil \ l,.>v. I-h.mc .-..-. Ill I,-.. Inn \nB<-I<- 



L. E. Behymer 

MANAGER OF DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS 

Executive Offices: 

705 Auditorium BIdg., Los Angelea 



Alexander Bevani 

Ai.i. nil \M iii:s nr Till-; 

VOCAL ART 



12.',0 AVIiidx 



s .v.\f;i-;i,i:.s 

fl.-llS llollm-niid Ilniilr 
ully ot Arll«t 'I't-nrhrra 



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Itunrli'l lii>lru<-ll,in. I hiiiiilirr Mimlr llrrllala 

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A. KOODLACH 

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l»nn..l...<-ur— \|.pri>l.rr 
i:i Mrj.-.lli- Thrnlr.. Ill.lc. |,o, Angclf. Turkfr -lOia 

JOHN SMALLMAN 

II «iii riiNi:— 1 1: II iiKii or sini;in«; 

nice TrInI l>)- \ |>|i<>lnliiiriil, f :i Oil. >itadlo.' S0.1.S(M So. C«L 
Muxlr « o. llldK. VUlnn nrnln, Sermarj-. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL RE\'IEW 



December 26, 1924 



CLAIRE DUX ^«p'^«"'' 



CONCERT MANAGEMENT ARTHUR JUDSON 
FISK BUILDING, NEW YORK CITY 



IMPENDING MUSICAL EVENT 

(Continued from Page S. Column 3.' 
San Carlo Grand Opera Co. — The following comprises 
the repertoire and principals tor the two weeks' engage- 
ment ot the San Carlo Grand Opera Company beginning 
February 2 at the Curran Theatre: 

Mon.. Feb. 2 — Tosca. Gentle. Homer, Salazar. Valle. 
DeBiasi. Guerreiri. 

Tues., Feb. 3 — Aida. Roselle. DeMette. Tommasini. 
Basiola. DeBiasi. Guerreiri. 

Wed Mat.. Feb. i — Faust. Roselle, Kent, Onofrei. 
Valle. DeBiasi. Guerreiri. Andrea. 

Wed. Eve.. Feb. 4 — Chenier, Saroya. DeMette, Salazar, 
Basiola. DeBiasi, Gurreiri. 

Thurs.. Feb. 5 — Butterfly, Miura. Kent, Onofrei, Valle, 
Cehanovsky, Guerreiri. 

Fri . Feb 6 — Rigoletto. Lucchese, DeMette, Onofrei, 
Basiola. DeBiasi. Guerreiri. 

Sat Mat . Feb. 7 — Carmen. Gentle. Lucchese, Tom- 
masini. Valle, DeBias'. Guerreiri. 

Sat. Eve.. Feb. 7 — Trovatore, Saroya. DeMette, Sala- 
zar. Basiola. DeBiasi. Guerreiri. 

Sun.. Feb. S — Cavaleria. Gentle. Kent. Salazar, Cehan- 
ovsky, Guerreiri, Pagliacci. Roselle. Tommasini, Basiola. 

Mon.. Feb. 9 — Boheme, Roselle. Marcalle, Onofrei. 
Valle. DeBiasi. Guerreiri. 

Tues.. Feb. 10 — Traviata, Lucchese, Mercalle, Onofrei, 
Basiola, Cervi, Guerreiri. 

Wed . Feb. 11 — Carmen, Gentle, Lucchese, Salazar, 
Valle. DeBiasi. Guerreiri. 

Thurs. Mat.. Feb. 12 — Lohensrin, Saroya. DeMette, 
Tommasini. Valle. DeBiasi. Guerreiri. 

Thurs. Eve.. Feb. 12 — Faust, Roselle. Kent. Onofrei, 
Basiola, DeBiasi. Guerreiri. 

Fri. Feb. 13 — Lucia, Lucchese. Mercalle. Salazar, 
Basiola. DeBiasi. Guerreiri. 

Sat. Mat.. Feb. 14— Butterfly, Miura. Kent. Onofrei, 
Valle. Cehanovsky, Guerreiri. 

Sat. Eve.. Feb. 14 — Aida. Saroya. DeMette. Tommasini. 
Basiola. DeBiasi, Guerreiri. 

Rowland Hayes — Rowland Hayes, the phenomenal negro 
tenor, who sings here Sunday afternoon. February 22. 
at Beatty's Casino, under management ot the Elwyn 
Concert Bureau, has inspired perhaps more spontaneous 
publicity than any artist now on tour. From numerous 
critical comments the following is selected from Pitts 
Sanborn. Telegram and Evening Mail, under date of 
February .i, 1924: 

"The audience packed the hall from the last inch of 
standing room to the last seats on the stage. Indeed, 
many would-be listeners were necessarily turned away 
at the doors. From these phenomena Mr. Hayes is 
clearly the John McCormack ot his race, .^nd he is 
further like the distinguished Irish tenor in that he 
sings Handel. Mozart, archaic Frenchmen. Italians of 
the eighteenth or the nineteenth century, classic Ger- 
man Lieder. and French modernists with understanding 
and style. It he does not essay Irish folk songs, he 
does give the spirituals of his own people, and whether 
he sings in English or in German, his diction is abso- 
lutely distinct and seemingly effortless " 



FRANK W. HEALY ATTRACTIONS 

The Roman Choir — One ot the greatest treats to be 
given in .America on the coming tour ot the great sing- 
ers of the "Roman Choir", will be the performance of 
Guonod's "The Death of Jesus" (from the Redemption, 
a sacred trilogy for chorus and four separate voices). 

Guonod. the composer ot this masterpiece, was one 
of the most eminent ot French sacred and dramatic 
composers. His father, Jean-Francois Guonod, painter 
and engraver of talent, winner ot the Par's Fine .Arts 
Academy's 2d Prix de Rome (17831, died when the boy 
was in his fifth year. His mother, a most accomplished 
woman, first contributed to his literary, artistic and 
musical education, and early sent him. an already pro- 
ficient pianist, to the Lycee Saint Louis. In 1836 he 
entered the Paris Conservatory, studied harmony with 
Reicha. counterpoint and fueue with Halevy. and com- 
position with Lesueur and Paer. He won the 2d Prix 
de Rome with his cantata "Marie Stuart and Rizzio" in 
1837. and in 1839. his cantata "Fernand" won the Grand 
Prix de Rome by 25 votes out of 27, In Rome he studied 
ecclesiastical music, particularly the works of Pale- 
strina, and in 1841 a grand orchestralMass a 3 was 
performed at the Church of San Luigi dei Francesi. 
Immediately thereafter Guonod became world famous 
and there followed in quick succession his operatic 
triumphs "Faust", "Romeo and Juliet" and other great 
works. 

The last years of his life were mainly devoted to 
sacred composition. La Redemption which was pro- 
duced in Birmingham. England, in 1882. is a sacred 
trilogy, the Latin text of which Guonod arranged from 
the Catholic liturgy. 



MISCHA ELMAN NEXT "POP" SOLOIST 



One of the outstanding events of the 1924-25 musical 
season in San Francisco will be the concert to be given 



on the night ot Janu;\ry 15 by the San Francisco Sj-m- 
phony Orchestra with .Mischa Elman. world celebrated 
violinist as the soloist. The Elman concert will be the 
fourth municipal "pop " to be given under the auspices 
of the City ot San Francisco, Supervisor J. Emmet 
Hayden. chairman of the Auditorium Committee, an- 
nounces that the prevailing popular admission schedule 
will not be changed tor this great concert. 

Elman has been acclaimed by critics as one of the 
most popular artists on the concert stage Tonic, tech- 
nic. temperament intelligence, artistry, musicianship 
are all combined in his work. As the Cleveland Xews 
said ot a recent concert: "He is one ot the most popular, 
and the reason for it is that Elman touches the hearts 
ot everyone He plays from his heart as well as from 
his head, and his heart is generous." Conductor Alfred 
Hertz, of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra is 
arranging a particularly pleasing program for the city 
musical event which will undoubtedly draw a "standing 
room only" audience to the Civic Auditorium. 



Mme. Johanna Gadski, the distinguished concert and 
opera soprano, has returned to Germany after a twelve 
weeks' tour through all the principal Eastern cities, 
under the direction of Albee Keith, general manager ot 
the Keith Circuit. The diva demonstrated on this occa- 
sion that classic music can be presented before vaude- 
ville audiences with brillant success. She elicited the 
greatest respect and attention from all her audiences. 
Mme. Gadski changed her programs evry day. somthing 
that had never been done before in vaudeville and on 
each program she included one aria from a Wagnerian 
opera. The balance of the program was selected from 



NEW SONGS FOR TEACHER AND SINGER 


It's a Mighty Good World 




O'Hara 


Golden Moon 




Rolt 


Come to My Heart 




English 


Wood Fairies ... 




...Wilfrid Jones 


Brown Bird Singing 




Wood 








Rose Marie of Normandy 




Del Rigo 


Beauty 






Piper of Love... 




Carew 








The Market 




Carew 


Among the Willows 






A Good Heart All the Way 




Clarke 


Dancing Time in Kerry 






Sweet Navarre 






My Heart's Haven 




Phillips 


Love Pipes of June 






My Little Island Home 




Baden 


Ragged Vagabond 




Randolph 


CHAPPELL-HARMS, INC. 
185 Madison Avenue New York City 



the German lieder of Brahms. Schumann, Schubert, 
Franz Strauss and in the majority ot cases they were 
sung in German. On account of the programs being 
changed daily vocal students had an opportunity to at- 
tend several performances which many took advantage 
of. 

Mme Gadski is known as one ot the best dressed 
women on the concert stage and she again justified this 
reputation by wearing a new gown at every perform- 
ance (twice a day). The eminent artist sang only ex- 
clusively classic programs, never stopping to cheanen 
her art. although selecting compositions pleasing to her 
hearers who appreciated Mme, Gadski's judgment of 
their taste so much that they asked tor encores for such 
songs as Feldeinsamkeit (Franz), Who Is Sylvia? (Schu- 
bert), and Vergebliches Standchen (Brahms). After the 
conclusion of the programmed numbers there were addi- 
tional recalls on which occasion Mme. Gadski sang the 
Battle Cry of the Valkyries, with which she always 
created a sensation. Notwithstanding being sick during 
most of her trip, she continued her engagement, but as 
soon as she arrives in Europe she will place herself 
under medical guidance. 



Xaver Scharwenka, the distinguished pianist and peda- 
gogue, died in Berlin the middle ot December following 
an operation tor appendicitis Scharwenka was world 
renowned as pianist, composer and pedagogue and rep- 
resented one ot the leading forces in music in Eurone, 
For years he was head ot the widely known Scharwenka 
Conservatory in Berlin and his concert tours brought 
him to this country where he was also heard on the 
Pacific Coast. In more recent years his activities were 
conPned to his adoT-ted country. Germany, and .American 
music lovers have had no opportunity to renew pleasint 
acquaintances either with his art or pedagogy. His 
compositions are frequently heard on piano programs. 
His loss will no doubt he felt in the musical activities 
ot the world. 



LIEDER SINGER 

BRUNSWICK RECORD 



LINCOLN 

BATCHELDER 

Pianist -- Accompanist 

Studio 412 Cole St. : Phone Hemlock 368 



THE PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL 
REVIEW 

H,\S FOUGHT FOR THE RESIDENT ARTIST 

DURING THE LAST TWENTV-TWO YEARS — IS 

SUCH A P\PER WORTH SIBSCRIBING FORf 

IF SO. DON'T WAIT ANY LONGER. 



George Lipschultz 

Musical Director anti Violin Soloist 



Loew's State Theatre 
Los Angeles 



Lo E W'S ^ WAR FIElD 

BEGINNING SAT., DEC. 27 



'HUSBANDS AND LOVERS' 

LEWIS STONE,' 'lew CODY 
FLORENCE VIDOR 



Fnnrhon .niul M.-in-o's Ideas 
"GOLD \Nn PEAUI.S" 
Spectacular Preseutatiou Vet Staged 



Elwin A. Calberg 



Soloist and Accompanist 
Available Season 1924-1925 



STENGER VIOLINS 

Exemplify Intrinsic Excellence and Are 
Pre-eminently Superior 

.\ life's devotion of iininterruiited stndy and labor, 
involving? tlie mastery of iirinciples of ninslcal 
acoustics, timber physics, and cnf£'Inee'-ins, has 
yielded the understanding of those principles which 
iiplify the "StenKer Idci" In violin makinE. and 



Ik the bcsrinnins of a 



able art. 



W. C. STENGER 

INC0RP0R.4TED 

Maker of Fine riolins 
617-61S Steinwav Hall. Chicago 



December 26, 1924 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



MUSICIANS' CLUB GIVES CHRISTMAS JINKS 

Prominent Members of the Profession Assemble at Bel'evue Hotel and 
Enjoy Annual Banquet— New Officers Elected— William Edwin 
Chamberlain to be President for New Term— Julius Haug 
Lauded for Administration — Program Consisting Prin- 
cipally of Fun Greatly Enjoyed. 

BY ALFRED METZGER 



The .Musicians' Club gave its Annual 

Christmas dinner at the Bellevue