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A PLACE TO CALL HOME, 

A PLACE TO THRIVE 

Housing Strategy for Bradford District 

2020 - 2030 



\ 

CONTENTS 

Foreword 2 

A Place in which to thrive 3 

The District Setting 6 

Maximising Outcomes 9 

Key Objective 1- More Homes 11 

Key Objective 2 - Quality Homes & Neighbourhoods 19 

Key Objective 3 - Homes for All 23 

Delivering the Strategy 27 

Links to other strategies 28 

V_ ) 


FOREWORD 


I am pleased to introduce “A Place to Call 
Home, A Place to Thrive; Housing Strategy 
for Bradford District 2020-2030”. 

The strategy focuses on the role housing 
can play in creating healthy, well connected 
sustainable and thriving communities as part 
of a collaborative drive to improve quality of life 
for all. 

The strategy sets out the actions the Council 
and partners can take to deliver housing 
priorities in a way which secures greater health 
and well being and economic prosperity. This 
is why it is important to acknowledge that 
housing interventions alone cannot lead to 
fulfilling lives, but housing must be delivered as 
part of an overall effort to achieve happy and 
successful lives. 


Councillor 
Alex Ross-Shaw 

Portfolio Holder 
Regeneration, Planning 
and Transport 


I am highly encouraged that the commitment 
from partners is there to deliver our priorities 
and this is evident in all that we do, whether it 
is housing delivery, economic, stronger and 
cohesive communities, health or social care. 
The willingness of our partners to participate 
is strong and the future for our District and its 
residents is one of optimism and excitement. 

I look forward to this housing strategy playing 
its part in delivering the best outcomes for our 
residents. 



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HOUSING STRATEGY FOR BRADFORD DISTRICT 2020-2030 








A PLACE IN WHICH TO THRIVE 



Bradford District is a place in which 
to live and thrive. The District offers 
attractively priced terraced housing 
within close knit city neighbourhoods, 
quality social housing in well kept 
estates across the District, unique 
Victorian Squares with spacious family 
accommodation, luxury city centre 
apartments in modern premises or in 
listed buildings, located in architecturally 
renowned Little Germany, executive 
family homes near stunning countryside, 
and homes of character in villages and 
towns which are amongst the most 
prosperous in the country. 



This strategy sets out the vision, priorities 
and approach for meeting the housing needs 
of the residents of Bradford District in ways 
which can contribute to a more productive and 
inclusive economy, address health and social 
inequalities, tackle the challenge of climate 
change and help build stronger communities. 

Above all we want to deliver housing 
objectives in a way which is inclusive and the 
benefits reach everyone. 


Everyone in Bradford District should have a 
place to call home which meets their needs and 
in which they can thrive. Housing has a pivotal 
role in making the District a great place to live 
and work for everyone - a place where all our 
children have a great start in life, where people 
are supported to prosper in good jobs, where 
people live long and healthy lives and all our 
neighbourhoods are great places to live. 


The Council and the Housing 
Partnership makes this 
commitment to ensure that our 
housing interventions reach 
everyone. We are determined to 
ensure that the benefits of this 
strategy support people who may 
feel excluded by the housing 
market, including the most 
vulnerable people within our most 
deprived neighbourhoods. This 
approach will guide us when we 
plan, develop, deliver and monitor 
our housing objectives. 1 


The strategy is a jointly owned strategy by 
the Council and the multi-agency Bradford 
Housing Partnership. It will be monitored and 
reviewed on a regular basis by the Council and 
the Bradford Housing Partnership and delivery 
will be carried out by a range of housing 
and housing related agencies recognising 
the reality that housing objectives cannot be 
delivered by the Council alone. 




HOUSING STRATEGY FOR BRADFORD DISTRICT 2020-2030 


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OUR VISION 

Everyone in Bradford District should 
have a place to call home which meets their 
needs and in which they can thrive 



OUR OBJECTIVES 

More Homes: We want to increase the supply of homes of the right 

type and quality and in the right locations to meet the needs and 

aspirations of our diverse and growing population. 

We will: 

• Increase the rate of house building and provide a range of accommodation, from affordable 
homes to the higher-value housing that can attract and retain skilled workers 

• Deliver more family housing and increase the supply of larger homes in areas with high levels 
of overcrowding 

• Focus on meeting the need for affordable homes which meet the needs of people on lower 
incomes and first time buyers 

• Improve access to more homes by reducing empty homes. 



Quality Homes and Neighbourhoods: Our homes and neighbourhoods should be 
sensitive to future environmental, demographic and technological change. We want high-quality 
homes in neighbourhoods where people want to live and thrive. We want new developments of the 
highest quality standards and existing homes retrofitted to create homes that are energy efficient 
and adaptable. 

We will: 

• Deal with the issue of poor quality stock by working together with owners and landlords 
encouraging and supporting them to bring properties into good repair, including empty homes 
which are causing blight in our neighbourhoods 

• Look for opportunities to work with the health sector to deal with health impacts from poor 
quality housing and unhealthy neighbourhood environments 

• Encourage and support new developments to achieve high levels of sustainable design and 
construction standards 

• Ensure all new homes meet the Nationally Described Space Standard (NDSS) for internal 
space in new dwellings. 


Homes for All: We want to ensure that everyone has a place to call home and that vulnerable 
residents in our communities are supported to live independently. 

We will: 

• Offer help to residents with a range of needs to improve their access to suitable housing 

• Increase the supply of accessible housing which is able to meet people’s need throughout 
their lives 

• Support the provision of specialist accommodation 

• Help vulnerable people maintain their tenancies and enable a decent quality of life. 


HOUSING STRATEGY FOR BRADFORD DISTRICT 2020-2030 




MEASURING SUCCESS 


We will monitor and report on the 

following key targets: 

More Homes: 

• New Housing 
Completions (net), 1,703 
per annum minimum 

• New Affordable Housing 
Delivered, 411 per annum 
minimum 

Quality Homes and 
Neighbourhoods: 

• Close the gap between 
the number of long term 
empty homes in Bradford 
District and the West 
Yorkshire Average 

• An increase in the 
number of private sector 
homes where housing 
conditions have been 
improved through 
intervention measures 

Homes for All: 

• An increase in the rates of 
successful homelessness 
preventions 

• Reduce length of stay 
in Bed & Breakfast to 
no more than 7 nights 
(average) 



HOUSING STRATEGY FOR BRADFORD DISTRICT 2020-2030 


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THE DISTRICT SETTING 



OUR OPPORTUNITIES 

Bradford is a district of scale, complexity and 
diversity. We are home to 537,000 people 
making us the sixth largest city authority in 
the UK and by 2037 this will have increased to 
around 550,000 people. Bradford is a youthful 
district with 142,600 people under the age of 18, 
which is 26.4% of the total population making us 
the youngest city in the UK. 

We have a rich ethnic diversity - Black and 
minority ethnic communities make up 36% of 
the total population and 153 languages are 
spoken in the district. Current and historic 
trends in migration have made Bradford a truly 
international district that is globally connected, 
both in terms of our cultural richness and trading 
links. We celebrate diversity and proud to be a 
City of Sanctuary welcoming people fleeing war 
and persecution. 

The district covers some 143 square miles, 
and has a mix of urban and rural areas with 
distinctive character. Bradford has a wide 
range of physical and environmental assets 
which makes it an attractive place to live and 
invest in. Most of the industrial and residential 
development is in the south of the district and 
along the valley bottoms, with the city centre of 
Bradford forming the heart of the district. 

A majority of people live in the urban centres 
of Bradford and the freestanding towns of 
Keighley, Bingley, Shipley and llkley. Two- 
thirds of the district is rural with moorland and 
breath-taking countryside landscapes. The 
district is also home to the major international 
tourist destinations of Haworth and Saltaire (a 
UNESCO World Heritage Site). 

Bradford is an economy of significant scale that 
is worth £10.1 billion and is the ninth largest city 
economy in England. We are home to 15,785 


businesses employing 206,000 people in the 
District and over 250,000 people across the 
UK as a whole; with a combined turnover of 
more than £30 billion. Bradford District attracts 
over ten million visitors a year with more than 
784,000 visitors staying overnight. Visitor spend 
is estimated to be over £430million per year. 

Above all, the District is confident and has 
strong partnership and stakeholder involvement 
working to secure successful outcomes for the 
Districts residents - not just housing outcomes 
but economic, health and care, education, 
community and tackling poverty. 

OUR CHALLENGES 

The District faces a number of housing 
challenges. Our population is growing and 
changing, increasing the need for new and 
suitable homes to be delivered, but the supply of 
new homes has not been growing fast enough. 

The District need is not just for more homes but 
homes for a diverse population with differing 
need including homes for larger families and 
those which meet cultural needs, homes 
adapted for people with disabilities and homes 
which are inclusive and accessible for a range of 
needs and changing circumstances. 



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The District has a growing population of older 
people aged 65 and over that is expected to 
increase by 39.5% to around 113,000 by 2037 
adding pressure to provide housing which is 
suitable for our ageing population. 

Our housing legacies are directly linked to 
the District’s industrial past with 5,800 listed 
buildings and about a third of all houses built 
before 1919. Older stock is disproportionately 
represented in the private rented sector. 



There has been a reduction in the number 
of long term empty homes in the district, 
which has had a positive impact on improving 
neighbourhoods and meeting housing needs. 
However, there are still a number of long term 
empty homes which are causing serious blight 
in their neighbourhoods, which need concerted 
action and intervention. 

In order to both retain and attract residents 
and investment into the district, we need to 
provide a range of housing including affordable 
housing and higher value housing. Symptoms 
of insufficient housing supply are evident across 
the district: overcrowding has increased to nearly 
10% of households, and homelessness has 
increased significantly during the last decade. 

Access to affordable housing is a major issue 
in the District. The proposed Core Strategy 
has identified the need for around 1,700 new 
homes a year of which over 400 will need to be 



affordable homes. Inaccessible home ownership 
and housing benefit reform is making housing 
less affordable for many households. 

The District is polarized in terms of high and 
low income households, which has an effect 
on how the housing market operates. The 
areas with the highest concentrations of low 
income households are also associated with 
the poorest quality housing stock, overcrowding 
and empty properties, and the resultant effects 
of poor health and poor quality of life in general. 
These households despite living in areas with 
the most affordable homes often face the worst 
affordability constraints. 

Key health indicators including life expectancy 
and infant mortality show that Bradford still 
lags behind regional and national averages 
in terms of the health and wellbeing of our 
residents. Housing has a big part to play not only 
in improving health and wellbeing, but also in 
improving financial stability for households. 

Unemployment and worklessness are high in 
Bradford. Youth and long term unemployment 
are significant challenges for the district, 
particularly for the inner urban areas of Bradford 
and Keighley and some outlying housing 
estates. 


HOUSING STRATEGY FOR BRADFORD DISTRICT 2020-2030 


















The economic dynamics of the sub-region are 
key to the District’s future trajectory. How the 
economy grows will determine how the housing 
market is shaped. 

OUR APPROACH 

Housing will play a pivotal role in helping the 
District and its people realize its ambitions and 
the Council and partners will work towards 
addressing the issues identified in this strategy. 

We will focus on meeting the need for more 
homes, homes which are affordable, of good 
quality and sustainable. 

We will deal with poor quality stock by working 
together with owners and landlords encouraging 
them to bring properties into good repair. 

We will look for opportunities to work with the 
health sector to deal with health impacts from 
poor quality housing. 

We will focus efforts on effective place-making 
and to turn round neighbourhoods in decline. 



We will ensure that sections of the population 
that find it difficult to maintain their independence 
are supported such as the homeless, those with 
complex need, older people, those with physical 
disability and Learning Difficulties, Care Leavers 
and many others requiring support. 


This strategy recognizes that we cannot 
achieve our housing objectives without 
working with others so we will strengthen 
partnership working and deliver outcomes for 
all to the best of our ability. 



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MAXIMISING OUTCOMES 



In delivering the vision and objectives we 
will ensure, alongside our commitment to be 
inclusive, that we deliver in such a way that 
there is maximum benefit realized for our 
communities. 

This means that the new homes we build 
are green, safe, and in inclusive and distinct 
neighbourhoods that create healthy communities 
for all; maximizing outcomes by adopting a 
successful place making approach. 

We will place quality at the heart of our 
intervention, not just in terms of building quality 


housing but turning round neighbourhoods 
in decline and ensure that the impact of 
poor quality is addressed and healthy living 
supported. 

In our quest to provide the homes we need 
we must ensure that those sections of the 
population that need assistance to secure a 
better quality of life are supported and that the 
benefits from good quality housing and thriving 
neighbourhoods reach all sections of the 
population. 


In delivering our 3 key objectives of More Homes, Quality Homes & Neighbourhoods, and 
Homes for All, we will aim to: 



IMPROVE AFFORDABILITY 

Supporting residents struggling to afford access to 
housing or meet their housing costs 






PROVIDE EFFECTIVE PLACE MAKING 

Exploring ways to regenerate our communities 
and secure well designed neighbourhoods that 
people want to live in 





SUPPORT HEALTHY LIVING 

Ensuring housing actions take into account health 
impacts and help to improve people’s wellbeing 




4 


PROVIDE SUSTAINABLE HOUSING IN 
SUSTAINABLE NEIGHBOURHOODS 

Delivering housing that enhances environmental 
wellbeing and address our net zero carbon 
commitment 




HOUSING STRATEGY FOR BRADFORD DISTRICT 2020-2030 


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r 




IMPROVE AFFORDABILITY 

Many people in the District struggle to access housing 
either to buy or to rent primarily due to low incomes. 

We will support residents struggling to afford access 
to housing or meet their housing costs. 

This can be done by increasing the supply of affordable 
housing by working with our social partners, developers 
and Homes England. Another way of addressing 
affordability is by improving incomes and we will work 
with the Economic Partnership and City Region partners 
to bring better paid jobs into the District and increase 
skills levels. We will support advice agencies to help 
people maximize benefits take up and manage budgets 
and debt. 

Those who own their own homes are sometimes unable 
to afford to keep up with mortgage payments and to 
afford the costs of keeping their properties in good repair. 
Both renters and owners struggle to pay for utility costs 
and can end up in fuel poverty. We will help people 
reduce their housing costs by tackling fuel poverty 
through measures such as making homes more energy 
efficient, promoting energy efficiency schemes and 
encouraging owners and landlords to improve properties. 

" * 

SUSTAINABLE HOUSING 
IN SUSTAINABLE 
NEIGHBOURHOODS 

A poor quality environment affects everyone’s health 
and wellbeing and not reducing our carbon footprint 
will make matters worse. We will ensure that we deliver 
housing objectives in a way which meets the needs of 
the current generation without compromising those of 
future generations. 

Bradford District declared a climate emergency in 
January 2019 and will work with the West Yorkshire 
Combined Authority to deliver on our regional ambitions. 
We aim to be a zero carbon District by 2038. 

The Council has produced, ‘Homes and 
Neighbourhoods: A guide to designing in Bradford’ 
which sets out how we will create ‘green, safe, inclusive 
and distinct neighbourhoods that create healthy and 
sustainable communities for all’. Our Design Guide 
sets out 8 priorities which address local needs and 
issues, reflecting what is important to our residents and 
stakeholders. It is not just about visually attractive homes 
and neighbourhoods, which appeal to the senses, but 
it is critically about creating healthy, safe, inclusive, 
accessible, sustainable, prosperous, affordable homes 
and neighbourhoods connected to good transport 
networks, with easy access to employment and well 
served by public services. The guide will act as a 
supplementary planning document to support the Local 
Plan Core Strategy and to provide detail on how to 
interpret and deliver it. 


' * 

SUPPORT HEALTHY LIVING 

Having a good quality, warm and safe home is an 
essential prerequisite of wellbeing and good health. 

We will ensure housing actions take into account 
health impacts and help to improve people’s wellbeing. 

This strategy recognises that housing is a key 
determinant of health and it commits the council and its 
partners to support the Guiding Principles contained 
within: “Connecting people and place for better health 
and wellbeing, Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategy 
for Bradford and Airedale, 2018 - 2023”. The Housing 
Partnership will work closely with the Health & Wellbeing 
Board to deliver shared outcomes and the close working 
relationships developed over many years between the 
Care and Health sectors will continue to be delivered in 
line with the “Happy, Healthy & At Home” plan. 

Not being able to find suitable accommodation or living 
in poor quality or hazardous accommodation is bad for 
health and wellbeing often leading to stress and anxiety 
which can lead to more serious mental health issues. 

Bradford District with its ‘Homes & Neighbourhoods, 
a guide to designing in Bradford’, is going a lot further 
by requiring developers to place healthy homes and 
neighbourhoods at the forefront of their development 
proposals, ensuring residents have access to green 
spaces and healthy environments which result in good 
health and wellbeing. 

* * 

EFFECTIVE PLACE MAKING 

Our neighbourhoods are our first and foremost focus. 
Our Place Making approach is to place the community 
at the heart of our efforts to make great places for all. 

We will explore ways to regenerate our communities 
and secure well designed neighbourhoods that people 
want to live in. 

The main focus of place making and place shaping 
is to make neighbourhoods, areas, villages, towns 
and cities well connected and sustainable places that 
everyone can enjoy. A strong strategic housing role will 
be developed by the multi-agency Housing Partnership 
by working with a wide array of planners, economic 
strategists and transport planners to ensure new housing 
developments contribute to creating great places and 
a place to call home, and help develop stronger, more 
cohesive communities which foster community spirit. 

The housing partnership will play a lead role in 
neighbourhood management strategies and encourage 
greater collaboration with economic development and 
regeneration initiatives in order to realise the benefits 
of economic growth and inward investment. Providing 
quality housing developments will help to create places 
where people can thrive and where residents will be 
proud to live. 


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HOUSING STRATEGY FOR BRADFORD DISTRICT 2020-2030 











KEY OBJECTIVE 1: MORE HOMES 


We want to increase the supply of homes of the right type and quality and in the right 
locations to meet the needs and aspirations of our diverse and growing population 



THE EVIDENCE 

• The number of dwellings in the District 
total about 218,000. 65% of this is owner 
occupied, 15.4% social housing, and 19.6% is 
private rented or living rent free. About 9,600 
are not occupied. 

• Bradford District has a population of 
537,000 representing 10% of the Yorkshire 
& Humber population (ONS mid year 2018). 
The population is predicted to grow by 2.4% 
over 2019-2037 reaching to 549,540. This 
growth rate represents a slowdown after a 
significantly larger growth rate of 14% since 
2001 . 

• Over a quarter of the population is between 
the ages of 0-17 years, making the city the 
youngest in the country. The District has a 
median age of 36.2 compared to the England 
average of 39.9 and Yorkshire & Humber of 
40. 

• The District also has an increasing number of 
older people aged 65 and over representing 
15% of the population. This group is expected 
to grow by 39.5% by 2037 to about 113,000 
adding pressure for housing which is suitable 
for an ageing population. 


MODERN METHODS OF 
CONSTRUCTION (MMC) 

MMC have been around since World War 
2 but have become popular in recent years 
with climate change and sustainability rising 
up the national and international agenda. 

MMC is a definition framework created by 
government which has seven categories 
of modern construction services. It seeks 
to aid collaboration and adoption of pre¬ 
manufacturing, site based materials and 
process innovations. These include factory 
produced, pre-engineered, building units which 
can result in quicker methods of as much as 
30% than traditional construction. There is 
less waste both during construction and when 
occupied and reduced carbon emissions 
and improved health and safety. With quicker 
delivery, revenue streams are accelerated 
when properties are rented out. To add to 
this method of construction some Housing 
Associations are going further such as Accord 
in the Midlands that are building plastic free 
homes not only minimising its use during 
construction but using alternative materials for 
kitchens, bathrooms and windows. 



HOUSING STRATEGY FOR BRADFORD DISTRICT 2020-2030 


11 




NUMBER OF HOMES IN 2018 






PRIVATE 
RENTED OR 
RENT FREE 



AVERAGE HOUSE PRICES 
IN THE DISTRICT 



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HOUSING STRATEGY FOR BRADFORD DISTRICT 2020-2030 
















• There has been a noticeable fall in net 
migration and more people are leaving 
the District than coming in. Young adults 
and family groups are moving out mainly 
to neighbouring Districts. However more 
people have moved to Bradford District from 
our largest neighbour, Leeds. 

• Bradford District became more ethnically 
diverse between 2001 and 2011. The 
largest proportion of the population 
identified themselves as White British 
(63.9%) in the 2011 census which is a large 
reduction from 76% in 2001. 

• The Pakistani population is the largest 
section of the Black & Minority Ethnic 
population in the District and also the 
largest grouping in any local authority area 
in England. It stands at 20.4% which is an 
increase of 6% since 2001. 

• The majority of Pakistani and South 
Asian households reside in inner urban 
wards which exhibit high levels of multiple 
deprivation. 

• The two key indicators of insufficient 
supply of housing are homelessness and 
overcrowding. The Council public survey, 
carried out by arc4 in 2019, identifies that 
2,552 households are either homeless or in 
Temporary Accommodation and a total of 
15,410 are living in overcrowded conditions. 

CHALLENGES 

• The District need is not just for more homes 
but homes for a diverse population with 
differing need including homes for larger 
families and those which meet cultural 
needs, homes adapted for people with 
disabilities and homes which are inclusive 
and accessible for a range of needs and 
changing circumstances. 

• Building housing which is suitable for 
people with specific needs such as older 
people and those with disabilities especially 
requiring level access accommodation can 
prove to be financially unviable. 

• Care must be taken however as the 
expectations of older people are changing 


NEW HOMES WITH ELECTRICAL 
CHARGING POINTS 

Like many other busy places, Bradford District 
has areas of poor air quality which is having 
an effect on the health of residents. Bradford 
Council began to require electrical vehicle 
charging points on every new property via 
development control policy in 2013 and this 
has led to an increase in the uptake of electric 
vehicles and improvements in air quality. 

The government is currently consulting on 
introducing national policy to follow Bradford’s 
lead nationwide. The policy was acknowledged 
as good practice in 2015 with a national 
planning award. 



and traditional forms of housing for older 
people may not be meeting needs as older 
people are saying they want to stay in their 
own homes. 

• Developer feedback shows that Bradford 
District is disadvantaged in the competition 
for new investment as a result of a lack of 
supply of suitable allocated sites. Delays in 
the plan preparation process were found to 
be causing frustration amongst those keen 
to invest in the District. 

• There are 9,792 extant planning 
permissions accounting for 23% of the 
Core Strategy target (Housing Land Supply 


HOUSING STRATEGY FOR BRADFORD DISTRICT 2020-2030 


13 





Update March 2018). 60% of these are on 
Previous Developed Land (PDL) which 
can prove more challenging to deliver 
as a result of the physical constraints. 

As a consequence some of these extant 
permissions may not be delivered. 

• Delivering housing in areas where standard 
volume house builders have not been 
active, primarily brownfield urban areas, 
often requiring more regeneration related 
interventions. 

• Limited capacity in Council teams to 
promote and drive forward housing delivery 
on stalled sites. 


• Barriers to development identified in a study 
by Cushman and Wakefield are: weak 
purchaser demand; land supply/release; 
local resistance; and high development 
costs due to topography constraints. 

Whilst developer confidence has improved 
recently the underlying market weakness 
remains due to low values and high costs. 

• Our Industrial legacy has left behind many 
former mills and premises, many listed, 
which are costly to convert. 


NEW BOLTON WOODS 
"URBAN VILLAGE” 

The New Bolton Woods Urban Village is a 
new £150m development between Shipley 
and Bradford City, with good transport links 
and adjacent to Frizinghall railway station. 

It will provide over 1,000 homes and will be 
complemented by shops, schools, medical 
centre and sports facilities. The project has 
been in the planning stages since 2012 and is 
led by Canal Road Urban Village Ltd (CRUVL), 
a partnership between URBO and Bradford 
Council. The first phase, to provide 50 new 
homes, 20 of which are social housing, was 
completed in 2014. The next 145 homes 
are currently under construction and due to 
be completed in 2021. After that will be the 
development of a further 250 homes along with 
an access road to allow the development of 
up to 700 homes on the Bolton Woods Quarry 
site. The entire development may take up to 
15 years and will form a new village rather 
than another suburb of Bradford, creating a 
new community which will stimulate business 
growth and investment in this part of the 
District. 



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OUR APPROACH TO DELIVERY 


r\ * Our Partial Review of the Core Strategy aims to maximise brownfield regeneration opportunities and 

U I J allows a limited release of Green Belt land in sustainable locations. The overall level of housing growth 
* per annum is proposed to be lowered from a minimum 2,476 dwellings to 1,703, with 411 of this to be 
affordable. 

We ' m Pl ement the Housing Delivery Test Action Plan which sets out a number of practical 
UZ > measures such as strengthening the Council supporting and enabling role in housing delivery and to 
use interventions to unlock sites to enable housing delivery on unviable sites. 

#*** We will work via the Local Plan to secure effective place- making and master planning at area and 
UO " neighbourhood levels and explore opportunities for regeneration and establish robust partnerships to 
make it happen. 

fl / t We wil1 rec l uire architects, designers and developers to use our Design Guide, “Homes & 

U4 r Neighbourhoods: a guide to designing in Bradford”, to create green, safe, inclusive and distinct 
neighbourhoods that create healthy communities for all. 





05 


We will work strategically and collaborate with our Leeds City Region partners to ensure effective delivery 
of the Regions housing and economic needs. 


ft i We will ensure more empty homes are brought back into use in line with the Empty Homes Action 

U O M Plan to add to the supply of accessible stock. 


> 


07 


ii > 


We will work with developers to understand and overcome the barriers they face when seeking to develop 
in the District. 


ft ft We will ensure that the strong qualities of the housing market and the economic opportunities and 

UO M potential in the District are promoted. 



We will ensure new homes are sustainable and consider climate change impacts and continue to require 
developers to provide electric charging points in every new home. 



EMPTY HOMES ACTION PLAN 

Reducing the number of empty homes remains 
a high priority. Our Empty Homes Action Plan 
reinforces our commitment to achieve this and is 
predicated on: 

• Preventing properties becoming empty in the 
first place 

• Partnership approach to tackling empty 
homes 


• Practical solutions to bring empty homes back 
into use 

The Plan consists of specific tasks such 
as educating owners about the impact on 
neighbours and the community of keeping 
properties empty, providing financial assistance 
as part of regeneration schemes; enforcement 
action when necessary. 


HOUSING STRATEGY FOR BRADFORD DISTRICT 2020-2030 


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HOW WE WILL MEASURE SUCCESS 


n * k An increase in net additional homes meeting our minimum target of 1,703 new homes per year 
^ 1 (Core Strategy Partial review proposed target) 

. Deliver a minimum of 411 affordable homes per year (Core Strategy Partial review 
^ ^ proposed target) 




03 



Provide new housing in the places where needed in line with targets in the Core Strategy 
Partial Review 



/ - 

SUSTAINABLE 

DEVELOPMENTS 

The Council Design guide, “Homes & 
Neighbourhoods, a guide to designing 
in Bradford”, directs planning applicants 
to Air Quality & Emissions: Technical 
Planning Guidance and West Yorkshire 
Low Emissions Strategy 2016-2021 
which Bradford Council has signed up 
to. Factors such as public transport 
and active travel (e.g. walking and 
cycling); integrating trees and planting; 
incorporating electrical vehicle charging 
points and other infrastructure supporting 
low emissions vehicles; and ensuring 
everyday amenities and services such 
as convenience stores and schools 
are located within reasonable walking 
distances. A low carbon development 
is also promoted with a multitude of 
ways to integrate and embed low carbon 
strategies, including modern Methods of 
Construction. The guide directs applicants 
to ensure that a development’s location, 
density and all aspects of transport are 
carefully planned, particularly to minimise 
the use of cars. Sustainable drainage will 
make good use of water and reduce the 
risk of flooding. The effects of sun and 
wind must be considered in such matters 
as passive solar gain, shading, and the 
microclimate of public spaces. The energy 
demand for heating, lighting, hot water 
and cooling should be minimised and low 
carbon energy to collect separated waste 
streams and minimise the impact of the 
waste collection system on the public 
realm. 

s_/ 





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HOUSING STRATEGY FOR BRADFORD DISTRICT 2020-2030 






























Oxenhope 


DELIVER HOUSING IN THE 
PLACES THEY ARE NEEDED 

The Core Strategy forms an essential part of the 
Local Plan for the District setting out strategic 
planning policies to help determine planning 
applications. A partial review was carried 
out in 2019 of the Core Strategy in light of 
significant changes to planning policy 
and local strategies since the adoption 
of the plan. The revised draft plan sets 
out a planning policy to meet our 
revised housing growth needs in full, to 
be delivered by maximising brownfield 
regeneration opportunities and requiring a 
limited release of Green Belt land in sustainable 
locations. 

The Partial Review of the Core Strategy states that 
planning decisions as well as plans, strategies, 
programmes and investment decisions should 
seek to transform economic, environmental, 
physical, and social conditions of the District, in 
particular the Regional City of Bradford including 
Bradford City Centre, Shipley and Canal Road 
Corridor, key regeneration areas, including 
Manningham and Holme Wood, and Leeds 
Bradford Corridor, as well as Keighley, Airedale, 
and Shipley. 

Growth will occur in the places where homes are 
most needed and where best use of land is made. 

The review proposes to reduce the housing target 
from the previous target of 2,476 homes per year 
to a minimum of 1,703 with 411 of these affordable, 
using the new government methodology. Over 
70% of housing growth will be focused in the 
Regional City Area with the target for Bradford 
City Centre itself increased from 3,500 to 4,000 
homes. 





Wilsden Heaton 

• Little • Manningham 

>en olme Thornton Ho ^ 011 RrflAforH 


THE 

BRADFORD 

DISTRICT 


Clayton 

Queensbury 

• Wibsey 


Holme Wood 



Road Corridor offers the opportunity to establish 
new successful mixed neighbourhoods alongside 
new employment opportunities. It also provides 
an opportunity to neighbouring communities, such 
as Manningham, to benefit from the optimism and 
confidence created by the new area. 

In inner city areas of Manningham and Little 
Horton, existing successful regeneration plans 
can act as a basis for high quality housing to 
complement key employment sites. This can be 
aided by employer and developer engagement 
to create housing growth and turn round these 
deprived communities into sustainable places 
where people would choose to live and in which 
to thrive. 


To allow the delivery of the plan in full the Council 
will need to find land in the Green Belt for about 
5,000 homes, representing a large reduction from 
the previous 11,000 recorded in the adopted Core 
Strategy. 

Major regeneration and neighbourhood renewal 
opportunities include a sustainable urban 
extension at Holme Wood alongside action to 
increase incomes and potential benefits from 
the proposed South East Link Road. Principal 
towns and settlements such as Keighley, Bingley 
and Silsden also provide opportunities for 
regeneration and renewal. The Shipley & Canal 


The Bradford Top of Townscape Heritage 
Scheme, Forster Square Station improvements, 
development of a new “City Village” in Bradford 
City Centre, and the plan to redevelop city 
centre markets at a value of £21 m will improve 
the city offer considerably and provides a major 
opportunity to significantly promote city living. 

The Northern Powerhouse Rail project and 
plans for the City Region Transit Network will 
create opportunities to improve connectivity in 
a significant way and act as catalysts for new 
residential and commercial development within 
key gateways and corridors. 



HOUSING STRATEGY FOR BRADFORD DISTRICT 2020-2030 


17 





















THE ROLE OF SOCIAL HOUSING 

It is recognised by all that more social housing 
is key to extending the benefits of affordable 
and social housing to more households. 

Bradford District has a range of Social 
Housing Providers, or Housing Associations, 
from the largest Incommunities with over 
22,000 properties, to Black & Minority Ethnic 
led Manningham Housing Association with 
about 1000 homes, meeting the needs of an 
ethnically diverse population. Another home 
grown association is the Accent Group which 
now operates nationally but still retains a 
strong local focus. 

Partnership working with the Council is strong 
with involvement and engagement of most 
landlords operating locally. The Council will 
continue to work with our Social Landlords 
to meet our affordable housing targets. We 
will also explore with our partners how we 



can develop the wider agenda of tackling the 
effects of poverty and to influence broader 
health and wellbeing outcomes. The Council 
will work closely with social landlords to 
improve tenant participation and to develop 
an integrated and more effective tenant 
engagement framework. 

There is plenty of valuable work being carried 
out by Social Landlords in the District beyond 
just managing stock. These organisations 
play a meaningful role in supporting tenants 
by offering training and help to secure jobs, 
and advice to manage debts etc. Some social 
landlords such as Incommunities, Accent 
Group and Yorkshire Housing are participating 
in the Housing First pilot and providing 
much needed accommodation for this highly 
challenging client group. 


BRADFORD Y0UTHBUILD 

Bradford Youth Build, a successful example 
of social housing providers collaborating with 
the Council, was developed in year 2000 by a 
desire to bring empty homes back into social 
housing. Bradford Youth Build Trust was set 
up from an idea by two local social housing 
providers, Accent and Manningham, and the 
Council to offer disadvantaged young people 
a chance to gain construction experience 
on site whilst empty properties were 
being refurbished. The Council and BYBT 
established a programme of purchase, repair 
and social letting linked to training. BYBT 
became a local entity with high ambitions to 
improve skills amongst local youth. Activities 
are funded by income generated from 
BYBT’s property portfolio which stands at 22 
properties. These provide accommodation 
for tenants at affordable rents. A construction 
training centre is also leased to a local college. 
BYBT also funds local projects which support 
skills training and development. This includes 
funding Bradford Works, a local environmental 
social enterprise. 


INCOMMUNITIES GEM 
PROGRAMME 

GEM, Graduate Employment Mentoring, is 
a training programme for graduates initiated 
and developed by Incommunities recognising 
that graduates need encouragement and 
support and further skills training to make a 
successful career in the housing sector. GEM 
has been recognised as a ground breaking 
gradate training scheme by the housing 
sector and beyond helping to build the careers 
of many a young graduate. Incommunities 
Centre for Partnership offers a 12 month 
learning experience with a range of housing 
associations and Council’s in England and 
Scotland. The scheme is accredited by the 
Chartered Institute of Housing (CIH) with 
students studying for a level 4 qualification. 
Since 2009 the programme has trained 
over 150 graduates and over 70% of those 
completing the course are currently working 
within the housing sector. 


18 


HOUSING STRATEGY FOR BRADFORD DISTRICT 2020-2030 









KEY OBJECTIVE 2: 

QUALITY HOMES AND NEIGHBOURHOODS 


We want high-quality homes in neighbourhoods where people want to live and 
thrive. We want new developments of the highest quality standards and existing 
homes that are energy efficient and adaptable 


THE EVIDENCE 

• Almost 31% of the District stock was built 
pre 1919 and is occupied by households on 
low incomes. These are typically located 

in inner urban areas. Almost half of the 
dwellings were built between 1919 and 1982 
and 21.5% were built between 1983 and 
2018. 

• In October 2019 there were 4079 long term 
empty homes. 

• The private rented sector has increased 
significantly in size during the last decade 
from 11% in 2008 to almost 20% in 2019. 

• As a result of significant levels of 
investment, the social stock of about 33,000 
homes, owned by around 20 Housing 
Associations, generally meets the Decent 
Homes Standard and is well maintained. 
Incommunities, our stock transfer company, 
owns two thirds of the social stock - 6% of 
social stock contained Category 1 Hazards 
(excess cold and fall hazards) when the 
BRE carried out a study on behalf of the 
Council in 2015. 

• The BRE study found that in the private 
stock 14% of owner occupied homes had 
Category 1 Hazards, and the private rented 
sector had 26% i.e. the private rented stock 
contains proportionately greater levels of 
properties in poor states of repair than other 
tenures. 

• Fuel poverty affects 15% of households in 
the owner occupied stock, 18% in social, 
and 28% in the private rented stock. In the 
private rented sector over 11% of dwellings 
were rated with Energy Performance 
Certificate (EPC) at below Band E. 


HOME HEATING, INSULATION 
AND RENEWABLE SOURCES OF 
ENERGY 

Insulation offers one of the most cost effective 
ways to conserve heat within the home as 
walls, roofs and floors lose a great deal of heat 
if these are not properly insulated. Energy 
bills can be considerably reduced if the home 
is properly insulated, draught- proofed and 
windows double glazed. Hot water cylinders 
should be lagged; old boilers replaced with a 
condensing boiler, and consideration given to 
switching to a “green” supplier. Households on 
low incomes and welfare benefits may be able 
to access government funded insulation and 
boiler replacement schemes. The Renewable 
Heat Incentive (RHI) is a government 
financial incentive available to home owners 
and landlords (social and private) which 
pays them for using renewable heat. It 
is administered by the Office of Gas and 
Electricity Markets (Ofgem) and contributes to 
the UK’s responsibility to meet its target of 15% 
renewable heat generation by 2020. Those 
joining the scheme receive quarterly payments 
for seven years for the clean, green, renewable 
heat the system produces. 



HOUSING STRATEGY FOR BRADFORD DISTRICT 2020-2030 


19 







HOMES IN THE 





£71 m 
£22m 


NEEDED TO REMEDY COLD & DAMP AND 
FALLS HAZARDS (CATEGORY 1) IN THE 
DISTRICT'S HOUSING STOCK 

OF THIS TO REMEDYTHE PRIVATE 
RENTED STOCK 



CHALLENGES 

• The cost of remedying the worst conditions 
in the private sector .i.e. just the Category 1 
hazards, is estimated at £71 m with the cost 
of remedying the private rented stock alone 
estimated at £22m. 


CHAIN STREET 

A successful partnership between 
Incommunities, Bradford Council, Homes 
England, Barnfield Construction, and Quality 
Social Housing (QSH) who worked together 
to deliver high quality affordable homes in the 
Chain Street area near Bradford City Centre. 
This was quality conversion of run down flats 
into 16 highly attractive, high quality homes for 
social rent with a significant improvement to 
the street scene including a linear park which 
has added well needed greenery into the 
neighbourhood. 



• The highest concentrations of hazards 
are found in some of the poorest wards 
in the District such as City, Manningham, 
Bowling & Barkerend, exacerbating and 
compounding poverty and health impacts. 

• Whilst social stock is in relatively good 
condition, our Housing Association partners 
will need to continue to keep them in good 
states of repair. 

• The District has many wards characterised 
as low income, high dependency with 
some wards containing as many as half its 
residents on incomes lower than the lower 
quartile of £19,000. Most inner city wards 
exhibit high levels of multiple deprivation. 

• Many of the District’s inner urban Wards 
are populated primarily by Black & Minority 
ethnic households, particularly South 
Asians which results in a district which is 
segregated along ethnic lines. 

• In terms of multiple deprivation, the District 
is ranked 19th most deprived local authority 
in England and the 2nd most deprived in the 
Yorkshire & Humber region (after Kingston 
Upon Hull). Whilst areas in the District 
such as llkley and Wharfedale are ranked 
amongst the least deprived in the Country, 
some of the inner urban wards in Bradford 
City and Keighley are amongst the most 
deprived ten per cent in England. 


20 


HOUSING STRATEGY FOR BRADFORD DISTRICT 2020-2030 





















CREATING HEALTHY PLACES 

The Council’s Core Strategy Partial Review report includes a comprehensive 
new “Creating Healthy Places” strategic policy which aims to maximise health 
and wellbeing gains from development proposals and to ensure that negative 
impacts are designed out or mitigated. There is also a new policy focus on bio¬ 
diversity net gain, which requires developers to ensure habitats and wildlife 
are enhanced and left in a measurably better state than they were found pre¬ 
development. 

The Council and partners are also keen on improving air quality as poor 
quality air is having an effect on the health of residents. A plan is currently 
being developed to improve air quality, and Bradford has become the first 
place in the UK to monitor air quality using high tech public phone boxes. 
Several BT InLink UK digital street units installed in the city centre have in-built 
modular sensors which collect air quality every minute. This data is available 
to the public and raises public awareness of air quality in the District. 





OUR APPROACH TO DELIVERY 


01 



02 


03 




04 


05 


06 


07 






08 


09 




10 


11 




The Council will continue to make Home Appreciation Loans available. These are equity based loans 
paid back when the house is sold or when inherited with no monthly payments to help homeowners who 
struggle to maintain their homes due to lack of resources. 

We will ensure more empty homes are brought back into use in line with the Empty Homes Action Plan 
and alleviate the blight caused by problematic empty homes. 

The Council’s Housing Standards team will apply the 3E’s approach to secure quality in the private 
rented sector and when dealing with empty homes: Education, Encouragement, and then Enforcement, 
as a last resort. 

The Council, social and private landlords and the West Yorkshire Fire Service will work together to 
ensure high rise blocks are safe to live in and meet the required safety standards. 

Various Council Departments, social and private landlords, Police and other agencies will work together 
to deal with neighbourhood problems such as anti-social behaviour and nuisance. 

The Council and partners will work together to explore opportunities to regenerate and remodel 
neighbourhoods and lobby government for regeneration and renewal funding. 

The Council will assess development proposals against the principles and approach set out in our 
Design Guide, “Homes & Neighbourhoods”, to deliver quality homes and neighbourhoods which are 
healthy by reducing emissions and promoting clean air. 

The Council will use the Private Sector Lettings Scheme to ensure that private landlords bring their 
properties to required standards when accommodating clients from the District Housing Register. 

The Council and the Housing Partnership will strengthen links between housing and health partners to 
examine ways to improve the health of the population through housing interventions which lead to better 
health outcomes. 

We will improve strategic engagement of the housing sector in the work of the Economic Partnership to 
find ways to improve income levels and to use housing interventions to benefit the local economy. 

We will consider the effects of segregated communities and explore ways to cross ethnic divides and to 
support balanced communities which creates cohesive neighbourhoods. 


HOUSING STRATEGY FOR BRADFORD DISTRICT 2020-2030 


21 











































HOW WE WILL MEASURE SUCCESS 


01 ) 

^ An increase in the number of private sector homes where housing conditions have been improved 

02 ) 

^ Reductions in the number of empty homes particularly long term problematic empties 

03 ) 

^ More energy efficient homes and fewer households in fuel poverty 

04 ) 

^ Ensure all licensable Houses in Multiple Occupation are licensed 


( -\ 

THE 3 E P S: 

EDUCATION, ENCOURAGEMENT, 
ENFORCEMENT 

Our approach in the Council’s Private Sector 

Housing Team is to educate landlords and 

encourage them to put things right. If that fails we 

will use enforcement powers as last resort. 

• Emphasis on responsibility of the home 
owner and reduce dependency on public 
sector assistance 

• Focus on problematic empties and HMO 
licensing 

• Responsive and proactive approach to 
improve conditions in the rented sector 

• Help targeted on vulnerable people via equity 
loans and assistance 

s._> 



- \ 

QUALITY HOMES & NEIGHBOURHOODS 

THROUGH NET ZERO CARBON 


Bradford Council declared a climate emergency in 
January 2019. This was followed by a declaration 
in July 2019 by the West Yorkshire Combined 
Authority, of which Bradford Council is a Member. 
The WYCA ambition is to become a net zero carbon 
city region by 2038 with significant progress by 
2030. 

The Leeds City Region Energy Strategy and 
Delivery Plan were adopted and is progressing with 
a particular focus on buildings, transport, energy and 
industry. 

Recent research from the Tyndall Centre 
recommends an immediate programme to cut 
emissions by 13% per year to deliver a Paris 


Agreement aligned carbon budget. Regional 
housing-related energy efficiency and fuel 
poverty programmes including Better Homes 
Yorkshire have made progress but there is major 
acceleration required to improve housing quality 
and environmental performance. 

Work is underway in Bradford District to establish 
a City Centre Clean Air Zone which should result 
in significant reduction in emissions in future 
years. 

Research by Tyndall Centre says that in the 
District 38% of emissions come from housing, 
27% from transport, and 35% from industrial and 
commercial. 



22 


HOUSING STRATEGY FOR BRADFORD DISTRICT 2020-2030 


— \r—\r 
























KEY OBJECTIVE 3: HOMES FOR ALL 


Whilst many households in the District are suitably housed there are a range of 
groups which require help and assistance to lead better quality of life. 


THE EVIDENCE 

• The number of people aged 65 and over is 
projected to increase from 81,000 in 2019 to 
113,000 by 2037, a 39.5% increase. The 75 
plus will increase by 56.7% and 85 year plus 
by 68.5%. 

• The level of people diagnosed in the District 
with dementia is increasing, partly due 

to improved and earlier diagnosis, with 
an estimated 5000 people living with the 
condition currently. 

• Estimates of people with a Learning Disability 
vary between 8000-9400 but represent 
significant challenges for housing, care and 
support providers. 

• A household survey on behalf of the 
Council carried out by arc4 identified 
29,372 households in housing need which 
includes 15,410 overcrowded, 4,795 with 
mobility impairment living in unsuitable 
accommodation, and 2,552 under notice or 
with lease coming to an end. 

• Fuel poverty affects 15% of households in 
the owner occupied stock, 18% in social, and 
28% in the private rented stock. 

• Pressure on the Council’s Housing Options 
team has been rising with homelessness 
approaches increasing year on year since 
2010 with over 9,000 approaches during 
2018/19. 

• The household survey identified 86,929 
people with disability or long standing 
illness, with 26,430 residents with physical 
disabilities, 10,942 with visual impairment, 
and 18,848 with a mental health problem. 

• The District contains 1,206 cared for children 
and 556 care leavers are over 16. Some of 
the biggest challenges are housing related 
particularly support to this client group to 
maintain a tenancy and to live independent 
lives. The Council’s responsibility as a 
Corporate Parent whilst robust is being 


BRICSS 

Bevan Healthcare and Horton Housing 
Association teamed up to establish BRICSS, 
Bradford Respite Intermediate Care and Support 
Services. Both organisations provide support 
to some of the District’s most vulnerable people. 
Their respective expertise in helping vulnerable 
people was put to good use in this scheme. 

An example of BRICSS enabling clients to 
move into independent living is client N who 
had surgery to remove his bowel. N became 
homeless and started sleeping rough, he was 
drinking heavily and unable to manage his 
stoma. He contracted an infection and was 
admitted into hospital. N deteriorated into a 
coma and was nursed on intensive care for 
several months. Once he was well enough, 

N was discharged into BRICSS where he 
was supported with medical appointments, 
medication and managing his stoma. N made 
great progress in terms of self care and alcohol 
recovery and has since maintained abstinence. 
Whilst in BRICSS, N was diagnosed with type 
2 diabetes. He engaged well with healthcare 
and through balanced nutrition was able to 
better manage his diet and weight. N found 
recovery emotionally challenging and received 
lots of support and encouragement from 
staff. N’s confidence and resilience increased 
significantly, he regained his driving licence 
and used his past experience as a chef to 
cook Sunday dinners for his fellow residents. N 
moved to lower level supported housing within 
Horton. This provided him with the right balance 
of support and a stepping stone towards 
independent living. 


developed to treat looked after children as 
special and our care and support to be as 
personalised as possible. 

• With over a quarter of the population made 
up of young people we will have pressures 
associated with educational attainment 
for children living in sub standard and 
overcrowded accommodation and transition 
towards adulthood and independent living. 


HOUSING STRATEGY FOR BRADFORD DISTRICT 2020-2030 


23 




TOTAL PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES 86,929 of which: 



26,430 10,942 18,848 


PHYSICAL 

DISABILITIES 


VISUAL 

IMPAIRMENTS 


MENTAL 
HEALTH ISSUES 


1,400 


PEOPLE WITH COMPLEX 
NEEDS PLACED IN SUPPORTED 
HOUSING EACH YEAR 



9,100 


WHEELCHAIR ADAPTED 
HOMES NEEDED NOWOR IN 
THE NEXT 5 YEARS 


At a recent engagement event participants identified at least 30 groups with specific need requiring 
assistance including mental health problems, Domestic Abuse, old age, homelessness, offending history, 
drug and alcohol abuse, Learning Disability, physical disabilities, money issues 


• Bradford District is ethnically diverse with 
64% classed as White British, total Black 
and Minority Ethnic 36%, with the South 
Asian population 26.8%, and the largest 
grouping amongst the BAME being the 
Pakistani population representing 20.4% of 
the population (Census 2011). 

• The 2011 census identified there were 424 
gypsy and traveller households of whom 
76.4% lived in general housing and 23.6% 
in caravans. 

• On relative affordability of alternative 
tenures, the analysis found that there are 
no tenure options which are affordable 
for households on lower quartile incomes 
(£19,000 per annum). 

• 1,400 people with complex need are placed 
in supported housing each year. 

• Around 12,000 households live in properties 
which have either been adapted or 
purpose built for someone with an illness 

or disability. Analysis estimates that about 
9,100 wheelchair adapted homes are 
needed now or in the next 5 years. 

CHALLENGES 

• At a recent housing strategy engagement 
event we identified that there were over 30 
groups in need of support and assistance 
representing the breadth of challenges 
facing support services. 

• An ageing society poses specific 
challenges when developing and delivering 
services with a range of needs associated 
with old age. 

• Poverty associated with worklessness and 
low skills levels represent a major challenge 


when attempting to address access to 
suitable accommodation for many of our 
households. 


HOUSING FIRST 

The District contains a cohort of people who 
experience a cycle of failure in accessing 
and maintaining housing and refusals from 
accommodation providers for whom the cohort 
is too high risk. The Housing First model is being 
piloted in the District taking a person centred 
approach placing people directly into a home 
and then providing flexible and intensive support 
for as long as necessary. Since August 2018,16 
people with complex need have benefited from 
the service with encouraging results. Adam is 
one such beneficiary who at 43 had 20+ years 
of being in and out of prison, a cycle of failure 
within supported living and long periods of 
homelessness and rough sleeping. His housing 
history and additional support needs in terms 
of substance misuse, offending and mental ill 
health led to a refusal from local providers but 
Housing first took on the challenge. Adam had 
a Criminal Behaviour Order not to enter the city 
centre so the team worked with him to source 
accommodation in the area of his choice and 
a safe distance from the city centre. The team 
liaised with the Council Private Rented Lettings 
Team to secure private sector accommodation 
and furnish the property for Adam. Adam 
received daily visits from the team to support 
him with tenancy management and maximise 
his income by applying for benefits. As well 
as providing emotional support the team also 
assisted Adam with attending his regular 
appointments with Probation, drug and alcohol 
services and medical appointments. Adam 
now takes pride in his home and feels more 
confident. Adam says, Tor the future... I hope to 
keep my home until I die.” 


24 


HOUSING STRATEGY FOR BRADFORD DISTRICT 2020-2030 















OUR APPROACH TO DELIVERY 


01 



02 


03 


We will ensure housing and associated services consider the specific needs of different groups when 
designing and delivering services using up to date information provided by studies such as the recent 
arc4 research and analysis. 

Policy makers and planners will have regard to size, location, and quality of homes needed for future 
needs of older people and other needs groups, in order to allow them to live independently and safely 
in their own home, and, if and when the need develops, to enable them to move into more suitable 
accommodation. 

A wide choice of housing options will be made available by the sector including Extra Care, adapted 
housing, shared housing and self contained with the necessary care and support to maintain a good 
quality of life. 



n / We w '^ ensure Provision of sufficient housing to meet the needs of people with disabilities through 

Uh adaptations, and the provision of more homes with level access and homes that are able to be adapted. 


06 


07 


08 





09 


10 


11 


12 









We will encourage our social housing partners to deliver more social housing so that there is a good 
supply of affordable and good quality housing for those in need. 

The Council and the Housing Partnership will work with the health sector to minimise the impact of poor 
housing on health including impacts of fuel poverty. 

The Council and Housing Partnership will work with utility companies and government to help promote 
schemes which makes homes more energy efficient ensuring home owners and landlords are aware of 
available funding for green and energy efficient housing. 

We will prioritise vulnerable sections facing homelessness or at risk through the allocations policy and the 
revised homelessness & rough sleeping strategy by placing prevention at the heart of service provision. 

We will ensure that Housing Related Support services maximise help to vulnerable residents by 
commissioning services that will improve outcomes for them. 

We will work closely with services and agencies which offer mental health and drug and alcohol services 
and ensure support services are better linked with each other. 


We will continue to work with government to resettle refugees fleeing war and persecution through our 
managed migration programmes. 



14 



We will work with the Economic Partnership to help improve incomes for those on low incomes and 
the workless. One of the ways we will help is to assist, as a sector, in improving access to training 
opportunities and access to good jobs. This will result in improving the ability of those on low incomes to 
afford to access and to sustain housing. 

We will work in partnership to monitor the effects of Welfare Reform and find ways to deal with its effects 
on the Districts residents. 


HOUSING STRATEGY FOR BRADFORD DISTRICT 2020-2030 


25 



















































HOW WE WILL MEASURE SUCCESS 


01 

02 

03 

04 

05 


* 

X 

X 

X 

X 


Successful preventions of homelessness 


Reduced numbers in fuel poverty 


Reduction in number of households using Bed & Breakfast and reduced length of stay in B&B 
Number of homes adapted 


Greater accommodation choices for older people and those with disabilities 


INCLUSIVE & ACCESSIBLE HOUSING 

Principle 2.17 of the Council’s Deign Guide, “Homes 
& Neighbourhoods: A guide to designing in Bradford 
requires all homes and neighbourhoods to be 
designed to be inclusive and accessible for all. Ten 
per cent of proposed homes should be designed 
to meet standards of Building Regulations M4 (3): 
Category 3, Wheelchair user dwellings, with the 
remaining 90% designed to meet the standards 


\ 

of Building Regulations M4 (2): Category 2, 

Accessible and adaptable dwellings. An exception 
will be made, where there are technical constraints, 
for level access requirement. The Council is not 
just interested in accessible homes but also in 
easily accessible streets and pavements and paths; 
having an effective strategy for parking and bins; 
level access to all open space and play facilities - 
ensuring less able residents are able to move with 
relative ease. 


AFFORDABILITY EXPLAINED 

Affordable housing includes social rented, 
affordable rented and intermediate housing, 
provided to specified eligible households whose 
needs are not met by the market. It can be a new- 
build property or a private sector property that has 
been purchased for use as an affordable home. 
(Ministry of Housing, Communities & Local 
Government). 

Private rents in Bradford in the 12 months to 
September 2018 ranged from £350 per month 
for a lower quartile one bed to £995 for an upper 
quartile four or more bed property. The overall 
median rent was £495. Whilst these rents are 
relatively lower compared to other parts of the 
country, they still pose affordability issues for 
those on low incomes. As an example a family 
wanting to rent a four bed private property would 
have to be earning over £44,000 per annum to be 
able to afford the private sector rent on the basis 
that no more than 25% of earnings (government 
recommended) should be spent on housing costs. 

In terms of buying a home typical mortgage 
multipliers allow a single person to borrow up 
to 3.5 times their gross income and a couple 
to borrow 3 times their combined income. This 
implies that, for households with no existing equity 
a single person with an income of £19,000 (lower 
quartile earnings) and a couple with an income 
of £22,000 could afford to buy a property selling 
at below £66,000 which is most likely to be a one 


or two bed property in an inner urban ward most 
likely requiring remedial works. A typical three 
or four bed room home would be out of reach for 
many Bradford households. The average house 
price in Bradford District in 2018 was £131,000. 
Generally social housing rents are lower and 
therefore more affordable, than private rents. In 
Bradford District a recent LGA analysis showed 
that social rents were 69% of private rents. 
(Source: Understanding Local Housing Markets, 
LGA). 

This means that our efforts should be directed at 
providing greater levels of social housing in the 
District. We will work with our Registered Provider 
partners to maximise funding available from 
Homes England and ensure supply of affordable 
housing is improved significantly. We will continue 
to use our powers within the planning system 
to improve supply through the use of Section 
106 agreements, which enable us to negotiate 
a proportion of affordable housing on all new 
developments. 

For a home to be truly affordable, householders 
need to be able to afford to maintain and heat 
their homes effectively. Bradford has a higher 
than average number of homes without central 
heating, and our legacy of terraced and back to 
back housing means many households struggle 
to insulate and heat their homes effectively. The 
strategy will attempt to address this issue by 
working with energy suppliers and agencies to 
assist in making housing costs more affordable. 


26 


HOUSING STRATEGY FOR BRADFORD DISTRICT 2020-2030 


"v-v—v —\r 























DELIVERING THE STRATEGY 


This strategy sets out the approach the Council 
and partners will take to deliver on our priorities. It 
is clear that the priorities in this strategy cannot be 
successfully delivered without the commitment of 
partners and agencies involved in providing suitable 
housing for its residents. We will work together 
collaboratively with a range of partners to deliver what 
we have promised and to regularly report progress. 




The strategy will be owned jointly by Bradford Council 
and the Bradford Housing Partnership. The Housing 
Partnership will review the success measures in this 
document and monitor progress against the targets 
on an annual basis. Regular reports will be made to 
the Council’s Overview & Scrutiny Committee. 

The Bradford Housing Partnership will monitor, 
review and report progress on behalf of the District’s 
partners. The Housing Partnership will report into a 
Governance structure which will include reporting into 
and working with the Economic Partnership and the 
overarching District Health & Well Being Board. 

This strategy alone cannot meet fully the aspirations 
of our residents and we recognize that working 
across strategies, partnerships and programmes will 
be key to the successful delivery of our priorities. 

We also realize that some of the delivery will rely on 
government policy and availability of resources from 
government. An important part of our approach will 
therefore be to lobby government not just for more 
resources but also to influence both current and 
future government policy. 


KEY MESSAGES AND 
PRINCIPLES FOR 
DELIVERY PARTNERS 

The strategy represents a high level 
framework with key messages and 
principles which delivery partners need 
to take into account when drawing up 
their plans and programmes and when 
providing services. It does not attempt to 
provide a comprehensive action plan and 
will rely on plans and programmes set 
out elsewhere e.g. the Housing Delivery 
Test Action Plan, Adopted Core Strategy, 
Homelessness & Rough Sleeping 
Strategy, Empty Homes Action Plan, 
Affordable Homes Programme, Great 
Places to Grow Old Programme, and 
the plans and programmes of partners 
such as Incommunities and other Social 
Landlords, as well as the Leeds City 
Region and West Yorkshire Combined 
Authority. 



HOUSING STRATEGY FOR BRADFORD DISTRICT 2020-2030 


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This Strategy provides a high level strategic framework for the delivery of the District’s housing 
challenges and the ambitions set out within the strategy will be implemented in conjunction and 
alongside plans contained in the following documents: 

Bradford District Plan 2016-2020 
Bradford Council Plan 2016-2020 

Bradford Homelessness & Rough Sleeping Strategy 2020-2025 
Housing Delivery Test Action Plan 2019 

Connecting People and Place for a better health & well being, A Joint Health & Wellbeing Strategy for 
Bradford & Airedale 2018-2023 

Joint Strategic Needs Assessment for Bradford 2019 

Adopted Core Strategy Development Plan Document 

Core Strategy Partial Review 2019 

Great Places to Grow Old, Bradford District’s Housing Strategy for the Over 50’s 2011-2021 
Pioneering, Confident & Connected, an Economic Strategy for Bradford District 2018-2030 
Homes & Neighbourhood’s, a guide to designing in Bradford 2019 

Planning a Healthy, Happy Bradford District, 2018-2023, (part of the Core Strategy Partial Review 
documentation) 

Happy, Healthy & At Home, A plan for the future of health and care in Bradford District & Craven, 2017 

Stronger Communities Together Strategy 

Improving Lives to 2040, Strategic Plan (Incommunities) 

Other partner strategies, plans and programmes 


For further information contact: 

Department of Place 

Housing Access & Strategy 

City of Bradford Metropolitan District Council 

Britannia House 

Bradford BD1 1HX 

Telephone: 01274 434362/432591 
Email: housing.strategy@bradford.gov.uk 


The wording in this publication can be made available in other 
formats such as large print and Braille. Please telephone 
01274 434362 . 


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HOUSING STRATEGY FOR BRADFORD DISTRICT 2020-2030