Skip to main content

Full text of "Cabinet - 08/12/2020"

See other formats




North Ayrshire Council 
Comhairle Siorrachd Air a Tuath 


Cabinet 


A meeting of the Cabinet of North Ayrshire Council will be held remotely on Tuesday, 
08 December 2020 at 14:30 to consider the undernoted business. 


Arrangements in Terms of COVID-19 

In light of the current COVID-19 pandemic, this meeting will be held 
remotely in accordance with the provisions of the Local Government 
(Scotland) Act 2003. Where possible, the meeting will be live-streamed 
and available to view at https://north-ayrshire.public- 
|.tv/core/portal/nome. In the event that live-streaming is not possible, a 
recording of the meeting will instead be available to view at this location. 


1 Declarations of Interest 
Members are requested to give notice of any declarations of interest in 
respect of items of business on the Agenda. 


2 Minutes 
The accuracy of the Minutes of the meeting of the Cabinet held on 10 
November 2020 will be confirmed and the Minutes signed in accordance 
with Paragraph 7 (1) of Schedule 7 of the Local Government (Scotland) 
Act 1973 (copy enclosed). 


EDUCATION ITEMS FOR DECISION 

3 Local Education Phasing Delivery Plan (Revised) 
Submit a report by the Executive Director (Communities) on the revised 
North Ayrshire Local Education Phasing Delivery Plan (copy enclosed). 


GENERAL BUSINESS FOR DECISION 


Reports by the Chief Executive 


North Ayrshire Council, Cunninghame House, Irvine KA12 8EE 


Public Performance Reporting 2019/20 

Submit a report by the Head of Democratic Services on 2019/20 
public performance reporting and the draft Annual Public Performance 
Report 2019/2020 (copy enclosed). 


Reports by the Executive Director (Place) 


Safer North Ayrshire Strategy 2020-2025 
Submit a report by the Executive Director (Place) on the priorities detailed 
within the Safer North Ayrshire Strategy 2020-2025 (copy enclosed). 


Town Centre Fund 2020-2021 
Submit a report by the Executive Director (Place) on the priorities detailed 
within the Safer North Ayrshire Strategy 2020-2025 (copy enclosed). 


Reports by the Executive Director (Communities) 


Community Asset Transfer Applications 

Submit a report by the Executive Director (Communities) on proposals to 
transfer the ownership of Almswall Pavilion and Football Ground, 
Kilwinning and the former Cleansing and Grounds Maintenance Depot, 
Ladysmith Road, Kilbirnie Public Park (copy enclosed). 


Reports by the Director (Health and Social Care Partnership) 

HSCP Budget Monitoring Report 

Submit a report by the Director (Health and Social Care Partnership) on 
the projected financial outturn for the financial year as at September 2020 
(copy enclosed). 


Urgent ltems 
Any other items which the Chair considers to be urgent. 


North Ayrshire Council, Cunninghame House, Irvine KA12 8EE 


Webcasting - Virtual Meeting 

Please note: this meeting may be recorded/live-streamed to the Council's 
internet site, where it will be capable of repeated viewing. At the start of 
the meeting, the Provost/Chair will confirm if all or part of the meeting is 
being recorded/live-streamed. 


You should be aware that the Council is a Data Controller under the Data 
Protection Act 2018. Data collected during the webcast will be retained in 
accordance with the Council's published policy, including, but not limited 
to, for the purpose of keeping historical records and making those records 
available via the Council's internet site. 

If you are participating in this meeting by invitation, you are consenting to 
being filmed and consenting to the use and storage of those images and 
sound recordings and any information pertaining to you contained in the 
them live-streaming/recording or training purposes and for the purpose of 
keeping historical records and making those records available to the 
public. If you do not wish to participate in a recording, you should leave 
the 'virtual meeting'. This will constitute your revocation of consent. 

If you have any queries regarding this, please contact 
dataprotectionofficer@north-ayrshire.gov.uk. 


North Ayrshire Council, Cunninghame House, Irvine KA12 8EE 


Cabinet Sederunt 





Elected Members Chair: 


Joe Cullinane (Chair) 

John Bell (Vice-Chair) 

Robert Foster 

Alex Gallagher Apologies: 
Louise McPhater 

Jim Montgomerie 


Church Representatives 
Attending: 
Mr Andrew Bruce 
Mr lan Haining 
Ms Babs Mowat 
Teaching Representative 


Ms Jackie MacKenzie 


Youth Council Representatives 


North Ayrshire Council, Cunninghame House, Irvine KA12 8EE 


Cabinet (Education) 
10 November 2020 Agenda Item 2 


At a Meeting of the Cabinet of North Ayrshire Council at 2.30 p.m. involving 
participation by remote electronic means. 


Present 

Joe Cullinane, John Bell, Robert Foster, Alex Gallagher, Louise McPhater and Jim 
Montgomerie; and Jacqui MacKenzie (Teaching Representative), Andrew Bruce, and 
Babs Mowat (Church Representatives) (Agenda ltems 1-5). 


In Attendance 

C. Hatton (Chief Executive), M. Boyd, Head of Service (Finance), D. Forbes, Senior 
Manager (Financial Management); F. Walker, Head of Service (People and ICT), E. 
Nixon, Senior Manager (Customer Services) and (Chief Executive's); R. 
McCutcheon, Executive Director, D. Hammond, Head of Service (Commercial); C. 
McAuley, Head of Service (Economic Development and Regeneration); J. Cameron, 
senior Manager (Housing Strategy and Development); A. Laurenson (Senior Manager 
(Regeneration), and M. Laverty, Team Manager (Housing Strategy) (Place); A. Sutton, 
Executive Director (Interim), A. McClelland, Head of Service (Education) and R. 
Arthur, Head of Service (Interim) (Connected Communities) (Communities); K. 
Yeomans, Director (Growth and Investment); C. Cameron, Head of Service (HSCP 
Finance and Transformation) and D. MacRitchie, Senior Manager (Children, Families 
and Justice (HSCP); and M. McColm, Senior Manager (Communications), J. 
Hutcheson, Senior Communications Officer, E. Gray and A. Little, Committee Services 
Officers (Democratic Services). 


Apologies for Absence 
lain Haining 


Chair 
Joe Cullinane in the Chair. 


1. Declarations of Interest 


There were no declarations of interest by Members in terms of Standing Order 10 and 
Section 5 of the Code of Conduct for Councillors. 


2. Minutes 


The accuracy of the Minutes of the Meeting of the Cabinet held on 6 October 2020 
was confirmed and the Minutes authorised to be signed in accordance with Paragraph 
7 (1) of Schedule 7 of the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973. 


3. Scottish Attainment Challenge in North Ayrshire — Progress Report 


Submitted a report and received a presentation by the Executive Director 
(Communities) on the impact of the Scottish Attainment Challenge on improved 
outcomes for learners in North Ayrshire. A Data & Impact Overview for 2019-2020 
was set out at Appendix 1 to the report. 


The presentation provided details on primary attainment levels in literacy and 
numeracy as well as a focus on the attainment levels of those pupils living in the areas 
of highest deprivation within North Ayrshire. Comparisons were also shown between 
the attainment level locally and nationally. 


Members asked questions and were provided with further information in relation to: 


e whether it would be possible to include the 2019/20 academic year in future 
data trends given the interruption to classroom learning amid the Covid-19 
pandemic; 

e what plans are in place to provide assistance to those pupils who struggled to 
learn at home and may have fallen behind as a result; 

e the process for setting up a remote learning model should a school be forced 
to shut and the lessons learned from the first lockdown; and 

e whether there had been any reports of reduced socialization among pupils 
following the period of remote learning. 


The Cabinet unanimously agreed to (a) note the progress made to date; and (b) 
receive a further progress report in one year. 


4. South West Educational Improvement Collaborative (SWEIC) Annual Plan 
2020 


Submitted a report by the Executive Director (Communities) on the priorities and 
content of the South West Educational Improvement Collaborative (SWEIC) Annual 
Plan 2020 as set out at Appendix 1 to the report. 


Members asked questions and were provided with further information in relation to the 
future of the collaboration and whether funding will be available beyond the current 
academic year. 


The Cabinet unanimously agreed to (a) approve the SWEIC Annual Plan 2020; and 
(b) note the progress to date. 


5. Local Education Phasing Delivery Plan (Revised) 


The Cabinet was advised that, following a recent Scottish Government update, the 
report on the Local Education Phasing Delivery Plan would need to be amended to 
reflect the latest guidance. Assurance was provided that the latest requirements and 
advice within the updates had been implemented locally. 


The Cabinet unanimously agreed to continue consideration the item to the next 
meeting to allow the updates to be incorporated into the report. 


6. Revenue Budget 2020/21: Financial Performance to 31 August 2020 


Submitted a report by the Head of Finance on the financial performance for the Council 
at 31 August 2020. Budget reports for each service and the Housing Revenue Account 
were set out at Appendices 1-7 of the report, a summary of virement/budget 
adjustment requests at Appendix 8 and an overview of the IJB's financial performance 
as at Period 3 at Appendix 9. 


Members asked questions and were provided with further information in relation to: 


e the timeline for the 2020/21 budget setting process; and 
e the continued impact of the pandemic upon financial projections 


The Cabinet unanimously agreed to (a) note (i) the information and financial 
projections outlined in the report and (ii) the current financial projection for the Health 
and Social Care Partnership; and (b) approve (i) the earmarking of £1.720m to meet 
future year commitments and (ii) the virements detailed in Appendix 8 of the report. 


7. Capital Programme Performance to 31 March 2021 


Submitted a report by the Head of Finance on the progress in delivering the Capital 
Investment Programme for 2020/21 as set out at Appendix 1 to the report. The HRA 
Capital Statement was set out at Appendix 2. 


Members asked questions and were provided with further information in relation to the 
anticipated impact of construction inflation attributable to the pandemic on the cost of 
projects detailed in the Capital Investment Programme. 


The Cabinet unanimously agreed to (a) approve the revisions to budgets outlined in 
the report; and (b) note (i) the General Services and HRA revised budgets at 31 August 
2020 and (ii) the forecast expenditure to 31 March 2021. 


8. Treasury Management & Investment Mid-Year Report 

Submitted a report by the Head of Finance on Treasury Management update for the 
period 1 April to 30 September 2020. The Treasury Management and Investment Mid- 
Year Report was set out at Appendix 1 to the report. 

The Cabinet unanimously agreed to (a) endorse the contents of the Treasury 
Management and Investment Mid-Year Report for 2020/21; and (b) note the Prudential 
and Treasury Indicators contained therein. 


9. myaccount — Customer Authentication for Online Services 


Submitted a report by the Head of People and ICT on myaccount and the benefits of 
using this as the authentication method for North Ayrshire Council online services. 


The Cabinet unanimously agreed that (a) the Council use myaccount for 
authentication for online services on the new Customer Relationship Management 
system; (b) the Yoti app be used for level 3 verification, linked with myaccount; and (c) 
no existing online customer data or case data be migrated to the new Customer 
Relationship Management System. 


10. Strategic Housing Investment Plan 2021 - 2026 


Submitted a report by the Executive Director (Place) on the Strategic Housing 
Investment Plan 2021 - 2026 as set out at Appendix 1 to the report. 


The Cabinet unanimously agreed to (a) approve the Strategic Housing Investment 
Plan 2021-2026 for submission to Scottish Government; and (b) give delegated 
authority to the Executive Director (Place) and the Cabinet Member for the Green 
New Deal and Sustainability to liaise directly with the Scottish Government in 
agreeing the North Ayrshire development programme and the rescheduling of 
projects as required. 


11. Roads Winter Service and Weather Emergencies Plan 2020-21 


Submitted a report by the Executive Director (Place) on the Roads Winter Service 
and Weather Emergencies Plan 2020/21 as set out at Appendix 2 to the report. The 
Winter Preparation Action Plan 2020/21 was set out at Appendix 1. 


The Cabinet unanimously agreed to (a) approve the Roads Winter Service and 
Weather Emergencies Plan 2020/21; and (b) note the preparations and 
developments contained in the Winter Preparation Action Plan. 


12. Millport Coastal Flood Protection Scheme - Final Scheme 


Submitted a report by the Executive Director (Place) on final confirmation of the 
scheme and the proposed next steps. The objections received to the project were 
collated and set out at Appendix 1 to the report. 


Having considered the contents of the objections to the project, the Cabinet 
unanimously agreed to (a) approve (i) the scheme without modification; and (ii) the 
commencement of the final design of the scheme; and (b) note the indicative project 
timescale as detailed in Section 2.14 of the report. 


13. Millburn Flood Protection Scheme - Isle of Cumbrae 

Submitted a report by the Executive Director (Place) on the development of the 
Millburn Flood Protection Scheme. A summary of the community consultation 
process was set out at Appendix 1 to the report. 

The Cabinet unanimously agreed to (a) note the feedback from the recent community 
consultations on the scheme options; and (b) approve the preferred scheme option 
and submission. 


Councillor McPhater left the meeting at this point. 


14. Lochshore Regeneration Project 


Submitted a report by the Executive Director (Place) on the delivery of the strategic 
regeneration of Lochshore. 

The Cabinet unanimously agreed to (a) approve the transfer of land owned by 
Scottish Enterprise to the Council at nil value to facilitate the wider regeneration 
proposals; and (b) note (i) the significant progress made in securing £3.45m of the 
required £3.6m funding required to deliver the proposed Garnock Visitor & 
Community Hub, (ii) the proposed implementation of early phase projects including 
the Garnock Visitor and Community Hub and proposed access improvements, play 
facilities and planting which will contribute to the regeneration of the area and (iil) the 
intention to utilise the Lochshore site as a key location for tree planting as part of the 
Council's net-zero aspirations. 


15. Proposals for Street Naming 


Submitted a report by the Executive Director (Communities) seeking approval for a 
street name within the residential development on land which was formerly St 
Brendan’s RC Church in Corrie Crescent, Saltcoats. The Council’s street naming 
and numbering guidance was set out at Appendix 1 to the report, location plans at 
Appendix 2 and Cunninghame Housing Association’s supporting statement at 
Appendix 3. 


The Cabinet unanimously agreed to (a) note the exceptional circumstances; and (b) 
approve the street name recommended by the Three Towns Locality Partnership, 
namely ‘Janet Strang Court’. 

16. Ayrshire Growth Deal Update 


Submitted a report by the Director (Growth and Investment) on the progress of North 
Ayrshire Council's Ayrshire Growth Deal Projects. 


The Cabinet unanimously agreed to note the progress made in developing the suite 
of projects forming part of North Ayrshire Council's Ayrshire Growth Deal portfolio. 


17. Chief Social Work Officer Annual Report 


Submitted a report by the Director (Health and Social Care Partnership) on the Chief 
social Worker’s annual report as set out at Appendix 1 of the report. 


The Cabinet unanimously agreed to note and endorse the Chief Social Worker’s 
annual report. 


18. Exclusion of the Public 


The Cabinet resolved in terms of Section 50(A)4 of the Local Government (Scotland) 
Act 1973, to exclude from the Meeting the press and the public for the following item 
of business on the grounds indicated in terms of Paragraph 9 of Part 1 of Schedule 
7A of the Act. 


The Chair noted that confirmation had been received that the webcast of the meeting 
had been terminated at this point. 


18.1 Lease of Gateway Building 13 Irvine Enterprise Area 


Submitted a report by the Executive Director (Place) on letting of the Gateway Building 
in i3, Irvine Enterprise Area. 


The Cabinet unanimously agreed to the recommendations as set out in the report. 


10 


Agenda Item 3 


NORTH AYRSHIRE COUNCIL 


8 December 2020 


Cabinet 
Title: Local Education Phasing Delivery Plan (Revised) 
Purpose: To seek Cabinet approval on the revised North Ayrshire Local 


Education Phasing Delivery Plan. 


Recommendation: That Cabinet: 
i) Notes the continued progress that has been made in 
response to Scottish Government legislation; and 
ii) Approves the revised Local Education Phasing Delivery 
Plan. 


1.1 


1.2 


1.3 


1.4 


Executive Summary 


On 30^ of June 2020, Cabinet approved North Ayrshire's Local Education Phasing 
Delivery Plan (LPDP). This set out North Ayrshire’s approach to restoring in-school 
learning; to providing remote learning (the “Contingency Plan”); and delivering childcare 
for vulnerable children and families of key workers. 


Scottish Government announced on the 30^ of July 2020 that all schools should reopen 
full-time from the 11' of August 2020 and that arrangements, such as blended learning, 
should remain in place as a contingency. 


As a result, North Ayrshire's Local Education Phasing Delivery Plan has been updated 
to reflect the steps taken to ensure the safe return of over 18,000 learners and 2000 
staff across North Ayrshire in August 2020. 


The revised Local Education Phasing Delivery Plan is included at Appendix 1. The key 
changes include: 


e Removal of a requirement for 2-metre physical distancing between pupils across the 
school estate & school transport. 


e Updates to the establishment risk assessment template, which must be completed 
by all education settings, to reflect Health and Safety Executive guidance as well as 
national and clinical advice. 


e Anew requirement for pupils and staff to wear face coverings in secondary school 
common areas as well as the option to wear them in learning settings if they choose. 


11 


2.1 


2.2 


2.2 


2.3 


2.4 


2.5 


2.6 


e Further information on how education establishments should respond in the event 
of a suspected Covid-19 case or outbreak. 


e Revised contingency arrangements should a pupil, class or whole school be required 
to self-isolate. 


e Additional information on remote and online learning provision 


e Information on additional staffing recruited as a response to the return to in-school 
learning. 


Background 


North Ayrshire’s Local Education Phasing Delivery Plan was created in response to 
Scottish Government's “Excellence and Equity During the Covid-19 Pandemic” and 
“Strategic framework for reopening schools, early learning and childcare provision” 
guidance. These documents informed the local authority's approach to restoring in- 
school learning; providing at home learning; and delivering childcare for vulnerable 
children and families of key workers during the first wave of the pandemic. 


scottish Government's strategic framework indicated a combination of factors which 
meant that a blended model of in-school and at home learning was likely for most pupils, 
at least during the initial phase of re-opening of schools. This informed the decision to 
develop blended learning plans, which would have resulted in learners' education being 
split part-time between school and at home learning. 


Due to the publication of revised scientific advice, Scottish Government announced on 
the 23'* of June that physical distancing would not be required between learners in 
education settings. This also extended to school transport which has been viewed as 
an extension of the school estate. This was followed by Scottish Government 
announcing on the 30" of July that all pupils should return to full-time in school education 
from the 11" of August onwards. 


In response to the expectations outlined in the national framework and Scottish 
Government's Education Continuity Directions, North Ayrshire Council established an 
Education Recovery Board which facilitated effective partnership working across the 
Council to implement national legislation and this included the creation of the Local 
Education Phasing Delivery Plan. 


Due to the changing nature of the Covid-19 pandemic, it was agreed by Cabinet that 
the Local Phasing Delivery Plan should remain a live document which would be 
amended to reflect further developments. This document has been provided at 
Appendix 1 and updates are highlighted in the version control contents page and in red 
font within the plan. 


ocottish Government's Education Continuity (No. 5) requires each education authority 
to prepare contingency plans which can be used immediately in the event of a local 
coronavirus outbreak. This has been incorporated in the revised Local Education 
Phasing Delivery Plan. 


In addition, all education establishments developed local arrangements, specific to their 


individual contexts, should these contingencies need to be implemented in response to 
confirmed Covid cases. 


12 


2./ 


2.8 


2.9 


A major development, since the first version of Local Phasing Delivery Plan was 
approved by Cabinet, has been the purchase of additional ICT devices and connectivity 
for pupils at risk of digital exclusion if remote learning is required. North Ayrshire Council 
received £ 551,172 from Scottish Government's digital inclusion fund and has invested 
a further £318,960 to meet identified need. This has included the purchase of: 


e 1217 wifi ¡Pads 

e 189 cellular iPads 

e 306 MiFi units 

e 900 chromebook laptops 

e 582 anywhere SIMs for 12 months 


In addition, remote learning also continues to be supported through the on-going 
development of digital learning resources locally via Glow. Some schools have also 
adopted digital approaches to issuing homework and piloted the use of digital 
technology to hold virtual whole school assemblies. VSCENE, which is an education 
specific video collaboration tool, is now in place for remote learning and will complement 
the on-going expansion of the national e-Sgoil learning and teaching platform. 


North Ayrshire has also enhanced school staffing in response to the on-going pandemic. 
This has resulted in the recruitment of a total of 50 additional teachers and 8 classroom 
assistants for the current academic year and the retention of existing enhanced 
classroom assistant levels in the first half of the year to support a successful transition 
back to in-school learning. 


2.10 The projected impact and implications, including financial, of implementing blended 


learning plans (including the staffing and ICT implications) were reported to Cabinet on 
30^ June. These are under continuous review, and the situation remains fluid as local 
cases and outbreaks influence financial and operational decision making. 


2.11 In relation to health and safety and in-school arrangements to safeguard staff and pupils, 


3. 


3.1 


the HSE has visited a number of North Ayrshire establishments and is satisfied with the 
current and ongoing measures being implemented to respond to Covid-related 
circumstances. 


Proposals 


It is proposed that Cabinet: 


1) Notes the continued progress that has been made in response to Scottish 
Government legislation; and 


ii) Approves the revised Local Education Phasing Delivery Plan. 


13 


4. Implications/Socio-economic Duty 
Financial 


4.1 As noted in 2.9 the financial implications associated with the implementation of blended 
learning are being continually influenced by local circumstances. Further updates will 
be provided as part of the Covid finance reporting schedules. 


Human Resources 


4.2 Implementation of blended learning plans have resulted in the need to recruit additional 
staff to cover potential staff absence related to Covid-19. This is being reviewed on an 
ongoing basis. Contractual arrangements have been made to identify and employ 
additional staff already to support service continuity. 


Legal 


4.3 The Local Phasing Delivery Plan has been developed to take account of existing 
statutory duties relevant to the provision of education and all five Educational Continuity 
Directions issued to Education Authorities by the Scottish Government during the 
pandemic. 


Equality/Socio-economic 


4.4 A range of measures have been developed within the LPDP to ensure that the 
arrangements are responsive to a range of needs, including deprivation and health and 
wellbeing. 


Environmental and Sustainability 


4.5 None 


Key Priorities 


4.6 Council priorities: 


e Children and young people have the best start in life. 
e Active and strong communities. 


e Inclusive, growing and enterprising local economy. 


Community Wealth Building 


4.7 The commitment to continued employment of supply staff and local funded providers 
respects our commitment to local employment and procurement. For example, we have 
worked closely with our funded providers to ensure appropriate delivery of early years 
and childcare in a way which supports their business objectives, and school meals 
continue to be sourced locally. 


14 


5. Consultation 


5.1 Consultation takes place at the Education Recovery Board, which has representatives 
from services across the Council and Trade Union representatives. 


Audrey Sutton 
Interim Executive Director 


For further information please contact Caroline Amos/ Andrew McClelland, Head of 
Service, on 01294 324416 or 01294 324413. 

Background Papers 

0 


15 


NORTH AYRSHIRE 
COUNCIL 





A 


North Ayrshire Council 


Comhairle Siorrachd Air a Tuath 


EDUCATION RESILIENCE 
PLANNING 


Managing Risk / Prioritising Safety and Wellbeing / Ensuring Learning 
Continuity 


Version 3 — November 2020 


Version Control 


Version | Date of Section Changed Reason for Change Update Summary 

Issue 

July 2020 | Initial Document NEM 
1 


Version | Sept Our Phased Approach | Revised Contingency Removed 
2 2020 Plans 


Section 2 — Factor 1 In line with revised SG | Update 
Guidance 


Section 2 - Staff who In line with revised SG Additional Section 


were shielding or are Guidance 
clinically vulnerable 


required to self-isolate | Guidance 
required to quarantine | Guidance 


Section 2 — Staff In line with revised SG | Additional Section 
absent due to Guidance 
childcare 

Section 2 — Children In line with revised SG | Update 
who are shielding and | Guidance 

clinically vulnerable 


Section 5 — Sector In line with revised SG New Section 
Advice Card Guidance 


Section 7 - Curriculum | In line with revised SG | Additional bullet for 
Guidance Senior Phase/College 

attendance with links 
to College 
arrangements 
documentation 

Section 8 — Physical In line with Education New Section 

Education and Home Scotland Guidance 

Economics 


Scotland Guidance 
International Travel Guidance 




















Section 11 — School In line with revised SG | New Section 
Trips including Guidance 
Overnight Stays 
In line with revised SG | New Section 
Clubs Guidance 
Section 17 — In line with revised SG | New Section 
Movement Between Guidance 
Schools 
Spaces Guidance 
Section 21 — Break In line with revised SG | Update on cleaning of 
and Lunchtimes Guidance dining room furniture 


and availability of 


17 


drinking water. 
Wearing of face 
communal areas. 


Section 22 — Staff Updated Advice Staff layouts to be 
Areas adhered to 


Section 23 — Hygiene | In line with revised SG | Minor revision to 
Guidance wording and revised 
guidance on 
ventilation systems 


Section 26 — Health General Update Availability of PPE 
and Safety Matters 


Section 27 — Risk General Update To share risk 
Assessments assessments with 
staff 


Covid-19 paragraph 
Section 29 — Process New Section Includes links to the 
for Display of Process Maps 
Symptoms and an 
Identified Outbreak 
Section 30 — Face 


Coverings 











In line with revised SG 
Guidance 


Use of face coverings 
in communal areas 
and use of FFP3 type 
face coverings 

To reflect current 
processes for testing 


In line with revised SG 
Guidance 


Section 31 — Test, 

Trace, Isolate and 

Support (Test and of staff, children, 

Protect) parents and carers 

and Personal Care Guidance coverings 

oection 33 - Staffing In line with revised SG | Updates on shielding 
Guidance and clinically 


vulnerable staff and 
mitigation of staff 











absence 
Communications processes 
Section 37 — New Section With examples 
Contingency 
Arrangements 
Version | Nov 2020 | Section 2 — Mitigating | In line with revised SG | Details of protection 
3 Factors for COVID-19 | Guidance — 30 Oct levels added. Section 
2020 on face coverings 
moved from Section 
37 


Section 6 - Schools In line with revised SG | Additions 
Guidance — 30 Oct ASN - updates risk 





2020 assessments 


18 


Secondary — SQA 
Information 


Section 7 — Early In line with revised SG | New Section 
Learning and Guidance — 30 Oct 
Childcare Settings 2020 


ection 8 - Curriculum New Guidance on E- National E-Learning 
Learning offer to support a 
blended approach to 

learning 








Section 9 - PE In line with revised Separated from HE 
Education Scotland and new guidance 
Guidance 2 November | protection levels 
2020 


Section 10 — In line with revised New Section 
Changing Rooms Education Scotland 

Guidance 2 November 

2020 


Section 12 - Music In line with revised Follow SAGE advice 
Education Scotland 
Guidance 2 November 
2020 


Section 13 — Art, In line with revised New Section 
Design and Education Scotland 
Photography Guidance 2 November 

2020 
Section 14 — Dance In line with revised New Section 
and Drama Education Scotland 

Guidance 2 November 

2020 
Section 15 — Science | In line with revised New Section 
and Practical SSERC Guidance - 1 
oessions and 7 Sep 2020 











section 19 — School In line with revised SG | Face coverings 
Day Guidance — 30 Oct 
2020 
Section 22 - Visitors In line with revised SG | Face coverings 
Guidance — 30 Oct 
2020 
Section 23 — In line with revised SG | Face coverings and 
Movement Between Guidance — 30 Oct limit attendance 
ochools 2020 
Section 24 — In line with revised SG | Face coverings and 
Staff/Pupil Movement | Guidance — 30 Oct reinstatement of fire 
2020 drills 
Section 25 — Teaching | In line with revised SG | Addition of protection 
Spaces Guidance — 30 Oct levels and face 
2020 coverings 
4 


19 


Section 27 — Breaks 
and Lunch 


Section 28 — Staff 
Areas 


Section 29 - Hygiene 


Section 30 — 
Equipment and 
Resources 

Section 32 — Health 
and Safety Matters 


Section 35 — 
Ventilation and 
Temperature 

Section 37 — Test and 
Protect 


section 39 - Staffing 


In line with revised SG 
Guidance — 30 Oct 
2020 

In line with revised SG 
Guidance — 30 Oct 
2020 

In line with revised SG 
Guidance — 30 Oct 
2020 


In line with revised SG 
Guidance — 30 Oct 
2020 

In line with guidance 
from NAC Corporate 
Health and Safety 

In line with revised SG 
Guidance — 30 Oct 
2020 


In line with revised SG 
Guidance — 30 Oct 
2020 


Face coverings 


Face coverings 


Updated Information 
on ELC use of anti- 
bac gel and 
toothbrushing 
Handling of jotters 
and quarantining 


Addition of emergency 
evacuations 


New Section 


Addition of 
inconclusive testing 
addition of SEEMIS 
COVID-19 codes 
Protection levels and 
Guidance for pregnant 
employees added 





20 


Version 3 — November 2020 


Contents 

ME TORON O MEE T EEEE E 2 
CONTEN passo 6 
A ION ett titrant tees oe IA 8 
2. Mitigating Factors Tor GOVT Osc e sinis Ghil 9 
SI A EAEE AEE AEA EAER 13 
4. The “Covid-Ready” Capacities of Schools............................. eese 14 
DECO AOVICO CON raed T tc P 15 
as 68 6) @) {= rene o 15 
7. Early Learning € Childcare SettingS..............cooocccccccncoconncocononononnnonnnnnnnnnnnnnncncnoness 16 
SI RI ai é HU Ig g pene teen eee tenes Sees ore tee Re err ee mee eee ene codec d conso drca efus 18 
0 PAYSICAl EQUGAUON P ——————————————— 9 20 
10: GhanGing: AMS: A 20 
TT TOME ECONOMICS amianto 21 
12: MUSIC AA A ee ee eee ee 21 
ta. An, Desidniana PhnotóograDbhy DENN irrita 21 
14, Dance ana DAMA ins AAA A enr 21 
15. Science:ana Practical WO  mmmmvuwwwewvwwwvvvwvvvwwvwvvwvwvvva 22 
16; iude —————— 22 
17. School Trips including Overnight Stays .......occccoccccccccncccnnnononononanononacnnonaconnnanonnnns 22 
T8 56ho90l TANS DOM stan 23 
T9- The ocho! Dae acitetend istante rinneamar mm 23 
20. Pupil Drop Off/Pick Up Arrangements ..............cccsscccsseeceeeeceeeecseeessesecseeesseeesseeeeas 24 
2l ai Lsi áise AA o E — — 24 
22 VISOR gra ig laa Cle IMS pr o o ee 25 
29. Movement Between Seho0ls co oc etu a ate diat a e o 25 
24 Sta upl MOVSITIGI Tee mctu E bere tb eee abet tuse i ee 26 
25 LEACHING Spaco oss 26 
fáis OUO SPACES RTT TTE TETTE TETTE UT 27 
21. Break ana LUNCA INES rusia ita 2/ 
VCI f —————— ——— —— 27 
A O M CEU COE er aie DNUS DE 28 


21 


30. 
31. 
32. 
33. 
34. 
35. 
36. 
37. 
38. 
39. 
40. 
41. 
42. 
43. 
44. 


Equipment and Resources serrana irte 29 


SCHOO! Ta Mica oa 30 
mece A 30 
ISC ASSESSMENT [ana Ke MEA 30 
AN 31 
venuaton and: tempera varia A 32 
Process for Responding to Confirmed CaSeS.....occccoccccoccnccncnconcnonnnncnnnnnoncnonanannns 34 
MST eA CU Fre ONS t EE Em 35 
Intimate and Personal Cale tvs imental ia 37 
SA nee er ee ee ee 37 
GOMIMUMICANOM et o o 39 
GOMMURICATION WIth ONIO EN mm 39 
CEA e APP a e 39 
Contingency ATM ge Meer 39 
o TOC TOT TET 42 


22 


1. Introduction 
Together, every day, we will try to do the right thing. 


Throughout the pandemic, North Ayrshire's education service has continued to deliver 
learning to the many children and young people in its care. During lockdown, our staff 
worked hard to deliver a range of educational activities; they produced and shared 
resources and provided online materials. Our Head Teachers ensured that our 
children and young people remained connected to their school communities and they 
were particularly vigilant in relation to our most vulnerable children and families. 


The duty of our service is to deliver a high quality curricular experience to all our pupils 
and early years children and our task for recovery is to ensure that we respond 
professionally and responsibly to the challenge of a new delivery model in the context 
of a pandemic. Children must continue to learn, develop and progress 


This plan is North Ayrshire Council's (NAC) approach to the reopening of schools and 
early learning and childcare (ELC) settings across North Ayrshire and the ongoing 
delivery of education. It is cognisant of Scottish Government and Public Health 
guidance, which will continue to be updated following further reviews. 


North Ayrshire Council's top priority is to ensure the safety and wellbeing of our 
children, young people, staff and communities and this is reflected throughout our 
plans for the range of learning models required in our early years, primary and 
secondary education establishments. International and local guidance highlights to 
Head Teachers, the need for effective hygiene measures to supress the virus and 
further details have been provided within this document. 


Our plan supports the following key principles: 


Nurturing Wellbeing and 


Health & Safety Approaches Resilience 


Equity and Fairness Learning Rights of the Child 


Collaboration 

& Collegialit 
In order to support the development and review of this plan, NAC has worked 
collaboratively with a range of partners including national bodies, trade unions, 
neighbouring local authorities and education establishment leadership teams to 


ensure a wide range of views have been considered and our key challenges and 
opportunities highlighted. 





23 


Whilst there is a need for centralised guidance to ensure a holistic approach for our 
educational establishments Education recognises much of this will be context specific 
and different solutions may exist at a local level. As a result of this, establishment 
leadership teams will be supported through this plan's principles to make informed 
local decisions which reflect the needs of their learners, staff and wider community. 


The priority considerations outlined within this plan are as follows: 


= The health and wellbeing of our school communities 

= The delivery of an appropriate curriculum 

= Continuity of learning for children and young people during periods of quarantine, 
self-isolation or temporary school closure 

= All planning will be based on relevant medical and scientific evidence 

= Health and Safety measures should be in place, including appropriate and effective 
risk assessment to prevent the spread of the virus 

= We will adopt a 2m radius in our approach to physical distancing planning. All 
available indoor and outdoor learning spaces should be utilised to maximise the 
available space and promote physical distancing where possible. 


As we respond to meet the needs of our pupils, families and communities during this 
global pandemic, we endeavour to work together to ensure that all children and young 
people in North Ayrshire experience the best start in life and are able to attain and 
achieve their full potential. This plan provides further detail of the approach we have 
taken as we embark on this journey together. 


2. Mitigating Factors for Covid-19 
2.1 Factor 1: Protection Levels 


Protection Levels are set, reviewed and changed by the Scottish Government. All 
staff must be aware of the Protection Level in place in North Ayrshire. 


Protection Level 0 — 2 

Face coverings should be worn by adults where they cannot keep 2m away from other 
adults and / or children and young people across primary and secondary. Within ELC 
and childcare models there is no requirement to wear a face covering in early stage 
and P1 and P2. The "sustained period" of close contact for 15-minutes no longer 
applies. 


Protection Level 3 — 4 Enhanced Protective Measures 

In North Ayrshire face coverings should be worn by adults at all times where they 
cannot keep 2m from other adults and/or children and young people in primary and 
secondary schools (with some exceptions for P1-P2). 


Face coverings should be worn by adults in Early Learning and Childcare settings 
when physical distancing is not possible but are not mandatory when interacting with 
children. 


24 


Face coverings should be worn by parents and other visitors to any school site 
(whether entering the school grounds or building), including drop-off and pick-up times. 


2.1.1 Face Coverings 


e As North Ayrshire is currently in Level 3, pupils in the senior phase (S4-S6) and 
their teachers and support staff should wear face coverings in classrooms, as well 
as when they are moving around the school and in communal areas. 


e Face coverings should be used by adults and secondary pupils when moving 
around settings, communal areas, staff rooms, administrative areas or canteens 
across all school settings. Some staff will be exempt from wearing face coverings 
for medical reasons. Anyone who believes they are exempt should make an 
application for an exemption card via the attached link. 


https://exempt.scot/face-covering-exemptions/ 


Classroom assistants and those supporting children with additional support needs, 
who routinely have to work within 2m of secondary-aged young people, should wear 
face coverings as a general rule. However, the use of opaque face coverings should 
be balanced with the wellbeing and needs of the young person - appropriate use of 
transparent face coverings may help in these circumstances. 


No-one should be excluded from education on the grounds that they are not wearing 
a face covering. As is usual, if there are any concerns about a child or young person 
behaving or acting in a way which does not align with school policy or procedure, their 
behaviour or actions should be discussed with them to resolve those concerns as 
quickly as possible. 


Guidance is available for curriculum-based subjects and can be found in the Education 
Scotland Hub. 


https://www.gov.scot/binaries/content/documents/govscot/publications/strategy- 
plan/2020/10/covid-19-scotlands-strategic-framework/documents/annex-1 - 
protection-levels-framework/annex-1 -protection-levels- 
framework/govscot?e3Adocument/annex-1-protection-levels-framework. pdf 


2.1.2 Attendance at school/workplace 


Protection Level 0-2 

It is anticipated that normal school attendance can be maintained however, if 
parents/carers or staff raise concerns they should be discussed and managed 
appropriately. 


Protection Level 3 


Parents/Carers should discuss with their GP or clinician whether children with the 
highest clinical risk should still attend school/ELC. 


Head Teachers and Heads of Centres should ensure that individualised risk 
assessments for staff members with the highest clinical risk are in place and updated 


10 


20 


appropriately, and staff should speak to their line manager to ensure all appropriate 
protections are in place. Consideration should be given to supportive discussions with 
Occupational Health. 


Decisions on appropriate protections should be informed by the individualised risk 
assessments, and may include protective measures in the workplace, such as working 
remotely (e.g. at home or in different settings) or carrying out different tasks within 
their usual workplace. If protections cannot be put in place, staff can discuss with their 
line manager whether a fit note is required from their GP or clinician. 


Protection Level 4 - Enhanced and Targeted Protective Measures 

Children and young people who are in the shielding grouping should not attend 
school/ELC. However, further consideration should be given to the use of 
individualised risk assessments to maximise school attendance and increase access 
to regulated childcare service, for children who continue to shield during Level 4 
restrictions. 


The risk assessments should be informed by guidance from the secondary care 
(hospital) clinical team managing the health needs of the child or young person. 


For staff at the highest clinical risk, the Head Teacher or Head of Centre should ensure 
that an individualised risk assessment is completed and in place. At Level 4, to provide 
additional assurance, the Chief Medical Officer will issue a letter which is similar to a 
fit note that will last for as long as the local area is under Level 4 restrictions. This letter 
can be used in the few cases where, following updating of risk assessments and 
discussions with employers, it is not possible to make a workplace safe for staff. Being 
in receipt of one of these letters does not automatically mean that staff should not 
attend work if appropriate protections and controls are in place. 


Staff should use the period covered by the letter to discuss any concerns further with 
their employer or an occupational health adviser. If, on completing the individualised 
risk assessment, the actions result in adequate protections in the workplace, then they 
may continue to attend work. 


2.2 Factor 2: Physical Distancing 


A 2m physical distancing approach has been adopted within all establishments both 
between staff members and between staff members and pupils. This measure is in 
line with scientific and medical guidance and is current at the time of writing. However, 
this measure may be adapted following Scottish Government guidance and any 
accommodation arrangements should be flexible enough to permit future changes. 


All schools have been supported by Property Management & Investment (PMI) 
through a measurement exercise which advises on the maximum numbers of persons 
in each space where physical distancing applies. This will include non-teaching spaces 
such as staff areas and school kitchens, where physical distancing will also be 
required. 


Early years and primary school children do not need to physically distance from each 
other, but staff should remain physically distanced from children, where possible. 


11 


26 


secondary schools should encourage distancing wherever practicable between young 
people, particularly in the senior phase. 


All schools must do their utmost to encourage and maximise opportunities to maintain 
as much distance as possible, within the constraints of school timetabling, physical 
building layout and other factors. 


Wherever possible, efforts should be made to keep children and young people within 
the same groups for the duration of the school day. 


2.3 Factor 3: Responding to Covid-19 


Responding to Covid-19 

The Risk Assessment document for each school will clearly advise staff on the correct 
procedure to be undertaken should anyone display Covid-19 symptoms during the 
school day. The NAC general process for how to respond to someone displaying 
symptoms in a school/EYC is accessible via NAC Glow Education Sharepoint here: 


NAC Process for Display of Symptoms 


lí anyone in an education or childcare setting becomes unwell with a new, continuous 
cough or a high temperature, or has a loss of, or change in, their normal sense of taste 
or smell (anosmia), they must be sent home and advised to follow the HPS non- 
healthcare settings guidance: 


= If achild is awaiting collection, they should be moved, if possible, to a room where 
they can be isolated behind a closed door, depending on the age of the child and 
with appropriate adult supervision if required. Ideally, a window should be opened 
for ventilation. If it is not possible to isolate them, move them to an area which is at 
least 2m away from other people. 

= If they need to go to the bathroom while waiting to be collected, they should use a 
separate bathroom if possible. The bathroom should be cleaned and disinfected 
using standard cleaning products before being used by anyone else. 

= PPE should be worn by staff caring for the child while they await collection if a 
distance of 2 metres cannot be maintained (such as for a very young child or a 
child with complex needs). 

"= |n an emergency, call 999 if they are seriously ill or injured or their life is at risk. 

= Schools should adhere to the Test and Protect guidance. 

= Further information can be found in the corporate FAQ document 


Staff who were shielding or are clinically vulnerable 

Shielding has been paused and those who are medically assessed as clinically 
vulnerable should complete a personal occupational risk assessment to determine 
whether the risk is low enough for them to return to the workplace with the appropriate 
mitigations in place. 


lf assessed as not able to return to the workplace then the employee will be provided 
with work to do at home and this situation will be reviewed on a regular basis. 


12 


2/ 


These staff may be involved in: 


"= Lesson planning 
= Interactive education delivery 
= Any other roles which can be done from home and as directed by the Head Teacher 


Staff who are required to self-isolate 
Information on staff who are required to self-isolate can be found in North Ayrshire 
Council's Corporate FAQ document 


Staff who are required to quarantine 
Information on staff who are required to quarantine can be found in North Ayrshire 
Council's Corporate FAQ document 


Staff who are absent due to childcare 

If a member of staff is absent because their child has Covid-19 or Covid-19 symptoms, 
they would be required to isolate as detailed in the FAQ document. If a member of 
staff is absent because their child is otherwise unwell, the usual special leave 
provisions for care of a dependant would apply. 


Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic Groups 
The concerns within Minority Ethnic communities must be recognised and individual 
requests for additional protections should be supported wherever possible. 


Head Teachers/Heads of Centre must have sensitive, supportive conversations with 
all Minority Ethnic staff, which consider their health, safety and psychological wellbeing 
and personal views and concerns about risk. Wellbeing support services should be 
promoted to all Minority Ethnic staff. 


Children who were shielding or are clinically vulnerable 
A small minority of children will fall into this category, and parents/carers should follow 
medical advice if their child is in this category. 


Where a child is identified as clinically vulnerable, schools will work with parents to 
ensure appropriate work and support can be provided. 


In Protection Levels 0 — 2, pupils with the highest clinical risk can continue to attend 
school/ELC and follow the advice to the general population. Enhanced measures 
apply to children and young people, at highest clinical risk in schools at Protection 
Level 3 and 4. 


3. Buildings 
Buildings 
North Ayrshire Council's Facilities Management Service is responsible for cleaning 


and the provision of cleaning resources in most schools in North Ayrshire. For Stanley 
Primary School, Arran High School, Greenwood Academy and St Matthew's Academy, 


13 


28 


this provision is undertaken by Mitie who are the Facility Managers under the PPP 
contract. 


The Education Service has worked closely with identified officers from these Services 
to ensure appropriate signage and hygiene facilities are provided in all establishments. 
This includes the provision of hand sanitiser and soap, in line with the risk 
assessments carried out in each building and school delivery plans developed by head 
teachers with guidance provided by Council officers through onsite visits to 
establishments. 


Utilisation of buildings 

As outlined above and during Phase 3 of the Scottish Government's Recovery 
Programme, all school buildings will be open for use. All schools must comply with 
their risk assessment, health and safety requirements and Scottish Government 
directions. 


It remains the responsibility of each education establishment leadership team to 
manage risk assessments for their context with support and guidance available 
centrally from Corporate Health & Safety and the Education Infrastructure team. 


Each education establishment was supported to prepare for the return of staff and 
pupils through a visit by Council Officers with specialist knowledge of the various 
service delivery areas. This included officers from Education Infrastructure, Facilities 
Management, Building Services, Property Management and Investment (PMI) and 
Health & Safety. 


Officers were able to offer support and advice for Head Teachers in completing a pro- 
forma planning document and risk assessment for their establishment. The document 
templates were approved centrally, to ensure fairness and consistency of approach 
across North Ayrshire. 


4. The “Covid-Ready” Capacities of Schools 


NAC officers have undertaken an exercise to establish the notional capacity of each 
space in each school, should the current advice on physical distancing change in the 
future. 


It is recognised however that no two schools are the same or operate in the same way. 
This will require each Head Teacher to consider the indicative capacity information 
provided to them and apply knowledge of their local factors. Head Teachers have 
been provided with layout plans showing the indicative capacity of spaces within their 
school. 


schools have been encouraged to utilise all available spaces within their buildings in 
order to provide suitable accommodation whilst observing current restrictions. 


14 


29 


5. Sector Advice Card 


This reference document was designed by Scottish Government to guide action to 
prevent the spread of Covid-19; to support workplace communications and training; 
and to describe the action to be taken in the event of an outbreak. Separate cards 


have been produced for various sectors of public life. The Sector Advice Card for 


schools is available through the NAC Glow Education Sharepoint site and covers the 
following topics: 


= Additional Information with associated links 

= Prevent and spread of Covid-19 in Schools 

= Workplace Communication — Schools 

= Actions in the Event of a Suspected Outbreak — Schools 


It is recommended that this document be displayed in schools. 


6. Schools 


Primary schools 

The local authority seeks to maximise the amount of in-school teaching time and this 
is reflected in school attendance models. Any changes to school operating times have 
been made to maximise class contact time and are aligned to local agreements on 
teacher contact. 


Facilities Management will provide an enhanced cleaning regime during the week. 
This will include additional hours for cleaning throughout the school day, with a focus 
on touch points such as handrails, door handles etc. 


All existing NCCT working agreements remain in place. Arrangements for part time, 
temporary and non-teaching staff will be managed by school leadership teams to 
ensure this meets the needs of the local context. 


For the early stage (P1-P2), schools may consider making use of ELC models of 
managing children’s interactions and other mitigations, where appropriate, particularly 
when adopting a play-based approach. 


ASN schools 

In recognition of the bespoke nature of ASN school provision and the need to 
safeguard the welfare and wellbeing of some of our most vulnerable children, bespoke 
plans are in place for each individual pupil. These take account of any updated risk 
assessment and will be coordinated by ASN school Head Teachers with support from 
the Education Senior Management Team and the ASN Campus Head Teacher. 


These risk assessments need to be reviewed regularly taking account of: 


= the minimum space required to ensure the required 2m physical distancing 
between adults who might be in a classroom 


15 


30 


= the mitigations which may require to be adopted according to the nature of activity 
being undertaken and individual pupil needs 

= the appropriate mitigations needed to address infection control and pupils needs 
to keep children, young people and staff safe 

= the risk associated with planned learning activities which require adults to be in 
close contact with each other and with pupils 

= the risks involved and the mitigations required to be in place for situations where 
adults require to be in close contact with each other and/or with pupils in order to 
provide support and intervene, e.g. in de-escalation procedures. 


Secondary schools 

secondary school Head Teachers have developed bespoke models for their school 
context and should continue to ensure decision making aligns with the guidance 
outlined in this document and school capacity information issued. A key consideration 
initially was the revision of the timetable to maximise teaching time for pupils with a 
focus on utilising technology to enable all learners to participate in learning at-home 
and in-school. 


Senior phase/SQA National Qualification Courses 

There will be no external assessment of National 5 courses this year and an alternative 
certification approach will be put in place based on teacher and lecturer judgement 
supported by continuous and specific assessment and robust quality assurance 
procedures. 


Higher and Advanced Higher exams are planned to start on Monday 10 May 2021 and 
finish on Friday 4 June 2021, with Results Day on Tuesday 10 August 2021. A clear 
contingency plan will require to be developed and there are key checkpoints in place 
up to the February break to allow the Scottish Government to assess public health 
advice and its impact on the plans for these exams. 


7. Early Learning & Childcare Settings 


Initial Scottish Government guidance was published on 21 Aug 2020 providing further 
information on how early learning & childcare provisions would operate safely on fully 
re-opening at the start of the new term. Throughout the summer period the Service 
continued to provide early learning and childcare provision for identified vulnerable 
children and children of key workers. 


New guidance for early learning and childcare settings was published on 30 October 
and included the following information. 


Cleaning in an early years setting must be completed at least daily or when groups of 
children change in preparation for a new group of children. Surfaces in dining and 
snack areas should be wiped down and disinfected between uses by each group. 


Facilities Management will provide an enhanced cleaning regime during the week. 


This will include additional hours for cleaning throughout the day, with a focus on touch 
points such as handrails, door handles etc. 


16 


31 


Soft furnishings, such as throws, should be used for individual children and washed 
after use. Where children have their own blankets, throws etc these should be stored 
in individually identified bags and laundered weekly as a minimum. 


Where possible parents should provide any outdoor clothing, which should be taken 
home each week for laundering. Children should not share clothing. 


Limiting Children’s Contacts 
Early years settings must consider how to limit contact. Consideration should be given 
to the following factors: 


= Children must be managed within identified consistent groups. 

= More than one group can use a large space, but groups should not mix. 

= The size of the group will depend on the age and overall number of children and 
the layout of the setting. 

= Large indoor groups should be avoided. 

= Groups should be no more than 33 children in one group with adult to child ratios 
in line with national care standards. 

= Children are not required to physically distance from each other. 

= Staff should work with the same groups. 

= Where possible, staff breaks should be managed to ensure groupings of staff do 
not mix. 

= Consideration should be given to moving all unnecessary items from the playroom 
setting to maximise capacity and decrease cleaning requirements. 


Outdoor Spaces: 

= If outdoor equipment is used, multiple groups must not use it simultaneously. 

= Appropriate cleaning time must be provided between each group. 

"= Staff should consider using other outdoor spaces, such as parks, woodland and 
beaches near to their setting whilst keeping groups away from other children or 
adults who are not part of the service. 


Physical Distancing: 

= Physical distancing between adults must be maintained at all times. This applies 
to staff, parents and any other adult who may attend the early years setting 
including external contractors and delivery personnel. 

= All staff rooms and offices should be set out in line with the detailed revised plans 
as supplied by PMI and maximum occupancy notices should be placed on doors. 


Use of Face Coverings in an Early Years Setting: (see section 2.1.1 Face 
Coverings for full detail) 


= Face coverings are not required when working directly with children, including on 
the floor or supporting children to move around the building, toileting or as a result 
of being less than 2 metres from children. 

= Adults must maintain a 2m distance from other adults. 

= Face coverings must be worn when adults cannot maintain a 2m physical distance 
from other adults including in all corridors and communal spaces. 

= These should also be worn when in all offices, admin areas and toilets unless an 
exemption applies. 


17 


32 


= Parents and visitors must wear a face covering in all areas of the school/ELC 
grounds — internal and external. 


Singing in an Early Years Setting 

The Advisory Sub-Group on Education and Children's Issues has concluded that 
singing in early years settings should not take place indoors. The Group recognises 
that children will sing naturally when playing and should not be discouraged from doing 
SO. 


Drop Off and Pick Up: 

= Consideration should be given to one-way systems for parents and children to 
access and leave the setting. 

= Parents should wear a face covering whilst on the grounds including in the car 
park. 


Staffing in an Early Years Setting: 
us It is recommended that staff, including supply staff, do not work across more than 
one setting in a day. 


Blended Placements: 

= Attendance by children in blended arrangements should be reduced as far as 
possible. 

= Parents and carers should be encouraged to limit the number of settings that their 
child attends. 

= Where a child attends more than one setting consideration must be given to 
sharing records across settings to assist with any Test and Protect process — 
records should be managed in a way which is consistent with GDPR. 


Student Placements 

The SQA is developing guidance on the HNC Childcare Practice to support providers 
with the challenges of delivering the placement elements of the qualification in this 
academic year. The guidance will highlight the need to develop contingency plans to 
allow students to undertake some practices through remote learning. Please see link 
below. 


Broad guidance on evidence gathering and estimation 


8. Curriculum 


In delivering the curriculum throughout the Recovery Phase, ELC, primary and 
secondary teachers and practitioners should consider the following key points: 


=" Setting out a clear statement of intent to prioritise the physical, mental and 
emotional wellbeing of children and young people, practitioners and families 

= Recognition that good health and wellbeing is fundamental to ensuring that children 
and young people can engage effectively in their learning. 

"= |n ELC, Realising the Ambition will continue to be utilised as a practice guide to 
support high quality delivery of learning and childcare in early learning settings. 


18 


33 


The Care Inspectorate document Operating an early learning and childcare setting 
(including out of school care and childminders) during COVID-19 will be used to 


support self-valuation activity particularly around the health and wellbeing of 
toddlers and young children. 

Using the Refreshed Narrative tor Curriculum for Excellence as a practical tool to 
support a curriculum rationale for the BGE and senior phase in the Recovery 
Phase. Periodic review of the curriculum rationale during the Recovery Phase will 
help to ensure the curriculum is shaped locally and takes account of children and 
their families’ circumstances. 

Maximising opportunities for communications and dialogue with children, young 
people and their families and continuing to build relationships and resilience. 
Benefits of play and outdoor learning will be factored into learning plans - including 
opportunities for learners to be physically active, to enjoy and learn about their 
natural environment, and to relax. 

Ensuring regular contact for children and young people with a key adult from the 
school who knows them well, to talk about their wellbeing; to share experiences 
during lockdown, including successes and challenges; to offer compassion and 
individual support as required; and to support engagement with learning. 

Ensuring regular access for learners to high quality activities through working with 
teachers and practitioners in educational settings and remote learning at home. 
Considering how engaging with partners in youth work, culture and sport may be 
able to enrich the offer available for children and young people outside school 
hours. Focusing on learning across literacy, numeracy and health and wellbeing 
will be the initial priority with increasing learning experiences across all four 
contexts of learning. Cross curricular linked themes can help learners’ experiences 
and activities across the BGE and senior phase. 

Young people in the senior phase may require tospend time in college 
environments. They should ensure that they follow the guidance on the appropriate 
approach to these specific circumstances whilst on campus. This has now been 


included within updated NAC guidance for school-college partnership 
arrangements Similar guidance has also been prepared for use with senior phase 


learners accessing NAC foundation apprenticeships and Advanced Highers 
through NAC consortium arrangements. These documents are also available on 
NAC Education Glow Coronavirus pages). 

schools have been advised that pupils should not attend work experience until 
further notice. 

Focusing on promoting and developing skills that will increase children and young 
people's abilities to learn remotely and identifying opportunities to develop future 
skills that will help equip them for the uncertainties of the future. 

Working with learners and their families in drawing together evidence of learning 
to begin to determine children's achievements together with their next steps in 
learning. The moderation cycle should be a helpful process to follow. 

Recognising that children and young people from disadvantaged backgrounds may 
have faced multiple barriers to learning over the period of the school closures. 
Applying the principle of equity, consider how to provide additional and appropriate 
support where it is most needed in order to maximise engagement with learning 
and continue the work to close the poverty related attainment gap. 


19 


34 


National E-Learning Offer to Support a Blended Approach to Learning 


Head Teachers and Heads of Centre must develop their contingency plans for 
providing education remotely for some children and young people or perhaps a full 
class, should they need to self-isolate for a period of time. 


e-Sgoil has developed a range of live interactive lessons for learners in the Broad 
General Education and the Senior Phase. 


A direct link to the offer can be found here http://esgoil.com/esgoilbgeoffer2020/ 


Head Teachers can register an individual or groups of pupils and children and discuss 
specific requests. Learners in the senior phase can currently register directly for the 
after-school hours online study support sessions. 


lf any Head Teacher or Head of Centre is interested in providing recorded content or 
live supported study for any part of the E-Learning National offer, please contact 


fionahopkins@north-ayrshire.gov.uk_ and she will take this forward with the local 


SWEIC implementation group which is developing an online offer. 


9. Physical Education 
Updated guidance for PE (V7 - 2/11/20) was introduced on 2 November 2020 and 


supersedes previous guidance issued. Schools must be aware of the current 
Protection Level in operation within North Ayrshire and make suitable arrangements 
for PE based on that Protection Level. Risk Assessments must be reviewed and 
updated to take account of any changes that may need to be made and ensure that 
all staff are aware of the updated arrangements. 


10. Changing Rooms 


The use of changing rooms should be avoided where possible - however consideration 
should be given to the needs of children and young people who require additional support. 


When considering the use of changing rooms, schools should ensure that they implement 
reasonable and proportionate control measures which reduce risk to the lowest reasonably 
practical level and have active arrangements in place to monitor that the controls are: 


= effective 
= working as planned 


" updated appropriately considering any issues identified and changes in public health 
advice. 


More detailed guidance can be found in the Education Scotland PE curricular guidance (V7 
- 2/11/20). 


20 


35 


11. Home Economics 


Updated guidance for Home Economics (V2 - 2/11/20) has been produced by 


Education Scotland. 


The guidance for HE follows the same principle as that developed for PE and should 
allow schools to review and amend their risk assessments and also includes 
suggestions to stimulate conversations about how Home Economics can be safely and 
effectively delivered, and these should be included in the Home Economics risk 
assessments. 


12. Music 


There is an increased risk of transmission of Covid-19 during instrumental and class 
music lessons (particularly when singing and playing wind instruments). This is 
because of the respiratory aerosols which are exhaled during these activities and the 
close proximity of participants. The wearing of face coverings is usually not possible 
for these activities. 


Education Scotland published new guidance on 30 October 2020 - Key Messages 
from the COVID-19 Sub-Group Advice on Music. 


A specific risk assessment should be in place to inform of the decisions and control 
measures taking account of the individual needs of those with additional support 
needs. 


The updated guidance for Music (V2 - 30/10/20) from Education Scotland will assist 


schools in determining a suitable approach to re-introducing music lessons. Any risk 
assessments associated with these activities must be reviewed, updated and shared 
with appropriate staff. Please see link below. 


opecific advice on singing in an early years setting can be found in Section 7 of this 
document. 


13. Art, Design and Photography 
Updated guidance for art & design and photography (V2 - 27/10/20) should be used 


by practitioners to support safe decision making and implementation of activities in this 
curricular area. 
14. Dance and Drama 


Updated guidance for dance (V3 - 4/11/20) and drama (V3.1 - 4/11/20) is available 


from Education Scotland to support the safe delivery of these subjects in the current 
context. 


21 


36 


Risk Assessments must be reviewed and updated to account for any changes that 
may need to be made and ensure that all staff are aware of the updated arrangements. 
These must be shared with staff. 


15. Science and Practical Work 


The Scottish Schools Education Research Centre (SSERC) published guidance on 
Science on 1% and 7^ September 2020. The most recent guidance is the SSERC 


guidance for practical work in science. 


Risk assessments should be reviewed and updated to reflect changes and shared with 
all staff. 


16. International Travel 


The Health Protection (Coronavirus) (International Travel) (Scotland) Regulations 
2020 require all those returning to Scotland from non-exempt countries to self-isolate 
at home or another appropriate location for 14 days. 


Those self-isolating should not go out to work or school or visit public areas. 


This point is covered on the sector advice card (see section 5) that should be displayed 
prominently in schools. The list of exempt countries is kept under constant review, and 
schools and local authorities should ensure they are familiar with the most up to date 
list. Head Teachers and Heads of Centres should ensure that arrangements are in 
place to identify and support children and young people who need to self-isolate 
including appropriate safeguarding measures. Directors of Public Health and local 
health protection teams are available to offer further support where there are concerns. 


httos://www.gov.scot/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-public-health-checks-at- 





borders/pages/overview/ 


17. School Trips including Overnight Stays 


The COVID-19 Advisory Sub-Group on Education and Children's issues has published 
advice on school trips which include an overnight stay. The guidance provides key 
messages when considering school trips: 


= Overall, the risks of transmission on a school trip which includes an overnight stay 
away from place of normal residence are greater than the potential benefits to 
children and young people. 

= Trips which include overnight stays should be introduced in an incremental 
manner. 

= Planning for such visits should not commence until later in the school year, when 
there will be greater understanding about the virus and viral transmission. Actions 
in different settings will have developed further in response to that learning. 


22 


3/ 


= Decisions to reinstate school trips including an overnight stay will be dependent on 
there being low levels of Covid-19 infection in the population and on systems being 
in place for close monitoring, rapid testing and tracing of suspected cases. 


https://www.gov.scot/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-advisory-sub-aroup-on- 
education-and-childrens-issues---advisory-note-on-school-trips-which-include-an- 








overnight-stay/ 


18. School Transport 


ochool transport will be provided for all eligible pupils with some changes to prevent 
the spread of Covid-19. 


All children and young people should wash their hands or use hand sanitiser before 
going on transport and then again when entering their destination. 


All pupils over the age of 5 are required to wear a face covering on school transport, 
unless they are unable to do so. A face covering should be provided by the parent / 
carer in the first instance and a small supply will be available onboard transport in the 
event a pupil is unable to source one in advance of the journey. 


ocottish Government guidance indicates that school transport should be seen as an 
extension of the school estate and as a result physical distancing between pupils is 
not required. On public transport pupils should maintain 2m physical distancing where 
possible from other passengers. 


Further information has been made available to parents, carers and pupils accessing 
school transport. Schools may encourage pupils to walk or cycle to school in keeping 
with the promotion of active travel. 


19. The School Day 


One of the main principles of the government strategy for schools returning has been 
to minimise the interaction of individuals in the school building in order to reduce the 
risk of contamination. 


This may lead to Head Teachers deciding that an effective way to manage this aspect 
of the requirements at peak times, is to arrange a phased approach to the school day 
and activities. This could mean a staggered start and end to the school day, as well 
as staggered breaks during the day: 


= Secondary school Head Teachers should consider timetable structures which 
minimise movement around the school where possible. This may include 
consideration being given to teachers moving to pupil groups, rather than vice- 
versa. 

= Where facilities and weather allow, staff should consider using outdoor spaces for 
learning. 

= School assemblies should not take place until further notice. 


23 


38 


20. Pupil Drop Off/Pick Up Arrangements 


schools and ELC settings have developed bespoke plans which suit their specific 
context whilst adhering to physical distancing advice. These have been communicated 
to all parents/carers. 


Restrictions are currently in place for parent/carer/visitor access to school grounds and 
buildings. The specific arrangements may vary from school to school and these have 
been clearly communicated to parents/carers by the HT or HoC, as well as being 
clearly signposted in the school grounds. 


Where staggered times are introduced, parents should attend as close to the 
appointed drop/off pick-up time as possible. Parents will be asked NOT to congregate 
at the school gates. The advice on the use of face coverings in education settings 
within each Protection level is slightly different. Please see Section 2.1.1 Face 
Coverings. 


Any protocol developed at school level should consider the following key aspects: 


= Children and young people should be regularly reminded of the required 
behaviours at drop off/pick up time. 

= Staff will welcome their group at the designated entrance and then lead them to 
handwashing facilities prior to entering the classroom. 


21. Breakfast Clubs 


Any school operating a Breakfast Club or wishing to start a Breakfast Club should refer 
to the guidance from Food Standards Scotland. The guidance from Food Standards 
scotland provides a risk assessment toolkit and checklist which should be followed by 
the school. The risk assessment and checklist can be found using the link below. 


https ://www.foodstandards.gov.scot/publications-and-research/publications/covid-19- 
guidance-for-food-business-operators-and-their-employees 


https ://www.foodstandards.gov.scot/downloads/COVID-19 - 
Risk Assessment Tool for Re- 


starting Food Business Operations During COVID-19.paf 


https://www.foodstandards.gov.scot/downloads/FSS COVID- 
19 summary checklist for restarting food businesses.pdf 


In the circumstances where a school has a breakfast club which is organised by the 


third sector, parents and carers or volunteers, the guidance on unregulated children’s 
services will apply. 


https ://www.gov.scot/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-organised-activities-for- 
children/ 


24 


39 


22. Visitor Arrangements 


Other than deliveries and the attendance of peripatetic staff, (which may include 
Building Maintenance operatives on essential business) all other visitors to schools 
should be discouraged at this current time. The only exception to this is in an 
emergency situation where a parent/carer is required to be physically present in school 
to support their child. Otherwise, alternative communication methods should be used. 
In the exceptional circumstances where a visit must take place, then the following 
procedures must be followed: 


= Visit must be pre-arranged, unless in response to an emergency situation 

= Staff should take responsibility to complete the Visitor Book on behalf of the visitor 

= No plastic visitor ID badges/lanyards should be used. Schools should source a 
single use alternative 

= At Protection Level 3 and above all visitors must wear a face covering on entering 
the school grounds and continue to wear it for the duration of their visit. The 
covering must not be removed until they have left the school grounds. 

= All visitors to wash/sanitise their hands, on entry to the building 

= Visitors should minimise their movement around the school and physical distancing 
rules should be adhered to. 


23. Movement Between Schools 


Movement between schools (e.g. of temporary/supply/peripatetic staff etc) should be 
kept to a minimum, until further notice. This includes attendance at school such as 
visiting and supply teachers, psychologists, nurses, social workers and those providing 
therapeutic support. 


Head Teachers are required to check that supply staff are not already employed in 
another school on the day supply work is needed, prior to confirming any offer for 
supply work. Supply staff should only attend one school per day. 


With regard to movement of NCCT teachers between classes and across settings, this 
is permitted but should be minimised wherever possible. Schools should be 
encouraged to follow SNCT and LNCT guidance on how flexibility of time over a 2- or 
4-week period may help to reduce movement of staff across classes. 


In recognising the importance of providing support for children and young peoples’ 
specific health and wellbeing needs, the professionals working with them should make 
every effort to maintain communication with them and provide support to them by using 
lower risk methods, such as digital/virtual means or outdoor settings. 


This does not mean that none of these services and supports can be provided in the 


school setting however the management of visitors to schools requires careful risk 
assessment in order to prevent transmission of the virus within and between schools. 


25 


40 


24. Staff/Pupil Movement 


Although it is envisaged that pupil groups will stay in their classes wherever possible, 
there are times (break times, practical classes, end of the school day) when some 
degree of movement around the school is unavoidable. 


All primary staff and pupils and staff in secondary schools are required to wear a face 
covering, in common areas and school corridors. In Protection Levels 3 and 4 pupils 
in S4 — S6 are required to wear face coverings in classrooms. 


Strategies which may be employed to address movement around the schools are as 
follows: 


Introduction of a one-way system to school buildings where possible 

Stagger pupil access to corridors 

Use any external doors in classrooms for pupil access/egress to avoid corridors 

In secondary schools, consider removing the period change bell and establishing 

a Staggered arrangement to release pupils into circulation spaces at slightly 

different times 

= Careful management of toilet spaces will be required. 

= Fire and Emergency procedures will require to be reviewed in light of any changes 
which are introduced 

= Fire Drills must now be reinstated, and educational establishments must implement 
plans to test their procedures. . 

" As physical distancing cannot be maintained during an evacuation, all employees, 
senior phase pupils and visitors MUST wear a face covering throughout. Physical 
distancing is still required at Fire Muster points between all adults unless space 
restrictions prohibit this. 

= Any child or young person with a Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan (PEEP) 
must have it reviewed by the school or early years setting to ensure it complies 
with all requirements. 

"= Any changes to building layout or pupil /child movement rules must be clearly 

communicated to all parties and supported by clear signage. 


25. Teaching Spaces 


Guidance on the use of face coverings in teaching spaces can be found in section 
2.1.1 


Physical distancing between staff and pupils should be complied with where possible. 
Class layouts have been reviewed in accordance with physical distancing criteria. The 
capacity of a space may be affected by the type and portability of the furniture, the 
prevalence of fixed furniture and equipment, and any specific needs of the staff or 
pupils who will occupy the space. 


Where possible learners should sit at the same desk when they are in the same class. 


In secondary schools, where possible, pupils are encouraged to sit side by side and 
facing forwards, rather than face to face. 


26 


41 


26. Outdoor Spaces 


Outdoor space should be used where it is possible and practical, to enhance the 
learning experience. Where different groups propose to use outdoor spaces, some co- 
ordination between staff will be required to minimise interaction between groups. 


27. Break and Lunch Times 


Pupils should be encouraged to sit with their own learner group where possible and 
interaction outwith that group should be minimised. 


Maintaining physical distancing at break times is not necessary between pupils, but 
there are a few actions which staff should consider which may assist: 


Promote the use of playgrounds 

Be flexible with timings 

In a Dining Hall, seating should be considered carefully. 

As always, effective supervision, both within buildings and playgrounds will be 
required. 

= Dining tables, chairs and touch points must be wiped down between sittings 

= Outdoor equipment should only be used in playgrounds where mitigations are in 
place and if staff are able to ensure that it is cleaned between groups of children 
and young people using it. 


Face coverings should be worn as advised in section 2.1.1 Face Coverings. 


Schools must ensure that free drinking water is available to children and young people 
throughout the day and schools are expected to continue to meet this duty whilst taking 
account of the latest health protection advice. Water dispensers were inspected by 
PMI and cleaned by FM prior to the schools opening. 


28. Staff Areas 


Physical distancing applies within staff areas of the school. Head Teachers will know 
the capacity of all staff rooms and staff bases and should plan to ensure that these 
maximum numbers are not exceeded. 


Face coverings will be worn as detailed in section 2.1.1 Face Coverings 

Staff should only use their own cutlery, cup etc and should thoroughly clean these 
items immediately after use. Staff should not prepare refreshments for other members 
of staff. 

school Offices and other staff work areas may be limited in terms of the number of 


staff who are permitted to work at any one time. Schools should consider additional 
areas which can be used for administrative work. Offices should be set out as per 


2/ 


42 


the revised maximum capacity with the required physical distancing as identified by 
PMI. 


29. Hygiene 


As handwashing with soap and water for 20 seconds is the most effective method of 
reducing the transmission of Covid-19 from person to person, schools should ensure 
that there is a regular and robust system of handwashing in place for all occupants of 
the building, staff and pupils. 


Early Years Settings 

The new Practical Guidance for Reducing the Risks from Covid-19 in Early Years 
settings published on 30 October 2020 states that hand washing with soap and water 
is most effective method for hand hygiene practices. Where no running water is 
available then hand wipes can be used. Antibacterial hand gel is not recommended 
for early years children. 


All Other School Settings 

The Facilities Management team will continue to ensure appropriate levels of 
equipment and cleaning materials are available. Enhanced cleaning procedures for 
schools are in place and it is essential that all practices in schools reflect the 
importance of rigorous cleaning and hygiene arrangements: 


= All children and adults entering and leaving the building should adhere to 
government handwashing and face covering advice. Staff will continue to reinforce 
and educate children on the requirement to maintain effective hand hygiene 
practices prior to arriving at school and throughout the day. 

= Ensure that sufficient handwashing facilities are available. Where a sink is not 
nearby, Facilities Management have provided hand sanitiser at entrances to the 
building, in classrooms and other areas within the school. 

us Facilities Management staff will engage in daily cleaning of all areas in schools. 
There is also a social responsibility upon staff and pupils to ensure surfaces and 
resources are clean for learners to use. Antibacterial wipes or antibacterial spray 
and paper towels must be available in all classrooms. 

" Additional cleaning of toilets will take place as part of the overall cleaning regime 
within schools. Clear signage will be displayed in toilet areas regarding 
handwashing and use of appropriate hand drying equipment. 

= If children and young people are moving between classes, consideration should be 
given to the Protection Level within North Ayrshire Council for guidance on wearing 
face coverings as well as ensuring sufficient cleaning materials are provided to 
enable them to wipe down their desk/chair/surfaces before leaving the room. 

= Toothbrushing can continue where there are adequate facilities to do so. Updated 
guidance is available from Childsmile. Please see link below. 


Childsmile National Standards for Nursery and School Toothbrushing Programmes 


28 


43 


Ensure that all children and adults: 


Frequently wash their hands with soap and water for 20 seconds and dry 
thoroughly. 

Clean their hands on arrival at the school, before and after eating, and after 
sneezing or coughing. 

Follow the guidance on the use of PPE 

Avoid touching people, surfaces and objects and are advised to cover their mouth 
and nose with a disposable tissue when they cough or sneeze, and then put the 
tissue in the bin. 

If symptomatic, be asked to wear a face covering to reduce the risk of virus 
transmission to hard surfaces via airborne droplets where this can be tolerated. 
Support children and young people who have trouble cleaning their hands 
independently. 

Consider how to encourage children to learn and practise these habits through 
regular reminders and signage. Games and repetition may be used to support 
younger children. 

Have access to bins that have a bin liner in place for tissues and other waste which 
are collected and emptied throughout the day. 

Prop doors open, where safe to do so (bearing in mind fire safety and 
safeguarding), to limit use of door handles and aid ventilation. 

Have availability of anti-bacterial wipes or spray to clean surfaces, chairs etc within 
their classrooms. 


30. Equipment and Resources 


Equipment and resources in schools and ELC settings will be more limited in the 
Covid-19 ready environment. Some are hard to clean; some are not essential. Schools 
and ELCs must give thought to equipment and resources, to ensure that only items 
which are necessary and can be effectively cleaned, are utilised. 


Where available storage can be identified, all unnecessary items should be removed 
from classrooms or playrooms. This minimises cleaning requirements and permits the 
Staff to clean more areas more thoroughly. 


The use of shared resources by learners should be minimised. Factors to consider in 
planning for this are as follows: 


Staff handling jotters and other equipment should follow the recommended hand 
washing regime using soap and warm water/use of alcohol-based hand sanitiser. 
This should be undertaken before and after handling jotters (or other pieces of 
equipment). This mitigates the need for quarantining items for 72 hours before, and 
72 hours after. Staff should also avoid touching their mouth, nose and eye area. 
Children should be discouraged from bringing toys from home. If this is not possible 
the items should not be shared with other children. 

Careful consideration may need to be given to introducing a quarantine system of 
72 hours for books in the event of an outbreak, taking account of the risk of 
transmission against the impact on teaching and learning. 

As far as possible, provide stationery for individual children and young people to 
reduce the number of shared rulers, pencils etc 


29 


44 


= Ensure that items which are unavoidably shared within learner groups are cleaned 
before and after use 

= Consider any specialist areas of schools which may require extremely thorough 
cleaning (e.g. Sensory spaces, soft play areas etc) and carefully consider how/if 
these spaces can be used and the regime required if they are to be used. 

= Play equipment should be cleaned regularly throughout the day and especially 
between different groups. Where items cannot be cleaned, these should be 
removed from use. 

= Modelling clay and similar materials should not be used as they cannot be cleaned. 


31. School Uniform 


In order to facilitate regular laundering of clothes worn to school, Head Teachers 
should review and revise, as appropriate, their school uniform policy, including 
consideration of a temporary relaxation of the policy for the duration of the Covid-19 
arrangements. 

Any change in policy requires to be communicated to all parties at the earliest 
possible opportunity. 


32. Health and Safety Matters 


There will be some occasions where staff involved in the delivery of early learning and 
childcare and education within schools, will not be able to maintain the 2m physical 
distancing criteria. Where adults cannot keep 2m distance and are interacting face-to- 
face for a sustained period (about 15 minutes or more) with other adults and/or children 
and young people, face coverings must be worn. 


Any proposed use of PPE must be subject to a risk assessment and be in full 
accordance with the relevant health and safety or workplace legislation, pertinent to 
the particular setting in which it will be used. 


A supply of PPE has been made available for all education staff. In addition, a process 
for replenishing PPE stocks across all establishments has been established and 
communicated. 


Emergency Evacuations 
oee section 24 for advice on emergency evacuations and fire drills. 


33. Risk Assessments 
A key aspect of NAC's planning for the return of schools is the compilation of a generic 
Covid-19 Building Risk Assessment reference document for use across all 


establishments. This will enable Head Teachers and Heads of Centres to produce 
their own specific Covid-19 risk assessment. 


30 


45 


The generic Covid-19 Building Risk Assessment contains the identification of specific 
Covid-19 hazards and the relevant controls to reduce the risk of virus transmission. 
Head Teachers or Head of Centres have been supported in the completion of this by 
Corporate Health & Safety, Property Management and Investment and Facilities 
Management and the Trade Unions, in advance of establishments opening for staff 
and pupils. Additionally, in North Ayrshire all Head Teachers have been provided with 
a full information pack of supporting documents to assist in the operation of the schools 
during the pandemic. 


Whilst the risk assessment document is generic and prompts the thought process on 
several issues, it cannot cover all circumstances in all schools. Pre-existing risk 
assessments, which are held by schools for specific activities, must be reviewed and 
revised at school level, to suit their specific circumstances and must include controls 
relating to Covid-19. 


Establishment risk assessments must be shared with all staff and faculty risk 
assessments must be shared and made available to all staff within the faculty. Staff 
should be involved in the risk assessment review process. Staff must also sign to 
acknowledge that they have read and understood the content of the appropriate risk 
assessment. 


Children, young people and staff with complex needs or underlying health conditions 
should already have an individual risk assessment and it is essential that all individual 
risk assessments are now reviewed to consider Covid-19 risk factors. These reviews 
should be carried out by relevant staff as soon as possible, and as appropriate, in 
order to highlight any issues which will require to be implemented. 


34. PPE 


Health Protection Scotland advise that staff should only use PPE in accordance with 
health and safety policies and risk assessments — i.e. not on an informal, precautionary 
basis. Staff should only wear PPE when it is appropriate to the task they are 
undertaking, unless the task is identified as one where there is an elevated risk of 
transfer of infection through respiratory secretions. 


scottish Government's guidance highlights the types of PPE required in specific 
circumstances which are set out below: 


= Suspected Covid-19: A fluid-resistant surgical mask should be worn by staff if 
they are looking after a child or young person who has become unwell with 
symptoms of Covid-19 and 2m distancing cannot be maintained whilst so doing. If 
the child or young person who has become unwell with symptoms of Covid-19 
needs direct personal care, gloves, aprons and a fluid-resistant surgical mask 
should be worn by staff. If the affected person has mild symptoms and is over the 
age of 16, and can do so, they should go home as soon as they notice symptoms 
and follow the guidance for households with possible coronavirus infection 
including testing and self-isolation. If the individual affected is a child or young 
person below the age of 16 (or otherwise unable to travel by themselves), 


31 


46 


parents/carers should be contacted and asked to make arrangements to pick up 
the child or young person from school. 

= Fluid-resistant surgical coverings and eye protection should be worn if a risk 
assessment determines that there is a risk of splashing to the eyes such as from 
coughing, spitting, or vomiting. 

"= Intimate care: Gloves and aprons should continue to be used when providing 
intimate care to a child or young person. This can include personal, hands-on care 
such as washing, toileting, or first aid and certain clinical procedures such as 
assisted feeding. 

" The wearing of face visors can also be considered when providing intimate care in 
addition to a fluid-resistant surgical mask. The risk assessment should identify the 
requirement for this. 

= Gloves and aprons should be used when cleaning the areas where a person 
suspected of having Covid-19 has been. 

= Gloves and aprons should be used when cleaning equipment or surfaces that 
might be contaminated with body fluids such as saliva or respiratory secretions. 


Having adhered to the legislation and having undertaken a risk assessment, where 
PPE is required in an education setting, staff should be familiar with how to use the 
PPE correctly. Anyone requiring advice on its use should contact colleagues within 
Corporate Health and Safety for further advice and training. It should be noted that 
where a risk assessment has identified the need to wear a face mask, such as an FFP3 
type face mask, then these require face fitting tests to be carried out by a competent 
tester before they can be used. 


35. Ventilation and Temperature 


There is a need for an appropriate supply of fresh air to assist with minimising the risk 
of infection. However, there is also a need to maintain indoor temperatures for reasons 
including user comfort, health and wellbeing, and learning and teaching. 


schools should ensure that risk assessments are updated appropriately for the 
autumn/winter period, in consultation with corporate services including PMI, staff, 
trade unions and (where applicable) PPP providers, to consider issues around 
ventilation and heating/warmth that are relevant to their specific environments. 


Where applicable, ventilation systems (including air conditioners and hot air heating 
systems) have been checked or adjusted to ensure they do not pose a risk to the 
spread of the virus. Where possible, all spaces should be well ventilated regularly 
using natural ventilation (opening windows) or ventilation units. 


Where it is not possible to keep doors and windows open, and centralised or local 
mechanical ventilation is present, systems should wherever possible be adjusted to 
full fresh air. The local authority will support schools to adopt strategies to balance the 
need for ventilation whilst ensuring that children, young people and staff are warm. All 
systems have been adjusted by PMI to meet these requirements. 


The primary effective method of increasing natural ventilation remains the opening of 
external doors, vents and windows. Wherever it is practical, safe and secure to do so, 


32 


4 


and appropriate internal temperatures can be maintained in line with statutory 
Obligations, this approach should be adopted. Keeping doors open (again, with 
appropriate regard to safety and security) may also help to reduce contact with door 
handles. 


Internal fire doors should never be wedged open (unless assessed and provided 
with appropriate hold open and self-closing mechanisms which respond to the 
actuation of the fire alarm system). 


It is recognised that in the autumn and winter, schools are unlikely to be able to keep 
external doors and windows open as often, or for as long, as in warmer weather 
periods. 


Potential approaches may include: 


Ventilation 

= Partially opening doors and windows to provide ventilation while reducing draughts. 

= Opening high level windows in preference to low level to reduce draughts. 

= Purging spaces by opening windows, vents and external doors (e.g., between 
classes, during break and lunch, when a room is unused, or at other suitable 
intervals if a space Is occupied for long periods at a time) 


Temperature 

= Providing flexibility in permissible clothing while indoors. 

= Designing seating plans to reflect individual student/staff temperature preferences. 

= Adjusting indoor heating to compensate for cold air flow from outside (e.g., higher 
System settings, increased duration) 


Schools should be mindful of the impacts of poverty on a family's ability to provide 
suitable and additional clothing. Many schools already support families in these 
instances and should continue to do so. Families can also be directed to their 
community Locality Hub via the contact centre. 


some staff may also be unable to access appropriate clothing and schools/centres 
should ensure they provide warm and waterproof clothing for those who do not have 
it to allow them to deliver the curriculum. 


Mechanical Ventilation 

Internal air recirculation should be avoided or minimised. If this is not possible whilst 
maintaining appropriate internal conditions, systems should be operated to achieve 
statutory requirements as a minimum. Where these systems are fitted in schools and 
can be adjusted in line with guidance, this has already been undertaken. 


Local Exhaust Ventilation and Fume Cupboards 


LEVs WITH EXTERNAL EXHAUST 

Where LEV systems vent through an external exhaust system, they can be used as 
normal. The operator must wear a face covering as would be required in most cases 
of operating technical equipment served by an LEV. If there is any doubt over exhaust 
arrangements the equipment should not be used. 


33 


48 


LEVs VENTING TO INTERNALSPACES. 

Although these LEVs are fitted with filters, the efficacy of the filters in inhibiting viruses 
is unknown. Whilst current guidance suggests that virus transmission via these units 
is “low risk”, more work is required to assess the appropriate control measures 
required to allow these units to be operated safely. This type of unit must not be used 
at present. 


Fume Cupboards 


FUME CUPBOARDS WITH EXTERNAL EXHAUST 

Where fume cupboards vent through an external exhaust system, they can be used 
as normal. The operator must wear a face covering as would be required in most cases 
of operating technical equipment served by an LEV. If there is any doubt over exhaust 
arrangements the equipment should not be used. 


FUME CUPBOARDS VENTING TO INTERNAL SPACES. 

Although these fume cupboards are fitted with filters, the efficacy of the filters in 
inhibiting viruses is unknown. This may present a risk of recirculating any airborne 
viruses within the spaces. This type of unit must not be used 


36. Process for Responding to Confirmed Cases 


Revised processes for (a) Display of Symptoms and (b) for responding to a confirmed 
case of Covid -19 have been produced and included within this section. 


lf a symptomatic person tests positive for COVID-19 the Government guidelines for 
self-isolation must be adhered to and the person cannot return to the establishment 
until their isolation period is over and they are well enough to return and have been 
fever-free for 48 hours without the use of medication. Any household members should 
remain in isolation for 14 days from symptom onset in the symptomatic person, even 
if they don't have symptoms themselves. 


The NHS Scotland test and protect arrangements will be automatically initiated 
following a positive test and contact tracing will be carried out. Individuals identified 
through the contact tracing process will be advised to self-isolate as close contact of 
the confirmed case and must continue to isolate for 14 days from the last exposure to 
the case even if they have a negative test result. (see Section 37 Test and Protect) 


An outbreak is defined as a school having two or more confirmed cases of Covid-19 
within 14 days and the normal reporting procedures should be followed when dealing 
with an outbreak. Public Health Scotland will be notified if there is either a single 
confirmed (test positive) case of Covid-19 or any suspicion that there may be an 
outbreak of cases in a setting so they can assess the situation and offer advice. 


Schools will be expected to work closely with their Head of Service/senior manager 


and local HPT to resolve the situation. COSLA and Public Health Scotland are 
currently developing a national protocol for managing cases and outbreaks in schools 


34 


49 


however North Ayrshire’s education service and the Public Health Team in NHS 
Ayrshire and Arran already have an agreed protocol in place. 


In some instances, the Health Protection Team will recommend that an Incident 
Management Team (IMT) is created. The IMT will discuss and agree actions and 
additional measures to deal with the specific situation faced in a 
school/centre/location. 


For schools/centres this may include: 


= reviewing risk assessments 

= reviewing if there is compliance with existing guidance, 

" greater use of face coverings, 

= reviewing and reducing higher risk activities, and/or a move to remote learning. 
schools will be able to register their symptomatic staff as category 3 key workers under 
the employer referral portal, to ensure priority access to testing. The nature of this 
portal is to prioritise tests and appointments over the general public. This route directs 
individuals through to a Regional Test Centre or Mobile Testing Unit (whichever is 
nearer). For those who cannot access an RTC/MTU (if they do not have access to a 
car or live too far away), they can order a home test kit. 


3/. Test and Protect 


This strategy is being implemented across Scotland's Health Boards and is vital in 
the fight to keep transmission rates as low as possible. Schools should ensure that 
they are familiar with the requirements of the process. 


At this time, no staff or pupils will be subject to temperature checks within schools. 
Individuals and their families, in all cases, should remain vigilant in respect of high 
temperatures and other common symptoms of the virus. 


Full support will be provided for anyone exhibiting symptoms or anyone having been 
contacted by the Test and Trace Contact Team, as having been in close proximity to 
someone with the virus. 


Everyone who develops symptoms of Covid-19 — a new, continuous cough; fever or 
loss of, or change in, sense of smell or taste - should self- isolate straight away, stay 
at home and arrange a test via the appropriate method. See Appendix 6 — Positive 
Case Flowchart. 


People who live in the same household as a person with symptoms should also self- 
isolate straight away and stay at home. Only those developing symptoms should be 
tested. [here is no need for other members of the household to have a test, unless 
they are also symptomatic. 


If the test result for the symptomatic person is negative, and they are not already 
isolating as a ‘close contact of a confirmed case, they can end isolation and return to 


35 


90 


work or school when they are well enough and have not had a fever for 48 hours 
assuming also that they are not quarantining for foreign travel reasons. The rest of 
their household can end isolation straight away. 


school staff who opt to undertake asymptomatic testing do not need to self-isolate 
while awaiting results. If the test is positive, the symptomatic person must remain in 
isolation until 10 days from symptom onset, or longer if symptoms persist. They must 
otherwise be well and remain fever-free for 48 hours without medication. The rest of 
the household should remain in isolation for 14 days from symptom onset in the 
symptomatic person, even if they don't have symptoms themselves. 


Everyone who tests positive for Covid-19 will be put in touch with the local contact 
tracing team so that other close contacts can be identified. All close contacts who are 
in the same household as confirmed cases will be asked by Test and Protect to self- 
isolate for 14 days from symptom onset in the symptomatic person. Contacts from 
outside the household of the confirmed case will be asked to self-isolate at home for 
14 days from the date of last exposure to the case. 


Everyone who has been asked to self-isolate by Test and Protect as close contacts of 
confirmed cases must continue to self-isolate for 14 days, even if they have a negative 
test result. 


Unless otherwise advised by Test and Protect or local Incident Management Teams, 
where children, young people or staff do not have symptoms but are self-isolating as 
a close contact of person who is a confirmed case, other people in their household will 
not be asked to self-isolate along with them. However, it may not be possible for some, 
or all, of the other family members to remain distant from the self-isolating person in 
the household and on in these instances specific advice will be provided to the families 
by Test and Protect. 


Children, young people and staff can book a test through www.nhsinform.scot, the 
employer referral portal (for staff only — see below) or, if they cannot get online, by 
calling 0800 028 2816. 


Where a test result has come back as inconclusive it must be assumed that it is a 
positive case and the advised procedures for self-isolation must be followed. 


ochools should contact the local health protection team for advice if they have two or 
more cases (staff or students) or an increased rate of background illness. Public 
Health can be contacted on 01292 885 882. 


ochools should also maintain an accurate register of absences of children and staff 
and whether these are due to possible or confirmed Covid-19. The absence codes 
issued by SEEMIS previously should continue to be used for children and young 
people with weekly reporting for staff. See Appendix 7 for SEEMIS Codes. 


36 


91 


38. Intimate and Personal Care 


some children and young people may require the provision of intimate care, which can 
encompass personal care and may also apply to certain invasive medical procedures, 
such as assisted feeding. 


In the circumstances described above, staff need to increase their level of self- 
protection, such as considering whether it is possible to complete duties differently to 
minimise close contact and increased cleaning of frequently touched surfaces and 
carrying out more frequent handwashing. Handwashing should always be practised 
before and after the use of PPE. 


Staff carrying out intimate care should wear an apron, gloves, protective eye wear and 
a fluid resistant face covering unless a risk assessment has identified that additional 
PPE must be used. 


Staff who are supporting children and young people with complex needs will need to 
follow Health Protection Scotland guidance. This guidance provides details about the 
use of additional PPE required if undertaking an Aerosol Generating Procedure (AGP), 
such as suctioning. 


Staff should have access to disposable single use gloves for spillage of blood or other 
body fluids and disposing of dressings or equipment. Local infection control 
procedures that outline safety and protocols should be stringently followed. This 
includes procedures for the disposal of soiled items; laundering of any clothes, towels 
or linen; and cleaning equipment for children and young people, such as hoists and 
wheelchairs. 


Hand hygiene is essential before and after all contact with the child or young person, 
before putting on PPE, after removal of PPE and after cleaning equipment and the 
environment. Hands should be washed with soap and water. 


Alcohol-based hand rub can be used if hands are not visibly dirty or soiled. Alcohol 
based hand rub stocks should not be stock-piled. Washing effectively with soap and 
water is sufficient. 


39. Staffing 


The availability of staff to support the ongoing delivery of teaching and learning will 
significantly impact on the arrangements possible within each school. 


Staff, including supply staff, should not work in more than one establishment on a 
single day. 


Staff who were previously in the shielding or clinically vulnerable groups should be 


able to return to the workplace following an individual risk assessment to assess their 
risk and ensure appropriate mitigation measures are in place. 


37 


52 


The Protection Levels may have a further impact on this. Head Teachers and Heads 
of Centres need to be aware of the Protection Level for North Ayrshire when 
considering staffing levels and attendance. 


In Protection Levels 0 — 2, staff with the highest clinical risk can continue to work, 
following a dynamic risk assessment. Arrangements should be made to enable 
appropriate physical distancing staying 2m away from others, wherever possible, in 
line with current advice on maintaining a safe school environment. If they must spend 
time within 2 metres of other people, they should wear a face covering. 


Enhanced measures apply to children and young people and staff at highest clinical 
risk in schools at Protection Levels 3 and 4. 


The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists are advising that the risk of 
exposure to expectant mothers (particularly if they are in the third trimester) should be 
kept as low as Is practically possible. It is a legal requirement to undertake a new and 
expectant mother risk assessment. This assessment must include Covid-19 as an 
identified hazard. 


It is recognised that for a small number of employees, the outcome of their individual 
occupational assessment will be that they are in the Covid-19 high risk category and 
should not return to the workplace. In these circumstances, arrangements should be 
made for staff to carry out work at home and to keep this under regular review. 
Occupational Health may need to be consulted in this process. 


The availability of staff may also be adversely impacted by absence of employees who 
have Covid-19 or other illness or are required to self-isolate due to household Covid- 
19 or advice of Test & Protect contact tracers. 


To mitigate against the impact of absence and to support education recovery for 
children and young people, additional teaching staff have been engaged. These 
teachers will be deployed across schools as required, to support education recovery 
and the ongoing delivery of teaching and learning. In addition, teachers employed in 
central Scottish Attainment Challenge posts (such as the Professional Learning 
Academy) will be available to support schools who are experiencing a higher level of 
staff absence. 


Arrangements to support groups or classes during periods of staff absence should be 
considered. This will involve identification of staff available to provide cover for a group 
or potentially, where no alternative exists, changes to the attendance pattern for 
specific classes or groups. 


As far as practically possible, the same staff should work with the same group or class 


each time they are in school. Significant issues in relation to staff absence should be 
discussed with the central Staffing Team and the school/centre’s link Senior Manager. 


38 


53 


40. Communication 


It is essential that in such unusual circumstances, we ensure that all communications 
are carefully considered, concise and well-timed. It is key that all stakeholders are fully 
aware of arrangements. 


The Education Recovery Board has established a Communication Plan which will 
coordinate key decisions and information to stakeholders including school leadership 
teams, parents / carers, pupils, North Ayrshire residents and Elected Members. Key 
messages for public communication will be provided by the 6 recovery workstreams. 


The Education Service recognises as recovery planning progresses. Head Teachers 
are likely to have many questions which will inform school decision making. In primary 
schools any queries are being directed through the school cluster representative on 
the recovery workstream and the Senior Manager linked to the cluster. 


In Secondary schools any queries are being directed to the Senior Manager 
associated with the cluster and the workstream lead. 


41. Communication with Children 


Head Teachers and Heads of Centres should consider the most effective way to 
engage with their learners to ensure that children and young people are fully informed 
and have adequate opportunity to raise questions about any of the new arrangements. 


42. Parents and Carers 


Naturally, parents will be concerned about the health and wellbeing of their children in 
the context of a Covid-ready education setting. They will want to know what measures 
are in place to reduce the risk of virus transmission. The education service and schools 
will regularly communicate with parents and carers, both generally and at Parent 
Council level. 


schools and ELC may wish to use information from, or direct parents to, the following 


resources, all of which provide excellent information on Covid-19, from a parental 
perspective: 


= Parent Club’s dedicated Covid-19 web pages, 
= National Parent Forum 


= Parentzone Scotland websites and other sources 
43. Contingency Arrangements 
The local authority recognises the importance in remaining vigilant and responsive to 


Covid-19 in order to minimise the risk to children, young people, staff and local 


39 


o4 


communities. As a result, plans have been drawn up for a number of contingency 
scenarios in the event of multiple confirmed Covid-19 cases (an outbreak). 


The situation is assessed on a case-by-case basis and decisions made in partnership 
with Public Health Scotland and Local Response Teams. 


Please note the list below is not exhaustive and is subject to change depending on 
local circumstances and national guidance. 


NATURE OF 
DISRUPTION 


Authority wide closure of 
schools and early years 

provision in response to 

an authority outbreak 


Whole school or early 
years centre closure as a 
result of a localised 
outbreak 


school or early years 
class required to self- 
isolate as a result of an 
outbreak 


Blended learning 
contingency plans are to 
be implemented (if 


CURRENT HIGH-LEVEL PLANS 


All schools will implement remote learning with all pupils and 
staff at home. Pupils can access online learning and/or paper 
learning packs provided by class teachers. Additional devices 
have been provided for pupils without access to digital learning 
at home. Schools will primarily use VSCENE for online learning 
through video conferencing. 


ELC settings will continue to provide online learning 
experiences such as storytelling, outdoor experience and staff 
interactions. 

The school will implement remote learning with all pupils and 
staff at home. Pupils can access online learning and/or paper 
learning packs provided by class teachers. Additional devices 
have been provided for pupils without access to digital learning 
at home. Schools will primarily use VSCENE for online learning 
through video conferencing. 


ELC settings will continue to provide online learning 
experiences such as storytelling, outdoor experience and staff 
interactions. 


The school will implement remote learning with all affected 
pupils and staff at home. Pupils can access online learning 
and/or paper learning packs provided by class teachers. 
Additional devices have been provided for pupils without access 
to digital learning at home. Schools will primarily use VSCENE 
for online learning through video conferencing. 


ELC settings will continue to provide online learning 
experiences such as storytelling, outdoor experience and staff 
interactions. 


50% of pupils at each school will attend Monday — Tuesday and 
the other 50% of pupils will attend Thursday - Friday. Remote 
learning will be provided to learners on days when they are not 





40 


sis 


instructed by Scottish 
Government) 


attending school. Additional devices have been provided for 
pupils without access to digital learning at home. Schools will 
primarily use VSCENE for online learning through video 
conferencing. 


A range of Council services have been working closely to 
ensure a process is in place should this be required. All schools 


and early years provisions have a draft Risk Assessment that 
outlines children & young people will maintain 2m physical 
distance in schools and remain in small cohorts in early years 
establishments. Enhanced mitigations are noted on this risk 
assessment and will be put in place to support establishments 
to transition to blended learning plans. 





41 


96 


44. Appendices 


The Scottish Government - official guidance documents 


broad guidance on evidence gathering and estimation 
updated advice on face coverings 


guidance on organised outdoor sport for children and young people 


https://www.gov.scot/publications/coronavirus-Covid-19-guidance-on-sport-and- 





leisure-facilities/pages/operational-guide-and-checklist/ 

scientific advice from the COVID-19 Advisory Sub-Group on Education and Children's 
Issues - advisory note on physical education, music and drama in schools 

guidance on carrying out practical work in Sciences and Technologies 
https://www.gov.scot/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-guidance-on-reopening- 
early-learning-and-childcare-services/ 

Coronavirus (COVID-19): Curriculum for Excellence in the Recovery Phase 


Coronavirus (COVID-19): strategic framework for reopening schools, early learning 
and childcare provision 


Coronavirus (COVID-19): guidance on re-opening school age childcare services 
Coronavirus (COVID-19): guidance on reopening early learning and childcare services 


Coronavirus (COVID-19): guidance on preparing for the start of the new school term 
in August 2020 - version 2 


Coronavirus (COVID-19): support to childcare sector 
Coronavirus (COVID-19): childminder services guidance 


Coronavirus (COVID 19): Advisory Sub-Group on Education and Children's Issues — 
advisory note on face coverings in schools August 2020 


Health Protection Scotland - official guidance documents 


Covid-19 Guidance for Non-Healthcare Settings (21 Aug 2020) 


Care Inspectorate — official guidance document 
httos://www.careinspectorate.com/index.ohp/news/5/47-operating-an-early-learning- 





and-childcare-setting-including-out-of-school-care-and-childminders-during-covid-19 


42 


57 


Appendix 1 


COVID-19 SECTOR ADVICE CARD 


AK 
The Scottish 
Government 


Last updated: 06 August 2020 





Scottish Government Coronavirus (COVID-19): framework for decision making 
Health Protection Scotland COVID-19 workforce education information and resources. 


ocottish Government guidance for residential children's houses, residential schools and secure 
care facilities on staffing, social distancing and self-isolation 


Health Protection Scotland information and guidance for social or community care and 
residential facilities,, including a control measure tool for the control of incidents and outbreaks 
incident or outbreak control tool for social or community care or residential settings - Health 
Protection Scotland advice for social or community care and residential settings staff 

Care Inspectorate coronavirus information 


Health and Safety Executive coronavirus information 
UK Boarding Schools Association COVID-19 guidance 
Scottish Council of Independent Schools 

Independent Schools Council 

National Transport Guidance portal 

Outdoor Learning Directory 

Scottish Advisory Panel on Outdoor Education 

Assist FM Catering guidance 


Assist FM Cleaning guidance 
Health Protection Scotland non-healthcare setting guidance 


08 





The wellbeing of all children, young people and staff should be the central focus. There are 
important actions that everyone can take to prevent the spread of the virus. 


Everyone who: 


e has the symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19) - a new persistent cough, fever, or a loss of 
sense of smell and /or taste — should stay at home and arrange for coronavirus testing; 

e is living with someone who has coronavirus symptoms should stay at home and follow 
the relevant advice; 

e has returned ( or come) to Scotland from a country which is not exempt from the UK 
quarantine rules, should stay at home following the relevant guidance. 


Everyone should frequently wash their hands for 20 seconds and dry them thoroughly or use 
hand sanitiser - always when entering the building, before/after eating and after using the toilet — 
and use a tissue or elbow to cough or sneeze into, dispose of tissue waste immediately and wash 
hands after. 


There should be an enhanced cleaning regime including regular (at least twice daily) cleaning 
of commonly touched surfaces. Remove any hard to clean resources from the environment 


Wherever it is safe, doors and windows should be kept open to increase natural ventilation 


Whilst 2m distancing is not required between children or young people, schools should 
encourage distancing where possible particularly in the senior phase. Mitigations such as using 
all available space should be considered. 


Efforts should be made to keep children and young people within the same groups as far as 
possible throughout the school day. Avoid assemblies and other types of large group gatherings. 


Two metre physical distancing between adults, and between adults and children should be 
maintained. Where adults cannot keep 2m distance and are interacting face-to-face for a period 
of 15 minutes or more, they should wear face coverings. The number of people in staff rooms at 
any one time should be limited. 


Movement between schools should be kept to a minimum. Parents/carers should not enter 
school buildings unless required. 


Personal Protective Equipment: if someone becomes unwell with symptoms of COVID-19 and 
needs direct personal care gloves, aprons and a fluid-resistant surgical mask should be worn.. 
Gloves and aprons should continue to be used when providing intimate care to a child. 


Anyone wishing to wear a face covering is allowed to do so. 


schools should follow the guidance on attendance for children, young people and staff who have 
health conditions or are pregnant, or who live with individuals who have health conditions or are 
pregnant. 


99 


Workplace Communications — SCHOOLS 


All pupils, parents or guardians and staff should be aware that the following 
should be addressed to produce a COVID-safe working environment. 


Consult with staff, including trades unions, to ensure policies and procedures include 
COVID-19 risk assessment and mitigations. 


Identify and support those who should not attend (e.g. as shielding or other health issues). 
Continue work from home policies and provide necessary support to those who can. 


Ensure all staff are aware of their responsibility to control the soread of COVID-19 in their 
workplace. 


Ensure pupils and staff have access to suitable learning opportunities in effective hand 
washing technique, cough etiquette and use of personal protective equipment (PPE). 


Ensure managers and staff understand their obligations with respect to Scotland's Test and 
Protect Strategy. That staff are clear how to access testing. 


Ensure pupils and staff do not congregate in communal areas such as canteens, arrival and 
entry areas, staff rooms, wash areas/hygiene stations and corridors. 


Put in place training which will ensure that all employees understand the requirements for 
control measures including physical distancing and measures to monitor adherence by all 
staff. 


Ensure all pupils and staff are clear that those who have symptoms or are diagnosed with 
COVID-19 and their household/other contacts do not attend work and follow advice on 
self/household isolation. 


Ensure all staff are clear that if they become unwell whilst at work they should return home 
and seek testing. 


Ensure that staff are clear on what is expected of them should a pupil or work colleague 
become unwell on site. 





Immediate action 


If there is any suspicion that there may be a cluster of cases in your school, the most important thing you 
can do is to contact your local NHS Board Health Protection Team (HPT) promptly. 


Do not spend time trying to work out what you should do yourself. Your HPT will be happy to advise you 
on what to do. 


It is very important that the expert HPT be advised as early as possible of a possible problem so they 
can assess the situation and offer you advice. 


When should | suspect an outbreak? 
An outbreak should be SUSPECTED if there are: 


e two or more confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the setting within 14 days 
or 
e Increase in background rate of absence due to suspected or confirmed cases of COVID-19 


A suspected outbreak should be reported to the local HPT who will undertake a public health risk 
assessment to determine whether there is an outbreak. 


Note that schools with increased rates of respiratory illness should also be alert to the possibility that this 
could be due to COVID-19 and contact their local HPT for further advice. 


How do | contact the local HPT if | suspect an outbreak? 
e immediately inform your local NHS board HPT, using the local contact details found here (click on 
link for relevant no.): 
Ensure the school has a nominated point of contact (COVID lead) to liaise with the Health 
Protection Team 


What else should I do if | suspect an outbreak? 


Continue to follow the measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19. 

Your local Health Protection Team will conduct a rapid investigation and undertake a risk 
assessment. You will need to work with them to do this. The HPT will advise on the most appropriate 
actions to take. 

Depending on the risk assessment outcome, the Health Protection Team may establish an Incident 
Management Team (IMT) to manage the situation. 

The IMT will lead the Public Health response and investigations, and will work with you to put 
appropriate interventions in place and advise/support communication processes 


What interventions might be put in place if there is an outbreak in the school? 

Your Health Protection Team or Incident Management Team will work with you to identify the 
appropriate measures. The first step is to review implementation of core standard preventive measures 
and to ensure that they are in place and effective. 





What else may | need to do? 
The Health Protection Team or Incident Management Team will declare when the outbreak is over. 


61 


Ayrshire 
College 





school — College Partnership Appendix 2 
COVID mitigation procedures 
The health, safety and wellbeing of all students, staff and visitors is of paramount 
importance. In order to protect this, the following practices should be adhered to in the 
delivery of school/college partnership programmes. 
1. Travel to college campuses 
school pupils travel to college either on foot, by public transport or by private taxi. 
Transport is organised by the school (minibus, coach or taxi). Pupils must wear 
face coverings if travelling on public transport. 
The college has organised some taxi travel for some pupils studying a 
Foundation Apprenticeship at college. Pupils will be transported in school 
groups; therefore will not share a taxi with pupils from other schools. 
2. Physical Distancing 
Colleges are referred to in the Scottish Government publication Coronavirus 
(COVID-19): framework for decision making — Scotland’s route map through and 
out of the crisis. 
As we are currently in Phase 3 of the route map, colleges can operate under a 
phased return with blended model of remote learning and limited on campus 
learning where a priority (with) Public health measures (including physical 
distancing) in place.’ 


In College settings, the physical distance requirement is 2 metres. All school 
pupils should adhere to this requirement. 


Specific guidance for the College sector came into effect on 29 June 2020. 
https://www.gov.scot/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-guidance-for-colleges/ 


3. Face coverings 


lt is mandatory to wear face coverings in communal areas of the College and this 
also applies to our learners from school. 


Individual exemptions may be granted for health reasons. 
4. Arrival at, and departure from, College 


First day of study 


On arrival at college on the first day of study, school pupils will be directed to an 
identified waiting area for their school. They will remain in this area until their 
name is called and they are escorted to their allocated classroom. 


School-College COVID Mitigation Procedures, 25 August 2020 1 


62 


Pupils should not arrive early as they cannot be accommodated within the 
College campuses. 


Subsequent days 


On arrival at college after the first day, pupils should make their way, directly, to 
their allocated classroom. They will be asked to remain in the classroom for the 
duration of their time at college. 


Finish times 


Classes will be allocated staggered finish times in 5-minute intervals to ensure 
that all pupils are not leaving the building at the same time. 


Class groupings 


Class groups have been made up with the minimum number of schools, possible, 
to reduce the number of schools mixing. 


Within the classroom, learners will be allocated seats within their school groups 
and will be physically distant from learners from other schools. 


Breaks 


Classes are normally two hours in duration, therefore, there will be no planned 
break. If an individual learner requires a comfort break, this will be addressed on 
an individual basis. 


Where a class is three hours in duration, again there will be no planned break 
where everyone leaves the classroom. If an individual learner requires a comfort 
break, this will be addressed on an individual basis. 


Delivery of classes in school settings 

Before a member of college statf begins delivery in a school, the staff member 
should have access to the individual school risk assessment. On the first visit, 
the statf member should be taken through the relevant school risk assessment 
by a member of school staff and be orientated in the current Covid-19 
arrangements for the school. 

College staff will visit only one school on any given day. 


Learning and Teaching 


Blended Learning 


Blended learning is an approach to learning that combines online learning 
materials and timetabled classes that allow for an interaction online with 
traditional classroom or specialised space based methods. 


School-College COVID Mitigation Procedures, 25 August 2020 2 


63 


The majority of classes will be delivered using a blended learning model. Classes 
will be divided in to two groups where one group will attend on one of the 
designated college days e.g. Tuesday afternoon and will study remotely on the 
other afternoon e.g. Thursday afternoon. The second group will do the same but 
on alternate days. Classes will therefore be small (8-12 pupils depending on 
room capacity based on desks being laid out two metres apart). Exceptions to 
this have been communicated to schools. 


While in the classroom at college, pupils will be required to follow the 2 metres 
distance from each other and 2 metres from the lecturer. 


Class etiquette 


When working online, school pupils should follow the same standards, as they 
would do in a classroom setting. 


Below is a link to a short, fun video about online etiquette. School pupils should 
follow this etiquette when they are using any online platform. 


httos://inside.isb.ac.th/ldc/2020/03/28/oracticing-etiquette-students/. 





Teams 


Online learning, at Ayrshire College, will be facilitated using the Microsoft 365 
Teams platform. 


Where teaching is taking place as a live online session, the lecturer will invite 
pupils, one week in advance, to the Teams session. Only those pupils within the 
class will receive and have access to this session. 


Pupils will access the session using their College email address. Access to the 
session will only be possible using this email address. Access to the virtual 
learning environment will also be possible Teams. 


The setting within Teams allows the class lecturer to monitor and manage 
individual class sessions in a safe and secure environment. No student cameras 
will be used. Although lecturer presentations may be recorded, there will be no 
recording of any student discussions. 


Lecturers can moderate discussion within individual channels within Teams. 
Ayrshire College has a policy in place that alerts the lecturer to the use of 
inappropriate words and phrases. 


The above processes have been developed in line with current Scottish Government 
guidance. Any revision to national or sectoral guidance will result in a review of 
processes after discussion with our Local Authority partners. 


School-College COVID Mitigation Procedures, 25 August 2020 3 


64 


Appendix 3 


Covid Mitigation Procedure in relation to delivery of Foundation Apprenticeship class at Irvine Royal Academy 


Delivery staff: from North Ayrshire Health & Social Care Partnership & North Ayrshire Communities (Education) 


This set of guidance should be read in conjunction with the Risk Assessment for Irvine Royal Academy, the wider guidance issued to Council staff and any 
updates issued by Scottish Government. Any apparent contradictions/lack of clarity should be referred to Laura Cook, lauracook@north-ayrshire.gov.uk 
who will take advice from Corporate H & S. 


‘Issue | Mitigation Steps | |Issustog — i. 


Pupils are from a number of schools 


Travel to & from Irvine Royal 


Arrival/departure from Irvine Royal 


Staff delivering the course are not 
permanently based at Irvine Royal 


Following discuss with Corporate H &S, this should not prevent delivery of this 
class. Pupils should be made aware of the steps they need to take to keep 
themselves & others safe. They will already have this knowledge from their 
own school setting but will be briefed on details particular to Irvine Royal 
Academy. Pupils will not travel back to their own school on the same day after 
this class. If pupils join the class from other schools after the first session, 
staff will ensure that they are briefed in relation to Covid & emergency 
requirements at Irvine Royal Academy. 

Pupils will be advised on up to date travel guidance by their school. Pupils 
travelling by taxi will be in their own school groups. Pupils will wear face 
masks whilst on public transport or in taxi. 

Arrival and departure times will be planned to avoid clashing with Irvine Royal 
entry/exit and class change times. Pupils & staff will have a planned route to 
the room to follow that minimises contact with touch points and other people. 
Pupils will wash/sanitise their hands on arrival at the school and on arrival in 
the classroom. Facilities are available at both points. From 31/8/20, pupils & 
staff will be required to wear face coverings in communal areas. 

Staff will not work in more than one school on any given day and will avoid 
visiting other establishments on the same day, before delivery of this class. 
They will be given a copy of the Risk Assessment for Irvine Royal Academy. A 
named Depute Head will be a point of contact for the visiting staff. The staff 
will maintain 2m physical distancing from each other and pupils at all times. If 
they wish to do so, staff can wear face coverings. The staff will be briefed on 
the temporary procedures in the event of a fire or other emergency exit. 





65 


Use of classroom & resources 


Pupil/staff member displays 
symptoms of Covid 


Use of toilets 


Provision of drinking water 





Breaks 


The classroom will be stocked with hand sanitiser & wipes. Pupils & staff will 
sanitise their hands on entry & exit to room. Pupils & staff will be asked to 
wipe down their work areas at the beginning & end of class. Where possible, 
pupils will sit next to pupils from their own school and they will sit spaced 
apart as far as is reasonably possible. Pupils should sit in the same position 
each time in class and HSCP staff will keep a seating plan. 

Pupils will be issued with their own laptops and sharing will not be permitted. 


Windows & door will be opened to ensure a flow of air. 


The staff will be issued with the up to date guidance in relation to this issue 
and will expected to follow the procedures set up in Irvine Royal Academy. 
Course delivery staff will be provided with school & contact details of all the 
pupils in order that prompt communications can happen. It will be made clear 
to staff & pupils that they should not attend if they are displaying symptoms & 
have not had a negative test result. 

A key will be provided to staff for the use of pupils & staff. The school's 
guidance in relation to the use of this facility will be adhered to. 

Initially, bottles of water will be provided, and once the class is established, 
pupils will be asked to bring their own water bottles. They will be informed 





where the nearest water cooler is to their classroom and will be instructed on 
its safe use. 





66 


Appendix 4 


Advanced Higher Consortium Arrangements — Advice to Schools 


This should be considered within the context of schools’ existing agreed risk 
assessments and where at all possible, the opportunity to deliver all or part of the 
course content by remote/digital/self study should be taken. 


Young people travelling between schools to access provision is a key part of the senior 
phase. From the week beginning Monday 14' September, some young people 
undertaking Advanced Highers will be allowed to travel to other schools. This will be 
decided on a case-by-case basis taking account of the following factors: 


e [he total number of young people in the class 

e The number of schools coming together to access the provision 

e The ability of young people from different schools to 2m social distance within the 
available accommodation 


Where consortium travel has been approved, young people should be informed of the 
local practices/guidance within the host school. Over and above the local 
practices/guidance the following additional mitigations should be strictly adhered to: 


e For potential track and trace purposes, young people from other schools should 
be included in the class seating plan 

e 2m social distancing should be strictly adhered to between groups of young people 
from different schools and between groups of young people and the class teacher 

e Visiting pupils should have access to handwashing/sanitising facilities on arrival 
and be advised of a safe route to & from the classroom 

e Current guidance for school € public transport should be followed 

e Arrival and departure times for young people should be slightly staggered to ensure 
minimal contact with groups of young people from other schools. Those times 
should be planned, where possible, to avoid entry/exit & class change times within 
the host school. 

e Parents should be made aware of the arrangements 

e [he host school's risk assessment should be made available to pupils or parents 
on request 

e On return to their own school, pupils should follow all of the existing procedures in 
place 


67 


COVID-19 — DISPLAY OF SYMPTOMS IN EDUCATIONAL ESTABLISHMENTS 


REVISED 17.09.2020 Appendix 5 





HT/HOC contacts FM who will organise cleaning in line with HPC guidance.Area must not be used until cleaning is 
complete. 


V8 17/09/2020 


North Ayrshire Council 
Comhairle Siorrachd Agr à th 


COVID-19 — DISPLAY OF SYMPTOMS IN EDUCATIONAL ESTABLISHMENTS 


REVISED 17.09.2020 





If the symptomatic person tests negative for COVID-19 


They should not return to establishment until they are well enough to do so and have been fever 
free for 48 hours without the use of medication. Household contacts can return to school/work 
as long as they are ssmptom free and remain vigilant. 


If a test is inconclusive or refused 


(This should be treated as a positive test result) 


Symptomatic person stays self-isolated for the prescribed 10 days from the onset of symptoms 
(or longer if symptoms persist) or gets (re)tested. Should not return to establishment until they 
are well enough to do so and have been fever free for 48 hours without the use of medication. 
Household members need to self-isolate for 14 days however there is no requirement for them 
to be tested unless they show symptoms. If symptomatic member of household does not get 
tested then the whole household must follow self-isolation guidance and remain vigilant. 


AS 


North Ayrshire Council 


Comhairle Siorrachd 6 9: 








V8 17/09/2020 


COVID-19 — DISPLAY OF SYMPTOMS IN EDUCATIONAL ESTABLISHMENTS 


REVISED 17.09.2020 





Further Information: 


e Anyone who begins to display symptoms should not attend school in the first place, however if 
symptoms develop during the school day, they should be isolated and vacate the premises as 
detailed above, irrespective of being contacted by NHS Test & Protect. 


e |f someone presents with symptoms but cannot/will not be tested, HT/HoC should go on the 
assumption that the individual would have tested positive and will require to self-isolate for the 
recommended period. Symptomatic people must follow the national guidance and self-isolate for 
10 days and household members for 14 days (or longer if symptoms persist). 


e The Transport Hub should be contacted when there is a confirmed case of COVID-19. 
e Schools have been provided with sets of red, amber and green cones to allow for clear and 
consistent communication links between school and cleaning staff for highlighting an area where 


a symptomatic person has been sitting or working. 


e Aredcone will be placed on desk or surface where a symptomatic person has been seated to 
indicate that it should not be touched/used until it has been cleaned. 


e Once the area has been cleaned, the cleaning staff will also sanitise the cones and place the 
green cone on top of the others to indicate that the seating / work area can be occupied. 


e School staff who opt to undertake asymptomatic testing do not need to self-isolate while 
awaiting results. 


V8 17/09/2020 AN 


North Ayrshire Council 


Comhairle Siorrachd 7 O 


Positive COVID-19 Case 
(Education Actions) 


Appendix 6 
Parent / Carer / Staff 
member informs HT 





Public Health decision 
about case management 
approach 


Incident 
Management Team 
(IMT) convened 


Teams/phone call / Problem Assessment 
email between Public Group (PAG) 

Ñ Health, HOS, HT y N convened 

D (straightforward case) Á N complex case) 











North Ayrshire Council 
Comhairle Siorrachd AT se 


Appendix 7 


SEEMISGroup 


Enabling Digital 
Information for Education 





SEEMIS ScotXed 
Circumstances that this may be used in 
Short Full Description Code —Attendance/Absence 
Reason 
> COA Attendance — Self Isolation — Coronavirus Where a pupil is scheduled to be in school but cannot attend because of self-isolation 15 Attendance 


related to COVID-19 and can undertake learning at home. 


A CAA Auth. Abs. — Self Isolation Coronavirus Where a pupil is scheduled to be in school but cannot attend because of self-isolation 28 Other Authorised Absence 
related to COVID-19 and is unable to undertake learning at home. 


F CAB Sickness unable to home Irn Coronavirus Where a pupil is scheduled to be in school but cannot attend because of COVID-19 af Other Authonsed Absence 
related sickness and is unable to undertake leaming at home. 


B COB Sickness able to home Irn Coronavirus. Where a pupil is scheduled to be in school but cannot attend because of COWID-19 14 Attendance 
related sickness and can undertake learning at home. 


> COH Home Leaming - Attendance Where a pupil is scheduled to be undertaking home learning and is not known to be 50 Attendance 
absent from this. 
A CAH Home Learning - Absence (Any Reported) Where a pupil is scheduled to be undertaking home learning but is unable to undertake 21 Other Authorised Absence 


this. Covers all reas 





s for absence including sickness, family holidays etc. 


N CPI Parent isolating against advice C. virus Where a parent has chosen to keep their children away from school as a precautionary i Other Unauthorised Absence 
measure where there is no advice to take such measures 


CLO Should not attend school closure — u Not sent to ScotXed 
Coronavirus. Where a decision has been taken at National o Local Authonty level to close a school to 
USE EXISTING SCHOOL CLOSURE CODE limit the spread of the virus 
VIA 


al > Management > Calendar> 


Revised: 17 September 2020 ©SEEMIS Group LLP Page 3 of 4 


12 


——— cretion 


NORTH AYRSHIRE COUNCIL 
8 December 2020 
Cabinet 
Title: Public Performance Reporting 2019-20 
Purpose: To advise Cabinet on 2019-20 public performance reporting and 


the draft Annual Public Performance Report 2019-2020. 


Recommendation: That Cabinet agrees to a) note the status of the Council's 


1.1 


1.2 


2.1 


performance indicators at Appendices 1 and 2; b) approve the 
draft Annual Public Performance Report 2019-20 set out at 
Appendix 3; and c) note that this report will also be referred to the 
Audit and Scrutiny Committee for further consideration. 


Executive Summary 


This report details the Council's performance against a range of performance indicators 
(Pls) during 2019-20. The report also presents the Council's Annual Public 
Performance Report for 2019-2020 which will be published on our website. This is the 
first Annual Public Performance Report produced for our new Council Plan 2019-24 'A 
Council that is Fair for All’ and covers the 2019-20 financial year. A separate report on 
our response to the Covid-19 pandemic will be produced as part of our six-monthly 
Council Plan progress reporting. 


This report enables scrutiny of how we meet our statutory reporting obligations, 
summarises our six-monthly performance reporting and demonstrates how we work with 
our partners to progress our priorities outlined in the Council Plan 2019-24. Our 
priorities are Aspiring Communities, Inspiring Place and a Council for the Future. 


Background 


The Accounts Commission Direction 2018 on Public Performance Reporting sets out 
categories of performance information. This Direction gives us flexibility in determining 
which Pls meet the requirements of the Direction in order to demonstrate Best Value. 
The Accounts Commission expects us to ensure balanced reporting in terms of 
improvements in performance and areas of focus as timeously as is practical. The 
Direction is outlined in Table 1 below: 


fó 


Table 1 


Part 1: Improving local services and Part 2: Demonstrating Best Value 
local outcomes 


Statutory Performance Indicator 1 


The Commission requires the council to 


report 
comparison (i) over time and (ii) with other 


Performance in improving local public 
services, provided by both (i) the 
council itself and (ii) by the council in 
conjunction with its partners and 
communities. 


Progress against the desired 
outcomes agreed with its partners and 
communities. 


Statutory Performance Indicator 2 


The Council's assessment of how it is 
performing against its duty of Best 
Value, and how it plans to improve 
against this assessment. 

Audit assessments of its performance 
against its Best Value duty, and how it 
has responded to these assessments. 
In particular, how it (in conjunction with 


lts partners as appropriate) has 
engaged with and responded to its 
diverse communities. 


such information to allow 


similar bodies. The Commission requires 
the Council to report on information drawn 
from the Local Government Benchmarking 
Framework in particular and from other 


benchmarkino 


2.2 


2.3 


2.4 


2.0 


2.6 





activities. 


Following a review of our performance indicators (Pls) as part of the development of 
our Council Plan 2019-20 we identified 34 indicators that provide a balanced overview 
of our performance and address Part 1 of the Accounts Commission Direction. 


We compare our performance to other similar bodies through 80 Local Government 
Benchmarking Framework (LGBF) indicators which are reported separately to Cabinet 
and published on our website (www.north-ayrshire.gov.uk/performance) with links to the 
national “My Local Council” comparison tool. 


Detailed information on our Council Plan Pls included within the Annual Performance 
Report are available online through our North Ayrshire Performs portal on our website. 
Following recommendations from our Best Value Audit earlier this year, we are 
developing a more modern and user-friendly interface which will be live on our website 
in early 2021. 


We recognise the impact of our work cannot be demonstrated or effectively scrutinised 
using only quantitative (PI) data. As a result, the Annual Performance Report provides 
an update on how we are progressing to achieve desired outcomes for our partners and 
communities. 


The Annual Performance Report forms part of a suite of public reporting which includes: 


The Community Planning Partnership Annual Report 
Council Plan progress reports 

Local Government Benchmarking Framework 
Education Insight 

Education Authority Annual Plan 

North Ayrshire Performs portal 

HSCP Annual Performance Report 


74 


2./ Performance Indicator Summary 
Appendix 1 details the full set of performance indicators, showing (where available) 
three years of performance data and a Red, Amber, Green “RAG?” status. The Green 
status means performance is on target, Amber is slightly adrift of target and Red is 
significantly adrift of target. 


2.8 Analysis of the indicators with the latest available targets is outlined in Table 2. 77.8% 
of indicators with 2019-20 data are on or slightly adrift of target. This is comparable with 
2018-19 when 81.3% were in this category. (The total number of indicators reported 
decreased from 66 last year to 34 this year following the introduction of the new Council 
Plan 2019-24.) 


Table 2: Annual Status Comparison 
Key I I I IN Number of Indicators Number of Indicators 
(2018-19) (2019-20) 
37 (77.1%) 19 (70.4%) 
À slightly adrift 


on adrift de — i» == 
2 data only/unavailable” — a —— — 


“Data for seven indicators is pending, including four education indicators where data will 
not be available until February 2021. 





2.9 Appendix 2 lists underperforming indicators (red and amber) with further details on the 
reasons for underperformance and actions being taken to address these. One 
significantly adrift of target (red) indicator "Number of attendances at indoor sports and 
leisure facilities (excluding pools)" has been directly impacted by the pandemic during 
February and March due to sports governing bodies postponing activities and the 
resulting decline in customer confidence. 


2.10 Table 3 shows a status comparison between mid-year and year end. 


Table 3: Six Month Status Comparison 


Number of Number of 
Indicators Indicators Movement Includes: 
(2019-20 Mid-Year)** | (2019-20 Year End) 
Formerly 14 green Pls, 1 
@ on target 0 (83. 3%) 9 (70. 4%) amber and 4 data only 
(targets are now set) 


| 7 ” ee 1 green PI and 1 
Formerly 2 green Pls, 
2 amber and 
© significantly adrift 6 (22.2%) bate unl Parente ote 
now set). 
- Formerly 1 green PI, 1 
wa data only/unavailable 10 T amber, 2 red and 3 data 
only. 
**Where no quarterly data is available the most recent annual status is used. 


Approximately two thirds of our Council Plan PIs are recorded annually, the most recent 
status better reflects performance. 





19 


2.11 


Comparison of 2019-20 performance with 2018-19 performance (short term trend) and 
2016-17 performance (long term trend) is noted in Table 4. Performance improved in 
63% of available indicators since last year and 91.7% over the three-year period. 


Table 4: 2019-20 Summary of short term/long term trends* 


QUEE JE ee — 
— 2018-19) EUER 2016-17) 


@ improved 17 17 (68%) ——— 22 | BB (91.7%) ^ 1%) 


8 (29.6%) 
= No Change 2 (7.4%) ERE 


"Data for seven indicators is pending, including four education indicators where 
data will not be available until February 2021. In addition, three indicators were 
introduced in 2018-19 and so have no 2016-17 (long term) comparison 
available. One indicator was not recorded for 2016-17 so 2017-18 data has 
been used to calculate long term trend. 





2.12 Annual Public Performance Report 


2.13 


2.14 


The draft Annual Public Performance Report 2019-20 is attached in Appendix 3. 
The report provides a summary of how we, in partnership with our communities 
have worked to deliver our Council Plan priorities. 


As our Community Planning Partnership Board is chaired by the Leader of North 
Ayrshire Council and administered by the Council, this year we have included a 
brief summary of our CPP performance within our Annual Performance Report. 
Full details of CPP performance are published in The Community Planning 
Partnership Annual Report. 


Key highlights from 2019-20 include: 


Priority-Wide 
e Our Community Wealth Building Strategy was approved by the Community Wealth 
Building Commission. 


Aspiring Communities 

e Ananalysis of the Community Investment Fund showed a wide range of approved 
initiatives would address key local issues such as isolation and mental health. 

e A North Ayrshire Summit on Drug Related Deaths was held in January, following 
a drugs emergency motion being passed in September. 

e Our Executive Youth Council, in partnership with the Carer's Trust consulted with 
young carers on barriers to participation and will be taking the report to the Scottish 
Youth Parliament. 


Inspiring Place 

e We declared a state of Climate Emergency with our key ambition to be net-zero 
carbon, achieving a balance between carbon emissions and carbon removal. 

e Following extensive collaboration with the HSCP and NHS Ayrshire and Arran, we 
have opened our Trindlemoss Day Opportunities facility, a multi-purpose facility 
providing day care, residential accommodation and a range of support services. 


e We have completed 31 new houses at Montgomerie View, Seamill. 


76 


A Council For The Future 

e We engaged with communities, giving our residents a Fair Say on our Council 
budget and an opportunity to suggest new approaches to delivery. 

e We paid our employees the new Real Living Wage five months early resulting in 
a rise of 30p per hour from November rather than April. 

e We have improved the processing times for Housing Benefit and Council Tax 
Reduction. New claims timescales reduced by 9.5% since 2018-19 and change of 
circumstances timescales reduced by 24.8%. 


2.15 Key areas of focus over the next six months include: 


Responding to the Covid-19 Pandemic 

e Working alongside our partners to continue to support our residents and 
businesses during the Covid-19 pandemic will be our key priority for the next six 
months. 


Priority-wide 

e Launch and implement our Community Wealth Building Strategy 2020-25. A first 
for Scotland, it will become our strategic approach to economic recovery and 
renewal. We will work alongside key partners to ensure a wellbeing economy with 
social and environmental stability for our communities. 

e Develop our Economic Recovery and Renewal Approach built on our Community 
Wealth Building objectives and outline the actions we will take to recover and 
renew from the economic impact of the Covid-19 pandemic. The Approach will 
set out how we will build back better, fairer and greener through a local Green 
New Deal for North Ayrshire. At the heart of this will be an £8.8 million Investment 
Fund to support an inclusive and green economic recovery and in addition we will 
use our Capital investment to support recovery and wider regeneration. 


Aspiring Communities 

e Implement the priorities of the Mental Health Strategy for North Ayrshire to support 
Our young people and empower our employees and partners to promote positive 
mental health and wellbeing without stigma. 

e Conclude funding commitments for the Ayrshire Growth Deal. 


Inspiring Place 

e Progress the proposals for the new Ardrossan Campus to provide a state of the 
art educational and community facility. 

e Continue to develop Millport and Upper Garnock Flood Protection Schemes. 

e Support regeneration by maximising our assets through alternative community 
and business use. 


A Council For The Future 

e Action any areas for improvement highlighted during our Audit Scotland Best 
Value review. 

e Continue to engage with our communities on our transformation themes and 
development of locality community charters. 

e Capture experiences and learning from our response to the Covid-19 pandemic. 


2.16 The report will be made available through our website and shared via our various 
social media channels. Hard copies will be provided on request. 


Tf 


3. Proposals 

3.1 It is proposed that Cabinet agrees to a) note the status of the Council's performance 
indicators at Appendices 1 and 2; b) approve the draft Annual Public Performance 
Report 2019-20 set out at Appendix 3; and c) note that this report will also be referred 
to the Audit and Scrutiny Committee for further consideration. 

4. Implications/Socio-economic Duty 

Financial 

4.1 There are no financial implications. 

Human Resources 

4.2 There are no human resource implications. 


Legal 


4.3 This report confirms the arrangements for the Council's compliance with its duties under 
the Local Government Act 1992 and the Local Government in Scotland Act 2003 and 
commitment to improving public performance reporting. 


Equality/Socio-economic 


4.4 There are no equality/socio-economic implications. 


Environmental and Sustainability 


4.5 There are no environmental and sustainability implications. 


Key Priorities 
4.6 This report helps to demonstrate the Council's delivery of its strategic priorities. 
Community Wealth Building 
4.7 There are no community wealth building implications. 
5. Consultation 
5.1 Feedback from the Executive Leadership Team (ELT) informed the content of this 
report. 
Andrew Fraser 
Head of Democratic Services 


For further information please contact Barry Tudhope, Senior Manager (Corporate 
Policy, Performance & Elections), on 01294 324113. 


Background Papers 
Council Plan 2019-24 


78 





Appendix 1: Council Plan Performance Indicators (Pls) — Summary 


KEY 


Performance Indicator Status Short Term Trends Long Term Trends 


| Q9 | Significantly Adrift of Target | || Improving —. 
[ * [No Change | | = [No Change — 
TE [Getting Worse - 
nm 


Data Not Available 
Data Only 





Council Plan Priority 1: Aspiring Communities 


Code & Short Name SUS 2018/19 2019/20 Short Term Long Term 
| Value | Status | Value | Status | Value | Target | Status | Trend Trend 


CP 01 Percentage of — 
population who are baseline established for & 45.53% 60% 
involved in local 2018-19 
decision making 
CP 02 Percentage of Council New measure and 
budget directed via baseline established for | 1.1196 0.89% (Y 
participatory methods 2018-19 
CP_03 Percentage of residents 
who agree they have New measure and 
access to opportunities | baseline established for | 47% 47% e 
to participate in their 2018-19 
local community 





19 


New measure in 
2018/19. No 
2016/17 
comparison 
available. 


New measure in 
2018/19. No 
2016/17 


comparison 
available. 


New measure in 
2018/19. No 
2016/17 
comparison 
available. 





Code & Short Name 


CP 04 Percentage of children 
achieving their 
developmental 
milestones at the time 
the child starts primary 
school 


CP 05 Average total tariff score 
of pupils living in SIMD 
30% most deprived 
areas 


CP 06 Average tariff score: All 
Leavers 


CP 07 Percentage of school 
leavers entering positive 
destinations 


CP 08 Percentage of children 
living in poverty (after 
housing costs) 


CP 09 Percentage of working 
age population in 
employment 


CP 10 Percentage of 
procurement spent on 
local enterprises 


CP 11 Percentage of people 
earning less than the 
living wage 


CP 12 Percentage of learning 
disability service users 
accessing employment 
support activities 





“Value | Status | Value | Status | Value | Target | Staus — 


11.2% 


24.25% 


po ujuojuofor |e 


18% 


638.1 


780.7 


94% 


26.59% 


69.7% 


17.43% 


24.3% 


23.88% 


Data not 
currently 
available 


Data not 
currently 
available 


Data not 
currently 
available 


Data not 
currently 
available 


Data not 
currently 
available 





10.2% 


19.18% 


Data not 
currently 


available 





23.84% 


19% 


718 


00 
cO 
al 


96% 


26.5% 


10% 


23% 


24% 


30% 


00 
O 


Data not 
currently 
available 


Data not 
currently 
available 


Data not 
currently 
available 


Data not 
currently 
available 


Data not 
currently 
available 


Data not 
currently 


avallable 


Y 


Short Term | Long Term 
Trend Trend 


Data not 
currently 
available 


Data not 
currently 
available 


Data not 
currently 
available 


Data not 
currently 
available 


Data not 
currently 
available 





.. 
uH 


Data not 
currently 
available 





há 


Code & Short Name Avive 2018/19 2019/20 Short Term Long Term 
| Value | Status | Value | Status | Value | Target | Status | Trend Trend 


CP_13 Percentage of children 
with BMI centile >91 at | 12.65% 9.98% Y) 13.19% 10.5% 3 3 
27 month review 


T 
Based on 
2017/18 not 
CP 14 Percentage of 2016/17 as Pl 
households in fuel 30% wi 26% O 28% 25.5% y introduced that 
poverty year. (Two 
year rather 
than three 
year trend) 


CP_15 Number of attendances 
at indoor sports & 
leisure facilities 1,848,777 wh 1,886,930 wi 1,859,843 | 1,964,100 y “a 
(excluding pools) 

CP 16 Percentage of people Data 
a sisse ud 65.8% 66.68% available 669 Data available | Data available 

g-te ? ° February ° February 2021 | February 2021 

receiving personal care 2021 
at home 


CP 17 Number of Emergency Pr 724 rS 933 a 17,816 20,257 
Admissions 


CP_18 Percentage of new 
tenancies to applicants 
who were assessed as 18.28% 81.48% 84.07% 82% 
homeless sustained for 
more than a year 


81 








Council Plan Priority 2: Inspiring Place 


| 201718 7/18 2018/19 2019/20 Short Term Eu Term 
Code & Short Name 


CP 19 Proportion of 
operational buildings 90.91% 93% 
u i 


that are suitable for their 
á á mor oa 





89.91% 91.01% 


current use 


CP_ 20 Overall percentage of 
road network that 
should be considered 
for maintenance 
treatment 


CP 21 Proportion of properties 
receiving superfast 
broadband 


CP 22 Number of electric 
vehicle charging points 
publicly available 


CP 23 Number of new build 
Council housing units 
reaching completion 
(cumulative) 


CP 24 Number of empty homes 
brought back into use* 


CP 25 Percentage of Council 
dwellings that meet the 


39.196 38.196 


inn 


92.3576 93.7% 


sb 





NO 





© 
Br 
. 





© 


094 900 


E) 


© 
um 


© 


HD 


99.19% Y) 


99.14% 99.18% 99.4% 


Scottish Housing 
Quality Standard 


CP_26 Tourism Visitor 


"|e. 
o 








sb 


Code & Short Name 2017/18 | 20819 | 8/19 2019/20 Short Term Long Term 
CP 27 Street Cleanliness Index 92.2 94.5 NS 46 
- Percentage Clean 
CP 28 Hectares of vacant and 
derelict land in North 1,294 1,279 1,180 1,244 
Ayrshire 
maes DUETO Can PS 756 40,666 37,508 | 39,320 | * 
emissions (tonnes) 


CP 30 Total installed capacity 
of low carbon heat and 
electricity generation 9,029 9,682 9,700 9,700 
across the Council's 
estate (kW) 

. 31 Percentage of total 

household waste that is z . ó ó 
recucled (calendaryear | 90% 54.6% 56.3% 59% A AT T 
as per SEPA) 


“CP_24 Number of empty homes brought back into use - We have now developed a more robust reporting process for empty homes. Historically reported 
figures have been changed to cumulative and some minor errors corrected. We are confident we will exceed the target of 600 empty homes brought back 
into use by 2024. 








83 


Council Plan Priority 3: A Council for the Future 


| 201718 7/18 | 201849 | 8/19 2019/20 
Code & Short Name lur d Term Cw Term 


| Value | Status | Value | Status | Value | Target | har: ad Ei 


CP_32 Percentage of 
eon BHEEIEEIEIEIES 
service 
CP mee nansacnons | 207% | O «em O em e | O | te — 
I Se be IO 





84 


Appendix 2: Council Plan Performance Indictors (Pls) - Exception Report 


Council Plan Priority 1: Aspiring Communities 


Code and Short Name 2018/19 2019/20 Short | Long 
Term | Term 
Trend |Trend 


Value [Target[Status] Value [Target Status 


CP 01 Percentage of 51% 45.53% | 60% bhí For purposes of creating as much rigour as possible, we specifically 
population who count the opportunities where democratic participation is directly 
are involved in with or through the Council. This does not therefore include the 
local decision situations where the Council provides support to local 
making organisations to engage with individuals and communities e.g. 

Ardrossan Development Trust, Stevenston Development Trust, 
Beith Development Trust, Cumbrae Development Trust, 
Community Council engagements and a variety of interest group 
engagements e.g. community associations, heritage and sports 
groups. 

Where a group meets more than once during a year only one 
occurrence is counted. This is to minimise double counting where 
possible. This also means, towards the end of the year many 
regular events will have already been included in the figure earlier 
in the year. It should not be concluded that during quarter 4 fewer 
events took place. 

Due to the nature of this indicator it is not possible to record unique 
individuals, but it does give an indication of the involvement of our 
community in local decisions 


85 
















Code and Short Name 2018/19 2019/20 Short | Long 
Term | Term 
Trend |Trend 
| Value [Target[Status| Value [Target] Status 


CP_10 Percentage of 17.43% wi 19.18% | 23% AT T The information has been taken from Spikes Cavell utilising the 
procurement proximity and supplier size fields. The 2019/20 percentage spend 
spent on local with local (SME) is 19.18% which is a 1.75% improvement on the 
enterprises 2018/19 figure of 17.43%. 


Percentage of 23.88% | 30% 23.84% | 30% The Learning Disability Job Coaches are a crucial resource with 

learning regard to employability that has, along with the rest of day services, 

disability service been experiencing a period of considerable flux and development 

users accessing over the past year. This is in part due to preparing for the closure 

employment of existing services and the move to a combined new site at 

support Trindlemoss, in Irvine. 

activities 
Recent work has focused on exploring the existing role of job 
coaches working within learning disability day services, with a view 
to ensuring that their activity reflects and benefits from the broader 
community change agenda being promoted in association with the 
development of Trindlemoss Day Opportunities Centre. 
Collaboration with a broad range of community partners is a key 
aspiration for Trindlemoss, and it is anticipated that the Job 
Coaches, as core practitioners within Trindlemoss, will play a role 
in creating new collaborations which will in turn will improve 
performance in this area. 

Percentage of 9.98% |10.5% Y) 13.19% | 10.5% y m Our Universal Early Years team continues to provide support 

children with ensuring the health of young children. Health Visitors also carry out 

BMI centile >91 reviews of all children in North Ayrshire at 27 - 30 months, to make 

at 27 month sure they are healthy and thriving. 

review 


86 













Code and Short Name 2018/19 2019/20 Short | Long 
Term | Term 
Trend |Trend 
A Yale Taraetjsiats, 


CP 14 Percentage of 26% 26% 28% |25.5% > . The Scottish House Condition Survey (SHCS) provides estimated 
households in annual fuel poverty figures. In July 2019 the fuel poverty definition 
fuel poverty changed with the introduction of the Fuel Poverty (Targets, 

Definition and Strategy) (Scotland) Act. SHCS reporting for this 
year incorporates some of the changes to the new fuel poverty 
definition resulting in more homes being identified as being in fuel 
poverty. This is a best estimate of fuel poverty under the new 
definition and cannot be compared to previous local authority 
analysis figures. We continue to focus efforts towards reducing fuel 
poverty through the development of our Local Heat and Energy 
Efficiency Strategy, the delivery of home insulation and solar PV 
installation programmes, and the referral mechanisms established 
through the Local Energy Advice Forum to maximise income and 
support residents with utility bill enquiries and switching suppliers. 
“Long term trend based on 2017/18 not 2016/17 as PI introduced 
that year. (Two year rather than three year trend) 


CP 15 Number of 1 os 93 1 di 84 | 1,964, Although facilities and activities only closed from 23 March 2020 
attendances at 100 attendances were negatively impacted by the Covid 19 pandemic 
indoor sports & during the latter part of February and all of March. Despite 
leisure facilities introducing a customer awareness campaign and additional 
(excluding cleaning processes customer confidence reduced due to the 
pools) pandemic. Meanwhile a number of sports governing bodies made 

decisions to stop all activity leading to a reduction in attendances 
across all activities. 


8/ 








Priority 2. Inspiring Place 


Code and Short Name 2018/19 2019/20 


Term | Term 
homme Rao oy 


CP_19 Proportion of = 01% = wad lind 91% = 2019/20 result was 90.91% against a target of 93%. The Scottish Average 
operational for 2018/19 was 82.14% with the Council ranked 9 out of 32 Scottish Local 
buildings that Authorities and remains in the 2nd quartile. Rationalisation of the 
are suitable for Additional Support Needs school estate and integration of Health and 
their current use Social Care Partnership locality teams within secondary schools will 

improve performance. 

Percentage of 94.6% |54.5% 56.3% | 59% A AT ul The estimated Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) 

total household Household Waste Recycling performance for 2019 (calendar year) is 

waste that is 56.3% against a target of 59%, showing an increase of 1.7% compared to 
recycled 2018 (54.6%). This is mainly attributable to the Council introducing Purple 

(calendar year Bin collections on the mainland in April 2019 for glass, cans and plastics 

as per SEPA) with the existing Blue Bin being used for paper and card. The figure is still 

subject to checking and final verification by SEPA. 


ka Licata Lond los hind 





88 


Appendix 3 


Annual Public 
Performance Report 
2019/20 


A 


North Ayrshire Council 
Comhairle Siorrachd Áir a Tuath 





Contents 





Welcome 


A Year of Key Events 


About Us 

Overall Performance 

Tne National Picture 

Our Priorities 

What Has Been Achieved So Far 


Aspiring Communities 


Aspiring Communities: At a Glance 


Case Studies 


Inspiring Place 


Inspiring Place: At a Glance 


Case Studies 


A Council for the Future 


A Council for the Future: At a Glance 


Case Study 
Financial Overview 


Partnership Working 

















This is our first Annual Performance report on our new Council Plan and we aim to give you 
a clear insight into where we have performed well over the past twelve months as well as 
where we can improve. 


Our strong culture of continuous improvement was recognised through our recent Best Value 
Assurance audit with significant improvement noted during the past decade. This audit is our 
official “report card” produced by Audit Scotland on behalf of the Accounts Commission and 
examines all elements of our work to ensure we are delivering our statutory duty of Best Value. 


During 2019/20 we developed our Community Wealth Building Strategy. This strategy will 
Support an inclusive economy so that everyone benefits from a stronger local economy, 
enhanced community empowerment and an increase in fair employment. 


Following the success of our Employability programmes, we have seen 435 unemployed 
residents secure employment this year. We also launched "EQUAL" our Supported Employment 
Service to assist our residents with a disability to find long term fulfilling employment. In addition, 
our Community Benefit Clauses within our procurement contracts have provided 1,301 weeks of 
employment for our residents. 


We were one of the first Scottish councils to launch our whole systems approach to 
understanding issues around the public health priority of diet and healthy weight. This will see 
partners working together to fully understand the complexity of our residents issues and 
experiences before addressing them. 


In yet another first, to coincide with Challenge Poverty Week and Scottish Climate Week we 
launched an enhanced Real Nappy Incentive Scheme - becoming the first council in the UK to 
provide free "birth to potty” real nappy packs. 


We declared a Climate Emergency with our key ambition to be net-zero carbon by 2030 and 
introduced our enhanced household waste and recycling service. 


1 Annual Public Performance Report 2019/20 94 





We completed 105 new houses, providing high quality, sustainable homes for 
our residents. This includes 20 supported accommodation units as part of a 
refurbishment programme at Trindlemoss, Irvine. 


Finally, the information in this report demonstrates a full year of our performance as 
at the end of March 2020. Our response to the Covid-19 pandemic will be detailed in 
a separate report later this year. However, we want to acknowledge the incredible 
instant collaborative response that was mobilised with our communities, key 
workers and the private sector. We want to thank everyone who has stayed at 
home or helped deliver services at this time. 





Councillor Joe Cullinane Craig Hatton 
Leader of the Council Chief Executive 


How well do you feel we have performed? 
We would welcome your thoughts. 


You can contact us via: 

email at NorthAyrshirePerforms@north-ayrshire.gov.uk 
use the hashtag #NorthAyrshirePerforms on social media 
call 01294 324648 


or write to us at: 


Performance Feedback 

The Corporate Policy, Performance and Elections Team 
North Ayrshire Council 

Ist Floor East 

Cunninghame House 

Friars Croft 

Irvine 

KA12 8EE 





Annual Public Performance Report 2019/20 







A Year of Key Events 





April 2019 


» Irvine Harbourside and Ardeer - The 
Great Harbour, plans revealed, with 
£14 million earmarked through the 
Ayrshire Growth Deal. 


July 2019 






> Opening of Kyleshill Court, Saltcoats — 
36 high quality affordable homes for 
older residents. 












A 


May 2019 


> £3.43 million construction on 31 new 
Council houses at Ardrossan Road, 
Seamill. 







> We successfully delivered the 
European Parliamentary Elections. 












August 2019 






with Respite and Residential 





> Kilwinning Early Years Centre 






Programme. 





June 2019 


> Wrap, Run and Fun was launched, 
allowing our children and young 
people to enjoy a nutritious lunch and 
take part in free activities. 






September 2019 








Wealth Building Commission. 








> We declared a Climate Emergency 


P Active Travel Hub launched, with the 
aim to encourage us all to walk and 
cycle in North Ayrshire. 






time. 


3 Annual Public Performance Report 2019/20 





. LL edi 


October 2019 


» Welaunched our HOME (Home 
Ownership Made Easy) scheme 
making it easier for people to get on 
the property ladder. 














a FS ME j | 


> Work commenced on £27.7 million 
Additional Support Needs Campus, 


accommodation in Stevenston. 


received a £670k upgrade as we 
roll out our Early Years Expansion 
















> First meeting of the Community 


> The Circuit, Irvine a £5.4 million sport 
facility opened its doors for the first 






> "Whole systems approach’ to diet and 
healthy weight launched - ensuring 
partners work together to fully 
understand our residents issues and 
experiences before addressing them. 


> Work commenced in Millport on 
a £15 million regeneration of its 
historic town centre. This will focus on 
the conservation area by repairing 
buildings, improving shop fronts and 
public spaces. 


November 2019 


> We supported the Arran Development 
Trust to receive a grant of £3.612 
million to help build affordable homes. 
This grant was part of an £8.5 million 
financial package. 


> Our Youth Participatory Budgeting 
event saw 5,583 young people aged 
between 8 and 25 years decide how 
£60,000 of funding would be allocated. 


» We launched the COIG. com website 
and mobile application showcasing 

"Five routes. One great adventure.” 
We are expecting to attract 100,000 
visitors annually to North Ayrshire. 


December 2019 


» We successfully delivered the UK 
Parliamentary Elections. 
















January 2020 


> Trindlemoss Day Opportunities 
opened, providing a modern facility 
for residents with learning disabilities 
and the community as a whole. 





> Our innovative Energy from Waste 
contract went live, with grey bin waste 
now converted to renewable energy 
rather than landfill. This is a joint 
project with four other councils. 


» We confirmed that we will have net- 
zero carbon emissions by 2030. 





February 2020 


» We have agreed a £25 million housing 
project which will provide 122 new 
Council houses at Flatt Road, Largs. 


> North Ayrshire had its Fairtrade Zone 
status renewed for another two years. 















=e” uE oe ; RR = : » 
ah FOE Nal PLE 
! ADO " A JE. 

a ^ A Má t wt Mis "X 


| 
I i 
I 


March 2020 


» Community groups across North 
Ayrshire were awarded £100k from the 
North Ayrshire Community Investment 
Fund (CIF) for local projects. 






mn 


E oo 










Pa 


= 
ea 
= 











^ B: 
"d 





















T 

























1 


> We worked alongside our communities, 
partners and the private sector, 
together we mobilised an instant 

response to the Covid-19 pandemic. 






Annual Public Performance Report 2019/20 4 


About Us 









A 














Overall Performance 
Elected Members 
| ST. | | Following the introduction of our new well as setting ambitious targets. 
Labour Conservative P eG m Council Plan 2019-24, we undertook a 
2i \ 4 nor thorough review of our performance More detailed information on our performance 
P J € 4 Ír indicators. This review included introducing indicators can be accessed at our website 
new performance indicators to quantify our | 


www.north-ayrshire.gov.uk/performance 











¡Bo dá i — ——— impact in areas previously unmeasured 
Independent | Moo Ane LES SLEPT v. such as democracy and participation as 


SNP 
Population Female 
breakdown 52.4% Economy 


in 2019/20 O of indicators with data available were 
i O on or only slightly adrift of target 


The National Picture 





Adults in SIMD living amongst 
: | 
0 S Ri ci ui The Local Government Benchmarking three years of increase. Nationally the 
134, 740 andis 70.296 ó Framework (LGBF) is a national tool designed Improvement Service has identified a trend 
28.0% to enable us to compare our performance with of improvement either slowing or declining 
| mE | other local authorities across Scotland, identify across key service areas throughout Scottish 
Children living in Businesses 


Population Male 





| best practice and improve our services. councils and we are monitoring this closely. 
poverty operating across 
0 North Ayrshire You can explore our performance and how 
23.4% During 2018/19 (most recent data available) we compare with other local authorities in 
3,260 6396 of our indicators, were performing above Scotland in more detail using the My Local 
the Scottish average, either in the top quartile Council tool. 
___ — sá Ín— or second quartile. This has decreased by five (https://www.improvementservice.org.uk/ 
Infrastructure | percentage points since 2017/18 following benchmarking/explore-the-data) 
Staff Breakdown Farly Years Centres 3 45% 39% 
Male ; Le bii I 34% 
Primary Schools AY 35% Q ° 
6.956 27% A co sc ícsQii 1 30% — Em ne 28x 3% 29* 29* 
Secondary Schools Q | 24% 
y E i i i mee 17% aus B i7% 17% 17% aus 
velie sem m reme abh hInis Sra le Zi à 0 0 0 J 0 Y 
Sea — Support Needs Schools 4 l ! 159; 1576 
0 12,931 b 10% 
0 ae 5% 
Km of roads 1 ,039 0% | 
| | | 2015/16 2016/17 2017/18 2018/19 
Ist Quartile ll end Quartile | 3rd Quartile W 4th Quartile 


5 Annual Public Performance Report 2019/20 93 Annual Public Performance Report 2019/20 6 


Aspiring Communities 


im L 
hE ma 
rí E! 
Dad m 
"i ] . 
~ 


Extensive consultation with young 
people and partners to refresh 

our award-winning Young People's 
Citizenship and Participation Strategy 
is ensuring our young people continue 
to have a voice in local and national 
decisions that affect them. 


We held the first Joint Community 
Planning Partnership (CPP) Locality 
Partnership and Health and Social Care 
Partnership (HSCP) Locality Planning 
Forum on Arran, a pilot which is the first 
of its kind in Scotland which will turther 
develop a place-based approach to 
designing and delivering local services. 


Our Vision ‘A North Ayrshire that is Fair For All’. 


Our Mission Working together to improve well- 
being, prosperity and equity in North Ayrshire". 


Our three priorities are: Aspiring Communities, 


Inspiring Place and A Council for the Future. Children and young people experience the 


best start in life 


Key Priority: Aspiring Communities - 


Our Executive Youth Council worked is now led by school leadership teams in 


In October an analysis of the use of 

the Community Investment Fund (CIF) 
against key themes showed a wide range 
of initiatives have been approved to 
address key local issues such as isolation 
and mental health. To date £1,034,045 

of Council expenditure has been agreed 
and £932,404 of external funding has 
been secured by CIF projects. 


We completed an extensive community 
engagement process to explore our 
network of community centres and 
libraries, in the context of the significant 
challenges in our medium-term financial 
plan. The two programmes consisted 

of 28 meetings and attracted 1,601 
responses, including 212 via our online 
engagement platform, Consul. 


Annual Public Performance Report 2019/20 


What Has Been Achieved So Far 





Active and Strong Communities 


Following a drugs emergency motion 
being passed by Council in September, 
a North Ayrshire Summit on Drug 
Related Deaths was held in January. 
Our Alcohol and Drug Partnership 
(ADP) Participatory Budgeting event 
was announced at the summit with a 
focus on prevention and community 
engagement to address drug deaths. 
It was due to take place in April and is 
now moving online enabling community 
groups and organisations to bid for 
grants between £8k and £10k from a 
total fund of £60k. 


94 


in partnership with Carers Trust to 
consult with young carers on the 
barriers to participation experienced 
by many. Their report will be taken to 
the Scottish Youth Parliament. 


Kilwinning and Largs Academies 
established wellbeing hubs which provide 
Support and resources to pupils. This 
includes peer to peer support from 
pupils trained in Scottish Mental Health 
First Aid as well as targeted programmes 
to combat low self-esteem and other 
aspects of mental health. The Wellbeing 
Model will be rolled out to all localities. 


Since April 2019, there have been 143 
referrals to the secondary school 
counselling service. Of these, 36 young 
people have finished their counselling 
sessions with over 90% of pupils 
reporting improvement following this 
support. Counselling is one of a range 
of mental health supports available 
across North Ayrshire. 


Implementation of the “Devolved 

School Management Scheme’ in North 
Ayrshire has given authority to our Head 
Teachers to allocate parts of their budget 
totalling £75.7 million. Decision making 


consultation with key partners in order to 
better support the learning and teaching 
of over 18,000 children and young people 
across North Ayrshire. 


We have provided tree period products 
to over 4,000 pupils in all North 
Ayrshire secondary schools in addition 
to community provision. 


Construction began on the modern, fully 
accessible Additional Support Needs 
Campus and Respite and Residential 
accommodation in Stevenston. This will 
replace four existing Additional Support 
Needs schools. 





Annual Public Performance Report 2019/20 8 


> Aspiring Communities 


Inclusive, growing and enterprising economy 


> 






9 


Employoblin 


Our Community Wealth Building 
Strategy was approved by the 
Community Wealth Building 
Commission in March. Community 
Wealth Building is a transformational 
approach to economic development 

to ensure fair and resilient local and 
regional economies. There is significant 
interest in the strategy from regional, 
national and international partners. 


Proposals have been prepared and 
Submitted to both UK and Scottish 
Governments as well as Growth Deal 
agencies for projects to improve digital 
infrastructure. 


Annual Public Performance Report 2019/20 


» Weare advancing the joint development 


of a National Centre for Digital Process 
Industries at i3, Irvine. It is being 
facilitated through the Ayrshire Growth 
Deal, in partnership with the National 
Manufacturing Institute for Scotland 
(NMIS). 


Following the establishment of 

the Ayrshire Regional Economic 
Partnership in April 2019, the Regional 
Economic Strategy is being developed 
and will be referred to the Regional 
Partnership Board and Committee for 
consideration in June 2020. We have 
secured in principle commitment from 
partner agencies to support its delivery. 


We have grown the number of 
businesses operating out of The Circuit 
(social enterprise/business incubation 
facility) which is now fully occupied with 
12 new businesses based there who can 
access the on-hand support available. 


We officially launched our new 
Supported Employment Service 
"EQUAL this year. This service supports 
North Ayrshire residents aged 16 or 
over with a disability to find long term, 
fulfilling employment and to provide 

all the support required for them and 
their future employers. So far, we have 
registered and supported 109 residents 
with a disability, with 18 clients being 
supported in employment. 


We had a successful jobs fair that 
attracted 150 unemployed residents 

at the re-launch of the Kilwinning 
Employability Hub at Kilwinning Library. 


95 


> Aspiring Communities 


Residents and communities, enjoy good, 
life-long health and wellbeing 


p 


In the last six months, as part of our 
resettlement programme, we have 
supported seven Syrian families to 
resettle into our local communities. 
Since the start of the programme we 
are proud to have welcomed 41 Syrian 
families to North Ayrshire. 


Our community-based rehabilitation 

unit at Warrix Avenue, Irvine, supports 
individuals with severe, enduring mental 
health needs in an environment that 

is close to independent living. Since 
opening we have received 15 referrals, 
supported eight admissions, transferred 
three individuals back to acute in-patient 
service and discharged one person back 
to the community. 


We commissioned North Ayrshire 
PEAR - Prevention, Early intervention 
And Recovery service in September 
through third sector partners Turning 
Point. Working closely with our Drug 


and Alcohol Recovery Service, it is 
aimed at individuals not engaging with 
other services and supports self as well 
as agency referrals. 


Our Care at Home and Community Alert 
services retained their Very Good grade 
for Care and Support as well as achieving 
an ‘Excellent’ grading for Management 
and Leadership following our annual 
inspection by The Care Inspectorate. 
This is the first time that any service 

as large as our own has been awarded 
such a grade. Health and Social Care 
performance can be viewed in more 
detail at nahscporg/performance. 


Our school holiday meals initiative 
was relaunched as Wrap, Run and Fun 
to have a more inclusive approach 
encouraging further uptake of a free 
nutritious lunch and activities. This 
was delivered in partnership with KA 
Leisure. 





Annual Public Performance Report 2019/20 10 


> Aspiring Communities 





Annual Public Performance Report 2019/20 


Residents and communities are safe 


We have implemented the new 
Environmental Health food law inspection 
regime and it is facilitating future 
inspection programming, using the new 
Food Law Rating System. This combines 
the food safety and food standards 
programmes into one Food Law 
Inspection Programme and will keep our 
residents safe through a more efficient 
process for our businesses. 


The Police Triage Pathway within the 
Crisis Resolution Team is now fully 
rolled out and demand is regularly 
monitored. This mental health service 
provides support to our police 
colleagues who are involved in assisting 
individuals who are experiencing 
mental health distress. It provides 
police officers with direct access to 
Community Psychiatric Nurses in the 
Crisis Team who can assist with risk 
assessment, general advice and if 
necessary, admission to hospital. 


A successful joint initiative with UK 
Border Force, Police Scotland, Housing 
Services and the Licensing Team 

was brought together by our Trading 
Standards and the Corporate Fraud 
Team to tackle human trafficking and 
houses in multiple occupation on a 
number of premises. 


96 


Over the next six months we will: 


Progress our Community Wealth 
Building Strategy including developing 
a new Community Wealth Building food 
system with partners to offer a variety 
of community-led food provision with a 
range of ownership and participation 
models. 


Implement the priorities of the Mental 
Health Strategy for North Ayrshire: 
work to develop confidence in our 
staff to support positive mental health 
and wellbeing; develop organisations 
that support positive mental health 
and wellbeing without stigma and 
discrimination; encourage confidence 
and resilience in our children and 
young people; and help parents and 
carers to support their children's positive 
mental health. 


Develop new ways of working through 
multi-agency locality hubs and a 
network of partners to better support 
our communities. 


Finalise our Children's Services Plan and 
Child Poverty Action Plan and submit 
them to the Scottish Government. 


Progress the extensive property and 
facilities management support required 
to deliver the 1140 hours of Early 
Learning and Childcare Expansion. 


Aspiring Communities: Areas of Focus 





Progress our new sector-leading 
Additional Support Needs (ASN) Campus 
which will provide a high-quality learning 
environment for over 200 ASN pupils 
who currently attend our four ASN 
schools. 


Support all school leavers to secure 

a positive post-school destination by 
working with a range of partners to 
promote the training, further education 
and employment opportunities available 
within a challenging economic climate. 


Conclude funding commitments for 
Ayrshire Growth Deal (AGD) and 
progress our suite of AGD projects to 
deliver inclusive growth, innovation 
and support place-based regeneration 
activity. 





Annual Public Performance Report 2019/20 12 





> Aspiring Communities 


Aspiring Communities: At A Glance | Case study: Wrap, Run and Fun 







Our holiday meals initiative has grown from strength to strength, 
providing a healthy Gold standard 'Food for Life' lunch for North 
Ayrshire primary school pupils at no charge. 








£932,404 


external funding, secured by Community 
Investment Fund projects 







Happening 
here this 
school holiday! 









Ardrossan Campus 


proposals for state-of-the-art education 
and community facility approved 





492 ios 


created through 
... Supported local 
businesses 








LL 


Iti a ws live [3 
gn club! "primary school pupils. 













NS Find out more at 
j je> www.north-ayrshire.gov.uk/holidayschoolmeals 


Supported by M 
sá DI. Pa = \ 
= ae w b D 
E &- | e | leisure : — 






We've supported 


291 


new businesses 






















435 

















We successfully rebranded our holiday a 5% increase compared to summer 




















unemployed meals programme as Wrap, Run and Fun 2018. The Facilities Management team 
people, back | Pa | | 
EE with a strong partnership with KA Leisure continue to develop the school holiday 
£ 6 O O O O f to deliver activities for children and young meals provision to maximise the number 
reg lt | w/ of Youth people. This relaunch sought to remove of children benefiting from this service. 
8 Participatory Budgeting allocated by the stigma associated with free meals and The ongoing review will include building 
TWO th | rds 5,583 young people introduce the initiative as a community on existing community partnerships and 
of people aged 65 or over activity club for North Ayrshire children working with other stakeholders to widen 









aged between 8 and 25 years | | M | 
| E and young people, where food is available. the service into the community to reach 


with long term care needs those who need it most. 


supported to stay at home To continually improve, an ongoing review 






















of the activities on offer has resulted in The rebranded Wrap, Run and Fun 

a wider partnership with KA Leisure and programme is crucial in ensuring that 
Number of children O O other community partners at various all children and young people in North 
living in poverty venues. The attendance over the summer Ayrshire have the opportunity to receive a 
has reduced by period resulted in an additional 721 healthy meal. 





meals being served, which equates to 





2.67% 


13 Annual Public Performance Report 2019/20 Annual Public Performance Report 2019/20 14 





> Aspiring Communities 


Case study: Birth to Potty Scheme 


The new enhanced nappy scheme can 
save families up to £1,300 per child on 
the cost of disposable nappies, whilst 
reducing the environmental impact of 
nappies by 40%. 


We already offered a Real Nappy Incentive 
Scheme which provides a free trial pack, 
giving new parents the chance to see what 
suits their baby best. This trial pack consists 
of three free reusable nappies in various 


styles, two waterproof wraps, biodegradable 
liners and a handy laundry bag. 


Parents or carers who use the trial pack 
are now able to request the full new ‘birth 





to potty’ pack, containing 20 birth to 

potty nappies, biodegradable liners and 

a laundry bag. This comprehensive kit is 
provided free of charge. Parents or carers 
who were already comfortable with the 
idea of using reusable nappies can also 
request this option without the need for a 
trial kit first. 


Making the switch to reusable nappies can 
save a significant amount of money in the 
longer term - however the initial outlay 
can be costly. Our birth to potty scheme 
removes this cost and removes the impact 
of managing disposable nappy waste. 


15 Annual Public Performance Report 2019/20 


98 


Key Priority: Inspiring Place 


Qa —_—_ 
Arr as sii 
gé E 


= a 3 EX s T — | ic: as — — . fiet e 
-— or dam tal J a "€ LR OT - 
——— —áni oS ES one O 
Am 





Well connected with effective infrastructure 


»  Irindlemoss Day Opportunities opened 
in January 2020 following extensive 
collaboration with the Health and Social 
Care Partnership and NHS Ayrshire 
and Arran. It provides a modern 
facility where residents with learning 
disabilities and the community as a 
whole can access opportunities to 
maximise health and wellbeing. 


> We approved a new Road Asset Safety 
Inspection Policy which is designed to 
bring a further shift from reactive to 
planned maintenance to improve the 
condition of our network. We saw our 
Roads Condition Index improve from 
38.1% to 37.3% this year which validates 
our prioritised approach to maintenance 
investment, and we expect to build on 
these improvements in the coming year. 


> Our Ardrossan Campus proposals 
for a state of the art educational and 
community facility were approved and 
will provide modern, fit for purpose 
surroundings to give young people 
the best start in life. It will see the co- 
location of Ardrossan Academy, Winton 
Primary School and Early Years Centre, 
Ardrossan Library and swimming/ 
leisure facilities as well as provide 


access for the Health and Social Care 
Partnership (HSCP) Children and 
Families Locality Team. 


> The Scottish Government awarded 
£1.417 million Town Centre Funding 
in 2019/20. We agreed to focus £1 
million investment on Stevenston 
and Dalry with the balance being 
available to Support proposals from 
other towns. Proposals include shop 
front, streetscape and buildings 
improvements amongst other projects 
nominated locally. Delivery of these 
projects will continue into this year. 


> Flood Protection Schemes - the £17.5 
million Upper Garnock Scheme is 
now at contract award stage with a 
site start anticipated during summer 
2020, and for the £275 million Millport 
Flood Protection Scheme the statutory 
consultation has been completed 
following notification of the scheme in 
March 2020. 





Annual Public Performance Report 2019/20 


16 


» Inspiring Place 


Homes that meet residents' needs 


We have completed 31 new build » 
affordable homes at Montgomerie 

View, Seamill. The homes were 

constructed off-site in a factory, a first 

for the Council. This method reduced 
construction time and waste whilst 

retaining a high level of quality. 





We have agreed a £25 million housing 
project which will provide 122 new 
council houses at Flatt Road, Largs 
and are exploring the opportunity 

to provide 29 extra care sheltered 
residences at St Colm's Place. 


We have completed our Meadowcroft 
facility providing support for looked-after 
and former looked-after children and 
young adults. 


Vibrant, welcoming and attractive 
environment 


» 


17 


We worked with a local community group, > 
FRIENDS, in Stevenston, to plant 2,000 
new trees at Ardeer Quarry. These 

trees will help absorb carbon from the 
atmosphere, provide a valuable habitat 
for animals and plants, and create an 
attractive environment for physical 
activity, health and wellbeing benefits. 
The 3.3-hectare area will also reduce our 
grounds maintenance costs by replacing 
a grassed area with natural woodland. 


Annual Public Performance Report 2019/20 


Working in partnership with the local 
community in Castlepark, Irvine, a 
Campaign was launched to highlight 
littering and other environmental crime to 
discourage those responsible. This four- 
week initiative involved increasing our 
enforcement patrols and saw a number 
of offenders issued with Fixed Penalty 
Notices for fly tipping and dog fouling. This 
model is being rolled out to hotspots in 
other communities across North Ayrshire. 


99 


> Inspiring Place 


A sustainable environment 


> We have declared a state of Climate 
Emergency and our key ambition is 
to be net-zero carbon, achieving a 
balance between carbon emissions 
and carbon removal. Our household 
waste recycling performance was 
56.3% for the 2019 calendar year, a rise 
of almost 2% from previous year. Our 
new household bin collection service 
involves recovering energy from our 
residual waste in partnership with 
four other councils and Clyde Valley 
Residual Waste. 


> The success of our carpool scheme 
continues, with a 33% increase in pool car 
mileage- over 275,000 miles travelled 
during 2019/20. This performance was 
facilitated by a further recruitment drive 





providing a 20% increase in membership 
taking us to 1100 drivers reducing their 
grey fleet mileage, where staff use their 
own vehicles. We also added a further 
three electric vehicles to the scheme 
taking the total to six fully electric 
vehicles which is reducing our carbon 
emissions further. 


> As part of our Dickson Drive, Irvine, 
development, we completed two 
Sustainable demonstrator homes in 
March 2020. They showcase renewable 
energy system including water heat 
pumps, solar roof panels, upgraded 
insulation and thermal stores providing 
heating, hot water and electricity 
generation. 


Annual Public Performance Report 2019/20 18 





Over the next six months we will: 


Progress the proposals for the new 
Ardrossan Campus to provide a state 
of the art educational and community 
facility. 


Implement our £5.9 million roads, street 
lighting and structures maintenance 
investment plan for 2020/21. 


Implement our investment plans at ia, 
Irvine as a premier business location 
with first class accommodation and 
sites on offer. 


Continue to deliver our housebuilding 
programme to build 1,575 new council 
homes. 


Deliver major housing planning 
applications in Irvine, Three Towns, West 
Kilbride and Kilwinning to help tackle 
the decline in population forecasts and 
support community growth making 
housing more affordable to working 
age families. 


— -1 
iE 
mn ee 


Annual Public Performance Report 2019/2( 





Support the wider regeneration of 
our communities by maximising all of 
our land and assets including through 
alternative uses for community and 
business benefit. 


Finalise design proposals for stage 

two of the Maritime Mile at Irvine 
Harbourside, commence community 
and partner consultation and conclude 
proof of commercial concept for Great 
Harbour proposals. 


Prepare for the start of construction 
of the Millport Coastal Flood Protection 
Scheme that is scheduled for August 
2021, following the scheme being 
formally notified in March 2020. 


Commence work on the Upper 
Garnock Flood Protection Scheme in 
summer 2020. 


Prepare proposals for planting over 
100,000 trees in North Ayrshire as part 
of our £500k commitment to planting 
trees as part of our net-zero emission 
ambitions. 








s "a ma m! 
Med L| Lili E 


sr | RE nU 


| gs “| I) 





2,0 0 0 trees planted 


at Ardeer, Stevenston to help absorb 
carbon from the atmosphere 








Our total household waste that is 
recycled continues to be among the 
best in Scotland at 


5 6. 3% an increase of 
1 1% since last year 








94.6 


Street 
cleanliness 
score this has 
increased every 
year for the past 
four years 


180 (65%) 
of tenants have 
been rehoused 
after the decision 
to demolish our 
High Flats in Irvine 


36 public electric vehicle (GA 


charging points available, 
an increase of 44% from the 
previous year 























Over 1,200 YẸ 
residents influenced Y 


grounds maintenance 
in their locality through 


participatory budgeting ( 1 i 





Annual Public Performance Report 2019/20 —20 


> Inspiring Place 


Case study: Zero Waste Strategy 


Our Zero Waste Strategy 2018 - 2022 outlines a clear commitment 
to prevent, minimise, reuse and recycle waste that is produced both 
externally and internally within the Council. A wide range of actions 
have been progressed to move North Ayrshire towards being a 
Zero Waste Council, this includes: 


Implementation of an enhanced 
waste and recycling service, including 
successful delivery of around 61,000 
new purple bins to households for the 
recycling of glass, cans and plastics; 


Being the first UK council to offer a free 
birth to potty’ reusable nappy scheme 
to reduce waste from the reliance on 
disposable nappies; 


Implementation of a Plastic Waste 
Prevention Plan to support the 
council's ambition to become Plastic 
Free Council by 2022; 


Working in partnership with third 
sector organisations, including 
supporting the Think About Plastic - 
Arran initiative to gain accreditation as 
Scotland's first plastic-free community; 


Delivering a residual waste treatment 
solution through the Clyde Valley 
partnership to recycle and recover 
eneroy from our grey bin waste; and 


Engaging with young people and 
supporting residents in waste 
education and awareness, through 
school initiatives and promotion of the 
Right Stuff Right Bin campaign. 


During the 2019 calendar year our 
performance improved by 1.7% on the 
previous year, with 56.3% of household 
waste now recycled. 


21 Annual Public Performance Report 2019/20 


> Inspiring Place 


Case study: Castlepark Spring Clean 


Our Streetscene Team worked in partnership with residents in 
Castlepark to tackle concerns relating to environmental crime 

in their community. A tailored public campaign was launched to 
highlight littering and other environmental crime in the area. This 
four-week initiative saw the Streetscene Environmental Enforcement 
Team increasing patrols and issuing a number of offenders with 
Fixed Penalty Notices for fly tipping and dog fouling offences. 


During that time our Enforcement Team Free dog fouling bags were provided to 
identified: residents who reguested them and areas 


of litter resulting from the recent storms 
18 incidents of fly tipping - with 12 fixed were identified and cleared. 
penalty notices of £200 each issued as 
a result of subsequent investigations. The Castlepark Spring Clean’ was a 
huge success, improving the appearance 


Six offenders who were instructed of the area, increasing civic pride, and 
to pay for the removal of some fly stimulating environmental volunteering 


tipped waste due to the nature of the opportunities. Officers are working on the 
contents. roll-out of this model to other hotspots 


across North Ayrshire. 


Two owners failing to clean up after 
their dog who were issued with fixed 
penalty notices of £80 each. 


Annual Public Performance Report 2019/20 22 





Key Priority: A Council For The Future 





An accessible Council that puts residents 
and communities at the heart of what we do 


» Our Council Leader and Chief Executive 
hosted a series of budget engagement 
sessions during November, giving 
communities a Fair Say on our Council 
budget as well as an opportunity to 
generate ideas to ensure priority 
services are delivered as efficiently as 
possible. 


> We were the first Council in Scotland 
to launch an on-line search facility for 
families to check the location and view an 
image of headstones in burial grounds. 


NISC 
J | 
(CN 


23 Annual Public Performance Report 2019/20 


Our Digital Team alongside our Library 
Service hosted a free drop in event 
at the Trinity Church Active Travel 
Hub, Irvine, to help our residents 

get online safely and securely, save 
money through using online services 
and connect with friends. The 
Digidabble equipment and a gaming 
area were also available, giving many 
residents access to technology that 
would otherwise be out of reach 
while providing the basic digital skills 
necessary for our residents to be 
confident and safe online. 


102 


» ACouncil For the Future 


An efficient Council that maximises 
resources and provides value for money 


» 


Preparations for our Best Value Audit 
by Audit Scotland were completed. The 
Audit confirmed that we are performing 
well across all themes and had very few 
recommendations for improvement. 


As part of our ongoing commitment 

to cyber security, we have again been 
certified by the UK government as 
compliant with their security standards. 
Beyond this, we have commissioned a 
programme of work which will ensure 
we remain secure from both known 
and emerging threats. 


» We have improved the processing 
times for Housing Benefit and Council 
Tax Reduction. New claims reduced 
by 9.596 since 2018/19 and change of 
circumstances reducing by 24.896. 


»  Weare the first council in Scotland to 
develop an on-line resource modelling 
schedule for grounds maintenance 
work, enabling teams to do their job 
more effectively while providing a better 
service to our communities. 


A valued workforce that delivers 


high quality services 


» 


We continued to focus on customer 
satisfaction with 8196 of customers 
being delighted with the service they 
have received. This is better than our 
target of 77% and is consistent with our 
satisfaction rate for the previous year. 


We paid our employees the new Real 
Living Wage five months early. The new 
rate of £9.30 per hour was announced 
in November 2019, a rise of 30p per 
hour for our employees. The new Living 
Wage rate was not due to be adopted 
by businesses and organisations until 
April 2020. 


> We have put in place new initiatives 
through our Healthy Working Lives 
programme to support the health and 
wellbeing of our workforce - over 7596 of 
our employees live within North Ayrshire. 





Annual Public Performance Report 2019/20 24 


> A Council For the Future 


A powerful and respected voice A Council for the Future: At A Glance 

















> Our Interim Report on the Feasibility » In partnership with the Health and Social 
of Citizen's Basic Income Pilots in Care Partnership, we were identified 
Scotland was submitted to the Scottish by the Scottish Government as one of 
Government in October. Findings were three national test sites for ‘co-creating po IIA 
shared with national stakeholders and libraries for wellbeing’. This has led 2 2 Ae y 
Scottish Ministers at a meeting with the to the creation of a wellbeing hub in p EAN 
Cabinet Secretary for Communities and Kilwinning Library co-designed with our CO 
Local Government. The report Mental Health Youth Ambassadors from bin calendar reminders downloaded A 


was promoted during Challenge Poverty 
Week then launched in November. 


Kilwinning Academy. 


Achieved the 2-2 Mobilisation 


io. DRE of Grounds 
cold . & lin she 


teams saves 


Healthy 1 : up to 
Working "A Y E 
Lives Ete 42,000 
Areas of Focus Award | w litres 


Kilwinning Community Hub 









| of water per 
Employee Engagement level is ! year due to the 


Over the next six months we will: » Capture experiences and learning from 
our response to the Covid-19 pandemic. | | reduction in 
» Continue to engage with our wr] a y 40) O O | ! paper used 
communities on our transformation > Explore additional external funding to wei /U bed Dua 
themes and development of locality support key priorities. an increase of 


community charters. 


» Action the few areas of improvement P vei / 9 
highlighted during our Audit Scotland bd Cee 
Best Value review. survey in 2012 








25 Annual Public Performance Report 2019/20 Annual Public Performance Report 2019/20 26 


103 


> A Council For the Future 


Case study: Grounds Maintenance 


Mobilisation 


Our Streetscene Service is responsible for maintaining 2,410 
hectares of public open space across North Ayrshire. This includes 
parks, pitches, schools, cemeteries, beaches and woodland. 


In the spirit of continuous improvement, 
opportunities to embrace the digital 
agenda to improve performance were 
explored. Building on earlier work to 
make play park and memorial inspection 
paperwork electronic, a decision was 
made to digitise grounds maintenance 
activities and issue grounds maintenance 
colleagues with tablet devices. 


The process involves the analysis of 
working practices to fully understand 

the current resources and demands. 

This was used to identify areas for 
improvement. A bespoke online system 
was created to schedule grounds 
maintenance work. Following a pilot, it was 
extended across the service. 


27 Annual Public Performance Report 2019/20 


The benefits are: 


Accurate daily data enabling better 
allocation of resources 


A flexible workforce ready to meet 
changing demands quickly 


Teams can prioritise outstanding tasks 
based on their local knowledge. 


A better overview of grounds being 
maintained 


An almost paper free system, 
equivalent to saving up to 42,000 litres 
of water a year 


Next Steps: 


Data will be analysed to inform next 
year's workforce planning 


Customer enquiries will be passed to 
teams remotely 


The technology can be used by other 
services to make improvements and 
efficiencies 


Financial Overview 


Where we get funding 


Scottish Government 
General Grant 


67.1% 


Council Tax 


16.4% 


Non domestic rates 


11.8% 


Scottish Government 
Specific Grant 


4.3% 


Use of reserves 


0.4% - 


Allocation 


Communities 
inc. Education 


37.1% 


Health and Social 
Care Partnership 


28.1% 


Place 


18.1% 


Other Corporate items 
(including financial costs) 


Finance and 
Corporate Support 


5.176 


Chief Executive and 
Democratic Services 


1.1% 


ful 
O 


Annual Public Performance Report 2019/20 28 





| Our Fair For All Strategy has five pledges: 


ership Working 


yrshire Community Planning 


Economic Growth Children 


To be the most improved local 
economy in Scotland, with all 
sections of our communities 
benefitting from this growth. 


We will support, nurture 
and encourage all our 
children to reach their 
full potential. 


Performance Status 

8 Data Only (no target) 
Amber 
Red 


Performance Status 
1 Data Only (no target) 
2 Green 

Amber 


Our Community Planning Partnership (CPP) consists of public, private and 
voluntary organisations and groups working together with communities 
through our six Locality Partnerships to make North Ayrshire a better place to 
live. There are 32 CPPs across Scotland, one for each council area. 





Performance Status 
5 Green 








o ae ue D M Environment 
e College Ayrshire ! 
ESAE & Arran All North Ayrshire 
residents have 
Skill access to and enjoy a 
B. oKIIIS M . . 
Ss SCOTTISH Development MEX. c safe, quality environment, and 
Mad m Scotland - TSI | © ~~ are given the opportunity to be 
included in the key decisions 
> P | made about their community. 
ZK : 
ai. — Scottish Enterprise l 
The Scottish Performance Status Performance Status 
| : | Data Only(no target) 3 Data Only (no target) 
|o 00 — NNNM  w—| 1] à à à Á = 
| Green 3 Green 


Red Amber 





Our CPP Board is chaired by the Leader of 
North Ayrshire Council and administered 
by the Council. 


Our Fair For All Strategy and Local 
Outcomes Improvement Plan (LOIP) form 
the focus of the work of our CPP. As a result, 
our Council Plan and our cross-partner 
strategies directly align to them. 


The following data gives an indication of 





Our CPP's Local Outcomes Improvement Plan 2017-2022 (LOIP) has four key priorities: 

















A Healthier A Safer 
North Ayrshire | North Ayrshire 


A Working 


North Ayrshire 












































Key: 


Data Only — 


No target set 














our partnership's performance during Green - 
2019/20. We are aware our impact on mm | I On target 
communities cannot be demonstrated Performance Performance Performance 
through figures alone, therefore the full Status ¡(Status ¡Status |: Slightly adrift 
CPP Annual Report will be made available 4 Green 10 Data Only 4 Data Only |! Data Only of target 
on the northayrshirecommunity website. Red (no target) (no target) (no target) 

1 Green 2 Green 2 Green aM 

Amber Amber wii adrift 





29 Annual Public Performance Report 2019/20 Annual Public Performance Report 2019/20 30 


105 


North Ayrshire Council 
Comhairle Siorrachd Áir a Tuath 





1.1 


1.2 


1.3 


1.4 


1.5 


1.6 


2.1 


2.2 


Agenda Item 5 


NORTH AYRSHIRE COUNCIL 


8 December 2020 


Cabinet 
Title: Safer North Ayrshire Strategy 2020-2025 
Purpose: == .— To seek approval of the priorities detailed within the Safer North - 


Ayrshire Strategy 2020-2025 and the implementation thereof. 


Recommendation: That Cabinet approves the Safer North Ayrshire Strategy 2020- 
2025. 
1. Executive Summary 


ocotland's revised National Performance Framework (NPF) was published in June 
2018, focusing on eleven national outcomes, including ‘we live in communities that are 
inclusive, empowered, resilient and safe’. 


The Antisocial Behaviour etc. (Scotland) Act 2004 places a duty on each local authority 
and Chief Constable to jointly produce a strategy to tackle antisocial behaviour in their 
Council area. 


‘A Safer North Ayrshire’ is one of the four key priorities identified within our Community 
Planning Partnership ‘Local Outcomes Improvement Plan’. 


The Safer North Ayrshire Strategy (2020-2025) builds on the significant progress 
already made by Community Planning Partners in keeping North Ayrshire safe and sets 
out the key commitments, a framework for working together, and a dynamic delivery 
plan for the next five years. 


The Safer North Ayrshire Partnership (SNAP) is responsible for overseeing the delivery 
of the Safer North Ayrshire Strategy 2020-2025. 


Members are invited to approve the Safer North Ayrshire Strategy 2020-2025. 
Background 
Policy Context 


‘We live in communities that are inclusive, empowered, resilient and safe’, is a key 
strategic objective and focuses on helping local communities to flourish, becoming 
stronger, safer places to live, whilst offering improved opportunities and a better quality 
of life. 

The Antisocial Behaviour etc. (Scotland) Act 2004 places a duty on each local authority 
and Police Scotland to jointly produce a strategy to tackle antisocial behaviour and 


107 


2.3 


2.4 


2.0 


2.6 


2./ 


2.8 


provides a range of legal tools to enable agencies to tackle antisocial behaviour more 
effectively. As part of a wider strategic approach, the Act aims to bring about a change 
in attitudes and behaviours, and ultimately make communities safer places to live where 
fewer people suffer from problems caused by antisocial behaviour. 


‘A Safer North Ayrshire’ is one of the four key priorities identified within our Community 
Planning Partnership ‘Local Outcomes Improvement Plan’. 


The Safer North Ayrshire Strategy 2020-2025 has been developed to contribute to the 
improvement in a range of performance measures detailed within the National 
Performance Framework, whilst supporting local priorities and outcomes. 


Progress 


The Safer North Ayrshire Strategy 2020-2025 builds on significant progress already 
made by the SNAP in keeping North Ayrshire safe. The integrated efforts of the partners 
over the last five years has resulted in the following improvements in community safety: 


20.696 reduction in all crimes and offences 
6.596 reduction in violent crime 

16.596 reduction in dishonesty crimes 
8.8% reduction in drug related crimes 
47.896 reduction in housebreaking 

17.996 reduction in vandalism 

896 reduction in dwelling fire casualties 


Strategic Vision and Priorities 


People have differing experiences of crime, antisocial behaviour and accidental harm 
and vulnerable groups living within communities are often more at risk. In recognition 
of this, a range of consultation and engagement with stakeholders was undertaken 
across North Ayrshire in order to understand what matters to local people. 


This informed the strategic vision and priorities to be addressed over the next five years 
in the strategy. The vision is: 


North Ayrshire continues to be a safe, secure and vibrant place to live, work and 
visit, where partners and communities work together to support our people, 
particularly those who are vulnerable. 


The strategy draws together the range of national and local community safety priorities 
which, combined with stakeholder consultation, has helped gather local evidence to 
inform the strategic priorities detailed below: 


108 


Crime and 
Antisocial 


Antisocial Deliberate Human 


. Violent | 
un SLE Dishonesty Drugsupply behaviour fire setting trafficking 


has crime 





reduced 


People Fee 


Safe and Gender ET 
Vulnerable Fire safety Water Unintentional Doorstep Internet 


based | 
People are safety Harm Crime safety 
Protected 


violence 
Road Safety Reducing injury iet I Road usage 
' ! i traffic condition i 
has improved. associated with: - ms behaviour 
collisions of vehicles 


2.9 Over the next five years there will be a renewed focus on prevention and early 
intervention, with partners working together with local people to understand and respond 
to the needs of the different communities across North Ayrshire. 


Hoarding 








2.10 During September 2020, the Strategy was reviewed through the lens of COVID-19, 
resulting in an addition to the action plan which, ensures that the needs of vulnerable 
people are met throughout the pandemic. 


NO 
ae 
— 


During the pandemic we established a network of six Community Hubs across North 
Ayrshire with CPP, community and third sector partners. The Community Hubs proved 
a lifeline for many of our residents, providing essential services such as a prescription 
delivery service, hot meals, befriending and foodbank distribution for those unable to 
access food due to shielding, self-isolation or financial issues. This successful 
partnership approach will be developed and maintained post-pandemic 


Measuring Success 


2.12 Through collaboration and consultation, we have identified what is important to 
stakeholders and residents of North Ayrshire, and the criteria by which the success of 
the Safer North Ayrshire Strategy (2020-2025) will be measured. 


2.13 This has been set out in the Safer North Ayrshire Delivery Plan 2020-2025, which sets 
out the actions, outcomes, responsibilities and timescales. The plan is dynamic and will 
continue to evolve throughout the duration of the Strategy, in response to emerging 
priorities. The Delivery Plan is included at Appendix | of the Strategy. 


Collaborative Working 


2.14 The Safer North Ayrshire Partnership (SNAP), chaired by the Cabinet Member for 
Green New Deal & Sustainability, comprises a range of Community Planning partners 
responsible for community safety in North Ayrshire. The Safer North Ayrshire Strategy 
2020-2025 links directly to partners' action plans, detailed in Appendix 2 of the Strategy, 
including the local Police Plan, the Scottish Fire and Rescue Plan and the Community 
Justice Ayrshire Strategy. 


2.15 SNAP enhances the outcomes delivered across single agency plans by identifying and 


responding to shared priorities and emerging needs. These priorities are incorporated 
within the Safer North Ayrshire Strategy 2020-2025. 


109 


Monitoring the Strategy 

2.16 The Strategy will be underpinned by a robust monitoring framework which will ensure 
that outcomes are reported to the Senior Officers Group on a quarterly basis and the 
Community Planning Board annually. 


3. Proposals 


3.1 That Cabinet approves the priorities detailed within the Safer North Ayrshire Strategy 
2020-2025 and the implementation thereof. 


4. Implications/Socio-economic Duty 

Financial 

4.1 The strategy and associated actions will be implemented from within existing resources. 
Human Resources 

4.2 None 


Legal 


43 The Antisocial Behaviour etc. (Scotland) Act 2004 places a duty on each local authority 
and Police Scotland to jointly produce a strategy to tackle antisocial behaviour in their 
Council area. 


Equality/Socio-economic 


4.4 The Safer North Ayrshire Strategy has been subject to a full Equality Impact 
Assessment. The Assessment found no negative or discriminatory effects. 


The Strategy has a focus on protecting vulnerable groups including the elderly, women 
at risk of domestic violence, vulnerable adults and children within our communities. 


Environmental and Sustainability 
4.5 Addressing anti-social environmental crimes such as littering, fly-tipping, graffiti and 


other environmental crimes will help to provide a more attractive and vibrant local 
environment for communities to enjoy. 


Key Priorities 


4.6 The Safer North Ayrshire Strategy 2020-2025 will assist the Council to meet its strategic 
priorities as detailed below: 


The Local Outcomes Improvement Plan 201 7- 2022 priority - ‘A Safer North Ayrshire’ 


The North Ayrshire Council Plan 2019 — 2024 priority outcome — ‘North Ayrshire's 
residents and communities are safe' 


110 


Community Wealth Building 


4.7 The development of land and asset ‘community wealth building initiatives’ will be 
complemented and facilitated by the creation of safer and appealing assets for 
community use through the implementation of a number of community safety actions 
detailed within this strategy. 


5. Consultation 


5.1 [here has been a range of consultation throughout the development of the strategy 
across key stakeholders including: 


The North Ayrshire Violence Against Women Partnership 
Community Planning partners 

Locality Planning Partnerships 

North Ayrshire Council 

Police Scotland 

ocottish Fire and Rescue 

otrategic Planning Group (Health and Social Care Partnership) 
Health and Social Care partnership professionals 


The final draft of the strategy was available for public consultation for a period of six 
weeks. 


RUSSELL McCUTCHEON 
Executive Director (Place) 


For further information please contact Janeine Barrett, Senior Manager, on 01294 
314600. 


Background Papers 


1 
oafer North Ayrshire Strategy 2020-2025 


111 





Safer North Ayrst r 


2020-2025 á d 


Contents 


OR OW ON m ————————— — Hà 2 
Introduction to North Ayrshire .....................eeceeeeeeeernne 3 
eV ————————— dean: 4 
Strategic PONCY CONTEXT tana 5 
Community Safety in North Ayrshire ............cccccsscccssececseceseeseeeeeseeees 6 

disi. T ——————— 6 


Services available for tackling antisocial behaviour and crime in 


K aig AV TE MET TO T DOT 7 
Informing the Strategy .....occccocncnonncnnccnnnnnonacononanononanonnonacononaronenaronannnos 8 
Priority 1: Reducing Crime and Antisocial Behaviour .................... 8 


Priority 2: People Feel Safe and Vulnerable People are Protected 


"——————— "nn" ——— 0€ 9 
Priority 3: Improving Road Safety .........ccooccccccoccnncnonnnonaconenaronenanonos 9 
What Success Looks Like.......................................4 9^ ..... MI ........... 10 
How We Will Work Together.........ccooocccccoccnononcnnncnccnnonaninonacononanononos 12 


Prevention First Group ...........cccsccssccssccssccsecesecesccesccesesaseesscesecesees 13 
Gender Based Violence Working Group.............................. e 13 
Monitoring the Strategy susana 14 
Appendix 1: Safer North Ayrshire Delivery Plan 2020-2025 ........... 15 
Priority 1: Reducing Crime and Antisocial Behaviour.................. 15 


Priority 2: People Feel Safe and Vulnerable People are Protected 


y TERRE 16 
Priority 3: Improving Road Safety .........coocccccoccncononononanonenanononnnos 19 
Appendix 2: Single Agency Plans and Strategies ............................. 21 

Single agency Plans and Strategies which impact Community 
SCIRE 21 
Appendix 3: Equality Impact Assessment..........................eeeeeeeeeee 22 
FE UL AINE mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmi. 22 
Appendix 4: CONSUILATION «oso o un inicie 23 
Appendix 5: Safer North Ayrshire Partners ........................ eese 24 
1|Page 


113 


Foreword 


A safe community is a liveable community, where people can go about their daily activities in an environment without fear, risk, harm or 
injury. Community safety is about building strong cohesive, vibrant, participatory communities, where homes, roads, public spaces and places 


of work are safe, and feel safe for everyone to enjoy 


2|Page 


114 


Introduction to North Ayrshire 


North Ayrshire is a safe and secure place to live, work and visit. The area is home to 138,000 people residing across diverse island, coastal, 


rural, and urban towns and villages, and split into six areas known as ‘localities’. 


North Ayrshire Figure 1: North Ayrshire localities 
Localities 2018 







send Garnock 
egen 
L] Locality Boundaries 2018 Va | ley 


North Coast 
& Cumbraes 


unemployment, and poor health. 


proportionally to arising issues. 


| Crowe copyright and dalabats right 2015 Orcmance Buren lees na, 100023397 





115 


Irvine Kilwinning 


Three 
Towns 





We have good transport links to our island communities, neighbouring authorities, 
Glasgow and beyond. This is in addition to affordable housing, quality parks and 
outdoor leisure space and a distinctive cultural heritage. However, there is also a 
great deal of inequality. More than one in four families live in some of the most 
deprived areas in Scotland, and many people face disadvantage, poverty, 


There are different challenges within each of the North Ayrshire localities. We are 
therefore committed to ‘locality planning’, engaging with our local partners to 
identify solutions to area-specific issues. The Safer North Ayrshire Partnership 
(SNAP) is a multi-agency group who work together with local communities and key 
stakeholders to prevent crime and antisocial behaviour, responding quickly and 


3|Page 


Our Strategy 


The Safer North Ayrshire Strategy (2020-25) builds on the significant progress already made by the Community Planning Partners in keeping 
North Ayrshire safe and sets out: our key commitments; framework for working together; and dynamic delivery plan for the next five years. 


We have worked collaboratively with stakeholders from across North Ayrshire to develop our vision and the priorities to be addressed over the 


next five years. Our vision is: 





North Ayrshire continues to be a safe, secure and vibrant place to live, work and visit, where partners and communities work 
together to support our people, particularly those who are vulnerable. 


This Strategy draws together the range of national and local community safety priorities which, combined with stakeholder consultation, has 
helped us to gather local evidence to inform our strategic priorities as detailed below: 








Crime and 
sae T l Violant | Antisocial Deliberate Human 
Dishonesty STI E Drug supply behaviour fire setting trafficking 
has 
reduced 
People Fee 
Safe and Gender : ! 
Vulnerable Fire safety pied based ME a p d pd Hoarding 
People are salety violence y 
Protected 
Road Safety Reducing injury ied mm Road usage 
has improved. associated with: Petre E al behaviour 





Over the next five years we will have a renewed focus on Prevention and Early Intervention, with partners working together with local people 
to understand and respond to the needs of the different communities across North Ayrshire. 


4|Page 


116 


Strategic Policy Context 


‘We live in communities that are inclusive, empowered, resilient and safe’, is a key strategic objective and focusses on helping local 
communities to flourish, becoming stronger, safer places to live, whilst offering improved opportunities and a better quality of life. 


The delivery of the Safer North Ayrshire Strategy will support this national goal by contributing to the improvement of a range of performance 
measures detailed within the National Performance Framework, most specifically: 


PERCEPTIONS OF LOCAL AREA Percentage of adults who rate their neighbourhood as a very good place to live 
PERCEPTIONS OF LOCAL CRIME RATE Percentage of respondents who think crime in their area has stayed the same or reduced in the past 2 years 
CRIME VICTIMISATION Proportion of people who have been the victim of one of more crimes in the past year 


The Antisocial Behaviour etc. (Scotland) Act 2004 places a duty on each local authority and Chief Constable to jointly produce a strategy to 
tackle antisocial behaviour and provides a range of legal tools to enable agencies to tackle antisocial behaviour more effectively. 


A Safer North Ayrshire is one of the four key priorities identified within our Community Planning Partnership ‘Local Outcomes Improvement 
Plan’. The Strategy will also work to reduce the inequalities that can be found across North Ayrshire as detailed within the Community Planning 
Partnership’s ‘Fair for All’ strategy. 


There are a range of agencies across North Ayrshire who have operational responsibility for keeping North Ayrshire safe, and the Safer North 
Ayrshire Strategy links directly to their action plans, including the local Police Plan, the Scottish Fire and Rescue Plan, the Community Justice 
Ayrshire Strategy and others as detailed within Appendix 2. 


The Safer North Ayrshire Partnership enhances the outcomes delivered across individual agencies’ plans by identifying and responding to 
shared priorities and emerging needs. 


5|Page 


117 


Community Safety in North Ayrshire 


North Ayrshire is a safe place to live, where levels of crime and antisocial behaviour have continued to reduce. Our residents tell us that they 
feel safe living and working within their communities. We have achieved significant reductions in crime, antisocial behaviour and accidental 


injury over the last five years. 


Progress 


It is important to review our successes and the significant progress we have made to date, to make sure we take the opportunity to build upon 


this. Some of our key achievements are: 


All Crime & 
Offences 


-20.6% 


Drug Related 
Crime 


-8.8% 


Disorderly 
Conduct 
Crime 


-30.2% 


Violent 
Crime 


-6.5% 


House 
Breaking 


-47.8% 


Accidential 
Dwelling Fire 
Casualties 


-8% 


Serious 
Violent 
Crime 


-12.4% 


Motor 
Vehicle 
Crime 


-38.60% 


Dishonesty 
Crime 


-16.5% 


Vandalism 
-17.9% 


Non 
Domenstic 
Fire Safety 


-3% 





118 


6|Page 


Services available for tackling antisocial behaviour and crime in North Ayrshire 


THE SAFER NORTH AYRSHIRE APPROACH TO PREVENTION AND EARLY INTERVENTION IS STRONG ASA 
RESULT OF OUR COMMITMENT TO PARTNERSHIP WORKING AND SHARING OF KNOWLEDGE AND 
RESOURCES. 


Our integrated approach means that we can intervene early to proactively prevent crime, antisocial behaviour and accidental harm. The Safer 
North Ayrshire Partnership has developed and implemented a range of joint initiatives. 


e Safer Shores Initiative e Investment in council enforcement e Positive Steps employability 
e Prevention First services Programme 
e White Ribbon Campaign e Investment in enhanced North e North Ayrshire Skills Academy 
e inter-agency planning and Ayrshire CCTV e Fire Safety e-training for Home 
response to events and festivals e Youth engagement work Care Staff 
e Partnership safety arrangements promoting road safety e Dementia training 
for Bonfire Night and the festive e Community led youth support e Fire Reach Programme 
period projects e Prison discharge protocol 
e Projects to prevent and protect e Youth engagement with 
vulnerable residents from police campus officers 


doorstep crime 
e Diversionary activities to 
reduce and deter youth 


disorder and criminality The likelihood of being a victim of crime in North Ayrshire is at its lowest level for five 


years. 


North Ayrshire also continues to experience lower levels of accidental dwelling fires 
compared to the Scottish average. 





119 


Informing the Strategy 


We recognise that people have differing 
experiences of crime, antisocial behaviour 
and accidental harm and that vulnerable 
groups living within our communities are 
often more at risk. We therefore 
undertook a range of consultation and 
engagement with stakeholders across 
North Ayrshire in order to understand 
what matters to local people. This helped 
to identify the areas of work we need to 
prioritise over the next five years. 


North Ayrshire covers a broad 
geographical area including a mix of urban 
areas, rural towns and island 
communities. The incidence and profile of 
antisocial behaviour is likely to vary across 
communities and reinforces the 
importance of tailoring our approach to 
recognise local issues and needs. 


Priority 1: Reducing Crime and Antisocial Behaviour 


Antisocial behaviour and crime describe a range of issues which cause distress to 
communities and make them feel unsafe. This behaviour is often the visible symptom of 
deep-rooted problems such as lack of opportunity and the effects of alcohol, drugs and 
deprivation. National policy recognises that only by addressing these underlying issues and 
creating more choices and chances for people to lead positive lives, can long term solutions 
be reached. 


Incidences of antisocial behaviour have declined in North Ayrshire over recent years. Police 
Scotland records a number of measures associated with antisocial behaviour, the most 
relevant being “public reported incidents of antisocial behaviour’. Up to date statistics on 
incidence of antisocial behaviour in North Ayrshire are available from SNAP partners’ 
respective websites. Despite the encouraging decline in incidents, our Strategy recognises 
that antisocial behaviour has a negative impact on communities. Engagement with 
communities has also consistently highlighted the importance of antisocial behaviour issues 
— and community safety more widely - for local residents. 


Our Prevention First initiative is a multi-agency response to reducing crime, antisocial 
behaviour and community concerns by identifying and changing the conditions that drive 
crime in our communities. The integrated approach has changed the way in which we 
communicate, gather intelligence, agree priorities and utilise partnership resources. The 
initiative has resulted in a significant increase in the detection of crime, as well as a 
reduction in levels of crime and antisocial behaviour. 


Over the next five years we will continue to develop this approach, prioritising prevention 
and early intervention to ensure our communities feel safe. 


8|Page 


120 


Priority 2: People Feel Safe and Vulnerable People are 
Protected 


How people feel about the community they live in is important to their physical and mental 


wellbeing. It is therefore important that we understand the concerns and experiences of 


residents in relation to crime, antisocial behaviour, safety and harm. 


We also recognise that there are vulnerable people living within our communities who are at 


greater risk. This includes: 


Children at risk of abuse and exploitation 
Minority groups 

People with addiction issues 

People with mental health issues 

Victims of crime and antisocial behaviour 
Vulnerable adults 

Women at risk of violence 


As a partnership we will work together to safeguard these people, protecting them from 


abuse and exploitation and reducing the risk of harm. Over the next five years we will: 


Work together to safeguard our people, protecting them from abuse and exploitation 
and reducing the risk of harm 

Work with local communities to identify people at risk 

Put in place opportunities for prevention and early intervention 

Ensure local communities know how to respond when they have concerns about 


their families and neighbours 


121 


Priority 3: Improving Road 
Safety 


We are committed to reducing the 
number of people who are killed or 
injured on our road network. 


Partnership working is the key to ensuring 
safe use of our roads in North Ayrshire. 
We will work with local communities to 
understand their concerns in relation to 
road safety, ensuring their involvement to 
identify local issues and the development 
of local initiatives to effect change. 


Over the next five years we will work 
together to: 


e Ensure effective patrolling of the 
roads 

e Influence driver and road user 
behaviour 

e Detect and deter all types of crime 
on our roads 

e Tackle antisocial use of the roads 

e Ensure vehicles are road worthy 


e Ensure our roads remain safe 


9|Page 


What Success Looks Like 


THROUGH COLLABORATION AND CONSULTATION, WE HAVE IDENTIFIED WHAT IS IMPORTANT TO 
STAKEHOLDERS AND RESIDENTS OF NORTH AYRSHIRE AND THE CRITERIA BY WHICH THE SUCCESS OF THE 
SAFER NORTH AYRSHIRE STRATEGY (2020 - 2025) WILL BE MEASURED. 


Delivery Plan Success Criteria 


Levels of crime and antisocial behaviour have reduced 


Our residents will feel safe in their homes and communities 


The threat from organised crime groups and criminals involved in 

the supply of drugs has reduced 

The risk to vulnerable people from crime and accidental harm has 
reduced 

The risk of harm from fire has reduced within the home and wider 
community 

Effective Justice Services which support reductions in reoffending 


The number of people injured on our roads network has reduced 


A reduction in casualties in and around our bodies of water 


How we will measure this 


Crime statistics 

CCTV statistics 

Antisocial behaviour statistics 

Deliberate fire statistics 

Stakeholder survey results 

Annual community safety stakeholder conference 
Community Hub initiative feedback 

Crime statistics 

Reporting on joint initiatives 

Reporting of joint initiatives targeted at vulnerable groups 
Number of appropriate vulnerable adult and child protection referrals 
Scottish Fire and Rescue Service statistics 
Reporting on joint initiatives 

Reporting of joint initiatives 

Community Justice Conference 

Prison throughcare statistics 

Crime statistics 

Accidental harm statistics 

Roads statistics 

Coastguard statistics 

Police Statistics 





10|Page 


122 


Scottish Fire and Rescue Service statistics 


11|Page 


123 


How We Will Work Together 


The Safer North Ayrshire Partnership (SNAP) brings together a broad range of partners 
(listed) who work together with local communities to promote community safety. The 
partnership is chaired by an Elected Member and meets four times a year to provide 
leadership and to consider emerging priorities or barriers to effective joint working. 


The Safer North Ayrshire Partnership is led and directed by a steering group which includes 
Elected Members and senior officers as detailed in the diagram opposite. 


SNAP is responsible for monitoring the delivery of the Safer North Ayrshire Strategy and 
reporting progress to the North Ayrshire Community Planning Partnership. Partners are 
committed to working together to: 


e Gather and share knowledge and expertise, targeting services at areas and groups 
within the community with greatest need 

e Build on best practice — ‘What Works’ 

e Use a balanced approach to prevention, early intervention, communication and 
engagement 


e Include local communities (e.g. Community Hub support model) 


The Safer North Ayrshire Partnership is supported by two inter-agency operational steering 
groups: the Prevention First Group, chaired by Police Scotland; and the Gender Based 
Violence Group chaired by an officer from the Council’s Housing Service. These groups are 
responsible for the operational delivery of the Safer North Ayrshire Strategy. The full list of 
partners involved in the Safer North Ayrshire delivery plan is detailed within Appendix 4 


Local Elected 
Members 


North Ayrshire 
Council: 
Communications 


Scottish Fire and 
Rescue Service 


North Ayrshire 
Adult Protection 
Committee (HSCP) 


Children and 
Families (HSCP) 


Third Sector 


Interface 





North Ayrshire 
Council: Place and 
Communities 
Directorates 


Police Scotland 


Addiction Services 
(HSCP) 


Social Work Justice 
Services (HSCP) 


Community Justice 
Ayrshire (HSCP) 


Coastguard 





124 


12|Page 


Prevention First Group 


The Prevention First Group focusses on early intervention, 


antisocial behaviour, road safety and fire risks and reports back to 


the SNAP. The group gathers information from a range of sources 


including: 


Police crime reports and incidents 

Issues raised by tenants and residents 

Antisocial behaviour complaints 

Local businesses concerns 

Elected Member concerns and complaints 

Concerns highlighted by housing providers 

Priorities identified by the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service 


The group use their local knowledge and expertise to identify 


trends in order to deliver a coordinated inter-agency response. 


Gender Based Violence Working Group 


Led by Housing Services and supported by North Ayrshire Women’s 
Aid, this partnership delivers the national Equally Safe Strategy for 
Preventing and Eradicating Violence against Women and Girls. The 
group meet every two months to discuss and monitor the delivery 
of the action plan, reporting progress to the Safer North Ayrshire 
Partnership. 


The 16 Days of Action Group is a subgroup of the Gender Based 
Violence Group. They meet bi-monthly to coordinate and plan 
events to galvanise action to end violence against women and girls 
in North Ayrshire. A calendar of activities is delivered throughout 
the year, with a concentration of activities from 25 November, the 
International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women on 
10 December, Human Rights Day, in support of the international 16 
Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence Campaign. 


13 |Page 


125 


Monitoring the Strategy 


The Safer North Ayrshire Partnership 
reports progress against the Safer North 
Ayrshire Strategy annually to the 
Community Planning Partnership Board 
and quarterly to the Senior Officers 
Group, which oversees all relevant local 
plans, strategies and performance related 
to community safety. 





Community Planning Partnership Board 


Community Planning Partnership Senior Officers Group 





Safer North Ayrshire Partnership 


Prevention First Steering Gender Based Violence 
Group Group 


16 Days of Action Group 


14 |Page 


126 


Appendix 1: Safer North Ayrshire Delivery Plan 2020-2025 


THIS PLAN IS DYNAMIC AND WILL CONTINUE TO EVOLVE THROUGHOUT THE DURATION OF THE 
STRATEGY, IN RESPONSE TO EMERGING PRIORITIES. 


Priority 1: Reducing Crime and Antisocial Behaviour 





Action Outcome Success Responsibility Timescale 
Criteria 
1.1 Enhance the Prevention First programme across Embedded services are delivered Prevention First 
North Ayrshire across the whole of North Police Scotland 
Ayrshire 
1.2 Review partnership processes to maximise a Review is completed and Prevention First 
coordinated stance against the supply of drugs outcomes presented to SNAP Police Scotland 
and ADP 
1.3 Tackle the supply of drugs through enforcement Increased detection in the supply Prevention First 
activities, utilising inter-agency resources of drugs Police Scotland 
1.4 Embed the Prison Discharge protocol across Reduction in reoffending 6 Prevention First December 
partners to reduce the risk of reoffending Homeless Service 2020 


1.5 Continue to deliver accredited offender An annual report to SNAP on the Prevention First Annual 
programmes aimed at reducing offending impact of offender programmes H&SCP 
behaviour will be produced 
Delivery of MF:MC 
Delivery of Caledonian Programme 


1.6 Continue to deliver specific interventions for Annual report to SNAP on impact Gender Based Annual 
women who are involved in the justice system to of intervention of women's Violence 
reduce offending behaviour programmes H&SCP 
Delivery of the Court Screening Service for 
Women 





15|Page 


127 


Action Outcome Success Responsibility Timescale 
Criteria 


1.7 Implement Housing First (HF) programme to 100 units of HF created Prevention First March 


reduce the risk of reoffending Reduction in reoffending for Housing 2024 
those involved (Homeless) 
Services 
1.8 Develop and deliver a Safer Town Centre initiative X Reduction in crime and antisocial 
behaviour in our town centres 





Priority 2: People Feel Safe and Vulnerable People are Protected 


Action Outcome Success Responsibility Timescale 
Criteria 
2.1 Undertake a review of CCTV to ensure they are Review completed and outcomes 2 Prevention First March 
situated in the right locations presented to SNAP Housing Services 2021 
2.2 Develop a community engagement framework to Framework approved by Locality 
enable communities to influence identification of 1 Planning Partnerships and 
local issues and delivery of local solutions integrated into Prevention First 
2.3 Develop and implement a monitoring tool to Community perception has 
gauge community perception of: improved 
Their local area 
Local crime rate 
Crime victimisation 
Social capital within communities and 
loneliness 
2.4 Undertake a review of home security provision Review complete and reported Gender Based 
and equipment to ensure it is fit for purpose to SNAP Violence 
Housing Services 





16|Page 


128 


Action Outcome Success Responsibility Timescale 




































































Criteria 
Promote and deliver home safety service with a People at risk of crime and Gender Based Annual 
focus on those at risk and vulnerable people antisocial behaviour feel safe Violence 
within their home Housing Services 
Develop volunteering opportunities across North Increase in the number of people SNAP Annual 
Ayrshire engaging in volunteering Third Sector 
opportunities Interface 
Develop and promote drug awareness training SNAP partners have undertaken Prevention First 
across partner organisations training H&SCP 
2.8 Improve access to and uptake of drug prevention Increase in service uptake annual 3 Prevention First Annual 
and diversionary activities within communities report to SNAP from ADP H&SCP 
2.9 Increase initiatives to minimise the risk of door Level of initiatives increased 4 Prevention First Annual 
stop crime doorstep crime reduced Protective 
Services 
2.10 Increase awareness campaigns to keep vulnerable Increase in campaigns 4 Prevention First Annual 
people safe online Increase in uptake H&SCP 
2.11 Implement the Equally Safe Strategy, National Reduction in domestic violence 4 Gender Based March 
Standards Framework and interagency 16 Days of Achievement of National Violence 2025 
Action framework to ensure: Standards accreditation NAC Housing 


e North Ayrshire communities embrace equality 
and mutual respect, and rejects all forms of 
violence against women and girls 

e Women and girls thrive as equal citizens: 
socially, culturally, economically and politically 

e Interventions are early and effective 
preventing violence and maximising the safety 
and wellbeing of women, children and young 
people 





17|Page 


129 


Action 


e Men desist from all forms of violence against 
women and girls and perpetrators of such 
violence receive a robust and effective 
response 


Success 
Criteria 


Outcome 





2.12 


2.13 


Support whole systems approach to divert young 
people away from Justice system through 
prevention and early intervention 

Continue to train front line staff to identify the 
signs of neglect and abuse, ensuring they 
understand how to report concerns 











Annual report to SNAP on impact 6 
of whole systems approach 


SNAP partners trained 4 
Increased referrals to H&SCP 





2.14 


2.15 


2.16 


2.17 


Continue to train staff on the impact of Adverse 
Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and Trauma 


Develop a dynamic media campaign to promote 
Community Safety dashboard statistics and 
initiatives to improve community knowledge and 
perception 





Identify those parts of North Ayrshire affected by 
deliberate fire setting, with information sharing 
and response across partners. 








Utilising Fire Skills, Fire Setters and school 
education programmes to raise awareness of the 
impact of fire related antisocial behaviour. 








SNAP partners trained and 4 
recognise and respond to 

individuals who have been 

affected by these 

Annual review of impact of ACE 

training on service delivery to 

SNAP 

Monthly reporting across all 2 
media 

Perceptions of community safety 
remains high 





Reduction in deliberate fire 5 
setting with annual report to 

SNAP 

Delivery to all secondary schools 5 


across North Ayrshire 


130 


Responsibility 





Prevention First 
H&SCP 


Prevention First 
H&SCP 


Timescale 





Annual 
report 


Rolling 
5-year 
programme 





Prevention First 
H&SCP/NHS 


Prevention First 
NAC 
Communications 


Prevention First 
SFRS 


Prevention First 
SFRS 





Rolling 
5-year 
programme 


August 
2020 


December 
2020 


Rolling 5- 
year 
programme 





18 | Page 


Action 


Work with partners to develop joint strategies to 
reduce the risk posed by deliberate fire setting 
Promote and deliver home safety visits with a 
focus on those at risk and vulnerable people 
Development of and participation in the Safer 
Shores initiative 


Tackle environmental crime, promoting outcomes 
to improve community perception 


Work together with local communities to ensure 
vulnerable people’s needs are met throughout the 
COVID 19 pandemic and beyond, through a 
number of mechanisms including the network of 
six Community Hubs across North Ayrshire 
established with CPP, community and third sector 
partners. 


Priority 3: Improving Road Safety 


Action 


3.1 Promote road safety and responsible driver 


behaviour, targeting at risk groups 
3.2 Ensure road networks remain safe during winter 
periods 


Outcome 


Reduction in deliberate fire 
setting 
Reduction in accidental fires 


Lower levels of crime, antisocial 
behaviour and harm during safer 
shores initiatives 

Higher detection of: 

Dog fouling 

Graffiti 

Fly tipping 

Communication framework to 
promote outcomes in place 
Vulnerable people are identified, 
and partners work together to 
ensure their needs are met 


Outcome 
Fewer road accidents 


Fewer road accidents 


Success Responsibility 
Criteria 
Prevention First 
SFRS 
Prevention First 
SFRS 
SNAP 
Police Scotland 


Prevention First 


Prevention First 
NAC Communities 
Directorate 


Success Responsibility 
Criteria 
7 Prevention First 
Police Scotland 
Prevention First 
NAC Roads 


131 


Timescale 


April 2021 


Annual 


Annual 


March 
2021 





Timescale 


Annual 


Annual 





19| Page 


Ensure safe routes to school and work by Fewer casualties on our road 7 Prevention First Annual 


promoting walking, cycling and safe travel network NAC 
Communications 
Undertake annual Vehicle Forecourt Safety Improved vehicle safety 7 Prevention First Annual 
Initiative (VFSI) Annual report on VFSI to SNAP 
Continue the annual road network maintenance Ensure our Roads remain safe 7 Prevention First Annual 


investment programme alongside robust 
application of our Road Asset Safety Inspection 
Policy in addressing defects on the road network 


20 | Page 


132 


Appendix 2: Single Agency Plans and Strategies 


Single Agency Plans and Strategies which impact Community Safety 


Fair for all 
Strategy 


North Ayrshire 
Adult Support 
and Protection 
Arrangements 


H&SCP Drug 
and Alcohol 
Plans 


North Ayrshire 
Health and 
Social Care 


Strategic Plan 


Environmental 
Policy 


Local 
Employment 
Activity Plan 


NAC 
Litter, Fly 
Tipping and 
Dog Fouling 
Prevention 
Strategy 


North Ayrshire 
Volunteer 
Strategy 


Fire and Rescue 
Services Plan 


CJA Beginnings, 
Belonging, 
Belief 


NAC Open 
Space Strategy 


NAC Education 
‘Anti-Bullying 
Strategy’ and 
‘Promoting 
Positive 
Relationships 
Policy’ 


Local Outcome 
Improvement 
Plan 


Locality Plans 


CPP Safer North 
Ayrshire 
Strategy 


NAC Road Asset 
Plan/ Road 
Safety Plan/ 
Winter 
Weather 

Emergencies 

Plan 

NAC Education 
‘Parental 
Involvement 
Strategy’ and 
‘Attendance 
Policy’ 


mm — 


s Strategy 


Council Plan 


CPP Equally 
Safe Strategy 


NAC Rapid 
Rehousing 
Transition Plan 


NAC Education 
“Inclusion 
Policy” and 
“Included, 
Engaged and 
Involved Policy” 


Civil 
Contingencies 
Safer Shores 
Plan 


Local Policing 
Plan 


NAC 
Local Housing 
Strategy 


NAC Tenant 
Participation 
Strategy 





North Ayrshire 
Child 
protection 
Arrangements 


Town Centre 
Parking 
Strategy 


Multi Agency 
Public 
Protection 
Arrangements 


Third Sector 
Interface 
Business Plan 


133 


21|Page 


Appendix 3: Equality Impact Assessment 


Equalities 


The Safer North Ayrshire Strategy has been subject to an Equality Impact Assessment. The Assessment found no negative or discriminatory 
effects on any of the following equality groups: 


e Age 

e Disability 

e Gender reassignment 

e Gender 

e Maternity and pregnancy 
e Race 

e Religion or belief 


e Sexual orientation 


The Strategy has a focus on protecting vulnerable groups including: the elderly; women and girls at risk of domestic violence; vulnerable 
adults; and children within our communities. 


22|Page 
134 


Appendix 4: Consultation 


THE CONSULTATION PROCESS THAT INFORMED THE FINALISED STRATEGY IS SUMMARISED IN THE TABLE 
BELOW. 


On-line Professional 
survey Review 


Focus 


Consultation Workshops 
Groups 


Website 


Violence Against Women Partnership 

Strategic Management Team 

Community Planning Partners 

Locality Planning Partnership 

North Ayrshire Council 

Police Scotland 

Scottish Fire and Rescue Service 

Strategic Planning Group (Health & Social Care Partnership) 


Health and Social Care Partnership Professionals 





23| Page 
135 


Appendix 5: Safer North Ayrshire Partners 


Partner Organisation Service 
Elected Members 
North Ayrshire Council Housing Services: 
e Housing Operations 
e Homelessness and 
Community Safety 
e Housing Strategy 
e Community Safety 
e Homelessness Services 
Protective Services 
Streetscene 
Roads 
Waste 
Connected Communities and 
Education 
Legal 
Communications 


Police Scotland 
Scottish Fire and Rescue Service 








Partner Organisation Service 
Health and Social Care Addictions 
Partnership Mental Health 
Children and Families 
Justice Social Work 
Adult Support and Protection 
Child Protection 


LXV 


Registered Social Cunninghame Housing Association 
Landlords 


24 | Page 
136 





North Aurshire 
Community Planning Partnership 


AE = 
asl — NHS 
+ Ap. SCOTTISH Community Justice ee > Na má 
32 Ww Working together fora catur Scotland | F SEA Ayrshire 


North Ayrshire a De 
Comhairle Siorrachd Áir a 





| ecting y 
y POLICE together t 


SCOT LAND NORTH AYRSHIRE 








E- Ayrshire. Delivering care Ayrshire 
together Arran 











137 


Agenda Item 6 


NORTH AYRSHIRE COUNCIL 


8th December 2020 


Cabinet 
Title: Town Centre Fund 2020-2021 
Purpose: To seek approval for the allocation of recently announced - 


additional Town Centre Funding. 


Recommendation: It is recommended that Cabinet agrees to the approach set out 


1.1 


1.2 


2.1 


2.2 


including the allocation of funds to support the acquisition and 
improvement of vacant/derelict sites, and projects in Millport, 
Dalry, Stevenston and Kilbirnie. 


Executive Summary 


In September 2020 Scottish Government announced an additional £18 million to be 
provided to local authorities through the Town Centre Fund, which forms part of the 
£230 million Economic Recovery Stimulus package announced in June 2020. This 
equates to a further £0.507M funding which is in addition to an earlier North Ayrshire 
allocation of £1.418M, proposals for which were agreed by Cabinet in May 2019. 


This report sets out proposals for expenditure of the additional funding, with investments 
to allow the acquisition and improvement of vacant sites given the priority this 
represents for local members and communities, as well as support for projects in 
Millport, Dalry, Stevenston and Kilbirnie. 


Background 


Following agreement with COSLA and local authority Leaders, the Scottish 
Government announced on 9 September 2020 that £18 million would be provided to 
local authorities through a Town Centre Fund. That saw an allocation of £1.418M to 
North Ayrshire, proposals for which were agreed by Cabinet in May 2019. This included 
approximately £1M be utilised to prioritise action in Stevenston and Dalry; with the 
remaining £0.418M being utilised to support a range of other projects and community- 
led initiatives across North Ayrshire town centres. 


The North Ayrshire additional allocation of £0.507M requires financial commitment by 
March 2021 and project completion by September 2021.The further grant fund is for 
capital expenditure which is additional to that which is already or would otherwise be 
allocated to the 2020-21 budget and should not substitute for existing spend. 


138 


2.3 


2.4 


2.0 


2.6 





The Government have advised that the aim of this additional £18 million fund is to 
stimulate local construction activity and support employment across Scotland. Local 
authorities should also make investment decisions in the context of national and local 
commitments to town centres including the Town Centre First Principle and the Town 
Centre Action Plan; and more recently, the Place Principle. 


The consideration of potential projects has been informed by the grant conditions, the 
deliverability of projects, consultation with local ward members, known community- 
based projects and priorities, and alignment with actions identified in the emerging 
North Ayrshire Regeneration Delivery Plan. 


On this basis, it is recommended that the fund is allocated as follows: 


Project Description — 1 1 1 Proposed Budget 


Asset acquisition, Fund to support the acquisition of sites £0.300M 
identified through ongoing elected member 
acquisitions will be subject to successful 
negotiation. 
| Funding to support ongoing CARS initiative £0.120M 
due to additional costs arising as a result of 
Covid19. 
Funding to support refurbishment works to £0.030M 
pavilion for community use due to additional 
costs arising during detailed design. 
Funding to support additional shopfront £0.030M 
improvements as a result of the initial scheme 
being oversubscribed. 
2 Main Street Additional funding to support post-demolition £0.017M 
Kilbirnie improvement works for use as amenity space 
Garnock Street, Additional funding to implement full extent of £0.010M 
Kilbirnie resurfacing works 


The ability to conclude asset acquisitions within the funding timescales is subject to 
owner value expectations and interest in sale. If officers identify that acquisitions will 
not proceed to the full value, then funds will be reallocated to existing town centre 
projects in Dalry and Stevenston or others identified within this paper and in the 
emerging North Ayrshire Regeneration Delivery Plan. This approach seeks to maximise 
the impact of the fund, while supporting a range of initiatives, in line with current funding 
conditions. 


139 


3. Proposals 


3.1 It is recommended that Cabinet agrees to the approach set out including the allocation 
of funds to support the acquisition and improvement of vacant/derelict sites, and 
projects in Millport, Dalry, Stevenston and Kilbirnie. 


4.  Implications/Socio-economic Duty 
Financial 


4.1 The North Ayrshire additional allocation of £0.507M requires financial commitment by 
March 2021 and project completion by September 2021.The additional grant fund is for 
capital expenditure which is additional to that which is already or would otherwise be 
allocated to the 2020-21 budget and should not substitute for existing spend. 


Human Resources 


4.2 No implications 


Legal 


4.3 Individual projects will consider legal implications through their development and will 
progress in compliance with grant conditions. 


Land and building acquisitions will require negotiation. Mechanisms such as 
compulsory purchase orders will be considered where value expectations prove to be 
unreasonable, and where sites blight communities. 


Equality/Socio-economic 


4.4 Recognising that almost a third of the Scottish population lives within 500 meters of a 
derelict site, and that in deprived communities that figures increases to 55%, the need 
for an asset acquisition, development and environmental works fund has been identified 
with the intention of enabling the Council to positively intervene and tackle long-term 
vacant land and buildings. 


Environmental and Sustainability 


4.5 It is expected that the recommendations in the report will have a range of positive 
environmental impacts. Projects will address identified environmental improvement 
opportunities, including positive enhancements to vacant and derelict land and 
improving the urban fabric of town centres, in line with Scottish Planning Policy and the 
Scottish Government Town Centre First Principle. 


Key Priorities 


4.6 The recommendations support the delivery of the Council Plan outcomes under the 
Inspiring Places and Aspiring People themes, particularly our ambitions to achieve an 
inclusive, growing and enterprising economy and a vibrant, welcoming and attractive 
environment. 


140 


Community Wealth Building 
4.7 Through locally agreed priorities, this fund will primarily support the delivery of the Land 
and Assets pillar. The develooment and implementation of a strategic regeneration 


programme will support social, economic and environmental outcomes through the 
delivery of physical and environment land and asset improvements. 


5. Consultation 


5.1 Internal consultation has taken place to identify deliverable projects to maximise the 
benefit of the fund for North Ayrshire communities 


5.2 Furthermore, the emerging Regeneration Delivery Pan is currently the subject of public 
consultation on the Council's Consul platform, elected member workshops and locality 
coordinators continue to provide input. This has informed the proposals contained in 
the report. 


5.3 Previous public consultation exercises, such as charrettes have also informed the 
identification of projects. 


RUSSELL McCUTCHEON 
Executive Director (Place) 


For further information please contact Alex Mackenzie, Development Manager, on 01294 
324788. 


Background Papers 


1. Town Centre Fund Cabinet Paper, 14 May 2019 


141 


Title: 


Purpose: 


Recommendation: 


Agenda Item 7 
NORTH AYRSHIRE COUNCIL 


8 December 2020 


Cabinet 


Community Asset Transfer Applications 


Almswall Pavilion and Football Ground, Kilwinning and former 
Cleansing and Grounds Maintenance Depot, Ladysmith Road, 
Kilbirnie Public Park 


To agree: 

a) The transfer of ownership of Almswall Pavilion and Football 
Ground, Kilwinning from North Ayrshire Council to Scottish 
Incorporated Charitable Organisation (SCIO), “Kilwinning 
Community Football Academy”; and 


b) A 25-year lease of the former Cleansing and Grounds 
Maintenance Depot, Ladysmith Road, Kilbirnie Public Park 
from North Ayrshire Council to Garnock Valley Men’s Shed. 


That Cabinet: 


a) Agrees the asset transfer of Almswall Pavilion and Football 
Ground, Kilwinning from North Ayrshire Council to Scottish 
Incorporated Charitable Organisation (SCIO), “Kilwinning 
Community Football Academy”; 


b) Approves the recommended terms of transfer on this occasion 
at 1096 of the property valuation of £62,000 (£6,200 in total); 


C) Agrees the 25-year lease of the former Cleansing and Grounds 
Maintenance Depot, Ladysmith Road, Kilbirnie Public Park 
from North Ayrshire Council to the Scottish Incorporated 
Charitable Organisation (SCIO), "Garnock Valley Men's Shed"; 


d) Approves the recommended terms of lease on this occasion at 
5% of the normal annual fee of £8,000 (£400 per annum in 
total); and 


e) Authorises officers to conclude the associated legal and 
community asset transfer process. 


142 


1.1 


1.2 


1.3 


1.4 


1.5 


1.6 


2.1 


Executive Summary 


The report proposes the community asset transfer of Almswall Pavilion and Football 
Ground, Kilwinning (appendix 1) from North Ayrshire Council to the Scottish 
Incorporated Charitable Organisation (SCIO) “Kilwinning Community Football 
Academy” (KCFA) - appendix 2. 


The transfer of Almswall Pavilion and Football Ground, Kilwinning will provide a 
sustainable base for the local youth football provision in a facility which has been 
declared surplus to service requirements by North Ayrshire Council. KCFA ownership 
of the facility would enhance the opportunity for KCFA to expand their family club and 
provide a base from which run their football and community activity without the financial 
restrictions that they currently have in the rented premises. 


This report recommends that Cabinet agrees to the transfer on the recommended terms 
of 10% of the property valuation of £62,000 (£6,200 in total) and that officers should be 
authorised to conclude the process under these terms. 


The report proposes a 25-year lease of the Former Cleansing and Grounds 
Maintenance Depot, Ladysmith Road, Kilbirnie Public Park (appendix 3) between North 
Ayrshire Council. This will allow it to be utilised as a community asset to address 
loneliness and social isolation amongst men in the Garnock Valley. 


GVMS have been successfully operating the facility and have already carried out a 
range of improvements. The lease will allow them to continue the development of the 
asset to best meet the needs of the groups. The Group's work has a significant impact 
on raising male life expectancy, improving quality of life and connecting men with 
services and facilities in the wider community. They successfully engage with men who 
may be reticent about engaging with the community. As a result of their involvement in 
the Men's Shed, members are more confident and recognise that they can make a 
positive contribution to society. 


This report recommends that Cabinet agrees to the lease the recommended terms of 
lease on this occasion at 596 of the normal annual fee of £8,000 (£400 per annum in 
total) and that officers should be authorised to conclude the process under these 
terms. 


Background 


Under the terms of the Community Empowerment (Scotland) Act 2015, community asset 
transfer provides an opportunity for people to be involved in developing and providing 
opportunities or services for their local communities. This may include requesting the 
transfer of ownership, lease or other rights. It may also allow groups to develop 
commercial ventures, which will support community benefit. Asset transfer may also 
mean that public assets get used more frequently and more effectively. Community-led 
ownership may also allow additional opportunities for groups to secure extra funding or 
resources. 


143 


Kilwinning Community Football Academy 

2.2 The main aim of Kilwinning Community Football Academy (KCFA) is to use football to 
engage and inspire people to build a better life for themselves and unite the 
communities in which they live. Dedicated staff deliver football coaching, educational 
programmes and personal development, providing people with opportunities to change 
their lives for the better. The Academy has divided their aims and objectives into two 
separate outcomes, Community and Football. 


2.3 The proposed uses include a range of events and activities which contribute to their key 
objectives to: 


e Increase community activity offering fun structured activities for the community; 

e Create a safe and fun environment for players with a view to improving current 
facilities and lead the community in gaining support for a new football facility in the 
area; 

e Maintain links between the club, schools and leagues in order to co-ordinate and 
secure development opportunities for all players; 

e Increase the numbers of children & young adults playing organised, quality football 
across North Ayrshire and surrounding areas; and 

e Contribute to the active and healthy well-being of all children in our club, through 
positive coaching, development of their skills, fitness, confidence, and 
understanding of the game and building respect for officials, other players and 
coaches 


2.4 KCFA agreed the lease of an industrial unit in October 2018. Since then the club has 
converted the unit into a purpose-built area with community space, offices, bar and 
toilets. This has been the base for the Academy in running community events, 
fundraisers, fitness classes and becoming the home of the Academy. They have 
demonstrated their ability to manage the asset and built up experience as they progress 
to the ownership of the facility at Almswall Park. Reducing monthly revenue pressures 
through ownership of Almswall Park will be enable KCFA to invest in the asset's future, 
building on its profile as an all-weather facility. 


2.5 Securing the KCFA base at Almswall will allow the Group to enhance the amount of 
volunteer opportunities they can provide both in the sports sector and in facilities 
management. In addition, they would also be able to sustain their current 2 paid part 
time posts at the club and realise the potential of offering more employment 
opportunities through external funders or via the increased income generating potential. 


2.6 The facility was part of the portfolio of leases previously operated by KA Leisure, who 
rescinded the lease in response to the community interest. The asset transfer of the 
facility offers a long-term solution to the sustainability of the facility and a strong base 
from which KCFA can deliver their growing support for community work health, 
wellbeing, fitness and sport into the future. 


Garnock Valley Men's Shed 

2./ The purpose of Garnock Valley Men's Shed is to provide recreational facilities and 
advance the social needs, health and wellbeing of men of all ages and backgrounds 
living in Garnock Valley and surrounding areas. They are part of the national network 
of "Men's Sheds’. 


144 


2.8 The men attending experience a sense of purpose and meaning to life. Outcomes 
include: 


Increased self-worth/empowerment; 
Increased confidence/self-esteem; 
Increased sense of independence/control; 
Decreased depression/suicidal thoughts; 
Increased sense of pride/achievement; 
Increased happiness/contentment; and 
Decreased stress/anger. 


2.9 Operating under a temporary occupational licence for the past 18 months GVMS has 
made significant renovations/upgrades to the facility, including complete renovation and 
fitting of a new kitchen/social area; electrical rewiring and installation of a new lighting 
system; installation of a fully equipped wood/metal craft workshop; re-connection of the 
building's water supply; installation of CCTV; and construction of a bespoke scale- 
modelling room. Most of this work has been undertaken by the members themselves, 
building their confidence and resilience, whilst ensuring ‘buy-in’ and ownership of the 
building. In addition, relationships with local contractors have been developed through 
community benefits, adding value to the project and to the asset. 


2.10 As a result of tasks undertaken by GVMS for the benefit of the local community, 
members are held in high esteem by a variety of community groups and organisations. 
Members have built benches for the local football club, the local allotments and assisted 
with the maintenance of the local community garden. In addition, members have been 
heavily involved in volunteering at ParkLives in Kilbirnie, where families attend in large 
numbers to access free food and sports activities. 


2.11 GVMS plan to continue to utilise the building as community asset to address loneliness 
and social isolation amongst men in the Garnock Valley. They aim to develop the 
foundation work to fully develop the building, starting with a re-launch and progressing 
to a fully operational men's mental health facility. 


2.12 The benefits include a redeveloped asset which will have a significant impact on raising 
male life expectancy, improving quality of life and connecting men with services and 
facilities in the wider community. 


2.13 The group has indicated an interest in full ownership of the asset in the future. At that 
stage a further report would be brought to Cabinet to seek relevant approvals. 


3. Proposals 


3.1 It is proposed that 
Cabinet: 


a) Agrees the asset transfer of Almswall Pavilion and Football Ground, Kilwinning 
from North Ayrshire Council to Scottish Incorporated Charitable Organisation 
(SCIO), “Kilwinning Community Football Academy’; 


b) Approves the recommended terms of transfer on this occasion at 10% of the 
property valuation of £62,000 (£6,200 in total); 


145 


c) Agrees the 25-year lease of the former Cleansing and Grounds Maintenance 
Depot, Ladysmith Road, Kilbirnie Public Park from North Ayrshire Council to the 
Scottish Incorporated Charitable Organisation (SCIO), “Garnock Valley Men's 
Shed"; 


d) Approves the recommended terms of lease on this occasion at 596 of the normal 
annual fee of £8,000 (£400 per annum in total); and 


e) Authorises officers to conclude the associated legal and community asset transfer 


process. 
4. Implications/Socio-economic Duty 
Financial 


4.1.1 Through the transfer of Almswall Pavilion and Football Ground, the Council will 
achieve a capital receipt of £6,200 (which is 1096 of the valuation figure of £62,000), 
a reduction in revenue expenditure and, in the longer term, there will cost-avoidance 
in the capital budget due to the need for future investment in replacement of the pitch 
and maintenance of the premises. The sum proposed reflects the community benefit. 


4.1.2 Through the lease of the former Cleansing and Grounds Maintenance Depot at 
Ladysmith Road , Kilbirnie, the Council will achieve revenue income of £400 (which is 
5% of the normal annual fee of £8,000), a reduction in revenue expenditure and, in 
the longer term, there will cost-avoidance in the capital budget due to the need for 
future investment in upkeep of the premises. The sum proposed reflects the 
community benefit. 


Human Resources 


4.2 None. 


Legal 


4.3 The Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 places a statutory obligation on the Council 
to obtain the best price or the best rent when it disposes of any asset by sale or lease. 
These regulations permit a disposal at less than the best price achievable where either 
(a) the property is valued at less than £10,000, or (b) the Council has compared the 
financial cost of transfer against the community benefits and determined that the 
transfer is reasonable and promotes either economic development or regeneration, 
health, social well-being or environmental well-being. 


Equality/Socio-economic 


4.4 There will be considerable socio-economic benefits from the transfer, hence the figures 
proposed. These include a variety of positive impacts for the young people in Kilwinning, 
described at paragraph 2.3. The Garnock Valley Men's Shed offers a range of positive 
impacts, described at paragraph 2.8 improving health, wellbeing and self-esteem 
among men. 


146 


Environmental and Sustainability 


4.5 The transfer seeks to provide sustainable community facilities. 


Key Priorities 


4.6 The proposals contained within the report support the following North Ayrshire Council 
Plan priorities: 


e Active and strong communities 
e Inclusive, growing and enterprising local economy 
e People enjoy good life-long health and wellbeing. 


Community Wealth Building 
4.7 This proposal supports the following pillars of community wealth building: 


e Advancing community enterprises; 
e Advancing local ownership of underused land and buildings; and 
e Supporting local business activities and increasing the variety of ownership models. 


5. Consultation 
5.1 The consultation required in terms of the Community Empowerment (Scotland) Act 2015 
for a community asset transfer application has now concluded with no objections 


received for either group. 


5.2 Consultation has taken place with Economic Development, Finance, Estates, Property 
Maintenance and Investment, and Legal Services. 


Audrey Sutton 
Interim Executive Director (Communities) 


For further information please contact Rhona Arthur, Interim Head of Connected 
Communities), on (01294) 324415. 


Background Papers 


Almswall Pavilion and Football Ground, Kilwinning — Appendix 1 
Former Cleansing and Grounds Maintenance Depot, Kilbirnie Location — Appendix 2 


147 


THIS IS THE PLAN REFERRED TO IN THE FOREGOING 
LEASE BY THE NORTH AYRSHIRE COUNCIL IN FAVOUR 
OF NORTH AYRSHIRE LEISURE LIMITED OF: Appendix 1 


Almswall Park, Kilwinning 
Area within red boundary = 0.96 Hectares (2.38 Acres) or thereby 


= = 
M 





Priority Right Of Use 


= 
LB one nd 


2S 


Almswall Park Pitches 


North Ayrshire 


PRINCIPAL ESTATES OFFICER 
ROBERT SAMSON F.R.I.C.S, 


DRAWN BY | Plane Wildridge 
| DATE 20/5/2000 


i; 
br Ai 
n [DRAWING No 
DRAWING No| 860 | 
RED BOUNDARY LINES 
SCALE 
Reproduced from the Ordnance Survey mop with the permission of The Controller OS SHEET N9Z6-4|NE 


of Her Majesty's Stationery Office Crown Copyright Licence No 100023393 1 48 


TW 





Appendix 2 


Proposed Street Naming And Numbering 
The Shed, Ladysmith Road, Kilbirnie, KA25 6BH 


SO 


m 





Fi "Y 
em as 


a 4 = F. uf Fa 
A— : ¿E Y Cd G VI 
= = us“ CA , , j 





Os 


2] 
My 








North Ayrshire Council 
| | Omhairle Siorrachd Air a Tuath 


149 


Agenda Item 8 


NORTH AYRSHIRE COUNCIL 


8 December 2020 


Cabinet 
Title: HSCP - Budget Monitoring Report 
Purpose: — To provide an update on the projected financial outturn for - 


the financial year as at September 2020. 


Recommendation: It is proposed that the Committee note the attached report. 


1. Executive Summary 


1.1 The attached report provides an overview of the financial position for the 
partnership and outlines the projected year-end outturn position informed by the 
projected expenditure and income commitments, these have been prepared in 
conjunction with relevant budget holders and services. The report also outlines 
the estimated financial impact of the Covid-19 response, the associated funding 
and financial risks. 


2. Background 

2.1 The Cabinet agreed to receive regular reports on the financial performance of the 
Health and Social Care Partnership. The Budget Monitoring report presented to 
the IJB on 19 November 2020 outlined the projected financial outturn for the 
financial year as at September 2020 and is attached as an appendix. 


3. Proposals 


3.1 It is proposed that the Committee note the report. 


The implications are outlined in the attached report. 


4. Implications 





The implications are outlined in the attached report. 


150 


The implications are outlined in the attached report 
Equality: The implications are outlined in the attached report 


Key Priorities The implications are outlined in the attached report 
Community Benefits: The implications are outlined in the attached report 


5. Consultation 


Environmental & The implications are outlined in the attached report. 
Sustainability: 





5.1 The attached report outlines the consultation that has taken place. 


For further information please contact Caroline Cameron on 07801 439900. 


Background Papers 
None 


151 





NP 


NORTH AYRSHIRE 
Health and Social Care 





Partnership 
Integration Joint Board 
19 November 2020 
Subject: 2020-21 — Month 6 Financial Performance 
Purpose: To provide an overview of the IJB’s financial performance as at 
Period 6 including an update on the estimated financial impact of the 
Covid-19 response. 
Recommendation: It is recommended that the IJB: 


(a) notes the overall integrated financial performance report for the 
financial year 2020-21 and the overall projected year-end 
underspend of £0.377m at period 6; 

(b) notes the estimated costs of the Covid mobilisation plan of 
£7.656m, including savings delays, and the associated funding 
received to date; 

(c) note the financial risks for 2020-21, including the impact of 
Covid 19, and that there is no recommendation at this time to 
implement a formal Financial Recovery Plan for the IJB; 

(d) approve the budget changes outlined at section 2.8. 


Glossary of Terms 


NHS AA NHS Ayrshire and Arran 
HSCP Health and Social Care Partnership 


Mental Health 
Child & Adolescent Mental Health Services 


Red, Amber, Green 

UNPACS, (UNPlanned Activities) — Extra Contractual Referrals 
NHS Resource Allocation Committee 

Grant Aided Expenditure 

Performance and Audit Committee 





1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 


1.1 The report provides an overview of the financial position for the partnership and outlines 
the projected year-end outturn position informed by the projected expenditure and 
income commitments, these have been prepared in conjunction with relevant budget 
holders and services. lt should be noted that although this report refers to the position 
at the August period end that further work is undertaken following the month end to 
finalise projections, therefore the projected outturn position is as current and up to date 
as can practicably be reported. 


1.2 The projected outturn, before the impact of Covid-19, is a year-end underspend of 


£0.377m for 2020-21 which is a favourable movement of £0.386m. There is scope for 
this position to fluctuate due to in-year cost and demand pressures and assumptions in 


152 


1.3 


1.4 


1.5 


relation to funding and the achievement of savings. The position has been adjusted to 
reflect the potential impact of Lead Partnership services. In the absence of any 
alternative risk sharing agreement for lead partnership services an NRAC share of the 
projected position has been assumed as this would be in line with the allocation in 
previous years. 


From the core projections, overall the main areas of pressure are learning disability 
care packages, looked after children and adult in-patients within the lead partnership. 
However, there has been significant progress to reduce the pressures in these areas. 
The financial position demonstrates that the work started before the pandemic to 
ensure the IJB moved into the new financial year in a financially sustainable position 
has not been reversed by the Covid-19 response. If this position can be sustained as 
we move through the year, and assuming all Covid-19 costs are fully funded, the IJB 
will secure financial balance and repay £1.5m of the debt to North Ayrshire Council as 
planned. 


The most up to date position in terms of the mobilisation plan for Covid-19 based on 
the return to the Scottish Government in October projects £7.656m of a financial impact, 
which is split between additional costs of £6.5m and anticipated savings delays of 
£1.1m. The impact of savings delays has been built into the core financial projection 
above on the basis that there is less confidence that funding will be provided to 
compensate for this. There are financial risks associated with Covid-19 as the IJB has 
yet to receive confirmation of the full funding allocation. To date our total funding 
allocation to £5.491m, this allocation has been updated following the period 5 position 
where we reported that the North HSCP funding was £5.183m. This reflects further 
discussions at Finance Leads re the distribution of funding for lead partnership services 
and to reflect a fairer approach following the submission of updated Covid cost 
estimates in October. 


Until the full funding for Covid-19 is confirmed there is a risk that there may be a shortfall 
in funding to fully compensate the North Ayrshire IJB for the additional costs. However, 
there is no recommendation at this time to implement a Financial Recovery Plan on the 
basis that: 


e There is increasing confidence that additional costs will be funded based on the 
recently received and future expected funding allocations; 

e Offsetting reductions of £0.530m have not been included in the overall funding 
allocation and also have not been factored into the HSCP financial projections, 
therefore at this stage these would potentially remain available for North to re- 
direct to any funding shortfall; 

e The current estimated costs for which funding has not yet been allocated is 
around £1m, this is a level that can potentially be recovered through 
management actions later in the financial year; 

e [he most significant area of additional Covid cost is the purchase of PPE for 
social care, the extension of the current MOU for the PPE Hubs includes an 
assurance that PPE costs will be reimbursed in full, this is also in line with the 
recent allocation for PPE being on an actuals basis; 

e The period 6 position projects an underspend position (excluding Covid) and 
this does not include any assumption re the £1.5m held by the Council towards 
the IJB debt, this position assumes the debt repayment is made as planned, 
this position also incorporates estimated delays with savings delivery. 


The financial position will continue to be reported to the IJB at each meeting, these 
reports will outline the monthly financial projections and the updated position in relation 


153 


2.1 


2.2 


2.3 


to estimates for Covid costs. This will include the ongoing consideration of whether a 
Financial Recovery Plan may be required in the future. 


CURRENT POSITION 


The report includes an overview of the financial position including commitments against 
the available resource, explanations for the main budget variances, an update on 
progress in terms of savings delivery and plans to work towards financial balance. 


The report also includes detail of the estimated costs and potential financial impact of 
the Covid-19 response. 


FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE - AT PERIOD 6 


The projected outturn position at period 6 reflects the cost of core service delivery and 
does not include the costs of the Covid 19 response as these costs are considered 
separately alongside the funding implications. 


Against the full-year budget of £254.257m there is a projected year-end underspend of 
£0.377m (0.1596). The Integration Scheme outlines that there is an expectation that 
the IJB takes account of the totality of resources available to balance the budget in 
year. Following this approach, an integrated view of the financial position should be 
taken, however it is useful to note that this overall position consists of a projected 
overspend of £0.913m in social care services offset by a projected underspend of 
£1.290m in health services. 


As highlighted at the end of last year the payroll turnover target was to be centralised 
for future years as the approach in previous years left some service areas with 
unachievable targets whilst other areas were able to overachieve, it was agreed that a 
more transparent approach would be to manage the payroll turnover and vacancy 
savings centrally. This approach has been adopted for 2020-21, this has helped to de- 
clutter the financial report and to make it more transparent re the overall turnover target 
and the progress towards achieving this across the partnership. Section 2.6 highlights 
progress with the partnership vacancy target. 


Appendix A provides the financial overview of the partnership position. The sections 
that follow outline the significant variances in service expenditure compared to the 
approved budgets with detailed analysis provided in Appendix B. 


Health and Community Care Services 


Against the full-year budget of £69.280m there is an underspend of £0.973m (1.496) 
which is an adverse movement of £0.124m. The main variances are: 


a) Care home placements including respite placements (net position after service user 
contributions) — underspent by £0.649m (adverse movement of £0.138m). The care 
home budget moved into a sustainable position towards the end of 2019-20 and the 
opening position for the budget for 2020-21 was expected to be an underspend 
position as at that time we set the budget at a level to fund 810 places and we were 
funding 782. The occupancy in care homes has fallen further in the first quarter of 
2020-21 and there are significant vacancies in care homes, the projected 
underspend includes a steady net increase of 10 placements per month until the 
year-end. The main reason for the adverse movement is a reduction in the projected 
amount of charging order income receivable (£0.117m) and a reduction in the 
respite underspend (£0.036m). 


154 


2.4 


b) Independent Living Services are overspent by £0.220m (favourable movement 
£0.011m) which is due to an overspend on physical disability care packages within 
the community and direct payments. There is an expectation that there will be some 
recovery of funds from Direct Payments where services have ceased, this may 
improve the projected position. There will be further work undertaken with the 
implementation of the Adult Community Support framework which will present 
additional opportunities for reviews and will ensure payment only for the actual 
hours of care delivered. The roll out of the CM2000 system for Adult services was 
postponed towards the year-end due to the Covid response and will be implemented 
early in the new year. 


c) Care at home was initially projected to overspend by £0.287m (adverse movement 
£0.190m). The financial projections reflect recent recruitment and assumes an 
increased service level both in house and purchased until the end of 2020-21. As 
this additional capacity was included in the Covid cost return this overspend has 
been excluded from the overall financial position, as the current level of overspend 
is below the level of Covid resources requested. 


d) Aids and adaptations projected underspend of £0.255m (£0.045m adverse 
movement). There have been significant delays with carrying out assessments and 
providing equipment and adaptations during lock down. It is expected that during 
the year there will be considerable delays with this spend, the level of projected 
underspend is less than the underspend in 2019-20. The final outturn depends on 
the level of assessments that can be undertaken in the coming months however this 
cannot be determined at this stage in the year. The service are working on plans to 
re-mobilise these services and address the waits for assessment and delivery of 
equipment and adaptations. 


e) Carers Act Funding is projected to underspend by £0.443m (no movement) based 
on the currently committed spend and delays with taking forward developments to 
support carers. The total uncommitted budget is £0.560m so this projected position 
assumes there will be carers’ support plans undertaken and a level of 
demand/services identified from these plans to be delivered later in the year. The 
service plan to undertaken positive promotion of the services available to carers and 
are currently reviewing the process for a carers assessment to make this more 
accessible to individuals requiring support. 


Mental Health Services 


Against the full-year budget of £77.108m there is a projected overspend of £0.744m 
(1%) which is an adverse movement of £0.231m. The main variances are: 


a) Learning Disabilities are projected to overspend by £2.320m (adverse movement 
£0.128m), included within this is £1.320m (£0.131m adverse movement) in relation 
to community care packages and £0.556m (£0.017m adverse movement) for 
residential placements. The 2020-21 budget for all adult care packages (LD, PD 
and MH) were realigned with any projected underspends in other areas being used 
to reduce the LD projected overspend. 2020-21 savings relating to the 
implementation of the Adult Community Support Contract are delayed as the full 
implementation of the CM2000 system has been postponed as the focus for 
providers has been on the response to COVID-19. This will commence with a 
phased roll out from January 2021, the financial benefits of the system are included 
in the projection later in the year but at a reduced level (causing an adverse 
movement of £0.147m) due to the delay. Community Learning Disability Care 


155 


packages are proving to be one of the most challenging areas to address 
overspends. The current projection assumes the current level of commissioned 
support will continue for the year, there are opportunities to reduce this commitment 
as a significant number of these care packages were reduced or suspended during 
lock down, these will be reviewed when services are re-started to ensure support is 
re-started at the appropriate level, this may potentially reduce the year-end 
projected position and the opening projections for next year which are currently 
being collated to inform budget planning for 2021-22. 


b) Community Mental Health services are projected to underspend by £0.239m 
(£0.005m favourable movement) mainly due to a reduction in care packages. There 
has been a reduction in the number of care packages since the start of the year and 
there have been some temporary reductions to care packages during lock-down, 
currently these are assumed to be temporary reductions, these will also be reviewed 
when brought back online. 


The Lead Partnership for Mental Health has an overall projected underspend of 
£1.348m (adverse movement of £0.097m) which consists of: 


O 
— 


e A projected overspend in Adult Inpatients of £0.583m (adverse movement of 
£0.043m due revised assumptions on bed sale income). The overspend is 
mainly due to the delay in closing the Lochranza ward on the Ailsa site. The 
ward closed during August 2020 but there remain staff to be re-deployed, the 
overspend may reduce if alternatives can be identified for displaced staff sooner. 

e UNPACS is projected to underspend by £0.040m (£0.113m adverse movement) 
based on current placements. The adverse movement is due to a new 
placement being made. 

e A projected underspend of £0.200m (£0.100m adverse movement) in Elderly 
Inpatients due to the completion of the work to reconfigure the Elderly Mental 
wards, this represents the part-year saving with the full financial benefit being 
available in 2021-22. The adverse movement is due to staffing levels for wards, 
the workforce tool for the wards is being run which will determine the final 
Staffing. 

e A projected underspend in MH Pharmacy of £0.220m (£0.030m favourable 
movement) due to continued lower substitute prescribing costs. 

e The target for turnover or vacancy savings for the Lead Partnership is held within 
the Lead Partnership as this is a Pan-Ayrshire target. There is a projected over- 
recovery of the vacancy savings target of £1.268m in 2020-21, further 
information on this is included in the table below: 


Vacancy Savings Target (£0.400m) 
Projected to March 2021 £1.668m 
Over/(Under) Achievement £1.268m 


There were significant vacancy savings delivered during 2019-20 from lead partnership 
services and these were brought into the financial position during the year as it became 
clear that services were not going to be able to recruit to all vacancies. The current 
projection to the year-end is informed by the recruitment plans and the confidence in 
recruitment success and realistic timescales for filling individual vacancies. 


The main areas contributing to this position are noted below: 


e Adult Community Health services £0.133m 
e Addictions £0.020m 


156 


CAMHS £0.295m 

Mental Health Admin £0.330m 
Psychiatry £0.488m 

Psychology £0.383m 

Associate Nurse Director £0.067m 


2.5 Children Services & Criminal Justice 


Against the full-year budget of £35.925m there is a projected underspend of £0.081m 
(0.2%) which is a favourable movement of £0.122m. The main variances are: 


a) Looked After and Accommodated Children are projected to overspend by £0.457m 
(adverse movement of £0.015m). The main areas within this are noted below: 


e Children's residential placements are projected to overspend by £0.662m 
(adverse movement of £0.119m), as at period 6 there are 16 placements with 
plans to reduce this by 3 by the end of the financial year and an assumption that 
there will be no further placements during the year. Budget plans for 2020-21 
were based on starting the year with 18, reducing to 14 by the end of Q1 and to 
10 places by the end of Q2 and for the remainder of the year. Progress with 
plans to move children from residential placements have been impacted by 
Covid-19 as there has been an impact on Children's Hearings and this has limited 
the availability of tenancies. Children's services are working towards further 
improving the position as we move through the year as starting the 2021-22 
financial year with 13 placements will impact on the savings planned for next 
year. 


e Fostering placements are projected to overspend by £0.095m (£0.032m 
favourable movement) based on the budget for 129 places and 126 actual 
placements since the start of the year. This is a reduction of 7 placements from 
month 5. The fostering service is an area we are trying to grow, and a recruitment 
Campaign was undertaken early in the new year to attract more in-house foster 
carers to limit the ongoing requirement for external foster placements. There are 
a number of additional fostering placements attributed to Covid-19 which are out 
with these numbers as the costs have been included on the Covid-19 mobilisation 
plan. Respite foster placements is projected to underspend by £0.060m as 
placements have not taken place due to Covid-19 restrictions. 


e Kinship placements are projected to underspend by £0.149m (adverse 
movement of £0.012m) based on the budget for 370 places and 344 actual 
placements since the start of the year. 


b) Children with disabilities — residential placements are projected to underspend 
by £0.196m (no movement). Community packages (inc direct payments) are 
projected to underspend by £0.125m based on current placements and an 
assumed increase in direct payment cases. 


c) Respite is projected to underspend by £0.107m due to respite not taking place 
due to COVID. 


d) Transport costs — projected underspend of £0.081m (favourable movement of 
£0.035m) due to reduced mileage costs. 


2.6  Turnover/Vacancy Savings 


157 


2./ 


The payroll turnover target has been centralised for 2020-21. The turnover target for 
the North Lead Partnership for Mental Health services is detailed within the Lead 
Partnership information at section 2.4. 


The turnover targets and projected achievement for the financial year for Health and 
Social Care services out with the Lead Partnership is noted below: 


Services 


Vacancy Savings Target *(£1.957m (0.645m) 


Projected to March 2021 £1.957m 1.044m 


Over/(Under) Achievement CI 0.399m 





(“the target for social care services has been increased on a non-recurring basis for 2020-21 only by 
£0.110m to offset the saving for the roll out of Multi-Disciplinary Teams, as no permanent reductions to 
the structure can be identified at this time but will be by the service from 2021-22 onwards) 


The position in the table above reflects the assumption in the current financial 
projections. For social care there have been significant vacancy savings to period 6 
due to delays with recruitment and a total of £1.156m has been achieved to date. It is 
not anticipated that the level of vacancies will continue at this rate to the financial year- 
end, the full annual target is expected to be achieved on the basis that there will 
vacancies sustained at around 69% of that level. We may potentially exceed the target, 
as was the case in previous years, but the likelinood of this will not be known with 
confidence until services and recruitment re-starts fully over the coming months. 


The Health vacancy projection to the year-end is informed by the recruitment plans and 
confidence in recruitment to posts for the remainder of the year. 


The main areas contributing to the health and social care vacancy savings are spread 
across a wide range of services with vacancy savings being achieved in most areas, 
the most notable in terms of value being social worker posts (across all services), the 
Community Mental Health Teams and Allied Health Professionals. 


Savings Progress 


a) The approved 2020-21 budget included £3.861m of savings. 


Position at Position at 
Budget Approval Period 6 
£m £m 
Red Te 


0.274 
2.801 1.801 
1.060 1.786 
TOTAL | 3864 38 | 


TOTAL 





b) The main areas to note are: 


i) Red savings of £0.274m relating to reducing LD sleepovers and the 
review of Adoption Allowances, both of which have been impacted by 


158 


2.8 


Covid-19, the delays in these savings have been included in the overall 
projected outturn position; 

11) Whilst all savings remain on the plan to be delivered there are delays with 
some savings with delays in implementation due to Covid-19, for 
example the implementation of the Adult Community Support Framework 
as the introduction of the CM2000 system is delayed as providers were 
focussing on COVID related service and staffing issues and further 
internal implementation work is required; 

lil) The confidence with some savings has increased since the budget was 
set due to the progress made towards the end of 2019-20, for example 
with freeing up additional capacity for Care at Home services by reducing 
care home placements. 


Appendix C provides an overview of the savings plan, this highlights that during 2020- 
21 it is anticipated that a total of £2.483m of savings will be delivered in-year, with 
£1.378m of savings potentially delayed or reduced. The delays are due to Covid-19 
and have been included in the mobilisation plan return to the Scottish Government, but 
at this stage they have also been reflected in the overall projected outturn position as 
there is less confidence that the impact of savings delays will be compensated with 
additional funding. 


The Transformation Board is in place to provide oversight and governance to the 
programme of service change. A focus of the Board is to ensure plans are in place to 
deliver savings and service change, with a solution focussed approach to bringing 
programmes back on track. Whilst some of our plans were put on hold due to Covid, 
the transformation plans will be re-mobilised at pace to ensure we taken any 
opportunities to join up the re-design services as they come back online. The 
Transformation Board re-started in July and there will be a concerted effort to ensure 
the maximum savings delivery can be achieved in-year, to assist with the current year 
position and to ensure there is no recurring impact moving into 2021-22. 


Budget Changes 
The Integration Scheme states that “either party may increase it’s in year payment to 
the Integration Joint Board. Neither party may reduce the payment in-year to the 
Integration Joint Board nor Services managed on a Lead Partnership basis....without 
the express consent of the Integration Joint Board”. 
Appendix D highlights the movement in the overall budget position for the partnership 
following the initial approved budget. 
Reductions Requiring Approval: 
The specific reductions the IJB are required to approve are: 

e Transfer of posts to NAC corporate procurement £0.076m 

e Transfer of Parkinson nurse to South £0.109m 

e Arrol Park resource transfer to South £0.024m 
It is recommended that the IJB approve the budget reductions outlined above. 
Future Planned Changes: 
An area due to be transferred in the future are the Douglas Grant and Redburn rehab 


wards from acute services to the North HSCP. The operational management of these 
wards has already transferred to the partnership, but the due diligence undertaken on 


159 


2.9 


the budget has highlighted a funding shortfall. It has been agreed with NHS Ayrshire 
and Arran that the financial responsibility will not transfer until balance is found. In the 
meantime, we are managing services and plans are well progressed to reduce the 
projected overspend prior to any transfer. 


NHS - Further Developments/Pan Ayrshire Services 


Lead Partnerships: 


The IJB outturn position is adjusted to reflect the impact of Lead Partnership services. 
During 2019-20 agreement was reached with the other two Ayrshire partnerships that 
in the absence of any service activity information and alternative agreed risk sharing 
arrangements that the outturn for all Lead Partnership services would be shared across 
the 3 partnerships on an NRAC basis. This position is currently the default for 2020- 
21 as the further work taken forward to develop a framework to report the financial 
position and risk sharing across the 3 partnerships in relation to hosted or lead service 
arrangements has been delayed by the requirement to focus efforts on the Covid 
response. 


The underspend in relation to North Lead Partnership services is not fully attributed to 
the North IJB as a share has been allocated to East and South partnerships, similarly 
the impact of the outturn on East and South led services will require to be shared with 
North. At month 6 the impact on NA WB is a £0.338m underspend (£0.353m 
underspend for East and £0.015m overspend for South). 


East HSCP - projected underspend of £0.981m (£0.353m NRAC share for NA IJB). 
The main areas of variance are: 


a) Primary Care and Out of Hours Services (Lead Partnership) - there is a projected 
underspend of £0.741m (favourable movement of £0.656m). This reflects 
detailed work undertaken to analyse year-to-date costs and anticipated activity 
over the remainder of the financial year. This includes reduced projected costs 
on Dental Services where there have been a number of services cancelled for 
the year-to-date. These services are expected to restart in the final quarter of 
the 2020 calendar year, with an anticipated increase in staffing costs going 
forward. In addition, work has been undertaken to update cross charging 
against for Ayrshire Urgent Care Services (AUCS) costs related to the Covid-19 
pandemic. It is anticipated that the current level of Covid-related GP activity will 
continue until the end of December at this stage. In addition, increased staff 
turnover savings are projected for AUCS, with posts to be recruited to in the final 
quarter of the financial year. It is anticipated at this stage that the Primary Care 
Improvement Fund will outturn on budget. The Primary Care budget has 
increased from £79m at month 4 to £86m at month 6 and is due to confirmation 
of funding allocations from the Scottish Government, including Primary Care 
Transformation Funding, Family Health Services Covid-19 funding, Dental 
funding and an increase to the global sum. 


b) Prison and Police Healthcare (Lead Partnership) - £0.233m projected 
underspend (favourable movement of £0.279m). This relates to drugs costs 
which were previously charged to the prison have correctly now been charged 
against Covid-19 and additional staffing savings. 


South HSCP - projected overspend of £0.041m (£0.015m NRAC share for NAHSCP). 
The overspend is mainly due to an overspend in the community store. 


160 


2.10 


2.11 


Set Aside: 


The budget for set aside resources for 2020-21 is assumed to be in line with the amount 
for 2019-20 (£30.094m) inflated by the 3% baseline uplift, this value was used in the 
absence of any updated information on the share of resources and is £30.997m. 


At the time of setting the IJB budget it was noted that this may require to be updated 
following the further work being undertaken by the Ayrshire Finance Leads to establish 
the baseline resources for each partnership and how this compares to the Fair Share 
of resources. It was anticipated that 2020-21 would be used as a shadow year for 
these arrangements, however this work has been delayed due to the Covid-19 
response. A further update will be provided to IJBs as this work progresses. 


The annual budget for Acute Services is £351.2 million. The directorate is underspent 
by £5.3 million following allocation of the COVID-19 funds received from Scottish 
Government. 


The year to date underspend of £5.3 million is a result of: 


e £7.4 million of “offset savings”. These are the underspends resulting from low 
outpatient and elective activity in the year to date. 
° £2.1 million of unachieved savings. 


The IJBs and the Health Board have submitted a remobilisation plan outlining how 
activity will return to normal as far as is possible and are working together to ensure 
patients are looked after in the most suitable environment. 


COVID-19 — FINANCE MOBILISATION PLAN IMPACT 
Summary of position 


From the outset of the pandemic the HSCP acted very swiftly to respond and developed 
a mobilisation plan detailing the additional activities to support our response, alongside 
the estimated financial impact. Financial returns have been submitted to the Scottish 
Government on a regular basis, on the premise that any additional costs aligned to 
mobilisation plans would be fully funded. There is a risk that if the full cost of the Covid- 
19 response is not funded that the IJB may require to recover any overspend in-year. 


The IJB were updated in October outlining the cost estimates, the financial year-end 
projections and any potential funding gap based on scenarios re Covid-19 funding. The 
IJB also need to consider any action required to recover the financial position in-year. 


Mobilisation Plan Costs 


The most recent mobilisation plan cost submission submitted in October estimates the 
costs to be £7.656m to March 2021. The financial returns have moved to a quarterly 
submission alongside the Health Board financial returns to the Scottish Government. 
The costs remain estimates as the situation continually evolves and there have been 
several iterations of the financial plan. 


The majority of the additional costs for the HSCP relate to the provision of social care 


services and the most significant areas are PPE, additional staff costs for staff absence 
and student nurses, loss of income due to closed services, additional care home 


161 


2.12 


placements, payments to commissioned care providers to ensure future sustainability 
and the impact on our approved savings programme. 


The local finance mobilisation plan submission is included as Appendix E. The main 
areas of cost together are summarised below: 


August | October | Variance 
Service Area Return Return 
£m £m 


Payments to Providers 1.655 1.683 


Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) 2.052 1.693 | (0.359) 


Savings Delays 
Nursing — Students and Bank Staff 
Care at Home Capacity 

Loss of Income 

Staff Cover 
Care Home Beds — Delayed Discharges 
Fostering Placements 
Delayed Discharges - Other Measures 
Other staff costs 
Winter Planning 
Other costs 
Offsetting cost reductions 
TOTAL 7.211|  7.656| 0.445 | 


Further information on the elements of the plan are included in previous IJB reports. 
The main changes to estimated costs are the reduction in PPE estimates based on an 
expectation of more supply being delivered from the NSS hub, the level of stocks we 
have in place and the stabilisation of costs for PPE items. The other significant 
movement is in the other staff costs, this has increased significantly due to NHS finance 
identifying additional staff costs for wards which were not appropriately allocated to 
Covid, therefore this reflects a more accurate estimate of the costs rather than an 
expected increase in the requirement. 





Covid-19 Funding Position 


At the outset of the pandemic there was an assurance that subject to any additional 
expenditure being fully aligned to local mobilisation plans, including the IJB responses, 
reasonable funding requirements will be supported. This was on the basis that a 
process would be developed for these to be accurately and immediately recorded and 
shared with the Scottish Government. The basis of this reporting was drawn up and 
agreed with COSLA and Health and Social Care Partnerships. 


Previous finance reports to IJB have outlined the chronology of funding through the 
year and the period 5 finance report outlined that £5.183m of funding was agreed at 
that time to be allocated for North Ayrshire delegated services. This funding allocation 
has subsequently been increased to £5.491m. This reflects further discussions at 
Finance Leads re the distribution of funding for lead partnership services and to reflect 
a fairer approach following the submission of updated Covid cost estimates in October. 


The revised funding allocations are noted below: 


162 


North East South | TOTAL 
£000 £000 £000 A 
Q1 Allocation 3,010 2,400 2,018 7 | 7429 


TOTAL ALLOCATION 


Funding Already Received (£83m) 3,509 2,464 1,835 7,808 
NET NEW FUNDING ALLOCATION ga 3,840 2,794 8,616 


The funding allocations to date have been based on the following approach: 





e allocation based on actual costs incurred in Quarter 1 and funding agreed for 
Q2-Q4 in line with agreed parameters (70% of funding for Q2-Q4, exception of 
5096 of funding for social care payments to providers, DD reduction); 


e action is taken to mitigate additional financial pressure as far as possible and to 
make best use of resources across the system. HBs and lJBs are asked to 
reassess options for savings that can be delivered, therefore no provision at this 
time for savings delays, similarly the offsets identified by some areas have not 
been included at this stage; 


e funding allocated in line with actual expenditure where spend disproportionately 
impacts on specific IJBs and where there is a significant uneven distribution, 
includes PPE and social care; 

e funding allocated up to an NRAC share to cover spend that is incurred across 
all HB/IJBs where there is a higher level of consistency between Board areas, 
this includes staffing costs and overtime, equipment, investment in digital, 
additional beds, and community hubs; 


e expectation in principle that funding is split between HBs and lJBs in line with 
SG funding letter/allocation, however HBs and IJBs may agree to allocate 
funding flexibly between categories to better recognise local pressures and 
priorities; 

e further funding may be required to meet costs that have been in excess of 
formula shares, and SG will review reasonable requests for further financial 
support to meet pressures. 


Given the level of uncertainty currently reflected in financial assumptions full funding 
has not been allocated at this stage, the Scottish Government will work with Health 
Boards and lJBs over the coming months to review and further revise financial 
assessments and intend to make a further substantive funding allocation in January. 
This will allow identification of the necessary additional support required, and 
realignment of funding in line with actual spend incurred. For social care further work 
is progressing with COSLA to identify financial implications, including sustainability 
payments to providers. Given uncertainty reflected in estimates across Scotland the 
funding allocation for social care is based on actuals for Q1 and 5096 of forecast spend 
for Q2-Q4. The Scottish Government will revisit social care allocations in November 
and this will include part of the funding announced in the recent winter plan. 


IJB CFOs have highlighted some challenges posed by the NRAC share approach for 
some service areas and Scottish Government Health Finance colleagues have agreed 
to a further allocation later in November specifically for primary care and mental health 
services, which will be based on the actual cost estimates without an NRAC cap and 
with the two service areas as individual allocations. 


163 


2.13 | Covid — Financial Risk 


Overall at this time the financial risk to the IJB has been reduced significantly by the 
recent funding announcement and subsequent allocation. 


The table below summarises the overall estimated Covid-19 costs for the North HSCP 
alongside the funding received to highlight the potential gap: 


Latest 
October 
£m 


Mobilisation Plan Costs 7.656 


FUNDING TOTAL (5.491) 
Shortfall 2.165 
Shortfall (excluding savings) | 1033 





The estimated additional costs to March 2021 compared to the funding received to date 
leaves an estimated balance of £1.033m for which funding has not yet been received 
or allocated. 


In terms of the estimated elements of the plan not yet funded: 


e we have assumed through our core budget monitoring projections that the 
delays in savings will not be funded and these are included in financial 
projections, as noted in this report we are projecting breakeven on that basis; 

e the offsets of £0.530m have not been included in the overall funding allocation 
and also have not been factored into the HSCP financial projections, therefore 
at this stage these would potentially remain available for North to re-direct to any 
funding shortfall; 

e there will be a potential further funding allocation for Social Care (November) 
and Health (January) when the costs will be revisited, we would expect on that 
basis that a further funding allocation would be released to compensate for 
actual costs. 


There are a number of financial risks related to the Covid-19 response for North 
Ayrshire IJB, risks include: 


e Scottish Government funding is not sufficient to fully fund the response and there 
is a shortfall in funding when allocated; 

e Risk that financial position cannot be recovered in-year and the IJB overspend 
and add to the debt owed to North Ayrshire Council; 

e |f insufficient funding is provided an exercise will be required at a later stage to 
re-allocate costs and funding to the 3 IJB areas for Lead Partnership services, 
this could lead to greater costs being aligned to the North IJB particularly for any 
shortfall in funding for Primary Care including Covid Assessment Hubs; 

e Further uncertainty of funding for pressures which may continue beyond 2020- 
21, including for example PPE; 

e Currently provider Sustainability Payment Principles have been agreed to 
remain in place for the year with tapering down of support for some elements 
over the next few months, there is an ongoing responsibility for HSCPs to ensure 
the sustainability of the social care sector and the sustainability principles will 
remain under review by the Scottish Government and COSLA; 

e Financial position from 2021-22 onwards and the impact on public sector funding 
and the future funding of Health and Social Care services. 


164 


The below illustrates the ways in which this financial risk can be mitigated: 


— 





Lobby for 
further Funding 
= Review all e 
bots Controls on 
CONES = Further Covid-19 
| more — nd (YTD risk 
slippagejoffsets E MAE 
(integrated — . 
budget) A y 
Mitigate Risk 
Management 
Actions — eg 
Recruitment 
Freeze 
eer uncommitted 
ren's non-essential 
placements) spend 





Given the scale of the financial risk at this stage in the year it is not recommended that 
the IJB consider a formal financial recovery plan at this time. 


This recommendation is on the basis that: 


e There is increasing confidence that additional costs will be funded based on the 
recently received and future expected funding allocations; 

e Offsetting reductions of £0.530m have not been included in the overall funding 
allocation and also have not been factored into the HSCP financial projections, 
therefore at this stage these would potentially remain available for North to re- 
direct to any funding shortfall; 

e The current estimated costs for which funding has not yet been allocated is 
around £1m, this is a level that can potentially be recovered through 
management actions later in the financial year; 

e [he most significant area of additional Covid cost is the purchase of PPE for 
social care, the extension of the current MOU for the PPE Hubs includes an 
assurance that PPE costs will be reimbursed in full, this is also in line with the 
recent allocation for PPE being on an actuals basis; 

e [he period 6 position projects an underspend position (excluding Covid) and 
this does not include any assumption re the £1.5m held by the Council towards 
the IJB debt, this position assumes the debt repayment is made as planned, 
this position also incorporates estimated delays with savings delivery. 


The financial position will continue to be reported to the IJB at each meeting, these 
reports will outline the monthly financial projections and the updated position in relation 
to estimates for Covid costs. This will include the ongoing consideration of whether a 
Financial Recovery Plan may be required in the future. 


A budget outlook report for 2021-22 will be presented to the IJB in December and this 
will include estimates of recurring Covid pressures. 


165 


2.14 Provider Sustainability Payments and Care Home Occupancy Payments 


COSLA Leaders and Scottish Government have agreed an approach to supporting the 
social care sector to ensure that reasonable additional costs will be met. 


We have been making payments to commissioned social care providers in line with the 
agreed National principles for sustainability and remobilisation payments to social care 
providers during COVID 19. 


Care Home Occupancy Payments - we have engaged with older people's care homes 
in relation to care home occupancy payments and make regular monthly payments to 
care home providers with emergency faster payments being made if required. 
Meetings are being held with each care home to discuss ongoing sustainability and to 
provide support. 


Sustainability payments - providers are responsible for submitting a claim for 
additional support to the Partnership for sustainability payments and this is assessed 
as to what support is required on a case by case basis based on the supporting 
evidence provided. Each case is assessed by the same group to ensure equity and 
consistency across providers. 


In general, all payment terms have been reduced and once any payment is agreed it is 
being paid quicker to assist the cash flow position of providers. The assessment of 
some claims has been difficult due to delays with additional information and supporting 
evidence being submitted to support claims, hence there are a number of claims that 
are in process. 


The sustainability payments are estimated to be a significant cost in our mobilisation 
plan and the timely submission and assessment of claims is key to ensuring we can 
accurately estimate the financial cost and ensure the costs are reclaimed from the 
ocottish Government. 


Providers in North Ayrshire are not all strictly adhering to these timescales and we are 
still receiving claims dating back to the start of the pandemic, the commissioning team 
are working with providers to support them to submit claims. 


The tables below show the support provided to date and the outstanding claims as at 
the end of September: 


NCHC Care 
PROVIDER SUMMARY Homes 


Total Number of Providers 
Number in contact for support 
Providers Supported to date 


NCHC Care 
OUTSTANDING CLAIMS Homes 


Total Number of Claims 
Value of Claims £477,887 £95,853 £573,740 


NCHC Care 
SUPPORT PROVIDED Homes Other Services 


£ £ 





166 


Occupancy Payments * £1,082,882 £1,082,882 
Staffing £61,769 £50,621 £112,390 
PPE, Infection Control £92,795 £31,390 £124,185 


£11,600 £273 £11,873 
TOTAL £1,249,046 £82,284 £1,331,330 


* payments to end of September 





A significant level of financial support has been provided to our commissioned 
providers, in particular older people's care homes. The sustainability payments for 
some elements of support are tapering down between September and November 
(occupancy payments), other elements will continue to be in place beyond November 
and this includes the Social Care Staff Support Fund and support with PPE, infection 
prevention control and some additional staffing costs. 


Due to concerns re the sustainability of the social care sector the Scottish Government 
agreed to sustain the levels of support in November at the same level as October, i.e. 
for care homes paying for 5096 of vacancies during the month and to continue with a 
planned care approach. This was agreed on the basis that a review of transitional 
arrangements is required to provide more targeted support to the sector, focussed 
discussions are currently taking place so that new arrangements can be agreed by 
Scottish Government and COSLA and in place from the beginning of December. 


3. PROPOSALS 


3.1 Anticipated Outcomes 


Continuing to closely monitor the financial position will allow the IJB to take corrective 
action where required to ensure the partnership can deliver services in 2020-21 from 
within the available resource, thereby limiting the financial risk the funding partners, i.e. 
NAC and NHS AA. 


The estimated costs and funding in relation to the Covid-19 response also require to 


be closely monitored to ensure that the IJB can plan for the impact of this and to ensure 
that the IJB is in the position to re-claim funding to compensate for the additional costs. 


3.2 Measuring Impact 


Ongoing updates to the financial position will be reported to the IJB throughout 2020- 
21. 


4. IMPLICATIONS 
The financial implications are as outlined in the report. 
Against the full-year budget of £254.257m there is a projected 


underspend of £0.377m (0.15%). The report outlines the main 
variances for individual services. 


There are a number of assumptions underpinning the projections 
which could change as we progress through the year. We will 
continue to work with services to ensure the most accurate and 
reliable position is reported. 





167 


One of the main areas of risk is the additional costs related to the 
Covid-19 response and these are detailed in the report together 
with an updated position in relation to funding. 


Human Resources: 
Equality: 


People 

Sustainability: 

Risk Implications: Within the projected outturn there are various over and 
underspends including the non-achievement of savings. The 


greatest financial risk for 2020-21 is the additional costs in relation 
to Covid-19. 


Community Benefits: 


Direction Required to Direction toi- SS o o 
Council, Health Board or |1. No Direction Required | 
Both 2. North Ayrshire Council | 

3. NHS Ayrshire & Arran | 





4. CONSULTATION 
4.1 This report has been produced in consultation with relevant budget holders and the 
Partnership Senior Management Team. 


The IJB financial monitoring report is shared with the NHS Ayrshire and Arran Director 
of Finance and North Ayrshire Council's Head of Finance after the report has been 
finalised for the IJB. 


5. CONCLUSION 
5.1 It is recommended that the IJB: 


(a) notes the overall integrated financial performance report for the financial year 
2020-21 and the overall projected year-end underspend of £0.377m at period 6; 
(b) notes the estimated costs of the Covid mobilisation plan of £7.656, including 
savings delays, and the associated funding received to date; 

(c) note the financial risks for 2020-21, including the impact of Covid 19, and that 
there is no recommendation at this time to implement a formal Financial Recovery 
Plan for the IJB; 

(d) approve the budget changes outlined at section 2.8. 


For more information please contact: 


Caroline Cameron, Chief Finance & Transformation Officer on 01294 324954 or 


carolinecameron@north-ayrshire.gov.uk 


Eleanor Currie, Principal Manager - Finance on 01294 317814 or 


eleanorcurrie@north-ayrshire.gov.uk 


168 


2020-21 Budget Monitoring Report-Objective Summary as at 30' September Appendix A 





2020/21 Budget 


| | Council CF | .— Heath «—— | TOTAL Over [Movement in 


Over/ Over/ Over/ (Under) projected 
Partnership Budget - Objective Summary (Under) (Under) (Under) 
Budget Budget Budget Spend 
Variance Variance Variance 








Spend variance 
Variance at | from Period 









C Period 5 5 

|  £'O00 | sooo | £000 | £000 | £000 |  £'OO0 | £000 | £000 | sooo |  £oo0 | sooo — 

| 55,938] 54821 (1,117) 13,342) 13460 144 69,280| 6837 (973)| (1,097! 124 
|: Community Care Service Delivery — | 28579 2845 (| ^ 0| 9 Oof 28,570 
1,727 (239) 
1,852 (415)! 4969 5,060 91| 6736| 6,412 (824) (343) 
367| 12 2143 210 9 2458 2470 12 
24,806| 226941 2,135| 52,302! 50911 (1,3391) 77,108] 77,852 744| 513]  —— 231 
446 2,192 128 
|:Addictions te} A 135] O” ate] 827] 
: Lead Partnership Mental Health NHS Area Wide | | o o 0 48,824 47,476 48,824 (1,348) 
CHILDREN & JUSTICE SERVICES | 32100) 32,019| —— (81) 3825  — 3,825 — 0| 35,925 35,844 (81) ^ 4f (122) 
|: Irvine, Kilwinning and Three Towns — — | 3145  — 3,028 (157) 9 of ol 3,185 (157) (71) 
(1169) | | 0| op 0| 1263 1147 — (116) 41) (15) 
intervention Services | 2042] ^ 2,028; (19) 315 35 Oof 2357 2,38 (19) 
457 o — 0| — O| 17735. 184192 457 
|: Quality Improvement | 4287  — 4050 (23) ^ 0| o  o| X 4287 4 | (237) 
[:PublicProtection — ^ | | 6028 — 62 ( . 0| à$O0| o 69 X 622 (6) 
Justice Services | 29060 2560 | à 0 o .— 0 3 200 2500 $2560 op __QY o 
454 —  451| —— (3| 3,20 3120 | — 0| 35744 35723 . (S|  — 0^ (3) 
: Lead Partnership NHS Children's Services — | 90 ^ O| ^  O 3 3 à à1 0 390] 390] o og X J^ 
PRIMARYCARE | 0 op — 0 | 51,04 51024 | o|j 51024 51024 | 0! 0| o 
ALLIEDHEALTHPROFESSIONALS | . JJ JJ o| 557]  Á 550]  —  (75| 597 550] (715 — 0 (75) 
CHANGE PROGRAMME ” — — | Y — 1: oQ ion) ion) ol — 1012 102 o o o 
OUTTURN ON A MANAGED BASIS — | 121,011! 12,924 — 9143 133,246! 131,440| (1,806) ^ 254,257| 2533684 (893)! (932| ^ 39 
Return Hosted Over/Underspends Fast | — — 0| — — 0| of ol sf 42 of 4e — 4e 
Return Hosted Over/Underspends South | oQ .— 0| o o 412] 42 op — 412 — 412| 45 (33) 
Receive Hosted Over/Underspends South | — of — — O op op — 415 — $158 9. 15  — asp et (66) 
Receive Hosted Over/UnderspendsEast | — 0| o] o_o  Gs9| Goal ol  (G59| (59 (58) (200) 
|OUTTURN ON AN IJB BASIS | 121011 12,924 913| 133,246] 131,956] (1,290) 253,880 (377) |^ e] (389 
2020-21 Budget Monitoring Report — Detailed Variance Analysis Appendix B 


— 


69 


Over/ 
(Under) 
Spend 
Variance 
£000's 


Older People care homes inc respite - underspend of £0.649m based on 716 placements and including an under recovery of income 
from Charging Orders. 
27,690 (310) Independent Living Services : 

* Direct Payment packages- overspend of £0.100m on 62 packages , increase due to review of clawback calculation 

* Residential Packages - underspend of £0.026m based on 34 packages. 

* Community Packages (physical disability) - overspend of £0.146m based on 49 packages . 
Care at Home (inhouse & purchased) - was projected to overspend by £0.287m due to increased demand which has been funded by an 
allocation of Covid funding. 

20,970 ABS os Employee Costs - overspend £0.056m due to use of casual staff within Montrose House. 

Direct Payments - underspend £0.176m to year end on 30 packages, review of clawback adding to the underspend. 


3.260 (256) Aids and Adaptations - underspend of £0.255m related to the reduced number of OT assessments taking place during COVID 19 - 
adverse from prior period as spend expected to pick up towards year end. 


Carers Centre - projected underspend of £0.443m 
6,412 (324) | Anam Cara - projected overspend in employee costs of £0.026m due to pilot of temporary post with a view to longer term savings in bank 
& casual hours. 


2,470 Outwith the threshold for reporting 


Over/ 
(Under) 
Spend 
Variance 
£000's 


MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES 77,10 77,852) 
Residential Packages- overspend of £0.556m based on 41 current packages. 
21,408 2,320 
Community Packages (inc direct payments) - overspend of £1.320m based on 344 current packages. 
Community Packages ( inc direct payments) and Residential Packages - underspend of £0.239m based on 93 community packages, 
6,141 (239) . . : 
12 Direct Payments and 29 residential placements. 


2,827 Outwith the threshold for reporting 


Adult Community - underspend of £0.143m due to vacancies. 
Adult Inpatients- overspend of £0.583m due to a delay in closing the Lochranza wards, revised assumptions on redeployed staff and an 
under recovery of bed sale income. 
UNPACs - underspend of £0.040m based on current placements and assumed service level agreement costs. 
Elderly Inpatients - underspend of £0.200m which includes the £0.934m of unallocated funding following the elderly MH review. 
47,476 (1,348)| CAMHS - underspend of £0.305m due to vacancies. 
MH Admin - underspend of £0.390m due to vacancies. 
Psychiatry - underspend of £0.490m due to vacancies. 
MH Pharmacy - underspend of £0.220m mainly within substitute prescribing. 
Psychology- underspend of £0.450m due to vacancies. 


Budget Outturn 


£000's 


£000's 





N 
00 
O 
O 
O 


Locality Services 


Community Care Service Delivery 


Rehabilitation and Reablement 


p 
U 
— 
o 









Long Term Conditions 


Integrated Island Services 


o 
N 
Q 
0) 





Budget Outturn 


£000's 


£000's 





Learning Disabilities 


Community Mental Health 





Lead Partnership (MHS) 


A — 

00 N o 0 N 
00 © w O ES 
N — 0 0 al 
A 0) O 00 0 00 





170 


Over/ 
(Under) 
Spend 
Variance 
£000's 


Budget Outturn 
£000's £000's 


CHIDREN'S AND JUSTICE SERVICES 35,844 


Irvine, Kilwinning and Three Towns 3,185 3,028 





Transports costs - Projected underspend of £0.040m due a reduction in spend in Staff Mileage costs 








(157)|Cornerstone Respite - Projected underspend of £0.072m due to respite services not taking place due to COVID 





Employee Costs - Projecting £0.059m underspend due to a substantive post being vacant . This will be offsetting an overspend in 
employee Costs within Quality Improvement. 
A Valley, North Coast and 1,263 1,147 (116)|Transports costs - Projected underspend of 0.017m due a reduction in spend in Staff Mileage costs. 
rran 
Cornerstone Respite - Projected underspend of £0.035m due to respite services not taking place due to COVID. 
Intervention Services 2,357 2,338 (19) |Outwith the threshold for reporting 


Looked After Children placements - Projected underspend of £0.122m, favourable movement of £0.50m which is made up of the 
following:- 
Kinship - projected underspend of £0.149m. Budget for 370 placements, currently 344 placement but projecting 349 placements by the 
year end. 
Adoption - projected overspend of £0.035m. Budget for 69 placements, currently 73 placements. 
Fostering - projected overspend of £0.095m. Budget for 129 placements, currently 132 placements and projecting 135 placements by 
the year end. - 

a ed AU ACCOMIMOCAIEE 17,735 18,192 457|Fostering Xtra - projected overspend of £0.009m. Budget for 32 placements, currently 29 placements but projecting 28 placements by 
the year end. 
Fostering Respite - Projected underspend of £0.060m which is due to respite services not taking place due to COVID 
Private fostering - projected underspend of £0.018m. Budget for 10 placements, currently 10 placements. 
IMPACCT carers - projected online Budget for 2 placements, currently 2 placements. 
Residential School placements - Projected overspend £0.662m, current number of placements is 16, assumption that 1 will end in 
October, 1 in November and 1 ending in January and no further new admissions resulting in 13 placements at the year end. No secure 


Employee Costs - Projected Overspend £0.114m of which £0.070m relates to employee acting up to Senior Manager which will being 
offset with her vacant post within the Irvine Locality. 


Transports costs - Projected underspend of £0.034m due a reduction in spend in Staff Mileage costs, now basing mileage projection on 
actual spend this year. 


Community Packages - Projected underspend of £0.086m, favourable movement £0.011m due to delay in packages starting due to 
COVID 108 Community Packages on establishment list. 


Quality Improvement 


Direct Payments - Projected Underspend £0.039m, adverse movement of £0.009m which is due to reduction in % clawback. Current 
number of packages in place is 42 and projecting an increase of further 3 packages until end of the year. 


Children's Residential Placements - Projected underspend of £0.0196m. Currently 10 Residential Placements 





4,287 4,050 


Public Protection 628 (6) |Outwith the threshold for reporting 
2.506 2.506 mara threshold tecrepontina 


Universal Early Years 3,574 3,571 (3) |Outwith the threshold for reporting 


oe AR IRAN Edrene 0 | ao Outwith the threshold for reporting 
Services 


390 
PRIMARY CARE 51,024 51,024 Outwith the threshold for reporting 
ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONALS 5,577 5,502 (75)|Projected underspend in supplies. 


MANAGEMENT AND SUPPORT 14,331 13,823 (508)|Over recovery of payroll turnover on health services. 
AN RUS Outwith the threshold for reporting 


W 
2 ie 


O 


CHALLENGE FUND 1,012 1,012 


- 
O 
- 
» 
r 


254,257 (893 


Threshold for reporting is + or - £50,000 


171 


2020-21 Savings Tracker 


Appendix C 





: Deliverability Approved Deliverability Saving Projected to : 
Savings i E : Projected 
eterne Description Status at Saving Status Delivered @ Deliver Shortfall 

P budget setting 2020/21 Month 6 Month 6 | during Year 
number £m £m Em £m 














ildren and Young People - External Residential 











0.297 0.286 |Currently projecting an overspend. Some plans to 
2021-22. 


074 |Current projected overspend but outcome of the 


adoption review still to be implemented 


Comment 







move children have been impacted by COVID. Expect 
to have 13 places at the year-end when the original 
plan was to have 10 places, will impact on savings for 


Fully achieved, met through efficiencies across 
Children's services 


An underspend is projected at month 6. 


Tender delayed, saving can be met through budget 
underspend for 2020-21. Tender due to be 
implemented February 2022. 


Cluster sleepover models centred around core 
supported accomodation are being considered but will 
be delayed. The supported accomodation build 
timescales have slipped due to COVID. 





The provision of day care is being reviewed to ensure it 
can be delivered safely. This will include a review of 
the staffing, a new staffing structure has been planned 
which will deliver the full year saving in future years but 
will be delayed until January 2021. 

















Fully achieved but two tenancies still to take up their 
place and the final tenancy has to be decided. 


















Fully achieved, slightly over-delivered (£10k) 


For 2020-21 only this saving has been added to the 
vacancy savings target to be met non-recurringly. 
There are a number of vacancies across Community 
Care and Health but at this stage the service can not 
identify posts to be removed on a permanent basis, will 
be formalised and removed from establishment from 


2021-22. 














Fully achieved 



















Expect to fully achieve but there is a projeced 
overspend due to additional TUPE costs and an 
increased level of service. 






























1 Ch 
Placements 
3 Children's Services - Early Intervention and Prevention 0.050 aan A 
4 Fostering - Reduce external placements o.036|] | | - o - | 
5 Community Support - Children's Care Packages 0.008 NES EN 
6 LD - Reduction to Sleepover Provision INN 0.200 
7 Learning Disability Day Services - 0.050 0.229 
8 Trindlemoss 0.150 - - 
1 9 Mental Health - Flexible Intervention Service - - 
! sa 
10 Roll out of multidisciplinary teams - Community Care 
and Health 
11 Carers Act Funding - Respite in Care Homes 
12 Care at Home - Reablement Investment 
13 Care at Home - Efficiency and Capacity Improvement 
14 Day Centres - Older People 0.038 
15 Charging Policy - Montrose House 
16 Adults - New Supported Accommodation Models Will 0.025 0.038 
17 Adult Community Support - Commissioning of Services Will 0.150 0.488 
18 Charging Policy - Inflationary Increase 0.025 





EN i 


TOTAL SOCIAL CARE SAVINGS 0.550 1.117 


3.045 





1.378 





172 


Expect to fully achieve but there is a projeced 
overspend due to additional TUPE costs and an 
increased level of service. 

Day centres are currently closed and staff have been re 
deployed, will look for opportunities to release savings 
when the services re-open. 





0.025 0.025 New charging policy in place and additional income 
projected to be achieved. 


Project has slipped. Expected completion date is early 
2021. Saving was based on 5mths, Assume only 
2mths are achieved 

Implementation of CM2000 was delayed due to Covid, 
expect to bring system on line for Adult providers from 
mid February 2021. 

Charging has been suspended during COVID 19, with 
the exception of care homes and community alarms, 







expect to bring back on line in October. 


Health: 






































: Deliverability Approved Deliverability Saving Projected to . 
Savings à . . Projected 
tenes Describtion Status at Saving Status Delivered @ Deliver Shortfall Comment 
p budget setting| 2020/21 Month 6 Month6 | during Year 
number £m 
£m £m 
19 0.120 | — - | —- [Fully achieved 
20 |Packages of care 0.100] = - |  - [Fully achieved 
21 Elderly Mental Health inpatients (lead partnership) 0.216; . | - |  - |Fully achieved 
22 MH Payroll Turnover (lead partnership) 0.100 E e Fully achieved 
23 North Payroll Turnover 0.280 | - |  - |Fully achieved 
TOTAL HEALTH SAVINGS 0.816 0.816 0.000 0 
TOTAL NORTH HSCP SAVINGS 3.861 1.366 1.117 1.378 








173 


2020-21 Budget Reconciliation Appendix D 


: Permanent or 
pounce E Parry | t 
Initial ApprovedBudget CE 96,963, 
CATE | | [| 4 
Emorinbudget — — — — Cy 1299 
Resource Transfer — —  — 2,79 
WAN Circuits Budget Transfer - Kyle Road - New data Connection (Store Costs) 1 | — P | (1) 
British Sign Lanaguage funding transferred to Democratic Services — | 3 | P | (5) 
Child Abuse Enquiry costs - Budget from Corporate ? — č 1 | 5 | T | 58 
Corporate Procurment Posts 313490 &313106. =| 6 | P | (76) 
Budget Reported at Month6 o — — —  — |  — | [ 121011 


i Permanent or 
MEATH Perica e t 
Initial ApprovedBudget 149,830 
Resource Transfer (22,769) 
Adjustment to base budget ASOC PO) 
2019/20 Month 10-12 budget adjustments  — — ^ | 1 | P | 399 
Full Year effect of Part Year Reductions EP (54) 
Additional living wage funding P18 
Primary Care Presoribing - Uplift 932) PO 2060 
Primary CarePrescribing-CRES _ —  — — Z o 1) 3 | P | (756) 
Outcomes Framework - Breast Feeding 
Training Grade Funding RD 
Funding transfer to Acute (Medical Records) (33) 
Lochranza Discharges to Sothiscp TP (170) 
Precribing Reduction ws P  , (1497) 
AdminpostsfromSouthHSCP — 1 1 1 1 1 1 | 4 | P | 54 
Uplift Adjustment “Rt 
2,170 
Training Grade Funding — ——— APO | ^ 5986 
Lochranza Discharges to SouthEast HSCP — o o O O| 5 | P | (32 
Arrol Park Discharges to SouhHSCP — o | 5 | P | (107) 
Trindlemoss resource transfer adjustment č —  — | 5 | P | (48 
TrainingGradeFunding — —  —  — 1 1 | 6 | P | 9S9 
Diabetes PreventionPsychologistPostNR  — o 1 | | 6 | T | nnl 
Re-parent Parkinson Nurse Nthto Sh — — — — — [6 | P | (109) 
Arrol Park Discharges to South HSCP — o 1 | 6 | P | €642 
MedicalPayAward-JunorDoctors 16 | P | 31 
Budget Reported at Month6 — — — — .— o — | — |  — | 133246 


COMBINED BUDGET 254,25 


174 


Appendix E 
Mobilisation Submission — October 2020 













































Revenue Revenue 

Consolidated HSCP costs Apr-20 WEN 74!) Jun-20 Jul-20 Aug-20 Sep-20 Oct-20 Nov-20 Dec-20 Jan-21 Feb-21 Mar-21 2020/21 

Additional Hospital Bed Capacity/Costs - Maintaining A A A E O A A O O A O OU A A Se 
[Delayed Discharge Reduction- Additional Care Home Beds 8102 | 78564] 78564 | 78564| 7864 __- | o- |  _- |  -= | >= | >= | - [| y 396358) 
[Delayed Discharge Reduction- Additional Care at Home Packages os 
[Delayed Discharge Reduction- Other measures o 65604| 43621 432 aaj 43 4362) __- | __- | - |  - |  - | o [| 8744| 
[Deep dea es 
ICOVID-19 screening and testing for virus OO | 
Estates 8 Facilities cost including impact of physical distancing measures EL ‘l a a fal a CRE. RO ROE . e] x | a | mba 
Additional temporary staff spend - Student Nurses 8 AHP Li - | i: | 36922%6| 104113| 139,650] | 7473] | | —- |  - |  - | o- | 684719 
Additional temporary staff spend - Health and Support Care Workers 2 o- 
Additional temporary staffspend-AllOther 1 — 41206| 45,673]  253332|  35198|  40000| 400001 40,000] 40,000] 40,000] 40,000| 65.41) 















[Social Care Provider Sustainability Payments = | 26524] 223944| 314,525]  313,608| 288,857 | 96,650| ^ 45,000| 4500|  45000|  45,000| 1,682,828 | 
[Social Care Support Fund- Costs for Children 8 Families Services (where delegated to HSCP) | ee 
[Other external provider costs 22 poo m poo oo 2 | | | -p  -| o- 
Additional costs to support carers ee 
Mental Health Services lo oo ooo ea =p -p| -| -p | o- 
Additional payments to FHS contractors 88370] 4820  - |  5o000|  5000| 500| 5000 5000| 5000| 63,190| 
[Additional FHS Prescribing ee 
[Community Hubs ll 22 poo 2 poo bi [pp | | EL - | 
[Other community care costs ll) m o 2 =p |. | - | - | -p| -p| - | dcc 
lossofinome 88500 88,500]  88500| 88,500] ~—88,500|  8850|  - | - |  - | - |  - | - |  531000| 
[Staff Accommodation Costs ee 
[Additional Travel Costs e857  175| 157| | 1028| -o |  -9]| - |  - | - | | | - | 10206] 
Digital, IT & Telephony Costs — — — ^. //; / //// iii loss  - | sp (87) 1680] |. 6|  - |  - |  - |  - |  - ] S- | . 16876 
[Communications fF 
[Equipment & Sundries 89,055 |  16479| 22141| aoaea) tag o- | - |  - |  - | - | S- | 88414] 
[Homelessness and Criminal Justice Services ll... bi pi - | -p -p| -p| -— | pp - | — | | o- | 
[Children and Family Services 52 |  12466|  20,856| 347601 347601 34760,  17,380|  17380|  17380| - | - | - | 196394| 
[Prison Healthcare Costs o. 2 pp | -p| -p| Li | — pp - | — | =p o- | 
Hospice - Loss of income loo 2 EL ooo LLL LL o- | 

ing support, including training & staff wellbeing E RP TT" >J cepo cedo èl >l] ce qe ab, cee) (ne | 
[Resumption & redesign of primary care/contractor services to support access to urgent care in hours and OOH | | ee 
[Costs associated with new ways of working- collaborative C—O ooo LLL LLL 
Winter Planning o 89,444 |  39444| 39444| — 118,32 | 
[Other - Please update narrative 8,555 | zeza]  7673| zena] zen)  - |  - |  - 247 | 
Other - Please update narrative L- e. - xp. aJ o Side. e & p. o Do: MS ES a E IS 
[Other - Please update narrative eS 
[Other - Please update narrative ee 
[Other - Please update narrative o ooo o 2 o- 
Other - Please update narrative oom qo => or | =p o | o bo - | =P -p| cd - | 
[Other - Please update narrative ee 
[Other - Please update narrative_ lo oo poo pop =p -p| -| pp -e - | 
[Other - Please update narrative ef - | - || =p | pp -— | — | a -i 
[Offsetting cost reductions - HSCP || (| (108007| (108,007) (108.007) (68,583) (68,588) (68588) - | - | - | - | - | | - | (529770) 
RSS 49,922 416052| 1,085,613 | 799,832 | 1,166,738 | 747,138 | 503,820] 311,613 | 299,407 | 267,893 | 267,893 |  228,449| 6,524,370 | 

Subtotal 
Y 57422] 557,552] 1,227,113 | 941,332 | 1,308,238 | 888,638 | 550,987 | 358,780 | 346,574 | 315/059| 318509]  275615| 7,656,370 | 
Total 


175